Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


ESTABLISHED 1895



House Amend Law On Su



Better Balance

In Price

Needed

_THE levy imposed on sugar manufactured this year
which is sold for home consumption, will be used to stabil-
ize the price of dark crystal, if the Governor-in-Executive

Committee thinks it expedient.
the House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to amend |
the law in respect to levies on sug

in this island.

This was decided when!

ar sold for consumption |

_ This Bill has made the provision as an interim pro-}
vision and there will be further investigations to try and|

get a more reasonable balance bet

exported sugar.

The Objects and Reasons of the
Bill are: —

In 1947 His Majesty’s Govern-
ment in the United Kingdom
agreed to a certain price for
sugar cxported to the United
Kingdom. on the understanding
that a. proportion of that price
would be reserved and paid to a
price stabilization reserve fund,
a capital rehabilitation reserve
fund and a labour welfare fund
In Barbados the Sugar Industry
(Rehabilitation, Price Stabiliza-
tion and Labour Welfare) Act,
1947, was enacted to give effect to
this understanding. By this Act,
however, a levy equal to the pro-
portion to be so reserved was im-
posed on all sugar manufactured
in the Island and not only on
sugar exported to the United
Kingdom, and the whole proceeds
of the levy have been credited to
the three funds mentioned above.
The amount of the levy was in-
creased in certain years by virtue
of the provisions of section 3 of
the Sugar Industry (Rehabilita-
tion, Price Stabilization and La-
bour Welfare) (Special Levy)
Act, 1951.

The effect of this levy on sugar
consumed in the Island is to in-
erease the price paid by local con-
sumers who are therefore in effect
contributing to these funds. Com-
bined with the increase in the ex-
port price for the 1952 crop, the
effect would be to make it neces-
sary to increase the local price of
sugar beyond what is considered
reasonable.

This bill therefore seeks to pro-
vide that so much of the levy as
is imposed on sugar manufactur-
ed in 1952 which is sold for con-

sumption in the Island, shall be
paid to t®e Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee, instead of to the
above funds, and that the Govern-
or-in-Executive Committee may
use tho-merevs seveceived as he
vhinks expedient for the® purpose
of stabil the price of certain
classes of sugar only, if the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
thinks this expedient.

Mr, F. L. Walcott (L) in intro-
ducing the Bill said tnat for some-
time the Government had been
giving consideration to the im-
portant question of the local sugar
consumption which was unfor-
tunately being increased to the}
@ On page 6



THE BOLIVIAN revolution
has ended but death hangs
heavy in the streets of La Paz,
capital city of Bolivia. Bodies
of the dead are lined up out-
side the General Hospital to
be identified by friends and
relatives before burial. The
revolution began on April 9th
and ended after three days of
bloody battles. After the re-
volt, Victor Paz Estenssoro,
leader of the WNationalistic
Revolutionary Movement
(M.N.R.) ended six years of
exile when he flew home to
take over the Presidency.
Estenssoro won most of the
votes in last May's election
but was unable to take over
the Presidency. The M.N.R
revolt cleared the way.
—(LN.P.)

ween price of sugar and}



From All Quarters:

Live Acarids
Brought
To Sweden

STOCKHOLM Live acarids,
relatives of spiders and scorpi-
ons and the only form of animal
life except for migrant birds that
as been found in the wastes of
Queen Maud’s Land, have been
brought to Lund University by
Dr. Ove Wilson, one of the Swed-
ish members of the Norwegian-
Swedish-British Antarctic Expedi-
tion. The length of the acarids, of
which some 100 species were
found, varies between 0.23 and
0.5 mm. They live in the dark ,
under stones and avoid light andj
sunshine. To enable them to sur-
vive, they had. to be transported
in special ice-boxes,

STOCKHOLM Beta particles
of radioactive substance are fair-
‘ly easily absorbed by materials
placed in their way. The magni-
tude of the absorption is
dication of the
terial, i.e. of the thickness of
homogeneous materials and of the





ment called the Beta-Comp-
arator for the industrial measur-
ing of the thickness and weight
of sheets in conjunction with the
manufacture of paper cardboard,
fibrous boards, plastics, textiles,
metal foils, etc. eres ec
Among the advantages of this
new Swedish instrument is that
the materials need not be touched
during the



t an in-limportance must take precedence
density of the ma-|oyer all othe:

1 for export.” Usually the yearly
weight per surface unit of non-| economié survey is a preview for)
homogeneous materials. 'the Budget but this year the
Cn the basis of these observa-| Budget came early and many of
tions the Stockholm firm LKB-j|the detailed facts and figures
Produkter has designed a n djhave already been published.
placed on the market an instru- —U.P.



Farnum For .
Finland Fund

The West Indies have
reached a high rung on the
ladder of the cricket world.

Don't be contented with
this. The chance of bringing
West Indian cycling into the
limelight rests partly with
you.

Send your donation to the
Farnum ror_Finland Fund to-
day, to the Royal Bank of
Canada, Barclay’s Bank or the
Barbados Advocate.

AMT. PREV. ACK. $235.42
E. C. Jackman .... 10.00
Mr. D. A. Clarke .. 5.00

TOTAL

- $260.42



Less Gars, Food,
Work In 1952

CUURCHILL

LONDON, April 22.
Prime Minister Winston
Churchill's government warned
the nation it will get fewer cars
and television sets this year, less
food and more temporary unem-
ployment in the drive for

national solvency and security.

That was the grim picture pre-
sented by the economic survey
for 1952 presented to the Com-
mons, Thg survey made it clear
that even rearmament prograniume
must suffer cuts to build up the
vital export trade so Britain can
once again pay her own way in
the world.

However, the said
ern types of (jet)
few other equipments

“some mod-
aircraft and
of major



activities including |
where necessary even production |



—_—_——
WEDNESDAY; 23,



;
On the motion of the Leader}
jof the House of Assembly, Mr,!
G. H. Adams, the House yester- |
|day passed a Resolution re |
their sorrow at the death of Sir!
Stafford Cripps, former British)

Adams ‘said that there hav.
dom been more courageous ite
ae 8 ea Sir Stafford.
e der f the tion
Mr. Fred Goddard and en
ent member Mr, Victor vanes
also paid tribute to Sir Stafford.
The House stood a’ short while in
silence as a token of respect, A
letter af sympathy will also be
sent to Sir Stafford’s family,
_ Mr, Adams said that it was not
just because Sir Stafford was a
Socialist and an outstanding So-
cialist that he was going to sa
what he would say, Men of all
paries would agree that in the
long and glorious history of Bri-
lish parliamentary constitution,
there have seldom been more
courageous and parca
statesmen as Sir Stafford



| Sir Stafford attacked the very ex-
jistenee of British monarchy.

jas Chancellor of the Exchequer,

| Staffard on

been.

He said he need not
the House of the whole of
Stafford’s parliamentary career,
Every man in the world who had
ever heard of Sir Stafford,Cripps
would witheut hesitation use one
adjective of him above all others
and that was, courageous a

Attacked Monarchy

Several times in the Course
his public life, Sir Stafford by bis
words and writings, put hig i-
tical fortunes to the test 7and
risked them all, At a timé en
it was very unpopular to do so,

Mr, Adams said he would pass
over his many activities before
Sir Stafford became most famous

He had had the fortune to hear Sir
the occasion of the
Austerity programme and heard





Queen Juliana
Visits Canada

OTTAWA, April 22.

Queen Juliana of the Nether-| such. ?

lands began a six day unofficial

. measuring process,!visit here but the Royal s@hedule
while, contrary to methods based | is

almost as crowded as her

on electric conductivity, t h elofficial tour of the United States.
measuring process is not affected! Tihe Queen, to. whom Ottawa
by moisture or electrolytes. Was a second home during World
AMSTERDAM : The total ex-|War II, landed at the airport
ports of fresh vegetables in 1951|Monday after a two-hour flighi
(approximate figures) amounted!from Detroit.
to 350,000 tons as compared with The official a 1
300,000 tons in 1950, and those; 2 ©, Gilicial programme, de-
of fruit to 165,000 tons, as com- scribed as “the unofficial visit to
‘ Hi ; aaa Canada of Her Majesty Queen
pared with 95,000 tons in 1950. Tanita; herlands”
AMSTERDAM An. ‘Amster- uliana of the Netherlands
: at called. for ten separate events
dam shipbuilding y a rd has today ‘ana five tomorrow
launched the 18,500 ton motor |‘O°®Y wT ald cg :
tanker Bill, which is built for the The Queen’s visit here is not
Norwegian firm of ship owners|official because of mourning in

L. Gill Joanessen, Oslo.
AMSTERDAM : The Portuguese
government has given an order
to a shipbuilding company in
Groningen for the building of a
large twin-screw steam tugboat,

destined for Portuguese East
Africa. This vessel will also do

service as a salvage vessel, pilot
boat and buoying vessel and will

be provided with the necessary
equipment for these purposes,
which will include radio tele-
phony.



DEATH IN THE

the Dominion following the death
of King George VI.



—U.P.
Press Club Lecture
MR. FRANK WALCOTT,

M.C.P., will lecture to members
of the Barbados Press Club at 4.30
p.m. to-day. The subject will be
“Industrialisation in the West
Indies.” The general public is
also welcome.

STREETS



~~ CRIPPS’ SON GOES
TO SWITZERLAND

ZURICH, April 22.
John Cripps, son of the former



Labour Government's Chancellor
arrived at Zurich airport this
morning after delay, caused by
bad weather. He took the airport
"bus into the city and was met at
the railroad station by Lady
Yr sister Peggy who

him for some time
is understood that









ily i] immediately

make pl f funeral. (In

i ers specu-

lated whet pr will be
buried in B —U.P,



| ° '
| Island Sinks |
BOMBAY, April 22. |

Reports fram Dacca, capital of}
East Pakistan, said the island of}
Kutubdia, eight miles off the East!
Pakistan coast near Chittagong is
sinking into the

sea

The northern tip of the island
now completely under water
and 40,000 inhabitants are panic

stricken.
The sinking has been accompan-



ied by a series of underwater ex-
plosions which began March 18
Reports said the blast nded
like cannonfire.—U.P,



MONTGOMERY
VISITS POPE

VATICAN CITY, April 22.
British Field Marshal, Viscount
Bernard Law Montgomery, Deputy
to General Eisenhower at SHAPE

had a private audience of twenty}

minutes with Pope Pius XII in the
Pope’s Library,

During the audience
ery presented to the Pontiff
aide, Lieut-Colonel R. C.S
M.S; ontgomery
were ac
by John
First Secr

tio o }

Montgorm-
his







the Vat

ers-Cocks

ympanied to
abastian Sc
tary of the

can




| comments on it, and if there
jone thing that an onlooker co

—————————| Canadian—U.S. $ |

not help feeling, it was that Sir
Stafford faced up t his critics
and all opposition, whether he
was Labourite or Concervatiy, $
being first. and. ost an ale
lishman and was doing his as

There was no doubt whatever
that he lost seats for the Labour
Party and became unpopular as
the iron Chancellor, But there was
no doubt about it that the pro-
gramme of austerity had so far
saved England, the British Com-
monwealth and maybe the world.
Had there been in the place of
Sir Stafford, a Chancellor who
was determined merely to please
his followers, merely to please his
party, England might have been
in a worse position than she is
at present. .England might have
been hitched even more to the
waggon of another power and
might have found herself by now
struggling in a third World War.

Sir Stafford was one of the most
outstanding statesmen in English’










Parliamentary history and was a/*

@ On page 6



‘Legislators i
PayTributeTo
Sir Stafford —

tea: | |



1952

Advorate



ve

Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr)

2

break, bulldozers on the barges wo
‘water was ten inches below the ex

—



Ap
Collector





MESSAGE FROM
THE CHIEF SCOUT

*"“On St, George’s Day,
ather together to

” st
ee s for the life of '
“our Foun

der, and to re-
“affirm the promise they
“made at their investiture.
“Let each of us, there-
“fore, resolve to pay more
“attention to our duty to
“help other people, Re-
“member always what our
“Founder told us in his last
“message; that the only way
“of gaining happiness for
“ourselves, is to try and give
“it away to other people,”
ROWALLAN,
Chief Scout, British Com-
monwealth and Empire.



GENERAL TELLS

OF 4,000 DEATHS

FRANKFURT, Germany,
April 22
German General Eugene Ober-

haeusser in charge of Katyn

Forest area at the time that the

ae O mass graves of 4,000 Polish
Vote $41 officers were discovered in 1943,
& . 2 testifying before a five-man U.S,




For Repair
Of Boats

THE Legislative Council yester-
day concurred in a resolution for
$41,460 which is to authorise a
revote for that amount for the re-
pair and rebuilding of

seas of December last year.

In moving concurrence of the
resolution, the Hon’ble the Colon-
ial Secretary said it was one In
respect of a revote. He had no
comments to make on the resolu-
tion as such, but it occurred to him
however that members of the
Council might like to have a pro-
gress report on the repairs and re-
building which were being under-
taken and he accordingly asked
the Fisheries Officer to supply him
with some facts. ‘

Honourable members would re-
member that it was originally pro-
posed to rebuild 40 boats and re-
pair 43. It had been subsequently
found that some of the boats which
had been completely written off
could in fact be repaired.

Congressional
mittee, said that
uments found on the men’s bodies
proved they were shot while the
Russians

and this Signal Corps troops occu-

fishing lyer was the first witness
boats destroyed during the rough today

Investigating Com-
letters and doc-

still controlled the
region,
hitehaired Oberhaeusser testi-

fying said, he was in command

pied the Katyn
1941 to October

area from June
1943, Oberhaeus-
called
Committee

Katyn

the
wartime

before
investigating the
massacre,

More than 40 newsmen, photo-
graphers and television camera-
men were in the half filled court-
room for the second day of the
Congressional Katyn testimony
gathering,

—UP.



. Walter Wanger
Sent To Prison

SANTA MARIA, California
April 22.
Film producer Walter Wanger,
who shot and wounded the agent
of his film star wife, Joan Bennett,
in a Hollywood ear park last De-

The task of.rebuilding the boats|cember, was sentenced here to-

which were completely destroyed
was being carried on at the Reef
where it was necessary. to estab-
| lish some electrically driven
machine tools and Government
was indebted to the Electric Sup-
ply Company for providing the
electric supply for that purpose.
@ On Page 7









MONTREAL, April 22
The United States dollar on
Monday closed at a discount of
131/32 per cent. in terms. of
Canadian funds unchanged from
Friday's close. That is, it took
98 1/32 Canadian dollars to buy
American dollars. The pound
sterling’ was worth $2.75-3/8,)
unchanged from Friday.

ih

New York's report is that the}





Canadian dollar was up 1/16 of}
a cent at a premium of 2 1/16]
per cent. in«terms of United;
States Funds in closing foreign
exchange dealings on Mond j
the pound sterling went up 1

f a cent at $2.81 cP



day to four months’ imprisonment
Judge Harry J. Borde deleted the
part of the Grand Jury indictment
which alleged “intent to commit
murder" and reduced the
charge to “assault with a deadly
‘weapon .”’

Rather than provints murder
intent, the evidence proves that
Wanger had no such intent at all,”
the Judge said, Wanger had al-
feged that Lang tried to break up
his home but Miss Bennett and
Lang said their relationship was
btrictly a business one.—U.P.







AROOPS RACE TO SAVE COUNCIL BLUFFS FROM FLOOD












































ae.

' WITH THE FLOOD CREST NEARING at Council Bluffs, lowa, Army troops and civilians work hand in hand
in a feverish attempt to bolster the weakening levee holding back the waters of the rampaging Missouri
\iver. Barges loaded with rock have been placed at strategic points along the river and, ip the event of a
ch, At the time this picture was made the

uld push the rock into the bres
pected flood crest of



31.5 inches.

pointment Of Rent
Declared Invalid

After accepting by a majority vote a legal opinion
given by Mr. W. W. Reece, Solicitor General, to the effect
the appointment of Mr Albert Maynard as Rent
Collector and Maintenance Clerk of the Housing Board
invalid, the Housing Board yesterday decided on the casting
vote of its Chairman, Mr. G, H, Adams, to appoint a
“Screening Committee” to consider and make recommend: |iney would get

that

ations in conn

t ons iN the 107 applicants who seorecet |
the advertisemen Ro e post, ;

The opinion of the Solicitor Gen-
eral was sought after a protest by
Mr, E. D, Mottley who walked out
from the meeting at which the ap-
pointment of Mr, Maynard was
made, leaving the meeting without
t quorum

The Solicitor General's opinion
reads as follows:

By Section 4 of the Bridgetown
Housing Act 1936 (1936-8) any
four members of the Board shall
be a quorum for the transaction of
the business.

The facts submitted for my con-
sideration show there was a meet-
ing of the Housing Board on the
22nd March, 1952 when the ap-
pointment of a Rent Collector and
Maintenance Clerk came up for
consideration, Mr. Mottley, a
member of the Board attended the
meeting, and, while the appoint-
ment was being considered, rose
from his chair and said, “I will not
stay here any longer” and started
tc leave the table. The Acting
Chairman while Mr, Mottley was
still in the Couneil Chamber but
had left the table, stated that
it had been moved and seconded
that Mr. Maynard be appointed to
the post and declared Mr. Maynard
appointed and instructed the Sec-
retary to advise him (Mr. May-
nard) appointed accordingly.
Where a quorum is prescribed,
that means, sratively, that no
business be ted unless the
prescribed number at deast ‘be
present, Bottomley’s case 16 Ch.







Db, 681.
In order however, that they may
have a duly constituted quorum it
necessary that they should act
onjointly, and as a Board .. . They
ire bound to be together, as a
Board, at the time the thing is
ordered to be done (Bramwell R
D'Arcy v. Tammar & ete, Ry. 36
L.J, Ex 37
On the facts it is clear that, al-
though Mr. Mottley was alleged to
be present in the Council Cham-
ber he was not acting together
with the other members. of the
Joard at the time when Mr. May-
nard was appointed to the office
of Rent Collector and Mainten-
ance Clerk, |I am therefore of the
opinion that the appointment to
Mr. Maynard to the said office is

invalid
(Sad.) W. W. REECE.
Agreement

Outlining his position to the
3oard when the matter was dis-

cussed yesterday, Mr. G. H.
Adams, Chairman of the Board,
said he had the profoundest re-
spect for Mr. Beckles, (who acted
as Chairman on the ogcasion when
the “invalid” appointment was
made), but speaking personally,

and as a lawyer, he felt that Mr,
Reece's opinion was correct.

He was sorry that the dispute
had arisen, but as far as he was
concerned, he did believe that
every time there a chanee to
encourage somebody who was al-

wa









ready working in an organisation,
that they should give the person
$ . ’ that chance. If he had been pres-
‘ 1 . .
Rains Bring I ( ar ent, he would probably have done
. that. On the other hand, he was
aoe C6ry, ro 22 not prepared to ask any member
enewed rain, some of it he slof the be g ied by what
brought fears of further fi bl he } hole question
along the Missouri River to-day. ! , nm or the Board, he
But the banks held at critical

spots and experts felt sure that However, as a general rule, he
the twin cities—Kansas_ City,| wou! that in any appointment
Kansas, and Kansas City, Missour with w h he id to do, if there
would be safe. Army engineers ¥ omebody an ganisation
estimated that 386,000 acre of] wh iving atisfactior d
vere unde yvater i th! +3 r ’ ' ‘

Nebrask U.P ] @ on page 5

‘





" pb ; \
PRICE: . CENTS

var Levies

| Barbadian
Artists

EXHIBIT AT THE MUSEUM

’

Two new exhibitions open
at the Museum today of
paintings by Ivan Payne, the
Speightstown painter, and the
late Mary Irene Gill. Both ex-
hibitions will run for four
weeks.

This is Ivan Payne's first one-
man exhibition, Payne was born
in Speightstown in December 1923,
nd he is, pfore, 28 years old.















icrayons,
fo paint, and h
exhibited at thy @p

an 1a
bf each yea

e first









pf Merit,
Painting
by the

in Canada
Mary Irene Gill, the other ex-
hibitor at the Museum, is a sister
of Caro Gill, the talented artist
whose paintings were exhibited at
the Museum in 1950, Mary Irene
Gill was educated at the Alexan-
dra School, and in 1917 accom-
panied her sister to Canada, where
both of them studied at the Mon-
treal Art School. Irene’s interest
lay in nursing rather than in art,
She, therefore abandoned art
classes and began her training as
a nurse. She qualified as a rurse
in Canada, but she was not strong
enough for stich arduous work.
She returned to Barbados where
she died at an early age,



(Interndtional Soundphoto)



Prisom Riot Ends

NEW JERSEY, April
Sullen and weak, 231 convicts
who had held out in the dormitory f
wing at Rahway State Prison since
last Thursday night surrendered
to-day. Prison officials had been
waiting patiently with hunger ana
thirst as their allies to break the
revolt. The men were promised
no physical pun-
ishment if they surrendered with-
out-harming eight guards they
hold as hostages. U.P.

99



3 Wil. Students Awarded
Foundation Fellowships

NEW YORK, April 22.
TTHREE students from the British West Indies were named on
Monday as winners of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial
Foundation Fellowships.






The fellowships which will enable the winners to continue
study in their respective fields, went to Dr. John Horace Parry,
Professor of Modern History at the University College of the West
Indies, Mona, Jamaica, studying Municipal Government in the
Spanish Indies—from the conquest to independence, Edgar Austin
Mittelholzer of New Amsterdam, British Guiana, creative writer
and author; and Douglas MaCrae Taylor of Magua, Dominica, a
fruit farmer, Ethnolinguist, studying the language of the black
Caribs of British Honduras.—¢

FRY’S

WONDERFUL VALUES



COKERNUT. BAR

,"

(Milk Chocolate: Caramel - Fudge)

FRY’S 4 FAVOURITES



\

Pe Pe

eR












































































. ES RIL 23, 1952
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE RPMs onsen a -

tb Calling BOLD °43, —

HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
ARIB to-day extends heart) With The Royal Bank Back To U.S.A.

‘
‘ congratulations to West In- ISS M. KING of British Me®:: Wilhelmina Beckles of the om a

dies Captain, John Goddard, Guiana: wh hakleben’ baie UA. whe ted been see
O.B.E., on his thirty-third birth- daying here for the past three ing a holiday here with her rela- ITH AN L-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES o


























day. John whe was born on April weeks staying at “Actra”, Rocks tives at Britton’s

C 1 Hil, returned
23, 1919, has the distinction of ley, is due to return home to-day home on Sungey by a

being an old Lodge School boy is with Antigua and
and also an Old Harrisonian. by D.W.LA. Bie 1s Creed ”





= ears . of C was accompanied by her daughter, ‘
He was a promising athlete at the Royal Pank of Canads. Shout isit er WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
pees tat eee Fe eUTRAN, cuppcitece- VAIS Soo BR uate !
Honal # hel cae . L. OU , Superintend- 1X Grenada, on Saturday f
eh ie ee on, ae oe ent of Police in St, Lucia ar- Miss Mary Bell. She willie MEN Only 8.30 p.m. 7
Indies in 1948 He also success- rived here yesterday by B.W.LA., spendii Wwecks’ holiday | '
ay, 2 See Tadion sont his wife and their two children.” ing This’ ts Miss Bere wecona| The “aches opowie, ing te the cat be, Babes Se-somsy -
ia in '48—'49; ; nsland iis wife an eir two children. . s is iss $s secon doing here.”’ t scowls. te the car .
in 1600 ana sar duet mateinel ‘the s visit to the Colony. " = fe working for Samra Claus,” thing inside one of the pockets, , AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER
West Indies in the Tests in Aus- Trinidad Medico On Six Months’ Leave -

tralia in Which the West Indies
lost the rubber.

John is one of ten children, the
only one of whom did not play
cricket and take part in athletics
was an only sister. He is still a
comparatively young International
captain and there is every indica-
tion that he will be the man to
lead the West Indies against India











































venrnrasasiiniidedeee, WARNING !
peat Perfo pmantce This picture includes powerful Medical Sequences.

NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !
With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS. PL AZ Ausannante S (Diat 5170)
fanmweis. SHOWS AT

ovymric tenant at OPENING FRIDAY 25th (APRIL)

Night at 8,30
A Geidgter taeabe et” pocbramene with over 20 new song hits

R. I. TRIMINGHAM, who EAVING for England yester-] @90996e< SAO
arrived in the colony for the dL day by the s.s. Willemstad was
week end left yesterday morning Mr. W. E. Bassett, Agricultural] %
by B.W.L.A., for Trinidad. Dr. Superintendent of Montserrat, who] %
Trimingham was staying at In- was here for the past ten days. He
dramer Guest House, Worthing. is on six months’ leave.

Hanid Lectured the Kittens






















Tans year. —But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her— awe
° ‘ MR. JOHN GODDARD, O.B.E. ' jeeenting aeep LEGS AND Hmm
happy! vee ae oe Leetu at F. dati By MAX TRELL | ‘ Es — Onsen? Chive FARiNeé .. and
i oe ee ID had Blackie on one knee, | BAND
R ss Bene. cas s. MB. CAMERON TUDOR, M.A.,| and Whitewash on the other, Both THE RHYTHM KINGS STEEL in cecilia GID MEE cei,
‘ JORDY and their two chil- (Oxon), will deliver a lecture} kittens sat very quietly, looking up i's chtertemmedt ab it's BEST ;
dren of New Orleans, La., U.S.A., 0" South Africa and the Common=| now and then at Hanid and purring. 5 Boos ONE MASTERPIECE AFTER ANOTHER
have been holidaying at the Crane W°#!th,—a study in Origins at the “You're darlings, both of you,”

for the past two weeks. Mr. Jordy Monthly Meeting of the Old Boys’| anid said at last, patting both of

is employed at the Phillips Oj] Association on Friday, April 25 at) them along their little backs at the TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.; Opening Tomerrow
8



EMPIRE ROXY



















































‘0. hopes to leave with hi p.m. same time so as not to get either of
Satie en the 27th “april for F ‘ them jealous. “But 1 do wish,” she LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Caracués, Venezuela, where they or Convention added, “that you didn’t both play re-aay 445 & 8.0 Last 2 Shéws To-day 4.30 & 8.15
have been living for the past two a ae a as 5 week-end! tag so very a Bad Voki ‘To-morrow 4.45 only ened midoy” and Continuing
ars. y B.W.LA., for the Conven- “Do you'’know,” Hanid went on
~ tion of the North American Assur- daiestenne first one kitten then the Definitely yoor last Sets - or and GA BLE
For Medical Aid ance Company were Mr. Vernon| other as she spoke; “you've been _“A PLACE IN THE, SUN ugtome, OVE: wkomite”
R. MRS. DEORAJ een and Mr. K. eee, oe playing tag ever since early, a THURS. at 8.2% seatity vs.
‘ompany’s representatives in \ ning? When I first got up an , ng: > .
Print ee te om Lucia and Grenada respectively. oben oak af the wikdew, there. son ip t _Tim HOLT—Richard MARTIN
hime colomy aie so “13th April wr are staying at the Marine} were, scampering across the garden. | |_ . aes a Ke enythen Kings Thurs. 2 Friday 4.30 * 815 G A R BD | E R
" * Hotel. ; 5 And you kept it up all morning un- : Steel Band. moe
pitention ona Geeer th teane ait montor ecdine & BWA. fn| til noontime when you eame to the The kittens locked up at Hanid. Ee “FIGHTER SQUADRON” nl
onday evel y BW.LA,, for ch ft inute or two to get . . a _ : , a
lon egg Bi they ig 4 use, the Conventoin were Mr. E, Grell| Yotr saucer of milk. Then you| At that very instant Old Patchie|}} WALT D Pi a “INSPECTOR GENERAL” The battle
Worthing. ’ and Mr. Darey Galt from Trinidad, | \tarted all over again. You must be | Stopped washing her face, walked “ALICE TN_.WONDERLAND 5 fT
F Mr. C. de Caires from British] terribly tired, aren’t you?” she said, | slowly to the end of the porch, took | }} Watthiere GaLe Aka” - Of Texas..
Up and About Guiana and Mr. M. Phillips from| ooking into Blackie’s face, “Aren’t | a spring and climbed up to the rdof. An Academy Award. Winner a and the
IS many friends will be glaa 7°™C% you?” she said to Whitewash. ee wae ag aye Fa ag get : iran battle
; Toss H
to learn that Mr, G. H. Adams, Back to Trinidad * Porred Louder high 28 the chimney where the swal- OLYMPIC “DEAD Aw eee b of the
te cat wan = ap Fogg mw bg IME: KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L.,| Both kitteW foked back at fa-| lows were living during the summer. |} Bake de aie. cllhs eee eo
is nd bout, ngain H cuided Point-a-Pierre, returned to} nid, and purred(m bit louder than} «o}, well,” Hanid said to Blackie TO. uP (Am (only aren a OE Flemihgs sexes!
up and about again. He pres: Trinidad th ¥ before. But neither of them said i h: eee ia Th oe :
over a special m r over the week-end by " and Whitewash; kuess your ba “tie: REDMEAD AND TRE
Housing Board héld at the Coun- B.W.LA., after spending a holiday| anything. Uy cob nah mother likes it better on the roof.]{ Yn - D cowBor”
cil Chamber yesterday mi with his relatives. He is ason of “Of course,” said Hanid. “I’m not| Phe view must be better. But I do open akiies ie
sroce ain Beaweil Dr. C. FP, Stoute, retired Veterinary | quite sure it is tag that you two wish you'd both stay on the porch at} TH MARK BROTIIERS in
ir. Muervinow On - Officer of Kensington Road. play. Maybe rs see ry of | jeast until the sun goes down and it BURT tAsere ee. ae _ “DU ut
‘ ; kitten-game, 1 wish you'd tell me | gets cooler. And I think,” Hanid put}} sd
‘ Attended Cricket To See Her Son what ve name of it is. Would you & hp suggestion, “you ought to canepan MEAS "penton. ROYAL ’ 4 da
R. CAROLINE RAMESAR of} Please, dears?” wash your faces so you'll be nice}}} P. u's a he 4 9) P
; Meet D sti Hanid waited for a moment oF} anq clean for supper.” ANCE eer air iku glace Teepe Pesbditew 4.00 & 0.18 eer haga lay) x,
R. F. A) C. CLAIRMONTE and arrived’ hone foe che eee PO] two. ‘The Kee Cain's Senn eRe dh POO Sic et wind Bu Biot in a Or: 1
Mr. J. M. Kidney, the Barba- days with her two dau dj ious to tell Hanid the name o , c » ——________. (2-8-8 LG iE e AQ
See aisine ala "Wainans arene’ Sh hepa et| eens ree ene fa |S ony re ove ell RePRSOR EE | ae HL cliche ie
the meeting of the West Indies the Lodge Sc! , will .| shook her head sadly (for it di e shady par I ch. : i" iT OF TEXTS” Aa Anta Rat
Cricket Board of Control in British thy Rook Over the venie whi aad seem a shame that they would want | minute or two they really sat there,|}) -ripinG DOWN THE CANYON” Starring: Alan Rocky LANE u ve] RRR YMA: » AEH AW poeint
Guiana, returned home on Mon- js staying at Super Mare Guest] to keep the name of their game a{and almost—but not quite—looked|f eania oe ‘ebeas “pa tol) tb ae ‘
day night by B.W.1.A,, from Trini- House, 4 “seeret) and continued. t as though they might sifrt to wash)) _ y t n r
dad, Grenada Legislator “Now wouldn’t it be better to just | their faces. But suddenly, in the jf Friday only 4. & 815 Onivy, 20 VILLAND In HERE AT L AST ~~ =o
Leaving Today ON’BLE T. A. MARRYSHOW,| Sit quietly on the porch and rest | twinkling of an eye, they were gone. |i] caMis aboriigns .
T. COMMANDER CHARLES vehi ;| until supper time,‘darlings? Look| “Blackie! Whitewash!” called/ ‘OF MiséOURT’ plaaeevOne Lape” D AY a D all B A T Hi § li E B a
is HAYWARD, Lite Vice- the Logiiglise Galata ent at your mother,” she said, pointing | Hanid. . sn am /

President of the A.A.A., of Trini- ada, left for Trinidad yesterda their heads to the other side of the| They were nowhere to be seen\| -

Presid y ch where Big Patchie sat wash-| And when Hanid lookéd up at the " 7
he inrsing Peinided. tine BS ote, vorae a Mine her face with one of her paws, | roof to tell Bis Patchie that hex tw DON i A RG WE J
evening by B.W.LA., after spend- | During his ten-day stay in Bar. | “Your mother doesn’t dash around, | children had disappeared, therg/™" “4 me 7, = as
a week's holiday as the guest bados, he was the guest of Mr. and playing tag or whatever-it-is. She | they both wert, voddied next to their
of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Duthie of Mrs, G. H. Adams at “Tyrol Cot”, sna AN heh : perch ~ ee ‘on Se
‘ave e a ; ’
ee ee ol” : bricks of the chimney,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

| APRID. : POWERFUL—AND
100 ee Ae ae tk, Colt NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS

, 4 ere eee POWERFULLY DIFFERENT
Mrs. A. L. Stuart Sicisict ke chaeerettewen |THE REAL, THE ONLY, THE GENUINE, |—"tom WARNER BRos.
. .â„¢m. lody from the Stars, 5.55 os
Dawn







THE BIBLE’S GREATEST LOVE STORY












ou
BEFORE.

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN i7 '
.WOMEN IN THE NEWS—& FO r

\














Mrs, Stuart is the wife of Dr. weaker until eventually she be- second show in 1939 the School] p.m. ‘Think on these Things, 6.45. pyn. : ,
A. L, Stuart of “Norham,” Tweed- came blind for ten weeks, During was closed but Mrs, Stuart contin- I gg at i e HLL the
side Road. She was born in British this time she was kept in a dark ued to train girls who took part in. f

. 2%6.62M, 31.42M
Std alicia easiedcatienGinnapoalahiglennes tained
7.15 p.m. Calling the West_Indies, 7,45

y Request, 8.15 p.m. Radio News- & CINDERELLA CUP

prin. Inieriude, 8-85. p.th. Prom qe | Yee PHYLLIS. THAXTER
rials, "8 p.m. -Geort RAYMOND MASSEY

Guiana but when she was merely room and the Studios afforded her in any entertainments. Such help
Beven years old she left for Cali- the best medical attention, After was rendered to the Excelsior
fornia where she was adopted by School of Music,
her uncle Dr, W. E, Richardson, eee ,

Mrs. Stuart’s love for dancing ; ! Revuedeville
and her achiévernents in these









5 .m, S* George, 1
Although she has no children ME Ee Re















p.m,
10.15 See *
reflected more than a cas~ | Mrs. Stuart is very fond of them, | p.m. With, the Gloucesters in A fesse Gig YOUNG—
ested didlos 3a Mabie ee tink _ fo in 1949 the dancing school was} 135 »,™, sh th Md at a e James GLEASON
natural ability to handle the most revived in response to several re-| {,,, {

difficult . Acting on this, her |
uncle permitted her to take extra |
lessons during the holidays in
New York, As she grew into mid- i
teens she struggled with two de- |
sires —her uncle’s whose wish for |
her was to follow the medical pro- t
fession and her own to maké |
dancing her career and further-
more to create her own steps. t
{
t
f
4

quests from mothers. Later in the
ar a Mannequin Parade and
nce was staged at the Drill Hall
in aid of Chants. There “a a
repeat pe some time
later, As the echool grew Mrs.
Stuart produced Revuedeville 1950
and 1951 at the Empire Theatre.
‘These two shows reflected local
talent among the girls and they
are now clamouring for another
ow.

Through the success of the last
year’s show, Mrs, Stuart has con-
structed a new apartment for the §
@chool which includes a ballet,
dancing, powder, and changing |
room, and canteen, There are also

vOuLi CALE IT
SNOW WHITE |IBOn MY :

YOU'LL SAY IT’S
* BLUANTY (Dias 2310)

P i A 7 A aa BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-MORROW (Thurs.) 24th., 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 &-8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
















At Elstree
In 1931 Mrs. Stuart visited her
mother in British Guiana. She
went to Trinidad and the
and later Barbados where
She continued her dancing, taking
6 icular interest in stage shows.
1932 she left for England and

couor ev TECHNIC






















lans on f forming « \ © eepr. e
three years later was married in plans on foot for forming a club. » | oe. v \
aeoaee. The same me year bes . ciltic- ‘i La ae sek New Materials ; i : ? So aa
fn stodian hankan whine nee iivlted. ade eae ee aah THEY WERE ‘ALT D AND NOW HE|fi
udios, London, where her ed Mrs. Stuart who is head '

agents secured for her a third of the Barbados branch to bring : New Styles IVES YOU E! } Presents A MIDNITE VAUDEVILLE
wt in ee of ~ River.” ooo she decided against troupe to Puerto Rico for the Car- on

s Technicolour picture, di- becoming a movie actor, and di- ibbean Festival to be held in Au- 1 DI WILL =YOU WILL :
rected by Alexander and Zoltan rected all attention to her home. gus The festival cobniaad of For Cocktails ‘Weddings THE KIDDIES LOVE It ‘YOU ENJOY IT ) SATURDAY APRIL 26 MIDNEIT
Korda, starred Nina McKinney, She was also invited by the B.B.C. Bamples of the folk lore—dance, ‘ , 2
and Paul Robeson. But after the to appear on a “Guest Star” pro- music and art from all the islands From $18.00 each N.B, : with “ALICE” — Waltz Disney’s Academy Peabisi
close-ups were taken they discov- gramme but unfortunately she was of the Caribbean, Bach island will Aware Featire — eaturing
ered that the colour of ber eyes in Manchester at that time. present something different in also {\ AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTES
was not suital part. : style and type, ‘ , starrin; -
Soon afterwards she took part in Dancing School 60 15 denier “NATURE’S HALF ACRE” ,.
films with Merle Oberon, Leslie Other Interests NYLONS — $2.27 ; MOonNAH Direct from Martini
Howard, Hermaine Bradley ang . After returning to Barbados Dancing is her chief fir but r “ EY” A} ISLAND” H om maqgue

ny other British stars in there were numerous requests for Mrs, Stuart holds a diploma from Better than BEAVER VALL and “SEAL I x” Magici a
_orade of Stars, 1938." Her dane- &, Sanne ees e se Mrs. Bie New York School in Interior New Cocktail i ‘ } (Magician and Rhumba Dancer)
ing routines were taught by Buddy opened a scliool for dancing Decoration (1945) and a certifi- HANDBAGS This Alone orth Price Admission { ie ,
bp carataper Director and Danc- po haa pte ee gy cate in Hair and Beauty Culture ’ sw the of i ata -peaenticmgeemiindy ancien:
ng Master at Elstree. ° she realise that from Wilfred Academy, New York, — $6.23 ac ’ URABELLA (Exotic Tango Dancer)
this Was more her line—dealing (1945). She is y nome of music, for You cah only get to Wendérland { ;
At that time fechnicolour hasn't hem want the herself’ hae been Sar ee aS Sur > a : Wresaarilin : \ ee wee De
ani a een is all “at home” as a housewife. ‘ ke 3 i ¢ rilr ‘ ,

been long introduced and the taught. In 1988 she staged her Although she is not a member The MODERN As ot it’s Tee Kt BOODHOO BROS. (B.G’s Acrobatic Kings)
lighting effects were ten times first show at the Empire Theatre. of any Board or Institution, she =

stronger than ordinary light. After This was a big success and the fol- contributes in all ways to charity
many takes and retakes Mrs, lowing year the school increased and has a special interest in the
Stuart’s eyes became weaker and in numbers, However, after her Institvtion for the Blind.

dust Opened

WMeNGD MOUNE SED. ik. kiicis cout. obihacseen cp ticank $1.00
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS 36” @
WHITE, PEACH, BLUE.
OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONGOLEUM RUGS,
BY THE YARD.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606

2

HARVEY ROGERS (leading ballroom Exponent
and several other sensational stars

AT i
EMPIRE THEATRE Music by Keith Campbell's Society 5

Friday, April 25th — Thursday, May. 1st.

DRESS Shoppe

Broad Street



4 “ : BURT LANCASTER
"s WEB" Warren HUDT . 3 The Gard t, James
a TODAY & TOMORROW 38.30 P.M

ae eae a hab ere oe tres DARBA ) OISTIN—Dial 8404 -acaiouan iat tee
AY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M: c Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m. Bette DAVIS &
E F ie BA NTE: , “WHIPLASH” Dane _CLABI
ya “The BLUE VEIL” = “"% ~ aoe * rai a ake toe

“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”
THE THING Robert ARMSTRONG
“Mi

&
(From ther World) FORBIDDEN PAST

Robert MITC
THURS (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. MIDNITE SAT ‘NTH
io Triple Attraction —
ze ina ANGFORD & “RAIDERS of the DESERT” |
ROSE OF SANTA ROSA” aca BAD”. (Coles) Richard ARLEN — Andy DEVINE

. . ; pees ~ ; Rod CAMERON — Yvonne De CARLO “CHEYENNE COWBOY" |
HOOSIER HOT SHOTS ;: . / = =

TRE §
D
Jane



ee, mee. i
ae a ee



. IP Tex WILLIAMS &
“ROSE of SANTA ROSA” TEX BENEKE & GLENN MILLER

“REDIN the OUTLAW TRA” , : ORCHESTRA





WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

House Hit

At Public

Service Commission .

WHEN certain members of the House of Assembly last
ght sought during the consideration of two Resolutions
lating to the payment of the members of the Public Ser-
fice Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff
the Commission, to criticise certain appointments on the
lommission, His Honour the Speaker was forced on several
ecasions to rule such members out of order and implore
hem to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions.

his was particularly the case
a Mr. Mapp, junior member for
‘Thomas, who repeatedly, de-
the intimations from the
r that he should not do so,
ised the appointment of Mr.
ey Douglas-Smith to mem-
ip on the Commission.
fter being ruled out of order
'three consecutive occasions
le making such observations
criticisms against Mr. Doug-
Smith’s appointment, Mr. Mapp

‘ jhitted that “I have been hard

learing to-night and
t rulings too good.”
he, two Resolutions, the one a
jllary of the other, provided
} the Chairman of the Com-
sion be paid $20.00 per meeting
} a maximum remuneration of
00 in any one month, and that
fibers should be paid at the
-of $10.00 per meeting with a
imum remuneration of $40.00
y one month; and for the ap-
ment of one Long Grade
& and one Stenographer Typist
‘the performance of duties
ing from the institution of the
ynission.
tthis connection, $3,000 has
ady been provided in the 1952-
Zolonial Estimates to meet the
Mated expenditure. Serving
ters in the Public Service will
receive any remuneration
ve their normal salaries, The
uission will be responsible
Advising the Government as
fds to recruiting, training,
ipline, appointment and pro-
lon of Civil Servants and other
ad matters, and in view of the
that the Commission is to be
Tmanent body, it is considered
table that the staff necessary
its efficient operation should
aced on a permanent basis.
peaking on the question of re-
teration for the service render-
y members of the Commission,
O. T. Allder (I) criticised the
of the remuneration, and
‘d the hon’ble member who
t with the Resolution in this
tection to outline the basis on
th the rates were fixed, and
often the Commission would
In his opinion $20.00 a
ting for the Chairman was
ty high”, and foresaw the
ibility of the Commission
ting in some instances for only
minutes.
r. W. A, Crawford (C) reter-
to the stipulation that no Civil
fant on the Commission would
any remuneration for his
vice on the Commission,
said he did not agree
tthe proposals. He imagined
there was some _ pre-
ince for the proposals, and
ad that it appear to him
on the it when a man
‘called upon to perform duties
the nature envisaged in the
lic Service Commission Act,
_he should be given some
a compensation.
Â¥. A. E. 8. Lewis (L) criticised
idea of having a member of
Executive Committee on the
imission, and recalled how the
ty had been advocated that
icians should keep out of the
irs of the administration, and
that while that was being
tehed, a member of the Ciyil
tice was made a member of
‘Executive Committee. He
not reconcile the two dif-
at policies.

Â¥. Mapp (L) attempted io dis-
the personnel of the Com-
ficn, and was ruleq out of
@, His Honour having earlier
iselled Mr, Lewis to refrain
1 doing so,
ie first Resolution was passed
during the discusston on the
d Resolution which dealt
{ the setting up of the Clerical
f, Mr. Mapp again sought to
ass and criticise the appoint-
t of Mr. Douglas-Smith as a
ber of the Commission.
e asked “What does the
gent Tudor of the University
ie of the West Indies know
the local Civil Service and
competent to advise the
Yo . as regards recruit-
t, training, discipline, appoint-
Civil

cannot

and promotion of

ants.
ee again His

Honour the

aker asked the hon’ble mem-
—

ber to refrain from discussing the
personnel of the Commission, the
appointment of which did not con-
cern the House, but still Mr. Mapp
persisted, On two other occasions
His Honour was forced to call the
member to order, but he continued,
“I ean’t see what the Director of
Extra Mural Studies, an English-
man who has recently out
here, knows about the local Civil
Service, a «
Hard of H ! x

Mr. Mapp continuing his critic-
ism urged Government to try to
find “suitable Barbadians who
have served in the local Service,
people who know of local condi-
tions and suitabilities, to serve on
such a body.

When once again the hon’ble
member attempted to bring the
name of the Resident Tudor into
the discussion, His Honour appeal-
ed to him “to keep the name of
the Resident Tutor out of the de-
bate, ang Mr, Mapp replied, as he
was about to sit down, “I have
been hard of hearing, and cannot
hear rulings too good.” .

Mr. E. W. Barrow (L) joined
issue with the wording of the
second clause of the Addendum
which read:

The amendment seeks to in-
crease the Establishment by one
Long Grade Clerk and one
Stenographer-Typist for the per-
formance of duties arising from
the institution of a Public ice
Commission which will throw an
additional burden on the
lishment Branch of the
riat, and called it a
worded clause.

He observed that it did not say
that the Long Grade Clerk and
Stenographer- ist should be
members of the staff of the Com-
mission and it also assumed quitd
falsely that the Public Service
Commission was itself to be an
addendum to the Colonial Secre-
tariat.

He thought that it was against
the true spirit of the Public Ser-
vice Commission Bill, because if
the House wanted to appoint an
Advisory Body to the Colonial
Secretary it would have done so,
and they would have set up a
separate and distinct body.

His contention was that if the
Public Service Commission ‘was
an independent body, it should not
be considered an advisory body
to the Colonial Secretary’s office,
and should have a Clerk and
Typist quite apart from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office. The two
erganisations should work in as-
sociation, but not in collusion.

If they worked in collusion,
they would find that the Coloniat
Secretary or one of the Assistant
Colonial Secretaries or another
Senior Officer of the’ Office would
always hold the files of the Com-
mission and when a meeting was
held, that officer would come along
and act as Secretary for the time
being.

He urged that the Public Ser-
viee Commission should be @ com-
pletely separate and independent
body, and observed that if they
worked in collusion, it would be
equal to retaining the status quo
of the old state of affairs wherd
the Colonial Secretary was “Lord

Executioner, Judge. Jury
and everything,” on appoint-
ments, with other Heads of De-
partments acting in an advisory
capacity.

He thought it was highly unde-
sirable that they shoud pass any
section which might give the
Colonial Secretary licence to be-
lieve that the Commission which
the House wanted as an inde-
pendent body, should be an ad-
dendum or appendage to his own
policy.

He was only throwing out a
word of warning, and if the warn-
ing fell on the “right ears,” he
would not vote against the Reso-
lution, In conclusion he appealed
to members to be careful, ai
warned that “it was not a frontal
assault, but an enveloping move-
ment.’*

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) associated
himself with the (remarks an
observations made by Mr, Barrow,
and Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasised
that the two officers for whicn
they were making provision
would be too closely connected
with the Commission, and would
be in a position to deal with

Secreta-
“cleverly



The Speaker’s chair,
all seating throughout the Chamber,
galleries and lobbies and every other
article of upholstered furniture
chroughout the new building
are equipped with

“ ze / &

,




jardy Ltd., London;
Co. Ltd., Cheltenham;





PUN RUBefR CO.

+ for the Ministry of Works : Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, O.M., R.A.
Acknowledgments:
9 co-operation of the Contractors responsible for the seating is
ully acknowledged by Dunlop Rubber Co. Led, >—-J.
Maple & Co, Ltd., London; HM. H. Martyn
F. Sage & Co. Ltd., London; Waring &
Gillow Led., London,

TD. (DUNLOPILLO DIVISION),

ONDON










L. Green

WALTON, LIVERPOOL

1920 NEW BOND STREET, W.i

FOUNDERS OF THE LATEX FOAM INGUSTRY
500/059

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THE GAMBOLS _.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

MAW-WAW . SUE SUE USES A eae
LIPSTICK THAT STICKS. — HAW-HAM...
a

GAYE. €@
WINNINGS TO COLLEC

oro WAVE

FROM
WONEST JOE IN THAT RACE?) _
(NO, DEAR Wily ?

2G



KLM ’s New Air
Freight Room
Is Most Modern

CURACAO
At Schiphol Airport in Amster-
dam this week, K.L.M. Royal

Dutch Airlines opened the most
ultra modern air freight building
in Europe. The new edifice has
been erected on the site of the
first air freight hangar which was
opened for service just 32 years
ago when K.L.M.’s first air freight
consignment was a parcel of En-
glish newspapers and a letter
frem the Mayor of London to the
Mayor of Amsterdam.

The construction of the new
depot was prompted by the tre-
mendous expansion in air freight
traffic since the end of the World
War II and the fact that K.L.M.
igs convinced that cargo will can-
tinue to grow in importance to

ie airline industry.

The building occupies 1,900
square yards of warehousing
space and its unique application
of working methods, cargo hand-
ling, layout and technical aids
are designed for speedy and
efficient management of many
tons of freight per day. Cargo
planes are parked in front of the
building and special ets for
speedy loading and unloading of
the aircraft are placed into
operation, as well as the latest
mechanical devices used for this
type of work. Conveyor belts
transport the freight directly into
the building. A-special platform-

truek-bed height at one end of 80€S.

the depot facilitates the loading
and unloading of freight trucks.
Because of the growing num~-
ber of live animals transported
by K.L.M. in the past few years,
a hotel for Animals, occupies
ce in the new construction.
his hotel is equipped with run-
ning water, heat, electrical con-
nections, a ventilating system and
temperature control and can be
furnished to accommodate any
number or kind of animals at a
moment's notice, Specially trained
animal stewards are in charge
of the livestock at the hotel and
accompany all K.L.M. animal
shipments aboard the aircraft.





their own promotion, and so to
k, “sit in judgment upon
emselves.” ~ a . ye

Replying categoriqally to tne
criticisms, Mr. Adams explaine
that Mr. Douglas-Smith was the
first choice of the Ciyil Service
Commission and said that it_ was
wise to have someone on the Com-
mission who would not be preju-
diced. He thought it was a Fs0
thing too to have a member of the
Executive Committee who was not
a politician on the Commission,
and to have the Colonial Secretary,
who was directly connected with
the administration there.

He agreed that it would be
damnable to have a politician on
the Commission, and replying to
the criticism made by Mr. Bar-
row, said “I speak with sorrow
rather than in anger,” at such
criticisms coming from the hon’ble
member who should know that
throughout the British Empire,
there were Public Service Com-
missions.

He asked
members thought that the Govern-
ment had not taken great care in
the matter, or that they did not
use precedence after endeavour-
ing to correct faults and errors
experienced by other places be-

d fore coming to a decision,

He welcomed hon’ble members
drawing errors to the attention of
Government, but he would coun-
sel them to first find out whether

ad they were not making mistakes,

Directing his gaze to where Mr.
Barrow sat, Mr, Adams said “the
people of St. George correct their
mistake .. . I think a word ta

thie wise should be sufficient.”
The Resolution was ultimately
passed, r



ay

GEORGE

HZMzwmme sz

whether hon’ble United



Wild Rabbit Upsets
The Family’s Plan

LAUNCESTON, Cornwall, April.

Plans by the Boswell fa

mily of Bathpool—a hamlet on

the edge of Bodmin Moor-—to live in Nassau, have been

upset by a rabbit.

Alternative plans to settl

in Kenya or South Africa

have also been frustrated by the same rabbit.



Bunski, an wild i"
lish rabbit Celt sete, pet a
et Boswell, wife of

ell, retired farmer,
exerts an influence over this
family similar to that of Harvey
in the famous play.

Mrs, Boswell said: “It is ridicu-
lous and at times maddening. But
there it is, our lives are ruled by
a rabbit.

“Believe me there is no mushy
sentiment behind our attachment
to Bunski. I have killed scores
of rabbits without compunction
but Bunski is different. I do not
pretend to be able to explain it,”

“Bunski” was a baby when Mrs.
Boswell advanced on him five and
a half years ago with the inten-
tion of killing him as a meal for
one of her ferrets.

Then, said Mrs, Boswell: “The
rabbit instead of running away
leapt into my arms and nestled

against me for ¢+ee
have been p ¢ him ever
sinee. Everywher. © go Bunski

Mrs, Boswell r. 14 the ratbit

to robust maturity py which time
Bunski’s affection for the family
—herself, husband and daughter
Veronica—was unbreakable,

It was when the Boswells
thought of moving to sunnier
climes abroad that in Whitehall
Government offices Bunski cor-
respondence files came into exis-
tence.

First Kenya, then the South
African Government were sound-
ed. Neither would “wear’’ Bunski.

The Bahamas agreed, provided
Bunski had a clean bill of health,
But B.O.A.C, gaid “No” to him as

a passenger.

company insisted on.
him travelling under a butcher’s
care — “unthinkable,” said the
Boswells.

Even Bire demanded to know
‘Yin triplicate)’ why thé Boswells
wanted to bring Bunski with them.

Said Mr, Boswell: “The master
in this house is a rabbit.”

West Reply Will
Leave Door Open

LONDON, April 22.

British Foreign Secretary, An-
thony Eden, said to-night that the
Western reply to Russia’s demand
for talks on Germany “will not
close the door to negotiations.”
The reply to the last Soviet note
on which British, French and
United States experts will start
work here to-morrow would be
constructive, he told a dinner of
the Newspaper Society.

“It will take in account the de+
sire of the German people for
unity without forgetting that a
Germany can only ~ ba
founded on true ingegen ence and
free democratic choice, “It will
take in account the earnest de-
sire of all peoples for peace and
for a European settlement which
safeguards the interests of all.”

MAIL NOTICE

AMENDED

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered Mail
at 1 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2 p.m
TO-DAY 23rd April 1952



Man With 500 Ti
Says ‘None To. Wear’

THE FIRST ONE WAS 1}d. FARE

TEN ‘years ago a passenger
on a No. 49 London bus gave the
conductor a brightly coloured tie
instead of a 1}d. fare—and started
a collecting craze,

The surprised conductor, Her-
bert (“Percy”) Price, began to
collect ties in his spare time. Then
flve years ago, as an inspector,
he was put in charge of the pas-
sengers service at Northolt Air-
port, and his hobby progressed
quickly.

Mr, Price said to-day: “Ameri-
ean and Continental
have a habit of loosening their
ties when they step from an air-
plane,

eT am usually around to ad-

e them, and when they hear
that I am a connoisseur, they give
them to me on the spot nine times
outof ten.”

Christmas Gift
\ Travallers send him ties from

The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractive!
slim, with bright eyes, cote
com) » and real fitness,
Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Bean’
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping millions
{healthy and youthful in looks
and figure. Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS
Just a couple at Bedtime
i SUN
SHADES

henge else erat

all different styles and
types available

From 727
to ahout $9.00

Call TODAY at your
JEWELLERS

Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 Broad Street.








SPECIAL

FOR TWO (2)

over $10.00



» You will admire our eng eeahes and attractive Prices

Ladies Dress Materials, Ladies Shoes, Ladies Hats,
Ladies Nylon Stockings, Ladies Anklets etc.
Gents Ready Made Pants, Elite Shirts, Gents Sport Shirts,
|Tie Retainers and Ties, Gents B.V.D's, Socks, “Otis” Vest ete.



\For Better Bargains Try...

AHELY & CO. 19 Swan Street—for,
ERVICE VALUE & VARIETY





NEWS FLASH

’

GLORIOUS WEEKS

We now offer you 5% Discount on all Cash Purchases”

|

|

|

omM< mama Fecs

PHONE 4934 |

travellers



all parts of the world, Air crews, |

British and foreign, often dvop

into his little office with a oe |

they have picked up for i

a few in Nice, Madrid,

Amsterdam or Stockholm, }

{

And his usual Christmas present

from his family Hayes, Middle-
sex, is invariably a tie.

Now he has five hundred,
ranging from American imitation
“Old Schools” to 5ft, long hand- \
painted nylon specials. His fay-
ourite is a bright royal blue silk
tie with the Statue of Liberty
hand- in gold. Many .of
his lection are kept in glass-

topped cases.

But “Perey” never wears one.
He says: “As novelties or works
of art they are supreme, but
wear them? I wouldn't be seen
dead in any of them, I've spent;
most of my life wearing my black |
uniform tie and it suits me just

fine,”
—LES.


































PAGE THREE








the deticious fragrance of "4711" Tosca

“470” Tosca Eau de Cologes

Perfume and the freshness of “4711
classic Eau de Cologne are ite out
4 standing qualities

Tosca Perfume
a breath of

“a7
alluring and fascinating -

romance.



TOSCA

RO ade in COLOON See

The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on
Rhine; it is now again obtainable in the original quality, made
according to the famous and secret formula since 1792.



7



The popularity of John White shoes is built om
VALUE, as well as DEPENDABILITY, Comfort
and style ?— Yes, certainly -~ they are as easy-
fitting and smart looking as you could wish, But
their outstanding VALU is what men expect and
always get when they insist on shoes made by
John White. See them for yourself in leading
stores throrghout Barbados,



Here’s the

NEW

ENGLISH
ELECTRIC

| refrigerator
|

Bringing you
Better Living!

Pheesing a refrigerator needs care-
t, particularly if you have

ful thoug
never had one before.

should always look for.

The first is quality of workmanship,
for on this depends the len
trouble-free service your refrigerator
will give you. And the second is capa-
city, for the more your refrigerator

SEE THE NEW MODELS

THE CORNER

But there are
two vitally important features which
are very easy to spot and which you



alii Seared nat



nen y



holds the greater boon it will be.
The new English Electric Refrigerator
offers|:—

Meat Keeper

Extra Bottle Space
Automatic Lighting
Humidrawers for Vegetables
Silent Running

Quick Adjustable Shelves
Extra Large Storage Area.

NOW ON SHOW AT
4

STORE

th of









PAGE TWO

ARIB to-day extends heart)
4 congratulations to West In-

dies Captain, John Goddard,
O.B.E., on his thirty-third birth-
day. Jehn whe was born on April
23, 1919, has the distinction of
being an old Lodge School boy
and also an Old Harrisonian.

He was a promising athlete ‘ai
school but on leaving school he
has deVoted most of his recrea-
tional timne to cricket. He has cap-
tained first Barbados, then the West
Indies in 1948, He also success-
fully led the West Indies against
India in ’°48—'49; against England
in 1950 and has just captained the
West Indies in the Tests in Aus-
tralia in Which the West Indies
lost the rubber.

John is one of ten children, the
only one of whom did not play
cricket and take part in athletics
was an only sister. He is still a
comparatively young International
captain and there is every indica-
tion that he will be the man to
lead the West Indies against India
néxt year.

May the years be many and
happy! .

On Holiday

{ R. AND MRS. WALTER 5S.
; JORDY and their two chil-
dren of New Orleans, La., U.S.A.,
have been holidaying at the Crane
for the past two weeks. Mr. Jordy
is employed at the Phillips Oi!
Co., and hopes to leave with his
family on the 27th April for
Caracus, Venezuela, where they
have been living for the past two
years.

For Medical Aid
R. AND MRS. DEORAJ
SAMAROO of San Fernando,
Trinidad, have been holidaying in
the colony since the 13th April.
Mrs. Samaroo is here for medica!
foe beat and hopes to leave with
er husband next week. They are
staying at Indrama Guest House,
Worthing.

Up and About

IS many friends will be glad

to learn that Mr. G. H. Adams,
C.M.G., who had been confined to
bed since his return from Geneva,
is up and about again. He presided
over a special mi of the
Housing Board héld at the Coun-
Sart pealle t attwal
Mr. Marrvshow off.

* Attended Cricket
_ -—- Board Meet
R. F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE and
Mr. J. M. Kidney, the Barba-
dos Representatives who attended
the meeting of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control in British
Guiana, returned home on Mon-
day night by B.W.1.A., from Trini-

Leaving Today
L* COMMANDER CHARLES
HAYWARD, e~

,. . Life

President of the A.A.A., of Trini-
daa and President of the T.A.F.A.,

be returning to Trinidad this
evening by B.W.LA., after spend-
a week’s holiday as the guest
| Mr. and Mrs. Norman Duthie of
Trees, St. James.

of



aub Calling

MR. JOHN GODDARD, 0.B.E.

Leeture at Foundation

7 R. CAMERON TUDOR, M.A.,
(Oxon), will deliver a lecture

on South Africa and the Common-

wealth,—a study in Origins at the

Monthly Meeting of the Old Boys’

Association on Friday, April 25 at

8 p.m.





For Convention

RRIVING over the week-end

by B.W.1.A., for the Conven-

tion of the North American Assur-

ance Company were Mr. Vernon

Cooper and Mr. K. Williams, the

Company’s representatives in St.

Lucia and Grenada respectively.

They are staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Representatives arriving on
Monday evening by B.W.1LA., for
the Conventoin were Mr. E. Grell
and Mr. Darey Galt from Trinidad,
Mr. C. de Qaites from British
Guiana and Mr. M. Phillips from
Jamaica,

Back to Trinidad
R. KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L.,
Point-a-Pierre, returned to
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA., after spending a holiday
with his relatives. He is a_son of
Dr. C. F. Stoute, retired Veterinary

Officer of Kensington Road.

To See Her Son
R. CAROLINE RAMESAR of
St. Augustine, Trinidad, who
arrived here for the Baster holi-
days with her two daughters and
to see her son who is a pupil at
the Lodge Schooi, will be return-
ing home Over the week-end. She
is staying at Super Mare Guest
House. .
Grenada Legislator
ON’BLE T. A. MARRYSHOW,
C.B.E., Deputy President of
the Legislative Council of Gren-
ada, left for Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.LA., where he will spend
a day before returning home,
During his ten-day stay in Bar-
bados, he was the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. G. H. Adams at “Tyrol Cot”,
Spooners Hill,



.WOMEN IN THE NEWS—8

Mrs. A. LL. Stuart

Mrs, Stuart is the wife of Dr.
A. L. Stuart of “Norham,” Tweed-
side Road. She was born in British
Guiana but when she was merely
even years old she left for Cali-
fernia where she was adopted by
her uncle Dr. W. E, Richardson,

Mrs, Stuart’s love for dancing
and her achievements in these
classes reflected more than a cas-
ual interest. Here was seen a
natural ability to handle the most
difficult steps. Acting on this, her
uncle permitted her to take extra
lessons during the holidays in
New York, As she grew into mid-
teens she struggled with two de-
sires —-her uncle’s whose wish for
her was to follow the medical pro-
fession and her own to make
dancing her career and further-
more to create her own steps.

At Elstree
In 1931 Mrs. Stuart visited her
mother in British Guiana. She
went to Trinidad and the
and later Barbados where

she continued her dancing, taking }

icular interest in stage shows.
1932 she left for England and
three years later was married in
London, The same year her danc-
career was climaxed at Elstree
Studies, London, where her
agents secured for her a third
part in “Saunders of the River.”

This Technicolour picture, di- bec
rected by Alexander and Zoltan rected all attention

weaker until eventually she be-
came blind for ten weeks. During
this time she was kept in a dark
room and the Studios afforded her
the best medical attention. After






RECT RRR er :

Nig

Mrs, A. L. STUART

lancet aisaraeerarmer nro wesc



recovering she decided

t against
coming a movie actor,

and di-
to her home,

Korda, starred Nina McKinney, She was also invited by the B.B.C,

and Paul Robeson, But after the
close-ups were taken they discov-
ered that the colour of her eyes
Was not for the .
Merle Oberon,
Howard, Hermaine Bradley and

my other British stars in
“Parade of Stars, 1935.” Her danc-
ae ‘were taught by Buddy

dley~-stage Director and Danc-
ing Master at Elstree

Technicolour
At that time technicolour hadn't
b@en long introduced and the
lighting effects were ten times
stronger than ordinary light. After
my takes and retakes Mrs.
rt’s eyes became weaker and





DIAL. 4220

Just Opened

PRINTED SPUNS 36”
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS

WHITE, PEACH, BLUE.
OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONGOLEUM RUGS,

to appear on a “Guest Star” pro-
gramme but unfortunately she was
in Manchester at that time.

Dancing School

After returning to Barbados
there were numerous requests for
a dancing school. Ih 1937 Mrs.
Stuart opened a sciiool for dancing

and fit. The school numbered
over and she realised that
this Was more her line—dealing

with children and imparting to
them what she herself had been
taught. In 1938 she staged her
first show at the Empire Theatre.

is was a big sticcess and the fol-
lowing year the school increased
in numbers. However, after her

@

36”

BY THE YARD.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

rived here yesterday by B.W.LA.,
on a visit. He was accompanied by

week end left yesterday morning
by B.W.LA.,
Trimingham was staying at In-
dramer Guest House, Worthing. is

' in aid of. Charity. There
# repeat

; talent among the girls and they

With The Royal Bank
ISS M. KING of British
Guiana who has been holi-

daying here for the past three
weeks staying at “Accra”, Rock=
ley, is due to return home to-day
by B.W.1.A. She is eriployed with
the Royal Bank of Canada.

Superintendent of Police
R. L. OUTRAM, Superintend- ;
ent of Police in St. Lucia ar-

his wife and their two children.

Trinidad Medico
R. I. TRIMINGHAM, who
arrived in the colony for the

for Trinidad. Dr.





Hanid Lectured the Kittens

—But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her—

By MAX TRELL |

HANID had Blackie on one knee, |
and Whitewash on the other. Both
kittens sat very quietly, looking up
now and then at Hanid and purring.

“You're darlings, both of you,”
Hanid said at last, patting both of
them along their little backs at the
same time so as not to get either of
them jealous. “But 1 do wish,” she
added, “that you didn’t both play
tag so very much.”

“Do you’know,” Hanid went on,
addressing first one kitten then the
other as she spoke; “you've been
playing tag ever since early, early
morning? When I first got up and
looked out of the window, there you
were, scampering across the garden.
And you kept it up all morning un-
til noontime when you came to the
porch for a minute or two to get
your saucer of milk. Then you
started all over again. You must be
terribly tired, aren’t you?” she said,
‘ooking into Blackie’s face. “Aren’t
you?” she said to Whitewash.

~ Purred Louder

Both kitteW® Moked back at Ha-
nid, and purred’p bit louder than

before. But neither of them said/gnq Whitewash; “€

anything, . ; | mother likes it better on the roof. }{
“Of course,” said Hanid. “I’m not | Phe view must be better.

quite sure it is tag that you two
play. Maybe it’s a special kind of
kitten-game. 1 wish you’d tell me
what the name of it is. Would you
please, dears?” ‘

Hanid waited for a moment or
two. The kittens didn’t seem anx-
ious to tell Hanid the name of the
tag-game they were playing. So she
shook her head sadly (for it did
seem a shame that they would want
to keep the name of their game a
‘seeret) and continued.

Ge 0 tp get a be ae » _
sit qui on the porch and res
until supper time, darlings? Look
at your mother,” she said, pointing
their heads to the other side of the
porch where Big Patchie sat wash-
ig her face with one of her paws.
“Your mother ar me eevand,
pla; or whatever-it-is. She

aden tee too hot to run, She

’t leave the shady porch; oh,







nol”

second show in 1939 the School
was closed but Mrs, Stuart contin-
ued to train girls who took part
in any entertainments. Such help
was rendered to the Excelsior




7

Revuedeville

Although she has no children} 7.
| Mrs, Stuart is very fond of them,

bo in 1949 the dancing school was
revived in response to several re-
quests from mothers. Later in the
ar a Mannequin Parade and
ce was staged at the Drill Hall



perform, some time
later. As the ool grew Mrs.
Stuart produced Revuedeville 1950
and 1951 at the Empire Théatre.
‘These two shows reflected local

are now clamouring for another
show.

Through the success of the last
year's show, Mrs. Stuart has con-
structed a new apartment for the
@chool which includes a ballet,
dancing, powder, and changing |
room, and canteen, There are also!
plans on foot for forming a club. - |

' Festival

Lisa Lekis, Festival Director,
invited Mrs. Stuart who is head’
of the Barbados branch to bring a
troupe to Puerto Rico for the Car-
ibbean Festival to be held in Au-
gus The festival consists of
kamples of the folk lore—dance,
music and art from all the islands
‘of the Caribbean, Each island will
present something different in
style and type.

Other Interests
Dancing is her chief fiir but
Mrs. Stuart holds a diploma from
the New York School in Interior
Decoration (1945) and a certifi-
cate in Hair and Beauty Culture
from Wilfred Academy, New York,
(1945). She is fond of music,
gardening and art and on the whole
is all “at home” as a housewife.
Although she is not a member
of any Board or Institution, she
contributes in all ways to charity
and has a special interest in the
Institution for the Blind.























ane
“YMAN



DIAL 4606

p Char

M®. Wilhelmina Beckles of the
US

ing a holiday here with her rela-
tives at Britten’s Hil, returned
home on Sunday by B.W.LA. via
Antigua and Puerte Rieo. She
was accompanied by her daughter.

ing. This is Miss Bell’s second
visit to the Colony.

On Six Months’ Leave

day by the s.s. Willemstad
Mr. ‘W. a

Superintendent of Montserrat, who ‘
was here for the













stopped washing her face, walked
slowly to the end of the porch, took | }}
a spring and climbed up to the roof.
Hanid could hear her footsteps pat-
z tering across the shingles, up as
high as the chimney where the swal-
lows were living during the summer. }}

least until the sun goes down and it
gets cooler. And I think,” Hanid put
in as a suggestion, “you ought to}
wash your faces so you'll be nice |)
and clean for supper.” K

the shady part of the porch. For a
minute or two they really sat there, |)
and almost—but not quite —looked |
as though they might sifri to wash |}
their faces. But suddenly, in the]f
twinkling of an eye, they were gone,

Hanid.

And when Hanid looked up at the
roof to tell Big Patchie that hez two
children hi
they both were, cuddled next to their
mother,
faces, right next to the
bricks of the chimney.













4.00-—-7,15 p.m
Kc andahaliauaigslaiine-glapammnene
4 p.m, The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
i “p.B.C. Midland Light

p.m. Think on these

Sports Round-up and Programme Parade,
p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m, Home News

from Britain

7.

|. The MODERN

*TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M

‘Thurs, Special 1.80 p,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE













Back To The U.S.A.

.A. who had been spend-

Second it





In a twin
is Said

kh figure
Belor e the two
nd looking mos:

ot

doing here."
“I'm working for Samra Claus,”













EAVING for England yester-
E.






ten days. He
on six months’ leave.





MPIC Te-néght at 8.30

OLY * a r
EMPIRE Thursday

A Complete change of Digtidene



7 7

THE RHYTHM

445 & 8m
To-morrow 4.45 only
Definitely your last chance to see
“A PLACE IN| THE SUN”
THURS. at 8.30
CALYP#0 REPEAT
AKCE.. .

Orchestra
Steel

ES
FRI. 2% & 8.
wach Dreeiy's
“ALICE IN_.WONDERLAND”

“NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
An Academy Award Winner
———————

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY AT 4.0.(Only)
Tomarrow 4.30 & 8.15
















. Along G's
and the Rhythm Kings



The kittens looked up at Hanid.
At that very instant Old Patchie !







“Oh well,” Hanid said to Blackie
yuess your







Ray MALLAND
. But i do “COPPER CANYON”
i ri ta t orch a
wish you’d both stay on the p: Donte Laie



in
“I WALK ALONE”



3s A :
CALYPSO AT 's
ANCE wit P.G

Along *
0 and the Rhythm Kings
Steel Band. ee

aaa eae See
THUR, 24th & SAT. 2th 1.50 p.m.
ROY ROGERS Double

“RIDING DOWN THE CANYON”
“SONG OF TEXAS
Friday only 4.90 & 8.15

“JAMES BROTHERS



* Sat on Porch
She set the two kittens down on |





“Blackie! Whitewash!” called|

They were nowhere to be seen

disappeared, theré

all three




washing their
sun-hot

YOU'VE NE
BEFORE.



B.B.C. Radio Progratnine

MAS pn ns aD 16 Me, COR

m. B

6.45 pign.

15—1045 pom . 26.62M, $1.32M

| Laareatetsemeeiscenepsencnen ence
7.15 p.m. Calling the West indies, 7,45
School of Music, by oh. Sp

uest, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
m. Statement of Account,

m.

reel, 8. P.
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55. p.m.

S* George, 10 p.m.
7 10,15















DRESSES

New Materials

New Styles <.

THEY WERE an














For Cocktails or }












Weddings a w \ SATURDAY APRIL 26 — MIDAIT
From $18.00 each N.B, Spe “ALICE” — Waltz Disney’s Academy |} featurin|
dies ‘Atte Bhatt Peatne a ( AN INTERNATIONAL aROUE OF ARTISTES
is 5 i starring -
60 gauge 15 denier NATURE’S HALF ACRE”
S — $2.27 : ; Bir i Di tf
$2 teas “BRAVER VALLEY wa ’ MONAH wect from Martinique
_ ktail : : . (Magician and Rhumba Dancer)
HANDBAGS This Alone is worth the Price of Admission. LOLITA—(French Guiana’s Samba Queen)
for — $6.23 KURABELLA (Exotic Tango Dancer)

alt Disney
And he'll take

As soon as it’s s

DRESS Shoppe

Broad Street







Charles

LSUEon tn The BLUE VEIL”

Joan BLONDELI-—Don TAYLOR—Agnes MOOREHEAD
Also The SHORT ;—"

0 a TOMO 45
James CAGNEY in . :
o 8) 9.0

dy

ie ct Spec ‘

Triple_A’ he .

ron
“Sx G

Tex WILLIAMS & Leo. BRO

Se ae

“ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS &

“RIDIN TRE OUTLAW TRAN.”
STARRETT, Smiley BURN



Rupert and the Toy Scout—9 BUT
aioe i 4 + BOLD true
f ae bs CT. HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS











With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS.

FAREWELL SHOWS AT

(PERCY GREEN'S jghonesrng’ =, Wopien, LEGS AND HB
KINGS STEEL

i's Ciitertemmeni ab it's BEST

‘ and
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{ nn

OF MIssOURT’




NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS
THE REAL, THE ONLY, THE GENUINE.

You E! {
THE KIDDIES WILL LOVE IT=YoU WiLL ENJOY it}

ws cah Only get to eee
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own here.

EMPIRE THEATRE

Friday, April 25th —














WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1952


















om~Dad

ITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
a
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES _

WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m. |
MEN Only 8.30 p.m.

AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!
WARNING !
This picture inclides powerful Medical Sequences.
NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !

P LAZA—sannantes (Dial 5170)

OPENING FRIDAY 25th (APRIL)

8.30
et Over 2 new song hits







mA METRO GOLDWYN MAYER Ay L 0 BE 20TH CENTURY FOX

ONE MASTERPIECE AFTER ANOTHER
}i TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.) Opening Tomorrow
LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
: and Continuing
GABLE
bi ee
GARDNER




ROXY

Last 2 Shows To-day 4.30 & 8,15
“ROSEANNA McCOY”™



and
“STORM OVER WYOMING”
Starring:

Tim HOLT—Richard MARTIN
Thurs. @ Friday 4.30 & 8 15
Edmond O'BRIEN in
“FIGHTER SQUADRON”
“INSPECTOR GENERAL”




























The battle
of Texas..
and the
battle
€ of the
sexes!









dai ARE

and
“DEAD MAN EYES"
—
Sogame SAT. 4.30 & 3.15
Glenn - ‘Rnonda Flemings

; —in — :
“Time REDHRAD AND TRE

ROYAL

To-asy & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15
Wild OTT in



“LORE STAR
NEL GARR VME. pri gy poem
HERE AT LAST = =» =

DAVID and BATHSHEBA
THE BIBLE’S GREATEST LOVE STORY

18s





‘BANDIT KING OF TEXTS"
Starring: Alan Rocky LANE

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND in
“DARK 3













“embwerOM Lani”








:



nx

VER SEEN i7














&



POWERFUL—AND
POWERFULLY DIFFERENT
—From WARNER BROS.

“COME


















e
© civprrna (CUP™
Y PHYLLIS THAXTER
RAYMOND MASSEY
Gig YOUNG—
> James GLEASON



YOu'LE CALL IT
BOLDY a

YOU'LL SAY IT’S

BLUNT! (Diat 2310)

P i A Z A an BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-MORROW (Thurs.) 24th., 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.













AND NOW HE|{
} Presents A MIDNITE VAUDEVILLE
on






























JOE CLEMENDORE (we all know him)
BOODHOO BROS, (B.G’s Acrobatic Kings)
HARVEY ROGERS (leading ballroom Exponent
and several other sensational stars
Music by Keith Campbell’s Society 5






in
Thursday, May ist. I

AREE
“CRISS CROSS”
BURT LANCASTER
The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 38.30 P.M
“BEYOND THE FOREST”
Bette DAVIS &





OIs' 8404
Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m,


















" “WHIPLASH” Dane
Warner : THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME - ae ee
pike 00 ‘2 CREEK” (Coler) Robert YOUNG & FRI, & SAT. 8.30 P M
SCOTT “MIGHTY JOR YOUNG”

THE THING

Robert ARMSTRONG &
(From Another World) 7

‘MY FORBIDDEN PAST"
Robert MITCHUM

MIDNITE SAT. %“TH
Triple Attraction —

“RAIDERS of the DESERT”
Richard ARLEN -— Andy DEVINE
“CHEYENNE COWBOY"

Tex WILLIAMS &
TEX BENEKE & GLENN MHAER
ORCHESTRA



Randolph
-subows, Genta, Pekinte
SIX GUN MESA Johiny Mack BROWN

SAT. SERCTAL 1,30. p.m.

“BADMEN’S TERRITORY’
— .
gs Tim
‘tom & DAD ail

——=——
THURS (only) 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
“HONEYMOON LODGE
Francis LANGFORD &
“RIV .












" (Coler)
onne De CARLO










WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

House Hit

At Public

Service Commission |

WHEN certain members of the House of Assembly last
night sought during the consideration of two Resolutions
relating to the payment of the members of the Public Ser-
vice Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff
of the Commission, to criticise certain appointments on the
Commission, His Honour the Speaker was forced on several
occasions to rule such members out of order and implore
them to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions.

This was particularly the case
with Mr. Mapp, junior member for
St. Thomas, who repeatedly, de-
spite the intimations from the
Chair that he should not do so,
criticised the appointment of Mr.
Aburey Douglas-Smith to mem-
bership on the Commission.

After being ruled out of order
on three consecutive occasions
while making such observations
and criticisms against Mr. Doug-
las-Smith’s appointment, Mr. Mapp
admitted that “I have been hard
of hearing
hear rulings too good.”

The two Resolutions, the one a
corollary of the other, provided
that the Chairman of the Com-
mission be paid $20.00 per meeting
with a maximum remuneration of
$80.00 in any one month, and that
members should be paid at the
rate of $10.00 per meeting with a
maximum remuneration of $40.00
in any one month; and for the ap-
pointment of one Long Grade
Clerk and one Stenographer Typist
for the performance of duties
arising from the institution of the
Commission,

In this connection, $3,000 has
already been provided in the 1932-
53 Colonial Estimates to meet the
estimated expenditure, Serving
Officers in the Public Service will
not receive any remuneration
above their normal salaries. The
Commission will be responsible
for advising the Government as
regards to recruiting, training,
discipline, appointment and pro-
motion of Civil Servants and other
allied matters, and in view of the
fact that the Commission is to be
a permanent body, it is considered
desirable that the staff necessary
for its efficient operation should
be placed on a permanent basis.

Speaking on the question of re-
muneration for the service render-
ed by members of the Commission,
Mr, O. T. Allder (I) criticised the
rate of the remuneration, and
asked the hon’ble member who
dealt with the Resolution in this
connection to outline the basis on
which the rates were fixed, and
how often the Commission would
sit. In his opinion $20.00 a
meeting for the Chairman was
“very high’, and foresaw the
possibility of the Commission
meeting in some instances for only
five minutes.

Mr. W. A, Crawford (C) refer-
red to the stipulation that no Civil
Servant on the Commission would
get any remuneration for his
service on the Commission,
and said he did not agree
with the proposals. He imagined
that there was some pre-
cedence for the proposals, and
added that it | appear to him

t on it when a man
was called upon to perform duties
of the nature envisaged in the
Public Service Commission Act,
that he should be given some
extra compensation,

Mr. A. E. 8. Lewis (L) criticised
the idea of having a member of
the Executive Committee on the
Commission, and recalled how the
policy had been advocated that
politicians should keep out of the
affairs of the administration, and
paid that while that was being
preached, a member of the Ciyil
Service was made a member of
‘the Executive Committee. He
could not reconcile the two dif-
ferent policies,

Mr. Mapp (L) attempted io dis-
cuss the personnel of the Com-
mission, and was ruled out of
order, His Honour having earlier
counselled Mr, Lewis to refrain
from doing so,

The first Resolution was passed
and during the discuss{on on the
second Resolution which dealt
with the setting up of the Clerical
Staff, Mr. Mapp again sought to
discuss and criticise the appoint-
ment of Mr. Douglas-Smith as a
member of the Commission.

He asked “What does the
Resident Tudor of the University
College of the West Indies know
about the local Civil Service and
to be competent to advise the
Government as regards recruit-
ment, training, discipline, appoint-
ment and promotion of Civil
Servants.

Once again His Honour the

Speaker asked the hon’ble mem-
————

HOUSE OF



to-night and cannot .

ber to refrain from discussing the
personnel of the Commission, the
appointment of which did not con-
cern the House, but still Mr. Mapp
persisted, On two other occasions
His Honour was forced to call the

te order, but he continued,
“I ean’t see what the Director of
Extra Mural Studies, an English-
man who has recently out
here, knows about the local Civil
Service. » * «

Hard of z
Mr. Mapp continuing his critic-
ism Government to try to
find “suitable Barbadians who
have served in the local Service,
people who know of local condi-
tions and suitabilities, to serve on
such a body.

When once again the hon’ble
member attempted to bring the
name of the Resident Tudor into
the discussion, His Honour appeal-
ed to him “to keep the name of
the Resident Tutor out of the de-
bate, ang Mr, Mapp replied, as he



KLM’s New Air
Freight Room
Is Most Modern



CURACAO
At Schiphol Airport in Amster-
dam this week, K.L.M. Royal

Duteh Airlines opened the most
ultra modern air freight building
in Europe. The new edifice has
been erected on the site of the
first air freight hangar which was
opened for service just 32 years
ago when K.L.M.’s first air freight
consignment was a parcel of En-
glish newspapers and a letter
from the Mayor of London to the
Mayor of Amsterdam,

The construction of the new

was about to sit down, “I have depot was prompted by the tre-

been hard of hearing, and cannot
hear rulings too good.”
Mr. E. W.

mendous expansion in air freight
‘traffic since the end of the World

. Barrow (L) joined War II and the fact that K.L.M.
issue with the wording of the is convinced that cargo will con-

second clause of the Addendum
which read: ;

The amendment seeks to in-
crease the Establishment by one
Long Grade Clerk and one
Stenographer-Typist for the per-
formance of duties arising from
the institution of a Public Service
Commission which will throw an
additional burden on the Estab-
lishment Branch of the Secreta-
riat, and ealled it a “cleverly
worded clause.

He observed that it did not say
that the Long Grade Clerk and
Stenographer- ist should

ue to grow in importance to
ie airline industry.

The building occupies 1,900
Square yards of warehousing
space and its unique application
of working methods, cargo hand-
ling, layout and technical aids
are designed for speedy and
efficient management of many
tons of freight per day. Cargo
planes are parked in front of the
building and special pallets for
speedy loading and unloading of
the aircraft are placed into

be operation, as well as the latest

members of the staff of the Com- mechanical devices used for this

mission and it also assumed quited 4

of work. Conveyor belts

falsely that the Public Service transport the freight directly into
Commission was itself to be an the building. A special platform-

addendum to the Colonial Secre-
tariat.

He thought that it was against
the true spirit of the Public Ser-
vice Commission Bill, because if
the House wanted to appoint an
Advisory Body to the Colonial
Secretary it would have done so,
and they would have set up a
separate and distinct body.

His contention was that if the
Public Service Commission ‘was
an independent body, it should not
be considered an advisory body
to the Colonial Secretary’s office,
and should have a Clerk and
Typist quite apart from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office. The two
organisations should work in as~
sociation, but not in collusion.

If they worked in collusion,
they would find that the Coloniat
Secretary or one of the Assistan
Colonial Secretaries or another
Senior Officer of the Office would
always hold the files of the Com-
mission and when a meeting was
held, that officer would come along
end act as Secretary for the time
being.

He urged that the Public Ser-
viee Commission should be @ com-
pletely separate and independent
body, and observed that if they
worked in collusion, it would be
equal to retaining the status quo
of the old state of affairs where
the Colonial Secretary was “Lord

Executioner, Judge, Jury
and everything,” on appoint-
ments, with other Heads of De-
partments acting in an advisory
capacity.

He thought it was highly unde-
sirable that they shoud pass any
section which might give the
Colonial Secretary licence to be-
lieve that the Commission which
the House wanted as an inde-
pendent body, should be an ad-
dendum or appendage to his own
policy,

He was only throwing out a
word of warning, and if the warn-
ing fell on the “right ears,” he
would not vote against the Reso-
lution, In conclusion he appealed
to members to be careful, ard
warned that “it’ was not a frontal
assault, but an enveloping move-
ment.”

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) associated
himself with the (remarks an
observations made by Mr. Barrow,
and Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasised
that the two officers for whicn
they were making provision
would be too closely connéctéd
with the Commission, and would
be in a position to deal with



COMMONS

The Speaker’s chair,
all seating throughout the Chamber,

galleries and lobbies and every

other

article of upholstered furniture
chroughout the new building
are equipped with

eae
rill i
Ee SZ



«

¢ the Ministry of
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& Co. Ltd., Cheltenham;



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ONDON: 1920 NEW BOND STREET, W.I
FOUNDERS OF THE LATEX FOAM INDUSTRY
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Works : Six Giles Gilbert Scott, OM, R.A.

i Acknowladgments:

> co-operation of the Contractors responsible for the seating is

gratefully acknowledged by Dunlop Rubber Co, Ltd. -—J. L. Green

Maple & Co. Ltd., London; H. H. Martyn
F. Sage & Co. Ltd., London;

Gillow Led., London.

NLOPILLO

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Waring &

truck-bed height at one end of 80€5

the depot facilitates the loading
and unloading of freight trucks.
Because of the growing num-
ber of live animals transported
by K.L.M. in the past few years,
a hotel for Animals, occupies
ce in the new construction.
is hotel is equipped with run-
ning water, heat, electrical con-
nections, a ventilating system and
temperature control and can be
furnished to accommodate any
number or kind of animals at a
moment's notice, Specially trained
animal stewards are in charge
of the livestock at the hotel and
accompany all K.L.M, animal
shipments aboard the aircraft.





? their own promotion, and so to

k,

mselves.” ~ a 4 a

Replying categoriqally to thy
criticisms, Mr. Adams explain
that Mr. Douglas-Smith was the
first choice of the Civil Service
Commission and said that it was
wise to have someone on the Com-
mission who would not be preju-
diced. He thought it was a good
thing too to have a member of the
Executive Committee who was not
a politician on the Commission,
and to have the Colonial Secretary,
who was directly connected with
the administration there.

He agreed that it would be
damnable to have a politician on
the Commission, and replying ta
the criticism made by Mr. Bar-
row, said “I speak with sorrow
rather than in anger,” at such
criticisms coming from the hon’ble
member who should know that
throughout the British Empire,
there were Public Service Com-
missions,

“sit in judgment upon
es. w= , 3 :

whether hon’ble Uni

He asked
members thought that the Govern-
ment had not taken great care in
the matter, or that they did not

use precedence after endeavour-:

ing to correct faults and errors
experienced by other places ‘be-
fore coming to a decision.

He welcomed hon’ble members
drawing errors to the attention of
Government, but he would coun-
sel them to first find out er

d they were not making mistakes,

Directing his gaze to where Mr.
Barrow sat, Mr. Adams said “the
people of St. George correct their
mistake . .. I think a word ta
the wise should be sufficient.”

The Resolution was ultimately
passed, r







GEORGE




HZnzZomime sz



1 “HAW. . SUE SUGE USES &
LIPSTICK THAT

winNin £0 tet HOM
. GS TO COLL
HONEST JOE IN THAT RACE?

PAGE THREE



ow HAVE

DEAg Wily ?

yu &

Wild Rabbit Upsets

The Fam

LAUN
Plans by the Boswell fa

ily’s Plan

CESTON, Cornwall, April.
mily of Bathpool—a hamlet on

the edge of Bodmin Moor—to live in Nassau, have been

upset by a rabbit.
Alternative plans to se

ttle in Kenya or South Africa

have also been frustrated by the same rabbit.

Bunski, an ordinary wild Eng-
lish rabbit kept as a pet by Mrs.
Vera Mi Boswell, wife of
Mr. P. J. well, retived farmer,
exerts an influence over this
family similar to that of Harvey
in the famous play.

Mrs, Boswell said: “It is ridicu-
lous and at times maddening. But
there it is, our lives are ruled by
a rabbit.

“Believe me there is no mushy
sentiment behind our attachment
to Bunski. I have killed scores
of rabbits without compunction
but Bunski is different, I do not
pretend to be able to explain it.”

“Bunski” was a baby when Mrs.
Boswell advanced on five and
a half years with the inten-

tion of killing him as a meal for
one of her ferrets.

Then, said Mrs, Boswell: “The
rabbit instead of running away
leapt into my arms and nestled

Man With 500 Ties

Says ‘None To. Wear’
THE FIRST ONE WAS 1}4, FARB

TEN ‘years ago a passenger
on a No, 49 London bus ve toe



all parts of the world, Air crews, |
British and foreign, often dvop
into his little office with a er

they have picked up for i
a few shillings in Nice, Madrid,
Amsterdam or Stockholm,

{

And his usual Christmas present

from his family Hayes, Middle-
sex, is invariably a tie.

Now he has five hundred,
ranging from American imitation
“Old Schools” to 5ft, long hand- \
painted nylon specials. His fay-
ourite is a bright royal blue silk
tie with the Statue of Liberty

in gold. Many .of
his lection are kept in glass-

topped cases.

But “Perey” never wears one.
He says: “As novelties or works
of art they are supreme, but
wear them? I wouldn’t be seen
dead in any of them, I’ve spent ;
most of my life wearing my black |
uniform tie and it suits me just

conductor a brightly coloured tie fine.”

instead of a 1}d. fare—and started

a collecting craze,

The surprised conductor, Her-
bert (“Percy”) Price, began to
collect ties in his spare time. Then
fwe years ago, as an inspector,
he was put in charge of the pas-
sengers service at Northolt Air-
port, and his hobby progressed
quickly,

Mr, Price said to-day: “Ameri-
can and Continental travellers
have a habit of loosening their

es whe: y st ir-

an am 4 _— + ‘ n they step from an air

ve been p him ever = «| suall d-

ieee Ser eoe ft go B am usually around to ad
;

,

Mrs. Boswell nursed the ratibit
to robust maturity by which time
Bunski’s affection for the family

—herself, husband and daughter

Veronica—was unbreakable,

It was when the Boswells
thought of moving to sunnier
climes abroad that in Whitehall
Government offices Bunski cor-
respondence files came into exis-
tence.

First Kenya, then the South
African Government were sound-
ed. Neither would “wear’’ Bunski.

The Bahamas agreed, provided
Bunski had a clean bill of health,
But B.O.AC. said “No” to him as
a passenger.

A shipping company insisted on.
him travelling under a butcher’s
care — “unthinkable,” said the
Boswells.

Even Eire demanded to know
in triplicate)’ why thé Boswells
wanted to bring Bunski with them.

Said Mr, Boswell: “The master
in this house is a rabbit.”

West Reply Will
Leave Door Open

LONDON, April 22.

British Foreign Seeretary, An-
thony Eden, said to-night that the
Western reply to Russia’s demand
for talks on Germany “will not
close the door to negotiations.”
The rest to the last Soviet note
on which British, French and
United States experts will start
work here to-morrow would be
constructive, he told a dinner of
the Newspaper Society.
“It will take in account the de+
sire of the German people for
unity without forgetting that a
ted can only ~be



founded on true independence and
free democratic choice. “It wi
take in account the earnest de-
sire Of all peoples for peace and
for a European settlement which
safeguards the interests of all.”



that I am a connoisseur, they give
tiem to me on the spot nine times
oWthof ten.”
Christmas Gift
Travallers send him ties from

that them, and when they hear

{

h



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and style? — Yes, certainly they are as easy-
fitting and smart looking as you could wish, But
their outstanding VALUE is what men expect and
always get when they insist on shoes made by
John White. See them for yourself in leading
stores throughout Barbados.





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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BARBADOS 8 ADVOCATE,

catnaptener concent?

1952

Wednesday, April | 23,

SEAWELL REPORT

DURING the debates in the House of
P Assembly earlier this year some very
unflattering statements were made by
members against the Canadian engineers
Joaned by the Canadian government to
the government of Barbados. During these
~ debates Mr, Adams honourably defended
the Canadian engineers and attributed the
misfortunes of Seawell to “extraordinary
bad luck.”
When the House considered the Con-

















LONDON LETTER

The Library of the House of
Commons is always a pleasant
place but particularly at this time
of the year when spring has got-
ten over her first tearful doubts
and is settled down to a maidenly
sobriety, Here there are no tele-
phones to interrupt, no strangers,
no constituents. The philosopher
can sink into a deep leather chair
and close his eyes so as to concen-
trate the better upon the debate
to which he will return later on.

It is amusing to hear the tugs
snorting a warning to the bridge
that they, are coming through, and
it is soothing to watch those wise
motionless philosophers of the
river, the barges, standing philo-
sophically while they gaze.at the
Houses of Parliament.

So it is in the Library that I



By BEVERLEY BAXTER

ours for the taking. Those coun-
tries which have not succumbed to
communism by that time will fall
to the Russian sword.” and yet
here it is—springtime 1952—and
we are still alive. Somehow,
somewhere, Stalin's calculations
have gone wrong. I suggest, even
at the expense of repetition,

he made the same mistake as Hit-
ler in overestimating the effect of
fear and underestimating

strength of the human spirit,

We always forget the Greeks so
easily, yet not only did they fight
Italy in the war but took on Ger-
man as well. Their heroism is
almost as great as their incapacity
for stable government. But after
the long occupaticn of the Ger-

Federation |
‘In The
Empire”’

LONDON.

“Federation is in the air,” writes New
Commonwealth in its current issue. -

to oif the selfish interests of com-|
petitive capitalism are apt to for-
get the primary importance of)
politics.

But with all their fumbling)
and bungling, and despite the |
half-heaiicd, split-minded inter-
vention of America the oil did not
gush and the fimancial situation
of Persia became more and more
difficult. But if Persia failed the
Russian dream there was still
E
oR was, tevever. quite
another matter. You might argue
for or against British Imperialism
in Persia but when it comes to
the Suez Canal, without which
our ships would have to make
long voyage round the Cape, that
was something of a very. different
complexion. .

New Commonwealth continues: “It may
be pertinent to inquire whether anything is
to be learned from the examples of federa-



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

BOOKS !

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ADVOCATE





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want to write this letter from
London, for there are ideas in my
head that need ‘clarifying, and I
have a feeling! that if the job is
well done the provéss of clarifica-
jumine some of the dark
S hice mind as, well.
Eden Optimistic

aa eh Big U.K. Acts Swiftly tion which we already possess. It is not
mans had en they fought the MK. Ac s Sw . 4

¢etatauhiet-vebellion "Ket was to The British ~acted swiftly,/Perhaps sufficiently realised that among the
put Greece in the bag. That was renee mercilessly, This was a|Commonwealth countries which are known

t to Britain's sea power and
pag a nee saeea heen ae ought that is something ‘which Britain| 4S Dominions, excluding Great Britain, there
are only three examples of unitary govern-

that Tito, the plump wonder boy Will take from no country. Sel-
ments, namely, the Union of South Africa,

nolly report $60,000 were voted for re-
pairs to the runway. The Legislative
Council later sanctioned this expenditure.

At the time some members 6f the House
queried the Government’s reasons for
voting $20,000 more than the $40,000 sug-



VALOR STOVES
(Table Models with one and

of communism, would turn 40m has a great power. used its
against Russian Imoverialism and Strength with so little regard for |

o
’
recent
example is typical
of ‘built-to-last’ . ..
:
4
:








two burners ) %
the susceptibilities of a smaller) New Zealand, and Ceylon. The others are %
‘ ‘ admit that in writing DOt only defy Stalin but mock SIGE! BRT Mae Gitieueh te ithe ' : Large Two and Three Burner %
gested by Mr. Connolly. They contended the eB dition of the world him? Yet the Suey that came from British Lion had home to an ena |all examples of federalism; namely, Canada Models %
that whatever sum voted would be spent. nese ae Yugoslavia but at the other satel- eho a which consists of ten provinces, each with ‘
i Repair work on the runway began about | }Y. fo, a private talk eee Re, COT | eae Some meriting |itS separate legislature; Australia, com- Cartiiete «Miuoin x
id-April and this week almost all of the Anthony? Eden. '1 am not in a posi- of these words~and their pub-! prising six States; India, which not only em- VENS — Medi %
1,700 feet which asphaltic con- | tom to quote him but there is no cle : lication but I =— this —. Ladies the f Provinces tat alia taan aum 8
Square feet on Pp harm in saying that he was more MEV ERLEY cy — that Persia ies the former Provinces bu y Large %
crete patches have been placed have been | optimistic about the immediate f- HAXTER M.P will come a te terms with

completed. -These patches have been dug
down and refilled some to’a depth of 18
ins. and one to a depth of 6 feet but aver-
age depths were between 2 and 3 feet.

The completion of the asphalted patches
this week promised” well for~the ending
of the whole job not later than June at a
cost within the $60,000 voted by the gov-
ernment.

On Monday, however, the concrete con-
veyor which performs. the work of some
three or four’men in a quarter of the time
was discovered to be damaged. Unléss
that concrete conveyor can. be
locally in a reasonable period of time the
repair of the runway at’ Seawell will bé
delayed. If concrete. blocks are laid) by
hand it will greatly” inckbuge ‘the cost of
the job and the House’s Brey of $60,000
will be exceeded.

It is right that the-public should be told
these facts. promptly. Had.public state-
ments in the form-of pregress reports been
issued during the construction of the few
runway not only would much of the mud-
slinging that was done in the»House of
Assembly and outside have,been
















ture than any time since the end
of the Hitler war, and remember
that while Eden may be a romantic
off Gity’-hé is arealist when it
cgmes to foreign affairs.

Things have not workeg out ac-
cording to plan for Stalin. That
does not meen that the western
world has placeti itself in an im-
pregnable position or that western
statemanship deserves the bame
of genius, Democracy always mud-
dies its affairs and_. thete have
been plenty of mistakes sitice the
War-worn democracies put away
the sword in 1945-and. teok amp the
torch. >

Stalin is not-a feo) like Hitier,
but he has permitted himself the
same. basic miscalculation as dhe
Fuehrer, Hitler believed thatvfear
was the most powerful of human
emotions. Hence the pograms

anised gangs of street ruf-

ig ang the final dream
@@ a Victorious Third Reich erect-
‘@d upon the corpses of it- enemiec
@ dream that ended with Hitler's
sultide in the bunker.

Stans rian
Stalin aa nardiy iaken over
»irpm Lenin when he began to pien

~ Nis ened. — absolute. power, A:-

believed that Hussia
Wout be. at war, with Germany
a eaaeare lume be BOt oniy Lqui-

-Ampos- ,
sible but corrective action night iso Have */eciated ali those leacers of ine party

been taken at the time.

Now is the* time. for~an“inquiry to. be.
made by the government into the dam-
aging of the concrete conveyor at Seawell
and the facts of the, inquiry rust be placed
before the: public. ae

It is not fair to the public | keeping them
in the dark with regards the spénding of
their money.

The $60,000 now beixg spent at Seawell
are coming not from the United Kingdom
but from the government, of. Barbados,
Work has been going on at Seawell for
nearly two months now and 60 per cent.
of the concrete slabs still have to be laid.
At the present rate of progress using the
concrete conveyor the work would have
been completed by June within the limits -
of the sum voted by the House of Assem-
bly for repairs to the runway. The dam-
aging of the conerete conveyor cannot be
regarded as.a normal affair nor even as
“extraordinary bad luck.”

The nature of the damage suggests that
it was wilfully done. Failure to enquire
into this damage and failure to report the
findings will breed no confidence among
the people. .

The public have become very sensitive
and rightly as to how public money is
spent at Seawell and Mr. Connolly's plac-
ing of responsibility for failures at Sea-
well on the ‘government and the contrac-
tor was not reassuring to the public. This
time ‘there is no contractor. The govern-
ment -is résponsible for the work and is
fortunate in having the assistance of Mr.
James of Canada to help them carry. it
out. If conerete conveyors are sabotaged
and conerete mixers put out of cémmis-
sion the work at Seawell cannot. be said
to be proceeding smoothly.

The public await with perturbed minds
t for an announcement from the govern-
ment that immediate action will be taken
to inquire into the suspected sabotage of
equipment being used to repair the run-
way at Seawell.

FISH FARMING

~ LONDON.

A SCIENCE) practised ‘by mdhks) \in)
Britain and Céntral Europe in the Middle
Ages may revolutionise West African
village diet in the next few years, It is
the science of fish farming, which was»
carried out hundreds of years ago in cer-
tain parts of the British Isles and Bohemia,
and is only now being used again to breed.
fish in arid places,

Expert in this is Dr. C. F. Hickling,
Fisheries Adviser to the Colonial Adviser,
who will visit Nigeria next month, in, his
tour of West African territories,

He has already conducted astonishing
experiments with his fish farms in other
pafts of the Empire. He flew fingerlings
—tiny fish just. spawned—of tropical fish
from Malaya and South China to the West
Indies, where he started fish farms in-a
number of inland areas,

4 Hatta >

tf





fs



; whOwere Jrotskyists or Leniaists,

a enna hall the generai stan
@nd_ imprisoned or liquidatea
eS Of State servants in the
government | departments. “You
va.ue life toe highly in the West,”
he said to Lord Beaverbrook m
‘ar, “nothing is so easy tc
as human beings.”
talin intended to maké war
against Germany as.soon as he had
built up the military might ot
Russia and had undermined the
security of Germany by Commun-
ism. But Hitler acted before Rus-
sia was readyiahd Stalin was
forced to embrace the gorilla he

se when the pone turned on
nim. ! '

Stalin saw nis” troops being
hurled back but when he realised
that the Anglo-Americans would

not leave Russia to the merey of
Hitler his * cortisone ce ey

Until the ae was over here was
no time for politically educating
the, crumbling capitalists, -world,
ahd Stalin devoted his whole effort
to the defeat of Germany. History
will record that in that effort
proved himself a generalissimo of
gehius and indomitable spirit,

When the war ended he was an
fld'man but fanaticism ig @ drug
that drives.the heart at a merci-
less pace. Perhaps too it is wo
noting th~t di¢tators can
tire unless they choose a hice
quiet grave. Stalin. had to go on
with his world revolution, nor was
he daunted but, what He saw,

Asia was in flames, China had
gone Communist, Burma was in
revolt, Nehru’s ‘hour in
India, Japan was grove in the
first defeat of her hi: Pales-
fine and the Arab States had
taken to the knife, Egypt was
swollen with foreign money and
homemade nationalisation, Persia
was erupting. “Roosevelt. whose
spirit had done g6,.much to sustain
Stalin in the dark days of the*war
and proved a gullible innocent
in conference. The Balkans were
in the maw of the Russian grip,
and Eastern Germany was a Rus-

jan satellite, Britain was ‘virtual
bankrupt, France was bled
cae and Italy was there for
the picking, What did the millions
of Russia’s wartime, dead Matter
against such a blessed outcome’

Now the world Would hear me
crack 6f the Russian whip! ‘Now
. they would see whether Britain
would try to maintain her tra-
ditional policy of denying a warm
water port to Russia, The Kremlin
had the “palace of victo-
rious Communist Imperialism.

What opened
oan et es pare bungled the Persian affair ana

had in his
fatigue robbeti him of them: in
the night. |

Empiié Breaks Up

It must) have taathened his
Muscovite heayt to see the British
Empire breaking. up~before his
eyes. India, that proudest gem in
Britain’s erown, had become a
Republic with a hostile Pakistan
laring furiously across the mis-

apen frontier carved with such
indecent haste, Burma, which had
been defended with so many
British lives, was free for oppor-
tunism and ‘corruption.

The only great nation which had
emerged stronger from the war
was the United States of America,
but why should Stalin doubt that
the fondness which Roosevelt
has Shewn towards him not only
the fondness but the trust—would
be contiriuéd by Truman, especial-
ly as Churchill was no longer in
a position to fortify ‘his spirit?

l.do not dotibt that Stalin must
have looked out from the windows
of the Kremlin and said: “By the
spring of 1952-the world. .will be

Beverley Baxter is a Cana-
dian who came home to con-
quer England. In his autubio-
graphy he described with what
painful experiences he entered
‘Fleet Street’ and the world
of English journalism.

Within a few years Beverley
Baxter was editor of the
DAILY EXPRESS and one of
the brightest lights of the
world he had so recently en-
tered.

Having made one reputation
he turned to making another.
With his zest, love of life and
the stage which refiects life, he
became London's most dashing
theatre critic

Not content with an editor-
ial chair and an eminent posi-
tion as a critic. Beverley
Baxter entered Parliament (as
a Conservative) in 1935. With
his roots in Canada and his
interests in the Empire. Bax-
ter has been relied upon by
his colleagues in Parliament to
present many an unorthodex
and thankless view—especial-
ty during the pre-war years
when Empire affairs were
largely ignored. He is still in
Parliament and still a journal-
ist and drama critic.

The ADVOCATE is now
able to offer Baxter's intimate
commentary on ‘The Commons,"
Winston Churchill. the Gov-
ernment, and all that catches
his eye—the eye of a free and
brilliant critic—on the re-
markable stage of affairs at
Westminster. This commen-
tary is similar to the account
Beverley Baxter renders to his
own Canadian countrymen—a
twice monthly feature that is
as famous as MacLean's Maga-
zine in which it appears.



and Rumania for fear another

Tito would arise.
Action Essential
Stalin was losing face, a
dangerous loss for even a semi-
oriental. Something had to be

hated and then fight for his own done to show the world who was sians?

master, something dramatic,
ironic and humiliating but short
of war. So Russia closed the
roads supplying the allied zones
in Berlin. The Anglo—American
reply was as swift as a thunder-
clap upon a flash of lightning.
With a roar of engines the air
lift began, costly, cumbersome
but decisive. The west had defied
Stalin for the first time,
Stalin drew away to nurse his

os injured pride.

Where could he find solace for
his self-esteem? Above all where
eould he display the might of
Russia without involving her in
a world war? The answer was
Korea!

General MacArthur told me in
New York that the north Korean
army was the best trained and
best equipped military unit he
had ever fought against, The

. Russians had done a wonderful

job in preparing this formidable
army and were tertain ithat by
the time the western nations
could make up their minds South
Korea would be overrun and
there would no loriger be a divi-
ded state. The whole thing was
to be a dynamite exhibition of
Russia’s strength without the loss
of a single Soviet soldier. And
what a strategic jewel Korea
‘would be in the hands of Russian
stooges. Korea was a prize in
herself as well as a Communist
demonstration of strength,

But the United Nations, under
the courageous impetus of
America acted with incredible
swiftness. We cannot yet see the
end of the ‘tragic story but Stalin
had suffered his fourth great
Ser Rot Greece, Tito, the
Berlin air lift, Korea. The Com-
munist dream’ of world conquest
was paling beneath the morning
light or reality.

Yet Stalin had two great hopes
—Persia and Egypt. If only the
anti-British outburst could be
sustained in those two countries
then. surely the doors would be
to Russia. The British

the American intervention did

not help much, for when it comes table

—

OUR READERS SAY

CNS. And The
French Line

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I am indeed grateful to
Mr. F, L. Y. Simpson for having,
fin his letter of the 20th of this
month, published those remarkable
figures. I believe that Mr. Simp-
son made public these figures to
prove that the C.N.S. have been,
for the past couple of years,
supplying adequate facilities for
intercolonial sea travel. If I
allowed Mr. Simpson’s figures to
stand alone, it would most
naturally appear to those who
know no better that the of 753
passengers dealt with in and out
of this port for the year 1951
could be considered favourable.
Such figures however look rather





jcompletely organised Princely States, such
right then Russia will have lost &S Hyderabad and Mysore; and, to a lesser
two sources of great hope. }extent, Pakistan. We should therefore have

The truth is that while both | @2mple experience of federalism to draw upon
Persia and Egypt deeply resented | within our own borders.

what they called the I hi :
of the Angio—American alliance. “Indeed, we are already extending the

neither ‘was willing to accept principle, where its application has seemed
Russian commu nh as an alter-

native. desirable, to Nigeria, with its Regional and

Egypt
Great Britain. If I am proved)




Thus we come to this signifi-|Central Assemblies, but Nigeria, too, is a
cant paradox, that while many of
the smaller nations are in revolt/large and diverse country with an area




against the Victori
of Imperialism they
to accept commun

. conception greater than that of France and pre-war
are reluctant; § P

sm as a sub-|Germany combined. The case of Malaya is
Stitute. This may be of small | different. This small peninsula was already
encouragement to the westerr

capitalist. world equally, it split up into separate Sultanates when the
Supplies little inspiration to the | British arrived, and it was essential for effi-
lonely man in the ‘Kremlin,

But Stalin, despite his years,|cient administration to apply some degree
is sti one of the ablest, if not |
the ablest, ef ihe political lead |! federation; even so, some States in the
ers of the . world. Unlike| north remained unfederated. Centralisation
a laos bp secur ta pertiansent | hawever, tended steadily to increase, and
for his actions. He can switch and/ after the war the Malayan Union was pro-
change st will regardless of pub-/| posed, leaving the Malay rulers only their

lie opinion hus .
the blue he/ religious and cultural functions,





Therefore out
went back on everything he had
s and offered Germany the} .
chance to re-unite. I speak with! “Let us turn to the far different case of
some knowledge when I declare!

thet this dasislon startled’ every |the Caribbean. Here we are recommending
foreign minister in the western| federation to these widely-separated com-
ag ahi wisi “ai incere— | MUnities largely because it is desired to con-
and: cparwies w -& ay fer on the West Indies dominion status, and
chould he take the wick of 44this would be impracticable unless there
united Russia~hating Germany? I) were some central authority. At first, the
sanistete oF ieee. the | foreign | majority of the West Indian Governments
America, as well as the foreign|were in favour of federation, only those of
hae oe ll aliy conseaar the mainland Colonies, British Guiana and

British Honduras, whose circumstances are

very different, demurring, and the Montego
Bay conference agreed to recommend fed-





Yes it was mot so puzzling since
Stalin is above all qa realist. Why
not give up the of conquer-
ing Europe in view of the indis-
putable fact that western military

and oceanic power made such a|€ration, following the Australian model,
conquest a highly problematical|though of course hin ore
affair? Why not lull the west to 8 not g could be m

physically dissimilar. Since then, however,
some doubts have become apparent, and those
who know best the atmosphere and greatly
differing conditions in these isolated com-
munities and what is called “island mental-
ity” are equally dubious about the wisdom
and practicability of an elaborate centra!
administration superimposed upon the island
Governments, and tend to ask whether a
sufficiently useful result could not be achiev-
ed by functional association, such as a Cus-
toms Union and other similar links, which
would also probably appeal to the mainland
Colonies and even to Bermuda. But it is
difficult to see how dominion status could be} %
conferred upon ,such a loose assemblage of|%
diverse units.

sleep? Why not by sweet reason-
ableness persuade the western
world to leave Asia to the Rus-

Asia Still Left

Stalin, the gambler, was run-
ning out of chips but there was
always the chance of Le Grand
Coup if the remaining chips were
put on the winning number, in|!
other words, Asia,

Nor did Stalin’s swift brain
end there, With the genius of a
man who by his own gifts rose to
the dictatorship of Imperialist
Russia he changed his strategy
with a swiftness that was only
equalled by its cynicism, Hither-
to he had looked upon the hungry
territories of the world as a
breeding source for communism
providing they remained hungry.
Suddenly Russia started to export
food stuffs to every country, and
territory (within the Russian Zone
of influence) that needed them.

good

“We bring you peace. and “In Africa the problem is difficult, but at}%
will and food,” cried the Russians,

"Wa are-the pales ahivegn least equally formidable for other reasons.|%
The menace of the Kremlin, the}1n South Africa, we already have the plural
threat of the Red Army, the im- 1 bi
placable severity of Imperialist jcommunity, and the Government’s some
communism had resolved into ajWhat despairing and negative solution if its|§
roa umanity which offered -|9
food to the hunkty. Aa polities it racial problem i is segregation, with perman-| ¥

ent white domination, This Apartheid policy

was brilliant although perhaps a >
is already having repercussions throughout}

little late.
Africa, just as British Colonial policy in














row, It is not in my power to see
beyond the ranges and to tell you
what is buried there. My only
purpose is to remind you how
startlingly the strategy of Imper-
ial communism has changed in the
last year. *

From a military standpoint it
seems quite clear that Russia has
lost (if we may borrow the term
from Americ: the Primaries.
Secondly it would seem equally
clear that the nations which live
under the heel of capitalism are
not eager to exchange their known
hell for the unrevealed delights of
a communist heaven.

There I shall leave it. But
may I remind you once more this
is springtime 1952 and that the
Russian timetable called for the
collapse of the “western capitalist
world by that time.

Svalin is a little late in his time-

distant scene nor predict the mor-

ation is now proposed between Southern
and Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, to
form what would become a Central African
dominion, with safeguards for the rights and
interests of the African inhabitants in the
three territories. The arguments for feder-
ation are strong and, indeed, urgent; the
economic ones are generally admitted, but
in view of increasing pressure from the
south, the political advantages of a stable
central State are probably equally great.
African opinion, however, is at present deep-
ly suspicious.

New Commonwealth adds: “Whatever
happens in Central Africa will undoubtedly
have repercussions in East Africa and even
in West Africa, Nigeria and the Gold Coast
are no doubt large enough to stand on their
own feet, but not so Sierre Leone and the
Gambia, and all four West African Colonies
are separated from each other by French ter-
ritory, and what is to be the future of the
Sudan ?

There remains the question of the eoond-|
mic and political future, in this complex
modern world, of all those small and widely
scattered units in the Commonwealth
islands in the Pacific, the Atlantic and the
Mediterranean, outposts like Hong Kong
and so forth, for which no obvious form of
association is possible, except perhaps under
the “protection” of one or other of the
larger units. At present, that responsibility
is exercised widely only by Great Britain.”

poor when compared with the
figures of the French Line for
the same period and plying be-
tween the same ports in the B.W.1,
save St. Vincent. The French
Line carried out of this port
during the same period 771 pas-
wengers and brought in836, making
a total of 1607 passengers for the
year.

It must be remembered that the
C.N.S. receives a subsidy from
all the B.W.I, colonies and not the
French Line, therefore I doubt if
Mr. Simpson or anyone else will,
in the light of the above com-
parison, attempt to claim the
C.N.S. has given adequate and
satisfactory service during the
last couple of years.

Yours faithfully,
A.D. GITTENS.

Ido not intend to paint the
Africa necessarily affects the Union. Feder-| —



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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23. 1952

Labourer Not Guilty Of Attempting Murder ‘™---

Conflicting Evidence Given

AN Assize jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yester-
day returned a verdict of not guilty after being invited to
return such a verdict by His Lordship the Chief Justice
Sir Allan Collymore in the case in which Jonathan Bel-
grave a labourer of Canefield, St. Thomas, was charged

with attempting to murder
years old by throwing her
grievous bodily harm with
leged by the prosecution
December 27, 1951.

“Share The
Work” Shoul

Be Slogan
Says Marryshow

Hon’ble T, A. Marryshow,
Deputy President of the Legis-
lative Council of Grenada, ad-
dressing the students attending
the Trade Union Course at the
Y.M.C.A, on Monday night told
them that he was one who be-
lieved that the future was with
youth and that the good new days
of the world were ahead.

He said that while there was
a lot that they could gain from
what had been done in the past,
it was not for him to glorify
what was generally called the
good old days which in the study
of history were comparatively
bad.

“The mind of man is marching
on and each age (though in the
confusion of things we may not
realise it) was on evolutionary
grounds better than the last,” he
said,

He impressed on the students,
the high importance and growth
of responsible leadership, “It is
better to be respected than to be
feared” he told them. He men-
tioned also that he was one
socialist who had no quarrel with
capital for the excellent reason
that he could do with some capital
himself.

Capital And Sin

He envied no man his riches,
nor should they do so, He want-
ed trade unionists to work hard
and earn capital—capital enough
to have them live in good homes,
eat good food, waar clean clothes
and enable them to educate their
children.

They should aim at getting not
only a living wage, but a saving
wage. He was for capital, but
against capitalism in so far as it
meant a misuse or abuse of capi'tal
for selfish or sinful ends.

Spectacular demonstrations and
the like do little good in the end.
Trade Unionists must impress
people by their seriousness in the
work they do and this can be
done in a strong and silent way.
They must be too proud to be
Petty: too sure of themselves too
self-reliant and strong to be pur-
veyors.of panic and generavwrs of
hysteria. .

Trade unionism is a business—
big business, and by training, the
Trade Union Official should be
able to argue and negotiate with
the best on equal tarms,

Popular slogans are “soak the
rich” and “share the wealth”, but
he suggested that consideration
should sometimes be given an-
other slogan? “share the work.”

New Spirit

He said that -he was looking
forward to seeing a new trade
union spirit in the islands when
by sheer force of character, busi-
ness acumen and self respect,
employers would be compelled to

‘ respect the movement, co-operate
and come to terms as they surelyaware of the fact that there

would, when they got to know
that Trades Unionism could be as
quiet as a simple screw, but be
strong enough to arrest the at-
tention of any social engineer who
ought to know that even a little
screw could hold a mighty engine
together, or in the absence of it
might lead to common disaster.
Mr, Marryshow expressed sym-
pathy on the death of Mr. Ed-
wards and warned Barbados that
these recurring drowning fatala-
ties might mar her geod name as
a tourist resort. : ;
There was talk of nationalisa-
tion in the air and while he did
not suggest nationalising the
beaches, he thought it was time
for the Government to step in and
make safety arrangements on
these fine beaches so that holi-
day seekers would come there
with less misgivings. ie
Mr. Marryshow left for Trini-
dad yesterday, but before doing so
he said in reply to a query that
he had seen lots of improvements
since he was here last, but he
had glimpses of a backward Bar-
bados in some respects in this

year 1952.

No Offices
ingtance the said; “With
boasted constitutional
advance as regards a_ people’s
Government here, the, elected
leaders of your Government have
no offices to which one may go
to discuss matters, mor any secre-
taries to make appointments.
These leading members of the
House who form the Government

For
all your

— Before ihviting them to return






For the Home!

BARBADOS ADV‘







PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFULS MEET

Elaine Callender, a child seven
down into a well and causing
intent. The offences were al-
to have been committed on

a verdict of not guilty, His Lord-
ship told the jury that there was
no evidence against the accused
and the little child told the Police
Magisirate one thing and said
ancther in the court. In the
Police Court the child said
another man named Sam and
the accused threw her im the well
and now she said it was the
accused who threw her in the
well,

They had to go by the evidence
which they heard and it would
be entirely unsafe to convict
that young man on that criminal
offence. The law required that
an unsworn testimony of a little
chi'd must be corroborated.

There was no evidence against
the accused other than that of
the little girl seven years old and
therefore he could not say any Re 2
more than to ask them to return Pb ia ,
a verdict of not guilty, ,

Counsel in the case was Mr. MUTUAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR W. Averell Harriman (left) shakes
Henderson Clarke, Q.C., for the hands with Sen. Estes Kefauver, who seeks the Democratic presidon-
accused, while Mr. W. W. Reece, tial nomination, at a $100-a-plate dinner given in a New Yor! hotel
Q.C., Solicitor General, appeared by the State Democratic Committee. Harriman. who was the guest of
for the Crown. honor, ts slated to be chosen New York's favorite-son candidate for
President. At a Washington press conference. President Truman
called Harriman aualified for the -oane (Internationa!

Shopkeeper Acquitted
Of Receiving
Stolen Sugar

After deliberating for three quarters of an hour an
Assize jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found
Melva Walrond a shopkeeper of Hunte Street, St. Michael,
not guilty of receiving four bags of sugar valued at $69.16 cn
November 1, 1951, knowing them to have been stolen.

A basket with a dish in it was he Acting Puisne Judge, His reasonable doubt (a) that the
also taken out of the well. Lordship Mr. Justice G. L., Tay- sugar was the property | of
At this stage Mr. W. W. Reece, jor who presided told the jury Proverbs, (b) that the sugar was
Crown Counsel, told the court afier they had returned their stolen and (c) that the accused
that there was no other evidence verdict that it was a most sur- received the goods knowing them
the prosecution had to produce prising verdict considering the ‘to be stolen.
other than what the girl said. His oaths that they had taken when
Lordship then invited the jury they were sworn. If the explanation is one which
to return a verdict of not guilty. Wr J, E. T. Branker appeared leaves the jury in doubt as to
After the jury had returned on behalf of he accused while whether she knew the goods
their verdict His Lordship, turn- wy, Ww, W. Reece prosecuted for were stolen, then the jury should
ing to the mother of the child, the Crown. The case against be told that the case was not

told ther that she should take ajrond was that she took these proved and return a verdict of
more care of her child and see ¢oyy



Jaw Fractured

Dr. Colin Vaughan told the
court that on December 27 he
examined Elaine Callender in
the Casualty of the General Hos-
pital. She was suffering from
shock and the upper jaw was
fractured. The back of the skull
was punctured and there were
some abrasions on the left elbow.
These injuries could have been
caused by the girl falling into a
well containing water.

She was detained in Hospital
for three days.

Darcey Downes of Bridgefield,
St. Thomas, said that on Decem-
ber 27 at about 2.30 p.m. he went
into a well at Cane Garden, St.
Thomas and took out Elaine
Callender. Her clothes were wet.



. bags of sugar from the «oi guilty.
that she is not allowed to travel motor larry of Proverbs and
about too far alone, placed them in her shop. “You have to decide on the



Meanwhile Proverbs was miss- evidence as a whole, The entire
ing bags of sugar and_ had evidence must be taken as a
reported the matter to the Police whole. I am submitting that the
and on November 1 the Police statement of the accused is a far
followed the lorry to Walrond’s more reasonable thing to accept
shop at Hunte Street. than the evidence of the Police

9
What M.P’s
The defence was that the sugar who are professional witnesses”

W ant To Know
was taken into Walrond’s shop Mr. Branker submitted.

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) and Mr. after a friend had asked Walrond

to keep the sugar for him.
aastiene are Fp canes When the case resumed yester-

; ‘ ,. day morning Mr, Branker con-
Mr. Williams asked; : ag ae tinued to address the jury on the
ernment recently received a r case, He told them to look at the

quest for a raise in pay from the evidence given by the Police as
casual workers and rock blasters t4 the alleged conversation
employed by the Department of jetween tihe accused and the men
Highways and Transport and by working on the lorry.



NOLLE PROSEQUI IN |
WOUNDING CASE
At the Court of Grand Sessions

yesterday Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
Solicitor General, entered a nolle |

the Contractor for supplying “According to the’ Police the Frvason Jones. Jones, was charged
stones? accused asked for the balance of |; h a Aiatind: bony rae on
ill Governmen: re- the goods with inflicting bodily yarm on

SIS Bees ‘ 8 , Ethel Trotman sometime — in

consider the question and promote Discrepancies | December. His Lordship the Chief
the idea of an increase in the There were certain diserepan- Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, pre-
rate of pay for these vock blasters? jes which were present. The sided.
Mr. Bryan asked: Is Government quty of the prosecution was to Mr. Reece told the court that
is prove the case. They had the he ynderstood that other proceed-
grave discontent among the ranks statement of the accused which ings have begun and they would
of the fcllowing workers: Bus was given within a short time of pe given to the court in due course
Conductors, Drivers of Omnibuses, the occurrence in the shop. The of time.





Chauffeurs, Hotel workers, Do- occurrence took place between 11
i is é 2 ate t was
mestic Servants etc., and this dis- and 12 and the statemen s '
contentment is due to the low scale given so promptly that the MEANWELL DIED

accused had no chance to prepare

of wages, long hours of work, cohsuli. a

conditions of service and the ab- 2, Statement or to

NATURALLY
sence of any security of tenure? friend.

is i He invited them to accept word Death by natural causes was the
ae a ere anes the nega 5. word the datement. of the verdict returned by a nine-man
tive, will Government appoint @ Zouused that these goods were jury when the inquest touching
Committee to investigate the con- }eing kept by her for someone the death of Arnold Meanwell, a
ditions mentioned above? whom she said she knew well. »and leader and musician of Top
3. Ifthe answer isin theaffirm- The defence did not have to Rock, Christ Church, was con-
ative will Government immediate- prove ‘anything even if the cluded at District “A” before
ly proceed to set up a wages Board defence called on witnesses that Coroner C. L. Walwyn yesterday.
for the purpese of remedying this did not impress them (the jury), | Meanwell died at his home on
uncatisfactory and undesirable it was still the duty of the grose- March 18, 1952, and the next day
state of affairs? cution to prove its case. _ Dr. A. S. Cato, performed a post
“So you have to consider this mortem examination at the Bur-
case in the light of that state- ton’s Parlour, Pinfold Street. ‘Dr.
have to be hunted up hill and ment given by the accused.'You Cato said that death was due to
down dale in the byways and have to be sure that the property acute alcoholism and
behind tihe hedges. It is not good was stolen and was received by ease
enough, This is where Trinidad the accused who knew it was
leads. To go to the Offices of a stolen, before you can convict,
Minister in Trinidad is to feel As to the question o* receiving
proud of the Minister. There are her statement is that a man.
offices there well appointed and whom she knows well and who
established with business atmos- works at Proverbs came into her
phere from which it is hard to shop and shook her hand and
escape. — asked her to keep the goods
ition in Barbados in this for him,
sentitilion is very unsatisfactory. Bags of sugar were placed on
It does not add to the dignity» vf the counter w hile Jones and the
the Assembly, nor to the high other man went outside, You
importance of the island in other have to ask yourselves whether
respects. this is evidence of receiving by
I hope I have not put my foot the accused. The Police said that
into it, but what I say is in good the bags were brought in the shop
faith for I do love Barbados by some men. It is a matter for
which I have long regarded as you whether the ‘things which
my second country.” have to be estublished bevond

_————

liver dis-



COMPLAINT OF
MISCONDUCT

dents of the Pine Housing Area
and charging two other residents
with misconduct was received by
the Bridgetown Housing Board
yesterday at their meeting. A sub-
Committee was appointed to in-
vestigate the matter.

_ The committee which will go
into the matter comprises the same

noes of the Selection Commit-

30 x 18 $6.01
FALKS









A complaint signed by 30 resi-{

STOVES

2 BURNER TABLE MODEL

ICATE







Appoihtment Of Rent
Collector Declared Invalid |

@ from page 1

should be. promoted. “In any
single thing which I have to do,
private or public, that would be
ny method,” Mr. Adams added

Mr. Cox said that they had
overlooked that the last time they
made two appointments—that of
the Clerk of Works, and that of
Mr. Marshall—they were appoint-
ed “over the heads” of others who
had been employed at the Housing
Board. ,

Mr, Adams in answering this
observation by Mr. Cox said that
it had never been brought to the
notice of the Board that other
people had been then working in
the jobs.

Good Intention

Mr. Mottley, like Mr, Adams,
expressed his profound respect for
Mr, Beckles, and said that he felt
that Mr. Beckles in making the de-

cision he had made, had acted with
severy good intention

They were not concerned with
the merits or demerits of the case,
but were there to consider the
opinion which was given by the
Solicitor General. Under the cir-
cumstances, he felt that though the
Chairman (Mr. Adams) was not
present when the appointment was
made ,he would have, as he did
yesterday, expressed the view
which he (Mr. Mottley) had ex-
pressed, and which he had ob-
served that the present government
was adhering to—the principle of
promotion, all things being equal

He was not so foolish to think
that because he liked a person, or
because a person supported his
political. views, that that person
should be appointed against a per-
son whose ability and suitability
merited that person a particular
post.

Mr. Mottley after explaining to
the Chairman of yesterday's meet-
ing the circumstances under which
the “invalid” appointment was
made, and admitting his own error,



due to the circumstances at the
time, suggested that the Board
should adopt the principle, for

which there was precedent, of re-
ferring the applications to a
Screening Committee which would,
if necessary, interview candidates
He questionea whetner in view
of the fact that Mr. Maynard was
already working on the job, the
appointment which they now had
to consider would take effect, in
accordance with the advertise-
ment, from the Ist April, or from
the time of the new appointment
He formally moved, seconded by
Hon, F. C. Hutson, that the Board
accept the opinion given by the
Solicitor General. This was later
agreed to by a majority, Mr. John
Beckles being the only member to
object, having earlier moved, with-
out getting a seconder, that the
Board seek further legal advice.
Law And Common Sense
Speaking against the suggestion
that the Board “seek further legal
adyice”, Mr. Adams expressed the
view that the opinion given by the
Solicitor General was one in which
“law and common sense were
synonomous”
“Mr. Beckles explained that he

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'
acted as he did, bearing in mind |
the urgency of the matter at that
time, and said he would stand by
his decision. ; ®

The Board having accepted the
legal opinion, the Chairman ruled
that the three alternatives open to}
the Board were, either to consider |
the question of the appointment,
re-advertise the post, or appoint a
screening committee to: interview
the candidates. He pointed out
that the Board could eithér ap-
point Mr, Maynard, and if he were

of appointed, recommend that he
be paid for his services.

Following this ruling, Mr. Mott-
ley urged that the Chairmah give
a further ruling thatthe recotd of
the minutes show that the appoint-
ment was made, not from:the first |.
of April as stated in the advertise-
ment, but from the time of the
actual appointment,

The ruling being made, Mr.
Mottley continued to explain that
there were 107 applicants for the
post, with qualifications ranging
from “nil” to “all sorts of certifi-
éates”, and outlined to the Chair-
man what took place at the meet-
ing before he left it without a
quorum.

He urged that while in a de-
mocracy it was always necessary
to compromise, yet it was danger-
ous to compromise a principle, and
after admitting his mistake in not
following the principle of refer-
ring the applications to a “Screen-
ing Committee, moved, seconded
by. Dr O'Mahoney, that a Screen-
ing Committee be appointed to
make recommendations to the
Board.

He emphasised that the final
confirmation of the appointment
“rests” with the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, and added
that as a public body, they should
act in such a way as to avoid
criticism.

Mr, Beckles moved, seconded by
Mr. M. E. Cox, that Mr. Maynard
be appointed, and after an ob-
servation by Mr. Cox regarding
a conversation between . himself
and Mr, Lashley, Mr. Adams
pointed out that from discussions
he had had with Mr. Lashley, he
could say that Mr. Lashley’s atti-
tude was always clear and above
board.

Mr. Beckles’ motion for the ap-
pointment of Mr. Maynard was
put and resolved in a tie, three
members voting on each side. The
Chairman gave his casting vote
against Mr. Beckles’ motion, em-
phasising that as a public Board,
they had to act in such a way as to
avoid the remotest suspicion,

The vote was as follows: For
Mr. Beckles’ motion for the tp.
rointment of Mr, Maynard: ei
3eckles, Mr. Cox, and Mr, H. A.
Tudor, Against, Mr. Mottley, Dr.
J.P, O'Mahoney and Hon. F. C,
Hutson :

At this point, the Chairman ad-
journed the meeting until next
Saturday morning, when they will
sonsider other general matters
which have had to be postponed
because of the various discussions
on the question of the appoint.
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PAGE SIX * BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 9%





nl

: 66 ” ‘ ‘
Sugar Levies Law Amended “\eéte Bece Bey | wy re nones or succeast 408
as ee gine Rana oou'ge——_—_____—~ ‘Preated At U.S. Consul

= i i °

same price as for the Ministry of privilege. Peter was making the bill con- L i ; |

Pood oer ee that the Stabilisation fusing. He wanted te know egislators ASSEMBLYMEN SAY |
ey felt as ence basis for Fund was most important. Last ers were justified in asking for a 7 a

assessing the price of local sugar Tuesday, there was a very Solid Higher price for sugar that is ay ripute THE House of Assembly last night passed a Bill to

should be made. In any year the debate in the House on it. He ‘
Ministry of Food increased sugar was counselling the Government to Consumed locally, Sle was im- confer upon consular officers of foreign states certain pow-

; ed if the British Govern- ; cot ‘

for export, prices in Barbados consider the matter when they Ment had not given them an in- @ From page 1 ers relating to the administration of estates and property

= ose rene. The voogmn ee sane and providing crease on the © present crop, the a ‘ake and de- oF deceased persons; to restrict the powers of members of
, ee a wou Ae oe Gnd. ity oid would be manures Prepared to Fight _the police foree and other persons to enter such consular

Sugar for local consumption and as far as bringing the matter be- sold at the same price 0: jast , 1 1937 when he (Mr. Adams) offices, and among other things to confer certain immuni-
ouvers for export and he was given fore the House and discussing it ee They. ead to be aaa dast found himself in London and got ties and privileges on such consular officers and employees
zower prices for his sugar than were concerned, he must say that the increased price asked for was 12 touch with Sir Stafford, put his - of such foreign States.
the manufacturer who exported, it there was a lot in that. It was a not going to put local consumers Posi told him that : }
would be pointless to deal with matter that was known to the in coparey he might be in a sorry position During the debate on the Bill, Consulate will. be made part of
the home market. members of the House for the past e sai at if they took out if he returned to Barbados mere- Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) drew atten- Anperiee. j
At the present tiene, it was an five years. They knew that when funds from the Labour Welfare ly because he was of the people tion to what he e “insults said that it was a good thine
inierim matter for that year in there was an increase in the price Fund to stabilise the price of the who preached constitutional ad- and discrimination some em- to hear of any grievance but this
erder that Government could go paid by the Ministry of Food, that locally consumed sugar, it would vaneement before he was finished, ployees of the American Consul Act could not improve the position
into the whole question of assess- the local sugar contributed to the mean that less dollars would be Sir Stafford assured him that he here against people of the “negro or make it worse. :
ing export prices and the local Stabilisation Fund. They knew available from that fund to would take care of everything ace,” and taking the cue from Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) said that
sugar for hame consumption. that the price and arrangements Sugar workers of the island to from that end, At that time, too, the observation made by Mr. he sincerely hoped that the privi-
It was the"Government’s inten- were adjusted annually. They repair their houses. Before they Sir Stafford told him of an in- Talma, Mr. E. W. Barrow, (L) leges would not cause the Consu-
tion, he said, to see that the price knew that their arrangement was ai re ‘on the matter, they stance when he had to intervene charged that such discourteous late to employ their own citizens












If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two

, consider whether any- in issue in Trinidad behaviour complained of amount- and not employ citizens of the

Nee ae ee eee ant “Epeubing ot tho Mekamilienigs ene coud he doge to Kemp tito. “an abuse ‘of diplomatic island or state. ; a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
just price. of machinery, he said that fhe °V83" at the same price. He mentioned those two in- privileges.” Mr. W. A. Crawford (C), said quickly restore lost energy and
Mr. WwW. A. Crawford (C) first ple wh . the t He “Referring to the Hon. Junior stances, he to shew that Sir The Bill which was taken that he was very much interested ; a
that it < tab eno ot: ave yember's remark that some Stafford was always prepared to charge of by Mr. Adams gives a in Mr. Talma’s remarks. He sqid tone up the whole nervous system. 6
oe = aie Ta r _— e a in Reha OM member should have asked a fight the cause of colonials who consular officer power to act as that only the day before he,sent a : Y fi ,
tadt a oe it 80 boon: 4 a _ It was the decision of the question on the matter earlier, he were suffering. All those who executor of an estate or property demestic servant to the office cf Giving new vitality it fortifies you _m
o consider it with | suc! inistry of Pood. said that the Government was came into contact with him would belonging to a member of his own the American Consul and she was aguinet eam ‘kt eethaselian ‘dak 8

urgengy, especially as so little in- As far as lateness was con- ains ealise ho has died, and ex- treated very courteously. If there
forma’ had been given in the cerned, he was informed that commpeioal, 38 -* 4 ae, 3 how such the cause of cuits’ consulat ‘officers or con- was any rude behaviour on the
Tiouse in the introduction of the arrangements, ces, wages, Oe oar ches 00 Ns the ques- he nee ee ET icin sular employee of a state from part of the employees it is his
Bill. It was certainly a matter allocations and things of that sort tion. The second reading WaS with Jamai in bering serving on juries. opinion that this behaviour should
in-which the House should have had taken place at the asking of then passed. how Sir Stafford J i Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that be brought to the attention of the
had more than five or 10 minutes the price for the caming crop. If Mr. Adams said that they had jn 1938 and hel oe pe Bae tke members will remember that some empl fers. He hoped that Mr. )
they had had or in the introdyc- they did not get those arrange- promised the electorate not to in- People’ 7 b omas fe ne time ago a bill on similar lines Talma would see .to it that the UKE
tion they should have been given Mehts made before that date, he crease the cost of living and here aver Gace” the ‘een oy came before the House. A little instances of ‘eles 3 he commpielngs oT
a mass of information which wa: said, it meant that they would was an opportunity to keep that +04 party, he has been helpful to doubt arose and the bill was not be brought immediately to the |

remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine
is especially valuable

es after illness.
Ton

p
ex a
arte Toes

AS



not given at all. o evens the whole thing out promise The obvious way h it and. indir to the demo- passed. It was referred to Wash- nee ¢ vw ee: ee. 2

One would readily conceive, he He Cis ine dateed. ‘with keep the price of sugar down Wa cratic progress the West In- i#gton. hy ste t form, mented Mr. Talma on drawing to oi
said that something should be done yne'‘Hon Senior Member for St. }rurting the labourer who is look- “les,” he said. re eet nt carries all that is the attention of the House the m
to maintain the price of sugar a! philip that there were other ne tothe Labour Welfare Fund , “Every one of us in the far~ jececsary, Mr. Adams :aid. discourtesies meted out to per- =

the level in the reach of the methods for if, but th ith hi flung portions of the British Com- co em|

thle Be § ; e lateness help him with his house. They Mr. C. E. Talma (L), said that sons of colour by ployees of

be citizen of the community. of it wipes out the alternatives siniy ee to put an end to monwealth will look back at Sir). ‘agreed in instal sith the the American Consul’s office.
the amount of local sugar con- anq in his opinion, it was not the this cess business on local sugar. Stafford’s career as an inspiration i) “However, so far as em- Mr. E. D, Mottley, (E) after re-











suméd was fixed at 10,000 tons a fault of the Government t promise the - to those of us who feel it our 1 i
‘ y Consular Offices affirming his attitude to the ques-

year, they should be told, fo ions a. oe i going to olbai- duty and in feeling it our duty gloves Re, pe the tion of discriminating, said that we
instance, fe amount of money Cheap Sugar dize the price of every item in find that the cause of ‘colonials Gece of the American Consul, he while he was not attempting ta a
Go ee tt ee’ ey to meas He thought -that yesterday Barbados. He did not ae at avery wage nt a ee > bo felt that it would mean more hard- gay that the or o- by the e
© its presen hat price whisky was sold. They find a champion of outstan ;, not to mention insults, would member for t urch was ue
level. They could al! calculate it Cer oe merely have had a have > y exeinuned to subsidize merit who will aid us in our Te patented on a_ certain @ On Page 7 ap
but not at a moment’s natice and by having ay ne deer the price of the best granulated struggles”. section of the community. oa
not before the Bill would have jy .eq” of the 1947 Bill retatiA sugar. They have promised to Mr. F, C. Goddard, Leader of ‘As far as the American Consul ° an
been passed, and the word “Exported” put in subsidize what the average man the a seconded = Peaid and Vice on wr reg ts . © ore a2
h * has to buy. ing Resolution, .He no one could expec r treat- You pay no mor Saat
General Revenue Sable ihe, ‘cue Mr. W. A. utawtora (C) said ‘hat Co lander of the House ad ment than that at present meted » ah ee
If one had had-time (o consider r, Lewis said that he agreed he woula like to know how 2, Stester pessons knowledge of, out by them. for the : nh onsieo
it, one could have deciaeg Whether that the ple should get sugar that 6 wert repeene to reim- Sir Stafford than he and oi As regards to the employees of TAKE. HOME A BOTTLE TOBAX % 26
alternative proposals eould nov cheaper, but he was Fonderins corte the Labour Welfare Fund spoken. He said that Sir rd the, Consular Office end the test GREATER SSS os
have been better, For instante tf it would have been good for with the money it was deprived was a man of grea “er and ment meted oe re saaneyer’ st
one wondered whether the fund them to say that they could sell of through this source. Laney of Gu. oes. he Wor AS, Se “paid that EXPERIENCE me
Should not be allowed to remain Sugar cheaper and then not get His point always had been that courageous Socialist because ant weinives in America, be J Hd thet , %
and the sugar be subsidized from am increased price from the Min- the Rehabilitation Fund should be Was a man of wealth who when t ee 1 oe f that we
the General Revenue Fund, One istry of Food. reduced and as far as ttt; matter stuck to his views and the cause hands of the employees of tha w

i . ar din a manner
also wondered whether the amount He did not share the view that was concerned, that the Rehabili- of England above ever ything else. office they are treate
which was found necessary to the Ministry of Food should be tation Fund may be reduced to His austerity programme after the which would sneer ben =
subsidize it should not be spread asked every year to give an in- the point at which you could get war which went to build up an He said that * en ee . 1”
over the total sugar production in creased rice. If th asked for all your money for subsidizing economic structure would go down negro. hep “ a - Se
any given year. it. the inistry of Food would sugar without interfering with the in history, he said. American ee eles te as
Another. atternative. to be con- automatically put up the price of Labour Welfare Fund or Price Independent member Mr, V. B. like a pe. Oe ae e see dud fet
sidered wes.the individual funds $0008 they sent to the islands, Stabilization Fund. Vaughan speaking said, for the to speak to the employ





























































: e
i ivi «especially ‘in these days when Mr. Adams said that Govern- small grou which had a tendency the Consul or Vice Consul. . : Ovaltine 2 Hv
oo ene ae oe adeuntabs exports and imports are regu- ment had kept its pledge not to to be at an times together, sai 5, feared that the privilege of : a
of reducing any particular fund , increase the cost of living. Gov- ‘that Sir Stafford was a great 4g immunities to which they a 5 .

}. ay people in England were ernment had discovered ways and example of advanced thinking ld agre uld be abused by zs zd ere. rt =
ane ye e the ie gp ingame looking out for a balance in means not to let the Labour Wel- statesmen of the age and those of < cutee. and he saw no es
can te sugar a presen! trade, hg said, and the moment fare Fund suffer, them who professed to be attach- 770.4 on which further privileges from ov

Tha — the Rehabiti they for an ipergaaed It was tween leaving the ed to doctrines which were then Hei further immunities should be —thet’s one reason why the, od B oh
t was-to say, the Rehabilita- et they (the people in Eng- Labour Welfare Fund alone and predominant in the political life granted to employees. this airline has been any other jeverage ; wo
We nae eee. ae moins a —— up the aie Be letting the puer go oe To the saw P him an example to be fol- ®'Y) 0° 014 that when the average “first choice” of interna- f of
¢ > ® the goods ey are sending question of letting the sugar go lowed. : to that office . S183
continued ‘indefinit on its. down. up they said: “no? ‘Although a man of wealth, he = = eg ed eer oe gn tional travelers for nearly ' ar
Pert pat ay : opel = Oe like Sila ha tid la “We a et = pus tat hed never fols that wont seis disdoyrteous manner by, the em- Screen of a century. < 3 le ‘ ty

e a oe , — we are going to kee e price have priority over © ' ing thi ill he 3 . Joka
the extra’ unt could be used Sur “ee ae oe fone took of sugar at what it fs and even of the state, te that Shey would be roving ae
fe. the puppete. ae Sabilise suger ead he iholigne foo" the Labour Welfare ee heqaipe Coenen more power to the employees % NEW YORK si

rose alternatives, he . th xchequer, he wed ae sir c i e f . 1
gaid, sprang to his mind fnd they did the right thing at_the : tele traatits aa be used, not only earry out hee eee rill cane Non-stop service by the luxurious , early this century, ‘Ovaltine’ was introduced
therefore idered it nd time, He thought that the Gov- | Mr. E, D. Mottley (H), said that 7 of economics Of colour. o 32 ye FE] Presidente” or via San Juan by to serve the cause of good health, it was unig 10

+? ae thi one oe regrel- ernment should have got the he undgrstood it that they werd in the narrow senee the employees to behave worse, popular, money-saving “El Turista.” an nal a , medical bo
table that the question came be- eympathy of the members of the going to subsidize brown sugar. 45 implied by capitalists but eco). said, , original product. It readily won the support of i Se
fore them*at moment's natice and Pouse, It would have been use- Free, were four types of sugar nomically and at the same evr, Adams said that Mr. Talpa men. It was adopted by Hospitals and Nursing Homes. It —
Without more statistical informa- guy if some member had asked a in this country. to make all classes comntortabny. might have done a good to the E u R ° PE rapidly established itself in world-wide popularity. "e
tion, _. question on the matter earlier, It seemed to him that the dark The House stood a stot: Wt. community by saying what he pac ‘Ovaltine’ still maintains its leadership . .. its essential a
Mr. VOB. Vaughan (1) said Mr. R. G. Mai L) asked crystal sugar was not as popular in silence after the Resolution was «1.1 said. He (Mr. Adams) ha Ri service by giant double- differences. Some of the differences concern the ingredients “e
many people of Barbados. were whether the G aa tend- with the people as tne yellow passed WA! ever experienced these difficul- ed “Strato” Clippers*—world’s their selection, their quali rg proportions in
‘© whether e Government intend- e be " Ah n —we —their selection, the: f t
a. ne that oat re made od stabilising the sugar that was crystal. He said that a: pe ase | ties, hat the bill only meant aoe airliners — to gone ro | which they are used. The oo a exes in ‘Ovaltine’ is vr
in the colony by them ani should _ that the standard of liv ha He said that the on njoy stopovers in England, ire- i tamin fs
be cheaper to the consumer. He a ett ay cz. so risen that when they couid seil Canal Will Be that the American Consul would] land. PAA Clippers‘also fly to India ORM, SESS YE ve epntent, ‘20
fet that the people of Barbados should have been given the in their shops five bags of yellow E not have to pay income tax, ete.| and the Orient. Other ‘Ovaltine’ differences are evident in the steps taken ne
should ‘be told the reasons for House. crystal, they would possibly only 4 | ‘As soon as they passed the bill the inthe interests of quality. The famous ‘Ovaltine’ Farms, a2
asking for a higher price. Th> He sald that in the 1914-18 pel Wp 08 Gree bags of ‘Cage Opened Next Month Venezuela eae Seninies, wens Serene Sey ee eres
ouse ould not have met so war, the consumers were getting °Tyst#. oe , Ont ose e ot,
jurriedly and decide on an im- a black kind of sugar from the "The faet that they are subsi- AMSTERDAM The new Am- . es | Be:
wrtant -roaiter Hke that. shopkeepers and some of the dizing the dark crystal is nov ¢terdam-Rhine Canal, which will Erezemt oe, te all = cities | > eens ete ccatending month “Oval tine’ is the regular
h » .earrying out, in his opinion, the | See SALDET: | oe ae y fem promoting im
The people felt, perhaps rightly rrerchants supplying the ar ying , P : shorten by 50% the time required } and vigour—for helping to ensure natural, resto sleep. ~
so, that they should get their sug r were on the Control Board. He promise they made to the public. jo, sailing from Amsterdam to | | r ri ty y sont 3 ots
cheaper, Sugar’ was one of ihe felt that an explanation was ne- He agreed with them with not the Rhine, reducing it to 20) * | Remember — ‘Ovaltine’ provides the highest possible LD
principal foods of the island and essary when it wag (that that subsidising the granulated sugar jours, will be officially opened « * quality at the lowest possible p
getting.sugar more cheaply would class of sugar should be sold to which was only used in few |) 91’May next. At the same time | You can now “fly PAA” almost any- Sold ts aipitgha tae by oll Chemiete ood Stones.
mean.saving money in the people's the public. homes, The dark crystal was the huge lock at Tiel, the larg- where —in fact, to 83 countries P.¢.208
pockets, ~ Mr. F. L, Walcott said that Much used in clubs and hotels for 4.) inland navigation lock in the | and colonies on six continents,
some members said that the Gov- sweetening coffee but the man in \oq, with a lock chamber of | ‘
He ‘aid that the Government ernment was railroading the the street, whom they are sup- 1181 feet long will be opened by | or reservations, see your 5 :
doula fo into all the avenues to bill, It was not matter of rail- Posed 'o 6 helping, used the yel- Queen Juliana, Zipper Travel Agent or WANDER Brand Malt & Cod Liver Oil

out if cheap sugar could be roading it. e price of sugar crystal. i great im- } This product of the ‘Ovaltine’ Research Laboratories has been
suld in the isiand. would have been increased tor 4, ; a oe i bra Amster- a recogntaed by doctors as fulfilling the very highest standards. te ;

. Je at the consumin blie had not e said that they would not be Por ant. “Ge hee

Mr. J. A, Haynes (E) said that k Pp ot the ; but also for other Dutch allie PS 7 . ‘ ;
he realised that it was a very the Government a a means Keeping their promise if they oh ell as in a wider sense a Te ee eee’ (nitive Mae fetoer hice cilities nad
urgent matter for Jderatiny, of stopping it. As it had come at left out the biggest seller — this towns, as Ww a its wi ow TExXPERIENcED = adults thoroughly enjoy. ——
t he did not think he H that time they had to choose ‘t island’s yellow sugar — sugar for the Nefheslands 4.5 : SS AT
But he no that the Hon. cod 't Which is being used by the gen- hinterland in Western , . |
Junior Member for St. Peter, who 28 an interim measure in order 1 publi > 79 |
introduaed the Bill ve them: to.fix the price of sugar. eral public. And who was the abel $l. NW AMERICAN |
enough @etails, ‘That Hon, Mem- _,{'¢,t0d Dak he wap scoueed of React Fie contended that merely fully wf what he hed said thet a Hons Aw
, : : ., not giving enou ‘ormati yp aee ully at he i |
ee had em in a very brief 44, Satie, ous Saat fe te to subsidize dark crystal, they four times more yellow.sugar is one - ANS |
monaer..the objects and reasons plain that 10,000 tons of sugar were not keeping that pledge. sold than dark crystal. He said Da Costa & Co., Lid. |
of the bil. He (Mr, Haynes) was Wore consumed locally: and thé He said that if they w to that the rich people are begin- a Bese Great = bitdeaieon | ‘
hoping that that member would price would be raised by 13 get figures from the Sugar Pro- ning to realise that there is more © Phone 2122 (After business hours 2303)
ove cues ee ee aes be- Gents. That meant that they ot Pg egg ete wow would value in wg Oy crystal oe nO ze De LIMA Sth #56. PAA; INE
fore matter is put before the ou’ a e sest_ seller tl ark erystal plays
Council, » : youd ps Ad nae eae 2186.0m" was the yellow sugar. “e the Tinleahe’ post than'on other t pe ;
They did net expect to be treat- have done was to allow the price majority of this sugar is being of sugar. He warned again that & CO., LED.
ed like children, Perhaps the of sugar to go up. But they in- od on majority of the peo- the standard of living is rising
soe uece for a oes tended to stabilise the brown ore fee # poo. Hi yao why not and people are using the yellow 20 BROAD STREET
ad_discuss e matter hi in i i : _— q ‘
circles, he said, but -they on the-cents owe tat eight "He asked them, to think eare- e Bill was then passed. ;
; om

Kidneys Must
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Your body cleans out excess Acids



} THE PLEASURES OF CYCLING ON



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BERNARD SPILSBURY—His Life & Cases

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X-LBT 668-1) 10.55







_ observance of fair conditions of

“m3
at

‘g matter rested for four years.
1949 an International Labour Con- 600!










=



On the last occasion the ques-
on for the second reading was

13—1 division, the Hon. R. Chal-
‘ote against it.












f the Honourable Mr. Gale, which
‘seconded, so that information

arks in the speech in which I
ved the second reading of this
In 1945 the late Colonel
liver, Stanley, who was Secretary
State for the Colonies in the

aretaker Government, stated in
a Circular despatch that he had
bad under consideration, in con-




=



Development and

_ Welfare Act, 1940, the need for

It will be remembered in this

_ tached to the receipt of assistance
' under the Colonial Development

and Welfare Act of 1940 was the

labour in the execution of works

_ paid for from Colonial Develop-

ment and Welfare funds. The
Secretary of State went on to say
that, after consultation with the
Colonial Labour Advisory Com#
mittee, Model Rules for the guid-
ance of Colonial Governments in
connection with governmental and
public contracts had been framed
and, I quote, “these model rules
appear to me to be reasonable and
will, I trust, be of use to Colonial
Governments in the observance of
the requirements of the Colonial
Development and Welfare Act.”

Four Years Rest
The Model Rules were accepted

: in principle by the Executive Com-

mittee of that time and a circular

" was sent to the Heads of Govern-
» ment Departments for observance.

There, as I said previously the
In

vention was passed, which His
Majesty’s Government ratified,
concerning labour clauses in pub-
lic contracts and the Secretary of

State sent a circular despatch ask-

ing to what extent the model rules
of 1945 were being observed, and
added that, I quote, “I regard it as
most desirable that a fair wages
clause should be included in Gov-
ernment contracts generally.”

The Labour Commissioner re-
ported that provision on the lines
of the model ruies was not being
embodied in Government contracts
as a matter of course.

He accordingly recommended

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

2 THE Legislative Council passed yesterday without
. amendment, a Bill to carry out the Convention relating to
Labour Clauses in Public Contracts.

This Bill was last discussed by the Council on Febru-
‘ary 5 and was postponed on motion of Hon. V. C. ra
seconded by the Hon. the Colonial Secretary after the Hon.

the expense of his workers, in view
of the competition involved, or,

member, I am sure, will gainsay
that Government ought to be a

ment bodies with equal force.

_ Second; the difficulty of keep-
ing bodks and accounts is thought
to have been greatly exaggerated.
As the Acting Labour Commis-
sioner has pointed out, all em-
ployers of labour are required
under the. Workmen’s Compensa-
tion Act, Holidays with Pay Act
and Protection of Wages Act to
keep certain records. Under Sec-
tion 7 of the Holidays with Pay
Act an employer, which includes
a contractor, has to keep records
of the remuneration and period
of employment of all his em-
ployees. The records which
would have to be kept under this

anly too willing to advise any
contractor as to the manner in
which the records should be kept.
or will not be complicated, and
if there is no change from one
week to another in the rates of
wages or hours of work, a simple
Statement such as “Same as for
previous week” would suffice.



The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-
tary tabled a Message informing
the Council of His Excellency the
Governor's assent to certain Acts
in the name and on behalf of Her
Majesty the Queen

The Hon’‘ble the Colonial Secre-
tary laid the following Documents:

itement

Molice during the quarters ended
30th September, 1951, and 3ist
December, 1951.

The Civil Establishment (General)

West Indies for the year 1951
of the Committee ap-
pointed to examine the establish-

to supplement the Estimates 1952—
53, Part 1—Current, as shown in
Supplementary Estimate 1952—53,
No, 1, which form the Schedule to
the Resolution.

Resolution to p'ace the sum of
$7,177 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee *
to Supplement the mates,
1952—-53, Part 1l—Capital, as shown
in the Supplementary Estimate,

» No. 2, which forms the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to approve of the
compulsory acquisition by the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
of a parcel of land estimated to
contain 65,901 sq. ft. but since
found by actual*surve, to contain
72,550 sq. ft., situate to the South
ot Westbury Road in Westbury
Road in the parish of St. Michael
for the purpose of enlarging the
playing field and otherwise for the

Governor-in-Executive Commitjee
of an area of land estimated to
contain two roods 30% perches but
by actual survey since found to
contain 19,010 square feet situate in
the parish of St. Philip for the
purpose of constructing a road
Jeading from Foul Bay Beach to

BARBADOS

COUNCIL PASS LABOUR C



carry out the Convention re ¢
to Labour Causes in

Contracts
The Council adjourned

to-day at 1.15 p.m

HOUSE

When the House met yerterday,

“ag
-
Puxsic

until

lishment of administrative,

pro-
fessional and technical

officers,
Post Office advances for ay

Excellency the Governor to the
Honourable the House of Assem-
biy informing the Honourable

levies on sugar sold for consump-
tion in this island

The House passed a Reso!ution
to approve the rates of remunera-
tion paid to the Chairman and
members of the Public Commis-
sion, and a Resolution reiating to
the appointment of the BPlerical
Staff to the Commission

‘The House also passed a Resolut-
tion for $3,400 to provide for the
preparation of 29 acres of land at

awell Plantation and to grant
foans to tenants of the Plantation,

A Bill to amend the Diplomatic
Privileges Act, 197 was passed

The House passed a Bill to con-
fer upon the consular officers of
foreign States with which consular
conventions are concluded by mer
Majesty certain powers relating to
the administration of the estates
and properties of deceased per
sons to restrict the powers of mem-

Merchant Shipping Act, 1698 to
confer immunities and privileges
en consular officers and employees
of such foreign States and for pur-
Poses connected with the matters
aforesaid.

The House adjourned until next
Tuesday at 3 p.m



Hon, J. Mahon said that he was

Third, there is no reason at all the person who had started off
why small men should be driven criticism on the Bill on the last

out of business or that costs
should go up, provided that fair
Wages are in fact being paid al-
ready.
be no repercussion if they are not,
then the object of the Legislation

occasion, but he wanted to tell
honourable members that he had
completely changed his views and

If they are, there should he saw no reason to object to the

Bill that day.
He did not think it would cause

will be abundantly justified. The any great hardship to the small

Central Government and
Government bodies,

Local mason or carpenter who had con-
which ought tracted work, He had been made to

always to be jealous of their ynderstand that once a contractor

reputation as model em
have a
this matter of fair wages.
_Fourth, the Labour

staff will be able to cope quite
easily with the extra work, which,
after all. is not very considerable.
You,-Sir, I believe, keep a little
kK in which you jot down the
occasions on which, on the intro-
duction of some new measure, a
Head of Department says that he
does not require extra staff, with

: ployers, proved himself to be a contractor
clear duty to perform in within the clauses of the Rill, he

would not have every time he ap-

plied for a contract to go to the
Labour Commissioner.

He would
be given an annual certificate. It

was only when he proved that he
had not paid his workers a fair

wage or provided for them with
the necessary conditions of work
that he would be written off. :

Hon. G. D. L, Pile said that it

the object of challenging him at 4Pppeared to him that they were

a later date if at a later date he

should have the temerity to for- Which

giving the Labour Commissioner—
could easily mean some

ward a request for extra staff on clerk in his department the power

that account.

I warned the Act- to put a contractor on the black

ing Labour Commissioner about list after his first mistake and

this possible “ambush”,
repeated that he would not re-

quire extra staff. By the same Central Government contract.

but he condemn him for life to being un-

able to get a local Government =
e

token he answered the fifth criti- did not think that was right.

cism that the legislation will be
honoured in the breach and con-
siders that that will not be so.

The Hon. Colonial Secretary said

he was no expert on labour mat-

*‘Negro Race”’
Badly Treated

@ From Page 6 ,
not true, ne would say that it
was not true to say that “every
man who goes down to the Ameri-
can Consul’s Office was treated like
a pig.” He said he had gone to
that office on several occasions,
and he had never been discrim-
inated against.

Following several , jinterpo-
lations by various members in ex-
planation of what they might or
might not have said, His Honour
Speaker reminded Hon’ble mem-
bers that the Bill dealt with Dip-
lomatic Consular relationship,
and counselled hon’ble members
that it did not reflect well on the
House for members to speak as
they did. His Honour said he had
given too much latitude and
urged members to stick to the
Bill.

The Bill was then dealt with
in Committee stage, and Mr.
Adams took the opportunity to
explain that the Bill did not deal
with diplomatic privileges as some
members seemed to think, and
added that the “hot air” was due
to the fact that hon’ble members
did not read tthe Bill,

It was passed through all its
sections in Committee without

ADVOCATE



LAUSES BILL

Repair of Boats

@ Continued from Page 1.
It was necessary to’ build sheds
to house the tools and to have them
laid down as well as to have the

Mr. Mahon and Hon. sates paid over to the Aceountant Mr. Adams laid the follow .ng:— necessary electric current and If those facilities were provided,
it ho on. Mr. Challenor had strongly criticised General by the Commissioner of | Report of | the | Cc mmitice wiring. An additional wire shed they might be able to employ |

was also erected to offer protection
to the workmen from sun or rain.

y- were concerned, he understood |

put. This was done yesterday having got the contratt, to kee (Amendment) No. 3 Order, 1952. ment of Money Orders to 2th The Work F st cee saanatienhaat |
nd decided in the affirmative by a too much for himself and pass on Report of the Comptroller tor February, 1952. In order that the work should that they were being constructed
too little to his employ No Development and Welfare in the Message No. 11/1952 from His proceed as quickly as possible, out of a composition made of scrap

mahogany and white cedar trees
had been cut from the wood at

When consideration of the Bill model employer and ensure the ment of administrative, pro- House of certain Acts. which Summervale, St, Philip and trans- carefully and see whether that was |
= fessional and technical officers, have been assented to in the 7 “ : e Ss 0! iti
resumed yesterday, the Hon. observance of a minimum stand- The Council concurred in: name and on behalf pf Her pwrted to the Reef. At the Reef, bog can oorane ie pea le Sef
he Colonial Secretary said: ard of working conditions in work Reslution to place the sum of Majesty the Queen the wood was cut into reasonable 4) .,°° s yal.
Further consideration of this done for the public. The same $41,460 at the disposal of fhe @ House passed a Bill to Sizes to work through machines that when the boats were hauled |
‘ill-was. postponed on the motion argument applies to local govern- Governor-in-Executive Committee amend. the law in respect of ‘ & ac oss up on the beaches or the reef, the |

This felling of trees and slabbing
of wood continued until the end of
January.

In early February, the actual
boat work started at the Reef and
some 28 sets of timber frames had
been cut, levelled and made ready
for assembly. The first six kee's
which had been ordered from
British Guiana since December
10,2951 arrived on March 27, 1952.
Within two days two keels had
been shaped and laid so that con-
struction work was started on the
first two boats,

Up to the moment, some six
keels had been laid and work was
proceeding on these boats, but due

Government of British Honduras
since early February, there had
been a slowdown of the programme
to some extent. The lumber from
British Honduras should arrive in
early May.

The Fisheries Officer concluded
his report by saying it was safe
to say that good progress had
been made and if all the material
now outstanding should arrive be-
fore the end of May, it was sure
that all of the boats would be
ready before the beginning of the
next fishing season.

He added that it was to be hard-
ly pessible for any organisation to
have rebuilt those boats within
less time, bearing in mind the ab-
solute shortage of material which
existed in the island at the time of
the disaster.

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-
tary then moved that the Resolu-
tion be concurred in.

Hon'ble G, D. L. Pile enquired
about the replanting of trees
which had been cut. down. He
asked if anything had been done or
was going to be done about the
matter.

Hon'ble Mr. J. Mahon said
that Government was to be highly
commended for the action in
which they had taken in rebuild-
ing the boats,

He thought there was an ‘abso-
lute necessity for providing cold
storage facilities. There was no
point improving the fishing indus-
try and then when there were in-
creased catches of fish, there was
no way to preserve them,

He suggested that the money



which was spent on subsidisation |
pf salt fish and salt pork could be |
used towards providing these cold |
storage facilities.

more men in the fishing industry.
As far as the keels for the boats |

iron and concrete. He hoped that

the Government would watch}

concrete might be broken. He also
understood when the concrete and
scrap iron were mixed and iron
began to rust, it lead to easier
cracking of the concrete.

He warned that the Government
should not make the same mistake
ns in the case of the Investigator
and after spending a large amount
of money, had to spend another
large sum to correct the first mis-
take,

The Hon'ble Colonial Secretary
said that with regard to the point
made by Hon'ble Mr. Pile relative
«0 the replanting of trees, until
he had received the report of the
Fisheries Officer, he did not know



i : use of the Westbury School. bers of the police force and other . aiteieliedl aka ve that trees had been cut down. He
' a fair wages clause for inclusion Bill would be similar .and the Resolution to approve of the persons to enter the cpnsular to the shortage of certain: hard- would, however, make investiga-
' &n contracts Labour Department would be compulsory acquisition by the offices of such States; to amend the wood which was promised by the

tions on the matter.

With regard to the points raised
by the Hon’ble Mr. Mahon, ne}
agreed that the question of the
keels should be looked into. He
himself knew very little of fishing
boats and had to leave the work
to be carried out by the Fisheries
Advisory Committee and the Fish-
eries Officer.

He said that he did not want
the same thing to happen in that
case as happened in the case of the
Investigator. He would see that
the peint was taken up.

With regard to the cold storage
plant, that had been under con-
sideration for some time and he
hoped that provision for such a
plant would be possible in the not
} too distant future.

With regard to the question of
Subsidisation, he thought he was
right in saying that subsidisation
of salt fish had ceased with this
year’s Estimates although there
was still subsidisation of salt pork.
The resolution was then concurred
in.



He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

PAGE SEVEN











For leather i
of every colour—

* is incline It cleans, preserves—and how it

Colonial Secretary a The Pe * lat Yesterday V polishes! Ask your retailer for Pfopert’s.

, i gisiature ote $A] 460 For Nothing else is quite the same. Watch

Answers Criticisms COUNCIL Se gts cent sah ge om . eee ee
2 oe Lampintive Sounat me ey passed a Bill to

r

It’s easy to keep surfaces clean and shining — just give
them a quick rub over with a little Vim on a damp cloth every
day. Vim is so smooth —it won’t scratch — leaves ail
surfaces polished and bright. Use Vim for a/l your cleaning—..
it’s so quick and easy to use, -

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily




further debate, and given its Third
reading and passed.

2

—

that a fresh circular should be
sent to Government Departments
to the effect that the model rules
should, in future, be acted upon
and that legislation should be pre-
pared to give effect to the Inter-
national Labour Convention. The

ters, but after consultation with
the Labour Commissioner and

No wonder this man dreaded
going to work, for rheumatic
pains in his arms made it torture
to use them, Yet to-day he feels
fitter than ever and work is a
pleasure, as he tells in his letter 1

“IT had been suffering from

Finally, Sir, in reply to the
questions as to what harm has
been done because of the lack of
legislation so far and as to the
benefits to be conferred by it, I
would merely repeat that the
Government circular of 1950 had






a -
i 6
there ~ Vas Y
was no need for the Bill because n .
fair wages were being paid, he had Proved Medications

reached the conclusion perhaps

Land Distribution



Short Burners








, work, the was still of the opinion
as under the Colonial Development that while the Bill would not im- APRIL 22, 1952 * * x *
) St"which this Island has derived Pose hardship on the big contrac- 1 i
Se no eitinl atvenianen, te ensure {m it wees ae Ph cay Se tif 15 4/10% Cheques on’ Bankers 73 $/107% DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts.

that fair wages are paid to work- contractors who carried out minor .......|) Sight Drafts 73 2/10 %
ers employed by contractors. It is work for paroghial bodies like the 75 3/10% Cable fare} Y. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts. -
not unknown for a contractor tobe repair of churches and other 7 8/10% Currency 73 Sab
tempted to submit a low tender at parochial buildings. sour’ cys om 0% /19%

Secretary of State was informed
that the Convention could be ap-
plied to Barbados.
The Points
The main points of criticism

to be issued because the pro- that fair wages were in many cases,
visions of the previous one of Not being paid, If a contractor was
1945 were not being observed in not paying fair wages, he deserved

practice, and that the benefit to
be gained from the Bill will be

to be put on the black list.

At Seawell

A RESOLUTION which allows
the distribution of 29 acres of land
at Seawell in four-acre units was









rheumatism very badly and had
such pains in my arms I scarcely
knew how to use them, Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I





2 Burner: Model @ $66.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also
WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS

: found relief. So, of course, I have
when this Bill was under consid~- ; ; As regards the point about yesterday passed by the House of : : uN.
that f wages w be ed : j â„¢ kept on with it, am now thor- With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
eration before in this Honourable $y, SaCEaNan aeolowed on publie putting too much power in the Assembly. . The Resolution is for Feel the difference! Hero’s a oughly better and have never felt

Council were as follows: —
(1) What was the reason for the
Bill?

(2) The requirements of the
Bill, when applied to con-
tracts awarded by local
Government bodies, would
cause great hardship since
these contractors were for
the most part small “bosses”
who do not have the facili-
ties to keep the books and
accounts which would be
required under clause 5 of
the Schedule.

Small men would tend to
be driven out of business or
costs would go up by reason
of their having to employ
someone to keep their books.
The Bill would add to the
tangle of red tape, add con-
siderably to the,duties of
the Labour Commissioner,
who would probably ask for
extra staff, and confer no
benefits on the community.
(5) The Bill would be honour-

ed in the breach.

Let me touch on each of these
points in turn. First, the reason
or object of the Bill. This briefly,
Sir, is apart from our obligations

~

(3

(4)

OO eeet
ur AA

contracts and that, Sir, is a bene-
fit worth having.

hands of the Labour Commissioner,
it should be remembered that the

I hope that, in the light of my Labour Commissioner was a re~

explanation, Honourable

Mem. sponsible officer of the Government

bers will agree that there is a and there was no reason to expect
case for the Bill and that it is that he would on some occasions

not nearly so sinister as they first
imagined. I now ask that the
second reading of the Bill, which
a already been seconded, pro-
ceed,

abuse his powers to the detriment
of a contractor.

.
Hon. C. Wylie explained that
with reference to the remarks

made by Hon, Mr. Pile, there was
Hon. R. Challenor said he had nothing in the Bill or the Schedule

criticised the Bill on the last oc-
casion and had not changed his

which told any Government body
which contractor they must em-

view that it was totally unnecess- ploy. There was no law in this
ary and would only necessitate the country which said that a Govern-

use of a lot of paraphernalia.
would put a hardship on
small contractor who did not have
the facilities for keeping books.

While it might be good legisla-
tion for some other countries, he
did not think it applied to Barba-
dos at all.

Hon, V. C. Gale said he had dis-

agreed with the Bill on the last ‘eading was then put and carried

occasion and although he agreed
that the Government should set
an example in paying fair wages
and providing good conditions of

A

It ment body must employ people on
the a list

supplied by the Labour
Officer or any one else.

Hon. Mr. Pile said that after
hearing what the Hon, Mr. Wylie
had said he would withdraw his
objection to the Bill.

The question for the second

on a 13~—1 division.



RATES OF EXCHANGE



“The Longest Wearing Tyre Ever Built”

Firestone

$3,400, of which $1,400 will be for
the preparation of the land and
the remainder to provide loans to
the tenants,

This Resolution was defeated
during the last Session of the
House when some members sug-
gested that it would be better to

allow perhaps 29 people to awn,

the lend, than four. The Govern-
ment came back to-day and again
informed the House that it was
the advice of experts that the
four acre lot system would be
more economical,

POCKET CARTOON






lozenge thot’s really medicated
+++ with six special ingredients
to relieve throat irritations and
stop coughs faster.















By OSBERT LANCASTER






Charles
Mc Enearney
& Co. Lid.





Office :
Merchandise :

4326
4528

SOSOS

>

RIDE A...

HOPPER
BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS. FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

| (FOBBO909S0696999 5696960000590 00K. 50095069900,

so fit for years. I used to feel
miserable and sluggish, but now
it is a pleasure to work ins
ofa dread.’’—S.B,

The pains and stiffness of
rheumatism are usually caused
by deposits of excess uric acid in
the muscles and joints, Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels.
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
ere’ restored

If you are troubled with rheu-
matism, give Kruschen a trial
yourself. You can get it from
all Chemists and Storea,



Workshop : 4546 ,
” 4650 y

HY)

a

complete with waste and overflow
T. HERBERT, Ltd.
10 & 11 Roebuck Street

Established Incorporated

Exclusive Shopping Centre

ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery.
CARIB SHOP: Carved Mahogany, Native
Barbadian Wares, Indian Bags and Belts.

GREYSTONE GALLERIES: Completely
new Technique, designs and Finishes in
Barbados Pottery.

STANSFELD SCOTT & CO:
and Groceries.

Wines, Spirits
THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked
by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts.

BETTINA LTD: Gowns,
ete,

Lingerie, Gifts,

CLUB POINCIANA:
Guest Rooms.

Bar, Restaurant,

BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hair-
dressing, Beauty treatment.

Balmoral Gap. Hastings.
























PAGE BIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS. |__ "om ext | rvmic sates | Diplomatic Privileges | SHIPPING NOTICES

TELEPHONE 2508 HOUSES REAL ESTATE

Ny . AIRY COT—Brighton, St. Michael, all A t P d °
ao | FOR SALE a oe ae ct Fasse ROYAL NETHERLANDS

| ment at Worthing on the Seaside con-|and Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath. STEAMSHIP CO
| taining Reception, Dining-room an3 One| Toilet and Kitchen, Garage and Ser- The House of Assembly yester- mental representatives alone being .
vant's Room in yard. Standing on Over} qay passed a bill to amend the entitled to such privileges, and











—

















The MV. CARIBBEE will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, enmeeret.
. Kitts. Sailing




















BRLMAR—On the 22nd April, 1952
Austin Alfred Belmar, His funeral will





AUTOMOTIVE Double Bedroom fitted with Simmons





leave his late residence Winona, Max- ; ———— Beds, Toilet, Bath, Kitehenette and} 47150 «q. ft. of land all closed with . - rE
well, Christ Church at 4.30 pm. to-day| AUSTIN PARTS—One (1) Austin 10|Frigidaire. Dial 8133 23.4.52—2n | barbed wine fence. Cocoanut and Lime |Diplomatic Privileges Act, 1947. (bo) reaualt the —_ Mos BONA, So an Agee
for Christ Church Cemetery. No flowers | Van Body; one (1) Austin Spare Engine] |---| Trees. Inspection daily except Sundays The Secretary of State in calling lege by pro ding tha tw be M.S. 2nd May
by request, and other miscellaneous parts. , Apply: BUNGALOW —Modern furnished j| between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Purther|attention to the recently enacted made under the Act must no’ M.S. HERA, 9th May 1952

oe cla R eae We SO Py: toll 2 J ulae running not water cold Barticulars. Dis) 9049 International Organisations (Im- framed so as not to confer privi-]S.S. COTTICA, 16th May 1952 ae

— | Road 7.4.52— ets ani 8 " 3 :

ws 4.52—t-f-n- | ater, all modern conveniences. Dial 5.4.28. | uinities and Privileges) Act, 1950, leges or immunities greater than d TO U.K. & EUROPE Toe, M.YV. eee. =
i act Cargo ssen

a * , 952.
SUNGALOW A hendsomer newi- {which consolidates the United are required to give effect to any |M-S. | wins NENA ARAMARIBO
built bungalow with all modern co#ve-|Kingdom law contained in the international agreement in that ‘AND

ANNOUNCEMENTS AUTOMOBILE — 1949, Green Morris | 164 20.4.52—3n.

Minor, 24,000 miles in excellent condition St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba.





$1,200.00 © t. Apply Ja BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, Es 5 GUIANA rs only for St. Vincent.
NOTICE TO PARENT: Sones ee =a even pen > a ape ao Bs loge of iand at The Tees, * with a wertes- Diplomatic Privileges certensen) ne ate that those changes may ne in Qnd June 1952. Date. at dates Ye be ne 2
P. ze Ss a » - a ; s. -
HOT LUNCHES at reasonable -prices] BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chassis,| Telephone, Reasonable terms to, suitable fg view over ihe west const. Acts, 1944 to a out from time to time have practical | § TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
— to Pupiis a Harrison College | new . For immediate delivery, Courtesy comme. dy phy: Beachlands, St James of adniinine, "Agee egg iy a this a ea of privi- significance in ~ jitan ae . S 1962.
permission of t! Headmaster), and jarage 4616 20.4.52—6n. ne ; 4. .f.n. a . en e field ~ ifica: non, Ss. 2th 1952.
other “Secondary Schools; at RUS-EN- none ONT cients | 28 OF 4507. 13.46.51. |, (8 oo SP. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.

lege, by providing that any persons territories as well as in the ited
CASVILLE, NAVY GARDENS, Ch. Ch he are representatives, whether Kingdom and this \e



——— % "
. Crumpton Street; (centrally lo- CAR—One Vauxhall 25 h.p. with 5 good FLAT—Weiches, Government Hill side, Agents. b6,.6366 O56 666690090006SS085 P

cated and opposite Harrison .College) |tvres in excellent condition. Dial 4514. [from May 1st. Apply Mrs. ‘Tomer.







CAR—One Woolsey Six-Eighty, mile-

eee att iba iiaiha eet aeaade
PUBLIC NOTICES awe, mt Sa. condition, Apply| FLAT--"Fully furnished small upper

flat In Marine Gardens, Available May

Also Boarding and ing. Furnished 23.4.52.—2n. | Din) 4086 22.4.52—2n | A Well appointed bungalow in first class) of ernments or not, on any lation is intended to bring the leg- iaincsaiatdibeanimy bertiiaae
ane werufnisned rooms for rent. —— $$$ $$ ta ae eee our’ toraliee eee yay pen veranda.) Organ of the organisation or are islation in this Island into line :
pply in Person—Telephone 4324. CAR-—Morr Oxford Perfect condi- FUAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished, i. ie reoms each wit! | * ‘ eo
een MGA BECCLES. [tions mileage 2.370. Telephone 209 | St. Lawreece on Seg. Available April} wash basins, one having large cedar cup- members of any committee of;with the United Kingdom legisla N LINE
23.4.52.—2n, 23 f 52 ttn. on. Phone 3803. We invite inspection} board as well. Kitchen complete with |the organisation shall _ be} tion.
for next Winter, 29.3.52-—t.f.n, | Duilt in cupboards. Electricity laid on.| included in the scope of the Act Mr. G. H. Adams (L), who
ee _ T

This house is in a cool and quiet]; oved the pass: of the bill, said
rT instead of, as hitherto, govern- |m e passing e
neighbourhood wis garden laid out and that it was one of those bills that



































































































































23.4.52.—3n.| 1:1. Phone Mrs. Gibson, Marine Hotel”, | Servants rooms with lavatory and a large became necessary from time to OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
—— | -— -——___-— 13.4.52—t.f.n, | erage time on Interna 1 t.
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB CAR—198 A.40, 4 new tyres. New| ————«___ It is available for immediate possessior.. NUTICE He said that the main was a
NOTICE TO MI paint job. Recent rebore. Telephone FARAWAY~St. Philip coast, 3 bed- Apply to C. A. Pierce, Phone 4460, ‘ Due
NOTICE is hereby given that in ac- | 9556. 18.4.82—7n. 'rooms. Fully furnished. ™ 18.4 $2-6n |is hereby given that all persons having j little easing up on passports. Vessel From Leaves Barbados
Cordance with Rule 8 the Club will be}. it gupply. Double Car Port, two | —————————_—__-_______.Jany debt or claim upon of affecting the
closed to Members on Saturday, April] MORRIS MINOR—Tourer 8,09) miles|servant rooms. From May Ist. Phone| HOUSE—A brand new Chattel House estate of ARTHUR Lia AREER | a ee a . -London 30th Mar. 22nd April
sath. from 730 to 10.30 p.m.. for}in excellent condition. Mortis Minor : 4476. 30.4 52—4.f.n | 18x9x8 with shedroof 21x7 and kitchen} late of Pine Road, Belleville, in, the 58.58. * yy London 21st April 3rd Ma:
coring Display and Aquatic Events by | saloon 7,000 miles like new. Fort Roya! 9x7 attached, situated at Pine Land, St,| parish of Saint Michael and Island of s/s. “TRADER” $2 y
oa Scouts. . Garage Ltd. Telephone 4504 | FLAT New, very modern, seaside flat,| Michael, and spot can be rented. Best | Barbados. Retired Master Mariner, who ... . - isepew and
y order of the Committee, : 20.4.524n. | completely furnished. Telephone, gas. offer $1,350.00 accepted. For f {died there on the 3ist day of July, 1951, ion 19th April 2nd May
H, P. SPENCER. ——— clectritity. Facing sen. Excellent and | P8rticulars apply next door or Dial "fare hereby required to send S.S. “MERCHANT” Ni and
Secretary. VAUXHALL WYVERN—in_ excellent| safe seabathi Apply to “MARESOL” 19.4.52--4n |! their claims, duly attested, to the iss Ived First 0 2nd M: 17th M:
‘ 22.4.52—8n | condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY | gr LAWRENCE onr, Phone 8406 ~ a2 neh 2 | ungersizved, in care of Means. = 0 a S. and
rn nnn nm 1GARAGE. Dial 16 20.4.52—€n. |" enone ee t.t.n. | LAND—2,000 square feet of land at}¥oud & Boyes oF No, 16 1 ter | Anthea ena nee ike” oles
— ba ‘| Wavell Avenue, Black Rock, beside main | Brigsetows,
———— , ec > wl date we shall ir x in
NOTICE 5 TERACOMBE Maxwells 4 bedrooms, |208d. Por particulars sec “DeAram A: (0t June Je, ater ine ‘saeets of the | your iealth and weaken neart. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
; ; ELECTRICAL furnished with or without linen. Dial {Scot Middle Street, dial 2645. said estate among the parties entitled In 3 minutes ACO— Pre:
ee se na 35.4 52-9? \inefeto, having regard to the debts and) fT ption gh the blood owe. 1 For Closes in Barbados
: : iideininealied aoa — - have jates throug e 1 a c
NOTICE 1s MOREMY WEN tnat mel “nADIOMONUC Poe heal Owner | MAMISTOW, Mukwell Coast; 3 bed- |, 1. Property consisting of two spsied} <0) # only of which we shall not be} ing the attacks. Phe ver firetdaythe §=|S.S. “MULT. .. Liverpool 24th April
Transfer Books ang Register of Members| ,...,.¢ colons Cheap. Phone 8532 rooms ete. Fully furnished ‘including |20use and the lands on which it stands |}ad notice. AUe. ‘it tbuted to any per-] strangling mucus te vi S.S. “SENATOR” London 30th April
of the above-named Company will “be 23.4 52-ren |tefrigerator and telephone. Apply_ to |#24 situated at Rodgers Rd., Govern- = of whees debt or claim we shall not giving free, easy breathing sest- = ae
closed ftom the 24th day of April to the ae 8 , “nlpArcy A, Scott, Middle Street. Dial} ment Hill, St. Michael. Apply K. lave hed notice at the time of such ful sleep. No dopes, no =
7th day of May 1982, beth days inclu- | “REPRIGERATOR—Westinghouse latest | 649. 33,4.53.—2n, | Sandiford, Spry St. Dial 2974. distribution. lode MENDACO tablete at meals and For further Information apply ¢o - . .
sive. v. model, With Freeze Chest. Phone 2520 PLAT —with operty at &. Davidis Ch. Ch And all persofhs indebted to the said be entitely free from ma ;
By order of the Board of Directors. 23 4.626 |. MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with | two storied house and land on which] ..iate are requested to settle their Bronchitis In next to no even "
COMN BD. B WILLIAMS, fo a Linen. it stands. Apply: K- Sandiford, “Spry | Sccounts, without delay though vou. may. have, suffered for DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents
‘D4 324 REFRIGERATOR—“Frigidaire” 4% cu. For 2u particulars. to Alma . oleh ae Dated the 2ist day of April, 1952. years. MENDA! ig so successful
s Mist. in perfect condition, $250.00 Wilkes, ; Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. . Propetty at Junction of St. Mat- that it is guaranteed to give you tree,
Dist. “C” St. Philip 22.4.52—3n 93.2.52—t.f.n, | thias and Dayrells Road, including two LIONEL O'DONALD MARSHALL easy breathing im 24 hours and to :
elas storied house and a separate building OLGA KATHLEEN MARSHALL completely stop your Astin oy oceys 2 °
WASHING MACHINES. Hoover, clec.| NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed.{now being used by the Seventh Days ALFRED DeCOURCY BOYCE. = money vere ese rene pace atio
trical, home washing machines. | Only | rooms. Fully furnished, lighting Plant, Adventists’ as a Church Apply K Qualified Executors, Estate of Bhemist. The qusrantes protects yeu. ,
Iso” The answer to laundry problems.| Watermill supply, Double Garage, three |5®ndiford, Spry St. Dial 2374 ARTHUR LLOYD MARSHALL, ¥
"as Purchase on terms can be ed. | servant rooms. For May and from The three properties are pact of the | deceased.
K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St.| tober ist Phone 4476. ‘EsYate of D. Brathwaite (Dec) 23.4,52.—3n. } 4
w & o Dial 5136. 23.4.52.—3n. 10.4,52-—t .£.n, 20.4.52—2n SOUTHBOUND Sails Bathe Sets Arrives Sells
REG —— Ce eee Montreal Halifax Boston B’ Bdos
OFFICES at 48, Tudor Street, suitable outine undersigned will offer for sale ‘by GOVERNMENT OTIC 6. — Ap Wap. 2
eir ice, . 17, s+ o- oe 4 g
LIVESTOCK for Doctors. Dents, or Hatr ‘peessert. | Bian sires Ariggetown. on ‘Fhuraday CANADIAN CRUISER | sm "s B ths
52 4 52—2n| Ist May 1952, ALL THOSE buildings, ** 12 May at 33 May
GRADE HOLSTEIN COW-—To caive comprising offices and warehouses on the 3 J
1a

Department of Highways & Transport — Vacaney for
- PERSONNEL OFFICER
Applications are invited for the post of Personnel Officer, Depart-
t of Highways and Transport.
menrhe at is vensionable with salary on the scale $1,728 x 72 —
2,160 x 96 — 3.024 x 144 — 3,456 per annum. In addition a non-

Wharf and Prince William Henry Street
and McG: x Street, Bridgetown, stand-
ing on 5,137 square feet of land and now
nw by Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co.,

engin cenmenneeaeniaemeesinans
within a few days. Second lactatipn. 2 .
Dial 2968. Kenneth D. G. Frost, Stan- TRINITY COTTAGE—Fully furnished

more Lodge, Black Rock 22.4.52—4..n

MECHANICAL

three-bedroom house, including tele-
phone, available from May. Phone 2959,
19.4. 8%—4n.

__ |" “VISTA BELLA, Navy Gardens,
MASSEY-HARRIS FARM RQUIPMENT |Drawing, dining, | three with




















‘dos

a Apr.

* nie

o . 1 22 May % May 2 June ‘une

c. GER .. 30 May 2 June = 11 June June

LADY = Se te 9 June June 14 June 2 June June
+» 2% June June - 2 July
os 30 June 3 July — 12

M - - 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 Ji

18 Ju
zs sus
NQRTEBOUND Arrives = Sails Arrives Arrives Arrive:





Further particulars from the under
signed.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,




Arrives






-Manufe spreaders, Fertilizer, Distribu- | Man 4% cock: nette, Solicitors ‘nsionable cost of living allowance is payable in accordance i 8,
tors, Grass Mowers, Rakes, Side-delivery |Toilet and Bath. Garage, Servants room, gitore. 4) D F : 4 determined on Bdos B'dos Boston 8%. John = Montres!
takes for windrowing eane Trash, Grass |and Laundry room. Phone Mrs. King 20.4.52—10n | approved rates. Point of entry into the scale will be LADY RODNEY uu . 26 Apr. 5 May, ee Fata 10 May



















Loaders, Wheel Strakes for attachment | 3076, 23.4.52.—1n, the basis of experience and qualifications. Contributions at the rate



22 May, - 23 May; 2% May






















to Wheel Tractors to prevent whéel- | * ke AUCTION tf 4% of salary will be required under the Widows and CDN. CRUBER .. 24 May S June 8 June} 2 June

spin, COURTESY GARAGE aia teen. ——————— | Pension Act: 1928. No quarters are provided. Travelling allowance c ee st: seals; Gabel mate

"26. WANTED UNDER THE SILVER = | );yatie on basis of mileage. ; be| LABY wc dune Wdune a7 June — 38 Fung 2 July
PIANO—-One grand piano. Milton. in HAMMER Apprintment will be on probation for two years and will c.

ee ree OEE ewe oa ce Me eek e made subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit ae és 2 Jung 38 June 8 July 3 Jul u July

— 2 oh are ae ave a aun he On Thursday 24th at “Gandhi Villa") ¢.- ernployment in the Public Service. CDN deihe 14 jay 8 Su suly aa Vi al + i an y

eee HELP Brighton, Black Rock: by order of Mr.|°°" ‘Candidates should not be less than thirty-five (35) tm of age | “c nee Oh MM OW ore na

. ani we will se is Furni e # :
— which includes — Morris Suite (Settee| and shovld preferably have had experience in the and 4 July w@July ~~ — 6 Aug) 8 Aug 10 Avg.
MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTANT required to take ful} | and 2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top: a anceeneas aa labour with a knowledge of modern r practice] LADY RODMME .. 7Aug. Aug 19 Aug. — | @ang SA.






Coffee Table; Berbice, Tub and
hols: Chairs; all in Mahogany; Hello-
craft Radiogram, Brass Floor Lamp,
Divan; Carved Teakwood Table; Very
Nice Tapestrys Tea Trolley, Oak Dining

charge; preferably with experience of
a Machine Accounting. Salary subject tc
AQUARIUMAS—All Glass sizes 30x12x ability and qualifications. Applications
12 a 18 *& 10 x 9 imehes. Complete }in_ writing only to C, S. P ER &
with ants and Fish, Archie Clarke, | CO. 10,4.52—4n

Phone 5148 23.4.52—4n
APPLICATIONS are invi' from men
ANTIQUES — ot every description ne

and women ly interested Ani-

Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver | mal Welfi ' the pothitrent of
z Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- PART-TIME ‘ARY to the BAR-
7 ; 4 graphs ave. at Correa Antique Shop ooo . ‘andidates Tay ;
heres a iS. | Attaining Rove) Yeehy Cte a ahem, Coreghonse ahd goaeecl of stam nd

. nce control

Pa eve det cineneroacinenglierrmiemncaraen must be capable of organising Appeals dnd
S(SCO ee PS ea GASOLINE RAY POINTING oe Publicity Sear Tne h Dressing Tal combined, Single
urnose ..° }riew 1% hp. line Spray Daf to 1 pit, eaon week day and} Bedstead. with Box Spring, Electhlg
Outfit with guns, 30ft. airhose, Respira- | the salary’ ts 00 per month, Apply | Lamps, Bedside Tables; iron Single
SISSONS BROTHERS | ors. ana strinina toot ook’ fnetuded | In own andwrling i Ars instance xing | Bedstead Mir'd Press and Dressing table

’ uctions. en: Kin; mes $ alt= tab in white,
& COMPANY, LTD.. py. c | nan, Barbados $.P.C.A. C/o Headquarters Burner On stove. Kitchen” Mabie and
Office, Central Police Stn. Bridgetown. | Chairs, Pram: Bicycle,

and principles.

The Personnel Officer will be under the control of oe Ui
of Highways and seers we be reggae Fe les

i to rsonnel includin e mainten:

ogmen. Pigtaxen, Sent Goes, ee tS ta the ee oretiion of rules, regulations, and conditions
Refrigerators, both in aa. ‘ctor of service to employees in the department and the prompt investi-
order; Glass and China, Brass Ware,| gation and settlement of minor complaints. 9699655"
Ted and Dinner Services, Carpets, Ver- Applications supported by testimonials should be submitted on

andah Cualts; Boskinelves) Swim Ber] forms obtained trom the Secretariat to the Colonial Sewer ot

Press, Bureau, and Dressing Table all in| later than the 3rd of May, 1952.
Mahogany: Cream painted Press with






























































ours are from




































“ e

CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

(1) Modern bungalow at Maxwell Coast, Ch. Ch. It con-
sists of spacious verandah, drawing, dining and breakfast
rooms, (6) bedrooms each with built in cupboards and
(3) with tiled baths, garage, and servants’ rooms with
lavatories and baths. It is definitely the most
built house in that district and is ideally suited as a guest

. house.
(2) At Welches, Ch. Ch., below Oistin’s on the sea: one small

ome ut & LOND ON ome King Street, 7 days Aen EU is ‘

Â¥ ~ta.
eee ‘eee a taneed by Tf, sac 7 22.4.52—-2n | other items,
erbel .. Plantations td., Carter GIBSON V-CLASS SPEEDBOAT, built Sale 11.30 o’cl
& Co., Barbados Co-Operative Cotton | and iinported in 1648. Length Ii feat, ae, and TELEPHONE CLERKS. ial gsh Scat Terms CASH,
Factory, N. B. Howell, G. W. Hutchin- | Beam 5 feet 9 inches, Draught 14 t and e s . N.
ton & Co. Lid., T. J, Sealy, Central] Seating capacity six to seven people. GODDARD & SONS, LTD, vy 4.69.--2n BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Foundry Ltd., Watkins & Co. Ltd.,} Steel hull materials ond construction Auctioneers.
end the B'des Hardware Co., Ltd. comply with Lloyd's Board. of Trade



Cannisters and












23.4.52—20



————$— $$
PRODUCTION MANAGER — Reliance
t 17.3.52—Mn,
























requirements. Powered with Ford water- | Shirt Factory. I
a Mmotor—10/32 B.H.P. Speed 10 Kn0th, | stone bungalow with open verandah, drawing and dining
App Reginald French, D, V. Scott &] SUB AGENT WANTED, Resident | }OOG60 599999603985 SSS" f rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, toilet and , servants

Co., Ltd 22.4.52—Tn. | Bridgetown, well connected with com- : ’ 'p jeod to

— = - merce, to sell accredited British goods rooms and garage. Price sell. I
ONIONS—Stock up NOW Every ]on commission, State age, experience (3) Nine acres of good arable land at Enterprise, lh. Ch. )
Housekeeper should buy a 50 tb bag of | references, Post Box 532, ‘Trinidaa Anyone interested can pay part of the pure rice and “COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... ... 2ist May, 1952
4

Onions at 1/- per pound, Guaranteed
to keep ‘for 3-nronths

$2—3n —$—$—— TT
oom The Year Book of the West Indies
and Countries of the Caribbean

MISCELLANEOUS including Bermudas, Bahamas and

‘ the Guianas—latest Edition, With
+

*“DE GRASSE” ... 4th June, 1952... .. 16th June, 1962
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

give a mortgage for the balance on the said

(4) At Enterprise Nr. Govt. Farm, Ch, Ch. (1) two storey
house built of stone, and s' on 2 acres of arable
land. Very good results are acquired from kitchen gar-
den. There is a fan mill which is in good working order:
and the pipes for overhead i ion.

(5) At Barbarees Road next Plaza Theatre, 2 acres of land.
It is near enough to the city to erect a sugar bond or

factory.
D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer, Real Estate Agent & Valuator,
Middle Street. Dial 2645.







23.4. 52——1n





——_

OIL—The world’s finest motor oil
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.
VEEDOL. “Found wherever fine cars
travel”. 17,2,52—t.f.n,














Illustrations, Gavetter and Maps in
colour

Bicycles for Motor attachments.
Extra strong frames with over
size tyres—$65.00 only complete
with Oil Bath, Bell and Pump.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and





SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... ist June, 1952... .... 13th June,
*““DE GRASSE” .... 29th June, 1952... .. 9th July, 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton

599999




BUNGALOW~—Modern Storie Bungalow
in good residential district, 3 bedrooms,
servants quarters, all round wail Ho
closure preferred—not een’ £2)
Apply: Advocate, 2.24. 4 52—Gn.














All roads lead to Silver
Sands, Whitsuntide, Monday

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
*“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952... ... 6th May, 1952
:
Bank Holiday, June 2nd x

Caen ne UE e

RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM
Records. Ttree for Two Dollars, your
choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD. “GARIE BEER BOTTLES — Did vou BEER BOTTLES — Did you

9.4,62—-t.{.n. now that you could get three cents
or 7
RAIN GAUGE CYLINDERS — Wave [cr 70> two Carib Bodies! Bring SONS
yours handy now the rainy season 18] (Rarbados) Ltd, Victoria Stroet.
approaching Knights Ltd $.4.06—3 22.4.52—an
2 52—3n 7

_——$—$——
by reer Tere act ad FURNISHED hree -
RIDDOBRON INHALANT—For relief of | Pcp amine sone Oe umes” mings
Asthmatic Sufferers $3.00 Wo" a be on the seashore, St. James, Worthings
Ltd wack ie or Maxwell Coast, Telephone Mrs
Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph Geephert S008. 16.¢.68—4n
England's leading Daily Newspaper now PUMP. eho a
arriving in Barbados by Air only & few }| pam rane UL en eee
days after publication in London. Con-|sujtabie for transferring Rum from
tact; lan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltt. (@asks into smaller containers. A. §

Local Representative, Tel. 3118 BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd, RUM
17.4,52—t.f.n. | DEPT. 20.4.52—3n































Sports of all kinds, Boat
Race open to all boats;
A. B. & C Athletic Races;
Tug-of-War, Greasy Pole,
All-Day Dancing. Hands
Boats, A & B Class, etc., ete.

Further particulars later.
23.4.52.—2n
































GLASS ROSE BOWLS
Come and see our lovely assortment
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts,



———————
We have Jacob's Cream Crackers $1.20
tin; Fancy Sweet Biscuits Js Ib. Phas 42c | §66966690S9SSS90006000%"

NOW IT’S EASY reduced.—KNIGHT'’S LTD 23.4,52.2n SBA VIEW GUEST




















FORESTER'S SCHOLARSHIP FUND








. WATER PIPE_Galva ized water pipes, .
The Money Saving Way Ye"—Ma—I/? Mar", 2° also pipe fittings. HOUSE
Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads, Shee etn. Spee ciagies 4.52—t.f.n
cena; Cradles, Wardiiia Ova ———_+-—_- —_—— ~~ HASTINGS BARBADOS 659960 56556905
Stand: $8.00 up, Co rl
Sprinas eM TABLES for Dining al as eee
{teh a FPaney use. carders ong' +. ath
Waggon. tren trolleys, “Side (OVERNMENT NOTICE quoted on sequest Now is Your Chance to Buy a Ticket for
ards—Kitehen, China and Bed- ‘
Koon Cabinets, anuoes ‘ees hatemene Permenast aoe $1.00
; p — DRAWING ROOM welcome. ‘. :
RNITURE, Rush Furniture for |}| CLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN Dinner and Cocktail and win one of the Valuable Prizes now on display
little and Big—FIANOS, Pram, BRIDGE. parties arranged. in the show window of ‘
ae pone. ae cag panee J. H. BUCKLAND
ice nee 4 MONEY ‘ . . ,
mee sates AL THE CHAMBERLAIN BRIDGE Propeietor.

bpbeeeer will be CLOSED to all traffic from

MONDAY, 28th April to FRIDAY,

L S WILSON 2nd May for the purpose of re-
+ . pairs

BPRY STREET, DIAL 4000 20.4.52,.-—2n.

Messrs. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

“1, ONE TREADLE SINGER MACHINE
2. ONE BUSH RADIO
» 8 ONE GENTS’ THREE SPEED RALEIGH CYCLE
or
ONE SPORTS MODEL (if won by a lady)
Seyeral Consolation Prizes will also be given















ORIENTAL
PALACE









FOR SALE

10 feet lengths

56

LPO EA PPP ISEPLOLSSSLLSSSLESPOPSE,

4 eae OO 69% “4 COS o re

’ i ent kis neil: Weedle HEADQUARTERS FO IRON CORRUGATED SHEETS in 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 feet
GIRLS FRIENDLY Cooker complete with owed. SOUVENIKS . Drawing takes sini in MAY 30th, 1952 lengths from $3.00 per sheet :
‘ Olly: aid 2860 mouths, FROM INDIA, CHINA & ° \$ ASBESTOS CORRUGATED SHEETS

SOCIETY good. as new, owner left CEYLON Tickets may be obtained from :— SPECIAL SCREWS AND WASHERS, also ASBESTOS





ANNUAL FETE ae it at your Gas Co.

Under the Patronage of Ray Street.
Lady Savage

will be held at
THE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 26th
Opened
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.

RIDGES now being received

ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES in 3 and 4 Inch ’with the
necessary Bends—Ys, Tees.

GALVANIZE NAILS ool cents per

Ib. 8
PLAIN FLAT GALVA for making Ridge Caps,
Down Pipes, Guttering, etc.
<

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dias 5466

1, Singer Machine Co. 6. Mrs. E. St. C. Sim-

mons, Holetown



We also stock COPPER in 18. 24, 30 and 36 Inch.
GALVANIZE PIPES from %4 Inch to 4 Inch
EXPANDED METAL for Concrete Work, Railings etc.
GALVANIZE STAPLES

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.
Coleridge Street a Dial 4100

SEE US FOR THE FOLLOWING

KEILLERS JAMS:--Black Currant, Raspberry, Strawberry,
, Apricot, Gooseberry, and Damson in 1-1b. tins.
ALL GOLD JAMS:—Apricot, Plum in 2-lb. tins.
HARTLEYS JAMS: —Strawberry, Bramble, and Greenguage in
bottles,
MORTON'S JAMS: Raspberry in bottles.

2. Co-operative Bank,
Marhill Street






7. Mr. G. A, Ramsay,

The Fete will be opened by Jerusalem, St. Peter

Mrs. Peebles.

There will be the follow-
ing - Stalls: Flowers and
Variety, Needlework, Sweets
Household, Books, Cakes

s

. A. E. Taylor's, ‘
Coleridge Street 8. Mr. E. C. Hewtt,
C/o Alleyne, Arthur

& Co.

LLC PELELLES TSEC



4. Mrs. M. Ramadin,







eee MAT-MALADE:--R. F. F, Marmalade, Little Chip Marmalade, c/o Colonnade 3 where
Lucky dips and Pony Rides and farley’s Marmalade ana 7-lb, tins of Jams. Stores, White Park 9. Mr. L. E. Foster, % Qualities are HIGH
20. the, children Also Triopath oy and
y kind permission of Col Lyle’s Golden Syr ac Jolden Syrup. ¢ ‘ 3 i
atichelin, the ‘Pol 1 a | yle’s Golden oe, Se oa. tolden Syrup, and 5. Miss oe Weekes, St. Andrew x 3 Prices are LOW ceitia ;
conducted by Capt. Raison ; Pa Lae: e , Goodland DIAL—FOUR-ONE-DOU A
pl play during the after- {}}|} JOUN bD. TAYLOR & SONS LTD. 3 and Where
. vit SS } 4
f ADMISSION — 6D 14 Roebuck Street ase Dial 4335 g é :| There are NO Parking Problems §
ett |) ¥
FILLE LDL DALLES "$0:0000006000600660500+ 655 06SSSSN 455559595095 SF FO DOS HOO ISS ISOS OOTGGSS , DOOIO $$O5550S00O05S9SSS99SS SSS SOSSST SSS TSSF >


















WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 1952



HENRY










—
. NOW LISTEN TO ME.
| Web WANTED YOu TO
| BELIEVE SHE WAS DEAD,












SOME CHILDISH IEA OF
HAVING DISSRACED
| THE BAMILY. .



YOU'RE LUCKY
GOING TO
AN OFFICE Fe

% 1 READ THATA

WIFE WALKS FIVE
MILES A DAY
OOING HER

DOING A WASHING USES SIXTEEN
MORE MUSCLES THAN IT TAKES TO
ORIVE A TRUCK-AN IRONING TAKES AS



BY DAN BARRY

WELL, IT'S ALL OVER NOW,
THANKS TO YOU, KENT! yOu .
COULD HAVE PUT US ALL
TO SLEEP AND SLIPPED
OUT WITH THE ROCKET,
YOURSELF / I...1 DON'T
KNOW HOW TO THANK
you, BiLL!

FOR WHAT FOR
CAUSING THIS
NIGHTMARE — AND
THE LOSS OF ONE
OF YOUR CREWMEN?
YOu CAN'T GO ON TO
JUPITER NOW —
THANKS TO ME!

“WE FOUND YOU DANGLING FROM THE
ROCKET RAMP... A FEW MORE MINUTES,
AND YOv MIGHT HAVE SLIPPED AND

WOUND UP AS BIG MOE DID— ON THE
FLOOR OF THE LAUNCHING CHAMBER!”

En
SV F. ES

4 Sr] Wn
OR

, ANY 1 bt] th
A lee

















BIG MOE WAS AN
Ox! HE STOOD uP

AND TO THINK I RISKED My
NECK TO STOP BIG MOE, WHEN
HE WAS DRUGGED ALL THE WHILE
AND COULDN'T HAVE MADE
HIS ESCAPE GOOD ANYHOW!















P MOST CONFUSING / 2E
AMERICAIN PAYS ME ZE BIG

TIP TO WAIT FOR HIM... THEN
TAKES ANOTHER TRIP, MOST ‘
UNWILLINGLY / 21S CALLS FOR _ >

YOU'VE GOT THE BALL
NOW...BUT I CAN
ALWAYS PRAY FOR

A FUMBLE /

$0! WISELY DONE /
TAKE HEART...SOON
NO OUTCRIES, M’SIEU (T WILL BE ALL
HAZARD / PROLONG YOUR
LIFE ANOTHER HOUR BY
STRICTEST SILENCE /

acs
i
i
ob

iV;



[ooops

Mp FOR GOOONS UST A MINUTE-
Fee "LL GIT ME HAT
AN’ WALK WITH

my YOU-AS I'M DUE
FOR A BAWLIN’



( NOwW-=- YOU'LL

PARDON ME -
I MUST GET
HOME FOR

Â¥
_ ME ,
HAT AND WALK AROUND

THE BLOCK-I AVERAGE ABOUT
TWENTY TIMES A DAY --

MY



ANYTHING NEW) /
ON THE LAMBERT /
STORY, CAPTAIN?

sy

WELL... THINK
I'LL HAVE A
UTTLE TALK
WITH THE HiLL &





PRINTS WERE ON THE GUN
THAT KILLED HER

> [1M GOING HOME. 1 CAME
TO FIND MATERIAL ON

THE PHANTOM NIVTH, FOR

MY BOOK. | FOUND NOTHING
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON |



PAGE NINE

Gland Discover
Restores Yout
in 24 Hours

Sufferers from loss of vigour, nery
Ousness, weak body, impure blood,
failing memory, and who are oid anc
worn-out before their time will be de-
lighted to iearn of a new gland disecy-

y by an American doctor

is new discovery makes it po
sible to quickly and easily reatore \
gour to your glands and body, te build
fich, pure blood, to strengthen your
mind and memory and fee) like a new
man in only 8 days. In fact, this die-
covery wich ls a home med
Pleasant, easy-to-take table
does away with gland operations and
begins to build new vigour and energ:
in 24 hours, yet it is absolutely harm
jess and natural in action.

The success of this amazing dis- ~
covery, called VI-TABS, has been eo |
great that it is now being distributed
by all chemists here under a guaranteo
of complete satisfaction or money
baek. In other words, VI-TABS must
make you feel full of vigour and
energy and from 10 to 20 years young
er, Or you merely return the empty
peters and get your money back

VI-TABS costs little, and the guar-

antee protects
Vi-Tabs ** .

Restores Manhood and Vitality

a a a a ee

















or



MY PAIN

Be kind to your face IS GONE ...

USELEss TO BUY the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn
your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of tissues to
remove it.

Don't scour your delicate skin. There's no need. Pond’s soft
Tissue Hankies are so absorbent that they will quickly soak up the
cream — dust, stale make-up and all. And they never collapse into
soggy little pieces, They're strong as well as soft and alsorbent.

There are so many uses for these Tissues all the time, everywhere,
Used as hankies, they are softer than the finest cambric,
and save you hours of washing and ironing. Destroy
them once you have used them.

Get a packet today, and keep it handy,
You will wonder how you ever managed with-

out Pond’s Tissue Hankies. At all the best
stores.

SOFT * STRONG x ABSORBENT



| SACROOL
$ @TRIUMPHS
| OVER PAIN

BUY A BOTTLE FROM
KNIGHTS DRUG STORE









IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit





———_—=_—==_=

Customers for Monday to Wednesday only









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside.
Speighistown and Swan Street

Usually Now Usually Now
POTATOES — 4 Ibs. ......... 48 36 Bottles MORTONS CURRY ..... ee 48
Tins CLASSIC CLEANSER ..... 24 22 Tins JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS 1.82 1.50
Tins NESCAFE (4-02.) .......... 87 80 Pkgs. HONEY COMB SPONGE 19 16



D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES









The Book of
Claudia

By Rose Franken

Twelve years ago Rose Franken commenced to
write the history of a woman and the portrait of a
marriage. She conceived it as an entity, a sustained
and extended story, to be told with the sophisticated
technique of a single point of view.

These novels, or rather these chapters of one long
novel, have been read and loved across the world, and
are now for the first time, presented, as they were
intended to be presented, as an integrated story in a
single volume. The truly profound can always be
simply stated. The business of life is living, and a fun-
damental part of that process is concerned with a man
and a woman making a home together.

Marriage, in the eyes of Rose Franken, is an art,
and this penetrating study of a woman’s scul in its
search for maturity explores that art. It explores it
with the sharp acid of wit and humour, and a wisdom
which is unabashed by the prevading tenderness and
vivid passion of two people in love.

Only occasionally in the world of letters does
such a book occur; what Mark Twain did for the life
of a boy, what Galsworthy did in the saga of a family,
Rose Franken has done in the story of a marriage.

NOW ON SALE AT

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY







ai OU a a a eR ed al



PAGE TEN

Inter-school Meet

Highlights Holiday

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, April 19.

A feature of Grenada’s Eastertide has been the island’s

“at homing” to Caribbean y«

uth, highlight being the Inter-

Windward Island Schools Tournament which opened at

Queen’s Park on Thursday
ends on April 30



Sports Window

The 1952 Knockout Compe-
tition opens at Kensington
this afternoon with a fixture
between Pickwick-Rovers and
Police. “

Pickwick-Rovers are com-
peting this season in the Sec-
ond Division while Police are
in the Third Division. The
Knockout Competition is an
open one and teams from any
division can enter. It has hap
pened in the past that teams
from the Third Division have
finished among the finalists so
that every Knockout game
provides its own interest and
competition.



Trinidad Beat
Barbados Again

(From Our Own Correspondent?

KINGSTON, April 22.
Trinidad clinched Brandom
Trophy championships leg from
Barbados today as Jim Ho and
Gunn-Munro coming in for Noth-
nagel beat Eric Taylor and Don-
eld Trimmingham 6—3; 6—1,
6—5, The final two singles to be
played tomorrow have no bearing
on the match and Trinidad will go
on to meet Jamaica in the finals.
Although Trinidad gained a two-
match lead on Barbados in the

Brandon Trophy Championships
in Jamaica on Monday, it was
Barbadian Eric Taylor's show

with a pleasing exhibition of stra-
tegie shotmaking tennis in which
he convinced spectators that had
he the opportunity of regular

tourney play he would be near the «

top in British West Indian tennis.
Taylor was beaten by Trinidad’s
Ralph Legall 6—4; 6—3, 0—6;
6—3; but a heavy drizzle at the
end of the third set,enforeed a
lengthy interval which probably
saved Legall from having to go
five sets, for at the end of the third
he was a winded man and had
been actually beaten in the third
at love, The reason for Taylor's
wih was obviously the reaction
after the keen battle of the first
two sets which had been very
tight Legall had had to run a great
deal to counter the rhythmic short-
cross in the service box, deep cross,
to the sideline strategy that Tay
lor adopted. But after a rest o
nearly 45 minutes. Legall returnec
refreshed and soon forced point
ut the net to make Taylor hit too
often and impetuously. Playing

with an athletic meeting and

In addition to the seventy odd
lads arriving last Tuesday morn-
ing by the “Cacique del Caribe”
for the games from Dominica, St.
Lucia and St. Vincent, as many
Windward Island girls have held
a Guide Camp at Quarantine
Station and a large group of Trini-
dad college boys are holidaying
here.

The week opened with the two-
day Easter meeting of the Gren-

ada Turf Club which attracted
fair crowds On both days and,
despite entry of only thirteen
horses, provided’ many keenly

contested events among the six-
teen on the card.

Top riding honours went to
Jockeys Joseph and Levine, both
piloting in five winners but the
former securing five seconds and
two thirds as to his opponent's
four and one respectively, Mr.
c. J. Bertrand headed the train-
ers’ list with nine winners, Mr.
Clarence Renwick taking four and
Mr. Rex Renwick three,

Good Weather

Brilliant weather graced the
meeting and the going was along
a hard and dusty track.

Hundreds of other holiday
makers found other pleasure spots,
particularly the island’s many
beaches, while there was scarcely
a village pasture without its
cricket match.

Only incident, marring the pub-
lic holiday took place in the early,
hours of Wednesday when a
truck returning with a party of
steelbandsmen and others from a
dance capsized on the Beausejour
road, injuring six, of whom one
died some hours later in hospital.
Victim was Kelvin Caesar, a Vin-
centian groom attached to Mr.
Cc, J. Bertrand’s stables,

Inter-Schooi Tournament

With the races ended, interest
is now high in the Inter-Schools
Tournament. The visiting teams
are all ‘housed at the Grenada
Boys, Secondary School hostel
where on Wednesday evening a
cocktail party was held for Old

Boys and prominent citizens to
meet the youngsters and their
masters,

Accompanying the Dominica

team are Mr. Victor Archer, Head-
master, and Mr. A, V. Grell of the
Grammar School and Fr, Albert,
Headmaster of St. Mary’s
Academy,’ the latter institutions
aving two representatives in the
ram of eighteen, The St. Lucians
re under Revd. Bro, Canice.
feadmaster of St. Mary's College,
nd Messrs Haynes and Foster,
\ssistant Masters. Managing the

sparkling shots to the last, Taylor'§Vincentians are Mr. I. F. Gordon

went down 6—3 in the final set. |

Trinidad’s number one Frank-
lyn Gunn Munro had no trouble
beating Barbados’
Denis Worme 6—2, 6—%, 0-—6 and

6—2 because Worme played
awkwardly against the Trinidad
man whose real game of

strength has not yet been tested,

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

“Your American dollars
OK British pounds 1"





St. Lucia Defeat
Grenada, By 59

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 22.
St. Lucia won the second
round in the inter-school cricket
series defeating Grenada by 29
runs. Grenada only added seven
runs to their overnight score of 96
on resumption today replying to
St. Lucia’s first innings of 143
In their second session, St, Lucia
after losing four wickets for 9
runs went on to repeat the first

ind Mr. E. McG. Keane Assist-
ant Masters.
Yesterday the first ericket match

number twolopened between St, Vincent and

Dominica, while on Monday and
Tuesday next Grenada and St,
Vincent meet, with finalists -play-
ing a three-day fixture starting
April 24.

The football series start the fol-
lowing week,

Four new records were set
in Windward Island Schools Tour-
nament athletics last Thursday at
Queen’s Park, three by Grenada
and one Dominica.

New Record

William Gittens of the G.B.S.S,
cleared 5 ft. 11% ins. in the High
Jump to beat the previous mark
by an inch after eliminating his
Dominica rival, S. Robinson, at
5 ft. 9 ins. and then did an -ex-
hibition jump at 6ft, In addition,
he turned in a new time in the
440 yards and was partly respon-
sible for Grenada’s clipping a
minute from the record in the
inter-school Relay.

A Fingal of Dominica in the
Pole Vault bettered his own re-
cord in 1950 by two inches, clear-
ing 10 ft. 5 ins,

Outstanding in the sprints was
Hugh Bain of Presentation Col-
lege, winning the 100 Yards and
220 Yards for Grenada.

A bumper crowd attended the
meeting, among them being His
Honour the Administrator and
Mrs, Macmillan, :

i

neoring with 49. Needing 184 to

win in 95 minutes. Grenada
knocked up 100 in 65 minutes and
totalled 154 at close of play.

Roland Ogilvie and Ronnie Gres-
ham in an undefeated 6th wicket
partnership scored 55 and 45
respectively,

St. Lucia and Dominica play a



BARBADOS





SPORTS QUIZ

The Barbados Advocate will
award a book on sport to the
first person who sends the cor-
rect answers to the following
questions.

CRICKET

1. When British Guiana
won the ,Triangular Inter-
colonial Cricket tournament in
1895 one British Guianese
bowler took the last four
Trinidad wickets in the first
innings for an extremely small
scoge. Who was he, how many
wickets did he take and for
how many runs scored?

FOOTBALL
2. A player throws the bal)
from the touchline to the cross-
bar and it bounces Off the goal-
keeper into the nets. Would
you give a goal?

WATER POLO
3. Who was captain of the
Trinidad “Discovery” Water
Polo team which visited Bar-
bados in 1949, and was this the
first tournament between these
two colonies?

SWIMMING

4. In what part of the
world did the crawl swimming
stroke originate?

TABLE TENNIS

5. What is the first stroke

in a game of Table Tennis?
HORSE RACING

6. Who is responsible for
the weight carried by a horse
in a weight for age event?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be ad-
dressed “Sports Quiz”, c/o
Advocate Sports Editor, and
must reach this office m4
noon on Saturday, A 26.
The correct answers and the
name of the winner will be
published in the Sunday Advo-
cate of April 27.

Each entry must be accom-
panied by A COUPON as Set
out below.

SPORTS QUIZ







Your Football
Problems

By O. S. COPPIN

THE Printer’s Devil yesterday
was responsible for the omission
of the answer to Query No. 3.
However it is an ill wind that
blows nobody some good ang I
have discovered that the query
is similar to one which * have in-
cluded.in my Sports Quizz.

That being the case the answer
will have to be withheld until after
the completion and fans can have
a shot at solving it themselves
until after the closing of the Quizz.

Query No. 1. An opposing for-
ward and the goalkeeper coliide
and both fall over the goal-line.
The ball remains in play but the
forward is, prevented from getting
it because the goal-keeper had
locked his legs around the for-
ward’s ankle. What should be done
in this case?

Answer. The referee should
award a penalty kick,

Query No, 2. A_ goalkeeper
takes four steps and is then out-
side his Own goal area. He throws
the ball over an incoming for-
ward’s head intending to catch it,
but the forward charges him
down in a legitimate manner and
then scores. Is this a goal?

Answer No, 2. Yes.

Query No.3. A player is in-
jured and with the referee’s per-
mission he is allowed to go into
the goal. If a penalty is awarded
ean he then exchange with the
real gaolkeeper in order that there
should be a greater chance of
saving the goal?

Answer No. 3. Yes. There

nothing to prevent this.

Query No, 4. Suppose it is a
very wet afternoon and five mem-
bers of say Spartan arrive and six
of Empire arrive at Kensington
for a fixture, The ground is play-
able and they want to play. It is

is

right for the referee to allow them].

‘to play or should he refuse to al-
low them to play?

Answer No. 4. Yes. The ref-
eree must allow them to play, The
Laws of the Game state that not
MORE than eleven players etc.,
ete,

Query No. 5. Sometimes the
crowd in the Public Stand at
Kensington is very unflattering

to linesmen and I know that some
linesmen prefer not to line near
Xhat stand. Suppose at half time
atimid linesman decided that he
would not change over and go by
the Public Stand, can the referee
order him to do so?

Answer No, 3. Yes.

Query No. 6. Suppose both
linesmen waved their flags at the
same time. One linesman told the
referee that he had seen the full-
back handle the ball and the other
linesman told the referee that he
had seen the player push the full-
back, what would you do if you
were referee?

Answer No. 6. I would drop the
ball and continue the game be-
cause I saw neither infringement.

Query No, 7. Can an attacking
player stand inside his opponents
‘oal witen a corner kick is being
aken?

Answer No. 7,

Query No, 8, Can the goalkeep-
er standing outside his own pen-
alty area punch the ball cut with-
out being penalised?

Answer No. 8 Yes, if the ball

Yes,

innings total. Hollis Bristol top- three-day final starting Thursday. is within the penalty area.



(Theil Do fr Every



INTO HIS HEAPMOBIL

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YOU SAID you
NEEDED GAS
WHY DIDN'T yOu

A VERY
AND

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GHILLABER 1S, OH, SO CAREFUL
| ABOUT WHAT FUEL AND ERL GO
'S_INNARDS *++5



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FLOOEY STATIONâ„¢

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CATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED.

| Bure wen ir COMES
NOW, 1S DEFERENT..w 1” THERE, |

even By Jimmy Hatlo |

See

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ee HIS OWN



THEM ER
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CON CARNE AN See

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a

Sumnierhayes

Tennis Tourtiey

~
£
bea’

On Saturday two matches’
Men’s Doubles were played. E,
Atkinson and D. A, Wiles
Hon, V. C. Gale and C.. H. Chen*
ery 6—1, 6—3, 4—6, 6—3. t

L. G. Hutchinson and A, D
Hutchinson vs. Col. O, St. A. Duke
and Dr. A. & Cato was unfinished
for the third time. The scores were
in favour of the Hutchinson broth-
ers 4—6, 6—4, 6—3, 4—6, 3—2.

It has been decided to replay
two best of three this afternoon:

On Monday in the Men’s Singles
J. 7 mn Dear beat J. L, Parris
6—3, 6—4.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: Nil.
Total rainfall for month to

date: 1.99 ins.
Highest Temperature: 86.5° F.
‘ est Temperature: 73.0° FP.
Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.973,
(3 p.m.) 29.878.
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.45 a.m.
Sunset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, April 17.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 2.35 a.m., 3.19 p.m.
Low Tide: 9.15 a.m., 9 18 p.m.





WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions......
10 a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil 1.15 p.m.

Meeting of Board of Health. .

2.30 p.m.
Football Kensington
5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Y.M.C.A. Con-

cert... 8.15 p.m.
Westeners vs. Malvern at St.
Leonard's,











$10.77



ADVOCATE



Olympic Hopeful] = Swiss Roll

oe






Sweep

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 21.

Swiss Roll with

drawn Monday “as

meeting closed Saturday:—

Results were as follows:

K Handicap, Seven
Class “F”

Ibs.)

Ibs.)
Time. 1.314.
Directors

Ibs.)

3. Downupsi (Belle 136 Ibs.)
Time 1.15. cord,

. Class
1. Crackerjack
lbs.

“H”

(Patrick

-)
2. Olivia (Beckles 123 Ibs.)
3. Black Beauty (Sunich
Ibs.)
Time: 1.193.
Bourda

THE ONLY woman on the UvS-
Olympic equestrian team, Mar-
jorie Haines, 24, of Gwynned Val-
ley, Pay smiles up at her, mount,
Flying Dutehman, at’ the Sleepy
Hollow Country Club, ‘Scarbor-

New York. The expert
horsewoman will maneuver her
mount in intricate and difficult

Pensive (Sunich 115 Ibs.)
— oe (Beckles
Ss.



Wins D.T.C. |

Mr. G. E. Lam’s chestnut mare}
12 points won
the D.T.C. Shilling Sweep to be
the Easter

Furlongs.
1. Surprise Packet (Gobin 122

2. Sun Watch (Ferreira 122 lbs.)
3, Just-by-Chance (Beckles 122

Handicap, Six Furlongs.
“Class

“Cc” 7
1. Swiss Roll (Aphgn 114 1bs,)
2. Black Shadow (Naidoo 118

Berbice Handicap, Six Furlongs
113

112
Handicap, Seven Furlongs.
Class “E”

116
se Packet (Gobins 126
S.

_ gymnastics without visibly guid- Time: +1.31 1/5.
ing him in,the Olympic competi- Colony Handicap, One Mile.
tion. (Intefnational Exclusive) Class “A-2”
*1..Etoile-de-Fleures (Beckles
119 lbs.)

Plantations Ltd.
Versus Banks

A team picked from the staffs
of Barclay’s Bank, the Canadian
Bank of Commerce and the Royal
Bank of Canada will play a
friendly football game against a

Time: 1.49 2/5.

1. Alarm (Beckles 121)
2. Golden Arrow (Gobin

team‘ from Plantations Ltd., at 5 Time 1.19 1/5.

o'clock this evening on YÂ¥.M.P.c, Stabroek Bamiinge.. One Mile

at ye are as follows:— 1. Swiss Roll (Beckles 125 Ibs )
Banks:— G. Farmer (Capt.)j% 2+ Black Shadow (Gobins 128

Williams, D. Davies, D. Ross, Ibs.)

s.

.<. Davis, B. Armstrong, H. Jones,
T, Davies, C. Evelyn, P. Potter,
M. Weatherhead.

Plantations Ltd.—L. Warren,
A. Evelyn, J. S. Patterson, E. B.
Deane, S. Smith, A. Hazel, A.
Weatherhead, K. L. Jordan, P.
Gooding, D. Allamby, R. Green-
idge (Captain).

3.



Rowe’s XI Defeat
Illustrious By

26 Runs

Dominica Beat
St. Vincent

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 19.

Dominica won the cricket first
round of the Schools Tournament
to-day defeating St. Vincent by
four wickets. Resuming this
morning Dominica took the over-
night score of 86 for nine to 107
in reply to the Vincentians’ 83.
Going back to the wicket St. Vin-
cent reached a total of 86 after
losing the first wicket at 43.
Daisley was again star batsman
scoring 43 in this innings before
dismissal . E. Emmanuel for
Dominica took seven St. Vincent
wickets for 25 runs and top scor-
ed with 27 to enable his side’s
needed 65 for victory. Fielding
on both sides was again splendid.



outright victory for Rowe’s XI.

on a good wicket.
scored 114 runs,

respectively.

Bowling for Illustrious,

Tilustrious _ replied with

for 21 respectively.

2. Port Walvis (Naidoo 118 Ibs)
3. Double Link (Sunich 114 Ibs)

Vlissengen Handicap, Six Furlongs
Class “G”

128
lbs). *
3. Sir Lassie (Aphan 112 Ibs.)

Anna Tasman (Aphan 1138
Ibs.)

A one-day cricket match at
‘Brisbane,” Chelston Gap, Cullo-
den Road, yesterday ended in an



A

WE HAVE RECEIVED A SHIPMENT OF LARGE

PLANTER’S UMBRELLAS

BUY AT ONCE!



CAVE SHEPHERD &: Co. LTD.

10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



—( ee _ lH _WC}™®~.C~CjuyCC OO =U? OF §<—@TEeeEeTeEe=DFEmO SES

$100.22

JUST FOR SAYING

“GIMME |
A CARIB”



tween Port and

ae" Ss HERF ARE TRE CLUES:
1. This. Mr. Carib knows the difference be-

stern, but so does anyone.







@'

flow good a detective are you,
Mr. & Mrs. Barbados ? The makers
of Sparkling Carib Beer sponsor
a competition for quick thinking

discover their mysterious Mr, Carib
and challenge him personally with
the word, — “Gimme a Carib, Mr.
Carib.” If you're, the first detective
to be right you've earned yourself
twenty-five dollars, and should you
happen to have a Carib bottle cap
with you at the time your prize
will be one hundred dollars ana
twenty two cents. So watch this
space for clues—-REMEMBER, DO
NOT TELEPHONE Mr. CARIB,
challenge him personally between
thy Yours of 8 a.m, and 8 p.m. And
remember too that any thirst de-
serves a Carib.

—e

Starboard, bow . and

2. You could possibly meet him—though we
doubt it, at the junction of 10th Avenue
and Pine Road and Tudor Street and
Sobers Lane. ae
3. He’s not a law enforcement officer but
definitely a “G" man. :

RUNS THAT MACHINE NEXT TO YOURS?

SSS SSS DEE PEEFL EF L-L-Z.





Skipper Rowe of Combermere
won the toss and elected to bat
His team
of which N.
Alleyne, M. Skeete and H. Robin-
ton scored 30, 19 not out and 13

M.
Barrow, E. King, R. Suttle and H.
Worrell took 3 for 18, 2 for 21 and
2 for 31 and 1 for 10 ae
runs, of which M. Barrow, V. Mar-
shall and M. Jones scored 23 not
out, 14 and 12 respectively, Bowl-
ing for Rowe’s XI, M. Skeete and
A. Phillips took 8 for 24 and 2



Barbadians. Simple too — You just

|












































WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

SEA SCOUTS’ * MARINE
DISPLAY

AQUATIC SPORTS
WATER POLO MATCH
and FIREWORKS

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB -

(For local and visiting members only)

ON

* SATURDAY, 26th April, at 8 p.m.











Admission __________ $1.00
Admission to Gravesend Beach

Come and see the thrilling Ship-to-Shore Rescue by Breeches’ Buoy
organised under the direction of the Harbour and Shipping Master. *



ALL PROCEEDS FOR’ THE
ASSOCIATION.

BOY SCOUTS’

ot 6
e
eo So

C. B. Rice & Ce.

Merchant Tailors



OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS

BUT

THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
RESPECT TO THE

HIGH QUALITY OF
MAFFEI MADE SUITS

Pr. Wm. Henry
Street



——_





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4 in, thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft., 9 ft., 10 ft.

WALLBOARD MOULDING for covering Joints

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

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TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
\% in, thick, 4 ft. x 6 ft., 8 ft,
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14 in. thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft. 4 ft. x 8 ft.
3/16 in, thick, 3 ft. x 7 ft., 4 ft. x 8 ft.

TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS

eee
3/16 in. thick, 4 ft. x 8 ft.
"Phone 4267,

WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING
TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING
WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., LTD.





Full Text

PAGE 1

House Amend Law On Sugar Levies Better Balance In Price Needed THE levy imposed on sugar manufactured ihis year which is sold for home consumption, will be used to stabilize the price of dark crystal, if the Govern or-in-Executive Committee thinks it expedient This was decided when the House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to amend the law in respect to levies on sugar sold for consumption in this island. This Bill has made the provision an an interim pnvision and there will be further investigations to try and get a more reasonable balance between price of sugar and exported sugar. The Object* and Henom of the Bill arcIn 1947 His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom agreed to a certain price for sugar exported to the United Kingdom on the understanding that a proportion of that price would be reserved and paid to a ibUUaUop reserve fund. a capital rehabilitation reserve fund and a labour welfare fund In Barbados the Sugar Industry (Rehabilitation. Price Stabilization and labour Welfare) Act, 1M7. was enacted to give effect to thi* understanding tly thin Act. ihowever. a Levy equal to the proportion to be so reserved was Imposed on all sugar manufactured in the Island and "" ,,lllv "" auger exported to the United Ki n gdo m and the wbola proceeds of the lew have been credited to .the three funds mentioned above. Thf amount of the lei %  creased in certain years by virtue of the provisions of section 3 of the Sugar Industry (Rehabililatlon. Price Stabilization and Labour Welfare) (Special Lew) Act. I ML The effect of teiis levy on sugar consumed in the Island Is to increase the price paid by local consumers who are therefore in effect %  ontrthuUng to these funds. Combined with the increase In the export price for the 18.S2 crop, the effect would be to makl sary to increase the local price of sugar hevond what i* considered reasonable This bill therefore seeks to provide that so much of the levy as i< imposed on sugar manufactured in 1952 which Is sold tor consumption in the Island, shall be paid to taV Governer-in-F.xerutive Committee, instead of to the above funds, and that the Govemor-in-Executive Committee may •~orev %  Bd television seta this venr. less Food and more lempor i in the m national solvency and security. That was the grim picture presented by the economic %  urvej for 1952 presented to the Commod Ttafj Harvey nude it clean lh.il %  van rearmament programme must suffer cuts to build up the vital export trade so Britain can in H ..r, tie said "some modem types of (jet) au< i i equipments of major Importance must take pn over .til i. "•-ludinj; oasjaan even nnidtieUan for export."* Usually Ihe yearly economic survey is u preview for, the Budget but Hula -car the •'"' Stafford became moat famous Budget came eirlv and mnnv of'-'* Chancellor of the Exchequer. died fact* and figures Me had had the fortune to hear SsT Legislators PayTributeTo Sir Stafford I On the motion of the leader. • f the House of Assembly. Mr. O. II Adam.-, ihe House venterday pussed a Resolution recording their sorrow at the death of Sir Stafford Crippe, former British Chancellor of the Exchequer Mr, Adams said that there have eeljadom been more courageous states! men than Sir Stafford. The Lender .pf the Opposition '* Mr Fred Goddard and Indeiiciidi i niber Mr. Victor Vaughan also paid tribute to Si. Stafford., The House stood a short while in' silence as a toke:i QJ resixvi A letter of sympathy will also be sent to Sir Sufford's family. Mr. Adams said that it was not just because Sir Stafford waa a Socialist and an outstanding Socialist lhat he waa going to say arfuri ha would say. Men af J povfMl would agree that in the long mid glorious history of British parliamentary constitution, Iheie have seldom boon more courageous and understanding slatcarmcn as Sir Stafford nsuf bMHi He said he need not remind ihe House of the whole of Sat Stafford's Dartlaim-m.il v creer. Bvoo nan In the world ti had ever heard of Sir Stafford. i:ii|,ps would without hesitation ifse on* adjective Of him above all ethers and that was. courageous Attacked Monarch) I -line* in ihe Course of put.In I.'.'. Sn Stafford by words and writing*-, put his %  UcaJ fortune; to the le-* and %  isked them alL At lime wfcer it was very un|>opular to do sn Sir Stafford attacked Ihe very exHlence or British niuiiarchy. lid tic would puss ities before DROOPS RACE TO SAVE COUNCIL BLUFFS FROM FLOOD Barbadian Artists t:\itimi \T Tin: wtSKl w Tun new exhlblUona open at the Mu.seum tndav o( %  late M.ii • l Both exhibitiona will run t rajrj %  MT 1823. Ujtrrfnre, 28 years old. M<• .i^SpcU'tiTiitown fetching hoi of been pul —I'.P. Qmen J if liana Visits Canada OTTAWA. April 22. Queen Julimut if thl Netl rlanda begun %  six da> visit henbUl trW Ron] eri"!tilc is almost as ciowdod as her official tour of the UOttl The Qu -. ne during World Wi II. landed :it the airport Monday after %  two-hour fligh 1 from Detroit. The oflic %  Bribed sgj CaikBda lit Juliana ol railed for %  the programme, denofflcial visit to Majesty Queen Motherlands" ten separate .vent. today and five ton 01 Tne Queen's visit hggi ofBelrJ becauaa of mourning in Ihe Dominion following ihe death of King George VI. —U.P. Press Club I^flur*' MB FRANK WAlXJOTT, M.C.P, will lecture to members of ihe Barbados Press Club at 4.30 p.m. to-day. The subject will be •'Industrialisation in ihe We,: Indies" The general public is also welcome. Stafford on the occasion of Use Austerity programme mid heard comments on it. anil if there w* one thing lhat an onlooker could not help feeling, it was that Stafford faced up to nil til and all opposition, whether .'..i latlnHirtlc or Omce-rvaUvf. *>JJ being find and fotetno't an bikg. Iishninn .ind was doing has beat as %  ueh. There was no doubt wh^tevei Ui.it he l.tst seaU for the labour P.-irty and became unpopulai the iron Chancellor. But thenwas louM about it lhat the i-mtl i it> hud BO far ttvad England, the British Common wealth and maybe the world. i i.been in the place „f Sir Stafford, a Chancellor who was datartniu<>l Dsfret) i<> pil an folb.wers, merely to please his rKirty, EngUiid might have boon worse position than i\\greaa report on the rcpalra and rebuilding which were being undertaken and he accordingly ;. ked Ihe Fisheries Officer to supply hi with some facts. Honourable members would n memlicr that it wan originally proposed lo rebuild 40 boats and repair 43 It had been subsequently found that some of the boats which 'i completely written off could in fact be repaired The task of rebuilding the boats which *ere completely destroyed fits lelng carried on at the Reef where it was necessary to establish some electrically driven M took lad 'iovernmonl indebted to ihe Eleelri< SupCompany for providing the 'trie supply for that purpo*' aj On Page 7 CRIPPS' SON GOES TO SWITZERLAND Island Sinks BOMBAY April 22. Reports from Dacca, capital of -vrcrmrnt, Chancellor | p,,,, p kl , nri| ,nid X he island of %  Zurich airport thi Rulubd right mile* off the Bast nmmg after delay, caused by ( Pakistan pni near Chitiagong is %  ind was met at tatton by Lady The northern tip of the island npps and his sister Peggy who is now completely under water fi>r him for some time and 40.000 -i %  stricken. MONTGOMERY VISITS POPE VATICAN CITY, April 22. rigid Marshal. Viscount Bernard Law Montgorncr to General Eisenhower at SHAPE had a private audience of twenty Pope's Library During the audience Montgomnhabttants are panic cry presented to the Pontiff his %  ktl R. C. Sharpies. WITH f HI HOOD CMST HEARING at Council Bluffs, lows. Army troops and civilians work hand in hsfefl t in a feverish attempt lo bolster the weakening levee holdlnq bach the -ulers of the rampaging v .'Bes loaded with rock t tinia a'oog ihe river and. In the event of a break, bulldozers on the barges would push the rock Into the brt << It Al tht time this picture was made the water was ten inches bclnu I I (International .Vounrfphoioi Appointment Of Rent Collector Declared Invalid nanv Studied in Canada Mary Irene Gill. Ihe other exhibitor at the Museum, is a sister of Cam tiii. HM talented artist whose paintings were exhibited at the Museum in 11150. Mary Irene ."111 was flit.. 1 boot, and m IttT pained her sister lo Canada, where lioth of them studied •< 'he Montreal An Bchool iilay in nursing rather than in art. sinthi refon -uiiruf as a nurse. B ajs a rnirse In Canada, but she was not strong enough for such nrduous work. She rat timed to II the. died V MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF SCOUT "On SI. (leuiKr !>..> "our Founder, and to re"afrlrm the promise they "made nl their invesliliuc "Lc! MM 'f u'. tliert i %  i .illeulion to dill dWtj i" "help ottiei i Re%  -il I ,.t our i at told us in his last "message; lhat thl onl. %  i plnetj for Ivea, is to iry and give **lt away to OUHT people HOW ALLAN. Chief S-out. British Commonweallh and Empire. GE1NEHAL PELLS Ol' 4,000 DEATHS ritANKriTRT. Germany, April 22 German General Eugen. < n--i haeuaser in charge of K.dyn rornst area at the time that the muss grave-. of 4.000 Polish ofllcers were ihscuvercd In 1 testifying before %  BvfMissV I Coiigreasion.d Inw Col ', aald that letters anil docs found on the men's IMNIICS 1 thu v .-rsh.H while Hie Ruaalaiut -nil eotttniatd the region. Whilei, %  l ^-er testifying siud, he was In command and tits Signal Corps troops occulted the K.Uvn arN bom Jii 1 %  i64i lo Oetobi i IMI, Oberi n %  i today before Iha ConimHt Investigating the sfartlmi Rartyn magMcre. More than 40 riev.-rnrn photOand Iclevisnm Hrj in tt>half rille.1 i-ourtfor the Mcond day of the Congressional Kalyn gathejtttig. —UP. nUly would immedla'ely The sinking has been aceompanM C Monti Sharpla* l the funeral. (In ied by a series of underw-iter exwere accompanied newspapers specuplosions which began March 18. by John Sabastian Some: lauH whether CnpD< will be Reports said the blasts founded First Secretary of the Brltnh legapuned in Britain -If like cannonflre— l*.P. tion to the Holy SeGflitadiurt—L'.S'. 8 MONTREAL. April 22 The United States dollar on Monday closed at a discount of l II :t:per cent In terms of Canadian funds unchanged from Friday's close That la. It took 1 madlan dollars to buy Amemrnn dollars. The pound sterling was worth M.7SI 8. unchanged from Friday. New York's report is that the dollar was up L16 of a premium i per cent m ta*BM '-f United SUtasS Funds in closing foreign exchange dealings on Ihe pound "teriing went up 1 8 of a cent at |2.81 — <0" Walter Wanger Sent To Prison SANTA MAKIA California Apul 22 Film producer Walter Wanger, who shot and trauoded U of his dim sbir wife. J<*ii Bennett, In a Hollywood ear park I I cember, was Mntenced here loday to four months' nnj.i. Judge Harrv J } % %  part of tha Grand Jury indictment which alleged "intent to MaaUnil murder" and ridi a d the charge to "astault with a deadly weapon Ratlier than provinfi rr urdjtr Intent, the evidence proves that Wangei had no such micm ,,t ; ,]l." the Judge said, Wanger had al(•-god lhal LBng.tJ PIS hone but Ml* Bennett and I..ini! said their relationship was r I I' After accept inn by a majoiity vnle a leRal opinion riven by Mr. W. W. Reecc, Solicitor General, to the effect that tlu appointment ol Mr Albert Maynard a-f Kent tor and Maintenance Clerk of. the Housinv; Board Invalid, the Housing Board yesterday decided on the casting o4 its Chairman. Mr. Q> H. Adams, 10 appoint a "S raonlng CommlV*" to consider and make recommend i oiinoctiuii wiih the 107 appVicanta who answered li tluadveitiaemeni for the peat. I' idon of the Solicitor General was sought after a protest by Mi 1 li MoilU-y who walked out from the meeting .it which the appointmenl of Mr. Maynard wjis | without quorum General's opinion ii i .i fullov m I Of thl Mridgetown I0M (IU36-8) any 'I "i the Hoard shall quorum for ihe transaction of bu inn i h> fi< t. •uhnwttrd far my conilderatlon ihow loani was a meetmi: <.f the Housing Board on the a. INI when the apL of a Rent Collector and Main te nance Clark came up for Mr Mi Of Hie Hoard attended the ling. and. while the appointment was tielng considered, roaa air and said, "I will not slay here an) lonM ind started leave Ihe table. The Acting man a/hlla Mr. Mottley was •till HI Hie Council C'humher bul had i<" the fable, state.! that |i had been moved nnd seconded that Mr. Maynard be appointed to :ed Mr Maynard .(•pointed ;md instructed the Seciiuv to ,iivi:e linn (Mr. Maylid) appointed accordingly wi . i ouorussl is ureseribed. lhat means, Imperatively, that no inless the luiinl-'r at Jeast "be ll'.tt'unley's rase 10 Ch. Il 111 Prison l!i 'i I .ml NEW .It.HSKV AprU n Suiien and waak, 111 %  %  %  a day night sin -1 i.ad been wailing patiently with hunger and thirst as Uwu dBMi to break th levoli. The men were promised they WOtlld He* %  llli.l lit :'. %  ot haiuiuig eight guards rhey old u. ha %  — t'.r. .'{ W.I. Students Awarded Foundation Felkswahipe NSW 1 DM \i-tii %  %  | 'Hid I • -.j.l. in. rrum the HrllMt Hr.l Indies rr. named on Monday as winners of thr John Simon tiattenhrlm Memorial loundatlon Fellowships. The fellowships which will enable the wuineito coi .study in their respective fields, went to Dr. John Kotaea I'nr-. l-rofes-u.r of tfMasnl sssMat) it dw Unlvon p/ Oolkw I tl % % %  Weal Indies, Moiia, Jamaica, studying Municipal Goven i Spanish Indies—from Ihu conquest to iudepcudence. TMK.IT Austin Mlttelholiar of Now Amsterdam. Iltitrh QuuuUs, BTMl and author; and Douglas M.d i fruit farmer. Elhnollngulst. studying the language of Ike Caribs of British Honduras.—** Kuius Bring Fear KANSAS r|TY. April 22 Renewed rain, some of it heavy, brought fears of furthei along the Missouri River to-day But thr banks held spots and experts felt sure tint the twin citloa—Kansas C Kansas, and Kansasd' would be safe Ai estimated that 386.000 land were under water in south (eastern Nebraska I r in order bowever, lhal they may %  united quorum >' %  f lhat they should act and as a Board They are bound bo t-togeil M Board, id the nine the thing Is ordered lo be done (iininmeii H I Tammar ai etc. Ry 30 ; I the fad. it Is clear that, althougll Mi. Mottley was alUnctl la be present In the Council Cham1M r ha a*ai not acting loajMhac with the othl i member of the Board at the time when Mr. Mayiwii'i %  appolnlad to the office D f Rent Collecloi and M-mt.ni im tbati fore of the appointment to dd oflWe u Invalid (fM | W W. REECE. Agreement Outlining his position to the Board when the matter was dlacussed yesterday. Mr (; II Adams, Chairman of the Board. aald he had Ihe i^-.foundc^t reHK1 fo, M. BaekBaaj fwho acted in on the ogcasion when e "invalid" appointment was nriri. but speaking personally, and as a lawyer, he felt that Mr. opinion was COII %  orry that the dispute had arisen, hut ns far ns h


PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. APRIL 23, 1S2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN COUNCIL PASS LABOUR CLAUSES BILL Colonial Secretary Answers Criticisms THE Legislative Council passed yesterday without amendment, a Bill to carry out the Convention relating to Labour Clauses in Public Contracts. This Bill was last discussed by the Council on February 5 and was postponed on motion of Hon. V. C. Gale. seconded by the Hon. the Colonial Secretary after the Hon. Mr. Mahon and Hon. Mr. Challenor had strongly criticised f On (he last occasion the questhe expense of his workers, In view Won lor the second reading wu of the competition Involved, or. pot put. This was done yesterday having got the contract, to keep and decided in ihe affirmative by a loo much for himself and pass on [IS— 1 division, the Hon. R Challoo little to his employees. No poor betas the only member to member. I am sure, will gainsay vote against it. that Government ought to be a j When consideration of the Bill model employer and ensure the Was resumed yesterday, the Hon. observance of a minimum standthe Colonial Secretary said: ard of working conditions in work Further consideration of this done for the public The same Bill was postponed on the motion argument applies to local govcropf the Honourable Mr. Gale, which ment bodies with equal force. L 1 E 0n 2T d ,?? I th 5 t infOTm Uon Second, the difflcultv of keeomight be obtained on various ing bookr • •arks in the speech In which I J£?"a !" iHffi^Jufli^ 1 amoved the second reading of this "£} pSiJifil?* 3 1 Z P "/, AcI Bill In 1M5 the lale* Colonel ££„ ^!^' 10 of Wa f" Ao to Oliver Stanley, who was Secretary *f n p i" f a, n h "S"?".' 0nd ^" Of Slate for the Colonies in the *? ' l ^,* Ho,ld V" llh **> I Caretaker Government, stated in *" ,^ *F pio ^ r \ wh kh incl ** a Circular despatch thai he had f n?i, .. '.' cor ^ 5! had under tOO ak ifsja U on. in con! hr remuneration and period nection with the requirement* of {j^ ptoyn , nl of %  ". hls ? m : the Colonial Development and ffi The records which Welfare Acl, 19*0, the need for £,, d na V' V ** kc P : undcr tn,s a fair wasa* clause for inclusion P'V wou d * "imilar and the in contracts -Ubour Department would be It will be remembered in this •*5 r 1O willing to advise any connection that a condition at*traetr as to the manner in tached to the receipt of assistance .£ hlcn H.? reco rd should be kept, under the Colonial Development T "•£ win not e complicated, and and Welfare Act of 1940 was the observance of fair conditions of labour in the execution of works paid for from Colonial Development and Welfare funds The Secretary of State went on to say that, after consultation with the Colonial Labour Advisory Com* mlttee. Model Rules for the guidif there is no change from one week to another in the rates of wages or hours of work, a simple statement such as "Same as for previous week" would suffice. In The Legislature Yesterday COUNCIL i Cfiaprl lUree 1 r-r aaajaV, r HonM l-,r Colonial *r*reu*tod %  Maaa laSe wmf* Council ot Mil Eai-vllan.} U- "' aaaant to muin ArU on Mnui of Aer ijvatjr Ir* Ounp rag n..r,bi ih* OBioBua a*m> Urn IBID Use(cli.tia.rig tV u !" nU suitnwivi of tha i—nr of mwiT paid over to in* Aieounluii OatnTai by Uie> ComnUaalonor ot %  tout, duilna Oie fuarun n d>d SMh S*t>lnW.. 1H1, an4 j| a a, D tnml l. ISSI TheCivil Sjta bllt rimat.1 (Jen %  rb i Amwvdm.nl. No 1 Order. ISSI h>oort of litel\>rnpt roller lor n*vi inpfiviii anil 'AXfara. in itie Wra* Ino.,. (a, n,, ,.„ te->i h>l->tl of Ihe CarmjiilWr aiifh*> Oar*. The Council pa—ra. > foil W carrr owl IheOa>onlbv lo Lokour Caiaaea la r\w..n DeaSrarii Tha Ooaatti aaUourMoal until to -> .1 1 1 m HOUSE inlet] 1 • (ho O.U admin lalratlva. ...i tasasasal atsl to place th*> n in. dlspoaal oi % %  •Exreutitt an I tlw Kal SupplometiUry Eatlm Ho I, wttHh r*mi if. tha Kraolu %  SSISSUI MUTT at trine dlapoaal of UM i-BMacMiiK C on jn HI** to 9upplama*it tha Ball ma lew. IMS S3. leH 11 -Capital •• iho.ii I" Ihe Supplementary Eat I mate. aSSS S S No I. avhith forma IH Scnvdulo to ih Roaolullon. Baaolutlon lo approvr ol III* (ompulaorv acquialllun by trio Governor-in-Roocut lv> CommlllPF of a parcvl of Und ritm.aird tu MtMakl S.fl aq ft but aliw-o round b actual nurvr to contain Tl.SM aq ft altualr lo tlir Smilh ol Wr.ll.ui> Road in Wralb Hoad in the panah ot HI UKKatl the purpoao of mUmwi ine ^ Bold and olharwiav lor Ihe rat bury School Raeotullon la approve of the rompulaory acqulailion by Ihe ,-. %  .-, %  I :>....' :•;. •1 an area oi Und eat Una tad U contain two rooda Ja 1 -, perchea, but by actual aurvau aimfpund W contain ISOIO aquare feet atluale In Ihe pariah o( St Philip lor the purpoae of conatfucllna; a road leodinaT from Foul Bay Beach lit When Ihe Houae met yn'rrday. Mr Adam* laid Ihe folio. ,.i Report ol that O mnutia* eaamine the eetabOf adminiatratit*. ptoIvancva foi ^av of Money Order* to Sfih February, ltd] Mr>ad* No 11 ISSS from MM Bjicoflaney the Oovrn. Honourable Ihe Houer of AaarmIniornuna Ihe Huli.hii able lev lea on aufar Hl |ai for r o naa—p tion in I hit laland Ihe Houae paaaed a Reao'utlon to aaprove the rate* o* remunerafion paid to the Chaii.nan -nd nteenbara of the Public f Man. and a Kraatlution m.lnia to the appointment of the glerkal Staff to the OommUaUon The Houae alao paaaed a Roohittkan (or SS ton lo prdvtd* (,„ the prpparalion nl St nci*a of land at •Wawell Planl-iion and to aranl loan, to teawnu si the Plantation A BUI to amend Ihe IMplixnMic ltlvi>ta Act. 1S41 oaa paued The llnuae paaaed a Hill lo ci fee i foreign %  H I oS piayu ih which mt .iilac concluded by na>r Ma teal, .rilaiii p.mera relating to Ihe adinlivlauaUon of tlir and properliea of deceaaed |ier aona to rraUH t Ihr pemera ..( nieiuban of the polk* force and other peraona to enter the rBnaulai < FVea of auch Statra to amend Ihe Merchant Shipping Act. ISSS to en conaular ofBcaca and employee* of auch foreign Statra ard for purpoaea connecled with the maltara aforeaaid The Houae adjourned until neat Vote $41,460 For Repair of Boats Third, there L ... why small men should be driven criticism out of business or that costs occasion, ihould go up, provided that fair honoun Hon. J. Mahoa. said that he was reason at all the person who had started 'rt it the Bill on the last but he wanted to tell rr^"^rg^~r 7T," % %  luj'.TrT. nouia go up, provided that fair honourable members thai he had connection with governmental and * " £ K ***!!* p "^ ft completely changed his views and public contracts had been framed J^iS* ""^ r Ti lhere 8hou,d h e s w no rca,on lo obJect to lh and, I quote, "these model rules % D 0 „! epe ^ !" 01 (. ,h f y ar f not BiU that day. appear lo me to be reasonable and !,".* n JJ* h ob ^ . f V 1 1 .fff*' s **l? He did not think it would cause wiuT 1 trust, be of umto Colonial cV", ^ abundantly Justified. The any great hardship to the small Governments in the observance of /%*",."„„ v l !" m e n ...?".'!. r?f?! mason or carpenier who had conthe requirements of the Colonial Development and Welfare Act." Four Years Rest Tbe Model Rules were accepted in principle by the Executive Committee of that time and a circular Government bod es which ought tracted work. He had been made to always to be Jealous of their understand that once a contractor .epuiat.on as model employers. provcd htmse'.f to be a contractor tV?i. • # y P** 0 "" ,n within the clauses of the Bill, he Fourth th P l ir^ a g r"rr,rnn, 1 W Uld n0t aV **P "^ h *' ,,;" U A; ISaHSThComm,s : plied for a contract to go to the rwneeot that time ana a circular ^" u ul Ji h prent Labour Commissioner. He would was sent to the Heads of Govern• will be able to cope quite . ._ f ,..,i !" rt.ncf.. It ment Department, for observance. > with the extra work, which. !" !" %  "J."' "^ fJIi'JL There * I said nrcvioualv the er allu not very considerable. w onl J' w !" D h e proved that he matter reSid for fSur ye"?. In V^Sir. I believe, keep a little h ** !" L p *"** !" !" *h 1949 an International Labour Conbook in which you Jot down tfhe **'' L prov,dcd .. f or ,hom w,,h vention was passed, which His occasions on which, on the Introttte necessary conditions of work Majesty's Government ratified, ductlon of some new measure, a lnat ha would be written off. concerning labour clauses in pubHead of Department says that he „ „ lie contracts and the Secretory of does not require extra staff, with Umt ? %  D :*~ "*• >a a tn at it State sent a circular despatch askthe object of challenging him at appeared to him that they were ing to what extent the model rules %  later date if at a later date he Kiving ihe labour Commissioner— of 194& were being observed, and should have the temerity to forwhich could easily mean some added that 1 quote, "I regard it as ward a roquet* for extra staff on clerk in his department the power most desirable that a fair wages that account. 1 warned the Actto put a contractor on the black clause should be Included In GovIng Labour Commissioner about list after his first mistake and rrnment contracts generally." this possible "ambush", but he condemn him for life to bcinit unThe Labour Commissioner rerepeated that he would not reable to get a local Government or sorted that provision on the lines quire extra staff. By the same Central Government contract. He of the model ruies was not being token he answered the fifth critidid not think that was right, embodied in Government contracts clsm that the legislation will be as a matter of course. honoured in the breach and conThe Hon. Colonial Secretary said He accordingly recommended siders that that will not be so. he was no expert on labour matthat a fresh circular should be -..„ .. ... ...... ters, but after consultation with sent lo Government Departments nil ^ n a "^%  "K '" h I a e p,y B l £ he the labour Commissioner and to the effect that the model rules ^est.on^asjo what harmJias ^^ jn mind 1||e ^^ o( should, in future, be acted upon "Negro Race' 9 Badly Treated % Krora Page not true, ne would say that it was not true lo say that "every man who goes down to the American Consuls Office was treated like a pig." He said he had gone to that office on several occasions, and he had never been discriminated against. Following several Jnterpolalions by various members 'n explanation of what they might or might not have said. His Honour Speaker reminded Hon'ble members that the Bill dealt with Diplomatic Consular relationship, and counselled hon'ble members that It did not reflect well on the House for members to speiik as they did. His Honour said IKhad given too much latitude and urged members to stick to the Bill. The Rill was then dealt with in Committee stage, and Mr. Adams took the opportunity to explain that the Bill did not deal with diplomatic privileges as some members seemed to think, and added that the "hot air" was due lo the fact that hon'ble members did not read the Bill. It was passed through all Its sections in Committee without further debate, and given lb* Third reading and passed. far and as to the honourable members that there and that legislation should be prelegislation -~ a— -.. w . f pared to give effect to the Interbenefits lo be conferred by it. I *" " !" nein. Saw^had national Labour Convention The wou'd merely repeat that the ,a r wages were being paid, he^had S^retary of Safe w informed Government circular of 1950 had !" rt*d *lU^7n m.n7?2? that the Convention could be up'? be issued because the prothat fa r wages were in many cues. plied to Barbados visions of the previous one of no being paid. It a contractor was The Point* IM5 were not being observed in not paying fair wages, he deserved Th. main po,„, s o, .MUd^ P"--f Jf" J ll l -?-J 1 %  b. pu, on U,. bl.c k „ 5 >. when thtf Bill •ration before Council were (1) What wi BIU? i under i this Honourable follows: — ,., be sained from the Bill will be that fair wages will be ensured As regards the point about (> the re-ison for lite !" ntraets and that. Sir. I. a benebwtds olI the Labour Commissioner, (it worth having It should be remembered that the ST, ,,„„: .,„.„,, „, h I hope that, in the light of my Labour Commissioner was a reBlfT .S !2< !" explanation. Honourable Mem. sponslble officer of the Government tract, awarded by focal bers will agree that there Is %  and there was no reason lo expect Gov.TOment bodies would "'or the Bill and that it is that he would on some occasions cause steal hardship since n01 nearly so sinister as they first abuse his powers lo the detriment these contractor* were for imagined. I now ask thai the of a contractor. the most part small -bossessecond "'*' 1 "> of the Bdl which e.nlained that who do £. have the facllih^ already been seconded, proJf-^JJ T ,„"&'" femirSs !" ,^,. ke l P l ,lV l f ^Sw n. %  "•<" by Hon. Mr. pile, there was e£X£5 ,mder clause 5 tTf H ""* CtaU '' "> " % %  < nolhlng in the Bill or the Schedule tS SrtSdul? criticised the Bill on the last ocwhich told any Government body *ii awJlMi w.u.l.i lend to caslon and had not changed his which contractor thev must em<3 SV c!r',ven"ut ot b J u!nef, S "' 'J" ,"'• Jf^g """'>P'There wa. no law In this costs would go up by reason %  •7 and would only necessitate the country which said that a GovcrnQ| their having to employ us '' f a lot of paraphernalia. It ment body must employ people on someone to keep their books, %  '" %  uld put a hardship on the a list supplied by the Labour (4) The Bill would add to the small contractor who did not ha tangle of red tape, iidd conthe facilities for keeping books. srderably to the,duties of While it might be good ]egi < "iinuct ir in Page 1. U w.is neressaiy to build sheds UM tools and io b laid ti vvn as well as to have the neexsss^ry c.cctric current and V. adthtiunal wire slicd was ab>o erected to offer protection to the workmen from sun of rain. The Work In oider that the work snould proceed as quickly as possible. mahogany and white cedar trees had been cut from the wood at Bl PI .. p '.he Reef. At the Reef, the wood was cut into reasonable sixes t> work through machines. This felling of trees and slabbing Of] ii-ntinued until tha und 0| JHuary, 11 %  nlv February, i: i lx*l work started at the Reef and aonjaj 2H sets of timber frames had bcaai. cut. levelled and made ready for assembly. The Itrst ix kee's \i-huk had been orderreei shaped and laid MI that rnnslructiiin work was sUirted on the first tv\,i boat*. Up tn the moment, some ix keels had bevn laid and work was proceeding on these Iwats. but due tu tin >hortage of certain hardwood which was promised by the MM of British Honduras since early February, there had bsen n slowdown of the programme to some extent. The lumber from British Honduras should early May The Fisheries Officer concluded his report by saying it was safe to say that good progress had Iseen made and if all the material now outstanding should arrive before the end of May. it was sure that all of the boats would be : n the beginning of the ft led that it was to be htirdly possible for any organisation fco MM lebullt those boats within lest lime, bearing In mind the absolute shortage of material which existed in the island at the time of tha di-aster. UM HcatM the QoloBlfJ Secretary then moved iliat the Resolution he concurred in. Hun hie (J. D. L. Pile ennuired about the replanting of trees which had bfaSSQ rut down, lit asked if anything had been done or was going to be done about the matter Ilamhlr Mr. J. Mahon -aid that Government was lo M highly commended for the BfrtSOO n which they had taken In in.,' As far as the keels for the boats %  that they were bfstag < %  on' ..f ,i .uinporvition DUHM of scrap iron and concrete. He hoped that the Government would watch carefully and see whether that was the hesl comix-silion that could be used beoiuse he that when the boats were hauled upon the beaches or the n.r, HM WBWtrt innilit be limk. understood when the concrete and scrap iron were mixed and iron began to rust, it lend to easier I tha concrete. Me w.iine.1 That tile Ctiivcinniei.t >hi>uhl out m.kc the same mistake •is in the case #rf the laveHsalar and after spending a lai %  %  had to ipano large ^UIll % %  tsarrw I log first i take. The llonble ('atlenlal SecrrUry said that wiiii regard lo ttaa poini a MM I p ih.n'hle Mr Pile relative •i. the raptantlnf of trees, until he b iii received QM rapoii i>f Iha F^heiif. i ii'. .. k did not know that trees had DMB CO) do-sm. LfO would, however, make invesligaUOgd rjn the matter. With reward to Ihe i-iints raised by the Hon'ble Mr. Mahon, nc agreed that the question of the keels should be looked into Hi himself knew vny little of fishing boats and had to leave the worb to be carried out by the Fixhrnrs Advisory Committee and the Fisheries Officer. He said ih it he did not wanl the same thing to happen In thai case as happened in the case of the Invftihraior. He would see that the paint was taken up. With regard to the cold storage plant, that had been under con%  •'• i '":i '"i Mmi Uma rasd ba hoped that provision for such a plant would lx> possible In the not too distant futonWith regard to the question „f subsldUiilion. he thought he i.a.s right in saying that subsidisation of salt fish had ceased with Um year's Estimates although there was still subsidisation of salt poik The resolution was then concurred For leather of vrerff rolour— It cleans, preserve* —and how it p.-lisbev \>k ynur retailer for Pi*or*Tt's. Nothing else is quite the same. Watch the difference it makes lo your shoes! PROPERTS NHOK IBBAM USEDTOi DREAD WORK It's easy to keep surfaces dean and shining — just five them a quick rub over with a little Vim on a damp cloth every day. Vim is so smooth — ii won't scratch — leaves all surfaces polished and bright. Use Vim for all your deaning— it's so quick and easy to use. VIM cleans everything smoothly and speedily Proved Medications • if—*WlHl Pl th dilsrsncsl lUrej*$ a loicr,ga|Sol'if,-ii/,r.*ditot'd . wHh fix ipeciol Ingrtdisnti h) religva ihroof IrriloHoni end Uop ceuohi f( the labour Commissioner, tion for some othei Officer or any one else. Hon. Mr. Ne said that after ntrlesV'hc hearing what the Hon. Mr. Wylle who would probably atk for did not think it applied to Barbaextra staff, and confer no doa at all. benefits on the community. Hon. V. C. Gale said he had dis(5) The Bill would be honouragreed with the Bill on the last ed In the breach. occasion and although he agreed Let me touch on each of these hal he Government should set 2*2SJJ *Sa RiU This hrteflv" •" "Pl* '" **>** !" wafes or object J, l ^ ll i ,J^,^f'V>' and providing good conditions of """'i ?£ r\ i rrvi !" „ work np wut " of 'he opinion un i!*l w* Co i onU 1 *^ l J%Z£!S *hat while the Bill would not ima ? d l! e w a ,M uS.S ^Tc "3EKZ I*** hardship on the big contracof which this Islandhas derived to,, t d f substantial advantage*, to ensure lmpow hard.,. !" on lnc „ that fair wage, are paid to workcon T raclrirs wto 7arrted oi.1 ndnor ers employed by contractors It is work fol .„, n hial bodies like the > i^ c.bi. not unknown for a praetor to he ntmlr of w cm V rcnM and oXr * S2 endcr at parochial buildings. „ g^ had said he would withdraw hii objection to the Bill. The question for the second reading was then put and carried on a 13—1 division. MATES OF EXCHANGE 3 10*. Chrquaa nn Bankrra 71 S 1 '. Dfntand Drafla 1] u I Suftit Drafla 7J S IS ". templed to submit a low tender at POCKET CARTOON ByOSBERT LANCASTER *t>s£ r n No wondsr this man draadaf golag to work, for rhsumatla pains In his arms mads It tortara to us* tbsm. Yst to-day ha feala fit IT baa aar aod work la a pUaaurs, as as Mils la his Isttov I "I had bsaa saffsrlng Cross rhsunyatlsm vary badly and had %  uch pains la my arms I scarcely kni-w hosr to oss tbam. Than I %  . told to try Km• nan Bait*, and after ualag one bottla I found relief. 8p. of coarse. I has* kpt on with it. am now thoroughly batter and hare never felt so fit for years I aaed to feel miserable airl slngilsb. but now It is a pleasure to work Instead ofadread B.B. The pains and stiffness of rheumatism are usually caused by deposits ofevceas uiic acid la tbe muscles and Joints. Krua-hso %  llmulata* the kidneys and other Intestinal organs to retralsr healthy action so that all tbe •sosae uric acid U eipxlled through the natural channels. When that goes, achoa and palaa go too. Freshness anJ vigour are< restored If you are truubled with rfieumatlsm. g.v Kr^ischen a trial vooraair You can got It from gli Chemlsu aad Hlores. VALOR COOKER STOVES Short Burners 2 Burner Model >50 14 3 Buntor Model '*> $7187 WHITE FOHCF.I.AIN ENAMEL SINKS With Double DrainlHtaid (,t> 16564 complete, with wasta and overflow Eslabllshcd 1860 T. llEItBEUT, Ltd. Hi & II Itoebuck Street Incorporated 1926 "The Longest Wearing Tyre? Eer Built" Firestone Charles McEnearney & Co., Ltd. BARrSAW ir) qoodnessl %  I leap up breakfast bowlfuls of sweet Keilogg e Corn Flakes. TtMy'rafraaih*irr(;riaparr! .So fWarfy.' the "power*'of ..in, and its whole-kr-rnel values in Iron, VlUmin B,. niacinl A targaia ii% goodnema — KeUogg's Corn Klskae 4£ MOIHIg KNOWS ^^r-fVVV^X^VV/OVXXrlaOOwM REDE A HOPPER BICYCLE s TBE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. While Park Road. SI. Michael Office: 4326 Merchandise: 4928 Workshop : 454S „ 46SO nsnsEKSffjro Yillaqt SxclusiVe Shopping Centre %  %  • • • DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gilta. Y. IM LIMA & CO: China, J.-. ll.-r.-. GlIU. ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationer;. CARIB SHOP: Carved MahoKany, Native Barbadian Wares, Indian Bagi and Bella. G8KYSTONE (.M.I.I KII-. Completely new Technique, designs and Finishes in Barbados Pottery. si \ NSH in SCOTT Sc CO: Wines, Spirits and Grocetiee. THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked by hand. Skirts, Shirts, Shorts. Ill I UN \ LTD: Gowns, Lingerie, GlIU, etc. CLUB POINCIANA: Bar, Restaurant. Guest Rooms. BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hairdressing, Beauty treatment. .'.-.'.'.', %  <:: %  .',<.'.: %  H (Hastings.



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t WEDNESDAY. APRIL 13, IMt BARBADOS ADVOCATE fA<;E THKFT. GAMBOLS House Hit At Public Service Commission WHEN ct-Tiuin members of the House of Assembly last sight sought during the consideration of two Resolutions foaling to the payment of the members of the Public Serfce Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff t the Commission, to criticise certain appointments on the .ommissiun. His Honour the Speaker was forced on several suasions to rule such members out of order and implore hem to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions, ( is was particularly the cue t*r i refrain from discussing the Mi. MUpp. junior member for personnel ol the Co mmi ssio n the 'Thomas, who repeatedly, deappointment of which did not conr Uic intimations from the eem the House, but still Mr. Mapp Ir lhal he should not do so. persisted. On two other occasu;-. ti.'-cd the appointment of Mi. His Honour was forced to call the frey Douglas-Smith to memmem b er to order, but he continued, fnp on the Commission. "I can't ec what the Director id 1'. baini ruled Out of mUt-i F-xti., Mural Studies, an Engli liIhfes cestaeenllva occasion:, man who has recently come out |e making such observations here, knows about the local Civil en tic isms against Mr. DougService. Smith's appoinuiiwit, Mr. M-pp I.,._J .g U...FIM litted that I have been hard .. ard * ***""?? rlll CURACAO tearing to-night and cannot "*"• ** %  continuing hi* emuA[ Schiphol Airport in Amster*rullngs too^tood." " urged Oovernsoenite try to llom xn „ weell K.LM. Royal hft two Resolutions the one a ""d "suitable Barbadians Who Dulch AJrllnes opened the most illary of the other, provided ave served in the local Service, ullra m( >dern air freight building t the Chairman of'the Compeople who know of local condi| n Europe The new edlAre has |ion be paid 20. per meeting tions and suiUbUiues. lo srve on t*^ erected on the site of the 1 a maximum remuneration of such a body. first air freight hangar which was 00 in any one month, and that When once again the bon'ble opened for service just 32 years ibers should be paid at the member attempted to bring the ago wheil K.L.M'. first air freight %  of $10 DO per meeting with a name of the Resident Tudor into consignment was a parcel of Eni remuneration of $40.00 the discussion. His Honour appealg iuh newspapers and a letter mut *m M *-tiliB* 1 A/JTs New Air Freight Room is Most Modern month; and for the aped to him to keep the name of tnm the Mayor Qf London to tho U?h rabbit kept as a pel by Stn of one Long Grade the Resident Tutor out of the deMayor of Amsterdam. Vent Margaret iiosweU. wife of and one Stenographer Typist bate, and Mr. Mapp replied, as he The construction f the new Mr J o 09 **""' retired farmer. 'the performance of dutie kg from the institution of Uu. !" n th Wild Rabbil Upsets The Family's Plan LAUNCESTUK. Cornwall. April Plans by the Boswell family ..f Bathpnul a hamlet on the edge of Bodmin Moorto live in Nassau, have been upset by a rabbit. Alternative plans to settle m Kenya or South Africa have also been frustrated by the same rabbit Man With 500 Tit* i.l par* ol tag woil.l Air crew*. Itritith and futrigrv ofti-n iimp into his little office with .< nifSj variety they have packed up fgM it few shillings In Nice. Madrid.' A ms terdam or Stockholm. And his usual Chttstmas I Bunski. an ordinary wild ] I m > <-. %  from his family Hayes, Ukldl.-tex, is Invariably a tie. Now he Its*. Beg BUfft"M ranging from AsMriOM aSSltaOOSJ "Old Betiooar" %  >• til long handpainted nylon ipecutls. His f.vourlfct is g bright royal blue silk tie with the Statue of Liberty hand-painted in gold. Many of his cotleclion topped cases kept in gla: of art they gi u Ion i this comiccllon. $3.0oo has is about to sit "down. "I have depot was prompted by the tieexerts an mfluence over this 58V** llOfltl* I O \\ t'HV >>eeii hard of hearing, and cannot mendous .-xparuudn in air freight family similar to that of Harvey hear rulings too good" traffic since the end of the World In the famous play. THi: HIST ONE WAD 1|* f ARE war them Mr r W Barrew ^ %  *> passeiigei aaosBd clause ..f the Addendum nnn.i.. giow m importance to there it is, ovj UVfJI ..:• roM he ,-hich read: *•* • i^lln *• industry. a rabbit. The amendment seeks to inhn.ld.ne tsaauiaea 1900 B, licv m **" %  > no mushy „ collecting efosf. % %  ,!ST cr.d?' a cierk nen an? on? -.Ere ^iSto* ej^w^ouinng %  ?* %  *^.. !" ^*^ Th, ^i^ cone But "Perey" never wears one. says "As novelties or woiks S y been provided in the 19^2lonial Estimates to meet the gated expenditure. Serving *r> in the Public Service will receive any remuneration Bunski. abbits but Bunski TEN yea i* ago on a No VI liondon hug" gave fci costductor a brightly coloured twinstod of a l a d. fareand started I have killed scores ben" c^r'cvT PTIM' beau to wsthoul compunction -olle.-t Uen in his spare time. Then I diffeix-nt I do not nvc y^ n aao .,„ m (H .,^, i are supreme, but I wouldn't be ween [lead in any of then I'vr 5pent must of my Ufe weuruut my black unlaarni 'le and It suits mc iu*t line."' -LB.S. ^* 4711 Tosca Eau dc Cologr .mr mil tK' gas MI n. UMSn qu*Wio &f 711 ton! I'eilumt %  Uunna M4 tataiMlwg • bill j@)rTOSCA l,., IraulM "4UV tau cf.paom >>>lognon Rhine; ii oblunabla m the arifln*! tui.miy, made %  ccordlnx to thp fumi'J* ami MONl foimula miner 17W. E."5r ? P ST lmen 1 n i K 1 nddTt!^a'^"bidw on'lh. Emat: .liiclenl 0 manor, and in viow ol lha , d c UrU „ in it tho Commission la to be i un-iil.i.d ,vorded clause. Ha '" %  a.SSTi^LS "Z"L~"r.'.~'Z. •"a* !" service at Northolt Ahih. Secret.ton. of frel.ht per dar Carlo "WVlHTS Sth tie wS "f: ,"" %  hl! lH,b> y ""^Wl SS arc pa.aed m .ron^o. O. -^ '^^^ .'mcTSar -^"> 0 one of her ferrets. Mr. Price said to-doy: "Ameriinto Then saUI Mra BeaweU: -le can and Continental traveller abbit Instead of running away hav> a habit of looT<* ^ !" • rma ? %  ""^ "as when they step from an airibserved that it did not say speedy loading and unload. Grade Clerk and the aircraft are plaesd daced on a permanent basis. making on the question of re|nilsioI1 and it also assumed quite t ..„ of work Conveyor belts t glUn *vJ!f 'SJSSS^ ^ P 4 *"* leration for the service renderfalgelv h at the Public Service tr^port the Irnghi directly into have y_Wf "i "^..S, -"' "" y members of the Commission. Commission was ittelf to be an |ie building A special platrormBUlcr ,. Kveiywner g.. Hurwu jgL,. ibm, O. T. AUder Hi criUolsed the addendum to the Colonial Secretruv k-bed height at one end of %  * %  • ,. ^ja,, W I •> of tho remuneration, and tarlat. the depot facilitates the loading M^ BoaweU r fc "* *J. r *" thrm to nu d the hon'ble member who H P thought lhal it was against d UI ,ioading of freight Iruck:W robust nialurtty oy which Uine l with the Resolution in this thu true spirit of the Public SerBecause of the growing numBunski affsruon for the fainlly lection to outline the basis on vice Commission Bill, because if ^ ot hvc omm als iransported — h#l ^ hu bm ^ r ^ t ^ ugtMr t onica—was ting In some instances for minutes. :h the rales were fixed, and the House wanted to appoint an r— K ^ M m the past few year-. often the Commission would Advisory Body to the Colonial hoXcl toT Animals, occupies was* when the BoswelU Tn his opinion 20.00 a Secrelary it would have done so ^ conitructlon 'hought of moving lo>*££ ting for the Chairman was and they would ; tavc l up a ^ft(rtel l5 ^^pped with runc ^* b '? d '*%  u ^**J* •>high" and foresaw the **pwate and distinct body. m waler. heat, electrical con(.ovemment mces Bunski cor?bility of £e c"mmison !" contention was hal if the JM ventiUtlng system and |l^denctlhss came into eals%  „ Public Service Comrrussloit wa* ,_„ l—I .. tur control and can be tencc. ,y an independent body, it should not "rnShed to Tcommodate any ' Kenya, then the SouUi . , be considered an advisory body "aSbfToe fcitJrBsaal3S -I • African Government were sound)r. W. A Crawford (Ul refer, ^ Co i onta secretary's office. "" n ^ iv ^, l "? Sicialh7 trained ed. NaWsar would %  wear' Bunski. to the sllpu.ationU.atnv Civil „ nd & Mld ^^ „ Clerk and SSlrtaantrt wFB S The Bahamas agreed, provided nt on the Commission would T yp W qulte %  part from the Colo' n \^\ "^£Vth* hotel and Bunski had a clean bill of heakh. all K L.M. animal But B.O.A.C. said "Noto him as aboard ihe aircraft. a passenger. A -ihippuii; con pan) IsvMaa on — i % % % %  — him travellUig under a butcher's care — 'unthinkable.'' said the r t ^ k ;'*', l pr ^ n m ,u i dgm'ent upon ^^'EI,, demanded lo know ( ( n triplicate)' why W %  • wells luully around to adjnd when they henr connoisseur, they give on the spot nine times ,f ten" ( In I-.IM1.I. Gtlt avulleis send him lita from Typls ni.-l I any remuneration for hU n ,a1 Secretary's Office. The two <— — vice on the Commission, organisations should work in asaccompan> i said he did not aaree soclatlon. but not in collusion. shipments i the proposals. He imagined If they worked in collusion, ^^^^^ there was some prethey would llnd that the Colonial mi miiwun!" a..,.. !" .... k %  ', Senior OflHer of me Office would !£",!; %  ,.... iilways hold the flies of the Com^E3',iY mission and when a meeting was JgSgr held, that officer would come along ctl sice for th tf proposals, and Secretary or one of the Assistant appear to htm Colonial Secretaries or another •; on the face of It when .. mar called upon to perform dutiei tie nature envisaged In th< He Service Commission Act lie should bo given some a compensation. t. A. E. 8. Lewis (L) criticised W the l-^J 1_ a._lla,.la, U ..-^t.U hthlHg 1 (>d U TiitW | i Secrejary for the time that Mr eategorionlly Mr. Adams explai Douglas-Smith was the iha aii.od first choice of Ihe Civil Serv id act "iff-ru that jh. FUMI. Sjr^iT^esJm^oS'^Com. vice C.mmisalon should be a com„,,..,„„ „,,,„ wou | d no & pr# u ,t was a good of the mission, and recalled how the workc< | In collusion, it would be nember t .. unted to bring Bunski with them. Said Mr. Boawell: "The master in this house is a rabbit." West Reply Will Leave Boor Open 55. • 1 TJ2 IL^M " a %  *32trBE. £Lu „TrL p "a^wd that It would be lor iSl on Germany will not lice % %  • made member of menu, with other Heads of DC„,_,„,„[; to have 0 politician on clole the door to neiotiaUons lExecutive Committee. H. partment. actln, in an advisory S5 n c !" mUllon ,„d replying in ThTriSy >o U la.l Soviet note £ not reconcile the mo dlfrapacity. th( „| t | c |, m made by Mr. Baron which BclUsh. French and 01 policies. He hoog hl it was highly underow. said "I speak with sorrow United States experts will sttirt r. Mapp ID attempted lo disairable that they ahoud pass any rather than in neer." at such work here to-morrow would l the personnel ot the Comsection which might give the crtticiams comma from the hon we constructive, he told a dinner of tn and was rutad ou! ot Colonial Secretary licence to bmember who ahould know that th. Newspaper Society 7 iii. Mnninir linvlna ear.iec lleva that the Comtniaaion which throughout the British Empire. • j, will take la account Ihe de. Llled Mr Lewis to refrain Ihe House wanted as ... Indethere were Public Service Com, lr e of the . Nature tlcrnsod. thai you kerp v.'u. %  vtm cltiBitd i impuriuei. CUnnad tern h> docton cuciftnn thai Bile Bean lo thii, gently ind cffectivelv Bile rksn. at.keeping mtUioti. 'hestthy and youth!ul m lr..k%  nJ figure Slsit uhirig ihcm lonighi Nature i (Jgetfl A.j BILE BEANS ie llrsl Resolution was passed dendum or appendage to hii during the discussion o.i the policy. ad Resolulloti which dealt nc l the setting up of the Clerical w,oru j 0 1 l i t Mr. Mapp again sought to y aga(nsl th e Resolng to correct faults and errors f or a European settlement which ass and criticise the appointlul)0n ]n conc ua i on he appealivi experimced by other places besafeguard! the interest* of all | of Mr. Douglas-Smith as a members to be careful, ai d fore coming to a decision. —U^. gber of the Commission. warned that "it was not s front 'I He welcomed hon'ble members %  asked "What docs the -j^auu but an enveloping movedrawing errors to the attention of lent Tudor of the University m , n i." Government, but he would courtage of the West Indies know j^ ^ s^ xalma (L) associate v sel them to first find out whether It the local Civil Service and ^imsou with the Irernstrks an-l they were not making mistakes. MAIL NOTICE AMENDED |e competent to advise the obierVationV'made by Mr. Barrow. Directing his gare to"where Mr UniU<1 ,. gj,, frnment as regard* recruitand Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasised Barrow sat. Mr. Adams said "the AntBtrp nd Am ,„ l* w*e J( th. ae-i.i t and promotion of Civil they were making provision i n,n' would be loo c gee again His Honour ihe with the Commission, and would The He.iution was iiciy to.D*v SSM Apni isw Iker ;isked the hon'ble membe in a positlo ._.inected the wise md would The R deal with passed. I think a word to %  "•< %  hould be sufficient.'' .'':' 'olution was ultimately m. SUN SHADES %  II different .lyle. and Irpea available ITIHII TZ; lo about S.00 Call TOIIAY al year IMM I I I -KS V. II. I l>l\ A CO.. LTD. %% Broad sire, l Ike paipularrt. if Joke. While IKWS fr lm.lt ,m \ M I I j. %  II s-a lH-l'tMlAIIII II V. f i.mlurf and Mvle?—\es, tTrla'nli—(hev are as easylium; and Mitail li'iilm us mil .nuld Mish. Ilul HH II oul'liiitUing VMM K <-h:ii men np.nl and ul*a"i I \thvii llir* WM "" '•Iw** made b Jolin \Mijte. S.e ihriii lur >our\ell iu leading sloirs lluw'^hi.'il lliibataos. Sir' made by JOHN WHITE means made just right HOUSE OF COMMONS \l S! I I AMI! M u s FLASH Th* Speaker's chair, all coating throughout the Chamber, galleries and lobbies and every other article of upholstered furniture throughout the new building Arc equipped with .'iil ii Nil \l'!,i l.aiex Foam Cushioning SkSSfca Ssawl itm. OML. tA. Tll.ce>-.p.-.1" .< I CwlfKIO-l ftlN-MM IH IM NMla| • w..-i..4r><) %  • 0-e.lop I..Mr C IM t—i l_ Orwa lCl .<: %  ... %  N.m. t lM'IC>lM..lMl Wartafl a O.ll—li*. Lull SPECIAL IOH TWO (2) GLORIOUS WEEKS Winow offer you ."'< Discount on all Cash Purches. over $lt.0U • OUI. OCRS CKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street — Digfributors N E W S H I P M E N T You will admire aair rxqui.ile da-siitn. and attractive Prirr. la Lacliea llres. Material., Udiea Shiw-, l.aUii Hal. Ladies Nylan Sin.kint-. Ladies Anklets ear. Genla Bead. Made Pan!., Elite Shlrta, Gents Sport Shirts. Tie Retainers and Tie., tienls BV.D'i, Sorks. "(Mis' Vest etc. For Batter Bargains Trv .. GEORGE AHELY & CO. 19 Swan Street—for ERVICE VALUE & VARIETY PM0NE 4934 J u s T R E C E I V E D Here's the NEW ENGLISH ELECTRIC refrigerator Bringing you Belter Living! Choosing a refrigerator needs careful thought, particularly It you have never had one before. But there are two vitally important features which are very easy to spot and which you should always look for. The first is quality of workmanship, for on thu depends the length of trouble-free service your refrigerator will give you. And the second is capacity, for the more your refrigerator SEE THE XEW Main is VOII OV slUiU AT THE CORNER STORE hold-, the greater boon it will bt The new Bngliah Ebctrfc Kvfrigerator nffcrs :— • Meat Keeper • Kxtra Bottle Space • Automatic Lighting • Humidrawers for Vegetables • Silent Running • Quick Adjustable Shelves • Kxtra Large Storage Area. <





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PACE TWO 1 II Mill VIHis AI>VIXATk %  WMIMDAIf. AW. a*. IW Qcudb Calling C AB1D ic-day extends hoartv congratulation* to West Indie* Captain. John Goddanl. OB.E. on his tbii1> •third birthatav. Jehm whe w*s bom im April 33. \%\\ has the distinction of beta* ua old Lodge School bu> and also an Old Ham-sonuin. I prom tain,; dttileie a: school but on leaving hns devoted moil of hi* IT-CTP tlonal time to crtchct. He ha* explained first Barbados, then the Weal Indies in IMS. He also sucresafuUv led (he West Indies against India in '48—'40. against England in lt50 and has just captained iho West Indies in the Tets in Australia in which the Wast Indies lost the rubber John !s one of ten children, the only one of whom did not play cricket and lake part in athletics was an only iiswt lie k still %  comparatively young Irilern.ilinii.il captain and there > %  v*ry indication tint he will be .hi* man tr> lead the West Indies against [ndu. n4trt year May the years be many and happy! On Holiday M R. AND MRS WALTER S JORDY and their two children of Hew Orleans, La.. r.S A have been holidaying at the Cran %  for the past two weeks. Mr. Jord is employed at the Phillips Oil Co.. and hopes lo Wave with hi' family on the 17th April Hot Caracas. Venezuela where thr< have been living for the past two years. For Medical Aid M R. AND MRS. DEORAJ SAMAROO of San Fenmnd.. Trinidad, have been holidaying in the colony since the 13th April. Mrs. Samaroo Is here for medica* attention and hopes to leave with her husband next week. They ai Back To The U.S.A. With The Royal Bank M ISS M. KING of Unlit* Guiana who has been holidaying here for the past three |ng a holiday hare with her relaM RS Will:. Imina Heckles of the USA. who had been spend* *aVr.t ten's HUI, returned home to-day hom on Sunday bj B.W.1.A ylg u-e-pfcT tavlng nt "ACcTl*". Rock***"•* U-turn home to-day hwn br B.W.I.A Rhr || employed with AiHh.ua and Puerto Rieo. a*alh Kov.nl Hank of Canada. *1 ifeompanied bl h I dai | • %  B I „ Second Viwit Superintendent of Police HRJVING from St Mark'sJ fR. L. OUTRAM. Superirrtcncl.i\ (irenBda. on Satum.iv wa> if Police in St. Lucia arMiss Mar* BeB. She will KK ii here >dtrida> bv B.W.I.A. %  pcnmtlg three week*' holiday BB visit. He was accompanied by Super Mare Guest Bouse. Worfrt-vife and their two children. Irtft This is Miss Bell's second visit to the Colony. Trinidad Medico On Six Month*' Leave TRIMINGHAM. who EAVINC for England yestcrarrived in the colony for the at-/ day by the s.s. Wineawaad vns week end left yesterday morning Mr. w. E Bassett. Agricultural by B.W.I.A.. for Trinidad. Dr. Superintendent of Montserrat. who Truntnghnm was staying at Inwas here for the past ten days. He flramei Guest House. Worthing. is on six months* leave. M?, D B 'in JOHN GODDARD. OJU l.'.-ctui-r at FouncTatlon M R. CAMERON T1ITX>R. M.A. will deliver a lec-tun on South Africa and the Common wealth.—a study in Origins at the Monthly Meeting of (he Old ItoyV Association on Friday. April 25 at 8 p m For Convention A RRIVING over the week-end by B.W.I A., for the ConvenMon of the North American Assurance Company were Mr. Vemon Cooper .ii'! Mi K. Williams, the Company's representatives In St Lucla and Grenada respectively They are staying at the Marine Hotel Representatives arriving on Monday evening by B.W.I.A.. for Hanid Lectured the Kittens —But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her — By MAX TRKI.I. RBM-ianfinus: iSK^aMr E (:rc Worthing. Up and About H IS many friends will be glad to learn that Mr. <; II Adams. C.M.G.. who had been confined to • ., bed since his return from Geneva, jyi is up und about again. He presir*— %  over a Housing Board held at the Coun cil Chamber yesterday morning before proceeding to Reewetl to tee Mr Marrvshow off. Trinidad C. de Cures from British Guiana and Mr. M. Phillip* from Back to Trinidad KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L.. Point-a-Pierre, returned to rig Board held at the Coun?;*' K A """ "H"* !" a hol,duv nth h Di I Ofllcei latlves. He i .. "ut*. retired Veterimir> HANID had Blackie on one knee. and Whitewash on the other. Both kittens tat very quietly, looking up now ami tiicn at II.mid and purring. "You're darling-, both of you," Hanld said at last, pat • ing both of them along their little Lacks at the same time so as not to g*t either of (ham Jealous. "Bat I do wish." she; added, "that you didn't both play tag so eery much." "Do you know." Hanid went on, addressing first ons kitten then the other as she spokr: "vou've been playing tag ever since early, earl? morning? When 1 first got up and looked out of the window, there you were, scampering across the garden. And you kept it up all morning until noonti-.e when vou ean-.e to the porch for a minute or two to get vour saucer of milk. Then you started all over again. You must be terribly tired. Brent you?" she said. 'noklng into Blackie'" face. "Arent you?** aha said to Whitewash. ; Purred 1-m.iler Rupert and the Toy Scout — 9 in BUT TRUE HfGIIHlC MtOfX>CTIOHS MUSI NTS lkling the tree* figur* Wpn th< two nsli \ m Why. %  j iwinkl • Mindinf. f A took Tg mo%.nimyt-d %  | • &oM<. arid art ona. <,*. w|. "Aad a. this >•*" en ? Do teD as what you art The mti ewwl* ft •orkiag fof Saats Ctius." '.ar. "a ivd dw old L_werk to da vetr yaar, what with most homai aad ason ohifdnr and ssata toys s^asal aad. Ha brsska al saddaalr aad walk ing at ih cat Kt fiahaa SK aonsathing inaida ons of iha pat ks ai. Qrand Calypso Repeal Performance Wilk TKIXWAD'S LEAMflMC Ml*rNMlgt, TAMnrru. mcfm% AT DI T1IBW OLYMPIC T.-^TW • •• •" % %  • • %  "*sr^.~fu:," l kl 1 OUKN> OltCBKaTKA B DAHnvr. rumi I41V0 Attended Cricket Board Meet >l Ketulngton Road. To See Her Son r\. CABOUNI RAMBSAR ol M R.r.A.c.cu,Homx.ni "rtt ,!r;nI'S^t-^" Mr. J. M. Kidney, the Barba,| n ys wild her two daughters and dos Rcpresentntivcs who attended to s* her son wh.. la a pupil at the meeting of ihc West Indie* the Lodge School will be returnCricket Board of Control In British mg home 0 -.-end. Site Guiana, returned home on Monu staying al Super Man Guest day night by B.W.I.A, from TrimHouse. ** 1 . „ Grenada Legislator Leaving looay fjoN'Bii: T A. MAIUIYSHOW, I T. COMMANDER CHARLES rl C .BE., Deputy President of JLv HAYWARD, Ufa Vicethe Legislative Council of OronPresident of the A.A.A., of TMninria. left for Trinidad yesterday dad and President of the TA.F.A, by B.W.I.A.. where he will ipend will be returning to Trinidad this %  <| a y before rehurnlng home. evening by B.W.I.A., after spendDuring hl ten-day stay in Baring a week's holiday as the guest bados, he was the guest of Mr. and of Mr and Mrs. Norman Duthke of Mrs. G. H. Adams at "Tyrol Cot" Old Trees. St. James. Spooners Hill. I wish you'd tell me of it itWould yoa kittcn-gwhat the please, dears?" Hanid waited for a moment or two. The kittens didn't seem anxions to tell Hanld the naase of to* tag-game they ware playing. So she shook her head sadly (for it did seem a shame tha' they Would want to keep tha tiarrr of their gam* a aeeret) and continued. "Now wouldn't it be better to Just sit quietly en the porch and rest inul supper time, darlings? Look at your mother." she said, pointing H the'ir haadi to the other side of tht porch where Big Patehie sat washiiiu her face with ona of her paw*. "Your mother doesn't dash around, playing/ tag or whatev It's too hot At that very instant Old Patehie %  Hopped washing her face, walked %  lovll to the end of the porch, took a *pring and climbed up to the roof. Hanid coold hear her footsteps pattaring acroas the shingles, up si high as the chimney where the swalBoth kittewl rgtoked back at Ha) ow were living during the summer, nid. and purr<-.| bit louder than %  KQh wHl< Htnld MI J to Blaekie before. But r< ilher of them .aid > ,„,, Whitewash; t rieas your anything mother like* it better on the roof. "Of course," said Hanid. "1 m noi. Th# Yltw muit ^ better. But I do quite sure it Is tag that you t* i w ,,h you'd both stay on the pored al play. Maybe it's a special kind of taai| un|i | ^ un —^ j^,,, pni | n gets cooler. And I think." Ilnnid put tB as a snggestion. "yon ouglil to wash your fares so you'll be nice and clean for supper." Sat on Porch She set the two kittens loan on the shady part of the pun n. For a minute ar two they realh sM there, and almost--but not quite -looked as though they might siTirt 10 wash their faces. But suddenly, la th> twinkling of an eye, they wre gone. "BlackisI Whitswaali!" called 'Toottm't hart •ol' They were nowhere to be And whan Hanld looked up at the roof to tell Big Patch!* that her two children had disappeared, there %  -it-is. Shi 1 they both were, cuddled ne^t ta their She j mother, all three washing their the shady porch; oh.' faces, right bricks of the nest to the sua-bot chimney. WOMES i,\ nit; mwr— Mrs. A. L. Stuart Mrs. Stuart Is the wife of Dr. L. Stuart of "Norham,"* Tweed%  vnkt i until eventually she Sj.second show m 1938 the School came blind for ten weeks. During was closed but Mrs. Stuart rontinside Road. She was bom in Brtti.-.h this time she was kept In a dark tied to train girls who took part Guiana but when she was merely room and the Studios afforded her in any entertainments. Such help %  even years old ihe left for CallIha bast medical attention. After was rendered to the Excelsior forma where the was adopted brj her uncle Dr. W. E. Richardson. Mrs. Stuart's love for dancing and her achievements In these classes reflected more than a casual interest. Here was aaen a natural ability to handle the most difficult step. Acting on this, her uncle pvrmlttcd her lo take extra Icsons during the holidays in New York. As she grew Into mitfteeni she struggled wilh Iwo desire* —her uncle's whose wish for her was to follow the medical pro* feesion and her own to make dancing her career and furthermore to rrente her own lep~ AI Kktra In lMl Mrs. Stuart visited :%  i mother lo British Guiana. She tlien went to Trinidad and the islands and later Barbados what* she continued her dancing, ukm.' particular interest in stage shows In 1932 she left for England and three years later was married in London. The same year her dancing career was climaxed at Blsuee Film Studios, London, where her agents secured for her a third part in "Saundera of the River." rcioverlng This Technicolour picture, dibecoming j iacted by Alexander and Zoluii reeled all She .School of Music. Revuedeville Although she has no children Mrs. Stuart i. very food of them, go in lfMB the dancing school was revived In response to several requests from mothers. Later In the year a Mannequin Parade and Dance was staged at the Drill Hall In aid of Charity. There WR a I repe.it performance some time later As the school grew Mrs. i Stuart produced Rcvuericvlllr i960 | and 1931 at the Empire Theatre. These two snows reflected local talent among the girls and they arc now clamouring Tor another show. Through the success of the last yejn> show. Mm. Stuart has constructed a new apartment for the •rhool which Includes a ballet. ii.i'.ring. powder, and changing room, and canteen. There are also pl;inon foot for forming a club. FaaUral Lisa Lekis, Festival Director. invited Mrs. Stuart who is head of the Barbados branch to bring a she decided ifainal troupe lo Puerto Rico for the Cai uiovir .u-toi ; ud .i Ibbean Festival to be Mr] %  A.. t tent ion to hci home, gu The festival consists ot B.B.I. Radio ProHrmar 4SS—Lit .SB. 4pm The News, IB .. rr\-M, 119pm BBC MMIand Kftil Oi.hemu*. p m. Onm-~' ol Uje We. 1 IS p II. Heloay from tM SUn. p m. Inlerlude S p m ftcoUbst BtagaiUw. 0 IS p.m. CoUmul Ci'mawniarr. • p.m. Thaafe on Uwse Thlnss. *' i>. Si-i.t %  Kuund up and Profi i> in The News. T 10 p n fi..n. Britain. :is-iatB pa. ssasM. n atM •J P„-H r Pat.di BOLD K om Dad WITH AN ALL-STAt HOLLYWOOD CAS T! iianisTir aweirncai WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m. MEN Only 8.30 p.m. AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER! WARNING THI in.iurr InrlHdn. powerful Mfdlcal Requnca. JIOT r~,.n.m^.,l.-.l lor llir Woak-Hoatto* I I 1 i/1—HiKIKHII. (Dial '.!#, SPIMM. IHIIIVt /'HI. |UMII | METPO COIDWYN MAYER tlOBl 20TH CENTURY FOX as tie iso i in it p>"'I lotaorrim '.-•• a. ia P ... •>o>oi < asBBsasaasj CABLE vs. t. 111 I S I 11 •si uiliim Ill '. a. 10 r .mm LAS I SHOVfS Staife! WINTERS fiary MERRILL MCttNl TCmlrt KiawWYNN Afctti DAVIS C2& 2Q^*VO^W: TM battle of Texas and the kittle of the aues! GABLE GARDNER _atoiei CRAWFORD liflSl 1 ;ci ;•>: wn iq tni'r HOX'T AHGMJE! rOl'VK YtCHH S£EX BEFORE. IT NOW FOR Till FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS IHE REAL, THE ONLY. THE GENUINE. t || p in CalUng Iha Well liidlre, 4S p in B> Baviieal. • li p.m. Bodiw Nr %  eel. %  H B.m luimunt o* Arcotmi. R 4S p m Inlarlude. I SI p m. rrosn Ulr CditfKiat*. a p m & Geors*. • P •* The Newt. IB 1 p.m. Haw. T-ia. W.U K LI. Wiltt • %  QluucrMcri U. KOTM. %  S.nifM Uao^e ...d the Maple lMl 10 *1 p nt Hi>>al Phiiruirmankr (itrMB Mrs. A. L. irrr'AKT Korrta. starred Nina McKlnney. She was alto Invited iy the M I i.e. aamplea of the folk lore—di %  ind i'aul Kobeson. But after the to .appear on a "Guest Star" promusic and art from all the island dose-upa were taken they di*covgramme but unfortunately she was of the Caribbean Bach island will ored that the colour of her eyes in Manchester at thai time present lomething different in was not suitable for the part. .tyle and type. Soon afterwards the took part in Dam im. School „ illms with Merle Oberon, Leslie Other Intrrents Howard, llermalne Bradley and A * T returning to Barb-do-. Dancing li her chief flair but many other British stars in lher 3 **•"• numerous requests for Mrs. Stuart holds a diploma from "Parade of Stars. 1935." Her danc dancing arho..l ih 1937 Mr* the New York School in Interior ins routines were taught by Buddy Stuart opened a M:-KI lor dancing Decoration (lfM5) and a eertiftBradley--stage Director and Daneand keep fit. The achool numbered oate In Hair and Beauty Culture ing Mailer at Elstree oVer Mty and Ifv reall that from Wilfred Academy, New York -sa.. %  ., thh. was more he. Una leallng ,1943). She U fond of musu. ngfasBlealour with children and imparting %  . gardening and art and on the whole At that time technicolour ha.-.nM them woat she har-elf had been fa n || -at home" as a hoUaWWffe. been long introduced and the taught. In IBM she staged her Although she It not a member lighting effects were ten times first show at the Empire Theatre, of an/ Board or Institution, she stronger than ordinary light. After This was a big success and the folcontributes In all ways lo charity many takes and retakes Mrs. lowing year the schnnt increased and has a special Interest In the Stuart's eyes became weaker and In numbers. However, after hei institution for the Blind. Just Opvnt'd PRINTED SPina. M" @ 11.00 PLAIN BF.MBF.RG SHEERS 3t" @ H.47 WHITE. PEACH. BLUE. OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONOOLEUM RUGS. BY THE YARD. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORKS DIAL 4606 NEW CHIC DRESSES of New Materiel* New Styles Fer Cocktails or Wetta-lnge From SlH.no each also tO ue IS denier NYLONS — .n New Cocktail HANDBAGS for — M.Z3 r-BS j. The MODERN DRESS Shoppe Broad Si reel IH Rtaeabrr <££!"* You U\rd YN'R asaihg gf ,: IINDERELU HERE AT LAST m mm DAtin ....el It 4. I IIMII !! 4 %  III BIB. I I.HI VII SI I OM MOB. coioi BYTECHHICOIOR S -I a +1 FANTASIA THEY WERE ALL WALT DISNEY'S. DIVES YOl' ALICE! AND NOW HE THE KIDDIES WILL LOVE IT—YOU WILL ENJOY IT X.B. Special wilh "ALICE" W.ltt Disney's Academy Award Short Feature — "NATUBE-S HALF ACBI" Better than "BEAVER VALLEY" and "SEAL ISLAND" •ratr* T.t .m>*B-H This Alone Is worth the Print of You can only get to WeoderUnat II Walt Disnev take* vou that* And he'll take you in hia Wondertlm Aa soon as it's shown hare. EMPIRE THEATRE Freaav. April 25th — Thursday, May let. '.PLAZA Cle'NEMAT PHYLLIS THAXTER RAYMOND MASSEY Gig YOUNG— James GLEASON oei I CALl IT BOLD! YOU'LL SAY ITS BLUM! ,BNea23ia PLAZA — MMIIM.I I 0 N Oprninn TO-MORROW (Thurs.) 24th., 4.4.'i and 8.30 p.m. Also FRIDAY (3 Shows I 2:10—4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily lit 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. (. I (Ml I Preeenl. 4 IISIII \ tlllll VII I I OK 4viHiin.. ti'itii tt, Mieaaiii featuring AR INTERNATIONAL OROTJp or ARTISTEH starring ellre>aea Marliaai,ea(HaglcUn and Rhumbs Dancer) LOLTTA—(French Oalans'x SatnbA Queen) KURABELLA (Exotic Tango Diner) JOB OLEHENDORE (we ..11 know him) BOODHOO BROS (B.O's Acrobatic Kings) HARVEY ROOER8 (leading ballroom Exponent and several other sensational stars Music by KMth Campbell*-. Society ft I'l-ml Thin ."/>..i To-morrow fur Von\PWS BfWd SIM IN 4,4.11 II RRIDOETOWN—Dial Ult TO-DAY 4.45 a 8.30 P.M. "The BLUE VEIL -VMAN rneuia* lAt-aHTON if. Jeaa m^>Nnci.i A/so The SHORT: -mm T\Y1X -An-a m .-OHO.*. NING BASKETBALL" M Than Ifteett-l IS F-BS %  BOaa or BANTA WOBA iioiaun HOT SHOTS a UDL1 TBU OIIIA" TSA1L U%  TTAjllUrtT %  •milr ni'UNrrt l lJUU Ill MS jsssii Mo gi as g I tlM I I U I rstt ct'F SrtV Sy.ea ii • i IB Triple Aiuardasi %  KM •( thriMBWast^AKa Mrhartf AW I IH natty DBCTTT-TT Sam OHM xafiBjar-T>. WtUlAkS Ai l.-o BIBuWT. a aaxd %  MIH BARBARF.F8 —DUI 517t %  on4. TOoa4ia *M a %  "WyK* wwrawKi %  cjoaw aa CB>IK eratati ir NOOWX ON rar eaAiaiFTw nJCTTSW SIX OIK M J*m.T M. XT k BBCV. MK.IAil.JB |>.u. BAD MB* TMBITOSa IUnOll>li faCOTTGa>(>> IIAYBB A -MBKB PStOM > -!!•• B BAD I -ON nis TIN— nui HIH THEY WONT BELIEVE ME "rVabrrl YOUNG A THE THING IOM1MU "l-i.i 4T ajaxlal I > r M BO*V af SAST4 SO-' BUMS IB* Ol'TI-A* t Tbe Gardra—SU Janea roiiav a TOMOBJIOK — par -arvoMD TBIFOKBBT-' Ukia X-It.MTV JOB TOt'NC loO.il AHAmTHONC a Ml .OBBIDDKM PAST" RoliaMI MtTCMUW IHW Hll.slll -nil .( It.' DFBBBT" Mil IN And* DBVUSl -C'HlTKrKI COSBOT' T-. wn MAMS A Tsoc nsBsBJca a C-.LXNN MMJXK ^V/, MeMM I .H I I I



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WEI>Nlsmv APRIL 23 i5: BARBADOS AOVlli \TI. PAGE FIVE Labourer Not Guilty Of Attempting Murder Conflicting Evidence Given AN Assize mry at the Court of Grand Session* jUtmday returned a verdict of not guilt v after being invited to return such a verdict by His Lordship the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore in the case in which Jonathan Belgrave a labourer of CaneHeld. St. Thomas, was charged with attempting to murder Elaine Callender. a child seven years old by throwing her down into a well and causing grievous bodily harm with intent. The offences were alleged by the prosecution to have been committed on December 27, 1951. """"" '" %  %  %  Before Inviting them to return ,,s~%% r .. verdict of not guilty, His Lord••^|ii|l*f* I MI* t;p u *^ *** > ur -y t nal ****** % %  PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFULS MEET Work" Should Be Slogan Says \farry-show evidence against the accused and lete little child told the Police MagWjate one thing and said ano'her in the court. In the Police Court the child said another man named Sam and the accused threw her In the well and now she sold that It was the accused uiho threw her in th" well. They had to go by the evidence Hon'ble T. A. Marryshow *hlch they heard and it would Deputy President of the LegU** entirely unsafe to convict lative Council of Grenada adtnat y un ma n xtUtt criminal dranitii the students attending off* 1 **The law required that the Trade Union Course at the "Jtuniworn testimony of a unie Y.M.C.A. on Monday nltfU told ch '.r. Jl^* ** corr ^ on,tc< them that he wa^ one who be? t There w "? 'dfncr against \i*v*A ii..t ,,.. ... TlC 'he accused other than that of i ?l !L £ lh * *** a verdicl of nol aullty. a J^ £2 ,! nCy I !" 1 *. **l n from Counsel in the cow was Mr. what had been done in the past, Henderson Clarke, OC. for the It was not for Wm to glorify accused, while Mr. W. W. Reece, what was generally called the Q.C.. Solicitor General, appeared Kood old days which In the study f or the Crown. of history were comparatively %  %  £_. . Jaw Fractured The mind of man is marching on and each age (though in the Dr Colin Vaughan told r 1 u on the eft elbow. feared" ho told them. He menThcsp Injuries could >' was one A|>ioifiliiienl Of Kent Collector Declared Invalid NOW... a new medicated dog soap WITH DISTIHCT ADVANTAGES a r pur 1 acttd as he did, bearing in mind the urgency of the matter at that i ihould be promoted and said he would stand by •mtjU thing which I have to tin hidecision. Bfivafta or public, that would be The Board having accepted the • Uave> iht ^i haslthy matted,* Mr Adams added legal opinion, the Chairman ruled jnd-lou* Mr Cox said that thev had it-"", the three alternatives open to' ovii looked that the last Ume they 'be Board were, either U consider I ii >de two appointments—that of 'he question of the appointment, U %  Clerk of Weeks, and that of re-advcrtlse the post, or appoint a I III Barahall—th-> wne appoint%  ereenlni comrnlttaa to interview U JIJ* .igauw mange :..ih" 'l>c candidates He pointed out' Ihl Hniistni that the Board could either np• Mr Maynard. and If he were Mr. Adams in answtring this o> appointed, recommend that he Mr. Cos said that be paid for his services. It had m U %  IWOWUii this ruling. Mr Moult, the Board thai oCbar %  *) urged that the l"hairman give p*'--lilc had been then working In %  funhtr ruling that the record of the jobs. the minutes show that the appolnt(.,,.,( Intenlton men', was made, not from the first U. Motttaj Ilka Mr. Adams. ifiP*^ -S2? JL^f'S'tat lespect for "'* "\ **£5 Ji tell tclual "Ppnmtment. S* 1 "* B T k1, li ;V The ruling Deing made. M, cision he had made had acted with fclotUw continued la explain thai *ver>good intention th „ r ^ 107 .ppu can ts for the They were net concerned with P* tt ,h ^l 't^ Hn ns .ranging Its of the case, nil" to iitt of certldMUTUM SECURITY AOMINISTRAIOt W Avercll Harrltnan (leftl shnV hands with Sen Estcs Kefauvcr. who seeks the Dai tial nomination, at a JI00-a-pi ale dinner given in a New Yor*: hotel by the State Democratic Cort.mlttec Kunmil who was the ruesi of honor, i* listed to be chosen Now Vrlt' favarllf-ton eu President At a WashlnctOD BTOM eesifersnsa. President Trum.n ealled ifarrtman 'in-ii" v considej 'the rates" and outlined to the Cha.riv. n bi the m" what took place at the meel" e 'ng before ha left DM n erlt but arsn opinion which was given by fndcr the clr1'iimstances. he felt that though the Chairman tM. Adams) was not ur d tha wmle ln V d# prSStSt when tin.iH-imtment was Z'^L^L^vlllFZ.^SZES' us he did lo eompromise. yet Jtwas dangerpleasant • non-irritant • invigorating • insecticidal bee: tioned al*, that he was one *fST rmrtpie of promotion, all things bcm omul He was not so foolish to think that because he liked a person, or be-ause a person supported M political view*, that that person Should be appointed acain-it %  ivlon whose abtlltv and lUttaMW. •nerilcd that person a particul %  Mr MottIcy after explaining to Ulg Chairman of M After deliberating for three quarters of an hour an Sf 0 ?**' Shopkeeper Acquitted Of Receiving Stolen Sugar umpromise a principle, and after admitting his mistake in not following the principle M icfeinng the applications tg a "Screening Committee, moved, seconded by Dr O'M.ihoney, that a Screening Commute* be appointed to n Jatlon* to the Board. IMKRIU CHEMICAL (PH4HM4CEUTICALS) LTD. %  —— m*i,JMf, KHMIMIO eftmf—Hj Chrmi, ml /ndkilrtn JJMM "Ml AOfOS AND IHM Hll.i TOSS a, t MVMS 4 tMt (MRSAOM) LTO. rm MI NS, aataairva. p.r %  < %  illk r.pi wlthaal rafrlsreti He emphasised thai the final Tilirmation of the appointment rests" with the Governor-lnCcanmlttOt, and added that al a public body, they should h a way as to avoid itl.lMH Mi iic< ..:.-• moved M-HIII.I-HI ba .ifi.-i .m obAssize jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found "'** MrTal E Mclva Walrond a shopkeeper of Huntc Street. St. Michael, due to tin circumstances t the not fiuilty of receiving four bags of sugar valued al Sli^.lO n '•'""' niMtsted thai the Board November 1. 1951. knowing them to have been stolen Jhkh oire be appointed, and garvauon bi Hi 1 %  and Mr. l-ashloy. Mr. Adamr ll that from discussion* had had with Mr lashley. he plUl for the excellent reason ,. that he-could do with some capital Darcy DoUnc* of Drldgeneld. himself. st Thomas, said that on DecemCapital And Sin ber 27 at about 2 30 p.m. he went He envied no man his riches, into a well at Cane Garden. St nor should they do so. He wantThomas and took out Elaine ed trade unionista to work hard Callender. Her clothes wei and earn capital—capital enough A basket with a dish in it was The Acting Puisne Judge. His reasonable doubt (a) 'hat the fc-ring the in to have then, live in good homes, also taken out of the well lordship Mr. Justice G. U Taysugar was the property of S-reening CommiTire which would, eat good food, wear clean clothe* At this stage Mr. W. W. Reeve. lli; wll „ presided told the |ury Proverbs. ' n rrt ,:' s Thev should aim at getting not the prosecution had to productj,, lhlllverdict considering UV to be stolen. already worming on Wm job, the living wage, but a saving other than w*t the girl said. Hi, fcl(hs hnl „„,, h;ill ,., k ,. n whril s| i MWment which Un nowliid |j>rdship then invited the jury tney wcrp wonii If the explanation is o.^ whu h COnatdef would take effect, in to return a verdict of nm guilty. Mr j E T Branker appeared leaves the )ury In doubt as to ^"" rd ;" c wlth '.', nnrman gave his casting vote After the )ury had returned on ^^^ lA hc ilccuied wWte whether she knew the gwds !!"'''; n 'IV 1 P \ L,Z • %  *'* M BafWca' motion, emtheir verdict His Lordship, turnMr w W Resee proaecuted for were stolen, then the Jury ahould ,h# !" "' ll lh '' n. ..p| ointment hu|fiing lha 4B „ .„ l(( | lc Board. |d Ing to the mother of the child. he Crown> The ca P ggauW be told that the can? was not He f; tev had to act In such a way as to '" vValrond was that she took these proved and return a verdict of Hon. F. C. Hu son, that the Board remotest suspicion. that Mr Lashley's attialways clear and above only wage. Hc was for captt-i. Imt against capitalism in so far as It meant a misuse or abuse of capital for selfish or sinful ends. Spectacular demonstrations the like do bttle good in the end. i ould ruck %  I.,, .lid Mi Barlrtl' motion for the apootntment Of Mr Maynard was, put and resolved In a tie. three membe r s voting on each side Th 1. KLIM 2. KLIM! 3. KLIM qaallty Ii i-.r> .-Kor4. KLIM Ii ••<•ll.lt far |r.U, >>!U A 6 KLIM is recommended for infant feeding iM. i'nir Kl IM |i. n Ol cm.ru *.*. want ih bi nounshiog milk lor you -HI all (hit sad aiort. Kl IM milk i* ALWAYS purr, fully ing and *s*tr to digeM. 'Hut • li> %  i. HJfl b* ilociori . txrttricd b] told her that she uld take JM5 T^.S'l'L^^^^ '^L^^OT'P^Z SS about too far alone place! them in her shop. Meanwhile Proverbs was Ing bags of sugar and people by their seriousness In thi work thoy do and this can be done in a strong and silent way. They must be too proud to be Pitt*; too sure of themselves too self-reliant and strong to be purveyors o* fauiic and generaiors of hysteria. Trade unionism Is a busines: big business, and by training, the Trade Union Official should he able to argue and negotiate with the beat on ogu-1 terms. questions of Government rf B y morning Mr. Branker Popular alegana are "soak the Mr. Williams asked. His Gov, iniml to linrtr e the jury cm the rich" and share the wealth", but eminent recently received a reniM ||e ^Xd them U> look at the he sussesled that c*insldrraU*n quest for a raise in pay from the evidence given by the PO should sometime* be tiven anca-unl workers and rock blasters j 0 lhe alleged conversation other slwsam "share the work." employed by the Deportment of i„.i W( .en tha nccus* New Spirit Highways and Transport and by work i nK ,,„ the lorry He said that he was looking the Contractor for supplying According to the Police the forward to seeing a new trade stones? accused asked for the balance of union spirit In the islands when 2, If so. will Government rethe goods. What M.P's Want To Know \T & WiHiniK* ll nnd Mr *" lllnltl '""' — — mt %  %  Sollcitoi Oanoral Tinwas later You have to decide on the agreed to b] Mr John I .vidence as a Whole The entire BjcUes being the on had evidence must be taken as The vote was ni follows: For Mi He UcsV motion for the nprolnt-nant of Mr. Maynard: Mr nccklea. Mr Cox. and Mr 11 A %  bject. I... %  -ved. with,. v -,,, „, ^„, "reported'the "matter to IhcPollee whole. I am submitting lh..t the 9ul getting %  •'<•": '^j Tudoi A..inst. Mr Mottley Dr Novembsr 1 the Police statement of the accused Is a far Ui>-rd seek further legal advice j p. O'Mahoney and lion T. C followed the lorry to Walrond's more reasonable thing to .u-eirpt Law And < omnum Sense llutson S ( >ekH. aga'nsl I M thai point, the Chairman adthat the Hoard "eoefc rurtln i lenl journed the meeting until new' adylre". Mr Adams expressed the Saturday morning, when they will view that the opinion given by the snnvidcr other general matter* Snliciloi G In wrMefa which have had to be postponed %  use were becaUM' of the various discussion „„i". on the question of the ^apomnt Mi Heckle-explained that he nient. shop nt Hunte Street. than the evidence of the P-idia The defence was that Vie sugar who are profe*-lona! wiUies** was taken into Walrond's shoii Mr. Branker submitted fter a friend had asked Walrond for him. NOLLE PROSEQUI IN WOUNDING CASE 1 — ^ '-*%&*•& w ^ l ieeee W Of? SSSSES S.*J5BStS £ **XS1 ,ft c *.-* •*" %  mfn SSSS^aSiZ. !" >.-„ S %  prosri with inflicting I and leader and musician of Top ties might mar her gaod name as 3 if the answer is In the affirmThe defence did not have to Rock. Christ Church, was c-ina tourist resort. mlve will Government immediateprove anything even if the "hided at District -A" ln-f'-ra There was talk of nanonailsn]v procef>< i i Q set up a wages Beard defence called on witnesses tha*. Coroner C. L. Walwyn yesterday. lion In the air and while he did [or hf purpcw 0 f remedying this ^id not impress them (the jury). Mean well died at his home on not suggest nationalising the „ n a ,j,f 1c tory and undesiirble it was still the duly of *he groseMarch 18. 1952, and the next day beacho. he thought " !" Mnt)1 rif lf r airs cution to prove Its case. Dr A. S. Cattt performe-l %  pot* tor the Government to step in and ..^ yuu have to CO nsider this mortem examination at tl Burmoke safety arrangements on — (>BS(1 m thP u K ht or that statejon'ft Parlour. Pinfold Street !*r. these tine beaches so that hohhunted up hill and ment given by the accused. You rato said that death was due to 7. KLIM Ii aefe < %  tae aaeclally-achad *• %  8. KLIM ii pr.g.c.d aaSar itrlclaitcaatral KLIM .: MILK FliiT IN f BIFIIINCI THI WOILO OVII which 1 short time of "be"given~to thVeouri in due t time. MEANWELL DIED NATURALLY Death by natural causes was verdict returned by a nine mall jury when the Inquest touching the death of Arnold Meanwell day seekem would come with less misgivings hero down dole in the byways oru! Trinibehind the hedges It Is not good ...... %  ...1 TM r l'K,l alcoholism [re disCOMPLAINT OF MISCONDUCT to be sure tliat the property .icut Mr. SirShow Ot lo. m*SS*Thrirw"cr? MnlSS t"^ iSZi"itTi^Hj>HL '"* he jaw ta reply im JhinqA Joh ike dioms! TEA NAPKINS in Linen $.0 per sel COCK TAIL NAPKINS J2.00 per sel CROCHET CENTRE CLOTHS $1.20. $2.0(1. $3.20 CROCHET LUNCHEON SETS $21.00 & $17.S0 a set HOME PRODUCTS DEPT. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LTD10. II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET WHMI ENAMELLED TABLE TOPS Snhsitiiitiul Itmilii,/ til Harffui— #•>••* 30 x 18 Stt.OI .16 x lit S7.I7 38 x 21 S7.74 FAEKS STOVES 2 Rl'RNER TABLE MODEL Slronulv Made— Highly Kfflrlrnl ONI.V $24,711 EACH I \ \>ll II I:I SINKS -.IM.I.E DRAINER 42" x 21"—$50.31 DOUBLE DRAINER 64" > 21"—$7.2 COMFLER WITH WASTE FITTINIi AND BRACKETS GALVANISED NAILS II1 M D.M.I.ISII >lthl — All. Hm l.\ SMMh -\OTI-: n II 1'iiin: :iu CENTS PKII M I HARRISONS Hardware Store Broad Street Tel. 2364 IT'S NO HOLIDAY WITHOUT A CAMERA Wf NOW Offlt Wirgin Folding Camera 4/5 Lens Knduk Brownie Folding Camera 6/3 I .-n. Duo-flex Box Camera Reflex Wirgin Flexfo 3 5 Lens Kodak Model E Box Camera L'ni-Fex Camera. Baby Brownie Camera AUo Bertram Expoaure Meters $36.00 KNIGHTS LID. Phoenix & City Pharmacy




ESTABLISHED 1895



House Amend Law On Su



Better Balance

In Price

Needed

_THE levy imposed on sugar manufactured this year
which is sold for home consumption, will be used to stabil-
ize the price of dark crystal, if the Governor-in-Executive

Committee thinks it expedient.
the House of Assembly yesterday passed a Bill to amend |
the law in respect to levies on sug

in this island.

This was decided when!

ar sold for consumption |

_ This Bill has made the provision as an interim pro-}
vision and there will be further investigations to try and|

get a more reasonable balance bet

exported sugar.

The Objects and Reasons of the
Bill are: —

In 1947 His Majesty’s Govern-
ment in the United Kingdom
agreed to a certain price for
sugar cxported to the United
Kingdom. on the understanding
that a. proportion of that price
would be reserved and paid to a
price stabilization reserve fund,
a capital rehabilitation reserve
fund and a labour welfare fund
In Barbados the Sugar Industry
(Rehabilitation, Price Stabiliza-
tion and Labour Welfare) Act,
1947, was enacted to give effect to
this understanding. By this Act,
however, a levy equal to the pro-
portion to be so reserved was im-
posed on all sugar manufactured
in the Island and not only on
sugar exported to the United
Kingdom, and the whole proceeds
of the levy have been credited to
the three funds mentioned above.
The amount of the levy was in-
creased in certain years by virtue
of the provisions of section 3 of
the Sugar Industry (Rehabilita-
tion, Price Stabilization and La-
bour Welfare) (Special Levy)
Act, 1951.

The effect of this levy on sugar
consumed in the Island is to in-
erease the price paid by local con-
sumers who are therefore in effect
contributing to these funds. Com-
bined with the increase in the ex-
port price for the 1952 crop, the
effect would be to make it neces-
sary to increase the local price of
sugar beyond what is considered
reasonable.

This bill therefore seeks to pro-
vide that so much of the levy as
is imposed on sugar manufactur-
ed in 1952 which is sold for con-

sumption in the Island, shall be
paid to t®e Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee, instead of to the
above funds, and that the Govern-
or-in-Executive Committee may
use tho-merevs seveceived as he
vhinks expedient for the® purpose
of stabil the price of certain
classes of sugar only, if the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
thinks this expedient.

Mr, F. L. Walcott (L) in intro-
ducing the Bill said tnat for some-
time the Government had been
giving consideration to the im-
portant question of the local sugar
consumption which was unfor-
tunately being increased to the}
@ On page 6



THE BOLIVIAN revolution
has ended but death hangs
heavy in the streets of La Paz,
capital city of Bolivia. Bodies
of the dead are lined up out-
side the General Hospital to
be identified by friends and
relatives before burial. The
revolution began on April 9th
and ended after three days of
bloody battles. After the re-
volt, Victor Paz Estenssoro,
leader of the WNationalistic
Revolutionary Movement
(M.N.R.) ended six years of
exile when he flew home to
take over the Presidency.
Estenssoro won most of the
votes in last May's election
but was unable to take over
the Presidency. The M.N.R
revolt cleared the way.
—(LN.P.)

ween price of sugar and}



From All Quarters:

Live Acarids
Brought
To Sweden

STOCKHOLM Live acarids,
relatives of spiders and scorpi-
ons and the only form of animal
life except for migrant birds that
as been found in the wastes of
Queen Maud’s Land, have been
brought to Lund University by
Dr. Ove Wilson, one of the Swed-
ish members of the Norwegian-
Swedish-British Antarctic Expedi-
tion. The length of the acarids, of
which some 100 species were
found, varies between 0.23 and
0.5 mm. They live in the dark ,
under stones and avoid light andj
sunshine. To enable them to sur-
vive, they had. to be transported
in special ice-boxes,

STOCKHOLM Beta particles
of radioactive substance are fair-
‘ly easily absorbed by materials
placed in their way. The magni-
tude of the absorption is
dication of the
terial, i.e. of the thickness of
homogeneous materials and of the





ment called the Beta-Comp-
arator for the industrial measur-
ing of the thickness and weight
of sheets in conjunction with the
manufacture of paper cardboard,
fibrous boards, plastics, textiles,
metal foils, etc. eres ec
Among the advantages of this
new Swedish instrument is that
the materials need not be touched
during the



t an in-limportance must take precedence
density of the ma-|oyer all othe:

1 for export.” Usually the yearly
weight per surface unit of non-| economié survey is a preview for)
homogeneous materials. 'the Budget but this year the
Cn the basis of these observa-| Budget came early and many of
tions the Stockholm firm LKB-j|the detailed facts and figures
Produkter has designed a n djhave already been published.
placed on the market an instru- —U.P.



Farnum For .
Finland Fund

The West Indies have
reached a high rung on the
ladder of the cricket world.

Don't be contented with
this. The chance of bringing
West Indian cycling into the
limelight rests partly with
you.

Send your donation to the
Farnum ror_Finland Fund to-
day, to the Royal Bank of
Canada, Barclay’s Bank or the
Barbados Advocate.

AMT. PREV. ACK. $235.42
E. C. Jackman .... 10.00
Mr. D. A. Clarke .. 5.00

TOTAL

- $260.42



Less Gars, Food,
Work In 1952

CUURCHILL

LONDON, April 22.
Prime Minister Winston
Churchill's government warned
the nation it will get fewer cars
and television sets this year, less
food and more temporary unem-
ployment in the drive for

national solvency and security.

That was the grim picture pre-
sented by the economic survey
for 1952 presented to the Com-
mons, Thg survey made it clear
that even rearmament prograniume
must suffer cuts to build up the
vital export trade so Britain can
once again pay her own way in
the world.

However, the said
ern types of (jet)
few other equipments

“some mod-
aircraft and
of major



activities including |
where necessary even production |



—_—_——
WEDNESDAY; 23,



;
On the motion of the Leader}
jof the House of Assembly, Mr,!
G. H. Adams, the House yester- |
|day passed a Resolution re |
their sorrow at the death of Sir!
Stafford Cripps, former British)

Adams ‘said that there hav.
dom been more courageous ite
ae 8 ea Sir Stafford.
e der f the tion
Mr. Fred Goddard and en
ent member Mr, Victor vanes
also paid tribute to Sir Stafford.
The House stood a’ short while in
silence as a token of respect, A
letter af sympathy will also be
sent to Sir Stafford’s family,
_ Mr, Adams said that it was not
just because Sir Stafford was a
Socialist and an outstanding So-
cialist that he was going to sa
what he would say, Men of all
paries would agree that in the
long and glorious history of Bri-
lish parliamentary constitution,
there have seldom been more
courageous and parca
statesmen as Sir Stafford



| Sir Stafford attacked the very ex-
jistenee of British monarchy.

jas Chancellor of the Exchequer,

| Staffard on

been.

He said he need not
the House of the whole of
Stafford’s parliamentary career,
Every man in the world who had
ever heard of Sir Stafford,Cripps
would witheut hesitation use one
adjective of him above all others
and that was, courageous a

Attacked Monarchy

Several times in the Course
his public life, Sir Stafford by bis
words and writings, put hig i-
tical fortunes to the test 7and
risked them all, At a timé en
it was very unpopular to do so,

Mr, Adams said he would pass
over his many activities before
Sir Stafford became most famous

He had had the fortune to hear Sir
the occasion of the
Austerity programme and heard





Queen Juliana
Visits Canada

OTTAWA, April 22.

Queen Juliana of the Nether-| such. ?

lands began a six day unofficial

. measuring process,!visit here but the Royal s@hedule
while, contrary to methods based | is

almost as crowded as her

on electric conductivity, t h elofficial tour of the United States.
measuring process is not affected! Tihe Queen, to. whom Ottawa
by moisture or electrolytes. Was a second home during World
AMSTERDAM : The total ex-|War II, landed at the airport
ports of fresh vegetables in 1951|Monday after a two-hour flighi
(approximate figures) amounted!from Detroit.
to 350,000 tons as compared with The official a 1
300,000 tons in 1950, and those; 2 ©, Gilicial programme, de-
of fruit to 165,000 tons, as com- scribed as “the unofficial visit to
‘ Hi ; aaa Canada of Her Majesty Queen
pared with 95,000 tons in 1950. Tanita; herlands”
AMSTERDAM An. ‘Amster- uliana of the Netherlands
: at called. for ten separate events
dam shipbuilding y a rd has today ‘ana five tomorrow
launched the 18,500 ton motor |‘O°®Y wT ald cg :
tanker Bill, which is built for the The Queen’s visit here is not
Norwegian firm of ship owners|official because of mourning in

L. Gill Joanessen, Oslo.
AMSTERDAM : The Portuguese
government has given an order
to a shipbuilding company in
Groningen for the building of a
large twin-screw steam tugboat,

destined for Portuguese East
Africa. This vessel will also do

service as a salvage vessel, pilot
boat and buoying vessel and will

be provided with the necessary
equipment for these purposes,
which will include radio tele-
phony.



DEATH IN THE

the Dominion following the death
of King George VI.



—U.P.
Press Club Lecture
MR. FRANK WALCOTT,

M.C.P., will lecture to members
of the Barbados Press Club at 4.30
p.m. to-day. The subject will be
“Industrialisation in the West
Indies.” The general public is
also welcome.

STREETS



~~ CRIPPS’ SON GOES
TO SWITZERLAND

ZURICH, April 22.
John Cripps, son of the former



Labour Government's Chancellor
arrived at Zurich airport this
morning after delay, caused by
bad weather. He took the airport
"bus into the city and was met at
the railroad station by Lady
Yr sister Peggy who

him for some time
is understood that









ily i] immediately

make pl f funeral. (In

i ers specu-

lated whet pr will be
buried in B —U.P,



| ° '
| Island Sinks |
BOMBAY, April 22. |

Reports fram Dacca, capital of}
East Pakistan, said the island of}
Kutubdia, eight miles off the East!
Pakistan coast near Chittagong is
sinking into the

sea

The northern tip of the island
now completely under water
and 40,000 inhabitants are panic

stricken.
The sinking has been accompan-



ied by a series of underwater ex-
plosions which began March 18
Reports said the blast nded
like cannonfire.—U.P,



MONTGOMERY
VISITS POPE

VATICAN CITY, April 22.
British Field Marshal, Viscount
Bernard Law Montgomery, Deputy
to General Eisenhower at SHAPE

had a private audience of twenty}

minutes with Pope Pius XII in the
Pope’s Library,

During the audience
ery presented to the Pontiff
aide, Lieut-Colonel R. C.S
M.S; ontgomery
were ac
by John
First Secr

tio o }

Montgorm-
his







the Vat

ers-Cocks

ympanied to
abastian Sc
tary of the

can




| comments on it, and if there
jone thing that an onlooker co

—————————| Canadian—U.S. $ |

not help feeling, it was that Sir
Stafford faced up t his critics
and all opposition, whether he
was Labourite or Concervatiy, $
being first. and. ost an ale
lishman and was doing his as

There was no doubt whatever
that he lost seats for the Labour
Party and became unpopular as
the iron Chancellor, But there was
no doubt about it that the pro-
gramme of austerity had so far
saved England, the British Com-
monwealth and maybe the world.
Had there been in the place of
Sir Stafford, a Chancellor who
was determined merely to please
his followers, merely to please his
party, England might have been
in a worse position than she is
at present. .England might have
been hitched even more to the
waggon of another power and
might have found herself by now
struggling in a third World War.

Sir Stafford was one of the most
outstanding statesmen in English’










Parliamentary history and was a/*

@ On page 6



‘Legislators i
PayTributeTo
Sir Stafford —

tea: | |



1952

Advorate



ve

Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr)

2

break, bulldozers on the barges wo
‘water was ten inches below the ex

—



Ap
Collector





MESSAGE FROM
THE CHIEF SCOUT

*"“On St, George’s Day,
ather together to

” st
ee s for the life of '
“our Foun

der, and to re-
“affirm the promise they
“made at their investiture.
“Let each of us, there-
“fore, resolve to pay more
“attention to our duty to
“help other people, Re-
“member always what our
“Founder told us in his last
“message; that the only way
“of gaining happiness for
“ourselves, is to try and give
“it away to other people,”
ROWALLAN,
Chief Scout, British Com-
monwealth and Empire.



GENERAL TELLS

OF 4,000 DEATHS

FRANKFURT, Germany,
April 22
German General Eugene Ober-

haeusser in charge of Katyn

Forest area at the time that the

ae O mass graves of 4,000 Polish
Vote $41 officers were discovered in 1943,
& . 2 testifying before a five-man U.S,




For Repair
Of Boats

THE Legislative Council yester-
day concurred in a resolution for
$41,460 which is to authorise a
revote for that amount for the re-
pair and rebuilding of

seas of December last year.

In moving concurrence of the
resolution, the Hon’ble the Colon-
ial Secretary said it was one In
respect of a revote. He had no
comments to make on the resolu-
tion as such, but it occurred to him
however that members of the
Council might like to have a pro-
gress report on the repairs and re-
building which were being under-
taken and he accordingly asked
the Fisheries Officer to supply him
with some facts. ‘

Honourable members would re-
member that it was originally pro-
posed to rebuild 40 boats and re-
pair 43. It had been subsequently
found that some of the boats which
had been completely written off
could in fact be repaired.

Congressional
mittee, said that
uments found on the men’s bodies
proved they were shot while the
Russians

and this Signal Corps troops occu-

fishing lyer was the first witness
boats destroyed during the rough today

Investigating Com-
letters and doc-

still controlled the
region,
hitehaired Oberhaeusser testi-

fying said, he was in command

pied the Katyn
1941 to October

area from June
1943, Oberhaeus-
called
Committee

Katyn

the
wartime

before
investigating the
massacre,

More than 40 newsmen, photo-
graphers and television camera-
men were in the half filled court-
room for the second day of the
Congressional Katyn testimony
gathering,

—UP.



. Walter Wanger
Sent To Prison

SANTA MARIA, California
April 22.
Film producer Walter Wanger,
who shot and wounded the agent
of his film star wife, Joan Bennett,
in a Hollywood ear park last De-

The task of.rebuilding the boats|cember, was sentenced here to-

which were completely destroyed
was being carried on at the Reef
where it was necessary. to estab-
| lish some electrically driven
machine tools and Government
was indebted to the Electric Sup-
ply Company for providing the
electric supply for that purpose.
@ On Page 7









MONTREAL, April 22
The United States dollar on
Monday closed at a discount of
131/32 per cent. in terms. of
Canadian funds unchanged from
Friday's close. That is, it took
98 1/32 Canadian dollars to buy
American dollars. The pound
sterling’ was worth $2.75-3/8,)
unchanged from Friday.

ih

New York's report is that the}





Canadian dollar was up 1/16 of}
a cent at a premium of 2 1/16]
per cent. in«terms of United;
States Funds in closing foreign
exchange dealings on Mond j
the pound sterling went up 1

f a cent at $2.81 cP



day to four months’ imprisonment
Judge Harry J. Borde deleted the
part of the Grand Jury indictment
which alleged “intent to commit
murder" and reduced the
charge to “assault with a deadly
‘weapon .”’

Rather than provints murder
intent, the evidence proves that
Wanger had no such intent at all,”
the Judge said, Wanger had al-
feged that Lang tried to break up
his home but Miss Bennett and
Lang said their relationship was
btrictly a business one.—U.P.







AROOPS RACE TO SAVE COUNCIL BLUFFS FROM FLOOD












































ae.

' WITH THE FLOOD CREST NEARING at Council Bluffs, lowa, Army troops and civilians work hand in hand
in a feverish attempt to bolster the weakening levee holding back the waters of the rampaging Missouri
\iver. Barges loaded with rock have been placed at strategic points along the river and, ip the event of a
ch, At the time this picture was made the

uld push the rock into the bres
pected flood crest of



31.5 inches.

pointment Of Rent
Declared Invalid

After accepting by a majority vote a legal opinion
given by Mr. W. W. Reece, Solicitor General, to the effect
the appointment of Mr Albert Maynard as Rent
Collector and Maintenance Clerk of the Housing Board
invalid, the Housing Board yesterday decided on the casting
vote of its Chairman, Mr. G, H, Adams, to appoint a
“Screening Committee” to consider and make recommend: |iney would get

that

ations in conn

t ons iN the 107 applicants who seorecet |
the advertisemen Ro e post, ;

The opinion of the Solicitor Gen-
eral was sought after a protest by
Mr, E. D, Mottley who walked out
from the meeting at which the ap-
pointment of Mr, Maynard was
made, leaving the meeting without
t quorum

The Solicitor General's opinion
reads as follows:

By Section 4 of the Bridgetown
Housing Act 1936 (1936-8) any
four members of the Board shall
be a quorum for the transaction of
the business.

The facts submitted for my con-
sideration show there was a meet-
ing of the Housing Board on the
22nd March, 1952 when the ap-
pointment of a Rent Collector and
Maintenance Clerk came up for
consideration, Mr. Mottley, a
member of the Board attended the
meeting, and, while the appoint-
ment was being considered, rose
from his chair and said, “I will not
stay here any longer” and started
tc leave the table. The Acting
Chairman while Mr, Mottley was
still in the Couneil Chamber but
had left the table, stated that
it had been moved and seconded
that Mr. Maynard be appointed to
the post and declared Mr. Maynard
appointed and instructed the Sec-
retary to advise him (Mr. May-
nard) appointed accordingly.
Where a quorum is prescribed,
that means, sratively, that no
business be ted unless the
prescribed number at deast ‘be
present, Bottomley’s case 16 Ch.







Db, 681.
In order however, that they may
have a duly constituted quorum it
necessary that they should act
onjointly, and as a Board .. . They
ire bound to be together, as a
Board, at the time the thing is
ordered to be done (Bramwell R
D'Arcy v. Tammar & ete, Ry. 36
L.J, Ex 37
On the facts it is clear that, al-
though Mr. Mottley was alleged to
be present in the Council Cham-
ber he was not acting together
with the other members. of the
Joard at the time when Mr. May-
nard was appointed to the office
of Rent Collector and Mainten-
ance Clerk, |I am therefore of the
opinion that the appointment to
Mr. Maynard to the said office is

invalid
(Sad.) W. W. REECE.
Agreement

Outlining his position to the
3oard when the matter was dis-

cussed yesterday, Mr. G. H.
Adams, Chairman of the Board,
said he had the profoundest re-
spect for Mr. Beckles, (who acted
as Chairman on the ogcasion when
the “invalid” appointment was
made), but speaking personally,

and as a lawyer, he felt that Mr,
Reece's opinion was correct.

He was sorry that the dispute
had arisen, but as far as he was
concerned, he did believe that
every time there a chanee to
encourage somebody who was al-

wa









ready working in an organisation,
that they should give the person
$ . ’ that chance. If he had been pres-
‘ 1 . .
Rains Bring I ( ar ent, he would probably have done
. that. On the other hand, he was
aoe C6ry, ro 22 not prepared to ask any member
enewed rain, some of it he slof the be g ied by what
brought fears of further fi bl he } hole question
along the Missouri River to-day. ! , nm or the Board, he
But the banks held at critical

spots and experts felt sure that However, as a general rule, he
the twin cities—Kansas_ City,| wou! that in any appointment
Kansas, and Kansas City, Missour with w h he id to do, if there
would be safe. Army engineers ¥ omebody an ganisation
estimated that 386,000 acre of] wh iving atisfactior d
vere unde yvater i th! +3 r ’ ' ‘

Nebrask U.P ] @ on page 5

‘





" pb ; \
PRICE: . CENTS

var Levies

| Barbadian
Artists

EXHIBIT AT THE MUSEUM

’

Two new exhibitions open
at the Museum today of
paintings by Ivan Payne, the
Speightstown painter, and the
late Mary Irene Gill. Both ex-
hibitions will run for four
weeks.

This is Ivan Payne's first one-
man exhibition, Payne was born
in Speightstown in December 1923,
nd he is, pfore, 28 years old.















icrayons,
fo paint, and h
exhibited at thy @p

an 1a
bf each yea

e first









pf Merit,
Painting
by the

in Canada
Mary Irene Gill, the other ex-
hibitor at the Museum, is a sister
of Caro Gill, the talented artist
whose paintings were exhibited at
the Museum in 1950, Mary Irene
Gill was educated at the Alexan-
dra School, and in 1917 accom-
panied her sister to Canada, where
both of them studied at the Mon-
treal Art School. Irene’s interest
lay in nursing rather than in art,
She, therefore abandoned art
classes and began her training as
a nurse. She qualified as a rurse
in Canada, but she was not strong
enough for stich arduous work.
She returned to Barbados where
she died at an early age,



(Interndtional Soundphoto)



Prisom Riot Ends

NEW JERSEY, April
Sullen and weak, 231 convicts
who had held out in the dormitory f
wing at Rahway State Prison since
last Thursday night surrendered
to-day. Prison officials had been
waiting patiently with hunger ana
thirst as their allies to break the
revolt. The men were promised
no physical pun-
ishment if they surrendered with-
out-harming eight guards they
hold as hostages. U.P.

99



3 Wil. Students Awarded
Foundation Fellowships

NEW YORK, April 22.
TTHREE students from the British West Indies were named on
Monday as winners of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial
Foundation Fellowships.






The fellowships which will enable the winners to continue
study in their respective fields, went to Dr. John Horace Parry,
Professor of Modern History at the University College of the West
Indies, Mona, Jamaica, studying Municipal Government in the
Spanish Indies—from the conquest to independence, Edgar Austin
Mittelholzer of New Amsterdam, British Guiana, creative writer
and author; and Douglas MaCrae Taylor of Magua, Dominica, a
fruit farmer, Ethnolinguist, studying the language of the black
Caribs of British Honduras.—¢

FRY’S

WONDERFUL VALUES



COKERNUT. BAR

,"

(Milk Chocolate: Caramel - Fudge)

FRY’S 4 FAVOURITES



\

Pe Pe

eR









































































. ES RIL 23, 1952
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE RPMs onsen a -

tb Calling BOLD °43, —

HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
ARIB to-day extends heart) With The Royal Bank Back To U.S.A.

‘
‘ congratulations to West In- ISS M. KING of British Me®:: Wilhelmina Beckles of the om a

dies Captain, John Goddard, Guiana: wh hakleben’ baie UA. whe ted been see
O.B.E., on his thirty-third birth- daying here for the past three ing a holiday here with her rela- ITH AN L-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES o


























day. John whe was born on April weeks staying at “Actra”, Rocks tives at Britton’s

C 1 Hil, returned
23, 1919, has the distinction of ley, is due to return home to-day home on Sungey by a

being an old Lodge School boy is with Antigua and
and also an Old Harrisonian. by D.W.LA. Bie 1s Creed ”





= ears . of C was accompanied by her daughter, ‘
He was a promising athlete at the Royal Pank of Canads. Shout isit er WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m.
pees tat eee Fe eUTRAN, cuppcitece- VAIS Soo BR uate !
Honal # hel cae . L. OU , Superintend- 1X Grenada, on Saturday f
eh ie ee on, ae oe ent of Police in St, Lucia ar- Miss Mary Bell. She willie MEN Only 8.30 p.m. 7
Indies in 1948 He also success- rived here yesterday by B.W.LA., spendii Wwecks’ holiday | '
ay, 2 See Tadion sont his wife and their two children.” ing This’ ts Miss Bere wecona| The “aches opowie, ing te the cat be, Babes Se-somsy -
ia in '48—'49; ; nsland iis wife an eir two children. . s is iss $s secon doing here.”’ t scowls. te the car .
in 1600 ana sar duet mateinel ‘the s visit to the Colony. " = fe working for Samra Claus,” thing inside one of the pockets, , AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER
West Indies in the Tests in Aus- Trinidad Medico On Six Months’ Leave -

tralia in Which the West Indies
lost the rubber.

John is one of ten children, the
only one of whom did not play
cricket and take part in athletics
was an only sister. He is still a
comparatively young International
captain and there is every indica-
tion that he will be the man to
lead the West Indies against India











































venrnrasasiiniidedeee, WARNING !
peat Perfo pmantce This picture includes powerful Medical Sequences.

NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !
With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS. PL AZ Ausannante S (Diat 5170)
fanmweis. SHOWS AT

ovymric tenant at OPENING FRIDAY 25th (APRIL)

Night at 8,30
A Geidgter taeabe et” pocbramene with over 20 new song hits

R. I. TRIMINGHAM, who EAVING for England yester-] @90996e< SAO
arrived in the colony for the dL day by the s.s. Willemstad was
week end left yesterday morning Mr. W. E. Bassett, Agricultural] %
by B.W.L.A., for Trinidad. Dr. Superintendent of Montserrat, who] %
Trimingham was staying at In- was here for the past ten days. He
dramer Guest House, Worthing. is on six months’ leave.

Hanid Lectured the Kittens






















Tans year. —But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her— awe
° ‘ MR. JOHN GODDARD, O.B.E. ' jeeenting aeep LEGS AND Hmm
happy! vee ae oe Leetu at F. dati By MAX TRELL | ‘ Es — Onsen? Chive FARiNeé .. and
i oe ee ID had Blackie on one knee, | BAND
R ss Bene. cas s. MB. CAMERON TUDOR, M.A.,| and Whitewash on the other, Both THE RHYTHM KINGS STEEL in cecilia GID MEE cei,
‘ JORDY and their two chil- (Oxon), will deliver a lecture} kittens sat very quietly, looking up i's chtertemmedt ab it's BEST ;
dren of New Orleans, La., U.S.A., 0" South Africa and the Common=| now and then at Hanid and purring. 5 Boos ONE MASTERPIECE AFTER ANOTHER
have been holidaying at the Crane W°#!th,—a study in Origins at the “You're darlings, both of you,”

for the past two weeks. Mr. Jordy Monthly Meeting of the Old Boys’| anid said at last, patting both of

is employed at the Phillips Oj] Association on Friday, April 25 at) them along their little backs at the TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.; Opening Tomerrow
8



EMPIRE ROXY



















































‘0. hopes to leave with hi p.m. same time so as not to get either of
Satie en the 27th “april for F ‘ them jealous. “But 1 do wish,” she LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
Caracués, Venezuela, where they or Convention added, “that you didn’t both play re-aay 445 & 8.0 Last 2 Shéws To-day 4.30 & 8.15
have been living for the past two a ae a as 5 week-end! tag so very a Bad Voki ‘To-morrow 4.45 only ened midoy” and Continuing
ars. y B.W.LA., for the Conven- “Do you'’know,” Hanid went on
~ tion of the North American Assur- daiestenne first one kitten then the Definitely yoor last Sets - or and GA BLE
For Medical Aid ance Company were Mr. Vernon| other as she spoke; “you've been _“A PLACE IN THE, SUN ugtome, OVE: wkomite”
R. MRS. DEORAJ een and Mr. K. eee, oe playing tag ever since early, a THURS. at 8.2% seatity vs.
‘ompany’s representatives in \ ning? When I first got up an , ng: > .
Print ee te om Lucia and Grenada respectively. oben oak af the wikdew, there. son ip t _Tim HOLT—Richard MARTIN
hime colomy aie so “13th April wr are staying at the Marine} were, scampering across the garden. | |_ . aes a Ke enythen Kings Thurs. 2 Friday 4.30 * 815 G A R BD | E R
" * Hotel. ; 5 And you kept it up all morning un- : Steel Band. moe
pitention ona Geeer th teane ait montor ecdine & BWA. fn| til noontime when you eame to the The kittens locked up at Hanid. Ee “FIGHTER SQUADRON” nl
onday evel y BW.LA,, for ch ft inute or two to get . . a _ : , a
lon egg Bi they ig 4 use, the Conventoin were Mr. E, Grell| Yotr saucer of milk. Then you| At that very instant Old Patchie|}} WALT D Pi a “INSPECTOR GENERAL” The battle
Worthing. ’ and Mr. Darey Galt from Trinidad, | \tarted all over again. You must be | Stopped washing her face, walked “ALICE TN_.WONDERLAND 5 fT
F Mr. C. de Caires from British] terribly tired, aren’t you?” she said, | slowly to the end of the porch, took | }} Watthiere GaLe Aka” - Of Texas..
Up and About Guiana and Mr. M. Phillips from| ooking into Blackie’s face, “Aren’t | a spring and climbed up to the rdof. An Academy Award. Winner a and the
IS many friends will be glaa 7°™C% you?” she said to Whitewash. ee wae ag aye Fa ag get : iran battle
; Toss H
to learn that Mr, G. H. Adams, Back to Trinidad * Porred Louder high 28 the chimney where the swal- OLYMPIC “DEAD Aw eee b of the
te cat wan = ap Fogg mw bg IME: KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L.,| Both kitteW foked back at fa-| lows were living during the summer. |} Bake de aie. cllhs eee eo
is nd bout, ngain H cuided Point-a-Pierre, returned to} nid, and purred(m bit louder than} «o}, well,” Hanid said to Blackie TO. uP (Am (only aren a OE Flemihgs sexes!
up and about again. He pres: Trinidad th ¥ before. But neither of them said i h: eee ia Th oe :
over a special m r over the week-end by " and Whitewash; kuess your ba “tie: REDMEAD AND TRE
Housing Board héld at the Coun- B.W.LA., after spending a holiday| anything. Uy cob nah mother likes it better on the roof.]{ Yn - D cowBor”
cil Chamber yesterday mi with his relatives. He is ason of “Of course,” said Hanid. “I’m not| Phe view must be better. But I do open akiies ie
sroce ain Beaweil Dr. C. FP, Stoute, retired Veterinary | quite sure it is tag that you two wish you'd both stay on the porch at} TH MARK BROTIIERS in
ir. Muervinow On - Officer of Kensington Road. play. Maybe rs see ry of | jeast until the sun goes down and it BURT tAsere ee. ae _ “DU ut
‘ ; kitten-game, 1 wish you'd tell me | gets cooler. And I think,” Hanid put}} sd
‘ Attended Cricket To See Her Son what ve name of it is. Would you & hp suggestion, “you ought to canepan MEAS "penton. ROYAL ’ 4 da
R. CAROLINE RAMESAR of} Please, dears?” wash your faces so you'll be nice}}} P. u's a he 4 9) P
; Meet D sti Hanid waited for a moment oF} anq clean for supper.” ANCE eer air iku glace Teepe Pesbditew 4.00 & 0.18 eer haga lay) x,
R. F. A) C. CLAIRMONTE and arrived’ hone foe che eee PO] two. ‘The Kee Cain's Senn eRe dh POO Sic et wind Bu Biot in a Or: 1
Mr. J. M. Kidney, the Barba- days with her two dau dj ious to tell Hanid the name o , c » ——________. (2-8-8 LG iE e AQ
See aisine ala "Wainans arene’ Sh hepa et| eens ree ene fa |S ony re ove ell RePRSOR EE | ae HL cliche ie
the meeting of the West Indies the Lodge Sc! , will .| shook her head sadly (for it di e shady par I ch. : i" iT OF TEXTS” Aa Anta Rat
Cricket Board of Control in British thy Rook Over the venie whi aad seem a shame that they would want | minute or two they really sat there,|}) -ripinG DOWN THE CANYON” Starring: Alan Rocky LANE u ve] RRR YMA: » AEH AW poeint
Guiana, returned home on Mon- js staying at Super Mare Guest] to keep the name of their game a{and almost—but not quite—looked|f eania oe ‘ebeas “pa tol) tb ae ‘
day night by B.W.1.A,, from Trini- House, 4 “seeret) and continued. t as though they might sifrt to wash)) _ y t n r
dad, Grenada Legislator “Now wouldn’t it be better to just | their faces. But suddenly, in the jf Friday only 4. & 815 Onivy, 20 VILLAND In HERE AT L AST ~~ =o
Leaving Today ON’BLE T. A. MARRYSHOW,| Sit quietly on the porch and rest | twinkling of an eye, they were gone. |i] caMis aboriigns .
T. COMMANDER CHARLES vehi ;| until supper time,‘darlings? Look| “Blackie! Whitewash!” called/ ‘OF MiséOURT’ plaaeevOne Lape” D AY a D all B A T Hi § li E B a
is HAYWARD, Lite Vice- the Logiiglise Galata ent at your mother,” she said, pointing | Hanid. . sn am /

President of the A.A.A., of Trini- ada, left for Trinidad yesterda their heads to the other side of the| They were nowhere to be seen\| -

Presid y ch where Big Patchie sat wash-| And when Hanid lookéd up at the " 7
he inrsing Peinided. tine BS ote, vorae a Mine her face with one of her paws, | roof to tell Bis Patchie that hex tw DON i A RG WE J
evening by B.W.LA., after spend- | During his ten-day stay in Bar. | “Your mother doesn’t dash around, | children had disappeared, therg/™" “4 me 7, = as
a week's holiday as the guest bados, he was the guest of Mr. and playing tag or whatever-it-is. She | they both wert, voddied next to their
of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Duthie of Mrs, G. H. Adams at “Tyrol Cot”, sna AN heh : perch ~ ee ‘on Se
‘ave e a ; ’
ee ee ol” : bricks of the chimney,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

| APRID. : POWERFUL—AND
100 ee Ae ae tk, Colt NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS

, 4 ere eee POWERFULLY DIFFERENT
Mrs. A. L. Stuart Sicisict ke chaeerettewen |THE REAL, THE ONLY, THE GENUINE, |—"tom WARNER BRos.
. .â„¢m. lody from the Stars, 5.55 os
Dawn







THE BIBLE’S GREATEST LOVE STORY












ou
BEFORE.

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN i7 '
.WOMEN IN THE NEWS—& FO r

\














Mrs, Stuart is the wife of Dr. weaker until eventually she be- second show in 1939 the School] p.m. ‘Think on these Things, 6.45. pyn. : ,
A. L, Stuart of “Norham,” Tweed- came blind for ten weeks, During was closed but Mrs, Stuart contin- I gg at i e HLL the
side Road. She was born in British this time she was kept in a dark ued to train girls who took part in. f

. 2%6.62M, 31.42M
Std alicia easiedcatienGinnapoalahiglennes tained
7.15 p.m. Calling the West_Indies, 7,45

y Request, 8.15 p.m. Radio News- & CINDERELLA CUP

prin. Inieriude, 8-85. p.th. Prom qe | Yee PHYLLIS. THAXTER
rials, "8 p.m. -Geort RAYMOND MASSEY

Guiana but when she was merely room and the Studios afforded her in any entertainments. Such help
Beven years old she left for Cali- the best medical attention, After was rendered to the Excelsior
fornia where she was adopted by School of Music,
her uncle Dr, W. E, Richardson, eee ,

Mrs. Stuart’s love for dancing ; ! Revuedeville
and her achiévernents in these









5 .m, S* George, 1
Although she has no children ME Ee Re















p.m,
10.15 See *
reflected more than a cas~ | Mrs. Stuart is very fond of them, | p.m. With, the Gloucesters in A fesse Gig YOUNG—
ested didlos 3a Mabie ee tink _ fo in 1949 the dancing school was} 135 »,™, sh th Md at a e James GLEASON
natural ability to handle the most revived in response to several re-| {,,, {

difficult . Acting on this, her |
uncle permitted her to take extra |
lessons during the holidays in
New York, As she grew into mid- i
teens she struggled with two de- |
sires —her uncle’s whose wish for |
her was to follow the medical pro- t
fession and her own to maké |
dancing her career and further-
more to create her own steps. t
{
t
f
4

quests from mothers. Later in the
ar a Mannequin Parade and
nce was staged at the Drill Hall
in aid of Chants. There “a a
repeat pe some time
later, As the echool grew Mrs.
Stuart produced Revuedeville 1950
and 1951 at the Empire Theatre.
‘These two shows reflected local
talent among the girls and they
are now clamouring for another
ow.

Through the success of the last
year’s show, Mrs, Stuart has con-
structed a new apartment for the §
@chool which includes a ballet,
dancing, powder, and changing |
room, and canteen, There are also

vOuLi CALE IT
SNOW WHITE |IBOn MY :

YOU'LL SAY IT’S
* BLUANTY (Dias 2310)

P i A 7 A aa BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-MORROW (Thurs.) 24th., 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 &-8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
















At Elstree
In 1931 Mrs. Stuart visited her
mother in British Guiana. She
went to Trinidad and the
and later Barbados where
She continued her dancing, taking
6 icular interest in stage shows.
1932 she left for England and

couor ev TECHNIC






















lans on f forming « \ © eepr. e
three years later was married in plans on foot for forming a club. » | oe. v \
aeoaee. The same me year bes . ciltic- ‘i La ae sek New Materials ; i : ? So aa
fn stodian hankan whine nee iivlted. ade eae ee aah THEY WERE ‘ALT D AND NOW HE|fi
udios, London, where her ed Mrs. Stuart who is head '

agents secured for her a third of the Barbados branch to bring : New Styles IVES YOU E! } Presents A MIDNITE VAUDEVILLE
wt in ee of ~ River.” ooo she decided against troupe to Puerto Rico for the Car- on

s Technicolour picture, di- becoming a movie actor, and di- ibbean Festival to be held in Au- 1 DI WILL =YOU WILL :
rected by Alexander and Zoltan rected all attention to her home. gus The festival cobniaad of For Cocktails ‘Weddings THE KIDDIES LOVE It ‘YOU ENJOY IT ) SATURDAY APRIL 26 MIDNEIT
Korda, starred Nina McKinney, She was also invited by the B.B.C. Bamples of the folk lore—dance, ‘ , 2
and Paul Robeson. But after the to appear on a “Guest Star” pro- music and art from all the islands From $18.00 each N.B, : with “ALICE” — Waltz Disney’s Academy Peabisi
close-ups were taken they discov- gramme but unfortunately she was of the Caribbean, Bach island will Aware Featire — eaturing
ered that the colour of ber eyes in Manchester at that time. present something different in also {\ AN INTERNATIONAL GROUP OF ARTISTES
was not suital part. : style and type, ‘ , starrin; -
Soon afterwards she took part in Dancing School 60 15 denier “NATURE’S HALF ACRE” ,.
films with Merle Oberon, Leslie Other Interests NYLONS — $2.27 ; MOonNAH Direct from Martini
Howard, Hermaine Bradley ang . After returning to Barbados Dancing is her chief fir but r “ EY” A} ISLAND” H om maqgue

ny other British stars in there were numerous requests for Mrs, Stuart holds a diploma from Better than BEAVER VALL and “SEAL I x” Magici a
_orade of Stars, 1938." Her dane- &, Sanne ees e se Mrs. Bie New York School in Interior New Cocktail i ‘ } (Magician and Rhumba Dancer)
ing routines were taught by Buddy opened a scliool for dancing Decoration (1945) and a certifi- HANDBAGS This Alone orth Price Admission { ie ,
bp carataper Director and Danc- po haa pte ee gy cate in Hair and Beauty Culture ’ sw the of i ata -peaenticmgeemiindy ancien:
ng Master at Elstree. ° she realise that from Wilfred Academy, New York, — $6.23 ac ’ URABELLA (Exotic Tango Dancer)
this Was more her line—dealing (1945). She is y nome of music, for You cah only get to Wendérland { ;
At that time fechnicolour hasn't hem want the herself’ hae been Sar ee aS Sur > a : Wresaarilin : \ ee wee De
ani a een is all “at home” as a housewife. ‘ ke 3 i ¢ rilr ‘ ,

been long introduced and the taught. In 1988 she staged her Although she is not a member The MODERN As ot it’s Tee Kt BOODHOO BROS. (B.G’s Acrobatic Kings)
lighting effects were ten times first show at the Empire Theatre. of any Board or Institution, she =

stronger than ordinary light. After This was a big success and the fol- contributes in all ways to charity
many takes and retakes Mrs, lowing year the school increased and has a special interest in the
Stuart’s eyes became weaker and in numbers, However, after her Institvtion for the Blind.

dust Opened

WMeNGD MOUNE SED. ik. kiicis cout. obihacseen cp ticank $1.00
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS 36” @
WHITE, PEACH, BLUE.
OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONGOLEUM RUGS,
BY THE YARD.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606

2

HARVEY ROGERS (leading ballroom Exponent
and several other sensational stars

AT i
EMPIRE THEATRE Music by Keith Campbell's Society 5

Friday, April 25th — Thursday, May. 1st.

DRESS Shoppe

Broad Street



4 “ : BURT LANCASTER
"s WEB" Warren HUDT . 3 The Gard t, James
a TODAY & TOMORROW 38.30 P.M

ae eae a hab ere oe tres DARBA ) OISTIN—Dial 8404 -acaiouan iat tee
AY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M: c Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m. Bette DAVIS &
E F ie BA NTE: , “WHIPLASH” Dane _CLABI
ya “The BLUE VEIL” = “"% ~ aoe * rai a ake toe

“MIGHTY JOE YOUNG”
THE THING Robert ARMSTRONG
“Mi

&
(From ther World) FORBIDDEN PAST

Robert MITC
THURS (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. MIDNITE SAT ‘NTH
io Triple Attraction —
ze ina ANGFORD & “RAIDERS of the DESERT” |
ROSE OF SANTA ROSA” aca BAD”. (Coles) Richard ARLEN — Andy DEVINE

. . ; pees ~ ; Rod CAMERON — Yvonne De CARLO “CHEYENNE COWBOY" |
HOOSIER HOT SHOTS ;: . / = =

TRE §
D
Jane



ee, mee. i
ae a ee



. IP Tex WILLIAMS &
“ROSE of SANTA ROSA” TEX BENEKE & GLENN MILLER

“REDIN the OUTLAW TRA” , : ORCHESTRA


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

House Hit

At Public

Service Commission .

WHEN certain members of the House of Assembly last
ght sought during the consideration of two Resolutions
lating to the payment of the members of the Public Ser-
fice Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff
the Commission, to criticise certain appointments on the
lommission, His Honour the Speaker was forced on several
ecasions to rule such members out of order and implore
hem to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions.

his was particularly the case
a Mr. Mapp, junior member for
‘Thomas, who repeatedly, de-
the intimations from the
r that he should not do so,
ised the appointment of Mr.
ey Douglas-Smith to mem-
ip on the Commission.
fter being ruled out of order
'three consecutive occasions
le making such observations
criticisms against Mr. Doug-
Smith’s appointment, Mr. Mapp

‘ jhitted that “I have been hard

learing to-night and
t rulings too good.”
he, two Resolutions, the one a
jllary of the other, provided
} the Chairman of the Com-
sion be paid $20.00 per meeting
} a maximum remuneration of
00 in any one month, and that
fibers should be paid at the
-of $10.00 per meeting with a
imum remuneration of $40.00
y one month; and for the ap-
ment of one Long Grade
& and one Stenographer Typist
‘the performance of duties
ing from the institution of the
ynission.
tthis connection, $3,000 has
ady been provided in the 1952-
Zolonial Estimates to meet the
Mated expenditure. Serving
ters in the Public Service will
receive any remuneration
ve their normal salaries, The
uission will be responsible
Advising the Government as
fds to recruiting, training,
ipline, appointment and pro-
lon of Civil Servants and other
ad matters, and in view of the
that the Commission is to be
Tmanent body, it is considered
table that the staff necessary
its efficient operation should
aced on a permanent basis.
peaking on the question of re-
teration for the service render-
y members of the Commission,
O. T. Allder (I) criticised the
of the remuneration, and
‘d the hon’ble member who
t with the Resolution in this
tection to outline the basis on
th the rates were fixed, and
often the Commission would
In his opinion $20.00 a
ting for the Chairman was
ty high”, and foresaw the
ibility of the Commission
ting in some instances for only
minutes.
r. W. A, Crawford (C) reter-
to the stipulation that no Civil
fant on the Commission would
any remuneration for his
vice on the Commission,
said he did not agree
tthe proposals. He imagined
there was some _ pre-
ince for the proposals, and
ad that it appear to him
on the it when a man
‘called upon to perform duties
the nature envisaged in the
lic Service Commission Act,
_he should be given some
a compensation.
Â¥. A. E. 8. Lewis (L) criticised
idea of having a member of
Executive Committee on the
imission, and recalled how the
ty had been advocated that
icians should keep out of the
irs of the administration, and
that while that was being
tehed, a member of the Ciyil
tice was made a member of
‘Executive Committee. He
not reconcile the two dif-
at policies.

Â¥. Mapp (L) attempted io dis-
the personnel of the Com-
ficn, and was ruleq out of
@, His Honour having earlier
iselled Mr, Lewis to refrain
1 doing so,
ie first Resolution was passed
during the discusston on the
d Resolution which dealt
{ the setting up of the Clerical
f, Mr. Mapp again sought to
ass and criticise the appoint-
t of Mr. Douglas-Smith as a
ber of the Commission.
e asked “What does the
gent Tudor of the University
ie of the West Indies know
the local Civil Service and
competent to advise the
Yo . as regards recruit-
t, training, discipline, appoint-
Civil

cannot

and promotion of

ants.
ee again His

Honour the

aker asked the hon’ble mem-
—

ber to refrain from discussing the
personnel of the Commission, the
appointment of which did not con-
cern the House, but still Mr. Mapp
persisted, On two other occasions
His Honour was forced to call the
member to order, but he continued,
“I ean’t see what the Director of
Extra Mural Studies, an English-
man who has recently out
here, knows about the local Civil
Service, a «
Hard of H ! x

Mr. Mapp continuing his critic-
ism urged Government to try to
find “suitable Barbadians who
have served in the local Service,
people who know of local condi-
tions and suitabilities, to serve on
such a body.

When once again the hon’ble
member attempted to bring the
name of the Resident Tudor into
the discussion, His Honour appeal-
ed to him “to keep the name of
the Resident Tutor out of the de-
bate, ang Mr, Mapp replied, as he
was about to sit down, “I have
been hard of hearing, and cannot
hear rulings too good.” .

Mr. E. W. Barrow (L) joined
issue with the wording of the
second clause of the Addendum
which read:

The amendment seeks to in-
crease the Establishment by one
Long Grade Clerk and one
Stenographer-Typist for the per-
formance of duties arising from
the institution of a Public ice
Commission which will throw an
additional burden on the
lishment Branch of the
riat, and called it a
worded clause.

He observed that it did not say
that the Long Grade Clerk and
Stenographer- ist should be
members of the staff of the Com-
mission and it also assumed quitd
falsely that the Public Service
Commission was itself to be an
addendum to the Colonial Secre-
tariat.

He thought that it was against
the true spirit of the Public Ser-
vice Commission Bill, because if
the House wanted to appoint an
Advisory Body to the Colonial
Secretary it would have done so,
and they would have set up a
separate and distinct body.

His contention was that if the
Public Service Commission ‘was
an independent body, it should not
be considered an advisory body
to the Colonial Secretary’s office,
and should have a Clerk and
Typist quite apart from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office. The two
erganisations should work in as-
sociation, but not in collusion.

If they worked in collusion,
they would find that the Coloniat
Secretary or one of the Assistant
Colonial Secretaries or another
Senior Officer of the’ Office would
always hold the files of the Com-
mission and when a meeting was
held, that officer would come along
and act as Secretary for the time
being.

He urged that the Public Ser-
viee Commission should be @ com-
pletely separate and independent
body, and observed that if they
worked in collusion, it would be
equal to retaining the status quo
of the old state of affairs wherd
the Colonial Secretary was “Lord

Executioner, Judge. Jury
and everything,” on appoint-
ments, with other Heads of De-
partments acting in an advisory
capacity.

He thought it was highly unde-
sirable that they shoud pass any
section which might give the
Colonial Secretary licence to be-
lieve that the Commission which
the House wanted as an inde-
pendent body, should be an ad-
dendum or appendage to his own
policy.

He was only throwing out a
word of warning, and if the warn-
ing fell on the “right ears,” he
would not vote against the Reso-
lution, In conclusion he appealed
to members to be careful, ai
warned that “it was not a frontal
assault, but an enveloping move-
ment.’*

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) associated
himself with the (remarks an
observations made by Mr, Barrow,
and Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasised
that the two officers for whicn
they were making provision
would be too closely connected
with the Commission, and would
be in a position to deal with

Secreta-
“cleverly



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all seating throughout the Chamber,
galleries and lobbies and every other
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chroughout the new building
are equipped with

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2G



KLM ’s New Air
Freight Room
Is Most Modern

CURACAO
At Schiphol Airport in Amster-
dam this week, K.L.M. Royal

Dutch Airlines opened the most
ultra modern air freight building
in Europe. The new edifice has
been erected on the site of the
first air freight hangar which was
opened for service just 32 years
ago when K.L.M.’s first air freight
consignment was a parcel of En-
glish newspapers and a letter
frem the Mayor of London to the
Mayor of Amsterdam.

The construction of the new
depot was prompted by the tre-
mendous expansion in air freight
traffic since the end of the World
War II and the fact that K.L.M.
igs convinced that cargo will can-
tinue to grow in importance to

ie airline industry.

The building occupies 1,900
square yards of warehousing
space and its unique application
of working methods, cargo hand-
ling, layout and technical aids
are designed for speedy and
efficient management of many
tons of freight per day. Cargo
planes are parked in front of the
building and special ets for
speedy loading and unloading of
the aircraft are placed into
operation, as well as the latest
mechanical devices used for this
type of work. Conveyor belts
transport the freight directly into
the building. A-special platform-

truek-bed height at one end of 80€S.

the depot facilitates the loading
and unloading of freight trucks.
Because of the growing num~-
ber of live animals transported
by K.L.M. in the past few years,
a hotel for Animals, occupies
ce in the new construction.
his hotel is equipped with run-
ning water, heat, electrical con-
nections, a ventilating system and
temperature control and can be
furnished to accommodate any
number or kind of animals at a
moment's notice, Specially trained
animal stewards are in charge
of the livestock at the hotel and
accompany all K.L.M. animal
shipments aboard the aircraft.





their own promotion, and so to
k, “sit in judgment upon
emselves.” ~ a . ye

Replying categoriqally to tne
criticisms, Mr. Adams explaine
that Mr. Douglas-Smith was the
first choice of the Ciyil Service
Commission and said that it_ was
wise to have someone on the Com-
mission who would not be preju-
diced. He thought it was a Fs0
thing too to have a member of the
Executive Committee who was not
a politician on the Commission,
and to have the Colonial Secretary,
who was directly connected with
the administration there.

He agreed that it would be
damnable to have a politician on
the Commission, and replying to
the criticism made by Mr. Bar-
row, said “I speak with sorrow
rather than in anger,” at such
criticisms coming from the hon’ble
member who should know that
throughout the British Empire,
there were Public Service Com-
missions.

He asked
members thought that the Govern-
ment had not taken great care in
the matter, or that they did not
use precedence after endeavour-
ing to correct faults and errors
experienced by other places be-

d fore coming to a decision,

He welcomed hon’ble members
drawing errors to the attention of
Government, but he would coun-
sel them to first find out whether

ad they were not making mistakes,

Directing his gaze to where Mr.
Barrow sat, Mr, Adams said “the
people of St. George correct their
mistake .. . I think a word ta

thie wise should be sufficient.”
The Resolution was ultimately
passed, r



ay

GEORGE

HZMzwmme sz

whether hon’ble United



Wild Rabbit Upsets
The Family’s Plan

LAUNCESTON, Cornwall, April.

Plans by the Boswell fa

mily of Bathpool—a hamlet on

the edge of Bodmin Moor-—to live in Nassau, have been

upset by a rabbit.

Alternative plans to settl

in Kenya or South Africa

have also been frustrated by the same rabbit.



Bunski, an wild i"
lish rabbit Celt sete, pet a
et Boswell, wife of

ell, retired farmer,
exerts an influence over this
family similar to that of Harvey
in the famous play.

Mrs, Boswell said: “It is ridicu-
lous and at times maddening. But
there it is, our lives are ruled by
a rabbit.

“Believe me there is no mushy
sentiment behind our attachment
to Bunski. I have killed scores
of rabbits without compunction
but Bunski is different. I do not
pretend to be able to explain it,”

“Bunski” was a baby when Mrs.
Boswell advanced on him five and
a half years ago with the inten-
tion of killing him as a meal for
one of her ferrets.

Then, said Mrs, Boswell: “The
rabbit instead of running away
leapt into my arms and nestled

against me for ¢+ee
have been p ¢ him ever
sinee. Everywher. © go Bunski

Mrs, Boswell r. 14 the ratbit

to robust maturity py which time
Bunski’s affection for the family
—herself, husband and daughter
Veronica—was unbreakable,

It was when the Boswells
thought of moving to sunnier
climes abroad that in Whitehall
Government offices Bunski cor-
respondence files came into exis-
tence.

First Kenya, then the South
African Government were sound-
ed. Neither would “wear’’ Bunski.

The Bahamas agreed, provided
Bunski had a clean bill of health,
But B.O.A.C, gaid “No” to him as

a passenger.

company insisted on.
him travelling under a butcher’s
care — “unthinkable,” said the
Boswells.

Even Bire demanded to know
‘Yin triplicate)’ why thé Boswells
wanted to bring Bunski with them.

Said Mr, Boswell: “The master
in this house is a rabbit.”

West Reply Will
Leave Door Open

LONDON, April 22.

British Foreign Secretary, An-
thony Eden, said to-night that the
Western reply to Russia’s demand
for talks on Germany “will not
close the door to negotiations.”
The reply to the last Soviet note
on which British, French and
United States experts will start
work here to-morrow would be
constructive, he told a dinner of
the Newspaper Society.

“It will take in account the de+
sire of the German people for
unity without forgetting that a
Germany can only ~ ba
founded on true ingegen ence and
free democratic choice, “It will
take in account the earnest de-
sire of all peoples for peace and
for a European settlement which
safeguards the interests of all.”

MAIL NOTICE

AMENDED

Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered Mail
at 1 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2 p.m
TO-DAY 23rd April 1952



Man With 500 Ti
Says ‘None To. Wear’

THE FIRST ONE WAS 1}d. FARE

TEN ‘years ago a passenger
on a No. 49 London bus gave the
conductor a brightly coloured tie
instead of a 1}d. fare—and started
a collecting craze,

The surprised conductor, Her-
bert (“Percy”) Price, began to
collect ties in his spare time. Then
flve years ago, as an inspector,
he was put in charge of the pas-
sengers service at Northolt Air-
port, and his hobby progressed
quickly.

Mr, Price said to-day: “Ameri-
ean and Continental
have a habit of loosening their
ties when they step from an air-
plane,

eT am usually around to ad-

e them, and when they hear
that I am a connoisseur, they give
them to me on the spot nine times
outof ten.”

Christmas Gift
\ Travallers send him ties from

The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractive!
slim, with bright eyes, cote
com) » and real fitness,
Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Bean’
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping millions
{healthy and youthful in looks
and figure. Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS
Just a couple at Bedtime
i SUN
SHADES

henge else erat

all different styles and
types available

From 727
to ahout $9.00

Call TODAY at your
JEWELLERS

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omM< mama Fecs

PHONE 4934 |

travellers



all parts of the world, Air crews, |

British and foreign, often dvop

into his little office with a oe |

they have picked up for i

a few in Nice, Madrid,

Amsterdam or Stockholm, }

{

And his usual Christmas present

from his family Hayes, Middle-
sex, is invariably a tie.

Now he has five hundred,
ranging from American imitation
“Old Schools” to 5ft, long hand- \
painted nylon specials. His fay-
ourite is a bright royal blue silk
tie with the Statue of Liberty
hand- in gold. Many .of
his lection are kept in glass-

topped cases.

But “Perey” never wears one.
He says: “As novelties or works
of art they are supreme, but
wear them? I wouldn't be seen
dead in any of them, I've spent;
most of my life wearing my black |
uniform tie and it suits me just

fine,”
—LES.


































PAGE THREE








the deticious fragrance of "4711" Tosca

“470” Tosca Eau de Cologes

Perfume and the freshness of “4711
classic Eau de Cologne are ite out
4 standing qualities

Tosca Perfume
a breath of

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alluring and fascinating -

romance.



TOSCA

RO ade in COLOON See

The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on
Rhine; it is now again obtainable in the original quality, made
according to the famous and secret formula since 1792.



7



The popularity of John White shoes is built om
VALUE, as well as DEPENDABILITY, Comfort
and style ?— Yes, certainly -~ they are as easy-
fitting and smart looking as you could wish, But
their outstanding VALU is what men expect and
always get when they insist on shoes made by
John White. See them for yourself in leading
stores throrghout Barbados,



Here’s the

NEW

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ELECTRIC

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Bringing you
Better Living!

Pheesing a refrigerator needs care-
t, particularly if you have

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The first is quality of workmanship,
for on this depends the len
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But there are
two vitally important features which
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The new English Electric Refrigerator
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Automatic Lighting
Humidrawers for Vegetables
Silent Running

Quick Adjustable Shelves
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NOW ON SHOW AT
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th of






PAGE TWO

ARIB to-day extends heart)
4 congratulations to West In-

dies Captain, John Goddard,
O.B.E., on his thirty-third birth-
day. Jehn whe was born on April
23, 1919, has the distinction of
being an old Lodge School boy
and also an Old Harrisonian.

He was a promising athlete ‘ai
school but on leaving school he
has deVoted most of his recrea-
tional timne to cricket. He has cap-
tained first Barbados, then the West
Indies in 1948, He also success-
fully led the West Indies against
India in ’°48—'49; against England
in 1950 and has just captained the
West Indies in the Tests in Aus-
tralia in Which the West Indies
lost the rubber.

John is one of ten children, the
only one of whom did not play
cricket and take part in athletics
was an only sister. He is still a
comparatively young International
captain and there is every indica-
tion that he will be the man to
lead the West Indies against India
néxt year.

May the years be many and
happy! .

On Holiday

{ R. AND MRS. WALTER 5S.
; JORDY and their two chil-
dren of New Orleans, La., U.S.A.,
have been holidaying at the Crane
for the past two weeks. Mr. Jordy
is employed at the Phillips Oi!
Co., and hopes to leave with his
family on the 27th April for
Caracus, Venezuela, where they
have been living for the past two
years.

For Medical Aid
R. AND MRS. DEORAJ
SAMAROO of San Fernando,
Trinidad, have been holidaying in
the colony since the 13th April.
Mrs. Samaroo is here for medica!
foe beat and hopes to leave with
er husband next week. They are
staying at Indrama Guest House,
Worthing.

Up and About

IS many friends will be glad

to learn that Mr. G. H. Adams,
C.M.G., who had been confined to
bed since his return from Geneva,
is up and about again. He presided
over a special mi of the
Housing Board héld at the Coun-
Sart pealle t attwal
Mr. Marrvshow off.

* Attended Cricket
_ -—- Board Meet
R. F. A. C. CLAIRMONTE and
Mr. J. M. Kidney, the Barba-
dos Representatives who attended
the meeting of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control in British
Guiana, returned home on Mon-
day night by B.W.1.A., from Trini-

Leaving Today
L* COMMANDER CHARLES
HAYWARD, e~

,. . Life

President of the A.A.A., of Trini-
daa and President of the T.A.F.A.,

be returning to Trinidad this
evening by B.W.LA., after spend-
a week’s holiday as the guest
| Mr. and Mrs. Norman Duthie of
Trees, St. James.

of



aub Calling

MR. JOHN GODDARD, 0.B.E.

Leeture at Foundation

7 R. CAMERON TUDOR, M.A.,
(Oxon), will deliver a lecture

on South Africa and the Common-

wealth,—a study in Origins at the

Monthly Meeting of the Old Boys’

Association on Friday, April 25 at

8 p.m.





For Convention

RRIVING over the week-end

by B.W.1.A., for the Conven-

tion of the North American Assur-

ance Company were Mr. Vernon

Cooper and Mr. K. Williams, the

Company’s representatives in St.

Lucia and Grenada respectively.

They are staying at the Marine
Hotel.

Representatives arriving on
Monday evening by B.W.1LA., for
the Conventoin were Mr. E. Grell
and Mr. Darey Galt from Trinidad,
Mr. C. de Qaites from British
Guiana and Mr. M. Phillips from
Jamaica,

Back to Trinidad
R. KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L.,
Point-a-Pierre, returned to
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA., after spending a holiday
with his relatives. He is a_son of
Dr. C. F. Stoute, retired Veterinary

Officer of Kensington Road.

To See Her Son
R. CAROLINE RAMESAR of
St. Augustine, Trinidad, who
arrived here for the Baster holi-
days with her two daughters and
to see her son who is a pupil at
the Lodge Schooi, will be return-
ing home Over the week-end. She
is staying at Super Mare Guest
House. .
Grenada Legislator
ON’BLE T. A. MARRYSHOW,
C.B.E., Deputy President of
the Legislative Council of Gren-
ada, left for Trinidad yesterday
by B.W.LA., where he will spend
a day before returning home,
During his ten-day stay in Bar-
bados, he was the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. G. H. Adams at “Tyrol Cot”,
Spooners Hill,



.WOMEN IN THE NEWS—8

Mrs. A. LL. Stuart

Mrs, Stuart is the wife of Dr.
A. L. Stuart of “Norham,” Tweed-
side Road. She was born in British
Guiana but when she was merely
even years old she left for Cali-
fernia where she was adopted by
her uncle Dr. W. E, Richardson,

Mrs, Stuart’s love for dancing
and her achievements in these
classes reflected more than a cas-
ual interest. Here was seen a
natural ability to handle the most
difficult steps. Acting on this, her
uncle permitted her to take extra
lessons during the holidays in
New York, As she grew into mid-
teens she struggled with two de-
sires —-her uncle’s whose wish for
her was to follow the medical pro-
fession and her own to make
dancing her career and further-
more to create her own steps.

At Elstree
In 1931 Mrs. Stuart visited her
mother in British Guiana. She
went to Trinidad and the
and later Barbados where

she continued her dancing, taking }

icular interest in stage shows.
1932 she left for England and
three years later was married in
London, The same year her danc-
career was climaxed at Elstree
Studies, London, where her
agents secured for her a third
part in “Saunders of the River.”

This Technicolour picture, di- bec
rected by Alexander and Zoltan rected all attention

weaker until eventually she be-
came blind for ten weeks. During
this time she was kept in a dark
room and the Studios afforded her
the best medical attention. After






RECT RRR er :

Nig

Mrs, A. L. STUART

lancet aisaraeerarmer nro wesc



recovering she decided

t against
coming a movie actor,

and di-
to her home,

Korda, starred Nina McKinney, She was also invited by the B.B.C,

and Paul Robeson, But after the
close-ups were taken they discov-
ered that the colour of her eyes
Was not for the .
Merle Oberon,
Howard, Hermaine Bradley and

my other British stars in
“Parade of Stars, 1935.” Her danc-
ae ‘were taught by Buddy

dley~-stage Director and Danc-
ing Master at Elstree

Technicolour
At that time technicolour hadn't
b@en long introduced and the
lighting effects were ten times
stronger than ordinary light. After
my takes and retakes Mrs.
rt’s eyes became weaker and





DIAL. 4220

Just Opened

PRINTED SPUNS 36”
PLAIN BEMBERG SHEERS

WHITE, PEACH, BLUE.
OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONGOLEUM RUGS,

to appear on a “Guest Star” pro-
gramme but unfortunately she was
in Manchester at that time.

Dancing School

After returning to Barbados
there were numerous requests for
a dancing school. Ih 1937 Mrs.
Stuart opened a sciiool for dancing

and fit. The school numbered
over and she realised that
this Was more her line—dealing

with children and imparting to
them what she herself had been
taught. In 1938 she staged her
first show at the Empire Theatre.

is was a big sticcess and the fol-
lowing year the school increased
in numbers. However, after her

@

36”

BY THE YARD.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

rived here yesterday by B.W.LA.,
on a visit. He was accompanied by

week end left yesterday morning
by B.W.LA.,
Trimingham was staying at In-
dramer Guest House, Worthing. is

' in aid of. Charity. There
# repeat

; talent among the girls and they

With The Royal Bank
ISS M. KING of British
Guiana who has been holi-

daying here for the past three
weeks staying at “Accra”, Rock=
ley, is due to return home to-day
by B.W.1.A. She is eriployed with
the Royal Bank of Canada.

Superintendent of Police
R. L. OUTRAM, Superintend- ;
ent of Police in St. Lucia ar-

his wife and their two children.

Trinidad Medico
R. I. TRIMINGHAM, who
arrived in the colony for the

for Trinidad. Dr.





Hanid Lectured the Kittens

—But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her—

By MAX TRELL |

HANID had Blackie on one knee, |
and Whitewash on the other. Both
kittens sat very quietly, looking up
now and then at Hanid and purring.

“You're darlings, both of you,”
Hanid said at last, patting both of
them along their little backs at the
same time so as not to get either of
them jealous. “But 1 do wish,” she
added, “that you didn’t both play
tag so very much.”

“Do you’know,” Hanid went on,
addressing first one kitten then the
other as she spoke; “you've been
playing tag ever since early, early
morning? When I first got up and
looked out of the window, there you
were, scampering across the garden.
And you kept it up all morning un-
til noontime when you came to the
porch for a minute or two to get
your saucer of milk. Then you
started all over again. You must be
terribly tired, aren’t you?” she said,
‘ooking into Blackie’s face. “Aren’t
you?” she said to Whitewash.

~ Purred Louder

Both kitteW® Moked back at Ha-
nid, and purred’p bit louder than

before. But neither of them said/gnq Whitewash; “€

anything, . ; | mother likes it better on the roof. }{
“Of course,” said Hanid. “I’m not | Phe view must be better.

quite sure it is tag that you two
play. Maybe it’s a special kind of
kitten-game. 1 wish you’d tell me
what the name of it is. Would you
please, dears?” ‘

Hanid waited for a moment or
two. The kittens didn’t seem anx-
ious to tell Hanid the name of the
tag-game they were playing. So she
shook her head sadly (for it did
seem a shame that they would want
to keep the name of their game a
‘seeret) and continued.

Ge 0 tp get a be ae » _
sit qui on the porch and res
until supper time, darlings? Look
at your mother,” she said, pointing
their heads to the other side of the
porch where Big Patchie sat wash-
ig her face with one of her paws.
“Your mother ar me eevand,
pla; or whatever-it-is. She

aden tee too hot to run, She

’t leave the shady porch; oh,







nol”

second show in 1939 the School
was closed but Mrs, Stuart contin-
ued to train girls who took part
in any entertainments. Such help
was rendered to the Excelsior




7

Revuedeville

Although she has no children} 7.
| Mrs, Stuart is very fond of them,

bo in 1949 the dancing school was
revived in response to several re-
quests from mothers. Later in the
ar a Mannequin Parade and
ce was staged at the Drill Hall



perform, some time
later. As the ool grew Mrs.
Stuart produced Revuedeville 1950
and 1951 at the Empire Théatre.
‘These two shows reflected local

are now clamouring for another
show.

Through the success of the last
year's show, Mrs. Stuart has con-
structed a new apartment for the
@chool which includes a ballet,
dancing, powder, and changing |
room, and canteen, There are also!
plans on foot for forming a club. - |

' Festival

Lisa Lekis, Festival Director,
invited Mrs. Stuart who is head’
of the Barbados branch to bring a
troupe to Puerto Rico for the Car-
ibbean Festival to be held in Au-
gus The festival consists of
kamples of the folk lore—dance,
music and art from all the islands
‘of the Caribbean, Each island will
present something different in
style and type.

Other Interests
Dancing is her chief fiir but
Mrs. Stuart holds a diploma from
the New York School in Interior
Decoration (1945) and a certifi-
cate in Hair and Beauty Culture
from Wilfred Academy, New York,
(1945). She is fond of music,
gardening and art and on the whole
is all “at home” as a housewife.
Although she is not a member
of any Board or Institution, she
contributes in all ways to charity
and has a special interest in the
Institution for the Blind.























ane
“YMAN



DIAL 4606

p Char

M®. Wilhelmina Beckles of the
US

ing a holiday here with her rela-
tives at Britten’s Hil, returned
home on Sunday by B.W.LA. via
Antigua and Puerte Rieo. She
was accompanied by her daughter.

ing. This is Miss Bell’s second
visit to the Colony.

On Six Months’ Leave

day by the s.s. Willemstad
Mr. ‘W. a

Superintendent of Montserrat, who ‘
was here for the













stopped washing her face, walked
slowly to the end of the porch, took | }}
a spring and climbed up to the roof.
Hanid could hear her footsteps pat-
z tering across the shingles, up as
high as the chimney where the swal-
lows were living during the summer. }}

least until the sun goes down and it
gets cooler. And I think,” Hanid put
in as a suggestion, “you ought to}
wash your faces so you'll be nice |)
and clean for supper.” K

the shady part of the porch. For a
minute or two they really sat there, |)
and almost—but not quite —looked |
as though they might sifri to wash |}
their faces. But suddenly, in the]f
twinkling of an eye, they were gone,

Hanid.

And when Hanid looked up at the
roof to tell Big Patchie that hez two
children hi
they both were, cuddled next to their
mother,
faces, right next to the
bricks of the chimney.













4.00-—-7,15 p.m
Kc andahaliauaigslaiine-glapammnene
4 p.m, The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
i “p.B.C. Midland Light

p.m. Think on these

Sports Round-up and Programme Parade,
p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m, Home News

from Britain

7.

|. The MODERN

*TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M

‘Thurs, Special 1.80 p,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE













Back To The U.S.A.

.A. who had been spend-

Second it





In a twin
is Said

kh figure
Belor e the two
nd looking mos:

ot

doing here."
“I'm working for Samra Claus,”













EAVING for England yester-
E.






ten days. He
on six months’ leave.





MPIC Te-néght at 8.30

OLY * a r
EMPIRE Thursday

A Complete change of Digtidene



7 7

THE RHYTHM

445 & 8m
To-morrow 4.45 only
Definitely your last chance to see
“A PLACE IN| THE SUN”
THURS. at 8.30
CALYP#0 REPEAT
AKCE.. .

Orchestra
Steel

ES
FRI. 2% & 8.
wach Dreeiy's
“ALICE IN_.WONDERLAND”

“NATURE'S HALF ACRE”
An Academy Award Winner
———————

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY AT 4.0.(Only)
Tomarrow 4.30 & 8.15
















. Along G's
and the Rhythm Kings



The kittens looked up at Hanid.
At that very instant Old Patchie !







“Oh well,” Hanid said to Blackie
yuess your







Ray MALLAND
. But i do “COPPER CANYON”
i ri ta t orch a
wish you’d both stay on the p: Donte Laie



in
“I WALK ALONE”



3s A :
CALYPSO AT 's
ANCE wit P.G

Along *
0 and the Rhythm Kings
Steel Band. ee

aaa eae See
THUR, 24th & SAT. 2th 1.50 p.m.
ROY ROGERS Double

“RIDING DOWN THE CANYON”
“SONG OF TEXAS
Friday only 4.90 & 8.15

“JAMES BROTHERS



* Sat on Porch
She set the two kittens down on |





“Blackie! Whitewash!” called|

They were nowhere to be seen

disappeared, theré

all three




washing their
sun-hot

YOU'VE NE
BEFORE.



B.B.C. Radio Progratnine

MAS pn ns aD 16 Me, COR

m. B

6.45 pign.

15—1045 pom . 26.62M, $1.32M

| Laareatetsemeeiscenepsencnen ence
7.15 p.m. Calling the West indies, 7,45
School of Music, by oh. Sp

uest, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
m. Statement of Account,

m.

reel, 8. P.
8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55. p.m.

S* George, 10 p.m.
7 10,15















DRESSES

New Materials

New Styles <.

THEY WERE an














For Cocktails or }












Weddings a w \ SATURDAY APRIL 26 — MIDAIT
From $18.00 each N.B, Spe “ALICE” — Waltz Disney’s Academy |} featurin|
dies ‘Atte Bhatt Peatne a ( AN INTERNATIONAL aROUE OF ARTISTES
is 5 i starring -
60 gauge 15 denier NATURE’S HALF ACRE”
S — $2.27 : ; Bir i Di tf
$2 teas “BRAVER VALLEY wa ’ MONAH wect from Martinique
_ ktail : : . (Magician and Rhumba Dancer)
HANDBAGS This Alone is worth the Price of Admission. LOLITA—(French Guiana’s Samba Queen)
for — $6.23 KURABELLA (Exotic Tango Dancer)

alt Disney
And he'll take

As soon as it’s s

DRESS Shoppe

Broad Street







Charles

LSUEon tn The BLUE VEIL”

Joan BLONDELI-—Don TAYLOR—Agnes MOOREHEAD
Also The SHORT ;—"

0 a TOMO 45
James CAGNEY in . :
o 8) 9.0

dy

ie ct Spec ‘

Triple_A’ he .

ron
“Sx G

Tex WILLIAMS & Leo. BRO

Se ae

“ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS &

“RIDIN TRE OUTLAW TRAN.”
STARRETT, Smiley BURN



Rupert and the Toy Scout—9 BUT
aioe i 4 + BOLD true
f ae bs CT. HYGIENIC PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS











With TRINIDAD’S LEADING CALYPSONIANS.

FAREWELL SHOWS AT

(PERCY GREEN'S jghonesrng’ =, Wopien, LEGS AND HB
KINGS STEEL

i's Ciitertemmeni ab it's BEST

‘ and
| ™S MASSck SOUr”
{ nn

OF MIssOURT’




NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS
THE REAL, THE ONLY, THE GENUINE.

You E! {
THE KIDDIES WILL LOVE IT=YoU WiLL ENJOY it}

ws cah Only get to eee
eae
own here.

EMPIRE THEATRE

Friday, April 25th —














WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1952


















om~Dad

ITH AN ALL-STAR HOLLYWOOD CAST!
a
SEGREGATED AUDIENCES _

WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m. |
MEN Only 8.30 p.m.

AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER!
WARNING !
This picture inclides powerful Medical Sequences.
NOT recommended for the Weak-Hearted !

P LAZA—sannantes (Dial 5170)

OPENING FRIDAY 25th (APRIL)

8.30
et Over 2 new song hits







mA METRO GOLDWYN MAYER Ay L 0 BE 20TH CENTURY FOX

ONE MASTERPIECE AFTER ANOTHER
}i TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.) Opening Tomorrow
LAST SHOWS 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.
: and Continuing
GABLE
bi ee
GARDNER




ROXY

Last 2 Shows To-day 4.30 & 8,15
“ROSEANNA McCOY”™



and
“STORM OVER WYOMING”
Starring:

Tim HOLT—Richard MARTIN
Thurs. @ Friday 4.30 & 8 15
Edmond O'BRIEN in
“FIGHTER SQUADRON”
“INSPECTOR GENERAL”




























The battle
of Texas..
and the
battle
€ of the
sexes!









dai ARE

and
“DEAD MAN EYES"
—
Sogame SAT. 4.30 & 3.15
Glenn - ‘Rnonda Flemings

; —in — :
“Time REDHRAD AND TRE

ROYAL

To-asy & Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15
Wild OTT in



“LORE STAR
NEL GARR VME. pri gy poem
HERE AT LAST = =» =

DAVID and BATHSHEBA
THE BIBLE’S GREATEST LOVE STORY

18s





‘BANDIT KING OF TEXTS"
Starring: Alan Rocky LANE

FRI. (Only) 4.30 & 8.15
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND in
“DARK 3













“embwerOM Lani”








:



nx

VER SEEN i7














&



POWERFUL—AND
POWERFULLY DIFFERENT
—From WARNER BROS.

“COME


















e
© civprrna (CUP™
Y PHYLLIS THAXTER
RAYMOND MASSEY
Gig YOUNG—
> James GLEASON



YOu'LE CALL IT
BOLDY a

YOU'LL SAY IT’S

BLUNT! (Diat 2310)

P i A Z A an BRIDGETOWN

Opening TO-MORROW (Thurs.) 24th., 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Also FRIDAY (3 Shows) 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.













AND NOW HE|{
} Presents A MIDNITE VAUDEVILLE
on






























JOE CLEMENDORE (we all know him)
BOODHOO BROS, (B.G’s Acrobatic Kings)
HARVEY ROGERS (leading ballroom Exponent
and several other sensational stars
Music by Keith Campbell’s Society 5






in
Thursday, May ist. I

AREE
“CRISS CROSS”
BURT LANCASTER
The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 38.30 P.M
“BEYOND THE FOREST”
Bette DAVIS &





OIs' 8404
Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m,


















" “WHIPLASH” Dane
Warner : THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME - ae ee
pike 00 ‘2 CREEK” (Coler) Robert YOUNG & FRI, & SAT. 8.30 P M
SCOTT “MIGHTY JOR YOUNG”

THE THING

Robert ARMSTRONG &
(From Another World) 7

‘MY FORBIDDEN PAST"
Robert MITCHUM

MIDNITE SAT. %“TH
Triple Attraction —

“RAIDERS of the DESERT”
Richard ARLEN -— Andy DEVINE
“CHEYENNE COWBOY"

Tex WILLIAMS &
TEX BENEKE & GLENN MHAER
ORCHESTRA



Randolph
-subows, Genta, Pekinte
SIX GUN MESA Johiny Mack BROWN

SAT. SERCTAL 1,30. p.m.

“BADMEN’S TERRITORY’
— .
gs Tim
‘tom & DAD ail

——=——
THURS (only) 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
“HONEYMOON LODGE
Francis LANGFORD &
“RIV .












" (Coler)
onne De CARLO







WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

House Hit

At Public

Service Commission |

WHEN certain members of the House of Assembly last
night sought during the consideration of two Resolutions
relating to the payment of the members of the Public Ser-
vice Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff
of the Commission, to criticise certain appointments on the
Commission, His Honour the Speaker was forced on several
occasions to rule such members out of order and implore
them to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions.

This was particularly the case
with Mr. Mapp, junior member for
St. Thomas, who repeatedly, de-
spite the intimations from the
Chair that he should not do so,
criticised the appointment of Mr.
Aburey Douglas-Smith to mem-
bership on the Commission.

After being ruled out of order
on three consecutive occasions
while making such observations
and criticisms against Mr. Doug-
las-Smith’s appointment, Mr. Mapp
admitted that “I have been hard
of hearing
hear rulings too good.”

The two Resolutions, the one a
corollary of the other, provided
that the Chairman of the Com-
mission be paid $20.00 per meeting
with a maximum remuneration of
$80.00 in any one month, and that
members should be paid at the
rate of $10.00 per meeting with a
maximum remuneration of $40.00
in any one month; and for the ap-
pointment of one Long Grade
Clerk and one Stenographer Typist
for the performance of duties
arising from the institution of the
Commission,

In this connection, $3,000 has
already been provided in the 1932-
53 Colonial Estimates to meet the
estimated expenditure, Serving
Officers in the Public Service will
not receive any remuneration
above their normal salaries. The
Commission will be responsible
for advising the Government as
regards to recruiting, training,
discipline, appointment and pro-
motion of Civil Servants and other
allied matters, and in view of the
fact that the Commission is to be
a permanent body, it is considered
desirable that the staff necessary
for its efficient operation should
be placed on a permanent basis.

Speaking on the question of re-
muneration for the service render-
ed by members of the Commission,
Mr, O. T. Allder (I) criticised the
rate of the remuneration, and
asked the hon’ble member who
dealt with the Resolution in this
connection to outline the basis on
which the rates were fixed, and
how often the Commission would
sit. In his opinion $20.00 a
meeting for the Chairman was
“very high’, and foresaw the
possibility of the Commission
meeting in some instances for only
five minutes.

Mr. W. A, Crawford (C) refer-
red to the stipulation that no Civil
Servant on the Commission would
get any remuneration for his
service on the Commission,
and said he did not agree
with the proposals. He imagined
that there was some pre-
cedence for the proposals, and
added that it | appear to him

t on it when a man
was called upon to perform duties
of the nature envisaged in the
Public Service Commission Act,
that he should be given some
extra compensation,

Mr. A. E. 8. Lewis (L) criticised
the idea of having a member of
the Executive Committee on the
Commission, and recalled how the
policy had been advocated that
politicians should keep out of the
affairs of the administration, and
paid that while that was being
preached, a member of the Ciyil
Service was made a member of
‘the Executive Committee. He
could not reconcile the two dif-
ferent policies,

Mr. Mapp (L) attempted io dis-
cuss the personnel of the Com-
mission, and was ruled out of
order, His Honour having earlier
counselled Mr, Lewis to refrain
from doing so,

The first Resolution was passed
and during the discuss{on on the
second Resolution which dealt
with the setting up of the Clerical
Staff, Mr. Mapp again sought to
discuss and criticise the appoint-
ment of Mr. Douglas-Smith as a
member of the Commission.

He asked “What does the
Resident Tudor of the University
College of the West Indies know
about the local Civil Service and
to be competent to advise the
Government as regards recruit-
ment, training, discipline, appoint-
ment and promotion of Civil
Servants.

Once again His Honour the

Speaker asked the hon’ble mem-
————

HOUSE OF



to-night and cannot .

ber to refrain from discussing the
personnel of the Commission, the
appointment of which did not con-
cern the House, but still Mr. Mapp
persisted, On two other occasions
His Honour was forced to call the

te order, but he continued,
“I ean’t see what the Director of
Extra Mural Studies, an English-
man who has recently out
here, knows about the local Civil
Service. » * «

Hard of z
Mr. Mapp continuing his critic-
ism Government to try to
find “suitable Barbadians who
have served in the local Service,
people who know of local condi-
tions and suitabilities, to serve on
such a body.

When once again the hon’ble
member attempted to bring the
name of the Resident Tudor into
the discussion, His Honour appeal-
ed to him “to keep the name of
the Resident Tutor out of the de-
bate, ang Mr, Mapp replied, as he



KLM’s New Air
Freight Room
Is Most Modern



CURACAO
At Schiphol Airport in Amster-
dam this week, K.L.M. Royal

Duteh Airlines opened the most
ultra modern air freight building
in Europe. The new edifice has
been erected on the site of the
first air freight hangar which was
opened for service just 32 years
ago when K.L.M.’s first air freight
consignment was a parcel of En-
glish newspapers and a letter
from the Mayor of London to the
Mayor of Amsterdam,

The construction of the new

was about to sit down, “I have depot was prompted by the tre-

been hard of hearing, and cannot
hear rulings too good.”
Mr. E. W.

mendous expansion in air freight
‘traffic since the end of the World

. Barrow (L) joined War II and the fact that K.L.M.
issue with the wording of the is convinced that cargo will con-

second clause of the Addendum
which read: ;

The amendment seeks to in-
crease the Establishment by one
Long Grade Clerk and one
Stenographer-Typist for the per-
formance of duties arising from
the institution of a Public Service
Commission which will throw an
additional burden on the Estab-
lishment Branch of the Secreta-
riat, and ealled it a “cleverly
worded clause.

He observed that it did not say
that the Long Grade Clerk and
Stenographer- ist should

ue to grow in importance to
ie airline industry.

The building occupies 1,900
Square yards of warehousing
space and its unique application
of working methods, cargo hand-
ling, layout and technical aids
are designed for speedy and
efficient management of many
tons of freight per day. Cargo
planes are parked in front of the
building and special pallets for
speedy loading and unloading of
the aircraft are placed into

be operation, as well as the latest

members of the staff of the Com- mechanical devices used for this

mission and it also assumed quited 4

of work. Conveyor belts

falsely that the Public Service transport the freight directly into
Commission was itself to be an the building. A special platform-

addendum to the Colonial Secre-
tariat.

He thought that it was against
the true spirit of the Public Ser-
vice Commission Bill, because if
the House wanted to appoint an
Advisory Body to the Colonial
Secretary it would have done so,
and they would have set up a
separate and distinct body.

His contention was that if the
Public Service Commission ‘was
an independent body, it should not
be considered an advisory body
to the Colonial Secretary’s office,
and should have a Clerk and
Typist quite apart from the Colo-
nial Secretary’s Office. The two
organisations should work in as~
sociation, but not in collusion.

If they worked in collusion,
they would find that the Coloniat
Secretary or one of the Assistan
Colonial Secretaries or another
Senior Officer of the Office would
always hold the files of the Com-
mission and when a meeting was
held, that officer would come along
end act as Secretary for the time
being.

He urged that the Public Ser-
viee Commission should be @ com-
pletely separate and independent
body, and observed that if they
worked in collusion, it would be
equal to retaining the status quo
of the old state of affairs where
the Colonial Secretary was “Lord

Executioner, Judge, Jury
and everything,” on appoint-
ments, with other Heads of De-
partments acting in an advisory
capacity.

He thought it was highly unde-
sirable that they shoud pass any
section which might give the
Colonial Secretary licence to be-
lieve that the Commission which
the House wanted as an inde-
pendent body, should be an ad-
dendum or appendage to his own
policy,

He was only throwing out a
word of warning, and if the warn-
ing fell on the “right ears,” he
would not vote against the Reso-
lution, In conclusion he appealed
to members to be careful, ard
warned that “it’ was not a frontal
assault, but an enveloping move-
ment.”

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) associated
himself with the (remarks an
observations made by Mr. Barrow,
and Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasised
that the two officers for whicn
they were making provision
would be too closely connéctéd
with the Commission, and would
be in a position to deal with



COMMONS

The Speaker’s chair,
all seating throughout the Chamber,

galleries and lobbies and every

other

article of upholstered furniture
chroughout the new building
are equipped with

eae
rill i
Ee SZ



«

¢ the Ministry of
Th

| & Vardy Led., London;
& Co. Ltd., Cheltenham;



2. LTD. (BUNLOPILLO DIVISION), WALTON, LIVERPOOL
ONDON: 1920 NEW BOND STREET, W.I
FOUNDERS OF THE LATEX FOAM INDUSTRY
500/059
ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street — Distributors |

Works : Six Giles Gilbert Scott, OM, R.A.

i Acknowladgments:

> co-operation of the Contractors responsible for the seating is

gratefully acknowledged by Dunlop Rubber Co, Ltd. -—J. L. Green

Maple & Co. Ltd., London; H. H. Martyn
F. Sage & Co. Ltd., London;

Gillow Led., London.

NLOPILLO

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Waring &

truck-bed height at one end of 80€5

the depot facilitates the loading
and unloading of freight trucks.
Because of the growing num-
ber of live animals transported
by K.L.M. in the past few years,
a hotel for Animals, occupies
ce in the new construction.
is hotel is equipped with run-
ning water, heat, electrical con-
nections, a ventilating system and
temperature control and can be
furnished to accommodate any
number or kind of animals at a
moment's notice, Specially trained
animal stewards are in charge
of the livestock at the hotel and
accompany all K.L.M, animal
shipments aboard the aircraft.





? their own promotion, and so to

k,

mselves.” ~ a 4 a

Replying categoriqally to thy
criticisms, Mr. Adams explain
that Mr. Douglas-Smith was the
first choice of the Civil Service
Commission and said that it was
wise to have someone on the Com-
mission who would not be preju-
diced. He thought it was a good
thing too to have a member of the
Executive Committee who was not
a politician on the Commission,
and to have the Colonial Secretary,
who was directly connected with
the administration there.

He agreed that it would be
damnable to have a politician on
the Commission, and replying ta
the criticism made by Mr. Bar-
row, said “I speak with sorrow
rather than in anger,” at such
criticisms coming from the hon’ble
member who should know that
throughout the British Empire,
there were Public Service Com-
missions,

“sit in judgment upon
es. w= , 3 :

whether hon’ble Uni

He asked
members thought that the Govern-
ment had not taken great care in
the matter, or that they did not

use precedence after endeavour-:

ing to correct faults and errors
experienced by other places ‘be-
fore coming to a decision.

He welcomed hon’ble members
drawing errors to the attention of
Government, but he would coun-
sel them to first find out er

d they were not making mistakes,

Directing his gaze to where Mr.
Barrow sat, Mr. Adams said “the
people of St. George correct their
mistake . .. I think a word ta
the wise should be sufficient.”

The Resolution was ultimately
passed, r







GEORGE




HZnzZomime sz



1 “HAW. . SUE SUGE USES &
LIPSTICK THAT

winNin £0 tet HOM
. GS TO COLL
HONEST JOE IN THAT RACE?

PAGE THREE



ow HAVE

DEAg Wily ?

yu &

Wild Rabbit Upsets

The Fam

LAUN
Plans by the Boswell fa

ily’s Plan

CESTON, Cornwall, April.
mily of Bathpool—a hamlet on

the edge of Bodmin Moor—to live in Nassau, have been

upset by a rabbit.
Alternative plans to se

ttle in Kenya or South Africa

have also been frustrated by the same rabbit.

Bunski, an ordinary wild Eng-
lish rabbit kept as a pet by Mrs.
Vera Mi Boswell, wife of
Mr. P. J. well, retived farmer,
exerts an influence over this
family similar to that of Harvey
in the famous play.

Mrs, Boswell said: “It is ridicu-
lous and at times maddening. But
there it is, our lives are ruled by
a rabbit.

“Believe me there is no mushy
sentiment behind our attachment
to Bunski. I have killed scores
of rabbits without compunction
but Bunski is different, I do not
pretend to be able to explain it.”

“Bunski” was a baby when Mrs.
Boswell advanced on five and
a half years with the inten-

tion of killing him as a meal for
one of her ferrets.

Then, said Mrs, Boswell: “The
rabbit instead of running away
leapt into my arms and nestled

Man With 500 Ties

Says ‘None To. Wear’
THE FIRST ONE WAS 1}4, FARB

TEN ‘years ago a passenger
on a No, 49 London bus ve toe



all parts of the world, Air crews, |
British and foreign, often dvop
into his little office with a er

they have picked up for i
a few shillings in Nice, Madrid,
Amsterdam or Stockholm,

{

And his usual Christmas present

from his family Hayes, Middle-
sex, is invariably a tie.

Now he has five hundred,
ranging from American imitation
“Old Schools” to 5ft, long hand- \
painted nylon specials. His fay-
ourite is a bright royal blue silk
tie with the Statue of Liberty

in gold. Many .of
his lection are kept in glass-

topped cases.

But “Perey” never wears one.
He says: “As novelties or works
of art they are supreme, but
wear them? I wouldn’t be seen
dead in any of them, I’ve spent ;
most of my life wearing my black |
uniform tie and it suits me just

conductor a brightly coloured tie fine.”

instead of a 1}d. fare—and started

a collecting craze,

The surprised conductor, Her-
bert (“Percy”) Price, began to
collect ties in his spare time. Then
fwe years ago, as an inspector,
he was put in charge of the pas-
sengers service at Northolt Air-
port, and his hobby progressed
quickly,

Mr, Price said to-day: “Ameri-
can and Continental travellers
have a habit of loosening their

es whe: y st ir-

an am 4 _— + ‘ n they step from an air

ve been p him ever = «| suall d-

ieee Ser eoe ft go B am usually around to ad
;

,

Mrs. Boswell nursed the ratibit
to robust maturity by which time
Bunski’s affection for the family

—herself, husband and daughter

Veronica—was unbreakable,

It was when the Boswells
thought of moving to sunnier
climes abroad that in Whitehall
Government offices Bunski cor-
respondence files came into exis-
tence.

First Kenya, then the South
African Government were sound-
ed. Neither would “wear’’ Bunski.

The Bahamas agreed, provided
Bunski had a clean bill of health,
But B.O.AC. said “No” to him as
a passenger.

A shipping company insisted on.
him travelling under a butcher’s
care — “unthinkable,” said the
Boswells.

Even Eire demanded to know
in triplicate)’ why thé Boswells
wanted to bring Bunski with them.

Said Mr, Boswell: “The master
in this house is a rabbit.”

West Reply Will
Leave Door Open

LONDON, April 22.

British Foreign Seeretary, An-
thony Eden, said to-night that the
Western reply to Russia’s demand
for talks on Germany “will not
close the door to negotiations.”
The rest to the last Soviet note
on which British, French and
United States experts will start
work here to-morrow would be
constructive, he told a dinner of
the Newspaper Society.
“It will take in account the de+
sire of the German people for
unity without forgetting that a
ted can only ~be



founded on true independence and
free democratic choice. “It wi
take in account the earnest de-
sire Of all peoples for peace and
for a European settlement which
safeguards the interests of all.”



that I am a connoisseur, they give
tiem to me on the spot nine times
oWthof ten.”
Christmas Gift
Travallers send him ties from

that them, and when they hear

{

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BARBADOS 8 ADVOCATE,

catnaptener concent?

1952

Wednesday, April | 23,

SEAWELL REPORT

DURING the debates in the House of
P Assembly earlier this year some very
unflattering statements were made by
members against the Canadian engineers
Joaned by the Canadian government to
the government of Barbados. During these
~ debates Mr, Adams honourably defended
the Canadian engineers and attributed the
misfortunes of Seawell to “extraordinary
bad luck.”
When the House considered the Con-

















LONDON LETTER

The Library of the House of
Commons is always a pleasant
place but particularly at this time
of the year when spring has got-
ten over her first tearful doubts
and is settled down to a maidenly
sobriety, Here there are no tele-
phones to interrupt, no strangers,
no constituents. The philosopher
can sink into a deep leather chair
and close his eyes so as to concen-
trate the better upon the debate
to which he will return later on.

It is amusing to hear the tugs
snorting a warning to the bridge
that they, are coming through, and
it is soothing to watch those wise
motionless philosophers of the
river, the barges, standing philo-
sophically while they gaze.at the
Houses of Parliament.

So it is in the Library that I



By BEVERLEY BAXTER

ours for the taking. Those coun-
tries which have not succumbed to
communism by that time will fall
to the Russian sword.” and yet
here it is—springtime 1952—and
we are still alive. Somehow,
somewhere, Stalin's calculations
have gone wrong. I suggest, even
at the expense of repetition,

he made the same mistake as Hit-
ler in overestimating the effect of
fear and underestimating

strength of the human spirit,

We always forget the Greeks so
easily, yet not only did they fight
Italy in the war but took on Ger-
man as well. Their heroism is
almost as great as their incapacity
for stable government. But after
the long occupaticn of the Ger-

Federation |
‘In The
Empire”’

LONDON.

“Federation is in the air,” writes New
Commonwealth in its current issue. -

to oif the selfish interests of com-|
petitive capitalism are apt to for-
get the primary importance of)
politics.

But with all their fumbling)
and bungling, and despite the |
half-heaiicd, split-minded inter-
vention of America the oil did not
gush and the fimancial situation
of Persia became more and more
difficult. But if Persia failed the
Russian dream there was still
E
oR was, tevever. quite
another matter. You might argue
for or against British Imperialism
in Persia but when it comes to
the Suez Canal, without which
our ships would have to make
long voyage round the Cape, that
was something of a very. different
complexion. .

New Commonwealth continues: “It may
be pertinent to inquire whether anything is
to be learned from the examples of federa-



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

BOOKS !

THE FINEST RANGE IN TOWN

AT THE

ADVOCATE





%,

STATIONERY



This most

products.





want to write this letter from
London, for there are ideas in my
head that need ‘clarifying, and I
have a feeling! that if the job is
well done the provéss of clarifica-
jumine some of the dark
S hice mind as, well.
Eden Optimistic

aa eh Big U.K. Acts Swiftly tion which we already possess. It is not
mans had en they fought the MK. Ac s Sw . 4

¢etatauhiet-vebellion "Ket was to The British ~acted swiftly,/Perhaps sufficiently realised that among the
put Greece in the bag. That was renee mercilessly, This was a|Commonwealth countries which are known

t to Britain's sea power and
pag a nee saeea heen ae ought that is something ‘which Britain| 4S Dominions, excluding Great Britain, there
are only three examples of unitary govern-

that Tito, the plump wonder boy Will take from no country. Sel-
ments, namely, the Union of South Africa,

nolly report $60,000 were voted for re-
pairs to the runway. The Legislative
Council later sanctioned this expenditure.

At the time some members 6f the House
queried the Government’s reasons for
voting $20,000 more than the $40,000 sug-



VALOR STOVES
(Table Models with one and

of communism, would turn 40m has a great power. used its
against Russian Imoverialism and Strength with so little regard for |

o
’
recent
example is typical
of ‘built-to-last’ . ..
:
4
:








two burners ) %
the susceptibilities of a smaller) New Zealand, and Ceylon. The others are %
‘ ‘ admit that in writing DOt only defy Stalin but mock SIGE! BRT Mae Gitieueh te ithe ' : Large Two and Three Burner %
gested by Mr. Connolly. They contended the eB dition of the world him? Yet the Suey that came from British Lion had home to an ena |all examples of federalism; namely, Canada Models %
that whatever sum voted would be spent. nese ae Yugoslavia but at the other satel- eho a which consists of ten provinces, each with ‘
i Repair work on the runway began about | }Y. fo, a private talk eee Re, COT | eae Some meriting |itS separate legislature; Australia, com- Cartiiete «Miuoin x
id-April and this week almost all of the Anthony? Eden. '1 am not in a posi- of these words~and their pub-! prising six States; India, which not only em- VENS — Medi %
1,700 feet which asphaltic con- | tom to quote him but there is no cle : lication but I =— this —. Ladies the f Provinces tat alia taan aum 8
Square feet on Pp harm in saying that he was more MEV ERLEY cy — that Persia ies the former Provinces bu y Large %
crete patches have been placed have been | optimistic about the immediate f- HAXTER M.P will come a te terms with

completed. -These patches have been dug
down and refilled some to’a depth of 18
ins. and one to a depth of 6 feet but aver-
age depths were between 2 and 3 feet.

The completion of the asphalted patches
this week promised” well for~the ending
of the whole job not later than June at a
cost within the $60,000 voted by the gov-
ernment.

On Monday, however, the concrete con-
veyor which performs. the work of some
three or four’men in a quarter of the time
was discovered to be damaged. Unléss
that concrete conveyor can. be
locally in a reasonable period of time the
repair of the runway at’ Seawell will bé
delayed. If concrete. blocks are laid) by
hand it will greatly” inckbuge ‘the cost of
the job and the House’s Brey of $60,000
will be exceeded.

It is right that the-public should be told
these facts. promptly. Had.public state-
ments in the form-of pregress reports been
issued during the construction of the few
runway not only would much of the mud-
slinging that was done in the»House of
Assembly and outside have,been
















ture than any time since the end
of the Hitler war, and remember
that while Eden may be a romantic
off Gity’-hé is arealist when it
cgmes to foreign affairs.

Things have not workeg out ac-
cording to plan for Stalin. That
does not meen that the western
world has placeti itself in an im-
pregnable position or that western
statemanship deserves the bame
of genius, Democracy always mud-
dies its affairs and_. thete have
been plenty of mistakes sitice the
War-worn democracies put away
the sword in 1945-and. teok amp the
torch. >

Stalin is not-a feo) like Hitier,
but he has permitted himself the
same. basic miscalculation as dhe
Fuehrer, Hitler believed thatvfear
was the most powerful of human
emotions. Hence the pograms

anised gangs of street ruf-

ig ang the final dream
@@ a Victorious Third Reich erect-
‘@d upon the corpses of it- enemiec
@ dream that ended with Hitler's
sultide in the bunker.

Stans rian
Stalin aa nardiy iaken over
»irpm Lenin when he began to pien

~ Nis ened. — absolute. power, A:-

believed that Hussia
Wout be. at war, with Germany
a eaaeare lume be BOt oniy Lqui-

-Ampos- ,
sible but corrective action night iso Have */eciated ali those leacers of ine party

been taken at the time.

Now is the* time. for~an“inquiry to. be.
made by the government into the dam-
aging of the concrete conveyor at Seawell
and the facts of the, inquiry rust be placed
before the: public. ae

It is not fair to the public | keeping them
in the dark with regards the spénding of
their money.

The $60,000 now beixg spent at Seawell
are coming not from the United Kingdom
but from the government, of. Barbados,
Work has been going on at Seawell for
nearly two months now and 60 per cent.
of the concrete slabs still have to be laid.
At the present rate of progress using the
concrete conveyor the work would have
been completed by June within the limits -
of the sum voted by the House of Assem-
bly for repairs to the runway. The dam-
aging of the conerete conveyor cannot be
regarded as.a normal affair nor even as
“extraordinary bad luck.”

The nature of the damage suggests that
it was wilfully done. Failure to enquire
into this damage and failure to report the
findings will breed no confidence among
the people. .

The public have become very sensitive
and rightly as to how public money is
spent at Seawell and Mr. Connolly's plac-
ing of responsibility for failures at Sea-
well on the ‘government and the contrac-
tor was not reassuring to the public. This
time ‘there is no contractor. The govern-
ment -is résponsible for the work and is
fortunate in having the assistance of Mr.
James of Canada to help them carry. it
out. If conerete conveyors are sabotaged
and conerete mixers put out of cémmis-
sion the work at Seawell cannot. be said
to be proceeding smoothly.

The public await with perturbed minds
t for an announcement from the govern-
ment that immediate action will be taken
to inquire into the suspected sabotage of
equipment being used to repair the run-
way at Seawell.

FISH FARMING

~ LONDON.

A SCIENCE) practised ‘by mdhks) \in)
Britain and Céntral Europe in the Middle
Ages may revolutionise West African
village diet in the next few years, It is
the science of fish farming, which was»
carried out hundreds of years ago in cer-
tain parts of the British Isles and Bohemia,
and is only now being used again to breed.
fish in arid places,

Expert in this is Dr. C. F. Hickling,
Fisheries Adviser to the Colonial Adviser,
who will visit Nigeria next month, in, his
tour of West African territories,

He has already conducted astonishing
experiments with his fish farms in other
pafts of the Empire. He flew fingerlings
—tiny fish just. spawned—of tropical fish
from Malaya and South China to the West
Indies, where he started fish farms in-a
number of inland areas,

4 Hatta >

tf





fs



; whOwere Jrotskyists or Leniaists,

a enna hall the generai stan
@nd_ imprisoned or liquidatea
eS Of State servants in the
government | departments. “You
va.ue life toe highly in the West,”
he said to Lord Beaverbrook m
‘ar, “nothing is so easy tc
as human beings.”
talin intended to maké war
against Germany as.soon as he had
built up the military might ot
Russia and had undermined the
security of Germany by Commun-
ism. But Hitler acted before Rus-
sia was readyiahd Stalin was
forced to embrace the gorilla he

se when the pone turned on
nim. ! '

Stalin saw nis” troops being
hurled back but when he realised
that the Anglo-Americans would

not leave Russia to the merey of
Hitler his * cortisone ce ey

Until the ae was over here was
no time for politically educating
the, crumbling capitalists, -world,
ahd Stalin devoted his whole effort
to the defeat of Germany. History
will record that in that effort
proved himself a generalissimo of
gehius and indomitable spirit,

When the war ended he was an
fld'man but fanaticism ig @ drug
that drives.the heart at a merci-
less pace. Perhaps too it is wo
noting th~t di¢tators can
tire unless they choose a hice
quiet grave. Stalin. had to go on
with his world revolution, nor was
he daunted but, what He saw,

Asia was in flames, China had
gone Communist, Burma was in
revolt, Nehru’s ‘hour in
India, Japan was grove in the
first defeat of her hi: Pales-
fine and the Arab States had
taken to the knife, Egypt was
swollen with foreign money and
homemade nationalisation, Persia
was erupting. “Roosevelt. whose
spirit had done g6,.much to sustain
Stalin in the dark days of the*war
and proved a gullible innocent
in conference. The Balkans were
in the maw of the Russian grip,
and Eastern Germany was a Rus-

jan satellite, Britain was ‘virtual
bankrupt, France was bled
cae and Italy was there for
the picking, What did the millions
of Russia’s wartime, dead Matter
against such a blessed outcome’

Now the world Would hear me
crack 6f the Russian whip! ‘Now
. they would see whether Britain
would try to maintain her tra-
ditional policy of denying a warm
water port to Russia, The Kremlin
had the “palace of victo-
rious Communist Imperialism.

What opened
oan et es pare bungled the Persian affair ana

had in his
fatigue robbeti him of them: in
the night. |

Empiié Breaks Up

It must) have taathened his
Muscovite heayt to see the British
Empire breaking. up~before his
eyes. India, that proudest gem in
Britain’s erown, had become a
Republic with a hostile Pakistan
laring furiously across the mis-

apen frontier carved with such
indecent haste, Burma, which had
been defended with so many
British lives, was free for oppor-
tunism and ‘corruption.

The only great nation which had
emerged stronger from the war
was the United States of America,
but why should Stalin doubt that
the fondness which Roosevelt
has Shewn towards him not only
the fondness but the trust—would
be contiriuéd by Truman, especial-
ly as Churchill was no longer in
a position to fortify ‘his spirit?

l.do not dotibt that Stalin must
have looked out from the windows
of the Kremlin and said: “By the
spring of 1952-the world. .will be

Beverley Baxter is a Cana-
dian who came home to con-
quer England. In his autubio-
graphy he described with what
painful experiences he entered
‘Fleet Street’ and the world
of English journalism.

Within a few years Beverley
Baxter was editor of the
DAILY EXPRESS and one of
the brightest lights of the
world he had so recently en-
tered.

Having made one reputation
he turned to making another.
With his zest, love of life and
the stage which refiects life, he
became London's most dashing
theatre critic

Not content with an editor-
ial chair and an eminent posi-
tion as a critic. Beverley
Baxter entered Parliament (as
a Conservative) in 1935. With
his roots in Canada and his
interests in the Empire. Bax-
ter has been relied upon by
his colleagues in Parliament to
present many an unorthodex
and thankless view—especial-
ty during the pre-war years
when Empire affairs were
largely ignored. He is still in
Parliament and still a journal-
ist and drama critic.

The ADVOCATE is now
able to offer Baxter's intimate
commentary on ‘The Commons,"
Winston Churchill. the Gov-
ernment, and all that catches
his eye—the eye of a free and
brilliant critic—on the re-
markable stage of affairs at
Westminster. This commen-
tary is similar to the account
Beverley Baxter renders to his
own Canadian countrymen—a
twice monthly feature that is
as famous as MacLean's Maga-
zine in which it appears.



and Rumania for fear another

Tito would arise.
Action Essential
Stalin was losing face, a
dangerous loss for even a semi-
oriental. Something had to be

hated and then fight for his own done to show the world who was sians?

master, something dramatic,
ironic and humiliating but short
of war. So Russia closed the
roads supplying the allied zones
in Berlin. The Anglo—American
reply was as swift as a thunder-
clap upon a flash of lightning.
With a roar of engines the air
lift began, costly, cumbersome
but decisive. The west had defied
Stalin for the first time,
Stalin drew away to nurse his

os injured pride.

Where could he find solace for
his self-esteem? Above all where
eould he display the might of
Russia without involving her in
a world war? The answer was
Korea!

General MacArthur told me in
New York that the north Korean
army was the best trained and
best equipped military unit he
had ever fought against, The

. Russians had done a wonderful

job in preparing this formidable
army and were tertain ithat by
the time the western nations
could make up their minds South
Korea would be overrun and
there would no loriger be a divi-
ded state. The whole thing was
to be a dynamite exhibition of
Russia’s strength without the loss
of a single Soviet soldier. And
what a strategic jewel Korea
‘would be in the hands of Russian
stooges. Korea was a prize in
herself as well as a Communist
demonstration of strength,

But the United Nations, under
the courageous impetus of
America acted with incredible
swiftness. We cannot yet see the
end of the ‘tragic story but Stalin
had suffered his fourth great
Ser Rot Greece, Tito, the
Berlin air lift, Korea. The Com-
munist dream’ of world conquest
was paling beneath the morning
light or reality.

Yet Stalin had two great hopes
—Persia and Egypt. If only the
anti-British outburst could be
sustained in those two countries
then. surely the doors would be
to Russia. The British

the American intervention did

not help much, for when it comes table

—

OUR READERS SAY

CNS. And The
French Line

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—I am indeed grateful to
Mr. F, L. Y. Simpson for having,
fin his letter of the 20th of this
month, published those remarkable
figures. I believe that Mr. Simp-
son made public these figures to
prove that the C.N.S. have been,
for the past couple of years,
supplying adequate facilities for
intercolonial sea travel. If I
allowed Mr. Simpson’s figures to
stand alone, it would most
naturally appear to those who
know no better that the of 753
passengers dealt with in and out
of this port for the year 1951
could be considered favourable.
Such figures however look rather





jcompletely organised Princely States, such
right then Russia will have lost &S Hyderabad and Mysore; and, to a lesser
two sources of great hope. }extent, Pakistan. We should therefore have

The truth is that while both | @2mple experience of federalism to draw upon
Persia and Egypt deeply resented | within our own borders.

what they called the I hi :
of the Angio—American alliance. “Indeed, we are already extending the

neither ‘was willing to accept principle, where its application has seemed
Russian commu nh as an alter-

native. desirable, to Nigeria, with its Regional and

Egypt
Great Britain. If I am proved)




Thus we come to this signifi-|Central Assemblies, but Nigeria, too, is a
cant paradox, that while many of
the smaller nations are in revolt/large and diverse country with an area




against the Victori
of Imperialism they
to accept commun

. conception greater than that of France and pre-war
are reluctant; § P

sm as a sub-|Germany combined. The case of Malaya is
Stitute. This may be of small | different. This small peninsula was already
encouragement to the westerr

capitalist. world equally, it split up into separate Sultanates when the
Supplies little inspiration to the | British arrived, and it was essential for effi-
lonely man in the ‘Kremlin,

But Stalin, despite his years,|cient administration to apply some degree
is sti one of the ablest, if not |
the ablest, ef ihe political lead |! federation; even so, some States in the
ers of the . world. Unlike| north remained unfederated. Centralisation
a laos bp secur ta pertiansent | hawever, tended steadily to increase, and
for his actions. He can switch and/ after the war the Malayan Union was pro-
change st will regardless of pub-/| posed, leaving the Malay rulers only their

lie opinion hus .
the blue he/ religious and cultural functions,





Therefore out
went back on everything he had
s and offered Germany the} .
chance to re-unite. I speak with! “Let us turn to the far different case of
some knowledge when I declare!

thet this dasislon startled’ every |the Caribbean. Here we are recommending
foreign minister in the western| federation to these widely-separated com-
ag ahi wisi “ai incere— | MUnities largely because it is desired to con-
and: cparwies w -& ay fer on the West Indies dominion status, and
chould he take the wick of 44this would be impracticable unless there
united Russia~hating Germany? I) were some central authority. At first, the
sanistete oF ieee. the | foreign | majority of the West Indian Governments
America, as well as the foreign|were in favour of federation, only those of
hae oe ll aliy conseaar the mainland Colonies, British Guiana and

British Honduras, whose circumstances are

very different, demurring, and the Montego
Bay conference agreed to recommend fed-





Yes it was mot so puzzling since
Stalin is above all qa realist. Why
not give up the of conquer-
ing Europe in view of the indis-
putable fact that western military

and oceanic power made such a|€ration, following the Australian model,
conquest a highly problematical|though of course hin ore
affair? Why not lull the west to 8 not g could be m

physically dissimilar. Since then, however,
some doubts have become apparent, and those
who know best the atmosphere and greatly
differing conditions in these isolated com-
munities and what is called “island mental-
ity” are equally dubious about the wisdom
and practicability of an elaborate centra!
administration superimposed upon the island
Governments, and tend to ask whether a
sufficiently useful result could not be achiev-
ed by functional association, such as a Cus-
toms Union and other similar links, which
would also probably appeal to the mainland
Colonies and even to Bermuda. But it is
difficult to see how dominion status could be} %
conferred upon ,such a loose assemblage of|%
diverse units.

sleep? Why not by sweet reason-
ableness persuade the western
world to leave Asia to the Rus-

Asia Still Left

Stalin, the gambler, was run-
ning out of chips but there was
always the chance of Le Grand
Coup if the remaining chips were
put on the winning number, in|!
other words, Asia,

Nor did Stalin’s swift brain
end there, With the genius of a
man who by his own gifts rose to
the dictatorship of Imperialist
Russia he changed his strategy
with a swiftness that was only
equalled by its cynicism, Hither-
to he had looked upon the hungry
territories of the world as a
breeding source for communism
providing they remained hungry.
Suddenly Russia started to export
food stuffs to every country, and
territory (within the Russian Zone
of influence) that needed them.

good

“We bring you peace. and “In Africa the problem is difficult, but at}%
will and food,” cried the Russians,

"Wa are-the pales ahivegn least equally formidable for other reasons.|%
The menace of the Kremlin, the}1n South Africa, we already have the plural
threat of the Red Army, the im- 1 bi
placable severity of Imperialist jcommunity, and the Government’s some
communism had resolved into ajWhat despairing and negative solution if its|§
roa umanity which offered -|9
food to the hunkty. Aa polities it racial problem i is segregation, with perman-| ¥

ent white domination, This Apartheid policy

was brilliant although perhaps a >
is already having repercussions throughout}

little late.
Africa, just as British Colonial policy in














row, It is not in my power to see
beyond the ranges and to tell you
what is buried there. My only
purpose is to remind you how
startlingly the strategy of Imper-
ial communism has changed in the
last year. *

From a military standpoint it
seems quite clear that Russia has
lost (if we may borrow the term
from Americ: the Primaries.
Secondly it would seem equally
clear that the nations which live
under the heel of capitalism are
not eager to exchange their known
hell for the unrevealed delights of
a communist heaven.

There I shall leave it. But
may I remind you once more this
is springtime 1952 and that the
Russian timetable called for the
collapse of the “western capitalist
world by that time.

Svalin is a little late in his time-

distant scene nor predict the mor-

ation is now proposed between Southern
and Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, to
form what would become a Central African
dominion, with safeguards for the rights and
interests of the African inhabitants in the
three territories. The arguments for feder-
ation are strong and, indeed, urgent; the
economic ones are generally admitted, but
in view of increasing pressure from the
south, the political advantages of a stable
central State are probably equally great.
African opinion, however, is at present deep-
ly suspicious.

New Commonwealth adds: “Whatever
happens in Central Africa will undoubtedly
have repercussions in East Africa and even
in West Africa, Nigeria and the Gold Coast
are no doubt large enough to stand on their
own feet, but not so Sierre Leone and the
Gambia, and all four West African Colonies
are separated from each other by French ter-
ritory, and what is to be the future of the
Sudan ?

There remains the question of the eoond-|
mic and political future, in this complex
modern world, of all those small and widely
scattered units in the Commonwealth
islands in the Pacific, the Atlantic and the
Mediterranean, outposts like Hong Kong
and so forth, for which no obvious form of
association is possible, except perhaps under
the “protection” of one or other of the
larger units. At present, that responsibility
is exercised widely only by Great Britain.”

poor when compared with the
figures of the French Line for
the same period and plying be-
tween the same ports in the B.W.1,
save St. Vincent. The French
Line carried out of this port
during the same period 771 pas-
wengers and brought in836, making
a total of 1607 passengers for the
year.

It must be remembered that the
C.N.S. receives a subsidy from
all the B.W.I, colonies and not the
French Line, therefore I doubt if
Mr. Simpson or anyone else will,
in the light of the above com-
parison, attempt to claim the
C.N.S. has given adequate and
satisfactory service during the
last couple of years.

Yours faithfully,
A.D. GITTENS.

Ido not intend to paint the
Africa necessarily affects the Union. Feder-| —



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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23. 1952

Labourer Not Guilty Of Attempting Murder ‘™---

Conflicting Evidence Given

AN Assize jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yester-
day returned a verdict of not guilty after being invited to
return such a verdict by His Lordship the Chief Justice
Sir Allan Collymore in the case in which Jonathan Bel-
grave a labourer of Canefield, St. Thomas, was charged

with attempting to murder
years old by throwing her
grievous bodily harm with
leged by the prosecution
December 27, 1951.

“Share The
Work” Shoul

Be Slogan
Says Marryshow

Hon’ble T, A. Marryshow,
Deputy President of the Legis-
lative Council of Grenada, ad-
dressing the students attending
the Trade Union Course at the
Y.M.C.A, on Monday night told
them that he was one who be-
lieved that the future was with
youth and that the good new days
of the world were ahead.

He said that while there was
a lot that they could gain from
what had been done in the past,
it was not for him to glorify
what was generally called the
good old days which in the study
of history were comparatively
bad.

“The mind of man is marching
on and each age (though in the
confusion of things we may not
realise it) was on evolutionary
grounds better than the last,” he
said,

He impressed on the students,
the high importance and growth
of responsible leadership, “It is
better to be respected than to be
feared” he told them. He men-
tioned also that he was one
socialist who had no quarrel with
capital for the excellent reason
that he could do with some capital
himself.

Capital And Sin

He envied no man his riches,
nor should they do so, He want-
ed trade unionists to work hard
and earn capital—capital enough
to have them live in good homes,
eat good food, waar clean clothes
and enable them to educate their
children.

They should aim at getting not
only a living wage, but a saving
wage. He was for capital, but
against capitalism in so far as it
meant a misuse or abuse of capi'tal
for selfish or sinful ends.

Spectacular demonstrations and
the like do little good in the end.
Trade Unionists must impress
people by their seriousness in the
work they do and this can be
done in a strong and silent way.
They must be too proud to be
Petty: too sure of themselves too
self-reliant and strong to be pur-
veyors.of panic and generavwrs of
hysteria. .

Trade unionism is a business—
big business, and by training, the
Trade Union Official should be
able to argue and negotiate with
the best on equal tarms,

Popular slogans are “soak the
rich” and “share the wealth”, but
he suggested that consideration
should sometimes be given an-
other slogan? “share the work.”

New Spirit

He said that -he was looking
forward to seeing a new trade
union spirit in the islands when
by sheer force of character, busi-
ness acumen and self respect,
employers would be compelled to

‘ respect the movement, co-operate
and come to terms as they surelyaware of the fact that there

would, when they got to know
that Trades Unionism could be as
quiet as a simple screw, but be
strong enough to arrest the at-
tention of any social engineer who
ought to know that even a little
screw could hold a mighty engine
together, or in the absence of it
might lead to common disaster.
Mr, Marryshow expressed sym-
pathy on the death of Mr. Ed-
wards and warned Barbados that
these recurring drowning fatala-
ties might mar her geod name as
a tourist resort. : ;
There was talk of nationalisa-
tion in the air and while he did
not suggest nationalising the
beaches, he thought it was time
for the Government to step in and
make safety arrangements on
these fine beaches so that holi-
day seekers would come there
with less misgivings. ie
Mr. Marryshow left for Trini-
dad yesterday, but before doing so
he said in reply to a query that
he had seen lots of improvements
since he was here last, but he
had glimpses of a backward Bar-
bados in some respects in this

year 1952.

No Offices
ingtance the said; “With
boasted constitutional
advance as regards a_ people’s
Government here, the, elected
leaders of your Government have
no offices to which one may go
to discuss matters, mor any secre-
taries to make appointments.
These leading members of the
House who form the Government

For
all your

— Before ihviting them to return






For the Home!

BARBADOS ADV‘







PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFULS MEET

Elaine Callender, a child seven
down into a well and causing
intent. The offences were al-
to have been committed on

a verdict of not guilty, His Lord-
ship told the jury that there was
no evidence against the accused
and the little child told the Police
Magisirate one thing and said
ancther in the court. In the
Police Court the child said
another man named Sam and
the accused threw her im the well
and now she said it was the
accused who threw her in the
well,

They had to go by the evidence
which they heard and it would
be entirely unsafe to convict
that young man on that criminal
offence. The law required that
an unsworn testimony of a little
chi'd must be corroborated.

There was no evidence against
the accused other than that of
the little girl seven years old and
therefore he could not say any Re 2
more than to ask them to return Pb ia ,
a verdict of not guilty, ,

Counsel in the case was Mr. MUTUAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR W. Averell Harriman (left) shakes
Henderson Clarke, Q.C., for the hands with Sen. Estes Kefauver, who seeks the Democratic presidon-
accused, while Mr. W. W. Reece, tial nomination, at a $100-a-plate dinner given in a New Yor! hotel
Q.C., Solicitor General, appeared by the State Democratic Committee. Harriman. who was the guest of
for the Crown. honor, ts slated to be chosen New York's favorite-son candidate for
President. At a Washington press conference. President Truman
called Harriman aualified for the -oane (Internationa!

Shopkeeper Acquitted
Of Receiving
Stolen Sugar

After deliberating for three quarters of an hour an
Assize jury at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday found
Melva Walrond a shopkeeper of Hunte Street, St. Michael,
not guilty of receiving four bags of sugar valued at $69.16 cn
November 1, 1951, knowing them to have been stolen.

A basket with a dish in it was he Acting Puisne Judge, His reasonable doubt (a) that the
also taken out of the well. Lordship Mr. Justice G. L., Tay- sugar was the property | of
At this stage Mr. W. W. Reece, jor who presided told the jury Proverbs, (b) that the sugar was
Crown Counsel, told the court afier they had returned their stolen and (c) that the accused
that there was no other evidence verdict that it was a most sur- received the goods knowing them
the prosecution had to produce prising verdict considering the ‘to be stolen.
other than what the girl said. His oaths that they had taken when
Lordship then invited the jury they were sworn. If the explanation is one which
to return a verdict of not guilty. Wr J, E. T. Branker appeared leaves the jury in doubt as to
After the jury had returned on behalf of he accused while whether she knew the goods
their verdict His Lordship, turn- wy, Ww, W. Reece prosecuted for were stolen, then the jury should
ing to the mother of the child, the Crown. The case against be told that the case was not

told ther that she should take ajrond was that she took these proved and return a verdict of
more care of her child and see ¢oyy



Jaw Fractured

Dr. Colin Vaughan told the
court that on December 27 he
examined Elaine Callender in
the Casualty of the General Hos-
pital. She was suffering from
shock and the upper jaw was
fractured. The back of the skull
was punctured and there were
some abrasions on the left elbow.
These injuries could have been
caused by the girl falling into a
well containing water.

She was detained in Hospital
for three days.

Darcey Downes of Bridgefield,
St. Thomas, said that on Decem-
ber 27 at about 2.30 p.m. he went
into a well at Cane Garden, St.
Thomas and took out Elaine
Callender. Her clothes were wet.



. bags of sugar from the «oi guilty.
that she is not allowed to travel motor larry of Proverbs and
about too far alone, placed them in her shop. “You have to decide on the



Meanwhile Proverbs was miss- evidence as a whole, The entire
ing bags of sugar and_ had evidence must be taken as a
reported the matter to the Police whole. I am submitting that the
and on November 1 the Police statement of the accused is a far
followed the lorry to Walrond’s more reasonable thing to accept
shop at Hunte Street. than the evidence of the Police

9
What M.P’s
The defence was that the sugar who are professional witnesses”

W ant To Know
was taken into Walrond’s shop Mr. Branker submitted.

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) and Mr. after a friend had asked Walrond

to keep the sugar for him.
aastiene are Fp canes When the case resumed yester-

; ‘ ,. day morning Mr, Branker con-
Mr. Williams asked; : ag ae tinued to address the jury on the
ernment recently received a r case, He told them to look at the

quest for a raise in pay from the evidence given by the Police as
casual workers and rock blasters t4 the alleged conversation
employed by the Department of jetween tihe accused and the men
Highways and Transport and by working on the lorry.



NOLLE PROSEQUI IN |
WOUNDING CASE
At the Court of Grand Sessions

yesterday Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
Solicitor General, entered a nolle |

the Contractor for supplying “According to the’ Police the Frvason Jones. Jones, was charged
stones? accused asked for the balance of |; h a Aiatind: bony rae on
ill Governmen: re- the goods with inflicting bodily yarm on

SIS Bees ‘ 8 , Ethel Trotman sometime — in

consider the question and promote Discrepancies | December. His Lordship the Chief
the idea of an increase in the There were certain diserepan- Justice, Sir Allan Collymore, pre-
rate of pay for these vock blasters? jes which were present. The sided.
Mr. Bryan asked: Is Government quty of the prosecution was to Mr. Reece told the court that
is prove the case. They had the he ynderstood that other proceed-
grave discontent among the ranks statement of the accused which ings have begun and they would
of the fcllowing workers: Bus was given within a short time of pe given to the court in due course
Conductors, Drivers of Omnibuses, the occurrence in the shop. The of time.





Chauffeurs, Hotel workers, Do- occurrence took place between 11
i is é 2 ate t was
mestic Servants etc., and this dis- and 12 and the statemen s '
contentment is due to the low scale given so promptly that the MEANWELL DIED

accused had no chance to prepare

of wages, long hours of work, cohsuli. a

conditions of service and the ab- 2, Statement or to

NATURALLY
sence of any security of tenure? friend.

is i He invited them to accept word Death by natural causes was the
ae a ere anes the nega 5. word the datement. of the verdict returned by a nine-man
tive, will Government appoint @ Zouused that these goods were jury when the inquest touching
Committee to investigate the con- }eing kept by her for someone the death of Arnold Meanwell, a
ditions mentioned above? whom she said she knew well. »and leader and musician of Top
3. Ifthe answer isin theaffirm- The defence did not have to Rock, Christ Church, was con-
ative will Government immediate- prove ‘anything even if the cluded at District “A” before
ly proceed to set up a wages Board defence called on witnesses that Coroner C. L. Walwyn yesterday.
for the purpese of remedying this did not impress them (the jury), | Meanwell died at his home on
uncatisfactory and undesirable it was still the duty of the grose- March 18, 1952, and the next day
state of affairs? cution to prove its case. _ Dr. A. S. Cato, performed a post
“So you have to consider this mortem examination at the Bur-
case in the light of that state- ton’s Parlour, Pinfold Street. ‘Dr.
have to be hunted up hill and ment given by the accused.'You Cato said that death was due to
down dale in the byways and have to be sure that the property acute alcoholism and
behind tihe hedges. It is not good was stolen and was received by ease
enough, This is where Trinidad the accused who knew it was
leads. To go to the Offices of a stolen, before you can convict,
Minister in Trinidad is to feel As to the question o* receiving
proud of the Minister. There are her statement is that a man.
offices there well appointed and whom she knows well and who
established with business atmos- works at Proverbs came into her
phere from which it is hard to shop and shook her hand and
escape. — asked her to keep the goods
ition in Barbados in this for him,
sentitilion is very unsatisfactory. Bags of sugar were placed on
It does not add to the dignity» vf the counter w hile Jones and the
the Assembly, nor to the high other man went outside, You
importance of the island in other have to ask yourselves whether
respects. this is evidence of receiving by
I hope I have not put my foot the accused. The Police said that
into it, but what I say is in good the bags were brought in the shop
faith for I do love Barbados by some men. It is a matter for
which I have long regarded as you whether the ‘things which
my second country.” have to be estublished bevond

_————

liver dis-



COMPLAINT OF
MISCONDUCT

dents of the Pine Housing Area
and charging two other residents
with misconduct was received by
the Bridgetown Housing Board
yesterday at their meeting. A sub-
Committee was appointed to in-
vestigate the matter.

_ The committee which will go
into the matter comprises the same

noes of the Selection Commit-

30 x 18 $6.01
FALKS









A complaint signed by 30 resi-{

STOVES

2 BURNER TABLE MODEL

ICATE







Appoihtment Of Rent
Collector Declared Invalid |

@ from page 1

should be. promoted. “In any
single thing which I have to do,
private or public, that would be
ny method,” Mr. Adams added

Mr. Cox said that they had
overlooked that the last time they
made two appointments—that of
the Clerk of Works, and that of
Mr. Marshall—they were appoint-
ed “over the heads” of others who
had been employed at the Housing
Board. ,

Mr, Adams in answering this
observation by Mr. Cox said that
it had never been brought to the
notice of the Board that other
people had been then working in
the jobs.

Good Intention

Mr. Mottley, like Mr, Adams,
expressed his profound respect for
Mr, Beckles, and said that he felt
that Mr. Beckles in making the de-

cision he had made, had acted with
severy good intention

They were not concerned with
the merits or demerits of the case,
but were there to consider the
opinion which was given by the
Solicitor General. Under the cir-
cumstances, he felt that though the
Chairman (Mr. Adams) was not
present when the appointment was
made ,he would have, as he did
yesterday, expressed the view
which he (Mr. Mottley) had ex-
pressed, and which he had ob-
served that the present government
was adhering to—the principle of
promotion, all things being equal

He was not so foolish to think
that because he liked a person, or
because a person supported his
political. views, that that person
should be appointed against a per-
son whose ability and suitability
merited that person a particular
post.

Mr. Mottley after explaining to
the Chairman of yesterday's meet-
ing the circumstances under which
the “invalid” appointment was
made, and admitting his own error,



due to the circumstances at the
time, suggested that the Board
should adopt the principle, for

which there was precedent, of re-
ferring the applications to a
Screening Committee which would,
if necessary, interview candidates
He questionea whetner in view
of the fact that Mr. Maynard was
already working on the job, the
appointment which they now had
to consider would take effect, in
accordance with the advertise-
ment, from the Ist April, or from
the time of the new appointment
He formally moved, seconded by
Hon, F. C. Hutson, that the Board
accept the opinion given by the
Solicitor General. This was later
agreed to by a majority, Mr. John
Beckles being the only member to
object, having earlier moved, with-
out getting a seconder, that the
Board seek further legal advice.
Law And Common Sense
Speaking against the suggestion
that the Board “seek further legal
adyice”, Mr. Adams expressed the
view that the opinion given by the
Solicitor General was one in which
“law and common sense were
synonomous”
“Mr. Beckles explained that he

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'
acted as he did, bearing in mind |
the urgency of the matter at that
time, and said he would stand by
his decision. ; ®

The Board having accepted the
legal opinion, the Chairman ruled
that the three alternatives open to}
the Board were, either to consider |
the question of the appointment,
re-advertise the post, or appoint a
screening committee to: interview
the candidates. He pointed out
that the Board could eithér ap-
point Mr, Maynard, and if he were

of appointed, recommend that he
be paid for his services.

Following this ruling, Mr. Mott-
ley urged that the Chairmah give
a further ruling thatthe recotd of
the minutes show that the appoint-
ment was made, not from:the first |.
of April as stated in the advertise-
ment, but from the time of the
actual appointment,

The ruling being made, Mr.
Mottley continued to explain that
there were 107 applicants for the
post, with qualifications ranging
from “nil” to “all sorts of certifi-
éates”, and outlined to the Chair-
man what took place at the meet-
ing before he left it without a
quorum.

He urged that while in a de-
mocracy it was always necessary
to compromise, yet it was danger-
ous to compromise a principle, and
after admitting his mistake in not
following the principle of refer-
ring the applications to a “Screen-
ing Committee, moved, seconded
by. Dr O'Mahoney, that a Screen-
ing Committee be appointed to
make recommendations to the
Board.

He emphasised that the final
confirmation of the appointment
“rests” with the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, and added
that as a public body, they should
act in such a way as to avoid
criticism.

Mr, Beckles moved, seconded by
Mr. M. E. Cox, that Mr. Maynard
be appointed, and after an ob-
servation by Mr. Cox regarding
a conversation between . himself
and Mr, Lashley, Mr. Adams
pointed out that from discussions
he had had with Mr. Lashley, he
could say that Mr. Lashley’s atti-
tude was always clear and above
board.

Mr. Beckles’ motion for the ap-
pointment of Mr. Maynard was
put and resolved in a tie, three
members voting on each side. The
Chairman gave his casting vote
against Mr. Beckles’ motion, em-
phasising that as a public Board,
they had to act in such a way as to
avoid the remotest suspicion,

The vote was as follows: For
Mr. Beckles’ motion for the tp.
rointment of Mr, Maynard: ei
3eckles, Mr. Cox, and Mr, H. A.
Tudor, Against, Mr. Mottley, Dr.
J.P, O'Mahoney and Hon. F. C,
Hutson :

At this point, the Chairman ad-
journed the meeting until next
Saturday morning, when they will
sonsider other general matters
which have had to be postponed
because of the various discussions
on the question of the appoint.
ment, " @

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PAGE SIX * BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 9%





nl

: 66 ” ‘ ‘
Sugar Levies Law Amended “\eéte Bece Bey | wy re nones or succeast 408
as ee gine Rana oou'ge——_—_____—~ ‘Preated At U.S. Consul

= i i °

same price as for the Ministry of privilege. Peter was making the bill con- L i ; |

Pood oer ee that the Stabilisation fusing. He wanted te know egislators ASSEMBLYMEN SAY |
ey felt as ence basis for Fund was most important. Last ers were justified in asking for a 7 a

assessing the price of local sugar Tuesday, there was a very Solid Higher price for sugar that is ay ripute THE House of Assembly last night passed a Bill to

should be made. In any year the debate in the House on it. He ‘
Ministry of Food increased sugar was counselling the Government to Consumed locally, Sle was im- confer upon consular officers of foreign states certain pow-

; ed if the British Govern- ; cot ‘

for export, prices in Barbados consider the matter when they Ment had not given them an in- @ From page 1 ers relating to the administration of estates and property

= ose rene. The voogmn ee sane and providing crease on the © present crop, the a ‘ake and de- oF deceased persons; to restrict the powers of members of
, ee a wou Ae oe Gnd. ity oid would be manures Prepared to Fight _the police foree and other persons to enter such consular

Sugar for local consumption and as far as bringing the matter be- sold at the same price 0: jast , 1 1937 when he (Mr. Adams) offices, and among other things to confer certain immuni-
ouvers for export and he was given fore the House and discussing it ee They. ead to be aaa dast found himself in London and got ties and privileges on such consular officers and employees
zower prices for his sugar than were concerned, he must say that the increased price asked for was 12 touch with Sir Stafford, put his - of such foreign States.
the manufacturer who exported, it there was a lot in that. It was a not going to put local consumers Posi told him that : }
would be pointless to deal with matter that was known to the in coparey he might be in a sorry position During the debate on the Bill, Consulate will. be made part of
the home market. members of the House for the past e sai at if they took out if he returned to Barbados mere- Mr. ©. E. Talma (L) drew atten- Anperiee. j
At the present tiene, it was an five years. They knew that when funds from the Labour Welfare ly because he was of the people tion to what he e “insults said that it was a good thine
inierim matter for that year in there was an increase in the price Fund to stabilise the price of the who preached constitutional ad- and discrimination some em- to hear of any grievance but this
erder that Government could go paid by the Ministry of Food, that locally consumed sugar, it would vaneement before he was finished, ployees of the American Consul Act could not improve the position
into the whole question of assess- the local sugar contributed to the mean that less dollars would be Sir Stafford assured him that he here against people of the “negro or make it worse. :
ing export prices and the local Stabilisation Fund. They knew available from that fund to would take care of everything ace,” and taking the cue from Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L) said that
sugar for hame consumption. that the price and arrangements Sugar workers of the island to from that end, At that time, too, the observation made by Mr. he sincerely hoped that the privi-
It was the"Government’s inten- were adjusted annually. They repair their houses. Before they Sir Stafford told him of an in- Talma, Mr. E. W. Barrow, (L) leges would not cause the Consu-
tion, he said, to see that the price knew that their arrangement was ai re ‘on the matter, they stance when he had to intervene charged that such discourteous late to employ their own citizens












If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two

, consider whether any- in issue in Trinidad behaviour complained of amount- and not employ citizens of the

Nee ae ee eee ant “Epeubing ot tho Mekamilienigs ene coud he doge to Kemp tito. “an abuse ‘of diplomatic island or state. ; a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
just price. of machinery, he said that fhe °V83" at the same price. He mentioned those two in- privileges.” Mr. W. A. Crawford (C), said quickly restore lost energy and
Mr. WwW. A. Crawford (C) first ple wh . the t He “Referring to the Hon. Junior stances, he to shew that Sir The Bill which was taken that he was very much interested ; a
that it < tab eno ot: ave yember's remark that some Stafford was always prepared to charge of by Mr. Adams gives a in Mr. Talma’s remarks. He sqid tone up the whole nervous system. 6
oe = aie Ta r _— e a in Reha OM member should have asked a fight the cause of colonials who consular officer power to act as that only the day before he,sent a : Y fi ,
tadt a oe it 80 boon: 4 a _ It was the decision of the question on the matter earlier, he were suffering. All those who executor of an estate or property demestic servant to the office cf Giving new vitality it fortifies you _m
o consider it with | suc! inistry of Pood. said that the Government was came into contact with him would belonging to a member of his own the American Consul and she was aguinet eam ‘kt eethaselian ‘dak 8

urgengy, especially as so little in- As far as lateness was con- ains ealise ho has died, and ex- treated very courteously. If there
forma’ had been given in the cerned, he was informed that commpeioal, 38 -* 4 ae, 3 how such the cause of cuits’ consulat ‘officers or con- was any rude behaviour on the
Tiouse in the introduction of the arrangements, ces, wages, Oe oar ches 00 Ns the ques- he nee ee ET icin sular employee of a state from part of the employees it is his
Bill. It was certainly a matter allocations and things of that sort tion. The second reading WaS with Jamai in bering serving on juries. opinion that this behaviour should
in-which the House should have had taken place at the asking of then passed. how Sir Stafford J i Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that be brought to the attention of the
had more than five or 10 minutes the price for the caming crop. If Mr. Adams said that they had jn 1938 and hel oe pe Bae tke members will remember that some empl fers. He hoped that Mr. )
they had had or in the introdyc- they did not get those arrange- promised the electorate not to in- People’ 7 b omas fe ne time ago a bill on similar lines Talma would see .to it that the UKE
tion they should have been given Mehts made before that date, he crease the cost of living and here aver Gace” the ‘een oy came before the House. A little instances of ‘eles 3 he commpielngs oT
a mass of information which wa: said, it meant that they would was an opportunity to keep that +04 party, he has been helpful to doubt arose and the bill was not be brought immediately to the |

remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine
is especially valuable

es after illness.
Ton

p
ex a
arte Toes

AS



not given at all. o evens the whole thing out promise The obvious way h it and. indir to the demo- passed. It was referred to Wash- nee ¢ vw ee: ee. 2

One would readily conceive, he He Cis ine dateed. ‘with keep the price of sugar down Wa cratic progress the West In- i#gton. hy ste t form, mented Mr. Talma on drawing to oi
said that something should be done yne'‘Hon Senior Member for St. }rurting the labourer who is look- “les,” he said. re eet nt carries all that is the attention of the House the m
to maintain the price of sugar a! philip that there were other ne tothe Labour Welfare Fund , “Every one of us in the far~ jececsary, Mr. Adams :aid. discourtesies meted out to per- =

the level in the reach of the methods for if, but th ith hi flung portions of the British Com- co em|

thle Be § ; e lateness help him with his house. They Mr. C. E. Talma (L), said that sons of colour by ployees of

be citizen of the community. of it wipes out the alternatives siniy ee to put an end to monwealth will look back at Sir). ‘agreed in instal sith the the American Consul’s office.
the amount of local sugar con- anq in his opinion, it was not the this cess business on local sugar. Stafford’s career as an inspiration i) “However, so far as em- Mr. E. D, Mottley, (E) after re-











suméd was fixed at 10,000 tons a fault of the Government t promise the - to those of us who feel it our 1 i
‘ y Consular Offices affirming his attitude to the ques-

year, they should be told, fo ions a. oe i going to olbai- duty and in feeling it our duty gloves Re, pe the tion of discriminating, said that we
instance, fe amount of money Cheap Sugar dize the price of every item in find that the cause of ‘colonials Gece of the American Consul, he while he was not attempting ta a
Go ee tt ee’ ey to meas He thought -that yesterday Barbados. He did not ae at avery wage nt a ee > bo felt that it would mean more hard- gay that the or o- by the e
© its presen hat price whisky was sold. They find a champion of outstan ;, not to mention insults, would member for t urch was ue
level. They could al! calculate it Cer oe merely have had a have > y exeinuned to subsidize merit who will aid us in our Te patented on a_ certain @ On Page 7 ap
but not at a moment’s natice and by having ay ne deer the price of the best granulated struggles”. section of the community. oa
not before the Bill would have jy .eq” of the 1947 Bill retatiA sugar. They have promised to Mr. F, C. Goddard, Leader of ‘As far as the American Consul ° an
been passed, and the word “Exported” put in subsidize what the average man the a seconded = Peaid and Vice on wr reg ts . © ore a2
h * has to buy. ing Resolution, .He no one could expec r treat- You pay no mor Saat
General Revenue Sable ihe, ‘cue Mr. W. A. utawtora (C) said ‘hat Co lander of the House ad ment than that at present meted » ah ee
If one had had-time (o consider r, Lewis said that he agreed he woula like to know how 2, Stester pessons knowledge of, out by them. for the : nh onsieo
it, one could have deciaeg Whether that the ple should get sugar that 6 wert repeene to reim- Sir Stafford than he and oi As regards to the employees of TAKE. HOME A BOTTLE TOBAX % 26
alternative proposals eould nov cheaper, but he was Fonderins corte the Labour Welfare Fund spoken. He said that Sir rd the, Consular Office end the test GREATER SSS os
have been better, For instante tf it would have been good for with the money it was deprived was a man of grea “er and ment meted oe re saaneyer’ st
one wondered whether the fund them to say that they could sell of through this source. Laney of Gu. oes. he Wor AS, Se “paid that EXPERIENCE me
Should not be allowed to remain Sugar cheaper and then not get His point always had been that courageous Socialist because ant weinives in America, be J Hd thet , %
and the sugar be subsidized from am increased price from the Min- the Rehabilitation Fund should be Was a man of wealth who when t ee 1 oe f that we
the General Revenue Fund, One istry of Food. reduced and as far as ttt; matter stuck to his views and the cause hands of the employees of tha w

i . ar din a manner
also wondered whether the amount He did not share the view that was concerned, that the Rehabili- of England above ever ything else. office they are treate
which was found necessary to the Ministry of Food should be tation Fund may be reduced to His austerity programme after the which would sneer ben =
subsidize it should not be spread asked every year to give an in- the point at which you could get war which went to build up an He said that * en ee . 1”
over the total sugar production in creased rice. If th asked for all your money for subsidizing economic structure would go down negro. hep “ a - Se
any given year. it. the inistry of Food would sugar without interfering with the in history, he said. American ee eles te as
Another. atternative. to be con- automatically put up the price of Labour Welfare Fund or Price Independent member Mr, V. B. like a pe. Oe ae e see dud fet
sidered wes.the individual funds $0008 they sent to the islands, Stabilization Fund. Vaughan speaking said, for the to speak to the employ





























































: e
i ivi «especially ‘in these days when Mr. Adams said that Govern- small grou which had a tendency the Consul or Vice Consul. . : Ovaltine 2 Hv
oo ene ae oe adeuntabs exports and imports are regu- ment had kept its pledge not to to be at an times together, sai 5, feared that the privilege of : a
of reducing any particular fund , increase the cost of living. Gov- ‘that Sir Stafford was a great 4g immunities to which they a 5 .

}. ay people in England were ernment had discovered ways and example of advanced thinking ld agre uld be abused by zs zd ere. rt =
ane ye e the ie gp ingame looking out for a balance in means not to let the Labour Wel- statesmen of the age and those of < cutee. and he saw no es
can te sugar a presen! trade, hg said, and the moment fare Fund suffer, them who professed to be attach- 770.4 on which further privileges from ov

Tha — the Rehabiti they for an ipergaaed It was tween leaving the ed to doctrines which were then Hei further immunities should be —thet’s one reason why the, od B oh
t was-to say, the Rehabilita- et they (the people in Eng- Labour Welfare Fund alone and predominant in the political life granted to employees. this airline has been any other jeverage ; wo
We nae eee. ae moins a —— up the aie Be letting the puer go oe To the saw P him an example to be fol- ®'Y) 0° 014 that when the average “first choice” of interna- f of
¢ > ® the goods ey are sending question of letting the sugar go lowed. : to that office . S183
continued ‘indefinit on its. down. up they said: “no? ‘Although a man of wealth, he = = eg ed eer oe gn tional travelers for nearly ' ar
Pert pat ay : opel = Oe like Sila ha tid la “We a et = pus tat hed never fols that wont seis disdoyrteous manner by, the em- Screen of a century. < 3 le ‘ ty

e a oe , — we are going to kee e price have priority over © ' ing thi ill he 3 . Joka
the extra’ unt could be used Sur “ee ae oe fone took of sugar at what it fs and even of the state, te that Shey would be roving ae
fe. the puppete. ae Sabilise suger ead he iholigne foo" the Labour Welfare ee heqaipe Coenen more power to the employees % NEW YORK si

rose alternatives, he . th xchequer, he wed ae sir c i e f . 1
gaid, sprang to his mind fnd they did the right thing at_the : tele traatits aa be used, not only earry out hee eee rill cane Non-stop service by the luxurious , early this century, ‘Ovaltine’ was introduced
therefore idered it nd time, He thought that the Gov- | Mr. E, D. Mottley (H), said that 7 of economics Of colour. o 32 ye FE] Presidente” or via San Juan by to serve the cause of good health, it was unig 10

+? ae thi one oe regrel- ernment should have got the he undgrstood it that they werd in the narrow senee the employees to behave worse, popular, money-saving “El Turista.” an nal a , medical bo
table that the question came be- eympathy of the members of the going to subsidize brown sugar. 45 implied by capitalists but eco). said, , original product. It readily won the support of i Se
fore them*at moment's natice and Pouse, It would have been use- Free, were four types of sugar nomically and at the same evr, Adams said that Mr. Talpa men. It was adopted by Hospitals and Nursing Homes. It —
Without more statistical informa- guy if some member had asked a in this country. to make all classes comntortabny. might have done a good to the E u R ° PE rapidly established itself in world-wide popularity. "e
tion, _. question on the matter earlier, It seemed to him that the dark The House stood a stot: Wt. community by saying what he pac ‘Ovaltine’ still maintains its leadership . .. its essential a
Mr. VOB. Vaughan (1) said Mr. R. G. Mai L) asked crystal sugar was not as popular in silence after the Resolution was «1.1 said. He (Mr. Adams) ha Ri service by giant double- differences. Some of the differences concern the ingredients “e
many people of Barbados. were whether the G aa tend- with the people as tne yellow passed WA! ever experienced these difficul- ed “Strato” Clippers*—world’s their selection, their quali rg proportions in
‘© whether e Government intend- e be " Ah n —we —their selection, the: f t
a. ne that oat re made od stabilising the sugar that was crystal. He said that a: pe ase | ties, hat the bill only meant aoe airliners — to gone ro | which they are used. The oo a exes in ‘Ovaltine’ is vr
in the colony by them ani should _ that the standard of liv ha He said that the on njoy stopovers in England, ire- i tamin fs
be cheaper to the consumer. He a ett ay cz. so risen that when they couid seil Canal Will Be that the American Consul would] land. PAA Clippers‘also fly to India ORM, SESS YE ve epntent, ‘20
fet that the people of Barbados should have been given the in their shops five bags of yellow E not have to pay income tax, ete.| and the Orient. Other ‘Ovaltine’ differences are evident in the steps taken ne
should ‘be told the reasons for House. crystal, they would possibly only 4 | ‘As soon as they passed the bill the inthe interests of quality. The famous ‘Ovaltine’ Farms, a2
asking for a higher price. Th> He sald that in the 1914-18 pel Wp 08 Gree bags of ‘Cage Opened Next Month Venezuela eae Seninies, wens Serene Sey ee eres
ouse ould not have met so war, the consumers were getting °Tyst#. oe , Ont ose e ot,
jurriedly and decide on an im- a black kind of sugar from the "The faet that they are subsi- AMSTERDAM The new Am- . es | Be:
wrtant -roaiter Hke that. shopkeepers and some of the dizing the dark crystal is nov ¢terdam-Rhine Canal, which will Erezemt oe, te all = cities | > eens ete ccatending month “Oval tine’ is the regular
h » .earrying out, in his opinion, the | See SALDET: | oe ae y fem promoting im
The people felt, perhaps rightly rrerchants supplying the ar ying , P : shorten by 50% the time required } and vigour—for helping to ensure natural, resto sleep. ~
so, that they should get their sug r were on the Control Board. He promise they made to the public. jo, sailing from Amsterdam to | | r ri ty y sont 3 ots
cheaper, Sugar’ was one of ihe felt that an explanation was ne- He agreed with them with not the Rhine, reducing it to 20) * | Remember — ‘Ovaltine’ provides the highest possible LD
principal foods of the island and essary when it wag (that that subsidising the granulated sugar jours, will be officially opened « * quality at the lowest possible p
getting.sugar more cheaply would class of sugar should be sold to which was only used in few |) 91’May next. At the same time | You can now “fly PAA” almost any- Sold ts aipitgha tae by oll Chemiete ood Stones.
mean.saving money in the people's the public. homes, The dark crystal was the huge lock at Tiel, the larg- where —in fact, to 83 countries P.¢.208
pockets, ~ Mr. F. L, Walcott said that Much used in clubs and hotels for 4.) inland navigation lock in the | and colonies on six continents,
some members said that the Gov- sweetening coffee but the man in \oq, with a lock chamber of | ‘
He ‘aid that the Government ernment was railroading the the street, whom they are sup- 1181 feet long will be opened by | or reservations, see your 5 :
doula fo into all the avenues to bill, It was not matter of rail- Posed 'o 6 helping, used the yel- Queen Juliana, Zipper Travel Agent or WANDER Brand Malt & Cod Liver Oil

out if cheap sugar could be roading it. e price of sugar crystal. i great im- } This product of the ‘Ovaltine’ Research Laboratories has been
suld in the isiand. would have been increased tor 4, ; a oe i bra Amster- a recogntaed by doctors as fulfilling the very highest standards. te ;

. Je at the consumin blie had not e said that they would not be Por ant. “Ge hee

Mr. J. A, Haynes (E) said that k Pp ot the ; but also for other Dutch allie PS 7 . ‘ ;
he realised that it was a very the Government a a means Keeping their promise if they oh ell as in a wider sense a Te ee eee’ (nitive Mae fetoer hice cilities nad
urgent matter for Jderatiny, of stopping it. As it had come at left out the biggest seller — this towns, as Ww a its wi ow TExXPERIENcED = adults thoroughly enjoy. ——
t he did not think he H that time they had to choose ‘t island’s yellow sugar — sugar for the Nefheslands 4.5 : SS AT
But he no that the Hon. cod 't Which is being used by the gen- hinterland in Western , . |
Junior Member for St. Peter, who 28 an interim measure in order 1 publi > 79 |
introduaed the Bill ve them: to.fix the price of sugar. eral public. And who was the abel $l. NW AMERICAN |
enough @etails, ‘That Hon, Mem- _,{'¢,t0d Dak he wap scoueed of React Fie contended that merely fully wf what he hed said thet a Hons Aw
, : : ., not giving enou ‘ormati yp aee ully at he i |
ee had em in a very brief 44, Satie, ous Saat fe te to subsidize dark crystal, they four times more yellow.sugar is one - ANS |
monaer..the objects and reasons plain that 10,000 tons of sugar were not keeping that pledge. sold than dark crystal. He said Da Costa & Co., Lid. |
of the bil. He (Mr, Haynes) was Wore consumed locally: and thé He said that if they w to that the rich people are begin- a Bese Great = bitdeaieon | ‘
hoping that that member would price would be raised by 13 get figures from the Sugar Pro- ning to realise that there is more © Phone 2122 (After business hours 2303)
ove cues ee ee aes be- Gents. That meant that they ot Pg egg ete wow would value in wg Oy crystal oe nO ze De LIMA Sth #56. PAA; INE
fore matter is put before the ou’ a e sest_ seller tl ark erystal plays
Council, » : youd ps Ad nae eae 2186.0m" was the yellow sugar. “e the Tinleahe’ post than'on other t pe ;
They did net expect to be treat- have done was to allow the price majority of this sugar is being of sugar. He warned again that & CO., LED.
ed like children, Perhaps the of sugar to go up. But they in- od on majority of the peo- the standard of living is rising
soe uece for a oes tended to stabilise the brown ore fee # poo. Hi yao why not and people are using the yellow 20 BROAD STREET
ad_discuss e matter hi in i i : _— q ‘
circles, he said, but -they on the-cents owe tat eight "He asked them, to think eare- e Bill was then passed. ;
; om

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} THE PLEASURES OF CYCLING ON



Pate Giciee UO ee ma ane. THE STRUGGLE FOR EUROPE: Chester Wilmot

BERNARD SPILSBURY—His Life & Cases

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= fhe ‘hu 2S'titon Vinge dellnte,
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Getting Nights rane outer Frere | A selected list from a new coasignment of books just received:—-

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passages, don't rely on ordinary *
tines, Fight such Poisons and troubles













with the doctor's preserip' Cystex. LORD RANDOLPH CHURCHILL by Winston Churchill
Cy eet ete entire ni threw Roura, ) SIR PATRICK HASTINGS—Cases in Court
roasts merenedeastings |W SNORE: Someret Maugham
che : F CORE: merset ugham
Ne ae eanee the Gust: THE NEW MOON: Taffrail
ee brotects CHILDREN OF KAYWANA: Mittelholzer
Fer Kidney Bhogmetlon, Bipseer You, THE TROUBLE AT NUMBER S : Gerald Bullett
bist MARTIN MERRIEDEW: Mary en
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slain use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP
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PRAYER & HYMN BOOKS (small size) @ $1.08 now received ¢} so fresh and energetic after you've 3
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| TUBES or JARS Telephone: 4427 FOR PERSONAL FRESHN ESS ALWAYS ?





X-LBT 668-1) 10.55




_ observance of fair conditions of

“m3
at

‘g matter rested for four years.
1949 an International Labour Con- 600!










=



On the last occasion the ques-
on for the second reading was

13—1 division, the Hon. R. Chal-
‘ote against it.












f the Honourable Mr. Gale, which
‘seconded, so that information

arks in the speech in which I
ved the second reading of this
In 1945 the late Colonel
liver, Stanley, who was Secretary
State for the Colonies in the

aretaker Government, stated in
a Circular despatch that he had
bad under consideration, in con-




=



Development and

_ Welfare Act, 1940, the need for

It will be remembered in this

_ tached to the receipt of assistance
' under the Colonial Development

and Welfare Act of 1940 was the

labour in the execution of works

_ paid for from Colonial Develop-

ment and Welfare funds. The
Secretary of State went on to say
that, after consultation with the
Colonial Labour Advisory Com#
mittee, Model Rules for the guid-
ance of Colonial Governments in
connection with governmental and
public contracts had been framed
and, I quote, “these model rules
appear to me to be reasonable and
will, I trust, be of use to Colonial
Governments in the observance of
the requirements of the Colonial
Development and Welfare Act.”

Four Years Rest
The Model Rules were accepted

: in principle by the Executive Com-

mittee of that time and a circular

" was sent to the Heads of Govern-
» ment Departments for observance.

There, as I said previously the
In

vention was passed, which His
Majesty’s Government ratified,
concerning labour clauses in pub-
lic contracts and the Secretary of

State sent a circular despatch ask-

ing to what extent the model rules
of 1945 were being observed, and
added that, I quote, “I regard it as
most desirable that a fair wages
clause should be included in Gov-
ernment contracts generally.”

The Labour Commissioner re-
ported that provision on the lines
of the model ruies was not being
embodied in Government contracts
as a matter of course.

He accordingly recommended

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

2 THE Legislative Council passed yesterday without
. amendment, a Bill to carry out the Convention relating to
Labour Clauses in Public Contracts.

This Bill was last discussed by the Council on Febru-
‘ary 5 and was postponed on motion of Hon. V. C. ra
seconded by the Hon. the Colonial Secretary after the Hon.

the expense of his workers, in view
of the competition involved, or,

member, I am sure, will gainsay
that Government ought to be a

ment bodies with equal force.

_ Second; the difficulty of keep-
ing bodks and accounts is thought
to have been greatly exaggerated.
As the Acting Labour Commis-
sioner has pointed out, all em-
ployers of labour are required
under the. Workmen’s Compensa-
tion Act, Holidays with Pay Act
and Protection of Wages Act to
keep certain records. Under Sec-
tion 7 of the Holidays with Pay
Act an employer, which includes
a contractor, has to keep records
of the remuneration and period
of employment of all his em-
ployees. The records which
would have to be kept under this

anly too willing to advise any
contractor as to the manner in
which the records should be kept.
or will not be complicated, and
if there is no change from one
week to another in the rates of
wages or hours of work, a simple
Statement such as “Same as for
previous week” would suffice.



The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-
tary tabled a Message informing
the Council of His Excellency the
Governor's assent to certain Acts
in the name and on behalf of Her
Majesty the Queen

The Hon’‘ble the Colonial Secre-
tary laid the following Documents:

itement

Molice during the quarters ended
30th September, 1951, and 3ist
December, 1951.

The Civil Establishment (General)

West Indies for the year 1951
of the Committee ap-
pointed to examine the establish-

to supplement the Estimates 1952—
53, Part 1—Current, as shown in
Supplementary Estimate 1952—53,
No, 1, which form the Schedule to
the Resolution.

Resolution to p'ace the sum of
$7,177 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee *
to Supplement the mates,
1952—-53, Part 1l—Capital, as shown
in the Supplementary Estimate,

» No. 2, which forms the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to approve of the
compulsory acquisition by the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
of a parcel of land estimated to
contain 65,901 sq. ft. but since
found by actual*surve, to contain
72,550 sq. ft., situate to the South
ot Westbury Road in Westbury
Road in the parish of St. Michael
for the purpose of enlarging the
playing field and otherwise for the

Governor-in-Executive Commitjee
of an area of land estimated to
contain two roods 30% perches but
by actual survey since found to
contain 19,010 square feet situate in
the parish of St. Philip for the
purpose of constructing a road
Jeading from Foul Bay Beach to

BARBADOS

COUNCIL PASS LABOUR C



carry out the Convention re ¢
to Labour Causes in

Contracts
The Council adjourned

to-day at 1.15 p.m

HOUSE

When the House met yerterday,

“ag
-
Puxsic

until

lishment of administrative,

pro-
fessional and technical

officers,
Post Office advances for ay

Excellency the Governor to the
Honourable the House of Assem-
biy informing the Honourable

levies on sugar sold for consump-
tion in this island

The House passed a Reso!ution
to approve the rates of remunera-
tion paid to the Chairman and
members of the Public Commis-
sion, and a Resolution reiating to
the appointment of the BPlerical
Staff to the Commission

‘The House also passed a Resolut-
tion for $3,400 to provide for the
preparation of 29 acres of land at

awell Plantation and to grant
foans to tenants of the Plantation,

A Bill to amend the Diplomatic
Privileges Act, 197 was passed

The House passed a Bill to con-
fer upon the consular officers of
foreign States with which consular
conventions are concluded by mer
Majesty certain powers relating to
the administration of the estates
and properties of deceased per
sons to restrict the powers of mem-

Merchant Shipping Act, 1698 to
confer immunities and privileges
en consular officers and employees
of such foreign States and for pur-
Poses connected with the matters
aforesaid.

The House adjourned until next
Tuesday at 3 p.m



Hon, J. Mahon said that he was

Third, there is no reason at all the person who had started off
why small men should be driven criticism on the Bill on the last

out of business or that costs
should go up, provided that fair
Wages are in fact being paid al-
ready.
be no repercussion if they are not,
then the object of the Legislation

occasion, but he wanted to tell
honourable members that he had
completely changed his views and

If they are, there should he saw no reason to object to the

Bill that day.
He did not think it would cause

will be abundantly justified. The any great hardship to the small

Central Government and
Government bodies,

Local mason or carpenter who had con-
which ought tracted work, He had been made to

always to be jealous of their ynderstand that once a contractor

reputation as model em
have a
this matter of fair wages.
_Fourth, the Labour

staff will be able to cope quite
easily with the extra work, which,
after all. is not very considerable.
You,-Sir, I believe, keep a little
kK in which you jot down the
occasions on which, on the intro-
duction of some new measure, a
Head of Department says that he
does not require extra staff, with

: ployers, proved himself to be a contractor
clear duty to perform in within the clauses of the Rill, he

would not have every time he ap-

plied for a contract to go to the
Labour Commissioner.

He would
be given an annual certificate. It

was only when he proved that he
had not paid his workers a fair

wage or provided for them with
the necessary conditions of work
that he would be written off. :

Hon. G. D. L, Pile said that it

the object of challenging him at 4Pppeared to him that they were

a later date if at a later date he

should have the temerity to for- Which

giving the Labour Commissioner—
could easily mean some

ward a request for extra staff on clerk in his department the power

that account.

I warned the Act- to put a contractor on the black

ing Labour Commissioner about list after his first mistake and

this possible “ambush”,
repeated that he would not re-

quire extra staff. By the same Central Government contract.

but he condemn him for life to being un-

able to get a local Government =
e

token he answered the fifth criti- did not think that was right.

cism that the legislation will be
honoured in the breach and con-
siders that that will not be so.

The Hon. Colonial Secretary said

he was no expert on labour mat-

*‘Negro Race”’
Badly Treated

@ From Page 6 ,
not true, ne would say that it
was not true to say that “every
man who goes down to the Ameri-
can Consul’s Office was treated like
a pig.” He said he had gone to
that office on several occasions,
and he had never been discrim-
inated against.

Following several , jinterpo-
lations by various members in ex-
planation of what they might or
might not have said, His Honour
Speaker reminded Hon’ble mem-
bers that the Bill dealt with Dip-
lomatic Consular relationship,
and counselled hon’ble members
that it did not reflect well on the
House for members to speak as
they did. His Honour said he had
given too much latitude and
urged members to stick to the
Bill.

The Bill was then dealt with
in Committee stage, and Mr.
Adams took the opportunity to
explain that the Bill did not deal
with diplomatic privileges as some
members seemed to think, and
added that the “hot air” was due
to the fact that hon’ble members
did not read tthe Bill,

It was passed through all its
sections in Committee without

ADVOCATE



LAUSES BILL

Repair of Boats

@ Continued from Page 1.
It was necessary to’ build sheds
to house the tools and to have them
laid down as well as to have the

Mr. Mahon and Hon. sates paid over to the Aceountant Mr. Adams laid the follow .ng:— necessary electric current and If those facilities were provided,
it ho on. Mr. Challenor had strongly criticised General by the Commissioner of | Report of | the | Cc mmitice wiring. An additional wire shed they might be able to employ |

was also erected to offer protection
to the workmen from sun or rain.

y- were concerned, he understood |

put. This was done yesterday having got the contratt, to kee (Amendment) No. 3 Order, 1952. ment of Money Orders to 2th The Work F st cee saanatienhaat |
nd decided in the affirmative by a too much for himself and pass on Report of the Comptroller tor February, 1952. In order that the work should that they were being constructed
too little to his employ No Development and Welfare in the Message No. 11/1952 from His proceed as quickly as possible, out of a composition made of scrap

mahogany and white cedar trees
had been cut from the wood at

When consideration of the Bill model employer and ensure the ment of administrative, pro- House of certain Acts. which Summervale, St, Philip and trans- carefully and see whether that was |
= fessional and technical officers, have been assented to in the 7 “ : e Ss 0! iti
resumed yesterday, the Hon. observance of a minimum stand- The Council concurred in: name and on behalf pf Her pwrted to the Reef. At the Reef, bog can oorane ie pea le Sef
he Colonial Secretary said: ard of working conditions in work Reslution to place the sum of Majesty the Queen the wood was cut into reasonable 4) .,°° s yal.
Further consideration of this done for the public. The same $41,460 at the disposal of fhe @ House passed a Bill to Sizes to work through machines that when the boats were hauled |
‘ill-was. postponed on the motion argument applies to local govern- Governor-in-Executive Committee amend. the law in respect of ‘ & ac oss up on the beaches or the reef, the |

This felling of trees and slabbing
of wood continued until the end of
January.

In early February, the actual
boat work started at the Reef and
some 28 sets of timber frames had
been cut, levelled and made ready
for assembly. The first six kee's
which had been ordered from
British Guiana since December
10,2951 arrived on March 27, 1952.
Within two days two keels had
been shaped and laid so that con-
struction work was started on the
first two boats,

Up to the moment, some six
keels had been laid and work was
proceeding on these boats, but due

Government of British Honduras
since early February, there had
been a slowdown of the programme
to some extent. The lumber from
British Honduras should arrive in
early May.

The Fisheries Officer concluded
his report by saying it was safe
to say that good progress had
been made and if all the material
now outstanding should arrive be-
fore the end of May, it was sure
that all of the boats would be
ready before the beginning of the
next fishing season.

He added that it was to be hard-
ly pessible for any organisation to
have rebuilt those boats within
less time, bearing in mind the ab-
solute shortage of material which
existed in the island at the time of
the disaster.

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-
tary then moved that the Resolu-
tion be concurred in.

Hon'ble G, D. L. Pile enquired
about the replanting of trees
which had been cut. down. He
asked if anything had been done or
was going to be done about the
matter.

Hon'ble Mr. J. Mahon said
that Government was to be highly
commended for the action in
which they had taken in rebuild-
ing the boats,

He thought there was an ‘abso-
lute necessity for providing cold
storage facilities. There was no
point improving the fishing indus-
try and then when there were in-
creased catches of fish, there was
no way to preserve them,

He suggested that the money



which was spent on subsidisation |
pf salt fish and salt pork could be |
used towards providing these cold |
storage facilities.

more men in the fishing industry.
As far as the keels for the boats |

iron and concrete. He hoped that

the Government would watch}

concrete might be broken. He also
understood when the concrete and
scrap iron were mixed and iron
began to rust, it lead to easier
cracking of the concrete.

He warned that the Government
should not make the same mistake
ns in the case of the Investigator
and after spending a large amount
of money, had to spend another
large sum to correct the first mis-
take,

The Hon'ble Colonial Secretary
said that with regard to the point
made by Hon'ble Mr. Pile relative
«0 the replanting of trees, until
he had received the report of the
Fisheries Officer, he did not know



i : use of the Westbury School. bers of the police force and other . aiteieliedl aka ve that trees had been cut down. He
' a fair wages clause for inclusion Bill would be similar .and the Resolution to approve of the persons to enter the cpnsular to the shortage of certain: hard- would, however, make investiga-
' &n contracts Labour Department would be compulsory acquisition by the offices of such States; to amend the wood which was promised by the

tions on the matter.

With regard to the points raised
by the Hon’ble Mr. Mahon, ne}
agreed that the question of the
keels should be looked into. He
himself knew very little of fishing
boats and had to leave the work
to be carried out by the Fisheries
Advisory Committee and the Fish-
eries Officer.

He said that he did not want
the same thing to happen in that
case as happened in the case of the
Investigator. He would see that
the peint was taken up.

With regard to the cold storage
plant, that had been under con-
sideration for some time and he
hoped that provision for such a
plant would be possible in the not
} too distant future.

With regard to the question of
Subsidisation, he thought he was
right in saying that subsidisation
of salt fish had ceased with this
year’s Estimates although there
was still subsidisation of salt pork.
The resolution was then concurred
in.



He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

PAGE SEVEN











For leather i
of every colour—

* is incline It cleans, preserves—and how it

Colonial Secretary a The Pe * lat Yesterday V polishes! Ask your retailer for Pfopert’s.

, i gisiature ote $A] 460 For Nothing else is quite the same. Watch

Answers Criticisms COUNCIL Se gts cent sah ge om . eee ee
2 oe Lampintive Sounat me ey passed a Bill to

r

It’s easy to keep surfaces clean and shining — just give
them a quick rub over with a little Vim on a damp cloth every
day. Vim is so smooth —it won’t scratch — leaves ail
surfaces polished and bright. Use Vim for a/l your cleaning—..
it’s so quick and easy to use, -

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily




further debate, and given its Third
reading and passed.

2

—

that a fresh circular should be
sent to Government Departments
to the effect that the model rules
should, in future, be acted upon
and that legislation should be pre-
pared to give effect to the Inter-
national Labour Convention. The

ters, but after consultation with
the Labour Commissioner and

No wonder this man dreaded
going to work, for rheumatic
pains in his arms made it torture
to use them, Yet to-day he feels
fitter than ever and work is a
pleasure, as he tells in his letter 1

“IT had been suffering from

Finally, Sir, in reply to the
questions as to what harm has
been done because of the lack of
legislation so far and as to the
benefits to be conferred by it, I
would merely repeat that the
Government circular of 1950 had






a -
i 6
there ~ Vas Y
was no need for the Bill because n .
fair wages were being paid, he had Proved Medications

reached the conclusion perhaps

Land Distribution



Short Burners








, work, the was still of the opinion
as under the Colonial Development that while the Bill would not im- APRIL 22, 1952 * * x *
) St"which this Island has derived Pose hardship on the big contrac- 1 i
Se no eitinl atvenianen, te ensure {m it wees ae Ph cay Se tif 15 4/10% Cheques on’ Bankers 73 $/107% DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts.

that fair wages are paid to work- contractors who carried out minor .......|) Sight Drafts 73 2/10 %
ers employed by contractors. It is work for paroghial bodies like the 75 3/10% Cable fare} Y. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts. -
not unknown for a contractor tobe repair of churches and other 7 8/10% Currency 73 Sab
tempted to submit a low tender at parochial buildings. sour’ cys om 0% /19%

Secretary of State was informed
that the Convention could be ap-
plied to Barbados.
The Points
The main points of criticism

to be issued because the pro- that fair wages were in many cases,
visions of the previous one of Not being paid, If a contractor was
1945 were not being observed in not paying fair wages, he deserved

practice, and that the benefit to
be gained from the Bill will be

to be put on the black list.

At Seawell

A RESOLUTION which allows
the distribution of 29 acres of land
at Seawell in four-acre units was









rheumatism very badly and had
such pains in my arms I scarcely
knew how to use them, Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I





2 Burner: Model @ $66.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also
WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS

: found relief. So, of course, I have
when this Bill was under consid~- ; ; As regards the point about yesterday passed by the House of : : uN.
that f wages w be ed : j â„¢ kept on with it, am now thor- With Double Drainboard @ $65.64
eration before in this Honourable $y, SaCEaNan aeolowed on publie putting too much power in the Assembly. . The Resolution is for Feel the difference! Hero’s a oughly better and have never felt

Council were as follows: —
(1) What was the reason for the
Bill?

(2) The requirements of the
Bill, when applied to con-
tracts awarded by local
Government bodies, would
cause great hardship since
these contractors were for
the most part small “bosses”
who do not have the facili-
ties to keep the books and
accounts which would be
required under clause 5 of
the Schedule.

Small men would tend to
be driven out of business or
costs would go up by reason
of their having to employ
someone to keep their books.
The Bill would add to the
tangle of red tape, add con-
siderably to the,duties of
the Labour Commissioner,
who would probably ask for
extra staff, and confer no
benefits on the community.
(5) The Bill would be honour-

ed in the breach.

Let me touch on each of these
points in turn. First, the reason
or object of the Bill. This briefly,
Sir, is apart from our obligations

~

(3

(4)

OO eeet
ur AA

contracts and that, Sir, is a bene-
fit worth having.

hands of the Labour Commissioner,
it should be remembered that the

I hope that, in the light of my Labour Commissioner was a re~

explanation, Honourable

Mem. sponsible officer of the Government

bers will agree that there is a and there was no reason to expect
case for the Bill and that it is that he would on some occasions

not nearly so sinister as they first
imagined. I now ask that the
second reading of the Bill, which
a already been seconded, pro-
ceed,

abuse his powers to the detriment
of a contractor.

.
Hon. C. Wylie explained that
with reference to the remarks

made by Hon, Mr. Pile, there was
Hon. R. Challenor said he had nothing in the Bill or the Schedule

criticised the Bill on the last oc-
casion and had not changed his

which told any Government body
which contractor they must em-

view that it was totally unnecess- ploy. There was no law in this
ary and would only necessitate the country which said that a Govern-

use of a lot of paraphernalia.
would put a hardship on
small contractor who did not have
the facilities for keeping books.

While it might be good legisla-
tion for some other countries, he
did not think it applied to Barba-
dos at all.

Hon, V. C. Gale said he had dis-

agreed with the Bill on the last ‘eading was then put and carried

occasion and although he agreed
that the Government should set
an example in paying fair wages
and providing good conditions of

A

It ment body must employ people on
the a list

supplied by the Labour
Officer or any one else.

Hon. Mr. Pile said that after
hearing what the Hon, Mr. Wylie
had said he would withdraw his
objection to the Bill.

The question for the second

on a 13~—1 division.



RATES OF EXCHANGE



“The Longest Wearing Tyre Ever Built”

Firestone

$3,400, of which $1,400 will be for
the preparation of the land and
the remainder to provide loans to
the tenants,

This Resolution was defeated
during the last Session of the
House when some members sug-
gested that it would be better to

allow perhaps 29 people to awn,

the lend, than four. The Govern-
ment came back to-day and again
informed the House that it was
the advice of experts that the
four acre lot system would be
more economical,

POCKET CARTOON






lozenge thot’s really medicated
+++ with six special ingredients
to relieve throat irritations and
stop coughs faster.















By OSBERT LANCASTER






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Office :
Merchandise :

4326
4528

SOSOS

>

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BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS. FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road.
St. Michael

| (FOBBO909S0696999 5696960000590 00K. 50095069900,

so fit for years. I used to feel
miserable and sluggish, but now
it is a pleasure to work ins
ofa dread.’’—S.B,

The pains and stiffness of
rheumatism are usually caused
by deposits of excess uric acid in
the muscles and joints, Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels.
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
ere’ restored

If you are troubled with rheu-
matism, give Kruschen a trial
yourself. You can get it from
all Chemists and Storea,



Workshop : 4546 ,
” 4650 y

HY)

a

complete with waste and overflow
T. HERBERT, Ltd.
10 & 11 Roebuck Street

Established Incorporated

Exclusive Shopping Centre

ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery.
CARIB SHOP: Carved Mahogany, Native
Barbadian Wares, Indian Bags and Belts.

GREYSTONE GALLERIES: Completely
new Technique, designs and Finishes in
Barbados Pottery.

STANSFELD SCOTT & CO:
and Groceries.

Wines, Spirits
THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked
by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts.

BETTINA LTD: Gowns,
ete,

Lingerie, Gifts,

CLUB POINCIANA:
Guest Rooms.

Bar, Restaurant,

BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hair-
dressing, Beauty treatment.

Balmoral Gap. Hastings.





















PAGE BIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS. |__ "om ext | rvmic sates | Diplomatic Privileges | SHIPPING NOTICES

TELEPHONE 2508 HOUSES REAL ESTATE

Ny . AIRY COT—Brighton, St. Michael, all A t P d °
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| ment at Worthing on the Seaside con-|and Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath. STEAMSHIP CO
| taining Reception, Dining-room an3 One| Toilet and Kitchen, Garage and Ser- The House of Assembly yester- mental representatives alone being .
vant's Room in yard. Standing on Over} qay passed a bill to amend the entitled to such privileges, and











—

















The MV. CARIBBEE will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

Dominica, Antigua, enmeeret.
. Kitts. Sailing




















BRLMAR—On the 22nd April, 1952
Austin Alfred Belmar, His funeral will





AUTOMOTIVE Double Bedroom fitted with Simmons





leave his late residence Winona, Max- ; ———— Beds, Toilet, Bath, Kitehenette and} 47150 «q. ft. of land all closed with . - rE
well, Christ Church at 4.30 pm. to-day| AUSTIN PARTS—One (1) Austin 10|Frigidaire. Dial 8133 23.4.52—2n | barbed wine fence. Cocoanut and Lime |Diplomatic Privileges Act, 1947. (bo) reaualt the —_ Mos BONA, So an Agee
for Christ Church Cemetery. No flowers | Van Body; one (1) Austin Spare Engine] |---| Trees. Inspection daily except Sundays The Secretary of State in calling lege by pro ding tha tw be M.S. 2nd May
by request, and other miscellaneous parts. , Apply: BUNGALOW —Modern furnished j| between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Purther|attention to the recently enacted made under the Act must no’ M.S. HERA, 9th May 1952

oe cla R eae We SO Py: toll 2 J ulae running not water cold Barticulars. Dis) 9049 International Organisations (Im- framed so as not to confer privi-]S.S. COTTICA, 16th May 1952 ae

— | Road 7.4.52— ets ani 8 " 3 :

ws 4.52—t-f-n- | ater, all modern conveniences. Dial 5.4.28. | uinities and Privileges) Act, 1950, leges or immunities greater than d TO U.K. & EUROPE Toe, M.YV. eee. =
i act Cargo ssen

a * , 952.
SUNGALOW A hendsomer newi- {which consolidates the United are required to give effect to any |M-S. | wins NENA ARAMARIBO
built bungalow with all modern co#ve-|Kingdom law contained in the international agreement in that ‘AND

ANNOUNCEMENTS AUTOMOBILE — 1949, Green Morris | 164 20.4.52—3n.

Minor, 24,000 miles in excellent condition St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba.





$1,200.00 © t. Apply Ja BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, Es 5 GUIANA rs only for St. Vincent.
NOTICE TO PARENT: Sones ee =a even pen > a ape ao Bs loge of iand at The Tees, * with a wertes- Diplomatic Privileges certensen) ne ate that those changes may ne in Qnd June 1952. Date. at dates Ye be ne 2
P. ze Ss a » - a ; s. -
HOT LUNCHES at reasonable -prices] BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chassis,| Telephone, Reasonable terms to, suitable fg view over ihe west const. Acts, 1944 to a out from time to time have practical | § TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
— to Pupiis a Harrison College | new . For immediate delivery, Courtesy comme. dy phy: Beachlands, St James of adniinine, "Agee egg iy a this a ea of privi- significance in ~ jitan ae . S 1962.
permission of t! Headmaster), and jarage 4616 20.4.52—6n. ne ; 4. .f.n. a . en e field ~ ifica: non, Ss. 2th 1952.
other “Secondary Schools; at RUS-EN- none ONT cients | 28 OF 4507. 13.46.51. |, (8 oo SP. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.

lege, by providing that any persons territories as well as in the ited
CASVILLE, NAVY GARDENS, Ch. Ch he are representatives, whether Kingdom and this \e



——— % "
. Crumpton Street; (centrally lo- CAR—One Vauxhall 25 h.p. with 5 good FLAT—Weiches, Government Hill side, Agents. b6,.6366 O56 666690090006SS085 P

cated and opposite Harrison .College) |tvres in excellent condition. Dial 4514. [from May 1st. Apply Mrs. ‘Tomer.







CAR—One Woolsey Six-Eighty, mile-

eee att iba iiaiha eet aeaade
PUBLIC NOTICES awe, mt Sa. condition, Apply| FLAT--"Fully furnished small upper

flat In Marine Gardens, Available May

Also Boarding and ing. Furnished 23.4.52.—2n. | Din) 4086 22.4.52—2n | A Well appointed bungalow in first class) of ernments or not, on any lation is intended to bring the leg- iaincsaiatdibeanimy bertiiaae
ane werufnisned rooms for rent. —— $$$ $$ ta ae eee our’ toraliee eee yay pen veranda.) Organ of the organisation or are islation in this Island into line :
pply in Person—Telephone 4324. CAR-—Morr Oxford Perfect condi- FUAT AND HOUSE—Fully furnished, i. ie reoms each wit! | * ‘ eo
een MGA BECCLES. [tions mileage 2.370. Telephone 209 | St. Lawreece on Seg. Available April} wash basins, one having large cedar cup- members of any committee of;with the United Kingdom legisla N LINE
23.4.52.—2n, 23 f 52 ttn. on. Phone 3803. We invite inspection} board as well. Kitchen complete with |the organisation shall _ be} tion.
for next Winter, 29.3.52-—t.f.n, | Duilt in cupboards. Electricity laid on.| included in the scope of the Act Mr. G. H. Adams (L), who
ee _ T

This house is in a cool and quiet]; oved the pass: of the bill, said
rT instead of, as hitherto, govern- |m e passing e
neighbourhood wis garden laid out and that it was one of those bills that



































































































































23.4.52.—3n.| 1:1. Phone Mrs. Gibson, Marine Hotel”, | Servants rooms with lavatory and a large became necessary from time to OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
—— | -— -——___-— 13.4.52—t.f.n, | erage time on Interna 1 t.
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB CAR—198 A.40, 4 new tyres. New| ————«___ It is available for immediate possessior.. NUTICE He said that the main was a
NOTICE TO MI paint job. Recent rebore. Telephone FARAWAY~St. Philip coast, 3 bed- Apply to C. A. Pierce, Phone 4460, ‘ Due
NOTICE is hereby given that in ac- | 9556. 18.4.82—7n. 'rooms. Fully furnished. ™ 18.4 $2-6n |is hereby given that all persons having j little easing up on passports. Vessel From Leaves Barbados
Cordance with Rule 8 the Club will be}. it gupply. Double Car Port, two | —————————_—__-_______.Jany debt or claim upon of affecting the
closed to Members on Saturday, April] MORRIS MINOR—Tourer 8,09) miles|servant rooms. From May Ist. Phone| HOUSE—A brand new Chattel House estate of ARTHUR Lia AREER | a ee a . -London 30th Mar. 22nd April
sath. from 730 to 10.30 p.m.. for}in excellent condition. Mortis Minor : 4476. 30.4 52—4.f.n | 18x9x8 with shedroof 21x7 and kitchen} late of Pine Road, Belleville, in, the 58.58. * yy London 21st April 3rd Ma:
coring Display and Aquatic Events by | saloon 7,000 miles like new. Fort Roya! 9x7 attached, situated at Pine Land, St,| parish of Saint Michael and Island of s/s. “TRADER” $2 y
oa Scouts. . Garage Ltd. Telephone 4504 | FLAT New, very modern, seaside flat,| Michael, and spot can be rented. Best | Barbados. Retired Master Mariner, who ... . - isepew and
y order of the Committee, : 20.4.524n. | completely furnished. Telephone, gas. offer $1,350.00 accepted. For f {died there on the 3ist day of July, 1951, ion 19th April 2nd May
H, P. SPENCER. ——— clectritity. Facing sen. Excellent and | P8rticulars apply next door or Dial "fare hereby required to send S.S. “MERCHANT” Ni and
Secretary. VAUXHALL WYVERN—in_ excellent| safe seabathi Apply to “MARESOL” 19.4.52--4n |! their claims, duly attested, to the iss Ived First 0 2nd M: 17th M:
‘ 22.4.52—8n | condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY | gr LAWRENCE onr, Phone 8406 ~ a2 neh 2 | ungersizved, in care of Means. = 0 a S. and
rn nnn nm 1GARAGE. Dial 16 20.4.52—€n. |" enone ee t.t.n. | LAND—2,000 square feet of land at}¥oud & Boyes oF No, 16 1 ter | Anthea ena nee ike” oles
— ba ‘| Wavell Avenue, Black Rock, beside main | Brigsetows,
———— , ec > wl date we shall ir x in
NOTICE 5 TERACOMBE Maxwells 4 bedrooms, |208d. Por particulars sec “DeAram A: (0t June Je, ater ine ‘saeets of the | your iealth and weaken neart. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
; ; ELECTRICAL furnished with or without linen. Dial {Scot Middle Street, dial 2645. said estate among the parties entitled In 3 minutes ACO— Pre:
ee se na 35.4 52-9? \inefeto, having regard to the debts and) fT ption gh the blood owe. 1 For Closes in Barbados
: : iideininealied aoa — - have jates throug e 1 a c
NOTICE 1s MOREMY WEN tnat mel “nADIOMONUC Poe heal Owner | MAMISTOW, Mukwell Coast; 3 bed- |, 1. Property consisting of two spsied} <0) # only of which we shall not be} ing the attacks. Phe ver firetdaythe §=|S.S. “MULT. .. Liverpool 24th April
Transfer Books ang Register of Members| ,...,.¢ colons Cheap. Phone 8532 rooms ete. Fully furnished ‘including |20use and the lands on which it stands |}ad notice. AUe. ‘it tbuted to any per-] strangling mucus te vi S.S. “SENATOR” London 30th April
of the above-named Company will “be 23.4 52-ren |tefrigerator and telephone. Apply_ to |#24 situated at Rodgers Rd., Govern- = of whees debt or claim we shall not giving free, easy breathing sest- = ae
closed ftom the 24th day of April to the ae 8 , “nlpArcy A, Scott, Middle Street. Dial} ment Hill, St. Michael. Apply K. lave hed notice at the time of such ful sleep. No dopes, no =
7th day of May 1982, beth days inclu- | “REPRIGERATOR—Westinghouse latest | 649. 33,4.53.—2n, | Sandiford, Spry St. Dial 2974. distribution. lode MENDACO tablete at meals and For further Information apply ¢o - . .
sive. v. model, With Freeze Chest. Phone 2520 PLAT —with operty at &. Davidis Ch. Ch And all persofhs indebted to the said be entitely free from ma ;
By order of the Board of Directors. 23 4.626 |. MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with | two storied house and land on which] ..iate are requested to settle their Bronchitis In next to no even "
COMN BD. B WILLIAMS, fo a Linen. it stands. Apply: K- Sandiford, “Spry | Sccounts, without delay though vou. may. have, suffered for DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents
‘D4 324 REFRIGERATOR—“Frigidaire” 4% cu. For 2u particulars. to Alma . oleh ae Dated the 2ist day of April, 1952. years. MENDA! ig so successful
s Mist. in perfect condition, $250.00 Wilkes, ; Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. . Propetty at Junction of St. Mat- that it is guaranteed to give you tree,
Dist. “C” St. Philip 22.4.52—3n 93.2.52—t.f.n, | thias and Dayrells Road, including two LIONEL O'DONALD MARSHALL easy breathing im 24 hours and to :
elas storied house and a separate building OLGA KATHLEEN MARSHALL completely stop your Astin oy oceys 2 °
WASHING MACHINES. Hoover, clec.| NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed.{now being used by the Seventh Days ALFRED DeCOURCY BOYCE. = money vere ese rene pace atio
trical, home washing machines. | Only | rooms. Fully furnished, lighting Plant, Adventists’ as a Church Apply K Qualified Executors, Estate of Bhemist. The qusrantes protects yeu. ,
Iso” The answer to laundry problems.| Watermill supply, Double Garage, three |5®ndiford, Spry St. Dial 2374 ARTHUR LLOYD MARSHALL, ¥
"as Purchase on terms can be ed. | servant rooms. For May and from The three properties are pact of the | deceased.
K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd., Lr, Broad St.| tober ist Phone 4476. ‘EsYate of D. Brathwaite (Dec) 23.4,52.—3n. } 4
w & o Dial 5136. 23.4.52.—3n. 10.4,52-—t .£.n, 20.4.52—2n SOUTHBOUND Sails Bathe Sets Arrives Sells
REG —— Ce eee Montreal Halifax Boston B’ Bdos
OFFICES at 48, Tudor Street, suitable outine undersigned will offer for sale ‘by GOVERNMENT OTIC 6. — Ap Wap. 2
eir ice, . 17, s+ o- oe 4 g
LIVESTOCK for Doctors. Dents, or Hatr ‘peessert. | Bian sires Ariggetown. on ‘Fhuraday CANADIAN CRUISER | sm "s B ths
52 4 52—2n| Ist May 1952, ALL THOSE buildings, ** 12 May at 33 May
GRADE HOLSTEIN COW-—To caive comprising offices and warehouses on the 3 J
1a

Department of Highways & Transport — Vacaney for
- PERSONNEL OFFICER
Applications are invited for the post of Personnel Officer, Depart-
t of Highways and Transport.
menrhe at is vensionable with salary on the scale $1,728 x 72 —
2,160 x 96 — 3.024 x 144 — 3,456 per annum. In addition a non-

Wharf and Prince William Henry Street
and McG: x Street, Bridgetown, stand-
ing on 5,137 square feet of land and now
nw by Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co.,

engin cenmenneeaeniaemeesinans
within a few days. Second lactatipn. 2 .
Dial 2968. Kenneth D. G. Frost, Stan- TRINITY COTTAGE—Fully furnished

more Lodge, Black Rock 22.4.52—4..n

MECHANICAL

three-bedroom house, including tele-
phone, available from May. Phone 2959,
19.4. 8%—4n.

__ |" “VISTA BELLA, Navy Gardens,
MASSEY-HARRIS FARM RQUIPMENT |Drawing, dining, | three with




















‘dos

a Apr.

* nie

o . 1 22 May % May 2 June ‘une

c. GER .. 30 May 2 June = 11 June June

LADY = Se te 9 June June 14 June 2 June June
+» 2% June June - 2 July
os 30 June 3 July — 12

M - - 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 Ji

18 Ju
zs sus
NQRTEBOUND Arrives = Sails Arrives Arrives Arrive:





Further particulars from the under
signed.
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,




Arrives






-Manufe spreaders, Fertilizer, Distribu- | Man 4% cock: nette, Solicitors ‘nsionable cost of living allowance is payable in accordance i 8,
tors, Grass Mowers, Rakes, Side-delivery |Toilet and Bath. Garage, Servants room, gitore. 4) D F : 4 determined on Bdos B'dos Boston 8%. John = Montres!
takes for windrowing eane Trash, Grass |and Laundry room. Phone Mrs. King 20.4.52—10n | approved rates. Point of entry into the scale will be LADY RODNEY uu . 26 Apr. 5 May, ee Fata 10 May



















Loaders, Wheel Strakes for attachment | 3076, 23.4.52.—1n, the basis of experience and qualifications. Contributions at the rate



22 May, - 23 May; 2% May






















to Wheel Tractors to prevent whéel- | * ke AUCTION tf 4% of salary will be required under the Widows and CDN. CRUBER .. 24 May S June 8 June} 2 June

spin, COURTESY GARAGE aia teen. ——————— | Pension Act: 1928. No quarters are provided. Travelling allowance c ee st: seals; Gabel mate

"26. WANTED UNDER THE SILVER = | );yatie on basis of mileage. ; be| LABY wc dune Wdune a7 June — 38 Fung 2 July
PIANO—-One grand piano. Milton. in HAMMER Apprintment will be on probation for two years and will c.

ee ree OEE ewe oa ce Me eek e made subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit ae és 2 Jung 38 June 8 July 3 Jul u July

— 2 oh are ae ave a aun he On Thursday 24th at “Gandhi Villa") ¢.- ernployment in the Public Service. CDN deihe 14 jay 8 Su suly aa Vi al + i an y

eee HELP Brighton, Black Rock: by order of Mr.|°°" ‘Candidates should not be less than thirty-five (35) tm of age | “c nee Oh MM OW ore na

. ani we will se is Furni e # :
— which includes — Morris Suite (Settee| and shovld preferably have had experience in the and 4 July w@July ~~ — 6 Aug) 8 Aug 10 Avg.
MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTANT required to take ful} | and 2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top: a anceeneas aa labour with a knowledge of modern r practice] LADY RODMME .. 7Aug. Aug 19 Aug. — | @ang SA.






Coffee Table; Berbice, Tub and
hols: Chairs; all in Mahogany; Hello-
craft Radiogram, Brass Floor Lamp,
Divan; Carved Teakwood Table; Very
Nice Tapestrys Tea Trolley, Oak Dining

charge; preferably with experience of
a Machine Accounting. Salary subject tc
AQUARIUMAS—All Glass sizes 30x12x ability and qualifications. Applications
12 a 18 *& 10 x 9 imehes. Complete }in_ writing only to C, S. P ER &
with ants and Fish, Archie Clarke, | CO. 10,4.52—4n

Phone 5148 23.4.52—4n
APPLICATIONS are invi' from men
ANTIQUES — ot every description ne

and women ly interested Ani-

Glass, China, old Jewels, fine Silver | mal Welfi ' the pothitrent of
z Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- PART-TIME ‘ARY to the BAR-
7 ; 4 graphs ave. at Correa Antique Shop ooo . ‘andidates Tay ;
heres a iS. | Attaining Rove) Yeehy Cte a ahem, Coreghonse ahd goaeecl of stam nd

. nce control

Pa eve det cineneroacinenglierrmiemncaraen must be capable of organising Appeals dnd
S(SCO ee PS ea GASOLINE RAY POINTING oe Publicity Sear Tne h Dressing Tal combined, Single
urnose ..° }riew 1% hp. line Spray Daf to 1 pit, eaon week day and} Bedstead. with Box Spring, Electhlg
Outfit with guns, 30ft. airhose, Respira- | the salary’ ts 00 per month, Apply | Lamps, Bedside Tables; iron Single
SISSONS BROTHERS | ors. ana strinina toot ook’ fnetuded | In own andwrling i Ars instance xing | Bedstead Mir'd Press and Dressing table

’ uctions. en: Kin; mes $ alt= tab in white,
& COMPANY, LTD.. py. c | nan, Barbados $.P.C.A. C/o Headquarters Burner On stove. Kitchen” Mabie and
Office, Central Police Stn. Bridgetown. | Chairs, Pram: Bicycle,

and principles.

The Personnel Officer will be under the control of oe Ui
of Highways and seers we be reggae Fe les

i to rsonnel includin e mainten:

ogmen. Pigtaxen, Sent Goes, ee tS ta the ee oretiion of rules, regulations, and conditions
Refrigerators, both in aa. ‘ctor of service to employees in the department and the prompt investi-
order; Glass and China, Brass Ware,| gation and settlement of minor complaints. 9699655"
Ted and Dinner Services, Carpets, Ver- Applications supported by testimonials should be submitted on

andah Cualts; Boskinelves) Swim Ber] forms obtained trom the Secretariat to the Colonial Sewer ot

Press, Bureau, and Dressing Table all in| later than the 3rd of May, 1952.
Mahogany: Cream painted Press with






























































ours are from




































“ e

CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

(1) Modern bungalow at Maxwell Coast, Ch. Ch. It con-
sists of spacious verandah, drawing, dining and breakfast
rooms, (6) bedrooms each with built in cupboards and
(3) with tiled baths, garage, and servants’ rooms with
lavatories and baths. It is definitely the most
built house in that district and is ideally suited as a guest

. house.
(2) At Welches, Ch. Ch., below Oistin’s on the sea: one small

ome ut & LOND ON ome King Street, 7 days Aen EU is ‘

Â¥ ~ta.
eee ‘eee a taneed by Tf, sac 7 22.4.52—-2n | other items,
erbel .. Plantations td., Carter GIBSON V-CLASS SPEEDBOAT, built Sale 11.30 o’cl
& Co., Barbados Co-Operative Cotton | and iinported in 1648. Length Ii feat, ae, and TELEPHONE CLERKS. ial gsh Scat Terms CASH,
Factory, N. B. Howell, G. W. Hutchin- | Beam 5 feet 9 inches, Draught 14 t and e s . N.
ton & Co. Lid., T. J, Sealy, Central] Seating capacity six to seven people. GODDARD & SONS, LTD, vy 4.69.--2n BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Foundry Ltd., Watkins & Co. Ltd.,} Steel hull materials ond construction Auctioneers.
end the B'des Hardware Co., Ltd. comply with Lloyd's Board. of Trade



Cannisters and












23.4.52—20



————$— $$
PRODUCTION MANAGER — Reliance
t 17.3.52—Mn,
























requirements. Powered with Ford water- | Shirt Factory. I
a Mmotor—10/32 B.H.P. Speed 10 Kn0th, | stone bungalow with open verandah, drawing and dining
App Reginald French, D, V. Scott &] SUB AGENT WANTED, Resident | }OOG60 599999603985 SSS" f rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, toilet and , servants

Co., Ltd 22.4.52—Tn. | Bridgetown, well connected with com- : ’ 'p jeod to

— = - merce, to sell accredited British goods rooms and garage. Price sell. I
ONIONS—Stock up NOW Every ]on commission, State age, experience (3) Nine acres of good arable land at Enterprise, lh. Ch. )
Housekeeper should buy a 50 tb bag of | references, Post Box 532, ‘Trinidaa Anyone interested can pay part of the pure rice and “COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... ... 2ist May, 1952
4

Onions at 1/- per pound, Guaranteed
to keep ‘for 3-nronths

$2—3n —$—$—— TT
oom The Year Book of the West Indies
and Countries of the Caribbean

MISCELLANEOUS including Bermudas, Bahamas and

‘ the Guianas—latest Edition, With
+

*“DE GRASSE” ... 4th June, 1952... .. 16th June, 1962
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

give a mortgage for the balance on the said

(4) At Enterprise Nr. Govt. Farm, Ch, Ch. (1) two storey
house built of stone, and s' on 2 acres of arable
land. Very good results are acquired from kitchen gar-
den. There is a fan mill which is in good working order:
and the pipes for overhead i ion.

(5) At Barbarees Road next Plaza Theatre, 2 acres of land.
It is near enough to the city to erect a sugar bond or

factory.
D’ARCY A. SCOTT,
Auctioneer, Real Estate Agent & Valuator,
Middle Street. Dial 2645.







23.4. 52——1n





——_

OIL—The world’s finest motor oil
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.
VEEDOL. “Found wherever fine cars
travel”. 17,2,52—t.f.n,














Illustrations, Gavetter and Maps in
colour

Bicycles for Motor attachments.
Extra strong frames with over
size tyres—$65.00 only complete
with Oil Bath, Bell and Pump.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and





SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

*“DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... ist June, 1952... .... 13th June,
*““DE GRASSE” .... 29th June, 1952... .. 9th July, 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton

599999




BUNGALOW~—Modern Storie Bungalow
in good residential district, 3 bedrooms,
servants quarters, all round wail Ho
closure preferred—not een’ £2)
Apply: Advocate, 2.24. 4 52—Gn.














All roads lead to Silver
Sands, Whitsuntide, Monday

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
*“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952... ... 6th May, 1952
:
Bank Holiday, June 2nd x

Caen ne UE e

RECORDS—Clearing our stock of MGM
Records. Ttree for Two Dollars, your
choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD. “GARIE BEER BOTTLES — Did vou BEER BOTTLES — Did you

9.4,62—-t.{.n. now that you could get three cents
or 7
RAIN GAUGE CYLINDERS — Wave [cr 70> two Carib Bodies! Bring SONS
yours handy now the rainy season 18] (Rarbados) Ltd, Victoria Stroet.
approaching Knights Ltd $.4.06—3 22.4.52—an
2 52—3n 7

_——$—$——
by reer Tere act ad FURNISHED hree -
RIDDOBRON INHALANT—For relief of | Pcp amine sone Oe umes” mings
Asthmatic Sufferers $3.00 Wo" a be on the seashore, St. James, Worthings
Ltd wack ie or Maxwell Coast, Telephone Mrs
Subscribe now to the Dally Telegraph Geephert S008. 16.¢.68—4n
England's leading Daily Newspaper now PUMP. eho a
arriving in Barbados by Air only & few }| pam rane UL en eee
days after publication in London. Con-|sujtabie for transferring Rum from
tact; lan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltt. (@asks into smaller containers. A. §

Local Representative, Tel. 3118 BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd, RUM
17.4,52—t.f.n. | DEPT. 20.4.52—3n































Sports of all kinds, Boat
Race open to all boats;
A. B. & C Athletic Races;
Tug-of-War, Greasy Pole,
All-Day Dancing. Hands
Boats, A & B Class, etc., ete.

Further particulars later.
23.4.52.—2n
































GLASS ROSE BOWLS
Come and see our lovely assortment
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts,



———————
We have Jacob's Cream Crackers $1.20
tin; Fancy Sweet Biscuits Js Ib. Phas 42c | §66966690S9SSS90006000%"

NOW IT’S EASY reduced.—KNIGHT'’S LTD 23.4,52.2n SBA VIEW GUEST




















FORESTER'S SCHOLARSHIP FUND








. WATER PIPE_Galva ized water pipes, .
The Money Saving Way Ye"—Ma—I/? Mar", 2° also pipe fittings. HOUSE
Popular Bureaus, Bedsteads, Shee etn. Spee ciagies 4.52—t.f.n
cena; Cradles, Wardiiia Ova ———_+-—_- —_—— ~~ HASTINGS BARBADOS 659960 56556905
Stand: $8.00 up, Co rl
Sprinas eM TABLES for Dining al as eee
{teh a FPaney use. carders ong' +. ath
Waggon. tren trolleys, “Side (OVERNMENT NOTICE quoted on sequest Now is Your Chance to Buy a Ticket for
ards—Kitehen, China and Bed- ‘
Koon Cabinets, anuoes ‘ees hatemene Permenast aoe $1.00
; p — DRAWING ROOM welcome. ‘. :
RNITURE, Rush Furniture for |}| CLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN Dinner and Cocktail and win one of the Valuable Prizes now on display
little and Big—FIANOS, Pram, BRIDGE. parties arranged. in the show window of ‘
ae pone. ae cag panee J. H. BUCKLAND
ice nee 4 MONEY ‘ . . ,
mee sates AL THE CHAMBERLAIN BRIDGE Propeietor.

bpbeeeer will be CLOSED to all traffic from

MONDAY, 28th April to FRIDAY,

L S WILSON 2nd May for the purpose of re-
+ . pairs

BPRY STREET, DIAL 4000 20.4.52,.-—2n.

Messrs. Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

“1, ONE TREADLE SINGER MACHINE
2. ONE BUSH RADIO
» 8 ONE GENTS’ THREE SPEED RALEIGH CYCLE
or
ONE SPORTS MODEL (if won by a lady)
Seyeral Consolation Prizes will also be given















ORIENTAL
PALACE









FOR SALE

10 feet lengths

56

LPO EA PPP ISEPLOLSSSLLSSSLESPOPSE,

4 eae OO 69% “4 COS o re

’ i ent kis neil: Weedle HEADQUARTERS FO IRON CORRUGATED SHEETS in 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 feet
GIRLS FRIENDLY Cooker complete with owed. SOUVENIKS . Drawing takes sini in MAY 30th, 1952 lengths from $3.00 per sheet :
‘ Olly: aid 2860 mouths, FROM INDIA, CHINA & ° \$ ASBESTOS CORRUGATED SHEETS

SOCIETY good. as new, owner left CEYLON Tickets may be obtained from :— SPECIAL SCREWS AND WASHERS, also ASBESTOS





ANNUAL FETE ae it at your Gas Co.

Under the Patronage of Ray Street.
Lady Savage

will be held at
THE HOSTEL, Country Rd.
on SATURDAY, April 26th
Opened
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.

RIDGES now being received

ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES in 3 and 4 Inch ’with the
necessary Bends—Ys, Tees.

GALVANIZE NAILS ool cents per

Ib. 8
PLAIN FLAT GALVA for making Ridge Caps,
Down Pipes, Guttering, etc.
<

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dias 5466

1, Singer Machine Co. 6. Mrs. E. St. C. Sim-

mons, Holetown



We also stock COPPER in 18. 24, 30 and 36 Inch.
GALVANIZE PIPES from %4 Inch to 4 Inch
EXPANDED METAL for Concrete Work, Railings etc.
GALVANIZE STAPLES

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.
Coleridge Street a Dial 4100

SEE US FOR THE FOLLOWING

KEILLERS JAMS:--Black Currant, Raspberry, Strawberry,
, Apricot, Gooseberry, and Damson in 1-1b. tins.
ALL GOLD JAMS:—Apricot, Plum in 2-lb. tins.
HARTLEYS JAMS: —Strawberry, Bramble, and Greenguage in
bottles,
MORTON'S JAMS: Raspberry in bottles.

2. Co-operative Bank,
Marhill Street






7. Mr. G. A, Ramsay,

The Fete will be opened by Jerusalem, St. Peter

Mrs. Peebles.

There will be the follow-
ing - Stalls: Flowers and
Variety, Needlework, Sweets
Household, Books, Cakes

s

. A. E. Taylor's, ‘
Coleridge Street 8. Mr. E. C. Hewtt,
C/o Alleyne, Arthur

& Co.

LLC PELELLES TSEC



4. Mrs. M. Ramadin,







eee MAT-MALADE:--R. F. F, Marmalade, Little Chip Marmalade, c/o Colonnade 3 where
Lucky dips and Pony Rides and farley’s Marmalade ana 7-lb, tins of Jams. Stores, White Park 9. Mr. L. E. Foster, % Qualities are HIGH
20. the, children Also Triopath oy and
y kind permission of Col Lyle’s Golden Syr ac Jolden Syrup. ¢ ‘ 3 i
atichelin, the ‘Pol 1 a | yle’s Golden oe, Se oa. tolden Syrup, and 5. Miss oe Weekes, St. Andrew x 3 Prices are LOW ceitia ;
conducted by Capt. Raison ; Pa Lae: e , Goodland DIAL—FOUR-ONE-DOU A
pl play during the after- {}}|} JOUN bD. TAYLOR & SONS LTD. 3 and Where
. vit SS } 4
f ADMISSION — 6D 14 Roebuck Street ase Dial 4335 g é :| There are NO Parking Problems §
ett |) ¥
FILLE LDL DALLES "$0:0000006000600660500+ 655 06SSSSN 455559595095 SF FO DOS HOO ISS ISOS OOTGGSS , DOOIO $$O5550S00O05S9SSS99SS SSS SOSSST SSS TSSF >















WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 1952



HENRY










—
. NOW LISTEN TO ME.
| Web WANTED YOu TO
| BELIEVE SHE WAS DEAD,












SOME CHILDISH IEA OF
HAVING DISSRACED
| THE BAMILY. .



YOU'RE LUCKY
GOING TO
AN OFFICE Fe

% 1 READ THATA

WIFE WALKS FIVE
MILES A DAY
OOING HER

DOING A WASHING USES SIXTEEN
MORE MUSCLES THAN IT TAKES TO
ORIVE A TRUCK-AN IRONING TAKES AS



BY DAN BARRY

WELL, IT'S ALL OVER NOW,
THANKS TO YOU, KENT! yOu .
COULD HAVE PUT US ALL
TO SLEEP AND SLIPPED
OUT WITH THE ROCKET,
YOURSELF / I...1 DON'T
KNOW HOW TO THANK
you, BiLL!

FOR WHAT FOR
CAUSING THIS
NIGHTMARE — AND
THE LOSS OF ONE
OF YOUR CREWMEN?
YOu CAN'T GO ON TO
JUPITER NOW —
THANKS TO ME!

“WE FOUND YOU DANGLING FROM THE
ROCKET RAMP... A FEW MORE MINUTES,
AND YOv MIGHT HAVE SLIPPED AND

WOUND UP AS BIG MOE DID— ON THE
FLOOR OF THE LAUNCHING CHAMBER!”

En
SV F. ES

4 Sr] Wn
OR

, ANY 1 bt] th
A lee

















BIG MOE WAS AN
Ox! HE STOOD uP

AND TO THINK I RISKED My
NECK TO STOP BIG MOE, WHEN
HE WAS DRUGGED ALL THE WHILE
AND COULDN'T HAVE MADE
HIS ESCAPE GOOD ANYHOW!















P MOST CONFUSING / 2E
AMERICAIN PAYS ME ZE BIG

TIP TO WAIT FOR HIM... THEN
TAKES ANOTHER TRIP, MOST ‘
UNWILLINGLY / 21S CALLS FOR _ >

YOU'VE GOT THE BALL
NOW...BUT I CAN
ALWAYS PRAY FOR

A FUMBLE /

$0! WISELY DONE /
TAKE HEART...SOON
NO OUTCRIES, M’SIEU (T WILL BE ALL
HAZARD / PROLONG YOUR
LIFE ANOTHER HOUR BY
STRICTEST SILENCE /

acs
i
i
ob

iV;



[ooops

Mp FOR GOOONS UST A MINUTE-
Fee "LL GIT ME HAT
AN’ WALK WITH

my YOU-AS I'M DUE
FOR A BAWLIN’



( NOwW-=- YOU'LL

PARDON ME -
I MUST GET
HOME FOR

Â¥
_ ME ,
HAT AND WALK AROUND

THE BLOCK-I AVERAGE ABOUT
TWENTY TIMES A DAY --

MY



ANYTHING NEW) /
ON THE LAMBERT /
STORY, CAPTAIN?

sy

WELL... THINK
I'LL HAVE A
UTTLE TALK
WITH THE HiLL &





PRINTS WERE ON THE GUN
THAT KILLED HER

> [1M GOING HOME. 1 CAME
TO FIND MATERIAL ON

THE PHANTOM NIVTH, FOR

MY BOOK. | FOUND NOTHING
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON |



PAGE NINE

Gland Discover
Restores Yout
in 24 Hours

Sufferers from loss of vigour, nery
Ousness, weak body, impure blood,
failing memory, and who are oid anc
worn-out before their time will be de-
lighted to iearn of a new gland disecy-

y by an American doctor

is new discovery makes it po
sible to quickly and easily reatore \
gour to your glands and body, te build
fich, pure blood, to strengthen your
mind and memory and fee) like a new
man in only 8 days. In fact, this die-
covery wich ls a home med
Pleasant, easy-to-take table
does away with gland operations and
begins to build new vigour and energ:
in 24 hours, yet it is absolutely harm
jess and natural in action.

The success of this amazing dis- ~
covery, called VI-TABS, has been eo |
great that it is now being distributed
by all chemists here under a guaranteo
of complete satisfaction or money
baek. In other words, VI-TABS must
make you feel full of vigour and
energy and from 10 to 20 years young
er, Or you merely return the empty
peters and get your money back

VI-TABS costs little, and the guar-

antee protects
Vi-Tabs ** .

Restores Manhood and Vitality

a a a a ee

















or



MY PAIN

Be kind to your face IS GONE ...

USELEss TO BUY the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn
your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of tissues to
remove it.

Don't scour your delicate skin. There's no need. Pond’s soft
Tissue Hankies are so absorbent that they will quickly soak up the
cream — dust, stale make-up and all. And they never collapse into
soggy little pieces, They're strong as well as soft and alsorbent.

There are so many uses for these Tissues all the time, everywhere,
Used as hankies, they are softer than the finest cambric,
and save you hours of washing and ironing. Destroy
them once you have used them.

Get a packet today, and keep it handy,
You will wonder how you ever managed with-

out Pond’s Tissue Hankies. At all the best
stores.

SOFT * STRONG x ABSORBENT



| SACROOL
$ @TRIUMPHS
| OVER PAIN

BUY A BOTTLE FROM
KNIGHTS DRUG STORE









IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit





———_—=_—==_=

Customers for Monday to Wednesday only









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside.
Speighistown and Swan Street

Usually Now Usually Now
POTATOES — 4 Ibs. ......... 48 36 Bottles MORTONS CURRY ..... ee 48
Tins CLASSIC CLEANSER ..... 24 22 Tins JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS 1.82 1.50
Tins NESCAFE (4-02.) .......... 87 80 Pkgs. HONEY COMB SPONGE 19 16



D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES









The Book of
Claudia

By Rose Franken

Twelve years ago Rose Franken commenced to
write the history of a woman and the portrait of a
marriage. She conceived it as an entity, a sustained
and extended story, to be told with the sophisticated
technique of a single point of view.

These novels, or rather these chapters of one long
novel, have been read and loved across the world, and
are now for the first time, presented, as they were
intended to be presented, as an integrated story in a
single volume. The truly profound can always be
simply stated. The business of life is living, and a fun-
damental part of that process is concerned with a man
and a woman making a home together.

Marriage, in the eyes of Rose Franken, is an art,
and this penetrating study of a woman’s scul in its
search for maturity explores that art. It explores it
with the sharp acid of wit and humour, and a wisdom
which is unabashed by the prevading tenderness and
vivid passion of two people in love.

Only occasionally in the world of letters does
such a book occur; what Mark Twain did for the life
of a boy, what Galsworthy did in the saga of a family,
Rose Franken has done in the story of a marriage.

NOW ON SALE AT

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY







ai OU a a a eR ed al
PAGE TEN

Inter-school Meet

Highlights Holiday

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, April 19.

A feature of Grenada’s Eastertide has been the island’s

“at homing” to Caribbean y«

uth, highlight being the Inter-

Windward Island Schools Tournament which opened at

Queen’s Park on Thursday
ends on April 30



Sports Window

The 1952 Knockout Compe-
tition opens at Kensington
this afternoon with a fixture
between Pickwick-Rovers and
Police. “

Pickwick-Rovers are com-
peting this season in the Sec-
ond Division while Police are
in the Third Division. The
Knockout Competition is an
open one and teams from any
division can enter. It has hap
pened in the past that teams
from the Third Division have
finished among the finalists so
that every Knockout game
provides its own interest and
competition.



Trinidad Beat
Barbados Again

(From Our Own Correspondent?

KINGSTON, April 22.
Trinidad clinched Brandom
Trophy championships leg from
Barbados today as Jim Ho and
Gunn-Munro coming in for Noth-
nagel beat Eric Taylor and Don-
eld Trimmingham 6—3; 6—1,
6—5, The final two singles to be
played tomorrow have no bearing
on the match and Trinidad will go
on to meet Jamaica in the finals.
Although Trinidad gained a two-
match lead on Barbados in the

Brandon Trophy Championships
in Jamaica on Monday, it was
Barbadian Eric Taylor's show

with a pleasing exhibition of stra-
tegie shotmaking tennis in which
he convinced spectators that had
he the opportunity of regular

tourney play he would be near the «

top in British West Indian tennis.
Taylor was beaten by Trinidad’s
Ralph Legall 6—4; 6—3, 0—6;
6—3; but a heavy drizzle at the
end of the third set,enforeed a
lengthy interval which probably
saved Legall from having to go
five sets, for at the end of the third
he was a winded man and had
been actually beaten in the third
at love, The reason for Taylor's
wih was obviously the reaction
after the keen battle of the first
two sets which had been very
tight Legall had had to run a great
deal to counter the rhythmic short-
cross in the service box, deep cross,
to the sideline strategy that Tay
lor adopted. But after a rest o
nearly 45 minutes. Legall returnec
refreshed and soon forced point
ut the net to make Taylor hit too
often and impetuously. Playing

with an athletic meeting and

In addition to the seventy odd
lads arriving last Tuesday morn-
ing by the “Cacique del Caribe”
for the games from Dominica, St.
Lucia and St. Vincent, as many
Windward Island girls have held
a Guide Camp at Quarantine
Station and a large group of Trini-
dad college boys are holidaying
here.

The week opened with the two-
day Easter meeting of the Gren-

ada Turf Club which attracted
fair crowds On both days and,
despite entry of only thirteen
horses, provided’ many keenly

contested events among the six-
teen on the card.

Top riding honours went to
Jockeys Joseph and Levine, both
piloting in five winners but the
former securing five seconds and
two thirds as to his opponent's
four and one respectively, Mr.
c. J. Bertrand headed the train-
ers’ list with nine winners, Mr.
Clarence Renwick taking four and
Mr. Rex Renwick three,

Good Weather

Brilliant weather graced the
meeting and the going was along
a hard and dusty track.

Hundreds of other holiday
makers found other pleasure spots,
particularly the island’s many
beaches, while there was scarcely
a village pasture without its
cricket match.

Only incident, marring the pub-
lic holiday took place in the early,
hours of Wednesday when a
truck returning with a party of
steelbandsmen and others from a
dance capsized on the Beausejour
road, injuring six, of whom one
died some hours later in hospital.
Victim was Kelvin Caesar, a Vin-
centian groom attached to Mr.
Cc, J. Bertrand’s stables,

Inter-Schooi Tournament

With the races ended, interest
is now high in the Inter-Schools
Tournament. The visiting teams
are all ‘housed at the Grenada
Boys, Secondary School hostel
where on Wednesday evening a
cocktail party was held for Old

Boys and prominent citizens to
meet the youngsters and their
masters,

Accompanying the Dominica

team are Mr. Victor Archer, Head-
master, and Mr. A, V. Grell of the
Grammar School and Fr, Albert,
Headmaster of St. Mary’s
Academy,’ the latter institutions
aving two representatives in the
ram of eighteen, The St. Lucians
re under Revd. Bro, Canice.
feadmaster of St. Mary's College,
nd Messrs Haynes and Foster,
\ssistant Masters. Managing the

sparkling shots to the last, Taylor'§Vincentians are Mr. I. F. Gordon

went down 6—3 in the final set. |

Trinidad’s number one Frank-
lyn Gunn Munro had no trouble
beating Barbados’
Denis Worme 6—2, 6—%, 0-—6 and

6—2 because Worme played
awkwardly against the Trinidad
man whose real game of

strength has not yet been tested,

ARTIE'S HEADLINE

“Your American dollars
OK British pounds 1"





St. Lucia Defeat
Grenada, By 59

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 22.
St. Lucia won the second
round in the inter-school cricket
series defeating Grenada by 29
runs. Grenada only added seven
runs to their overnight score of 96
on resumption today replying to
St. Lucia’s first innings of 143
In their second session, St, Lucia
after losing four wickets for 9
runs went on to repeat the first

ind Mr. E. McG. Keane Assist-
ant Masters.
Yesterday the first ericket match

number twolopened between St, Vincent and

Dominica, while on Monday and
Tuesday next Grenada and St,
Vincent meet, with finalists -play-
ing a three-day fixture starting
April 24.

The football series start the fol-
lowing week,

Four new records were set
in Windward Island Schools Tour-
nament athletics last Thursday at
Queen’s Park, three by Grenada
and one Dominica.

New Record

William Gittens of the G.B.S.S,
cleared 5 ft. 11% ins. in the High
Jump to beat the previous mark
by an inch after eliminating his
Dominica rival, S. Robinson, at
5 ft. 9 ins. and then did an -ex-
hibition jump at 6ft, In addition,
he turned in a new time in the
440 yards and was partly respon-
sible for Grenada’s clipping a
minute from the record in the
inter-school Relay.

A Fingal of Dominica in the
Pole Vault bettered his own re-
cord in 1950 by two inches, clear-
ing 10 ft. 5 ins,

Outstanding in the sprints was
Hugh Bain of Presentation Col-
lege, winning the 100 Yards and
220 Yards for Grenada.

A bumper crowd attended the
meeting, among them being His
Honour the Administrator and
Mrs, Macmillan, :

i

neoring with 49. Needing 184 to

win in 95 minutes. Grenada
knocked up 100 in 65 minutes and
totalled 154 at close of play.

Roland Ogilvie and Ronnie Gres-
ham in an undefeated 6th wicket
partnership scored 55 and 45
respectively,

St. Lucia and Dominica play a



BARBADOS





SPORTS QUIZ

The Barbados Advocate will
award a book on sport to the
first person who sends the cor-
rect answers to the following
questions.

CRICKET

1. When British Guiana
won the ,Triangular Inter-
colonial Cricket tournament in
1895 one British Guianese
bowler took the last four
Trinidad wickets in the first
innings for an extremely small
scoge. Who was he, how many
wickets did he take and for
how many runs scored?

FOOTBALL
2. A player throws the bal)
from the touchline to the cross-
bar and it bounces Off the goal-
keeper into the nets. Would
you give a goal?

WATER POLO
3. Who was captain of the
Trinidad “Discovery” Water
Polo team which visited Bar-
bados in 1949, and was this the
first tournament between these
two colonies?

SWIMMING

4. In what part of the
world did the crawl swimming
stroke originate?

TABLE TENNIS

5. What is the first stroke

in a game of Table Tennis?
HORSE RACING

6. Who is responsible for
the weight carried by a horse
in a weight for age event?

NOTE: All entries for
“Sports Quiz” should be ad-
dressed “Sports Quiz”, c/o
Advocate Sports Editor, and
must reach this office m4
noon on Saturday, A 26.
The correct answers and the
name of the winner will be
published in the Sunday Advo-
cate of April 27.

Each entry must be accom-
panied by A COUPON as Set
out below.

SPORTS QUIZ







Your Football
Problems

By O. S. COPPIN

THE Printer’s Devil yesterday
was responsible for the omission
of the answer to Query No. 3.
However it is an ill wind that
blows nobody some good ang I
have discovered that the query
is similar to one which * have in-
cluded.in my Sports Quizz.

That being the case the answer
will have to be withheld until after
the completion and fans can have
a shot at solving it themselves
until after the closing of the Quizz.

Query No. 1. An opposing for-
ward and the goalkeeper coliide
and both fall over the goal-line.
The ball remains in play but the
forward is, prevented from getting
it because the goal-keeper had
locked his legs around the for-
ward’s ankle. What should be done
in this case?

Answer. The referee should
award a penalty kick,

Query No, 2. A_ goalkeeper
takes four steps and is then out-
side his Own goal area. He throws
the ball over an incoming for-
ward’s head intending to catch it,
but the forward charges him
down in a legitimate manner and
then scores. Is this a goal?

Answer No, 2. Yes.

Query No.3. A player is in-
jured and with the referee’s per-
mission he is allowed to go into
the goal. If a penalty is awarded
ean he then exchange with the
real gaolkeeper in order that there
should be a greater chance of
saving the goal?

Answer No. 3. Yes. There

nothing to prevent this.

Query No, 4. Suppose it is a
very wet afternoon and five mem-
bers of say Spartan arrive and six
of Empire arrive at Kensington
for a fixture, The ground is play-
able and they want to play. It is

is

right for the referee to allow them].

‘to play or should he refuse to al-
low them to play?

Answer No. 4. Yes. The ref-
eree must allow them to play, The
Laws of the Game state that not
MORE than eleven players etc.,
ete,

Query No. 5. Sometimes the
crowd in the Public Stand at
Kensington is very unflattering

to linesmen and I know that some
linesmen prefer not to line near
Xhat stand. Suppose at half time
atimid linesman decided that he
would not change over and go by
the Public Stand, can the referee
order him to do so?

Answer No, 3. Yes.

Query No. 6. Suppose both
linesmen waved their flags at the
same time. One linesman told the
referee that he had seen the full-
back handle the ball and the other
linesman told the referee that he
had seen the player push the full-
back, what would you do if you
were referee?

Answer No. 6. I would drop the
ball and continue the game be-
cause I saw neither infringement.

Query No, 7. Can an attacking
player stand inside his opponents
‘oal witen a corner kick is being
aken?

Answer No. 7,

Query No, 8, Can the goalkeep-
er standing outside his own pen-
alty area punch the ball cut with-
out being penalised?

Answer No. 8 Yes, if the ball

Yes,

innings total. Hollis Bristol top- three-day final starting Thursday. is within the penalty area.



(Theil Do fr Every



INTO HIS HEAPMOBIL

I THOUGHT

YOU SAID you
NEEDED GAS
WHY DIDN'T yOu

A VERY
AND

fj €
GHILLABER 1S, OH, SO CAREFUL
| ABOUT WHAT FUEL AND ERL GO
'S_INNARDS *++5



Time



INTAKE

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PARTICULAR

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WAIT TILL

I SEE A SUPER-
FLOOEY STATIONâ„¢

ye ° ay:
| roe, \" :
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CATE, Ine, WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED.

| Bure wen ir COMES
NOW, 1S DEFERENT..w 1” THERE, |

even By Jimmy Hatlo |

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THEM ER
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CON CARNE AN See

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a

Sumnierhayes

Tennis Tourtiey

~
£
bea’

On Saturday two matches’
Men’s Doubles were played. E,
Atkinson and D. A, Wiles
Hon, V. C. Gale and C.. H. Chen*
ery 6—1, 6—3, 4—6, 6—3. t

L. G. Hutchinson and A, D
Hutchinson vs. Col. O, St. A. Duke
and Dr. A. & Cato was unfinished
for the third time. The scores were
in favour of the Hutchinson broth-
ers 4—6, 6—4, 6—3, 4—6, 3—2.

It has been decided to replay
two best of three this afternoon:

On Monday in the Men’s Singles
J. 7 mn Dear beat J. L, Parris
6—3, 6—4.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: Nil.
Total rainfall for month to

date: 1.99 ins.
Highest Temperature: 86.5° F.
‘ est Temperature: 73.0° FP.
Wind Velocity: 11 miles per
hour.
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.973,
(3 p.m.) 29.878.
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.45 a.m.
Sunset: 6.15 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, April 17.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 2.35 a.m., 3.19 p.m.
Low Tide: 9.15 a.m., 9 18 p.m.





WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions......
10 a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil 1.15 p.m.

Meeting of Board of Health. .

2.30 p.m.
Football Kensington
5.00 p.m.

Police Band at Y.M.C.A. Con-

cert... 8.15 p.m.
Westeners vs. Malvern at St.
Leonard's,











$10.77



ADVOCATE



Olympic Hopeful] = Swiss Roll

oe






Sweep

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G., April 21.

Swiss Roll with

drawn Monday “as

meeting closed Saturday:—

Results were as follows:

K Handicap, Seven
Class “F”

Ibs.)

Ibs.)
Time. 1.314.
Directors

Ibs.)

3. Downupsi (Belle 136 Ibs.)
Time 1.15. cord,

. Class
1. Crackerjack
lbs.

“H”

(Patrick

-)
2. Olivia (Beckles 123 Ibs.)
3. Black Beauty (Sunich
Ibs.)
Time: 1.193.
Bourda

THE ONLY woman on the UvS-
Olympic equestrian team, Mar-
jorie Haines, 24, of Gwynned Val-
ley, Pay smiles up at her, mount,
Flying Dutehman, at’ the Sleepy
Hollow Country Club, ‘Scarbor-

New York. The expert
horsewoman will maneuver her
mount in intricate and difficult

Pensive (Sunich 115 Ibs.)
— oe (Beckles
Ss.



Wins D.T.C. |

Mr. G. E. Lam’s chestnut mare}
12 points won
the D.T.C. Shilling Sweep to be
the Easter

Furlongs.
1. Surprise Packet (Gobin 122

2. Sun Watch (Ferreira 122 lbs.)
3, Just-by-Chance (Beckles 122

Handicap, Six Furlongs.
“Class

“Cc” 7
1. Swiss Roll (Aphgn 114 1bs,)
2. Black Shadow (Naidoo 118

Berbice Handicap, Six Furlongs
113

112
Handicap, Seven Furlongs.
Class “E”

116
se Packet (Gobins 126
S.

_ gymnastics without visibly guid- Time: +1.31 1/5.
ing him in,the Olympic competi- Colony Handicap, One Mile.
tion. (Intefnational Exclusive) Class “A-2”
*1..Etoile-de-Fleures (Beckles
119 lbs.)

Plantations Ltd.
Versus Banks

A team picked from the staffs
of Barclay’s Bank, the Canadian
Bank of Commerce and the Royal
Bank of Canada will play a
friendly football game against a

Time: 1.49 2/5.

1. Alarm (Beckles 121)
2. Golden Arrow (Gobin

team‘ from Plantations Ltd., at 5 Time 1.19 1/5.

o'clock this evening on YÂ¥.M.P.c, Stabroek Bamiinge.. One Mile

at ye are as follows:— 1. Swiss Roll (Beckles 125 Ibs )
Banks:— G. Farmer (Capt.)j% 2+ Black Shadow (Gobins 128

Williams, D. Davies, D. Ross, Ibs.)

s.

.<. Davis, B. Armstrong, H. Jones,
T, Davies, C. Evelyn, P. Potter,
M. Weatherhead.

Plantations Ltd.—L. Warren,
A. Evelyn, J. S. Patterson, E. B.
Deane, S. Smith, A. Hazel, A.
Weatherhead, K. L. Jordan, P.
Gooding, D. Allamby, R. Green-
idge (Captain).

3.



Rowe’s XI Defeat
Illustrious By

26 Runs

Dominica Beat
St. Vincent

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, April 19.

Dominica won the cricket first
round of the Schools Tournament
to-day defeating St. Vincent by
four wickets. Resuming this
morning Dominica took the over-
night score of 86 for nine to 107
in reply to the Vincentians’ 83.
Going back to the wicket St. Vin-
cent reached a total of 86 after
losing the first wicket at 43.
Daisley was again star batsman
scoring 43 in this innings before
dismissal . E. Emmanuel for
Dominica took seven St. Vincent
wickets for 25 runs and top scor-
ed with 27 to enable his side’s
needed 65 for victory. Fielding
on both sides was again splendid.



outright victory for Rowe’s XI.

on a good wicket.
scored 114 runs,

respectively.

Bowling for Illustrious,

Tilustrious _ replied with

for 21 respectively.

2. Port Walvis (Naidoo 118 Ibs)
3. Double Link (Sunich 114 Ibs)

Vlissengen Handicap, Six Furlongs
Class “G”

128
lbs). *
3. Sir Lassie (Aphan 112 Ibs.)

Anna Tasman (Aphan 1138
Ibs.)

A one-day cricket match at
‘Brisbane,” Chelston Gap, Cullo-
den Road, yesterday ended in an



A

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“GIMME |
A CARIB”



tween Port and

ae" Ss HERF ARE TRE CLUES:
1. This. Mr. Carib knows the difference be-

stern, but so does anyone.







@'

flow good a detective are you,
Mr. & Mrs. Barbados ? The makers
of Sparkling Carib Beer sponsor
a competition for quick thinking

discover their mysterious Mr, Carib
and challenge him personally with
the word, — “Gimme a Carib, Mr.
Carib.” If you're, the first detective
to be right you've earned yourself
twenty-five dollars, and should you
happen to have a Carib bottle cap
with you at the time your prize
will be one hundred dollars ana
twenty two cents. So watch this
space for clues—-REMEMBER, DO
NOT TELEPHONE Mr. CARIB,
challenge him personally between
thy Yours of 8 a.m, and 8 p.m. And
remember too that any thirst de-
serves a Carib.

—e

Starboard, bow . and

2. You could possibly meet him—though we
doubt it, at the junction of 10th Avenue
and Pine Road and Tudor Street and
Sobers Lane. ae
3. He’s not a law enforcement officer but
definitely a “G" man. :

RUNS THAT MACHINE NEXT TO YOURS?

SSS SSS DEE PEEFL EF L-L-Z.





Skipper Rowe of Combermere
won the toss and elected to bat
His team
of which N.
Alleyne, M. Skeete and H. Robin-
ton scored 30, 19 not out and 13

M.
Barrow, E. King, R. Suttle and H.
Worrell took 3 for 18, 2 for 21 and
2 for 31 and 1 for 10 ae
runs, of which M. Barrow, V. Mar-
shall and M. Jones scored 23 not
out, 14 and 12 respectively, Bowl-
ing for Rowe’s XI, M. Skeete and
A. Phillips took 8 for 24 and 2



Barbadians. Simple too — You just

|












































WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1952

SEA SCOUTS’ * MARINE
DISPLAY

AQUATIC SPORTS
WATER POLO MATCH
and FIREWORKS

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB -

(For local and visiting members only)

ON

* SATURDAY, 26th April, at 8 p.m.











Admission __________ $1.00
Admission to Gravesend Beach

Come and see the thrilling Ship-to-Shore Rescue by Breeches’ Buoy
organised under the direction of the Harbour and Shipping Master. *



ALL PROCEEDS FOR’ THE
ASSOCIATION.

BOY SCOUTS’

ot 6
e
eo So

C. B. Rice & Ce.

Merchant Tailors



OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS

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PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. APRIL tt, IMt House Hit At Public Service Commission WHEN certain members of the House of Assembly last n*ght might during the consideration of two Resolutions rejating to the payment of the members of the Public Service Commission, and the establishment of the Clerical Staff of the Commission, bo criticise certain appointments on the Commission, His Honour the Speaker was forced on several occasions to rule such members out of order and implore them to speak on the merits or demerits of the Resolutions. BARBADOS ADVOCATE tAC.E ii.REE This was particularly the case with Mr. M;.pp. Junior member for St Thomas, who repeatedly, despite the intimation* from the Chair thai he should not do so. criticised the appointment of Mr. Aburrv Duuslas-Smllh to meinU-rship on the Commission Afti-T heing ruled out of ordei on three consecutive occasions while making such observations and criticisms against Mr. Douglas-Smith's appointment, Mr. Mapp .idmitted that "I have been hard of hearing to-night and cannot hear rulings too good." The two Resolutions, the one a corollary of the other, provided that the Chairman uf the Commission bo paid I20.J0 per meeting with a maximum remuneration of 580.00 In any one month, and that members should be paid at the rtfcbj of $10.00 per meeting with a maximum remuneration of $40.00 in any one month; and for the appoinlment of one Long Grade Clerk and one Stenographer Typist for the performance of duties ..lining from the institution of the I "imnuision. In tin, connection. $3,000 has ^cn provided in the 18JL'T>3 Colonial Estimates to meet the estimated expenditure. Serving Ofocen* in the Public Service will not receive any remuneration above their normal salaries. The Commission will be responsible for advising the Government as regards to recruiting, training, discipline, appointment and promotion of Civil Servant* and other allied matters, and In view of the fact thit the Commission Is to be a permanent body, it is considered desirable that the staff necessary for its efficient operation should be placed on a permanent basis. Speaking on the question of remuneration for the service, rendered by members of the Commission. Mr. O. T. Alliier (I) criticised the rate of the remuneration, and ...kcu the hon'ble member who dealt with the Resolution in this connection to outline the basis on which the rates were fixed, and how often the Commission would it. fn his opinion $20.00 %  meeting for the Chairman was •vary high", and foresaw the possibility of the Commission meeting In some instances for only five minutes. Mr. W. A. Crawford (O) referred to the stipulation that no Civil Servant on the Comuiu>biou would get any remuneration (or his service on the Commission, and said he did not agree. with the proposals. He imagined that were waa some precedence for the proposals, and added that It did appear to him that on the lace of It when -,, man was called upon to perform dutie* of the nature envisaged in the Public Service Commission Art, that he should be given some extra compensation. Mr. A. B. at. Lewis (L) criticised the idea of having a member of the Executive Committee on the Commission, and recalled how the policy had been advocated that politicians should keep out of the affairs of the administration, and h l the member to order, but he continue,!. %  I cant ee what the Director i Extra Mural Studies, an Erujh-iiman who has recently cone out here, knows about the local Civil Service. t . Hard of Hearissx Mr. Mapp continuing hu> critic L.m urged Government to try to hnd "suitable Barbadians who have served in the local Service, people who know of local conditions and suitabilities, to serve on such a body. When once again the hon'ble member attempted to bring the name of the Resident Tudor into the discussion. His Honour appealed to him "to keep the name of the Resident Tutor out of the debate, and Mr. Mapp replied, as he was about to sit down. "I have been hard of hearing, and cannot hear rulings too good."' MT. E. W. Barrow Joined issue with the wording of the second clause of the Addendum which read: The amendment seeks to increase the Establishment by one Long Grade Clerk and one Stenographer-Typist for the performance of duties arising from the institution of I Public Service Commission which will throw an additional burden on the Establishment Branch of the Secretariat, and called it a "cleverly worded clause. Ho observed that it did not say that the Long Grade Clerk and Stenographer-Typist should be members of the staff of the Commission and It also assumed quite falsely that the Public Service Commission was itself to be an addendum to the Colonial Secretariat. He thought thai it was against the true spirit Of the Public Service Commission Bill, because if the House wanted to appoint an Advisory Body to the Colonial Secretary it would have done so. and they would have set up a separate and distinct body. His contention was that if the Public Service Commission wa an independent body, it should not bo considered an advisory body to the Colonial Secretary's office, and should have a Clerk and Typist quite apart from the Colonial Secretary's Office. The two organisations should work in a. %  sociation, but not in collusion. If they worked in collusion, they would find that the Colonial Secretary or one of the Assistant Colonial Secretaries or another Senior Officer of the Office would nlways hold the files or the Commission and when a meeting was held, that officer would come along and act as Secretary for the timo being. He urged that the Public Service Commission should be ft completely separate and independent body, and observed that if they worked In collusion, it would be equal to retaining the status quo of the old st.ite of affairs where the Colonial Secretary was • %  Lord High Executioner, Judge Jury and everything." on appointments, with other Heads of Departments acting in an advisory capacity. He thought it was highly undesirable that they shoud pass any section which might give the Colonial Secretary licence to believe that the Commission which the House wanted as an Independent body, should be an addendum or appendage to his own policy. He was only throwing out a word of warning, and If the warning fell on the "right cars/' he would not vote against the Resolution. In conclusion he appealed to members to be careful, ai d warned that "it was not a fronVil assault but an enveloping movement." Mr. C. E. Talma (I.) associate i himself with the bernerks and observations made by Mr. Barrov/. and Mr. A. E. S. Lewis emphasis* id that the two officers for whl %  they were making provision would be too closely connected with the Commission, and would be in a position to deal with KLM'i Htm Air Freight Room Is 9fost Modern Wild Rabbi I Upsets The Family's Plan LAUNCESTON Cornwall. April Plans by the Bos well family of Bathpool-a hamlet on the edge of Bod in in Moor—to live in Nassau, have been upset by a rabbit. Alternative plans to settle in Kenya or South Africa have also been frustrated by the same rabbit. Bunski. <.rdsii*ry wild sto*iCURACAO At Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam llm week. KLM. Royal Dutch Airlines opened the most ultra modern air freight building in Europe The new edifice has bssksj erected on the site of the first air freight hangar which was opened for service Just S3 years ago when K.L.M '* first air freight consignment was a parcel of English newspapers and a letter from the Mayor of London to the lh rabbit kept us a pet by MIN Mayor of Amsterdam. Vcra Margaret Uoswell. wife o, The construction of the new Mr p J Boswell, retired farmer, a L%J m iwr depot was prompted by the tieexerts an Influence over thi* -THY.S il Otis' I O \\ w' all para* of the world. Air crew*. British and foreign, nfl-n SSJM mto his little office with .i new variety they have picked up * %  ii few shillings in Nice. Maditil. Amsterdam or Stockholm. And his usual Christmas present from his family Hayes. Middh%  SSb la invariably a tie MM he hest five hundred. ranging from American uintatui Old SVI*K>1S" to Ml. long haitdpelnted nylon specials Hi i. i ourile Is a bright royal blue silk tie with the Statue of Liberty hand-painted tn gold. Many of his couvc' ictlon kept in glasaBut P erc y never wean one. p says "A* nuvetttes or works nrt they are suprvme, but Till; FIRST ONE HAS l id. rAKfci fV Uiem' 1 i>uldn't be seen deud In any of the-: Pve %  pent building occ uples TFN years ago a paascngcr on a No 49 I^onAon bus gave tho eSMductoc %  brightly coloured tic Instead ol a lid fare—and started a collecting craze. Tinsurprised conductor, Her!?_**. killed .-"M! ben ri>*rc>"> Price, began most of my life wearing my black i uniform tie and It suits me Just -3P nine Iff!" B*u oV Cologne ironies from Cologne L %  now again obtainable il quality, mad Thi square yards of warwhousing space ana its unique application of working methods, cargo hand"' ""* "^L^TT^SS "*** Ue ,n hw W U !" T^ ling, layout and technical aids ^2 !" ***} "/* e !" l .. do .£ ** year. ago. an inspect.*. are designed for apeedy and P TL^. k ^.^fJ e JV •^"•1"• wa ** '" chars* ol the uasI baby when Mrs ^^ service t Northolt Aiiport. and his hobby progressed quick ly curding to the fnmas ami i et foimula since 1791. Then, said Mrs Boswell: -list Mrs. Boswell nursed the ratshtt > robust maturity by which time efficient management of many tons of freight per day Cargo *** advanced on planes are parked in front of the f. iu,u Q %  £ ***" thl building and special pallet* for ''on ry killin g him %  peedy loading and unloading of ^""g the aircraft are placed into operation, as well as the latent mechanical devices used for this type of workConveyor belts transport the freight directly into the building A special platform• sUw i truck-bed height at one end of *e the depot facilitates the loading and unloading of freight trucks Because of the growing numBunski s affection for the family ber of live animals iransported —heiseif. husband and daughter by KLM in the past few years. Veronica—was unbieakable. g hotel for Animal*, occupies was when the Boswells space in the new construction, thought of moving to sunruer This hotel is equipped with runclimes abroad that m Whitehall nlng water, heat, electrical conGovernment offices Bunski cornectiona, a ventilating system and respondence files came into exlatemperature control and can bo ^f^e* furnished to accommodate nny *"st Kenya, then the South number or hind of animals at a African Government were soundmoment's notice Specially trained ed. Neither would "wear" Bunski animal stewards are in charge The Bahamas agreed, provided of the livestock at the hotel and Bunski had a clean bill of heaKh. accompany all KLM. animal But B.O.A.C. said "No* to him n* shipment* aboard the aircraft. • passenger. A shipping company insisted on him travelling under a butcher's cars — "unthinkable.' 1 said the when Mr* and itana meal for Mr. Price said to-day "Amerl. jan and Continental traveller-. .abbit instead of running away naV e a habit of looeiiiiig their leapt into my anas and Beetled ties when they step from an airugainst me lor protection . I ,*,*. have been protecting him over %  | ,r, usually around to a.lEverywhere 1 gu Bursskl jgt;,. ihe mi jnc wnPtl u, ey Mlir llpit I am ,i connoisseur, they gi ifiriii to me on the spot nine llrr.es % ut of ten." Clu i .i.n.i< .in Travellers send him lies from promotion, and so to it in judgment upon their ow apeak. fnernselvi.. Replying .atrgorioilly to trsa criticisms, Mr. Adams explained 2£ ^ r o,^,? u '.he Sm civ, 1 w ^" ^m 6£i Commission and said that it was wise to have someone on the Commission who would not be prejudiced. He thought it was a good thing too to have a member of the Executive Committee who was not a politician on the Commission, and to have the Colonial Secretary. BoaweUs. Bvsm Eire demanded to know (in triplicate)' why the Boswells I wanted to bring Bunski with them. Saul Mr. Boswell "The master! Weet Reply Will Leave Door Open The natural way to KEEP SLIM AND FIT If you wsot to he snractmir dim, wild bright eyes, radisni .ompkuoo. and real flints. Nsrure demand* that you Ercp your syiuun cleansed •>! %  mpuiiuo. Clinical tet h docton outturn thai Hile Bran Jo thh, gently iml cffectircly Ihlc brsni arc lu-.-pmg million. 'HrsliriT and youthful in kwki and figmc Siari ulcing them tanlgtil N*tu ( Crmi* k>4 LONDON, April 22 Britisli Foreign Secretary, Anwho was directly connected with thony Eden, said to-night that tho the administration there. Western reply to hussln's demand He agreed that it would bo ( or taiiu on Germany 'will not danuiable to have a politician on close the door to negotiations." the Commission, and replying to The reply to the last Soviet note the criticism made by Mr. Barw which BriUsh, French and row said "I speak with sorrow United States experts will sturt rather than in anger," .at such (work here to-morrow would 1 criticisms coming from the hon'ble constructive, he told a dinner of member who should know that the Newspaper Society, throughout the British Empire, • n w m tll ^ ,„ „ tl ,,uni thr !• %  there were Public Service Comsue of the German people for missions. un ity without forgetting that a He asked wahether hon*blf United Germany can only ha members thought that the Governf unded on true independence and ment had not taken great care in f IO p democratic choice "It will the matter, or that they did not lake in account the earnest deuse precedence after endeavoursire of all peoples for peace and Ing to correct faults and errors f or a European settlement which experienced by other places besafeguards the interests of all fore coming to a decision. —U.P. He welcomed hon'ble members drawing errors to the attention of •* %  atMsaassweai Government, but he would counMAIL NOTICE :*c\ thorn to first find out whether they were ruvt making mistakes. AMENDED Directing his gaze to where Mr. (or Cn.l. h icu..IH.SS Barrow sat, Mr.' Adams said "the A|| people of St. George correct their w,u,„*i win b* <••• *\ in. o*nri mistake ... I think a word to r-o-i oatn > %  una t the wise should oe sufnclent." .*?**' "•"J'Jl* '" ji c "i'*V?' I> M II'I' The Resolution was ultimately ^DAY M^prii'iw passed. BILE BEANS Jmi 4 loupir %  ( B ed< II e SUN SHADES list (ti-i nl "f "f John Vkhifr shoes is hull os \ tll.l, as Mi-ll us llU'rMUHIIITV. < omfort and si>| ( ?—\e%. rcrlsoursell in leading slui.s ll)ie:'^hi.'H !.,,(.%  all illfTrrriu alylrs and Irpes available From 72/ lo about Sfl.00 Call TODAY at year JEWeiXEBB V. Del l>l\ 4\ CO.. i. in. t BrMd -i,„i made by JOHN WHITE means made just right HOUSE OF COMMONS %  -!JV/1|* J i~jl The Speaker's chair, all seating throughout the Chamber, galleriet and lobbies and every other article of upholstered furniture throughout the new building are equipped with %  %  La/ex Foam Cushioning %  t. ti*.c Milna, o*.la. Tfc. w f — ii— o' m. C.HW..I n.M*i. '• ••~*tm t. .-.-l..^, b, o.(^ l.tM>CU~t LQiw •" %  %  riIC.LU.LMi W^tafft a.ii. IW.. i,.i n .0 DLIHONI WAITON. UVM.OOI -. (0 N|w |OND ITfllET. W.I -'"' O' 'HI UtlX fOAM INDUSTRY ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street — Distributors MUSI I I AMI! Jta N E W S H I P M E N T SPECIAL FOH TWO (2, GLORIOUS WEEKS Wr now offer you 5 c r Discount on all Cash Purchases over 111.00 You will admire our rxqimite i(ns and attractive Prices b> Ladies Dress Materials. Ladies Shoes, LasMas Hals, Ladies Nylon Stocldnrs. Ladles Anklets etc. Gents Ready Made Pants, Elite Shirts, Gents Sport Shirts, Tie Returners and Ties, Gents H V.D's. Socks. "Otis" Vest etc. For Better Bargains Try . GEORGE AHELY&C0 19 Swan Street-for ERVICE VALUE & VARIETY PMOUE 493S J u s T R E C E I V E D Here's the NEW ENGLISH ELECTRIC refrigerator Bringing you Better Living! Choosing u refrigerator needs careful thought, particularly 1/ you have never had one before But there are two vitally important features which are very easy to spot anil which you should always look for. The Grit is quality of workmanship, for on this depends the length of trouble-free service your refrigerator will give you. And the second is capacity, for the more your refrigerator SBJg THE \l II MODELS .VOW O.V s#lll AT THE CORNER .STORE IOKJ.. the i,:^iei LH*UI it will be. The nuw English Kltttnt Kefrigerator offers :— • Meat Keeper • Kxlra Bonk Space • Automatic Lighting • Ilumidrawers for Vegetables • Silent Running • Quick Adjustable Shelves • Extra Large Storage Area.


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PAGE 1

%  AGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE iFEltNBSDAV. APRIL IX 1 CLASSIFIED ADS. TtLLPMONC 250 |.)II> i.k will I Ape*! A'jriBAtfrtdlr^i HI-n. Mvt ha* lair ianww* Wiaom. %  w*lt O-tet Cmor-. ..t 4 %  p m tc-da II Church CrmrlM'. ton sAi.t: AUTOMOTIVE NHw'SCr .n4 AMMMINUgMBNTS BOT LIWII* I UUP li ed to Pupil' ib porn..aln of I other 5>condarv School., at *,K--li< L'RBE. CraeaptaSweat, .contrail. I. ta'ed and opfxxjtr Harn-on Colleg. AHBoarding and I^IIM Piirnlehe and unTurnhlw*. room. ISr rent Appl* in P.i ..n Telephone *M H n ntW* BECCIX* u H pimii \OTME*. CAB On. Woolen %  I 10.000. nnlkm l.dxnjiii A Taylor • ( Ml I It I Kl VOTTfTla henr-L jlvea thai In accordance with Buk a lhClub will be cloavd la Min*tn on Saturday. ApH Bath, (rom 1B> lo 10 M B m *>r Warm* DeapMy anal Aquatic Event, bj He D' I the Cnianni*. tr niataoi SMPPWM. TR OHM. C* LTB MJTTCS U HIJUCBY BaVrj. I'.al Mr Trdnafer Book.' -.I* Kaia*rr ol Meu,jarrt of u, abava-naaaM ftw aia> win ^a I ..I Direev.r. Nerietarv :i i %  Ra AtTTTN PARTS—One ill Auitln I an Bov; on* >11 AuflUat Spare EngintJ other tMaraUanaoni pair. Appl' I V Sro*t ft Co lid • hil*> Pat AlHWt.jPKi :a Ore.ii Hajari Irnof. MOOT mil.. in ea.elM nt CMJIII.,, I p*a on t.r ..rareet Applv J.-.n Jane. OTl *• 4 BR-J HCItPOKi) TRUCKS r Vauxhall r. p with a go—! reliant ondit,.... Di.l 4S14 JUM-tr. 5588? aw lyiaa Nei % ore TOTtfhon IS 4 IS Tn rrrtmif RUMOR TOUW IM IM riceUent condition aaairla Man* '.loon ION mile, lit. .. |..l It*., Garage Lid Trlepl> m tH4 a* 4 M J FOR RCVT NfflM SALES HOUSES REAL ESTATE APARTMENT OR* ml at WOVtnlM i lining aWWPUon D.n..g-.BB pouM. li lww n ai>ed an Bed. Tniiaa RVi". rnainiire Dial im in.... Jean** CBB* i **"'""•' AIRY COT—Brighton. t. Michael, at) iikodai n romvaattanca*. hmi.e contain* Opar. and CTana* Verandah*. Drawlr* ..r>g Dining *om.. 1 HadioafD*. Bath. ToUri and Knrhfn. OaradW and aVrIB yard SttBdinf on vr 17.110 i ft of land aU racloaad Vltn barbad WIM rna Cocaanul and Llr.' Tr< InapKlldO dally -Btapt Bnda>> iH • P B Purlirt BKACH COTTAOB cm *L lai „,rfl bathakfl. W"^ *" aarvlnM I" Haaaafiabia tanaa r l> BaarhMada. St Jai IMOALOW II bunajaio* i nl*nr>. atandUid < OTft of lapd at Tb. I*d. ith M VB. wrr lna wral •-> Atoo wur na auiUlBr building aiu> adolnir,r Aawly to Mil— Caall IHal ri-T V7aWh. Oowmmanl Hill tdr !" n Ma. IM Apply M B YIBSB n.AT AND HOUaTT FBll. f^ralahad. I^riar* a Baa. ftvaUaa4a Apfii Photv* MRS. *. invOa '.' %  wactloR IM MX! WIMaa at.l.aaV-t-t.Bnj^T• %  piiliy lurowi 1*1 Phant Rtr> Otto %  d tan*-I vippri AvalUbla Mat -J.rirHWl IHttll" nda* ronal'lind oi %  wing n waati baatii*. ana havi'.a latar cdar i %  .!>board aa wall KiWRan complrla wlwl b .til in > upBontdi ElactrKlly laid on TbU bauaa I* in a tool anal ajunyt IRhbourhood wiin gatdan laid out aAd FARAWAY II roMia Fully fur" Wattrir.ill auppl) r\inl fOOTBi I ;4fN Philip r-aat. 1 dd•Bad URBUng PUB* Doubk Car Pttrt. Iwo ai May %  < Phon* i .4 I.B VAUXMA1.I WY% I .%  ndilion. Tindar S.MO mllrfUUK CAHACiE Ui..l agia tO M ..I l.i j KLAT Kaaa, MR mwdv(n. >>M) Ral (ORMadj||U> funuabad TalepRMVC. gaa. rlarfrKii* Pacing ara KRcanaM anf >,U *MbaU>lng Apply o -MARaKH I.AWPCNCC GAP Phono MM, 1? t.M—i I n EI.ECTkK -AI. BADtO i-.iPr Kadi" i*wn*r thaap Pkona U1 RETB1GEBATOH W-.lmlh.i.iw 1-lr.t i rraaaa Cb—1 phona ZUD a 4 R>—ftn MR a 4 an *.IV. MACHINRS Hoover. alaUiral, banva waablng n^thlna. Only ilJ) Tba anawar to Uundry protjRrnv PurCRRM on tarmtan ba WBBBM %  'r • rn L4d Lr. Broad Si WM % % %  '%  %  LIVESTOCK ( COW To cahra irt.illpn > >: FII-I i *fc n i wa-Hj.n MECHANICAL MABaJ VIIAIIHH I (.^r -l.i AltM sguiPMrsT l.-rl,iliat DlaPlb(L.. Rahaa. Rldr drllvnv lowing rana Traab. Graai advr*. Wnaal RUakv* lor atlarh*nail Wdf-I Tractor* I" P-fvr.it h*r>l,ln COUTtTIERV GABAC.r Dial 4glll M 4 BS-dn. Mllto,. i, mra Mano M 4 Ml.i PIANO One grai Villaga. SI J-..i II*-RACOWlV M .• I l-.l,. MARISm* mm Maxwell COMI. 1 Fully luml.-diad Including awd lalepftpa* Apply la Scott Middle Strael Dial am FVRJfaSrlRIi FUAT-wltb MWar and Unan Good Raa-batf For f^rtbar parUcuUra Applj lo Ahu l-i'.Uy No • Coral Band*. WorUuBS?%  1 1 1 n NKWHAVBM Crana Coaat. 4 badroonva FUOT (urniabad. lighting riant. WaMamUl awpply. Ddubla Uaraga. 1' %  ervant raORti rn li>| .U from tober 111 Phoi.a MM OFTTCBB al U Tudo. .Docb.rm DnU>i> Appla: Cacil Jammott TRINITY COTTAGF T< hraa-lR>dmom hnuaa. in bona. availAWe Horn Mav ....!. %  | lilt 4 r^v-4n VI-TA RULA* Navy Cardan. Tollat and Bath Garafa. Rcrvanu t> taundty room Phone Bfra. WANTKB Dial RMS I • 'J *Diplomatic Privileges Act Passed Th, Hour Q( Anilv y~t*rmeoUl rafHMnUUm •ton* bln; riloSuc Pvn Act. IM? Cb] rcduc i Hold of privi•TCa^^VJi.i* ^*JBSnXifUK > u not to confer pmi or ImmunlUM rt** r ,ha •uc required to give effort to any intcrruitloiil agreenwot in that attention to the recently encd !" InU-maliOMl Orianis-.itJon. (Imj !"!" munlUM.ndPri.ne.cl Act 1M which con>Ud.w. the United Klrotdoir Uw contained In the srH'3^^ S s^,rnr^ thi* receni .araUUtiot._ ____ il-lfc-ilM ,„ ^.n^tt^pohtim in HIP Umti i landing legv intt-nded 10 brinf th* lPCItBUid Into Imp T.^ahajaTBTaM of „n^f 'S* ..bo ore ,,^-nuUy... whher .*^*l.f Bovernmentii or not. on uiy li I. |c. h.\ provldini that any plon ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. iKiNADBt on STBPTPOaV on HEBA. in May 1SH. v %  comCA. IdlR Mar IRM ina o |o I a ft | l ROFI M S Ifftl Jf*—e'at. arid April l*" &f BJw^rtfrlSnDAi. FARAMABIBO AMI RtUTUB OI'tANA I ft BONAlKt. on kh May IRU >. CtlTTtCA. OB ld JUXVO BRB VILLNl TO TBD-Il-AU ft CUBAA'AU M .1 lOCVBA on Hal AprU 1RW %  OBKQOP, on FTtb April IBM p MltSON. SON ft COITFJ. AgaBla iiS^-^SS^S^'S'SamwlaaMvBi .!.. m ualM info i;"' i.* orgRrtisatlon shall DC included In the scope of th# Act imtead of. as hitherto, jeovfrn...i Apply to C A > wiUi lavatory and a large for Im media i* Plaice. Phone 10 4 IKH'awi A brand new ChatUI Hpua.' i.m w uh %  hedrool JIJ and KlMb* i BT attactiad ntuaUd al Pine Laynd. B> MKHael. and apot can l ranted Bawt nflcr IIUOOU ecarpted For Particularapply naat door or ^"rMaia&iL ft] I .. -an I Avenue. Middl e RUvwl dial ft> Property tunea. and UM land* -led Mtuatad %  %  .'. inn. s.ndKoTd. den Pros St MJcfcaa. Apady K ~ Ttal m* Davld'a Ch 1 land on whMli BandHard Bpi lUnda. Apply M Sirwal Dial %  *> Properly at Junction of St. M> thMa and DBveelU Ro-d. U elad houae and a aapaiata buildl. %  being itard lav Uva Seven Hi Dai ventlat*aa a Cnurcb Apply h Nltford. Bpry St Dial S374 ITia three propaniea arepart ol II' BBBHO o* D Brain*.it. JO 4 M>-lr & IRsn at 111 Bridgelown on TIM Ma. IRM A1J, THOSE bill iHng ofBt*. >ng n.rvhouari r aala b U'-Gngor Straet. Brlddetown '%  on S.llf aquare fael of land and no occuing by Maaara B M Jonea ft (r niher BBPUculBra rrom tne undaj ad cornx. CATTOUD a. co All ilON NOTICE I debt o> claim upon or affrcimg it" at. ( ARTHUH LLOYD MARSHAL! _* Of Pine Road IWIIevlllc. t-artah of Saint Michael In th. HeiVr. d Maeier Manner who ii ed that* un Uve lilt day of Jiily. tl 1 1 la I .heir claim, duly alta-ted to, Ove 'J£T& OMtRJ -e .hall not .v had BadfeM -i th. lime Of BRftl £B| N BirpaBOTR. inn-btod U . R e.late are reaue'lad lo aallla that' Doled the Hat rtav M April 1091 LIONEL O DONALD "*£?*( OI-OA KATlltXEN MARSIIALI M.FHED D.COORCY BOYCS AHTHLMl LLOYD*MAHSHAlJ.ion. Mr. O. H. AdRBB. (L. *1io moved the passing of the bill, sam that it was one of those bills thrir became nfx-eJMary from time to nme on Inlarnatlonftl A p wB fnoti t He satd that the mam eftect wan | little easing up on passporti ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Dai ChoKIng, laapiBg. whaaaing A.ihma and Baaneh.H pokOOB -4B)f avrteeu. a> yaur aaarg>^iula i ali'i ad weaken *o Baart In J inlpa'-r MNDA.O-tb. pra""" %  o( a romooi dotiar—circu. u gl. >ha bb—I •lutehlv turb%  %. Thrv*., 1 %  .! %  :.ia .i.. lum take l I'M MKNPAfO tnbMte al maai> ana i. iiifely frea from AMhrna and liran-hilla In M>I lo Bo tuna, OVOT ihowgh ynu iay haa %  uRarajd for .,T. Mi:\rACO •* o on t cig if iji 1ht H II Bnaiaalaad IO gtva ion frea eary l.r-alhinf IB 21 boWTO BBd to loinplflely 'top Four AalhmB In %  1— • money bac* jot jatura _of aaaply ickace 0 Inehcwlth Ptantand Fiah Arch. Ph.me lH ACCOUNTANT required -liari> preferably wlili Machine Accoiayiting BglB B and qualification* .ruing only lo C. B CO SISCO ftaint fat evetu putptrie . SISSONS BROTHERS • ft COMPANY. LTD ANTit|(- — ot rrary dearriptlon GUaR, China, old Jewel*. Rn* Silver Watarcolour* .rly book*. Map.. Autograph* elc at iiTlngaa Antique Shop adlolnlng Moyal Y-dil Club TlARoTjNfT 0*BAY~PAiNriNG On. new !i h p OoanllnSp'" PalnUB* Outfit a.tli inm ft airhoie. Haaplra ifl tarlplng lonta, booh lnclu.ie-1 with ImlruclMiAppl* Kennath King. Street 7 dn). Avenue flly v ubll it AIM-.:IIUOM prrcHFt ft lio.S-*n APPlirATlONR ara Invited Iram men id veiaman awpAbbHarntad m AnlB%0J Welfare for the anpolnlment ot I'AICT TIME A Thnm v.will *ell hn h:n include. Morrlt S-.ile 'Sellae md 1 Arm Chair*>. Piano Vltrolite Ton. Coffee Table. Barb ice Tub and Uphoia: Chair*, all in Mahogany. craft Radiogram. Braaa Floor l.irrjp. Plvan. Carved Teak wood Table, Nice Tnpratrv. Tex TrotlM. Oak Dining Tabio and Leather Seat Chair*. Dinner Waggon. Picture.. U E. and No llrfrtseralora. both in good working order: Olaa* and China. Bra*. W Tea and Dinner Servlcca. Carpet*. V ,.ndah Cbalra; Hookahelvea. Twin •tea da with Simmon* Hpnnga; Pteaa. Bureau, and Dreanlng Table Mahogany Cream palntrd Prill frraaalng T.ble conunned. Single Ceda) lledali .id wild B< Spring. riectaVf Bedalda Table-. Iron SlrglO I Mlrtl lie*, and DreaUng Libia iled while. Elrctrtr OH Rtova. Kitchen Table nnd Chair*. Priim; Rlcvtlr. C.tnni.irr. and GOVERNMENT NOTICE „e.aru.e.> 'JMU^Mft^'" AppUc.tion, .re I !" ri for the pet of Terv-nel Ofc. D-rt Pension ActIi8 No quarters aic provided payable on basis of mileage. Travelling allowance SHIPPING NOTICES ajCORBt Carf) and PBawngaefor sss-s.-ae-jsact The M V ,-oept OanM (CM Rl Lucia, or* !" PoaaanBer. only i n-te ..fS-iling lo M aCMOVNRR OBNUI ARBOCIATTON ^DfC) ,.-. Tale. 0M1 fm HARRISON LINE P oi-ntABu r*0M TBK DNITD KINGDOM s s s.a. s.a. HERDSMAN %  'CROFTER" TRADER" S 8. "MERCHANT" London London Glasgow an d London Newport and Uindon 30th Mat ITUt April 22nd April 3rd May 2nd May 17tb May HU.IWAII) rO* TBK I N1TH1 KINGDOM s.s. s s. V.uel %  MULTAB" SENATOR" IDe Liverpool London Cloaca l rfcroa4oi 24th April iinth April r.r tinker UnraUk. aatar — DA COSTA A CO.. LTD.— AgaoU Canadian [National Steamship* AUY NEIJiO.S CAJfAlalaVN URUlai* CANADIAN LONatntUCTOB I-ADY I lADYf lANAWAM CRl'lSER i AKADIAN CONBTBUCTOR i ADTT r — — 16 Api IT Apr .1 MR I May I Ma< s 1 July u July M Ma. 1 JURO — 11 June %  Apr II May M M.y • Juno U June at June 1 July 1 Jukj 11 July IS Ji ftt July Rt Ji NQRTBBOLNB 1ADY RODNEY IADY CDN Bi ffSTST probation for two VBars and will be M. ?UT.JK S uie' ielSted candidate being pwsed mdlclly fit I .ho. Id prele-ably have had ^^S'^'tSJVSmJR ,,..gement of labour with a knowledge of modern labour prBrt.ce ana The Personnel OfBcer wiU be under the control --iBjg of Highways and Trnnsport and w,H be rasponsible, fr^JX; %  flating to personnel including the nwinUnance of f^*^ lt K! .?*_*__ J .*..-.c.-irotniitn. „r rules, reauiiitionb, and condition Id'Vecords.'lhV'interpreUtlon of rules, regulations. _of nervice to employees in the department and the prompt inv-ft. nation and settlement ol minor complaints. ^I.—IM-J nn Applications supported by testimonials should be submitted _on I. cms obUined (lorn the Secretariat lo thi l..ter than the 3rd of May. 152. Colonial Secratary not 23.482—2n Fl-OBB SOBthftDaptaMl DC GRASSE" 24th April, 19S3 COI/JMBIE" Bth May, 1952 .. DK GRASSE" *th June. 1852 C IE G"TRANSATLANTIQUE | S illinis from SoBlhawpton lo ti.a.eloupe. MarlUlque. X Barb.do. Trinidad. La Gnaara. Curacao A Jaaaalea ^ Arrive. Fl rb ai M 6-.li May, 1M2 ... lilt May. 16th June, 152 l92 •Not culling &1 Guadeloupe SAILING ntOM BARBADOS TO kl ROrL ha O a d B B M '"DE CRAS8E" 19th May, 1KS2 .... • COLOMBIE" lat June. 1M1 .. DE GRASSE" 2th June, 1992 .... 29th May, 1952 13th June, 1M2 9th July 1942 'Sailing direct to Southampton S GLASS ROSE BOWLS Come and see our lovely assortment CENTRAL I MIMIIIH >l for. Br.ad A Tmitr SU. '//ry//)ov>r//,v,v.VrtW/AV/,r.*/. will be held nt THE HOSTEL, Country Rd. on SATURDAY, April 26Ill Opantd fiom 3 30 to 6.30 p.m. Th,I. %  "ill Uiopened b> Mr.. Peebles There will be the following ^ Stall.: Flower, and k. Sweetii Househiild. Books, Caket ami In Luikv dip. and Pom Rides for thr rhildr.n Mlchclin. Ih. I eonrtnctf.i by I Will play during th. aflernoon. ADMISSION — D 11 M V l M/.l. CORKl/CATED SHEETS In 6. 7. 8. and 10 ii-i-t Irnxths IRON COKRUOATED SHEETS in *. 7. . and I* fat) length* (nun S3.N ( Mi .lu-.i ASBESTOS CIIRRI'llXTEII SHEETS SPhXIAL SCREWS AND WASHERS, nl.,. ASBESTOS RIDGES now being received ASBESTOS SOIL PIPES in 3 and 4 Inch 'with tto necessur\ Bend.—Y. Tf*. GALVANIZE NAII'.S only I* cmU per lb. PLAIN FLAT GALVANIZE (or making Ridge Caps. Down Pipe.. Gutterinc. etc. We also .lork COPPER In 18. M. 30 and J* lack. GALVANIZE PIPES (rom ' Inch to 4 Inch EXPANDED METAL (or Concrete Work, R.ilings e4c QAI.TANTSE STAPLES A. E. TAYLOR LTD. Coleridge Street — Dial 4100 where Qualities arc inc.lt and Prices are LOW DIAL—FOUR-ONE-DOUBLE-O and Where There are NO Parking Problem. %  .'.'. %  .'. %  .'.-.v.'. %  %  .: %  .:: % % % %  %  •%  % %  • %  %  %  %  %  %  ;:v.:'.:-.-.'



PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE nr-** *—• **"Sugar Levies Law Amended ^-J Mr, O, T. Allaer <1) said that-Mr. O. T. AlleVr *1> ,__, __. _, ---• Uie lion Junior Member for St. # >*m M< I "ther side had .tot got that ^ ^ ^ m>k(ng lhf b| „ ^^ same price is for the Muis'rj ol privilege, fusing. He wanted to know Food. He Mid that the SUbiUeatlon whel R er he „,„ maouiactu,Tbey felt thai another basi-. (01 Fund was moet importanL Last ww ult i n edln _klng for a assetsuig the price of local sugar H*uesday. there *•• • very aottd jrtjjher price for sugar that snoukt be made. In any year in Ministry oX Food i n crea s ed sugar for* export, price* In Bartec-a have Also irure—ed. The reason WM thai .1 manufacturer wou.U i.*i that tC he was producing sugar for local consumption the House on it. He Legislators Pay Tribute "Negro Race" Badly Treated At U.S. Consul ASSEMHLYtfW SAY Y THE MONKS OF 6UCKFAST • symbol of Inje ctwracr and drvolion In his country I'p. |...r.-H In Fight In 1917 what he (Mr Adama) found hirrualf in London and got THE House of Assembly lasl night pagged a BUI lo ,..nfer upon conaular uRIcera of foreign slates certain powers relating lo the administration of estates-and properly of deceased persons; to restrict the powers of members .1 in. police force and other persons to enter such consular "uftkes, and among other things to confer certain immunities and privileges on such consular officers and employees of such foreign States. dalalc on th. BUI. Consulal. will be made pail •' rhlrlng ihe ft was the GovsTUinem i that the price and were adjusted am tion, he said, lo see lhal Ihc nrss. knew lhat their arran of sugar did nol lue above wh-1 different from the other islands' they considered a reasonable and Speaking ot the Rehabilitation consumed locally. He was isnto .ouiueULn. the Government '0 _.„,,, ,| ,hr British Govcransidcr ihe mailer when they Sent had not giiMi them an lntre allocating and providing rrv ase on the present crop, tor for Ihc fund. sugar would bt manufacture*! Mr. A. E. K. Lewss 11.1 said thai under the same conditions and as far as bringing the matter betold al the same price of last Jars for cafurt „i.d he was g.v. n fore Iht Hoaw and discussing .1 ,ear. They had be careful that n wUfc ^ aua ^^ {j, .vwer prices for his sugar Ihi.n were uncerned. he muat say that the increased price asked Ifor was -u ^ to hk ^ „ a uski hlm tbad tteiaswufaclurer who eajorled, ,, Ihere m a lot in lhat. fl was a not going to put local consumers [, __?,!, „, .££. -.iuon woulo be pouillen to deal wlin matter thai was known to Ihc in JfWfy. „ „ reoirtved to %  arbodoa mere, air C. I Tabeas (L) drew alienAlMlca. IM home market. members of the House for ihe pail He said thst '' 'b> '"{. "' v ^..^ he was of the issopl. atari t" whal he called "Insults He said that il wi" • V>>""• Al in. M lane, .1 was n trW year. They knew that who, fund, from th. ^bou r Welfare ^ J^^^ „gJuMt*Slia%  %  discrimination by aom. emlo hear ..f any irWvance bat thi. inam, nuSrer tor Sal year la there ... an, increase In the p rice Fund •"•>>" th -price of th. ^^^SioHh^SSlSJSl, plovee. of Ih. American Consul Act euukl ,t imp" vc Ihe uo.it.oi. ..„.. thai oovcrnmcnl could ,., pdto the Ministry of Tood. thai toca y corned lugar.^wj DUM JJ^^^ ^^ ^ „,, M ,, u t people of the -neg... %  make .1 •"',•. u.10 Ihe whole guosuon of asses, the local sugar conlr.bule.i to the ";'"" % %  i c >L ""{^ ,~ a „, .c^ld lake care of everyhlng rac.." and taking the cue from Mr.*. ^ J^J" '• """',;,. ing esuort prla and the loc.,1 Slablllsalion Fund The, knew J" !" ?*^ 0 "jje uluul to from that end. At that umi. toe, fc observation mad, by Mr h "f"" XiJ^ ihe Con.",,ar for num. ccmsumplion that the, price and arrangement, .UWJ ;!" n ou 2 s „.,„, u,.y sir Sliced told him of an InJJ-* %  * %  • ^couruiu. IX .0 SnPlo, .heuown clizen, fe nffi-iS triH-c.' 0 Junior Jr^"heru? to U SSrr, Si ^D'by fflUff-Sr! ^laEk^H' 1 '!^Mr. W. Al-rawfaeg 1C1 first people who gave the rrvonejr, gave „„„,„„•, ..ma,, thai asm. Stafford waa always prepared to chaise u to t Adam, gjves a ^ u uid that it was v^ry regretuble it mostly to the lyhabliltatlon ^ e mh r nould „.. ^krt ^a n^ thecaiuaof .coscadal. who ^^ "^ £K5'„ tt v £w <£??" •"-"• ', '."^"Jjf^s courteously. If there behaviour on the ..loyeea It Is hi behaviour shoul allentlon of Ihe „., tnken plnre at the asking of J^' passed. K _, how Sir Stafford cam. to Jamalci. "'„.", ^m'TenTein'beV tMt some empl./ers hoped lhal M Ihe p.lce for the coming crop. If Mr. Age-. -Id lhat they had ln ,„, „„ **„* u found Ihe ""T"^ a blU GrT similar line. ~ the. .1 I not gel those arrangepromised Ihe eleclorule nol to1 Inpv.,ple a Nallonal Party and how """ •. h House. A little mem. made before thai date, he K ,h, cost of living and here ^ -m „„ ,„.„,„,.„„„ of ""> '•'"' {JVJf u „ ol „,.! II meanl that Ih.v would „„, a „ opportunity to keep that ,„., p, n „,. ^ „.„ h,!,,,^ to J^llsd"'^ w „ r^eed ,, Washbe Ihrowmg Ihe whole thing out ugggafil The obvious way to „ M lm irTCU „ „, ,„e demo"^***? 3 rererreo ic of gear. Keep Ihe price of suswdown was progrea. in the Wt In"' H „„ cvpr ln |U p ,„enl form. He said,, thai he agreed with ,., slop this cess. They wet. dlra> h, „ ld UiS new bin carries all lhal is the Ho,, Senior Member for St. Iiurtmg the labourer who ,, I• "• D M,,U "(E > ,l,,r in which the House nhouid have ha iverano cltficn of the community If ;he amount of local miRnr conximM wi fixed at 10.000 ton. ;. year, they should be told, foi insane*, fllrnTnount of money that would be neecs^arv to kee the nrl^ of eujrnr at % peaesnt tcvrl. They could all rolrulnfe 11 but not at a njoment'" nnt.ro •nd not before th,' BUI wouR haw been na compl mentPd Mr Talma on drawing t" the attention of the House th" dincourtesles meted out to peraons of colour by employees or lean Consul's offlcc and m hi< opinion. It fault "f the Government (heap Sugar not th* this cess business on local sugai. They cannot prom-M he peo*?* "f, "Z pie that they are foing to subs'duty wid ho feel It our ov feeling il our duly CJ * coloniai-s ofn „. General Revenue If one li~d had tui-.COnal. it, one couid hava daciuac) vrbi U OlWllUillVC gM ••pOtMUfe COUlU He hough i that yesterday th.-, null merely have had a i ill corning out for the purpose nf having the word "manufactured" of the IH7 BUI deleted and the word "Exported" pul in. which would include the suiar exported to the other colonial. Mr. Lewis said that be agreed that the people should get sugar %  r. but he was wonderm.. V '.K every item in nnd thai the cause of colonial om(f> of ,j, e A lwbadoV P He duTnoT S!! t evywh-re cau from time to tea „,. tnal „ wou Shat ork-e whlikv wa. sold. They nnd a champion of outstanding ^p,. no fc m S£ Ct C urorm^d to subsidise ment who will aid u. in our ^ perpetraU have tot promised ' ". %  "——..—..--— ,n ,r 1C T^^.e" D romlsed"'" "MI* $* C. O-d-d. Lder ol •"£" a.".r-Virnericin Cmuul .Xdi^al^h. .^.rman ihe O^PPC-lk^^ ,he p.-JtoJ-Jgg hus to ouy. (hjj( ihe Uader of the House had men* than lhat al present meted .Mr. W. A. .-rawiord (O s-w greoUr pswaonal knowledge of UUtatrte, H it" would have been good lor *,th the money it Ml deprived ; ^ purpose He waa a v%h* are anxious to '''"; ,hk ", .red whether u* lun them to say lhat they could M-1 .,, ti, ...ih tm source^ ( fM '^^^ Socialist because he ralaUvei in America, he said th Culat~Ofhces afTlrming his atUtude lo ^ %  %  oneeSSd. especially th.tun o, dl cr m ln a tmg^.d that he AmerlcanConsul. ho while he as not %  """<*'.." ould mean more bardaay that the charge madeb> the mention Insults, would member for Cbiiit Churcn was t ated on a certain • On iHge i tectiLin nf the community cheaper. one wouUer shuulu nut be allowed 10 remuir and the sugar be subsidized Iron, Uie Gi'licr..! HevelUlO Fund. Ou< „u.minK-icu wtvelher the amounl which was found necessary to subsidize it should, not be sprciu over the total sugar production Ln .ii... given year. Another alternative to be co. aidered was the individual lunai m the ligM of their individual impurtances^fladAUt any advantage of reducifnr^ahy particular fund ., man of -. to his views arul the couie ).:, .. of Ihe employee, %  they are Ireated In of ilul manner the Ministry of Food should 1* ttion Fund may be reduced t<> nsked every year to give an lnth.point at which you could creased price. If they asked for .,ll youf money sugar cheaper and then not get His point always had been lhat an increased price from the Minme UehabiMutloti Fund should lxlatry of Food. ieduced and as tar as tiy m l V V'V^.Msnd^bove -vervthlng else. ...... H. did not share the view thai !" COOC-T-d, ^J^gSft His^uSty ^gramme after the which wU -jw** vhlch went to build up an lie said UWt *" rn .r for".Ub..dlzlng no.n.c.tru.-turew.-.idgodown nsjjjro ^^^ ^ S trcaleo Ministry of t-ood would nigar without mterfering with! Oxe m t ro ^^,^ mb 1 agr. V H. like a pfx providing lhat he has automatically put up the price of l..,l>our Welfare Fund or Price l^V^^^^^'^ he to .peak lo the employees and nol * mnd the moment ..,,. Fund suiter. thoin "£?*£****} ^. t then ground on whkh furih level. ihev asked for an increased It was between leaving the ed to dJ n *' the „d, ; sr. ndi„a auestlon „, lelUng os, sugar go towjd __ ~Z£*gS. f?JZ2&T "$?£?\W\' f* m ^ nevaijeh ^wc.^ should jjg^f—fc^ You pay no more for th* GREATER EXPERIENCE BIKKFAST TONIC WINE \. TAKE HOME BOTTLE TODAY "''T He leurcsl lhat the privileges .. •J'". i.nd immunities to which Ihey J.U thinkins u agree would be abused by f*? the employes ""d he saw no ""."h^ ground on which further privilege, hich were then 0vT Inu ,,unllles should be political life Ull ,„ emptafs* ,lr to be foi" ... ...* ..-. ........ continued -tndennitelj on its down. present basis, but might very US MUd be ieduced to Ihe point at which Ihe exlrTTambunl could be ued M for the purpose. Tho t three .nlternativehe sold, sprang to hut mind id be eonaiderad it regret; the queaUeii came b*%  %  notice and Mthoul nioiv sutisucol Infonri tion. I V. B. Tatuhsn (1) sa.d many people of Barbados were c >mpl ming that sugar wi ;i t.." colony by ihem and it should mostly consumed be ci.eaper to the consumer. Hi He felt that an 01 t thai the people of Barbados should have been be told the reasons [or House, asking for a higher price. Th %  He said that in Mouse should not have met -n war. the consumers were gelling rrf.lv u ids on an lma Msck kind of sugar from the •n-taiit ; u>r luui that. shepkeepars and some of the Tie people fell, perhaps rightly merchants supplying the sugjii •o. thai th*; shovild get their ibllc mat had iwver in ui-. *••-'%  '"„-." •mambered wu aTe j^ing 1O keep the price have priority over other <"'" p)[> yB il Is and ever f sugar at Welfai lhat lie ago. the House look out money from the Treasury to „., stabilise sugar and he thought f^,,^ tVm.. % s^'tWS^ as s . mm** I,.,.-,, should have aot the ha undfrstoud il thl lho> wero .vrnTatiy of in. mZU,* Ihe EfM "da. Mw * Houie ft would have been useThere were tour type, of sugar ful if some member had niked a "> mis euuiiiry When he became Chance lor ol Ihe Excheouer, he "bowed Ih* wealth could be used, not onl> in liunarrow sense of economics as implied by capitalists but econ.micallv and at the same Ume ,., make all classe. comfortable The House stood a short e-hlle whether the Government Intended stabilising the sugar that was in cheeper, Sugar was one ol -i prlncipsl food* nf the Island ar< eettlng sui'ar more cheaply wauh mean saving money in the peupl*' pocketa. He old lhat the Govenum i. ^ould go into all the aveuu>< ti Qnd out if ihcap sugar could M sola in the is.ana. Mr. J. A. Haynea (B) said t> he realised that It was a vciy urgent matter for considerati.. but he did not think lhat ihe Hon. Junior Member for St. Peter, wnn tntroduoed the BUI. gave them •Dough detailsThat Hon. Mem* tye had given in a very brief ler the objects and reason* J „ tfU He (Mr. Haj.ios) was ifaat that member would give thor-i more Inform-ilion btforo this mailer is put before DM Council. 'PI on the Control Hoard, li felt lhat an explanation was necessary when |l wa .that that class of sugar should be sold to the public. Mr. F. L. Waleott said lhat some members said that the Govi eminent was railroading the > bill. It was not a matter of rail• .lulling it. The price of sugar would have been Increased to I the conaurninl public had not the Government adopted a mean". of -topping It. As It had come at that time, they had to choose it as an Interim measure In order to fix the price of sugar. He said that he was accused of not giving enough Information on the matter. He want on to explain that 10,000 tons of sugai Wan mniiuiwd locally and the puce would be raised by I' cents. That meant that they would have had about $136,000 What the (Government could th the people us Hie yellow piiasad. crystal. He said that they knew the colony *"** *"* -landard of living had f .ii n explanatton risen that when thjy could sen Canal Vt ill Bo given the '" lMu shops rive begs of yellow *_** %  **-crystal, they would possibly only „ .,.! V„ v | Msflittll the I814-1B **' I* !" Ihrec bags of dirk OlHUfCi MCXl il/>nlll crystal. r The fact that thety are subalAMSTERDAM The new Amdizing the dark crystol Is not sterdani-Rhine Canal, which *' %  ] rrylng out. in his opinion.^ the shorten by 50% the time required j( they would be gh'i/tg ...ore vower to tho employees to aacn out their cruelties o.. people of colour 'This power will caUM thc employes to behave worse h Mr"Adaans ld that Mr. Talnia might hove done a good to the community by saying what he | ko ujat said He (Mr. Adams! tv-o r.aver experienced these difncult '*He said that the bill only meant thS the American Consul would not have to pay Income tax etc As soon as they passed the bill the PAA -thajfs one reason why this airline has been "first choice" of international travelers for nearly c quarter of a century. NEW YORK by the fcrurtoos .. jt vis San |u-.n bj pop.it.t. irKmt. -'i* ."K "I-1 l HI -t' Non-Uop *rv.ce "El fieUdent*" %  EUROPE Regular service !>y %  decked "Stralo" Clippers' v;;." __.ling trom Amsirrdart the Rhine, reducmg It lo -0 hours, will be officially openo on 21 May next. At the same time *'"• the huge lock ut Tiel. the larg*" est inland navigation lock in the Id wilh a lock chumlni W 1.181 feet long wiU be opened b> Tliey ,11'I net expect to be treathave done was to allow the pne ed like children. Perhaps the of suga Hon. J iiuor Member for St. Peter tended had dlscurted the matter in higher sugar ai clrr-l-x he "aid. but *ey on the cents pe to go up In stabilise id maintain pound. But they inthe brown it at eight ise they made to the public. igreed with them with DO. hsidising the granulated sugar which was onljr used in few huniM The dark crystal much used in clubs and hotels for %  waateilhlg ronW but Ihe man I the street, whom they are supY2**L2J?\ helDln *uwd lhe >el y'ueen Juliana. mm crystal. ^ The new „,„.! i5 Q f great unite said that Ihey would not bo portance not only toj^ !" keeping the.r promise if W JTM watta • Sir *"• %  left oul the biggest seller this 1^"J* ffSsSandi and" island's yellow sugar — sugar * Jf :^!r7^atern Viroo. which is being used by the genhinterland in Waatarn "iurop. anil public. And who was the ________ %  %  —general public' 1 the man in the street. He contended that merely fully of what he had said %  ' to subsidize dark costal, they four limes more yellow sugar ll were not keeping that pledge. sold than dark crystal. He He Mild thai if they ware to that the rich people are oegiiget figures from the Sugar Pronmg lo realise tluit there is more | ducers' Association they would value in the dark crystal ami • find out that the bl_ost seller -with ihem. the dark crystal play was the yellow sugar. If the g bigger parl than any other type majority or this sugar ia bemg of sugar. He warned again thai -old and the majority nf the peoUie ..i-iidard of living Is nap.] the poorer class, why not and people ore using the yetlow gi_u dosUr%  fastest aiilmers lo Pan Enkiy Jopov-is in EngLmd. U> laod. PAA CliLipeii'-Uo ti> lu lud>.i and the Orient. Venezuela ----W HEN, early this century. 'OvaitiD lo serve the cause of good Health, It waa tinlaas sn s-igfo— prodQct. It readily won the support of aMdieal men. It was adopted by Hospitals and Nursing Homes. It rapidly established Itself In world-wide popularity. 'Ovaltlne' still maintains Its leadership ... Its essential diflfcrenuee. %  a_to Because of lu outstandlng merit 'Ovaltlne' la the regular rood beverage ln millions of homes, for promoting health and vigour-for belplng to ensore natural, restorative sleep. LeasseWeer — Qf——' asjsaaaai m* -VsAss. pm$t i b h qmsUty al (As issssaf pomlbU frit: ...i.ii |a >f.)ii.'i:ifwM_ ec.io^ubsidlio tho yellc lie asked them to ,ug_. think • Bill i th. Q SSBsstSI EXJOY THE PI.EAS1 Hi:* OF VUNSJ OS Kidnevs Must Clean Out Adds ataner iMsdJrmg.iir* iMIInfj rp Nlthl.. Htn — .i, t ,:,< %  ., „.k..f. A. tints Jo.nl*. Acidity •* %  wiilna d %  iVaS*tl^l***^• l •' ,: "* ,,JI^O, b, '• l•c- Bofdcn MRS MCOWTY S DEAD the *&&**!£&£* „ m HH AWINGS— \ SI PERB COLLECTION Bi S8EI.I. FLINT A HISTORY OF GOLF IN RRITAJM „__.„__ M -,, KRENt'II IMPMSSIONIRTS-'IFTY PICTURES IN FULL COLOUR WF.STERNS, ROMANCE THRILLERS. DETECT^T: AND PETER CHEYNEY Utlr^ HISTORY AHUMAN RELATIONS & CHRISTIANITY IN EUROPEAN HISTORY In Itutterlleld PRAYER Si HYMN BOOKS ,|] s./.-i .. $1.06 now received rVRENTS AND TEACHERS t We have made a enn-fu. v. i v voung children. I Words'*. "The Songs tl are now on display and may .-* (Or particulars. Telephanr .LAKE NOTE:— cltfction of readers suitable for nnftl Reading Steps". "Wifard • letters Sing", -U.. etc These \f Inspected it thi* t-ookshop Use LIFEBUOY TOILET SOAP You'll feel so fresh ir.J energetic after you've used Lifebuoy Toilet Soap. Its deepcleansinElaiher iciliv decs you of v arm.", keeps you fn>h so much longer! For freshness lit day and every day — u I Toilet Soap I'OK PERSONAL FRESHNESS i/.M M>



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VVLDM Slt\\ U'KII ItVlttt VIMts \,>,,i< \n I'M.I MM HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY AHC TO TLM; I SiSEP AV NECK TO STOP 9*0 MOE, Mf N HE WAS P*UfiP ALL THE rVHILE ANC COUlC" HAVE *AP£ Ml? ESCAPE ftOOP AH'hOW' Wt FOJHP >0u CaVldUNd ROM THE SOCKET RAWP... A FT* MCT A#UTES. AK? *X MttHT HAVE SUPPEP ANP ttC-UNO I* A5 6<* OE PIPOH THE F.OC* > IH| IAUHC-IH* OHAWCEC *(U IT** All CVE* SOW l-*-^ WHAT:' ivc "* ThANdS TO IOU. KENT.' OU ,1 C*VW*& THIS COWP HAVE PUT US At / K*5HTMArE — AHP TO SlEfP AKP SllPPeP y THE lOSS OF OHE OUT WITH THE BUCKET < ,C* VOuROtEWWIH' VCMtSElf I 1 PCH'T L VOU CAH'T oO OH TO • NOW MOW TO THAHK -**ITW HOW — ^^ >l>. Bill.' —^ W ID *l!j ^^ &"> *M 1 ktflte JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC MANUS %  %  H 1 RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND '.TS W.si-'E ONTWE LAMBse ; S-OW\CA7TAiN^/' \ SC^S'.3 WEH 'N FOR Bo kind to your face Uittiu 10 1 TOUI kOtTfl CM Mm it I ihc kttriwM (old :eam 10 clean* unlew. you alwi im ihe pcnihrM IXmt MM* >OUI O-taM g iant, eaay-'' %  %  noura. yet It laa^*,lu•.'•a and M'M-JI .Tha aua<*w ot thi ainailnfl 1 d ."•ary. ealla4 VI-TAB9. h. i..araal that It %  now l.mf a cf rarapkxi ntiflartion UM ln U t*-r -ara-.. VI T. ... • Mriy and foim llloiaj,,-•r, ae VOM maa*lr return iha •> iitiiilnblr n( our Hi 1111. Ii •. I <-< iuliisloo % %  and Swan Slrrel Uiually Now Usually Now POTATOKS — 4 lb*. 48 :16 Bollln MURTONS CUM M ** Tim CLASSIC CLEANSER 14 21 Tim JACOB'S ( III\M CRACKERS 1.12 I.S0 Tins NESCAFE (4-OI.) *7 Bn pbW, HONEY COMB SPONC.E . I 16 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE I < I O \ \ A II i; UROC ERICS THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES %  %  :v.'.. %  -. %  %  -i ANKC V^ IttJUPIlIUE fce-EVEWHN 1 L i NOFI %  The Book of Claudia Bv Hnwr I 'ranken Twelve years ago Eose Franken commenced to write the history of a woman and the portrait o( a marriage. She conceived it aa an entity, a sustained and extended story, to be told with the sophisticated technique of a single point of view. These novels, or rather these chapters of one long novel, have been read and loved across the world, aad are now for the first time, presented, as they were intended to be presented, as an integrated story in a single volume. The truly profound can always be simply stated. The business of life is living, and a fun damental part of that process is concerned with a man and a woman making a home together. Marriage, in the eyes of Rose Franken, is an art, and this penetrating study of a woman's ooul in its search for maturity explores that art. It explores it with the sharp acid of wit and humour, and a wisdom which is unabashed by the prevading tenderness and vivid passion of two people in love. Only occasionally in the world of letters does such a book occur; what Hark Twain did for the life of a boy, what Galsworthy did in the saga of a family, Rose Franken has done in the story of a marriage XOU OK SALE AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY



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P,U;K TWO 1 IIAKHAIM1S ADVCKATk uii.Mvin,. AMULtS, [• £Wfl Catling C 'ARIB to-day extends heart 1 congratulations to West Indie* Captain, John Goddarrt. n his thirty-thud hirthg*.. John who w*i* boni on April 23. 111*. has the distinction of a-.nt - Miss Mary Bell. She will t* -pcnoina three weeks' holiday aal Super Mare Quest House. WorthItiA This is Miss Bell's second visit to the Colony. On Six Months' Leave 1 SAVING for Engla nd yeatcr' day by the s s. Wlllesnatmal wis Mr. W. E tUsaett, Agricultural Superintendent of Montserrat, who was here for the past ten days. He JOHN GODDARD. O.B...| Lecture at Foundation M R. CAMERON TUDOR. M.A., (Oxoni. will deliver a lecture on South Africa and the Commonweallh,—a study in Origin* at the Monthly Meeting of the Old Boy*' Asncial.M< \| ill 25 jl 8 p.m For tonvrntion A RRIVING over the weak-end by B.W I.A., for the Conven'nm of the North American Assurance Company were Mr. Vernon Cooper and Mr K. Williams, the Cnmp.inv's representatives In St. Lucia and Grenada re sp ectively. They are staying at the Marine Hotel. Hcpresentauvek arriving on Monday evening by B.W.I.A.. for the Conventoln were Mr y Ctratl and Mr. Darcy Gait from Trinidad, Mr. C. de Cures from British Guiana and Mr. M. Phillips from Back to Trinidad M K KEITH STOUTE of T.L.L. Point-a-Plerre. returned tu Trinidad over the week-end by B.W.I.A.. lifter spending a holidav with his telalive*. He la a.aoi %  'i te. retired Vetermarv I Kensington Road. To See Her Son D R. CAliiiLINE RAMESAR o( St. Antine Trinidad, who arrived here for the Banter holidays with her two daughters and to gaa hrr ton who is a pupil at the Lodge School, will be returning home ov. i j A,-nk-ajnd. She IS staying hi Super Man Guess Hoot*. Grenada Legislator H ON'BLE T. A MARRYSHOW, C.B.E., Deputy President of the Legislative Council of Grenada, left for Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.. where he will spend ,i day before returning home. During his ten-dny stay In Barbados, he was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Adams at "Tyrol Cot", Spoonen. Hill. Hanid Lectured the Kittens —But She Wasn't Sure They Heard Her— Ry MAX TKt-:i.l. HANID had Blackie on one knee, and Whitewash on the other. Both kittens sat aery qulvtly. looking op now and then at Banid and purring. "You're darling*, both of you," Hanld said at last, pat-ma both of | them along their little Uwk a< the saine lime Bo as not to get either of them Jealous. "Bot I do wi.h." she added, "that you didn't both ploy tag so very much." "Do you keow." Hanid went on, addressing first one kitten then the other as she spoke: "vou've keen playing; tag eer since early, early morning;? When I first got up and Itmk'd out of the window, there you were, scampering across the garden. : rpl it up all morning until mmnti--.e when you M gssrta. '<>r a minute at two l" get sucer of milk. Then you The kitlen t Hanld. said ( darted all over again. You mu-i I-terribly tired, arent you V she said, 'ooklng into Blarkie's face. "Arent your* she said to Whitewash. Pasred I %  %  i Flnth kiiresft atnked back si Ranld, and purred'^ bit louder Ivefore. But ndsaW "f them anything "Of course,'' said Haiud. "I'm not ()uita sure it la tag that you two l>Uy. Maybe it's a special kind of kitten-game. 1 wish you'd tell me what the name of it is. Would yoo please, dears?" Hanid waited for a moment or two. The kittens didn't seem anxious to tell Hanld the nasM of the tag-came they were playing. So sh %  hook her head seem Rupert an d the Toy Scout—9 BOLD TKE MYOIINIC MtOOUCTIOMS MfSINTS m < aptors w nnord. siaTs as* l*ap Wda*. "Atal M ilw cr 7 Do lal as wh*i you an do-ng here." The orhei tcewU. Tm o'k:eg for Ssais aius." '. SIM. Chr.sim.is II jnd aS U fsailcnun has assr* work to do v( year, ehat wish Daoea houses ana saw* dh>t* tnsl asses ares aoasaat sad. Ht bosk* el saooaaly sasl walk big so ihe car he fishes aw i thing irundt one ef d*s | Mom Dad ae>VV*VOV%V'**VOV'^X si a at ItOIII rh-nalsr "MjM %  • • %  ,.iBll. .K.aif. .1 I.S*aesa.l WISl Tr AIM nw.u.s UB.HISTHA t DATsn^r. eAsrrNBB M.I i oaeENB TWfc lW/friAf KIWS STEEL KM W I HM At that very instant Old Patch, stopped washing her face, walked slowly to the end of the porch, took a -pring and climbed up to the roof. Hanid eonld hear her footsteps pat' term* across the shingles, up as 1 high as the chimney where the swallows were Hying during the summer. "Oh well," Hanid said to Itlackie and Whitewash; "f guess your mother likes it batter on the roof. The view must be better. But I do wish you'd both slay on the porch at least until the sun goes down and it gets cooler. And 1 think." Hand put hi as a suggestion, "you i.uirlit 'o wash your faces so you'll be nice and clean for supper." Sal on Porrh She set the two kittens .own on Jy (for it did I the shady part of the porrh. I"or a Would want j minute or two they real!., sat there. to keep the name of their gam* aland almost—bot not quite -looked secret) and continued. laa though they might atari 10 wash "Now wouldn't it be better to juBt: their faces. But suddenly, in the sit qoletly on the porch and rest' twinkling of an eye. they were gone, until supper time, darlings? Look I "Blackie! Whitewash!" called at your mother." she said, pointing Hanld. their heads to the other side of the They were nowhere to be seen, poreh when Big Patehle sat washAnd whan Hanld looked up at the iiig her face with ona of her paws, j roof to tell Big Patchie that her two "Your mother doesn't dash around, i children hsvtf disappeared, there playing tag or whntever-lt-fs. She they both were.cuddled n?v '• their .miwi It's too hot to run. She > mother, all three washing their •Tefllem't Ways the shady porrh; oh, I faeas, right neat to the Bun-but sol 1 i bucks of the chimney. WOME.X l\ THE NEW9—I Mrs. A. JL Stuart Mrs. Stuart is the wife of Dr. weaker until eventually A. L Stuart of "Noi-bam," Tweedcame blind for ten weeks. During Bide Road. She was born in British tills time she was kept in a dark Guiana but when she was merely room and the Studios afforded he %  even years old she loft for CallIhe bast medical forma where ihe WN adopted by tat* aecond show >n 1930 the School as closed but Mrs, Stuart contmi*d to train girls who look part ny entertainments. Such help the Excelsior her uncle Dr. W. E. Rlchardaon. Mrs. Stuart's love for dancing and her achievements In these classes reflected more than a casual Interett Hare was aeen n natural ability to handle the most difficult steps. Acting on this, her uncle permitted her to bsaal extra lessons during the holidays in New York. As she grew Into midteens she struggled with two deeires —her uncle's whose wish foi her was to follow the medical profesaion and htr own to make dancing her career and furthermore to create her own step* At KbaLrvtln 1011 Mrs. Stuart visited .. % %  i toother lo British Guiana She then went to Trinidad and the islands and later Barbados where she continued her dancing, lasting particular interest in stage shows In 1032 she left tor England and three years later was married In London. The %  acne year her dancing career was climaxed at Ktsueo Film Studios, London, where her afenu secured for her a third pan in "Sounder* of the River Mention. After was rendered School nf Mu.f Mrs. A. U STUART werfng she decided This Techniculour picture, dibecoming a movie actor, acted by Alexander and_Zoltan reeled aU attention to lici notne, She WB> also invited by tinB.B.C Korria, starred Nina McKi: and Paul Robcson. But aftei tin <-lose-up* were taken they discovered that the colour of her cyei was not suitable for the part Soon ..fterwards she took part u iUtns with Merle Oberon, Lesln Howard, Hermalne Bradlev and many other British stars tr. "Parade of Stars, 1935." Her dancRevuedeviUe Although she has no children Mr.-. Stuart is very fond of them, so in 1049 the dancing school wn* revived in response to several requests from mothtsra. Later In the year a Mannequin Parade and Dame was staged at the Drill Hall In aid of CLbsVttX. There was a repeal performance some time lalrr As the school grew Mrs. Stuart produced Revuedevlllc i950 and I9S1 at the Empire Theatre. These two shows reflected local talent among the girls and they are now clamouring for another I show. Through Ihe success of the last year's show. Mrs. Stuart has conBtrurted a new apartment for the achool which Includes a ballet I dancing, powder, and c-hanginu rom. and canteen. There ; ire also* plans 0 n foot for forming a club. 1 FeeUval Lisa Lokls, Festival Director,' invited Mrs. Stuart who is hoad' of the Barbados branch to bring i Uaioal troupe to I'uert.i Rico for the Cat ;;ud diIbbean Festival to be held in AuThe n--.tiv.il consisU ot B.B.C. Radio Profrwif Laaa • p m The New*. V1B p m The Daiir t. %  ,..-. 11 ,. m BBC MldUnO ll.M Dnhesirs. Sam. Cnme*>vr ol U)e Wtrh. S IS a.m. Ms lady from U> Star*, i M p in. Interlude. S p m nrotttsb MsSTasJoe. • It ii. m. CDUMIBI Conunennrv ( X v m Tnink on thsaa Thlnas. *' % %  i 1 ." 1 apnrlHound Up nd l'n*Si(iDime IHrods 7 p m. The News. TlOpm Hatw NPSTI rrnni Brnaia. m gal a. saaeai. ei 1 Itpm Calllns Uie Wast Indie* 1 *• p.m. B> Bequest. Blip, m B*dn-Niitfl. B 3B p.m SUlen.rnl <* Arrouni. %  •pm Inierludr. IBpm. rrvm UV Edilotiali. B p m a* Qeors*. 10 p m Tlns r i. %  Aiairr ns BaNniaiAwn %  tyrrlSi Kl. RtniNn TKIW* rat CANTON "It SONG OF TT>AS rnasv eat* i at a a u JAMBS BkBorniaa OP Miaaorai RO\Y on t aaaw* r. i sse a %  a oar. ANNA M*COT [WITH AN ALL-STAB HOLLY WOOD CAST IIIIII1TIB AUaiBNCI! WOMEN Only 4.45 p.m MEN Only 8.30 p.m AGE LIMIT 12 YEARS AND OVER! il as sBsta t / Thai BtaaaTC Inrlaar. powrrful Mnllral SeqiHDCM. SOt rr.omm.nd-U lor llir l\r .t-ll.artrd : |*| 4/ a.— iiviiiiiiiiis ,I"I "aliai OHINISl. IKIIIVl a-alla (Vl'llll | METRO GOtDWYN MAVER !• I ONS >niiinrini IOBU %  y a. 10 •• %  •• I &f .*• *IIOS iVga WTOMINI. in.inra sotAORON T ana p*srt(-roa OENIBAL k T STM asr BM.rWAY ro %  -AN;B\J and "DBAB MAN ana" Opamlas SAT. UB O Itt Qantn Pera — Rhonala rUattUna" TBI BtDBTgAD AND TBTK cowBor" and TBSJI MAIOC a jay n r iy s <.. "OVVK novrROYAL i • %  *•' a Ta c artsw t a a l u Wild SUl sXi40TT in •antia. rtma 5 GRIM SMtey WINTERS Bry MERRILL rmsMRENNK Kia.WYNN AiatiUVlS OUI 20TH CEMTURY FOX inn \so %  % % %  ii Opa-niaaaj Tra>* •• %  •• y a. i F .. %  aaaal U.li.al., CABLE vs. GARDNER Th* bailie olTnts i and tha battle I of the lexes! rax. lOain • %  a aw il IV1A Dt HAVILUUtD I "BUUUK nraaoa aaa MIANTOIt LABf" GABLE GARDNER CRAWFORD IMSttl • iiiqpwri MMOX'T ARGUE! VWf*Vm M:U:H SBEX it BEFORE. NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME IN BARBADOS IHE REAL, THE ONLY, THE GENUINE. AKVTUOJ raw to .i ripen r < urniiime but uniortunately she in Manchester at th,v .> •**• and tJT>Danem| School Other Intcreatv to Barbados Dancing Is her chief flair but 'V"V-, 0 f- Mr*. Stuart holds a diploma from in 1937 Mr* th. New York School in Interior mg ryulinee were taught hv Buddy Stuart opencda M. >. I tor ri.ineing Dc.ralion (1M5, and a cert-fiBradley--stage Director and Daneaitd keep Bl. The B-)K.I numbered c .-.iin Hair and Beauty culture ing Master at Estree. oW flfty and ihe reel* i that from Wilfred Academy. New York. 1 lL T..7— h "' """ '" allnfcl < 1945 Sh 'f toad of music, ...., s-i tssz ire .T p Bid ,n8 bee : 1 ': vm tig 5 ?&££ ^hUnJ7tTect n ,r0 w U ^r ^ oTL ? W ?* "?? £? Although X .."no, 7£& llfhtinK rffacta wfTe ten tim., flrat ahow at In. Empur Tlioatrr. at any Hoard or raalMilllmi .ho .trorjrr ,h.n ortlnar, IKtit. Af.cr Thl. wn 1,1, nicrau and .ho r,.lSnnSSnti, i !" aU w" 10 rt'arH. raany takaa and ratakea Mr. b>wln y,ar the nchool incn-a.ra aM h a. a .racial hilantt In Ihr became waakar and In numbm. Howrvrr after her lnvllvtlon to, the Blind Teefcnidou, At that ttma tachnlcolour hi'.n'l Stuan'v •Must Opened NEW CHIC DRESSES of New Materials New Styles Far Cocktails or WrdaJInr.* From SlH.ae) each aiao •t R-iMti15 dealer NYLONS — $7 New Cocktail HANDBAGS for — M.H The MODERN DRESS Shoppe Broad Si reel YM RtBeBbtr %£%?' lOQ UVfd YM'IY utiaj kf I'INBERtllA ALllL CHOiiTTCCHNKtttR ^a4-fV : "* FANTAS1A ^0' MERE AT LAST m mm DA>IH .....I II 1 I II Ml I II 4 III! HIWI I S I.KIVIISI Kill TOR% I'HYLLIS THAXTER RAYMOND MASSEY Gig YOUNG— James GLEASON SOSl-l I CALL IT Bill D! YOITLL SAY ITS %  LINT! PLAZA(BMaal 23 IB) HHIUI,IIII\ Openina Tll-Ml Hlltou (Thurs.l 24lh.. tATt and 8.U0 p.m. Also FSIDAY (.1 Show.) 1MV —1.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuinij Daily al 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. THEY WESE ALL WALT DISNEY'S. GIVES YOU ALICE! AND NOW HE si.on 11.47 PBINTED SPCNS 3@ PLAIN BEMRKRCi SHEERS M" 'a' WHITE, PEACH, BLUE OPENING SHORTLY. LARGE SHIPMENT OF CONOOLEUM RUGS. BY THE YARD. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORKS DIAL 4606 SS88?Z?' wi -^X? THE KIDDIES WILL LOVE IT—YOU WILL ENJOY IT N.B. Srocial with "ALICE" Walll Dbawy'l Academy Award Short Feature — •'NATURE'S HALT ACBS" Boner than "BEAVER VALLEY" and "SEAL ISLAND" This Alone H worth the Price art AdmiHtaa You can only get to Wonderland If Walt Disney takes You that* And he'll take you in hit Wondertlm As soon as It's shown hat*. EMPIRE THEATRE Friday. April 25th — Thursday, May lit. Bast GLOBE IsaaaaaNsi A MIB^ILL > turn vii 11 ON '•IHnilt, VI-KII a*0 '• % % %  •SI I I featuring AN INTERNATIONAL OROTJP or ARTISTES MON4H stairlni lire* I ( %  %  .arlBBaisajaar(Magician and ghiimbs Dancer) LOLITA—(French Onlann'i Samba Quean) KURABELLA (Eaouc Tango Dancer) JOE OLEMENDORE (we all know him) BOODROO BROS. IBO'i Acrobatic Rings) HAktVEy ROGERS (leading ballroorn Exponent and several other sensational stars Music by Keith Csmpball's Society 5 BBssWl Thi* $ptiri< I <> nuirrmr f,,r Won\e %  nD*B'H WRB F iaa ?isTiaawi a i ^ ,ajejBwo. c %  B' a B> a aaaaaia^aa>i 1AZA ClN E MA $ .CASTTH %  niDOtTOWN—DIOI till TO-DAY 4.45 a 8.30 P.M. J ^. tSSSR*. "The BLUE VEIL' Juan Bt/VNnr.l.l-Don TATUaBk-AsraH MOOBBaTBATI Abo Th, SHOKT. —"WINNING BASKETBALL" rtMMM. Iii"""i T.r. %  a-MMI IB Bosr. or SANTA BOA H:Ksucn H"T SHOTS BJOLH TB* OITLAB TB4UL C-inrlr r M -BOBB •( '•ASTA .>-*. %  11HS tt> UITI.AM IUMI ttllll The Garden—Si. JBBJMB DBAV a roMoaaoB aaa PM "B8TOND TBF lURRKT a-lle DA Via n MlriS


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PACE TEN Inter-school Meet Highlights Holiday tt'rom Our Own < nrrcsnondenl) ST <-FORCE'S. April lit. A feature of Grenada's Eastertide has been the island's "at hotnin WUi youth, luKhlmht beini! the InterWindward Island gehooli Tournament which opened at Park on Thursday with an athhHJc mwtini; and i-nd* on April 30 In addition to the seventh. <*id lads arriving last Turad. %  r. | i>\ the "Cacique del Carlbe" for the gome* (mm Dominica, St. Lucia and St. Vincent, as many I Island girl* have held .it Quarantine Station and a large group of Trtnilesa boys are holidaying BARB UK>S ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23,152 Sports W iiif/ow Tho I • >mp tltion openat Kensington tin. afternoon with a flitnt" between Puk*Kk Rovermid tattaa, Pickwick Rovers ar com pet mi Urn. season in the Sac *nd Dlvimon while Flir f ara l* tat Third Division. The Knockout Oempetltloa ti u open on* sod teams from any divi.ion can enter. It has bap pened in IBs put tiut turns tram the Third Division have finished >nng the finalist* so that every Knockont game provideit* own interest and I | •-.' Trinidad Itortl Hurlmdtis Agai n hrr The) WOO* ojened with the twottlnfl of the Gren' Clufa which attracted rig on rtf > i i. thirteen horses, provided many keenly events among the sixteen 'in ihe card. I Idlnfl honours went to .tcckeys Joseph and Levlne. IxAh piloting in live nmcij but the former securing five seconds and two thirds as to his opponent* d one respectively. Mr. C J. Bertrand headed the trainers' list with nine winners. Mr. %  Ifenwick taking four and Mr. Hex Ren wick three. Good Weal her SPORTS QUIZ The aUrbado. Advocate will award a book an sport to the Iret person who sends the cor tect answers to the following qUSSttOBS. CRICKET 1. Whan British Guiana won the Tnangnlsr Inter colonial Cricket tournament in ia06 one BnUsh Oolane< bowler took the last four Trinidad wickets in the nr Inning* for an extremely small scops. Who was be, how many wickets did he tabs and for bow many rnns •cored" FOOTBALL 2. A player throws the ball from the toucbilne to the era as bar and It bounces off the goslkeeper Into the net* Would yoa give a goal* WATER POLO 3. Who was captain of the Trinidad "Discovery" Water Polo team which visited Barbados In 1949, and was this the Brat tournament between these two colonies? SWIMMING 4 la what part of Us world did the crawl s ir* from Hundreds of other holiday blows nobody some good mid I .k.r* found ..ther pleasure jpots, have discovered that the query Gunn-Mum-o cominc in rot Noth> particularly the Island's many • similar to one which havinnd l>w r •—o, The final two smiles to be edekst match. will haw t bs-withheld until after 0W have no bearing Onlv incident, marring the pub^zS-SSi^SAtS^SS hVve dad will r> lie holiday took place in the earl). L^SSTSviSf n themscWr; DOtira of Wednesday when R iJa5StS^SL,mtJlimSSi AJlhwagtiTTtoWod gained .two,,uck rwturnlng Wtth a party of until after the .losing of the Quiz7. sot in the staelbandsmen and others from u Query Ne. 1. An opposing torhips da,,,-,, capsized on the Deausejour WBr d and the goalkceiN'r i.i Jamaica on Monday, it was ri ,. u) injuriag 1X ot wh om one and i, olh fall over the goal-line. ,T; o," ,, t ," %  ,i u la,or '" hBB ?fi rt The ball remains >n play but the — Caesar, %  Vinforwjiniiii:--r!iii\t'^ Teisnig Toarny On Saturday two matches the Easter meeting closed Saturday:— Results were as follows 1 Kingston Handicap. Seven I urkniv Cuum "F" Surprise Packet (Gobin 122 lbs > 2 Sun W-itch (Ferreira 122 lbs.) 3 Just-by-Chance (Beckles IBJ %  be.) Time. 1 311 Dlreetera Handicap. Six Ferlong* %  Oaaa "C" 1 Swiss Roll (Aphan 114 lbs.) 2 Black Shadow (Naidoo UB lbs.) 3 Downupsi (Belle 136 lbs 1 Time I 15 Record. Berbice llandirap. B\IX l*urlono Class "II" 1 Crackerjack (Patrick 113 lbs.) 2. Olivia (Heckle* 123 lbs.) 3 Black Beauty 1 Sunich 112 lb,.) Time. 1.16 jorle Halncs 24, of Gwynned ValBoorda llandieap. Seven Furlones. lev. Po„ smiles up at her mount, Flyii i Dutchman, at the Sleepy Hollow Country Club. Scarbor" ougi. New york. The expert hors* A-oman will maneuver her •mount In Intricate and difficult gymnastics without visibly guiding him in the Olympic eoenpetiHca. 'rnfemflffonal Excluiivt) Plantations Ltd* Versus Banks C. J. Bertrand's stables. pa bad Kelv... ^ ig tennis in which ( rn lnn |room n ttnche no five pets, foi B1 ihe BOd Of the thlin he was a winded man and had been actually bwatan m ihe third %  ipon foi Ta.lorv wia w ol v Knial] the n ictlwi nfter the KMO bUttU ol the tlr*. which had l>een verv Answer Ne. 2. Ye! WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codrlngton: Nil. Total rainfall for month to date: 1.99 ins. Haghest Temperature MS* P. Lowest Temperatnre: 73. 0* T. Wind Velocity: 11 miles per hour. Barometer: (9 a.m> 29 7J\ (3 p.m.) 29.878. TO-DAY Sunrise: o 48 a m Hnnaet: 6 15 p.m. Moon: Last Quarter. April 17. LtgfaUng: 6 30 p.m. High Tide2 38 a.m.. 3 19 p.m. Low Tide: 9 IS a.m., 9 IS p.m. light UcatU hod had to run a grea; Oi^iinrnar School and pr Albert. Q Nfc a> A plaver dealto counter the rhMhmic shortHeadmaster of St. Mary -a Class ~F." Pensive (Sunich 113 lbs) Just-by-Cbance (Heckles lie 1 lbs.) Surprise Packet (Gobins 128 lbs.) Time: -1.31 1/5. felony Handicap. One Mile Claas %  \ : %  1. Etoile-de-Fleures (Heckles 119 lbs.) 2 Port Walvis (Naidoo 118 lbs) 3 Double Link (Sunich 114 lbs) Time: 1.40 2/5. Vltsr!ii.en Handk*p. Six I'urlong* Claas "O1 Alarm (Beckles 121) 2. Golden Arrow (Gobin 128 lbs) 3 Sir Lassie (Aphan 112 lbs.) Time 1.19 1/3. Stabrwek Handicap. One Mile Class-D" 1 Swiss Roll (Beckles 125 lbs A tcim picked from the staffs ol Barclay's Bank, the Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Royal Bank of Canada will play a friendly football game against a team from Plantations Ltd., at 5 o'clock this evening on Y.M.P.C. ground. S Williaml) Davits 1> stemR, C. Davis, B. Armstrong. H. Jones, T. Davies. C. Evelyn, P. Potter. M. Weatherhead. Plantations Ltd.—L. Warren. A. Evelyn. J S Patterson. E. B. Rmi/ga'a XI Dl'ft'lll Dene f S. Smith. A. Hazel. A. WW* Al utHai Weatherhetd. K. L Jordan. P. Goodlng. D. ALIamby, R. Greenidge (Captain). lbs.) Anna Ti lbs.) (Aphai 113 SEA SCOUTS' MARINE DISPLAY 4QU4TK SPORT* WATER POTO MATCH —1 IIHIVtOHkS AT THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB (For local and t-uirina membert only) ON • SATURDAY, 26th April, at 8 p.m. Admission $ 1.4)0 Admlwion to C.ravpsrnd Beach 2/Oom. and the thttllliiR Shlp-to-Shor. BKiie by BiMche.' Buoy organlMd under the direction of the Harbour end Shipping Mn-trr M.I. PROCKKDS FOR rin: Bill SCOITSA8SOQUTIOK cross In lb deep eraw—A"*!?!. !n l lor adople.l. Hut after .1 rest < nearly IS minutes. IA'^.III retUIDSi refreahccl and ^n.lll forced point, _t the net 10 make Tsyloi nil i< often and Unpauioualy. iMuytnrt iured and with the referee's permission h is allowed to go Into uvlnjc two representatives in the "J "' !^. "V "~" J of r hte^„ The St. I..Cans ^* 1*^ JSEZT whh'Te re under R*wL £0 Canice. gllo ke0|>rr ln or „ or tnot !he re leudmaater of St. Mary's College. „„.,,, h rf Hayn ..(.,!.• M.,;I.-.' id Foster, Managing the sparkling shot* to Uie last. Taylorf/incentians are Mr. I. F. Gordon want down 6—9 in the nnal act. \i mn Otuto Muiiro had no trouble"! Yesterday the first cricket match should be a greater iving the goaP Answer Ne. 3. Yes. There is othing to prevent this. y Grenada and ntie Dominica strongth hns not yet been tested. A prl| 24. The football series start the foi WHAT'S ON TODAY Ccurt of Orand Sessions 10 a.m. Meeting of Legislative Council . 1 15 p.m. Meeting or Board of Health 1 M p m Football Kensington ., 6 00 gum. Police Band at Y M C A Concert 8 16 p.sa. Weatenars vs. Malvern at BtLeonard's. Doniiniea Boat St Vinceitt .From Oiir O—n Corrnpond.nl> GRENADA. April 19. Illustrious By 26 Runs A one-day cricket match at I 'Brisbane." Chelston Gap, Cullo-1 den Road, yesterday ended in outright victory for Rowc's XI Skipper Rowe of Combermerc Dominica won the cricket first won the toss and elected to bat round of the Schools Tournament on a good wicket. His team to-day defeating St. Vincent by scored 114 runs, of which N. four wickets. Resuming this Alleyne. M. Skeete and H. Robinmorning Dominica took the overson scored 30, 19 not out and 13 night score of 88 for nine to 107 respectively in reply to the Vlnccntians' 83. Joing back to the wicket St VlnBowling for Illustrious. M. cent reached a total of 86 after Barrow. E. King, R. Suttle and H. losing the first wicket at 43. Worrell took 3 for 18, 2 for 21 and Daisley was again star batsman 2 for 31 and 1 for 10 respectively scoring 43 in this innings before Illustrious replied with dismissal. E. Emmanuel for runs, of which M. Barrow. V. Mi Dominica took seven St. Vincent shall and M. Jones scored 23 not wickets for 25 runs and top scorout, 14 and 12 rcpectively. Bowled with 27 to enable his side's n g for Rowe's XI. M Skeete and iceded 65 for victory. Fielding A Phillips took 8 for 24 and 2 on both sides was again splendid. r or 21 respectivel: ARTIE'S HEADLINE 'Tw rtrnc'icoji dofiarjOH Brttuh poandj / New Record Wilb.nu Cittern ,.f the C..0.S.S. low them to play? Answer No. 4. Y. The referee must allow them to play. The Laws of the Game state >hat not MORE than eleven players etc.. etc. St. L.wiu DclYut Grt'iruda Hv .">*) (uery No. 5. Sometimes ihe crowd in the Public Stand gl rJaaiwd I*ft II s. Ins in the High Kensington is very unfiattCruiK .lump to >>e..l the previous mark " linesmen and 1 know lhai some by an inch after eliminating his linesmen prefer not to line near Dominica rival. S. Robinson, at that stand. Suppose at half time 'J it. ins, and then did an exI timui linesman decided that he hlbMOn limp :a 6ft. In addition, would not channe over and RO b> he tinned 111 a new time in ihe the Public Stand, cjui the referc 440 yards and was paitly responorder him to do so* Ibis tat Ol %  M i l s clipping a fimswrr Ne. 8. Yes iniinite from the rwCOTd Ul the '"I lielay. Querj Ne, C. Suppose both A Kingal of Di'inlnicu In the linesmen waved their fiags at thi Pole Vault bettered his own ieUH am 0ns linesman told the cord in 1850 by two Inches, clearreferee that he had seen the fulling 10 ft. 5 ina. back handle Ihe ball and the othei Outstanding In the sprints was linesman told the referee that ht Hugh Bain of Presentation Colhad seen the player pu-h the fulllege, winning the 100 Yards and back, what would you do if vat 220 Yards fur Grenada. were referee? A bumper crowd attended the mevtmt!. among them being His Aaswer Ne. 8. I would drop UP ( Honour the Administrator and ball tad continue the fame be-1 n Mr*. Macmillan. "in Own C F n-iumdenl 1 GRENADA. Apul :. St Lucia won ina %  acorad ~~ m ~~ ~ round in the inter-school cricket acortaU with 4D. Needing 184 ti scries ! %  -' %  %  1" %  Oranads By BJ Wlli ,, t 93 minutes. On-nada runs. OfwBadt onta added M -ven km-i-kela> > Answer No. B. Yes. If the liming tOUL Hollis HusU.1 top. three-day tinnl stnrlinc Thursday i within the penalty area I TheyII D o Ir Every Time •By Jimmy Hatlo Mmnftt \ WE HAVE RECEIVED A SHIPMENT OF LARGE IMAMIKS I Mlllll I I AS SI0.77 — BBBTV AT OA'f'E! CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. LTD. 10, II. 12 S 13 BROAD STREET Shirts by Van Heluon Austin It.-.cl Consulate %  Elite Atrtex C. B. Rico l> Co. > %  <' %  < haul l.iili.is $100.22 e JUST FOR SAYING GIMME A CARIB 99 li: IIP AM. THK CLC3; \! Carlb knows fhe difference ... Port and Siarboarcl stern, but so does anyone You could possibly moat him—though wo doubt It. at the Junction of 10th Avenue and Pii.e Road and Tudor Street and Sobers Lane. f He's not a taw enforcement officer but detiniteh %  -Q" man n m HI sei flaw food a delecllve sre voe. Mr. A Mrs Barbados ? The makers or Sparklinf Carlb Beer sponsor a 'i.m:.rtii..in for gulch ihlnklnf tJ.ifbjJ.aii*. Slmpl* lee — Tea Juei deseaver their najsterMss Mr. Carlb and rhaHenfe him personally with the won'— "C.imme a Carlb. Mr. Carlb." If you're, the first sctectttr to be right yoe'ee earned yosrself twentv-flvr dellars. aad shosM >on happen 10 have a Carib bottle rap with -..TI si the lisse toor prise will be one hangred deUara ana Iwenl* two rents. So walch I hi* for Hur* — Ht Ml MHI If DO NOT Tri.FPHONK Mr. CASUB. efiallence him peraonallv between of S am. and I p.m. And remember loo that any thirst deft Carlb. OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS BUT THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH RESPECT TO THE HIGH QUALITY OF >IA1 I Kl MADE SLITS Hr. Wm. Ilrnr* Slreet 27K7 WHO RUNS THAT MACHINE NEXT TO YOURS? SAT orna nar rauoaawj TERMITE-PROOF BtTLDING MATERIALS OMRSZ INSULATING M.I .III i Mill SHPKTS In Ihi.l. I it v ft.. %  rt.. If n WALLBOARD MOULDING for tmns) Joints STANDARD II Mllilii 1 Mil > SHEETS THE BOARD OF 1.000 t'SFS. ', In. thick. 4 ft. x 6 ft.. 8 (t.. 10 ft. TEMPERED II Mil UK I Mil I SHEETS i. In. thick, 4 ft. 6 ft., 8 ft. PLYWOOD SHEETS hi. thick. 3 ft. x 7 ft. 4 ft. x 8 fl. : 10 in. thick. 3 ft. x 7 ft. 4 ft. x 8 fl. TI RNAL1, ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS in, la. thick. 4 ft. x 8 ft, 'Phone 4267, WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.



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I'M.I i. F: HARKAltO* \n\ in \l| mmv,0j^xm |.0\l0\ LETTER Federation \Vcdnc>da>. April 23, IMS SI AW III 1(1 lOII I DURING the debates in the House of Assembly earlier this year some very unflattering statements were made by members against the Canadian engineers loaned by the Canadian government to the government of Barbados. During these debates Mr. Adams honourably defended the Canadian engineers and attributed the misfortunes of Sea well to "extraordinary bad luck." When the House considered the Connolly report $60,000 were voted for repairs to the runway. The Legislative Council later sanctioned this expenditure. At the time nome members of the House queried the Government's reasons for voting $20,000 more than the $40,000 suggested by Mr. Connolly. They contended that whatever sum voted would be spent Repair work on the runway began about mid-April and this week almost all of the 1.700 square feet on which asphaltic concrete patches have been placed have been completed These patches have been dug down and refilled some to a depth of 18 ins. and one to a depth of 6 feet but average depths were between 2 and 3 feet. The completion of the asphalted patches this Week promised well for the endine; of the whole job not later than June at a co within the $60,000 voted by the government. On Monday, however, the concrete conveyor which performs the work of some three or four men in a quarter of the time MB discovered to be damaged. Unless that concrete conveyor can be repaired locally in a reasonable period of time the repair of the runway at Seawelf wtl! be delayed. If concrete blocks are laid by hand it will greatly increase the cost of the job and the House's grant of $60,000 will be exceeded. It is right that the public should be told these fact* promptly. Had public statements in the form of progress reports been issued during the construction of the new runway not only would much of the mudslinging tbat was done in the Ilouae of Assembly and outbade have been nnpusible* but corrective action might also h.ive been taken at the time. Now is the time fOT an inquiry to be made by the government into the damaging of the concrete conveyor at Seawell and the facts of the inquiry must be placed before theaubhe It is not fair to the public keeping them in the dark with regards the spending of their money. The $60,000 now beiuft spent at Seawell are coming not from the United Kingdom but from the government of Barbados. Work has been going on at Seawell for nearly two months now and 60 per cent, of the concrete slabs still have to be laid. At the present rate of progress using the concrete conveyor the work would have been completed by June within the limits of the sum voted by the House of Assembly for repaint to the runway. The damaging of the concrete conveyor cannot be regarded as a normal affair nor even as "extraordinary bad luck." The nature of the damage suggests that It was wilfully done. Failure to enquire into this damage and failure to report the findings will breed no confidence among the people. The public have become very sensitive and rightly as to how public money is spent at Seawell and Mr. Connolly's placing of responsibility for failures at Seawell on the government and the contractor was not reassuring to the public. This time there is no contractor. The government is responsible for the work and is fortunate in having the assistance of Mr. James of Canada to help them carry it out. If concrete conveyors are sabotaged and concrete mixers put out of commission the work at Seawell cannot be said to be proceeding smoothly. The public await with perturbed minds tor an announcement from the government that immediate action will be taken to inquire into the suspected snliotnge of equipment being used to repair the run way at Seawell. nterrsts of eom%  n) apt to forImportanre ol %  "In The Empire •* LONDON. "riles New „ T '" %  Bum! nl B. BIYIKl.tV BAXTER lo ial thr MlHih I Commons is always .1 pleasant llarly at this time ours for the taking. Those counget the primary of the year when spring has nottrie* which have not succumbed 10 polr. ten over her first tearful doubts lilllMlllllllll by dull tin., will fa.I But with all thair fumblm* and i' settled down to a niaiitriilv to the Russian sword." and yes aad bunglinaT. aial Ille '" %  snorting a wanung to the budge strength of the humsn spirit. ..' . B )n !T Ur ltCL tn?.<*.ir. !" Commonwealth in its current l'isue. that the, arc com,,,, through, and We a!..,, forget the Greeks so _" pVl, "?t "rtST 11 SraeTsO' It is soothing to watch those wise ..ally, yet not only did they light £, sSE Canal*inhou" Twtdesl %  notlonlea. philosopher, of Ihe It.l, in the war but took on Cerour ah's, Vould Jay" to make TrT' 'iT h7!r ,iiU'""I!* ".'".t" ",*" * W *"'. T^ heroism la i„„, ycyaae round the Cap*, that be pertinent to inquire whether anything is to be learned from the examples* of federa.V thai I the U.nK oerupatli n if II,. want lo writs Una Mist from man-, had er.ded. they fought ths t'.K. Acts Swiftly London, for there are idea*. In my communist rebel:ion "that w.> to The British acted bSSd tnal need clarifying. n nd I put Greece in the h g. That was har.hly. mercilessly This was a have a feeling ih,.t if uM job 11 blow number one for Stalin. threat to Britain's ar* power and well done the process of tlariflciThen who would have thought tna '* something which Britain Utui imy Ulwrninc some or the dark that Tito, the plump wonder bov wlu t *' te from no country. Selare only three examples of unitary govern""i sUTCS^lte '^STSSSST 'i£ft. *& ^^^J^JSTr^ Sjn-nU. namely, the Union of South Africa, let nTadi 1 th? in writing ot onl > ut ""** J, u *W'^I Jt '** "Li. !" -U ?: r Ncw Zealand, and Ceylon. The others are about the condition of |ha world hi as It k> at ibis moment I New Commonwealth continues : "It may tion which we already possess. It is not perhaps sufficiently realised that among the Commonwealth countries which are known as Dominions, excluding Great Britain, there • that came fro. tho Kremlin wa directed not at Yugoslavia but at l.l\ Bcv.rU* Bait*r is a Caiia dian who came boas* to con staer England In fan am. bio graphf h. described lth what painful sxpariaaeat, fa. sotarMl Fleet Street 1 an* the srorld of Basllak foaxaaluaa. WitaiD a faw yaan BTtrter li"r was a-Htsc •( UM DAILY EXTftSM aa4 saw sf UM bnctatest lagkt* W UM worM ha fca4 so rsosaUr MIsasA Hanoi auaV otta rsp a tau— art t ar —< to Mskuaf aaaUMt W.ta U* e-t OT of hf. as4 tha *U4 vhich raSocu Ufa. ao bocasB* toiiaanc aw*i Saafeiits Uifaur Nat roauat wit* aa •XI*M what influenced by having Just Ustaned talk by Antftony Men. 1 am not In a po*!Uon to quote him but ". harm In saying that he ^ opiimutie ajxat the |nii4i ture than may tune since the wnd of th<| Hitler r, and remember Kden may be a romantic Ofl dui> | • comes to foretrn affairs. Thing* haw not worked out according lo plan for SUlin That does.not jnean that th* western world ha* placer! ( MeU : preenable position or that wrstem slate m*n*hip oe w r voa • %  of genius Democracy alwaji muddles iu affairs arid t'^fr l.a\. •v of mistakes since the war-worn democr a cies put away the sword in 1M& and ssoa up the Stalm L not a foot like Hitler •Mil he has pc-routted hMUssw tbt •ame bar Mrt/kre.g anj the f.nal dream sal a wVtortous Third Re. •d upon the corpsf-t of ,\ a dream that ended .l suicide In the bsmker. Nasi % run Stalm Una naruiy .aaen ovoi .Iryo. lattun when nc t*s-n to pi-i, his IOWQ to sosoiuie pi e beu**-?a tnai Would he at **c SflBl | %  SraassSsOCT time aa m—'. calew all uiose Maoers ot me pans '* %  !' ft !-•...-:> or .uenu.m'. but ejucuted nail tne general iuu i i i*oned or lnjuid-tev. '^HBBV of State servanu in utv governmenl depgutmenu. 'You \a.ue life too nignly in tne West/ •..1 ;., L>,iu BtaViTUroo* n, tho war, "nothing u so easy tc %  •:> '•• lOfnan beings." fanjad to make **i %  bu.lt up UN .n.n,.uv Blgtit 01 ^ Rumania tc Hussia aiul iuu laTtssS rai l ii acI Ubs Tito would arise, security of Germany by tominunArtinn Fv-ential tna. but Hitler acted before Russia was roady, and stalm teas forced to embrace the gorilla he hated and then Jlght for h. ,-.-.%  "in vmpiu.mx m lire' ,. , in .J. British Lion had come to an end. a examples of federalism; namely. Canada which consists of ten provinces, each with largely IgsMtvd %  • M *>tUl la rariiasMtat and .ufl a jearmal ist cd draaa l M Th ADVOCATE ts oow aUs to atfot Bastar* utumato agSssssSsI Iks OIBBSBSSSJI Wlaatoa OarckUL U Oov ll % %  ml and all that catcher kU ays—th* ays of a frse and brilliant critic—on th* resaarkable itagi* of affairs at WntBilDtar This COaunaBtary Is siaUlar to tha account Btrerley Baztai rrndars to hi* own Canadian eonntryman a twice monthly foatnro that U a* fanou* a* Mac La an < Mags tint in which it appear*. li a r hat western **her and oceanic p.,wer made such conQuast a highly t.roblematical alTair* Why po' lull the west to Stalin was losing face, a sleep? WHQ %  • reasondangerouloss for even a semiableneas Prsuadj the oriontal. Something had to be world to leave Asia to the Rusown dune to .how the wotid who was slans? the iortlla turned en miwSer. .meu>lng dramatic. Ironic and humiliaUng but nhort Asia Still i.cft Stalin saw hflr troops being of ;.r. So Russia closed the Stalin, the t.,mbler, was runluuleU sack b.it when hs realised roads supplying the allied zones nlng out of chips but There was that the Atlglo-Ajnartcans would in Berlin The Anglo—American always the chance of Lr Grand not lc.i\. ft i |a ho tho mercy of reply was as swift as a thunderCoup if Ihe rerr Hit.er his coufldanosicturnrd c,a P "P 0 a narn ' Hffhtnlng. put on the wn Until the war was over there was W'*' 1 a romr * etigines the .iir other wonts. As no time for politically educating' 1 1 hBffan, costly, cumbersomo Nor did St.ilin's swift brain th.irumbling cauilalisu world huX ,l '*' *"• %  Thc wes ni 1 defied end there. With the genius of a ..r iSuhndevuUrdhia whole effort Su,,m for lne flrrt Ume "^ !" n wnc> hy hl ow **** "** tn to th^defeat^f GeVSgnr HiVtorV Stali^ ^ .ill ord thut in that effort drew away to nurse pride Where could he liml %  ol.ice f.,i intrevTi b^weea. th*, wtDsg 1,s separate legislature; Auatralia, comof thf*e word* and their aabprising six States; India, which not only cm% %  ration but I nsahr Uitw prwphe, ,. , , r) (RI Mjl rersia and bodies the former Provinces but also many Ea-ypt mill rae to terms with completclv organised Princely States, such Great Brltoia. If 1 am proved ,,.'.., ., ,, rishi thea RaMi utii hate lest as Hyderabad and Mysore; and, to a lesser c**o saaerea f creai haae. extent. Pakistan. We should therefore have The truth is that while both ample experience of federalism to draw upon Persia and Ifypt dcepf> resen:--d within our own borders, what tliey ealleii the ImpertaUsm „, of the Anglo— A -encan alliance Indeed, we are already extending the neither was wnUuisj to accept principle, where its application has seemed Human comm u r-w xt en alter, T, ^ -,, ,.. ,. naUve. ; .ihle. to Nigeria, with its Regional and Ttius we corn. :. thi aigniflCentral Assemblies, but Nigeria, too, is a cant paradox, tlia. while many of ., the smaller nati. an m revolt large and diverse country with an area (.gainst the Viet ^Vsception g re ater than that of France and pre-war to accept coanrr... ..-T-. as a subttermanv combined. Ihe case of Malaya is stitute Thw may be otinudl different. This small peninsula was alreadv encouraeement the weatem r CsipitaUist world i .: equally, it split up into separate Sultanates when thc fPR" "*** XF&2! !" w ^ British arrived, and it was essential for effllonely man in tn* Kremlin. But *hsslaiL d<-sptie lus years cient admimstiation lo apply some degree &^L£?££& a i£l l .ot Meralion: oven to, some States In the the world. Unlike north remained unfederated. Centralisation ,wever, %  ended teadjljto .nereaae, and ix his actions. He ,-an switch and after the war the Malavan Union was pro'ic^^iton^ 11 ,F&nfl ** rf ^^ P^sed. leaving the Malay rulers only thei: Therefore ou: of wie blue he religious and cultural functions. w-en-t back on eA-erything he had said and offered Germany the chance to re-unite I speak with i "Let us turn to the far different case ol l^ilvsr*s&^led ,, e\!" :,hc Caribbean. Here we are recommendinf foreign minister in -he western federation to the*e widely-separated com^iWpoatris; stahn was *mcere— [Ilinit '^ largely because it is desired to conand otherwHaewhy should #.e;fer on the West Indies dominion status, and sX.Sdhe* t2T1he'~ri!uroi h a th,s woul d > impracticable unless there i.: te-i r..5.-r...i r..r.nyl 1 \wvuWOO* well ^ the foreign were in favour of federation, only those of of the Dirmn.ons, were ,i_ • i n %  • i.> %  *£ %  • p-irzled aivd 6>epi> concerned. ,ne mainland Colonies, British Guiana and v. it wasriot so puming since j British Honduras, whose circumstances are not'rive up the* MrVaf 'rnnquer' ver >' different, demurring, and the Montego in Europe in view of the indij.Bay conference agreed to recommend fedputable fart that western military, ,. 'eration, following the Australian model, though of course nothing could be more physically dissimilar. Since then, however, some doubts have become apparent, and those who know best the atmosphere and greath differing conditions in these isolated communities and what is called "island mentality" are equally dubious about the wisdom tiling chips were! ar| d practicability of an elaborate centra! ning number, in administration superimposed upon the island Governments, and tend to ask whether sufficiently useful result could not be achieved by functional association, such as a Customs Union and other similar links, which This most recent esample is typical ol 'built-to-last' . products. STOVES VALOR (Table Models wi.h one and two burners) Largo Two and Three Burnar Models OVENS — Small Medium Large C. S. Pitcher & Co. j STERNETTE REFRIGERATORS 5.6 cu. ft. Capacity Sealed Unit. 5 Year Guarantee. PKICE S 100.00 DA COSTA & CO. LTD. Elfrlricil Drpl. UM ffiii'.,,:.; %SLFS2St£2g!k c nl "* "l>n.auch a loo* assemblage ol diverse unltf. dictator*} tipOf Impen.ilis*. issin he changed his strntegy mirTc couin miioii %  < %  %  i.ii 1U1 a swiftnesK th.it was only EfcTr nlTSSr ^.,f;" i-"i" 1 tfl llls ,. u 0SlO em ? Abt^o -ll when quailed b. ,u %  -,.,,.,„. Hitherwould also probably appeal to thc mainland w,.., s ; ,:-,„;-£. i ^?l oni r a nd evc ""' B ermud '"""" (la M1.H1 out i-iii.itw.ism ia,a diut „ world w,u Tbi annrer \^s too it (•< vvorth Gcner.iL M.K.\i'lu.r laid in.in Suddenly Russia started to export n-.liiin tli | dictators ^NiioCatP Ncw Vork Uiat thc north Korean fixwl stuffs to every country, and unlejas (day choose g Hloe army was the best trained and territory (within thc Russian Zone best equipped military unit he of Influence) that needed them, had sTeS* fought against. The "We bring you peace and good fiaaarianj had done ,i wonderful will nnd food," cried t/ie Russian.". ob In preparing this formidable "We are the peace-makers." irmy and wore ccrlaln 'hat by The menace of the Kremlin, the revolt, Nehru\ hour haul er.'..,. tn xlu ll ""' ,h *' western nations threat of the Red Armv, the 1mw i? gni-eAW >kl ll 1 c uW mak< "P lhrir m,nd Sou,h Pble %  SVerlW of Imperialist . ".< .Jsr**" '"* K* enr IV bankrupt, France •, hied AmPrlca •f'*' a Wllh incredible from a military standpoint it white and Halv %*aa ther* f !" **''tne*s. We cannot yet see the cems quite clear that Russia has %  mild try to maintain her t,„Yrt Stalin had two great hopes S eormnilnist h-Sen d u Wl ot ditlunal policy of denying a warm —Persia and F.gypt If only the There I ^i ,it CUM U rt,,i water port lo Russia. The Kremlin anti-British outburst could be may I remind vnu once more -hi. had become the pelve of vletosustained In those two countiie. s springtime IMS and that the I-ious Communist Imperial What dreams Stahn must hiv lud in hi* waking noui faligi the n robbed lii III, i>( thvm in the., surely the door, would be R u lan UmetaUg called f-.r the riod and ptyiny beiween the same part* in the B.W.I Vincent. The French To The Editor, The Adrocate— SIR,—I am Imaged i.n.dil to \ A \^ caiT j„i out of this port many Mr. F. I.. Y. Simpson (or having during the same period 771 pas. his letter of the 20th of this rengers and brnught lnS36. making th. published those remarkable „ to t a l 0 f i§o: passengers for the The only great nation which had figures. I believe that Mr. Simprm....ed granger from the war son made public < tljesc figure, to lt must ^ remembered lhat the was the United States of Americ;!. prove that the C.N.S. have l.een, CJfJj „,., v ee a subshh but why -hould Slalin doubt that for the past couple of years, „\\ t h e n.W.i. colonies and"not the (lie fondness which Roo VniBMB a pecialstand alone. It would most parlson. attempt to claim th' ly as Churchill was no longer in naturally appear to those who cJA has given adequate and a position to fortifv his aplrltr know no better that the of 73S satisfactonservice during the 1 do not doubt thai St din must pn'sengerg dealt with in and out last couple of years. haw l.-nked out from the window* of this pott for the year 1931 kid bo considered favourable Yours faithfully. Spring of 1952 the world will be Such figures however look .ather A. D. G1TTENS. "In Africa the problem is difllcull, but ai least equally formidable for other reasons In South Africa, we already have thc plural community, and the Government's somewhat despairing and negative solution if ils racial problem is segregation, with permanent white domination. This Apartheid policy is already having repercussions throughout Africa, just as British Colonial policy in Africa necessarily affects the Union. Federation is now proposed between Southern and Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, to form what would become a Central African dominion, with safeguards for the rights and intercuts of the African inhabitants in the three territories. The arguments for federation are strong and. indeed, urgent; the economic ones are generally admitted, but view of increasing pressure from the south, the political advantages of a stable central State are probably equally great. African opinion, however, is at present deeply suspicious. New Commonwealth adds; "Whatever happens in Central Africa will undoubtedly have repercussions in East Africa and even in West Africa. Nigeria and the Gold Coast are no doubt large enough to stand on their own feet, but not so Sierre Leone and the Gambia, and all four West African Colonies are separated from each other by French territory, and what is lo be the future of the Sudan ? There remains the question of the economic and political future, in this complex modern world, of all those small and widely scattered units in the Commonwealth — islands in the Pacific, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, outposts like Hong Kong and so forth, for which no obvious form of association is possible, except perhaps under the "protection" of one or other of the larger units. At present, that responsibility ^d widely only by Great Britain." Itltl \KI AM I'OOIIS Rabin llaad Oala Quick Coekini Quaker Oats Msrtao's Scotch Oatmeal Crape Nata < r, %  .,„, of Wheat All Bran U'ert-a-BU Shredded Wheat Sausages In lloKreah Sausaars t'inadlsn i % %  Smoked Kippers Danish Raron n.vK IOIIKI: For a |ood cup of Coffee ordrr IMI'lRt: COFFFF only l !n per lb. Chase A Sanbarnr Purr Coffee 1 in per lb. •r Chase & Sanbernr Instant Coffee .87 per tin 40 to 45 Cups per tin Here The? Are Calves Liver Calves Sweetbreads Calves Ki.lnrs. Fillet Steaks Mlprrd Steaks Froien Haddock Frosen Salmon Raked Beans Spa.ir.plll & Ckeese Kraft t h, . (louda Cheese Carra Hoda Biscuits MK IAI.S 1 Irh .im.ui's Vitamin Yeast 1.48 per tin Loose Tea I aa per lb. Ilressed Rabbits 42 per lb. llrp-i^d Tripe .12 per lb. Phone G0DDARDS WE Deliver