Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










ESTABLISHED 1895







B’dos Scouts Celebrate

St. George’s Day At

Harrison College
200 Attend Church

Parade

: POTTED Sports at Harrison College yesterday evening
highlighted the Scouts’ celebrations of

Service

the day. The Scouts

taking part in the sports showed great enthusiasm and

thrift.
St. George’s Week began
Campaign by the Scouts of t

was paid to those people who gave jobs to Scouts during |

their Bob-A-Job Week.

poreeny with a Good Turn
e island. Special attention

Over 200 Scouts and Guides attended the Church Par- |
ade Service which was held at St. Michael’s Cathedral ‘|
from 11.00 a.m. Dean Hazelwood conducted the service. |

Later in the day—at 4.00 p.m.—a Wolf Cub Parade Ser- |
vice was held at St. Ambrose Church. |

After the morning Service at the Cathedral, the Scouts

marched over to the Y.M.C.A.
try districts took lunch.

After lunch the Scouts from the country districts visit-

ed the Barbados Bottling Co.,
they were treated to free dri

where those from the coun-

Ltd., Roebuck Street, where

where they were given as many biscuits as they wanted.

The Potted Sports, so called because of being concen-
trated in one small area where all the events took place
together, began shortly after 4.30 p.m. |

Twenty tearfis from various troops—some troops enter- |
ed two teams—took part in the sports which were high-
lighted by the Bread and Jam Race. Each team was com-
prised of seven representatives,

There were ten stations in the circle and judges were
placed at each station. Two teams at a time took part in

each event.
what to do.

|
nks and the Biscuit Factory |
|
|

As the Bread and Jam Race began the first two teams

ran up to the table with gleaming eyes.

two slices of bread, plastered

|
{
|
The judges at each station told contestants |
!

On the table were
with jam. The contestants |

were in all smiles until they heard that their hands would

be tied behind their backs.

After this was announced the |

teams found it difficult to get a representative.

Each representative had

to make use of his chen and

After

overcoming that difficulty, they ate the bread with plea-

sure.

Another amusing event was the Charlie Chaplin Race.

In this the contestant carried

a football between his knee

and a boxing glove on his head. Twirling a staff, he ran

towards the finishing line.

He afterwards returned quick-

ly to hand over the ball, glove and staff to one of his team

mates.

There was also the Tunnel Ball
Relay Race. In this the members
of each team passed the ball be-
tween their legs to each other.
This was one of the first races to
be completed.

Many Scouts also found inter-
est in the Standing Long Jump.
Contestants were forced to jump
without taking a run. "This made
it a bit difficult. The * Scouts
sprung high into the air but they
were not able to jump very far.

The Stone Race was similar to
the Potato Race, a regular fea-
ture at Girls’ School Sports. @n
this occasion stones replaced the
potatoes which are now very ex-
pensive. The stones were fairly
small and sometimes hid them-|
selves in the grass, making it
even more difficult for contest-
ants. It was noticeable that at
the end of the evening’s proceed-|
ings all the stones were there.
With the Potato Race, sometimes
a few potatoes disappear of their |
own accord of course. |

pais near eerie desinarneniirasienesieeratianai=neay hie

At another station there was
the Tug-O-War event in progress.
In this event the bigger Scouts
regularly took advantage of the
smaller ones:

Throwing The Ping-Pong Ball
was extremely difficult. Of the
first two teams which took part,
only one contestant was success
ful There was very little wind
blowing to divert the ball but
the distance to the container into
which the ball had to be thrown
was over six feet.

Catching The Staff called for |
agility. Each judge held a staff)
which was suddenly released. A
representative from each team had
to catch the staff before it struck
the ground. The team with the
most points won. |

The small Scouts were at home
in Climbing The Telegraph Pole.
A basketball pole was used for
the occasion and the small scouts,
who were most likely accustomed
to climbing trees, swiftly got to
the top of this pole.

@ on page 6



PRESIDENTS MEET IN WASHINGTON



THE NATION’S CHIEF EXECUTIVE, President Harry S. Truman (left) has

a warm greeting for Alexander F.

Jones, president of the American

Society of Newspaper Editors, as the two shake hands following Mr.

‘Truman’s press conference in the a

uditorium of the Smithsonian In-

stitute in Washington, President Truman, ‘asked at the conference if he
thought he had the power to seize the nation’s newspapers and radio
he did the steel industry, replied thet the President has to act for

itever is for the best of the countrs

‘International Soundphoto)



Synod Bans Birth Control

GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 23.

Taking the opportunity to ans-
wer people who had asked wheth-
er the Church had made any pro-
nouncement on the subject of birth
control, His Grace the Archbishop
of the West Indies, Most Reverend
Alan John Knight, when deliver-
ing his charge at a service mark-
ing the opening of the Synod of

the Diocese in the Cathedral
Church of St. George last night
said: “Birth prevention measures

are contrary to the laws of God
He referred enquirers to the de-

claration of the 1946 Synod which

was “To the further safeguarding

assembled, have felt bound to con-
demn unequivocally, the recom-
mendations contained in the re-
port of the West India Commission
of 1945 on birth prevention meas-

ures as contrary to the laws of
God. Solution of this and any
such .social problem is to be

sought and found in individual re-
sponsibility and self control.”

“You will agree,” added His
Grace, “that. this pronouncement
leaves no room for misunderstand-

ing what the teaching of the
Church is about this much debated
subject.’

His Grace next addressed him-

of the Sacrament. of Holy Matri-} self tothe Church's teaching about

mony we, the Bishops

in Synod |

marriage, —)

be
nose to get the bread into his mouth. All contestants were | 2000

however able to get the bread into their mouths.

RED REBELS 'U.S.—Spanish Talks

LOSE BIG

fi 7 . |
OPERATIONS |
HANOI, April 23. |
Communist rebels lost some |
men in big cleanup |
operations launched by the |
French Union troops recently, |
according to a French head-|
quarters estimate of casualties. |
The announcement said the
four operations
“Porto”, “Polo”, and “Turko”
all in areas near Handi; “had





|

“Mercury”







BREAD AND JAM

The Bread and Jam Rec + at the Scouts’ Potted Sports
at Harrison College yeste: dey evening provided much
amusement“for onlookers. [y. this rece, the contestants,
with their hands tied behind ‘heir backs, had to eat bread
and jam from the table. !/ st contestants got through
quickly with the bread but hx | to make a second attempt
to clean up the jam.



rh rrtrentnpehrem lig nage —a

THURSDAY, =e 24,. 1982

j
|

|
|
|

|
|

|

|

Members of the Board present | e
were Messrs T. E, Went, C, Glin- S
don Reed, W. H. Carter and H. | e l

presented
they |
bers of the |
workmen and to set examples to on tests
others who had not had their op-

portunity

Since the scheme for training ALBANY, New York, April 23. tion
journeymen apprentices started in| Supporters of General Eisen- “wo. en'blel
1924, 293 apprentices have satis-}hower claimed most of New York's G. B. Ev
factorily completed their five year 6 Republican Convention dele~ Hu
period and have been awarded | "ates as a result of his one-sided »nticipated
certificates, victory in Tuesday’s primary. The é ;

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Locally Consumed

Sugar Will Stay. At
8 Cenis Per Pound

20 Get Bursa ry TMeaaced without objection 2, Bil
Certificates

giving the Governor-in-Fxeca-
Special mention was made of Benjamin Yarde, ship

tive Committee authority to

|

\

| the price of locally consumed
carpenter, when he and 19 other journeymen the respee-|

sugar, thereby stabitising the
price af 8 cents pér Th which iv
the same price as last year.
‘The prices which the consumer
will pay for the three grades of
sugar will be 8; 10 and 11 cents
per Ib for the respective grades,
The provisions of the Bill only
apply to sugar manufactured
this year, and it is proposed that
the whole question of the price

spend approximately $140,000 of
the levy imposed on this year's
sugar for the three funds, price

were yesterday awarded bursary certificates for the respec-

tive trades they learnt during the past five years. The cer-

tificates were presented by the Board of Industrial Training

stabilisation, rehab'litation and
labour welfare, in subsidizing
throught their chairman Mr. T. E. Went when the Board
met yesterday. ea

year,
The subsidy will be used on browa
crystals, although the quantity
of yellow crystals Mi
greater than thg Wert):
and i+ is ant) that

Husbands, and the secretary M of sugar for local consumption
G. Weekes, | shall be reconsidered before next
Before the apprentices were! e ven
/

with the Certificates,
the mem-

be honest

were enjoined by
Board to











; retiring N.A.T.O, chief backed by; Crystals to @

eer bit rea Proll of 0. alias Thomas }. Dewey won erystals depe'’
ee, rat ean aii even of 12 scattered Republican the brown er
ing; — saingr, tailor, pe hectrin contests. Senator Robert A. Taft} brighter colour P
binder, bm yp > oh Rem iggy Sota tock only one. Four winners were average consumer
clan, motor mechanic, ¢ pe npledged but . rganization
(mechanical) shoemaker, plumber, or ealaites re eee Introducing the Bill, Hon, the

~ {ship carpenter, painter or black- On the Democratic side there], Colonial Secretary said: 3

smith ; wan no clean-cut test between | The purpose of this Bill is |

Before distributing the certifi-] presidential hopefuls although| out succinetly in the Objects ‘bl
‘ates. Mr. Went told the journey-|Senator Estes Kefauver picked + Reasons, but if Honours ie
nen passing out that they had/ene delegate in Schenestady Members will bear with me 1
ome there five years ago and|majority of state Democratic should like to add a few extra

Proceed Smoothly

By EDWARD DEPURY

WASHINGTON, April 23
Highly reliable sources said that current negotiations
in Madrid for bilateral military accord between the United

S.ates and Spain were proceeding very satisfactorily.
They said negotiations are beyond the preliminary
stage and serious discussions have started in’ regard to the
United States desire for airand navalbases and the Spanish

need for arms and equipment,

~~ They-considered-these ncgotiations cotiid be concluded



cost the Reds epproximately| et gee
. : ‘ os ( py C Ss.
1 3,000 killed, and 2,000 taken | ¥ , : 7? dip 4 These coutibds understood that
prisoners. Spanish negotiators were showing
The first of these encieting| é a sense of reality - 0 van ote
operations “Mercury” launched a - y were available in the United States
wonth ago to cateeineate the| Farnum For for supplying Spanish armed
fifth Division cut deeply into| rie - forces and as to the possibility of
Communist Forces and after the}} Finland Fund obtaining machinery for helping
operation Genera} Raoul Salan, | to streamline Spanish arms fac~
commanding the French Forces | Have you yet contributed to tories. They pointe da out that oy
said the Red Division had been the Farnum for Finland Fund? ing to the Korean. war and numer-

so badly mauled that it no longer |
existed as a fighting force, but
had been split up into disorgan-
ized grouvs.

Satisfactory Attacks
The other three operations al-

though not so large were also}
termed “satisfactory” by the |
French Headquarters and except

for a small scale “mopping up

of villages, are virtually com- |
pleted.
Headquarters said French |

Union Troops had captured more |
Communist arms and equipment
during these operations than ever |
before in the delta. Meanwhile, |
after a week of bitter fighting in|
the area of rapids some 20 miles!
east of Hanoi, the Franco
Vietnam troops were now in pos-

session of the major base for
Communist Vietminh operations
—U-P.



On Official
Visit To Moscow

LONDON, April 23.
Paul Mason, Assist-
Secretary of State
responsible for Soviet affairs in
the British Foreign Office, has
left for Moscow on a short visit.

Mason, one of Foreign Secret-
my Anthony Eden's advisers on
Soviet Russia and Eastern Eu-
rope, left London yesterday on
what officials described as a*rou-
tine visit of the British Embassy
in Moscow.”

Officials denied he is travelling
on a special diplomatic mission
but did not exclude the passibil-
ity that he might meet Kremlin
representatives during his (rief
stay in Moscow.

Mason superuises the Foreign
Office's northern department
which deals with Russia. the
Satellite states and Scandinavian
countries.

A career diplomat, he had serv-|
ed after the war in Sofia, Bul-

Officially
ant Under



garia as envoy extraordinary and|European nations’ quest for sys-

Minister Plenipotentiary.—U.P.

“DE GRASSE” ON
W.I. RUN AGAIN

(From Our Own
Correspondent)

LONDON. April 23
S.S. De Grasse makes her
first voyage to-morrow to
the West Indies after being
refitted; Together with the
Colombie, she will maintain
regular service to the French



West Indies, Barbados,
Trinidad, Venezuela, Col-
ombia and Jamaica with
ailings every two or three
veeks About 100 passen-
gers from England are ex-
pected to embark at South-
ampton to-morrow for the

West Indies



This fund has been started ous worldwide arms commitments

, ) Inited States the choice
to defra the expenses of t the United States
cyclist Ken vainnal at the - arms readily available for
Olympic Games in Helsinki Spain is not large at present but
next July. they believed that the United
Donations are accepted at States is in a_ position to help
Barclay’s Bank the Royal spain considerably in moderniz~-
Bank of Canada and the Bar ing her arms factories

bados Advocate. . ,

AMT. PREV, ACK. $250.42 Depend on Spending
ere a , = On the other hand they believed
TOTAL $251.42 that Spanish officials are counting

heavily on the United States navy

and airforce spending consider-

.t}able sums of dollars in Spain for

ne bases and laying
ies

Move By West ome vn supp

The sources



said that while Ad-
. T. â„¢ | niral William M. Fechteler, Naval
urope oO Get | Chief of Staff is reported to be-

| lieve that the United States Sixth

U S Aid Lil el , | Fleet does not require much ae
vay of supply bases in Spain,

wT ag | other Admivals including Admiral

| William



Carney, Commander of
:
By K. C. THALER he Sixth Fleet argue such bases
LONDON, April 23 e vital
West European nations may in-|,,. 1 hese sources stressed that the
voke shortly: N.A.'T.0_ Pact pros United States’ Airforce and navy
visions on economic co-operation ould provide pons ot soln
n search for United States assist- for Spain if wee Ne re ia
ance to meet the new threat to! @ on page’:
their economic and financial Stab-!
ility, |
Under N.A.T.O, treaty, all mem-|}

bers pledged to eliminat
in their international
policies and encourage
collaboration between
of them,

Behind the moves to invoke this
clause lies the growing fear of an
approaching economic slump. ‘

The clause also might be called
upon to support the stand of West-
ern European countries against the
projected U.S. import restrictions
already formally attacked by Brit-
ish and Italian notes of protest

Those among European N.A.T.O,
members who advocate formal in-
voking of the pacts of the economic
clause, argue it might counteract
the U.S. tendency to keep imports
out of the U.S. market. Beyond
this, they argue it might bring the
U.S. more actively behind the

conflict}
economic }
economi
any or all



tematic steps to defe@at.the re-
current dollar problem and. its
harmful repercussions on their LORD ALEXANDER

economies.—U.P.



x | West’s Build-up
Sabres Cut Rails | May Prevent. War

April 23 LONDON, April

|
SEOUL





United States Sabre jets which | 4 .
knocked out four Russian planes|, Britain's new Defense Minister
Tuesday went screaming back into} +/°T? Alexander said on Wednes
North Korea today to chop at} @@y that the we defense build
Communist supply lines, cutting} UP may preven the tart of
rails in 76 plaees before noon. Of| World War HII He told the
the four bagged Tuesday, one wags} Pritish House of Lords that
» M.LG. 15 jet caught in the air as| Western strength has already at-
t tried to sneak into Korea from} ta@ine 1 point that convinces hin
Manchuria. The other three re| that potential enemies themselves
ld Yak 9 propelHer-driven figi re not sure they are sufficiently

hict ere found like challenge the Alli

i parked on the airstriy f ie World War II ¢ ~
Sinuiju on the Korean side f 1€ er irned tf the we i
Yalu River. I t Dn ortable period

Diving Sabre jets ripped them to xiet before t m feel
shreds,—U.P, U.P

juring the intervening period had



nd he sincerely
vould appreelate what

tion of the American Newspaper
Publishers Association, said news-

a plaque expressing the Associa-/
tion's gratitude “for his magnifi- |
cent

sociation last year voicing shock
at the expropriation by'the Argen- |
tine Government of
great newspapers of the world.”

stubbornly in short and apparently
itile session:
sual routine by the crash of artil-
leory barrage

illing i
utter

Tnited
lammed into Communist position ¥

nd caused a

and



leaders has endorsed W. Averell words of explanation.

srogressed from boyhood to man-|tlarriman, Mutual Security Ad-| or some years the price paid for
1000 ninistrator sugar exported from the Island
: The few seattered contests} has been rising and every time

Duty To Community

it has risen there have been
The Government had been

automatic increases in the retail

uld hardly serve as a barometer
Dewey were not backing Eisen-

mough to see that there was the]; wor “Voters elected 90 Conven- price of sugar sold locally. The
necessity for providing them with] \45 delegates. Six delegates at inevetses in the price of sugat

knowledge which would help] orge will be picked by the Re- exported have been of great ben-
them to beeome useful citizens, | -ablican State Committee. efit to the Island, and the money

hoped that they
had bee

will send 94 to their
including four at
’

Democrat
~onvention

has found its way into the
pockets of growers of cane and



jone for them and remember that | large. workers in the industry, and,
@ On Page 5 In Pittsburg, General fBisen- indirectly, has helped most of

\ower swept Pennsylvania's the inhabitants of the Island.
“ Presidential ~“populerity’’~-Pri-f-pne steady increase in the cost
EDI I OR OF nary with a half million vote of living has, however, been &
: lead over Harold E. Stassen his} continual worry to the Govern-
6 , 99 nearest opponent and his sup- ment, and the increase in the
LA PRENSA porters claimed at least five of price of sugar sold for local con-
I , eight delegates in bitterly dis- sumption has been one of the
HONOLU RED puted Allegny County items which has given cause for
The State’s Republicans na particular concern, Executive
NEW YORK, April 23 ods lr petainle Mighars spit Va Committee is doing all in its

Dr. Alberto Gainza Paz, self- Democrats each elected 60 whine power to stop this increase
exiled editor of the Buenos Aires |Steucted delegates yesterday 0} Some time has been spent by
newspaper La Prensa,,in an ad-|ielr July Conventions in Chi-| pyeoutive Committee in consid-
dress before the annual Conven- | &@89. ering the question, and I am

senator Robert A. Taft whose

sorry that it has been necessary
name was not listed on the ballot

to ask this Honourable Council

paper men must fight for every| received enough write in votes to consider it at such short
man’s right to know what is going |for hin to forge ahead of Stassen notice. The stocks of 1951 sugar
on in the world who appeared with Eisenhower are on the point of running out,

Gainza Paz was presented with on the preferential ticket. ‘Taft's
eupporters said they hoped to get

four delegates in heavily popu

and it is for that reason that t
have been advised that it is im-
perative that the Bill should be

fight for a democratic fre@) jsted Allegny County dealt with out of its normal turn.
press ’ vet} Senator Estes Kefauver led! = 1t will be observed that the Bill
aa enone clantas . _ eH iit other presidential hopefuls inj only applies to sugar manufae-
f a resolution adopted by the As-|". dispirited Democrat write in|tured in the Island during the

contest. —U.P.

@ on page 5

“one of the



UP,

Truce Talks
Interrupted

PANMUNJOM, April 23

Korean truce negotiators argued

‘ |
~ WORLD FAMOUS ALES

FROM

BURTON, ENGLAND

As if to remind debaters that -
still going on 288 days
the Truce Talks started, a
Nations artillery

shaken out of the

barrage

t outside the 1,000 yard security

me

The barrage hook truce tents

Communist trans-
or to halt briefly. Staff officers
‘ussing armistice upervision,

including Russian and airfield con-
truction deadlocks, met for
a few minutes
blame
make any progress. —U.P, |

only
They had time to

each other for failure to



} AND

Atom Bomb |

i} . t
Kept To Plan | Worthington
abst te soa

United States atomic bomb yester-
day in “Fury Valley”
Nevada hills,
fotally
Bikini

newsmen

deep in the
revealed a weapon
different from the great
tests, according to some
who covered all three
ists. a7

BREWED AND BOTTLED
TO PERFECTION

This bomb dealt a fast clean
lethal blow exactly on schedule
exactly in conformity with
blueprints nd then was done|
with it |
Tt »ombs of Bikir ere more
sctaining ith treat ividly } NOW ON SALE AT
loure cloud n ‘ ved by]
itinuc lightning |
The aieeame, phere of h J. N. GODDARD & SONS L
and bomt eemed to reveal ® ™ RD ON td
mpep of u ‘ ri olle orn ry
ther territ ession of BRIDGETOWN
; |
I ¢ la :
£ I it phase
maetiy on time—_4 :
3.000 feet in ith 10
pinpoint target 1]
UP





PAGE TWO



NV R. WILLIAM A. BROWN,
Chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Barbados Electric
Supply. Corporation Ltd., arrived



yesterday morning from Eng-
ty T.C.A. via Montreal on a
ss visit and is staying at the
dser Hotel
Leaving Today
UE4o leave to-day by B.W.LA.
for Tobago are Mr, Henry
Gotfredson, a retired businessman
of Wisconsin and Mrs. Gotfredson
who were here for the past three
weeks staying at the Marine Hotel.
They expect to spend about
three or four days in Tobago be-
fore réturning to the U.S.A. by
Pan American Airways.

Retired Businessman
AY R. and Mrs, Emanuel Rimbaud
of Martinique who had been
holidaying
days, Will be

here for the past ten

remaining for a fur-
ther period staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Mr. Rimbaud is a retired busi-

nessman,
First Visit
ae. the passengers arriv-
ing here yesterday morning
from Montreal by T.C.A. was Mr.
G. S. Whelpton from Windsor, On-
tario. He has come out here on his
first visit and will be remaining for
about two.or three weeks, staying
at the Occan View Hotel,





He said that they have had a
cold wet spring and two weeks
f the temperature in Windsor
was 26° F., but when he left, it
had risen considerably and was
about 65° F.

Mr, Whelpton is the owner of
Whelpton Electric Co. in Windsor

Sales Representative

Returns
M* LESLIE CORBIN, Sales
Representative of Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., re-
turned from Jamaica over the
week-end by B.W.LA., after a
week’s visit.





Carb

| SOCKET CARTOON
83, OSBER?T LANCASTER



* But,
could do the Ascot
mentary—why I can tell a
Dior from a Jacques Fath a

darling, Ot course /
com-

quarter of} a mile away, no
+ matter how jast they're
moving 1"

Keen Golfer
AYING his second visit to Bar-
bados is Mr. W. Sutherland, a
Scotsman who has been residing
in Caracas, Venezuela for the past
five years. He arrived here last
week by B.W.L.A. for two weeks’
holiday and is staying at the Ocean
View Hotel,

A keen golfer, Mr, Sutherland
is an accountant employed with
the Shell Caribbean Petroleum
Company in Caracas,

Spent Three Mcnths
ISS ETTA HAREWOOD of St.
Lawrence Gap returned to
the island on Sunday from Trini-
dad where she spent three months’
holiday. She was the guest of Miss
Elsie Richards of Port-of-Spain.





Calling

. ‘* #
Winter Visifor
R. A. E. NORCROSS of Otta-
wa, Canada, and a regular
visitor to Barbados,’left for Trini-
dad on Monday by B.W.1LA. to
take steamship opportunity back
home. During his three months
here he was staying at the Marine

Hotel.

U.K. Director
OLIDAYING in Barbados is
Mr. S. Hallar, Director of

Kenyon Son and Craven Ltd. of
Rotherham, England. He arrived
yesterday morning by T.C.A. via
Mortveal and is staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Winding Up Holiday

OL. and Mrs. Colin Osbourne,

parents of Mrs. Charlie Man-
ning. are now winding up their
holiday at the Marine one paar
to returning to their home in
ilton, Ontario, by the Lady Rodney
when it leaves later in the week.
They arrived here about six weeks
ago and were staying at the Col-
ony Club, St. James,

Spent Four Months’

Holiday
RS. RITA MORRELL, a Bar-
badian, who has been domi-
ciled.in Canada is paying her first
visit to the island in twenty years.

Mrs. Morrell is a sister of Mrs.
Frank Moore of Bank Hall and has
been spending a four months’ holi-
day as the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Moore.

Mrs. Morrell is in charge of the
Salon Vendome of Messrs Robert
Simpson, Montreal. She returns to
Canada this week-end by the
R.M.S. Lady Rodney.

.

For Summer Holidays
RS. FRANCES SWINTON of
London, England, who arrived

over the week-end by the SS.
Golfito, has come to spend the
summer holidays. She is staying at
the Marine Hotel.



Your Feet Affect Your Face

The feet very largely govern the
prettiness of the face! It sounds a
foolish statement—until you stop
to think about it. Then you realise
enly too well that if the feet are
uncomfortable, the hurt shows
immediately in the face—in fur-
rowed brow and pained expression,
If things are not quickly put right
the limes turn into permanent
wrinkle®, and the general expres-
sion “sours;’ And lines are more
easily ingrained than they are
eradic*ted. The feet must be kept
comfortable if prettiness of the
face is to be maintained. Preven-
tion is- indeed better than cure.

foot ills are seli infiicieu
Culsed t~licugn personal carejess~-
wat Go hot fil proper-

Wass Wiel dv OL sult the Suape
Ol tue POOL and Hnegiect of the Teer
bucihociVes,

si0st

ic adive

‘The very varied styles of shoes
avilable voday allied with tem-
uune vanity, lead to many foot
troubles, A gir. falls in love with
1 special style, and, even though
it isn’t perfectly comfortable, buys

it. “It will become more comfort-
able’ as she wears it in, she con-
templates, Wishful thinking,
Usually the discomfort persists,
and in less than no time the dam-
age is done a painful corn
makes its appearance,

Do, do take great care over the
“dressing” of your feet. If a
favoured style is not comfort-
able, pass it by. There may be a
near style better suited to the

shape of your feet. And if al the
fancy designs make your feet feel
unhappy, give them the go by,
and choose a well-fitting court, a
flattie of a laced style. The lat-
ter, you will recollect, has recent-
ly been greatly favoured by our
lovely Queen—and she has to

stand aS much as any one of us.
It is not essential to buy expen-
sive shoes. to ensure comfort.
Good buys: are always the best.

It is all a matter of fitting style
to foot—an essential that can’t be
eniphasised tod strenuously.
Size Right

Fortunately today we are not so
size conscious as we were years
ago. Size six has taken premier
place .over the then more usual
four, size seven is quite ordinary,
while it isn’t unheard of to find
feet sized eleven, Flatties are
fashionable, and very comfort-
able, but though this
like model goes well with tweeds

and business clothes, it is not at-

tractive for dance or dressy wear.
And aching feet can
caused through changing from
low to high heels, Keeping to
one hee] level is the wisest idea,

it is more inducive to foot com-

fort, and obviously less encourag-

ing to aching ankles. But it is up
to you to work out the shoe prob-

lem for yourself.

Corn Cures
Corns and callouses are the
bugbear of all feet and, when

shoes are misfits, appear almost
overnight. If you have been un-
jucky enough to acquire one— or

more—do get rid of them at once;
give them home treatment. There
are very many excellent propri-
etary cures on the market, But
you must follow the instructions,
and use them persistently and
regularly until the corn has gone,
‘Then see to it that the shoe that
caused it is banished. Ruthless
and extravagant, but cheaper in
the long run than corn cures—
and wrinkle ointment!

Dampness between the toes en-

courage soft corns which are
just as painful and diffieult to
dispese of as hard ones. So do

make sure that you dry your feet

thoroughly after bathing, pow-
dering between the toes,
Helpful Hints

You can mix your own cures

at home: —A _ tablespoonful each



BY THE WAY... & seochamber

HE suggestion made at last
year’s Liberal Summer School
(by an F erly ugly girl) that

the talk man and the two short
men should all huddle together
So as to make the two hats appear
to cover the three heads does not

get rid of the difficulty I men-
tioned; the tall man would have
to crouch down to the level of
the other two. Otherwise one of
the hats” Would be tilted and
crooked, and would probably
slip off the two heads.

If there were two tall men and
ene shert man nothing in the
problern would be changed, The
two tall men would huddle under
one hat, and the short man would
have the two hats, And all three
would took just as ‘ridiculous as
usual. No, There must be some
other way out of the difficulty.
Travellers’ joy

SEE that it will soon be possi-

ble to pay for a holiday on
the instalment system. ,

Official: I'm sorry, Mrs, Wag-
staff, but there will be no lunch
for you at Epernay to-day

Mrs. W. : No lunch! Why?

Official : You have not paid
your fifth instalment as per con-
tract

Mrs. W. : But

Official : See Schedule H. Miss
Ghilvers has been sent home for

alling behind with her payments,
ine moment, Mr. Bollard. That



lemonade you had at Bar-le-Duc
makes you fourpence in arrears.
It will be added to your next in-
stalment due at Rheims,

Miss Grable kicks off

pico sar shonge,

mame shos, The African
proverb came to mind as I
looked at a picture of mounted
police charging a mob. It was
the weekly stampede of a scream-
ing crowd outside a football

ploosat lar

Rupert and the



The Toy Scout brings a large

“I've been sent ahead to try to
ease things for Santa Claus,"’ he
murmurs, “and to find out
what would be the shortest way
he could come without missing

dust Opened

PRINTED SPUNS_ 36”
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS 36”

WHITE, P

@

EACH, BLUE.

“slipper”

swiftly be

—~———__—_-





and Nutchester is th:
Pussyville is over here. Nutwood
is about
three."*

moment and looks thoughtful,

of Epsom salts, salt, borax and
sdap flakes, keep them stored in
ajar and add a little to your
nightly hot foot bath, Then plunge
your feet into cold water after-
wards, and after drying thor-
oughly, rub them with methy-
lated spirit. Methylated spirit is
excellent for hardening the feet.
This you should remember when
you decide to first go stocking-
less. It will prevent those agon-
ising blisters so quickly caused
by friction on bear skin.

Here is another “extra” even
if you do not give your feet a
special daily bath. give them a
final rinse in cold water, and rub
them with eau de cologne
“another hardener and stimu-
lant.””

Tired Feet

When complaining of tired feet
try a few exercises to relax
them. This will take the tiredness
out of them. Stand with bare feet
parallel, six to eight inches apart.
Rise on the balls of the feet,
twisting heels inwards and trying
to grasp the floor with the toes.
Do this about twenty times,
slowly. Then walk tiptoe, bare-
foot, until it is necessary to drop
back on the heels, It’s tiring
while you do it, but it pays in re-
gults,

Other foot exercises are:—

Grasp a large marble with the §

toes and try to take as many
steps as you can without drop-
ping it.

Lie flat on your back with
knees stiff, feet and toes stretched
dut in a slightly pigeon-toes po-
‘sition. Count four, and at the
same time bend the ankles and
bring the toes towards you as
much as possible. In addition to
aiding tired feet, this exercise
aids the arches, toes, calves, and
ankles and keeps the feet in per-
fect condition.





ground. But it looked very like
a picture of the great days when
Mrs. Dietrich used to escape from
her hotel in a milkfloat, and when
a piece torn off her fur coat by
an admirer would fetch $500 at
(Tattersall’s. The police must be
dvzading the days when a foot-
ball match coincides with the
visit to the district of a film
actress. One day an enterprising
club will pay, say Miss Betty
Grable to kick off. The military
will be called out (watch the
lady handle them) and the whole
district will be smashed and
torn to bits.



Toy Scout—10— i 0

sini. This vilage i is rather
map from the car and spreads it hard to fit in, That’s why I was
out between Rupert and Willie. gy sie and having’ look

ae way and

in the middle of the
He falls silem for e

OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF COMGALEUM RUGS,

BY THE YARD.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

: BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Business and Pleasure
R. HENRY LIPPMAN from
Trinidad arrived here recent-
ly by B.W.1LA. with his sisters
Mrs. A. Fomneneky of La ir
Bolivia and Mrs. Behrend
Hartford, Connecticut, who are
svending a holiday with him at
the St. Lawrence Hotel.

Mr. Lippman’s visit is really one
on business coupled with pleasure
since he is Director of Colonial
Advertising (Barbados) Ltd., and
is over here to be on hand for the
completion of the mew Barbados
Telephone Directory which his
company is producing. He ex-
pects this will be issued within the
next,few days,

* v«
On Inspection Visit
R. D, CARDMASTER, Resi-
dent Inspector for the West
Indies of the New India Insurance
Co., Ltd. with headquarters in
Trinidad, arrived here on Tuesday
by B.W.LA. on a short visit and
is staying at the Hastings Hotel.
Mr, Cardmaster is now on one
of his monthly inspection visits to
the agencies in the area which in-
cludes British Guiana, Surinam,
Curacao and Aruba. He expects to
return to Trinidad on Saturday on
his way to British Guiana.

St. Lucia Planter
Me A. DUBOULAY, planter of

St, Lucia, arrived on Tuesday
by B.W.1.A. on a short visit and
is staying at the Hotel Royal.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19.76 m., 25.58 m,

4.00 p.m. The News, 410 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Rhythm is Their
Business, 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5.00
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 6.00 p.m, Welsh Diary,
6.15 p.m. Crazy People, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News
From Britain.
7.15—10.30 p.m. — 25.53 m., 31,32 m,







7.15 p.m, We See Britain, 7.45 p.m.
Music of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Special Despatch,
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m, From the
Editorials, 9.00 p.m. There's None So
Rare, 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. It Stuck In, My
Mind, 10.30 p.m. Oliver Twist.



Se nee



Across

- Redact on tick? (6)
To the crow it has uplift. (3)
Noticesdle in gifts to a sister.
(5) ¥. Gape. (4)
. Boring but it has a red ray. (6)
Colour 1 get when mixed with
explosive. (4)
Hangs out art (4)
The artist is fh "Fruit. (6)
aeeeed down on the course, (3
Consumed, (3) 18, Taste i$
5

> be AP

ta

—

Wickedness no sappers revile. (
Well rooted family line, (4)
. Elephants sacrifice to music, (

Does he play nap most? (7)

Down

It should be binding. (8)

2. Supplies the raid rota. (8)
These tied down to rules of
eating. (4, 5) 4, Bully. (6)
Where to hear the laure! tree ?
(3) 6. Pully informed. (5)
Get a stain out of this, (5)

Says gone to buttonholes. (8)
My brother's children. (6)
But alone holds the nail,

. To spike it’s a balsam. (4)
. Vigour In the U.S.A, ia)

Splution of eee ‘S puzzle.—Acro:

Pee BBS

ia
Sesee

ws
~



1. ab. 4 0 7, Etiolate 10,
Stoker: 13, Eternal: 14. Nimbus; 15,
ar; 16. Pare; 18. Use; 19, Bonus: 21,
Omit; 22, Nave; 23. Ether Down: 1,
Dimension; 2, Restive: 3, Attempt: 5,
Please: 6 Earl; 8. Treasure: 9. Express:
11. Orb trobuini) 4% ours 15, Punch;
i7, Ante; 19, Bee; 20. Out

ee

The battle
of Texas...
~ and the
_ battle
of the
sexes!



wie

LIONEL

meh iN

roa oe VINCENT SHERMAN «ences eZ. WAYNE (







GARDNER



SEN HAGE

dt



Henry VU: A D

HENRY VIII:

PATIENT. By Sir Arthur 8.
MacNalty. Christopher Je@hn- e
son. 18s. 202 pages.

WHAT was wrong with Henry d
VIII? What caused the ulcer in a
his leg which brought him so much
suffering and bad temper? Why
did so many of his children
eight) miscarry or die at birth? g
»me authorities have been ready q

an explanation: the King

tion,
Sir Arthur MacNalty, formerly

By MAX TRELL

THE sky had grown dark and
there were flashes of lightning and |
rumbles of thunder. Knarf and Han-
id, the shadow-children with the
turned-about names, were standing
with their faces pressed against the
window, waiting for the first drops
of rain to fall when al! at once they
heard someone calling their names.
The voice came from the flower-bed
just under the window.

They looked out. It was their
friend King Nep.

“Come out,” he called. “I’ve got
something very interesting to show
you.”

“But it’s going to rain any min-
ute!” said Hanid.

“That’s just why I want you to
come now. It, will be too late when
it stops. Meet me at the edge of the
brook under the willow.” With that
King Nep scurried off and soon dis-
appeared among the tall blades of
grass on the other side of the gar-
den. He was much shorter than a
blade of grass himself.

Edge of Brook

Knarf and Hanid slipped on their
rain-hats and rubbers and made
their way as fast as they could to
the edge of the brook. Meanwhile
the sky had grown even blacker
than before. The lightning flashed
in a dozen places, and the thunder
"@facked like cannon. Just then they
Spied King Nep.

“I know it’s not the best kind
of weather to come out in,” he ex-
plained. “But it’s the only time you
can meet Ben. He’s flying his kite.”

“Ben ?” said Knarf. “Who's Ben?”

“And why should anybody want
to fly a kite when it’s lightning and
thundering and about to rain?”
asked Hanid in astonishment.

“Ben’s been away for a long, long!
time,” said King Nep. “But he some-
times comes back on a day like this.
He’s just. down the edge of the!
brook a little, flying that kite of
his (and this is just the kind of day
he likes to fly it in). He'll be pretty)
busy. But maybe he won't mind if |
you watch him a bit.”

So Knarf and Hanid, filled with |
curiosity about Ben and his kite, |
followed King Nep down along the
edge of the brook. And sure enough, |
just as they went around the turn |
where al the ferns and jack-in-the. |
pulpits grew in a great green mass,
they saw Ben flying his kite.

Ben wasn’t any larger than King





A DIFFICULT Ch ih
istry of Health, pondering all the!

tubercular tendency of the
most fascinating medical problems |

in history, he concludes that the}
King’s sore

difficult case, in more ways than
Rad ccotracted a shameful infec- gne.



King Neptune Had a Friend

—The Shadows Met Hi

° 2 : ° |
ifficult Patient |
hief Medical Officer at the Min-

vidence (including the Pan ae
u=
ors) finds the case not proven. In
judicious study of one of the,

leg” was probably |
ulcer. Nobody will}
Henry VIII was a

varicose
loubt that

World Copyright Reserved
er —LES.



im in a Strange Way—



“Come outside,” King Nep called
to the Shadows,

Nep himself, and he was dressed in
such odd, old-fashioned clothes that
to Knarf and Hanid he seemed to
have stepped out of some old, old
picture. He wore shoes with big
bows on them, and a long coat with
tails. His hair was long and hung
in.a pig-tail at the back of his neck;
and he wore a hat with three cor-
ners. His kite was tossing in the
wind, but he held on tightly to the
string. And at the end of the string,
Knarf and Hanid noticed that a
little key was tied. Ben was stand-
ing on a log.

As soon as King Nep came up
with Knarf and Hanid, Ben nodded
and smiled. “1 suppose,” he said,
“you'd like to know why 1'm flying
my kite in all this lightning and
thunder?”

“Yes, of course we would!” said
Hanid.

“l’m just trying to prove that
lightning is electricity,” he said. ‘1
think | can bring some of it down
from the sky—make it come all the
way down the kite and spark ont
of the key. Just you wait and see
But don’t stand too close, for light-
ning is dangerous.”

Just then there was a great flash
in the sky, and almost at the same
instant a spark flew out of the key.
“It is electricity!” eried Ben. And
the next instant he ran off, shouting
with excitement.

“1 wonder,” said Hanid to King
Nep; “was that Ben Franklin?”

And King Nep smiled, though he
wouldn't say, really, whether it was
er it wasn’t.

Me Oe Ree ee

Grand Calypso Repeat Lerformance :

With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS. %
















It's entertainment a



PE.

a» BRODERICK

mt

CAN Ah GA be

IN THEIR FAREWELL SHOW AT x
Â¥,
y +
EMPIRE — TO-NITE at 8,30 s

A complete change of programme with over 20 new song hits *-.
Also Presenting %

(PERCY GREEN'S ORCHESTRA . . RUBBER LEGS AND HIS

DANUING PARTNER - and

THE RHYTHM KINGS STEEL BAND

t it's BEST .

“A woman like
you isn’t going
to kiss more

‘than one man
like this!”



THIS THEATRE ANNOUNCES THAT WE WILL SHOW

h4 Ord and DAD




COMING ‘SOON
“BLUE LAMP”



BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

James

CAGNEY



TO-DAY's S\SPECIAL 1.30 p.m.
“ROSE OF SANTA ROSA”

HOOSTER a ROOSTER HOT SHOTS. SHOTS

Sat. Special 60 am a 130 pm, Special (0 am & 1.30 p m
Triple Attraction —
“MEN of the TIMBERLAND”
Richard ARLEN. ~Andy DEVINE &
“SIX GUN MUSIC" Tex WILLIAMS
and LES BROWN & BAND

LBSESOSSS SLES SESS SEED SODIOS SEDGE SSS OSES SCS SSG

TO-MORROW * %,
and Continuing Dally 445 & & <0

COME FILL THE CUP

Phyllis THAXTER —Ray mona. _MASSEY- —Gig_ a OUNG

& RIDIN

d WEDNESDAY 30TH, 5 & 8.30.
ON TUESDAY 29TH an aa oni aaa edie

“PLAZA CINEMAS



445 & AMD pm

THE OUTLAW TRAIL’
Charles aan. charles. STARRETT _

er atauls Spectsi sa. Special Sat.
WHOLE SERIAL

THE SPIDER’S WEB

Warren HULL



SER SSSSS



BARBAREFS —Dial 5170
Last 2 Shows To-day 4.30 & %.30
“DEVIL'S HENCHMEN”
Warner BAXTER &
CORONER CREEK (Color)
Randolph SCOTT

THURS. Special 1.°0 p.m
“SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE”
Tex RITTER &

SIX GUN MESA Johnny Mack BROWN

SAT. SPECIAL 1.3) p.m.
“SADMEN'S TERRITORY”
Randolph SCOTT—Gabby HAYES &
“RIDER FROM TUCSON”
Tim HOLT
OPENING FRIDAY STH
“MOM & DAD"

SSESSSSSSESSSSSSGSESE GES SOONG GGG GGG HOGS 99S S5SS95:



THURSDAY,

APRIL 24, 1

a
ue
re







it's the ‘New High’ in Vaudeville

GLOBE presents

A MONSTER VAUDEVILLE
CARNIVAL

Saturday April 26 — MIDNITE

SPEARHEADED BY

MONAH — now from Martinique

(Famous MAGICIAN and CURVE DANCER)

LOLITA (Samba-Rhumba Jerker)
(Spanish Tango Ace)
AND

KURABELLA

JOSEPH CLEMENDORE (Cobra Man)

THE BOODHOO BROS. (Indian Stunt Kings from B.G.)
HARVEY ROGERS (A Ballroom Expert)

ENA KING (B.G's Radio Sw stest Voice)

Music by
KEITH CAMPBELL’S Society 5

PIT 24: HOUSE 48; BALCONY 60; BOX 72
TO-DAY—GLOBE

TICKETS on Sale







POWERFUL—AND

POWERFULLY DIFFERENT

—From WARNER BROS.

- COME
FILE the
cup”

PHYLLIS: THAXTER
RAYMOND MASSEY
Gig YOUNG—

YOWLE CALL IT

BOLDY
YOU'LL SAY IT’S
BLUNTY

James GLEASON





(Diat 2310)

P i A 7 A aa BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-DAY (THURSDAY), 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Se



To-day 4.45 only
“A PLACE IN THE SUN”



Tonite at 8.20

CALYPSO REPEAT PERFORM-
ANCE ‘ A.ong with F.u's
Orchestra and the Rhythm Kings
Steel Band.



EMPIRE

Opening To-morrow 2.30 & 8% WO
WALT DISNEY'S

“ALICE IN- WONDERLAND”
EXTRA
“NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
An Academy Award Winner



Sat. 26th at 1 °0 p.m







Wild Bil ELLIOTT in
Ae ELL FIRE” &
“BANDIT. KING OF TEXAS"
with
Alan Rocky; LANE

Sat. 26th Midnite
“DRUMS OF THE CONGO”

and
“THE LADY OBJECTS”

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-day 4 30 & 8.15
Ray MELLAND

“COPPER CANYON”
and
BURT LANCASTER in
“I WALK ALONE”







Ta-day & Sat at 1.30 p.m.
ROY ROGERS Double

“RIDING DOWN THE CANYON”
and
“SONG OF TEXAS

Friday only 4.30 & 8 15

“JAMES BROTHERS
OF MISSOURI”

BOLD

—=—

\




ROXY
To-day & To-morrow 4 20 & 8.15
Edmond O'BRIEN in

“FIGHTER SQUADRON”
and
“INSPECTOR GENERAL"

Starring:
Danny KAYE
———
To-day & Sat, at 1.30 p.m.
“HALFWAY TO SHANGHAI”

and
“DEAD MAN EYES”





Opening SAT. 4.30 & 8.15
Glenn Ford — Rhonda Flemings

—in —
“THE REDHEAD AND THE —
COWBOY”
and ’

THE MARX BROTHERS in
“DUCK SOUP”



Sat. Midnite
WHOLE SERIAL

“THE JAMES BROTHERS
OF MISSOURI”

ROYAL

To-day Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Wild Bill ELLIOTT in
“HELL FIRE”





and
“BANDIT KING OF TEXAS”
Starring: Alan Rocky LANE

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15 .

OLIVIA. DE HAVILAND in
“DARK MIRROR”

and
“PHANTOM LADY”



& Sun 4.30 &
“SILVER CITY”
and
“VICTORY”

8.15

BUT
TRUE

HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Mom-Dad'

WITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES —

WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
MEN Only 8.30 p.m.




(heres ek

AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!

WARNING !

This picture includes powerful Medical Sequences.
NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !

PLAZA—scnsinces (Dial 5170)

3 5$993993o" 5

COMING SOON TARBAREES
“CRISS CROSS"

BURT LANCASTER



OISTiN—Dial 8404
To-day (only) 445 & 8.30 p.m

“HONEYMOON LODGE”
Francis LANGFORD &
“RIVER LADY" (Color)

Rod CAMERON — Yvonne De CARLO
Friday & Sat (45 28H pm

MISS GRANT TAKES A CHANCE

and

_WE WERE STRANGERS
~~ SAT. Special 1 30 P M
“ROSE of SANTA ROSA”
HOCSIER HOT SHOTS &
“RIDIN the OUTLAW TRAIL”
Charles STARRETT, Smiley BURNETTF

SSOS OCS OSSSS

PIOSO LOS SSP SOS

Richard ARLEN —

OPENING ee oth eee

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
To-day 4.30 p m,.
“BEYOND THE FOREST”
Bette DAVIS &

“WHIPLASH” i Dane CLARK
FRI & SAT. 8.30 PM.
“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”

Robert ARMSTRONG &
“MY FORBIDDEN PAST”
Robert MITCHUM

MIDNITE SAT.
Triple Attraction —
“RAIDERS of the DESERT”

«TH

Andy
“CHEYENNE COWBOY"
Tex WILLIAMS &

TEX BENEKE & GLENN MLLER

ORCHESTRA

DEVLN x

POSSESS SSR,

OE ——————E—





THURSDAY, APRIL 24,

1952

U.S. Race To Try
First H-Bomb

From R. M. MeCOLL

WASHINGTON, April.

America’s top scientists and technicians are racing

against the clock to try to

ensure that the world’s first

hydrogen bomb will be exploded next September, when
the United States undertakes the next great ‘hush-hush’
experiments on the Pacific atoll of Eniwetok. ’

Thousands of millions of dollars have been poured out
on this project, ever since President Truman gave the ‘green
light’ over a year ago. Huge ‘plants’ have been set up,
guarded by thousands of security men. Some of America’s
best scientific brains have been at work, seeking to perfect
the new bomb, which is theoretically a thousand times more
powerful than the existing A bomb.



The work is being rushed to the
limit now because of the psycho-
logical factors involved. If, as the
directors of American political-
military policy believe, the grandâ„¢
crisis in world affairs is due to
be reached some time within the
next 12 months, demonstrable

ession by the West of an

-Bomb might be the ace card
which could enforce the peace.

America is convinced that the
decisive factor in the world strug-
gle depends on the start which
the West obtains in atomic
weapons. So new orders have
gone out that the already strenu-
ous work on the Hydrogen Bomb
shall be stepped up even further,
to try to bring about a victorious
burst which will produce the
bomb by the autumn.

While this big drive is on, there
are powerful voices behind the
scenes taking up the angrily
debated question of whether
America should oar should not
continue to with-hold from
Britain and Canada her atomic
information and research discov-
eries,

There is a sahool of thought
in the State Department for
example, bf is anes in a
battle roya fh powerful
at the Pentagon. The tate
Department men are completely
opposed to the law which says
that America must not tell
Britain or anyone else anything
at all in the atomic field, and
they are working away diligently
to get a change.

France Can Still
Retain Influence

In Tunisia

WASHINGTON, April 21.

Some United States officials be-
lieve that France could still exe-
cute a skillful political withdrawal
from Tunisia which would leave
virtually intact her economic in-
terests there and the revenue she
derives from them.

Some, Officials however, fear
that the/time for graceful exit has
passed and France eventually may
lose most of her vested interest
in the area. Meanwhile, much of
the United States Public and Press
continues to be mystified despite
“explanation” by Secretary of
State Dean Acheson and others
by Govérnment’s refusal to vote
t> place the Tunisian French dis-
pute before the United Nations.

Labour Organisations, Congress-
men and Newspapers still contend
that United States threw over-
board its traditional Anti-Colonial
policy by its action in the Securi-
ty Council, This analysis by highly
placed United States officials may
reveal in part at least why Ache-
son decided that the French should
have the opportunity to try to sat-
isfy their Tunisian Nationalist
aspirations before the Security
Council intervenes.

It is believed that most French-
men sincerely want a settlement
with the Tunisians, but they want
to be certain first, just how much
ground t are economically able
to give.—U.P.



U.S.—Spanish
Talks Proceed
Smoothly

@ from page 1
available on satisfactory terms.
They said that Luis Carro

Blanco, Interim Foreign Minister
and Under-Secretary of the Presi-
dency is setting the pace for these
negotiations on the Spanish side
and that he is well situated to do
so because he is the personal re-
presentative of Generalissimo
Franco to whom he reports daily
on the progress of the negotiations,

Will Take Longer

While the economic negotiations
are closely connected with the
military ones, the Mutual Security
Agency mission is likely to take
considerably longer in reaching an
agreement for allocating the
$100,000,000 because so many fin-
ancial and economic fa s are
involved and also because the sud-
den death of its deputy head
Rifat Tirana has left the mission
badly crippled.

So far the Export and Import
Bank has not found any official to
replace Tirana on the on.

Tirana was the Bank’s Chief
Economist for Western Europe.
Furthermore they pointed out that
Tirana was the only member of
the three-man mission who had
dealt for any length of time with
Spanish economic and financial
affairs.

Answer Awaited

It has been learned that U.S.
economic and military teams ne-
gotiating for Spanish bases have
completed proposals to representa-
tives of the Spanish Government
and are awaiting a reniy.

George Train, head of the econo-
mic team reportedly handed a
written draft of economic pro-
nosals to Jaime Arguelles, Trade
Under-Secretary of the Spanish
Ministry of Commerce last week.

Proposals afte believed to re-
commend projects which could be
financed by one hundred million
dollars voted recently by Congress.
Major General Kissner, Chief of
the 25-man military mission has
completed verbal proposals to
General Juan Vigon, Chief of the
Spanish General Staff.

The néxt move will be up to the
Spaniards. A US official said
formal talks would not begin until
the return of Spahish Foreign
Minister Alberto Martin Artajo on
April 28 from his tour of the
Middle: East.

CANADA’S
NEW
BUDGET

EASES RATES

Canadian business, which was
not expecting much relief from
the 1952 Budget, should be stim-
ulated in many directions by the
changes that the Minister of
Finance was able to announce.
Relief in the form of corporation
taxes, is of course, infinitesimal,
the new effective or top tax rate
now being 54% in. Ontario and
Quebec and 52% in the other
provinces, as compared with the
old rates of 546% and 52.6%
respectively, These rates include,
of course, the addition of 2%
announced in October last and
effective as from January 1, 1952,
to cover the cost of Old Age
pension legislation which started
(at $40 per month for those over
70 years of age) at the beginning
of 1952. Hence, the 1951 corpora-
tion rate of 52.6% (or 50.6%) is
raised to 54% (or 52%) for 1952.

A wide range of companies,
however, will benefit from the
commodity tax reductions, with
the excise tax on such products
as automobiles, the smaller elec-
trical household appliances,
radios and phonographs, luggage,
jewellery, etc., cut from 25% to
15%, the 15% rate on stoves,
washing machines and refrigera-
ators removed, the 30% rate on
soft drinks reduced to 15% and
the tax on cigarettes lowered by
3 cents on the standard package
of 20, all effective April 9, 1952.

A PROBLEM

As is usual when such taxes
are changed, goods on which the
old tax rates» have been paid
will be a problem for a time. Ex-
cise and Sales taxes are paid
when the product leaves the plant
of the manufacturer, and those
now in the hands of wholesalers,
dealers or retailers will have paid
the higher rate. Accordingly it
will depend upon the relative
bargaining position of the manu-
facturer and his distributor as to
who will bear the loss or whether
it should be divided, if the pro-
ducts have to be sold at a lower
pricey reflecting the new lower
rates, Of course, if the products
can be sold at the old prices, thera
will be no problem. However, cig-
arette prices appear to have been
cut immediately on the opening
of business on Wednesday and
dealers in household goods took
eecasion to give wide publicity
to the immediate cut applicable
to their stocks on hand.

Relief to Large Group of Pub-
lic Utilities; Some Still,
Hampered »

The difficulties under whiclt
public utility companies distribu-
ting or generating electricity, gas
or steam are operating, forced
as they are to raise large amounts
of capital to finance expansion of
services and allowed to earn
only a modest return on their
capital because of public control
of rates, is recognized by the
Government in the form of a
deduction from the tax otherwise
payable of an amount sufficien’
to reduce to 43% (from 50%) the
tax payable under the Income Tax
Act on that part of a corpora-
tion’s taxable income that is de-
rived from such distribution .or
generation, This relief will apply
to those companies which derive
more than one-half of their gross
revenue from the distribution to
or generation for distribution to
the public of electrical energy,
gas or steam.

1952 Weather
Talks Will Be
Held In June

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April.

Plans for a meeting of a Sub-
commission of Re al Assoeia-
tion IV of thé.World .Meteoro-~
logical Organisation to be held
here June 16—19 were discussed
with the President, Dr. Andrew



Thomson, by officials of the
Caribbean Commission, during
Dr. Thomson’s recent visit to

Kent House. This was announced
recently by Mr. EB. F. . de
Vriendt, Secretary General.

The tentative agenda for the
conference includes a review o'
the 1951 Hurricane season and
of progress made in implement:
recommendations of the 195
Hurricane Subcommission. Vari-
ous proposals to improve the
effectiveness of the hurricah®
warning system in the
Caribbean will be considered,
‘nd recommendations made for
the 1952 hurricane season.



CONTROL OF TANGIERS

MADRID, April 23.

The Spanish Foreign Office
confifmed that Spain sent the
second note to the United States,
Britain and Franee on the control
of Tangiers. The contents of the
note are not immediately known,
but it is believed that the second
note cleared up vague points in
the first note of April 7.

—(UP.)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Guggenheim Fellowship






AMERICAN SHORTS :



AwardsForB.W.L, 1952 Parret Ban

THE award of four Fellowships to residents of the

British West Indies for the

year 1952-53 is announced to-

day by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
of New York City. This is the first of a series of annual
Fellowships awards by the Foundation for the British

West Indies.

The Guggenheim Foundation’s
Fellowships for the British West
Indies are granted to assist schol-
ars and artists of demonstrated
capacity ‘to carry on, in the United
States, research in all fields of
knowledge and artistic creation in
all the arts. Usually the Fellows
of the Foundation are between
25 and 40 years of age. The Fel-
lowships are granted for long or
short periods, depending upon the
studies which the Fellows will
earry on. Men and women, mar-
ried or unmarried, without dis-
tinction of race, colour or creed,
are eligible on equal terms.

The John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation was estab-
lished in the year 1925 by the
late United States Senator Simon
Guggenheim and by Mrs. Guggen-
heim as a memorial to a son, John
Simon Guggenheim, who died in
1922.

The list 6f Fellowship appoint-
ments now made follows:

Dr. John Horace Parry, Pro-
fessor of Modern History, Uni-
versity College of the West In-
dies, Mona, Jamaica. Dr. Parry,
during his Fellowship, will make
a study of the history of municipal
government in the Spanish Indies
from the Conquest to Indepen-
dence. He is the author of “The
Spanish Theory of Empire in
the Sixteenth Century,” 1940;
“The Audenica of New Galicia in
the Sixteenth Century,” 1948—
both published by the Cambridge
University Press; and of “Europe

and a Wider World.” London,
1949.
Mr. Douglas MacRae Taylor,

fruit farmer; ethnolinguist, Magua,
Dominica, Mr. Taylor plans to
continue, in the United States, his
studies of the Black Carib lan-
guage .of British Honduras. He
is the author of “The Black Carib
of British Honduras,’ published
in New York, 1952, Mr. Taylor
proposes to try to unravel the
African and native American ele-
ments in the language and culture
of the Black Carib group.

Mr. Ronald Gordon Fennah,
Entomoblogist, Imperial College of
Tropical Agriculture, St. Augus-
tine, Trinidad, Mr. Fennah plans
taxonomic studies of the ento-
mology of the Lesser Antilles, He
is the author of numerous scien-
tifie papers on entomology and
cropy agronomy.

Mr. Edgar Mittelhélzer, a native
of British Guiana, now editor of
the Office,” published in London,
Council, London, Mr. Mittelhélzer,
a novelist, plans during his Fel-
lowship year to write a novel
on the British West Indian scene.
He is the author of three novels:
“Corentyne Thunder” published
in London, 1941; “A Morning at
the Office,” published in London,
1950, and in New York under the
title “A Morning in Trinidad”;
and “Shadows Move among



Vaccine To
Stop Rabies

NEW YORK, Feb.—(XNS)

The development of an en-
tirely new rabies vaccine for
dog immunization was announced
'regently by Lederle Laborato-
ries Division, American Cyan-
amid Company, manufacturers of
drugs, antibiotics and biological
products,

Described by the company as
the “most important step taken
towards the elimination of rabies
as a fatal disease since the work
done by Pasteur,” the new vac-=
cine has been tested successfully
em more than 12,000 dogs. It will
be made available to veterinari-
ans and to sanitary and ic
health officials oul
world to aid them in the preven-
tion of rabies in dogs.

Credit for developing the vae-
cine was given to Drs. Herald R
Cox and Hilary Ko; re-
searchers in the field of virus
diseases, The new vaccine is pro=
duced from live virus which has
been modified by growth in chick
embryos. It is completely modi-
fied and does not contain mam-
malian brain or spinal cord tissne.

The virus strain used in the

Them,” published in London and
Philadelphia, 1961.

The Trustees of the Foundation
are Mrs. Simon Guggenheim,
President, Francis H. Brownell,
Roger W. Straus, John C,. Emison,
Medley G. B, Whelpley, Charles
Merz, Roswell Magill, Elliott V.
Bell, and Henry Allen Moe, Seo-
retary.

The Foundation’s Committee of
Selection consisted of Dr. Edgar
Professor of Botany in
Washington University, St. Louis,
Missouri; Dr, Henri M, Peyre.
Professor of French in Yale Uni-
versity; Dr, Carl O. Sauer, Pro-
fessor of Geography in the Uni-
versity of California; Dr. Edwin
Bidwell Wilson, Retired

Professor
of Vital Harvard Uni-
versity; and Dr. Louis Booker

Wright, Director of the Fo!

gar
Shakespeare Library, Washington,
D.C., Chairman,



Solomon’s
Copper Mines
Discovered

RED SEA, PORT EILAT, April.

Traces of King Solomons’ fabu-
lous copper mines were uncovered
this week ton the Israel side of the
Israel-Jordon border by a 60-year -
old Siberian-born Israeli engineer
in ‘“Hashish Valley,” 20 miles from
the desolate Red Sea hamlet of
Eilat.

He is Michael Muller whose
great-grandfather prospected in
the Urals with the famous British
geologist Murchison.

The mines straddle the tradi-
ace remuamess: ree across
san Vv from don to Egypt.
In the iblical King’s day, the
barren hills of southern Israel
were thickly forested with oak
trees and high-grade copper was
extracted by smelting aquamarine

in charcoal furnaces.

Muller, tanned mahogany by the
burning sun picked up chunks of
fossilised charcoal to show me
streaks of metallic copper glinting
as brightly blue as the noon day
desert sun.

King Solomon could not hope
to tap all this wealth, and the
Israelis are beginning where he
left off.

Prospecting started in the area
a year ago, and in February of
this year a thick vein estimated to
contain: 100,000 tons of pure ore
were struck. Already, the slopes
of the pink, wind-eroded crags, in
whose bowels copper has been
found, are piled high with vividly-
coloured rocks extracted with
little more than a hammer and
chisel by tunnel-digging engineers.
And top-level Government officials
are considering how best to exploit
poverty-stricken Israel's sudden
new source of wealth,

The world market price is
oround £400 a ton, but the
Israelis must overcome immense
transport, housing and feeding
difficulties before they can sell
their copper. And there must be
peace between Israel and the
Arabs before Israel vessels can.
safely pass through the less-than-a
mile-wide charnel gua: on one
side by Egypt, and on the other
by Jordon ‘and Saudi Arabia. .

But the Israelis hope, if they
can raise £1,000,000, and if Anglo-
American goodwill paves the way
to a peace settlement, that it will
rot be much more than 17 months
before the first consignments are
loaded from the jetty where,
thousands of years ago, the Queen
of Sheba stepped ashore to be
greeted by the King of a thousand
wives.



Commission
May Be Formed

PARIS, April 23.

The French Resident General
fo Tunisia Count Jean De
Hauteclocque left this morning
for Tunis after a round of con-
ferences with members of the
French Government.

During the past week, Haute-
clocque carried out a tight sched-
ule of discussions top-level
Government to find a
way of ending the touchy Tunis-

ituation.

production of the new vaccine ian si

was first isolated by Dr. Harald
N. Johnson of the Rockefeller
Foundation from the brain of a
child named Flury who died of
rabies. Dr. Johnson maintained
passage of the virus through chick
brains, Cox and Koprowski then
injected it into chick embryos.
Practically free from nervous tis-
sue, the new chick embryo vac-
cine has not been found to cause
paralysis or other signs of illness
following vaccination although
more than 12,000 vaccinations
have been performed.

Lederle researchers predict that
veterinarians will be able to im-
munize dogs by a single vaccina-
tion. If dog owners fully co-op-
erate with the vaccination pro-
grarmmes as Organized by public
health officials and veterinarians,
rabies can be effectively con-
trolled and eventually virtually
eliminated.

Before leaving pear yg a oy
last night held last minute talks
with ench Premier Antoine
Pinay Minister of Foreign Affairs
Robert Schuman, Secretary of
State for War Pierre De Chevinke
and others,

Their conversations dealt
largely with the general situation
in Tunisia,

Circles close to the govern-
ment said they also discussed

possible lifting of Martial Law

and other. restrictions but under-

stood no important new decisions

taken. However they believed
that the Resident General will
urge Tunisian Premier Salah
Edine Baccouche to speed selec-
tion of his seven Tunisian mem-
bers to sit on the Commission in
an attempt to have the Commis-
sion operating before the Moslem
festival of Ramadan on ee

Repealed ?

WASHINGTON— Parrots, love-
birds, parakeets, cockatoos and
other Psittacines just about to be
admitted again to this country
after a 14 years’ ban, may not be
welcome after all. A warning
voice was raised by the Pubic
Health Service in Florida as a
parrot, from that State imported
to the Middle West, infected his
owners with psitacosis. The bird
died, his masters recovered after
short hospitalization and treat-
ment with antibiotics,

Rejoicing pet lovers, seeing the
Prejudical Act of 1988” virtually
repealed, are no longer sure theiy
feathered friends will return,
Their hopes have been’ aroused
after medical researchers de-
bunked the belief that only the
Psittacines carry the bug that
may affect human lungs. Careful
study had shown that the diseas*
is prevalent among all kind of
birds. The researchers, further-
more, had found contamination
from bird to human negligible
and occasional infections casily
eur ith aptibioties.

o Time To Eat Out

NEW YORK—The New York
restaurant business is in the dol-
drums refiectisg a trend which
seems to be nationwide.

One familiar hang-out after the
other is clésing its doors, A varie
ty of reasons is being blame: for
this jarring note in the overal!
theme of economic prosperity
The influence of television which
keeps the family at home, the
marked shift from city to subur-
ban living and at last not least a
reluctance or inability to pay
present-day restaurant prices
when the family budget is already
strained to the limit, are con
sidered the main factors in the
slump in the eating business.

Exuberant T-B Patients
Cautioned

NEW YORK—World-wide re-
joicing by tubercular patients at
the recent announcement of a
newly discovered miracle drug
expected to conquer the disease
‘m the not too far distant future,
‘was’ dampened by a chorus ot
cautioning voices from medical
circles,

The pemature announcement
of the drug came as patients told
friends anq relatives about truly
miraculous response to the treat-
ment with Nydrazid and leaked
into the press ‘before medical au-

thorities were willing to endorse ,

the disclosure. Their warning
voices were drowned in the ini-
tial clamour of joy. Pulmonaty
tuberculosis specialists in a con-
ference at the New York Acad-
emy of Medicine reiterated their
warnings against over optimism
and warned emphatically that the
healing effect of the drug evi-
denced in some 200 desperately
ill test cases does by no means
preclude the necessity of lung
surgery to repair damages al-
ready done. Moreover, they
warned, the ultimate effect of the
drug can be measured only after
treatment has been stopped al-
together and last not least tests
must be conducted for a long
time to come before the battle is
definitely decided.

E. R. Squibb & Sons, co-manu<
faeturers of the new anti-tuber-
-@ular drug, deeply worried about
the premature announcement at
this time, expressed regret in a
circular letter to 135,000 Ameri-
can physicians about the leak to
the “lay press before completion
of clinical studies.”

New Diesel Engine With Low
Fuel Consumption
COLUMBUS Ind.—A new hori-
zontal Diesel engine reported to
have_ improved mileage up tc
43% over comparable Diesel en-
gines, has been introduced by the
Cummins Engine Company, It i
especially designed for city
and intercity busses. Low fuel
consumption is attributed to ar
Pgenious fue) system featuring

a double dise pump.



New Plane Air
Conditioned

LONDON.
Air travellers who use the 100-
seat Bristol Brittania airliner

when it goes into service in 1954
will breathe air heated, cooled,
moistened or dried, as they pre-
fer. To make this possible, th«
plane is to have the latest piece
of atmosphere equipment for its
pressurized cabins,

It_is a humidifying unit, being
produced by the General Elec-
trie Company, makers of Can-
berra bombers, for the Bristol
Aeroplane Company which is
building the turboprop Brittania.
The unit comprises an electrical-
ly heated boiler controlled by : |
humidistat — a device which}

the measures air moisture. }

When humidity falls to 25 per|
gent, the humidistat automati-
cally switches on the electric
boiler and water is fed into the
cabin atmosphere as steam. As|
soon as humidity rises to more
than 60 per cent, the humidistat}
automatically turns the unit off!
again. *

Most present-day aircraft have
heating and cooling equipment.
The Brittania will be the first to
regulate humidity as well, j



PAGE THREE

Tense Struggle In
Mexican Elections

By ROBERT PRESCOTT
MEXICO CITY, April 23.
Presidential “heir” Adolfo
Ruiz Cortines facés the toughest
Leftwing opposition of a quarter

















The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

century in Mexico’s' tense elec-

don campaign, and’ politicians Cook to exclaim :

fear Conservative Governments’ |

control may be shaken, | “Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
Although Ruiz Cortines is a | {f ”

top-heavy favourite in the three- | } mek ice!

i

|

way race for the Presidency, |

growing political, unrest and new

voting lineups threaten his

party's grip on Congress for the
first time since 1917.

—(U.P.)

Black Market
Knacked Out |

CAPE TOWN, April.
Natal’s black market in sugat
which had assumed serious pro-
portions Owing to the late cutting
of the cane crop, has been dealt
a knockout blow by Minister of

is here again. .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.



These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas-or electricity, and are available in t\% eub.
ft, and 7 cub. ft. models.



—



. x ‘J Ww
Economic Affairs, Eric Louw. BOOK } OURS NO
For Louw promised that any
legitimate dealer who gave
information leading to the con- e
viction of a black marketeer

would be given the total stock of
sugar held by the black market«
eer. Now trade under the counter
has practically disappeared,
according to the inspectors.

THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.

Plantations Building





HARBOUR LOG |



x

%

In Carlisle Bay %

Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. Mary M \}
Lewis, Sch. Mandalay IT, Sch. Burma D,, | >

Sch. Cloudia 8, Seb Jores,
Sch, Cyclorama ©., Sch. W. L., Bunicia,
Sch. Franklyn D.R., Sch, Lady Noeleen,

Molly N

Sch, Unitea Pilgrim S., Sch. Florence
Emanuel, Sch, My Qwn, M.V. T ,
Radar, Sch. Enterprise S., Seh, Philip

H. Davidson, Sch. At Last

Air Traffic

ARRIVALS By BWIA. ON
TUESDAY

Vrom Trinidad;
P. Taylor, L. Qutram, A, Outram, W.



Vutram, D. Cardmaster, 8 insborrow,
Webb, M. Webb, E. Roach, C. Peterkin,
Hobson, C. Monroe, E, Monroe, Key

R. Ramijisson, K, Lewis, V. Morris,
Pr aires.
From St, Lucia:

Andre’ Du Boulay, Stella Worrel, Hammers
Philip Camall

DEPARTURES By BW.1.A. ON Saws

TUESDAY Saw Files

For St. Laola: r
Darnley Alexander, Viricent Sarnucty,

For Trintdad:
Laura Beattie, Joan Marshall, Gail
Denise

Marshall, Andrew Christine,
Thuez, Theresa O'Rielly, Rollins Skeete,
Dr. Inez Trimingham, Hon

shaw, Reynold Goetz, Ducte
Murray Newell, Rona Newell,
Sempson, Ronald Dabney Josephine
Dabney, John. Dabney, Carlos Arcaya,

RODNEY’ DUE FRIDAY
The R.M.S. Lady Rodney is
expected to arrive at Barbados
on Friday morning from_ British
Guiana via Trinidad, Grenada
and St. Vincent,

The Lady Rodney will be
loading rum for Bermuda and
general cargo for Canada, She
will be leaving port on Frida
night for Canada via the Bri
Northern Islands, She is con-
signed to Messrs. Gardiner Aus-
tin & Co., Ltd,

“Festina” Goes To Cuba

The two Texans James Furlong
and Joseph Pellich who arrived
at Barbados on January 17, after | ¥
a 26-day Atlantic crossing in| @
their 33-foot yacht Festina, left|¢
Aruba last month for Cuba.

They are on their way from
Copenhagen to Texas where they
intend to sell Festina and settle
down, From Cuba they will be
heading back to the United
States.

Domingo Navarra and Manuel
Peres who accompanied them all
through their voyage so far, will
leave the yacht at Cuba where
one of 43em has relatives.

The Festina was in Barbados
for about two weeks.

MODERN
FARM EQUIPMENT

For Bigger Crops

Including .. .

TRACK, HALF-TRKACK and
WHEEL TRACTORS
PLOUGHS
CANE CARTS
BAGASSE SPREADERS (ideal also for
applying Filter-press Mud, Ashes and

, Pen Manure) °
FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS
MANURE LOADERS
GRASS MOWERS (Trailer & P.T.O. Types)
GRASS RAKES
GRASS LOADERS
SIDE DELIVERY RAKES—for windrowing

Screwdrivers
Grinding Wheels
Compasses



Planes
Plane Irons
Vices



BARBADOS
“2 CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY
LTD.



“ Otte, es
PLCC OOS:, SOSSOSSSF

‘
SOCOM IOOS >



eo Sue



eee







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{



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





The Sort Of Thing Aneurin | 7y7£ UNEXPECTED |

BARBADOS tg ADVOCATE

1952



—

Thursday, April 24,

——_—— Ot

QUEENSTOWN

QUEEN Elizabeth If-was 26 years old on
Monday. This young-Queen who succeed-
ed her Royal father when she was in.
Kenya beginning a tour to the Dominions
of Ceylon, Australia and New Zealand
has not yet been crowned’



The coronation ceremony will probably
take place next year.

Whether Barbados retains its present
status as a Crown Colony or whether it
becomes self governing or merges with
the United Kingdom or Canada or with
other West Indian Crown Colonies to be-
come a West Indian Dominion is a matter
for conjecture. °

But whatever be its political destiny it
is safe to suppose that the link with the
Monarch ofthe United Kingdom will not
be broken, » s

This week Queen Elizabeth II in the first
year of her Gracious reign over the Brit-
ish Commonwealth of Nations cele-
brated her twenty-sixth birthday. Her
Majesty’s birthday should remind all of us
in Barbados ‘of the tasks arid burdens
which have fallen upon her shoulders.

How can we contribute towards lighten=
ing that burden? The answer is simple.
By being good citizens and loyal subjects.

But there is one public step which Bar-
badés might.take-to bring pléasure and
happiness to the young Queen before her
coronation takes place.

Many centuries ago Barbados honoured
a King of England by naming Jamestown
after him. Today what used to be James-
town is now called Hole Town. Might
Barbados not fittingly honour Queen
Elizabeth by changing the “Hole” to
“Queens” and calling a part of this island
which has especial connections from earli-
est settlement with the monarchs*of Eng-
land Queenstown 2.

A gesture so simple would cost us noth+

ing, but the pleasuré it would give to that
gracivuus young woman called so untimely
to reign over us and to shoulder the great
burdens under.which Her Royal Father
was heroically crushed down would be its
owm reward:” ;

; Let: Barbados. showwits loyalty.to the
British Crown and its» affection. for the
young sovereign by this friendly act.



BOB-A-JOB
IT was to be expected that a pioneer
effort like Bobajob would reveal certain
weaknesses of Scout organisation as well

as bring to the fore the quality and bene-
fits of scouting.

It would be quite easy to select
examples of scouts whose activities dur-
ing Bobajob week brought great credit on
their troops and on scouting. Several
heuseholders will no doubt have written
words of encouragement or praise to Scout
Headquarters. But if scouting depends on
praise or approval for encouragement it
will carve no lasting niche in the commun-
ity. Scouts no less than any other body or
individual require to know their mistakes
and to learn from them,

Two of those mistakes were noticed
last week in this newspaper: a lack of
initiative in certain areas with regard to
soliciting work: and a lack of telephonic
flexibility. One of these defects was
remedied by individual scouts who went
out and found jobs without being detailed.

On the job too scouts showed failings. _

They arrived to do outdoor work with no
proper working clothes, and) without any
rations. In one .pantievlar. instance a
householder gave in food to two scout
workers almost half the equivalent of a
total day’s-earnings of $5.00.

In another where the householder was
unable to feed them scouts were prema-
turely sent away because lack of food
mace their work of little value.

These points can be remedied by atten-
tion at Scout Headquarters. But there
is one failing which can only be remedied
by scouts themselves. When one scout
accuses another scout of being unfit to
wear scout’s uniform because he was idle
and lazy during a national Bobajob week
the quality and honour of Scouts them-
Selves are at stake. Troop masters ought
to impress on every scout before allowing
them to go out on jobs that not only his
honour is at stake but that the whole
Scout Movement will be judged by the
way he sets about his work. Many scouts
were a credit to their troops and to their
movement, Others were not and it would
be doing little service to scouts not to
point out that Bobajob week brings scouts
to the attention of the whole community
and that unwilling or lazy workers bring
discredit on the whole movement.








Bevan Says= |

Aneurin Bevan’s book “In Place of Fear” is now published. The Quotes, |

@ WHENEVER the Labour Party
has made a mistake it has not been
in comsequence of pursuing its
principles too roughly or’ too far
but by making too many conces-
sions to-conventional opinion.

@ THE TROUBLE with the
boards of the nationalised indus-
tries is that they are a constitu-
tional outrage . . . . The Minister,
by divesting himself of parlia-
mentary responsibility, disfran-
chises the electorate as well.

@ UP TO the Korean incident
American Far Eastern. ‘policy
floundered from one extreme to
another. At first she put all her
money on the Chinese National-
isto, When these failed, she turned
her back on the whole area... .

It is still a matter of conjecture
whether those who invaded South

-Korea did not think that the United
States had disinterested herse.t ime
the Far East and that, therefore;
it was safe for them to try their
hand.

@ THERE is no evidence to
show that the Soviet Union wants
a trial of strength. She can, of
course, fall into it. But it is easier
for a dictatorship to pull out of
such a situation tham it is for >
democracy. |A_ dictatorship’ has
no public opinion to satisfy.

What an ex-cabinet colleague says ahout hisa

Bevan. It Seems, Is At
Loggerheads With Himself

This book* by Aneurin Bevan
will confuse many critics who have
painted the author in lurid colours
and held him ub as a horrible ex-
ample of the taging, roaring re-
volutionary, bent on the immedi-

‘ate destruction of capitalism and
all its works.

Apart from some peevish com-
ments on minor aspects of policy,
the most orthodox and Right-wing
member of the Labour Party could
find little to cavil at.

Even Mr. Bevan's principal sup-
porters will fail to acclaim the
book as a reservoir of inspiration
or an exciting) version of their
political gospel. |

Mr, Bevan issues no command
to his followers to roll up their
sleeves and go jinto battle; there
is no preview of\a holy crusade.

Here he makés'no bid for the
leadership of the Labour Party.

Mr. Beyan's brief narrative of
his erly struggle for self-educa-
tion to “lift himself out of the rut”
is revealing,

Unfortunately, such an experi-
@nce can produce melancholy re-

. flections in later years and cause

the victim fo be at cross purposes
with everybody, i
Yet, the fact that some men are

*‘ able to rise above their environ-
“ment_and attain eminence in lit-

eratute, art, industry, and politics
seems to coptain the refutation of
Mr. Bevan's theory that poverty in
childhood is necessarily a barrier
to advancement.

ee So undecided

"Yt is a pity that the tragedy, in-
tense bittefness, and desolation
which were all too common in the
valleys of South Wales in his day,
together with details of his work
underground receive no more than
a passing reference.

If he had devoted more space.to
his’ actual experience it would
have» proved more illuminating
than his analysis of economic
issues.

These read very much like the
fruits of nocturnal discussions with
some obfuscated economist, whose
views on how to relate economic
facts to political strategy are about
as useful as the) opinions of the
pigs of Drdgheda'on, psycho'ogy.

Mr. Bevan claitns to have pro-
fited by his study of Marxism.

“In so far as 1 can be said to
have had a political training at
all, it has been in Marxism.”

However, he prefers the evolu-
tfénary processes and rejects the
method of revolution,

This will not endear him to the
Politburo, which, despite his de-
clared confidence in the theories
of Marx, Lenin, and Engels, is
likely to regard him as an obscur-
antist idealist.

He sees a new world evolving
which is vastly different from the
old: a familiar sentiment agree-
able in many quarters.

Yet Mr. Bevan is at logger-
heads with himself in deciding
the pattern of the new order of
society.

Our Readers Say

Birth Control — A
Scientific , Necessity
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,--The present’ controversy
on birth-control, or contraceptive
is not the first’ time that this
supposedly “anti-Christian Mon-
ster” has reared its head in the
Island of Barbados; the last oc-
casion a novel piece of propaganda
was used against it. It was when
the school children were first
given condensed ‘milk each day,
some parents refused to permit
their children to drink this milk,
as the Government was putting
“BIRTH-CONTROL” in it to keep
the population
if it -was just some ill-ad
action of an uneducated people
or a malicious act by some anti-
birth conttolists?
‘ In the United) States of Am-
erica, a ragir controversy has
been taking plate, Yor -yaars over
Mrs. Margaret |Sanget, Who “has
fought since>1912 for planned
parenthood and the general use of
contraceptives, She has* is
light) grow the
Parenthood Federation
of Ameri in which all the
local tirth-control leagues are
unified, and their affiliated com-
mittees sponser 200 elinics
throughout the USA. This
planned ‘parenthood is fought
against strongly by a certain reli-
gious -body in the States, but the
really: interesting part is that the
clinics of the Federation Mot only
give contraceptive advice, but
provide a ‘Fertility Service’. to
aid those» anfortinate married
couples who desiré,to have chil-

flickering
‘Planned




dren which they would) call their
own, but by some freak of nature
are prevented from) having them.

Many are the arguments used
against contraceptives by these

people; one of the main ones is

@ THE reaction of the United
States to the revelation (im Korea)
of her military unpreparedness for
a major war dealt a deadly blow
to Europe’s hopes for economic
recovery, and at the same time
sent a cold wind throughout the
backward regions of the world.

It revealed the weakness of the
motive behind President Truman’s
Fourth Point (To give economic
and technical help to backward
areas,

If this motive had been entirely
altruistic it might have stood the
strain. I have no doubt about the
intentions: but unfortunately it
had been represented to the Amer-
ican peop‘e as the bulwark against
Communism,

Korea raised the question, Have
we time for the Fourth Point to
operate? At once the military ex-
perts said No!

@THE ARMS programme,
agreed in the summer of 1950 was
not sufficient to meet the needs
regarded as militarily desirable.
Before the year was out a still
heavier programme was demand-
ed; and all to be accomplished in
Waree years, by which time, we
were told, we could “talk to Rus-
sia out of strength.”

Tt seems insane for Russia to
wait for that date if her real in-

By EMANUEL SHINWELL, M.P.

_ Mr. Bevan is one of our most
intriguing political advocates and
everybody would like to know
what he is driving at.

His philosophy may be conven-
iently summarised in the conclud-
ing sentence of the book where he
declares his abiding faith in demo-
cratic Socialism.

“What.” Mr. Bevan asks, “
democratic Socialism?”

“The philosophy of democrat-
ic Socialism is essentially cool
in. temper. It sees society in
its context withs nature and is
conscious of the limitations im-
posed by physical conditions.

“It sees the individual in his

context with society and is
therefore compassionate and
tolerant.

“Because it knows that all
political action must be a choice

between a number of possible
alternatives it eschews all abso-

lute proscriptions and _ final
decisions.”

And further, “It seeks the
truth in any given situation,

knowing all the time that if this

be pushed too far it falls into

error,

“It struggles against the evils
that flow from private property,
yet realises that all forms of
private property are not neces-
sarily evil.”

Such placid sentiments, even if
somewhat confusing, are hardly
calculated to excite the faithful.

Too much of this and Mr.
Bevan may evoke condemnation,
not for being tco revolutionary,
but for not bes.g revolutionary
enough,

So confusing

Aneurin Bevan cannot make up
his mind which leg to stand on
about Soviet Russia. He deplores
the concentration camps, the sup-
pression of personal liberty, and
the soul-destroying régime pre-
vailing in that country, yet be-
lieves that one day the workers of
Russia will exert sufficient pres-
sure to enable political democracy
to emerge.

As yet, there is precious little
evidence of a change of heart; nor
can he prove, on the records of
the years since the war, that
Soviet Russia, while anxious to
avoid global war, is desperately
working for peace.

Mr. Bevan is not opposed to
rearmament. He sternly rebukes
the pacifists, which is poor con-
solation after the support they re-
cently accorded him.

“Against the background of
mounting tension created by
such policies,” he writes, “it is
idle to talk about general dis-
armament, People are not, and
never have been, prepared to
throw away their guns while
they feel unsafe. -

“The guns are there because
the sense of insecurity is there,
not the insecurity because the
guns are there,

——



that you may deprive the world
of some genius! It 1s strange that
they never stop to think that for
every one genius born there are
millions of mediocre individuals,
and that thousands, nay hundreds
of thousands of these turn out to
be vagabonds and criminals, How
much better off the world would
be without its Capones, Dillingers,
and Willie ‘The Actor’ Suttons,
Anyhow we will leave these
Churchites out of this, for argu-
ments on the Bible have been
going on for centuries, so it is
useless to continue along these
lines. It may be that George Ber-

own! One wonders fade Shaw summed up the atti-

de of the Church when he wrote
'—You should not be oppressed
by the frightful sum of human
misery, for there is no sum, Pov-
erty and pain are not comulative.
If you stand the suffering of one

person, the suffering of. millions
is no worse."

It is, therefore, to history and
science that modern man has to
resort, to avoid the errors of past
generations being repeated and to
try and save mankind from the
horrible future for which it is
heading. During the early stages
of this world, there was a gradual
increase in the population of the
world, this was due to the slow
rate of food production by manual
labour, plagues, diseases, and
wars, This state of affairs contin-
ued until the ‘steam age’ arrived,
so when the increase of food pro-
duction was actually trebled due
to the improved methods of till-
age, etc., the population of the
world increased by leaps and
bounds. Take the population
of England and Wales as ‘an
example. In 1700 this was
5,134,516; by 1800 it had
reached 9,187,176—nearly double
in one hundred years! Along came



tention is a military show-down.
She is obviously less belligerent
than some American publicists.
NO ONE is less fitted than a
military expert’to weigh the eco-|
nomic consequetices of his inor-|
dinate demands. }
Yet the nature of the modern!
military machine makes it more |
tuan ever necessary that the in-
dustrial repercussions should be
carefully before heavy
military ex ure is embarked
upon, This not done either in
Britain or in the United States.

@ THE outStanding need of
China, as of similar communities, |
is for the industrial products of the
urban communities of the West.
These Russia is not able to supply
in anything approaching the quan- |
tities required,

Indeed, just to the extent that
Russia has perverted her own
economy to war purpcses, she is
unable to assist in supplying the
civilian requirements of her tem-
porary allies.

It is a grim commentary on the
direction taken by the Russian re-
volution that the North Koreans
found it easier to obtain tanks thar
tractcr ploughs from their Soviet
“friends.” But is not the West
making just that «ame mistake?

“The existence of huge arma-
ments directly contributes to
the universal fear, but it is sec-

ALWAYS HAPPENS

By DON TAYLOR
HE country of “The Odd Things That
Happen” has become the world’s front-
page country.

That country is the Anglo-Egyptian
Sudan, It is a key to the Middle East situa-
tion. For there will be no settlement of the
Suez problem, no agreement with Egypt—
until the Sudan question is settled.

THE PRIZE FAROUK COVETS

FAROUK calls himself the “King of the
Sudan.” But the real “uncrowned king” of
the Sudan is, Governor-General Sir Robert

George Howe, the brilliant workingman’s|%

son who won his way from elementary school
to Cambridge and on to the Foreign Office.
He was bréught up in a terrace house—
now his address is “The Palace, Khartoum.”
EXTRAORDINARY people always
seem to be turning up in the Sudan.

Four officers of the Ethiopian Air Force
arrived there recently. It is odd, but they
were all Scandinavians.

And, of all things, they had come to look
into the business possibilities of crocodile
shooting.

MAN CHASES A_ LION

EVEN the animals of the Sudan are news.

In front of me, as I write, is the story of
a hippo which whiled away a spare hour by
chasing the inhabitants of a village round
the streets.

A leopard (was he in league with the local
headman?) kept a team of Government
audit officials besieged in a house for the



ondary, not primary. This ap-

plies to atom weapons as to

more primitive types.”

This is a refreshing example of
realism,

Although not against spending
money on defence he omits to
state in precise terms what pro-
portion of the national income
should be devoted to this purpose.

This is an unfortunate omission,
because he doubts whether the
threat to world peace has dimin-
ished or @hat, Soviet Russia is
willing to make an attempt to
ease the tension,

So muddled

To place the blame on the U.S.
as he appears to do, for what is
called panic rearmament is no
answer. ‘ Ho}

That country may be right or
wrong in bringing pressure on
the Western nations to rearm,

But the build-up of armaments
under the aegis of the Atlantic
community would never have
taken place if Soviet Russia had
not surrounded herself with a
number of satellite countries,
spent a_ substantial proportion oi
her resources on armaments, and
caused the blockade which led to
the Berlin air-lift.

The Korean aggression gave an
impetus to” rearmament, as even
Mr. Bevan would agree.

It confers no, benefits on the
British public to stir up hostility
against the U.S.

Whatever faults may have been
encountered in American foreign
policy, we are bound to rely,
whether in the search for world
peace or a deterrent against war
(or even as Mr. Bevan would
himself desire, to assist in eco-
nomic rehabilitation) on the moral
and physical backing of the
American people.

This view is reinforced by Mr.
Bevan’s own plea that it is wiser
to spend on the development of
backward countries than on arma-
ments.

This, as he knows, is accepted
United Nations policy, which may
well have been carried through
with enthusiasm and with the
necesary financial support if the
world had not been living under
the threat of aggression.

So entangled

I say this book is an attempt at
a thoughtful, analytical, and so-
ciological study’ in which Bevan
the orator and fgrceful agitator is
subcydinated to Bevan the phil-
osopher.

Yet somehow it fails to catch on
because he is neither decisive nor
conclusive.

In short, we have here the
thoughts of a man who is trying
to disentangle a series of com-
plex problems and, in the process,
gets into a tangle himself.

* Heinemann, 6s,

—L.E.S.







the steam age with a bountiful
supply and the strides made in
medical science thus controlling
diseases and removing the most
effective check on the increase of
the population of the world. The
result, the population of England
to-day is quoted (not includin

best part of a day.

And a native reports that he chased a man-
eating lion down the road until it was out of
sight. . .

The official comment on this says: “His
story is being treated with some referva-
tion.” .

TOO HOT, OR TOO COLD

THE climate, too, can always be relied on
to keep up the country’s reputation.

Recently a car broke down in the desert,
and the passengers nearly perished from
heat and thirst.

Yet, shortly after, on the Wadi Barei,
camels became immobilised in a kneeling
position—stiff with the night cold. They had
to be aided to their feet.

And on Jebel Marra, at Jawa, an old wo-
man was found frozen stiff beside an ice-
bound waterhole !

She was only thawed out by fires being lit
round her.

THE SUDAN is the land where school-.
boy strikes have become a national past-
time.

Strike leaders are expelled, schools
are closed—but the strikes go on.

The workers have nothing .to learn
from the West. Labourers recently turn-
ed up with a huge snake they found in
a drain. On'the strength of this “occupa-
tional hazard” they demanded a rise in
pay. "

YET, in the midst of this ferment of West-
ernisation, large tracts of the sprawling
Sudan are like the Empire of Kipling’s day

Border incidents — with tribesmen from
the Congo, Ethiopia, or Uganda—occur regu-
larly,

Spears are blooded, captives are dragged
off, ancient insults are avenged, cattle are
driven away.

The country has just had its record year
of prosperity. ;

THE GREAT Gezira cotton scheme
has been an example of what can be
done by co-operation between Govern-
ment, peasant, and private entelrprise,

Britain’s record here is good.

Right now, the Legislative Assembly of

Sudan are debating the self-government con- x

stitution we have laid before them.

It was annoying to Farouk—for Egypt’s|}

idea was to make the Sudan her virtual col-

ony. |
But, instead, the Sudan will decide her

own future--whether she links up at all with
Egypt, goes her own way, or links with Bri-
tain and the Empire. ;
WHEN I was in the Sudan recently I ask-
ed an old soldier what he thought of Egypt’s

Monmouthshire as 37,354,917, and| ambition to take over the country.

Wales (excludi Monmouth

2,158,193; “this ‘aes a total of
39,513,110—an increase of thirty
million three hundred and twenty-
five thousand nine hundred and
thirty-four; roughly four times as
much as it was one hundred and
fifty years ago, The whole popu-~
lation of the world has increased
at this alarming rate, for from 1840
to 1940 it climbed from 1,000,000,-
000 to 2,200,000,000,

The size of the world has not
increased nor has the production
= aun increased at the rate
of the population. This means t
MILLIONS FACE A DEATH OY
STARVATION! It will not be long
before the ute in the new
world will reach afuration point.
America is near the maximum of
180,000.000 people which she can
provide for, when this happens
there will be no food stuffs left
over for export; the same will
happen to Canada, ‘the Argentine,
Brazil and Australia, What will
happen to little’ Barbados when
there will be ho emigration and
her population, reaches 250,000?
She cannot support her present
population now, will she be able
to support ano’ 50,000 people
then? Is it Christian to bring little
children into this world to see
them die a slow and lingering
death of starvation? No, educa-
tion in contraceptives is the only
solution for the WHOLE WORLD
AND NOT BARBADOS ALONE.

Yours etc.,
‘ JOHN BECKLES.

“Take over us?” he said. ‘When you Brit-
ish go we'll incorporate Egypt in the Sudan,”



Panamerican Highway
Gets Hoost

HARRY W. FRANTZ
WASHINGTON, April 23.

Eduardo Dibos Mayor of Lima Peru has
given a timely boost to the Panamerican
highway through his authorship of “The
Great Hemispheric Road.”

This survey, a publication of the Inter-
national Road Federation, gives latest
authoritative information concerning the
history, economic utility «and construction
progress on the 15,449 mile network of trunk
highways.

They eventually will link all of the capital
cities on the American continent and con-
nect by ocean ferries with the principal
Caribbean republics. Dibos’ survey, in
pamphlet form, was timed for distribution
during the world meeting of the Interna-
tional Road Federation which starts in

By

Washington, May 13.

Authorities predict it will stir the imagin-

ation of delegates from Highway associations

of 25 countries, who are to attend. —U.P.

t

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952





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THURSDAY. APRIL 24, 1952





Labourer Guilty Of Sho

Gets 18-Month Term

His Lordship the Acting Puisne Judge, Mr. G. L. Taylor
at the Cog:t of Grand Sessions yesterday sentenced Theo-



SUGAR

philus Clarke a labourer of Belle Gully, St. Michael, to 18
months’ imprisonment with hard labour after an Assize
jury found him guilty of breaking into the shop of Hislop
Blenman of Tweeuside Road, St. Michael, -with intent to
steal on June 15, 1951.
‘Clarke appeared before the court
= a two count ee OP the
rst count—on whic e was Mar R
found guilty—he was. charged y eece
wie beseseed pan De shop of
islop Blenman on June 15, 1951, I od 7 d
and on the second count charged ntr uce
him by being found in a build-
ing with intent to commit a felony. T Th B
Emerson Howard—keeper of the oO e ar
criminal records—said thet the .
accused was sentenced to six Miss Mary Audrey Reece, LL.B.,
months’ imprisonment with hard was introduced to the local bar
labour in 1948 for bivaking into-a yesterday morning before the
store, business of the Court of Grand
Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to the Sessions was started. The Judges
Attorney General prosecuted for of the Assistant Court of Appeal
the Crown. This was the retrial and Petty Debt Court, Police Mag-
of Clarke as on ‘the first trial a jistrates, and many barristers-at-
jury failed to agree whether he Jaw witnessed the introduction.
was guilty or not of the two Miss Reece was introduced to the
Ue was not represent- Court by the Hon'ble Mr, C. Wylie,
° ° Attorney General. In introducing
Gav’ K ys To Husband Miss Reece, the Attorney General
Violet Blenman, wife of Hislop said it was a pleasant duty. for
him to move to His Lordship for
Blenman told the court that her eee
husband has a business at. Tweed- Permission to Miss M. A. Reéce to
side Road, St. Michael, On June practice in His Lordship’s Courts
15 she closed the shop and went and other courts of Barbados.
home. She left no one in the shop. , Miss Reece is the daughter o
On reaching home she handed the the Solicitor General and the
keys of the shop to her husband so grand daughter of the late Mr.
that he could get into the shop, H. W. Reece, K.C., who was also
Soon after he left she heard that Solicitor General in Barbados.
a man was found in the shop Miss Reece was born on Septem-
which is about 100 yardsfrom the ber 22, 1928, in Barbados and is
house. , .the first Barbadian woman to he
She went to the shop and saw called to the bar of England and
the accused held by her husband be seeking permission to practise
and another man. A door of the in Barbados.
shop was tampered with but there
was nothing missing in the shop.
Drinks and cakes were in the shop.
The accused was taken to the
Police Station.
Hislop Blenman, husband of
Violet Blenman said that on June
15 about midnight he was home
when his wife gave him the keys
of the shop at Tweedside.
He went to the shop with a torch
and while inspecting the shop he
saw the accused stooping under the
counter of the shop as if he was
searching for something.
He called out for help and sev-
eral people came. He saw that the
back door was open. The accused
tried to escape but he prevented
him from doing so. The accused
was wearing a vest shirt at the
time. He took the accused to the
Belmont Police Station.



NOT GUILTY OF
FOROIBLE ENTRY

An Assize jury at the Court of
Ground Sessions yesteraay founa
belicid Jessamy not guilry of Uiv
forcible entry of a house occupieu
by William Nightengale after be-
ing aavisea tO revurn sucn a ver-
dict by His Lordship the Acting
Puisne Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor.
The offence was alleged to have
been committed on October 25.

Mr. G. H. Adams appeared on
behalf of Jessamy while Miss
M. E. Bourne prosecuted for the
Crown, The prosecution called o1
four witnesses: then Mr. Ad ms
submitted that it was necessary
in a case like that to prove mens
rea and from the evidence given
by the witnesses there was no
evidence of mens rea therefore
the jury could not convict on the
evidence.

Miss Bourne submitted that
there was sufficient evidence in
the case to take to the jury and
that mens rei was shown by the
act of the accused who had legal
advise and went to the Police
Station.

His Lordship then told the jury
that in a case of that kind it was
necessary for the criminal inten-
tion to be proved and therefore
-s the defendant had not a guilty
mind he would advise them to re-
turn a verdict of not guilty.

Witnesses said that the defend-
ant went inte the Niehtengale
Home with other men and dam-
aged the things in the house.



“LADY RODNEY”
EXPECTED TOMORROW

The C.NS. Lady Rodney
arrives in Carlisle Bay on Friday
morning, April 25 and will sail
‘the same night for Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via
the British Northern Islands,



MEAL AND GAS

A Shipment of 1,160. bags of
coconut meal, 50 drums of domes-
tic gasoléne, 29 cylinders of gas
and 200 cases of gelatine were
among the cargo arriving here on
Tuesday by the schooner At Last.
The At Last called from British
Guiana. She is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Acsociation.







TEA NAPKINS in Li

COCKTAIL NAPKINS
CROCHET CENTRE CLOTHS
CROCHET LUNCHEON SETS ..$21.00 & $17.50 a set



a



Really ine Things
For the Home!

Miss Reece was educated at year 1952; it is proposed that the
Queen’s -College and Oxford whole question of the price of
High School, England, and in sugar for local consumption shall
.1950 she graduated from the be reconsidered before next year.
University of London with a The method of keepigg down tne
degree of Bachelor of Laws. She price which it is proposed to use
entered the Middle Temple in this year is thought to be the best
1947 and was called to the bar one which can be adopted at this
on November 27, 1951, and it is stage.
interesting to know that her 4
father and grand father Were As stated in the Objects and
also called to the bar at Grays Reasons, the Bill seeks to provide
Inn. The Hon’ble C W. Reece is that so much of the levy for re-
also Puisne Judge in Hong Kong habilitation, price stabilisation and
and it would seem from the day labour welfare as is #mposed on
of her birth that Miss Reece sugar manufactured in 1952 which
breathed in an atmosphere of the is sold for consumption in the
law. ? Island shall be paid to the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee,
(and the Governor-in-Executive

His Lordship the Chief Justice Committee may use these moneys
Sir Allan Collymore said: “Miss us he thinks expedient for the
Reece, it is with pleasure that my purpose of stabilising the price of
brother judge and I o& this bench sugar sold for consumption in the
welcome you to the bar of this Island or of any grades or class of
island. I am sure that your many such sugar. It is expected that this
friends and well-wishers join in year the levy will amount to $13.20
this welcome, As most of us know per ton of sugar plus an additional
and as the learned Attorney Gen- $1.80 per ton or $15 per ton, The
eral has stated, your grand father loc:l] consumption is approxim-
was a jurist of renown in the ately 9,300 tons, and the amount
Caribbean area and a brilliant ad- of the levy which will be used for
vocate in the courts of Barbados. stabilising the price of sugar sold

“Your father is the preseht locally would therefore be ap-
Solicitor General for whem it is proximately $140,000. In other
doubtless a proud moment. It is Caribbean Colonies the levy is not
well known to all of us that the imposed on sugar for local con-
position which he now occupies was sumption, and the course which it
once occupied by your grand father js now proposed to adopt is not
Mr. H. Walter Reece, K.C., thus 1¢ therefore unusual. It is obvious]?
may be said by lineal descent that preferable to taxing the whole
law in you is engrained; and in community to subsidise the sugar
addition your uncle is a judge of which is consumed.

Hong Kong.
“T have listened with interest to Careful Study
The suggestion has ‘been made

Welcome

ty

&

your scholastic attainments, at
school, at London eee. and é
at the Middle Temple and I wish ‘ Danes
you well wherever, your future may and the manufacturer of sugar
lie, I understand your visit to this should receive less for sugar
island of your birth may be of sold for local consumption than
short duration, but wherever your the people who sell sugar for ex-
future career may lie and your Prt. It has also been suggested
talents lead you, I wish you suc- ‘that a cess for the purpose should
cess and you. are permitted to be imposed on the whole industry.
practise in the several courts of Honourable Members will appre-
the island.” ciate that questions like these re-
Replying Miss Reece thanked quire very careful consideration
His Lordship for the kind words indeed. +4 :
he had spoken in welcoming her , Last year an attempt was made
and the learned Attorney General t° have the principal kind of sugar
for introducing her to the bar of Which is exported—dark crystals—
Barbados. She appreciated the introduced in the shops, but this
reference His Lordship and the inferior grade does not seem’ to
learned Attorney General had have been generally acceptable to
made to her father and grand the public. Executive Committee
father and she would try to live Proposes therefore to subsidise the
up to the standard they had set. next grade—brown crystals—and
She was proud to be the first to fix the maximum price of that
avoman born in Barbados to be g8rade of sugar at the same price
called to the English bar and in- 45 last year, namely, 8c. per pound,
troduced to the bar of Barbados, Otherwise it would have risen to
At all times she would endeavour 9% Or 10c. per pound. The quan-
to maintain the high tradition and tity of yellow crystals at present
honour of the bar of the island. consumed is greater than that of
brown crystals, but as it will not

be possible with the funds avail-
able also to subsidise this grade of
sugar or specials, it is expected



Gramophone For

that there will be a swing in con- the dice * Me sugar?” Thee

- 4 sumption from yellows to browns. conditions had never existed in
Youth Movement In® calculating the amount which a rh — eaten always
: will be necessary for the subsidi- Charged for the local sugar a price

The Barbados Youth Movement tion of the brown crystals this Which was based on the export of
will soon be receiving a_gramo~- Dark Crystals, however low that

phone and records from England. expectation has been provided for.

.The gramophone will assist the or-
ganisation in its musical apprecia-
tion,

Rev. L, Bruce-Clarke, founder
and President of the movement,
received a letter from Mr.
Young of Essex stating that th
gramophone, a greetings record
from Mr. Young’s Club and other
records were recently shipped to
the Barbados Movement.

The Bill before the Council,
however, leaves the manner in
which sugar will be subsidised in
the discretion of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee. It will

price of sugar sold for consump-
tion locally as may be necessary,





cs eves. $9.00 per set
$2.00 per set
$1.20, $2.00, $3.20





HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD

10,

If, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

ee





During

Oo

BARBADOS





PRESENTATION



BENJAMIN YARDE who has just passed out as a journeyman ship carpenter receives a bursary cer-
tificate from the Colonial Engineer, Mr. T. E. Went. He was one of 20 (the others standing in the pic-
ture) who have finished a successful five years’ training at different trades, and who were all given cer-
tificates. Special mention was made of Yarde’s app.ication and ability.

WILL STAY —son mc:

and possible with the funds avail-
able,

During the course of his address,
the Colonial Secretary paid a tri-
bute to the Clerk of the Council
who managed ai short notice to
get the Copy of the Bill printed.

Seconding the motion for the
Second Reading of the Bill. Hon,
H. A. Cuke said he thought it was
due to the public to’ have some
general knowledge of the situation
in connection with the sale of local

sugar.
He explained that the sugar
which is manufactured in this

island for export is “Raw” sugar,
known here as Dark Crystals and
also known in the sugar world as
grades. That sugar’ was ex-
burced to Canada and the United
Kingdom and was refined and sold
as refined sugar, and was not
the same as in this country in the
raw state. There were no sugar
refineries in this island, and there-
fore no refine sugar was* made,
They however made Grades of
sugar for local consumption and
that was called Brown Crystals
which was known in other West
Indian Islands as “Wash” Grades.
Then there was Yellow Crystals
which was known in other places
as “Plantation White”

Dump Prices

Before the war sugar for export
was sold at very low prices; in
fact, sold at dump prices . What
they called Cuban price, and con-
ditions here were very bad and
the workers in the industry re-
ceived very low wages and the re-

turns to the employers were neg-

ligible, in some cases, none at all
that period, several of
the islands in the West Indies as-

hat the people who grow the canes sisted the industry by legislation

fixing a much higher price for
local sugar, thereby giving the in-
dustry some extra funds to com-
bat the low export price they re-

ceived. Actually, in Australia
which consumed about % of her
production, the local price was

very high, and enabled them to
meet the dump price of abroad

~And so it was done in many of the

islands in the West Indies, notably
Trinidad, and Jamaica which has
a large consumption of sugar. But
the local price was very high and
allowed the industry to get some-
thing out of the consumption of
local sugar.

In this island that was never
done. However low the price of
sugar fell in the foreign market,
the local price was based on that
price and therefore “we have had
justification during the past to
continue to assess local price on
the export price.”

In some of the other islands,
Governments had asked the in-
dustry in consideration of the help
they gave in the days when the
sugar was dumped at low prices,
“will you now help with the ris-

ing cost of living by keeping down




price went.”
More Canes

The next point was that these
con-
sumption and naturally were not
made by all the factories in this
a therefore be possible for that body island; and so if you went to a

to watch the situation and to take factory and asked the management
such measures to keep down the to make “Wash Grades” or Yel-
low Specials, they would tell you

sugars were sold for local



ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE

ne





pbreaking |

Be 20 Get Bursary
Certificates

@ from page 1

they owed a duty to the commu-
ba wich had allowed them
money for training over and above
what the ordinary boy got.

It was really their birthday, he
said. He realised the five years of |
hard grind they had put in and
he was very pleased that a very
high percentage of thém had been
successful and the failures were
in the minority.

“But what I want to impress
upon you,” he said, “is that you
are only now on the edge of your
work and must still learn and
expend some energy along your
respective lines,

“There is the Evening Institute
which has technical classes and
if you are really ambitious, you
should join the Institute. Give
a little of your spare time one
evening a week and you will find
that it would be advantageous.”

They had acquired a_ certain
amount of teehnical skill, he told
them, but they should enhance
that advantage by becoming good
workmen and knowing how ‘to
deal with their fellow workmen
and thelr employers, In other
words, they had‘to be honest to
themselves.

He sincerely hoped in the years
which followed they would be able
to truly say that they were please,
they had had the five years
training.

Honest Day's Work

The Director of Education re-
called to them that it was St.




































for family
fitness

Marmite isa dietary source
of Vitamin B. A little added to
—_— .. ou gy Gravies
an woury dis! ives
flavour and eaurebeiee thie
dren love Marmite—especially
in Sandwiches of every variety
and on hot buttered toast.

In jars: | oz.,2 oz.,

4 oz., 8 oz., 16 oz.”

. MARMITE |

THE VITAMIN B YEAST EXTRACT
GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR

Rae oO

at







cents per 100 lb, more fér Wash
Grades, and 40 cents more for Yel-
low and 60 cents for Specials, they
would be losing. It was obvious
that it would take more canes to
make a ton of Wash Grade than
it would to make a ton of Dark
Crystals and as all the factories
did not make theSe sugars you
could not expect everybody to
make the special sugars, and sell
them at the same price as they
exported the grades.

Therefore, the basic price of
local sugar was the export price
of the grades, plus quotation of the
different grades which increase
was to be added to the cost, That
had continued all along the years,

This year the price of sugar was
increased very considerably, some-
thing like $27.00 per ton, and in
the normal course of events the
same procedure would be followed.
The export price of sugar $7.00
per 100 tons for Grades, $7.20
Wash Grades, $7.40 Crystals and
$7.60 for Special.

One point seemed to have slip-
ped the memory and attention of
the people and it was that with
the price of sugar going up by
such a sum of money this year
there was being disbursed some
$2,000,000 extra wages, so that it
dtd not mean that the price of
sugar going up would only mean

increasing the cost of living, but a ©

large proportion of the people who
consume sugar were getting
$2,000,000 more in wages

Levies

That did not mean that some-
thing should not be done to hold
the price of sugar down. As re-
gards all the special funds, the
objects and reasons of the Bill
were a little reversed. It talked
about a levy being put on local

sugar, but that was not quite so
From the price of Sugar as fixed

for export, those ce were
levied. In other words, taken out
of the export price and so much
paid to the Price Stabilization
Fund, the Price Rehdbilitation
Fund and the Labour Welfare
Fund,

It was not the case that those
cesses were laid on the local price
of sugar. It was one of the export
price of sugar that those sums
were taken,

So it was at the moment
that Government was trying to
see what could be done to help
the situation, and the local Sugar



last

Producers Association who were
interested in the matter were
asked if they would raise any
objection to the amount to be

put to the three funds being put
to an equalisation account so as
to keey down the local price of
sugar and they agreed to it.

No mention was made of that,
and he thought it was right that
it should be known that the Sugar
Producers Association agreed to
it in order to help the situation,

Now the difficulty here was that
that amount of money, as the
Colonial Secretary has told them

-$139,500, nearly $140,000 would
be required if they wanted to hold
the price of sugar down, Last
year the wash grades or “Browns”
old at 8 cents per lb. and if they
did not hold the price down this
year, they would be sold at 94
cents per Ib,

Subsidy
followed the years

procedure in

‘ t rice w* > 91 cents per
that ur senived 9 me price would be 9) I
iless they received 20 ~, i ea pana’é
a

——



30 x 18 $6.01



FALKS STOVES

2 BURNER TABLE MODEL

Strongly Made—Highly



HEST
NOTE

ENGLI
OUR



ONLY $24.70 EACH



PRICE



36x 18 $7.17

Efficient
COMPLETE



MH MAKE — ALL




That was, if they took the same
» ish

* schooner Timothy

2 2EELLLLLLLLELDLELELLLLED LLCO NY
WHITE ENAMELLED TABLE

Substantial Quality at Bargain Prices

ENAMELLED SINKS

SINGLE DRAINER 42” x 21”—$50.34
DOUBLE DRAINER

TING AND BRACKETS

GALVANISED NAILS
SIZES
38 CENTS
























George’s Day and of the message
Lord Rowallan had given, They
had to give happiness to others
and not be satisfied until they
had done an honest day's work
Mr. Carter who next spoke t
the passing out apprentices tolc
them that though they were some-
what skilled workmen, they hac
always to bear in mind that skil
was not everything and they hac
to learn to discipline themselves

The other member of the Board
Mr, H. Husbands said that care
was very essential in their work
and recalled that when the St.
Michael&S almishouse was being
built a small barrel of nails were
picked up by the end of the job
Indeed, he said, he knew a man
who had built a house with nails
thus picked-up. He therefore
cautioned them to be always care-
ful with ‘their employers’ ma-
terials,
The journeymen~ who were
presented certificates are: Ben-
jamin Yarde — ship carpenter
Clarence Thomas, Wilson Alleyn«

ca penters, Hugh Wilkinson,
Stanley Gittens, Ivan Goslin and
rhorald Kellman—cabinet makers













oatmeal in Ful-O-Pep
Feeds and Mashes for

Frank Corbin—Mason; Emerson Niner starting, growing and egg
Nichols—Motor mechanic, | Cate production contributes
ton Cox, Coswyn Gr’ , Samue Fer information
Depeiza, Gradfield Smith, Ralph end orders, contact os more profitable
taurt and Victor on — Elec- R. M. JONES & CO., Led, resul
ivicigns, William Johnson —
Printer, Irvine Hinds, — P. ©, Box 241 Made by
Clarke—Engineer, George chols
tailor and Neville Greene book Sridgetewn The Quaker Cate Company

yinder, |



Ack fer Ful-O-Pep Poultry Feeding Guide—it's freel

—_————————————_———!

A Biscuit is as good as

Governor A'ssents
‘tio Ten Acts

The Governor has assented to
ine folowing Acts in the neme
ind on behalf of Her Majesty the
Queen —
‘ne Public Officers’ Housing
Loans Act, 1952 (1952-1),
The Customs Tariff (Amend-
ment) Act, 1952 (1952-2).
Vhe Bills of Exchange (Amend-
ment) Act, 1952 (1952-3).

The Pioneer Industries (En
couragement) (Amendment
Act, 1952 (1952-4).

The Revenue Equalisatio:
Fund Act, 1952 (1952-5).
The Expiring Laws Continu
ance Act, 1952 (1952-6).
The Expiring Laws Act, 195-

it’s Pastry—

CRA WFORD’S
BISCUITS



1952-1). are justly famous for
The Public mngioress a. ; ed

1982 (1982-8). their exquisite pastry.
The Police (Amendment) Act

1952 (1952-9).

The Appropriation Act, 195°

52.-10).
Mpeg TO GET THE BEST ASK FOR

‘““Confident”’ In
Inner Basin

The Schooner Confident I. G.
which was recently launched a
Browne’s Beach, was yesterday
taken to the inner basin of the
Careenage where her two masts
will be lifted in place.

Mr. Lord, Jonfident I, G.’s
owner, said that he was hoping to
get the machinery for lifting the
masts in place by next week. He
brought up the masts from Brit-
Guiana last month by the
A. H. Van-

CRA WFORD'S
BISCUITS

ITS THE PASTRY THAT
COUNTS.

sluytman.









TOPS IT’S NO HOLIDAY

WITHOUT A CAMERA

WE NOW OFFER

33x 21’ $7.74





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Kodak Brownie Folding
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Uni-Fex Cameras
Baby Brownie Camera
Also Bertram Exposure
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64” x 21”—$67.82
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” ”







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Hardware Store
Broad Street
Tel. 2364















.

CLASS

DIED

‘Oi “April 23, 1952, at her
Brittons X Rd.,

IFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 25086
FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

BECKLES
residence “Ellaville”,
St. Michael Mrs. Miriam Beckles
Funeral leaves her Inte residence at


























4 p.m,“ ti@iy for = >
Church, and thence to the estbury
Cemetery : Friends are asked to AUTOMOBILE — 189, Green tris
attend Minor, 24,000 miles in exc@lent condition
Eloise Brathwaite (Sister), Gwen $),200.00 or nearest Apply Jason Jones
Walton (Daughter!, Vivien, 208 Jones 22.4.52—-3n
| nds),
seeiriegtok” ine, TO 4.52 BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chassis,
a new. Por immediate delivery, Courtesy
FIELD—On 23rd April, 1952, RUFUS Garage 4616 2.4 52—6n
eel, Ba’ Toad, at 430] CAR—Morris Minor 16600 miles.
p.m. today for Bt, leona, — Ring 2503. 22.4.52—3n
a 24.4.52. CAR-—Morris Oxéord. Perfect condi-
= tion; mileage fe Telephane 28
HUSD. ; the 23rd April, 1952, a4. .2.n
UGHAN HUSBANDS, J.P. :
late of St. y, the ij CAR—One Wi Six-Eighty,
leaves residence, Horse Hill} age 10,000; i condi
Hous St at 3.30 o'clock this} Redman & Garage

Joseph.
evenin: " for “St. lucy Parish Church.



b
ses on
New

” CAR 1948 A. 4 new .

paint job. Recent rebore.

8556. 18.4.52—Tn.
—$—_—$——$_

(Wreat? & be sent to the Funeral oe
Parlour Hinds & Co, Tw ide
Road). “Friends are invited



‘Ada (widow); Noel, Aubrey, Clifford,
Elsie, iChildren). 4.4.52 -
: One PREFECT FORD 1949 Model.
ORIAM Partly new. Price hs. Apply
TODERINGHAME-In_ loving memory, of Suausie's Garage, SOE Bae
Foderinghaey Sno Saperted thie Hie) HALLMAN MINX—One 8G Black

“Because for our dear Saviour's sake
Our sins are al) forgiven .
And istians only fall to sleep

= Cee, eae
Bynoe -» or No.
24.4.52—5n.







Stacy, Lorna (@aughters), Noel, Grant a ck
(sons), Sydney (grandson). 24.4.82—In.] TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin ck.
Eee Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co. Lid, White
RARRIS—iIn° loving memory of our] Park Road.
ed son and brother, Walter 244.524 f n.
. who 4d this life on the
Mth Apri 1049. VAUXHALL WYVERN— excellent
Yappy and smiling, always content condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY
Loved and respected wherever he GARAGE. Dial 4616.
went,
To a beautiful fe came a peaceful
end,
He died as he lived, everybody's ELECTRICAL
friend ia o4
The Harris's. Ramily, Nr. St. Martins RADIO—Large Pye Radio Qwoert
er 24.4.54—10. Fieayving colony. Chéap Pons $o58 .
TROTMAN .— Im loving memory 2%} 22
Veteen frre n who departed on] REFRIGERATOR—‘Prigidaire” 4% cu.
24th Apr! pe. ft. in perfect condition, $250.00 Wilkes,
Not gone memory: Dist. “Cc” St. Philip 22.4.$2—3n.

Not gone from love;







But to her heavenly home above WASHING MACHINES. Hoover, elec-
Some may forget as she is gone trical, home washing machines. Only
ot remember no matter} s)35. The answer to laundry problems.
ow tons~ hay terms inged.
Vetlyn Roemer (mother), Erskiné (son). 1k it Hunts @ Go, DO, Le Broed Bt
Neville (bi *y Rosalie (grandmother), | jai $136. wh a 3n
Rosa jolene (aunts) Hyacinth, io .
Gean, yy and Colleen Laas ee ‘
. : n
LIVESTOCK
WORRE — In ing of my
dear beloved B "Blease Gertude - -
Worrell, who depart this li on GRADE HOLSTEIN COW—To calve
24th April, 1949. within few yr lactation
How often I tread the path Dial 2068, D. . Prost, Stan-
That leads me to the gr more Lodgé, Rock. 22.4.52—t.f.n.
b bing: Rhine — oe LPI 80 well
ut whom I cou
—s night a all is silent POUL ¥
And sleep forsakes my eyes > i aes aire
M3" guts on, Sone ere | SER Ye AG a aa
wens Cost one. Serius ’ a ROCK: | PURE.
Louise , Week oll ks unsexed for ngxt
phe ny Jes, Grace, = H enson starting Sings they mete Be
Keith (¢ ane" r eet er’ as already receiving

——$—$—$——$—_———

PUBLIC NOTICES
THE wAtinanosoutPriNG & TRADING
co, UP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Transfer Books and Register of Members
of the above-named Ci y will (be
closed from the 24th day April to the

7th day of May 1952, both days inclu-

Sadie nat e Board ot Directors.

MA’
—Manure
tors, Grass
rakes for

Secretary.
TRE bos aan Aue CLUB
Ni cE TO MBERS
NOTICE is hereby given that In ace
cordanve, with Rule 8 the Club will be

closed t® Members on Saturday,
2th, from 7.30 to 10.30 p.in.,

20th.
Marine Di ond Aquatic Events by
SH . mmittee
vee
Ooo a eo SPENCER:
= &

Secretary.
4

eens a Gi
a x
with Melants and





- -— - —_——
Vv SPEEDBOAT, built

NOTICE uren [224 imported nm 1948. Length 18, fect,
ara a See atarct tnots rave, | Beam 8 feet 9 inches, Draught 12 fee
the Parochial Ce ed id te will ‘pe seetng one ete ri md conadioll
opened for business on the follows | comply with Lloyd's Board of Trade
days onlys— . requirements, Powered with Ford water=
Thursdays from 10,00 2.54, 9 a} nom B.H.P. Speed 10 knots,
Fridays Oe, 8 ea, Po | Apoly Rewinald French,,.D. ¥. ,Sgott, &
Parochial Treasurer r ; Mh a c
3e.¢ 184 KHAKI DRILLS — Spinner’e heavy

quality $1.16 and superior 8 oz. Drill

$1.46 per yard. Guaranteed fast colours
Come and see at KERPALANT, 52 Swan
Street. XH 4:52—1n.
asanele

ONIONS—Stock up NOW. Every
Housekeeper should buy a 50 tb bag of
Onions at 1/- per pound. Guaranteed

ry

Estate of
ARCHDEACON ALFRED SHANKLAND

‘ Deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al)
pergons having any debt or claim upon
or affecting the Estate of Archdeacon
Alfred Shankland, late of Third Avenue



. |Shirt Factory.



, san a

x. . Compile’

Fish. Archie Clarke.
23.4.52—4n

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





COUNTER and TELEPHONE CLERKS.
Apply by letter and in person. J. N.
GODDARD & SONS, LTD. 23. .—2n

ONE COOK, General Servant.
to Mrs. Lisle Bayley, Pavilion
Hastings ma

Apply
Court,
62-2.
PRODUCTION MANAGER

- Reliance
17.3.52—1n.

SUB AGENT WANTED. Resident
Bridgetown, well connected with com-
merce, to sell accredited British goods
on commission, State age, experience,
references, Post Box 532, Trinidad

23.4.52—3n

From ist May 1952, for the Coleridge

“Secretary to the

Post is a Whole Time

The Office of this Secretary shall

be at the School, and the Secretary shail

be required to combine the duties of

Clerk to the Governing Body with those
ot Secretary to the Headmaster

2. Applicants shall have had a See-
ondary Education, and possess a Cam-
bridge Schoo} Certificate or its equivalent.
pnd be proficient at Twping: ability to
write Shorthand being an advantage

3. The Salary is $100.00 per month.
rising by annual increments of eight dol-
lars to $140.00 per month.

4. Applications to be received by the
Headmaster, R. C. Springer, Esq., M.
", Government Hill, St.
ael, by Post, enclosing recent Testimon-
oi. not later than Saturday 26th April

By Order of the Governors of the School
RRANCKER

‘TIONS are invited from men
and women keenly interested jn Ani-
Welfare for the appointment of
TIM > BAR-

two names for
man, Barbados
Office, Central

erence to: The Chair-
S.P.C.A, C/o Headquarters
Polwe Stn. Bridgetown.
22.4.52—2n

ae
MISCELLANEOUS

CARIB BEER BOTTLES — Did you
know that you could get three cents
for every two Carib Bottles? Bring fran





to Messrs, A. S. BRYDEN & SON!
€ ) Ltd,, Victoria Street.
22.4.52—3n



BUNGALOW—Modern Stone Bungalow
in good residential district, 3 bedrooms,
servants quarters, all round wail en-

. |closure preferred—not exceeding £2,700.
22.4.52—n.

Apply: Advocate, Z.24.



INCUBATOR—Oil or . gas. Any size,
but 200—300-egg capacity preferred.
Post particulurs, Bennett; Gregg Farm
Bungalow, St. Andrew.

*24.4.52—2n.



PUBLIC SALES





' "©. REAL ESTATE

ALL that bungalow called “SCAFELL”
with the furniture therein standing on
ly Square Feet of land situate at
Station House Hill, St. Philip, and_con-
taining Living and Dining Rooms, ree
Bedrooms, Toilet, Bath, and Kitchen,
with a Garage for one car, and Servant's
Rooms. Government water supply and
electricity.

OFFERS IN WRITING will be received



ty the undersigned up to Saturday the
Qrd day of May 1952, at 12 noon. The
vendor does not bind himself to aceapt
the highest or any offer. Inspection on
application to Mr. H, G. Gooding, Tel
95295. rther particulars and con-

» CATFORD & CO.,
No, 17 High Street,
Bridgetown,
20.4,.52—5n

BUNGALOW — A handsome, newly-
built bungalow with all modérn conver

feet 3 land at The Lodge, with a wonder-
ful view over the west const.

Also four fine similar building sites
adjoining. Apply to Miles Cecil, Dial
2518 or 4367. 13.4. 52-—12n .

HOUSE—One board and shingle house
with open verandah and shop situated
at Boscobel, St. Peter. Apply: Gordon
Chandler on premises. 22.4,52—1n

“LE TOUQUET" — Maxwell Coast.
Drawing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms,
running water, electric light and tele-
phone. A nice property standing on
about 2 acres of land in one of the most
attractive and popular parts of the coast

above walt be set up for sale by

auction at the offices of the undersigned
on Friday, 2nd May, 1952, at 2 p.m

Applications for permission to view





should be made to Mr. F. D. G. Simp-
Pellevilte, in the parish of Saint Michael, |to keep for 3 months. M e
who died in this Meland on the 30th day HAROLD PROVERBS & =, Ltd. | sen, senses aes as 95214.
of January 1962, are requested to send 23.4.52—I1n CARRINGTO! BAD: "a
i particulars of their claims, duly Luc, é
attested, to the undersimned, the qualified said A ea 13,.4.52—6n,
exceutors of the Estate of the svid © ren Pp rms, ng lastii 3 ae pore fh
~a bre le price, onl cents per yard | The undersigned will offer for sale by
Altea. Shankland. (decestecd, i par [siete AR 32 Swan Street public competition at their office, No. 17,

of Messrs, Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, on or before
the Sth day of June 1952, after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the

24.4.52—1n
RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM

High Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday,
lst May 1952, ALL, THOSE buildings,
comprising offices and warehouses on the

. for Two Dollars, your Wharf and Prince William Henry Street
asscts of the ‘said Estate among the | Records. Thves te Mee Ol rp. and McGregor Street, Bridgetown, stand-
parties entitled thereto, having regard to .4,62—t.f.n. | ing on 5,137 square feet of land and now

the debts and ojaims only of which we
shall then have had notice; And that we
shall not be liable for assets so distri-
but to-any person of whose debt or
e WE shall not have had notice at
the time.of such distribution,

all persons indebted to the said
Ratate afe requested to settle their ac-
“9

RAIN GAUGE CYLINDERS — Have
yours easy: ow eae season is
roac! :
as . . 22,4.52—3n.

RIDDO’ SNHALANT—For relief of

TRON
Without delay. as on Ror eS ee

#his 2nd day of April, 1952,
H, G, MURRAY,
- Cc, R. ARMSTRONG,
Qualified Executors of the Estate
got Alfred Shankland, dec'd,
© 3.4.52--4n

:.o eS eere
Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: Ian Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd

Local Representative, Tel, 3118.
171.4,52—t.f.n.



FOR SALE

ee small table model Gas
Cooker complete with oven.

i

We have Jacob's Cream Crackers $1.20
tin: Fancy Sweet Biscuits % Ib. pkgs 42¢.
pkee, Buy at once. tock is being
reduced.—KNIGHT'S LTD. . 23.4.52.2n

PIPE—Galvanized water pipes,



Only used a few months, [Pee ee sor aso pipe on
as new, owner ieft City Garage, Victoria
Island. 2.4.52—t.f.n
. ae
See it at your Gas Co.
Bay Street. FOR RENT








occupied by Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co.,
Ltd.

Further particulars from the undér-

signed.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
a teas



AUCTION
aoheepennenneeeonnemeereenennees Sactinsenttie
UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 2th at “Gandhi Villa”
Brighton, Black Rock: by order of Mr
D. A. Thani we will sell his Furniture
— which includes — Morris Suite (Settee

-l and 2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top;

Coffee Table; Berbice, Tub and Up-
hols:, Chairs; all in Mahogany; Helio-
cr Radiogram, Brass Floor Lamp,
Divan; Carved Teakwood Table; Very
Nice Tapestrys Tea Trolley, Oak Dining
Table and Leather Seat Chairs; Dinner
Ww Pictures, G. E. and Norge
rators, both in good working
order; Glass and China, Brass Ware.
Tea and Dinner Services, Carpets, Ver-
endah Chairs; Bookshelves; Twin Bed
steads with Simmons Springs; Mird.
Press, Bureau, and Dressing Table all in

|

iM ny: Cream painted Press with
HOUSES | Dressing Table combined, Sirgle Cedar
Bedstead with Box Spring, Electric
Lamps, Bedside Tables; tron Single
2 BUNGALOW — Fully furnished, 5} Pedstead Mir'd Press and Dressing tabic
all modern conveniences, in| |; painted white, Electric Stove, 4
Navy ens. Phone 4311, Johnson. | purner Qil Stove, Kitchen Table and
ning Chaise, Pram; Bicycle, Canisters and
Ee SE gee mee other items.
= . BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, |" daie ; &: mii
HEADQUARTERS FOR vevfect. bathing, quiet. All meals and aa p'clgem Mente CASH
— SOUVENIKS ierviccs supplied fem main house. OW? | BRANKER TROTMAN & CO
FROM INDIA, CHINA & Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable . i
4 CEYLON couple, Apply: Beachlands, St. James or Auctioneers.
phone 0157. 14.3.52—4.f.n. 23.4.52—2n




ete —ietinn
FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat.
Completely furnished. Telephone, gas,
electricity. Facing sen. Excellent and
safe seabathing. Apply to “MARESOL"
ST. LAWRENCE GAP. Phone 8496.
17.4.52—t.f.n.

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466

FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3 bed-





g rooms. Fully furnished. Lighting Plant.
x THE BIG EVENT Watermill supply. Dou! Car Port, two
s servant rooms. From Ist. Phone
+476. 0.4, 52—t.f.n

HEATHFIELD, Crane — For May,

OF THE YEAR

THE LOYAL BROTHERS

June, July. Furnished, electricity, re-
frigerator. Apply A, D. Herbert, Phone
8385 ° 4.52—8n



ILFRACOGMBE—Maxwell's 4 bedrooms,
OF THE STARS Seppenes with or without pr Dial

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
Silver ang Linen, Good ing.
For further particulars. Apply to Alma
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.
23.252—t+.f.n.

NEWHAVBN — Crane Coast, 4 bed-
rooms Fully furnished, lighting Plant,
| Watermi! supply, Double Garage, three

Present

Carnival



OS PSCOCSP CSO POGFS FOP OOF









5 servant rooms. For May an
om June 5th & 7th % | tober ist Phome 447s.” and from O¢_
~ t@ sa Seudite 10.4. 59—t. f.n
at Queen’s Par! Q | ———_—_— ihe celal a
s OFFICES at 48, Tudor § ” tf
% further Particulars Later % | for aston. Dentists, ov street, Suita |
te a XM | Apply: Cecil.Jemmott. Phone 4563
7 SOOCPOOOSS | 22.4.52—2n





“Sonic” Carries Out
Seismic Survey

; The motor vessel Sonic is car-
rying out a seismic survey of the
area bounded by the parallel of
latitude “10 degrees 23 minutes
north and extending from point
Lisas westward to longitude 61
de 45 minutes and ther
southward to the mainland,

| The Sonie began her operations
on Tuesday and is expected to
finish her.survey on Monday. She
is painted white. She carries a
red flag during the day and a red
light during the night.

Ships moving along the Trini-
}dad west coast, in the Gulf of
Paria and the Southern
approaches have been warned to
j; use caution and keep clear of the
| Sonic.
This



information was received

"lat the local Harbour and Ship-

ping Department.





niences, standing on about 12,000 square,

|



Talks to Workers

el









HER LONG siege of illness does not
prevent Eva Peron, wife of Ar-

what F.B.I. men carrying out an
investigation .
through this event.
national Relief Service, given b:
Scouter A. J. Tatnall Head-
quarters at 8 o'clock last night,

ing programme. A film was also
shown,

in a barricaded prison
prisoners gave up veneer,
one of the eight. guards he

killed and eight others wounded
by State police bullets.—



oe
’ oa
Scouts Celebrate St. George’s Day |
from page 1 = 78 hool. Bach

The other event was Relaying ote two scadile each "ot the
The Message. In this event four Classes —- Welter, Light,

when contestants were OM Middle and Heavy.
the message they resem some- At 7.30 p.m. there will be an

Inter-Troop Table Tennis Com-
petition in which each troop
be represented by four players.
On Friday at 5.00 p.m. there
will be the Inter-Troop Scout
Competition. One patrol of seven
or eight Scouts under 18 years of
age, from each troop will enter
this competition .

A hush reigned
A lecture on the Scout Inter-
at

imaxed the day’s very interest-

To-day at 4.30 p.m. the Scouts big day.

will have their Inter- Box- From 8.00 o'clock on Saturday
ing Competition at the ni¢ht the Scouts stage

ee ee a a
23 play quatiec f

Greug te Rou Bln wae halal eS ennth

a to a new state prison farm a 2 ore

Monday at 4.30 p.m. an Inter-

After holding out for 113 hours
dormitory

N St. George’s Week will be clim.

as hostages was harmed. seed wan 8 sate ot

But prisoners still holding out *emsingion, on

in barricaded cell block 15 at 7-30 o'clock.

po coc my TS BB 1. Bethel “A” team with 18
‘or u .

prisals for ‘helt Dart vaste wes points out of a possible 20.

UP.

——
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIa,
ZEALAND LINE LIMITE

(M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M.V. CARIBBEE will

88. “TEKOA”" to sail accept Cargo and Passengers for

from Adelaide February 1 Dominica, p> Montserrat,

March 43rd, ey h 10th, Bris- Nevis and St. Kit®. Sailing Mon-
bane March arriving at Trinidad jay 28th inst ;

about A 22nd and Barbados about The M.V. MONEKA will accept

April 25) Cargo and Passengers for -

sel has ample space for chilled and hard and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
frozen cargo. tnd May 1952 <
Cargo accepted on through Bills of The M.V. DAERWOOD will
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accept Cargo and Passengers for
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba. {
lulands. Passengers only for St. Vincent.

SHIPPING NOTICES

In addition to general cargo this ves-

For, furtnér particulars apply —
their FURNESS a @ ov., LTD,

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952

NEW
D.

° 54



mica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis



Date of Salling to be notified»

BWI, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC)

ana Consignee Tele. 4047

DACOSTA & OO. LTD,
BARHADOR. WA









NEW YORK SERVICE
STBAMEBR senile 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th Apri
STEAMER ‘salle Oth May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 198i.

A STBAMBR sailed 10th April

rives Ba’ 26th
gentina’s Juan Peron, from ad- A STBAMER sails Mth April artives barhegee tote oer teen x
dressing the National Congress of eesti eneernnasesip saa
Rural Workers in Buenos Aires. TAKE NOTICE CANADIAN SERVICE
She was reported looking drawn -
and pale as she officially closed Goo R SOUTHBOUND
ti " l }
he conference. qd eer ) «| Faveme ot saad ae ait nt
That & RUBBER COMPANY, a corporation organ-}S.S. “ALCOA PA\ od Barbados
Sugar Will ized under the laws of the State of Ohio, United States of A whose rede |'S'S. “ALCOA POINTER” * ee eeiee, elias eet. Ge sae
fe business a is 1144 East Market Street, Akron, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied} ss. “A STEAMER” MONTREAL Ma 16th May eo
ar : + ‘or the of a in Part “A” of Register in respect of pneumatic,} s s| “A STEAMER” ". MONTREAL May 30t fame.
t t cushion, and solid tires constructed wholly or partly of rubber and used for motor ‘ 3 jay 30th une 9th
; i a be ge eats, anes eyeles, er , aeroplanes and oe, a, and NORTHBOUND Dus Miekkacs
cluding part of such t . such tr , Outer casing r tire shoes an nner “ ” je PDa
lubes, therefor; tire chains and non-skid devices, inside tire protectors, outside 8,8. STINERA tos April 18th For St, John, N.B. and St











Per Pound

lb, and % it was desired to hold
the price down to 8 cents per

a
v

tire protectors, repair outfits: repair patches
ing cement; inner tubes; vulcanizing materials; vulcanizing outfits; tire rims; top

rubber goods; rubber mats and matting; airplane supplies;
material in general; ink rollers and blankets for printers’ use including newspaper
cutting rubbers; leather substitute materials, st:

and bandages; patching gum; patch-

ressing and tire paint; rim paint; vehicles wheels; rubber tiling for floors; rubber
alves; rubber hose and tubing; rubber machinery; heels and soles; mechanical
packing and packing

ries and

Ls. orage batte: rking plugs:
ill be entitled to register the

lb. it would i : a pillows, cushions and mattresses, and w same after

of $1.50 Ee age wee subsidy one month from the 24th day of April 19923, un some person shall in the
Ave DOS ., and the sug-| meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such regls-

hace was that the sum of money | tration. © Trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Ss!






ould be put to a_ separate
equalisation fund and used for the
holding down of the wash grades.
As the hon’ble Colonial Secretary
had told them, it was quite true
that the amounts consumed were
Specials 14,000 bags, Yellows 54,-
000 bags and other grades 25,000
bags. That ‘on what would take
events—25,000 bags wash grades,
54,000 bags Yellows and 14,000
bags Specials. But in as much as
to pay to keep the price down to
8 cents instead of 10 cents for
the yellows, instead of the dif-
ferential being 14 cents, it was
now being 1 penny a_lb, and it
was assumed that there would
a swing from the Yellows to

retary said,
naturally have to watch and see
how: it would go. Actually the
Sugars did not present a_ great
difficulty because they were made
during the crop season and there-
fore those factories which made
those sugars, agreement would be
arrived at as ards the quanti-
ties which they d make, that
was the quantities would be sold.

Loss Sustained

The stocks of all the old sugars
were completely exhausted, so
actually some of the traders had
been selling this year’s crop sugar
and had sustained some loss al-
ready. The position now was that
if the Bill was passed, the gov-
ernment would have a fund to
subsidize the wash grades at 8
cents per lb instead of the normal
price of 104 cents a lb.

He had figures of the prices
of variqus grades in the various
island’s Dark Crystals was sold in
some islands—Antigua had one
factory and so too did St. Kitts—
and the prices were as follows:
Antigua 7 cents; St. Kitts 6 cents;
St. Lucia 74;

When it came to Wash Grades
Antigua price was 11 cents per |b;
St. Kitts 11 cents; St. Lucia 94
cents; Trinidad 8; Jamaica 8 and
Barbados 8 which would be bring-
ing Barbados into line with the
other places; Yellows: Antigua
St. Lucia, none; Trinidad 8}; B.G.
74; Jamaica 9 and Barbados 10
cents lb.

local industry to charge a higher
price for the local sugar when

the price of local sugar be some-
thing less than the price of the
export sugar.

The Bill did not the
principle, All it did was to ask
that the money which, out of the
export price would have been put
to the three funds, would be put
to a seperate equalisation fund
and used for subsidizing the
Brown Crystals. He had much
pleasure in seconding the motion
= the second reading of the
Hon. G. B. Evelyn observed tha‘
people did not mind paying a price
to get the best sugar for use, and
said that he had been reliably
informed that servants, even those
in the low income groups, her
ferred to pay 9 cents for their
sugar in order to get the brighter

sidized the
would be such a big swing
from people using the better ||
grade sugar to the Brown Sugar,
despite the subsidy.

Hon. K. R, Hunte said that what
Mr, Cuke had said was quite
right but added that the compu- |‘
tations were right provided that
the sugar was the right colour, If
it were not bright in colour it
would not sell because it was his
experience that the people pre-
ferred a bright coloured sugar.

The Bill was read a second time
and pased in all its stages.

Prisoners Cause
$2,500,000 Dantage |

NEW YORK, April 23

Warden Julian Frisbie of
Southern Michigan prison bowed | |
to demands of mutinous convicts
in the hope of saving ten guards | |
held as hostages by rioters who
have caused $2,500,000 damage to}
the world’s largest walled prison)
in Jackson, Michigan, while in
Rahway, New Jersey, the sur=|



the expansion of

this purpose a free grant of the /fol








Dated this 23rd day of April, 1
H. WILLIAMS,
of Trade Marks.
24.4.52—-3n

. GOVERNMENT NOTICE

BUILDING ESTATE, CITY OF
There is an



”

be prepared to develop a building estate on a substantial scale.

The Government would be prepaxyd to consider offering for

lowing areas: <-

(a) All the unoccupied land lying North of the extension
of the Government Housing Scheme, Freetown Road,
North of the City of Belize and bounded as follows: —

North by North Circular Road, East
canal lying to the west of the Belize and Newton
Clubs, South by the extension of the Government
-Housing Scheme, the Police Training School and cer-

BELIZE
re need for more building land to provide for
city of Belize. The Government of British
ene is prepared to make land available to any concern which
wou
2.

by a drainage

oe lots at present occupied, and West by the Circular
(b) All unoceupied land lying adjacent to the Haulover

bridge on the Belize—Airport Rodd;
described as follows: —

bounded and

Qhurch and the North Circular

main road from Belize to the

Haulover Road, West by the Belize River.
(ii) All unoccupied land to the South of the main

Road,
Ai

Tanks bounded as follows: —
North by Haulover Road, East b.
South by private lands on the
and West by private~ lands.

.

between the Circular Road mentioned in (a) and
« the southern bank of the Belize River at the Haulover

(i) North by the sea and the proposed new Rifle Range,

East by land to be granted to the Roman Catholic
South by the
rport .known as

(Haulover Road) commencing at a point approx-
imately 30 chains west of the Bulk Oil Storage

private lands,
aulover Creek

3. The plan of these areas may be inspected on application to

the Director of Surveys, Belize. :

4. The lands would be granted under the following conditions:

(1) Estate roads to be constructed by the grantee according

to the plan together with proper surface drainage.
(2) A sea wall or concrete revetment to
accordance with the plan.
(3) The whole area to be filled to a uniform level.

be constructed in

Roads, sea walls, revetments and filling to be constructed to a specifi-

cation given by the Director of Public Works.

(4) The size of lots on the Haulover Road to be not less than

300 by 600 feet and those north of the Government Hous-

ing Scheme, Freetown Road, not less than 50 by 80 feet.

(8) Surveys to be made by a Government Surveyor appoint-
ed by the Government of British Honduras.

(6) The grantee to have the right to sell filled lots for re-
covery of capital expenditure;
by Government to be reserved for conversion into parks,
playing fields, etc.

(7) Dwellings on
value not less than B.H. $9,000; dwellings north of the
Government Housing Scheme, Freetown Road, to range
from $2,000 to $5,000 according to the size and location
of the lots.

Any person or body interested in these

45. oposals is requested
to get in touch with the Colonial Secretary, Bel

e, British Honduras.
J 24.4.52—1n,
< FSOVISSSSSS990099009S959599S909389SSIS SSG FS
For the HOUSEWIFE
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THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

ee







HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |

“PEEK FREAN”

a

9 a REND
Be ete ae USE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE “
nn ete REE :



(BRITAIN’S HEST BISCUITS) —















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FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES
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AS YOU SAY INAMERICA, WH . THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

“THE GAME IS NEVER OVER TILL
THE LAST MAN IS OUT “/ WE'RE
NOT OUT YET / ¥

PLEASE BE COMFORTABLE,
MY FRIENDS / SOON WE SHALL
REACH YOUR RENDEZVOUS WITH
FATE... A COMFORTABLE, SNOWY
GRAVE IN THE FRENCH ALPS /













The Horseman's
Year

Hy W. E. LYON
A Tribute by



BRINGING UP FATHER









































(a ; Col, H. M. Llewellyn

IT'S GONNA BEA SWELL SHINDIG - ~ RAMS ara Lt Col H. M \ ly

TONIGHT AT WALA-MALA HALL/TH'T]| MULLIGAN Never H vusT A (-_WHAT? You yusT “—>] | TO PUT THE MULLIGAN in the “Sunday Times’’ to

GANG IN EVENIN’ CLOTHES/--DUGAN [- WORE A SHIRT IN MINUTE-JIGGS! | CAME FROM MULLIGANS TUXEDO ON ,

RENTED DUFFY | MIG LIFE-HESTILL || HELLO--On-|| (House - wat ? HIM AN! HE { The Horseman’s Year. 7

TH’ WAITER'S (- WEARS RED RILEY ? WANT THAT'S AWFUL /! HIT ME WIDA HH :

TUXEDO - CASEY-cORKY AN' || UNDERWEAR! fi TO SPEAK TO az: “When I grow very, very old and my bones

iL “eee? Af TRC . :
catenin S| | —S4zlegoi\ ei creak like an ageing door, I shall have the annual
MULLIGAN 6's" > Hr en oo = ITT 5-19 volumes of The Horseman’s Year at my right hand.
Ree torn eee | ad Those who interest themselves in horses live excit-

\

ingly in the future with such hopes of a classic—or

o ; , i, ei x cee /
2) “ad | ey ‘ DY tL # At 4d > | : .
u-|| f Ais Me : uf (i 5 Fa the Farmers’ Race; with the foal just dropped by a
= Pia, } } . ' « * Q) 2 Tha



favourite brood mare; a season in High Leicester-
shire with the best horse you have ever had in the
stable; a show jumping win over some particularly
smug foreign rival. But how comforting is it to know
that, when the marginal penny has been spent, or
nee the marginal bone broken, and you have ridden

THE COPS ARS WANGIN' THIGH OL) NOT MY MONICA we. your last horse, you will be able to live just as excit- ‘
RAP ON LAMBERT’S GiRL- /| KS SHE COULDN'T HAVE " 6 ear ingly in the past. ;
FRIEND, THE SOCIETY :

DAME, MONICA HILL! ~~ Ve , i me gum” GANT a “For this you will have to thank Lieutenant
< c/ ; , < Colonel Ted Lyon, an Elizabethan in the true sense,
a brilliant horseman who can write just as brilliantly
on his subject. As a record of the equestrian world
of today, his book is without equal. It deals with .
all the major horse sports in this country .... ‘
“It is a profusely illustrated collection of articles ool
in every case delightfully written by an accepted
leading authority. A comprehensive yet concise evar
survey, it has many light touches which make it

a rea instructive and pleasant reading for all—from the
ois BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES very young to the very old.”’

RIP KIRBY

GIMME THE CITY DESK/

HELLO, JOE..THIS IS BARKER...
THE COPS ARE PICKIN’
UP MONICA HILL!
THEY FOUND HER
PRINTS ON THE
GUN THAT KILLED
YOUNG LAMBERT!

ee te ts NI



ASKULL MARK « PHANTOM! BUT MV GUIDE «
MAGKED MAN*+4HE COULDN'T BE THE | IA LEGEND A SUPERSTITIONS
| PHANTOMS



WE KEPT THE LADY+
aa NOW ON SALE AT
ADVOCATE
STATIONERY



ie ts

NEXT WEEK + NEW ADVENTURE [—
ne te oe









PAGE EIGHT

Police Beat
Rovers 2—1
In K.O. Match

Police scored a fairly convinc-
ng defeat over Pickwick-Kover
when they won by two goals to
one and knocked the Rovers out
ot the Knock Out football] coynpe-
tition Which began at Kensington
yesterday.

tne Police centre forward F.
Tay.or scoreg both goals in the
first half, one about eignt minutes
after the start of play and the
other a few minutes before hal!
time. Rovers centre forwara
Basil Lewis, scored the goal for

his team about two minutes before
close of play.

It was q somewhat dull game at

times, especially in the beginning,
but the last fifteen minutes was
very fast as the Rovers tried to
cover lost ground and Police
never slackened.¢ The Rovers
Back line was weak, but perhaps
their most outstanding player was
the rightwinger, D. Greenidge.
For Police the backs O. Marshal:
and E, Thompson and the right
half M. Franklyn played well.

Police had the touch off. The
game began in an awkward,
slow manner, and straightaway
the scanty crowd were feeling
that this was not quite the type o!
football they had been seeing at
Kensington during the First Di-
vision games. For the first five
minutes neither team seemed to
have the edge on the other and i!
was more a kicking affair than
skilful football with good pass-
ing either way. But as the game
progressed, it became evident
that Police was the more press-
ing.

About eight minutes after play
began, Police’s centre forward I
Tay.or took advantage of thi
Hickwiek-Rovers backs being
somewhat out of position to sen
the ball into the nets and put the
gcore one up for Police.

This was the signal for a keen-
er struggle and the Rovers start-
ed some pressing on their cwn
but it just happened that they
could not make the last effort
necessary to trick the backs oull,
of position and score. So thei:

attempts went wide and | thos
that did not, were ably saved b»
*Mongrel” Haynes, the Polic¢
custodian who was showing good
judgment,

Rovers kept up this attack

right up to half time, but tre-
quently failed to make the most
of their opportunities. Then,
about two minutes before hall!
time, the Police forward got away
with -the ball when Marshall in
the back line cleared their goa!
area and he this time actually
Swooped upon the ball and sent
it wide of the goal keeper's reach

The second half began fas: and
it was noticeable that “he Rovers
were paying more attention t
combining, but the way Police
held their ground, made yo, feel
that this improved playing was a
bit too late. At any rate, the
Spectators were being treated to
better football.

Five minutes after the resump-
tion, the Rovers goalkeeper was
called upon to make a good save
when left half Cadogan sent in a
low, powerful shot, M. Foster in
goal managed to push the ball
outside and nothing was gained
from the corner kick as the left
winger, Banfield did not kick
hard enough to get the ball in po-
Sition for scoring.
~ A short while later, Shannon on

the right wing for Police was
passed the ball while the for-
wards ran into position. The
spectators began yelling expect-
antly, but Shannon after drib-
bling a while with the ball,

kicked it outside.

The last fifteen minutes was
very fast and play was concen-
trated in Police's area, but
Haynes in goal was good. At the

last minute,, however. Rovers
were able to score a goal

, The teams were:—

Police: M. Haynes, O. Mar-
shall, E. Thompson, M. Franklyn,
V. Layne, C. Griffith, C. Ban-
field, R. Cadogan, F, Taylor

B. Blenman and G. Shannon.

Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster,
B. Robinson, W. Greenidge J
Greenidge, D. Greenidge, S. Car-
ter, L. Foster, Basil Lewis, Bun-
ny Lewis, R. Eckstein and W
Keliy.



Barbados Beaten

(From Our Own Correspondent

KINGSTON, April 23.

Trinidad clinched their win ovet
Barbados finally to-day when the
last two single matches in their
Brandon Trophy encounter ended
with Legall beating Trimmingham
6—2, 64, 6—4 and Gunn Monro
beating Taylor 7—5, 6—4, 7--5
Trinidad meets Jamaica on Frida)
in the finals.

| They'll ‘Do Ie Every



HIYA VIC +» JUST
THE MAN I WANT TO
SEETHIS IS MY DAUGHTER,
CROWEENA-SHE WANTS TO

GO INTO THE MODELING

GAME>SO I SAYS ++-"I

KNOW JUST THE MAN

TO SEEâ„¢WELL WHAT

DO YOU THINK OF HER ?
MIND IF WE SIT


















GY \ Teareaur peers are JF
\ CANT GET AWA

TROPHY

THE TORNADO CUP, pre-
sented by Brandram-Hender-
son Ltd., Paint Manufacturers
of Canada, through their local

Agents Messrs. T. Geddes
Grant, to the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club. Mr, A. BR. Toppin,
Managing Director of the firm,
recently handed over the Cup
to the Club.

This is the first time that
the Tornadoes are racing in
the R.B.Y.C. Regattas.
Vamoose, skippered by Tony
Hoad, is at present in the lead.

£100—I1s Odds
ainst Golf
ole-in-One

By JAMES GOODFELLOW



WHAT are the odds against
any golfer doing a hole in 6ne?
Odds of 2,000 to 1 in shillings

are being offered against anyone
holing a tee shot during a compe-
tition beginning on May 31 at the
Sunningdale Ladies’ Club, where
here are 10 one-shot holes. The
compétition goes on until the end
of the year, and “takers” will be
entitled to make an attempt every
day during its progress.

Last year
had done a

1,409 players who
hole in one held
competition at short holes

three New York courses. Each
hit five shots—an aggregate of
7,045, All failed to get down in
Nearest

on

one. ball finished 34in,

from the pin,

But the strangest story con-
cerns an American professional
HENRY GONDER,. He hit 1,817
balls—it took him 16 hours and
24 minutes—trying to do a 160yd.

hole in one and then gave it up!
His 1,750th shot struck the hole
and came out. Caddies teed and
retrieved the balls,

The Finest Putter

ALEC HERD did 19 holes in
one and JAMES BRAID hac 18.
Three times Open champion
HENRY COTTON has had only
seven, and BOBBY LOCKE'S

number is said to be two.

Australian NORMAN VON
NIDA ranks BOBBY LOCKE
as the world’s finest putter.
Yet the former Open champion
registered 41 putts in the final
round of the Masters’ open
tournament at Augusta, Geor~
gia, won by Sam Snead.

Said von Nida, now in London
with his wife “I took 40 putts.
At one hole I had a chance ci an
eagle 3 from three feet, yet I took
a 6, If your ball was on the wrong
side of the hole it just seemed
impossible to hole it.”

So it is not surprising that
Snead's aggregate 286 for 72 holes
the highest so far in the
surnaments,
\ very

was

d fit Von Nida plans
another full season here, includ-
1g the Open championship a‘
Royal Lytham and St. Anne’s

M.C, Of The Clinic

DAI REES will be masier of
ceremonies at the golf clinics
which will be held the day before
play begins in the _ professional

surnament.

He makes a commentary as
competitors demonstrate strokes
and the galléry are given some
useful tips,

Clinics are a feature of U.S.A.

golf PATTY BERG, lively and
humorous, led the American
women professionals in one at
Wentworth. The team are ex-

ected here again this summer.
L.E.S.

‘Time Repisiered U.S Potent Ofte

a

ViC HIDES IN HERE
TO DUCK PESTS LIKE

LUKE TAXES *=+5











\—. FROM “em !

I GUESS
EVERY FATHER



__By Jimmy Hatlo |

vic IS
OuT
BUSINEGS++-BUT ONLY













THINKS HIS KID IS





SPORTS QUIZ

The Barbados Advocate will
award a book on sport to the
first person who sends the cor-
rect answers to the following

questions.

CRICKET
1. When British Guiana
won the Triangular Inter-

colonial Cricket tournament in
1895 one British Guianese
bowler took the last four
Trinidad wickets in the first
innings for an extremely small
score. Who was he, how many
wickets did he take and for
how many runs scored?

FOOTBALL

2. A player throws the ball
from the touchline to the cross-
bar and it bounces off the goal-
keeper into the nets. Would
you give a goal?

witie POLO ,

3. 0 was captain of the
Trinidad “Discovery” Water
Polo team which visited Bar-
bados in 1949, and was this the
first tournament between these
two colonies?

Changed



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ae ca



SWIMMING
4. In what part of the
world did the crawl swimming
stroke originate?
TABLE
5. What is the first stroke
in a game of Table Tennis?
HORSE RACING

6. Who is responsible for
the weight carried by a horse
in a weight for age event?
All entries for

“ Quiz”, c/o
Advocate Sports Editor, and
must reach this office by 12

published in the Sunday Advo-
cate of April 27.

Each entry must be accom-
panied by A COUPON as Set
out below.

SPORTS QUIZ





Handicap

Times For 9th Regatta

(By Our Yechting Correspondent)

My criticisms on Sunday have borne fruit.

helmsmen of the Intermedi

Those
ate Class who were contem-

plating going fishing instead of racing in the last three
regattas can now change their minds as Mohawk, which
was on a winning spree, has been brought back to start with
Clytie. She now only receives two minutes from Gnat and

Coronetta, the scratch boats

It will be interesting to see how
her skipper Bob Cumberbatch will
fare. On Saturday last Bob, who
is a good~sportsman,. after being
taunted by other Intermediate
skippers, threatened to start with
the scratch boats if the handicap-
pers did not change his time. He
went as far as to say that he would
start with the scratch boats and
win, The handicappers have, how~-
ever stopped Bob from
one extreme to the other and in
his present position he has a chance
to show “the boys” that he is as
good a helmsman as they are,

A few changes have been made
in the B Class. Fantasy, which has
been sailing extremely well, has
been brought back to start with
Flirt, Moyra Blair, Rascal and
Okapi. Formerly, Fantasy received
a minute from these boats.

Hi Ho now receives two minutes
from Fantasy and the others.

a Formerly she only got a minute

from Fantasy, Ranger still
ceives a minute from Hi Ho.

There have been no changes in
the C Class. Miss Behave, Madness
and Folly continue to receive two
minutes from Magwin which gets
a minute from Scamp. Rogue and
Gannet give Scamp a minute.

In the Intermediate Class,
Mohawk, which formerly started
with Invader and Reen, now gives
them three minv‘es. wk
bives Dawn and Dauntless two
minutes while before she received
h minute from them.

Skippy continues to receive a
minute from Invader and Reen,
Clytie and Mohawk, which are
now starting together, receive two
minutes from Gnat and Coronetta,
the scratch boats of the class.
According to the last times, Mo-
hawk received five minutes from
Clytie, Gnat and Coronetta. This
change has removed Clytie from
scratch position.

Only one change has been made
in the D Class. Peter Pan formerly

ee

Four For World
Youth Congress

LONDON, April 23.
Four British University students
left aerially for Argentina to re-
present Britain at a Buenos Aires

re-

University and World Youth Con- | ‘

gress, The students were selected |
from undergraduates specializing
in Spanish and Latin American
subjects and will be guests of the
Argentine authorities for two
weeks.

Last night the. students| }

of the Class.

received three minutes from Rain-
bow. Now she will only receive
two. :

Seabird, Olive Blossom and Van
Thorndyke continue to start to-
gether. They give Rainbow
minutes.

Also starting together are Imp,
Rainbird and Sinbad. ‘They con-
tinue to receive three minutes
front Hurricane,

However, Hurricane is ir’ a
worse position. Formerly — she
started with the C boats. Now she
Starts with Mischief, and Gipsy
follows closely behind. Apart from
watching out to avoid being back-
winded, Hurricane will have to
roe clear of accidents.

The handicap times for the
Ninth Regatta are as follows:—

a ¢
Class Ne. Yacht Startat Flag
— r

B 10 Wizard









2.20 Red
B 13 “Ranger i
D 8 Peter Pan 2.301 bien”
B 4 HiHo 2.3% Rea
nape ia pea +
D 12 Rainbow 2.33 Yellow
“ ia e
B 481 Fantasy a
B 6 Flirt
B 7 Moyra Biair 2.4 Red
B 8 Rascal
B 9 Okapi ,
D 4& Seabird
D 9 Olive Blossom 2.85 Yellow
D © Van Thorndyke *
ee P
dD 3 Ray bird 2.88 Red
dD 7 ad ‘
B 5 Mischiet
D i4 Festethe 2.41 Yellow
B11 Gipsy 2.42 Red
% 6 Skippy 2.43 Yellow
I 2 fhvader
I ll Reen 2.44 Red 5
I 9 Dauntless
C 12 Dawn 2.45 Yellow
K ‘Tornadoes 2.46 Red
I 7 Mohawk
t 18 Clytie 2.47 Yellow
c - 1 “Miss Behave
C 3 Madness 2.48 Red
Cc 9 Folly
--- ~~ r
‘ 1
1 4 Coronetta 2.49 Yenow.
eon Magwin 2.50 Red -
Cc 2 Scamp 2.51 Yellow
Cc | Rogue
Cc 10 Gannet 2.52 Red e

N.B. 10th Regatta Saturday 10th May,
1052

llth Regatta Saturday 17th May,

1952.

were entertained at the Argen-! |

BOVRIL

is a great

tine Embassy here by Minister!
Carlos Leguizamo.

They are George Knapp of Lon-
don University, Keith Whinnon of
Oxford, James Hill and William
Hopper of Glasgow University,

—U.P.

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions — |
10.00 a.m. |
|



Meeting of St. Philip Vestry
—11.00 a.m.

Meeting of St. Michael Ves-
try — 2.00 p.m.

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry — 2.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington —
—5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Reed’s Beach |

St. James — 7.45 p.m. }
!



ON. THE Loox- &
Ce am THE HoMeLy |
ONES LOOK HIM ae



WaTcHING HE DoTG

DADDY TRY TO EASE

HIS OFFSPRING INTO A

GLAMORPUSS JOB.
, AnpP

(a HATLO HAT TO

= “JO"K., CHICAGO,

Zi.






defence

PLYWOOD SHEETS

TURNALL ASBESTOS
3/16 in. thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft.

"Phone 4267,

eee

two"



WHAT DO YOU KNOW OF SPORT ?



Twenty Questions On
A Variety Of Subjects

BY ALL-ROUNDER

(1) What was the name of the
jockey who rode the 1952
Grand National winner?

(2) Who stroked the Oxford
crew to victory over Cam-
bridge last month?

(3) Who won the 100 metres
sprint at the 1948 Olympic

>

mes?

(4) “Which was the last Football
League club to win the F.A.
Cup in successive seasons

(5) Who is the British Empire
Heavyweight boxing cham
pion?

(6) And from whom did he take
the title?

(7) Who captained the MCC
team on their recent tour of
-India, Pakistan and ?
And for which ish
county does play?

(8) Who is ‘ae Open Golf
Champion?

(9) Who won the 1951 Wim-
bledon arare singles cham-
pionship

(10) With which is the
Thomas Cup associated? And
which ¢o at present
hold the trophy?

(11) The following are cricket
trophies: Currie ome. Shet-
field Shield and Plunkett
Shield. In which countries
are they played for?

(12) What was the final score in
the recent Test series be-

Australia and the
West Indies?

(13) Who captained the British
Ryder Cup team in Ameri-
ca last year?

(14) A seventeen year-old ap-
prentice jockey came into

nce when he won an
important race. What was
his name and what was the
race? :

(15) Can you name the only side
that beat the Springboks in
their recent tour of the
United Kingdom and France?

(16) Who is the cruiser-weight
boxing champion of the
world? |

(17) Who is the Women’ Tennis
Champion of the United
States?

(18) A University athlete recent-
ly established a new record
time for the mile in the Ox-
ford and Cambridge sports.
His name please?

(19) Who are the Football League
Champions?

(20) What is the Swaythling Cup
and which country are the
present holders?

ANSWERS TO SPORTS

QUIZ
(1) Arthur Thompson, He also
rode the 1948 winner,

Sheila's Cottage.

(2) Chi her Davidge. It was
his third boat race.

(3) Harrison Dillard, U.S.A.
Second was his countryman,
Barney Ewell.

(4) Blackburn Rovers in 1890
and 1891,

(5) Johnny Williams of Rugby.

(6) Jack Gardner of Market
Harborough.

(7) Nigel Howard, Lancashire.

(8) Max RBaulkner,

" (9) Dick Savitt (U.S.A.)
(10) Badminton. Malaya are the

present holders. .
Currie Cup, South Africa,
Sheffield Shield, Australia.
Plunkett Shield, New
ealand.

Kastralia beat the West In-
dios by four matches to one.
Arthur Lacey was the non-
playing captain of the Bri-
tish Ryder Cup team.

Dominic Forte rode Phariza,
winner of the Lincolnshire
Handicap,

London Counties beat the
Springboks at Twickenham
on November 10th.

(16) Joey Maxim of America,
(17) Maureen Connolly,

(12)
(13)

(14)

(15)



against

INFLUENZA



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UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
4 in. thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft, 9 ft, 10 ft.
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STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

THE BOARD OF 1,000 USES.
\ in. thick, 4 ft. x 6 ft., 8 ft., 10 ft.

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
M% in. thick, 4 ft. x 6 ft. 8 ft

14 im, thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft, 4 ft, x B ft
3/16 in. thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft., 4 ft. x 8 ft.

WOOD SHEETS

WILKINSON. & HAYNES (0., LTD.



(18) Christopher Chataway of
Oxford won the mile in the
1952 sports 4 mins, 10.2
seconds beating the record
set up by Roger Bannister
the previous year.

(19) Tottenham Hotspur won the

Football League Ghampion-

ship last season.

The Swaythiing Cup is the
premier Men’s team event in

(20)



table tennis. Holders are
Hungary.

o , i

Winner Honoured

GUA , April 23.

Guatemala p ing the big-

gest celebration er for the

return of Doroteo Flores, winner

of last Saturday's Boston Mara-
thon,

Flores is the first Guatemalan
ever to win this International
Sports event. Flores, an an,
— only ba a month Bs j city
emp e and sw a family
of eight. corre



Sports Window

SPARTAN meet Everton
this afternoon in a return
First Division fixture. Spar-
tan with Empire are second
‘in the First Division Cup
line-up with 12 points to
Notre Dame's 14, the leaders
tm this competition, Spartan
will no doubt go all out this
afternoon to score a possible
14 points incase there is the
proverbial slip ‘twixt the cup
and the lip as far as Notre

lame is concerned,

$10.77








HERW ARE

tween Port and
stern, but so does

doubt it, at the j
and Pine Road
Sobers Lane.

3. He’s not a law
definitely a “G" 1



THURSDAY, APRIL” 24, 1952
Fore eiceemeets iatcneameearapremetennmeias

“Industrialisation”
At The Press Club

Mr. F. L. Walcott M.C.P., yes-
terday led off a discussion on
Industrialisation in the West In-
dies to members and friends of
we Barbados Press Club.

T.
During his discourse Mr. Walcott
told of the effects Industrial plan-
ning would have on the economy
on the West Indies and cited the
Industrial experiment in Puerto
#ieo as a pattern which the West
Indies would do well to adopt.
Mr. Walcott also said that in the
British Caribbean the Jamaicans
were the most industrially mind-
ed. Also takifig part in the dis-
cussion were Messrs J, M. Hewitt,
W. Rudder, F. L. Cozier, A. Year-
wood, R. Mapp and O. S. Coppin.



WEATHER . REPORT
YESTERDAY
Relat from Codrington :
T Rainfall for Month to
ites ‘Geman : 86,5°
iced Temperature : 72.5°
Wing Velocity 9 miles per

hour
(9 a.m.) 29.962;
bo 20.884

s TU-DAY

’

p.m.
High Tide: 3.05 a.m., 4.00

p.m.
Low Tide: 9.49 p.m, 9.46






NOTICE
Foundation Old Boys are
reminded that their month-
ly meeting takes place to-
morrow night, FRIDAY 25th
at 8 p.m. r. J. C, Tudor
will be the guest Speaker.











WE HAVE RECEIVED A SHIPMENT

PLANTER’S UMBRELLAS
- BUY AT ONCE!

YEED THE

CHILDREN ON =

ERNIE'S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB
There will be a Special
Meeting
To-morrow Evening
at 6.00 o’elock sharp
to discuss the ‘problems of
the last day’s racing at
UNION PARK

Q@.: Why do Luxury and
Tourist Liners call here?

A.: Simply so that Chief
Stewards can _ stock
larders with Goddard’s
Home made Cambridge-
shire Sausages made
from pigs bred and fed
on their own farm.
Only legs are used.

I shall have all these
luxuries to-morrow night
as well as
Special Lobster Cocktails
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C. Snow of Edge-
Water Hotel Fame.

Special Peche Melba
From Home Grown Peaches
im tins)

and what nots!
AND WHY NOT?



TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
PENCILS for Marking Linin
eee, for Marking Glass

& C
CARD PLATES in 3 Sizes
AUTOGRAPH ALBUMS
PHOTO ALBUMS
Heavy Guage BICYCLES
for Motor

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY







CAVE SHEPHERD & CoO, LTD.

10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

J & R ENRICHED
BREAD

THEY LOVE IT...
STRENGTH & ENERGY

BECAUSE Ir

JUST FOR SAYING

'ME
CARIB”

Sib CLUES: SO”

1. This Mr. Carib knows the difference be-

Starboard, bow and

anyone.

2. You could possibly meet him—though we

unction of 10th Avenue
and Tudor Street and

enforcement officer but
nan.





6

How good a detective are you,
Mr. & Mrs. Barbados ? The makers
of Sparkling Carib Beer sponsor
a competition for quick thinking
arbadians. Simple too — You just
discover their mysterious Mr. Carib
and challenge him personally with
the words — “Gimme a Carib, Mr.
Carib.” If you're the first detective
to be right you've earned yourself
twenty-five dollars, and should you
happen to have a Carib bottle cap
with you at the time your prize
will be one hundred dollars and
twenty two cents. So watch this
space for clues REMEMBER, DO
NOT TELEPHONE Mr. CARIB,
challenge him personally between
the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. And
remember too that any thirst de-
serves a Carib,

If you added seven, nine and twenty,

an@ it gave you his car, house, or

telephone number—well it would
be rather silly of us—wouldn’t it?

Upon his decisions you may be

sometimes out of pocket though he

doesn’t believe in high taxation.

We'd say he’s about 5 ft. 7 in. get it?

Five feet, seven inches.

DID YOU BUY SOMETHING FROM HIM












as



Full Text

PAGE 1

Tlll'RSn.W. APRIL 24. 195! l:\Hli\lMK ADVOCATE I'M.I SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS FT* OOKS'A BT= A 6WELU *U:ND5 TCMSMT AT L A-MALA MALL* TM GA-J3 +, g^OJU'CLOTuBS'-DU&AW iWTi %  > n ^ I' MMTW. Tunfioo-——'I cAsevc-s m:sr iiisiinsi OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS CHEESELETS MARTINI CRACKERS PLAY BOX TWIGLETS Etc. Etc. DELICIOUS & APPETISING V9 tsk T ... in mmaM USf ANYTMf. ANYWHMI If you knew her secret you, too, could be more charming, lovely, attractive *nd ii* K. in ol her attraaivraca. it OdoRo-Ku. Don't Iff oSmding underarm odour ipoil IOUI oaiuiai • (W"KoNo Mlclr ttopi p*r*|wrinun sod odour for %  full 24 hour* • Odo-Ro-No tear* creamy lorifet —ncrcr gctt K"" en in opaa iAr. • No deodorant cream i* to harmIn* to fabrki at Odo-Ro-No. • No deodorant cream >. tender to •* %  Muiiutv .km, and IIUW ODO-RQ-DQ C R I AM TIM rfwdoronl without a.ubi rHE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES %  VABK-T.E SWCfTHE ) ru.'.vToij Eu'i-^ Gm£* "lut "^ M.-.4UFPMAN-UE COUlDNl (EWE %  < TOE rn&Nit*re nor A ^. UrlNiMAN HE5AW1H, \ A IE4SN0. A SUtKTi !<* J nee mi. PI TELAW"ANt>CueClW SATE MX> wtct tiMosr uiLEDPOiNon;/ -— %  j IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SI'M IAI Ol I IMS lire % %  ii.iiilulile ul our Wroni •lir* Tw enfold*. S|><-iuli>sio> ii mill Swan Siit-ii i-.u.iii> Now Usually Now Tin. OVAI.T1NE Uml I..1H Ul Tin. BRISKET BEEK (4-lb.) 4.20 3*0 Tin. SIHIiI.EY'S PEAS -IS IS Jar. CHAMPION Ml VI Mill 2} Tin. M I lili I \ I'. Mil K 1.16 1.1)4 BlUHl O'KEEKE'S BEER 2 21 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street 1 11 1; ( (i 1 (i \ \ \ 11 1: . o r 1 it 1 %  •: s The Horseman's Year |, W. K. I.VO.V A Tribute by Lt. Col. H. M. Llewellyn in the "Sunday Times" to The Horseman's Year. "When I grow very, very old and my bones creak like an ageing door. I shall have the annual volumes of The Horseman's Year at my right hand. Those who interest themselves in horses live excit ingly in the future with such hopes of a classic—or the Farmers' Eace; with the foal just dropped by a favourite brood mare; a season in High Leicestershire with the best horse you have ever had in the stable; a show jumping win over some particularly smug foreign rival. But how comforting is it to know that, when the marginal penny has been spent, or the marginal bone broken, and you have ridden your last horse, you will be able to live just as excit ingly in the past. "For this you will have to thank Lieutenant Colonel Ted Lyon, an Elizabethan in the true sense, a brilliant horseman who can write just as brilliantly on his subject. As a record of the equestrian world of today, his book is without equal. It deals with all the major horse sports in this country .... "It is a profusely illustrated collection of articles' in every case delightfully written by an accepted leading authority. A comprehensive yet concise survey, it has many light touches which make it instructive and pleasant reading for all—from the very young to the very old." \OW ON SAM-: AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY


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PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 TRICE rVT. CT B'dos Scouts Celebrate St. George's Day At Harrison College 200 Attend Church Parade Service POTTED Sports al Harrison College yesterday evening highlighted the Scouts' celebrations of the day. The Scouts taking part in the sports showed great enthusiasm and thrift. St. George's Week began yesterday with a Good Turn Campaign by the Scouts of the island. Special attention was paid to those people who gave jobs to Scouts during their Bob-A-Job Week. Over 200 Scouts and Guides attended the Church Parade Service which was held ..! St Michael's Cathedral from 11.00 a.m. Dean Hazel wood conducted the service. Later in the day—at 4.00 p.m.—a W-ilf Cub Parade Service was held at St Ambrose Church After the morning Service at the Cathedral, the Scouts marched over to the Y.M.C.A. where those from the country districts took lunch. After lunch the Scouts from the country districts visited the Barbados Bottling Cc Ltd Roebuck Street, where they were treated to free drtnkl and the Biscuit Factory where they were given as miny biscuits as they wanted The Potted Sports, so called because of being concentrated in one small area where all the events took place together, began shortly after 4.30 p.m Twenty teams from various troups—some troops entered two teams—took part in the sports which were highlighted by the Bread and Jam Race. Each team was comprised of seven representatives. There were ten stations in the circle and judges were placed at each station. Two teams at a time took part in each event. The judges at each station told contestants what to do. As the Bread and Jam Race began the first two teams ran up to the table with (teaming eves On the table were two slices of bread, plastered with jam. The contestants were in all smiles until they heard that their hands would be tied behind their backs After this was announced the teams found it difficult to get a representative. Each representative had to make use of his chtn and nose to get the bread into his mouth All contestants were however able to get the bread into their mouths. After overcoming that difficulty the\ ate the bread with pleasure. Another amusing event was the Charlie Chaplin Race. In this the contestant carried a football between his knee and a boxing glove on his head. Twirling a staff, he ran towards the finishing line. He afterward* returned quickly to hand over the ball, glove and staff to one of his team mates. IMIIAIt \\U JAM The Bread and lam Rfl< at the Scouts Polled Sports crl Harrison College yeetei Icy eveninq provid.d much n muss merit lor onlookers, b this roes, the contestant*. with their hands tied befaMc sir baths, had to eat bread and iam bom the table. tt contestants qot through quickly with the bread but r • i to make a second attempt Locally Consumed Sugar Will Stay At 8 Cents Per Pound 20 Get Bursary Certificates Special mention wssj nu Bel sit In Y.ude. ship Carpenter, when he and 1 other journeymen apprentice* were yesterday awarded bursary crrtiHcnle* for the respec11 they learnt durin the past live yean The rertiflcates were presented hv 0 u Board of Indu trial ITejTUDjl through! their chairman M [ E Went when the Board met yastarday absi There was also the Tunnel Ball Relay Race. In this the member* of each team passed the ball between then legs to each othsr. This was one of the first race* to be complete*! Many Scouts also found interest In the Standing Long Jump Contestants were forced In jump Without liking : %  run "This mad It a bit difficult. Th, Seoul sprung high into the an but the were not able to jump very far At another sUtion there was the Tug-O-Wai event In progress. In this event the bigger Scouts regularly took ndvantAge of the smaller ones was extremely difficult. Of the first two teams which took part. onl> one contestant was successwas very little wind blowing to divert the ball but the distance to the container into which the ball had to be thrown (was over six feet. The Stone Race was similar to | Catching The Stan* called foi th Potato Race, a regular fenagility Each judge held a start inn .it Girls' School Sports. #>n which was suddenly released. A this occasion stones replaced the I representative from each team had potatoes which arc now very sx-lto catch the staff ipefore it struck pensive The stones were fairly I the ground The team with the small and sometimes hid them-1 most points won. selves in the grass, making it I The small Scouts were at homo! even more difficult for contest-' in Climbing The Telegraph Pole, ants. It was noticeable that at'A basketball pole was used for the end of the evening's proceed-1 the occasion and the small scout'., ings all the stones were there, who were most likely accustomed With the Potato Race, sometimes' to climbing trees, swiftly got to a few potatoes disappear of their the top of this pole, own accord of course | g) un page 6 PRESIDENTS MEET IN WASHINGTON 1 *-'*8 1 ' a> I Tool |>*! lL"l jft >r i %  X \7 W Ji _ij i 1 RED REBELS LOSE BIG OPERATIONS HANOI. April Zi Communist rebels lost some ; 5.UG0 men in big cleanup oparatlou launched by the French Union troops recently, uccording to a French headquarters cbtimale of casualties. The announcement said UK four operations "Mercury' "Porto". '•Polo", and "Turk"' all tn areas near Hanoi, had COM the Reds approximately 3.000 killed, and 2,000 taken prisoner.v Ths tirM f these snclrcllOI %  Liry" launched i. fifth Division cut deeply Into Communist Force %  commanding the Fren> %  I Red Division h so badly mauled that it no longer existed SI I flffhUAg Ibad bean i Bead irrouoA. Satisfactory Attacks The other threi though not so large wen termed -siitisfiiftoiy" bj thfl K soda HsadOMSsfstt for a small scale "moppinu up of villages, lire virtually completed Headquarter* said Fl Union Troops had captured more Communist arms and aq during these operations U before in the delta. Ilsanwhlle, after a week of bitter fighting in the area of rapids some 20 miles Hanoi ths Franao Vietnam troops were now In pos1 session of the maloi %  Communi-t Vietrmnli operation* —r.r. U.S.—Spanish Talks Proceed Smoothly Bj RDWARD m:i'l K\ I H1NOTON, April 23 Highl) iroai i Md thai curn til in Madrid lor bilateral unlit r, accord between the United : i %  'inc vai \ MUstaatorily, l 'i, % .Hi ru iitiauowi are beyond the praUmlnar) i ,, ie thai Unit* i bags) and the Spanish foi arms shad erjuipma|H. They ctwuu>r UH Id toa concluded i well before economic i dine, ihe 5100.000.000 in sJd to Spam vded bv Congress. ources imdeistood ths Spanish negotiators wengaosrisil .i I>H>IHI iiiilitv .it. %  what irm* Ited States <.i MipplyniR Spanish irmsd tbg (%  usibility of %  r helping ne lories They pointrd out Hint owls in and minici i :l„ lb* rholct ,, cadi at ulidile for aoi i irga si prs sol sul • !.. illeved thai ths United Stoles la I to help % %  oil %  B VSte Messrs T E Went I i ,„ Raed, w ii C,...-, and H. %  1 Q Weeke*. •rtth the Csri %  | iiinnetl In US MM nt tin Board in ta i onpls %  to %  ortuaUy BlnCS the %  CttStnS ("i B|4, SM loMly complete i i rtod sag) n ii %  erUneetss, ApprSiruen have Ihc opium .if eeornlna sftbai bii starled to defray Uta eajNnsaa of .ydi-t Keo Farnum at the Olympii Oame< u. HeUinki uril July Donationarc a.crptd Bt Bsrslay's B.-ink. the Roy.il Bank of Canada .mrt ihc Bat hdoAd vocal*. AMT PREV ACX. '-"•" SB Well wlshei 1 00 TOTAL |tt| %  ItesMiid on Spendiny )ii iba othai Bsnd Ihsj bellevad il ra counana ,. TIVIIV on the l-'nlle.! States navy ,md alrforce ^p•-ndlllg consldsrUt turn* f dollars in Spain for modernising base, mid laying . -n wopne I tililt Julc AdTMI NATTONS CHIEF IXKUTIVI. Pr^ldcnt Harry S. Truman < lefl has sram greeting for Alcxcr.Hcr K. Jones, president of ths Anieri n S-^-tety of Newspaper Editors, as the two shake hands following Mr. Truman's press conference in the auditorium of the finiithsonlan In* lie in Washlniton. President TrUTinn."osked at the conference if he t pht he had tha power to %  alas the nation'* newspapers and radio did the steel Industry, replied th;t the President has to act for %  Tver Is for the beft of the emintrt 'HfemAtlonal Soundofioto) Synod Bans Birth Control r.EORGETOWN'. B G April 23 Taking the opportunity to answer people who had asked whether the Church had made an\ pronouncement on the subject of birth control. His Grace the Archbishop of thr West Indie;.. Mosl BSVOrend Alan John Knight when dsUvering his charge at a service marking the opening of the Synod ot f-w in the I Church of St G. said' "Birth prevention measures brsry u> the law He referred enquirer^ claration of The 194 Synod v-hich wss. "To the further safe£j"raing of the Ssersrnstrt of If mony we. the Bishops in Synod I have frit l-iuni demn unequivoc-il otalnad m the :• oi rne West India Commission of 1945 oi • .,n II aastrarj to ihc law I ibltloa of this and i Is] praha sa i is to be %  r.ught and found in individual re•-,,! ided HI-, thai thi* prunuuncement leaves no room for misunderstanding what the tear him Church is about ti e next addressed himself to the Church's teaching about msi riage —oi On Official Visit To \fo$cotc LONDON. April 23. OfncmlK Paul Mason. Assistmt Under Secretary <( Btata esponsiblr for Soviet affairs in he British Foreign O" %  il I'M Murfow on a short visit. Mason one of Foie'gn Secri'tu y Anthony Ease's advisers on • >virt Buaais and Eastt-i n awpe. left London yaolerday on ehat ofnrinls described as a"roui ie Mit of lh lintidi Embassy i Moscow^ Officials denied he is travelling in a special diplomatic mission Nit did not exclude the psssibilII • %  that he might meet Kremlin presentatives during his ISrief %  v In Moscow. Mason *upeau£cs the Foreign orthern department 1 uh deals with Busainthe '•lhte stateand Scandinavian taMrlsi A career diplomat, he had servafter the war In Sofia. Bulils as envoy extraordinary and mister Plenipotentiary.—IJ.P. Move By Weal Lurope lot, el : -^ U^.Aid Likely %  Ike Wins Seven Contests M.\\\\ IfM V..,k April 23 %  I EisenAWI i i I %  OWSt of New York's '>ii Republiesn Coavaotlon delca result of hi. om-adad rtman The retirihi K.A-T.O rhiaf bwked by rvernoi Tbnrnaa I' Dam en < %  %  R publican \ Taft H onl) one Foui wltuv ipledgeit but sen %  ^miration >n Ihe Da ,i„ naS there no i H in I between I hoprulf although K.i.u.-i paskael UP ne delegiit. in Kcheneatady A %  |Orill •! itatS Uennw i .tlu aders has endorsed W. Avsrell Mutual Security Ad^uniests %  . %  i were not baeking Eiasn"i Conven%  i delegates at i i tod by Ihe Hc%  nrnlttsc ill • %  ne w* bB then mvsntlon iraatudUai fout at GSDSSBI t EDlTOfl OF •LA IMtKNSV HONtHiHKII RaTH rout yarn II in AJbarto (lain/a Pas, selfsaUsd saWrM -I Iha Hu.-nos Airas uewspapei I. II rnt/.ii in ..n addiesa before Ihe annual Convention of the American Newspaper PublsSDSra Association, ifld m-wspepsr man anuat tigiii for evory "isn't right to know what Is going an in tag yorl | %  .is i.i lea .Mill %  pUQiia KDM dnj lbs Aaaoeia imns gratitude for his n.ugnLIV|. ,,, (ll .|,.,,.,,, ,,, h ,. u vlly popucnt flght for %  dsttweratk rrsel, ,,,, AUllll ^ ,,.. Ptttsburg, %  %  ". th h.ilf million vors i..,I oval Harold T. Stassen his ,M %  i BaofM nl and I irtera rJuroed -\ le.l^t ftvs of gh1 deli: i % %  : %  %  untJ i ha Mute. BapuDsk liu umn,cted delegates ye-lcrday to i at*, %  \ raft ebosa %  i IIMVMI enough write to vOtSB lo forai arantlal usaal i %  B> K v. I II M i r LONDON. A; may invoke shortly NATO P.et piDperatioa • %  • i %  threat ti %  illty .ill Msstn%  lii Ihelr international not MHiuire mo ii la Qu i-ases in Spain, illier Admirals including Admiral William Carnet Conimander of %  mch baMS re vital %  %  ''. %  Utes 1 Alrforcs i could provide I if haws >•.., • M page I "DE GRASSE" ON W.I. RUN AGAIN (From Oar Own (arre* post gent) IXiNDON April 23 l)e Grasse makes her rograaa to-morrow to lbs We t Indies after being Tonethe, with Ihe (Vilomlue. she will maintain regular service \<> thr French West Indies. Barbados. Trin,db %  o embark at ?louthamplon to-morrow *• West Indies %  *i b e l aa sn ai i>t them %  lha growing % %  iproachlruj seonornle alump. Ths atauaa also Upon to npporl the ^land of Wes'ei r Eurni %  i i i mallj .tit. II Iced 1 B lah and Italian notn> % %  Those among European W A TO, • i .Mm advocate uarmal in v.iklng of the pie i clause, argue It might counterai-t the US tendency to keep unporta out of the U.S market. Beyond ..rgue It might bring t behind l I v irooaan nations' quI lematic slep* to defeat the i and banitul economies—IJ.P. Sahros Cut HuiN %  BptTl Uniteri BtStS* I Hi whlcn k'no'ked out four I Tuesday went sereamlng I North Kot Cnmmuni<' cuttlnS %  the four bagged Tuesday, one was B Jet cauKht In I : Manchun .Id Yak 9 propelU-r-finven nghters whirh v.. .!r-tilp al I %  the Korean %  Valu Hlver. Diving Sabre ieU ripped them to shredi — TJ*. The pia<|ue contauisd iiUon adoptad bj ths AaI 0 Istlon l;st >eai voicing ah the Argen1 line (lovernment of 'one of the %  i>.liter* 'if the world t'.P. Truce Talks frtterrupted PANMI'NJOM April 23 i iubbornls in horl ilile seas i < %  'of Ihe 1 ry ban %  %  As If t i lllmg I'-Till going on BM d*yl Taika atarlad, a 'nlted N.i'i.,1 irtlll lamnud Into l • I %  • "i i I %  kt, met foi only nil!) Th*' had • DUMI foi t i.rogrcss.—U.P. '. •• Kl Liuvei I Bthi i i>M-nii Ttti.ii raapal i p iThe L*ii*tivr Cassaefl aasaSsdaj passed wHhout k|ertk. a fsiH slvlm ihe l.ovrn.or m-l t-eu I ttve I mmiller niihoril* !• i >*end *poxiri.u-l4I4SSSO o. ihr l-w impwwd sn tbl* Tser'a t sHcar for Utr IBSTM fundt. BaB I -.ubilKalUM. r*hab •.titl snd 1 iiiiniir •velf'srr In i 1 Ihr iiru.I U.11. L l a iB l l .ucsr. Uwi.h. %  UkUtsOas UMI priee ' e*.i* pee M> uBu-h i Ihe vantr prkr tn hwl sear he gfkea which Ihr i-tmaejner utll pa lor Ihe Ibree I %  I II Will be R. 10 and II BOaM per fb lor ihe r u paeUea iisalsa, he prevtslom of lha Bill onlv • Ppl\ U. sum minufstiured ihi. rear, and n b praajsaad th.it Ihe Whole qursllun af Ihe prlee *f asgsi tut I--*i rnuaaaB*fc*d -Il ill t., (-. Ml-ldrle i %  year The -ui.-i.i uill Ii austabi .iiiho ..i rssk** a trealei ih.>n and r I* a will be a lp.ii-' r>sul. In i ratal dap the brown brlshler mlout a vena* lu'rorliirlns 'I i ..i B aera aa ri mid ihr iiuri-. oi iiu. ii.ii B aai ui MI. i Mi.il* in th llbleeU "dl Krasssw. bul if Honoarabl* Mesnbrrs will hear wllh nu I -hinilil like to .ihl a few CVtra tt unto i>i i Md nulion %  ar .me yum thr price paid fat vorr> io ihr Oersre in.ni and Ihe Inrrease in Ike price of snsar *old for loctl eonsumptlon in-, bern one of Ihe items uhleh hir.i>rn eausr far parllrular com-rrn. I\,TUU\.Kimmlllri' i. dolio lU In IH imwrr lo Mop Ihti inrreaae Baaaa Baaa has hren *p'si b> Basalrri C^aasUMsa tn eonutrrlns Ihe qurMion .ind I am Murrv lhal II hibeen necessary In .etl ieHim .tld %  I iium ,1 |.i consider II u| -m h -horl notice. The stocks of IS5I sucai jre on Ihe IMIHU ol runninn nut. and It Ifor that rsaasa hsSf I have been advlaed that It as bmprrallve thai Ihe Bill should be drill HIUI out ol its normal lam, [l arlll be nbssrvad that the Bill Ugai m.mul iiDemocral wrtie mj i n rJ i the Island during the • on page % Atom Itonili Kepi To Plan WORLD FAMOUS ALES fROM BURTON. ENGLAND AND IOKII ALEXANDBJt Weal 9 Build-up May Prevent War LOUOON A %  Lord All daj laal %  up 111,1} I" start of •v r III He told Uie I %  point that eesn %  %  I 1 %  %  Mr ;>eriod I r I-4.H VUlAa Nl I .1 Vpr ,J The nalio of IkH i ii'ii Btatai aton Ie borno astsi flay in Turv Valh ill i • .1. • ttfrareiM from the gre.'it 1: Kim %  %  • biona. i c' This immh dealt a fast clean lethal bane ssactlj oa











ESTABLISHED 1895







B’dos Scouts Celebrate

St. George’s Day At

Harrison College
200 Attend Church

Parade

: POTTED Sports at Harrison College yesterday evening
highlighted the Scouts’ celebrations of

Service

the day. The Scouts

taking part in the sports showed great enthusiasm and

thrift.
St. George’s Week began
Campaign by the Scouts of t

was paid to those people who gave jobs to Scouts during |

their Bob-A-Job Week.

poreeny with a Good Turn
e island. Special attention

Over 200 Scouts and Guides attended the Church Par- |
ade Service which was held at St. Michael’s Cathedral ‘|
from 11.00 a.m. Dean Hazelwood conducted the service. |

Later in the day—at 4.00 p.m.—a Wolf Cub Parade Ser- |
vice was held at St. Ambrose Church. |

After the morning Service at the Cathedral, the Scouts

marched over to the Y.M.C.A.
try districts took lunch.

After lunch the Scouts from the country districts visit-

ed the Barbados Bottling Co.,
they were treated to free dri

where those from the coun-

Ltd., Roebuck Street, where

where they were given as many biscuits as they wanted.

The Potted Sports, so called because of being concen-
trated in one small area where all the events took place
together, began shortly after 4.30 p.m. |

Twenty tearfis from various troops—some troops enter- |
ed two teams—took part in the sports which were high-
lighted by the Bread and Jam Race. Each team was com-
prised of seven representatives,

There were ten stations in the circle and judges were
placed at each station. Two teams at a time took part in

each event.
what to do.

|
nks and the Biscuit Factory |
|
|

As the Bread and Jam Race began the first two teams

ran up to the table with gleaming eyes.

two slices of bread, plastered

|
{
|
The judges at each station told contestants |
!

On the table were
with jam. The contestants |

were in all smiles until they heard that their hands would

be tied behind their backs.

After this was announced the |

teams found it difficult to get a representative.

Each representative had

to make use of his chen and

After

overcoming that difficulty, they ate the bread with plea-

sure.

Another amusing event was the Charlie Chaplin Race.

In this the contestant carried

a football between his knee

and a boxing glove on his head. Twirling a staff, he ran

towards the finishing line.

He afterwards returned quick-

ly to hand over the ball, glove and staff to one of his team

mates.

There was also the Tunnel Ball
Relay Race. In this the members
of each team passed the ball be-
tween their legs to each other.
This was one of the first races to
be completed.

Many Scouts also found inter-
est in the Standing Long Jump.
Contestants were forced to jump
without taking a run. "This made
it a bit difficult. The * Scouts
sprung high into the air but they
were not able to jump very far.

The Stone Race was similar to
the Potato Race, a regular fea-
ture at Girls’ School Sports. @n
this occasion stones replaced the
potatoes which are now very ex-
pensive. The stones were fairly
small and sometimes hid them-|
selves in the grass, making it
even more difficult for contest-
ants. It was noticeable that at
the end of the evening’s proceed-|
ings all the stones were there.
With the Potato Race, sometimes
a few potatoes disappear of their |
own accord of course. |

pais near eerie desinarneniirasienesieeratianai=neay hie

At another station there was
the Tug-O-War event in progress.
In this event the bigger Scouts
regularly took advantage of the
smaller ones:

Throwing The Ping-Pong Ball
was extremely difficult. Of the
first two teams which took part,
only one contestant was success
ful There was very little wind
blowing to divert the ball but
the distance to the container into
which the ball had to be thrown
was over six feet.

Catching The Staff called for |
agility. Each judge held a staff)
which was suddenly released. A
representative from each team had
to catch the staff before it struck
the ground. The team with the
most points won. |

The small Scouts were at home
in Climbing The Telegraph Pole.
A basketball pole was used for
the occasion and the small scouts,
who were most likely accustomed
to climbing trees, swiftly got to
the top of this pole.

@ on page 6



PRESIDENTS MEET IN WASHINGTON



THE NATION’S CHIEF EXECUTIVE, President Harry S. Truman (left) has

a warm greeting for Alexander F.

Jones, president of the American

Society of Newspaper Editors, as the two shake hands following Mr.

‘Truman’s press conference in the a

uditorium of the Smithsonian In-

stitute in Washington, President Truman, ‘asked at the conference if he
thought he had the power to seize the nation’s newspapers and radio
he did the steel industry, replied thet the President has to act for

itever is for the best of the countrs

‘International Soundphoto)



Synod Bans Birth Control

GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 23.

Taking the opportunity to ans-
wer people who had asked wheth-
er the Church had made any pro-
nouncement on the subject of birth
control, His Grace the Archbishop
of the West Indies, Most Reverend
Alan John Knight, when deliver-
ing his charge at a service mark-
ing the opening of the Synod of

the Diocese in the Cathedral
Church of St. George last night
said: “Birth prevention measures

are contrary to the laws of God
He referred enquirers to the de-

claration of the 1946 Synod which

was “To the further safeguarding

assembled, have felt bound to con-
demn unequivocally, the recom-
mendations contained in the re-
port of the West India Commission
of 1945 on birth prevention meas-

ures as contrary to the laws of
God. Solution of this and any
such .social problem is to be

sought and found in individual re-
sponsibility and self control.”

“You will agree,” added His
Grace, “that. this pronouncement
leaves no room for misunderstand-

ing what the teaching of the
Church is about this much debated
subject.’

His Grace next addressed him-

of the Sacrament. of Holy Matri-} self tothe Church's teaching about

mony we, the Bishops

in Synod |

marriage, —)

be
nose to get the bread into his mouth. All contestants were | 2000

however able to get the bread into their mouths.

RED REBELS 'U.S.—Spanish Talks

LOSE BIG

fi 7 . |
OPERATIONS |
HANOI, April 23. |
Communist rebels lost some |
men in big cleanup |
operations launched by the |
French Union troops recently, |
according to a French head-|
quarters estimate of casualties. |
The announcement said the
four operations
“Porto”, “Polo”, and “Turko”
all in areas near Handi; “had





|

“Mercury”







BREAD AND JAM

The Bread and Jam Rec + at the Scouts’ Potted Sports
at Harrison College yeste: dey evening provided much
amusement“for onlookers. [y. this rece, the contestants,
with their hands tied behind ‘heir backs, had to eat bread
and jam from the table. !/ st contestants got through
quickly with the bread but hx | to make a second attempt
to clean up the jam.



rh rrtrentnpehrem lig nage —a

THURSDAY, =e 24,. 1982

j
|

|
|
|

|
|

|

|

Members of the Board present | e
were Messrs T. E, Went, C, Glin- S
don Reed, W. H. Carter and H. | e l

presented
they |
bers of the |
workmen and to set examples to on tests
others who had not had their op-

portunity

Since the scheme for training ALBANY, New York, April 23. tion
journeymen apprentices started in| Supporters of General Eisen- “wo. en'blel
1924, 293 apprentices have satis-}hower claimed most of New York's G. B. Ev
factorily completed their five year 6 Republican Convention dele~ Hu
period and have been awarded | "ates as a result of his one-sided »nticipated
certificates, victory in Tuesday’s primary. The é ;

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



Locally Consumed

Sugar Will Stay. At
8 Cenis Per Pound

20 Get Bursa ry TMeaaced without objection 2, Bil
Certificates

giving the Governor-in-Fxeca-
Special mention was made of Benjamin Yarde, ship

tive Committee authority to

|

\

| the price of locally consumed
carpenter, when he and 19 other journeymen the respee-|

sugar, thereby stabitising the
price af 8 cents pér Th which iv
the same price as last year.
‘The prices which the consumer
will pay for the three grades of
sugar will be 8; 10 and 11 cents
per Ib for the respective grades,
The provisions of the Bill only
apply to sugar manufactured
this year, and it is proposed that
the whole question of the price

spend approximately $140,000 of
the levy imposed on this year's
sugar for the three funds, price

were yesterday awarded bursary certificates for the respec-

tive trades they learnt during the past five years. The cer-

tificates were presented by the Board of Industrial Training

stabilisation, rehab'litation and
labour welfare, in subsidizing
throught their chairman Mr. T. E. Went when the Board
met yesterday. ea

year,
The subsidy will be used on browa
crystals, although the quantity
of yellow crystals Mi
greater than thg Wert):
and i+ is ant) that

Husbands, and the secretary M of sugar for local consumption
G. Weekes, | shall be reconsidered before next
Before the apprentices were! e ven
/

with the Certificates,
the mem-

be honest

were enjoined by
Board to











; retiring N.A.T.O, chief backed by; Crystals to @

eer bit rea Proll of 0. alias Thomas }. Dewey won erystals depe'’
ee, rat ean aii even of 12 scattered Republican the brown er
ing; — saingr, tailor, pe hectrin contests. Senator Robert A. Taft} brighter colour P
binder, bm yp > oh Rem iggy Sota tock only one. Four winners were average consumer
clan, motor mechanic, ¢ pe npledged but . rganization
(mechanical) shoemaker, plumber, or ealaites re eee Introducing the Bill, Hon, the

~ {ship carpenter, painter or black- On the Democratic side there], Colonial Secretary said: 3

smith ; wan no clean-cut test between | The purpose of this Bill is |

Before distributing the certifi-] presidential hopefuls although| out succinetly in the Objects ‘bl
‘ates. Mr. Went told the journey-|Senator Estes Kefauver picked + Reasons, but if Honours ie
nen passing out that they had/ene delegate in Schenestady Members will bear with me 1
ome there five years ago and|majority of state Democratic should like to add a few extra

Proceed Smoothly

By EDWARD DEPURY

WASHINGTON, April 23
Highly reliable sources said that current negotiations
in Madrid for bilateral military accord between the United

S.ates and Spain were proceeding very satisfactorily.
They said negotiations are beyond the preliminary
stage and serious discussions have started in’ regard to the
United States desire for airand navalbases and the Spanish

need for arms and equipment,

~~ They-considered-these ncgotiations cotiid be concluded



cost the Reds epproximately| et gee
. : ‘ os ( py C Ss.
1 3,000 killed, and 2,000 taken | ¥ , : 7? dip 4 These coutibds understood that
prisoners. Spanish negotiators were showing
The first of these encieting| é a sense of reality - 0 van ote
operations “Mercury” launched a - y were available in the United States
wonth ago to cateeineate the| Farnum For for supplying Spanish armed
fifth Division cut deeply into| rie - forces and as to the possibility of
Communist Forces and after the}} Finland Fund obtaining machinery for helping
operation Genera} Raoul Salan, | to streamline Spanish arms fac~
commanding the French Forces | Have you yet contributed to tories. They pointe da out that oy
said the Red Division had been the Farnum for Finland Fund? ing to the Korean. war and numer-

so badly mauled that it no longer |
existed as a fighting force, but
had been split up into disorgan-
ized grouvs.

Satisfactory Attacks
The other three operations al-

though not so large were also}
termed “satisfactory” by the |
French Headquarters and except

for a small scale “mopping up

of villages, are virtually com- |
pleted.
Headquarters said French |

Union Troops had captured more |
Communist arms and equipment
during these operations than ever |
before in the delta. Meanwhile, |
after a week of bitter fighting in|
the area of rapids some 20 miles!
east of Hanoi, the Franco
Vietnam troops were now in pos-

session of the major base for
Communist Vietminh operations
—U-P.



On Official
Visit To Moscow

LONDON, April 23.
Paul Mason, Assist-
Secretary of State
responsible for Soviet affairs in
the British Foreign Office, has
left for Moscow on a short visit.

Mason, one of Foreign Secret-
my Anthony Eden's advisers on
Soviet Russia and Eastern Eu-
rope, left London yesterday on
what officials described as a*rou-
tine visit of the British Embassy
in Moscow.”

Officials denied he is travelling
on a special diplomatic mission
but did not exclude the passibil-
ity that he might meet Kremlin
representatives during his (rief
stay in Moscow.

Mason superuises the Foreign
Office's northern department
which deals with Russia. the
Satellite states and Scandinavian
countries.

A career diplomat, he had serv-|
ed after the war in Sofia, Bul-

Officially
ant Under



garia as envoy extraordinary and|European nations’ quest for sys-

Minister Plenipotentiary.—U.P.

“DE GRASSE” ON
W.I. RUN AGAIN

(From Our Own
Correspondent)

LONDON. April 23
S.S. De Grasse makes her
first voyage to-morrow to
the West Indies after being
refitted; Together with the
Colombie, she will maintain
regular service to the French



West Indies, Barbados,
Trinidad, Venezuela, Col-
ombia and Jamaica with
ailings every two or three
veeks About 100 passen-
gers from England are ex-
pected to embark at South-
ampton to-morrow for the

West Indies



This fund has been started ous worldwide arms commitments

, ) Inited States the choice
to defra the expenses of t the United States
cyclist Ken vainnal at the - arms readily available for
Olympic Games in Helsinki Spain is not large at present but
next July. they believed that the United
Donations are accepted at States is in a_ position to help
Barclay’s Bank the Royal spain considerably in moderniz~-
Bank of Canada and the Bar ing her arms factories

bados Advocate. . ,

AMT. PREV, ACK. $250.42 Depend on Spending
ere a , = On the other hand they believed
TOTAL $251.42 that Spanish officials are counting

heavily on the United States navy

and airforce spending consider-

.t}able sums of dollars in Spain for

ne bases and laying
ies

Move By West ome vn supp

The sources



said that while Ad-
. T. â„¢ | niral William M. Fechteler, Naval
urope oO Get | Chief of Staff is reported to be-

| lieve that the United States Sixth

U S Aid Lil el , | Fleet does not require much ae
vay of supply bases in Spain,

wT ag | other Admivals including Admiral

| William



Carney, Commander of
:
By K. C. THALER he Sixth Fleet argue such bases
LONDON, April 23 e vital
West European nations may in-|,,. 1 hese sources stressed that the
voke shortly: N.A.'T.0_ Pact pros United States’ Airforce and navy
visions on economic co-operation ould provide pons ot soln
n search for United States assist- for Spain if wee Ne re ia
ance to meet the new threat to! @ on page’:
their economic and financial Stab-!
ility, |
Under N.A.T.O, treaty, all mem-|}

bers pledged to eliminat
in their international
policies and encourage
collaboration between
of them,

Behind the moves to invoke this
clause lies the growing fear of an
approaching economic slump. ‘

The clause also might be called
upon to support the stand of West-
ern European countries against the
projected U.S. import restrictions
already formally attacked by Brit-
ish and Italian notes of protest

Those among European N.A.T.O,
members who advocate formal in-
voking of the pacts of the economic
clause, argue it might counteract
the U.S. tendency to keep imports
out of the U.S. market. Beyond
this, they argue it might bring the
U.S. more actively behind the

conflict}
economic }
economi
any or all



tematic steps to defe@at.the re-
current dollar problem and. its
harmful repercussions on their LORD ALEXANDER

economies.—U.P.



x | West’s Build-up
Sabres Cut Rails | May Prevent. War

April 23 LONDON, April

|
SEOUL





United States Sabre jets which | 4 .
knocked out four Russian planes|, Britain's new Defense Minister
Tuesday went screaming back into} +/°T? Alexander said on Wednes
North Korea today to chop at} @@y that the we defense build
Communist supply lines, cutting} UP may preven the tart of
rails in 76 plaees before noon. Of| World War HII He told the
the four bagged Tuesday, one wags} Pritish House of Lords that
» M.LG. 15 jet caught in the air as| Western strength has already at-
t tried to sneak into Korea from} ta@ine 1 point that convinces hin
Manchuria. The other three re| that potential enemies themselves
ld Yak 9 propelHer-driven figi re not sure they are sufficiently

hict ere found like challenge the Alli

i parked on the airstriy f ie World War II ¢ ~
Sinuiju on the Korean side f 1€ er irned tf the we i
Yalu River. I t Dn ortable period

Diving Sabre jets ripped them to xiet before t m feel
shreds,—U.P, U.P

juring the intervening period had



nd he sincerely
vould appreelate what

tion of the American Newspaper
Publishers Association, said news-

a plaque expressing the Associa-/
tion's gratitude “for his magnifi- |
cent

sociation last year voicing shock
at the expropriation by'the Argen- |
tine Government of
great newspapers of the world.”

stubbornly in short and apparently
itile session:
sual routine by the crash of artil-
leory barrage

illing i
utter

Tnited
lammed into Communist position ¥

nd caused a

and



leaders has endorsed W. Averell words of explanation.

srogressed from boyhood to man-|tlarriman, Mutual Security Ad-| or some years the price paid for
1000 ninistrator sugar exported from the Island
: The few seattered contests} has been rising and every time

Duty To Community

it has risen there have been
The Government had been

automatic increases in the retail

uld hardly serve as a barometer
Dewey were not backing Eisen-

mough to see that there was the]; wor “Voters elected 90 Conven- price of sugar sold locally. The
necessity for providing them with] \45 delegates. Six delegates at inevetses in the price of sugat

knowledge which would help] orge will be picked by the Re- exported have been of great ben-
them to beeome useful citizens, | -ablican State Committee. efit to the Island, and the money

hoped that they
had bee

will send 94 to their
including four at
’

Democrat
~onvention

has found its way into the
pockets of growers of cane and



jone for them and remember that | large. workers in the industry, and,
@ On Page 5 In Pittsburg, General fBisen- indirectly, has helped most of

\ower swept Pennsylvania's the inhabitants of the Island.
“ Presidential ~“populerity’’~-Pri-f-pne steady increase in the cost
EDI I OR OF nary with a half million vote of living has, however, been &
: lead over Harold E. Stassen his} continual worry to the Govern-
6 , 99 nearest opponent and his sup- ment, and the increase in the
LA PRENSA porters claimed at least five of price of sugar sold for local con-
I , eight delegates in bitterly dis- sumption has been one of the
HONOLU RED puted Allegny County items which has given cause for
The State’s Republicans na particular concern, Executive
NEW YORK, April 23 ods lr petainle Mighars spit Va Committee is doing all in its

Dr. Alberto Gainza Paz, self- Democrats each elected 60 whine power to stop this increase
exiled editor of the Buenos Aires |Steucted delegates yesterday 0} Some time has been spent by
newspaper La Prensa,,in an ad-|ielr July Conventions in Chi-| pyeoutive Committee in consid-
dress before the annual Conven- | &@89. ering the question, and I am

senator Robert A. Taft whose

sorry that it has been necessary
name was not listed on the ballot

to ask this Honourable Council

paper men must fight for every| received enough write in votes to consider it at such short
man’s right to know what is going |for hin to forge ahead of Stassen notice. The stocks of 1951 sugar
on in the world who appeared with Eisenhower are on the point of running out,

Gainza Paz was presented with on the preferential ticket. ‘Taft's
eupporters said they hoped to get

four delegates in heavily popu

and it is for that reason that t
have been advised that it is im-
perative that the Bill should be

fight for a democratic fre@) jsted Allegny County dealt with out of its normal turn.
press ’ vet} Senator Estes Kefauver led! = 1t will be observed that the Bill
aa enone clantas . _ eH iit other presidential hopefuls inj only applies to sugar manufae-
f a resolution adopted by the As-|". dispirited Democrat write in|tured in the Island during the

contest. —U.P.

@ on page 5

“one of the



UP,

Truce Talks
Interrupted

PANMUNJOM, April 23

Korean truce negotiators argued

‘ |
~ WORLD FAMOUS ALES

FROM

BURTON, ENGLAND

As if to remind debaters that -
still going on 288 days
the Truce Talks started, a
Nations artillery

shaken out of the

barrage

t outside the 1,000 yard security

me

The barrage hook truce tents

Communist trans-
or to halt briefly. Staff officers
‘ussing armistice upervision,

including Russian and airfield con-
truction deadlocks, met for
a few minutes
blame
make any progress. —U.P, |

only
They had time to

each other for failure to



} AND

Atom Bomb |

i} . t
Kept To Plan | Worthington
abst te soa

United States atomic bomb yester-
day in “Fury Valley”
Nevada hills,
fotally
Bikini

newsmen

deep in the
revealed a weapon
different from the great
tests, according to some
who covered all three
ists. a7

BREWED AND BOTTLED
TO PERFECTION

This bomb dealt a fast clean
lethal blow exactly on schedule
exactly in conformity with
blueprints nd then was done|
with it |
Tt »ombs of Bikir ere more
sctaining ith treat ividly } NOW ON SALE AT
loure cloud n ‘ ved by]
itinuc lightning |
The aieeame, phere of h J. N. GODDARD & SONS L
and bomt eemed to reveal ® ™ RD ON td
mpep of u ‘ ri olle orn ry
ther territ ession of BRIDGETOWN
; |
I ¢ la :
£ I it phase
maetiy on time—_4 :
3.000 feet in ith 10
pinpoint target 1]
UP


PAGE TWO



NV R. WILLIAM A. BROWN,
Chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Barbados Electric
Supply. Corporation Ltd., arrived



yesterday morning from Eng-
ty T.C.A. via Montreal on a
ss visit and is staying at the
dser Hotel
Leaving Today
UE4o leave to-day by B.W.LA.
for Tobago are Mr, Henry
Gotfredson, a retired businessman
of Wisconsin and Mrs. Gotfredson
who were here for the past three
weeks staying at the Marine Hotel.
They expect to spend about
three or four days in Tobago be-
fore réturning to the U.S.A. by
Pan American Airways.

Retired Businessman
AY R. and Mrs, Emanuel Rimbaud
of Martinique who had been
holidaying
days, Will be

here for the past ten

remaining for a fur-
ther period staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Mr. Rimbaud is a retired busi-

nessman,
First Visit
ae. the passengers arriv-
ing here yesterday morning
from Montreal by T.C.A. was Mr.
G. S. Whelpton from Windsor, On-
tario. He has come out here on his
first visit and will be remaining for
about two.or three weeks, staying
at the Occan View Hotel,





He said that they have had a
cold wet spring and two weeks
f the temperature in Windsor
was 26° F., but when he left, it
had risen considerably and was
about 65° F.

Mr, Whelpton is the owner of
Whelpton Electric Co. in Windsor

Sales Representative

Returns
M* LESLIE CORBIN, Sales
Representative of Messrs.
S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd., re-
turned from Jamaica over the
week-end by B.W.LA., after a
week’s visit.





Carb

| SOCKET CARTOON
83, OSBER?T LANCASTER



* But,
could do the Ascot
mentary—why I can tell a
Dior from a Jacques Fath a

darling, Ot course /
com-

quarter of} a mile away, no
+ matter how jast they're
moving 1"

Keen Golfer
AYING his second visit to Bar-
bados is Mr. W. Sutherland, a
Scotsman who has been residing
in Caracas, Venezuela for the past
five years. He arrived here last
week by B.W.L.A. for two weeks’
holiday and is staying at the Ocean
View Hotel,

A keen golfer, Mr, Sutherland
is an accountant employed with
the Shell Caribbean Petroleum
Company in Caracas,

Spent Three Mcnths
ISS ETTA HAREWOOD of St.
Lawrence Gap returned to
the island on Sunday from Trini-
dad where she spent three months’
holiday. She was the guest of Miss
Elsie Richards of Port-of-Spain.





Calling

. ‘* #
Winter Visifor
R. A. E. NORCROSS of Otta-
wa, Canada, and a regular
visitor to Barbados,’left for Trini-
dad on Monday by B.W.1LA. to
take steamship opportunity back
home. During his three months
here he was staying at the Marine

Hotel.

U.K. Director
OLIDAYING in Barbados is
Mr. S. Hallar, Director of

Kenyon Son and Craven Ltd. of
Rotherham, England. He arrived
yesterday morning by T.C.A. via
Mortveal and is staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Winding Up Holiday

OL. and Mrs. Colin Osbourne,

parents of Mrs. Charlie Man-
ning. are now winding up their
holiday at the Marine one paar
to returning to their home in
ilton, Ontario, by the Lady Rodney
when it leaves later in the week.
They arrived here about six weeks
ago and were staying at the Col-
ony Club, St. James,

Spent Four Months’

Holiday
RS. RITA MORRELL, a Bar-
badian, who has been domi-
ciled.in Canada is paying her first
visit to the island in twenty years.

Mrs. Morrell is a sister of Mrs.
Frank Moore of Bank Hall and has
been spending a four months’ holi-
day as the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Moore.

Mrs. Morrell is in charge of the
Salon Vendome of Messrs Robert
Simpson, Montreal. She returns to
Canada this week-end by the
R.M.S. Lady Rodney.

.

For Summer Holidays
RS. FRANCES SWINTON of
London, England, who arrived

over the week-end by the SS.
Golfito, has come to spend the
summer holidays. She is staying at
the Marine Hotel.



Your Feet Affect Your Face

The feet very largely govern the
prettiness of the face! It sounds a
foolish statement—until you stop
to think about it. Then you realise
enly too well that if the feet are
uncomfortable, the hurt shows
immediately in the face—in fur-
rowed brow and pained expression,
If things are not quickly put right
the limes turn into permanent
wrinkle®, and the general expres-
sion “sours;’ And lines are more
easily ingrained than they are
eradic*ted. The feet must be kept
comfortable if prettiness of the
face is to be maintained. Preven-
tion is- indeed better than cure.

foot ills are seli infiicieu
Culsed t~licugn personal carejess~-
wat Go hot fil proper-

Wass Wiel dv OL sult the Suape
Ol tue POOL and Hnegiect of the Teer
bucihociVes,

si0st

ic adive

‘The very varied styles of shoes
avilable voday allied with tem-
uune vanity, lead to many foot
troubles, A gir. falls in love with
1 special style, and, even though
it isn’t perfectly comfortable, buys

it. “It will become more comfort-
able’ as she wears it in, she con-
templates, Wishful thinking,
Usually the discomfort persists,
and in less than no time the dam-
age is done a painful corn
makes its appearance,

Do, do take great care over the
“dressing” of your feet. If a
favoured style is not comfort-
able, pass it by. There may be a
near style better suited to the

shape of your feet. And if al the
fancy designs make your feet feel
unhappy, give them the go by,
and choose a well-fitting court, a
flattie of a laced style. The lat-
ter, you will recollect, has recent-
ly been greatly favoured by our
lovely Queen—and she has to

stand aS much as any one of us.
It is not essential to buy expen-
sive shoes. to ensure comfort.
Good buys: are always the best.

It is all a matter of fitting style
to foot—an essential that can’t be
eniphasised tod strenuously.
Size Right

Fortunately today we are not so
size conscious as we were years
ago. Size six has taken premier
place .over the then more usual
four, size seven is quite ordinary,
while it isn’t unheard of to find
feet sized eleven, Flatties are
fashionable, and very comfort-
able, but though this
like model goes well with tweeds

and business clothes, it is not at-

tractive for dance or dressy wear.
And aching feet can
caused through changing from
low to high heels, Keeping to
one hee] level is the wisest idea,

it is more inducive to foot com-

fort, and obviously less encourag-

ing to aching ankles. But it is up
to you to work out the shoe prob-

lem for yourself.

Corn Cures
Corns and callouses are the
bugbear of all feet and, when

shoes are misfits, appear almost
overnight. If you have been un-
jucky enough to acquire one— or

more—do get rid of them at once;
give them home treatment. There
are very many excellent propri-
etary cures on the market, But
you must follow the instructions,
and use them persistently and
regularly until the corn has gone,
‘Then see to it that the shoe that
caused it is banished. Ruthless
and extravagant, but cheaper in
the long run than corn cures—
and wrinkle ointment!

Dampness between the toes en-

courage soft corns which are
just as painful and diffieult to
dispese of as hard ones. So do

make sure that you dry your feet

thoroughly after bathing, pow-
dering between the toes,
Helpful Hints

You can mix your own cures

at home: —A _ tablespoonful each



BY THE WAY... & seochamber

HE suggestion made at last
year’s Liberal Summer School
(by an F erly ugly girl) that

the talk man and the two short
men should all huddle together
So as to make the two hats appear
to cover the three heads does not

get rid of the difficulty I men-
tioned; the tall man would have
to crouch down to the level of
the other two. Otherwise one of
the hats” Would be tilted and
crooked, and would probably
slip off the two heads.

If there were two tall men and
ene shert man nothing in the
problern would be changed, The
two tall men would huddle under
one hat, and the short man would
have the two hats, And all three
would took just as ‘ridiculous as
usual. No, There must be some
other way out of the difficulty.
Travellers’ joy

SEE that it will soon be possi-

ble to pay for a holiday on
the instalment system. ,

Official: I'm sorry, Mrs, Wag-
staff, but there will be no lunch
for you at Epernay to-day

Mrs. W. : No lunch! Why?

Official : You have not paid
your fifth instalment as per con-
tract

Mrs. W. : But

Official : See Schedule H. Miss
Ghilvers has been sent home for

alling behind with her payments,
ine moment, Mr. Bollard. That



lemonade you had at Bar-le-Duc
makes you fourpence in arrears.
It will be added to your next in-
stalment due at Rheims,

Miss Grable kicks off

pico sar shonge,

mame shos, The African
proverb came to mind as I
looked at a picture of mounted
police charging a mob. It was
the weekly stampede of a scream-
ing crowd outside a football

ploosat lar

Rupert and the



The Toy Scout brings a large

“I've been sent ahead to try to
ease things for Santa Claus,"’ he
murmurs, “and to find out
what would be the shortest way
he could come without missing

dust Opened

PRINTED SPUNS_ 36”
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS 36”

WHITE, P

@

EACH, BLUE.

“slipper”

swiftly be

—~———__—_-





and Nutchester is th:
Pussyville is over here. Nutwood
is about
three."*

moment and looks thoughtful,

of Epsom salts, salt, borax and
sdap flakes, keep them stored in
ajar and add a little to your
nightly hot foot bath, Then plunge
your feet into cold water after-
wards, and after drying thor-
oughly, rub them with methy-
lated spirit. Methylated spirit is
excellent for hardening the feet.
This you should remember when
you decide to first go stocking-
less. It will prevent those agon-
ising blisters so quickly caused
by friction on bear skin.

Here is another “extra” even
if you do not give your feet a
special daily bath. give them a
final rinse in cold water, and rub
them with eau de cologne
“another hardener and stimu-
lant.””

Tired Feet

When complaining of tired feet
try a few exercises to relax
them. This will take the tiredness
out of them. Stand with bare feet
parallel, six to eight inches apart.
Rise on the balls of the feet,
twisting heels inwards and trying
to grasp the floor with the toes.
Do this about twenty times,
slowly. Then walk tiptoe, bare-
foot, until it is necessary to drop
back on the heels, It’s tiring
while you do it, but it pays in re-
gults,

Other foot exercises are:—

Grasp a large marble with the §

toes and try to take as many
steps as you can without drop-
ping it.

Lie flat on your back with
knees stiff, feet and toes stretched
dut in a slightly pigeon-toes po-
‘sition. Count four, and at the
same time bend the ankles and
bring the toes towards you as
much as possible. In addition to
aiding tired feet, this exercise
aids the arches, toes, calves, and
ankles and keeps the feet in per-
fect condition.





ground. But it looked very like
a picture of the great days when
Mrs. Dietrich used to escape from
her hotel in a milkfloat, and when
a piece torn off her fur coat by
an admirer would fetch $500 at
(Tattersall’s. The police must be
dvzading the days when a foot-
ball match coincides with the
visit to the district of a film
actress. One day an enterprising
club will pay, say Miss Betty
Grable to kick off. The military
will be called out (watch the
lady handle them) and the whole
district will be smashed and
torn to bits.



Toy Scout—10— i 0

sini. This vilage i is rather
map from the car and spreads it hard to fit in, That’s why I was
out between Rupert and Willie. gy sie and having’ look

ae way and

in the middle of the
He falls silem for e

OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF COMGALEUM RUGS,

BY THE YARD.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

: BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Business and Pleasure
R. HENRY LIPPMAN from
Trinidad arrived here recent-
ly by B.W.1LA. with his sisters
Mrs. A. Fomneneky of La ir
Bolivia and Mrs. Behrend
Hartford, Connecticut, who are
svending a holiday with him at
the St. Lawrence Hotel.

Mr. Lippman’s visit is really one
on business coupled with pleasure
since he is Director of Colonial
Advertising (Barbados) Ltd., and
is over here to be on hand for the
completion of the mew Barbados
Telephone Directory which his
company is producing. He ex-
pects this will be issued within the
next,few days,

* v«
On Inspection Visit
R. D, CARDMASTER, Resi-
dent Inspector for the West
Indies of the New India Insurance
Co., Ltd. with headquarters in
Trinidad, arrived here on Tuesday
by B.W.LA. on a short visit and
is staying at the Hastings Hotel.
Mr, Cardmaster is now on one
of his monthly inspection visits to
the agencies in the area which in-
cludes British Guiana, Surinam,
Curacao and Aruba. He expects to
return to Trinidad on Saturday on
his way to British Guiana.

St. Lucia Planter
Me A. DUBOULAY, planter of

St, Lucia, arrived on Tuesday
by B.W.1.A. on a short visit and
is staying at the Hotel Royal.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19.76 m., 25.58 m,

4.00 p.m. The News, 410 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Rhythm is Their
Business, 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5.00
p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 6.00 p.m, Welsh Diary,
6.15 p.m. Crazy People, 6.45 p.m. Sports
Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News
From Britain.
7.15—10.30 p.m. — 25.53 m., 31,32 m,







7.15 p.m, We See Britain, 7.45 p.m.
Music of the Regiments, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Special Despatch,
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m, From the
Editorials, 9.00 p.m. There's None So
Rare, 10.00 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. It Stuck In, My
Mind, 10.30 p.m. Oliver Twist.



Se nee



Across

- Redact on tick? (6)
To the crow it has uplift. (3)
Noticesdle in gifts to a sister.
(5) ¥. Gape. (4)
. Boring but it has a red ray. (6)
Colour 1 get when mixed with
explosive. (4)
Hangs out art (4)
The artist is fh "Fruit. (6)
aeeeed down on the course, (3
Consumed, (3) 18, Taste i$
5

> be AP

ta

—

Wickedness no sappers revile. (
Well rooted family line, (4)
. Elephants sacrifice to music, (

Does he play nap most? (7)

Down

It should be binding. (8)

2. Supplies the raid rota. (8)
These tied down to rules of
eating. (4, 5) 4, Bully. (6)
Where to hear the laure! tree ?
(3) 6. Pully informed. (5)
Get a stain out of this, (5)

Says gone to buttonholes. (8)
My brother's children. (6)
But alone holds the nail,

. To spike it’s a balsam. (4)
. Vigour In the U.S.A, ia)

Splution of eee ‘S puzzle.—Acro:

Pee BBS

ia
Sesee

ws
~



1. ab. 4 0 7, Etiolate 10,
Stoker: 13, Eternal: 14. Nimbus; 15,
ar; 16. Pare; 18. Use; 19, Bonus: 21,
Omit; 22, Nave; 23. Ether Down: 1,
Dimension; 2, Restive: 3, Attempt: 5,
Please: 6 Earl; 8. Treasure: 9. Express:
11. Orb trobuini) 4% ours 15, Punch;
i7, Ante; 19, Bee; 20. Out

ee

The battle
of Texas...
~ and the
_ battle
of the
sexes!



wie

LIONEL

meh iN

roa oe VINCENT SHERMAN «ences eZ. WAYNE (







GARDNER



SEN HAGE

dt



Henry VU: A D

HENRY VIII:

PATIENT. By Sir Arthur 8.
MacNalty. Christopher Je@hn- e
son. 18s. 202 pages.

WHAT was wrong with Henry d
VIII? What caused the ulcer in a
his leg which brought him so much
suffering and bad temper? Why
did so many of his children
eight) miscarry or die at birth? g
»me authorities have been ready q

an explanation: the King

tion,
Sir Arthur MacNalty, formerly

By MAX TRELL

THE sky had grown dark and
there were flashes of lightning and |
rumbles of thunder. Knarf and Han-
id, the shadow-children with the
turned-about names, were standing
with their faces pressed against the
window, waiting for the first drops
of rain to fall when al! at once they
heard someone calling their names.
The voice came from the flower-bed
just under the window.

They looked out. It was their
friend King Nep.

“Come out,” he called. “I’ve got
something very interesting to show
you.”

“But it’s going to rain any min-
ute!” said Hanid.

“That’s just why I want you to
come now. It, will be too late when
it stops. Meet me at the edge of the
brook under the willow.” With that
King Nep scurried off and soon dis-
appeared among the tall blades of
grass on the other side of the gar-
den. He was much shorter than a
blade of grass himself.

Edge of Brook

Knarf and Hanid slipped on their
rain-hats and rubbers and made
their way as fast as they could to
the edge of the brook. Meanwhile
the sky had grown even blacker
than before. The lightning flashed
in a dozen places, and the thunder
"@facked like cannon. Just then they
Spied King Nep.

“I know it’s not the best kind
of weather to come out in,” he ex-
plained. “But it’s the only time you
can meet Ben. He’s flying his kite.”

“Ben ?” said Knarf. “Who's Ben?”

“And why should anybody want
to fly a kite when it’s lightning and
thundering and about to rain?”
asked Hanid in astonishment.

“Ben’s been away for a long, long!
time,” said King Nep. “But he some-
times comes back on a day like this.
He’s just. down the edge of the!
brook a little, flying that kite of
his (and this is just the kind of day
he likes to fly it in). He'll be pretty)
busy. But maybe he won't mind if |
you watch him a bit.”

So Knarf and Hanid, filled with |
curiosity about Ben and his kite, |
followed King Nep down along the
edge of the brook. And sure enough, |
just as they went around the turn |
where al the ferns and jack-in-the. |
pulpits grew in a great green mass,
they saw Ben flying his kite.

Ben wasn’t any larger than King





A DIFFICULT Ch ih
istry of Health, pondering all the!

tubercular tendency of the
most fascinating medical problems |

in history, he concludes that the}
King’s sore

difficult case, in more ways than
Rad ccotracted a shameful infec- gne.



King Neptune Had a Friend

—The Shadows Met Hi

° 2 : ° |
ifficult Patient |
hief Medical Officer at the Min-

vidence (including the Pan ae
u=
ors) finds the case not proven. In
judicious study of one of the,

leg” was probably |
ulcer. Nobody will}
Henry VIII was a

varicose
loubt that

World Copyright Reserved
er —LES.



im in a Strange Way—



“Come outside,” King Nep called
to the Shadows,

Nep himself, and he was dressed in
such odd, old-fashioned clothes that
to Knarf and Hanid he seemed to
have stepped out of some old, old
picture. He wore shoes with big
bows on them, and a long coat with
tails. His hair was long and hung
in.a pig-tail at the back of his neck;
and he wore a hat with three cor-
ners. His kite was tossing in the
wind, but he held on tightly to the
string. And at the end of the string,
Knarf and Hanid noticed that a
little key was tied. Ben was stand-
ing on a log.

As soon as King Nep came up
with Knarf and Hanid, Ben nodded
and smiled. “1 suppose,” he said,
“you'd like to know why 1'm flying
my kite in all this lightning and
thunder?”

“Yes, of course we would!” said
Hanid.

“l’m just trying to prove that
lightning is electricity,” he said. ‘1
think | can bring some of it down
from the sky—make it come all the
way down the kite and spark ont
of the key. Just you wait and see
But don’t stand too close, for light-
ning is dangerous.”

Just then there was a great flash
in the sky, and almost at the same
instant a spark flew out of the key.
“It is electricity!” eried Ben. And
the next instant he ran off, shouting
with excitement.

“1 wonder,” said Hanid to King
Nep; “was that Ben Franklin?”

And King Nep smiled, though he
wouldn't say, really, whether it was
er it wasn’t.

Me Oe Ree ee

Grand Calypso Repeat Lerformance :

With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS. %
















It's entertainment a



PE.

a» BRODERICK

mt

CAN Ah GA be

IN THEIR FAREWELL SHOW AT x
Â¥,
y +
EMPIRE — TO-NITE at 8,30 s

A complete change of programme with over 20 new song hits *-.
Also Presenting %

(PERCY GREEN'S ORCHESTRA . . RUBBER LEGS AND HIS

DANUING PARTNER - and

THE RHYTHM KINGS STEEL BAND

t it's BEST .

“A woman like
you isn’t going
to kiss more

‘than one man
like this!”



THIS THEATRE ANNOUNCES THAT WE WILL SHOW

h4 Ord and DAD




COMING ‘SOON
“BLUE LAMP”



BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

James

CAGNEY



TO-DAY's S\SPECIAL 1.30 p.m.
“ROSE OF SANTA ROSA”

HOOSTER a ROOSTER HOT SHOTS. SHOTS

Sat. Special 60 am a 130 pm, Special (0 am & 1.30 p m
Triple Attraction —
“MEN of the TIMBERLAND”
Richard ARLEN. ~Andy DEVINE &
“SIX GUN MUSIC" Tex WILLIAMS
and LES BROWN & BAND

LBSESOSSS SLES SESS SEED SODIOS SEDGE SSS OSES SCS SSG

TO-MORROW * %,
and Continuing Dally 445 & & <0

COME FILL THE CUP

Phyllis THAXTER —Ray mona. _MASSEY- —Gig_ a OUNG

& RIDIN

d WEDNESDAY 30TH, 5 & 8.30.
ON TUESDAY 29TH an aa oni aaa edie

“PLAZA CINEMAS



445 & AMD pm

THE OUTLAW TRAIL’
Charles aan. charles. STARRETT _

er atauls Spectsi sa. Special Sat.
WHOLE SERIAL

THE SPIDER’S WEB

Warren HULL



SER SSSSS



BARBAREFS —Dial 5170
Last 2 Shows To-day 4.30 & %.30
“DEVIL'S HENCHMEN”
Warner BAXTER &
CORONER CREEK (Color)
Randolph SCOTT

THURS. Special 1.°0 p.m
“SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE”
Tex RITTER &

SIX GUN MESA Johnny Mack BROWN

SAT. SPECIAL 1.3) p.m.
“SADMEN'S TERRITORY”
Randolph SCOTT—Gabby HAYES &
“RIDER FROM TUCSON”
Tim HOLT
OPENING FRIDAY STH
“MOM & DAD"

SSESSSSSSESSSSSSGSESE GES SOONG GGG GGG HOGS 99S S5SS95:



THURSDAY,

APRIL 24, 1

a
ue
re







it's the ‘New High’ in Vaudeville

GLOBE presents

A MONSTER VAUDEVILLE
CARNIVAL

Saturday April 26 — MIDNITE

SPEARHEADED BY

MONAH — now from Martinique

(Famous MAGICIAN and CURVE DANCER)

LOLITA (Samba-Rhumba Jerker)
(Spanish Tango Ace)
AND

KURABELLA

JOSEPH CLEMENDORE (Cobra Man)

THE BOODHOO BROS. (Indian Stunt Kings from B.G.)
HARVEY ROGERS (A Ballroom Expert)

ENA KING (B.G's Radio Sw stest Voice)

Music by
KEITH CAMPBELL’S Society 5

PIT 24: HOUSE 48; BALCONY 60; BOX 72
TO-DAY—GLOBE

TICKETS on Sale







POWERFUL—AND

POWERFULLY DIFFERENT

—From WARNER BROS.

- COME
FILE the
cup”

PHYLLIS: THAXTER
RAYMOND MASSEY
Gig YOUNG—

YOWLE CALL IT

BOLDY
YOU'LL SAY IT’S
BLUNTY

James GLEASON





(Diat 2310)

P i A 7 A aa BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-DAY (THURSDAY), 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Se



To-day 4.45 only
“A PLACE IN THE SUN”



Tonite at 8.20

CALYPSO REPEAT PERFORM-
ANCE ‘ A.ong with F.u's
Orchestra and the Rhythm Kings
Steel Band.



EMPIRE

Opening To-morrow 2.30 & 8% WO
WALT DISNEY'S

“ALICE IN- WONDERLAND”
EXTRA
“NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
An Academy Award Winner



Sat. 26th at 1 °0 p.m







Wild Bil ELLIOTT in
Ae ELL FIRE” &
“BANDIT. KING OF TEXAS"
with
Alan Rocky; LANE

Sat. 26th Midnite
“DRUMS OF THE CONGO”

and
“THE LADY OBJECTS”

OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-day 4 30 & 8.15
Ray MELLAND

“COPPER CANYON”
and
BURT LANCASTER in
“I WALK ALONE”







Ta-day & Sat at 1.30 p.m.
ROY ROGERS Double

“RIDING DOWN THE CANYON”
and
“SONG OF TEXAS

Friday only 4.30 & 8 15

“JAMES BROTHERS
OF MISSOURI”

BOLD

—=—

\




ROXY
To-day & To-morrow 4 20 & 8.15
Edmond O'BRIEN in

“FIGHTER SQUADRON”
and
“INSPECTOR GENERAL"

Starring:
Danny KAYE
———
To-day & Sat, at 1.30 p.m.
“HALFWAY TO SHANGHAI”

and
“DEAD MAN EYES”





Opening SAT. 4.30 & 8.15
Glenn Ford — Rhonda Flemings

—in —
“THE REDHEAD AND THE —
COWBOY”
and ’

THE MARX BROTHERS in
“DUCK SOUP”



Sat. Midnite
WHOLE SERIAL

“THE JAMES BROTHERS
OF MISSOURI”

ROYAL

To-day Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Wild Bill ELLIOTT in
“HELL FIRE”





and
“BANDIT KING OF TEXAS”
Starring: Alan Rocky LANE

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15 .

OLIVIA. DE HAVILAND in
“DARK MIRROR”

and
“PHANTOM LADY”



& Sun 4.30 &
“SILVER CITY”
and
“VICTORY”

8.15

BUT
TRUE

HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Mom-Dad'

WITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES —

WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
MEN Only 8.30 p.m.




(heres ek

AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!

WARNING !

This picture includes powerful Medical Sequences.
NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !

PLAZA—scnsinces (Dial 5170)

3 5$993993o" 5

COMING SOON TARBAREES
“CRISS CROSS"

BURT LANCASTER



OISTiN—Dial 8404
To-day (only) 445 & 8.30 p.m

“HONEYMOON LODGE”
Francis LANGFORD &
“RIVER LADY" (Color)

Rod CAMERON — Yvonne De CARLO
Friday & Sat (45 28H pm

MISS GRANT TAKES A CHANCE

and

_WE WERE STRANGERS
~~ SAT. Special 1 30 P M
“ROSE of SANTA ROSA”
HOCSIER HOT SHOTS &
“RIDIN the OUTLAW TRAIL”
Charles STARRETT, Smiley BURNETTF

SSOS OCS OSSSS

PIOSO LOS SSP SOS

Richard ARLEN —

OPENING ee oth eee

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
To-day 4.30 p m,.
“BEYOND THE FOREST”
Bette DAVIS &

“WHIPLASH” i Dane CLARK
FRI & SAT. 8.30 PM.
“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”

Robert ARMSTRONG &
“MY FORBIDDEN PAST”
Robert MITCHUM

MIDNITE SAT.
Triple Attraction —
“RAIDERS of the DESERT”

«TH

Andy
“CHEYENNE COWBOY"
Tex WILLIAMS &

TEX BENEKE & GLENN MLLER

ORCHESTRA

DEVLN x

POSSESS SSR,

OE ——————E—


THURSDAY, APRIL 24,

1952

U.S. Race To Try
First H-Bomb

From R. M. MeCOLL

WASHINGTON, April.

America’s top scientists and technicians are racing

against the clock to try to

ensure that the world’s first

hydrogen bomb will be exploded next September, when
the United States undertakes the next great ‘hush-hush’
experiments on the Pacific atoll of Eniwetok. ’

Thousands of millions of dollars have been poured out
on this project, ever since President Truman gave the ‘green
light’ over a year ago. Huge ‘plants’ have been set up,
guarded by thousands of security men. Some of America’s
best scientific brains have been at work, seeking to perfect
the new bomb, which is theoretically a thousand times more
powerful than the existing A bomb.



The work is being rushed to the
limit now because of the psycho-
logical factors involved. If, as the
directors of American political-
military policy believe, the grandâ„¢
crisis in world affairs is due to
be reached some time within the
next 12 months, demonstrable

ession by the West of an

-Bomb might be the ace card
which could enforce the peace.

America is convinced that the
decisive factor in the world strug-
gle depends on the start which
the West obtains in atomic
weapons. So new orders have
gone out that the already strenu-
ous work on the Hydrogen Bomb
shall be stepped up even further,
to try to bring about a victorious
burst which will produce the
bomb by the autumn.

While this big drive is on, there
are powerful voices behind the
scenes taking up the angrily
debated question of whether
America should oar should not
continue to with-hold from
Britain and Canada her atomic
information and research discov-
eries,

There is a sahool of thought
in the State Department for
example, bf is anes in a
battle roya fh powerful
at the Pentagon. The tate
Department men are completely
opposed to the law which says
that America must not tell
Britain or anyone else anything
at all in the atomic field, and
they are working away diligently
to get a change.

France Can Still
Retain Influence

In Tunisia

WASHINGTON, April 21.

Some United States officials be-
lieve that France could still exe-
cute a skillful political withdrawal
from Tunisia which would leave
virtually intact her economic in-
terests there and the revenue she
derives from them.

Some, Officials however, fear
that the/time for graceful exit has
passed and France eventually may
lose most of her vested interest
in the area. Meanwhile, much of
the United States Public and Press
continues to be mystified despite
“explanation” by Secretary of
State Dean Acheson and others
by Govérnment’s refusal to vote
t> place the Tunisian French dis-
pute before the United Nations.

Labour Organisations, Congress-
men and Newspapers still contend
that United States threw over-
board its traditional Anti-Colonial
policy by its action in the Securi-
ty Council, This analysis by highly
placed United States officials may
reveal in part at least why Ache-
son decided that the French should
have the opportunity to try to sat-
isfy their Tunisian Nationalist
aspirations before the Security
Council intervenes.

It is believed that most French-
men sincerely want a settlement
with the Tunisians, but they want
to be certain first, just how much
ground t are economically able
to give.—U.P.



U.S.—Spanish
Talks Proceed
Smoothly

@ from page 1
available on satisfactory terms.
They said that Luis Carro

Blanco, Interim Foreign Minister
and Under-Secretary of the Presi-
dency is setting the pace for these
negotiations on the Spanish side
and that he is well situated to do
so because he is the personal re-
presentative of Generalissimo
Franco to whom he reports daily
on the progress of the negotiations,

Will Take Longer

While the economic negotiations
are closely connected with the
military ones, the Mutual Security
Agency mission is likely to take
considerably longer in reaching an
agreement for allocating the
$100,000,000 because so many fin-
ancial and economic fa s are
involved and also because the sud-
den death of its deputy head
Rifat Tirana has left the mission
badly crippled.

So far the Export and Import
Bank has not found any official to
replace Tirana on the on.

Tirana was the Bank’s Chief
Economist for Western Europe.
Furthermore they pointed out that
Tirana was the only member of
the three-man mission who had
dealt for any length of time with
Spanish economic and financial
affairs.

Answer Awaited

It has been learned that U.S.
economic and military teams ne-
gotiating for Spanish bases have
completed proposals to representa-
tives of the Spanish Government
and are awaiting a reniy.

George Train, head of the econo-
mic team reportedly handed a
written draft of economic pro-
nosals to Jaime Arguelles, Trade
Under-Secretary of the Spanish
Ministry of Commerce last week.

Proposals afte believed to re-
commend projects which could be
financed by one hundred million
dollars voted recently by Congress.
Major General Kissner, Chief of
the 25-man military mission has
completed verbal proposals to
General Juan Vigon, Chief of the
Spanish General Staff.

The néxt move will be up to the
Spaniards. A US official said
formal talks would not begin until
the return of Spahish Foreign
Minister Alberto Martin Artajo on
April 28 from his tour of the
Middle: East.

CANADA’S
NEW
BUDGET

EASES RATES

Canadian business, which was
not expecting much relief from
the 1952 Budget, should be stim-
ulated in many directions by the
changes that the Minister of
Finance was able to announce.
Relief in the form of corporation
taxes, is of course, infinitesimal,
the new effective or top tax rate
now being 54% in. Ontario and
Quebec and 52% in the other
provinces, as compared with the
old rates of 546% and 52.6%
respectively, These rates include,
of course, the addition of 2%
announced in October last and
effective as from January 1, 1952,
to cover the cost of Old Age
pension legislation which started
(at $40 per month for those over
70 years of age) at the beginning
of 1952. Hence, the 1951 corpora-
tion rate of 52.6% (or 50.6%) is
raised to 54% (or 52%) for 1952.

A wide range of companies,
however, will benefit from the
commodity tax reductions, with
the excise tax on such products
as automobiles, the smaller elec-
trical household appliances,
radios and phonographs, luggage,
jewellery, etc., cut from 25% to
15%, the 15% rate on stoves,
washing machines and refrigera-
ators removed, the 30% rate on
soft drinks reduced to 15% and
the tax on cigarettes lowered by
3 cents on the standard package
of 20, all effective April 9, 1952.

A PROBLEM

As is usual when such taxes
are changed, goods on which the
old tax rates» have been paid
will be a problem for a time. Ex-
cise and Sales taxes are paid
when the product leaves the plant
of the manufacturer, and those
now in the hands of wholesalers,
dealers or retailers will have paid
the higher rate. Accordingly it
will depend upon the relative
bargaining position of the manu-
facturer and his distributor as to
who will bear the loss or whether
it should be divided, if the pro-
ducts have to be sold at a lower
pricey reflecting the new lower
rates, Of course, if the products
can be sold at the old prices, thera
will be no problem. However, cig-
arette prices appear to have been
cut immediately on the opening
of business on Wednesday and
dealers in household goods took
eecasion to give wide publicity
to the immediate cut applicable
to their stocks on hand.

Relief to Large Group of Pub-
lic Utilities; Some Still,
Hampered »

The difficulties under whiclt
public utility companies distribu-
ting or generating electricity, gas
or steam are operating, forced
as they are to raise large amounts
of capital to finance expansion of
services and allowed to earn
only a modest return on their
capital because of public control
of rates, is recognized by the
Government in the form of a
deduction from the tax otherwise
payable of an amount sufficien’
to reduce to 43% (from 50%) the
tax payable under the Income Tax
Act on that part of a corpora-
tion’s taxable income that is de-
rived from such distribution .or
generation, This relief will apply
to those companies which derive
more than one-half of their gross
revenue from the distribution to
or generation for distribution to
the public of electrical energy,
gas or steam.

1952 Weather
Talks Will Be
Held In June

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April.

Plans for a meeting of a Sub-
commission of Re al Assoeia-
tion IV of thé.World .Meteoro-~
logical Organisation to be held
here June 16—19 were discussed
with the President, Dr. Andrew



Thomson, by officials of the
Caribbean Commission, during
Dr. Thomson’s recent visit to

Kent House. This was announced
recently by Mr. EB. F. . de
Vriendt, Secretary General.

The tentative agenda for the
conference includes a review o'
the 1951 Hurricane season and
of progress made in implement:
recommendations of the 195
Hurricane Subcommission. Vari-
ous proposals to improve the
effectiveness of the hurricah®
warning system in the
Caribbean will be considered,
‘nd recommendations made for
the 1952 hurricane season.



CONTROL OF TANGIERS

MADRID, April 23.

The Spanish Foreign Office
confifmed that Spain sent the
second note to the United States,
Britain and Franee on the control
of Tangiers. The contents of the
note are not immediately known,
but it is believed that the second
note cleared up vague points in
the first note of April 7.

—(UP.)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Guggenheim Fellowship






AMERICAN SHORTS :



AwardsForB.W.L, 1952 Parret Ban

THE award of four Fellowships to residents of the

British West Indies for the

year 1952-53 is announced to-

day by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
of New York City. This is the first of a series of annual
Fellowships awards by the Foundation for the British

West Indies.

The Guggenheim Foundation’s
Fellowships for the British West
Indies are granted to assist schol-
ars and artists of demonstrated
capacity ‘to carry on, in the United
States, research in all fields of
knowledge and artistic creation in
all the arts. Usually the Fellows
of the Foundation are between
25 and 40 years of age. The Fel-
lowships are granted for long or
short periods, depending upon the
studies which the Fellows will
earry on. Men and women, mar-
ried or unmarried, without dis-
tinction of race, colour or creed,
are eligible on equal terms.

The John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation was estab-
lished in the year 1925 by the
late United States Senator Simon
Guggenheim and by Mrs. Guggen-
heim as a memorial to a son, John
Simon Guggenheim, who died in
1922.

The list 6f Fellowship appoint-
ments now made follows:

Dr. John Horace Parry, Pro-
fessor of Modern History, Uni-
versity College of the West In-
dies, Mona, Jamaica. Dr. Parry,
during his Fellowship, will make
a study of the history of municipal
government in the Spanish Indies
from the Conquest to Indepen-
dence. He is the author of “The
Spanish Theory of Empire in
the Sixteenth Century,” 1940;
“The Audenica of New Galicia in
the Sixteenth Century,” 1948—
both published by the Cambridge
University Press; and of “Europe

and a Wider World.” London,
1949.
Mr. Douglas MacRae Taylor,

fruit farmer; ethnolinguist, Magua,
Dominica, Mr. Taylor plans to
continue, in the United States, his
studies of the Black Carib lan-
guage .of British Honduras. He
is the author of “The Black Carib
of British Honduras,’ published
in New York, 1952, Mr. Taylor
proposes to try to unravel the
African and native American ele-
ments in the language and culture
of the Black Carib group.

Mr. Ronald Gordon Fennah,
Entomoblogist, Imperial College of
Tropical Agriculture, St. Augus-
tine, Trinidad, Mr. Fennah plans
taxonomic studies of the ento-
mology of the Lesser Antilles, He
is the author of numerous scien-
tifie papers on entomology and
cropy agronomy.

Mr. Edgar Mittelhélzer, a native
of British Guiana, now editor of
the Office,” published in London,
Council, London, Mr. Mittelhélzer,
a novelist, plans during his Fel-
lowship year to write a novel
on the British West Indian scene.
He is the author of three novels:
“Corentyne Thunder” published
in London, 1941; “A Morning at
the Office,” published in London,
1950, and in New York under the
title “A Morning in Trinidad”;
and “Shadows Move among



Vaccine To
Stop Rabies

NEW YORK, Feb.—(XNS)

The development of an en-
tirely new rabies vaccine for
dog immunization was announced
'regently by Lederle Laborato-
ries Division, American Cyan-
amid Company, manufacturers of
drugs, antibiotics and biological
products,

Described by the company as
the “most important step taken
towards the elimination of rabies
as a fatal disease since the work
done by Pasteur,” the new vac-=
cine has been tested successfully
em more than 12,000 dogs. It will
be made available to veterinari-
ans and to sanitary and ic
health officials oul
world to aid them in the preven-
tion of rabies in dogs.

Credit for developing the vae-
cine was given to Drs. Herald R
Cox and Hilary Ko; re-
searchers in the field of virus
diseases, The new vaccine is pro=
duced from live virus which has
been modified by growth in chick
embryos. It is completely modi-
fied and does not contain mam-
malian brain or spinal cord tissne.

The virus strain used in the

Them,” published in London and
Philadelphia, 1961.

The Trustees of the Foundation
are Mrs. Simon Guggenheim,
President, Francis H. Brownell,
Roger W. Straus, John C,. Emison,
Medley G. B, Whelpley, Charles
Merz, Roswell Magill, Elliott V.
Bell, and Henry Allen Moe, Seo-
retary.

The Foundation’s Committee of
Selection consisted of Dr. Edgar
Professor of Botany in
Washington University, St. Louis,
Missouri; Dr, Henri M, Peyre.
Professor of French in Yale Uni-
versity; Dr, Carl O. Sauer, Pro-
fessor of Geography in the Uni-
versity of California; Dr. Edwin
Bidwell Wilson, Retired

Professor
of Vital Harvard Uni-
versity; and Dr. Louis Booker

Wright, Director of the Fo!

gar
Shakespeare Library, Washington,
D.C., Chairman,



Solomon’s
Copper Mines
Discovered

RED SEA, PORT EILAT, April.

Traces of King Solomons’ fabu-
lous copper mines were uncovered
this week ton the Israel side of the
Israel-Jordon border by a 60-year -
old Siberian-born Israeli engineer
in ‘“Hashish Valley,” 20 miles from
the desolate Red Sea hamlet of
Eilat.

He is Michael Muller whose
great-grandfather prospected in
the Urals with the famous British
geologist Murchison.

The mines straddle the tradi-
ace remuamess: ree across
san Vv from don to Egypt.
In the iblical King’s day, the
barren hills of southern Israel
were thickly forested with oak
trees and high-grade copper was
extracted by smelting aquamarine

in charcoal furnaces.

Muller, tanned mahogany by the
burning sun picked up chunks of
fossilised charcoal to show me
streaks of metallic copper glinting
as brightly blue as the noon day
desert sun.

King Solomon could not hope
to tap all this wealth, and the
Israelis are beginning where he
left off.

Prospecting started in the area
a year ago, and in February of
this year a thick vein estimated to
contain: 100,000 tons of pure ore
were struck. Already, the slopes
of the pink, wind-eroded crags, in
whose bowels copper has been
found, are piled high with vividly-
coloured rocks extracted with
little more than a hammer and
chisel by tunnel-digging engineers.
And top-level Government officials
are considering how best to exploit
poverty-stricken Israel's sudden
new source of wealth,

The world market price is
oround £400 a ton, but the
Israelis must overcome immense
transport, housing and feeding
difficulties before they can sell
their copper. And there must be
peace between Israel and the
Arabs before Israel vessels can.
safely pass through the less-than-a
mile-wide charnel gua: on one
side by Egypt, and on the other
by Jordon ‘and Saudi Arabia. .

But the Israelis hope, if they
can raise £1,000,000, and if Anglo-
American goodwill paves the way
to a peace settlement, that it will
rot be much more than 17 months
before the first consignments are
loaded from the jetty where,
thousands of years ago, the Queen
of Sheba stepped ashore to be
greeted by the King of a thousand
wives.



Commission
May Be Formed

PARIS, April 23.

The French Resident General
fo Tunisia Count Jean De
Hauteclocque left this morning
for Tunis after a round of con-
ferences with members of the
French Government.

During the past week, Haute-
clocque carried out a tight sched-
ule of discussions top-level
Government to find a
way of ending the touchy Tunis-

ituation.

production of the new vaccine ian si

was first isolated by Dr. Harald
N. Johnson of the Rockefeller
Foundation from the brain of a
child named Flury who died of
rabies. Dr. Johnson maintained
passage of the virus through chick
brains, Cox and Koprowski then
injected it into chick embryos.
Practically free from nervous tis-
sue, the new chick embryo vac-
cine has not been found to cause
paralysis or other signs of illness
following vaccination although
more than 12,000 vaccinations
have been performed.

Lederle researchers predict that
veterinarians will be able to im-
munize dogs by a single vaccina-
tion. If dog owners fully co-op-
erate with the vaccination pro-
grarmmes as Organized by public
health officials and veterinarians,
rabies can be effectively con-
trolled and eventually virtually
eliminated.

Before leaving pear yg a oy
last night held last minute talks
with ench Premier Antoine
Pinay Minister of Foreign Affairs
Robert Schuman, Secretary of
State for War Pierre De Chevinke
and others,

Their conversations dealt
largely with the general situation
in Tunisia,

Circles close to the govern-
ment said they also discussed

possible lifting of Martial Law

and other. restrictions but under-

stood no important new decisions

taken. However they believed
that the Resident General will
urge Tunisian Premier Salah
Edine Baccouche to speed selec-
tion of his seven Tunisian mem-
bers to sit on the Commission in
an attempt to have the Commis-
sion operating before the Moslem
festival of Ramadan on ee

Repealed ?

WASHINGTON— Parrots, love-
birds, parakeets, cockatoos and
other Psittacines just about to be
admitted again to this country
after a 14 years’ ban, may not be
welcome after all. A warning
voice was raised by the Pubic
Health Service in Florida as a
parrot, from that State imported
to the Middle West, infected his
owners with psitacosis. The bird
died, his masters recovered after
short hospitalization and treat-
ment with antibiotics,

Rejoicing pet lovers, seeing the
Prejudical Act of 1988” virtually
repealed, are no longer sure theiy
feathered friends will return,
Their hopes have been’ aroused
after medical researchers de-
bunked the belief that only the
Psittacines carry the bug that
may affect human lungs. Careful
study had shown that the diseas*
is prevalent among all kind of
birds. The researchers, further-
more, had found contamination
from bird to human negligible
and occasional infections casily
eur ith aptibioties.

o Time To Eat Out

NEW YORK—The New York
restaurant business is in the dol-
drums refiectisg a trend which
seems to be nationwide.

One familiar hang-out after the
other is clésing its doors, A varie
ty of reasons is being blame: for
this jarring note in the overal!
theme of economic prosperity
The influence of television which
keeps the family at home, the
marked shift from city to subur-
ban living and at last not least a
reluctance or inability to pay
present-day restaurant prices
when the family budget is already
strained to the limit, are con
sidered the main factors in the
slump in the eating business.

Exuberant T-B Patients
Cautioned

NEW YORK—World-wide re-
joicing by tubercular patients at
the recent announcement of a
newly discovered miracle drug
expected to conquer the disease
‘m the not too far distant future,
‘was’ dampened by a chorus ot
cautioning voices from medical
circles,

The pemature announcement
of the drug came as patients told
friends anq relatives about truly
miraculous response to the treat-
ment with Nydrazid and leaked
into the press ‘before medical au-

thorities were willing to endorse ,

the disclosure. Their warning
voices were drowned in the ini-
tial clamour of joy. Pulmonaty
tuberculosis specialists in a con-
ference at the New York Acad-
emy of Medicine reiterated their
warnings against over optimism
and warned emphatically that the
healing effect of the drug evi-
denced in some 200 desperately
ill test cases does by no means
preclude the necessity of lung
surgery to repair damages al-
ready done. Moreover, they
warned, the ultimate effect of the
drug can be measured only after
treatment has been stopped al-
together and last not least tests
must be conducted for a long
time to come before the battle is
definitely decided.

E. R. Squibb & Sons, co-manu<
faeturers of the new anti-tuber-
-@ular drug, deeply worried about
the premature announcement at
this time, expressed regret in a
circular letter to 135,000 Ameri-
can physicians about the leak to
the “lay press before completion
of clinical studies.”

New Diesel Engine With Low
Fuel Consumption
COLUMBUS Ind.—A new hori-
zontal Diesel engine reported to
have_ improved mileage up tc
43% over comparable Diesel en-
gines, has been introduced by the
Cummins Engine Company, It i
especially designed for city
and intercity busses. Low fuel
consumption is attributed to ar
Pgenious fue) system featuring

a double dise pump.



New Plane Air
Conditioned

LONDON.
Air travellers who use the 100-
seat Bristol Brittania airliner

when it goes into service in 1954
will breathe air heated, cooled,
moistened or dried, as they pre-
fer. To make this possible, th«
plane is to have the latest piece
of atmosphere equipment for its
pressurized cabins,

It_is a humidifying unit, being
produced by the General Elec-
trie Company, makers of Can-
berra bombers, for the Bristol
Aeroplane Company which is
building the turboprop Brittania.
The unit comprises an electrical-
ly heated boiler controlled by : |
humidistat — a device which}

the measures air moisture. }

When humidity falls to 25 per|
gent, the humidistat automati-
cally switches on the electric
boiler and water is fed into the
cabin atmosphere as steam. As|
soon as humidity rises to more
than 60 per cent, the humidistat}
automatically turns the unit off!
again. *

Most present-day aircraft have
heating and cooling equipment.
The Brittania will be the first to
regulate humidity as well, j



PAGE THREE

Tense Struggle In
Mexican Elections

By ROBERT PRESCOTT
MEXICO CITY, April 23.
Presidential “heir” Adolfo
Ruiz Cortines facés the toughest
Leftwing opposition of a quarter

















The Refrigerator which ten
years ago caused the Bajan

century in Mexico’s' tense elec-

don campaign, and’ politicians Cook to exclaim :

fear Conservative Governments’ |

control may be shaken, | “Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
Although Ruiz Cortines is a | {f ”

top-heavy favourite in the three- | } mek ice!

i

|

way race for the Presidency, |

growing political, unrest and new

voting lineups threaten his

party's grip on Congress for the
first time since 1917.

—(U.P.)

Black Market
Knacked Out |

CAPE TOWN, April.
Natal’s black market in sugat
which had assumed serious pro-
portions Owing to the late cutting
of the cane crop, has been dealt
a knockout blow by Minister of

is here again. .

in full force just in time to meet the
needs of those who cannot avail themselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.



These machines are for operation on kerosene oil,
natural gas-or electricity, and are available in t\% eub.
ft, and 7 cub. ft. models.



—



. x ‘J Ww
Economic Affairs, Eric Louw. BOOK } OURS NO
For Louw promised that any
legitimate dealer who gave
information leading to the con- e
viction of a black marketeer

would be given the total stock of
sugar held by the black market«
eer. Now trade under the counter
has practically disappeared,
according to the inspectors.

THE EMTAGE ELEC. CO.

Plantations Building





HARBOUR LOG |



x

%

In Carlisle Bay %

Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. Mary M \}
Lewis, Sch. Mandalay IT, Sch. Burma D,, | >

Sch. Cloudia 8, Seb Jores,
Sch, Cyclorama ©., Sch. W. L., Bunicia,
Sch. Franklyn D.R., Sch, Lady Noeleen,

Molly N

Sch, Unitea Pilgrim S., Sch. Florence
Emanuel, Sch, My Qwn, M.V. T ,
Radar, Sch. Enterprise S., Seh, Philip

H. Davidson, Sch. At Last

Air Traffic

ARRIVALS By BWIA. ON
TUESDAY

Vrom Trinidad;
P. Taylor, L. Qutram, A, Outram, W.



Vutram, D. Cardmaster, 8 insborrow,
Webb, M. Webb, E. Roach, C. Peterkin,
Hobson, C. Monroe, E, Monroe, Key

R. Ramijisson, K, Lewis, V. Morris,
Pr aires.
From St, Lucia:

Andre’ Du Boulay, Stella Worrel, Hammers
Philip Camall

DEPARTURES By BW.1.A. ON Saws

TUESDAY Saw Files

For St. Laola: r
Darnley Alexander, Viricent Sarnucty,

For Trintdad:
Laura Beattie, Joan Marshall, Gail
Denise

Marshall, Andrew Christine,
Thuez, Theresa O'Rielly, Rollins Skeete,
Dr. Inez Trimingham, Hon

shaw, Reynold Goetz, Ducte
Murray Newell, Rona Newell,
Sempson, Ronald Dabney Josephine
Dabney, John. Dabney, Carlos Arcaya,

RODNEY’ DUE FRIDAY
The R.M.S. Lady Rodney is
expected to arrive at Barbados
on Friday morning from_ British
Guiana via Trinidad, Grenada
and St. Vincent,

The Lady Rodney will be
loading rum for Bermuda and
general cargo for Canada, She
will be leaving port on Frida
night for Canada via the Bri
Northern Islands, She is con-
signed to Messrs. Gardiner Aus-
tin & Co., Ltd,

“Festina” Goes To Cuba

The two Texans James Furlong
and Joseph Pellich who arrived
at Barbados on January 17, after | ¥
a 26-day Atlantic crossing in| @
their 33-foot yacht Festina, left|¢
Aruba last month for Cuba.

They are on their way from
Copenhagen to Texas where they
intend to sell Festina and settle
down, From Cuba they will be
heading back to the United
States.

Domingo Navarra and Manuel
Peres who accompanied them all
through their voyage so far, will
leave the yacht at Cuba where
one of 43em has relatives.

The Festina was in Barbados
for about two weeks.

MODERN
FARM EQUIPMENT

For Bigger Crops

Including .. .

TRACK, HALF-TRKACK and
WHEEL TRACTORS
PLOUGHS
CANE CARTS
BAGASSE SPREADERS (ideal also for
applying Filter-press Mud, Ashes and

, Pen Manure) °
FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS
MANURE LOADERS
GRASS MOWERS (Trailer & P.T.O. Types)
GRASS RAKES
GRASS LOADERS
SIDE DELIVERY RAKES—for windrowing

Screwdrivers
Grinding Wheels
Compasses



Planes
Plane Irons
Vices



BARBADOS
“2 CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY
LTD.



“ Otte, es
PLCC OOS:, SOSSOSSSF

‘
SOCOM IOOS >



eo Sue



eee







Cane Trash
and a host of other useful attachments ae a
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS | Your Enquiries are Cordially

Invited !

COURTESY GARAGE

ROBERT THOM LIMITED

REQUIRE ON-THE-SPOT PRIOR-
ITY SERVICING, AND OUR...
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THE PERSONAL SUPERVISION
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WHICH IS ESSENTIAL. te Far






PAGE FCUR

{



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





The Sort Of Thing Aneurin | 7y7£ UNEXPECTED |

BARBADOS tg ADVOCATE

1952



—

Thursday, April 24,

——_—— Ot

QUEENSTOWN

QUEEN Elizabeth If-was 26 years old on
Monday. This young-Queen who succeed-
ed her Royal father when she was in.
Kenya beginning a tour to the Dominions
of Ceylon, Australia and New Zealand
has not yet been crowned’



The coronation ceremony will probably
take place next year.

Whether Barbados retains its present
status as a Crown Colony or whether it
becomes self governing or merges with
the United Kingdom or Canada or with
other West Indian Crown Colonies to be-
come a West Indian Dominion is a matter
for conjecture. °

But whatever be its political destiny it
is safe to suppose that the link with the
Monarch ofthe United Kingdom will not
be broken, » s

This week Queen Elizabeth II in the first
year of her Gracious reign over the Brit-
ish Commonwealth of Nations cele-
brated her twenty-sixth birthday. Her
Majesty’s birthday should remind all of us
in Barbados ‘of the tasks arid burdens
which have fallen upon her shoulders.

How can we contribute towards lighten=
ing that burden? The answer is simple.
By being good citizens and loyal subjects.

But there is one public step which Bar-
badés might.take-to bring pléasure and
happiness to the young Queen before her
coronation takes place.

Many centuries ago Barbados honoured
a King of England by naming Jamestown
after him. Today what used to be James-
town is now called Hole Town. Might
Barbados not fittingly honour Queen
Elizabeth by changing the “Hole” to
“Queens” and calling a part of this island
which has especial connections from earli-
est settlement with the monarchs*of Eng-
land Queenstown 2.

A gesture so simple would cost us noth+

ing, but the pleasuré it would give to that
gracivuus young woman called so untimely
to reign over us and to shoulder the great
burdens under.which Her Royal Father
was heroically crushed down would be its
owm reward:” ;

; Let: Barbados. showwits loyalty.to the
British Crown and its» affection. for the
young sovereign by this friendly act.



BOB-A-JOB
IT was to be expected that a pioneer
effort like Bobajob would reveal certain
weaknesses of Scout organisation as well

as bring to the fore the quality and bene-
fits of scouting.

It would be quite easy to select
examples of scouts whose activities dur-
ing Bobajob week brought great credit on
their troops and on scouting. Several
heuseholders will no doubt have written
words of encouragement or praise to Scout
Headquarters. But if scouting depends on
praise or approval for encouragement it
will carve no lasting niche in the commun-
ity. Scouts no less than any other body or
individual require to know their mistakes
and to learn from them,

Two of those mistakes were noticed
last week in this newspaper: a lack of
initiative in certain areas with regard to
soliciting work: and a lack of telephonic
flexibility. One of these defects was
remedied by individual scouts who went
out and found jobs without being detailed.

On the job too scouts showed failings. _

They arrived to do outdoor work with no
proper working clothes, and) without any
rations. In one .pantievlar. instance a
householder gave in food to two scout
workers almost half the equivalent of a
total day’s-earnings of $5.00.

In another where the householder was
unable to feed them scouts were prema-
turely sent away because lack of food
mace their work of little value.

These points can be remedied by atten-
tion at Scout Headquarters. But there
is one failing which can only be remedied
by scouts themselves. When one scout
accuses another scout of being unfit to
wear scout’s uniform because he was idle
and lazy during a national Bobajob week
the quality and honour of Scouts them-
Selves are at stake. Troop masters ought
to impress on every scout before allowing
them to go out on jobs that not only his
honour is at stake but that the whole
Scout Movement will be judged by the
way he sets about his work. Many scouts
were a credit to their troops and to their
movement, Others were not and it would
be doing little service to scouts not to
point out that Bobajob week brings scouts
to the attention of the whole community
and that unwilling or lazy workers bring
discredit on the whole movement.








Bevan Says= |

Aneurin Bevan’s book “In Place of Fear” is now published. The Quotes, |

@ WHENEVER the Labour Party
has made a mistake it has not been
in comsequence of pursuing its
principles too roughly or’ too far
but by making too many conces-
sions to-conventional opinion.

@ THE TROUBLE with the
boards of the nationalised indus-
tries is that they are a constitu-
tional outrage . . . . The Minister,
by divesting himself of parlia-
mentary responsibility, disfran-
chises the electorate as well.

@ UP TO the Korean incident
American Far Eastern. ‘policy
floundered from one extreme to
another. At first she put all her
money on the Chinese National-
isto, When these failed, she turned
her back on the whole area... .

It is still a matter of conjecture
whether those who invaded South

-Korea did not think that the United
States had disinterested herse.t ime
the Far East and that, therefore;
it was safe for them to try their
hand.

@ THERE is no evidence to
show that the Soviet Union wants
a trial of strength. She can, of
course, fall into it. But it is easier
for a dictatorship to pull out of
such a situation tham it is for >
democracy. |A_ dictatorship’ has
no public opinion to satisfy.

What an ex-cabinet colleague says ahout hisa

Bevan. It Seems, Is At
Loggerheads With Himself

This book* by Aneurin Bevan
will confuse many critics who have
painted the author in lurid colours
and held him ub as a horrible ex-
ample of the taging, roaring re-
volutionary, bent on the immedi-

‘ate destruction of capitalism and
all its works.

Apart from some peevish com-
ments on minor aspects of policy,
the most orthodox and Right-wing
member of the Labour Party could
find little to cavil at.

Even Mr. Bevan's principal sup-
porters will fail to acclaim the
book as a reservoir of inspiration
or an exciting) version of their
political gospel. |

Mr, Bevan issues no command
to his followers to roll up their
sleeves and go jinto battle; there
is no preview of\a holy crusade.

Here he makés'no bid for the
leadership of the Labour Party.

Mr. Beyan's brief narrative of
his erly struggle for self-educa-
tion to “lift himself out of the rut”
is revealing,

Unfortunately, such an experi-
@nce can produce melancholy re-

. flections in later years and cause

the victim fo be at cross purposes
with everybody, i
Yet, the fact that some men are

*‘ able to rise above their environ-
“ment_and attain eminence in lit-

eratute, art, industry, and politics
seems to coptain the refutation of
Mr. Bevan's theory that poverty in
childhood is necessarily a barrier
to advancement.

ee So undecided

"Yt is a pity that the tragedy, in-
tense bittefness, and desolation
which were all too common in the
valleys of South Wales in his day,
together with details of his work
underground receive no more than
a passing reference.

If he had devoted more space.to
his’ actual experience it would
have» proved more illuminating
than his analysis of economic
issues.

These read very much like the
fruits of nocturnal discussions with
some obfuscated economist, whose
views on how to relate economic
facts to political strategy are about
as useful as the) opinions of the
pigs of Drdgheda'on, psycho'ogy.

Mr. Bevan claitns to have pro-
fited by his study of Marxism.

“In so far as 1 can be said to
have had a political training at
all, it has been in Marxism.”

However, he prefers the evolu-
tfénary processes and rejects the
method of revolution,

This will not endear him to the
Politburo, which, despite his de-
clared confidence in the theories
of Marx, Lenin, and Engels, is
likely to regard him as an obscur-
antist idealist.

He sees a new world evolving
which is vastly different from the
old: a familiar sentiment agree-
able in many quarters.

Yet Mr. Bevan is at logger-
heads with himself in deciding
the pattern of the new order of
society.

Our Readers Say

Birth Control — A
Scientific , Necessity
To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,--The present’ controversy
on birth-control, or contraceptive
is not the first’ time that this
supposedly “anti-Christian Mon-
ster” has reared its head in the
Island of Barbados; the last oc-
casion a novel piece of propaganda
was used against it. It was when
the school children were first
given condensed ‘milk each day,
some parents refused to permit
their children to drink this milk,
as the Government was putting
“BIRTH-CONTROL” in it to keep
the population
if it -was just some ill-ad
action of an uneducated people
or a malicious act by some anti-
birth conttolists?
‘ In the United) States of Am-
erica, a ragir controversy has
been taking plate, Yor -yaars over
Mrs. Margaret |Sanget, Who “has
fought since>1912 for planned
parenthood and the general use of
contraceptives, She has* is
light) grow the
Parenthood Federation
of Ameri in which all the
local tirth-control leagues are
unified, and their affiliated com-
mittees sponser 200 elinics
throughout the USA. This
planned ‘parenthood is fought
against strongly by a certain reli-
gious -body in the States, but the
really: interesting part is that the
clinics of the Federation Mot only
give contraceptive advice, but
provide a ‘Fertility Service’. to
aid those» anfortinate married
couples who desiré,to have chil-

flickering
‘Planned




dren which they would) call their
own, but by some freak of nature
are prevented from) having them.

Many are the arguments used
against contraceptives by these

people; one of the main ones is

@ THE reaction of the United
States to the revelation (im Korea)
of her military unpreparedness for
a major war dealt a deadly blow
to Europe’s hopes for economic
recovery, and at the same time
sent a cold wind throughout the
backward regions of the world.

It revealed the weakness of the
motive behind President Truman’s
Fourth Point (To give economic
and technical help to backward
areas,

If this motive had been entirely
altruistic it might have stood the
strain. I have no doubt about the
intentions: but unfortunately it
had been represented to the Amer-
ican peop‘e as the bulwark against
Communism,

Korea raised the question, Have
we time for the Fourth Point to
operate? At once the military ex-
perts said No!

@THE ARMS programme,
agreed in the summer of 1950 was
not sufficient to meet the needs
regarded as militarily desirable.
Before the year was out a still
heavier programme was demand-
ed; and all to be accomplished in
Waree years, by which time, we
were told, we could “talk to Rus-
sia out of strength.”

Tt seems insane for Russia to
wait for that date if her real in-

By EMANUEL SHINWELL, M.P.

_ Mr. Bevan is one of our most
intriguing political advocates and
everybody would like to know
what he is driving at.

His philosophy may be conven-
iently summarised in the conclud-
ing sentence of the book where he
declares his abiding faith in demo-
cratic Socialism.

“What.” Mr. Bevan asks, “
democratic Socialism?”

“The philosophy of democrat-
ic Socialism is essentially cool
in. temper. It sees society in
its context withs nature and is
conscious of the limitations im-
posed by physical conditions.

“It sees the individual in his

context with society and is
therefore compassionate and
tolerant.

“Because it knows that all
political action must be a choice

between a number of possible
alternatives it eschews all abso-

lute proscriptions and _ final
decisions.”

And further, “It seeks the
truth in any given situation,

knowing all the time that if this

be pushed too far it falls into

error,

“It struggles against the evils
that flow from private property,
yet realises that all forms of
private property are not neces-
sarily evil.”

Such placid sentiments, even if
somewhat confusing, are hardly
calculated to excite the faithful.

Too much of this and Mr.
Bevan may evoke condemnation,
not for being tco revolutionary,
but for not bes.g revolutionary
enough,

So confusing

Aneurin Bevan cannot make up
his mind which leg to stand on
about Soviet Russia. He deplores
the concentration camps, the sup-
pression of personal liberty, and
the soul-destroying régime pre-
vailing in that country, yet be-
lieves that one day the workers of
Russia will exert sufficient pres-
sure to enable political democracy
to emerge.

As yet, there is precious little
evidence of a change of heart; nor
can he prove, on the records of
the years since the war, that
Soviet Russia, while anxious to
avoid global war, is desperately
working for peace.

Mr. Bevan is not opposed to
rearmament. He sternly rebukes
the pacifists, which is poor con-
solation after the support they re-
cently accorded him.

“Against the background of
mounting tension created by
such policies,” he writes, “it is
idle to talk about general dis-
armament, People are not, and
never have been, prepared to
throw away their guns while
they feel unsafe. -

“The guns are there because
the sense of insecurity is there,
not the insecurity because the
guns are there,

——



that you may deprive the world
of some genius! It 1s strange that
they never stop to think that for
every one genius born there are
millions of mediocre individuals,
and that thousands, nay hundreds
of thousands of these turn out to
be vagabonds and criminals, How
much better off the world would
be without its Capones, Dillingers,
and Willie ‘The Actor’ Suttons,
Anyhow we will leave these
Churchites out of this, for argu-
ments on the Bible have been
going on for centuries, so it is
useless to continue along these
lines. It may be that George Ber-

own! One wonders fade Shaw summed up the atti-

de of the Church when he wrote
'—You should not be oppressed
by the frightful sum of human
misery, for there is no sum, Pov-
erty and pain are not comulative.
If you stand the suffering of one

person, the suffering of. millions
is no worse."

It is, therefore, to history and
science that modern man has to
resort, to avoid the errors of past
generations being repeated and to
try and save mankind from the
horrible future for which it is
heading. During the early stages
of this world, there was a gradual
increase in the population of the
world, this was due to the slow
rate of food production by manual
labour, plagues, diseases, and
wars, This state of affairs contin-
ued until the ‘steam age’ arrived,
so when the increase of food pro-
duction was actually trebled due
to the improved methods of till-
age, etc., the population of the
world increased by leaps and
bounds. Take the population
of England and Wales as ‘an
example. In 1700 this was
5,134,516; by 1800 it had
reached 9,187,176—nearly double
in one hundred years! Along came



tention is a military show-down.
She is obviously less belligerent
than some American publicists.
NO ONE is less fitted than a
military expert’to weigh the eco-|
nomic consequetices of his inor-|
dinate demands. }
Yet the nature of the modern!
military machine makes it more |
tuan ever necessary that the in-
dustrial repercussions should be
carefully before heavy
military ex ure is embarked
upon, This not done either in
Britain or in the United States.

@ THE outStanding need of
China, as of similar communities, |
is for the industrial products of the
urban communities of the West.
These Russia is not able to supply
in anything approaching the quan- |
tities required,

Indeed, just to the extent that
Russia has perverted her own
economy to war purpcses, she is
unable to assist in supplying the
civilian requirements of her tem-
porary allies.

It is a grim commentary on the
direction taken by the Russian re-
volution that the North Koreans
found it easier to obtain tanks thar
tractcr ploughs from their Soviet
“friends.” But is not the West
making just that «ame mistake?

“The existence of huge arma-
ments directly contributes to
the universal fear, but it is sec-

ALWAYS HAPPENS

By DON TAYLOR
HE country of “The Odd Things That
Happen” has become the world’s front-
page country.

That country is the Anglo-Egyptian
Sudan, It is a key to the Middle East situa-
tion. For there will be no settlement of the
Suez problem, no agreement with Egypt—
until the Sudan question is settled.

THE PRIZE FAROUK COVETS

FAROUK calls himself the “King of the
Sudan.” But the real “uncrowned king” of
the Sudan is, Governor-General Sir Robert

George Howe, the brilliant workingman’s|%

son who won his way from elementary school
to Cambridge and on to the Foreign Office.
He was bréught up in a terrace house—
now his address is “The Palace, Khartoum.”
EXTRAORDINARY people always
seem to be turning up in the Sudan.

Four officers of the Ethiopian Air Force
arrived there recently. It is odd, but they
were all Scandinavians.

And, of all things, they had come to look
into the business possibilities of crocodile
shooting.

MAN CHASES A_ LION

EVEN the animals of the Sudan are news.

In front of me, as I write, is the story of
a hippo which whiled away a spare hour by
chasing the inhabitants of a village round
the streets.

A leopard (was he in league with the local
headman?) kept a team of Government
audit officials besieged in a house for the



ondary, not primary. This ap-

plies to atom weapons as to

more primitive types.”

This is a refreshing example of
realism,

Although not against spending
money on defence he omits to
state in precise terms what pro-
portion of the national income
should be devoted to this purpose.

This is an unfortunate omission,
because he doubts whether the
threat to world peace has dimin-
ished or @hat, Soviet Russia is
willing to make an attempt to
ease the tension,

So muddled

To place the blame on the U.S.
as he appears to do, for what is
called panic rearmament is no
answer. ‘ Ho}

That country may be right or
wrong in bringing pressure on
the Western nations to rearm,

But the build-up of armaments
under the aegis of the Atlantic
community would never have
taken place if Soviet Russia had
not surrounded herself with a
number of satellite countries,
spent a_ substantial proportion oi
her resources on armaments, and
caused the blockade which led to
the Berlin air-lift.

The Korean aggression gave an
impetus to” rearmament, as even
Mr. Bevan would agree.

It confers no, benefits on the
British public to stir up hostility
against the U.S.

Whatever faults may have been
encountered in American foreign
policy, we are bound to rely,
whether in the search for world
peace or a deterrent against war
(or even as Mr. Bevan would
himself desire, to assist in eco-
nomic rehabilitation) on the moral
and physical backing of the
American people.

This view is reinforced by Mr.
Bevan’s own plea that it is wiser
to spend on the development of
backward countries than on arma-
ments.

This, as he knows, is accepted
United Nations policy, which may
well have been carried through
with enthusiasm and with the
necesary financial support if the
world had not been living under
the threat of aggression.

So entangled

I say this book is an attempt at
a thoughtful, analytical, and so-
ciological study’ in which Bevan
the orator and fgrceful agitator is
subcydinated to Bevan the phil-
osopher.

Yet somehow it fails to catch on
because he is neither decisive nor
conclusive.

In short, we have here the
thoughts of a man who is trying
to disentangle a series of com-
plex problems and, in the process,
gets into a tangle himself.

* Heinemann, 6s,

—L.E.S.







the steam age with a bountiful
supply and the strides made in
medical science thus controlling
diseases and removing the most
effective check on the increase of
the population of the world. The
result, the population of England
to-day is quoted (not includin

best part of a day.

And a native reports that he chased a man-
eating lion down the road until it was out of
sight. . .

The official comment on this says: “His
story is being treated with some referva-
tion.” .

TOO HOT, OR TOO COLD

THE climate, too, can always be relied on
to keep up the country’s reputation.

Recently a car broke down in the desert,
and the passengers nearly perished from
heat and thirst.

Yet, shortly after, on the Wadi Barei,
camels became immobilised in a kneeling
position—stiff with the night cold. They had
to be aided to their feet.

And on Jebel Marra, at Jawa, an old wo-
man was found frozen stiff beside an ice-
bound waterhole !

She was only thawed out by fires being lit
round her.

THE SUDAN is the land where school-.
boy strikes have become a national past-
time.

Strike leaders are expelled, schools
are closed—but the strikes go on.

The workers have nothing .to learn
from the West. Labourers recently turn-
ed up with a huge snake they found in
a drain. On'the strength of this “occupa-
tional hazard” they demanded a rise in
pay. "

YET, in the midst of this ferment of West-
ernisation, large tracts of the sprawling
Sudan are like the Empire of Kipling’s day

Border incidents — with tribesmen from
the Congo, Ethiopia, or Uganda—occur regu-
larly,

Spears are blooded, captives are dragged
off, ancient insults are avenged, cattle are
driven away.

The country has just had its record year
of prosperity. ;

THE GREAT Gezira cotton scheme
has been an example of what can be
done by co-operation between Govern-
ment, peasant, and private entelrprise,

Britain’s record here is good.

Right now, the Legislative Assembly of

Sudan are debating the self-government con- x

stitution we have laid before them.

It was annoying to Farouk—for Egypt’s|}

idea was to make the Sudan her virtual col-

ony. |
But, instead, the Sudan will decide her

own future--whether she links up at all with
Egypt, goes her own way, or links with Bri-
tain and the Empire. ;
WHEN I was in the Sudan recently I ask-
ed an old soldier what he thought of Egypt’s

Monmouthshire as 37,354,917, and| ambition to take over the country.

Wales (excludi Monmouth

2,158,193; “this ‘aes a total of
39,513,110—an increase of thirty
million three hundred and twenty-
five thousand nine hundred and
thirty-four; roughly four times as
much as it was one hundred and
fifty years ago, The whole popu-~
lation of the world has increased
at this alarming rate, for from 1840
to 1940 it climbed from 1,000,000,-
000 to 2,200,000,000,

The size of the world has not
increased nor has the production
= aun increased at the rate
of the population. This means t
MILLIONS FACE A DEATH OY
STARVATION! It will not be long
before the ute in the new
world will reach afuration point.
America is near the maximum of
180,000.000 people which she can
provide for, when this happens
there will be no food stuffs left
over for export; the same will
happen to Canada, ‘the Argentine,
Brazil and Australia, What will
happen to little’ Barbados when
there will be ho emigration and
her population, reaches 250,000?
She cannot support her present
population now, will she be able
to support ano’ 50,000 people
then? Is it Christian to bring little
children into this world to see
them die a slow and lingering
death of starvation? No, educa-
tion in contraceptives is the only
solution for the WHOLE WORLD
AND NOT BARBADOS ALONE.

Yours etc.,
‘ JOHN BECKLES.

“Take over us?” he said. ‘When you Brit-
ish go we'll incorporate Egypt in the Sudan,”



Panamerican Highway
Gets Hoost

HARRY W. FRANTZ
WASHINGTON, April 23.

Eduardo Dibos Mayor of Lima Peru has
given a timely boost to the Panamerican
highway through his authorship of “The
Great Hemispheric Road.”

This survey, a publication of the Inter-
national Road Federation, gives latest
authoritative information concerning the
history, economic utility «and construction
progress on the 15,449 mile network of trunk
highways.

They eventually will link all of the capital
cities on the American continent and con-
nect by ocean ferries with the principal
Caribbean republics. Dibos’ survey, in
pamphlet form, was timed for distribution
during the world meeting of the Interna-
tional Road Federation which starts in

By

Washington, May 13.

Authorities predict it will stir the imagin-

ation of delegates from Highway associations

of 25 countries, who are to attend. —U.P.

t

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952





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Danish Bacon

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Loose Tea 1.00 per Ib.

Dressed Rabbits .42 per Ib.
Dressed Tripe .32 per Ib.

Phone

GODDARDS
WE Deliver








THURSDAY. APRIL 24, 1952





Labourer Guilty Of Sho

Gets 18-Month Term

His Lordship the Acting Puisne Judge, Mr. G. L. Taylor
at the Cog:t of Grand Sessions yesterday sentenced Theo-



SUGAR

philus Clarke a labourer of Belle Gully, St. Michael, to 18
months’ imprisonment with hard labour after an Assize
jury found him guilty of breaking into the shop of Hislop
Blenman of Tweeuside Road, St. Michael, -with intent to
steal on June 15, 1951.
‘Clarke appeared before the court
= a two count ee OP the
rst count—on whic e was Mar R
found guilty—he was. charged y eece
wie beseseed pan De shop of
islop Blenman on June 15, 1951, I od 7 d
and on the second count charged ntr uce
him by being found in a build-
ing with intent to commit a felony. T Th B
Emerson Howard—keeper of the oO e ar
criminal records—said thet the .
accused was sentenced to six Miss Mary Audrey Reece, LL.B.,
months’ imprisonment with hard was introduced to the local bar
labour in 1948 for bivaking into-a yesterday morning before the
store, business of the Court of Grand
Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to the Sessions was started. The Judges
Attorney General prosecuted for of the Assistant Court of Appeal
the Crown. This was the retrial and Petty Debt Court, Police Mag-
of Clarke as on ‘the first trial a jistrates, and many barristers-at-
jury failed to agree whether he Jaw witnessed the introduction.
was guilty or not of the two Miss Reece was introduced to the
Ue was not represent- Court by the Hon'ble Mr, C. Wylie,
° ° Attorney General. In introducing
Gav’ K ys To Husband Miss Reece, the Attorney General
Violet Blenman, wife of Hislop said it was a pleasant duty. for
him to move to His Lordship for
Blenman told the court that her eee
husband has a business at. Tweed- Permission to Miss M. A. Reéce to
side Road, St. Michael, On June practice in His Lordship’s Courts
15 she closed the shop and went and other courts of Barbados.
home. She left no one in the shop. , Miss Reece is the daughter o
On reaching home she handed the the Solicitor General and the
keys of the shop to her husband so grand daughter of the late Mr.
that he could get into the shop, H. W. Reece, K.C., who was also
Soon after he left she heard that Solicitor General in Barbados.
a man was found in the shop Miss Reece was born on Septem-
which is about 100 yardsfrom the ber 22, 1928, in Barbados and is
house. , .the first Barbadian woman to he
She went to the shop and saw called to the bar of England and
the accused held by her husband be seeking permission to practise
and another man. A door of the in Barbados.
shop was tampered with but there
was nothing missing in the shop.
Drinks and cakes were in the shop.
The accused was taken to the
Police Station.
Hislop Blenman, husband of
Violet Blenman said that on June
15 about midnight he was home
when his wife gave him the keys
of the shop at Tweedside.
He went to the shop with a torch
and while inspecting the shop he
saw the accused stooping under the
counter of the shop as if he was
searching for something.
He called out for help and sev-
eral people came. He saw that the
back door was open. The accused
tried to escape but he prevented
him from doing so. The accused
was wearing a vest shirt at the
time. He took the accused to the
Belmont Police Station.



NOT GUILTY OF
FOROIBLE ENTRY

An Assize jury at the Court of
Ground Sessions yesteraay founa
belicid Jessamy not guilry of Uiv
forcible entry of a house occupieu
by William Nightengale after be-
ing aavisea tO revurn sucn a ver-
dict by His Lordship the Acting
Puisne Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor.
The offence was alleged to have
been committed on October 25.

Mr. G. H. Adams appeared on
behalf of Jessamy while Miss
M. E. Bourne prosecuted for the
Crown, The prosecution called o1
four witnesses: then Mr. Ad ms
submitted that it was necessary
in a case like that to prove mens
rea and from the evidence given
by the witnesses there was no
evidence of mens rea therefore
the jury could not convict on the
evidence.

Miss Bourne submitted that
there was sufficient evidence in
the case to take to the jury and
that mens rei was shown by the
act of the accused who had legal
advise and went to the Police
Station.

His Lordship then told the jury
that in a case of that kind it was
necessary for the criminal inten-
tion to be proved and therefore
-s the defendant had not a guilty
mind he would advise them to re-
turn a verdict of not guilty.

Witnesses said that the defend-
ant went inte the Niehtengale
Home with other men and dam-
aged the things in the house.



“LADY RODNEY”
EXPECTED TOMORROW

The C.NS. Lady Rodney
arrives in Carlisle Bay on Friday
morning, April 25 and will sail
‘the same night for Bermuda,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal via
the British Northern Islands,



MEAL AND GAS

A Shipment of 1,160. bags of
coconut meal, 50 drums of domes-
tic gasoléne, 29 cylinders of gas
and 200 cases of gelatine were
among the cargo arriving here on
Tuesday by the schooner At Last.
The At Last called from British
Guiana. She is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Acsociation.







TEA NAPKINS in Li

COCKTAIL NAPKINS
CROCHET CENTRE CLOTHS
CROCHET LUNCHEON SETS ..$21.00 & $17.50 a set



a



Really ine Things
For the Home!

Miss Reece was educated at year 1952; it is proposed that the
Queen’s -College and Oxford whole question of the price of
High School, England, and in sugar for local consumption shall
.1950 she graduated from the be reconsidered before next year.
University of London with a The method of keepigg down tne
degree of Bachelor of Laws. She price which it is proposed to use
entered the Middle Temple in this year is thought to be the best
1947 and was called to the bar one which can be adopted at this
on November 27, 1951, and it is stage.
interesting to know that her 4
father and grand father Were As stated in the Objects and
also called to the bar at Grays Reasons, the Bill seeks to provide
Inn. The Hon’ble C W. Reece is that so much of the levy for re-
also Puisne Judge in Hong Kong habilitation, price stabilisation and
and it would seem from the day labour welfare as is #mposed on
of her birth that Miss Reece sugar manufactured in 1952 which
breathed in an atmosphere of the is sold for consumption in the
law. ? Island shall be paid to the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee,
(and the Governor-in-Executive

His Lordship the Chief Justice Committee may use these moneys
Sir Allan Collymore said: “Miss us he thinks expedient for the
Reece, it is with pleasure that my purpose of stabilising the price of
brother judge and I o& this bench sugar sold for consumption in the
welcome you to the bar of this Island or of any grades or class of
island. I am sure that your many such sugar. It is expected that this
friends and well-wishers join in year the levy will amount to $13.20
this welcome, As most of us know per ton of sugar plus an additional
and as the learned Attorney Gen- $1.80 per ton or $15 per ton, The
eral has stated, your grand father loc:l] consumption is approxim-
was a jurist of renown in the ately 9,300 tons, and the amount
Caribbean area and a brilliant ad- of the levy which will be used for
vocate in the courts of Barbados. stabilising the price of sugar sold

“Your father is the preseht locally would therefore be ap-
Solicitor General for whem it is proximately $140,000. In other
doubtless a proud moment. It is Caribbean Colonies the levy is not
well known to all of us that the imposed on sugar for local con-
position which he now occupies was sumption, and the course which it
once occupied by your grand father js now proposed to adopt is not
Mr. H. Walter Reece, K.C., thus 1¢ therefore unusual. It is obvious]?
may be said by lineal descent that preferable to taxing the whole
law in you is engrained; and in community to subsidise the sugar
addition your uncle is a judge of which is consumed.

Hong Kong.
“T have listened with interest to Careful Study
The suggestion has ‘been made

Welcome

ty

&

your scholastic attainments, at
school, at London eee. and é
at the Middle Temple and I wish ‘ Danes
you well wherever, your future may and the manufacturer of sugar
lie, I understand your visit to this should receive less for sugar
island of your birth may be of sold for local consumption than
short duration, but wherever your the people who sell sugar for ex-
future career may lie and your Prt. It has also been suggested
talents lead you, I wish you suc- ‘that a cess for the purpose should
cess and you. are permitted to be imposed on the whole industry.
practise in the several courts of Honourable Members will appre-
the island.” ciate that questions like these re-
Replying Miss Reece thanked quire very careful consideration
His Lordship for the kind words indeed. +4 :
he had spoken in welcoming her , Last year an attempt was made
and the learned Attorney General t° have the principal kind of sugar
for introducing her to the bar of Which is exported—dark crystals—
Barbados. She appreciated the introduced in the shops, but this
reference His Lordship and the inferior grade does not seem’ to
learned Attorney General had have been generally acceptable to
made to her father and grand the public. Executive Committee
father and she would try to live Proposes therefore to subsidise the
up to the standard they had set. next grade—brown crystals—and
She was proud to be the first to fix the maximum price of that
avoman born in Barbados to be g8rade of sugar at the same price
called to the English bar and in- 45 last year, namely, 8c. per pound,
troduced to the bar of Barbados, Otherwise it would have risen to
At all times she would endeavour 9% Or 10c. per pound. The quan-
to maintain the high tradition and tity of yellow crystals at present
honour of the bar of the island. consumed is greater than that of
brown crystals, but as it will not

be possible with the funds avail-
able also to subsidise this grade of
sugar or specials, it is expected



Gramophone For

that there will be a swing in con- the dice * Me sugar?” Thee

- 4 sumption from yellows to browns. conditions had never existed in
Youth Movement In® calculating the amount which a rh — eaten always
: will be necessary for the subsidi- Charged for the local sugar a price

The Barbados Youth Movement tion of the brown crystals this Which was based on the export of
will soon be receiving a_gramo~- Dark Crystals, however low that

phone and records from England. expectation has been provided for.

.The gramophone will assist the or-
ganisation in its musical apprecia-
tion,

Rev. L, Bruce-Clarke, founder
and President of the movement,
received a letter from Mr.
Young of Essex stating that th
gramophone, a greetings record
from Mr. Young’s Club and other
records were recently shipped to
the Barbados Movement.

The Bill before the Council,
however, leaves the manner in
which sugar will be subsidised in
the discretion of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee. It will

price of sugar sold for consump-
tion locally as may be necessary,





cs eves. $9.00 per set
$2.00 per set
$1.20, $2.00, $3.20





HOME PRODUCTS DEPT.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD

10,

If, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

ee





During

Oo

BARBADOS





PRESENTATION



BENJAMIN YARDE who has just passed out as a journeyman ship carpenter receives a bursary cer-
tificate from the Colonial Engineer, Mr. T. E. Went. He was one of 20 (the others standing in the pic-
ture) who have finished a successful five years’ training at different trades, and who were all given cer-
tificates. Special mention was made of Yarde’s app.ication and ability.

WILL STAY —son mc:

and possible with the funds avail-
able,

During the course of his address,
the Colonial Secretary paid a tri-
bute to the Clerk of the Council
who managed ai short notice to
get the Copy of the Bill printed.

Seconding the motion for the
Second Reading of the Bill. Hon,
H. A. Cuke said he thought it was
due to the public to’ have some
general knowledge of the situation
in connection with the sale of local

sugar.
He explained that the sugar
which is manufactured in this

island for export is “Raw” sugar,
known here as Dark Crystals and
also known in the sugar world as
grades. That sugar’ was ex-
burced to Canada and the United
Kingdom and was refined and sold
as refined sugar, and was not
the same as in this country in the
raw state. There were no sugar
refineries in this island, and there-
fore no refine sugar was* made,
They however made Grades of
sugar for local consumption and
that was called Brown Crystals
which was known in other West
Indian Islands as “Wash” Grades.
Then there was Yellow Crystals
which was known in other places
as “Plantation White”

Dump Prices

Before the war sugar for export
was sold at very low prices; in
fact, sold at dump prices . What
they called Cuban price, and con-
ditions here were very bad and
the workers in the industry re-
ceived very low wages and the re-

turns to the employers were neg-

ligible, in some cases, none at all
that period, several of
the islands in the West Indies as-

hat the people who grow the canes sisted the industry by legislation

fixing a much higher price for
local sugar, thereby giving the in-
dustry some extra funds to com-
bat the low export price they re-

ceived. Actually, in Australia
which consumed about % of her
production, the local price was

very high, and enabled them to
meet the dump price of abroad

~And so it was done in many of the

islands in the West Indies, notably
Trinidad, and Jamaica which has
a large consumption of sugar. But
the local price was very high and
allowed the industry to get some-
thing out of the consumption of
local sugar.

In this island that was never
done. However low the price of
sugar fell in the foreign market,
the local price was based on that
price and therefore “we have had
justification during the past to
continue to assess local price on
the export price.”

In some of the other islands,
Governments had asked the in-
dustry in consideration of the help
they gave in the days when the
sugar was dumped at low prices,
“will you now help with the ris-

ing cost of living by keeping down




price went.”
More Canes

The next point was that these
con-
sumption and naturally were not
made by all the factories in this
a therefore be possible for that body island; and so if you went to a

to watch the situation and to take factory and asked the management
such measures to keep down the to make “Wash Grades” or Yel-
low Specials, they would tell you

sugars were sold for local



ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE

ne





pbreaking |

Be 20 Get Bursary
Certificates

@ from page 1

they owed a duty to the commu-
ba wich had allowed them
money for training over and above
what the ordinary boy got.

It was really their birthday, he
said. He realised the five years of |
hard grind they had put in and
he was very pleased that a very
high percentage of thém had been
successful and the failures were
in the minority.

“But what I want to impress
upon you,” he said, “is that you
are only now on the edge of your
work and must still learn and
expend some energy along your
respective lines,

“There is the Evening Institute
which has technical classes and
if you are really ambitious, you
should join the Institute. Give
a little of your spare time one
evening a week and you will find
that it would be advantageous.”

They had acquired a_ certain
amount of teehnical skill, he told
them, but they should enhance
that advantage by becoming good
workmen and knowing how ‘to
deal with their fellow workmen
and thelr employers, In other
words, they had‘to be honest to
themselves.

He sincerely hoped in the years
which followed they would be able
to truly say that they were please,
they had had the five years
training.

Honest Day's Work

The Director of Education re-
called to them that it was St.




































for family
fitness

Marmite isa dietary source
of Vitamin B. A little added to
—_— .. ou gy Gravies
an woury dis! ives
flavour and eaurebeiee thie
dren love Marmite—especially
in Sandwiches of every variety
and on hot buttered toast.

In jars: | oz.,2 oz.,

4 oz., 8 oz., 16 oz.”

. MARMITE |

THE VITAMIN B YEAST EXTRACT
GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR

Rae oO

at







cents per 100 lb, more fér Wash
Grades, and 40 cents more for Yel-
low and 60 cents for Specials, they
would be losing. It was obvious
that it would take more canes to
make a ton of Wash Grade than
it would to make a ton of Dark
Crystals and as all the factories
did not make theSe sugars you
could not expect everybody to
make the special sugars, and sell
them at the same price as they
exported the grades.

Therefore, the basic price of
local sugar was the export price
of the grades, plus quotation of the
different grades which increase
was to be added to the cost, That
had continued all along the years,

This year the price of sugar was
increased very considerably, some-
thing like $27.00 per ton, and in
the normal course of events the
same procedure would be followed.
The export price of sugar $7.00
per 100 tons for Grades, $7.20
Wash Grades, $7.40 Crystals and
$7.60 for Special.

One point seemed to have slip-
ped the memory and attention of
the people and it was that with
the price of sugar going up by
such a sum of money this year
there was being disbursed some
$2,000,000 extra wages, so that it
dtd not mean that the price of
sugar going up would only mean

increasing the cost of living, but a ©

large proportion of the people who
consume sugar were getting
$2,000,000 more in wages

Levies

That did not mean that some-
thing should not be done to hold
the price of sugar down. As re-
gards all the special funds, the
objects and reasons of the Bill
were a little reversed. It talked
about a levy being put on local

sugar, but that was not quite so
From the price of Sugar as fixed

for export, those ce were
levied. In other words, taken out
of the export price and so much
paid to the Price Stabilization
Fund, the Price Rehdbilitation
Fund and the Labour Welfare
Fund,

It was not the case that those
cesses were laid on the local price
of sugar. It was one of the export
price of sugar that those sums
were taken,

So it was at the moment
that Government was trying to
see what could be done to help
the situation, and the local Sugar



last

Producers Association who were
interested in the matter were
asked if they would raise any
objection to the amount to be

put to the three funds being put
to an equalisation account so as
to keey down the local price of
sugar and they agreed to it.

No mention was made of that,
and he thought it was right that
it should be known that the Sugar
Producers Association agreed to
it in order to help the situation,

Now the difficulty here was that
that amount of money, as the
Colonial Secretary has told them

-$139,500, nearly $140,000 would
be required if they wanted to hold
the price of sugar down, Last
year the wash grades or “Browns”
old at 8 cents per lb. and if they
did not hold the price down this
year, they would be sold at 94
cents per Ib,

Subsidy
followed the years

procedure in

‘ t rice w* > 91 cents per
that ur senived 9 me price would be 9) I
iless they received 20 ~, i ea pana’é
a

——



30 x 18 $6.01



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That was, if they took the same
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ENAMELLED SINKS

SINGLE DRAINER 42” x 21”—$50.34
DOUBLE DRAINER

TING AND BRACKETS

GALVANISED NAILS
SIZES
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George’s Day and of the message
Lord Rowallan had given, They
had to give happiness to others
and not be satisfied until they
had done an honest day's work
Mr. Carter who next spoke t
the passing out apprentices tolc
them that though they were some-
what skilled workmen, they hac
always to bear in mind that skil
was not everything and they hac
to learn to discipline themselves

The other member of the Board
Mr, H. Husbands said that care
was very essential in their work
and recalled that when the St.
Michael&S almishouse was being
built a small barrel of nails were
picked up by the end of the job
Indeed, he said, he knew a man
who had built a house with nails
thus picked-up. He therefore
cautioned them to be always care-
ful with ‘their employers’ ma-
terials,
The journeymen~ who were
presented certificates are: Ben-
jamin Yarde — ship carpenter
Clarence Thomas, Wilson Alleyn«

ca penters, Hugh Wilkinson,
Stanley Gittens, Ivan Goslin and
rhorald Kellman—cabinet makers













oatmeal in Ful-O-Pep
Feeds and Mashes for

Frank Corbin—Mason; Emerson Niner starting, growing and egg
Nichols—Motor mechanic, | Cate production contributes
ton Cox, Coswyn Gr’ , Samue Fer information
Depeiza, Gradfield Smith, Ralph end orders, contact os more profitable
taurt and Victor on — Elec- R. M. JONES & CO., Led, resul
ivicigns, William Johnson —
Printer, Irvine Hinds, — P. ©, Box 241 Made by
Clarke—Engineer, George chols
tailor and Neville Greene book Sridgetewn The Quaker Cate Company

yinder, |



Ack fer Ful-O-Pep Poultry Feeding Guide—it's freel

—_————————————_———!

A Biscuit is as good as

Governor A'ssents
‘tio Ten Acts

The Governor has assented to
ine folowing Acts in the neme
ind on behalf of Her Majesty the
Queen —
‘ne Public Officers’ Housing
Loans Act, 1952 (1952-1),
The Customs Tariff (Amend-
ment) Act, 1952 (1952-2).
Vhe Bills of Exchange (Amend-
ment) Act, 1952 (1952-3).

The Pioneer Industries (En
couragement) (Amendment
Act, 1952 (1952-4).

The Revenue Equalisatio:
Fund Act, 1952 (1952-5).
The Expiring Laws Continu
ance Act, 1952 (1952-6).
The Expiring Laws Act, 195-

it’s Pastry—

CRA WFORD’S
BISCUITS



1952-1). are justly famous for
The Public mngioress a. ; ed

1982 (1982-8). their exquisite pastry.
The Police (Amendment) Act

1952 (1952-9).

The Appropriation Act, 195°

52.-10).
Mpeg TO GET THE BEST ASK FOR

‘““Confident”’ In
Inner Basin

The Schooner Confident I. G.
which was recently launched a
Browne’s Beach, was yesterday
taken to the inner basin of the
Careenage where her two masts
will be lifted in place.

Mr. Lord, Jonfident I, G.’s
owner, said that he was hoping to
get the machinery for lifting the
masts in place by next week. He
brought up the masts from Brit-
Guiana last month by the
A. H. Van-

CRA WFORD'S
BISCUITS

ITS THE PASTRY THAT
COUNTS.

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Hardware Store
Broad Street
Tel. 2364












.

CLASS

DIED

‘Oi “April 23, 1952, at her
Brittons X Rd.,

IFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 25086
FOR SALE
AUTOMOTIVE

BECKLES
residence “Ellaville”,
St. Michael Mrs. Miriam Beckles
Funeral leaves her Inte residence at


























4 p.m,“ ti@iy for = >
Church, and thence to the estbury
Cemetery : Friends are asked to AUTOMOBILE — 189, Green tris
attend Minor, 24,000 miles in exc@lent condition
Eloise Brathwaite (Sister), Gwen $),200.00 or nearest Apply Jason Jones
Walton (Daughter!, Vivien, 208 Jones 22.4.52—-3n
| nds),
seeiriegtok” ine, TO 4.52 BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chassis,
a new. Por immediate delivery, Courtesy
FIELD—On 23rd April, 1952, RUFUS Garage 4616 2.4 52—6n
eel, Ba’ Toad, at 430] CAR—Morris Minor 16600 miles.
p.m. today for Bt, leona, — Ring 2503. 22.4.52—3n
a 24.4.52. CAR-—Morris Oxéord. Perfect condi-
= tion; mileage fe Telephane 28
HUSD. ; the 23rd April, 1952, a4. .2.n
UGHAN HUSBANDS, J.P. :
late of St. y, the ij CAR—One Wi Six-Eighty,
leaves residence, Horse Hill} age 10,000; i condi
Hous St at 3.30 o'clock this} Redman & Garage

Joseph.
evenin: " for “St. lucy Parish Church.



b
ses on
New

” CAR 1948 A. 4 new .

paint job. Recent rebore.

8556. 18.4.52—Tn.
—$—_—$——$_

(Wreat? & be sent to the Funeral oe
Parlour Hinds & Co, Tw ide
Road). “Friends are invited



‘Ada (widow); Noel, Aubrey, Clifford,
Elsie, iChildren). 4.4.52 -
: One PREFECT FORD 1949 Model.
ORIAM Partly new. Price hs. Apply
TODERINGHAME-In_ loving memory, of Suausie's Garage, SOE Bae
Foderinghaey Sno Saperted thie Hie) HALLMAN MINX—One 8G Black

“Because for our dear Saviour's sake
Our sins are al) forgiven .
And istians only fall to sleep

= Cee, eae
Bynoe -» or No.
24.4.52—5n.







Stacy, Lorna (@aughters), Noel, Grant a ck
(sons), Sydney (grandson). 24.4.82—In.] TRUCK—One (1) 3-ton Austin ck.
Eee Apply D.V. SCOTT & Co. Lid, White
RARRIS—iIn° loving memory of our] Park Road.
ed son and brother, Walter 244.524 f n.
. who 4d this life on the
Mth Apri 1049. VAUXHALL WYVERN— excellent
Yappy and smiling, always content condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY
Loved and respected wherever he GARAGE. Dial 4616.
went,
To a beautiful fe came a peaceful
end,
He died as he lived, everybody's ELECTRICAL
friend ia o4
The Harris's. Ramily, Nr. St. Martins RADIO—Large Pye Radio Qwoert
er 24.4.54—10. Fieayving colony. Chéap Pons $o58 .
TROTMAN .— Im loving memory 2%} 22
Veteen frre n who departed on] REFRIGERATOR—‘Prigidaire” 4% cu.
24th Apr! pe. ft. in perfect condition, $250.00 Wilkes,
Not gone memory: Dist. “Cc” St. Philip 22.4.$2—3n.

Not gone from love;







But to her heavenly home above WASHING MACHINES. Hoover, elec-
Some may forget as she is gone trical, home washing machines. Only
ot remember no matter} s)35. The answer to laundry problems.
ow tons~ hay terms inged.
Vetlyn Roemer (mother), Erskiné (son). 1k it Hunts @ Go, DO, Le Broed Bt
Neville (bi *y Rosalie (grandmother), | jai $136. wh a 3n
Rosa jolene (aunts) Hyacinth, io .
Gean, yy and Colleen Laas ee ‘
. : n
LIVESTOCK
WORRE — In ing of my
dear beloved B "Blease Gertude - -
Worrell, who depart this li on GRADE HOLSTEIN COW—To calve
24th April, 1949. within few yr lactation
How often I tread the path Dial 2068, D. . Prost, Stan-
That leads me to the gr more Lodgé, Rock. 22.4.52—t.f.n.
b bing: Rhine — oe LPI 80 well
ut whom I cou
—s night a all is silent POUL ¥
And sleep forsakes my eyes > i aes aire
M3" guts on, Sone ere | SER Ye AG a aa
wens Cost one. Serius ’ a ROCK: | PURE.
Louise , Week oll ks unsexed for ngxt
phe ny Jes, Grace, = H enson starting Sings they mete Be
Keith (¢ ane" r eet er’ as already receiving

——$—$—$——$—_———

PUBLIC NOTICES
THE wAtinanosoutPriNG & TRADING
co, UP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Transfer Books and Register of Members
of the above-named Ci y will (be
closed from the 24th day April to the

7th day of May 1952, both days inclu-

Sadie nat e Board ot Directors.

MA’
—Manure
tors, Grass
rakes for

Secretary.
TRE bos aan Aue CLUB
Ni cE TO MBERS
NOTICE is hereby given that In ace
cordanve, with Rule 8 the Club will be

closed t® Members on Saturday,
2th, from 7.30 to 10.30 p.in.,

20th.
Marine Di ond Aquatic Events by
SH . mmittee
vee
Ooo a eo SPENCER:
= &

Secretary.
4

eens a Gi
a x
with Melants and





- -— - —_——
Vv SPEEDBOAT, built

NOTICE uren [224 imported nm 1948. Length 18, fect,
ara a See atarct tnots rave, | Beam 8 feet 9 inches, Draught 12 fee
the Parochial Ce ed id te will ‘pe seetng one ete ri md conadioll
opened for business on the follows | comply with Lloyd's Board of Trade
days onlys— . requirements, Powered with Ford water=
Thursdays from 10,00 2.54, 9 a} nom B.H.P. Speed 10 knots,
Fridays Oe, 8 ea, Po | Apoly Rewinald French,,.D. ¥. ,Sgott, &
Parochial Treasurer r ; Mh a c
3e.¢ 184 KHAKI DRILLS — Spinner’e heavy

quality $1.16 and superior 8 oz. Drill

$1.46 per yard. Guaranteed fast colours
Come and see at KERPALANT, 52 Swan
Street. XH 4:52—1n.
asanele

ONIONS—Stock up NOW. Every
Housekeeper should buy a 50 tb bag of
Onions at 1/- per pound. Guaranteed

ry

Estate of
ARCHDEACON ALFRED SHANKLAND

‘ Deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al)
pergons having any debt or claim upon
or affecting the Estate of Archdeacon
Alfred Shankland, late of Third Avenue



. |Shirt Factory.



, san a

x. . Compile’

Fish. Archie Clarke.
23.4.52—4n

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





COUNTER and TELEPHONE CLERKS.
Apply by letter and in person. J. N.
GODDARD & SONS, LTD. 23. .—2n

ONE COOK, General Servant.
to Mrs. Lisle Bayley, Pavilion
Hastings ma

Apply
Court,
62-2.
PRODUCTION MANAGER

- Reliance
17.3.52—1n.

SUB AGENT WANTED. Resident
Bridgetown, well connected with com-
merce, to sell accredited British goods
on commission, State age, experience,
references, Post Box 532, Trinidad

23.4.52—3n

From ist May 1952, for the Coleridge

“Secretary to the

Post is a Whole Time

The Office of this Secretary shall

be at the School, and the Secretary shail

be required to combine the duties of

Clerk to the Governing Body with those
ot Secretary to the Headmaster

2. Applicants shall have had a See-
ondary Education, and possess a Cam-
bridge Schoo} Certificate or its equivalent.
pnd be proficient at Twping: ability to
write Shorthand being an advantage

3. The Salary is $100.00 per month.
rising by annual increments of eight dol-
lars to $140.00 per month.

4. Applications to be received by the
Headmaster, R. C. Springer, Esq., M.
", Government Hill, St.
ael, by Post, enclosing recent Testimon-
oi. not later than Saturday 26th April

By Order of the Governors of the School
RRANCKER

‘TIONS are invited from men
and women keenly interested jn Ani-
Welfare for the appointment of
TIM > BAR-

two names for
man, Barbados
Office, Central

erence to: The Chair-
S.P.C.A, C/o Headquarters
Polwe Stn. Bridgetown.
22.4.52—2n

ae
MISCELLANEOUS

CARIB BEER BOTTLES — Did you
know that you could get three cents
for every two Carib Bottles? Bring fran





to Messrs, A. S. BRYDEN & SON!
€ ) Ltd,, Victoria Street.
22.4.52—3n



BUNGALOW—Modern Stone Bungalow
in good residential district, 3 bedrooms,
servants quarters, all round wail en-

. |closure preferred—not exceeding £2,700.
22.4.52—n.

Apply: Advocate, Z.24.



INCUBATOR—Oil or . gas. Any size,
but 200—300-egg capacity preferred.
Post particulurs, Bennett; Gregg Farm
Bungalow, St. Andrew.

*24.4.52—2n.



PUBLIC SALES





' "©. REAL ESTATE

ALL that bungalow called “SCAFELL”
with the furniture therein standing on
ly Square Feet of land situate at
Station House Hill, St. Philip, and_con-
taining Living and Dining Rooms, ree
Bedrooms, Toilet, Bath, and Kitchen,
with a Garage for one car, and Servant's
Rooms. Government water supply and
electricity.

OFFERS IN WRITING will be received



ty the undersigned up to Saturday the
Qrd day of May 1952, at 12 noon. The
vendor does not bind himself to aceapt
the highest or any offer. Inspection on
application to Mr. H, G. Gooding, Tel
95295. rther particulars and con-

» CATFORD & CO.,
No, 17 High Street,
Bridgetown,
20.4,.52—5n

BUNGALOW — A handsome, newly-
built bungalow with all modérn conver

feet 3 land at The Lodge, with a wonder-
ful view over the west const.

Also four fine similar building sites
adjoining. Apply to Miles Cecil, Dial
2518 or 4367. 13.4. 52-—12n .

HOUSE—One board and shingle house
with open verandah and shop situated
at Boscobel, St. Peter. Apply: Gordon
Chandler on premises. 22.4,52—1n

“LE TOUQUET" — Maxwell Coast.
Drawing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms,
running water, electric light and tele-
phone. A nice property standing on
about 2 acres of land in one of the most
attractive and popular parts of the coast

above walt be set up for sale by

auction at the offices of the undersigned
on Friday, 2nd May, 1952, at 2 p.m

Applications for permission to view





should be made to Mr. F. D. G. Simp-
Pellevilte, in the parish of Saint Michael, |to keep for 3 months. M e
who died in this Meland on the 30th day HAROLD PROVERBS & =, Ltd. | sen, senses aes as 95214.
of January 1962, are requested to send 23.4.52—I1n CARRINGTO! BAD: "a
i particulars of their claims, duly Luc, é
attested, to the undersimned, the qualified said A ea 13,.4.52—6n,
exceutors of the Estate of the svid © ren Pp rms, ng lastii 3 ae pore fh
~a bre le price, onl cents per yard | The undersigned will offer for sale by
Altea. Shankland. (decestecd, i par [siete AR 32 Swan Street public competition at their office, No. 17,

of Messrs, Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, on or before
the Sth day of June 1952, after which
date we shall proceed to distribute the

24.4.52—1n
RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM

High Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday,
lst May 1952, ALL, THOSE buildings,
comprising offices and warehouses on the

. for Two Dollars, your Wharf and Prince William Henry Street
asscts of the ‘said Estate among the | Records. Thves te Mee Ol rp. and McGregor Street, Bridgetown, stand-
parties entitled thereto, having regard to .4,62—t.f.n. | ing on 5,137 square feet of land and now

the debts and ojaims only of which we
shall then have had notice; And that we
shall not be liable for assets so distri-
but to-any person of whose debt or
e WE shall not have had notice at
the time.of such distribution,

all persons indebted to the said
Ratate afe requested to settle their ac-
“9

RAIN GAUGE CYLINDERS — Have
yours easy: ow eae season is
roac! :
as . . 22,4.52—3n.

RIDDO’ SNHALANT—For relief of

TRON
Without delay. as on Ror eS ee

#his 2nd day of April, 1952,
H, G, MURRAY,
- Cc, R. ARMSTRONG,
Qualified Executors of the Estate
got Alfred Shankland, dec'd,
© 3.4.52--4n

:.o eS eere
Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph
England's leading Daily Newspaper now
arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: Ian Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd

Local Representative, Tel, 3118.
171.4,52—t.f.n.



FOR SALE

ee small table model Gas
Cooker complete with oven.

i

We have Jacob's Cream Crackers $1.20
tin: Fancy Sweet Biscuits % Ib. pkgs 42¢.
pkee, Buy at once. tock is being
reduced.—KNIGHT'S LTD. . 23.4.52.2n

PIPE—Galvanized water pipes,



Only used a few months, [Pee ee sor aso pipe on
as new, owner ieft City Garage, Victoria
Island. 2.4.52—t.f.n
. ae
See it at your Gas Co.
Bay Street. FOR RENT








occupied by Messrs, R. M. Jones & Co.,
Ltd.

Further particulars from the undér-

signed.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
a teas



AUCTION
aoheepennenneeeonnemeereenennees Sactinsenttie
UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Thursday 2th at “Gandhi Villa”
Brighton, Black Rock: by order of Mr
D. A. Thani we will sell his Furniture
— which includes — Morris Suite (Settee

-l and 2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top;

Coffee Table; Berbice, Tub and Up-
hols:, Chairs; all in Mahogany; Helio-
cr Radiogram, Brass Floor Lamp,
Divan; Carved Teakwood Table; Very
Nice Tapestrys Tea Trolley, Oak Dining
Table and Leather Seat Chairs; Dinner
Ww Pictures, G. E. and Norge
rators, both in good working
order; Glass and China, Brass Ware.
Tea and Dinner Services, Carpets, Ver-
endah Chairs; Bookshelves; Twin Bed
steads with Simmons Springs; Mird.
Press, Bureau, and Dressing Table all in

|

iM ny: Cream painted Press with
HOUSES | Dressing Table combined, Sirgle Cedar
Bedstead with Box Spring, Electric
Lamps, Bedside Tables; tron Single
2 BUNGALOW — Fully furnished, 5} Pedstead Mir'd Press and Dressing tabic
all modern conveniences, in| |; painted white, Electric Stove, 4
Navy ens. Phone 4311, Johnson. | purner Qil Stove, Kitchen Table and
ning Chaise, Pram; Bicycle, Canisters and
Ee SE gee mee other items.
= . BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, |" daie ; &: mii
HEADQUARTERS FOR vevfect. bathing, quiet. All meals and aa p'clgem Mente CASH
— SOUVENIKS ierviccs supplied fem main house. OW? | BRANKER TROTMAN & CO
FROM INDIA, CHINA & Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable . i
4 CEYLON couple, Apply: Beachlands, St. James or Auctioneers.
phone 0157. 14.3.52—4.f.n. 23.4.52—2n




ete —ietinn
FLAT—New, very modern, seaside flat.
Completely furnished. Telephone, gas,
electricity. Facing sen. Excellent and
safe seabathing. Apply to “MARESOL"
ST. LAWRENCE GAP. Phone 8496.
17.4.52—t.f.n.

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Diai 3466

FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3 bed-





g rooms. Fully furnished. Lighting Plant.
x THE BIG EVENT Watermill supply. Dou! Car Port, two
s servant rooms. From Ist. Phone
+476. 0.4, 52—t.f.n

HEATHFIELD, Crane — For May,

OF THE YEAR

THE LOYAL BROTHERS

June, July. Furnished, electricity, re-
frigerator. Apply A, D. Herbert, Phone
8385 ° 4.52—8n



ILFRACOGMBE—Maxwell's 4 bedrooms,
OF THE STARS Seppenes with or without pr Dial

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
Silver ang Linen, Good ing.
For further particulars. Apply to Alma
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.
23.252—t+.f.n.

NEWHAVBN — Crane Coast, 4 bed-
rooms Fully furnished, lighting Plant,
| Watermi! supply, Double Garage, three

Present

Carnival



OS PSCOCSP CSO POGFS FOP OOF









5 servant rooms. For May an
om June 5th & 7th % | tober ist Phome 447s.” and from O¢_
~ t@ sa Seudite 10.4. 59—t. f.n
at Queen’s Par! Q | ———_—_— ihe celal a
s OFFICES at 48, Tudor § ” tf
% further Particulars Later % | for aston. Dentists, ov street, Suita |
te a XM | Apply: Cecil.Jemmott. Phone 4563
7 SOOCPOOOSS | 22.4.52—2n





“Sonic” Carries Out
Seismic Survey

; The motor vessel Sonic is car-
rying out a seismic survey of the
area bounded by the parallel of
latitude “10 degrees 23 minutes
north and extending from point
Lisas westward to longitude 61
de 45 minutes and ther
southward to the mainland,

| The Sonie began her operations
on Tuesday and is expected to
finish her.survey on Monday. She
is painted white. She carries a
red flag during the day and a red
light during the night.

Ships moving along the Trini-
}dad west coast, in the Gulf of
Paria and the Southern
approaches have been warned to
j; use caution and keep clear of the
| Sonic.
This



information was received

"lat the local Harbour and Ship-

ping Department.





niences, standing on about 12,000 square,

|



Talks to Workers

el









HER LONG siege of illness does not
prevent Eva Peron, wife of Ar-

what F.B.I. men carrying out an
investigation .
through this event.
national Relief Service, given b:
Scouter A. J. Tatnall Head-
quarters at 8 o'clock last night,

ing programme. A film was also
shown,

in a barricaded prison
prisoners gave up veneer,
one of the eight. guards he

killed and eight others wounded
by State police bullets.—



oe
’ oa
Scouts Celebrate St. George’s Day |
from page 1 = 78 hool. Bach

The other event was Relaying ote two scadile each "ot the
The Message. In this event four Classes —- Welter, Light,

when contestants were OM Middle and Heavy.
the message they resem some- At 7.30 p.m. there will be an

Inter-Troop Table Tennis Com-
petition in which each troop
be represented by four players.
On Friday at 5.00 p.m. there
will be the Inter-Troop Scout
Competition. One patrol of seven
or eight Scouts under 18 years of
age, from each troop will enter
this competition .

A hush reigned
A lecture on the Scout Inter-
at

imaxed the day’s very interest-

To-day at 4.30 p.m. the Scouts big day.

will have their Inter- Box- From 8.00 o'clock on Saturday
ing Competition at the ni¢ht the Scouts stage

ee ee a a
23 play quatiec f

Greug te Rou Bln wae halal eS ennth

a to a new state prison farm a 2 ore

Monday at 4.30 p.m. an Inter-

After holding out for 113 hours
dormitory

N St. George’s Week will be clim.

as hostages was harmed. seed wan 8 sate ot

But prisoners still holding out *emsingion, on

in barricaded cell block 15 at 7-30 o'clock.

po coc my TS BB 1. Bethel “A” team with 18
‘or u .

prisals for ‘helt Dart vaste wes points out of a possible 20.

UP.

——
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIa,
ZEALAND LINE LIMITE

(M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M.V. CARIBBEE will

88. “TEKOA”" to sail accept Cargo and Passengers for

from Adelaide February 1 Dominica, p> Montserrat,

March 43rd, ey h 10th, Bris- Nevis and St. Kit®. Sailing Mon-
bane March arriving at Trinidad jay 28th inst ;

about A 22nd and Barbados about The M.V. MONEKA will accept

April 25) Cargo and Passengers for -

sel has ample space for chilled and hard and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
frozen cargo. tnd May 1952 <
Cargo accepted on through Bills of The M.V. DAERWOOD will
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accept Cargo and Passengers for
British Guiana, Leeward and Windward St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba. {
lulands. Passengers only for St. Vincent.

SHIPPING NOTICES

In addition to general cargo this ves-

For, furtnér particulars apply —
their FURNESS a @ ov., LTD,

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952

NEW
D.

° 54



mica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis



Date of Salling to be notified»

BWI, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC)

ana Consignee Tele. 4047

DACOSTA & OO. LTD,
BARHADOR. WA









NEW YORK SERVICE
STBAMEBR senile 18th April—arrives Barbados 29th Apri
STEAMER ‘salle Oth May— arrives Barbados 20th May, 198i.

A STBAMBR sailed 10th April

rives Ba’ 26th
gentina’s Juan Peron, from ad- A STBAMER sails Mth April artives barhegee tote oer teen x
dressing the National Congress of eesti eneernnasesip saa
Rural Workers in Buenos Aires. TAKE NOTICE CANADIAN SERVICE
She was reported looking drawn -
and pale as she officially closed Goo R SOUTHBOUND
ti " l }
he conference. qd eer ) «| Faveme ot saad ae ait nt
That & RUBBER COMPANY, a corporation organ-}S.S. “ALCOA PA\ od Barbados
Sugar Will ized under the laws of the State of Ohio, United States of A whose rede |'S'S. “ALCOA POINTER” * ee eeiee, elias eet. Ge sae
fe business a is 1144 East Market Street, Akron, Ohio, U.S.A., has applied} ss. “A STEAMER” MONTREAL Ma 16th May eo
ar : + ‘or the of a in Part “A” of Register in respect of pneumatic,} s s| “A STEAMER” ". MONTREAL May 30t fame.
t t cushion, and solid tires constructed wholly or partly of rubber and used for motor ‘ 3 jay 30th une 9th
; i a be ge eats, anes eyeles, er , aeroplanes and oe, a, and NORTHBOUND Dus Miekkacs
cluding part of such t . such tr , Outer casing r tire shoes an nner “ ” je PDa
lubes, therefor; tire chains and non-skid devices, inside tire protectors, outside 8,8. STINERA tos April 18th For St, John, N.B. and St











Per Pound

lb, and % it was desired to hold
the price down to 8 cents per

a
v

tire protectors, repair outfits: repair patches
ing cement; inner tubes; vulcanizing materials; vulcanizing outfits; tire rims; top

rubber goods; rubber mats and matting; airplane supplies;
material in general; ink rollers and blankets for printers’ use including newspaper
cutting rubbers; leather substitute materials, st:

and bandages; patching gum; patch-

ressing and tire paint; rim paint; vehicles wheels; rubber tiling for floors; rubber
alves; rubber hose and tubing; rubber machinery; heels and soles; mechanical
packing and packing

ries and

Ls. orage batte: rking plugs:
ill be entitled to register the

lb. it would i : a pillows, cushions and mattresses, and w same after

of $1.50 Ee age wee subsidy one month from the 24th day of April 19923, un some person shall in the
Ave DOS ., and the sug-| meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such regls-

hace was that the sum of money | tration. © Trade mark can be seen on application at my office.

Ss!






ould be put to a_ separate
equalisation fund and used for the
holding down of the wash grades.
As the hon’ble Colonial Secretary
had told them, it was quite true
that the amounts consumed were
Specials 14,000 bags, Yellows 54,-
000 bags and other grades 25,000
bags. That ‘on what would take
events—25,000 bags wash grades,
54,000 bags Yellows and 14,000
bags Specials. But in as much as
to pay to keep the price down to
8 cents instead of 10 cents for
the yellows, instead of the dif-
ferential being 14 cents, it was
now being 1 penny a_lb, and it
was assumed that there would
a swing from the Yellows to

retary said,
naturally have to watch and see
how: it would go. Actually the
Sugars did not present a_ great
difficulty because they were made
during the crop season and there-
fore those factories which made
those sugars, agreement would be
arrived at as ards the quanti-
ties which they d make, that
was the quantities would be sold.

Loss Sustained

The stocks of all the old sugars
were completely exhausted, so
actually some of the traders had
been selling this year’s crop sugar
and had sustained some loss al-
ready. The position now was that
if the Bill was passed, the gov-
ernment would have a fund to
subsidize the wash grades at 8
cents per lb instead of the normal
price of 104 cents a lb.

He had figures of the prices
of variqus grades in the various
island’s Dark Crystals was sold in
some islands—Antigua had one
factory and so too did St. Kitts—
and the prices were as follows:
Antigua 7 cents; St. Kitts 6 cents;
St. Lucia 74;

When it came to Wash Grades
Antigua price was 11 cents per |b;
St. Kitts 11 cents; St. Lucia 94
cents; Trinidad 8; Jamaica 8 and
Barbados 8 which would be bring-
ing Barbados into line with the
other places; Yellows: Antigua
St. Lucia, none; Trinidad 8}; B.G.
74; Jamaica 9 and Barbados 10
cents lb.

local industry to charge a higher
price for the local sugar when

the price of local sugar be some-
thing less than the price of the
export sugar.

The Bill did not the
principle, All it did was to ask
that the money which, out of the
export price would have been put
to the three funds, would be put
to a seperate equalisation fund
and used for subsidizing the
Brown Crystals. He had much
pleasure in seconding the motion
= the second reading of the
Hon. G. B. Evelyn observed tha‘
people did not mind paying a price
to get the best sugar for use, and
said that he had been reliably
informed that servants, even those
in the low income groups, her
ferred to pay 9 cents for their
sugar in order to get the brighter

sidized the
would be such a big swing
from people using the better ||
grade sugar to the Brown Sugar,
despite the subsidy.

Hon. K. R, Hunte said that what
Mr, Cuke had said was quite
right but added that the compu- |‘
tations were right provided that
the sugar was the right colour, If
it were not bright in colour it
would not sell because it was his
experience that the people pre-
ferred a bright coloured sugar.

The Bill was read a second time
and pased in all its stages.

Prisoners Cause
$2,500,000 Dantage |

NEW YORK, April 23

Warden Julian Frisbie of
Southern Michigan prison bowed | |
to demands of mutinous convicts
in the hope of saving ten guards | |
held as hostages by rioters who
have caused $2,500,000 damage to}
the world’s largest walled prison)
in Jackson, Michigan, while in
Rahway, New Jersey, the sur=|



the expansion of

this purpose a free grant of the /fol








Dated this 23rd day of April, 1
H. WILLIAMS,
of Trade Marks.
24.4.52—-3n

. GOVERNMENT NOTICE

BUILDING ESTATE, CITY OF
There is an



”

be prepared to develop a building estate on a substantial scale.

The Government would be prepaxyd to consider offering for

lowing areas: <-

(a) All the unoccupied land lying North of the extension
of the Government Housing Scheme, Freetown Road,
North of the City of Belize and bounded as follows: —

North by North Circular Road, East
canal lying to the west of the Belize and Newton
Clubs, South by the extension of the Government
-Housing Scheme, the Police Training School and cer-

BELIZE
re need for more building land to provide for
city of Belize. The Government of British
ene is prepared to make land available to any concern which
wou
2.

by a drainage

oe lots at present occupied, and West by the Circular
(b) All unoceupied land lying adjacent to the Haulover

bridge on the Belize—Airport Rodd;
described as follows: —

bounded and

Qhurch and the North Circular

main road from Belize to the

Haulover Road, West by the Belize River.
(ii) All unoccupied land to the South of the main

Road,
Ai

Tanks bounded as follows: —
North by Haulover Road, East b.
South by private lands on the
and West by private~ lands.

.

between the Circular Road mentioned in (a) and
« the southern bank of the Belize River at the Haulover

(i) North by the sea and the proposed new Rifle Range,

East by land to be granted to the Roman Catholic
South by the
rport .known as

(Haulover Road) commencing at a point approx-
imately 30 chains west of the Bulk Oil Storage

private lands,
aulover Creek

3. The plan of these areas may be inspected on application to

the Director of Surveys, Belize. :

4. The lands would be granted under the following conditions:

(1) Estate roads to be constructed by the grantee according

to the plan together with proper surface drainage.
(2) A sea wall or concrete revetment to
accordance with the plan.
(3) The whole area to be filled to a uniform level.

be constructed in

Roads, sea walls, revetments and filling to be constructed to a specifi-

cation given by the Director of Public Works.

(4) The size of lots on the Haulover Road to be not less than

300 by 600 feet and those north of the Government Hous-

ing Scheme, Freetown Road, not less than 50 by 80 feet.

(8) Surveys to be made by a Government Surveyor appoint-
ed by the Government of British Honduras.

(6) The grantee to have the right to sell filled lots for re-
covery of capital expenditure;
by Government to be reserved for conversion into parks,
playing fields, etc.

(7) Dwellings on
value not less than B.H. $9,000; dwellings north of the
Government Housing Scheme, Freetown Road, to range
from $2,000 to $5,000 according to the size and location
of the lots.

Any person or body interested in these

45. oposals is requested
to get in touch with the Colonial Secretary, Bel

e, British Honduras.
J 24.4.52—1n,
< FSOVISSSSSS990099009S959599S909389SSIS SSG FS
For the HOUSEWIFE
We can 0!

PRESTIGE PRESSURE COOKERS

at
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts.

OFFERING A FEW
MORE USEFUL
ITEMS



@SANDING DISC GRITS 16, 24, 36, 50
@MASKING TAPE

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@PISTON SEAL

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@RAWL PLUG DUROFIX
@COPPER TUBING %”, 34” 14”, +4”
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@ENGLISH SOCKETS SETS
@ENGINEER HAMMERS
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ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY ST. DIAL 4269

but certain areas selected

the Haulover Road to be constructed to a

SSORDOO POSS FP SPSSOS SOP OPOO AEA POPEOPP SIGE S

wy
%

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Lawrence River Ports

These vessels have limited passenger dtcommodation.
a

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE







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RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



Patterns



PHONE 4918




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SWGEMRRUIT DISHES o.......:cssccesensee @ $13.12 each
MA SRBERN POTS — 7%” on. ve @ 6.68 each
SMPE cea RE ited testy @ 8.51 each
0 aint RIO ab apie seen @ 11.38 each
SMOKER’S STANDS ..... @ 17.26 each
ASEE TRAYS. sicisiisicsisece spcmiesisvaie @ 94 each
FLOWER VASES — 77... .@ 4.14 each
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lengths from $3.00 per sheet

ASBESTOS CORRUGATED SHEETS

SPECIAL SCREWS AND WASHERS, also ASBESTOS
RIDGES now being received

ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES in 3 and 4 Inch with the
necessary Bends—Ys, Tees. '

GALVANIZE NAILS only 40 cents per Ib.

PLAIN FLAT GALVANIZE for making Ridge Caps,

Down Pipes, Guttering, etc.
We also stock COPPER in 18. 24, 30 and 36 Inch.

EXPANDED METAL for Concrete Work, Railings etc.
GALVANIZE STAPLES

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and Where
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a
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$
$
é




THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

ee







HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |

“PEEK FREAN”

a

9 a REND
Be ete ae USE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE “
nn ete REE :



(BRITAIN’S HEST BISCUITS) —















| OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES P
FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES
: Saeeeneoneene
Aiea ree’ ) Cgsea nen | Sect see TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS

YOU EXCUSE ME,
MAS. DE LAZLON>?





20 You MIND F
4 TAG ALONG?.



| CHEESELETS yes toer ee ol

you, too, could be more.

charming, lovely, attractive
MARTINI CRACKERS Oe the east of her attractiveness
is lo-Ro-No. Don't let offending

underarm odour spoil your natural
freshness.

@ Odo-Ro-No safely stops perspi-
PLAY BOX | ration and odour fora full 24 hours.
| @ Odo-Ro-No stays creamy longer
| | never gets gritty even in open jar. tT



| @ No deodorant cream is so harm-

BY CHIC YOUNG
















| _ less to fabrics as Odo-Ro-No, t
WE HAVENT HAD] [YoU LOOX )=( WAIT'LL YOU SEE | [IVE BEEN MAKING DOUGHNUTS-) | [IM WHat HAVE JT TWIGLETS Etc Etc |: O Nip decdeenns cocsn iy quai
DOJGHNUTS FOR | [TIRED <~ ~( WHAT I'VE BEEN DO YOU THINK WELL EVER YOU_IN THAT) ( ep. i44.. . . to even sensitive skio, and it is 90
A LONG TIME--| | TONIGHT —- OINS ALL BE ABLE TO EAT é BOK? 75ST AN OLD To
I THINK I'LL | | DEAR AFTER- 7 ALL OF THEM? Z PAIR OF
> S <@S( TAKE HOME 4 alt, Kenedy NOON Ss
Q < ‘A COU I Ce i , J
ui e COUPLE sey Ge 7 |
XQ) YS OF SOZEN de tcc iy 1 ° °
re Tips DELICIOUS & APPETISING >
| FRESH LIS Y m CREAM
= ¥ | | AO Rag The
| SPECIAL | ry | ee
| TODAY Mh } if | | deodorant
———= | | without
a doubt









| IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE











BY DAN BARRY

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only -







(AFTER THIS UNSUCCESSFUL \ \ VTALKING OF BREAKS, pace Sy. . "
gues an ae. giles eae a FLIGHT, THEY'LL TIE YOU / Bu I'M SENDING -. ‘ pepent, frog oF wy SPECI AL OFFERS are n labl . dsid
f * ‘LL { | UP_ FOR MONTHS IN RED REPORT OF TH "Fo BUTE contin IPE y s 5 ; anil ; eedsi
ENOUGH TO GET ) TO GO BACK TO EARTH ) | TAPE BEFORE YOU CAN ATTEMPTED PRISON * gown t r HAL RS are now availab “oi at re Hranches ae
Pe eT ely Cel A MN eee [IRV AGA, WOWT THEYE {| BREAK TO MY oth 0 Speightstown and Swan Street
WAY, LKS! NIT 9 UPERIORS! YOu
DARE ATTEMPT A JUPITER / MIGHT BE INTERESTED "8 oe we Usually N U N
FLIGHT SHORTHANDED! = ; IN READING IT/ \ el gErORTED? ’ uy sually ow sually ow ®
‘ o : 1 = ri " .
Tins OVALTINE (Large)... 1.38 1.20 Tins BRISKET BEEF (4-lbs.) 4.20 3.90
Tins SMDLEY’S PEAS .. 49 45
Tins NUTRICIA P. MILK .. 1.16 1,04

Jars CHAMPION
MUSTARD oe s 25 23 Bottles O’KEEFE’S BEER 26 21



AS YOU SAY INAMERICA, WH . THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

“THE GAME IS NEVER OVER TILL
THE LAST MAN IS OUT “/ WE'RE
NOT OUT YET / ¥

PLEASE BE COMFORTABLE,
MY FRIENDS / SOON WE SHALL
REACH YOUR RENDEZVOUS WITH
FATE... A COMFORTABLE, SNOWY
GRAVE IN THE FRENCH ALPS /













The Horseman's
Year

Hy W. E. LYON
A Tribute by



BRINGING UP FATHER









































(a ; Col, H. M. Llewellyn

IT'S GONNA BEA SWELL SHINDIG - ~ RAMS ara Lt Col H. M \ ly

TONIGHT AT WALA-MALA HALL/TH'T]| MULLIGAN Never H vusT A (-_WHAT? You yusT “—>] | TO PUT THE MULLIGAN in the “Sunday Times’’ to

GANG IN EVENIN’ CLOTHES/--DUGAN [- WORE A SHIRT IN MINUTE-JIGGS! | CAME FROM MULLIGANS TUXEDO ON ,

RENTED DUFFY | MIG LIFE-HESTILL || HELLO--On-|| (House - wat ? HIM AN! HE { The Horseman’s Year. 7

TH’ WAITER'S (- WEARS RED RILEY ? WANT THAT'S AWFUL /! HIT ME WIDA HH :

TUXEDO - CASEY-cORKY AN' || UNDERWEAR! fi TO SPEAK TO az: “When I grow very, very old and my bones

iL “eee? Af TRC . :
catenin S| | —S4zlegoi\ ei creak like an ageing door, I shall have the annual
MULLIGAN 6's" > Hr en oo = ITT 5-19 volumes of The Horseman’s Year at my right hand.
Ree torn eee | ad Those who interest themselves in horses live excit-

\

ingly in the future with such hopes of a classic—or

o ; , i, ei x cee /
2) “ad | ey ‘ DY tL # At 4d > | : .
u-|| f Ais Me : uf (i 5 Fa the Farmers’ Race; with the foal just dropped by a
= Pia, } } . ' « * Q) 2 Tha



favourite brood mare; a season in High Leicester-
shire with the best horse you have ever had in the
stable; a show jumping win over some particularly
smug foreign rival. But how comforting is it to know
that, when the marginal penny has been spent, or
nee the marginal bone broken, and you have ridden

THE COPS ARS WANGIN' THIGH OL) NOT MY MONICA we. your last horse, you will be able to live just as excit- ‘
RAP ON LAMBERT’S GiRL- /| KS SHE COULDN'T HAVE " 6 ear ingly in the past. ;
FRIEND, THE SOCIETY :

DAME, MONICA HILL! ~~ Ve , i me gum” GANT a “For this you will have to thank Lieutenant
< c/ ; , < Colonel Ted Lyon, an Elizabethan in the true sense,
a brilliant horseman who can write just as brilliantly
on his subject. As a record of the equestrian world
of today, his book is without equal. It deals with .
all the major horse sports in this country .... ‘
“It is a profusely illustrated collection of articles ool
in every case delightfully written by an accepted
leading authority. A comprehensive yet concise evar
survey, it has many light touches which make it

a rea instructive and pleasant reading for all—from the
ois BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES very young to the very old.”’

RIP KIRBY

GIMME THE CITY DESK/

HELLO, JOE..THIS IS BARKER...
THE COPS ARE PICKIN’
UP MONICA HILL!
THEY FOUND HER
PRINTS ON THE
GUN THAT KILLED
YOUNG LAMBERT!

ee te ts NI



ASKULL MARK « PHANTOM! BUT MV GUIDE «
MAGKED MAN*+4HE COULDN'T BE THE | IA LEGEND A SUPERSTITIONS
| PHANTOMS



WE KEPT THE LADY+
aa NOW ON SALE AT
ADVOCATE
STATIONERY



ie ts

NEXT WEEK + NEW ADVENTURE [—
ne te oe






PAGE EIGHT

Police Beat
Rovers 2—1
In K.O. Match

Police scored a fairly convinc-
ng defeat over Pickwick-Kover
when they won by two goals to
one and knocked the Rovers out
ot the Knock Out football] coynpe-
tition Which began at Kensington
yesterday.

tne Police centre forward F.
Tay.or scoreg both goals in the
first half, one about eignt minutes
after the start of play and the
other a few minutes before hal!
time. Rovers centre forwara
Basil Lewis, scored the goal for

his team about two minutes before
close of play.

It was q somewhat dull game at

times, especially in the beginning,
but the last fifteen minutes was
very fast as the Rovers tried to
cover lost ground and Police
never slackened.¢ The Rovers
Back line was weak, but perhaps
their most outstanding player was
the rightwinger, D. Greenidge.
For Police the backs O. Marshal:
and E, Thompson and the right
half M. Franklyn played well.

Police had the touch off. The
game began in an awkward,
slow manner, and straightaway
the scanty crowd were feeling
that this was not quite the type o!
football they had been seeing at
Kensington during the First Di-
vision games. For the first five
minutes neither team seemed to
have the edge on the other and i!
was more a kicking affair than
skilful football with good pass-
ing either way. But as the game
progressed, it became evident
that Police was the more press-
ing.

About eight minutes after play
began, Police’s centre forward I
Tay.or took advantage of thi
Hickwiek-Rovers backs being
somewhat out of position to sen
the ball into the nets and put the
gcore one up for Police.

This was the signal for a keen-
er struggle and the Rovers start-
ed some pressing on their cwn
but it just happened that they
could not make the last effort
necessary to trick the backs oull,
of position and score. So thei:

attempts went wide and | thos
that did not, were ably saved b»
*Mongrel” Haynes, the Polic¢
custodian who was showing good
judgment,

Rovers kept up this attack

right up to half time, but tre-
quently failed to make the most
of their opportunities. Then,
about two minutes before hall!
time, the Police forward got away
with -the ball when Marshall in
the back line cleared their goa!
area and he this time actually
Swooped upon the ball and sent
it wide of the goal keeper's reach

The second half began fas: and
it was noticeable that “he Rovers
were paying more attention t
combining, but the way Police
held their ground, made yo, feel
that this improved playing was a
bit too late. At any rate, the
Spectators were being treated to
better football.

Five minutes after the resump-
tion, the Rovers goalkeeper was
called upon to make a good save
when left half Cadogan sent in a
low, powerful shot, M. Foster in
goal managed to push the ball
outside and nothing was gained
from the corner kick as the left
winger, Banfield did not kick
hard enough to get the ball in po-
Sition for scoring.
~ A short while later, Shannon on

the right wing for Police was
passed the ball while the for-
wards ran into position. The
spectators began yelling expect-
antly, but Shannon after drib-
bling a while with the ball,

kicked it outside.

The last fifteen minutes was
very fast and play was concen-
trated in Police's area, but
Haynes in goal was good. At the

last minute,, however. Rovers
were able to score a goal

, The teams were:—

Police: M. Haynes, O. Mar-
shall, E. Thompson, M. Franklyn,
V. Layne, C. Griffith, C. Ban-
field, R. Cadogan, F, Taylor

B. Blenman and G. Shannon.

Pickwick-Rovers: M. Foster,
B. Robinson, W. Greenidge J
Greenidge, D. Greenidge, S. Car-
ter, L. Foster, Basil Lewis, Bun-
ny Lewis, R. Eckstein and W
Keliy.



Barbados Beaten

(From Our Own Correspondent

KINGSTON, April 23.

Trinidad clinched their win ovet
Barbados finally to-day when the
last two single matches in their
Brandon Trophy encounter ended
with Legall beating Trimmingham
6—2, 64, 6—4 and Gunn Monro
beating Taylor 7—5, 6—4, 7--5
Trinidad meets Jamaica on Frida)
in the finals.

| They'll ‘Do Ie Every



HIYA VIC +» JUST
THE MAN I WANT TO
SEETHIS IS MY DAUGHTER,
CROWEENA-SHE WANTS TO

GO INTO THE MODELING

GAME>SO I SAYS ++-"I

KNOW JUST THE MAN

TO SEEâ„¢WELL WHAT

DO YOU THINK OF HER ?
MIND IF WE SIT


















GY \ Teareaur peers are JF
\ CANT GET AWA

TROPHY

THE TORNADO CUP, pre-
sented by Brandram-Hender-
son Ltd., Paint Manufacturers
of Canada, through their local

Agents Messrs. T. Geddes
Grant, to the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club. Mr, A. BR. Toppin,
Managing Director of the firm,
recently handed over the Cup
to the Club.

This is the first time that
the Tornadoes are racing in
the R.B.Y.C. Regattas.
Vamoose, skippered by Tony
Hoad, is at present in the lead.

£100—I1s Odds
ainst Golf
ole-in-One

By JAMES GOODFELLOW



WHAT are the odds against
any golfer doing a hole in 6ne?
Odds of 2,000 to 1 in shillings

are being offered against anyone
holing a tee shot during a compe-
tition beginning on May 31 at the
Sunningdale Ladies’ Club, where
here are 10 one-shot holes. The
compétition goes on until the end
of the year, and “takers” will be
entitled to make an attempt every
day during its progress.

Last year
had done a

1,409 players who
hole in one held
competition at short holes

three New York courses. Each
hit five shots—an aggregate of
7,045, All failed to get down in
Nearest

on

one. ball finished 34in,

from the pin,

But the strangest story con-
cerns an American professional
HENRY GONDER,. He hit 1,817
balls—it took him 16 hours and
24 minutes—trying to do a 160yd.

hole in one and then gave it up!
His 1,750th shot struck the hole
and came out. Caddies teed and
retrieved the balls,

The Finest Putter

ALEC HERD did 19 holes in
one and JAMES BRAID hac 18.
Three times Open champion
HENRY COTTON has had only
seven, and BOBBY LOCKE'S

number is said to be two.

Australian NORMAN VON
NIDA ranks BOBBY LOCKE
as the world’s finest putter.
Yet the former Open champion
registered 41 putts in the final
round of the Masters’ open
tournament at Augusta, Geor~
gia, won by Sam Snead.

Said von Nida, now in London
with his wife “I took 40 putts.
At one hole I had a chance ci an
eagle 3 from three feet, yet I took
a 6, If your ball was on the wrong
side of the hole it just seemed
impossible to hole it.”

So it is not surprising that
Snead's aggregate 286 for 72 holes
the highest so far in the
surnaments,
\ very

was

d fit Von Nida plans
another full season here, includ-
1g the Open championship a‘
Royal Lytham and St. Anne’s

M.C, Of The Clinic

DAI REES will be masier of
ceremonies at the golf clinics
which will be held the day before
play begins in the _ professional

surnament.

He makes a commentary as
competitors demonstrate strokes
and the galléry are given some
useful tips,

Clinics are a feature of U.S.A.

golf PATTY BERG, lively and
humorous, led the American
women professionals in one at
Wentworth. The team are ex-

ected here again this summer.
L.E.S.

‘Time Repisiered U.S Potent Ofte

a

ViC HIDES IN HERE
TO DUCK PESTS LIKE

LUKE TAXES *=+5











\—. FROM “em !

I GUESS
EVERY FATHER



__By Jimmy Hatlo |

vic IS
OuT
BUSINEGS++-BUT ONLY













THINKS HIS KID IS





SPORTS QUIZ

The Barbados Advocate will
award a book on sport to the
first person who sends the cor-
rect answers to the following

questions.

CRICKET
1. When British Guiana
won the Triangular Inter-

colonial Cricket tournament in
1895 one British Guianese
bowler took the last four
Trinidad wickets in the first
innings for an extremely small
score. Who was he, how many
wickets did he take and for
how many runs scored?

FOOTBALL

2. A player throws the ball
from the touchline to the cross-
bar and it bounces off the goal-
keeper into the nets. Would
you give a goal?

witie POLO ,

3. 0 was captain of the
Trinidad “Discovery” Water
Polo team which visited Bar-
bados in 1949, and was this the
first tournament between these
two colonies?

Changed



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

ae ca



SWIMMING
4. In what part of the
world did the crawl swimming
stroke originate?
TABLE
5. What is the first stroke
in a game of Table Tennis?
HORSE RACING

6. Who is responsible for
the weight carried by a horse
in a weight for age event?
All entries for

“ Quiz”, c/o
Advocate Sports Editor, and
must reach this office by 12

published in the Sunday Advo-
cate of April 27.

Each entry must be accom-
panied by A COUPON as Set
out below.

SPORTS QUIZ





Handicap

Times For 9th Regatta

(By Our Yechting Correspondent)

My criticisms on Sunday have borne fruit.

helmsmen of the Intermedi

Those
ate Class who were contem-

plating going fishing instead of racing in the last three
regattas can now change their minds as Mohawk, which
was on a winning spree, has been brought back to start with
Clytie. She now only receives two minutes from Gnat and

Coronetta, the scratch boats

It will be interesting to see how
her skipper Bob Cumberbatch will
fare. On Saturday last Bob, who
is a good~sportsman,. after being
taunted by other Intermediate
skippers, threatened to start with
the scratch boats if the handicap-
pers did not change his time. He
went as far as to say that he would
start with the scratch boats and
win, The handicappers have, how~-
ever stopped Bob from
one extreme to the other and in
his present position he has a chance
to show “the boys” that he is as
good a helmsman as they are,

A few changes have been made
in the B Class. Fantasy, which has
been sailing extremely well, has
been brought back to start with
Flirt, Moyra Blair, Rascal and
Okapi. Formerly, Fantasy received
a minute from these boats.

Hi Ho now receives two minutes
from Fantasy and the others.

a Formerly she only got a minute

from Fantasy, Ranger still
ceives a minute from Hi Ho.

There have been no changes in
the C Class. Miss Behave, Madness
and Folly continue to receive two
minutes from Magwin which gets
a minute from Scamp. Rogue and
Gannet give Scamp a minute.

In the Intermediate Class,
Mohawk, which formerly started
with Invader and Reen, now gives
them three minv‘es. wk
bives Dawn and Dauntless two
minutes while before she received
h minute from them.

Skippy continues to receive a
minute from Invader and Reen,
Clytie and Mohawk, which are
now starting together, receive two
minutes from Gnat and Coronetta,
the scratch boats of the class.
According to the last times, Mo-
hawk received five minutes from
Clytie, Gnat and Coronetta. This
change has removed Clytie from
scratch position.

Only one change has been made
in the D Class. Peter Pan formerly

ee

Four For World
Youth Congress

LONDON, April 23.
Four British University students
left aerially for Argentina to re-
present Britain at a Buenos Aires

re-

University and World Youth Con- | ‘

gress, The students were selected |
from undergraduates specializing
in Spanish and Latin American
subjects and will be guests of the
Argentine authorities for two
weeks.

Last night the. students| }

of the Class.

received three minutes from Rain-
bow. Now she will only receive
two. :

Seabird, Olive Blossom and Van
Thorndyke continue to start to-
gether. They give Rainbow
minutes.

Also starting together are Imp,
Rainbird and Sinbad. ‘They con-
tinue to receive three minutes
front Hurricane,

However, Hurricane is ir’ a
worse position. Formerly — she
started with the C boats. Now she
Starts with Mischief, and Gipsy
follows closely behind. Apart from
watching out to avoid being back-
winded, Hurricane will have to
roe clear of accidents.

The handicap times for the
Ninth Regatta are as follows:—

a ¢
Class Ne. Yacht Startat Flag
— r

B 10 Wizard









2.20 Red
B 13 “Ranger i
D 8 Peter Pan 2.301 bien”
B 4 HiHo 2.3% Rea
nape ia pea +
D 12 Rainbow 2.33 Yellow
“ ia e
B 481 Fantasy a
B 6 Flirt
B 7 Moyra Biair 2.4 Red
B 8 Rascal
B 9 Okapi ,
D 4& Seabird
D 9 Olive Blossom 2.85 Yellow
D © Van Thorndyke *
ee P
dD 3 Ray bird 2.88 Red
dD 7 ad ‘
B 5 Mischiet
D i4 Festethe 2.41 Yellow
B11 Gipsy 2.42 Red
% 6 Skippy 2.43 Yellow
I 2 fhvader
I ll Reen 2.44 Red 5
I 9 Dauntless
C 12 Dawn 2.45 Yellow
K ‘Tornadoes 2.46 Red
I 7 Mohawk
t 18 Clytie 2.47 Yellow
c - 1 “Miss Behave
C 3 Madness 2.48 Red
Cc 9 Folly
--- ~~ r
‘ 1
1 4 Coronetta 2.49 Yenow.
eon Magwin 2.50 Red -
Cc 2 Scamp 2.51 Yellow
Cc | Rogue
Cc 10 Gannet 2.52 Red e

N.B. 10th Regatta Saturday 10th May,
1052

llth Regatta Saturday 17th May,

1952.

were entertained at the Argen-! |

BOVRIL

is a great

tine Embassy here by Minister!
Carlos Leguizamo.

They are George Knapp of Lon-
don University, Keith Whinnon of
Oxford, James Hill and William
Hopper of Glasgow University,

—U.P.

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions — |
10.00 a.m. |
|



Meeting of St. Philip Vestry
—11.00 a.m.

Meeting of St. Michael Ves-
try — 2.00 p.m.

Meeting of Christ Church
Vestry — 2.00 p.m.

Football at Kensington —
—5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Reed’s Beach |

St. James — 7.45 p.m. }
!



ON. THE Loox- &
Ce am THE HoMeLy |
ONES LOOK HIM ae



WaTcHING HE DoTG

DADDY TRY TO EASE

HIS OFFSPRING INTO A

GLAMORPUSS JOB.
, AnpP

(a HATLO HAT TO

= “JO"K., CHICAGO,

Zi.






defence

PLYWOOD SHEETS

TURNALL ASBESTOS
3/16 in. thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft.

"Phone 4267,

eee

two"



WHAT DO YOU KNOW OF SPORT ?



Twenty Questions On
A Variety Of Subjects

BY ALL-ROUNDER

(1) What was the name of the
jockey who rode the 1952
Grand National winner?

(2) Who stroked the Oxford
crew to victory over Cam-
bridge last month?

(3) Who won the 100 metres
sprint at the 1948 Olympic

>

mes?

(4) “Which was the last Football
League club to win the F.A.
Cup in successive seasons

(5) Who is the British Empire
Heavyweight boxing cham
pion?

(6) And from whom did he take
the title?

(7) Who captained the MCC
team on their recent tour of
-India, Pakistan and ?
And for which ish
county does play?

(8) Who is ‘ae Open Golf
Champion?

(9) Who won the 1951 Wim-
bledon arare singles cham-
pionship

(10) With which is the
Thomas Cup associated? And
which ¢o at present
hold the trophy?

(11) The following are cricket
trophies: Currie ome. Shet-
field Shield and Plunkett
Shield. In which countries
are they played for?

(12) What was the final score in
the recent Test series be-

Australia and the
West Indies?

(13) Who captained the British
Ryder Cup team in Ameri-
ca last year?

(14) A seventeen year-old ap-
prentice jockey came into

nce when he won an
important race. What was
his name and what was the
race? :

(15) Can you name the only side
that beat the Springboks in
their recent tour of the
United Kingdom and France?

(16) Who is the cruiser-weight
boxing champion of the
world? |

(17) Who is the Women’ Tennis
Champion of the United
States?

(18) A University athlete recent-
ly established a new record
time for the mile in the Ox-
ford and Cambridge sports.
His name please?

(19) Who are the Football League
Champions?

(20) What is the Swaythling Cup
and which country are the
present holders?

ANSWERS TO SPORTS

QUIZ
(1) Arthur Thompson, He also
rode the 1948 winner,

Sheila's Cottage.

(2) Chi her Davidge. It was
his third boat race.

(3) Harrison Dillard, U.S.A.
Second was his countryman,
Barney Ewell.

(4) Blackburn Rovers in 1890
and 1891,

(5) Johnny Williams of Rugby.

(6) Jack Gardner of Market
Harborough.

(7) Nigel Howard, Lancashire.

(8) Max RBaulkner,

" (9) Dick Savitt (U.S.A.)
(10) Badminton. Malaya are the

present holders. .
Currie Cup, South Africa,
Sheffield Shield, Australia.
Plunkett Shield, New
ealand.

Kastralia beat the West In-
dios by four matches to one.
Arthur Lacey was the non-
playing captain of the Bri-
tish Ryder Cup team.

Dominic Forte rode Phariza,
winner of the Lincolnshire
Handicap,

London Counties beat the
Springboks at Twickenham
on November 10th.

(16) Joey Maxim of America,
(17) Maureen Connolly,

(12)
(13)

(14)

(15)



against

INFLUENZA



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MATERIALS

UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
4 in. thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft, 9 ft, 10 ft.
WALLBOARD MOULDING for eovering Joints

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

THE BOARD OF 1,000 USES.
\ in. thick, 4 ft. x 6 ft., 8 ft., 10 ft.

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
M% in. thick, 4 ft. x 6 ft. 8 ft

14 im, thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft, 4 ft, x B ft
3/16 in. thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft., 4 ft. x 8 ft.

WOOD SHEETS

WILKINSON. & HAYNES (0., LTD.



(18) Christopher Chataway of
Oxford won the mile in the
1952 sports 4 mins, 10.2
seconds beating the record
set up by Roger Bannister
the previous year.

(19) Tottenham Hotspur won the

Football League Ghampion-

ship last season.

The Swaythiing Cup is the
premier Men’s team event in

(20)



table tennis. Holders are
Hungary.

o , i

Winner Honoured

GUA , April 23.

Guatemala p ing the big-

gest celebration er for the

return of Doroteo Flores, winner

of last Saturday's Boston Mara-
thon,

Flores is the first Guatemalan
ever to win this International
Sports event. Flores, an an,
— only ba a month Bs j city
emp e and sw a family
of eight. corre



Sports Window

SPARTAN meet Everton
this afternoon in a return
First Division fixture. Spar-
tan with Empire are second
‘in the First Division Cup
line-up with 12 points to
Notre Dame's 14, the leaders
tm this competition, Spartan
will no doubt go all out this
afternoon to score a possible
14 points incase there is the
proverbial slip ‘twixt the cup
and the lip as far as Notre

lame is concerned,

$10.77








HERW ARE

tween Port and
stern, but so does

doubt it, at the j
and Pine Road
Sobers Lane.

3. He’s not a law
definitely a “G" 1



THURSDAY, APRIL” 24, 1952
Fore eiceemeets iatcneameearapremetennmeias

“Industrialisation”
At The Press Club

Mr. F. L. Walcott M.C.P., yes-
terday led off a discussion on
Industrialisation in the West In-
dies to members and friends of
we Barbados Press Club.

T.
During his discourse Mr. Walcott
told of the effects Industrial plan-
ning would have on the economy
on the West Indies and cited the
Industrial experiment in Puerto
#ieo as a pattern which the West
Indies would do well to adopt.
Mr. Walcott also said that in the
British Caribbean the Jamaicans
were the most industrially mind-
ed. Also takifig part in the dis-
cussion were Messrs J, M. Hewitt,
W. Rudder, F. L. Cozier, A. Year-
wood, R. Mapp and O. S. Coppin.



WEATHER . REPORT
YESTERDAY
Relat from Codrington :
T Rainfall for Month to
ites ‘Geman : 86,5°
iced Temperature : 72.5°
Wing Velocity 9 miles per

hour
(9 a.m.) 29.962;
bo 20.884

s TU-DAY

’

p.m.
High Tide: 3.05 a.m., 4.00

p.m.
Low Tide: 9.49 p.m, 9.46






NOTICE
Foundation Old Boys are
reminded that their month-
ly meeting takes place to-
morrow night, FRIDAY 25th
at 8 p.m. r. J. C, Tudor
will be the guest Speaker.











WE HAVE RECEIVED A SHIPMENT

PLANTER’S UMBRELLAS
- BUY AT ONCE!

YEED THE

CHILDREN ON =

ERNIE'S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB
There will be a Special
Meeting
To-morrow Evening
at 6.00 o’elock sharp
to discuss the ‘problems of
the last day’s racing at
UNION PARK

Q@.: Why do Luxury and
Tourist Liners call here?

A.: Simply so that Chief
Stewards can _ stock
larders with Goddard’s
Home made Cambridge-
shire Sausages made
from pigs bred and fed
on their own farm.
Only legs are used.

I shall have all these
luxuries to-morrow night
as well as
Special Lobster Cocktails
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C. Snow of Edge-
Water Hotel Fame.

Special Peche Melba
From Home Grown Peaches
im tins)

and what nots!
AND WHY NOT?



TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
PENCILS for Marking Linin
eee, for Marking Glass

& C
CARD PLATES in 3 Sizes
AUTOGRAPH ALBUMS
PHOTO ALBUMS
Heavy Guage BICYCLES
for Motor

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY







CAVE SHEPHERD & CoO, LTD.

10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

J & R ENRICHED
BREAD

THEY LOVE IT...
STRENGTH & ENERGY

BECAUSE Ir

JUST FOR SAYING

'ME
CARIB”

Sib CLUES: SO”

1. This Mr. Carib knows the difference be-

Starboard, bow and

anyone.

2. You could possibly meet him—though we

unction of 10th Avenue
and Tudor Street and

enforcement officer but
nan.





6

How good a detective are you,
Mr. & Mrs. Barbados ? The makers
of Sparkling Carib Beer sponsor
a competition for quick thinking
arbadians. Simple too — You just
discover their mysterious Mr. Carib
and challenge him personally with
the words — “Gimme a Carib, Mr.
Carib.” If you're the first detective
to be right you've earned yourself
twenty-five dollars, and should you
happen to have a Carib bottle cap
with you at the time your prize
will be one hundred dollars and
twenty two cents. So watch this
space for clues REMEMBER, DO
NOT TELEPHONE Mr. CARIB,
challenge him personally between
the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. And
remember too that any thirst de-
serves a Carib,

If you added seven, nine and twenty,

an@ it gave you his car, house, or

telephone number—well it would
be rather silly of us—wouldn’t it?

Upon his decisions you may be

sometimes out of pocket though he

doesn’t believe in high taxation.

We'd say he’s about 5 ft. 7 in. get it?

Five feet, seven inches.

DID YOU BUY SOMETHING FROM HIM












as




PAGE 1

i'\i.i inn BARBADOS ADVOCATE QaJab Qallinq Ml, WH.LIAM A BHOWN. Barbados Electric tlon Lid. arrived : >rntng from England) trt T c A via Montreal on a Leaving Today D i;\ by B.W.I.A. f'c Tr %  .. ..: %  .,,, Mr Hi-nr. ii. < %  retired buunftiman of Wisconsin and Mr* Gotfrcdson t here for the part three %  ing at the Marine Hotel They Ph n Directory company is producing. H dept Inspector for the West es of the Ne Co.. Ltd. with headquarters in Trinidad, arrived here on Tuesday by BWIA. on a short visit and is staying at the Hastings Hotel Mr. Cardmaiter Is now on one >f his monthly inspection visits to the agencies in the area which includes British Guiana, Surinam. Curacao and Arub. He expects to return to Trinidad on Saturday on Keen Golfer ond visit to BarM RS. RITA MORRELL. a Barhis way to British Guiana badian, who has been dotnlKing Neptune Had a Friend — The Shadows Met Him in a Strange Way — By MAX ll:il! died in Canada is paying her first visit to the island in twenty years. 1 bados is Mr W Sutherland, a Mrs. Morrell Is A sister of Mrs Scotsman who has been midlng Prank Moor* of Hank Hall and has in Caracas. Venezuela for the pant been spending a four months' holilive years. He arrived here last day as the guest of Mr. and Mr? week by B.W.I.A. for two w..ks Kr.ink Moore holiday and is staying at the Ocean Mrs. Morrell is in charge of the View Hotel Salon Vendome of Messrs Robert A keen golfer. Mr. Sutherland Simpson. Montreal. She returns to is an accountant employed with Canada this week-end by the the Shell Caribbean Petroleum RM.S Lady Rodney. Company in Caracas. Spent Three Months For Summer Holidays M ISS ETTA HAREWOOD of St \yf Ms FRANCES SWINTON of Lawrence Gap returned to 1*1 London. England, who arrived a. t. Mil-, m,. s., n ,\ ( ... I.UJ rethe island on Sunday from Trimover the week-end by the SS turned from Jamaica over the dad where she spent three months' Golflto, has com-? to spend the %  rid by BWIA.. after a holiday. She was the guest of Miss summer holidays. She Is staying at Elsie Richards of Port-of-Spain. the Marine Hotel. M by B.W.I.A. on a short visit and is staying at the Hotel Royal Sales Representative Returns jytK LESLIE CORBIN. Sales B.B.C Radio ProgriHf mi asoAT. a ran. u. isss 1 as—711 ftSB. IS.IO ss.. SS.S8 SB. 4 00 pre Tha No. IS pm. Th* liii S*r ice, SIS pm Rhythm li Tri-li i4S p.m Bportirta B* !" rd. SOS Chok-. BOO p m W.l.h Diary. IS pm r. m The N*wi T 10 •. Horn* Nf.. Vtcm amain i.is— laaa pma ta.n sa. 11 St SB. %  Your Feet Affect Your Face The fen very largely govern Ihe II 11 all > mailer ol lining style of Epaom .alls, sail, borax ond prc.iiness of Ihe lace. It .sound* a lo foot—an eaacntlal that can't be sdap flakes, keep them storej In %  latemcnluntil you stop emphasised too strenuous,y. a Jar and add a little lo your to think about it. Then you realise Sue, RiEhl nlgMly hot foot bath. Then plunge onl) t.ra wall that if the leel are Tortunalely today we are not so Ju* 'eel Into cold water ofleruncomfor.ahlo. tlie hurt shows ,, M conictoua as we were years warda. and after drying Ihorlrr In torago s ,„ u na lakcn pr ml e t oughly. rub them with melhyd pained expreaalon. p |, ce ovn ^ lhei more usu>1 Ia ,ed ,p| r h. Methylated spirit is It tlnnio jre m,t ciiiuklv put right Iour ,| M „ vc „ „ qulle ortmary, oxeeUent for hardening the feel. "*5. f" "i !" ml Prnu.iient while II hat unheard of lo And This you should remember when lei-t sized eleven riattlea are you decide lo fin! go stocklng•lor, sourtr And line, are mm fashionable, and very comfortW 11 will prevent those a k oneasilv liiKTaiin.i than th.-y are „ble, bui though this "slipper" Ulng blUlers so quickly caused Ufa The feet mu t be kepi | ikc model gor wcll w|lh lmrd by friction on bear skin. comfortable if prelline.. .,f ihe and business clothes. It is nol al„_ ,. „„,„„ ...,„.. .„„ "-LW U^S do no.".' !" ^r' ,e,r" 'lllljr De „„!,., ^ B il„ Kelh a.p r (K. m THE sky had grown dark and there were flash** of lightning and rumbles of thunder. Knarf and Hanid. the shadow-children with tbe turned about names, were standing with their fares pressed against the window, waiting for the first drops of rain to fall when all at onee they heard someone railing their names Tha voice came from tho flower-bi (u't under the window. They looked out. It wai their frii-nd Kmr Nep. St. LUCla Planter I Tome out." he called. "I've got A. DUBOULAY, planter otl aomething very interesting to show St. Lucia, arrived on Tuesday ou ;" "But it a going to rain any minute"' .aid Hanid. "That'a just why I wsnt you to rome now It will be too late when it stops. .Meet me at the edge of the brook under the willow." With that King Nap scurried off and soon disappeared among the tall blades nl grass on the other aide of the garden He was much shorter than a blade of grass himself. Kdge of Brook Knarf and Hanid slipped on their rain-hats and rubbers and made their way as fast as they could to tho edge of the brook. Meanwhile 9 pi. B £. !" a 0 It*y **i *"""" BfS2 than before. The lightning flashed ID a dm on places, and the thunder •racked like cannon. Just then they Spifd King .\ep "I know it's not the best kind of "father to come out In." he explained. "But It's the only time you can meet Ben. He's flying his kite." "Ben ? said Knarf. "Who's Ben t* "And why should anybody want to fly a kite when it'a lightning and l.iiim.rring and about t ra-n?" tul Hanid in astonishment. 1.11 pm w. | Music al lh **l' N.*.r-. WOO. pm Ttia Mw. 10 10 p m New> Talk. 1011 pm. li atuck In Mr MMHI. 10 30 pm. Oliver TWHI irH^ed better t .'i.ual 1,UI ilia U i> CROSSWORD 1 ri R^ f*— T~ %  I—P~ tr pr sTTVT ji 115 M \ And aching feet i u caused through changing from _j. low to high heel*. Keeping to I "i UK taCri bi ijruper" ne ne l level Is the wisest idea. ap It Is more inducive to foot com. vii UM !•> or t. and obviously lea* encouraging to aching ankles. But it is up io you to work out the shoe probrJad fciyles of ahoaa lem for yourself. I. Looay j.ucu wan i.iiiI .. read u> nuuo tool Corn Cures lii'^otoa. A gtr, fall, ill love with Corns and cjillouavs %  tyle, .um, tvaa tluiugh bugbear of all feet and special daily bath, give them final rinse In cold water, and rub them with eau de coogne "another hardener and s;imu11. Boring nut it nu JI red -T.. u n •• laColour I set. wnen misM viiti 1. Redact cm tick r 181 5. To tna crow U haa uplift. O) 7 Hoiiceabla ID gilt* w a *i-ter. Tired Feel When compl try a few them. This will Uke the tiredness %  the out 0 f them. Stand with bare feet when parallel, six to eight inches apart viplcw:... 1*. Hant out 15. I lie artist li. Hetged di a." o dry. (si fh fruit. %  n, of llred fe ft SSfflS.S'iWrJtr.TKlr.. 11 Well rootad ramuy Una. ii g'VP'iaitla lacrinrc lo miuir. iS Uoaa na play nap moat ? (7) trloM n,it (japk; on the heels. Ift •. while you do it, but It pay* comfortable, buys shoes are misfits, appear almost Rise D n the balls of the feet. CODM more comlortovernight. If you have been untwisting heels inwards and trying able"' .. „lucky enough to acquire oneor to grasp the floor with the toes Wishful thinking, more—do get rid of them at once: Do this about twenty limes, Usually ihe discomfort persists, give them home treatment. There .,iowly. Then walk tiptoe, bareand in lags than DO Umg tludam"•* Mr* "'>>* excellent proprlfoo t, until It is necessarv to drou 'one — J painful corn alary cure on the — makes 1; • %  pPC4u*aAOt, you must follow lh !).. do t ik.grsjal lire over the and use them persistently and gulls. iiig" of your feet. If a regularly until the corn has gone. Other foot exercises at* 1 favoured style is not comfortThen see to it that the shoe that Grasp a large marble wit.i the rr may be a caused It is banished. Ruthless toes and try to take ai manv ;t.-r uited b. the and extravagant, but cheaper in steps as you can without drop01 your feet. And if a 1 the the long run than corn cure-— ping it. fancy designs make your feet feel >"> OUI malw sure that you dry your feet bring the toes towardyou lovely tsjuaen—and she hus to thoroughly after bathing, powmuch as possible. In addition to i ; .s any one ^f us Bering between the tow. aiding tired feet, this exercise %  enllnl to buy expenHelpful Hints aids the arches, toes, calves, and slioea to ensure comfort. You can mix your own cures ankles and keeps the feet In p*rbuys arc always the best, at home—A tableiponnful each feet condition. 1. tt should be binding. (Bi 'A. Snppllea lite raid mu. It) a. rttea* tied down to rulea cf rating. i. Si t. Bull* (S> S. Wlirr* to hear tha laurr; tree ? (SI S. Fully informed. 15) t. U*t a stain out or this. <&> lo. 3a>i gone lo buttonhole* f|> l.l My broli.era children. <0. tir in, '*• %  Q UI slont holds the nail. f the great days when ISfSJj",-* S! l*mcn.d. you had a, Bar-.e-Duc ShSSm' a Z&lSaTSS Z£ !" In arrears, a piece torn off her fur coat by an admirer would fetch *50Q at TiHtcrsall's. The police must be <'.;ading the days when a football match coincides with the visit to the district of a film %  actress. One dav an niifpriirioiix Honed; flu tall man would have x >•• %  '">•. The African club will nav" ,. \t,V. liiil i. lo lb. level of woverb came lo n„nd u 1 Grable to kick o"' The mlUUry rlM one nl looked at a picture of mounted ,,H be called out twain. '' a,Kl !l', ue rt C h r f" ,, i ,m i b """* '"* K-dle l"m U .nd'The crooked, t.nd would Probably ;"'"""'y/pnipede of a screamdistrict will be smashed m mieaUoo mada 'it lost lemonade you had Liberal Summer School make-' vou fiuitin-n (by an awfully ugly glrll lhal It will be added to your the tall mail and Uic iwo short >talmcnt due at Rheirns. lid nil huddle together so as to in !.e Ihe two Nil* appear Win* t,rilhll' kirk* off m Hie ihrce heads does not _., ,„. rid of iludidicully I menp^^ *<*r shonpr, ploosal I mats ta-tviiljsl iVosiiaft xt Info. 0 heads. If therr were two tall men and man nothing in the I bo chaniad. The i Id huddle under nd the short inun ould iwo hats And all three ;•• lust as ridiculous as usual. No, Their must be some 13 out 'l the diiticulty. '/r pa) for %  hoi %  on %  1 %  I'm sorry, 111 V$t% v. ill be no ..inch %  I emaj to-day, Hn H why? One nl 'i I..... ,,ot paid vour fifth instalment as per con%  UN IT. : Bui— s hedule II Mls homo for (rillmir behind With her One momer.t. Mr. Bollard That g crowd outside a football wrn to bits. Rupert and the Toy Scout—10 th, rvhole and ear. 16 IV ABI. Of >'HrrH* • DUMie —i Nave, JI tUMl 'W!i :t~V,v.i. *."'as„ m Is heen away for a long, long liahtnlng ii time." said King Nep. "But he some, times cornea back on a Hay like this. He's just down the edge of the brook a little, flying that kite nf his land this is just the kind of day ha likes to fly It in). Hell be pretty busy. But maybe he won't mind if you watch him a bit." .So Knarf and Hanid. filled witli "COBS. oaUide." King Nep called lo the Shadows. Nep himself, and he was dressed in such odd, old-fashioned clothes that to Knarf and Hanid he seemed to have stepped out of some old, old picture. He wore shoes with big Iiows on thorn, and a long coat with tails. His hair was long and hung Ina pitr-tall at the back of his neck; and he wore a hat with three corners. His kite was tossing In the wind, but he held on tightly to the string. And at the end of the string, Knarf and Hanid noticed that a little key was tied. Ben was standing on a log. As soon as King Nep came up with Knarf and Hanid, Ben nodded | and smiled. "I suppose," he said, i "you'd like to know why I'm flying \ my kite in all this lightning and j thunder?" "Yes, of course we would:" said I Hanid. I'm just trying to prove (. THVRSDAY. APRIL 24. 1 952 It's the New High in Vaudeville GLOBE PRESENTS A MONSTER VAUDEVILLE CARNIVAL ON Saturday April 26 — MIDNITE SPEARHEADED BY M0NAH now from Martinique (Famous MAGICIAN and t'l'RVE DANCER) LOLtTA (Saraba-Khumba Jerker) KCRABELLA (Spanlah Tamo Ace) AND JOSEPH CLEMENDORE (Cobra Man) THE BOODHOO BROS. Indian Stunt Kings from B.G.) HARVEY ROGERS (A Ballroom Expert) ENA MM. (B.Gs Radla M 'test Voice! Music by KEITH CAMPBELL'S Society 5 PIT t* HOl'SE ; BALCONY 6S: BOX It TICKETS on Sale TO-DAY—GLOBE tttneity." h said. think 1 can bring some of it d*n from the sky—make it come all ihe way down the kite and spark • nl of the key. Just you wait and see But don't stand loo close, for lightning is dangerous." Just then there was a grsal flah in the sky. and almost at the aama instant a spark flew out of the kej euriositj .bout Ben and his kite. "It is electricity!" cried Bci followed Kim; Nep down along the edu* of the brook. And sure enough. just as they went around the turn war* all the ferns and jark-in-thepulpits grew in a great green mass, bay saw Ben flying his kite. the nest instant be ran off, shout with excitement "I wonder,* said Hanid to King Nep; "was that Ben Franklin?" And King Nep smiled, thouah ho aouldn't say, really, whether it was Een wasn't any larger than King ^r it wasn't. POWERFUL—AND POWERFULLY DIFFERENT —From WARNER BROS. "COME FILL tsW CUP" PHYLLIS THAXTER RAYMOND MASSEY Gig YOUNG— James GLEASON iiiim i tn ir BOLD! YOU'LL SAY ITS BLUNT! |_ ;\ / ,\ —m IIIIIIK.I IO.> N Opening TO-DAY (THURSDAY), 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.311—1.45 & 8.311 p.m. nd Continuing Daily at 4,15 & 8.30 p.m. (Bi.il /IIS) Qrand Galypso -Repeat 3}e;formance RM TKISIDAD'S UiAUlMC CAIYPSO.VHNS. IN TIIKIR KARCWtTlX SlbOW AT %  v.rilll — TO-NITE at 8,30 III s 1 rniiM 11-. inTUk RHYTHM KIVGS STEEL BA\D II ..U-.l.lnm. Ml at III HIST . **•' %* V lo. II.. I. ...d Ml *X,. Present TO-DAY, 5 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing % EMPIRE CALTTCO arrrAr •'ALicr is* o\nrm,ANB' EXTMA %  VATtRSS IIAII Allf Wlltl Bi I CtJJOTT In now "tioHTta sQiAoaoN* iN-i-i < ron 1.1 srsAL ..: v K.WE 1.1 A MAI. \1 %  1 ll IS 1 m to •HAMIBAI' MAN war • Uati' USE The battle of Texas... and battle of the OLYMPIC %  coma I'ANTON" aiUlNG DOWX THE CASVOV 'SONG Or Tilt AS llSenltif SAT IBS a SIS aimn Foid — Hhond* PiainiDas tiCE UAIIX nKorums %  III 1 K snt'P" llOVAl Ml I Shaw. I.SS 1 Hill K1J.IOTT I HI I I Mill "PHANTOM I.AOTCLARK IS* Toy Soaui bong* a Ittg/t map from ihr tar snd spraadi a oui be 1 *t*n Ruprn and Wdlc. I'kf brrn ITPI ihr.d to try to CJM ihmf* (or Ssms OJUS." h murmurs, "and io find wit •thai •..ji.i.l be tht thonrsi iy hf could come wnhoui missing anybody. This village ia rather hatd 10 fit in. Thai's why 1 was up that tree and havin| a look round. Robin Down ia ovtr rhtra and Nutrhtaicr is that war aed % %  .. is over here. Nutwood i. about in the uiddW of the. thftt." Ha IalU silent for a moment and looks thoughtful. Just Openeti SIM $1.47 PRINTED SPUNS 36" (ffi PLAIN HIMIIKIK. SHKEKS 3" @ WHITE, PEACH, BLUE. I1PENINO SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONGOLEUM RUGS. BY THE YARD. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 sexes! M GABLE GARDNER CRAWFORD BOLD SI, : HYGIINIC PRODUCTIONS TOESfrlTS Mom-Dad ... U"iV THIS THEATRE ANNOUNCES THAT WE WILL SHOW kiOhi ...i DAD ON TUESDAY 29TH and WEDNESDAY 3I1TH. 5 & 8.30. | ••!• %  MSI. ISIBAI f.tU ( VI'IIII I !H AN ALLSTAK MOILTWOOD CASTI WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m. MEN Only 8.30 p.m. AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER! WARNING Tht. pirturr Includes powerful Mrdlcal Sequences. NOT recommended for Ihe Weak-llrartcd : 1*1 \/ \—HAIIIItHlls, (Dial '.!# %  ) COMD*a SOOM PLAZA CINEMAS cACNEi COMI I ILL llll CUP rti*::. TitAXTTH lUvmniia MAflarV t. i VOUNQ II. V D £iilM.. "WatV .( ihr TI*in*BI.AND" Blrhard AKLEN Andy ]>KV1NI k SIX oi N Ml'sitr. a nJiAUt and IX8 BHOWN BAND MlSnlU Sa*'l Bat. t-HOLX aimiAi. THE SPIDER S WEB DARB.XKKCS —Illrtl ||M LBM sa—. i. *„ iaai| •'DKVII IIIM IIMIN Wamrr HAXTEB a AOBOMK iKIIh .-I.,. Randols* SCOTT TMI'BS. •••.I.I 1 -a a m %  SrNDOWN' ON I III rfl.MBII Tr HITTTR A I IX Ql'W MISA Johnny M ack BROW SAT SPECIAL I 9> p.m. ..IIStBN TFBBITOB1'Randolph aoOTT Cabby HAYES Kll.l 11 ll:i Tl i -us Tim HOLT liriSlVI. | Rill t) M|, OISTiN—Dial R404 Ta-ia* (astlri S-aS a a sa p ia %  HnNivsons i.om.r rrancu UANC;I-UU 4 -BlVfX LADt %  ~l.f Hod CAMEJtON — Yvortn* TH CARLO i n.i.. a Milai ia ta MISS GRANT TAKES A CHANCE _WE WERE STRANGERS la HI I ll Tbc Garden—St. Jamea "B8VONO TBS tOBCSr' THpIr AttrmcU.n — KMI.I kit . ihr ovssar Blchmrd ABU.N A-.<1 nCVLir 111 MVVB roasoj" TBC BBMIXB a GUT-NX MHJJH onniEjjTRA -Vl***M.V'-'---',-, ', -, *'.%'.',% VSS+VAt. '--V>sfts>sftsM -,*.*.-,',



PAGE 1

PACI. I I IB II MM! \l>ns ADVOCATE THURSDAY. APRIL it. 1M2 tiAKHADOSe*AD\lMIl tft_.,**— -=—--%  —t-—-i Thursday. April It. 1952 The Soil OS I li i 111: Aneurin III-\ .III $aVs*Jsaa THE UNEXPECTED ALWAYS HAPPENS i\ In i>k Ol 'EEXKTOWX QUEEN Elizabeth II was 26 years old on Monday. This young Queen who succeeded hr Royal father when she was in kViiy.i beginning a tour to the Dominions of Ceylon, Australia and New Zealand has not yet been crowned.' The coronation ceremony will probably take place next year. Whether Barbados retains its present status as a Crown Colony or whether it becomes self governing or merges with the United Kingdom or Canada or with other West Indian Crown Colonies to become a West Indian Dominion is a matter lor conjecture. But whatever be its political destiny it is safe to suppose that the link with the Monarch of the United Kingdom will not bo broken. This week Queen Elizabeth II in the 6rst year of her Gracious reign over the British Commonwealth of Nations celebrated her twenty-sixth birthday. Her Majesty's birthday should remind all of us in Barbados of the tasks arid burdens which have fallen upon her shouldersHow can we contribute towards lightening that burden ? The answer is simple. By being good citizens and loyal subjects. But there is one public step which Barbados might take to bring pleasure and happiness to the young Queen before her coronation takes place. Many centuries ago Barbados honoured a King of England by naming Jamestown after him. Today what used to be Jamestown is now called Hole Town. Might Barbados not fittingly honour Queen Elizabeth by changing the "Hole" to "Queens" and calling a part of this island which has especial connections from earliest settlement with the monarchs of England Queenstown ? A gesture so simple would cost us nothing, but the pleasure it would give to that gracious young woman called so untimely to reign over us and to shoulder the great burdens under which Her Royal Father was heroically crushed down would be its own reward. I*t Barbados show -its loyally to th* British Crown and its affection for the young sovereign by this friendly act. \r i II rin Bevan\ book "In Place of Fear" is now published. The Quotes, 9 MUM1VII Ibl l-bor Parly THE reaction of in* United tention IS a military *how-ur^lBg its of her mihl-ry un preparedness [or than some American publicists. Wtf dealt a deadly blow — NO ONB | a leas rttted man a page tnuntiv hops, for •roflomu military expert to •*Hh the eco-' T same time normc consequences of his inoritl of her p principles too rouahlj or too far a majoi but by making tou many concesto Europe': By DON TAYLOR "pHr. country ol "The Odd Things That Happen" has become the world's frontttOOHS! UOOkSI THE FINEST RANGE IN TOWN AT THE whether those who invaiiar] South ,K.e, 1 rt,donMhinlhe Is It was sate lor them lo try their not sufficient to men the need, unable to assist In supplylni the h !" '__... ,. rrmrrtal as militarily desirable civilian requirement, of her tem„ THFxl wrlcncv to Before the yesr was out a null nor ry allies, show thai the Soviet Union want, heavier projr.ir.me was demandIt U a K rim commentary on the n Dial or strennh. She can. ol ad; and all to be accomplished in direction taken by the Russian recourse, fall into it. Hut il la easier i'tree yesr.. bv which time, we volution that Ihe North Korean' for a dictatorship to ptill out of were told, we could "talk to Rusfound it easier lo obtnm tank* th.such a -ltuatlon than It Is for r sla out of strength." trader pious*, from their Sovledeti"..r... A rt.rtntorship has It seems insane ror Ru-i to "friends" Put is nol the Wcr* no public I'Phlui lo MUsaV wnii f„r that date if her real inmaking just Hast -amc mistake? Wl;ti an r Tub %  • %  -•' rullrnifur mffm nhumi In... IIV\an. It SIIIIIS. Is J\t Lo4gerhead With Himself By EM.4MEL SIIIN'WELL. M.P. IIOII-A-.IOII IT was to be expected that a pioneer effort like Bobajob would reveal certain weaknesses of Scout organisation as well as bring to the fore the quality and benefits of scouting, It would be quite easy to select examples of scouts whose activities during Bobajob week brought great credit on their troops and on scouting. Several householders will no doubt have written words of encouragei.ient or praise to Scout Headquarters. But if scouting depends on praise or approval for encouragement it will carve no lasting niche in the community. Scouts no less than any other body or individual require to know their mistakes and to learn from them. Two of those mistakes were noticed last week in this newspaper: a lack of initiative in certain areas with regard to soliciting work: and a lack of telephonic flexibility. One of these defects was remedied by individual scouts who went out and found jobs without being detailed. On the job ton scouts showed failings. They arrived to do outdoor work with no proper working clothes and without any rations. In one particular instance a householder gave in food to tw* scout workers almost half the equivalent of a total day's earnings of (5.00. In another where the householder was unable to feed them scouts were prematurely sent away because lack of food made their work of little value. These points can be remedied by attention at Scout Headquarters. But there is one failing which can only be remedied by scouts themselves. When one scout accuses another scout of being unfit to wear scout's uniform because he was idle and lazy during a national Bobajob week the quality and honour of Scouts themselves are at stake. Troop masters ought to impress on every scout before allowing them to go out on jobs that not only his honour is at stake but that the whole Scout Movement will be judged by the way he sets about his work. Many scouts were a credit to their troops and to their movement. Others were not and it would be doing little service to KOUtfl not to point out that Bobajob week brings scouts tn the attention of the whole community and that unwilling or lazy workers bring discredit on the whole movement. TIM country is the Anglo-Egyptian # in, TKotRiJ: ' % %  : ..:,, & tfaMaraflsMftsfc % %  '" %  It is a key to the Middle East situ.-iboard Ihc nal onaJ m %  < in m % % %  m world. Yet the nature of ine modern lion For there will be no settlement of the tries la that they are a lonsUtuJi revealed trw weakness ol Ihe i'U-ituy mMfcinc makes it n , w — i PresUmi Truman's i.uu. itcr nm. -. that the mbuez problem, no agreement with fcgypt— by divnlmg himself of p.. r haFourth Point (To ffiv* economic dustrlal repereus*ions should be 1 ; until the Sudan question is settled. t-r TO ,hc KO, sj&Ti^jzvsiSi K^^Sntd c svr '-L^?^ ca, s "-r? l hc *' K ^i of .. the f American Tar Eastern pUry „„,„ have „„ d oubt about the Br ""' n ^ "• ">"">cd states. Sudan." But the real "uncrowned king" of noundered from one esfrcme to |„, on tl„ns: but unfortun.teiy ,t • THK ouOl.ndlnf need of' the Sudan is-Governtir-CIpnoral Sir Robert = ^ m pt?MtS WZZTttSS&SZi ?&£££^£XSr2'Si i a>* Howe, the brUhan, work,ngm.„S .....When tia t % %  !. .he imnci corronunlsm urban communit.es of the West, son who won his way from elementary school ^WafvtJKssiiJS ati^asars EZSSSS&:£.T£ ***"* •? ••*• ^s r re iperate? At once the military extitles required. • • %  brought up in a terrace house— now his address is "The Palace, Khartoum." i:\li; iOBDINABl /<>i>l> o/woyi seem lo be /-.ruin./ up <•< thSwian Four of0e0n "f 'hi t t kio p im A i th.n rrosnlly. It is -xi-L hut lhi-i II. ri g|| Sii>iV.'////.V//'///.'.V,V//.V, WV*VW Thia moat recant example is typical of 'built-to-laat' . products. This bonk* bv Aneurin Revnu will confute many critics who have painted ttw author In lurid colours and held him up as a horrililr rxnmpW of the taging. roaring rev.ilutlonarv. bent on the immediate destruction of capitalism and ..ii it-, werki Apart from some peevish comments on minor aspects of policy, %  _?"' P ev n '* <"•* %  tf our most intriguing politic.il advocates arid everybody would like to know what he is driving at. His philosophy may be conveniently summarised in the concludrealism. ing sentence of the book whore he Although not against spending abiding faith in demomoney on defence he omits to existence of huue araoinertia directly coalrtbiiles to UW uriir.Tui /,. ar but 11 Is secondary. not primary. This applies lo atom uvapotii as to more pHmithv types." This Is a rclYtshing example of the most orthodox and Right-wlu cratlc Soclati manskAii -. t at-— %  —1-^. T^ a It Even Mr. Sevan's principal supporters will fall to acclaim the book as a reservoir of insptraUon or an exciting, version of their poUuV tl i>-1 ''l Mr. ltcv.ii. issues no command to hts followers to roll up their sleeves and go into battle; there Is no prevn %  'ofl a ho^ crusade Here he mak*s no bid for the leadership ot thfl Uabour Party. Mr. Uevan's brif narrative of hL. onrly ilvucfBfl foi adf-educar himself out of the rut" is r( vi.illnf. Unfortunately, such an experience can produce melancholy reflections In later years and cause the victim fb be at cross purposes with %  vwrytody. Yet. the (act that some men arc able to rise above their environment and attain eminence In litMature, art, industry, and politics roptain tha refutauon ol Mi I'tv.iii s theory that poverty in childhood is necessarily a barrier %  rnent S undecided "If Is a" pl that the ti.>;i'.;'*v.'.:'s.vss.vss.'ss.'. should be devote*! to this purpose. The tAilosophir ..; dc.r^ratThis is an unlortunate omission ic NGMIIM i. ...,-iriolli/ cool because he doubts whether the i>i i. ...per. fi tvrt society in threat to world peBce has dlmlnits '..nrexr ICIMI. ualtire and is Ished or hjt Soviet Pus-ia Is conscious o/ ll„ Unillatloiu Imwlllinn lo make an allempt to < pkuftral condition*. case Ihe tension ft sees the individual in his context u-ith society and it So mn .-Idled i „ ".' !" nl Pslonale and To place Ihe blame on the U.S. '" ... as he appears to do. for what is %  sat n irnoies mat all called panic rearmament Is no political action mst be a choice answer. possible That country may be right or aui-matuvf it eschew all ahsowronit In brlnalnn pressure on L £""acnpllons and final the Western nations lo rearm r?"r „ . , Uul ,he '"dld-up of •imiminu And further. 'It seeks the under the seals of Ihe Atlantic l^.., n",V fflS? K*"^"!?' """niun'ty would never have knonirio all flic lime lhal l( this inken place if Soviet Russia had be laished loo far it falls Inlo nol surrounded herself with a •ST*— t .. numl >er of satellite countries, n llrugitles apalnst the cells spenl a substantial proportiui. oi hat lloiifrom prlrate ncpeny h cr resources on armamenls. snd V* rsO Waaa Urn nil form, o/ ,,„ ,h. blockade which led to ^i p T>"" y "" "" •""•Ihe Berlin air-lift. i^Vi" > .s .. Th Korean astfresslon lave in J^KS"'' 1 ?"""""'> %  C Y C ,' m'peius tonSSSS. H nan somewhat ronfus.ni sre hardly Mr. Uevan woukl auree. T !" LlX M .k. 1 h 'i?" confers no beneflls on the Too much M this and Mr. British public lo stir up hualilily Revan may evoke condemnation, ajainst the U S not for beina tco revolulionary. Whatever faults may have been IJi hut for nol b..... ic.olutlonary encountered In Amcriran foreign lofethei v. ttli details of hla work r ou n policy, wo are bound to rely. uiilciKrimnd receive no more than CM. conftisinc whether in the search for won. a passing reference Aiirui in Bevan cannot make up peace or a deterrent against war II ha had devoted more space lo tiis mind which leg to stand on (or even as Mr. Bivan would his actual experience it would about Soviet Russia. He deplores himself desire, to assist in ecohave proved more illuminating Ihc comcntratlon camps, the supnomlc rehabilitation I on th.'moral Ihan Ins analysis of economic prcssion of personal liberty, and and physical backing of the Issues. Ihe .iiil-dcstniving regime preAmerican people. These read very much like tho vaihng In that country, yet beThis view is reinforced by Mr. fruits of nocturnal discussions with licves that one day the workers of Bevan's own plea that It Is wiser some, obfuscated economist, whose Russia will exert sufficient presto spend on the development of views on how to relate economic sure to enable political democracy backward countries than on armsfacts to political strategy are about to emerge. BMntl as useful a-, tho opinion* of the As yet. there is precious little This, as he knows, is accepted pigs of Drdgheda'ep psycho ogy. evidence of a change of heart; nor United Nations policy, which may Mr. Bevan clasltis lo have procap he prove, on the records of "ell have been carried through lltcd by his study of Marxism. 'he years since the war. that with en'r'.:slasm and with the "ft. so far as f can be said lo Soviet Russia, while anxious to neeesarv financial support if the hare had a political training at avoid global war. Is desperately world had not been living under all. II has been In Marxism. working for peace. Ihe threat of aggression. However, he prefers tho rvoluMr. Bevan is not opposed to So entangled llonary processes and rejects the rearmament. He sternly rebukes I S av this bi.,k i. n n .tiemnl •>. method of revolution. Ihe pacifists, which Is poor cona Ihoiightful analvtlc-,1 -md . This will .i.I endear him lo the solation after the support they renological study In^ whichT ev Politburo, which, despite hll deccnlly accorded him. STERNETTE REFRIGERATORS 5.6 cu. it. Capacity Sealed Unit 5 Year Guarantee. PRICE s ioo.no DA C(l-( & C0. LTD. Elfctriral Drpl. rlared confidence in the theories nf Marx. 1-enin. and Engels, la likely to regard him as an obscurantist Idealist. .i new world < voMnfl which la fa tt y different from the old. a familiar sentiment agreeable in many quarters. Yet Mr Bevan is at loggerheads with himself in deciding the pattern of the new order of %  "Against Ihe background o/ moxmtlna tension created 6u such policies." he writes. "It u Idle to talk about general disarmament. People are not, and never hare been, prepared fo throw au-ay their ouns while iney feel unsafe. "The guns are there because the sense of insecurity is there. not the insecurity because the OHM are there. the orator and forceful aMator la ubr,-dinated to Bevan the philYet somehow It falls to catch on because he is neither decisive nor conclusive. In short, we have here the thouithts of a man who is trying lo disentangle a series of complex problems ..nd. in the process gets into a tangle himself. • He) n em aim, 6s. —L.E.S. Our U.a.l.rs Say Hi'lh Cmln-t — A Svirntifiv \rr4>H/iily TV Editor, the Advocatethat you may deprive the world the -.team age with a bountiful of some genius! It is strange that supply and the strides made in ihcy never stop to think that for medical sciemv thus controlling every one genius born there are diseases and remr thousands of these turn out to IOSU It. the pWation of^Lrllnd 5r^." ^l KS'^' "" We***" crlmliwU. How to-day Is JLSS i(Lt iZlud\ g .ti-crii istian Moni^ red its head in the much "better off the world %  bad**: the lost ocbe without it* Caponcs. DHHngers. Wales (excludlru/ MonrnVmlhi c.sioii a novel place of propaganda an d Willie The AetorSurton^ 2.15B.193T thT^kiT^ used %  gAlnSt ItIt was when lust t'hi i re hue: the school chudnn gtvtn condensed milk each day. :"i"'' j .mill refuseil lo permit "' ,J.,, tbeir hildren to drink this milk. C?. <>• %  niient was putting i, LcnvrafM." i^ .r •., v.,...,. Anyhow %  IHHTH-t'ONTROI." in it to keep the population down' One ".in. if wm Just some r will leave these M3.110—an .nertsase" of thirty t ol this, for argumillion three hundred and twenty. inentts on the lliblo have been "-'e thousand nine hundred and enturir*. so It Is thirty-four; roughly four times as useless to continue along these '""ch as it wa> one hundred and t may be that George Ber] %  >' y^ani ag*. The whole popunard Shaw summed _DWU • %  • %  .-iiiimifu up the nttllatli %  J3 '•''' ol the Church when he wrote t th Yd r^T J? —You should nol be opp >f the \..>rld has increased aUintiiiiK rote, for from 1840 uneducated OPOI.IO ~ ,UU • %  •" noi oe oppressed '<> 1* it elimhed from 1.000,000,. 2sfa imj,^ stss .Ho £sE ,o ""* %  "" %  In the 1'nited S'.ifes of Amerty and pain i If you stand the : The not cumulative. nc s,zc of the world has not .r planned t u Ufctf^a,^ lo hilrtor y and STARVATION' It will not be long that modern man has to before the countrjoa in the ne sine ntnoKl ii;d the ger.cial UAC r^Luatt contraceptives. She ha* sg4>i fliis resort, to avoid the errors of past wW will reaeh aahimtlon point flickering light growto the K cnerations being repeated and to Anwrlc *J* noor the maximum of 'Planned Parenthood Federation try and save mankind from the IM.ooo.OOO peoplu which she can of America;' In ^hich all the horrible future for which It is P rov 'oe foe. when this happen-. local hlithr-cotgtrol IssjgUssj ;ire heading. During the earlj••ages h 're will be no food stuffs left umil.^i. and their affiliated comof this world, there was a gradual over f '"' P0ttj llM MUM will sponsor 200 clinics Increiuve in the population of the bapt>en to ("anadsi. the Argentine, throughout the U.S.A. Thin wo rld. this was due to the slow Brazil and Australia. What [• % %  ••othood is fought rn ; c p f food production by manual happci to little Barbados when ntralnst strongly by a certain roll.jbour. plagues, diseases, and trw; e will be Ho emigration and glousJwdy In the Slate-, but the „-.„ Thfc sla 0 OI a ff Wrs co ntinJ" POpulaUon reaches 250.000 really interesting |irt is that the ucd unl ,i th •„toam age* arrived. Sh 1 cannot support her pre*cnt ellnlea <>f the Foder-itn-n*..* only „„ wht .„ lnc increase of food propopulation now. will she be able give eontnesssun aolvfco, but duetion was actually trebled due "" "'ppon aiv.ih*r 50,000 peot>le K."t!,ii : B*< I a* to tll u, e improved methods of tillthon ll Chris*hn to bring little aid tl Ic married „ K ,. rtc \^ f population of the childmi Into this world to see ,;, to have .hitwor jd inoroajad i Ua the •lost and lingering dron which they would cM thetr boondl Take the population death of starvation? No, eduoaowm, but by some freak of nature of England and Wales as tin lion in contr:i ( -,-.>Uve* i* the only %  vented from having them, example. In 1700 this w.solution for 'he WHOLE WORLD •'<• atgumenbi used 5.134.516; hv 1800 It had AND NOT DATllADOS AIX>NE. bf these reached 9.187.176—nearl> double %  i etc.. peopbe; one of the main oms Is in one hundred yean! Along came JOHN BECKXES pay. YET, in the midst of this ferment of Westernisation, large tracts of the sprawlinj; Sudan are like the Empire of Kipling's day Border Incidents — with tribesmen from the Congo, Ethiopia, or Uganda—occur regularly. Spears are blooded, captives are dragged off, ancient insults are avenged, cattle are driven away. The country has just had its record year of prosperity. THE GREAT Gexira cotton scheme has been an example of what can be dnne bv co-operation between Government, peasant, and privgjte rntrlrprise. Britain's record here is Rood. Right now, the Legislative Assembly of Sudan are debating the self-government constitution we have laid before them. It was annoying to Farouk—for Egypt's dea was to make the Sudan her virtual colony. But, instead, the Sudan will decide her own future--whether she links up at all with Egypt, goes her own way, or links with Britain and the Empire. WHEN I was in the Sudan recently I asked an old soldier what he thought of Egypt's ambition to take over the country. "Take over us?" he said. "When you British go we'll incorporate Egypt in the Sudan." I'.nt.iiiM ri-r.in Hi|(llWttV iiet* If .'MIHI By HARRY W. FRANTZ WASHINGTON, April 23. Eduardo Dibos Mayor of Lima Peru has given a timely boost to the Panamerican highway through his authorship of "The Great Hemispheric Road." This survey, a publication of the International Road Federation, gives latest authoritative information concerning the history, economic utility and construction progress on the 15.449 mile network of trunk highways. They eventually will link all of the capital cities on the American continent and connect by ocean ferries with the principal Caribbean republics. Dibos' survey, in namphlet form, was timed for distribution during the world meeting of the International Road Federation which starts in '..n. May 13. Authorities predict it will stir the imagination of delegates from Highway associations of 25 countries, who are to attend. —U.P. i lllll \KI AS! FOODS Robin Hood <>,i. Quick Cooking Quaker Oats Morton's Scoteh OaUneal ( %  rape Nats i r. mi of Wheat All Bran \\r I ,-i.iv shredded U I..n Sautir In Una Fresh Saa**Ke < it iiii.n Kiss Smoked Kippers I>jnKh Bacon FHVB canu For a good cup of ('offer seder EMPIRE COFFEE only 1.20 per lb. Chase A Ranborae Pure CITrr l.M per lb. t h. Ranborae Instant Coffee .87 per tin 40 to 45 Cops per tin Here Thev Are Calves Liver Calves Hweelbreads Cslvea Kidneys Fillet Steaks Minced Steaks Fresen Haddock Froseo Sal maa Baked Beans Spaghetti Cheese Kraft Cheese (loads Cheese CUT'S Soda Biscuits SPECIAIS Fleirhman's Vltsmin Yeast 1.48 per tin I—Tea I '"• per lb. Ilreed Ribblts 42 per lb. IW.-v-rt Tripr .12 prr lb. Phone G0DDARDS WE Deliver





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PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1*51 CLASSIFIED ADS. WWIID TELEBHOBE 2S0g li %  .%  %  DIFD E iUvtlle" %  nti"i %  > U„ v ,l Mr*. Mi Hen. Iteeklr* CBas*h .i<*e4 la '"*eL .th*iu .n*see>, o-eea n- %  arieci on n> Af*ii lets "IMMIH foe our deal BaWurOur or* in ell loetriven And Chriatuvn* only l*il >o Till Ulr .*.).. In heayeii MM*. Lamt f**lt.i. Moat iWi, Bvdney ip^"' *• I :**. Or* BBBBM Appty J_. TStVCStBS W. v rae a saa ne sia lr delives*. Oarage 4SH *-t^"JlKrj;"* • %  "" %  • -~ %  I Alt IMS At*. %  The* Or. PMTICT FORD IBM MO %  Illy new i-rice Bee—eieW* *?*>' HLJAKOUM* B.et>uf* St nl HHXUAN vnnx-om ** a-aca ll.Um.ii UIM. Bane St\80* BtllBB. '" •* .nler.1 eortatillon Ftyotw Bf SBa** k Bfftoe Ud o* tfe STl*. 4W fc I p.I II.IIK* 1& Talks to Workers Scouts Celebrate St. George's Day AGENT WAiVTUl Be. ilrld(rt'n well lonnulM with M Nil asrcreyJiied Hettl-h ._ tyrrtOwr. Walte HUIU. whs druMM Oil* 111* 4* uV Mh Apr!!••. ..rel %  nllliia. nlw-y* eonteni Layved and rflprel^ wherever I "If (MM a i-ea.eli To a be.utifl.1 and. Ha dee* It ILirrta'e family. Mr St H-rHn M M li a* ha lira* avervbadr Vafit3 Trv.ma. Dul lo he* heavenly hon* alv. lorn* may foraal •• aSa U BO*** li.it we. n ait ri'"if inker MS aaalle: Itoa ton*Vellvn Trotrr*rr .mother". Enkin* "out NrvilMibAMart, Hoaall* lerandinntnri %  Rca nttd Violee* aunt> Hyae!""* HOIIlll. — In loviiuf roaWiery of Wil wife lie*.* 0T1-1I '. I ir '•i.d'trf •*>) llhl Worrell. Hi.otter.""! 'res* lh path Th1 lead* m to OM> rva Whara lla. lha and 1 lo-d N wall Bui wlwn 1 co,ild not diva i n if tit wham alt bi "Uanl And %  laap laruMe* m '>_ ^_ My Uut*i|. an on !} % M" Fvar to to rtnrmban* b "i"*** Womll l ba rpq\iirad lo cunaXn* lha dutlaa ol L'laak lo lha OovanMn* Bad ii Ba n i Ur> In IN* Haadmaata* 1 Applicant! ahall have had a Batnrdarv Eduralion. and puaaraa a CamKrwir* Brhool rminc-ta or Ml rajuPralanl rd bp.oaVlaM al Trpknc ahimy lo krlta .Viortatand krlnd a* advanl^a > Vha Salary I. *]* %  • par monlh rlai'iar by annual InrrrmmU nl right dollar* m li to m a-r monin 4 AppltaaUun* lo ba racaivad by In* htidmulrr. R C Kpfmarr Eaq HA -Collulon". Oovammattl HIM. Bt HUhaal. by Poet. aawloaMB raaan* Taatlainn lala. aM Ular than Bklurday MPh April BM Dv Order ol lha Governor, of lha %  nw a l m ITBBB |a*fB 1 '"* %  H,gh School * %  trBOB DABy Thr otner event was TlBlBJsng aBrter two Seoul* m oaen rvf th* I The Uassaja. In this BVBBI. ft, ur cisstM WelUr. Lighl. whn contestant* were DBBB ln g on Middle and Mcavy th* rneuaft they rswmblad someAt ? 30 p m there will ba an what FBI. man carrying out an inter-Troop Table Tennta Cominvcligation. A hush reignad petition m which each troop will 'hroKBTi this evant. he repreaented by four players. A lecture on the Scout InterQ„ Friday at 5 00 p m. there •utuonal Relief Scrvac. given by wl|1 ^ t h,. inter-Troop Scout Sroutai A J Tatnall at H#Bdcompetition. On* patrol of seven a>aru-s at 8 o'doca; last night, ( h Scouts under IS yaors ol rum-Bed the day. very intaraalui# programme A film was also To-day st 4.30 p m the Scout* 111 have their Inter-Troop Boxing Competition at the Modern render of 231 rioting convicts brought the housing problem today to a new state prison farm authorities After holding out for 113 houm in a barricaded prison dormitory. prisoners gave up yostsrday. %  JotM' of the eight guards hold (ages was harmed SHIPPING NOTICES from each troop will lhl competition. Saturdsv wit! be the Ma day From BOO o'clock on Saturrla nleht the Smuti will staff* their Aouatle Sporls snd Marine T>li plav off the Aquatic Club On Rundsv at 4 SO p m there will be individual Orouo Chnreh Parades or Seoiibr* Owns and on Monday at 4 SO p m an InterTroop Signalling Competition BT Combermere School. St. George's Week will be dim:ed with a Torchlight Tattoo a/ IOMIIAI %  IMIMl, M XBALAMB UK B MKiii" IH.AN B. UMBJ I -TBKOAi. arttadulrd lo aall i AdaUMt* rabruory lllh Ua IbourBa March led, Bydnay March IHh. BnaMMM Month Band anwlna a? Trtnldod %  bout April tSnd and Barbados about saefl i5ii •al haa arnpla aooco lor chiliad and bard Irvian rarso <-arS ar.vplad " Ihra-idh HUH of I^dtns (<-r lrao*hi|>mapl at Tdalded lo Boinh Uuiana. I^award and WISaaed Ulanda inr poritrulara %  ss H y — PIBKBBB %  urn a CO.. Mi' Iklslim. will -irgo and Paaarnsar* (or Doaa•. Anllfua. Montaarral. Mavia Sad SI KilU Sallins PlMla* M IVlK*IH)ll -.11 BI* EaBSBB, Oranodo and Arabs y.u>ii| only lor St V* % %  **. !). % %  ( '., iBgBB r BBBSBBl ,*-'----.'--.'.---,',','-,*,*,',-,•,'--,'%  )^Aic&s***he* .. ur ,lcad M ell block 15 .1 %  *?*. _ ^^ _^_ VAt'XHAt.t. BYVBRN-h. rwtella-nt md'l.nn undtr lo* mtfcM ("i'HTP>V GAUACB Dial MM *> • SB-da. %  KLKCTRK'AI. Owuar t r Py. Padu. ,ji i fi'ip rhone BBBf ratPBIOtStATOR-' F*nrid-ira" *^ t" ,.. %  ... VV.lKr. DM i at Philip r • ss—Sn Honorary SecTitary A Traaawrar, rolaiidsa and Parry School IS 4 U-4fl AWPIJCATIONB era InvHed fraan aval -d woman kaanl< Inlrrcilrd in Amdull Wclfair IIH ih. .),;-.. IIV • lldalaa muil have •HSoitanc* m com mil In work. San 'nraapondanca and cunlrol of Maff and .mat bt capabla of organ lain* Appeal! an' rublicity (aiapaiana The hauri an froi tarn lo I p m aaeh week day an lha aalary U SSB 00 per monlh Apply V* \ • HIM. H M mil" year, *i .al :,.. % % %  wuhlnl n a* Only %  The %  ewer lo ia< pn.blema i. anansad I H It,ml* A Co. Ltd l.r •road Bi >ial DM S3 4 -B %  = !. IJVKSTOCK GBADC noLsrniN .Him. a few day*. 11*1 3aaS Kai.nalh D iota l^da* aUaak Roc COW-To calvi lacUUpn roat, BUn4 SB-I POULTRY IMIHII Aonns mi NOTHP lOMIIPPIMi a TBAOIM ITtl %  rxiiinL %  lARBF-O PlYMOOTll BOCK 1VHB llltai. wrak old Chtrk* utiaesad lor r_ %  .ann .tartliij NoVtmbat, Daramber ** ...h BOOK SOW a. alraartv rrrr"ir. -dar* hach WtD bo aqiarulad alr^rl lr*a apacial montha iaq ,. alnl %  linms DBt-iVBRED StiU halrhin* MAiTllira alraln bul *aiii**t daltv-i una BBJfWBTT THE nUNGAI " •TAfiyRSny .uual.-d brlwren Ape* It I 1 ...i Oeasg rare.. SIA.U St. i.dr.l". li> "i-l two name* lor ralprrnea 1 inaa, auimaaiFCA cOfV*. Crrilral Pol-.a 9th Tba Chair HeJquartrr n, daa* a MISCELI.ANKOUS (!ARln nEfSt BOTTl.tS Did .o.. now lhal you could an three crnU it vary two r*nb Bottlea* ffain| Iheii > Meaat* A S BHYIIEN A SONS I.t.i Victoria Saroot. BtTNOAlX-WModern B*on r Buna.lo. %  _• ...ia. f t..i -itmi. ] bedreaaaa. round wall anacc^odlns O.N0 as 4 ss -an aarvanll quartan. _.. rloaura pnfarrad — not Apl> Advocate. Z M IK.X'UATOH-OII or aaa. Any aua. bul SOU -SOS-esS capacity prefetrrd Poat parlieuu.r.. Bennett Cre* Paim Iluaaalow SI Andrew Bt I U sonci it iintrnv mvrjf thai n. rianafer P-.k. ind Hcfl.lrr -' Mdni>" it lha shovr-mimed Company will t* :>-*d frpm >u 2ih d..y of April n f> %  Tih day of Mav !•. both day* incB.-IV.' p.-,—I iiloaid of Dlrrelii K WILLIAMS. SOTBtJi fi" X taBJpy sivtn lhat In. ar. cml nee -H. Riil.' lbCiub will t., < .^ tP M*n b-ra -Ji Saturday. ABtll i n.^Bay •" Aauatw Bveni. hy ''p.^o^'druV | '^ft^T %  SB. %  NOTICE TABtSH Ol CBBIi-T CBI B II ri..m nib AneB :o li i ftlau. ><"'• %  •>' ih* Pw.M-' 7r>'-.rer'. finW wfil > 1v only— —— Tfiiradji pi ids-i • %  lo a' fraan a* W a m M S I ""•/OI.I. r> iiivM'i St 4 SS--4 JM\ R* r-lalal MftiDrt'CN AI i pen BWBeayaed, sorirr. IB itr.ru-Jtv orvxw thai Miwrn bBVUM .ii' -tebt %  ton havi %  JUctni MECHANICAL ipiradei*. rartlViiar M Mnwarl. Rakf* Ski-. ... wlndrowlns tana TrUnder*. Wnael Stnkaa lor an i Taactcrt to pttvn COUHTBY OAJIAGB 1 IMHIH SAIKS REAL ESTATE At.I. that bungalow -,'n ihr ruraltuii i 11.aSB Bquara reel SI..1I-, llonae Hill f l.ilnlns IJvina and innint nedriioina. Toilet. Bold MISCELLANEOUS %  allrd % %  BrAPTI.I Itlllla BBS BBtV u. Bnor-i. TtOe. and Ktlchrn. tOi.vriniiianl water oipplv a" OITgRS IN WRITING will ba raeeivt ih.-bi-iri.-l n|> 1*. Salurdav V rd dav ol May 1SS. al It noon Tt I'.IJVdoea ivol bind himaelf lo aaca M histieat or any offer In.poclior • • liplytation lo Ml n a QooSBBI Te -BM For lUrlhtt partieulara and ro< COTTUt, CATFOMIl A CO. Ho IT lllsh Blraei. BSIBgalaaS SB IB-4 AgUAHIUMABAll Olae* .lie* 3SailtS IS aed IS a 10 a B le**e Cmplala -irh PLuila and n*h Are bio t'larka Iti one aiat 04 48-40 "otBBON V-CLABB BT4BaU>nOAT. bulll ..•id imported In IBM Lenglh is lect. Dcam % (eel S inehe*. Dtauuhl II fret k-elim eapocBty •> *• as0B paoplc. *-iel hull material* and eon-trurli.m conioly with t'eyda Board of Trods .eaulremeolPi.wered wtlh Ford water. " %  -isygf ID* BBard IS knot* RoslBald rrancb, D ^ *%£"-. ?ri.,: KHAKI DKIIJB I allt, II IB and i I Mpar S— Arattdasss __..kland. la'e of Third Avanua P.llevllM. in thr pariah of Bainl Miehor f.o dlefl Hi lhi I' "nd i>n l*e SOlh d. ol lanuAiy UBS. "re reauealed It >n in %  arruco'.' %  rlaieaa, BUl %  ..... i. I. I .a.eutor* I the P-laia oi >e liable for Haola to diatn .led to any per-on of whoae debt St clalM *t h-ll int love had notice -1 lha lima nl ...eh dietrlbulion Add Ml tn.—i. l>-*>bled lo Ihe tatd fatete vee reaueeted l *llle their a^-couSV Wll Dated |hl* Ind d..v of April. 1M1 ti r. MimrtAV C a AKMSTBONO. nn of th* Eitale S".nla !" i dee'd ONIONR— SUh-k up OW %  *• louaetieeper should buy a so in bag sf >nloh* at I'per pound Ouarantred ^ keep for S hwdha. HAROIJ3 PBOVBIUS8 A U. LftJ i It A IB corn* hilren patlarn*. tons laatliui B-ialitT. .atnnabla prl. %  only IS Ml* * yard I KHJ'ALAHl U Swan •>' %  *._ ,. HaXOpnet -Clearing our *tork of MOM Kacofd* Tl.rea lor Twa Dallare, [ dSSaeS. A EAJUOES A CO ., I.TO RAIN OAUOE CYUND1M — 1 vourt handy now ihe ralnv eeoao approachlns Knlfhl. Ltd Ltd Bubaeelbe now to Ihe Daatf Telagrapb Kngland* leading Dall Neapapar no* arriving In Darbado* by Air only a tea day* atter publleallon In London Con tact tan Gale, c o Advocate Co. Lid Local IteprrarntaUvr. Tel. % %  tn.'.MlALUW A t tiydanrne, n-wl' mull b.aaalowith ail rn.-iatnr.-nvi iiirneea. tlandlns on alioul lS.rmS aquai !eet of land %  The Lodge, wllh a wondai i>n ii if (No* )e* Cecil. Dial 1) t M-ln board and .hln*le 1 TOCQX-BTMaawen g sratat, elemvugl t of I %  tag ibout I acres of and fen .inactive and pupulai Bart* of the eoaal rv above erlll be tat up f-r —IK oy luefasfi -I the office* of the undn.lgned m rrlda*. Bad May. 1SU. at 1 p m Appl .ul.l I ma %  Hi -Woodland". St OeorB* Tel Still CARBINOTON A SHALY. laaraa BUeet I! %  •! *ll The undenUmed will offer ..bile (umpetltlon al thel hgh Street, nurtgrlnwn %  ALL THOSj; building' %  inwi'lnn office* and warehouse* on in B'hart and Prince Wl Ham Henry Biret Street Brldgeu*e-n. alandfeel of land and liOregor S.ISf -i., ..-rupn-d by Meaai Lid Further partieu %  SBBM P U J.-iic* A C COTTLi:. CATFORD A CO Bollcltor* g SO 4 SS— lOti AUCTION W have Jacob'* Cream Cnchara SIM tin: Fancy Bweel BlaeulU S lb pkda U* % %  "luy ai one* Stock i* baine rrtoced.-KNiaiiTB LTD fJt.Mtn WATFPPUT, a..lvanl*ed waist PH1 1-1',". *' alao pipe BtttnC City Oara**. VtrSorU ~ UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Thuiadav Stlh al "Gundhi Villi tiieavt.il!. Black Rock by order of M > A Tti.ini wo will tell bla Fumlluie which Include. Morrla Bune .Settee nd I Aim Chair.': Piano Vltrollte T.-p -Bee Table. Beiblce, Tub and Up ..la' Chai... all in Muhoaaar; Hall..ra Carved Teakwood Table. V aUo pipe Biting' N ^ T-B# tn TM TTOUC. Oak Dl-i ORIENTAL PALACE HEADQf VR1C!nd had sustained some loss alrsjadj. The poBitlon now was that if the BlU was pa s sed, the gov%  .in'.got would have a 'und to subsidize the wash grades at 8 nU per lb instead of tin price of Hit cents a lb. He had nguies of the prices of various grade* hi the various island's Dark Crystals was sold in oine islands—Antigua had one factory and so too did St. Kitls— and the prices were as follows: Antigua cents: St. Kltts 6 cents; St. Lucia If; When it came to Wash Grades Antigua price was 11 cents per lb; St. Kltts 11 cento, St. Lucia 04 cents; Trinidad 8; Jamaica 8 and Barbados 8 which would be bring,in^ Barbados into line with the other places; Yellows Antigua St Lucia, none. Trinidad 8|; B.G. T|J Jamaica 0 and Barbados 10 cento per lb. As he explained earlier, the position was reversed In tssose culonias In that they allowed the local Industry to charge a higher ptlce for the local sugar when they were selling sugar cheaper ..broad and they were asking that the price of local sugar be something lass than the price of the export sugar. The BlU did not change the principle. All It did was to ask that th* money which, out of the export prtc* would have been put to Ihe Uuee funds, would be put to a seperate equalisation fiind and uaad for --uiwidlzing the Brown Crystals. He had much pleasure in •SKondlrtg the motion tor the second leading of the Bill. Hoa. O. BEvelyn observed thapeople dii not mind paying a price to get the best sugar for use. and ild that he had been reliably informe.1 that servants, even thus.in the low Income groups, preferred to pay 9 cants for their sugar In order to get the brightei „„h.g.n prison, sought Th* results of th* Pitted further assurances against re" ,fT "f l ? ll P w ?. „ .„. %  prlsaU for their part inthe up1 Bethel "A* team with lit uungs |D which one Inmate was points out of a possible so. killed and eight others wounded 2. Bethel B team. by State police bullets.—CJ Wrat Sea Scouts "A teem TAKE NOTICE GOODYEAR THE .,,..., KHiVrAH TIBS! a> BUtlniOt COMTANV. a corporation ._ ..r IK. ...of UhM. United State* of AnBarM-a. whoa Market Street. Akron. Ofaio. U B A ha* applied or in* raaiatnUoT. of a trad* mark in Part A .a* Itegiilei in leapael of pen uar-ion. and aolvd lire, conatructed wholly or partly of rabber and need lor moii. rtarka, motor ran. motor cycle.. bteveW*. aeroplane, and other vveilatBS, ant -betharafor. tin * and non-akld devieaa Inatd* lire protectori. vulatdi .n protet„r. lepair ...ilhu repair palcnea and bandagea; patchum gum: paten ng cement, inn*, tube.. vmcair.inB malenaw: vuk-an.nns outfit.: lire r.m.: loi inatlna and nn pan. r.n. pami. veh-He* wheel*, lubber tiling for Boor*, rubbe ale; rubber hoaf and tubing, rubber maebiaiary. heel, and aole*. %  il asaainii ubbrr good., rubber mall and rnatUns; airplana •uppliea. packing na ^<* !" material in general. Ink roller, and blanket, for printer*uae ineludinB %  •••* %  **' I It Bg rHSBMBB, leolhc u b*litute malcrial*, MornB> ballerhn and ^ lkl ^ p t X^ | PUI %  fm.r.t 1 froni nd will 1 .titled ^ Mth da. of April %  It. dupltcata to ...e BI my olflc* of .daptomoe. of H.ch intUon The Trade iwk ean be .ran on aBPlieallon al my oSSc*. Ikete.1 ihl2Srd day of April %  ;.r NRW KhsUB M Kill t: HlMMIIi M UBSBl ilU IMh April ariUea alarbado* SSlM April. IBM aalla pin Ma* ainie* llarbado* loth Mar/. IBM NEW ORLKANg MBViii: %  n w.i' WTXAMIH aallad lOtN April arrive. Sarliad** SSUl April, ltdl aal** Mil. Aa.ni %  imri ftarbadoa IMh May. 1SS1 CANADIAN HERVICK HALMPAX April IMh MOTBJtAI. April Stlh at trrttCAi M-istn kMMTsauU -J-o woi Arilrrd Hataida. AL .1 i-td %  ssj MB Ata* Mth I | I Due Barbado* .. April ISth ror Si John. N D and I I awrenc* River PunBtrUBR accommodation ROBERT TIIOM LTD.— NEW YORK a. GULF SERVICE Apply:— DA COSTA A CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE H. WILLIAMS. rat of Trade Mark. HIM GOVERNMENT NOTICE BTJILDINO EVSTATs., CITY OF BK.LZB There is on urgent need for more building land to provide for he expansion of the city of Belize. The Gf/vssmment of British Honduras is prepared to make land available to any concern whic.n would be prepared to develop a building estate on a fajhsunilal scale 2. The Government would be prepared to consider offering for thlipurpose a free grant of the'following areas: ^~ (s) All lite unoccupied land lying North of the extension of the Government Housing Scheme, Freetown Road. North of the City of Beiise and bounded as follows: North by North Circular Road. East by a drainage and the southern bank of the Belize River at the Haulover bridge on the Belize— Airport Road, bounded and described a* follows:— „ (1) North by the sea and the proposed new Rifle Hangc East by land to be granted to the Roman Catholi (nun-h and the North Circular Road. South by the main rood from Belize u> the Airport .known Haulover Rood. West by the Belize River. interested In these proposals is requested get In touch with the Colonial Secretary. Belize, British^-Jtgg* !" iiiusBiiiOaaowsQdiRsjnonf>iiBsniiiri 111 mi'""**'*-"— V.V.V/V,V,V/,V//'aV/V.V//. SPECIAL REDUCED PRICES DOOR MATS (PLAIN AND FIGURED) .1 Hifi ••/'.'...#. ,,( fii II. ./us in 'iii'lii/i/f imiti s.'.i; i TO MI. in. .-... GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIKS RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4918 •01 sr otwxi n Far the HOV&KWIFE We can offer IMII sun: PaasBfa BE COOKERS at (IMitil IMIMMUI >l Car. Bread *k Tudor Sta. MANKKK. TROTMAN A CO.. -LMi FLAT -New very modein %  %  .lalde flel Completely furnished Te'.ephone. %  *,*. tnclty Paemg tea Eaeelienl and -ale aaabalhlng Apply to "MABEflOl LAWBXNC* OAr rnone SBM IT .311 n PAHAWAV-I room* Full* f. I SjBBM • Philip eoaet. S bedrniahed Lighting Plant Double Car Port. Iwo From Ma> 1*1 Pt.one 10 4 S3--I f.n .ih '•Sonk'CkrrieflOiU Seiamic Sistrvey The motor vessel Sonic is carrying out a seismic survey of tho urea bounded by the parallel ol latitude lo degrcea 2J minute* north and extending from poiiv. | Lisas westward to longitude <• i |r'cgrec> 45 minutes and then [arssttnrard to the mainland. The Sonic began her operation" nn Tuesday and is expected to riiiutwnsD rXAT-wtra iinlsh hor iiirvey on Monday. Sho oood pa S sBBii |„ paimed white. She esrrie HCATMriKLD, Cian* For Mai une. July rurnlthed. ekfctrleliy, re ISentor Apply A D Herbfrt Phon s m Haei tn. SB SSB II i (1 ohl during the night. md f(TMAvs*t Z Crwa* rsnaL 4 boa-. Ships moving along the Tri ^ .dyad, lighting plant. .^d west coast. In the T.ulf tobar ut Phwa* 44T4 I apprnachc! rure* been Aiirned .t is.4 SB—< f n .i'S* caution and keep clear of the lbwas wondering whether even though Covetnrrient subvuli-.'d the Brown sugar, there would be such a big swing over from people using the better mdg sugar to the Brow n Sugai. despite the subsldy HOB. K. R. Haute said that what Mr. Cuke had said was quite i ight but added that the comput.Hions were right provided thai the sugar wan the right colour. If it wet* ibot bright In colour it would not sell because it was his i'x;ienence that the people prerasTfjd I bright coloured sugsr. The Bill was read a second Unie and pa*.A^ OFFERING A FEW MORE USEFUL ITEMS aSAN'PING DISC CRITS 16. 24, 36, 50 a MASKING TAPE a RUBBING COMPOUND eSPONGE RUBBER ei.OY COLD PLASTIC METAL a PISTON SEAL eKASFNIT CASE HARDENING eRAWL PLUG DUROFIX a COPPER TUBING V. A" 1*". A" aTYRE GAUGES (Car and Truck) a ENGLISH SOCKETS SETS a ENGINEER HAMMERS a HACKSAW BLADES it^CSa.'llSi.V Vi.'V'n Thl Infnrmaltan was raeelvert mto cWu J.tnn 10 .t" .i, v. 'nt Ihe local ltyrbour and Shlptt M-*I ping Departmant. heU as holUaM by rioter* wh' have cauaed ji.500.n00 dmao lo the world'' large*' walled prison In Jackson, Michigan, while In Runway, New Jeraey. the surECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY ST. DIAL 4269 GALVANIZE CORR1T. \TF.n SHEETS in 6, 7. 8. and 10 feel lemitlis IRON CORRUGATF.II SHEETS in 6. 7. H. 9 niKl II leel lenclhs frnin >::.lill per sheel ASBESTOS COKRl'liATED SHEETS SPECIAL SCREWS AND WASHERS, also ASBESTOS RIDGES now being received ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES in 3 and 4 Inch wilh the necessary Bends—Ys. Tees. GALVANIZE NAH.S only 40 cent, per lb. PLAIN FLAT GALVANIZE lor makine Ridge Caps. Down Pipes. Guttering, etc. We nlvi slock COPPER in l. 24. 30 and 3 Inch. GALVANIZE PIPES Iron. Mj Inch to 4 Inch EXPANDED METAL for Concrete Work, Railings etc. GALVANIZE STAPLES A. E. TAYLOR LTD. Coleridge Street — Dial 4100 where Qualities in 1IIOII and Prices arc LOW ; DIAI^-FOURONF.DOl'BLE-O and Where ^> There are NO Parking Problems ^^S



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THURSDAY, APRIL 11. 152 BARBADOS ADVOCATE TACF. THREE Try U.S. Race To First H-Bomb From R. M. MeCOLL WASHINGTON, April. America's top scientists and technicians are racing against the clock to try to ensure that the world's first hydrogen bomb will be exploded next September, when the United States undertakes the next great 'hush-hush' experiments on the Pacific atoll of Eniwetok. Thousands of millions of dollars have been poured out Oil this project, ever since President Truman gave the 'green light' over a year ago. Huge 'plants' have besjn set up guarded by thousands of security men. Some of America's best scientific brains have been at work, seeking to perfect the new bomb, which is theoretically a thousand times more powerful than the existing A bomb. MEr 6AM60L5 "* M ,'IAL" I .. TT71 Guggenheim Fellowship^ CANADA'S Awards For B.W.I., 1952 NEW BUDGET ELECTROLUX •fW'/f \ SHOUTS THE award of four Fellowships to residents of the British West Indies for the year 1952-53 is announced today by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation of New York City. This is the first of a series of annual Fellowships awards by the Foundation for the West Indies. Parrot Ban Repealed ? WASHINGTON—Parrots, i.^elurds. parakeets, cockatoos and British other Fitttaones jut tiboui to i>;' limit!il again to this countr; SASMS KITES The Ruggenhc Them," published in London and >klt T %  '* years' bn, may Koun irning lit Florida The work I* being rushed to the limit now because of the psychological factors involved II. DM directors of American politicalmil•—•. ... %  %  >> <>_•-, 7---... ..., ou* work -HI ihe HxlroKcn Bomb noi expecting much relief from capacity to carry on, In the United Roger W Straus. John C. Emison. the Middle West. '"'I*)*" %  .-hull be stepped UP even further. .he i52 Budget, should be stln.SUles. research in all field* of Medley G. B. Wheiptcy, Charles owners with psitacosi*. me bird to try to bring about a victorious uuted. in many directions by the knowledge and artistic creation in MTZ. Roswell Magill, Elliott V. died. Ms masters reco\ % % %  DOOM the changes that the Minister of all the arts. Usually the fellows Ball, and Henry Allen Moe. Sec*. Short hosptlalUation and ireat. n 2 b :.. by J, L aulum .. rinance was able to announce, of the Foundation are between retary. merit ith antibiotics While ui feathered friends will returi. t^uebec and 5% in the other carry on Men and women, marWashington University. 5t Ixails, Their hopes have been aroused %  %  Y %  %  ""' %  .''" %  7 'r atninfe P~vinees. as compared with the ned or unmarried, without dis£? issoun ? r i"*" ri 't? 1 *%  >< %  medlesl researcher, d-,ic old rates of 54\6% and 52.6% imetio„ of race, colour or creed, Professor of rratveh in Yale Unlbui k ,vi ON MM that „nK th, respectively. These rates include, are eligible on equal terms. vers.ly; Di. Carl O. Sauer. Prop^ttai mecarry |he bug that of course, the addition of 2% The John Simon Guggenheim lessor of Geography sn the, Unlmjy effect human lungs. Careful %  #— announced in October last and Memorial Foundation was estabve-sity oT California, Dr. Edwin „i,,dy hid shown that the disen effecti Teas*" ^trugglr lit Mexieiui Elections B> KUIUM PR F.SCOTT MF.X1CO CITY, April 2J. i inatiitiitlal -hen" Adolfd Rull OarltaM fuees the toughest Leftwin* npp.>Mtion of .1 quarter 1 entury in MexicoS tense elee%  jit;n. ,md politician* fear CouservaUve lg-overnn.cn t< control may be shaken. Although Rula Cortinea is a top-heavy fi.vourilc in the ihiectho Presidency. %  "' l rafj BS^ 11 15^" Looka I 11 raised by the Pubic sRWlRff politm... unrest and new %  v..iing lineups threaten his that'Mate imported P rt *' r 'P "" Congre* f.-r ihe first time since 117 —tll.P.I debated question of whether America should or should not continue to with-hold from I from January I, 1992, ..shed in the year 1925 !ru Bidwell Wilson, Retired profeasor \ f prevalent among all kind Information and research discoveries. There IK a school of thought 111 the State Department example, which Is engaged _. „ bottle n.yal with powerful figure* " cover .... — „„ _. „ UM Pentagon The State pension legislation which started Gufffenheun and by Mrs. OuggenY^""/; *"<* P *3*£ ^£2!2t niore Departireot men are completely (at >40 per month for those over helm as n memorial to a son. John Wright. Director of the rouftv gfrop, opposed to the law which says 70 years of a get at the begtnniruj Simon fluaenheiin. who died in Shakespeare Ubrary, Washington, Ulll1 that America must not tell of 1952. Hence, the 1951 corpora1922 filack ifatket Knocked Out 'Alt TOWN. April. 1 laef market in ugi-r which had assumed serious proDorUons owlna la UM Lata cuttuig • >f the cine crop ti.i Urn dealt ,. knockout bl..w by Mlm*1rr of Affairs, Eric Louw. „f For Louw promised that any The Refrigerator which ten years ago caused the Rajan Cook to exclaim r "Hey! Hey! aaek ice i".v /i #"#•#' 4*y*ain . in lull lore* just in time to meet the if (haste who cannot avail themselves of the electricity supply In the near f 11 lure. These machines are for operation nn Iiernvne oil. natural pal or electricity, nnd ate IMassMfl in T j cuh. ft. and 7 cub. ft. models. YOt Its SOW cost of Old Ago late UiuVad'steeas'sriMtor'a^iton ^J^^* 1 ? * "** ? • H y V *"*„^T birda" 'The" researehers. further'''Ki'imi.t. .lealer who 1 D.C Chairman. Britain or anyone else anything tion rate of 52.6% (or 30.6%) la all in the atomic llelu. %  hey are working away diligentli to get a change. raised to 54% (or 52%) for 1952. France Can Still I {t-laiii Influence In Tunisia A wide range of companies, however, will benefit from the commodity tax reductions, with £ r aE^X! oV-lV"*^ %  Mona. Jamaica. Dr. Parry a* automobiles, the smaller elerH „^„„ Kl F „„ rtMfc ,„ ^,, „.„, t r 1 c a I household appliances. radios and phonographs, luggage. The list ftf Fellowship appointments now made follows: Dr. John Horace Parry. Professor of Modern History. Uni%  ralty College of the West inSolonum 9 8 Copper yfiniH Discovered brmatton leading to the con-1 vtetKMi of .1 blavk initrkeleer •eaold ba fttin the total stock of *ugar held b> the black marketeer. Now trade und< has practically .li*ippe.ired ::ceording Io the inspectors. 15%, the 15% rate on stoves, washing machines and rcfrlgerauiHivrTn a.i 01 b,ors rt !" >ved. the 30% rate on "" '";"„r r i 0n ^ 1 rOU Id 2H eXP l 3 " l on ne standard package cute skillful political withdrawal of M a „ vnt cXivv Aprll 9 10S2 from Tunisia which would leave virtually intact her economic 111terestK there and the revenue she trow IfMfffl As is usual when such taxes Some Otticials however, fear are changed, goods on which the that the time for graceful exit has old tax rates have been paid passed and Franco eventually may will be a problem for a time. Ex— %  %  lose most of her vested interest else and Sales taxes are paid continue. In the United Slates his J' 0 8 !" "J"r gJSjL Ji^, tlH, .rea. Me.nwhUe. t nuch_ 0 f u ._hen ,he product leaves th. plant E J £ZJ^.3£* ^ ^.^^1^"*^^ had found eontiimtna'in' bird to human negllgibl > lecnsional infections ca-ll> .nod with ar'iblotics. To Time To Eat Out NEW YORK—The Wt* IPBrl restaurant business 1* in the doldrums reflect .g l trend which %  n" i" he nationwide One familiar hang-out after th-> other is closing it %  doors. A varle B Qf naaofia Is being blamed EOi this )arrlng note In the ovcral" theme of economic prosperity an. Crrn r SmiUi fabuTh 0 influence of television which JJJ* 1 ,. s 1 h u M ^" u iJ'J d keeps the family at home, tincyrieswM b sen marked shift from city to suburjm r ^" l,k "'"J*_ i_ : •* ban living and at last not least arsrisrss: ss-£v or n "" 1 1 j o^k—*^ J present-do > during his Fellowship, will make itud.v of the history of municipal jssasr.cranss airs e*^ "1 * ~* *** >% SEA PORT E.LAT. A P from the conquest to IndepenTraces of King Sol dence. He is the author of "The k>us copper mines we Spanish Theory of Empire in Mi is week on the Israel side of the the Sixteenth Century,' 1 1940; Israel-Jordon border by 60-vea: 'The Audenlca of Mew Oallcia in old Siberian-born htiu\. the Sixteenth Century,'* 1948— in 'Hashish Valley.' 20 mim both published by the Cambridge the desolate Red Sen hamlet of S-Sr.h l-ii-Tw,;?-^ ?\ i !" .I University Pres5 ; and of Europe Eilst h n ** p !" }* bua ^ h ****** and a Wldsr World." London, He is Ml.-hael MuUer whose, !" ^ '" !" J lm J!i ""1 IB4. great-grandfather prospected in %  Wared 'he main factors the Urals with the famous British ** ,hp author of "The Black Canb "explanation" by Secretory of dealers or retailers will have paid of British Honduras," published SUte Dean Acheson and others the higher rate. Accordingly it In New York, 1952, Mr Taylor by Government's refu-al to vote will depend upon the relative proposes to try to unravel the t place the Tunisian French dlsbargaining position of the menuAfrican and native American cleput* before the United Nations. facturer and his distributor as to mentii In the language and culture huriu||H ~ m Labour Orffanl*ition.s, Congressw ho will bear the loss or whether of the Black Carib group, men and Newspaperstill contend it should be divided. If the pro,, ,,. -. _. -. that United States threw overducts have to be sold at a lower „ *"• 1 Ron ld !" ?'\, ff M a i bonrd iU traditional Anti-Colonial price, reflecting the new lower Entomoogist Imperial college of iH.luy by its action in the Securirates. Of coui-c. if the products Troplvid Agriculture bt Augusty Council. This analysis by highly can be sold at the old prices, there. unc Trinidad. Mr. Fennah plans placed United Suites officials may will be no problem. However, cifftaxonoinic stuuies of the entoreveal in part at lesst why Achearelte prices appear to have been mology of the Lesser Antilles. He son decided that the French should cut immediately on the opening the auUior of numerous Bcienhave the opportunity to try to satof business on Wednesday and tine papers on entomology and fcsfy thair Tunisian Nationalist dealers m household goods took cropy agronomy aspirations before the Security cccasion to give wide publicity COUHl] intervenaa. to the immediate cut applicable It is believed that most Frenchto their stocks on hand to give lhey ai .-TT.P. hills of southern "Israel the leeent announcement of a • thickly forested with oak newly discovered miiackdiut; ,.^ trees and high-grade copper wa axpacUsd to conquer the diseaucxtracu>d by smelling aquamarine In the not too far distant future. rock in charcoal furnace*. was dampened by a charus ei ,] Muller, tanned miduigany by Ihe cautioning voices from nn-du.ii FW hunks of circles. .' fossilised charcoal to show mo The pocmature aiiuounoameiil "" v ^treaks of metallic copper glinting of the drug came as patients told fit brightly blue as the noon day friend, and relatives about truly '^ miraculous response to the treat*_ -?".w n "_J 1 ^K ,r at wl,n Nydraaid and leaked 3M into the press before medical authorities were willing to endorse ihe disclosure. Then warning Prospecting started m the arei voices were drowned MI the inJ•t year ago, and In February of Hal clamour of Joy. 1^ BSHMsr] this year a thick vein astimatad to tulierculosis specialists in a concontain 100,000 tons of pure ore ference at the New York Acsdwere struck Already, the slopes emy of Medicine reiterated their of the pink, wind-eroded crags. In warnings ugainst over optimism whose bowels copper Felfound, are piled high with vividlyhealing effect of the drug evlnovel coloured rocks extracted with denced in some 200 desperately mean 1rs.rt sun. King Solo. all this wealth, and the beginning where h t tap Israelis left off. Air Traffic >"M H. B W I A TtSIDAV TrlnlSae. r.tloi. I. Ouliam. A Uuliim H ... %  M Webb, g Hmrh, C PeUrkl^ ,. C M..i.to r Monrw PI. % %  lUmjUaun. K I'-ii V M-.,TI. %  1 EMSSI Tl S-llW S4. 1 %  1V > nilri Vtnr iii-uia ltll.> IV.II I.. J"-r, M -h.iii Andraw h< mlm> Ilrt.l — .1 Their %  sk^w. Ii, Trlmlnfham. Hon Th*o Starry 1 M..J.I lUrit. DuciOwn. n, NV_,.II it rSssreV. MUM lU.nald D-hr.1.1-nMi n Jolir. Dbit.. 1 %  BS AnV. RODNEY' DUE FRIDAY The It.M.S. Lastj Kedfiey is CXI'TUU to arrive at Barbados %  > n >*rid*y morning from British Mr Edjur Mi, llu ,^,. n.Uvc X&tl&X77Z\Z Kr' ^ ^^ Y.ik "Ac^i';--Jfe^" 1 '>'""" %  %  I llnu>h (.uuina. now Milor ot „„ Mnirtl Already, ihe lop >v ol Medicine mlrrated thlr Sh. Ldr Rdw> wlU be mrn .inewcly Win. • olllen.onl „..,., '. !v* Su L.ndS M^Mmhnof,"'',' "'..2Z "j"""•-"•>"• %  • '" rnln, liMnjI am OgUnfcn l „ M „ ~ ur „. tm ud,. aid will, ino Tunllnns, bul Ihoy want IMlrf to Lm* Group of Pubt "" n '".-' ,," ,:" !", I*" 1 ? bowp J !" ppor ""* b "" ",l wamrd rmphatlrally thai tha S3SS aUgo tor Canada. Sh. to br crtaln llr.t. |t how much lie Utilities: Some Slill ?„il v 1 u :" v „ p ''"^" d ^ "£ '"V nd %  ""T 1 h n wUh Y*"fc l "' nl "" rt of 9? '"" TO" % %  '" <* "-"•" "'" "" rxU "' rroun.ltlia• nr,. rronomirally aba. lUinpered • STJEl'iiiu. w~? SSi.i ZZ1 l^S" !" 1 rock, exlreelea with d-need ... nc 200 dcper.lely n ehl ,„, c IulU vlu the Brillah **n.mpereo on „,, grHish Wsl Indian acme | IIUr more than a hammer and III icst ca.ee does by no meanNorthern Hindi. She I. eonThe dimcultlo!. under whicH "e el Ihe author ot Ulnae novcU rh.sel l,y tgnneUdluIni etiflneers. -,„ |„„ c the necessity ol luni aimml to Mini Oardiner Auiuubllc utility companies distrlbu'Corentync Thunderpublished And top-level Government oltlclal. ,„„„, ,„ „.p,| r dama>ra ali„, & Co., Ud. '• -re considermc hois-best to exi.l.ilt r ... lf | y .u,.,,. M<. U.S. — Spanish Talks Proceed Smoothly ,0. M a_a* _•_ \ 1"" ~r • % %  w. -' %  tfW^ ^ asass^ *aassr *r^^ *.. s .^ Ol lUll Thunder" puollshed And top-level Government officials u rgery to repair damage-: al\ ig or generating electricity, gas jn L ? n don ;. I94 '> *'A Morning ;t :.re considering how best to exploit roa(ly ( | onr Mnreovei. Ihajl .team are operating, forced '.^.O?]",„ ^! ,h ,J n .j£?**; *?** .jM l h asl JgM-'i wdden WMrmrdi i h „ ultimate effeet of the as they are to raise largo amounts '?*<>. "d ' few York under th of capital to finance expansion of title "A_ Morning u poverty-stricken new source of wealth "Crvlcec. and allowed to earn only a modest return on their capital because of public control of rates, is recognized by the Government in the form of a terms, deduction from the tax otherwise Cairo payable of an amount sufTicien' Blanco. Interim Foreign Minister ln rc duce to 43% (from 30*1 the and Under-Secrclary of the PresiUx payable under the Income Tax rieney is setting the pace lor these AcI 0n tha parl 0 a corporanegotiatlons on the Spanish side ,,„„.„ Uxab i e income that is de.-.nd that he is well situated to do rlved from such aistrtbution or so because he to lhp „P" n 1 !" generation. This relief will apply ——ntatlve of Generalissimo • :md Shadows Move a> from page I available on satisfactory They said that Luis Vaccine To Stop Rabies NEW YORK. Feb.—(XNS) Ftstina" Gots To Cuba drug can be measured only after Thr lw „ Texsns James PMrloi The world market price is tre-it-nenl has been stopped alUld Joseph IHIlich who srrlved rround £400 a ton. but the together and last not lensl test^ ., t Hurbados nn January 17. after Israelis must overcome Immense mu*n be conducted for a long 26-day Atlantic crossing In transport, housing and feeding ''me to come before the battle b their S3-foot yacht F a atia a lef. %  urhrultie-* before they can sell del.-ilu-ly decided. Aruba last month for Cuba tnelr copper. And there must be E R Squibb St Sons, r-m.miThey are on (heir way fix peace be t ween Israel and the faetoreri of the new anti-tuberCopenhagen to Texin. where they Arabs before Israel vessel* osn avlnr drug, deeply worried sbout intend to sell Faallna and settle •jfely pass'hrough the less-than*a the premature announcement si down From Cuba they ile-wkle World .MrUiofo" *22L 'IT, n^ U n??(Kt'w!?dliJSd m n,l "llilar,' Ko.^wjkl, w,tn in, Preaidrnt. Dr. Andrew .oarchcr. ,n Uie nald of Thorn. (l n hv officials of thd dltei.se. Th, new vaccine is pro(erencev durlnj dueed from Uve virus which has French Government. Air travellers ..... islt to been modified by growth In chick During the post week. Hauteseat Bristol Ilr.lt lounced embryos. It is completely modi'locque carried out a light ached-hcn It goes into service m 19M recently by Mr. & F. H. de hed and does not contain mamnle of discussion* wtlh top-level wl n breathe air heated, cooled. Vriendt Secretary General. malisn brain or spinal eortf tissue 'loveslaasant onVlals to nnd a moistened or dr.i^i. at they or. Answer Awatle The virus strain used In the way of ending the louchy Turn.tvr To mah9 ^i* possible, th. it has been learned that U.S. The tentative agenda for the production ot the new vaceln, Ian situation plane is to have the latest piec. economic and military teams neconference Includes a review of WM flmi isolated by Dr. Harald .... -,f attnosuheie Kiuu.mctu for m ;oliatln for Spanish bsses have ,(,, 1951 Hurricane season and N JonnIM „f the Rockefeller ?•';"• '••'" Huteclocoiie 'fJiSedlablns completed proposals to renresenta0 f progress m.d. In Imptementlng rou „d,uon from the brain of a '*'' n 'p' "fj" l"t m """* •'•* U „ hum.difylng unit, bein, live, of the Spanish Government r^ommend.tlon. of the IM1 nild nsmcl Flur, who died of ' '."nch Premier Ant..ine ^^* ,„/ G "„„„ E1 „. nnd are awaltinn a re>y Hurricane Subcommlsskm. Varlrabto Dr JWmK „ maintained •J"*)' M.nlsle, of Forelan Aflsir. V | ~"^ maker, of Can George Train head of Ihe econo,: proposal, to Improve *. pM ,., c 0 lh v , hIou ^ chick ^T-^.r B^^e^JJln£ neT,. C ^mbJrs. !" rtne Brute effectiveness of the hurrleatlg „ r ins Cos nd Koprowski then S"" 1 JOr War Plene D, Chevmke „„„ company which 1 P£5£l f^fr^nerv^T'"; ^S^ -*-..••* !" Bfi """ the new chick embryo vaccine has not been found to rauae paralysis or other signs of illnea. following vaccination although •nore than 12.000 vaccinations have been psrformed. team reportedly handed written draft of economic pro•>sais to J;iimc Arguellcs. Trade L'nder-Secretary of the Spanish Minislrv of Commerce last week. Proposals are believed to recommend project* which could be Caribbean will be considered >nd recommendations made for the 1032 hurricane season. S^&tSX&gSSZ CONTROL OF TANGIERS Their conversations d e a I t — Ctt*B? U —" *" U, 0n W 'he^^iC'^onuUiST | Circles close to the governhumidlstat a *"' ""=' I mint said they also discussed tha measures air moisture posatMe lifting of Martial Law When humidity falls to !5 per, and other restrict,om but underfr" n t 'he humldlirt..t iiumBriMajor General Klaaner. Chief of MAD otn Aor.l !S partormed. ^^ ^ lmport r „„ deeldons rally switches on the electric I "''' f'.U" v2nil"nreooaaU to The Spanuh^Foreign Office Ledeele ress-rchers predict that l^een However they believed !*. l-r .nd water I. fed Into the ,,mplcci verbal P'** J confirmed that SMln sent the veterinarians srlU be aMe to hnthat the Rcident General w.ll cabla atmospher, as steam. A.I flenejal Juar,V gon Chief of the conlmed !" W'",^'g t !" miul ,„ dof by a .Ingle v.cclnaurge Tt.nl.ian Premier Sal.h am a. humidity rl to morel S "-rrnc'rmov,wr"beu D .othe BrSlnandmneio; thSSitroi lion. If do. ywnm fully co-opWin, Baeeouche to spjM -leethar, per ,ent. ,h, hum.dlst.. | strirfarS A I'S official sstd of Tangier.. The contents of the crate ,th th, vaccination proturn of his seven Tunisian memantomalirallr turns the unit oft foimal Mks would nol begin until note ar, not immediately known, grammes ... organiieo by public ber. to.lt o„ th. Commission In agafo. ih, ret -ii of Spun.ih Foreign but it i. believed that the second h~lth officials and veterinarians, an attempt to have the CommieMost present-day aircraft havatSHfaaZ, Alhertn Martin Artalo on note cleared up vague points In rabies can be effectively con'ion operating before the Moslem h.-atlng snd cooling ^iu.pm,n' Am I M from !" tour of the in, r.r.1 note of April 17 trolled snd eventually virtually festival of Ramadan en May 26 nr Brlltanla will be the first to Middle East —IV*.) eliminate* 1 —Cr. reguUle humidity as well | tioi:it> EQUIPMENT I in In Jin v . TRACK, HALF-TRACK and WHEEL TRACTORS PLOUGHS CANE CARTS BAGASSE SPREADERS (ideal also lor applying Filter-press Mud, Ashes and |jen Manure) FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS MANURE LOADERS GRASS MOWERS (Trailor 4 P.T.O Type") GRASS RAKES GRASS LOADERS SIDE DELIVERY RAKES(or windrowInK Cane Trash and a host ol other useful attachments AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS III Hi llll ON-TIIK-SPOT PRIORITY SERVICING. AND OUS . SPECIAL MOBILE SQUAD UNDER THE PERSONAL SUPERVISION OF MB. G. D. CLARKE IS PART OF THE AFTER-SALES SERVICE WHICH IS ESSENTIAL. \ ..nr Enquiries are Cordially Invited COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM LIMITED Dial 4S16 White Park Road



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TAGE BIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THIBSDAY APBIL 14. 1H Police Bea! Rovers 2—1 In K.O. Mai. I, I'tlR-e .(cored a i*ii.> ag OtlHl ovu WBN Uiey won by two goa's to otto ana KJiocKrrt uu R 1 In. KM t(h | niton wmch began .it K jcsierday. inpolice —am tBtsrsf*] Tgy.or scored both goats in the Am hall, on* about cignt minute* Bftgf me star! of play and ihe otner few minutes b< time. Rovers centre forwsro Basil Lewis, scored the go-, loi his team about two minute* before close oi play. It was M aomewhat dull time*, especially m Ut* beginning but the last fifteen minute* *'*. very fast a* the Rovers itud to M) ground uncl PoUo never slackened." The Roverback line wi< weak, but per hap' their most outstanduiu i •.winger, D. For Police the backs O. Marshal and K Thompson and thr rlfhl half M. Frankly ti played art*] Police bad the touch off. Th: game began in an awkwai... %  low manner, and s.ra.ghiaw..v tlw scanty crowd asset that this was not quite v. football they hnd been seeing ..' Kensington dJUTtlU lb) IHvision games. For thr (Irs) rive minutes neither team scented lo hve the edge on the other and |l was more u kicking affair th.n. skilful football with good pacing either way. But as the gam-progressed, it became evident that Police wan thr mol log. About eight flftlautsa | began. Police's centre forward t IJi if took advantage uf iBl I'LHwick-Ksvcrs backs lieint; aomewhat out ut position Uii ball into the nets and put tin •core one up for Police This was toe signal toff %  sMB tr struggle and the Rovers started some pressing on UK but it just nappeiii' "Mongrel" Haynes. the Post, custodian who was showing good Judgment Rovers kept up this alli.ck. tight up to half time, but frequently failed to make trio most Of their opportunities Then, •bout two minutes before half time, the Police forward got away With the ball when Marshall In the back line cleared their goal aren nnd he tinI Swooped upon the bill i' wide ol the got* I ke*pl The second half began far, ami It was noticeable that Were pay INK more ittl combining, but the way Polio* held their ground. Bsftdi that this Improved playing w bit too late. At any rate spectators were being better football TIUM'IIY SPORTS QUIZ Toe Barbados Advocate will %  ward a book on sport to tha %  rat ae f a wbo -,onds the see rest answer* to the fotltwlag i ie-'iotiCTUCKET 1. When British Onlana won tho Triangular Inter rolonlal Cricket tournament in 1B86 ono British OolaneM bowler took the last four Trinidad .Ticketla) Us IrN Inrung* for an satremely SSBBJI %  I oto Who was he. how ainr wickets did he take and for how many run* •cored'* FOOTBALL 2. A player throws the ball from the touthllno to the era— bar and It bounces off tho goal keeper Into the net*. Would yon give a goal* WATER POLO 3. Who IM captain of tho Trinidad "Discovery' Water Polo team which visited Barbados In 1MB, and was this the first tournament between these two colonies 1 HWIMMINO 4. lit what fart of the world did the enwl swlasamUi stroke originate* TABU TSBTKia ft. What la the lift stroke u a gaaae of Table Tennis" ROBBB KAC1MO 6. Who is responsible for tho weight carried by a horse in .i weight for Ago event? NOTE: All entries for "Sports Qnls" shoaid be ad dressed "SportQnls". c/0 Advocate Sports Editor, and mast reach this offlce by 12 noon on Saturday. April 20. The correct answer* and the HID" of the winner will be jiubh.hed in the Sunday Advo cste of April 27. Each entry must be sceosapsnled by A COUPON as Bet out below. SPORTS QUIT. Msate WIUT DO W>. A NOW OF SPOKT* "liulUbtriulisuIion" Twenty Questions On vi TI Prew aub A Variety Of Subjects jasji BY AU HOI \MK %  *hgj up by Roger Banniatar the previous y*ai Football League Ohampion.hip last season THE TORNADO CUP. pre tented by Brandian-Hendor ton Ltd., Paint Manufacturers of Canada, through their local Agents Messrs. T. Oeddes Ctrsnt. to tho Royal Barbados Yacht Cliid Mr. A. B. Toppln. Managing Director of the Arm. recently handed over the Cup to the Club. This i. the Brut time that the Tornados* are racing in the R.B Y C Regattas. Vamoose, ikippered by Tony Hoad. is nt present in the lead. Changed Handicap Times For 9th Regatta u tha name af the who rode the 1B52 i National winner? (2) Who stroked the Oxford crew to victory over Cambridge bast month 1 '-'(i Who won the 100 metres sprint at the1948 Olympic Gamaa? (l) Which was the last Football Leagua club to win the F.A Cup In successive seasons (SI Who fas the British Empire Heavyweight boxingchampion? ii) And from whom did he take tho tme? (7) Who captained the MCC team on their recent tour of India, Pakistan and Ceylon" And for which Engli-h county doea he play' %  HI Who is the Open Roll Champion? % %  •' Who won the 1B5I WisoMcdun Men'* singles champiooahipT riores m th,tlrsi Guatemalan i loi With which sport U the # ver lo win this Intemutkma! Thomas Cup nsJOciatad And Sport' event Flares an Indian. L Waicutt MCP. yealed oft a dissuasion on nduatnalisatlon In the Wast lnmernbers and friends of the Barbados Press Club. Mr. V. T. McCosnie was in the chair, ti ri,.^ !" t ft....— %  — During his discourse Mr. Walcott nJVnert^E .h, i^u V ,K ,old * "• *"** Industrial pian. S.-^SI. ^£?'^1 I " W** 1 l u "" cltasl th* rrr.? JTtV^'tJsif <***" •* rtB T l t K ln K F r to aHao as a pattern which the wed Indies would do well to adopt. io, r n iK.„ — -__„ h Mr Walcott also said that in the '•' TZZ^^^ !"!" British Cu.ibooan the Jamaicans ere the moat rndiistnally mind1. Also Uklng part in the dle(20> Th* 9-aythling Cup la the cuaaion war* Mea*n> 1. M. Hewitt, premier Men's team event ir, w Rudder. F. L Coiler. A. Yeartable tennis Holders are wood. R. Manp and O. S. Ctppin. Hungary. Winner Honoured GUATX/IALA. Apr,I SB, Guatemala Is planning the bigc*t celebration aver for the return of Doroteo Flores. winner of last Saturday's Boston MaraS100-leOdc Scablrd. Olive Blossom and VBB tnunted by other IntermedUie Thorndyke e<>ntinue to tart toi kippers, threatened to start with gether. They give Rainbow two the scratch boats if the handicapninutev pern did not change his time. He Also starting together are Imp, %  •in afOtlld it.iinbird and BlnbBd, They eon%  I ui with the scratch boats and linue to receive |BnM mmu.t win. The handicappeni have, howfrom Hurricane. # ver -topped Bob from going from one extreme to the other and In Howwver. Hurricane is in* n his present position he has q chance w rs e position. Formerly *he to -how "the boys" th;.t he Is as art*d with the C bo.ts. Now sh. Kood :i helmaman as they are. "•f 1 -' 1 *j' h Mttchief. nnd Otps> A few changes have been made '"*>ws closely behind. Apart frm in the B Class. Fantasy, which has *lching out to avoid being barkheen sailing extremely well, has v "nded. Hurricane will have to been brought back to start with kc *fc **• %  ' accident* %  Rascal and !" The KineM I'lilter lion, the Rovers gonlkecpei railed upon to make a good sav< when left half Cndog.m sant LB krw, powerful shot, at lostai IB ALKt' HERD did 111 liole.v in foal managed to push ths ball one ind JAMK.S HRAIII had It outside and nothing wanamed TlinbtaSI OpBB from the comer kick as th. leit BBMstf ctiTTON has bad onb winger. Banilcld did not kick gavan, and BOBBV MMHIl'S Bard enough to get the hill in poluimber is said to be two. Sit ion for scoring. Australian NOBMAN VON NIUA ranks BOBBY LOCKF. as the world's finest putter Yd hi iiiiirni Open ihiimpion I > 41 putts m |hs iin.il round of th* Master. 1 opaa tfiurnamcnt nt Augir Suead. i %  %  V I %  (i i. Mil nil wire "I look 10 putts. I'nl,,.' area, but At one hole 1 had I charted %  I %  n sod, At tinaaigla :* (nun thr,. BMM vat 1 MOB I A abort while later. Shannon OB the right wing for police wa> parsed the ball while I lieforwards ran Into position. The Spectators began yelling expectantly, but Shannon after nril. bling while wit* kicked n outside. The last fifteen raifl very fa-^l and plav trated Hnvncs last BtlBuw, riowevsr. Rovst .. i. n four ban w. on Ihsj e/roaa able t %  Tlii' tr„ms waffff Pol lor II H i>O. MSI %  SJMIL K Thompson. M. Frankljn. V Layne, C. Griflllh, I Mar, field. R Cadogan. K Tsyloi B. BlMiman and (i. Shannon. Piekwlrk-Roven: M. Foster. B. Robinson. W Greoiudue J Oreenldge. D, <"." %  nidge, 8. Ci d l.-u i ter. L. Foster. Basil Lewis, run ny Lewis, R. Eckstein and V kclly. side of tha hole it )u>< Impossflbli t.. helg it So it is not surprising that Sncad'"' aggregate 2H tor U tiolal i., %  i 'i i rnn ments. A very fit Von Nlda plan* another full SBBIOB here, nulud 0|BBB hampiopshl'i a' Anne'' MT. Of The Clinic Flirt, Moyra Blau. lEiicrly. Fantasy received a minute from these boats. Hi Ho now receive* two rnlnutss from Fantasy and the others. Formerly she only got a minute from Fantasy. Ra.iger still r eeives a minute from Hi Ho There have been no changes in the C Class. Miss Behave, Madne*. ..ml Foil] continue to receive two minutes from Magwln which gets %  minute from Scamp. Rogue and (Jtnnet give Scamp a minute. In the Intermediate Class, sfohssrk, which formerly started With Invader and Keen, now gives inem three mlnu'.ea. Mohawk also Kives Dawn and Dauntlesa two v.hflc before she received n niinula from them. Skippv continues to receive u minute from Invader and Keen Clytie and Mohawk, which are no* starting together, receive two nuntnffs from Gnat and Coronetta, the scratch boats of the class. Icrardlng to the last times. Mohawk received live minutes from t'lytie. Gnat and Coronetta. This >t;ange has removed Clytie from %  ralch position. Only one change has been made m the D Class. Peter I'an formerly Four For World Youth Congress LONDON, April 23 Cmi ItiHisli Ihi.versiU slmirn: Itft iieriully for Argentina to reliesenl llrltnin at a Buenos Alre-, University and World Youlh Conureas. The students were selected iiom undergraduates speciallung in Spanish and Latin American subjects and will be guests of the ArSMtlM authorities for two weeks. I-ast night the students were entertained at the Argentine Embassy here by Minister i .iihi. Leguizamo, They are George Knnpp of London University, Keith Whinnon of Oxford, James Hill and William Hopper of Glasgow University. —D.F. Ninth Regatln hJch country at present hold the trophy? Ml) Th* following are cricket trophle* Currle Cup. Shaflleld Shield and Plunkett Shield. In which countnea are they played for? (IS) What was tha final --core in the recent TSSt series between AuatraUa nnd the West Indies? [IS) Who captained the Unti.h Ryder Cup team UI America lust year' <14> A seventeen year-Old apprentice kwkta c*ms into prorninenci? when he won ,m important race What was his name and whst was th* i-ace? MS) Can you name the only side that beat the Springboks in their recent tour of the United Kingdom and France? MO Who 1* the cruwer-welght boxing champion of the l w w? < l b ?" ,fi l fagl a < 17> Who to the Women* Tennis Chnmpion o( the United Stale-%  (18) A University athlete leventIv eatabushed a new record time for the mile in the Oxford and Cambridge sports. His name please? ( 19) Who are the Football League Champions? <1!0> What Is the Swaythlins Cup and which country are the present holder** lYSHttW IO SPONTS QVIZ only $27 .i month Ba S employee and supports a family of eight. — (<\P. handicap times for the as follow i SMS N* n "io tataa WiurO Ststt *• na i as IM ii i] D %  B 4 rtanerr Potor Pan SJ 11 2 SI Yetlo IS Sort n i) Balnboo l St Yonn ai B • S t n a B • rasdaaj nirt BB" ta Oh.pi i St Bed Sports Window SPARTAN meet Everton this afternoon In a return First Division fixture. Spartan with Empire are second In the First Division Cup line-up with 12 points to Notre Dame's 14, the leaders hi this compeUUon. Spartan wlU no doubt go all out this afternoon to score a passible 14 points in-case there ii the proverbial .Sip twixt the cup and the lip as far as Notre Dame is concerned, WEATHER REPORT yinoDAY U.kU.II fr.radrlaiun %  T.UI ln(Ul far Hoalk lo d.U : l.tt In. Iltxhnt T.a,pr.turr : M.S Jt.5F. Low-rat Taaaparalarr r. Win* Vrloolly t mil-s iirr kaar air.aiili. )* a.a, I tt.HI: (• ami TO-HAY StinrK. : i.U an. Sanaal: 6.15 ,a. MOOD : Ij.l Qnartrr. Apl 17 l.llhUnc : 8.10 p m Hlh TM. : 3.95 ..m. (H Law TW. 9.19 p m t.K NOTICE Foundation Old Boys are raminded that their monthly meeting takes place tomorrow night. FRIDAY 25th at 8 p m. Mr. J. C. Tudor III be the guest Speak* ERNIE'S in Mi" I:\IK (LIB There will be a Special Meeting Te mo rrow RveeUng at 6.M a'rloeh -harp o discuss the piol.kn. ^i the last day's racing at UNION PARK J. : Why do Luxury and Tourist Liners call here 1 light A. : Simply so that Chief Stewards can to-.k larders with Goddaid'j Home made ('ambrid£c. i Sausag<,tt mada from pigs bred and fed on their own farm. Only legs are used. I shall havt all thi luxuries to-morrow I ss well as Special Lobster Cocktail'* supplied by Squadron leader A. C. Snow of EdeWater Hotel Fame Special! Peche Melba From Home Grown Pciiche-. in tins) AND WHY NOT TO-D AY'S NEWS FLASH PENCILS for Marking Llnin PENCILS ror Marking Glass. A I lillu CARD PLATES In 1 Stsea AUTOGRAPH ALBUBIS PHOTO ALBUMS Heavy Gautge BICYCLES for Motor Units All at S JOHNSON'S STATIONERS SBsl HARDWARE Ii.' ..1 %  winner. o 1 1.1 SMblrtl OllVf BloatolO v.i. BJsSBsdsib its Vrl l n T Imp Stoij-bii* stasai i as RrS n D B 1 s 14 1 Olpoy 1.41 S 4J i a 1 44 Yollow Bed Yastsw t 1 1 II A Tn. ardor Kern Sod 1 D.UI.U— Dswn t.4S 1 44 Vrllo* K Tanwaoes M 1 1 c i i i BM .,-. Clynr MU. Behavp Madiou PeUy ier 1 4S iMaaw 1 Onal i muavriti ) 4 I 11 *. c ii Mu-ln Bog c a rteaunp YcUew B. lOlh Rf|.il < May. i \UY 11) Arthur Thompwn. rode the 104B Sheila* Cotuge. <2> Chriatophar Davidgc his third boat race. 13) Harrlaon Dillord. U.8JL Second was his countryman, Barney Ewell. < 11 lll.ickburn Rov aad 1881. (S) Johnny Williams of Rushy. nil Jock Gardner of Market Hurt*, rough. (7) Nigel Howard. laancashlre. (8) Max fsuakner. (9> Dick Savltt (OS.A.) (10) Badminton. Malaya aie IM pi-essrnt holders. (ll Currle Cup. South Africa, Shefnel.i Shield, Australia Plunkett Shield, New Zealand. (U) AuatraUa beat the Weal Indija by f(-ur matches to one. (.J) Arthur Uc*y was the nonplaying captnin of theBritish Ryder Cup B (14) Dominic Forte rode PJaSngs, winner of the Iincolnslure Hsndicap. _. US) London Counties beat the Springboks at Twickenham on November 10th. (16) Joey Maxim of America. (17) Maureen Connolly. M0mj& WE HAVE RECEIVED PLANTER'S $10.77 — A SHIPMETH" OF LARGE I Mil II III AS m\ AT .ME! HiirlKlflirl.-;ili-i" KINGSTON. April 23 Trinidad clinched their |fl 0VCI Barbados llnally tO-daj when th. I %  %  I mh LSgSJI bc.iting TrimmiiiKhar i. l r. bentine Taylor 7—8 •>—4. 1—5 Truiid-d R14WU Jsn in i % %  Frid i in the finals. IIAl RIJ-.S srill bs I %  I the gulf clinics hull will be h. U .\ iK'iiitis in the profi %  urnament. He makea commentary as ronipatiti and Ihe g.il!fr> .ire givrn aoanc useful tips. Clinics are a feature of I'SA PATTV BERG, l.vcl i iimorous. let) (hfj Amerlrai OIBSB professionals In otM l HI Ths lesa n ti %  rre aniun this summei —irs. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court af Grand Sessions — 10 mi a.m. Meeting of 81 Philip Ve*lr> —11.OS a-m Mrellm of St Michael Vesley — 3.M a,m. Mr. %  !,,,, ur ChrUt I hurrh Vestry — 2 0 p.m. Faatball at Kensington — —3.SB p.m Police Band at Reed's Reach St James — 1A& p.sn. —•*• By Jimmy Hatlo | %  %  ( f f m,t VC 6 AUMAYB CN TNC Lt^Kl~\ our POR pRErry G>ra_s rs' HIS \A &j$*e£S"-8irr any TME HOMEUY/ZI WATC^'<^ IfciE COT.N\ t-nlorcement doflniteU a "G" i Mr. 4 Mrs. Barbadua ? The Banker. of Sparhllne Qslffs Beer .p.m • a SaBsaasWiSn far quick think in; BsBtBB*sssgSt. BSBBfSI %  — Tea Ju>l .h-. -ft tbolr nn .1.-1.i.it. Mr. Carlb mil rhillonio him persanallr siilh Hi. t,..r.i. — "(iinsmr a Carlb. Mr OSsrBS." If SSBntt the Brsl deteetlro In be rlcht fni'if earned Tonrsolf UM ui. me dolljr>. and >hnaM *eu -.i.i. %  •oltlo ii S*ve you BSI car. house, or telephone number—well it would be rather silly of us—wouldn't il? sometimes out of pocket though he doesn't believe in high U 1 '-'s about 5 ft 7 in. get It" sovi'ii inches. DID YOU BUY SOMETHING FROM HIM



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Till RSI.AV APRIL 24. I52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Labourer Guilty Of Shopbreaking Gets '18-Month Term IMII SIM %IIO\ His Lordship the Acting Puisne Judge. Mr. G. L. Taylor at the Coi|-t of Grand Sessions yesterday sentenced Thcphilus Clarke a labourer of Belle Gully. St. Michael, tu 18 months' imprisonment with hard labour after an Assize jury found him guilty of breaking into the shop nf Hislop Blenman of TwWiiifcU Road, St. Michael, with intent to steal on June 15,1951. %  Clarke appeared before lhe court en a two count indictment. On the first count—on which he was found guilty—he was charged with breaking into the shop of Hislop Blenman on June 15. 1951. and on the second count charged him Uriah being found in a buildin* \kith Intent to commit a felony. Emerson Howard—keeper of the criminal records—said that the a-'uicd was sentenced to six months' Imprisonment with hard Mary Reece Introduced To The Bar Miss Mary Audrey Rcece. IX. P.. i-n introduced to the local bar labour In 1948 for b.l-aklng into a yestctdiv morning before the store. business of the Court of Grand Mr. T. E Field, Assistant to the Sessions was started. The Judges Attorney General prosecuted for of the Assistant Court of Appeal the Crown. This was the retrial and Petty Debt Court. Police Magf Clarke as on the first trial a iatrales, and many b>rrlsters-atJury failed to agree whether he i BW Wltn esscd the introduction, was auiPy or not of the two Miss Reece was introdueed to the counts. Clarke was not representCourl bv Ihe H onble Mr. C. Wyllc. ed by counsel. Attorney General. In inlroduclng r* n . V ... T ll,..K.r-a MlM Reece, the Attorney General Blrnman told the court thai her !" m ."" n M v iV.Xt'. husband ha. a business at Tweed"" ^ !" '„", 'A^„, aide Road. SI Michael. On June <""""£ m H , L >r ,' l 1 ,lp l ? UT 15 she closed the shop and went "£, < %  > J !" "* " *£*** %  home. She left no one in the .hop. %  *• > " daughter or On reaehins home she handed the the j->' lc ''2. r a '" er '' ?" d JJ? key. of the shop to her hu.band so jand daughter of the late Mr. that he could set into the shop H W. Reece. K.l. who was BBK Soon after he left she heard thai Solicitor General In Barbados a man was found In the shop Miss Reece was born on Septemwhich Is about 100 vards from the bcr 22, 1928. in Barbados and la house. .the first Barbadian woman lo N> She went to the shop and saw called to the bnr of England and the accused held by her husband be seeking permission lo practise and another man. A door of the In Barbados, shop was tampered with but there BENJAMIN VARDE who has Just passed out ss a journeyman ship (aipentar receives a bur.iuy car tlllcats Ironi the Coloulal Engineer. Mr. T. E. Went. He w.: olio of JO llbe others standing ID the pic turs) who have finished a successful arc years' training si dinereut trades, and wbo were all given cartlDcates. Special mention was mads of Yarde's app.icsllon and ability. SUGAR WILL STAY20 Get Bursary Certificates • fraaa g*ag* 1 they owed a duty to the comrau• %  .> >>.iich hail alluwvri them money for training over and above what the ordinary boy got. It waa really their birthday, he Hid Hf i^lisod the (lvs> years of hard grind they had put l n and he was very pleased that a vorv high iK-rvoniage of rhem h.id been st„-rerful and the failures were in ihc minority. Hit what 1 want to impress upon you.** he said, "is that you uie only now on .'.kmcii and knowing how to deal ajitli thdr fellow workmen and their employers. In other 0 l. i hey had to bo honest to • i n .-iv.-. He aincvrely hoped In the years "huh lolUrwed they would be able ti> truly say that they were p.eastN they had had the five years training lion, -i Day's Work From Pug* I was nothing missing In the shop Drinks and cakes ware in the shop. The accused was taken to the Police Station Hislop Blenman. husband of Violet Blenman said that on June 15 about midnight he was home when his wife gave him the keys of the shop at Tweedside. Hi arced 10 the shop with a torch and while inspecting the hop he saw the accused stooping under the counter of the shop as If he was searching for something. He tidied out for help and several people came. He saw that the Ine Director of Education retailed I,, them that It was St %  fcngr's Day and of the messagr Mlss Reece was educated at year 1C52. It is proposed that the and possible with the funds avail' %  cnls \>< idr Wash Lrd Rowallan had given. The> Wucen'a College and Oxford whole question of the price of able. i L and 40ctntl mar*ltd Velhad to give happiness to othn. High School, England, and in sugar for local consumption shall During the course of his addreas. low and 60 cents for Specials, they and not be satisfied until the> 1950 she graduated from thu be reconsidered before next year, the Colonial Secretary paid a triwould be losing It was obvious had done an honest days work University of London with a The method of keeping down UM bute to the Clerk ot the Council ,ha J would take mure canes to Mr. Carter who next spoke t degree of Bachelor of L/iws. She price which It Is proposed to use wno managed a; short notice to make a tm 01 wash Grade than id,, pmuruf out apprentices lol. entered the Middle Temple m this year is thought to be the best get the Copy of uie Bill punted. U would to make a ton of Dark them that though they were some 1947 and was called lo the bar one which can be adopted at this Seconding the motion (or the rystals and as all the raclones wnat skilled workmen, they hat on November 27. 1951. and It is stage. Second Reading of the Bill. Hon. '"* %  "*' !**'> *ugars you u i wayi t o bear in mind that skit iiitcrcst.ng to know that her H A. Cuke said he thought ii ..%  t "oi a\**pc€. esssentlal In their work and it would m m from the day labour welfare as ifrnpo^ed on He explained tha the sugar ^"^£fjg& J"" and recalled th..l when the St. ot her birth that Miss Reece sugar lanufacturcd in 1952 which which Is manufact Island for export i back'door was open. The accused bruw"lii an tTunoaBhere of"the In "sold for oongsaTJ^tlon in thi tried to escape but he prevented !aw Island shall be paid to the Covhlm from doing so The accused Welcome nior-in-Executive Committee. was wearing a vest shirt at the ^. ld .j,.. Governor-.n-ExeviBive time He took the accused to the H|J i^j-u^.p me ChW justice Committee may use these moneys Belmont Police Station. S|f AJ|an Collymore Mld: Mlss ,S he thinks expedient for the ^^^__^__^^_ Reece, It is with pleasure that my purpose of stabilising the price of brother judge and I o this bench sugar sold for consumption In the IB V>" • !" 'l h!" l of rakwm also known in the sugar world • had conl,nuwl al1 l,,l : U '' 1 *? by '."V u trades. That sugar was exThU yew the p u 1 "' u ^ 1 h f J*' d f kne *'• m "' I to Canada and the United "'reascd %  *b0 had built a house wrthMU Kingdom and was refined and sold ,,,m " "ke 2..O0 per ton. and In thus pieked-up He therefore i sugar, and was not ""' normal rnurse of events the MUUoncd them lo ! %  always the same as ln this country in the l ll1 1 '"' followed ful with 'their employers' mastate There wen no sugar Thl> export price of sugar $7.00 t. 1 (rlUilllLK ENTRY th.a welcome. As most of M. x_-s.i_iaa*s-M-J a_i. ^ a ** ^^ ^ ^^ learned Attorney GenM.8Q per ton or 115 per ton. The al has stated, your grand father loc 1 consumption Is approxnnwhich was known in otin | as a jurist of renown in the ately 9,300 tons, and the amount Indian Islands as "Wash I bbean area and a brilliant adof the levy which will be used for Then there was Yi-n> % % % %  I .1 : jury court i An Ai i.. i | Bsaslon* yi-sieruay beioeitd Jessamy not gu.i.y oi uw lorciblc entry of a house occupieu vocate in the courts of Birbados. stabilising the price ot sugar sold^whlch was known In other plai by W.I lam K*^J I r v 5. Selteitor General for wham it tl proxlrruteiy SI40.000. lug auvwo_to .. i utii *' doubtless n proud moment. It ll &r|| bOU Colonies the C I */ i"i'L Lo 2; r\ T .1 lo, well known b all of us that the imposed on sugar for |>. i .: Oil S.JI^.LI sumpllon. and tin is now proposed t therefore ,.hrr levy Is not local Dump Trices Before ihi „ ..hleh it was sol,l .it v. i, 1 adopt i not net, soui at dump prices. %  in large proportion of tin |ieoi>Uwho hat nifu i i ^-'.*? %  %  n&XSSXSS, ESffiS* Iho'rcV^'uT^al.-'i.TsTiv^if •' i .a.I-TcJba-n p„V.a,„l i^ f ,. %  A aa !" "V 1 ",-" !" ', may be said by lineal descent that preferable In tanine Ihc while OIIIOIK tan i ind behalf of Jessamy while WM ,. |W VQU u „,„.,,„„,; ,„ d u, commu „iij. ,„ subsidise the sugir <"e workei, N UM indurtry reM. E. Bourne prosecuted for the -jj,..-.,' vn IP „nrlp t* a hiduc of which t. pim.nmrrt cciveil very low wjges am '.In Crown. The proswmion called o,. f. d n d ;'' !" ,; our unc ' i! lud c "' hlch COT,umcd ram to the employer, weie a. n. to hold four wllncsscs: then Mr. Ad ms "ihave listened with Interest to Cartful Sludv J;' b le. in some cases, am it ill UI'"' "' mr down As resubmltted lhat it wa. necessary h '" h „,'„." M ,* tl ^ nmcilT at D r, " ,ll; >*' iod """ "' ,: ;"' K %  V" %  p ^'"' !"Sft !" i'^r:="£Stsw ,h^e s ^s,x,w^c.nt EfcaMsg rthe Jury could not convlcl on the ,,,„„,, of vour blrth may ,„. „, sold for local consumption than evidence. B hort duration, but ... panterat, Hugh wnaim people and II was that with s ,.,„l.y Olttens. Ivan U.lln Ihc price of impair sssju ,ip b) „. „,,| K.-llmall cabliiM in..l..-i %  ,. k crbin Mason: Erne !" ,, .is being disbursed some ...... Mrt ,., r m ,--iui!uc CarlM.onnowi ,-!,:, wages. J l II NlehoU—MBIOf r did no 1 mean that tl sugar going up would "ot the coat of the "or !" of -' ( -'" x <" !" y" 'irtnWh. Samue i"*o"rm..n *-"". %  "'"}-''', S "e,', lh Elec „ .taurl ladVJttr Lovjll — Eleciclans. William J ,„t..,. Ii-vlmIIIIHIS. Arthur I MtlkWr, tlcoixo Nichols taller and Neville Greene book levies That did not mean that some Governor Vriaents To Tea Avis Miss Bourne submitted that f ulure FSK'Sl'irS ir,or'^rc,,n.umpir„n7h..; ?T > .-. % > hu wherever vour ">e people who sell sugar for eb. the low export price they refor •S"pr„a r ^ our C^'fVSe^n^^u! ttm£S&£ ^"ifKr T, niii II lulke-l *W %  hri 2 JS ^Ite^::' '< ; <.vemor h gwmtod to ot sugar as flxid '"*'nl Acts In the MOM l. UMecsscs were md 00 behalf of He. Majesty the Othei words, taken OUl upoood 0 f Honourable Members lustry I appre J. very high, and enabled them meet the dump price of abroad • I ort i rteo iinfi to the I'rire BtafaUiUtlon the Price Keiufbilitnlum Fund and the InI Wi II in paid b there was sufficient evidence in talents lead you, the case to take to the Jury and ,>,,, an( j you are permitted Out mena re\ wa^ shown bv the practise In the several courts v. -net of the accused who had legal lh e island." c ^. ,e tho A !" 2£X '^.S,^ -And so il was done in many of ihe iUL advie and went to the Police Replying Miss Reece thanked '' carerui eonsiacrauon ,,, in( |n hi Wc> | ndiM notably It was not the case thai those Station. His Lordship for the kind words indeed. Trinidad, and Jamaica which has cesses were laid on the local price His Lordship then told the jury he had spoken in welcoming her <-*• 3* r nn % %  cmp. was maat. B argc „, nil|JII1 p, 10ll 1)f %u%m h „ ^ gUMr u was one of the export that in a cacal p k( WJU vrry nlgh and 9rKr ot augn „,„, thott um9 necessarv for the criminal Intenfor Introducing her to the bar of wnicn M exjrw-*rii •'' At .,11 times she would endeovou. •<* w I0e per pound. The qum| n some of the othir Moods, lr> k ee,, d to maintain the fi.ul, tradition and "*' of y" ow crystals at present (governments had asked the inhoSoufof f the bu^f UlC isUnd consumed Is ITOOtOl than that Of dUSb honour of the bar or Uie island. ^^ rry5[oK but a5 it ., u „,.. „,,.. ,. iir ,„ .,„ ,,.,, when lllL be possible with the funds availsugar was dumped at 1. able also to subsidise this grade of '"'ll J*ou now holp wftfc tin rlssugar or specials. It Is expected Ing cost of living by keeping down Hagf then will lw n swing b) conthe price of local sugar' 1 These sumption from vellows tn brown*, conditions had never existed in Irf calcul.ting the amount which >hl Island, %  nd "we always will be necessary for the subsidicharged for the local sugar a prlt-e cation of lhe brown crystals this which was based tzpootatlon has boon priVtdod for. £*£ Cgo-tplo, boo i i The Bill before "he Council, More Canes A Sliipmcnt of 1,180 bag" of gois*lion in iU musical apprecia|loweV( r leaves the manner in The neat point was U :ubsldised in sugars were sold for IOBOI %  mind he turn l verdict i Witnesses said that lhe defendrrl toto ihe Nlffhteneal" Hornwit-, olhrr men and damaged the thingin the house. "LADY ROD\E)T EXPECTED TOMORROW The C.N.S. Lady Rodney arrives In Carlisle Bay on Fridav morning. April 25 and will sail the same night for Bermuda. Boston. Halifax and Montreal via the British Northern Islands. I M public Officers' Housing Loans Act, 1952 (1052-1). The Customs Tariff (Amend menu Act. 1052 (1052-2). in. Bllll of Exchange (Amend menl) Act, 1952 (1952-31. The Plontser Industries (En couragement) (Amend MQl Act, 1952 (1952-4). The He venue EojuallHatio Fund Act. 1952 <1952-*>i The Expiring Laws Continu ancc Act. 1952 (1952-0). Ifca Expiring Laws Act, 195x 1952-7). The Public Employee* I*av Regulations (Repeal I Ad 1952 (1952-8). The Police (Amendment) Ad 1952 (1952-9). The Appropriation Act. 195 (1952-10). MEAL AND GAS GramorphoAt" For YGulh Mm'onient The Barbados Youth Movement will soon be receiving a gramophone and records from England The gramophone will assist lhe orgaoi lion. "Confident" In Inner Ikixin coconut meal, 90 drums of domes**J*E*2 29 7 lln d t" of " and "President of the and 200 cases of gelatine were ^^v^i a ,eitcr from Rev. Ia> BlllM^ClOJkt, *TMM I0T |ne ,| iscrr1|l „, f the {.ovi-rnor-insumpUofl and naturally were not ifnwnl. Mr %  ttee. It .ill nade by all the factories in this sa>Jff-aiM eSi^nsiB i LR taj*sW. Tuesday by the schooner Al Last, .n-amophone. a greetings record "' w *''h The At Lost called from British f rorn Mr. Young's Club and other *-*'' Guiana. She i consigned to the records were recently shipped to pr,cr ,'" ., **' Schooner Owners* Association. the Barbados Movement. ,,on locally nasonv nl : the 'o make "Wat.li <.i .r j*< Id for consump'* Specials, they woul.l tell v..., 11 rn'cssary ugar and to It. No mention was made of that. and he 11 %  il shotiM ''"• BuMl .icreed to to help 1 Now the dlfncufty hen. irat thai '.hat amount of money, as Iho hocnei Confident I Ci -$139,500. nearly $140,000 would ,,, %  ,'ly launched a %  >ted to hold Browne's Beach, was yesterdaj CO >if UMj down l-ist i-• v.id it *i owner, mM that he was hoping to i lb. ant the machinery for lifting the NubMdv macU m place by nexl week. He Thai was. if they t<-ok UM 18010 hr-nighl up the masts from Britprwetu-e followed In the yonrt, „h Guiana last month by the -.he prfcO would bo St cents |>or i flhiWfrtT Ttmotny A. It. *•'• OM page C sjuytman. dfacdly Jin* JhinqA JoJi ih& diomn! TEA NAPKINS in Linen SIM P" scl COCKTAIL NAPKINS $2.00 per set CROCHET CENTRE CLOTHS 11.20. 12.00, $3.20 CROCHET LUNCHEON SETS $21.00 & S17.S0 a srl X/# : HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co. LTD 10, II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET Ulliii I \\>lll.ll It TABLE TOPS Si I hiltint.. ,1 Ou.,lii,i ../ Iturf/uin /*reF* 30x18 $0.01 86x18' S7.I7 .13x21 $7.74 i \I.KS SI<\I:S 2 BL'RNER TABI.i: MIIDU. Strongly Madr—Highly llliflrnl ONLY $24.70 EACH I V\>ll I I I II SINKS SINIILE DRAINER 42'' x 21"—$50.31 11(11111.1 nit MM li l.l v 21"—$67.2 COMPLETE WITH WASTE (ITUM. 1MI IIIIM Kl IS GALVANISED WHS IU.VI IM.MMI MAKE — All. SIZES l\ ST4MK XOTK oi ii nun: — 'III I'K.STS %  • %  : %  POI.MI HARRISONS Hardware Store Broad Street TeL 2364 The food for family fitness McrmHs It I good dietary toures ot V.I.mm B A 1.die added to Slews. Soup*. Saucw. Gn*iei and Savour/ diihn ji*sa exira Oavour cad oournKmcni. Children leva Marmiie—spscl*lir in Sandwiehas of cvsry vsrttfy •Ad on hot buKered toast. In 1*1*11.01..* os., 4 ox.. I or, It oi. MAR MITE THE VITAMIN B YEAST EXTRACT GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR FUL-QPEP V-Or^ s . Man a ce.. i.a. a. e. a., I.I L'aap/our hans at • Lajh *^rata of an production, and mala tain tbam la toad pbjrskaJ condition. Tka oatmaal la Ful-0-Pap Faada and llaaaaa lor starUnj. (rowing and an production contrlbutaa toward aaora profltahla raaulta. Tka Oinaa. OoH CMSkwaay Aaklor Ful o-r.p fault,y r..di n0 Oulda—ll'a frs.l A Biscuit is as good as it's Pastry— CRAWFORD'S BSSCUITS are justly famous for their exquisite pastry. TO GKt THE BEST ASK FOR CRAWFORD'S BISCUITS ITS THE PASTRY THAT COUNTS. IT'S NO HOLIDAY WITHOUT A CAMERA WE NOW Offtl Wirein Folding Tamara 4/5 l.i-ii% Kodak Brownir Folding Camrra 8/3 Lain ,. Duo-flax Box Camera Reflex .Virgin F'lexco „ „ 1 S Lens Kodak Model I Box Camera I'ni-Fex Cameras Baby Brownie Camera Also Bertram F.xposure Meters $36.00 KNIGHTS LTD. Phoenix & City Pharmaey ,y