(Sl'lNMNt; AM) KNITTlNti OE C'OTTtiV YARN ANII Till MANIFACTlllr: Or i,\liMIM.M Ordrr. 195 The GO\I-II.UI -iit-KxecutiVf Cominittt-.-. in exercise of thr power voiilcrred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Enemir lakes the following Order :— This Order may be cited an the Pioneer Industi) (Spinning and Knitting of Cottun Yarn and the Manufacture ui t-anneiits) Order, 1962. 2 Thtspinning and knitting of cotton yarn and the manu.icture of garments therefrum is hereby declared to be a pioneei ndustry and the following articles are hereby declared to bt pioneer products of that industry :— The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom. Made by the Governoi-m-Executlve Committee thir *""j' 0* one thousand nim hundred and fifty-two. By Command, Clerk. Executive Committee. 28.4.52—3' P.BT LFOtt KABPtH, Cav* .U.I •H MLM.-. : %  SA3A-I TTI4pdVlic ar-aj lii-irbj snuriad ada>ratt Ei.lBg 'crirlilTa any paiAOn r pat-i -omtoawi i I do not hat-I an>s.if rat .MiMDM tn any luroa unlaas b> a ' r atsiiad H* IM. ATMsVi WlUHUi HAY a • X |i... L Michael CONSTIPATED Act No**—and art rrlirf Im m fnv sAVf •nan wilh" Dr. ClAsrtl Klilney-Livn fcll.' Tiulv liuvallw m rff.-ci, iboy tn-al two condition4)1 once. Ihoiiain.ln pdj on thla rilasiivc irmrdy (or lap mmtn l*yr area" Hi Dr. Chase—a name yxai caji M %  nly oo for ratir. iDiTcnTuTisl K, 5NEY-LIVER PIUS tr nut aaeed but seekln' I i itlm pleaae writ* to* is HI I HIMIK siga Mik* j ;;uvs WAY o* 7 SALVATION PIANO l-.^tlr> llano in sXaid < LOT. phon* aw. brforr %  at A I .rr.nsr lor n.prct.ori SI 1 iaBrOsu3B--Cladrln our toek of MOM itt->MTtinro for Two DiJUri. vojr dlMri A RAKHBA A CO I TO t 4 H— i.r.n lubartlbr nowto lha Krtilaiid't laodlns Dall* %  rrlvtaa m riarUado. b. d-vc aflrr publlral.on I lrj_ Ian Oala. e o Ad Loral RaorrwritBtlvr. T -\r CO mi n 4 ui ST MICH ALLS C.IBXS SCrltKH. NOTICE BA OOVBB X stSJCt M BBAAJES KPPI A TlOWf Al HARRISON COLLEGE Id, MB) "mi al HajTiaoo Ci>l..will ram o>i TWawaai. tha 3SU> ..I Apui. PV and Ibr School Wilt be In atiaMWi Sir I. of Barbodoa' irnriprdlvr ot and School -pr** Iu>l altrill-l Fr*a Uurwart*. U .St 00 p*i lai two f> FnahlinJ^h JanU i CAasasaaag .T....' nativ • %  air u-ani. .I..l m I who havr iraMMd for s ponod ol U-j) WATXIV PIPE. ilAl*M'd waSW un ., i iv t" JI*. pip-atii'i -ilv !.... Wti.rla Slrrrl VHIIlVllr natkrr Hhh>Bswt %  th POPULAR I.AH t ..OKI l<%  hinmrnt will br raivins, UBIJIK Ttr of aiifncirn 10' HII.S II rh-A mdar >rar* al aar on Ihr and &f pu-mbr IBM IWTF anplM-allan mii.t t* moaW by th* trrnK or U:trd).ui at Ihr cifitlUI.-H ihr (. Qevai li. 'Gov/i Mkhar'n Glrlf S.Aifill aSUt.iaM. —I m ill -up,II in(oimati..ii faajiiiir.) i.y 'irh ponn Tw appUcAll-m fo/nn imi'l > rUaa in nd aant to th* a**-r*t**y al Ihr (io.rinlns QUEEN'S COLLEGE IS n*xt trim at Quawa'a Collfgr will n oa, Tuesday, tl* BHh of April. it ISO t m and Ihr School wi 1 InD B. M MALONE. Sarratary %  Trraausar. Ootamina aV>i> 4ur*n*l CollrRiBI.4.BS Ba THE HO.NIII! INUI04TRIKS < KNCOITRAUEMENT) ACT, 15I The G(ivrinor-in-F.xt'.iiti\Committee, pursuant to section 3(2)(a) of the PIOIMH>I ludtisim. (Encdurugcinent) Act. 1S>51. hi'rob Ufwm th. nuii ito ba published i.l his intention to make the Onl. set out bfJow in lining the inanutACtlire of sugar confectionery and i.u( food produeta to UJ Blonacr industry and boiled confectioneiy. lollipops, miiio and icing sugar, and every variety of nut footl products to be pioneer product* of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order aet ou< below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and of ihv grounds on whi.h he icUei. in support thereof to the Clerk to fW< Kxcuti\f Committee on or before the SlitT day of May on" t\it ao lonjrr nacMaary to turrri '?. M.. n i.i' -jtmns Bod-. ft OlrtaSchoo si n FURNITURE AUCTION I IV *,\'.i.. ,-%  '-• n .... ...... v GOVER NMENT N OTICE VACANT POST SENIOR MASTER, GRAMMAR SCHOOL. UOM1MCA %  mca th. dlac...ary .rf H,i. i liswoww aaCklnaroiai Hytaa an work la 10 mlnutM and not "nly atop. th* pain bat alao takaa out thr awdl lac, ataoa Maadtnf and rombata nm IrrllattoA Ihacrby curblna olhar tr..u Ma rauaad by Mia* aorh aa H-ad. t, Narvouanasa. Barkachr Cnnotlpatl... leaf *f % % %  egy, dabim, aad imudi. dlapoiltlon Oat Mylaa from yni-. drwgatol today undor thr posit I v. %  uaraata* M-laa muai atoc, your plt> paJna and Iroublaa or monry bark araturn mt ampl y pa<-> %  • .;//.V,WrV//W.W-V.V.'.. n.VM'IM, (IXSSIS ORDER THE I'IONEER 1NDISTRIE.S (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, lftgl ThtPioneer Industry (M'GAR t'ONFECTIONERY AND NC'T FOOH PRODUCTS) Order. 1M2 Tra? Governoi-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the power conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order -1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer industr. (Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products, Order, 1952. 2. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut fooil products is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and th-following articles arc hereby declared to be pioneer products of that industry :— boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and Icing lugar, ano every variety of nut food products Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee thi . ._ d *y of on thousand nin hundred and fifty-two. By Command, Clerk. Executive Committee 29.4.52—^1Applications are invited for one vacant poat of Header %  .i.iMiimir School. Dominica. B.WJ. The School roll at present numBra 150, and courses will be offered up to the Higher School Certiflcate examination of Cambridge University, 2. QKAliflCAtlons. Applicant for the posl should hold a University degree and be quAlified lo teach Mathematics up to Higher School Certificate standard 3. Emoluamenls. The Post is pensionable aoU carries a salary .n tlie scale (1,920 by $120 to $2,400 per annum. A temporary coataf-livirOf allowance |g payable ni the rate of twenty per cent of *alary The candidate selected may be appoihted at any point in :h* c<-ii<. ;i ocordirfg lo qaianncalioniv and experience. 4 Quarters. Quarters are rfyt provided 5 l.ravr. Leave is earned tn acCpsdance'with local regulations made for assistance towards overseas leave passagi nallrt Claaaaa at thr Ac|i*.ln ,* Club -111 c.fiiun*ner on FVida. * bid And Sat Srd of Ma. .O C laa—i In Ballroom. B*ilrt and S Kerp Fit will br undrrtakrn TUS lUon by Miaa Jnan RH SB X LRAD.A.ISTD ^ TUB UAKBADOB SCHOOL OF DANcnfC LTD § I nF*n>A M KINSTTKV J S-rrlai-. J 3P 4 U--, ^ THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (EN"' URAOEMENT) ACT, IM1 The Governor-m-Exeeu live Committee, pursuant to sectuit K2Ka) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereb. .-auses this notice to be published of his Intention to make the Ordei .et out below declaring the manufacture of ham, bacon and meiituiiiig to be a pioneer industry und ham. bacon and other foixl irodif't iModuccd from meut of IOC ally-reared pigt to be DitassMT iroducls of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out %  elow is hereby invited to give notice tn writing of his objection and il the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk o the Executive Committee on or before the 21st dav of May one houaand nine hundred and Afty-two so thai due consideration mav >e given to any objections received pursuant to thi* notice. l'iil DJ l.-t.inunu|ls and references Oiould I" I to the Rttablialimunt Oilicer, Goveinmeni Office. Domm • %  ',. ^ A.ppTK.ilion< f|oin ineinoeis ..f the Government Sen-Ice of uir liuuid l>e trgn:rojtted ilnoMfih the officer Administering thi Government of that Colony. • • a 27.4.62— U PITMAN S TYPE| WRITING EXAM Wke place on Sal MA>) at CaaaWrsBder. A.BI Anthmetic anil oilier teat will be held on %  fldaWBss*. 17th MAS'. Trae I.P.S. Protlciene, Teal haarrlvrd Anyone desiris of sitting must communicate with me. A batch of LP.8. TyaewrlUag Tea* Pa#ers will be arriving soon. Enttr now Phone 8X00. Leavt your number. n ROCK 8ok I.P.S. Repreaentaiiv. %  lUvkcresf. Olstln Hill. Christ Church OKI) Kit THE PIONEER IMirSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1M1 The Pioneer Industry (HAM. BACON AND MTAT-CURINO) Order. 1952 The Govcrnor-in-ExecutiVe Committee, in exerci'P of the power ui.ferret! on him bv section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encoui%  Bcment) Aci, 1951, hereby makes the following Order 1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Ham. Bacon and Meat-curing) Order. 1952. ?. The miinufaeture of ham. bacon and meat-curing hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the followiin: articles are hereby declared to be pioneer productof th;it industry — Ham. bacon and other food products produced from meat of l icrilly-reared pigs. Made by the Guvei i.ui-m-Execuliv,Committee this . J J ._ y ' ont thousand innhundred and fifty-two By Command, Clerk, Executive Committee. 29.452—3n t; :; OPENED A Lovely Assortment of CHROMIUM WARE \ OISHSS FERN POTS 7Vi" „ — 814" .. — W SMOKER-S STANDS (it 113.12 each @ 6.68 each ui' 8.51 each @> 11.38 each @ 17.26 each ASH TRAYS FLOWER VASES — T" .. r i .94 each 4.14 each 4.83 each PLANTATIONS LIMITED ,'/-'.V/-'.'-'/-*.'-'//-'.'/-'.',','/.",-.',',V/,.,./,V,V/,'.'-'.V/.'r'.! TW. si v CAsmiur win .-ooapt Cargo and Pa nan aa n lot Xrtiaua Hontaorrat, Srvl. and St Kl". Aalllnl FtldAoB.WJ. -i IIOIISI U*MI> ASSOCIATION |DfC> Coaalaorr Trla. Mdl y^MuyasSt* !" ^^ NEW YORK SKRVH t BTBAISaW aalla 1Mb Apri'. I ••lit pUi Mar a NEW ORLEANS SHVKi: CANADIAN SERVICE SOLTBBOINU HAMTAX April lllh MOTRFAI. April JOth MONTRFAL May ISth May Wlh irl* havr linulrd pa*a* n a r ar UulSWOdaSlotl ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE Apply:— DA COSTA CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE SAGUENAY TERMINALS CANADIAN SERVICE From Montreal and Halifax HI r l MAS II : %  1IM1IA1. 'A VBBMr-l. LMTIO KINGDOM SERVICE Ertmi South Wale*. Liverpool uud i .1 %  -. ..u "SKAUVA?.:. N O RtXiL.'.AI-"swniosT II..C.1-. IS April B Apt.| I I IS Ua.%  Ma 22 MA> 14 June. 15 Jiil> UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE From Antwerp, K..i i. ; dam and London KiaaMad Art1*al Oal** li.l.i.l... ataraados Agents : PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 703 it< fCA ot* •C io TAKI apvANTAac ..r EXCUKSION rAaaa HOW IN r.FFTCT a i...... ..„...,, e.. Cumplvt. InlDm.BlK.n. Ste <. \KI.INI K At'STIN a Co. B'p lim %  just rereirwi 1 A .\EW SUII>\II;AT or LADIES' and CHILDREN'S HOLLANDIA SHOES LADHS KUEDE SHOES in Black. Blown. Navy Gret LADHS While. Buckskin Shoes White. Leather -'ior, ^ „ Bruarn, „ .. v Blark Patent Shees %  I HII.IMil S SHOES In Black A Hhll* I IM f IN S 7.47 f 742 119.44 Hlic 7—19 ; in in it %  ,. 11—J St I .S1 —St.9 5—85.14— $5.97 I9.2S—45.4* at *5.5? M.31—fS.48—S5.S9—.7S 9S.11—>...99 A SS.27 ALSO-JOHN WHITE Poatwesr for MEN tit S9.7S A $19.97 IOR BMTEK BARGAIN'S TRY AHELY & Co. 19 Swan St. for ERVICE. VALUE & VARIETY Phone: 49SI



PAGE 1

n I>I>\\ MKII a in.,.' BARBADOS ADVOCATE FAOfc UIKbt: Point Four Has Helped Caribbean PORT-OF-SPA1N, Ai T.uv %  fuur leal Awiaunce to Caribbean UrrttoraM was -ignaiiMxi lo&u] I! Mr Hector Garcia, housing ex-i-pnrierl for rtuty at Kent House. Caribbean Cnmmtaaion headquarters. The services of the** experts %  have been made available to the *_ # i_ territories iervert by the Com/ *""eT J misslrn for a two-yew period undar a project of the Technical Cooperation Admim.iratlon. De0. Stiile. which administers ihe Point Four Programme They have been .mimed to the Commission to assist local government* In developing pilot projects, tenting lOCtJ building materials. developing on-the-job training pr'.grrmmes. and demonstrating how people can build nnd finance houses for themselves. • THE GR.\Z\ IH PGBtfAfT A tram I'agr 1 I tcanaal L-XIK pubUali.vj \vtr*lrtlrr Blackburne Opens Art Group Show MURDER TRIAL • l li.n. rage I. ubeo tnr ilutht* he Elma Huweil Uiai nignt. It he was wraring, was true that she used to sleep The defence was alleging. Mr. at Vela and in the same bed us caasaasaaaasw Mi Reecc said, that Brewstar lived Veta and he. She, (Elma), mu-i with 10-year-old Vela Small in have gone into the bed after he pane's Village firewater left her had been asleep for he only The \ home on the evening of September noticed her on the following u, ( %  -, 7 and when he returned later he morning. Asneni called for some water and started He did not ask Elma to do Ltteti'iMi On Puerto Rico In June—Julv Uli KKcrlanvy. Mr K. W Blackwashing return ..f Ins garmei.ts (.lathing for him for he had nol 1OB .| -Ji. IITH* nnenerl tt.r> t\frti mmw a-, r.m, % >** w .„>,* ,v— _. i „_ tl^ IMBTUII dent-. % %  %  rial .vernment<, ^"^ Pened the nfth annual Art Frn the beu where she wu ly->.,v, .hot the colour of th, '.-•. 1,,..^,,, j 7 F H A Un up ,l *• CWadl ChamWOJUr in which he was "ashing rerel/rv r.^L,.." & *" " Wed.ie*d^v 23rd last. The Uie gamienls I ,.,,„, i Po) Btlag arlth the lntciInstituuof A in at h ASKC.I wnai was Ine i travel*, lie au ;. li^ JIM, n my ru|. Bfl 1 %  u the world tu-oat*. pai i lot those srha i enter tne diplomatic oejMOl I en be done cneapl>. All it h.t cost me fn m> nv, about $1,200. He saW fatal he hag law Spertenre of a hike around Hrli %  mi in IWti and on that %en lure, he saade a thorough lour of Furoo*. keraUns < l-.it of th> lrun < urUln". Previous r\ perleakcr in law underirouiiil movement in Holland durhu ar sear* fired hi* spirit and *ni him farther afield, II' BjaajJ oil North Africa. He had crowed ItaJv to Stcll* and ih< i a Uirilliiix tour which led him la Joist a raravan to r r oaa ihr Sahara and to eontlnue hit. b hiklns am a ramel for %  OVOfoJ Vriendt, Si %  .,! fc|g| with the |0 BBftfgf | had done no washing when -r.,,. r,,,,, ,,, h a rhed home that night mto „ .,„ iaspevlor liouriie said that iiniiervii\ ..< t),.Uu % %  >,, iudUd w %  ith T/,r?? 0r WM a " m l"' by Mrs. He U.W IK^I that he had ju*i Hrewsle, *M wearing black „ n U er-umvc,.y r&Z | mat^S Blackburne and Cap,. F.E.Hew.tt. {J^-g JJ w ho ^ "J- £ P-nts when he jntafeln^ h.m. P^uT^an^ Expect to l .< .i n Asked for coromenl on their assignment. Mr. Hanson and M: B (nllmving V.-IU, "'" "' tv, ll *'' u Ih A T Wllsnn Armmlam f th.W yews. Jtt "CS f A "'""'-' 53t ftrtW7h dfSi D [ £jto had performed ,he nim"nol txicarry nVouid. in the low-cost „^ w _. nu--.-,. wnr i. Her P"" <* arid attributed death lioiiMtnt Held In various Caribbean mg work. Her ,„,,„.„„, ^^TsJiS' Ins IKI vent tires w a • CongjQ KiVei. and being takei. aspect fi>r a few monUi' Hie also made an escape from m African Princes^ of the Nean-.The course will Keani Uibe who wanted i<> IM,\A and expect to • ii us Uutruct on UM taehi level. KM ,t H,i ;, r '!''* a n Mosler-., scene with a beach. !" ^ orrh * r t nd h ? < oU ow W actvpt it." hi said, nol consider force to be in tin' i strong evidence given by the questioning as lo Brewster's adin with whom he was living milting having %  rubber-handled Sm knife which his mother had told m 10 BoMtr undu istandinK ne mip-iilunt part Of ihe t'nit States: lo elar|f> the imporlan pt pfaj ,, BggM canrcugt Fn'tM Ii fenii i Africa and % %  ,MIS ,.f 1he rsiurs' ll uw ">l" &f *' (r "w tribe Carrying A Shovel He was kepi piltoiicr in the ground ,r til. gfjasansjaj when t**0 >1<1 >l pineapples, in the foreground is indicted Mr K-, e i-. fc.,'.VJr„ !KH! '' :,M,V 1 •*" ' %  • pnfers done uf?T:„*?sT "^f lh *" mt the' man "who" had" attacked' "a/as i-unducting s-n-ial studies in trnr ^^^'•l IqrmfnW menders. The,e peters "a" ** V.;,"^., Sri:^.''vSS •" \tr u, IK .|, i,.! ... i., ._ u y *auuu!i meinuer. innc posters 11 „ 11 ,i, . "~ "%. — \",~T" Ih. Boulh-Skk nuDlng Ilo.rd Kl,JfS.t„^Ir?ia IltvwMrr ,.lu..,e.l ham ..,, „• Cluc.B Huuslni! Aulhurlly. Prior ^," „",TTj~. !" i m < m liisiavtot UUwuid Spriujur th. I.. )oimiin ilusliill ..I Pouit Four "o, *,„„ %  "" r _. _... „„ urrt witness calico, mild thai h I'hatit broke into the tribe's viltu'vvl he had previously I ill] '• *'' "" %  mauraudlng exetirsii rusurd that llenskin had said that %  % %  %  t the nnd for •< %  the CBimlnmal tied ii panlun and h.escabed bj roHow< niK the elephantHe evenUiaalj ransni i linked Inway do %  (lie Cgpa ali,| OH 10 llittisl Qulana WnUc In Bouth Anwnea i . %  ..] i. . ,i the ran* UMctt. during which IUDO in drove catlle over the A 1 i al one time M jnln n %  f KM nyiumies nl change lie f^ul .isked lin-wster how he iihl -... he did nut seHo well "}•< %  ...nire will I.. .ndurt, Uial night, yit had slept in tht> through a oonwlngtlon at Intturci -mue bed she had slept, but he did t tlw University ol Puerto Rh-i not consider that a cross-rxam'tf instructors from both Unlv*i< niation. sitie elds ainsini Re-vjuuruiicd lureiterated thai *oi.omie*. geography. poltUi > when Brewster had told him not science, and weird rnouriin ,%  >.. "'II and ulher policemen went lo various parts of the island. the Garden Land where he saw clats discussions In small the body of Haswell lyin^ on the groups, ground with a pool of blood around her head. Aboul 40 feet ••I Tnindiid and thei f the -ither Islands in IN i nit Tl.. official prop-el lews is bvbi' from tl l.rH-luire Ai UM). gth nurm. D Set. t'lLlllp II I).vtd.ni. N
  • ool of blood I.I in e.ilt-.t alleiilioii near which the liod.v was lylnii on ln ^j ... lu,. Mr George T. Warren. Chief he night, lo Hie nearest hoiiv wo" !" ,." K^-kJuTllsim • i:,„i,.i,.l H,e Anlisu.i Sugar FoeIve feet, sut inehe, and neatb; i^er ll^t "lei,, he% la-. boen ap,..,.,uM Cluef there were ,l„„.p „, khu. kl„, .^.V'^JIZ ^^^ „,;,;„ '"""' .?' 'JS' !"" ^K a _i ss '-' % % %  ""d blood on hb. clothes iheDepiitn •' < ..I Agiictillure and Factory. Mr. Warren has worked Accused lound Benskiii gave them o slalemettl ..ire in Puerto Hun. His henfor the past ten years. On September 20. he went to Hit and was taken fo the Hospital work has been centred around Ihe ._..„, K „^. rl „,-, A -,, ^ ",",,"' "'J""! m "", "' D—"*! On September 11, Vet. Small planning and organising of rural %  "" s "f" "'„* nl ._" vu "'' "W"' "e <"und Ilu; accused handed him knife and pair ol eoiiiiminilii s in. .. I ':. V I UM P'.Uce, V. A. Bunting, lias beem „nd Invited him along with Small p, n u Land Law A.i H Puarlo Hico. .,|,|..mtod. .i liansfir an AsaunJo Cenlraal Police Station On Cross-cammed, he corroborale,! and over-all social and physical an! Superinuaident ot Police m the foUnwing day. Sgt. Marshall inaptelor Sprlngi-r" evideii.e Improvements. Mr Garcia has a the Jamaica Constabulary. Assl. and he wenl to Vela Smalls home to how Haswell was dressed II. B.A. Degree in Eduction from the Supl Buntuig was boili In Jamaland Small gave Marshall a knfe odd the cut Benskin had Unlversitv nf Puerto Rico and a c. He served eight yaam In ttu, and a pair of brown soft boots the left side of Ins Head , Muster's in Rural Sociology from Royal Air Poice and came here in Brewster was arrested and forehead. Carnegie University. Pittsburgh. 1M ,_. charged for murder on November Dr James Waleott .said that he li I.,n 11, u in II w *s announced that Lord 0. Brewster said then that he ^ ad received from Sal. Marshall. ^^ nnih^7. ? "" n "l b. the Monster would visit Antigua on "new nothing of the murder knife, shirt, felt hi! and ., pal. £E SBSSuSl IffgS Mun-er anotl.ed „,. Escel&&. -- pR B-g. gj^ tAtAAWitt> imied mofll ment in ihe Curibbean Coinml sion for the work which thev now beKinningThcir efforts will be aaaeonar Kvrnim. nllp. fn.m nrlll.h _. %  nsaaaai rsanj > I-L. urvuie iiigrun said thai !" tr^*r V^iftjiS 0 '! Inpee.or Coeil Bourne said that Sii5K. m SL.".". It."^ ""TT "sT ^ "NJI., 1 Vl i apot of blood aboul 30 feet I.M-v\)d<>r'> iitnthe! rtitd WaiUM. %  dirertPd lenry that, in the circumstances he } p 5i 0 5 h D nt plnns. hus reluctantly come to the con"^^ Ihod, for elusion that his proposed visit to jKJJJ hurricane the Colon* must be cancelled. Ho "?* n ,._.,-.. cr~ %  ---varuon nrewners rnotner with a and rcnhas cxpresocd hi. regret thai he ^ L „^l^ '^^}^^ l ^' ^r^ wurnni. They found a osr*ar. a possible, will be unable to visit Arrtlgua ^^"L HSSP-S truWl ^ n t aUai u * 0n ""^ "**> JSTL^LV^L^ 0 ^ "••rs ;^hr^.,on. ablp, d o oon s^^^^^fi^^tt'wra or ,,0... Sgssm^^"nvSina^d C ^"^ • ^ho^e. aSSfrgrShS MSW ;peelScl;!l•o,,s'^,n7 el meu^s'-.o; efirsion that hU V^.* !" £ n'S^rnUlo C w aSiwlVer rSfiSCSLs?* h building houses that are hurricane the Colony must be cancelled. H %  __i .fTr ^T5 proof, termite-proof, i structed. in so far as from low-cost materials, produced They wUI set up demonstrations, furnish advice to local government and private contractors, encourage local manufacture of building tuspl hyproduct' and other cheap matnrials. and so on. The proiert provides for making .vuilable a small amount of Acrobats" blunts Thrill Crowds evife. She wx ;. friend of Bonw -'^2. The Boodhoo Brothers, acrobats signed the statement with After answering some qu—tic Brewster told him he wag i mclined to answer any more. U was he who identified Brewster c-uld not write, but body to the doctor. at, cpi -i. Capi llorman Scott, 1 'Muipmont uoh pf West Indian fame, ware toudja x Cf5 foamoc irttn. f£Z K ff ,.,.;;,' tt-p J, .'' >!•• Mnek-miikinu muchinerv. ,.^is,..^,.l for ihe r nCTfornaUICO t>a .i.n. n ..*..**' !" riniiK itau •arpentcr M. ijUi ... %  Vawi FiillMii arrlvlna at rMrbadw b. II I-.wl> Nrlann >'rfpida> r. '•BaeaBBh II Canr -.rt wiifeu. \ H OIOWOP C J.,hi,s (in >• %  n0 — L w Will. %  ". JS oortable blocg-ruldng machinery. a ppi aU( |,€l for their pcrformau.ee y^. gj^n,,,,,. temem mixers, hand and power at the Globe Theatre on Saturday i n ttUa ,ttomonl Brewster said .* lo-U. .md the I lite to be asatgned nuU ,i by j. rapacity ro*d The that „„ September 7 he had bt^-n tuarv to the Commission for loan to me Brothers. Omar and Buddy, mgnl(| igartindaJo's Itoad at his was local governmonis. lighted the Show. mother He had lilt Vela's house The Caribbean Commission will Omar and Buddy Boodhoo toM w htre he lived at about fl.30 v n turniih "flUe ^pace. secretarial. he Advocate yesterday that th. %  „ nd re Bched there at about 7 p.m. nnd other services while iho haV( n0 w decided to stage their Hll mou,,-,. was home, he said, technicians are at the Central own acrobatic, stunt riding and lind ^ ate and ^.pntually left • %  Secrelnri:it in Trinidad. While wlrv walking shows—the first %  f 8 90 o'clock for home, they are assigned to the local which wdl be at the Childrer, Hp denied his mo ther h—so\-crnmeiita. those governments Goodwill League Building <:i will pay transportation withlh s; turday night. the ternt< ry nnd will also pay the Omar Boodhoo said that th .' expenses of the trainees and n re hoping to give every Barb provide such maps, testing laciliu ia n a 1 hance to see their fea' ties, and collaborating personnel Already they have made an e bo necessary. tensive lour of the schools in tlic The projee' will be financed island. irider the Pmni F-mr Programme He said that he is also hopn I ^T'te atttr he has approached the ormont of about $68,000 for rect authorities, to stretch his that on September 8. nt nbouf un. he passed by the M010B his way to work. Hi dsndlns: at the Mortuaiv gate when he saw Carlton Brewster passing and Brewster spoke to him • On Pag* 3. -' % %  "l'i. J ma !.> %  %  •*. I..M. II.-1 >•• %  > Bl Kill. Ill ,'l.h.v r. iM4tT V. lie LIMA A CO.. LTD. :'0 rtltOAli sriin STUDENTS COMPLAIN advised him not to carry about a certain knife he had when walk• From Page 1 ing. With Miss Stuart, Laoy HugSome I Ii ii in H" 1 • to enquire into condition He was wearing the b ma "' trauung of student nurses OJUI clothes he had on while being w* have discussioiu on the aduianda 01 aaSasas< aaBai %  < ihe %  TI>KVOI %  • %  •%  *!%  > Se-hanfou-iuitn-si-if Hnturi nj., %  •mxnoKHa asaissiai DW M.'.ia. an haw roaJ d • v **v (P at^sakuirf ^%^| -^^ l^S •.#. >-J •ir.r#*>t iT+fma war. %  - „\\ HMa-aWKin ItnwfhlkrM i ^jX ^ ananai %  • %  mm.-' I>H ^^N> S3 as — -- -— M0MII HIH0M ... r-jr 1111 aaaO UM '•mnii- MOaait til TO % 1 %  %  aOj raa m PC FOKT KOl'AL l.AII.HI.I. LTD. I'hnn,' 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 OFFERING A FEW MORE USEFUL ITEMS • SANDING DISC GRITS 16, 24. 36, 50 • MASKING TAPE • HUIiniNG COMPOUND •SPONGE MJHBEH • I.OY COLD PLASTIC METAI. • PISTON SEAL • KASEMT CASE HAIIUENING • RAWI. PLUG DUROFIX •COPPER TUBING ',", A" "i", A" • TYKE ;AI'GES (CM .III.I Truck) •ENGLISH SOCKETS SETS • ENCINEKK HAMMERS • HACKSAW BLADES ECKSTEIN BROTJfEIlS BAY ST. -*. ',*,-. -,-,-W,',',', DIAL 4269 '/////////*,'...'.'////////.*''•; I I nil It II n if ) %  nt vi:Ait 1.1 \KA\TEE NO OILING-NO ATTENTION IS EVER NEEDED WITH THIS SEALED UNIT. OBI I.AKA(.E TRADING CO.. LTD. VICTORIA STREET. 'unlity Lifelonf Wear Splendid Value itiniixnos \ 1 0-1H> IOITOXFACTORY LTB. I ::•


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    ill ii \\ 41-1(11 t* 1M2 IUKBAIMIS .I.MM in PAGE sn i %  HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BY CHIl YuUNO 1 JUST PUT ON NAIL POLISH. DEAR>OU'LL HAVE TO ; WAIT A MINUTE UNTIL ITT OOlESj (LASn GORDON BY OAN BAKKr AT PEAK VELOCITY— BO MILES A SECOND — POWER 15 CUT, ANP THE SHIP CRUI56S ON THROUGH SPACE ... JUMNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS MOB BRINGING UP FATHER NOW WT THAT JU9T \ IKE A COR.. AUM'.' SPOtUNfr I ^-f A-fiuvo BUTTY'' ^^^y \p*A^s*^^^y r j. ^^^f' V ."%Y* ^i *iMlLk tSj ""!' %  '-"wwUll ': • -l.il liy NIP KlkB' BY Ai LX RAYMOND H.ERRIN GS FRESH or in TOMATO SAUCE %  HUP -•- WHftf TOi, %  IT \no * Pfco CRKAM-Or WHFAT (OWN HAKIT MACARONI PTXARI. mcr I t.vr IAHUV v'U. UAHUtY it'HJ-U) OAT1 TOMATOCM TOMATO jrU'R %  cn ipup rHiCKKN v>irp OXTAi: i "KKOI MOUP *)lh 1UCX illiiKB* NOOOUt aouv HIAM or cir BOUT r.AIUMVt DtlY PKAS MIXED VWJETABIX HA KM) WANS l'i>HK -na BCANB BAroN pr lb %  WOT -H Rt STIAET& SAMPSON (1938) LTD. JUST RECEIVED Pkgi. TU Lyle Castor Mnfl M *nd lUfon Lgc. ii'ii Small linVienna S-U'lf" i-fcrGoddard PUiw '* "" der Tliw Stove PolUb Tliw Helni VeceUbli Hld I'fc.Bridal Irlw Bufsr Tim i ..-L.tiin.' TUii Asald. Sweet BlwoiU Tin* Pineapple ( liuntaTin* Strawberrtea Also: TIN HAMS RpeeUI prior to Shopkeeper&f AI. thew Ihlaia get ftum INCE & CO. LTD. %  • •. BOKBCCK ST. .A PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only M'l.l 111. Ol I I IIS nrr now available at our HVanrhr* I < -tlsiili Spritfhlwlon % %  and Sunn Slril UlU.llj Now $ .40 Usually NOW ONIONS (2 111) I J BOTTLES JAM Ml 3 .M Apricot 40 .36 l'K<:S Tl'KBAN DATES 37 .33 BOTTI.KS LOCAL VINKIiAR White Brown TINS SARDINES 2 .22 .20 .20 18 .18 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE COLONNADE GROCERIES '' / \ i / you rto* \ i I WHOOiOtr, 1 1 V SEVEN f J 1 Mt L; -.' 1 £SL. L ^PJv r^jj^pft %  ^f" 1 Raaatnw 4 \^ THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY M00RES W4TA!4U6urX*air jvtc-*)l • %  \ I 9IABSI0CCiO/iSlir/lHl:. K1I\G < %  OIHPI VI A Pictorial Record Of His Great Life This volume is a tribute to his Into Majesty KiriK (ieor^e VI. the sailor knitf who Rave of himself unsparingly in the faithful service of his peoples. Hi UvM OH In UM memories recallenl by tlis book—fifteen years til hll COUraCOOUi MlfB, nnd earlier u the Duke of York. The boy. %  i'ii ti i .II I i\tr'.. the husl or An outstanding biography written and •id with symp;iihy and deep reapect that wdl stir the hearts of the multitudes who %  • d Him Thn** who hove boked orders shall call for their copifs ol once Prire %'l.Tl ADVOCATE STATIONERY STORE



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    PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE Qahib Calling THREE HEADS j B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME "There ara three he*dg In every | TUEBDAY APRIL n IM 0ceiirf SUy Hinn in her *"-: 'VT/" N tU*^io"f book "Good Manners I n A Nutoi" a. !" *,, s.i P "N.1.11— I0SO %  M '. I! %  i ihc Cont AssociationB in th Caribbean ares. on April SO Among the subiect 10 be dl*rustei sr. SeTVlctl. tit of Hn n:!aU. Tratr.iRa. .1 ; of Work. It eages. Re-engagr merit ol I' %  M %  TC.A. Barrister M R A H H.IT-. Ran I Montr* I bj T.CA tu M gnpao M by M rct thr-B t the Ocean View Hotel. Spent Two W;elu \ spending two i ^'iirbjJoa, Mr. J Lallan Jr., of Bos%  tta, relumed h< me t..i'. by the I.aJ> %  as I %  Staying at the Ocean View Hotel. tnplovert with the brokerage (Inn of iO0ri and II.ITIL.-1.. Paid Buimcst Visit M ROMM1& U %  %  • %  gin* Dmetat of u.. returned to the I Mr. Gittens went on a bu'iness visit for the Company. Spent a Month M RS. A. G HA/.r.l.l. of St. VlBOSttt n-turned htme on Thursday by B.G. Airways after apa n d. n < %  month's vacation hen with Hi and Km MastertonSmith, Ruled Sane, Freec Urveiling Ceremony T HE Unveiling Ceremony of the tablet in memory of the l..te Rev. F. M. H.wthorne look plaee on Sunday evening at 4.50 for tne executive's interest J nu-s Street Methodis*. Church. The late Rev. Haw* ihnrniwas the shell" 'The one who is ahead, I* • ~i-m **n.i> MaiPhai and the head who does routli work. Whichever head you am, head your work well." (a) A genuine desire to work and not for one's own. (b> A clear perception of • ffli-e ethics and a wilUagnea. to • Barbados-Trinidad district for cha nge, the Utcral truth when l a\-ar* and Superintendent Mlnnecessary. (e> Loyalty to the executive and to other office peopli (d) Ability to follow instrux. .._ Mitl Ttur Comn>... B>a>. i*>fl Bound-Up ami •arasV T.S am. Tb K-. ~~-M Mewa Eram fbrtaiii IN CHICAGO, Rulh Stelnbagen. St, who shot and wounded Eddie Waitkus. Phillas first baseman, on June 15. 1M9. u, pictured after she was adjudged sane and freed of a charge of assault with Intent to kilt. After the shooting she was committed to the Kankakas State Hospital. Miss Steinhagen said she planned to return to the stats hospital to work as an occupational therapist f/niarnaclonali Ister for the Jamei Street Methodist Church for 17 years. He also served on the Board of Directors of the YMC.A-. the 8.P.CA, and lft __ Q i ,_, Fami.v W-lfmU., snd other ^ Co^Jd.nc* in one', ability r^men Bodies. Representatives |o u n .^ ^^r^merOs ^ . ?T,,y .h _,? ? n 0f t00k tartal position, coupled with the p.. niiJcmemMy. earnestness U, learn thoroughly %  Jit To Canada any or all parts of the work. M R. and MRS. JOHN KINCH (f) An Impersonal attitude t weie passengers on Friday wards the executive and his bus for M< ntreaj by TC.A o n a fournans dealings Interest In discovering ways Mi. Klneh who is Senior Airof pleasing the executive. line Clerk of TCA. will visit the (h) A complete understanding | s head office to see how of one-s own responsibilities. thing* are being done there. (i) Courage to stand for one': 0 # s t*.a— f December. Mr. Dawson Is a Fel'ow of ,_, the Royal Society of Arts. Lon*JL don. England, and President of e yei weeks Dawson Bros., Limited in Monu ncr and the gift of entrance. To be noticed and admired is the goal of her entire effect. Grooming and neatness are more than essential. General Characteristics Aloof, serious, poised. SI 1 moving, indivuallst. Bone %  trartare: Medium statuesque. Model figure, long legs.! %  out rortrall. IM put Ian**' Aavh.la. Knurd. SI) pR-S Krwirwl. I p H.ia Dm * %  rram Britain. *• pm Interlude, m Pr-nn th* KdtLorUU. 0pm To Stood. SIS pm rum M>vw. iKn. SU SS* pm S-SX %  A Uaush 10 SB p m The IS 10 pm N. TalS, 10 la pn. 10SO pm Th Kupert and the Toy Scout— 14 As iho Seout AMI away. Hut* • nd Will* ran to ma Podgy, who is sitiing on the grass and looking vtry dared. Whit on oinh is thai aUnc ? ha gsipi. It nearly hit mo." It's a sort nl flying motor-car." taught Rupert. '* And in ,. .her,'. i"Tov Sroot who working lor ihoy Kind ina win RH wringtr, who can suit b* t*t the sky. Nuprn iclli Podgy how ind Willw first saw the my." 1 Mrs. Hastertona tTER spending 11 -m-law and daughJ\ hoJldiiy ta ua^c, Mr. trN l who are M „t, ta ,he e vere skin tones than pastel. Colours; More black rather d white Sleek, smooth-tailored, id Mrii Urmund Dieof Cara* ~""* 7"" .**'I' B .'I ,n " %  severe chignon, coronation braid. eat. \£li*Su returned home ?n D !" n,on f f P nada '^ Chubb Malie-.p: Accent on eyes atul Venezuelan! Return Home s-t'u.d-y bl n w i A TJlm" : nd / on %  * % Safe Co., of mou th Da,k V era byo Idarina m l_.nce. Tara and Susan. They Mr. and Mrs, Dawson have .. li n iome on ;> wera slaying at Paradise Beach travelled extensively throughout : h ". n ^'o 0 "; n Patterned ma. arrJay by B W I A A ClUb. The B.W.I, and indeed throughout Jf 1-1 n , .">"** or hairy urfacc. leaving direct for Marquetla were Mr. Dier Is Canadian Vicethe World, but admit that I rtfUo and his Consul in Caracas. lengthy stay in Barbados has been Antonio ami Mr and Reluming to Venezuela by the a unique and beneficial experiMrs. David Hecht and their litsame opportunity were Mr. and ence. They have enjoyed the tie daugh'or Cecilia who were Mrs. J. Pollock and two children charm of Bridgetown, the staying at the Auuatic Club. from Maracaibo. They had spent romance of the Careenage thr Mr PorMlo who ., p.„l„g J 1 !" SS 1 ,' "'"" n "" "*" be "'. of 'J" !" "V><*: *• hi. ..xlh VUII !., .he mind B V 'K! H ^!_. t ._ „ ench.n.,n bc.ch .nd Ihc tailrrn; "the sun and the moon had a quarrel." "Oh. what did they quarrel about?" asked Hanid. "About which of them was the more Important. I don't know how it was that the quarrel started, but I think it was a very cloudy day and neither of them had anything else to do. At any rate the sun insisted that he was more important, and the moon said that she was more Important. "Finally." said Ting-a -Ling. Long, slender hands aiKl[ t) ry both agreed to let the folks Vivid colouring and fine B u lhe folks-who lived on the asrth and knew them both, lo decide which of thrm was the more important. They asked the four Winds to go about the earth and ask everyone they met —Which is more imp rtant, lhe Sun or the Moon. Four Winds Blew "So for four times four days the Contrast ta colours. Jewel tones. f.. B r winds blow about, here anil Fabrics: Smooth, firm. Broadtin re nnri tveryhenr, asking rvery Sun and Moon Had a Quarrel —£acft Thought He Wax More Important— By MAX I It I I I. "ONE day," said Ting-a-Llng to nd Hanid, the shadow-chtl employed as Secretary in a Solicitor's Office while his nephew is ui h itie Craoie i Corporation in Caracas. Ms*. Hecht is Proprietor of two bust* nmss concerns in Caracas. Mr. Pollock Is S the Creole Petroleu MtTOUOfUni Spsnt Three Weeks M R AND MRS P. POPPIB ..ineji to Venezuela or i .y by B.W.I.A. a f tei spending three weeks' holiday A-IUHII ng at the Windsor Hotel, it *-„,„" With Confederation Life W. MORRISON. Brunch Manager he Confederation Life Insurnce Society and Mr. Pat Date, M AJOR H. Trinidad of was that! first visit here and they holiday. the %  also of Trinidad, arrived here frkbaS evening by B.W.I.A. trom after having visit.>i St. fou. inoss in the interest Company. ih e Acclamation of the Accession ,it,ed "Sombreo ', of Queen Elizabeth II. But above not like h is part all the Dawsons have been thrilled by the hospitality, emirtesv and fiieiiiiliness of all sections of the community. Mr, and Mm. look forward wi cloth, linen, shark-skin, shantung. tr/or tfaap&mmd HOLLYWOOD. Argentine actor Fernando Lornas was suspended by Mctro-Gol.lwyn Mayer because he declined to go igh with his part In the picture! they met to toll them what they rhi f the Sun and the Moon. at the end of that time Ihe four Is came tieether on ton of UM sal mountain ami toll the Sun tbt MOM what they had found Sun and Muun were having s I~Ht bados. They Wi-dsor iinxj to Barit the Hotel f the Society -, j'vu Mr Dale iflunied to Trinidad Major Morrison c.n for a holiday. His in from Thnidatl by H W I A inlay motnlni to Iota htm and a Company Jg^ are ,a > in ,h HoU 1 > lyiuf company i Lia. On Visit To Mother P AYING a visit lo her mother Mrs. Marion Clarke of Hillafoy. St. Thomas u Mrs. Sarah Roachford of the U.S.A. who IravIfa ilew c "'" ,i oul '" T'tniilad on the ArgenUae and 'hen came over here by B.W.I.A. on Saturday morntag. READERS' RECIPES Reader* of the Advocate are invited to send In their own recipe* for publication. Each housewife has bar favourite recipe but has never thought of passing it on to her neighbour 11 this is dons the exchanges will enable other* to build up a good collection to the benefit of the family. Send la yourto-day to THE WOMEN'S EDITOR iium Thursday. Mr. Jackie Marson, Jnr, Trvatsurcr of the Club, received u letstd by the Registrar, yesI lUtig Ui.it the Club had Iwan incorpor-led under the v lanpalrfag Acl of 1910 of Baibauos and that the Company was limited. One of the members told G "The B.L.C.. i not only a Com[i my. but good company.' To Join Hit Wife M R. JAi'K afXRRY, Dlroetoi <.( afggan Oonlon Qrant and CO, <>f l-ort-of-Spain. Trinidad, airivad yesterday morning by iiw.iA on .i two waali vim, nha* now come to Join his wife who ih is staving at the Holer Royal. Mr. Merry is a brother of Mr. Cyil Merry who was Manager of the West Indies team lo AusAwarded M.R.C.P. (Lond) %  H K. L. STUART, a former Barbados Scholar who medical student in the U.K. D" S.M.O. Antigua She was accompanied by her daughter Mrs. Eleanor Davis and her little grand daughter, Claudia. From The U.S.A. M R. auu MRS. W. II. Yearwood of 'Hilliiigt< n"' the Ivy who went up to the U.S.A. on a visit, returned home on Friday by B.W.I.A. via Puerto Rico. Alliance Francaite *TVIE monthly meeting of AlltCHObb w ORD uilhcs. t Wm. Fogarty bados ta 1049 for Canada when' resentatlve of Messi he spent two years. From CanLtd. ..naorly two week* In the colony c„ M i, D logical department, arrived from w m sl tlwit men who had W telephone, nnd rartlo-l-.xes' orinot seems to have worked rather dishes us' N* 1 "'>B "K 0 when the tilms bethings out fairly uselessly. I ,-nw of what has ?" %  was natural for an amsuggest that he should now take bilious lad to want to read, as the tiom de plume HiHizildigr.* Prod nose-' Verv liTtle Wtsl M ' Today Mujen/imp or Shrash Mneph. I .< ,f you ask me ' "• % 1 lon K* r noeesaary to be able knew a girl called Inckfotopvlop ^ ever ask *Jff*£*£?J* *S*3 R< S n ? k ? nz W niv : who .. changed i nnything. You're always butIII 4IMI r — I ~ !7 ~J ., IT ~^t" 1 1 "1—irnj— just did) "Tag Baal WinJ spoke llr-t 'Oh Sur. it said, '1 spoke to all the trees In lhe forest and all the i the fields. All of them ABTMHI that if n't for you, none of them would be ajle to grow. They say you are the more important. "Then," saitl Tinp-a-Ling. "the Weal Wi.-i.l Osaka '0 M 'I aaked alt the Cata and all the Mice and all Ihe Owls and all the Frogs. They all a creel that you were more %  than lhe Sun; for YOU shine for thorn when they go about %  Wl i *p ke. 'i I I ny Ol e "III men.' it said. '.IT antoag t O Moon, that you nan t pcrtant And tat reason they gava] sunbeams and The Sun c^n only be nil thnr friends on Earth, and seen in the H^VIU-M' when thera is on>inllv to lhe ehil.ln ataasj l. I'm s tumult, lansi. *. World tanv>u talU i 0, out flow, (si if Hi I tma U i You h..e n< ) It'a a spinnl.. a. 7-K, uniM by ni*nt tl> a aucn a ring would bo lenient or mean Ol li. He naai recently nod unaoui'i' plenty of light; while lhe Moon can bo seen clearly at night when there is scarci ly any light at all. North Wind Spoke "Then, last of all. t Wind tPOJM, '<) Sun and O .Moon, it said. 'I blew about lhe world u.k ing everyone 1 met. I ukad the LMsl the Tiger and the Eagle. 1 asked the HUM. the Mountains, the Uten and the Brooks. But none of tlun could make up ihcir minds which of you two ithe more important. And then. Just as 1 was coming here. I lit child who was playimin his garden. And the child said If there were no sun there no sunbeams. And if then moon thenwould be no moonbeams. Anil If there were n | and as nsaonbtanai l v. ml i be rj unhappy. So I ho] shining forever think they are tilth the • portaat' "And that." snid T.i "was what the fonr V Sun and the Moon, It dtd the nuar. : 'inc.'lie Sun and the Moon that H I i'h trying to find ont wbieh %  %  %  | %  ., tbty became friends again and pent all their time sanding their %  l-Minidowi We'll soon have that better engSfed i rlini it \iU\. n. From That aiulnter) %  %  p "* fom mo dork ale ce.sr. | If, Nulluu "V. X noedom. (7) J rilea back by night. O) 4. It's mean to spilt I: %  Set in lo apnt mruot. ._. 7. Roaort lo the lapptra %  > A tatS-oB st lea.. ASEPTIC OINTMENT Childreo'i sklo aihneaoi need ihc BOMbiD| touch of Germoleoo OWOBCSU. h rekwiea IrriratMo, subdues inilammauoo sod gives pratecooa eaoiaa the enny of barmful bacurls Yon wtU flad, ax>, thai Ormoleae draws out dm from cuts, abrasions, bbsten and sores and mmthe growth of new ikln. Keep t |Ua of Germoleoo handy for family oat, FOR SPOTS, MSHES, 1URHS IRHITJITIOHS, ABRASIONS fouc/i — heals in record time. rui r. vs VIRII *> %  ^•-' AND CONTINUING INDi.l IMFFLY H^IIHVHIIS ( %  >... %  -.iroi PLAZA BOLD SI Mom Dad IIWITM AH ALL ST HOLLrWOOD C*ST! WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m. MEN Only 8.30 p.m. AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER! IMIN-I VSISS II .1A.XKTTA IMtlA S SIIOI* • s BB TO NCEIlS §ALE (OXTI.MI.Mi fur riearaaee \ DRESSES Alain Greatly R.-rJueed ALSO ON SAI.i; ;* Handbais. Shopping Baskets. Nylon Indies in Mark, white, \ and peach, Nylon Storklngs, Children s TantUf. i'anty-Girdles, .* ieres. Bithlng Sulla and Gifts ^y 1 *.^-','----.^V'';''*f*'V-v-^r^*'-'-*-'*'''er**-'-'-*r'-*.*.'. '.'.*.',v :'.% PLAZA THEATRES BKIIMiK.TMV^N (DIAL ttl> Ta4ay a Toniriin M a aat a s. DEAD RECKONING Kiiiiiphri". BoR.irt Ac CORONER CREEK Rnnrtoii | %  Mill "-1 Ihr III M HI Richard AHLEN % %  till VsnfStl COWBOY Ir. WIIJ.IAMS A IlKNtKr a Glenr BARBAI I TO-DAT a Oaetl'g Ihur. -p.i .1 Ui pm RANGE LAND ROLLIN* WESTWARD OISTIN ID1A1 MOA> HAT A WED l.3n THE SPIDERS WEB nu ita-r aosiANca M i> al %  KIIMSI. IkO IIMI'.I II I >M1 un n i • i. ^ i-Miin: ?*o A.\uriii:n .MAVIIIII>II:II. •** %  GLORIOUS OPENING THURSDAY. MAY 1ST. 8.3U P.M. MOST FORBIDDEN OF THE WOtHD'S GRFAY LOVE STORIES I k>r %  ~Xw f **n ,f r"iaH WWT>VA-,V.VJ (.41111 The Garden—si. Jaaaea 2 OOAT a TOMoaaow i.a) |a v THEY WONT BELIEVE ME 5 VOI-NO a THE THING ream ting in. I must think over th •tier. //i fmxfinp A f3RAVT nalta m in rna .> %  ). T .'. to marry a Mr Chevstargil Cion(e-rol-de-rKlo |x>l/uks But she appeared in aaNsVr Hm nttfiifilft pera as Fafmum Boludigrentomua-_a a_a-i„sshave. By the way. the stage l.i,nt>iH,h*iru uls ,na lwi )r.|* name, my dea A MAN tailed Shakandro PoThurstoii, was Anjiduns C'.d.in\ .I'C'lr'/ t'hanged hh "(lnf WINDSOR SHOES LATEST STYLES — BACKLESS & TOF.I.ESS Wldto, Tan. Blnrk. Cherry Rrd $10.20 — $10.6 OnttaT SCHOOL BHOSS-BUck LM* Only $7.1 MEN'S SAMPLE SHOES — Tt Only $10.40. Worth $15.00 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAI 4??n YOUR SHOE STORF.S DIAL 4606 ALICt IN WONDiai.AND Color by Teihnlrolor EXTRA arrriAi. "NAIl BS'S BAI.r AIRS %  An Acadrn*.Asi:I %  i.iii : r |),M, 4.45 ,v 8.14 P.M. i r *-**-* DIAL 2310 GLOBE TODAY 5 & 8.15 p.m. TOMORROW 5 & S.I5 p.m. MOM A A la IIAII (Showing siinultni.eou.1y PLAZA Burharecs) WOMEN— MATINEES MEN — NIOHT No K.,l. 1'ndrr 12 Admitted Repeat Midnite Vaudeville Ask the 1.500 funs who s-m this Show Saturday — on — WED. APRIL 30T1I MIOMTK Spearheaded hy MOXAII Sensational and Exotie l>ancer CLEMESDORE The versatile Cobra Man LOI.ITA Kl'RABELLA (Hot Stud! (A Beauty) (Several Other Super Duper Artistes) Complete change of Programme Pit 24. House 36. Balcony 4H. Box SO Tickets on Sole WBDNBSOA1 MTE





    PAGE 1

    % PACI 1 -I H BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tl TSIIAY. APRIL M. H55 BAKMUOSa^Aln 01*11 is;>2 Tiicdm April 29. I say Morrison will Win LONDON REPORT (By DAVID TEMPLE u -, ISOLATIONISM I'MK condition ol the world to-day. deT A. Marr\ reported to have told students al the Trade Union Course at the YM.C.A. gives little ground for easy optimism that "the mind •>( man is marching on and each age ... was on evolutionary grounds battkV than the last." There is a whole generation in China today unaccustomed to what peace means. Slavery and forced labour is to-day widely practised in the Soviet Union, The International Labour Office estimates tha' five million people are unemployed in Europe. The greatest writers in all the civilized countries continue to productliterature depicting a world in which suicide and diseases of the mind arc on the increase. Even the cinema and the theatre mirror a world in which all is not best. The United Kingdom, centre of the greatest Empire and Commonwealth the world has ever known stands poised to-day on the brink of an abyss which, if it cannot be avoided, will lead to financial and economic ruin. The rearmament race has never been swifter and the countries of the North Atlantic Treaty organisation are bending every effort to increase their defences against the mighty military machine of imperialistic Russia. Race tensions and suspicions are the rule not the exception in Africa: in Asia nationalism is proving inadequate to cope with opposing nationalism and organised bandits and thugs. Hn Western Europ. the French fear German resurgence while all Western Europeans living on the Continent resent Britain's aloofness to join a Federal Europe. War still wages in Korea, Indo-China and Malaya The Arab world is uneasy. In nearby Latin America coups and counter coups occur with bewildering frequency. Everything, as a Greek philosopher once said, is in a state of Mux. But the conditions of normal everyday life in the twentieth century, unparalleled as they are in the known history of man, are ghastlier still because of man's inventions. The development of atomic energy and the aeroplane to mention only two of the most spectacular inventions of modern times bus made the destruction of the whole world possible m our lifetime. And with all his scientific knowledge and skill man is powerless against hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters which continue to claim human lives. Ban In the British West Indies it is true that a relatively small number of the worlds population have been enjoying a state of life which has been moving progressively upwards ever since 1941 when action began to be taken on the Report of the Royal Commission which visited the West Indies in 1938—39. The war which devastated thousands of European cities and converted the peaceful life of millions of men and women into a struggle for existence among falling bombs and rubble stones was beneficial to the West Indies, putting a premium on its agricultural produce on which the prosperity of IhflM islands have always depended. It would be a pity if all that progress were to be endangered because of'insulation from the realities of the world in which we live. It is always possible that good days of the world are ahead. There have been good days in many periods of human history In the past, but it would be absurd and dangerous for the British West Indies to suppose even for a moment that their present prosperity can be separated from the proteotion and assistance which is their right as overseas possessions of the United Kingdom. Real national independence and real national sovereignty depend on the ability of a nation to defend itself and it is %¡ remarkable fact that not one man or woman born in the" West Indies has ever said that the West Indies singly or collectively could defend themselves against %  twentieth century aggressor One has Only to pose the question to appreciate the impossibility of its ever being answered. But the people of Barbados ought to be grateful to the Hon. Mi. Marryshow for emphasising certain basic facts which have been given little attention by the majority of West Indians until very recent" years. The need for capita!: n serious attitude to work" the sharing of work: self-reliance among workers tha development of character and business acumen are obj-i I that were Insufficiently stressed by many Labour supporters in the West Lnd the early days of Trade Union growth. It is a welcome sign of change in the R hen politicians turn the spotc jn deficiencies of West Indians rather than blaming those deficiencies on alleged ition by metropolitan countries. -On Points LONDON, ii. i M \\i i L SHINWUX, M.r. the fact, it is your fault and DM Anthony Eden basks in the fjl lUroerl Morrison, of South mine" . ,*., Lewlsham. .mi on my l-ft. M, £uld replace Ramsay MacDonH U hOft period of office M For-: br ' hl repuUtlon. At the moment his standAneunn Bev.n, from Efcbw Vale. •• eign Secretary wit unmarked by mg with the public could hardly be higher Herbert Morrison, IMpublic could hardly be highe: ship of the Uit*> "** vt -* b ?* pouwcai doctrine printed bnr*-i-n any %  "ten Hie friction within tlumentary rope* Ho may hot be ul party has failed to weaken his everybody, cup o( tea. but in the :_„„ ratheri-lineal arena he i ".II thereJJgJJT TJf,,! ' %  "Sai^LEC*;. K ,. „„. common "n u' r.t •. "" question. There is not a doubt that plenty of I haw known .-very one of Jn Some people say he is m* .1 . k< ., 1.-0. . j roan -inre the tim.. ..f it.-t-. 1. ~ : but I pop,,,.,, !" "£„{*; i^ni^er.** i PP ,e wno re Labour supporters on domesKeir llardle. and doubt whether *?. %  "g jg". ? %  "'* %  *?! by yielding to clamour, whether lie questions prefer Anthony Eden's Ton Ker'cSecm ""*. '~pc BM WS^^T !" {M ZtSS^TSSi j •"<""* of f„r, g n affairs ,0 Herbert Mo, ng continue u. be the leader disability which!nlycisV^ **" bel, v s to * ****• l,s %  s ^hp^shod Socialist mishandling. nw l Whe hr ''" sal battla, The trad* -— %  %  I But intelligent people here in Britain who W hR! ta "" n * l ^^ NEITHERX\a?J", Executake an interest in the way the world wag, liontetiine* mdulged in JJj*^ ^ f Jj!^ r ^^JJiwJ are doui * me hard criticising of the ex "'h •* %  .dinary muddle into which British forIjat-our MPs to c'et a leader. If. however, at the annual eonference there la open hoalillt lib. error BEVAM MAY look upon them 1 a pretty dull lot—hardly pieaamg up tn his standard. A fatal In I he uueiie IN ADDITION to Morrison aim personal and caustic Bevsn I have htaid sever-, cth.i about them, and the bru. i es rnenttened as possible suttuns he has rubbed the wrung way cesMjrs, among them Huali Dalt.ni. "' %  : %  tOCfjel : % %  r\-adily. Chuier Ede. and Jim Griffiths. „ tlic jiunn*r men aft BuKn OaluUtrll, Alf Kobeiv. aad Jim Callashaii— -II fln.l-)-i< Kv.'ii Mi Croeaa a bo u Mr Bevan's rijthl-hand man. MB M -j^..^ a „. ^^ blc mvn Pjfttff_ .nni .hem who .re not w.mtlna or R u 4*S2J*! „ L J Prune M.ner beiote ,„ ^n^. M lnd eed thev h-v.m A h m L*f !^ e Sffi f n, ,U L" he had nwched the ae of 23. but ghown during, and rince, the war. rSST'uSXJiT' ,K tf "n th the Labour Party I* much toe n the Interest* of the whole V££L, ^J* r *'ji w uW _" rautlous for such experimeDt Let not a wrong word be said urnlf loo easily to 1 ttgn pol:cy aaagaj to be heading under tht ..nee of the oft'.cials of the Fop?i(;n Office Sutf blfiacSa^ 1 thC ""* -dt-ptte the ener,;etie and s.ncer, etTorts of MP' could h tthoai) Eden. — the ex Anthony Eden again hit the headlines ah nver Europe with the forma! ?;•;;'. %  n u'i.t. offerscarcely any new commitments, that I Britain would under-right the European De1 inlinvnty nf>,ris>r i t*ie ronfer, and also Ir the constituency KING GEORGE VI A I'll I.II:I\I Rr.t'Oltn OF HIS GREAT 111 I: Thoae who have boolce-1 outer, rai now call in and aelot tuple* I'IIII:. S-J.7-J ADVOCATE VIVIIOMII. fence Community. But Continental statesmen Tlo ,„, W J}"' (f„,^5r,(?• '*• ; nd officials are still nevcrlheless suspicious .uaplcton of iSa^ort ta^i'n ^tte^puSon!' of Perfidious Albion." They find that British ambit i .n is no: l: anybody who rocks the boat. only objectionable when it fdils ll 1S Uup ,h ** ,h *' tr df "".on* to meanire up to Ul nghl ipia|ilV h? v f " ">" '"V*^^ 1 l *Z"? n r oat %  !._ IAIJ_. ISU.I KOIUIIIII >miM Kaa. But this I'nion poucr Foreign Office diplomats are doing all in theii with them. Bevan will. OH i.ff!.'. find It would air tuiuh to convince tiiem that in the Prir TheI 'ii'.ir.l. inaiiti became ,1 nobody could b. .J", E J7 A kl '" "' h ' h '" " '"*"' ' *""'* h Mp "' Euro P ean co gg who t^iKssw Xoe^'r.'^.s"',^ KS oper rr n F or ; ns,ancc ,hc Mar :T Plan er created a complex organization of European countries deluding Britain to keep a watch on trade inside Europe and the flow of goods coming from the United States under the Marshall Plan itself. Now that the Marshall Plan is coming to an end this organization ainin. ,o, the aHJtTBB a punch de JS£^^fl !" — _jim— hard. The labour Party has been %  Ctsjr) mi i.'Ki' 1,-f.^, r ".. i, V 'iivuvniiiaii vuini & iu mi m ini.s (ir^.iruzaiior, rSS? *?£>* "(STtitdrSS Cltod O.E.E.C. ,s under fire fro. Britain alparllamentar>quahtiea .in by an over-vh.li.unj ma| irlty. „' "' an 2, ,c "" llw r Morrison, like Ueviui I... eon'"Z£L.?"','i u 1 r n h ""l > "' Jderable parllamenlary ouallliei W """" the ,. ove will .„ %  u > With the help of good Tool*. The large selection at C. S. PITCHER & CO. includes Rubber Heaa, Forks. Rakes and Shears. C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 1172 where the Held is of Baited. Only Morrison and Bev. ap.H-ar to ba in final bout. Aa tlic deputy leaier -t Uw go, | ,... Parliamentary Labour Party, Morbert M %  specially stronf poinU fjosifion. He ha. occupied :h. If |h Uvi..n were many years, and wa* nol place just now Morrison even challenge at the last elecwin by tlon for the ofllor On the oteir hand. Bcvan'i aldera popular It v with the rank and fllr • % %  %  %  OUDd -drninisUator, hai is exreptioruil. und has. never been %  Ultaojuallad cxiwrience of public surpassed—perhaps urily daao %  mtegnty is beit>b#en oquaUad oo*b, ly enough, waa by Oswi.id .Musley His value f rOii.ll MW ForSJtl Iht OonSOME people seem to dislike u-hrn Mnaleywai .ntlflcai manner rated oueruhrlH.m, ^ir Party conHe always appear, to he saying: B.-r7-t pWsoas^i Ki Mo^ruim C mC d,saslrous W 'nston Churchill once said .... tr>n. t do too, b tasrtsg rucc^-in the | that Britain stands between three concentric TOOLS f^&mftttfA though every Cunlinental country would like to keep it in existence. The British Foreign Ofllco is having a kind of private war with 'he aim to make NA.T.O. the only set of InPartH^pr^a'al S2SS|^national initials on the Continent. It is iaj*-r.,.'-,ibcmhip union j a|1 rather trivial and petty—but it could be. — ujilly aucceed depends, in my view— and in the final resort—on the attitude of the tiades unions —L.E.S. ference at M.indudno. Atm.aU .". .1-.,, Mpeetad that, ni> l^esl for yov and the world at L.C.Ci-Iccfionf p-Vulanty. he large, and if you donT apprniate leading? bsvau*e of. (us Where Our IK< ; %  !< i s Snyz ., otoi MK T..V. si-C^ T>71>, M I n l Ur * uU "B-dmas,er of ^S rnnlad by Mrs R W E. Tucker va '" ble f '•• There are 5ugar %  i a grciit nfssMt, thanks to tho mony "' "' w l' feel th 1 tt ls *• Ew t-nerwy of the/! collectors nnd the fardlroslty of %  i Would you I>e good enough to i^ntili-li the following results? Yttu.i f..ltr,fully. CECII.E WALCOTT. Hon. Sct-ivlaiy Trcasur< i Appeals A Publicity Sub i ommlltea Harb.ulw S P C A other experts the subject and then publish their .hidings. Our Legislators %  ferrcd to the darker I 'u.ft i:.. r and to the __*£ that deserve, aome ,ooK ff , y fc .vor/'ir^rth C s^i JSSS pS^rs !" hol ^r wellk ,u,wn to „,, of us now m part of iT"wor'ut' Wl ST bSK be In need of no add.Uonal of price or scarcity, WB* caj not [•ndatlon from me get. but this should not | iho to is* hnuiniu-h case U^IIK -^„J n.._.. ^> •* %  Umer nnd 81 ) i A O. aainn.r and hdpn* Vtrlland PsUM .• K A Way iwnj of y*M I do want to say how much case with good Barbado I prulao ami admlia l.i< policy of ndO Sugar. delegating rcspaoatbUlly to hht Yours faithfully' It U sound judginent un^ S. C. SK.N\KJ{ Word _..-.. l_ Boxen (Olln. R. (.< A GUI A I.e-lM, Mr-, iole nUbrlla-< • r NC.O.V .. in ai clou,,w u v telflsh rofu..deraUnns. Brundish. Small ofllcials (and there are sevBlue Waters Terrace in is oral in our midst) try to build up a 26.4.52. "legend of indispensability. and Hirlh **--' %  w their every word or gesture is Tn T !" ''""" %  / now publicised. Thev are also proporo, R T. *" / d "x'<'— *J tionately je;dous <>f the iK-puhirlty ,,„' 'T' nr ? U|h ^ "Hirteay of Zn of other officials. Should Captain £ P %,ffiT L w u,d "*• to ""•* %  Raun.n be csOled upon to aive any r.£ !? "basn-aUtHia, " %  other territory the l>enellt of his ,.„,.,L C Jcreaae, rnuiUpty ica fine qualities as musician and D !" !"!" eartn %  . and than teacher (though we hope we shall ^1*5 !" to > ,pov,d o food STERNETTE DEEP FREEZE 3.9 cu. ft. Capacity Hermetically Sealed Unit. E^ Year Guarantee. % %  I IH'la 42.>.00 DA fOSIA & CO. LTD. Elfdriral tat Km. lM will have the deep satlstaction of Si, !L 22 ^"n| that the 'Raiion touch' m J .^"t" na,ure ln ,h ^ anUiu.1 scnse Commonwealth %  '^ilc h cm q h^ wel1 known in Strasbourg. They apprill still live on under the capable marked last week the Foreign Office seems to be so dizzy revolving on throe circles that it is in danger of falling out of them all. Certainly this is a dangerous business because it is not only in European capitals that British IWcign policy looks isolationist. To American and Canudians it looks simply foolish for Britain to quarrel with her European neighbours in a quite illusory hope that she will have a special preferential arrangement with the United States at any time. It is Congress that pays; and as far as Congress is concerned that is not how business is done. Sometimes it is said that Britain must keep out of being friendly with Europe because of her Commonwealth associations. But quite a victory was won last year and the European C -Untrlfla no longer want Britain to pool her resources or abolish her preferences—or indeed do anything that is not plain commonrepresentatives are in*] a Mr. Mia B. Uert> KuUon I.I r> Mr. I. ftr.lry Mr A O J.n.l.t, .si Mr. J M %  I Mn it i< ParrM Mr. K A W*v iBI. Joaepl.' Wn -. s. .it |SJ| J.mtiColi Mn MaMUn iflt. Jimni . Mr. G E Clk Hoanart ,t ii si guidance of the men whom he has "JJ trained for li : earth according 1 •s n II:S if 71 ol any obstacle th.it may l>e put in his way. We could do with %  tew more like Un. With thanks for space. You IS faithfully, MUSK" U.YK.U. Mf Twnnd Hot*!Ii.. A. kn I In. G.iaa.1 iOr llola-li l-rwuli L-rshlp. And this ;;'il, B t M \i'S iu, f' P |an M*n alone dares to defy the Almighty'* c'rea. iither legl-Liti.e nor municipal wnere there n re amendments and withdrawal* of motions. The earth can produce and Over Produce ,,t any time o r in ScOajtV ikib-a-Joh Wmm u ">' > lJ r %  %  cording U> GovernTo The Editor. The AdeocolcZVl f'lS!* ,l; ""; ln f W >"" "' he SIK.-Further to your editorial ££L' heal * * ^** whkfc which was somewhat critical in 5S 1 d Hff •" J 1 "' ** Wd tone, may 1 au thAt my own ex !" the thousands of gallons of MM pertenoe with the ScouU wa. !" h ^h w'*nmtly thrown Lrt.cul-rlv happv. don the drains of Bnti.h Gniarur" aWd (Of two scout* to do ^ wt aeU Uke UMWr. deserve Ju if hard work in my Wreutton* o:retrlbuUon? So big b' ys. including JJ! !" ?* !" 11 Ihu C r ^ f,,M of Bir ii a M JS.OQ worth aartn T ciate that Commonwealth commitments and European commitments have no need to conflict. So what is all this bkfcaring from the ron-i^n Office? II.HSM Tribal'Tfrif-eT. TUc Adeocoie— one of those wt went to Jim.nr. Control. Fran No reflection is made on Anthony Eden whose public statements without exception have been excellent and well intentioned. but our present school of professional diplomats seems to be addicted to point scoring rather than to making friends. For the moment the pressure of communism gives Britain a number of allies, but it needs sound fell quietly „nd diplomacy to make them trusting friends hordes because . th the local organiser at V"*JIy Hill 65 a.m. en Thursday and said *"*. had no man power. Birth Conthev would work two five-hour ir,, l "ad been pi.irt.sed th^re' .Mil m Thev worked so well Faetorte* und. T preuure of war Police Band. I ., l(|(1 continue If •. '•"> jaat h uinli of nnnaa' m 1M9-45. The same f.,.. thoae already jrtven to Jiergcarit Mmc w 6 15 am lhl> lini# .„ loiiea. if Government, *r> willed on hs f>motio„ to the 4 ., l ,„ lav an ^ a,d %  harJ ten esuld produce machinery (or sarr, on v.hat may be niceaary> f.ir mass and on food productimr and comfortable does net efar enough toward* Wrtnrma _. u^y worked t*o home* eU. W>.en Itorm* wreck ecogratioi. of this talented band*nour ^7 0 me good turn The>nshina bo.u m.re and better ones nan whose' wor as %  c^ieeer ^ ., ubsUnt tai sum and my are built. Ihauster make* manesting urotTammes In AmeVic 1.1.I.I....TI I should like through your include plans to. frustrate life on acknowledge thc.r this pl-net. 'God's In His Heaven, nd courtesy, their All well with the world.' Thanks Archer on hi*, sh-omotum -> the Sf .„ lt liiv ; n ,j iu \ %  I rank o< IsUtSn Serge-nt. If. ^ (lld hc kemnrvar; tt^-* e* J j rwifion M(in() : ;trul Turtdur %  Wedneoa>hours t r HI --i rni*ei IUJ nmiiicu was musical llle of our island. Woi not the rank of InspectT bf more fitting tribute to his merit nd l.mg service, as well a* being ^..,i,_--_. nore In kt-c-plng with his poaraon us Deptr^ t'ondnrtor of the Band He has the ability, the •ervice jiid the in the Television Education A FRIEND in the United States hag Wl nun to me asking for copies of the British Broadcasting Corporation's talaviaiori programme. He does not believe that a broadcasting system of our kind can possibly produce Interjob and iiiriirw.'ii ..-. .. — .. e — w. f whatever they undertook Hunte fur bravakr advocaling leave nothing undone Right and Rig).ttotajnr.s. I appeal exi*nenre What u thm wh|c(| |iwled ,„ ^ do The> to heaa. ol dan.w.. ..'.lllat. : Ihji IUII raward. s ,,irl, ol Seoutitu. and voelal c.,^|, u> forati .tsnuiii af whom I ... umc ^re BwbaUnited Christian fnml arainit tlua grammes lo chooce from runnini! all the da Trie B.B.C. offers one programme in the afternoon and the evening only. Bui its virtue! are its boldness. It is not bound hand and feet by the lowest common denominator the public takes and recently the television sir vice has spread over the whole country a '" %  '!'". ,lu proKramme consisting of intelligent films Another l.Jtiatman or wnoni I T( ahauhl like to anake mention ia d J j^J ,, havc undertaken a ufly menace „'. Birth Control \ k~?T'""1 vv "" 1 """. "' ""i-in^vnt nims Corporal llet *•>.• versatility U Bo b.a-iob' week and no doubt Youth must o. trained to respect L C refused distribution through well-known. He has delighted us Ine ^cers of the movement have ihelr bodies as the temples o( the : ,ne n orm al cinema circuits. The famous film as a -Xylophone artist, ami ,. rn mn o,e eaper.erce Holy Chad. Devotee. „r llirth Beauty and the Beast made on the storv of kiddle. •>*?**.$"*"}?* .nd will address themselvM to Corrtrol are thus* who want to the ureat French dramatist Jean Cocteau was Annual part) for children ol mm,„„ such „ he „ raU ed In your molil society butternlc, without „„ lh ... ,u„ llv „ , ^i bars of tho Fore.. I have seen him ;„ lumm go | u as I ."> nthe pleds of a wtaldirui ring and "" alr tnc olnor "'R 1 nd 1 would like behind the bM. drum at Garrison ppr,,^, however, they have made lh o,c within the married circle lo know from the B.B C. Listener Research Parades, and heard him perform nvm „„„ „„d I have heard „ „., „.„„ ,„ ,„, rk lh dutJ „ hl v Service what percentage of televiewers were „„, ...... ..„ ssSL-? ,l:,r y f.rXr !" JKi?"tS Pd by &s s '" nge .1 l n '•' l ,u %  ". r.^n,ortocov.r^nf„l practice. ^ ke d "P '" a !" Wel castle. on Iba balai Blad the bassoon I manVothcr tributes to U I have also seen him con.li. -Una w| || Bn( i .peed with which they the Police Band and In j-o Th. few executions ha cadet, or members af the ., v ^bably had a healthy lesson. i.nd the mmt Hand. Yours truly. .,. who I i aaenUon M Ml !" I BEI,SON Uaati •ly beeauac I sSja Sugar f llirth f...,ti..| < ., „„,', ,., ,.,', '.,("1..'. IriaixexTThi'lTa'r 1 ''s'xc 1 .riM had mfM all ,x..puler.t nura r „ „, r dl ,„r. The AdraeWeW ^Bto HraWiJitrf ihl.^lZItSL SIR Y...1 h. v,. I.X.M,II> ml)% %  !-1 octim eoutorilus H'IIII .n.l upon maklne enquuy ,„ hc<1 loadlna article and the educated, s.i BarbaKOU '' I nfJ-aT that 1.0 of Ipem out of four I was shocked to learn that he had ( .. :i..use and Council 'ios .'nilli-.r, hawbOUgbl The a sugar, exit tlrk.t IT"*Now, Sir. as ,, „ ,„„ ,„, „, Mu ., ., f.,iuVull> ,, '. S


    PAGE 1

    TtTSDW APBIT H. Mil BARBADOS ADVOfUl PACE FIVF MURDER TRIAL NE TANKS READY "* SHI !" EW Tree* Fence, Grass Beautify Playfield # tram Pir 3. Re-examined, he said. "1 ilCross-exammed he said he did ways told the Police that I could not know Haswell. identify my assailant by hU long Awakened by Noise mouth' and the clothe, hi Anna CNeale of Taylors Gap. %  had never seen that man before. Bank Hall, who h.ed at the GarDr. A. S. Cato who ti den Land on the date of toe Haswcll's body at the Pi. murder, said that she was home tutry. St Michael, said she was sleeping when she was aroused dead abou: 1 hour* when he saw by a bounce against the house, the body. It was that of %  young Then she h.rd a flajtlerirg. Af (f wall d*viopod girl. The face, trunk a snort while she peepou wut and % %  ..' limbs were blood stained and w the body of a woman bounc:he mouth and nose contained Ins up and down. She was afraid jlood and clrncd her window. About ten mmutes later she heard someHaemorrhage and Shock •mi running and pushing a bicycle A. S. Cato described the down the i*p. Tin. person i lied ^'i'. 1 '* "'Juries, and said that for hrr nei*hbour Bowman. When d '*" ^ due to haemorrhage and %  he heard Bowman's voice sh* = lock from lne '"Junes described looked out and saw Bowman BenTne '"J^"" *"• influtod with a skin and two strangers. Bcs.sk m ha; P instrument suclva* a knife, had a kerchie; tied acros* hi* Tne condition of the lungs also fnrehend auggtated some degree of asLeonard Benskln. 19. of Garden I '' 1 Land. St Michael, id hr hwd Mr. Fainter esked i qutatloni known Norm.t !' %  : % % %  next witness to give evidence % %  <. Bb WM his *ancre. *' '"*' Crown was Veta Small, and she lived at Fields Gap. Bank She *aid she used to live at Dean's H-ll On the 7th S-p'emhAr IBM. h* n I N mu m th H IfotH ;.r-d Wl ... *• I) 1 Frem th"re they went hv way <.f Hnebuck Street .11 far Village. St Mi'-haei from 'he 14lh Aprtl t1st October, IMI. She knew the defendant with whom she was friendly and ihey she knew cifn.i Jlowell who spent pan of her vacation in September at her home. Howell was there on the ni ht the Gl be of the Trh. She. the witness, went to work the 7th and whei sh ra OTn* r'' '„ n ''' h '\ ' v ''-td home in th^ eveniniihe V>ev nome he corrr leading to the Brewstcr left at about ft o'clock Garden Land. „, ga ,„ h(s motn „., He w „ „ wearing a pants with stripes a Kcreivcd Blow two-toned shirt, a felt hat and a They walked idrng a track pair of sneakers. Elma and ho which was bordered bv a long row remained home Brewstcr came of Khus-Khus grass. There were back shortly after 9.30 p.m. spices in the grass, and when he Elma was outside with Egbert got to one of the spaces, he f-lt She was in bed when Carlton a blow on his left shfulder. Brewstcr returned and said he He was "truck .1 blow on rh* had lust come from his mother's. left side of hU face and he fell. The accus-d asked for water out The b.cycle fell, and he quickly none was there. She told the acDe.dli by nusadvciitur, due to regained his feet and returned a cuaed to go for water and he said drowning was the verdict returned blow to the man's chin. The man ^ WM noj going back out. by a nine-man Jury when the fell, but on regaining his feet, he n e ajked Elma to bring thetnquost Into the circumstances renewed the attack and they boih wotcr and ^ c dul WThc at ._ surrounding the death of Mr John fell ^,th his asiiilant on top. ^^ remain^ over the half Mc&sktM (62) a Canadian who norma ran. and the man run uoor w...> here after h"r. Me too got up and run &V ty i u in Ihe same direction. When Elma brought the water In front of THE TREES at the Prince?* Alice Playing Field, which v \ M :: 111|j. are ^rowmj* rapuilv Shortly the cagass. whicH \\ue envied to protect them. vaj to l' n-n lime" fence around the eastern end if the; BtgM hat also grown considerably bul at on* corner; especially, the salt water is stunting the fence %  Vomit four weeks ago the Playing Field got its motor mower approaching the field can I clearly see the good work the Bga been doing during %  kg The long grass which rormarl] covered the field has basin cut The ground stafT of three men The Oistlns Market now has a and ,ne **retaker are at present cage around its cuunter Because ,l '" in gr* n the western end ol this cage, Idlers are keot out of nf ""* rtrld Tn, •*•" ' resP 8 "— pound The outer wall ""~ u '" *"" ""'*""" Oinlinf ttminill ft Oistin 's Market Gels A Cage *l* 1*47, the Amy t new medlam Unk, clamben ovir In embankJienl (lop) on Ihe tot trick of the Amerlcin Locomotive QtnMU at ss:r ,d ,. N %  J; AI b " om ""' %  "<• u '"" %  • '"•""" %  "•* vehicle! .wail ihlpmenl to ilratejle center, of the wotlj The Uinki h.ve been rlwrouil; te.teci l w m.n.uierjbllllj and pre prwir Fjicli na, ben cun lor )S houn itraieht on Ihe tot track. flMeriuiliouill Canadian Died Trade Lnions' By Drowning Conference ihe fish around the market, crly had a flat surface, now has a knife edge surface This has prevented vendors from cutting fish and kclllng vegetables on the wall This nsh market is one of the Bng in in* island iu be wired around. Now fish vendors of the -et should also be wired around. On Tuesday there was a shortage of fish at the OtttlsVl Market VeDdOn WOO! to Silver Sands When ihev bought fish to be sold iii lo Maiket As soon as the fish was put on sale every) t<> el some instead of waiting until ihe price was lowered, as they ii..illy do. tfUe for raking the field, cutting hlch form*' %  preparing the lawn tennis courts and cleaning the Pavilion after entertainments The Caretaker told the Advo.v vesleiday that he is hoping •I;al his itafT will soon be Increased to live as ther is a lot of work >o ba done Breakwater On the weatarn and Ol the field i. a breakwater many yards long i %  m llB worry of the ground staff When tt is rough BOWl over the treakwter and floods DM gflsd ol loa | field where Rdepoalts large quanDances are held in the Pavilion ubout twice in nthly. I^nvllle Table Tennis Club also uses th Pot UM month ol M..reh. 12.429 p^viTioii for table tennis, pounds of fish were sold In the At uri ent <>ne lawn tennis court Olmn's Market This was 388 ,, lir ng u"ne. vacWn-rronV Novi (•) '""-t.on and Unempioymenl. ^Hi. I nlljckm.^and l "" ^g ?&7oofflh T!? • lying at Si. '" •* %  Ol Trade Union Ass..pounds of bonlta ,m ," U Xh ?Lh SS^ their 1-awrence. Clinsl Church, ended elation. g,, f.„ |h|| monUl I0.TB3 )>ounds con ** ,n Ii? hcuse in the gap. the accused put fume of UH tWB yesterday at District "A" PoUeg fg)_Trade Union Edu. I of flsli havfl keen I rougM into Ok "" lie heard i groaning, and saw the ler into a basin, and then dranfe fa) The Committee also agreed tl. ,\ Market. TM total amount far the man running away. some from the bucket. Mr. John McKanglg died at Dr. C. P. Alexander. President of Uu month of April la ftai was 9.474 He ran to Norma who was lying Clolhes Taken UO Bayley's Clinic arter he was taken Seamen and Waterfront K "b"' lolal this month. 6,778 rn the ground with hnlf of her The accused look off all Jus there from Battery Beach, St. Union in Trinidad and Organmer i*>unds were flying Ash. On April body in the gutter and the other clothes, hung up tils pants, put L irrotJoa, where he and his wife of O.R.I.T. and I should van" lfl 8 "'' l""ds i f tlym half on the rood. the sneakers under the bed and not into difficulties while balhing Jamaica on behalf of O.R.I.T 0 ,, in ,he market. Already 2.IS85 dropped hi> shirt on the floor He there at ubout 9 a.m. on April 27. It is a signal honour for liarl"*""* 11 * dolphin sponged his arm pits, and then The body Mfd was b„dos that th c first Conference of '" washed out the shirt which ixc taken to Burlon Funeral Parlour. tn c I.C.F.T.U. will lie held here ..rnrl This may be re wire fence wad placed leiinis courts. nedled If a tround the He speke to Norma, but she did not reply. He went to Mr. Bownmwi man 1 pi Kg and aroused him. Mr. jj, d takgn OstT" H have been l M'Uijht into the market Seven hundred and seventy pounds were 1M ,u .... !" .. rnnfold Street, whera %  pot mac; %  ;'"iooun-* rneatmrrf Z5h ar-Tt "*$ n April %  • nd he went to Norma. Sho ^icoa hat u,e water in (em examination was performed U !" J £2 > L ggfltSB-Pg As a result of the cage being i.nn with a torch light they were wnlch he w „hed the shirt was by Dr. A. S. Cato. 5hr. J? £ deliberation, at erected around the count.,. Inert able to ste the cut and blood on rcd The accused threw .way the Dr. Cato told the Court yesterConference. n;|S bctn gn !„!•„.,,„. in tn ^ M i P „f her body. ? water. day that the lungs cf the deceased Invitations tickets to wanflofi People who Bowman went back to his hon..e. Hc „„ mort wnter ,„ t |„. basin, contained water, but therewas no invitatian, to UM c !" f# !" .formerly gutted fish on the boM and he (witness) went to one put the shirt back In H and I orrhafl or bran, diicase Wll ) t' ,xtonderi in 11,7.1 I remises now use Ihe beach at the Mrs. Forde's where he was R1 ven ^raahed it with soup. He then pneant The deceased was dead H^ffaKrnSi % %  % % %  TlB^ir l,a k ^ the M rk *' 'naufad. water ko wash hi* hand which had wen t outside and hung out the lor ..i ,,i,i t,v,l. .urs and from hW ', , „ ."Z„ C n %  C Dm \ VE-. • • • blood from a wound In his race. $Mr x. examination daatfa mm due to ' U M nd lh .f C | 0 i Ameuea. • H i thgt ud nil brcther-s H e came back in. went to the suffocation rrom drowning. "'* International Labour OfflfN J^ !"!" ?"'." wife went and his brother left. He door and looked al his hand. She Dr. Kinch who Wag called lo" d l hf Cuban Federation .1 nlng to bring In lar K e -., U % %  Oj remained Ihere until the Police went and got a drink of water Battery Reach. St. I-iwrcnee. soon Workers. seine fish. Thev are not ye fgn came and then he went to the 2 nd the accused asked her to pour after Ihe incident. Hid thai when Al ,hr ""Elusion of the Conkeen on seline nsh.ma l r M y iino :n some on his hands. he readurt the beach he saw some f cnc 1 e a m c,ulB ^'a" hHd al JiT^Sli^lSr^f fl Ji fl.h t l"" She did so and noticed that bloody water coming from SS "'*" ubl L">rary and, I adthe large number of flyina fish beMJII Not Idenlincd tney were stained red. She went nose of the deceased and there dressed the affiliated syoug) tirvs Damagv Canes, kitchen Shortly afler I0.3O am. yesterday, the Fire Brigade was summoned to a fire at Prospect, St. jdines. On arrival they found a ighl by six feel, attacheu to the house of Delclna Mingon fire. They assisted In putting oul th. blase. Th* Brigade turned out undei Band <p ripe cane* were burnt whs* llie SHAOtA'TSl MESSRS. A. %. BRVDEN SONS (BARBADOS). LTD., P.O. BOX 403. HRIDULIOWN. BARBADOS I bo pital The mat ng back t<> bad; the accused Joined was also some fluid In tne lungs. ,h e i" i a peak cap. khoJti aborts and sliirt. tier shortly afterwards, and sat He gave the deceased an inje.t;.m Conference. The man appenrvd to be well on the corner of the bed. %  ni-ed him to the HocnltaL have great enntidente in tl built, and was a hlile taller thnn The accused looked from oni 11*. success of Hie he was. He could not identify side to ihe other, lie 1 -l i ho hlroiii; I nder Current Im nt ,„ hr „. the man. "I now lick up a girl" and she Mrs. aurjorw Me&amia, the lnal Kr ,. ilter unltv a m „,, To Mr. Farmer — "Cm the way asked him "How you could do wa "I tnc deceased, said that unions is H .,.,,„;,. from the Eeplonacie, he went t^ that? That Is trouble. How you she and hi 1 husband left where i.„ .,, w ,. 5 (o(ll svih.ttu.-. the (Iit.be by way ol !'-,> S:i-ect. come to do that?" He turned and they were staying In SI. Lawrence l^kine (iwarri T Pp byn St.. Spry Street and Roetola her "1 was coming up Roefor a bath In the^ sea at ..bout ^.^...n.on of the people f Barbuck Street. I don't remrmber buck Street and 1 saw_a girl and 7.30a.m. o n> .-.pnl I The, %  boih gg *£ ,hJ *&at5al mini at Kirtons Tenphihp, at about 9.5it Sunday. They are the I (i"ii'> of D. D. Garner 01 Kern .,. c.1,1 ih. % %  S t. Philip and were Bytng fish season will soon come |e an md insured. Tins fire extendesi to Groves t confidence '" '' "-Tbeiw tre plenty i*ne*0ah*to kg i: • %  % %  ; %  ••• Jfl %  < %  burnt a ouanTrade Union Move, |U( h( • %  hc „|H ut. "f irash and sour grass, the territories and fee: propert y of Plantatio n! Ltd "GOLFITO'" DUE ON THURSDAY The Whiti they wOI M i>ut her husband >nce a success. taUlnfl the Magistrate Uiat Norma a man coming r was to my right with the bicycle got by the Esso Garage, they *' %  I "Be distani m front „. • I did not tell the swung across Perry Gap and I her when a big wave struck them „;^2f n r n *' cUn l *** r % wung behind them. I stopped '"* •*• fell a strong under J r r TS "" l *f<' *"!!"'• I>ack and the two of them, went current and from the expression Secretary of OR IT.. C. P. Alexalong. When I got to them, I on her husband's face she knew onrtrr ITesident of the Seamen Boy! .. ^.^ tM ,[ p A | r ick rushed them and the man ran that he was in difficulties. She also and_ Wa'rfront Worker-.' Union khool and the woman began to flght was not feeling safe and shouted of Trinidad. Mr. F. J, < back with me and I cut her up for help but war, still trying to iet O.II K President of the S'tr and come home." t'' ngf husband. Immediately after and Widcrfionl Worker* Un 1 1 Magkttrata lhag. Norma was close to the grass on the left hand side of the tr... k I did not know whit struck me —Whether it was a knife or 1 band 1 could •! %  Jie it was rk. The man's focv was very close to mine Norma was .-In atina loudly while Ihe man ami I struggled on the ground, and she was running a %  *> Immediately he jumped on me. Norma ran, and the man go! up laiiu ran alter her At.er about three ntUUltag IgU had nothing w.th mc when I : n 1 went for the bieycl" after Mr. Bowman had come out and before lw, IHT shouts some men came .Threatened their assistance and both of them The accused then lay down were Liken to Iba shore. and UUTOateoad that "if I tell anyThe doctor then arrived and the body and cause him to get locked deceased was taken to Dr. Bayup or something wrong happen to ley's Clinic. Her husband stayed him, I would see what would at the Clinic for about live bOUfl happen to me." before he died. Cm the next morning at al>out Police Constable 25 Carter /clock Elma woke her and attached w the Centra] Polka her something. She woke Station told the Court that of St. Lucia in-.1 AHidbroak" Calls T IT Molasses BOya 1 Club, whirh ._pldly progressing in Hi activities has three good b ids players This Club Is carried on In Ih. Oisl I' Although the Club has had DO ..m'-. %  '" ', %  Jtt lak' ing a keen interest In the game* The table tennis plavrrs af BaUour LaynC of P 1 ishley of and 1 These boyi have %  good attack and should go far if I H Un Police Station enters a Boys' Club team In the Barbnrto< Tabla TatV jils Association Competitions next %  %  SS Cninto is ex peeled to 1 Ti iiu.l.-l al on Thursday lo take 35 for Southampton. All .ire expected V I* on board bv 2 p.m. and the ni '" '"c mail wu .mother and said he would go down Perry man n.m Gap and see who the girl was assisted htm In bringing out the that got killed. deceased. Mrs. McKen/ie was She told him: "You mean you al * brought out of the sea. told me you lick pp a girl down Bcresford Trotman. one of the there last night and votj still go,WI aasurtill| in ihe roactta, said ing down there"" He icplic^l ,hal ll <|innix-oys of this „, Club take an Interest in table tan uu Other red in •PI,. > ~ L ^_ draughts and dominoes. aJiT n" s ^ 100nc r f r "" rrH h %  %  Oistlns get their *upRmllk called here from British v ,., ,, rr .„| Ilim a mM hakery lana on Sunday with a cargo xh,, bak ery was started t NO QUORUM %  is no moiling of Ihi* St chqilay due I*' f ,1 i|ti..riiin Mi-nbpra ill have dlacuaaed Ihe Maudr YOU'LL FAVOUR FOR ITS DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY. COMFORT AND LONG. LASTING QUALITY. The Suedette "PLAYDAY" i UMMM. .here'a the Shoe for fOU BrMri a %  "*w Part k*ii. comlorlai>le a %  houae Shoe and to •*wom..Ja./ Available ij „ 0 wniTi; * 11 fK SKI 8-8 I'HM'KI) AT ONLY S7.25 I n &c*fa>4 I i.f I.Sl bags of rice, 60 canons ., ,,„ | )V Mr Sydney Waller II is or nrewood. 50 bunches •""* iiinxi .i %  .. % % %  a u ..—.. • %  DO, -.!> %  which he lived Scavengers Inspected I went around to the Scavenging I>t p .riment and inspected the men m the preMrtice of llie Pollci oil two consecutive mornings. Tne Police carried Mr. Bow to Central Police S.allc nd three ~The "bakery'is very small and fruit and 262 |t s owner has no carls to deliver .. greenhearl. |. .,. M t of <)„ tn -I is sup.._ arriving on Sunday wai .,\\^\ •„ *ham of the Town the molasses tanker Alheli^.-a, . y.,.. j ,, p v huh rame for a load or vacuum r „und.no districts flock the bakp.in molasses fo. Triniiiad. The erv to bake their Saturdnv loaTM AthellM-wa* cleared port yesterday Trie bakery Is very sanitary and %  ,: r '"' 'I*r'mdal Hear, Us'need is oiostly Ml OB The SOirMMier Pool arc the agriili Rank-Holidays which follow f lha -raire. w. HasMh gnd wsa k an oa when bread is scarce 1 >' %  *• % %  A („. Ud ,., O,-M, "f th-' Athelbrook. ;. A,i ,.i |. %  ..!.'. i f. r "LADY NELSON** l-EAVES PORT The ft.M.S. lady NeUoi ortivad he heard Ihe ihouts of help from at Barltados from Canada via the Mrs M" K H i wag British Nortbern Islands yesterP ur '* accused went around '. From his wife and ha day. With i from %  %  %  j) Thev lurt %  I no reports of th< c B long time. One Ing i* qulit In OlsUn's We di not even receive minor reOLD LADY FOUND ilifferenl from that of the^ccuscd 4ifji,5c and ahe gol ready for wi.rk end two other man h'-lped .11 <'iui..di..t 1 i*.it, discharged anVl~4B The fact that suspicicn rssie.1 Before ahe aaft he came back and I Hfhtlnf !.. Ja aaMl ll aabecv. Di "in of lur 103 passenger, irtnnK on me never frightened me. I ^jd | t w,,, t IUP t h„ iiT y „,.,, Kinch w then called lo the off at Barbados, the Lad* Naaaan w<~*.:. 1^.^ w ,.1,1 Mnrearet have many lime, th light that the, % „ knled ln IVrrv 0ap riu, „,. |,,„|, A „„. ,:,„, h „ ,„r OT „ left port |.„ nigj.t? HTT," T,d ".! U.w, r Tjttt TmSS? position in which I found my..lf hd „„, klu> „ h „. prewnled the fact, of the inquest Guiana via St. Vlneenl. Grind, (1,,? *f M hTS :d for some explanation^ A „, .,u tt HI, Lordship, t.j the Jury who re.urne.1 a verdict ..idITrlnldjd. Sh. ?,£££ 5£T' iSurt^T ESS* until of dealh by misadventure due lo'-.. ; Meaara Cardiner Auslln Co rula been found at Bla. faun • drowning. Umited. s Jos ph sh ,, |n gooo hc ,|, h | W/IIHMW IllXt.S %  always co-operated PolK rith the artjournnd further hearin is morning at 10 o*.loi IIIAMDMI pHUsaTssssuPn And in \-.IOMI ffUHMNQ HINOH Av.lt hlr Heparately or In Heta Vour Jewellers : V. De LIMA A tO., LTD. ,'*',•.',',',',•,'. \ FRESH SUPPLIES ARRIVED C'nrovil Tablets Nminarol Taba!aii Tubleta Peplo-Bismol Iron.led Vi-asl Tnblrts h%'ngnrs Halsam /eplu I.ni.ii Kemnver 1'eneih lodired Catlte l.ii ks T.<".r. Itr Iii.il Anli4t te I iii^iieiiline fhfaAGt ******* &** Qn QUA (D/ISM $WU (Dept. GOULD WOTAla STANDARD IRISH ll.\[.V in Aqua, BOM. Powder, rieah Pink.Nil. Bincult. Lsmon. OysMr, Strawbttrry, Oold, Tan and Whits 'a 13 79 Yd. •SATIN RIBTA Ths is a gergseiis ribbed art silk msUrlal with a saun back. It has a beautifol fsel and baaga irsesfolly. mil range of shades @ $3 IS Yd. TAFFETA Available in Plain and Watered ftnlskes la s lovely range of shade". Several quallUe. for II 26 to %i 'JO Yd HARRISONS SHOES We are now offering a fine assortment of these High Cl.iss Sandals for I.flM-s in White, I'.uck BUok Suede. CnUt %  nd Silver Kid. Priie. r'ii.;in.' from S1204 lo $19.79 CAVT SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & !3 BROAD STRF.F.T KNIGHTS DRUG STORES i'or,\Tot;s II II.s Or. Cash and 4 in.' On... BCCKFAST TONIC WIM 12 66 IIKINZ TOMATO KKTIIII'I' .|Mr bol mon I'ICKI.KII o.-.iors_,,, ,. IHINZ (MOW (HOW T"c Kl KS per bol. UN AKUONATE OF SODA—1-lb. pkf FOOD YEAST I-lb pka CURRY POWDER—p*r Un BLACK PEPPER—I 01 |*g WIIITK PIPPM KOO OOAVA rn LV SHARWOODS ( Bl UCC—per t^ DRIED s* DRIED MIMT-pcr t> 'STAJVSmtJf. SCOTT A I



    PAGE 1

    GEN. RIDGWAY SUCCEEDS EISENHOWER Mark Clark Replaces Ridgway In Far East GRUENTIIER CONTINUES AS SHAPE CHIEF OF STAFF „ WASHINGTON, April 28 PRESIDENT TRUMAN appointed General Matthew Ridgway as new Supreme Allied Commander in Europe and named General Mark W. Clark to replace Ridgway in the Far Eaat. General Ridgway will replace General Dwight D. Eisenhower whose release as Supreme Allied Commander in Europe will be effective June 1. A North Atlantic Council meeting in Paris asked Truman to designate an American and he chose Ridgway. Ridgway was formally nominated by.the President and the actual appointment was made by the NATO Council. T h v Prraidam Uibcloeed a* Kulgway's raquasl lhat General Alfred M. Gruenther will continue as Chief of Staff In Parl. Clark who succeed* Ridgway aa head of the rar East Command and commander in chief of Force* In Korea, i, now Commander of Army Forces stationed at Fort Monroe, Virginia. Truman sent RldaTway a massage saying In part: "You have my highest personal usloem and Seat wishes as you assume this great reaponslbllll, I know M our people will be fully and warmly behind you as will all rieedom loving people the world over." In appointing Clark. Truman said: -In making this appointment Clark Ji'„ emph .". s "* a> General which have bee., so ably ci rr |ed out by General Rldgwav with regard to U„„ M NauS'acttaS h^me^,''' 1 1 '" "" lb1 '"" Solution To Truce Talks Proposed PANMUNJOM April io rh United Nation., proposed on lotiday an "overall solution" to -• deadlocked Ki>teai. Armistice talks and top-flight delegates, iin'dialely wont into scret soasJon talk over the offer. '"'" %  leiununists' reply to the United Nations proposal was not announced because of tha news blackout that was pulled over tho talks Shortly after Vice-Admiral Turner Joy. head ol the United Nations del*nation presented the -iTer, North Korean General Nam I proposed an indefinite recess. NU agreed. It was up to the Cotnmunlslx to .tame the date and time of the next Plenary Session. Allied officers first considered the entire meeting as secret but their decision wa8 ^i^. altered when the Communistreleased the first part or the diseuasJons leading up to an agreement to go into executive sessions. United Nations spokesman BrlgJtlier Oenerol William P. Nuckub "id the decision to hold secret talks was made In the hope of speeding an armistice in Korea Ho said: "we hope to minimise me use of meetings for propaganda purposes. We hope that by netting ,iown to brass tacks an a ^!,, ce c .J n *• "•<*•. **— %  peedlly. The Communists constantly have utilised open It—Iran sounding boards."—ft.p. %  OLD MAN R.Vr,LEAVES FREIGHT TRA.N STRANDED \j 2 GiW EvideUCe In Murder Trial Grow Ufay Face Court Martial WASHINOTOM. April 1$ Anny Secretary Frank Phce Jr announced that lorra ., 5*£ B*IL. b ? -n lKl •• Ma|or J'obert G "?w wo peraonal dlii Ml nto Communist hand, and a haute! MU b. held te detaruun. whether be should MatttaJ Cha.gea cover impronertv f^...i* T lo ,ll " military information In private record, .ad OSS* ",*"!" -at inform: ..lion properly. I . T.S? 0 ,'"* oul * '"• 'baft h.v %  -Soviet agentol Grow* S^L^" • %  on'amcl ekcerpcn which he axpraaaad the opinion att'tiek Su^i^.STf* ""'' ; •md by •hlttm? Ho^"h?b!!!r txcerpu were later published in the Ruaaun preaa. Grow la S7 viara „ld and is a former military attache to the United Stales Embaaay in Moscow. — v.r. %  I M It 11 MARK CLARK I TwFOBIDDE\ TO ENTER B.G. GEORGETOWN B.ii T1 „ April 2*. fie uovemor in Council made .. — -i_. %  %  i i3^ '* !" e prohibiting William face Court .Mrachan and Ferdinand Smith ftotu entering British Uuiann. Honble Dr. Cheddi Jagan an' were con%  "HPau to be I emote today. '„ fj f^'Wgn Ofllee sold that SSf& '"' ""larence bc-l s^ 1 K7,"!? 1 FptUn AmbaaUS7 A 5' r "" ah *""" '•> 1'!" u "' M """* ""' n w British l British proposBU war, inforamt riEl"^ '" Amr '"" weak IiV i?. """"a "aid they wri a referred t„ Fajvptlan Pren,,,,; Slilft h . "tfri* tham as -an basis for negotla1 Trade Unions' Conference To Begin Here On June 5 told hiArtvrii.^ retar ? ' '^ e B rb * Workers' Union ,.. ocate m an '""efVew yesterday, hv thn r S? 1" a m m ber •' • Sub-Commilleo appointed b> Iho afTiliates of lhe International ConfederationTolfte* Trade Un.on. (I.C.F.T.U.) and (O.R.I.T.) returned i .lay from Tnnidjsd where he attended a meetlM of thai frZ n rl eC fr m ^ Pr 26 "' A P ril 27 "> <^ !" S l"e RepoV.5 !" K J !" and '" mak. pUn. for the hold,n of a con.'* w" f So ntUm %  m "* l Organisations S the area Soviet Airforee laarger Than VS. -FINLETTER B.G. Trade Union Council Moves To Settle Disputes RGETOWN, B.li., April i~ BRITISH GUIANA Tr St,. Onion Council hu suKgeslerl In the Labour Deparlment Oiat the latter eontUdci tli. po sibillly of recommendinn lo Governiiienl Hie in(iudui.tinn of machinery for settlemeit by ballot among workers til jurisdlciional disputes ami \g the oniona This action stemmed Irom faauon the Cnnnl'a par I le^aKlink' th e Labour situ.itlon on itugar estates ling : .in-...r Hag CounDi.U .i .••lution to the iit..h!.ni s(iiultl be found in the i or one union in the %  Uggr industry lo be efTeeted by HV ii..ill-, matter! of exiatinj I pagg HBJg|||sn tin raporl nt the (-oniniitlee set up by the Council to draft tinrontltuUofl '>. neh i union. un i Lonl Muiinter Leaves B.G. it. WASHINGTON April 28 ir ftl Forc S^"^"? Thorra. K nugttgff ebtimates the overall United State. pWne strength to llnited sut.^"^ ,£JH' iS*""' >Cnd " GSORGETOWN. U.G April 27 I-ord Munater Parliament The Sub-Committee %  Moiotod oy the Caribbean amiiatea ot the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions tl.CFTUi and the Inter-American Regional •ri-i 1 1 1 0 ' wpffcgn 'P !" T) met in T ""'*i-orU from the area and to make plans for the holding of a Conference of the various afl.liated Organisation in the area. The first session of the Committee started discussionat the Queen's park Hotel at 9 P.M. on Saturday 26th and ended at 4-80 A.M. Sunday 27th. Recon. me n d a t ion* The Committee received rtB Tts on the working of Trade nions in Grenada. British Guiana. Barbados. Trinidad' Jaman .. S. Lucia aad St. Vincent; and aaade recommendations to tExecutive Board of O.R-l.T a.id I.C.F.T.U. to assist the Organ.* tlonal activities in the are*. The Committee recommend"l that a Conference of all of the nlTiliated Trade Union* In the area should be held in BARBADOS on THURSDAY. Vh jt'VE TO SATURDAY. 7th JUNE The Ageiid.1 of the i will include:— (a) The establishment of a SubSecretariat In the area. 'bi Report of the Regional Secretary 13.000 and 15,000 In each tategor Whilo Russian *ur power h oumerically -uperior Flnlcttd aa,u the United Stutes production bj M battai quality planes of certain types. He said the United auu M far in the lead in lighterbombers and heavy uombaars. In a radio transcription b Anvens.an ijtgioi, nnletter the fame-l Russian MIG 15 Is -about -i good as tha beat of our Interceptors" He added the Russians have "to many" MICia the* have been able to transfer about t00 of them lo the Cblneac Communist Air Force.— V.T. Situation Mined The Council now clalmi ihiu lhe .vitlulrmwal of M.P.C.A. ib u attitude to the I uuiii.l ind its failure to honoui its nbliKalit.iiby uttending meet iiig-i of the Committee wln-n sum 'noned. or otherwise parliclpatliik in the functioning of live Commit tee u appointed to implement on.. inion propotnl. has now .ilternl the situation. The Council adds that membership of iugar workers In M.I'.C A i* absolutely nil from Blairmont lo Skcldon, negligible on the Ba Coast. Demerara. and only i control at Diamond u i Vi i lillaa, Schoon Ord lUgt K'.P. W.I. Students Compluui To Conservatives radio transcription by the t^krti halck" He had the o|)portunity ,„ \ Ing moat of industrial develop......* — schemes appearing and operation riu %  J % %  -., ,-#, in British Guuiu. and i. I tlntl IlilS \oStr(*Ii! forward to this country s making' i"equally reniaikable" de\elopnnn' Mm In the next lei, ft He said he wa van BMktb uu pressed, more especially whatl h ovir the past __ I ratpai kabM m la I'l-lili'iil I.I-IHII-I-S HST's STUDY AFTER REDECORATtON %  •ORT-OF-SPAIN. April M I ilglllators >f (he Goverriroei ..( a House meeting with Ur, Munater this moniing told hm lhat Triiiulad ha no strong political leaders and straws d thai navt •trans political party an< M The discussions touched ledcrBtioa aim political, i4>cial and eoo.i..lili..i.i affntuig Uu During hi.; stay, Loid Minister will visit lh various In%  .. baparial CoUaca Tropical Agriculture. Barbadian \> ins Exhibition >lait h KINGSTON. Jca. April W1. In an exhibition match ycaterday Eric Taylor ami Dan i i %  nfagtitu of Barbadoa l> Chin and Ivan Phillip Cioi.uia 3-g. J. 6—1. •—|. SrjS : i "" ""' tli ( 1 " ^pected tr-< h. wTS the first set -Cr I leave tor Ne Y-,rk o„ Sunday Porter Gets 18 Months For Larceny THIS 15 tha PnaadeoTi study which la feaaaad oa the second Qoor of tha newly-decorated and rebuilt White Haw— A painting of fiaalilaal 1 ruman'f aMtbar la la tha l iiii fc piaa 1 M--noHonai tWHnilaiJ Thiriy-year-oio John Baile> 01 sent Ut th Duncan Trotman. pornn : ft 1-and. GovernmcNt ii lerday evtning laattanoi montha' impn-nnmeI Court of Grand Session, by His Lordship the Chief Jiassj larceny of 14 gaJvanhu belonging to Manninr. .-. former employri In aentenctng Bellej PlMdad guilty to th, •arUer in tha Session. I! (;overnrnent Indusia| School in 193: fin taking part in the disturbance*., .n.i iiun he had wounded one of the oihei B pill of the gssMkal I ir year* there. Bailey absconded t. TrtnldMl ... IW^. and was deport. Immigration autho I Hu Lordship told I... I'.n %  %  %  LONDON. April Ui. All.'gat IUIIS -if COaOlU prciydm at Labour Kxchangea Lo (,,,.. Ilntaln are to be broughi tu Hi. •I (Jov.'iniiHiit D-lni matteis concerning hoattl ac cotQBKKtation tt* itudenti in llv United Kingdom. delrabitlb ot eatHblishing a Wl i-entre u,i problonn t( | .tudcnl nurses from the W> ( : al-o be raised in th, IIOUMm th* liar future. Thuae subkacU were discuss., to-night at .. friendly two-houi n eating between Cunst-ivativi M;P> *d a deputation nlru ntrgrig from the Weal ludiai Students um on Bar* stances of colour praludlca on i ( % %  pan of mdlvldualw l laabour Ex rhangewere mentione.1. Tin ileputatmn was 1. ) b) Ift I H L Eytlo (president i <>r Muii.f Guiana and included I* raa. Miss llene Stuart of Barilos and Miss M. 0*Oarri <> luiiMtrvutivw ,,,|, was Mr IM' %  Smith,.,.. Casairc •Vest Indie-, Sub-Cnmmiltee whi was Ln the chair, gnd oUV i man l*rs present wer* Sir Patrick % %  am ChaJnnao ,r tha Coaaai vntlvv Ovemeaa Bureau. Bernard Rralne {Secretuiv gj ihe Waal Indies Sub Committee) Dodd I'nrker. Chairman of the Imperdil AfTnirs Conimittre. H.irul, Walkinann and Richard Pilking ton. Iadv Huggins who is Chalrmai of the Wp*t Indies Committe -stabllshed outside the Hou# t. Veep member* Informed of lete. 'vents In the territories was als. %  resent. On Pace i No Account Of $2,000 Union f^umln -. W.U00 of th 1 mil. i V,.., % .,, iv .,.• Ratepayer*' Union .,( Si V m % %  .niiol b,. gMOtssstfal for. actord'"K lo the report of the loag| Urn. —d Bovell and Skeete Auditor. In have been jpptilnled by thif.ovvruiiiunt of St Vincent 1' 'xamme the Union's accounts. The firm of Bovell and Skect* las appointi'i by tha Bagdftrar ol Trade Uniom, of St. '. cxamliiith. accounta of thi Union from 11 MM. Ijocemb-'r 20. 1950, to Oecemhe 1. 1951 Tha ' that the have found the accountn nation for handbng th. the uu.in 'oiufmion they state that Usr I unable to certify tin bjp ,nd correct statements I the flnancinl transartif.-. in Ion The union ha* some 40 bill i • throughout St Vlm-ent erltl Fleadou.rterIn Klne-town h 'he auditor* have ronfined lhe( 'Xamination lo the headquarter. In K>"Tlte Crazy Dutchman"" Calls I fere I Haiku da Minwn us llart. the erary flying Dutchman MI \M.M Holland. who Usrlad out on hiworld tour five nilhngN In lUrbudos %  ni.iiiiiuj on Ihe laad> IMK TKIAL ol Carlton Hrewster a scavenger of Dean's Village. St Michael, who is char^ei. with murdering 1IJyi-ai nld N'irma H as well on Septemler ""last year, bei;an at the Cinirt of Grand Sessions yesterday morning, before His U.rdship the Chief Justice. Sir Allan CUymore '1V.!M..I the Jti witneaes the Prosecution propose to rail, hava given avidliafa Ut*."\ ur is aliened to have att-akcl Hajwetl whil. (fcatonard Uenskini ivcart rj Parry G*P on (he nii.'ht of September 7 at about u 15 and with having %  fter beating Benshin and causing him to flaw, killed ffoiwell The mam evidence the proseiuuon is relying on t* lhat of Breeder's romrnun law wife, Veta Small, who lold HH' Court hoW had returned on the iught of tha alleajt-u killing and liter washlna out hi. elothea .on%  Kit to her thai he had just licked up a girl in Perry Cap.** The caae for the tron Is being ondueled bv Mi W W. Recce, BVgatSM General. Mr. George Farmer is appearing u i-ehalf of the ...ruseo At tin' end nf yesterday's hear* ing. the lurj visited th. MBM of the murder. Outlining the ca*e to the jury. Mr. Recce first told them thai us lueation-* of law they would be ...tided by HH laordship but they a trie judge, of the fact*. lie defined murdei ... the un* .*ful killing UMihed Benshln M* Heeee safd, woulu %  e|l them how a man came upon the iteene and put hia hand %  boulder. A scurBr between 'he wo men followed and Beoskn w.is %  iven a blow on his theek Mid fell. He got up and when he relived another hard hlow. ha r.,1. leaving the woman there with the "t acker Later he returned and found the voung lady lying in front of a woman's house, apparently in an unconscious condition He rillrd the Police He waa the ouly witness who could give them any Idea from Ma eyesight as tu what happc..,. There was no other such witness at all. Benakui w;.s not in a position :o identtly th.. man, though he dea• ..a pair I HAIKA III. i oi i • elaou tium St Kilti, ... U'hile here he expecU to give IIIIIIIIH'I of lacturaa at the varllus prim.i, ihools nn different subjects. Thii globe trotter who get: rae passages from air and chipnng companies, pays his hole nd other livinji urlng and writing Since receiving his early tduBllOD 11 the AmaU-rdaiu DiplonaUi s.ii. K. i ha aaa visited 45 iilTereut rounlriea, covering tome '<> nlv Hv speaks ton 1 if II • nr l.uign.i^er. including '.'inian. Afrikaans, Portuguvs.and Italian in •ddltion 'i i few African anrl South Amen%  nn dialects and lei tures In eight I .mguagek. He has .ilreudy had I • tin Page 3. J RA'.: : IOH--Maken o< Ihe WORLD'S CHAMPION CYCLE ft %  hi.. * a u ~ '.". ' """ ""' '""", me iiun mignt wtJ, ^ Jfj'S'."^"" "'" ,l ""' •>' %  n'"" og gum. SSTnJ^wSl ' "' -'"•" h W lh h "" 2r^ e 2a" ,, 1 ,!rr-r*s ^vr,r,,n <• %  • %  • r ^ n a. H *" l>rdhip sentenced hit. to •K o.^i M %  %  ''"'""•*'' 8 months' imprisonm. tnat Bailey nad a previous contold him "you havt got voumelf •iction for larceny, that hr arag to blame for it." St. LlWV ||:r||-iliL' ScbaiiM M.IMII. .1 The question i ItoarJ oi. 1 I %  inch wdi rem I'II it en Clinketta • %  ; nformalli Government would nk i make Opinion< xpresaed -ua;eal that tha land will be used as a small herne Mr r | Kngineer said ketts area U fairly thiefe lated and could do wi" scheme You are on a ^t^ WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A RaJeigh w die choscr of Reg Harm—1 | ProfeMsaul \pnni ( lump ion for iht ascoad Morsialm. Hero i pr.atl ..f tbc wndom ..| hmina; your buydr from %  (.ompany -.th u <.h grsai j leihnKal eavssssocc aad BJMiwIsdge thai Jeugned jj and built the mord-hrrskorg RAIJUGH. 1 RALEIGH I THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLC t hf* ml Kmngt: J*. U r H i Urn I I Wll. BHEPHESO a CO.. LTD. III. II. 12 4 13 Broad Sim munist Air Forca


  • Citation
    The Barbados advocate

    Material Information

    Title:
    The Barbados advocate
    Uniform Title:
    Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
    Portion of title:
    Sunday advocate
    Place of Publication:
    Bridgetown Barbados
    Bridgetown, Barbados
    Publisher:
    Advocate Co.
    Publication Date:
    Frequency:
    Daily
    regular
    Language:
    English

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    Subjects / Keywords:
    Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
    Genre:
    newspaper ( sobekcm )
    Spatial Coverage:
    Barbados -- Bridgetown

    Notes

    Dates or Sequential Designation:
    Apr. 22, 1983-
    Numbering Peculiarities:
    No issue published for May 3, 1983.
    General Note:
    On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
    General Note:
    Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
    General Note:
    Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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    University of Florida
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    University of Florida
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    Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
    Resource Identifier:
    17931718 ( OCLC )
    sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
    Classification:
    Newspaper ( lcc )

    Related Items

    Preceded by:
    Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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    Full Text


    .
    9
    ‘

    Hharbavtos

    GEN. RIDGWAY SU€CEEDS

    Mark Clark Replaces
    Ridgway In Far Eas



    ESTABLISHED 1895

    GRUENTHER CONTINUES

    AS SHAPE CHIEF OF STAFF] Truce Tatks

    WASHINGTON, April 28
    PRESIDENT TRUMAN appointed General

    Matthew Ridgway as new Supreme Allied

    Commander in Europe and named General Mark
    W. Clark to replace Ridgway in the Far East.
    General Ridgway will replace General Dwight
    D. Eisenhower whose release as Supreme Allied
    Commander in Europe will be effective June 1.
    A North Atlantic Council meeting in Paris
    asked Truman to designate an American and he

    chose Ridgway. Ridgway was formally nominated
    by.the President and the actual appointment was
    made by the NATO Council.

    The President discloseq at
    Ridgway’s request that General
    Alfred M. Gruenther will con-
    tinue as Chief of Staff in Paris.
    Clark who succeeds Ridgway as
    head of the Far East Command
    and Commander in Chief of Forces
    in Korea, is now Commander of
    Army Forces stationed at Fort
    Monroe, Virginia,

    Truman sent Ridgway a mes-
    Sage saying in part: “You have
    my highest personal esteem and
    best wishes as you assume this
    great responsibility. I know all
    our people will be fully and
    warmly behind you as will all
    freedom loving people the world
    over.”

    In appointing Clark, Truman
    said: “In making this appointment
    I want to emphasise that General
    Clark will continue the policies
    which have been so ably carried
    out by General Ridgway with
    regard to United Nations action
    in Korea including if possible, the

    achievement of anh ji!
    armistice.”—,P, a {

    Grow May Face
    _ Court Martial









    GENERAL MARK CLARK.
    —S——



    ‘WO FORBIDDEN
    TO ENTER B.G.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    GEORGETOWN, B.G.,

    April 26.

    fell into Communist hands and a The Governor in Council made

    hearing will be held to determine’ an order i illi
    ; prohibit Will
    eee he should face Court|Strachan and Ferdinand Smith
    artial. , from entering British Guiana,
    Charges cover improperly Hon'ble Dr, Cheddi Jagan and

    recording classified military in-!a crowd of member:
    formation in private records and} People’s Progressive Mat cecil
    failing to safeguard secret inform-|ed to Atkinson Airport | to meet
    ation properly, them by regular B.W.1LA, plane as
    The case srew out of the theft} scheduled but they did not turn
    by a Soviet agent” of Grow’s/up; but even if they had landed
    diary _ Which contained excerpts;they would not have been per-
    in which he expressed the opinion | mitted to enter Georgetown.
    that the States P.P.P. memvers paraded at the
    attack Russia as soon as possible| Airport with placards reading
    and by “hitting below the belt”, | “British subjects should be allowed
    Excerpts .were later published! free movement in the West Indies.”
    press. Grow is 57 tion authorities believe
    years old and is a former military | that Strachan and Smith had re-
    attache to the United States Em-|ceived word that they would be
    bassy in Moscow, deemed prohibited immigrants

    —U.P. ‘and cancelled the visit.



    Trade Unions’ Conference
    To Begin Here On June 5

    A CONFERENCE of all the Trade Unions in the
    area affiliated to the (O.R.LT.) Inter-American Regional
    Organisation of Workers is due to be held in Barbados from
    Thursday, June 5, to Saturday, June 7, Mr. F. L. Walcott,
    M.C.P., General Secretary to the Barbados Workers’ Union,
    told the Advocate in an interview yesterday.

    Mr. W alcott a member of the Sub-Committee appointed
    by the affiliates of the International Confederation of Free
    Trade Unions (I.C.F.T.U.) and (O.R.LT.) returned yester-
    day from Trinidad where he attended a meeting of that
    committee
    from the area and to make. plans for the holding

    ference of the various affiliated Organisations in the area.
    Mr. Walcott said:— -

    The Sub-Committee



    '
    appointed |



    by the Caribbean affiliates of the a

    International Confederation of HST $s STUDY A

    Free Trade Unions (1L.C.F.T.U.) a eee

    and the Inter-American Regional - oe
    rganisation of Workers ing



    (O.R.1.T.) met in Trinidad from ;
    the 26th to 27th April to discuss
    the Reports from the area and to
    make plans for the holding of a
    Conference of the various afili-
    ated Organisation in the area,
    The first session of the Commit-
    tee started discussions at the |
    Queen’s Park Hotel at 9 P.M. on
    Saturday 26th and ended at 4.30
    A.M. Sunday 27th.
    Recommendations |
    The Committee received re-
    ports on the working of Trade
    Unions in Grenada, British Gui-
    ana, Barbados, Trinidad’ Jamaica, |
    St. Lucia amd St. Vincent; and!
    made recommendations to tac!
    Executive Board of O.R.LT, and
    L.C.F.T.U, to assist the Organisa- |
    tional activities in the area. ;
    The Committee recommended
    that a Conference of all of the!
    affiliated Trade Unions in the
    area should be held in BARBA-|
    DOS on THURSDAY, 5th JUNE
    TO SATURDAY, 7th JUNE. |
    The Agenda of the Conference |
    will include:—
    Sub-
    |





    therefore it might have been pos-
    (a) The establishment of a bh 2 Sible to deal with him on t|
    Secretariat in the area footing.
    (b) Report of the Regional} THIS IS the President’s study which is located on the second floor of Since then, it was discovered
    Secretary. the newly-decorated and rebuilt White House. A painting of President that Bailey had a previous con-
    @ on page 5 Trunan’s mother is im the background, fnternational Exclusive) | -iction for larceny, that he was
    i












    potsing definite had yet been

    from April 26 to April 27 to discuss the Reports
    of a con-}900 of them to the Chinese Com-
    | UP.

    FTER



    ha oy





    d

    DR.



    —



    Solution To
    Proposed

    PANMUNJOM April 28
    The United Nations proposed on
    Mon “overall solution” to
    the deadlocked Korean Armistice
    talks and top-flight delegates im-
    mediately went into scret session
    to talk over the offer.

    The Communists’ reply to the
    United Nations proposal was not
    announced because of the news
    blackout that was pulled over the
    talks. Shortly after Vice-Admiral
    C. Turner Joy, head of the United
    Nations delegation presented b
    offer, North Korean General Nam
    ll proposed an indefinite recess.
    Joy agreed.

    It was up to the Communists to
    hame the date and time of the
    next Plenary Session.

    Allied officers first considered
    the entire meeting as secret but
    their decision was later altered
    when the Communists released the
    first part of the discussions lead-
    ing Up to an agreement to go into
    executive sessions,

    United Nations spokesman Brig-
    adier General William P. Nuckols
    said the decision to hold secret
    talks was made in the ho of
    Speeding an armistice in Korea.
    He said: “We hope to minimise
    the use of meetings for propa-
    ganda purposes. We hope that by
    getting down to brass tacks an
    armistice can be reached more
    speedily. The Communists con-
    Stantly have utilised open sessions
    as sounding boards.”—U.P.

    Full-scale Talks On

    Anglo-Egyptian
    Treaty Unlikely

    LONDON, April
    Chances for the ede
    full-scale negotiations on the
    Anglo—Egyptian Treaty were con-
    sidered to be remote today.
    The Foreign Office said that

    the equally rampant Mi





    BRITISH GUIANA Tr;
    to the Labour Department



    of machinery for settlemen



    Farnum For

    Ths fund still has a far way
    to go. We are aiming at
    $2,880 . 00.

    Do your bit to defray the
    expenses of the Ace Cyclist,
    Ken Farnum to the Olympic
    Games at Helsinki next July.
    Donations are accepted at the

    arranged for
    tween Eden
    sador Abdel
    mally hand
    formula.

    a conference be-
    and Egyptian Ambas-
    Fattah Amr to for-
    over the new British





    British proposals were infor~ Royal Bank of » Bar-
    mally conveyed to Amr last week clay’s Bank, and the office of
    and Cairo reports said t were the Advocate.
    referred to Egyptian ier Goal .............. $2,880.00

    ilaly who them as “an Amt. prev. Ack. $ 419.14 |
    unsatisfactory basis for negotia- A. E. M. 2.00
    tions,"—U.P. N. Carmichael . 5.00 i

    . | Professor Weekes . 1.00 |
    Total * $427.14

    Soviet ‘Airforce
    Larger Than U.S.
    —FINLETTER

    WASHINGTON, April 28
    US. Air Force Seeretary Thomas |
    K. Finletter estimates the overall
    United States plane strength to! April 27.
    2/3 or 3/4 that of Russia, Finletter Lord Munster Parliamentary
    said Russia has about 20,000 front- Under-Secretary of State for the
    line combat planes and an equal | Colonies leaves for Trinidad to-
    number in reserve while the|day after spending just over a
    United States has only between | week.
    13,000 and 15,000 in each eategory.' He had the opportunity of visit.

    |ing most of industrial developmen

    J

    Lord Munster
    Leaves B.G.

    GSORGETOWN, B.G.,



    While Russian air

    power is ‘ "
    — , : i, schemes appearing and operating
    numerically superior Finletter said in British Guiana and is looking
    the United States production is |

    of better quality planes of certain | orward to this country’s making

    pes. er : .| “equally remarkable” developmen:
    4 a ie ope eo we States | strides in the next ten years

    in fighter- Oe ‘ . 7
    ee He said he was very much im-
    bombers and heavy bombers. | pressed, more especially when he
    In a radio transcription by the | looked back over the past ten
    American Legion : Said | years and saw remarkable strides
    famed Russian MIG 15 is —CCP)

    “about a Lek oe fox

    interceptors”. He a e Rus- ° .
    Barbadian W itis
    Exhibition Match

    sians have “so many” MIG’s they
    have been able to transfer about |
    KINGSTON, J’ca., April 27.
    In _ an exhibition match yester-

    REDECORATION | day Eric Taylor and Darnell Prim-
    ai ‘mingham of Barbados beat Joseph
    wee eee {Chin and Ivan Phillips of British
    7 [Guiana 3—6, 6—3, 6—1, 6-1,

    Taylor's all round play despite
    his inevitable errors with strong
    support from Trimmingham kept
    them well out in front after losing
    the first set.—OC.P.



    munist Air Force,






    Thirty-year-old John Bail: y on
    Duncan Trotman, porter of Seales’
    Land, Government Hill, was yes-
    terday evening sentenced to 18
    months’ imprisonment at the
    Court of Grand Sessions by Hi:
    Lordship the Chief Justice for the

    fooled his. own Counsel Mr. F
    W. Barrow, as well as the Court
    when he said that there a
    nothing yecorded against hin



    ——

    ‘OLD MAN RIVER’ LEAVES FR



    1 »
    WHILE FLOOD WATERS of the Missouri River were ru:
    i was threatening cities in W:

    Finland Fund |



    larceny of 14 galvanised sheet
    belonging to Manning & Co i
    former employers.

    In sentencing Bailey 10]
    pleaded guilty to the offence
    arlier in the Sessions, His Lord
    Ship told Bailey that the worst
    feature of the case was that he

    x, APRIL 29, 1952

    EIGH




    Union Council has suggested
    at the latter consider the pos-

    sibility of recommending to Government the introduction

    t by ballot among workers of

    jurisdictional disputes among the unions.
    This action stemmed from fear on the Cuncil's part
    regarding the Labour situation on sugar estates.

    According to informa’ Fiis-
    patched by the caw ha
    Commissioner, of our, am
    biss, this week-~ ; ane
    workefs had suspen jon“ In

    the jurisdictional dispute between
    the Guiana Industrial Worker:
    Union and the Manpower Citizens
    Association, beeause of the Coun-
    cil’s view that a_ solution to the
    problem should be found in the
    formation of one union in the
    Sugar industry to be effected by
    |the amalgamation of existing
    Unions, and were awaiting the
    report of the Committee set up
    | by the Council] to draft the con-
    ‘titution of such a union.

    Situation Altered

    | The Council now claims that
    [the withdrawal of M.P.C.A, its

    present rebellipus attitude to the
    | Council and its failure to honow
    | its obligations by attending meet-
    | ings of the Committee when sum-



    moned, or otherwise participating
    in the functioning of the Commit-
    | tee as appointed to implement one
    union proposal, has now altered
    the situation.

    The Council adds that member-
    ship of sugar workers in M.P.C.A
    is absolutely nil from Blairmont
    to Skeldon, negligible on the East

    Coast, Demerara, and only
    minority control at Diamond
    Wales, Versailles, Schoon Ord
    nd Uitvlugt )C.P.)





    T’dad Has No Strong
    | Political Leaders

    From Our Own Correspondent)

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 28

    | Legislators of the Government
    jat a House meeting with Lord
    | Munster, this morning told hin
    that Trinidad has no strong polit-
    ical leaders and stressed the need
    ‘or a strong political party anc
    leaders,

    The discussions touched feder-
    | ation and political, social and eco-
    {nomic conditions affecting the
    jcolony. During his stay, Lord
    | Munster will visit the various in-
    | dustries and the Imperial College
    of Tropical Agriculture.
    | Lord Munster, touring the Carib-
    | bean for first-hand information on
    the colonies, arrived yesterday
    }and it is expected that he will
    I leave for New York on Sunday.

    Parter Gets 18 Months For Larceny

    sent to the Government Indus-
    trial School in 1937 for taking
    part in the disturbances, and that

    he had wounded one of the othe:
    pupils of the school during his
    four years there,

    Bailey absconded to Trinidad

    in 1942, and was deported by the
    |Immigration authorities there in
    1951,

    His Lordship told Bailey

    that
    it

    ;}had he told Mr. Barrow and the

    {Court the truth, the Court might
    jhave been able to deal with him
    jin a different way. As it , he
    jhad fooled his own Counsel so
    that his plea of guilty really did
    'not show that he was sorry fo!
    j;what he had done, but tl

    trying to get off luckil

    His Lordship sentenced hi
    months’ imprisonment
    jtold him “you have got yourself

    to blame for it.”

    ‘
    )

    }18

    T TRAIN



    os
    shing down on St. Joseph and Kansas City,
    Mississipp: isconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and Iowa, Above,
    cars of a Milwaukee freight train are almost submergect as “Old Man River” sweeps over the approach toa
    roundhouse at LaCrosse, Wise., and threatens to wash out a railroad right-of-way,

    ey

    STRANDED

    Be





    (International)

    B.G. Trade Un ion | WL. Students
    Council Moves To
    Settle Disputes

    Fee Union cs B.G,, April 27.

    Complain To
    Conservatives

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    LONDON, April 238.
    Allegations of colour prejudice
    at Labour Exchanges in Great
    Britain are to be brought to the
    notice of Government. Othe:
    matters concerning hostel ac
    commodation for students in the
    United Kingdom, desirability of
    establishing a West Indian student
    centre andy problems of
    nurses from’ the West Indies
    also be raised in the
    near future,
    These subjects were diseusse:
    to-night at a friendly two-hour
    neeting between Conservative

    will
    House in the

    student ,



    id a deputation ninc
    t the West |

    Students Union, Several

    indian
    in-

    stances of colour prejudice on the

    part of individuals at Labour Ex
    changes were mentioned, The
    deputation was led by Mr. J. H
    L, Eytle (President) of Britist
    Guiana and included two student

    nurses Miss Llene Stuart of Bar-

    bados and Miss M, O’Garra, Or
    the Conservative side was Mr
    Peter Smithers, Chairman of th«
    West Indies Sub-Committee wh«
    was in the chair, and other mem
    bers present were Sir

    Patrick

    Spens, Chairman of the Conser-
    vative Overseas Bureau, Bernard

    Braine (Secretary of the

    Indies Sub - Committee) Dodd

    West

    Parker, Chairman of the Imperial

    Affairs Committee,

    Harold

    Watkinson and Richard Pilking-

    ton,

    Lady Huggins who is Chairmar
    of the West Indies Committe
    established outside the Houg® t:
    keep members informed of Inte:
    “vents in the territories was als:
    present.

    @ On Page 3.
    ene

    No Account
    Of $2,000
    Union Funds

    Funds exeeeding $2,000 of th
    United Workers, Peasants’ anc
    Ratepayers’ Union of St. Vincen
    cannot be accounted for, accord
    ing to the report of the local firn
    and Bovell and Skeete Auditor
    whe have been appointed by the
    Government of St. Vincent t
    examine the Union’s accounts

    The firm of Bovell and Skeete
    was appointed by the Registrar of

    Trade Unions of St, Vincent t
    examine the accounts of th«
    Union from its inception or
    December 20, 1950, to Decembe
    $1, 1951.

    The auditor's report that the

    have found the accounting orga:
    isation for handling the affair
    the union, unsatisfactory and i
    conclusion they state that the
    are unable to certify the account
    as true and correct statements «
    the financial transactions of +}
    union.

    The union has
    es throughout
    Headquarters

    some 40 brancl
    St. Vincent wit!
    in Kingstown br

    |

    the auditors have confined thei
    examination to the s»ccounts ef
    the headquarters in Kingstown





    St. Lucy Housing
    Scheme Mooted

    ed at the
    Boars or
    Boarc

    of lane

    The que
    meetir of
    Aaturd 1
    would

    tion was ra
    the Housing
    to what

    h eight acre

    the

    do v




    |

    j
    |
    it
    |

    }

    which will remain from Clinketts
    plantation Lucy after a play-

    ng field School were estab-
    jished there, and Mr. G. H. Adams
    Chairmar nformally i tt
    Government nuld ask the Boar¢
    to make est

    Opinions ¢ xpressed Suggest that
    the land will be used a , smal
    Housing scheme. Mr. T. BE. Went
    Colonial Engineer 1id the Clin
    ketts area is fairly thickly popu-

    vit! F

    lated and could

    heme

    I2

    us
    chools on different subjects.

    ree passages from air and ship-
    ing companies,
    nd other living expenses by lec-
    uring and writing 5

    natic
    lifferent countries, covering some

    lifferent
    french, German, Afrikaans, Por-
    tuguese and Italian in addition ta
    1 few African and South Ameri-
    ‘an dialects and lectures in eight
    languages,

    |

    |

    |

    y

    Twenty-iour-year-old Haika de Q

    |



    PRICE : FIVE



    EISENHOWER

    om ail : Tiliiinadtlipige



    2 Give Evidence
    In Murder Trial

    THE TRIAL of Carlton Brewster, a scavenger of Dean's
    Village, St. Michael, who is charged with murdering 18-
    year-old Norma Haswell on September 7 last year, began
    at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday morning before
    His Lordship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore.
    Twelve of the 20 witneses the Prosecution propose to call,
    have given evidnece.

    Brewster i$ alleged to have attacked Haswell while
    she and her fiance (Leonard Benskin) were on Perry Gap
    on the night of September 7 at about 9.15 and with having
    after beating Benskin and causing him to flee, killed
    yaad. The main evidence the prosecu=
    | Uon is relying on is that of w=

    ster’s common law wife,

    Small,, who told the Court, how
    Brewster had returned on the
    | night of the alleged killing ‘and

    “The Crasy,
    Dutchman’’
    Calls Here

    | after washing out his clothes con=
    jfided to her that he had just
    | “licked up a girl in Perry Gap.”
    | The case for the crown is being
    | conducted by Mr. W. W. Reece,
    .C., Solicitor General. Mr

    Poel, familiarly known as “Har-|George Farmer is appearing on
    y, the crazy flying Dutehman”| behalf of the accused. .
    roam Arnhem, Holland, who], At the end of yesterday's hears
    tagted out on his world tour five] ing, the jury visited the seene of
    years ago with ten shillings in| the murder, . ;
    us pocket, arrived in Ba Outlining the case to the jury)
    esterday morning on the Lady} Mr. Reece first told them that ip
    questions of jaw they would be
    guided by His haogenip but they
    were the judges of the facts,

    He defined murder as the un«
    lawful killing of another with
    malice aforethought, expressed or
    implied ,though, he said, it did not
    mean that every killing was mur+
    der ;

    Expressed Malice

    The case before them was net
    a case of any expressed malicé
    Nothing had been said by the
    prisoner to show an evil mind of
    the wicked intention, but from the
    circumstances under which the
    killing was done, he was suggestng
    © them, there was no reason for
    them to come to any other conclu-
    sion than that the man who coms
    mitted the offence intended the
    ‘onsequence of his action,

    The evidence would prove,
    said, that Haswell went for a ri
    on a bicyele on September 7, ac»
    companied by her young friend
    Benskin, After wet
    Street, they were
    Perry Gap when they were 4

    Benskin, Me. Peece anid, would
    tell them how a man came upon
    the scene and put his hand on hie
    shoulder. A seuffle between the
    two men followed and Benskn was
    given a blow on his cheek and
    fell. He got up and when he ré-
    ceived another hard blow, he ran,
    leaving the woman there with the
    attacker,

    Later he returned and found the
    young lady lying in front of a
    woman's house, apparently in an
    unconscious condition. He called
    the Police

    He was the only witness who
    could give them any idea from his
    eyesight as to what happenca-
    There was no other such witness
    at all.

    Benskin was not in a
    He has already had | identify the man, thoug
    @ On Page 3. on page 3

    HAIKA DE POEL.
    Velson inom St. Kitts on a two-
    Week stay,” :

    While here he expects to give
    number of lectures at the vari-

    primary and secondary

    This globe trotter who gets

    pays his hote

    Since receiving his early edu-
    tion at the Amsterdam Diplo-
    School he has visited 45
    0,000 mtiles. He

    languages

    speaks ten
    including

    ition to
    he des-

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    —

    PAGE TWO



    R. JUSTICE H. A. Vaughan,
    Mr. C 4. Cop Mr. L. A.
    Hall and Mr. A. E, Lewis, left
    yesierd: fiernoo by B.W.LA.
    for G to attend the Con-
    f Civil Service Associa-

    tions in the Caribbean area.
    The Conference opens on April

    30

    Among the subject: to be dis-

    cussed are Unification of Services,
    Equipment of Hospitals, Training,
    Cancitions of service of Nurses,
    Widows and Orphans Pensions
    Acts, Hours of Work, Leave Pas-
    gages, Re-engagement of Pen-
    sioners, Medic] Aid and Hos-
    vitalization for Civil Servant,

    T.C.A. Barrister

    AAR. A. H: Hart, Barrister-at-

    a7 y fo T 1s-Canznda-

    Airlines, returned to Montreal
    by T.C.A, afler an en-
    ten days’ holiday. He
    was accompanied by Mrs. Har!
    and they were. staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel,

    Spent Two Weeks

    FTEZR spending two weeks’
    AN ta

    on Friday
    joyoble

    n Barbados, Mr. J

    n MeLellan Jnr., of Bos-

    ion, Massachusetts, returned hcme

    on Friday night by the Lady

    Rodney. He was staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel.

    He is employed with the brok-

    erage firm of Rogers and Hatfield.

    Paid Business Visit
    M* RONNikz GITTENS, Man-

    aging Director of the Carib-
    be.n Theatres returned to the
    Colony on Friday from Trinidad.
    Mr. Gittens went on a business
    visit for the Company.

    Spent a Month
    RS. A, G. HAZELL of St.
    Vincent returned hcme on
    Thursday .by B.G. Airways after
    spending a month’s vacation here
    with Mr. and Mrs, Masterton-
    Smith, her son-in-law and daugh-
    ter.

    Venezuelans Return Home
    UITE a number of Venezue-
    lans who were holidaying in
    B.urbados yeturned home on Sal-
    urday by B.W.1L.A, Among tho
    leaving direct for Marquetia were

    Mr. Ramon Portilio and _ his
    nephew Antonio and Mr. and
    Mrs. David Hecht and their lit-

    tle daughter Cecilia who were
    staying at the Aquatic Club.

    Mr. Portillo who was paying
    his sixth visit to the island is
    employed as Secretary in a Sol-
    icitor’s Office while his nephew
    is wih the Creole Petroleum
    Corporation in Caracas, Mr.
    Hecht is Proprietor of two busi-
    ness concerns in Caracas,

    Spent Three Weeks
    R. AND MRS. F. POPPER.
    a returned to Venezuela on
    Suturday by B.W.LA. after
    spending three weeks’ holiday
    slaying. at the Windsor Hotel, It
    was their first visit here and they
    had a very enjoyable holiday.
    Mr. Popper is Manager of Vic-
    tor Grunwald Co., Importers of
    Curacas,

    ilying Company
    2 sarbadus Lignt Aeroplane
    Club became a Company
    irom Thursday.

    Mr. Jackie Marson, Jnr., Treas-
    urer of the Club, received a let-
    ter, signed by the Registrar, yes-
    terday statung that the Club had
    been incorporated under the
    Companies Act of 1910 of Barba-
    dos and that the Company was
    limited,

    One of the members told Carib:
    “The B.L.C., is not only a Com-
    pany, but good company.”

    Awarded M.R,C.P. (Lond.)
    »R. K. L. STUART, a former
    Barbados Scholar who was
    a medical student in the U.K. is
    now a Member of the Royal Col-
    lege of Physicians, London. His
    parents, living at Black Rock, re-
    teived news of his success yes-
    terday.

    It may be remembered that Dr.
    Stuart recently got his M.R.C.P.,
    Edinburgh. Dr. Stuart left Bar-
    bados in 1949 for Canada where
    he spent two years. From Can-
    ada he went on to Eng!and,

    With U.B.O.T.
    AAR. JULIUS WILSON, an old
    Harrisonian who is now em-
    ployed with UBOT in the geo-
    logical department, arrived from
    Trinidad by B.W.1.A, on Saturday
    morning to spend about ten days’
    holiday with his relatives.
    He is staying with his sister
    Trs. Torrence Franklin of White-
    ll





    ne ne ee

    Carub Calling

    Ruled Sane, Freec



    aA

    t
    IN CHICAGO, Ruth’ Steinbagen, ”
    22, who shot and wounded Eddie
    Waitkus, Philies first baseman, onâ„¢
    June 15, 1949, is pictured after
    she was adjudged sane and freed
    of a charge of assault with intent
    to kill. After the shooting she was
    committed to the Kankakee State
    Hospital. Miss Steinhagen said she
    planned to return to the state hos-
    pital to work as an occupational
    therapist. (International)



    Canadian Vice-Consul

    FTER spending five weeks’

    holiday in Barbados, Mr,
    and Mrs. Ormond Dier of Cara-
    cas, Venezuela, returned home on
    Saturday by B.W.I1A. accom-
    panied by their three children,
    Lance, Tara and Susan. They
    were staying at Paradise Beach

    » Club,

    Mr. Dier is Canadian Vice-
    Consul in Caracas,

    Returning to Venezuela by the
    same opportunity were Mr. and
    Mrs. J. Pollock and two children
    from Maracaibo, They had spent
    three weeks staying at the Ocean
    View Hotel.

    Mr. Pollock is Storekeeper of
    the Creole Petroleum Company,

    With Confederation Life

    AJOR R. W. MORRISON,
    Trinidad Branch Manager
    of the Confederation Life Insur-
    ance Society and Mr. Pat Date,
    the Society's District Manager
    also of Trinidad, arrived here on
    Friday evening by B.W.I.A, from
    Antigua after having visited St.
    Kitts on business in the interest
    of the Society.
    Mr. Date returned to Trinidad

    the following evening by B.W.LA.
    is staying

    whide Major Morrison
    on for a holiday. His wife» flew
    in from Trinidad by B.W.LA. on

    Saturday morning to join him and ,;

    they the Hotel

    Royal.

    To Join His Wife
    R. JACK MERRY, Director
    of Messrs Gordon Grant and
    Co., of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,
    arrived yesterday morning by
    B.W.1.A, on a two-week visit, He
    has now come to join his wife who
    is staying at the Hotel Royal.
    Mr. Merry is a brother of Mr.
    Cyril Merry who was Manager
    of the West Indies team to Aus-
    tralia.

    S.M,O. Antigua

    R. H. D. WEATHERHEAD
    who has been seconded to
    the post of Senior Medical Officer,
    Antigua, returned here on Friday
    evening by B.W.LA. for a visit.
    Dr. Weatherhead was at one lime
    C.M.O. of Barbados before going
    out to Nerth Borneo as Director

    of Medical Services.

    Also returning from Antigua on
    Friday was Mr. Wm Hughes, rep-
    resentative of Messrs Wm, Fogarty
    Ltd. aie

    After Two Wecks
    EAVING last week by B.W.LA.

    4 for Trinidad was Miss Joan

    McIntosh of St. George's, Gren-

    are staying at

    ada. Miss McIntosh who spent
    nearly two weeks in the colony
    will stay in Trinidad for a few

    days before returning home, She
    is employed with Messrs. Thom-
    son, Hankey, & Co., Ltd, St
    George's, During her stay here
    she was a guest at Silver Beach
    Guest House,

    Unveiling Ceremony

    HE Unveiling Ceremony of

    the tablet in memory of the
    late Rev. F. M. Hawthorne took
    place on Sunday evening at 4.30

    at the. Jimes Street Methodist
    Church, The late Rev. Haw-
    thorne was the chairman of

    the Barbados-Trinidad district for
    20 gears and Superintendent Min-
    ister for the James Street Method-
    ist Church for 17 years. He also
    served on the Board of Directors
    of the Y.M.C.A., the S.P.C.A., and
    Family Welfare League and other
    prominent Bodies. Representatives
    from various denominations took
    part in the ceremony.

    Off To Canada
    R. and MRS. JOHN KINCH
    were passengers on Friday
    for Montreal by T.C.A. on a four-
    week visit.

    Mr. Kinch who is Senior Air-
    line Clerk of T.C.A. will visit the
    company’s head office to see how
    things are being done there.

    On Caribbean Tour
    I N BARBADOS for one week
    is Mr. J, Dresser, Sterling
    Area Manager for Canada Dry
    with headquarters in Bermuda.
    He arrived on Saturday r..orn-
    ing by B.W.1.A, from irinidad

    and is staying at the Ocean View
    Hotel.

    Mr, Dresser who has just re-
    turned from Australia on a visit
    in the interest of his company, is
    now visiting the company’s
    branches in the Caribbean,

    Enjoyed Holiday
    A=â„¢ the passengers leav-
    ing on the Lady Rodney on

    Friday night were Mr. W. Ed.
    Dawson ang his wife who are
    returning to Montreal after be-

    ing in Barbados since the middle
    »f December,

    Mr. Dawson is a_ Fellow of
    the Royal Society of Arts, Lon-
    don, England, and President of
    Dawson Bros., Limited in Mon-
    treal who are agents in the
    Dominion of Canada for Chubb
    and Son's Lock and Safe Co., of
    London and Wolverhampton,

    Mr. and Mrs, Dawson have
    travelled extensively throughout
    The B.W.I. and indeed throughout
    the World, but admit that a
    lengthy stay in Barbados has been
    a unique and beneficial experi-
    ence. They have enjoyed the
    charm of Bridgetown, the
    romance of the’ Careenage, the
    beauty of the countryside, the
    enchanting beaches and the im-
    pressive ceremonies surrounding
    the Acclamation of the Accession
    of Queen Elizabeth II. But above
    all the Dawsons have been thrill-
    ed by the hospitality, courtesy
    and friendliness of all sections of
    the community. Mr, and Mrs.
    Dawson look forward with keen
    anticipation to returni: to Bar-
    bados. They were at the Hotel
    Windsor.

    On Visit To Mother
    AYING a visit to her mother
    Mrs. Marion Clarke of Hil-
    laby, St. Thomas is Mrs. Sarah
    Roachford of the U.S.A. who trav-
    elled out to Trinidad on the Ar-
    gentine and then came over here
    by B.W.LA. on Saturday morn-
    ing.

    She was accompanied by her
    daughter Mrs. Eleanor Davis and
    her little grand daughter, Claudia,

    From The U.S.A.
    R. and MRS. W. H. Year-
    wood of “Hillington” the
    Ivy who went up to the U.S.A.
    On a visit, returned home on Fri-
    day by B.W.LA. via Puerto
    Rico,
    Alliance Francaise
    7? monthly meeting of Alli-
    ance Francaise will take place
    on Thursday, May 3, at the Brit-
    ish Council at 8.15 p.m. An in-
    teresting French film, ‘“Premiére
    de Cordée” will be shown,
    The meeting is going to start
    punctually.

    To Study Engineering
    RRIVING from Curacao via
    Trinidad by B.W.1LA, on Sat-

    urday morning was Mr. Handel
    Griffith, a Barbadian who pas
    been working with C.P.I.M. for
    the past four years. He has now
    come to spend a holiday with his
    parents at Rock Dundo, St. James
    prior to going on to the United
    Kingdom to study sanitary engin-

    eering.
    A Son Is Born
    ONGRATULATIONS to Mr.
    and Mrs, J. A. Millington of
    “Jamdor”, Maxwell, on the birth
    of a son and heir %n Sunday.
    This is their third child, the first
    two are girls.

    smile



    BY THE WAY ee « By Beachcomber

    T SAY! Suppose it was the too Why should anyone want to read name

    tall men who had only one
    hat, and the short men who had
    one each! That rather dishes us!
    It makes nonsense of what has
    gone before.

    Prodnose: Very little was re-
    quired fo do that if you ask me.
    Myself: Nobody need ever ask
    you anything. You're always but-
    ting in. I must think over this
    new aspec* of the matter,

    In passing

    A GRAVF. snokesman with a

    piercing mind has noted that

    increasing illiteracy seems to
    suggest that ‘there is something
    wren? with modern methods .of
    education. The question arises:

    WINDSOR





    or write when there are films
    and telephones and radio-boxes?
    Not long ago, when the films be-

    gan, it was natural for an am-
    bitious lad to want to read, as
    every film had captions. Today

    it is no longer necessary to be able
    to read, There is always some-
    one to tell you the title of a film,

    and who is in it, and there are

    an increasing number of picture-
    papers for home use when the
    radio has broken down, With my
    rife-rol-de-rido,

    Enter Miss Bafafaft
    Lobopokstricals
    MAN called Shakandro Po-

    by deed-poll, my dear

    Mrs. Thurston) to Bufler Kog-
    orinol seems to have worked
    things out fairly uselessly, I

    suggest that he should now take
    the nom de plume Rouzildigrot
    Mujenzimp or Shrash Mneph, I
    knew a girl called Inekfotopylop
    Skenzidruvy, who changed her
    name (by deed-poll, my dear Mrs.
    Thurston) to Huforaxicle Napar-
    arvinch, She married a Mr. Skop-
    chul Uffawyles and divorced him
    to marry a Mr. Chevstargil Go-
    polzuks. But she appeared in
    opera as Fafmam Boludigrentomu-
    shave. By the way, the stage
    manager’s name, my dear Mrs.
    Thurston, was Anjiduns Catan-

    ‘ poldigretz who changed his anchif.

    SHOES

    SS

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    White, Yan, Black, Cherry Red
    GIRLS’ SCHOOL SHOES—Black Lace Only

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    DIAL 4606



    BARBADOS

    THREE HEADS

    “There are three heads in every
    office,” says Sally Hines in her
    book “Good Manners In A Nut-
    shell”. “The one who is ahead,

    , i ri c
    the one who is trying to get ahead lat the Opera, 6.00 p.m. Ulster Maif.zine

    and the head who does routine
    work. Whichever head you are,
    head your work well.”

    (a) A genuine desire to work
    for the executive’s interest and
    not for one’s own,

    (b) Aclear perception of
    effice ethics and a willingness to

    change the literal truth when
    necessary.
    (c) Loyalty to the executive

    and to other office people.

    (d) Ability to follow instruc-
    tions of the executive.

    (e) Confidence in one’s ability
    to fulfil the requirements of a sec-
    retarial position, coupled with the
    earnestness to learn thoroughly
    any or all parts of the work.

    (f) An impersonal attitude ‘to-
    wards the executive and his busi-
    ness dealings.

    (g) Interest in discovering ways
    of pleasing the executive.

    (h) A complete understanding
    of one’s own responsibilities.

    (i) Courage to stand for one’s] ~

    own rights and self-respect.

    (j) Alertness in relieving the
    executive of undue. exertion or
    excess work.

    Which Type Are
    Yow ?
    Is It The Dramatic Type?

    The true Dramatic woman has
    a slim, model-like figure and
    usually has a seriousness of man-
    ner and the gift of making an
    entrance. To be noticed and
    admired is the goal of her entire
    effect. Grooming and neatness
    are more than essential.

    General Characteristics

    Aloof, serious, poised. Slow
    moving, indivualist.

    Bone structure: Medium to
    statuesque. Model figure, long
    legs.! Long, slender hands and
    feet.
    eyes.

    Hair:

    Sleek, smooth-tailored,

    severe chignon, coronation braid. | portant. They asked the four Winds

    Make-up: Accent on eyes and
    mouth. Dark skin tones rather
    than pastel,

    Colours: More black and white
    than colours; no patterned ma-
    terial, no rough or hairy surface.
    Contrast in colours. Jewel tones,

    Fabrics: Smooth, firm.




    406:

    Daily Service
    445 -p.m. Sandy

    p-m. Sports
    Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
    Home

    ADVOCATE

    B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

    7.15—10.38 p.m —

    7.15 p.m
    sonal Portrait,
    8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
    port From Britain, 8.45 p.m
    8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m.
    Books To Read, 9.15 p.m. Film
    9.30 p.m. Ray's A Laugh,
    News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
    Herbert Hodge Talking,
    Sclitary Wasp.

    25.53m., 31.32m.
    Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m.

    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952
    6 pm — 19.76m,, %5.53m.
    4@ p.m. The News, 410 pm. The
    4.15 p.m. New Records,
    MacPherson, 5.00 p.m
    ts of the Week, 5.15 p.m. pizhts

    Per-

    15 p.m. Meet The Commonwealin, 6.45
    Round-Up and Programme
    7.10 p.m.

    10.30 p.m. The

    News From Britain.



    Vivid colouring and fine!

    |

    Kiupert and the Toy Scout—-14



    Wh

    working for Santa Claus."’
    they stand and watch the tin
    stranger, who can still be seen

    the sky, Rupert tells Podgy how h
    and Willie irst saw the mysterio

    As the Scout flies away, Rupert
    and Willie run to join Podgy, who
    is sitting on the grass and looking

    very dazed, ‘* What on earth is
    that plane?" he gasps. “* It nearly

    tracks and followed them to d

    hit me.” "k's a sort of flying cover the hidden car. ** But | »
    motor-car,”” laughs Rupert. “And following those tracks, too,” crit
    in it there’s a Toy Scout who Podey

    Sun and Moon Had a Quarrel

    —Each Thought He Was More Important—
    By MAX TRELL j

    “ONE day,” said Ting-a-Ling to
    Knarf and Hanid, the shadow-chil-
    dren; “the sun and the moon had
    a quarrel.”

    “Oh, what did they quarrel
    about?” asked Hanid.

    “About which of them was the
    more important. I don’t know how
    it was that the quarrel started, but
    I think it was a very cloudy day and
    neither of them had anything else
    to do. At any rate the sun insisted
    that he was more important, and
    the moon said that she was more
    important.

    “Finally,” said Ting-a-Ling,
    “they both agreed to let the folks
    —all the folks—who lived on the
    earth and knew them both, to de-
    cide which of them was the more im-





    Sun and Moon were having a
    quarrel,

    to xo about the earth and ask every- | plenty of light; while the Moon can
    one they met—Which is more im- | be seen clearly at night when there
    portant, the Sun or the Moon, is scarcely any light at all.

    Four Winds Blew North Wind Spoke

    “So for four times four days the} “Then, last of all, the North
    fowr winds blew about, here and | Wind spoke. ‘O Sun and O Moon,

    Broad-/! there and everyhere, asking every | it said, ‘1 blew about the world ask-

    cloth, linen, shark+skin, shantung. | one they met to tell them what they | ing everyone | met, | asked the Lion

    Actor Suspended
    HOLLYWOOD,
    Argentine actor Fernando Lamas
    was suspended by Metro-Goldwyn
    Mayer because he declined to go

    through with his part in the picture | out.

    titled “Sombreo”’. Lamas just did
    not like his part.

    READERS’ RECIPES |

    Readers of the Advocate are
    invited to send in their own
    recipes for publication.

    Each housewife has her
    favourite recipe but has never
    thought of passing it on to her
    neighbour.

    If this is done the ex-
    changes will enable others to
    build up a good collection to
    the benefit of the family.

    Send in yours to-day
    to

    THE WOMEN’S EDITOR





    CROSSwORD



    Across
    1. I'm a tumult, (anag. 9) |
    ¥. World famous falls (7)
    ‘0. Out flow. (3)
    (2. Hi! this ts engaged. (3)
    3. You have no rignt to this. (v)
    (5. It’s a spinner. (4)
    8. Zoo gnus by night. (4)
    ¥. Such a ring would be tenient

    or mean? (3)
    'l. He has recently had unsoug'!
    limelight. (4)
    #2, From that millinery shop. (3)
    ‘3. Prom the dark ale cellar. (4)
    4, Challenge (4) 25, Notion, (4)
    '6. Post. (5)

    Down

    An odd clue. (6)
    Freedom. (7)
    Files back by night, (3)
    It’s mean to split hairs, (4)
    Set in order. (8)
    . His smali lake will stain (7)
    Utilise, (3)
    . Ared tome, not very good. (8)
    * Healing cover on the id. (3)
    - Most birds do to get 18. (6)
    . Thrust. (5)
    Resort to the sappers. (5)
    A take-off at tea, (3)
    Solutt gt yesterday's puzzie.—
    seross: 3, Holiday; Y, (bikidie:; 10
    sdapt; 21 Annoy; 12. Dare; 13, Elder;
    5, Rink; 16, Sieze; i9, Tentative: 21
    farm; 22 Idea, 23. Lmpel; 24. Ink
    vown: 1, Hyacinth; 2. Ornate: 35
    +, Idol;” 5, Daydream: 6, Adder; 7,
    spron; &, Steak; 14, Mitre; 16. Snap;

    Even: 18. Beak: 29 ‘Tin‘ted)

    EMPIRE

    TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 & Continuing
    Dally
    WALT DISNEY'S

    “ALICE IN WONDERLAND”

    APeH- stones

    s

    Color by Technicolor
    EXTRA .. . SPECIAL
    “NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
    An Academy Award Winner
    Also: LATEST NEWSREEL



    SAT. 3rd. 1.30 pm
    Rod Cameron, — Yvonne De Carlo
    — in

    THE LADY OBJECTS
    — and —
    DRUMS OF THE CONGO

    OLYMPIC

    Last 2 Shows Todhy 4.30 & 8 15



    Universal's Atomic Double —
    Alexis Smith — Scott Brady
    =o in «=

    “UNDERCOVER GIRL”
    and

    “UNDER THE GUN”
    Starting
    Richard Conte — Audrey Totter

    WED. & THUR. 430 &@ 815
    JOAN ga!
    in



    ‘LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN
    and (WOMAN”

    Bud Abbott Lou Costello

    in

    “HIT THE ICE"

    a ‘
    Thur. ist. Sat. rd 1 3 pm
    HALF WAY TO SHANGHAI

    - and —
    DEAD MAN EYES



    ly



    thought of the Sun and the Moon.| the Tiger and the Eagle. I asked
    And at the end of that time the four | the Hills, the Mountains, the Rivers
    Vinds came together on top of the | and the Brooks. But none of them
    highest mountain and told the Sun | could make up their minds which of
    and the Moon what they had found | you two is the more important. And
    then, just as 1 was coming here, 1
    “The East Wind spoke first. ‘Oh | met 4 little child who was playing
    Sup,’ it said, ‘1 spoke to all the trees |" his garden. And the child said
    in the forest and all the flowers in| /f there were no sun there would be
    the fields, All of them agreed that if ; 2° sunbeams. And if there were no
    not for you, none of them would be |” there would be no moonbeams,
    able to grow. They say you are the | And if there were no sunbo.:1s
    more important. | and no moonbeams 1 would be vury
    “Then,” said Ting-a-Ling, “the unhappy, So | hope they both |



    wy , /©\ shining forever and ever, for '

    West Wind spoke. ‘O Moon,’ it said, | think they ah both tha vudkt
    ‘tasked all the Cats and all the Mice | portant.’

    i d all the Owls and all the Frogs, | “And that,” said Ting-a-!



    ‘ THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME
    g

    6%



    a eee
    THURS (Only) 830 PM,

    1ey all agreed that you were more
    important than the Sun; for you
    shine for them when the

    “was what the four Winds tolu |
    Sun and the Moon. It didn’t decide
    Ae oiee y go about the quarrel, but it did convince the
    igi? . . | Sun and the Moon that it wa. foo!

    “Then the South Wind spoke. ‘1 | ish trying to find out which of the
    asked many wise old men,’ it said,|two was the more important. So
    ‘and the wisest among them said,|they became friends again and
    O Moon, that you were the more im- |spent all their time sending their
    portant. And the reason they gave | sunbeams and moonbeams down to
    was this. The Sun can only be /all their friends on Earth, and es-
    feen in the Gaytime when there is) pecially to the children.”

    * We'll soon have that better

    ~ oymore, ue

    ASEPTIC OINTMENT

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    touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-
    lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
    gives protection against the entry of
    harmful bacteria. You will find, too,
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    abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
    ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
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    The Garden—St. James
    TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.

    Legions Fall!
    Maidens Melt!
    As the Reckless
    SONS of the
    MUSKETEERS
    Ride Forth to
    DO or DIEY

    a
    HOT-BLOODED ADVENTURE

    Robert YOUNG &

    THE THING

    (From Another World)

    Oe

    “HONEYMOON LODGE”
    Francis LANGFORD &
    “RIVER LADY = (Colom)
    Rod CAMERON
    _ PCCP SSPE LOC

    *
    —

    ROXY

    TODAY Last 2 Shows 4.90 @ 8 15
    PARAMOUNT Double —

    Glefin Fora — Rhonda Flemings A] a 7 [ iT al 7
    “TRE REDHEAD ae M A R F F i 0’H Hud
    | Sows |

    a,
    WED. & THUR. 4.30 & 8.15
    BIG DOUBLE .,

    “TRAIL OF THE LONESOME
    d

    an ( PINE”
    Barbara Stanwyck, Wendel Corey
    in

    “PHELMA JORDAN”
    Thurs. ist. Sat 3rd, 1 36 p.m.

    Wild Bill ELLIOTT in—

    HELLFIRE &
    BANDIT KING OF TEXAS

    Last 2 ~“s Today *** *
    Yvonne De Carlo — Rud Cameron



    with ROBERT DOUGLAS » GLADYS ¢

    “THE LADY OBJECTS”

    OPENING THURS. 1ST.
    4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Also
    FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
    and Continuing Daily 4.45 &

    8.30 P.M.

    PLAZ.

    and
    “DRUMS OF THE CONGO”
    ey
    Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 & 8.15
    Whole Serial—

    CALL OF THE SAVAGE

    *
    with Noah BEERY Jnr. B*towmn

    8.00 p.m. Linger Awhile, | }))
    Re- | ))
    Interlude, |

    Review, |

    10.00 p.m. The
    10.15 p.m,

    Thrones Topple!













    AND CONTINUING

    PLATA

    HYGIENIC FRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

    Mom-Dad'

    WITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
    ____ SEGREGATED AUDIENCES _.

    WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
    MEN Only 8.30 p.m.

    a A lA i i i ati ln ee i te teen allie nail

    TUESDAY







    Now stow

    BUT
    TRUE

    BOLD

    Ga
    AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!

    DON’T 4188

    APRIL

    1952

    Sj
    SSS

    29,







    ING

    INDEFINITELY
    BARBAKEES
    (Diat 5170)




    5

    on!







    26,66 oo Oo
    LE SPE PSS F FOES FOSS PLFA ASSL A SI IAI IAA IF

    >

    yd

    .
    %
    %
    &

    o

    ~
    &

    PLAZA THEATRES

    BRIDGETOWN

    DRESSES

    Handbags, Shopping Baskets, Nylon Undies in black, white, %s

    LLLP

    Richard ARLEN

    “CHEYENNE COWBOY”
    Tex WILLIAMS &
    Tex BENEKE & Glenn

    =

    JANETTA DRESS SHOP



    NEXT TO ©INGERS

    SALE CONTINUING >

    for Clearance

    ALSO ON SALE,

    and peach, Nylon Stockings, Children’s Panties, Panty-Girdles,
    Brassieres, Bathing Suits and Gifts

    PRPS



    BARBAREES





    (DIAL 2310) ny Bae 5170
    ; -DAY & Cont'd
    Today & Tomorrow )
    430 & 8.30 pm. || WOMEN tec;
    DEAD 640M & DAD
    RECKONING Segregated Audience
    Humphrey Bogart & ae ~dbiniy t
    CORONER Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m
    CREEK RANGE LAND
    (Color r ee
    Randolph SCOTT ROLLIN’ ”
    Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.
    Trip e Attraction ! WESTWARD

    “RAIDERS of the

    DESERT” Tex RITTER

    “Rose of Santa Rosa’
    Hoosier Hot Shots &
    ORCHESTRA

    Charles STARRETT







    Again Greatly Reduced >

    ¥
    GEESE OOOOCO OCOD A AES

    SAT Special 1.30 pm

    ‘Ridin’ the Outlaw Trail’

    ppp opp oes

    %

    COS

    PPPS SOP STE OOS
    7 .
    SS



    OISTIN
    (DIAL 8404)

    LODAY & WED. 4.%) &
    8.20 p.m
    Whole S 1

    THE SPIDER'S
    WEB

    Warren HULL





    THURS (only)
    8.90 p m
    HER FIRST ROMANCE
    Margaret O'BRIEN &
    “DEAD RECKONING”
    Humphrev POGART
    —

    44 &





    Midnite SAT.
    Triple Attraction —
    “MEN of the TIMBER-

    LAND”
    Richard ARLEN &

    “SIX GUN MUSIC”
    & “LES BROWN &
    BAND”





    AN@G@THER

    “ay.

    MASTERPIECE ” fo,



    GLORIOUS OPENING
    THURSDAY. MAY 1ST, 8.30 P.M.

    PNG Ty Ts

    \ ,MOST FORBIDDEN OF THE
    IORLD’S GRFAY LOVE STORIES!



    BA |

    coidk ay FECHNICOLOR

    TO

    VW at TN



    aris Vat eee

    AT Ost:



    DIAL 2310’

    PIT 24c;

    SUNDAY :



    Repeat Midni

    HOUSE 48c; BALCONY

    T2e;

    BOX $1.00

    Reservations for Box Seats Only !
    BATHSHEBA continues with 3 Shows Daijy—1.30 p.m., 5 & 8.30 p.m.



    SPECIAL 5 P.M. MATINEE & 8.30 P.M.



    GLOBE |

    TO-DAY 5 & 8.45 p.m. TOMORROW 5 & 8.45 p.m.

    MOM AND DAD

    (Showing simultaneous!y PLAZA Barbarees)

    WOMEN — MATINEES MEN — NIGHT

    No Kids Under 12 Admitted

    —on—

    te Vaudeville

    Ask the 1,500 fans who saw this Show Saturday

    WED. APRIL 30TH MIDNITE

    Spearheaded by

    Sensational and Exotic Dancer

    CLEMENDORE

    The versatile Cobra Man

    LOLITA
    (Hot Stuff)
    (Several Other Super Duper

    KURABELLA
    (A Beauty)

    Complete change of Programme
    Pit 24, House 36, Balcony 48, Box 60
    Tickets on Sale WEDNESDAY NITE

    MONAH
    Artistes)





    TUESDAY, APRIL 29,

    1952

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Point Four

    Has Helped
    Caribbean

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 22.

    Tangible evidence of Point Four
    Technical Assistance to Caribbean
    territories was signalised today
    when Mr. Donald R. Hanson and
    Mr. Hector Garcia, housing ex-
    perts, reported for duty at Kent
    House, Caribbean Commission
    headquarters.

    The services of these experts
    have been made available to the
    territories served by the Com-
    mission for a two-year period
    under a project of the Technical
    Cooperation Administration, De-
    partment ‘of State, which admin-
    isters the Point Four Programme.

    They have been assigned to the
    Commission to assist local govern-
    ments in developing pilot projects,
    testing local building materials,
    developing on-the-job training
    progremmes, and demonstrating
    how people can build and finance
    houses for themselves.

    Several territorial governments
    have already requested their assis-
    tance, according to Mr. E. F. H.
    Vriendt, Secretary General. These
    requests are being studied with
    n view to early determination of
    a schedule of priorities, he ex-
    plained.

    Expect to Learn

    Asked for comment on their
    assignment, Mr. Hanson and Mr.
    Garcia authorised the following
    statement: “We by no means
    approach this job with the idea
    that we know it all. On the
    contrary. We are well aware of
    the developments in the low-cost
    housing field in various Caribbean
    territories, and expect to learn as
    well as instruct. On the technical
    level, as we see it, this is going
    to be a give and take proposition,”

    Mr. Hanson has had long ex-
    perience as a planner, first with
    the South-Side Planning Board
    in Chicago, and later with the
    Chicags Housing Authority. Prior
    to joining the staff of Point Four
    technicians, he served as Execu-
    tive Director of the Indianapolis

    Housing Authority. He has an
    A.B. Degree from Purdue Uni-
    versity in. Civil and Sanitary

    Engineering, and has taken post-
    graduate work at the University
    of Chicago.

    Mr. Garcia, a native of Puerto
    Rico, has specialised in develop-
    ing aided-self-help instructi©n
    techniques under Caribbean con-
    ditions. For eight years this has
    been his principal concern as a
    member of the staff of the Social
    Programmes Administration of
    the Department of Agriculture and
    Commerce in Puerto Rico. His
    work has been centred around the
    planning and organising of rural
    communities under Title V of the
    Land Law Act of Puerto Rico,
    and over-all Social and physical
    improvements. Mr. Garcia has a
    B.A. Degree in Education from the
    University of Puerto Rico and a
    Master’s in Rural Sociology from
    Carnegie University, Pittsburgh.

    Develop Housing

    Both men are recruted by the
    U.S. Housing and Home Finance
    Agency specifically fow assign-
    ment in the Caribbean Commis-
    sion for the work which they are
    now beginning.

    Their efforts will be directed
    specifically to developing plans,
    specifications and methods for

    building houses that are hurricane
    proof, termite-proof, and con-
    structed, in so far as possible,
    from low-cost materials, locally
    produced. They will set up
    demonstrations, furnish advice to
    local government and private con-
    tractors, encourage local manu-
    facture of building supplies from
    by-products and other cheap
    materials, and so on. }

    The project provides for making
    available a small amount of
    demonstration equipment, such as
    portable block-making machinery,
    cement mixers, hand and power
    tools, and the like, to be assigned
    to the Commission for loan to the
    local governments.

    The Caribbean Commission will
    fufnish office space, secretarial,
    and other services while the
    technicians are at the Central
    Secretariat in Trinidad. While
    they are assigned to the local
    governments, those governments
    will pay transportation within
    the territcry and will also pay the
    expenses of the trainees and
    provide such maps, testing facili-
    ties, and collaborating personnel
    as may be necessary.

    The project will be financed
    under the Point Four Programme
    at a total cost to the United States
    Government of about $68,000 for
    the two-year period of the pro-
    gramme, ;

    Approval of the project was
    first announced by the United
    States Co-Chairman, Mr. Ward M.
    Canaday, at the opening of the
    Commission's meeting in St. Croix
    last October.

    EEE LLL ELLE LL ILE LLLP LLLP APOPEA,
    g ms

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    Before you apply more make-up be sure to cleanse
    your skin thoroughly with the rich, penetrating

    LIMACOL -

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    It’s Deliciously Refreshing



    Antigua Newsletter

    Blackburne
    Opens Art
    Group Show

    (From Our Own Correspondent

    His Excellency, Mr, K, W. Black-
    burne opened the fifth annual Art
    Exhibition held by the Antigua
    Art Group at the Council Cham-
    bers on Wednesday 23rd last. The
    Governor was accompanied by Mrs,
    Blackburne and Capt. F. E. Hewitt,
    A.D.C.

    Exhibits by Antiguan artists are
    not a many this year as previously
    mainly because ithe three best
    known artists, Prince, Francis and
    Adams have been busily employed
    with special assignments. A-new
    member of the group, Mary E.
    Wilson of Scotland, wife of Mr.
    A. T. Wilson, Accountant of the
    Antigua Sugar Factory, has done
    some very pleasing work. Her
    poster—aq scene with a beach,
    Flamboyante in full bloom and
    pineapples_in the foreground is
    easily the best of five posters done
    by various members. These posters
    will be taken to the Caribbean
    Festival which is being held in
    Puerto Rico this year. A bowl of
    mixed flowers also by Mrs. Wilson
    was much admired.

    St. Kitts has sent some new and
    interesting work by Harris and
    Franklin Brown. Nevis is well
    represented by a number of oil
    paintings by Mrs. Wilkin.

    Barbados has sent the largest
    number of exhibits and the pic-
    tures by six new artists are much
    appreciated. Of all the exhibits in
    the exhibition “Card Players” by
    Golde White ‘has commanded
    greatest attention.

    Mr. George T. Warren, Chief
    Chemist of the Antigua Sugar Fac-
    tory has been appointed Chief
    Chemist of the St. Kitts Sugar
    Factory. Mr. Warren has worked
    here for the past ten years.

    Assistant Superintendent of
    Police, V. A. Bunting, has been
    appointed, on transfer, an Assist-
    ant Superintendent of Police in
    the Jamaica Constabulary, Asst.
    Supt. Bunting was born in Jamai~-
    ea, He served eight years in the
    Royal Air Force and came here in
    1949.

    It was announced that Lord
    Munster would visit Antigua on
    4th May but the date of departure
    of the vessel by which he is to
    travel from New York to South-
    ampton has been advanced. Lord
    Munster has notified His Excel-
    lency that, in the circumstances he
    has reluctantly come to the con-
    clusion that his proposed visit to
    the Colony must be cancelled, He
    has expressed his regret that he
    will be unable to visit Antigua
    and hopes to be able to do so on
    another occasion.

    Acrobats’ Stunts
    Thrill Crowds

    The Boodhoo Brothers, acrobats
    of West Indian fame, were loudly
    applauded for their performance
    at the Globe Theatre on Saturday
    night by a capacity crowd. The
    Brothers, Brae gad Buddy, high-
    lighted the S| ‘

    "one and Buddy Boodhoo told
    the Advocate yesterday that they
    have now decided to stage their
    own acrobatic, stunt riding and
    wire walking shows—the first of
    which will be at the Children’s
    Goodwill League Building on
    aturday night.

    ef said that they
    are hoping to give every Barb. -
    dian a chance to see their fea‘:.
    Already they have made an e*-
    tensive tour of the schools in the
    island. " ; }

    He said that he is also hoping
    after he has approached the cor-
    rect authorities, to stretch his wire
    across the Fountain Garden in
    Trafalgar and perform his high
    wire walking stunt. ;

    The boys are also hoping to be
    able to give performances at the
    Plaza Theatres, the Marine Hotel,
    Club Morgan and other well
    known places.





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    ELL_AT BREAKFAST

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    TRE STAIRS

    URDER TRIAL

    @ From Page 1.



    seen Elma Howell that night. It
    cribed the clothes he was wearing. was true that she used to sleep
    The defence was alleging, Me. at Veta and in the same bed as
    Mr. Reece said, that Brewster lived Veta and he. She, (Elma), must
    with 19-year-old Veta Small in have gone into the bed after he
    Deane’s Village. Brewster left her had been asleep for he only
    home on the evening of September noticed her on the following
    7 and when he returned later he morning.
    called for some water and started He did not ask Elma to do
    washing certg® of his garments. anything for him for he had not
    From the bed where she was ly-« seen her.
    ing, She saw that the colour of the He had done no washing when
    water in which he was washing he reached home that night.
    the garments was red. Inspector Bourne said that
    He told her that he had just Brewster was wearing a black
    put out a girl who had been in pants when he interviewed him.
    Perry Gap with a man. She asked Cross-examined he said that at
    him how he could do such a thing yo ‘stage during his questioning
    and he told her that she had better of Brewster did he suspect him of
    keep her mouth shut—it would having committed the murder.
    be better for her. He never tried to force any
    Strong Evidence admissions from Brewster. He did
    “That, if you accept it,” he said, not consider force to be in the
    “is strong evidence given by the questioning as to Brewster's ad-
    woman with whom he was living mitting having a rubber-handled
    for years.” knife which his mother had told
    oor Exe bad preted the him not to carry around. -l
    mortem and attributed death i A Shov
    to haemorrhage and shock follow- water tes him when he
    ing injuries which could have been had a shovel he had previously
    inflicted with a knife. heard that Benskin had said that
    Mr, Reece added that Elma the man who had attacked was
    Howell who used to live at Veta carrying one.

    would in part corroborate Veta’s Hi

    e had asked Brewster how he
    evdence as to what happened when .o.)1¢ say he did not see Howell
    Brewster returned home on the that night, yet had slept in the

    night of the murder. - : ‘ he adi
    Inspector Git wood Springer, the ee me ae al gpeaenrbdon

    ee
    went to the Garden Land, St. Mic- : i ;

    H Re-examined he reiterated that
    hael on the night of the murde: when Brewster had told him not

    and saw the body lying, Y in to ask him any more questions,

    the gutter and partly.in the Road i
    he had immediately stopped.
    of Perry Gap. It had several stab Sgt. Louis Marshall said that

    wounds about it and after some
    about 9.55 p.m. on September 7,
    time was removed to the Public he and other policemen went to

    Mortuary. the Garden Land where he saw

    The following day he returned i
    the body of Haswell lying on the
    to the scene and took measure- ground with a | oF Stoea

    ments. From a large pool of blood *
    near which the body was lying on os Bhs techn, sacceel teee weak
    the night, to the nearest house was 4, some Khus-khus grass f
    ove Sat a neha ie pesety Later that night he saw Leonard
    grass © elurnps of Khus KNUS Benskin who had a wound on his
    ; face and blood on his clothes.
    Accused Found Benskin gave them a statement
    On September 20, he went to the and was taken fo the Hospital.
    home of Veta Small at Deane’s On September 21, Veta Small
    Vilage whvre he found the accused handed him a knife and a pair of
    and invited him along with Small pants.
    to Centraal Police Station. On Cross-examined, he corroborated .
    the following day, Sgt. Marshall Inspector Springer’s evidence as
    and he went to Veta Small’s home to how Haswell was dressed. Ho
    and Small gave Marshall a knfe gaid the cut Benskin had was on
    and a pair of brown soft boots. the left side of his head near his
    Brewster was arrested and forehead.
    charged for murder on November Dr. James Walcott said that he
    5. Brewster said then that he had received from Sgt. Marshall,
    kney nothing of the murder. a knife, shirt, felt hat and a pair

    ss-examined, Inspector of pants. The blade of the knife
    Springer said that Haswell’s skirt musgested blood. Stains on the

    was black and he bodice white. clothes esti bl
    He did not know whether she but nate wate eet we

    wore other clothes. There was a Sea
    spot of blood about 30 feet away PC, Home Soonenee that

    from the house
    h : on September 20, he and other
    Inspector Cecil Bourne said that policemen went to the home of

    cn September 20 he saw Brewster Carlton Brewster’s mother with a

    at the C.I.D. and told him they
    were making investigations into ae eee, | Saey Arie 8

    the murder of Haswell and that yy pants eens” qn some rocks
    he wanted some information f Samuel Worrell of the Garden

    him. ; “(Land gaid that Haswell used to
    Srewster said, “Man you can ‘jive at his home. Haswell’s mother
    ask me anything,” and he pro+ was not in Barbados and she lived

    ceeded to ask him questions. there as she was a relative of his
    After answering some questions wife. She was a friend of Ben-
    Brewster told him he was not skin

    inclined to answer any more.

    It was he wh
    Brewster could not write, but Truth cee, Aantined the

    body to the doctor.

    signed the statement with an Herman Scott, a carpen’ f
    “X." Cpl. Yearwood witnessed ? a

    King Edward Road, Bank Hall,
    seid that on September 8, at about
    6.45 a.m. he passed by the Mor-
    tuary on his way to work. He
    was standing at the Mortuary
    gate when he saw Carlton Brews-

    the signing.

    In this statement Brewster said
    that on September 7 he had been
    to Martindale’s Road at his
    mother. He had left Veta’s house
    where he lived at about 6.30 p.m.
    and reached there at about 7 p.m.

    His mother was home, he said,
    and he ate and eventually left at
    8.30 o’clock for home.

    He denied his mother having
    advised him not to carry about a
    certain knife he had when walk-

    ing.
    Some Clothes

    He was wearing the sama
    clothes he had on while being
    questioned, a black pants and he
    was bare footed, though he did
    have a pair of soft boots which
    he used to wear about.

    Until then, he had only heard
    of Perry Gap, but did not know
    it. He was net on Roebuck Street
    that night. He did not know what
    time he reached Veta’s house, but
    went to sleep on reaching home
    without saying anything to Veta,

    He said, too, that he had not

    to h
    @ On Page 5.

    |
    |
    STUDENTS COMPLAIN |



    @ From Page 1..

    With Miss Stuart, Lady Hug-
    gins is to enquire into conditions
    of training of student narses and
    will have discussions on the ad-
    visability of including either more
    midwifery or more public health
    training in their syllabuses. They
    will also review opportunities for
    nurses who have graduated.

    After the students had departed
    Conservative M.P’s expressed
    their admiration of the way in
    which various questions had been
    brought to their notice and com-
    mented on the high quality of
    student personnel.

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    ter petting and Brewster spoke '
    m.



    SHUSR GEONGE vO
    BE QuieT

    JUST HAD +O

    LOTT wna oe,

    Leetures On
    Puerto Rico
    In June—July

    _ The University of Puerto Rico
    IS co-operating with the Inter-
    American Institute of Agricul-
    tural Sciences in various educ

    tional fields for mutual benefit.

    The University has now entered
    into an arrangement with the
    University of Delaware to sponsor
    an inter-university course = in
    Puerto Rican studies from June
    22 to July 29. The course will
    cut across the customary compart-
    mentalisations of knowledge and
    will deal with Puerto Rico from
    the regional point of view, as a
    living and growing social organ-
    ism.

    Some of the aims of the course
    are: to foster understanding of
    ome important part of the United
    States; to clarify the importance
    of human beings and their prob-
    lems as the basic materials of all
    social sciences, and the need for
    conducting social studies in term:
    of the dynamics of change.

    The course will be conducted
    through a combination of lectures
    at the University of Puerto Rico
    by instructors from both Univer-
    sities, in such fields as history,
    economics, geography, political
    sciénce, and so on; visits to
    Puerto Rican government offices
    and discussions by government
    officials. of their departments
    work and problems; field trips to
    various parts of the island; and
    class discussions in small semina:
    groups,

    This news is taken from the
    official brochure of the study
    project.

    SEA AND AIR
    TRAFFIC

    In Carlisle Bay

    Seh. At Last, Sch. Burma D., Seh
    Philip_H. Davidson, Sch. Mary M. Lewls
    Sch. Island Star, Sch. Lydia Adina $
    Sch. Cloudia §., Sch. Molly N. Jone:
    Sch. Franklyn DB. R., Sch, Enterprise §

    ARRIVALS

    M.V, Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
    Cook, from Trinidad.

    Schooner Everdene, 68 tons net, Capt
    Philips, from British Guiana

    Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tony
    net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana

    Schooner Laudalpha, 60 tons net, Capt
    Gumbs, from St. Lueta

    S.S. Lady Nelson, 4,665 tons net, Capt
    Wallace, from St. Lucia,

    DEPARTURES
    Schooner My Own, 21 tons net, Capt
    McKree, for St.
    Schooner Esso Aruba,
    Capt. Marks, for Grenada
    0.7. Rodas, 1,855 tons net,
    Van der Wast, for Martinique
    -V. Caribbee, 100 tons
    Gambs, for Dominica
    8.8. Lady Nelson, 4,655 tons net, Capt
    Wallace,
    Passengers arriving at Barbados by
    he 8.8, “Lady Nelson” yesterday were:
    From Boston:— H. Campion and wife
    1, Gouke, A. H. Greene. G, L
    From Bermudas— ©
    wife, E, St. C, Morrison
    From Antieua J. W. Bradshaw
    From Montse — J. E. Darey
    From Domin D
    Jeffrey atid wife,

    34 tons net

    Capt

    net, Capt







    Mant

    Phillip, A Dumas,” S Michael, FR
    Richards
    From St. Kilts H. DePoel.



    NO OILING—NO
    EVER NEEDED
    SEALED

    Vincent. |
    !

    for St. Vincent, |

    Johnson |
    WwW. Wills and |

    Green, J.'
    Jeffrey, C. G.|

    GUARANTEE

    “THE GRAZY
    DUTCHMAN”

    @ From Page |

    five of his travel books published
    Asked what was tne idea -
    hind his travels, he saia uy
    ambition is to joim the Dutcu
    Digjomatic Service on my rs
    turn to Holland mext year
    added that travel was the

    wud

    Dene

    teacher in the world to-dag, par- |

    ticularly for those who wanted i
    enter the diplomatic service, A
    can be done cheaply.
    cost me for my five
    about $1,200.

    He said that he had the ex-
    perience of a hike around Brit-
    ain in 1946 and on this ven-
    tire, he made a thorough tour
    of Europe, keeping clear of the
    “Iron Curtain”. Previous ex-
    perience in the underground
    movement in Holland during
    war years fired his spirit and
    sent him further afield. He
    went on North Africa. He had
    cressed Italy to Sicily and thes
    a thrilling tour which lead him
    to join a caravan to cross the
    Sahara and to continue hitch-
    hiking on a camel for several
    months,

    Among his adventures was
    paddling his own canoe down the
    Congo River, and being taken
    AS a spy suspect for a few months.
    le also made an escape from at
    African Princess of the Neam-
    Neam tribe who wanted to have
    him as her consort,

    His most thrilling experience
    so far was when he was captured
    along with qa Frenchman by can-
    nibals while travelling throug!
    French Central Africa and was
    almost made a meal for the tribe
    He was kept prisoner for tw«
    days in a hole in the ground ana
    only escaped when two old ele-
    phants broke into the tribe’s vil-
    lage on a maurauding excursior
    and the cannibals fled, His com-
    panion and he escaped by follow-
    ing the elephants.

    He eventually reached Rho-
    desia and worked his way dow?
    t. the Cape and on to British
    Guiana, While in South America
    he crossed and re-crossed the con-
    tinent, during which time he
    drove cattle over the Andes and
    was forced at one time to join in
    the weird mourning ceremeny
    with savage Indians over a dead

    From British Guiana, he went
    man.
    to Trinidad and then visited most
    ef the other islands in the Carib-
    bean before coming on here
    From Barbados he hopes to visit
    Central America and the United
    States before returning to Hol-
    land.

    RATES OF EXCHANGH

    28TH APRIL, 19pz
    CANADA
    Cheques on Bankers 73 4/10%

    years 1s

    m20

    Demand Drafts 13.25 %
    Siaht Drafts 73 :1/10%
    752/10 Cable
    {43 7/10% Currency 71 :9/10%
    | Coupons T1 2/10",
    % Silver 207,





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    PAGE FOUR



    BARBADOS tay

    Sr {ose
    April 29,



    Tuesday, 1952

    _———<—<$<—<$=——

    ISOLATIONISM

    THE condition of the world to-day, de-
    spite what the Hon. T. A. Marryshow is
    reported to have told students attending
    the Trade Union Course at the Y.M.C.A..
    gives little ground for easy optimism that
    “the mind of man is marching on and each
    age ... was on evolutionary grounds better
    than the last.”



    There is a whole generation in China to-
    day unaccustomed to what peace means.
    Slavery and forced labour is to-day widely
    practised in the Soviet Union. The Inter-
    national Labour Office estimates that five
    million people are unemployed in Europe.
    The greatest writers in all the civilized coun-
    tries continue to produce literature depict-
    ing a world in which suicide and diseases of
    the mind are on the increase. Even the
    cinema and the theatre mirror a world in
    which all is not best. The United Kingdom,
    centre of the greatest Empire and Common-
    wealth the world has ever known stands
    poised to-day on the brink of an abyss
    which, if it cannot be avoided, will lead to
    financial and economic ruin, The rearma-
    ment race has never been swifter and the
    countries of the North Atlantic Treaty
    organisation are bending every effort to
    increase their defences against the mighty
    military machine of imperialistic Russia.
    Race tensions and suspicions are the rule
    not the exception in Africa: in Asia nation-
    alism is proving inadequate to cope with
    opposing nationalism and organised bandits
    and thugs.

    In Western Europe the French fear Ger-
    man resurgence while all Western Euro-
    peans living on the Continent resent Brit-
    ain’s aloofness to join a Federal Europe.

    War still wages in Korea, Indo-China and
    Malaya. The Arab world is uneasy. In near-
    by Latin America coups and counter coups
    occur with bewildering frequency. Every-
    thing, as a Greek philosopher once said, is
    in a state of flux.

    But the conditions of normal everyday
    life in the twentieth century, unparalleled
    as they are in the known history of man,
    are ghastlier still because of man’s inven-
    tions. The development of atomic energy
    and the aeroplane to mention only two of
    the most spectacular inventions of modern

    times has made the destruction of the whole.

    world possible in our lifetime. And with all
    his scientific knowledge and skill man is
    powerless against hurricanes, earthquakes,
    floods and other natural disasters which
    continue to claim human. lives.

    Here in the British West Indies it is true
    that a relatively small number of the
    world’s population have been enjoying a

    \ state of life which has been moving pro-
    gressively upwards ever since 1941 when
    action began to be taken on the Report of
    the Royal Commission which visited the
    West Indies in 1938—39.

    The war which devastated thousands of
    European cities and converted the peace-
    ful life of millions of men and women into
    a struggle for existence among falling
    bombs and rubble stones was beneficial to
    the West Indies, putting a premium on its
    agricultural produce on which the prosper-
    ity of these islands have always depended.

    It would be a pity if all that’ progress
    were to be endangered because of’ insula-
    tion from the realities of the world in which
    we live.

    It is always possible that good days of
    the world are ahead. There have been good
    days in many periods of human history in
    the past, but it would be absurd and dan-
    gerous for the British West Indies to sup-
    pose even for a moment that their present
    prosperity can be separated from the pro-
    tection and assistance which is their right
    as overseas possessions of the United King-
    dom. Real national independence and
    real national sovereignty depend on the
    ability of a nation to defend itself and it is
    a remarkable fact that not one man or
    woman born in thé West Indies has ever
    said that the West Indies singly or collec-
    tively could defend themselves against a
    twentieth century aggressor One has
    only to pose the question to appreciate the
    impossibility of its ever being answered.

    But the people of Barbados ought to be
    grateful to the Hon. Mr. Marryshow for em-
    phasising certain basic facts which have
    been given little attention by the majority
    of West Indians until very recenf years.
    The need for capital: a serious attitude to
    work: the sharing of work: self-reliance
    among workers: the development of char-
    acter and business acumen are objectives
    that were insufficiently stressed by many
    Labour supporters in the West Indies in
    the early days of Trade Union growth.

    It is a welcome sign of change in the
    West Indies when politicians turn the spot-
    light on deficiencies of West Indians rather
    than blaming those deficiencies on alleged
    exploitation by metropolitan countries.

    ———_—_

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    anoatt |i say Morrison will Wim LONDON REPOR

    “On Points |

    GENTLEMEN, on my right, Mr.
    Herbert Morrison, of South
    Lewisham, and on my left, Mr.
    Aneurin Bevan, from Ebbw Vale.

    These two men are the principal
    contenders for the future Jeader-
    ship of the Labour Party. °

    I don’t believe that there is any
    immediate prospect of a change
    in the. Soeialist leadership. Mr.
    Attlee’s position is impregnable,
    and will retain so until he chooses
    to retire.

    ven the friction within the
    party has failed to weaken his
    prestige, or to impair his author-
    ity.
    I have known every one of his
    time of



























    any of them has been held in
    higher esteem. I hope he will
    long continue to be the leader.

    But when he does retire, what
    then?

    In the queue

    IN ADDITION to Morrison and
    Bevan I have heard several cther
    names mentioned as possible suc-
    cessors, among them Hugh Dalton,
    Chuter Ede, and Jim Griffiths.

    Among the younger men are
    Hugn Gaitskell, Alf Robens, and
    Jim Callaghan—all first-rate.

    ' Even Mr, Crossman, who is Mr
    Bevan’s right-hand man, can be
    put-‘among the hopefuls.

    Pitt was Prime Minister . before
    he hag»reached the age of 25, but
    the Labour Party is mutch too
    cautious for such experiments,

    Let not a wrong word be said
    of anyone who aspires to be the
    leader of his party. After all,
    ambitior“is not a crime, It is
    only objectionable when it fails
    to measure up to the right qualifi-
    cations.

    But this is the kind of contest
    where the field is of necessity
    limited. Only Morrison and Bevan
    appear to be in training for the
    final bout.

    As the deputy leader of the
    Parliamentary Labour Party, Mor-
    rison is in a_ specially strong
    posifion. He has occupied the
    post for many years, and was not
    even challenged at the last elec-
    tion for the office.

    On the other hand, . Bevan's
    popularity with the rank and file
    is-exceptional, and has, never been
    Surpassed—-perhaps only dnce. has
    itbeen equalled and that, strange-
    ly enough, was by Oswald Mosley

    T shall never forget the occa-
    sion when Mosley was cheered to
    the eeho at a Labour Party con-
    ference at Llandudno,

    everybody expected that,
    because of his popularity, he

    a maples

    SP.CA: Tag Day

    To Tre Editor, The Advocate—
    SIR,—The S.P.C.A. Tag day
    Organiséd by Mrs. R..W. E. Tucker
    was a great success, thanks to the
    ene of the collectors and the
    ‘)sen@rosity of the public.
    Would you good enough to
    peblish the following results ?
    Yours faithfully,
    CECILE WALCOTT,
    Hon. Secretary/Treasurer,
    Appeals & Publicity
    Sub-committee



    Barbados S.P.C.A..
    $e

    Mrs. B. King and helpers
    (Upper Broad St.) er, ft 190.81

    Mrs. A, O, Skinner and helpers
    (Lr, Broad St.J .... pes oes 8 123.39
    Shetland Ponies ...,...6.645 54 38
    Mrs. E. A. Way (Public Bidgs) 50.59

    Mrs. W. A. Grant. ‘and ‘helpers
    (Worthing & Hastings) ...... 203.52
    Mrs, L, Bowen (Garrison) 49.23
    Mrs. BR. Gill (St. Lawrence) . 40.55
    Mrs. A. Gill & helpers (Ch. Ch.) 68.72

    Mrs. Las Gale (Culloden & Dal-
    keith Rds) ..4...... des eat OO

    Mrs, C, Noot & Miss Hazlewood
    (Cathedral District) ......... 108.20

    Mrs. D, Seott (Two Mile Hill) ; 8.

    Mrs. FY Me Dowell (Aquatic
    Club} ‘

    Miss PAtkering (Fontabelle) 19.56

    Mrs. T. Gittens (Britton’s Hill) 16.54
    Nurses’ Assen, (Bay St.) . 19.19
    Mrs. G. King (Pine Hill) ...... 46.87

    Mrs. G. Clarke (Strath¢lyde) .> 18.53
    Miss K. Hollinsed (Bel'eville) ph

    Mrs. M. Greaves (St. John) ..

    Mrs. B. Skeete & Mrs. L

    Hutson (St. Philip) . 75.18
    Mrs. L. Sealey & Mr, A, G

    Jordan (St. Geruge) ....... 24,52
    Mrs. J. Mahon (St. Thomas) 24.00
    Mrs. R. Parris (St. Peter) 22,36
    Mrs. E. A. Way (St, Joseph) . 45.92
    Mrs. N. Scott (St. James Coast) | 9.76
    Mrs. Massiah (St. James) .... 16.70
    Mrs E. Clark Hoiman (St, :

    Luey) .. Myo’ oT oa BOT
    Mrs. H. Townsend (Marine

    Hotel) ...4..+ esteeeceas te: Cae
    Miss A. Skinner (Windsor Hotel) 8.00

    Mrs. Gausden (Ocean View
    Hotel) vas kqebset 21.58
    Donations 2.35
    Gross Total ............ $1,641,02

    Expenses (Advertising, Print«
    Aft © CCC) aa ewe eee v cece 55.68
    Net proceeds $1,585.44

    Tribute

    To' The-Editot, The Advocate—
    SIR,—As an old admirer of the
    Roli¢e Band, | should-ike publicly
    to add my werd jof congratulation
    to those already given to Sergeant
    Archer on hi§ motion to the
    rank of Station rgeant, I feel,
    however, that such a promotion
    does net go far enough towards
    recognition of this talented bands-
    man Whose work as a composer
    and arranger has enriched the
    musical life of our island. Would
    not the rank of Inspector be a
    more fitting tribute to his merit
    and long service, as well as being
    more:in keeping with his position
    as Deputy Conductor of the Band?
    He has the ability, the service
    and the experience. What is there

    in the way of this just reward,
    Another bandsman of whom I
    should like to make mention is
    Corporal Best whose versatility is
    well-known. He ‘has delighted us
    as a Mylophone artist, and the
    kiddies ag Santa Claus at the
    Annual party for children of mem-
    bers of the Force, I have seen him
    behind the bass drum at Garrison
    Parades, and heard him perform
    on the bells and the bassoon, I
    have also seen him conducting
    the Police Band and training the
    cadets or members of the

    Volunteer Band, a
    I mention his name and fis
    accomplishments chiefly because I
    jhad missed his corpulert figure
    \from recent appearances of the
    Band, and upon making enquiry
    I was shocked to learn that he ‘hhad
    |been transferred to the Road by
    \the Commissioner. Now, Sir, as
    lyou. know, a bandsman cannot be
    ltrained overnight, especially one
    |with Corporal Best's accomplish-
    | ments and it does seem to-me that

    ur Readers Say:

    By EMANUEL SHINWELL, M.P.

    would replace Ramsay MacDon-
    and so he might have done, if
    he had not become entangled in
    the web of a_ political doctrine
    auen to Labour's principles,

    What will Labour do at the next
    time of asking? Bevan has all
    the essential parliamentary quali-
    ties. He is a fascinating debater,
    carries a hefty punch, has lots of
    audacity, and knows all the parlia-
    mentary ropes. He may not be
    everybody's cup of tea, but iin the
    politcal arena he is “all there”
    and a deal more.

    Some people say he is not a
    first-class adminictrator, but if
    dou't believe this is true. No,
    here is a man whose talents should
    not be underrated.

    But he also suffers from a grave
    disability, which may easily lose
    him the final battle. The trade
    union leaders are not too happy
    about him. :

    He has sometimes indulged in
    personal and caustic comments
    about them, and the bruised vic-
    tims he has rubbed the wrong way
    will not forget too readily.





    His error

    BEVAN MAY look upon them
    as a pretty dull lot—hardly meas-
    uring up to his standard. A fatal
    error,

    There afe many able men
    among them who are not wanting
    in courage. as indeed they have
    shown during, and since, the war,
    in the interests of the whole
    nation. Perhaps they won't suc-
    cumb too easily to brilliant feats
    of parliamentary oratory, They
    also have a healthy suspicion of
    anybody who rocks the boat.

    It is true that the trades unions
    have no say in the actual election
    of the leader, but nobody could be
    appointed who was in ill-fayour
    with them.

    Bevan will, therefore, find it
    tough to convince them that in
    addition to having a punch he
    also knows the rules. :

    So, I fancy the chances of Her-
    bert Morrison to gain a victory on
    points.

    If the election were to take
    place just now Morrison would
    win by an overwhelming majority.

    Morrison, like Bevan, has con-
    siderable parliamentary qualities
    He is a sound administrator, has
    an unequalled experience of public
    service, and his integrity is be-
    yond reproach,

    His value

    SOME people seem to dislike
    his somewhat pontifical manner.
    He always appears to be saying:
    “Brother, here I am trying to do
    my. best for you and the world at
    large, and if you don’t appreciate

    the Commissioner's action is
    bound to weaken the Band as well
    as rob Our popular Bandmaster of
    valuable assistance. There are
    many of us who feel that this is
    a matter that deserves some look-
    ing into.

    Finally, although Captain
    Raison’s work and worth are so
    well-known to all of us now as
    to be in need of no additional
    word of commendation from me,
    yet I do want to say how much
    I praise and admire his policy of
    delegating responsibility to his
    N.C.O.’s, It is sound judgment un-
    clouded by selfish considerations.
    Small officials (and there are sev-
    eral in our midst) try to build up a
    legend of indispensability, and
    their every word or gesture is
    publicised, They are also propor-
    tionately jealous of the popularity
    of other officials, Should Captain
    Raison be called upon to give any
    other territory the benefit of his
    fine qualities as musician and

    8 teacher (though we hope we shall

    have him for a long time yet) he
    will have the deep satisfaction of
    knowing that the ‘Raison touch’
    will still live on under the capable
    guidance of the men whom he has
    trained for leadership. And this
    in spite of any obstacle that may
    be put in his way. We could do
    with a few more like him,
    With thanks for space.
    Yours faithfully,
    MUSIC LOVER.

    Scouts’ Bob-a-Job Week

    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—Further to your editorial
    which was somewhat’ critical in
    tone, may I say that my own ex-
    perience with the Scouts was
    particularly happy.

    I asked for two scouts to do
    $5.00 worth of hard work in my
    garden. Two big boys, including
    one of those wl . went to Jamaica,
    came with the local-organiser at
    6.45 a.m. on Thursday and said
    they would work two five-hour
    mornings. They worked so well
    that I-said they could continue if
    they wished, They therefore
    came at 6.15 a.m. this time cn
    Saturday and did a hard ten
    hour day, They did the same on
    Monday and Tuesday, and on
    Wednesaay they worked two
    hours to do me a good turn. They
    earned a substantial sum and my
    lasting goodwill and personal
    interest.

    { should like through your
    columns t) acknowledge their
    willingness and. courtesy, their

    determination to .make a good
    job of whatever they undertook
    and. to leave’ nothing undone
    which needed to be done. They
    showed the true spirit of Scouting.
    This is the first time the Barba-
    dcs Scouts have undertaken a
    ‘Bob-a-job’ week and no doubt
    the officers of the movement have
    learned much from the experience
    and will address themselves to
    p ints such as these raised in your
    columns. So far as I am con-
    cerned, however, they have made
    a flying start and I have heard
    many other tributes to the good-
    will and speed with which they
    worked. The few exceptions have

    probably had a healthy lesson.

    Yours truly,
    Miss D. IBBERSON.
    Best Sugar ?

    To The Editor, The Advocate—
    SIR,—You have recently pub-
    lished a leading article and the
    debates in the House and Council
    on the subsidisation of sugar.
    Is it not a fact that Muscavado
    Sugar is the most _nutricious
    sugar produced in the Island, and
    are not brown sugars much bet-
    ter in this respect than the whites

    the fact, it is your fault and nct|

    mine.”

    eT

    (By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS)

    LONDON,
    Anthony Eden basks in the glory of a

    His short period of office as For-| bright reputation. At the moment his stand-

    eign Secretary was unmarked by
    substantial achievement, and some
    recent appearances have disap-
    pointed back-benchers.

    In fairress, however, it should |

    be recalled that he followed
    Ernest Bevin, who until he be-
    came i filled the post with re-
    markable brilliance.

    Perhaps foreign affairs may not
    suit Morrison’s training and tem-
    perament, His principal pre-
    occupation has been with domestic
    affairs, where his abundance of
    common sense is a great asset.

    Like other politicians he loves
    popularily, but will never seek it
    by yielding to clamour, whether
    from party members or the general
    public; he will always do what
    he believes to be right.

    Forcing move

    NEITHER the Nationa] Execu-
    tive of the Labour Party nor the
    annual conference can _ in‘erfere
    ‘vith the exelusive privilege of
    Labour M.P.s to elect a leader.

    If, however, at the annual con-
    ference there is open hostility
    against th
    would be uncer‘ain.

    Labour M.P.s could hardly ig-
    nore the existence of a strong
    minority opinion

    leadership, the result}

    in the confer-|

    |ing with the publie could hardly be higher
    jand some of the political pundits have even
    dared to say that the Conservatives would
    | have won a bigger majority with him instead
    of Winston Churchill as leader. Recently he
    made speeches to the House of Commons and
    to the foreign correspondents in London that
    have lifted or maintained the high opinion
    | everybody has of his grasp of every foreign
    question. There is not a doubt that plenty of
    people who are Labour supporters on domes-
    tie questions prefer Anthony Eden’s Tory
    handling of foreign affairs to Herbert Mor-
    rison’s slip-shod Socialist mishandling.

    But intelligent people here in Britain who
    | take an interest in the way the world wags
    |are doing some hard criticising of the ex-

    wwaordinary muddle into which British for-
    |eign policy seems to be heading under the
    | guidance of the officials of the Foreign Office
    —despite the energetic and sincerc efforts of
    Anthony Eden.

    |



    | thon e i i i
    Sass. snc Uecthn tive cometituencs’| An y Eden again hit the headlines ali

    organisations, .

    This might force them into sub-
    mission, and their attitude on the
    future ieadership would be cor-
    respondingly affected. Such a
    situation is not impossible.

    What is more, I shall take a
    lot of convincing that a move of
    this sart is not in contemplation.

    Union power

    THE STAKES are high; in the
    event of Labour's return to power,
    whoever is appointed the leader
    would almost certainly become
    the Prime Minister. i

    The Bevanites are men of con-
    siderable intelligence and organ-
    ising ability, They will press
    Bevan’s claims—hard.

    The Labour Party has been
    engulfed in a_wave of emotion
    before now. If they can provoke
    the rank and file into the. right
    temper, anything can happen.

    Whether the move will actually
    succeed depends, in my view—
    and in the final resort—on the
    attitude of the trades unions,

    j —L.E.S.

    Again the clash in the Socialist
    Party was emphasised at Margate
    when a@ mass-membership union
    voted overwhelmingly for the
    Bevan philosophy. But Morrison,
    too, is tasting success—in the
    L.C.C. elections. Where is it all
    leading?





    and straws? You would be doing
    your many readers a tremendous
    service if you would consult the
    Family Doctor or other experts
    on the subject and then publish
    their findings. Our Legislators

    over Europe with the forma! statement, offer-
    jing scarcely any new commitments, that
    Britain would under-right the European De-
    fence Community. But Continental statesmen
    and officials are still nevertheless suspicious
    of “Perfidious Albion.” They find that British
    Foreign Office diplomats are doing all in their
    power to scuttle the ship of European co-
    operation. For instance the Marshall ,Plan
    created a complex organization of European
    countries including Britain to keep a watch
    on trade inside Europe and the flow of goods
    coming from the United States under the
    Marshall Plan itself. Now that the Marshall
    Plan is coming to an end this organization
    called O.E.E.C. is under fire from Britain al-
    though every Continental country would like
    to keep it in existence. The British Foreign
    Office is having ‘a kind of private war with
    the aim to make NA.T.O. the only set of in-
    ternational initials on the Continent. It is
    all rather trivial and petty—but it could be-
    come disastrous. Winston Churchill once said
    that Britain stands between three concentric
    circles, that she must have an equal part in
    each of the three circles—the Anglo-American
    community, the British Commonwealth, and
    Europe. As the Economist newspaper re-
    marked last week the Foreign Office seems to
    be so dizzy revolving on three circles that it



    have referred to the darker|is in danger of falling out of them all.
    sugar as “inferior” and to the 4
    mater ong ae “better” or| Certainly this is a dangerous business be-
    7 Ss j : : . .
    wrong: urely this is all) cause it is not -only in European capitals that
    There are many wholesome

    articles produced in some remot

    met of the World which, heonuer

    price or scarcity, we ca t

    get, me thle should 2

    case w good Barba -

    vado Sugar, re, eee
    Yours faithfully,

    & (Cc.
    Brundish, Pee
    Blue Waters Terrace,

    26.4.52
    Birth Control

    To The Editor, The Advocat
    SIR,—Through the courtesy
    your paper I would like to
    the following observations, a
    God said “Increase, multiply
    and fill the earth.” . .’) and then
    proceeded to provide food for
    man from trees, beast and fowl
    Read Gen. 1, 22—31, 3
    ince then nature in the animal
    and vegetable life has quietly aie
    on re-creating the earth according
    to His scheduled plan, Man alone
    dares to defy the Almighty’s crea-
    es scheme. This matter is
    neither legislative no: i
    where there Ph ee

    are amendments
    withdrawals of motions, ee

    The earth can produce a
    Over Produce at any time or =
    any year according to Govern-
    ment’s right planning. What of the
    tons of wheat and of coffee which
    were destroyed in the U.S.A, and
    Brazil, the thousands of gallons of
    milk which were recently thrown
    down the drains of British Guiana?
    Do not acts like these deserve just
    repercussions or yetribution? So
    likewise will the practice of Birth
    Control. France fell quietly and
    quickly to Hitler’s hordes because
    she had no man power. Birth Con-
    trol had been practised there!

    Factories under pressure of war
    rolled out vast supplies of arma-
    ment in 1939—45, The same fac-
    tories, if Government, ‘so willed
    could produce machinery (or
    what may be necessary) for mass
    food productionvand comfortable
    homes ete. When storms wreck
    fishing boats more and better ones
    are built. Disaster makes man
    think, | plan, and produce, Our
    peacetime programme should not
    include plans to-frustrate life on
    this planet, “God's in His Heaven.
    All's well with the world.’ Thanks
    to Rev. Hutchinson and Mr, George
    Hunte for bravely advocating
    Right and Righteousness, I appeaj
    to heads of denominations, colleges
    and social societies to form a
    United Christian front against this
    ugly menace of Birth Control,

    Youth must be trained to respect
    their bodies as the temples of the
    Holy Ghost. Devotees of Birth
    Control are those who want to
    remain society butterflies without
    the pledge of a wedding ring and
    those within. the married circle
    who want to shirk the duties they
    vowed to carry through on their
    wedding day, foreither selfish
    reasons or to cover sinful practices
    and the most zealous advocates are
    those who have no children of
    their own,

    In conclusion, Birth Contrdl is a
    vicious sin in the sight of God
    and a menace in any cultural,
    educated, sane, civie life. Barba
    dos, give it what it is worth—an
    exit ticket.

    Yours faithfully,
    IRIS M. HOLDER.
    “Marycot”,
    Paynes Bay,
    St, James,

    not be the

    e courtesy of



    British foreign policy looks isolationist. ‘To
    American and Canadians it looks simply
    foolish for Britain to quarrel with her Euro-
    pean neighbours in a quite illusory hope that
    she will have a special preferential arrange-
    ment with the United States at any time. It
    is Congress that pays; and as far as Congress
    is concerned that is not how business is done.

    Sometimes it is said that Britain must keep
    out of being friendly with Europe because of
    her Commonwealth associations. But quite a
    victory was won last year and the European
    countries no longer want Britain to pool her
    resources or abolish her preferences—or in-
    deed do anything that is not plain common-
    sense. Commonwealth representatives are
    now well known in ‘Strasbourg. They appre-
    ciate that Commonwealth commitments and
    European commitments have no need to con-
    flict. So what is all this bickering from the
    Foreign Office?

    No reflection is made on Anthony Eden
    whose public statements without exception
    have been excellent and well intentioned,
    but our present school of professional diplo-
    mats seems to be addicted to pvint scoring
    rather than to making friends. For the
    moment the pressure of communism gives
    Britain a number of allies, but it needs sound
    diplomacy to make them trusting friends.

    Television Education

    A FRIEND in the United States has written
    to me asking for copies of the British Broad-
    casting Corporation’s television programme.
    He does not believe that a broadcasting sys-
    tem of our kind can possibly produce inter-
    esting programmes. In America televiewers
    in the biggest cities have even six pro-
    grammes to choose from running all the day.
    The B.B.C. offers one programme in the after-
    noon and the evening only. But its virtues
    are its boldness. It is not bound hand and
    feet by the lowest common denominator the
    public takes and recently the television ser-
    vice has spread over the whole country a
    programme consisting of intelligent films
    that have been refused distribution through
    the normal cinema circuits. The famous film
    Beauty and the Beast made on ‘the story of
    the great French dramatist Jean Cocteau was

    on the air the other night and I would like

    |to know from the B.B.C. Listener Research
    Service what percentage of televiewers were
    attracted by this strange film of fair beauty
    | locked up in a rugged castle.

    | But sometimes I wonder whether this ad-
    | diction to television is not a sign of national
    | stupidity Do we need to spend our days sit-
    | ting in front of little boxes? The Danes would
    |seem to come out of this intelligent test very
    | well, for I hear that 170 of them out of four
    | million have bought Television receivers. The|
    |television service in Denmark is probably |
    | closing down. }
    | Meanwhile, in Britain, we have television}
    | critics along side book, theatre, film, radio and
    ‘music critics —L.E.S,







    }

    ——_——

    1



    KING GEORGE VI

    A PICTORIAL RECORD OF HIS GREAT LIFE
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    TUESDAY, APRIL. 239,



    1952

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    (oan neneemaneenmee ett



    TUESDAY, APRIL.

    29, 1952



    @ From Page 3.

    Cross-examined he said he did

    not know Haswell.
    Awakened by Noise

    Anna O’Neale of Taylor's Gap,
    Bank Hall, who lived at the Gar-
    den Land on the date of the
    murder, said that she was home
    sleeping when she was aroused
    by a bounce against the house.
    Then she heard a fluttering. After
    a short while she peeped. out and
    baw the body of a woman bounc-
    ing up and down. She was afraid
    and closed her window. About
    ten minutes later she heard some-
    one running and pushing a bicycle
    down the gap. The person called
    for her neighbour Bowman. When
    she heard Bowman’s voice shé
    looked out and saw Bowman, Ben-
    skin and two strangers. Benskin
    had a kerchief tied across his

    forehead
    Leonard Benskin, 19, of Garden
    Land, St. Michael, said he had

    known Norma Haswell for about

    three years. She was his fiancée,

    =A she lived at Fields Gap, Bank
    au,

    On the 7th September, 1951, ‘he
    met Nerma at the junction of
    Country Road and White Park
    Thev went a ¢ ace Rawr Strret

    wisi’ tepins
    sce for -bout an hour ord a half
    From there they went by way of
    Roebuck Street as far as the Globe
    Theatre

    After
    left thea

    where they nt th

    obeut ten minutee they
    cw be and rode to Perry's
    Gap. It was about 9.10 p.m. They
    rode through Perry Gan until thev
    got to the corner leading to the
    Garden Land.

    Received Blow

    They walked along a_ track
    which was bordered by a long row
    of Khus-Khus grass. There were
    spaces in the grass, and when he
    got to one of the spaces, he felt
    a blow on his left shrulder.

    He was struck a blow on the
    left side of his face and he fell.
    The bicyele fell, and he quickly
    regained his feet and returned a
    blow to the man’s chin. The man
    fell, but on regaining his feet, he
    renewed the attack and they both
    fell with his assailant on top.

    Norma ran, and the man ran
    after her. He too got up and ran
    in the same direction.

    In front of a beuse in the gap,
    he heard 4 groaning, and saw the
    man running away.

    He ran to Norma who was lying
    cn the ground with half of her
    body in the gutter and the other
    half on the road.

    He spoke to Norma, but she did
    not reply. He went to Mr. Bow-
    man’s place and aroused him. Mr.
    Bowman and he went fo Norma,
    and with a torch light they were
    able to see the cut and blood on
    her body, :

    Bowman went back to his home,
    and he (witness) went to one
    Mrs. Forde’s where he was given
    water tio wash his hand which had
    blood from a wound in his face.

    His brother and his brother’s
    wife went and his brother left. He

    remained there until the Police
    came and then he went to the
    hospital.

    Man Not Identified

    The man seemed to be wearing
    a peak cap, khaki-shorts and shirt.
    The man appeared to be well
    built, and was a little taller than
    he was. He could not identify
    the man.

    To Mr, Farmer:— “On the way
    from the Esplanade, he went to
    the Globe by way of Bay Street,
    Probyn St., Spry Street and Roe-
    buck Street. I don't remember
    telling the Magistrate that Norma
    was to my right with the bicycle
    between us. I did not tell the
    Police Magistrate that.

    Norma was close to the grass on
    the left hand side of the track.

    I did not know what struck me
    —Whether it was a knife or a hand.
    I could not see well because it was
    a bit dark, The man’s face was
    very close to mine. Norma was
    shouting loudly while the man and
    1 struggled on the ground, and she
    was running away.

    Immediately he jumped on me,
    Norma ran, and the man got up
    anu ran after her. Afier abdut
    three minutes I ran after them, I
    had nothing with me when I ran.

    I went for the bicycle after Mr.
    Bowman had come out and before
    the Pelice came. I did not have
    the bicycle when I ran after
    Norma and the man.

    I told Inspector Springer that
    I could identify the man if I saw
    him. I also told that to the other
    policemen.

    The man appeared to be carry-
    ing a shovel. I did not think it
    important. I said I could identify
    the man who from his clothing
    appeared to be a scavenger. I did
    nat say I knew the village in
    which he lived.

    Scavengers Inspected

    I went around to the Scaveng-
    ing Department and inspected the
    men in the presence of the Police
    on two consecutive mornings.

    The Police carried Mr. Bowman
    to Central Police Station, Mr
    Bowman’s appearance . is
    different from that of the accused,

    The fact that suspicion rested
    on me never frightened me,
    have many times thought that- the
    position in which I found myszif
    called for some explanation. I
    have always co-operated with the
    Police.
















    put

    fer

    Re-examined, he said, “I al-
    ways told the Police that I could
    identify my assailant by his “long
    mouth” and the clothes he wore.
    I had never seen that man before.

    Dr. A. S. Cato who examined
    Haswell’s body at the Public Mor-
    tuary, St. Michael, said she was
    dead about 16 hours when he saw
    the body. It was that of a young
    well developed girl. The face, trunk
    sm limbs were blood stained and
    the mouth and nose contained
    olood.

    Haemorrhage and Shock

    Dr, A. S. Cato described the
    multiple injuries, and said that
    death was due to haemorrhage and
    shock from the injuries described
    The injuries were inflicted with a
    sharp instrument such/as a knife.
    The condition of the lungs also
    Suggested some degree of as-
    phyxia.

    Mr, Farmer asked no questions.
    The next witness to give evidence
    for the Crown was Veta Small.
    She said she used to live at Dean’s
    Village, St. Michae! from ‘he 14th
    April ts Ist October, 1951.

    She knew the defendant with
    whom she was friendly, and they
    lived together. She knew Elma
    Howell who spent part of her va-
    cation in September at her home.

    Howell was there on the nicht
    of the 7th.

    She, the witness, went to work
    On the 7th and when she return-
    ec home in the evening she found
    Carltcn Brewster and Elma at
    home.

    Brewster left at about 6 o’clock
    to go to his mother’s He was
    wearing a pants with stripes a
    two-toned shirt, a felt hat and a
    pair of sneakers. Elma and she
    remained home Brewster came
    back shortly after 9.30 p.m.
    Elma was outside with Egbert.
    She was in bed when Carlton
    Brewster returned and said he
    had just come from his mother’s.

    The accused asked for water but
    none was ‘there. She told the ac-
    cused to go for water and he said
    he was not going back out.

    He asked Elma to bring the
    water and she did so. The ac-
    cused remained over the half
    door.

    When Elma brought the water,
    the accused put some of the wa-
    ter into a basin, and then drank
    some from the bucket,

    Clothes Taken Off

    The accused took off all his
    clothes, hung up tis pants, put
    the sneakers under the bed and
    dropped his shirt on the floor. He
    sponged his arm pits, and then
    washed out the shirt which he
    had taken off. ,

    She noticed that the water in
    which he washed the shirt was
    red. The accused threw away the
    water. ‘

    He put more water in the basin,
    the shirt back in it and
    washed it with soap. He then
    went outside and hung out the
    shirt.

    He came back in, went to the
    door and looked at his hand. She
    went and got a drink of water
    and the accused asked her to pour
    sorne on his hands.

    She did so and noticed that
    they were stained red. She went
    back to bed; the accused joined
    her shortly afterwards, and sat
    on the corner of the bed.

    The accused looked from one
    side to the other. He told her:
    “IT now lick up a girl” and she
    asked him “How you could do
    that? That is trouble. How you
    come to do that?” He turned and
    wld her: “I was coming up Roe-
    buck Street and I saw a girl and
    aman coming up. When they
    got by the Esso Garage, they
    swung across Perry Gap and I
    swung behind them. I stopped
    back and the two of them went
    along. When I got to them, I
    rushed them and the man ran
    and the woman began to fight
    back with me and I cut her up
    and come home.”

    Threatened

    The accused then lay down
    and threatened that “if I tell any-
    body and cause him to get locked
    up or something wrong happen to
    him, I would see what would
    happen to me.” °

    On the next nwrning at about
    five o’clock Elma woke her and
    told her something. She woke
    the aecused and told him that
    Elma said a man went under the
    sugar apple tree and said a girl
    got killed in Perry Gap last night.

    The accused got up, went to the
    window and asked “Which side
    the man gone,” Elma told him
    the man went down the gap. The
    accused sat down on the corner
    of the bed and after a time he
    got up, put on the same clothes
    he wore the night before, except
    for the shirt. He went outside
    and said he would go down Perry
    Gap and see who the girl was
    that got killed.

    She told him: “You mean you
    told me you lick yp a girl down
    there last night and you still go-
    ing down there?” He replied:
    “T got guts.”

    » T.e accused went around the
    house and she got ready for work.
    Before she left he came back an
    I said it was true that a girl had

    been killed in Perry Gap, but he
    did not know her.

    At this stage His Lordship
    adjourned further hearing until
    this morning at 10 oclock.



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    MURDER TRIAL .



    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    samt

    ge

    AN M-47, the Army's new medium tank, clambers over an embank-
    ment (top) on the test track of the American Locomotive Company at

    Schenectady, N. Y. At bottom,
    vehicles await shipment to
    have been vigorously tested

    lined up in rowa the powerful armored
    strategic centers of the world, The tanks

    for maneuverability and fire power. Fach
    has been run for 45 hours straight on the test track. i

    (International)



    Canadian Died
    By Drowning

    Death by misadventure due to
    drowning was the verdict returned
    by a nine-man jury when the
    inquest into the circumstances
    surrounding the death of Mr. John
    McKenzie (62) a Canadian, who
    ‘was here on vacation from Nova
    Scotia and staying at St.
    Lawrence, Christ Church, ended
    yesterday at District “A” Police
    Station,

    Mr. John McKenzie died at Dr.
    Bayley’s Clinic after he was taken
    there from Battery Beach, St.
    Lawrence, where he and his wife
    got into difficulties while bathing
    there at about 9 a.m. on April 27.
    The body of the deceased was
    taken to Burton's Funeral Parlour,
    Pinfold Street, where a post mor-
    tem examination’ was performed
    by Dr. A. S. Cato,

    Dr. Cato told the Court yester-
    day that the lungs of the deceased
    contained water, but there was no
    haemorrhage or brain disease
    present, The deceased was dead
    for about five hours and from his
    examination death was due to
    suffocation from drowning.

    Dr. Kinch who was called to
    Battery Beach, St. Lawrence, soon
    after the incident, said that when
    he reached the beach he saw some
    bloody water coming from the
    nose of the deceased and there
    ‘was also some fluid in the lungs.
    He gave the deceased an injection
    end ordered him to the Horzital.

    Strong Under Current

    Mrs, Marjorie mckenzie, the
    wife of the deceased, said that
    she and her husband left where
    they were staying in St. Lawrence
    for a bath in the sea at about
    7.30 a.m. on Spril 27. They both
    went into t'.e sea, but her husband
    was a little distanca in front of
    her when a big wave struck them
    and then she felt a strong under
    current and from the expression
    on her husband’s faca she knew
    that he was in difficulties. She also
    was not feeling safe and shouted
    for help but was still trying to get
    to her husband, Immediately after
    her shouts some men came to
    their assistance and both of them
    were taken to the shore.

    The doctor then arrived and the
    deceased was taken to Dr. Bay-
    ley’s Clinic. Her husband stayed
    at the Clinic for about five hours
    before he died,



    Police Constable 25 Carter
    attached to the Central Police
    Station told the Court that on

    April 27 between 8.30 a.m. and 9
    am., he was on Battery Beach,
    Christ Church, and while on the
    beach he heard shouts of help
    coming from the sea. He then
    discovered that the shouts were
    coming from a woman in the sea
    and also saw a man in difficulties.
    He plunged into the sea and
    reached the woman, but she asked
    him to help her husband who was
    some yards away from her.

    He went to tne mau auua another

    man named Charles Greenidge
    assisted him in bringing out the
    deceased. Mrs. McKenzie was

    also brought out of the sea,

    Beresford Trotman, one of the
    men assisting in the rescue, said
    that he jumped into the sea after
    he heard the shouts of help from
    Mrs McKenzie. The deceased was
    some yards from his wife and he
    and two other men helped in
    bringing the deceased ashore. Dr.
    Kinch was then called to the
    beach. At this stage the Coroner
    presented the facts of the inquest
    to the jury who returned a verdict
    of death by misadventure due to
    drowning.






    Dept.

    Trade Unions’
    Conference

    @ fromm page 1
    (c) Agricultural and Workers
    Problems in Caribbean area.
    (d) IrNiustrial and Mine Workers,
    (e) Inflation and Unemployment,
    (f) Rights of Trade Union Asso-
    ciation,
    (g) Trade Union Education.

    The Committee also agreed that
    C. P. Alexander, President of the
    Seamen and Waterfront Workers’
    Union in Trinidad and Organiser
    of O.R.I.T. and I should visi’
    Jamaica on behalf of O.R.I.T.

    It is a signal honour for Bar-
    bados that the first Conference of
    the LC.F.T.U. will be held here
    I am looking forward with great
    expectation to the deliberations at
    this Conference.

    Invitations
    Invitations to the Conference
    will be extended to the British
    Trade Union Congress, The A.F.
    of L. and the C.LO. of America,

    the International Labour Office
    and the Cuban Federation of
    Workers,

    At the conclusion of the Con-
    ference a meeting was held at
    the Public Library and, I ad-
    dressed the affiliated groups on
    the purpose .of the forthcoming
    Conference.

    I have great confidence in the
    success of the Trade Union Meve-
    ment in these territories and fee!
    that greater unity among all
    Unions is an esvential prerequis-
    ite to West Indian Federation,

    I am looking forward to the
    co-operation of the people -f Bar-
    bados to make this Internationa)
    Conference a success.

    Present at the meeting
    Mr, Francisco Aguirre,
    Secretary of O.R.1.T., C. P. Alex-
    ander, President of the Seamen
    and Waterfront Workers’ Union
    of Trinidad, Mr, F. J. Carasco
    O.B.E., President of the Seanien
    and Waterfront Workers’ Union
    of St. Lucia and myself,

    “Athelbrook” Calls
    For Molasses

    The 74-ton schooner Frances W.
    Smith called here from British
    Guiana on Sunday with a cargo
    of 1,500 bags of rice, 60 cartons o.
    r.ce, 300 bags of charcoal, 30 tons
    of firewood, 50 bunches and three
    packages of fresh fruit and 262
    p.eces of sawn greenheart,

    Also arriving on Sunday was
    the molasses tanker Athelbrook
    which came for a load of vacuum
    pan molasses for Trinidad. The
    Athelbrook cleared port yesterday
    afternoon for Trinidad.

    The Schooner Pool are the agents
    of the Frances W. Smith and
    Messrs H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
    are agents of the Athelbrook.

    “LADY NELSON”
    LEAVES PORT

    The R.MLS. Lady Nelson arrived
    at Barbados from Canada via the
    British Northern Islands yester-
    day. With general cargo from
    Canadian ports discharged and 49
    out of her 103 passengers getiing
    off at Barbados, the Lady Nelson
    left port last night for British
    Guiana via St. Vincent, Grenada
    and Trinidad. She is consigned
    20 Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co.,

    were’
    General





    ~ Limited.







    GOULD

    es ‘i
    ante ae

    he CAVE Sil

    Trees, Fenee, Grass |

    Beautify

    THE TREES at the Prir
    were planted by Miss Nell
    Shortly the cages, whicli
    may have to be removed.

    The “sweet lime” fence around the eastern end of the
    field has also grown considerably but at one corner
    especially, the salt water is st

    Oistins Round-Up
    Oistin’s Market
    Gets A Cage

    The Oistin’s Market now has a
    cage around its counter. Because
    of this cage, idlers are kept out of
    the fish compound. The outer wall
    around the market, which form-
    erly had a flat surface, now has a
    knife edge surface. This has pre-
    vented vendors from cutting fish
    and selling vegetables on the wall.
    _ This fish market is one of the
    first in the island to be wired
    around, Now fish vendors of the
    City are complaining that the City
    Fish Market should also be wired
    around,

    On Tuesday there was a short-
    age of fish at the Oistin’s Market.
    Vendors went to Silver Sands
    where they bought fish to be sold
    in thy Market. As soon as the fish
    was put on sale everyone rushed
    to get some instead of waiting un-
    til the price was lowered, as they
    usually do.

    For the month of March, 12,429
    pounds of fish were sold in the
    Oj(stin's Market. This was 386
    pounds better than in March last
    year. In March last year 6,900
    pounds of flying fish were sold in
    the Market while 7,000 pounds
    were sold this year,

    More dolphin were brought to
    the Market in March last year.
    The amount recorded last year was
    4,267 as against 3,860 this year.

    The total for this year is made
    up of 7,000 pounds of flying fish,
    3.860 pounds of dolphin, 34 king
    fish, 141 bill fish, 824 shark, 246
    albacore, 100 mackerel and 223
    pounds of bonita.

    So far this month 10,783 pounds
    of fish have been brought into the
    Market. The total amount for the
    month of April last year was 9,474.
    Of the total this month, .5,778
    pounds were flying fish. On April
    16,875 younds of flying fish war
    sold in the market, Already 2,585
    pounds of dolphin have been
    brought into the market, Seven
    hundred and seventy pounds were
    sold on April 9.

    As a result of the cage being
    erected around the counter, there
    has been an increase in the sale of
    tickets to vendors. People who
    formerly gutted fish on the front
    premises now use the beach at the
    back of the Market instead.

    *

    Fishermen at Oistin’s are begin-
    ning to bring in large catches of
    seine fish. They are not yet very
    keen on seine fishing. They find it
    difficult to sell seine fish because of
    the large number of flying fish be-
    ing caught

    One fisherman told the Advocate
    that he is hoping the flying fish
    season will soon come to an end,
    “There are plenty seine fish to be
    caught,” he said

    a



    The Oistin’s Boys’ Club, which
    js rapidly progressing in _ its

    activities has three good table te*-
    nis players. This Club is carried
    on in the Oistin’s Police Station.
    Although the Club has had no offi-
    cidl opening, its members are tak-
    ing a keen interest in the games.

    The table tennis players are
    Balfour Layne of Foundation
    Boys’ School, Patrick Lashley of
    Combermere School and Shirley
    Bentham, These boys have a good
    attack and should go far if Oistin’s
    Police Station enters a Boys’ Club
    team in the Barbados Table Ten-
    nis Association Competitions next
    year. '

    Nearly two dozen boys of this
    Club take an interest in table ten-
    nig Other games played are
    draughts and dominoes.

    People of Oistin’s get their sup-
    ply of bread from a small bakery
    This bakery was started two years
    ago by Mr. Sydney Walters, It is
    the onl bakery in Oistin’s.

    The bakery is very small and
    its owner has no carts to deliver
    loaves. Most of the bread is sup-
    plied to shops of the Town.

    Every Friday. people from su#
    rounding districts flock the bak-
    ery to bake their Saturday loaves
    The bakery is very sanitary and
    clean. Its need is mostly felt on
    Bank-Holidays which follow
    week-ends, when bread is scarce
    in Oistin’s.

    *

    * ”

    The Police at Oistin’s are having
    a quiet time, They have received
    no reports of theft or accidents for
    a long time. One constable said,
    “Everything is quiet in Oistin’s.
    We de not even receive minor re-
    ports,”



    OLD LADY FOUND

    Eighty-two-year-old Margaret ; . . /
    Tull of Lower Estate, Tenantry, | %y (
    St. George, who was Jeportes | Y. De LIMA % KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
    missing in Saturday’s vocate , . .
    has been found at Blackman’s,! & €O., LTD. %

    St. Joseph. She is in good health. | eetieeana radii



    We a

    10, & 13

    B







    assortment of these High |

    Dicer” Rintacent $2.66
    Pei a HEINZ TOMATO KETCHUP—per bot 80
    Nu-Buck. Black’ \W HEINZ PICKLED ONIONS-=per bot. .... re
    Suede, Gold |] HEINZ CHOW CHOW PICKLES bot 33 ft
    ee ae BICARBONATE OF SODA—1-lb. pkg i 24
    and Silver FOOD YEAST—1-lb pkg pS “ }
    Kid. CRAVEN A CIGARETTES—tins 50 /
    e CURRY POWDER—per tin so OM
    ; ks i} BLACK PEPPER—1 oz. pkg 34
    aor ronging, ba |! WHITE PEPPER—1 oz. pkz 49
    oe \f¥ KOO GUAVA JELLY—2-Ib. tins 47
    e iW SHARWOODS CHUTNEY SAUCE—per bot 55 i
    If DRIED SAGE, DRIED PARSLEY—per bo" 34 H
    a 1 , ye
    EPHERD & CO. LTD. DRIED MINT—per ss Soe
    ROAD STREET STANSFELD, SCOTT & €9. LID.

    PAGE FIVE

    Playfield —

    , : cty
    neess Alice Playing Field, which |
    Manning, are growing rapidly.
    were erected to protect them,|

    ©

    unting the fence.

    About four weeks ago the Play- |
    ing Field got its motor mower

    Anyone approaching the field can

    clearly see the good work the

    mower has been doing during

    those weeks. The long grass which

    formerly covered the field has

    been cut.

    The ground staff of three me
    and the caretaker are at presen
    cutting grass on the western end
    of the field. This staff is respon-
    sible for raking the field, cutting
    grass, preparing the lawn tennis
    courts caer cleaning the Pavilion
    after entertainments,

    The Caretaker told the Advo-
    eate yesterday that he is hoping
    that his staff will soon be increased
    to five as there is a lot of work
    to be done

    Breakwater

    On the western end of the field
    is a breakwater many yards long
    The sea ic the main worry of the
    ground staff. When it is rough,
    the water flows over the break-
    woter and floods one end of the
    field where it, deposits large quan-
    tities of debris.

    Dances are held in the Pavilion
    about twice. monthly. Lenville
    Table Tennis Club also uses the
    Pavilion for table tennis. —

    At present one lawn tennis court
    is being used. The other two will
    soon be ready, to we
    roups of people play n
    the Princess Alice Playing Field.
    One group uses the court on Mon-
    days and Fridays, the next on
    Tuesdays and Thursdays and the
    last on Wednesdays and Satur-
    days.

    Many children from the sur-
    rounding districts play games at
    the field. Recently four football
    matches were being played at the
    same time.

    Lawn tennis players sometimes
    complain that the footballs are
    constantly kicked across their
    court. This may be remedied if a
    wire fence was placed around the
    tennis courts.

    y

    You can
    favourite

    joy Britain's
    acces. Sis
    blends to choose
    every one @® 6:
    blend of vintage leat



    SOLA AGENTS:
    MESSRS. A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS), LTD.,
    P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS





    ©





    YOU'LL FAVOUR FOR ITS =
    DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY, >
    COMFORT AND LONG.

    LASTING QUALITY.

    Fires Damage
    Canes, Kitchen

    Shortly after 10.30 a.m. yester-
    day, the Fire Brigade was sum-
    moned to a fire at Prospect, St.
    James. On arrival they found a
    kitenen, eight by six feet, attachea
    to the house of Delcina Mings on
    fire. They assisted in putting out
    the blaze.

    The Brigade turned out under
    the command of Major Craggs.

    . *



    Six acres of second and third
    crop ripe canes were burnt when
    a fire occurred at Kirtons Ten-
    antry, St. Philip, at about 9.5u
    pm. on Sunday. . a are the
    property of D, D. Garner of
    Marchfield, St. Philip and were
    not insured,

    This fire extended to Groves
    Plontation where it burnt a quan-
    tity of trash and sour grass, the
    property of Plantations Ltd.

    “GOLFITO” DUE
    ON THURSDAY

    The S.S. Golfito is expected to

    Suedette
    “PLAYDAY”

    Ledies...here’s the Shoe for you... Smart as a new Paris @
    frock. .comfortable ag a house Shoe and so economicadly

    g
    call at Barbados from Trinidad at patced too! Oo) “ i
    7 am. on Thursday to take 35 ‘] bi, . ; &
    passengers for Southampton, All Avai abie IR Qo
    passengers are expected tc be on + % BLACK iG i

    board by 2 p.m., and the Golfito
    PRICED AT ONLY. $7.29



    * WHITE
    will be leaving port shortly after
    for England. She is consigned to
    Messrs Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
    Limited.

    NO QUORUM
    There was no meeting of the St.
    Joseph Vestry yesterday due to
    the lack of a quorum. Members

    would have discussed the Maude
    Report,











    s
    >
    ‘

    s
    a“

    .

    ‘
    3
    *s
    %
    x
    °
    e
    >

    Carovit Tablets Novinacol

    |8 Tabasan Tablets Pepto-Bismol, <
    Ironized Yeast Tablets C-P- Bronchial Anti-
    Bengnes Balsam Unguentine

    *

    6 “9
    oho Ott

    FRESH SUPPLIES
    ARRIVED,

    CEPOL APPEAL LOLOL

    DIAMOND
    RINGS

    SE

    Zepto Tartar Remover Pencils
    lodized Cattle Licks

    DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT
    And
    DIAMOND WEDDING
    RINGS
    Availeble Separately
    or in Sets

    Your Jewellers:

    COOVESOOOOS

    4

    cap I

    PEP PS OPS S SSS SS SSS SPFSS









    POTATOES
    10 Ibs — 96e.

    SHOES

    re now offering a fine

    Cash and Carry

    Only.





    BUCKFAST TONIC WINE—per bot.



    )

    ‘
    4



    OEE LICL ALE


























    PAGE SIx

    CLASSIFIED ADS.

    ___G> TELEPHONE 259
    DIED ; ‘ ;
    FOR SALE



    PUBLIC SALES

    ——————— et

    REAL ESTATE

    FOR RENT



    HOUSES
    BUNGALOW—Thiee bedrooms on St. |
    | James Coast. 4 miles from towri. For |





    es














































    “HOUSE—One (1) board and shingle information Dial 0168 26.4. 52—3n
    BABB—Ou 28th April Lucile Batt House with open verandah and shop, |-———————— *
    bb of Bank Hall Cross Road, Fumeral | OTIVE situated at Boscobel, St. Peter. Apply] Qbean4 COnTAGE on St. James Coast
    il leave the late residence at 4.15 pum. | AUTOM Gordon Chandler, on premises |gervices supplied from main house. Own |
    to-day “for the We tbury Cemetem;., _- 22.4.58—-10 Prelephone
    hn Babb, ( and), Mrs, R. A.| CAR— | Rawards mothers. Lorton. Lgie,|celient conaition®” Dial 4040 Chelsea | SHOP—Going Business with Abuse eae rT ae
    Lindsay, Vere and Ciyde Eawardn| Gerage 11950) Ltd 29 .4.52—2n Pag situated at Grand View, Nr \° . (broth Inez Edwards, Mr. | ————_________________. | Shop %, St. Thomas sie: e048 "Ga, ton ee ee
    Daisi ering, Mrs. Rlets Meaty | GAR 2,,3m0 Ford Prefect. done 300 premiser, A. Fotde O99 '4.52—4n ee ene Rock, 4
    (siste 29.4.52—Ir.| miles. Apply C. Arthur, c/o Auto e omnes {FOOS and all modern conveniences. For

    Particulars Dial 6121
    Prospect, St. James
    epee

    YFONTAMARA’—On the Maxwell

    , | Coast. Fully furnished. Telephone 2257
    Wharf and Pence Wilkian Henry ‘Street |OF apply to Browne & Co,, 43, Swan St
    ond McGregor Street, S, sane 27.4, 52—2n
    a now

    D. A. Browne,

    ——
    —___---— Co., Corner Trafalgar and Epry Streets.§ ) The undersigned will offer for sale by |
    BRATAWAITE...On 28th ( April 1962 27,4.52—-3n. Ppublic competition a office, No. 17,
    JosephGBrathwaite (Mikon of Rock- High Street, ;
    ley, Christ Church, His funeral will ist May 1.
    leave ‘his late residence at 4.30 p.m
    today for the. Westbury Cemetery.
    Gladys Brathwaite, Emily Green-
    idge, MitcW#? Greenidge.

    CAR—Late 1951 Vauxhall Wyvern.
    Owner driven. In good condition; done
    7,000 miles. Phone 6135,

    26 .4.52—4n.



    on Thursday,






























    - ing on 5,137 square feet of |
    29%.52—1n] “CAR—Hiiman Minx X-1203, excellent | occupied Thy Menats. R. M. Jones & Co., . FLAT: Finished. cool, specious fat. |
    WAEDOTI—Op ith April 1988. aba | GOnGuIe, Fras eed, "pew Battery: | T uner perticulse from the under ae direct cane Aguatic Club
    . 7 952 and 4 ee gis . s .
    privately next day, Edward prely pees 4 : 26.4.52—3n. | signed. : fram town. Dial 288) 29.4.52—)

    M. Waleott;*inte of Demerara and






























































    of Archway, House, Navy Garden: “AR f fect cond ! COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat
    Barbados. in nailense a0 noleghiohe 2940. Solicitors. tely furnished. Telephone, gar
    British Giana and WI. paper > 23.4. 52—t.f.n. 20.4.52—10n | electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and
    please cUQ¥, 29.4. 52—1y =. = | safe seabathing. Special Summer Rates
    wee ere HILLMAN MINX—One 1948 Black ©) Apply to “MARESOL” ST. LAWRENCE
    THANKS Hillman ' Minx, “done 26,000 miles, in ex- ° Pr Og
    —— - cellent one ition. aon FP. Stokes
    ; & Bynoe Ltd., or . , cs
    BECKEZS—Miss Eloise Brathwaitg jsin- * 24.4.92~—5n. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER FARAWAY-—St. Philip coast, 3 bed :
    cercty thanks all who in various Ways . ° ° Plant. j
    ( | Sxpreseed yippethy for her family gad) scARENw ENGINE, 05 h.p., 6 cylinder,| BY instructions received, 1° wit sett | Watermill supply, Double ree
    her on ‘the’ AéBth of her sister MiFiA:| Gray Engine, complete with}on Wednesday, April 30th’ at Messrs | gar, °"* TeOms- ve, Oe, eee
    Beckles. : Ain sterngear propelicr. DaCosta & | Redman i ‘Taylors Garage. coh ve : C slencittehinn idl
    . Lid., Dial 4689. lage (1) 75hp A. Motor Cyc! FURNISHED i
    FIELDS: _ We, the Uhdersigned through | 20.4:52~in} (Damaged in Accident) Sale at 1 p.m, MODERN Tihs wae
    + this)medium beg to thank All ChOSC | an |Terms Cash.5 , Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
    who so kinaiy) sent flow: cards| ONE BEDFORD UTILICON—i2 H.P. VINCENT-GRIFFITH, Lane be. particulars. to Alma
    and in any ot! way expr their | offers ived, can be seen at The Auctioneer. No. $ Cora) Sands, Worthing.
    mpathy in our recent bereavement.| Barbados Telephone Co., Ltd. § a.m.— 27.4.32—3n & 23.2.52—t.f.n.
    ee ” ant Bomily. ns: - BU sre a cas 38.4. me + NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 ped |
    MAYNES: We, the undersigned ask ail —One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck. ( ’ rooms. Fully furnished, nt,
    - those to accept sincere thanks who eee “SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White PUBLIC NOTICES Watermill supply, Doubie three
    attended the funeral, sent post cards, . . be servant rooms. For May and from Oc_
    wreaths or in any way extended their 24.4524 fn. —*----2-+—- ] tober Ist Phone 4476
    sympathy through our sad bergfive- . * NOTICE ° 10.4.52—t.f.
    gnen¥yon t deat sof Fitz Gtrald fr Se re eee PAI ‘OF BT 3
    > Hywnes, who died Ave r LIVEST K ARISH ¢ ea a o| “TRINITY F furnished,
    Louise Ha: ife), eta (Daw r), VES ‘ul 9 one 4 estry 4 te wi
    Lawrinbn, Stephen, FredericR, ‘Ra : Exhibitions at St. Michael's Schog |Wiee bedancins, come

    will be received by® the undersigned up

    Se miieed, riel and to, Saturilay, .the 10th. May, 1952, and

    Dac
    Ufton ( dson). :

    ONE SAANEN GOAT--Apply to Velda
    Hoticr. Greenfields, St. Michael,




































































    c 62—4n, | 8Te subject to’ the follow! conditions. ehinaherapenmnentinentitenlig
    i a ey 2 ad ee Lee eee 1 Eanaiaates must be e daughters nH Oo WANTED
    , ' ot tishioners, in straitened circum-
    » .» IN MEMORIAM . MECHANICAL starlees,, and fot legs than eight (8)
    _ Ca err Eocene antoreenes - ~—___—- ears, nor velye® (1% HELP
    PARRIS:* In loving meipory’ of our be-] "AN AML: One & fect Pan Mill-in| did on” 2nd epter bar joc: te te ——_———
    © “over? Mother, polly pent, whet’) good condition at’ Bel Air, Richmond | proved. by’ a birt certificate, gwhich| MANAGER—required for Colony Club
    p auldep 29th April: Be ted ik , | Gap 24.4.52-—-2n) must accompatiy the application (Barbados), Attructives proposition to
    dork F deetis. eae ' ps 2. .Carididates’ between eidhto (8) and | right man requiring Penney Tat
    VatSided and 'witht¥ed to, suppty“our | tough, dn A-l condition. Apply; G. L ‘the ain, eee pee epenined at eal a See
    “neds on. iverad with patiewes |) i1for@. Norwood Plantation, St’ James. | those between ten (10) carl twelve U2)| ‘PARTS ASSISTANTS'—Previous ex-
    In sijencesshe suffered with patienss 36.4.68—Sn. | yeti okt” an Mawuriiny, Tih. Jone Or patient peolttea!” Dainty Wearinandi:
    ° : milieced k.her home fo suff ea i =; ~———|_ 8. All ecAndidates must be at the] ate swith experience. Suitable appli-
    ei a Pee ee ae ; . School not later tham 5 a.m. on the] canf§ to ar ae a later pe
    . er naunsend , 2 MISCELLANEO -| date: of their_examination Ist June 1952. pply in person with |
    ee a ee cae. 5 motte ve x ZS S. FRASER, written application. ekstein, Brothers
    * Edtis, Tune, Chesterfield, Tyrone ‘(Grav ‘BGONOMY—Why buy 2 ozs. Prepared | - Cler®to the Yegtry &: John Bay Street : —4in
    :. chilidrert) > . 29-4.52-—-1n [Mustard ‘for 25c.. When. you:can get 6 : - - a 52—6n Sate Dense? sera soresenes
    _ - ons. Cankalan ” “CHAMPION | Rye MISCELLANEOUS
    * es tenes : {Mustard for. thé same 25c.. “yours "a. ear
    PERSONAL Grocer ean’ help yea, ring 2480 foc] A CORRECTION | o.: ‘AL BED, Dial 6107, H. W
    %,, oe ee ‘ details. : *29.4:52—1n parte “se Hinds, “Weftmore”, st Lawrence. oo
    ee =f Sg * : : .
    . pu ~ ereby -warned. against GIBSON V~- T,\ built #* “Aftention is called the correctigns in sa—
    cite crea wifes FLORRIB KR. | and. imported in 148. Length 18. feet, - the Advertigerent pu hopes se re LOST
    REEC Beam 5 feét 9 inches, Draught 12 feet wernmeh rsapies, atoSt ichael's






    ton th:
    i > to. F M oa :
    od myself SRionibie te “her oe

    six



    Seating capacity to. seven peopl: WALLET—On Monday, April 28th ty

    + dpe no,
    or ahi


















    These Wo



    Girlsy’ S¢hool?

    a a 5 O%
    se Scontracting any debt or {Steel ‘hull materials and const jon, ,: Wh. the,first » D Advertisements pub- | the lanade, one Leather Wallet con-
    debts fhoiny “namie “unless by a written [comply with Lioyd’s. Board of . Trade) listed on, Satur pigs th mgt the | taining’ a Gold Sifact Ring with initials
    Order, signed.by me. . requirements, Powered with Ford water-| %#te-for the’ rece of apPiicttion forr W.D. and M.D., also Race Ticket, Series
    vot ec’ -C¥RIGEARLE REECE. | motor—10/%2 B,H.P. Speed 10. knots.|.wak cimoneougly printed, as 26th +|W.2520 "Summer Meeting 1952." Pinder
    oo RSP es Dayrells Road, | Appiy Reginald’ French, D. V. Scott &| whilesthe"daté on ich Mood tamination |rewarded returning same to Advocate
    pein t Ch. Ch. }Go., Léa 22.4;52—n. |'8.to be held) w, primed incorrectly | Advertising Dept. 29.4 42--1n

    ‘ori at 16th May .
    LUNCH "TINS: Strong: Launch Tins dates our have been, re ctively ,
    with inner Tray poetiely enamelled, | May and 7th ‘June, aypritled today

    23 52a.




    “ 16th
    .* -: |
    :The.'publlic. atehereby warned against |





    Reasonable terms to suitable|to be pionees products of that industry.

    a-|of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk

    25.4.53—t..0.| thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    EDUCATIONAL |

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    ere

    GOVERNMENT NOTICES





    THE PLONEEK INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951 |
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section 3 (2)

    fa) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragezuent) Act, 1951, hereby
    causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
    set out below declaring the manufacture of wax and wax products to
    be a pioneer industry and wax and wax’products from sugar cane

    9

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out
    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and

    t
    to

    the Executive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May one

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER iNDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    Pioneer Industry (WAX and WAX PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
    The -in-Exeeutive Committee, in exercise of the s

    one mile conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    8 agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the foll Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as
    (Wax and Wax Products) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of wax and wax
    declared to be a pioneer industry and the f
    hereby declared to be pioneer products of that industry :—

    Wax and wax ‘ucts from sugar cane.

    Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
    day of one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.
    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n.

    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    5(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereb)
    causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order

    Pioneer Industry

    ucts is hereby
    owing articles are



    ;\set ovt below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn

    and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer industry
    and the spinning and knitting of cotton ee West Indian
    cotton and the manufacture of garments t rom to be pioneei
    products of that industry.

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set ou‘ | 5-5.

    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection anc

    ‘|of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Cleri

    to the Executive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May onc
    thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    The Pioneer try (SPINNING AND KNITTING OF COTTON
    YARN AND THE MANUFACTURE OF GARMENTS) Order, 195”
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the power
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Spinning and Knitting of Cotton Yarn and the Manufacture of
    Garments) Order, 1952.

    2. The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn ang the manu-
    facture of garments therefrom is hereby declared to be a pioneer
    industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be
    pioneer products of that industry :—

    The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian

    cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom. —

    Made by the apr rer -tnsemerutive Committee this

    day one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.

    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n

    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951





























    Re:
    chi

    Governing Boay,

    rds. Three for Two « , your Free 00
    A. BARNES & CO., LTD. ee : | Harrison Coliege.
    ice ~ 9.4.89—t.f.n.| HP (2) Ding Es mt | 9.4.23 an,

    tem . oy c
    Subscribe now to 2 we “Telegraph Pca na daughter of a QUEEN'S COLLEGE

    England’s leading now native,’ of this Bland ora ds ughter
    iving in Barbados Air only a few of persons who are domiciled” in .
    days sitar publication in London. Con- this. Island, and who have resided | The next term at Queen’s College will
    in this Island for a period of tep| begin on Tuesday, the 20th of April,
    years’ prior Jo the last day of ré-| 1952, at 9.20 a.m. and the School will be

    Lovat Rapresen Seatotive, fel wun
    ve, Z : (
    , : vin tions; in session for the entire day.
    2. Be (| merit in the opin D. BE. M. MALONE,



    * he

    The; ic ‘the her warned agailwt
    amreon seen or persous
    nomsoever, #5 1, do not*held: myself
    onsibli® (om anyone contracting any
    debts jn my name unless by a
    itten® drder .signed ty me.
    . WILFRED. HA


















    H,
    17,.4,62+t.f.n.






    . i Governi Body, t Secretary-' r,
    wr z te | © Ghueated'at the Beha a” Governing “Body,
    , Vietorla Stre 3 over “10 sears and under 12 Queen’s College.

    ears of age on the 2nd ber,
    Wears

    Every. application amugt be the
    parents or guatdian of the cafididate upon
    the: form of application approved by th.
    Governing -Body:and ebtaingble from the
    Secretary ‘of thé ‘Governing vy at her
    office at St. Michael's Girls’ School from
    Tuesday, April 29th+1952, and must supply
    all information yequised by such form
    The application forms must,be filled in}

    6.4.52 —2

    CurbYourPiles

    it from Piles
    tinge the dlncov ery of Hytex (formerly

    et. ;
    Gy R2.4.53—t.f.n, in,























    Act naw —and wet re ot dns few aNort |:

    Rours with” Dr. ae Kidiey-Liver |

    Bie. Truly aa in effect, az teas

    on this effective remedy for help ey,
    need it: Dr, sc—a name

    Pine

    | ZAIRRIVED
    POPULAR

    84180 GAS COOKERS


























    if not saved but seekine

    St. Michael's Girls, School.
    Salvation, please write for 2 *

    under
    guarantee Hytex must stop your pile

    5 een! Soins and {ehabtal Gr esonty bac or

    return of empty 2

    OSE,




































    > + et 7 * , }
    : FREE HOOK ! :
    : S 0 Pwitn peaked GOVERNMENT. NOTICE. : sroneienapnnnnetennennts
    Oe 8 ag } sets ° . .
    . Se GOD'S, WAY OF VACANT POST” DANCING 3
    % ¢ ry \ SENIOR MASTER, GRAMMAR SCHOOL,. DOMINICA CLASSES
    % SALV ATION Applications are invited for one vacant post of Master, Ballet Classes at the Aquatic
    x PLAIN” © Grammar School, Dominica, B.W.I. The School ro]l at present num- My a aa a eon" »
    oe é N bers 150, and courses will be offered up to thé: Higher,School Certifi- Cotkad Ee males Masiat ant
    > - §S, Roberts, Gospel cate examination of Cambridge University. - ° Keep Fit will be undertaken. Tu-
    % Book? & ‘Tratt Service, 30 § 2. Qualifications. Applicants for: the: post should hold a Uni-|% ition by Miss Joan Ransom ®&
    % Central Ave,, Bangor, N.E o§ | versity degree arid be qualified to teach Mathematics up to Higher L.R.A.D., ALS.T.D.
    Vesa. eveneiesey hae 562 | School Certificate > cares THE BARBADOS ‘SC: L OF
    a 3. Emoluments. The Post is pampnatie ana carries a salary DANCING LTD.
    in the scale $1,920-by $120 to.$2,400 per annum. A temporary cost~- BRENDA ‘McKINGTRY,
    of-livint? allowance. is payable at the: rate°’of twen’ cent, of Srey. :
    salary, stg..cohnidate ‘selected ‘may be -appaihted at any point in %
    the scale adcording - to: qualifications. and. experience.
    -4.° Quarters, . Qu vters-a ‘prov: °° SOSS9OSSSGSSSO SOO SSIS,

    ai nce® with local regulations

    Leave: led Sin a
    yi : istanice towa: overseas leave passages.

    “b.. Passage

    ‘.
    +

    PITMAN'’S TYPE-


















    : : “Free. passages to: Dominicg to take up appointment %
    rn ‘are .provided,-tor Pie cer ‘and. fot®his wife and children if they | % R Tl
    : * _}}] accompany;: him of:‘follow. him: twelve months from the date of his WwW | NG EXAM
    : oo eee i igh M's St bitishtie 2a ° ° ; will take place on Sat.
    <<. 2°.» Conditions: of ferries. . Fhe, officer owill be subject to Colonial|% (10th May) at Combermere.
    FURN TURE Regulations and Lota jenerdl Orders... °° at 11 am. Arithmetic and
    : WAL itions stating the applicants age, qualifications and teagh- other test will be held on

    and “indicating “the earliest date on which he could
    i by testimonials and references should be

    overnment Office, Domin -

    Saturday, 17th May.

    The LP.S. Proficiency Test
    has arrived. Anyone desir-
    ous of sitting must commun-
    icate with me,








    » RUCTION

    2) T a o BF og! $ , 7 °
    “Cr. ANN®'S) DAY © SCHOOL front Mmeinbers. of the Government Service of any




    Sage patet eis Ri. Sen smitted..through the officer Administering the 'A batch of LPS. Type-
    TO hadnt ak hen oma ‘that Colony, 5" « writing Test Papers will be
    } om, ‘ Tar ithe. 3° 27.4.52—1n. arriving soon. Enter now.






    8200.
    number.
    Cc. B. ROCK

    vp “iigtyulcved Sby the" Rev. Phone
    amp-COODEF TUedisport, of b+

    ° Fegentteert and Eifeets® inchiding a
    outhgheait

    Leave your



    ‘OFFICIAL’ NOTICE







    ese
































    giewiifiber of Antiques? Views. - ret ewe Sole LPS ,
    aR Gh ing We" ty ‘“ANe THE COURT OF CHANCERY fda Rative
    Dita, Dig. Nets Terbas Aa : ee “Rookerest”, Oistin Hill, %
    Mah wing Talre. Ockgnt tree ANGE of té Chancer) Act, “1906.1 do hereby give notice to all Christ Church
    Mah. Side Tableg Kite! ‘ables persone: having or claim any eftate, right or interest or any liev or ing,
    and Chairs, o Arn! Chairs. i ry e in or affecting’ the propetty hereinafter mentioned (the property ©
    hee, Antigqne Mah Arh Chairs, abt)! te bring béfore mp an account of their claims with their witnesses,
    bice Cnfur, Rocker, Singie lng s. and’ vouchers to be examined me on any Tuesday or Friday be-
    Setter Douby Erdded © "Settee,, , x -~) hours of 12 néon and 3 0% lock’ in the afternoon at the Registration
    Folding bagel Lhina Cabinet. | . “PXblic Bu nas," Bridgetown, before the 4th day of July 1962 in
    Mah. }Sidebpyfd gjth » Mirror, order that sich cliffs may be reported and aceo: to procpature
    Diymer, Wagon with Marble Top and priate, thereof respectively; otherwise such’ sons will be preclude\ from
    Ware Press, Mah. Aurii* Pines Rook- thé ben } and be deprived of all claims on or

    of atv’ decree against the said
    :














    ceses, Mah.* -,Writing. -Burea}, property h ° °

    Poder Hiant Stands, Mab. Prayer ti 5 7
    * Dest ie Cantertiurvy, Writts PLAINTIFF: HUGIC OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCT A d Other Thi

    7 Washstands, Filing “Cabl- [I]. DEFENDANT: 1 D, SBALY_.CO., LIMITED % n ings
    uetn, our Poster » Beas... rine - ) 6.) ) . 3 2 ‘

    Presses, Srouks and ‘Stand, Chest- PROPERTY; AP? THAT certain picch, or parcel of and sittate ne r Warne |

    of-Drawers( Griaki Father Clock r in the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesa former); a fo
    Case, Banging othe? Gasolgne - supposed to cohtain by estimation four acres or thereabouts but | al Money Saving Prices
    Lampe, Wood and Coal’ Stove. ) found by recent survey to contain five acres and six perches 1 | :

    Larders, _Wall Brackets, Candle ) thereabduts abutting and bounding on the North on lands ot / NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,
    Shades, Brass and Stiver Candie Warners Plantation on the East on lands formerly of Allen Walcott Bureaus, Chests-of-Drawers, Bed
    ticks Carpet Sweeper, Towel but how of E. Best, M. WH. H. Sullivan and the estate of J, Mhiyires steads 2-feet to S-feet’ wide
    Rails, “ ing Wheel Water deceased on the South on lands of Graeme Hall Plantation on Springs, Laths, Washstands $8 up
    Colourg, “Pird Cage, Sangre lands of T. Cox and on a road and on the West on the Pubiic Nightchairs, Towel, Shoe & Hat-
    G pS ke, Hookah dAipe, Coll Road or however else the same may abut and bound | racks—TABLES for Dining, Kitch-
    ot iver, Grass, Glassware, Books, Biull Gied: 29 Januaay 1982. } en & Fancy Use, China, Bedroom
    Oviler®, Old China including Blue Date April, 1952. . ’ & Kitchen Cabinets, Larders
    Willow W and Staffordshire H WILLIAMS

    China Figu Mirrors, Decanters Registrar-in-Chancer) DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
    and algo a very large assortment 29 .4.$2—3r in Morris, Rush and other types,

    of misbellan’0Us items too mumer-



    4 Desks, Bookracks,






    z

    1B3BS9002006050S00S000S60SEHNNSOOOHETESTOSOOOL OO

    5 y giving. “creuit.:.to. "my. wife, LORETTA Especially 7 bee Perea de ‘ . | Tie
    ee & HARPER dnée ‘Lotetta Allayne) &s 1 do [Only & cents each erat . ae | HARRISON Cc EGE
    nov paid? if, responsible for her or P&S} cents each G..W. Mute & a) e as . OLL
    aatone tia gontiacting any debt or debts | Go. Ltd, os. | sr. wnpails Hens SCHOOL
    . ihe my on Sour by a written er ——— : : OT
    sane yr Sn Pehone, maak A to Re GO P eresanins on A the Soho 1 wil be - sian Ry one
    © RUPERT LEON HARPER. BOT eae ict re. BMD A Sean | The Governing Bodyoof the St. Michacl's | rar, ‘Nis “nin te 0 pan session | lollipops,
    “ * mw é eee arrange for Mspection. -! ' Gils’ Sehoo ferefor competition: the 9.15 * , an. om
    « . * St. cha ne ee caeens F Barend * irres; e ris! eee ‘
    : ~ 26.4.52—dn. ff) RECORDS—Clearing our Stock ‘of MGM, .Eny Setwol -previoushy Rieriied Five (5) Secretary-Treasurer.

    ( -and.sent to the Secretary of the Governing | work in 10 minutes and not only stops
    A ov a these have not yet ts at her office on or before noon on pi Bain ome cae out the Ses
    been ; : e , Stops

    Prices of next shipment will be rites Examination will be held at_ the Irritation curbing other trou-
    higher. chool at 9.30 a.m. on Friday, 7th June! bles by auch as che, |

    982 7". Nervousness, e, Constipation.

    Why wot call at your Gas Show- oir eo A loss of energy, debility. and irritable

    rooms, Bay Street "TO-DAY and mee Ds ye disposition Get H Rox from your

    secure one of these cookers. Secretary, Governing y+ druggist the positive



    a “« PECSIIOSIOSIOO OOO OOS SI IODIIOOO OSSD OOOO FOOT G_ PIANOS, Manios—Pram. | Go-
    ar a an a s
    ' , ms cs ip; . Kitch-
    ‘AUCTIONEERS ||| PLATENS ; ~_ TING aE aM, Btmaics “Wa
    John *4. Biadon | A small but eannatttp assortment —
    i’ a
    & ce. CENTRAL EMPORIUM | L. S. WILSON
    mst | SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009
    ~ Rianiations Building... Cnr, Broad & Tudor Sts. PEnat: PEAK
    ” en eh

    Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
    causes this notice to be piblished of his intention to make the Order

    The next term at Harrison College will |Set out below declaring the manufacture of sugar confectionery and

    products to be a pioneer industry and boiled confectionery,
    minis and icing sugar, and every variety of nut food
    products to be pioneer products of that industry.

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out
    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
    of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
    to the Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one
    thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that dtte consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES OD ACT, 1951
    The Pioneer Industry (SUGAR CONFECTIONERY 1D NUT FOOD
    PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food
    products is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the
    following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of
    that industry :—

    boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and

    every variety of nut food products.

    | Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this

    day of one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.

    | By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n.

    | THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

    | The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    | $(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
    | causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
    | set out below declaring the manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-
    jcuring to be a pioneer industry and ham, bacon and other food
    | xroducts produced from meat of iocally-reared pigs to be pioneer
    | preducts of that industry.





    2. Any a. who objects to the making of the Order set out
    “_ | is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
    1 ¥ e

    eae on_ which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
    o the Executive Committee on or before the 2Ist day of May one
    housand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    %e given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    - Bonin 1a ee
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Ham, Bacon and Meat-curing) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-curing is
    hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following
    eee are hereby declared to be pioneer products of that
    industry :—

    Ham, bacon and other food products produced from

    loeally-reared pigs. . ween meee

    Made by ~ povernor-ineRingcutive Committee this
    y a one thous: nine
    hundred and fifty-two. oe
    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4,52—3n.
    PSOVOSES

    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    }
    |
    |
    !






    JUST OPENED ....
    Ie A Lovely Assortntent of

    CHROMIUM WARE

    Ns

    ®
    ~
    ge
    &
    S

    &




    6.68 each
    » » — 8%" 8.51 each
    ' ” » — OF”... 11.38 each



    LLCS ECELLSELLELCLCCEE AL





    SMOKER’S STANDS. ocsoeon @ 17.26 each %|
    ASH TRAYS o.oo cccscisisessnenes @ Seach |
    FLOWER VASES — Tocccume@ 414 each !

    a oo .@ 4.83 each S

    PLANTATIONS LIMITED )

    POSS SOOO OOO OSB S600 SOOO



    bane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad
    about April 22nd and Barbados about
    April 25th.

    '

    from Adelaide February 15th oe met
    Bris-

    In addition to general cargo this ves-

    For furtner particulars apply —

    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952



    Sailing Sunday 4th May 1962
    The M.V

    cept Cargo

    Deminica,

    “MONEKA” will ac-
    and Passengers for

    Antigua, Montserrat.

    sel has ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
    frozen cargo. day 2nd inst.

    Cargo accepted on through Mills of The M.V. “CARTBBER” will
    Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accept Cargo and Passengers for
    British Guiana, Leeward and Windward Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
    Islands. Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday

    Sth May, 1952

    FURNESS WITHY & CU., LTD., B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
    TRINIDAD. ¢ ASSOCIATION (INC)
    and s Consignee Tele. 4047
    DACOSTA &

    co.,

    SHIPPING NOTICES

    MONTREAL, AUSTRALIn, NEW SOLS CSS SOS POSE FOTOSâ„¢,
    MANE UN) The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
    . “TEK - scheduled accept Cargo and ‘assengers for
    ae - — 2 ae St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
    March ard, Sydney March 10th, Passengers only for St. Vincent,









    NEW YORK SERVICE

    A STEAMER sails 18th April— arrives Barbados 29th April, 1952.
    A STEAMER sails 9th May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 1952.

    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

    A STEAMER. sailed 10th April —arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952
    A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.

    CANADIAN SERVICE
    SOUTHBOUND





    a ee

    wee

    Name of Ship Sails from Arrived
    a Barbados
    “ALCOA PARTNER’ ie -» HAL#FAX April 13th April 23rd.
    8.8. “ALCOA POINTER’ » MOTREAL April 30th May 10th
    S.S. “A STEAMER” .. MONTREAL May 16th May 26th
    S.S. “A STEAMER” .» MONTREAL May 30th June 9th
    NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
    8.8. RA" +s ibe April 18th For St. John, N.B. and St.








    Lawrence River Ports

    .
    These vessels’ have limited passenger accommodation

    Re

    ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
    Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE



    in

    CANADIAN SERVICE

    6 Rel DY a net ne hy eM a A Et

    From Montreal and Halifax

















    fy

    Expected Arrival
    Montreal Halifax Dates, Bridgetown,
    Barbados
    s.s. “BLUE MASTER 14 April 19 April 6 May
    5.s. “SUNDIAL” 30 April 5 May 25 May
    ©.s. “A VESSEL 14 May 19 May 2 June
    *.s. “A VESSEL’ 30 May 4 June 20 June
    UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
    From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow
    ara" asa a Bae dg ee Er
    Wales Liverpool Glasgow Dates Bridgetown,
    m.v. “SKAUVANN" 18 April 22 April 4 May
    5.8. “N. O. ROGENAES 28 April 2May 6 May 22 May
    £.8. “SUNMONT 18 May 28 Ma 14 June
    5.8. “FEGGEN”™ 9June 15 June 34 June 10 July
    UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SEKVICE
    From Antwerp, Rotterdam and London
    ee Ex Arrival
    Antwerp Kotterdam London Dates a
    Bar!
    mv. “SPURT” 16 April 18 April 25 April 1l May
    m.v. “BRUNO” 12 May 15 May 22 May 2 June



    Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703





















    G
    aut ee

    TAKE ADVANTAGE Ot THF
    EXCURSION FARES
    NOW IN EFFECT
    @ Lowest Fares ever
    @ 0-Day Excursions
    @ All Flights by “North Star”
    Skyliners.

    For Complete Information, See
    GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.
    Ltd.
    Lower Broad Str. B'town.
    Phone — 4704
    TRANS-CANADA
    Air Lines
    International Trans-Atlantic
    Transcontinental

    We hace just received
    A NEW

    SHIPMENT

    LADIES’ and

    CHILDREN'S
    HOLLANDIA

    SHOES

    LADIES SUEDE SHOES









    in Black, Brown, Navy & Green @ . $ 8.08
    LADIES White, Buckskin Shoes @ . $ 9.98
    ” White, Leather Shoes @ . $ 7.47
    ” Brown, ” » @. $ 7.32

    ” Black Patent Shoes @ lata
    CHILDREN SHOES in Black & White
    Sizes 7—10 @ $4.81—$4.95—$5.14—$5.07

    » tO @ .... $5.26—$5.40 & $5.52
    Sizes M2 @ ne, $5.33—$5.48—$5.59—$5.78
    DDR @ he eceenee SETL—B5.99 & $6.27

    ALSO—JOHN WHITE

    Footwear for MEN
    @ $9.78 & $10.87

    FOR BETTER BARGAINS TRY....

    GEORGE

    AHELY & Co.19 Swan St. for
    ERVICE, VALUE & VARIETY

    Phone: t=8 4934












    $

    !
    !
    |
    }

    i
    i



    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952 > / TE
    BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN









    SSS SSS SOS SSST FSF FOCOS,













    HENRY

    BY CARL ANDERSON | : a oe ae tae 2
    Pkgs. CREAM-OF WHEAT e
    CORN FLAKES
    MACARONI

    Tins PATENT BARLEY

    » PEARL BARLEY

    ROLLED OATS
    TOMATOES

    CHICKEN SOUP

    GARDEN DRY PEAS
    MIXED VEGETABLE
    BAKED BEANS
    PORK and BEANS
    BACON per lb.
    ESCHALOT per tb
    PucwttS per ib,

    STUART & SAMPSON
    (1938) LID.

    Headquarters for Best Rum.
    46366 : .





    4

    JUST RECEIVED



    1M SURE 1 SWITCHED
    THE CABIN LIGHTS





    SH... THATS

    MAS. OE LAZLON'S THEN WE
    WHAT YOU'RE DOING OOOR.. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND
    FOR ME. JOE... Go Now. | ONE ANOTHER-
    \ Ea, LAVA ?,.



    Pkgs. Tate & Lyle Castor

    Sugar

    Sliced Ham and Bacon

    Lge. and Small Tins Vienna
    Sausages

    Pkgs. Goddard Plague Pow-

    ‘ der

    ® Tins Stove Polish

    2 Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

    Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar

    Tins Gelatine

    Ting Asstd. Sweet Biscuits

    ® Tins Pineapple Chunks
    Tins Strawberries

    H E MAT nicest



    ae : IN TO > ;
    BY CHIC YOUNG | es a of all Also:
    ! TIN HAMS
    Special price to Shopkeepers :
    Sd

    NAIL POLISH, DEAR=-) |, |
    YOU'LL HAVE TO
    Ali these things get from - -

    INCE & CO.
    LTD.

    8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

    monl HERRINGS
    %

    FRESH or ix TOMATO SAUCE



    ~SO00GRSOS6440"





    i< PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
    SPEC i

    IAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

    oOo

    SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,





















    ACCELERATION! THE DREAD MOMENTS | [AT PEAK VELOCITY—8O MILES A SECOND — POWER IS

    were a sare 4 Siesta lee, cau cans CUT, AND THE SHIP CRUISES ON THROUGH SPACE... Speightstown and Swan Street

    FASTEN ACCELFRATION Usually Now Usually © Now

    "A BOTTLES Jam ; Bags ie . . : " i eencedibeenne 6 © 20
    ; PR ie ic aiidincdas tue 136 SYED sno peseroniesteretrtenspiorio - otf



    PKGS. TURBAN DATES

    D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

    THE COLONNADE GROCERIES| —



    rs
    = FIVE La Sy
    SSS TO FULL BLAST ae ote?
    : —— FIVE... FOUR. (7 =<
    Pes an Z THREE... TWO.., f ae D4
    _ —_ = — x4 ((

    JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS





    ww» YOU WiLL TURN SACK...

    NOW, ISN'T THAT JUST
    LIKE A COR... ALWAYS SPOILING
    A:GUY'S PARTY ?/








    OR WE SHALL BE FORCED
    THIS 15 DR. ANTON 4 al E 70 TAKE DRASTIC
    SPEAKING / IT 1S 4
    IMPOSSIBLE FOR US |







    KING GEORGE VI

    A Pictorial Record Of His Great Life



    OH! JIGES DARLING! HOW | ‘This volume isa tribute to hig late Majesty
    r 1 COME King George VI, the sailor king who gave of

    himself unsparingly in the faithful service
    of his peoples.

    BOY! THERE GOES TH’
    PHONE -I'M JUST IN

    TIME - I WONDER WHAT
    STATION IG CALLING!

    } ’

    LS
    Pee atc te ae ihe ber



    He lives on in the memories recalled by this
    book—tifteen years of his courageous reign,
    ind earlier os the Duke of York. The boy,

    * the young man with an eager heart, the hus-
    I id 1 the father.

    BY ALEX RAYMOND

    ALL RIGHT... SO YOU KNOW THE ¥ ee : ’ :
    ANSWERS. I'M LISTENING... / “Gp \ ra An outstanding biography written and

    SPILL ‘EM!
    istrated with sympathy and deep respect
    that will stir the hearts of the multitudes who

    ON YOUR MIND,
    SEVEN? MAKE IT 1
    FAST..1'M BUSY.’ / YOU'RE WRONG, /\\~ a :
    AS USUAL! {/ | f HILL DAME 4 . \ ; e ;
    ’ ‘ S HAD NOTHIN’ TO a7. loved him

    KILLIN’?

    Those who have booked orders shall call
    for their copies at once



    Price $2.72
    BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES |

    THAT WAS A LIGHT WORKOUT
    TODAY. REGULAR TRAINING
    STARTS” TOMORROW, SMYTHE

    ee




    RL “ i
    A



    ADVOCATE STATIONERY
    STORE









    PAGE EIGHT

    Spartan Defeat
    Wanderers 3—I

    SPARTAN DEFEATED WANDERERS, a Third Divis-
    ion Team, to the tune of three goals to one in their Knock-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE










    Results Of Ninth Regatta

    There are a few protests pending. The Sailing Committee
    of the R.B.Y.C. will deal with these protests on Thursday.
    Owing to the protests the total ints for all the boats in
    the C and Intermediate Classes will not be published. Mohawk
    which came fourth may be disqualified and this will mean ,

    Saturday last by the local seouts



    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952°










    AQUATIC

    From Our Own Correspondent)

    }
    |
    | GRENADA, April 28 Many ailments are caused by poor blood which






    SPOR S Grenada defeated St. Vincent may affect the whole tem. Skin eruptions
    I two—nil in the school football and izriestion, simple rheumatism and painful BOWS
    opener today. : fe

    The Aquatic Sports staged on|

    in celebration of St. George’s week |

    WHAT’S ON TODAY






















    of th that the other boats will move up. Miss Behave has protested |] were won by the 3rd Barbados complaints. Be sure to ask for RWEUMATE
    out Football match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon, against Folly and Folly against Mohawk. Sea Scouts. Thefe was a very red LARKE’S ‘asi ACHES
    A fair crowd witnessed the match. Spartan scored two of The results of the Ninth Regatta are as follows: good attendance and from the 10.00 a.m. ONGINA. BING
    their goals in the first half of play while the other goal tela he rors Rar tage Meeting of House of Assembly 1 Mi
    was kicked in late in the second half. Wanderers also bright! Mt Seen not far off}}| — 3.00 pm.
    scored their lon 1 in the second half when they were » 3 rightly lighted and further be-|] Friendly Football at St. ae
    seminal @ etna Its: hick e : z i ; $ £ ae a en oat of = lst anueert es? p.m,
    * : F a 2 a OS a Seouts. Nearby on unecil Films at
    irae are goat nee yrs inna nee ne d 22 } 3 Su 3 5 a5 i = ree End ieee the Police Y¥.M.C.A.—7.00 p.m
    riff two an ‘ o ’ ‘ootball a - 4 ae peyeee. atte eee in 5 2 This Week sF 2 aabiie 9.52 2480 3742 0008 «4 «(12 95am the top of the booth recently erect- Boys’ School Pasture,
    sides had many opportunities but KNOCKOUT $ Mischies Has kia geass ks te e y+ nt bp inet a? Soe
    did not make good use of them. Mon. 28—Spartan vs. Wanderers 6. Flirt 99.44 3641 39.07 3831 3 13 103 I tie svete & . Ansae Genesel Mooting
    Re . 7 Moyra Bi 2020 39 19 30.31 n the events contested by the 8.P.C.A. British Coun
    The game started with Spartan Referee: W. Hoyos. » Moyra Blair . 5538. . 6 2 7
    defending the goal at the Linesmen: R. Parris & G f oe ith eR nee a ae 1s Pa and 3rd Barbados Sea 4.15 pm
    southern end of the field. A slight Amory. . 19 Wisara DNS. é a = ice DNS. SS ay" hig a Gene aa
    ; ; ‘Thure. 1_C : 3. ; 1. 55 9 7 : 2 2
    pag Pe ag + noi had or r 2 ane See 4a1. Fantasy 40.28 8§©6 39.56 $3 25 8 g os 1 point for a third place, Through
    kick off. Spartan went on the Linesmen: C. Roachford and TORNADO CLASS agg be -” Ge viasing of the 50 WEATHER REPORT
    offensive and as Gittens at left O. Robinson. K. 34 Cornet 2419 2243 «2230 2311 2 11 79 108 yds. event which was only dis-
    ; ‘ al ‘ T.K. 35 Earil 25.00 2220 2318 2332 3 10 93 govered after the conclusion of YESTERDAY
    half for Spartan Passed to Grant Sat. 3—Empire vs. Notre Dame. “ -
    centre forward, the Wanderers Referee: J. Howorth. TH. 31 Tempest DNS. = on eS ae the Sports, there was a match race none eee from Codrington: nil
    right back Proverbs intercepted Linesmen: W. Hoyos and A. TK. 38 Thunder 25.57 2208 2250 a8 4) (8 OD .. }) te decide the winners of the Sports. otal Rainfall for month to
    fi cleaved bis area Parris. TK. 39 Swansea D.N.S : eres? Vie However on @iscovéry of this er- date: 2.14 ins.
    and cleared his . ' TK. 40 Varnoose Wii 23.00 «2152 «edt 12105 ror the points awarded for the|| Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F.
    The Wanderers forwards made DIVISION ONE TK. 41 Zephyr DNS. = : ; 25 PP : Lowest Temperature: 73.0 °P.
    a good movement which was ON T.K. 42 Breakaway DNS. - . Mie match race were discarded, thus}} Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
    rer ik oe es Tues. 29—College vs. Empire at oat ae ~ ee aoe a - ali
    hma § , nt ; arometer a.m.
    long low pass tested Lawless the see aren, 2 second wit’ 21 points and Ist (3 p.m.) 29.966
    Wanderers custodian. Spartan 3 5 ; 7 third with 8 points. TO-DAY
    still continued to pile up the pres- DIVISION TWO & 2 = Sports commenced with a Sunrise: 5.41 am.
    sure and their forwards made ‘ \ i fl 2 £ a very exciting water polo match Sunset: 6.15 pam. 5 2
    repeated attempts toa open the Tues. 29—Notre Dame vs. Everton. . a5 23 as 2 : #3 3 between Bonitas, a.team compris-]] Moon: New, April 24 @ School Bags with Straps
    scoring. Referee: L, King. ¢ * ing of old sea scouts, and Whip- Lighting: 6.30 p.m. y c sth ‘ bl
    Then when the half was about Wed. 30—Carlton vs. Spartan. 1. Miss Behave 45.44 4.34 46.39 1 10 ua as porays. Bonitas won the game two]| High Tide: 6.53 a.m., 6.41 p.m. @ Exercise Books—Single, Arithmetic, Double
    eight minutes old, Haynes at cen- Referee: E. Amory. = co tu out? on - goals to »ne. Low Tide: 12.02 p.m. Line
    tre half for Spartan received a Fri. 2—Notre Dame vs. P.-Rovers. 7. Rogue 47.29 46.24 6.56% 7 4 :
    pass, ran down unmarked and Referee: L. Harris. 1% Foly 43.31 oz so38% g 5 - The boat race which followed @ Drawing Books, Note Books
    2 = spar- . anne! » . * - — ested
    a nee rith Oe ee ee tate edit DIVISION THREE i. Magwin ve we baba’ " , ipow Gane Tent teoe Mearted G Bleed? @ Hard Back Exercise Books, Fountain Pens
    n. ith oi a reg * _ Ta s Ss,
    Spartan still continued to press pyes, 29—Cable & Wireless vs. INTERMEDIATE p : from Needham*s Point just off the um . 2
    and. the second goal came when Everton at Boarded Hall. ee a6 U8: COBH GO CS OE] mm Scout hut and ended at the we Teeth magn that you, may @ Paint Boxes, Pencil Boxes, Crayons
    Griffith st Heer wing eat in per Referee: C. B. Williams. 4. Coronetta 46.4 49.09 41485 8 epee a. a be Barbados} have Pyorrhee, Trench outh or e & i a Math tical Set
    kicked the ba ard in e le Lodge vs. Y.M.C.A. Lodge. 1. Mohawk 46.08 50.49 48.28% 4 9 Outs passed e winning perhaps Ww ‘asers. eads, Compasses, Mathematica Ss
    corner of tha nets giving Lawless Sateves, H. D. Wilson . 8. Skippy Sah - . Or 8 a mark with a strong stroke to win pA anes Brees ’ »
    no chance to save. Score two nil. Regiment vs. Rangers at Gar-~ —a 49.20 © 83.59 51.39% 6 7 from the 2nd Barbados. matism ble, Amosan @ Rulers, Ink
    Half time found the score un rison. 12. Dawn 48.17 50.22 49.19% 3 10 62 In the swimming events there a gum the first day.
    changed. On the resumption it Referee : F. Edwards. 18. Clytie 46.08 46.33 46.20% 1 12 56 was very keen competition, es- el y a aulokly. tit @ Braid for Uniforms
    was Spartan again pressing but Wanderers vs. Notre Dameeat g aan asi? sian 80.47 4 o a 108 pecially between the 2nd and 3rd mn must your mouth well
    Wanderers were making spirited Bay. 3. Rainbira 49.19 48.09 48.44 2 ut 93 Barbados Sea Scouts, as the final] $24 Seve your teeth e raes, Oat e
    attempts to put in one. Then a Referee: K. Walcott. 4. Seabird 54.12, 63.18 53.15 5 2 3 points are apt to suggest. mosan from your chemist’ today,
    melee took place in the Spartan Carlton vs. Pickwick-Rovers at +g ag wie oon it On the conclusion of the swim- ihe Sy arautep protects yOu 1
    area and Bowen was adjudged Carlton, 9. Olive Blossom D.N.S a ~ 37 ming events, the spectators were " CAVE SHEPHERD & C0 LTD
    guilty of foul play. Referee Hoyos Referee: A, Parris. 1G enceenay ne, Seat ee Sar Sie , 4 entertained to a fireworks display : ” °
    Myan wae “kicked by Davies 7 ein 14. Hurricane : st 411% 3 0 89 from the Lord Combermere and

    centre half for Wanderers who
    made no mistake in kicking the
    ball well into the goal. This
    beamed to give the Wanderers
    players more spirit for they were
    now seen combining well.

    Then about five minutes before
    the blow off, Griffith again on the
    wing, got to the ball after Jemmott
    had kicked it across the Wander-
    ers goal and finding himself un-
    marked, kicked in the third goal

    for Spartan and the second for “

    himself. Play ended with the
    Score 3-1 in favour of Spartan,

    The teams were:—

    Spartan : Atkins, Gibbons,
    Bowen, Morrison, Gittens, Haynes,
    Griffith, Cadogan, Grant, Ishmael
    and Jemmott,,

    Wanderers: Lawle-s, Atkinson,
    G. Proverbs, Patterson, Mayers.
    Davies, Farmer, Corbin, Proverbs,
    H. Farmer and D. Atkinson.

    The referee was Mr. B. Hoyos.

    Referee: f. King.

    Police vs. Everton at Comber-

    mere.
    R. Hutchinson,

    Referee:
    College vs. Combermere Old

    joys at College.
    Referee: C. Roachford.
    Fri. 2—Y.M.P.C. “B” vs.
    at Beckles Road.
    Referee: J, Archer.
    Cc. & W. vs.
    Boarded Hall.
    Referee: E. Amory.

    Comb. vs. Police at Combermere
    « Hoyos.

    Referee: ,
    Carlton vs. Regiment at Carlton
    Referee: H. Wilson.

    Rangers vs. Notre Dame at Shell

    Referee: O. Graham.

    Fri. 2—P.-Rovers vs. ¥.M.C.A. at

    Kensington,
    Referee: R. Hutchinson.
    College vs. Y¥.M.P.C, “A”

    College.
    Referee: L, King.



    Answers To

    Mr. Cecil Hutchinson, C/o
    T. 8. Garraway and Co., is the
    winner of the Sports Quiz.
    Mr. Hutchinson got four of the
    six questions right but there

    The queries and answers are
    as follows:—
    CRICKET
    1, When British Guiana
    won the Triangular Inter-
    colonial Cricket tournament in
    1895 one British Guianese
    bowler took the last four
    Trinidad wickets in the first
    innings for an extremely small
    score, Who was he, how many
    wickets dfd he take and for
    how many runs scored?
    Answer No. 1. 8. W. Spros-
    ton. Four wickets for 5 runs.
    FOOTBALL
    2. A player throws the ball
    from the touchline to the cross-
    bar and it bounces Off the goal-



    Committee Makes
    Recommendations

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 24.
    The Gambling and Public Lot-
    teries Committee appointed by the

    keeper into the nets. Would
    you give a goal?
    Answer No. 2. Yes.
    WATER POLO
    3. Who was captain of the
    Trinidad “Discovery” Water
    Polo team which visited Bar-
    bados in 1949, and was this the
    first tournament between these
    two colonies?
    Answer No. 3. Basil Ander-
    son. Yes.
    SWIMMING
    4. In what part of the
    world did the crawl
    — 0 ?
    swer No, 4. In the South
    Sea Islands and developed in
    Australia,
    TABLE TENNIS
    5. What is the first stroke
    (n a game of Table Tennis?
    Answer No. 5.
    HORSE
    6. Who is responsible for
    the weight carried by a horse
    in a weight for age event?
    Answer No. 6. The trainer.



    becoming common gambling
    houses and to run or cause to be
    run not more than four public
    lotteries a year and to establish
    ind run or cause to be established
    ind run one gaming house or
    casino in the colony.



    DOMINICA WINS

    erton

    Cc. O. Boys at

    * — of football actuall

    at



    on football problems.

    When does a game
    commence?
    Answer No. 1. hen the ball
    has rolled its complete circum-
    ference after the kick-off.
    Query No. 2. Is it correct that
    the spectators can always tell
    which team won the toss by

    Query No. 1,

    checking on the team that
    kicked-off?
    Answer No. 2. No, The team

    winning the toss can either

    take the kick~

    gies GaN he ie etal

    won or toss.

    not Mt ace that 2

    . changed the goal-keeper. Is it
    all right if the linesman who is
    also secretary of that club in:
    forms the referee?

    Answer No. 3. Yes.

    Query No. 4. Can a player be
    off-side from a goal-kick?

    Answer No. 4. No.

    Query No. 5. What should be the
    penalty if a player at Place Kick,
    plays the ball back.

    Answer No. 5. Have the kick
    retaken,

    Query No. 6. If two players col-
    lide and in the referee’s opinion
    one player is still semi-conscious
    although he persists in carrying
    on, can the referee in the play-
    er’s own interest, order him off
    the field?

    Answer No. 6, es.
    Query 7. Cah a player insist
    upon aring a coat each time



    FOOTBALL ASSOC.

    Following are the results of '
    matches played last week:— |

    April 2lst Penrode beat Hark- |
    liffe 3—0. |

    April 22nd Rangers beat Advo- |
    cate 2—0.

    April 23rd Westerners beai |
    Malvern 4—0,

    April 25th Rangers beat Pen- |
    rode 3—2,

    This Week’s Fixtures

    B’DOS FRIENDLY |








    Your Football Problems

    By O. S. COPPIN

    I HAVE IGNORED some queries this week that are too
    frivolous and which are not aimed at eliciting information
    Today I deal with those which I
    consider are genuinely aimed at obtaining some help.

    Auswer No.7. The referee should

    Query No. 8. A player in an off-

    Answer No. 9.
    Query No. 10.

    Answer No. 10. No.
    Query No. 11. Suppose both goal-

    Answer No. 11.
    Query No. 12.

    ‘
    | Answer No. 12. Send both plays



    Buoy Rescue
    the Lord Combermere to the
    Aquatic Club. The Lord Comber-
    mere all alight in the water with
    fireworks of various description
    thrilled the crowd immensely and
    went a far way in helping to make
    the entertainment the success that
    it was.
    The results are as follows:
    8.00 P.M. WATER POLO MATCH
    BONITAS vs. WHEPPORAYS
    Winners: Bonitas 2—1.
    8.30 P.M, BOAT RACE
    Ist — Ist Sea Scouts, 2nd
    Scouts, 3rd — 3rd Sea Scouts
    Time: 4.23”
    445 P.M. % YARDS SWEMMING
    RACE

    2nd Sea

    it starts to rain during a match?
    I have seen this done in a game

    here, I do not know if it was an ,18t — Cadogan (rd SS), 2nd —

    Griffith (3rd $.S.), 3rd — Headley (Ist



    all —.fferent styles and
    types available

    10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





    ——_——_——.

    a





    e
    We offer:

    official fixture but the player $73°) From 727 Plain White
    was allowed to do it, t is Time: 18 sees. . pe i eu. ”
    the ruling? 8.05 P.M. S YARDS SWIMMING RACE 6” x 6’, 3” x 3” 4" x 4”

    1st — Allen (2nd S.S.}, 2nd
    & Reid (3rd S.S.)
    Time: 42 secs.
    6.05 P.M RESCUE RACE
    ist — Atwell (and Sea Scouts), 2nd
    Griffith (3rd Sea Scouts), 3rd — Rudder
    (ist Sea Scouts).
    Time: 26 secs.
    915 P.M. RELAY RACE

    make the player remove the
    coat and caution him.

    side position on the penalty line

    gan (3rd S.S.), 3rd — Sobers (3rd S.S.)

    Time; 1.5 sees. «
    9235 P.M. % YARDS RANGERS RACE
    {st —- Miss Phillips, 2nd — Miss Collens

    Time: 16 secs.
    TOTAL POINTS
    ard B’dos Sea Scouts 25 Points, 2nd B’dos
    Sea Scouts 21 Points, !st B’Dos Sea Scouts
    8 Points.

    Jamaica Beat

    Trinidad 5—0

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, April 28.

    Jamaica made it 5—0 today
    as they avenged the 4—1 defeat
    by Trinidad last year when play
    in the Brandon Trophy finals
    ended today.

    Jimmy Farquhason beat Jin Ho
    in straight sets 7—5, 6—4, 6--4,
    while Eddie Aris beat Gunn
    Munro 3—6, 6—4, 6—4, 7—5 in
    the two last single matches,

    + No 9 Su
    a cigarette dating the game,
    could he be penalised?
    Yes, the referee
    should caution him.
    y No. If a player went
    near the edge of the field for a

    drink, could he be penalised
    too?



    keepers arrive in sweaters. of
    the same colour, which goal-
    keeper would be required to
    change?

    Neither. I see no
    reason for changing.

    If a player retali-
    ated with two blows after hav-
    ing been hit by another player.
    what action should the referee
    take in the circumstances?

    ers off the field.





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    report yesterday recommending Dominica won the Inter yg. Penrode. ’ | i ea bieod oom
    the establishment of a Board of Schools Cricket Series to-day Referee: Mr. T. Maynard. * ‘i
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    ers to licence race courses for wicket, vs. Westerners. | Kidney Pills. They help the kidneys to rid the blood
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    leense places in which gamblitye 95. St. Lucia defeated Grenada played at St, Leonard’s G \ HALF A CENTU. sucoess ailments inadequate
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    Full Text

    PAGE 1

    PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. APRIL 2. 1M Spartan Defeat Wanderers 3—1 SPARTAN DEFEATED WANDERERS. %  Third Division Team, to the tune of three goals to one in their Knockout football match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon. A fair crowd witnessed the natch. Spartan scored two of their goals in the first half of play while the other coe.1 was kicked in late in the second half. Wanderers alto scored their lone gqjfl in the second half when thev were awarded a penalty kick * This Week's Football The Spartan goal st & Griftth (two goals) -nil 1 HiynM. Davles scored from a penally kirk (or Wanderers. Both sides had many i-pportunltW but did not make good use of them Thr the field. A blight wind was blowing Hcmvi the (tteri ;.s Referee Hoyos blew fottM kick off. Spartan went <>n ih. offensive and at Gittens at letl Results Of .\iiiih Regalia There are a few protests pending The Sailing Committee of the 1(11 Yt will deal with these protests on Thursday. Owing to the protest* the total points for alt the boats In the C and Intermediate Classes will not be published. Mohawk which came fourth may be disqualified and Ibis will mean that the other boats will move up. Mis* Behave has protested .igainjt Folly ami Folly against Mohawk. The results of the Ninth Regatta are as follows: KN.Xs.OtT Men2—Spartan vs. Wanderers Referee. W. Iloyo* Linesmen: K. farm It G. Amoty. Chair*. 1 -Carlton vs. Everton. Fteferev; O. Graham. l.ineMiien: ('. Itoachford and O. Robinson. hall f*r Spartan passed to Grant Sal3— Empire vs. Notre Dame. centre forward, the Wanderer: right back Proverbs intercepted and c leu red his area. The Wanderers forwards mad. a good movement which ** broken up by Gibbons and Busm and then Isr.rn.ivl on receiving %  long low pass tested Lawless thu Wanderers custodian. Spartan Mill continued to pile up the pressure and their forwards snack repeated attempts \„ open the grissf Then when thr halt was abou, eight mtniirT uld, Haynes at centre hiilf lor Spartan received a pasts, ran down unmarked nn press and the second goal cam* Sthsa Griffith at right wing cut In "ml gjgto I lbs bell bprd in the irtt corner of the net* giving Lewiesno chance lo save. Score two nil Half time found the •core uichanged. On the resin <**>. Bpat tas i fia**** BSjSWiai bu Wandtirni were making sntrited attempt (o put in i>ni Then i pagjaa u->v plgew Ui the spai'.iti area and Ilowen was .id judged guilty of foul play. Krferoe Hoyns awarded ;i penalty kick. This was kicked by Davit-, centre half for Wanderers who made no mistake in kicking the ball well into the goal. Thi* seemed to give the Wanderer" players more spirit for they were now seen combining well. Then about live minutes bcfi i Howotm Linesmen 1 W. Hovoa and A. Pan I DIVISION ONK Empire at r*. 2—College College. L. Harris. DIVISION IV.II Tees. 29—Notre Dame vs. Everton. Referee L King. I Wed. 3e—Car I ton vs. Spartan. Referee K Amory. Fri. I N o tr i Dame ** P.-Rovers. Referee. L. Harris. DIVISION %  iu:i l Tees. Z—Cable & Wireless vs. Everton al Boarded Mall. (tataret; C. B. willlasns. I .,.,,:, v M r A. ..i Lodge Referee. H. D. Wilson. Regiment vs. Rangers at Garrison. F. Edwards. ii LI i %  NotVI l> 'me -1 Bay. Referee: K. WalcoU. I"..i Hun vs. Pickwiik-Hovers ni Carlton. Referee. A. 1'arris. Had. 3t— Foundation Old Boys v* Foundation at Foundation. Rentw I. King. Police vs. Bverton at ComoerReJerw R. Hutehinson. College vs. Cooibermeia Old Boys at College. Referee: C, Roachford %  %  sassUM tORNAIIO ••„* TK 14 C ,n TK IS Koitl TK M rurv TK IT T, TK M Thundri TK IS Si TK IK u n>Mh a .a> I I hi V ;; i 1 %  SMS MSO ST .43 MM | &f SIT Nil 4i or 40OS S us 11 14 SS.4S IS B 1 Mil 1S0T Mil a IS so U Ml* JSJI sin SIM ssn Mil DNS DNS DNS DNS hi h n au nn an DHS DNS Foth II SBBBWBB I . I I'll |.l v I I Onal 1 Inverter 4 ODIOFWIU M | %  I SfclPI" I Haunt b— II Keen IS D.v... IS Clyli. • IXASH 4411 4*41 4*ta EM w 4SM Ml? i >. eiae • %  : 4T44 •Sit 4SS> 44 01 4in u:. MXl 44 M .< n esoe 2 111 41.07 Si IS M.OIS *i4s:^ 4128". %  1 J*', 4S.ISW MM'. the blow off. Ortfnth again on the Fri. 1-YMP.C "B* v. Tverton wing, got to the ball after Jemmott had kicked it across the Wanderon goal and finding himself unmarked, kicked in the third < % %  '' for Spartan and the second for himself. Play ended wllh tho score 3—l in favour of Spartan The teams were:— Saertaa : Atkins. Gibbons. Griffith. Cailogan Grant. Ishmael and Jenunott^r Wasfcicren: Lawle--. Atkinson. O. Proverbs, Palterson. Mayers Davios. Farmer. Corbln. Proverbs. H. Farmer and D. Atkinson. Tho referee was Mr B. Hoyor. Ucckles Road, tteferae J. Archer. C. & W. vs. C. O. Boys at Boarded Hall. RefereeE. Amory. Comb. vs. Police at CmnbermereReferee: W. Hoyos. Carlton \s Regiment at Carlton. KefereeH. Wilson Ranger* vs. Notre Dame at Shell Referee O. Graham. Fri. i—V -Hovers vs. Y.M.C.A. at Kensington. Referee R Hutehinson. college vs Y.M.P.C "A" at College. Referee: L. King Your Football Problems By O. S. COPPIV 1 HAVE IGNORED some queries this week that are too frivoktug and which are not aimed at eliciting information on itx.tball problems. Today 1 deal with those which 1 consider are genuinely aimed at obtaining some help. When doe Query No. I. When doet a game of football actually commence? Aaawer Ne. 1. When the ball has rolled Its complete circumference after the kick-off. Query Ne. 1. Is it correct that the spectators can always tell which team won the was by checking on the team that kicked-oir: Answer Ne. it starts to rain during a match: I have seen this done in a game here, 1 do not know if it was an official lixtuie but the plavr was allowed to do It. WJiat is the ruling? Answers To Sport Quiz* Mr. Oecll HnichWaoo, O/o T. fl Oarraway and Co.. Is tho winuor of Uio gports Qala. Mr. Hutehinson get four of the %  ix qunUon* right but there was not a single conpeUtor except Mr. Hutehinson who could got more than two qeeattons right The quartos and answers are as follows:— OBIOKBT 1. Whsn British Oulana won Uio Triangular Inter colonial Orlckot toiirnnmoot la HOfi ono British Qulaaese bowlor took tho last fear Trinidad wtckota In tho amt inningfor an oxtromely ssaall seore. Who was ho. how many srtckots dfd ho tako and for how many runs scorsd? Answor No. 1. a. W. gproa ton. Four wickets for S runs. FOOTBALL 2A playor throws the ball from the touchline to tha crossbar and It bounces "oft tha goalkeeper into the nets. Would you g*.vo a goal? Answer No. 2. TtS. WATER POLO 3. Who w*> captain of tfes Trinidad "Discovery" Water Polo team which visited Bar bade* la 1940, and was this aha first tournament between these two colonise? Answor No. 3. Basil Andoron Tes. SWIMMING 4. In what part of tas world did tha crawl iwlmmlng stroke crialaate? Answer KoTT. In the goutfc Boa IManda sod developed In Aii*tt*lU. TABUS TENNIH 6. What U tho first stroke .ii a gama of Table Tennis? Answer Ho. 6. gervice ROSSTE RACING 8. Who Is responsible for tho weight carried by a horse In a weight for age event? Answer No. 6. The trainer Answer No. 7. The referee should make the player remove the coat and caution blm. No. The learn *Hery No, g. A player in an olttoss can either side position on th c penalty Una vhooM'goals ur Uupa the kick-.top:, a goal-kick. Should he be oft so that the team actually blown off-sideinking the klcfc-oot might have **•/ Ne, . No. The kick won or lost the teas. should be retaken. utter) Ne. %. A caplaiu fails to <***T Np, %• Suppose ,. player lit a cigarette during the game, "notify the referee thai he has changed tha goal-keeper. Is if .ill right if the linesman who is aJao secretary of that club In forms the referee? Answer Ne, 1. Tea. Query No. 4. Can a player be off-side from a goal-kick' \nsm-rr Ne. . No. Query No, 5. What should bo the fg-L^Jtau*"is""at ^Vn %  %  i-^-.h !" -i could he be penalised"' Answer Na. . Yes. the referee should caution him. Query No, It. If a player went Daer the edge of the Bald for .. drink, could he be penaliavd too? Answer No, It. No. AQUATIC SPORTS The Aquatic Spurts staged on' Saturday last by the local seouta In celebration of St. George's weak, were won by the 3rd Barbados Sea Scouts. There was a very good attendance and from the Aquatic Club the Lord Combermere could be wen not far off brightly lighted -nd further beywr.d, the scout hut of the IT Barbados Sea Seouta. Nearby "ii the Greaves End beach the Police Band setU acmes lively tunes from the top of tha booth recently erected by Mr. A E. Taylor, jnd added lo the evening's entertainment. In the event* contested by the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Barbados Sea Scouts. 5 pointa were awarded for fsrst, I points for a second and I point for a third place. Through an error in the placing of the 50 yds event which was only discovered after the conclusion of the Sparta, there was a match race to decide the winners of the Sports However on discovery of the* error the points awarded for the match race were discarded, thus bringing the 3rd Sea Scouts first with 25 points, 2nd Sea Scouts second wit' 21 points and 1st Sea Scouts third with 8 points The Sports commenced with a vf7 exciting • between Butulas, a teaun oggsgeraaIng of old sea scouts, and Whipporayx. Bonltas won the game two The boat race which followed wan contested by the three Sea S.>ut Hoops. The race started from Noedham's Point Just off the ^en Scout hut and ended at the Aquatic Club. The 1st Barbados Ben Seoul> passed the winning mark with ,i strong >,tiuKc to win from the 2nd Barbodo" In the ftwuiuuiiig evg) was very keen rumpeeHlon. espeiullv between the 2nd aiul 3nl Barbados Sea Scouts, as the lliuil points are apt to suggest. On the conclusion of the swimming events, the >.poctlon were entertained to a 11 rework* display fumi the I.-ird ruiiiU-nueu,.i. %-ouu. and Scoots, liil — Ire Sea Seoul*. TimVSaB-u rat at i4U> KMIMMIM. %  ACS ux Cadosen . ."! obe-. A Rrld •3rd 111 Time: U eeei I u'. P M Bl 1 ( BAir in Ai*cli >H1 Sea Seoul*'. sd a, (i tard S B i Jrfl •lobr.. J..I R I rin>. i S uerv I* r M tS tABDSANOIBS KAl I irt MM rhtllipe. Snd MtssColleiiTOTAJ POINTS aro avsoe sea ficouu at pomu. me ST. VINCENT BEATF.N 'A.r Own CO,,-, GRENADA. April 28 Grenada defeated St. Vincent two—nil in the school football opt • i today. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Grand gesaseeuk10 00 a-Ss. Meeting ef House of Assembly 3 00 p.m. Friendly Football at S*. Leonard's—5 00 pan. BrlUsh Council Films at TM 0 A.—7.00 p.m Mobile Clneaaa. at Oleaaaat's Boys' Sehaol Paatare, St Lacy -7 30 pas. Annual Osssral Meeti.Bg I 1* 0 A British Council a IB pav TTell^n *! Jf 1-1 It i\-Hofl* in ^ M .^L"i A HJ ^-ai^^eerat miv aflect the %  auk* mean Skin r rupbmi sad tmtsUDsu aanpsfi rL*n*saausui aisi paiaf al KMOIS arc nature's ngeal that you need Chirk* esseoswae Blood Mature. Tsss farnous madiune help* £0K/ to daaaae das hssod sareasn of aaapuniiei and dfifisajAsjeg heap veu fit aael arse from these and umuar ^3,_... nossklssoBM rmasrsawin. Be nre to ask for CLARKE'S Hood Mixture^ umuM WEATHER REPORT YEfiTBRDAY Rainfall from Oedrtngtae: ail Total sValnfail for saoath to date 2 14 itu Highest Temperature: 16 I *F. Lowest Temperature: 7S 0 "F Wiod Velocity: 18 mile, per hoar. Barometer (0 am) ao.Oati la pa) 29 gg TO-DAY iBanas: 5 41 aask Bonset: 6 16 past Moon: New. April 84 Li|hUng: 6 30 BJB. Hlgh Tide 6 r,3 a.m.. HI 1 p.m. Low Tide12 02 p.m Bach to Gums Bleed! flleedina Hums, Core Mouth >nl Loose Teeth mean ihai re Uti l'"rrli.i. Trench Uouth %  I persaae sssse had giaaaea thai eoeaer er laur cause jour teeih i fail oat sad Diay •!•<> TBUM Id ii.silem and siaart Trouble. on esa the tes t a, ires aisg <"' %  Araesaa arast sashe your nsestb w. sad aaes rour teeul or IDSBOT ba-' oa return "t imply pickaae. •'• % %  SUN SHADES all ...iTtrtui stylea and lypes available I rm 72? its .bout 9SMMI Call TODAY al yoar HUH I r Ks \. lie LIMA A CO.. 1.1II. Mi Broad Street. e School Bug* with Sirup* S %%  rrciv. Books—Sinuk. Arithmetic. Double Line • Drnuinij Books. Note Books • Hurd Hnck Kxercise Books. Fountain Pens • I'uiul Boxes. Pencil Boxes. Crnvons e I r.i'u-. Leads. C'ompussis, >liilhentatical Sets • Itnlei s. Ink O Braid for Uililorm e CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. It. 11. 12 & 13 Broad Slrrrl ferBrst Brsatls-ADVEHTISE thc same colour, which goalkeeper would be required change? Jamaica Boat Trinidad .">—0 plays the ball back AneweaT Ne. 5. Have the kick retaken. Haery Ne. *. If lwo placers collide and In the referee's opinion Answer Ne. II. Neither. I sec no one plgyer Is still saml-eoi^clous reason for changing. Bitmap ho persists in carryiuit <|uery Ne. It. If n player retaliated with Iwo blows after havended today. ing been hit by another plaver. Jimmy Farquhason beat Jin Ho what action should the referee In straight seta 7— 5, 6—4, 6-4. Held? i the referee in the piny i interest, order him f irrom Our Own C.ere*|Kina*tiH KINGSTON. April 28. Jamaica made it 5—0 today ns they avenged the 4—1 defeat by Trinidad last year when play the Brandon Trophy flnaU In straight set while Eddie Committee MakeU.'t.niuuriul'iliiMi(FVom Our Own CoireapundvnD GEORGETOWN. D.G., April 24 The Gambling and Public Lotteries Committee appointed by (he Governor to make recommendations for amending present laws in relation i„ nil forms of gamblm-Hid public luttcrlOB rclciscd it: i-eport yesteid.ty reeoniisieQdgai the establlshiTii'nt of a Board of Commissioners wllh specific pewi-rs to licence rare eearrStg PM gambling, lo license all fonn ol .ramlng. betUng and l..• % %  license places in which gBOBbllng ..ikes place to as lo prevent thc/i 1-ivomlng comroon garabliiig houses and to run or cause to bu nin not more than four publii' I tileries a year and to eatabli>h iiid run or cause to be establishi-d tml run ono gaming house or %  f irm In the colony. DOMINKA Mi\S gsgWssl %  Proni Our Own Correspondence* (iHENAUA. April L'ti Dominica won the [nil l Schools Cricket Series to-day defeating SI. Lucin by ono wicket. Tho scores : Doimmt.i itKl ;md 104 for : St. Lucin 114 und 05. St. Lucia defeated Grenada seJUfir. Vaswer No, g. Yea take ,„ Ui e cl^cunurtances ^ • while Eddie Arts User* Mo. 1. Can :i player insist %  Answer Ne. 12. sSen.i both plsy* Munro 3—, upon wearing a coat e nch tlim ( rr, of ih c fle | di th# two tttXt B'DOS FRIENDLY FOOTBALL ASSOC. Following are the results oi instches played last week:— I April 21st Penrode beat Hark, liffe 3—0. April 22nd Rangers beet Advo| cate 2—0. April 23rd Weslerners boa \ Malvem 4—0. April 25th Rangers beat Pen\ xle .t 2. This Week's Fixtures Monday. April 28th. Harkllflc • vs. Malvem. Referee: Mr. C. E. Reece. T^csdav. April 2Bth: Advocnuvs. Pen rode. Referee' Mr. T M.iynard. Wednesday, April 30th: Rnngcn. [ vg, Westerners. Referee: Mr. J. Archer. All tho above matches will % %  played at SL Leonard's Grounds, j Richmond Gap, Barbareo* Itoud. serve r em right! beat —4. 7—5 intches. **Eery Picture •ells a Story" Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved They'll Do It Eve v Time w*.--**. By Jimmy HatloTj .isrderung, psinting, odd |obi round the bouse can be a pleasure again when you are fear froco backache, ri .s n s.sd c pains, stiff, aching muKsn and iointa, lumSif tisgo or gggssssg unnary Troubles due to impunoee in the blood. Why not get bappr relief by fistsfifi Itesn'i Backseat Misery Pills. They belp (be kidosys to rid the blood osTeaosss tarlo acid and other snpua.ba which cchsrvrlse mlgfat oellsct a. the lyilli gfid casate dieueee aMfisf 4 CasWTCT V a/ sassssi ia r.gsssst ajfigagaj dm to esssfsjsssl atssav assess k aW sressf rsswJ s/ Domti Mb. Gr/W ssea asaf %  fif eg sfst MM s*W sjs a s sy gg a l iJM •J'kiwu ossrinc omd srssarv Mi Bj lasv/Viaasi gayj I For PERMANENT FLOORS. COUNTERS & WALLS, that will last a Lifetime:e ENGUSH UNGLAZED FLOOR TILES HUm Red, 2 shadt<> of Speckled Creum and Red Plain While " X •". 3" X 3" 4" X 4" ENGLISH GLAZED TILES Blur, Black. Given and While • %  xr WHITE SNOWCBBTB CEMENT RED It BUFf COLORCRETE CEMENT KF.RROCRETE Ra| id-HardeniiiK CEMENT PORTLAND CEMENT in baa's • 'Phone : 4456. 4267 WILKINSON & IIAVNIS CO., LTD. J&R ENRICHED BREAD serve together WITH ANCHOR MILK sen %  • atai. MRS. j.TA-mvy PEAUHG AUKIST HIT HER ESCj-HWTe CEILIN6 WHEN 'JrlE RXN17 OUT rtHAT TUt WlNTlNCj JD6 VVCOLP COST-— &TFWTTH PLENTY OOUGH SHELL B>RT FOR JUN< THATS L4.BELEP ATT-LIKE THE ONE ENTITLED"SAWD B0W.,UNTOSSO DfiANS V G S & CO. / SPECIAL For l.. C-'l GLORIOUS WEEKS We DOM offer vnu S% Hisiuunt on all Caah Purchase^ o\er $10.60 So Remember WORLD'S MOST COPIED 1MGIIH FOR BETTER I: Mil, MS-TRY (iioKiti: s AHEI.V i C0.-I9 Swan Slrtrl lor EBVICE. VALUE & VARIETY PHONE 4,34 II iih a tlmiff nf iln!•! %  • •fle/ffH-s — llil'/ll/ t/ !" i'. I il/mli'siilf/ IH I una .YOII IHISII Thi. uonoerful marhlnr is now also available with FULL-TRACKS You'll be lrul> amaxed to see Ibra smallro.



    .
    9
    ‘

    Hharbavtos

    GEN. RIDGWAY SU€CEEDS

    Mark Clark Replaces
    Ridgway In Far Eas



    ESTABLISHED 1895

    GRUENTHER CONTINUES

    AS SHAPE CHIEF OF STAFF] Truce Tatks

    WASHINGTON, April 28
    PRESIDENT TRUMAN appointed General

    Matthew Ridgway as new Supreme Allied

    Commander in Europe and named General Mark
    W. Clark to replace Ridgway in the Far East.
    General Ridgway will replace General Dwight
    D. Eisenhower whose release as Supreme Allied
    Commander in Europe will be effective June 1.
    A North Atlantic Council meeting in Paris
    asked Truman to designate an American and he

    chose Ridgway. Ridgway was formally nominated
    by.the President and the actual appointment was
    made by the NATO Council.

    The President discloseq at
    Ridgway’s request that General
    Alfred M. Gruenther will con-
    tinue as Chief of Staff in Paris.
    Clark who succeeds Ridgway as
    head of the Far East Command
    and Commander in Chief of Forces
    in Korea, is now Commander of
    Army Forces stationed at Fort
    Monroe, Virginia,

    Truman sent Ridgway a mes-
    Sage saying in part: “You have
    my highest personal esteem and
    best wishes as you assume this
    great responsibility. I know all
    our people will be fully and
    warmly behind you as will all
    freedom loving people the world
    over.”

    In appointing Clark, Truman
    said: “In making this appointment
    I want to emphasise that General
    Clark will continue the policies
    which have been so ably carried
    out by General Ridgway with
    regard to United Nations action
    in Korea including if possible, the

    achievement of anh ji!
    armistice.”—,P, a {

    Grow May Face
    _ Court Martial









    GENERAL MARK CLARK.
    —S——



    ‘WO FORBIDDEN
    TO ENTER B.G.

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    GEORGETOWN, B.G.,

    April 26.

    fell into Communist hands and a The Governor in Council made

    hearing will be held to determine’ an order i illi
    ; prohibit Will
    eee he should face Court|Strachan and Ferdinand Smith
    artial. , from entering British Guiana,
    Charges cover improperly Hon'ble Dr, Cheddi Jagan and

    recording classified military in-!a crowd of member:
    formation in private records and} People’s Progressive Mat cecil
    failing to safeguard secret inform-|ed to Atkinson Airport | to meet
    ation properly, them by regular B.W.1LA, plane as
    The case srew out of the theft} scheduled but they did not turn
    by a Soviet agent” of Grow’s/up; but even if they had landed
    diary _ Which contained excerpts;they would not have been per-
    in which he expressed the opinion | mitted to enter Georgetown.
    that the States P.P.P. memvers paraded at the
    attack Russia as soon as possible| Airport with placards reading
    and by “hitting below the belt”, | “British subjects should be allowed
    Excerpts .were later published! free movement in the West Indies.”
    press. Grow is 57 tion authorities believe
    years old and is a former military | that Strachan and Smith had re-
    attache to the United States Em-|ceived word that they would be
    bassy in Moscow, deemed prohibited immigrants

    —U.P. ‘and cancelled the visit.



    Trade Unions’ Conference
    To Begin Here On June 5

    A CONFERENCE of all the Trade Unions in the
    area affiliated to the (O.R.LT.) Inter-American Regional
    Organisation of Workers is due to be held in Barbados from
    Thursday, June 5, to Saturday, June 7, Mr. F. L. Walcott,
    M.C.P., General Secretary to the Barbados Workers’ Union,
    told the Advocate in an interview yesterday.

    Mr. W alcott a member of the Sub-Committee appointed
    by the affiliates of the International Confederation of Free
    Trade Unions (I.C.F.T.U.) and (O.R.LT.) returned yester-
    day from Trinidad where he attended a meeting of that
    committee
    from the area and to make. plans for the holding

    ference of the various affiliated Organisations in the area.
    Mr. Walcott said:— -

    The Sub-Committee



    '
    appointed |



    by the Caribbean affiliates of the a

    International Confederation of HST $s STUDY A

    Free Trade Unions (1L.C.F.T.U.) a eee

    and the Inter-American Regional - oe
    rganisation of Workers ing



    (O.R.1.T.) met in Trinidad from ;
    the 26th to 27th April to discuss
    the Reports from the area and to
    make plans for the holding of a
    Conference of the various afili-
    ated Organisation in the area,
    The first session of the Commit-
    tee started discussions at the |
    Queen’s Park Hotel at 9 P.M. on
    Saturday 26th and ended at 4.30
    A.M. Sunday 27th.
    Recommendations |
    The Committee received re-
    ports on the working of Trade
    Unions in Grenada, British Gui-
    ana, Barbados, Trinidad’ Jamaica, |
    St. Lucia amd St. Vincent; and!
    made recommendations to tac!
    Executive Board of O.R.LT, and
    L.C.F.T.U, to assist the Organisa- |
    tional activities in the area. ;
    The Committee recommended
    that a Conference of all of the!
    affiliated Trade Unions in the
    area should be held in BARBA-|
    DOS on THURSDAY, 5th JUNE
    TO SATURDAY, 7th JUNE. |
    The Agenda of the Conference |
    will include:—
    Sub-
    |





    therefore it might have been pos-
    (a) The establishment of a bh 2 Sible to deal with him on t|
    Secretariat in the area footing.
    (b) Report of the Regional} THIS IS the President’s study which is located on the second floor of Since then, it was discovered
    Secretary. the newly-decorated and rebuilt White House. A painting of President that Bailey had a previous con-
    @ on page 5 Trunan’s mother is im the background, fnternational Exclusive) | -iction for larceny, that he was
    i












    potsing definite had yet been

    from April 26 to April 27 to discuss the Reports
    of a con-}900 of them to the Chinese Com-
    | UP.

    FTER



    ha oy





    d

    DR.



    —



    Solution To
    Proposed

    PANMUNJOM April 28
    The United Nations proposed on
    Mon “overall solution” to
    the deadlocked Korean Armistice
    talks and top-flight delegates im-
    mediately went into scret session
    to talk over the offer.

    The Communists’ reply to the
    United Nations proposal was not
    announced because of the news
    blackout that was pulled over the
    talks. Shortly after Vice-Admiral
    C. Turner Joy, head of the United
    Nations delegation presented b
    offer, North Korean General Nam
    ll proposed an indefinite recess.
    Joy agreed.

    It was up to the Communists to
    hame the date and time of the
    next Plenary Session.

    Allied officers first considered
    the entire meeting as secret but
    their decision was later altered
    when the Communists released the
    first part of the discussions lead-
    ing Up to an agreement to go into
    executive sessions,

    United Nations spokesman Brig-
    adier General William P. Nuckols
    said the decision to hold secret
    talks was made in the ho of
    Speeding an armistice in Korea.
    He said: “We hope to minimise
    the use of meetings for propa-
    ganda purposes. We hope that by
    getting down to brass tacks an
    armistice can be reached more
    speedily. The Communists con-
    Stantly have utilised open sessions
    as sounding boards.”—U.P.

    Full-scale Talks On

    Anglo-Egyptian
    Treaty Unlikely

    LONDON, April
    Chances for the ede
    full-scale negotiations on the
    Anglo—Egyptian Treaty were con-
    sidered to be remote today.
    The Foreign Office said that

    the equally rampant Mi





    BRITISH GUIANA Tr;
    to the Labour Department



    of machinery for settlemen



    Farnum For

    Ths fund still has a far way
    to go. We are aiming at
    $2,880 . 00.

    Do your bit to defray the
    expenses of the Ace Cyclist,
    Ken Farnum to the Olympic
    Games at Helsinki next July.
    Donations are accepted at the

    arranged for
    tween Eden
    sador Abdel
    mally hand
    formula.

    a conference be-
    and Egyptian Ambas-
    Fattah Amr to for-
    over the new British





    British proposals were infor~ Royal Bank of » Bar-
    mally conveyed to Amr last week clay’s Bank, and the office of
    and Cairo reports said t were the Advocate.
    referred to Egyptian ier Goal .............. $2,880.00

    ilaly who them as “an Amt. prev. Ack. $ 419.14 |
    unsatisfactory basis for negotia- A. E. M. 2.00
    tions,"—U.P. N. Carmichael . 5.00 i

    . | Professor Weekes . 1.00 |
    Total * $427.14

    Soviet ‘Airforce
    Larger Than U.S.
    —FINLETTER

    WASHINGTON, April 28
    US. Air Force Seeretary Thomas |
    K. Finletter estimates the overall
    United States plane strength to! April 27.
    2/3 or 3/4 that of Russia, Finletter Lord Munster Parliamentary
    said Russia has about 20,000 front- Under-Secretary of State for the
    line combat planes and an equal | Colonies leaves for Trinidad to-
    number in reserve while the|day after spending just over a
    United States has only between | week.
    13,000 and 15,000 in each eategory.' He had the opportunity of visit.

    |ing most of industrial developmen

    J

    Lord Munster
    Leaves B.G.

    GSORGETOWN, B.G.,



    While Russian air

    power is ‘ "
    — , : i, schemes appearing and operating
    numerically superior Finletter said in British Guiana and is looking
    the United States production is |

    of better quality planes of certain | orward to this country’s making

    pes. er : .| “equally remarkable” developmen:
    4 a ie ope eo we States | strides in the next ten years

    in fighter- Oe ‘ . 7
    ee He said he was very much im-
    bombers and heavy bombers. | pressed, more especially when he
    In a radio transcription by the | looked back over the past ten
    American Legion : Said | years and saw remarkable strides
    famed Russian MIG 15 is —CCP)

    “about a Lek oe fox

    interceptors”. He a e Rus- ° .
    Barbadian W itis
    Exhibition Match

    sians have “so many” MIG’s they
    have been able to transfer about |
    KINGSTON, J’ca., April 27.
    In _ an exhibition match yester-

    REDECORATION | day Eric Taylor and Darnell Prim-
    ai ‘mingham of Barbados beat Joseph
    wee eee {Chin and Ivan Phillips of British
    7 [Guiana 3—6, 6—3, 6—1, 6-1,

    Taylor's all round play despite
    his inevitable errors with strong
    support from Trimmingham kept
    them well out in front after losing
    the first set.—OC.P.



    munist Air Force,






    Thirty-year-old John Bail: y on
    Duncan Trotman, porter of Seales’
    Land, Government Hill, was yes-
    terday evening sentenced to 18
    months’ imprisonment at the
    Court of Grand Sessions by Hi:
    Lordship the Chief Justice for the

    fooled his. own Counsel Mr. F
    W. Barrow, as well as the Court
    when he said that there a
    nothing yecorded against hin



    ——

    ‘OLD MAN RIVER’ LEAVES FR



    1 »
    WHILE FLOOD WATERS of the Missouri River were ru:
    i was threatening cities in W:

    Finland Fund |



    larceny of 14 galvanised sheet
    belonging to Manning & Co i
    former employers.

    In sentencing Bailey 10]
    pleaded guilty to the offence
    arlier in the Sessions, His Lord
    Ship told Bailey that the worst
    feature of the case was that he

    x, APRIL 29, 1952

    EIGH




    Union Council has suggested
    at the latter consider the pos-

    sibility of recommending to Government the introduction

    t by ballot among workers of

    jurisdictional disputes among the unions.
    This action stemmed from fear on the Cuncil's part
    regarding the Labour situation on sugar estates.

    According to informa’ Fiis-
    patched by the caw ha
    Commissioner, of our, am
    biss, this week-~ ; ane
    workefs had suspen jon“ In

    the jurisdictional dispute between
    the Guiana Industrial Worker:
    Union and the Manpower Citizens
    Association, beeause of the Coun-
    cil’s view that a_ solution to the
    problem should be found in the
    formation of one union in the
    Sugar industry to be effected by
    |the amalgamation of existing
    Unions, and were awaiting the
    report of the Committee set up
    | by the Council] to draft the con-
    ‘titution of such a union.

    Situation Altered

    | The Council now claims that
    [the withdrawal of M.P.C.A, its

    present rebellipus attitude to the
    | Council and its failure to honow
    | its obligations by attending meet-
    | ings of the Committee when sum-



    moned, or otherwise participating
    in the functioning of the Commit-
    | tee as appointed to implement one
    union proposal, has now altered
    the situation.

    The Council adds that member-
    ship of sugar workers in M.P.C.A
    is absolutely nil from Blairmont
    to Skeldon, negligible on the East

    Coast, Demerara, and only
    minority control at Diamond
    Wales, Versailles, Schoon Ord
    nd Uitvlugt )C.P.)





    T’dad Has No Strong
    | Political Leaders

    From Our Own Correspondent)

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 28

    | Legislators of the Government
    jat a House meeting with Lord
    | Munster, this morning told hin
    that Trinidad has no strong polit-
    ical leaders and stressed the need
    ‘or a strong political party anc
    leaders,

    The discussions touched feder-
    | ation and political, social and eco-
    {nomic conditions affecting the
    jcolony. During his stay, Lord
    | Munster will visit the various in-
    | dustries and the Imperial College
    of Tropical Agriculture.
    | Lord Munster, touring the Carib-
    | bean for first-hand information on
    the colonies, arrived yesterday
    }and it is expected that he will
    I leave for New York on Sunday.

    Parter Gets 18 Months For Larceny

    sent to the Government Indus-
    trial School in 1937 for taking
    part in the disturbances, and that

    he had wounded one of the othe:
    pupils of the school during his
    four years there,

    Bailey absconded to Trinidad

    in 1942, and was deported by the
    |Immigration authorities there in
    1951,

    His Lordship told Bailey

    that
    it

    ;}had he told Mr. Barrow and the

    {Court the truth, the Court might
    jhave been able to deal with him
    jin a different way. As it , he
    jhad fooled his own Counsel so
    that his plea of guilty really did
    'not show that he was sorry fo!
    j;what he had done, but tl

    trying to get off luckil

    His Lordship sentenced hi
    months’ imprisonment
    jtold him “you have got yourself

    to blame for it.”

    ‘
    )

    }18

    T TRAIN



    os
    shing down on St. Joseph and Kansas City,
    Mississipp: isconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and Iowa, Above,
    cars of a Milwaukee freight train are almost submergect as “Old Man River” sweeps over the approach toa
    roundhouse at LaCrosse, Wise., and threatens to wash out a railroad right-of-way,

    ey

    STRANDED

    Be





    (International)

    B.G. Trade Un ion | WL. Students
    Council Moves To
    Settle Disputes

    Fee Union cs B.G,, April 27.

    Complain To
    Conservatives

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    LONDON, April 238.
    Allegations of colour prejudice
    at Labour Exchanges in Great
    Britain are to be brought to the
    notice of Government. Othe:
    matters concerning hostel ac
    commodation for students in the
    United Kingdom, desirability of
    establishing a West Indian student
    centre andy problems of
    nurses from’ the West Indies
    also be raised in the
    near future,
    These subjects were diseusse:
    to-night at a friendly two-hour
    neeting between Conservative

    will
    House in the

    student ,



    id a deputation ninc
    t the West |

    Students Union, Several

    indian
    in-

    stances of colour prejudice on the

    part of individuals at Labour Ex
    changes were mentioned, The
    deputation was led by Mr. J. H
    L, Eytle (President) of Britist
    Guiana and included two student

    nurses Miss Llene Stuart of Bar-

    bados and Miss M, O’Garra, Or
    the Conservative side was Mr
    Peter Smithers, Chairman of th«
    West Indies Sub-Committee wh«
    was in the chair, and other mem
    bers present were Sir

    Patrick

    Spens, Chairman of the Conser-
    vative Overseas Bureau, Bernard

    Braine (Secretary of the

    Indies Sub - Committee) Dodd

    West

    Parker, Chairman of the Imperial

    Affairs Committee,

    Harold

    Watkinson and Richard Pilking-

    ton,

    Lady Huggins who is Chairmar
    of the West Indies Committe
    established outside the Houg® t:
    keep members informed of Inte:
    “vents in the territories was als:
    present.

    @ On Page 3.
    ene

    No Account
    Of $2,000
    Union Funds

    Funds exeeeding $2,000 of th
    United Workers, Peasants’ anc
    Ratepayers’ Union of St. Vincen
    cannot be accounted for, accord
    ing to the report of the local firn
    and Bovell and Skeete Auditor
    whe have been appointed by the
    Government of St. Vincent t
    examine the Union’s accounts

    The firm of Bovell and Skeete
    was appointed by the Registrar of

    Trade Unions of St, Vincent t
    examine the accounts of th«
    Union from its inception or
    December 20, 1950, to Decembe
    $1, 1951.

    The auditor's report that the

    have found the accounting orga:
    isation for handling the affair
    the union, unsatisfactory and i
    conclusion they state that the
    are unable to certify the account
    as true and correct statements «
    the financial transactions of +}
    union.

    The union has
    es throughout
    Headquarters

    some 40 brancl
    St. Vincent wit!
    in Kingstown br

    |

    the auditors have confined thei
    examination to the s»ccounts ef
    the headquarters in Kingstown





    St. Lucy Housing
    Scheme Mooted

    ed at the
    Boars or
    Boarc

    of lane

    The que
    meetir of
    Aaturd 1
    would

    tion was ra
    the Housing
    to what

    h eight acre

    the

    do v




    |

    j
    |
    it
    |

    }

    which will remain from Clinketts
    plantation Lucy after a play-

    ng field School were estab-
    jished there, and Mr. G. H. Adams
    Chairmar nformally i tt
    Government nuld ask the Boar¢
    to make est

    Opinions ¢ xpressed Suggest that
    the land will be used a , smal
    Housing scheme. Mr. T. BE. Went
    Colonial Engineer 1id the Clin
    ketts area is fairly thickly popu-

    vit! F

    lated and could

    heme

    I2

    us
    chools on different subjects.

    ree passages from air and ship-
    ing companies,
    nd other living expenses by lec-
    uring and writing 5

    natic
    lifferent countries, covering some

    lifferent
    french, German, Afrikaans, Por-
    tuguese and Italian in addition ta
    1 few African and South Ameri-
    ‘an dialects and lectures in eight
    languages,

    |

    |

    |

    y

    Twenty-iour-year-old Haika de Q

    |



    PRICE : FIVE



    EISENHOWER

    om ail : Tiliiinadtlipige



    2 Give Evidence
    In Murder Trial

    THE TRIAL of Carlton Brewster, a scavenger of Dean's
    Village, St. Michael, who is charged with murdering 18-
    year-old Norma Haswell on September 7 last year, began
    at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday morning before
    His Lordship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Collymore.
    Twelve of the 20 witneses the Prosecution propose to call,
    have given evidnece.

    Brewster i$ alleged to have attacked Haswell while
    she and her fiance (Leonard Benskin) were on Perry Gap
    on the night of September 7 at about 9.15 and with having
    after beating Benskin and causing him to flee, killed
    yaad. The main evidence the prosecu=
    | Uon is relying on is that of w=

    ster’s common law wife,

    Small,, who told the Court, how
    Brewster had returned on the
    | night of the alleged killing ‘and

    “The Crasy,
    Dutchman’’
    Calls Here

    | after washing out his clothes con=
    jfided to her that he had just
    | “licked up a girl in Perry Gap.”
    | The case for the crown is being
    | conducted by Mr. W. W. Reece,
    .C., Solicitor General. Mr

    Poel, familiarly known as “Har-|George Farmer is appearing on
    y, the crazy flying Dutehman”| behalf of the accused. .
    roam Arnhem, Holland, who], At the end of yesterday's hears
    tagted out on his world tour five] ing, the jury visited the seene of
    years ago with ten shillings in| the murder, . ;
    us pocket, arrived in Ba Outlining the case to the jury)
    esterday morning on the Lady} Mr. Reece first told them that ip
    questions of jaw they would be
    guided by His haogenip but they
    were the judges of the facts,

    He defined murder as the un«
    lawful killing of another with
    malice aforethought, expressed or
    implied ,though, he said, it did not
    mean that every killing was mur+
    der ;

    Expressed Malice

    The case before them was net
    a case of any expressed malicé
    Nothing had been said by the
    prisoner to show an evil mind of
    the wicked intention, but from the
    circumstances under which the
    killing was done, he was suggestng
    © them, there was no reason for
    them to come to any other conclu-
    sion than that the man who coms
    mitted the offence intended the
    ‘onsequence of his action,

    The evidence would prove,
    said, that Haswell went for a ri
    on a bicyele on September 7, ac»
    companied by her young friend
    Benskin, After wet
    Street, they were
    Perry Gap when they were 4

    Benskin, Me. Peece anid, would
    tell them how a man came upon
    the scene and put his hand on hie
    shoulder. A seuffle between the
    two men followed and Benskn was
    given a blow on his cheek and
    fell. He got up and when he ré-
    ceived another hard blow, he ran,
    leaving the woman there with the
    attacker,

    Later he returned and found the
    young lady lying in front of a
    woman's house, apparently in an
    unconscious condition. He called
    the Police

    He was the only witness who
    could give them any idea from his
    eyesight as to what happenca-
    There was no other such witness
    at all.

    Benskin was not in a
    He has already had | identify the man, thoug
    @ On Page 3. on page 3

    HAIKA DE POEL.
    Velson inom St. Kitts on a two-
    Week stay,” :

    While here he expects to give
    number of lectures at the vari-

    primary and secondary

    This globe trotter who gets

    pays his hote

    Since receiving his early edu-
    tion at the Amsterdam Diplo-
    School he has visited 45
    0,000 mtiles. He

    languages

    speaks ten
    including

    ition to
    he des-

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    PAGE TWO



    R. JUSTICE H. A. Vaughan,
    Mr. C 4. Cop Mr. L. A.
    Hall and Mr. A. E, Lewis, left
    yesierd: fiernoo by B.W.LA.
    for G to attend the Con-
    f Civil Service Associa-

    tions in the Caribbean area.
    The Conference opens on April

    30

    Among the subject: to be dis-

    cussed are Unification of Services,
    Equipment of Hospitals, Training,
    Cancitions of service of Nurses,
    Widows and Orphans Pensions
    Acts, Hours of Work, Leave Pas-
    gages, Re-engagement of Pen-
    sioners, Medic] Aid and Hos-
    vitalization for Civil Servant,

    T.C.A. Barrister

    AAR. A. H: Hart, Barrister-at-

    a7 y fo T 1s-Canznda-

    Airlines, returned to Montreal
    by T.C.A, afler an en-
    ten days’ holiday. He
    was accompanied by Mrs. Har!
    and they were. staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel,

    Spent Two Weeks

    FTEZR spending two weeks’
    AN ta

    on Friday
    joyoble

    n Barbados, Mr. J

    n MeLellan Jnr., of Bos-

    ion, Massachusetts, returned hcme

    on Friday night by the Lady

    Rodney. He was staying at the
    Ocean View Hotel.

    He is employed with the brok-

    erage firm of Rogers and Hatfield.

    Paid Business Visit
    M* RONNikz GITTENS, Man-

    aging Director of the Carib-
    be.n Theatres returned to the
    Colony on Friday from Trinidad.
    Mr. Gittens went on a business
    visit for the Company.

    Spent a Month
    RS. A, G. HAZELL of St.
    Vincent returned hcme on
    Thursday .by B.G. Airways after
    spending a month’s vacation here
    with Mr. and Mrs, Masterton-
    Smith, her son-in-law and daugh-
    ter.

    Venezuelans Return Home
    UITE a number of Venezue-
    lans who were holidaying in
    B.urbados yeturned home on Sal-
    urday by B.W.1L.A, Among tho
    leaving direct for Marquetia were

    Mr. Ramon Portilio and _ his
    nephew Antonio and Mr. and
    Mrs. David Hecht and their lit-

    tle daughter Cecilia who were
    staying at the Aquatic Club.

    Mr. Portillo who was paying
    his sixth visit to the island is
    employed as Secretary in a Sol-
    icitor’s Office while his nephew
    is wih the Creole Petroleum
    Corporation in Caracas, Mr.
    Hecht is Proprietor of two busi-
    ness concerns in Caracas,

    Spent Three Weeks
    R. AND MRS. F. POPPER.
    a returned to Venezuela on
    Suturday by B.W.LA. after
    spending three weeks’ holiday
    slaying. at the Windsor Hotel, It
    was their first visit here and they
    had a very enjoyable holiday.
    Mr. Popper is Manager of Vic-
    tor Grunwald Co., Importers of
    Curacas,

    ilying Company
    2 sarbadus Lignt Aeroplane
    Club became a Company
    irom Thursday.

    Mr. Jackie Marson, Jnr., Treas-
    urer of the Club, received a let-
    ter, signed by the Registrar, yes-
    terday statung that the Club had
    been incorporated under the
    Companies Act of 1910 of Barba-
    dos and that the Company was
    limited,

    One of the members told Carib:
    “The B.L.C., is not only a Com-
    pany, but good company.”

    Awarded M.R,C.P. (Lond.)
    »R. K. L. STUART, a former
    Barbados Scholar who was
    a medical student in the U.K. is
    now a Member of the Royal Col-
    lege of Physicians, London. His
    parents, living at Black Rock, re-
    teived news of his success yes-
    terday.

    It may be remembered that Dr.
    Stuart recently got his M.R.C.P.,
    Edinburgh. Dr. Stuart left Bar-
    bados in 1949 for Canada where
    he spent two years. From Can-
    ada he went on to Eng!and,

    With U.B.O.T.
    AAR. JULIUS WILSON, an old
    Harrisonian who is now em-
    ployed with UBOT in the geo-
    logical department, arrived from
    Trinidad by B.W.1.A, on Saturday
    morning to spend about ten days’
    holiday with his relatives.
    He is staying with his sister
    Trs. Torrence Franklin of White-
    ll





    ne ne ee

    Carub Calling

    Ruled Sane, Freec



    aA

    t
    IN CHICAGO, Ruth’ Steinbagen, ”
    22, who shot and wounded Eddie
    Waitkus, Philies first baseman, onâ„¢
    June 15, 1949, is pictured after
    she was adjudged sane and freed
    of a charge of assault with intent
    to kill. After the shooting she was
    committed to the Kankakee State
    Hospital. Miss Steinhagen said she
    planned to return to the state hos-
    pital to work as an occupational
    therapist. (International)



    Canadian Vice-Consul

    FTER spending five weeks’

    holiday in Barbados, Mr,
    and Mrs. Ormond Dier of Cara-
    cas, Venezuela, returned home on
    Saturday by B.W.I1A. accom-
    panied by their three children,
    Lance, Tara and Susan. They
    were staying at Paradise Beach

    » Club,

    Mr. Dier is Canadian Vice-
    Consul in Caracas,

    Returning to Venezuela by the
    same opportunity were Mr. and
    Mrs. J. Pollock and two children
    from Maracaibo, They had spent
    three weeks staying at the Ocean
    View Hotel.

    Mr. Pollock is Storekeeper of
    the Creole Petroleum Company,

    With Confederation Life

    AJOR R. W. MORRISON,
    Trinidad Branch Manager
    of the Confederation Life Insur-
    ance Society and Mr. Pat Date,
    the Society's District Manager
    also of Trinidad, arrived here on
    Friday evening by B.W.I.A, from
    Antigua after having visited St.
    Kitts on business in the interest
    of the Society.
    Mr. Date returned to Trinidad

    the following evening by B.W.LA.
    is staying

    whide Major Morrison
    on for a holiday. His wife» flew
    in from Trinidad by B.W.LA. on

    Saturday morning to join him and ,;

    they the Hotel

    Royal.

    To Join His Wife
    R. JACK MERRY, Director
    of Messrs Gordon Grant and
    Co., of Port-of-Spain, Trinidad,
    arrived yesterday morning by
    B.W.1.A, on a two-week visit, He
    has now come to join his wife who
    is staying at the Hotel Royal.
    Mr. Merry is a brother of Mr.
    Cyril Merry who was Manager
    of the West Indies team to Aus-
    tralia.

    S.M,O. Antigua

    R. H. D. WEATHERHEAD
    who has been seconded to
    the post of Senior Medical Officer,
    Antigua, returned here on Friday
    evening by B.W.LA. for a visit.
    Dr. Weatherhead was at one lime
    C.M.O. of Barbados before going
    out to Nerth Borneo as Director

    of Medical Services.

    Also returning from Antigua on
    Friday was Mr. Wm Hughes, rep-
    resentative of Messrs Wm, Fogarty
    Ltd. aie

    After Two Wecks
    EAVING last week by B.W.LA.

    4 for Trinidad was Miss Joan

    McIntosh of St. George's, Gren-

    are staying at

    ada. Miss McIntosh who spent
    nearly two weeks in the colony
    will stay in Trinidad for a few

    days before returning home, She
    is employed with Messrs. Thom-
    son, Hankey, & Co., Ltd, St
    George's, During her stay here
    she was a guest at Silver Beach
    Guest House,

    Unveiling Ceremony

    HE Unveiling Ceremony of

    the tablet in memory of the
    late Rev. F. M. Hawthorne took
    place on Sunday evening at 4.30

    at the. Jimes Street Methodist
    Church, The late Rev. Haw-
    thorne was the chairman of

    the Barbados-Trinidad district for
    20 gears and Superintendent Min-
    ister for the James Street Method-
    ist Church for 17 years. He also
    served on the Board of Directors
    of the Y.M.C.A., the S.P.C.A., and
    Family Welfare League and other
    prominent Bodies. Representatives
    from various denominations took
    part in the ceremony.

    Off To Canada
    R. and MRS. JOHN KINCH
    were passengers on Friday
    for Montreal by T.C.A. on a four-
    week visit.

    Mr. Kinch who is Senior Air-
    line Clerk of T.C.A. will visit the
    company’s head office to see how
    things are being done there.

    On Caribbean Tour
    I N BARBADOS for one week
    is Mr. J, Dresser, Sterling
    Area Manager for Canada Dry
    with headquarters in Bermuda.
    He arrived on Saturday r..orn-
    ing by B.W.1.A, from irinidad

    and is staying at the Ocean View
    Hotel.

    Mr, Dresser who has just re-
    turned from Australia on a visit
    in the interest of his company, is
    now visiting the company’s
    branches in the Caribbean,

    Enjoyed Holiday
    A=â„¢ the passengers leav-
    ing on the Lady Rodney on

    Friday night were Mr. W. Ed.
    Dawson ang his wife who are
    returning to Montreal after be-

    ing in Barbados since the middle
    »f December,

    Mr. Dawson is a_ Fellow of
    the Royal Society of Arts, Lon-
    don, England, and President of
    Dawson Bros., Limited in Mon-
    treal who are agents in the
    Dominion of Canada for Chubb
    and Son's Lock and Safe Co., of
    London and Wolverhampton,

    Mr. and Mrs, Dawson have
    travelled extensively throughout
    The B.W.I. and indeed throughout
    the World, but admit that a
    lengthy stay in Barbados has been
    a unique and beneficial experi-
    ence. They have enjoyed the
    charm of Bridgetown, the
    romance of the’ Careenage, the
    beauty of the countryside, the
    enchanting beaches and the im-
    pressive ceremonies surrounding
    the Acclamation of the Accession
    of Queen Elizabeth II. But above
    all the Dawsons have been thrill-
    ed by the hospitality, courtesy
    and friendliness of all sections of
    the community. Mr, and Mrs.
    Dawson look forward with keen
    anticipation to returni: to Bar-
    bados. They were at the Hotel
    Windsor.

    On Visit To Mother
    AYING a visit to her mother
    Mrs. Marion Clarke of Hil-
    laby, St. Thomas is Mrs. Sarah
    Roachford of the U.S.A. who trav-
    elled out to Trinidad on the Ar-
    gentine and then came over here
    by B.W.LA. on Saturday morn-
    ing.

    She was accompanied by her
    daughter Mrs. Eleanor Davis and
    her little grand daughter, Claudia,

    From The U.S.A.
    R. and MRS. W. H. Year-
    wood of “Hillington” the
    Ivy who went up to the U.S.A.
    On a visit, returned home on Fri-
    day by B.W.LA. via Puerto
    Rico,
    Alliance Francaise
    7? monthly meeting of Alli-
    ance Francaise will take place
    on Thursday, May 3, at the Brit-
    ish Council at 8.15 p.m. An in-
    teresting French film, ‘“Premiére
    de Cordée” will be shown,
    The meeting is going to start
    punctually.

    To Study Engineering
    RRIVING from Curacao via
    Trinidad by B.W.1LA, on Sat-

    urday morning was Mr. Handel
    Griffith, a Barbadian who pas
    been working with C.P.I.M. for
    the past four years. He has now
    come to spend a holiday with his
    parents at Rock Dundo, St. James
    prior to going on to the United
    Kingdom to study sanitary engin-

    eering.
    A Son Is Born
    ONGRATULATIONS to Mr.
    and Mrs, J. A. Millington of
    “Jamdor”, Maxwell, on the birth
    of a son and heir %n Sunday.
    This is their third child, the first
    two are girls.

    smile



    BY THE WAY ee « By Beachcomber

    T SAY! Suppose it was the too Why should anyone want to read name

    tall men who had only one
    hat, and the short men who had
    one each! That rather dishes us!
    It makes nonsense of what has
    gone before.

    Prodnose: Very little was re-
    quired fo do that if you ask me.
    Myself: Nobody need ever ask
    you anything. You're always but-
    ting in. I must think over this
    new aspec* of the matter,

    In passing

    A GRAVF. snokesman with a

    piercing mind has noted that

    increasing illiteracy seems to
    suggest that ‘there is something
    wren? with modern methods .of
    education. The question arises:

    WINDSOR





    or write when there are films
    and telephones and radio-boxes?
    Not long ago, when the films be-

    gan, it was natural for an am-
    bitious lad to want to read, as
    every film had captions. Today

    it is no longer necessary to be able
    to read, There is always some-
    one to tell you the title of a film,

    and who is in it, and there are

    an increasing number of picture-
    papers for home use when the
    radio has broken down, With my
    rife-rol-de-rido,

    Enter Miss Bafafaft
    Lobopokstricals
    MAN called Shakandro Po-

    by deed-poll, my dear

    Mrs. Thurston) to Bufler Kog-
    orinol seems to have worked
    things out fairly uselessly, I

    suggest that he should now take
    the nom de plume Rouzildigrot
    Mujenzimp or Shrash Mneph, I
    knew a girl called Inekfotopylop
    Skenzidruvy, who changed her
    name (by deed-poll, my dear Mrs.
    Thurston) to Huforaxicle Napar-
    arvinch, She married a Mr. Skop-
    chul Uffawyles and divorced him
    to marry a Mr. Chevstargil Go-
    polzuks. But she appeared in
    opera as Fafmam Boludigrentomu-
    shave. By the way, the stage
    manager’s name, my dear Mrs.
    Thurston, was Anjiduns Catan-

    ‘ poldigretz who changed his anchif.

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    BARBADOS

    THREE HEADS

    “There are three heads in every
    office,” says Sally Hines in her
    book “Good Manners In A Nut-
    shell”. “The one who is ahead,

    , i ri c
    the one who is trying to get ahead lat the Opera, 6.00 p.m. Ulster Maif.zine

    and the head who does routine
    work. Whichever head you are,
    head your work well.”

    (a) A genuine desire to work
    for the executive’s interest and
    not for one’s own,

    (b) Aclear perception of
    effice ethics and a willingness to

    change the literal truth when
    necessary.
    (c) Loyalty to the executive

    and to other office people.

    (d) Ability to follow instruc-
    tions of the executive.

    (e) Confidence in one’s ability
    to fulfil the requirements of a sec-
    retarial position, coupled with the
    earnestness to learn thoroughly
    any or all parts of the work.

    (f) An impersonal attitude ‘to-
    wards the executive and his busi-
    ness dealings.

    (g) Interest in discovering ways
    of pleasing the executive.

    (h) A complete understanding
    of one’s own responsibilities.

    (i) Courage to stand for one’s] ~

    own rights and self-respect.

    (j) Alertness in relieving the
    executive of undue. exertion or
    excess work.

    Which Type Are
    Yow ?
    Is It The Dramatic Type?

    The true Dramatic woman has
    a slim, model-like figure and
    usually has a seriousness of man-
    ner and the gift of making an
    entrance. To be noticed and
    admired is the goal of her entire
    effect. Grooming and neatness
    are more than essential.

    General Characteristics

    Aloof, serious, poised. Slow
    moving, indivualist.

    Bone structure: Medium to
    statuesque. Model figure, long
    legs.! Long, slender hands and
    feet.
    eyes.

    Hair:

    Sleek, smooth-tailored,

    severe chignon, coronation braid. | portant. They asked the four Winds

    Make-up: Accent on eyes and
    mouth. Dark skin tones rather
    than pastel,

    Colours: More black and white
    than colours; no patterned ma-
    terial, no rough or hairy surface.
    Contrast in colours. Jewel tones,

    Fabrics: Smooth, firm.




    406:

    Daily Service
    445 -p.m. Sandy

    p-m. Sports
    Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
    Home

    ADVOCATE

    B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

    7.15—10.38 p.m —

    7.15 p.m
    sonal Portrait,
    8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
    port From Britain, 8.45 p.m
    8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m.
    Books To Read, 9.15 p.m. Film
    9.30 p.m. Ray's A Laugh,
    News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
    Herbert Hodge Talking,
    Sclitary Wasp.

    25.53m., 31.32m.
    Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m.

    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952
    6 pm — 19.76m,, %5.53m.
    4@ p.m. The News, 410 pm. The
    4.15 p.m. New Records,
    MacPherson, 5.00 p.m
    ts of the Week, 5.15 p.m. pizhts

    Per-

    15 p.m. Meet The Commonwealin, 6.45
    Round-Up and Programme
    7.10 p.m.

    10.30 p.m. The

    News From Britain.



    Vivid colouring and fine!

    |

    Kiupert and the Toy Scout—-14



    Wh

    working for Santa Claus."’
    they stand and watch the tin
    stranger, who can still be seen

    the sky, Rupert tells Podgy how h
    and Willie irst saw the mysterio

    As the Scout flies away, Rupert
    and Willie run to join Podgy, who
    is sitting on the grass and looking

    very dazed, ‘* What on earth is
    that plane?" he gasps. “* It nearly

    tracks and followed them to d

    hit me.” "k's a sort of flying cover the hidden car. ** But | »
    motor-car,”” laughs Rupert. “And following those tracks, too,” crit
    in it there’s a Toy Scout who Podey

    Sun and Moon Had a Quarrel

    —Each Thought He Was More Important—
    By MAX TRELL j

    “ONE day,” said Ting-a-Ling to
    Knarf and Hanid, the shadow-chil-
    dren; “the sun and the moon had
    a quarrel.”

    “Oh, what did they quarrel
    about?” asked Hanid.

    “About which of them was the
    more important. I don’t know how
    it was that the quarrel started, but
    I think it was a very cloudy day and
    neither of them had anything else
    to do. At any rate the sun insisted
    that he was more important, and
    the moon said that she was more
    important.

    “Finally,” said Ting-a-Ling,
    “they both agreed to let the folks
    —all the folks—who lived on the
    earth and knew them both, to de-
    cide which of them was the more im-





    Sun and Moon were having a
    quarrel,

    to xo about the earth and ask every- | plenty of light; while the Moon can
    one they met—Which is more im- | be seen clearly at night when there
    portant, the Sun or the Moon, is scarcely any light at all.

    Four Winds Blew North Wind Spoke

    “So for four times four days the} “Then, last of all, the North
    fowr winds blew about, here and | Wind spoke. ‘O Sun and O Moon,

    Broad-/! there and everyhere, asking every | it said, ‘1 blew about the world ask-

    cloth, linen, shark+skin, shantung. | one they met to tell them what they | ing everyone | met, | asked the Lion

    Actor Suspended
    HOLLYWOOD,
    Argentine actor Fernando Lamas
    was suspended by Metro-Goldwyn
    Mayer because he declined to go

    through with his part in the picture | out.

    titled “Sombreo”’. Lamas just did
    not like his part.

    READERS’ RECIPES |

    Readers of the Advocate are
    invited to send in their own
    recipes for publication.

    Each housewife has her
    favourite recipe but has never
    thought of passing it on to her
    neighbour.

    If this is done the ex-
    changes will enable others to
    build up a good collection to
    the benefit of the family.

    Send in yours to-day
    to

    THE WOMEN’S EDITOR





    CROSSwORD



    Across
    1. I'm a tumult, (anag. 9) |
    ¥. World famous falls (7)
    ‘0. Out flow. (3)
    (2. Hi! this ts engaged. (3)
    3. You have no rignt to this. (v)
    (5. It’s a spinner. (4)
    8. Zoo gnus by night. (4)
    ¥. Such a ring would be tenient

    or mean? (3)
    'l. He has recently had unsoug'!
    limelight. (4)
    #2, From that millinery shop. (3)
    ‘3. Prom the dark ale cellar. (4)
    4, Challenge (4) 25, Notion, (4)
    '6. Post. (5)

    Down

    An odd clue. (6)
    Freedom. (7)
    Files back by night, (3)
    It’s mean to split hairs, (4)
    Set in order. (8)
    . His smali lake will stain (7)
    Utilise, (3)
    . Ared tome, not very good. (8)
    * Healing cover on the id. (3)
    - Most birds do to get 18. (6)
    . Thrust. (5)
    Resort to the sappers. (5)
    A take-off at tea, (3)
    Solutt gt yesterday's puzzie.—
    seross: 3, Holiday; Y, (bikidie:; 10
    sdapt; 21 Annoy; 12. Dare; 13, Elder;
    5, Rink; 16, Sieze; i9, Tentative: 21
    farm; 22 Idea, 23. Lmpel; 24. Ink
    vown: 1, Hyacinth; 2. Ornate: 35
    +, Idol;” 5, Daydream: 6, Adder; 7,
    spron; &, Steak; 14, Mitre; 16. Snap;

    Even: 18. Beak: 29 ‘Tin‘ted)

    EMPIRE

    TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 & Continuing
    Dally
    WALT DISNEY'S

    “ALICE IN WONDERLAND”

    APeH- stones

    s

    Color by Technicolor
    EXTRA .. . SPECIAL
    “NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
    An Academy Award Winner
    Also: LATEST NEWSREEL



    SAT. 3rd. 1.30 pm
    Rod Cameron, — Yvonne De Carlo
    — in

    THE LADY OBJECTS
    — and —
    DRUMS OF THE CONGO

    OLYMPIC

    Last 2 Shows Todhy 4.30 & 8 15



    Universal's Atomic Double —
    Alexis Smith — Scott Brady
    =o in «=

    “UNDERCOVER GIRL”
    and

    “UNDER THE GUN”
    Starting
    Richard Conte — Audrey Totter

    WED. & THUR. 430 &@ 815
    JOAN ga!
    in



    ‘LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN
    and (WOMAN”

    Bud Abbott Lou Costello

    in

    “HIT THE ICE"

    a ‘
    Thur. ist. Sat. rd 1 3 pm
    HALF WAY TO SHANGHAI

    - and —
    DEAD MAN EYES



    ly



    thought of the Sun and the Moon.| the Tiger and the Eagle. I asked
    And at the end of that time the four | the Hills, the Mountains, the Rivers
    Vinds came together on top of the | and the Brooks. But none of them
    highest mountain and told the Sun | could make up their minds which of
    and the Moon what they had found | you two is the more important. And
    then, just as 1 was coming here, 1
    “The East Wind spoke first. ‘Oh | met 4 little child who was playing
    Sup,’ it said, ‘1 spoke to all the trees |" his garden. And the child said
    in the forest and all the flowers in| /f there were no sun there would be
    the fields, All of them agreed that if ; 2° sunbeams. And if there were no
    not for you, none of them would be |” there would be no moonbeams,
    able to grow. They say you are the | And if there were no sunbo.:1s
    more important. | and no moonbeams 1 would be vury
    “Then,” said Ting-a-Ling, “the unhappy, So | hope they both |



    wy , /©\ shining forever and ever, for '

    West Wind spoke. ‘O Moon,’ it said, | think they ah both tha vudkt
    ‘tasked all the Cats and all the Mice | portant.’

    i d all the Owls and all the Frogs, | “And that,” said Ting-a-!



    ‘ THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME
    g

    6%



    a eee
    THURS (Only) 830 PM,

    1ey all agreed that you were more
    important than the Sun; for you
    shine for them when the

    “was what the four Winds tolu |
    Sun and the Moon. It didn’t decide
    Ae oiee y go about the quarrel, but it did convince the
    igi? . . | Sun and the Moon that it wa. foo!

    “Then the South Wind spoke. ‘1 | ish trying to find out which of the
    asked many wise old men,’ it said,|two was the more important. So
    ‘and the wisest among them said,|they became friends again and
    O Moon, that you were the more im- |spent all their time sending their
    portant. And the reason they gave | sunbeams and moonbeams down to
    was this. The Sun can only be /all their friends on Earth, and es-
    feen in the Gaytime when there is) pecially to the children.”

    * We'll soon have that better

    ~ oymore, ue

    ASEPTIC OINTMENT

    Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
    touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-
    lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
    gives protection against the entry of
    harmful bacteria. You will find, too,
    that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
    abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
    ulates the growth of new skin. Keep @
    tin of Germolene handy for family use.




















    FOR
    SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
    = IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS

    GERMOLENE soothes at a touch ~hedls in record time. ®

    9999S599059S995S99 90 FO" aos
    GALETY |





    The Garden—St. James
    TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 p.m.

    Legions Fall!
    Maidens Melt!
    As the Reckless
    SONS of the
    MUSKETEERS
    Ride Forth to
    DO or DIEY

    a
    HOT-BLOODED ADVENTURE

    Robert YOUNG &

    THE THING

    (From Another World)

    Oe

    “HONEYMOON LODGE”
    Francis LANGFORD &
    “RIVER LADY = (Colom)
    Rod CAMERON
    _ PCCP SSPE LOC

    *
    —

    ROXY

    TODAY Last 2 Shows 4.90 @ 8 15
    PARAMOUNT Double —

    Glefin Fora — Rhonda Flemings A] a 7 [ iT al 7
    “TRE REDHEAD ae M A R F F i 0’H Hud
    | Sows |

    a,
    WED. & THUR. 4.30 & 8.15
    BIG DOUBLE .,

    “TRAIL OF THE LONESOME
    d

    an ( PINE”
    Barbara Stanwyck, Wendel Corey
    in

    “PHELMA JORDAN”
    Thurs. ist. Sat 3rd, 1 36 p.m.

    Wild Bill ELLIOTT in—

    HELLFIRE &
    BANDIT KING OF TEXAS

    Last 2 ~“s Today *** *
    Yvonne De Carlo — Rud Cameron



    with ROBERT DOUGLAS » GLADYS ¢

    “THE LADY OBJECTS”

    OPENING THURS. 1ST.
    4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Also
    FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
    and Continuing Daily 4.45 &

    8.30 P.M.

    PLAZ.

    and
    “DRUMS OF THE CONGO”
    ey
    Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 & 8.15
    Whole Serial—

    CALL OF THE SAVAGE

    *
    with Noah BEERY Jnr. B*towmn

    8.00 p.m. Linger Awhile, | }))
    Re- | ))
    Interlude, |

    Review, |

    10.00 p.m. The
    10.15 p.m,

    Thrones Topple!













    AND CONTINUING

    PLATA

    HYGIENIC FRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

    Mom-Dad'

    WITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
    ____ SEGREGATED AUDIENCES _.

    WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
    MEN Only 8.30 p.m.

    a A lA i i i ati ln ee i te teen allie nail

    TUESDAY







    Now stow

    BUT
    TRUE

    BOLD

    Ga
    AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!

    DON’T 4188

    APRIL

    1952

    Sj
    SSS

    29,







    ING

    INDEFINITELY
    BARBAKEES
    (Diat 5170)




    5

    on!







    26,66 oo Oo
    LE SPE PSS F FOES FOSS PLFA ASSL A SI IAI IAA IF

    >

    yd

    .
    %
    %
    &

    o

    ~
    &

    PLAZA THEATRES

    BRIDGETOWN

    DRESSES

    Handbags, Shopping Baskets, Nylon Undies in black, white, %s

    LLLP

    Richard ARLEN

    “CHEYENNE COWBOY”
    Tex WILLIAMS &
    Tex BENEKE & Glenn

    =

    JANETTA DRESS SHOP



    NEXT TO ©INGERS

    SALE CONTINUING >

    for Clearance

    ALSO ON SALE,

    and peach, Nylon Stockings, Children’s Panties, Panty-Girdles,
    Brassieres, Bathing Suits and Gifts

    PRPS



    BARBAREES





    (DIAL 2310) ny Bae 5170
    ; -DAY & Cont'd
    Today & Tomorrow )
    430 & 8.30 pm. || WOMEN tec;
    DEAD 640M & DAD
    RECKONING Segregated Audience
    Humphrey Bogart & ae ~dbiniy t
    CORONER Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m
    CREEK RANGE LAND
    (Color r ee
    Randolph SCOTT ROLLIN’ ”
    Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.
    Trip e Attraction ! WESTWARD

    “RAIDERS of the

    DESERT” Tex RITTER

    “Rose of Santa Rosa’
    Hoosier Hot Shots &
    ORCHESTRA

    Charles STARRETT







    Again Greatly Reduced >

    ¥
    GEESE OOOOCO OCOD A AES

    SAT Special 1.30 pm

    ‘Ridin’ the Outlaw Trail’

    ppp opp oes

    %

    COS

    PPPS SOP STE OOS
    7 .
    SS



    OISTIN
    (DIAL 8404)

    LODAY & WED. 4.%) &
    8.20 p.m
    Whole S 1

    THE SPIDER'S
    WEB

    Warren HULL





    THURS (only)
    8.90 p m
    HER FIRST ROMANCE
    Margaret O'BRIEN &
    “DEAD RECKONING”
    Humphrev POGART
    —

    44 &





    Midnite SAT.
    Triple Attraction —
    “MEN of the TIMBER-

    LAND”
    Richard ARLEN &

    “SIX GUN MUSIC”
    & “LES BROWN &
    BAND”





    AN@G@THER

    “ay.

    MASTERPIECE ” fo,



    GLORIOUS OPENING
    THURSDAY. MAY 1ST, 8.30 P.M.

    PNG Ty Ts

    \ ,MOST FORBIDDEN OF THE
    IORLD’S GRFAY LOVE STORIES!



    BA |

    coidk ay FECHNICOLOR

    TO

    VW at TN



    aris Vat eee

    AT Ost:



    DIAL 2310’

    PIT 24c;

    SUNDAY :



    Repeat Midni

    HOUSE 48c; BALCONY

    T2e;

    BOX $1.00

    Reservations for Box Seats Only !
    BATHSHEBA continues with 3 Shows Daijy—1.30 p.m., 5 & 8.30 p.m.



    SPECIAL 5 P.M. MATINEE & 8.30 P.M.



    GLOBE |

    TO-DAY 5 & 8.45 p.m. TOMORROW 5 & 8.45 p.m.

    MOM AND DAD

    (Showing simultaneous!y PLAZA Barbarees)

    WOMEN — MATINEES MEN — NIGHT

    No Kids Under 12 Admitted

    —on—

    te Vaudeville

    Ask the 1,500 fans who saw this Show Saturday

    WED. APRIL 30TH MIDNITE

    Spearheaded by

    Sensational and Exotic Dancer

    CLEMENDORE

    The versatile Cobra Man

    LOLITA
    (Hot Stuff)
    (Several Other Super Duper

    KURABELLA
    (A Beauty)

    Complete change of Programme
    Pit 24, House 36, Balcony 48, Box 60
    Tickets on Sale WEDNESDAY NITE

    MONAH
    Artistes)


    TUESDAY, APRIL 29,

    1952

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    Point Four

    Has Helped
    Caribbean

    PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 22.

    Tangible evidence of Point Four
    Technical Assistance to Caribbean
    territories was signalised today
    when Mr. Donald R. Hanson and
    Mr. Hector Garcia, housing ex-
    perts, reported for duty at Kent
    House, Caribbean Commission
    headquarters.

    The services of these experts
    have been made available to the
    territories served by the Com-
    mission for a two-year period
    under a project of the Technical
    Cooperation Administration, De-
    partment ‘of State, which admin-
    isters the Point Four Programme.

    They have been assigned to the
    Commission to assist local govern-
    ments in developing pilot projects,
    testing local building materials,
    developing on-the-job training
    progremmes, and demonstrating
    how people can build and finance
    houses for themselves.

    Several territorial governments
    have already requested their assis-
    tance, according to Mr. E. F. H.
    Vriendt, Secretary General. These
    requests are being studied with
    n view to early determination of
    a schedule of priorities, he ex-
    plained.

    Expect to Learn

    Asked for comment on their
    assignment, Mr. Hanson and Mr.
    Garcia authorised the following
    statement: “We by no means
    approach this job with the idea
    that we know it all. On the
    contrary. We are well aware of
    the developments in the low-cost
    housing field in various Caribbean
    territories, and expect to learn as
    well as instruct. On the technical
    level, as we see it, this is going
    to be a give and take proposition,”

    Mr. Hanson has had long ex-
    perience as a planner, first with
    the South-Side Planning Board
    in Chicago, and later with the
    Chicags Housing Authority. Prior
    to joining the staff of Point Four
    technicians, he served as Execu-
    tive Director of the Indianapolis

    Housing Authority. He has an
    A.B. Degree from Purdue Uni-
    versity in. Civil and Sanitary

    Engineering, and has taken post-
    graduate work at the University
    of Chicago.

    Mr. Garcia, a native of Puerto
    Rico, has specialised in develop-
    ing aided-self-help instructi©n
    techniques under Caribbean con-
    ditions. For eight years this has
    been his principal concern as a
    member of the staff of the Social
    Programmes Administration of
    the Department of Agriculture and
    Commerce in Puerto Rico. His
    work has been centred around the
    planning and organising of rural
    communities under Title V of the
    Land Law Act of Puerto Rico,
    and over-all Social and physical
    improvements. Mr. Garcia has a
    B.A. Degree in Education from the
    University of Puerto Rico and a
    Master’s in Rural Sociology from
    Carnegie University, Pittsburgh.

    Develop Housing

    Both men are recruted by the
    U.S. Housing and Home Finance
    Agency specifically fow assign-
    ment in the Caribbean Commis-
    sion for the work which they are
    now beginning.

    Their efforts will be directed
    specifically to developing plans,
    specifications and methods for

    building houses that are hurricane
    proof, termite-proof, and con-
    structed, in so far as possible,
    from low-cost materials, locally
    produced. They will set up
    demonstrations, furnish advice to
    local government and private con-
    tractors, encourage local manu-
    facture of building supplies from
    by-products and other cheap
    materials, and so on. }

    The project provides for making
    available a small amount of
    demonstration equipment, such as
    portable block-making machinery,
    cement mixers, hand and power
    tools, and the like, to be assigned
    to the Commission for loan to the
    local governments.

    The Caribbean Commission will
    fufnish office space, secretarial,
    and other services while the
    technicians are at the Central
    Secretariat in Trinidad. While
    they are assigned to the local
    governments, those governments
    will pay transportation within
    the territcry and will also pay the
    expenses of the trainees and
    provide such maps, testing facili-
    ties, and collaborating personnel
    as may be necessary.

    The project will be financed
    under the Point Four Programme
    at a total cost to the United States
    Government of about $68,000 for
    the two-year period of the pro-
    gramme, ;

    Approval of the project was
    first announced by the United
    States Co-Chairman, Mr. Ward M.
    Canaday, at the opening of the
    Commission's meeting in St. Croix
    last October.

    EEE LLL ELLE LL ILE LLLP LLLP APOPEA,
    g ms

    -

    +
    %
    ¢

    *



    lather of

    66S
    OOO POCPOOSOOOGG FSS SO SSOSSSP OSS LOE EOC

    $
    %
    %

    SeecoossoeesSTOKES & BYNOE LTD. — AGENTS se¢soseese00""

    PAUSE A MINUTE

    PAINT-JOB LADY

    Is “your face really CLEAN?

    Before you apply more make-up be sure to cleanse
    your skin thoroughly with the rich, penetrating

    LIMACOL -

    TOILET SOAP

    It’s Deliciously Refreshing



    Antigua Newsletter

    Blackburne
    Opens Art
    Group Show

    (From Our Own Correspondent

    His Excellency, Mr, K, W. Black-
    burne opened the fifth annual Art
    Exhibition held by the Antigua
    Art Group at the Council Cham-
    bers on Wednesday 23rd last. The
    Governor was accompanied by Mrs,
    Blackburne and Capt. F. E. Hewitt,
    A.D.C.

    Exhibits by Antiguan artists are
    not a many this year as previously
    mainly because ithe three best
    known artists, Prince, Francis and
    Adams have been busily employed
    with special assignments. A-new
    member of the group, Mary E.
    Wilson of Scotland, wife of Mr.
    A. T. Wilson, Accountant of the
    Antigua Sugar Factory, has done
    some very pleasing work. Her
    poster—aq scene with a beach,
    Flamboyante in full bloom and
    pineapples_in the foreground is
    easily the best of five posters done
    by various members. These posters
    will be taken to the Caribbean
    Festival which is being held in
    Puerto Rico this year. A bowl of
    mixed flowers also by Mrs. Wilson
    was much admired.

    St. Kitts has sent some new and
    interesting work by Harris and
    Franklin Brown. Nevis is well
    represented by a number of oil
    paintings by Mrs. Wilkin.

    Barbados has sent the largest
    number of exhibits and the pic-
    tures by six new artists are much
    appreciated. Of all the exhibits in
    the exhibition “Card Players” by
    Golde White ‘has commanded
    greatest attention.

    Mr. George T. Warren, Chief
    Chemist of the Antigua Sugar Fac-
    tory has been appointed Chief
    Chemist of the St. Kitts Sugar
    Factory. Mr. Warren has worked
    here for the past ten years.

    Assistant Superintendent of
    Police, V. A. Bunting, has been
    appointed, on transfer, an Assist-
    ant Superintendent of Police in
    the Jamaica Constabulary, Asst.
    Supt. Bunting was born in Jamai~-
    ea, He served eight years in the
    Royal Air Force and came here in
    1949.

    It was announced that Lord
    Munster would visit Antigua on
    4th May but the date of departure
    of the vessel by which he is to
    travel from New York to South-
    ampton has been advanced. Lord
    Munster has notified His Excel-
    lency that, in the circumstances he
    has reluctantly come to the con-
    clusion that his proposed visit to
    the Colony must be cancelled, He
    has expressed his regret that he
    will be unable to visit Antigua
    and hopes to be able to do so on
    another occasion.

    Acrobats’ Stunts
    Thrill Crowds

    The Boodhoo Brothers, acrobats
    of West Indian fame, were loudly
    applauded for their performance
    at the Globe Theatre on Saturday
    night by a capacity crowd. The
    Brothers, Brae gad Buddy, high-
    lighted the S| ‘

    "one and Buddy Boodhoo told
    the Advocate yesterday that they
    have now decided to stage their
    own acrobatic, stunt riding and
    wire walking shows—the first of
    which will be at the Children’s
    Goodwill League Building on
    aturday night.

    ef said that they
    are hoping to give every Barb. -
    dian a chance to see their fea‘:.
    Already they have made an e*-
    tensive tour of the schools in the
    island. " ; }

    He said that he is also hoping
    after he has approached the cor-
    rect authorities, to stretch his wire
    across the Fountain Garden in
    Trafalgar and perform his high
    wire walking stunt. ;

    The boys are also hoping to be
    able to give performances at the
    Plaza Theatres, the Marine Hotel,
    Club Morgan and other well
    known places.





    s

    ON THE

    SOL LBL PLLLLLLLLLOL LOL PE LLL

    ?

    tT p THAT GHE
    WASN'T LOOKING VERY
    ELL_AT BREAKFAST

    "

    TRE STAIRS

    URDER TRIAL

    @ From Page 1.



    seen Elma Howell that night. It
    cribed the clothes he was wearing. was true that she used to sleep
    The defence was alleging, Me. at Veta and in the same bed as
    Mr. Reece said, that Brewster lived Veta and he. She, (Elma), must
    with 19-year-old Veta Small in have gone into the bed after he
    Deane’s Village. Brewster left her had been asleep for he only
    home on the evening of September noticed her on the following
    7 and when he returned later he morning.
    called for some water and started He did not ask Elma to do
    washing certg® of his garments. anything for him for he had not
    From the bed where she was ly-« seen her.
    ing, She saw that the colour of the He had done no washing when
    water in which he was washing he reached home that night.
    the garments was red. Inspector Bourne said that
    He told her that he had just Brewster was wearing a black
    put out a girl who had been in pants when he interviewed him.
    Perry Gap with a man. She asked Cross-examined he said that at
    him how he could do such a thing yo ‘stage during his questioning
    and he told her that she had better of Brewster did he suspect him of
    keep her mouth shut—it would having committed the murder.
    be better for her. He never tried to force any
    Strong Evidence admissions from Brewster. He did
    “That, if you accept it,” he said, not consider force to be in the
    “is strong evidence given by the questioning as to Brewster's ad-
    woman with whom he was living mitting having a rubber-handled
    for years.” knife which his mother had told
    oor Exe bad preted the him not to carry around. -l
    mortem and attributed death i A Shov
    to haemorrhage and shock follow- water tes him when he
    ing injuries which could have been had a shovel he had previously
    inflicted with a knife. heard that Benskin had said that
    Mr, Reece added that Elma the man who had attacked was
    Howell who used to live at Veta carrying one.

    would in part corroborate Veta’s Hi

    e had asked Brewster how he
    evdence as to what happened when .o.)1¢ say he did not see Howell
    Brewster returned home on the that night, yet had slept in the

    night of the murder. - : ‘ he adi
    Inspector Git wood Springer, the ee me ae al gpeaenrbdon

    ee
    went to the Garden Land, St. Mic- : i ;

    H Re-examined he reiterated that
    hael on the night of the murde: when Brewster had told him not

    and saw the body lying, Y in to ask him any more questions,

    the gutter and partly.in the Road i
    he had immediately stopped.
    of Perry Gap. It had several stab Sgt. Louis Marshall said that

    wounds about it and after some
    about 9.55 p.m. on September 7,
    time was removed to the Public he and other policemen went to

    Mortuary. the Garden Land where he saw

    The following day he returned i
    the body of Haswell lying on the
    to the scene and took measure- ground with a | oF Stoea

    ments. From a large pool of blood *
    near which the body was lying on os Bhs techn, sacceel teee weak
    the night, to the nearest house was 4, some Khus-khus grass f
    ove Sat a neha ie pesety Later that night he saw Leonard
    grass © elurnps of Khus KNUS Benskin who had a wound on his
    ; face and blood on his clothes.
    Accused Found Benskin gave them a statement
    On September 20, he went to the and was taken fo the Hospital.
    home of Veta Small at Deane’s On September 21, Veta Small
    Vilage whvre he found the accused handed him a knife and a pair of
    and invited him along with Small pants.
    to Centraal Police Station. On Cross-examined, he corroborated .
    the following day, Sgt. Marshall Inspector Springer’s evidence as
    and he went to Veta Small’s home to how Haswell was dressed. Ho
    and Small gave Marshall a knfe gaid the cut Benskin had was on
    and a pair of brown soft boots. the left side of his head near his
    Brewster was arrested and forehead.
    charged for murder on November Dr. James Walcott said that he
    5. Brewster said then that he had received from Sgt. Marshall,
    kney nothing of the murder. a knife, shirt, felt hat and a pair

    ss-examined, Inspector of pants. The blade of the knife
    Springer said that Haswell’s skirt musgested blood. Stains on the

    was black and he bodice white. clothes esti bl
    He did not know whether she but nate wate eet we

    wore other clothes. There was a Sea
    spot of blood about 30 feet away PC, Home Soonenee that

    from the house
    h : on September 20, he and other
    Inspector Cecil Bourne said that policemen went to the home of

    cn September 20 he saw Brewster Carlton Brewster’s mother with a

    at the C.I.D. and told him they
    were making investigations into ae eee, | Saey Arie 8

    the murder of Haswell and that yy pants eens” qn some rocks
    he wanted some information f Samuel Worrell of the Garden

    him. ; “(Land gaid that Haswell used to
    Srewster said, “Man you can ‘jive at his home. Haswell’s mother
    ask me anything,” and he pro+ was not in Barbados and she lived

    ceeded to ask him questions. there as she was a relative of his
    After answering some questions wife. She was a friend of Ben-
    Brewster told him he was not skin

    inclined to answer any more.

    It was he wh
    Brewster could not write, but Truth cee, Aantined the

    body to the doctor.

    signed the statement with an Herman Scott, a carpen’ f
    “X." Cpl. Yearwood witnessed ? a

    King Edward Road, Bank Hall,
    seid that on September 8, at about
    6.45 a.m. he passed by the Mor-
    tuary on his way to work. He
    was standing at the Mortuary
    gate when he saw Carlton Brews-

    the signing.

    In this statement Brewster said
    that on September 7 he had been
    to Martindale’s Road at his
    mother. He had left Veta’s house
    where he lived at about 6.30 p.m.
    and reached there at about 7 p.m.

    His mother was home, he said,
    and he ate and eventually left at
    8.30 o’clock for home.

    He denied his mother having
    advised him not to carry about a
    certain knife he had when walk-

    ing.
    Some Clothes

    He was wearing the sama
    clothes he had on while being
    questioned, a black pants and he
    was bare footed, though he did
    have a pair of soft boots which
    he used to wear about.

    Until then, he had only heard
    of Perry Gap, but did not know
    it. He was net on Roebuck Street
    that night. He did not know what
    time he reached Veta’s house, but
    went to sleep on reaching home
    without saying anything to Veta,

    He said, too, that he had not

    to h
    @ On Page 5.

    |
    |
    STUDENTS COMPLAIN |



    @ From Page 1..

    With Miss Stuart, Lady Hug-
    gins is to enquire into conditions
    of training of student narses and
    will have discussions on the ad-
    visability of including either more
    midwifery or more public health
    training in their syllabuses. They
    will also review opportunities for
    nurses who have graduated.

    After the students had departed
    Conservative M.P’s expressed
    their admiration of the way in
    which various questions had been
    brought to their notice and com-
    mented on the high quality of
    student personnel.

    te SLE ETE ISLS: LEAL CS ES: Ne

    eros
    ‘MUSCULAR FATIGUE
    : Sets you down...

    a-Seltzer

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    ¢








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    Millions take it at the very first sign of
    Muscular Fatigue. Sparkling, pleasant-
    tasting Alka-Seltzer is such an easy
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    speedy Alka-Seltzer handy always!

    Famous Alka-Seltzer helps mifliers.
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    i4é COPBOARO ONDERY





    ter petting and Brewster spoke '
    m.



    SHUSR GEONGE vO
    BE QuieT

    JUST HAD +O

    LOTT wna oe,

    Leetures On
    Puerto Rico
    In June—July

    _ The University of Puerto Rico
    IS co-operating with the Inter-
    American Institute of Agricul-
    tural Sciences in various educ

    tional fields for mutual benefit.

    The University has now entered
    into an arrangement with the
    University of Delaware to sponsor
    an inter-university course = in
    Puerto Rican studies from June
    22 to July 29. The course will
    cut across the customary compart-
    mentalisations of knowledge and
    will deal with Puerto Rico from
    the regional point of view, as a
    living and growing social organ-
    ism.

    Some of the aims of the course
    are: to foster understanding of
    ome important part of the United
    States; to clarify the importance
    of human beings and their prob-
    lems as the basic materials of all
    social sciences, and the need for
    conducting social studies in term:
    of the dynamics of change.

    The course will be conducted
    through a combination of lectures
    at the University of Puerto Rico
    by instructors from both Univer-
    sities, in such fields as history,
    economics, geography, political
    sciénce, and so on; visits to
    Puerto Rican government offices
    and discussions by government
    officials. of their departments
    work and problems; field trips to
    various parts of the island; and
    class discussions in small semina:
    groups,

    This news is taken from the
    official brochure of the study
    project.

    SEA AND AIR
    TRAFFIC

    In Carlisle Bay

    Seh. At Last, Sch. Burma D., Seh
    Philip_H. Davidson, Sch. Mary M. Lewls
    Sch. Island Star, Sch. Lydia Adina $
    Sch. Cloudia §., Sch. Molly N. Jone:
    Sch. Franklyn DB. R., Sch, Enterprise §

    ARRIVALS

    M.V, Athelbrook, 286 tons net, Capt
    Cook, from Trinidad.

    Schooner Everdene, 68 tons net, Capt
    Philips, from British Guiana

    Schooner Frances W. Smith, 74 tony
    net, Capt. Hassell, from British Guiana

    Schooner Laudalpha, 60 tons net, Capt
    Gumbs, from St. Lueta

    S.S. Lady Nelson, 4,665 tons net, Capt
    Wallace, from St. Lucia,

    DEPARTURES
    Schooner My Own, 21 tons net, Capt
    McKree, for St.
    Schooner Esso Aruba,
    Capt. Marks, for Grenada
    0.7. Rodas, 1,855 tons net,
    Van der Wast, for Martinique
    -V. Caribbee, 100 tons
    Gambs, for Dominica
    8.8. Lady Nelson, 4,655 tons net, Capt
    Wallace,
    Passengers arriving at Barbados by
    he 8.8, “Lady Nelson” yesterday were:
    From Boston:— H. Campion and wife
    1, Gouke, A. H. Greene. G, L
    From Bermudas— ©
    wife, E, St. C, Morrison
    From Antieua J. W. Bradshaw
    From Montse — J. E. Darey
    From Domin D
    Jeffrey atid wife,

    34 tons net

    Capt

    net, Capt







    Mant

    Phillip, A Dumas,” S Michael, FR
    Richards
    From St. Kilts H. DePoel.



    NO OILING—NO
    EVER NEEDED
    SEALED

    Vincent. |
    !

    for St. Vincent, |

    Johnson |
    WwW. Wills and |

    Green, J.'
    Jeffrey, C. G.|

    GUARANTEE

    “THE GRAZY
    DUTCHMAN”

    @ From Page |

    five of his travel books published
    Asked what was tne idea -
    hind his travels, he saia uy
    ambition is to joim the Dutcu
    Digjomatic Service on my rs
    turn to Holland mext year
    added that travel was the

    wud

    Dene

    teacher in the world to-dag, par- |

    ticularly for those who wanted i
    enter the diplomatic service, A
    can be done cheaply.
    cost me for my five
    about $1,200.

    He said that he had the ex-
    perience of a hike around Brit-
    ain in 1946 and on this ven-
    tire, he made a thorough tour
    of Europe, keeping clear of the
    “Iron Curtain”. Previous ex-
    perience in the underground
    movement in Holland during
    war years fired his spirit and
    sent him further afield. He
    went on North Africa. He had
    cressed Italy to Sicily and thes
    a thrilling tour which lead him
    to join a caravan to cross the
    Sahara and to continue hitch-
    hiking on a camel for several
    months,

    Among his adventures was
    paddling his own canoe down the
    Congo River, and being taken
    AS a spy suspect for a few months.
    le also made an escape from at
    African Princess of the Neam-
    Neam tribe who wanted to have
    him as her consort,

    His most thrilling experience
    so far was when he was captured
    along with qa Frenchman by can-
    nibals while travelling throug!
    French Central Africa and was
    almost made a meal for the tribe
    He was kept prisoner for tw«
    days in a hole in the ground ana
    only escaped when two old ele-
    phants broke into the tribe’s vil-
    lage on a maurauding excursior
    and the cannibals fled, His com-
    panion and he escaped by follow-
    ing the elephants.

    He eventually reached Rho-
    desia and worked his way dow?
    t. the Cape and on to British
    Guiana, While in South America
    he crossed and re-crossed the con-
    tinent, during which time he
    drove cattle over the Andes and
    was forced at one time to join in
    the weird mourning ceremeny
    with savage Indians over a dead

    From British Guiana, he went
    man.
    to Trinidad and then visited most
    ef the other islands in the Carib-
    bean before coming on here
    From Barbados he hopes to visit
    Central America and the United
    States before returning to Hol-
    land.

    RATES OF EXCHANGH

    28TH APRIL, 19pz
    CANADA
    Cheques on Bankers 73 4/10%

    years 1s

    m20

    Demand Drafts 13.25 %
    Siaht Drafts 73 :1/10%
    752/10 Cable
    {43 7/10% Currency 71 :9/10%
    | Coupons T1 2/10",
    % Silver 207,





    Zipper
    Wallets

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    Y. De LIMA
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    PAGE THREE








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    PAGE FOUR



    BARBADOS tay

    Sr {ose
    April 29,



    Tuesday, 1952

    _———<—<$<—<$=——

    ISOLATIONISM

    THE condition of the world to-day, de-
    spite what the Hon. T. A. Marryshow is
    reported to have told students attending
    the Trade Union Course at the Y.M.C.A..
    gives little ground for easy optimism that
    “the mind of man is marching on and each
    age ... was on evolutionary grounds better
    than the last.”



    There is a whole generation in China to-
    day unaccustomed to what peace means.
    Slavery and forced labour is to-day widely
    practised in the Soviet Union. The Inter-
    national Labour Office estimates that five
    million people are unemployed in Europe.
    The greatest writers in all the civilized coun-
    tries continue to produce literature depict-
    ing a world in which suicide and diseases of
    the mind are on the increase. Even the
    cinema and the theatre mirror a world in
    which all is not best. The United Kingdom,
    centre of the greatest Empire and Common-
    wealth the world has ever known stands
    poised to-day on the brink of an abyss
    which, if it cannot be avoided, will lead to
    financial and economic ruin, The rearma-
    ment race has never been swifter and the
    countries of the North Atlantic Treaty
    organisation are bending every effort to
    increase their defences against the mighty
    military machine of imperialistic Russia.
    Race tensions and suspicions are the rule
    not the exception in Africa: in Asia nation-
    alism is proving inadequate to cope with
    opposing nationalism and organised bandits
    and thugs.

    In Western Europe the French fear Ger-
    man resurgence while all Western Euro-
    peans living on the Continent resent Brit-
    ain’s aloofness to join a Federal Europe.

    War still wages in Korea, Indo-China and
    Malaya. The Arab world is uneasy. In near-
    by Latin America coups and counter coups
    occur with bewildering frequency. Every-
    thing, as a Greek philosopher once said, is
    in a state of flux.

    But the conditions of normal everyday
    life in the twentieth century, unparalleled
    as they are in the known history of man,
    are ghastlier still because of man’s inven-
    tions. The development of atomic energy
    and the aeroplane to mention only two of
    the most spectacular inventions of modern

    times has made the destruction of the whole.

    world possible in our lifetime. And with all
    his scientific knowledge and skill man is
    powerless against hurricanes, earthquakes,
    floods and other natural disasters which
    continue to claim human. lives.

    Here in the British West Indies it is true
    that a relatively small number of the
    world’s population have been enjoying a

    \ state of life which has been moving pro-
    gressively upwards ever since 1941 when
    action began to be taken on the Report of
    the Royal Commission which visited the
    West Indies in 1938—39.

    The war which devastated thousands of
    European cities and converted the peace-
    ful life of millions of men and women into
    a struggle for existence among falling
    bombs and rubble stones was beneficial to
    the West Indies, putting a premium on its
    agricultural produce on which the prosper-
    ity of these islands have always depended.

    It would be a pity if all that’ progress
    were to be endangered because of’ insula-
    tion from the realities of the world in which
    we live.

    It is always possible that good days of
    the world are ahead. There have been good
    days in many periods of human history in
    the past, but it would be absurd and dan-
    gerous for the British West Indies to sup-
    pose even for a moment that their present
    prosperity can be separated from the pro-
    tection and assistance which is their right
    as overseas possessions of the United King-
    dom. Real national independence and
    real national sovereignty depend on the
    ability of a nation to defend itself and it is
    a remarkable fact that not one man or
    woman born in thé West Indies has ever
    said that the West Indies singly or collec-
    tively could defend themselves against a
    twentieth century aggressor One has
    only to pose the question to appreciate the
    impossibility of its ever being answered.

    But the people of Barbados ought to be
    grateful to the Hon. Mr. Marryshow for em-
    phasising certain basic facts which have
    been given little attention by the majority
    of West Indians until very recenf years.
    The need for capital: a serious attitude to
    work: the sharing of work: self-reliance
    among workers: the development of char-
    acter and business acumen are objectives
    that were insufficiently stressed by many
    Labour supporters in the West Indies in
    the early days of Trade Union growth.

    It is a welcome sign of change in the
    West Indies when politicians turn the spot-
    light on deficiencies of West Indians rather
    than blaming those deficiencies on alleged
    exploitation by metropolitan countries.

    ———_—_

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    anoatt |i say Morrison will Wim LONDON REPOR

    “On Points |

    GENTLEMEN, on my right, Mr.
    Herbert Morrison, of South
    Lewisham, and on my left, Mr.
    Aneurin Bevan, from Ebbw Vale.

    These two men are the principal
    contenders for the future Jeader-
    ship of the Labour Party. °

    I don’t believe that there is any
    immediate prospect of a change
    in the. Soeialist leadership. Mr.
    Attlee’s position is impregnable,
    and will retain so until he chooses
    to retire.

    ven the friction within the
    party has failed to weaken his
    prestige, or to impair his author-
    ity.
    I have known every one of his
    time of



























    any of them has been held in
    higher esteem. I hope he will
    long continue to be the leader.

    But when he does retire, what
    then?

    In the queue

    IN ADDITION to Morrison and
    Bevan I have heard several cther
    names mentioned as possible suc-
    cessors, among them Hugh Dalton,
    Chuter Ede, and Jim Griffiths.

    Among the younger men are
    Hugn Gaitskell, Alf Robens, and
    Jim Callaghan—all first-rate.

    ' Even Mr, Crossman, who is Mr
    Bevan’s right-hand man, can be
    put-‘among the hopefuls.

    Pitt was Prime Minister . before
    he hag»reached the age of 25, but
    the Labour Party is mutch too
    cautious for such experiments,

    Let not a wrong word be said
    of anyone who aspires to be the
    leader of his party. After all,
    ambitior“is not a crime, It is
    only objectionable when it fails
    to measure up to the right qualifi-
    cations.

    But this is the kind of contest
    where the field is of necessity
    limited. Only Morrison and Bevan
    appear to be in training for the
    final bout.

    As the deputy leader of the
    Parliamentary Labour Party, Mor-
    rison is in a_ specially strong
    posifion. He has occupied the
    post for many years, and was not
    even challenged at the last elec-
    tion for the office.

    On the other hand, . Bevan's
    popularity with the rank and file
    is-exceptional, and has, never been
    Surpassed—-perhaps only dnce. has
    itbeen equalled and that, strange-
    ly enough, was by Oswald Mosley

    T shall never forget the occa-
    sion when Mosley was cheered to
    the eeho at a Labour Party con-
    ference at Llandudno,

    everybody expected that,
    because of his popularity, he

    a maples

    SP.CA: Tag Day

    To Tre Editor, The Advocate—
    SIR,—The S.P.C.A. Tag day
    Organiséd by Mrs. R..W. E. Tucker
    was a great success, thanks to the
    ene of the collectors and the
    ‘)sen@rosity of the public.
    Would you good enough to
    peblish the following results ?
    Yours faithfully,
    CECILE WALCOTT,
    Hon. Secretary/Treasurer,
    Appeals & Publicity
    Sub-committee



    Barbados S.P.C.A..
    $e

    Mrs. B. King and helpers
    (Upper Broad St.) er, ft 190.81

    Mrs. A, O, Skinner and helpers
    (Lr, Broad St.J .... pes oes 8 123.39
    Shetland Ponies ...,...6.645 54 38
    Mrs. E. A. Way (Public Bidgs) 50.59

    Mrs. W. A. Grant. ‘and ‘helpers
    (Worthing & Hastings) ...... 203.52
    Mrs, L, Bowen (Garrison) 49.23
    Mrs. BR. Gill (St. Lawrence) . 40.55
    Mrs. A. Gill & helpers (Ch. Ch.) 68.72

    Mrs. Las Gale (Culloden & Dal-
    keith Rds) ..4...... des eat OO

    Mrs, C, Noot & Miss Hazlewood
    (Cathedral District) ......... 108.20

    Mrs. D, Seott (Two Mile Hill) ; 8.

    Mrs. FY Me Dowell (Aquatic
    Club} ‘

    Miss PAtkering (Fontabelle) 19.56

    Mrs. T. Gittens (Britton’s Hill) 16.54
    Nurses’ Assen, (Bay St.) . 19.19
    Mrs. G. King (Pine Hill) ...... 46.87

    Mrs. G. Clarke (Strath¢lyde) .> 18.53
    Miss K. Hollinsed (Bel'eville) ph

    Mrs. M. Greaves (St. John) ..

    Mrs. B. Skeete & Mrs. L

    Hutson (St. Philip) . 75.18
    Mrs. L. Sealey & Mr, A, G

    Jordan (St. Geruge) ....... 24,52
    Mrs. J. Mahon (St. Thomas) 24.00
    Mrs. R. Parris (St. Peter) 22,36
    Mrs. E. A. Way (St, Joseph) . 45.92
    Mrs. N. Scott (St. James Coast) | 9.76
    Mrs. Massiah (St. James) .... 16.70
    Mrs E. Clark Hoiman (St, :

    Luey) .. Myo’ oT oa BOT
    Mrs. H. Townsend (Marine

    Hotel) ...4..+ esteeeceas te: Cae
    Miss A. Skinner (Windsor Hotel) 8.00

    Mrs. Gausden (Ocean View
    Hotel) vas kqebset 21.58
    Donations 2.35
    Gross Total ............ $1,641,02

    Expenses (Advertising, Print«
    Aft © CCC) aa ewe eee v cece 55.68
    Net proceeds $1,585.44

    Tribute

    To' The-Editot, The Advocate—
    SIR,—As an old admirer of the
    Roli¢e Band, | should-ike publicly
    to add my werd jof congratulation
    to those already given to Sergeant
    Archer on hi§ motion to the
    rank of Station rgeant, I feel,
    however, that such a promotion
    does net go far enough towards
    recognition of this talented bands-
    man Whose work as a composer
    and arranger has enriched the
    musical life of our island. Would
    not the rank of Inspector be a
    more fitting tribute to his merit
    and long service, as well as being
    more:in keeping with his position
    as Deputy Conductor of the Band?
    He has the ability, the service
    and the experience. What is there

    in the way of this just reward,
    Another bandsman of whom I
    should like to make mention is
    Corporal Best whose versatility is
    well-known. He ‘has delighted us
    as a Mylophone artist, and the
    kiddies ag Santa Claus at the
    Annual party for children of mem-
    bers of the Force, I have seen him
    behind the bass drum at Garrison
    Parades, and heard him perform
    on the bells and the bassoon, I
    have also seen him conducting
    the Police Band and training the
    cadets or members of the

    Volunteer Band, a
    I mention his name and fis
    accomplishments chiefly because I
    jhad missed his corpulert figure
    \from recent appearances of the
    Band, and upon making enquiry
    I was shocked to learn that he ‘hhad
    |been transferred to the Road by
    \the Commissioner. Now, Sir, as
    lyou. know, a bandsman cannot be
    ltrained overnight, especially one
    |with Corporal Best's accomplish-
    | ments and it does seem to-me that

    ur Readers Say:

    By EMANUEL SHINWELL, M.P.

    would replace Ramsay MacDon-
    and so he might have done, if
    he had not become entangled in
    the web of a_ political doctrine
    auen to Labour's principles,

    What will Labour do at the next
    time of asking? Bevan has all
    the essential parliamentary quali-
    ties. He is a fascinating debater,
    carries a hefty punch, has lots of
    audacity, and knows all the parlia-
    mentary ropes. He may not be
    everybody's cup of tea, but iin the
    politcal arena he is “all there”
    and a deal more.

    Some people say he is not a
    first-class adminictrator, but if
    dou't believe this is true. No,
    here is a man whose talents should
    not be underrated.

    But he also suffers from a grave
    disability, which may easily lose
    him the final battle. The trade
    union leaders are not too happy
    about him. :

    He has sometimes indulged in
    personal and caustic comments
    about them, and the bruised vic-
    tims he has rubbed the wrong way
    will not forget too readily.





    His error

    BEVAN MAY look upon them
    as a pretty dull lot—hardly meas-
    uring up to his standard. A fatal
    error,

    There afe many able men
    among them who are not wanting
    in courage. as indeed they have
    shown during, and since, the war,
    in the interests of the whole
    nation. Perhaps they won't suc-
    cumb too easily to brilliant feats
    of parliamentary oratory, They
    also have a healthy suspicion of
    anybody who rocks the boat.

    It is true that the trades unions
    have no say in the actual election
    of the leader, but nobody could be
    appointed who was in ill-fayour
    with them.

    Bevan will, therefore, find it
    tough to convince them that in
    addition to having a punch he
    also knows the rules. :

    So, I fancy the chances of Her-
    bert Morrison to gain a victory on
    points.

    If the election were to take
    place just now Morrison would
    win by an overwhelming majority.

    Morrison, like Bevan, has con-
    siderable parliamentary qualities
    He is a sound administrator, has
    an unequalled experience of public
    service, and his integrity is be-
    yond reproach,

    His value

    SOME people seem to dislike
    his somewhat pontifical manner.
    He always appears to be saying:
    “Brother, here I am trying to do
    my. best for you and the world at
    large, and if you don’t appreciate

    the Commissioner's action is
    bound to weaken the Band as well
    as rob Our popular Bandmaster of
    valuable assistance. There are
    many of us who feel that this is
    a matter that deserves some look-
    ing into.

    Finally, although Captain
    Raison’s work and worth are so
    well-known to all of us now as
    to be in need of no additional
    word of commendation from me,
    yet I do want to say how much
    I praise and admire his policy of
    delegating responsibility to his
    N.C.O.’s, It is sound judgment un-
    clouded by selfish considerations.
    Small officials (and there are sev-
    eral in our midst) try to build up a
    legend of indispensability, and
    their every word or gesture is
    publicised, They are also propor-
    tionately jealous of the popularity
    of other officials, Should Captain
    Raison be called upon to give any
    other territory the benefit of his
    fine qualities as musician and

    8 teacher (though we hope we shall

    have him for a long time yet) he
    will have the deep satisfaction of
    knowing that the ‘Raison touch’
    will still live on under the capable
    guidance of the men whom he has
    trained for leadership. And this
    in spite of any obstacle that may
    be put in his way. We could do
    with a few more like him,
    With thanks for space.
    Yours faithfully,
    MUSIC LOVER.

    Scouts’ Bob-a-Job Week

    To The Editor, The Advocate—

    SIR,—Further to your editorial
    which was somewhat’ critical in
    tone, may I say that my own ex-
    perience with the Scouts was
    particularly happy.

    I asked for two scouts to do
    $5.00 worth of hard work in my
    garden. Two big boys, including
    one of those wl . went to Jamaica,
    came with the local-organiser at
    6.45 a.m. on Thursday and said
    they would work two five-hour
    mornings. They worked so well
    that I-said they could continue if
    they wished, They therefore
    came at 6.15 a.m. this time cn
    Saturday and did a hard ten
    hour day, They did the same on
    Monday and Tuesday, and on
    Wednesaay they worked two
    hours to do me a good turn. They
    earned a substantial sum and my
    lasting goodwill and personal
    interest.

    { should like through your
    columns t) acknowledge their
    willingness and. courtesy, their

    determination to .make a good
    job of whatever they undertook
    and. to leave’ nothing undone
    which needed to be done. They
    showed the true spirit of Scouting.
    This is the first time the Barba-
    dcs Scouts have undertaken a
    ‘Bob-a-job’ week and no doubt
    the officers of the movement have
    learned much from the experience
    and will address themselves to
    p ints such as these raised in your
    columns. So far as I am con-
    cerned, however, they have made
    a flying start and I have heard
    many other tributes to the good-
    will and speed with which they
    worked. The few exceptions have

    probably had a healthy lesson.

    Yours truly,
    Miss D. IBBERSON.
    Best Sugar ?

    To The Editor, The Advocate—
    SIR,—You have recently pub-
    lished a leading article and the
    debates in the House and Council
    on the subsidisation of sugar.
    Is it not a fact that Muscavado
    Sugar is the most _nutricious
    sugar produced in the Island, and
    are not brown sugars much bet-
    ter in this respect than the whites

    the fact, it is your fault and nct|

    mine.”

    eT

    (By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS)

    LONDON,
    Anthony Eden basks in the glory of a

    His short period of office as For-| bright reputation. At the moment his stand-

    eign Secretary was unmarked by
    substantial achievement, and some
    recent appearances have disap-
    pointed back-benchers.

    In fairress, however, it should |

    be recalled that he followed
    Ernest Bevin, who until he be-
    came i filled the post with re-
    markable brilliance.

    Perhaps foreign affairs may not
    suit Morrison’s training and tem-
    perament, His principal pre-
    occupation has been with domestic
    affairs, where his abundance of
    common sense is a great asset.

    Like other politicians he loves
    popularily, but will never seek it
    by yielding to clamour, whether
    from party members or the general
    public; he will always do what
    he believes to be right.

    Forcing move

    NEITHER the Nationa] Execu-
    tive of the Labour Party nor the
    annual conference can _ in‘erfere
    ‘vith the exelusive privilege of
    Labour M.P.s to elect a leader.

    If, however, at the annual con-
    ference there is open hostility
    against th
    would be uncer‘ain.

    Labour M.P.s could hardly ig-
    nore the existence of a strong
    minority opinion

    leadership, the result}

    in the confer-|

    |ing with the publie could hardly be higher
    jand some of the political pundits have even
    dared to say that the Conservatives would
    | have won a bigger majority with him instead
    of Winston Churchill as leader. Recently he
    made speeches to the House of Commons and
    to the foreign correspondents in London that
    have lifted or maintained the high opinion
    | everybody has of his grasp of every foreign
    question. There is not a doubt that plenty of
    people who are Labour supporters on domes-
    tie questions prefer Anthony Eden’s Tory
    handling of foreign affairs to Herbert Mor-
    rison’s slip-shod Socialist mishandling.

    But intelligent people here in Britain who
    | take an interest in the way the world wags
    |are doing some hard criticising of the ex-

    wwaordinary muddle into which British for-
    |eign policy seems to be heading under the
    | guidance of the officials of the Foreign Office
    —despite the energetic and sincerc efforts of
    Anthony Eden.

    |



    | thon e i i i
    Sass. snc Uecthn tive cometituencs’| An y Eden again hit the headlines ali

    organisations, .

    This might force them into sub-
    mission, and their attitude on the
    future ieadership would be cor-
    respondingly affected. Such a
    situation is not impossible.

    What is more, I shall take a
    lot of convincing that a move of
    this sart is not in contemplation.

    Union power

    THE STAKES are high; in the
    event of Labour's return to power,
    whoever is appointed the leader
    would almost certainly become
    the Prime Minister. i

    The Bevanites are men of con-
    siderable intelligence and organ-
    ising ability, They will press
    Bevan’s claims—hard.

    The Labour Party has been
    engulfed in a_wave of emotion
    before now. If they can provoke
    the rank and file into the. right
    temper, anything can happen.

    Whether the move will actually
    succeed depends, in my view—
    and in the final resort—on the
    attitude of the trades unions,

    j —L.E.S.

    Again the clash in the Socialist
    Party was emphasised at Margate
    when a@ mass-membership union
    voted overwhelmingly for the
    Bevan philosophy. But Morrison,
    too, is tasting success—in the
    L.C.C. elections. Where is it all
    leading?





    and straws? You would be doing
    your many readers a tremendous
    service if you would consult the
    Family Doctor or other experts
    on the subject and then publish
    their findings. Our Legislators

    over Europe with the forma! statement, offer-
    jing scarcely any new commitments, that
    Britain would under-right the European De-
    fence Community. But Continental statesmen
    and officials are still nevertheless suspicious
    of “Perfidious Albion.” They find that British
    Foreign Office diplomats are doing all in their
    power to scuttle the ship of European co-
    operation. For instance the Marshall ,Plan
    created a complex organization of European
    countries including Britain to keep a watch
    on trade inside Europe and the flow of goods
    coming from the United States under the
    Marshall Plan itself. Now that the Marshall
    Plan is coming to an end this organization
    called O.E.E.C. is under fire from Britain al-
    though every Continental country would like
    to keep it in existence. The British Foreign
    Office is having ‘a kind of private war with
    the aim to make NA.T.O. the only set of in-
    ternational initials on the Continent. It is
    all rather trivial and petty—but it could be-
    come disastrous. Winston Churchill once said
    that Britain stands between three concentric
    circles, that she must have an equal part in
    each of the three circles—the Anglo-American
    community, the British Commonwealth, and
    Europe. As the Economist newspaper re-
    marked last week the Foreign Office seems to
    be so dizzy revolving on three circles that it



    have referred to the darker|is in danger of falling out of them all.
    sugar as “inferior” and to the 4
    mater ong ae “better” or| Certainly this is a dangerous business be-
    7 Ss j : : . .
    wrong: urely this is all) cause it is not -only in European capitals that
    There are many wholesome

    articles produced in some remot

    met of the World which, heonuer

    price or scarcity, we ca t

    get, me thle should 2

    case w good Barba -

    vado Sugar, re, eee
    Yours faithfully,

    & (Cc.
    Brundish, Pee
    Blue Waters Terrace,

    26.4.52
    Birth Control

    To The Editor, The Advocat
    SIR,—Through the courtesy
    your paper I would like to
    the following observations, a
    God said “Increase, multiply
    and fill the earth.” . .’) and then
    proceeded to provide food for
    man from trees, beast and fowl
    Read Gen. 1, 22—31, 3
    ince then nature in the animal
    and vegetable life has quietly aie
    on re-creating the earth according
    to His scheduled plan, Man alone
    dares to defy the Almighty’s crea-
    es scheme. This matter is
    neither legislative no: i
    where there Ph ee

    are amendments
    withdrawals of motions, ee

    The earth can produce a
    Over Produce at any time or =
    any year according to Govern-
    ment’s right planning. What of the
    tons of wheat and of coffee which
    were destroyed in the U.S.A, and
    Brazil, the thousands of gallons of
    milk which were recently thrown
    down the drains of British Guiana?
    Do not acts like these deserve just
    repercussions or yetribution? So
    likewise will the practice of Birth
    Control. France fell quietly and
    quickly to Hitler’s hordes because
    she had no man power. Birth Con-
    trol had been practised there!

    Factories under pressure of war
    rolled out vast supplies of arma-
    ment in 1939—45, The same fac-
    tories, if Government, ‘so willed
    could produce machinery (or
    what may be necessary) for mass
    food productionvand comfortable
    homes ete. When storms wreck
    fishing boats more and better ones
    are built. Disaster makes man
    think, | plan, and produce, Our
    peacetime programme should not
    include plans to-frustrate life on
    this planet, “God's in His Heaven.
    All's well with the world.’ Thanks
    to Rev. Hutchinson and Mr, George
    Hunte for bravely advocating
    Right and Righteousness, I appeaj
    to heads of denominations, colleges
    and social societies to form a
    United Christian front against this
    ugly menace of Birth Control,

    Youth must be trained to respect
    their bodies as the temples of the
    Holy Ghost. Devotees of Birth
    Control are those who want to
    remain society butterflies without
    the pledge of a wedding ring and
    those within. the married circle
    who want to shirk the duties they
    vowed to carry through on their
    wedding day, foreither selfish
    reasons or to cover sinful practices
    and the most zealous advocates are
    those who have no children of
    their own,

    In conclusion, Birth Contrdl is a
    vicious sin in the sight of God
    and a menace in any cultural,
    educated, sane, civie life. Barba
    dos, give it what it is worth—an
    exit ticket.

    Yours faithfully,
    IRIS M. HOLDER.
    “Marycot”,
    Paynes Bay,
    St, James,

    not be the

    e courtesy of



    British foreign policy looks isolationist. ‘To
    American and Canadians it looks simply
    foolish for Britain to quarrel with her Euro-
    pean neighbours in a quite illusory hope that
    she will have a special preferential arrange-
    ment with the United States at any time. It
    is Congress that pays; and as far as Congress
    is concerned that is not how business is done.

    Sometimes it is said that Britain must keep
    out of being friendly with Europe because of
    her Commonwealth associations. But quite a
    victory was won last year and the European
    countries no longer want Britain to pool her
    resources or abolish her preferences—or in-
    deed do anything that is not plain common-
    sense. Commonwealth representatives are
    now well known in ‘Strasbourg. They appre-
    ciate that Commonwealth commitments and
    European commitments have no need to con-
    flict. So what is all this bickering from the
    Foreign Office?

    No reflection is made on Anthony Eden
    whose public statements without exception
    have been excellent and well intentioned,
    but our present school of professional diplo-
    mats seems to be addicted to pvint scoring
    rather than to making friends. For the
    moment the pressure of communism gives
    Britain a number of allies, but it needs sound
    diplomacy to make them trusting friends.

    Television Education

    A FRIEND in the United States has written
    to me asking for copies of the British Broad-
    casting Corporation’s television programme.
    He does not believe that a broadcasting sys-
    tem of our kind can possibly produce inter-
    esting programmes. In America televiewers
    in the biggest cities have even six pro-
    grammes to choose from running all the day.
    The B.B.C. offers one programme in the after-
    noon and the evening only. But its virtues
    are its boldness. It is not bound hand and
    feet by the lowest common denominator the
    public takes and recently the television ser-
    vice has spread over the whole country a
    programme consisting of intelligent films
    that have been refused distribution through
    the normal cinema circuits. The famous film
    Beauty and the Beast made on ‘the story of
    the great French dramatist Jean Cocteau was

    on the air the other night and I would like

    |to know from the B.B.C. Listener Research
    Service what percentage of televiewers were
    attracted by this strange film of fair beauty
    | locked up in a rugged castle.

    | But sometimes I wonder whether this ad-
    | diction to television is not a sign of national
    | stupidity Do we need to spend our days sit-
    | ting in front of little boxes? The Danes would
    |seem to come out of this intelligent test very
    | well, for I hear that 170 of them out of four
    | million have bought Television receivers. The|
    |television service in Denmark is probably |
    | closing down. }
    | Meanwhile, in Britain, we have television}
    | critics along side book, theatre, film, radio and
    ‘music critics —L.E.S,







    }

    ——_——

    1



    KING GEORGE VI

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    (oan neneemaneenmee ett
    TUESDAY, APRIL.

    29, 1952



    @ From Page 3.

    Cross-examined he said he did

    not know Haswell.
    Awakened by Noise

    Anna O’Neale of Taylor's Gap,
    Bank Hall, who lived at the Gar-
    den Land on the date of the
    murder, said that she was home
    sleeping when she was aroused
    by a bounce against the house.
    Then she heard a fluttering. After
    a short while she peeped. out and
    baw the body of a woman bounc-
    ing up and down. She was afraid
    and closed her window. About
    ten minutes later she heard some-
    one running and pushing a bicycle
    down the gap. The person called
    for her neighbour Bowman. When
    she heard Bowman’s voice shé
    looked out and saw Bowman, Ben-
    skin and two strangers. Benskin
    had a kerchief tied across his

    forehead
    Leonard Benskin, 19, of Garden
    Land, St. Michael, said he had

    known Norma Haswell for about

    three years. She was his fiancée,

    =A she lived at Fields Gap, Bank
    au,

    On the 7th September, 1951, ‘he
    met Nerma at the junction of
    Country Road and White Park
    Thev went a ¢ ace Rawr Strret

    wisi’ tepins
    sce for -bout an hour ord a half
    From there they went by way of
    Roebuck Street as far as the Globe
    Theatre

    After
    left thea

    where they nt th

    obeut ten minutee they
    cw be and rode to Perry's
    Gap. It was about 9.10 p.m. They
    rode through Perry Gan until thev
    got to the corner leading to the
    Garden Land.

    Received Blow

    They walked along a_ track
    which was bordered by a long row
    of Khus-Khus grass. There were
    spaces in the grass, and when he
    got to one of the spaces, he felt
    a blow on his left shrulder.

    He was struck a blow on the
    left side of his face and he fell.
    The bicyele fell, and he quickly
    regained his feet and returned a
    blow to the man’s chin. The man
    fell, but on regaining his feet, he
    renewed the attack and they both
    fell with his assailant on top.

    Norma ran, and the man ran
    after her. He too got up and ran
    in the same direction.

    In front of a beuse in the gap,
    he heard 4 groaning, and saw the
    man running away.

    He ran to Norma who was lying
    cn the ground with half of her
    body in the gutter and the other
    half on the road.

    He spoke to Norma, but she did
    not reply. He went to Mr. Bow-
    man’s place and aroused him. Mr.
    Bowman and he went fo Norma,
    and with a torch light they were
    able to see the cut and blood on
    her body, :

    Bowman went back to his home,
    and he (witness) went to one
    Mrs. Forde’s where he was given
    water tio wash his hand which had
    blood from a wound in his face.

    His brother and his brother’s
    wife went and his brother left. He

    remained there until the Police
    came and then he went to the
    hospital.

    Man Not Identified

    The man seemed to be wearing
    a peak cap, khaki-shorts and shirt.
    The man appeared to be well
    built, and was a little taller than
    he was. He could not identify
    the man.

    To Mr, Farmer:— “On the way
    from the Esplanade, he went to
    the Globe by way of Bay Street,
    Probyn St., Spry Street and Roe-
    buck Street. I don't remember
    telling the Magistrate that Norma
    was to my right with the bicycle
    between us. I did not tell the
    Police Magistrate that.

    Norma was close to the grass on
    the left hand side of the track.

    I did not know what struck me
    —Whether it was a knife or a hand.
    I could not see well because it was
    a bit dark, The man’s face was
    very close to mine. Norma was
    shouting loudly while the man and
    1 struggled on the ground, and she
    was running away.

    Immediately he jumped on me,
    Norma ran, and the man got up
    anu ran after her. Afier abdut
    three minutes I ran after them, I
    had nothing with me when I ran.

    I went for the bicycle after Mr.
    Bowman had come out and before
    the Pelice came. I did not have
    the bicycle when I ran after
    Norma and the man.

    I told Inspector Springer that
    I could identify the man if I saw
    him. I also told that to the other
    policemen.

    The man appeared to be carry-
    ing a shovel. I did not think it
    important. I said I could identify
    the man who from his clothing
    appeared to be a scavenger. I did
    nat say I knew the village in
    which he lived.

    Scavengers Inspected

    I went around to the Scaveng-
    ing Department and inspected the
    men in the presence of the Police
    on two consecutive mornings.

    The Police carried Mr. Bowman
    to Central Police Station, Mr
    Bowman’s appearance . is
    different from that of the accused,

    The fact that suspicion rested
    on me never frightened me,
    have many times thought that- the
    position in which I found myszif
    called for some explanation. I
    have always co-operated with the
    Police.
















    put

    fer

    Re-examined, he said, “I al-
    ways told the Police that I could
    identify my assailant by his “long
    mouth” and the clothes he wore.
    I had never seen that man before.

    Dr. A. S. Cato who examined
    Haswell’s body at the Public Mor-
    tuary, St. Michael, said she was
    dead about 16 hours when he saw
    the body. It was that of a young
    well developed girl. The face, trunk
    sm limbs were blood stained and
    the mouth and nose contained
    olood.

    Haemorrhage and Shock

    Dr, A. S. Cato described the
    multiple injuries, and said that
    death was due to haemorrhage and
    shock from the injuries described
    The injuries were inflicted with a
    sharp instrument such/as a knife.
    The condition of the lungs also
    Suggested some degree of as-
    phyxia.

    Mr, Farmer asked no questions.
    The next witness to give evidence
    for the Crown was Veta Small.
    She said she used to live at Dean’s
    Village, St. Michae! from ‘he 14th
    April ts Ist October, 1951.

    She knew the defendant with
    whom she was friendly, and they
    lived together. She knew Elma
    Howell who spent part of her va-
    cation in September at her home.

    Howell was there on the nicht
    of the 7th.

    She, the witness, went to work
    On the 7th and when she return-
    ec home in the evening she found
    Carltcn Brewster and Elma at
    home.

    Brewster left at about 6 o’clock
    to go to his mother’s He was
    wearing a pants with stripes a
    two-toned shirt, a felt hat and a
    pair of sneakers. Elma and she
    remained home Brewster came
    back shortly after 9.30 p.m.
    Elma was outside with Egbert.
    She was in bed when Carlton
    Brewster returned and said he
    had just come from his mother’s.

    The accused asked for water but
    none was ‘there. She told the ac-
    cused to go for water and he said
    he was not going back out.

    He asked Elma to bring the
    water and she did so. The ac-
    cused remained over the half
    door.

    When Elma brought the water,
    the accused put some of the wa-
    ter into a basin, and then drank
    some from the bucket,

    Clothes Taken Off

    The accused took off all his
    clothes, hung up tis pants, put
    the sneakers under the bed and
    dropped his shirt on the floor. He
    sponged his arm pits, and then
    washed out the shirt which he
    had taken off. ,

    She noticed that the water in
    which he washed the shirt was
    red. The accused threw away the
    water. ‘

    He put more water in the basin,
    the shirt back in it and
    washed it with soap. He then
    went outside and hung out the
    shirt.

    He came back in, went to the
    door and looked at his hand. She
    went and got a drink of water
    and the accused asked her to pour
    sorne on his hands.

    She did so and noticed that
    they were stained red. She went
    back to bed; the accused joined
    her shortly afterwards, and sat
    on the corner of the bed.

    The accused looked from one
    side to the other. He told her:
    “IT now lick up a girl” and she
    asked him “How you could do
    that? That is trouble. How you
    come to do that?” He turned and
    wld her: “I was coming up Roe-
    buck Street and I saw a girl and
    aman coming up. When they
    got by the Esso Garage, they
    swung across Perry Gap and I
    swung behind them. I stopped
    back and the two of them went
    along. When I got to them, I
    rushed them and the man ran
    and the woman began to fight
    back with me and I cut her up
    and come home.”

    Threatened

    The accused then lay down
    and threatened that “if I tell any-
    body and cause him to get locked
    up or something wrong happen to
    him, I would see what would
    happen to me.” °

    On the next nwrning at about
    five o’clock Elma woke her and
    told her something. She woke
    the aecused and told him that
    Elma said a man went under the
    sugar apple tree and said a girl
    got killed in Perry Gap last night.

    The accused got up, went to the
    window and asked “Which side
    the man gone,” Elma told him
    the man went down the gap. The
    accused sat down on the corner
    of the bed and after a time he
    got up, put on the same clothes
    he wore the night before, except
    for the shirt. He went outside
    and said he would go down Perry
    Gap and see who the girl was
    that got killed.

    She told him: “You mean you
    told me you lick yp a girl down
    there last night and you still go-
    ing down there?” He replied:
    “T got guts.”

    » T.e accused went around the
    house and she got ready for work.
    Before she left he came back an
    I said it was true that a girl had

    been killed in Perry Gap, but he
    did not know her.

    At this stage His Lordship
    adjourned further hearing until
    this morning at 10 oclock.



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    ment (top) on the test track of the American Locomotive Company at

    Schenectady, N. Y. At bottom,
    vehicles await shipment to
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    Canadian Died
    By Drowning

    Death by misadventure due to
    drowning was the verdict returned
    by a nine-man jury when the
    inquest into the circumstances
    surrounding the death of Mr. John
    McKenzie (62) a Canadian, who
    ‘was here on vacation from Nova
    Scotia and staying at St.
    Lawrence, Christ Church, ended
    yesterday at District “A” Police
    Station,

    Mr. John McKenzie died at Dr.
    Bayley’s Clinic after he was taken
    there from Battery Beach, St.
    Lawrence, where he and his wife
    got into difficulties while bathing
    there at about 9 a.m. on April 27.
    The body of the deceased was
    taken to Burton's Funeral Parlour,
    Pinfold Street, where a post mor-
    tem examination’ was performed
    by Dr. A. S. Cato,

    Dr. Cato told the Court yester-
    day that the lungs of the deceased
    contained water, but there was no
    haemorrhage or brain disease
    present, The deceased was dead
    for about five hours and from his
    examination death was due to
    suffocation from drowning.

    Dr. Kinch who was called to
    Battery Beach, St. Lawrence, soon
    after the incident, said that when
    he reached the beach he saw some
    bloody water coming from the
    nose of the deceased and there
    ‘was also some fluid in the lungs.
    He gave the deceased an injection
    end ordered him to the Horzital.

    Strong Under Current

    Mrs, Marjorie mckenzie, the
    wife of the deceased, said that
    she and her husband left where
    they were staying in St. Lawrence
    for a bath in the sea at about
    7.30 a.m. on Spril 27. They both
    went into t'.e sea, but her husband
    was a little distanca in front of
    her when a big wave struck them
    and then she felt a strong under
    current and from the expression
    on her husband’s faca she knew
    that he was in difficulties. She also
    was not feeling safe and shouted
    for help but was still trying to get
    to her husband, Immediately after
    her shouts some men came to
    their assistance and both of them
    were taken to the shore.

    The doctor then arrived and the
    deceased was taken to Dr. Bay-
    ley’s Clinic. Her husband stayed
    at the Clinic for about five hours
    before he died,



    Police Constable 25 Carter
    attached to the Central Police
    Station told the Court that on

    April 27 between 8.30 a.m. and 9
    am., he was on Battery Beach,
    Christ Church, and while on the
    beach he heard shouts of help
    coming from the sea. He then
    discovered that the shouts were
    coming from a woman in the sea
    and also saw a man in difficulties.
    He plunged into the sea and
    reached the woman, but she asked
    him to help her husband who was
    some yards away from her.

    He went to tne mau auua another

    man named Charles Greenidge
    assisted him in bringing out the
    deceased. Mrs. McKenzie was

    also brought out of the sea,

    Beresford Trotman, one of the
    men assisting in the rescue, said
    that he jumped into the sea after
    he heard the shouts of help from
    Mrs McKenzie. The deceased was
    some yards from his wife and he
    and two other men helped in
    bringing the deceased ashore. Dr.
    Kinch was then called to the
    beach. At this stage the Coroner
    presented the facts of the inquest
    to the jury who returned a verdict
    of death by misadventure due to
    drowning.






    Dept.

    Trade Unions’
    Conference

    @ fromm page 1
    (c) Agricultural and Workers
    Problems in Caribbean area.
    (d) IrNiustrial and Mine Workers,
    (e) Inflation and Unemployment,
    (f) Rights of Trade Union Asso-
    ciation,
    (g) Trade Union Education.

    The Committee also agreed that
    C. P. Alexander, President of the
    Seamen and Waterfront Workers’
    Union in Trinidad and Organiser
    of O.R.I.T. and I should visi’
    Jamaica on behalf of O.R.I.T.

    It is a signal honour for Bar-
    bados that the first Conference of
    the LC.F.T.U. will be held here
    I am looking forward with great
    expectation to the deliberations at
    this Conference.

    Invitations
    Invitations to the Conference
    will be extended to the British
    Trade Union Congress, The A.F.
    of L. and the C.LO. of America,

    the International Labour Office
    and the Cuban Federation of
    Workers,

    At the conclusion of the Con-
    ference a meeting was held at
    the Public Library and, I ad-
    dressed the affiliated groups on
    the purpose .of the forthcoming
    Conference.

    I have great confidence in the
    success of the Trade Union Meve-
    ment in these territories and fee!
    that greater unity among all
    Unions is an esvential prerequis-
    ite to West Indian Federation,

    I am looking forward to the
    co-operation of the people -f Bar-
    bados to make this Internationa)
    Conference a success.

    Present at the meeting
    Mr, Francisco Aguirre,
    Secretary of O.R.1.T., C. P. Alex-
    ander, President of the Seamen
    and Waterfront Workers’ Union
    of Trinidad, Mr, F. J. Carasco
    O.B.E., President of the Seanien
    and Waterfront Workers’ Union
    of St. Lucia and myself,

    “Athelbrook” Calls
    For Molasses

    The 74-ton schooner Frances W.
    Smith called here from British
    Guiana on Sunday with a cargo
    of 1,500 bags of rice, 60 cartons o.
    r.ce, 300 bags of charcoal, 30 tons
    of firewood, 50 bunches and three
    packages of fresh fruit and 262
    p.eces of sawn greenheart,

    Also arriving on Sunday was
    the molasses tanker Athelbrook
    which came for a load of vacuum
    pan molasses for Trinidad. The
    Athelbrook cleared port yesterday
    afternoon for Trinidad.

    The Schooner Pool are the agents
    of the Frances W. Smith and
    Messrs H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
    are agents of the Athelbrook.

    “LADY NELSON”
    LEAVES PORT

    The R.MLS. Lady Nelson arrived
    at Barbados from Canada via the
    British Northern Islands yester-
    day. With general cargo from
    Canadian ports discharged and 49
    out of her 103 passengers getiing
    off at Barbados, the Lady Nelson
    left port last night for British
    Guiana via St. Vincent, Grenada
    and Trinidad. She is consigned
    20 Messrs Gardiner Austin & Co.,

    were’
    General





    ~ Limited.







    GOULD

    es ‘i
    ante ae

    he CAVE Sil

    Trees, Fenee, Grass |

    Beautify

    THE TREES at the Prir
    were planted by Miss Nell
    Shortly the cages, whicli
    may have to be removed.

    The “sweet lime” fence around the eastern end of the
    field has also grown considerably but at one corner
    especially, the salt water is st

    Oistins Round-Up
    Oistin’s Market
    Gets A Cage

    The Oistin’s Market now has a
    cage around its counter. Because
    of this cage, idlers are kept out of
    the fish compound. The outer wall
    around the market, which form-
    erly had a flat surface, now has a
    knife edge surface. This has pre-
    vented vendors from cutting fish
    and selling vegetables on the wall.
    _ This fish market is one of the
    first in the island to be wired
    around, Now fish vendors of the
    City are complaining that the City
    Fish Market should also be wired
    around,

    On Tuesday there was a short-
    age of fish at the Oistin’s Market.
    Vendors went to Silver Sands
    where they bought fish to be sold
    in thy Market. As soon as the fish
    was put on sale everyone rushed
    to get some instead of waiting un-
    til the price was lowered, as they
    usually do.

    For the month of March, 12,429
    pounds of fish were sold in the
    Oj(stin's Market. This was 386
    pounds better than in March last
    year. In March last year 6,900
    pounds of flying fish were sold in
    the Market while 7,000 pounds
    were sold this year,

    More dolphin were brought to
    the Market in March last year.
    The amount recorded last year was
    4,267 as against 3,860 this year.

    The total for this year is made
    up of 7,000 pounds of flying fish,
    3.860 pounds of dolphin, 34 king
    fish, 141 bill fish, 824 shark, 246
    albacore, 100 mackerel and 223
    pounds of bonita.

    So far this month 10,783 pounds
    of fish have been brought into the
    Market. The total amount for the
    month of April last year was 9,474.
    Of the total this month, .5,778
    pounds were flying fish. On April
    16,875 younds of flying fish war
    sold in the market, Already 2,585
    pounds of dolphin have been
    brought into the market, Seven
    hundred and seventy pounds were
    sold on April 9.

    As a result of the cage being
    erected around the counter, there
    has been an increase in the sale of
    tickets to vendors. People who
    formerly gutted fish on the front
    premises now use the beach at the
    back of the Market instead.

    *

    Fishermen at Oistin’s are begin-
    ning to bring in large catches of
    seine fish. They are not yet very
    keen on seine fishing. They find it
    difficult to sell seine fish because of
    the large number of flying fish be-
    ing caught

    One fisherman told the Advocate
    that he is hoping the flying fish
    season will soon come to an end,
    “There are plenty seine fish to be
    caught,” he said

    a



    The Oistin’s Boys’ Club, which
    js rapidly progressing in _ its

    activities has three good table te*-
    nis players. This Club is carried
    on in the Oistin’s Police Station.
    Although the Club has had no offi-
    cidl opening, its members are tak-
    ing a keen interest in the games.

    The table tennis players are
    Balfour Layne of Foundation
    Boys’ School, Patrick Lashley of
    Combermere School and Shirley
    Bentham, These boys have a good
    attack and should go far if Oistin’s
    Police Station enters a Boys’ Club
    team in the Barbados Table Ten-
    nis Association Competitions next
    year. '

    Nearly two dozen boys of this
    Club take an interest in table ten-
    nig Other games played are
    draughts and dominoes.

    People of Oistin’s get their sup-
    ply of bread from a small bakery
    This bakery was started two years
    ago by Mr. Sydney Walters, It is
    the onl bakery in Oistin’s.

    The bakery is very small and
    its owner has no carts to deliver
    loaves. Most of the bread is sup-
    plied to shops of the Town.

    Every Friday. people from su#
    rounding districts flock the bak-
    ery to bake their Saturday loaves
    The bakery is very sanitary and
    clean. Its need is mostly felt on
    Bank-Holidays which follow
    week-ends, when bread is scarce
    in Oistin’s.

    *

    * ”

    The Police at Oistin’s are having
    a quiet time, They have received
    no reports of theft or accidents for
    a long time. One constable said,
    “Everything is quiet in Oistin’s.
    We de not even receive minor re-
    ports,”



    OLD LADY FOUND

    Eighty-two-year-old Margaret ; . . /
    Tull of Lower Estate, Tenantry, | %y (
    St. George, who was Jeportes | Y. De LIMA % KNIGHTS DRUG STORES
    missing in Saturday’s vocate , . .
    has been found at Blackman’s,! & €O., LTD. %

    St. Joseph. She is in good health. | eetieeana radii



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    ROAD STREET STANSFELD, SCOTT & €9. LID.

    PAGE FIVE

    Playfield —

    , : cty
    neess Alice Playing Field, which |
    Manning, are growing rapidly.
    were erected to protect them,|

    ©

    unting the fence.

    About four weeks ago the Play- |
    ing Field got its motor mower

    Anyone approaching the field can

    clearly see the good work the

    mower has been doing during

    those weeks. The long grass which

    formerly covered the field has

    been cut.

    The ground staff of three me
    and the caretaker are at presen
    cutting grass on the western end
    of the field. This staff is respon-
    sible for raking the field, cutting
    grass, preparing the lawn tennis
    courts caer cleaning the Pavilion
    after entertainments,

    The Caretaker told the Advo-
    eate yesterday that he is hoping
    that his staff will soon be increased
    to five as there is a lot of work
    to be done

    Breakwater

    On the western end of the field
    is a breakwater many yards long
    The sea ic the main worry of the
    ground staff. When it is rough,
    the water flows over the break-
    woter and floods one end of the
    field where it, deposits large quan-
    tities of debris.

    Dances are held in the Pavilion
    about twice. monthly. Lenville
    Table Tennis Club also uses the
    Pavilion for table tennis. —

    At present one lawn tennis court
    is being used. The other two will
    soon be ready, to we
    roups of people play n
    the Princess Alice Playing Field.
    One group uses the court on Mon-
    days and Fridays, the next on
    Tuesdays and Thursdays and the
    last on Wednesdays and Satur-
    days.

    Many children from the sur-
    rounding districts play games at
    the field. Recently four football
    matches were being played at the
    same time.

    Lawn tennis players sometimes
    complain that the footballs are
    constantly kicked across their
    court. This may be remedied if a
    wire fence was placed around the
    tennis courts.

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    YOU'LL FAVOUR FOR ITS =
    DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY, >
    COMFORT AND LONG.

    LASTING QUALITY.

    Fires Damage
    Canes, Kitchen

    Shortly after 10.30 a.m. yester-
    day, the Fire Brigade was sum-
    moned to a fire at Prospect, St.
    James. On arrival they found a
    kitenen, eight by six feet, attachea
    to the house of Delcina Mings on
    fire. They assisted in putting out
    the blaze.

    The Brigade turned out under
    the command of Major Craggs.

    . *



    Six acres of second and third
    crop ripe canes were burnt when
    a fire occurred at Kirtons Ten-
    antry, St. Philip, at about 9.5u
    pm. on Sunday. . a are the
    property of D, D. Garner of
    Marchfield, St. Philip and were
    not insured,

    This fire extended to Groves
    Plontation where it burnt a quan-
    tity of trash and sour grass, the
    property of Plantations Ltd.

    “GOLFITO” DUE
    ON THURSDAY

    The S.S. Golfito is expected to

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    * WHITE
    will be leaving port shortly after
    for England. She is consigned to
    Messrs Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
    Limited.

    NO QUORUM
    There was no meeting of the St.
    Joseph Vestry yesterday due to
    the lack of a quorum. Members

    would have discussed the Maude
    Report,











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    PAGE SIx

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    (siste 29.4.52—Ir.| miles. Apply C. Arthur, c/o Auto e omnes {FOOS and all modern conveniences. For

    Particulars Dial 6121
    Prospect, St. James
    epee

    YFONTAMARA’—On the Maxwell

    , | Coast. Fully furnished. Telephone 2257
    Wharf and Pence Wilkian Henry ‘Street |OF apply to Browne & Co,, 43, Swan St
    ond McGregor Street, S, sane 27.4, 52—2n
    a now

    D. A. Browne,

    ——
    —___---— Co., Corner Trafalgar and Epry Streets.§ ) The undersigned will offer for sale by |
    BRATAWAITE...On 28th ( April 1962 27,4.52—-3n. Ppublic competition a office, No. 17,
    JosephGBrathwaite (Mikon of Rock- High Street, ;
    ley, Christ Church, His funeral will ist May 1.
    leave ‘his late residence at 4.30 p.m
    today for the. Westbury Cemetery.
    Gladys Brathwaite, Emily Green-
    idge, MitcW#? Greenidge.

    CAR—Late 1951 Vauxhall Wyvern.
    Owner driven. In good condition; done
    7,000 miles. Phone 6135,

    26 .4.52—4n.



    on Thursday,






























    - ing on 5,137 square feet of |
    29%.52—1n] “CAR—Hiiman Minx X-1203, excellent | occupied Thy Menats. R. M. Jones & Co., . FLAT: Finished. cool, specious fat. |
    WAEDOTI—Op ith April 1988. aba | GOnGuIe, Fras eed, "pew Battery: | T uner perticulse from the under ae direct cane Aguatic Club
    . 7 952 and 4 ee gis . s .
    privately next day, Edward prely pees 4 : 26.4.52—3n. | signed. : fram town. Dial 288) 29.4.52—)

    M. Waleott;*inte of Demerara and






























































    of Archway, House, Navy Garden: “AR f fect cond ! COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat
    Barbados. in nailense a0 noleghiohe 2940. Solicitors. tely furnished. Telephone, gar
    British Giana and WI. paper > 23.4. 52—t.f.n. 20.4.52—10n | electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and
    please cUQ¥, 29.4. 52—1y =. = | safe seabathing. Special Summer Rates
    wee ere HILLMAN MINX—One 1948 Black ©) Apply to “MARESOL” ST. LAWRENCE
    THANKS Hillman ' Minx, “done 26,000 miles, in ex- ° Pr Og
    —— - cellent one ition. aon FP. Stokes
    ; & Bynoe Ltd., or . , cs
    BECKEZS—Miss Eloise Brathwaitg jsin- * 24.4.92~—5n. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER FARAWAY-—St. Philip coast, 3 bed :
    cercty thanks all who in various Ways . ° ° Plant. j
    ( | Sxpreseed yippethy for her family gad) scARENw ENGINE, 05 h.p., 6 cylinder,| BY instructions received, 1° wit sett | Watermill supply, Double ree
    her on ‘the’ AéBth of her sister MiFiA:| Gray Engine, complete with}on Wednesday, April 30th’ at Messrs | gar, °"* TeOms- ve, Oe, eee
    Beckles. : Ain sterngear propelicr. DaCosta & | Redman i ‘Taylors Garage. coh ve : C slencittehinn idl
    . Lid., Dial 4689. lage (1) 75hp A. Motor Cyc! FURNISHED i
    FIELDS: _ We, the Uhdersigned through | 20.4:52~in} (Damaged in Accident) Sale at 1 p.m, MODERN Tihs wae
    + this)medium beg to thank All ChOSC | an |Terms Cash.5 , Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
    who so kinaiy) sent flow: cards| ONE BEDFORD UTILICON—i2 H.P. VINCENT-GRIFFITH, Lane be. particulars. to Alma
    and in any ot! way expr their | offers ived, can be seen at The Auctioneer. No. $ Cora) Sands, Worthing.
    mpathy in our recent bereavement.| Barbados Telephone Co., Ltd. § a.m.— 27.4.32—3n & 23.2.52—t.f.n.
    ee ” ant Bomily. ns: - BU sre a cas 38.4. me + NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 ped |
    MAYNES: We, the undersigned ask ail —One (1) 3-ton Austin Truck. ( ’ rooms. Fully furnished, nt,
    - those to accept sincere thanks who eee “SCOTT & Co. Ltd, White PUBLIC NOTICES Watermill supply, Doubie three
    attended the funeral, sent post cards, . . be servant rooms. For May and from Oc_
    wreaths or in any way extended their 24.4524 fn. —*----2-+—- ] tober Ist Phone 4476
    sympathy through our sad bergfive- . * NOTICE ° 10.4.52—t.f.
    gnen¥yon t deat sof Fitz Gtrald fr Se re eee PAI ‘OF BT 3
    > Hywnes, who died Ave r LIVEST K ARISH ¢ ea a o| “TRINITY F furnished,
    Louise Ha: ife), eta (Daw r), VES ‘ul 9 one 4 estry 4 te wi
    Lawrinbn, Stephen, FredericR, ‘Ra : Exhibitions at St. Michael's Schog |Wiee bedancins, come

    will be received by® the undersigned up

    Se miieed, riel and to, Saturilay, .the 10th. May, 1952, and

    Dac
    Ufton ( dson). :

    ONE SAANEN GOAT--Apply to Velda
    Hoticr. Greenfields, St. Michael,




































































    c 62—4n, | 8Te subject to’ the follow! conditions. ehinaherapenmnentinentitenlig
    i a ey 2 ad ee Lee eee 1 Eanaiaates must be e daughters nH Oo WANTED
    , ' ot tishioners, in straitened circum-
    » .» IN MEMORIAM . MECHANICAL starlees,, and fot legs than eight (8)
    _ Ca err Eocene antoreenes - ~—___—- ears, nor velye® (1% HELP
    PARRIS:* In loving meipory’ of our be-] "AN AML: One & fect Pan Mill-in| did on” 2nd epter bar joc: te te ——_———
    © “over? Mother, polly pent, whet’) good condition at’ Bel Air, Richmond | proved. by’ a birt certificate, gwhich| MANAGER—required for Colony Club
    p auldep 29th April: Be ted ik , | Gap 24.4.52-—-2n) must accompatiy the application (Barbados), Attructives proposition to
    dork F deetis. eae ' ps 2. .Carididates’ between eidhto (8) and | right man requiring Penney Tat
    VatSided and 'witht¥ed to, suppty“our | tough, dn A-l condition. Apply; G. L ‘the ain, eee pee epenined at eal a See
    “neds on. iverad with patiewes |) i1for@. Norwood Plantation, St’ James. | those between ten (10) carl twelve U2)| ‘PARTS ASSISTANTS'—Previous ex-
    In sijencesshe suffered with patienss 36.4.68—Sn. | yeti okt” an Mawuriiny, Tih. Jone Or patient peolttea!” Dainty Wearinandi:
    ° : milieced k.her home fo suff ea i =; ~———|_ 8. All ecAndidates must be at the] ate swith experience. Suitable appli-
    ei a Pee ee ae ; . School not later tham 5 a.m. on the] canf§ to ar ae a later pe
    . er naunsend , 2 MISCELLANEO -| date: of their_examination Ist June 1952. pply in person with |
    ee a ee cae. 5 motte ve x ZS S. FRASER, written application. ekstein, Brothers
    * Edtis, Tune, Chesterfield, Tyrone ‘(Grav ‘BGONOMY—Why buy 2 ozs. Prepared | - Cler®to the Yegtry &: John Bay Street : —4in
    :. chilidrert) > . 29-4.52-—-1n [Mustard ‘for 25c.. When. you:can get 6 : - - a 52—6n Sate Dense? sera soresenes
    _ - ons. Cankalan ” “CHAMPION | Rye MISCELLANEOUS
    * es tenes : {Mustard for. thé same 25c.. “yours "a. ear
    PERSONAL Grocer ean’ help yea, ring 2480 foc] A CORRECTION | o.: ‘AL BED, Dial 6107, H. W
    %,, oe ee ‘ details. : *29.4:52—1n parte “se Hinds, “Weftmore”, st Lawrence. oo
    ee =f Sg * : : .
    . pu ~ ereby -warned. against GIBSON V~- T,\ built #* “Aftention is called the correctigns in sa—
    cite crea wifes FLORRIB KR. | and. imported in 148. Length 18. feet, - the Advertigerent pu hopes se re LOST
    REEC Beam 5 feét 9 inches, Draught 12 feet wernmeh rsapies, atoSt ichael's






    ton th:
    i > to. F M oa :
    od myself SRionibie te “her oe

    six



    Seating capacity to. seven peopl: WALLET—On Monday, April 28th ty

    + dpe no,
    or ahi


















    These Wo



    Girlsy’ S¢hool?

    a a 5 O%
    se Scontracting any debt or {Steel ‘hull materials and const jon, ,: Wh. the,first » D Advertisements pub- | the lanade, one Leather Wallet con-
    debts fhoiny “namie “unless by a written [comply with Lioyd’s. Board of . Trade) listed on, Satur pigs th mgt the | taining’ a Gold Sifact Ring with initials
    Order, signed.by me. . requirements, Powered with Ford water-| %#te-for the’ rece of apPiicttion forr W.D. and M.D., also Race Ticket, Series
    vot ec’ -C¥RIGEARLE REECE. | motor—10/%2 B,H.P. Speed 10. knots.|.wak cimoneougly printed, as 26th +|W.2520 "Summer Meeting 1952." Pinder
    oo RSP es Dayrells Road, | Appiy Reginald’ French, D. V. Scott &| whilesthe"daté on ich Mood tamination |rewarded returning same to Advocate
    pein t Ch. Ch. }Go., Léa 22.4;52—n. |'8.to be held) w, primed incorrectly | Advertising Dept. 29.4 42--1n

    ‘ori at 16th May .
    LUNCH "TINS: Strong: Launch Tins dates our have been, re ctively ,
    with inner Tray poetiely enamelled, | May and 7th ‘June, aypritled today

    23 52a.




    “ 16th
    .* -: |
    :The.'publlic. atehereby warned against |





    Reasonable terms to suitable|to be pionees products of that industry.

    a-|of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk

    25.4.53—t..0.| thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    EDUCATIONAL |

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    ere

    GOVERNMENT NOTICES





    THE PLONEEK INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951 |
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section 3 (2)

    fa) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragezuent) Act, 1951, hereby
    causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
    set out below declaring the manufacture of wax and wax products to
    be a pioneer industry and wax and wax’products from sugar cane

    9

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out
    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and

    t
    to

    the Executive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May one

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER iNDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    Pioneer Industry (WAX and WAX PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
    The -in-Exeeutive Committee, in exercise of the s

    one mile conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    8 agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the foll Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as
    (Wax and Wax Products) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of wax and wax
    declared to be a pioneer industry and the f
    hereby declared to be pioneer products of that industry :—

    Wax and wax ‘ucts from sugar cane.

    Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
    day of one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.
    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n.

    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    5(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereb)
    causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order

    Pioneer Industry

    ucts is hereby
    owing articles are



    ;\set ovt below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn

    and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer industry
    and the spinning and knitting of cotton ee West Indian
    cotton and the manufacture of garments t rom to be pioneei
    products of that industry.

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set ou‘ | 5-5.

    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection anc

    ‘|of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Cleri

    to the Executive Committee on or before the 2lst day of May onc
    thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    The Pioneer try (SPINNING AND KNITTING OF COTTON
    YARN AND THE MANUFACTURE OF GARMENTS) Order, 195”
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the power
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Spinning and Knitting of Cotton Yarn and the Manufacture of
    Garments) Order, 1952.

    2. The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn ang the manu-
    facture of garments therefrom is hereby declared to be a pioneer
    industry and the following articles are hereby declared to be
    pioneer products of that industry :—

    The spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West Indian

    cotton and the manufacture of garments therefrom. —

    Made by the apr rer -tnsemerutive Committee this

    day one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.

    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n

    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951





























    Re:
    chi

    Governing Boay,

    rds. Three for Two « , your Free 00
    A. BARNES & CO., LTD. ee : | Harrison Coliege.
    ice ~ 9.4.89—t.f.n.| HP (2) Ding Es mt | 9.4.23 an,

    tem . oy c
    Subscribe now to 2 we “Telegraph Pca na daughter of a QUEEN'S COLLEGE

    England’s leading now native,’ of this Bland ora ds ughter
    iving in Barbados Air only a few of persons who are domiciled” in .
    days sitar publication in London. Con- this. Island, and who have resided | The next term at Queen’s College will
    in this Island for a period of tep| begin on Tuesday, the 20th of April,
    years’ prior Jo the last day of ré-| 1952, at 9.20 a.m. and the School will be

    Lovat Rapresen Seatotive, fel wun
    ve, Z : (
    , : vin tions; in session for the entire day.
    2. Be (| merit in the opin D. BE. M. MALONE,



    * he

    The; ic ‘the her warned agailwt
    amreon seen or persous
    nomsoever, #5 1, do not*held: myself
    onsibli® (om anyone contracting any
    debts jn my name unless by a
    itten® drder .signed ty me.
    . WILFRED. HA


















    H,
    17,.4,62+t.f.n.






    . i Governi Body, t Secretary-' r,
    wr z te | © Ghueated'at the Beha a” Governing “Body,
    , Vietorla Stre 3 over “10 sears and under 12 Queen’s College.

    ears of age on the 2nd ber,
    Wears

    Every. application amugt be the
    parents or guatdian of the cafididate upon
    the: form of application approved by th.
    Governing -Body:and ebtaingble from the
    Secretary ‘of thé ‘Governing vy at her
    office at St. Michael's Girls’ School from
    Tuesday, April 29th+1952, and must supply
    all information yequised by such form
    The application forms must,be filled in}

    6.4.52 —2

    CurbYourPiles

    it from Piles
    tinge the dlncov ery of Hytex (formerly

    et. ;
    Gy R2.4.53—t.f.n, in,























    Act naw —and wet re ot dns few aNort |:

    Rours with” Dr. ae Kidiey-Liver |

    Bie. Truly aa in effect, az teas

    on this effective remedy for help ey,
    need it: Dr, sc—a name

    Pine

    | ZAIRRIVED
    POPULAR

    84180 GAS COOKERS


























    if not saved but seekine

    St. Michael's Girls, School.
    Salvation, please write for 2 *

    under
    guarantee Hytex must stop your pile

    5 een! Soins and {ehabtal Gr esonty bac or

    return of empty 2

    OSE,




































    > + et 7 * , }
    : FREE HOOK ! :
    : S 0 Pwitn peaked GOVERNMENT. NOTICE. : sroneienapnnnnetennennts
    Oe 8 ag } sets ° . .
    . Se GOD'S, WAY OF VACANT POST” DANCING 3
    % ¢ ry \ SENIOR MASTER, GRAMMAR SCHOOL,. DOMINICA CLASSES
    % SALV ATION Applications are invited for one vacant post of Master, Ballet Classes at the Aquatic
    x PLAIN” © Grammar School, Dominica, B.W.I. The School ro]l at present num- My a aa a eon" »
    oe é N bers 150, and courses will be offered up to thé: Higher,School Certifi- Cotkad Ee males Masiat ant
    > - §S, Roberts, Gospel cate examination of Cambridge University. - ° Keep Fit will be undertaken. Tu-
    % Book? & ‘Tratt Service, 30 § 2. Qualifications. Applicants for: the: post should hold a Uni-|% ition by Miss Joan Ransom ®&
    % Central Ave,, Bangor, N.E o§ | versity degree arid be qualified to teach Mathematics up to Higher L.R.A.D., ALS.T.D.
    Vesa. eveneiesey hae 562 | School Certificate > cares THE BARBADOS ‘SC: L OF
    a 3. Emoluments. The Post is pampnatie ana carries a salary DANCING LTD.
    in the scale $1,920-by $120 to.$2,400 per annum. A temporary cost~- BRENDA ‘McKINGTRY,
    of-livint? allowance. is payable at the: rate°’of twen’ cent, of Srey. :
    salary, stg..cohnidate ‘selected ‘may be -appaihted at any point in %
    the scale adcording - to: qualifications. and. experience.
    -4.° Quarters, . Qu vters-a ‘prov: °° SOSS9OSSSGSSSO SOO SSIS,

    ai nce® with local regulations

    Leave: led Sin a
    yi : istanice towa: overseas leave passages.

    “b.. Passage

    ‘.
    +

    PITMAN'’S TYPE-


















    : : “Free. passages to: Dominicg to take up appointment %
    rn ‘are .provided,-tor Pie cer ‘and. fot®his wife and children if they | % R Tl
    : * _}}] accompany;: him of:‘follow. him: twelve months from the date of his WwW | NG EXAM
    : oo eee i igh M's St bitishtie 2a ° ° ; will take place on Sat.
    <<. 2°.» Conditions: of ferries. . Fhe, officer owill be subject to Colonial|% (10th May) at Combermere.
    FURN TURE Regulations and Lota jenerdl Orders... °° at 11 am. Arithmetic and
    : WAL itions stating the applicants age, qualifications and teagh- other test will be held on

    and “indicating “the earliest date on which he could
    i by testimonials and references should be

    overnment Office, Domin -

    Saturday, 17th May.

    The LP.S. Proficiency Test
    has arrived. Anyone desir-
    ous of sitting must commun-
    icate with me,








    » RUCTION

    2) T a o BF og! $ , 7 °
    “Cr. ANN®'S) DAY © SCHOOL front Mmeinbers. of the Government Service of any




    Sage patet eis Ri. Sen smitted..through the officer Administering the 'A batch of LPS. Type-
    TO hadnt ak hen oma ‘that Colony, 5" « writing Test Papers will be
    } om, ‘ Tar ithe. 3° 27.4.52—1n. arriving soon. Enter now.






    8200.
    number.
    Cc. B. ROCK

    vp “iigtyulcved Sby the" Rev. Phone
    amp-COODEF TUedisport, of b+

    ° Fegentteert and Eifeets® inchiding a
    outhgheait

    Leave your



    ‘OFFICIAL’ NOTICE







    ese
































    giewiifiber of Antiques? Views. - ret ewe Sole LPS ,
    aR Gh ing We" ty ‘“ANe THE COURT OF CHANCERY fda Rative
    Dita, Dig. Nets Terbas Aa : ee “Rookerest”, Oistin Hill, %
    Mah wing Talre. Ockgnt tree ANGE of té Chancer) Act, “1906.1 do hereby give notice to all Christ Church
    Mah. Side Tableg Kite! ‘ables persone: having or claim any eftate, right or interest or any liev or ing,
    and Chairs, o Arn! Chairs. i ry e in or affecting’ the propetty hereinafter mentioned (the property ©
    hee, Antigqne Mah Arh Chairs, abt)! te bring béfore mp an account of their claims with their witnesses,
    bice Cnfur, Rocker, Singie lng s. and’ vouchers to be examined me on any Tuesday or Friday be-
    Setter Douby Erdded © "Settee,, , x -~) hours of 12 néon and 3 0% lock’ in the afternoon at the Registration
    Folding bagel Lhina Cabinet. | . “PXblic Bu nas," Bridgetown, before the 4th day of July 1962 in
    Mah. }Sidebpyfd gjth » Mirror, order that sich cliffs may be reported and aceo: to procpature
    Diymer, Wagon with Marble Top and priate, thereof respectively; otherwise such’ sons will be preclude\ from
    Ware Press, Mah. Aurii* Pines Rook- thé ben } and be deprived of all claims on or

    of atv’ decree against the said
    :














    ceses, Mah.* -,Writing. -Burea}, property h ° °

    Poder Hiant Stands, Mab. Prayer ti 5 7
    * Dest ie Cantertiurvy, Writts PLAINTIFF: HUGIC OWEN SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCT A d Other Thi

    7 Washstands, Filing “Cabl- [I]. DEFENDANT: 1 D, SBALY_.CO., LIMITED % n ings
    uetn, our Poster » Beas... rine - ) 6.) ) . 3 2 ‘

    Presses, Srouks and ‘Stand, Chest- PROPERTY; AP? THAT certain picch, or parcel of and sittate ne r Warne |

    of-Drawers( Griaki Father Clock r in the parish of Christ Church and Island aforesa former); a fo
    Case, Banging othe? Gasolgne - supposed to cohtain by estimation four acres or thereabouts but | al Money Saving Prices
    Lampe, Wood and Coal’ Stove. ) found by recent survey to contain five acres and six perches 1 | :

    Larders, _Wall Brackets, Candle ) thereabduts abutting and bounding on the North on lands ot / NEW & Renewed Wardrobes,
    Shades, Brass and Stiver Candie Warners Plantation on the East on lands formerly of Allen Walcott Bureaus, Chests-of-Drawers, Bed
    ticks Carpet Sweeper, Towel but how of E. Best, M. WH. H. Sullivan and the estate of J, Mhiyires steads 2-feet to S-feet’ wide
    Rails, “ ing Wheel Water deceased on the South on lands of Graeme Hall Plantation on Springs, Laths, Washstands $8 up
    Colourg, “Pird Cage, Sangre lands of T. Cox and on a road and on the West on the Pubiic Nightchairs, Towel, Shoe & Hat-
    G pS ke, Hookah dAipe, Coll Road or however else the same may abut and bound | racks—TABLES for Dining, Kitch-
    ot iver, Grass, Glassware, Books, Biull Gied: 29 Januaay 1982. } en & Fancy Use, China, Bedroom
    Oviler®, Old China including Blue Date April, 1952. . ’ & Kitchen Cabinets, Larders
    Willow W and Staffordshire H WILLIAMS

    China Figu Mirrors, Decanters Registrar-in-Chancer) DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
    and algo a very large assortment 29 .4.$2—3r in Morris, Rush and other types,

    of misbellan’0Us items too mumer-



    4 Desks, Bookracks,






    z

    1B3BS9002006050S00S000S60SEHNNSOOOHETESTOSOOOL OO

    5 y giving. “creuit.:.to. "my. wife, LORETTA Especially 7 bee Perea de ‘ . | Tie
    ee & HARPER dnée ‘Lotetta Allayne) &s 1 do [Only & cents each erat . ae | HARRISON Cc EGE
    nov paid? if, responsible for her or P&S} cents each G..W. Mute & a) e as . OLL
    aatone tia gontiacting any debt or debts | Go. Ltd, os. | sr. wnpails Hens SCHOOL
    . ihe my on Sour by a written er ——— : : OT
    sane yr Sn Pehone, maak A to Re GO P eresanins on A the Soho 1 wil be - sian Ry one
    © RUPERT LEON HARPER. BOT eae ict re. BMD A Sean | The Governing Bodyoof the St. Michacl's | rar, ‘Nis “nin te 0 pan session | lollipops,
    “ * mw é eee arrange for Mspection. -! ' Gils’ Sehoo ferefor competition: the 9.15 * , an. om
    « . * St. cha ne ee caeens F Barend * irres; e ris! eee ‘
    : ~ 26.4.52—dn. ff) RECORDS—Clearing our Stock ‘of MGM, .Eny Setwol -previoushy Rieriied Five (5) Secretary-Treasurer.

    ( -and.sent to the Secretary of the Governing | work in 10 minutes and not only stops
    A ov a these have not yet ts at her office on or before noon on pi Bain ome cae out the Ses
    been ; : e , Stops

    Prices of next shipment will be rites Examination will be held at_ the Irritation curbing other trou-
    higher. chool at 9.30 a.m. on Friday, 7th June! bles by auch as che, |

    982 7". Nervousness, e, Constipation.

    Why wot call at your Gas Show- oir eo A loss of energy, debility. and irritable

    rooms, Bay Street "TO-DAY and mee Ds ye disposition Get H Rox from your

    secure one of these cookers. Secretary, Governing y+ druggist the positive



    a “« PECSIIOSIOSIOO OOO OOS SI IODIIOOO OSSD OOOO FOOT G_ PIANOS, Manios—Pram. | Go-
    ar a an a s
    ' , ms cs ip; . Kitch-
    ‘AUCTIONEERS ||| PLATENS ; ~_ TING aE aM, Btmaics “Wa
    John *4. Biadon | A small but eannatttp assortment —
    i’ a
    & ce. CENTRAL EMPORIUM | L. S. WILSON
    mst | SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009
    ~ Rianiations Building... Cnr, Broad & Tudor Sts. PEnat: PEAK
    ” en eh

    Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    3(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
    causes this notice to be piblished of his intention to make the Order

    The next term at Harrison College will |Set out below declaring the manufacture of sugar confectionery and

    products to be a pioneer industry and boiled confectionery,
    minis and icing sugar, and every variety of nut food
    products to be pioneer products of that industry.

    2. Any person who objects to the making of the Order set out
    below is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
    of the grounds on which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
    to the Executive Committee on or before the 21st day of May one
    thousand nine hundred and fifty-two so that dtte consideration may
    be given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES OD ACT, 1951
    The Pioneer Industry (SUGAR CONFECTIONERY 1D NUT FOOD
    PRODUCTS) Order, 1952
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1, This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Sugar Confectionery and Nut food products) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of sugar confectionery and nut food
    products is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the
    following articles are hereby declared to be pioneer products of
    that industry :—

    boiled confectionery, lollipops, mints and icing sugar, and

    every variety of nut food products.

    | Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this

    day of one thousand nine
    hundred and fifty-two.

    | By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4.52—3n.

    | THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951

    | The Governor-in-Executive Committee, pursuant to section
    | $(2)(a) of the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
    | causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
    | set out below declaring the manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-
    jcuring to be a pioneer industry and ham, bacon and other food
    | xroducts produced from meat of iocally-reared pigs to be pioneer
    | preducts of that industry.





    2. Any a. who objects to the making of the Order set out
    “_ | is hereby invited to give notice in writing of his objection and
    1 ¥ e

    eae on_ which he relies in support thereof to the Clerk
    o the Executive Committee on or before the 2Ist day of May one
    housand nine hundred and fifty-two so that due consideration may
    %e given to any objections received pursuant to this notice.

    ORDER
    THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT) ACT, 1951
    - Bonin 1a ee
    The Governor-in-Executive Committee, in exercise of the powers
    conferred on him by section 3(1) of the Pioneer Industries (Encour-
    agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order :—

    1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry
    (Ham, Bacon and Meat-curing) Order, 1952.

    2. The manufacture of ham, bacon and meat-curing is
    hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following
    eee are hereby declared to be pioneer products of that
    industry :—

    Ham, bacon and other food products produced from

    loeally-reared pigs. . ween meee

    Made by ~ povernor-ineRingcutive Committee this
    y a one thous: nine
    hundred and fifty-two. oe
    By Command,
    Clerk, Executive Committee.
    29.4,52—3n.
    PSOVOSES

    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    }
    |
    |
    !






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    For furtner particulars apply —

    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952



    Sailing Sunday 4th May 1962
    The M.V

    cept Cargo

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    “MONEKA” will ac-
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    sel has ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Fri-
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    Cargo accepted on through Mills of The M.V. “CARTBBER” will
    Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accept Cargo and Passengers for
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    Islands. Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday

    Sth May, 1952

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    SHIPPING NOTICES

    MONTREAL, AUSTRALIn, NEW SOLS CSS SOS POSE FOTOSâ„¢,
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    ae - — 2 ae St. Lucia, Grenada, and Aruba,
    March ard, Sydney March 10th, Passengers only for St. Vincent,









    NEW YORK SERVICE

    A STEAMER sails 18th April— arrives Barbados 29th April, 1952.
    A STEAMER sails 9th May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 1952.

    NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

    A STEAMER. sailed 10th April —arrives Barbados 26th April, 1952
    A STEAMER sails 24th April—arrives Barbados 10th May, 1952.

    CANADIAN SERVICE
    SOUTHBOUND





    a ee

    wee

    Name of Ship Sails from Arrived
    a Barbados
    “ALCOA PARTNER’ ie -» HAL#FAX April 13th April 23rd.
    8.8. “ALCOA POINTER’ » MOTREAL April 30th May 10th
    S.S. “A STEAMER” .. MONTREAL May 16th May 26th
    S.S. “A STEAMER” .» MONTREAL May 30th June 9th
    NORTHBOUND Due Barbados
    8.8. RA" +s ibe April 18th For St. John, N.B. and St.








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    s.s. “BLUE MASTER 14 April 19 April 6 May
    5.s. “SUNDIAL” 30 April 5 May 25 May
    ©.s. “A VESSEL 14 May 19 May 2 June
    *.s. “A VESSEL’ 30 May 4 June 20 June
    UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
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    ara" asa a Bae dg ee Er
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    m.v. “BRUNO” 12 May 15 May 22 May 2 June



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    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952 > / TE
    BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN









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    KING GEORGE VI

    A Pictorial Record Of His Great Life



    OH! JIGES DARLING! HOW | ‘This volume isa tribute to hig late Majesty
    r 1 COME King George VI, the sailor king who gave of

    himself unsparingly in the faithful service
    of his peoples.

    BOY! THERE GOES TH’
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    TIME - I WONDER WHAT
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    } ’

    LS
    Pee atc te ae ihe ber



    He lives on in the memories recalled by this
    book—tifteen years of his courageous reign,
    ind earlier os the Duke of York. The boy,

    * the young man with an eager heart, the hus-
    I id 1 the father.

    BY ALEX RAYMOND

    ALL RIGHT... SO YOU KNOW THE ¥ ee : ’ :
    ANSWERS. I'M LISTENING... / “Gp \ ra An outstanding biography written and

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    ON YOUR MIND,
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    KILLIN’?

    Those who have booked orders shall call
    for their copies at once



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    THAT WAS A LIGHT WORKOUT
    TODAY. REGULAR TRAINING
    STARTS” TOMORROW, SMYTHE

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    ADVOCATE STATIONERY
    STORE






    PAGE EIGHT

    Spartan Defeat
    Wanderers 3—I

    SPARTAN DEFEATED WANDERERS, a Third Divis-
    ion Team, to the tune of three goals to one in their Knock-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE










    Results Of Ninth Regatta

    There are a few protests pending. The Sailing Committee
    of the R.B.Y.C. will deal with these protests on Thursday.
    Owing to the protests the total ints for all the boats in
    the C and Intermediate Classes will not be published. Mohawk
    which came fourth may be disqualified and this will mean ,

    Saturday last by the local seouts



    TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1952°










    AQUATIC

    From Our Own Correspondent)

    }
    |
    | GRENADA, April 28 Many ailments are caused by poor blood which






    SPOR S Grenada defeated St. Vincent may affect the whole tem. Skin eruptions
    I two—nil in the school football and izriestion, simple rheumatism and painful BOWS
    opener today. : fe

    The Aquatic Sports staged on|

    in celebration of St. George’s week |

    WHAT’S ON TODAY






















    of th that the other boats will move up. Miss Behave has protested |] were won by the 3rd Barbados complaints. Be sure to ask for RWEUMATE
    out Football match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon, against Folly and Folly against Mohawk. Sea Scouts. Thefe was a very red LARKE’S ‘asi ACHES
    A fair crowd witnessed the match. Spartan scored two of The results of the Ninth Regatta are as follows: good attendance and from the 10.00 a.m. ONGINA. BING
    their goals in the first half of play while the other goal tela he rors Rar tage Meeting of House of Assembly 1 Mi
    was kicked in late in the second half. Wanderers also bright! Mt Seen not far off}}| — 3.00 pm.
    scored their lon 1 in the second half when they were » 3 rightly lighted and further be-|] Friendly Football at St. ae
    seminal @ etna Its: hick e : z i ; $ £ ae a en oat of = lst anueert es? p.m,
    * : F a 2 a OS a Seouts. Nearby on unecil Films at
    irae are goat nee yrs inna nee ne d 22 } 3 Su 3 5 a5 i = ree End ieee the Police Y¥.M.C.A.—7.00 p.m
    riff two an ‘ o ’ ‘ootball a - 4 ae peyeee. atte eee in 5 2 This Week sF 2 aabiie 9.52 2480 3742 0008 «4 «(12 95am the top of the booth recently erect- Boys’ School Pasture,
    sides had many opportunities but KNOCKOUT $ Mischies Has kia geass ks te e y+ nt bp inet a? Soe
    did not make good use of them. Mon. 28—Spartan vs. Wanderers 6. Flirt 99.44 3641 39.07 3831 3 13 103 I tie svete & . Ansae Genesel Mooting
    Re . 7 Moyra Bi 2020 39 19 30.31 n the events contested by the 8.P.C.A. British Coun
    The game started with Spartan Referee: W. Hoyos. » Moyra Blair . 5538. . 6 2 7
    defending the goal at the Linesmen: R. Parris & G f oe ith eR nee a ae 1s Pa and 3rd Barbados Sea 4.15 pm
    southern end of the field. A slight Amory. . 19 Wisara DNS. é a = ice DNS. SS ay" hig a Gene aa
    ; ; ‘Thure. 1_C : 3. ; 1. 55 9 7 : 2 2
    pag Pe ag + noi had or r 2 ane See 4a1. Fantasy 40.28 8§©6 39.56 $3 25 8 g os 1 point for a third place, Through
    kick off. Spartan went on the Linesmen: C. Roachford and TORNADO CLASS agg be -” Ge viasing of the 50 WEATHER REPORT
    offensive and as Gittens at left O. Robinson. K. 34 Cornet 2419 2243 «2230 2311 2 11 79 108 yds. event which was only dis-
    ; ‘ al ‘ T.K. 35 Earil 25.00 2220 2318 2332 3 10 93 govered after the conclusion of YESTERDAY
    half for Spartan Passed to Grant Sat. 3—Empire vs. Notre Dame. “ -
    centre forward, the Wanderers Referee: J. Howorth. TH. 31 Tempest DNS. = on eS ae the Sports, there was a match race none eee from Codrington: nil
    right back Proverbs intercepted Linesmen: W. Hoyos and A. TK. 38 Thunder 25.57 2208 2250 a8 4) (8 OD .. }) te decide the winners of the Sports. otal Rainfall for month to
    fi cleaved bis area Parris. TK. 39 Swansea D.N.S : eres? Vie However on @iscovéry of this er- date: 2.14 ins.
    and cleared his . ' TK. 40 Varnoose Wii 23.00 «2152 «edt 12105 ror the points awarded for the|| Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F.
    The Wanderers forwards made DIVISION ONE TK. 41 Zephyr DNS. = : ; 25 PP : Lowest Temperature: 73.0 °P.
    a good movement which was ON T.K. 42 Breakaway DNS. - . Mie match race were discarded, thus}} Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
    rer ik oe es Tues. 29—College vs. Empire at oat ae ~ ee aoe a - ali
    hma § , nt ; arometer a.m.
    long low pass tested Lawless the see aren, 2 second wit’ 21 points and Ist (3 p.m.) 29.966
    Wanderers custodian. Spartan 3 5 ; 7 third with 8 points. TO-DAY
    still continued to pile up the pres- DIVISION TWO & 2 = Sports commenced with a Sunrise: 5.41 am.
    sure and their forwards made ‘ \ i fl 2 £ a very exciting water polo match Sunset: 6.15 pam. 5 2
    repeated attempts toa open the Tues. 29—Notre Dame vs. Everton. . a5 23 as 2 : #3 3 between Bonitas, a.team compris-]] Moon: New, April 24 @ School Bags with Straps
    scoring. Referee: L, King. ¢ * ing of old sea scouts, and Whip- Lighting: 6.30 p.m. y c sth ‘ bl
    Then when the half was about Wed. 30—Carlton vs. Spartan. 1. Miss Behave 45.44 4.34 46.39 1 10 ua as porays. Bonitas won the game two]| High Tide: 6.53 a.m., 6.41 p.m. @ Exercise Books—Single, Arithmetic, Double
    eight minutes old, Haynes at cen- Referee: E. Amory. = co tu out? on - goals to »ne. Low Tide: 12.02 p.m. Line
    tre half for Spartan received a Fri. 2—Notre Dame vs. P.-Rovers. 7. Rogue 47.29 46.24 6.56% 7 4 :
    pass, ran down unmarked and Referee: L. Harris. 1% Foly 43.31 oz so38% g 5 - The boat race which followed @ Drawing Books, Note Books
    2 = spar- . anne! » . * - — ested
    a nee rith Oe ee ee tate edit DIVISION THREE i. Magwin ve we baba’ " , ipow Gane Tent teoe Mearted G Bleed? @ Hard Back Exercise Books, Fountain Pens
    n. ith oi a reg * _ Ta s Ss,
    Spartan still continued to press pyes, 29—Cable & Wireless vs. INTERMEDIATE p : from Needham*s Point just off the um . 2
    and. the second goal came when Everton at Boarded Hall. ee a6 U8: COBH GO CS OE] mm Scout hut and ended at the we Teeth magn that you, may @ Paint Boxes, Pencil Boxes, Crayons
    Griffith st Heer wing eat in per Referee: C. B. Williams. 4. Coronetta 46.4 49.09 41485 8 epee a. a be Barbados} have Pyorrhee, Trench outh or e & i a Math tical Set
    kicked the ba ard in e le Lodge vs. Y.M.C.A. Lodge. 1. Mohawk 46.08 50.49 48.28% 4 9 Outs passed e winning perhaps Ww ‘asers. eads, Compasses, Mathematica Ss
    corner of tha nets giving Lawless Sateves, H. D. Wilson . 8. Skippy Sah - . Or 8 a mark with a strong stroke to win pA anes Brees ’ »
    no chance to save. Score two nil. Regiment vs. Rangers at Gar-~ —a 49.20 © 83.59 51.39% 6 7 from the 2nd Barbados. matism ble, Amosan @ Rulers, Ink
    Half time found the score un rison. 12. Dawn 48.17 50.22 49.19% 3 10 62 In the swimming events there a gum the first day.
    changed. On the resumption it Referee : F. Edwards. 18. Clytie 46.08 46.33 46.20% 1 12 56 was very keen competition, es- el y a aulokly. tit @ Braid for Uniforms
    was Spartan again pressing but Wanderers vs. Notre Dameeat g aan asi? sian 80.47 4 o a 108 pecially between the 2nd and 3rd mn must your mouth well
    Wanderers were making spirited Bay. 3. Rainbira 49.19 48.09 48.44 2 ut 93 Barbados Sea Scouts, as the final] $24 Seve your teeth e raes, Oat e
    attempts to put in one. Then a Referee: K. Walcott. 4. Seabird 54.12, 63.18 53.15 5 2 3 points are apt to suggest. mosan from your chemist’ today,
    melee took place in the Spartan Carlton vs. Pickwick-Rovers at +g ag wie oon it On the conclusion of the swim- ihe Sy arautep protects yOu 1
    area and Bowen was adjudged Carlton, 9. Olive Blossom D.N.S a ~ 37 ming events, the spectators were " CAVE SHEPHERD & C0 LTD
    guilty of foul play. Referee Hoyos Referee: A, Parris. 1G enceenay ne, Seat ee Sar Sie , 4 entertained to a fireworks display : ” °
    Myan wae “kicked by Davies 7 ein 14. Hurricane : st 411% 3 0 89 from the Lord Combermere and

    centre half for Wanderers who
    made no mistake in kicking the
    ball well into the goal. This
    beamed to give the Wanderers
    players more spirit for they were
    now seen combining well.

    Then about five minutes before
    the blow off, Griffith again on the
    wing, got to the ball after Jemmott
    had kicked it across the Wander-
    ers goal and finding himself un-
    marked, kicked in the third goal

    for Spartan and the second for “

    himself. Play ended with the
    Score 3-1 in favour of Spartan,

    The teams were:—

    Spartan : Atkins, Gibbons,
    Bowen, Morrison, Gittens, Haynes,
    Griffith, Cadogan, Grant, Ishmael
    and Jemmott,,

    Wanderers: Lawle-s, Atkinson,
    G. Proverbs, Patterson, Mayers.
    Davies, Farmer, Corbin, Proverbs,
    H. Farmer and D. Atkinson.

    The referee was Mr. B. Hoyos.

    Referee: f. King.

    Police vs. Everton at Comber-

    mere.
    R. Hutchinson,

    Referee:
    College vs. Combermere Old

    joys at College.
    Referee: C. Roachford.
    Fri. 2—Y.M.P.C. “B” vs.
    at Beckles Road.
    Referee: J, Archer.
    Cc. & W. vs.
    Boarded Hall.
    Referee: E. Amory.

    Comb. vs. Police at Combermere
    « Hoyos.

    Referee: ,
    Carlton vs. Regiment at Carlton
    Referee: H. Wilson.

    Rangers vs. Notre Dame at Shell

    Referee: O. Graham.

    Fri. 2—P.-Rovers vs. ¥.M.C.A. at

    Kensington,
    Referee: R. Hutchinson.
    College vs. Y¥.M.P.C, “A”

    College.
    Referee: L, King.



    Answers To

    Mr. Cecil Hutchinson, C/o
    T. 8. Garraway and Co., is the
    winner of the Sports Quiz.
    Mr. Hutchinson got four of the
    six questions right but there

    The queries and answers are
    as follows:—
    CRICKET
    1, When British Guiana
    won the Triangular Inter-
    colonial Cricket tournament in
    1895 one British Guianese
    bowler took the last four
    Trinidad wickets in the first
    innings for an extremely small
    score, Who was he, how many
    wickets dfd he take and for
    how many runs scored?
    Answer No. 1. 8. W. Spros-
    ton. Four wickets for 5 runs.
    FOOTBALL
    2. A player throws the ball
    from the touchline to the cross-
    bar and it bounces Off the goal-



    Committee Makes
    Recommendations

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 24.
    The Gambling and Public Lot-
    teries Committee appointed by the

    keeper into the nets. Would
    you give a goal?
    Answer No. 2. Yes.
    WATER POLO
    3. Who was captain of the
    Trinidad “Discovery” Water
    Polo team which visited Bar-
    bados in 1949, and was this the
    first tournament between these
    two colonies?
    Answer No. 3. Basil Ander-
    son. Yes.
    SWIMMING
    4. In what part of the
    world did the crawl
    — 0 ?
    swer No, 4. In the South
    Sea Islands and developed in
    Australia,
    TABLE TENNIS
    5. What is the first stroke
    (n a game of Table Tennis?
    Answer No. 5.
    HORSE
    6. Who is responsible for
    the weight carried by a horse
    in a weight for age event?
    Answer No. 6. The trainer.



    becoming common gambling
    houses and to run or cause to be
    run not more than four public
    lotteries a year and to establish
    ind run or cause to be established
    ind run one gaming house or
    casino in the colony.



    DOMINICA WINS

    erton

    Cc. O. Boys at

    * — of football actuall

    at



    on football problems.

    When does a game
    commence?
    Answer No. 1. hen the ball
    has rolled its complete circum-
    ference after the kick-off.
    Query No. 2. Is it correct that
    the spectators can always tell
    which team won the toss by

    Query No. 1,

    checking on the team that
    kicked-off?
    Answer No. 2. No, The team

    winning the toss can either

    take the kick~

    gies GaN he ie etal

    won or toss.

    not Mt ace that 2

    . changed the goal-keeper. Is it
    all right if the linesman who is
    also secretary of that club in:
    forms the referee?

    Answer No. 3. Yes.

    Query No. 4. Can a player be
    off-side from a goal-kick?

    Answer No. 4. No.

    Query No. 5. What should be the
    penalty if a player at Place Kick,
    plays the ball back.

    Answer No. 5. Have the kick
    retaken,

    Query No. 6. If two players col-
    lide and in the referee’s opinion
    one player is still semi-conscious
    although he persists in carrying
    on, can the referee in the play-
    er’s own interest, order him off
    the field?

    Answer No. 6, es.
    Query 7. Cah a player insist
    upon aring a coat each time



    FOOTBALL ASSOC.

    Following are the results of '
    matches played last week:— |

    April 2lst Penrode beat Hark- |
    liffe 3—0. |

    April 22nd Rangers beat Advo- |
    cate 2—0.

    April 23rd Westerners beai |
    Malvern 4—0,

    April 25th Rangers beat Pen- |
    rode 3—2,

    This Week’s Fixtures

    B’DOS FRIENDLY |








    Your Football Problems

    By O. S. COPPIN

    I HAVE IGNORED some queries this week that are too
    frivolous and which are not aimed at eliciting information
    Today I deal with those which I
    consider are genuinely aimed at obtaining some help.

    Auswer No.7. The referee should

    Query No. 8. A player in an off-

    Answer No. 9.
    Query No. 10.

    Answer No. 10. No.
    Query No. 11. Suppose both goal-

    Answer No. 11.
    Query No. 12.

    ‘
    | Answer No. 12. Send both plays



    Buoy Rescue
    the Lord Combermere to the
    Aquatic Club. The Lord Comber-
    mere all alight in the water with
    fireworks of various description
    thrilled the crowd immensely and
    went a far way in helping to make
    the entertainment the success that
    it was.
    The results are as follows:
    8.00 P.M. WATER POLO MATCH
    BONITAS vs. WHEPPORAYS
    Winners: Bonitas 2—1.
    8.30 P.M, BOAT RACE
    Ist — Ist Sea Scouts, 2nd
    Scouts, 3rd — 3rd Sea Scouts
    Time: 4.23”
    445 P.M. % YARDS SWEMMING
    RACE

    2nd Sea

    it starts to rain during a match?
    I have seen this done in a game

    here, I do not know if it was an ,18t — Cadogan (rd SS), 2nd —

    Griffith (3rd $.S.), 3rd — Headley (Ist



    all —.fferent styles and
    types available

    10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street





    ——_——_——.

    a





    e
    We offer:

    official fixture but the player $73°) From 727 Plain White
    was allowed to do it, t is Time: 18 sees. . pe i eu. ”
    the ruling? 8.05 P.M. S YARDS SWIMMING RACE 6” x 6’, 3” x 3” 4" x 4”

    1st — Allen (2nd S.S.}, 2nd
    & Reid (3rd S.S.)
    Time: 42 secs.
    6.05 P.M RESCUE RACE
    ist — Atwell (and Sea Scouts), 2nd
    Griffith (3rd Sea Scouts), 3rd — Rudder
    (ist Sea Scouts).
    Time: 26 secs.
    915 P.M. RELAY RACE

    make the player remove the
    coat and caution him.

    side position on the penalty line

    gan (3rd S.S.), 3rd — Sobers (3rd S.S.)

    Time; 1.5 sees. «
    9235 P.M. % YARDS RANGERS RACE
    {st —- Miss Phillips, 2nd — Miss Collens

    Time: 16 secs.
    TOTAL POINTS
    ard B’dos Sea Scouts 25 Points, 2nd B’dos
    Sea Scouts 21 Points, !st B’Dos Sea Scouts
    8 Points.

    Jamaica Beat

    Trinidad 5—0

    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    KINGSTON, April 28.

    Jamaica made it 5—0 today
    as they avenged the 4—1 defeat
    by Trinidad last year when play
    in the Brandon Trophy finals
    ended today.

    Jimmy Farquhason beat Jin Ho
    in straight sets 7—5, 6—4, 6--4,
    while Eddie Aris beat Gunn
    Munro 3—6, 6—4, 6—4, 7—5 in
    the two last single matches,

    + No 9 Su
    a cigarette dating the game,
    could he be penalised?
    Yes, the referee
    should caution him.
    y No. If a player went
    near the edge of the field for a

    drink, could he be penalised
    too?



    keepers arrive in sweaters. of
    the same colour, which goal-
    keeper would be required to
    change?

    Neither. I see no
    reason for changing.

    If a player retali-
    ated with two blows after hav-
    ing been hit by another player.
    what action should the referee
    take in the circumstances?

    ers off the field.





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    ENRICHED Feppetee







    Governor to make recommenda- , M i iffe Jardening, painting, round house
    tions for amending present laws SERIES vs. aac oe Seeinns so artebah teen
    in relation to all forms of gambling (From Our Own Correspondence) Referee: Mr. C. E. Reece rheumatic pains, stiff, tain: utdies and foints, hana-
    and public, lotteries released it: GRENADA, April 26 Tuesday, April 29th: Advocate bago or common ana ca di impurieies
    report yesterday recommending Dominica won the Inter yg. Penrode. ’ | i ea bieod oom
    the establishment of a Board of Schools Cricket Series to-day Referee: Mr. T. Maynard. * ‘i
    Commissioners with specific pow- defeating St. Lucia by one Wednesday, April 30th: Rangers Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
    ers to licence race courses for wicket, vs. Westerners. | Kidney Pills. They help the kidneys to rid the blood
    gambling, to license all form of The scores Dominica 106 Referee: Mr, J. Archer. of excess uric acid and other impurities which other-
    caming, betting and lotteries, ta and 104 for $; St. Lucia 114 and All the above matches will be wise might collect in the system gnd cause distress.
    leense places in which gamblitye 95. St. Lucia defeated Grenada played at St, Leonard’s G \ HALF A CENTU. sucoess ailments inadequate
    .akes place so as to prevent thern earlier. Richmond Gap, Teetieate ian kidmay = ts nk vaordee 's Pills. ‘Cnt men ané * 2

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    PAGE 1

    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. nun Tt LCPHom ;y an. Ai>-l )SM 1 -.ilia blit> ..( Rank Mill r-o Road Fun* w?l| 1^* ti.r IM? irlKfMT >l 1 IS p Mill N .1 I AUTOMOTIVE "GVar* M 1 M AW Ow I A < • %  Sdwarui, li • KWtn %  "Mill "ft Dial i %  iB\IMw\I1l O A JB* „ ll.: -I J. %  .1 B*l *>*. Cluui CtHirt* > %  >• lunrral wii Wave Jll* Mr imilmrf it 4 3D p n X4.U, *..r is. wmo-irN Crn-tcry r.-a^r K N*V Oatd*** T1TANKS MintfiM> Claw* asffstartralta Bta ... %  .apmaN aniMW) for hi fain.il> > %  >< Mr n ttt (af|h Of hn l*trr Mifi.i 4 li FIILUt. W. v..r Dnit.ufd im.-i. % %  odium hr to lhan all Uiand m any other way aaprtaaM Uir mil'Prior.* Va-ooiall Wyvam CAJI—PUllaiAn ** %  X-1B*. **eaUatl '-.iiiiaa. Tvraa aw*d new MAltr" Aavirvnt* AUUnsun Phoaw *S*t HII-LMAM WNX Ont IIIWILII. Minx don* BLOW nt condition PWi* n a Brn** Ltd or So STTa %  a in.. 3 .tfetftal ls*a**M ..;„! MM %  tAal *•* MARINT KM. I C*: •trrnao* l.ld '-!£•atha pi Hi .my way ritmdrd U-l' %  ymnatny Ituuud'n our aad lfv. J#-< t* draUt ia a • u , ~2SZ ursttjs' £x %  ~a^ ."tr-or -,.<—. ^ prwUMt ^^'(**• ^"ML".. w AH wi GOVERN MENT NOTICES THI PIONEER INDIKTUUI ENCOt RAfttMENT) ACT. ItSI Trie Govejrnor-in-Executivc lomsnitlee. pur> u>nt u> section S (2 | a| t.f the Pioneer Industrie. 'EncourgrT..rtit, Act. Hill ttcreb. %  use* ihi> notice to be publmhed of hi Uitenuon to make the Orow I set out IN'IUU declarinjt the manufacture of wax and wax products to i be a pioneer industry and wax and wax products from sugar cane SHIPPING NOTICES %  uitaMalin he jn-Hiec. pcoducU of thai mduatry. r" UTiii^'rrjr Aiv> pars*" Mikm of Uit Ordar %  neieb> invited bo fi" notice in writing of his objectic Th. .,n >-t p m i. II fh Btnwi %  nU*< ,Vhnr %  -! No %  alll M a tTi wI I on Tlnli Mat. *. AU THVHI bullaUnas c^mo-IMne olhc.'. and *arlioda*> w n Ih* Wharf snd t>M* WiiTism rlma? Btnet I iund' Jflooa A Co.. mmDWHmxnm-miM* Hack. Ill aad all MM. kubu. Dial CIJi t 1-iOaaKI. a Jai AUCTIONUNDER THE IVORY HAMMER M-i. HV HMl.lf.llUf IlVOCl I Wadoad>v. April 30Ui stadamao A Taylar;* Oars** t Uir 11 < SMT a h t> B A afotoi CyrillOatnagrd in Acridonti AaM at 1 p m T*nna Casb > rtscKXT cpirrmi Auclionni BJO .it th |i %  ka support thereof tn the Clerk tKJwTi'*' 'he Executive Cornroittce on o. before the 211 daj of May one -Ithiuaand nine hundred and fi(t>-two ao that due conaide ration mai> I kirsugnt 'n Ihl ORDIB nil I'liiMIK i\Ul sIKII.S iLNCOl KAl.LMtN I • At I. IHJ.I • a r-.t . mni, • %  T*" '**<' lhsatry (WAX and WAX PBODVCTS) Oeder. Mil ma. ail ionvr'iMtico* t'pp*i Tli Govcrnot -in-Excutl%*e Committee. In exercise of the powet n ^mXm" c, "*1 'a i ? M ??'"l con, **' •?" W*.*'*'." 1 100 ,f:i "*.** Pon*r Industries (Bicoi Priii* Qulana, Laawsi S* 4 I FLAT tfSZ, n to FLAT—Hw. vor* modorn. •< C—apaMalf raiatthad T.l*pl rtwlrxit' racma ara Katalhrnt ar •afr I—aatfclM BoaOa tttMKM -ie. ar la< l-AWHENrt Industi FARAWAY l Philip coast, a bod.onti v FUU* funUAhod UghUim Plan I Watrrmili supelr Dawbat Car Pott. wa "niil rooms FTosa ssay lit PMM am io at—i f.p IN MEMOR1AM r\kBV-* V, m. ^uj 'n*i-.w>-'ot'ou* B.^oVrV atothrr', BmilV K%  tth Aprn.:iain; iM.iilr'Mi a f*w-lh*l i.V-'wn.-i %  V '!..Ilrt.itIII a •iihnl lo.suppa* "HI MJFI' gWtA VldaTHItr*!^. t.. %  #.., JH£ n. i.,t, T.".n* ftlkltprt.' J*-4 IIIISOMI jrjp la.'ill. oifr ri.iUJuj; I riomm. *. urwig, -. — 1-icJltl* for hr i wainad aa.ua lORITl \ I 4nr> iLorrtta AlM>n*< M 1 •!* vICMd h. .'* %  MKCHANICAL %  i rotattUoi Appii %  I %  %  MISCEI.LANEOI'S i. iipnaae H %  sii f as* Iti-paiii lard IH g%| AhOB voi. ran SM %  flimt i-MAMMON Muttard l.-r M c If %  TOUT. .-.-. %  i..ii 0.l rlnaa*M fm X* 4 U ID (MRJBON V CIAHS 8lXOt*>A' ind impoM-d In !•* %  LanaTl' '.am 4 IMI t inch*-* Drautf laatlnf raparttv ats to st-van propi Ural hill mlo.laU and const Amply with LUiyd'i Board of >i>li*niriil( Poworod with Fnrd VnNI '^ US li It I' Soaad 10 kn4< Ag RrStr.1.1 Frf-n*h. O V Votl_ \ VI HI M NOTM IS NOTICE FAAiaa? or Mt JOHN f AppiirAlloft. IW mw or ipra Vaotry B*"4Rlona at at ttldsaart qlru N.-II WUI (M iwrtvr.1 by in* undatnanrd up la Bolurdav iKr lint. Ma> 11*1 and -ijbja.1 li. m> follua-Hfi .-niMlitioriA 1 CandldaMA niu-t n* Ihr daiurnUr> ifl PanaMonrrv m aUalUnoa nrcutivnnco* an.I net l*oa lhan .isht >i years, nor son than twatvr 1 Hl> yror. old on Asd !*rpi*n.b*r last to br pewntd br n btmr rorllAmii athl-h < "i.i—In |i-:ii|.h(..uon 1 CiUsbBAt*. Wl*nn nli.1 <|i ..i.d laa ill*' >M>a-utd Will braimmal -I lh BrKuol .01. .FrwlA\ "h J.irw ...,d ".— iK-l.rrn in Id. ..ill (Sfstva l>> ram akg, —< Hatiirdav 711. Jn.ir. lSl I All .ndKlaU-i ii.ua* br ..t Ihr : datr -if Ihrlr )i SMlltlW A a IKAWH. inkb. Ihr Vr*lt.. St Join. as 4 SI 4Vi Vfn IOIIKII MOV li' li*! OoAVarimrfT 7 A7,-,r,-l -' jy Tilrharl. poopl, 0lA;--aTvol IIN'-II TINH trasi IAUI. T.... i %  •.,.:.. rrn"*U"ii ::•• .n. -rt-b*r lot friwol chiklrr. Qnl) BS raids Mirti Plaet* TumtM^Si "Ms tash 0 w It .t^.lnso. .in ua aaiaV*. MCaOgSUI FUKNaaHsn) FLAT will %  ftrar and Uaan Oood Saw-balMnf For lnjlhrparticulars Apply to Alma LaalUaV No I Coral t-and* WorttaMg HIM If n NtWHAVBfl Crana Coaal. 4 i' .1 rooiu Fulls lumlSTiad. Iltillii| Plant WalarmUl aupply. Doubi •arvant room* For Ka; tober Itl Phona 4*n lent) Act. 1051. hereby makethe foil' 1 This Order ma\ he cited i Wax and Wax ProductOrder I2 2 Tlic iruuiulActure ui wax and WAX products is hereby leclarod to be a pioneer industry and the following Articles art 'iersby declared to be pioneei producti of that industry : — Wax and wax products from sugar eane. Made by the Govcrnor-in-Excrut.vc Coninuttee thi: day of one thousand tun' liundied and fifty-two By Command. Clerk, Executive Committee. 2tn SiIn ONTIIAl AHIItl.. MBW atabtXAsDj) List iiirm IM.AN.X. UMKi TBKOA" n artaMuMJ to tall Addtiaa Faawuary lltk MaNaaurwr ~.,n Ud Adaoy March ieU>. shrHban. March tsad arrtviria at Trinidad April and and Barbados abatat April sstb. Tn addilfOn to aonr.il cargo thli yaaMl nuaraplr •parr lor rhillrd Bod hard Canto acrr|Mad on throuah Bills ml LAdine lor uariahlpasarit at Trinidad to -vmdward AV//,V,V/yrO'*VVV/.V/'/', la'.lli. I liorasr THINITV COTTAOC -Fully fumlbri1. I. roa-iplrlr with trlrtbrrrPkjaap Bd T.4.S-1f l WANTED THE PIONEEK INDI STKlf > H.NCOtHAGEMENTl ACT. I si I The Gcrt-ertior-in-Executivr Committee, purauant to sectio. ,*{*)(a) of the Pioneer Industrie (Encouragement) Act, 1M1, hereby 'ur. this notice to lie published of his intention to make the Ordc .set ot below declaring the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn [and the manufacture of garments therefrom to be a pioneer induatr. ana the spinning and knitting of cotton yarn from West India: Ico'ton And the manufacture of garment., therefrom to be pionrt pr.iUn'is of that industry. 2. Any person who objects to the mailing of the Order set ou below is hercbv invited to give notice in writing of his objaction an. or the grounds on which he relics in support thereof to the Cler lo the Executive Comrnitlet on or before the 21st day of May on. thousand nine hundred "'•< %  fifty-two so that due consideration ma: he itiven to any objectionreceived pursuant to this notice MA.NAclF.lt i.-a,.lrrrt for C4oi. Club 1 H>irt>Adaa>. AllrWclKrpaopoattton t. %  quIrMa [M-imAiMHit poat %  4B-A -TAPT* AJWTANTw praetpus Krrirnrr piofrrrrd satlarv commrr '.'^r^iir, ooi'-r.Tr.x'n *""• Ai ^, ,95 ^j;^r I.. Junr ItSI Appl. In parton will • illlrn apflM-alior. Frhilrli. Ilrallio' 77 4 se i MISCDXANEOUS k r IKMrtT. Iill. 'trWritni minor*-. Si ..".-• %  .-d waurrt ^''££ jllr * "J* 1 aJK'SP" wailr'ni-d-J^on ChlchAp-'W' ito I.hMfA at-, print-d ii^vrrarilr HI SuiiUav, A rtt Msh Ma. Tst. (lain >|u'.in havr brrn irufvi't L k rb |*ltl Ma> and 7lh 3,ui-afc^f.ifl-1 LOST Mom.. WAUXT O. It. Fyb, w D and .%  inunt* Mr %  -ndrd roturiikim -Vd.i-rtMMdr rtrpi ORDER Till1'lONEfJl 1MH STBIE-S lEjVC'OI'RAiiEMENT) ACT. 1M1 Ihr Plan.ir lndu