Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


ESTABLISHE!) 1895

a +f





PHarbavos



J

Lord Lyle Attacks
Double Taxation

Colonies

Damaged:

U.K’s Interest Harmed

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, April 30.

LORD LYLE in his capacity as Chairman of the West

§ndies Sugar Com:

y Limited attacks the United King-

dom double taxation policy in his annual statement to

shareholders issued to-day.

“Empire development on a vast scale is the only means
of improving the standard in the colonies and of restoring
the dwindling standard of living at home,” he says.

“Development requires capital.
This is fully realised by the

tracted into each island.

Colonial Governments,

_ They have taken the very prac

tical step of declaring a tax-free
holiday of five years or more on
profits from new capital invested
in pioneer industries.”

Lord Lyle continues: “Unfor-
tunately watertight bureaucratic
departments in Whitehall have
nullified the effect of this tax free
holiday for British capital.”

Companies Gain Nothing

He points out that the eolonies
forego the whole of the tax but
British registered companies gain
nothing because the normal ruls
is that the difference between the
Colonial and the British tax is
paid to the British Treasury. And
the smaller the Colonial tax the
larger the British tax.

“Only the British Treasury
gains from the sacrifices of tha
colony” continues Lord Lyle.

“What’s so galling is that in
America these conditions do not
apply so that Colonial foresight
results only in attracting foreign
and not British capital.”

Lord Lyle expresses the hope
that the Colonial Government now
in power will see that this state
of affairs is put right. He says
it is not only damaging to the
Colonies and intonsistent with
accepted British Policy but also
harmful to the long-term interest
of the Mother Country.

Referring to his recent visit to
Jamaica he said that he had been
impressed by increasing activity
on all sides as compared with a
iffew years ago and expresses the
hope that this upsurge in activity
results from the realisation that
without increasing productivity

there little long-term im-
prove! general conditions.
’He says that one of in-
creasing luctivity is the crea-

tion of new industries encouraged
by tax concessions; But new in-
dustries can only succeed if the
general economy of the island is
sound. And this economy rests
on sugar. In the enthusiasm for
new industries it is to be hoped
that sugar is not forgotten. But
at the same time it must not ba
relied upon to provide an undue
proportion of the istand’s revenue.

Concern

Lord Lyle expresses’ concern
also at the disparity in local prices
of sugar as compared with the
export price and says he does not

ieve it is sound to use the com-
modity locally to subsidise the
community as a whole.

Subject to confirmation at the

ual General Meeting on May
21, a final dividend of seven pence
per ordinary share free of income
ax will be paid, which, with an
interim dividend of four pence,
makes a total of eleven pence for
the year. ~

9 U.S. Fliers Killed





Capital must be at-
Campai
To Eradicate
Yellow Fever

Dr. J, P, O’Mahony, Director of
Medical Services, is starting a
cam; = att ati, the

ion les e
mosquito responsible for carrying
urban yellow fever.

He told the General Board of
Health at their meeting yester-
day afternoon that it was well
Saw. that the os cones
Mosquito was presen’ -
dos to an undesirable extent. The
campaign will include _ special
training of selected sanitary in-
spectors, to-house inspec-
nat and treatment based on

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices in‘a ¥ said that he

eport,
thought the campaign necessary
because the Pan-American Sani-
tary Bureau, — the
Regional Bureau of the World
Health tion for the
Western ere — was en-
trusted with solution of the con-

tinental problem of urban yellow
fever, and that in order for them
to be successful, they should in-
clude all territories in the West-
ern Hemisphere.

International Effort

He said that as Barbados pre-
sents an im it intercolonial
shipping and one of
tercolonial and international air-
ways” importance, it should not

stay out of the international effort |

to wipe out the aedes aegypti
mosquito from the Caribbean. It
was of added interest to note that
eradication of the mosquito w
prevent outbreaks of Dengue
Fever which has been in the West
Indies for twenty years.
The report said that the
P.A.S.B. was authorised to set up
an eradication programme of an
international scale and it has set
up an office in Jamaica for the

supervision of the work in the
@ On Page 6



Farnum For
Finland Fund

i The fund to defray the ex-
penses of Ken Farnum to the
Olympic Games in Helsinki

next July is just creeping
along.

Donations are accepted at
the Royal Bank of Canada,
Barclay’s Bank and the office
is the Barbados Advocate.







,00
Since Monday
4 Bob Cumberbatch .. 3.00
Z TOKYO, April 30 Bookers Bros. (B’dos)

A United States Air Force C46 ann bee G lente 10.00
transport smashed into the rim of}| A.B.C. .......... 1,00
Mount Aso on Kyushu, killing ali SE 5.00
four crew-members. e© accident Da Costa & Co., Ltd. 100.00
brought to nine the number of NW. E. Wilson & Co...... 25.00
United States airmen killed in ain Rs @ Go. ......... 25.00
erashes in Japan since Monday. 's Water

A Helicopter of the Third AG Club ........ 2.00
Rescue Squadron landed on Mount + Lewis .......... 1.00
Aso soon after the C46 crash. The|| Betsam ........... 2.00
pilot radio¢d there are “no sur- A. H. Bowen ...... 5.00
vivors.” Springer ...... 3.00

Four crew-members of a C1i9|| Eddie from T’dad. . 1.20
Flying Boxcar were killed last High School... .17.34
night when the transport hit the Mr, & Mrs, Louis
ridge while appreaching Ashya 10,00
athe pUS of oo Pet —

ep of an F§1 Mus’
killed on Monday when his antes Total ............. $ 709.68
crashed 30 miles north of Nobeoka ;
Kyshu.—U.P.
. a,







in-| have ruled,



From All Quarters

Most Useless
Underground

Rome: The most useless under-
ground in the world has just heen
opened in Rome. It starts at St.
Paul’s Gates, which is practically
where the city ends, and after
three miles emerges in a deserted
spot of the Roman countryside.
At the terminus there are five
imposing unfinished buildings —
and a few grazing sheep. The
underground was planned and
partly built during Mussolini’s
day. It was intended to take
streams cf visitors to a great
Fascist world fair, which was left
half built. The Catholic gov-
ernment completed Mussolini’s
job, hoping that Rome would
ee spread in that direc-

on.

Amsterdam: The Amsterdam
municipality plans to impose a
tax of 50s. a year on cars parked
in streets between midnight and
4 a.m, Five thousand car owners
are compelled to leave their cars
in the streets because no garages
are available.

Tel Aviv: Forty four-year-olds
(wheedled into place by their
mothers) demonstrated at the
Town Hall of the seaside resort
of Natanyig this morning demand~-
ing a kindergarten in their area.
The Mayor of Natanyia promised
the children he would do what
he could for them.

Milan: The Anglo-Iranian Oil
Company has joined in Sicily’s
greatest organised search since
the army man-hunt of bandit
Guiliano, The Anglo-Iranian and
two American companies are
tooth-combing 750,000 acres in
search of oil. Geologists believe
oil exists in southern and western
Sicily. Smallholders, who once
prayed in the village churches for
rain, are now praying they will

it.

New York: Scotsmen the world
over will be pleased to hear that
bagpipes are officially accepted at
last in America as a musical
instrument, The Musicians’ Union
after long debate-—
| OK, it’s music!

Gairy Was





ca “Discourteous”’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 30
| “If you did not come in I
}have had you arrested and

| brought here” Sir Clement Malone,
Chairman of the three-man Com~
mission of Inquiry into the work-
ing of the P.W.D, tald the Hon.
E. M. Gairy who was appearing
to give evidence this morning,
He began by saying that he
wanted to make it clear that he
did not come beeause he had
received a subpoena on the
previous day,

Or. Tuesday the Commissioners
waited over an hour for the com-

ing the Legislator Labour leader
at whose own instigation the in-
quiry resulted by a motion in the
Legislature.

“You toid the Commission you
would be present on Tuesday
when you were quite aware a
meeting of the Executive
fixed for that day. You were
very discourteous.” Gairy said:
wy in not come because I could
not.”

was







_ MUTINY RUNS



THEIR BLOODY INSURRECTION at on end, mutinous prisoners leave Cell Block 15 at the Southern Micht~
gan Prison, in Jackson, after win .ng an eleven-point reform program in return for calling off their yebel-



THURSIAY, MAY 1, 1952

S COURSE WITH STEAK AND TIME

od









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Ss

A



lion and releasing guard hostages, The prisoners (top, left) back out the door after being searched, while

others (right) march into d
Ministers Get
Police Guards

IN SOUTH AFRICA

CAPETOWN, April 30.

Police reinforcements poured
into Capetown on Wednesday
night to maintain order during
the tense Parliamentary debate
on the Bill which would elimi-
nate court checks on the Govern-
fs of Prime Minister Danie
an. : "

the home of every Government
Minister, and Opposition political
Jeaders said that at least 250
patrolmen have been temporarily
transferred from

Police said in Pretoria re-
inforcements are being moved in

outlying areas,

id} because “threats have been made

against individuals,” specifically
members of the Government. The
anti-Court Bill is designed to nul-
lity the Appellate Court's recent
reversal of the law denying half
castes the voting rights of the
white people but it would have
the effect of freeing Government
from all judicial control.—U.P.

Rattle Casualties

WASHINGTON, April 30
The Defense Department
ported on Wednesday



known American battle casualties) The production

in Korea now total 107,965, The
increase of 299 over the las
week's summary includes cas-
ualties from the beginning of the

war through last Friday,

turned to military service.—U.P)



: of the sitting, expect-

Fuel Workers’ Walkout

Hampers Civil Economy

DENVER, Apirl 30.

THE STRIKE of 90,000 fuel workers began at 12.01
a.m. (local time) in most of the United States’ petroleum
countries except California threatening fue! shortage not

only for motorists, public transportation and shipping but |

for natural gas consumers as well.

The strike had been delayed twice at Government's |

request. Company officials in most eases began orderly

shutdowns which were to
lines.

EXPLOSION KILLS 30 ON HEAVY CRUISER ST. PAUL



THE NAVY DEPARTMENT has announced that an explosion in a fo!
heavy cruiser St. Paul killed 30 members of the crew while the
Korean coast. There were no wounded. The blast was officially d
leved caused by a powder bag catching fire. There was no evidence that enemy
toe worst naval disaster of the Korean war, 1

rward gun turret (arrows) aboard the
ship was engaging in an actian off the
escribed as a gunpowder explosian, be-

fire caused the tragedy,

The ship is back in agtion, (International Sound olio::

For the time being any serious

effect on the National Defence ef-

fert appeared to have been avert-
ed by union leaders’ decision not
to eall an immediate walkout at
California refineries which supply
most of the fuel for warships,
planes and mechanized ground
equipment,

The coalition of CIO AFL and
independent unions that ordered
the strike estimated that the walk-
out would cut the daily produe-
tion of , diesel fuel, motor
oils rather refined petroleum pro-
duets in half—enough to be felt
on civilian economy within a short
while.

A new threat for industrial and
domestic users of natural gas de-
veloped when pickets appeared on
gas epics, on which a large
part of the civilian population de-
pends for cooking, heating
operation of factory furnaces

Assistant Federal Mediator Chief
C, M, Mills was optimistic as he
reported “some progress” in nego-
tiatiorls Tuesday, Talks were to
continue although the strike was
underway in the world’s larges:
oil plant—Standard Oil of New
Jersey—was granted a 72-hour
period of grace in which to close
down operations.

The strike, over wage demands

and

originally had been scheduled for | clo ing Foreign Exchange
* | March 3 but was postponed at the} ings
request of Federal Mediator Ching

and President Truman,—U.P.

|
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}
|
)
Police guards are stationed |

|

re~



Listed | described by this source as one
are 18,980 deaths, 76,675 wound-| based along the Rhine River bar-
ed, 9,795 missing, 1,134 captured,| rier, It pointed out that NATO
1,381 previously missing but re-|

| about

(By DAVID

hall to dine on steak and ice cream, Weariness and tension etched on
me one enlil divide aa magn Mesa cau: otter hoing feed. (Luaternational)

| Russia Is Not
Ready For War

BRIGGS)
WASHINGTON, April 30.

A UNITED STATES SOURCE closely acquainted with

‘the European defence positic

mn, said the Russians are con-

centrating on building up the mobility of their forces but

do not yet-appear ready to s

lart a war.

It said 30 Soviet divisions now in position to attack

in Western Furopewoutd

require a considerable buildup

in strength before the Russians could hope to succeed in an

allout onslaught on the West,

The source said such a_build-
up would be detected by Western
intelligence, The only known
changes in Soviet forces in the
past three years were given as
these; The Russians have heen
increasing the mobility of their
ground forces through motoriza-
tion, They have greatly improv-
ed the mobility of their 145 divi-
sions and five of their former ter
cavalry divisions have been cone
verted to armoured divisiong with
stress on mobility,

Satellites Improve

Soviet satellite divisions have
been improved but are still not
good enough for big league “war-
fare.” The Russians have been
trying to increase the mobility
and offensive punch of these
forces,

Soviet airpower




has been in-

that the creasing in defensive capabilities |.

of MIG 165 jet
fighter, largely a defensive alr.
craft, hag been standardized at
400 to 500 airplanes per
month,

Western defence strategy was

forces are committed to receiving
the first blow of an attack and
would need the defensive depth
of area between the iron curtain
and the Rhine to absorb this,
Western Weaknesses
The source outlined — several!
weaknesses in the Western)
position however. These includ«|
ed; Western forces will not reach!
strength equal to the 30 Soviet|
divisions facing the West for an-}
other year,

Claimed After
Car Collision

In the Court of Or!ginal Juris-
diction yesterday His Nonour Mr.

J, H, Hanschell adjourned until
May 8 the cage in whith Oscar
McCollin of Greens, St, George,
is claiming damages to the amount
of £50 from Clifferd Gooding of
Silver Sands, Christ Church, who
it is alleged damaged the plaintiff's
car through negligence in a collis-
ion, Gooding is not admitting lia-
bility,

Counsel in the case are Mr.
J, BT. Brancker for the plaintiff
McCollin and Mr. J. 8, B, Dear
for the defendant Gooding. ‘The
plaintiff? alleged that the incident
took place on Mareh 25, 1951

Sgt. Inniss attached to the Dis-
trict “BY Station said that on
March 25 at about 1 p.m, he was;
called to Brighton Main Road, St.
George, where he saw two cars
drawn up on the left side of the
road, G-293 was on the left side
of the road facing Mount Hill, St,
George, Both wheels were in the
gutter, The other car X-933 was
ilo on the left side of the road
but fa¢ing Brighton Plantation. He
took measurements and both the
plaintiff and defendant gave him
statements about the collision.

MecCollin told the Court that



The deterrent to a Soviet attack
is not yel in the field but remains!
the economic and atomic guperi-,
ority of the West,

UP,

Jamaica Province





be followed by posting of picket |

Of Canada Fund

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca., April 30

Rich industrialist James Gore
has suggested the start of a fund
named the Jamaica Province of
Canada. Gore has suggested the
ftart of the fund to the Dally
Gleaner enclosing a cheque for
$500 for the purpose of financing
the move towards Jamaica and
possibly a B.W.I. alliance with
| Canada,

The suggestion followed a news-
puper story that a group of Cana-
dian Parliamentarians are inter-
ested in coming to Jamaica to
discuss political affairs,



U.S. $ At Discount

MONTREAL, QUE., April 40.

The United States Dollar on
Tuesday closed at a discount of
two per cent, in terms of Cana-
dian funds up =1/32 from Mon-
day’s close; that is it took $0.98
Canadian to buy $1 American,
The pound sterling was $2.75 3/8
unchanged from Monday.

NEW YORK, April 30.

The Canadian dollar was at a
premium of 21/32 per cent, in
terms of United States funds in
deal-
on Tuesday. The pound
sterling was unchanged at $2.81.

lvar, the radiator, grill and fenders

ibe fixed.

Sabrejets

alter the collision he carried his
ar G-293 to a mechanic Springer
who said that when he got the

vere damaged, He had to take out)
the engine so that the chassis could

Down 6 MIG’s

SEOUL, April 30

United States planes destroye
six Communist MIG-~-15 jet fight
ers and damaged four others in
sudden renewal of aerial warfare
in clearing weather over North
Korea today,

Fifth Air Force Sabre Jet
knocked down all six of the Rus- |
slan-built MIG’s and accounted |
for three of the damaged jets in a
swirling dog-fight just south — of
the Yalu River on the Manchurian
(rontier,

While the United States fighters
warded off prowling MIG’s, Allied
fighter-bombers smashed railway
and bridge construction completed
by the Communists during the
past three days of rain,



United Nations Navy guns at]
the same time bombarded targets
on the es and west coasts of
North Korea,

On the ground Allied soldiers
recaptured an advance United
Nations position near “Punch-

bowl Valley” on the eastern front.

United Nations troops also re~
pulsed a series of Red probing
attacks west of Mundung Valley}
‘and north-west of Punchbowl] |

Nearly 70 Communist soldiers
were killed in five small ground
actions on Tuesday.—U.P







precincts

Taft

£50 Damages |



—

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Scavenger To

= Die For Murder

CARLTON BREWSTER, a scavenger of Deane’s Vil-
lage, St. Michael, was yesterday condemned by His Lord-
ship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, to hang when
an Assize Jury took 12 thinutes to find him guilty of mur-
dering 19-year-old Norma Haswell on September 7 last

year,

This sturdy, umsmiling man, attacked Haswell while
she and her fiance, Leonard Benskin, were in Perry Gap
on, the night of September 7 at about 9.30 and after beating

Benskin, killed Haswell.



Kisenh@wer
Qutstrips
Senator Taft

BOSTON, April 30
General Eiseniower piled up a
idslide vote uver Senator Robert
Taft, ix the Massachusetts
Sidential Primary and clinched
lion's shore of the State’s 38
National Cony4ntioen delegates.
Running better than two to one
ahead of Taft in a State-wide
Write in” popularity poll, the re-
tiring chief of NATO ted in all
Fut two of 28 contests for district
delegates,
The “Compromise” slate of ten
delegates at lurge was unepposed.

Pre
ihe

Eisenhower not only ram away
with the Republican poll but was
‘ strong second behind Senator
®stes Kefauver in the Democratic
referential test. President Tru-

man third, and Taft fourth were
far outdistanced.

With 1,375 of the State’s 1,739
counted the vote was
{‘epublican: Pisenhower 160,842
raft 70,059, Governor Barl War-
en of California $86, former Min-
hesota Governor Harold EB. Stassen

‘78, and General MacArthur 1,544.

Democratic Kefauver 21,438,
Kisenhower 11,940, Truman 5,383,
3,615, Governor Paul A.
Dever of Massachusetts 1,791 and
W. Averell Harriman 696.—-U.P.

Sidewa
idewalks
Not Used
Sufficiently
Some people are st } mot using
he side walks on either side of
the Victoria Bridge. Now that the
Chamberlain Bridge is out of
working order it is more neces-
ory that people ‘should avoid

walking in the path of the traffic
moving along the Victoria Bridge.





Yesterday between the hours of
11.00 am, and 1.00 p.m. there
vas @ continual flow of traffic
ver the Victoria Bridge as the
Chamberlain Bridge is undergoing
repairs, Despite all this traffic
sume people were still walking
in the road between the Bridge
which is for vehicular traffic
alone.

One woman was nearly knocked
down when she attempted to cross
from one side of the road to the
next, Luekily for her the driver
ipplied his brakes in time.

There are signs on either side
1 the road urging the pedestrians

use the side walk. The two
ide walks can accommodate the
valking public.





*@

i
al



CHOCOLATE
COKERNUT BAR

Ae

i , Ws



FRY’S

UNCHIE =~.

FRY’S 4 FAVOURITES



He was represented by Mr.
George Farmer whom, His Lord-
snip remarked hag conducted thé
case forcibly and weli. - -

Mr. W. W. Reece, @.C., Solici-
tor General, prosecuted for the
Crown,

In the preliminary hearing of
the case, Brewster attacked a wit-
ness and there was much diffi<
culty in getting him off her and
throughout this case, insteag of

the usual two policemen guard
ing him, four flanked him.
This was the last case for thif

Sessions

and a large crowd was
abeut the :

court precincts,
Long Trial

Putting the case for the de#
fence, Mr. Farmer said he hat
noted with appreciation the kecm
interest they had taken over the
evidence. It had been a ‘some
what long trial with a mass off
evidence, but he hoped they
would continue to be patient ond
maintain the keen interest right
to the end. Even to the extent
of boring them, even to the ex-
tent of repetition, he would bow
to be sure he presented the cas
for the defence with all therough-
ness. ;

He said that the defence wag
not sayimg that Norma Haswell
was not murdered, that she was
not brutally put to death: but
the defemce were saying that th
question at issue was, “Bey. J
wroved beyond a reasonable doubt
that Brewster murdered her?”

Mr, Farmer pointed out dis=
crepancies in Benskin’s evidencé
und asked the jury to view thé
whole with doubt. He stressed
inat Bemskin had described the
attacker to certain people and hig
description was that the attackef
was tall, dark and slim—a des¥
cription which in no way tallied
with the accused. ¥

He pointed out that the alleged
confessions by Brewster to his re=
puted wife, and to a friend Force
as told by them were not the

me mor did they agree with
Benskin’s evid ‘

He said that Veta Small, Brew-
ster’s common law wife, and
Brewster, had had a_ dispute
sometime before ang it well might
be that she was motivated by
that in speaking of alleged cons
fessions. e

Threatened :

He said, too, that the Policd
had threatened her that it would
be “a sorry do” if she did not tell
them what Brewster had told her
and she had been in this way
brow beaten.

He showed out that Small had
only spoken of seeing blood on
Brewster’s hands after he had
washed the clothes, when surely
any blood that was there would
have been washed off.

Mr. Reece for the prosecution,
on the other hand, submitted that
the discrepancies, where they
were any, were not material.
There was no reason why Forde
On page 5












Sets 14) i/ oe



iinte }.



on nena ANTE __\\citnnIeNeNRenEbeRenm arene

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952



SCAVENGER TO DIE FOR MURDER

@ From page 1.
in whom Brewster
should pick out Brewster from dence given . by
all the rest of Barbadians as a Witness and how
man who had
killed the girl, The defence had *Viaence,
not teld them why they should And in considering that
not accept his evidence and they â„¢UuSt bear in.mind, as mea wf the
should accept it.

that

much you

given a different statement.

ated by persons who they could
well believe were not prejudiced.
For instance, when she said he
told her he was gcing to the mor-
tuary, someone said that he had
seen him there.

So they had to accept her evi- and ' remember
dence and Forde’s as to his con- what they hear.
fiding in them and come to the gifferent’ version
conclusion that he was guilty.

His Lordship said: The accused even
is charged that he at the parish observe
of St. Michael on the 7th of Sep- other thi
tember last year, murdered Norma
Haswell.

As you have heard and as it is |
requisite that I should repeat to ty
you, when you come to deliberate, j,
you will bear in mind that it is
the duty of the prosecution to
establish the guilt of the accused
beyond a reasonable doubt before
you can convict hin. He stands ~“S"*
in the dock innocent until he is 2¢vanced on the evidence proved guilty. the way in which evidence as

If you are satisfied after con- een given, at the same time you
sidering all the evidence together â„¢USt view the matter altogeiour,
with all the criticisms advanced t@king into account all the
on his behalf by Mr. Farmer in ©Vidence, —
his thorough and forceful address _ Uf you discover that there sre
to you, if after all that, you ara Vital discrepancies which make
atisfied beyond a reasonable >°U disbelieve a particular wit-
doubt that he is guilty, it is your "eSs, naturally you will not accept
duty to find him se. If you are the evidence. But, if as there
not so satisfied, if you have a May be, there are certain discrep-
reasonable doubt, it is your duty @Mcies in the evidence, either as
to return a verdict of not guilty. between what a witness says here

Solemn Task or another time, these discrep-

You have a solemn task to per- S2Cl€S may mot be important and
form. The case as you will realise YOU May still get the general pic-
is one of the most serious in law ‘Ure, the general outline of the
and therefore you will take care ¢Vidence given — always bearing
—each one of you individually— 1 mind that in the considerauun
and pay due attention to all you of this point and you are left in
have heard and each of you in- % Teasonable doubt, the benetit vi
dividually make up his mind as ‘hat doubt will be in favour cf
to what he considers is the true the accused. ,
verdict and then jointly and As has been rightly put, a rea-
unanimously come to that verdict. S°nable doubt is not a whimsical

You gentlemen are the sole Weak spirited kind «f doubt which
judges of the facts in this case OMe adopts because one is weak
and there is little law involved. °F easy-going. It is a reasonable
If in the course of my remarks Goubt as the expression goes and
I express any opinion on the facts ™e€aMs such a doubt as would pre-
of which you are the sole judges, V€Mt you in your ordinary cours:
you will realise that

gest to you,
certain discrepancies in th> evi-

member scme part of what they

other

something and

Say, the demeanour and

mind.

Criticisms
While as has been very forcibly
and well done — while it is “yuite
right that criticisms should be

it is my Cf life or erdinaiy business ac-
opinion that I am expressing. 1 tivities from taking that particu-
am not a judge of the facts, you Jar course, That is the type of
are the sole judges of the facts. doubt which the law says must
If I express an opinion and you be dispelled by the Prosecution
agree with it. you may adopt it before there is a conviction. Tne
as your own. onus .is on the prosecution to es-

On the other hand you may dis- tablish the guili; beyond a reasen-
card it. It is a matter entirely for abla doubt.

No Doubt

you.

Now murder is the unlawful h
killing of a person by another with | It is my duty to remind you
malice either expressed or im- briefly of the more important mat-
plied.. Well, this case does not ters that have been put to ycu by
deal with any expressed malice. the defence — the defence which
The evidence show that the ac- does not deny, I repeai, that Norma
cused diq not know the unfortun- Haswell was killed, killed in* a
ate girl who was murdered. ‘dastardly and desperate way, y.-u
Therefore you are only concerned well may think. When I say that,
with it as far as that definition is you must not jump to the con
concerned, what is known as 1m- clusin that the accused is the
plied malice. And all it means is person, but must be satisfied be-
a wicked intention, a wicked yond a reasonable doubt that he
intention as displayed by the was the person.
circumstances of the particular The defence broadly therefore,
case and in this case the wicked is that the prosecution has tai)
intention either to kill or the in- in that duty and the more im-
tention to inflict grievous bodily portant points which you will bear
harm which would be likely to in mind are those put to you by
result in death and from which Mr, Farmer on behalf vf the
death results, accused,

Method of Attack You will remernber the young

In considering that aspect—that man Leonard Eenskin, the boy
is to ‘ay, the intention to kill or fricnd the intention to inflict grievous has met her death and you will
bodily harm from which remember hin giving evidence so
death is likely to result—you are far as he is concerned, as well as
entitled to take into account the with regard Veta Small. Doubt-
method of the attack, the type of less you will fecl a kind of sym-
weapon used, the circumstances pathy because his girl friend wa;
surrounding the case and come to killed at the night when the two
your conclusion as to whether of them were out together having
there was murder. visited the Esplanade and so

Now it is not denied for the forth.
defence that this unfortunate girl Mr. Farmer criticises the evi-
Norma Haswell met her death as dence of Leonard Benskin and
a result of being killed by som€- one of the points put to you ic
one. Therefore some of the evi- that Benskin in the Magistrate's
dence to which you have listened Court related how the deceased
you need not bother your head gir] and he were walking along
about, like the evidence of Dr. in the vicinity which you all had
Cato who describes the wounds the opportunity cf visiting, with
from which the girl died. That is the bicycle between them, with
not of vital importance although the girl cn the right and himself
an essential element in this case. on the left. That is the evidencs
Nor need you give much thought given before the Police Magis-
to the finding of the body, the trate, Here he said the girl was
measurements which the police on his left nearest to the khus
took, except for certain purposes, jhus grass; then he came and
or the finding of the police of then the bicycle which he was
blood near the head of the un- ji ching on his right hand. And
fortunate ‘woman, because as I cays Mr, Farmer, here is a man
have said, you have heard Mr. ae - :

ai a 7 . giving one version before ‘he
Farmer say that she was killed Police Magistrate and another Ver-
by someone is net denied and

. sion here and therefore this is one
therefore your main task is to

.. discrepancy in the two statemen‘s
make up your mind on the ques- which he has given end which

hon ee ee Png wo Ta Re he suggests can put you in doubt
€ arks—are } satis- ~~ ¢ SaIRITIEGS a al lina
fea beyond a reasonable doubt? 288 to his reliability as a witne

Well, it is there, and bear in mind



Af nee Evieenee ii what I said before, that it is your
ter directing the jury on di- quty to say wnether that is a mat-
rect evidence, and circumstantial ter of vital importance or not
evidence, ig 5 eee pp so consider the other part of hi
on to speak o ha witness evidence.
demeanour. ts j
In considering the evidence o . CoE se gt
this case, he said, you will take SE ge ME ee ee ei
into account the demeanour of the M4tver enlir@ly for yeu. eae
itnesses whom you saw and remember that in the statements
See “You will consider thaq Which were alleged to have been
hen you try to make up your made by the accused, given by the
Cama aout are making up your Witnesses in evidence. You will
minds as to whether this witness remember Forde’s. Forde said

or the other witness is a witness @ On Page 6.

Discrepancies



—







Biscuit, Lemon, Oystez,

“SATIN RIBTA”

with a satin back.
feel and hangs gracefully.

TAFFETA

in a lovely range of shades.

HARRI

of the truth; whether you should
confided, attach much credence to the evi-
particular
can

told him he had Bive to this or that part of the
you

world, human nature, the fraili-
If Smal] had been terrified by ties of it and realise as I am sure
the Police, she coulg since have YOU will, that memories of peo-

But Ple vas. powers = seer ane
. Vary and if you take that all into
her evidence had been corrobor account, you will accept, I sug-
that there will pe

dence in a case of this kind, Some
people hear same things and re-

near; others hear the same thing
parts of
Some produce a
f of what they
think they have heard. Some who
see certain things happen
ethers
ngs in what took place.
Therefore you will make due
allowance, taking into account, as
the
pes of people and bear this in



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BARBADOS

CARS DAMAG







ADVOCATE



Life Assurance building, shortly before 10 o'clock yesterday morning.

M 179 is owned by A. W. Harper and was being driven by his wife.

damaged.

broke all previous records, according to the Annual Report
of 1951 which was presented to members at the Annua!
General Meeting of the S.P.C.A. at the British Council,

“Wakefield”, on Tuesday night.

March when the two Shetland Ponies collected over $50.

In October
S.P.C.A.

last the
paid the traveling, liv-
ing expenses and salary of Chief
Inspector Terrezao for four weeks

year

and had the benefit of his 25
years of experience in British
Guiana. The Inspector carried

out a full programme of activ-
ities which included lecturing to
all types of audiences, broadcast-
ing, and making patrols with the
staff.

The report states: “His visit
was of great benefit to our work
indebted to the B.G.
the loan of his ser-

and we are
S.P.C.A. for
vices.

His Excellency the Governor,
Sir Alfred Savage, K.C.M.G., hon-
oured the Society by continuing
in the office
year.



of Patren for the

The Chairmanship

Changes in the Chairmanship of
the Executive Committee were
inevitable following the departure
to England of Col. Campbell in
March, Canon Moore in July and
Mr. Douglas Smith in October.
Colonel R. T. Michelin, one of the
Vice Presidents, took over this
office in October. .Major Foster
resigned o-ving to pressure of
cther duties,

Certain recommendations of the
Reorganisation Sub - Committee
were approved by the Executive
Committee and put into
The services of two
were terminated and one
was appointed on probation.

The appeals and publicity Sub-
Committee were very
their repert showed.
tive Committee
formation of a
Sub - Committee

effect,
Inspectors
man

active as
The Execu-
approved of the
Band of Mercy

composed of

members either specially inter-
ested in, or particularly quali-
fied to deal with the Humane

Education of children,

The last Annual General Meet-
ing was held at the British Coun-
cil, Wakefield, by kind permission
of the Represertzetive, Mr. Risley

Belfield Land
To Be Let In Lets

The General Board of Health
approved at their meeting yester-

day the division ‘and letting in
lots cf 83,863 sq. ft. of land at
Belfield, Biack Rock, by Miss
Nora Augusta Watts.

The Board approved the divi-

sion and sale of 37,458 sq. ft. of
land in lots at Maxwells, Top

Rock, by Mr. Mitchinson Lloyd
Harris°n It also approved the
dividing and letting of 79,120 sy.
lots at Grazettes,
Mr.

land in
1, by
iffith.

ft. of
St. Mict
Laurence

Frederick






They stipulated that lots 17
and 18 of the land at Beifield were
not to be used, Another applica-
tion would have to be made to


















£7 Fine For
Unlawful
Possession

His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-| scheduled for April










PAGE FIVE



St. Joseph Round-up
























| Hawker’s Iequiry
| fo Be Held On May 2

from = =

Messrs. BOOTS
PURE DRUG Co.

BOOTS BLOOD MIXTURE

—for Boils and Pimples,

| AN ENQUIRY into the circum-
| stanees surrounding the death of
45-year-old Beatrice Foster, a
hawker who di¢d on the spot when
a ‘bus in which she was driving
overturned on March 31 on Spring
Vale Road, St. Andrew, has been
| fixed for Friday, May 2, at District
“F’, St. Joseph. The inquest
25 was ad-

—

relieves Neuritis, Rheu-

SSE,
ee arrived



















trict “A" yesterday fined 64-/journed on that date, because the :
year-old Hughson Leach, a watch-| majority of ‘witnesses whose evi-| matism and a'] aches and 4
man of Jessamy Lane, St. Michael,; uence are of major importance | ,
£7 to be paid in 28 days or in| were still on the sick list. | Pains caused by impure (@~
default two months’ imprisonment! A CYCLIST, Clebert Hinkson of Blood
with hard labcur for the unlaw-| Foster Hall, St. John, was injured '
ful possession of goods. jon Tuesday at about 2 p.m. after BOOTS MINERAL SALTS
The offence was committed on| he collided with a lorry while
April 29. Police Constable 249 | riding coon along Bowling FOR PIGS
Springer who brought the case| Green, St. Joseph. Both of his 5
told the court that he saw ey pensa were aoe. and his bi- Boots Calamine Lotion. .
defendant along James Street/cYcle Was extensive y damaged. ; ‘
carrying a box under his arm. i ADVOCATE corfespondent Boots Kaolin Poultice
He stopped him, and looking|¢lled at Wakefield, St. John, the Boots Glycerine and Thy-
into the box saw that there were| Place of the proposed Candy Fac- . a Thy
four tins of cooked hams, one of seinet aac ie =» Soe aa a a mol Mouth-wash
milk and a tin of Ovaltine. He) *UPerintendent, was old that
asked the defendant where he got | Candy making operations will be Boots Sterile Water for
these’ goods from and the defen- | S¢sun during the next two weeks, injections
dant failed to give him a aabiA"so- | Ot Gngnoed workers are at pres- e r
tory explanation, He then} ©"! engaged in mixing Cassava Boo 5s Ss
arrested sim, | with sugar, and bagging it. This t= Syrup of Figs. J
Twenty year old labourer Wool- | ne aoe is being sent to Canada, Well known Laxativ
berton King of Reed Street St. me BRAVE pent Said. / ;
Michael was yesterday ordered hich saa ar tee of rain for children, reliev
t is “shi + Ww a 2 >, 1 . : 4
to bon ye? Gy ee ue Cuseeny and fell with i occ constipation in adit!
bodily harm erald Earle st reak until 11.45 p.m. shi
Ronit o on Gerald Earle on spoiled a Moonlight Sca-bathing and children.
; : ‘ ' . The Ane je * iy enie a attlewash last Tues-
TWO motor cars were involved in an accident at Lower Broad Street, opposite the Barbados Mutual The fine is to be paid in 14 days| yay » Pieni f
or there is an alternative of cne aera The ,picnic. was SE* BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
One, M 251, is owned by Barclays Bank and was being driven by 0. Yearwood, while the other, month's imprisonment with hard and St Neha pautha oes
labour. Earle told the court that| oo.) 4) tee ee ee
The right front fender of M. 179 was extensively damaged and the left front fender of M 231 slightly the defendant “pit ily: tes ‘the : pen aes we nee LIMITED i
. * < o socla ire in
- sie ; ; as : thumb, these parts, | eeudecaid
] e 2 on Searles of Bank Hall, St
Michael was yesterday found
S.P.G.A. Flag Day Collection sie wesc |
Walwyn of using indecent lan- F
guage on Probyn Street anc .
Breaks All Previous Records _ sists cece:
shal while in the execution ¢/
, ? his duty. ;
. Bee 4 ; aan t For the first offence he wae
THE S.P.C.A.’s FLAG DAY COLLECTION of $1,427.86 the year by the Appeals and Pub- neq 15/+ to be paid in 14 dan
licity Sub-Committee which te- 4, 14 days’ imprisonment, an: Q BEASTIFEL
sulted in the following activities:\— 6. the resisting 30/- in 14 days
Poem ear ak Be Perit eee ae or One month's imprisonment Gasv-Te-CLean
Flag Day was held in previous records ; be he ad were committed or FLOOR COVERING
, ae ; oo April 29,
, Animal Weitere ay aeks Police Constable Marshall tele 4
z ; An Anima ellare eck the c urt that a § > ¢ z
eueicey, on April 20.) bir. Gecrge “arranged in October brought the about his Selavinur on, Probyn “SILVER STAR’ .
Thebans serch ant os ot we a eee “ Street and he still continued tc
West nae predided, Serta Dae Wire Genet ete eee and @usbehave and when he tried tc
—™» . . = t * "er é é > >» £ r PAY ; fc asic
ims, kingly lent by the Caha- Canasta Party together netted arrest him the defendant resisted
dian Trade Commissioner, Vrmi- $336.22. .*
dad, were shown, For the first time in the history CANE FIRES:
Dog Refuge af the Society, a stall displaying ?
The Report conunued: “We re- ERE Oas, ‘posters. atid Onna, HAs Seven and a half acres of fourth
gret to report yet again, that in teria connected with the § ociety's crop ripe canes, three and three
. . i work was on view at the Annual quarter acres of young cane
Spite of all our pleaaings, Govern- sh the Barbados Agr yeung
E ie ssib.e to EXhibition of the Barbados Agri-~ plants and two acres of first cro’
ment has not found it possib-e to | It 1 justrinl Society and
aa Phe th se cultural and Industrial Society and ratoons were burnt when a fire
pass legislation regulating the over $50 was donated in small occurred at Guinea Plantation
licensing of dogs, but plans for Qing hy the public St John - Tu = They ae
the building of a dog refuge by in, iD as Sale joy . are
oull * ma the property of D. M. and L. M
the Society are complete and only Posters and leafless have been & and “ware danse
await Government sanction widely distributed throughout the * “Whis fine oxtonde ae nae View
“The Assistant C al Secre- island, and an article by the Hon, . This fire extended to ;
The Assistant’ Colonial Secre- island, and an Hed, “Call. From S- Philip, and burnt fourteen
tary, the Director of Public Werks Secretary entitled, “Call ro! 4 three arter apres hte
und the Clerk of the Vestry of The Caribbean”, was published in ares sale Sine tales a SF,
5 hae ave ¢ en intess the ional Humane Review in Crop ripe canes and: six and i
raed ee aa ee eee " ee America, This article was in part helf acres of young cane. plants,
viewed and _ numer aed sate * vesponsible for the formation by Property of Mrs. Jean Nicholl
have been written on this sub- 116° American Humane Association of the same plantation, ‘They
ject. ; of a project known as A,I.D. Were insured, .
In October, a deputation com “(Animals In Distress), Another “Ave s+ Seniors. Piati INSIST ON
sisting of the Honorary Secretary, The Report ends: “We are tation, St, Joseph, at about 11.0( )
Honorary Treasurer, and the prateful to the general public for P.m. on Tuesday bixnt seven
Chief Inspectors of our Society {heir support. and our heartfelt acres of fourth crop ripe canes
and that of the B.G. S.P.C.A. thanks go to the Press whose co- and three acres of third crop Il VER SJ
was received by Mr, W. W. Reece, operation throughout the year and young ratcons. They are the |
and Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P. particularly during Animal Wel~ preperty of J, A, Haynes of !
Several aspects of animal! welfare fare J Wee k has been most Parks; St. Joseph, and were SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
were discussed, particularly the generou: insured,
need for up-to-date legislation |
covering a wide range. We hop
that action wil] be taken in the | F
very ncar future to deal at least | 4
with the dog licensing problem if
“In Tooruary, the attention of
Government was called to. the on 6 é es
appallinjzy conditions under which La LLL, ‘FS Mes ese
animals awaiting slaughter are Z € be, {Z (
kept at the’ abattoir. Structural ‘
shortcomings in the stock pens | e
prevent the proper watering of aw ac e
sheep, goats and pigs; all are ' iv eee
herded together in misery and
suffering fo. hours prior to death give them HALIBORANGE
The ghastly practice of allowing
‘animals to witness the slaughter- every day
ing of their fellows while await- Z . RD
ing their own turn for the knife Tuert’s NOTHING Lik# IT for building MEAN CERTAIN
is really deplorable, and we can- up reserves of vital energy, promoting
not condemn too forcefully the healthy growth, strong bones and teeth a
continuance of this barbarism. <-gstetahiiae to ilinese SAVINGS ead
“The Society bought a new :
Mortis Van in May and this has ‘
cries “i abli Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
gziven good service enabling the if
Chief Inspector to answer calls with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in Single Good Quality BED SHEETS ...., $3.98
from all over the island. Vitamins A and D and so delicious in taste that Double Good Quality HEAVY SHEETS... 6.93
Z {Bands of Mercy the most finicky youngster takes Single COLOURED BLANKETS 2.98
“During the month of June, 78 it with delight.
elementary schools Organtied me 2 : Double COLOURED BLANKETS 3.98
Bands of Mercy among pupil a? tncldentally; itp: Ang for growne
& f ‘ é 5 2upils Te aaa te
attending these schools. Of these ups too! TOWELS, TOWELS — Face, Bath, Ete. ., from 31
37 were. Boys’ Schools and 31 BY? EDTIC De ard 1.39
Girls’ Schools and 10 Mixed| 5 Lovely Quality 56” wide BE CK per yar
Schools. The Bands varied in|} STRAW MATS — Various Sizes... from 88 j
size from six to 80 members each.
“The Bands of the following OIL CLOTH, PLASTIC SHEETING and
Schools took part in the Children’s| THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL nee cae ine |
Concert zt Queen's Park House| q PLASTIC T, COVERS \ |
St ene ntunel Waltare Ds te BED ROOM & DRAWING ROOM RUGS from 3.45 \
ot, Li é ‘ YS, ot. stephen’s
Boys’, St, Giles’ Girls’, St. Barn i}
bas Boys’, Grace Hill Girls’, Wes- | e |
ley Hall Girle’, pupils of . the |
Carrington’s Girls’, Wesley Hall i
30ys’ and the Erdiston Model | YES ! WE HAVE THESE AND MOR! - AT
Mixed School also contributed
ane to the programme. No for- | at
mal nee A at ee THANI BROS
Mercy Sub-Committee have bee; Made in England by: A =
meld, ALLEN & HANBURYS L7D., LONDON, E.2

the Board before those two lots
could be used.
















S









Four meetings were held duripg







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———

PAGE TWO;



EV CANON A. H. BARLEE
recently acting vicar of St
John The Baptist leaves to-day

tor Engiand for holiday.

C.J’s Brother
R. ERIC COLLYMORE, broth-
er of His Lordship the Chief ”
Justice Sir Allag Collymore, and
Mis. Collymore -wha had been
holidaying here, return to Eng-
land today. Accompanying them
are Mr. and Mrs. Michael Greaves
who are also off to spend a holi-
day in England. Mrs. Greaves is
also a sister of his Lordship the
Chief Justice,
On Long Leave
R. & MRS KENNETH NI-
CHGLLS also sail for Eng-
land today for a long holiday.
During his absence the Dental
Parlour will be carried on by Dr.
Nicholls, Snr.
Former Dean
EWS has been received that
4 Rev. W. M. Richards, former-
ly Dean of St. Michael's Cathedral
and who has been attached io the
British Embassy in Caracas, will
be leaving for England at the end
of this month. He will be accom-
panied by Mrs. Richards,

KKeturning to Colonial

Office
R. BERNARD ROLFE of the
Secretariat of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisation,
leaves to-day by the S.S. Golfito
for England. He will be accom-
panied by his wife and little son

Richard. ‘

Mr. Rolfe who was seconded
here for three years Office, has
just completed his tour. He will be
returning to the Colonial Office.

After 38 Years

FTER an absence of 38 years

in the U.S.A., Mrs, Kathieen
Bevins returned here recently to
spend a holiday with her relatives.
She is staying with her sister Mrs,
Beatrice Gibson of Salters, St.
George. Wel

Back from Races
MONG the passengers arriving
on Monday night by B.W.LA.
from Trinidad were Jockeys Gil-
bert Yvonet and Eric Holder who
took part in the four day Race
Meeting at Union Park.
From Venezuela
; R. ALBERTO RIOS of the
Telephone Company in Cara-
cas, arrived here on Monday by
B.W.1LA. via Trinidad for about
eight days’ holiday. He was accom-
panied by his wife and they are
staying at the Aquatic Club.
Also arriving by the same op-
portunity we-e Mr. and Mrs. Mel-
dior, Rodriguez from Venezuela.
They are remaining for two weeks
taying at the Windsor Hotel,





Rupe

Rupert and Willie find the hole
in the hedge and push through.
“Hi, you chaps,” calls the little
bear, ‘' Come and listen to what
has happened.” They are so
excited about their game that they

pay no heed, but at length he
makes them gather round.







Mr. PAUL FOSTER

For Jcurnalism Course
R,. PAUL FOSTER, reporter
on the staff of the “Barba-
dos Advocate’, leaves today for
England where he will undergo
training in Journalism during the
next six Months,

Paul who was formerly on the
staff of Cable & Wireless joined
the ‘Advocate’ about two years
ago and has been selected for
training in the U.K. For the first
two months he will be attached
to the Liverpool Daily Post and
Echo Ltd., and also hopes to spend
some time in Scotland as well as
on the staff of a London Daily.

Executive Director YWCA

ISS MARGARET HART, a
Grenadian who has _ been
Executive Director of the Y.W.C.A.
in Trinidad since September 1949,
is now on a tour of the Caribbean
‘visiting the various associations in
the area.

She arrived here a week ago
after visiting British Guiana and
Paramaribo and will be remaining
until the end of the month, ;

Miss Hart who was staying at
Super Mare Guest House since her
arrival, expects to take up re-
dence at the Y.W.C.A, from t+
day. From Barbados she goes to
Grenada,

Welfare Officer

RS, H,. A. VAUGHAN, Assist-

ant Social Welfare Officer

left for Grenada. by BWIA on

Monday. Mrs, Vaughan accom-

panies her husband, President of

the Civil Service Association who

is now attending the Conference

of Civil Service Associations in
the Caribbean in Grenada,



* There's been a messenger from
Santa Claus,"’ he cries. ‘* He was
in a flying motor-car, and he’s try-
ing té make things easier for him,
because poor Santa has too much
work nowadays."’ ‘*Oh dear, |
hope he doesn’t mean he's going
to forget to fill any of our stock-
ings!" says Reggie anxiously.

Caub Caltt

’ iy , the Secretary of Commerce}

Ni ht authority to extend the charters

El Dorado ‘ THURSDAY, May 1, 1952 of vessels to citizens of the |

O—7.15 pm 19 76M 25.8M ippines. Authority was formerly |

. - i en cee eae nan ted in the Maritime Board

EMBERS of the S.P.C.A. who The eagerly-awaited production| 4.00 pm. The News, 4.10 p.m. The V&â„¢ i E

Jg | Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Rhythm is thir Which has been since abolished.

attended the Annual Gen- of Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night | Business, 445 p+m. Sporting Record, Approximately eight ships are

eral Meeting of the Association Will take place at the | British 5 ou p.m. Composers of the Week. 3.18 saeciee all ’ laud = inter
at the British Council, “Wake- Council’s “Pocket Theatre” during’ poms Listener’ Choics, 6.00 p.m ,"*8" coastal trade in the Philippines.
field”, on Tuesday night were the week beginning Monday, May Diary, $18 pm ypust Fancy 645 p.m s ee
shown a very educational film 19th. Since it was impossible 2 ade, 7.00 p ah. The Mowe: 1 om. are

ntitled “El Dorado”. This film ®*commodate all who wanted to} sf News from Britain £45 p.m_ Interlude, 8.55 p.m

. Sacee ae ss film see Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”, 030 p.m 25 54M_ 81 2M the Editorials, 9.00 p.m. From the

cescribed British Guiana, its rea
sources, the population and their
religions,

After the meeting, Dr, Salmond,
who moved a_ vote of thanks,
said that the Society was espec-
ially grateful to the British Coun-
cil, He hoped that it would
mever ever become necessary for
Great Britain to curtail the good
work of the British Council.

He said that the Society ap-
preciated very much the work
Mrs. Cecile Walcott, Hon, Secre-
tary, was doing. He did not think
there was anyone who had the
work of the society more at heart
than her,

Russian Artist

M VLADIMIR NECHOUMOFF,

Russian Artist, and his wife
who had been holidaying in this
island as guests of Dr, and Mrs.
K. M. B. Simon, at St. Leonard's
House, left on Monday for Guade-
loupe.

M. Nechoumoff who is a_ top
flight Russian artist has been liv-
ing in Paris since the Revolution
of 1917, During his stay in Barba-
dos he painted local scenes and
portraits and held an Exhibition
at the Barbados Museum,

He also delivered a lecture on
“The Development of French Art”
to the Alliance Francaise, From
Guadeloupe M, Nechoumoff and
his artist wife expect to return
to Paris shortly.

Fourth Visit

‘R. ROLLINS SKEETE, a Bar-
badian who has lived abzoad
for 45 years is now spending a
holiday her with his relatives in
Shorey Village, St. Andrew. He
has spent sixteen years in Panama

and twenty-nine in the U.S.A, and
this is his fourth visit home since
he first left.

He came down from the U.S.A.
some weeks ago and has just re-
turned from Trinidad where he
‘pent a week with friends,

Mr. Skeete was last here in 1929
when he spent three months,

For Students

"EMBERS of Club 11 of the

Girls’ Industrial Union will
be “At Home” to the Labour
Students at a dance at the Union
Headquarters, Constitution Road
on Saturday night. The students
are at present attending the Lab-
our Training Course at the
Y.M.C.A.

The girls are making every
possible effort to make the eve-
ning as pleasant as possible for
the visitors.

Married at St. Leonard’s
QO* Thursday afternoon last at

St, Leonard’s Church,
marriage took place of Miss May
Nicholls, Nurse of Dr.

of the Colonnade Stores,

The bride who was given in

marriage by Mr, Arthur Byer wore

beaded satin lace while her head-
dress was a tiara of pearls. She
was attended by her sister Miss
Elaine Nicholls as maid of honour.

The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. Wood and the duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Cedric Phillips,

A reception was held at “Utica”,
White Park Road and the honey-
moon is being spent at Bathsheba.



West Indian Table Talk

Missing from the
service of the Order of St. Michael
and St. George at St. Paul’s Cathe-
dral this week was the Earl of
Athlone, senior member of the
Order, He is still in Jamaica, The
service, in commemoration of those
members who have died in the
lnst twelve months, was conducted
by the Bishop of Blackburn.

Earlier in the proceedings a new
banner that of Captain Sir Bede
Clifford, former Governor of
Bahamas and Trinidad, was affixed
in the chapel of St. Michael and

St. George. An Army officer, clad Somerset House,

(By LONDONER)

London airport. He merely replied
“no comment” when asked whether
there was any truth in reports of
his forthcoming engagement to
the Princess,

DUKE’S PAINTINGS

Two oil paintings belonging to
the Duke of Windsor, former Gov-
ernor of the Bahamas, are com-
ing up for auction at Christie’s
next month, One shows a view
of London from near St. Paul’s
Cathedral, and the other is of
in the Strand,

in scarlet carried the banner be- taken from the river, Both paint-

fure its owner in the procession ings
ot the Order from the west door Scott the British Landscape paint- aircraft
choir aisles to the chapel near the er who lived
century.

west door.

AUTHOR FOR JAMAICA
re be 4 his way to Jamaica via New
o!

cuss the American sales of his pub-
lications,
damaica where he will stay with
friends,
ROMANCE RUMOUR

Rumni
are‘ But
fathor

Lord Ogilvy,

. would

e in
f on. his

Jamai

TE SORE Meer GS

is Major Maleolm Vivian wards]
Hay, author of “Wounded and a p}
Prisoner of War’, “A Chain of tion
Error in Scottish History”, “The peen bought for
Blairs Papers,” “Winston Churchill Wardell who liv
and James II’ and other publica- pes
tions. He is accompanied by his on
daughter Mrs. Moncrieff Paterson, developing,
In New York, Major Hay will dis- figures in the

are att ibuted

to Samuel

in the eighteenth

BAHAMAS PLAYWRIGHT
In London recently was Simon
whose play, Marriage
ayground, written in collabora-
with Kiernan Tunney, has
the West End.
es in the Bahamas
acquired forty miles of coast
Andros island which he is
Several well known
Bahamas are build-

ing houses on Andros for them-
Then he moves on to selves,

STUDENT FARES
I asked a BOAC spokesman this

has linked the name of week why the special rate student
Lord Ogilvy with P.incess Mar- {

ares had been stopped on the New

whose York-London route. The answer is
the Earl of Airlie, has large that under the new IATA tourist

e:vice scheme which comes into

feoce on May Ist there 'wiil be

EE, a I OTD a LR,

| MO@YGASHEL FABR

RICS

LARGE CHECKS. oct. cu. Lk R88

memorial recent arrival from the colony at hardly any difference between the

tourist fare and the special student
rate, Tourist fare for students is
£148 return. The old student rate
was £141. Students can still
obtain once-weekly bookings direct
from Jamaica to London for
£162 10s, ;

AIRCRAFT SWITCH
Two DC-3 aircraft at present On
the strength of Bahamas airways
are to be transferred to BWIA.

Payment for these aircraft will|

be raade by West Indies Airways
and will be shown on the balance
sheets at the end of the year.
Reason for the transfer is that the
are unsuited to the
Bahamas geography. They still
have plenty of flying time left in
them, In future, Bahamas airways

the

c Bayley’s
Clinic and Mr, Neville Simmonds

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Pocket Theatre

Twelfth







which was given for three per-|'
formances in this diminutive
theatre last year, there will be
five performances of ‘Twelfth
Night”
booked by the general public,
They will take place on the nights
of Monday 19th, Tuesday 20th,
Thursday 22nd, Friday 23rd and
Saturday 24th. Several of the
players who helped to make
“Pygmalion” such a success are
in the cast, which includes Paul-

e Dowding as Viola, Nina Mich-
elin as Olivia, Frank Collymore as
Malvolio, James Grossmith as Sir
Toby Belch, Miles Skewes-Cox as
Sir Andrew Aguecheek and Idris
Mills as Feste, the jester.

The two producers, James Gros-
smith and Philip Hewitt-Myring,
are hoping that despite the small-
ness’ of the space available much
of the magic of what many critics
have called the most perfect com-
edy in the English language will
be brought to the audience.
Special attention is being paid to
costuming; and Greta Bancroft is
arranging and playing the music
with which “Twelfth Night”
abounds, All seats in the small
auditorium have an equally good
view of the stage and will be sold
at the same price of one dollar.
The British Council is bearing all
the expenses of putting on the
play. Seats may be booked either
by personal application or by
Jetter addressed to the British
Council, Wakefield House—not by
telephone. Those writing are
asked to enclose the money for
the seats they want, and to give
fa_ second choice of date in case
all the seats are booked for the
night they would prefer.



Which Type
Are You?

Is It the Sophisticated Type?

Our fifth and definite type, the
Sophisticated, revels in many
things — man-tailored suits, basic
dresses, many accessory changes.
Her loveliness is streamlined and
her theme modernity.

General Characteristics

Smooth, alert. Restless,
bitious.

Bone Structure: Slim and trim.
Well-proportioned figure. Medium
size hands and feet. Accented
eyes and mouth,

Main Effect

Hair; Smooth, modern,
rent fashion trend.

Make-Up: New, modern, sleek,
definite eyebrow line.

Colours: Dark with bright or
light accents; navy and black are
favourites.

Fabrics: Smooth,

cur-

sleek,

Jush.
Gaberdines, shantung, faille,
Lines: Tailored suits; ‘basic
dresses.
Extras

Trimming: Linen and pique ac-
cents; sequin or braid if unusual
are effective.

Jewellery : Current trend
‘Sets’ good,
Perfume: Dashing, sophisti-

cated, nat sweet.
Accessories : Modern.
Hats; Many. New slants and
treatments of prevailing style.
Shoes: Plain court,
Bags: Smooth, sleek, ample size.

TIPS FROM TABLES

NEW YORK,

Court action for their share
service gratuities was filed by
Group of frustrated banquet wait-
ers at the Hotel Waldorf Astoria
Alleging that out of ten million
dollars in tips from diners and
winers over a period of six years
the hotel had withheld 5% out of
the 15% which is rightfully theirs,
the waiters, are now looking for-
ward ‘to a decision that would pay
them an accumulated lump sum

of 3 million dollars,



of
a



CROSS wvavdD



will be operated entirely by am-
phibious aircraft. There will be
no replacement for the DC-3s.



READERS’ RECIPES

Readers of the Advocate are
invited to send in their own
recipes for publication.

Each housewife has her
favourite recipe but has never

thought of passing it on to her
neighbour,

If this is done the ex-
changes will enable others to
build up a good collection to
the benefit of the family.

Send in yours to-day

to
THE WOMEN'S EDITOR





Pie he i a ea

PLAINS suitable for Slacks Etc... _. $2.25



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES



Across

1. Arrive with pet to -rivat.
7. Performance ot

(7)
time on Iiittie

work. (5)

10 How do ears purn? (4)

11. From the spa into health (5)

12. Some dour .ittie creature, (8)

13 Ancient city with outstand-
ing feature. (6)

16. This ward is sheltered (3)

17 The quilt ran in peaceful
shape, (8) 19. Come tn! (5)

20 Ann agreed to hold the horse. (3)

21. Miles of expression ? (5)

22. Rest of the red marine. (9)

Down

i, Guide or the alternative

behaviour (Â¥) ~

Desirabie to see Prue on top. (9)
Needs nothing to be first Ma)
» Slippery though unpolished. (4)
Abie ,to make a oundile. (4)
f leave the lever trial to become
one (9)
Listens for oruken time, (3)
Not in a smear of oil. (6)
Knock senseless. (4)
Sort oe We see iittie of. (5)
80 Cause suspense. (4)
Ghastly pale. (5)
. What the drones do. (4)
Solution of yesterday s puzzle, — Across:
1 Peunions; 7 pose: 11 Ale,
tive: TTT wane FB bockd 20 On ea
: e 18, 20.
24, ther: ss Tone: 26 China et.
Down: ee ee 2
: "8, Pram, 9 "fo, Tmsmeidingst
16. Adders. 19, Stoo. 80. Onin aa

t; 22, Sty(xi; 23, Bnew.
x
S

PeSOCe SOOPER

et ee
eon

LLLP L ECE A PLOY.

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 8.390 PM,

“HONEYMOON LODGE”
Francis LANGFORD &

“RIVER LADY (Color)



$. ____Rod_ CAMERON
% FRID. & SAT. 830 P M
{MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND"
x and *
PR . Sosy ~
% WE WERE STRANGERS” x
DIAL 4606 : John GARFIBLD” eS
A BSSSCe
4

at which seatqg can be|——

‘Genérai lin Caught a Worm

Am-|






| B.B.C. Radio

Programme





p.m. We See Britain, 7.45 p.m
of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio
‘sreel, 830 p.m. Special Despatch,



NEW SEA LAW
WASHINGTON, April 30

President Truman’ on Wednes- |
day signed into law a Bill giving}

Mom and Dad ton tu @RISS



Third Programme, 9.45 p.m. Accordian
Music, 10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. # Stuck In My
Mind, 10.80 p.m. Oliver Twast,



—He Did It All With a Hook and a Worm—

By MAX TRELL

“YOU'RE a great and wonder-
ful hunter of wild animals,” Hanid
said to General Tin the tin soldier.

“Ah, thank you, my dear,” re-
plied General Tin, very pleased to

ive such a fine compliment.
“I've often been told that I’m quite |
good at hunting.”

“Are you good at fishing, too? |
Are you a great and wonderful |
fisherman?”

“Well,” said the General in al
modest voice, “perhaps I’m - the |
greatest and most © wonderful |




herman in the world. But, to tell

you the truth, 1 don’t know of any-
one who is better.” }

This sounded quite good. So
Hanid said: “What kind of fish did
gou ever catch, General?” |

“Two kinds, my dear. Big fish
and little fish.” }

“Oh, | thought there were more
kinds than that.”

Shook His Head

General Tin shook his head. |
“Fish, like everything else, have
all kinds of names. But when you
look at them carefully, you'll see
that there are really only two
kinds:—the big ones and the little
ones. I’ve caught both kinds,” he
added. “As a matter of fact, I once
caught a whale, which is the big
gest thing that swims in the sea
Of course, lots of fisherman have
caught whales. But 1 caught my
whale with a hook and a worm,
which I’m sure no one has ever
done before. And it was an enor-
mous whale, as big as a boat.”

Hanid wanted to know how Gen-
eral Tin could possibly have caught
such an enormous whale with only
a hook and a worm.

“Tt was very simple. It all comes
back, as I said before, to the two
kinds of fish—the big fish and the
little fish. This is how I caught the
whale. I got a worm and a hook and
I threw it in the pond. In a short
time I caught a fish—a very little
fish. Then with this little fish I
went to the river, and threw it in.
And a short time later I had a big-
ger fish. So I kept catching bigger
and bigger fish until finally I
caught a whale. But all I started
with was a hook and a worm.”



lm Grand breakfast main dih!

Here’s the ‘‘power’’ of corn.
‘astes powerfully good!

fo dene. fresh! Your

ain in goodness—
Kelloge’s ‘orn Flakes.

MOTHER vows Meer



>



General Tin told Hanid what a good
fisherman he was.

Hanid asked General Tin if he
had ever made a pet of a fish.

“Yes indeed! I once had a beau-
tiful flying-fish named Genevieve.”

“A flying-fish!” said Hanid in
surprise. “Did it really fly?”

In a Cage

“I should say it did! I kept Gen-
evieve in a cage in a large bow! of
water. And every now and then she
| would fly out of her bowl and sit
on her perch in the cage. She would
|always balance herself on her tail.
| Genevieve had a beautiful voice.”
“This flying-fish sang?” Hanid
| exclaimed.

“Of course she sang! You should
have heard her sing

Sweet and low, sweet and low

Wind of the western sea
|She sang lots of other sea-songs,
too. I was very proud of Genevieve.
| But one day I left her cage open
| by mistake and when I came home,
| she was gone.”

“Ah,” said Hanid sadly. ae

“I think she flew off with the sea-
gulls, I hope they showed her the
way back to the ocean. But she
must be happy there. A cage is no
| place for a flying-fish. I'll never
| keep one there again.”

Then General Tin winked, and
Hanid smiled—for something told
her that General Tin had never
really kept a flying-fish in a cage
at all. He was only telling a story.









SINGER SEWING MACHINE
(0.

ANNOUNCES

th

at

DRESSMAKING
CLASSES

will commence
for the Summer Term
on

MONDAY,

MAY ith.

ENROLMENTS SHOULD BE CONFIRMED

AS EARLY A

S POSSIBLE!







»* GLOBE

PRESENT THE BIBLE'S GREATEST LOVE STORY ®
TONITE AT 8.30 O'CLOCK >
(No Matinee To-day)





“David,
CSlayer of
Goliath,
\Give Us
@ The

Adulteress, :

Bathsheba!”

starring '
Produced by DARRYL F. PE + Directed
SOON!

PIT 24c;
Reservations for Boxes only (all other tickets sold at booth)
N.B.—Tomorrow and Saturday 3 Shows : 1.30, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.

HOUSE 48c;

Special 5.00 p.m. MA

BALCONY 72c;

ATHSHEBA

‘TECHNICOLOR

SUSAN HAYWARD

te HENRY KING * "5.0%, Sy PHILIP DUNNE

PLOY OOUUYOYYYYYYYYUVSL

BOX $1.00

TINEE on SUNDAY

| DON'T Miss IT!

Si ted Audiences :
egregated Audi —.
Women 4.45 p.m. Sasi



THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

They Played It

Last 2 Shews Today With BULLETS!





LARCASTE











Mem 8.30 p.m. ;
pi | COMING SOON
AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS & OVER! | BARBAREES

PE AZA=BARBAREES: PLAZA Osi 70

The FUNNIEST thing
that ever happened to a family!

EMPIR
PLAZA THEATRE

















BARBAREES
(DIAL 5170)
To-day & Continuing
WOMEN 445 p.m
MEN _ 830 pm

6404 & DAD

Segregated Audience
Age Limit 12 Years and
over!

BRIDGETOWN
(DIAL, 2310)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
FRIDAY 2.30 — 445 &
84 pm,

& Continuing Daily
445 & 8.30 pm

“SONS of the

OISTIN
(DIAL 8404)

TODAY (Only)
4.45 & 8.30 p.m

HER FIRST ROMANCE
Margaret O'BRIEN &
“DEAD RECKONING”
MUSKETERS" Humphrey BOGART

(Technicolor) ——_—————
Cornel Maureen

WILDE -— O'HARA

Fri. & Sat. 44 & 8 30



Today's Special 1.40 p.m

RANGE LAND

Whip WILSON &
ROLLIN’
WESTWARD

Tex RITTER



pm,
“WHITE TOWER”
(Color)
Glen FORD -- Valii &
“TARZAN'S PERIL’
Lex BARKER



Today's Special 1 30 p m
Triple Attraction !
“RAIDERS of the
DESERT"
Richard ARLEN
Â¥CHEYENNE COWBOY"
Tex WILLIAMS &
Tex BENEKE & Glenn
MILLER ORCHESTRA



SAT 1.30 p.m

Triple Attraction —

KAIDERS of the
DESERT’

Richard ARLEN &
‘CHEYENNE COWBOY

Tex WILLIAMS &

SAT Special 1.30 pm
“Rose of Santa Rosa’
Hoosier Hot Shots &
“LAW of the ‘Ridin’ the Outlaw Trail’ Tex BENEKE & Glen

BADLANDS" Charles STARRETT MILLER & Orchestra

FSFE IDF SFIS

SAT Special 9.30 & 1.30

“PRAIRIE LAW"





ROXY





Last 2

Shows To-day 4.45 & 8.30
WALT DISNEY’S

EMPIRE
Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Fred McMurray - Henry Fonda
“ALICE IN WONDERLAND” in
.

Color by Technicolor “TRAIL OF THE LONESOME
EXTRA . SPECIAL and (PENE”
“NATURE'S HALF ACRE” dees i

An Academy Award Winner THELMA JORDAN
Also: LATEST NEWSREEL Starring
ee ee

. BARBARA STANWYCK —

} SAT. 3rd. 1.30 p.m earTne a

Rod Camerc — Yvonne De Carlo WENDEL COREY
—in— } ere ae — PS.

Today 1.30, & Sat. 3rd 1,30

THE LADY OBJECTS . C =

= ang. Wild Bill ELLIOTT in—

DRUMS OF THE CONGO | ~ "
FRIDAY (On.y) 4,30 & 8 15









BAT. 3rd MID-NITE
“TIGER WOMAN"
Linda Sterling

OF TEXAS





- Rocky Lane



HELLFIRE &
BANDIT KING
>.
OL 1 MPIC “LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN
" * and (WOMAN”
Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15

JOAN FONTAINE
in

Bud Abbott Lou Costello

in

* E ICE”
“LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN ate

(WOMAN"

and SAT. 3rd MID-NITE
Whole Serial

“JACK



Bud Abbott — Lou Costello

ARMSTRONG”
in '



“HIT THE ICE”

ROYAL

Today Last 2 Shdws 4.30 & 8.15
Whole Serial—



Today 1.30, & Sat, Srd 1.30 p m
HALF WAY TO SHANGHAI
— and —

DEAD MAN EYES

CALL OF THE SAVAGE



OPENING FRI. 4.30 & 815

with Noah BEERY Jnr.

“TARGET UNKNOV@\”
and

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 815

“BOYS IN BROWN” “HALFWAY TO SHANGHAI"
and

“DEAD MAN EYES”



A UNIVERSAL DOUBLE









| WINE...









WOMEN...ADVENTURE
GRAND OPENING
TO-DAY 4.45 and 3.30 p.m.

Tomorrow 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing DAILY at 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

BOLD LOVE...BRAVE DEEDS!

Spurred by the
flash of cold
steel...the
thrill of

warm
lips!












——

CORNEL WILDE
MAUREEN O'HARA .

Fy bale Mas Ni eae

Osa TECHNICOLOR: # #)
ate ROBERT DOUGLAS - GLADYS COOPER | i A 7
E
BRIDGETOWN
(Diat 2310)

* Ce

i



THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

Ja To Alter Comstitution Within A Year

Power Will Go To

Separate

Ministries

KINGSTON, Jamaica, April 29.
JAMAICA'S constitution will be changed within

one year to provide

a substantial advance to-

wards complete self-Government, Governor Sir
Hugh Foot, K.C.M.G., announced in the Jamaica
Legislature to-day as he gave his Throne speech
opening the new spring and budget session.

The Governor said that an agree-
ment had been reached following
local talks he had with nominated
members of the Legislative Coun-
cil and representatives of the
Jamaica Labour Party and the
People’s National Party last year
on the main lines on which con-
stitutional advance should proceed,
and these had been accepted by
the Secretary of State for the
colonies, who expressed willing-
ness to proceed with constitution-
al changes at the earliest moment.

Restricted Reform

Reform will be restricted at the
present time to Ministerial powers
and a balance of power between
elected and the official and the
nominated element of the Execu-
tive Council, leaving legislature
reforms until a later date.

Coppin Urges e
Unification Of
Public Services

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 30

An earnest plea was made by
C. A. Coppin, presiding officer of
the C.S.A, Federation Conference
who Said that Legislators and
Administrations in the area should
do everything in their power for
the early materialisation of the
Unification of Public Services. A
large representative gathering at-
tended the formal opening held
in - Legislative Council Cham-

In one year’s time the constitu- be:

tional change will effect: The
transfer of final administrative
powers from the Executive Coun-
ci! to separate Ministries in which
elected ministers and their staff
will direct administration and ini-
tiate a policy for Executive Coun-
cil study.

The Executive Council will be-
come principal instrument policy
with the larger elected representa-
tion providing a clear majority by
the addition of more ministers,

The leader of the majority party
in the House of Representatives
will have full powers over the
appointment and relieving the ap-
pointment of all other ministers.

Under the proposals the elected
Ministers will have full respon-
sibility for all acts of Government
instead of the present position
maintained in. the Council’s sys-
tem of balance,

A Safeguard

As a safeguard however the
Secretary of State for the colonies
has proposed that reserved powers
now resting with the Governor
in Executive could and should in
future reside with the Governor
alone, in view of the fact that the
large elected majority will nullify
the effectiveness of the Governor's
casting vote. ot

Full details of the Constitution
changes will be sent to the House
of Representatives in the next few
weeks, but in the meantime pub-
lie discussion has been invited, on
the general principles. Government
presented the Legislature to-day
with a huge budget anticipating a
revenue of £15,000,000 and similar
expenditure during the current
year, This amount was swelled
however by the hurricane rehab-
ilitation programme.

“1

ORDER REINSTATED

WASHINGTON, April 30.

The Distriet of Columbia Court
of Appeals on Wednesday rein-
stated the steel seizure until 4.30
p.m. Friday to give Government
a chance to appeal to the Supreme

Court.
—UP.



Mr. Coppin expressed regret that
the goal of political federation
seemed to be receding somewhat
and it was feared by the C.S.A.
on it may take unification with

He implored the assistance of
Legislators to prevent this, for
Unification though an integrdl part
of any practical federation could
in reality, be proceeded with in-
dependently and is not needed to
be encompassed with the difficul-
ties. and dissensions which beset
political affairs.

Indeed, he urged it as practical
step in evolution of federation
going so far as to say that with
unification achieved and function-
ing one of the biggest hurdles to
federation would be cleared,

The Administrator in his open-
ing speech after introduction by
J, H. V, Redhead, Registrar and
President of the local association
said that the C.S.A. parley pre-
ceded only by a few months the
general London Federation Con-
ference and it was noteworthy
that a Royal Commission report
jaiqd particular stress upon the
need for the integration of the
Caribbean services,

All the C.S.A, had done and
would do in the next few days
would be a contribution towards
the general purposes delegates to
London will pursue.

eo
Pineapple
- °

Nurseries
Proposal for the establishment
of pineapple nurseries to produce
eight million suckers in three yeSrs
has been submitted to Government
by the Jamaica Agricultural So-

ciety, tha liaison between the ad-
ministration and farmers.

A Government backed pro-
gramme has already been put into
effect for the development of the
pineapple industry in the island.



UNING THE DEX of the Nieuw Amsterdam as it arrives in New York are Mr. and Mrs. Jan Griffioen and
their 17 child=~<>a, all headed for a farm in Abbotsford, British Columbia. There are 11 girls and 6 boys,
whose ages ra ==g=e from one to 22, and they hail from Utrecht, HoHand, The family migration will cost the
Grificens $7.0 for passage alone before they reach their destination, The father said his reason for
aiving Up a steaxx>


A Trearning—Point In Jeans Plan Paint
West Indian History 4.

By BUTE HEWES

JUST 150 years ago, there occurred in London an

event that ~w*-as to mark_a turning-point in the history of

On April 2, 1792, William Wilberforce

succeeded ir® persuading the House of Commons to approve
his motion or the abolition of the slave trade.

This wees the first real success gained by the move-
ment for th<= abolition of slavery, which had been carried
on vigorous EZ -~ for more than a century.
when the SB =2we traffic between Africa and the Caribbean
was at its Fe
the West Ir=cties.

West Indiar=

Between 1680 and 1786, con-
temporary statas=ticians estimated
that some 2,13. ©00 slaves were
imported into “re British Col-
onies, in Ameri Indies. In 179O°_ a staternent 01
the number of slaves exported

from the Africo==mz coast during
that year broke down the tots’
as_ follows: Essay the i British,

38,000; by the Eeâ„¢rench, 20,000; by
the Dutch, 4,006%-> by the Danes,
2,000: by the BE” «<>rtuguese, 10,000.
Thus, more theea= half the trade
was in British Pr zemds..

Wilberforce wemss one of the men
behind the formmem®ertion of a com-
mittee in Londox= in 1787 to work
for the abolitio=w= of this traffic.
Two years latex-_ he laid before
the House of <—_ommons twelve
resolutions as t&me basis for the
ending of the sM ave trade. Dis-
cussion was pcesstponed. and for
two years, a Zouse committee
took evidence fx-<>rn witnesses.

Motion HZ Defeated

In 1791 Wilte troduced a moti=~z, to prevent the
further importata the British colom@™™@des in the Wes
Indies. This wee=as defeated by
163 votes agains .

But a year lewter, on April 2,
1792, the effogt== of Wilberforce
and his supporte\==s were success-
ful. Another tr=<>tion was intro-
duced for the abolition of the
trade. This wees amended in

DUT<—H COUPLE FARMBOUND

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

eS ee

PAGE THREE



Wwe cCuoPr OF WV"

| T
|

Pretty
1



Manufacture

company for the local
of paint is being
a group of Kingsion
Machinery, has been
foreign experts for |

formed by
businessmen
ordered and

LONDON,

shortly.

The company aims to take up
the $1,000,000 (W.1.) per annum
paint business of the island, and
to export its surplus proguctien
throughout the British Caribbean.

grows
more.
development of these territories
would have been very different.

the The entire sugar economy of the

trade should cease on Jan-

uary 1, 1796. West Indies was built up on
Tt was not until 1807, however, slavery. Vast _ plantations of with
that the House of Lords agreed sugar in the islands owe thei

to pass a Bill. This provided that
no vessel should carry slaves out
of any port in the British
dominions after May 1, 1807, e
and that no slave should be we
landed in the British Colonies

after March 1, 1808.

BOVRIL<
Ree Ee
Death Rate High SR

But it was
abolition of the slave trade did
not lead to improved treatment
of slaves in the West Indies. Now
that fresh supplies were cut off,
slaves already there were over-
worked. The death rate was
high. In 1807, there were 800,000
slaves in the West Indies; in
1830, there were 700,000. It be-
came increasingly evident that
the evil could be stopped only by
abolishing slavery altogether.

Wilberforce again pressed for
improvements in the conditions
of slaves and recommendations
were made to the West Indian
Legislatures to this end. In 1839,
Wilberforce had strong public
support in Britain and by 1833 a

very existence today to slavery.
: U.P.

makes a
tasty
sandwich

, miniature. Everyone enjoys the rich
javour and goodness of Bovril
enjoy it often—one 4 02 bottle

wer 100 delicious sandwiches

Bill was passed v=
ery completely. A sum of
£20,000,000 was provided as
compensation to the planters. By

August, 1838, the last slave in

the West Indies was freed.
Historians agree that without

the slave traffic in the early days

favour of grad@uwzezal abolition and ~&

the House of <_ommons

finally
agreed, by 238 —=-otes to 85, that



POST OFFICE NOTICE:

AIR MAIL

Effective Ist May, 1952, ATR MAILS will be closed at the Gen—
eral Post Office as follows: —



(Cancelling previous Schedules)





Destination Time Day Destination Time Day
AFRICA 2.00 p.m. | Monday GRENADA 9.30 a.rxe. Tuesday
2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 2.00 p.2=. Friday
11.45 am.] Friday GUADELOUPE 2.00 p.r2-. Monday
ANTIGUA 2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 9.30 a.r=e=. Saturday
9.30 am] Saturday HAITI 11.45 a..z Monday
ARUBA 2.00 pm,| Monday 11.45 a.rz=- Thursday
11.45 am Thursday HAWAII 2.00 p.r=>- Monday
AUSTRALIA (all air) | 11,45 am Monday 2.00 p.r=-. Wednesday
11.45 am Thursday 11.45 am. Frida
AUSTRALIA 11.45 am.| Wednesday [HONG KONG 11.45 are Monday
(air to Panama only)} 9.30 am Saturday 11.45 a2. Thursday
INDIA 2.00 p.m Monday
BAHAMAS .. 2.00 p.m.f Monday 2.00 pre _ Wednesday
11,45 am, Friday 11.45 a.rem_ Friday
BERMUDA 2.00 p.m.| Monday INDONESIA 2,00 p.rx=_ Monday
2.00 p.m.} Wednesday 2.00 p.re=_ Wednesday
BORNEO 2.00 p.m, Monday 11.45 a.rerm _ Friday
2.00 p.m.f| Wednesday [JAMAICA 2.00 p.re= _ Monday
11,45 am, yf Fri 2.00 p.rr=_ Wednesday
BR. GUIANA 11.45 am, |) Monday 11.45 acre _ Friday
8.00 am,} Friday JAPAN 11.45 a.m — Monday
BR. HONDURAS 2.00 p.m.| Monday 11.45 arr — Thursday
BURMA... 2.00 p.m, | Monday MALAYA 2.00 p.m _ Monday
2.00 pam nae 48 p.1rx=_ egosetsy
11.45 am, ay 1. ates - ay
MARTINIQUE 2.00 p.m _ Monday
CANADA (Direct) .. 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 9.30 a.rre— Saturday
(via Trinidad) 11.45 am.| Friday MAURITIUS 2.00 p.rre_ ay
CANAL ZONE 11.45 am, | Wednesday 2.00 p.m Wednesday
9.30 am,.| Saturday 11.45 a.m Friday
CENTRAL AMERICA | 11.45 am.] Monday MEXICO 11.45 arr Monday
(except C.Z.) ; 11.45 am.| Thursday 11.45 arr _ Thursday
CEYLON 2.00 pm.]| Monday MONTSERRAT 2.00 p.rx=_ Wednesday
2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 9.30 a.trr=— Saturday
; 11.45 am. | Friday NEW ZEALAND 11.45 arr= — Monda
oHINA 2.00 pm.} Monday all air) .. 11.45 are Thursday
; 2.00 p.m, | Wednesday ‘W ZEALAND .. 11.45 are Ww ay
11.45 am. Hie (air to Panama only)} 9.30 a.m Saturday
SUBA | 11,45 am, onda’
111.45 am.| Thursday |PALESTINE Fi 2.00 p.m Monday
CURACAO 2.00 p.m, ree, ia p= _—— ay
, m. ursda, 45 arm a
Dias 4 ” | PHILIPPINES 11.45 2 ay
DOMINICA .. o 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 arm Thursday
DOM. REPUBLIC .. 11.45 am.]| Monda PUERTO RICO 2.00 pz Wednesday
11.45 am.}| Thursday 9.30 a.re=_ Saturday
DUTCH GUIANA .. 11.45 am.| Monday ST, CROIX V.I. 11.45 a.com
11.45 am.| Wednesday 11.45 are — Thursday
ani ST. KITTS 2.00 p.r==- Wednesday
SUROPE 2.00 p.m] ,Monday 9.30 arr Saturday
- 2.00 an Wednesday |ST. LUCIA .. 9.30 arr. Tuesday
11.45 am.| Friday 9.30 arm ay
FIT ise 4 11.45 am. | Monday ST. THOMAS 11.45 a.rr=_—
11.45 am Thursday 11.45 azz. Th iy
FR. GUIANA 11.45 am Monday ST. VINCENT 9.30 a.rc== Thursday
11.45 am Thursday 9.30 a.com Saturday
SOUTH AMERICA .. 11.45 are. Monda
GT. BRITAIN 2.00 pm.| Monday (except Venezuela 11.45 arm Th y
2.00 pm.| Wednesday |TORTOLA .. +t 2.00 p.r==. Wednesda,
11.45 am, —_ —* 2: 2 a.race Saturday
i DAD 11.45 am. onday S.A, = 7 =
sao 2.00 p.m Monday 2.00 p.m Wednesday
11.45 am.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m Friday.
to Friday VENEZUELA 2.00 p.rxrs. Monday
9.30 am Saturday 2.00 prs Friday

A



Registered mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
ROBERT A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster.

General Post Office,

|
‘

WITH

with a choice
engines: ==

Gasolene.

This wonderful machine is now also
available with FULL-TRACKS

You'll be truly amazed to see this small-
looking unit performing jobs, both in the
field and on the road, that are beyond wheel
Tractors of twice its Horsepower.

This Tractor is indeed the friend of both the
small and large Plantation owners alike and
the price is well within your reach.

We shall be pleased to arrange a
oom demonstration at your request gpe_-

ROBERT THOM

4616
\

EE————————— oO ee

SRA AND AIR

=—=—_=_
ARRIVALS — BY BWIA

oD
From TRINIDAD:
|} B. Farfan, C
| Ferreira, J
,; don, A
Freitas,
Boyack,
Moreati, Y
Tiron, C
iJ. Finlay

PEPARTURKES — BY BWIEA
For TRINIDAD:

vet Reid,
David Refd, Emily
celles, Yoland Seott, Ellis Maingot, Helen
Matngot,
Kathleen Wood, Ann Wood, Tim Wood
Anthony Wood. George Robinson, Dapt

(International) |ne Eversley, Maud Lowe, Deborah |
|Rhape, Malcolm Downey, John Corbin
| Ceetl Ledra
For 8ST LUOTA; |

Amut Ambrose, Peter Elis, Albertha
| Charles, Alison Charles, Connell Charles

| David Horloek, Phillip Canali

| Rival For Bagasse |

pointed out that
crisis in the 1920’s small quanti-
ties of paper were made from)
elephant grass (pennisetum pur-|

found that the ‘ Nites aS

A sandwich made with Bovril is a real meal

And they can
§ Bovril makes

ENRICHED Feat

Vaporising
O11 and NOW DIESEL

LIMITED

COURTESY GARAGE

}
DIAL
i





SPOSOOO ES”,

SCORES “ e503 COO , SLECEO ESOS ASP LAE o*



TRAFFIC ©



N TURSDAY

Farfan, P. Farah, J
Seott, R. Huggins, A. Gor
lamoine, J. Millan, M. De
D. Macneil aw Mckay M
P_ Harley, H. McLean, J. Berry
y. Xavier, Y. Lyon, VU. |
Navarro, A. Moore, 8. Fintay

ON TUESDAY

Strona, Dr
Michael

Lewis Reid, Marga
Reid, Diana Reid
Niblett, Glynn Las

John Bradshaw, Austin Wood



-

LONDON.

Commenting on recent reports |
the setting up of the plant are op 4 paper shortage in Bri
expected to arrive in the island owing to the lack of raw materials |

a. letter published in The Times

in |

in a similar)

: pureum). :

No paint manufacture is at pre- “wast areas of East Africa are;

It came at a time gent eatablished in the British wavered with this plant, which
est Indies

to a height of five feet or

Twenty-five years ago

manufacturers said that it was
suitable for making paper pulp, |
but the processing would |
economical,

be un-|

It is sugg that |

the advances made 1%

the last two and a half decades, | js

this may not now be the case.
—B.

%

el
|

















beefy

rem

oo
FO HSS

of three

ROSSER SOS OOOO PSOOOO, FOOOO -

-







LOCOS TSD

VHF SSISGO

CPF

>
%
~

SRO SS

GGSCGSSSOOS



® Top Quality
® Lifelong Wear
® Splendid Value



BARBADOS
CO-OP
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

SCDVIOD SOS TONG OBO

i

|

4 44
PL LSECEE ELLE PEEP PEC SFY

ELECTROLUX





The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

Cook to exclaim :
“Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
mek ice!”

is here again. .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.
These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41 cub.
ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

BOOK YOURS NOW

: |
THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.
i



Plantations Building

t



ee
oS

OFFERING A FEW
MORE USEFUL
ITEMS

a



@SANDING DISC GRITS 16, 24, 36, 50
@MASKING TAPE

@RUBBING COMPOUND

@SPONGE RUBBER

@LOY COLD PLASTIC METAL
@PISTON SEAL

@KASENIT CASE HARDENING
@RAWL PLUG DUROFIX

@COPPER TUBING 4”, 3%" %”’, *:"
@TYRE GAUGES (Car and Truck)
@ENGLISH SOCKETS SETS \
@ENGINEER HAMMERS
@HACKSAW BLADES

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY ST. DIAL 4269









rane

CLASSIFIED ADS§.|._ Fen "ext | YELLOW Fever Scavenger To Die | SHIPPING NOTICES



__PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952
oem Se re EE a an ne te te NR























































































































































































. ie oateet inane 6 teaisiea et beege tthe ee
Continued from Page 1 F or Murd MONTREAL, AUSTRALAa, NEW 2939S"
i Rr ss se a i a
DIED FOR SALE BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast,|Caribbean under the control of _ er ee ee The MV. “DAERWOOD” will
perfect bathing, quiet. All meals and|Dr. P, F. de Caires. @ From Page 5 That di - SS. “TEKOA” ww scheduled to sail accept Cargo and Passengers for
BIRCH—Op' 30th April 1952, at her resi- services supplied form main house. Own! Dr, O'Mahony seid terda ‘ ‘ Phat discrepancy, you well may | trom’ Adelaide ‘5th Melbourne |% St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
dence Holétown St. James, Constance Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable | 44.4 yes y the accused tolc him that the two think, does not go to the root of|March ard, Sydney 10th, Bris-|@ Passengers only for St. Vincent,
Birch, Funeral lenves her late AUTOMOTIVF couple. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or some countries hed been parties, Benskin and the girl as the matter, because as has beer |ane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad | Sailing Sunday 4th May 1952.
residence at 4 pm today for the Phone C15 14,3.52—t.f.n. worming on a similar programme it turned out to be, were in the put by the prosecution, there 1 about April 22nd and Barbados about The M.V. “MONEKA” will ge-
oletowr ethodist Church and|j-—— - sometime and some had era- . = , by 5
thence Apnihe St: Jurhes Cameters CAR; Frazer F-20 in A-1 condition FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat. dicated the “It is of oe ‘on he — ona them cr no doubt that Benskin suffered in- Tn addition to general cargo this ves- iettuniea® Regain iaontowest,
No cards, Friends are asked to} Mileage 21,000. Ring 9109 1.5.52—4n | Completely furnished, ‘Telephone, gas, ——- when he approached them — this jury on his head; that he w:-»|S¢! has ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
attend Ries electricity. sea. Excellent and|common interest to us. The need is given in the statement by Forde. attacked and got this severe | ze" cardo. day 2nd inst
Nina Reeves, Rita Birch «daugi- | CAR—Morris 8 HP. in good condition, | Safe seabathing. Special Suinmer Rates.|of such an eradication pro- —asking for “mine”. But what wound , S@verc| Cargo accepted on through Bills of | The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
tere). “Loutse Thompson ve Buves, four (0 ood tyres. uunet M, Fitz- | Apply to MORESOL" ST, LAWRENCE oo in Barbados is exempli- {| am putting to ypu is the fact It is put kes ions a Saree = ee to gocept Cates ant Demengets ae
ugene * Walcott, ph era one or . GAP. Phone . —_~ - julana, Leew: ward mm ca, tigua, itserrat,
(Grandeufitiren) 8.8810. 1.5.52—3n 26.4.52—~e.0.4,—+t.t.n, | fed.” that Benskin, gives one version in cept what ee ‘ae Ghee oho Isiands. Nevis and St, Kitts, Sailing Friday
—**—*"|“TAR—Hiliman 1081 model, Mileage | FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3. bed. wattiee a. gd sued as the Magistrate's Court as to the sereams at the time of the mur-| For furter particulars apply — eee a
LEACOCK—Qa 20th April 1952 Emily $6,500. In absoluteky perfect condition. rooms. furnished. Lighting Plant. in he position in which th were der. The counsel for the de-|*URNESS WITHY a@ co., LTD. B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
Leacock, site employes at. “DUM. | Going cheap. Telephone R. S. N Watermill supply. Double Car Port, two hed in walking, the position of the bicy- fence said: It is passing strang.| ™S=N™AD. ASSOCIATION (INO)
PRIESY Henry's Lane, Saint} --Office 3925. Home 8374 servant rooms. From May Ist, Phone he WAS ole a who was next to whom there were shouts om murder anc and Consignee Tele. 4047
Michael, The funeral leaves the 90.4.52—t.f.n. | 4476. 10.4,52—t.4.n | about two to two and a hours and so on.’ And the difference he is prod 1 peeve fr c DACOSTA & CO, LG:
inevad we ot iueds 0 - - re away from South America e *. luced ae BARBADOS.
Twoedside Road. at 8.45 o'clock ths CAR- 1837 Humber Hawk Car in good] FLAT AND HOUSE—Pully furnished may be due to the fact — wed: to sa "
tho “Christian “Missio Peondition. Apply to" Mrs." Bethell, St. Lawrence on Sea, Avaliable aped|™@ disease is endemic. The in- wot know — that there is, thm of srrmmene MO earch thie ere |
Tabew Tudor Street and thence | Searles Plantation, Christ Church. on. Phone 3903. We invite inspection |CUbation period of the disease likelihood that because of the de- . ’
pO Cette the, Westbury Cemeter: 1.5_52--2n | for next Winter, 29.3.52—t.4.n, | SIX and so it would be im- ceased girl, he was a telling the His Woman’s Evidence *
Friends are mvite = ma nnn nnn ans | ceanieneniineinsinen sian tomibipilientsintinhicasamem es) to detect the disease Lordship reminded the jury
rtin Leaeock and Family CAR—Standsrd Vanguard 1,700 miles} MODERN PURN a truth about the alkin be Jury e
1'5 5211 J 1961 model 8 months old §2.300 Apply | silver and Linen. Qoed sex paniiit| when it was coming into Barba- gether and they ah, have’ besa Of the evidence of O'Neale, the
. ‘e PP oO a
—— ~ | Smiths Engineering works Dial—4947 For further particulars: Apply fo Aung | 0s. kh woman who lived near the scene
THANKS W0.4.52-—5n. | Lashley No, 0 Coral Sands, Worthing Serious Disease in the khus khus grass, but he did and pointed out that she could he
) ROL ER NOY ck 29.801 ton s = not like . say that as he had be- sig to corroborate Benskin in eh ae ke ae
b e od mices CAR—On 1) Prefect Fo: im @god | —————_~.__ a 2 ‘ . a
Mn ute theta tne sedi ts f sondition,”" Owner riven. Dat 4246" 0r | “NEWHAVEN — Grane Cons, 4 bed-|eaid, “It'le Shemnitied th tee Ruikine ort tine’ Deen coming after Haswell was dead.
thank all those who attended the tun. 93192. HU. L. Hill C/o J. N. Goddard rooms, Fully furnished, lighting Plant, He said that Benskin had at no NEW YORK SERVICE
e of the late O. Austin Belmar o oe ana a ogy By rire wae tn toleea a iting = ite on tk uk os time said that he could identif;
23rc Apri s a > a" rooms. from and then an- Lb 7
Varian were exotteend theit sympathy’ CAR—(1) M,G. Coupe im perfect) tober ist Phone 4476. a htin other in the island We but you may well think’ that is the man. A STEAMER sails 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th April, 1962.
1.2—1n |order. Apply Neweastle Plantation, St. 10.4.59—t.1.n. | one serine f ion not cf vilal Gageietaee wan would remember, he told A STEAMER sails 9th May—arrives Barbados 20th May. 1952.
_— ; Se ————e=_e_e___ if that Benskin had said, 1. POT See ee es yee
a en |, TRINITY COTTAGE—Pully furnishea,| because we have the mosquitoes a » t
EDUCATIONAL [SP iei Bi Fesegnone hear [tates bedrooms, compiete ” with tele:|and We ate mot far away from a hat with @ peek and he rented: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
: : 9.3,08-44.0, [Bois aie bt ee Se at} where the is at present.” stocks. They expected to get one oq them that qb oe
or ea renee i oe wricks Bay, St. James. pe a He said that would need tor from each of the rural © |, ("© ‘hat one of the witnesses A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
i HARRISON COLLEGE TRUCK--One (1) 3S-ton Austin Truck. 52— the ti ‘of the local inspec two f Christ Church ee —— he returned hor A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.
ortison College has a staffing vacancy SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White ~ — Mam fabent Sar” Oe ae eee parishes, urc! iS hat was folded in such a wa,»
foy ite Honours Graduate in English, for | ABBY DV. SC " Commissioners of Health. The as many as possible from St. va
eptember, 1954 Park Road 4 ; Commissioners as showed a peak. AD
T Abeibabten seule be. tide to the wearin, PUBLIC SALES circularised ne es “and iMienae “t eeie ieotoes ton cant Benskin had not run away, %: (ee
Headmaster on or before the 6M of Mas. ae ICAL ther sam” tet 3. be) oveane Sanitary Inspectors _ sean but bad waited unui SOUTHBOUND
= oon CTR 2 the Police arrived and then 1.
QUEEN'S COLLEGE “HEFRIGERATORS—New shipment, ic- REAL ESTATE hex cacietins wus cen: (oho ee ee ee the hetiee eet ae ie ee ee eee Barbadss
Queens Cotlege bas o staffing vacanc ceived Coldrator 7 cubic foot models, lete and he wanted to RSI. Certificate or the , ic Biss “ALCOA PARTNER” HALSFAX April 13th April 23rd.
for an Honours Graduate in Science, for [latest desivn, 5-year quarantce on famous | —————__—— p pay he could have been s ; * “ALCO. °° tee pi :
September. 1952. American weneral Electric Tcrmetieatiy | AIRY COT—=Brighton, St, Michael, ail|'tibute to them. Sanitary Inspectors’ Certificate, “is. told them tat Eenrater S'S. “A STRAMER’ ‘MONTREAL May tein May 26th
fpplicavons should be made to the | gealed unit systera, Door lock standard.| modern conveniences, house contains} He did not think that the pro- They will be trained for 14 days common law wife had b lor |S.8. “A STEAMER” “1 tL TI MONTREAL May Sotn Foon Oh
ames on or before oa £f [Electric Sales & Service Ltd. Tweedside} Open and Closed Verandahs, Drawing] gramme was going to ‘be very -at a centrally selected place in ad been lov, i Biv Se #8
952 %—=" 1 Road St. Michael Phone 4629. — and Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath, expensive to the island They Teideetown to him all along until the Poli. NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST SR et ee fl ye Seana oe were getting the co-operation of D.D.T. To Be Used oo Saeee it tt i na oe re Aerie eel 8 Thee ane aes ae ee aah
INDIES 17,150 sq. ft. of land all enclosed with|the Pan American Sanifar. Seay pep thon eq yrplath.hlersg sie Mg y ee
ak dalaneant tAscaplan tn tha Libears of b-cauiaa nds LIVESTOCK “a “nn ba write tenes. Cocoanut ond, Lime|Bureau. They also had goorl te 6 ae Mana Fn een en te
d bré 4 Trees. exce ndays x
the University Coliewe of the West Indies. | COW —One young heifer, Haleitin 2d) Retween p.m: and’ 6 p.m. Further found in the City where there are He said that they might well asi eee es |
recomuised University, and possession. of fapringer “Brooklyn”, dindawarsy Roua t MTeCUaRTe: | Dial 2648, eal PUBL a lot of houses and not in country themselves why should Forde de- ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
the Aanocinteship of the, Librar YA 1.5.52—In . : ic NOTICES districts, Dr. Ey eae Se liberately try to lie against Brew- Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
RIHOM Wil e.b Stone vecdnunendation HOUSE—One (1) board and shingle fey could und anywhere. ster; anyhow it was a matter for A Rr ea ee sR Se
Dia cieoaht catdiauta wil te cotmeckoe MISCELLANEOUS House with pen verandah and Bee NOTICE le said that it has been found them. y o study for the Registrati p tation scobel, rete. pply ‘ : ; =
Mt ihe ‘Litton: Association, if he is not | CLOCKS—Electric wall clocks for} Gordon Charidler, on premises, Tne public ate thfortned that having out cee ee His Lordship finally said that —— _ - ——— =
a qualified librarian. The salary offeres | offices ete. mantel clocks, and alarm 22.4.52—n | regained my health, all transactions and a tones a ey the they had to come to a unanimous
Ki) x 90 — £950 per annus and the | clocks, Ali sizes and designs. K. R.| —>7>>—>———-____________ | payments should now be made to the | 5 . and also verdict, bearing in mind their duty F Oo R & A L E
commencing salary will depend upor Hunte & Go. Ltd, Lower Broad Street. ates Seing , Business nd ith, house | office of 3. Ni. T. Chatalani. Merchant eraer 6 mosquito (malaria in accordance with the oaths they
qualifeations: “and” previous experience. | pal — $1 4.54—3n. . ., Nr, | Proprietor, at the corner of Baxters and | carrier). h k th i i om We eke
ConirbuttUn to the Federated Superan Shop Hill, St. Thomas. Apply on | Pussage Road: F ad taken te the community and
atl Sehane for Universities i re-1 FRESH CIGARETTES—We havo just | Premises, A. Forde. 29.4.52—4n ” 30.4.52—2n a ee cnn ——s at the same time to the accused Ww NAVY
» “Appieations should be accompanied by | Cigersttac’ “Leet Supply of “Four Aces. | ‘The undersigned will offer for sale by NOTICE ways in mind of edn ting the who was there innocent until he; GARDENS |
two testimonials or ;references, ‘i LTD co . "30. 4.52—an | BUbLic competition at their office, No. 17, ay’ 9 luca’ was proved guilty to their satis-}
closing date Yor receipt of applications ir : ig Maer Bridgetown. en Thursday, ‘i weiieaient dhe adn ao wie perie to eve Dr. faction, . A modern, compact and well built stone property in a |
; 20th May, 3952, an » sen’ . a # r that . . : ‘
the Librarian, University College of fhe | p GARDEN HOSE: ii, Garden Hove ond} muiidings, comprising oMtices “and. ware. | Exhibitions at St. Michael's Girls’ Schoo! give ideas ‘and iy on The jury retired for 12 minutes popular and central residential quarter. The house is assured
West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, B.W.1. , 3 eer St | houses on the Woasd kind Prinses William | Will be received by the undersigned up Rediftusio er and then returned their verdic. ef adequate privacy by flowering shrubs and shade trees.
Ve ta-in) eh" | Henry Street and MeGregor Street, | to Saturday, the 10th. May, 1952, and lon. It was also bes gwiend of guilty. There is a good size living room and dining room, 3 airy bed-
HANG up the “Atomite” Fly Wand in| Bridgetown, standing on 5,837 square feet | ate subject ‘to the following conditions. | that the Mobile Cinema pam- Shaun: daterate edad eset’ bath ning ; . Th
your home and be rid of Flies, Mosquitors,| @f land and now occupied by Messrs,| 1. Candidates must be the daughters |phlets be used to educate the » Separate toilet and bathroom with tiled shower. The
JOR-LICENSE NOTICE | and Fiving Ants etc. Price only 6¢ R. M. Jones & Co, Ltd ot Parishioners in straitened cireum- garage is integral with the main building and has a door giving
LIQUO oN ‘ ’ : Further particulars from t) under- | stances, a; . NINE KILLED i
KNIGHT'S LTD. ae whened the der year, vide 2 va thas doen oe (8) on. V. C. Gale said that he i DELHI, April 30 direct access to the house. A wide L shaped front verandah,
‘The upplicatlbn of Charles Ward, Agent, 0, 4.68—Sn COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.. cM on Sad 12) years agreed with eve NEW » Apri . which is not overlooked, is a pleasant and dominant feature.
ot Pri Black Rock + Pens HAIR TONIC-—“Oriental Hair Tonic” Solicitors, | proved by a Dirth eeritfeate, whieh | O'Mahony said. He felt bod =~ All nine aboard were killed to- Good servants’ quarters are provided and the ow of 14,250
oot parm _ Cae pits, Malt Liavor" |is recommended to keep your Hair soft 20.4,52—10n | must accompany the application. pro} e was quite n night when = an Indian Airline Sq. ft. are completely fenced and private. ery reasonably
far Dodgs, Biack Rock, Be, talohael in and Cularen” Price yw. bm ee carnaidates netween eight (f) ana eine 2 the fact that thar want Dakota crashed in a field nearj|/ priced at £4,250 as the owner is leaving the Island. Further
inetd this 26th any it Abril 1952 bi ore can . a ae AUCTION the School on etiday, a ine, an a getting an of pi ; ; biosey esg rege 2 Py ‘ b done information obtained from the sole agents |
Zollce Magistrate, a eee eee es welve (12) lin Barbados and also an increa: |
& eae ta LUNCH TINS: Strong Lunch Tins By instructions of the Insurance Co. ie cad Fie = io 7th June, 1952. in the tourist trade. The Chair, Madras, Five were passengers ||, JOHN MoM. BLADON & co. |
CHARLES WARD with Inner Tray attractively enamelled.| 7 wit sell on Frida 2nd Ma ? = candidates must be at the a = th j
MWVARD. | | Eapectally damabih dx aenao\ cnileren, Pe y at 3 P.m./Schoo! not later than 9.15 a.m. on the | Man observed that nothing could =a four crew. The plane ap- ||) AFS. FV.A
NB.—This application will be eonsid- | 20ly $3 cents each. Plastic Tumblers| NELSON STREET—DE LU: S_,Co.—|date of their examination, keep a tourist out of a place more peared over Delhi at the tail end FS. P.V.A.
cred at _a Licensing Court to be held « J % Cente each, G. W. Hutchinson & 143 hp 1947 model; done enise sine clerk to fe Vest ASPR.,, | than mosquitoes. of a blinding duststorm whicn||) Phone 4640. Plantations Building. |
Police Court, to be held at Police 83,0 Cow tad. 29.4.52—n | miles; damaged ‘by aceident—principally na eet The _ Board accepted Dr. swept over the city for four hours, i i ae etialieeesints taint er
Police Court District “A on Friday the MARINE ENGINE, 95 hp. 6 cviinder, body work, Terms CASH, . O’Mahon: 1g —UP.
9th day of May bis ap poate? mn. Geigy ikavton , complete with R. ARCHER McKENZIF y’s report, " Fa :
Police Magistrate, Dist. A" terhgear and propeller. DaCosta & 30.4.52—3n. "
16.08 en , 29.4.52—Tn f
SS
i RECORD@—Clearing four stock of MGM Ww ANTED
és Records. Three for oO rs, your
(OVERNMENT NOTICE choice, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. : —
= “aes 9.4.52—tf.n, | ,





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BUREAU OF EMIGRATION Engiand’s leading Daily Newspaper now | An assistant foreman capable of super-

“ ari in Barbados Air only a few/vising our machine shop department.
AND en trom | 2898 after publication in London. Con-| Applicant must have Knowledge m
It_is hereby notified that from tact: Fan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. | making sketches and reading blue



DUNLOP TYRES

May tst, 1952, until further notice, | Local Representative, Tel, 3118. prints. .
the Bureau will be closed for new 17,.4.52—t.f.n. Copies of recent testimonials must be
eigtrations nd. renewals of |-————— So | titted with application for particu-
Teegigerawons a al SUGAR—NEW MUSCOVADO SUGAR | /ars relating to salary and other condi-
registration, now obtainable from all leading grocer-| tons, by Sist May 1952, To: The Man- sisisshins i
LABOUR DEPARTMENT ies ager, the Barbados Foundry Limited, 9 ee
1.5.52], “so good for you” P.O, Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-

380.4.52—6n | tOWn, Barbados



es en ae 1,5.52—in
- VENETIAN BLINDS: Onky afew 3 ft )>-=-_—_———_—_—_—__.._.___
QOCPPPPOISSOSIOSOSSSSF | Ajuminum American Style to Close $16,00| An Assistant Works Engineer, capable
%
\
%



1
oe each. Dial 4689, 1,5.52—4n | Of supervising a workshop and Foundry.

e + Experience in sugar machinery repair
x . 3
¢ - A Cake Sale

VAT—One (1) 5,000 Oak Vat — | work desirable. Applicant must have
apply D. V. Scott 0S White | Knowledge of scale drawing and experi-

% (to be held at NEWSAM @& Co

x On FRIDAY MAY 2nd labour.

% | Park Road. 1.5,52t.f.n. ]ence in the control and direction of
- Z from 10 a.m. % WATCHES—A new assortment of Copies of recent testimonials must be
Â¥

ARE THESE YOUR TYRE SIZES.

ca



. ,
y & , i Ladies’ R. G. Wrist Watches. L, M, | submitted with application for particu-
ss lm aid of a deserving Charity Clarke, No. 12, James Street. Phone lars relating to salary and other condi-

Nessooscossoseoosssoose. | 1757 3,6: Fiseudéle tue Bishetca Bea tamtieh
ANNOUNCEMENTS Briduetown, eieiogs te son
ARRIVED |

MANAGER,-—required for Colony Club

700-20/32 x6 8 ply
750-20/34 x 7 10 ply















_ Anoth Shi Shiai twices icianedanenema
" POPULAR oa weer in Comfort at tie Maxiats Oss eight man ‘requiring permanent post” 750 20/34 x 7 “Roadtrak”
84180 GAS COOKERS work tag ineeecad gitts dor ‘a, , STaNkamaas te : -- * '
A few of these have not vet Seto She titans: a eee partment “in well “catablished “Frederick 500-14 475-16 450-17 400-18
“Prices of next shipment will b ©00~4!-0. Teiiity to hanile corretpandenee aaueee
of next shipmen . oak Sasa 2 ee oe eo Pere ors qi : .
higher DENTURES: You can’t afford to throw [| U#!, Salary plus participation in profits 400/425-15 500-16 475-500-17 450-18
Why not call at your Gas Show away a Broken Denture today, our expe- expen Ani F o hee one
re BR Street TO- y ‘ > cper| i 4
reeure ane of these cooers, "* |{{ worst. Dental “Plate in ‘three hours, [Of Spain, ‘Trinidad, 90, 4.52—€n 525-15 525-16 525-550-17 525-18

——

WORKSHOP MANAGER-—Previous ex-
perience preferred. Sound mechanical
training or background essential. Apply

O Ri ENT AL PERSONAL itd PO. hak Me ade od an



Square Deal Dental Laboratory, Upper
Reed Street. 1 6.683



ee





550-15 550-16 600-17 550-18
600-15 575-16 700-17 400-19







O.A, remember Eddie from Trinidad , NOTICE -
December 1941, E.V.M 1,5.59—1n
‘ THE WEST INDIA i - oa
PALACE ca | pal EEE, — $0018 475(500-19
SE ee ee eneane NO’ that the
m t ‘ Transfer Books and Register of Members — -
HEADQUARTERS FOR ramsey oe ICE ves bt the. Alavemamed Cofipangy Will, be 650-16 450-21
SOUVENTKS As from the Mth to the 3ist May both |closed from the lst day of May 1952, to
FROM INDIA, CHINA & inclusive the Parochial Treasurer's |the 14th day of May, 1952 both days in
CEYLON Office, St. James will be opened on | elusive. mM

Saturdays only from 10 a.in. to 12 noon Ry Order of the Roars of Directors

’ P. H. TARILTON, R, LEACH
Parochial Treasurer, St. James Secretar»
1.6.52—3n |1.5.52—4n .

Pe. Wim. Hy. St. Diai 3466 pH SOFSGSINGSSSOSSODOGUT IISGOOSSIOSS SS GOS OFS GSS ©".

LIMITED STOCKS OF ABOVE SIZES





PLASTIC SHEETING : WILL BE SOLD AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
KANG SowTS” ChB A small but salalll ou seoienil :
ANNUAL DANCE CENTRAL EMPORIUM : ror & DAYS ony d
QUEENS PARK NoUSE Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. 3 j

on
SATURDAY NIGHT, May 3 1952

SUBSCRIPTION 2/-

THURSDAY, MAY lst
FRIDAY, MAY 2nd

Music by Perey Green's Orchestra




Refreshments on Sale,
13,4,52.—3n,



: Two (2) ASPINALL PANS ;

One (1) 1650 sq. ft. TRIPLE EVAPORATOR

| May Day Celebra tions complete with Vacuum and Tower Pumps 3,600.00
(




a

Ten (10) GALVANISED STEEL
PUBLIC MEETING AND —













each 150.00
eee oo primer ; One (1) New Fictcher Centre Feed MUD PRESS « SA | [ J R I A Y ’ MI A Y 3rd
Union =e 36 Chambers 30” square oo... ccc 2,000.00 i
eT Eerats One (1) CENTRIFUGAL ENGINE 12” x 24” '
in ama i. (Fletcher) ...... ab 600.00
On THU » Ist MAY, One (1) Set STEEL GEARINGS suitable for 48” Mill 1,000.00 i CASH ONLY
Tiss ts ae One (1) COOLING TOWER . 600.00 : f A
The Dembneteation March One thousand (1,000) ft. 7” CAST IRON PIPE—per th 10
will leave the Union’s Head- One (1) Lot aoe Iron Flangéd GUTTERING
Pig enn ong || Rear srry gaa
mm, E d e NE complete with
Sih Beotae as Acree ECKSTEIN BROS. — bay steer.
ae ply eee One (1) MULTITUBULAR BORER = 1a” .,Net 200.00
Mr. G. H. , Mr. F. L. ee ES 4” x 14 NE coli
debt: Beco em Jong — each ooo. "i 12.90 PHO S 4269 3372







Barbados Labour Party and Two (2) 26” x 44” New MILL ROLLS each ........... 400.00
the Executive Council. 29.4.52.—6n.

ASF EFT LDDA:











i i i i a i a a |





PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sq ADVOGATE

IS
Geese a8 SS Cee





Thursday, May 1, 1952

MAY

This is the merry month of May, the
month in which the government has prom-
ised to submit its five-year programme of
capital expenditure. If Barbados were
governed by the Governor instead of by
the Governor-in-Executive Committee
there would be little doubt what the pro-
gramme would be,

Priority would be given to the construc-
tion of a deep water harbour.

More assistance would be given by
Government to develop the tourist trade.

_ Secondary industries would be encour-
aged.

And assistance would be given to small-
holders: to grow more food and to keep
livestock.

All of these points with the exception
of the first were listed by His Excellency
at the opening of the legislature on 18th
December, 1951. More than five months
have passed since the Governor expressed
the hope that the proposal for the deep
water harbour would be examined by “all
branches of the Legislature early in the
New Year so that a definite decision can
be taken one way or the other without
further delay.”

The year is fast approaching the close
of its first six months and no decision has
yet been taken.

A proposal has been put forward by gov-
ernment by which the Sugar producers
would be asked to contribute the greater
part of an annual recurring expenditure
of some million dollars but no details have
been given to the public. No doubt they
will be told this month,

The “Yes” or “No” which must be given
with regard to the deep water harbour
affects every decision involved in the
economic development of Barbados. To
delay that answer further than this month
is not in the interests of the community.

With regard to assisting smallholders to
grow more food and to keep livestock the
government has shown itself ready and
willing to assist but does not appear to
have decided yet how best that assistance
ean be given,

Six agricultural stations in the island
are being used as “guinea-pig” experi-
ments to discover what size of holdings
and what types of vegetables and live-
stock can most profitably be exploited by
the smallholddrs. Unfortunately two
factors operate against their success: the
government’s rigid control of local food
prices and the absence of market garden-





| MANY years ago I saw and
|heard the late Lord Birkenhead
‘address the late Lord Parmoor.
|Things do not advance much, for
I have never since seen or heard
anything better.

Parmoor, father of Sir Stafford
Cripps, was then the Socialis‘
leader in Opposition in the Lords.
Birkenhead, speaking for the Tory
Government, suddenly paused to
contemplate the white-haired
fresh-faced figure before him.

At last, with all the air of a new
dawning d.scovery, he cried: “Iz
this Sir Alfred Cripps?”

Now Sir Alfred Cripps, before
becoming a noble Socialist, was a
valiant Tory and tariff reformer.
Tears sprang to his aged eyes
under the Birkenhead lash. He
turned his seraphic countenance
hither and thither, seeming to ask:
“Won’t someone stop him beat-

ing me ?”
Probity

A reverse change occurred in
the second generation of political
Crippses. The revolutionary Sir
Stafford of younger days became
the later fount of financial prob-
ity .

Contemplating him as Chancel-
lor of the Exchequer before illness
struck him down overnight, T
often said to myself: “Is this Sir
Stafford C.ipps ?”

Was tais he who once rang
Buckingnam Palace’s doorbell and
Tan away?

Vy hat I mean is that he said in
1934 that if his party came to
power it would have to overcome
opposition from Buckinham Pal-
ace. But he dropped this line at
once when challenged.

Was this Sir Stafford who, in
1937 said that the British working
man would be as well off if his
boss was the Boche?



Persuasion

In the House of Commons in
1948, and at the Trade Union Con-
gress at Margate, he preached the
doctrine that a rise in wages is a
bad thing unless production goes
up.
How does a bus driver, as an
example, increase his output ?
Does he drive two or more buses
tandem. like a loom-minder mind-
ing more looms ?

Large numbers of workers can-
not increase their output. For
them the stony path was laid
down of making a fixed wage
meet rising costs of living.

Cripps preached his wage
restraint astonishingly held, the
trade unions movement largely
to it. He persuaded even the
General Council of the T.U.C.
to issue wage-freeze commenda-
tions all by the strength of his
ego and his known personal fru-
gality.

He wore himself to extremity
for his country in war. He
flailed the failing body in peace
to win the Battle of Dollar Gap.

Was this Sir Stafford Cripps
who was near pacifist in 1937,
who urged ordnance factory
workers to down tools if war
came, since war served only
capitalist interests ?

The Cousin...

When, in the late forties, it was *

heresy to doubt his high prin-
ciples, I was ill-qualified for the
role of hero-worshipper.

The Socialists three him out
when he was a violent Social-
ist restored him when he

later became a_ respectable
One .Zt.

By WILLIAM BARKLEY

At one of his pre-war Bristol
elections I fell in with a lively
girl cousin of Cripps. “Canvass-
ing for Sir Stafford?” 1 inquired

She brusquely retorted that
she was canvassing against him,
and that in her view he was
standing for the party which
offered him the best hopes of
political advancement.

I reported to Sir Stafford. He
struck a damaged and indignan:

The Wonan———
=
My His Side
HE was Sir Stafford
Cripps’s night murse
during the anxious 2!
months, on and off, at the
Bircher Benner clinic at
Zurich. .. .

During the day she met his
callers, answered his letters,
arranged his flowers. . .

Now she is free to go
back to their home in the
Gloucestershire hills, the
home she has seen only
rarely recently.



LADY

CRIPPS

attitude and thrusting his hand

in his pocket pulled out some

quite small pieces of paper.
“Look at the briefs I refuse

every day in my work for the
party !" he exclaimed.

I held out my hand to take
them and he at once thrust them
—briefs, mark you — into his
waistcoat pocket.

I asked him: “Do you think I

fell off a gooseberry bush ?”

And that was all the talk. The
next thing I knew four large
dockers had deposited me, auite
gently on the pavement outside.
But I was left with the thought
that a certain amount of dram-
atie make-belief is necessary to
the successful politician.

Puzzles...

Was this Sir Stafford Cripps who
rallied his party for a time, and
much of the nation, to high moral
seriousness and offered it leader-
ship on a stony road?

Yes it was. Indeed it was all
the time the same Sir Stafford,
the same who wanted to liqui-
date the Empire before the war

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

What Made Sir Stafford
Turn Round On Himself? |

and saw the dollar gap closed |
after the war by~ produce of the)
smaller Empire countries. |

Contradicti gpuzzies,enigma. |
What made — turn |
round on h :

Well, first, hé”™ grew up. The

immensely suc@essful K.C.,
deeply read in law and shallowly
read in other gaids, was in poli-|
tics a mere t at 50. Then
there were o sons.

2. PATRIOTISM. To find his
country under menace from Hit-
ler was something different from
imagined theories. In 1939 he
threw up all briefs and offered his
services for victory.

3. THE FUN of power. Mr.
Mont Follick, the effervescent
M.P. for Loughborough, once
asked Lloyd George why he made!
such a blunder as to stay in
politics when he coulq have be-
come an elder statesman in 1918.

Lloyd George tickled the palm
of his hand and replied: “The
itch for power,”

It is no cynicism to say that a
politician is fired with a sense!
of his own usefulness and indis-|

pensability . a
4. RELIGIOUS... dedication..
Public life was saerificial to

Cripps, because his faith gave
him sublime self-confidence and
conviction of reetitude.

5. REPENTANCE. Maybe the
simple explanation of the change)
in Cripps was that he recognised |
the error of his earlier ways, but
with more than normal share of|
stiff-neckedness he believed that
he had always been of one mind.

Infidel

The final paradox of Cripps is
that when he became orthodox
anda respectable he was restored
to the Socialist Party, but he
wes a violent Socialist when he
was thrown out of it.

It was not merely for his views
that he was expelled. It was for
infidelity.

He was thrown out when he
advocated forming a common
front with all anti-Tories, for
this meant he had no faith that
the Socialists could ever win an
election by themselves,

That party will sooner tolerate
a rebel than an infidel. Con-
versely,, you will go far in the
party if you have faith in it and
no brains.

Bui, Still...

Cripps leaves a great name, al-
though he was a great failure. A
failure in Moscow, where in bit-
ter frustration, he spent time
moving the embassy furniture,
watching the Dynamos, visiting}
the Opera, talking law with
Vishinsky .

He was foolishly credited with
having done something to bring
Stalin on to our side. But the
credit there belong to Hitler.

He was a failure in his India
mission.

His policy in finance and
wages began to fail when he had
to devalue the sterling exchange |
against his judgment Success no-|
where accompanied him.

_ Yet one could at the same time
Getest Cripps for his policies and
respect him for his qualities. In|
public life respect is the highest
form of success,



MR. CHURCHILL'S IS

A REVOLUTIONARY |

GOVERNMENT

By CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS M.P.

LONDON,

It is Mr. Churchill who is the real revol-
utionary leader in British politics.
Traditionally, the leader of the largest
party in the House of Commons is called
upon by the Sovereign to form a Govern-
ment, which he creates from amongst Mem-
bers of Parliament of his own party. And,
in recent times, by far the greater number
of the Ministers and Under-Secretaries have
been Members of the House of Commons.
They have been Members, too, who have
served for some years on the back benches
of the House, who have earned from ex-
perience a right to promotion to the Front
Bench.

A few Ministers and Under-Secretaries
have always been Members of the House of
Lords, but these Lords have been traditionally
men who have given their lives to politics.
They either sat in the House of Commons
before they became peers, or for many years,
took an active part in the party battles of
ihe House of Lords. The Government was
in fact formed of professional politicians, al-
though times of war provided exceptions.

However, Mr. Churchill, though a Con-
servative, is a man less wedded to constitu-
tional precedent and party allegiance than
Mr. Attlee and other Prime Ministers of the
past.
In forming his Government, Mr. Churchill
followed a boldly revolutionary pattern.

Of his leading Ministers, only two—Mr.
Butler, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and
Mr. Eden, the Foreign Secretary—are party
politicians of the traditional type.

Of other Ministers in the House of Com-
mons, two of the most important—Mr. Lyt-

Sir Walter Monckton, the Minister of Labour

Government,

Of the rest, the most important Ministers—
Lord Salisbury, Lord Leathers, Lord Alexan-

der, Lord Cherwell, Lord Woolton, and until

House of Lords.
Of these, Lord Salisbury, the leader of the

dition given his life to politics, first in the
Commons and then in the Lords. But the rest

telton, the Secretary for the Colonies, and

—are not men who have served the customary
apprenticeship on the back-bench. They were
brought into Parliament from other walks of
life outside politics and put straight into the
recently Lord Ismay—are Members of the

House of Lords, has in accordance with tra-

have no poiltical career behind them, nor any

lctemeetieeeatimael



—_——
|

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

KING GEORGE VI







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long-standing public connection with the
Conservative Party. They have never in their
lives been elected to any office. Nor do they ||
now head any of the traditional departments
of state. They have been given newly created

; Si —LE.S.
ers co-operatives and distributing agen- e
cies,

The government’s reluctance to assist

loeal food production by removal of con-






FOR CAR & MOTOR BUS”
They Brighten — and Lighten
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LEATHERETTE SEAT COVER



Nay Nay N ye! Say Some Old Welsh



trols on prices is influenced perhaps by
its success in increasing customs revenues
and limiting importers’ profits on import-
ed foods,

This obsession on the part of govern-
ment has led to a policy of subsidising
carbohydrates such as rice at a time when
the growth locally of yams, potatoes and
eddoes have almost ceased because the
control price gives no incentive to the
grower to produce or distribute.

Excellent refrigeration facilities for
vegetables and fish exist and can be ex-
tended at the Barbados Ice Company
where most of the island’s imported meat
is now stored, but no approach by the
government seems yet to have been made
to this very efficient organisation which
has served the island well for fifty years,

Instead the government is bewildered,
by the conflicting advice it receives from
many quarters.

Meanwhile in recent years valuable
crops of tomatoes, carrots and_ string
beans have been cestroyed on the gov-
ernment agricultural stations and the list
of private individuals whose efforts to
make market gardening pay have ended
in failure is growing.

The answer for market gardening and
fish is to be found at the Barbados Ice
Company.

The establishment of a Central Milk
Depot so dear to the heart of the Govern-
cr is mysteriously delayed although full
agreement has been reached.

A central creamery is not only a neces-
‘sity in itself but the effect it will have fh
encouraging the keeping of livestock

locally cannot be exaggerated. ’

Until the central milk depot is estab-
lished the keeping of livestock cannot be
“increased.

Meanwhile the Government might well
reconsider whether the temporary subsid-
isation of animal feed might not be of
greater permanent value to the commun-
ity than the subsidisation of biscuit flour,
rice and sugar, A much greater encour-
agement of local food production is ex-
pected from the government.

With regard to tourism the value of
this industry to the island is perennial
and ean only be exhausted by stupidity.
So far the government has shown itself
over-hesitant in encouraging an industry
which after sugar is our greatest asset.
This month may see a much needed
change of heart.

ABERTILLERY.

In Wales. the land of his boy-
hood, they are saying with some
amusement that Mr. Aneurin
Bevan's mer ories of\his early life
must have slipped.

Telling in his recently published
book the stury of the hardships of
his youth and his first revolts
against, them, he describes an
episode when unemployed miners
marched on = the workhouse at
Tredegar where the guardians
were meeting, He writes: —

“They marched from Trede-
gar. Ebbw Vale, Nantyglo and

Blaina, and Tt marched with

them, for I was one of the

leaders, And we locked the
guardians in for two days and
nights.”

Challenged
In the local newspaper, the
South Wales Gazette, two men,
who took a prominent part in that
incident, strongly challenged Mr.
Bevan’s story.

Mr. Jack Jones a miner, of
Gwernberthi-road, Cwnmtillery,
says: “The guardififtswere not

locked in for two ‘days and nights
but for one night only.

“Furthermore, Bevan was not
on that demonstration. He was
not unemployed at that time but
was working as a check-weigher
at Ty Trist colliery

“Passing the workhouse on. his
way home from work, he called in
and began to lecture us for lock-
ing the guardians in. So we de-
cided to lock him in with them,
at which he expressed further re-
sentment”

Our Readers Say:

The Stuff of History

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—-I have followed Mr, F. A,
Hoyos’ article in your Saturday’s
issue and found it very enlighten-
ing indeed ta the reading public;
but there are just a few points
which I should like to mention,
which I thi need mentioning
that were le out, and = surely
need recording,

A portion of the article states:
“Space has been found for Charles
Duncan Oneale, the founder of
the Modern Democratic Move-
ment, and this brings us logically
to Grantly Adams who is the only
representative of the living to be
included in the services.”

I think, Sir, if Mr. Hoyos is
touching on the point of Dr.
Oneale’s Modern Democratic
movement, he will have to go
very far. back to let the public
really understand the sense of the
Doctor’s movement as there is a
lot attached to it.
| The history dates back as far as
Marcus Garvey; and the U.N.ILA.
which means the Universal Negro
Improvement Association, and the
many notable oharacters attached
to same, and brings us up to the
present as it stands now.

In conclusion, I beg to state therd





Friends

(By GWYN LEWIS)

Mr. James Minton, a
miner, of Brynteg-road,
says: “Bevan was not
march at all,

“It was not until 8 p.m. that he
arrived at the workhouse. The
year was 1923, and I can remem-=
ber it well.

How is the fight?

“Nye came into the grounds and
said: ‘Well, boys, how is the fight
going?” After about an hour he
said he was going home because
his mother would be wondering
where he was.

“I saw him later in the even-
ing, and he said: ‘Those two
loonies on the gate would not
let me out.’ He was so annoyed
that he got a biscuit tin and said
that if he was going to stay there
he would see ‘to it that none of
them, had amy sleep, and as soon
as he saw anyone dozing he would
bang the biscuit tin,”

former
Blaina,
on that

I saw both these men today.
Mr. Minton, who is 70, said: “I
have been obliged to refute Nye’s
version of the affair because I
have on a hundred political plat-
forms in Wales and England de-~
seribed the events at Tredegar
Workhouse,

“Tt was an affair in which he
had little part. He has been
careless with the truth in telling
his own life story. I was chair-



are many personalities alive now
who belonged to the Movement
and will know whether Mr.
Hoyos is right in his gleanings
or not, so they are looking for-
ward for the up to the momeni
history of the movement.
Yours,
L. B, CLARKE.

Tudor Bridge,

‘Jrish Habits”

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—One hesitates to criticize
the statements of The Great, but
from your account of the proceed-
ings at the Housing Board it would
appear that Mr. G, H, Adams is
under the impression that the
keeping of pigs in the kitchen is
an “Irish habit,”
Ancient legend tells us that he’s
got the pigs in the wrong room: —
An Irishman was showing an
Englishman over his house. It
consisted of two rooms—a kitch-
en which served as living-room
and a bedroom in which the
man of the house and his wife,
half-a-dozen children, dogs,
eats, hens and a pig slept.
“Dear me,” said the English-

man, “but where does the pig
sleep?”

“Arrah, he sleeps under the
bed.”

man of the committee that or-
ganised everything, so I should

know.”
‘Did not lead’
Mr. Jack Jones said:

“Tt was
a march of about 14 miles. Mr.
Bevan did not lead us. I, Jim

Minton, and other members of the
organising committee led the
marchers.

“I object to him giving himself
a boost in his book without regard
to the full truth of the part he
played or did not play.”

Mr. Moses Williams, now 79,
one of the locked-up guardians,
said to me: “I remember Mr.
Bevan coming into the workhouse
and making a speech. But he
most certainly was not responsi-
ble for our being locked up.”

Finally, I spoke to three veteran
miners who had taken part in the
march.

Three agree

They are Harry Plummer ,aged
77, of Part-street, Blaina; Michael
Carey, 79, of Shop-row, Blaina;
and John Jenkins, 68! of Corona-
tion-street, Blaina.

All three said they saw nothing
of Mr, Bevan on the march. |

Mr. William Bevan, Aneurin’s|
brother, said in an argument 1
heard in whatI was told was
Neye's favourite inn:— |

“It may be open to argument
that my brother literally took part
in the march. I think in fact he
was working that day. But I defy
anybody to say that he was not
heart and soul in the thick of the
fight and in the van of the wae:

—L.E.S.

“But—isn’t the—the smell—
very oppressive?”

“Yerrah what smell! We
can't be pampering him that
way. Suge he must put up with
it like thé rest of us!”

A minor inaccuracy, perhaps,
but the Irish are a touchy race,
and if Mr. Adams doesn't realize}
the awful risk he runs,let him take |
heed of the fate of England since;
Ireland permitted her to break)
away!

BS ali

27th April, 1951.
S.P.C.A. Vice-President

To The Editor, The Advocate, |

SIR,—In your excellent report
of the Annual General Meeting of |
the S.P.C.A, you state that Major
A. R. Foster was elected a Vice-
President. This is incorrect. |

T. B.

This honour was conferred on
Mrs. Jessie Forster of Coconut
Cottage, Hastings in recognition
of her generous gift of an Animal
Drinking Trough, and the sum of
six hundred and fifty dollars for
the building of a Dog Refuge. |

Yours faithfully, |

CECILE WALCOTT, |
Hon, Secretary (Acting) S.P.C.A.

the House of Commons.

entific research.

better than Under Secretaries.
ADVANTAGE

age that the men who make the policy are
not the men who answer for it.
It is too early yet for a final verdict, but it

in the modern state has created a most real
problem, but that neither Mr, Attlee nor Mr.
Churchill has yet found the solution for it.

Under Mr. Attlee’s system the Ministers
were so overworked that there was no oppor-
tunity for coherent planning. The Govern-
ment, as Sir Stafford Cripps confessed, was
driven “from expedient to expedient.” But
under Mr. Churchill’s system the House of
Commons is largely stultified, compelled to
direct its criticisms against 2 nominal Min-
ister, who everyone knows, is not really re-
sponsbile for the policy which he has to de-
fend. The architect of the policy, meanwhile,
remains inaccessible,

One result is inevitably to render a restive
House of Commons more restive still. An-
other result is that there is a dangerous lack
of contact between the Government on the
one hand and public opinion and the press on

| the other.

Policies—whether the recent increase in
London transport charges, the banishment of
Seretse Khama, or the textile crisis—burst
upon a public which had not been prepared
for them. Ministers, when challenged in the
House of Commons, hardly knew the reasons
for those policies themselves.

-There is general agreement that it was
faulty public rv; ations which were, more than
anything else, responsible for recent Con-
servative defeats in the County Council elec-
tions, And that this is a defeat which will have
to be remedied before Mr. Churchill’s con-



stitutional experiment can be carried er

te success,

positions of a general overlordship over the
Ministers of a number of the departments in

Lord Woolton is in charge of Food and
Agriculture, Lord Leathers of all the Trans-
port services, Lord Alexander, the general |
Minister of Defence, over all, the Service

departments ,and Lord Cherwell over all sci-

They are members of the Cabinet and, along
with Mr. Churchill, the creators of policy. The
nominal Ministers who have to answer for
the policy in the House of Commons are little

The new system has the advantage that the
creators of policy are freed from depart-
mental worries and from the strain of House
of Commons bickering, It has the disadvant-

is safe to say that the pressure of pasigeeey

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HURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN





BY CARL ANDERSON

HENRY ,

Kill those throbbing pains’ in
your muscies at once! Apply
Sloan's Liniment lightly—

erate

You don't rvb in “Sloan's” you dab it
on the affected part gently-~" Sloan’s””
does the rest ! Good for er
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joints too! 2



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YOU TRICKED \

ME ~- HENRY ! J




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The Complete Gardener Surfeit of Lampreys









BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

THAT'S RIGHT- AN’
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By W. E. SHEWELL-COOPER

No name is more widely
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worid, among both profes-
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Among the owners of small
gardens he has been best
known for his A.B.C. garden-
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and at last, with the assistance
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and 'Trees—Fruit—Vegetables
—Growing Under Glass—Gar-
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The first two parts cover all.
general considerations of soil,
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vegetables useful to the small
garden their care and main-
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Fully indexed, and with many
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by NGAIO MARSH

Surfeit of Lampreys, already
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The Observer

of black-and-white illustra-
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“With this book in his hand,
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ADVOCATE STATIONERY

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PAGE EIGHT

Thunderhead II Wins
2,000 Guineas

NEWMARKET, April 30.

THUNDERHEAD II, one of the best backed outsiders,

proved too strong for the

English three-year-olds to-day,

winning the Two Thousand Guineas. ,

Jockey Poincelet, drawn in the centre of the field,
always had Thunderhead favourably placed.

When they reached the top of the hill two furlongs
from home, he suddenly sent his mount to the front and
Thuriderhead had so much in hand that he won easily from
King’s Bench, another French horse, to give Peincelet his

first English Classic success

Thunderhead by Merry Boy out
of Hiradiade is trained by E, Pol-
let. Charlie Elliott five times win-
ner of the event had no doubt
about the result of the photo fin-
ish—the took the French Argur to
the enclosure rescrved for the third
finisher.

by

Agitator ridden champion

Jockey Gordon Richards started
9 to4 favourite and finished
fourth. Another French horse

Ararat the second was sixth.

Richards who said he led by one
and a half lengths at one time had
no excuses for Agitator’s failure.

Palpitate was badly left at the
start and finished last of the 26
runners.

A leading London book-maker
said Thunderhead’s win suited the
bookmakers but added that if
French horses win the remaining
Classics some punters will win
fortunes.” —U.P.

Carlton Draw
With Spartan

Carlton and Spartan played to
a goalless draw in their Second
Division football match at Queen's
Park yesterday afternoon. The
game was slow throughout and
both sides failed to make most of
the many chances they were
given,

In the first half of play the
Spartan players did most of the
pressing but when the forwards
got into the Carlton area they
just failed to score, On tw®
occasions Grant, centre forward
foy Spartan failed to make most
of rosy chances. Jemmott on the
left wing on receiving a pass from
Wilson cut in and when everyone
expected a goal, he kicked the
Wall well away from the Carlton
goal.
Carlton got in their stride
during the second half of play
but their forwards also failed to
seore, Cozier who was seen in
goal for Spartan was tested
twice and he saved. About two
minutes before the blow off
Hutchinson, ores unmarked ran
down alone to the Spartan area
and Cozier came out; but before
Cozier could intercept, Hutchin~
son in his hurry kicked the ball

ell over the cross bar of the

jpartan goal.

The Referee was Mr. O, Graham.

SUMMERHAYES
TENNIS RESULTS

Results of Summerhayes Lawn
Tennis Tournament :—
MEN'S DO

UBLES

Dr. A. 8. Cato and Col O. St.
A. Duke beat Capt. C. R. E.
Warner and J. L, Parris 6—4;
5—7; 6—3; 6—4.

MEN’S SINGLES

L. A. Harrison beat J. S, B.
Dear 6—3; 3—6; 6—4.

Dr. A. 8. Cato and Col. O. St.
A. Duke will meet E. R. Atkin-
son and D. A. Wiles for the Y.







De Lima Trophy on Friday,
May 9.
WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington : .01
in

Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.15 ins.
Highest Temperature : 87.5°F.
Lowest Temperature : 70.5°F.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.954; (3
p.m.) 29.876
. TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.41 a.m.
Sunset: 6.15 pm.
Moon : First Quarter, May 1
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 7.35 a.m., 9.54 p.m.
Low Tide : 1.04 a.m., 2.35 p.m.







WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.
Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry
— 1.00 p.m. p
Police Band at Annual Fair,
Country Road Manse — 3.00

p.m.
Football at Kensington—5.0¢

p-m.

Friendly Football at St. J-son-
ard’s — 5.00 p.m.

Extra Mural Youth Meeting,
British Council — 5,00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Bay Pasture,
St. Michael — 7.30 p.m













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} EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
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« &

TRYING To WAKE uP
JUNIOR To THE FACT



| THAT HE SHOULD WORK a

FOR A LIVING*s= |

THANX ANO A TP OF THE \=
HATLO HAT TO }
COUSIN GEORGE, ERIE, FA. |





4

NT ) |Z
CHANCE FOR ADVANCEMENT

IS MECHANICAL



Phadkar Is
‘Indian
Bedser’

By BRUCE HARRIS

The Indians, first cricketers to
‘nvade England by air as a side,
ure due to “open” on Cup Fina
ay, Saturday, May 3, at Worces-
er,

Why Worcester again? In recent
years the city has achieved a repu-
tation for,a cold wet greeting to
visiting sides, A change in the
first match might change the luck.

I well remember the arrival of
the 1946 Indian team at Worcester
at 3 a.m. on the freezing first
morning of their opening match.
They had left London late and
lost their way by road, They also
lost the match by 16 runs. No
wonder,

Let me be candid: If the In-
dians—and for that matter the
Englishmen, too—do not show
more “push” and “go” in the
tour than was displayed in the
recent one in India, interest in
them here will wane,

Our cricketing public “hopes
on hopes ever’; I am toid that
the covered grandstand seats at
Lord's have been fully booked for
the first three days of the Test
match beginning on June 19, Yet
there must be a limit to public
patience with dull cricket. ‘We
want to see both sides trying to
win, even at risk of losing,

Who are tthe visitors we most
desire to watch? The captain
V. S. Hazare, S. G. Shinde and
Cc. T. Sarwate toured England
in 1946. R. V. Divecha, the
off-spinner, played for Oxford
University and the Gentlemen
last season, Others are known
in our League cricket,

There is one “unknown’—24-
year-old Pankaj Roy, who is the
best young opening batsman In-
dia has developed for years.

He is stocky, with a sound
defence and an economically used
range of scoring strokes. His 387
Test aggregate against the MCC
—highest innings 140—was a re-
cord for an Indian,

Another to watch will be D, G.

India’s ‘as!

the balla sort of Indian

Like Bedser, he ean hit.
N Chowdhury may become the
centre of controversy when the
tour begins, He is a medium-
pace bowler, with a jerky action,
which may cause umpires ‘to
scratch their heads, Indian um-
pires have accepted him, Per-
haps ours will.

Watch vice-captain H. R. Adhi-
kari, not for his batting—though
that is adequate — but for his
fielding. This Army captain is

probably the best fieldsman in
the party, especially at cover-
point.

These and others are likely to
ive us quite a run.
bai India they took the Test
series to one win each and three
draws. But they were playing an
England “A” team — no Hutton,
no Compton, no Bedser, no May.
It will shatter our belief that
our cricket is. on the mend if
they beat us on the faster
wickets and in the colder con-
ditions of an English season,
We ought to win. More impor-
tant is it to win attractively rather
than drearily.



Sports Window

Carlton and Everton meet
this afternoon at Kensington
in a First Round Knockout
fixture. Since the inclusion of
Blades in the last Everton
match «ne Mason Hall Street
team have presented a more
formidabie opposition.

Qn the owner hand, Carlton
in their last fixture in which
they held Notre Dame to a
draw were impressive. The
game should therefore be an
interesting one.



Time

|
s
S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

me ar) Ee ge Ge







EXTREME LEFT is Edwin Rogers as a 16-year-old boy (115 Ibs.) before he started weightlifting.

Second from iefi after training for a year and a half.
20 years of age, 180 Ibs., and champion lifter in his division.
Body Building in the Sunday “Advocate.”

Turpin Meets
Robinson Socially
June At White City

(By GEORGE WHITING)

RAY ROBINSON is to meet Randolph Turpin at the
White City on June 10. Fortunately for Robinson, but
unfortunately for Turpin and us, the meeting will only be
social.

Robinson, who retained his world middle-weight title
against Rocky Graziano in Chicago recently, sails for
Europe on May 24, and has promised to be on view ina
ringside seat when Turpin goes after Don Cockell’s cruiser-

weight title on June 10.
demanded a lot more money—

Will Robinson’s arrival here just as he is now.
have any significance in the nego- For not even the I.B.C. would
tiations to match him in a third have the nerve to insist on
world title fight with Turpin? another return fight clause in the

Optimist Jack Solomons says event of Robinson and Turpin
yes. Personally, I cannot se€ going into action a third time.
where Solomons is going to find It is this state of affairs that
enough money to console Robin- makes one a little doubtful of
son for the good hiding Turpin Sugar Ray even again exposing
would probably give him, or for himself to the steam-hammer

the absence of Sugar Ray’s fist of “Licker” from Leamington
favourite protection—another “re= Spa,
turn fight” clause. —L.ES.



A Monopoly
One of these days boxing’s Soccer Amateurs To
rulers in the U.S.A. will Oras ;
get down to this “return fig p
ne nee they do, — rs Tour F ar East
be within reach of easing e
sport’s biggest headache—the uni- (By DENNIS HART)
versal control of world champi- LONDON
‘onships. A party of sixteen amateur foot-
Until now, with the powerful ballers are due to leave London
New York Athletic Commission on May 4th on the first leg of a
forbidden by State laws to com- journey that will take them half-
bine or affiliate with other bodies, way round the globe and back in
the settlement of world cham- just 20 days. They are the mem~-
pionships has become almost a bers of the Athenian League re-
monopoly of the International presentative side who have ar-
Boxing Club of New York. ranged to play three games in
Hong Kong aad three more in
They tie up promising talent Singapore before returning on
on cast-iron quptracts, pick whom May 24th.
the like as challengers, an ee *
insist on their champion being Because of Britain's Olympic
protected by “return fight” clauses as commitments it will not be
when they defend their world the strongest possible Athenian
side but it is still a formidable

titles. ;
ese safeguards are undoubt- combi! containing two cur-
oar good pase. but, in the "ent Internationals.

They are Roy Stroud (Hendon)
centre-f and Denis Kelle-

absence of world control, they
freeze Of jer (Barnet) inside-left.

put boxing in a deep
frustration.
' é he to 8 as
Still, the light seems gradually , Tadeo reg by
to be drawing.’ Robert Christen- jrendon F.C. to Hong Kong and
bury, new-broom chairman ofthe yanila last year. Hendon proved
New York Commission, has been very popular visitors and the Hong

invited to the Brussels conference Kong F.A their mage.
: A. asked their Secretary
of the European Boxing Union gitan Greene if he thought another

from May 23-26. tour could be arranged, if sible
If he accepts, he will hear first- against a renusdarnenye “ide.

hand just why we on this side of
the Atlantic feels that “return] When Mr, Greene returned to
fight” clauses are a bane and a]England he immediately sounded
blight on world championship|the Athenian League Committee
boxing. who readily agreed to send a re-
The European rule reads:|presentative team.

“Boxing either title holders or

challengers, who are to contest a K
championship title, are forbidden st
to guarantee in contracts relating 1
to such title contests a_ return
match in the event of the title
changing hands. Any clause of
this nature occurring in contracts
shall be declared null and void.”

A request was made by tihe Hon,
ong F.A. that the tour shoul
art before May, as when Hen-=
on were out east last year one
of their games was rained off dur-
ng the monsoon season, But
Athenian League Secretary War-
ren pointed out that fixtures had
‘o be completed and with so many

‘lubs engaged in the Amateur Cw
Precaution is well as other competitions this
Had such a_ regulation been sould not be done,

enforced in the U.S.A, they would
have been spared that feather-
weight title “serial” that finished
up in an undignified brawl _be-
tween Sandy, Saddler and Willie
Pep. They would also have
avoided the recent backstage
arguments on the heavy-weight
problems of Jersey Joe Walcott

and Ezzard Charles. ; % her (Barmet), R. Stroud (Hendon
And Randolph Turpin might}@, parker, J. Sorensen {Southall}

now be middle-weight champion
3k tha Work. bo z Bennett (Wealdstone) for-

To Ray Robinson, and the
International Boxing Club, to
whom he was and is on contract,
it was no more than a normal ]|
business precaution to insist on a};
“return match” safeguard when |!
he signed for the title fight he||
lost so sensationally to in |)
here last July. % |

Without that protective clause],
Robinson would undoubtedly have |)

}
{
|
|

The full team is E. Bennett
(Southall) goalkeeper; G. McGhee
and R, Gadstone (Wealdstone) and
©. Harvey (Southall) full-backs;
J. Gerrans (Barnet), C. W
(Southall), D, Stoker (Sutton) G,
4. Battie (Southall) and W. Fish-
er (Hendon) half-backs; T. Fruin,
J. Taylor (Wealdstone), D. Kelle.



ny tern aaa oe pies soins

Other pictures show Rogers as he is today,
Read his articles on Weightlifting and




































line, under the cross-bar and
between two goalposts
and yet score a goal?
3. RACING
What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap

Race ?
4. WATER-POLO
Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom fer the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
Table Tennis

Sports Quiz
addressed “Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
aid must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10. The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set out below.

SPORTS QUIZ

Sb oales we hele ate hee ele Baa |
Uranium Rush
Starts In Manitoba

OTTAWA.
* Prospectors with dog teams are
rushing into Wekusko, lake area
of Northern Manitoba about 50
miles north-east of The Pas,
where qa uranium strike has been
made,

The Pas is 350 miles north-
west of Winnipeg near the Sas-
katchewan border.

Early reports indicate the find
may be one of the most im-
portant yet in Canada. More than
$850 claims have been filed on
rocky land.

Copper and nickel deposits
have also been found in the same
area, according to assay reports.

The new uranium area runs
along the Wekusko Lake.

Rich pitchblende has_ been
found in three separate locations,

If the field materialises, Can-
ada will have three major sources
of uranium. The other two, al-
ready in production and supply-
ing most of the uranium now be-
ing used by United States and
Canadian atomic plants, are at
Great Bear Lake north of Edmon-





ton, Alberta, and in Northern
Saskatchewan around Beaver-
lodge, where a new settlement

called Uranium City is
built in the spring.

to be







+ Schiphol

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952



Manchester
Beat Arsenal

‘From Our Gwa © it)

LONDON, April 26.
For once in a while the spot-
light is off the First Division.
With Manchester United beating
Arsenal and Fulham taking Hud-
- dersfield into the Second Division
with them by their 1—0 victory
at Craven Cottage, ce! ip
been

and relegation issues have
decided,

But what a tussle there is in
Division two for the right to join
Sheffield Wednesday in the pro-
motion gallery. Birmingham have
finished their programme with
51 points and.are second, But if
Cardiff City beat Leeds United
at Ninian Park next week the
Welsh club will top them on goal

average.
Birmingham beat Luton 3—1
and but for the brilliant
display of international goal-
keeper Streten would have won

even more convincingly.

ard Changed
There was at excitement on
the ground en at it

was shown on the scoreboard
that Cardiff were losing 3—2 to
Bury. But cheers changed to
groans when the scoreboard al-
tered to Cardiff winning 2-—0.
They eventually won i
Coventry’s last hope of retain-
ing her status faded when they
lost 3—) to Leeds.

The Manchester - United — Ar-
senal clash at Old Trafford which
two weeks ago was being hailed
as the match of the century
turned out to be the anti-climax
of the century. United with the
championship assured unless they
lost 7—0 crowded on all sail and
against the Arsenal team which
finished with only nine men—
Shaw and Roper went off with
injuries—won as_ they pleased.
Rowley got the hat-trick, Pear-
son 2 and young, outsi left
Byrne the other. The Arsenal
goal came from outside right Cox,

Commenting after the match
on his team’s cup chances against
Newcastle next week Arsenal
Manager Tom Whittaker said we
shall try really hard-“if we've
enougt players to put on the

eld.”

Arsenal injuries list now reads
Logie Lishman, Roper, Shaw and
Daniel.

Newcastle came through their
League match injury-free and

none played a bigger part, in the
6—1 triumph over Villa than
reserve inside |forward Hannah

and Davies. Only problem for
Director-Manager Stan Seymour

is whether he shall drop these}:

two for Robledo and Foulkes who
are first team re; .
_ A last minute goal by reserve
inside forward Dennis Hall gave
Walthamstow victory over
ton after extra time in the F.A.
Amateur Cup at Wembley.



From Shakespeare

To Aeronautics

AMSTERDAM,
_A lot of talking goes on in the
Link Trainer department
Airport, Amsterdam,
mainly via the microphones at the
Control Desks. On entering the
building one does not notice much
of this talking. for it is drowned
by the buzzing of the small mock-
up aircraft, which are sometimes
disrespectfully, but most appro-
priately, referred to as “drunken
chickens”.

Mr. Edward G, Walton, head of
the Link Trainer Department, does
a great deal of this talking himself
from time to time. And ean he
talk! When Mr. Walton picks up
the microphone and starts giving
landing instructions, the French
air traffic controller, who has to
speak English, in aceordance with
international regulations, is imi-
tated with just as much skill as
his American colleague, while the
accent of the English controller
ean be reco immediately,
once Mr, Walton has cleared his
throat, This is important for the
the pilots, because it means that
they will not have any difficulty
in understanding the instructions
from the Control Tower when they
actually land at airflelds in France,
Great Britain or the United States,
Mr. Walton’s marvellous imita-
tions are no accident, for he has
done a lot of acting. He was born
at Warwick, in the English Mid-
lands, and went to school there.
The school at Warwiek is famous
for its annual Shakespearean per-
formances, and at the early age of
14, Mr. Walton made his first ap-
pearance on the stage, as the Duke
of York in “Richard II”, That was









only an amateur preJuction but he
soon became a professional actor,
making his debut on “The Devil's

i ”. Mr. Walton still shud-
ders when he thinks of the double
role that he played in “Mr. Whu”,
a which was performed twice
nightly, with the result that he
had to make fast and frequent
changes in his make-up every eve-
ning. Mr. Walton has also appear-
ed ina film, as a_ naval officer
in “The Middle Watch.” The
stage has always remained his
first love, though in the course of
time he switehed over to the Link
Trainers which he now supervises
daily like a stage manager, and
occasionally he still stands before
the footlights.

NEW BEAT OLD
Foundation Boys defeated Foun-
dztion Old Boys 2—0 in a 3rd
Division football fixture played at
Foundation yesterday.



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BUILDING

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Fish Farming

The Government issued a state-
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that its policy was to look towards
fish-farmning to supply the island
fish requirements in the future
The statement came as the price
ef codfish, imported from New-
foundiand, took its third two cents
jump in six months, “because of
circumstances beyond our control,
the Government said.

“It is unlikely,” the statement
read,” that considerable supply of
local fish will be available for at
least 12 months, but thereafter,. if
progress continues on present lings,
there is every reason to hope that
the supply situation will steadily
Considerable interest

improve '
being shown by local concerns in
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it is anticipated that the con sumer

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when this fish is available.



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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE l"l It BARBADOS ADVOCATE Till RSD \\ MAY I. 152 BARBADOS MAlMXittE e. .1 T 1 II,,,,. ,l.i.. Mu> I IS.-.2 MAY This is the merry month of May, the month in which the Kovemment has promised lo submit its live-year programme of capital expenditure. If Barbados were governed by the Governor instead of by the Governor-'n-Executive Committee there would be little doubt what the programme would be. Priority would be given to the construction of a deep water harbour, More assistance would be given by Government to develop the tourist trade. Secondary industries would be encouraged. And assistance would be given to smallholders to grow more food and to keep livestock. AM of these points with the exception of the first were listed by His Excellency at the opening of the legislature on 18th December, 1951. More than five months have passed since the Governor expressed the hope that the proposal for the deep water harbour would be examined by "all branches of the Legislature early in the New Year so that a delinite decision can be taken one way or the other without further delay." The year is fast approaching the close of Its first six months and no decision has yet been taken. A proposal has been put forward by government by which the Sugar producers would be asked to contribute the greater part of an annual recurring expenditure of some million dollars but no details have been given to the public. No doubt they will be told this month. The "Yes" or "No" which must be given with regard to the deep water harbour affects every decision involved in the economic development of Barbados. To delay that answer further than this month is not in the interests of the community. With regard to assisting smallholders to grow more food and to keep livestock the government has shown itself ready and willing to assist but does not appear to have decided yet how best that assistance can be given. Six agricultural stations in the island are being used as "guinea-pig" experiments to discover what size of holdings and what types of vegetables and livestock can most profitably be exploited by the smallholders. Unfortunately two factors operate against their success: the government's rigid control of local food prices and the absence of market gardeners co-operatives and distributing agencies. The government's reluctance to assist local food production by removal of controls on prices is influenced perhaps by its success in increasing customs revenues and limiting importers' profits on imported foods. This obsession on the part of government has led to a policy of subsidising carbohydrates such as rice at a time when the growth locally of yams, potatoes and eddoes have almost ceased because the control price gives no incentive to the grower to produce or distribute. Excellent refrigeration facilities for vegetables and lish exist and can be extended at the Barbados Ice Company where most of the island's imported meat is now stored, but no approach by the government seems yet to have been made to this very efficient organisation which has served the island well for fifty years. Instead the government is bewildered by the conflicting advice It receives from many quarters. Meanwhile in recent years valuable crops of tomatoes, carrots and string beans have been destroyed on the government agricultural stations and the list of private individuals whose efforts to make market gardening pay have ended in failure is growing. The answer for market gardening and fish is to be found at the Barbados Ice Company. The establishment of a Central Milk Depot so dear to the heart of the Governor is mysteriously delayed although full agreement has been reached. A central creamery is not only a necessity in itself but the effect it will have in encouraging the keeping of livestock locally cannot be exaggerated. Until the central milk depot is established the keeping of livestock cannot be increased. Meanwhile the Government might well reconsider whether the temporary subsidisation of animal feed might not be of greater permanent value to the community than the subsidisation of biscuit fioui. rice and sugar. A much greater encouragement of local food production is expected from the government. With regard to tourism the value of this industry to the island is perennial and can only be exhausted by stupidity. So far the government has shown itself over-hesilant in encoui;u;ing an industry which after sugar is our greatest asset. This month may see a much needed change ol heart. WIIMI MadV Sir SIU.IOKI Turn Hound On llims< II? MANY years ago I saw and heard the late Lord Birkonhead address the laic Lord Parmoor. Thinns do not advance much, lor I have never since seen or heard anvthjng better Parmoor, father of S.r Stafford leader in Opposition in the Lords liirkenhead. speaking for the Tory Government, suddenly paused to contemplate the white-haired frc-.h-f.,red figure befoi. At last, with all the air o( a new dawning d icovery. he cried "fj this Sir AUred Cnpps*" Now Sir Alfred Cnpps, before becoming a noble Socialist, was a valiant Tory and tariff reformer. Tears sprang to his aged eyes Liider the Birkmhcad butt. He turned his seraphic countenance hither and thither, seeming to ask "Won't someone stop him beatis me V Probity A reverse change occurred in the second generation of political Crippses. The revolutionary Sir Stafford of younger days became the later fount of financial probContemplating him as Chancellor of the Exchequer before illc i struck h power it would have to overcome opposition frnin Bucklnham Palace. But he dropped this line at onre when challenged. Was this Sir Stafford who. in IM7 said that the British workinman would be as well off if hi* boat was the Boche ? Persuasion In the House of Commons in 1948. and at the Trade Union Congress at Margate, he preached the that a rise in wages Is a had thing UOaBM production goc* up. How does a bus driver, as an example, increase his output ? Does he drive two or more buses tandem, like n loom-minder mindThr Socialists three him ou t I wa* a rtolcnt -< .lorcd hbii when he hUrr b C —M rerprctabh Bv WILLIAM B4RKI.IV At one of his pre-*., elections I fell in with a lively girl cousin of Cnpps. "Canvassing for Sir Stafford"" I inquired She brusquely ret":' she was canvassing against him. and that in her view he was standing for the party which offered him the best hopes of political advancement. I reported to Sir Stafford. H> struck a damaged and indlgnan: I in W'r,-.III HV II b Sil S HE was Sir Staff ord CrlppV* night nurse during the anxlee* ? %  month*, or. and off at the Rlrrher Benner clinic at Zurich During the day she met his callers, answered his letter*, arranged his flowers Now she is free to go hack to their home In the <.lureterhlre hills, the home she haa seen onI> rarely rerrntl* . ii m | In Large numbers of workers cannot increase their output. For them the stony path was laid down of making a fixed wage meet rising costs of living. Crlpps preached his wage restraint astonishingly held, the tradM union movement largely to It. He persuaded even the General Council of the T.U.C. to issue wage-freeze commendations all by the strength of hi* ego nd his known personal fiugality. He wore himself to extrennly for his country in war. He Halted the failing body in H .,.-, %  lo win the Battle of Dollar Gap. Was this Sir Stafford Crlpps who was near pacifist In 1937, who urged ordnance factory workers to down tools if war came, since war served only capitalist interests ? The Cousin . When, in (he lale forties, it mi heresy to doubt his high principles. I was ilf-qualilled fur UM role of liero-wor&hlppcr. atliludc and thrusting in his pocket pulled out some quite small pieces of paper "Look at the briefs 1 refuse every day tn my work for the party I" he exclaimed. I MM out my hand them and he at once thrust them —briefs, mark you — into hi* (>ockc t I asked him : "Do you think I fell off a gooseberry bush 7" And thru was all the talk. The next thing I knew four large dockets had dei>osited me. ouite gently on the pavement outside. Hut I was lift with the thought that a certain amount of dramatic, make-belief i* necessary to the successful politU.an Puzzles . Was this Sir Stafford Cripps who rallied his party for a time, and much %  >[ the naUon. to high moral seriousness and offered it leadership on a stony road ? Ye it was. Indeed it was all the time the same Sir Staff.,: I, the some who wanted to liquidate the Empire before the war %  he dollar gap closed after the war by produce "I id" smaller Empire eeajnti Contradiction*. Atu/Ues.enigmj. What made aWJstalTord turn round on himsck ? Well, first. h**itrew up. The immensely lurrfliful K.C i ..d in law *nd shaUowlj read in other MUs, was in poll, tics a mare ad.*ent at 50. Then there were other"reasons. . PATRIOTISM To find his; country under menace from Hit1 ler was something different from imagined theories. In 1939 he threw up all briefs and offered hi* services for vletoiv. 3 THE FUN or power. Mr Mont Folhck, the effervescent M P for Loughborough. once asked Lloyd George why he made' such a blunder as to stay in politics when he could have become an elder statesman in 1918. GsMTai tickled llwpalm of his hand and replied "The itch for power.' It Is no cynicism to say that a politician is fired with a sense of his own usefulness and indls1 pcnsabllily. 4 RELIGIOUS dedication. Public life was sacrificial to Cnpps. because hifaith gave! him sublime srlf-confldtmce and' conviction oi reeiittide. 5 REPENTANCE Maybe th* simple explanation of the change in Cnpps was that he i the error of his %  with more than normal share of stiff-neckedness he believed that he had always been of one mind.i Infidel The final paradox of Cripps is that when he became orthodox an.; lUaina. and l morcflea u'ltli UMffl jor I was one ol the leaders. And IN locked the uiiardmtis m /or two days and Hi gll tf ." ( ll.lll: II i .1 In the local newspaper, the South Watea QOMUO, two men, Wio took a prominent pun m that meiden', strongly thallenged Mr. Ucvans story. Mr. Jin A Jones a miner, of (iwrri.lH-rlhi-r.tiut. Cwmtiller. says: "The giiardiMs* Vn. not locked in for two days and nights but for ono night onqr. "furthermore. Bcvan was not On that demonstration. He was not unemployed at tint I ivaa vv..iking as a check-weigher ii Ty Tn i colliery 'PiuariBg tho TrnrtrNmite on his jy home from work, no called In and began to lecture us for lockng (ihe guaidians in. So we de— 1 Ck him in with them. at which he expressed further resentment" -Friend* (By GWYN LEWIS) Mr. James Minton. a former miner, of Brynteg-road, Blaina, %  ays: "Bcvan was not on that march at all. "It wns not until 8 p.m. that ho nrrlved at the workhouse. The year was 1923, and I can remember It well. How is the fight? "Nye came into the grounds and •aid W.ll, boys, how is the fight going.'" After about an hour he stid he was going home because his mother would be wondering arbor* he was. "I saw him later m the evening, and he said: -Those twa I.-.me* on UM fate ould not let me out.' He was so annoyed that he got a biscuit tin and said thai if ho wai going to stay there he would see to it that none of then\ had any sleep, and as soon he saw anyone dozing he would bang the biscuit tin." I il-ith these men today, Mr. Minton, who u 70. said: "I have been obliged to refute Nye's Of the affair because X bi ve n .. II I...: political ptatWaloi and bgland deNil bed the events at i use. •It a II ,.u affair in which hehad little part. He has hceii an i< with the truth in telling his own life story. I was chairman of the committee that organised everything, so I should know." •Did not lead' Mr. Jack Jones said: "It was n march of about 14 miles. Mr. Bevsn did not lead us. I. Jim Minton. and other members of the organising committee led the marchers. "I object to him giving himself n boost in his book without regard to the full truth of the part he played or did not play Mr. MuseWilliam:., now 79 one of the lockrd-up guardians.' said to mc: "I remember Mr. Bevan eoming into the workhouse and making a speech. But he most certainly was not responsible for our being locked up." Finally, I spoke to three veteran miners who had taken part In the march. Three agree They are Harry Plummer ,agcd 77, of Part-street. Blaina; Michael Carey, 79. of Shop-row. Blaina; and John Jenkins, 681 of Coronation-street, UUina. All three .said they saw nothing of Mr. llevan in the march. Mr William Bcvan, Aneurln's brother, said in an argument I heard In what I was told was wuinte inn: — "It may be open to argument that my brother llterallv %  In the march. 1 think in tad he nig that day. But I defy anybody to say that tutu-art and soul in the thick of tlie fight and in the van of tinfr .-. —L.E.S. Our ll< ;nl is Kay: fit Staff n/ History To Tl„Frtifor. The Adrwratf, SIR,—I have followed Mr. P. A. I %  rticlO. In your Sa.unl.iy'.>. i'Mie and found It very cnlijihit r.ing indeed lo the reading public; but there are just a few points which I should like to mention, which I lihink need monttoaiDf *hnt were left out, and surely Deed re< inline. A portion of the article state*: "Space has been found for Charles Duncan Onealc. the founder of the Modern Democratic Movement. :md this brings us logically to Grimily* Adams who is the only ative of the living to !* %  included in the gen COgs" I think. Sir if Mr Hoyos is m the point of Dr. Oneetes Modem Democratic movement, he will have to go very hu bank to let the really undciN'Hnd the OOnM of the Doctor's movement as U lot attached to H. The hi-lory dat.s bach as far as Marcus Garvey; and t> which mes %  to same, and brings us %  Jn conclus.un, I beg to state there ore many personalities alive now srtw h.iniined to the Movement and will know whether Mr. Hoyos is right in his gleanings Of not. so they are looking forward for the up to the momen. Djasory of the movement. V..„i L. B. CLARKE. Tudor Bridge, "Irish I/ahit*" Pa ***• fdtter. The Adtwole— SIR.—One hesitates to criticize vaente of The Great, but IT account of the proceed0 Hou-ing Hoard If would at Mr. G. H. Adams is under the impression that tho f pigs in the kitchen is Inbit." %  if .end tells US that hCS got the pigs in the wrong room: — An irishman was showing an i hman over his house. It : of two rooms—a kitchen which served ns living-room and a bedroom in which tre men of the house and his wife, half-a-dozen children. doga, cat*, hens and a pig slept. %  me." id the fenytishI tons the pig he sleeps under the bed." -But—Isn't the-thc smellvery oppressive?" rerrnfa wharf smell! We cant be,pampering him that way. Susv he must put up with it like the" r si of us!" A minor inaccuracy, perhaps, but the IrUh are a touchy race.' and if Mr. Adams doesn't realize the awful risk he runs.let him take heed of the faUof England since Ireland permitted her to break away! Yours etc. J. T B 27th April. 1951. .s./'.C I. \iv<'-Pn$i


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PAUL SIX CLASSIFIED ADS. i. % % %  %  • BARBADOS ADVOCATE TRLrPHONC ISM iih it %  1 tor r,-, i • v-f -, :.m. CaniUn' %  .i let. I u/rh u.i i Fnenda in aAM Ii %  r..-.. H.U Bar, 'er> • l><*rMr T JTalc f "l,.-H Bin' A.i.aW,7tBren IBSSW,, Ui Mi-I. HIIHll' Kill t MIOXAI II \RRISON COLLEGE IOU. ApplW-aUQl* ahouM bo made M I U %  tha "in virfK-.ni ini-itcir OF mr STta %  -.in. i. i .:* %  of IhrWw Iitdiri %  ,... I I .... -I.-. HOBHl I'I-.I ci.ilv and Wiin lon 0 %  indite MI; iktrj orff % %  %  lr UolverOIUoa ** (el D MS i < %  ,1.1 aBgMM M %  -wUcaiH>t 1. ..i-U alioi.i baent l .irfle at TI>. Oka, Jarnau* It W 1 UtfUOR LICENSE NOTIC! i Ourtn ValMM .( "i %  • n w> Rock. Hi Mmwi %  %  %  ipVtH Mall uqi* i —u aa -Wil %  4 „hi ii >jl April ISU %  J.LEOD Ban. %  n A OIAIIIJ* WARD App IMM n be eon-is...a ai I %  % %  %  • ''• '•* Mid t.i-14 at Poltee K H i "A" on FtKUt i Oth dm of M.v 10*9 at 11 o'clock,,. F A. McLBOO. Police MuisliaW Diet. "A" MIVULNMEM NOIitl II; KRAI Or rMlGH ATION \M) IMI'l.OYMLNT rtbj aotlMd thai from Ma* 1 I, I9S3, iint.I further notice, tht Bureau will W. %  luscd for new md reriewali nl i ..tii.ii >UH UKI'AKTMENT ; '"I A Cake Sale I AHHIVM POPULAR suao H4R 004WMM %  1 • 1 %  : nlll I,. ia *h.. %  l\\ %  .. FOR SALE AUTOMOTIVF Alt M-ni%  11 Iin ip—i %  %  M rmCerihl Phone HU oi MM ItM-k CAB—Hillmin 1M1 made. f>w In ab*o.u(lperfect G-.rur cheap Telephone P. NlrhoUe oeire seat Horn* HN I | i i %  CAP,IKrT Hi.inber H>a* Car in Bood opdllUi'i Appl> IO Mra Iteln. II. Walk. %  %  Untatiin L'hrlal Churth CAMSteatdiid VaiaSuaid I.1UU -...xDial owe <-AK On., ill ivefe.i rrd in v-i ..lOIII-n ilt..ei driven DUI H6 o< .itr.|| I Hill CM J N OortateTd CAtii|| M ii Coup* in order Apply Ncweaatle -"li John St 4 TIU'CK CNM III S-ton Auatln Truik Applv D.V -rOTT A Co IM. Whli. Part KAMI :. i i I iv BKACII COTTAaB on *l Jan pvifxi l^inana qviirl AH n aarviraa aupclMd from man ho Talvpraona Haitcnaiila wrau u eoupt# Appl*: B*afhli|. SI Pfcona lift )4 ) _t f fLAT-Nro. vrrv ..lr.„. araaMf % %  Compute!* (urnlanaftV ToUpiwat. M ru „ — teikin -. aalv MMixthific Up.. ...I lui fARAWAT-lt Phll.p eoMt, I b*4r<*mi Fully lamlahad Uchtlnf Flanl fctormill auppi) Doubia Car Foci, two •rrvBDt room FTom May IM FbOM ••M I4.4MV-I FLAT AND HOL" II li>r. on I %  i> Fnmw MM 1 i'f nrll Winter. Full) rurnlahad. AralUblo April Invite inipniinn M a ui ruKlin rmilkulaia Appi. I.. AUI.ttr.WN„ a Con. I H.r^ s ,ii..,. B I U I I .n NEWHAVMN CnM CUI, 4 1*4ioon-a Fliltj fniiilan^l. IHhtio* PtenL 14 4 U— til ELECTRICAL lliTRKiFRAIOrlANrv, lilpmMil rivot ColdiaMr 1 >-uMr fon" mm lm' oc.ifi. ^jfr luomil'r no lamoua ABMtMM unrral KterliW h-mtelH-ll, In.w --k iiaMaM i bra L Barvtrr no Twrrdo.li Boon M Mlrnnr. P*>rr 4t39 4 11 i LIVESTOCK Mter, MM* -, Apple l >4r l> I II.I.H. MISCELLANEOUS ( %  ii# ale niBUlrl rkMK< r UIHI nlaiir . Mn* %  i*%  md Flvtn AM* rtr. Pnrr only te KNtuirrs LTD SB 4 SSSn HAIB TOtnC—-Ort*nUl Hall TnW-' rrronunoixted to krrp Taut Hair *-fi %  d luatroua Can b uaad by Mom. feman. a4 CM MBI B Frlr* I/bt KNIGHTS LTD. 30 4 UJ' I l*MCH TINt ich Ttni ir Tray •luortivlv on-mrllnl rapavlauy aulMWo far iviar Apply It 4 MIn JUfW M..W4 .1 O.and Vtew, Nr %  hop Mill. SI Ttioma. Appl. i... promiara. A Fordr * 4 %  !—4n Th.iiulrnUjmrd arUJ „>ir. .,, aaW by public .omprliuon ..t thru ofllr.. No. 17 Mihi Mri.l, Brtdatelown on Thurada,,. !",;' '•. t J PTO. ALL niosc bulldtnav romprlrlruj nfflcn and war*. """•" •> Ihr Wrtnif and J-nncr William llrni> Hirtn ma rOi.. Brld..tewn. •undtng on ijjfl tqo,,, ,^, of tehd and now rvrcupiad bv Mr-. at. M Jonri J, Co. U,f Fur-hor partkrulaM from fvr uru(rrBlarnrd COTTIX CATPORD ft CO %  tlMMaaa 4 M-ion AUCTION By inau-urtloiia c( tha InOuranov Co I will Ml) on Fiiday .nd May at S p m "t Ihf OCNFHAI. WOTOH BUS Co Nl-JSON BTHFBT-DF. It'XI AUSTIN IB hp. I4T modal; donr only l|O0 mila. dantaaod by acvHjrm -piini-ipa1|\ body wo.k Tarma CASH R ARCHFR M.Kr.NZir WAIVTEU HELP A-i.i.l I.,, 1'IHB our mac! A PP lira ii I oiu.t mokino *krtrhn ptinti man tapablr of pa Inr afiop ik>uarl havr kmmlr.lir and rcadlnaOdMM .if rrrmt l.-iimonUI. muat be .ibmllir.1 PM ..ppliralion fo, l ilir" ""Utlin ihrr colMli (P.... bv JUI M..s ia. To TM Man%  or in* BarbKdoi Foundry Umflrd 1 ii n.i i whii. r..r n. •Kit H*r' 1 I 0 II .In I Woi ,.i. a workahop and Found r, Bxprricnco in turn nutchlnny rrpali work dralracila ApplM-ant mun havr Knowlrddr of arale drawlna and rapa-rione* In Ihr ronlrol and dn-rioin %  >( labour Copira ol rocml Iratiinoniali muat bo lubmltted wtuh ..i-pik'iin.n r. %  i particular* irlallnl to aalary and olhrr rnndltlona. lay lUt May IB03, To thr Manaprr thr a.rlilo. F.-„,.i. PO H* tl. Whit.I';.IK. H.H.d. MANAUKM-rrqulrrd lor Colmiv Club iBnrbadoai. AttrartlvrPI.VVKI1I.-I I.. rtcltt mji irquirtnn prrmanml poat at 4 3) Ai MANAOSVI—For vinti.teMuii agon.r aja. ... wall rotebluhnl Frnlcn.it %  imi Firm Widf rxprr KII.I' and aliini> I.I hundlr .Mriapandmrr rrnr,1I,.I. iaaarl pin. pittu ipalloa In ptwdsa Bai.ni .oromotfcuir.l.vtitn abiu*. and -.unro. Applt %  O RM Bf Port 3P 4 !U-dn %  ,..:ii rt.i. .1... UOKKSHOP MANACiKK -Prr* prrtriii-j Sound rm %  r bai-karuiniil •••ontlal Appl< YELLOW FEVER CAMPAIGN I mlintrd frm r>r 1. CoriW-faii under tin roolrol ,,r Dr. P. T. df Cairos Dr. O'Mahony said yesterday that some countrlM had beo?n wnrklDg on a similar profiarnmr for sometime aad some had eradioated the mosquito. "It u of romrnott Interest to us. The nsed o! such an srsdacstkn prorimmr u Barbados is exemplifled." The c.S.I. had found In his -urrrri many instancss of the mosqultoss ID tbs parishes be Jn•pscted. he ssld. Barbados was .ilbeWS it %  a serious disease.* he %  ..ui "It It tramnmed by the mosquitoes biting a person who Infected and then biting in"her person In the island. Wo are starting toe campaign here because we hare the moaquitnemd we are not far away frorn where the disease Is at present." He said that they would need the co-operation of the local '"mmlMlooers of Health. TOP Crmmbatlonsif %  of Health wrr circularised sometime ago and: they said that they were In agreement with the circular Their co-operation was complete and he wanted to pay tribute to them. He did not think that the proKramme was going to be ver> expensive to the island. They were getting the co-operation of the Pan American Sanllar\ Bureau Thev also had gooit THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1HI Scavenger To Die For Murder • r>BBB i*a*Te S the .iccuted told him thai the Iwo parties, Benakln and the girl aa it turned out to be. were Jn the grass, thai he leapt on them er when he dpproarhed them this is given in the statement by For fa -asking for "mine" But what I am putting to rDu is the fart that Benskln, give* one version In the Magistrates Court as to the position m which they were walking, the position of the bicyels and who was next to when-, and so on. And the different' may be due to the fact wo) *d Hot know — that there is th' likelihood that because of the deceased glrL he was not telling the truth about their walking together and they may have been in tne fc.hu* khus grass. Mil he rchn ProprlH,*. al the comer of Baxter* an P aoaaaa Road*. BrMsotown NOTICE PABJSB OF "T JOHN Applicationa tor one or moro Vtstt] F.ihlbiUona at St afkhaofa Guli' Mi,-. —ill br reretvod by the nndrnfaitrd M> to taiurdar. the 1Mb. May. IMS. and ir t •!l bM *• ,h followlns rondlllona. C n *"ae mu-t be the daughter. .11 Parl.hioner. in -iriiir,rd (Ireum-tuner., and not lem than elaht yean "M on md September. lffM: to H provrd by a birth rartlfteate. wharri ir.iat arcompai.v the npp( lea lion 7 Candldata* between cijht i| jr.d ten lie. year, old will be nammad t irte Vhool on Friday, filh Jam. and (Iva-o brWeen ten HOi and twrlre 11. —a old. on Saturday. Tth June. IS** All candidate* mint be M the f-rhool rot later than %  13 %  m. en th* ui> i: S. FRASSR. Clerk to the VeMry. HI. John M 4 •.''. FOR SALE AT MOUNT WILTON FACTORY Day (rlt'hralions PUBLIC MEETING) AND T>EMONBTKATIOK The Bsrbadoe Worken' Union will eelebrjir MAY DAV On THURSDAY. 1st MAY, with a Demonstration March and Public Meetiue. rhe ii. III.UI-.H ii.-ic March will leave the I'nlon'a Head iu*rters st >.!• pJB. The Puhlir Mi-.-t, nlll berln n( 7 rm al IMI'iri t'RIC'KKT OROUNDB. The Speakers will Include Mr. O. H. Adams, Mr. P. L. WslroM. Visiting Trade %  Ms, Members ef the tl^rhados Labour Party and the Executive Council. <*) \-i'i\ \i i PAN8 Ill 1640 -.., ft TRII'I.I EVAPORATOIt plele with Vocinun and Tower Pump* '101 GALVANISED KTKEL BOXES ' x V x r .. each 1 (I) New Fletcher Centre Peed MTD PRESS 3 ('haaohers it" ( mr. ,l '! l Mi;n i (,\i ENGINE If %  Mr cReiaoet) %  <1> sei MTEEL GEARINGH sulUhle foe 48" Mill 1.1 1) r(SOLING TOWER ( limn. %  nd (l.Ml) ft. V (AST IRON PIPE—per th (I) Lot H" t'asl Iron I lamed CtTTERING per D> (II Belt Driven DUPLEX PUMP &" x 6" \ (l CANE i MII:II it CHAIN complete with Steel Slata 36" wide %  Iir long I) Ml LTITI'BI'LAR BOILER 8" x 14" Net New STEEL BOILER TI'BFS 4" x W long — each lt> U x 44" New MILL ROLLS each 20,4.52. IM.00 6H.S0 6oa.oo 204L06 stocks. They expected to gat one Inspector from each of tne rural parishes, two from Christ Church and ns many as possi b le from St. Michael The MSB would give one of thalr doctors and one <-f their Sanitary Inspectors. The local irispeetors, according to the report, should have the K.s.i. Certificate or the local Sanitary Inspectors' Certificate. They will be trained for 14 days at a centrally selected place In Bridgetown. | D.D.T. To Be Used In answer to the Chairman who asked If the inosquitoes would be found in the City where there ore a lot of houses and not In country districts, Dr. O'Mahony said that they could be found anywhere. He said that it has been found out that D.D.T. would attack the mosquitoes which they wan speaking about and also tha ncnuplieltmosquito (malaria carrier). Dr. H. 0. Cummins inquired whether Dr. O'Mahony had any *'jys In mind of educating the people to the programme. Dr. O'Mahony said that they would Hive press releases and talks over Radiffuslon. It was also auggested that the Mobile Cinema and pamphlets be uaad to educate the Hon. V. C. Gale said that he agreed with everything that Dr. O'Mahony said. He felt that the programme was quite necessary owing to the fact that they were getting an increase of plane traftV ir Barbados and also an Increase In the tourist trade. The Chairman observed that nothing could keep a tourist out of a place more than mosquitoes. The Board accepted Dr. O'Mahoriy'a report. Thai di-. spaii n<1 ihink. does not go to the rooi i' the matter, because, as has bee. put by the prosecution, there' i no doubt that Benskin suffered injury on his head; that he an -•Hacked md got this •ever wound. It Is put tD you — can you accept what he says abcut fit ssaws t the time of She murder The counsel for the offence said: It is passing strant. there were shouts for murder an. no one is produced to prove hV_ lo say that he heard the sere n cf murder. Woman's Evidence His Lordship reminded the jur% oi the evidence of O'Neale. tin woman who lived near the sceni %  M p. mred out that -die rould in said to corroborate Bc-nskin In hi rntadng after ilaswdi was dead He said that Benskm had at no time said that he could identlf< the man. They would remember. he> told them that Benskin had aid. '.escribing the man. that he woi, a hat with a peak and he reminiied them that one of the witne-iM *aul that when he relumed hotn his hat waa folded in such a ws as showed a peak. Benskm had not run away. i. told them, but t ad waited tup Ihc Police arrived and then i. lo be carried to the Hospital. It had wailed, despite the fact thi: he could have been suspected. He told them that Brewstei oommon law wife had been lo", i to him nil along until the Pod. came to her. Her evidence as lo the washing of the garments ari d ti.i* fetching of the water had beci corroborated: in norne measure. He -aid that they might well arw themselves why should Forde d< llberalcly try to lie against Brew,. star; anyhow it was a matter for them. His Lordship finally said thi.t Ihey had to come *> u unanimous verdict, bearing in mind their dutv in accordance with the oaths ttsty had taken tcthe community an i at the same lime to the accusoi who waa there innocent until h.was proved guilty to then satisfaction. The jury retired for 12 minute and then returned their verdu. of guilty. NINE MLLED NEW DELHI. April 30. All nine aboard were killed tonight when an Indian Airlin* Dakota crashed in a field nrm Willingdon Airport here arhan about to land after a flight froi i Madras. Five were passengers ;:..! four crew. The plane appeared over Delhi al the %  '! end of a blinding duatstorm widen swept over the city for four hour-. —TJ.P. SHIPPING NOTICES t LINK) "TFKOA,. % %  ineartid to aatll from Adalalda February 15th SliBteuaoi March Sid Sydney March I Oth. Brl*t-an. March Mnd arrrrlna at Trinidad about April Und and Iterbadoa about April Illh In addition to oenrral earao thai voa aal haw ampla apace for chilled and hard fruren raroo Car*o accepted on thraush BUIa Of Lad Ins for Iranahlpmrnl at Trinidad la HrlUafi Oulana, Leeward and Windward For turiner partlculara apply — rt-s-vaaa WITBV a co.. LTB, TBIMIBAB. The HV D ABB WOOD will acran4 Cargo and Pa imt —r. far at Lucia. Orovtada. aad AruPa. paanogan only for at Va t loot. BalUns t—i day Oth May ISM The M V. -MONEKA w. and P**aeruieri DomuiMa. Antifiie. Montaei i" N..i. and at Kite*, aaiima fo%  e 9 The M V X aeeepl Cargo and PaaaciuPrn lor X Uonvlnlca, Antlaua, Montearrat. X hevia and St. Km.. Sailing Frtdaw X tib Bat, isss S SW1 SCBlOOMBa ut.'IM . ASSOCIATION GULF SERVICE Apply;— DA COSTA a\ CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE FOB SA L E ARCHWAYS GARDES A modern, compact and well built stone property In a popular and central residential quarter. The house is assured of adequate privacy by flowering shrubs and shade trees. There is a good sire living room and dining room. 3 airy bedrooms, separate toilet and bathroom with tiled shower. The car-age is Integral with the main building and has a door giving direct access to the house. A wide L shaped front verandah. whkh is not overlooked, is a pleasant and dominant feature. Good servants 1 quarters are provided and the arounds of 14,25< sq. ft. are completely fenced ;mrt private, very reasonahlv priced at £4.250 as the owner la leaving the Island. Further Information oMnined from the sole agents JOHN M. III. \IIO\ & CO. Ph.nr .6.0 A F S.. F.V.A. Pl.nUllon. B.ildlni DUNLOP TYRES CAR, TRUCK-BUS OWNERS!! ARE THESE YOUR TYRE SIZES. 700-20/32 x 6 750-20/34 x 7 750-20/34 x 7 500-14 400/425-15 525-15 550-15 600-15 650-15 475-16 500-16 525-16 550-16 575-16 600-16 650-16 8 ply 10 ply "Roadtrak" 450-17 475-500-17 525-550-17 600-17 700-17 400-18 450-18 525-18 550-18 400-19 475/500-19 450-21 LIMITED STOCKS OF ABOVE SIZES WILL BE SOLD AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES FOR 3 DAYS ONLY THURSDAY, MAY 1st FRIDAY, MAY 2nd SATURDAY, MAY 3rd CASH ONLY ECKSTEIN BROS. BAY MIIHI. PHONES 4269 — 3372



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E SDAY, IRY [SDAY. MAY 1. 1952 B \RBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SFVFN BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES ^ *m_^iii BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK R06BINS BRINGING UP FATHER L9 &#M&S& F ; ^^ 'ii\ '. i !%  I.I. U ,— m _^ J^B^^ !" BY GEORGE MC. MANUS JLJST LOOK AT TVj'Gcocpev Aw ME/.r 0'..L. GUCE UAQ&E<5 BBO-MCff CAMS TO SfiS US AW BAT uG OUT OF MCXJ5C Ar HONIED TWEffS E H-AT TO PUT A BgO M NIOI AN' LiVS /' iA GCW TO PUT STOP TO TW>6 -I NEVER 0OU WWJT TO SUV WV Hen SBMTT TV.AT& S. .. ,.* J | A-. %  '.-•.. IT-AN' MII76 MV %  I *MQW 11.:. f.'V.r MOKV-Bur C*J**< 3CPVm then throfcfcini pii n to four maaclei at OHM Apply boa PI liaimflnt lljhtly— M your Yo*i don't rvt> in 'SWMn'"youdtiil on the afTmed pan gently—Stoin'. doe* the reM I Oood for Bkbn and p nn. and ultT total* loo! IOOI >aa TM s> fKTUM M. HOW OM INI PMUT \ TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH 4* The ropulartt* of .lohn White shoe* is built on \ \l I I us n< II as l>r'FtM>\Rll II V. ( omfnrt ami si>W?— Vaja, tvrtaiuh — ihr> are as ea*>ini.i..' and smarl looking as MM i-iHX ihem (or \ourself m kading stores ihrouKhoul llarbados. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right •-VW,',",V,V D.VM I.M. ii %ssi:s £ *;"" <*'* % %  • •*Aui.iif J i;.t. (till (MIMM A IB.TD. S TMJt I1AKIIAD04 SCHOOL OP %> DANCING LTIX DIUENDA MtKINSTKY. S.-rtlilv ; W 4 U Jn IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credil Customers for Monday to Wednesday only Sl'l.l l.\l. Ol I I HIS art' lion utuilublf,il our Hi in. h. s I it 1 • ilsiil. S|i*-ii4li(si% 11 and Su;in Slrerl Tin* PATE DE FOIS 1 I in 11 ril Du.uililv I 0B0U8I WHISKY—per iw „ —p*T Ii' III' Usually Now $17.60 $13.70 I"'Ml 8.20 S.7S 4.80 51.0(1 47.00 1.50 4.IMI Tins HEINZ SOUP ( TOMATO ONION \ Tins AM MOVIES Tins IIKOOKS PEARS Bollln VI-STOl'T Usually Now .36 .32 .14 .40 .82 .74 .30 .26 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T II R O 1 O > > A II %  III O i i; II I E S The Complete Gardener By W. E. SIlEWKU.-COOrUl No norni' is DMM widely known in Ihe horticultural worid, amontf b
cricnce, he has written The Complete (.ardenei The book in nine parts: Gardennig Foundations — Choice of a t.aiden Klowers and Koliaiir Klowei trie Shrubs and Tier;. Fruit Vegetables —Growing Under Glass—Garden 1'esl: alH Disease >1 ders for the Month. The hrst two parts cover all general CODlUlentlOIH of soil, climate, drainage, tools, cultivwMODt I'i'ipagation, pruning, design, coluor, lay-out and materials. Part III—VIII deal with all species and varieties of flowers, trees, fruit and 1 1 table, u-.1 fni to the small garden their care and maintenance, their particular need* and failings, and what I.. < poet of different plants under different conditions. The author takes no knowlodn for granted, but explains fully in simple language every side fo the gardener's materials problems and chancer Fully indexed, and with many cross-references in the text itself, the book is as easy to use as it is comprehensive. It con %  tains 15 colour plates. 48 pages Surfeit of Lampreys by NGAIOMAKSII Surfeit of Lampreys, already a classic, is the I'ust detective story to appear in the St. James's Library. "Charming eccentric, Micawberish .... Chief Inspector Alleyn as distinguished and sympathetic as ever. This is a capital detective story: gruesome crimes, light relief, sprightly characters, good plot, resolute und bcoao* minded detective." Milward Kennedy, The Sunday Times "The most enjoyable is Surfeit of Lampreys, in which that engaging New Zealand writer, Miss Ngaio Marsh, is at her best. This BUttj chief merit is that her stories ..!..I, ,. '.. 't i. %  •.el. i i rrj on characters who are excellent company." ( %  tMirge W. Bishop. The Daily Telegraph "There is no doubt that Miss Ngaio Marsh is among the most brilliant of those authors who are transforming the detectvie story from a mere puzzle into a novel with many other qualities besides the challenge to our wits." The That* literary Supplement Marsh bounds to the top of the ladle.' Clan .< brilliantly raodabla drawing* i %  m detective rtory, La far and away the best she has yet written Milirirr Richardson, The Observer ..f I lack-nnd-whitc illustrations, and 40 diagrams in the "With this book in I no one. however practised however inexperienced need ever be at a loss In I ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. KAY 1. I*** Thunderhead II Wins 2,000 Guineas NEWMARKET. April 30. THUNDERHEAD II. one of the best backed outsiders, proved too strong for the English liin-s'-yeai-oids to-day, winning the Two Thousand Guineas. 1'.i:.celet. drawn in the centre of the field. ahvavs had Thunderhead favourably placed. When they reached the top of the hill two furlonm from homo, he suddenly sent his mount to the front and Thunderhead had so much in hand that he won easily from King's Bench, another French horse, to give Poincelet hi flrat English Classic success. ^^ Truindnlua.l I.v Mi-ri-i Boy ouv— -*• ' of Hiradladc Is tiaincl by E. rotManchester Beat Arsenal fUrn. IMrHWMMH Ua Elliott flvlimw winner ,.t tnc mnt had no doubt ( %  bout the result of the photo lln• tOOk The Flench ArKur W the enriomjre res. rvert lor the third finisher. Agitator ridden by champion Jockev Gordon Richards started 9 la 4 favourite and ftnLsheri fourth. Another French horse Ararat the second was sixth. Richards who said he led hy on utd a hall lengths at on* time bad no excuses for Agitator's failure Palpitate was badly left at tee, start and finished la*t ot the 26 runners. A leading London l>ook-rnakei said Thunderhead's win suited the booKmukers but added that if French h.res win the rrmainlnK classics some punters will win fortunes.' —F.P. Phadkar Is An 'liidiun Bedser' EXTREME LEFT Is Edwin Roger* a ltlyear old boy (1M lb*.) before be started •.•ightlif Uuj,. a>coi.d fiwn ift alter training for a year and a half. Other picture* shaw Rogers as be is teday. 20 years of age, leu lbs., and rbamplon lifter In bis division. Bead bin article* on Weightliftlni and Body Building in tie Sunday "Advocate." Carlton Draw With Spartan Carlton ~nd Spartan played to a goalless draw in their Second Division football match at Queen'* Perk yesterday nfternof n. The game was slow throughout am] both BideH failed to make most ot the many chances they were given. In the first half of play the Spartan players did most of the pressing bul when the forwards got Into the Cnrltnn area they Just fulled lo score. On I*" occasions Grant, centre forward for Spartan failed to make met of rosy chances. Jcmmott on the %  •ft wing on receiving a pass from Wilson cut in and when everyone, expected %  goal, he kicked the 1*11 well away from Use Carlton ge-al. Carlton g< •* their stride during the second half >f Ma* but their forwards also failed to score. Coaler who was seen in goal for Spartan was tested twice end he saved. About two minutes before the blow o Hutching**,, being unmarked Xwa nlonr lo the Spartan and Cozier came out: but before Cozier could intercept. Hutchlnson In his hurry kicked the ball well over ihe grOsg bar of the Spartan goal. The Referee wn* Mr. O. O Turpin Meets Robinson Socially June At White Gty (By GKORGE WHITING) RAY ROBINSON is to meet Randolph Turpin at the White City on June 10. Fortunately for Robinson, but unfortunately for Turpin and us, the meeting will only be %  octal. Robinson, who retained his world middle-weight title against Rocky Graxianc. in Chicago recently, sails for Europe on May 24. and has promised to be on view in a nngside seat when Turpin goes after Don Cockell's cruiserweight title on June 10. demanded ., lot more moneyWill Robinson'' arrival hare )U st as he keeper stand on the beston far the purpose ei defsBdlng his goal T li Table Tennis What are the sseasuremrnti of a Table Teanls bat. iff i.rdlnjr lo the LaM'S of the Ciainr NOTK: All ealrtes far Saorla 4. but he is id least medium-qilick, and swlafi Ihe ball—a sort of Indian Bedser. like Bedser, he can hit. N Chowdnury may become the centre of controversy when the In deep rd. i IT, her (Barnet) Instde-li-ft nged ; put boxing trust rntlon it The tour has been Still, the light seems gradually ., llirec n(U .„ no 0 tour begins. He Is a mediumto be drawing. Robert Christeni^ndon f C to Hong Kong and uuee bowler, with a jerky action, bury, new-broom chairman of the Man ,i, \ ui y* mr Hendun prou-d which may cat! New York Comnnssi n. has been vcry puj, u i ar viaiiors and thi LONDON April SO. For once In a while the spot* light is off the First Division. With Manchester I'nlted beatin_ 'ru'ii.l and Fulham taking llmllenneld into the Second Division *ith them by their 1—• victery Craven Cottage, championship i relegation issues have been itul what, a tussle there is la ..wsion twe for the right to jou v.emeld Wednesday in the pro ition geilery'. Biriv.inghain have %  USTHXI their prugrainme with Ud .ire second. But if CurdUT City beet Leeds United it Ninmn Park next week the Welsh club will top them on goal .iverage. Mirmiiigliam beat Luton 3—1 today and bul for the brilliant display of international goalkeeper StreUn would have won] even more convincingly. Scoreboard Changed There was great excitement on 1 the ground when at halftlme it arOa shown on the %  coreboard that Cardiff were losing 3—2 to Bury. But cheers changed to groans when the scoreboard altered to Cardiff winning 2—0. They eventually won 3—0. Coventry's last hope of retaining her statue faded vahen they lost 3—1 to Leeds. The Manchester United — Arsenal clash at Old Traflord which two weeks ago was being hailed as the match of the century turned out to be the anti-climax of the century United with the, ch.implonship assured unless they lost 7—0 crowded on all sail and against the Arsenal team which Anished with only nine men— Shaw and Roper went off with injuries—won as they pleased Rowley got the hat-lrick, Pearson 2 and young, outside lefi Byrne the other. The Arsenal goal came from outside right Cox. Commenting after the match on his team's cup chances against Newcastle next week Arsenal Manager Tom Whittaker said we shall try really hard-—"If we've enoujsh players to put on the field." Arsenal injuries list now reads Logie Lishnun. Roper. Shaw and Deariel Newcastle came through their 1A .igue mafch Injury-free and ii'ie |>l.i>ed i bigger part, in the iiiutnph over Villa than : i serve inside forward Hannah n will be av.iliable tor M dally like a itage manager, and | oa st 12 months, but thereafter. It occasionally he still stands before progress orniinues on present llw--. the footlights. ihere is every reason to ipe thai imorove Considerable interest "I pal that ihe NEW BEAT OLD Foundation Boys defeated FOun. di..ion Old Boys 2—0 in R 3rd Division fnotball fixture played at Foundation yesterday. an la BvaUab PRINTS ON PARADE aKh their lieada. Iniliaii urninvited lo the Brussels i aweuUll him. Perof the European Qoxi I May 23-28. Uranium Rush Maria In Miinilolw Union Rung F.A. asked their SevrcUr3 vlll. Stan Gn tour could be i WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codling ton I .01 In. Total Eainfall for Month to date: US Ins lllg.ir.t Tempnature : H7.f)*r. Lowest Temperatnre : TO-B^F. Wind Vslockty a milsa ptr hour Barometer (B s.tn.l OT.OM; {3 p.m ) -•!' N7i. TO-DAY Sunrise l Ml s.m. %  onset: 6 IB pm. Moon : First Quarter. May 1 Lighting : 7.00 pin. High Tide: 7.36 a.m., 9.54 p.m. Lew Tide : 104 am. 2.S6 p.m. pires hav haps ours w.... i'f"heM-ce"pts he will hear first^in.rrre^re^emirti Watch vlco-captaiii H• Adhihlini j j ust why we o n this side of kn. not for his batting—though no AlUntic feeli thai 'return that la adequate — but for his arfc| clauses are u bane and a ileldtng. This Army captain >* .,n g ht on world championship irobablv the best lleldsmnn in boxing. tlw party, especially at coverThe Ej:opea n rule rend: 1l0 i n i. "Boxing either title holders < These and others gn likely to i-h.illenners, who are to contest KIVO ua quite a run championship title, are !orl>dd< In India ihey t<-k the Test lo guarantee In contrncW relating hfglaj lo one win eacli and three to such title contests return nniws But they were playing un n ntrh in the event of the title r'nglaiul "A" team — no Hulton. .hiinging hands. Any clause of %  j Compton, no Bedser. no May. this nnture occurring It will shatter our belief that I'rei-auliosi OITAWA. Prospectors with dog teams ire mod. if uoa-ibie c*sa.ia; ttsss ake ~ ide if he thought another From .SluikchiM-arr To Aeronautics AMSTERDAM. A lot of talking goes on In the Link Trainer department at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam, mainly via the microphones at the Control Desks. On entering the building one does not notice much of this talking, for it is drowned by the buzzing of the small mockup aircraft, which are sometime disrespectfully, but most appronrialely. referred to as "drunkc hie kens". Mr. Edward O. Walton, head of our cricket is on the mend if they beat ua on the faste. wlrketH and In the colder eondrUuiis of an English season. We ought to win. More imuo.Unt U it to win attractively rathe, : ..in drearily. i contracts ••hall be declared null and void." WHAT'S ON TODAY Police Courts — 10.00 a.m. Meeting of Bt. Tfaoauui Vestry — l.oo p m Police Band st Annaal Fair, Country Road Manas — S.00 Football at Kensington—6 0( %  tfSk, Friendly Football at 8t. T-on ard'i — B.00 p.m. Extra Mural Youth Meeting. British Council — BOO pas. Mobile Cinema, Bay Fastare, St. Michael %  7.30 pi Sports Wimlota Carlton and Everton meet this afternoon at Kensington in a First Round Knockout nxtnre. Since the inclusion of Blades in the last Everton match xing Club, to whom he was and u on contract it was no more than a normal business precaution lo Insist on a "ntum match" safeguard when be vlgned for the title fight he lost so sensationally ti here lust July. Without that protective clause Robinson would undoubtedly have Northern Manitoba about 50 the Link Trainer Department, does milos north-east of The Pas, a great deal of this talking h When Mr. Oreerie returned to where a uranium strike has been from time to time. And can he England he Immediately s<-unded made. talk! When Mr. Walton picks up '.he AUii'idan Ix*ague Cornmlttee The p fcs s 350 miles norththe microphone and starts giving who readily agreed to send a rewell 0 f Winnipeg near the Saslanding in.sti-uct.ons, the French iiesentative team. kntchewan border. ulr trnffic controller, who has to %  \ 1-twie.H wati,,,,,,. i.v •!„. u .,., Early reports indicate the find speak English, in accordance with] Kr^ "E. ri?Lr ."oils --> i !" %  B * -ISssfl ?**"* £•*• Marl hr-tor. May. a. -he>Hen. ll > Canada. More lhan JaUd with jusl u much Jk II a. Ion were out eaat last year mv 850 claima haw been lllcd on n American colleague, while the .1 their itamee was rained off durrock. land. %  " %  "< • 'he Englu* controllei iig the monaoon season. But Copper and nickel Uepo.it* •• %  nc recognised Immediately. Mhenlan league SecrC-iry Warlu.ve also been found in the simp • ,UT Mr. Walton has cleared hi. 'en pointed out that fixtures had area, according to as*ay report-. Ihroat. This is Important tor the %  i lanrtnpMcil and with so many The now uranium area run""' pUola, because It mean, that lub. engaged in the Amateur Cup alone Ihe Wckusko Lake. ,h ey will not have any difficulty is well as other competitions this nj c h pitchblende has been in understanding the Instruction, •ould not be done. ,„„„,, ln thre „ jep,,,,, locations from c Control Tower when they _. .„ _ l( the Held materialises. Can"f ,ua "j; %  ", d "' ^ff*JSJ*. "J?" !" "' The full team Ls E. Hennett ortm _,,i h.i.. thr... maior forces Greal Biltaln or the United States. iSouthall) goalkeeper; G. MeCriea "','" "'". '" S.' „Vhc r iwo ilMr Walton's marvellou. Imlla,,Kl__R nanatone (Wealdrtiau;) and %  r"g.Jg_'"". ,„JL lion, are no aeeldnl. for he ha. CANADIAN PRINTS M" wide nl 70c.. 73c. and 76c. per yd. FLANNELETTE M" wide in shadi". a| Pink and Blu* @ White ( 81c. — ALSOIMITATION LINEN 36" wide u S1.20 per yard CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & IS Broad Street SEE IS FOR CHROMIUM FITTINGS INCLUDING • CHAIN BOLTS • I1AHKI 1. BOLTS lilllllt HANDLES • SHOWER ROSES : PILLAR COCKS BUTTS • LOOSE PIN BUTTS • TOILET HOLDERS • TOILET SEAT HINGES • TOILET RAILS S.e6S -hlO I tVBKUS VCCIWKAL. I ElPE^E'.CE SECeCS*lioo.i n..i 'i ana _„ a j„ in ^.....n._,, .., lin i v uons in* no acciaeni, ror ne nas i &*im.efta KffSLi 4 ^. jn^Stttetis: WttWiR!£ SS^^^.^r.-'S SS ^.oSfoe, fit >r (Henrion) half-backs; T. Frnnx, Oreit Bear lake north of EdmonMf"JJ5 2J 1 Taylor (WeeldslonO, D. Kelle ". Alberta, nnd in Nor'hern 1^" r" „, her (BimtA). BSlroud (llmdnn). Simkalchewan uround Beaver'"J*' ,c ^; l' !" Parker, J. Snrenicn (Snulhall) lodge, where a new settlement ind T Bennett (Wealdstonpl forcalled Uranium Clly is *o be >ards built In the spring. wick U famous keepearcan perthe parly age of 14, Mr. Walton made hti ftist apliearance on the stage, as the Duke of York in "Rlcherd II". That waa G\ For PERMANENT FLOORS, COUNTERS & WALLS, that will last a Lifetime:e* //,,; I M.I.IMI I M .1. \/\ li FI.OOK TILES Plain Red. 2 shades of Speckled Cream and Red Plain White " x r, a" x 3" 4" x 4" ENGLISH GLAZED TILES Blue. Black. Green and White ex •" WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT RED & BUFF t'OLORC'RKTE CEMENT KKRROCRETE Rarld-IlardeninK CEMENT PORTLAND CEMENT in bafs • 'Phone : 44SC 4267 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. BUILDING NEEDS HE1E.XTLY Aluminum Gutterinc — 18'. 21", 30", 3" Galvanism! Sheet, — 6'. 7'. '. *', 1*" Nails — all sires Red Cement While Cement Hard-bottamrd Kitchen Chairs — $7.35 each WT GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS NOW The Finest Beer Brewed Anywhere PLANTATIONS LIMITED




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THURSDAY, MAY I, l5z BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THRU. J'ca To Alter Constitution Within A Year Power Will Go To DUTCH COUPLfc FARMBOUND Ofl^ Separate Ministries KINGSTON. Jamaica. April 29. JAMAICA'S constitution will be changed within one year to provide a substantial advance towards complete self Government, Governor Sir Hugh Foot, K.C.M.Q., announced in the Jamaica Legislature today as he gave his Throne speech opening the new spring and budget session. The Governor % %  -ml thai an agreem*nt had been reached bit local talk* he had with nnmln-vei member* of the I.-ti*l>livt* OOUDui and prw iitatiw o< the i i'.nty jnit tin 1 Pteplv"! NaUooaJ Put) lag, > % %  ..,on the mah lines on whu-h COB* %  rthlifcmil :nK.iiiicshould pTOMSd, and the*,, h | be*n tCMpM by )rioni ftir 0un r l _, pw m 0 .„, Hi.. S..n-l J iy i* Slate (or Ibe „ colonies, A A-llllngGRENADA, April 30 • % ess lo proceed with constitut-orA !> earnest pica was made by I change* at the earlit moment. Jr A Coppin, presiding officer of i %  .,.-. %  i f. %  ..,, ""' CAA, Federation Ooofmoea who laid that Lcaniator* Coppin Urges Unification Of Public Service* UNIWC TM OB CK of the .Vi.-aw Anultrdm as It arrives la New York are Mr and Mrs. Jan GrlAocn and %  /..iJT--i,. all headed for a farm In Abbotsford. BtltUh Columbia. Than aia 11 girls and boys, <•.' %  age* r.' - nfrom one to 22, and they ball from Utrecht, HoHand. The family migration will coat the na 7..-*0 for paasage alone before they reach their declination. The father aald hi* rraaon for ftfvlnaj "K v>*r-*B*vsful farm in llolUnd u "to give the children a belter cn*aea." fiafrrsatkinoll Restricted Reform Reform will tie restrirtrd ol the .,„a .. i,..i..,,cof am, bthnm .,,. '* ,?.!""* '" """ >" wcr "" A Tsurning—Point In West Indian History nonlnalad ataman, of ihe Exwii,.-,, reDii-uMtntlw. ^.hUt... ,. „ve conn.,]. U,V„IK legislgitm!%Vta^ SEfStad reform until a late, date. m hf t^iirtif. Council Ch..mln ont year*time the conrtituber. lional change will effect: The Mi. Cuppin expre-tsed regret thai transfer of final adnunlittalivo the goal of political fedeni %  !..•powers from the Executive Cumstemed to be receding somewhat' d! to separate Ministries in which -i.d it was feared by the C.S.A. etaetgd miniMer* and their Malt thM it may take unification with will ihi-V. administration und inlit. tlate a policy fen Executive CounHe implored the assistance of l-eglslaiors to prevent this, for The BltcuUva Council "ill bei"Ufatton though an Integral pun Inatrumaol policy of any practical federation could with the Uirgcr elected represent;!in reality. Inproceeded with inIdtftg a clear majortlv by aeiiendenll.. and is not needed to ih* addition of more minister*. emompawad arlw the riitltaulThe leader of the majority party "5* ""a vmmatan* which heset "lilt JaTll^ETSS'S tamporary staL^r^ians estimated i!LSt^L ll/^ZSitoiZ So ln **"• urged it a* practical that some 2.1SO.OOO slave* were appointment and ( relieving Uwapn ovo UUo|| of t & mUon imported into He British Ctlpojntmard of -"Jjw '"'"JS going so far as to say that with onlei, in Amtrlca and the Wtv Ci.dc, the piopnaalstheReeled umIicilUon Khirvrd ai ^ (wu -, lon tnMmt In 17fW>. a. statement oi *^1lng one of the biggest hurdles to the number of slaves export* from the Africans si coast durum J'tnns Plan Paint Mamtfactirre A company %  %  ..,of paint i!•" i j fi rmed | Klna*"* %  plant the i'lan By Bt'TK HEWtt LONDON LONDON. • ''" Commenung on recent reportJUST 1 60 years ago, thrre occurred In London an y.Jgj"*,, *gilT. 'i? ffutarS % %  ^C .*F X T ?LifflS event that was to mark.;. turrtinR-point in the history of fgS ^^ ^SJS^ 1 -"TTSS. The Wc*1 Indies On April 2. 1792, William Wilberforee Th* coinMny imi us take up ppint,,! Zu X thot in a simlUi succeeded it- persuading the House of Commons u> approve Ihe $1,000,000 (W.I) pm annum cTliU in th€ i^os smaU quantihis motion ^or the abolition of the slave trade >ea of paper were mad* Irani Th.s w^ S the Hrst real success gained by the move! • -gjg < !" (P— ^ ment for th^ abolition of slavery, which had been carried K p>tnt manufacturg %  at preVa ^ t -re-a of Tmti Atticm „,. on VtgOTOttffi 1 >* for mure than a century. II came at a time g> nl aaUbui tod in the Bnthh ,^ v-rf j w tui this plant, which when the si *a%-e traffic between Africa and the Caribbean Weat ladtei __^___ grows to a height of live feet or !" "" more. Twenty-five years ricvclooment of these territories manufacturers said that 11 wag would have been very different suitable for making paper. pulp Between I08O and 1786. conthe trade should cease on JanThe entire sugar economy o* f G^ernmant fef eralton WW|W ^ clMied intlead of the pieacnt position Bd in the Council's sys-rh. Adminblrator m his opentern of balance. Ing (peech after introduction by A Safeguard J. H. V Redhead. Registrar and As a safeguard however uw presideni of the local association Secretary* of State for the colonies said thnt the C.S.A. parley prohas proposed that reserved powers ceded only by a few months the Hag with the Governor Koned and for t tdii.i cummittei' fr^m witnesses. efeated %  gorce aRain into prevent tin 3X of slaves inU> &• in the We* Baaa defeated b> ORDER REINSTATED WASHINGTON. April 30. The District of Columbia Court Of Appeals on Wednesday reravtated Ihe steel seliure until 430 p.m. Friday to give Government In 1701 Wll trnduced a mota further lmportati< 1 the British col*am Propcsal for the establishment Indies. This v*r~ 1.1 pineapple mtr>eric> to produce 183 votes against* eight million suckers in three yeSrs , — ,. h;.(; been submitted to Government .^ul a yeaila *sr on April 2. by the Jamaica Agricultural So17M. the effort s of Wilberforee %  %  %  -lu I.... twcii ;h .I.If hta siipunrw ggaaaag van IUIGBBI niinMr.itii.il ;md farmers. '"' %  Another nraotlon wai introduced for the aakMiUUoa of the Government backed protrade. This w-*; amended 1 I, 1798. Wrd Indies was built up It was not until 1807, however, slavery. Vast pUnUtions that the House of Lord' agreed sugar in the islands owe the t pass a Bill. This provided that very existence today t with the advances made during *, ihe last two and a half decades, ,* this may not now be the •£•*. |£ UaY BOVRIL makes a tasty sandwich tl A vandws h mad* with Bovi rasad iiure Bftff] ivuui and goodness of" Bovnl uoy it oMen -i\c 1 N faMOs ,er US) deliim!" B 1 chance to appeal to the Supreme gramme has already been put into favour ol grada-aiaal abolition and 1 Court. effect lor the development of the the House of Commons finally —I'J*. pineapple industry in the island agreed, by 238 ^rot to 83, that. POST OFFICE \OI U %  : AIR MAIL Effective 1st May. 1*52. AIR MAILS will be closed nt the Oen1 1'iwt Ofllce us follow(Cancellii i& previous Schedules) AFRICA ANTIGUA .. ARUBA AUSTRALIA (all air) AUSTRALIA (air to Panama only) BAHAMAS UIRMUDA RORNEO MR HONDURAS I'.URMA CANADA (Direct) tvln Trinidad 1 CANAL ZONE ;XNTRAL AMERICA (except C.Z ) -CYLON CUBA CURACAO DOMINICA .. DOM REPUBLIC DUTCH GUIANA KITROPE FIJI .FR GUIANA ;T nRITAlN TRINIDAD Ha 2.00 p.m. 2 00 p.m. 11.45 am. 2 00 p.m. 9.30 H in. 2.00 i'in 11.45 am. II 45 am. 11.45 am, 11.43 am. 9 90 im. 2.00 p.m. II 49 am. 2.00 pm. 2.00 pm. 2.00 p.m. 2 00 p.m. 11.45 a.m. 11.43 am. 8.00 a.m. 2.00 pjn. 2.00 pra. 2 00 pm II 19 '.m. 2.00 11.43 11 45 9.30 11 45 11.45 2.00 2.00 11.45 2.00 2 00 II 45 11.45 11 45 2 00 11 4ft 2 00 p.m. 11 45 am. 11 45 am. 11 45 s m. II 45 am 2.00 pm 2.00 pm. 11 45 a.m. 11.45 11 43 am. 11.45 nt II 45 ar 2.00 p.i 2.00 pm 11 45 II 45 2.00 p.m II 45 9.30 1 Day Monday Wednevrtav Frlda) WediiL-sday Saturday Monday Thursday M idai Tiiur*d-> Wednesday Saturday Monday Friday Monday wWMI % % %  Monday Wedne*inv Eft. Friday Monday Monday Wednc lay Friday Wednesday Friday Wedne'iliv Saturd. Monday Thursdsv Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Thursday Mondav Thursday Wednesday Monday Thursday Mondsy Wednesday Monday Wedneidav Friday Monday Thursday Monday' Thursday IB r..-|.v Wednesdav Fridaj Monday MOadsa Wednesday to Friday latlllllsi IJestinatlon GRENADA GUADELOUrr. HAITI HAWAII HONG KONC. INDIA INDONESIA JAMAICA JAPAN MALAYA MARTINIQUE MAURITIUS MEXICO MONTSERRAT NEW ZEALAND (all aln NEW ZEALAND (Sir to Panama PALP^TINE PHILIPPINES PUERTO RICO STCROLXV.I ST KITTS ST. LUCIA . ST THOMAS ST VINCENT SOUTH AMERICA (CXc.pt Venezuela rORTOLA iviii An'lgu > USA. VENEZUEI-A %  l> I Time 9.30 u.XKa 2.00 p.m 2.00 p.m 0.30 u.rsn 11.43 B.IXX 11.45 Jin 2.00 p.a-an 2.00 p.a-an 11.45 u.rm-m 11.45 a.rxr-a 114.', ., . 2.0O p.m 2.00 p.rsr-ii 11.45 a.m 2.00 p.rsra,. 2 00 p.m 11.45 a rsr* 2.00 p.rv-a 2.00 prrs 11.43 a.rra 11.43 ..11 11.41 n rn 2.00 p.m 2.00 prn 11 4S a.m 2.0O p.m It.30 n.rx-a 2.00 pm 2.00 prn 11.45 ,nr 11 45 anr* 11 45 im 2 00 p.rr-x. 9.30 a.rs- 11 .45 im 11.45 am 11 45 a.rr-m 9 34) am. 2.00 p. 2.00 p 11.45 a.r 11.45 U II 46 a.r 2 00 pi 9 30 a.t 11.40 a.1 11.45 a.i 2.00 p. 1 V 30 i. r 9 30 a.j 9 80 sU 11.45 a.r 11 43 a.i 9 30 a.: 9.10 a.i II 45 aj II 45 ,. 1 2 00 p.i 9.30 a. 2.00 p 1 2 00 p. 11.43 a.) 2 00 p. 2 00 p Day Tufsda) Friday Monday Saturday Monday Thursday Monday Wednesday Friday Monrfay Thini'l''. M011. lay Wednesday Friday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Wednesdav Friday Monday Th-"•*'** v Monday Wednesdav Friday Monday Saturday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Thursday Wcefhgads Saturdsv Monday Thursday Wednesday Saturday Monday WadsMsM I Friday Monday Thurada> Wednesdav Saturdsy Monday Thursday Wednesdav Saturdav Tuesday Saturday Monday Thursday Thursday Saturday Mood .. Thursday IFsjdgsgaM Saturday Monday W9d*>mir. Friday Monday Friday serve right! J&R ENRICHED BREAD WITH ANCHOR MILK H.MH.UtOS CO-OP torro.x FJtCTOMV LTB. ELECTROLUX The which ten Ihe Bajnn Refrigerator years ago caused Cook lo exclaim I "Hay Hey 1 Locka Fia niek Ice !" *.V /'#•#• 4tfJ4ihl . In full force Juit In time lo meet the needs of tfco*>e who cannot avail themselves of the clertrlcily supply in the near future. These machines are for operation nn kerosene oil, natural gas or electricity, and are available in 4 l /t *ub. ft. and 7 rub. ft. models. HOOK YOURS MOW e THK KMTACE BUM. tO. Plantations Building WORLD'S MOST COPIED IfHCISii Rridtlcred null Is closed an hour before ordinary mall. ROBERT A CLARKE. Colonial Poetm&rter. flcnrral Post Offlcv, M.*,n. i> iili a rhitif' ml */•••••• fiif/ini's — itsiilf/ Imatmlvn-. Vapnrimimff Oil ana XOW IHISII. Thi. wondprtul mwhine in now also ...lilnl.l.with HI.I.TRACKS \ mi II l truly amazes} to sec thb .niull I'Mikni.. unit perfurmini; job%. both In the lield and on the road, that are beyond wliea-l Tractors of twice its HonterKiwer. This Tr,,ctor i> indeed the friend of both the small and lame Plantation ownens alike and the price is well within your reach. *•'• %  .hull hf //• s'l 1,, .niiiiif), 1, %  •^5; dvmnnslralimn nl unnr vnuvHl % %  %  1 11 COURTESY GARAGE OFFERING A FEW MORE USEFUL ITEMS • SANDING DISC GRITS 16. 24. 36, SO • MASKING TAPE • RUBBING COMPOUND • SPONGE RUBBER • LOY COLD PLASTIC METAI. • PISTON SEAL • KASENIT CASE HARDENING • RAWI, PLUG DUROFIX • COPPER TUBING


PAGE 1

Till K-DAY MAY I, 152 BARRADOS ADVOCATF SCAVENGER TO DIE FOR MURDER PAf.F. FTVF • From pace 1. of the truth, whether \uu should in whom Brew-tei -onilded. attach much credence lo the evishould pick out Brewster %  -. %  particular all the rest of Bartwdlans as a witness and how much you can man who had told him he had *>ve to this or tha: part of the killed the giri. The %  '< not tcld them why they should And in considering not accept his evidence and they 'u>>t bear in.mind, as n i should accept it. world, human : If Small had been ternlkd by ,,cs of •* realise as 1 am ou wlU UlHl BMflwrRi liven a different statement. But pic v >'. powers uf observation her evidence had been corrohorvar > jnd v <>u take th .t all bnIO ated by persons who the v could ac **". > %  '' "rUI acM] woll hHievc were not preturtlrcd. k **"• lha ,hc w !i •> %  PW i-.stan.-e, when she Mid he SffSV???^ told be* he was going lo the mor~SJ K* ?"* ct "l 1 kmtL So '. nc So .hTy hS'to .cept h.r .!2'3 r £< !" "'" *• %  'hint d..ic. and Fordc's a. to his MOXt U,.7?, ££ r £ %  "* ' ndln, in ,„, m .nd . to .ho J.SjW?," v^'ton "STA. "SeJ vunclurton that h. a, Builly. think hev „ „ d s !" g or St. Michatl on the ith ofStpother thin*, in what took pUr. ...it year, imirtorwl Norm. Th.rrtor? ,„u will m. *TS As yoi, hae he.rd and a, It I. Iw^'SSS^FT', that 1 should rcpe.. to Iyp ^'„, ^.p^SX,"';. you, when you coma to deliberate. ^^ ^ F a Dtat you will HM in mind tii.il 't the duly of the prosecution '.\n* %  > %  A.I:I I rilirimis establish the guilt of the accused *• mie ll as hj t*** 1 very forth./ beyond a reasonable doubt before 0 !" w "' done — while it is juil you con convict run,. He stands rlBinl ,nQ1 rriticisms should uin the dock innocent until he is advanc * <* the evidence i proved guilt. } ne wa >' >" which eviii.-., If you are satisfied after conlxcn K |v *". at the sam • sidenng iill lha evidence togilher m B v %  % %  %  ""' m.-itr.-i i with all the criticisms advanced "•• into account all 'In on his behalf by Mr. Farmer in ev 'dence. his thorough r.nd forceful address V >*>" discover that (ho* .,-.to you. if after all that, you uro %  *• discrepancies, which make %  titfltd beyond a reasonable J u dubihcve a particul.ir wll' ou ma y *">' aWt in. Mlfnl picLha i one of the most In law ton the general OtttUM I TWO motor earn wcra mvolved in an accident at Lower Broad Btieet, oppo-it* the Batbsdoo Mutual Ufa AWHH.,IICO htuldiiig. nhortly beforo 10 o'clock yenterday metolng. On*. M 201. is owned by Barclay* Bank and was being dnrtn by O. Tearwood. while the other, H 1.9 is owned by A. w. Harper and wan being driven by hi* wife. The right front fender of M. 179 wan tlWiulvely damaged and the left front fender of H ;\li MIIBMIV damaged. S.F.C.A. Flag Day Collection Breaks All Previous Records THE S.P.CA.'s FLAG DAY COLLECTION of $1,427.86 Uje ;i pravloui records, toeordlng to the Annual ftvporl ... win u. ini ii.ii.-v .viii/td in iw "— *"" and therefore you will lake care vld "ce given — always bearing —each one of you Individually— "I ,n nd that in the COnsKJ and pay clue attention to all you or ,hi P 0 '" 1 and you are left in have heard and each of vou "in"reasonable doi.bi. the ben dividually make up his mind as l P at doubl ''" be in favour Dt lo uh.it he consider! is the true "^ accuted. ..nd then jointly and As his been rightly put. ,, .unanimously come to that verdict. "WMbw doubt is not a u You gentlemen ere the sole vea *i-irllid kuid f doubt which Judges o; the facts in this case U,1C adopts because one is wuk and there ii little law involved. r easy-going. It i >, .•casonible If in the course of my nmarks doubt as the expression goes an-.t ;iny opinion on the facts '"^"s nuch a doubt as would prrS.l'.C-A. paid the traveling, liv*><" of which you are the sole Judges. ve "t >ou in your ordinarj %  %  sum salary of Chi :ou will realise that it is my *' I,fc r crdin-ny business acInspector Terrezao for four wetopinion that I am expressing*. I 'ivities from taking mat pnrtkuand had the benent of bjl :'.'J "lma, kUKUj lent by ihe L-iw i am not %  judge of the facts, you la* course. That is ihe Ivpc of years of experience in British "''" I 1 -"" %  • %  I D %  • u; %  rre the jole Judges of the facts, doubt which tho law says m;ul Guiana. The Ingot '"' %  wfi sbown. If I express an opinion and you be dispelled by the PTosccut..:> out a full programme of nclivt>uu K %  : %  " "• > ou may adopt it before ther*. i, | ,. ICs wnlch nr)ud(d ISub-Coniinitti'o whuli re of 1951 which was prwnttd to members M 'ho An: *rUji!S*uS (kMlerul Meeting ol lha S.P.C A. at the British Council, lunl of $1.41744 which bntn ill "Wakelleltl". on TimiliJ ni^ht. FlaR Day was htld in l 1 March when the two Shetland Ponies collected over S50. Aniinnl Welfare W**t f An An.mal W.lf.ir.' --%  Octibcr l.;pi yen i lluluowr, on rtiim -o. !.,„„, |, v HM, ..> ...... 1 ii % %  %  IXtovU ol Chief %  •""! i" publl ',.,..5 3 UrwWk • %  .; iii.n.,. | OM Ml , ,, ,.,.. .„„! ''£3*^,, ll hi) 25 """ • ""•"'! '• %  "< hy " • u I '"i "" £7 Fine For Unlawful Possession *hip Mr. C L. Walwyn P lUcfl Magistrate of DU\' M-!erday lined 64llughson Leach, a watrhrassfeUnj Lane. St Mi.hj.-l. '•ill in 28 duy or in :•"> months' imprisonment with hard lab ur for the unlawful poaai B iion <1 goods. The offence was committed on 1 Police Consul. 1.Ml who hrought the case |0W Mi,, court that he saw the along James Street carrying a box under his arm. H stopped him. and locking Into the !*>* saw thnt there were fOut tins of conked hams, one of milk and tin ol Ovaltimv || %  defendant where be K<'1 Ddl from and the d. fenI 10 five him i satls'Ti xplanatlon. Ho then d him Twenty year obi labourer WoiR %  % %  ; Med Street St. MuiKifi vraj yt i" His Worship Mr. C. L Walwra to pay a AM of 40 for Inflicting ham) m\ Gerald Earl* on %  \:-,: :i • i* to be paid in 14 days la an alternative of month's linprtao nra anl with hird labour E.ile told the court that the defendant bit him on the thumb. James Searles of Bank Rail, St Miihael was yesterday found unity by His Worship Mr. C L Walwyn ol uatnj indecent lan%  i 1 %  Sit.-.1 Police Constable Mar shall while In the execution hix duty. P"i(he :iiM offence he wa. to |>r paid in 14 day or 14 ilnys 1 imprisonment, an f..i the resisting 30 %  in 14 days or one month's Imprisonment The offences were committed oi April 20. foUee Constable Marshall t-J< court thai he spoke to Searlc behaviour on Probyn %  till contlnucfl U hen he tried ti arrest him the defendant resisted CA1NK FIRES your qwn onus Is On the other hand you may distablish the guil ; beyond a teas, ncard it. It is a matter entirely for ibafl doubt. ^M No ubt Now murder is the unlawful killing of a person by another with It is my duty to remind vou malice either expressed or imbriefly of the more impi i ta plicit. Well this OMa piled malice. And all It means Is person, but must be tatltl a wirkeH intmtion, a wicked yond a nason.iblc doubt laal b> intention as displayed by the was the person. %  We thai H, wicked IM! the prosecution harm which would be likel. result In death and from which Mr. Farmer on behalf death results. Method of Attack In considering that aspect' Is to ay. the intention to kill or 'ri nd f the u fortunate girl who the intention lo inflict grievous has met her death and you will For tho Ural Umo „\ the I of ihe %  %  %  : dlgplaylng • DthOT maSeven and a tudf acres of fnurtr %  riu,.u ,„i three .ng, and making patroli with thej %  pite "i ,01 ou r pleuamg>. Oovern,':'. L '' "; ''' ''*„"' ''" %  An 11 !" '''' %  '*' 1 "" s of i' Ul >l£ ' staff. I ,t poss.be i. 'V' V"" A %  " "'*t CtW Th,reporl rtatea; %  *. efarii page lecUlaUoo n n£i m • \ imt when ., |) n was of great benelll (ft Our work licensing of dogs. l,ut pi.,„ foi , .„', Oceurnvl at Uulneu Plantation to the B.C. the building of ., l Sl 'W '"> Tuoi„v Th.-v .,,, S.P.C.A. for •>!. %  loan ol in% % %  1lha Boctetv an coropl< t. .mo onlj Potloi roperty of n. M and 1, M vices. await Qovernmeni aancUon l Jted throughoui the ''"fff 01 and w, '"* i*md His Excellency the Governor. "The ASM-: nt Col ""• bj the Hon !" "JW nrtonotd to Hill View Sir Alfred Savage, K.C.M.G.. hnntary. the Uirtttoi of Public w.-ik BecreUn entitled, fall Proen ] "•"!'. and burnt fouiteer onrad the Society i, v continuing and tho Clerk of the v. '." "'"* '> [ '" w > %  """' "' in in the office of Patron for the St. Michael, have nil bgon niter<"' National Humam %  "'! ', %  ", ."iV .' yar viewed and nun u lettan il1 ""' %  Jnv <, ^ VV 11 1 i^_ 1-hhu hon, ,.,,iit !" n ii., 1. 'I'l-m or Mrs Jeii n Nulioll The ( hairiiianslnp have be. n written on this sub, (OantaUotV ThOJ to tin Chalrmaneblp oi n, Ootobeg a aopaUtlon 1 ,n ?'. %  ',' !'"., V '"'' M AID "TSoiSS^toa at P u n were „,,„, of „ hon, ,. Wo M Jg^H SljS, aT"Jtoui ll!.' -.Honoi il public for P-m. on TuaadeJ h.^.t sever in Chief Inaoectori „r our a fourUi erofl rtoo cane ,, IIHI hhroo aerai of third crop ..nil young rat OILS They are the Mr. Fun , l |>e.ty of J. A. lUyio'v. of case and In ihi: l"^!" 1 "", """!.' ,'" k '" r 'fci?' in ,h ' '""" d "'' "W ini*'""' h C ,lno "oore in July and and ih ul „l in,, n.r; J.PJ IhTprenTwhoii S2*JS-i n ..* rl r? ^? a & Pon.nl pomu which you will be.,r Mr. DouiU. Sndtt In Qclobjr. „., „, c v „ ,,,. M W W 1 mind arc IhoM pul lo ,00 by Coloiiel R. T. Mlchelin. one of the a r, d M h , il I" Chl( lna| 1 In July and and that lh, Nice ITciclenls, look over this Sev. i |, '.V "vJf 11 %  ^ 22* 22*"' .1 remember Ihe younrj mimed o-vinn lo nrexure of lc . d f„ r „|.-i„-dale lrl.lnlion Leonard L'mskin. Ihe boy ether dullw. eoverim n wide ranBe. Wi Certain leeoroinend.tlona of the ""' l '" l, ""' bodily harm from whleh remember l.„„ (Ivlng evidence s". '" ** OottmlltW "JJ J''^. !" 1 death is likely to rcsull-you ore lar an he ll conrernvj. as x.. 11 ... ' %  '• :.|,pr,,v,d by the KM, IUV, " entitled to take Into account the wilh regard Vela Small DoubtCommittee onil ,„il Into en.-,: .. '" method of the ,tuck, the type of l.ss you will fed a kind ol svn.. The services of Iwo Inspeeton '?.,.,,/,,''.'.,.',',;,'.'' wen,-,,, UHd th. clreumntonces pathy leiauM hi. mrl friend v. a I m Htlrllliattd and „„„ man JSESK". !" %  unoundlni the case .nd come lo killed at Ihe night when the two wa. appointed on probation. J"! „ Z" '.',' ..,; ,,. your conclusion as 10 whether ol Ihem were out Kscther havinv The appeals and publicily Sub;„„,. ihere was murder .>.. )"?> ">e &ptanade and .„ Oannutle,. were very active ... p„.; Now ll is not denied for th. lorth. the,, reperl sliowe.1. ; I p,, all a defence thai thai unfortunal. Birl lb. Ttmm crWdM lh. rltlT. Onunltttf .pprov. I th* l„„,.„ ,.„ ,. f !" ',. ""' %  Z s "klled r bv D ^me' ''">" o' I'on.rd B.nskln and formation ol 1,.,,,, „r Me, LTiilLllZ^m^ttH^I V. o ,h f Pl" PO' '"..vou > Sub-Committee composed ol The ,; o | win. dence lo which you have listened Court lelaled how the deceased „ted In. nr |,,rt„ularl,„ualim "I their tell II. i r.„ k*. Si .Insvph. ured. .,!,., "I'M M *£! ."t'l ""A. b0 h ,? *'""' h 'r. d rl "" d he wero "Miking along ,T"to" ,| from whieh the ,.. died. Thai U Z 'SSZT&lSlflgS, Z n J^Hu^SJpSSX r'T not of vitnl Importance although hc B rI (n h( HBh nrt ,.'.„.. ,. ,"' %  ,' 'hew IhJ BriUtn Counnunl element in this case. „„ he | c it Thl. K !" n". c "W M ""' bv kini1 Nor nted you give much thought „,.,„,, i, e f orc ,h c p r .l,ee Marl*. of ,he Represei.l.-tive. |fj lo the Hnd,n of Ihe body, tho ,„,,, Hm hc sn| „ h „ mMunrMBb which the police h , „ n ate>1 ,f k IV\^?<£\7'','^ V !g?"; !" > F-= then he ca, .V"?"',""' 7",V" "ZuT"; khu "'" %  "vn he came an the Bnnlnj of the police ol nPn lhc bi lc whlch he J Kid near the head of the un„„. h i.. „„ KT. .,„,,. K~,J _ And by someone is r.U denied and ,,„„ „„.,..,. by Iherelore your mam task ,. . dl.ereonnev make up 1 mind on Ihe quesSSJ P hS'l Hot. which 1 put to you In my .',.',. opei ing remarks—are you satis"f ,„-": I, doubt" Oirerl Ki idence To Be Lot In Luis ral Board of Health here and therefore this If on i the t a, he has given ami whl b put you in doubt 'h.ibil:' Well, it is there, and tear in mind hat I s;.iii before, that it duty to say wncthf r that is a i Alter fiirect.ng the jury on d.-i.l circumstantial (r of v u imp onunce or not evidence. His Lordship went EO eonairier the other p.rt of on to speak of inc. witnesses eii demeanour. In eoiiRirierinc the evidenee of the atatemi'nt.s DiM-rrpancie-. i far as ti into account the demeanour of thr "' '"-*T "itireiy fa witnewes whom you saw and ,, menbt ( [ '"f. 1 '' heard. You will consider that which were alleged to. hi -nade by the accused, gi when you try to make up your ; nln tfl nuking •rhrr this p your Ing the r own turn for the knife i are < imn too f'.in-fuiiv the contlnuani "The Siiclety bought I v* n good lerviee enabUn) lha Chlof Insrsictor lo an from all over the island. Hands of Mflrcy '-ihiring tii nth of Juno, 18 ; v schools orfnniisi d Banda of Mare* mi.n, i The General Board of Health at tending these tchoola. CM ipprovi day the dlVlalOfi and letting In Girls" Schools and 10 aflaed i ft -A l-inl %  Tin Ii. i,, I iieiii->i -'ii Oiray, s 1 .. Michael bv Mr. lrederleli f-iuranee'. .. P* r 1 .' 1 "'' %  Wletofj Mixi it Sa hiN.i also They H I lots 17 Hems to the programme. No form:il meetings of the Board of Mero Sub-Commitiec have beer held. Tour meetings wen held dun, To keep "/Stt/e 6usy 6o€ttes* JM fit and activi?... W •*. -TV. ll.om HALIBORANGE I ffiW ov.rydcy r irifssfl l;i II' • i. THIS', inr ir tor building L V up ngerveaol rsbtl mergy, promoting \„ licglihy .rowih. •imtig honn and iceth — mid leaanaaoi io dineu. Madr tiim. piiic-i lulihm oil. cleverly hlcndcd with the Iuitc ol dot iirangn. it it rich in Viumm. A and I) gfld to delicious in lane that ^ the nunt hnuky >-.>ungtcr taket ^. 4 •< ""h oVIighi. 4BVT jsjiss"* IiKidcmally, II'I tine fur grownHaliborange been „,! ]g of tin land .d Beifleld were by the n0E to be US cd. Another applicaevidenee. Y->u •rfll .,,„ At)U ld have to be mad* to Fdrde's. Forrie said :ri r Board before th se two lots t On Paee . of JOV m lingland by : IIVMIIKiS LTD., LONDON, F.2 Qn OuA (DASAA ^oodi (Depl. KIOTAIAS STANDARD IRISH UNIN in Aqua. Hose, Powder. Dash Pink.KU. Biscuit. Lemon, Or**i. SU-vbrry, Oold. Tan and Waite a 13 3d Yd. (By ihe hniaeja. TAYLOR WOODS) "SATIN RIBI.V Ths is a gorgeous Hhbed art tl!k maUrtal with a utln back. It has a beautiful feel and hang* gracefully. Full range of shades <$ 13 18 Yd IUHIA Availabls in Plain and WaUred aatlaaes in a lovely range of shade*. 8vral tiualiUei for SI 26 to 12 W) Yd HARRISONS HOSIERY bS Guaae — I.'. UKNIKR in shodes of . ( or:il. Tupii/ Ainaihygl Diamond wi'li Rliirk Seam Per Pair .S2.:2 CAVE SIlKI'HLltD & CO. LTD. in. II. 12. IS, lino \n SI BEE1 SI. Joit'ph Rountl-u/i Hawkers Inquiry roJfoIIeMOnMar/2 AM ENCV1KY into tl.. iiounding the death of id Beatrice Foster, a bo died OTi the spot when bu In whii-h ^he was driving overturned on March 31 on Spring Vale Hoad. St Andrew, has been itxed for rnday. May 2. at District t' St. Joseph The inquest -icheauled for April 25 was ad)ournid on that date, because the majority of witnesses whose evlare of major importance were still on the sick list A CYtl.lsi. | : | Minkaon of hosier Hall St. John, was injured on Tuesday at about 2 p.m. after he collided with a lorrv while riding downhill along Bowling H, Joseph. Both <>f m liends were injured and his biriir. ADWKMI .ailed nt Wakwield. St. John, tho lha proposed Candy Factory, and m nn Interview, with a itipertntendcnt, was told that ill be l-egun during the next two wSJOfca, A numl-ei i.at prest-nt engaged in mixing Cassava with sugar, and bagging it Thi,, nixtvre is being sent to Canada the Bunartnteodent said. A HEAVY IH>WNrOt'K of r.on MUon began at 10.20 u aa Tuesday and fell onaj break unt •poiwd | Mtxwdigh Picnic at CMaewa^h ;.,-t IM.--' LI.V night, tne Plenla was ar% %  nged by a numher of St Joseph •nd St John youths. Moonlight -ca-batning Ilcnies are spc-iai (feature ->f aoclal ur,„ these parts. Just in i ,i, ,! from : l L'l> pin. on I With an >til 11.45 p.m.. lajbl S.-;.-iathing Pl'RE DRU; Co. BOOTS BLOOD MTXTIRF. —for Boils and PtmpUe. relieA-es Neuritis. Rheumatism and a'l aches and Pains caused by impur< Blood. BOOTS MINERAL SALTS FOR PIGS Boots ralamlne Lofl B-K.U Kaolin Poultiei BaoU Clyrerine and Thymol Mouth-wash BaoU Sterile Water ft tions. Boota Synip of Fla*. well known Laxati' for ehlldren. relir.constipation in adul and children. BRICE WMTBintf LIMITED FOR THE BEST I iiiium HIT TI eini ruioa COVKHINC 'SILVER STAR* CONGOLEUM INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES These HOUSEHOLD LINES MEAN CERTAIN SAVINGS . Single Good quality BCD SlltllTS II.MII.I. Good Oualltt HEAVY SHEETS Slnilr ( i M.nt I: t Ii BLANKETS DMM| (OI.OI KEI) BLANKETS TOWELS, TOWELS — Eaee. lUth. Kir. Lovely tjn.hu 56'' v.ldr BEIITUK STRAW MATS — Vnrioun Slien OIL CLOTH. l'l.AMK SIIIIUMi 4 nd PLASTIC T. G\ ERS BEIt ROOM A DKAIMNG HOOM RIGS 1 VF.S WB BATE TBUB AND M01I \T IIIA.M IlltOS. I*R. WM HNV STIttEI DfAL ft ^///////,y^//^////////// # V/,V//,V FRESH SUPPLIES ARRIVED ^ < arnvil Tablets S Tubusan Tablets I /.il Yi-al Tiibl.li Nllll'l I'.plll.llisl'iol TCP. Brosdil I diii. J. HriiEii.s lliiliam S /cplo Tarlar Krmovrr Pencils >; liiili/.d C.lll. I.i.k. IilUUiliCnr KNIGHTS DRUG STORES •.'SSS+'.'S.'.'SSSSSS,;;; ; • : • %  .:•,-.




ESTABLISHE!) 1895

a +f





PHarbavos



J

Lord Lyle Attacks
Double Taxation

Colonies

Damaged:

U.K’s Interest Harmed

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, April 30.

LORD LYLE in his capacity as Chairman of the West

§ndies Sugar Com:

y Limited attacks the United King-

dom double taxation policy in his annual statement to

shareholders issued to-day.

“Empire development on a vast scale is the only means
of improving the standard in the colonies and of restoring
the dwindling standard of living at home,” he says.

“Development requires capital.
This is fully realised by the

tracted into each island.

Colonial Governments,

_ They have taken the very prac

tical step of declaring a tax-free
holiday of five years or more on
profits from new capital invested
in pioneer industries.”

Lord Lyle continues: “Unfor-
tunately watertight bureaucratic
departments in Whitehall have
nullified the effect of this tax free
holiday for British capital.”

Companies Gain Nothing

He points out that the eolonies
forego the whole of the tax but
British registered companies gain
nothing because the normal ruls
is that the difference between the
Colonial and the British tax is
paid to the British Treasury. And
the smaller the Colonial tax the
larger the British tax.

“Only the British Treasury
gains from the sacrifices of tha
colony” continues Lord Lyle.

“What’s so galling is that in
America these conditions do not
apply so that Colonial foresight
results only in attracting foreign
and not British capital.”

Lord Lyle expresses the hope
that the Colonial Government now
in power will see that this state
of affairs is put right. He says
it is not only damaging to the
Colonies and intonsistent with
accepted British Policy but also
harmful to the long-term interest
of the Mother Country.

Referring to his recent visit to
Jamaica he said that he had been
impressed by increasing activity
on all sides as compared with a
iffew years ago and expresses the
hope that this upsurge in activity
results from the realisation that
without increasing productivity

there little long-term im-
prove! general conditions.
’He says that one of in-
creasing luctivity is the crea-

tion of new industries encouraged
by tax concessions; But new in-
dustries can only succeed if the
general economy of the island is
sound. And this economy rests
on sugar. In the enthusiasm for
new industries it is to be hoped
that sugar is not forgotten. But
at the same time it must not ba
relied upon to provide an undue
proportion of the istand’s revenue.

Concern

Lord Lyle expresses’ concern
also at the disparity in local prices
of sugar as compared with the
export price and says he does not

ieve it is sound to use the com-
modity locally to subsidise the
community as a whole.

Subject to confirmation at the

ual General Meeting on May
21, a final dividend of seven pence
per ordinary share free of income
ax will be paid, which, with an
interim dividend of four pence,
makes a total of eleven pence for
the year. ~

9 U.S. Fliers Killed





Capital must be at-
Campai
To Eradicate
Yellow Fever

Dr. J, P, O’Mahony, Director of
Medical Services, is starting a
cam; = att ati, the

ion les e
mosquito responsible for carrying
urban yellow fever.

He told the General Board of
Health at their meeting yester-
day afternoon that it was well
Saw. that the os cones
Mosquito was presen’ -
dos to an undesirable extent. The
campaign will include _ special
training of selected sanitary in-
spectors, to-house inspec-
nat and treatment based on

The Director of Medical Ser-
vices in‘a ¥ said that he

eport,
thought the campaign necessary
because the Pan-American Sani-
tary Bureau, — the
Regional Bureau of the World
Health tion for the
Western ere — was en-
trusted with solution of the con-

tinental problem of urban yellow
fever, and that in order for them
to be successful, they should in-
clude all territories in the West-
ern Hemisphere.

International Effort

He said that as Barbados pre-
sents an im it intercolonial
shipping and one of
tercolonial and international air-
ways” importance, it should not

stay out of the international effort |

to wipe out the aedes aegypti
mosquito from the Caribbean. It
was of added interest to note that
eradication of the mosquito w
prevent outbreaks of Dengue
Fever which has been in the West
Indies for twenty years.
The report said that the
P.A.S.B. was authorised to set up
an eradication programme of an
international scale and it has set
up an office in Jamaica for the

supervision of the work in the
@ On Page 6



Farnum For
Finland Fund

i The fund to defray the ex-
penses of Ken Farnum to the
Olympic Games in Helsinki

next July is just creeping
along.

Donations are accepted at
the Royal Bank of Canada,
Barclay’s Bank and the office
is the Barbados Advocate.







,00
Since Monday
4 Bob Cumberbatch .. 3.00
Z TOKYO, April 30 Bookers Bros. (B’dos)

A United States Air Force C46 ann bee G lente 10.00
transport smashed into the rim of}| A.B.C. .......... 1,00
Mount Aso on Kyushu, killing ali SE 5.00
four crew-members. e© accident Da Costa & Co., Ltd. 100.00
brought to nine the number of NW. E. Wilson & Co...... 25.00
United States airmen killed in ain Rs @ Go. ......... 25.00
erashes in Japan since Monday. 's Water

A Helicopter of the Third AG Club ........ 2.00
Rescue Squadron landed on Mount + Lewis .......... 1.00
Aso soon after the C46 crash. The|| Betsam ........... 2.00
pilot radio¢d there are “no sur- A. H. Bowen ...... 5.00
vivors.” Springer ...... 3.00

Four crew-members of a C1i9|| Eddie from T’dad. . 1.20
Flying Boxcar were killed last High School... .17.34
night when the transport hit the Mr, & Mrs, Louis
ridge while appreaching Ashya 10,00
athe pUS of oo Pet —

ep of an F§1 Mus’
killed on Monday when his antes Total ............. $ 709.68
crashed 30 miles north of Nobeoka ;
Kyshu.—U.P.
. a,







in-| have ruled,



From All Quarters

Most Useless
Underground

Rome: The most useless under-
ground in the world has just heen
opened in Rome. It starts at St.
Paul’s Gates, which is practically
where the city ends, and after
three miles emerges in a deserted
spot of the Roman countryside.
At the terminus there are five
imposing unfinished buildings —
and a few grazing sheep. The
underground was planned and
partly built during Mussolini’s
day. It was intended to take
streams cf visitors to a great
Fascist world fair, which was left
half built. The Catholic gov-
ernment completed Mussolini’s
job, hoping that Rome would
ee spread in that direc-

on.

Amsterdam: The Amsterdam
municipality plans to impose a
tax of 50s. a year on cars parked
in streets between midnight and
4 a.m, Five thousand car owners
are compelled to leave their cars
in the streets because no garages
are available.

Tel Aviv: Forty four-year-olds
(wheedled into place by their
mothers) demonstrated at the
Town Hall of the seaside resort
of Natanyig this morning demand~-
ing a kindergarten in their area.
The Mayor of Natanyia promised
the children he would do what
he could for them.

Milan: The Anglo-Iranian Oil
Company has joined in Sicily’s
greatest organised search since
the army man-hunt of bandit
Guiliano, The Anglo-Iranian and
two American companies are
tooth-combing 750,000 acres in
search of oil. Geologists believe
oil exists in southern and western
Sicily. Smallholders, who once
prayed in the village churches for
rain, are now praying they will

it.

New York: Scotsmen the world
over will be pleased to hear that
bagpipes are officially accepted at
last in America as a musical
instrument, The Musicians’ Union
after long debate-—
| OK, it’s music!

Gairy Was





ca “Discourteous”’

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 30
| “If you did not come in I
}have had you arrested and

| brought here” Sir Clement Malone,
Chairman of the three-man Com~
mission of Inquiry into the work-
ing of the P.W.D, tald the Hon.
E. M. Gairy who was appearing
to give evidence this morning,
He began by saying that he
wanted to make it clear that he
did not come beeause he had
received a subpoena on the
previous day,

Or. Tuesday the Commissioners
waited over an hour for the com-

ing the Legislator Labour leader
at whose own instigation the in-
quiry resulted by a motion in the
Legislature.

“You toid the Commission you
would be present on Tuesday
when you were quite aware a
meeting of the Executive
fixed for that day. You were
very discourteous.” Gairy said:
wy in not come because I could
not.”

was







_ MUTINY RUNS



THEIR BLOODY INSURRECTION at on end, mutinous prisoners leave Cell Block 15 at the Southern Micht~
gan Prison, in Jackson, after win .ng an eleven-point reform program in return for calling off their yebel-



THURSIAY, MAY 1, 1952

S COURSE WITH STEAK AND TIME

od









|
|
|
|
|
|
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a

Ss

A



lion and releasing guard hostages, The prisoners (top, left) back out the door after being searched, while

others (right) march into d
Ministers Get
Police Guards

IN SOUTH AFRICA

CAPETOWN, April 30.

Police reinforcements poured
into Capetown on Wednesday
night to maintain order during
the tense Parliamentary debate
on the Bill which would elimi-
nate court checks on the Govern-
fs of Prime Minister Danie
an. : "

the home of every Government
Minister, and Opposition political
Jeaders said that at least 250
patrolmen have been temporarily
transferred from

Police said in Pretoria re-
inforcements are being moved in

outlying areas,

id} because “threats have been made

against individuals,” specifically
members of the Government. The
anti-Court Bill is designed to nul-
lity the Appellate Court's recent
reversal of the law denying half
castes the voting rights of the
white people but it would have
the effect of freeing Government
from all judicial control.—U.P.

Rattle Casualties

WASHINGTON, April 30
The Defense Department
ported on Wednesday



known American battle casualties) The production

in Korea now total 107,965, The
increase of 299 over the las
week's summary includes cas-
ualties from the beginning of the

war through last Friday,

turned to military service.—U.P)



: of the sitting, expect-

Fuel Workers’ Walkout

Hampers Civil Economy

DENVER, Apirl 30.

THE STRIKE of 90,000 fuel workers began at 12.01
a.m. (local time) in most of the United States’ petroleum
countries except California threatening fue! shortage not

only for motorists, public transportation and shipping but |

for natural gas consumers as well.

The strike had been delayed twice at Government's |

request. Company officials in most eases began orderly

shutdowns which were to
lines.

EXPLOSION KILLS 30 ON HEAVY CRUISER ST. PAUL



THE NAVY DEPARTMENT has announced that an explosion in a fo!
heavy cruiser St. Paul killed 30 members of the crew while the
Korean coast. There were no wounded. The blast was officially d
leved caused by a powder bag catching fire. There was no evidence that enemy
toe worst naval disaster of the Korean war, 1

rward gun turret (arrows) aboard the
ship was engaging in an actian off the
escribed as a gunpowder explosian, be-

fire caused the tragedy,

The ship is back in agtion, (International Sound olio::

For the time being any serious

effect on the National Defence ef-

fert appeared to have been avert-
ed by union leaders’ decision not
to eall an immediate walkout at
California refineries which supply
most of the fuel for warships,
planes and mechanized ground
equipment,

The coalition of CIO AFL and
independent unions that ordered
the strike estimated that the walk-
out would cut the daily produe-
tion of , diesel fuel, motor
oils rather refined petroleum pro-
duets in half—enough to be felt
on civilian economy within a short
while.

A new threat for industrial and
domestic users of natural gas de-
veloped when pickets appeared on
gas epics, on which a large
part of the civilian population de-
pends for cooking, heating
operation of factory furnaces

Assistant Federal Mediator Chief
C, M, Mills was optimistic as he
reported “some progress” in nego-
tiatiorls Tuesday, Talks were to
continue although the strike was
underway in the world’s larges:
oil plant—Standard Oil of New
Jersey—was granted a 72-hour
period of grace in which to close
down operations.

The strike, over wage demands

and

originally had been scheduled for | clo ing Foreign Exchange
* | March 3 but was postponed at the} ings
request of Federal Mediator Ching

and President Truman,—U.P.

|
|
|
|
|
}
|
)
Police guards are stationed |

|

re~



Listed | described by this source as one
are 18,980 deaths, 76,675 wound-| based along the Rhine River bar-
ed, 9,795 missing, 1,134 captured,| rier, It pointed out that NATO
1,381 previously missing but re-|

| about

(By DAVID

hall to dine on steak and ice cream, Weariness and tension etched on
me one enlil divide aa magn Mesa cau: otter hoing feed. (Luaternational)

| Russia Is Not
Ready For War

BRIGGS)
WASHINGTON, April 30.

A UNITED STATES SOURCE closely acquainted with

‘the European defence positic

mn, said the Russians are con-

centrating on building up the mobility of their forces but

do not yet-appear ready to s

lart a war.

It said 30 Soviet divisions now in position to attack

in Western Furopewoutd

require a considerable buildup

in strength before the Russians could hope to succeed in an

allout onslaught on the West,

The source said such a_build-
up would be detected by Western
intelligence, The only known
changes in Soviet forces in the
past three years were given as
these; The Russians have heen
increasing the mobility of their
ground forces through motoriza-
tion, They have greatly improv-
ed the mobility of their 145 divi-
sions and five of their former ter
cavalry divisions have been cone
verted to armoured divisiong with
stress on mobility,

Satellites Improve

Soviet satellite divisions have
been improved but are still not
good enough for big league “war-
fare.” The Russians have been
trying to increase the mobility
and offensive punch of these
forces,

Soviet airpower




has been in-

that the creasing in defensive capabilities |.

of MIG 165 jet
fighter, largely a defensive alr.
craft, hag been standardized at
400 to 500 airplanes per
month,

Western defence strategy was

forces are committed to receiving
the first blow of an attack and
would need the defensive depth
of area between the iron curtain
and the Rhine to absorb this,
Western Weaknesses
The source outlined — several!
weaknesses in the Western)
position however. These includ«|
ed; Western forces will not reach!
strength equal to the 30 Soviet|
divisions facing the West for an-}
other year,

Claimed After
Car Collision

In the Court of Or!ginal Juris-
diction yesterday His Nonour Mr.

J, H, Hanschell adjourned until
May 8 the cage in whith Oscar
McCollin of Greens, St, George,
is claiming damages to the amount
of £50 from Clifferd Gooding of
Silver Sands, Christ Church, who
it is alleged damaged the plaintiff's
car through negligence in a collis-
ion, Gooding is not admitting lia-
bility,

Counsel in the case are Mr.
J, BT. Brancker for the plaintiff
McCollin and Mr. J. 8, B, Dear
for the defendant Gooding. ‘The
plaintiff? alleged that the incident
took place on Mareh 25, 1951

Sgt. Inniss attached to the Dis-
trict “BY Station said that on
March 25 at about 1 p.m, he was;
called to Brighton Main Road, St.
George, where he saw two cars
drawn up on the left side of the
road, G-293 was on the left side
of the road facing Mount Hill, St,
George, Both wheels were in the
gutter, The other car X-933 was
ilo on the left side of the road
but fa¢ing Brighton Plantation. He
took measurements and both the
plaintiff and defendant gave him
statements about the collision.

MecCollin told the Court that



The deterrent to a Soviet attack
is not yel in the field but remains!
the economic and atomic guperi-,
ority of the West,

UP,

Jamaica Province





be followed by posting of picket |

Of Canada Fund

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca., April 30

Rich industrialist James Gore
has suggested the start of a fund
named the Jamaica Province of
Canada. Gore has suggested the
ftart of the fund to the Dally
Gleaner enclosing a cheque for
$500 for the purpose of financing
the move towards Jamaica and
possibly a B.W.I. alliance with
| Canada,

The suggestion followed a news-
puper story that a group of Cana-
dian Parliamentarians are inter-
ested in coming to Jamaica to
discuss political affairs,



U.S. $ At Discount

MONTREAL, QUE., April 40.

The United States Dollar on
Tuesday closed at a discount of
two per cent, in terms of Cana-
dian funds up =1/32 from Mon-
day’s close; that is it took $0.98
Canadian to buy $1 American,
The pound sterling was $2.75 3/8
unchanged from Monday.

NEW YORK, April 30.

The Canadian dollar was at a
premium of 21/32 per cent, in
terms of United States funds in
deal-
on Tuesday. The pound
sterling was unchanged at $2.81.

lvar, the radiator, grill and fenders

ibe fixed.

Sabrejets

alter the collision he carried his
ar G-293 to a mechanic Springer
who said that when he got the

vere damaged, He had to take out)
the engine so that the chassis could

Down 6 MIG’s

SEOUL, April 30

United States planes destroye
six Communist MIG-~-15 jet fight
ers and damaged four others in
sudden renewal of aerial warfare
in clearing weather over North
Korea today,

Fifth Air Force Sabre Jet
knocked down all six of the Rus- |
slan-built MIG’s and accounted |
for three of the damaged jets in a
swirling dog-fight just south — of
the Yalu River on the Manchurian
(rontier,

While the United States fighters
warded off prowling MIG’s, Allied
fighter-bombers smashed railway
and bridge construction completed
by the Communists during the
past three days of rain,



United Nations Navy guns at]
the same time bombarded targets
on the es and west coasts of
North Korea,

On the ground Allied soldiers
recaptured an advance United
Nations position near “Punch-

bowl Valley” on the eastern front.

United Nations troops also re~
pulsed a series of Red probing
attacks west of Mundung Valley}
‘and north-west of Punchbowl] |

Nearly 70 Communist soldiers
were killed in five small ground
actions on Tuesday.—U.P







precincts

Taft

£50 Damages |



—

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Scavenger To

= Die For Murder

CARLTON BREWSTER, a scavenger of Deane’s Vil-
lage, St. Michael, was yesterday condemned by His Lord-
ship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, to hang when
an Assize Jury took 12 thinutes to find him guilty of mur-
dering 19-year-old Norma Haswell on September 7 last

year,

This sturdy, umsmiling man, attacked Haswell while
she and her fiance, Leonard Benskin, were in Perry Gap
on, the night of September 7 at about 9.30 and after beating

Benskin, killed Haswell.



Kisenh@wer
Qutstrips
Senator Taft

BOSTON, April 30
General Eiseniower piled up a
idslide vote uver Senator Robert
Taft, ix the Massachusetts
Sidential Primary and clinched
lion's shore of the State’s 38
National Cony4ntioen delegates.
Running better than two to one
ahead of Taft in a State-wide
Write in” popularity poll, the re-
tiring chief of NATO ted in all
Fut two of 28 contests for district
delegates,
The “Compromise” slate of ten
delegates at lurge was unepposed.

Pre
ihe

Eisenhower not only ram away
with the Republican poll but was
‘ strong second behind Senator
®stes Kefauver in the Democratic
referential test. President Tru-

man third, and Taft fourth were
far outdistanced.

With 1,375 of the State’s 1,739
counted the vote was
{‘epublican: Pisenhower 160,842
raft 70,059, Governor Barl War-
en of California $86, former Min-
hesota Governor Harold EB. Stassen

‘78, and General MacArthur 1,544.

Democratic Kefauver 21,438,
Kisenhower 11,940, Truman 5,383,
3,615, Governor Paul A.
Dever of Massachusetts 1,791 and
W. Averell Harriman 696.—-U.P.

Sidewa
idewalks
Not Used
Sufficiently
Some people are st } mot using
he side walks on either side of
the Victoria Bridge. Now that the
Chamberlain Bridge is out of
working order it is more neces-
ory that people ‘should avoid

walking in the path of the traffic
moving along the Victoria Bridge.





Yesterday between the hours of
11.00 am, and 1.00 p.m. there
vas @ continual flow of traffic
ver the Victoria Bridge as the
Chamberlain Bridge is undergoing
repairs, Despite all this traffic
sume people were still walking
in the road between the Bridge
which is for vehicular traffic
alone.

One woman was nearly knocked
down when she attempted to cross
from one side of the road to the
next, Luekily for her the driver
ipplied his brakes in time.

There are signs on either side
1 the road urging the pedestrians

use the side walk. The two
ide walks can accommodate the
valking public.





*@

i
al



CHOCOLATE
COKERNUT BAR

Ae

i , Ws



FRY’S

UNCHIE =~.

FRY’S 4 FAVOURITES



He was represented by Mr.
George Farmer whom, His Lord-
snip remarked hag conducted thé
case forcibly and weli. - -

Mr. W. W. Reece, @.C., Solici-
tor General, prosecuted for the
Crown,

In the preliminary hearing of
the case, Brewster attacked a wit-
ness and there was much diffi<
culty in getting him off her and
throughout this case, insteag of

the usual two policemen guard
ing him, four flanked him.
This was the last case for thif

Sessions

and a large crowd was
abeut the :

court precincts,
Long Trial

Putting the case for the de#
fence, Mr. Farmer said he hat
noted with appreciation the kecm
interest they had taken over the
evidence. It had been a ‘some
what long trial with a mass off
evidence, but he hoped they
would continue to be patient ond
maintain the keen interest right
to the end. Even to the extent
of boring them, even to the ex-
tent of repetition, he would bow
to be sure he presented the cas
for the defence with all therough-
ness. ;

He said that the defence wag
not sayimg that Norma Haswell
was not murdered, that she was
not brutally put to death: but
the defemce were saying that th
question at issue was, “Bey. J
wroved beyond a reasonable doubt
that Brewster murdered her?”

Mr, Farmer pointed out dis=
crepancies in Benskin’s evidencé
und asked the jury to view thé
whole with doubt. He stressed
inat Bemskin had described the
attacker to certain people and hig
description was that the attackef
was tall, dark and slim—a des¥
cription which in no way tallied
with the accused. ¥

He pointed out that the alleged
confessions by Brewster to his re=
puted wife, and to a friend Force
as told by them were not the

me mor did they agree with
Benskin’s evid ‘

He said that Veta Small, Brew-
ster’s common law wife, and
Brewster, had had a_ dispute
sometime before ang it well might
be that she was motivated by
that in speaking of alleged cons
fessions. e

Threatened :

He said, too, that the Policd
had threatened her that it would
be “a sorry do” if she did not tell
them what Brewster had told her
and she had been in this way
brow beaten.

He showed out that Small had
only spoken of seeing blood on
Brewster’s hands after he had
washed the clothes, when surely
any blood that was there would
have been washed off.

Mr. Reece for the prosecution,
on the other hand, submitted that
the discrepancies, where they
were any, were not material.
There was no reason why Forde
On page 5












Sets 14) i/ oe



iinte }.
on nena ANTE __\\citnnIeNeNRenEbeRenm arene

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952



SCAVENGER TO DIE FOR MURDER

@ From page 1.
in whom Brewster
should pick out Brewster from dence given . by
all the rest of Barbadians as a Witness and how
man who had
killed the girl, The defence had *Viaence,
not teld them why they should And in considering that
not accept his evidence and they â„¢UuSt bear in.mind, as mea wf the
should accept it.

that

much you

given a different statement.

ated by persons who they could
well believe were not prejudiced.
For instance, when she said he
told her he was gcing to the mor-
tuary, someone said that he had
seen him there.

So they had to accept her evi- and ' remember
dence and Forde’s as to his con- what they hear.
fiding in them and come to the gifferent’ version
conclusion that he was guilty.

His Lordship said: The accused even
is charged that he at the parish observe
of St. Michael on the 7th of Sep- other thi
tember last year, murdered Norma
Haswell.

As you have heard and as it is |
requisite that I should repeat to ty
you, when you come to deliberate, j,
you will bear in mind that it is
the duty of the prosecution to
establish the guilt of the accused
beyond a reasonable doubt before
you can convict hin. He stands ~“S"*
in the dock innocent until he is 2¢vanced on the evidence proved guilty. the way in which evidence as

If you are satisfied after con- een given, at the same time you
sidering all the evidence together â„¢USt view the matter altogeiour,
with all the criticisms advanced t@king into account all the
on his behalf by Mr. Farmer in ©Vidence, —
his thorough and forceful address _ Uf you discover that there sre
to you, if after all that, you ara Vital discrepancies which make
atisfied beyond a reasonable >°U disbelieve a particular wit-
doubt that he is guilty, it is your "eSs, naturally you will not accept
duty to find him se. If you are the evidence. But, if as there
not so satisfied, if you have a May be, there are certain discrep-
reasonable doubt, it is your duty @Mcies in the evidence, either as
to return a verdict of not guilty. between what a witness says here

Solemn Task or another time, these discrep-

You have a solemn task to per- S2Cl€S may mot be important and
form. The case as you will realise YOU May still get the general pic-
is one of the most serious in law ‘Ure, the general outline of the
and therefore you will take care ¢Vidence given — always bearing
—each one of you individually— 1 mind that in the considerauun
and pay due attention to all you of this point and you are left in
have heard and each of you in- % Teasonable doubt, the benetit vi
dividually make up his mind as ‘hat doubt will be in favour cf
to what he considers is the true the accused. ,
verdict and then jointly and As has been rightly put, a rea-
unanimously come to that verdict. S°nable doubt is not a whimsical

You gentlemen are the sole Weak spirited kind «f doubt which
judges of the facts in this case OMe adopts because one is weak
and there is little law involved. °F easy-going. It is a reasonable
If in the course of my remarks Goubt as the expression goes and
I express any opinion on the facts ™e€aMs such a doubt as would pre-
of which you are the sole judges, V€Mt you in your ordinary cours:
you will realise that

gest to you,
certain discrepancies in th> evi-

member scme part of what they

other

something and

Say, the demeanour and

mind.

Criticisms
While as has been very forcibly
and well done — while it is “yuite
right that criticisms should be

it is my Cf life or erdinaiy business ac-
opinion that I am expressing. 1 tivities from taking that particu-
am not a judge of the facts, you Jar course, That is the type of
are the sole judges of the facts. doubt which the law says must
If I express an opinion and you be dispelled by the Prosecution
agree with it. you may adopt it before there is a conviction. Tne
as your own. onus .is on the prosecution to es-

On the other hand you may dis- tablish the guili; beyond a reasen-
card it. It is a matter entirely for abla doubt.

No Doubt

you.

Now murder is the unlawful h
killing of a person by another with | It is my duty to remind you
malice either expressed or im- briefly of the more important mat-
plied.. Well, this case does not ters that have been put to ycu by
deal with any expressed malice. the defence — the defence which
The evidence show that the ac- does not deny, I repeai, that Norma
cused diq not know the unfortun- Haswell was killed, killed in* a
ate girl who was murdered. ‘dastardly and desperate way, y.-u
Therefore you are only concerned well may think. When I say that,
with it as far as that definition is you must not jump to the con
concerned, what is known as 1m- clusin that the accused is the
plied malice. And all it means is person, but must be satisfied be-
a wicked intention, a wicked yond a reasonable doubt that he
intention as displayed by the was the person.
circumstances of the particular The defence broadly therefore,
case and in this case the wicked is that the prosecution has tai)
intention either to kill or the in- in that duty and the more im-
tention to inflict grievous bodily portant points which you will bear
harm which would be likely to in mind are those put to you by
result in death and from which Mr, Farmer on behalf vf the
death results, accused,

Method of Attack You will remernber the young

In considering that aspect—that man Leonard Eenskin, the boy
is to ‘ay, the intention to kill or fricnd the intention to inflict grievous has met her death and you will
bodily harm from which remember hin giving evidence so
death is likely to result—you are far as he is concerned, as well as
entitled to take into account the with regard Veta Small. Doubt-
method of the attack, the type of less you will fecl a kind of sym-
weapon used, the circumstances pathy because his girl friend wa;
surrounding the case and come to killed at the night when the two
your conclusion as to whether of them were out together having
there was murder. visited the Esplanade and so

Now it is not denied for the forth.
defence that this unfortunate girl Mr. Farmer criticises the evi-
Norma Haswell met her death as dence of Leonard Benskin and
a result of being killed by som€- one of the points put to you ic
one. Therefore some of the evi- that Benskin in the Magistrate's
dence to which you have listened Court related how the deceased
you need not bother your head gir] and he were walking along
about, like the evidence of Dr. in the vicinity which you all had
Cato who describes the wounds the opportunity cf visiting, with
from which the girl died. That is the bicycle between them, with
not of vital importance although the girl cn the right and himself
an essential element in this case. on the left. That is the evidencs
Nor need you give much thought given before the Police Magis-
to the finding of the body, the trate, Here he said the girl was
measurements which the police on his left nearest to the khus
took, except for certain purposes, jhus grass; then he came and
or the finding of the police of then the bicycle which he was
blood near the head of the un- ji ching on his right hand. And
fortunate ‘woman, because as I cays Mr, Farmer, here is a man
have said, you have heard Mr. ae - :

ai a 7 . giving one version before ‘he
Farmer say that she was killed Police Magistrate and another Ver-
by someone is net denied and

. sion here and therefore this is one
therefore your main task is to

.. discrepancy in the two statemen‘s
make up your mind on the ques- which he has given end which

hon ee ee Png wo Ta Re he suggests can put you in doubt
€ arks—are } satis- ~~ ¢ SaIRITIEGS a al lina
fea beyond a reasonable doubt? 288 to his reliability as a witne

Well, it is there, and bear in mind



Af nee Evieenee ii what I said before, that it is your
ter directing the jury on di- quty to say wnether that is a mat-
rect evidence, and circumstantial ter of vital importance or not
evidence, ig 5 eee pp so consider the other part of hi
on to speak o ha witness evidence.
demeanour. ts j
In considering the evidence o . CoE se gt
this case, he said, you will take SE ge ME ee ee ei
into account the demeanour of the M4tver enlir@ly for yeu. eae
itnesses whom you saw and remember that in the statements
See “You will consider thaq Which were alleged to have been
hen you try to make up your made by the accused, given by the
Cama aout are making up your Witnesses in evidence. You will
minds as to whether this witness remember Forde’s. Forde said

or the other witness is a witness @ On Page 6.

Discrepancies



—







Biscuit, Lemon, Oystez,

“SATIN RIBTA”

with a satin back.
feel and hangs gracefully.

TAFFETA

in a lovely range of shades.

HARRI

of the truth; whether you should
confided, attach much credence to the evi-
particular
can

told him he had Bive to this or that part of the
you

world, human nature, the fraili-
If Smal] had been terrified by ties of it and realise as I am sure
the Police, she coulg since have YOU will, that memories of peo-

But Ple vas. powers = seer ane
. Vary and if you take that all into
her evidence had been corrobor account, you will accept, I sug-
that there will pe

dence in a case of this kind, Some
people hear same things and re-

near; others hear the same thing
parts of
Some produce a
f of what they
think they have heard. Some who
see certain things happen
ethers
ngs in what took place.
Therefore you will make due
allowance, taking into account, as
the
pes of people and bear this in



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BARBADOS

CARS DAMAG







ADVOCATE



Life Assurance building, shortly before 10 o'clock yesterday morning.

M 179 is owned by A. W. Harper and was being driven by his wife.

damaged.

broke all previous records, according to the Annual Report
of 1951 which was presented to members at the Annua!
General Meeting of the S.P.C.A. at the British Council,

“Wakefield”, on Tuesday night.

March when the two Shetland Ponies collected over $50.

In October
S.P.C.A.

last the
paid the traveling, liv-
ing expenses and salary of Chief
Inspector Terrezao for four weeks

year

and had the benefit of his 25
years of experience in British
Guiana. The Inspector carried

out a full programme of activ-
ities which included lecturing to
all types of audiences, broadcast-
ing, and making patrols with the
staff.

The report states: “His visit
was of great benefit to our work
indebted to the B.G.
the loan of his ser-

and we are
S.P.C.A. for
vices.

His Excellency the Governor,
Sir Alfred Savage, K.C.M.G., hon-
oured the Society by continuing
in the office
year.



of Patren for the

The Chairmanship

Changes in the Chairmanship of
the Executive Committee were
inevitable following the departure
to England of Col. Campbell in
March, Canon Moore in July and
Mr. Douglas Smith in October.
Colonel R. T. Michelin, one of the
Vice Presidents, took over this
office in October. .Major Foster
resigned o-ving to pressure of
cther duties,

Certain recommendations of the
Reorganisation Sub - Committee
were approved by the Executive
Committee and put into
The services of two
were terminated and one
was appointed on probation.

The appeals and publicity Sub-
Committee were very
their repert showed.
tive Committee
formation of a
Sub - Committee

effect,
Inspectors
man

active as
The Execu-
approved of the
Band of Mercy

composed of

members either specially inter-
ested in, or particularly quali-
fied to deal with the Humane

Education of children,

The last Annual General Meet-
ing was held at the British Coun-
cil, Wakefield, by kind permission
of the Represertzetive, Mr. Risley

Belfield Land
To Be Let In Lets

The General Board of Health
approved at their meeting yester-

day the division ‘and letting in
lots cf 83,863 sq. ft. of land at
Belfield, Biack Rock, by Miss
Nora Augusta Watts.

The Board approved the divi-

sion and sale of 37,458 sq. ft. of
land in lots at Maxwells, Top

Rock, by Mr. Mitchinson Lloyd
Harris°n It also approved the
dividing and letting of 79,120 sy.
lots at Grazettes,
Mr.

land in
1, by
iffith.

ft. of
St. Mict
Laurence

Frederick






They stipulated that lots 17
and 18 of the land at Beifield were
not to be used, Another applica-
tion would have to be made to


















£7 Fine For
Unlawful
Possession

His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwyn,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-| scheduled for April










PAGE FIVE



St. Joseph Round-up
























| Hawker’s Iequiry
| fo Be Held On May 2

from = =

Messrs. BOOTS
PURE DRUG Co.

BOOTS BLOOD MIXTURE

—for Boils and Pimples,

| AN ENQUIRY into the circum-
| stanees surrounding the death of
45-year-old Beatrice Foster, a
hawker who di¢d on the spot when
a ‘bus in which she was driving
overturned on March 31 on Spring
Vale Road, St. Andrew, has been
| fixed for Friday, May 2, at District
“F’, St. Joseph. The inquest
25 was ad-

—

relieves Neuritis, Rheu-

SSE,
ee arrived



















trict “A" yesterday fined 64-/journed on that date, because the :
year-old Hughson Leach, a watch-| majority of ‘witnesses whose evi-| matism and a'] aches and 4
man of Jessamy Lane, St. Michael,; uence are of major importance | ,
£7 to be paid in 28 days or in| were still on the sick list. | Pains caused by impure (@~
default two months’ imprisonment! A CYCLIST, Clebert Hinkson of Blood
with hard labcur for the unlaw-| Foster Hall, St. John, was injured '
ful possession of goods. jon Tuesday at about 2 p.m. after BOOTS MINERAL SALTS
The offence was committed on| he collided with a lorry while
April 29. Police Constable 249 | riding coon along Bowling FOR PIGS
Springer who brought the case| Green, St. Joseph. Both of his 5
told the court that he saw ey pensa were aoe. and his bi- Boots Calamine Lotion. .
defendant along James Street/cYcle Was extensive y damaged. ; ‘
carrying a box under his arm. i ADVOCATE corfespondent Boots Kaolin Poultice
He stopped him, and looking|¢lled at Wakefield, St. John, the Boots Glycerine and Thy-
into the box saw that there were| Place of the proposed Candy Fac- . a Thy
four tins of cooked hams, one of seinet aac ie =» Soe aa a a mol Mouth-wash
milk and a tin of Ovaltine. He) *UPerintendent, was old that
asked the defendant where he got | Candy making operations will be Boots Sterile Water for
these’ goods from and the defen- | S¢sun during the next two weeks, injections
dant failed to give him a aabiA"so- | Ot Gngnoed workers are at pres- e r
tory explanation, He then} ©"! engaged in mixing Cassava Boo 5s Ss
arrested sim, | with sugar, and bagging it. This t= Syrup of Figs. J
Twenty year old labourer Wool- | ne aoe is being sent to Canada, Well known Laxativ
berton King of Reed Street St. me BRAVE pent Said. / ;
Michael was yesterday ordered hich saa ar tee of rain for children, reliev
t is “shi + Ww a 2 >, 1 . : 4
to bon ye? Gy ee ue Cuseeny and fell with i occ constipation in adit!
bodily harm erald Earle st reak until 11.45 p.m. shi
Ronit o on Gerald Earle on spoiled a Moonlight Sca-bathing and children.
; : ‘ ' . The Ane je * iy enie a attlewash last Tues-
TWO motor cars were involved in an accident at Lower Broad Street, opposite the Barbados Mutual The fine is to be paid in 14 days| yay » Pieni f
or there is an alternative of cne aera The ,picnic. was SE* BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
One, M 251, is owned by Barclays Bank and was being driven by 0. Yearwood, while the other, month's imprisonment with hard and St Neha pautha oes
labour. Earle told the court that| oo.) 4) tee ee ee
The right front fender of M. 179 was extensively damaged and the left front fender of M 231 slightly the defendant “pit ily: tes ‘the : pen aes we nee LIMITED i
. * < o socla ire in
- sie ; ; as : thumb, these parts, | eeudecaid
] e 2 on Searles of Bank Hall, St
Michael was yesterday found
S.P.G.A. Flag Day Collection sie wesc |
Walwyn of using indecent lan- F
guage on Probyn Street anc .
Breaks All Previous Records _ sists cece:
shal while in the execution ¢/
, ? his duty. ;
. Bee 4 ; aan t For the first offence he wae
THE S.P.C.A.’s FLAG DAY COLLECTION of $1,427.86 the year by the Appeals and Pub- neq 15/+ to be paid in 14 dan
licity Sub-Committee which te- 4, 14 days’ imprisonment, an: Q BEASTIFEL
sulted in the following activities:\— 6. the resisting 30/- in 14 days
Poem ear ak Be Perit eee ae or One month's imprisonment Gasv-Te-CLean
Flag Day was held in previous records ; be he ad were committed or FLOOR COVERING
, ae ; oo April 29,
, Animal Weitere ay aeks Police Constable Marshall tele 4
z ; An Anima ellare eck the c urt that a § > ¢ z
eueicey, on April 20.) bir. Gecrge “arranged in October brought the about his Selavinur on, Probyn “SILVER STAR’ .
Thebans serch ant os ot we a eee “ Street and he still continued tc
West nae predided, Serta Dae Wire Genet ete eee and @usbehave and when he tried tc
—™» . . = t * "er é é > >» £ r PAY ; fc asic
ims, kingly lent by the Caha- Canasta Party together netted arrest him the defendant resisted
dian Trade Commissioner, Vrmi- $336.22. .*
dad, were shown, For the first time in the history CANE FIRES:
Dog Refuge af the Society, a stall displaying ?
The Report conunued: “We re- ERE Oas, ‘posters. atid Onna, HAs Seven and a half acres of fourth
gret to report yet again, that in teria connected with the § ociety's crop ripe canes, three and three
. . i work was on view at the Annual quarter acres of young cane
Spite of all our pleaaings, Govern- sh the Barbados Agr yeung
E ie ssib.e to EXhibition of the Barbados Agri-~ plants and two acres of first cro’
ment has not found it possib-e to | It 1 justrinl Society and
aa Phe th se cultural and Industrial Society and ratoons were burnt when a fire
pass legislation regulating the over $50 was donated in small occurred at Guinea Plantation
licensing of dogs, but plans for Qing hy the public St John - Tu = They ae
the building of a dog refuge by in, iD as Sale joy . are
oull * ma the property of D. M. and L. M
the Society are complete and only Posters and leafless have been & and “ware danse
await Government sanction widely distributed throughout the * “Whis fine oxtonde ae nae View
“The Assistant C al Secre- island, and an article by the Hon, . This fire extended to ;
The Assistant’ Colonial Secre- island, and an Hed, “Call. From S- Philip, and burnt fourteen
tary, the Director of Public Werks Secretary entitled, “Call ro! 4 three arter apres hte
und the Clerk of the Vestry of The Caribbean”, was published in ares sale Sine tales a SF,
5 hae ave ¢ en intess the ional Humane Review in Crop ripe canes and: six and i
raed ee aa ee eee " ee America, This article was in part helf acres of young cane. plants,
viewed and _ numer aed sate * vesponsible for the formation by Property of Mrs. Jean Nicholl
have been written on this sub- 116° American Humane Association of the same plantation, ‘They
ject. ; of a project known as A,I.D. Were insured, .
In October, a deputation com “(Animals In Distress), Another “Ave s+ Seniors. Piati INSIST ON
sisting of the Honorary Secretary, The Report ends: “We are tation, St, Joseph, at about 11.0( )
Honorary Treasurer, and the prateful to the general public for P.m. on Tuesday bixnt seven
Chief Inspectors of our Society {heir support. and our heartfelt acres of fourth crop ripe canes
and that of the B.G. S.P.C.A. thanks go to the Press whose co- and three acres of third crop Il VER SJ
was received by Mr, W. W. Reece, operation throughout the year and young ratcons. They are the |
and Mr. Fred Goddard, M.C.P. particularly during Animal Wel~ preperty of J, A, Haynes of !
Several aspects of animal! welfare fare J Wee k has been most Parks; St. Joseph, and were SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
were discussed, particularly the generou: insured,
need for up-to-date legislation |
covering a wide range. We hop
that action wil] be taken in the | F
very ncar future to deal at least | 4
with the dog licensing problem if
“In Tooruary, the attention of
Government was called to. the on 6 é es
appallinjzy conditions under which La LLL, ‘FS Mes ese
animals awaiting slaughter are Z € be, {Z (
kept at the’ abattoir. Structural ‘
shortcomings in the stock pens | e
prevent the proper watering of aw ac e
sheep, goats and pigs; all are ' iv eee
herded together in misery and
suffering fo. hours prior to death give them HALIBORANGE
The ghastly practice of allowing
‘animals to witness the slaughter- every day
ing of their fellows while await- Z . RD
ing their own turn for the knife Tuert’s NOTHING Lik# IT for building MEAN CERTAIN
is really deplorable, and we can- up reserves of vital energy, promoting
not condemn too forcefully the healthy growth, strong bones and teeth a
continuance of this barbarism. <-gstetahiiae to ilinese SAVINGS ead
“The Society bought a new :
Mortis Van in May and this has ‘
cries “i abli Made from purest halibut oil, cleverly blended
gziven good service enabling the if
Chief Inspector to answer calls with the juice of ripe oranges, it is rich in Single Good Quality BED SHEETS ...., $3.98
from all over the island. Vitamins A and D and so delicious in taste that Double Good Quality HEAVY SHEETS... 6.93
Z {Bands of Mercy the most finicky youngster takes Single COLOURED BLANKETS 2.98
“During the month of June, 78 it with delight.
elementary schools Organtied me 2 : Double COLOURED BLANKETS 3.98
Bands of Mercy among pupil a? tncldentally; itp: Ang for growne
& f ‘ é 5 2upils Te aaa te
attending these schools. Of these ups too! TOWELS, TOWELS — Face, Bath, Ete. ., from 31
37 were. Boys’ Schools and 31 BY? EDTIC De ard 1.39
Girls’ Schools and 10 Mixed| 5 Lovely Quality 56” wide BE CK per yar
Schools. The Bands varied in|} STRAW MATS — Various Sizes... from 88 j
size from six to 80 members each.
“The Bands of the following OIL CLOTH, PLASTIC SHEETING and
Schools took part in the Children’s| THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING HALIBUT OIL nee cae ine |
Concert zt Queen's Park House| q PLASTIC T, COVERS \ |
St ene ntunel Waltare Ds te BED ROOM & DRAWING ROOM RUGS from 3.45 \
ot, Li é ‘ YS, ot. stephen’s
Boys’, St, Giles’ Girls’, St. Barn i}
bas Boys’, Grace Hill Girls’, Wes- | e |
ley Hall Girle’, pupils of . the |
Carrington’s Girls’, Wesley Hall i
30ys’ and the Erdiston Model | YES ! WE HAVE THESE AND MOR! - AT
Mixed School also contributed
ane to the programme. No for- | at
mal nee A at ee THANI BROS
Mercy Sub-Committee have bee; Made in England by: A =
meld, ALLEN & HANBURYS L7D., LONDON, E.2

the Board before those two lots
could be used.
















S









Four meetings were held duripg







66

Co






SHEP



a









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LLG

o
———

PAGE TWO;



EV CANON A. H. BARLEE
recently acting vicar of St
John The Baptist leaves to-day

tor Engiand for holiday.

C.J’s Brother
R. ERIC COLLYMORE, broth-
er of His Lordship the Chief ”
Justice Sir Allag Collymore, and
Mis. Collymore -wha had been
holidaying here, return to Eng-
land today. Accompanying them
are Mr. and Mrs. Michael Greaves
who are also off to spend a holi-
day in England. Mrs. Greaves is
also a sister of his Lordship the
Chief Justice,
On Long Leave
R. & MRS KENNETH NI-
CHGLLS also sail for Eng-
land today for a long holiday.
During his absence the Dental
Parlour will be carried on by Dr.
Nicholls, Snr.
Former Dean
EWS has been received that
4 Rev. W. M. Richards, former-
ly Dean of St. Michael's Cathedral
and who has been attached io the
British Embassy in Caracas, will
be leaving for England at the end
of this month. He will be accom-
panied by Mrs. Richards,

KKeturning to Colonial

Office
R. BERNARD ROLFE of the
Secretariat of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisation,
leaves to-day by the S.S. Golfito
for England. He will be accom-
panied by his wife and little son

Richard. ‘

Mr. Rolfe who was seconded
here for three years Office, has
just completed his tour. He will be
returning to the Colonial Office.

After 38 Years

FTER an absence of 38 years

in the U.S.A., Mrs, Kathieen
Bevins returned here recently to
spend a holiday with her relatives.
She is staying with her sister Mrs,
Beatrice Gibson of Salters, St.
George. Wel

Back from Races
MONG the passengers arriving
on Monday night by B.W.LA.
from Trinidad were Jockeys Gil-
bert Yvonet and Eric Holder who
took part in the four day Race
Meeting at Union Park.
From Venezuela
; R. ALBERTO RIOS of the
Telephone Company in Cara-
cas, arrived here on Monday by
B.W.1LA. via Trinidad for about
eight days’ holiday. He was accom-
panied by his wife and they are
staying at the Aquatic Club.
Also arriving by the same op-
portunity we-e Mr. and Mrs. Mel-
dior, Rodriguez from Venezuela.
They are remaining for two weeks
taying at the Windsor Hotel,





Rupe

Rupert and Willie find the hole
in the hedge and push through.
“Hi, you chaps,” calls the little
bear, ‘' Come and listen to what
has happened.” They are so
excited about their game that they

pay no heed, but at length he
makes them gather round.







Mr. PAUL FOSTER

For Jcurnalism Course
R,. PAUL FOSTER, reporter
on the staff of the “Barba-
dos Advocate’, leaves today for
England where he will undergo
training in Journalism during the
next six Months,

Paul who was formerly on the
staff of Cable & Wireless joined
the ‘Advocate’ about two years
ago and has been selected for
training in the U.K. For the first
two months he will be attached
to the Liverpool Daily Post and
Echo Ltd., and also hopes to spend
some time in Scotland as well as
on the staff of a London Daily.

Executive Director YWCA

ISS MARGARET HART, a
Grenadian who has _ been
Executive Director of the Y.W.C.A.
in Trinidad since September 1949,
is now on a tour of the Caribbean
‘visiting the various associations in
the area.

She arrived here a week ago
after visiting British Guiana and
Paramaribo and will be remaining
until the end of the month, ;

Miss Hart who was staying at
Super Mare Guest House since her
arrival, expects to take up re-
dence at the Y.W.C.A, from t+
day. From Barbados she goes to
Grenada,

Welfare Officer

RS, H,. A. VAUGHAN, Assist-

ant Social Welfare Officer

left for Grenada. by BWIA on

Monday. Mrs, Vaughan accom-

panies her husband, President of

the Civil Service Association who

is now attending the Conference

of Civil Service Associations in
the Caribbean in Grenada,



* There's been a messenger from
Santa Claus,"’ he cries. ‘* He was
in a flying motor-car, and he’s try-
ing té make things easier for him,
because poor Santa has too much
work nowadays."’ ‘*Oh dear, |
hope he doesn’t mean he's going
to forget to fill any of our stock-
ings!" says Reggie anxiously.

Caub Caltt

’ iy , the Secretary of Commerce}

Ni ht authority to extend the charters

El Dorado ‘ THURSDAY, May 1, 1952 of vessels to citizens of the |

O—7.15 pm 19 76M 25.8M ippines. Authority was formerly |

. - i en cee eae nan ted in the Maritime Board

EMBERS of the S.P.C.A. who The eagerly-awaited production| 4.00 pm. The News, 4.10 p.m. The V&â„¢ i E

Jg | Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Rhythm is thir Which has been since abolished.

attended the Annual Gen- of Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night | Business, 445 p+m. Sporting Record, Approximately eight ships are

eral Meeting of the Association Will take place at the | British 5 ou p.m. Composers of the Week. 3.18 saeciee all ’ laud = inter
at the British Council, “Wake- Council’s “Pocket Theatre” during’ poms Listener’ Choics, 6.00 p.m ,"*8" coastal trade in the Philippines.
field”, on Tuesday night were the week beginning Monday, May Diary, $18 pm ypust Fancy 645 p.m s ee
shown a very educational film 19th. Since it was impossible 2 ade, 7.00 p ah. The Mowe: 1 om. are

ntitled “El Dorado”. This film ®*commodate all who wanted to} sf News from Britain £45 p.m_ Interlude, 8.55 p.m

. Sacee ae ss film see Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”, 030 p.m 25 54M_ 81 2M the Editorials, 9.00 p.m. From the

cescribed British Guiana, its rea
sources, the population and their
religions,

After the meeting, Dr, Salmond,
who moved a_ vote of thanks,
said that the Society was espec-
ially grateful to the British Coun-
cil, He hoped that it would
mever ever become necessary for
Great Britain to curtail the good
work of the British Council.

He said that the Society ap-
preciated very much the work
Mrs. Cecile Walcott, Hon, Secre-
tary, was doing. He did not think
there was anyone who had the
work of the society more at heart
than her,

Russian Artist

M VLADIMIR NECHOUMOFF,

Russian Artist, and his wife
who had been holidaying in this
island as guests of Dr, and Mrs.
K. M. B. Simon, at St. Leonard's
House, left on Monday for Guade-
loupe.

M. Nechoumoff who is a_ top
flight Russian artist has been liv-
ing in Paris since the Revolution
of 1917, During his stay in Barba-
dos he painted local scenes and
portraits and held an Exhibition
at the Barbados Museum,

He also delivered a lecture on
“The Development of French Art”
to the Alliance Francaise, From
Guadeloupe M, Nechoumoff and
his artist wife expect to return
to Paris shortly.

Fourth Visit

‘R. ROLLINS SKEETE, a Bar-
badian who has lived abzoad
for 45 years is now spending a
holiday her with his relatives in
Shorey Village, St. Andrew. He
has spent sixteen years in Panama

and twenty-nine in the U.S.A, and
this is his fourth visit home since
he first left.

He came down from the U.S.A.
some weeks ago and has just re-
turned from Trinidad where he
‘pent a week with friends,

Mr. Skeete was last here in 1929
when he spent three months,

For Students

"EMBERS of Club 11 of the

Girls’ Industrial Union will
be “At Home” to the Labour
Students at a dance at the Union
Headquarters, Constitution Road
on Saturday night. The students
are at present attending the Lab-
our Training Course at the
Y.M.C.A.

The girls are making every
possible effort to make the eve-
ning as pleasant as possible for
the visitors.

Married at St. Leonard’s
QO* Thursday afternoon last at

St, Leonard’s Church,
marriage took place of Miss May
Nicholls, Nurse of Dr.

of the Colonnade Stores,

The bride who was given in

marriage by Mr, Arthur Byer wore

beaded satin lace while her head-
dress was a tiara of pearls. She
was attended by her sister Miss
Elaine Nicholls as maid of honour.

The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. Wood and the duties of
bestman were performed by Mr.
Cedric Phillips,

A reception was held at “Utica”,
White Park Road and the honey-
moon is being spent at Bathsheba.



West Indian Table Talk

Missing from the
service of the Order of St. Michael
and St. George at St. Paul’s Cathe-
dral this week was the Earl of
Athlone, senior member of the
Order, He is still in Jamaica, The
service, in commemoration of those
members who have died in the
lnst twelve months, was conducted
by the Bishop of Blackburn.

Earlier in the proceedings a new
banner that of Captain Sir Bede
Clifford, former Governor of
Bahamas and Trinidad, was affixed
in the chapel of St. Michael and

St. George. An Army officer, clad Somerset House,

(By LONDONER)

London airport. He merely replied
“no comment” when asked whether
there was any truth in reports of
his forthcoming engagement to
the Princess,

DUKE’S PAINTINGS

Two oil paintings belonging to
the Duke of Windsor, former Gov-
ernor of the Bahamas, are com-
ing up for auction at Christie’s
next month, One shows a view
of London from near St. Paul’s
Cathedral, and the other is of
in the Strand,

in scarlet carried the banner be- taken from the river, Both paint-

fure its owner in the procession ings
ot the Order from the west door Scott the British Landscape paint- aircraft
choir aisles to the chapel near the er who lived
century.

west door.

AUTHOR FOR JAMAICA
re be 4 his way to Jamaica via New
o!

cuss the American sales of his pub-
lications,
damaica where he will stay with
friends,
ROMANCE RUMOUR

Rumni
are‘ But
fathor

Lord Ogilvy,

. would

e in
f on. his

Jamai

TE SORE Meer GS

is Major Maleolm Vivian wards]
Hay, author of “Wounded and a p}
Prisoner of War’, “A Chain of tion
Error in Scottish History”, “The peen bought for
Blairs Papers,” “Winston Churchill Wardell who liv
and James II’ and other publica- pes
tions. He is accompanied by his on
daughter Mrs. Moncrieff Paterson, developing,
In New York, Major Hay will dis- figures in the

are att ibuted

to Samuel

in the eighteenth

BAHAMAS PLAYWRIGHT
In London recently was Simon
whose play, Marriage
ayground, written in collabora-
with Kiernan Tunney, has
the West End.
es in the Bahamas
acquired forty miles of coast
Andros island which he is
Several well known
Bahamas are build-

ing houses on Andros for them-
Then he moves on to selves,

STUDENT FARES
I asked a BOAC spokesman this

has linked the name of week why the special rate student
Lord Ogilvy with P.incess Mar- {

ares had been stopped on the New

whose York-London route. The answer is
the Earl of Airlie, has large that under the new IATA tourist

e:vice scheme which comes into

feoce on May Ist there 'wiil be

EE, a I OTD a LR,

| MO@YGASHEL FABR

RICS

LARGE CHECKS. oct. cu. Lk R88

memorial recent arrival from the colony at hardly any difference between the

tourist fare and the special student
rate, Tourist fare for students is
£148 return. The old student rate
was £141. Students can still
obtain once-weekly bookings direct
from Jamaica to London for
£162 10s, ;

AIRCRAFT SWITCH
Two DC-3 aircraft at present On
the strength of Bahamas airways
are to be transferred to BWIA.

Payment for these aircraft will|

be raade by West Indies Airways
and will be shown on the balance
sheets at the end of the year.
Reason for the transfer is that the
are unsuited to the
Bahamas geography. They still
have plenty of flying time left in
them, In future, Bahamas airways

the

c Bayley’s
Clinic and Mr, Neville Simmonds

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Pocket Theatre

Twelfth







which was given for three per-|'
formances in this diminutive
theatre last year, there will be
five performances of ‘Twelfth
Night”
booked by the general public,
They will take place on the nights
of Monday 19th, Tuesday 20th,
Thursday 22nd, Friday 23rd and
Saturday 24th. Several of the
players who helped to make
“Pygmalion” such a success are
in the cast, which includes Paul-

e Dowding as Viola, Nina Mich-
elin as Olivia, Frank Collymore as
Malvolio, James Grossmith as Sir
Toby Belch, Miles Skewes-Cox as
Sir Andrew Aguecheek and Idris
Mills as Feste, the jester.

The two producers, James Gros-
smith and Philip Hewitt-Myring,
are hoping that despite the small-
ness’ of the space available much
of the magic of what many critics
have called the most perfect com-
edy in the English language will
be brought to the audience.
Special attention is being paid to
costuming; and Greta Bancroft is
arranging and playing the music
with which “Twelfth Night”
abounds, All seats in the small
auditorium have an equally good
view of the stage and will be sold
at the same price of one dollar.
The British Council is bearing all
the expenses of putting on the
play. Seats may be booked either
by personal application or by
Jetter addressed to the British
Council, Wakefield House—not by
telephone. Those writing are
asked to enclose the money for
the seats they want, and to give
fa_ second choice of date in case
all the seats are booked for the
night they would prefer.



Which Type
Are You?

Is It the Sophisticated Type?

Our fifth and definite type, the
Sophisticated, revels in many
things — man-tailored suits, basic
dresses, many accessory changes.
Her loveliness is streamlined and
her theme modernity.

General Characteristics

Smooth, alert. Restless,
bitious.

Bone Structure: Slim and trim.
Well-proportioned figure. Medium
size hands and feet. Accented
eyes and mouth,

Main Effect

Hair; Smooth, modern,
rent fashion trend.

Make-Up: New, modern, sleek,
definite eyebrow line.

Colours: Dark with bright or
light accents; navy and black are
favourites.

Fabrics: Smooth,

cur-

sleek,

Jush.
Gaberdines, shantung, faille,
Lines: Tailored suits; ‘basic
dresses.
Extras

Trimming: Linen and pique ac-
cents; sequin or braid if unusual
are effective.

Jewellery : Current trend
‘Sets’ good,
Perfume: Dashing, sophisti-

cated, nat sweet.
Accessories : Modern.
Hats; Many. New slants and
treatments of prevailing style.
Shoes: Plain court,
Bags: Smooth, sleek, ample size.

TIPS FROM TABLES

NEW YORK,

Court action for their share
service gratuities was filed by
Group of frustrated banquet wait-
ers at the Hotel Waldorf Astoria
Alleging that out of ten million
dollars in tips from diners and
winers over a period of six years
the hotel had withheld 5% out of
the 15% which is rightfully theirs,
the waiters, are now looking for-
ward ‘to a decision that would pay
them an accumulated lump sum

of 3 million dollars,



of
a



CROSS wvavdD



will be operated entirely by am-
phibious aircraft. There will be
no replacement for the DC-3s.



READERS’ RECIPES

Readers of the Advocate are
invited to send in their own
recipes for publication.

Each housewife has her
favourite recipe but has never

thought of passing it on to her
neighbour,

If this is done the ex-
changes will enable others to
build up a good collection to
the benefit of the family.

Send in yours to-day

to
THE WOMEN'S EDITOR





Pie he i a ea

PLAINS suitable for Slacks Etc... _. $2.25



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES



Across

1. Arrive with pet to -rivat.
7. Performance ot

(7)
time on Iiittie

work. (5)

10 How do ears purn? (4)

11. From the spa into health (5)

12. Some dour .ittie creature, (8)

13 Ancient city with outstand-
ing feature. (6)

16. This ward is sheltered (3)

17 The quilt ran in peaceful
shape, (8) 19. Come tn! (5)

20 Ann agreed to hold the horse. (3)

21. Miles of expression ? (5)

22. Rest of the red marine. (9)

Down

i, Guide or the alternative

behaviour (Â¥) ~

Desirabie to see Prue on top. (9)
Needs nothing to be first Ma)
» Slippery though unpolished. (4)
Abie ,to make a oundile. (4)
f leave the lever trial to become
one (9)
Listens for oruken time, (3)
Not in a smear of oil. (6)
Knock senseless. (4)
Sort oe We see iittie of. (5)
80 Cause suspense. (4)
Ghastly pale. (5)
. What the drones do. (4)
Solution of yesterday s puzzle, — Across:
1 Peunions; 7 pose: 11 Ale,
tive: TTT wane FB bockd 20 On ea
: e 18, 20.
24, ther: ss Tone: 26 China et.
Down: ee ee 2
: "8, Pram, 9 "fo, Tmsmeidingst
16. Adders. 19, Stoo. 80. Onin aa

t; 22, Sty(xi; 23, Bnew.
x
S

PeSOCe SOOPER

et ee
eon

LLLP L ECE A PLOY.

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 8.390 PM,

“HONEYMOON LODGE”
Francis LANGFORD &

“RIVER LADY (Color)



$. ____Rod_ CAMERON
% FRID. & SAT. 830 P M
{MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND"
x and *
PR . Sosy ~
% WE WERE STRANGERS” x
DIAL 4606 : John GARFIBLD” eS
A BSSSCe
4

at which seatqg can be|——

‘Genérai lin Caught a Worm

Am-|






| B.B.C. Radio

Programme





p.m. We See Britain, 7.45 p.m
of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio
‘sreel, 830 p.m. Special Despatch,



NEW SEA LAW
WASHINGTON, April 30

President Truman’ on Wednes- |
day signed into law a Bill giving}

Mom and Dad ton tu @RISS



Third Programme, 9.45 p.m. Accordian
Music, 10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. # Stuck In My
Mind, 10.80 p.m. Oliver Twast,



—He Did It All With a Hook and a Worm—

By MAX TRELL

“YOU'RE a great and wonder-
ful hunter of wild animals,” Hanid
said to General Tin the tin soldier.

“Ah, thank you, my dear,” re-
plied General Tin, very pleased to

ive such a fine compliment.
“I've often been told that I’m quite |
good at hunting.”

“Are you good at fishing, too? |
Are you a great and wonderful |
fisherman?”

“Well,” said the General in al
modest voice, “perhaps I’m - the |
greatest and most © wonderful |




herman in the world. But, to tell

you the truth, 1 don’t know of any-
one who is better.” }

This sounded quite good. So
Hanid said: “What kind of fish did
gou ever catch, General?” |

“Two kinds, my dear. Big fish
and little fish.” }

“Oh, | thought there were more
kinds than that.”

Shook His Head

General Tin shook his head. |
“Fish, like everything else, have
all kinds of names. But when you
look at them carefully, you'll see
that there are really only two
kinds:—the big ones and the little
ones. I’ve caught both kinds,” he
added. “As a matter of fact, I once
caught a whale, which is the big
gest thing that swims in the sea
Of course, lots of fisherman have
caught whales. But 1 caught my
whale with a hook and a worm,
which I’m sure no one has ever
done before. And it was an enor-
mous whale, as big as a boat.”

Hanid wanted to know how Gen-
eral Tin could possibly have caught
such an enormous whale with only
a hook and a worm.

“Tt was very simple. It all comes
back, as I said before, to the two
kinds of fish—the big fish and the
little fish. This is how I caught the
whale. I got a worm and a hook and
I threw it in the pond. In a short
time I caught a fish—a very little
fish. Then with this little fish I
went to the river, and threw it in.
And a short time later I had a big-
ger fish. So I kept catching bigger
and bigger fish until finally I
caught a whale. But all I started
with was a hook and a worm.”



lm Grand breakfast main dih!

Here’s the ‘‘power’’ of corn.
‘astes powerfully good!

fo dene. fresh! Your

ain in goodness—
Kelloge’s ‘orn Flakes.

MOTHER vows Meer



>



General Tin told Hanid what a good
fisherman he was.

Hanid asked General Tin if he
had ever made a pet of a fish.

“Yes indeed! I once had a beau-
tiful flying-fish named Genevieve.”

“A flying-fish!” said Hanid in
surprise. “Did it really fly?”

In a Cage

“I should say it did! I kept Gen-
evieve in a cage in a large bow! of
water. And every now and then she
| would fly out of her bowl and sit
on her perch in the cage. She would
|always balance herself on her tail.
| Genevieve had a beautiful voice.”
“This flying-fish sang?” Hanid
| exclaimed.

“Of course she sang! You should
have heard her sing

Sweet and low, sweet and low

Wind of the western sea
|She sang lots of other sea-songs,
too. I was very proud of Genevieve.
| But one day I left her cage open
| by mistake and when I came home,
| she was gone.”

“Ah,” said Hanid sadly. ae

“I think she flew off with the sea-
gulls, I hope they showed her the
way back to the ocean. But she
must be happy there. A cage is no
| place for a flying-fish. I'll never
| keep one there again.”

Then General Tin winked, and
Hanid smiled—for something told
her that General Tin had never
really kept a flying-fish in a cage
at all. He was only telling a story.









SINGER SEWING MACHINE
(0.

ANNOUNCES

th

at

DRESSMAKING
CLASSES

will commence
for the Summer Term
on

MONDAY,

MAY ith.

ENROLMENTS SHOULD BE CONFIRMED

AS EARLY A

S POSSIBLE!







»* GLOBE

PRESENT THE BIBLE'S GREATEST LOVE STORY ®
TONITE AT 8.30 O'CLOCK >
(No Matinee To-day)





“David,
CSlayer of
Goliath,
\Give Us
@ The

Adulteress, :

Bathsheba!”

starring '
Produced by DARRYL F. PE + Directed
SOON!

PIT 24c;
Reservations for Boxes only (all other tickets sold at booth)
N.B.—Tomorrow and Saturday 3 Shows : 1.30, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.

HOUSE 48c;

Special 5.00 p.m. MA

BALCONY 72c;

ATHSHEBA

‘TECHNICOLOR

SUSAN HAYWARD

te HENRY KING * "5.0%, Sy PHILIP DUNNE

PLOY OOUUYOYYYYYYYYUVSL

BOX $1.00

TINEE on SUNDAY

| DON'T Miss IT!

Si ted Audiences :
egregated Audi —.
Women 4.45 p.m. Sasi



THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

They Played It

Last 2 Shews Today With BULLETS!





LARCASTE











Mem 8.30 p.m. ;
pi | COMING SOON
AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS & OVER! | BARBAREES

PE AZA=BARBAREES: PLAZA Osi 70

The FUNNIEST thing
that ever happened to a family!

EMPIR
PLAZA THEATRE

















BARBAREES
(DIAL 5170)
To-day & Continuing
WOMEN 445 p.m
MEN _ 830 pm

6404 & DAD

Segregated Audience
Age Limit 12 Years and
over!

BRIDGETOWN
(DIAL, 2310)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
FRIDAY 2.30 — 445 &
84 pm,

& Continuing Daily
445 & 8.30 pm

“SONS of the

OISTIN
(DIAL 8404)

TODAY (Only)
4.45 & 8.30 p.m

HER FIRST ROMANCE
Margaret O'BRIEN &
“DEAD RECKONING”
MUSKETERS" Humphrey BOGART

(Technicolor) ——_—————
Cornel Maureen

WILDE -— O'HARA

Fri. & Sat. 44 & 8 30



Today's Special 1.40 p.m

RANGE LAND

Whip WILSON &
ROLLIN’
WESTWARD

Tex RITTER



pm,
“WHITE TOWER”
(Color)
Glen FORD -- Valii &
“TARZAN'S PERIL’
Lex BARKER



Today's Special 1 30 p m
Triple Attraction !
“RAIDERS of the
DESERT"
Richard ARLEN
Â¥CHEYENNE COWBOY"
Tex WILLIAMS &
Tex BENEKE & Glenn
MILLER ORCHESTRA



SAT 1.30 p.m

Triple Attraction —

KAIDERS of the
DESERT’

Richard ARLEN &
‘CHEYENNE COWBOY

Tex WILLIAMS &

SAT Special 1.30 pm
“Rose of Santa Rosa’
Hoosier Hot Shots &
“LAW of the ‘Ridin’ the Outlaw Trail’ Tex BENEKE & Glen

BADLANDS" Charles STARRETT MILLER & Orchestra

FSFE IDF SFIS

SAT Special 9.30 & 1.30

“PRAIRIE LAW"





ROXY





Last 2

Shows To-day 4.45 & 8.30
WALT DISNEY’S

EMPIRE
Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Fred McMurray - Henry Fonda
“ALICE IN WONDERLAND” in
.

Color by Technicolor “TRAIL OF THE LONESOME
EXTRA . SPECIAL and (PENE”
“NATURE'S HALF ACRE” dees i

An Academy Award Winner THELMA JORDAN
Also: LATEST NEWSREEL Starring
ee ee

. BARBARA STANWYCK —

} SAT. 3rd. 1.30 p.m earTne a

Rod Camerc — Yvonne De Carlo WENDEL COREY
—in— } ere ae — PS.

Today 1.30, & Sat. 3rd 1,30

THE LADY OBJECTS . C =

= ang. Wild Bill ELLIOTT in—

DRUMS OF THE CONGO | ~ "
FRIDAY (On.y) 4,30 & 8 15









BAT. 3rd MID-NITE
“TIGER WOMAN"
Linda Sterling

OF TEXAS





- Rocky Lane



HELLFIRE &
BANDIT KING
>.
OL 1 MPIC “LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN
" * and (WOMAN”
Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15

JOAN FONTAINE
in

Bud Abbott Lou Costello

in

* E ICE”
“LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN ate

(WOMAN"

and SAT. 3rd MID-NITE
Whole Serial

“JACK



Bud Abbott — Lou Costello

ARMSTRONG”
in '



“HIT THE ICE”

ROYAL

Today Last 2 Shdws 4.30 & 8.15
Whole Serial—



Today 1.30, & Sat, Srd 1.30 p m
HALF WAY TO SHANGHAI
— and —

DEAD MAN EYES

CALL OF THE SAVAGE



OPENING FRI. 4.30 & 815

with Noah BEERY Jnr.

“TARGET UNKNOV@\”
and

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 815

“BOYS IN BROWN” “HALFWAY TO SHANGHAI"
and

“DEAD MAN EYES”



A UNIVERSAL DOUBLE









| WINE...









WOMEN...ADVENTURE
GRAND OPENING
TO-DAY 4.45 and 3.30 p.m.

Tomorrow 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing DAILY at 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

BOLD LOVE...BRAVE DEEDS!

Spurred by the
flash of cold
steel...the
thrill of

warm
lips!












——

CORNEL WILDE
MAUREEN O'HARA .

Fy bale Mas Ni eae

Osa TECHNICOLOR: # #)
ate ROBERT DOUGLAS - GLADYS COOPER | i A 7
E
BRIDGETOWN
(Diat 2310)

* Ce

i
THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

Ja To Alter Comstitution Within A Year

Power Will Go To

Separate

Ministries

KINGSTON, Jamaica, April 29.
JAMAICA'S constitution will be changed within

one year to provide

a substantial advance to-

wards complete self-Government, Governor Sir
Hugh Foot, K.C.M.G., announced in the Jamaica
Legislature to-day as he gave his Throne speech
opening the new spring and budget session.

The Governor said that an agree-
ment had been reached following
local talks he had with nominated
members of the Legislative Coun-
cil and representatives of the
Jamaica Labour Party and the
People’s National Party last year
on the main lines on which con-
stitutional advance should proceed,
and these had been accepted by
the Secretary of State for the
colonies, who expressed willing-
ness to proceed with constitution-
al changes at the earliest moment.

Restricted Reform

Reform will be restricted at the
present time to Ministerial powers
and a balance of power between
elected and the official and the
nominated element of the Execu-
tive Council, leaving legislature
reforms until a later date.

Coppin Urges e
Unification Of
Public Services

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, April 30

An earnest plea was made by
C. A. Coppin, presiding officer of
the C.S.A, Federation Conference
who Said that Legislators and
Administrations in the area should
do everything in their power for
the early materialisation of the
Unification of Public Services. A
large representative gathering at-
tended the formal opening held
in - Legislative Council Cham-

In one year’s time the constitu- be:

tional change will effect: The
transfer of final administrative
powers from the Executive Coun-
ci! to separate Ministries in which
elected ministers and their staff
will direct administration and ini-
tiate a policy for Executive Coun-
cil study.

The Executive Council will be-
come principal instrument policy
with the larger elected representa-
tion providing a clear majority by
the addition of more ministers,

The leader of the majority party
in the House of Representatives
will have full powers over the
appointment and relieving the ap-
pointment of all other ministers.

Under the proposals the elected
Ministers will have full respon-
sibility for all acts of Government
instead of the present position
maintained in. the Council’s sys-
tem of balance,

A Safeguard

As a safeguard however the
Secretary of State for the colonies
has proposed that reserved powers
now resting with the Governor
in Executive could and should in
future reside with the Governor
alone, in view of the fact that the
large elected majority will nullify
the effectiveness of the Governor's
casting vote. ot

Full details of the Constitution
changes will be sent to the House
of Representatives in the next few
weeks, but in the meantime pub-
lie discussion has been invited, on
the general principles. Government
presented the Legislature to-day
with a huge budget anticipating a
revenue of £15,000,000 and similar
expenditure during the current
year, This amount was swelled
however by the hurricane rehab-
ilitation programme.

“1

ORDER REINSTATED

WASHINGTON, April 30.

The Distriet of Columbia Court
of Appeals on Wednesday rein-
stated the steel seizure until 4.30
p.m. Friday to give Government
a chance to appeal to the Supreme

Court.
—UP.



Mr. Coppin expressed regret that
the goal of political federation
seemed to be receding somewhat
and it was feared by the C.S.A.
on it may take unification with

He implored the assistance of
Legislators to prevent this, for
Unification though an integrdl part
of any practical federation could
in reality, be proceeded with in-
dependently and is not needed to
be encompassed with the difficul-
ties. and dissensions which beset
political affairs.

Indeed, he urged it as practical
step in evolution of federation
going so far as to say that with
unification achieved and function-
ing one of the biggest hurdles to
federation would be cleared,

The Administrator in his open-
ing speech after introduction by
J, H. V, Redhead, Registrar and
President of the local association
said that the C.S.A. parley pre-
ceded only by a few months the
general London Federation Con-
ference and it was noteworthy
that a Royal Commission report
jaiqd particular stress upon the
need for the integration of the
Caribbean services,

All the C.S.A, had done and
would do in the next few days
would be a contribution towards
the general purposes delegates to
London will pursue.

eo
Pineapple
- °

Nurseries
Proposal for the establishment
of pineapple nurseries to produce
eight million suckers in three yeSrs
has been submitted to Government
by the Jamaica Agricultural So-

ciety, tha liaison between the ad-
ministration and farmers.

A Government backed pro-
gramme has already been put into
effect for the development of the
pineapple industry in the island.



UNING THE DEX of the Nieuw Amsterdam as it arrives in New York are Mr. and Mrs. Jan Griffioen and
their 17 child=~<>a, all headed for a farm in Abbotsford, British Columbia. There are 11 girls and 6 boys,
whose ages ra ==g=e from one to 22, and they hail from Utrecht, HoHand, The family migration will cost the
Grificens $7.0 for passage alone before they reach their destination, The father said his reason for
aiving Up a steaxx>


A Trearning—Point In Jeans Plan Paint
West Indian History 4.

By BUTE HEWES

JUST 150 years ago, there occurred in London an

event that ~w*-as to mark_a turning-point in the history of

On April 2, 1792, William Wilberforce

succeeded ir® persuading the House of Commons to approve
his motion or the abolition of the slave trade.

This wees the first real success gained by the move-
ment for th<= abolition of slavery, which had been carried
on vigorous EZ -~ for more than a century.
when the SB =2we traffic between Africa and the Caribbean
was at its Fe
the West Ir=cties.

West Indiar=

Between 1680 and 1786, con-
temporary statas=ticians estimated
that some 2,13. ©00 slaves were
imported into “re British Col-
onies, in Ameri Indies. In 179O°_ a staternent 01
the number of slaves exported

from the Africo==mz coast during
that year broke down the tots’
as_ follows: Essay the i British,

38,000; by the Eeâ„¢rench, 20,000; by
the Dutch, 4,006%-> by the Danes,
2,000: by the BE” «<>rtuguese, 10,000.
Thus, more theea= half the trade
was in British Pr zemds..

Wilberforce wemss one of the men
behind the formmem®ertion of a com-
mittee in Londox= in 1787 to work
for the abolitio=w= of this traffic.
Two years latex-_ he laid before
the House of <—_ommons twelve
resolutions as t&me basis for the
ending of the sM ave trade. Dis-
cussion was pcesstponed. and for
two years, a Zouse committee
took evidence fx-<>rn witnesses.

Motion HZ Defeated

In 1791 Wilte troduced a moti=~z, to prevent the
further importata the British colom@™™@des in the Wes
Indies. This wee=as defeated by
163 votes agains .

But a year lewter, on April 2,
1792, the effogt== of Wilberforce
and his supporte\==s were success-
ful. Another tr=<>tion was intro-
duced for the abolition of the
trade. This wees amended in

DUT<—H COUPLE FARMBOUND

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

eS ee

PAGE THREE



Wwe cCuoPr OF WV"

| T
|

Pretty
1



Manufacture

company for the local
of paint is being
a group of Kingsion
Machinery, has been
foreign experts for |

formed by
businessmen
ordered and

LONDON,

shortly.

The company aims to take up
the $1,000,000 (W.1.) per annum
paint business of the island, and
to export its surplus proguctien
throughout the British Caribbean.

grows
more.
development of these territories
would have been very different.

the The entire sugar economy of the

trade should cease on Jan-

uary 1, 1796. West Indies was built up on
Tt was not until 1807, however, slavery. Vast _ plantations of with
that the House of Lords agreed sugar in the islands owe thei

to pass a Bill. This provided that
no vessel should carry slaves out
of any port in the British
dominions after May 1, 1807, e
and that no slave should be we
landed in the British Colonies

after March 1, 1808.

BOVRIL<
Ree Ee
Death Rate High SR

But it was
abolition of the slave trade did
not lead to improved treatment
of slaves in the West Indies. Now
that fresh supplies were cut off,
slaves already there were over-
worked. The death rate was
high. In 1807, there were 800,000
slaves in the West Indies; in
1830, there were 700,000. It be-
came increasingly evident that
the evil could be stopped only by
abolishing slavery altogether.

Wilberforce again pressed for
improvements in the conditions
of slaves and recommendations
were made to the West Indian
Legislatures to this end. In 1839,
Wilberforce had strong public
support in Britain and by 1833 a

very existence today to slavery.
: U.P.

makes a
tasty
sandwich

, miniature. Everyone enjoys the rich
javour and goodness of Bovril
enjoy it often—one 4 02 bottle

wer 100 delicious sandwiches

Bill was passed v=
ery completely. A sum of
£20,000,000 was provided as
compensation to the planters. By

August, 1838, the last slave in

the West Indies was freed.
Historians agree that without

the slave traffic in the early days

favour of grad@uwzezal abolition and ~&

the House of <_ommons

finally
agreed, by 238 —=-otes to 85, that



POST OFFICE NOTICE:

AIR MAIL

Effective Ist May, 1952, ATR MAILS will be closed at the Gen—
eral Post Office as follows: —



(Cancelling previous Schedules)





Destination Time Day Destination Time Day
AFRICA 2.00 p.m. | Monday GRENADA 9.30 a.rxe. Tuesday
2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 2.00 p.2=. Friday
11.45 am.] Friday GUADELOUPE 2.00 p.r2-. Monday
ANTIGUA 2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 9.30 a.r=e=. Saturday
9.30 am] Saturday HAITI 11.45 a..z Monday
ARUBA 2.00 pm,| Monday 11.45 a.rz=- Thursday
11.45 am Thursday HAWAII 2.00 p.r=>- Monday
AUSTRALIA (all air) | 11,45 am Monday 2.00 p.r=-. Wednesday
11.45 am Thursday 11.45 am. Frida
AUSTRALIA 11.45 am.| Wednesday [HONG KONG 11.45 are Monday
(air to Panama only)} 9.30 am Saturday 11.45 a2. Thursday
INDIA 2.00 p.m Monday
BAHAMAS .. 2.00 p.m.f Monday 2.00 pre _ Wednesday
11,45 am, Friday 11.45 a.rem_ Friday
BERMUDA 2.00 p.m.| Monday INDONESIA 2,00 p.rx=_ Monday
2.00 p.m.} Wednesday 2.00 p.re=_ Wednesday
BORNEO 2.00 p.m, Monday 11.45 a.rerm _ Friday
2.00 p.m.f| Wednesday [JAMAICA 2.00 p.re= _ Monday
11,45 am, yf Fri 2.00 p.rr=_ Wednesday
BR. GUIANA 11.45 am, |) Monday 11.45 acre _ Friday
8.00 am,} Friday JAPAN 11.45 a.m — Monday
BR. HONDURAS 2.00 p.m.| Monday 11.45 arr — Thursday
BURMA... 2.00 p.m, | Monday MALAYA 2.00 p.m _ Monday
2.00 pam nae 48 p.1rx=_ egosetsy
11.45 am, ay 1. ates - ay
MARTINIQUE 2.00 p.m _ Monday
CANADA (Direct) .. 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 9.30 a.rre— Saturday
(via Trinidad) 11.45 am.| Friday MAURITIUS 2.00 p.rre_ ay
CANAL ZONE 11.45 am, | Wednesday 2.00 p.m Wednesday
9.30 am,.| Saturday 11.45 a.m Friday
CENTRAL AMERICA | 11.45 am.] Monday MEXICO 11.45 arr Monday
(except C.Z.) ; 11.45 am.| Thursday 11.45 arr _ Thursday
CEYLON 2.00 pm.]| Monday MONTSERRAT 2.00 p.rx=_ Wednesday
2.00 p.m.}| Wednesday 9.30 a.trr=— Saturday
; 11.45 am. | Friday NEW ZEALAND 11.45 arr= — Monda
oHINA 2.00 pm.} Monday all air) .. 11.45 are Thursday
; 2.00 p.m, | Wednesday ‘W ZEALAND .. 11.45 are Ww ay
11.45 am. Hie (air to Panama only)} 9.30 a.m Saturday
SUBA | 11,45 am, onda’
111.45 am.| Thursday |PALESTINE Fi 2.00 p.m Monday
CURACAO 2.00 p.m, ree, ia p= _—— ay
, m. ursda, 45 arm a
Dias 4 ” | PHILIPPINES 11.45 2 ay
DOMINICA .. o 2.00 p.m.| Wednesday 11.45 arm Thursday
DOM. REPUBLIC .. 11.45 am.]| Monda PUERTO RICO 2.00 pz Wednesday
11.45 am.}| Thursday 9.30 a.re=_ Saturday
DUTCH GUIANA .. 11.45 am.| Monday ST, CROIX V.I. 11.45 a.com
11.45 am.| Wednesday 11.45 are — Thursday
ani ST. KITTS 2.00 p.r==- Wednesday
SUROPE 2.00 p.m] ,Monday 9.30 arr Saturday
- 2.00 an Wednesday |ST. LUCIA .. 9.30 arr. Tuesday
11.45 am.| Friday 9.30 arm ay
FIT ise 4 11.45 am. | Monday ST. THOMAS 11.45 a.rr=_—
11.45 am Thursday 11.45 azz. Th iy
FR. GUIANA 11.45 am Monday ST. VINCENT 9.30 a.rc== Thursday
11.45 am Thursday 9.30 a.com Saturday
SOUTH AMERICA .. 11.45 are. Monda
GT. BRITAIN 2.00 pm.| Monday (except Venezuela 11.45 arm Th y
2.00 pm.| Wednesday |TORTOLA .. +t 2.00 p.r==. Wednesda,
11.45 am, —_ —* 2: 2 a.race Saturday
i DAD 11.45 am. onday S.A, = 7 =
sao 2.00 p.m Monday 2.00 p.m Wednesday
11.45 am.| Wednesday 11.45 a.m Friday.
to Friday VENEZUELA 2.00 p.rxrs. Monday
9.30 am Saturday 2.00 prs Friday

A



Registered mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
ROBERT A. CLARKE,
Colonial Postmaster.

General Post Office,

|
‘

WITH

with a choice
engines: ==

Gasolene.

This wonderful machine is now also
available with FULL-TRACKS

You'll be truly amazed to see this small-
looking unit performing jobs, both in the
field and on the road, that are beyond wheel
Tractors of twice its Horsepower.

This Tractor is indeed the friend of both the
small and large Plantation owners alike and
the price is well within your reach.

We shall be pleased to arrange a
oom demonstration at your request gpe_-

ROBERT THOM

4616
\

EE————————— oO ee

SRA AND AIR

=—=—_=_
ARRIVALS — BY BWIA

oD
From TRINIDAD:
|} B. Farfan, C
| Ferreira, J
,; don, A
Freitas,
Boyack,
Moreati, Y
Tiron, C
iJ. Finlay

PEPARTURKES — BY BWIEA
For TRINIDAD:

vet Reid,
David Refd, Emily
celles, Yoland Seott, Ellis Maingot, Helen
Matngot,
Kathleen Wood, Ann Wood, Tim Wood
Anthony Wood. George Robinson, Dapt

(International) |ne Eversley, Maud Lowe, Deborah |
|Rhape, Malcolm Downey, John Corbin
| Ceetl Ledra
For 8ST LUOTA; |

Amut Ambrose, Peter Elis, Albertha
| Charles, Alison Charles, Connell Charles

| David Horloek, Phillip Canali

| Rival For Bagasse |

pointed out that
crisis in the 1920’s small quanti-
ties of paper were made from)
elephant grass (pennisetum pur-|

found that the ‘ Nites aS

A sandwich made with Bovril is a real meal

And they can
§ Bovril makes

ENRICHED Feat

Vaporising
O11 and NOW DIESEL

LIMITED

COURTESY GARAGE

}
DIAL
i





SPOSOOO ES”,

SCORES “ e503 COO , SLECEO ESOS ASP LAE o*



TRAFFIC ©



N TURSDAY

Farfan, P. Farah, J
Seott, R. Huggins, A. Gor
lamoine, J. Millan, M. De
D. Macneil aw Mckay M
P_ Harley, H. McLean, J. Berry
y. Xavier, Y. Lyon, VU. |
Navarro, A. Moore, 8. Fintay

ON TUESDAY

Strona, Dr
Michael

Lewis Reid, Marga
Reid, Diana Reid
Niblett, Glynn Las

John Bradshaw, Austin Wood



-

LONDON.

Commenting on recent reports |
the setting up of the plant are op 4 paper shortage in Bri
expected to arrive in the island owing to the lack of raw materials |

a. letter published in The Times

in |

in a similar)

: pureum). :

No paint manufacture is at pre- “wast areas of East Africa are;

It came at a time gent eatablished in the British wavered with this plant, which
est Indies

to a height of five feet or

Twenty-five years ago

manufacturers said that it was
suitable for making paper pulp, |
but the processing would |
economical,

be un-|

It is sugg that |

the advances made 1%

the last two and a half decades, | js

this may not now be the case.
—B.

%

el
|

















beefy

rem

oo
FO HSS

of three

ROSSER SOS OOOO PSOOOO, FOOOO -

-







LOCOS TSD

VHF SSISGO

CPF

>
%
~

SRO SS

GGSCGSSSOOS



® Top Quality
® Lifelong Wear
® Splendid Value



BARBADOS
CO-OP
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

SCDVIOD SOS TONG OBO

i

|

4 44
PL LSECEE ELLE PEEP PEC SFY

ELECTROLUX





The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

Cook to exclaim :
“Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
mek ice!”

is here again. .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.
These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41 cub.
ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

BOOK YOURS NOW

: |
THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.
i



Plantations Building

t



ee
oS

OFFERING A FEW
MORE USEFUL
ITEMS

a



@SANDING DISC GRITS 16, 24, 36, 50
@MASKING TAPE

@RUBBING COMPOUND

@SPONGE RUBBER

@LOY COLD PLASTIC METAL
@PISTON SEAL

@KASENIT CASE HARDENING
@RAWL PLUG DUROFIX

@COPPER TUBING 4”, 3%" %”’, *:"
@TYRE GAUGES (Car and Truck)
@ENGLISH SOCKETS SETS \
@ENGINEER HAMMERS
@HACKSAW BLADES

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY ST. DIAL 4269






rane

CLASSIFIED ADS§.|._ Fen "ext | YELLOW Fever Scavenger To Die | SHIPPING NOTICES



__PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952
oem Se re EE a an ne te te NR























































































































































































. ie oateet inane 6 teaisiea et beege tthe ee
Continued from Page 1 F or Murd MONTREAL, AUSTRALAa, NEW 2939S"
i Rr ss se a i a
DIED FOR SALE BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast,|Caribbean under the control of _ er ee ee The MV. “DAERWOOD” will
perfect bathing, quiet. All meals and|Dr. P, F. de Caires. @ From Page 5 That di - SS. “TEKOA” ww scheduled to sail accept Cargo and Passengers for
BIRCH—Op' 30th April 1952, at her resi- services supplied form main house. Own! Dr, O'Mahony seid terda ‘ ‘ Phat discrepancy, you well may | trom’ Adelaide ‘5th Melbourne |% St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
dence Holétown St. James, Constance Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable | 44.4 yes y the accused tolc him that the two think, does not go to the root of|March ard, Sydney 10th, Bris-|@ Passengers only for St. Vincent,
Birch, Funeral lenves her late AUTOMOTIVF couple. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or some countries hed been parties, Benskin and the girl as the matter, because as has beer |ane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad | Sailing Sunday 4th May 1952.
residence at 4 pm today for the Phone C15 14,3.52—t.f.n. worming on a similar programme it turned out to be, were in the put by the prosecution, there 1 about April 22nd and Barbados about The M.V. “MONEKA” will ge-
oletowr ethodist Church and|j-—— - sometime and some had era- . = , by 5
thence Apnihe St: Jurhes Cameters CAR; Frazer F-20 in A-1 condition FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat. dicated the “It is of oe ‘on he — ona them cr no doubt that Benskin suffered in- Tn addition to general cargo this ves- iettuniea® Regain iaontowest,
No cards, Friends are asked to} Mileage 21,000. Ring 9109 1.5.52—4n | Completely furnished, ‘Telephone, gas, ——- when he approached them — this jury on his head; that he w:-»|S¢! has ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
attend Ries electricity. sea. Excellent and|common interest to us. The need is given in the statement by Forde. attacked and got this severe | ze" cardo. day 2nd inst
Nina Reeves, Rita Birch «daugi- | CAR—Morris 8 HP. in good condition, | Safe seabathing. Special Suinmer Rates.|of such an eradication pro- —asking for “mine”. But what wound , S@verc| Cargo accepted on through Bills of | The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will
tere). “Loutse Thompson ve Buves, four (0 ood tyres. uunet M, Fitz- | Apply to MORESOL" ST, LAWRENCE oo in Barbados is exempli- {| am putting to ypu is the fact It is put kes ions a Saree = ee to gocept Cates ant Demengets ae
ugene * Walcott, ph era one or . GAP. Phone . —_~ - julana, Leew: ward mm ca, tigua, itserrat,
(Grandeufitiren) 8.8810. 1.5.52—3n 26.4.52—~e.0.4,—+t.t.n, | fed.” that Benskin, gives one version in cept what ee ‘ae Ghee oho Isiands. Nevis and St, Kitts, Sailing Friday
—**—*"|“TAR—Hiliman 1081 model, Mileage | FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3. bed. wattiee a. gd sued as the Magistrate's Court as to the sereams at the time of the mur-| For furter particulars apply — eee a
LEACOCK—Qa 20th April 1952 Emily $6,500. In absoluteky perfect condition. rooms. furnished. Lighting Plant. in he position in which th were der. The counsel for the de-|*URNESS WITHY a@ co., LTD. B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
Leacock, site employes at. “DUM. | Going cheap. Telephone R. S. N Watermill supply. Double Car Port, two hed in walking, the position of the bicy- fence said: It is passing strang.| ™S=N™AD. ASSOCIATION (INO)
PRIESY Henry's Lane, Saint} --Office 3925. Home 8374 servant rooms. From May Ist, Phone he WAS ole a who was next to whom there were shouts om murder anc and Consignee Tele. 4047
Michael, The funeral leaves the 90.4.52—t.f.n. | 4476. 10.4,52—t.4.n | about two to two and a hours and so on.’ And the difference he is prod 1 peeve fr c DACOSTA & CO, LG:
inevad we ot iueds 0 - - re away from South America e *. luced ae BARBADOS.
Twoedside Road. at 8.45 o'clock ths CAR- 1837 Humber Hawk Car in good] FLAT AND HOUSE—Pully furnished may be due to the fact — wed: to sa "
tho “Christian “Missio Peondition. Apply to" Mrs." Bethell, St. Lawrence on Sea, Avaliable aped|™@ disease is endemic. The in- wot know — that there is, thm of srrmmene MO earch thie ere |
Tabew Tudor Street and thence | Searles Plantation, Christ Church. on. Phone 3903. We invite inspection |CUbation period of the disease likelihood that because of the de- . ’
pO Cette the, Westbury Cemeter: 1.5_52--2n | for next Winter, 29.3.52—t.4.n, | SIX and so it would be im- ceased girl, he was a telling the His Woman’s Evidence *
Friends are mvite = ma nnn nnn ans | ceanieneniineinsinen sian tomibipilientsintinhicasamem es) to detect the disease Lordship reminded the jury
rtin Leaeock and Family CAR—Standsrd Vanguard 1,700 miles} MODERN PURN a truth about the alkin be Jury e
1'5 5211 J 1961 model 8 months old §2.300 Apply | silver and Linen. Qoed sex paniiit| when it was coming into Barba- gether and they ah, have’ besa Of the evidence of O'Neale, the
. ‘e PP oO a
—— ~ | Smiths Engineering works Dial—4947 For further particulars: Apply fo Aung | 0s. kh woman who lived near the scene
THANKS W0.4.52-—5n. | Lashley No, 0 Coral Sands, Worthing Serious Disease in the khus khus grass, but he did and pointed out that she could he
) ROL ER NOY ck 29.801 ton s = not like . say that as he had be- sig to corroborate Benskin in eh ae ke ae
b e od mices CAR—On 1) Prefect Fo: im @god | —————_~.__ a 2 ‘ . a
Mn ute theta tne sedi ts f sondition,”" Owner riven. Dat 4246" 0r | “NEWHAVEN — Grane Cons, 4 bed-|eaid, “It'le Shemnitied th tee Ruikine ort tine’ Deen coming after Haswell was dead.
thank all those who attended the tun. 93192. HU. L. Hill C/o J. N. Goddard rooms, Fully furnished, lighting Plant, He said that Benskin had at no NEW YORK SERVICE
e of the late O. Austin Belmar o oe ana a ogy By rire wae tn toleea a iting = ite on tk uk os time said that he could identif;
23rc Apri s a > a" rooms. from and then an- Lb 7
Varian were exotteend theit sympathy’ CAR—(1) M,G. Coupe im perfect) tober ist Phone 4476. a htin other in the island We but you may well think’ that is the man. A STEAMER sails 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th April, 1962.
1.2—1n |order. Apply Neweastle Plantation, St. 10.4.59—t.1.n. | one serine f ion not cf vilal Gageietaee wan would remember, he told A STEAMER sails 9th May—arrives Barbados 20th May. 1952.
_— ; Se ————e=_e_e___ if that Benskin had said, 1. POT See ee es yee
a en |, TRINITY COTTAGE—Pully furnishea,| because we have the mosquitoes a » t
EDUCATIONAL [SP iei Bi Fesegnone hear [tates bedrooms, compiete ” with tele:|and We ate mot far away from a hat with @ peek and he rented: NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
: : 9.3,08-44.0, [Bois aie bt ee Se at} where the is at present.” stocks. They expected to get one oq them that qb oe
or ea renee i oe wricks Bay, St. James. pe a He said that would need tor from each of the rural © |, ("© ‘hat one of the witnesses A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952.
i HARRISON COLLEGE TRUCK--One (1) 3S-ton Austin Truck. 52— the ti ‘of the local inspec two f Christ Church ee —— he returned hor A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.
ortison College has a staffing vacancy SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White ~ — Mam fabent Sar” Oe ae eee parishes, urc! iS hat was folded in such a wa,»
foy ite Honours Graduate in English, for | ABBY DV. SC " Commissioners of Health. The as many as possible from St. va
eptember, 1954 Park Road 4 ; Commissioners as showed a peak. AD
T Abeibabten seule be. tide to the wearin, PUBLIC SALES circularised ne es “and iMienae “t eeie ieotoes ton cant Benskin had not run away, %: (ee
Headmaster on or before the 6M of Mas. ae ICAL ther sam” tet 3. be) oveane Sanitary Inspectors _ sean but bad waited unui SOUTHBOUND
= oon CTR 2 the Police arrived and then 1.
QUEEN'S COLLEGE “HEFRIGERATORS—New shipment, ic- REAL ESTATE hex cacietins wus cen: (oho ee ee ee the hetiee eet ae ie ee ee eee Barbadss
Queens Cotlege bas o staffing vacanc ceived Coldrator 7 cubic foot models, lete and he wanted to RSI. Certificate or the , ic Biss “ALCOA PARTNER” HALSFAX April 13th April 23rd.
for an Honours Graduate in Science, for [latest desivn, 5-year quarantce on famous | —————__—— p pay he could have been s ; * “ALCO. °° tee pi :
September. 1952. American weneral Electric Tcrmetieatiy | AIRY COT—=Brighton, St, Michael, ail|'tibute to them. Sanitary Inspectors’ Certificate, “is. told them tat Eenrater S'S. “A STRAMER’ ‘MONTREAL May tein May 26th
fpplicavons should be made to the | gealed unit systera, Door lock standard.| modern conveniences, house contains} He did not think that the pro- They will be trained for 14 days common law wife had b lor |S.8. “A STEAMER” “1 tL TI MONTREAL May Sotn Foon Oh
ames on or before oa £f [Electric Sales & Service Ltd. Tweedside} Open and Closed Verandahs, Drawing] gramme was going to ‘be very -at a centrally selected place in ad been lov, i Biv Se #8
952 %—=" 1 Road St. Michael Phone 4629. — and Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath, expensive to the island They Teideetown to him all along until the Poli. NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST SR et ee fl ye Seana oe were getting the co-operation of D.D.T. To Be Used oo Saeee it tt i na oe re Aerie eel 8 Thee ane aes ae ee aah
INDIES 17,150 sq. ft. of land all enclosed with|the Pan American Sanifar. Seay pep thon eq yrplath.hlersg sie Mg y ee
ak dalaneant tAscaplan tn tha Libears of b-cauiaa nds LIVESTOCK “a “nn ba write tenes. Cocoanut ond, Lime|Bureau. They also had goorl te 6 ae Mana Fn een en te
d bré 4 Trees. exce ndays x
the University Coliewe of the West Indies. | COW —One young heifer, Haleitin 2d) Retween p.m: and’ 6 p.m. Further found in the City where there are He said that they might well asi eee es |
recomuised University, and possession. of fapringer “Brooklyn”, dindawarsy Roua t MTeCUaRTe: | Dial 2648, eal PUBL a lot of houses and not in country themselves why should Forde de- ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
the Aanocinteship of the, Librar YA 1.5.52—In . : ic NOTICES districts, Dr. Ey eae Se liberately try to lie against Brew- Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
RIHOM Wil e.b Stone vecdnunendation HOUSE—One (1) board and shingle fey could und anywhere. ster; anyhow it was a matter for A Rr ea ee sR Se
Dia cieoaht catdiauta wil te cotmeckoe MISCELLANEOUS House with pen verandah and Bee NOTICE le said that it has been found them. y o study for the Registrati p tation scobel, rete. pply ‘ : ; =
Mt ihe ‘Litton: Association, if he is not | CLOCKS—Electric wall clocks for} Gordon Charidler, on premises, Tne public ate thfortned that having out cee ee His Lordship finally said that —— _ - ——— =
a qualified librarian. The salary offeres | offices ete. mantel clocks, and alarm 22.4.52—n | regained my health, all transactions and a tones a ey the they had to come to a unanimous
Ki) x 90 — £950 per annus and the | clocks, Ali sizes and designs. K. R.| —>7>>—>———-____________ | payments should now be made to the | 5 . and also verdict, bearing in mind their duty F Oo R & A L E
commencing salary will depend upor Hunte & Go. Ltd, Lower Broad Street. ates Seing , Business nd ith, house | office of 3. Ni. T. Chatalani. Merchant eraer 6 mosquito (malaria in accordance with the oaths they
qualifeations: “and” previous experience. | pal — $1 4.54—3n. . ., Nr, | Proprietor, at the corner of Baxters and | carrier). h k th i i om We eke
ConirbuttUn to the Federated Superan Shop Hill, St. Thomas. Apply on | Pussage Road: F ad taken te the community and
atl Sehane for Universities i re-1 FRESH CIGARETTES—We havo just | Premises, A. Forde. 29.4.52—4n ” 30.4.52—2n a ee cnn ——s at the same time to the accused Ww NAVY
» “Appieations should be accompanied by | Cigersttac’ “Leet Supply of “Four Aces. | ‘The undersigned will offer for sale by NOTICE ways in mind of edn ting the who was there innocent until he; GARDENS |
two testimonials or ;references, ‘i LTD co . "30. 4.52—an | BUbLic competition at their office, No. 17, ay’ 9 luca’ was proved guilty to their satis-}
closing date Yor receipt of applications ir : ig Maer Bridgetown. en Thursday, ‘i weiieaient dhe adn ao wie perie to eve Dr. faction, . A modern, compact and well built stone property in a |
; 20th May, 3952, an » sen’ . a # r that . . : ‘
the Librarian, University College of fhe | p GARDEN HOSE: ii, Garden Hove ond} muiidings, comprising oMtices “and. ware. | Exhibitions at St. Michael's Girls’ Schoo! give ideas ‘and iy on The jury retired for 12 minutes popular and central residential quarter. The house is assured
West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, B.W.1. , 3 eer St | houses on the Woasd kind Prinses William | Will be received by the undersigned up Rediftusio er and then returned their verdic. ef adequate privacy by flowering shrubs and shade trees.
Ve ta-in) eh" | Henry Street and MeGregor Street, | to Saturday, the 10th. May, 1952, and lon. It was also bes gwiend of guilty. There is a good size living room and dining room, 3 airy bed-
HANG up the “Atomite” Fly Wand in| Bridgetown, standing on 5,837 square feet | ate subject ‘to the following conditions. | that the Mobile Cinema pam- Shaun: daterate edad eset’ bath ning ; . Th
your home and be rid of Flies, Mosquitors,| @f land and now occupied by Messrs,| 1. Candidates must be the daughters |phlets be used to educate the » Separate toilet and bathroom with tiled shower. The
JOR-LICENSE NOTICE | and Fiving Ants etc. Price only 6¢ R. M. Jones & Co, Ltd ot Parishioners in straitened cireum- garage is integral with the main building and has a door giving
LIQUO oN ‘ ’ : Further particulars from t) under- | stances, a; . NINE KILLED i
KNIGHT'S LTD. ae whened the der year, vide 2 va thas doen oe (8) on. V. C. Gale said that he i DELHI, April 30 direct access to the house. A wide L shaped front verandah,
‘The upplicatlbn of Charles Ward, Agent, 0, 4.68—Sn COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.. cM on Sad 12) years agreed with eve NEW » Apri . which is not overlooked, is a pleasant and dominant feature.
ot Pri Black Rock + Pens HAIR TONIC-—“Oriental Hair Tonic” Solicitors, | proved by a Dirth eeritfeate, whieh | O'Mahony said. He felt bod =~ All nine aboard were killed to- Good servants’ quarters are provided and the ow of 14,250
oot parm _ Cae pits, Malt Liavor" |is recommended to keep your Hair soft 20.4,52—10n | must accompany the application. pro} e was quite n night when = an Indian Airline Sq. ft. are completely fenced and private. ery reasonably
far Dodgs, Biack Rock, Be, talohael in and Cularen” Price yw. bm ee carnaidates netween eight (f) ana eine 2 the fact that thar want Dakota crashed in a field nearj|/ priced at £4,250 as the owner is leaving the Island. Further
inetd this 26th any it Abril 1952 bi ore can . a ae AUCTION the School on etiday, a ine, an a getting an of pi ; ; biosey esg rege 2 Py ‘ b done information obtained from the sole agents |
Zollce Magistrate, a eee eee es welve (12) lin Barbados and also an increa: |
& eae ta LUNCH TINS: Strong Lunch Tins By instructions of the Insurance Co. ie cad Fie = io 7th June, 1952. in the tourist trade. The Chair, Madras, Five were passengers ||, JOHN MoM. BLADON & co. |
CHARLES WARD with Inner Tray attractively enamelled.| 7 wit sell on Frida 2nd Ma ? = candidates must be at the a = th j
MWVARD. | | Eapectally damabih dx aenao\ cnileren, Pe y at 3 P.m./Schoo! not later than 9.15 a.m. on the | Man observed that nothing could =a four crew. The plane ap- ||) AFS. FV.A
NB.—This application will be eonsid- | 20ly $3 cents each. Plastic Tumblers| NELSON STREET—DE LU: S_,Co.—|date of their examination, keep a tourist out of a place more peared over Delhi at the tail end FS. P.V.A.
cred at _a Licensing Court to be held « J % Cente each, G. W. Hutchinson & 143 hp 1947 model; done enise sine clerk to fe Vest ASPR.,, | than mosquitoes. of a blinding duststorm whicn||) Phone 4640. Plantations Building. |
Police Court, to be held at Police 83,0 Cow tad. 29.4.52—n | miles; damaged ‘by aceident—principally na eet The _ Board accepted Dr. swept over the city for four hours, i i ae etialieeesints taint er
Police Court District “A on Friday the MARINE ENGINE, 95 hp. 6 cviinder, body work, Terms CASH, . O’Mahon: 1g —UP.
9th day of May bis ap poate? mn. Geigy ikavton , complete with R. ARCHER McKENZIF y’s report, " Fa :
Police Magistrate, Dist. A" terhgear and propeller. DaCosta & 30.4.52—3n. "
16.08 en , 29.4.52—Tn f
SS
i RECORD@—Clearing four stock of MGM Ww ANTED
és Records. Three for oO rs, your
(OVERNMENT NOTICE choice, A. BARNES & CO., LTD. : —
= “aes 9.4.52—tf.n, | ,





Subscribe now to the Datly Telegraph seit diipabihien cad ldeclsadalpiina ial iin ilk"
BUREAU OF EMIGRATION Engiand’s leading Daily Newspaper now | An assistant foreman capable of super-

“ ari in Barbados Air only a few/vising our machine shop department.
AND en trom | 2898 after publication in London. Con-| Applicant must have Knowledge m
It_is hereby notified that from tact: Fan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd. | making sketches and reading blue



DUNLOP TYRES

May tst, 1952, until further notice, | Local Representative, Tel, 3118. prints. .
the Bureau will be closed for new 17,.4.52—t.f.n. Copies of recent testimonials must be
eigtrations nd. renewals of |-————— So | titted with application for particu-
Teegigerawons a al SUGAR—NEW MUSCOVADO SUGAR | /ars relating to salary and other condi-
registration, now obtainable from all leading grocer-| tons, by Sist May 1952, To: The Man- sisisshins i
LABOUR DEPARTMENT ies ager, the Barbados Foundry Limited, 9 ee
1.5.52], “so good for you” P.O, Box 91, White Park Road, Bridge-

380.4.52—6n | tOWn, Barbados



es en ae 1,5.52—in
- VENETIAN BLINDS: Onky afew 3 ft )>-=-_—_———_—_—_—__.._.___
QOCPPPPOISSOSIOSOSSSSF | Ajuminum American Style to Close $16,00| An Assistant Works Engineer, capable
%
\
%



1
oe each. Dial 4689, 1,5.52—4n | Of supervising a workshop and Foundry.

e + Experience in sugar machinery repair
x . 3
¢ - A Cake Sale

VAT—One (1) 5,000 Oak Vat — | work desirable. Applicant must have
apply D. V. Scott 0S White | Knowledge of scale drawing and experi-

% (to be held at NEWSAM @& Co

x On FRIDAY MAY 2nd labour.

% | Park Road. 1.5,52t.f.n. ]ence in the control and direction of
- Z from 10 a.m. % WATCHES—A new assortment of Copies of recent testimonials must be
Â¥

ARE THESE YOUR TYRE SIZES.

ca



. ,
y & , i Ladies’ R. G. Wrist Watches. L, M, | submitted with application for particu-
ss lm aid of a deserving Charity Clarke, No. 12, James Street. Phone lars relating to salary and other condi-

Nessooscossoseoosssoose. | 1757 3,6: Fiseudéle tue Bishetca Bea tamtieh
ANNOUNCEMENTS Briduetown, eieiogs te son
ARRIVED |

MANAGER,-—required for Colony Club

700-20/32 x6 8 ply
750-20/34 x 7 10 ply















_ Anoth Shi Shiai twices icianedanenema
" POPULAR oa weer in Comfort at tie Maxiats Oss eight man ‘requiring permanent post” 750 20/34 x 7 “Roadtrak”
84180 GAS COOKERS work tag ineeecad gitts dor ‘a, , STaNkamaas te : -- * '
A few of these have not vet Seto She titans: a eee partment “in well “catablished “Frederick 500-14 475-16 450-17 400-18
“Prices of next shipment will b ©00~4!-0. Teiiity to hanile corretpandenee aaueee
of next shipmen . oak Sasa 2 ee oe eo Pere ors qi : .
higher DENTURES: You can’t afford to throw [| U#!, Salary plus participation in profits 400/425-15 500-16 475-500-17 450-18
Why not call at your Gas Show away a Broken Denture today, our expe- expen Ani F o hee one
re BR Street TO- y ‘ > cper| i 4
reeure ane of these cooers, "* |{{ worst. Dental “Plate in ‘three hours, [Of Spain, ‘Trinidad, 90, 4.52—€n 525-15 525-16 525-550-17 525-18

——

WORKSHOP MANAGER-—Previous ex-
perience preferred. Sound mechanical
training or background essential. Apply

O Ri ENT AL PERSONAL itd PO. hak Me ade od an



Square Deal Dental Laboratory, Upper
Reed Street. 1 6.683



ee





550-15 550-16 600-17 550-18
600-15 575-16 700-17 400-19







O.A, remember Eddie from Trinidad , NOTICE -
December 1941, E.V.M 1,5.59—1n
‘ THE WEST INDIA i - oa
PALACE ca | pal EEE, — $0018 475(500-19
SE ee ee eneane NO’ that the
m t ‘ Transfer Books and Register of Members — -
HEADQUARTERS FOR ramsey oe ICE ves bt the. Alavemamed Cofipangy Will, be 650-16 450-21
SOUVENTKS As from the Mth to the 3ist May both |closed from the lst day of May 1952, to
FROM INDIA, CHINA & inclusive the Parochial Treasurer's |the 14th day of May, 1952 both days in
CEYLON Office, St. James will be opened on | elusive. mM

Saturdays only from 10 a.in. to 12 noon Ry Order of the Roars of Directors

’ P. H. TARILTON, R, LEACH
Parochial Treasurer, St. James Secretar»
1.6.52—3n |1.5.52—4n .

Pe. Wim. Hy. St. Diai 3466 pH SOFSGSINGSSSOSSODOGUT IISGOOSSIOSS SS GOS OFS GSS ©".

LIMITED STOCKS OF ABOVE SIZES





PLASTIC SHEETING : WILL BE SOLD AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
KANG SowTS” ChB A small but salalll ou seoienil :
ANNUAL DANCE CENTRAL EMPORIUM : ror & DAYS ony d
QUEENS PARK NoUSE Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. 3 j

on
SATURDAY NIGHT, May 3 1952

SUBSCRIPTION 2/-

THURSDAY, MAY lst
FRIDAY, MAY 2nd

Music by Perey Green's Orchestra




Refreshments on Sale,
13,4,52.—3n,



: Two (2) ASPINALL PANS ;

One (1) 1650 sq. ft. TRIPLE EVAPORATOR

| May Day Celebra tions complete with Vacuum and Tower Pumps 3,600.00
(




a

Ten (10) GALVANISED STEEL
PUBLIC MEETING AND —













each 150.00
eee oo primer ; One (1) New Fictcher Centre Feed MUD PRESS « SA | [ J R I A Y ’ MI A Y 3rd
Union =e 36 Chambers 30” square oo... ccc 2,000.00 i
eT Eerats One (1) CENTRIFUGAL ENGINE 12” x 24” '
in ama i. (Fletcher) ...... ab 600.00
On THU » Ist MAY, One (1) Set STEEL GEARINGS suitable for 48” Mill 1,000.00 i CASH ONLY
Tiss ts ae One (1) COOLING TOWER . 600.00 : f A
The Dembneteation March One thousand (1,000) ft. 7” CAST IRON PIPE—per th 10
will leave the Union’s Head- One (1) Lot aoe Iron Flangéd GUTTERING
Pig enn ong || Rear srry gaa
mm, E d e NE complete with
Sih Beotae as Acree ECKSTEIN BROS. — bay steer.
ae ply eee One (1) MULTITUBULAR BORER = 1a” .,Net 200.00
Mr. G. H. , Mr. F. L. ee ES 4” x 14 NE coli
debt: Beco em Jong — each ooo. "i 12.90 PHO S 4269 3372







Barbados Labour Party and Two (2) 26” x 44” New MILL ROLLS each ........... 400.00
the Executive Council. 29.4.52.—6n.

ASF EFT LDDA:











i i i i a i a a |


PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS sq ADVOGATE

IS
Geese a8 SS Cee





Thursday, May 1, 1952

MAY

This is the merry month of May, the
month in which the government has prom-
ised to submit its five-year programme of
capital expenditure. If Barbados were
governed by the Governor instead of by
the Governor-in-Executive Committee
there would be little doubt what the pro-
gramme would be,

Priority would be given to the construc-
tion of a deep water harbour.

More assistance would be given by
Government to develop the tourist trade.

_ Secondary industries would be encour-
aged.

And assistance would be given to small-
holders: to grow more food and to keep
livestock.

All of these points with the exception
of the first were listed by His Excellency
at the opening of the legislature on 18th
December, 1951. More than five months
have passed since the Governor expressed
the hope that the proposal for the deep
water harbour would be examined by “all
branches of the Legislature early in the
New Year so that a definite decision can
be taken one way or the other without
further delay.”

The year is fast approaching the close
of its first six months and no decision has
yet been taken.

A proposal has been put forward by gov-
ernment by which the Sugar producers
would be asked to contribute the greater
part of an annual recurring expenditure
of some million dollars but no details have
been given to the public. No doubt they
will be told this month,

The “Yes” or “No” which must be given
with regard to the deep water harbour
affects every decision involved in the
economic development of Barbados. To
delay that answer further than this month
is not in the interests of the community.

With regard to assisting smallholders to
grow more food and to keep livestock the
government has shown itself ready and
willing to assist but does not appear to
have decided yet how best that assistance
ean be given,

Six agricultural stations in the island
are being used as “guinea-pig” experi-
ments to discover what size of holdings
and what types of vegetables and live-
stock can most profitably be exploited by
the smallholddrs. Unfortunately two
factors operate against their success: the
government’s rigid control of local food
prices and the absence of market garden-





| MANY years ago I saw and
|heard the late Lord Birkenhead
‘address the late Lord Parmoor.
|Things do not advance much, for
I have never since seen or heard
anything better.

Parmoor, father of Sir Stafford
Cripps, was then the Socialis‘
leader in Opposition in the Lords.
Birkenhead, speaking for the Tory
Government, suddenly paused to
contemplate the white-haired
fresh-faced figure before him.

At last, with all the air of a new
dawning d.scovery, he cried: “Iz
this Sir Alfred Cripps?”

Now Sir Alfred Cripps, before
becoming a noble Socialist, was a
valiant Tory and tariff reformer.
Tears sprang to his aged eyes
under the Birkenhead lash. He
turned his seraphic countenance
hither and thither, seeming to ask:
“Won’t someone stop him beat-

ing me ?”
Probity

A reverse change occurred in
the second generation of political
Crippses. The revolutionary Sir
Stafford of younger days became
the later fount of financial prob-
ity .

Contemplating him as Chancel-
lor of the Exchequer before illness
struck him down overnight, T
often said to myself: “Is this Sir
Stafford C.ipps ?”

Was tais he who once rang
Buckingnam Palace’s doorbell and
Tan away?

Vy hat I mean is that he said in
1934 that if his party came to
power it would have to overcome
opposition from Buckinham Pal-
ace. But he dropped this line at
once when challenged.

Was this Sir Stafford who, in
1937 said that the British working
man would be as well off if his
boss was the Boche?



Persuasion

In the House of Commons in
1948, and at the Trade Union Con-
gress at Margate, he preached the
doctrine that a rise in wages is a
bad thing unless production goes
up.
How does a bus driver, as an
example, increase his output ?
Does he drive two or more buses
tandem. like a loom-minder mind-
ing more looms ?

Large numbers of workers can-
not increase their output. For
them the stony path was laid
down of making a fixed wage
meet rising costs of living.

Cripps preached his wage
restraint astonishingly held, the
trade unions movement largely
to it. He persuaded even the
General Council of the T.U.C.
to issue wage-freeze commenda-
tions all by the strength of his
ego and his known personal fru-
gality.

He wore himself to extremity
for his country in war. He
flailed the failing body in peace
to win the Battle of Dollar Gap.

Was this Sir Stafford Cripps
who was near pacifist in 1937,
who urged ordnance factory
workers to down tools if war
came, since war served only
capitalist interests ?

The Cousin...

When, in the late forties, it was *

heresy to doubt his high prin-
ciples, I was ill-qualified for the
role of hero-worshipper.

The Socialists three him out
when he was a violent Social-
ist restored him when he

later became a_ respectable
One .Zt.

By WILLIAM BARKLEY

At one of his pre-war Bristol
elections I fell in with a lively
girl cousin of Cripps. “Canvass-
ing for Sir Stafford?” 1 inquired

She brusquely retorted that
she was canvassing against him,
and that in her view he was
standing for the party which
offered him the best hopes of
political advancement.

I reported to Sir Stafford. He
struck a damaged and indignan:

The Wonan———
=
My His Side
HE was Sir Stafford
Cripps’s night murse
during the anxious 2!
months, on and off, at the
Bircher Benner clinic at
Zurich. .. .

During the day she met his
callers, answered his letters,
arranged his flowers. . .

Now she is free to go
back to their home in the
Gloucestershire hills, the
home she has seen only
rarely recently.



LADY

CRIPPS

attitude and thrusting his hand

in his pocket pulled out some

quite small pieces of paper.
“Look at the briefs I refuse

every day in my work for the
party !" he exclaimed.

I held out my hand to take
them and he at once thrust them
—briefs, mark you — into his
waistcoat pocket.

I asked him: “Do you think I

fell off a gooseberry bush ?”

And that was all the talk. The
next thing I knew four large
dockers had deposited me, auite
gently on the pavement outside.
But I was left with the thought
that a certain amount of dram-
atie make-belief is necessary to
the successful politician.

Puzzles...

Was this Sir Stafford Cripps who
rallied his party for a time, and
much of the nation, to high moral
seriousness and offered it leader-
ship on a stony road?

Yes it was. Indeed it was all
the time the same Sir Stafford,
the same who wanted to liqui-
date the Empire before the war

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

What Made Sir Stafford
Turn Round On Himself? |

and saw the dollar gap closed |
after the war by~ produce of the)
smaller Empire countries. |

Contradicti gpuzzies,enigma. |
What made — turn |
round on h :

Well, first, hé”™ grew up. The

immensely suc@essful K.C.,
deeply read in law and shallowly
read in other gaids, was in poli-|
tics a mere t at 50. Then
there were o sons.

2. PATRIOTISM. To find his
country under menace from Hit-
ler was something different from
imagined theories. In 1939 he
threw up all briefs and offered his
services for victory.

3. THE FUN of power. Mr.
Mont Follick, the effervescent
M.P. for Loughborough, once
asked Lloyd George why he made!
such a blunder as to stay in
politics when he coulq have be-
come an elder statesman in 1918.

Lloyd George tickled the palm
of his hand and replied: “The
itch for power,”

It is no cynicism to say that a
politician is fired with a sense!
of his own usefulness and indis-|

pensability . a
4. RELIGIOUS... dedication..
Public life was saerificial to

Cripps, because his faith gave
him sublime self-confidence and
conviction of reetitude.

5. REPENTANCE. Maybe the
simple explanation of the change)
in Cripps was that he recognised |
the error of his earlier ways, but
with more than normal share of|
stiff-neckedness he believed that
he had always been of one mind.

Infidel

The final paradox of Cripps is
that when he became orthodox
anda respectable he was restored
to the Socialist Party, but he
wes a violent Socialist when he
was thrown out of it.

It was not merely for his views
that he was expelled. It was for
infidelity.

He was thrown out when he
advocated forming a common
front with all anti-Tories, for
this meant he had no faith that
the Socialists could ever win an
election by themselves,

That party will sooner tolerate
a rebel than an infidel. Con-
versely,, you will go far in the
party if you have faith in it and
no brains.

Bui, Still...

Cripps leaves a great name, al-
though he was a great failure. A
failure in Moscow, where in bit-
ter frustration, he spent time
moving the embassy furniture,
watching the Dynamos, visiting}
the Opera, talking law with
Vishinsky .

He was foolishly credited with
having done something to bring
Stalin on to our side. But the
credit there belong to Hitler.

He was a failure in his India
mission.

His policy in finance and
wages began to fail when he had
to devalue the sterling exchange |
against his judgment Success no-|
where accompanied him.

_ Yet one could at the same time
Getest Cripps for his policies and
respect him for his qualities. In|
public life respect is the highest
form of success,



MR. CHURCHILL'S IS

A REVOLUTIONARY |

GOVERNMENT

By CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS M.P.

LONDON,

It is Mr. Churchill who is the real revol-
utionary leader in British politics.
Traditionally, the leader of the largest
party in the House of Commons is called
upon by the Sovereign to form a Govern-
ment, which he creates from amongst Mem-
bers of Parliament of his own party. And,
in recent times, by far the greater number
of the Ministers and Under-Secretaries have
been Members of the House of Commons.
They have been Members, too, who have
served for some years on the back benches
of the House, who have earned from ex-
perience a right to promotion to the Front
Bench.

A few Ministers and Under-Secretaries
have always been Members of the House of
Lords, but these Lords have been traditionally
men who have given their lives to politics.
They either sat in the House of Commons
before they became peers, or for many years,
took an active part in the party battles of
ihe House of Lords. The Government was
in fact formed of professional politicians, al-
though times of war provided exceptions.

However, Mr. Churchill, though a Con-
servative, is a man less wedded to constitu-
tional precedent and party allegiance than
Mr. Attlee and other Prime Ministers of the
past.
In forming his Government, Mr. Churchill
followed a boldly revolutionary pattern.

Of his leading Ministers, only two—Mr.
Butler, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and
Mr. Eden, the Foreign Secretary—are party
politicians of the traditional type.

Of other Ministers in the House of Com-
mons, two of the most important—Mr. Lyt-

Sir Walter Monckton, the Minister of Labour

Government,

Of the rest, the most important Ministers—
Lord Salisbury, Lord Leathers, Lord Alexan-

der, Lord Cherwell, Lord Woolton, and until

House of Lords.
Of these, Lord Salisbury, the leader of the

dition given his life to politics, first in the
Commons and then in the Lords. But the rest

telton, the Secretary for the Colonies, and

—are not men who have served the customary
apprenticeship on the back-bench. They were
brought into Parliament from other walks of
life outside politics and put straight into the
recently Lord Ismay—are Members of the

House of Lords, has in accordance with tra-

have no poiltical career behind them, nor any

lctemeetieeeatimael



—_——
|

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952

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long-standing public connection with the
Conservative Party. They have never in their
lives been elected to any office. Nor do they ||
now head any of the traditional departments
of state. They have been given newly created

; Si —LE.S.
ers co-operatives and distributing agen- e
cies,

The government’s reluctance to assist

loeal food production by removal of con-






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trols on prices is influenced perhaps by
its success in increasing customs revenues
and limiting importers’ profits on import-
ed foods,

This obsession on the part of govern-
ment has led to a policy of subsidising
carbohydrates such as rice at a time when
the growth locally of yams, potatoes and
eddoes have almost ceased because the
control price gives no incentive to the
grower to produce or distribute.

Excellent refrigeration facilities for
vegetables and fish exist and can be ex-
tended at the Barbados Ice Company
where most of the island’s imported meat
is now stored, but no approach by the
government seems yet to have been made
to this very efficient organisation which
has served the island well for fifty years,

Instead the government is bewildered,
by the conflicting advice it receives from
many quarters.

Meanwhile in recent years valuable
crops of tomatoes, carrots and_ string
beans have been cestroyed on the gov-
ernment agricultural stations and the list
of private individuals whose efforts to
make market gardening pay have ended
in failure is growing.

The answer for market gardening and
fish is to be found at the Barbados Ice
Company.

The establishment of a Central Milk
Depot so dear to the heart of the Govern-
cr is mysteriously delayed although full
agreement has been reached.

A central creamery is not only a neces-
‘sity in itself but the effect it will have fh
encouraging the keeping of livestock

locally cannot be exaggerated. ’

Until the central milk depot is estab-
lished the keeping of livestock cannot be
“increased.

Meanwhile the Government might well
reconsider whether the temporary subsid-
isation of animal feed might not be of
greater permanent value to the commun-
ity than the subsidisation of biscuit flour,
rice and sugar, A much greater encour-
agement of local food production is ex-
pected from the government.

With regard to tourism the value of
this industry to the island is perennial
and ean only be exhausted by stupidity.
So far the government has shown itself
over-hesitant in encouraging an industry
which after sugar is our greatest asset.
This month may see a much needed
change of heart.

ABERTILLERY.

In Wales. the land of his boy-
hood, they are saying with some
amusement that Mr. Aneurin
Bevan's mer ories of\his early life
must have slipped.

Telling in his recently published
book the stury of the hardships of
his youth and his first revolts
against, them, he describes an
episode when unemployed miners
marched on = the workhouse at
Tredegar where the guardians
were meeting, He writes: —

“They marched from Trede-
gar. Ebbw Vale, Nantyglo and

Blaina, and Tt marched with

them, for I was one of the

leaders, And we locked the
guardians in for two days and
nights.”

Challenged
In the local newspaper, the
South Wales Gazette, two men,
who took a prominent part in that
incident, strongly challenged Mr.
Bevan’s story.

Mr. Jack Jones a miner, of
Gwernberthi-road, Cwnmtillery,
says: “The guardififtswere not

locked in for two ‘days and nights
but for one night only.

“Furthermore, Bevan was not
on that demonstration. He was
not unemployed at that time but
was working as a check-weigher
at Ty Trist colliery

“Passing the workhouse on. his
way home from work, he called in
and began to lecture us for lock-
ing the guardians in. So we de-
cided to lock him in with them,
at which he expressed further re-
sentment”

Our Readers Say:

The Stuff of History

To The Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—-I have followed Mr, F. A,
Hoyos’ article in your Saturday’s
issue and found it very enlighten-
ing indeed ta the reading public;
but there are just a few points
which I should like to mention,
which I thi need mentioning
that were le out, and = surely
need recording,

A portion of the article states:
“Space has been found for Charles
Duncan Oneale, the founder of
the Modern Democratic Move-
ment, and this brings us logically
to Grantly Adams who is the only
representative of the living to be
included in the services.”

I think, Sir, if Mr. Hoyos is
touching on the point of Dr.
Oneale’s Modern Democratic
movement, he will have to go
very far. back to let the public
really understand the sense of the
Doctor’s movement as there is a
lot attached to it.
| The history dates back as far as
Marcus Garvey; and the U.N.ILA.
which means the Universal Negro
Improvement Association, and the
many notable oharacters attached
to same, and brings us up to the
present as it stands now.

In conclusion, I beg to state therd





Friends

(By GWYN LEWIS)

Mr. James Minton, a
miner, of Brynteg-road,
says: “Bevan was not
march at all,

“It was not until 8 p.m. that he
arrived at the workhouse. The
year was 1923, and I can remem-=
ber it well.

How is the fight?

“Nye came into the grounds and
said: ‘Well, boys, how is the fight
going?” After about an hour he
said he was going home because
his mother would be wondering
where he was.

“I saw him later in the even-
ing, and he said: ‘Those two
loonies on the gate would not
let me out.’ He was so annoyed
that he got a biscuit tin and said
that if he was going to stay there
he would see ‘to it that none of
them, had amy sleep, and as soon
as he saw anyone dozing he would
bang the biscuit tin,”

former
Blaina,
on that

I saw both these men today.
Mr. Minton, who is 70, said: “I
have been obliged to refute Nye’s
version of the affair because I
have on a hundred political plat-
forms in Wales and England de-~
seribed the events at Tredegar
Workhouse,

“Tt was an affair in which he
had little part. He has been
careless with the truth in telling
his own life story. I was chair-



are many personalities alive now
who belonged to the Movement
and will know whether Mr.
Hoyos is right in his gleanings
or not, so they are looking for-
ward for the up to the momeni
history of the movement.
Yours,
L. B, CLARKE.

Tudor Bridge,

‘Jrish Habits”

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—One hesitates to criticize
the statements of The Great, but
from your account of the proceed-
ings at the Housing Board it would
appear that Mr. G, H, Adams is
under the impression that the
keeping of pigs in the kitchen is
an “Irish habit,”
Ancient legend tells us that he’s
got the pigs in the wrong room: —
An Irishman was showing an
Englishman over his house. It
consisted of two rooms—a kitch-
en which served as living-room
and a bedroom in which the
man of the house and his wife,
half-a-dozen children, dogs,
eats, hens and a pig slept.
“Dear me,” said the English-

man, “but where does the pig
sleep?”

“Arrah, he sleeps under the
bed.”

man of the committee that or-
ganised everything, so I should

know.”
‘Did not lead’
Mr. Jack Jones said:

“Tt was
a march of about 14 miles. Mr.
Bevan did not lead us. I, Jim

Minton, and other members of the
organising committee led the
marchers.

“I object to him giving himself
a boost in his book without regard
to the full truth of the part he
played or did not play.”

Mr. Moses Williams, now 79,
one of the locked-up guardians,
said to me: “I remember Mr.
Bevan coming into the workhouse
and making a speech. But he
most certainly was not responsi-
ble for our being locked up.”

Finally, I spoke to three veteran
miners who had taken part in the
march.

Three agree

They are Harry Plummer ,aged
77, of Part-street, Blaina; Michael
Carey, 79, of Shop-row, Blaina;
and John Jenkins, 68! of Corona-
tion-street, Blaina.

All three said they saw nothing
of Mr, Bevan on the march. |

Mr. William Bevan, Aneurin’s|
brother, said in an argument 1
heard in whatI was told was
Neye's favourite inn:— |

“It may be open to argument
that my brother literally took part
in the march. I think in fact he
was working that day. But I defy
anybody to say that he was not
heart and soul in the thick of the
fight and in the van of the wae:

—L.E.S.

“But—isn’t the—the smell—
very oppressive?”

“Yerrah what smell! We
can't be pampering him that
way. Suge he must put up with
it like thé rest of us!”

A minor inaccuracy, perhaps,
but the Irish are a touchy race,
and if Mr. Adams doesn't realize}
the awful risk he runs,let him take |
heed of the fate of England since;
Ireland permitted her to break)
away!

BS ali

27th April, 1951.
S.P.C.A. Vice-President

To The Editor, The Advocate, |

SIR,—In your excellent report
of the Annual General Meeting of |
the S.P.C.A, you state that Major
A. R. Foster was elected a Vice-
President. This is incorrect. |

T. B.

This honour was conferred on
Mrs. Jessie Forster of Coconut
Cottage, Hastings in recognition
of her generous gift of an Animal
Drinking Trough, and the sum of
six hundred and fifty dollars for
the building of a Dog Refuge. |

Yours faithfully, |

CECILE WALCOTT, |
Hon, Secretary (Acting) S.P.C.A.

the House of Commons.

entific research.

better than Under Secretaries.
ADVANTAGE

age that the men who make the policy are
not the men who answer for it.
It is too early yet for a final verdict, but it

in the modern state has created a most real
problem, but that neither Mr, Attlee nor Mr.
Churchill has yet found the solution for it.

Under Mr. Attlee’s system the Ministers
were so overworked that there was no oppor-
tunity for coherent planning. The Govern-
ment, as Sir Stafford Cripps confessed, was
driven “from expedient to expedient.” But
under Mr. Churchill’s system the House of
Commons is largely stultified, compelled to
direct its criticisms against 2 nominal Min-
ister, who everyone knows, is not really re-
sponsbile for the policy which he has to de-
fend. The architect of the policy, meanwhile,
remains inaccessible,

One result is inevitably to render a restive
House of Commons more restive still. An-
other result is that there is a dangerous lack
of contact between the Government on the
one hand and public opinion and the press on

| the other.

Policies—whether the recent increase in
London transport charges, the banishment of
Seretse Khama, or the textile crisis—burst
upon a public which had not been prepared
for them. Ministers, when challenged in the
House of Commons, hardly knew the reasons
for those policies themselves.

-There is general agreement that it was
faulty public rv; ations which were, more than
anything else, responsible for recent Con-
servative defeats in the County Council elec-
tions, And that this is a defeat which will have
to be remedied before Mr. Churchill’s con-



stitutional experiment can be carried er

te success,

positions of a general overlordship over the
Ministers of a number of the departments in

Lord Woolton is in charge of Food and
Agriculture, Lord Leathers of all the Trans-
port services, Lord Alexander, the general |
Minister of Defence, over all, the Service

departments ,and Lord Cherwell over all sci-

They are members of the Cabinet and, along
with Mr. Churchill, the creators of policy. The
nominal Ministers who have to answer for
the policy in the House of Commons are little

The new system has the advantage that the
creators of policy are freed from depart-
mental worries and from the strain of House
of Commons bickering, It has the disadvant-

is safe to say that the pressure of pasigeeey

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HURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN





BY CARL ANDERSON

HENRY ,

Kill those throbbing pains’ in
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PAGE EIGHT

Thunderhead II Wins
2,000 Guineas

NEWMARKET, April 30.

THUNDERHEAD II, one of the best backed outsiders,

proved too strong for the

English three-year-olds to-day,

winning the Two Thousand Guineas. ,

Jockey Poincelet, drawn in the centre of the field,
always had Thunderhead favourably placed.

When they reached the top of the hill two furlongs
from home, he suddenly sent his mount to the front and
Thuriderhead had so much in hand that he won easily from
King’s Bench, another French horse, to give Peincelet his

first English Classic success

Thunderhead by Merry Boy out
of Hiradiade is trained by E, Pol-
let. Charlie Elliott five times win-
ner of the event had no doubt
about the result of the photo fin-
ish—the took the French Argur to
the enclosure rescrved for the third
finisher.

by

Agitator ridden champion

Jockey Gordon Richards started
9 to4 favourite and finished
fourth. Another French horse

Ararat the second was sixth.

Richards who said he led by one
and a half lengths at one time had
no excuses for Agitator’s failure.

Palpitate was badly left at the
start and finished last of the 26
runners.

A leading London book-maker
said Thunderhead’s win suited the
bookmakers but added that if
French horses win the remaining
Classics some punters will win
fortunes.” —U.P.

Carlton Draw
With Spartan

Carlton and Spartan played to
a goalless draw in their Second
Division football match at Queen's
Park yesterday afternoon. The
game was slow throughout and
both sides failed to make most of
the many chances they were
given,

In the first half of play the
Spartan players did most of the
pressing but when the forwards
got into the Carlton area they
just failed to score, On tw®
occasions Grant, centre forward
foy Spartan failed to make most
of rosy chances. Jemmott on the
left wing on receiving a pass from
Wilson cut in and when everyone
expected a goal, he kicked the
Wall well away from the Carlton
goal.
Carlton got in their stride
during the second half of play
but their forwards also failed to
seore, Cozier who was seen in
goal for Spartan was tested
twice and he saved. About two
minutes before the blow off
Hutchinson, ores unmarked ran
down alone to the Spartan area
and Cozier came out; but before
Cozier could intercept, Hutchin~
son in his hurry kicked the ball

ell over the cross bar of the

jpartan goal.

The Referee was Mr. O, Graham.

SUMMERHAYES
TENNIS RESULTS

Results of Summerhayes Lawn
Tennis Tournament :—
MEN'S DO

UBLES

Dr. A. 8. Cato and Col O. St.
A. Duke beat Capt. C. R. E.
Warner and J. L, Parris 6—4;
5—7; 6—3; 6—4.

MEN’S SINGLES

L. A. Harrison beat J. S, B.
Dear 6—3; 3—6; 6—4.

Dr. A. 8. Cato and Col. O. St.
A. Duke will meet E. R. Atkin-
son and D. A. Wiles for the Y.







De Lima Trophy on Friday,
May 9.
WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington : .01
in

Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.15 ins.
Highest Temperature : 87.5°F.
Lowest Temperature : 70.5°F.
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.954; (3
p.m.) 29.876
. TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.41 a.m.
Sunset: 6.15 pm.
Moon : First Quarter, May 1
Lighting : 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 7.35 a.m., 9.54 p.m.
Low Tide : 1.04 a.m., 2.35 p.m.







WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts — 10.00 a.m.
Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry
— 1.00 p.m. p
Police Band at Annual Fair,
Country Road Manse — 3.00

p.m.
Football at Kensington—5.0¢

p-m.

Friendly Football at St. J-son-
ard’s — 5.00 p.m.

Extra Mural Youth Meeting,
British Council — 5,00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema, Bay Pasture,
St. Michael — 7.30 p.m













elhey'll Do It Ever

A “
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USEFUL“TO HELP IN STOCK
ROOM OF PIANO FACTORY.
5-DAY WEEK EXCELLE!







PRI
} EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
} PPL

« &

TRYING To WAKE uP
JUNIOR To THE FACT



| THAT HE SHOULD WORK a

FOR A LIVING*s= |

THANX ANO A TP OF THE \=
HATLO HAT TO }
COUSIN GEORGE, ERIE, FA. |





4

NT ) |Z
CHANCE FOR ADVANCEMENT

IS MECHANICAL



Phadkar Is
‘Indian
Bedser’

By BRUCE HARRIS

The Indians, first cricketers to
‘nvade England by air as a side,
ure due to “open” on Cup Fina
ay, Saturday, May 3, at Worces-
er,

Why Worcester again? In recent
years the city has achieved a repu-
tation for,a cold wet greeting to
visiting sides, A change in the
first match might change the luck.

I well remember the arrival of
the 1946 Indian team at Worcester
at 3 a.m. on the freezing first
morning of their opening match.
They had left London late and
lost their way by road, They also
lost the match by 16 runs. No
wonder,

Let me be candid: If the In-
dians—and for that matter the
Englishmen, too—do not show
more “push” and “go” in the
tour than was displayed in the
recent one in India, interest in
them here will wane,

Our cricketing public “hopes
on hopes ever’; I am toid that
the covered grandstand seats at
Lord's have been fully booked for
the first three days of the Test
match beginning on June 19, Yet
there must be a limit to public
patience with dull cricket. ‘We
want to see both sides trying to
win, even at risk of losing,

Who are tthe visitors we most
desire to watch? The captain
V. S. Hazare, S. G. Shinde and
Cc. T. Sarwate toured England
in 1946. R. V. Divecha, the
off-spinner, played for Oxford
University and the Gentlemen
last season, Others are known
in our League cricket,

There is one “unknown’—24-
year-old Pankaj Roy, who is the
best young opening batsman In-
dia has developed for years.

He is stocky, with a sound
defence and an economically used
range of scoring strokes. His 387
Test aggregate against the MCC
—highest innings 140—was a re-
cord for an Indian,

Another to watch will be D, G.

India’s ‘as!

the balla sort of Indian

Like Bedser, he ean hit.
N Chowdhury may become the
centre of controversy when the
tour begins, He is a medium-
pace bowler, with a jerky action,
which may cause umpires ‘to
scratch their heads, Indian um-
pires have accepted him, Per-
haps ours will.

Watch vice-captain H. R. Adhi-
kari, not for his batting—though
that is adequate — but for his
fielding. This Army captain is

probably the best fieldsman in
the party, especially at cover-
point.

These and others are likely to
ive us quite a run.
bai India they took the Test
series to one win each and three
draws. But they were playing an
England “A” team — no Hutton,
no Compton, no Bedser, no May.
It will shatter our belief that
our cricket is. on the mend if
they beat us on the faster
wickets and in the colder con-
ditions of an English season,
We ought to win. More impor-
tant is it to win attractively rather
than drearily.



Sports Window

Carlton and Everton meet
this afternoon at Kensington
in a First Round Knockout
fixture. Since the inclusion of
Blades in the last Everton
match «ne Mason Hall Street
team have presented a more
formidabie opposition.

Qn the owner hand, Carlton
in their last fixture in which
they held Notre Dame to a
draw were impressive. The
game should therefore be an
interesting one.



Time

|
s
S

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

me ar) Ee ge Ge







EXTREME LEFT is Edwin Rogers as a 16-year-old boy (115 Ibs.) before he started weightlifting.

Second from iefi after training for a year and a half.
20 years of age, 180 Ibs., and champion lifter in his division.
Body Building in the Sunday “Advocate.”

Turpin Meets
Robinson Socially
June At White City

(By GEORGE WHITING)

RAY ROBINSON is to meet Randolph Turpin at the
White City on June 10. Fortunately for Robinson, but
unfortunately for Turpin and us, the meeting will only be
social.

Robinson, who retained his world middle-weight title
against Rocky Graziano in Chicago recently, sails for
Europe on May 24, and has promised to be on view ina
ringside seat when Turpin goes after Don Cockell’s cruiser-

weight title on June 10.
demanded a lot more money—

Will Robinson’s arrival here just as he is now.
have any significance in the nego- For not even the I.B.C. would
tiations to match him in a third have the nerve to insist on
world title fight with Turpin? another return fight clause in the

Optimist Jack Solomons says event of Robinson and Turpin
yes. Personally, I cannot se€ going into action a third time.
where Solomons is going to find It is this state of affairs that
enough money to console Robin- makes one a little doubtful of
son for the good hiding Turpin Sugar Ray even again exposing
would probably give him, or for himself to the steam-hammer

the absence of Sugar Ray’s fist of “Licker” from Leamington
favourite protection—another “re= Spa,
turn fight” clause. —L.ES.



A Monopoly
One of these days boxing’s Soccer Amateurs To
rulers in the U.S.A. will Oras ;
get down to this “return fig p
ne nee they do, — rs Tour F ar East
be within reach of easing e
sport’s biggest headache—the uni- (By DENNIS HART)
versal control of world champi- LONDON
‘onships. A party of sixteen amateur foot-
Until now, with the powerful ballers are due to leave London
New York Athletic Commission on May 4th on the first leg of a
forbidden by State laws to com- journey that will take them half-
bine or affiliate with other bodies, way round the globe and back in
the settlement of world cham- just 20 days. They are the mem~-
pionships has become almost a bers of the Athenian League re-
monopoly of the International presentative side who have ar-
Boxing Club of New York. ranged to play three games in
Hong Kong aad three more in
They tie up promising talent Singapore before returning on
on cast-iron quptracts, pick whom May 24th.
the like as challengers, an ee *
insist on their champion being Because of Britain's Olympic
protected by “return fight” clauses as commitments it will not be
when they defend their world the strongest possible Athenian
side but it is still a formidable

titles. ;
ese safeguards are undoubt- combi! containing two cur-
oar good pase. but, in the "ent Internationals.

They are Roy Stroud (Hendon)
centre-f and Denis Kelle-

absence of world control, they
freeze Of jer (Barnet) inside-left.

put boxing in a deep
frustration.
' é he to 8 as
Still, the light seems gradually , Tadeo reg by
to be drawing.’ Robert Christen- jrendon F.C. to Hong Kong and
bury, new-broom chairman ofthe yanila last year. Hendon proved
New York Commission, has been very popular visitors and the Hong

invited to the Brussels conference Kong F.A their mage.
: A. asked their Secretary
of the European Boxing Union gitan Greene if he thought another

from May 23-26. tour could be arranged, if sible
If he accepts, he will hear first- against a renusdarnenye “ide.

hand just why we on this side of
the Atlantic feels that “return] When Mr, Greene returned to
fight” clauses are a bane and a]England he immediately sounded
blight on world championship|the Athenian League Committee
boxing. who readily agreed to send a re-
The European rule reads:|presentative team.

“Boxing either title holders or

challengers, who are to contest a K
championship title, are forbidden st
to guarantee in contracts relating 1
to such title contests a_ return
match in the event of the title
changing hands. Any clause of
this nature occurring in contracts
shall be declared null and void.”

A request was made by tihe Hon,
ong F.A. that the tour shoul
art before May, as when Hen-=
on were out east last year one
of their games was rained off dur-
ng the monsoon season, But
Athenian League Secretary War-
ren pointed out that fixtures had
‘o be completed and with so many

‘lubs engaged in the Amateur Cw
Precaution is well as other competitions this
Had such a_ regulation been sould not be done,

enforced in the U.S.A, they would
have been spared that feather-
weight title “serial” that finished
up in an undignified brawl _be-
tween Sandy, Saddler and Willie
Pep. They would also have
avoided the recent backstage
arguments on the heavy-weight
problems of Jersey Joe Walcott

and Ezzard Charles. ; % her (Barmet), R. Stroud (Hendon
And Randolph Turpin might}@, parker, J. Sorensen {Southall}

now be middle-weight champion
3k tha Work. bo z Bennett (Wealdstone) for-

To Ray Robinson, and the
International Boxing Club, to
whom he was and is on contract,
it was no more than a normal ]|
business precaution to insist on a};
“return match” safeguard when |!
he signed for the title fight he||
lost so sensationally to in |)
here last July. % |

Without that protective clause],
Robinson would undoubtedly have |)

}
{
|
|

The full team is E. Bennett
(Southall) goalkeeper; G. McGhee
and R, Gadstone (Wealdstone) and
©. Harvey (Southall) full-backs;
J. Gerrans (Barnet), C. W
(Southall), D, Stoker (Sutton) G,
4. Battie (Southall) and W. Fish-
er (Hendon) half-backs; T. Fruin,
J. Taylor (Wealdstone), D. Kelle.



ny tern aaa oe pies soins

Other pictures show Rogers as he is today,
Read his articles on Weightlifting and




































line, under the cross-bar and
between two goalposts
and yet score a goal?
3. RACING
What is the minimum
weight that can be imposed
as Top weight in a Barba-
dos Turf Club Handicap

Race ?
4. WATER-POLO
Can a goal-keeper stand
on the bottom fer the pur-
pose of defending his goal ?
Table Tennis

Sports Quiz
addressed “Sports Quiz”,
c/o Advocate Sports Editor,
aid must reach this office
by 12 noon on Saturday,
May 10. The correct
answers and the name of
the winner will be publish-
ed in the Sunday Advocate
of May 11.

Each entry must be
accompanied by A COUPON
as Set out below.

SPORTS QUIZ

Sb oales we hele ate hee ele Baa |
Uranium Rush
Starts In Manitoba

OTTAWA.
* Prospectors with dog teams are
rushing into Wekusko, lake area
of Northern Manitoba about 50
miles north-east of The Pas,
where qa uranium strike has been
made,

The Pas is 350 miles north-
west of Winnipeg near the Sas-
katchewan border.

Early reports indicate the find
may be one of the most im-
portant yet in Canada. More than
$850 claims have been filed on
rocky land.

Copper and nickel deposits
have also been found in the same
area, according to assay reports.

The new uranium area runs
along the Wekusko Lake.

Rich pitchblende has_ been
found in three separate locations,

If the field materialises, Can-
ada will have three major sources
of uranium. The other two, al-
ready in production and supply-
ing most of the uranium now be-
ing used by United States and
Canadian atomic plants, are at
Great Bear Lake north of Edmon-





ton, Alberta, and in Northern
Saskatchewan around Beaver-
lodge, where a new settlement

called Uranium City is
built in the spring.

to be







+ Schiphol

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1952



Manchester
Beat Arsenal

‘From Our Gwa © it)

LONDON, April 26.
For once in a while the spot-
light is off the First Division.
With Manchester United beating
Arsenal and Fulham taking Hud-
- dersfield into the Second Division
with them by their 1—0 victory
at Craven Cottage, ce! ip
been

and relegation issues have
decided,

But what a tussle there is in
Division two for the right to join
Sheffield Wednesday in the pro-
motion gallery. Birmingham have
finished their programme with
51 points and.are second, But if
Cardiff City beat Leeds United
at Ninian Park next week the
Welsh club will top them on goal

average.
Birmingham beat Luton 3—1
and but for the brilliant
display of international goal-
keeper Streten would have won

even more convincingly.

ard Changed
There was at excitement on
the ground en at it

was shown on the scoreboard
that Cardiff were losing 3—2 to
Bury. But cheers changed to
groans when the scoreboard al-
tered to Cardiff winning 2-—0.
They eventually won i
Coventry’s last hope of retain-
ing her status faded when they
lost 3—) to Leeds.

The Manchester - United — Ar-
senal clash at Old Trafford which
two weeks ago was being hailed
as the match of the century
turned out to be the anti-climax
of the century. United with the
championship assured unless they
lost 7—0 crowded on all sail and
against the Arsenal team which
finished with only nine men—
Shaw and Roper went off with
injuries—won as_ they pleased.
Rowley got the hat-trick, Pear-
son 2 and young, outsi left
Byrne the other. The Arsenal
goal came from outside right Cox,

Commenting after the match
on his team’s cup chances against
Newcastle next week Arsenal
Manager Tom Whittaker said we
shall try really hard-“if we've
enougt players to put on the

eld.”

Arsenal injuries list now reads
Logie Lishman, Roper, Shaw and
Daniel.

Newcastle came through their
League match injury-free and

none played a bigger part, in the
6—1 triumph over Villa than
reserve inside |forward Hannah

and Davies. Only problem for
Director-Manager Stan Seymour

is whether he shall drop these}:

two for Robledo and Foulkes who
are first team re; .
_ A last minute goal by reserve
inside forward Dennis Hall gave
Walthamstow victory over
ton after extra time in the F.A.
Amateur Cup at Wembley.



From Shakespeare

To Aeronautics

AMSTERDAM,
_A lot of talking goes on in the
Link Trainer department
Airport, Amsterdam,
mainly via the microphones at the
Control Desks. On entering the
building one does not notice much
of this talking. for it is drowned
by the buzzing of the small mock-
up aircraft, which are sometimes
disrespectfully, but most appro-
priately, referred to as “drunken
chickens”.

Mr. Edward G, Walton, head of
the Link Trainer Department, does
a great deal of this talking himself
from time to time. And ean he
talk! When Mr. Walton picks up
the microphone and starts giving
landing instructions, the French
air traffic controller, who has to
speak English, in aceordance with
international regulations, is imi-
tated with just as much skill as
his American colleague, while the
accent of the English controller
ean be reco immediately,
once Mr, Walton has cleared his
throat, This is important for the
the pilots, because it means that
they will not have any difficulty
in understanding the instructions
from the Control Tower when they
actually land at airflelds in France,
Great Britain or the United States,
Mr. Walton’s marvellous imita-
tions are no accident, for he has
done a lot of acting. He was born
at Warwick, in the English Mid-
lands, and went to school there.
The school at Warwiek is famous
for its annual Shakespearean per-
formances, and at the early age of
14, Mr. Walton made his first ap-
pearance on the stage, as the Duke
of York in “Richard II”, That was









only an amateur preJuction but he
soon became a professional actor,
making his debut on “The Devil's

i ”. Mr. Walton still shud-
ders when he thinks of the double
role that he played in “Mr. Whu”,
a which was performed twice
nightly, with the result that he
had to make fast and frequent
changes in his make-up every eve-
ning. Mr. Walton has also appear-
ed ina film, as a_ naval officer
in “The Middle Watch.” The
stage has always remained his
first love, though in the course of
time he switehed over to the Link
Trainers which he now supervises
daily like a stage manager, and
occasionally he still stands before
the footlights.

NEW BEAT OLD
Foundation Boys defeated Foun-
dztion Old Boys 2—0 in a 3rd
Division football fixture played at
Foundation yesterday.



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Fish Farming

The Government issued a state-
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that its policy was to look towards
fish-farmning to supply the island
fish requirements in the future
The statement came as the price
ef codfish, imported from New-
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jump in six months, “because of
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the Government said.

“It is unlikely,” the statement
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progress continues on present lings,
there is every reason to hope that
the supply situation will steadily
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PAGE 1

PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THTRSHW. MAT 1. lMt fourib QcdJinq Purkrt ThiiilnR .1AR1.F.K l %  >( St. John The Baptist leaves to-dav toUdur, C.J's Brother M the Chiel %  ) Coll wba imd been ., hen*, return to England today. Accompanying them H I Greaves ad a holtMb Greaves is •Ian a sister of his Lordship the Chief JusUee. On Long Leave D R. & tUm KENNETH NICHOLLS also aU for Englhnd toda\ loi a lone holiday. Durinp .is tbtanpl the Dental Parlour "ill be carried on by Dr. Nicholls. Snr. B Former Dean "rWTEWS has boon received that -> (: %  W M Hi.',..ids. formerly Dean f St. Michael's Cathedral ..nil l ii hai been attaehed to the British Embassy in Caracas, will be leaving for England at the end nf this tiioiith. lie will be accumsiW. Keturnh.g to Colonial Office B.B.C. Radio Programme El Dorado M EMBERS of the SPC.A. who The eagerly-awaited prod.. attended the Annual Genof Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night'' nai al Meeting of the Association w,, l take place j>i the Brilisl tlsh Coui Twelfth Night British Council, "WakeWuncirs Pocket Theatre" during j^ .,. . ', 'enh beginning Monday. May nesn. %  ilfld'-. ..n Tuesday night wire %  ftovn i verj aducaUonal tiim entitled Kl Ifc.rado". Thifilm ('•scribed British Guiana. Its re. the i 10th. PAIX FOSTER M M England where he \ .lining Ui Journals* Sin.e it was impassible to ftJX I ^" 1 imodate all who want. Bernard Snaw's "Pygm-ili""'. u ^u,.., un ,„ d .„ BSS~ rr s !" '"""*theatre lait ytr. there will be Aflcr the meeting. Or. Salmond, ' J^ !" K C ? "', •"Two'"* 2L.h £!l lh 1 WOi i ld Thursday 22nd. Friday 23rd and r^l D u b comc ne ***ry lor Saturday 24th. Several of the Great Britain to curtail the good pUyers who helped to make work of the British Council. "Pygmalion" such a success are He said that the Society apin the cast, which includes Paulpreclatcd very much the work Ine Dowdlng as Viola. Nina MichMr*. Cecil Walcott, Hon. Secreelm as Olivia. Frank Collymore a& tary, was doing. H c did not think Malvolio, James Grossmith as Slither wa anyone who had the Toby Belch. Miles Skewes-Cox at work of the society more al heart s,r Andrew Aguecheek and Idris than her. Mills at Feste. the ]s*ter. The two producers. James GrosRussian Artist smith and Philip Hewlll-Myrmg. are hoping that despite the smallspeca available much %  of what many crit: l„ r who had been holidaying in this have called the most perfect comNEW SEA LAW WASHINGTON. April 30 %  it Truman or. day signed into law %  Bill giving authority to extend the charters^ last of vessels to citizens of Ihe 1'hll%  *.** Ippines. Authority was formerly vested In the Maritime Board] which has been since abolished. sportins s*..,,-! Approximately eight ships are '£ tte *•* t is ./tot,* u engaged n inter ia*;'^ coastal trade in the Ph. : ami Pram JK ( %  >. %  —I'.l*. p m Th NSWS, %  l l> %  < %  — — %  4* O m lnlarl rra th. IHtVI tll.SS IT I Laal tiu. l—f-. Thi-H f/e* It WUh III l.l.hlS! ni Mom and Dad 'j^/CRIS* Segregated Audience! AI| ACROSS teeS. !• t>.r. AGC LIMIT 12 YEARS ft OVER' *> *•>* HrlUln. KpClmnili. n 11 n pi" Special Dini. — Third Hnim A p m Music. 10 OS | sua N.W. T.ik. i t. • p m A.mrulai. Th, N.- 10 10 p.m. I r II, M *( *k In M* Ol.vrr Tl. For Jcurnalitm Coarse PAUL FOSTTfl report* \f VIJiDIMIR NECHOUMOFF. ness of Ihe i m the -.tafl of the "Barbu* .Ruian ArUst. and his wife ' •*• "lagic ksaVM today I. BERNAHD ROLFE of the next six Secretaiiat of the Develnpduring the K \1 Ii Sin HOUR*, left or ftirmerly on the lP Wireless joined Paul who % % %  •>" •f'Adv^Sj*' o-duy by the S.S. Golflio ,,.,,.,, tor staalaotL He will be accomJ r S ulnlni[ panied by his wife and Itttl Richiird. Mi Rolfe who was seconded E. Poit and d ^^^ V" TSiJif* L ,h £ H2* pr,CP nf ^ do i-w" i ,tT -^T:I. riU. t„ -.mi Po^.""* and held an Exhibition The British Council ii two month* he Executive Director YWCA M 1 i'.i.l ,, for three years Office, has aome U nd as well )ust completed hLi tour. He will be on the rfaff of a London Daily. returning to the Colonial Office. After 38 Year* A FTER an absence of 38 yean. *1SS MAHGARET HART, In the U.S.A., Mis. Kathleen iVl Grenadian who has been Bevtns relumed here recently to gxacuUve Dtractoi %  Iha Y.WXIJ* I bUday With her relatives ln Trinidad since Septafflbtt I94X -aving with her sister Mrs. i%  v !" " Hmam. „*_M: g nd twenty-nine in the V.SJL. and this Is his fourth visit home smnce he first left. %  tba Bartadoi IhjswasB the expenses of putting on the Idiil.M. delivered a lecture on play, Sr;its rr.av I-h.-,ke| .-.llier I he I>r-veiopmcnt of French Artby personal application or bv ... the Alliance (rancdise. From letter addressed tn the Britl'h uuadeloup M. Ncchoumoff and Council Wnketleld House—not by jyjy A W i W expect to return telephone. Those writing arc naked lo enclose the money for the seats they want, and to gl shortly. Fourth Visit VfK. HOLL1NS SKEETE, | Bar-iA Indian wlw has lived abauad for 43 yen ; is now spending second choice of date In ease all the seats are booked for the right ihey would prefer. — ... , i iiMiiitai iti .iim tii u* ICII I M : iid.iv nlghl by B.W^A. tl |ho „, rt „ f „„. „,„„„, from Trinidad wore Jnrkr-y. Oilf, ht:l )larl who w „, „ n ,„ t j. Irt Yv.^i.t oml Eilc Holder who gupor Mrc Guest HUM dnee her look part In the four day Race nrriv.il, experts to take up red•" MeeltiM at Union Park. dmce at the YWCA. Irom t-^ * From Vertizuela day. From Uarbadoa she noes t M R ALBERTO Kins ol iho Grenada. : pany HI CaraI! W I A ... i Inldad lor ,.lK.ut BSi H. A VAUGHAN. AuUteluht days'h..;,d..y lie...... m-]Vl „,„ s.-,al Welfare Officer panlcd by his wife an,^ they are lcfl or < it enada. by HWIA on Monday. Mrs. Vaufh, Which Ty/te Are You? Welfare Of fie,, '.' %  k. d X.'^ m h', h luV, S „ A : ''" lk-Sophi.Ur,,!,,! IWf turns) m.m Trinidad where he ur fl 'th and dellnlte type the week with friends. Sophisticated, revels In many Mr Skeete was last here in I92 things — man-tailored suits, bask when he spent three months." For Students WnfBIRS <,f Club 11 if the ilrls' Industrial Union will ba "At Home" to the Labour Ihe Union staying .it UM Aquatic Club. Also arriving by the sam : op*&m tW husband."President of students at a dance at i a Mr. and Mrs. Mellhp clv „ Service AsaociaOOT. wtkO H,. „.„£,£ dior. Rodngiiez from Venezuela. , m w attending the Conference .... c,,...,,,. _, oh Th .,„il„,7 "' ^ %  Stte.'TS^ '" .re^t'^r^tendS'trS I. laying at the Windsor Hotel. ihe Caribbean in Grenadu. Rupert and the Toy Scoutnr-* — ~7r~' 1 mi -16 Ruptt osi Wtst I in iht hrdgt jnd purJi Through. Hi. you chips," Call ihr bttls bear. Comr jnd lmrn lo whit hii hjppfiKi!." Thy *ra so mined jboui ihrir game ih.n ilry pay no herd, bui a I leiiRih hr malica th*m gaihd rouad. dresses, many accessory changes. Her loveliness Is streamlined and her theme modernity. General Characteristic* Smooth, alert. Restless. Ambitious. Beiie Structure: Slim and trim. ConsUiution Road Well-proportioned figure. Med; hands and feet. Accented present attending the Lab* c > and moulh. our Training Cours at the „ „_ YM.c.A. Main Effect The girl* are making every -*•-• %  : Smooth, modern, curpossible effort to make the eve'*'* {"him. trend, niiii. .i-s plcasanl gf PQBti>Ja hi ake-Ip : SftW, IMdssn .-gas I., the visitors. definite eyebrow line <'o | o: Dark with bright or Married at St. Leonard's ll|(l,t ac cents; navy and black are O N Thursday afternoon last at '"IE""*"; „ ,. u St. Laenard*. church ih ,. \* !" T** Smooth, sleek, lush •oerdin.*. shantung, faille Unas: Tailored suits; ba Santa Oan.." hr m a Hying mMor-cat. and he'i nyIIIR td mikr ihingi finri foi him. briiutc pool Sanu hai too much ik nowadayi." "Oh dear, I hop* h dotin'i mean h' somi to forget lo hil any ol out votkIonard's Church, th marriage took place of Miss May Nicholls, Nurse of Dr Hay ley's rf ^^l? Clinic and Mr. Neville Siinmonds ar,MM of the Colonnade Stores. The bride who was given in Tri—a-a.. marriage by Mr. Arthur Byer wore !" "SS" ," "1 d plquc ac ", beaded satin lac* while her head ^T unusual dress was a tlaro of pearls. She "^Siill': „ was attended by her sister Miss ... W f* Lurrent trend i:: ii. NicholU as maid of honour. S %* !" *_ ,_. The ceremony was conducted ..", "ashing. soplnstiby Rev. Wood and the duties of Extras ; cated. not sweet B'ss Miff, iM'Stman were performed by Mr. CedricPhilUps. A leceptlon was held at "Iftica", Whit. Fiirk Road and the honeymoon is being spent at Bathsheba. West Indian Table Talk Mlsving frm the memorial service of the Older of St. Michael and St. George at St. Paul's Cathedral this wwsk was tho Earl ot Athlon.-, senior member of the Order. He is still in Jamaica. The in commemoration of those members who have died In the 1: st twelve months, was conducted b> the B.fth.p of Blackbuni. Earlier In the proceedings s new bi.nner truit of Captain Sir Bskte hWttWr Cnvemor of Bahamaand Trinidad, was affixed In the chapel of St. Mi. \ krtfl I I l Btad the banner before Its owner In the pioecaslo:, ot the Order from tho west door choir aisles to the chapel near the west door. %  i i nt.i; FOB JAMAICA On his way to Jaroal< Yoik is Majoi Hay. author of "Wounded and a Prisoner of War', "A Chain of si -ill History". "The Blalrs Papery.' "Winston Churchill ,.tnl J.inies 11' umi o'her pub'ications. He is acompann In \'. Sfork, lfa)Of Hay win disi utg Hie Anrssrlcan saint of his pubwhere hi* will stay with ROMANCE tU'MOL'R has ii Iced 'he pame of L I O ilvy with P i iceas Mar' 1 %  I O lv whose % %  Earl of Airlie. has large In would %  (By LONDONER) recant arrival fnmi the colony at rport i %  !> %  replied "no comment" wrsSO asked whether Uteri was any truth in reports of Ml forthcoming engagement to the Prmiv.'s. DUKE'S PAINTINGS Two oil paintings belonging to the Duke of Windsor, former Governor of the Bahamas, are coming up for auction at Christie's istb. One show.. view of London from near St. Paul's Cathedral, and Ihe other Is of Somerset Rouse, In the Strand. taken from th river. Both paintIngg are all Ibuted to Samuel Bcotl lot asrlttss. Lstftdatepo painter who Uved in UM eighteenth (Cntury. BAHAMAS PLAYWRIGHT In London recently was Simon whose play. Marriage Playground, written In collaboration with Kiernan Tumu-v. j,ns I en Ixiught lor the West End. Wn'Hcll who llvi In the Bahamas h's acquired fort* mlUs ot OOSsM on Andros Island which he la Bev .il well known flgurej In the Bahamas ar luildlng houses on Andros tor UMmSTUDENT FARES I ;i-k I BOAC spokesman this w t-k whj Mu (pedal ate st.dent %  i" .id been >.iop|ed on the New Yo k Lendon route Tiki answer la h • under th" new IATA tourist r vic a he e which comes into May 1st there 'wli be hardly any difference between the tourist faie and the special student rate. Tourist fare for students Is £148 return. The old student rate wait £141. Students can still obtain once-weekly bookings direct from Jamaica to London for £162 10s. AIRCRAFT SWITCH Two DC-3 aircraft at prcsenron the strength of Bahamas airways are to be tmnsierred to BWIA. Paym-nt for these aircraft will be Made by West Indies Airways ui'.I will bo shown on the balance khecbi at the end of the year. Reason fb r the transfer la that the iiircraft are unsuited to the Bahamas geographyThey still have plenty of flying time left In them In future. Bahamas nlrwav will be operated entirely b* amphibious aircraft. There will be, ro replacement for the DC-3*. i A e esasartni: Modern. HaU ; Many. New slant* and treatments of prevailing style. Shoes: Plain court. Bags: Smooth, sleek, ample si TIPS FROM TABLES NEW YORK. Court action for their share of service gratuities was filed by s group of frustrated banquet waiters at the Hotel Waldorf Astoria Alleging that out of ten million dollars in tips from diners and Winers over a period of six yearn the hotel had withheld 51 out of the 1ST which is rightfully theirs. the wallers, are now looking forward to a decision that would nay them an accumulated lump sum of 3 million dollars. READERS' RECIPES Readers of ths Advocate art niviti'd to send in their own recipes for publication. Each housewife has her favourite recipe but baa never thought of passing it on to her neighbour. If this is done the exchange* will enable others to build up a good collection to the benefit of the f sadly. Send ln yours to-day to THE WOMEN'S EDITOR MVYGASHEL I MUMS 'ARGE CHECKS, ... $2.32 I A'NS $1.84 "TAINS sui'able for Slacks Etc. $2.2S T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIM 4??n YOUR SHOP STORES DIAL 4606 i'.. T. rss ,. % %  , 10 Hn* aa rac ourn t <., 11. Prom ili < into ne.un iM ii some dour i:increature IBI id Aucifnt cm with ouuiaad ins tenure itt> 10 TIlL. •lard ,. .hc.trrro UI 17 The qui:t ran in peaceful anspe IV C.imr in I *S\ ,," .."" • Br "' uinoidinenarae. Oi 'ii MUM ol eiprewiDn • t5i •tl Haei or the red marine. (SI genre i IJutde ui uie aiWrnatKe lc Deli.vkiin iv> UMirib.e U, *t+ Krue „n up. tvi J Need* i.otrmif K„ oe rir.\ i4i -S.tppert UMuan iiip.itned OO- VK By MAX TREI.I. V'M 1| H gieat and easstsf' beT <>f wild animalr." Hen id %  Osjwra] Tin tbc tin soldier. Ah. thai \ you, my dear," rcMteJ 1 la, wry slss 'ii good at fishing, too7 \ -a great and wonderful in?" "Wcll. % %  saM the (sessenl in a ( I TH not the i greatest and most wundrrful, b-rman in the world. But. to tall, pen the twta. I doat k"o* of any-(i better." This soundeil quite goi>d. 8 %  Wkat ktnd of flh did gSHi ever cstch. (ier.eral?" •Two kindi". my dear. Big linh •i I little fish." "i)h. I thought there were more km U th>an that." Shook HiRead Oners) Tin shook his head. "I'i-ii, like everything else, have all khrdS of names. But when you look at them carefully, you'll -n that there are really only two kind*:—the t>!g ones and the little < i I've caught both kind*," he added. "As a mutter of fact. I once csiik'i'.t a whale, which is ihe big seal thing that swings in the sen Of course, lots of flshi caught whales. Rut I csught Vth ,le with a hook and a Which I'm sort M one hs* evri dons before. And it was an mini* while, as big as a beat." Ilanid wanted to know how (Jenersl Tin could pos*ibly hsve caught son an enormous whale with only a hook and a worm. It was very simple. It hack, as f said before, t kinds of Itsh-the big fish snd th little fish. This is how I caught th whale. 1 got a worm and n hook and I threw it in the pond. In a short time I caught a flsh—a very little fish. Then with this littli went to the Yoacan'f befieve/f... Louisa *** The FUNNIIST Ihing *ol ever happened lo a Cot Hanid asked General Tin if ht had ever made a pet of a Ash. "Yr* indeed! 1 once had a beautiful flying-lisli nnn "A flying-fish!" *ai.l Ilanid in surprise. "Did it nally fly?" In a Csge "I ssSkOld say it did! I kept OnSfteve In a cage in a large bowl of water. And cvciy now und then he would fly out of her bowl snd sil nth in the csge. She would alwiiy* bulsnce herself on her tail I had a beautiful voice I "This flying-fish sang?" Ilanid j exclaimed. "Ol eooret she siasll You should have heard her ng nd low. sweet and low Wind of the he sang lots of other sea-songs, loo. I was very proud of C.encvie%*c. But one day I left her cage open by mistake and when I came h< ',;. ..,' ihe ;igees %  "Ah." said Ilanid sdly. _^ %  I think she Raw off with the -eagulls. I hope they showed her the way hack to Ihe ocean. Bat shs must be happy there. A cage is no Ash I plare for a flying-fish. I'll Beveff •. and thiew it in.. ssssB one there again." And s short time later 1 hsd a bigThen General Tin winked, and ger fish. So I kept catching bigger I Ilanid smiled—for something told and bigger fish until finally I' her that Oners! Tin had caught a whale. But all 1 started really kept a flying-fish in a cage with was a hook and a worm." lot nil. He was only telling a atory. %  •II PI Hi: + TO-MORROW %  •L1/A I Hi 11RLS fteksM povisf %  Gruul braakfut main di*hl H.ra'i Ih. "P0" !" '"?;, 1 T.K~ pouerlidlytoff! CrUp. mli (rhl Vour bargain in goodiMM— Kollogg'a Corn WmtmM. The Adulteress. Bathsheba!" % AVID " BATHSHEBA •we %  ^TECMNKOtOR GREGORY PECK SUSAN NAYWARO ..I. .11. PIBBTLF ;Tiiiifs 4 M MtrtKT KING • """i—t I m !lf: HOl'SK 4ri AL<(>NV :?c; BOX SI.M Rescrvilions for Boxes only (all other lickels sold at booth) SB. -Tomorrow and Saturday 3 gkaw* : 111. S.tO at t.M p aa. Special 5.M p.aa. MATTNEE on SINDAV PIAZA HRSIM.I lilus (Dll /III) J



PAGE 1

Lord Lyle Attacks Double Taxation mmrr RUNS ITS COURSE WITH STEAK AND TIME Colonies Damaged: ILK's Interest Harmed (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON, April 30. LORD LYLE in his capacity as Chairman of the West Jndies Sugar Company Limited attacks the United Kingdom double taxation policy in his annual statement to shareholders issued to-day. "Empire development on a vast scale is the only means of improving the standard in the colonies and of restoring the dwindling standard of living at homa," he says. "Development requires capital. Capital must be attracted into each island. This is fully realised bv the Colonial Governments. Trury haw taken the very prac1 '' tical step of declaring a tax-free holiday of live years %  more on profits from new capital Invested in pioneer industries." Lord Lyle oaminuea: "Unfortunately watertight bureaucratic departments in Whitehall nave nullified the effect of thU tax irea holiday for British capital." Companies Gain Nothing He points out that the roton < •> forego the whole of the tax but British registered companies fan eradication of Aedes Aegypti. the nothing because the normal rul is that the difference between the Colonial and the British tax is paid to the British Treasury. And the smaller the Colonial tax the* larger the British tax. "Only the British Treasury %  Sins from the sacrifices of th* colony" continues Lord Lyle. "What's so sailing Is that in America these conditions do not apply so that Colonist foresight results only in attracting foreign and not British capital" Lord Lyle expresses the hope that the Colonial Government now in power will see that this stata of affairs is put right. He says It Is not only damaging to llio Colonies and inconsistent with accepted British Policy but also harmful to the long-term interest of the Mother Country Referring to his recent visit to Jamaica he said that he had be -n impressed by increasing activity on all sides ss compared with a few years ago and expresses the hope that this upsurge in activity results from the realisation thai without increasing productivity there JUIL be little long-term improvemanT in general conditions. He says that one way of inci easing productivity Is the ereauori"of new Industries encouraged by tax con ces sio ns But new industries con only lucceed if the general economy of the island is sound. And this economy rests on sugar. In the enthusiasm for new Industries it Is to be hoped that sugvr Is not forgotten. But at the same tim it must not be relied upon to provide an undue proportion of the Island's revenue. Concern Lord Lyle expresses concern also at the disparity in local prices of sugar as compared with the export price and says he does not believe it is sound to use the commodity locally to subsidise the community as a whole. Subject ty confirmation at the Annual General Meeting on May 21, a final dividend of seven pence per ordinary share free of income tax will be paid, which, with an interim dividend of four pence, makes a total of eleven pence for the year. 9 UaSt Fliers Killed Suhce Monday TOKYO, April 30 A United States Air Force c6 transport smashed Into the rim ol Mount Aso on Kyushu, killing all fcur crew-members. The accident brought to nine the number of liuted States airmen killed In air crashes in Japan since Monday. A Helicopter of the Third Air Reaeua Squadron landed on Mount A.*o soon after the C46 crash, The pilot radioed there are "no survivors." Four crew-members of a CUB Flying Boxcar ware killed last nighi when the transport hit the ridge while approaching Ashy* .tir base on Kyushu. The pilot of an FS1 Mustang was Killed on Monday when his fighter crashad 30 miles north of Nobeoka Kyehu.—UJ*. from ill Quarter* Most Useless Underground Kama: The mosi useless underground in the world has just been opened in Rome. It starts at St Paul's Gales, which is practically where the city ends, and aftei Ihree miles emerges in a deserted spot of the Roman countryside At the terminus there are live imposing unfinished building* — -nd a few grazing sheep. The underground was planned and partly built during Mussolini's day It was Intended to take streams cf visitors to a great Fascist world fair, which was left half built. The Catholic gov. ernment completed Mussolini's iob, hoping that Rome would eventually spread in that direction. Aaialeraeaa: The Amsterdam municipality plsns to impose a tax of 90s. a year on can parked in streets between midnight and I a.m. Five thousand Ctir owners ure compelled to leave their cars in the streets because no garages are available. Tel Arlv: Forty feur-ytar-olds (wheedled into place by their ithers) demonstrated at the Town Hall of th* seaside resort of Natanybj thla morning demandinclude nwiai In a kindergarten In the.r i-rea sign _will AP"aUnSl Thc M ** or "t Natanyia pr-mlsed Campaign To Eradicate Yellow Fever Dr. J. P. O'Msbony, Director of Medical Services, 's starting a campaign in Barbados for the mosquito responsible for carrying urban yellow fever. He told the General Board of Health at their meeting yesterday afternoon that it was well known that the aedes aegypti mosquito was present in Barbados to sn undesirable extent. The I the children he would do what | he could for them. Milan: The Angle-Iranian OH the army man-hunt of bandit Guilnno. The Anglo-Iranian and two Aim-ik an companies are tooth-combing "50,000 acres in search of oil. Geologists believe oil exl-ls in southern and western training of selected sanitary specters, house-to-house inspections and treatment based on DJ5.T. viS e in D TreU, SKl'S^H' ha jolnVl in Sicily' though, tL c^'ai^necSLir? 1 ^ 1 1 ^anised search >U,r because the Pan-Anaarkan Sana!lu tary Bureau. Washington — tha Regional Bureau of the World Health Organisation for tha Western Hemisphere — was entrusted with solution of the continental problem of urban yellow.Sicily. Smallholders, who once fever, and that in order for then! prayed in the village churches for to be successful, they should inrain, are now praying they wiM elude all territories in the Westrind item Hemisphere. | New York: Scotsmen the world over will be pleased to hear that bagpipes are officially accepted at He said that as Barbados pre-1 last in America as a musical sents an important intercolonial instrument. The Musiclau*' Union shipping problem and one of lahav ruled, afWr long debate— tercoloniul and international air-1 OJC. irg music! wayi" importance, It should not stay out of the International effort out the aedes aegypti mosquito from the Caribbean. It dded interest to note that eradication of the mosquito would prevent outbreaks of Dengue Fevei which has bean in the West Indies for twenty years. GR0JADA. April 30 The report said that the [f you did not come in 1 would P.A.S.B. was authorised to set up, nave nad you arrested and lion programme of an %  brought here" Bir Clement Malone. intenuit'onal scale and It has set I chairman of th,three-man ComScavenger To Die For Murder CAKl.TON BRKWSTKi,. %  pcawcn* Viir. St. Michael, was vaster Jay condemned by Hi** Lordship the? C'liu-I Justice;, Sir Allan Collymore. to han* when .in Assize Jury lm>k 12 afcinuirs to find him guilty of murderm<{ 19-year-old Norma Haswell on Septerr.lwi 7 veai. This sturdy, unjunilint* man, attacked Haswell while %  bfj and her dance?, Leonard Bcnskin. were in Perry Gap mi, the nitfhl <>f September 7 at about 9.30 and after beat inn i;. iiskin, killed iigurwell. — %  — He wa isrueaonlad by Mr. C#eorCe aVuitmT *hnn. His LAMUUp L< nutKcd had usa furuibly anal well. Mr. W. W. %  (••<-, Uem-idl, proaaciiled : THM UO00Y tNSUUKTtOM at i R end. mull nous prisoners leavtOll Block 19 at tha Southern MicMgsa Prison, In Jackwn.;. tin a> i : n< %  ...,.im Itform DtegtM U rattan loi oaUaal %  ttmi i< I Ibon and releasing guaid homages I be prisoner! (top. Mil back out as door after being searched while othen (right) march into dialog IsU lu Jiw on steak tod Ice ciaau. Woanucai and tension etched on -•' %  • % %  aia-a*•"--.•! <*' %  >•• %  "— ii .i., ,„....L.. -" %  -'--'-ii fra^ii i'"'^raBHonih International Effort Ministers Get Police Guards IS SOUTH ifWU Gairy Was "Discottrteoui' I|"I*IH Our OMB CoiTsBin>l up an office in Jamaica for the pervision of the work In the • On Page fa mum For finland fund I Tha fuae to defray the aspensaa of Ken ranium to tha Olympic Oasaea In Helsinki next July la Just creeping Donations are accepted at the Royal Bank of Osasda. Barclay's Bank and the office of the Barbados Advocate. Ooal S 2.wo.oo Ami. pre*. Aek. I 470 It Well Wisher .. 1.00 V. QeddM Orant Ltd 26.00 Bob Oumberaatch .. 3.00 Bookers Bros. (B'doa) ABC T.O.X Da OosU Co., Ltd. V. E. Wilaea a Co. a a Co WhlaaoraT'a Water Polo Clob V. Lewn Balaam A. H. Bower, Dan Springer Bddla froat rdsd Modern High School Mr MrLoul-. Lynch Swan Btore oaU 710.00 1.00 6.00 100.00 26.00 26.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 6.00 3.00 1.20 17 :M mission Of Inquiry into the working of the PW.D. told the H< K. M. Gau-y who was appearuig to give evidence this morning. He began by wanted to make it clear that he did not mine because h had received a subpoena on the previous day. Oi Tuesday the Commissioners waited over an hour for the commencement of the sitting, expecting the Legislator Labour leader at whose own instigation the lngulry resulted by l motion In the Legislature. "You toid the Commission you would be present on Tuesday when you were quite aware a meeting of thr Executive was fixed for that day. You were very discourteous." Galry said: "I did not come because I could not." CAPSTTOWN, Apiil 30 Police reinforcement* pourea Into Capetown on WedneteV night to maintain order durln, lbs tense Parllanicnlai> debate on the BID which would dim nah' court checks on the Govcn laciu of Prim.Mlnistr. Dir • Bsalan. Police guards are staliunoci at (he hame of every Government Minuter, and Opposition politk^l leaders said that at least ISO patrolmen have been tata) ransferred from outlyini nreiis. Police said bj PsvaVU renforcemtnts are being mov.<| in because "threats have bt'cri nudi' agaimt Individuals." sperillcnlly members of the Government. The ;ntlCourt Bill is designed 11 nullify the Appellate Court's recent reversal of the law denying hnlf castes the voting rights of the white people but it would havi saying that he,ihe effw ., of fr^i,,^ ,;„,. from all Judicial control.-r.P Russia Is I\ol Ready For War |U> DAVID MUGS] WASHINGTON. April JO. A irMTKD STATES S'lURCK rlnsely aeouaintad with the Kuropean defence posilum, said the Russians are contentrating on bulldirn! up the mobllP.y of thlr ForoM but do noi yet appear ready to stun a war 11 said .10 Soviet divisions now in pot* it am lo attack in Western Ptimpp wmird require a considerable buildup in strength before the Russians could hope to succeed In ar alloul onslaught on the West. The source said such a build£50 Duinagcs Claimed Afler Cur Collision iid br detected by WcsUni ntelligeni-e The mdy known :hangc* in Sovtol past Ihree years were given si these The Kussians have barn IIK the mobility til their through motorua' turn Ttio have gicitlv imoroV' : %  '. % %  ii..(iilit> ..f their Ml drvl%  iii. diiil Bve ol then lunner ten n.iliy euvMoBl have been contrw -muui-ed divuiuu with <>*• on mobility. Sali'lliles Improve >:iti' divisions have %  II improved but are still sitt good eiHiugh for big league "watCUB." The Hussians have bwn Ikiltw Ca$uall$e9 %  •>• £ p .nowuir .u-i oftoahK (Hiiw-h nf thaw WASHINGTON, April 311 ("nes. TinOtsanai Dtpartineni Sl,v "" i""-'' h -' i i"*" '" %  ported on Wednesday thtu ih. •_"-"'• .' delstwive raDabUtttU known American b itn,in Korea now toUil 107, increase of 2tV over week's summary laclttdei iltles from the beginning! In the Cou-t ot Ol guial JurlsilicUOn yestsrday His •lonuur M A. J. H. HanscbcU adlovrned until May 8 the case In whl* Oac UcColun of Greens, 8t, George, < claiming damages to the amount it f50 from Cliflord (inodlng of Silver Sands, Cl.rer. The other car X-33 wi. eaknesse* In the Western "b-> on the left side of tho rood Mtlon hwever. These Inchld'"it facing Brighton Plantation, lie Mk We-tcrn forest will not reach RMh measurements and both the "trrngtri isaaoc Robert I Taft, l'i th, Massuachuse-tt: • itial Primary and clinched <• ll.n.'s sh.r,. of tinState's 3B • tlnm.it dun *nti*in ,u 1%.-,:..' >•• Runnlruj hctt *r than two lo one Bad of Taft in a StaU'-widh IH" i-pulonty p,,U, tho rehi.f <>r NATO led in all i i two or :H onte-eta f..r .listrict ti Tha '('"iii|ii"iiii.-r" sl.ittof ten fdi')Mii'. i' uirsss) \v'.. 11noppoaed Klganhowei it onls >*i** BWB9 iirt tin|(. puLli. an |K>11 tMit was %  tfau tantid U>hind Svnator K.r.mver hi th,IX>mocratl( ntial tasl Presidteiit Trun UUrd, and Taft fourth were i 'I "(itdMunci-il. With I.37S of th,Stat.-' 1.73P pnelnets eountad th,voia Waal publican riMMihowr i>>n.H42 %  'l .en,!!, (iovfi-tttir r-^,i 1 Waren <>r Californui BSO, former Min%¡ ovarnoi Harold K. Staasen !l. ..ii-1 Gener.il Mm Arthur 1.544. Damoerauc Kefauver ^1,438. KiM-nhower I1.U40. Trumi.n S.340 raft 3.Hi:. Governor Puul A "•.eo|>h. fihouhl avoid '. %  Iking in the path of flutraffic uving along tinVi. (.>.,., Bridge tardas batwaaa UM hours of l 00 BJO. Ud l <>n v m there %  > ttinual flow o£ truffle tha Victoria Briddaa us tinruunberlain ssTidasj is imilanajiatin %  pans. Deaptta ul] ihln traffic luma i>cpic were niiii walUnB II thf IOIKI Iwlwpen the firldgc rbJgSj (,., vrhiciiliutraffic i (.inOfM worn..,, was nearly km. k.-,l l.iwn when -hi> attemptt'd lo cross '"in one. iMe or the rod to the -t Uhfklly V r her the driver Ipp ls ad hhl hrakes in time Thar* are signs on vlttier side ii.mahout this caae, instead of; tha usual two poUl • loa him four flanked him. Thim wa--< :n, S.-.-iSHorf* and a large wruu.i ..iiout Uic court piLong Trial I'uttinH the case (W tlue .i>'1 fence, air. rarmer laid rag Bad] noted with appreciation the %  interval they had taken evidence. ft had been .. what long, trl.il with a n .-videncej, but he hoped artooad tHrntanttr to be paUaaM en mnintaUn the keen interest t<> the end. Even to the extent of burins! them, even tn in, \tent <>f repetition, he would ha\u to be sure he presented the cuscf the defenc,with all th*sr>^ apaaeiaa in Benskin'a evulcmd %  I asked the Jury to vie* tha ilv with doubt. 11. .3 licnakui had descrihed the; er thff it i I the attache! • tun .. .)• way lines %  \i*i osiov iau> 3 ^ IIUVV mi isi:n OT. PAI r TH: HAVY MPAaTfMCNT has announced that an explosion In a forward gun turret (arrows) aboard thheavy crmser St Paul killed 30 number, ol the crew while the sh:p w engaging .„ m Ic'TS Z coast. Thsre ware no wounded. The bbst was officially described n a gunpowder exptealaT u* —s no evidence thM .^d in* uascdy i U back la athi>' k ffnrernatioMl -d raused by a powder bag catching fire. There "wsi aaval disaster of Un. Kn-ean war. The shi D efTact on the Nutlonul Defence effort appssred to have t*en av ed by union Ifeders 1 decision u. call an immediate walkoo CUfomla refineries wht. I moat of the (uel for '.varatips, planes and mechani/ed gro-ind equipment Tha coaliUon of CIO API. iif'saioriN by Brew;.'. , .ii.-il wife. .,iu! to a friend Ford* IQM b.v them wee* not tho rvuma nor did thev agree with Moitskin'a evidegtdc. He said that Vrts Small. star's common law wife*. mid; Urewsler, had had a dispuie sometinip before and it well minhi ba that she waa motivated hv that In apeoklng of alleged confess ions. Threatened aicl. too. that UM Poilea had thr*atene