Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895



Sunday Advocate



The Democrats Are
Assessing Harriman

(By HARRY W. FRANTZ)
WASHINGTON, April 19,

Democratie Politicians made swift appraisals of the

qualifications of W. Averell Harrinian, Director of-Mutual
Security, following President Truman’s tribute to him as a
patriotic and able American citizen.

Chief speculation was whether Harriman as a northern
“er “liberal” could attract wide support in the west and
south.

NEW YORKER
WRITER EYES
CARIB PRESS

PORT OF SPAIN, April 17

Mr, A, J. Liebling, ace writer
on the staff of the NEW YORKER
magazine, paid an Easter holiday
visit to Trinidad and the Carib-
bean Commission. With Mrs
Liebling, he is taking a leisurely
look gt this part of the world
aboard the “Alcoa Pioneer”.

Mr. Liebling is well known in,
press circles. His articles in the’
NEW YORKER under the heading} experience in world affairs
of “The Wayward Press” have] ‘Tryman’s friendly remarks
made him internationally known.} about Harriman were interpreted
The foibles of modern newspaper-| by political experts here as mean-
dom are his specialty, ing that the President would look
. with friendly eyes u arri-
It may be said with reasonable! man’s cantideey. but vile oe.
certainty that he will do a piece! garded as a direct endorsement of
on the press of the Caribbean, He] his nomination. It is not expect-
left Trinidad with an armful of}ed that Truman would make a
local papers and a gleam in his|statement of preference amon:
eye. {Democratic candidates before the

Questioned as to the future of| Democratic convention,

Republican politicians ' specu-
lated that the eleventh hour
‘boom” for Harriman would com-
pel more general public attention
to United States foreign policies
and their future implementation.

Truman's generous remarks re-
garding Harriman occurred at a
press conference, one day after the
withdrawal from the Presidential
race by Governor Adlai Stevenson
of Illinois who had been regarded
by “New Deal’ Democrats here as
the perronality most likely to
carry Wirous the foreign policies
and foreign aid programme of the
Roosevelt and- Truman Adminis-
trations.

WORLD AFFAIRS

None of the remaining Demo-
cratic contenders other than Har-
riman has had any extraordinary







the Caribbean in general and the R . . :
Commission in particular, Mr.| Tihe situation at the Convention
Liebling was non-committal, “I will depend upon whether New
am'’ he said, “too relaxed with|Y°rk state Democrats

and scenery to have a really | phe extent of

serious thought in my head. I can, !
however, borrow words from

fellow countryman who said
something like this; ‘Let us hang
together, as otherwise we shall |
certainly hang separately’. And
as for the Commission, what
better m e a ns of hanging to-

probable
Harriman from other states is
not yet predicted because Harri-
man did not enter any of the state’s
primary elections,

—U.P.



B’town Before

gether’’.

The Lieblings went on from | t °
Trinidad to British Guiana and M. j ff
Surinam. They will stop here O or ra 1c

briefly on their way back to New
York. ON special exhibition at
the Museum is a charming
gouache by Lady Gilbert-Car-
ter of Chamberlain Bridge and
its surroundings, which Lady
Gilbert-Carter has presented



STOW WILL GET
POST IN KENYA

(From Our Own Correspondent) jto the Museum.

GRENADA, April 19. The gouache was painted in

John Montague Stow, .C.M.G.,|1909, and is a view~ from the
Administrator of St. Lucia has/Cojonial Secretary's office. It is a
been selected for appointment to pusy bustling scene before the
the post of Director of the estab-|popularity of petrol driven vehi-
lishment of Kenya, He will be pro-|cjes, The two-power mule tram
ceeding to the U.K. about thd) with passengers for Hastings iv
middle of May on leave prior tO) siting for the Public Buildings
taking up his new post in October. clock to strike before it starts or
Born in 1911, educated at Har-| ‘1. journey. Behind the stationary
row school and Pembroke College, |173, is “the Fountain Garden
ambridge, he entered the Colo- ; ,
Cam) green and luscious from the spray

ial service, Nigeria, 1934. ; S f
We cae ae he was pro-+|f its fountain which plays every
> day. Enclosed by its neat iron

moted to the Secretariat of Gam-

bia, and came to Grenada 1944]Tailings the garden shows no sign
as Chief Secretary of the Wind-jof the ravages of wendering
wards. He was then appointed|sheep, which 40 years hence will
Administrator of St. Lucia in. ]xeduce this Bridgetown oasis a!-
1947. @On Page 16



Seout Tells Of Bob-a-Job Week

Pil-, a yard at Mrs. C. N. Taylor and
was running errands for Mr. O. T.
I ran another errand for

Eleven-year-old Wendell
grim of the 4th Barbados James
Street Scout Troop came into the) Allder

Advocate yesterday morning and;S. Squires and the easiest of all
asked for a job, Yesterday was;my jobs was finding a certiin
the last day of the Boy Scouts|word in the dictionary for Mr.

“Bob-a-Job’, week and young!H. O. Husbands at the Advoc>te
Pilgrim was making a last effort) Editorial Office.
to increase the ambunt of money |
on his “Job Sheet,” which is now Cleaned Shop
well over 30 shillings. I cleaned a shop and some glass
cases for. Mrs. Elcock, of Spooner’s
His “job” was to write an ac-| Hill, St. Michael, and counted
count of his activities during the | bottles for Mrs. E. Thomas. Every
week, and it was a somewhat ! day I was always on the go and
surprised scout who sat down at|some afternoons I did not get
the Editorial Desk to begin his’ home until 5 or 5.30.
job. However after a few mo-; I was lucky on two occasions,
ments’ thought he was soon busily getting two donations without
writing. | doing any work.
Here is his story:— I even supervised work in the
“I have been a scout for one liquor department of Smith and
year and as this is “Rob-a-Job” | Atwell.
week I’ve been always busy. I! I helped to open cases of cloth
belong to the James Street Scout at the Reliance Shirt Factory Ltd
Movement and I find Bob-a-Job and one of my last jobs was run-
week a busy, but interesting week. ning an easy errand from S. FE.
I have been watering garden Cole to Frank B. Armstrong in

beds at Mr. Bruce Austin, carry- | James Street.
ing trays of thread at the Singer |

Machine Co., and clipping grass a
at Capt. G. B, Hunte. I also weeded

I found it very difficult to get
job or donation in Baxter's
Road.”



ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD Wendell Pilgrim of the 4th Barbados James
Street Scout Troop writes of his experiences during Bob-a-Job week
which ended yesterday.

Pilgrim asked the Advocate for a “job”, so he was given
entry into journalism” at an early age.

“an

Farnum For
Finland Fund

A FUND has been started
to defray the expenses of Ken

Farnum at the Olympic Games
i in Helsinki next July.
You can help to bring the
| West Indies higher in the
} sporting limelight.

Send your donations to the
|| Royal Bank of Canada, Bar-
} clay’s Bank, and the Barbados

Advocate.

Amount previously
Acknowledged

Cable & Wireless
Sports Club

szzo 42



Total





TORCHLIGHT
TATTOO
ON APRIL 29

Scouts of the island will cele-
brate St. George’s Week from
Wednesday, April 23 to Tuesday,
April 29. The celebrations will
close with a Torchlight Tattoo at)
Kensington on the Tuesday night.
A similar Tattoo was held in 1948
at the Garrison.





BARBADOS, AP



| Economic

Conference
Successful

By W. A. RYSER

} » LONDON, April 19.

| Informed sources said the Soviet
} Sponsored international economic
'conference which just ended in
| Moscow has succeeded in impress-
|ing a number of Western business-
men with the possibilities of the
large expansion of east-west trade.
| This conference attained pre-
‘cisely what it aimed at fer it was
viewed here as the beginning of a
Soviet campaign aimed at abolish-
ing Western restrictions on the
export of strategic materials to
Communist countries.

Whether the conference accom-
plished anything in terms of real
business is not yet clear. Spectacu-
lar “deals” between representa-
tives of Communist countries and
unoffigial Western Delegates are
said to have been concluded. But
until these deals are looked into
by respective Western Govern-
ments there is no way of saying
what, if anything has been bought
or sold in Moscow.

According to official Soviel
sources, the British delegation

;concluded deals with Communist:

|

|

Tne Aquatic Sports and Marine |

Display at the Aquatic Club on

totaling some $70,000,000 the
French $80,000,000, the Belgians
$10,000,000 and the Italians
$50.000,000.

The Chinese Communist delega-
tion announced its d@als with for-
eign businessmen totalled “more

, than $60,000,000"

lesser deals are said
coneluded by cther

Numerous
to have been
delegations.

At the beginning of the conféy-
ence M. V. Nestorov, Chairman
of U.S.S.R, Chamber of Commerce
offered to increase Soviet for-

Saturday night is one of the out-| eign trade to $4,000,000.000 per

Standing features of
gramme.
In the Torchlight Tattoo the

local contingent of Scouts

at the Jamboree.

The programme is as follows:—

6.00—8.00 a.m. Good Turn
| Campaign — with special atten-|
tion to all who gave jobs in Bob-|!
a-Job Week. {
i 11.00 am. Boy Scout Church)
! Parade Service at the Cathedral—
}Scouts, in¢luding Rovers, will as-
semble at the Cathedral Square
by 10.30 a.m. Colours will be
carried but Not Staves. Scouts
are to bring Hymn Books and
Collection.
' 4.00 p.m. Wolf Cub Parade
| Service at St. Ambrose Church—
Cubs will assemble at the Church
‘by 4.15. No Colours.
| 4.30-—-6.00 pum. Potted Sports at
Harrison College — Each Troop
;may enter one or more Teams of
! Teams to be present by 3.30





t p.m.

8.00 p.m. Lecture on the Scout
International Relief Service, with
Film Strips. by Scouter A. J.
Tatnall at H.Q,

Thursday, 24th

4.30 p.m. Inter-Troop Boxing

Competition at Modern High

School. Each TroOp may enter

2 Scouts in each of 4 Classes —
@On Page 16



Well Deserved

Promotion’

The méeny well wishers and
lovers of music will be pleased
to learn that Sgt. Cecil A, Archer
of the Police Band was recently
promoted to Station Sgt, and
Deputy Conductor of the Band.
Station Sgt. Archer enrolled as

|
{



| SGT. CECIL ARCHER
iF

ja Band Cadet in 1920, and was
promoted to Police Constable the

jfollowing year. Normal promotion

| within the ranks of the band has,
of necessity, always been re-
tarded, and it was not until the
19th of November 1949, that Sgt
Archer aitained the position of

|Get. in the band.

|

|

|

|

|





@On Page 16

Pickled Pork









° at $10.68 per 100-Ib. bag (B.W.1 sg : M
» 2A . ene ties | Summer; Mrs.
Lice neces Currency), inclusive of frcight.| Clarke's Column.
insurance ex ge based in 71.8} 7 News For Women:
- : . ots bank charges and all other) . want d
| The Controller of Supplies has} fash You Baby An
again warned local importer that | ©8rBes. Your Figure
oustanding shipmertts of pickled | 8 Editorials; one
pork from..Canada for whieh) On The ence;
Ucences have been issued before H.C. GETS NEW } Labour Policy In
;20t4 March must be accompagied | | The W.1.
| »yY a certificate to the effect that | SPANISH MASTER | is 9 The People of Bar-
jsuch pork did not originate or was} | bados
not packed within 100 miles of the When Harrison College re-opens | > 10 Winston’s Father
nearest Foot and Mouth Disease!|after the Easter holidays, there! 11 The Lives of Harry
area twill be in a new Spanish Master 5 Lime em
The warning was first 1ed in; in the person of Mr. Jose Tor- 2a * { z Crossword;
March when licence to belnero, B.A. from Oviedo Univer- % ; Dartwords; .. =
jissued for the import in Spain He arrived here Trell’s Stories
| siderable tit pickled | yesterd morning by the Golfito 12 Comic Strips
\P . Beate fie ; i oa - b I am » 15 Church Services;
‘the “pie ‘ Pies én 16 Loeal News: Table
oe, E ee wera Phibault School of Tennis; Sea and
) He 1, De-~!TI in. Birmingham for te Aiken _ r
{ pa it e€, Do i-/|f will also assist in the Air Traffic
ion of Canada. ' tea of Fren

the pro-| year—instead

who!

: 1 presen?frecently attended the Jamboree ee

Caribbean sun, sand, salt water | Harriman as their “favourite son.” Jin Jamaica will put on the Page-! r
support] ant of Barbados which they staged




|
|

|
| 6,000 Bags Flour





of .the maximum
postwar turnover cf $1,000,000,000

Fu 20, 1952
z

'

}

issed their theory examina

od after a further four terms which ended in December
t year, 12 students gained a total of 33 speed certificates

Changes In
T.C.A. Flights






With effect frvom 25th April
1952, Messrs. Trans-Canada Air-
ines will be discontinuing their
lights 602 and 603 which oper-
ite thr@vfh this station on Fri-
jads, 2F lights 600 and 601, which
lorme operate through Barba-
dos Wednesdays, will now
vass t igh Barbados on THurs-
days. imes of arrival atu de
parture, however, remain un-

changed: as follows :—

Arrive Marbados trom Montre-
al and Bermuda af 5.10 a.m, and

Depart Barba@es for Port of
Spain, at 5.40 a.m.

Arrive Barbados from Port of
Spain at 10.15 atm, and Depart
Barbados for Bermuda and Mon-
theal at 11.00 a.m.

This flight aoes not go through
te Toronto, the first connection
being. on domestic service flight
1, departing Montreal 7.30 a.m

reached in 194% —U.P, {gr Toronto.

A CAPTIVE BALLOON hovers over the
wa ning planes away from the area,
ground below, negotiators work to ¢e

agreement which stand in the way of an armistice.

Malan Moves —_ |
Legislation
Against Courts

CAPETOWN, South Africa,

‘ : April 19.
The Nationalist Government
will introduce legislation next
weck to ‘prevent courts from

interfering with its racial scgrega-
tion laws. Premfer Daniel F.
Malan’s aides notified Opposition
eaders in the Assembly it intends
to introduce the controversial bill
next Tuesday or Wednesday,

The Government drafted the
proposed law after the Supréme
Court declared unconstitutional a
Malan Bill removing persons of
mixed blood from the general
voting register. Two opposition
parties—United Party and Labour
Party—have formed a united front

with the Torch Commando—an
Anti-Malan ‘organisation of 100,000
wal veterans—to fight the
proposed new law.

UP.



reins RS

Expected

Six thousand bags of unbleached
ft winter wheat flour is ‘due to



arrive in Barbados between the
latter part of this, month and inj
late May. The quota is not in-

cluded in the International Wheat
Agreement.
in respect if this item, licences
will be issued to local importer
from whom quotations have been
received against signed conirma-|
s from the West India|




B actory for ‘shipment in)
} 2,000-bag consignments, the first)
jto arrive late this menth



The ceiling price has been fixed
|
|
















“AERIAL VIEW OF TRUCE SITE ©

°
truce site at Panmunjom, Korea,
Meanwhile, in the tents on the
liminate nine paragraphs in the
(International)

MISSOURI
FLOODS

OMAHA, Nebraska, April 19.

This city’s industrial area faced
a new flood threat early today
after the water pressure from the
surging Missouri river blew up a
concrete s@wer,

Fragments of € road surface
above the sewer Were thrown 120
feet into the air and rush water



started towards the low lying
areas of Omaha.
Volunteers piled up sandbags

to strengthen the river dyke and







built a road for lorries bringing
up 600 tons of rock to seal off the
sewer,

Meanwhile downstream towns
and thousands of acres of land in
lowa,, Nebraska, Missouri and
Kafisas were beginning to feel the
full impact of the wollen
Missouri,

Above Rulo at Nebraska's south

Stern tip the river was 14 mil
vide And ut St, Joseph, Missor
third la ga@st city the river spread
over «five miles At Hamburg,
lowa frantic efforts, were being
made to protect water plants the

two thirds of
all threatened

business area and
the residential area
with inundation.









On Other Pages

Page 2 Carib Calling

»., 3 Cinema; Gardening
Hints; Farm and
Garden

» 4 Bookie: Sidelights
On Sport; Football
Report

” 5 Yachting, Weight-
lifting and Body-
building

. 6 Sewing Circle;

Embroidery for the



» ADVANCED —
COMMERCIAL _
CLASS PLANNED:

ARRANGEMENTS will probably be made to start an
Advanced Commercial class of the Barbados Evening In-
stitute in September this yex
C.LS., Dean of Commercial Studies, said yesterday.

After three terms’ work, all the students of a class at

e Combermere Centre which began in September, 1949,





PRICE : SIX CENTS
QUEEN’S FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMEN?

.



ar, Mr. St. Clair Hunte, F.1LP.S.,

tions in Shorthand in July, 1950



































S per minute.
It has been the practice to
terminate the studies of students
who reached the 70 or 80 words
per minute staxe so that new
tudents who have reached the 1
students could be trained, but it is
now felt that an advanced class
should be started to improve the
aiming and qualification of those

at 70 and 80 words a minute,
here will, necessarily, still be the
other classes,

Distinctions

Of the 33 speed certificates
gained, seven were with the dis-
unctions (L,.C.C.)

Due to the delay in obtaining

| c¢

ults and also to the compara-
|tively short life of the class,
students took similar rates oi

ispeed in the L.C.C. and with the
Pitman’s Institute and hold cer-
tificates in some instances fo
similar speeds from both examin-
jing bodies.

Five girls were successful in
| passing the 80 words per minute
|}which is the working speed re-
iquired at the Royal Society ot
Arts, Junior shorthand-Typist ex-

‘
IN THE FIRST PUBLIC engagement of her reign, England’s Queen Eliza-
beth IL walks past an honor guard of Yeomen after distributing
“maundy money” in Westminster Castle. These coins are specially
minted, and this year there were 26—one for each year of the Queen's
age. Her head should have appeared on them, but there was insufficient
time for change and they bore the head of her father, King George VI.







New Proposals Made For

imination, a goal set for the Ad-
| vanced Class e

The progress of the shorthand ro { « 1 M Ik Cc as » rT
{Speed students has been greatly en ra 1 VE amery

assisted by their English studies,
) In Klementary Book Keeping
passes, seven otf

ALTERNATIVE proposals for the establishment of a
Central Milk Depot and Creamery which have been agreed
to in principle by a majority of local Milk Producers are
still awaiting discussion at high level, Mr. Eric Deane told
the Advocate yesterday,

A committee representative of local Milk Producers

jthere were 11
which were with distinction,

In Typewriting, 13 student
gained L.C.C. certificates (certifi-
cate stage), including two dis-
tinctions, One st@@ent was unsuc-



essful e “is . rng a euedes by His

drew up alternative proposals following a suggestion by His

dit oe oe cone Excellency the Governor that the scheme should not be
LCC. English a th tae ¢§ allowed to fall through. y

1953 to lify f y . bee b* The proposals which the milk

( quality for he award o producers have now submitted to

|
|
|
|
]
‘
| the “L.C.C, Group Diploma” a:
steno-typist. Last Novemb:i
| Massiah gained a distinction ix

Government are that Government
should undertake the erection of
the necessary machinery for re-
jeeiving, processing and delivering
the milk to the consumer. Milk
producers on the other hand will
give a guarantee to Government
that they will supply the neces-
sary milk at a remunerative price
to themselves.

The first seheme which, it
was suggested, should be run on
a cosoperative basis, was aban-
doned because milk producers
considered that the new Co-oper-
ative Societies Act made it
practicable for them to continue
under the original terms

B.F.C. PLANE DUE
MAY 2ND



Murder In
Duplicate

es. It oa Happen

WATOH out for “Murder in
Duplicate” by GLENN CARP.

This is a crime story which
will be run in the Evening
Advocate in seven Instal-
ments, replacing the “Fabian
of the Yard” series.

The first instalment appears
next Monday.

Don't MISS it.

her 80 words per minute L.C.C
examination and also in type-
writing.

Following are the best speed re-
Sults of students: Mildeane Mas.
siah 8d-¢distinetion: ere Spencer
80, L.C.C., Denisé rwen, fbil®
Jones and Jeane Clarke 80, (Pit-
man’s), Majovie Barnett and Wen-
dina Pilgrim 70, Audrey Smith,
Daphne Legall and Joyce Wiggin’
60, (Pitman’s), and Alfred Ince
and Winifred Wiggins gained dis-
tinctions in the 50, (L.C.C,)

There were 175 applicants for
the class which begon last January
but the class could only accom-
modate 30,

im-=







See enereeeeteeeeere er eEED

Dr, Hamilton, Princips 2 ' The Auster aircraft fc the
Institute, is at se heaet he ote REGISTRATION Barbados Flying Club left, Eng.
in the U.K Mr. W. H. Carter, DISCONTINUED land yesterday by the S.S. Cros-
M.C.E. is Acting Principal, Mr. ter which is expected to arrive in

Barbados on May 2nd
A member of the club told the

The Labour Department will

C. M. Thompson teaches the Type-
discontinue for a short while fur-

writing and Book-Keeping, Mr,

S. C. Corbin Shorthand and Mr,| ther registrations for employ- Advocate that the hangar for the
F, A. Waterman, B.A., the English |ment after Monday 2ist instant. ' aircraft is at present under con-
r F This break is to enable the struction at Seawell and it is ex-

Registration Bureau to bring its , pected to be completed before the

“ea Scouts Stage
Aquatic Display

APRIL 26

The local Sea Scouts will hold
their Annual Aquatic Sports and
{Marine Display On Saturday,
[April 26, off the Aquatic Club, A
very extensive programme hag
jbeen prepared, A demonstration
lof the Breeches’ Buoy Rescue—a
ship to shore regcue—is expected
jto high-light the programme.

There will also be a Fireworks |

records up to date, larrival of the ‘plane







RA!.F1IGH-—Makers of the
WORLD'S CHAMPION



Display from the Lord Comber-| a
mere and a Rescue Race in which et
boys in clothes will swim from
the end of the field to the middle,
collect the victim and tow him
, back to the end. ‘ |
; The sports will begin at 8.00
}p.m with a Water Polo Match
'This will be followed by a Boat
j}Race from the Sea Scout Hut to
jthe Aquatic Club pier, There will




jthen be the 25 yards swimming
race, followed by the 50 yards, |
Rescue Race, Relay Race, 100
yards and 25 yards swimming |

jrace for Sea Rangers |

This will be the first occasion |
on which the Sea Seouts will be?
taking part in such an extensive |
programme and it promises to be|
a great success. }

ORDINATION AT |
ST. LEONARD'S

colourful ceremonial |}
during the celebration of the!
Holy Eucharist at St. Leon- |
ard’s yesterday morning the|
Lord Bishop Rt. Rev. G. L. G./{
Mandeville admitted to the}
Diaconate, Mr. Courtenay}
Johns an English student at!
Codrington College. |
| Among the clergy present were

eo
isaers







Noa

You are on a "
WINNER when you ride a Raleigh!

A Raleigh was-the choice of Reg. Harris—World’s
Professional Sprint Champion for the second ye
succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
your bicycle from a Company with such great
technical experience and knowledge that designed

cd















sitiaiocomees ¢








{Very Rev. Dean Hazlewood, Rev, and built the record-branking RALEIGH,
1H. C. Shepherd, Rev. M. E. Grif-
lth , Rev. C. A. Sayer and Rev. .
j A number of the students from
j\Codrington College attended the
Ordination
Re Johns will t Curate of THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
St. Leonard with Rev. W. D
Woode, Vicat A Product of Raleigh Industries Limited, Nottingham, Eng
“7 CAVE, SHEPHERD

& CO., LTD.

es

4
| sdbienictaiabipaatteaii
| FACTORY iNSPECTOR |
| ARRIVES
lesate



I. C. Margettes who has | - .

| be ppointed Factory Inspector {ff 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
jof Barbades on. a two-year con~||
jtract. arrived here, yesterday by {{ NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-

Golfito from England and has jj ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUS
| take 1 up temporary resigence at, }) wi lis
Stafford House {i
| 1 Marg » wa formerly }\}
H.M. Inspe of Factories, {) Ny



\







2

PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE

’

: RIGADIER and Mrs. Armand







| Wedding

SSS







{ SSS we | Smith who had been spend-
1 wi.? ‘ing the winter in Barbados, re-
Everyone loves @ Smooth, Lovely Skin,—but they detest i Etiquette jturned to Toronto on Friday by
Unsightly Hair, especially in Women . . .80:— : | TC > They were accompanied
16 . The formal wedding is nearly by rs. Florence Merrick, sister
“GET RID OF UNSIGHTLY HAIR” with always held in church although |of Mrs. Smith,
os with your clergyman’s permis-,; While here they were staying at
X $¢ y EET sion you may be married at;,the Marine Hotel.

home, in a club or a hotel, When | ,

For the Beach, Dance, Sailing, or any time when undér-arm air | the couple is not of the same, Had Suecessful Op,.*
becomes Unsightly, use VEET. nh S eciante " the ree R. D. S. GIDEON, Medical

VEET is extremely useful for men who have tongh beards, or
who find it uncomfortable to Shave

“vy B E T” removes VU tly, Superfvons Hair
in exactly “THREE wore

Superintendent of the Bar-
General Hospital, re 1ed
yesterday morning from Enfiand
by the Gelfito

Together, you and your fiance |) 3 dos
must call on the rector or rabbi .

Remember: well in advance of the wedding.

2 ‘ « {| Be sure to check on the Seating | of theee:-iithine after an absence
@e IT’S CLEAN! IT'S CERTAIN! ! IT'S SAFE.) !! apacity of the church before : :
making out a definite invitation | Dr, Gideon spent most of his

Thats VEET

list. Take into consideration the | font at Morefields Hospital, Lon-
R.P. 2/3, 4/- per tube

amount of space available at the don where he underwent a suc-
altar for pretty pageantry. Also cessful eye operation,

study the interior of the church At Luncheon

for best colour sohemes and M*.”: W. B CHENERY presided
architectural beauty. The most over the luncheon held at the
popular hours for: formal Protest-] “Green Dragon” on Friday in hon-
ant weddings are four or four-lour of the Merchants Cricket
thirty in the afternoon. Most of] League team which passed through
|the fashionable Catholic weddings] Barbados on its way to Dominica.

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. |
BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)











=

METRO GOLDWYN MAYER G i oO





B E 20TH CENTURY FOX

jare celebrated with a nuptial} Mr. Chenery represented Sir
A high mass. Invitations for a} Anan Collymore, President of the
Present TONITE 8.30 p.m, and Continuing 5.00 & 8.30 p.m. {formal wedding are all mailed at} Barbados Cricket Association.
41 jone time, one or two months

Other members of the Couneil of
the Barbados Cricket Association
who attended the luncheon were,
Mr. Ben Hoyos, Mr. S. O. C. Git-
tens, Mr. E. L. G. Hoad, Mr. W.
K. Atkinson, Mr. A. deL. Tnniss |

in advance.

Your parents should issue the
invitations and announcements
even though you are not living
at home If your parents are

, not living, your aunt and uncle or|®"4 Mr John Goddard.
ie . - mearest relatives may sponsm Leaving Today
Pa t ie ME Natta your wedding Even though EAVING to-day for Jamaigh is
yours is to be an informal wed- Mr. John Paviluk, West In-
rE ding, if other than close friends} dies Technical Representative for

ind relatives are to be there, you}Tidewater Associated Oi] Company






ya an



Caub Calling

SUNDAY,



A section of the 300 guests who attended

VIS ishould send formal engraved | of New York
. me wm Evelyn Varden invitations. Both families con- He Ph iets en spending the past
i + a NUNNALLY "OHNSON pe gg Agee kn Bi sictogs | Month in Barbados introducing the AT THE OPENING of Club Royal, Hastings, on Friday night.
; »asis, with names ad addres . vere ; ‘ s, é wh
- } a Dives »y JEAN NEGULESCO card-indexed for ready checking eae woes to local the Cocktail Party that marked the opening. A portion of the circular terrazzo dance floor is in the right
" Fj and accuracy. If you are having! Mr. Paviliuk was a guest at the foreground.



separate
lists, file

reception and ceremony
them independently to

















Windsor Hotel,



te hi Weddings
: : «& » avoid slip-ups. An invitation .to
Extra : A DARLING OF A SHORT the reouniioh automatically calls , .
‘THE WRECK OF THE HESPEROS for a present, but guests invited ESTERDAY afternoon at St.
only to the church are not so Matthias Church, Miss Patri-
==> |obligated, White, ivory or cream cia Cameron Boyce daughter of
are the only colours allowed for Mr and Mrs. Aubrey Boyce of
the double-fold linen paper 13 Navy Gardens was married to
appropriate for formal wedding Mr Patrick Kellman Roach, son of
invitation. A large-sized invita-, Mr Harry Roach of “Bedford
tion is customarily used for the; Lodge’, St. Michael, and the late
ultra-formal ceremony, the small-| Mrs. Roach.
er size for a less formal one, Thy The ceremony which took place
FOR ALL OCCASIONS is perfectly permissible to have shortly after 4 o'clock was per-
the return address embossed on

formed by the Rev. M. E. Griffiths.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore 3
“bouffant” style dress of white
cotton lace over slipper satin, tight
fitting bodice with long sleeves and
a low neckline, The skirt was very
full with two panels of satin let
into the front and back, opening
eut and down into the train. Her
headdress was a lace tiara from
which fell a very full finger-tip
veil of nylon tulle and she carried
a simple bouquet of white orchids

The two Matrons of Honour,
Mrs. Colin Bynoe and Mrs. Dick
Stokes wore identical ballerina
length dresses of maize coloured
lace and nylon net, The style was
similar to that of the bride’s dress
and they wore short mittens and
little pointed caps of lace. They
carried buoquets of peach coloured
gladioli.,

the flap of the outside envelope,
Tissues enclosed by the engraver
are usually left in to protect the |
engraving, but ‘it is not a pointl
of etiquette and may be decided}
personally,

NEXT WEEK: “Decide on Re-
ception Details” and “Confer with
your Florist.”



New Dresses for Cock-
tails or Weddings

Alees..;
EVENING DRESSES
BEACH DRESSES
SUN DRESSES
MATERNITY DRESSES
HOUSE DRESSES
and HOUSECOATS
From $15.00—$29.75

———



HIGH ADVENTURE!

Per

}. O'BRIEN

YVONNE

SRT

Py

Sard aT NLD
SILVER

NICD re | Business Office Superintendént

Pe) i ten i sat aortene o. -=
i t this i er fir

CLAISCEORGE-WRAELUOT. visit 'to the island but not to the

Denied by BYRON ASEAN Sovenplay by FAR GER West Indies, having been to Ja-
Bese» Sy ya St «Pedy ott ;maica and Nassau previously.



MODERN DRESSES






MR. AND MRS. PAT ROACH



Imported Canadian and
French HANDBAGS

in velvet, bengqline,
suedine and brocade
All Modern Shades
From $4.13—$6.98

LADIES HATS.

Smart Styles for Cocktails”
or Weddings
In a large assortment

HANDBAGS
of colours
Doubled with
|

of Distinction
From $5.19—$8.50
51 and 60 gauge 15
VICTORY

Lovely Stockings in all -_
From $2.05—$2.27 4 NOW SHOWING AT THE
Garberdines and iz
ALSO $=
THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ,
SSS SS SSS

Canadian Visitor

PENDING three weeks’ holiday
here is Miss Gladys Ireland
from Toronto, Canada, She arrived
recently by T.C.A, and is staying
at the Hotel Royal.

First Show
Ta goers will be pleased
to know that the new Dram-
atie Club has been formed under
the name of the “Barbados Play-
ers”. They hope to put on their
first show at the end of July.

Resident Tutor
R. AUBREY DOUGLAS-
SMITH, Resident Tutor in
Barbados for the University Col-
lege of the West Indies returned
from England by the Golfito yes-

The bride’s mother wore tur-
quoise lace and sheer made on
very simple lines with brown ac-
cessories.

The Church was decorated with
white Caracas daisies. The best-
man was Mr. Colin Roach, brother
of the 'groom and the ushers were
Mr. David Read, Mr. Val Roach,
Mr. Jim Kellman and Mr. Geoff.
Skinner

After the ceremony a reception
was held at the home of the bride.



Before returning home she hopes terday after six months’ leave. As a “going away”
NYLON STOCKINGS a to make brief stops at Caracas, He was accompanied by Mrs. pride "etites ‘mn han Cae
| " Curaeao, Haiti and Jamaica Douglas-Smith and their little son. pique piped in white, red shoes

and bag the noneymoon is being
spent at “Hill Crest”, Bathsheba.

N EASTER SUNDAY at St,
Barnabas Church, the mar-
riage took place between Miss
Maisie I. Bleckett of the Ivy Road
and Mr. Oliver M. Inniss of the
Central Foun try.
The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr, James Mahon,



NEW SHOP

WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY to notify our friends
and customers that our Shop has been moved from
LASHLEY’S LTD. in Prince William Henry Street to
JOHNSON’'S BUILDING between the Modern Dress
Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery in Broad Street.

I. BALDINI & CO.

Her veil was kept in place by a
jheaddress of white roses and she
Cedric HARDWICKE

Janetta Dress Shop |
|
|

END OF eee
|
'



Sir





The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. O. C. Haynes and the
duties of bestmman were performed
by Mr, Angus Evelyn. A recep-
tion was held at the bride’s resi-
dence, Ivy Road.

Mr. and Mrs, Inniss were the
recipients of many useful gifts.

A QUIET but impressive cere-
mony took place on Thursday
morning last at 9 o'clock at St.
John's Church when Mr. Festus
Thompson, Clerk of the Water-
works Department took as his
bride, Miss Hazel Hoppin, daughter











Denier Sheer
new shades
seer ply OLYMPIC THEATRE
Sharkskins
WARM COATS
Broad Street

FREDRICH MARCH —
From $18.00—$35.00
ae



























To-w & in




and
BY SPECIAL REQUEST a nee .%

attended by Miss Marjorie Inniss
sister of the groom as bridesmaid
“SEASON”

“VENDETTA
FARAMOUNT'S MASTERPIECE! VENDETT

A PLACE IN THE
Starring
Jontgoinery CLIFF
Elizabeth

SUN’

Starring
Faith DOMERGUE &
George

Betty FIELD)
EMPIRE | rox
To-dey Last 2 Shows 445 & #90 |
|
|
|

DOLENZ
TAYLOR






















Mon, a Tus 40a a3) ee Dan Tee of Mrs. C. A. Hoppin of Green's,
‘ YHUNDER ACROSS” with me : St. George and an _ Assistant
THE PACIFIC” Dick POWELL-—Rhonda FLEMING Next to Singers Building Teacher at. Grace Hill Girls’
Wendell COREY cPoncest TUCKER eC a gan oot BARC AINS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT School. . i «
pes - Wed. at 430 8 KAS STA:.TING MONDAY APRIL 2ist he rie, yet eiven. 8 mer
WOR SS ee nae ee ee aE DRESSES of ALL TYPES — Greatly Reduced Sant malign to poet tare
‘DRUMS OF THE CONGO” wee . ATHING SUITS on SALE $1.35 performed by Mr. L. Jones. The
“cana atoms : For Babies, Gels at ( Boyectrom.s es ssecrsesyssrsson sig | faut na was eB few.
Thurs, Mth at 840 p.m “STORM OVER WYOMING For Ladies —- in. Eles.lc Satin—ttom ....+.--00s sr rirstuereret ee $5.00 Hackett presided at the Organ.
CALYPSO REPEAT PERFORM- Geek ae La For Men ....... Vivace ewew er ber eee eee emblem esses ee rereer bene , A. reception was held at the
Orchestra ‘and ‘the Rhythm Kings eee, See «9 Pm UNDERWEAR on SALE ees eee es een ace the
ae ee. awe ae P.a'e Bras. in various styles .......... 0.06000 c ccc cee dace ees from $1.19 “Flleetview”, Bathsheba.
OLYMPIC Orchestra and thy Rhythm Kings SPM GRiy ek RMMOMIID 2 5 ian Lass chs oo 6 65% lee aa hee vcs . from oo me couple were the resiplonts
Steel Band, = £ Shine many valuable and usefu ifts
EVOL “ORIEN BOS: oo 66s iN de 0 ley Ms ete wigs os. RSC aNS 3 o. ’ gifts,
a } Nylon Briefs and Panties .........6.0.00.00 0000 ccc cae eeeeee from $1.72 So: d Hei
To-day to Tues. 4.20 & 8.15 } Ny Shins .... $748 n an eir
Edmond O° 2 RR ME EOMNMRID iG hci) 0 54 44-4 Gvieate ae ay Nieky 6 4 eee ce 64 64 Vs
ee ee ROY AL Molen GHEBA Soe Acc aid eda a dnagee bees toss tee CA Aa $7.76 R. AND MRS. RAY DA SIL-
LVRS oe" | fPo-day Lat 2 ows 5 | Weyl MAORI. ZUG) 5 Rad cheeses occ sop eae from $1.30 VA * the proud parents of
and c . . " a son and heir, born earlier this
Fredrick MARCH—Betty FTELD Republic Pictiires Presents ; GIFTS on SALE ; month in Kingston, Jamaica.
VICTORY Wendeti COREY—F grrest TUCKER Boxed Linen Luncheon ae eee Cases—Face Towels— where hay o Silva is stationed
seen Siaaae sce ipiie in ; s--Evening & Cocktail Bags—Silk Squares with the Royal Bank of Canada.,
" Soupento tiers | «eaun ee aad Raffia Handbags Shopping Baskets—Beach Mrs. da Silva is the former Dor-
“COPPER CANYON: esi eles ee ‘ rs — P othy Eckstien, only daughter of
“I WALK ALONE” un Y ‘ Baskets—Novelties i ; Mr and Mrs. G, C. Eckstein of
Wed, 98rd at 8.30 p.m. | Mon. & Tues. 4.0 & 819 js 5 ALSO on SALE “Casablanca”, Maxwell Coast.
CALYP80 REPEAT PERFORM KEPURLIC WHOLE SERIAI Childrens ; Panties ...... ae from 48c.
Ma Agee ‘ek hee | Ladies Mittens and Gloves
Orchestra and the Rhythm Kings | “THE JAMES BROTHERS i Ladies Linen Handkerchiefs
Steel Band ‘ : OF MISSOURI

, “ 24 OO
SSG POCPSSOSPEEOP SSSA VEE

ALA CINEMAS |



DOE A LEAL LOOSE PPT EPSPS SEO

COMING SOON BARBAREES G A 5 FE T Y



VOCS FOS
COMING SOON
“SONS OF THE MUSKETEERS” (Color
Cornel! WILDE-Maureen O'HARA

“ORESS CROSS
Van HEFPLIN

PL

































wore a dress of nylon and lace.,

Barrister-At-Law

R. F. G. “SLEEPY” SMITH

who passed his bar finals in
September and was called to the
Bar at Grays Inn in February is
now in Barbados to practise his
profession. He arrived yesterday
morning by the S.S. Golfito from
the United Kingdom,

He said that he had a good time
in England, but was very glad to
be back home. While in the U.K.,
he took a Trade Union Course and
played a lot of cricket.

An old Harrisonian,
was a Commissioned
the Barbados Battalion S.CF.,
during the war after which he
entered Codrington College and
took his B.A. He afterwards acted
on the staff of the Combermere
School before leaving for England.

He is a son of Mr. Smith, head-
master of St, Simon’s Mixed Schoo}
and Mrs. Smith of St. Andrew.

Mr. Smith
Officer in

Leaving Today

R. CHELSEA HOPE, Elec-

trician of Barbados Hard-
ware, is due to leave to-day by
B.W.LA, for Trinidad on a business
visit in the interest of his firm.
He expects to be away for about
two weeks.

On Honeymoon
R. and Mrs. Derek G Whitfield
who were married in Mara-
caibo, Venezuela over the fast
week-end came over to Barbados
for their honeymoon and are stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Whitfield is with the Shell
Caribbean Petroleum Company in
Maracaibo.

o



MR. AND MRS.

Special Representative
R. JAMES H. SAMPSON,
PhG,, B.S.Ph, Special Repre-

sentative of E. R. Squibb & Sons,
(International Corporatign, New
York, London, and Liverpool is at
present visiting Barbados

To-morrow night Mr. Sampson
will show a film at the General
Hospital at 8.30 ».m., to the Medi-
cal and Pharmaceutical and
Nurses’ Associations entitled “The
Nutritional aspects of Tropical
Diseases” accompanied by a brief
talk on the use % Dierysticin in
combined Antibiotic Therapy

On leaving Barbacos Mr. Samp-
son will visit Jamaica and _ the
Bahamas before returning to the
United States.

His visit is in the interest chief-
ly of the Liverpool branch of the
Company. Mr. Sampson arrived
here from Trinidad on April 12
after visiting several of the other
West Indian islands. He will be
leaving for Jamaica on April 22

Mr. Lisle A. Ross is the local
representative of E. R. Squibb
and Sons.

“The Magic Flute”’
HERE will be a Gramophone
Concert at the British Coun-
cil, “Wakefield”, on Tuesday 23rd
April, at 8.15 p.m. ‘Mr Hugh Young
will sent an abridged version
of ozart’s Opera “The Magic
Flute”
Admission is free and
welcome.

all are

APRIL 1952

26,



Married Yesterday
ESTERDAY
George’s
Alleyne
Mr. and
of St

married

ifternoon at St
Church Miss June
Yearwood, daughter of
M H. G. Yearwood
St. George was
John L. C. Gay,
and Mrs L. T. Gay of
Black Rock
bride who was given in
by her father wore a
embroidered organza





to
Mr
Brighton

The
marriage
of
vith a low scalloped neck-

n of

dress
nylon
line held in place with lilies of
the valley, a scalloped bouf-
fant overskirt, a long flowing
train and a headdress of lilies of
the valley.’Her bouquet was of
Queen Anne’s Lace, pink rose-
buds and gerberas.

She was attended by her sis-
ter Miss Hetty Yearwood as Maid
of Honour who wore graded
orchid net with appliqued skirt,
low neckline with wrapped front
and a stole attached with head-
dress and shoes to match, she
carried a bouquet of a horseshoe
form.

Her bridesmaids were the
Misses Thora King and Gloria
Hope who wore graded gold net,
and the Misses Monica Scott and
Cicely Norris who wore graded
green net. Their dresses were made
with strapless bodices, appliqued
skirts with stole attached with
headdresses ahd shoes to match.
They carried bouquets of horse~
shoe form,

The ceremony was conducted

Rev. S. A, E. Coleman. The
duties of: bestman were performed
»y Mr. Fred Gay while those of

by



shers fell to Messrs. Tony Atkins,
Kenrick Jordan and Arthur Gay.

A reception was held at “Tuil-
levies", Fitz Village, St. James,
the residence of Mr. and Mrs. A,
G. Johnson and the honeymoon is
being spent at “Hillcrest”, Bath-

sheba.

ISS GRACE PAYNE, daugh-

ter of Mrs, G. D. Payne of
“Hildathorpe”, Pine Road and the
late Mr. Philip Bruce Payne was
married yesterday afternoon at
St. Michael’s Cathedral to Mr.
David Taylor, son of Mrs. Shirley
Taylor of “Brighton, Black Rock
and the late Mr. Edmund Shirley
Taylor.

The ceremony was performed by
Dean Hazlewood assisted by Rev.
Frank Hassell. Bishop Mande-
ville gave the blessing.

The Bride was given in marriage
by her brother Mr. Anscele Payne.
She wore a dress of satin and
lace; lace bodice with long sleeves,
Peter Pan collar and high neck-

line. The skirt was of satin very
full and ending in a train. Her
headdress was of orange blos-

soms which kept in place a short
veil of Brussels lace. She carried
a bouquet of white roses, snap-
dragons and white gerberas.

The Bestman was Mr. Michael
Spence and the Bridesmaids were

Miss Wendy Farmer and Miss
Peggy Farmer. The Bridesmaids
wore identical dresses of pink
satin, Attached to the full skirts
were frills of white net. They
carried Victorian posies of shell

pink roses and forget-me-nots
and the headdress was a bonnet
effect with mating flowers to
their bouquets.

‘fter the ceremony a reception
was held at “Searles’ House,
Christ Church, the home of Mrs.
E. M. Bethell. The honeymoon is
being spent at the Crane Hotel.

DAVID TAYLOR

Solicitor General’s Family
Comes Home

Mi. 2%? MRS. H. W. W.
: and two children ar
Miss M, A, Reece, LLB., Coenen
at-law, arrived by the s.s. Golfito
sterday, Mr. W. W, Reece Qc.
Solicitor General was on board to
rreet them,

Mr. H. W. W. Reece is a
Officer of the Kuwait Ol Cone
pany, Iraq. His wife Rosemary
spent several years here during
the war with her mother Mrs. G.
Kellet, and has many friends in
Barbados.

Miss M. A. Reece, LLB., re-
presents the third generation of the
Reece family to do law. Her
gvandfather the late Mr, H. W.
Reece, K.C., was Solicitor General
of Barbados and one of the most
brilliant lawyers ever to practice
in the West Indies, Her father Mr.
Ww. W reece, Q.C., Solicitor
General has his own niche in the
rrofession and is a doughty
opponent, Her uncle is Mr, W. W.
Reece, B.A., Puisne Judge in
Hong Kong.

To Reside in U.S.A.

R. CAMERON BAYLEY of

Howell's Cross Read left the
colony recently for the U.S.A,,
where he has gone to.reside with
his relatives.



MOYGASHEL FABRICS

FLORAL & STRIPED

= = The Garden—St. James A FEW DRESS LENGTHS ONLY at RC AA
% BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 BARBAREES —— Dial eae OISTIN—Dial 8404 Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.90 p.m
-ONTINUING B Y o-day & ~ TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING DAILY AORONT & COSTELLO a “Ou TR AGE Pe aye f cin S| HEAVY PRINTED SPUNS
ane “harles " ¢ | " la P “RS Captain i
wittan LAbulbboe in ‘The BLUE VEIL MEET THE KILLER ioe rowane a ee =_— oe AN ASSORTMENT OF NEW DESIGNS a!__..._.__._ $1.25
i Joan BLONDELI-~-Don TAYLOR—Agnes MOOREHEAD BORIS KARLOFF TARZAN & THE SLAVE GIRL . ee % tng
Also The SHORT :—" WINNING BASKETBALL” ihel ‘Smith a Henry King Orchestra tae BARBER Denise DAR sl Mon, & Tues, 3.30 pm 3 a
Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m Opening Thurs. Mth er a aa SIHADMAN'S. . oN ee ee SILVER RIVER $ E DS
Ss SANTA s : ames “AGN , n undown a » pRY” T ¢ : errol rLYNN : yi
Soaeiee cai eae te His Rae ie rake Tex f x Randoiph Scott & THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME Errol 1 3 + R. E V ANS & WV HITFI :.
RIDIN’ THE OUTLAW TRAIL COME FILL THE CUP Sacieny 3 = aoa & THE THING BREAKING FO" % ] DIAL 4606
¥ Charles STARRETT Raymond MASSEY—Phylliis THAXTER OWT m Ho! (From Another World) John Gé ae SH s
LPP MAPPRPMLLAPABAPRRRBLE LLL PPO EE ERLLALRALALLRLLLAL LOLS CSO SOSSOVSSOSSTOSSSSIO DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES >
&
i ( ;







SUNDAY, APRIL

20,



At The Cinema

1952

Fasten Your Seat Belts

iky

G. Be.

WHEN a producer with a reputation for originality
and imagination pools his talents with a director noted
for his ingenuity, the result should be good entertain-

ment.

Add to this top-notch stars and the result may
very well be PHONE CALL FROM A*STRANGER.

In

this case it is—and the film starts at the Globe theatre

this week.

Emotional conflict and exciting drama are

fused with considerable skill in an absorbing, intelligent

and unusual film.

By clever use of the flash-back,
Director Jean Negulesco tells the
four stories that comprise the
plot, and with it, he integrates
the lives of the four principal
characters. Though the = story
tends to ramble a bit im the last
few reels, the picture works up
in the beginning with ever-
mounting tension and _ excite-
ment.

It is the story of four strangers
who are brought together by
chance. Three of them have
reached a turning point in their
lives, while the fourth has lived
with tragedy for ten years. The
first is a lawyer, who is tortured
by his wife’s one* lapse after
twelve years of marriage. The
second is a strip teaser whose
dream of success on Broadway
has faded and who hopes to patch
up her marriage which was
almost wrecked by her mother-
in-law. The third is a doctor
whose guilty canscience has
driven him to drink and the last
is a loud, brash travelling sales-
man who proves to be the great-
est enigma of them ail. On the
‘plane bound for Los Angeles,
the lawyer is made the confidant,
and when the ill-fated. ship crashes

he is the only survivor of the
quartet. He detemines to do all
he can to console the surviving
families, and through their
problems, he finds the solution
to his own,

Shelley Winters turns in the

best performance of her career as
the show-girl, while Gary Mer-
rill and Michael Rennie as the
lawyer and doctor respectively
are completely convincing. Kee-
nan Wynn’s loud-mouthed sales-

man is incredibly good and defies
description. Beatrice Straight and

Bette Davis both have significant
minor roles, and Miss Davis’
portrayal of the salesman’s wife
is at gem of acting. Her scene
with Gary Merril) at the end of
he picture is the highlight of
the film.

Music and photography are of
a high standerd and by way of
novelty, the audience experiences
the sensation of being in a plane
wiich has started to crash!

The film shows up human
frailties, but one follows the des-
tinies of the characters with the
growing conviction that “to
understand all is to forgive all.”

“THE BLUE VEIL” now show-
ing at the Plaza, Bridgetown, is
based on the theme “Who raises a
child of his own flesh lives with
nature; who raises a child of an-

other’s lives with God.” An ap-
pealing, heart-warming drama, it
makes no attempt to disguise or
mollify the fact that it is a “tear-
jerker.” In fact, writing, acting and
direction are all geared to extract
the maximum emotion from the
ledication of an ageing nursemaid
to her long line of “borrowed”
sons and daughters.



The story begins back around
1918 when a young war widow
loses her baby and decides to de-
vote the rest of her life to looking
after other people’s children, Nar-
rated in episode form, the picture
covers about thirty years in the
life of Louise Mason, by which
time, jobs are not too easy to get
and she has become greatly re-
du¢ed in circumstances. The end-
ng is definitely sentimental, but
it’is happy ard the obvious one
for the picture.

In a film of this kind where lit-
tle action takes place, acting is of
supreme importance, and the cast
in “The Blue Veil” is a strong one.
Louise Mason is played by Jane
Wyman, It is an exacting role and
Miss Wyman plays it with distinc-





tion and gives a beautifully sensi-
tive performance. However, I
would criticise the character itself
—not her portrayal. In view of the
strong maternal feeling of Louise,
her constant rejection of marriage
and a family of her own seems
somewhat incredible. My other
criticism is the makeup which ap-
peared to me to be overdone to-
wards the end of the film. Prior to
that, it was in perfect character—
but at sixty, one doesn’t necessar-
ily look eighty! .

The only other member of the
east who is seen all through the
picture is Cyril Cusack who runs
a toy-shop. A distinguished Irish
ictor, Mr, Cusack injeats his voice
with Gaelic wit and humour, to
say nothing of a stroyg Irish ac-
cent, and is thoroughly delightful.
Charles Laughton, Louise’s first
employer, who wants to marry
her; Agnes Moorhead, a wealthy
society woman who engages Lou-
ise; Joan Blondell, who neglects
her child for her stage career;
Audrey Totter, who after leaving
her son for eight years with Lou-
aceuses her of kidnapping him,
and Don Taylor, an earlier charge,
all give excellent performances
and the supporting cast leaves
nothing to be desired

One last word—take a hankie
with you.

_ The Plaza, Barbarces, is show-
ing one of Abbott & Costello’s pop-
ular comedies ABBi &
COSTELLO MEET THE KILLER
BORIS KARLOFF. I have not
seen it but I am quite sure that
no comment of mine is necessary
for the fans of comic team and
from what I can make out, they
have themselves a fine time. How-
ever, I am going to mention a
film which will start Friday next
at this theatre. About a year ago,
the Plaza, Bridgetown showed, for
the first time in Barbados, a film
dealing frankly with the subject
of sex education. This is now fol-
lowed up by a similar type of film,
Under the title of MOM AND DAD
it is an earnest and sincere appeal
for a wider knowledge among
young people of moral and social
hygiene and lays the blame for
prevailing ignorance squarely on
the parent’s shoulders,

The story is tragically simple.
Two adolescents fall in love and
after a short time, the girl real-
izes she is pregnant. Unable to
go to her mother for help, she
tries to kill herself, but her
attempt is frustrated and:she is
finally taken away until after
the event. Generally speaking, I





SUNDAY

Farm And Garden

(By AGRICOLA)

THE PAPAW—1l

THE papaw story would be incomplete without refer-

ence to the flowering habits of the plant.

understand these as they p

It is well to
lay an important part in the

culture and productivity of the tree. Individual plants vary

widely in the matter of sex.

Normally, the flowers are

unisexual; there are, therefore, ‘male’ and ‘female’ trees
but in addition, there are all sorts of variations between

these two extremes.

The ‘male’ flowers are borne on
long, drooping panicles; the
‘female’ flowers are larger than
the ‘male’ and usually are solitary
on short stalks, In the pe ind
sta of growth it is not poss
to tell the ‘male’ and the ‘female’
trees apart and differentiation
must wait until flowers appear
when it is necessary to remove
most of the unfruiting ‘males’. If
planting has been done on ary
scale, the practice is to leave one
‘male’ to every 12 ‘females.’ But
wait a moment: variations in the
flowering habit can be put-to good
use, Thus, while some trees will
show a preponderance ef male’
flowers and others of ‘female’,
there are still others hb -ing bi-
sexual or complete fuwers in
which both the ‘male’ and ‘female’
elements are present. A tree may
have a very few of such blossoms
in its flower population or it may
have many. If seed is constantly
selected from well developed trees
carrying a large proportion of bi-
sexuals and if the trees are other-
wise of good strain, it is possible
in a few generations to obtain a
strain producing as many as 90
per cent. of bisexual or complete
flowers. Obviously, it is trees with
this character that are the most
productive and the friut too is

usually of the best quality. Fur-
ther, if this rigid selection is fol-

lowed, ‘male’ trees instead of be-
ing necessary are a handicap and

should be eliminated from both

ately, natural

farm and neighbourhood. Fortun-
selection has, in
many instances, operated in this
direction and so assisted in re-
ducing the proportion of unpro-
ductive ‘males’. Indeed, few cul-
tivators now take the precaution
of planting three or four seedlings
to a hole to ensure having at least

one profitable producer therein.

liberal

do not think the human values are
as well portrayed in this film as

in “Bob And Sally’’. The char-
acter of the prudish mother is
over-drawn to such an extent as
to be almost unbelievable while
the father—though all in favour
of knowledge being imparted to
his children, is weak and ineffec-
tual, refusing to take his share of
responsibility in the matter. The
outstanding character is a school
teacher who realizes the responsi-
bility of adults to adolescents and
does something about it. The
youngsters who take part give
the impression of normal, natural
high school kids and they perform
their various roles with sincerity
and naturalness,

There are entirely nedical sec-
tions in this film w 1 i ¢ h are
graphic and may shock some
people They not only tell the
story of normal body functions,
but depict the ghastly ravages
wrecked on the human _ body





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NEWS!



Papaw trees should be spaced
not less than 10 feet apart.and the
holes should be two feet wide, of
good depth and prepared with a
supply of pen manure.
Seeds may be planted in situ or
tet in a nursery and the young
seedlings transplanted when about
eight inches high. Shade and water
them for a few days if necessary.
As regards after treatment, man-
uring is not likely to prolong life
but does increase productivity.
Organic nitrogen seems to be es-
pecially desirable and, therefore,
a liberal use of stable manure is
recommended. The tree is most
vigorous during the first 12 or 18
months and is not likely to re-
main in profitable bearing more
than three to four years. When a
plant has grown so tall that it is
difficult to gather the fruit which
also, at this time, tends ta get
small, cut off the trunk to about
three feet above the ground. This.
will encourage sprouts to form;
leave two or three strong ones
only and these will bear fruit like
the mother-plant in a short time.
It is good practice to protect the
cut surface of the trunk by cover-
ing with a piece of tin.

ment actagthantychcseentghincemenantisiistibiamnipatiieititlitaes a

through
diseases,

A forthright, utterly frank pie-
ture, pulling no punches, it tells
its story in a manner which will
never be forgotten by anyone who
sees it.

Though no definite age

ignorance and_ social

limit

has been mentioned for those
who see this film, I am under the
impression that twelve years of
age is the minimum.











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Garden Hints

For Amateurs
“GENERAL RE-POTTING”

As was said in a former week’s
article at this time of the year,
advantage should be taken of the
fine weather to do any potting
out of plants that is necessary in
general.

Dry weather is



essential for

potting out plants successfully
unless it can be done under
shelter.

The first thing to remember

when doing this job is to have
the p@ts clean and dry, Scrub
and sun them the day before if
they are pots that have been
used before, and, if they are new
pots soak them for some time be-
fore letting them dry ready for
use, ‘

Besides having the pots ready,
have the potting mixture ready
also, be it mould, mould and
manure and charcoal, or a regu-
lar mixture that is used for
ferns. Whatever it is have it
conveniently near the pots, and
the plants to be potted, so that
there wil] be the least possible

delay in setting the plants in
their new home.

The mixture used will of
course depend on what plants
are to be potted. Some plants,
like Anthuriums, need a very
rich soil, other plants require a

light soil etc., and the needs of
the plants must be known and
satisfied if the potting is to be

successful, Before’ filli the
pots however, no minttey what
the mixture used, a layer of

broken crocks of small stones
must be put in the bottom of the
pot for drainage, and, after the
plant has been planted and the
mould has been pressed down
firmly, it should be heaped rath-

er high to allow for sink
after the plants have eon
watered.

Once having potted out
plants, put the pots in a shady
spot for a week or so until the
new growth has started, after
which they can then be put
wherever desired,

INCREASING ANTHURIUM

‘ PLANTS

When doing this potting out
remember the Anthuriums and
if possible take this opportunity
to increase the stock of plants.
If there are any off-shoots that
can be separated, the sooner
these off-shoots are taken off the
mother plant, and put in pots of
their own the better, for the off-
shoot will develop much more
quickly when in a pot of its own,
It is sometimes possible to do
this separating without disturb-
ing the old plant, but it may be
found necessary to take up the
mother plant in order to get the
off shoot off cleanly with some
roots attached. Another way of
increasing Anthurium plants is
in the case of an old plant that
has grown up with roots out of
the pots, to cut it up. This is
done in this way. Cut the old
plant off level with the mould
stir up the mould, manure and
water it and the plant will soon
spring again, Then take the
piece that has been cut off and
Slice it up diagonally in bits of
about an inch thick each with a
few roots attached. Plant each
of these in a separate pot, and
each piece should give a new
plant.
In this way many plants
should be obtained from one old
plant. But do always remember
when planting Anthuriums that

the





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ADVOCATE



B.B.C. Radio
Notes

HOME NEWS FROM
BRITAIN

Now Broadcast to Listeners)
Here

From Sunday, 20th. April, there

will be some changes in the
schedule of the BBC's General
Overseas Service beamed to this

area. As a result of requests from
listeners in the Western Hemi-
sphere, the five minutes Home|
News from Britain’ will replace
the News Talk at 7.10 p.m. which |
used to follow the News Bulletin
at 7.00 p.m, This change wili
permit listeners to hear this
broadcast at a convenient time}
and it will actually be the first
time that it is beamed directly
to this area. The News talk will
be given after the 10.00 p.m./
News Bulletin and ‘From the
Editorials’ will now be heard at
8.55 p.m. on weekdays.

‘The Tailor of Gloucester’

For the Beatrix Potter fans, |
young and old, there is good |
news in the sehedule of , BBC}

programme in the coming week.
On Tuesday next, beginning ar
10.30 pam. the BBC will broad- |
cast_a dramatised version of one
of the Beatrix Potter tales tha.)
have delighted several genera-)
tions of children in many lands
-— The Tailor of Gloucester.’
whieh Miss Potter wrote when |
she was about twenty-six years!
old for a small friend who was |
ill! in bed. The story, in an ex-
ercise book, with painted illus-|
trations, was accompanied by a!
dedieatory letter: ‘Because you}
are fond of fairy ses and
have been ill, I h ide you
story all for yc a new
one that nobody hi rd before. |
And the queerest .bout it,
is that I heard it in Gloucester-
shire, and that it is true—at least |
about the tailor, the waistcoat,
and the “No more twist!"”:... .
You'll remember that if you}
know the story and if you don't}
but are young in heart you'll)
enjoy the broadcast next Tues- |
day, 22nd. inst. |

Play by West Indian

, It was unforwnate that re-!

ile

ception on the 6th, inst. when |
Derek ‘Walcott’s verse play |
‘Harry Dernier’ was broadcast

for the second time was not as)
good as it was last December but
on Sunday 20th. you'll have a}
chance—reception permitting— |
of hearing another play by aj}
West Indian, This is ‘Hassein’ or
rather extracts from it, by Rogar
Mais of Jamaica, The play is pro-
duced by another Jamaican, Noel
Vaz, who produced many amateur
Shows in Jamaica and was
awarded a British Council schol-
arship some years ago, ‘Hassein’
will be on the air for the full half
hour of ‘Caribbean Voices’ on
Sunday, 20th. inst. commencing
at the regular time of 7.15 p.m.
in the 25 and 31 metre bands,
9.58 and 11.75 megacycles,

they dislike to be planted too
deep.’ In fact many people con-
sider that they flower much bet-
ter when the plant is well grown
out of the ground.

When planning a bout of re~
potting this job so necessary to
the proper upkeep of the garden
is often delayed, or even put off
indefinitely because of the nuis-
ance of getting flower pots, It
means either a chance encounter
with a flower-pot hawker at the

door or a visit to the Bridge
where these pots are sold.
But the flower pots made at



the Lancaster Pottery are better
than those, and far easier to get,
for Piteher’s stock them, and it
just means a phone call order.

Not only are vhe Lancaster
pots better made and _ stronger,
but they are very reasonable in
price, the 80c. size being a really
big flower-pot. It's a good plan to
have a few empty pots of different
Sizes always at hand so there need
not be any delay when the
moment becomes necessary to re~
pot, or pot out some plants.

PEVPIOE 4




%



Trons

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TAGE THREE



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DO YOU KNOW
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

DAMES STRENGTHEN
LEAD SENIOR DIVISION
W.I. Board’s.**Second Childishness”’

By O. S. COPPIN

OTRE DAME, the Bay Land team who in three

years have won their way and promotion from
the Third Division to the Second Division and then
to the Firat Division, are now poised on the brink
of the acquisition of new honours and the formation
of a new page of local football history—the winning
of the 1952 First Division championship.

Yesterday at Kensington they defeated Everton by
, the odd goal in three and assumed a definite lead—
“he scoring fourteen points as against the twelve of their
former co-leaders in this line-up, Spartan and Empire.

These three tears have each played nine games and need
to play a single fixture to complete their individual commitments in
the First Division this season.

A NOTRE DAME SET-BACK IMPROBABLE
OTRE DAME have therefore a possible sixteen points and Spar-
tan and Empire fourteen each, assuming that each won their

final fixture. The “Dames” would have to be defeated by a most
improbable margin in their final fixture with Carlton and the other
two teams win by equally improbable margins in their final fixture
to occasion any upset in Notre Dame’s comparatively easy progress
iowards the championship.





SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952

Notre Dame Defeat BRIGHT LexT BEATEN
Everton Two—One

NOTRE DAME beat Everton by two goals to one in
their football match at Kensington Oval yesterday after-

noon.

A large crowd witnessed the game and this victory

puts Notre Dame well in the lead above the other clubs.
Both goals which were kicked in by inside right Daniel and
centre forward Gill were scored in the first half of play
while after many spirited attempts by Everton, Culpepper
at inside left, kicked in the lone goal for Evprton at the

closing stages of the game.

Veteran Reece did his best to
stave off the Notre Dame attack
but his defence did not back him
up well. The two Notre Dame
backs Browne and Straughan were
always on the alert and were al-
ways ready to intercept. McColin
on the right wing also played well,
but a few times he was too slow
to get to the ball when it was



FOOTBALL
FIXTURES
KNOCK OUT

Wed. 23.—Pickwick Rovers vs.
Police at Kensington.

AT UNION
Stable Mate Rasette Unbeaten
By BOOKIE

FTHE immediate reaction to the defeat of Bright
. Light by Careful Annie at Union Park is
that everybody will now say to the classifiers “|
told you so.” Bright Light is the first creole ever
to move from F class to C2 in one jump after a
season as a two-year-old although she is not the
first to begin her three-year-old career in this
division,

At the time of her promotion there was not a single person who
J discussed the matter with who agreed with the classifiers. For
my part I was prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt, since,
I felt, Bright Light had done so extraordinarily well at the Christmas
meeting, that they could not very well be blamed if they took her
to be a truly exceptional filly. She had indeed accomplished more
than any other creole had up to that age, with the exception of
Gleneagle.

But all along there was bound to be a feeling of misgiving be-
cause it seemed to me that Bright Light was racing against opposition
which was below the standards of past years. The two horses who
ran second and third to her on the majority of occasions were Gallant
Rock and Cavalier. When Cavalier came up here last month and was
soundly beaten in the Guineas and another race it only made that

As it is, there is little chance of the improbable taking place and : Referee: G. E, Amory feeling grow more pronounced. Now that Bright Light has failed
world — both for personal use, Notre Dame should have little difficulty in keeping Carlton away from Pt wing Seeley een oe ae Linesmen: S. Parris and C. in her first C class Sees with a substantial shavaines a 16 lbs. from
~ and also as a special gift. Famous mischief making in their final fixture with them. at-times he was inclined oo ie ae Roachford. the winner it seems definite that the misgivings were well founded
~~ ane I oe, Semon WHAT OF W.I. CRICKET BOARD? S$ inclin eep and that she was taken for more than she was worth.
— tatesmen, ede Ik the ball too long Division One i
= statesmen, baders” in business P(PHE West Indies Cricket Board of Control, notorious for their "The game started with the iv D Of course the meeting is not over yet, (it drags on to April 26th
he and commerce, women who set Kremlin-like attitude in their manner of giving information to Everton players defending the Mon, 21.—College vs. Carlton. next Saturday) and Bright Light may still put in another win. But
> the fashion for the world — all the Press and West Indian cricket public alike, held a General Meet- Referee: W. Hoyos. as the final grace for which she is entered is over 8 furlongs it is
~ e , ; ; goal at the northern end of the finesmen: R. Parris ang O beable that sh
{ are proud to own and use it; with ing in British ne on Wednesday last week and their attitude pitch, From the kick off Mande- hobinecn : . Beeecr aie te belt Actes tae coon rs ve the Easter
se it; © hanged. ; : son. andicap, both over 7 furlongs, r
Years ahead of anyother... it treaties are signed, and famous nee Se aan treat for holding this meeting that brought repre- Se rent co Ry s Sabie tba Thurs. 24.—Spartan vs, Everton. a three-year-old as early as April this, is a trying getarmmnnd bdaod.
THE AFRO-METRICINKSYSTEM books are written. sentatives a few thousand miles from Jamaica to British Guiana, cepted auichie w rr Referee: S. Gittens. We might not therefore see her until the Trial Stakes in June.
Jitdirety new method of drawing up, For someone whose affection several hundreds of miles from Trinidad, Barbados and the Leeward Shortly after McColin taking Linesmen: A, Parris and W. 4 . 3 y
afd releasing ink, the unig’ 7 gy has satay and Windward islands also to British Guiana, was to elect a President Aduattans of 6h ’ teed Hoyos. But what I find most interesting about Bright Light’s defeat is
Able-Metric Ink System of the Parker YOu value, a Parker ‘61’ would und Secretary of the Board. antag! easy pass cen

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WHO IS WHO?

the ball across the Everton goal
area but Reece anticipating came

Sat. 26.—Carlton vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: O, Graham.

that it points up an argument which I have been stressing time and
time again in this column every time; that the classifiers have made

ik | able i : ook place, according to reports at the Carib Hotel ‘ ; ;q. Linesmen: J. Archer and S, spectacular jumps with creole horses, and especially those of two and
wer yout own was, Ro Somiperatile i eaten te Wednesday Apirl 16. What has been the result? roy pnd, ‘Riches Me bell tuto mid Parris. three years old. That is the fact that the standard of the imported
bg ao writing instrument has ever been my been elected? In keeping with the irritating and fantastically yea; Dapiel again alps one Division Two English horses was bound to be rising as their numbers kept on in-
NEW PRECISION, NEW BEAUTY ade. coneeies conception of their relative importance to West Indies cricket, ogee ord iit Canna Sexoes Fri, 25—Empire vs. Carlton at creasing since the end of the war. The Trinidad classifiers have con-
ee eee een they issued a bulletin that the news would be released simultaneously 4, clear Park. tinually pooh-poohed this idea. They have in fact said that every

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to newspapers in the Caribbean by the Secretary of the British Guiana
Cricket Board of Control on Thursday.
NO NEWS YET

{ AM typing this article at 1 p.m on Saturday, April 19, in the year

of our Lord, 1952, and there has been no indication as to what
has happened at the meeting.

This sort of behaviour that is in keeping with one of Shakespeare’s
Seven Ages of Man—‘Turning again towards second childishness” has

After many efforts by the Notre
Dame forwards C. Daniel at inside
right drew first blood, He kicked
the ball well into the left corner
of the nets beating Reece com-
pletely, Reece threw himself on
the ground but the ball had passed
his hands when he tried to get it.

Referee: K. Walcott.

Spartan vs, Pickwick-Rovers at
Kensington.

Referee; C. B. Williams.

Division Three
Tues, 22.—Comb. Old Boys
Everton at Combermere,

Vs.

promotion along these lines which they made has been justified by
subsequent events. Exactly how they arrived at this conclusion TI
would like to know. Perhaps it was said merely for effect, for on
checking back to a few cases I certainly cannot agree with them.

To begin with, in several cases, notably those of Li an and B
Wishes, the horses never ran in the class to which they had Pc rio
moted, How, then, do they know they were justified with these two.

r t Referee: A. Parris. Secondly how can they explain away Ocean Pearl’
P.O.B 403, Brid been tolerated by the West Indian Press and by the member bodies of The score was now one nil in Rangers vs. Y.M.P.C, “B” at Christmas meeting of 1949. An F class pony ran her to Pts
.O. Box , Bridgetown the West Indian Cricket Board of Control for too long. Too long have fayour of Notre Dame. Notre Shell. in the Derby and she narrowly defeated Blue Streak in a six furlon
*] we been starved of information on matters vita? to West Indies cricket. Dame was now definitely on top s

4388 BARBADOS 8 x33-4 No.712 RA2778

Too long has the facetious answer been given to queries asking for
information childishly withheld.

of their rivals and everyone

Referee: R. Hutchinson.
Carlton vs, Notre Dame at Carl-

event in which she was receiving 20 Ibs. from this hor:

i ) se.
then soundly beaten in B class over six furlongs.

She was

: To add to this,
thought that the second goal the following June she was repeatedly beaten both i E
WHY THE SECRECY? would have been {scored when eee: K. Walcott. cuass. r omh in B class and.A
, ee HO in his right mind could invest the appointment of a President McColin on the right wing centred Found ° Boys ae Se Ue But perhaps they claim to be able to see into the future because
z and Secretary of the West Indies Cricket Board’of Control with nicely across and Daniel rushed «4» a¢ Foundation. it is only on her form at Arima in August and September 1950 that
} the secrecy that would surround top ranking appointments to the in to score but the ball went past Roferce- I King. Grean Pearl first justified her move from E2 to B2, I find that sort
x Board for Atomic Research or the Development of the Hydrogen bomb. the right post. Fri. 25 —Lodge vs. Police at of reasoning peculiar, to say the least.
What must also be remembered is that these gentlemen are meet- Five minutes after this incident Lodge cae Now the situation is worse than it was for Ocean Pearl. At least
, ing at the Carib Hotel with funds from West Indies cricket and the centre forward Gill finding him- Porence: O. Graham Ae pe Sour Years old when she bumped into the exceptional Sep-
f West Indian cricket public, being virtually shareholders, are entitled self alone on the ball kicked the Yorpc «a” vs. ¥.M.P.C, “py tember Song. The danger of her “heart being broken” was very
" : to some intelligent consideration. ball in the right corner of the goal AR A A i at much less than what it would have been for a younger horse. To-day
8 to put Notre Dame two up. c , ws if is quite possible for a three-year-old creole beginning the season
: IMPORTANT COMMITMENTS Half time found the score un- Referee: Ww. Pere + hell in the imported classes to meet a horse like September Song and
{ FWHE West Indian Cricket public is interested from the point of view changed. On the resumption it was Everton vs. Y.M.C.A. a en, unless our classiflers have the good of bloodstock breeding at heart
7 that the new officers, who, in truth and in fact, will be the only Everton who was pressing but Referee: O. Robinson. Ol it is clear that all we will succeed in doing is burning out most of
: By ; ; executive officers of the Board, are faced with a serious task in mould- every move they made was fol- Wanderers vs, Comb. Old Boys our ee oe before they develop properly. If they cannot appre-
5 5 ’ ing the forces of West Indies cricket together in time to face the Indian lowed by the Notre Dame at Bay. , ciate the oe between classifying hardened imported horses
oi ow es tour later this year on a level that should ensure that West Indies players. Wilkinson was called Referee: ox es and young creoles they should be made to do so by rules,
y i is i : o ic! to save twice an id. hy ° : : :
Y when you stop cricket is kept in the forefront of International cricket, ann J ert vans tue Boe Wed. 23.—Foundation vs. Comber- | pecaeend to the Union Park meeting now in progress the form
mn “A THE BOARD AND PROFESSIONALS ton twice kicked at the goal mere at Foundation, in : eAc > pees penta to be very diversified. After his brilliant
Â¥ -THEIRS will be the task of negotiating with the key professional in an effort to score. Olton at _ Referee: I. King. _ Victory on the first day Hellican, it was thought: was only unlucky to
fi al, cricketers for their services. Skipper John Goddard in an inter- centre forward also made a try Fri. 25—College vs, Foundation his Taek oot ts Mc of ne enue Trophy on the second day.
Mt ’ view with me over the Rediffusion Service soon after his return here but was not successful, Then at College. Third’ The last named male pda hoth — — ape Golden Quip
“t from Australia made no bones about his opinion of our chances with when everyone thought that Referee: L. King. , , ° placed in the first race.

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india this year. He said “as long as we can get our key professionals,
we can take care of them.” Ook L

Now there is no secret that the professionals Worrell and Wéekes
have been made some tempting offers for the coming winter, The
bare details as supplied by Goddard himseif are that Worrell has
been offered a coaching appointment in India with passages paid
both ways for his family and himself. Weekes has been offered one
in Ceylon on similar terms.

THE IMPORTANT FACTORS
T IS OBVIOUS theretore that although 1 have no doubt that

Everton was not going to open
their scoring, Culpepper inside left
receiving a short pass ran down
and kicked the bail into the nets.
Wilkinson dashed across the goal
but the effort was fruitless,

When Referee Amory sounded
the final blast the score was un-
changed with Notre Dame 2,
Everton 1.

The teams were:

First Round K.O. Draw
B.F.F.A. vs. Pickwick - Rovers
or Police.
College vs. Spartan or Wan-
derers,
Empire vs, Notre Dame.
Carlton vs. Everton.



FOOTBALL SCHOOL

Yesterday Golden Quip w

on with Pharlite s i
third. Hellican, who we did e fecond and Notonite

not hear was badly off, ran down the
field from start to finish, Astrion meanwhile has reft i
the last two races. ORS Tn ae

Nevertheless Golden Quip, it seems, is a horse aft
of Kitty O’Shea who was also in the ownership of Mr. “Alex Chie
She runs into form as a meeting progresses. She did it at the last
Christmas meeting and now she is doing it again at Union Park. Her
time for the mile yesterday was the best that has been done at Union
tor some years But on the whole the track does not appear to be
as fast in latter years as it was before the War. Brown Polly holds

the record for the mile at Union in 1 minute 38 seconds. Th i
turning out for the West Indies and their chance to see these Notre Dame: Wilkinson, Browne I is the best time for a mile anywhere between Barbedes *rrinidea
islands again would be factors in favour of the success of the nego- gtraughan, Archer, Roberts, The BAF.A. Football and B.G. :
ations but it is obvious that the fact that cricket is their means Of Greenidge, McColin, Daniel, Gill, School, conducted by Mr.

tivelihood must of necessity constitute another important factor in
the negotiations as well.

In addition to this there is the crying need to explore avenues
for discovering fresh talent, especially in the pace bowling depart«
ments, and not having done tnat, train these young men, for any
futute West Indian pacemen must be young men, as near as id
humanly possible to International standard.

TRINIDAD HAVE ALREADY BEGUN
FY*RINIDAD have already initiated tneir own scheme for talent
finding and there is no doubt that some of the other West Indian
colonies who are awake to the needs of West Indian cricket will
soon be following suit, n
It will be the business of the West Indian Cricket Board of Con¢
trol to co-ordinate these efforts at Association level and that is why
we are so anxious to hear of the appointment of the chief executive
officers. That is why we are impatient at the stupid delay and
secrecy that have surrounded the appointment and finally that ig
why we hope that the appointment has been an intelligent one.

SOME STIMULUS NEEDED

HERE was a comparatively poor response to the local Cycle and

Athletic Meet staged at Kensington on Thursday last. No one
expected the large crowd that normally attend the Meet with an
{ntercolonial flavour but coming soon after the Schools had staged
their own Athletic Meet and the Inter-School Union theirs, there
was a justiflable expectation that Athletics would be-in the air and
and that there would be some appreciable measure of local interest
attracted.

The cyclists and athletes themselves showed no inclination to
break either their necks or records and some complained that therq
was too short notice given, ‘

am .. ae t

Mandeville and F. Daniel.
Everton: Reece, Weekes, Simp-
son, Roach, Daniel, Hall, Sealy,
Culpepper, Olton, Haynes and
Holder,
The referee was Mr, E, Amory.

Graham Wilkes continues at
Kensington at 8.30 a.m. to-day.
Players who are members of
the School are asked to be
punctual,



LOCAL ATHLETICS NEED FILIP

Bces athletics need a filip.
arouse public interest and

gain their financial support.

There must be a campaign to
And what

is more, a good lot of this needs to be done before the Whitsuntide
Meet which will be an Intercolonial one. l
Athletes and cyclists will be invited from the neighbouring terri-
tories and these will be expenses which the Association must meet, It
will be necessary therefore for the Association to go all out to make this
Mect a success otherwise their slender resources might not even be

enough to cover them.

. START A COACHING SCHEME :
7 Association should also try and stage some sort of coaching

scheme for the Athletes.

It needs no expert to see how many

things they do wrong, starting, body movements, even e handing and
taking over of batons in the relay races.

There needn't be any expensive scheme.

There are people in the

island who would only be too willing to form a part of a panel of
instructors to the athletes. Schemes like these would do much to awaken
the interest both of the cyclists and athletes themselves as well as the

general public.

Go to it Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados.

challenge.



nk % ‘

AT AS PA i NTS combine robust and



Here is your

_ RECD.

PASO QS

The consistent Rock Diamond put in his second win for the meet-
ing yesterday, this time in the D and E class Mon Repos Handicap.
He had also run a good second to Assurance in the Penitence Handi-
cap only about 3 hours before. He has never been in such good form.

Princess Rasiyya, whom I mentioned last Sunday as a reformed
character, was another winner in D class. She won the Canning
Trophy over 8 furlongs last Monday in an exciting finish. In this
race jockey “Mice” Lutchman, who rode her, I understand. showed
commendable judgment and proved that front and free runners are
not the only ones on which he can be seen to the best advantage,
This I am particularly pleased to hear as I must number myself
among those who thought he lacked experience.

Among the three-year-olds in F class Gallant Rock is ruling the
roost with telling effect. He was easily beaten in the Easter Guineas
by Bright Light but yesterday, as he did on the first day, he proved
vet again that he is the best stabled in Trinidad by taking 133 lbs.
and running away from his contemporaries, the closest to him being
Clair de Lune who was in receipt of 21 lbs. In fact the highest weight
after his was The Ambassadress who carried 116, 8 lbs. of which was
overweight. Gallant Rock, it is worthy of note, is another success-
ful foal of the mare Leap Year who is by O.T.C. out of Scrap II. The
first one, Leap On, although not very outstanding, has always shown
quite a lot of speed. Incidentally he won his first distance race yes-
terday when he took the F class Fyzabad Handicap over a mile. With
Television. already a successful brood mare, Trinidadians might soon
learn to cherish O.T.C, mares, as much as they did his stock when
they were racing.

Little Rosette continues the meeting unbeaten with three wins
to her credit so far. Yesterday she won with 138 lbs. the nearest to
her being Drury Lane who had 122, Her time 1.03 for the five fur-
iongs with this weight was good. I still think Drury Lane must be
off colour but one wonders if Rosette is not going to be a second
Baby Bird.

(DUNLOP

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arene.

SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952








EDWIN ROGERS posing on the piles on 26.10.47 midday. Age 16 yrs, 5 mths.

WEIGHTLIFTING AND
BODY BUILDING

(By EDWIN ROGERS)
NOW that such great interest has been focussed on
Weightlifting and Body Building, I will give the public the
benefit of my six years’ experience of serious lifting in a

series of articles.

I will also endeavour to throw some

light on how important weightlifting can be in helping to
build strong and healthy bodies which everyone is desirous

of having.

I shall have personal interviews
with the lifting champions Messrs,
Barbados Junior and Senior, out-
lining their training programmes,
their progress, and life in general.
Other prominent figures in the
iocal Barbell Game whose untiring
efforts to put weight lifting where
it is today and who are still in the
game will also be interviewed.
Men who due to age have been
forced to retire from competitive
lifting and have turned coaches.

First, however, let me tell you
how and why I started exercising
and the terrific change it has made
to my life. I am going to be very
frank. If when you read this yours
is a similar case and from my
experiences which I will outline
IT can start several of my readers
to begin a training programme, my
effort will not have been wasted.
Weightlifting and all that goes
before it means long and tedious
work, but with great compensa-
tion if you are willing to stick to
it, Ask any weightlifter what made
him start to lift weights. Each
one will probably have a different
answer. However, in each case
they have an ultimate goal in view
to improve their bodies by healthy
exercising in friendly competitive
surroundings.

My Story

In my case it was like this. As
a 18-year-old school-boy very
underweight and very conscious of
the fact—life was not very pleas-
ant. Other boys would make fun
of my size or lack of size and this
developed in me a very strong
inferiority complex. When other
boys were together in a fight,
which attracted a crowd, I was
the quickest to run away from the
scene in order to make sure that
I would not be involved, for being
skinny and underweight I was
very nervous and afraid, When
the school masters asked me ques-
tions, I was so nervous that I used
to forget the answers. I had a
habit of blinking my eyes—again
through nervousness, whenever I
got excited. The boys then began
calling me “Blinks.” “I remember
quite clearly one occasion when
the headmaster ,noticing the blink-
ing of my eyes called me. But, be-
fore I could explain, I burst into
tears. From then on, I was called
another name — “Cry Baby. On
another occasion at our school
Sports, I was all ready in my
running outfit to represent our set,
but when the time came I could
not be found, When my hiding
place was discovered, my excuse
was that I had eaten too much.
Crowds terrified me.

I Begin Exercising

After all the ridicule and
mockery of names, I wanted to do
something about it. I was eager to
develop my body. For a few
months I did free hand exercises
which I found in Physical Culture
magazines, also a lot of swimming
and walking. After a while it
seemed I was repeating the same
exercises too often, which left me
in a tired and exhausted state, I
realised that I would have to doa
thousand or so movements in one
exercise if I wanted to improve.
I then got some rocks varying in
size and weight and went through
the exercises holding them; as soon



EDWIN ROGERS

as they “got light”, I would’ get
some heavier ones. I began to feel
so much better that it encouraged
me to exercise every other morn-
ing for twenty or thirty minutes.
Of course, I could only do my
exercises when I was on vacation.
The first time I ever saw a
Dumbell was when my brother
Evan bought himself two irs,
Harold Webster now the official
coach of the Amateur Weightlift-
ing Association of Barbados in-
structed him on the various
exercises on how to use them, I
was always present, as a spectator,
every evening after dinner when
my two brothers exercised to-
gether, but when they were taking
a rest between exercises, I would
go through with the lighter Dum-
bells some of the exercises they
had done, Many times they repri-
manded me for delaying thon.
Later my brothers Evan and
Glyne joined Mr. Webster's Gym
taking the Dumbells with them.

Improvised Equipment

After this I stopped exercising
for quite a few weeks. While tak-
ing a sea bath ome day I found
an old rusty Bar which I teok
home and with the use of old bits
of scrap metal and stones I im-
provised my own Barbell equip-
ment, I was unable to calculate
the weight on the bar, but it was
sufficient for me to press quite a
number of times. My exercises
were mostly confined to the Press,

My first real ‘workout’ began
one afternoon when I visited Mr.
Webster’s Gym to watch my,
brothers at work. After some en-
couragement, I performed a press
and to my amazement and to the
surprise of the others I
in completing a perfect press with
50 lbs. The news reached my
father who cautioned me not to
let it interfere with my studies.

York Courses

Since I wanted to do the same
exercises as my brothers I asked
Mr. Webster to allow me to ‘work-
out’ at his Gym, but due to lack
of space this was only possible
once a week. By this time we
owned a Barbell at home with
which I exercised on Tuesdays.








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Thursdays and Fridays using the
York Barbell and

l and 2. These courses originate
from the York Barbell Co., York
ae but See —- several copies
in many clubs through-
out the island.

At first it was hard to stick to
any fixed schedule. Improvement
did not come as quickly as I would
have liked and this was somewhat
disheartening. This is perhaps the
most “difficult period” to go
through. Difficult because it is the
“crossroads” which will decide
whether you will continue or lose
interest altogether. Stick at it and
onee over this stage the future
looks much brighter.

discuss how

interested in competitive



Friendly Football
Fixtures

A friendly game of Football
between Arsenal skippered by
H. Dear and Newcastle United
skippered by D. Stanton will be
played at the Garrison tomorrow.
These two teams battled to a one
all draw on Tuesday last and a
keen struggle is again anticipated.

Following are the teams: —

Arsenal:—H. Dear Capt., W.
Harewood, G. Blackman, B. Car-
ter, C. Rudder, B. Turton L
Greene, V.. Taylor, O. Taylor, D.
Weekes and A. King.

Newtastle United:—D. Stanton
Capt. R. Phillips, J. Phillips, R.
Smith, H. Bannister, B. Skeete,
L. Jarvis, U. Hurdle, U. Nurse,
N. Dottin and C. Doyle.

Following are the results of
matches played last week: —
Tuesday April 15th Rangers beat

Harkliffe 5—0.

Wednesday April 16th Penrode

beat Malvern 4-—0.

Friday April 18th Advocate and

wi ers drew 1—l.

THIS WEEK’S FIXTURES
Monday April 2ist Harkliffe vs.
Penrod

e.
Referee Mr. T. Maynard.
Tuesday April 22nd Rangers vs.
Advocate.
Referee Mr. J. Hinds.
Wednesday April 23rd Western-
ers vs, Malvern.
Referee Mr. J. Archer.
Priday, April 28th Rangers vs.

Referee Mr. O, Graham.
N.B.:—All matches will be played
at St. Leonard’s grounds,
Richmonds.

RIFLE SHOOTING

Scoring at last Wednesday
night’s practice of The Barbados
Small Bore Rifle Club was
unusually high, Mr. K. S, Year-
wood topped the list with 99 out
of a possible 100 points.

The following are some of the
best scores recorded. ;

H.P.S

100
Mr, K. S. Yearwood.... 99
Bs TREMOR oss 04 98
9a ey VENOM caves 98
» H. W. Webster ..... 98
» H. B. G. Marshall 97
Poe ee ee 96
» T. A. L. Roberts 96
on be, Sc DOTNR 0s sy 00 96

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Mohawk Wins:

| Handicappers Criticise

By Our Yachting Correspondent

MOHAWK, skippered by Bob
Cumberbatch, has now scored her
fourth consecutive victory in the
Intermediate Class. But still it
dees net appear as though the
handicappers are contemplating
moving her back a bit, Other
helmsmen of the Intermediate
Class are complaining that Mo-
hawk has too much time. They
claim that she is one of the big

boats of the class and cannot con- ,

tribute Ker suceess to good helms-
manship but to an enormous
amount of time.

I hope however, that, if it is
only for the sake of making,the
race more interesting, the handi-
cappers would consider
Mohawk with Gnat, Coronetta
Clytie or at least allow her a
minute from these boats.

The Eighth R.B.Y.C. Regatta
was sailed north about in a calm
sea yesterday afternoon, At the
start the wind was medium but
later it dropped considerably.

Fantasy won in the ‘B’ Class.
Hurricane scored another victory
in the ‘D’ Class while Rogue won
in the ‘C’ Class. Vamoose took
honours in the Tornado Class. re

Fight boats started in the ‘B
Class. At the end of the first
round, Ranger was in the lead.
She completed this lap 30 seconds
ahead of Fantasy after receiving
two minutes. Third was Hi Ho
and fourth Rascal. Mischief oe.
ceived a minute from Gipsy =
only lead Gipsy by

she now
wee. second lap Fantasy went
into the lead. She passed

; ahead of
oar five seconds behind Ranger.
Moyra Blair overtook Ranger
fore she reached the Bay Sree
mark. Gipsy overtook "7
and now had 13 seconds on ue.
Fantasy held the lead and W'
on to finish the race a littke over
four minutes ahead of Moyra
Blair which was second, lee
was third, a minute later, ‘an non
did the first round in 35 pine .
1 seconds, the second in 39 m -
utes 27 seconds and the last S .
minutes 37 seconds. Moyra B ' 5
completed the first round »
minutes and 24 seconds ond °
second in 38 minutes and 3 bar
c . Her third round was .
seconds better than the —
Raseal's first round was s 4...
36 minutes and 10 secon Hy —
second in 39 minutes and 3
onds and third 38 minutes and

seconds. : boats
ss seven boats
Class, ae ftth but

wint the end of the first round
Folly was leading, 15.
Siren Se ie later.
ew ,

on : “sailed a beautiful last
round. She gradually came into
the lead and went on to com ete
the race seconds ahead of
Gannet, Third was Magwin, a
minute and 15 seconds later.

Rogue's first round was done in
40 minutes 25 seconds and her last
in 41 minutes and 7 seconds.
Gannet did a faster first round.
Her time was 39 minutes and 58
seconds. Her time of 41 minutes
and 52 seconds for the second was
not very good. Magwin complet-
ed the first round in 41 minutes
and 33 seconds and the last in 43
minutes and 9 seconds.

Nine boats raced in the Inter-
mediate Class. Mohawle
along with Reen and Invader but
at the end of the first

minute behind Gnat. Mohawk
did the first round in 42 minutes
and 31 seconds and the second in
43 minutes and a second, Gnat’s
first round was done in 42 min-
utes and 25 seconds and her last
in 42 minutes and 39 seconds.
Reen completed her first round
in 45 minutes and three seconds



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round
Mohawk was two minutes and 35
seconds ahead of Reen Third
was Dawn, 50 seconds behind
Reen.

Mohawk kept the lead. She
finished four minutes and , 25
seconds ahead of Gnat which was
second, Third was Reen, over a

and the last in 46 minutes and five
seconds,

All the ‘D’ boats started with the
exception of Olive Blossom. Sin-
bad started with Rainbird and
Imp but quickly got away from
them They received three min-
utes from Hurricane.

\t the end of the . first round
Sinbed was leading. She finished
this round two minutes and 15
‘onds ehead of Hurricane and
Imp. Hurricane quickly overtook
linp. Fowsh was Rainbird and
fth Seabird. Peter Pan dropped
cut and headed for her home
ere before completing the
round.

ilurricane took the lead from
Sinbad just before the finish, She

completed the race 35 seconds
ahead of Sinbad. Third was
Rainbow, four minutes and 35

se-onds behind Sinbad. Rainbow
only had a lead of ten seconds on
Rainbird.

Hurricane did the race in one
heur, 29 minutes and 30 seconds.
Her first round was completed in
45 minutes and 30 seconds and the
‘ast in 44 minutes flat. Sinbad did
the first round in 45 minutes and
‘wo seconds and the second in
‘6 minutes and 59 seconds. Rain-
Low's time for the first round was

2 minutes and 32 seconds. She
did the second in 48 minutes and
47 seconds.

Only four Tornadoes started
The’ race was between Vamoose
Ndril and Comet. Tempest had a
jate start and was always far be-
tind the others.

Vamoose took the lead from
carly. At the end of the first
round she was about 35 seconds
ahead of Edril. Comet was third.
Vamoose was still in the lead at
the end of the second round, She
was now two minutes and 45
seconds ahead of Edril with
Comet still third.

Vamoose went on to finish the
race over six minutes ahead of
Comet which took the lead from
Edril a few yards away from the
Club mark. Vamoose the first
round in 20 minutes and 55 sec-
onds, the second in 22 minutes,
28 seconds and the last in 20 min-
utes 54 seconds. Comet finished
her first in 22 minutes, 28 seconds,
the second in 24 minutes five
seconds and the last in 22 minutes
55 seconds. Edril completed the
first round in 21 minutes 37 sec-
onds, the second in 24 minutes 41
seconds and the last in 23 min-
utes 30 seconds.

The Ninth Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Sat-
urday, April 26. A full table of-
the results of the Eighth Regatta
will appear in Tuesday’s Advocate.



Water Polo Season
Begins On May 12

HE water polo season is fixed
to begin on May 12th and prac-
tice afternoons for the various
leagues have been arranged as
follows: —

Mondays
Men's B |League;
Men's, A League.

The gear will also be available
on the other afternoons of the
week.

~~ Ladies;"Tuesdays —
Thursdays —

SHELL-LEASEHOLDS DISTRIBUTING CO LIMITED
PETROLEUM MARKETING C) (WEST INDIES) LTD

BRETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVENUE, PORY OF SPAIN





d The



APRIL 20 NO. 220

Topic
of

Last Week



It's really a trite savi
Sometimes we're forced to look

For some those precious phrases
Gleaned from the good old book

Those
Are
While
Just

whd are classed as blessed
those who strive for peace
others enjoy mischief
like a Christmas feast

Last Tuesday in the evening
Up in the other ploce
The Statesmen (*

of Barhado
dust set a pac

“Farnum’s” pace
This time guns were all
To safeguard peasantry
But boys it simply bailed down
To an after-dinner spree
°

loaded

A_round of accusations

Were fired in the at:
Simply by politicians

To get the white mon scared

Boys you should see the bubble
For bubblings they did'nt lack
Only to find out later
‘Twas all talk—and no fact
. :

If they would help the peasant
They should shut up their mouth

We never see these Statesmen
Til elections knocking "bout

The big man helps the peasants
With lorries and manure
He helps them with their orders
For lumber from the store
. . .

And year by year he helps them
To reap their sugar cane

And if he did'nt help them
Their efforts would be vain

Yes boys this is Barbados
Exclaimed frahkly by Lou
The people who are leaders
Just don't know what to do
.

To-morrow morning early
You can all wait and see

No sugar sold at Goddards
To sweeten a cup of tea

The new crop price for sugar
They failed to regulate
So housewives they have
Mm a very sorry state

left

This is what they should tackle
But this they will deapise

Recause they don't have nothing
For Government to nationalise

This ts the world al) over
From dawn ‘til set of sun

The things that we should fix up
Are generally left undone

30 fix the price for sugar
And fix it at once too
Without a little sugar
What car housewife do

The Dames, the Dames have tyumphed
Their football quick and clean
Deserves the National Anthem
Let's sing “God Save the Queen

sponsored by
J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
J&R RUM
and the blenders of

DISTRIBUTORS —

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.

PAGE FIVE
MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY







_

Wf you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine Is especially valuable after iliness.

qi we
** To keep
* pegular .

e?

’ ‘take ENQ’S
tye ‘< | if j °

Sparkling ENO’S “ Fruit Salt” first
thing in the morning freshens you up both
mentally and physically, It clears the head,
cleanses and refreshes the mouth, removes al
symptoms of liverishness. ENO’S conrains
no harsh purgatives. Its gentle laxative action
is non-habit-forming. ENC’S is ‘suitable
for delicate stomachs, safe for children and
invalids, Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy.




SPECIALLY
RECOMMENDED
2) for IRREGULAR ACTION,
SICK HEADACHE,
BILIOUSNESS,
INDIGESTION, ete,

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness.





Hii

s2itia









PAGE SIX



aulls hair_ .
Halo glorifies it!

VORP)



HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft
and easy to manage.

HALO makes your
permanents take
* better — last longer!

HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY

OF YOUR HAIR





i



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





NEWS for WOMEN

‘unknown’

Venetia the



(By SUSAN DEACON)

WHO will be The Outstanding
Debs of 1952—a year of girls more
beautiful than London has seen
for nearly 20 years?

Favourite ring

“Amor Vincit

conquers all.)
*

inscription :
Omnia” (Love

.
How to Choose Men’s



SUNDAY,

String Embroidery For The Summer



20, 1952

APRIL



Sewing
Circle
By PENNY NOLAN

It is unfortunate that so few
women realize the value of mas-
tering fine hand sewing. Although
the modern sewing machine will
do almost any sewing job there is
still a place for beautiful hand
work in the construction of fine
garments.

A few basic rules will make
hand sewing jobs easier apd more
perfect. The bulk of the material
should be held toward you, In
most cases the bulk should be held
in your lap. Care should be taken
not to crush or wrinkle the ma-
terial in your lap. When so held
the shoulders are relaxed. When
the bulk is on a table and the
seam or hem is toward the work-
er the hands stiffen and tension is
felt in the back of the neck, Ex-
eellent work can only be done in
a relaxed position.

A small amount of the material
should be held lightly between the
thumb and index finger of the
left hand. The needle should be
held between the thumb and index



finger of the right h a
Lady Caroline Child-Villiers i: Socks ; use two or three fingers to hold
one of the most beautiful. F ps MEN’S socks are actually bought, : : .
: 7) aired, — blue-eyed. he it “thi by wives and mothers. That is LONDON, March a. ‘LEFT: Th ; ib in black | One dress at a collection had a 4
€ More aul ul; aaa ht t Mes * Robir Wils © why they are often wrong,” says’ The latest epidemic in the|LEFT: Three piece suit in blac |combined cummerbund and spen-

hit heraaat mada Draenor she Sock expert Mr. Gordon Hope- fashion world is hand-embroid-| dupion, ee cua? re toners | ont. jacket. A piece of materi 1,

Of course! No other nail polish, at'any price, “cathe out’ fe 198h . Morley. ery. The newest materials for it py Aa ack-printe pm) about three yards long, was at-

taney Sede wawear 36 Yeer Sins. ve Sree Equally lovely is honey- , What kind of socks should men are procelain sequins, diamante iene uN ille -d sith | tached to the dress just below the

Cutex contains an exclusive new ingredi- | blonde Venetia Lane, an “un- wear? 5 » dew and garnet beads, which R a i aa fai eee jarm and could be worn swathed

ent, Enamelon. Your nails will retain their known” among the Debs. She “Plain ribbed, not patterned, form intricate and colourful pat- w a - ead and sequin lround the waist as a cummer-

lustre for days. Cutex does not crack, —_ is not classed as a rich girl. She he told me, “and they should never terns on all types of dresses. embroi ery.

off or fade. Choose from the many modern af

fashion shades.

Try Cutex Lipstick -
for true lip-appeal.
New, smooth, long-

t
j
|
|
|
|
|
}

makes her own clothes and has
a good dress sense.
t * *

Others in the running are Rosa-
mond Christie, daughter of John

; Christie, of Glyndebourne fame;

Patricia Cottingham, w hose
mother, Mrs. Thomas Lilley (of
Lilley and Skinner) is said to
have an income of around £100,-

wear brown socks with a navy
blue or black suit, or grey socks
with a brown suit.”

PERFECT CONTRASTS? “Beige
with a brown suit, maroon with a
grey or navy blue, and dark grey
with a black suit.”

Imperfect? The odd socks, of
different colours sported by
Eton boys.

“An Etonian,” says the Col-



Have you ever considered the
possibilities of embroidering with
white string? It made its first ap-
pearance at a collection of de-
signs for our summer, and it
looked attractive and unusual on
navy cotton dresses,

There were shantungs the col-
our of golden sand and burnt
oranges, silk-finished crepes pat-

(By DOROTHY BARKLEY)

for easy walking. Secondly, a full
skirted dress which illustrates the
current interest in embroidery.
Chalk white bead and sequin em-
broidery encircles the skirt and
edges the wide V neck. The dress
is in navy faille, and is worn over

bund, round the shoulders as a
jacket, or as a scarf.

The Masculine Influence

At various times in various
ways men’s fashions have inspired
the creators of women’s fashions.
Some time ago there was the
“Little Boy Look” when we cheer-
fully cropped our hair short and
wore those little boy caps. More



- es i lege Chronicle, “cam express terned ‘with giant flowers and several stiff petticoats. There is recently there was the “Edward- the needle. |Th se of i
00 year; an 7 i g s r . ” “ ” e use of a thimble
lasting Cutex comes in IE Bapah eco Beatty’ his sartorial ego only in the handkerchief cottons delicately nothing new about a navy and ian Look” with its “masher” jelns to avoid using two fingers
shades that harmonise whom Dior recently had photo- *wWo or three inches between checked. Since the accent was white colour scheme — but that jackets, ties and waistcoats. So 't to hold the needle. Push the
with your favorite nail graphed in one of his dresses. trouser and shoe. The re- 6 how to remain cool in .the does not mean that it cannot be Was, perhaps, inevitable that a needle with the side of the thimble,
polish. How does a girl become a Deb mainder of his dress is circum- ;,.at, sleeve details were particu- fresh, crisp and smart. designer would make jackets for not the tip end. Be sure you have
of the year? scribed. larly important. Suit sleeves women cut on the lines of a man’s the right needle fo rthe job. A
All depends on her beauty, her were bracelet length. silk coats The cummerbund and the spen- tailcoat! This type of jacket made needle that is blunt or two coarse
charm, her manners and her dress, » had “chinese lantern” sleeves cer jacket are two details shown jts first appearance this week in can spoil your best efforts,
sense. Money is not important. ‘Mother of World which pushed up into giant in all collections. The cummer- jightweight tweed end was worn If you are right handed you be-
Her parents can be rich or poor, - “pufis” above the elbow, and bund — any colour, any material with a tailored style of dress in gin at the upper right hand corn.
it doesn’t matter. eo



What does “coming out” mean?
Her poise, how she wears her

a



blouses had tiny cap sleeves, or
no sleeves at all.

—swathes the
most often used

waistline and is
to transform a

matching tweed,

er and sew from right to left for

; ; n most stitches. For the catch stitch,
Two styles — one formal, the humble black dress into a cock- , The influence of men’s fashions pjanket stitch, outline stitch and
clothes, and her personality other informal — are starred tail dress, is again detected in the choice of diagonal fagating you reverse the
are what really matter. from the collection. Mirstly. a . men’s shirting for women's procedure beginning at the left
a Simply, coming out of the school three-piece suit in black dupion The spencer jacket — any col- dresses. This has obvious advan- and sewing from left to right. If
+ emer ean = room into the social world. If not (see illustration left). The black our, any material — js softly tages. It is easy to launder and you are left handed you reverse
only means presentation at Court, is offset by pink dupion, printed draped across the bodice, has cool to wear. But be sure to the procedure,
but it means that she is giyen a with a black pattern, used for the either full or three-quarter length choose a simple style. The mast Lace requires very fine hand-
chance to meet peopie of her gen- tunic-style blouse, the collar and

* & Bobylo!

eration and make friends who will
be her friends for life,

She learns how to behave, how

cuffs. The skirt looks straight,
but has a box-pleat at the back

sleeves, and is worn with every-
thing from cotton beach dresses

practical is the sleeveless button-
through style which opens out flat

work. Insertion should be basted
on the right side of the fabric.

to organza evening gowns. for easy ironing. Both edges should be whipped
: down with a tiny sharp needle and
choose to dress, and how to face the ce Noe very fine matching thread. On the
extra mild, extra soothing world.

! Bath Size
PALMIOLIVE



SMART CHOKERS
SUMMER jewellery to wear with
cotton dresses will be gayer than
last year’s cork and wooden varie-
ties. '

Smart chokers are made from
round white china beads and
square rhinestones. I have seen
a 12-row necklace of small bottle-
green beads, and an all-white bead





wrong side trim away the fabric
under the insertion leaving enough
on both edges+to roll a tiny hem,
Hand roll and whip the edges with
fine stitches. To insert beading
roll and whip the edges of the
fabric as you insert the beading
in a seam or between lace and
fabric,

A fine finish for the edge of an

: all ont lace section is made by
r B ERED writes, “M am extremely sorry to hear have received several presents attaching fine lace beading to the
a ab» vein” V-shaped, to fit in the boy eae me but A l your trouble, my. dear, and from people who were not invited. edge with tiny running stitches.

Earrings larger than a keyring,
and made of straw, will be smart

just cannot resist other girls. He
always comes back to me event-

know of the anxiety and worry
you will have to face. However,

Am I supposed to ask them to both
the wedding and the reception?

To join lace invisibly, trim to
match the pattern and pin one

wally. At esent he has one I must urge you most sincerely to ; nai, edge over the other. Whip to-
ze ns Pas hionable Jamaican straw of whe. cnetney girl, Should I take your mother into your confi- OWADAYS, lavish expendi- gether with fine matching thread.
‘ ; 2
¢ gs! take him

SOOTHES BABY’S TENDER SKIN

sandals are now plentiful in
London, the price recently re-
duced by 10s, to 29s, 9d. a pair.

But these attractive shoes

with 3in. wedge heels are the (3

last we shall see for some time.

back again?

AM afraid, my dear, that this
boy is just. using you and
knowing your good nature, is very
much taking you for granted. I

dence. She will, I know, do all she
can to help you and would be ter-
ribly hurt were she to find out ac-
cidentally later on—as she surely
will, After all, she is your mother
and devote dto the only daughter,

ture cannot be aiforded and
I do not think an acquaintance
who sends a present would ex-
pect to be treated as relatives or
close friends. You could send out
invitations to the church only and

A mitred corner is made in lace
edge by cutting away a triangle
without cutting the edge of the
lace, Bring the edges together and
whip.

A lace insert is made by basting

‘ 4 a! . A burden shared, @S5* relatives or close friends by the lace in place then working
| Import restrictions now bar Ser ee one Se ear eae = a eis arenay. telephone or fetter, Or you could around the edges with the Satin
Palmolive—made of the finest ingredients—gives a creamy- | them. . Stas tent. Winks ehat tb ke tok O ROSE. “The spots you men- Put a notice in the paper saying stitch, The fabrie in back of tha
: t * ee .
smooth extra-mild lather that soothes away irritation as it gently |

floats away dirt. A daily Palmolive bath will keep your baby
. refreshed ...
extra-mild . . . extra soothing!

comfortable . . dainty. Remember, Palmolive is



FOR BRIDES
Pearl pink is the new colour
for wedding headdresses.
Some 1952 brides will wear
pink orange blossom with pink



CHILE’s First Lady, Senora Rosa
Markmann de Gonzales-Videla,

more to @o with him, It may
bring him to his senses, though I
cannot believe his love is true
when he treats you as he does.
Remember, my dear, that there
are many more fish in the sea

tion, my dear, are probably due to
bad eating habits. Take plenty
of greens in your diet. A little
witch hazel dabbed on the face
before making up will help to tone
up your skin. If the spots do not

“All friends welcome at the
church.” Which will mean that
the rezeption will only be for those
close to you

TOK. L, You are young enough,
my dear, to have several boy

insert is then trimmed away close
to the embroidery.

When attacking a lace edging to
a rawledge you may roll and whip
the edge of the fabric and the lace
at the same time,

n rt HE FAMILY friends, and there is plenty of time Decorative hand stitching and
wy pearl wailing, poses with one of her grand- — have ever been taken out of Rea ie sure, be for you to start taking them seri- embroidery often make the differ-
» “ Champagne veiling is also daughters at her home in Santiago. i able to advise you much more ously. It would be better, though, ence between an ordinary garment
, 7 new—with a seed pearl head- Mrs. Videla has been selected as q sta, ‘ not to be considered a flirt by your and a really distinctive creation.
= ecan fed clay dress. the “Mother of the World” by the pers ae gna eia S bata fu WEDDING PROBLEM friends. In time you will meet Naturally such work must be per-
_ Platinum wedding rings are American Mothers Committee. . r ;
1S ESPECIALLY



GOOD FOR You!



Fin “SSF

Ter Lovelness /U Over wuy BATH SIZE _PALMOLIVE



not popular with today’s brides.
The broad gold Victorian ring
is coming back.



She is active in the fields of child
care, women’s rights and public
welfare. (International)

I am afraid of my people, especi-
ally my mother finding out, and
do not know what to do. Please
help. me.



To make you
LOVELIER

writes, “I am getting married very
soon and as we have not much
money are having a small recep~-
tion after the wedding. Now I







POWDER...

the man you love, but in the mean-
time, have plenty of friends.
There is great safety in numbers,
my dear.




tect in order to be effective, Per-
fection in hand sewing comes from
practice and patience.
worth the effort.

It is well



Try this for reliet !

If you get sharp stabs of pain in
your back when you stoop and,

y

at other times, there is a dull and
continuous ache, the cause can very
often be traced to the kidneys. These
vital organs should filter poisons out of
the system but sometimes they get

Cool, fragrant powder to fluff
on ofter the bath, wonderfully fine,
deliciously refreshing.














TONLET WATERS . . .



' sluggish and congested and the backache
é. Perfumed luxury... Yrs $ you suffer is Nature's way of warning
lovely to use in LS you that your kidneys need assistance.
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bath t d: trusted medicine for .his purpose is
24 : nO Oe (33 De Witt's Pills. They have a cleansing
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SUNDAY, APRIL 26,
COPPER HAAa HOU ETTea

EXAMINES THE

z
z

“

EILEEN” ASCROFT’S COLUMN

gay hat,” says American actress Julle



1952

CULT OF THE —

MAD HAT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

HOH EAL0111 | RRM RT PRAT

—DEMONSTRATED BY A WOMAN WITH ;
A PASSION FOR THEM:







JULIE WILSON

ons in this one-woman Easter on Doster parate she shows ey-coloured rough straw with friied brim. ‘
Wilson, “makes a woman a woman.” © Of them —with somnemas. Sang every one, Tah o tins apple pod 3 yellow
: er -NEW YORKER . . . Robin felt is Hat has a tartan silk h
Putting theory into practice, she: brought Saoel ; oe hat in
her collection of hats—all 40 of them—to gene is "a Sr Se. « of Diack oy .
= _- - bead vy v
England in grey and silver-band bores : t § pe t detachable ostrich | Sa "gl ti -_
gust couldn’t bear to leave one behind. NA, .. Spring — caw in white. w ‘white with — ie ig velvet leaves
She spends much of. her year's dress sprays” of pink
ance om hats—jor her, the crazier the 4—COFFEE IN SaAns. eect tea ie



A Queen’s
—£3,000



Dress Bill
A YEAR

But did she get value for money?

By GEORGE MALCOLM
THOMPSON

A QUEEN AT HOME. By Vera
Watson. W. H. Allen. 18s.
264 pp.

IN all the nineteenth century
was “The Palace” ever fa\ed with
a graver crisis than the visit
(1873) of the Shah of Persia?

Was there ever a time when
those remote, stately (but very
human) officials who surrounded
the Queen-Widow had so many
problems to deal with, and so few
precedents to help them?

True, there had been six years
before, the State visit of the Sul-
tan of Turkey which cost the
Palace £8,922 14s. 10d., including
twelve quarts of eau de Cologne
for the royal guest and his suite.

The visit of the Shah was likely
to be infinitely more complicated.
But there was no escape. It was
part of the price the Queen must
pay for her own status as a great
Oriental potentate. Yet there
were moments when her patience
wore thin, She asked her Comp-
troller irritably why the Shah was
calleq “imperial.” “Because he is
Shah-in-Shah,” was the answer.
It gave no satisfaction. That’s no
reason,” her Majesty retorted.
The Foreign Office finally reported
that the Shah was not * ‘imperial.”

The Persian saan made his
way to London by Moscow and
Berlin. Inquiries sped across
Europe. Was it true the Shah
‘was bringing three wives? Would
he expect them to be lodged in
Buckingham Palace? “Does he
drink wine or, like other Persians
prefer spirits and those of the
strongest kind? Does he sleep on
the floor or in a bed? Does he sit
on chairs?”

It turned out that “the ladies”
had been sent back from Moscow.
The Shah would sleep in a bed
and sit on a chair. good fire-
work display would be very
acceptable. "

After the Shah’s Berlin visit,
the most unpleasant news arrived
in London, His Majesty’s followers
did not pay for what they order-

_ ed in shops. Their “encampment”

in the Royal Palace in Berlin nad
left “disastrous” effects. Worse,
the “free and easy manners of the
Shah, not yet accustomed to the
society of European ladies,” had
given offence to the Prussian royal
family. Nobody had dared to tell
the Shah that he. should not grab
a ‘chair until the Queen was seat-
ed, or take her Maiesty by the
elbow to make her get up, or put
his fingers into the dishes, or take

GALA OF LON
brings
you

exquisite

lonplowon

ing face powder-create

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GALA OF

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Gala tinted foundations and match-

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food out of his mouth to look at
it, or fling it under the table if it
did not suit his taste.

The Shah usually had his meals
in private and on the carpet.

If the German court was
shocked “by the manner in which
the Shah consoled himself for the
absence of his harem,” Bucking-
ham Palace was unlikely to be
jess appalled, especially when it
became known that the Shah had
telegraphed to Constantinople to
send on two Georgian slaves,

After these alarms the visit
went off splendidly, the only
trouble being to get rid of the
Royal visitor, or to entertain him
while he stayed.

Although the Persian visit is the

liveliest chapter in this account,
drawn largely from the Lord
Chamberlain’s papers, of social

life at Victoria’s Court, it is by no
means the only sidelight it throws
on a vanished era.

While Europe quivered under
the impact of the _ Franco-
Prussian war, the Lord Chamber-
lain was worried because Lord
Stanley of Alderley proposed to
“present” his wife, with whom he
was said to have lived before
marriage. Lord Stanley replied
that rumours had been spread by
“the unnatural malevolence” of
his family. He had been married

at Algiers perere Mussulman
witnesses. ‘was
admitted to the Palace.

Less happy was the outcome of
the affair Dr. Horsley

Chaplain-in-Ordinary, who took
to drink and ran into debt at
Buxton. When he
dom from arrest as
chaplain, Prince Albert
that the Queen should dismiss the
errant priest,

Queen Victoria spent more than
£3,000 a year on clothes, Whether
she got value for the money may
be doubted in view of the account
of an opening of Parliament given
by Mr. Anson, gentleman usher:
“After one smile, her countenance
relapsed into that peculiar fixed
look of melancholy. I think she
wore a purple dress, Royal
mourning. A pleasant change.”

The drainage at Buckingham
Palace (which led into the rain
pipes), the palace dusters (always
disappearing), the Windsor Castle
chimney-sweep (who lived with
an undesirable woman)—out of
a thousand trifles Vera Watson
builds up a picture of a court and
its queen. A book easy to read,
and to lay down,





ormpact.

LONDON

indation and pow<

Fashion Cosmas

Remember, there’s a Gala Lip and



F.S. NICHOLLS, P.O. B



OX 263 Also obtainable from

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yall the leading Seor

What's Cooking New Facts Come to Light .

YOUR BABY AND

In The Kitchen

More cake recipes. It is always
a heip to know recipes for many
eakes. This week | am giving you
a recipe for Ratan cake, another
Chocolate cake with chocolate
icing and another for a very tasty
Vanilla Cake.

RATAN

Flour 4 oz.

Butter or margarine 3 oz.

Sugar 2 oz.

Sultana 2 oz.

Milk 1 glass,

Egg 1.

Yeast (Dry) 1 package,

Put a bit of the flour in a mix-
ing howl and put the yeast in the
middle. Melt the yeast with a bit
of warmth milk and form a smal!
ball which you put in a warm
place. When you see that the ball
is starting to break up you know
that it is ready.

Add the rest of the flour, the

butter or margarine, the sugar, the “
and

milk the egg the sultana.
Work the dough beating it up
until it is soft and smooth. Put
the dough again in a bowl in a
warm spot in your kitchen and
leave it for about 10 minutes.
Then put it in a buttered cake tin
and bake it in moderate oven.
CHOCOLATE CAKE

1 cup sugar.

44 cup of butter.

2 large tablespoonsful of cocoa.

1 egg.
Beat all together.

When all is
blended add:
4 teaspoonful of starch or
cornflour.

4 cup of sour milk (% cup

milk and 1 teaspoonful of
vinegar).
cup of flour.

me

cup of boiling water.

Mix well again, put in a butter-
ed cake tin or pyrex in not too hot
oven. It takes from 25 to 30 min-
utes. wl

ICING
2 Tablespoonsful of butter,
1 cup of icing sugar,
1} tablespoonsful of cocoa.
2 tea ul of strong coffee,
Mix the butter with the icing
sugar, then the cocoa and finally
add the two teaspoonsful of coffee.
VANILLA CAKE
24 cups of flour.
44 teaspoonsful of baking pow-
der.
14 cups of sugar,
1 tablespoonfu] grated orange
rind.

% cup of butter or margarine.

%4 cup of

Beat for two minutes until the
batter is well blended and glossy

4 cup of milk.
3 eggs and
vanilla.
Beat for two more minutes.
Pour into cake tin (a large size)
bake in moderate oven. ©

1 teaspoonful of



Pink tones

choose carefully ..

English Peach, Cameo, Piak Pear!
Creamy tome: : Honey Glow, Champagne, Golden P.achel
Worm tones: Copper Cold, Rose Tan, Gipsy

YARDLEY 3s OLT BON

YOUR

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

IF yOur mother, madam, lost
her figure after you were born
take special care to watch your
weight when you have a baby.
pn liability to put on excessive
ht through motherhood defi-
ed seems to be «nherited.
This warning to mothers-to-be
is given by Dr, John Richardson,
of St. Thomas's Hospital, S.E. 1,
after a study of 40 young wives
who did not regain their figures
after having children.

Curve-conscious mothers should
not relax vigilence Over their
weight until at least three months
after their babies are born, the
or warns. Many women who
gain no excessive weight while
having their babies begin to put
it on soon afterwards.

Most of the fat forty were
slightly overweight before having
their babies. But pencilslimness
ig no guarantee that a woman will
not lose her figure when she has
children

Some women seem to be born
with a slight weakness of the
mechanism which controls appe-
tite, This mechanism is thrown
badly out of balance when they
have a :

In certain cases women get
overweight with their first baby,
but get no fatter with subsequent
children. Others put on weight
steadily with every child if they
do not curb their appetite

As a_ special warning Dr.
Rehardson quotes the case of 4
woman who weighed seven stones
before she married. After having
she weighed 17%

ones.

Expectant and nursing mothers
‘who want to keep slim should
weigh themselves daily, Those
who find they are suddenly put-
ting on extra weight should report
to their doctors for diet treatment.

They should not attempt to put
themselves on a strict diet without
medical supervision,

Dr, Richardson found that over-
weight women have substantially
more stillborn babies. So strict
dieting under doctor’s orders will
Brel only help you to recover your

figure but give your baby a better
chance,

TO COUNTER civilisation’s
newest ailment, nervous break-
down due to incessant anxiety,
doctors are reverting to nature’s
oldest remedy—sleep.

Over-worked men and women
who just cannot spare the time
for three months’ rest are being
given a Rip Van Winkle treat-
ment with hypnotic drugs.

During a five-day sleep broken
onl for taking liquid food
patients lose thelr” irritability and

nite

Yardley Complexion Powder, fine and fragrant, brings a new bloom to your beauty. \
‘There are nine perfect skin-tone coléurs. Choose a shade slightly datker

than your skin. Press the powder on firmly and generously.
Brush away the surplus—and admire your new-found loveliness.

YARDLEY

Complexion Powder

Dd TREBT LOND

- use cleverly

FIGURE

nervousness, doctors claim,

Big-sleep treatment was widely
used for treating battle-shocked
soldiers during the war.

No Parapraxis

Is YOUR ¥ an “oral
sadist”? He is if he puts his rattle
in his mouth and bites it, accord-
ing to a new dic tionary’ of psy-
cological terms.

Psychologists have perpetrated
so much tongue twining mumbo-
jumbology that a professor has
thought it necessary to write a
“small” (316 pages) Dictionary
of Psychology.*

So that you can test your famil-
jarity with the cOnsulting-room
jarjon I give ten more typical
terms from the professor’s list of
more than 4,500. His definitions
are given at the foot of the
column.

Test yourself. What is meant

yi~

(1) Aerophobia, (2) Grapho-
mania, (3) Jehovah complex, (4)
Looking-glass self, (5) Monorh-
inic, (6) Nolism, (7) Parapraxis,
(8) Peceatophobia, (9) Strabis-
mometer, (10) ae

ANSWERS: (1) ead of high
places. (2) An obsessive urge to
write, (3) Identification of one-
self with God, (4) The impression
of oneself obtained from the
opinions of other people, (5)
Smelling with one nostril only,
(6) The will not to do a given
act,

(9) Instrument for measuring the
amount of squint, (10) Hallucina-
tions taking the form of animals.
"A Dictionary of
by James Drever (Penguin, 3s.
6d.)
+L.£E.S.

Foot lich
Healed in 3 Days

your feet itch, amart ane burn
80 adi that they nearly drive you
crazy? Does the skin eraek, peel or
bleed? The real cause of these skin
troubles is a germ that has spread
throughout che world, and te ¥ ed
various panies such as Athicie 4 Foot
Singapore lich, Dhoby Iteh, You a nt
get rid of the trouble until you ree
move the germ cause A tew dis-

* a






dd Nixoderm,

covery, calle
ills ¢

itehing in 7 muinutes





n 24 hours and starts |

kin aoft, amouth and elear Ww 5 lays.
Nixoderm is so succesful it ie guar
a d to end the iteh atid heal the
al not only on the feet but the
W stubborn eases of Eesena, Piin~
s, Acne, Boils, and Ringworm of
fac © or body or mene? back en re ee
e ty « on. As our henlet for
= pie bec . Nixoderm
vday, The
Nixoderm (°!).00:
precects

for Skin Troubles you.







(7) A slip of the tongue Or
pen, (8) Morbid fear of sinning,

Psychology







Man About Jown

, advertised? They're

Eseribe Hoy Para Los Venezo- ; N
iave been locking for !
. * .

lanes En Barbados!

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.)
“a tore with everythin for) VICE (Ph. 4461) under the capable
verybedy, especially ! AJ direction of Mrs. Williams takes
,iendid selection of Ready-made| all your Party cares away, leave
uits in ‘Tweeds and Tropicals and| you with nothing to do but to in-
ens, loo, highlights the cloth-| vite your guests. Everything,
section. Prices range from) Sandwiches, Savories, China
down low ($39.43) for two-) Glasses, Cutlery AND DRINKS if
»iece Tropicals. Very smart tail-j you wish, together with Butler
wed Gaberdine Slacks comple-| and Maid service is yours for a
nent the vast Shirt Range in plain| very, very tiny sum per head—
nd faney colours and with collars} you'll really be amazed when you
(tached and separate. You'll find| phone about it! And, oh yes
casuiate, Elite Sea Island Cotton) you can order tastefully prepared
most famous in the world) and) tuncheon boxes, too.
ihe Internationally known Van| *,
scusen. For slumber, this is| RITZ STORE. Tudor Street is
ymething to dream about!—the) quite one of the most pleasing Dry
IbERTY SILK PYJAMAS are) Goods Stores in Town. The Stock

many



















































AQUATIC CATERING SER-

1
Way

wgeous and so are the CON-|/is always interesting—frequently
»ULATE POPLIN striped and) different, look ! Tropical Suitings
.ain colours. English Socks in| for $3.06, 56 in. wide and Prints

10 Lisle and Argyle Wool, Liberty} from 68c, Then there are Sports
are Silk Ties and Bow Ties and | Shirts from ONLY $2.00 and
.verty Wool Ties all ete a| flowered crepes, underwear, ladies’
chly varied and Mena 1 choice! shoes, brassieres and so much is
f Men’s wear. Cave Shepherd’s | sparkling and now that it’s a de-
known throughout the West|light to shop here—at the RITZ
adies by those who travel, and by | (pn. 2316) with no parking prob-
hoae who prefer good clothes. [lems !
« o .

DOMINICA HANDCRAFT CO.,|

~ °

.
CO-OP COTTON FACTORY is

there is no other store quite! presenting this week in its show-
ike this,- where the fascinating | room, the most pleasing of Cutlery
ut-of-door tropics is brought | ir true Sheffield quality—ideal
‘ght in side! Have you seen it? | fo edding Gift? And Czech-
The wonderful Grass Mats made! o: OVakian Clear Plain Glass in
2 any size carpet the floors; rain-|/C ampagne, Sherry, Cocktail and
ow splashed baskets in myriad|L) yueur sizes ers also) and
shapes crowd the walls and Straw, Dianer Sets that can be pur-

ind Raffia work both original and} c! ised complete or in “replacement j
xclusive, lines the counters. | pi ces. These, too, suggest Wed-

Jominica’s hospitable Ira Dangle-| ¢iig Gifts, don’t you think? Down

en will introduce you to her cool|t: earth Earthenware, Mixing |

ind delicious fruit drinks. Pow!ts ete., ., are many and varied, |
. . . |

Y. DE LIMA'S VILLLAGE ORIENTAL STORE on the cor-

JEWELLERY SHOP in Balmoral|ner of High St. is jam packed

ap, a box of magic where prices|with rich Oriental Cargoes. You |

ire the same as in the town shop.
Wonderful Topaz Rings, Watches
or both Ladies and Men and un-

must see these: Hand-carved
Indian Coffee Tables; Exotic Silks
i Gowns and Pyjamas; Wall Mats

isually attractive and practical |{from Cairo in all colour combina- |
‘Iluminumware — (a Vacuum/tions and designs and _ Silver |
Flask that keeps water ice cold/Filigree Jewellery and Brassware, |

for three days) — and so many | beautifully worked and extremely |

aried and attractivé decorative |decorative, And in the modern

tems. -Y. De Lima & Co. Ltd.,j;manner there is Silver Plated

re well known for their Evening |Ware—Knives, Forks and Spoons
. . *

“ags ond the selection in the
¢ lage Shop is not to be FORT ROYAL GARAGE =]
There’s a new Shipment in! Some- |
one told me you were looking for |
a Convertible. Are you? Here's |
lardware when you want it—and the newest of the dinky Morria, {
hat means a lot! Pitcher’s are|Minors in Green-—gee ! and only |
wesently showing their new Valor |$2160. Two and Four-Door Minor
Stove Models including the tricky |Sedams and the larger Oxford
ttle Table Models of one and two|make up an excellent variety ot |
surners with Ovens ranging|models and colours. Incidentally,
rough small, Medium and Large|there are two (2) J-Vans left,
© meet the two and three Burner | spanking new and ready for the
ype Valor Stoves. By the way,|/road now. They're the smallest |
id you see the Mirrors recentlyb\~ delivery Vans available!

c. 8, Pr TCHER & co. is where
rou i. find almost everything in







To keep that special
appointment. TTT

This is the punctual friendly clock that reminds
the world of its appointments—a VICTORY
Smith Alarm. In cream, blue or green cases
with plated fittings, A 30-hour alarm
clock with 4-inch dial carrying luminous
spots. Also available non-luminous,

ritish eeecermans by Smiths English
élocks

Smith larg

OBTAINABLE
























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Fabrics—made by one of the
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Here are two popular Beverly
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drapes smoothly, stays fresh,

wears well and washes quickly.

Look for the *“Tex-made”’ tag and
identification bands .. .
you are huying genuine sun-fast,
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MONTREAL:

PAGE SEVEN
—



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—— — ——_

PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS

Ls ae i ae ee ae ee ae



i ADVOGATE

SSSts= fsnee ce]



1952

————

Sunday, April | 20,

—— ct emai

HOME GROWN

THIS week the Control Board is meet-
ing to decide what answer to make to the
request of the Agricultural Society that
the control price of potatoes should be
removed from three cents per Ib. The
argument of the potato growers is that
it is uneconomic to grow potatoes and sell
them at 3 cents per lb.. No one is in a
better position to know whether potatoes
can be produced and sold at a reasonable
profit if the price is controlled at this
level than the growers and no doubt their
argument will be given every considera-
tion by the control authority.

Whether it is necessary to have controls
on locally produced foods at all is still a
subject for discussion among producers
and consumers in Barbados, In recent
years the government of Barbados has
decontrolled several locally grown vege-
tables such as string beans, tomatoes, car-
rots, beets and cabbage and competition
from neighbouring islands during this
period has tended slightly to prevent the
prices of vegetables rising too steeply,
except at times of great shortages when
prices become prohibitive for most people

The major obstacles to cheap vegetables
in Barbados is the lack of marketing and
consumers’ co-operatives and the failure
of controls to keep down prices was par-
tially recognised when the government
took off controls from several locally
grown vegetables. |

There remain on the control list, how-
ever, certain items such as eddoes, oranges,
grapefruit, julie mangoes, bananas, plan-
tains, sweet potatoes,. potato slips, and
yams when the reasons for keeping them
controlled are not at all clear.

In Trinidad the Government is follow-
ing quite another policy. On the recom-
mendation of the Local Food Production
Committee, price control has been re-
moved from locally produced beef, mut-
ton and pork, while between April 1952
and March 1953, fish, milk, eggs and vege-
tables are to be taken off the control list
on specified dates.

The government of Barbados on the

other hand is still undecided what policy ,

to follow with regard to local food pro-
duction except the vague generic one of
encouraging it.

Some of its methods are open to serious
criticism.

There is, for instance, a law which re-
quires 21 per cent. of the arable acreage
of the island to be planted with ground
provisions. According to informed evi-
dence this law is faithfully observed by
the plantations but is unenforceable with
regard to small peasant farmers who pre-
fer to put every available acre under
cane because of the high price offered.
Little enthusiasm, it is stated again in
reliable quarters, is displayed by the
plantation-owners who comply with the
letter of the law relating to the planting
of ground provisions but who do not re-
gard this enforced planting as economic,

It is interesting to compare conditions
in 1952 when there is a scarcity of ground
provisions with 1951 when according to
a speaker in the House of Assembly on
April 24th; “there are several plantations
today with acres of yams still in the
ground because they have not been sold.”

But comparison with the war years is
still more revealing. According to “The
Caribbean islands and the War”, a publi-
cation of the Anglo-American Caribbean
Commission, Jamaica as a result of com-
pulsory legislation during the war years
abolished the need to import rice in view
of the sufficiency of home grown carbo-
hydrates and in Barbados the planting of
ground provisions on 35 per cent. of the
land of the sugar cane growers resulted
in a total production of carbohydrates
sufficient to offset all of Barbados’ pre-
war imports of rice and 50 per cent of its
pre-war import of flour.

Today Barbados subsidises imported
rice at a cost to the island’s revenue of
$350,000 while the subsidisation bill of
certain grades of flour is not too far
behind.

No one would suggest that Barbados
should swing back to the drastic wartime
system of planting 35 per cent. of the
arable acreage with ground provisions. At
a time when sugar is being sold for good
prices this would be an unwise policy and
the provision of inspectors to ensure that
compliance with compulsory legislation
was being made would add to the cost of
the agricultural department.

The fact remains, however, that Bar-
bados is turning a blind eye to the defects
in its agricultural policy although it real-
ises the advantages of growing more local
food.

It compels the planting of ground pro-
visions but has not got the machinery to
see that they are planted. When they are
planted they cannot be sold at prices
which give a fair return to the producer
because the government still controls the
price of ground provisions.

Meanwhile, an island where, with only
14 per cent. more of its arable acreage
being allotted compulsorily to growing
ground provisions than today, sufficient
carbohydrates were grown to offset all of
its pre-war import of ri¢e and 50 per cent.
of its pré-war import of flour, is now sub-
sidising |imported rice to the exteni of
$350,000 annually.

There is much to be said for the argu-"

ment that rice is a simple food easy to
prepare And requiring less fuel than yams
or potatoes.

It is also true that total dependence on

being serialised on Page 8)
recalls the scientist's phrase to
describe the beginning of life in
the world ... “A single-celled
amoeba in the pretozoic slimé”’

Here is an irnpression of the first
romance written in the manner
of an Irish ballad.

I might have been your sweetr
heart 50,000,000 years ago.

You might have been the kind
of girl amoebas like to knew.

When you and I together gat
before the dawn of time

Two single-celled amoebas in
the protozoic slime.

Sure your eyes they never
shone jike stars
You had no eyes to

shine
You had no voice to tell
me that
Forever you’d be mine
Your hair was not like
en corn
Th pens in the fall
For me darlin bit of jelly
Had no hair at all,
at all,

locally grown. carbohydrates would be an | o-Moeba is an Irish name, it 1s

unwise; policyfor so small an island to
adopt, but hah of these arguments nullify
the fact \thats the artificial stabilization of
one impértéd éarbohydrate (rice) is giv-
ing no encouragement to the growers of
local carbohydrates even to carry out the
requirements of the law which stipulates
that ground provisions should be planted
on 21 per cent. of the arable acreage of
the island. If the heavy expenditure on
rice subgidisation is considered necessary
(and it is not by everyone) the least the
government can do is to allow the people
who comply with the law’s provisions to
sell their locally grown carbohydrates at
a reasonable profit.



TOWARDS SANITY
MR. ACHESON has been saying in
Washington that the United States must
allow other countries to earn dollars. The
immediate cause of this statement would
appear to be a note from the Italian gov-
ernment pointing out that tariff restric-
tions in the United States were not

assisting Italy to earn dollars to pay for
American imports.

Similar representations have been made
in Washington by other European govern-
ments and the manufacturers of motor-
cycles, bicycles and chinaware in the

United Kingdom have been successful in -

obtaining protests to. the American gov-
ernment ‘from the British Embassy
Washington,,.

Mr. Acheson is preaching to Americans
a doctrine that has been long pointed out
by the enlightened school of British poli-
ticians who opposed the first American
loan on the grounds that it attacked the
British imperial preference system while
protecting the American tariff wall.

Mr. Acheson was actually using their’
words when he said that the United States
cannot throw up tariff barriers while urg-
ing the abolition of other nations’ prefer-
ences. If the United States are to survive
as a great manfacturing country they will
have to increase American imports.

The incidence ‘of trade discrimination in
the United States is reflected in Europe
where commentators point out that the
improved position of the sterling area this
quarter is due ‘to a contraction of imports
from other countries. But this improve-
ment is by no means healthy particularly
with regard to the European Payments
Union because it has led to the contraction
of imports from Britain.

Cutting imports is a trade game that
everyone can play and if carried to excess
it can end in “Love “All.”

It is no more than a means of “buying
time” as one London newspaper said last
week. The only sane trade policy is one
which is; conducted. without artificial re-
strictions, Théfe“are signs that London is
fully awaresofwhat is happening and
realises that’ the’éutting of imports is little
more than the_exporting of trade troubles
from one country to another, without end.

These facts are exercising the greatest
financial minds in Europe and the United
States and there should be little surprise
if an announcement is made sooner or
later about a conference to discuss the
impossible trading conditions which exist
throughout the free world today. Mr.
Acheson's forthright declaration that the
United States must import more from
other countries may convince American
business men of the shortsightedness of
protecting local interests at the expense
of the total American economy. If only
our own questions of trade could be con-
sidered positively and freshly by alert
minds on the spot instead of being geared
to a rubber-stamped system applicable to
all colonial dependencies rémotely con-
trolled from Whitehall!

Then the possibilities of promoting our
own trade relations with Canada might be
considered differently than they are at
present. And the value of tourism might
be properly assessed.

begob bebad

It must be just the oldest name
old Ireland ever had

So when we sat together we
were once upon a time

Two single-celled O’Moebas
the protozoic slime.

in

Sure I couldn’t hold your —
little hand
You yes no hand to

But we snuggled up to-
gether
Cos the new world was
cold
There was no one there
to marry us
No mother there to call
But me darlin little jelly
o* care at all, at
a

mother

If your comes from
Ireland, from Killarney or
Kildare

You can bet your bottom dollar
she’s descended from a pair

Labour Policies In The W.L

Everybody will now have heard
of the famous telegram alleged to
have been sent by Lord Baldwin,
then Governor and Commander in
Chief of the Leeward Islands to a
Socialist Secretary of State for the
Colonies in reply to a query asking
for information about Communists
in the West Indies.

Lord Baldwin, the story goes,
sent the following telegram:
“COMMUNISTS NIL;
SOCIALISTS ONE (MYSELF).”

I am not in a position to vouch
for the authenticity or otherwise
of this charming little anecdote,
but I mention it because it reminds
me of another real episode in
which I recently played a humble
but leading part.

Wanting information about La-

in |bour organisations in the West In-

dies, and seeking it from a source
which should know more about»it
than any other, I was greeted with
the somewhat Baldwinian reply
that they aren't any.

The wit who offered this infor-
mation was of course pulling my
leg but he was not so far off the
rails as would appear at first, be-
cause information about Labour
organisations in the West Indies
is far less detailed or available
than is, say, our knowledge of the
ancient Phoenicians, }

We know that there are some
120 orga@sations registered under
the trade union legislation of the
British Caribbean territories but
as to what they are and what they
do, we know very little.

What for instance is the Carib.
bean Labour Congress? That ex+
cellent compilation, the Who’s Who
of Barbados 1951 ‘informs us that
Mr. G. H. Adams C.M.G, is Presi-
dent of the Caribbean Labour
Congress.

Yet a recent manifesto purport-
ing to be issued by the Caribbean
Labour Congress (London Branch)
contains this sentence “The pros-
tituting of the term Labour by
Bustamante of Jamaica, Gomes of
Trinidad and their international
bedfellows like Tito, Attlee, Bevan
will not ensnare us into an alter-
native whose benefit is comparable
b that of the frying pan and the
re

A sentence like this owes more
to Moscow than any other source
and would certainly be repudiated
by our own distinguished elderly
statesman who is however su
posedly still President of an or-.
ganisation whose London Branch_
is so naively Communist in
phraseology.

After reading Labour Policies in
the West Indies (published by the
International Labour Office,
Geneva (1952) price 13s, 6d.) TI
am still in the dark with regard to
the 120 organisations registered
under trade union legislation. in
the British territories of the Carib-
bean, but IT have at least found a
handbook on labour questions
which will prove invaluable to me
on many occasions in the future.

One of the greatest handicaps
to progress in the British Carib-
bean is the cat and dog attitude
which has been injected into la-
bour-employer relations by poli-
ticians anxious to exploit this easy
pathway to political notoriety, if
not power. 7

As a result almost any statement
relating to Labour whether eman-
ating from official publications or
from private individuals with spe-
cial knowledge has been suspect
by politicians who have set them-
selves up to be the only true inter-



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fenee

ACHEL CARSON'S book (now By NATHANIEL GUBBINS. move your hat until Stalin has)

Of single-celled O’Moebas who
were joined up for a time

As a lied O’Moeba

the protozoic slime.

Sure me heart it would
be beatin

. Wf 1 had a heart to beat

And me feet they would

be dancin
oe had no
When we had a million

“oda one
And ®e darlin bit
Didn't care. at alt at alt

Strange Honeymoon

While General Eisenhower
tried to cheer us with “The
situation of the free world is
brighter,” and Joe Stalin
said he does not consdier a
third world war is clbser than
it was three years ago, a
bald-headed man has written
to a newspaper saying he is
frightened to remove his hat
in the presence of women

in

* *" because he loses confidence.

ELL, my dear sir, even if

the fate of the world is in
the balance, let us drop everything
tc consider your problem.

One obvious way out of the
difficulty is to keep your hat on
at all times, though this would
not only make you unpopular in
churches, and look foolish in
restaurants, but excite both re-
sentment and curiosity in your
girl friend.

If you did not raise your hat
to her on meeting and parting,
she would think you were no
gentleman; if you told her it had

* stuck to your head, she would

naturally want to know why and
how long.

As these questions. would be
difficult to answer, you might
take aiother line. Men have
vowed not to shave until there
is universal peace. You might
say you have vowed not to re«







By GEORGE HUNTE

preters of Labour matters and
without whose “imprimatur” no-
thing can be said without provok-
ing accusations of prejudice or in
many instances personal abuse.

_ This primitive cat and dog fero-
city is slowly being dissipated,
largely as a result of the great ex-
tension of responsibility through-
out the area to representatives
elected to legislatures by support-
ers of Labour parties;"and more
and more politicians of the Left
are prefacing their speeches by
references to their new status of
political mellowness or maturity,
The ‘publiqation this year of
Labour Policies in the West Indies
should go a long way to expedite
owe state of maturing and mellow-

ing.

Although the principal compiler
of its 277 pages did visit most of
the territories concerned during
1946 and again dyring 1948-49, the
book is essentially, as is stated in
the introduction, an analysis of
d@cumentary informatian avail-
able to the International Labour
office.

It offers no solution to Labour
problems: it uses none of the re-
grettable political clichés with
which exponents of Labour ideolo-
gies normally present their view-

oint: it attempts to assess what

known about Labour policies
in the West Indies. And it includes
Bermuda and the Bahamas with

all the other territories falling w

within the terms of reference of
the Caribbean Commission.

The value of such an unpreju-
diced analysis can hardly be ex-
aggerated at a period when ( in
the British Caribbean at any rate)
the success or failure of present
government policies will advance
or retard progress for decades.
Until the Labour parties of the
area can approach problems
affecting Labour with the disin-
terestedness which marks the
analysis of this report, little hone
of real progress in the British
Caribbean can be entertained.

I deliberately differentiate be-
tween the British and the non-
British Caribbean because this
book is largely an account of the
British Caribbean for the reason
that no other metropolitan govern-
ment has apparently furnished the
International Labour office with
half as much documentary evi-
dence as the United Kingdom.
That is one reason.

Another is the obvious differ-
ence which exists between the .e-
lationship of say Puerto Rico or
Guadeloupe to the United States
and France, and between Barba-
dos for example and the United
Kingdom. 3

Direct Mhancial aid to Puerto
Rico from the Federal Goyern-
ment, it may be mentioned,
amounted to $580.000,000 from the
date of its becoming an American
territory (1898) to June 30, 1945.
And loans from federal agencies
amounted to $82,000,000 during
the period 1929 to 30 June 1944.

These are only two instances of
the many privileges which Puerto
Rico enjoys from its incorporation
into the Commonwealth of the
United States,

__And the French Departments of
Martinique and Guadeloype to
mention only one thing, benefit
with certain modifications from the
rovisions of legislation concern-
ng the organisation of social se-
curity in metropolitan France,

OUR READERS SAY

Family Welfare Society
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Would you be so kind as
to publish the following list of
Donations to the Special Appeal,
of the Family Welfare Society.

$c.

rT Beery Sree ee ee Try 5.00
Mrs. Blades (Annually) 10.00
Lady Gilbert-Carter .... 10.00
Mrs. Leicester Challenor 5.00
Mr, Robert Dear (Monthly) 1.00
Donation aM EN 5 Os 5.00
Mrs, Mary Gibson rae 25.00
Anon sen beeres a ehenen 10.00
Mrs. K. M. Shepherd ,.. 13.00
Mrs,, Ethel West . isbe 2,00

TORR]... cccrsdece $86.00

SYBIL, CHANDLER,
Hon. Secretary.

Philatelist

To The Editor, The Advocate—
» SIRI am a Philatelist and
would like you to oblige me
in publishing my name and
address in your newspaper that
fT am interested in exchanging
stamps of British Guiana and
other countries by the hundred
with Philatelists in your island
and other West Indian islands.

Hoping you will oblige me this
favour and thanking you in
anticipation.

Yours sincerely,

RANSFORD CHUNG.
16 New Stteet,
New Amsterdam,
Berbice,
British Guiana,
14.4,52,

shaken hands with the President
of the United States.

Assuming the friendship grows
warmer, you could propose with
your hat on. You could avoid

a church and be married in ali

register office. s
But what happens then?

If you suddenly remove your | {j

hat when you reach the hotel,
your bride may never recover
from the shock.

Tf you insist on wearing your
bowler day and night, I can only
say yours will be an unusual and
uncomfortable honeymoon,

Man Bites Lion
ORLD shortage of meat is
* causing some strange be-
haviour here and im foreign parts.
It has been reported that

President Peron recently spent

a whole night poking his nose

into the dtstbins of Buenos

Aires, ostensibly to see how

many steaks had been thrown

away by spoiled citizens.

As steaks are hard to come by,
even in the beef empire, I suggest
that he was probably hoping to
find a titbit for himself.

Dogs im Brita® killed and

injured 10,900 sheen in 1951.

If this is allowed to go on I
suggest that owners of sheep-
worrying dogs should become
vegetarians to make up for the
loss in rations.

And a man in a village in

Northern Rhodesia has bitten

a lion’s nose,

°

This is, indeed, a desperate
case of meat hunger. Therefore
I suggest that he should be

brought over here to bite the
noses of the dogs who worry the
sheep.

Or, better still, bite the noses
of the owners of the dogs that
worry the sheep.

In fact, if he’s that hungry, he
could eat the dogs and their
owners, too, for all I care.

In this way we could improve
our Sunday dinner and rid our-
selves of a lot of pests.

—L.E.S.

The report however realistically
realises that “the task of adapting
a social security system designed
for an _ industrialised Western
country to the differing social
—_ and organisations of a West

ndian community is clearly a
difficult one.” ri

How often when prudent state-,
ments like these have been made
by men of experience in this com-
munity have their makers been
branded with epithets of reaction-
ary, unprogressive or something
unprintable?

Coming from the stronghold of
Labour activities, the office at
Geneva, this statement cannot be
overlooked.

And with regard to the proposed
extension of French metropolitan
social security arrangements to the
French departments of Martinique
and Guadeloupe a mission of en-
quiry in 1949 concluded that only
if a substantial proportion of the
financial burden were borne by
metropolitan France, in view of
the low level of local resources,
could appropriate arrangements
be made.

No other metropolitan territory

with interests in the Caribbean
could afford to adopt the lavish
spending system of the Continen-
tal United States which has result-
ed in the level of real income and
wages having risen in Puerto Rico
over the past decade a fact which
according to the report “cannot be
established in respect of other
est Indian territories,”
Nor does the report err by sug-
gesting that the ills of West In-
dian society can be remedied
merely by the passage of legisla-
tion. The reverse opinion is ex-
pressed.

It is impressed by “the very
considerable strides made @uring
the past decade in the develop-
ment of employers and workers’
organisations” and concludes that
“to a very large extent the further
development of these organisations
depends on their own efforts and
there ib little that Government
policy can, effect in this regard.”

Its conclusions with regard ta
man power problems confirms the
centuries old fact, which had re-
cently escaped attention because ot
the starry eyed visionaries and in-
tellectuals who came to the West
Indies fresh from Cambridge and
other centres of learning to join
the chorus of those who believed
that the faults of West Indians so-
ciety were due to the wicked stiff-
necked Philistines who comprise
the so-called West Indian upper
and middle classes. This myth
has now been exploded by all
honest searchers
amongst Whom the author of this
report deserves to be numbered.

“In the island territories” he
writes “the rate of population
growth and the progressively

strong demand for higher living
standards make it difficult to en-
visage the islands being capable,
with their very limited resource;
of finding a solution without mi-
gration.”

What seeker after political hon-
ours in say the Barbados House of
Assembly would say words lika
these to his constituents? Yet
here is orthodox Labour stating
the truth from its world headquar-
ters in Geneva. '

“Within the present framework’
however and again many people
irrespective of political tendencies
or affiliation will applaud his ver-
dict “there are directions in which
perhaps more positive efforts
might be made notably in regard
to land settlement and the exten-
sion of vocational training facili-
ties.”

And I can pay no greater com-
pliment to the integrity of the
author of this report than by end-
ing this brief review of a worth-
while labour with a
which I might easily have written
myself:

“The introduction of large scale
rogrammes of vocational train-
ng . . . would not only serve «
variety of internal needs, but
would probably be a step in the
direction of breaking down some
immigration barriers.”

And without emigration, labour
policies in the West Indies cannot
hope to achieve much _ higher
standards of living than those we
now enjoy, if indeed they can
maintain them at their present
level.

F cosoocooeososeneooososoososoeoooooncooescosooss




after truth/¢

sentence | ¥

SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952





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SUNDAY, APRIL





20, 1952

THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS

“ WHITE SERVITUDE ”

By JOHN
The indentured white servant
was the first labourers in this

island, so they
first. To our
thinking, the

will be dealt with
modern way of
system of white
servitude was cruel, because it
subjected such large numbers of
persons to a completely differ-
ent way of life, which was ex-
ceedingly hard, laborious and in
many ways dangerous; in com-
pletely different climates and
undeveloped and strange regions.
Such persons were generally un-
fitted for this type of life, and
were incapable of’making a suc-
cess of it. The extremely hard
part was that once this type of
life had been started on by an
individual, there was no way of
drawing back from it, also they
were subjected to masters that
often ill-used and_ exploited
them; even if the ultimate end
was death. Death it usually was,
for many did not survive the
first five years, and fifty to sev-
enty-five out of every hundred
white indentured servants died
without having ever obtained. a
decent chance of survival. It is
not that the rogues, vagabonds,
and convicts who were sent out
would have enjoyed an easier
time if they had remained at
home; as some of the poor woffld
have been unemployed and be

forced to exist on the miserable were committed to prison with porary
poor rates of that day. Also they 20 lashes apiece, Captain Stan- the beginning of

were liable to have been pressed
into the army or navy when men
were required for these services.
No matter how poor people may
be and the risks they run «at

home. to be picked up and trans- Governor of this Island, whether difficulties

ported to a strange land away
from family and friends does not
relieve the situation, especially
when that transportation ter-
minates in servitude for seven to
ten years under a strange mas-
ter and stranger conditions,

Redemptioneer

There was the redemptioneer,
who sold himself into some state
of bondage for his passage and
keep, so as to escape the condi-
tions which existed at his home,
and being attracted to the wealth
of the colonies, the idea may
have been that when he had
served his time, he may have a
far better chance of attaining
decent indepepdence in the land
of his adoption than he did in
his own country.

Every large plantation had
supervisors who were in charge
of the servants and saw that they
performed their allotted tasks;
these supervisors were not nota-
ble for Christian charity. The
welfare of the servant, therefore,
not only depended upon his own
character and adaptability, but
also upon the temper and dis-
position of his immediate supe-
riors. Ligon wrote—‘I have seen
an Overseer beat a Servant with
a cane about the head, till the
blood has flowed, for a fault that
is not worth the speaking of;
and yet he must have patience,
or worse will follow.”

This was*tmhore than’ Tikely a
product of the times as the
greatest cruelties appear to have
occurred in the earlier years of
colonisation, for this enterprise
called for the hardest types of
pioneers and adventurers, These
men and women bore tremen-
dous difficulties themselves, and
were unsympathetic to those who
were weaker than themselves,
especially the unfortunate ‘ser-
vant. These servants were even
punished if they. so much as
fainted at their labours, Ligon
fecords that as the island be-
came more colonised, and ‘dis-
creeter and better natur’d men’
came into the control of affairs,
there was a marked improvement
in the treatment of servants. He
sums the existing conditions un-
der which white servants lab-
oured in this sentence—‘as for
the usage of the Servants it is
much as the Master is; merciful
or cruel,’

Conditions of Service

Throughout the colonial period,
all white servants arriving at
Barbados came under the follow-
ing conditions of Service. Those
of eighteen years or over serv
five years, and those under eigh-
teen—no matter what age—serv-
ed seven, The number of servants
coming to Barbados declined af-
ter all of the available land had
been granted out to the owners
and other servants who had serv-
ed their time. The price an in-
denture or convicted. servant
brought in the Colonies depend-
ed on two things—firstly, the
current demand for labour in
that particular Colony, and sec-

ondly; the individuals own
worth. Scottish servants were
highly esteemed, and the Irish

Catholics were despised; artisans

and skilled labourers were al-
ways in high favour.
The Council reeords contain

the following incident which gives
some idea of the treatment of
servants.

“Whereas by complaint made
hy John Thomas, servant unto

PRIDEAUX

Francis Leaver together with
Ensign Samuel Hodgkins, his
brother-in-law, did inhumanly

and unchyistianlike tortuze the
say’d John Thomas by hanging
him upon the hands and putting
fire matches between his fingers,
whereby he hath lost the use of
severall joynts and in great dan-
| s to lose the use of his right
and, it is thought fitt and so

ordered that the said Leaver and
Hodgkins pay the said John
Thomas within ten days, 5,000

Ibs of cotton apiece and that he
shall immediately be sett free
from the sayd master and that
the sayd Leaver take a speedy
course for the curing of the sayd
Thomas, and pay the same and that
the said Leaver and Hodgkins re-
main in prison during the Govern-
or’s pleasure.” The case followed
of ‘two varlets having charged
their master Captain Thomas Stan-
hope with the venting of’ unbe-
coming speeches against Governor
Hicks.” To -this charge Stanhope
admitted that on the occasion
referred to, of ‘being undeniably
drunk’, and that.he probably did
use the scurrilous expressions al-
leged: but upon further explana-
tion the same servants “did varie
from their former dispositions”
and being pronounced as “lyars,
also lewd and prophane livers

hope was also sent to prison
during the Governor's pleasure
for his unbecoming _ speeches
against “the Right Worshipful
Serjeant Major Henry Hicks,

at any time, drunk «r sober.”

Cruelty

Richard Ligon, who wrote the
first History of this Island, re-
cords that he saw in Barbados
“such cruelty done to Servants, as
I did not think one Christian could
have done to another.” (5) That
was in the forties of the seven-
teenth century, but this cruel
treatment must have continued
for many years after Ligon vis-
ited this Island, for thirty years
later, it was recorded that in
Barbados the white servants
were “used with more barbarous
cruelty than if in Algiers. re
. -as if hell commenced here
and only continued in the world
to come.” (6).

It was not only of the treat-
ment received by white servants
on this Island that Ligon records,
but also on the method of trans-
portation from England. He re-
cords that on the same ship that
he was voyaging on from Eng-
land to Barbados in 1647, that he
found many women to be sold
as servants, the “Major part of
them, being taken from ‘Bride-
wall, Turnbull Streets, and such
places of education. (7) this cus-
tom appears to have remained
in vogue for over a_ hundred
years, for it is recorded that even
in the middle of the eighteenth
century that it was the custom
of some ship’s captains to visit
bourse ae mete in oe ame
welly . unfortunate female
inmates with drink and ‘invite’
them to go to the colonies.



Gives Korea Views



SECRETARY of State Dean Acheson
testifies in Washington in support
of the Administration's $7,900,-
000,000 foreign aid request. Dur-
ing the hwaring he told the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee that
the Korean truce talks are in “a
difficult period.” He added, how-
ever, that “we should resist all
temptations to be either pessimis-

tie or optimistic. I believe the |



WARRENS LINE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

UP FOR VITTLES



GOVERNOR EARL WARREN of California, candidate for the Republican
presidential nomination, his wife, and daughter, Nina, line up for
canapes ata reception given in New York by University of California
Club of Greater New York. Holding tray is M. C. Gale. (International)





World Textile Slump

Hits Laneashire

(By RONALD BOXALL)

The situation in the textile
industry looks less like a tem-
recession and more like
a slump for
every day that passes. It might
be easier to agree with the lead-
ers of the industry in their con-
tention that this is a_ trade
recession and not a slump if the
facing Lancashire
were not shared by cotton indus-
tries all over the world. But,
unfortunately, they are.

Reports from all quarters tell
the same story. In Japan, where
a decision has already been
taken to cut back cotton produc-
tion by 40 per cent. the
announcement that Britain will
issue no further licences for the
importation of Japanese’ grey
cloth precipitated a sharp fall in
the price of cotton yarn-in the
Osaka market. The price fell
from the equivalent of about 54
pence per pound to 42 pence—a

third of its post-Korean peak
level—before dealing was sus-~
pended for the day.

From this quarter, too, come

reports that the domestic spin-
ning industry may have to reduce
its output still further. The cur-
tailment of 40 per cent. it is
feared, may prove an inadequa‘e
adjustment to the falling off of
domestic and overseas demand.
This gloomy picture is repeated
in practically every other coun-
try which boasts a_ substantial

cotton textile industry. In
America, some 62,000 of New
England’s 140,000 textile work-

ers are reported unemployed, In
Canada, mills are working only
three days a week. Holland is
contemplating a cut in cottén
production, and France too is
worried about the effects on its
eotton industry of recent import
restrictions. In Sweden, the num-
ber of textile workers has fallen
by 4,000 since the middle of last
year and now stands at the same
level as in 1935,

Grave Concern
The situation in Lancashire is

a matter of grave concern in
Britain. Mr. Peter Thorneycroft,
the President of the Board of
Trade has said that unemploy-
ment in the textile industries

amounts to some five per cent.
compared with rather less than
two per cent, for industry as a
whole. But, he added, the pub-
lished figures probably under-
state the problem. They mask a
good deal of short-time working
and inevitably cl6ak wide differ-
ences between one area and
another.

A Manchester Guardian report
underlines these differences, In
Bolton, it says, forty of the towns
cotton mills will be stopped this
week, The latest available unem-
ployment figures for this area
show that on March 17 there
were 964 wholly unemployed and
7,453 temporarily suspended.
Many mills will be closing for a
fortnight at Easter.

The situation in Oldham is
even worse. This week, 75 mills,
affecti some 12,000 workers,
will either be stopped or working
part-time. Last week 13,000
workers were affected. In Roch-
dale, 35 of the town’s 90 miles
are on short-time,

The Cotton Board’s latest
return, for the week ended March
15, shows that the total output
of single yarn in the spinning
section of the industry was only
15.87 million lbs, the lowest
figure reported so far this year.
It compares with 21.96 million
lbs. in the corresponding week of
1951—a decrease of about 28 per
cent, and was much smaller
than the figure$ ‘returned for any
week during the holiday period
last summer,

Forty-one mills were closed
throughout the week compared
swith 28 in the previous week,
?when output was 16.98 million

Francis Leaver, it appearing on negotiations will be successful.” &Jbs. There was a net loss of 965

sufficient testimony that the said




As soon as your doctor’s examination is completed and he
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full-time workers and 200 part-
timers also left the mills, bring-
ing the total number on
employers’ books down to 116,65
against the peak of 124,910
reached in November,

This loss of workers would be
less alarming, and even désira-
ble, if it led to an automatic
inerease in the number of em-
ployees engaged in defence and
engineering export industries,
But no such automatic transfer
of labour is considered likely,

As Lancashire industrialists
point out, many of the displaced
workers are married women with
family responsibilities, If they
lose their jobs in the cotton indus-
try they might decide to give up
their employment altogether, and
workers once lost in this way may
never be persuaded to return.
What faces the cotton industry
therefore, is not only a decline in
trade but also a loss of a large
proportion of their labour force

The belief is growing, more-
over, that the present recession—
which is generally attributed to
the accumulation of large stocks
in all the principal importing
countries—may reflect something
more than just a temporary
readjustment on the part of buy-
ers. It ‘is feared that some of our
traditional markets may have
been lost for ever.

Paradox

The paradox of a situation in
which world cotton textile
exports are gradually declining
despite a large increase in the
world population, has been com-~
metited on in various quarters
during the past few days.

Mr. Thorneycroft touched on
this aspect of the problem during
the Commons’ debate on the tex~
tile industry. We are a long way
he said, from the days when we
used to make piece goods for
Brazil, India, China and the Far
East. These countries now manu-
facture their own.

“Indeed,” he went on, “one
of the great problems which con-
fronts us is not so much competi-
tion from third parties, but that
the country to which we have
been exparting has set up its
own textile industry and is pre-
pared to supply its-ewn market,”

This, however, is by no means

a new situation. .The growth of

domestic industries, with a con-
sequent lessening of import
requirements, has long been

recognised by economists as an
inevitable outcome of the policy
of promoting the economic devel-
opment of backward areas, In
fact, the decline in the volume
of imported textiles goes back tc
the beginning of the first World
War,
General Decline

Before 1914, the volume of
imported textiles was 9,500
million* yards per annum; it fell
to 8,500 million in 1926—28 to
6,400 million in 1936—38, and to
4,000 million in 1948.,And this
general decline in textile imports
has naturally been reflected in
Britain’s own trade figures. Our
exports of cotton manufactures
alone amounted to 7,000 million
yards in 1913, but they gradually
decline until today they are well
below 1,000 million yards,

So much of Britain’s cotton
industry is concentrated in a
single area that any decline in
the demand for its products
inevitably leads to serious unem-
ployment and hardship. As Mr.
Thorneycroft has pointed out, in
a constantly changing world it is
wise to have facilities for taking
up some of the slack at times of
low demand. It would be a bold
man, he said who amidst all the
imponderables of the world today
sought to predict at exactly what
level of activity the British tex-
tile industry was going to settle
down.

Meanwhile, the



Government part



EMIGRATION

Hy

We ended our discussion of
this subject last week with the
warning that careful preparation
beforehand wok be required as
an insurance against failure of
any land settlement programme
in conjunction with emigration
plans. It is too early yet to con-
sider what preparatory capital
works on settlement areas will
ba necessary before their occupa-

tion. These must await availa-
bility and choice of sites. Fur-
ther, such fundamental prepara-
tion will obviously vary in re-
lation to land factors: bonifica-
tion, drainage, clearing, sanita-
tion and water supplies, roads.
schools, and preliminary work
connected with the breaking of
the land — all are likely to
demand attention in greater or
lesser degree at an early stage.
It is possible that an advance

working party will be part and
parcel of the initial set-up and
their duties might also include
the establishment of quick grow-
ing food and forage crops to pro-
vide a start for the main body
of settlers. Type of housing too
will have to be considered; pre-
fabricated units may be the
answer. Local conditions in the
areas. chosen will naturally re-
quire close study. It is not too
soon, however, to begin consid-
eration of the human factor as
this will over-shadow all else in
importance. We propose now to
examine a few general aspects of
that problem.

At this point, it may perhaps
be fitting to offer a brief com-
ment on Mr. Godson’s recent
article where, if understood cor-
rectly, he suggested in his term
‘beach-head’ a few families going
forth like the Mayflower pilgrims
to establish themselves on un-
known territory and. then, by
their success, persuading a larger
migratory movement. In_ their
case, of course, they were fleeing
from, persecution and almost in-
evitable death. and were quite
prepared to face untold hardship.
Many perished. This is not the
case to-day with the advances in
civilisation which have taken
place. However, we could agree
with him if it was a case of fill-
ing vacancies in already settled
schemes, mainly local in their
application, and which would
have to be arranged between the
administrations concerned. But
where, as in the circumstances
with whieh we are dealing, land
has to be drained and conditioned
in blocks, piecemeal settlement
by driblets of emigrants would
riot be practieal. Questions of
maintenance would arise and
vacant areas in tropical regions
soon revert to their original con~-
dition, necessitating fresh ex-

penditure for capital works. In
addition, deterioration — would
have been taking place in the

drainage and sanitation on occu-
pied holdings. So, from an eco-
nomic point of view, it appears
we must envisage complete occu-
pation block by block from. the
inception. The size of individual
“plocks’ will naturally depend on
the topography of the area and

the facilities to be provided.
Further, it would* be obviously
unfair to saddle a few settlers
with the maintenance charges

which should be borne by all the
occupants in a block. Failure to
recognise these difficulties before-
hand would lead to undesirable
complications: resentment and
dissatisfaction.

“Beach-Head ?”

We return to tne human ele-
ment factor and the problem of
selecting emigrants. We under-
siand that a survey has been
made of the peasant holdings in
the island on an acreage basis
that is, ‘he number of peasants
seitled on plots and the various
sizes of the individual holdings
is known. What apparently is
not known is the sources of
revenue of these people: what
percentage of a peasant’s reve~-
nue is earned on-the-farm and
what off-the-farm, It is probable
that a percentage of the holdings
is self-sufficient, what is the min-

imum size of ‘these? 10 acres,
eight, six, four or any other fig-
ure? Those that are self-sufficient
their owsens reasonably happy
and contented, will not be inter-
ested in emigration and will not

it can, within the limits imposed
by our defence and export pro-
grammes, to enable new indus-
tries to be started in areas
affected by the textile slump. .
That is all to the good, but
many people will regret the
implication that the Bitish tex-
tile industry has entered a per-
manent decline. The textile
industries have played an impor-
tant part in building up our
economic strength and, as the
Times has remarked it would be
only with the utmost reluctance
that anybody would resign him-
self to the idea that they were
to play a_ seriously diminished
in the nation’s future

has decided to give all the help economy,





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13. BROAD STREET.



ECONOMIST

be encouraged. Next, at what
point in the size scale must the
owner or occupier seek off-the-
farm work and is such work al-
ways available to him and depen-
dents? Are total income resources
ufficient to maintain a reasonable
standard of living? Among. this
class a percentage may be oar
ous of emigrating. is a third
group which Tekeiiy ole houses
and plots just large enough tc
provide the ordinary provision
crop foods; obviously, they mus
seek employment to. live. In thi:
group, a percentage will be desir

cus of trying its fortunes else-
where. There is a firth grou)
owning little or nothing, renter:
may be, which must labow
steadily for their maintenanc
This group may be the least hesi

tant to move but the least re

sourceful in outlook, We ar
only citing typical examples fo:
comparison, there may be other

in the adult, mature class. An:
finally, there is the growing num

ber of young people on the threr

hold of their working life fo
which the future holds little o

no prospects of making a hom

with the population density’ as.i
exists today. Classified informa
tion is possible on each of thes:
various groups by planned sw

veys of adequate: samples chose

in population centres. Only wit!
guidance of this kind can we hop:
to minimise the chances of un-
suitable selectees. Similar inves-
tigations have been carried out ir
other places, but they démanc
efficient organisation with pains

taking enumerators under prope

control, There is plenty of tim

if the work is begun now and
carried out gradually, first in area

selected by the Committee anc
then eventually covering the
whole island, It is not such a vas'
undertaking as might, at firs
thought, appear, since the prim

ary surveys should, we think, in-
clude persons not over 40 years o
age, say. It would seem undesir

able to burden settlements of the
type envisaged with le whe
have less than 20 or 25 full hard-
working years ahead of them. I

may be argued that accurate.in

formation of the kind foreshadow-
ed in these surveys will . prove
difficult to secure as the averag:
farmer and persons of his il!
keep no books. True enough, bu:
they have remarkable memorie
and it is surprising what can b«
elicited from them by the use 0
planned, judiciously framed ques
tions. Followed up by skilfu
cross-checks and careful analysis
close approximation to the fact
is definitely ascertainable, In th:
final screening, hea;th anc
physique tests will naturally de-
termine the ultimate choice o/
individuals,

Simple Instruction

Preparatory educational work
among the experienced selectee.
should not be long or tedious
They would need to be genere'l)
informed’ on the conditions they
are likely, to face, creps to b
grown, health precautions, simple
instruction in the use of hands
tools for work around the‘ holding,
care of implements, handling o
tractors perhaps, and so on, Also,
they would need to be impressed
with the importance of a co-oper-
ative and friendly attitude th
among themselves and in relation
to those responsible for guiding
and helping them to find their feet,
The position is not quite the same
with inexperienced young men, It
is suggested that suitable blocks
of land on Government, estates
might be set aside and worked ‘by
small groups of thege, on a co~-
operative basis, under careful
supervision. The lads would be
drafted in the particular areas and
no questions of housing and feed-
ing should arise. Dodds, Seawell
ond Pine estates occur to the mind
Further, on each of the jeul-
tural Stations an apprenticeshiry
scheme might be inaugurated foi
training small groups chosen ‘in
the respective areas. In this way
it would be possible to cover the
whole isMAnd with a network 0!
training sites at no great expense
This preparatory work would b«
fairly continuous in order, grad-
ually, to fill up the land settle
ments as each site or block i:
prepared and readied for occupa
tion by emigrants who would gv
forth, not, in complete ignorance
but strong in hope and expectation
of making homes for themselve:
and families and having had ‘th:
opportunity beforehand of know
ing their comrades.

The above, in bare outline, may
be helpful in apprising the public
mind of the kinds of problem:
involved in successful emigratio:
with land settlement the goal. No
special merit is claimed for any
of the ideas or suggestions pu
forward, The Committee will have
access to the advice and experi
ence of those best qualified to give
it both locally and wherever set-
tlements is affected. But, we dr
stress that, as far as ible
sound and practical methods of
approach are essential if succes:
is to be achieved. It is easy to
fail and at staggering cost.





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PAGE TEN



Winston

twentieth century.
a modern Gibben, it tells
of the greatest interest, both
one will welcome the new

Lord Randolph Churechil’s
career in politics was meteoric in
every sense of that much-abused
word. Emerging in 1880, he blazed
with ever increasing brilliance
upon the Parliamentary scene,
like Milton’s comet “perplexing
nations with the fear of change”’:
only to vanish in 1886 into the
outer spaces of political extinction.
How did an unknown back-
wencher become in so brief a time
the foremost figure of his party, at
the age of thirty-seven, Chancellor
of the Exchequer and Leader of
the House of Commons? Why did
he fall so suddenly from that giddy
eminence—and fall never to rise
again? These are the questions
which Mr. Churchill’s long and
fascinating biography seeks to an-
swer.

the curious political situation
which prevailed in 1880. Thirteer
years earlier Disraeli had taken
his famous leap in the dark and
enfranchised the yrban working

class . %
The Witty Young Man
The People—that mysteriou
coneept whose virtues the political
philosophers hgve so frequently
acclaimed—hace at last become
sovereign. But both the grept political parties
were singukarly: impervious to the

significance of that fact

Lord Randolph Churchill wa
oung, gay» Witty and remarkabl;
clever. Hé ‘saw at once that the
future lay-wiath the party which
could interpret the inarticulate as-
pirations of the new clectorate

He saw. thatwncither the Liberal
leaders, nor his own leaders—Dis-
racli died in 1881—-had any undet
standing of the new forces in soci-
ety. He perceived golden dividends
for a Tory opposition which at-
tacked the Liberals not for being
too radieal but for being too cau-
tious and too conservative.

The Conservative leaders were
Lord Salisbury in the House of
Lords, Sir Stafford Northcote in
the House of Commons. The latter
was a mild and elderly person
deeply imbued with the traditions
of the House,cand a great admirer

of Mr. » Gladstone . whom he
treated with courtly defer-
ence, irksome to ‘he younger

nembers of. the Tory Pariy Lord
Randolph was determined to drive
him out of active politics,

Tose with ihe cool and
enigma. Arth Palfour, Lord
Randolph Churchill formed the
so-called Pourth Party.

Its obiect was, behind a facade
of civility, to etteck and undermine
ihe prestige of the official Conser-
jJeader, Sir Stafford

» giver m

2 i irreverent allus-
son 46 the shepe of his beard. Lord
Rendolph and_his friends declared
cteynial war wpon ell those whom
he himself once described as old
men who crooned over “the fires
of the Carlton Club.”

Han






Banished

Those ha sing tactics inside

» House of Commons were ar

mpanied by popular appeal

tsic Like his son, Lord
‘andolph was a master of irony
invective, rhetoric. ‘Before
long he becam } iding ex

ponent of tiary Dem cracy” in
the country" Re

The first stage of his ambition
was reachedsiti.1885 when a Con
servative “Careqaker” Government
took office. At Lord Randolph’s
ineistence Six Stafford Northcote
was banistreto the dignified ob

security q
himself became Secretary for
India. et

Only one barrier now lay

between Lord Randolph and the
highest position. But that barrier

* 33.5S$O9906S
\ GPCRS O OO SOE FO PSOE FOE

I NOT ONLY

COST LESS
AND

GO FURTHER»
BUT ‘


eles

TASTE

ALF
59

BETTER

‘

SBOE POLST



His success was due in part =|

Tam Farm Fresh

(Not the Ordinary Tinned Bu tter)



’s Father

The Strange Dramatic Stery That Sheds New Light
—After 47 Years on a Tragic and Frustrated Career.

(By ROBERT BLAKE)

MR. CHURCHILL’S Life of his father, Lord Randolph
Churchill; is the finest politieal biography written in the be the last. After reading “My
Couched in the majestic

language of
a strange and dramatic story
political and personal. Every-
edition appearing to-day*, 47

years after the original publication of the book.

was formidable. Lord Salisbury
possessed a fame, a prestige and
n inteliectual capacity of the first
magnitude.

Moreover he hated democracy
and regarded progress as an illu-
on. The House of Cecil has sel—
dom been in the vanguard of the
people's cause, and Lord Salisbury
no exception. He regarded

Rendolph with profound

us
Lora



cepticism and no small appre-
er on.
For «the moment he could do

nothing to halt Lord Randolph’s

progress, The Irish crisis of 1885-6
ito which Lord Kandoiph plunged
vith all his vigour resulted in a

Conservative victory.



LORD RANDOLPH
2 beil on the mock.

1886 Lord
became

Tn the
ndolph

Cabinet of
Churchill

Chancellor of the Exchequer and

eader of the House of Commons.
Yet within six months his political
career was at an end.
It is true that Lord Randolph
roated fimance with a certain

levity. “I forget”, he once said,
“woe La bimetallist at the India
fice” ?”” And on’ another occa-

sion, when some figures

decimals had been explained to
he observed, “I never could
trake out whal those damned dots
mean.”

B his ruin came not from
feulty arithmetic, but an impetu-
us temperament.

After a long series of arguments
with the rest of the Cabinet he
uddenly in December resigned on

minor point concerned with
Army estimates. To his surprise
rd Solisbury accepted his resig-





atic amd mode no attempt to

persu him to withdraw. “Did
you ever know a man,” Lord
sulisbury said, “whe





rid of a boil on his neck wanted
nother?” Lord Randolph never
ueld office again.

His Blunder
new edition throws fresh
ht on Lord Randolph's resigna-
n in the form of a memoran-
um by Sir Henry Wolff, one of
his best friends,
It becomes clearer than ever
how fatal a blunder Lord Ran-
lph had committed in. resign-
ng on such an issue when it wa*
till a Budget secret; clearer, too,
ow determined Lord Salisbury
as to avoid a reconciliation with
s turbulent lieutenant.
In 1891 the triumph
ecils was completed, whe

This

of the
n Lord

of a peerage; and Randolph salisbury’s nephew succeeded to

ie lead in the House of Com-
yos. “So Arthur Balfour is really
der,” wrote Lord Randolph,
and Tory Democracy—the genu-
article--is at an end.” Four



1e

4

4 «
9998S

65964
POPPE PTOSS




SPOTS S998%", |



Hand, Feet And Now The-Post? | for STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial

By IAN GALE

MY TURN TO MAKE THE TEA.
* By Monica Dickens (Michael
Joseph 10/6).

I record with shame that this is
the first of Monica Dickens’s books
that I have read, but it will not

Turn to make Tea” I am a Monica
Dickens fam already and I am
busy looking for some of her
earlier suecesses such as “One
pair of Hands” and “One pair of
Feet.”

This is Monica Dickens’s first
autobiographical book since “One
pair of Feet”, the account of the
first—and only—year of her train-
ing to be a murse. Now we may
have the story of her experiences
on the Dewingham Post, an old-
established small-town paper with
a steady cireulation, a conserva-
tive outlook and not much sym-
pathy with the proposed innova-
tions of a junior reporter.

She tried hard to introduce a
women’s page, and nearly got
fired through her efforts, “Every-
one who comes here,” explained
the Editor, “starts off by thinking
this is a lousy old rag and they
must have been sent from Heaven
to bring it up-to-date ... Do you
know why people read this paper?
Because they’ve been reading it
foy umpteen years, and it’s still
more or less the same as the first
copy they ever read... When
they open the Post they like to
know what they are going to get.
Ged knows there are enough
shocks in this world already.”

Since Monica Dickens was the
first woman reporter the Post had
ever had. she was regarded as
somewhat of an experiment by
her colleagues, who also expecteri
her to do the chores of the office.
Here is a typical scene:

“Joe went over to the corner
where the gas ring was. ‘God
gh?’, he said, haven’t you even got
the kettle on yet? I thought you'd
bave made the tea by now.”

“You make it’ I said. ‘'m in
the middle of something fright-
fully important’

‘Not my turn.’ Joe sat down
with his overcoat on, took out
half a bent cigarette, looked at it
glumly and started to roll another.

Murray came in, rubbing hig

Fair At The

The Modern High School’s
Annual Fair and Bazaar was held
at the school grounds Roebuck
Street yesterday afternoon. The
proceeds of the function will go
to extend the school’s library. The
fair which began at two o'clock,
was attended by a large number
of gaily dressed people. The Police
Band was in atten ce,

There were various games in-
cluding Bingo and Roulette. The
Canteen, supplying ices, soft
drinks and cakes was well
petronised. There were several
rafffes and later in the afternoon
a dress parade was staged

the lawn when tiny tots
(ended to the strains et the wuties

added attraction after 6

haying got Pam. was fortune telling. Long



years later Lord Randolph was
dead,

His career had been tragic and
frustrated, but his pessimism was
only in part justified. Lord Ran-
dolph had done something for the
Tory Party which would never be
entirely reversed,

He had shown that the party
could survive only if it paid at
least some attention to popular
feeling and socfal reform.

The lesson has often been for-
gotten--with disastrous results—

ut it is there to be learned
again, and at least one famous
figure has never forgotten Lord
Randolph’s example, Mr. Church-
ill can say as truly as his father:
“I have never feared English
Democracy.”

* Lord’ Randolph Churchill b

Winston Churchill (Odha 21s.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RES D
—L.E.S.




vf

oe
me
Tesh



PAINTS
PAINTS
PAINTS

Yes, We Have Them in
Sizes and Colours Too
Numerous To Mention.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

hands with a dry sound. ‘Come/}
along then, Poppy,’ he said, like |
a kindergarten teacher, “Your |
turn to make the tea today. I
should have thought you would
have had it brewed for us by
now.”

It was not my turn
writing,

Vietor banging
door, He blew on his hands,
stamped his feet, slammed some |
books about and yelled ‘Shut up! |
at the comps.

‘Tea up?’ he asked me. ‘Come

I went on

came in, the



on girl, get cra 4
‘It’s not my turn. |
‘It's always your turn. You’ll
have to get up, anyway. I want

that phone book you're sitting on.’
He pulled it out from under me.”

I turned my copy upside down
so that no one could see what I
had written, took the kettle and
went downstairs to fill it...” —

Her experiences in the boarding
house run by the chain-smoking
Mrs. Goff make amusing reading.
A procession of colourful charac-
ters run the gauntiet of the au-
oa end readers will de-
igi n her crisp, mer -
traits, ° a ae

This is a book not to be missed.
Readable and witty, with a deep
and sympathetic insight into. the
strength and frailty of human
nature, under the surface.

TORY by G. M. Trevelyan

(Leugmans 21/-)

Only illustrations could have
improved Trevelyan’s now famous
— History.

nm this Illustrated edi
Social History the peer ay Poe
been selegied with scholarly care
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They form a eollection as fas-
cinating as it is varied. Woodcuts
ond engravings from eontempor-
ary books, portraits of famous
people and photographs of the
buildings of the period illustrate
the life of the people at every
level, helping to make the text
even easier lo understand,

oe three, which is now
published describes the i ‘
English Civilisation iegime of tne
pee of Anne, end also the - of

- Johnson, the 1
years of George ti an ee



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20,



THE LIVES OF

1952

>



HARRY LIME



J'VE known many places and left

them. Made many friends
and lost them. Won many for-
tunes and dissipateq them, My
fate seems to be linked with a
cosmic yo-yo, and the island of
Haiti was a low point in its
descent.

When I arrived in Haiti I had
money. In no time at all . was
on my bottom dollar. ‘

Of course, I still had my friends
among the natives, but even they
had become devoteq students of
Omar Khay-yam. That is, they
took the cash and let the credit
Zo.

I was in one of the seamier
bars, trying to persuade my old
friend Georges to put still another
drink on the slate, when I heard
my name called in a voice I'd
known once only too well.

I swung round, “Dorna! You
beautiful, wonderful witch! What
—or rather—whom are you doing
here?”

ENTER SAM
How He Gabbled !

ER lovely blue eyes were full
of laughter. “Harry, dar-
ling, three years haven't changed
you a bit.” She inclined her
blonde head towards a table where
an American in a seersucker suit
sat alone. “That's him . . He's
really quite charming, Harry.
You’d adore him. He collects
souvenirs collects money
too.”

“Ah! I might have known it. He’s
with you. Well, let’s meet him
. . . And, oh, Georges, you might
tell your boss that Harry Lime is
on the preferred list again.”

The bartender’s teeth gleamed
in his black face as I followed
Dorna between the tables. As she
snaked her way adrcitly along it
was difficult for me to focus my
attention on our mark. The mark,
in this case, was fat and perspir-
ing. Of course he was bald. His
contributions to the aromas of
the bar were generous—his cigar,
his perspiration, his money.

He didn’t get up when we
reached the table. He just waved
his cigar at Dorna, and bawled:
“Hi-ya, Baby? I was just gonna
send out a searchin’ party for ya.
Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!”

Dorna said: “Sam, I'd like you
to meet an old friend of mine.
Harry Lime . . Sam Torkin.”

“Siddown, siddown! Any friend
of Dorna’s is a friend of mine—
within reason, Ha, ha. Y’know,
Lime this is my firs. vacation in
18 years, Eighteen years! Can
y’imagine it?”

He gabbled. For eternities, he
gabbled. Dorna was obviously
amused by my boredom, but my
patience, as always, had a price.
Yorkin kept gabbling till I almost
considered reducing that price
F . and then he gave me my
cue.

“Sure is hot in these parts,” he
said, ‘Well, baby c’mon, Let’s
get outta this dump and find us
some souvenirs.”

“Souvenirs can be more than
souvenirs,” I told him. “The
average tourist trades his travel-
ler’s chéques for a worthless
trinket to show in his trophy room.
But, Mr. Torkin, instead of paying
money for useless sentiment, why
not use sentiment to acquire
money?”

I held up my hand to stop him
talking, and let him hear the
strange sound rolling in from the
hills, “Listen to those drums,
Torkin. They’re telling you the
secrets of Haiti.”

THE DRUMS BEAT
For Wedding Rites

ORNA asked: “Do you under-
stand them, Harry?” And I
replied: “As much as any civil-

ised man is permitted to.”










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SUNDAY

VOODOO DRUMS

Torkin stirred uncomfortably
“That's that voodoo stuff, ain’t
it?”

“Not ‘stuff,’ Torkin. These

drums are calling to the voodoo
gods to smile vupon the wedding
of a native man and his beloved.
The wedding rites are just be-
ginning. ey’ll continue till
cawn. It is the wedding of Fanse
end Gri-Gri. Fanse works as a
waiter in an hotel here in town.
His father got in a jam once, and
I saved his neck, That counts for
something in Haiti . . Now, if
you'll excuse me—I’m going to
the wedding.”

Torkin was impressed. “You're
goin’ up there? Hey, wait a min-
ute! Siddown What's all
this stuff about souvenirs and
sentiment and all?”

“Well, all right,’ I , said
reluctantly. “Iiook . . Haiti is
crawling with priceless relics
that’d bring fantastic prices from
any museum in the States. But
they’re not selling them, Torkin.
You must know the island and
the people to find them,”

“How come they’re worth so
much?”

‘Sentiment, old boy,” I told
him. “The voodoo brand of
sentiment. The natives protect
their sacred symbols with their
lives. And then, of course, there

are the raw materials . . little
sentimental trinklets . dia-
monds, rubies, sapphires. The

kind of sentiment we understand.”
Dorna sighed: “I love souven-
irs like that!”
“O.K., Lime,” Torkin said. You
can get me one of these baubles.
What’s your deal? ”

CRESCENDO
The Negroes Shriek

“TQIRST let me find a suitable

trinket: Time enough then
to bargain. For now, a small re-
tainer will do. But—as_ those
drums would tell you—sentiment
comes high in Haiti.”

I had a feeling that Dorna
would keep Sam Torkin well oc-
cupied for the present, The future
I'd handle in my own way. And
in the meantime, there was noth-
ing to worry about except keep-
ing a date with two dear friends.

I found them in the clearing
—Fanse and Gri-Gri at the head
«@ the ceremonial party, in a
place of honour. Uncivilised
children of the wilderness they
were , and so completely devoid
of treachery and dishonesty that
it appealed even to this rogue’s
heart.

They greeted me _ warmly.

Fanse said: ‘“M’sieur Harry! We
don’t think you ever come. We
are already married It is

now the moment to pledge our-
selves to the authority . (ce
a tribal custom, We—”

Gri-Gri put a small hand over
his mouth. ‘“Fanse!” Then, to
me: “Please, Harry! These are
tribal secrets. We can trust no
one with them,”

The drums veat insistenly, rose
to a crescendo, Suddenly the
entire gathering of Negroes began
to shriek and yell. The hot air
pulsed with the din.

“Fanse!” I said, _ startled.
“What's happening? What’s that?”

His eyes were wild with excite-
ment and anticipation. “It is the
authority! The sceptre!” he cried.
“The sacred sceptre of Henri
Cristophe!”

The sceptre of Henri Cristophe.
Here was the souvenir for Torkin.
I left my native friends to their
merry-making and beat it back to
town, fast,

But Torkin wasn't interested.
Even when I told him that Henri
Cristophe was the George
Washington of Haiti, he wasn’t
impressed. “Ah, every two-bit
country’s got its own Washing-
ton,” he — scoffed. “Get me



SOAP



COSSSFOD

Washington’s
interested.”

“Listen, man,” I said patiently.
“Cristophe started life as a slave.
He became Haiti’s most powerful
ruler. He stood off the combined
armies of France and England
with only 2,000 men! Up near Le
Cap Haitien, there’s a tremendous
fortress, high on the hill. Wash-
ington didn’t build that. Cristophe
did. He planned it, designed it,
dug rocks out of the mountains
with his bare hands . . . You're
a self-made man, Torkin. That
should appeal to you.”

“What the
Lime?”

“Look, Tlorkin. Henri Cristophe
was a landlocked saint to these
people—and all-powerful earth-
god. While he lived, his sceptre
was his symbol of strength—and
wealth. He had more jewels in
that sceptre than Dorna has
curves, Then there was a revolt
here, and Cristophe was found
dead. But the sceptre was gone.
For over 100 years its where-
abuts have been kept secret . . .
I know the secret, Torkin. I can
get it for you.”

“Yeah? How?” He
interested now, all right.

“That's my business. Your
business is to make it worth my
while,”

He made up his mind, “O.K.,
Lime. How much this time?”

I said: “Plenty, Torkin
But plenty!”

The next morning I climbéd
up.to the little hut Fanse had
built for his lovely bride. They
were like a pair of kids there to-
gether. It was a shame to break
up their happy welcome with
sordid talk of business. But it
had to be done,

and I’m

sceptre,

about sceptre,

was

_I put down the drink they had
given me and said: “Fanse , °
It’s that sceptre . . . the sceptre
of Henri. . . Uh, . , what's the
matter?”

Gri-Gri’s pretty face had gone
a sickly grey.

_She whispered: “Harry, please !
You must not ask. ‘These are
secrets of our people,”

I shrugged and made my way
back to town. It looked like a
hopeless job# I went to my dingy
room and sat on the bed, moodily
figuring how I could raise the
rent. :

Suddenly there came a knock
on the ddor, and I called “Come
in!” A figure slipped quickly
into the room. It was Fanse, and
if he’d looked frightened up there
in his house, he now looked fit
for a strait-jacket. He carried
something wrapped in sacking.

“When you are at my house
to-day, I see that you have great
trouble,” he said. “I tell Gri-Gri
you must have great trouble or
you would not ask for tribal
secrets. But it is all right, Harry.

* Baby revels in the
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

———$—$——
The Year Book of the West Indies



“I hear the drums,
sinister and urgent.”
Orson Welles, who portrays
Harry Lime in the “new
B.B.C. series “The Lives of

Harry Lime.”
From Haiti, mysterious
* isle whose natives still
practise the savage jungle
rites of their ancestors, comes
this new Harry Lime adven-
ture.

Harry Lime, that engaging
rogue, is dead now, He died
in the sewers of Vienna after
a series of escapades that
made screen history in the
film “The Third Man.” But
before that he had lived
many lives ... each
packed with thrills.

The Empire News is telling
them: all—exclusively. To-
day’s story is called “Voodoo
Drums”.

You are my friend. When you
are in trouble, I help you ie 4
Herel take it! And he threw the

bundle on the bed beside me.

The
The jewelled

sacking came unwrapped.
sceptre of Henri

Cristophe blazed up at me.
“You stole it from the high
priest!” I gasped. “What if they

find you took it?
to the police?”

He smiled sadly. “They will not
go to the police. The priest will
be my judge. They will punish
me . . I will die.”

Had I known a man like Fanse
earlier in my life, my ideas about
men might be different to-day.

I tried to explain some of this
to Dorna that night as we had a
drink in the bar, but she was
only interested in the sceptre it-
self, and the chances of Torkin

They won't go

buying it. “What's it really
worth?” she asked.
HYPNOTIC

Rhythm of Death

£ H, twenty thousand dollars,
maybe twenty-five .
Move the ash tray over, hmmm?’

“Bet Torkin would give me
thirty-five thousand for it. I’m
prettier than you. If you let me
peddle it to Torkin—”

I laughed, “Dorna, my sweet,
I lost you three years ago in
Madagascar. The sceptre might
be a temptation for you to leave

me again, Besides, the fact is
. . + I don’t have the sceptre.
Torkin bought it this morning

. for fifty thousand!’
The drums had started again
up in the hills. Before we had
drunk two glasses of champagne

“he noise had become loud, sinis-

ter and urgent. It affected
Georges, the barman, strangely.

With eyes rolling in his black
skull, he told us: “I am sorry, 1

must close the bar ; The
drums, Monsieur Harry. You
understand » . . the’drums!”

I was listening hard now, Dorna,
clutching my arm, said; “Harry
. . . What is it?”

“I don’t know. Those are the
death drums, They mean some-
one’s dead or dying . . . or going
to die.” Then I repeated slowly:
ve . or going to die! Dorna,
I have a hunch . . but 1 hope
I’m wrong.”

I shook off her hand and bolted
towards the door. She called
after me: “Harry! Wait! Where
are you. going?”

When I arrived at the ceremon-
ial grounds I. saw hundreds of
natives, still dressed in the tatter-
ed dungarees of the cane fields,
dancing and shrieking in a half-
hypnotic state, The death drums
were rolling all night. There was
no mistaking them... And as J
crashed through the bush sur-
rounding the clearing I saw

they’d already taken a life. There
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ADVOCATE

The Truth in
Your Horoscope

Was a body strapped to a post in
the centre of the circle, It was
Tiittilated . . charred . .-al-
most unrecognisable, Sam Torkin!
The voodeo priest danced up and
ack in front of it, waving curses
over it screaming through
the slits in a hideous mask .

afid in his hand he held the
sceptre of Henri Cristophe. The
sceptre had cost Torkin more

than he’d bargained for.
SACRIFICE
The Lovers Wait

J ‘D had enough, I turned to
leave. And then, at the far
end of the clearing, I saw some-
thing else. Two more bodies, tied
together back to back .. hang-
ing by their wrists from a long
-pole strung between two

The two of them together
; Fanse and Gri-Gri
ready to be sacrificed,

I didn’t wait to think. I dashed





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of you.

The swbered

them,

surprise almost

I shovited again: “You're making
a mistake. You're torturing two
innocent people. You can’t do it!

The priest said:
wronged us It
They must die.”

“They can't die. You think they
sold the sceptre to this man, but
they didn’t. I did. I'm the guy
you want, go untie those ropes,
Come on, move, or there'll be a
new voodoo priest holding forth
at your funeral,”

The crowd began to yell again,
and the priest swung his arm
towards them, “It’s no use, Harry
Lime. If you kill me, others will
take the revenge.”

I whipped out my clasp knife
and slashed at the ropes that
bound the girl, “It’s no use to
kill these “two, either,” I said.
*O.K., Gri-Gri, Your'e loose. Help
untie Fanse.”

She moaned: “Get away.
have brought shame to us.”

HEROISM
I Made It Pay

“They have
was forbidden

You

es, K I'll do it myself. . . Hold
still, Fanse There!
You're loose , Now run for

it.’ I yanked out the gun I had
holstered under my armpit. “Stand
back, you lunatics, or I'll start
knocking off voodoos!”

The priest and another man
died before I had convinced them
I wasn’t fooling,

Next morning Dorna and I
were on a steamship, leaning over
the stern rail.

“Well, there goes Haiti,” I said.
“Another corner of the world
chipped off. Haiti is through with
Harry Lime . . . Guess I messed

up your meal ticket, too, er?”
*Sam Torkin,” said Dorn
gently. “Pd@or Sam, Well

don't worry, Harry. You'll take
care of me . until the fifty
thousand is gone.”

I suppose a lot of people might
say 1 was really noble to rescue
Fanse and Gri-Gri. And maybe
I was, because they got away and
I put them on a boat to Cuba,

However, the fact that ]
grabbed the sceptre on the way
out and exchanged it later for a
very substantial piece of change

might have had something to do
with my heroics,
Being a hero is fine, so long as

its profitable. Or at least, that’s
the observation of Harry Lime
Most heroes don’t die broke.

NEXT SUNDAY
Harry Lime tells
another of his
remarkable

adventures.






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tered Tre





PAGE TWELVE

_ EGGED ON BY PROSPECT OF Leola |

8 UK OSMUKD Fs









By Eugene Sheffer

SUNDAY ADVOCATE















ke on the cross? (Mat. sp Settee, Sion. ia -
im mbycid mot
} HORIZONTAL 52—Particle. 39—Chops. 50—The lio: n
| 1—What Gileadite, who had 53—Harden. 41—Indisposition. 52—Hostels. ”
| was buried in 54—What is the first month of the 43—Part of an act. 53—Pig pen.
ene? reg eae 45—What prophet restored to lif 1a aoe
is of events. 5 prophe ite Ji,
5 The Way Toombet'e tether? Gi“ Siasculine name. a mother’s son? (2 Ki. 8:1) 58—Frost.
&~Comfort. Sn itch Sans i. o-oo ee tg book of the 5G-—epoh.
easure 0 . ent? Indian
12—Plant of lly family. o4— Auditory — _ a eee)
13—March e turmeric.
Metric Cube nt. Twelve month PFET AAT Arrrg
a)
lene ae oe veri De ees | ee? frre
awe ~ ee va * mabe, a hol- 7 oS ZL
| Ow lace to S. -
Oita Pua serve eds" ime. lott, Blase, to provide ‘Samson ast tet A et fF
| 1:3) ° 2—W: r
| in 3— rifled particle.
am eetmadiote os ti
26 " aoe. o ications.
What did the Lord t an
The bins to make - set upon ee
29—Alphabet ) Num, 21:
30—The men of what county 7—Make Make confident
| were merchants? (Ezek. 27:1! 8—Italian cely house.
| 31—Meadow. 9—Moun aborigine.
33—How many pounds did the i—Brrors | in printing.
aaa
: Luke 19:16) ig—Correded.
SEEKING TO BECOME the proud mother of twins, Mrs. Jenny Penguin, i Be . 11—Before. .
of the Philadelphia Zoo, turns over with her bill the two eggs she is | %—Who p! with her son 21--Pro posed international tans
hatching. As is the custom with poset is, her mate Johnny will soon ing for him eo ar Esau? a
take over the baby-sitting job. Theirs vas an epic zoo romance, sinee { 27:5) 77
Jenny was hatched in Philadelphia and Johnny is a South American § , | 25—Location. Wai | | {|
Humboldt penguin. They were soon billing and cooing. (International). » see as — sale selative, henounttiok Wy Wy YY Ty
|S Smal on tbe wall Dan, 335) PCA CLA GZ
DARTWORDS =| “ce tnemosx tigha « TY He
come or the new) e compassionate
c Gam sKing of the Jews?" maater“Yoraive Nimes | | | P| Yael Pt | | Pie
int i ete tH
mee” Dartwords $ 48—Small African tree Ly -
DELAY. The fArtieth and island. Peers vier of opprobrium
ie oes Be wis sees
ah ar, bs ‘the freh waned te

“aaa Ss
that Jesus 37—Father a Shallum
Coppuight, 1043, Syndicate,

»-man. Now--you have to a
arrange al! the words in or Chr,
between in such a way Weatures ine.

that the relationship
between any word and +
the one next to it is/
governed by one of six'g






oe Fat-Wat Was in [rouble

Pen Pals

|
|
la | i
| e/o The United Agencies,
RULES \s —All the Clocks in the Land Had Srapped— | sige
2 wor » be —14 Norton St.,
eeretant Ee etre By MAX TRELL | | rion
that precedes it “THE King,” said Genera! Tin | } Wortmanville,
synonym "Of ‘the "word the tin soldier, to Knarf and Hanid, |

that precedes it



“is in trouble. I’ve just received a






Georgetown, B, G.,

ap paaietacs pees letter from him.”” General Tin eae
subtracting one — letter waved the letter. It had a big golden To The Editor, The Advocate—
from or Ghangin one

ae in the preceding word. i
May be associated with | t
Secsale word m a saying

stim ie. Metaphor. -or- association of

oe it may form With the preee

d Ot s wall mage ( Publish my name and address re- |
Dereon, place. or thing. in. fect ‘ iunts ask, too,” added Kuarf. questing Pen Pals. My hobbies
or fiction '

Cliche Corner

mi

6. It may be
he precediy
| action of # book

co




ere

ica sUiccession

seal on the top of it, and two long
blue ribbons hanging down from |
the end of it.

“What king?” Hanid asked.
“That’s what I was just going to

associated With
1g word ‘in title or
Diav or other
n



au (ya te



General Tin said: “King Fat-

Wat, the King of the Land- On-The-

“Oh!” said Knarf and anid to- |



Dear Sir,

May I have the pleasure
im sending you this letter. I would
be very grateful if you could only

are Sports in general, Stamp Col-

lecting, Post Cards exchanging. I |

would like pals between the ages

;of 14 to 24 years, both male and



BECAUSE UPON THE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
HAPPINESS LIFE ITSELF. /

|
Other-Side-Of-The-W all.”

don't have to be & reader gether. “King Fat-Wat!’ | females KAT EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
} of any ee noes author to “His trouble,” General Tin went If you could only grant me this IN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
be es cliche expert. Reading any on, glancing quickly at the letter | . favour, I will be only too pleased MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE

of many wilt qualify you to again, “is very peculiar. It’s also! General Tin held up the letter. | as I do think Soe ae

the | oddiférous and queer.” ¢ on he toa conrespondence, gets CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS,

anawer the following ques- | “What's oddif—oddifer—-what’s | *imple,” he said. “All King Fat-Wat countries, ill i .

: | that word mean?” Knartf wanted to|"¢eds to set all the clocks in his | cio. ‘all letters vessived on FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
1. Christmas ts seldom happy, know. kingdom going at the right time is I beg to remain : FAILING IN THEIR IMPORTANT

is ive. oF it’s al —? | Clocks Stopped a day of sunshine and a—stick.” s ” DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS

y ness!” Hanid exclaimed. Clear Place ‘|
but never —1 pe Ea AO Transpo Be Pape: ee “What appened? What made them!) “Tell His Majesty,” sai@ Mr. PER PORE hcnavs * u
ve va Tay be dome but he's A rope of the theatre, (6) stop?” Punch, “to stand up a little stick in ARE NOT RIGHT — or
ior Sree How pale, (8) serdite, oe eet cane es the middle of his garden, in a clear
* “(6) 13, Everlasting ale rent. (7)! ause everybody in the whole | place where he can see the stick’s
. mw rAny, nice piace te. — pase 1@ {a return to the doctor. berore kingdom forgot to wind them the | shadow. At first the shadow will be 3s aa
‘hee, « sk ee tautee ivam, suits uud-one to | Right before. So now none of the | on one side. But slowly . . . slowly, ARE RIGHT!

& A needle lest is tmvasiably
where?





















15 Across
8. It’s Just habit, (3)
{9. Seems good French to us. (5)
| 21. ae tt, foi ilows

23. High ur
| tive. (5)

1, Extent. (9)
2. Remainder I've found fidgety.

recognised by Toby.
\/. Just a neat difference. ta)



“I haven’t the slightest idea,”
answered General Tin, “But this is
His Majesty's trouble. One day last
week all the clocks in the kingdom |
stopped.”

Avross

clocks in the whole land are run-
ning, and nobody knows what time |
it is. Isn’t that awful?”

“Why don’t they just start them
again?” said Knarf.

General Tin shook his head.“That
wouldn’t do any good. How can they
know what time to start them at? |

ou leave out.
2. A broken vane. (4)

I leave the alterna-



Down

— eo

woulaa t be



thought about clocks in this way be-
| fore It had seemed to them that
No! ie kes always told the right time.

i

|

'

J

Timid: room, coughed slightly.





“A stick!” cried Knarf and Hanid |

in astonishment,
“A little wooden stick.”
“Impossible,” said General Tin,
“But let’s hear about it anyway.”

| as the morning gets on and the sun
| climbs higher in the sky, the shadow
will move around to the front of the
stick, And when it’s exactly right
in front of the stick, at that moment
it will be exactly twelve o'clock
noon! And if His Majesty King Fat-
Wat will shout at that instant, or

it exactly twelve o’eclock, And
when it's exactly twelve o’elock, the

Ld , : They looked ‘ea: tell the right time again, I’m
sleCtipaststaret stotataia pir: 11. svard) Rope: 13, Girl: J aor: ee jou A
BissiisAsi sO AsIOl Uy) §—| Movs: al. mistino. Run! GS Magose, | *' him. He smiled. “it's ver

BISIVISAVISIVCAASLIVIC) mais! Pr cee 1
" - t ata Agee anny orders: |
CROSSWORD PUSELE SOLUTION | \4, dole; 15, Lemur: 18, Rose |

ln te cen ns MT

WMA

—WONDER WHEELS wt Y
Why Hercules
the finest bicyc

built to-day

ars

The best designers and engin
industry use the finest mate
Hercules. Even the smalk

iS
1e











ors in the cycle
als to build your
parts are tested







Your Servant,
Anthony A, Gonsalves.

stay home, Clutterbuck—
Do you want to be
describeé as a misguided

19 and 20, Is the Insect in ? \dows are aly ways straight~ I'll ‘missile “
HOB (8, 3) Finally Mr. Punch, who was sit- | wiite King Fat-Wat at once. He’ll warvare perrnne germ
Lived S| oS nately a 4 Rohisien of vpmerday's pussie «Aarons! ting quietly on the other side of the | be very jovovlious to hear that he



ACIDS AND POISONOUS

WASTES FROMTHE BLOOD=
THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=










APRIL 26, 1952

SUNDAY,











wee ee



Sew

pens from $1.00 to $1.32.
GALL-POINTS $ 1.08 (Refills 36Z}¢

TA yy 7 3} All the clocks would start at differ- | have the church bells start ring-

aT oTY atcha te dutetiy rent, but olitely (6) ent times. No on» would know which | | ing, then everyone in the kingdom
FADFOREDL | 6: Beat asset to the Upper House, | clocks were right and which clocks | can start his clock at twelve o'clock Cc. L. PITT & CO., LTD.
P A italic! vile 6. ani. ee cana Abin, ths were wrong,’ jand all me clocks will be right.”
Seta ts cE Gpeiges SacnaabNol” | lem Kenaet and Hants ant ro (=v ace sieht te, etal whi Bridget Patheda

AL | th. em. Knarf and Hanid didn’t know | “You're tig » Mr, Punch, en etown si) 8
eas 12, oe 808, spell make « bell | what to say, They had’ never | the sun is in the middle of the sky, Heaven's sake
». The boxer's
















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ON
























SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late

King George VI

BY CHIC YOUNG
[You MADE mE)

LOSE MY PLACE
oe A
GRUMBLING? ) ve mn i

\
=








OH--WIVES LIKE TO
HEAR THEIR HUSBANDS"

THEM,ONCE IN
A WHILE

NEW TIMES! NEW FASHIONS! NEW SHIRTS!

RELIANCE

THE SHIRT BARBADOS LOVES




















































go ara IT PAYS “OU TO DEAL HERE
[ae
=- = = — =
Fay "YOU SEE, AFTER I GOT THE DRUG By SIMPLY FEEDING AN : SPECIAL offers to all

i a THAT SAVED THE WARDEN'S URE. | SooRLEss, HARMLESS DRUG $0 THAT'S Cash anc and Credit Customers for Monday to W to Wednesday only
«= [ STi DON'T GET IT) WHEN I LEFT YOU ke? WAS LEFT ALONE IN THE PRISON INTO THE OXYGEN VENTS, L WAS WHAT KNOCKED OS SS SSS SSS
{ TO CHASE AFTER BIG MOE, WE WERE IN P LABORATORY!’ THAT'S WHERE THE ¢ /

Be tho. Ate Me Be J ogee ap cogil ASLE TO CVERCOME THE ME OUT! SPECIAL OFFERS are now ay ailable at our Hranches Tweedside,

WAKE UP IN A QUIET INFIRMARY taj IT SEEMS UP HERE IS PRODUCED...”

‘
MIRACULOUS — ALL TO SLEEP;

Speightsiown and Swan Street _

Usually Now Usually Now

hanes re save ys 48 36 * Bottles MORTONS CURRY ......_ 54 48

Tins CLASSIC CLEANSER ..... 2406 Tins JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS 182 1.50
Tins NESCAFE (4-02.) .......... 87 80 Pkgs. HONEY COMB SPONGE .. 19 16

POTATOES — 4 Ibs



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES:

Oe ee eee

NOT THAT {T MATTERS —
BUT WOULD YOU MIND
TELLING ME JUST HOW

1'M GOING TO LEAVE









REMOTE AND INACCESSIBLE SPOT, YOU
WILL BOTH BAIL OUT... WITHOUT

OF QUITE SIMPLY AND
EFFICIENTLY /









GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH =



eer eee





Ce et

IT Sw VELL- SEE THAT > rou|

EASY WHILE = DON'T 8u IOGE ¥ oe |
i IN THE HAT SHOOPE /- |

1] PICKING Our [| T WON'T BE VERY LONG! ps
Cc :

A HAT- -
MAGGIE” {3 wD







WHAT'S THIG7--A HAT FULL.














1952, Wiel Peagures Spndicne, tne



Wart tn oooh



/'6 SuRE ‘W I'M AFRAID IT'S a x
e NICE 70 SEE } BUSINESS, CAPTAIN... “=
YOU AGAIN, KIRBY/,A THE LAMBERT
TELL ME, IS THIS A MURDER CASE...
(eociaL CALL OR BUSINESS 2 y ~
\ ’ a |
v egy, ~ Ege
id hlefn
e
a BUT (M FINISHED? THE SIS BUT! eee ee mar ine
A SUCCESS. HE'LL COME TO SOON! WAITING TO SEE IF HE'S ALL IF HE’
ae le aaa icant Wate ME HOME NOW? HMMs» THEY DONT j Nor, IL NEVER /——
4 AVE HERES : \
ITS AMAZING THAT HE SURVIVED! es ee C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
ES, SS: SA a a







PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. , remue sates

TELEPHONE 2508







REAL ESTATE
SALE

























. ; ee, ”
R ALL that bungalow called “SCAFELL
—_ ro with the furniture therein —— °
SOx 11,4@2 Square Feet of land situate ai
nan sate ius oon aie AUTOMOTIVE Station House = = Rig po Rg eo
late . f 3 taining Living an niny » s
fone Dattp’s Fe chee Bedroom: Toilet, Bath, oe dervaane
wins ae retake m (Wife) George AUSTIN PARTS—One (1) Austin MW] with a age for one car, anc s : —
ote Racotier Moseley (Sister-in-Law), Millicent }and other miscellaneous parts. Apply: fe a
a es Pee 5 ; ir signed up to Saturday the
een 20.4.52—1n | Road 17,.4.52—t.f.n ree es ee” aa
On. ri RD “tor “s rimself to accept
BOLBROOK: On April 6, 1952, at Hanps, EDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chass aoe r + Mine Bs r ae ane ne
England—Viva. wife of Commander | new For immediate ee care niger a ee ats Geotums tal
N. D. Holbrook, V.C. 20.4.52/ Garage 4616 a

295 For further particulars and con-
ditions of sale apply to—
“ina COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,

———————————__———_ —
19th} CAR: One Chevrolet (Stylemaster) 1947
A. G./Model in first class condition. Dial 2550





HEMMINGS—Angelina, on April
4952, at the residence of Mr






















No. 17 High Street,
Johnson at Fitts Village, Ay cae for further particulars 19.4.52—2n Bridgetown,
Age 92 years. Her funeral leaves the ridge
above residence at 8 a.m. to-day for} CAR—Morris Minor. S—40. Two-door 2 2—5n
the Westbury Cemetery, Friends @Ff€/ ssioon. 7,000 miles. Owner driven. As BUNGALOW oe cocina a
ea John @ Gladyn Hem-|"eW: J-° T. Boumphrey, Sandy 240; {built bungalow with all modern conve-
Mabe! mgon an Glady - a r 5



mings (daughters), Lenora Hoppin _______. ] niences, standing on about 12,000 square





Lodge, with a wonder-
rene Suageet) Ar sin, CAR Ge TES COe Me erring ors wm Ge diane oon deank
(son-in-law) . 20.4 ? apply Mr eats Cie oe Theatee Also four fine similar building oo

any time after ST ae a ee in | adjoining. Apply to Miles Cecil. Dia
MRAZR—On April 19th, 1952, at his 2518 or 4367.

13.4.52—12n.
mother's residence, Garden, St. James.

































flat in Marine Gardens. Available May
ist. Phone Mrs. Gibson, Marine Hotel”.



SUNDAÂ¥ ADVOCATE
FOR RENT



_PUHLIC SALES | SHIPPING NOTICES

AUCTION

BY instructions received
Commissioner of Police I will set up for
























|

\
)

ROYAL NETHERLANDS




BEACH COTTAGE on St. James C







Thi M.V CARIBBER will
perfect bathing, quiet, Ail meals Sale by auetion at Central Sta- accept Cargo. and for
Services supplied from main house. Own} tion on y the 2ist, at 2 p.m. the STEAMSHIP co, - Dominica,

Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable iterns:—(1) Gents nickle plated .


















Antigua,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Mon-
day 28th inst.

The M.V. MONEKA will accept

couple. Apply: Beach
phone 0157,

lands, St. James cr one Watch, (2) Strings of Pearls, several

14.3.52—4.f.n. . Several Bicycle Frames, SAILING FROM EUROPE

tn 7 16) Silver , (1) Stove, (1) Motor|M.s Soros on 18th April im Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
BANNERETTE—At Silv c 1) Sewing Machine,|M.S. ST . On 2nd May 1952. unica, Antigua, Montserrat,
room house, bath, kitchen, _ bh ae ra Ror tnd several other items |M.S. HERA, 9th May 1952. and St. Kitts Sailing P aA)
and garage. G. Barnett near Kings.and, | of ? S.8. COTTICA, 16th May 1952. 2nd May 1952
Christ Chureh. 19.4.52—2n. DLARCY &. SCOTT hide SAILING TO UK @ EUROPE =
cette . . . MS WILLEM . A 1 * )
BUNGALOW —Modern furnished bunga- |’ SAILING TO TRINIDAD, FAKAMARIDO \
low on St. James’ Coast 3 bedrooms 3! MONDAY 2ist at 2 p.m. at LOWER AND BRITISH GUIANA |
toilets and baths running hot water col@|CARLTON, ST. J. * ook ighing, Bos’ | M.S. BONAIRE, on é@th May 1952 i
cg MH Modern conveniences, Dial) “GARGEANT” NO. B90. 2 4” x Y x 9 | SI CORMCAE oP aod Same ioee:
(164 20.4. + | new sails Po puiged | SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
- eat ; eae 6” jibbogn M.S. HECUBA, on 2ist April 1952. i
and July, containing 4‘ bedrooms with| Terma cash fall of hammer. ® °. P Sones see a oo }
running water in each. Fully furnished R. ARCHER McKENZIE, ' pe ” . t
including Refrigerator. Dial 8310, Mrs Auctionest.

Stuart Bynoe. 13.4.52—3n. | 20.4.52—In

— J

FLAT—‘Fully furnished small upper UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



)
i

13.4.52—t.f.n.



1

Kt
))
for two only,













- penenisesignstintieniennagieememamecamsen” SOUTHBOUND Saths Sat Safle
oo f } ; le End Settee, enc
19 years. His fu-| CAR—Austin A.70, only 6,000, as good | "Te Navy GARDENS. On. ch.| 7°" May ist onwards =~ te relies mye agg Povegy Montreal Halifax Beste doe Paes
RoE" tengen Tdie above venidence atjas new. Apply: Redman & Taylor's A well appointed bungalow in first class errinaercecigaatcingsieiiiemecnntatntaimmasmsiatatite petieaden: Waggons, Eaay Chairs all in pv Se ge — 7 ye 16 Apr 17 Apr, 2 Apr. 38 Ap 1}
4.15 p.m. for the Harbin Alley Ceme-| Garage Ltd 18-4 52-3": J order consisting of large open verandah. | “FLAT—New, very modern, seaside fat. ahogany: Folding Card Tables, What-| CANADIAN CRUISER ae. 8 May =" oe Bee
tery, St, James. Vauxhall 35 fh with 5)47awing rooms, three bedrooms each with | Completely furnished. Telephone, gas, Bots, Painted Cabinet; Oil Paintings and LADY RODNEY ISTRUCTOR.. 3 May a u “May 2 June oo
ee eeues Cinether), ial | (or eed a ees nou Dial | Wash basins, one having large cedar cup~| electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and| Pictures, Glass Dome and Birds; Glass CANADIAN C Ger" oe r 11 June ay
Joun, Vincent, Barbara (sisters) Cleo-] good tyres in excellent “ye . board as well. Kitchen complete with | safe seabathing. Apply to “MARESOL” }and China, Oak and Rush Chairs, Fret LADY NELSON LE ENGER - 30 May June - a3 lune
phas Benn (step-father). 4514 39,4.50-—20: feat in cupboards. Electricity laid on.| ST. LAWRENCE GAP. Phone 8406. w Machine; Black Marble Clock; CANADIAN ones ee a 9June 12 June 14 June ae oo
20.4.52—1n : Vi ard. condi-| This house is in a cool and quiet 17.4.52—t.f.n. iano Torchon Lace Maker, Fret Saw CANADIAN Gono pa 20 June @ June _ july a wu
——--—-—_--- i ae ee Sein Lewes ted to sell, |2€ighbourhood with garden laid out and} TEE achine, Double Iron Bedstead and | CANS RODS RUCTOR.. 30 dyne 3 July ~ July ai
THANKS en ore. oe ge Battle Lta., | Yard macadamised, there are also two FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3 bed. ing, Old Mahog. Linen Presses, Cedar Pe “ - 11 July l4July 16 July
eae Dial 4 a i | servants rooms with lavatory and a large | rooms, Fully furnished. Lighting Plant. : Chest of Drawers, Washstands,
IRATHWAITE We desire through this| Pinfold Street 19-4 52-207 | ghrage Watermill supply. Double Car Port, two = Vat, Lege MT. Festy! veavepoukn Arrives Sails | Afrives Arrives he
EAST AITN— Wo dacire Cems oe ieee Aa0, 4 new tres. New! It is available for immediate possession. |vervant rooms. from May ist. Phone [Fables Larder, iitchen Cabinet, Tables wee ‘ete tom ohne >
gent cards, flowers and wreaths sinc?) isint job. Recent rebore. Telephone| Apply to C. A. Pierce, EE a bee 10.4.52—t.f.n OO Gano a cod Boee,| SARE Boker... a Apr. 26 Apr. (5 May; — 6 May ay
BaP Be en, wean “essa | cot AMnca Sindta ameet| Were merch inwion when "Char and) EARY Manage "BAN BRR Ml my i
een) OY 20.4.89—In. |“ Onnis MINOR—Tourer 8,09) miles| Be Wise! “OLIVE BOUGH" (Seaside | Coast, fully furnished including telephone | other items, CANADIAN * ”, r Pa " i
alpeaciarense -—— in excelent condition. Morris’ Minor |a5@__Well Set in off Main Rd) at lend refrigerator. Available for the TROTMAN & CO., | “% Saune 8 June — | 18 June 18 June Mh Jum: |}
CALLENDER — We beg to offer our? 2) 151° 7,000 miles like new. Fort Roya! | HASTINGS—NEAR oN eee ;| months of May, October, November and Auctioneers. LADY ad 15 June 17 June 27 June — , 28 Jung ‘Judy | I
deépest gratitude to those who sent|7— age Ltd. Telephone 4504 A Large (Partly Stone) 3-Storey, 4|December. Telephone 2257 or apply 18.4.52—2n.| CANADIAN ' i
flowers and expressed their aympathy a sa 20.4.52—4n. | Bedrooms with Bastns, Severat ann No. 43, Swan Street. 19.4,52—2n. CHALLENGER 23 June 28 June ~ 6 July, 8 Pind |
nh on the death of wis Rooms, Open Gallery (Fron s . LL oe. t = jubt
Daiender, VAUXHALL WYVERN—In excellent | Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,| JUBILEB—Gibbes Beach. Dial 95268. UNDER THE SILVER CON CROIAaE “0 8 Fo 3 x iy 18 du “3 a 2 mF S
Albertha Colenien sree scenet condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY |2 Toilets, eer er eee ane 19.4.52—2n. HAMMER CANAD) = ‘ , fe
slonza, Clarance, St Clair, e : : ¥ .| Good Condition, ce ndy a pty . LAN a
fgons),’ Eulah Gittens (daughter), Clyde |GARAGE. Dial 4616 a= | Good and Bate Bathing, Trees, Garage |S SEG Boe oe Maxwell Road, | «O” , Thursday eas nen a ee LADY Roa Whi t> Ma gery 19 A Psu = a Baus,
Gittens (son-in-law). 20. 4,.52—In E also Garage Shed for 4 Cars, well Made {Christ Church. Fully furnisbed.. Availa, |Btighton, s a ol he Feature ~< ug. ue ug. -
FURNITUR up Yard, Ideal and enough Land to|ble for June and from September.|2> A. Than Moe denntis Wuite tieitae
Mr. ©, S. Coppin and family beg to |, |convert or erect a 60—i0 Room Hotel, | Phone 6139 or 3450. 18.¢.880n, |= Which includes — Mor: ~
tender their sincere thanks to all those and home chairs from |, puiid 3 Bungalows, also Suitable for



















CHAIRS—Office
persone who In divers ways $8.50 up, Plain and upholstered includ-





Inspect! ppoin' Derric’ Up-
twtr sympathy with them in thelr |'ng typists chairs and executive chairs.| ‘mont Only, “AT BRIGHTON, Seunide-e | contains oar oxilars: “arawaae dining |hols: Chairs; all in Mabageny;” salle- Bye Ainmer geveaians, aunty to
. 7 *} men’ y. ’ pons s ‘
rétent bereavement 20.4.sa—1n.)%: R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. Dig Phen Almost New Conerete 3 Bedroom jena Siupdranms {ene seit running wi f} Bivan; Pasig, Bree 3. FS GARDINER AUSTIN & co. LTD,
einen AEE ean Design Bungalow, all Modern hen, servants reom, water dn ees, Tae ee ~— Agents.
i sq. it electric light, enelosed yard. Apply: \R. ice Tapestrys Tea ey, Oak
See ae ee eee na ae POULTRY Onder £2,760 wee ACING NAVY oa Archer McKenzie. Dial 2947, R. ape modi aatiee Saat foes, nee
ee ee in ther tesans DENS.—Almost New 3 Bedroom 12 inch ty 20.4.52—1n. Ref iserators, ures, B a amine * ecaiitetiaiimadel sis
ee get ee ee we Senne Seca Dey oe ent oases April 26th. Parmentery nd Twice i der Baad. Ih Memeo ae By | sheds tiful view over the sea|Tea and Dinner Services, C . Ver-
2958.00 ee eee OO tae production | The Bus €0.,-2-Storey Stone Business |towards South Point; sultab'e for enter- |andah Chairs; Bookshelves; - M
ks and Hens produc \ se 5

IN MEMORIAM

HARTE—In loving memory of our
iene beloved Mother, Caroline DeHarte
Who departed this life om the 19th

April 1949.

Mf life and care would death

rte: .35 each—a White Reck Pullets] ?remises and Residence, Conveniences,
Aieor dove Seain™ 12 weeks old—price } Good Condition, Ideal for any Business,
4.00 Dial 3394 18.4.52—3n | Going Under £2,300. IN TUDOR ST.—
ah : Large 2-Storey Stone Business Premises

NS—25 irs of Utilit. eons,|« Hesidence with a Large Garage or

gine, Cosmeen *Mondeins and ion Workshop, all Conveniences, A-1 Con-
Prices according to selections. W. H.| dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant,



prevent
still be



























. Nel Road, Navy Gardens,|Can Yield $120.00 p.m. Under 22,000
aes ae Shrist Chueh. m "Y9.4.52—2n Can Buy It—UPPER NELSON ST.,—3
mani t Jones (daughter) Glenville Bedroom Residence, Sonvedsnes Good
.4.52—1n. Condition, about 3, sq. ft. Going

as SS ~ MECHANICAL Below £800. AT HASTIN oat
PHILLIPS—| joving memo" f our —————~ |—Almost Stone, 3 Bedrooms, ing
dear son Wesley Phillips who died on| C¥YCLE—One (1) Raleigh, Dyno Hub, Under £3,500. AT FONTABBLLE—A
‘April 18, 1951 ; : ee Boorse Sue. ives, apt cee Bargain: Almost New 3 Bedroom Stone

. . : S. astin

One year has passed since that sad che oe'y , ee in | Bungalow, Tiled Bath & Toilet, about

10,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,300.
NBAR CITY in Avenue, Quiet & Resi-
dential,—A Bargain; Almost New 3 Bed-
room Reinforced Concrete Bungalow,
over 7,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,100.



Since the one we loved has passed
away

We miss him now our hearts are sore

As time go hy we miss him more

His loving smile, his gentle face

MASSEY-MARRIS FARM EQUIPMENT
—Manure spreaderr, Fertilizer Distribu-
tors, Grass Mowers, Rakes, Side-deliverny
‘akes for windrowing cane Trash, Grass





BY FONTABELLE; 2 Bedroom Bungalow,
lace. Loaders, Wheel Strakes for attachment
en the yo Re Sr tee Phillips to Wheel Tractors to prevent wheel- Saari a See oo. AT
20.4.52—In.] spin. COURTESY GARAGE. Dial 4616. = pSidenc jone partly
family and his friends. 20.4.52-—6n, | Stone, and one stone—Almost New), both
anne yield $105.00 p.m., and Going Under
£4,000, AT LOWER BAY ST.,—Seaside,
ANNOUNCEMENTS MISCELLANEOUS 2 Bedroom Stone Residence, yields $25.00



p.m., Going Under £1,000, AT UPPER













aorta ~- os Pose’ § ace ROEBUCK ST.—.. 2-Storey—Partly Stone
itt | Glass, o! ew 3 Bedroom: (possible 4), 2 Toilets yields
In Comfort tt fnd losal_ hand. | Watercolours,” Early books, Maps, Auto- | $30.00 p.m., Going Under £1,200) AT
» all] Staphs etc, Gorringes mtique ROCKLEY NEW RD.,—about 1% Acre,
wack ged int F in. oe 0.90 pm. | sdjoining Hoyal Yacht Chib. Going. for about $4,000. AT LANDS
n mie aa, 3.2.52-t.£.n. | END; New 2 Bedroom (possible 3) Rein:
to : 6.4.52—t.f.n. Coherete Bungalow, and AT LOWER
= | Omice equipment of all kinds—Steel| Ray sT.; 2 Bedroom Stone Residence;
NAL Sate, ae Bi Se Ore Going Under £1,100 each. Dial $111.
Typewriters, ; de Abreu, “ Bough”
PERSO! _ [and Calculating “Machines, “Duplicating Bitte re Pee eh”,
en neste erin inst | Machines, ee
Miepetlis ere hereby warned agains: BRADSHAW '@ SOMacC in. | LAND—First class building -site af
Bust ) ae I do not . on. | Desricks, St. James, on the main road,
any: © minutes s-service, Approx.
ose SE eee ey debt or debts), OFL—The world’s finest p. on 10.009, sa. ft. | Priee reasonable, * Dia
Fame unless by a written ardor | Yeedol, at all leading Garages and Service , John V. Barker. 20.4,52—1n,
‘BY me. ote HOWARD, L. “Found wherever fine cars| — Property consisting of two storied’
‘ Airy Hill, St, George. * 11.9.08—-4.4- Trouse and the Iands on which it stands
20.4.52—2n. wo a j.|@nd situated at Rodgers Rd., Govern-
. PIANO—Carlton Piano, fully trop! ment Hill, St, Michael, Apply K
naneaeny Price $715 oon W popes Sandiford, Spry St. Dial 2374.

: . mahogany. 00, : , s \

GOVERNMENT NOTICE inson & Co, Ltd, 16.4,52—Sn. | 2. Property at St. David's Ch. Ch.

two storied house and land on which
——

i . : ,
OLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN | RECORDS-Ciearing our stock of MGM | ff. Sands. Apply: IK. Sandiford, Spry
i E A. Bante 7 eae 3. Property at Junction of St. Mat-

choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD,



. thias d Dayrelis Road, includi tw
The Chamberlain meee et 9.4.52—t.f.n toned “house ete iT Weatite bul ding
a4 bei Sev ys
Be cae ae aa Peicay “zn | Sabsibg get he aly Teeeram | ale ue hy te Seventh. Days
day, = het ok a4 England's leading Daily Newspaper now '
May for the purpose of repairs.

19,4,52—2n.

Sendiford, Spry St. Dial 2374
The three properties are part of the

Estate of D, Brathwaite (Dec)
20.4,.52—2n
Se nen
HOUSE—One attractive New board and
shingle house, 20 x 11 x 8 ft. Shed
20 x 8 put together with bolts and

arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17.4,52—t.f.n.
TEN nicely bound volumes of The
Children’s by





























Enayclopaedia edited
Arthur Mee. Phone Be. "NT Lietew Mog senien windows and deors
y n “ 7 :

All CLERKS and SHOP Sherlock Field, Foul Bay, Be De
ASSISTANTS are invited to on vines
attend a lecture which will | PU EMILIC NOTWECES | fouse—a trana new cater hose
be given at the Y.M.C.A. on 18x9x8° with shedroof 21x7 and kitchen
M 2ist inst. at 5 pm - _ } 9x7 attached, situated at Pine Land, St.
onday . IT. NO othr de eaters can be rented, Best
TIC offer 350, accepted. For further
Subject:—"“TRADE UNION- BARBADOS, particulars apply next door or Dial 95292.
ISM AMONG SALARIED IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF z 19.4.52—4n.

WORKERS.” A L

Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943.
NOTICE is hereby given that Lloyd
Taitt formerly residing at Haggatt Hall,
Saint Michael, died as a result a
motor lorry accident at My Lord’s Hill,
Saint Michael, and that compensation
has been paid into the Court.

All the dependants of the above-
named Lloyd Taitt, deceased, are here-
by requested to appear at the Assistant

Lecturer is Mr. J. D. Bell,

.A. research worker and
lecturer in industrial rela-
tions at Glasgow University
and an Oxford graduate.

Don’t miss this opportunity
of hearing a lecture of this

“LE TOUQUET” — Maxwell Coast.
Orawing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms,
cunning water, electric light and tele-
ahone. A_ nice property standing on
‘bout 2 acres of land tn one of the most
ittractive and popular parts of the coast,

The above will be set up for sale by
vuetion at the offices of the undersigned
om Friday, 2nd May, 1952, at 2 p.m,

Applications for permission to view
sort. Court See NOReL, Ce. Weeneecey, the 7th Sout pe spade to Mr. F. D. G. Simp-
Come and bring a friend, Dated this 3rd day of, April, jp jon, “Woodland”, St. George, Tel. 95214.
#0.#,68,-—-1n. Ag, Clerk, Assistant Court of Appeal. CARRINGTON & SEALY,
5.4,52—2n. Lucas Street



13.4,52—6n.

Laem
SPION KOP — MAXWELL COAST
standing on approximately 1% acres of
evel land suitable for building sites

in @ commanding position on the coast
NOTICE is hereby given that the one faffording extensive views. It is ullt

Hundred and Eleventh Yearly Ordinary }on rock. The bathing tro “a

General Meeting of the above-named {s excellent. The whole ean none
Society will be held at the Society's} good order, In the main building are
Office, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on]|5 bedrooms, 3sbathrooms a very large

Friday, 25th April, 1952, at 2 o'clock pym. | Jo ining room, an open ver: h
id Erelosed sun-deck, . ge

for the purpose of:— large
(1) Receiving from the Directors their en and two pantries. es
Separate bungalow for staff having 4

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE
ASSURANCE’ SOCIETY.

ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING

THE GIRL GUIDES
FAIR

will be held at

Report on the transactions of the





society for the year ended 3ist | bedrooms, verandah, separate toil.

December 1951. shower. There is a large double yasene
(2) Electing Directors and an Auditor}and good fowl house and pen. Main

for the current year. water, telephone and electricity. r
| The above will be set up for sale by
C. K. BROWNE, , | auction at the offices of the undersigned
Secretary. | on Friday, May 16th at 2 p.m. Viewing
Under the _ distinguished Beckwith Place. pana 4,306 "p.m. any day Sunday,
patronage of His Excellency war hel sees Chasive *h Thursday, May 15th in-
the Governor and t pr ‘ beaten tee re Furniture available if required

4 vr further particulars apply

Lady Savage CATFORD & CO.,

SATURDAY, 10th MAY tote
on . ’ 20.4.52—1n

1952 FOR SALE

The undersigned will offer f ,
Ga competition at their oe Net

office, No. 17,
Bridgetown. on Thursday.

from 3 to 8 p.m. 1 small table model Gas

Cooker complete with oven.
Only used a few months,

There will be many inter-

Whart “
esting Stalls: art and Prince Willia

m Henry Street
and McGregor Street, Bridgetown, stand-



= island, | OwMEY Tee WH cccupted by Nesssa Rt Sf 2d, now
; OUSEHOLD GIFTS See it at your Gas Co. ae particulars from the under-
» BOOKS Bay Street, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co,
PLANTS so es
SWEETS







TEAS, ICES and CAKES
SNACK and MILK BARS
WHEEL OF FORTU
LUCKY DIPS

| MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

ORIENTAL
PALACE



E



Pre-eminent at work and

ce HEADQUARTERS FOR
ADMISSION— paul 4 SOUVENIKS
This school will re-open » CHINA &
Adults 1/= I on Tuesday 22nd inst. A CEYLON

limited number of new pupils
will be accepted on Monday
21st at 10 a.m.

Children & Nurses |
Scouts & Guides |

in Uniform
20,4.52.—1



THANI'S

20.4.52,—-1n. Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466







ne
“LA PA

taining guests or convalescents,

Mird.
further details, dial 3390. 20.4.52—1n, | Press, Bureau, and Dressing Tabie all in e
Mah ; Cream painted Press with EDENVILLE”
MODERN FLAT—with g Table combined, Cedar (And Commerelal School) Cheapside — Fontabelte
Silver and Linen. Good tead with Box Spring, Electric Lakes Folly ps
Por further egtienion. Apply to Alma Bedside Tables; le The following pupils were on
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing. stead Mir'd Press and Dressing table Term II of the abovementioned cessful in the Chamber
23.2.52—t.t.n.|al; painted white, Electric 4 school begins on Tuesday, 29th ee
——————— rer Oil Stove, Kitehen Table and April. Parents/Guardians ‘desir- Elaine
NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed- Pram; , Cannisters and oa of en i , children/ re © ‘
wets m Plant. er items. wards are invited to communicate —_ . — English (Dis
* ou, ‘tor May and from Oc. MEER, TROTMAN '& GO. Wy Lik te undersigned “petore this Risie FE, Lowe — ;
tober Ist Phone 4476. F Auetioneers.” te Luther C. Walkes — English.
10.4.52—t.f.n. . Sa ee ee c. BEST. os Ae Peenate,
ONE ROOM or an Apartment furnished - 20.4.52—1n
0} unfurnished. Appl. No. 4 flat y
“Clifton Terrace" Bay Street, near LOST «& F ‘OUND ‘
Chelsea Road. 20.4,52—1n.




































2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top;




Gottes Table;

















For }steads with Simmons Springs;

WashingtonPreparatory









PPP PON









ae ete tee Lost : 3 |
unfurn ro \. . a
ites walk to Bridgetown, “a ot : P— Shiver ‘plaid Blue Mother- GLASS ROSE BOWLS

Bracelet, Saturday morning

‘SEASIDH BUNGALOW At Patm Bench, | Und Beckwith Place and Lower Broad
bed-





nd Beckwith, Flace and Lower Broad Come and see our lovely assortment
ia inchs tia ee ated h to Advocate Advertising Office. Reward
rooms, pply : offered. 19.4.52—3n. “ 7
Tt". [ ceemadeneuneitnimaingeinnree CENTRAL EMPORIUM
SEA QUEEN—On the sea, Hastings,|. WATCH: Ladies Gold Wrist Watch
from the Ist May, For further 8 fra ‘sine Bae,’ Wes mn Se eee Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts.
dial 4568. 16.4,63-<3n. a returning same to Advocate



wi on
Advertising Dept. 20.4,52—1n

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1004

On Tuesday, the 2%nd day of April,

to 4th October. Phone 4138 between | 1952, at the ‘hour of 2 o'clock in the

2—2n oon 80: a iy oO oO

Pi nit. TT ano rf bidder Vor any ‘sum not
TRINITY COTTAGE—Fu nish: under the appr: value

three-bedroom a Romidion —— All that certain piece of Land contain.

SMALL Cottage in St, Lawrence Gap
2 Bedrooms, fully furnished, fea-

bathing, immediate possession, Apply:
“Hollywood”, St, Lawrence ls
.4.52—1n

ite on
pach, Maange ante ne



4

SPRING SUMMER AUTUMN WINTER

But these Seasons change all through the Year

JOHN D. TAYLOR'S SPECIAL RUM

phone, available May. Ph 2959. by estimation 2 Roods, situate at
ede 19:41 4n, eer bounding ‘on lands (with the Distinctive Flavour)
ibbes 6068. \ lands of Ward ; ;
—— ee faa of 'D Chase, on, lands of J. King, Is consistent in Blénd throughout the year.
aah -|and on the Public Road, appraised as



follows:—
The whole area of land appraised to
four hundred and eighty dollars ($480.00)
Attached from Charlotte Priscilla
Marshall for and towards satisfaction,

nos Deposit to be paid on day
of purehase. 27

Provost Marshal's Office,
$rd April, 1952.

WANTED

Try this Blend and prove what others have proved.
BLENDED AND BOTTLED

by
JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.
Roebuck Street Dial 4335

WANTED



HELP

A MESSENGER—Barbados Dye Works.
A messenger must be tidy, neat and
courteous. Apply: Barbados Dye Works.

20.4.52—1n.

A TRACTOR DRIVER and Bulldozer
operator. Apply to “The Manager" Joes
River Factory. 19.4.52—3n .

peng a ere ninenceneptoom one
BUTLER— Experienced Butler-House





5.4.52—3n.









Maid, sieep in. Apply to Mrs. M. A MISCELLANEOUS
Murphy “Dumbarton” Christ Church. —
18.4.52—3n FURNISHED HOUSE with three bed-





rooms for the month of August, must
be on the seashore, St. James, Worthings
or Maxwell Coast. Telephone Mrs.
Shepherd 2342. 16.4.52—4n,
—_—_——.

WANTED TO RENT
PIANO—For one or two years, Will
be kept in good condition. Phone Mrs.

Cee a
PRODUCTION MANAGER — Reliance
Shirt Factory. 17.3.52—7n.

SCHOOL TEACHERS—Wanted for a
Boarding School now to be started in
Barbados—Two School Teachers either
Male teach English to



CARIB BEER BOTTLES

or Female to



Spanish Boys. Apply stating experience MacKenzie 2435. 18.4. 52—4n. .

and salary requined. P. O. Box 256,

Bridgetown, Barbados. 20.4.52—2n. a) Small Did you know that you could get three cents for
From Ist May 1052, for the Coleridge | PUmp ade of Metal other than tron every two Carib Bottles? Bring them to...

and Parry School, a “Secretary to the | Gasks ito sma! ers. A, 8.

School". This Post is a Whole Time BR

Post. The Office of this Secretary shall
be at the School, and the Secretary shail
be required to combine the duties of TYPEWRITER:
Clerk to the Governing Body with those} with eontinental
ot Secretary to the Headmaster, i

2. Applicants shall have had a Sec-
ondary Education, and possess a Cam-
bridge School Certificate or its equivalent, | w, GOOD HOME for a dog, For

ANTED
end be proficient at Typing: ability to rs. 1 8362. 19.4, 52—2n.
write Shorthand being an ariventaget ee _
EXCHANGE

3. The Salary is $100.00 per month, SALE
rising by annual increments of eight dol- oll se a ik for a Ford or
Austin Van, will be cone

Jars to $140.00 per month,
4. Applications to be received by the

Messrs A. S. BRYDEN & SONS

(Barbados) Ltd., Victoria St.

Portable Typewriter
keyboard. New or
offers to Advocate, No.
19.4.52—2n



@idered on either side. Also a number
Headmaster, R. C, Springer, Esq., M.A., of Ford Parts too numerous for listing.
“Collision”, Government Hill, St. Mich- . Barnett, Silver Hill, near Kingsland,

ael, by Post, enclosing recent Testimon-

jals, not later than Saturday 26th April

1952

By Order of the Governors of the School
THEODORE

Honorary & .
ete ee ao
19.4.52—4n

MISCELLANEOUS

eg ernreneern ee
BOARDING and LODGING at Rus-in- |

REGENT HIGH SCHOOL
Pine Rd., near Ist Ave., Belleville,
St. MICHAEL,

Next term begins on Tuesday,

29th April, 1962.
New pupils will be reeeived as
follows :—
























4, Pupils preparing for entrance d
Urbe—Crumpton Street, opposite Harri. and ee ae for an.
son College, Hot and cold lunches served. Government mw
Apply in person. Telephone 4324. and Colleges on Monday ILLO
20.4. . P W

Shania se eee eee ae ae other ony sohanes pupils

BOOKS—One copy each of the f e on_ 22nd April.
ing books: Tacitus - ‘Agricola: Vergil” : 3. for private tuition
Aeneid IV; Caesar - Gallic War Bk.1 a rent | oo time. Pupils ASES
C t
Bittern, Bea C/o Advocate | 1} for L.C.6. and School Certineate

exe



CAR—Wanted to
Car, low mileage,
4425.

purchase 10-12 h p
g00d condition. Dia) |
19.4.52—3n

CAR: Vicar Of St. Martins requires
tourer or drophead Car ten years old
or less (owner driven) Tender by letter
pnly Details and price car.

19.4.52—2n

CRUTCHES—Urgently needed crutehi
| With hand rest for lady 5ft. 5, ty |

B. BROWNE, (Inter B.A.)
Principal.

WE prove that we sell Cheaper than the rest.

Hemstitched Linen Sheets—72x108 @ $10.78 each.

” Pillow Cases—18x28 @ $2.02 each.
Best Quality Cotton Pillow Cases — 20x30 @ $2.08 each
Sheets 70x90.

4

METHODIST CHURCH

Annual Charity Fair

” ”










d for yourself.
|to Harris Stafford House. Apety Hastings Rocks Compare these LINES with others oe see y
20.4.52—In. SA ' AY dun 3ist Cotton Prints 36 inches wide at only 68 cents per yard.
SSS m,— .m.
Proceeds in aid Brae Poor and
FOR SALE Distribution

still we give you 5% Cash Diseount and furthermore there are
no Parking Problems when you shop at

Various Stalls, Household

, Faney Work, Teas,
Cakes and Ices, Games,
Books, Lucky Dips, Joy Rides
for children, Child’s Fancy
Dress Competition at 4 p.m.

Westinghouse Refrigerator
in perfect working order.
At Linden Grove Sale Tues-

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.



Police Band in attendance Coleridge Street — Dial 4100
day 22nd, by kind permission of the A
BRANKER TROTMAN Commissioner, Col. Michelin. where
& CO., Prices are LOW
Auctioneers Adults _ 1/- sae
Children & Nurses 6d. fr
20.4.52—1n. 20.4.52.—1n. > Qualities are HIGH

SUNDAY, APRIL 20,

SS

1952

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY

SOCIETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Patronage
Lady Savage -

will be held at
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.
The Fete will be opened by

will be the f -
Stalls: ee;

, Sweets,
a Books, Cakes
dips and Pony Rides



ces,
Lucky

— children,
y kind ission of Col.
lin, the Police Band
conducted by Capt. .



REAL ESTATE
JOHN
‘MM.
BLADON

& ce.
A.F.8., F.V.A.

QUE RERENSIVE LIST-
ALWAYS AVAIL-
ABLE.



FOR SALE

“NEWTON LODGE”, Maxwell

house of ne a ructed 2-storey

3 galleries,
ing room, dining room, break.
fa%t_Toom, good airy kitchen, 3
ms, Garages, servants’
quarters and out-buildings, The
grounds are well protected with

stone walls there
entrance d ne = 8 _—

pled by U.s Further
details ana ¥
1 Permission to view



NEW BUNGALow, £3,150-—Well
in

good unspoiled area close >
Club with 8,000 sq. ft. of Taras
walled all round. There’ are
good 8 with washbasins,
Jarge living room, verandah (not
sia aoa ene detached
Servants’ quarters

Unobstructed view.

nee lew. This
below actual cost.
tunity to obtain a
mature at such a low figure .

“BEACH RESIDENCE”, st.
Lawrence — Attractive 2 storey
house with 4 bedrooms, large
living-room, and Balleries. One of
the best spots on this bay with

sandy peach me excellent
£5,000." Very "sont

furnished
investment as Comtinaceis “neh

rentals are obtained,

“SWEET FIELD”, st. te:
Estate type house ipuilt ‘ot nna
Contains large living room with
French windows leading on to
covered verandahs with good view

Sea a short distance away. 3
Tone nets Storerooms and
oane on jcuarters, Saree

es well laid
right of way over

2%,
rounds and
beach.

“BERMERSYDE”, st
we cious stone built a
with shingle Toof, very well
enclosed “9
ainy lounge and
3 double ‘coms,
roasts ie servants’
out-
house is completely enclosed and
aa is direct access to the sea
ith good beach and bathing.

rge
room,
and

rooms, garage

2 storey on roe

with good grounds and interesting
y ne ae is excellent

a sec and

fo sandy cove. About 1%
“MALTA”, St. Petor—a modern
coral stone house with everite
roofing and of exceptionally sound
construction. This. Property has
recently ¢ ively re-
modelled and decorated inside and
cut. There are wide, roomy and
cool roofed-verandahs on two

sides with most attractiv,
across the beach. The living Seoes
‘a i ample dimensions with

ing doors o; onto
front verandah re

rooms are fitted with —
Wardrobes and have wath-Destne
There are two bathrooms
baths and hot and cold water. The
kitehen is well fitted with cup-
and is also supplied with
a water. Adjoining the kitchen
a butler’s pani with all mod-
ern fitments . ground floor
contains two Sarages, large store-
rooms, laundny and fervants’
juarters. e grounds are about
of an acre well laid out and
eewates and electricity
and the garde: =
mee with piped water 708 yen
lectric pump fitted toa d i
‘on the property. eee

with 3 bedrooms,

room, drawing room, lounge
jes, 2 .

quarters for three and all waa
amenities. Wa grounds of
about % of an acre insuring com-
plete privacy. Further details
upon application.

perty
dining

“LYNCHBURG”, 5th Ave. Belle-
ville — An attractive and well
Proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft. Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed).
large drawing room, study, modern
kitehen, 3 bedrooms, Sarage etc.
Low accepted for quick
sale, owner going abroad.

“VAS ABLAN CA”, Maxwell:
Coast—A beautiful property a
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship. Well designed for easy

“HOLDER’S HOUSE,” St. James
—An estate house built of stone
with pine floors and shingle roof.
3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms,
verandahs etc., also garage and
usual outbuildings. The house
stands on approx. 4 acres of well
timbered land (mahogany) ap-
proached by a long driveway
fianked with closely planted

trees. The outstanding
attraction of “Holders” is the
very lovely site which has the
advantage of being well elevated
and cool, with fine views on all
sides. Coast is less than a mile
away and town is 6 miles.

RENTALS

Several Furnished Houses and
unfurnihed Vlats available.

e
Phone 4640
Plantations Building











SUNDAY, APRIL. 26, 1952



Church Services

ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH







‘ ~ PASTER I. Moore Arriving from the United King- in a sunny climate. He is fond
cae eee ane eee S am THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL dom yesterday morning by the of swimming and is very pleased
Sermon; 3 p.m. Sunday ‘School: eur il am andiie Gad Siiewaes 7 pam Elders and Fyffes S,S. Gelfite were with the swimming facilities here
Evensong and Sermon Evensong and Sermon; Preacher at bot» Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Binney of He has the Life Saving Medals,

i services the Rev. J. 'B. Grant: L.Th —— who have now come to Gold, Silver and Bronze. He was

Minister in Charge; 4.30 p.m. on Mon- Barbados to reside also Physical Training Instrue-

METHODIST day, Wednes : a : S ve P 5
S STRERT—I1 am: Rev, T..F. youths this will’ be condysted be the Mrs. Binney has come to take tor ih the County of Duxham. |
sg ae hay Batwin, Tay tas Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor) ee ao English and
NES 9.20 am. Rey. Edwin and Mrs. Olga Browne rench istress at St. Michael’:
Taylor. 7 p.m. Mr G. McCalister. Ainciniiinaiintmeee ania ca Girts’ School, FROZEN MEAT DUE t
one aa ae = ors 2 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST HERE THIS WEEK !
_ ‘ ; pom. ae * Beltastewn, pper, Bay Street. An Honours B.A. of Liverpoo! |
~ Sundays a.m.an p.m T versity . ‘ane
GILL MEMORIAL—11 am. Rev. K. E. Wwanneta University, »Mrs. Binney wa }
rs. ys 8 p.m. A_ Service whic; . z . A shi e ‘s fro-
Towers, B.A.. B.D., 7 p.m. Mr. J. ineludes Testimonies’ of Christian” 2 trained at Oxford and used to A shipment of chilled and fro-|
¥ ae te teach s lone ti ‘ in Pens zen meat and ot;r foodstuffs

HOLETOWN—8.30 a.m. Rey. F. Law- °** Healing. ng me ago in Penang. i
rence, 7 p.m. Mr. W. St. Hill SUNDAY, APPIL 20, 1952 Recently she taught at Hamp- ‘Tom Australia is,."expected to
BANK HALL—9.30 a.m, “Mr. G. gp “cet of Lesson-Sermen: DQCTRINE stead in London. arrive in Barbados around the
Sinckler, Z p.m. Rev, K, E. Towers, “Geigen Text: Mark 16:45. ‘The a : : end of the week. :
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Mr. H, MR came not to be ministered unto, She has also done a lot of jour- The M.A.N.Z, liner Tekoa is
Husbands, 7 p.m. Rev. FP. Lawrence, but to minister, and to give his life a Dalism, and used to write travel ccheduled to make a call about
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Mr. E. Ll. Ban- "87s0m for many. articies for the North China Daily April 25 She loaded cargo at!
latter The following Citations are ineluded News, the Singapore Free Press

BETHESDA—11 a.m. Mr.





Salvation® Meeting. Preacher

G. Greaves. 1



New Mistress for St. Michael's |



Captain I









\delaide, Melbourne, Sydney and

the Lesson-Sermon: .
“4 2 sane Prisbane and is to arrive here via

Bible: and other papers in the Far East.





























BETHEL—11-a.m. Rev. T, J. Purley, He hath shewed thee, © man, what is : ;

7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant. good; and what doth the Lord require Her husband who is a Mining Trinidad.

DALKESTH—AU m. Mr A. Curwen = ee. eat to ao fuels. and to jove Engineer is looking forward for The Tekoa is consigned |
7 p.m. a AB rley mercy, and to walk humbly with thy the first ti Z stay Messrs a Cc : i

BELMONT—I1 a.m. Mr. G. Bascombe, God? ‘Micah 6:8. ; me to a pleasant stay Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd. =|
7 p.m. Mr. I. Blackman Science and Health with Key to the ee Le eat). Ce Cae os

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m. Rev, T. J Seriptures by MARY BAKER EDDY
Furley, 7 p.m. Mr. G. Harris He to whom “the arm of the Lord” PART ONE ORDERS |

PROV. DENCE—1!1 a.m. Mr. C. Best, is revealed will --+.« Yise into new- |
7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper ness of life with regeneration, By |

VAUXHALL—1l1 a.m. Mr. C. Jones, Lieut -Col. J. CONNELL, O BE. FD |
7 p.m. Mr. G. Brewster . Commanding |

Y * The Barbados Regiment
MORAVIAN SERVICES B.B.C. Radio Programmes frnve We. 16 18 Apr. 52 |

ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning hehe nttedigt-h inarsibinier bee nahi gitiahele penta hos Seiiaiqansion 2 Sic ~~ lan
Service; Preacher: Rev. E. E New; SUNDAY 1. PARADE -—~ TRAINING |
7 p.m. Evening Service; Preacher: Rev. 4 ¢9—7 15 = ee 1952 All ranks will parede at Regt. HQ «st 1700 hours on Thursday 24th April, 1962}
E. E. New beeen ne HQ Coy.—Tent Piiching—Demonstration by R.S.M.(b) “A™ Coy.—Will do Riot |

GRACE HILL; 11 a.m. Morning Ser- 4 { or Sai ri B" Coy.—Interior Economy Checking Kit-—Q M_ to be present— (Those
vice: Freacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.m. ¢ 1S pm eon 10 p.m. Interlude Volunteers whe have not already had their kit checked must bring all articles
ibening Servic: Hier: Ee hCG . ommon Good; 4.30 of clothing and equipment to this parade) |
Fe e a om Sunday Half Hour; 5 p.m. ‘Dick BAND PRACTICES }

lewi urpin; 6 p.m. Co 7 . eek; ae he ‘ , * 4 |

FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6.15 p.m. ‘English Magasine: was Voe* Band Practices will be held on Mon, 21, Wed. 23 & Thurs. 24 Apr. 58 i
Preacher: Mr. G. Francis. 7 p.m. Eve- Programme Parade and Interlude ” - a yer ee a ie — > , r 7 t
ning Service; Preacher: Mr. G. Francis, The News; 7.10 p.m. Home News from 1 & w vy 33 Re Siena), Piaee — See ae ee ae
yj MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser- Britain : 2 ANNUAL CAME
Vices: Exeacba:. Net ee i 0.45 p.m. T 20.53 & 31.92°M The Annual Camp will be held at Walker's, St. Andrew from Priday-t® to
|, DUNSCOMBE: ee rn ee a Sunday 22 June, 52. All ranks who are able to attend and have not yet hand
vice; Freacher: Mr. D. Culpepper Sugg’ Pam Caribbean Voices; 7.45. pm ed in their names should inform the R.S.M. as soon as possible

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service; ran yee 8.15 p.m, Radio News- 4 AUDIT BOARD }
Preacher: M AT tiga Have: is ae S. eee Saree ae Big. SAAS Officer has appointed the following Officers as Audit Boards

k SAL ca % 1 > tt e s cial vear ¢ ! 5 |

OISTIN—11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, From the Editgrials; 9 p.m. ‘BBC Con- OFFICERS" MESS ACCOUNT en Sete Re i
3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvas Cert Hall; 10 p'm. The News; 10.10 Rm Major A. S. Warren, E.D President
tion Meeting. Preacher: Brigadier O. D. Neves eat Pam, London Forum; Capt. H. R, Daniel | Momber
Dadd n eligious Talk : ra “o .

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—11 a.m MONDAY, APRIL tee sintaerete pier ates’, Member
Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Company; Meet- #:60--3 15. p.m. . 26.58 M Major C. E. P. Weatherhead Presidgnt {
ing: ? p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: _ 4 Pm. The News; 4.10 p.m, The Daily Capt. S. E. L. Johnson : Mer ‘ . iy
Maier M. Smith Service; 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pro- 2/Lieut. H. A. Husbands Membes i}

WELLINGTON STREET—11 9m. Hoi gramme: 8 pam. Inia Te Walta: 5.15 p.m. [4 APPOINTMENT , ieee 1g
ness Meeting; 3 p.m. Company Meeting. Souvenirs o: usic; 6 p.m. Welsh Miscel- . ain 3t, 2) is . 7
% p.m. Salvation Meeting, Preacher: Sr lany; 6.15 p.m. Take it From, Here;; wa sat ans R.. Paniel is appointed Assistant Adjutant, The Barbados Remiment
Major T. Gibbs p.m, Sports and Pro- " , PRICE . » > aw . ade an

SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 aum Holiness @ramme Parade; 7 pm. The News; 7.10 >. rere aren ER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 pan. P.m, Home News from Britain, "Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. C, Goddard
Salvation Meeting, Preacher; Sr. Captain 7.15—1@.4 p.m. 6 we & 3132 M Orderly Serjeant nT 278, Sit Williame. 8. D Q
Bishop — — be te ys é 2 af |

CARLTON—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 7.15 p.m. The Lady on the Sereen; Cr Cen Officer 2/Lieut. H. A. Husband 8
32 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva- 7.45 p.m. Happy Hoe-Down; 8.15 p.m Order\y Serjeant wes 70S 1 as Tor Se E x
tion Meeting, Preacher: Captain E. Radio Newsreel; 8.30 p.m. African Sur- aes | Saha UFneY,s G *
Bourne. : vey: 8.45 p.m Tataginde: 2.08 .m. From M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

CHECKER HALL—1ll a.m Holiness the Editorials; 9 p.m 1c t from S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m Agrigento; 9.30 p.m. John Glickman; The Barbados Regiment
Salvation Meeting, Preacher: Licutenant 9.45 p.m. Appointment with Music; 10 NOTICE Ss
Re. Reid p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. News Talk There will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours on Saturday, |

DIAMOND CORNER—11 a.m. Holiness 10.15 p.m. Seience Review; 10.30 p.m 26th April, Honowry Members may attend at 2045 hours »
Meeting, 3 p.m. Compamy Meeting, 7 p.m Tip Top Tunes. sintihenherianenian etd MER SAEEN ihteedelemabidiaaind Ran J



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Do you have attacks of Asthma or| J. I. had lost 40 lbs., suffere
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ee

cough-







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and gasp for breath and can't sieep?
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e
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GENERAL

ALOE AAI ALLE





SUNDAY ADVOCATE





IF IT'S GLASS
WE HAVE IT!

SHEET SPARKLE

GLASS

For Windows, Doors, Cabinets, Pictures, Shelves,

Counters, Show Windows, and many other uses.

MIRRORS—MIRRORS

12” x 15”
14” x 16”
16" x 18”
16” x 22”
18” x 24”

HEAVY DUTY GALV. BUCKETS
$1.49 to $3.40

GALVANISE WASHUPS |

@ $1.97







RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)

RIDE A ....

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BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road,
St. Michael

4326
4528

Office :
Merchandise :










pe We Cut to Required Sizes

HARDWARE vvrrties

Workshop : 4546



PAGE FIFTEEN





















eee een oan
}
BIS REE SS FE) SOC,
\ %
} . re ‘ “
The Members of 7 4y Come One! Come All ‘% E T g
aaxempe sfamee sue FAREWELL DANCE tothe s SBA VIEW GUEST 8
nvite you to their Annual Spring Dance x HOUSE S$
1 | by . ¥
| of the y
ANNUAL DANCE 4 Members of the CARVER UNITED CLUB % HASTINGS BARBADOS %
at EMPIRE CLUB BUCCANRER LODGE ROOM R Under new management.
QUPEN’S PARK HOUSE Y (m aid of games Tour to Antigua) St. James 1% Daily and longterm rates x
Queen's Park ( | at sd Hy Sas. sae | quoted on vec %
on 1 N's usic by C. B. Brown's entra | ae care Bd
SATURDAY NIGHT, May 3, 1982 {| sere eRe ADMISSION; — &- Hormenent | Susets 8
| THURSDAY th MAY’ ise Refreshments on sale welcome, ?
SUBSCRIPTION W- Dancing starts at 9 p.m Dinner and och °
aia hak Mile a | Music Perey Green's Orchestra Prizes giv eee in the | parties arranged. g
n } Dancing Dress Subseription Gents in the prettiest Shirt and i J, H. BUCKLAND, x
Refreshments on Sale. +9 Informal $1.90 the best Marico Dancer | Proprietor.
| Geer

SE ALIALLECE LLL AIO





PLATE









Mangoe Chutney Sauce—Bots.






Horse Radis Sauce ys Chicken Haddies Tins
Tomato Sauce z Tomato Juice és
1) Rose's Lime Juice - Lamb Tongue ie
i ©. T. Onions a Gooseberries pa
i} Ox Tongues—2-Ib. Tins Pears ss
ii Brisket Beef—4-Ib. Peaches a
it Oxo Cubes ef Cherries
‘) Lactogen J Hams— (Cooked) -.
) Cashew Nuts Bacon (Sliced)—\b
t Cashew Nuts a Mansion Polish — Tins
Ufillit Biscuits ‘ aaa guseer is
Asparagus i. ac ‘epper a
Currie Powder as Cocktail Biscuits
Assorted Biscuits *” Bourn Vita
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PHONE 4918







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PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 20. 1952

B’town Before
Motor Traffic

@ From Page 1

Y t to a desert



2 > . . ry io

| rinidad Sea And Air lraffic '

~ Set Rosarene, Sci Cymii E. Smitt

Sch. Mary M. Lewis, M.V: Charlies A

Race Results McLean, Sch. Mandalay i. Sch. Burma D
, Sch. Cloudia 8., Sch. Melly N_ Jones,
: Sch. Cyclorama O.. Sch. W. L. Eumicia, ,
VISTABELLA STAKES Sch Unieed Piaron G caetiaeres

Seh. United Pilgrim S$... Sth. -Flore-ce
GI and GU Four Years Old Emanuel, Sch. My Own, M.V, T.B, Raaar









New, Natty














































.
and over — 7 Furs. _ ARRIVALS : M t l
“More Donkey Carts My OWN Stee FOr ateridais ’
ne ae i 3.» COWBOY > SS. GOLFITO. 4805 tons net; Capt. 4
a ' “*"l min. 324/5 secs. Sapwotrh, for Trin | z
PENETENGE HANDICAP |. 42° bioniig: “OMAEM, “1 tons net, SHOTTED SPUN in grey
r El and Et! — 7 Furs. j —_-—— , Z
k 1, ASSURANCE : only 36” wide
I 2. ROCK. DIAMOND Erratum
is ho ad 3. PRINCESS RASSIRYA ; per yard... _ wi,
eet ee eos Lia 20 sors "ind Cavett af rucay the Gessbe |
“gk: roms PORE HE Magymicar So sacha ee ree ee |
. ft - that “ was cau! F :
1. CAREFUL ANNIE Quantities of the samples of bis een .t WAFFLE PIQUE
f 2. BRIGHT LIGHT Mr. Carmichzel mere! reported nis}
e Ha 3. MODEL .LIN findings of quantities of iy Rum in the ty
t 3. 1 nL viscera and went on to sii? that if death ; B : da $i |
= : 1 min. 2092/5 secs. was ecausd by drinking Bay Rum then ip | eige ya.____ Dh,
are. ST. MADELINE HANDICAP his opinion tre cause of death would be |
Square where i GI and GIl 3 Year Olds Only due mainly to aleoholic poisoning hit d $1 14
s Nelson , Pere. A Quiet Wedding ite yo.___ Pk.
7 \- ROSETTE |
, 2. BOLES ; iet weds!
On Easter Sunday a quiet wed-
cabs shciter fr he hot 8. Cee a maed ding took place at St. Leonard's NAVY BLUE SPUN
day PRINCESS TOWN HANDICAP Church when Miss Gloria | Byer )
This 1 1 va FI and FI 3 Year Olds Ont of the Ivy was married to Rudolph r ard \4
addition t growing SF ¥ “Walcott of Charles Rowe Bridge, per y ee oe
collection phical mate- 1. GALLANT ROCK ° St. George. The bride who was
rial relating to the island, It will 2 CL E De LUNE given in marriage by Mr Clarence
be on exhibition for the next two 3. MBDITATION Carew, presented a charming ap- WHITE SPUN
weeks. ; ce “>” uinin: 23/5. secs. pearance dressed in slipper satin
Exhibitions of paintings by Ivan . " . FYZABAD HANDICAP ane eee ee. seas, eds per yor << * S2¢
Payne and the late Irene Gill MARGEURITE WOOD, Ladies Island Champion and skipper of the Queen's College team, smashes one Fl and F2 = also carried, a bouquet of
open at the Museum on Wedne against Marion Manning when they met in the Queen's College—Barna Inter-Club match on Priday night. Four Years and over. 8 furs: Queen Arine’s Lace and Anthurium —_—_—_—————
day 28rd April for four weeks The match took place at the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall. Miss Wood won two-nil and Queen's College three-two. 1, LEATON ‘lilies. Her maid of honour was Miss
—_—_—__-— Miss Manning (backing the camera) is a defensive player. ' - 4% 2. HONEYMOON Phyllis: Carter and ines bridesmaid |
W lt D cerve | % | oo. e Beckles Road team, Adelphi beat 3. CHINA DOLL was Miss Masline Bishop. !
eli eservec ( can ‘ t ¥.W.C.A. threeitwo? after for. 1 min, 46 3/5 secs. pinuael staseacad 4 ik
Promotion e e ,ONnSO 1 a e feiting one match to the Y teem. metre week oe ae Lower. 8 furs.
Peay i The points are now as follows: 1. ROCK DIAMOND 1. GOLDEN QUIP 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
@ Frem Page 1 aden Sen Of eae nama 31, 2. WAVE CREST ’ 2. PHARLITE
Apart from brief spells of nor OSI 10n Adelphi 25, Y.W.C.A. 21, Y.M.P.C. 3. ROSE/MARY 3. NOTONITE
mal police duties, the whol f 22 and Lenville 9 ‘ 1 mth. 1 3/5 secs. 1 min. 41 4/5 secs. |
his service has been ent with o a > a
the band, and he has become a (By P. A. V.)
well known figure throu ‘ QUEEN'S COLLEGE, by ae1eat- Miss Howard was the first to reach
island ing Barna three-—-two on Friday 20 but Miss Clarke deuced the ‘
night, have consolidated their po- game After. a stubborn: battle at , J y,
Music Diploma sition as leaders in the Ladies teuce Miss Clarke won 23-—21 to | )) : 5 herever The Need
His musical stud with the Inter-Club Table Tennis ‘Division ane — Queen's College /
fictoriz oliege of M j London, The atch wa ave at the one, Barna n RED HAND PAINTS
ee ity his being awarded vee hae Fora oe mn Patsy Howard brought honours |
the Diploma of that college in One of the largest crowds ever even by Garesung Ne een Ne ‘ : : 3
1927 to attend a ladies match witnes*ed im the next set. Miss Howard dic 5 Provide reliable protection for Exteriors
During his long service in the the impressive college victory, Ot have to fight very hard to wh | and high-class decoration for Interiors. |
band, he has had tical €X- Play reached a very high stand- 4% Miss Hall rn an 76 off |
perience on most ie brass N= ard and the match between Joyce gers ha = ee = the C a acl | SPECIAL HOUSE PAINTS
struments, and is fully qualified @jarke and Rosie Howard was e@s- | eet Sas st Feet a ie ail . Grey, Dark Grey, Oak Brown, Barbados
to teach the junior members In pecially Interesting oe ns nae u reat ae aot Dark Stone, Red. Tropical White
addition to a thorough knowlec'ge Joyce Clarke displayed a high ro am Ss ene s f Rs
of wind instruments, he also-peS- degree of table tennis wit. She Marion Manning two ~nil a the ‘S’ Enamel-Finish S(ARINE PAINTS
sesses a good working knowledge «ould go very far in the Ladies Next set. Miss Wood's brilliant | Cream, Tulip Green, White.
of the string Bass and violin, is Open Championship. forehand attack left Miss Manning MATINTO FLAT PAINTS
a good arranger, and has com- When the match started Queen’s bewildered. ae | White & Green
posed several pieces for church College had 30 points to their Frem early in the | first game |
and Military Band, Of these, the credit and Barna 29, This match Miss Wood attacked, She won her | E F UND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS i
bays cate ymposgitions ar€ a took the fe of . , 5 games with hard and well placed } Bright Red, Grey, Mid Green
most successful composi L took the form of a Cup Final a |
Military Quick March “The Fruit both teams have only one match smashes, 1 Biss ete did a | HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN
of Perseverance” and the anthem each to complete the series, Stand a chance agains this accu ‘A firck clans fedsiess G .
“Hear my Prayer O Lord” takeh Queen's College now have 33 points Tate attaek. Miss Wood showed | wa wy The Sign of
from the Psalms and sung by the anq Barna 31 some of the form with which she } PAINT REMOVER
St. Mary’s Choir at a special ser- On Friday night next Queen’s won a ee C ee She For the easy removal of old Paint.
rice in 1951, College will meet Y.W.C.A, while won 21—15, 21—12. | ‘
vice tn_129 amen Barna sas ene ille Ba ile is Dolores Howard defeated Ruth | Phone 4267, 4456
I li | { T tt one of the weak teams in the com- Williams .twe—nil to bring hon- ‘ 7
ore ont aiLleog tition but has recently i ved ours even. Miss Williams de- WILKINSON & Hl Y
Tore a Is oP considerate os acubt attain lighted the crowd with beautiful 9 %
© From Page 1 whether Barna will be able to get forehand smashes but on the gther
Welter, Lrght, Middle and Heavy. five points from this match. They hand she lost many of her points a
Competitors to be at the School will however get at least four through erratic smashing.







by 4.00 p.m. ints which will give them a Miss Howard never lost con-

\ . '
7.30 pan. Inter-Troop Table 4642) of 35 centration. She won 21—18, 21—16. 9
Tenais Competition Each Troop sted ot - ;In the decisive set, Jean Chand-
may enter riot more than 4 Scouts. __Y.W.C.A, Stronger ler of Queen’s College beat Elsie
Friday, 25th to Saturday 26th Y.W.C.A., on the other hand, is Goodridge two—nil. The players

f very much stronger than Lenville were fairly’evenly matched but

5.00 p.m. Inter-Troop Scout but I am quite sure that Queen's Miss Goodridge made her mistake
Competition Each Troop may College can at least defeat the Y by constantly returning the ball

‘
€ oe , .

enter one Patrol of 7 or 8 Scouts team three—two, In this ease the high to her opponent's forehand.

under 18 years of age. Patrol we College team would end up with Miss Chandler won 21—16, 22—20,

Sleeping Equipment to be brought. 4 point more jaan Barna, In the other matches Y.W.P.C.

te at Scout Headquarters by 4.30

. tlowever much depends on Fri- defeated Lenvil'e three—two. One
p.m. in Full Uniform, Eating and night’ game, Should the teams Lenville player did not turn up
Competition t Modern High ond

; up with the same num- and this match was forfeited to the
Saturday, 26th ber ot points, the names of both

8.00 p.m... Aquatie Sports & will be inscribed on the Trophy.
Marine Display -— at Aquatic Joyce Clarke of Queen's Col-

a eee FROSOD IPOS? STOOP $595" HIGH QUALITY OF
i ee ee) ORNS (5 || MARFEL MADE SUITS
\

OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING





THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS
BUT

THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
RESPECT TO THE





Barna match, A iot of respensibil- M o« l

Sunday, 27th ity was thrown on the shoulders i emoria
Individual Group Church Pa- of Miss Clarke. She drew one of
rades or Scouts’ Owns, the hardest Barna players and this

230

A Tablet to the Memory of the



But Ay/ A y/













\
Monday, 28th set decided who would have won late Rev. S. M, Hawthorne will | §
4.30 pm. Inter-Troop Signalling the med. St be unveiled on Burlay 37m Agel % AH. COULD SWEAR Mm ;
Sompetition at Combermere hn the first game both players at James Street Methodist | ¢ HN
es Each Troop may enter began very cautiously Miss How- Church, at 4.30 p.m, g HE WAS HERE Hi} Y,
rs team of 4. Scouts under 18 years ard took the lead from early. Ser- aah ater i was jae % A Ss | 5 ‘
‘ age - either Semaphore or vices changed at 7-—3 in her inister of : ames Street for 1714 Cc | %
on Tear to ‘6a at the School favour. Miss Clarke was the more years, and Chairman of the Bar- 8 & OND AGO | i e |
by 4.00 p.m. with Flags. aggressive but her forehand shots, as and Trinidad District for 8 : . |
é tote on many occasions, had very little Over 20 years, , ? |
A , ‘ *
: on power behind them, Service He was held in high esteem by x
Tuesday, 20th \t Changed at 12—8 in favour of Miss all sections ot the community, $
8-15 pm. _ Werenha + kd at Howard but Miss Clarke took the In public life his service on the
Kensington. t a0 — ; Each next five points and the lead. Later Board of Directors of Y.M.C.A.,
Kensington by ty P Tore! “so. the score read 15 all, Miss Clayke S.P.C.A., Family Welfare and
paiatst a ore tat oren 8°* was playing very sensibly and at- other public bodies will always x 4
curely attached to Staff. tacking oply when she saw an be remembered. %
oppertunity. She won 21—15 The chairman of the i 3
Mics Howard took four of the Rev. J. S. Broomes will preside. %
first five points in the next gome A cordial invitation is extended %
WEATHER REPORT Service changed at 11—9 in her ta _ fae of the community %
favour but Miss Clarke brought ‘® Mend.
YESTERDAY ; : - — % 4
. ae ¥ 2e .7 8 1 + f . %,
Total Rainfall for month to of temperament. Miss Howard Stars For Ribbons % Pr. Wm. Henry



date: 1.99 ins however regained the lead and &
Temperature: 72.5 °F. won 21—17 WASHINGTON, April 18, |%
Wind Velocity: 10 miles per Took The Lead United States Army designated] @

hour In the final game Miss Clarke two new Korean battle cam-!@

Street

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.954 took the

(il a.m.) 29.940

)

| Rainfall from Codrington: Nil points even after a grand display
| Heward brought points even at 6 way for
|

SLOOP GPOVOPSFI OSE POSSE

lead at the start. Miss paigns on Friday preparing the .

service stars on the

TO-DAY all. When the players changed Korean Ribbon, Two new cam-
Sunrise: 5.45 am ends the score read 10—7 in Miss paigns the sixth and seventh so °
Sunset: 6.14 p.m 2. Howard's favour Miss Clarke far in the Korean war were the R
Moon: Last Quarter, April 17 took the next three points to bring United Nations summer fall |
sighting: 8.80 p.m. s the score even. Miss Howard kept offensive applicable within the $
Perna 12.59 a.m., 1.08 a steady one point leod. The score tertitgry of Korea and adjacent *

are. ap oS “A 19-——18 n her favour when waters hetween July 9; and
Low Tide: 7.21 a.m., 7.29 p.m. Miss Clarke patted for about five November 27, 1951. 2



| They'll Do It Every Time

minute to bring pcints level, —UP.

By Jim








OF THE BEST- SSED
IASTIDIA |S ONE OF THE BEST: DRE
Bs IN TOWNâ„¢BUT LAST NIGHT, HUBBY
HUSTLED HER OUT IN HER DOWDIEST DUPSâ„¢ |
1






Ano ALTHOUGH SHE -HAD NEVE! -
THING IN HER LIFE BEFORE ou
GUESSED IT, SHE "(NEED WE GO ON?)



-

Te iienneccbeta
I REALLY SHOULDN'T GO

\{ ANYWHERE LOOKING L
THIS, § kK T'VE 6
CLEANING OUT 7



23-IZ |S THE WINNAH OF
THE CUT-GLASS SHRIMP
AN? GRAVY BOAT! WILL
2, HE HOLDER OF 23-12

(COME UP ON THE

















YOUR NUMBER,
KID=GO ON UP’

s
+
*















j Shirts by
* Van Heuson
i * Austin Reed
* Consulate
* Elite
* Aertex
“a
‘ Wn » e
| ne €. B. Rice & Co
ol WS FINEST BEER BREWED ANY WHERE : : ;
aN : THE I 4 z Merchant Tailors
: a
coe es ino rear es pene Hshoveceneuctualiiudeab stele anal uildaianessiasevsntecsahanashiieuadiante’ —



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r.W.E rOtHTKEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. APRIL W, 1852 CLASSIFIED ADS. p,m,r ***** FOH HETr TELCPHONC 2309 DIFD i i, CM Phillip Hi* tuahweJ l' M* late mldmcr at 4 p i... st pnnip. J--i Winifred CahBawa *"• George tyntan taVothec.in-Lew. I'-nr Mr..le• Slater-in-Uiw. B*HU*M*1 Ilr.tM.aiL • Slater-in-Lami>iaou*. m> April %  it*. Engfead-Vlva <.i Spare Bngin and dUi *JU**elUae*ue pert* Arnii D V KM A Co Lb* White F.> Road %  rw For !.*• ,; %  -.. MM %  I HlxniNUH Angelina, on April IBM ..t ihF rceiaewce af Mi A Johnaoo > %  Fin* Village. the WM*ory CHintan * %  ai nrlM Mabel Johnam and (SLd.n Hrtf nlap daughter. UIUI. Ilui>i" 'furl lial*'" A * John *>* .ann-nviaw. I i i Apni IMh. IH1. leaidonrr. Oarden Ml Miller .ftI* year* •tea the bm t %  a, biiKr. mm htm (All OM mm BM %  4.-I4 THANKS III* *r l- lo geeo-at gratitude lo thoee Sower* and Mp ifu l thaU WlUl u or, the ANIh ABrt>,a Callendrr /Joaura Clarence. %  H I .l.li Ollleri. OP1.M i*on.in.lawi widow'. L**rar. I Cleir. Marlon 'lin.iMti CtF*M lender Ihetr *lrr*ore thanki ji.il> baa 1mpalhy and Boater* and ranli m their ibri"^nmit ceuwtl l>j Ibe drain of Oenrlh* Dot tin JO Nr--la. IN MEMORIAM dear beloved Mother. Caroline DeHarlr Who departed thl. UN on the Win April IM* bl Ufa and care would dealh peeveri Hrr Una on earth would .till Jonra daughter* on ivUh INII.iir*. In loving it-amory eg odr ton Wln ITtllUp*. wwn died .' Al.nl II, IS6I OM *ar ha* pa**ed atn*e •* %  •Mr Sum ih one we away W> ml** him now our heart. Aa thne %  R.' wo rnera nun Hi. kning .mi. ht* .mill* la** Nu one can AH '" %  vacant placa E*er l. be, remembered bv the Phillip* family and lila IrtaedR -— U ANNOI'MCEIMBNTS •hop In Comfort al PHP I •hop. where >ou will ftnd local I waark — %  > InK-rwaUm Una (torn dallv l—If a i Lrp to data Llbrait PEBSOXAL wwulW ara her**V warnad CAR: Ona CkkPVToM i*t> lani.**-. MM Modal In rlfat rWaa caaidKion Dial for (urtnar parurulara IP U CAB—Marrla Minor aV-40 Two-door Ukn t.om nUMa. Ownai drlvan. Aa ir J T Boumpnray. sandy i*n* M>. *t Jaaaaa 4 In CAM Ona rard Cr In aWrtind ordrr pplt Mr rVumd Co Otyao n> Una artar lit pn REAL ESTATE Ta,.at. Mail., a^ Kitchaa.. %  .ppi, aaal HOUSES BKACft COTTAOB on Bt, Jtnj paiM baihand. quiatAll an % %  MgM l!..„, Bjakj % ,,., I'lr|.rionr Hraaonabl* taraaa li Phon-^ IT %  "•"-* %  iCoaaa, ila ad i OIM WIIITtNIi I May IMd. vandor atoaa not bind ^ I ai i %  | %  i i-.ilu.ilan and con txrrnjr. CATTOUD co. S'. ii Hin tMnat. II r lUaalaw n a* • %  in i %  %  • ( nurti .,1 Bilvar Hill, a %  balh. kitchan. atora room a Barnclt nrar Kind and. %  • M> -" %  ."" !" J m ** Co-M baajroofwi %  ^'. and bath, n-nnlnj not waMr cMaT we-n. afl ntodrrn oon\rnlancae pial IM HI II SHIS AUCTION .jcalvad from *W of rottca t will aal .*•> for A. a by pwMtc auadMn >l Cantral *U I .n on M-aMa thr Il.l at I p B "' fLllawlnfl IMma III GanU ale Via pMtrd •.rial Watch, U. MrUtfa of PamrH. aavaral f-war % % %  > %  <.. aavrr.l Blcyala K niw rorka ll> tapva. Hi I Cki TTT f-ifi. ill fatwtnd Mall Tva.rftar. and aa-aral o A data %  COTT MONDAY II. .AIITOK. T %  Ait 4 .flAWT HO. HI M.AUiW A kandaama. nawla. (HIIII bungalow wilh all anodarw c MalaI „ iNI U • ItV-lM. CAR Aualin A M. on!, M. aa food I nr* Apply Kcdman al Taa-lwr** -lug.' 1.11 u ia • CAHOn* Mandard ftn aur-llanl mllaaffa al aM, CbaMaa O ,.,„ B; ,.:| .-,.1 IM i>r*.-*.l M -all ....'* Il.l. ia .3 a. CAaVIIdA. N4VV OABJ A wall apiHiinlrd bunaal ordar conalnllnr. "' bwda d f wlfl n WIUI having larwa radai Hltihan i —i p in a with Tiactrkrlv laid on. Thl* howaa la Hi a cool and quiat naianlu trl—-I wiln frardan laid out and yard iiiaiad.mi—d. IKara ara alas two Mrvar.U room* with lavatory and a Mrga i>iaa Naw 1 M rabara Talafdwn* t **""' 114 1 „>........• I,.I n„ C A rtarcr. Phona *MM. mm m MONHIS MhNuPt Touraf %  "i> fMaM i r.c.,"il rimditloi) Mi.iri Mrnrw Sakwin T.OaO mllra Ilka n*w Fi>rt fan a' da IJd Trlaphon* 4!HM .d > Bungalow,, ateo Sultabla for Clab or Plata tnaw-rtion by ApwoantAT BHIGIITI1N. Saaalda A.aaa*! Naw Conarate ) Brdroon. Arnorlaan D-aign Maa a palaw. i\ Modam Crw.yanh-.xr. abowl ll*ab , II OaW| tndar aJl.TIM PACaNU NAVY GAKUBMB Almoat Raw 3 Brdlrum I] incn Btraia f3uiUD>low. all Mad* pi ConMMM IJ'W. .„ ft (l.n, %  iioo in RELKON err. t riM Co MM • aull.K Ulldt-r :.-r... J-Sl..r for a IN Tl'DOK BT — %  Ma ii.. "Ii a LATI I..,..,Con('t'UMVNRV Cattlrwaafi, for May, % %  and July, aontalnlng 4 bad room* with running watar In aach Fully fun)|| including Racrlgrrator Dial ma. | Stuart Bynoa. 11 4 MPl-AT "Pully lurnlanad imai) HM Avi PHona Mr* Olbaon. Mai i Pumiakad Flat at Dua< .__Rfc .uilaoia for two only, i May IM onward* Phone tMO • 4 aS—t t n. •AT—Mew. varr nukdarn eaaiida flat. Complete!* furnkvhed Telephone, gaa, racing raw tacallrnl and moss**** A ppiy to MAKEBOI. ST LAWRENCE U Alii 4 S3 I FARAWAY-fR Philip coaet, 1 oedrooma. Fully furnlihed Ugh Una PlaM Wateraalll .iipply Double Cay Port, tww •ma From May IM. PIHPM 1 Ti I I r. %  FOMTAMARA" On | He Maawrll Coaat. fully lumuhed Incliad ng 1.1. oh„na nd rrfngeralor Avaii.b i for the monlh. of M.... (Vtoba* N van.oar and December Trlephonr U.V or apply rfa 41 Swan Htrret It 4 U~-n Jl-BILtt(Jlhbe. Baa.h P •.:* 1 4 U—Jn I.t3rrv)N.ON-.*lKA M*> Chrlrl Church FuUy furnli 'ad. Anili „r fo :.^ un •"* it,m I'hone MM ee MM U 4 MV-dn SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -IU<, PBOR gIROPB • MitF. an !"• April lau M B BTflatTUII. on Mid Met MIS M B MOM. MB May laa> %  %  COTTBCA, 1MB May 1B9I. BAlURU TO t< H %  IROFB V s w ii LBMRTAD. Bk>d AprR IBM • 4IIMM1 It* IBCXMi IK rtkAMIBIBO AMR %  Bt TM ial 01 us V *• BONAIRB. oar M May IMd • S COTTIC'A. tea Bad June 1MB) • til lie TO larewtn m ri BACAO U B HECUBA, or. Mat April IBM S S BOAKOOJ.. on Jltn April IBM B P MleaOH. aON A to. LTD. Ar-ata B w I kllU ABBOCIAItOf CeaMgwea Tale. l-MII.K THE SILVER HAMMER OM TVa*PpAY and at Linden Cmi g>„ Hall Boad by ordar of the Mia Pedrilal i End I CKair II In l>.l SMeboard Doubn Flap Table. Berhicr •Srlronk-r. WagBJona. Baar Chair Mahodan*: Pakilad! Card Takdaa, Bwt*. Palntaat Cahtnet. Oil Pamtinga and J/tclure*. Oleaa Deai.r and Hlrda. Ok*-* nd China. Oak and Ruth Cnaira. Frel %  i Marble Clock. Maker. Frel Saw R hine. Double Iron Bedatead -nd ing. 'Id MBRafJ Uoen Pi.-r. Crdar e Cheat ad Drawn. *.,^iat..t..i. r Ware, Laegr M T. Paatry Larder. KlUkei. Cab.nel. Tablr. J-Riirnrr Oil BMnr; gMrat Caal Rlo-re. aHi Garden Bench. Tennl* Work Breek. Invalid* BBaar BftANKBR. TEOTMAN CO.. Al II 4 Canadian National Steamships I-ADY KEIArVf CANADIAN CBUIUBB CANADIAN CRUISER CANADIAN roN*rrnLTTuat 1 ADY RODMTY ,.1 Mfi I* Apr I Ma.. IS May IT M ft Ape I Aa M May B May a June $ Jun 11 June ia Jun. at June M Jun. — 1 July 1 J..i, — It July U J-l> 14 July M July M jwl) M May 14 June UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER it Truirdav MOi al "Oandhi V.I k Hock by order ol I II %  ; hi* Furnlt R.ihtoi KOITIMlkt LADT RorkVEY 1ADY NELBON I DM Cat) *MJt CANADIAN C->NfJTRUCTOR IADT MOO CAMAEHAR HIAUJDIOI IADY NBl W CRU CANADIAN CONBTBl-rTOR LADT a* AB> aa Apr a Ma 10 M. u M.,. it MB M May aa May — a June a J m— aa II June •* June ai Jum Juno M June -_ a July a Juty ia juij 14 July It Jui< —. • Hay a June II Juno • July M July. aa u m M*> 11 Jun. t JiaM aa Juty %  Jui:, i I Aua • Aug. Mori -LA PA*.' Derrick* At Jrmr*. hmiae drawinc dining i.nnlng water i ._Jn. water and ararlaaia yard Apply ip 1 badroarr.. Kllehen. elartrkllg Nil aa t w ii • 'had; bawui. %  -aeda Boul. J *n Table, BrrhHe. VU hou Cham, a.l in Manorial •waft Radiogram. Bran* F'.oor Divan; Carvr.1 Teakwood T..i>!. Mice Tapeetrva Tr.i Trolley. Oak Table and Lealhi l'i,i i..i n. Bwditead WII MECHANICAL l— One tli Raleigh. Dvno Hub. %  port* Cycle Vary awed eoeaABPly Net! Gibt... Ha**liig* kva or aaoa aa 4 a>-in JIAHniB FARM E*Clf-MFNT Manure ipreadeie, FerlllUer Ihitnbn :or*. Graaa Mewera. Rakea. Blde-delivanake* for WHtdrowlng Hie Tra.h (Iraaa tder*. Wheel .Slrakaa ( Wheel Trwctnr* In pieiinl h.VI n COURTESY GAKAI1E Dial 411a WorRahoss all C.xiveal dtlMn. Ideal lor an. BuMBi Can Yield It* uo p m Under £iota> 'i Ho Ii I I'l'lh MI*)N ST.—a Bedroom Reudenie. Convenience*. Oood ditiou. about J.lou a*| It UoUuj rw IM AT HA MODBRN rUKNUUEO PLAT-wtth Silver and Linen. Oood Baa liailaiiig Per further parUcukm Apply to AMBB ITarPjg"" Bad! Laaki-y No a Con! %  nada. Worthlrai. LJt*i>M*d ittaa IIB ehimee OH Refrigerator*, both m good order. Olaaa and China. Braaa Ware. Tea and Dinner Bervti-ea. CaapeU. Verandah. Chaira; Rook.h.ly.t Twin Baditeade wilh Blmmon* Sptrntja. btRd Prra*. Bureau, and Draaabag Table all In M-'iii*yany Cream pakiRd Preaa with Lfreuang Table I'lnyolned. Mngle Cedar BOM Spring. F.laetric for further particular*, apply lo— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LTD.—Ai doing rate etae c •IBned' by' reapoiwlble foe her ntracllna .my ila%4 .. a II nin i by a wrMei fiOVERNMlPn NOTICE CLOSDtG OF CHAMBERXAIN pwiiMii: Thi? ChRmbwUiin Bncldf will bo closed to all Ironic from M-MIdBy. 28th April, to Friday 2nd nffay for the purpoap of r-pain 19 4 :>2— 2r, NOTICE All CLERKS and SHOP ASSISTANTS nr> invited to attend a lecture which will be given at the Y.M.C.A. on Monday Slat Inat. at 5 p.m. Subject —"TRADE UNIONISM AMONG SALARIED WORKERS." Lecturer l> Mr. J. D. Bell. M.A research worker nnd lecturer in Industrial relations at Glaiaow University and an Oxford graduate. Donf niigg thlg opportiini'ij of h.'ariHO a lecture of this aort. Come and bring a friend. 20.4.52. —In THE GIRL GUIDES FAIR v.ill be held at THE DRILL HALL Under the diftinoulahed tMiroruKrc of Uii Erc'ld the Ooivmor and Lady Sarape on SATURDAY. 10th MAY. 1952 from 3 in H p There will be estinn StalU: HOUSEHOLD GIFTS BOOKS PLANTS SWEETS TEAS, ICES and CAKES SNACK nnd MILK BAAfl WHEEL OF FORTUNE LUCKY DIPS ADMISSION— Adults — Children k :..-.. Scouts Ii GUKII in Uniform 20.4.5^ Red' Under R1.5UU AT FONT A ._ Il.rii.ir. Alrnaal Raw 3 llrdriKne. Staaie Bungalow. Tiled Bath A Toilet, about Going Undnr £1.MS Avenue, Uuiet ft Reallain. AlinoM New 1 Bed""IIB|I'llT. It Oolng Under ci,i BY FONTABEiXE. I Bedroom Bungalow, A-I Condition, doing under n.aoo AT IIABT>NUh% 1 Mealdeiuwa UNM pawtly ind one •tuneAlrr.nat Newi. both eld alOS 00 p.m. and Going Under 4,000 AT 1X.WEH BAY ST Hcj.tde, Bedroom Stone Beeldence, yield* US On %  Under E1.0O0 AT UI'Pr.K m.rJiUCK ST %  aVaeore) l'arll> Stone Redrr.Ki ipnulblr 4i. J Toilet* yield* 0 00 p in Going Under Cl.att. AT nOCKLJSY NEW KD bout l>. Acer. Going for about 84.000 AT LAMDR END. New > Bedroom ipo*albi. s, Botn. nhereir Bungalow. and AT LOWER HAY ST 3 Bedroom Stone Nr.,l mf Goliig Under CHOI each. Dial ||||. Abrru "Olive Bough". LAND PUM ciaai with IS mrnuir. EtH !• **a i ft Prw* ahW. '..hi. V B.rke. i i.iki.ua -lie al m U*e main road •ervlce Approx rr.wen.ibla Dial a IBip d the land* on" which ft d al Rodger* Rd OovwnSt Michael. Apply R. ..rw. Spry HI utal Hit. nm*rt% al Ri Davtd'* Ch Ch Honed houae and land on which •land*. Apply K Sandllnnl. Spr. Dial BT74 J Property at ;htt* and Dayrelli itoaied houae and a tea* being need ttr lha AdvenUaU' aa a Chim-h idiullford, Sprv SI DUI BT4 The Hire*, propertle* Katate of D Brathwail :li.dit>> l enth Da. Apply K llOL'SaV-One ataewrthfa N. Inyg „, d •ungle h..u*e. %  < II %  n | baa pul logwthvr ,u. baaM 're design window • and da PrMB aBBO on a* nearex efrM Appl %  hevlock Field. Foul Ha> St Phtlii ao 4 ia-jn igUoTB A Mend ,,. ..,,•,, M" l**.a .in, ehadmof IUJ a,*) h(wh( ; ,,M "'*' aMualed .1 Pine Land, B M wl?"., ^-"^ !" ** r ,, "• "Her ai.ueo accented For furth. ParUculara apply n..i door or Dial BUM IS 4 U-4II Toutiuirr %  I and dining unnlng waler. e!r,l.ic UgStl and lei. !" f •• P'oparir at ai ding .. *Si.f_? c '*". * "* d ,n '"•• * ,h "bau -Si ^ l"l".liir parta of the co..t The ah.,,,. ,|, ,„. ., „ ,^, ^ BM MVe. of lha undar-igncd m Friday, and M->. itu. at p m Applnalioni I... i.er.iua.lon to etpaj la to Mr F D O. Simp. ^Mnd". St George TM Mill CARRLNGTON at SRAL.Y, Luraa Street u.aa-n. NEWHAVDN Crane Coaat, 4 bdrouma Fully lurnlahad, lighting Plant. Watarmlll eupply. Double Oarage, three rwotn* For May and from Oc m Phone 4*ia. H.4.BB-I I h ^ Apaft > IMF. ROOM 1 r nlirrniahed Appl. Clifton Terraep" Bav % %  .-... Boad milled llMs To an approved tenant 1 or 3 nlnrniahed rooma. Bua Boute. Iff minle, walk to BrldgPlown Co Boa M sitASIDf! HUNG ALOWAt Palm Beach, tailing*, fully lumKlied. Ihree bedonm. Apply to Mr* Frad Roach %  r;s I Badroaena >alhlng. Imn ll.-il _~-i %  n. Haatlnga. A valla hie from and a p a* wAvrmxY oibbe*i n. •* and Dreeaeng table Eleeirtc Stgn-a, 4 Kitchen Table ar-J • Cle. Cannuten ggal WashinxtonFrrparalir)' Rl* II 3 o clock Term* CARH. BRAVKER. TR..TMAN J) CO., AueUooeers. r-a-ine on Tueeday. SMh %  renta-Ou f SMpi dppw.nterlroi I hahrhlldraa/ -.vrted LOST A IOI.M LOST HHACl.lJrT-S.ivn nUkd Blue'MiRher•f-Pwarl Bracelet. Saturday morning 1 ".imil Bev-kwith Place and l^nvri Broad Irert between 10 and II Finder return to AdverabAd\eTti*ang OfRce RawhTd •""•" 10 4 M—Jn WATCH taMTlea Oold WrkR Wat y—lerday about a B m between Pr-iap. ami mark Reck Ptnder will be *uiul fa warded on returning *ii^ i., AOroci Ad. % %  Hieing Dept a 4 M I'Bhlic Official Salt (The Ml. A at leW UVXTKI) HELP A v,ss.;\i;r-.n Bjarl a> | OR *f> i nuwarnger muat be lldv. neat _.. surteou*. Apply: Barbado* D>e Work. On Tuoaday. the Sand day of April. IBM at lha hour of I ..clock In iho %  narnoon will be aokt al my office t Ska hlgheit bidder for any mm not •BTJder the appraleed value All that certain piece of Land contain. Mat by awtlmatMn I Rood*, iltuate at Thorn bur v III11 In Pariah of Chrl.t Chonh outling and bounding on lan.l. of a Daab. on land* of one Ward, on land, of D. Chaee. on land* of J King. •Ad ON the Public Road, appraleed a* The whole area of land appralaed M f.-ur hundred ami eighty d.illar* laeBOWii Attached from Charlotte Pr lac i Ii* Mar.hall lor and toward* aaltalaclion. %  V HB-Mt Depo.it M be paid on day of piirrhaae T. T. MBADLEY. Provoet Martha). Provnat Marthal. Ornee. ir,t April. IBM B4aa-an. ntmXR— Fsperlenced Ma-1 .leap In A P lv . Miirphv Dumbarto S(1IOOI. TF-VClfBRB—WattMaJ Boarding School JUibadi-Two School Teacher* either aSalp or Ferrule lo teach Engll*h In simiii.t, |loy* Apply utaUng r.wrirand aalarp requlaad. P O Bod SSB. Bridgetown. Barbado* aa 4 Ml" KOP MAXWEl I I.I.VSI Und -liable for build lng""i le. cf-nananding poaltion on the coaat lrn.iv*. view*. || i. bu ,i, >e bathing from live houae Tha whole propeitv ,. In Ih, mam bunding a.r l b ^" K !" " v ry %  %  '•**" %  **"< t*n pantrte* i-^rooi T>i.r. l.,-ll, | I ire._ pantrte. (XiUtde H I bungalow for .t.ff having i indah. aaparale toilet am large doiihla *MlPgf l„. a d pen MS) i \-.. wajar. telephone and rlretrKlt ,Tnt ""."'. "'" w %  "P s-T HpanpOr^^ar-s ^>TLJt CATPORO ft CO.. High Street B 4 afr-u iinderv^nad will „,(( r „,b %  adanBB, High Street. IBM. AJJ. |iooj| com^.ain.-ofnce.-rnd IZ^l^Ti 2 H ",r *"—< %  Br,,la„own. .rT "• "" % % %  -H'-rc (e-t „( jn a UT."^. algnad""" p %  MK,|lton, ''"' ">• under COTTLJ: CATFOrlD ft CO. From IM May IBS] •d Parry School, a rhool" Thlt POM Coat The OSVe of thl* Seci i-r at the School, and the Secrrury *hail irerj ul red to combine lha duttaa of Clerk to the Governing Body wllh then* %  i Secretary to the Headrnaeter I Applicant* ahall have had a tec. ondary Education, and hridge School Certiflcale or II* equlvale" i-l be proSclent at Tt-plng ability I wrlla •Atarthand being an advantage 3 The Salary la IIOO 00 per monll u.ing by annual Incrrmentt ul eight dollar* to 1M oo per month 4 Application* to be received by th. Heagrnaatar. R C Sprmger. Ikq M A %  C.illlilon'-. Governrnent Hill. St Mich Teetimon Bffj GLASS ROSE BOWLS Come and see our lovely assortment I I M IIAl I lll'OIIII M Car. Brud a Tndar 8kv SPRING SIMMER AUTUMN WINTER But lht?sc Seasons change all through the Year JOHN D. TAYLORS SPECIAL RUM (with thr Distinctive FlavtMir) Is consistent in Blend throughout the year. Try thts Blend and pi ore what others hare proved. BLENDED AND BOTTLED by UMIA II. I A I OK A SOW LTD. Koehurk Street ... DUI 4305 CAB-Wanted Car. low mlkMi 4419 ORIENTAL PALACE HEADQUARTERS FOR a SOUVENIK8 Kpll INI1IA. CHINA J CETLON THANI'S ii> SI Dud :;ii-.i MISCELLANEOUS HOARDING a.Hl IA>IM3ING at H.. I rbe -Crumpton Street, oppoaur H %  on Collagre Hot and cold lui Apply in paraon Telephon. au 4 sIVOOKS-One copy each of the follow•>g book* Tacllu* • AAWUn'.a Varail Arnold IV; Caeear Oeiilc War RI. I r.nt-ci Marcu. Jordan c %  dilorlal Departnwnt I Vicar of St or drophead C .'.r n ,r d vrnl Tender by letter Detail* and price car • OH SAI.I-: Westlnghouw Refrigerator in perfect working order. At Linden Grove Sale Tuesday 22nd. RRANKER TROTMAN CO. AacUoneers %  4_ Haatlnga Rocks SATURDAY May Slat S p.m — • p.m ids in ii id Xnin DtatribuUon Varloua SUlla, Houiehold Ooode. Funcy Work. Taaa. Cakes and lea*, OBITASS, Itooka, U.cky Dipg, Joy Rides ftw ehlldiwn. Child's Fancy Draaa ComtMrUtkm at 4 p.m. Police Band in sttcndsBce by kind pajroikaaon of the CornmlaaioRaar. Col. Mlchelln. ADMISSION AdllT: — l/„ Children I Nurses ttf. M 4 SI.—tn. (ilRLV FRIENDLY SOCIETY ANNUAL FETE ""*", •< %  <^*rona. "I Lodh Savae, _._ .? m *• h.la al THE HOSrtL Counlr, Ra an SATURDAY. April 2S.h Opened rram 3 M to e.30 p.m. i Tni".*'" be the foUowing Stalla: Ftoweri and Variety. NeedLwork, Swaeu Household, Books Cake* and ices. Lucky dipt and Pony Rides for the children. By kind permission of Col. Mienelin. the PoUce Band conducted "T Capt. Raigon will play during the afternoon. ADMISSION — 6D. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BLAUOS ft €•. A PH.. P A. wo ALWATR AVAILABLE. FOR SaMX -aBHWMI d a-.tor.. —-.rw, Urge dbung rnn. b„^ airy kitchen, j i Be*. *erven| ouVkuiidhup, Th. ***L arote-Jkld wllh %  aeee i. double Lately .., % %  .. Flirthei RRW BI NO 4 Low, ilia.-.,. 'onalrueted rhwae iwaaaMew, ,L snod unepoiled area -*% %  .„ ,., "*7 %  'nen. detachm %  ***—* tBBST: %  [.•"*' %  A.lnM.lv. i ilot.v KSlar rurS^'^.s,""::' !u;-S£2 " !" T " "aS —ui. „. %  M SS l ~u " r-i Wt ." nru* 1 81. PM-r^A,. S'.S '. %  ".•'"""' %  iS atafW; >-.^ai.tlTh* !" '^ w ' I laid oui n XuZ. r beach •ighl of •anfa ainv lrii.ru C** sarwge end o u i-hZr''*K,* houaa |c nwinlai-i.." "*'—• The I !" "-. XXJ | tlMre i. dlrwl^pVaaa t, -* %  beach and bathln gaa i ndaii* i arova. RENTALS Phone 4M0 Plantation* Building r^S-Ii I"*** nu,-, „, TZf^^l !" •""'a-aa InSda .^ cool roofed -t HTfia^ ? Uo *"PPed !" fh Ma lwSL.. A a d Mnta ,n "'tcher. art. -i-ri^-V %  %  ;* l,h :i ""P" coniairu? "w ^ sround Boo, room.. Uu^d'r^nd'^tr^.'n'l,"' 'I*"ie*7^ ^^ %  "" %  "d" are about l^fgrgwaai5 llur-.lr d !"" ,hw are>n. up piled wnn pip^d water frtMB an electric pump 1111*4 Ul B a~T w 1V, on the property Ajiingiawtit wall praaerrad progpg ... .KTT ffS aaaeaaMae, Welled ground, of aboui •, of an acre Ineunng complete pri.ac) Further detain upon appllcalion. ^!: XHCa Ul Q ~ "* A %  one^— %  Wcti*B and .| atuiMiuvaiad 1 etorarr hu*e Htuat. i f OaaRaA7^, l X J Ji^*f ^SmT SJS: ^^^ WmBiWmmFi* •V*l*OL4at.y,„ Wl r**T A ..aoautiful property *„,%  aBJBIf the Sneet pre-w-r work %  b~f*. Wall de-lgned for t--V running witn > raeepthv,.4 ^ aaragp^oreroorna etc. The lan.i '"'-*J •"•• •!"> Sower an.I mmmiii anR^ r ^*"' I**M* "'atily IWcoMmended %  OLDBRa ROI'SE." SI j.rne* -An aaBaaa houaa. bum of none witn pine Soor. and *hirigle root a rereptlon rooma. S bedroom*, verandaha etc alao garage anal uiual ouUrulldlng* The houaa •tand. on appro* acre* of well Umbered land imahogan. 1 approached by a long drlvewiv hanked with cloaaly planted maBogany ireee The ou|4taa*allAg %  w aaMa*! of -Header* .* tn. vary lovely lite which ho* the advantage of being well elrv.tr.) and coal, with Sne view* on all akSaa Coaat la le*. Wan -.i.



PAGE 1

men nr.HT SUNDAY ADVOCATE Sl'VDAY. AHTIW1K B.\RBAlK)Sfi#Am'0rE i 1 --f 1 Sunday, April 20. 1S.-.2 num. t.itnw \ THIS week the Control Board ia meeting to decide what answer to make to the request of the Agricultural Society that the control price of potatoes should be removed from three cents per lb. The argument of the potato growers la that it is uneconomic to grow potatoes and sell them at 3 cents per lb. No one is in %  better position to know whether potatoes can be produced and sold at a reasonable profit if the price is controlled at this level than the growers and no doubt their argument will be given every consideration by the control authority. Whether it is necessary to have controls on locally produced foods at all is still a subject for discussion among producers and consumers in Barbados. In recent years the government of Barbados has decontrolled several locally grown vegetables such as string beans, tomatoes, carrots, beets and cabbage and competition from neighbouring islands during this period has tended slightly to prevent the prices of vegetables rising too steeply, except at times of great shortages when prices become prohibitive for most people The major obstacles to cheap vegetables in Barbados is the lack of marketing and consumers' co-operatives and the failure of controls to keep down prices was partially recognised when the government took oh* controls from several locally grown vegetables. There remain on the control list, however, certain items such as eddoes, oranges, grapefruit, julie mangoes, bananas, plantains, sweet potatoes, potato slips, and yams when the reasons for keeping them controlled are not at all clear. In Trinidad the Government is following quite another policy. On the recommendation of the Local Food Production Committee, price control has been removed from locally produced beef, mutton and pork, while between April 1952 and March 1953, fish, milk, eggs and vegetables are to be taken off the control list on specified dates. The government of Barbados on the other hand is still undecided what policy to follow with regard to local food production except the vague generic one of encouraging it. Some of its methods are open to serious criticism. There is, for instance, a law which requires 21 per cent, of the arable acreage of the island to be planted with ground provisions. According to informed evidence this law is faithfully observed by the plantations but is unenforceable with regard to small peasant farmers who prefer to put every available acre under cane because of the high price offered. Little enthusiasm, it is Mated again in reliable quarters, is displayed by the plantation-owners who comply with the letter of the law relating to the planting of ground provisions but who do not regard this enforced planting as economic. It is interesting to compare conditions in 1952 when there is a scarcity of ground provisions with 1931 when according to a speaker in the House of Assembly on April 24th; "there are several plantations today with acres of yams still in the ground because they have not been sold." But comparison with the war years is still more revealing. According to "The Caribbean islands and the War", a publication of the Anglo-American Caribbean Commission, Jamaica as a result of compulsory legislation during the war years abolished the need to import rice in view of the sufficiency of home grown carbohydrates and in Barbados the planting of ground provisions on 35 per cent, of the land of the sugar cane growers resulted In a total production of carbohydrates sufficient to offset all of Barbados' prewar imports of rice and 50 per cent of its pre-war import of flour. Today Barbados subsidises imported rice at a cost to the island's revenue of $350,000 while the subsidisation bill of certain grades of flour is not too far behind. No one would suggest that Barbados should swing back to the drastic wartime system of planting 35 per cent, of the arable acreage with ground provisions. At a time when sugar is being sold for good prices this would be an unwise policy and the provision of inspectors to ensure that compliance with compulsory legislation was being made would add to the cost of the agricultural department. The fact remains, however, that Barbados is turning a blind eye to the defects in its agricultural policy although it realises the advantages of growing more local food. It compels the planting of ground prohut has not got the machinery to see that they are planted. When they are planted they cannot be sold at prices which give a fair return to the producer because the government still controls the price of ground provisions. Meanwhile, an island where, with only 14 per cent, more of its arable acreage being allotted compul&orily to growing ,-,round provisions than today, sufficient carbohydrates were grown to offset all of its pre-war import of rice and 50 per cent. oi its pre-war import of flour, is now subsidising imported rice to the extent of $350,000 annually. There' is much to be said for the argument tha* rice is a simple food easy to prepare |nd requiring less fuel than yams or potatoes. It is also true that total dependence on locally gtown carbohydrates would be an unwise, milfcy for so small an island to adopt, bui ftotie of these arguments nullify the fact 1that the artificial stabilization of one imported Carbohydrate (rice) is giving no encouragement to the growers of local carbohydrates even to carry out the ic(|uiri-menU of the law which stipulates that ground provisions should be planted on 21 per cent, of the arable acreage of the island. If the heavy expenditure on rice subsidisation is considered necessary (and it is not by everyone) the least the government can do is to allow the people who comuly with the law's provisions to sell thou locally grown carbohydrates at a reasonable profit. Silling On The Fence n A( HEL CARSON'S book UT HMg fraud You had no hand to hold Bui MM muooled up together Cos the new world Wa* cold There was no one there 1o marry us So mother there to coil But ie darlin little jelly Didn't car.* at all, at TOWAIIIIS NA.MTY MR. ACHESON has been saying in Washington that *he United States must allow other countries to earn dollars. The immediate cause of this statement would appear to be a note from the Italian government pnintmg out that tariff restrictions in the United States were not assisting Italy to earn dollars to pay for American imports. Similar representations have been made in Washington by other European governments and the manufacturers of motorcycles, bicycles and chinaware in the United Kingdom have been successful in obtaining protests to the American government from the British Embassy in Washington, Mr. Acheson is preaching to Americans a doctrine that has been long pointed out by the enlightened school of British politicians who opposed the first American loan on the grounds that it attacked the British imperial preference system while protecting the American tariff wall. Mr. Acheson was actually using their' words when he said that the United States cannot throw up tariff barriers while urging the abolition of other nations' preferences. If the United States are to survive as a great manfacturing country they will have to increase American imports. The incidence of trade discrimination in the United States is reflected in Europe where commentators point out that the improved position of the sterling area this quarter is due to a contraction of imports from other countries. But this improvement is by no means healthy particularly with regard to the European Payments Union because it has led to the contraction of imports from Britain. Cutting imports is a trade game that everyone can play and if carried to excess it can end in "Love All." It is no more than a means of "buying time" as one London newspaper said last week. The only sane trade policy is one which is, conducted without artificial restrictions. TheTC'are signs that London is fully aware of what is happening and realises that the cutting of imports is little more than the exporting of trade troubles from one country to another, without end. These facts are exercising the greatest financial minds in Europe and the United States and there should be little surprise if an announcement is made sooner or later about a conference to discuss the impossible trading conditions which exist throughout the free world today. Mr. Acheson s forthright declaration that the United States must import more from other countries may convince American business men of the shortsightedness of protecting local interests at the expense of the total American economy. If only our own questions of trade could be considered positively and freshly by alert minds on the spot instead of being gcazed to a rubber-stamped system applicable to all colonial dependencies remotely trolled from Whitehall! Then the possibilities of ptomoting our own trade relations with Canada might bo considered differently than they are at present. And the value of tourism mij,ht be properly assessed. Labour Policies In The? W.I. tvler day and night. I can t way yours will be an unusual and \ uncomfortable honeymoon. N Man Biles Lion W ORLD >hortage of meat Is X causing some mange be^ havlour here and in foreign pau I II has been reported that 8 President Peron recerUy spent J a whole night poking his nose ; \ Into the dflslbins of Burno* ** Aires, ostensibly to see how \ many steaks bad been thrown I ,* away by spoiled rlUsens. As steaks arc hard to come b>. even in the beef empire, I suggest that he was probably hoping to And a titbit for I Dears hi Britain killed and injured lOM sheer. I. 1911. If this Is allowed to go on I ..<. U". us drop everything suggest that owners of sheeplb censider your problem. worrying dogs should become One obvious way out of the vegetarians to make up for the difficulty is to keep your hat on loss In rations. jit all times, though this would And a man In a villa*.c in not only make you unpopular in Northern RhodrsU ha* bitten tburches. and look foolish in a lion's nose. restaurants, but excite both reThis is. indeed, a desperate kcntmcnt and curiosity in your case of meat hunger. Therefore girl friend. I suggest that he should be' If y-u did not raise your hat brought over here to bite the to h.-r on meeting and parting, rose* of thedogs who worry the she would think you were no sheep. gentlcmtin ; if you told her it had Or. better still, bite the nose* stuck to your head, she would of the owners of the dogs thai naturally want to know why and worry tho. sheep. how long. i„ f ncti lf hcs hat nungr v ht As these questions would be, could eat the dogs and then answer, you might owners, too, for all I care. Men have In (his way wc could improve our Sunday dinner and rid ourStrange Honeymoon While General Eisenhower triad io cheer us with "The situation of the free world is brighter," and Joe Stalin said he docs not consdler a third world war is closer than it was three years ago, a bald-headed man has written to a newspaper saying he Is frightened to remove his hat in the presence of women because he loses confidence. W ELL, my dear sir, even if the fate of 'he world, is in This most recent example is typical of built-to-last' . products. VALOR STOVES (Table Models with one and two bur no J s ) Largo Two and Three Burner Models OVENS — Small Medium Large C. S. Pitcher & Co. II If your mother comes from difficult Ireland, from Klllarney or take aisother Kildare vowed not to shav e until the, sou can bet your bottom dollar is universal peace. Yo*. might selves of a lot ol shes descended from a pair *ay you have vowed not to re—L.E.S. By GEORf.K III NTK 11 now have hean of the famous telegram alleged t have l*en sent by Lord Baldwin, prefers of Labn then Governor and Commander in without whose S .i L ne I ewar l Islands to a thing can be said wu Socialist Secretary of State for the Ing accusations of prejudice t ..Ionics In reply io a query asking many instances personal abt lur information about Communists This primitive HI the West Indies. Ixird Baldwin, the slory goes, sent the following telegram: "COMMUNISTS NIL: for the of this charming little anecdote, „,. but I menu on It because it reminds references to" thine of another real episode In political mclt.nv., which I recently played a humble The publtoation but lending part. Wanting informant The report however realistlrewlS SS that "the task of adapting r matters and a social security system designed mprimaturnofor an industrialised Western d^wuhout provokcountry to the differing social cc or in needs and organisations of a West buse. Indian community is clearly -d dog ferodifficult .me." liVLt y bcin *. dl *Wl. How often when prudent statctoffSllysSSresull of the great exments like than have been made tension of rSSBpondbOlt? throughhy mm of xpenenco in this com rcprescntaUves munity have their mak. i .if reactionnd w ismasrif-ai'Sa "^HS !" !" or s m< """ ? prrf.cinj their upmbn by Coming from the stronghold o( new „,!„, 0( L.bour acUvlUn, the orricc at or maturity. Geneva, this statement cunnot be year of overlooked. S"> '?Jm ?The "' aneient I hoenlu.ins. which exponents of Laboar deoloial United States whirli has re^nllWe know that there are some gies normally present their view*E^&5titV£L uacOMUU 120 orgag.itIons registered under point: U attempt, to o.e.. u-hat wlige, having r.en In I'wrto Rl!!. the trade union legislation of the Cknomn about Labour potlcta ov t r 'th" niil dec* lea\ el which llnti.h Caribbean territories but in the We.t ladles. And It Includes iecordingTo ihcTreport %  •e.nnot b tu we know \er> little. all the other territories falling Wet Indian territories" Whsl for instance is the Ca.ib. within the terms of reference of Nor doc" the Jinortcrr hv sii£ ^tlo^SSrf^'wKPw^ %C-"bbe.n C%,mmllo.,. geXng' ^XHS"oTwS^Si ggLg^yJiffSJS*^^* !" „"* "$ <* h "LUngWltV -Sail sorletv can be remedied M, AlirMr^lgVi dlWi nal y* ,ia * h Tft >*/*merely by the passage of legisla,Unt ,!f th„ r^r^L |S I ^ C 1 fM*"' 1 fc %  pwiod when ( In t.on. The reverse opinion is ex(Unt of tho Caribbean Labour the Drltish Caribbean at any rate) pressed 1 ' '" the success or failure of present Yet a recent manifesto purportgovernment politics will advance ll •" impressed by "the verj ing to be Issued by the Caribbean or retard progress for decades, considerable strides made aurln,: Labour Congress (London Branch) Until the I-annur parties of the *• P^' decade in the dsvtiopcontains this senUncc "The pros•"* can approach problems !" nt of employers and worker' tituting of the term Labour by ""ccting Labour with the disinorganisations' and concludes thai Buitamante of J.imaica. OvflHti ilf terestednrss which marks the l <> very Urge extent the further Trinidad and Ihclr international analysis of this report, little hope development of these organisations bedfellows like Tito. Altlee Bevan of f** 1 Progress in the British depends on their own efforts and will not ensnare us Into an alterCaribbean can be entertained. 'hero it little that Government native whose benefit Is comparable %  deliberately differentiate bepolicy can effect in this regard.' to that of the frnng pan and the tween tho British and the nonIU conclusions with regard to fire." British Caribbean because this mi,n PO""<' problems confirm* ihA sentence like this owes more boo* ls largely an account of the centuries old fact, which had re to Moscow than any other source British Caribbean for the reason ""'7 wnped at J e ? ll; 1 because Ot nd would certainly be repudiated that no other metropolitan governlh f, starry eyed visionaries and Inby our own distinguished elderly merit has apparently furnished the tellectuals who came to the West statesman who is however supInternational Labour office with Indies fresh from Cambridge and posedly still President of an orhalf as much documentary evlother centres of learning to Join ganisatlon whose I-ondon Bram-h dence as the United Kingdom. ,he chorus of those who believed Is so naively Communist in That is one reason. that the faults of West ]"<" aophraseology. Another is the obvious differ cl >' WCT '' due to the wicked sthTAficr reading Labour Policies in eneo which exists between the .encek.- International Labour Office, Guadeloupe to the t-'mtcd States nd middle classes. This mytlOsntVS (19521 price 13s 6d ) I snd France, and between Barbshas now been exploded by all still In the dark wllh regard to dos for example and the Unite.) holiest s.-arvhers after truth 120 organisationregistered Kingdom amongst whom the author of this under trade union legislation in Direct flhanciM aid to Puerto report deserves to be numbered, the British territories or the C:.ribRIcO from the Federal Govern"In the island territories" he bean, but I have nt least fount! a ment. It may be mentioned, writes "the rate of population handbook on labour questions amounted to $580,000,000 from the growth and the progressively hich will prove invaluable to ma date of Its becoming an American strong demand for higher living 11 many occasions In the future. territory (1898) to June 30, 1945. standards make It difficult to enOne of the greatest handicaps And loans from federal agencies visage the islands being capable, to progress in the British Caril>amounted to $82,000,000 during with their verv limited resource-, bean Is the cat and dog attitude the period 1929 to 30 June 1944. of finding a solution without miwhich has been injected Into laThese are only two instances of gralion." hour-employer relations by pol,the many privileges which Puerto What seeker after political honticians anxious to exploit this easy Rico enjoys from its Incorporation ours in say the Barbados House ol pathway to political notoriety, if into the Commonwealth of the Assembly would %  ** words like. not power. United States. these to his constituent* Y. As a result almost any statement And the French Departments of here is orthodox Labour statinf mMartinique and Guadeloupe to the truth from its world hcadouarmention only one thing, benefit tan In Geneva. relating to Labour whether 1 atlng from official publications < from private Individual* with ipewith certain modlfieations'from the cial knowledge has been suspect provisions of legislation concernby politicians who have set themIng the organisation of social scsvlves up to be the only true Intercurlty in metropolitan France Within the present framework* however and again many peoph Irrespective of political tendenrlcf or affiliation will applaud his verdict "there arc directions In whicl perhaps more positive effort might be made notably in regard _, to land settlement and the exten / tiiliit, %  /,../ aion of vocational training faciliTo The Editor, The Advocate— „ tics." SIR.—Would you bo so kind as To The Editor. The Adcocfltc— And I can pay no greater eom%  publish the folU-wing list of SIR.—I am a Philatelist and pitmen! to the Integrity of the Donations to the Special Appeal, would like you to oblige me author of this report than by endt the Family Welfare Society. * publishing my name and ing this brief review of a worthI Ci address m your newspaper that while labour with a sentence. out 111 \mus .SAY family Wflfarr Stti'ivty Anon Mrs. Blade. (Annually) -ort-CartST .. Mrs Leicester Chsllem.r Mr Robert Dear (Monthly) Dunstlon Mrs. Mary Gibson Anon Mrs. K M. Shepherd .... %  %  %  5 00 ._ labour with I am Interested In exchanging which I might easily have written 10 00 gtan> P* of British loon nth er countries bv -XX with Pl.ilateslstg !" Unit rll... 111. I %  100 tnd other West Indian islands. Guiana and r the hundred "The introduction of large tcalr your island programmes of vocational 1 Inj would not onlHoping you will oblige me this variety of Internal needs, but 25 00 vour lind "sinking you 5 00 '"P'n YOU WH "bill .'-ll favour and usanking %  %  s^ieipation. 1300 ** %  %  • lncorcl > r 2.00 RXNBTORD cmnra 16 New Street. Total $88.00 New Amsterdam, Bcrbice. SYBIL CHANDLER Hon. Secretory. 14.4.53. in would probably be a step In th< direction of breaking down some immigration barriers." And without emigration, labour E olicies in the West Indies cannoi DDC to achieve much higher standards of living than those wr now enjoy, if Indeed they esr maintain them at their present level. that will give you full cover and protection. For information and advice, consult the Agents:— DA COSTA & CO. LTD. PAINTS FOR ALL PURPOSES Domestic paint, industrial paint, marine paint, every type and colour of palm ; International supply them all -lacquers and distempers too. Each one is scientifically produced not only to look attractive, but to stand up to hard wear and difficult climatic conditions. gefMctrrd X QUmUmmwtliifumfc yH&t/b Cjyirrf.t 5fc/ DA COSTA & CO., LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. *V*.^V^V>*..V',V',VVVVV'.^^^^ NOTICE No Price having been fixed for this Crop's Sugar for Local Consumption, we are unable to sell any more i sugar. •I. X. 4.odd.11 d A Stiiis Ltd. Johnson A Itetlman. :::v.:::::w.::v,:::::v.v.vs.v.:-'



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SUNDAY, APRIL 211. 1932 -IM)\V .titvocm: l" IGF. I I I \ I N THE LIVES OF HARRY LIME VOODOO DRUMS The Truth in Your Horoscope J 'VL known many place* and left them. Made many friends nnd lost them. Won many fortune* and dissipated them. My fate seems to be linked with a cosmic yo-yo. and the island of Haiti was a low point in Its descent. When I arrived in Haiti I had monvy. In no time at all i was on my bottom dollar Of course. I still had my friends among the natives, but even they had become devoted students of Omar Khay-yam. That Is. they took the cash and let the credit go. I was In one of *he seamier bars, trying to persuade my old friend Georges to put still another drink on the slate, when 1 heard my name called in a voice I'd known once only too well. I swung round. "Dorna' You beautiful, wondrrful witch! What —or rather—whom are you doing her*?" ENTER SAM How He Gabbled I H ER lovely blue eyes were full of laughter. "Harry, darling, three years haven't changed you a bit." She inclined her blonde head towards a table where ..n American in a seersucker suit gat alone. "That's him . He s really quite charming, Harry. You'd adore him. He collects souvenirs . collects money too.'' "Ah'. I might have known It. He s with you. Well, let's meel him . And, oh, Georges, you might tell your boss that Harry Lime is on the preferred list again." The bartender's teeth gleamed In his black face as I followed 1 Dorna between the tables. As sre snaked her way ;dr itly along it was difficult for me to focus my attention on our mark. The mark. in this case, was fat and perspiring. Of course he was bald. His contributions to the aromas of the bar were generous—his cigar. his perspiration, his money. He didn't get up when we leached the table He Just waved his cigar at Dorna. and bawled: Hl-ya, Baby? 1 was Just gonna send out a soarchtn" party for ya. Ha, ha. ha. ha, ha "' Dorna said: 'Sam, I'd like you to meel an old friend of mine. Harry Lime . Sam Turkin." "Slddown. siddown" Any friend of Dorn.1'5 is a friend of m'.ne— within reason. Ha, ha. Vknow, Lime this is my firs, vacation in 18 years. Eighteen years! Can y'imagine it?" He gabbled. For eternities, he gabbled. Doma was obvfcusly amused by my boredom, but my patience, as always, hid a price. Torkin kept gabbling till I almost considered reducing that price .... and then hp gave me my cue. "Sure Is hot in these parts." he said. "Well, baby c'mon. Let's gel outta this dump und llnd us some souvenirs." "Souvenirs can be more than •ouvaplrft" I told him. "Tho average tourist trades his traveller's ch/ques for a worthless trinket to show m his trophy room. But, Mr. Torkin, instead of paying money for useless sentiment, why not use sentiment to acquire money*" I held up my hand to stop him %  diking, and let him hear the strange sound rolling 111 from the hills. "Listen to those drums. Torkin. They're telling you the secrets of Haiti." THE DRUMS BEAT For Wedding Rues D ORNA asked: "Do you understand them, Harry " And I replied: "As much as any civilised man is permitted to." Torkin stirred uncomfortably "That's that voodoo stuff, ain't HT* "Not 'stuff,' Torkin. These drums are calling to the v..ii> gods to smile -upon the wedding of .1 mute man and his beloved. The wedding rites are Just beginning. They'll continue till dm, It Is the wedding of Fanse 1 nd Gn-Gri. Fanse works as a waiter in an hotel here m town. Ills father got in a jam once, and 1 raved his neckThat counts for vimething in Haiti . Now. if you'll excuse me—I'm going to the wedding. Torkin was impressed "You're Koin" up there? Hey. wait a minute! Slddown . What's all this stuff about souvenirs and %  1. .m. :it and all?'* "Well, all right, I said reluctantly. "Cook . Haiti is crawling with priceless relics. Ihat'd bring fantastic prices from any museum in the States. But they're not selling them, Torkin You mult know the island and the people to find them." "How come they're worth •*> much"" 'Sentiment, old boy," 1 told him "The voodoo brand of sentiment. The natives protect their sacred symbols with their lives. And than, of course, there ere the raw materials ht'lo sentimental trlnklets . diamonds, rubies, sapphires. The kind of sentiment we understand." Dorna sighed: "1 love souvenirs like that!" "O.K.. Urn*." Torkin said. You can get me am of these baubles What's your deal? CRESCENDO The Negroes Shilek "TpIRST let me find a suitable a? trinket. Time enough then to bargain. For now, a small retainer will do. But—as those drums would tell you—sentiment tomes high in Haiti." I had a feeling that Dorna would keep Sam Ttorkln well occupied for the present The future I'd handle in my own way. And in the meantime, there was nothing to worry about except keeping a date with two dear friends I found them In the clearing —Fanse and Grl-Gri at the heud a* fade whose native* still practise the savage Jasul** rites of their ancestor*. ,.m %  this nrw Harry Lime adventare. Ilarr* Lime, that engaging rogur. t* dead now. He dird In the srwrrs of \ irniu after a secte* of ewapodea that inidr scrern hl*tori In the nit-. "The Third Man." Bui beforr that he had lived man* lives corn parked with thrill*. The 1 m I'M.New* Is telling them all—exclusively. Today'* *tor> Is railed "VoediNi Drums'. Washington's sceptre, and I'm You are my Massi, When you %  ,-,1 • are in trouble. I help you "Listen, man." I said patiently. Here! take it! And he threw UM 'Cristophe started life as a slave, bundle on the bed besi, Th< I COSt TVrsm mor I SACRIFICE The Lovers Waif I I i-nough. I luriu'd la leave And then, at Uufa: ik-anng. I sow some thing else, Two more bodies, tied kejener hack to back . hang'i' .1 M lists ft* m a long hung between two %  raj together rUhBg aikl Gii-Grt . 1 M he sacrificed. I didn't wait to think I dashed oui into the oeatre <>i that CCSOT/I bursty gathering, yelling: "No! Wait' Stop it! . Listen all Tho surprise almost sobered U vkuig died lu a to* mtftsei n g I shodted again: "You're nukinc ke. You're torturing two '.nrtocent people. You can'l do it' How the famous Bennett College can help your career through personal POSTAL TUITION Wo 1 > 'I "Hi. Indicate to teal lrIM •kill InSU n %  la know whal IIM i has I .ill Mvlabla trpuUi tton* TW taints it ...... I 1 lali-'H. ri-wt*a Irlnidi. tnrnun LottoiM*. .it niuCBIrd |MI>I lh* WOCid D>H Ovate* MMS itev*. that Tab. tf an-..nd..i C M. Tn povularia* hu Am a UrtH IMn If you lot* .1 iMr Mr. or HIM*, addrcu and dal* ol blrUl all .L.rl, orllU* by %  %  ,iu No | Ptap'r anll far A*tili>f ..-.l W,.,. PMUlf IC bul *nMI I In II.IK.'i rtillJ OKaf lor MaUMMry. SnnmonuN You IH T r vou ruu tt, pssa the I exarm *hRh snll quslifx^rou ,T *our I uaJe or profemioo. If you arc !., in your career by sssssad 1 Cfipoftufitfjcs htfc'a mcsaJgc of' hops •nd eraouraijerncni %  se n si n g tuWes eo*H sessftitgl. When *ou eniol *rth Ihc llcniv %  I nm -in i< coacgskl unnl >.n, Qt This osiurarxc i given r-> the N the CoUege who has fMri in hu I'nvato Tuter Uaiiuns r If"* • ay vou have llxl.:.. I 1 .mm. but you woth M teas* s%s .il )* paocl Noestisi arc ctij.geJ Afl books us ues 10 siudcnu Yset Ulcal clsvtrncu .., Your own Tutor will help you. *fl bring o-il lbs cleveaneu in >ou. Ani: 1 gn i often iiK-if irssi j 1 insBgins %  JuoJify! Aoilt^uahlk-.'Uion'.iK.ii Iwdcrmeoi. fk-.t claMBM than send (•.URHU oUsjSUOn) fat Ihc lloaneii Cossc gssak m • III WHCH Of iHlSl HIS UUH IBTv? 3 (...... a., I wul I^M— -4 I....... I.M. •JMI 1*>>> lMf>H( S-aJK...,, l-fWl I..,„-,. ihvi r*taa> Wcaaliaa The priest said: "They have It was forbidden I'hev mil 1 an t die You Hunk the] .-. 14 |hi sceptre to this man, but they diun'l. I did. I'm the. pi) ui ^ y u w n *> untie thornropes man like Fanse Co me on, move, or there'll be •What about the sceptre, earlier "' "' !'''•_" a4tej ;.lH>ut m w V(-vlo ( ((tir „ holding forth Lime?" m n niight be difTerent to-day. „, v „ ur f un cral." "Look, li-irkin. Henri Cristophe lr "'' 1 1O ''xpl'iin some Ol this fhe crowd began to yell again, landlocked sslnt to these l D 0 "" 1 *hl night ni we had a ;ilu i thc pli „i BWU ng his 0"„ people—and all-powerful car.ligod. While he lived, his sceptre was his symbol of strength—and wealth. He had mere Jewels In that sceptre than Dorna has *<> rt ' ? he asked. curves. Then there was a revolt uvPvnTii' here, and Cristophe was found .,,,.„ dead. But the sceptre was gone. Phylhrn 01 Dealh For over 100 years its whereabouts have been kept secret I know the secret, Torkin. get it for you." "Yesh? How"* He was Interested now, all right. "That's my business. Your business is to make it worth. BVJ whileHe made up his mind. "O.K.. Lime. How much this time'"' I said: "Plenty, Torkin . But plenty! The next morning I climbed up to the little hut Fanse had built for his lovely bride. They wen* like a pair of kids there to,.„ gether. It *es a shame to break JJ^J J !" drink in the bar, but she was towail( , h Y m %  it* mTuse, II. only interested in th.* sceptre iti,, m0 U %oll km nVff others self, and thc charters of Torkin \^Kv the rcengc" buymg it "What's it really i whipped out my dasp knlfc %  nd Killed al the ropes that l>ound the girl. "It's no use to ill th' o two. MtBer," I said. • %  K. Qrl-Orl. Your e loose. Help %  %  %  ranse." aned t;h tray over, limnim' "Bet Torkin would give me thirty-live thousand for it. I'm prettier than you. If you let me peddle it to Torkin—" I laughed, "Dorna, my sweet, I lost you three years Madagascar Thc sccptnmight be a temptation for you to leave me agsin. Besides, the fact is . I don't have the sceptre Trsiktfl bQU0ti H Ihll morning . for fifty thousand The drums had started again i"uav N r'fooiiiVg.' hills. Before we had fiext morning Dorna and glasses of iiiampagne e-ere a imshlp, toanlng tr Y Hold nil, Fanse I'll*:' 're loose . Now run fc it.' I yanked out the gun I hail hoiitered under my armpit. "Stand bink. you lunatics, or I'll start knocking off voodoos!" 1 he BllesJ ind another man d I it-fore I hud convinced them the noise had become loud, glntit!.e tern rail. ter and urgent. It affected •Well, there goaf Haiti." I said lha barman, strangely. Another corner of the world I put down the drink they had *"". eyM . !" ""g tn h "> %  %  *-* < hipped off. Haiti is through wltli given me and said: Fanse . **"" %  h 11 lold us: "' •"> • orr yl Hariy Ume . Guess I masaed that sceptre of Henri . Uh matterf" Gri-Gri's prelly face had gone a sickly grey. She whispered: "Harry, please! You must not ask. These arc secrets of tur people I shrugged and made my way back lo town. It looked like ,, re must close the bar : ;0 drums. Monsieur^ lUny. undersLi undersUind the gi im I was listening hard now Dorna, lutchiug my arm, said: "Hern . what is it?" "I don't know. Those are the iealh drums. They mean omesss-r^i 'zsttzFIL •jsi5 al? b l r;:;: rent. %  m wron K Siiddoniv lh,--n %  I shook off her hind nnd l>olted inlo th l syu really noble to rescui Ksgise nnd l.u-i.u. Aim n, ,> I was, becauM* they got away an< 1 put them on a boat to Cuba. However, the fact ih:.t I grabbed the sceptre on the WHJ a'. ..nd xihanged it later for i ..TV lid '. iiih.il |. ia %  i.f i h..riK< trdgfal have had something to d< with my herol<5. Ih-ing M hero is Una. so long a; i ()r at least, that* tM am. • t -M Tkc BENNETT COLLEGE .. D*B*..M.T*a>l^lll < i ll -f. aalSaJ laqnl IMVVIUIWUX al | ,ealra Wrtl* now ai tin. ..n. w i>ad>|ln Addl rt'NDIT TA*K)IUt. iDvpl 11) P*. Upon '..t|*ii | Strrvt. HanUMy SS. kidla, r-nf to India It 4 ei*u. M* < 1 1 K1Ni has beca J to others in a sunilar state. Pt •kot ICM lie hinj <*HM arrebpt ion tmtaOoa plaipWi nd opra nirft unk-M coocScd 1 li.-iiaanJt of •kU IU(T"II hr pr.l %  i -1 (her* %  .. .i i i morr MUS ID naulH iksaDDD Prcsuipaoa. I hit Um ht-uiJ bsskr aWi r" "i§i UM lerrurrd •kia UMIMI, IBMs (be twrrlag frtni ind Jm e.Mil ih* ml', i-n WMtmi lom of .„Ml. in.t.i I ECZEMA. PSORIASIS, BO 11.3. uauPTiONS. pic;Ki-V HRAT, .MAI^UtlA SORES MklNliWORM luM • frw %  in'ii.itMnt of %  jaadcrrul DPi) Prescnpimn •! 0>* iniaua itii'f PcncvcK, nJ m good r*MtiH •nU IM IfsUag I DUD PraacnpUoB W IOIBIIIIIII* hom thtauBU sad a jass j %  % %  "'!• DmnM i P B Armttronglid grld|a-tawr HOS PER 1NB may be fust what you need to put back strength sod rgy. PHOSFBRINB soon re* vives thc sppetita sad, in so doing, it revives keenness far work, fog enterprise. PHOSFERINB helps to build up staying power—gives you reserve of ps uence gad goodv. ill when you need them moat. Try this grand ionic today, la Uquid or tablet form, a Tablets sj| PHOSFERINB equal io drops. THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS PRESCRIPTION ft Oearosaloa, Des"'fy, la\g —ilon, sftsr InfliMnae. ..rrimt nu,ivcs "" (tressed in the tatterIs> lion of Hurry Lin -• %  %  ^garees of the cane fields. a|oal heroes don't die broke. NKXT SUNDAY Hurry Lime trlli another of In remarkable udvenlurcs. YEAST-YITE Helled ^ YF.AST-VITK TkUi I Klve you fast relief from pain and follow It up by hclplnii you to feel belter and brlnhter aftorwardH. Karh "YEAST-VITE" Tablet la a scientific combination of analtrealo — orpaln-relluvlnK Ingredients —toKothor with the Important utimulant. Caffclno and tho valuable tonlo Vitamin Hi. Test tho effeot with thc neit pain or cold that attacks you! As the unpleasant symptonn fiido and vou hcKln to feel your old solf aKaln you will be one moro added to the countless thousands of people who have proved the groat benefit or YEASTVITE"'PIclt-Mc-UpTalil.' |1 Otl .1 .o'tleTO-DAYI Quickly fidtev&s HEADACHES NEURALGIA COLDS CHILLS FEVERISHNESS NERVE IND PAINS VEASTVI1E "Pick -Me-Up" Tablets



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SUNDAY. Al'ttll. IB. 1155 SUNDAY ADVOt ATI PASS rm EDWIN ROOERa t>oatch, has now scored her serotids. itni'th consecutive victory In IB'" All the "D* boat* t.'tried with the IMermediaV Class Hut still It exception of OUve HI I lhou*> tM ...ni.-tni-.jllnit other %  %  %  Oass are comulalning that Mohawk has too much time. They ctsrfm that she is on* ei the bis" boats of the class and cannot c t* ood haimaj BsaakSjtfBj blU i %  JII eaorsnoU* .mount uf Uine I hope howevci. th.ii. If It Is %  only for the sake of mukiiui the Bsora interesting, the handitappers would consider starUM Mohawk with <3nat. Coronetta and Clvtle or at least allow her a minute from these boats. H I assaj *J I appera are rv 1 ., .. (By fcDVYIN ROGERS) NOW thai such great interest has been focussed on WeiRhtliflinK and Body Build,n K I will Rive the public the from ^ Y^BSS!FcS!^!Si benefit of my six years' experience of serious lifting in a Penn.. but there are several coptes series of articles I will also endeavour to throw some in the many barbell clubs throuahliuht on how important wemhlllftinR can be in helping to out th* island, build .trong and healthy bodies which everyone is desirous p £ £•* ^SS^^rSiZ of having. I shall have personal interviews with the lift ins champions Messrs. Barbados Junior and Senior, outUnlnx their trainlne; programmes. their progress, and life i n general. Other prominent figures In the local Barbell Oame whose untiring efforts to put weight lifting where It is today and who are still in the game will also be interviewed. Men who due to age have been forced to retire from competitive lifting and have turned coaches. First, however, lot mo toll you how and why I started exercising and the terrific change it has made to my life. 1 urn going to be very frank. If when you read this yours Is a similar case and from my experiences which I will outline I can start several of my readers to begin %  training programme, my effort will not have been wasted. Weightlifting and all that goes before It means long and tedious work, but with great compensation If you arc willing to stick to it. Ask anv welghtllfter what made him start to lift weights. Each one will probably have a different answer. However, in each they have an ultimate goal In view Tantau won tn ib 'B' Class cored ..-other victory the D' Clasa while H. gue woe Eight boats started in u*e,I* d started with Rjiiibird p bu> quickly s>-t awn> ft-ui n re<-elvl fin Hurricane \! the and of the first round i %  I was e-.llng She tlnlshen 'i round Iwo ralnir.ee and 15 *ut afcfia*J of Huilieane and '. i Hurricajw qukkl. ->i<-n..>k I OUT h *ra> lUmbild -n.l 'i BasMN Pater Pan dropped >u' and headed for her 1 tiefore completing lh i % %  nd lIurrlealM took the lead fron Si bad just before the finish. Shi -I the race seconds all id of Slnbad Third was The Eighth R.B.Y.C Regatta !: nbow, four minutes and 85 ras soiled north about In a cahn onds behind Slnbad. Rainbow M ,...•,,,,, nftemoon At the %  d a lead of ten .vono1 %  £ FJSZJZXSIR H.'.;'rtU „,. .„. !" ,„ „„. hur. 1 mlnule. and SO aatoaoa have liked and this was somawhat dishcurU'iiiriK. This Is perhaps thr • nna* "tlifficull period* IhruuKh. Diffl.uU bocauac 11 i the !" ^JJXS5 dj lap Jo'atcoodl will tadd. SW""P*J*".Kr'rrS.vln vhajthar >-uu will continue ur lose inlarest altogether Stick at it and once over this stage the future looks much blighter Nest week I will discus, haw I rot interested In eansaetltlve lifting. HI Ho Her first round was completed In •5 minutes and 30 seconds and the n in 44 minules flat Slnbad die Ike, first round in 43 minutes am *o seconds and the second lr ft minutes and 30 second*. Ralnuw'* time for the first round wni 2 minutes and 32 seconds. She id the second in 48 minules and %  second! Onlv four Tornadoes started Friendly Football Fixtures vmttjm. !" SgJ$ J? v^ r .ce"wa. hSZZTvEX ^^ml^fronroipy but h1 -nd Comet, remps-t.h^ a she now only lad Qlpay "irSe s^"l 1P S2S" into the lead S^ l-luh. mart a mlnole „nd., ahead o< tH>' itlnlr five vcmnd •" 13 want paw-d th ind 10 sse*nh Moyra Rssjsjsi of Toot ball „ark Gipsy ovartooh *"""r B .v.md ,.nd now had 13 seconds %  *•£ Comet Fanti on to finish the ..i..four mlnuU-ahem Rlalr which -n third. ,i tin A friendly game between Arsenal xkippered H Dear nnd Newcastle UnlUd .•^Kippered hy IX Stanton will be played at the Garrison tosaarrow. These Iwo teamo battled to a one all draw on Tuesday last and a keen struggle is again anticipated. Following ju-c the teams: — Arsenal:—II. Dear Cap... W. Harewood G. niackman. 6. CsrLjSStes and 24 second:. tar, C. feudder. B. Turton l. ^".l In minutes and H S-*" „e aa they got light", i would get c.reene. V Taylor, O. Taylor. D ( *^l n Hcr third round was heavier ones. I began to feel Weekes and A King. !!v^ds better than th start and was always far bei lad the others. Vamoose took the lead from i uly. At the and of Ihe firs' i u.nd she was about 35 second; i.lwad of Edril Comet was third Vamoose wii* still in the lead al Utc. end of the second round. She v as now two minute* and 45 % %  conda ahead of Edrll till third little over VBnioosc W1 m im lo im>h u^ -, !" -21 •" over ds minutes ahead of „_ second. ""J*; i unel which look the lead from minute later rsm^> fcarll ^ few yards away from the Uub mark Vamooaa did the first Hr-"t i-und in 3^ ndnute* second in 39 EDWIN ROGERS Tl v-candS, the see and in 3* mi" IJUI ,j i n 20 minutes and 55 secutes 17 seconds atvH the last in ae 0|jdl> lhe ^^^ m U minutes, minutes S3 wconds Mov ," u % 28 seconds and the last in 10 min( ompletcd the /^ r Stnr\ petitive %  "* • cxeicls* every other mornCapt n Phillips, J Phillips. R. JV^ nu uM and 10 ?J '"; rt ^ *zL nut fnr tu/Miiv r,,.h,..._......„_ S3HI U Da^ntei^ n db H .* n n minu _.„.—. nnd 30 seeing for twenty or thirty minutesSniith. H. Bannl b Of course. I could only do my I* Jarvis. V Hurdle, U exercises when I was on vacation. K. Dottln and C. Doyle. In my case It was like this. As Tne irsI '"no 1 ever saw a Following are the result ikeete. Nurse. when my bi other ""'tches played last weak: — April 15th Hangers beat l-enrode IBth heat Malvern 4—0 Friday April IBlh Advocate and Westerners drew 1—1. THIS WEEK'S FIXTURES •londay April 21st Harkllffe vs Penrode. Referee Mr T. Maynard. '.'uesday April 22nd Rangers vs. Advocate. Referee Mr. J. Hind RIFLE SHOOTING a 13-yeai-old school-boy very Dumbcll underweight and very conscious of Evan bought himaeif two pairs. Tu ,** tl fT ^ l the fact life was not very pleasHarold Webster now the official HSrkliffa 5—0 ant. Other boys would make fun • --aeh ,.f the Amateur Welghtuflw ^ n f*V av Apn 1 of my size or luck of sue and this '"Association of Barbados Indeveloped In me • very strong ^tructed him on the various Inferiority complex. When other exorcises on how to use them. I boys were together In a fight, was always present, as a apecUtor. which attracted a crowd. I was tvery evening after dinner -vhen the quickest to run away from the iy two hmthan. exsrclsed toscene in order to make sure that fcother, but when they were taking 1 would not be involved, for being :> rest between exercises, I would skinny and underweight I was ..o through with the lighter Dumvsry nervous and afraid When bolls some of the exercises they the sctu-ol masters asked me queshad done. Many times they reprlUons. I was so nervous that I used mauded me for delaying them, to forget the answers. I bad a Later my brothers Evan and PrMa habit of blinking my eyes—again Glyne joined Mr. Webster's Oym through nervousness, whenever I taking the Dumbell* with them. got excited. The boys then began Improvised KquipmenI calling me "Blinks" "I Tt-mombet quite clearly ona occaion whan After this I stopped exercising the headmaster .noticing the blinkfor quite a few weeks. While taking of mv eves called me But. being a son bath one day 1 found | orc i ( : burst into an old rusly Bsr which I hook tears. From then mi. I snM called home and with the use of old bits another name — "Cry Baby. On of scrap metal and stones I Imanother occasion at our school pruviseri my own Barbell equipSports. I was itU ready in my mem. I was unable to calculate running outfit to represent our set, the weight on the bar. but It was but when the time came I could Mifflcient for me to press quite a not be found. When my hiding number of times My exercises place was discovered, my excuse were mostly confined to the Press, was that I hsd eaten too much. My first real •workout' began Crowds terrified me. one afternoon when I visited Mr. I Beuin Excrrlsin Webster's Gym to watch my After ^11 '.ho ridicule and brothers at work. After some e*> nyxkery of names, I wanted to do couragement, I performed a press s?tp M hipg about U. I was eager to *"'d to my amazement and lo lhe develop my body For a few • ur P r ** <* ,n nttif J* } %  ucceeded months I did free hand exercises in completing a perfect proas with which r found in Physical Culture J % %  J hp T f 'J BCt,oa n %  £ magazine-, also a lot of swlinming ["ther wbo cautzoned me not to and walking After a while it let it Interfere with my studies. seemed I was rsspeatiiig the 'MM York Oun.es exenises too often, which left mo Since I wanted to do the same In a tired and exhausted state. I exercises as my brothers I asked realised that I would have to do a Mr. Webster to allow me to 'workUsousand or so movements In one out' at his Oym, but due to lack exercise If I wanted to Improve, of apace this was only possible I then got some rocks varying In one* a week. By this time we size and weight and went through owned a Barbell at home with the exercises holding them; as soon which I exercised on Tuesdays %  nd in 5 mlnutea onds and third 58 mm-, "STL c a-*. = started Madness catnj ,1 30 see, ,nd •n boats tlfth but round "^t the end of the tin* _^ F.-iiv was leading. IS seconds SiSd of MtwijWrt Wt. f.annet. a few seconds lat" Pogue sailed a beautiful toJ* i-ouiut She gradual!* enme Into ,he lead and went on \^P 1 ^ The race 10 seconds ahead of Cannot, Third was Magwln. .. minute and 13 seconds %  %  Rogue* first round was done in dnesdsy April 23rd Western.,„ mmu ym 25 seconds and her lasi Malvern ,„ 4I m i nu tes and ^ saenrais. Referee Mr. J Archer rtgnnet did n fn-ter first rm"d ., April 28th Hangers vs ..,,.. lmt wai 39 minutes nnd Be 44Si Pl ? ir ? de .. ^ w -econds. HOT time of 41 m-nilU-s Men'i Referee Mr. O. Oraham. ^ 52 ^eronds for the second WHS V.B.:— All matches will be played not „,-. p^ Mngwln ng with Reen and Invader but Scoring at last Wednesday nt the end of the first round ight's practice of The Barbados Mohawk wn> two minuteand 3 • mall Bore Rifle Club wa* second'' ahead of Reen Third nuaually high. Mr. K. S. Yearwas Dawn *n scond. behind O.K1 topped the list with M out Keen. a possible 100 points. Mohawk kept the lead She The following are some of the ..lushed four minutes and 25 seconds ahead of Gnat which was second. Third was Reen over a minute behind Gnat. Mohawk did the first round In 42 minuteand 31 seconds and the second In 43 minutes nnd a second. Gnat's first round was done in 42 minutes and 25 seconds and her last in 42 minute? nd M seconds Reen completed her first round 111 45 minutes nnd three second54 seconds. Comet finished her first In 22 minules, 28 seconds. the second In 24 minutes five e>onds and the Last in 22 minute* 85 seconds. Edril completed the firs! lound In 21 minutes 37 second!., the second In 24 minutes 41 >nds and the lant in 23 mln„_j 30 seconds. The Ninth Regatta of the R I. v c will be sailed on SatApni 26 A full table of v. results of the Eighth Ragatu v ill appear In Tuesday's Adoocale Water Polo Season tU'guis On May 12 THE wa.er polo season is fixed %  >, begin on May 12th and prac'ice afternoons for the various leasHnM bavr been arranged as Monday* ladies."Tuesdays — 11 ll-eague. Thursdays — A League. The fsai will also be available q the "iher afternoons of the eek. •at acoraa racordrd |M Mt. K. S. Yparwood M ., M G. Tucker. a ,. H. F. Webster. M II W Webster •IH „ II. B 0. Marshall m ,. L W. Hasaell ... mi .. T. A. IRoberta .. M R. O. Brown* .... w Colds. Coughs, /f_do es you g oo d ,n iwo ways — y ou rub it on and you breathe it in! For quick, sure relic' rub THERMOGENE Medicated Rub all over your chest, throat, and back. Its healing warmth relieve. congestion, and breathing the plesiart medicinal vapour It glvei on* clear, nose, throat, and lungs. Glands Restored to Youthful Vigour In 24 Hours Scientist Explains How New Discovery Makes Men Feel Years Younger DOUBLE-ACTION THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB to big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins 4* MUI.*!.! fidruusa. •!"• *<• l"n IS -•(• at s> milll IWf IM| Msr mffifi.ll* • %  (••• %  ivuU tu KI...I/I. 5 %rtJftVd%Si s aUas* at T' soar. srbMMnr si ua> r %  ouiinf uuns %  bom lb* dixa>>>, •f SSW •"" • %  IM laUl till IK all pre MM • .oirbimuco • r-rti f-l rn^iHlbtn S) MM T>M fiM aU M Wiry • •MH B.SBW bf H I — %  Mai mm b* u> nvMlf .> ur • u bruts saw ssvia, ••Ssse. saS rasllt,. MS auM* is-s b nMIHial BtabMM *€ iti. Do' t %m m W eok Msm at anpf u asas ss s i i*r CM W %  -.*E mt B.yp aas3srstt SME %  SfSv&'Sa'SZ as. a..
s~< at-;-r Jj Jjj^ tai ^ *• —• Susrs If —* S 'lb—'— far* • ••^**' l 1 Doctor Praises Vi-Tofci ny ie. b/ %  Ji m i w . 11^ moil mot*'*. ,_ Ml IHSBtH o( .lunvlatin* .14 ln.*•tioltal IM ll.r.ili .r.4 in u > Ur^l M If •Ur>-U.ful (kfatr BBS •ttaliliU> irfeel Hesult* In 1 Dan/ Sxavui* VlaTaSs •• KitmiUKsllr mmM. S.4 M M* 4tMU> MMK IItl>->' •nd ii..* arirMim UH biM* .t,^ %  lW IM bor. IMI* II Mi !•* %  % %  Ulna fr* .M-UI. SUM MIU TsVTsV £J?ZU lb iMr Ml MB *an yuamt wHhtt •<> aSI n.i. M i. km ben. mmmK tU>U IBM alftH UsM M lb %  a* . —. W •bHb a*a mm (.•••. •f l>p* f •• feMBfl H I—S, •!!. at> astareiMsrUB tt'.r ..:.r-:v;* •*ti*4 n a i Is >• ess OM v%  •HMlUarRW. ajj-S^Tfi^lS off. mmZ?L*2!Tr rS* %  • old MlHt^MM. I %  % %  s aw OM WfaM It Vl-TabS • Guaranleed J Ta Itesfare SHELL-LEASEHOLDS DISTRIBUTING GO LIMITED PETROLEUM MARKETING CO (WEST INDIES) LTD %  RETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVcNUE, PORT OF SPAIN DISTRIBUTORSDA COSTA & CO.. LTD. JAMES A. LYNCH & CO.. LTD.



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MM>\\ M'KII SISTJAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN EILEEN' ASCdOFT'S COLUMN EXAMINES THE CULT OF THE — MAD HAT —DEMONSTRATED BY A WOMAN WITH A PASSION FOR THEM: JULIE WILSON A aay hat." says American act rest Jutta Wilson. make* a irommn a woman." Putting theory into practice, ihe brttfht her collection 0/ hat*—all 40 of foes*—lo Knaland in are* and ttver-band bole* : "t tui' wouldn't bear to leave one behind." some I' eeet> ( I f*iw (M'-liaMM to or Ham HH f.-*naw* /< MEW H'KM k Rota n-yellos. covered grey leot veilmg. Huw Minrr u silver ltd THBrE TO HAKK %  I |1)Y . 11 Nfl ef bleri fur felt, bears ( p.drechabWa-tnrh plura* I—COP Ac AANA . 8pr.nn sires In wrtiut Oh enormous *V i' ! I'--* end HM avple b osa-nn MOOU: IN BULtZIL lovely-day feHHI iciK-*— ALT Tots urn aBSCial-li.h hat (a UlTQUOtM valve*, has A chOU Of I k ttf,"ef e i-nera and in brad embroider art usOimBTTt g amcasr for sirei -.-.<.iad arrwm tare stack vtm Leaves hold e fke-fnukUng black eau. -4 Queen's Dress Bill —£3,000 A YEAR What's Cooking In The Kitchen More cake recipe*. It la always a Iieip U> know recipes lor many cakes. This week 1 am giving you a recipe lor ttaian cake, anotner Hat did she get value for money? SSTST-SSlr S". ^?S5 ValUlla Cf ^ By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMPSON New Facts Come to Light . YOUR BABY AND YOUR FIGURE Titan about Jown Larrthp kU> I'm La* V-ecse uaa KM Barbadaa: B) i II M-M \ riMiiM: A wilts AT HOMi:. By \>ra food out of his mouth to look at 4 pp. IN ail tin U II. Allen. Ihs. eonth t-entury w.iS Hie IMIuee" V1 f.\'u Wttfl .• Dim crtdl ihan the visit (1873) of tinShuh of Perns? "ir time when those remote, stately (but rOPJ humam officials who surrounded i the (Juocn-Wuti'w had so many If* It, or limn it under the table if did not suit his taste The Shah usually had his nie.il-. in private and on the carpet. If trttGerman court was shocked "by lite Manner in which Uie Soab consoled himself for the middle. Melt the yeast with absence of bis herein." BueklrUt* warm milk nnd form a am* i'alace was unlikely ppslUu. especially when It place. When you BATAN Flour 4 oc. Butter or margarine 3 ux. Sugar 2 or. SulUna 2 OX. Milk 1 glass. Eggl. Yeast (Dry) 1 package. Put mg bowl and put the yeast r\ > jane**, doctiir* claim. i %  p treatment was widch. ir your motner. madam, lost _** f^JSH, 'fX!****** her flcurr ufttr you were born take special care to watch your weight when you have a baby. The liability to put on exeeaaive weight through motherhood denniteJy seems to be .nherlted. This warning lo mothers-to-be bit of the flour in a mix>< Jilv.-, by lh-. Jekn Rk-btrabaM. the ni *' Thomas f Wo r.inipraxt. Is YOU* BABY an "oral .•.•.ust" He Is if he puts his rattle in rus mouth an.i bites It, aecorxllng to a new dictionary of payroloKical lerms. '"Vii'rpetrated so much tongue-twisting niumbo(uml>ol. .-;v ihitt .i iirufcjuor hag thouglu it neces-ii. t.i write a •.mail" (316 |>>ni Dictionary Then put It in a buttered cake tir ind bake it In moderate oven. i not.oi-.vi i tAKfc 1 CUP .Ufc-i %  i mp oi buttttr. i large tablespuonafui of co When all problinis I.I daal .Mtti. and *o few became known that the Shah had iM starting to break up you ki precedent: to help them.' telegraphed to Constantinople to that it la ready. Trur. than bad been six years end on two Georgian slaves. Add the real of the flour, the befuic. the State visit of the SulAfter the n alarm!, the vtoll butter or margarine, the sugar, the tan of Turkey which cost the went off splendidly, the only m(lk the egg and the sultans Palace £8,822 Ms. llkl., Including trouble being to get rid of the work the dough betting. It up twelve quart* of cau de Cologne Royal visitor, or to entertain htm yntu it la soft and smooth. Put for the royal guest and his suite. wn ,'!f. ht f*"*." 1 fc the dough again in a bowl in The visit of the Shah was likely ^ffS^JJl.f^ !" ^i S 5? w !" •P* %  fmW kitchen and to be innnitely more compucateo. J !" '** 1 .^Jff* ln h, ',u "?" : **" w for nbou, I0 %  ** %  • But thee was no escape. It was ^*" >Wly !" n thjpart ol the price ihe Uucen must h* lam J b rUln ., **?***< * %  JJ [or • meat Wc l Victoria's Court, it is „.. ,-. Oriental potenUte. Yet thei* means the only sidelight it throws wore mwiiwuu when her patience %  %  ^• %  lll 'ea era. wore thin, sue asked her CompWhile Europe quivered undci iiolki iiriubly why the Shah was l " impact of Ihe Franwc-.lled imperial." %  Because he l* Prussian war, Uie Lord ChamberShah-in-&iiah," was the answer, lain was worried because Lord it gave no satisfaction." Thai'* no -Stanley of Alder ley propoaed to reason her aiajwty retorted. "presesU" hu wife, witb whom he The Foreign Office tinally reported was said to have lived before thai the Shah was net 'imperial." marriage. Lord Stanley replied • that rumours had been spread by The Persian monarch made his "the unnatural malevolence'' of way to London by Moscow and his family. He had been married Berlin. inquiries sped acroafl at Algiers before Mussulman Europe. Was it true the Shah witncbse:-. La4£ Stanley was was bringing three wives? Would admitted to the Palace. BxSBS'RifiJ' 'S? £ i— i.. !" '. •< ojjrvaaVBs u, so m ,n. orlnk wine or, like other Persians the affair of Dr. Horsley Osklns, prefer spirits and those of the Chaplaui-ni-Ordinaxy. who took strongest kind? Doe* he sleep on to drink and ran Into debt at the floor or in a bed? Does he Buxton. When he pleaded freeon chalraf'' aom from arrest as a l/ueeu's It turned out that "the ladies" chaplain. Prince Albert insisted had been sent back from Moscow, that the Queen should dismiss the The Shah would sleep in a bed errant priest Hospital. S.E fter a tudy of 40 young wives who did not regain their figures to be bell which you put In a warm ^'^i' bn\ing children that ihr hull Curve-conscious moth.-is should of csychoii— %  not relax vtgllence over thew So that you • an test your famllweight until at least three months mt9 e/tUI the r-nsuU lng -room after their babies are bom. the larjon 1 give ten more typical octor srarns. Many women whu term* from Ihe professor's list of gain no excessive weight while nwre than 4.600 Hi* defsmtions having their babies begin to put %  ** *veo st the foot of the R on soon afterwards coluinti. Most of the fat forty were T-t yourself What is meant •dightly overweight before having l — Iheir babies But pencilalunnes> %  > Aerophobia. (I) Orapho^ no guarantee that a woman will mania. (3) Jehovah complex. M> not lose her figure when *he hss Lo"*in-glaa -elf (ft) M.m<^hchadren In'e'•> HWlera, (1) Parapraxls. Son* women seem to be bom <> IVceetophobla. (•) Strabla.light weakness of the mometer^lOi /oopsls \\l -lls.rHl.BU A Ce !" Ltd-i itore with eviTythint f--r npKisU; MEN'. A %  %  %  .tut TrojHcaU and %  %  highlights the cloth> nee from >43i for two1 ssssls Very seaart taal-< ate the CON-' LATV I*OPLIN striped and ..un colours. English Socks in ,Q Lisle and Argyle Wool. Liberty ire Silk Tie. and Bow Ties and l ftj Wool Ties all provide a M and beautiful choice %  .n. %  Shepherd's known UiroughiHit the West ndlag by ihie who travel, and b> I m prefer good clothes IM.'.IIMI \ H\MM BAFT I'O.. there Is no • it her store quite ike this, white the faxuialins at-of-.l.-n tropics Is brtmght Tght m side Have you seen n'' i '••e*Bs**ftffu| Grass MaU inaikte CM pel the floors, rainon splashed baskets In myriad rupee crowd the wall* and Straw ind llaffla work twth original and *cliiaive. lines the counters MHiunica's hospitable Ira Dangle%  TI win Introduce you to her cool ind delicious fruit drinks • • s Y. DE LIMA'S VIIXLAOE' ilAYELLCKY SIHIP in llalmoral • ap a box of magMwheuprice*, ir the same as in the town shop I ffondsjrful Tbaw Rings. Watches i both Lilin and Men and un.i-lh attiaitive and practical lunniimmwarr — (a Vacuum 'l.i-k that kee|is water Ice cold %  %  I throe days) — and so many < at i r.i.live decora live keni V IV lama & Co, Ltd, np well known for their Evening the -.election in the 'li*Shop i> not t<> be mechanism which controls uppeAWflWBBS: (1) Dread of high lite Thia mechanism is thrown Places U) An obsessive urge to badly out of balance when they write. (3) IdentltlcaUon of onehave a child aelf with God. (4) The impression In certain cases women gel of oneself obtained from the overweight with their first baby, opinions of other people. (> but get no fatter with subsequent Smelling wit* on* n-strll only. Beat all togelhei blended add; 1 teaspoon! J. of Starch cornflour. children. Others put on weight 1 cup of sour milk (' cup Readily with every child if they milk and 1 teaspoonful of do not curb their appetite vinegar). Aa a special warning Dr 1 cup of flour. Rchardaon quote* the ease of a i cup of bulling water. woman who weighed seven stones Mis well again, put In a butterbefore she man-led. After having ad cake tin or pyres in not too hot sag children she weighed HMi ndvertased* Tsstj -inj for : AQIATK I \U MlNt. > VlCfc(Hh. 44fll under the capable Oirectton of Mrs. WiUfcM ail your Party cares aw< >• u wni iiotntng lo do but to in• •te your gu< I iSa-ulwKhe*. ftnvorMi China Glasses, Cutlery AND DRINKS il >on wish, togethci with llullei ..nd Maid service "• yours fur a MI. tiny sum per head^— you'll reaLly be %  %  > phuiie about it AIK' you can order taslefulty prepared luncheon boxes, too. RITZ STOEE haioi sssTsssI I innte one of Hie most pk-asing Dri li'Hxls Ston- :n Town. Tin sv-k i always interesting -deqiiently %  TerxMit, h-k TrontceJ Suitings f.i $3.00, 50 an wide and TMnU fri'm Oflc. Then there are Sports Shirts from iWLY S. Bl Wind eSJgH .. ;.:i;tci ,'..'..I. I.uill.' ih <-. brassieres and so much is -i irkling sad now that it's a delight to shop here—at the R1T7 int. isiff) witli no parsdng problersal I CO-€>P IX>TTON FACTOEY is l-tesssntbitf thla ws-.'k oi its show,,. ni Uie nwt pleasing of CulUry ii true Sheffield quaHtj 4denl fn a .Wedding Gt't' AndCaerb. ovMXian Clear 1'lain Glft^ i ainpogne 8h> i Ll tucur M D. nicr SetIhftl %  ploje oi pi .-es These, too. >•> m Gifts, deal >-u b earth h^irihenv • I etc are man loektail and e. also) and :i\ *Hpui' epLa cmem uggesi Wen'iv -. %  Down ure \lixinc and varied IR1ENTAL STORE un ihe coi of High St is jam parked li rich Oriental Cargoefeaj these Hand-carved Indian Coffee Table-. BxotlC Silki down: ,i | Pylori | VI 4 (mm Cairo in all COtOUl I tlnna and designand ftUeej Filigree Jewellery and Hinssware, b> autrluUl worked and extremely di-eorative And in Hie modern I n .-liner there iSil\rr Plated 1 Waro—Knives, Forks and aHssOM I C, S PITCHER CO., is where ou'll Pit'.J .dinost evenUnng In .nitwrue when vou want ii—and Ut meana l..t I 1'ltrhrl's are nssently ssvowlng thotr new Valor 'o\. \l..del* itnludin* the tricky Use Table Mo-ieU of one and two 11 Ovnti langlnK lirough small. Medium and Laree o meet the two ami ihire Burner M "in *ee the Mirror* he way, lecatitly FORT ROYAL I.ARAC.i: There's a new asslpmtnl ml Bornsv oie told %  w.ii were h-iking fort li Convertible At. vou lleie'Ml west of lh. dinky Morris Minors In Green* nee and enh ?i0 T" and ibui %  Door Minor Sedans and the larger Oxford rnsikfl up an excellent variety ot Inodeb and coioui Inndeid.dlv 1 U %  i. m two (t) l-Vans lefti enenklruj new and ready for the! road now. They're the smallest! +f^ You've dreamed of bgsjmnsuT curves... and ihr I.e.nit (fill lift of maidcnjor//is Maiilruelte j flumes get a wonderful %m from nUklwiofins ntftlft% anetia' DeJntT vet o eiirrrasjaaToillng. Maideiirtte" gives fftnerb suppoii sssd figure sep•ratlea. Come choose yours nsnarl In vour favorite fabrics. flsssales Uaidenform bras> fc mr• made only in the States of America. at a r= ass •vary type of fcgure. deM ailnble ICING 2 Tablespoonsful of butter. 1 cup of IclOg sugar. It tablespoonsful <,1 cocoa. 2 tcaspoonaful of strong coffee. Mix the butter with the tdU ugar, then the cocoa and finally nnd ait on a chair. A" good fireQueen Victoria spent more than dd tne lwo teaspoonsful of coffi work display would be very* a-3.000 a year on clothe. Whether acceptable. she got value for the money ma> • • be doubted In view of the account After the Shah's Berlin visit of an opening of Parliament given the most unpleasant news arrived by Mr. Anson, gentleman ushei In London. His Majesty's followers "After one smile, her countenanci did not pay for what they orderrelapsed ir.to that peculiar fixed ed in shops. Their "encampment" look of melancholy. I think she In the Royal Palace In Berlin nad wore a purple dress Royal left "disastrous" effects. Worse, mourning. A pleaiant change." the "free and easy manners of the The drainage at Buckingham Shah, not yet accustomed to the Palace (which led Into the rain society of European ladles." had pipes), the palace dusters (always given offence to the Prussian royal disappearing), the Windsor Castle family. Nobody had dared to tell chimney-sweep (who lived with the Shah that he should not grab an undesirable woman)—out of a chair until the Queen was seata thousand trifles Vera Watson ed. or take her Majesty by the builil* up a picture of a court and elbow to make hei get -p. or put Its queen. A book easy to read. Pour Into cake tin (a large gu his Angers into the dishes, or lake -md to iky down. moderate oven. VANILLA CAKE 2| cupa of flour. 4J teajpoonsful ot baking powder. >1 cups of sugar. 1 tab!.spoonful grated orange rind. i cup of butter or margarine. || cup of milk. Beat for two minuteuntil the batter is well blended and glossy then add: 1 cup of milk. 3 eSfis and 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat for two more minute Expectant and nursing mother* who srant to keep slim should weigh themselves dally. Those who find they are suddenly putting on extra weight should report to their doctor, for diet treatmen' Tkey shoaM net attempt lo pul theaaeelves en a strict diet without medical supervision. Dr Richardson found that overweight women have subsuinOal-y itillbom babies So stn ; dieting under doctor's orders wUI not only help you to recover POUT figure but give your baby a bettei chance. TO COUNTtR csviHrotton'* newest ailment, nervous breakclown due to Incessant anxiety doctors are reverting to nature'* oldest remedy—sleep. Over-worked men and women who Just cannot spare the time for three months' rest are being given a Rip Van Winkle treatment with hypnotic drugs. During a five-day sleep br< ke only for taking liquid food pau-nta lose their irritability and (8| The will not to do a given act, <7> A slip of the tongu. i>en. < ft) Morbid fesr of sinning (01 Instrument for measuring the i of squint, (10) Hallucuiallon 'aking Ihe form Of animals 'A Dictionary of Psychology bo James Pnwr (Penguin. 3i Foot Itch Healed in 3 Days %  I....IM l. .Mraesoui ii,.,.,...,. li l I Ml rid of lh. II -... %  .%  thing >. %  M hv-'> • .1 "-•'. I I '. < J|'C !SafihMTs. *---'l .1 %  nei *i "<• uv IMI i-npl. ** %  !•. I To livvp thul H paJCJmi apiMtintitfi'nt Thii Is Ihe punctual friendly clock thai reminds the world of it* appointments—a VICTORY Smith Alarm In cream. Mue or green cases with plated tilling.. A Ml-hour alarm elml with 4 inch dial tarrying hunrMMM spots. Also available nun-lununous Briii.li prsa rn son-rrssdebySmiihsI oahsh /locka ltd. £rrutnf//ahm3 HARD TIMES i WITH BACKACHE Ofssn esw la ftTg fg ftt ts sss f e ha. k faans v sod feouus. hisabsgo or moui-m urioary disorders due sa duggidi kidney scdoa. Why pui up with ptlo and dla* camion whrn you iniahi p< luope rchef I-Y tshins DOBIIILMH K.lisrr Pdiv They srknulair and iuggi>h kideers and as hcJri UVm to nd tbr hknd of noass un. ecid sad other InpurtKS which oihersnse might colltit ia ihe v


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M \li\l Vl-Rll. *. l*St si Nli.W ADVOCATE rAGE TUBES Fasten' Your Seal BeltsFarm And Garden B,B £^ d!o it. 6. Iff. WHEN a producer win. %  imputation for originality and imagination po> ll Ml tauVetfJ with a director noted for his Ingenuity, the result should be good entertainment. Add to this top-notch stars and the result may very well be PHONE CALL FROM A-STRANGER In 1 the film starts at the Globe theatre this week. Emotional conflict and exciting drama are fused with considerable skill In an absorbing, intelligent %  ad unusual filmBy clever use of the flash-back. IMtwtor Jran N>rule*co tells the on *"* f v * %  beautifully sen: ftorlaa that comprlst the Uxr .P**.* 01 "" 1 ""?* .However. (By AGUCOLA) THE PAPAH—II Htclth facts Series DO YOU K"*OW 9 HOME SEWS ERUM BRITAIN Now i:i...i.U.'Nt tu these two extremes. The male' flowers are borne on However. I J on *, droop 1 "* BB^s-^^sss "--{KiP^S r5KL.? few reel., the picture works up an <' •'"> of her own seems tote" the ^TSL^lJLtLLt u ', In the beelnnlng with ever* o: "what incredible My other trees apart and ddrereotiution mountini tension and exciternildsm U the makeup which apmust wait until flower* appear g| peared to me to be overdone towhen it is neces sa ry to remove thl storv of four atrwiger* J^** -1 the end of the film Prior to moat of the unfrulting 'males'. If who are brmignt together by j !" '•" %  ln JP''* characterplanting THE papaw story would be incomplete without reference to the flowering habits of the plant It is well to understand these as they pity an important part in the .***"' 3 *-S2* CSBMBT /ntle culture and productivity of the tree. Individual plants ,'.. (( ui t .' HBC'I General widely in the matter of sex. Normally, the flowers are pfiftm Service beamed to this unisexual; there are. therefore, 'male' and 'female' tree* area. As a result of requests fro* but in addition, there are all sorts of variations between ii nera n the Western He. has been done on any \riru are (jroujjiii n;ntHT ij , J.J;, j —--— %  — w— -— — — -— Tine WCiiner in ,-h.nrr. Thr.* ..f (Dm have '", '.'>,"V oe "' l neceniar""to.." I""* 1 !" ***•'? 2"* out <* plan,, thai reached ;. lun.li po.nl In their "' >•"* • %  ' h '> • -male' to every II 'female, Bui tmrr ,,' r!£ Garden Hints For Amateurs "GENERAL REPOTTING" As was said In a former week's this time of tiw vear. advantage should be Uken of the tine weather to do imy potting %  eesatarj m lives, while the fourth has lived with tragedy for '.en years. The ilrst Is a lawyer, who me* lapse after ears of mam ecorui is a strip teaser whose dream of success on Broadway has faded iind who hopes to patch LIB bar marriage which was Charles Laughtoti'." Louises first ..(most wrecked t>v her motheremployer who want, m-law. The third la a doctor hrr; Agnes Moorhead, guiit" unent: variations in the j^ woalm r ^ SVS arss-j: z ^emrSfSSSi p^?Tp4u-sSi45 %  vnose has i drink and the last js, wclurn is Cyril Cusack who %  l..*-shop A Ht-t. n iii-hr, a moo* Irish ac-*l is thoroughly delightful marry wealthy uber Thus, while some trees will unless it can" be done .ukrfer show a preyondriuncc tt mule' shelter flowers and others of female'. The first shing to r there are still others b .utg blwhen doing this job is sexual or complete .It-wars in the pet* CM., and dry which both the-male'and'female' ami ,n them the elements are present. A tree may thev are pots Dial have bean have a very few of such blossoms used before, and, If they arc new In its flower population or it may poU soak them for some lime bewoman who engages Ix u h vr maR yu ••*** u ronitantly fore Icttinr; ahem d for Joan Blondell who neglects * te ' t ,d from well developed trees use. ying a large proportion of blBeside* having trie pots ready .wnig ""dais snd If the trees are otherhave taw aaflttssj mixture ready est enigma of Bhem .ill. On the her son for eight years with LouUIBe t T 00 1 tratn, it is possible nlao, be tt mould, mould and plane bound for lx>n Angeles. nccne 5 her of kldnapolns him m a tew generations to obtain a "iianure and charconl. or a reauU made the confldi.nl. „ nd Don Taylor, an earlier charge* s,t:,,n Producing as many at M >>>r mixture that is u ed for all give excellent performances P** r ccnt * bisexual or complete 'rrns. Whatever it u have it and the suoporting cast leaves "owenr. Obviously, it Is trees with ""ivenlently near the pota, and huraeter that are the most ne P'ant< in he potted, so that there wilj be the least W delay in setting the plan their new rtnv %  to S!* ^t I !" !*."!"* "*T hCT hiw ,or &f r ie ca>eer; carrying lan who proves to be the greatAudrey Totter, who after leaving SC1 (*' and> hen the ill-fated ship crashes ne is the only %  urvrvez at the quartet. He detemines to do ail nothing to be desired he can to eongOtt the suniving One last word-take a hankie productive and the friut t w SSSS Kr d J hr ^f h iJS w,,h >" ^"U •' 'he best quality. Furproblem.s. he finds the Mfctfta (no f th(|( ( ld stttcliort „ ,„,. Slu,Uv Wmters tu. !" in the ^^L^^SSStn 211FSriS£2^& best perform:.!^ of her career as CORTELl/> MEET THE Kill EH f !" "J? *SI^.SJ. !" ^ the show-L-irl. whfla Gars MerBOltlS KARLOFK l have 2 J? and nelghoourhood Fortimrifl and Mi.h.i n.n-iu .., the Man 5 bi.V i^,n u U e ! th2 mMy< nmt ^ • etectl L h J n BO > o.nuiint of mine la r^s!IS many instanc.-s. m >;-si m dramatised versum of mw S*''** of the lle.itnx Potter tales Ml* 1 have dH(ghlel l-r pxlni. nervuuanaM, M k"••• %  nJ II>M of manly vigour are eaeaa F Sy a Shtaaaa of i>rr.a SN "lanj (a van iin|v>iani %  •! ataad la Baaa>. To evarvoaM thaa* Iroublaa -i ti-ur* an.l gnlrhly rsatora """' an.) Daallk. laka Ik* aae •fianfin. ,|iav,>..ry rallvd Soaoa. ^'* mnii-r hnw li i.| Ten haa *ui t*ia.l HoBana U foaraaiUeS la SM veu riahi. rMnvlaorata rar rTaelata .lland and n.aka you faal H to %  year* "una>r nr n-rti bare. OM ftoaax. rr-.-i, tfH r .h.n.i.i TSs S WITH CASHMERE BOUQUET FACE POWDER • Sett taMvred • Delicately p''v*J • ;m--. Seeewsl *sce *swde j -ai a IO'I" trriaaei fa^isn • Clrfiga 1-gKlly, .-.-'. hw take the precaution the mixture used ting three or four seedling., broken crock* of -mail .tonea ._ a hole to ensure having at least must bo put ,,, ifce hi.it,... ,.' ih„ ,-MII.H the film. ?*%  hieation. This is now folholr? should be two feet wide, of %  high t., illW fw Dav i.m'a wile plants have been s unfonunato that real the tth lnst WBHW Wakett's verse play aim i> iJeriner" wasi broadcast town for HM second time was not U d rathgood as it was last December bir .-.mkage on Sunday 20th. you'll have a chance—reception permittingof hearing another play by . ""' ,h West Indian. This is 'HaseshY or *f> raUui extracts from it. by Roinr f Jsmslca. Tho play Is proles high. Shade and water new growth has started after !L K "SSl T. y "a? !" f a few *.ya If necessary which .her can then be Suf ty !" t* %  no *" t ,' % %  %  — %  Nod ds after treatment, manwherever .ie|re.l x \ w who ' %  ''"'"" %  ' m,,, > -maleiir (n : T E ,r ', T. hhow r "* Vhort""tlm;:*iheg7ri l S ^ues she is pregnant. Unable I'vSrtlh " t0 C mmh tor "•"• *• !" W. The tree S most 7o nature"who rTariT^hVui „r . tr,e ^ kMl htr ". ""* her vigorous during the first 12 or 18 £ Music and photoemphv are Of law *^ U P by ;i .vlmllnr typo of film. ood depth and prepared with u after th, .i high standard and by way of l?li,, ' r

-s the blame (or i K h, I nets— %  '-* %  *—•--%  — frailta-.v i.ui one folio avsdllne arsgiag .squarely on them for liruea of the charat-u-i aiUl HM the parent's shoulders. As regards sfter treatment, manwherever desired eivleliori ih:it urlng is not likely to prolong life INCKr \SIN'f; wiiii inru sl1 "" "' J.'NI.M. and was to forglvs aU." Titp %  *•** H tmglenliy .simple, but does Increase produrtivlty. Pi avVV ntVM awarded a British Council ache ITwo adolescent a fall in love nnd Organic nitrogen seems to bo esW i>, u -' J ', ,? '' '"" ,M, > eBrt %  'Haaaeur ,1. peclally desirable and, therefore. __"/. ',' J d V^fu R"*""* "** **'H %  'on the air for U.e full h.df liberal use of stable msnure .. ,7 ooasiWe t Iw A ;! u,k,n n "* *?w f 'Crll>lean Voices* on %  T T.. *fr* ""* oppo-luiuty .v.imlii>. 20th. iiiat. commsncliig mcreaM' the stock of plants. ..'. the regular time of 7.15 p.m. attempt W frustrated and "she""], months and hf not likely to re"^Z aSar?ii th. ^*r B o'-. Um ? ."-'i 1 3l ,vXr ? b *" M,t poiSng. "heart-wa nm^' dram.^ ;' nal,v Uke "V "^ after msk, ta profltobW bearlngmore ,hese ofT-shoot.-Tre take,, .Tth.. *** m l i ^* m * 1 c ''^l__ make, no ntlerrpt to d.sguise or l M hp p vent Generally speaking. I than three to four years. When a lllothPr pU nt. and put in S. of mollify the tact ihat it is a "tearOo no, ,J hink lh human values are Htf* %  *•* srown ao tall that it^ Is lh elr own the better, for the off"hey dlMike to be planted loo jerker %  in I'm L WrlUng, scUns and ."" weU portra >i' d ..'" thui Rlm """full to gather the fruit which .shoot will develop much more **•> In fart many people conillrcctloii are all Reared to extract '" Bob Ana Sally". Tho char•'" %  t Una time, tends to get quickly when in a pot of its own ,rt r 'hat thev flo'.T much betthe maximum emotion from the %  ** %  ,,f lh ' prudish mother Is "mall, cut ofT the trunk to abou". It Is sometime* possible to do x r when the plant Is well grown ledication of in ageing nursemaid over-drawn to such an extent as t,,re ' above the ground. Thi. this separating without disturb,H|1 * lh e ground. to her lon line uf borrowed" ,rt be almost unbelievable while w,n encourage sprouts to form; ma, the old plant, but it may be When planning a bout of resons and daughters. the fatherthough all in favour leave two or three strong ones found necessary to take up tho Piling this job so necessary to of knowledge being Imparted to ""^ and these will bear fruit like mother plant in order to get the the propc 'he mother-plant in a short time, off ahoot off rleanly with Mime IH often d It is good practice to protect the roots ;itt.uhi-d. Another %  ut surface of the trunk by coverIncreasing Anthurlum plants li ng with a piece of tin. m the case of an old plant that nas grown up with roots out of —^^___ ihc potH. to cut It up. This la done in this way. Cut the old through ignorance and social plant off level with the mould Lady-make sure... donTyou: guess 1 UseLISTERINE* ...its the best/ The rtory begin? back around htl children^ is weak and~ule}reryoung war widow lUBlt rtfu ing to ukv ^ share of responsibility In the matter. The a school loses her baby load decides to devote the rest of her life to looking •ime. jobs are not too easy to get yU"sters who take part give and she has become greatly relh *' impression of normal, natural ilueed in cirrum^nnres. The end'"^b school kids tig b deflnlWty '.cntnii.nial, but 'heir various mlos with sincerity it Is happy ard the obvious one nd naturalnesb. for the picture In a film of this kind where lit„ Tne e "f 0 n 5 jp 1 "n**"'" 1 %  Ion lakes place, acting is of r *n ""• nhn w i. i c h are • upreme importance, and the cast graphic and may shock some m "The Blue Veil" is a strong one pMpIl They not only tell the Ixtuiae Mason Is played by Jane story of normal body functions, Wyman. It is an 11 ;ind l>ut depiet the ghastly ravages Miss Wyman plays it with diltincwrecked on the human body 11 idell i Upkeep of the gaixii ayed. or even put off becMMsn* of the nunince of gt tt] i Bower pots, nessal i.liui ,i rlMiice encounter saw] a fhiwer-pot ruiwker at the loor or a visit to the Bridge A here these pots are sold. But the flower pots made at up the mould, manure and lr Lancaster Pottery are better ih-v'irforin A 'orthright. utterly frsnk pk*"ter it and the plant will soon xh n thoae. and far easier to get, \Jiih JiTHt ,urc P ul iing no punches, it tells "Pring again. Then take the if Pitcher's stock them, and 11 its atory In a manner which will P loc *' 'hat ha* been cut off nnd )" means never be forgotten by anyone who ~5* il "P .diagonally in bits of sees it. Though no definite age limit has been mentioned tor those who aee this lllm. I am under the Impression that twelve years of age is the minimum. STOMACH PAINS DUC TO INDIGESTION Try full ONE DOSli of MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH PnvtWH I .:. %  u.-nutkally balanced formula quickly relieves Stomach Pi 1'latuleiwr, Heartburn, Na or Acidity due to IndigmioD. ibout an inch thick few mots attached. Plant of these in a separate pot. each piece should five a plant. phone K. AI.I.KYNK AKTHI'K. W. A. MEDF0SD I'KRKINS & CO.. STAIRT & SAMPSON I labtaT] M.irmuladi^ Slrauborry Clreen Fin I0e. :ie. Ma. Per l-lb Claas Jar Uf ONXY A LIMITED QfANTITV AVAILABLE GET Mill.-, TO-DAY I .'/ll, • I IM trine Tooth I'liitiicooipoufrdKl ol SKM* than 14 i .r.lullr Mlttisd ia .n.lirnn, |>ir, iil* KlI^Diril IO Bl" I.IB numiiiuim |-iliOnriiniJlUinin( iiwl I nii-iinr 1 I-I li I'nir Iriiti (i,.r „,.-,hl.-l."4ir..ll,U.sM-. 1 Tr V ii tods, I Here's the NEW ENGLISH ELECTRIC refrigerator • Bringing you Better Living! holds the greater boon it will be. The new English Electric Refrigerator offers | :— • Meat Keeper Extra Bottle Spacv Choosmi: %  refrigerator needs careful thought, particularly if you have never had one before. But there? are two vitally Important features which ore very easy to spot and which you ohould always look for. Thai f.i rt a quality of workmanship, for "n this depends the length of trouble-free service your refrigerator will give you. And the second is capacity, for the more your refrigerator an THK imW MOnEUS SOW aW SHOW AT THE CORNER STORE Automatic Lighting Humidrawers for Vegetables Silent Running Quick Adjustable Shelves Extra Large Storage Area.



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tuttan l MHcutt ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS. A PRICE SIX CENTS The Democrats Are Assessing Harriman Economic Conference Successful (By HARRY W. FRANTZ) W ASHINGTON, April 19. Democratic Politicians made swift appraisals of the qualilli'ation* uf W Awi.'ll Harriman. Director of Mutual Security, following President Truman's tribute to him as a patriotic and able American ei11.-. Chief speculation was whether Harriman as a northern states "liberal" could attract wide support in the west and moth. Itcpiihh. :. %  politicians speculated Dial the eleventh hour 'boom" (or Harriman woi States foreign policies MOtatlon. Truman's generous remarks regarding Jlarriman occurred at a % %  mice, one day after the wilhler holiday visit In Trinidad and the Carib" %  nib.iin. With Mrs Uebling, he Is taking a MniMb look it this part of the world aboard the "Alcoa Pioneer" MOKI.i> Iff AIMS None of the mna Mr. Liebling is well known in Nrtne * thl r,iriai ">'>8 Demopros, crreto. Htt aTJlclS.nl£: crate "*• <** than HarNEW YORKER under the heading of "The Wayward Press*' have made him Internationally kiie The folblea (( f modem newspaper doni arc his specially. It may be aald with reasonable •nut he il| <|o a pie.* on the press of the Caribbean, He left Timldad with an armful ol local papers and a fleam in hit eye. Questioned as lo the future of theCaribbean in general and the Commission in particular. Mr, Uebling was non-committal "I am'' he said, "too relaxed with Caribbean sun. sand, salt water and scenery to have a really has had any extraordinary exparstnec in world affairs. Truman's friendly remark* about Harriman Were Interpreled %  I experts htra as meaning that the President would look with friendly eyes upon Harrimans candidacy but were not regarded HI a direct endorsement of his nomination. It is not expected that Truman would make a {.tatament Of pivfcietn...ndi dates before th* ( Democratic Democratic convent i mi. The situation at tho Convention will depend upon whether New Yrk state ~ as their favourite son." TIM extant of probable support sjsa-ta STUL rsis r=^,^!r J?J: By W. A. K.-li; , LONDON. April l. IftfOriBed nun 'sponsored international economli i which just ended in Moscow has su) Sot n ihe iii itish deletfaUee concluded deals with lomsnuni-i total lng some $70,000,000 th. I no.000,000, ihe Belg..T > SI0.00O.OOO and the Italians 180.000,000. The Chinese t'ommuni %  • Scout, of me ..land will ... 22SJ? SflJ 5E WsdnsMio. Anrii -:J nisu.nmi.oon Numerous lesser ill sen conclu.1 ,1 litiorn. \ OUiST rsttoo ... beld In 1K.H Al Ihe IwKinnlni; ol Irte <-nlSrM V Nrafoanv. rhalrnisw Th* Ai-ostlc Sport, and Mm.n*' s %  Chamlvr of Comir Farnuui For Finland Fund FUND has beea started to defray tho expanses of Ktn Farnuni at th Olympic Games in Hei-.ii.ki nest Jaly. Ton can help In bring the V*r-t ladita highar in tho aporttnn Uiuellgbt. Send your donations to th • Royal Bank of Canada, Barclay'i Bank, and the Barbados Advocate. *....i ^...u.o, .\tis,i-(|rd sew labl. VII.-! .. •nil. tios i ss TORCHLIGHT TATTOO ON APRIL 29 however, borrow words from fellow countryman who said something like this 'Let us hang together, as otherwise we shall certainly hang separately'. And as for fhe Commission, vhal better m e a n s of hanging together'. The Lieblings went on from Trinidad to British Qu Surinam. They will stop here briefly on their way bivk to New York. STOW WILL GET POST IN KENYA GRENADA. April 19 ter <;f Chamberlain Bridge and its axirroundinus. which Ladv Gilbert-Carter has presented to the Museum. The gouache was painted in John Montague Slow. .C.M.G.. lOflfl. an d Is a view from the Administrator i hMjCoMtllal Secretary's office. It. is a been selected for appointment to busy bUStllnjj scene bskton the the post of plrectorof the^estabpopularity of petrol driven The two-puwer mule Display at thu AqualuSaturday night is one of the outnandini features of the proIn the Torchlight Tattoo the local continue!.t of Seoul Democrats pnaanf iewnuj .ittended the Jamboree in Jamaica will put on the Pmt* ant of Hail>ados which they staged at the Jamboree. The programme is as follows — SM-IM a.m. Gesd Turn (imamlsa — with special .dtcntion to all who gave jobs in Bob-' a-Job Week. 11.00 a.m. Boy Seoul Charrh Farade Service al the Calhrdrsl Scouts, including Hover>. will assemble a' the CathasJrvl stainfaj by 103)1 a.m. Colours will be carried but Nat Slaves. Scouts are to hum. Hymn Hook, and -. 'Lcilleitlon. Special exhibition at l.0 p.m. Wolf Cub Parade ihe Museum is a charming Service at 8tAmbrose Church— gouache by Lady Gilbert-Car-1 ^ b 1 'S 0l ^^^ i ""' Chu,ch <.!•—.o p.m. I^iterf .Sports al Harrts-sa t allege — &ich Troop offered elgn tncrea-e SovtCI ft.i ide to $4,000,000 000 per stead of the maxln turnover cf SI.WHI.OOO.ftOO in 1944% —I'.P, ADVANCED COMMERCIAL CLASS PLANNED ARRAN will probably be made to start an .idvan Barbados Evening ln. tpmbrr tlu> year. Mr Si Clalr Hunte, K 1 1' S. id \rsti-rday. work, all ihe -Indents of a class at BMrt Contre which began m September. 1949, wi Shorthand in July. 1950 : four terms which ended] in I>eccmber ui ol 33 gp tod certiticates QUEEN'S FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Iro .hariges In T.C.A. Flights %  %  tttttUIUJ ll'cn %  I I H ednesdays, w ill days. waV of arrival pa I '.nc. b/T* ^ chunged. as loll%  p-r mil %  It has been Uic practice the studies -it itutfdlttl JO rr 80 word par minute Maite so thit new bo have reached 'he 1u tould i'e trained, :>ut it ;> now fell that an advanced clavs .snould be started to Improve the .lamuuj ami quaUsVatlon rf thot* 1 at 70 and tkl worda mtnute lltara will, necessarily, sii.l be the llisliiirlion* the :i.i peed cen even wan with UM u m ..n iv nan's Institute and hold cer1'ort Spaii, at 0,40 a.m. Sp.nn at Itiil-adifor Bermuda mi.i aionil 11.00 a.m. Thi hignt aoes not go through njb 11 Aral %  awing oil dotrn t.i servlea flight l.rieparthiK Montreal V 10 a.m AERIAL VIEW OF TRUCE SITE not yet predicted because Harrlmao did not enter any of the dale's primary elections. —I'.P. B'town Before! Motor Traffic | ON lishmcni .r Kenya Ha will be proceeding so the U.K. about thd middle o| Hay v uVoutar A. J il ii g. Thursday. 21th 4.3 p.m. Inter-Troop Boxing Ompctitlon at Modern High School. Kach Troop may enter 2 Scouts in each of 4 Classes — • On Page 14 Well Deserved Promotion The miny well wishers and lovers of mukic will be pleased U Cecil A. Archer '• verv difficulty to get Machine Co.. and clipping grass a Joh at Capt. G. B. Hunte. 1 also waa d l Or rionation in Boster'i Ma Ian .Woven Legislation Agiiinst Courin CAPETOWN, South Africa, April 19. The Nationalist Covet ninei.i vlll introduce legislation nexi ve k to prevent courts from with its racial MBaaaa. lor laws. Premfer Daniel T %  I > .; % %  eaders In the Assembly it Inter.d. to introtlu vi rslal bill sdn> or Wedneaday. 1 i Gavi nment drafted the er the SuprOnie %  .tu'lotial a i Bill removing persons of :iom the, general !'w„ oppoalUon United Party and Lnbour hav-forrietl a united front torch l %  nmando—an .,f 100,001) 1.1 l.p. 6,000 i;>>/>s Flour Expected ( II II. w:< ill l: a Band Cadet in 1920, and was Mt tO PolICO t lullowlng year. Normal promotion 1*!' 'la If not f the band has, eluded n the International Wh, %  soft winter wheat flour U 1ue t< arrUv In Barbados betw n thi %  nth and a MISSOURI FLOODS tlneates in some Instances similar speed* fruBi both examining bodies. A'IO successful ID psnriing tha 80 w tha wor kg ag speed retinned it uw Royal B Arts, Jiir:. Typist exitf.ii ihe AilClasa, Ograaa of the shot-thuno %  %  isxl-ted by then Ei hah In klemenUr) IhKik Keeping t!ui g weie I I pusses, which were with disllncliun hi i\ p. fining. 13 student gained L.C.C. cerUHcajtag (certiflCatg Ie>. Including two dlsi hie stgssVtit was uiuuc%  Ong student, Mlldeaur M >i.ih. rtiiulrea onl> to pan* I.C.C i .IK ir-is b* id,, end of '953 lo qualify for the award ol the "I..C •.< %  firoup IHploma' ai I% %  n i-i i Last Nwaaab i Maiah gained a dlatliu-Uon h her %  • words per minute L.t .< < xamlnaliari and alaa In type writing. Dg aie the best peed rs> suits of student* Mildenne Mns sitih " i"—i ti iaaJ T ii r ii l lnoiifii li 1.1 i ix-life* Cl,r... %  / I ii ..Fie ei. rfcs flo. ti'itM.ijorle Barnell and Wen(Una I'di-iiiit 7". Audi.-, Srinlii. Daphne Lagall and Joyea Wiggin 'i (Phnan 1 and Allrad nan and Wmified Wigging galnad dai in the 50 (L.C.C I %  iifl BJMU Ml f.n bui the < ii v aceom•teti i" >i H.innllori. Principal of (he al present mi leave ihe |'K all W H i ...hi Acting Principal, Mr. Dipaon teacher the Tvpe. writing and lt'.k-Keeping. Mr. '". ("Htiin Shorthand and Mr F A. Waterman, it A H,,r^gUsh 9m St'tlruls Stubs' IN THI PtST PUIUC eng-fement of her reign, Er-.gland'g Queen Eliiabath II walks past an honor guard of Yeomen after distributing "maundy IIIOIM>'' In Westminster Castle. These coins are specially minted, and this year there were 2—one for each year ef ths Queen's agt. Her head should have appeared on them, but there was inrufflrlent time for change and they bore the head of her father, King George VI. \<|tiuj.c hi-|il;i\ 4 •ardei. j'id it was no) 19th of Novatnlnti IMS '.alned the position of ;>g< in the band. • On Page 16 Pickled Pork Licences ELEVEN YEAR OLD Wendell Pilgrim of the tta Barbados James IUHI Scoot Troop writ*, of Us eiperienees daring Bab a Job weak which ended ye*terday. Pilgnai asked the Advocate lor a job", so as was given "an entry into Journalism" at an early age. .or g| C-i.-u-i. ." %  %  %  %  Will b, %  OBI quolations I %  '.V for ah.pnient In -.000-bag er.nsignmenl-. lo arrive late this t:.< nth. %  nig price has lieon flaed at SlOU per 100-Hi. bac (aVWl Currencv), InrJ i insurance exchange to" %, bank cliarg. charges. H.C GETS NEW SPANISH MASTER %  ih Mad.r Ml lose T.tnero. B.A from Oviedo Unlver^i-ain. He or: yesterday morning by lh< OasmW (r"m Pr.gland. Mr. Tornero who has been ing at Thlbault SAgriculture, Domm-!nve year.*, will also assist m the %  %  %  (pork fron %  %  %  • ii. h m .k dM m I "i,. m .t • .n i nearest Foot and Mouth I)i .I.-. The warninr was firrj issued m March when licence-, an siderahle en Canada. must lie issued hv the Veterinary Inspeetni partment teaching ol French. OMAHA. Nebraska. Aiml 19 Thu.ity'a laKlUMt.1ai area faced a new n„„, ihr-i.i earlv today ..fter the Watar prr-^uie from the U'RII. 2ft surging Missouri river blew up a The local Sea Scouts will h.dd '-* .-eweth.:r Annual Aquatic Sports and l "I surface Ma.lne Display o M Si.lurday, %  mere thrown ivw Apui M, off tha Aquatle Clubs A[ (ect into the air and rush wulei \n. %  'urate ot ,in Ilev W D \ i...i. FACTORY .NSPECTO* ARRIVES gga ttOg WtM has I I two-year eon• %  • yeaterdsy by Oafftte i and has i y residence at House. | Mr. Margettes was formerly *A IrKixvlI.r *if VTmr'tiHs"* I %  New Proposals >lade I'or Central Milk <>caniery Al.TKKNAllVK propogglg f..r the establishment .it a (Vnlral Milk Depot and Ocimri v which have I'-n | tu In principle by a majority ol local Milk ProdtlO still awaiting discussion at hiijh level. Mr. KrnI Vane told the Aalvorate yesterday. A committee i epiesent.itive <>f local Milk Producers drew up alternative proposals foil %  i -tmn in 11 is iiMtllfDcy UM Governor thai tho CM % %  ''be allowed to fall throuuh. I., .%  — % %  ,, %  %  .1 milk ,i era have now •ulrni vn| arc thai Oon should und %  aalvtna. proca aal ng and delivering tho milk to the etsnaUB i producers OD the other himd will %  si i in'lk -i elves' [ The lint scheme which. It I wa* lUgMBatfd, "hmild be run on IS abon%  BUVO S,.r 1 %  %  \ practicable for them t.. continue under the Bright .1 I', B.F.C PLANE DUE U MAY 2ND I The A uste. aiirrnf tor the oa Flying club left Kng.-de.d... le 'lie S S CraSI ter whleh u %  i Ive ui i Bai bad %  ot Mai tad -1 A majnbm ol UM i tub t.ii i lha • Advacate that the hangar for Uaf ei.nv itrueU eetad to I arrival ot ttw plane. Hunter In Duplicate .... It 1 uuldn i Happen Virata WATOH out for Manioc In £>UplicaU" by OLBNH OAkf Tals Is a crlBM -lory which will be run in tea Evening Advocata tn seven Instalments, roplaelng lha 'Tablan of tvhs Yard" sarlas. Tka Brit Instalment appeal* nsst Monday Don't Mian It KEG.STRA 1'ION DISCONTINUED Tha LabOUl D-paitinent will i.ntini.e |.n | ssVofl while tin r registrations for atnnloj' mem ..fter Mixiday 21st Instanl Thi* in oak is to enable th. Itegiktmtirsi Itureaii to bring it 1 records up to date. l'ntml area ull u i -itti i. undatloii If On Other l*agi k s Page 3 Carlb Caattaj 2 i in in i '.. rd.-nlnt M.III ; I i r m and i. ird 4 nH.kl-: ^il.Ilrhl. On Kparl. l.e.in.ll %  igirl S Vaehttni. WolgMliftius an<| ltod>bulMiix g Hewing f'lrrlr: Fmbroldery for th 1 s %  m m 9 r, afaa. < lirke'* I ..lumn. 7 lafsssj s, ir Hnmm: Voiir Haby And Vour Fliurr K Kdlt'irlaln: SiUIni 0a The Pea**; Linear Palkv la The IVX I 1 h People uf It irhi HlnUnn'i PasmBT 11 Ihe UVfa l H>rr> 1 | 11 U • 1 %  t'roasword: l*srtwarda: Max Trell's ISssri 1". < ami Strip-. Ift Loral New* Table Tennis: Sea and Air Trafhe H.M. Irupector of Tactortes. t You are on a WINNEn when you ride a Raleigh! A Raleigh was the gmMOl of Reg Hauls 1 Protei.nil! Spnnt (.haiip f the second year in %  occcvsi.n. Mere i prooi* of ihe wndsin of buying your bicycle from a CassamBj with sacg aaajg lechnjcal cspenen.* and kmmlcdic thai doigncd j and built the reivrd-broakfnB KALI KM& RALEIGH I THE ALL-STEEL A hWi V A*lMi lmtmitr.li ti-nesi I I C V C L E A CAVE, SHEPHEBD .-. en. I.in it, n, i2 : a i>r"ai s ai





PAGE 1

SUNDAY. APRIL M, 1S2 THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS WHITE SERVITUDE BY JOH \ PRIM \ t \ Sl'NDAi ADVOCATI PACI NINE The indentured white servant WM the nrst labourers In this Island, so they will be de ill with flrst. To uur modern way of thinking, the system of white servitude was cruel, became It •ubjected such larse number* of persons to a completed dinYrent way of life, which was exceedingly hard, laborious and in many ways dangerous; In completely different rlimate* and undeveloped and strange regions. Such persons were generally unfitted for this type of life, and were incapable of making a success of it. The extremely hard part was that once this type of life had been started on by an individual, there was no way of drawing back from it, also they were subjected to masters that ofhsn Ill-used and exploited them: even if the ultimate end was death. Death it usually was. for many did not survive the first five vearn and fifty t 0 tventv-fivp dirt of every hundred wWSe indentured servants died without having ever obtained decent chance of survival. It Is not that the rogues, vagabonds, and convicta who wore sent out would have enjoyed an easier time if they had remained at home; as some of trie poor wogld have been unemployed and be forced to exist on the miserable poor rates of that day. Also ihev were liable to hnve been pressed Into the army or navy when men were required for these services. No ma'ter how poor people may be and the risks they run • at home, to be picked up and transported to a strange land away from family and friends does not relieve the situation, ospecially ttihcn lhat transportation terminates in servitude for seven to ten years under a strange master and stranger conditions. Kedemptionecr There was tne redemptioneer, who sold himself Into some state of bondage for his paiiia.fi* and keep, so as to escape the conditions which existed at his home, and being attracted to the wealth of the colonies, the idea may have been that when he had %  Weed, his time, he may have a far better chance of attaining decent independence in the land of his adoption than he did in his own country. Every large plantation had rupervi.tors who were in charge iff the servants and saw that fchcy performed (heir allotted tasks; these supervisors were not notable for Christian charity. Th<_welfare of the servant, therefore, not only depended upon his own character and adaptability, but also upon the temper and disposition of his Immediate superiors IJgon wrote—"I hnve seen an Overseer beat a Servant wilii a cane about the head, till the blood has flowed, for a fault that is not worth the speaking of; and yet he mint have patience. or won* will follow." Ttils was "mure thn likely n product of the times at thv grentci? cruelties appear to have occurred In the earlier years of colonisation, for this enterprise called for the hardest types of pioneers and adventurers. These men and women bore tremendous difficulties themselves, and were unsympathetic to those who wore weaker than themselves, especially the unfortunate servant. These servants wore even Eihed if they so much as •d a* their labours. Llgon ds that as the island bel DM more colonised, and 'disrreeter and better natur'd men' came Into the control of affairs. there was a marked improvement in the treatment of servants. He sums the existing conditions under which white servants laboured In this sentence—"as for the usage of tihe Servants it Is much as the Master Is; merciful Condition* of Service Throughout the colonial period. nil white servants arriving at Barbados came under the following conditions of %ervice. Those of eighteen years or over served five years, and those under eighteen—no matter what age—served seven. The number of servants comin? to Barbados declined after all of Vie available land had been granted out to the owners and other servants who had served their time. The price an Indenture or convicted servant brought In the Colonies depended on two things—firstly, the current demand for labour In that particular Colonv. and seconrllv, the individuals own worth. Scottish servants were, highly es'eemed. and the Irish c.ithoHrs were despised; artisans and skilled labourers were alarays iti high favour. The Council records contain the following incident which gives some idea of the treatment of servants-. "Whereas by complaint made hj John Thomas, servant unto Francis leaver. H appearing on sufficient testimony that the said Francis Leaver together with Ensign Samuel Hodgkins, his brother-in-law. did inhumanlv and umfsristjjniike tomisv the say'd John Thomas by hanging him upon the hands and putting tire matches between his Anger*, whereby he hath lost the us* of %  everr.il joynU and in great danger to lose the use of his right tS.md. it Is thought tint and so ordered that the said Leaver and Hodgkins pay the said John Thomas within ten days 5.000 lbs of cotton apiece and that he shall Immediately be sett free from the sayd master and that the sayd Leaver lake a speedy course for the curing of the sayd Thomis. and pay the same and that the said Leaver and Hodgkins remain in prison during the Governor's pleasure. The case followed of 'two v.irleU having charged their master Captain Thomas Stanhope wrih the venting of unbecming speeches against Governor Hicks." To this charge Stanhope admitted that on the occasion referred to. of 'being undeniably drunk', and that he probably did UM the scurrilous expressions alleged' but upon further explam•lon the Mime servants "did fan* from their former dispositions" and being pronounced as "lyar-. also lewd and prophane livers were committed to prison with 30 lashes apiece. Captain Stanbopa • ift] o fM fag MMM during the Governor's pleasure for his unbecoming speeches against "the Bight Worshipful Serjeant Major Henry Hicks. Governor of this Island, whether at any time, drunk "r sober.'* Cruelly Richard Llgon. who wrote the first History of this Island, records that he saw In Barbados "such cruelty done to Servants, as I did not think one Christian could have done to another." (5) That was in the forties of the seventeenth century, but this cruel tri'itrnnt must have continued for many years after Litton visited this Island, for thirty years later, it was recorded that in Barbados the white servant* Wtn "used with more barbarous cruelty than if in Algiers. . . .as If hell commenced here and only continued In the world to come."(6). It was not only of the treatment icoetveti hy whits) servants on this Island that Llgon records. but also on the method of transportation from England. He records that on the same ship that he was voyaging on from England to Barbados In 1647, that he found many women to be sold as servants, the "Major part of ahem, being taken from 'Bridewall, Tumbull Streets, and such places of education. (") this custom appears to have remained In vogue for over a hundred years, tor It is recorded that even In the middle of the eighteenth century that It was the custom of some ship'* captains to visit houses of correction in Ctorkeatvell, ply the unf.trtuneaet female Inmates with drink and 'invite' them to go to the colonies. Gives Korea Views WARRENS LINE UP FOR VITTLES %  IL Bsssf asas! tfuPjd EaT* ^aana*^aaaal LsssK '' 1 assW :aWfft -aasi %  r A LBBBT • SJBBBBV. BBB^^BBBV 1 gssK'aasi Lsf ^ BBSSBSBSsC ^^Ma(^^ GOVMNOt EARL WARREN < f Ca,.fornia candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, hi* wile, and daughter, Nina, line up for canapes at a reception given in New York by University of California Club of Greater New York. Holding tray is M. C. Gale. (tnteraattoswU World Textile Slump Hits Lancashire EMIGRATION K* MO\0>IIST W. .nded our discussion Off be i Next, at what i %  n in in* shw scale must the warning that careful met or occupier seek off-thebeforehand woi* i be required a* !-•"<> wmk and I* such work alIfsjne* against failure of ways available to him and deptnd settlement programme dents? Are total Income resource* m conjunction with em.gration tfflcient to maintain a reasonable plans. It Is too early ft sMstftf <>f living? Among this tider what preparatory capital class a percentage may be dosirwnrks on settlement areas will ->us of emigrating. There Is a third a, necessary before their occupaH'-up which probably own hou-^ ti n. These must await availa%  >" plots just large enough t< hility and choice of sites. Furi" w %  *mature class. An. the establishment of quick growAnally, there u the growing num ng food and forage crops to pro?** OI > oun People on the Ihrc. vide a start for the ma.n body hold of thsur worKlng lie fo vide a start of settlers. Type body of housing to loch Iho future holds little Will have to be considered; pre"' Pt-*pU of ariasdng a horn ...i ....i m =„ .* ln with the population density as I By BONALD BOXALL) Tin .i uation in the textile taBsarl Ists today. Classified Informu l-ossiblg on each of thes' groups by planned sui • adequate samples chose __ in population centres. Only wit' guidance of this kind can we hop ier " ihl will nvor-thadnw' all else In guidance or this kind can we hop u". m '"'.KiL_ *'""*' li.Uoru have Men carried out I, fabricated units may answer. Local conditions in the areas chosen will naturally rc. „ ., _, _„„ quire close study. II is not too full-time workers and 200 parthowever, to begin con: %  s also left the mills, bring„,._..„,, D f ( hhuman factor Industolook* loss like a terning the total number — %  porary recession and more like employers' books down ti the beginning of a slump for against the peak of every day that passes It might reiiehrd In November. !" Tni^KUm ,n,r "' "' %  R,iS tigaUons have been carried be easier to agree with the leadThi* IDH .rf wofttsn would be inui P r "'" n other places, but they demani ers of the industiy' In their conless alarming, and even BasiraAt 'hut point, it may perhaps efficient organisation with pain* tcnlion ihat this is a trade ble. if it led to an automatic be lilting to offer a mat eomlaJklng enumerators under prope recession and not a slump if the increase in the number of emm*x\X on Mr. Godson's recent control There is plenty of tim difficulties facing Lancashire ployees engaged In defence and article where. If understood cort f i nc wor fc s begun now anal were not shnred by cotton Indusengineering export industries rectly, hi suggested in his term tarried out gradually, first tn srea tries all over the world. But, But no such automatic transfer 'beach-head' a few famil.es going selected by the Committee an. unfortunately, they are. 0 f labour is considered likelv totxh like the Maygewer pilgrims then eventually covering t h i Reports from all quarters tell As Lancashire industrialists ,0 establish themselves on unw holp island. It is not such a vas the same story. In Japan, where point out, many of the displaced known territory and then, by undertaking as might, at tin a decision has already been workers are married women with their success, persuading a larger thought, appear, since the prim taken to cut back cotton producfamily responsibilities. If they mlgrat< ry movement. In their Bry surveys should, we think, in lion by 40 per cent. the hwe their jobs In the cotton Induscase, of course, they were fleeing elude persons not over 40 years o announcement that Britain will try they might divide to give up fi^n\ persecution and almost In„g V> M y. It would seem undesir issue no further licences for the their employ merit altogether, ar.d evltable deathand were quite able to burden settlement* of thi importation of Japanese gr'y workers once lost in this way may prepared to face untold hardship, type envisaged with people win cloth precipitated a sharp fall in nevcr be persuuded to return. Many perished. This is not the have less than 20 or 25 full hard the price of cotton yarn in the W hjt f BCC1 t h e cotton industry caM to-day with the advances in working years ahead of them. I O ike. market. The price fell therefore, is not on.. i ivilisation which have taken n uy he argued that accurate in from the equivalent i ab,n M trade but also a loss of a urrva place However. WO could agree formation of the kind foreshadow pence per pound to 42 pence—a pruponiori of their labour forea] wllh him if it was a case of filled In these surveys will psov. The belief Is growing, moreIng vaeancM in already seltled difficult to secure as the averagover, thai the present r*c • rhemes, mainly local in their farmer and persons of his 111 which is generally attributed to application, and which would \ wvv no hooks. True enough, bu ged between the they have remarkable memorie .„ concerned. But „nd It is surprising what can Ining industry may have to redue? coun irics—may reflect something wh-re. as In the circumstances Hirltrd from them by the us* o Its output siill further. The cuinwrc tnan .^ B tempvrarj wi:h whleh we are dealing, land planned, ]i dieiously framed quetailmenl of 40 per cent it ll ,. 0;1 d|iistment on the pan of buydas to be drained and conditioned lions, followed up by skllfu feared, may prove an Inadeuua e „, n s f efcred lna t ome of our m blocks, piecemeal settlement eross-chrcks and careful analysis .', to the failing on or tr( |4|Uonal market* may have b v driblets of emigrants would c iose approximation to the fact domestic and overaeos demand ^^ (os( for (Vil fl ^ practirol. Queatlons of H definitely asccrtalnable In th This g onmy pictur t H repeated Paradux maintenance would arUe and nn al screening, heath an. i illy every other counnaradox of sltualiun in vacant areas m IlJ>lll1 regions physique te>U will naturally decotto.T^txuT* indu^ry^^ln *Sh ^worid c,ll fSllte S **£ '" f?tfi W-S ^' &£& .' he ***"•* ** Amenci, o e 62 Soo of' NttW "^po^• gradually declining dltton, necessitating fresh exindividuals. Ihn?lanri : a 40000 textile workdespite a large l.u.rasc in thi I cP*' works {" Simple Inslruclion S?ar? reoorted unc^iitvcd In w^rlrf population, has been comaddition. deterioration would CanadT SI 3 i < meBled i m rBrlous ...u.rters h,.ve been taking place in the |'„-pa.doi, fhr^!. dav^ w7*k llcdWnd^is during the iwst few gssn drainage and sanitaHon on occuBmo rrg the experienced <*l*rtee ronternntafinff a cut in ^Ston "' ThornTycroft touchcsl on pied h-ldlngs. So. from an eco^ oxtia „„, be long ..gff tfidlDB l urodutnon and France tool" this aspect of the problem durin* nomlc pot 0 t ' view, ll appears Th,.y would need U. be lium'l. worried about the^effert. orJ its he Cornmoiiadelsste on the texw. mu-t envisage complete occu.idoimed on the conditions lhe> rSt^indunry of recent import '* industry. We are a tong way pa tlon block by hlock from the Bre Utaja>tO face. cTMai to U rerfr^lioiu!^r7sw^enthe nun^ he said, from the days when we inception The *l of individual grown, health precautions simph S S Klie worker^" iSS Edler, -u*d l' make piece goods for MockWill naturally depend on mslrurtlon in the us* of^ hand) by 4% since Ve m?ddle of last Brazil. India. China and the Far ,,,„ lopOgrgphy of the area^and lools for work.around Hie holding year and now stands at the same Ea"'These eounlnes level as In 1935. ** Grave Concern The situation in I-incashlrc Is peak third of Its p level—before dealing pended for the day. From this quarter, too, corre il, !" accumuu'tTon" of "large stocks have to be i !!???:! j.HSl. _?..T?l B ?^L c -aS! n I '" • the principal fmportlng administratic ANIAMTED OPINIONS Says Mr. Lee Klag : "YOU CAN RE-LION IT BEING THE SWEETEST I HEM Toffee The Perfection of Confection MADE IN U.K. WALTERS' PALM TOFFEE LTD PALM WORKS. LONDON. W. 3 .if lirave COIH< MI Brttabx Mr Pelef Thorn.-v. raft, the President of the Board of Trade has suid that unemployment in the textile Industries to some g prcenT ^.^^V'^^T ipored wlth.-ather !?s* than Thjf; jgSSS. The iid,uieflHIti n r* provided, care of ImplemenU. handling o „ their own. rurther it would* be obviously truclors perhaps, and so on. Also Indeed." he went n. "one unfair to saddle a few settlers they would need to be imprvswu of the great problems which eonw |trt the maintenance charges with the Importance of a co-uper, not MI much eompi'iiw t,lch should le borne by all the ativ. and friendly attitude botn tion fr.m third iwrtles. hut that OPrl i„ : ,nt# IB hloek. Failure to among themselves and m relation the counti> to e have .„,,..„,„ ,i (C se dimrulties beforeto those responsible for guiding been exporting has aer up If hawaT would toad to lUkflaairgbto and helping fgVtm to find their feet toxtato industry anil Is precornpllesuongirsentment and Tlic position Is not quite the same market dissati-ru'iMii. He^chlli-lid?" with liiexperienced young men. Il is suggi'Meii that suitable blocks ..f Ijnd on Government estutej in,in eiemight be set aside and worked by aroblern ervision. The lsds would 1* N*Jj ^ISW'^M^UIT' utcome of the nolle;' JSg of the peasant holdings in nrarten in me par...-ui-r arr.. N ..u and ln ^^ c ^ w " n d,ff r T of prom ittng the economic £ vH;. ,.1-nd w an acreage basisno questions of housin,. and feedenees between one area and ( ( .. ( n „ f ,.,. kw:ir ,, ; „,. t uin ,ber oTpeaaanla ing should arue. Dodds.8e.well anoiner. (( hl ( |,.,i M|1 m tlie volui < ,, lU ., t lltl yi.,1., bl .,\ Uie vsrloui nd llne ejtales occur to Ihe mind A Manchester Guardtaai report ot imported textiles goes back to ,__, „ the Individu;.! holdings Further, on each of the Agricul underlines uhese differences. In thf beginning of ffie first World .. ttn,^,. What apparently 1* lural Stations an apprenUceshli Bolton, it says, forty of the towns W ar. nol known is the sources of scheme might 1* inaugurated tol cotton mills will be > ptopped this General Decline revenue of Ihcse people what training small groups chosen It I he latest available unem f pc llsant ., J revethe respective areas. In this way ptormaot figures for this aie,. Before 1UK. the volume of ~' \' TELM-H on-the-farm and it would l possible to cover lh. show that on March 17 there imported textiles was B.r.("l „fr.ihe.fa-m U M probslpla wholg lsnd with a network D — 964 wholly unemployed und m mion-yards per annum; it fell wn 7,453 temporarily suspended th.it I percental!' of i he b'i!dmg> ttairnng sites at no great espem*i the mmThis preparatory work would b 10 acres, filrly conlinuous in order, grad %  Ight six four or any other figually. to fill up the land settle lire' Th" 1 ^ that are %  een reflected in effecting some 12.000 workers. Britain's own trade figures. Our will either be stopped or working exports of cotton man part-time. Last week 13.000 H i,, ne amounted to 7.000 million workers were affected. In Both\ards In 1913. but they gradually dale, 35 of the town's 90 miles decline until today Ihey arc well are on short-lime. below 1,000 million yards. It can, within the lii The Cotton Board's latest So much of Britain's cotton by our defence .. return, for the week ended March industry la concentrated in : gramn ts, indus15. shows lhat ihe total output single area lhat any decline in tries to be started in areas of single yarn in the spinning, the demand for its products affected by the texUto -lump.. section of Ihe industry was only inevitably leads to serious unemThul is all to the good, bin 15.87 million lbs., the towi | and hardship. As Mr. many peopi. figure reported so far this year Thomeyeroft has polnt.d out In implication that the Mulsh texIt compares with 21.96 million constantly changing world it Is Ulg industry has entered a perlb,, in ite bcrrapoadlnf wk o, ,^ ,„ ( l..cinilo, for ukin, Mnl S5",_J!?. /;;• f i, w i; d ^ C ;, !" 1<£. :W.U hi.. — to Ihe advice and expert 1951—a decrease of about 28 pei m, ,,f the .! I Rl times of ln1 1 tani pnrt in building up than bsst figures ratumad fot igfl man he told who smitf*) ill th* |p40fni f *gJ ''"''• week during the holiday period imponderables of Ihe world t-wi last summer. Forty-one mills w throughout the week com with 2 special merit is claimed for any the ideas or suggestions pu 0 he enee of those best qualified to giv ould be it l*>th locally and wherever setthe utinoel reluctant• %  tlcmenU Is afTected. But, w _d< sought to Dredlct gTexac'b wint only wi'li the utmoat leluctan.tlcments Is affected. But. we • closed h^l of aetlvH? the Brit,;,, textha' anyliody would resign himstress thai, as far a. poasible fnpsred Uto industry was going to sel'le self to the idea thut they wer, sound and practical metfiodl 0" week, down to play .. seriously diminish.-t ipprosa* aressential if succeed. It Is easy ti il at staggering cost. HOUSEHOLD LINES ix or it ll\l\ II KPT. 1.05 Yd. 1.21 Yd. 1.10 In 111 1 I 15" HUCK TOWELLING In Ml 11 II . In OBSBNi OOU>, KOSK und 111 1 I FACE TOWELS In (iOI.I) lll.l K. KOSK ;inil (Ull.l.N BATH TOWELS In PLAIN WlIII I fnini 1 -.' i. BATH TOWELS l:, PINK. (Illll \ im.l filll.l) from 1.78 to 4.:12 BEACH TOWELS In Gaily Culuurrd IteMuns Irmn ].r>9 lo I.lit LAVATORY TOWELS In (1RKKN. BI.L'K mill WI1ITK i I. and GSr. BATH MATS In Hill: and aaSSM SM BED SHEETS •3" x SO" 70" x 90" Kir x loo90" x 10*'" Y I 1 .j, ll I H .. PILLOW CAI COTTON 20" x 30" I HI ,,nd I.8T rarh I.I.NKN 18" x 28" .. 2.21 HARRISONS Dial m\ QUICK AND DEPENDABLE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE GUARANTEED KNIGHTS DRUG STORES For tliose very Special Occasions GLOVES & MITTENS Gloves in Rayon Mesh in a variety of colours including Red, White. Blue, Grey, Yellow, Pink gi ir In White Mesh only 51.411 Red, Grey, 51.71 pair Mittens in Wine, Green, Cyclamen and Black & White. pair CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, II, 12, & 13 BROAD STREET. WITH FINEST FOODS DANISH KI.ICP.Il HAM-per lb. %  • I l DANISH SALAMI SAl'SAGK ier lb %  • 135 BLUE CUKESE-per lb. I 18 ItlRT SALUT CHEESE—per lb 1.1 I-AMEMIIEKT CHEESE—per tin 1 NESCAFE --o*. tin ...., NESCAFE ll-oz tin ,. 1.04 CHEAM OF WHEAT Small Pkg 51 CUEAM OF WHEAT—I-arge Pkg 3 MAIIASCHINO CHEItHIES Sm .11 > 68 MARASCHINO CHERRIES medium Ki! 0 MARASCHINO CHERRIES large bol 1.K0 A.IME PEANUT BL'TTPIt I-lb. Bol .61 iipn PEANUT BUTTER?-m hou 104 PURE CHERRY. RASPBERRYALMOND ESSENCE per hot 41 NUTRICIA POWDERKT) MILK—1-lb. tin ...... I. 10 NLTR1CIA POWDERED MILK— 2^ lbs. tin 171 OREEN LAREL CHUTNEY SA1VF. -per hot 5S CRAWFOHDS CREAM CRACKER—per tin ..1.20 STANSFELD SIGH & CO., LTD.






ESTABLISHED 1895



Sunday Advocate



The Democrats Are
Assessing Harriman

(By HARRY W. FRANTZ)
WASHINGTON, April 19,

Democratie Politicians made swift appraisals of the

qualifications of W. Averell Harrinian, Director of-Mutual
Security, following President Truman’s tribute to him as a
patriotic and able American citizen.

Chief speculation was whether Harriman as a northern
“er “liberal” could attract wide support in the west and
south.

NEW YORKER
WRITER EYES
CARIB PRESS

PORT OF SPAIN, April 17

Mr, A, J. Liebling, ace writer
on the staff of the NEW YORKER
magazine, paid an Easter holiday
visit to Trinidad and the Carib-
bean Commission. With Mrs
Liebling, he is taking a leisurely
look gt this part of the world
aboard the “Alcoa Pioneer”.

Mr. Liebling is well known in,
press circles. His articles in the’
NEW YORKER under the heading} experience in world affairs
of “The Wayward Press” have] ‘Tryman’s friendly remarks
made him internationally known.} about Harriman were interpreted
The foibles of modern newspaper-| by political experts here as mean-
dom are his specialty, ing that the President would look
. with friendly eyes u arri-
It may be said with reasonable! man’s cantideey. but vile oe.
certainty that he will do a piece! garded as a direct endorsement of
on the press of the Caribbean, He] his nomination. It is not expect-
left Trinidad with an armful of}ed that Truman would make a
local papers and a gleam in his|statement of preference amon:
eye. {Democratic candidates before the

Questioned as to the future of| Democratic convention,

Republican politicians ' specu-
lated that the eleventh hour
‘boom” for Harriman would com-
pel more general public attention
to United States foreign policies
and their future implementation.

Truman's generous remarks re-
garding Harriman occurred at a
press conference, one day after the
withdrawal from the Presidential
race by Governor Adlai Stevenson
of Illinois who had been regarded
by “New Deal’ Democrats here as
the perronality most likely to
carry Wirous the foreign policies
and foreign aid programme of the
Roosevelt and- Truman Adminis-
trations.

WORLD AFFAIRS

None of the remaining Demo-
cratic contenders other than Har-
riman has had any extraordinary







the Caribbean in general and the R . . :
Commission in particular, Mr.| Tihe situation at the Convention
Liebling was non-committal, “I will depend upon whether New
am'’ he said, “too relaxed with|Y°rk state Democrats

and scenery to have a really | phe extent of

serious thought in my head. I can, !
however, borrow words from

fellow countryman who said
something like this; ‘Let us hang
together, as otherwise we shall |
certainly hang separately’. And
as for the Commission, what
better m e a ns of hanging to-

probable
Harriman from other states is
not yet predicted because Harri-
man did not enter any of the state’s
primary elections,

—U.P.



B’town Before

gether’’.

The Lieblings went on from | t °
Trinidad to British Guiana and M. j ff
Surinam. They will stop here O or ra 1c

briefly on their way back to New
York. ON special exhibition at
the Museum is a charming
gouache by Lady Gilbert-Car-
ter of Chamberlain Bridge and
its surroundings, which Lady
Gilbert-Carter has presented



STOW WILL GET
POST IN KENYA

(From Our Own Correspondent) jto the Museum.

GRENADA, April 19. The gouache was painted in

John Montague Stow, .C.M.G.,|1909, and is a view~ from the
Administrator of St. Lucia has/Cojonial Secretary's office. It is a
been selected for appointment to pusy bustling scene before the
the post of Director of the estab-|popularity of petrol driven vehi-
lishment of Kenya, He will be pro-|cjes, The two-power mule tram
ceeding to the U.K. about thd) with passengers for Hastings iv
middle of May on leave prior tO) siting for the Public Buildings
taking up his new post in October. clock to strike before it starts or
Born in 1911, educated at Har-| ‘1. journey. Behind the stationary
row school and Pembroke College, |173, is “the Fountain Garden
ambridge, he entered the Colo- ; ,
Cam) green and luscious from the spray

ial service, Nigeria, 1934. ; S f
We cae ae he was pro-+|f its fountain which plays every
> day. Enclosed by its neat iron

moted to the Secretariat of Gam-

bia, and came to Grenada 1944]Tailings the garden shows no sign
as Chief Secretary of the Wind-jof the ravages of wendering
wards. He was then appointed|sheep, which 40 years hence will
Administrator of St. Lucia in. ]xeduce this Bridgetown oasis a!-
1947. @On Page 16



Seout Tells Of Bob-a-Job Week

Pil-, a yard at Mrs. C. N. Taylor and
was running errands for Mr. O. T.
I ran another errand for

Eleven-year-old Wendell
grim of the 4th Barbados James
Street Scout Troop came into the) Allder

Advocate yesterday morning and;S. Squires and the easiest of all
asked for a job, Yesterday was;my jobs was finding a certiin
the last day of the Boy Scouts|word in the dictionary for Mr.

“Bob-a-Job’, week and young!H. O. Husbands at the Advoc>te
Pilgrim was making a last effort) Editorial Office.
to increase the ambunt of money |
on his “Job Sheet,” which is now Cleaned Shop
well over 30 shillings. I cleaned a shop and some glass
cases for. Mrs. Elcock, of Spooner’s
His “job” was to write an ac-| Hill, St. Michael, and counted
count of his activities during the | bottles for Mrs. E. Thomas. Every
week, and it was a somewhat ! day I was always on the go and
surprised scout who sat down at|some afternoons I did not get
the Editorial Desk to begin his’ home until 5 or 5.30.
job. However after a few mo-; I was lucky on two occasions,
ments’ thought he was soon busily getting two donations without
writing. | doing any work.
Here is his story:— I even supervised work in the
“I have been a scout for one liquor department of Smith and
year and as this is “Rob-a-Job” | Atwell.
week I’ve been always busy. I! I helped to open cases of cloth
belong to the James Street Scout at the Reliance Shirt Factory Ltd
Movement and I find Bob-a-Job and one of my last jobs was run-
week a busy, but interesting week. ning an easy errand from S. FE.
I have been watering garden Cole to Frank B. Armstrong in

beds at Mr. Bruce Austin, carry- | James Street.
ing trays of thread at the Singer |

Machine Co., and clipping grass a
at Capt. G. B, Hunte. I also weeded

I found it very difficult to get
job or donation in Baxter's
Road.”



ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD Wendell Pilgrim of the 4th Barbados James
Street Scout Troop writes of his experiences during Bob-a-Job week
which ended yesterday.

Pilgrim asked the Advocate for a “job”, so he was given
entry into journalism” at an early age.

“an

Farnum For
Finland Fund

A FUND has been started
to defray the expenses of Ken

Farnum at the Olympic Games
i in Helsinki next July.
You can help to bring the
| West Indies higher in the
} sporting limelight.

Send your donations to the
|| Royal Bank of Canada, Bar-
} clay’s Bank, and the Barbados

Advocate.

Amount previously
Acknowledged

Cable & Wireless
Sports Club

szzo 42



Total





TORCHLIGHT
TATTOO
ON APRIL 29

Scouts of the island will cele-
brate St. George’s Week from
Wednesday, April 23 to Tuesday,
April 29. The celebrations will
close with a Torchlight Tattoo at)
Kensington on the Tuesday night.
A similar Tattoo was held in 1948
at the Garrison.





BARBADOS, AP



| Economic

Conference
Successful

By W. A. RYSER

} » LONDON, April 19.

| Informed sources said the Soviet
} Sponsored international economic
'conference which just ended in
| Moscow has succeeded in impress-
|ing a number of Western business-
men with the possibilities of the
large expansion of east-west trade.
| This conference attained pre-
‘cisely what it aimed at fer it was
viewed here as the beginning of a
Soviet campaign aimed at abolish-
ing Western restrictions on the
export of strategic materials to
Communist countries.

Whether the conference accom-
plished anything in terms of real
business is not yet clear. Spectacu-
lar “deals” between representa-
tives of Communist countries and
unoffigial Western Delegates are
said to have been concluded. But
until these deals are looked into
by respective Western Govern-
ments there is no way of saying
what, if anything has been bought
or sold in Moscow.

According to official Soviel
sources, the British delegation

;concluded deals with Communist:

|

|

Tne Aquatic Sports and Marine |

Display at the Aquatic Club on

totaling some $70,000,000 the
French $80,000,000, the Belgians
$10,000,000 and the Italians
$50.000,000.

The Chinese Communist delega-
tion announced its d@als with for-
eign businessmen totalled “more

, than $60,000,000"

lesser deals are said
coneluded by cther

Numerous
to have been
delegations.

At the beginning of the conféy-
ence M. V. Nestorov, Chairman
of U.S.S.R, Chamber of Commerce
offered to increase Soviet for-

Saturday night is one of the out-| eign trade to $4,000,000.000 per

Standing features of
gramme.
In the Torchlight Tattoo the

local contingent of Scouts

at the Jamboree.

The programme is as follows:—

6.00—8.00 a.m. Good Turn
| Campaign — with special atten-|
tion to all who gave jobs in Bob-|!
a-Job Week. {
i 11.00 am. Boy Scout Church)
! Parade Service at the Cathedral—
}Scouts, in¢luding Rovers, will as-
semble at the Cathedral Square
by 10.30 a.m. Colours will be
carried but Not Staves. Scouts
are to bring Hymn Books and
Collection.
' 4.00 p.m. Wolf Cub Parade
| Service at St. Ambrose Church—
Cubs will assemble at the Church
‘by 4.15. No Colours.
| 4.30-—-6.00 pum. Potted Sports at
Harrison College — Each Troop
;may enter one or more Teams of
! Teams to be present by 3.30





t p.m.

8.00 p.m. Lecture on the Scout
International Relief Service, with
Film Strips. by Scouter A. J.
Tatnall at H.Q,

Thursday, 24th

4.30 p.m. Inter-Troop Boxing

Competition at Modern High

School. Each TroOp may enter

2 Scouts in each of 4 Classes —
@On Page 16



Well Deserved

Promotion’

The méeny well wishers and
lovers of music will be pleased
to learn that Sgt. Cecil A, Archer
of the Police Band was recently
promoted to Station Sgt, and
Deputy Conductor of the Band.
Station Sgt. Archer enrolled as

|
{



| SGT. CECIL ARCHER
iF

ja Band Cadet in 1920, and was
promoted to Police Constable the

jfollowing year. Normal promotion

| within the ranks of the band has,
of necessity, always been re-
tarded, and it was not until the
19th of November 1949, that Sgt
Archer aitained the position of

|Get. in the band.

|

|

|

|

|





@On Page 16

Pickled Pork









° at $10.68 per 100-Ib. bag (B.W.1 sg : M
» 2A . ene ties | Summer; Mrs.
Lice neces Currency), inclusive of frcight.| Clarke's Column.
insurance ex ge based in 71.8} 7 News For Women:
- : . ots bank charges and all other) . want d
| The Controller of Supplies has} fash You Baby An
again warned local importer that | ©8rBes. Your Figure
oustanding shipmertts of pickled | 8 Editorials; one
pork from..Canada for whieh) On The ence;
Ucences have been issued before H.C. GETS NEW } Labour Policy In
;20t4 March must be accompagied | | The W.1.
| »yY a certificate to the effect that | SPANISH MASTER | is 9 The People of Bar-
jsuch pork did not originate or was} | bados
not packed within 100 miles of the When Harrison College re-opens | > 10 Winston’s Father
nearest Foot and Mouth Disease!|after the Easter holidays, there! 11 The Lives of Harry
area twill be in a new Spanish Master 5 Lime em
The warning was first 1ed in; in the person of Mr. Jose Tor- 2a * { z Crossword;
March when licence to belnero, B.A. from Oviedo Univer- % ; Dartwords; .. =
jissued for the import in Spain He arrived here Trell’s Stories
| siderable tit pickled | yesterd morning by the Golfito 12 Comic Strips
\P . Beate fie ; i oa - b I am » 15 Church Services;
‘the “pie ‘ Pies én 16 Loeal News: Table
oe, E ee wera Phibault School of Tennis; Sea and
) He 1, De-~!TI in. Birmingham for te Aiken _ r
{ pa it e€, Do i-/|f will also assist in the Air Traffic
ion of Canada. ' tea of Fren

the pro-| year—instead

who!

: 1 presen?frecently attended the Jamboree ee

Caribbean sun, sand, salt water | Harriman as their “favourite son.” Jin Jamaica will put on the Page-! r
support] ant of Barbados which they staged




|
|

|
| 6,000 Bags Flour





of .the maximum
postwar turnover cf $1,000,000,000

Fu 20, 1952
z

'

}

issed their theory examina

od after a further four terms which ended in December
t year, 12 students gained a total of 33 speed certificates

Changes In
T.C.A. Flights






With effect frvom 25th April
1952, Messrs. Trans-Canada Air-
ines will be discontinuing their
lights 602 and 603 which oper-
ite thr@vfh this station on Fri-
jads, 2F lights 600 and 601, which
lorme operate through Barba-
dos Wednesdays, will now
vass t igh Barbados on THurs-
days. imes of arrival atu de
parture, however, remain un-

changed: as follows :—

Arrive Marbados trom Montre-
al and Bermuda af 5.10 a.m, and

Depart Barba@es for Port of
Spain, at 5.40 a.m.

Arrive Barbados from Port of
Spain at 10.15 atm, and Depart
Barbados for Bermuda and Mon-
theal at 11.00 a.m.

This flight aoes not go through
te Toronto, the first connection
being. on domestic service flight
1, departing Montreal 7.30 a.m

reached in 194% —U.P, {gr Toronto.

A CAPTIVE BALLOON hovers over the
wa ning planes away from the area,
ground below, negotiators work to ¢e

agreement which stand in the way of an armistice.

Malan Moves —_ |
Legislation
Against Courts

CAPETOWN, South Africa,

‘ : April 19.
The Nationalist Government
will introduce legislation next
weck to ‘prevent courts from

interfering with its racial scgrega-
tion laws. Premfer Daniel F.
Malan’s aides notified Opposition
eaders in the Assembly it intends
to introduce the controversial bill
next Tuesday or Wednesday,

The Government drafted the
proposed law after the Supréme
Court declared unconstitutional a
Malan Bill removing persons of
mixed blood from the general
voting register. Two opposition
parties—United Party and Labour
Party—have formed a united front

with the Torch Commando—an
Anti-Malan ‘organisation of 100,000
wal veterans—to fight the
proposed new law.

UP.



reins RS

Expected

Six thousand bags of unbleached
ft winter wheat flour is ‘due to



arrive in Barbados between the
latter part of this, month and inj
late May. The quota is not in-

cluded in the International Wheat
Agreement.
in respect if this item, licences
will be issued to local importer
from whom quotations have been
received against signed conirma-|
s from the West India|




B actory for ‘shipment in)
} 2,000-bag consignments, the first)
jto arrive late this menth



The ceiling price has been fixed
|
|
















“AERIAL VIEW OF TRUCE SITE ©

°
truce site at Panmunjom, Korea,
Meanwhile, in the tents on the
liminate nine paragraphs in the
(International)

MISSOURI
FLOODS

OMAHA, Nebraska, April 19.

This city’s industrial area faced
a new flood threat early today
after the water pressure from the
surging Missouri river blew up a
concrete s@wer,

Fragments of € road surface
above the sewer Were thrown 120
feet into the air and rush water



started towards the low lying
areas of Omaha.
Volunteers piled up sandbags

to strengthen the river dyke and







built a road for lorries bringing
up 600 tons of rock to seal off the
sewer,

Meanwhile downstream towns
and thousands of acres of land in
lowa,, Nebraska, Missouri and
Kafisas were beginning to feel the
full impact of the wollen
Missouri,

Above Rulo at Nebraska's south

Stern tip the river was 14 mil
vide And ut St, Joseph, Missor
third la ga@st city the river spread
over «five miles At Hamburg,
lowa frantic efforts, were being
made to protect water plants the

two thirds of
all threatened

business area and
the residential area
with inundation.









On Other Pages

Page 2 Carib Calling

»., 3 Cinema; Gardening
Hints; Farm and
Garden

» 4 Bookie: Sidelights
On Sport; Football
Report

” 5 Yachting, Weight-
lifting and Body-
building

. 6 Sewing Circle;

Embroidery for the



» ADVANCED —
COMMERCIAL _
CLASS PLANNED:

ARRANGEMENTS will probably be made to start an
Advanced Commercial class of the Barbados Evening In-
stitute in September this yex
C.LS., Dean of Commercial Studies, said yesterday.

After three terms’ work, all the students of a class at

e Combermere Centre which began in September, 1949,





PRICE : SIX CENTS
QUEEN’S FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMEN?

.



ar, Mr. St. Clair Hunte, F.1LP.S.,

tions in Shorthand in July, 1950



































S per minute.
It has been the practice to
terminate the studies of students
who reached the 70 or 80 words
per minute staxe so that new
tudents who have reached the 1
students could be trained, but it is
now felt that an advanced class
should be started to improve the
aiming and qualification of those

at 70 and 80 words a minute,
here will, necessarily, still be the
other classes,

Distinctions

Of the 33 speed certificates
gained, seven were with the dis-
unctions (L,.C.C.)

Due to the delay in obtaining

| c¢

ults and also to the compara-
|tively short life of the class,
students took similar rates oi

ispeed in the L.C.C. and with the
Pitman’s Institute and hold cer-
tificates in some instances fo
similar speeds from both examin-
jing bodies.

Five girls were successful in
| passing the 80 words per minute
|}which is the working speed re-
iquired at the Royal Society ot
Arts, Junior shorthand-Typist ex-

‘
IN THE FIRST PUBLIC engagement of her reign, England’s Queen Eliza-
beth IL walks past an honor guard of Yeomen after distributing
“maundy money” in Westminster Castle. These coins are specially
minted, and this year there were 26—one for each year of the Queen's
age. Her head should have appeared on them, but there was insufficient
time for change and they bore the head of her father, King George VI.







New Proposals Made For

imination, a goal set for the Ad-
| vanced Class e

The progress of the shorthand ro { « 1 M Ik Cc as » rT
{Speed students has been greatly en ra 1 VE amery

assisted by their English studies,
) In Klementary Book Keeping
passes, seven otf

ALTERNATIVE proposals for the establishment of a
Central Milk Depot and Creamery which have been agreed
to in principle by a majority of local Milk Producers are
still awaiting discussion at high level, Mr. Eric Deane told
the Advocate yesterday,

A committee representative of local Milk Producers

jthere were 11
which were with distinction,

In Typewriting, 13 student
gained L.C.C. certificates (certifi-
cate stage), including two dis-
tinctions, One st@@ent was unsuc-



essful e “is . rng a euedes by His

drew up alternative proposals following a suggestion by His

dit oe oe cone Excellency the Governor that the scheme should not be
LCC. English a th tae ¢§ allowed to fall through. y

1953 to lify f y . bee b* The proposals which the milk

( quality for he award o producers have now submitted to

|
|
|
|
]
‘
| the “L.C.C, Group Diploma” a:
steno-typist. Last Novemb:i
| Massiah gained a distinction ix

Government are that Government
should undertake the erection of
the necessary machinery for re-
jeeiving, processing and delivering
the milk to the consumer. Milk
producers on the other hand will
give a guarantee to Government
that they will supply the neces-
sary milk at a remunerative price
to themselves.

The first seheme which, it
was suggested, should be run on
a cosoperative basis, was aban-
doned because milk producers
considered that the new Co-oper-
ative Societies Act made it
practicable for them to continue
under the original terms

B.F.C. PLANE DUE
MAY 2ND



Murder In
Duplicate

es. It oa Happen

WATOH out for “Murder in
Duplicate” by GLENN CARP.

This is a crime story which
will be run in the Evening
Advocate in seven Instal-
ments, replacing the “Fabian
of the Yard” series.

The first instalment appears
next Monday.

Don't MISS it.

her 80 words per minute L.C.C
examination and also in type-
writing.

Following are the best speed re-
Sults of students: Mildeane Mas.
siah 8d-¢distinetion: ere Spencer
80, L.C.C., Denisé rwen, fbil®
Jones and Jeane Clarke 80, (Pit-
man’s), Majovie Barnett and Wen-
dina Pilgrim 70, Audrey Smith,
Daphne Legall and Joyce Wiggin’
60, (Pitman’s), and Alfred Ince
and Winifred Wiggins gained dis-
tinctions in the 50, (L.C.C,)

There were 175 applicants for
the class which begon last January
but the class could only accom-
modate 30,

im-=







See enereeeeteeeeere er eEED

Dr, Hamilton, Princips 2 ' The Auster aircraft fc the
Institute, is at se heaet he ote REGISTRATION Barbados Flying Club left, Eng.
in the U.K Mr. W. H. Carter, DISCONTINUED land yesterday by the S.S. Cros-
M.C.E. is Acting Principal, Mr. ter which is expected to arrive in

Barbados on May 2nd
A member of the club told the

The Labour Department will

C. M. Thompson teaches the Type-
discontinue for a short while fur-

writing and Book-Keeping, Mr,

S. C. Corbin Shorthand and Mr,| ther registrations for employ- Advocate that the hangar for the
F, A. Waterman, B.A., the English |ment after Monday 2ist instant. ' aircraft is at present under con-
r F This break is to enable the struction at Seawell and it is ex-

Registration Bureau to bring its , pected to be completed before the

“ea Scouts Stage
Aquatic Display

APRIL 26

The local Sea Scouts will hold
their Annual Aquatic Sports and
{Marine Display On Saturday,
[April 26, off the Aquatic Club, A
very extensive programme hag
jbeen prepared, A demonstration
lof the Breeches’ Buoy Rescue—a
ship to shore regcue—is expected
jto high-light the programme.

There will also be a Fireworks |

records up to date, larrival of the ‘plane







RA!.F1IGH-—Makers of the
WORLD'S CHAMPION



Display from the Lord Comber-| a
mere and a Rescue Race in which et
boys in clothes will swim from
the end of the field to the middle,
collect the victim and tow him
, back to the end. ‘ |
; The sports will begin at 8.00
}p.m with a Water Polo Match
'This will be followed by a Boat
j}Race from the Sea Scout Hut to
jthe Aquatic Club pier, There will




jthen be the 25 yards swimming
race, followed by the 50 yards, |
Rescue Race, Relay Race, 100
yards and 25 yards swimming |

jrace for Sea Rangers |

This will be the first occasion |
on which the Sea Seouts will be?
taking part in such an extensive |
programme and it promises to be|
a great success. }

ORDINATION AT |
ST. LEONARD'S

colourful ceremonial |}
during the celebration of the!
Holy Eucharist at St. Leon- |
ard’s yesterday morning the|
Lord Bishop Rt. Rev. G. L. G./{
Mandeville admitted to the}
Diaconate, Mr. Courtenay}
Johns an English student at!
Codrington College. |
| Among the clergy present were

eo
isaers







Noa

You are on a "
WINNER when you ride a Raleigh!

A Raleigh was-the choice of Reg. Harris—World’s
Professional Sprint Champion for the second ye
succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
your bicycle from a Company with such great
technical experience and knowledge that designed

cd















sitiaiocomees ¢








{Very Rev. Dean Hazlewood, Rev, and built the record-branking RALEIGH,
1H. C. Shepherd, Rev. M. E. Grif-
lth , Rev. C. A. Sayer and Rev. .
j A number of the students from
j\Codrington College attended the
Ordination
Re Johns will t Curate of THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
St. Leonard with Rev. W. D
Woode, Vicat A Product of Raleigh Industries Limited, Nottingham, Eng
“7 CAVE, SHEPHERD

& CO., LTD.

es

4
| sdbienictaiabipaatteaii
| FACTORY iNSPECTOR |
| ARRIVES
lesate



I. C. Margettes who has | - .

| be ppointed Factory Inspector {ff 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
jof Barbades on. a two-year con~||
jtract. arrived here, yesterday by {{ NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-

Golfito from England and has jj ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUS
| take 1 up temporary resigence at, }) wi lis
Stafford House {i
| 1 Marg » wa formerly }\}
H.M. Inspe of Factories, {) Ny



\




2

PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE

’

: RIGADIER and Mrs. Armand







| Wedding

SSS







{ SSS we | Smith who had been spend-
1 wi.? ‘ing the winter in Barbados, re-
Everyone loves @ Smooth, Lovely Skin,—but they detest i Etiquette jturned to Toronto on Friday by
Unsightly Hair, especially in Women . . .80:— : | TC > They were accompanied
16 . The formal wedding is nearly by rs. Florence Merrick, sister
“GET RID OF UNSIGHTLY HAIR” with always held in church although |of Mrs. Smith,
os with your clergyman’s permis-,; While here they were staying at
X $¢ y EET sion you may be married at;,the Marine Hotel.

home, in a club or a hotel, When | ,

For the Beach, Dance, Sailing, or any time when undér-arm air | the couple is not of the same, Had Suecessful Op,.*
becomes Unsightly, use VEET. nh S eciante " the ree R. D. S. GIDEON, Medical

VEET is extremely useful for men who have tongh beards, or
who find it uncomfortable to Shave

“vy B E T” removes VU tly, Superfvons Hair
in exactly “THREE wore

Superintendent of the Bar-
General Hospital, re 1ed
yesterday morning from Enfiand
by the Gelfito

Together, you and your fiance |) 3 dos
must call on the rector or rabbi .

Remember: well in advance of the wedding.

2 ‘ « {| Be sure to check on the Seating | of theee:-iithine after an absence
@e IT’S CLEAN! IT'S CERTAIN! ! IT'S SAFE.) !! apacity of the church before : :
making out a definite invitation | Dr, Gideon spent most of his

Thats VEET

list. Take into consideration the | font at Morefields Hospital, Lon-
R.P. 2/3, 4/- per tube

amount of space available at the don where he underwent a suc-
altar for pretty pageantry. Also cessful eye operation,

study the interior of the church At Luncheon

for best colour sohemes and M*.”: W. B CHENERY presided
architectural beauty. The most over the luncheon held at the
popular hours for: formal Protest-] “Green Dragon” on Friday in hon-
ant weddings are four or four-lour of the Merchants Cricket
thirty in the afternoon. Most of] League team which passed through
|the fashionable Catholic weddings] Barbados on its way to Dominica.

Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD. |
BROAD STREET, and HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)











=

METRO GOLDWYN MAYER G i oO





B E 20TH CENTURY FOX

jare celebrated with a nuptial} Mr. Chenery represented Sir
A high mass. Invitations for a} Anan Collymore, President of the
Present TONITE 8.30 p.m, and Continuing 5.00 & 8.30 p.m. {formal wedding are all mailed at} Barbados Cricket Association.
41 jone time, one or two months

Other members of the Couneil of
the Barbados Cricket Association
who attended the luncheon were,
Mr. Ben Hoyos, Mr. S. O. C. Git-
tens, Mr. E. L. G. Hoad, Mr. W.
K. Atkinson, Mr. A. deL. Tnniss |

in advance.

Your parents should issue the
invitations and announcements
even though you are not living
at home If your parents are

, not living, your aunt and uncle or|®"4 Mr John Goddard.
ie . - mearest relatives may sponsm Leaving Today
Pa t ie ME Natta your wedding Even though EAVING to-day for Jamaigh is
yours is to be an informal wed- Mr. John Paviluk, West In-
rE ding, if other than close friends} dies Technical Representative for

ind relatives are to be there, you}Tidewater Associated Oi] Company






ya an



Caub Calling

SUNDAY,



A section of the 300 guests who attended

VIS ishould send formal engraved | of New York
. me wm Evelyn Varden invitations. Both families con- He Ph iets en spending the past
i + a NUNNALLY "OHNSON pe gg Agee kn Bi sictogs | Month in Barbados introducing the AT THE OPENING of Club Royal, Hastings, on Friday night.
; »asis, with names ad addres . vere ; ‘ s, é wh
- } a Dives »y JEAN NEGULESCO card-indexed for ready checking eae woes to local the Cocktail Party that marked the opening. A portion of the circular terrazzo dance floor is in the right
" Fj and accuracy. If you are having! Mr. Paviliuk was a guest at the foreground.



separate
lists, file

reception and ceremony
them independently to

















Windsor Hotel,



te hi Weddings
: : «& » avoid slip-ups. An invitation .to
Extra : A DARLING OF A SHORT the reouniioh automatically calls , .
‘THE WRECK OF THE HESPEROS for a present, but guests invited ESTERDAY afternoon at St.
only to the church are not so Matthias Church, Miss Patri-
==> |obligated, White, ivory or cream cia Cameron Boyce daughter of
are the only colours allowed for Mr and Mrs. Aubrey Boyce of
the double-fold linen paper 13 Navy Gardens was married to
appropriate for formal wedding Mr Patrick Kellman Roach, son of
invitation. A large-sized invita-, Mr Harry Roach of “Bedford
tion is customarily used for the; Lodge’, St. Michael, and the late
ultra-formal ceremony, the small-| Mrs. Roach.
er size for a less formal one, Thy The ceremony which took place
FOR ALL OCCASIONS is perfectly permissible to have shortly after 4 o'clock was per-
the return address embossed on

formed by the Rev. M. E. Griffiths.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore 3
“bouffant” style dress of white
cotton lace over slipper satin, tight
fitting bodice with long sleeves and
a low neckline, The skirt was very
full with two panels of satin let
into the front and back, opening
eut and down into the train. Her
headdress was a lace tiara from
which fell a very full finger-tip
veil of nylon tulle and she carried
a simple bouquet of white orchids

The two Matrons of Honour,
Mrs. Colin Bynoe and Mrs. Dick
Stokes wore identical ballerina
length dresses of maize coloured
lace and nylon net, The style was
similar to that of the bride’s dress
and they wore short mittens and
little pointed caps of lace. They
carried buoquets of peach coloured
gladioli.,

the flap of the outside envelope,
Tissues enclosed by the engraver
are usually left in to protect the |
engraving, but ‘it is not a pointl
of etiquette and may be decided}
personally,

NEXT WEEK: “Decide on Re-
ception Details” and “Confer with
your Florist.”



New Dresses for Cock-
tails or Weddings

Alees..;
EVENING DRESSES
BEACH DRESSES
SUN DRESSES
MATERNITY DRESSES
HOUSE DRESSES
and HOUSECOATS
From $15.00—$29.75

———



HIGH ADVENTURE!

Per

}. O'BRIEN

YVONNE

SRT

Py

Sard aT NLD
SILVER

NICD re | Business Office Superintendént

Pe) i ten i sat aortene o. -=
i t this i er fir

CLAISCEORGE-WRAELUOT. visit 'to the island but not to the

Denied by BYRON ASEAN Sovenplay by FAR GER West Indies, having been to Ja-
Bese» Sy ya St «Pedy ott ;maica and Nassau previously.



MODERN DRESSES






MR. AND MRS. PAT ROACH



Imported Canadian and
French HANDBAGS

in velvet, bengqline,
suedine and brocade
All Modern Shades
From $4.13—$6.98

LADIES HATS.

Smart Styles for Cocktails”
or Weddings
In a large assortment

HANDBAGS
of colours
Doubled with
|

of Distinction
From $5.19—$8.50
51 and 60 gauge 15
VICTORY

Lovely Stockings in all -_
From $2.05—$2.27 4 NOW SHOWING AT THE
Garberdines and iz
ALSO $=
THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ,
SSS SS SSS

Canadian Visitor

PENDING three weeks’ holiday
here is Miss Gladys Ireland
from Toronto, Canada, She arrived
recently by T.C.A, and is staying
at the Hotel Royal.

First Show
Ta goers will be pleased
to know that the new Dram-
atie Club has been formed under
the name of the “Barbados Play-
ers”. They hope to put on their
first show at the end of July.

Resident Tutor
R. AUBREY DOUGLAS-
SMITH, Resident Tutor in
Barbados for the University Col-
lege of the West Indies returned
from England by the Golfito yes-

The bride’s mother wore tur-
quoise lace and sheer made on
very simple lines with brown ac-
cessories.

The Church was decorated with
white Caracas daisies. The best-
man was Mr. Colin Roach, brother
of the 'groom and the ushers were
Mr. David Read, Mr. Val Roach,
Mr. Jim Kellman and Mr. Geoff.
Skinner

After the ceremony a reception
was held at the home of the bride.



Before returning home she hopes terday after six months’ leave. As a “going away”
NYLON STOCKINGS a to make brief stops at Caracas, He was accompanied by Mrs. pride "etites ‘mn han Cae
| " Curaeao, Haiti and Jamaica Douglas-Smith and their little son. pique piped in white, red shoes

and bag the noneymoon is being
spent at “Hill Crest”, Bathsheba.

N EASTER SUNDAY at St,
Barnabas Church, the mar-
riage took place between Miss
Maisie I. Bleckett of the Ivy Road
and Mr. Oliver M. Inniss of the
Central Foun try.
The bride who was given in
marriage by Mr, James Mahon,



NEW SHOP

WE TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY to notify our friends
and customers that our Shop has been moved from
LASHLEY’S LTD. in Prince William Henry Street to
JOHNSON’'S BUILDING between the Modern Dress
Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery in Broad Street.

I. BALDINI & CO.

Her veil was kept in place by a
jheaddress of white roses and she
Cedric HARDWICKE

Janetta Dress Shop |
|
|

END OF eee
|
'



Sir





The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. O. C. Haynes and the
duties of bestmman were performed
by Mr, Angus Evelyn. A recep-
tion was held at the bride’s resi-
dence, Ivy Road.

Mr. and Mrs, Inniss were the
recipients of many useful gifts.

A QUIET but impressive cere-
mony took place on Thursday
morning last at 9 o'clock at St.
John's Church when Mr. Festus
Thompson, Clerk of the Water-
works Department took as his
bride, Miss Hazel Hoppin, daughter











Denier Sheer
new shades
seer ply OLYMPIC THEATRE
Sharkskins
WARM COATS
Broad Street

FREDRICH MARCH —
From $18.00—$35.00
ae



























To-w & in




and
BY SPECIAL REQUEST a nee .%

attended by Miss Marjorie Inniss
sister of the groom as bridesmaid
“SEASON”

“VENDETTA
FARAMOUNT'S MASTERPIECE! VENDETT

A PLACE IN THE
Starring
Jontgoinery CLIFF
Elizabeth

SUN’

Starring
Faith DOMERGUE &
George

Betty FIELD)
EMPIRE | rox
To-dey Last 2 Shows 445 & #90 |
|
|
|

DOLENZ
TAYLOR






















Mon, a Tus 40a a3) ee Dan Tee of Mrs. C. A. Hoppin of Green's,
‘ YHUNDER ACROSS” with me : St. George and an _ Assistant
THE PACIFIC” Dick POWELL-—Rhonda FLEMING Next to Singers Building Teacher at. Grace Hill Girls’
Wendell COREY cPoncest TUCKER eC a gan oot BARC AINS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT School. . i «
pes - Wed. at 430 8 KAS STA:.TING MONDAY APRIL 2ist he rie, yet eiven. 8 mer
WOR SS ee nae ee ee aE DRESSES of ALL TYPES — Greatly Reduced Sant malign to poet tare
‘DRUMS OF THE CONGO” wee . ATHING SUITS on SALE $1.35 performed by Mr. L. Jones. The
“cana atoms : For Babies, Gels at ( Boyectrom.s es ssecrsesyssrsson sig | faut na was eB few.
Thurs, Mth at 840 p.m “STORM OVER WYOMING For Ladies —- in. Eles.lc Satin—ttom ....+.--00s sr rirstuereret ee $5.00 Hackett presided at the Organ.
CALYPSO REPEAT PERFORM- Geek ae La For Men ....... Vivace ewew er ber eee eee emblem esses ee rereer bene , A. reception was held at the
Orchestra ‘and ‘the Rhythm Kings eee, See «9 Pm UNDERWEAR on SALE ees eee es een ace the
ae ee. awe ae P.a'e Bras. in various styles .......... 0.06000 c ccc cee dace ees from $1.19 “Flleetview”, Bathsheba.
OLYMPIC Orchestra and thy Rhythm Kings SPM GRiy ek RMMOMIID 2 5 ian Lass chs oo 6 65% lee aa hee vcs . from oo me couple were the resiplonts
Steel Band, = £ Shine many valuable and usefu ifts
EVOL “ORIEN BOS: oo 66s iN de 0 ley Ms ete wigs os. RSC aNS 3 o. ’ gifts,
a } Nylon Briefs and Panties .........6.0.00.00 0000 ccc cae eeeeee from $1.72 So: d Hei
To-day to Tues. 4.20 & 8.15 } Ny Shins .... $748 n an eir
Edmond O° 2 RR ME EOMNMRID iG hci) 0 54 44-4 Gvieate ae ay Nieky 6 4 eee ce 64 64 Vs
ee ee ROY AL Molen GHEBA Soe Acc aid eda a dnagee bees toss tee CA Aa $7.76 R. AND MRS. RAY DA SIL-
LVRS oe" | fPo-day Lat 2 ows 5 | Weyl MAORI. ZUG) 5 Rad cheeses occ sop eae from $1.30 VA * the proud parents of
and c . . " a son and heir, born earlier this
Fredrick MARCH—Betty FTELD Republic Pictiires Presents ; GIFTS on SALE ; month in Kingston, Jamaica.
VICTORY Wendeti COREY—F grrest TUCKER Boxed Linen Luncheon ae eee Cases—Face Towels— where hay o Silva is stationed
seen Siaaae sce ipiie in ; s--Evening & Cocktail Bags—Silk Squares with the Royal Bank of Canada.,
" Soupento tiers | «eaun ee aad Raffia Handbags Shopping Baskets—Beach Mrs. da Silva is the former Dor-
“COPPER CANYON: esi eles ee ‘ rs — P othy Eckstien, only daughter of
“I WALK ALONE” un Y ‘ Baskets—Novelties i ; Mr and Mrs. G, C. Eckstein of
Wed, 98rd at 8.30 p.m. | Mon. & Tues. 4.0 & 819 js 5 ALSO on SALE “Casablanca”, Maxwell Coast.
CALYP80 REPEAT PERFORM KEPURLIC WHOLE SERIAI Childrens ; Panties ...... ae from 48c.
Ma Agee ‘ek hee | Ladies Mittens and Gloves
Orchestra and the Rhythm Kings | “THE JAMES BROTHERS i Ladies Linen Handkerchiefs
Steel Band ‘ : OF MISSOURI

, “ 24 OO
SSG POCPSSOSPEEOP SSSA VEE

ALA CINEMAS |



DOE A LEAL LOOSE PPT EPSPS SEO

COMING SOON BARBAREES G A 5 FE T Y



VOCS FOS
COMING SOON
“SONS OF THE MUSKETEERS” (Color
Cornel! WILDE-Maureen O'HARA

“ORESS CROSS
Van HEFPLIN

PL

































wore a dress of nylon and lace.,

Barrister-At-Law

R. F. G. “SLEEPY” SMITH

who passed his bar finals in
September and was called to the
Bar at Grays Inn in February is
now in Barbados to practise his
profession. He arrived yesterday
morning by the S.S. Golfito from
the United Kingdom,

He said that he had a good time
in England, but was very glad to
be back home. While in the U.K.,
he took a Trade Union Course and
played a lot of cricket.

An old Harrisonian,
was a Commissioned
the Barbados Battalion S.CF.,
during the war after which he
entered Codrington College and
took his B.A. He afterwards acted
on the staff of the Combermere
School before leaving for England.

He is a son of Mr. Smith, head-
master of St, Simon’s Mixed Schoo}
and Mrs. Smith of St. Andrew.

Mr. Smith
Officer in

Leaving Today

R. CHELSEA HOPE, Elec-

trician of Barbados Hard-
ware, is due to leave to-day by
B.W.LA, for Trinidad on a business
visit in the interest of his firm.
He expects to be away for about
two weeks.

On Honeymoon
R. and Mrs. Derek G Whitfield
who were married in Mara-
caibo, Venezuela over the fast
week-end came over to Barbados
for their honeymoon and are stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Whitfield is with the Shell
Caribbean Petroleum Company in
Maracaibo.

o



MR. AND MRS.

Special Representative
R. JAMES H. SAMPSON,
PhG,, B.S.Ph, Special Repre-

sentative of E. R. Squibb & Sons,
(International Corporatign, New
York, London, and Liverpool is at
present visiting Barbados

To-morrow night Mr. Sampson
will show a film at the General
Hospital at 8.30 ».m., to the Medi-
cal and Pharmaceutical and
Nurses’ Associations entitled “The
Nutritional aspects of Tropical
Diseases” accompanied by a brief
talk on the use % Dierysticin in
combined Antibiotic Therapy

On leaving Barbacos Mr. Samp-
son will visit Jamaica and _ the
Bahamas before returning to the
United States.

His visit is in the interest chief-
ly of the Liverpool branch of the
Company. Mr. Sampson arrived
here from Trinidad on April 12
after visiting several of the other
West Indian islands. He will be
leaving for Jamaica on April 22

Mr. Lisle A. Ross is the local
representative of E. R. Squibb
and Sons.

“The Magic Flute”’
HERE will be a Gramophone
Concert at the British Coun-
cil, “Wakefield”, on Tuesday 23rd
April, at 8.15 p.m. ‘Mr Hugh Young
will sent an abridged version
of ozart’s Opera “The Magic
Flute”
Admission is free and
welcome.

all are

APRIL 1952

26,



Married Yesterday
ESTERDAY
George’s
Alleyne
Mr. and
of St

married

ifternoon at St
Church Miss June
Yearwood, daughter of
M H. G. Yearwood
St. George was
John L. C. Gay,
and Mrs L. T. Gay of
Black Rock
bride who was given in
by her father wore a
embroidered organza





to
Mr
Brighton

The
marriage
of
vith a low scalloped neck-

n of

dress
nylon
line held in place with lilies of
the valley, a scalloped bouf-
fant overskirt, a long flowing
train and a headdress of lilies of
the valley.’Her bouquet was of
Queen Anne’s Lace, pink rose-
buds and gerberas.

She was attended by her sis-
ter Miss Hetty Yearwood as Maid
of Honour who wore graded
orchid net with appliqued skirt,
low neckline with wrapped front
and a stole attached with head-
dress and shoes to match, she
carried a bouquet of a horseshoe
form.

Her bridesmaids were the
Misses Thora King and Gloria
Hope who wore graded gold net,
and the Misses Monica Scott and
Cicely Norris who wore graded
green net. Their dresses were made
with strapless bodices, appliqued
skirts with stole attached with
headdresses ahd shoes to match.
They carried bouquets of horse~
shoe form,

The ceremony was conducted

Rev. S. A, E. Coleman. The
duties of: bestman were performed
»y Mr. Fred Gay while those of

by



shers fell to Messrs. Tony Atkins,
Kenrick Jordan and Arthur Gay.

A reception was held at “Tuil-
levies", Fitz Village, St. James,
the residence of Mr. and Mrs. A,
G. Johnson and the honeymoon is
being spent at “Hillcrest”, Bath-

sheba.

ISS GRACE PAYNE, daugh-

ter of Mrs, G. D. Payne of
“Hildathorpe”, Pine Road and the
late Mr. Philip Bruce Payne was
married yesterday afternoon at
St. Michael’s Cathedral to Mr.
David Taylor, son of Mrs. Shirley
Taylor of “Brighton, Black Rock
and the late Mr. Edmund Shirley
Taylor.

The ceremony was performed by
Dean Hazlewood assisted by Rev.
Frank Hassell. Bishop Mande-
ville gave the blessing.

The Bride was given in marriage
by her brother Mr. Anscele Payne.
She wore a dress of satin and
lace; lace bodice with long sleeves,
Peter Pan collar and high neck-

line. The skirt was of satin very
full and ending in a train. Her
headdress was of orange blos-

soms which kept in place a short
veil of Brussels lace. She carried
a bouquet of white roses, snap-
dragons and white gerberas.

The Bestman was Mr. Michael
Spence and the Bridesmaids were

Miss Wendy Farmer and Miss
Peggy Farmer. The Bridesmaids
wore identical dresses of pink
satin, Attached to the full skirts
were frills of white net. They
carried Victorian posies of shell

pink roses and forget-me-nots
and the headdress was a bonnet
effect with mating flowers to
their bouquets.

‘fter the ceremony a reception
was held at “Searles’ House,
Christ Church, the home of Mrs.
E. M. Bethell. The honeymoon is
being spent at the Crane Hotel.

DAVID TAYLOR

Solicitor General’s Family
Comes Home

Mi. 2%? MRS. H. W. W.
: and two children ar
Miss M, A, Reece, LLB., Coenen
at-law, arrived by the s.s. Golfito
sterday, Mr. W. W, Reece Qc.
Solicitor General was on board to
rreet them,

Mr. H. W. W. Reece is a
Officer of the Kuwait Ol Cone
pany, Iraq. His wife Rosemary
spent several years here during
the war with her mother Mrs. G.
Kellet, and has many friends in
Barbados.

Miss M. A. Reece, LLB., re-
presents the third generation of the
Reece family to do law. Her
gvandfather the late Mr, H. W.
Reece, K.C., was Solicitor General
of Barbados and one of the most
brilliant lawyers ever to practice
in the West Indies, Her father Mr.
Ww. W reece, Q.C., Solicitor
General has his own niche in the
rrofession and is a doughty
opponent, Her uncle is Mr, W. W.
Reece, B.A., Puisne Judge in
Hong Kong.

To Reside in U.S.A.

R. CAMERON BAYLEY of

Howell's Cross Read left the
colony recently for the U.S.A,,
where he has gone to.reside with
his relatives.



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FLORAL & STRIPED

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SUNDAY, APRIL

20,



At The Cinema

1952

Fasten Your Seat Belts

iky

G. Be.

WHEN a producer with a reputation for originality
and imagination pools his talents with a director noted
for his ingenuity, the result should be good entertain-

ment.

Add to this top-notch stars and the result may
very well be PHONE CALL FROM A*STRANGER.

In

this case it is—and the film starts at the Globe theatre

this week.

Emotional conflict and exciting drama are

fused with considerable skill in an absorbing, intelligent

and unusual film.

By clever use of the flash-back,
Director Jean Negulesco tells the
four stories that comprise the
plot, and with it, he integrates
the lives of the four principal
characters. Though the = story
tends to ramble a bit im the last
few reels, the picture works up
in the beginning with ever-
mounting tension and _ excite-
ment.

It is the story of four strangers
who are brought together by
chance. Three of them have
reached a turning point in their
lives, while the fourth has lived
with tragedy for ten years. The
first is a lawyer, who is tortured
by his wife’s one* lapse after
twelve years of marriage. The
second is a strip teaser whose
dream of success on Broadway
has faded and who hopes to patch
up her marriage which was
almost wrecked by her mother-
in-law. The third is a doctor
whose guilty canscience has
driven him to drink and the last
is a loud, brash travelling sales-
man who proves to be the great-
est enigma of them ail. On the
‘plane bound for Los Angeles,
the lawyer is made the confidant,
and when the ill-fated. ship crashes

he is the only survivor of the
quartet. He detemines to do all
he can to console the surviving
families, and through their
problems, he finds the solution
to his own,

Shelley Winters turns in the

best performance of her career as
the show-girl, while Gary Mer-
rill and Michael Rennie as the
lawyer and doctor respectively
are completely convincing. Kee-
nan Wynn’s loud-mouthed sales-

man is incredibly good and defies
description. Beatrice Straight and

Bette Davis both have significant
minor roles, and Miss Davis’
portrayal of the salesman’s wife
is at gem of acting. Her scene
with Gary Merril) at the end of
he picture is the highlight of
the film.

Music and photography are of
a high standerd and by way of
novelty, the audience experiences
the sensation of being in a plane
wiich has started to crash!

The film shows up human
frailties, but one follows the des-
tinies of the characters with the
growing conviction that “to
understand all is to forgive all.”

“THE BLUE VEIL” now show-
ing at the Plaza, Bridgetown, is
based on the theme “Who raises a
child of his own flesh lives with
nature; who raises a child of an-

other’s lives with God.” An ap-
pealing, heart-warming drama, it
makes no attempt to disguise or
mollify the fact that it is a “tear-
jerker.” In fact, writing, acting and
direction are all geared to extract
the maximum emotion from the
ledication of an ageing nursemaid
to her long line of “borrowed”
sons and daughters.



The story begins back around
1918 when a young war widow
loses her baby and decides to de-
vote the rest of her life to looking
after other people’s children, Nar-
rated in episode form, the picture
covers about thirty years in the
life of Louise Mason, by which
time, jobs are not too easy to get
and she has become greatly re-
du¢ed in circumstances. The end-
ng is definitely sentimental, but
it’is happy ard the obvious one
for the picture.

In a film of this kind where lit-
tle action takes place, acting is of
supreme importance, and the cast
in “The Blue Veil” is a strong one.
Louise Mason is played by Jane
Wyman, It is an exacting role and
Miss Wyman plays it with distinc-





tion and gives a beautifully sensi-
tive performance. However, I
would criticise the character itself
—not her portrayal. In view of the
strong maternal feeling of Louise,
her constant rejection of marriage
and a family of her own seems
somewhat incredible. My other
criticism is the makeup which ap-
peared to me to be overdone to-
wards the end of the film. Prior to
that, it was in perfect character—
but at sixty, one doesn’t necessar-
ily look eighty! .

The only other member of the
east who is seen all through the
picture is Cyril Cusack who runs
a toy-shop. A distinguished Irish
ictor, Mr, Cusack injeats his voice
with Gaelic wit and humour, to
say nothing of a stroyg Irish ac-
cent, and is thoroughly delightful.
Charles Laughton, Louise’s first
employer, who wants to marry
her; Agnes Moorhead, a wealthy
society woman who engages Lou-
ise; Joan Blondell, who neglects
her child for her stage career;
Audrey Totter, who after leaving
her son for eight years with Lou-
aceuses her of kidnapping him,
and Don Taylor, an earlier charge,
all give excellent performances
and the supporting cast leaves
nothing to be desired

One last word—take a hankie
with you.

_ The Plaza, Barbarces, is show-
ing one of Abbott & Costello’s pop-
ular comedies ABBi &
COSTELLO MEET THE KILLER
BORIS KARLOFF. I have not
seen it but I am quite sure that
no comment of mine is necessary
for the fans of comic team and
from what I can make out, they
have themselves a fine time. How-
ever, I am going to mention a
film which will start Friday next
at this theatre. About a year ago,
the Plaza, Bridgetown showed, for
the first time in Barbados, a film
dealing frankly with the subject
of sex education. This is now fol-
lowed up by a similar type of film,
Under the title of MOM AND DAD
it is an earnest and sincere appeal
for a wider knowledge among
young people of moral and social
hygiene and lays the blame for
prevailing ignorance squarely on
the parent’s shoulders,

The story is tragically simple.
Two adolescents fall in love and
after a short time, the girl real-
izes she is pregnant. Unable to
go to her mother for help, she
tries to kill herself, but her
attempt is frustrated and:she is
finally taken away until after
the event. Generally speaking, I





SUNDAY

Farm And Garden

(By AGRICOLA)

THE PAPAW—1l

THE papaw story would be incomplete without refer-

ence to the flowering habits of the plant.

understand these as they p

It is well to
lay an important part in the

culture and productivity of the tree. Individual plants vary

widely in the matter of sex.

Normally, the flowers are

unisexual; there are, therefore, ‘male’ and ‘female’ trees
but in addition, there are all sorts of variations between

these two extremes.

The ‘male’ flowers are borne on
long, drooping panicles; the
‘female’ flowers are larger than
the ‘male’ and usually are solitary
on short stalks, In the pe ind
sta of growth it is not poss
to tell the ‘male’ and the ‘female’
trees apart and differentiation
must wait until flowers appear
when it is necessary to remove
most of the unfruiting ‘males’. If
planting has been done on ary
scale, the practice is to leave one
‘male’ to every 12 ‘females.’ But
wait a moment: variations in the
flowering habit can be put-to good
use, Thus, while some trees will
show a preponderance ef male’
flowers and others of ‘female’,
there are still others hb -ing bi-
sexual or complete fuwers in
which both the ‘male’ and ‘female’
elements are present. A tree may
have a very few of such blossoms
in its flower population or it may
have many. If seed is constantly
selected from well developed trees
carrying a large proportion of bi-
sexuals and if the trees are other-
wise of good strain, it is possible
in a few generations to obtain a
strain producing as many as 90
per cent. of bisexual or complete
flowers. Obviously, it is trees with
this character that are the most
productive and the friut too is

usually of the best quality. Fur-
ther, if this rigid selection is fol-

lowed, ‘male’ trees instead of be-
ing necessary are a handicap and

should be eliminated from both

ately, natural

farm and neighbourhood. Fortun-
selection has, in
many instances, operated in this
direction and so assisted in re-
ducing the proportion of unpro-
ductive ‘males’. Indeed, few cul-
tivators now take the precaution
of planting three or four seedlings
to a hole to ensure having at least

one profitable producer therein.

liberal

do not think the human values are
as well portrayed in this film as

in “Bob And Sally’’. The char-
acter of the prudish mother is
over-drawn to such an extent as
to be almost unbelievable while
the father—though all in favour
of knowledge being imparted to
his children, is weak and ineffec-
tual, refusing to take his share of
responsibility in the matter. The
outstanding character is a school
teacher who realizes the responsi-
bility of adults to adolescents and
does something about it. The
youngsters who take part give
the impression of normal, natural
high school kids and they perform
their various roles with sincerity
and naturalness,

There are entirely nedical sec-
tions in this film w 1 i ¢ h are
graphic and may shock some
people They not only tell the
story of normal body functions,
but depict the ghastly ravages
wrecked on the human _ body





STOMACH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION
Try just ONE DOSE
of MACLEAN BRAND
STOMACH POWDER! This
scientifically balanced formula
quickly relieves Stomach Pains,
Flatulence, Heartburn, Nausea
or Acidity due to Indigestion.

M. B. MEYERS & ©O., LTD.,
P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown.





NEWS!



Papaw trees should be spaced
not less than 10 feet apart.and the
holes should be two feet wide, of
good depth and prepared with a
supply of pen manure.
Seeds may be planted in situ or
tet in a nursery and the young
seedlings transplanted when about
eight inches high. Shade and water
them for a few days if necessary.
As regards after treatment, man-
uring is not likely to prolong life
but does increase productivity.
Organic nitrogen seems to be es-
pecially desirable and, therefore,
a liberal use of stable manure is
recommended. The tree is most
vigorous during the first 12 or 18
months and is not likely to re-
main in profitable bearing more
than three to four years. When a
plant has grown so tall that it is
difficult to gather the fruit which
also, at this time, tends ta get
small, cut off the trunk to about
three feet above the ground. This.
will encourage sprouts to form;
leave two or three strong ones
only and these will bear fruit like
the mother-plant in a short time.
It is good practice to protect the
cut surface of the trunk by cover-
ing with a piece of tin.

ment actagthantychcseentghincemenantisiistibiamnipatiieititlitaes a

through
diseases,

A forthright, utterly frank pie-
ture, pulling no punches, it tells
its story in a manner which will
never be forgotten by anyone who
sees it.

Though no definite age

ignorance and_ social

limit

has been mentioned for those
who see this film, I am under the
impression that twelve years of
age is the minimum.











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|

% 136 Roebuck St, Dial 2813 3



Garden Hints

For Amateurs
“GENERAL RE-POTTING”

As was said in a former week’s
article at this time of the year,
advantage should be taken of the
fine weather to do any potting
out of plants that is necessary in
general.

Dry weather is



essential for

potting out plants successfully
unless it can be done under
shelter.

The first thing to remember

when doing this job is to have
the p@ts clean and dry, Scrub
and sun them the day before if
they are pots that have been
used before, and, if they are new
pots soak them for some time be-
fore letting them dry ready for
use, ‘

Besides having the pots ready,
have the potting mixture ready
also, be it mould, mould and
manure and charcoal, or a regu-
lar mixture that is used for
ferns. Whatever it is have it
conveniently near the pots, and
the plants to be potted, so that
there wil] be the least possible

delay in setting the plants in
their new home.

The mixture used will of
course depend on what plants
are to be potted. Some plants,
like Anthuriums, need a very
rich soil, other plants require a

light soil etc., and the needs of
the plants must be known and
satisfied if the potting is to be

successful, Before’ filli the
pots however, no minttey what
the mixture used, a layer of

broken crocks of small stones
must be put in the bottom of the
pot for drainage, and, after the
plant has been planted and the
mould has been pressed down
firmly, it should be heaped rath-

er high to allow for sink
after the plants have eon
watered.

Once having potted out
plants, put the pots in a shady
spot for a week or so until the
new growth has started, after
which they can then be put
wherever desired,

INCREASING ANTHURIUM

‘ PLANTS

When doing this potting out
remember the Anthuriums and
if possible take this opportunity
to increase the stock of plants.
If there are any off-shoots that
can be separated, the sooner
these off-shoots are taken off the
mother plant, and put in pots of
their own the better, for the off-
shoot will develop much more
quickly when in a pot of its own,
It is sometimes possible to do
this separating without disturb-
ing the old plant, but it may be
found necessary to take up the
mother plant in order to get the
off shoot off cleanly with some
roots attached. Another way of
increasing Anthurium plants is
in the case of an old plant that
has grown up with roots out of
the pots, to cut it up. This is
done in this way. Cut the old
plant off level with the mould
stir up the mould, manure and
water it and the plant will soon
spring again, Then take the
piece that has been cut off and
Slice it up diagonally in bits of
about an inch thick each with a
few roots attached. Plant each
of these in a separate pot, and
each piece should give a new
plant.
In this way many plants
should be obtained from one old
plant. But do always remember
when planting Anthuriums that

the





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LLLP PCTS

POPSESOOOE FO

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Screwdrivers
Grinding Wheels
Compasses

Planes
Plane

Vices

, BARBADOS
co-



ADVOCATE



B.B.C. Radio
Notes

HOME NEWS FROM
BRITAIN

Now Broadcast to Listeners)
Here

From Sunday, 20th. April, there

will be some changes in the
schedule of the BBC's General
Overseas Service beamed to this

area. As a result of requests from
listeners in the Western Hemi-
sphere, the five minutes Home|
News from Britain’ will replace
the News Talk at 7.10 p.m. which |
used to follow the News Bulletin
at 7.00 p.m, This change wili
permit listeners to hear this
broadcast at a convenient time}
and it will actually be the first
time that it is beamed directly
to this area. The News talk will
be given after the 10.00 p.m./
News Bulletin and ‘From the
Editorials’ will now be heard at
8.55 p.m. on weekdays.

‘The Tailor of Gloucester’

For the Beatrix Potter fans, |
young and old, there is good |
news in the sehedule of , BBC}

programme in the coming week.
On Tuesday next, beginning ar
10.30 pam. the BBC will broad- |
cast_a dramatised version of one
of the Beatrix Potter tales tha.)
have delighted several genera-)
tions of children in many lands
-— The Tailor of Gloucester.’
whieh Miss Potter wrote when |
she was about twenty-six years!
old for a small friend who was |
ill! in bed. The story, in an ex-
ercise book, with painted illus-|
trations, was accompanied by a!
dedieatory letter: ‘Because you}
are fond of fairy ses and
have been ill, I h ide you
story all for yc a new
one that nobody hi rd before. |
And the queerest .bout it,
is that I heard it in Gloucester-
shire, and that it is true—at least |
about the tailor, the waistcoat,
and the “No more twist!"”:... .
You'll remember that if you}
know the story and if you don't}
but are young in heart you'll)
enjoy the broadcast next Tues- |
day, 22nd. inst. |

Play by West Indian

, It was unforwnate that re-!

ile

ception on the 6th, inst. when |
Derek ‘Walcott’s verse play |
‘Harry Dernier’ was broadcast

for the second time was not as)
good as it was last December but
on Sunday 20th. you'll have a}
chance—reception permitting— |
of hearing another play by aj}
West Indian, This is ‘Hassein’ or
rather extracts from it, by Rogar
Mais of Jamaica, The play is pro-
duced by another Jamaican, Noel
Vaz, who produced many amateur
Shows in Jamaica and was
awarded a British Council schol-
arship some years ago, ‘Hassein’
will be on the air for the full half
hour of ‘Caribbean Voices’ on
Sunday, 20th. inst. commencing
at the regular time of 7.15 p.m.
in the 25 and 31 metre bands,
9.58 and 11.75 megacycles,

they dislike to be planted too
deep.’ In fact many people con-
sider that they flower much bet-
ter when the plant is well grown
out of the ground.

When planning a bout of re~
potting this job so necessary to
the proper upkeep of the garden
is often delayed, or even put off
indefinitely because of the nuis-
ance of getting flower pots, It
means either a chance encounter
with a flower-pot hawker at the

door or a visit to the Bridge
where these pots are sold.
But the flower pots made at



the Lancaster Pottery are better
than those, and far easier to get,
for Piteher’s stock them, and it
just means a phone call order.

Not only are vhe Lancaster
pots better made and _ stronger,
but they are very reasonable in
price, the 80c. size being a really
big flower-pot. It's a good plan to
have a few empty pots of different
Sizes always at hand so there need
not be any delay when the
moment becomes necessary to re~
pot, or pot out some plants.

PEVPIOE 4




%



Trons

RCS ESR









TAGE THREE



« Health Facts"’ Series

DO YOU KNOW
9

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po heartburn, acidity
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Take a dose of sparkling
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stomach wu occur.
dervescent Andrews set-

inner Cleanliness





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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

DAMES STRENGTHEN
LEAD SENIOR DIVISION
W.I. Board’s.**Second Childishness”’

By O. S. COPPIN

OTRE DAME, the Bay Land team who in three

years have won their way and promotion from
the Third Division to the Second Division and then
to the Firat Division, are now poised on the brink
of the acquisition of new honours and the formation
of a new page of local football history—the winning
of the 1952 First Division championship.

Yesterday at Kensington they defeated Everton by
, the odd goal in three and assumed a definite lead—
“he scoring fourteen points as against the twelve of their
former co-leaders in this line-up, Spartan and Empire.

These three tears have each played nine games and need
to play a single fixture to complete their individual commitments in
the First Division this season.

A NOTRE DAME SET-BACK IMPROBABLE
OTRE DAME have therefore a possible sixteen points and Spar-
tan and Empire fourteen each, assuming that each won their

final fixture. The “Dames” would have to be defeated by a most
improbable margin in their final fixture with Carlton and the other
two teams win by equally improbable margins in their final fixture
to occasion any upset in Notre Dame’s comparatively easy progress
iowards the championship.





SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952

Notre Dame Defeat BRIGHT LexT BEATEN
Everton Two—One

NOTRE DAME beat Everton by two goals to one in
their football match at Kensington Oval yesterday after-

noon.

A large crowd witnessed the game and this victory

puts Notre Dame well in the lead above the other clubs.
Both goals which were kicked in by inside right Daniel and
centre forward Gill were scored in the first half of play
while after many spirited attempts by Everton, Culpepper
at inside left, kicked in the lone goal for Evprton at the

closing stages of the game.

Veteran Reece did his best to
stave off the Notre Dame attack
but his defence did not back him
up well. The two Notre Dame
backs Browne and Straughan were
always on the alert and were al-
ways ready to intercept. McColin
on the right wing also played well,
but a few times he was too slow
to get to the ball when it was



FOOTBALL
FIXTURES
KNOCK OUT

Wed. 23.—Pickwick Rovers vs.
Police at Kensington.

AT UNION
Stable Mate Rasette Unbeaten
By BOOKIE

FTHE immediate reaction to the defeat of Bright
. Light by Careful Annie at Union Park is
that everybody will now say to the classifiers “|
told you so.” Bright Light is the first creole ever
to move from F class to C2 in one jump after a
season as a two-year-old although she is not the
first to begin her three-year-old career in this
division,

At the time of her promotion there was not a single person who
J discussed the matter with who agreed with the classifiers. For
my part I was prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt, since,
I felt, Bright Light had done so extraordinarily well at the Christmas
meeting, that they could not very well be blamed if they took her
to be a truly exceptional filly. She had indeed accomplished more
than any other creole had up to that age, with the exception of
Gleneagle.

But all along there was bound to be a feeling of misgiving be-
cause it seemed to me that Bright Light was racing against opposition
which was below the standards of past years. The two horses who
ran second and third to her on the majority of occasions were Gallant
Rock and Cavalier. When Cavalier came up here last month and was
soundly beaten in the Guineas and another race it only made that

As it is, there is little chance of the improbable taking place and : Referee: G. E, Amory feeling grow more pronounced. Now that Bright Light has failed
world — both for personal use, Notre Dame should have little difficulty in keeping Carlton away from Pt wing Seeley een oe ae Linesmen: S. Parris and C. in her first C class Sees with a substantial shavaines a 16 lbs. from
~ and also as a special gift. Famous mischief making in their final fixture with them. at-times he was inclined oo ie ae Roachford. the winner it seems definite that the misgivings were well founded
~~ ane I oe, Semon WHAT OF W.I. CRICKET BOARD? S$ inclin eep and that she was taken for more than she was worth.
— tatesmen, ede Ik the ball too long Division One i
= statesmen, baders” in business P(PHE West Indies Cricket Board of Control, notorious for their "The game started with the iv D Of course the meeting is not over yet, (it drags on to April 26th
he and commerce, women who set Kremlin-like attitude in their manner of giving information to Everton players defending the Mon, 21.—College vs. Carlton. next Saturday) and Bright Light may still put in another win. But
> the fashion for the world — all the Press and West Indian cricket public alike, held a General Meet- Referee: W. Hoyos. as the final grace for which she is entered is over 8 furlongs it is
~ e , ; ; goal at the northern end of the finesmen: R. Parris ang O beable that sh
{ are proud to own and use it; with ing in British ne on Wednesday last week and their attitude pitch, From the kick off Mande- hobinecn : . Beeecr aie te belt Actes tae coon rs ve the Easter
se it; © hanged. ; : son. andicap, both over 7 furlongs, r
Years ahead of anyother... it treaties are signed, and famous nee Se aan treat for holding this meeting that brought repre- Se rent co Ry s Sabie tba Thurs. 24.—Spartan vs, Everton. a three-year-old as early as April this, is a trying getarmmnnd bdaod.
THE AFRO-METRICINKSYSTEM books are written. sentatives a few thousand miles from Jamaica to British Guiana, cepted auichie w rr Referee: S. Gittens. We might not therefore see her until the Trial Stakes in June.
Jitdirety new method of drawing up, For someone whose affection several hundreds of miles from Trinidad, Barbados and the Leeward Shortly after McColin taking Linesmen: A, Parris and W. 4 . 3 y
afd releasing ink, the unig’ 7 gy has satay and Windward islands also to British Guiana, was to elect a President Aduattans of 6h ’ teed Hoyos. But what I find most interesting about Bright Light’s defeat is
Able-Metric Ink System of the Parker YOu value, a Parker ‘61’ would und Secretary of the Board. antag! easy pass cen

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make a most discerning present.

WHO IS WHO?

the ball across the Everton goal
area but Reece anticipating came

Sat. 26.—Carlton vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: O, Graham.

that it points up an argument which I have been stressing time and
time again in this column every time; that the classifiers have made

ik | able i : ook place, according to reports at the Carib Hotel ‘ ; ;q. Linesmen: J. Archer and S, spectacular jumps with creole horses, and especially those of two and
wer yout own was, Ro Somiperatile i eaten te Wednesday Apirl 16. What has been the result? roy pnd, ‘Riches Me bell tuto mid Parris. three years old. That is the fact that the standard of the imported
bg ao writing instrument has ever been my been elected? In keeping with the irritating and fantastically yea; Dapiel again alps one Division Two English horses was bound to be rising as their numbers kept on in-
NEW PRECISION, NEW BEAUTY ade. coneeies conception of their relative importance to West Indies cricket, ogee ord iit Canna Sexoes Fri, 25—Empire vs. Carlton at creasing since the end of the war. The Trinidad classifiers have con-
ee eee een they issued a bulletin that the news would be released simultaneously 4, clear Park. tinually pooh-poohed this idea. They have in fact said that every

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to newspapers in the Caribbean by the Secretary of the British Guiana
Cricket Board of Control on Thursday.
NO NEWS YET

{ AM typing this article at 1 p.m on Saturday, April 19, in the year

of our Lord, 1952, and there has been no indication as to what
has happened at the meeting.

This sort of behaviour that is in keeping with one of Shakespeare’s
Seven Ages of Man—‘Turning again towards second childishness” has

After many efforts by the Notre
Dame forwards C. Daniel at inside
right drew first blood, He kicked
the ball well into the left corner
of the nets beating Reece com-
pletely, Reece threw himself on
the ground but the ball had passed
his hands when he tried to get it.

Referee: K. Walcott.

Spartan vs, Pickwick-Rovers at
Kensington.

Referee; C. B. Williams.

Division Three
Tues, 22.—Comb. Old Boys
Everton at Combermere,

Vs.

promotion along these lines which they made has been justified by
subsequent events. Exactly how they arrived at this conclusion TI
would like to know. Perhaps it was said merely for effect, for on
checking back to a few cases I certainly cannot agree with them.

To begin with, in several cases, notably those of Li an and B
Wishes, the horses never ran in the class to which they had Pc rio
moted, How, then, do they know they were justified with these two.

r t Referee: A. Parris. Secondly how can they explain away Ocean Pearl’
P.O.B 403, Brid been tolerated by the West Indian Press and by the member bodies of The score was now one nil in Rangers vs. Y.M.P.C, “B” at Christmas meeting of 1949. An F class pony ran her to Pts
.O. Box , Bridgetown the West Indian Cricket Board of Control for too long. Too long have fayour of Notre Dame. Notre Shell. in the Derby and she narrowly defeated Blue Streak in a six furlon
*] we been starved of information on matters vita? to West Indies cricket. Dame was now definitely on top s

4388 BARBADOS 8 x33-4 No.712 RA2778

Too long has the facetious answer been given to queries asking for
information childishly withheld.

of their rivals and everyone

Referee: R. Hutchinson.
Carlton vs, Notre Dame at Carl-

event in which she was receiving 20 Ibs. from this hor:

i ) se.
then soundly beaten in B class over six furlongs.

She was

: To add to this,
thought that the second goal the following June she was repeatedly beaten both i E
WHY THE SECRECY? would have been {scored when eee: K. Walcott. cuass. r omh in B class and.A
, ee HO in his right mind could invest the appointment of a President McColin on the right wing centred Found ° Boys ae Se Ue But perhaps they claim to be able to see into the future because
z and Secretary of the West Indies Cricket Board’of Control with nicely across and Daniel rushed «4» a¢ Foundation. it is only on her form at Arima in August and September 1950 that
} the secrecy that would surround top ranking appointments to the in to score but the ball went past Roferce- I King. Grean Pearl first justified her move from E2 to B2, I find that sort
x Board for Atomic Research or the Development of the Hydrogen bomb. the right post. Fri. 25 —Lodge vs. Police at of reasoning peculiar, to say the least.
What must also be remembered is that these gentlemen are meet- Five minutes after this incident Lodge cae Now the situation is worse than it was for Ocean Pearl. At least
, ing at the Carib Hotel with funds from West Indies cricket and the centre forward Gill finding him- Porence: O. Graham Ae pe Sour Years old when she bumped into the exceptional Sep-
f West Indian cricket public, being virtually shareholders, are entitled self alone on the ball kicked the Yorpc «a” vs. ¥.M.P.C, “py tember Song. The danger of her “heart being broken” was very
" : to some intelligent consideration. ball in the right corner of the goal AR A A i at much less than what it would have been for a younger horse. To-day
8 to put Notre Dame two up. c , ws if is quite possible for a three-year-old creole beginning the season
: IMPORTANT COMMITMENTS Half time found the score un- Referee: Ww. Pere + hell in the imported classes to meet a horse like September Song and
{ FWHE West Indian Cricket public is interested from the point of view changed. On the resumption it was Everton vs. Y.M.C.A. a en, unless our classiflers have the good of bloodstock breeding at heart
7 that the new officers, who, in truth and in fact, will be the only Everton who was pressing but Referee: O. Robinson. Ol it is clear that all we will succeed in doing is burning out most of
: By ; ; executive officers of the Board, are faced with a serious task in mould- every move they made was fol- Wanderers vs, Comb. Old Boys our ee oe before they develop properly. If they cannot appre-
5 5 ’ ing the forces of West Indies cricket together in time to face the Indian lowed by the Notre Dame at Bay. , ciate the oe between classifying hardened imported horses
oi ow es tour later this year on a level that should ensure that West Indies players. Wilkinson was called Referee: ox es and young creoles they should be made to do so by rules,
y i is i : o ic! to save twice an id. hy ° : : :
Y when you stop cricket is kept in the forefront of International cricket, ann J ert vans tue Boe Wed. 23.—Foundation vs. Comber- | pecaeend to the Union Park meeting now in progress the form
mn “A THE BOARD AND PROFESSIONALS ton twice kicked at the goal mere at Foundation, in : eAc > pees penta to be very diversified. After his brilliant
Â¥ -THEIRS will be the task of negotiating with the key professional in an effort to score. Olton at _ Referee: I. King. _ Victory on the first day Hellican, it was thought: was only unlucky to
fi al, cricketers for their services. Skipper John Goddard in an inter- centre forward also made a try Fri. 25—College vs, Foundation his Taek oot ts Mc of ne enue Trophy on the second day.
Mt ’ view with me over the Rediffusion Service soon after his return here but was not successful, Then at College. Third’ The last named male pda hoth — — ape Golden Quip
“t from Australia made no bones about his opinion of our chances with when everyone thought that Referee: L. King. , , ° placed in the first race.

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india this year. He said “as long as we can get our key professionals,
we can take care of them.” Ook L

Now there is no secret that the professionals Worrell and Wéekes
have been made some tempting offers for the coming winter, The
bare details as supplied by Goddard himseif are that Worrell has
been offered a coaching appointment in India with passages paid
both ways for his family and himself. Weekes has been offered one
in Ceylon on similar terms.

THE IMPORTANT FACTORS
T IS OBVIOUS theretore that although 1 have no doubt that

Everton was not going to open
their scoring, Culpepper inside left
receiving a short pass ran down
and kicked the bail into the nets.
Wilkinson dashed across the goal
but the effort was fruitless,

When Referee Amory sounded
the final blast the score was un-
changed with Notre Dame 2,
Everton 1.

The teams were:

First Round K.O. Draw
B.F.F.A. vs. Pickwick - Rovers
or Police.
College vs. Spartan or Wan-
derers,
Empire vs, Notre Dame.
Carlton vs. Everton.



FOOTBALL SCHOOL

Yesterday Golden Quip w

on with Pharlite s i
third. Hellican, who we did e fecond and Notonite

not hear was badly off, ran down the
field from start to finish, Astrion meanwhile has reft i
the last two races. ORS Tn ae

Nevertheless Golden Quip, it seems, is a horse aft
of Kitty O’Shea who was also in the ownership of Mr. “Alex Chie
She runs into form as a meeting progresses. She did it at the last
Christmas meeting and now she is doing it again at Union Park. Her
time for the mile yesterday was the best that has been done at Union
tor some years But on the whole the track does not appear to be
as fast in latter years as it was before the War. Brown Polly holds

the record for the mile at Union in 1 minute 38 seconds. Th i
turning out for the West Indies and their chance to see these Notre Dame: Wilkinson, Browne I is the best time for a mile anywhere between Barbedes *rrinidea
islands again would be factors in favour of the success of the nego- gtraughan, Archer, Roberts, The BAF.A. Football and B.G. :
ations but it is obvious that the fact that cricket is their means Of Greenidge, McColin, Daniel, Gill, School, conducted by Mr.

tivelihood must of necessity constitute another important factor in
the negotiations as well.

In addition to this there is the crying need to explore avenues
for discovering fresh talent, especially in the pace bowling depart«
ments, and not having done tnat, train these young men, for any
futute West Indian pacemen must be young men, as near as id
humanly possible to International standard.

TRINIDAD HAVE ALREADY BEGUN
FY*RINIDAD have already initiated tneir own scheme for talent
finding and there is no doubt that some of the other West Indian
colonies who are awake to the needs of West Indian cricket will
soon be following suit, n
It will be the business of the West Indian Cricket Board of Con¢
trol to co-ordinate these efforts at Association level and that is why
we are so anxious to hear of the appointment of the chief executive
officers. That is why we are impatient at the stupid delay and
secrecy that have surrounded the appointment and finally that ig
why we hope that the appointment has been an intelligent one.

SOME STIMULUS NEEDED

HERE was a comparatively poor response to the local Cycle and

Athletic Meet staged at Kensington on Thursday last. No one
expected the large crowd that normally attend the Meet with an
{ntercolonial flavour but coming soon after the Schools had staged
their own Athletic Meet and the Inter-School Union theirs, there
was a justiflable expectation that Athletics would be-in the air and
and that there would be some appreciable measure of local interest
attracted.

The cyclists and athletes themselves showed no inclination to
break either their necks or records and some complained that therq
was too short notice given, ‘

am .. ae t

Mandeville and F. Daniel.
Everton: Reece, Weekes, Simp-
son, Roach, Daniel, Hall, Sealy,
Culpepper, Olton, Haynes and
Holder,
The referee was Mr, E, Amory.

Graham Wilkes continues at
Kensington at 8.30 a.m. to-day.
Players who are members of
the School are asked to be
punctual,



LOCAL ATHLETICS NEED FILIP

Bces athletics need a filip.
arouse public interest and

gain their financial support.

There must be a campaign to
And what

is more, a good lot of this needs to be done before the Whitsuntide
Meet which will be an Intercolonial one. l
Athletes and cyclists will be invited from the neighbouring terri-
tories and these will be expenses which the Association must meet, It
will be necessary therefore for the Association to go all out to make this
Mect a success otherwise their slender resources might not even be

enough to cover them.

. START A COACHING SCHEME :
7 Association should also try and stage some sort of coaching

scheme for the Athletes.

It needs no expert to see how many

things they do wrong, starting, body movements, even e handing and
taking over of batons in the relay races.

There needn't be any expensive scheme.

There are people in the

island who would only be too willing to form a part of a panel of
instructors to the athletes. Schemes like these would do much to awaken
the interest both of the cyclists and athletes themselves as well as the

general public.

Go to it Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados.

challenge.



nk % ‘

AT AS PA i NTS combine robust and



Here is your

_ RECD.

PASO QS

The consistent Rock Diamond put in his second win for the meet-
ing yesterday, this time in the D and E class Mon Repos Handicap.
He had also run a good second to Assurance in the Penitence Handi-
cap only about 3 hours before. He has never been in such good form.

Princess Rasiyya, whom I mentioned last Sunday as a reformed
character, was another winner in D class. She won the Canning
Trophy over 8 furlongs last Monday in an exciting finish. In this
race jockey “Mice” Lutchman, who rode her, I understand. showed
commendable judgment and proved that front and free runners are
not the only ones on which he can be seen to the best advantage,
This I am particularly pleased to hear as I must number myself
among those who thought he lacked experience.

Among the three-year-olds in F class Gallant Rock is ruling the
roost with telling effect. He was easily beaten in the Easter Guineas
by Bright Light but yesterday, as he did on the first day, he proved
vet again that he is the best stabled in Trinidad by taking 133 lbs.
and running away from his contemporaries, the closest to him being
Clair de Lune who was in receipt of 21 lbs. In fact the highest weight
after his was The Ambassadress who carried 116, 8 lbs. of which was
overweight. Gallant Rock, it is worthy of note, is another success-
ful foal of the mare Leap Year who is by O.T.C. out of Scrap II. The
first one, Leap On, although not very outstanding, has always shown
quite a lot of speed. Incidentally he won his first distance race yes-
terday when he took the F class Fyzabad Handicap over a mile. With
Television. already a successful brood mare, Trinidadians might soon
learn to cherish O.T.C, mares, as much as they did his stock when
they were racing.

Little Rosette continues the meeting unbeaten with three wins
to her credit so far. Yesterday she won with 138 lbs. the nearest to
her being Drury Lane who had 122, Her time 1.03 for the five fur-
iongs with this weight was good. I still think Drury Lane must be
off colour but one wonders if Rosette is not going to be a second
Baby Bird.

(DUNLOP

CAMBRIDGE
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SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952








EDWIN ROGERS posing on the piles on 26.10.47 midday. Age 16 yrs, 5 mths.

WEIGHTLIFTING AND
BODY BUILDING

(By EDWIN ROGERS)
NOW that such great interest has been focussed on
Weightlifting and Body Building, I will give the public the
benefit of my six years’ experience of serious lifting in a

series of articles.

I will also endeavour to throw some

light on how important weightlifting can be in helping to
build strong and healthy bodies which everyone is desirous

of having.

I shall have personal interviews
with the lifting champions Messrs,
Barbados Junior and Senior, out-
lining their training programmes,
their progress, and life in general.
Other prominent figures in the
iocal Barbell Game whose untiring
efforts to put weight lifting where
it is today and who are still in the
game will also be interviewed.
Men who due to age have been
forced to retire from competitive
lifting and have turned coaches.

First, however, let me tell you
how and why I started exercising
and the terrific change it has made
to my life. I am going to be very
frank. If when you read this yours
is a similar case and from my
experiences which I will outline
IT can start several of my readers
to begin a training programme, my
effort will not have been wasted.
Weightlifting and all that goes
before it means long and tedious
work, but with great compensa-
tion if you are willing to stick to
it, Ask any weightlifter what made
him start to lift weights. Each
one will probably have a different
answer. However, in each case
they have an ultimate goal in view
to improve their bodies by healthy
exercising in friendly competitive
surroundings.

My Story

In my case it was like this. As
a 18-year-old school-boy very
underweight and very conscious of
the fact—life was not very pleas-
ant. Other boys would make fun
of my size or lack of size and this
developed in me a very strong
inferiority complex. When other
boys were together in a fight,
which attracted a crowd, I was
the quickest to run away from the
scene in order to make sure that
I would not be involved, for being
skinny and underweight I was
very nervous and afraid, When
the school masters asked me ques-
tions, I was so nervous that I used
to forget the answers. I had a
habit of blinking my eyes—again
through nervousness, whenever I
got excited. The boys then began
calling me “Blinks.” “I remember
quite clearly one occasion when
the headmaster ,noticing the blink-
ing of my eyes called me. But, be-
fore I could explain, I burst into
tears. From then on, I was called
another name — “Cry Baby. On
another occasion at our school
Sports, I was all ready in my
running outfit to represent our set,
but when the time came I could
not be found, When my hiding
place was discovered, my excuse
was that I had eaten too much.
Crowds terrified me.

I Begin Exercising

After all the ridicule and
mockery of names, I wanted to do
something about it. I was eager to
develop my body. For a few
months I did free hand exercises
which I found in Physical Culture
magazines, also a lot of swimming
and walking. After a while it
seemed I was repeating the same
exercises too often, which left me
in a tired and exhausted state, I
realised that I would have to doa
thousand or so movements in one
exercise if I wanted to improve.
I then got some rocks varying in
size and weight and went through
the exercises holding them; as soon



EDWIN ROGERS

as they “got light”, I would’ get
some heavier ones. I began to feel
so much better that it encouraged
me to exercise every other morn-
ing for twenty or thirty minutes.
Of course, I could only do my
exercises when I was on vacation.
The first time I ever saw a
Dumbell was when my brother
Evan bought himself two irs,
Harold Webster now the official
coach of the Amateur Weightlift-
ing Association of Barbados in-
structed him on the various
exercises on how to use them, I
was always present, as a spectator,
every evening after dinner when
my two brothers exercised to-
gether, but when they were taking
a rest between exercises, I would
go through with the lighter Dum-
bells some of the exercises they
had done, Many times they repri-
manded me for delaying thon.
Later my brothers Evan and
Glyne joined Mr. Webster's Gym
taking the Dumbells with them.

Improvised Equipment

After this I stopped exercising
for quite a few weeks. While tak-
ing a sea bath ome day I found
an old rusty Bar which I teok
home and with the use of old bits
of scrap metal and stones I im-
provised my own Barbell equip-
ment, I was unable to calculate
the weight on the bar, but it was
sufficient for me to press quite a
number of times. My exercises
were mostly confined to the Press,

My first real ‘workout’ began
one afternoon when I visited Mr.
Webster’s Gym to watch my,
brothers at work. After some en-
couragement, I performed a press
and to my amazement and to the
surprise of the others I
in completing a perfect press with
50 lbs. The news reached my
father who cautioned me not to
let it interfere with my studies.

York Courses

Since I wanted to do the same
exercises as my brothers I asked
Mr. Webster to allow me to ‘work-
out’ at his Gym, but due to lack
of space this was only possible
once a week. By this time we
owned a Barbell at home with
which I exercised on Tuesdays.








It does jou good in two

ways — you rub it on
and you breathe it in!

DOUBLE

For quick, sure relief
rub THERMOGENE
Medicated Rub all over
your chest, throat, and back.
Its healing warmth relieves
congestion, and breathing the



pleasant medicinal vapour it gives
off clears nose, throat, and lungs.

- ACTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

=

In big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins
°

TRS! SSS



Thursdays and Fridays using the
York Barbell and

l and 2. These courses originate
from the York Barbell Co., York
ae but See —- several copies
in many clubs through-
out the island.

At first it was hard to stick to
any fixed schedule. Improvement
did not come as quickly as I would
have liked and this was somewhat
disheartening. This is perhaps the
most “difficult period” to go
through. Difficult because it is the
“crossroads” which will decide
whether you will continue or lose
interest altogether. Stick at it and
onee over this stage the future
looks much brighter.

discuss how

interested in competitive



Friendly Football
Fixtures

A friendly game of Football
between Arsenal skippered by
H. Dear and Newcastle United
skippered by D. Stanton will be
played at the Garrison tomorrow.
These two teams battled to a one
all draw on Tuesday last and a
keen struggle is again anticipated.

Following are the teams: —

Arsenal:—H. Dear Capt., W.
Harewood, G. Blackman, B. Car-
ter, C. Rudder, B. Turton L
Greene, V.. Taylor, O. Taylor, D.
Weekes and A. King.

Newtastle United:—D. Stanton
Capt. R. Phillips, J. Phillips, R.
Smith, H. Bannister, B. Skeete,
L. Jarvis, U. Hurdle, U. Nurse,
N. Dottin and C. Doyle.

Following are the results of
matches played last week: —
Tuesday April 15th Rangers beat

Harkliffe 5—0.

Wednesday April 16th Penrode

beat Malvern 4-—0.

Friday April 18th Advocate and

wi ers drew 1—l.

THIS WEEK’S FIXTURES
Monday April 2ist Harkliffe vs.
Penrod

e.
Referee Mr. T. Maynard.
Tuesday April 22nd Rangers vs.
Advocate.
Referee Mr. J. Hinds.
Wednesday April 23rd Western-
ers vs, Malvern.
Referee Mr. J. Archer.
Priday, April 28th Rangers vs.

Referee Mr. O, Graham.
N.B.:—All matches will be played
at St. Leonard’s grounds,
Richmonds.

RIFLE SHOOTING

Scoring at last Wednesday
night’s practice of The Barbados
Small Bore Rifle Club was
unusually high, Mr. K. S, Year-
wood topped the list with 99 out
of a possible 100 points.

The following are some of the
best scores recorded. ;

H.P.S

100
Mr, K. S. Yearwood.... 99
Bs TREMOR oss 04 98
9a ey VENOM caves 98
» H. W. Webster ..... 98
» H. B. G. Marshall 97
Poe ee ee 96
» T. A. L. Roberts 96
on be, Sc DOTNR 0s sy 00 96

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Mohawk Wins:

| Handicappers Criticise

By Our Yachting Correspondent

MOHAWK, skippered by Bob
Cumberbatch, has now scored her
fourth consecutive victory in the
Intermediate Class. But still it
dees net appear as though the
handicappers are contemplating
moving her back a bit, Other
helmsmen of the Intermediate
Class are complaining that Mo-
hawk has too much time. They
claim that she is one of the big

boats of the class and cannot con- ,

tribute Ker suceess to good helms-
manship but to an enormous
amount of time.

I hope however, that, if it is
only for the sake of making,the
race more interesting, the handi-
cappers would consider
Mohawk with Gnat, Coronetta
Clytie or at least allow her a
minute from these boats.

The Eighth R.B.Y.C. Regatta
was sailed north about in a calm
sea yesterday afternoon, At the
start the wind was medium but
later it dropped considerably.

Fantasy won in the ‘B’ Class.
Hurricane scored another victory
in the ‘D’ Class while Rogue won
in the ‘C’ Class. Vamoose took
honours in the Tornado Class. re

Fight boats started in the ‘B
Class. At the end of the first
round, Ranger was in the lead.
She completed this lap 30 seconds
ahead of Fantasy after receiving
two minutes. Third was Hi Ho
and fourth Rascal. Mischief oe.
ceived a minute from Gipsy =
only lead Gipsy by

she now
wee. second lap Fantasy went
into the lead. She passed

; ahead of
oar five seconds behind Ranger.
Moyra Blair overtook Ranger
fore she reached the Bay Sree
mark. Gipsy overtook "7
and now had 13 seconds on ue.
Fantasy held the lead and W'
on to finish the race a littke over
four minutes ahead of Moyra
Blair which was second, lee
was third, a minute later, ‘an non
did the first round in 35 pine .
1 seconds, the second in 39 m -
utes 27 seconds and the last S .
minutes 37 seconds. Moyra B ' 5
completed the first round »
minutes and 24 seconds ond °
second in 38 minutes and 3 bar
c . Her third round was .
seconds better than the —
Raseal's first round was s 4...
36 minutes and 10 secon Hy —
second in 39 minutes and 3
onds and third 38 minutes and

seconds. : boats
ss seven boats
Class, ae ftth but

wint the end of the first round
Folly was leading, 15.
Siren Se ie later.
ew ,

on : “sailed a beautiful last
round. She gradually came into
the lead and went on to com ete
the race seconds ahead of
Gannet, Third was Magwin, a
minute and 15 seconds later.

Rogue's first round was done in
40 minutes 25 seconds and her last
in 41 minutes and 7 seconds.
Gannet did a faster first round.
Her time was 39 minutes and 58
seconds. Her time of 41 minutes
and 52 seconds for the second was
not very good. Magwin complet-
ed the first round in 41 minutes
and 33 seconds and the last in 43
minutes and 9 seconds.

Nine boats raced in the Inter-
mediate Class. Mohawle
along with Reen and Invader but
at the end of the first

minute behind Gnat. Mohawk
did the first round in 42 minutes
and 31 seconds and the second in
43 minutes and a second, Gnat’s
first round was done in 42 min-
utes and 25 seconds and her last
in 42 minutes and 39 seconds.
Reen completed her first round
in 45 minutes and three seconds



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round
Mohawk was two minutes and 35
seconds ahead of Reen Third
was Dawn, 50 seconds behind
Reen.

Mohawk kept the lead. She
finished four minutes and , 25
seconds ahead of Gnat which was
second, Third was Reen, over a

and the last in 46 minutes and five
seconds,

All the ‘D’ boats started with the
exception of Olive Blossom. Sin-
bad started with Rainbird and
Imp but quickly got away from
them They received three min-
utes from Hurricane.

\t the end of the . first round
Sinbed was leading. She finished
this round two minutes and 15
‘onds ehead of Hurricane and
Imp. Hurricane quickly overtook
linp. Fowsh was Rainbird and
fth Seabird. Peter Pan dropped
cut and headed for her home
ere before completing the
round.

ilurricane took the lead from
Sinbad just before the finish, She

completed the race 35 seconds
ahead of Sinbad. Third was
Rainbow, four minutes and 35

se-onds behind Sinbad. Rainbow
only had a lead of ten seconds on
Rainbird.

Hurricane did the race in one
heur, 29 minutes and 30 seconds.
Her first round was completed in
45 minutes and 30 seconds and the
‘ast in 44 minutes flat. Sinbad did
the first round in 45 minutes and
‘wo seconds and the second in
‘6 minutes and 59 seconds. Rain-
Low's time for the first round was

2 minutes and 32 seconds. She
did the second in 48 minutes and
47 seconds.

Only four Tornadoes started
The’ race was between Vamoose
Ndril and Comet. Tempest had a
jate start and was always far be-
tind the others.

Vamoose took the lead from
carly. At the end of the first
round she was about 35 seconds
ahead of Edril. Comet was third.
Vamoose was still in the lead at
the end of the second round, She
was now two minutes and 45
seconds ahead of Edril with
Comet still third.

Vamoose went on to finish the
race over six minutes ahead of
Comet which took the lead from
Edril a few yards away from the
Club mark. Vamoose the first
round in 20 minutes and 55 sec-
onds, the second in 22 minutes,
28 seconds and the last in 20 min-
utes 54 seconds. Comet finished
her first in 22 minutes, 28 seconds,
the second in 24 minutes five
seconds and the last in 22 minutes
55 seconds. Edril completed the
first round in 21 minutes 37 sec-
onds, the second in 24 minutes 41
seconds and the last in 23 min-
utes 30 seconds.

The Ninth Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C. will be sailed on Sat-
urday, April 26. A full table of-
the results of the Eighth Regatta
will appear in Tuesday’s Advocate.



Water Polo Season
Begins On May 12

HE water polo season is fixed
to begin on May 12th and prac-
tice afternoons for the various
leagues have been arranged as
follows: —

Mondays
Men's B |League;
Men's, A League.

The gear will also be available
on the other afternoons of the
week.

~~ Ladies;"Tuesdays —
Thursdays —

SHELL-LEASEHOLDS DISTRIBUTING CO LIMITED
PETROLEUM MARKETING C) (WEST INDIES) LTD

BRETTON HALL, 16 VICTORIA AVENUE, PORY OF SPAIN





d The



APRIL 20 NO. 220

Topic
of

Last Week



It's really a trite savi
Sometimes we're forced to look

For some those precious phrases
Gleaned from the good old book

Those
Are
While
Just

whd are classed as blessed
those who strive for peace
others enjoy mischief
like a Christmas feast

Last Tuesday in the evening
Up in the other ploce
The Statesmen (*

of Barhado
dust set a pac

“Farnum’s” pace
This time guns were all
To safeguard peasantry
But boys it simply bailed down
To an after-dinner spree
°

loaded

A_round of accusations

Were fired in the at:
Simply by politicians

To get the white mon scared

Boys you should see the bubble
For bubblings they did'nt lack
Only to find out later
‘Twas all talk—and no fact
. :

If they would help the peasant
They should shut up their mouth

We never see these Statesmen
Til elections knocking "bout

The big man helps the peasants
With lorries and manure
He helps them with their orders
For lumber from the store
. . .

And year by year he helps them
To reap their sugar cane

And if he did'nt help them
Their efforts would be vain

Yes boys this is Barbados
Exclaimed frahkly by Lou
The people who are leaders
Just don't know what to do
.

To-morrow morning early
You can all wait and see

No sugar sold at Goddards
To sweeten a cup of tea

The new crop price for sugar
They failed to regulate
So housewives they have
Mm a very sorry state

left

This is what they should tackle
But this they will deapise

Recause they don't have nothing
For Government to nationalise

This ts the world al) over
From dawn ‘til set of sun

The things that we should fix up
Are generally left undone

30 fix the price for sugar
And fix it at once too
Without a little sugar
What car housewife do

The Dames, the Dames have tyumphed
Their football quick and clean
Deserves the National Anthem
Let's sing “God Save the Queen

sponsored by
J & R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
J&R RUM
and the blenders of

DISTRIBUTORS —

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
JAMES A. LYNCH & CO., LTD.

PAGE FIVE
MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY







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Wf you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine Is especially valuable after iliness.

qi we
** To keep
* pegular .

e?

’ ‘take ENQ’S
tye ‘< | if j °

Sparkling ENO’S “ Fruit Salt” first
thing in the morning freshens you up both
mentally and physically, It clears the head,
cleanses and refreshes the mouth, removes al
symptoms of liverishness. ENO’S conrains
no harsh purgatives. Its gentle laxative action
is non-habit-forming. ENC’S is ‘suitable
for delicate stomachs, safe for children and
invalids, Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy.




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Hii

s2itia






PAGE SIX



aulls hair_ .
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HALO REVEALS
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i



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





NEWS for WOMEN

‘unknown’

Venetia the



(By SUSAN DEACON)

WHO will be The Outstanding
Debs of 1952—a year of girls more
beautiful than London has seen
for nearly 20 years?

Favourite ring

“Amor Vincit

conquers all.)
*

inscription :
Omnia” (Love

.
How to Choose Men’s



SUNDAY,

String Embroidery For The Summer



20, 1952

APRIL



Sewing
Circle
By PENNY NOLAN

It is unfortunate that so few
women realize the value of mas-
tering fine hand sewing. Although
the modern sewing machine will
do almost any sewing job there is
still a place for beautiful hand
work in the construction of fine
garments.

A few basic rules will make
hand sewing jobs easier apd more
perfect. The bulk of the material
should be held toward you, In
most cases the bulk should be held
in your lap. Care should be taken
not to crush or wrinkle the ma-
terial in your lap. When so held
the shoulders are relaxed. When
the bulk is on a table and the
seam or hem is toward the work-
er the hands stiffen and tension is
felt in the back of the neck, Ex-
eellent work can only be done in
a relaxed position.

A small amount of the material
should be held lightly between the
thumb and index finger of the
left hand. The needle should be
held between the thumb and index



finger of the right h a
Lady Caroline Child-Villiers i: Socks ; use two or three fingers to hold
one of the most beautiful. F ps MEN’S socks are actually bought, : : .
: 7) aired, — blue-eyed. he it “thi by wives and mothers. That is LONDON, March a. ‘LEFT: Th ; ib in black | One dress at a collection had a 4
€ More aul ul; aaa ht t Mes * Robir Wils © why they are often wrong,” says’ The latest epidemic in the|LEFT: Three piece suit in blac |combined cummerbund and spen-

hit heraaat mada Draenor she Sock expert Mr. Gordon Hope- fashion world is hand-embroid-| dupion, ee cua? re toners | ont. jacket. A piece of materi 1,

Of course! No other nail polish, at'any price, “cathe out’ fe 198h . Morley. ery. The newest materials for it py Aa ack-printe pm) about three yards long, was at-

taney Sede wawear 36 Yeer Sins. ve Sree Equally lovely is honey- , What kind of socks should men are procelain sequins, diamante iene uN ille -d sith | tached to the dress just below the

Cutex contains an exclusive new ingredi- | blonde Venetia Lane, an “un- wear? 5 » dew and garnet beads, which R a i aa fai eee jarm and could be worn swathed

ent, Enamelon. Your nails will retain their known” among the Debs. She “Plain ribbed, not patterned, form intricate and colourful pat- w a - ead and sequin lround the waist as a cummer-

lustre for days. Cutex does not crack, —_ is not classed as a rich girl. She he told me, “and they should never terns on all types of dresses. embroi ery.

off or fade. Choose from the many modern af

fashion shades.

Try Cutex Lipstick -
for true lip-appeal.
New, smooth, long-

t
j
|
|
|
|
|
}

makes her own clothes and has
a good dress sense.
t * *

Others in the running are Rosa-
mond Christie, daughter of John

; Christie, of Glyndebourne fame;

Patricia Cottingham, w hose
mother, Mrs. Thomas Lilley (of
Lilley and Skinner) is said to
have an income of around £100,-

wear brown socks with a navy
blue or black suit, or grey socks
with a brown suit.”

PERFECT CONTRASTS? “Beige
with a brown suit, maroon with a
grey or navy blue, and dark grey
with a black suit.”

Imperfect? The odd socks, of
different colours sported by
Eton boys.

“An Etonian,” says the Col-



Have you ever considered the
possibilities of embroidering with
white string? It made its first ap-
pearance at a collection of de-
signs for our summer, and it
looked attractive and unusual on
navy cotton dresses,

There were shantungs the col-
our of golden sand and burnt
oranges, silk-finished crepes pat-

(By DOROTHY BARKLEY)

for easy walking. Secondly, a full
skirted dress which illustrates the
current interest in embroidery.
Chalk white bead and sequin em-
broidery encircles the skirt and
edges the wide V neck. The dress
is in navy faille, and is worn over

bund, round the shoulders as a
jacket, or as a scarf.

The Masculine Influence

At various times in various
ways men’s fashions have inspired
the creators of women’s fashions.
Some time ago there was the
“Little Boy Look” when we cheer-
fully cropped our hair short and
wore those little boy caps. More



- es i lege Chronicle, “cam express terned ‘with giant flowers and several stiff petticoats. There is recently there was the “Edward- the needle. |Th se of i
00 year; an 7 i g s r . ” “ ” e use of a thimble
lasting Cutex comes in IE Bapah eco Beatty’ his sartorial ego only in the handkerchief cottons delicately nothing new about a navy and ian Look” with its “masher” jelns to avoid using two fingers
shades that harmonise whom Dior recently had photo- *wWo or three inches between checked. Since the accent was white colour scheme — but that jackets, ties and waistcoats. So 't to hold the needle. Push the
with your favorite nail graphed in one of his dresses. trouser and shoe. The re- 6 how to remain cool in .the does not mean that it cannot be Was, perhaps, inevitable that a needle with the side of the thimble,
polish. How does a girl become a Deb mainder of his dress is circum- ;,.at, sleeve details were particu- fresh, crisp and smart. designer would make jackets for not the tip end. Be sure you have
of the year? scribed. larly important. Suit sleeves women cut on the lines of a man’s the right needle fo rthe job. A
All depends on her beauty, her were bracelet length. silk coats The cummerbund and the spen- tailcoat! This type of jacket made needle that is blunt or two coarse
charm, her manners and her dress, » had “chinese lantern” sleeves cer jacket are two details shown jts first appearance this week in can spoil your best efforts,
sense. Money is not important. ‘Mother of World which pushed up into giant in all collections. The cummer- jightweight tweed end was worn If you are right handed you be-
Her parents can be rich or poor, - “pufis” above the elbow, and bund — any colour, any material with a tailored style of dress in gin at the upper right hand corn.
it doesn’t matter. eo



What does “coming out” mean?
Her poise, how she wears her

a



blouses had tiny cap sleeves, or
no sleeves at all.

—swathes the
most often used

waistline and is
to transform a

matching tweed,

er and sew from right to left for

; ; n most stitches. For the catch stitch,
Two styles — one formal, the humble black dress into a cock- , The influence of men’s fashions pjanket stitch, outline stitch and
clothes, and her personality other informal — are starred tail dress, is again detected in the choice of diagonal fagating you reverse the
are what really matter. from the collection. Mirstly. a . men’s shirting for women's procedure beginning at the left
a Simply, coming out of the school three-piece suit in black dupion The spencer jacket — any col- dresses. This has obvious advan- and sewing from left to right. If
+ emer ean = room into the social world. If not (see illustration left). The black our, any material — js softly tages. It is easy to launder and you are left handed you reverse
only means presentation at Court, is offset by pink dupion, printed draped across the bodice, has cool to wear. But be sure to the procedure,
but it means that she is giyen a with a black pattern, used for the either full or three-quarter length choose a simple style. The mast Lace requires very fine hand-
chance to meet peopie of her gen- tunic-style blouse, the collar and

* & Bobylo!

eration and make friends who will
be her friends for life,

She learns how to behave, how

cuffs. The skirt looks straight,
but has a box-pleat at the back

sleeves, and is worn with every-
thing from cotton beach dresses

practical is the sleeveless button-
through style which opens out flat

work. Insertion should be basted
on the right side of the fabric.

to organza evening gowns. for easy ironing. Both edges should be whipped
: down with a tiny sharp needle and
choose to dress, and how to face the ce Noe very fine matching thread. On the
extra mild, extra soothing world.

! Bath Size
PALMIOLIVE



SMART CHOKERS
SUMMER jewellery to wear with
cotton dresses will be gayer than
last year’s cork and wooden varie-
ties. '

Smart chokers are made from
round white china beads and
square rhinestones. I have seen
a 12-row necklace of small bottle-
green beads, and an all-white bead





wrong side trim away the fabric
under the insertion leaving enough
on both edges+to roll a tiny hem,
Hand roll and whip the edges with
fine stitches. To insert beading
roll and whip the edges of the
fabric as you insert the beading
in a seam or between lace and
fabric,

A fine finish for the edge of an

: all ont lace section is made by
r B ERED writes, “M am extremely sorry to hear have received several presents attaching fine lace beading to the
a ab» vein” V-shaped, to fit in the boy eae me but A l your trouble, my. dear, and from people who were not invited. edge with tiny running stitches.

Earrings larger than a keyring,
and made of straw, will be smart

just cannot resist other girls. He
always comes back to me event-

know of the anxiety and worry
you will have to face. However,

Am I supposed to ask them to both
the wedding and the reception?

To join lace invisibly, trim to
match the pattern and pin one

wally. At esent he has one I must urge you most sincerely to ; nai, edge over the other. Whip to-
ze ns Pas hionable Jamaican straw of whe. cnetney girl, Should I take your mother into your confi- OWADAYS, lavish expendi- gether with fine matching thread.
‘ ; 2
¢ gs! take him

SOOTHES BABY’S TENDER SKIN

sandals are now plentiful in
London, the price recently re-
duced by 10s, to 29s, 9d. a pair.

But these attractive shoes

with 3in. wedge heels are the (3

last we shall see for some time.

back again?

AM afraid, my dear, that this
boy is just. using you and
knowing your good nature, is very
much taking you for granted. I

dence. She will, I know, do all she
can to help you and would be ter-
ribly hurt were she to find out ac-
cidentally later on—as she surely
will, After all, she is your mother
and devote dto the only daughter,

ture cannot be aiforded and
I do not think an acquaintance
who sends a present would ex-
pect to be treated as relatives or
close friends. You could send out
invitations to the church only and

A mitred corner is made in lace
edge by cutting away a triangle
without cutting the edge of the
lace, Bring the edges together and
whip.

A lace insert is made by basting

‘ 4 a! . A burden shared, @S5* relatives or close friends by the lace in place then working
| Import restrictions now bar Ser ee one Se ear eae = a eis arenay. telephone or fetter, Or you could around the edges with the Satin
Palmolive—made of the finest ingredients—gives a creamy- | them. . Stas tent. Winks ehat tb ke tok O ROSE. “The spots you men- Put a notice in the paper saying stitch, The fabrie in back of tha
: t * ee .
smooth extra-mild lather that soothes away irritation as it gently |

floats away dirt. A daily Palmolive bath will keep your baby
. refreshed ...
extra-mild . . . extra soothing!

comfortable . . dainty. Remember, Palmolive is



FOR BRIDES
Pearl pink is the new colour
for wedding headdresses.
Some 1952 brides will wear
pink orange blossom with pink



CHILE’s First Lady, Senora Rosa
Markmann de Gonzales-Videla,

more to @o with him, It may
bring him to his senses, though I
cannot believe his love is true
when he treats you as he does.
Remember, my dear, that there
are many more fish in the sea

tion, my dear, are probably due to
bad eating habits. Take plenty
of greens in your diet. A little
witch hazel dabbed on the face
before making up will help to tone
up your skin. If the spots do not

“All friends welcome at the
church.” Which will mean that
the rezeption will only be for those
close to you

TOK. L, You are young enough,
my dear, to have several boy

insert is then trimmed away close
to the embroidery.

When attacking a lace edging to
a rawledge you may roll and whip
the edge of the fabric and the lace
at the same time,

n rt HE FAMILY friends, and there is plenty of time Decorative hand stitching and
wy pearl wailing, poses with one of her grand- — have ever been taken out of Rea ie sure, be for you to start taking them seri- embroidery often make the differ-
» “ Champagne veiling is also daughters at her home in Santiago. i able to advise you much more ously. It would be better, though, ence between an ordinary garment
, 7 new—with a seed pearl head- Mrs. Videla has been selected as q sta, ‘ not to be considered a flirt by your and a really distinctive creation.
= ecan fed clay dress. the “Mother of the World” by the pers ae gna eia S bata fu WEDDING PROBLEM friends. In time you will meet Naturally such work must be per-
_ Platinum wedding rings are American Mothers Committee. . r ;
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It is well



Try this for reliet !

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y

at other times, there is a dull and
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SUNDAY, APRIL 26,
COPPER HAAa HOU ETTea

EXAMINES THE

z
z

“

EILEEN” ASCROFT’S COLUMN

gay hat,” says American actress Julle



1952

CULT OF THE —

MAD HAT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

HOH EAL0111 | RRM RT PRAT

—DEMONSTRATED BY A WOMAN WITH ;
A PASSION FOR THEM:







JULIE WILSON

ons in this one-woman Easter on Doster parate she shows ey-coloured rough straw with friied brim. ‘
Wilson, “makes a woman a woman.” © Of them —with somnemas. Sang every one, Tah o tins apple pod 3 yellow
: er -NEW YORKER . . . Robin felt is Hat has a tartan silk h
Putting theory into practice, she: brought Saoel ; oe hat in
her collection of hats—all 40 of them—to gene is "a Sr Se. « of Diack oy .
= _- - bead vy v
England in grey and silver-band bores : t § pe t detachable ostrich | Sa "gl ti -_
gust couldn’t bear to leave one behind. NA, .. Spring — caw in white. w ‘white with — ie ig velvet leaves
She spends much of. her year's dress sprays” of pink
ance om hats—jor her, the crazier the 4—COFFEE IN SaAns. eect tea ie



A Queen’s
—£3,000



Dress Bill
A YEAR

But did she get value for money?

By GEORGE MALCOLM
THOMPSON

A QUEEN AT HOME. By Vera
Watson. W. H. Allen. 18s.
264 pp.

IN all the nineteenth century
was “The Palace” ever fa\ed with
a graver crisis than the visit
(1873) of the Shah of Persia?

Was there ever a time when
those remote, stately (but very
human) officials who surrounded
the Queen-Widow had so many
problems to deal with, and so few
precedents to help them?

True, there had been six years
before, the State visit of the Sul-
tan of Turkey which cost the
Palace £8,922 14s. 10d., including
twelve quarts of eau de Cologne
for the royal guest and his suite.

The visit of the Shah was likely
to be infinitely more complicated.
But there was no escape. It was
part of the price the Queen must
pay for her own status as a great
Oriental potentate. Yet there
were moments when her patience
wore thin, She asked her Comp-
troller irritably why the Shah was
calleq “imperial.” “Because he is
Shah-in-Shah,” was the answer.
It gave no satisfaction. That’s no
reason,” her Majesty retorted.
The Foreign Office finally reported
that the Shah was not * ‘imperial.”

The Persian saan made his
way to London by Moscow and
Berlin. Inquiries sped across
Europe. Was it true the Shah
‘was bringing three wives? Would
he expect them to be lodged in
Buckingham Palace? “Does he
drink wine or, like other Persians
prefer spirits and those of the
strongest kind? Does he sleep on
the floor or in a bed? Does he sit
on chairs?”

It turned out that “the ladies”
had been sent back from Moscow.
The Shah would sleep in a bed
and sit on a chair. good fire-
work display would be very
acceptable. "

After the Shah’s Berlin visit,
the most unpleasant news arrived
in London, His Majesty’s followers
did not pay for what they order-

_ ed in shops. Their “encampment”

in the Royal Palace in Berlin nad
left “disastrous” effects. Worse,
the “free and easy manners of the
Shah, not yet accustomed to the
society of European ladies,” had
given offence to the Prussian royal
family. Nobody had dared to tell
the Shah that he. should not grab
a ‘chair until the Queen was seat-
ed, or take her Maiesty by the
elbow to make her get up, or put
his fingers into the dishes, or take

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food out of his mouth to look at
it, or fling it under the table if it
did not suit his taste.

The Shah usually had his meals
in private and on the carpet.

If the German court was
shocked “by the manner in which
the Shah consoled himself for the
absence of his harem,” Bucking-
ham Palace was unlikely to be
jess appalled, especially when it
became known that the Shah had
telegraphed to Constantinople to
send on two Georgian slaves,

After these alarms the visit
went off splendidly, the only
trouble being to get rid of the
Royal visitor, or to entertain him
while he stayed.

Although the Persian visit is the

liveliest chapter in this account,
drawn largely from the Lord
Chamberlain’s papers, of social

life at Victoria’s Court, it is by no
means the only sidelight it throws
on a vanished era.

While Europe quivered under
the impact of the _ Franco-
Prussian war, the Lord Chamber-
lain was worried because Lord
Stanley of Alderley proposed to
“present” his wife, with whom he
was said to have lived before
marriage. Lord Stanley replied
that rumours had been spread by
“the unnatural malevolence” of
his family. He had been married

at Algiers perere Mussulman
witnesses. ‘was
admitted to the Palace.

Less happy was the outcome of
the affair Dr. Horsley

Chaplain-in-Ordinary, who took
to drink and ran into debt at
Buxton. When he
dom from arrest as
chaplain, Prince Albert
that the Queen should dismiss the
errant priest,

Queen Victoria spent more than
£3,000 a year on clothes, Whether
she got value for the money may
be doubted in view of the account
of an opening of Parliament given
by Mr. Anson, gentleman usher:
“After one smile, her countenance
relapsed into that peculiar fixed
look of melancholy. I think she
wore a purple dress, Royal
mourning. A pleasant change.”

The drainage at Buckingham
Palace (which led into the rain
pipes), the palace dusters (always
disappearing), the Windsor Castle
chimney-sweep (who lived with
an undesirable woman)—out of
a thousand trifles Vera Watson
builds up a picture of a court and
its queen. A book easy to read,
and to lay down,





ormpact.

LONDON

indation and pow<

Fashion Cosmas

Remember, there’s a Gala Lip and



F.S. NICHOLLS, P.O. B



OX 263 Also obtainable from

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yall the leading Seor

What's Cooking New Facts Come to Light .

YOUR BABY AND

In The Kitchen

More cake recipes. It is always
a heip to know recipes for many
eakes. This week | am giving you
a recipe for Ratan cake, another
Chocolate cake with chocolate
icing and another for a very tasty
Vanilla Cake.

RATAN

Flour 4 oz.

Butter or margarine 3 oz.

Sugar 2 oz.

Sultana 2 oz.

Milk 1 glass,

Egg 1.

Yeast (Dry) 1 package,

Put a bit of the flour in a mix-
ing howl and put the yeast in the
middle. Melt the yeast with a bit
of warmth milk and form a smal!
ball which you put in a warm
place. When you see that the ball
is starting to break up you know
that it is ready.

Add the rest of the flour, the

butter or margarine, the sugar, the “
and

milk the egg the sultana.
Work the dough beating it up
until it is soft and smooth. Put
the dough again in a bowl in a
warm spot in your kitchen and
leave it for about 10 minutes.
Then put it in a buttered cake tin
and bake it in moderate oven.
CHOCOLATE CAKE

1 cup sugar.

44 cup of butter.

2 large tablespoonsful of cocoa.

1 egg.
Beat all together.

When all is
blended add:
4 teaspoonful of starch or
cornflour.

4 cup of sour milk (% cup

milk and 1 teaspoonful of
vinegar).
cup of flour.

me

cup of boiling water.

Mix well again, put in a butter-
ed cake tin or pyrex in not too hot
oven. It takes from 25 to 30 min-
utes. wl

ICING
2 Tablespoonsful of butter,
1 cup of icing sugar,
1} tablespoonsful of cocoa.
2 tea ul of strong coffee,
Mix the butter with the icing
sugar, then the cocoa and finally
add the two teaspoonsful of coffee.
VANILLA CAKE
24 cups of flour.
44 teaspoonsful of baking pow-
der.
14 cups of sugar,
1 tablespoonfu] grated orange
rind.

% cup of butter or margarine.

%4 cup of

Beat for two minutes until the
batter is well blended and glossy

4 cup of milk.
3 eggs and
vanilla.
Beat for two more minutes.
Pour into cake tin (a large size)
bake in moderate oven. ©

1 teaspoonful of



Pink tones

choose carefully ..

English Peach, Cameo, Piak Pear!
Creamy tome: : Honey Glow, Champagne, Golden P.achel
Worm tones: Copper Cold, Rose Tan, Gipsy

YARDLEY 3s OLT BON

YOUR

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

IF yOur mother, madam, lost
her figure after you were born
take special care to watch your
weight when you have a baby.
pn liability to put on excessive
ht through motherhood defi-
ed seems to be «nherited.
This warning to mothers-to-be
is given by Dr, John Richardson,
of St. Thomas's Hospital, S.E. 1,
after a study of 40 young wives
who did not regain their figures
after having children.

Curve-conscious mothers should
not relax vigilence Over their
weight until at least three months
after their babies are born, the
or warns. Many women who
gain no excessive weight while
having their babies begin to put
it on soon afterwards.

Most of the fat forty were
slightly overweight before having
their babies. But pencilslimness
ig no guarantee that a woman will
not lose her figure when she has
children

Some women seem to be born
with a slight weakness of the
mechanism which controls appe-
tite, This mechanism is thrown
badly out of balance when they
have a :

In certain cases women get
overweight with their first baby,
but get no fatter with subsequent
children. Others put on weight
steadily with every child if they
do not curb their appetite

As a_ special warning Dr.
Rehardson quotes the case of 4
woman who weighed seven stones
before she married. After having
she weighed 17%

ones.

Expectant and nursing mothers
‘who want to keep slim should
weigh themselves daily, Those
who find they are suddenly put-
ting on extra weight should report
to their doctors for diet treatment.

They should not attempt to put
themselves on a strict diet without
medical supervision,

Dr, Richardson found that over-
weight women have substantially
more stillborn babies. So strict
dieting under doctor’s orders will
Brel only help you to recover your

figure but give your baby a better
chance,

TO COUNTER civilisation’s
newest ailment, nervous break-
down due to incessant anxiety,
doctors are reverting to nature’s
oldest remedy—sleep.

Over-worked men and women
who just cannot spare the time
for three months’ rest are being
given a Rip Van Winkle treat-
ment with hypnotic drugs.

During a five-day sleep broken
onl for taking liquid food
patients lose thelr” irritability and

nite

Yardley Complexion Powder, fine and fragrant, brings a new bloom to your beauty. \
‘There are nine perfect skin-tone coléurs. Choose a shade slightly datker

than your skin. Press the powder on firmly and generously.
Brush away the surplus—and admire your new-found loveliness.

YARDLEY

Complexion Powder

Dd TREBT LOND

- use cleverly

FIGURE

nervousness, doctors claim,

Big-sleep treatment was widely
used for treating battle-shocked
soldiers during the war.

No Parapraxis

Is YOUR ¥ an “oral
sadist”? He is if he puts his rattle
in his mouth and bites it, accord-
ing to a new dic tionary’ of psy-
cological terms.

Psychologists have perpetrated
so much tongue twining mumbo-
jumbology that a professor has
thought it necessary to write a
“small” (316 pages) Dictionary
of Psychology.*

So that you can test your famil-
jarity with the cOnsulting-room
jarjon I give ten more typical
terms from the professor’s list of
more than 4,500. His definitions
are given at the foot of the
column.

Test yourself. What is meant

yi~

(1) Aerophobia, (2) Grapho-
mania, (3) Jehovah complex, (4)
Looking-glass self, (5) Monorh-
inic, (6) Nolism, (7) Parapraxis,
(8) Peceatophobia, (9) Strabis-
mometer, (10) ae

ANSWERS: (1) ead of high
places. (2) An obsessive urge to
write, (3) Identification of one-
self with God, (4) The impression
of oneself obtained from the
opinions of other people, (5)
Smelling with one nostril only,
(6) The will not to do a given
act,

(9) Instrument for measuring the
amount of squint, (10) Hallucina-
tions taking the form of animals.
"A Dictionary of
by James Drever (Penguin, 3s.
6d.)
+L.£E.S.

Foot lich
Healed in 3 Days

your feet itch, amart ane burn
80 adi that they nearly drive you
crazy? Does the skin eraek, peel or
bleed? The real cause of these skin
troubles is a germ that has spread
throughout che world, and te ¥ ed
various panies such as Athicie 4 Foot
Singapore lich, Dhoby Iteh, You a nt
get rid of the trouble until you ree
move the germ cause A tew dis-

* a






dd Nixoderm,

covery, calle
ills ¢

itehing in 7 muinutes





n 24 hours and starts |

kin aoft, amouth and elear Ww 5 lays.
Nixoderm is so succesful it ie guar
a d to end the iteh atid heal the
al not only on the feet but the
W stubborn eases of Eesena, Piin~
s, Acne, Boils, and Ringworm of
fac © or body or mene? back en re ee
e ty « on. As our henlet for
= pie bec . Nixoderm
vday, The
Nixoderm (°!).00:
precects

for Skin Troubles you.







(7) A slip of the tongue Or
pen, (8) Morbid fear of sinning,

Psychology







Man About Jown

, advertised? They're

Eseribe Hoy Para Los Venezo- ; N
iave been locking for !
. * .

lanes En Barbados!

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd.)
“a tore with everythin for) VICE (Ph. 4461) under the capable
verybedy, especially ! AJ direction of Mrs. Williams takes
,iendid selection of Ready-made| all your Party cares away, leave
uits in ‘Tweeds and Tropicals and| you with nothing to do but to in-
ens, loo, highlights the cloth-| vite your guests. Everything,
section. Prices range from) Sandwiches, Savories, China
down low ($39.43) for two-) Glasses, Cutlery AND DRINKS if
»iece Tropicals. Very smart tail-j you wish, together with Butler
wed Gaberdine Slacks comple-| and Maid service is yours for a
nent the vast Shirt Range in plain| very, very tiny sum per head—
nd faney colours and with collars} you'll really be amazed when you
(tached and separate. You'll find| phone about it! And, oh yes
casuiate, Elite Sea Island Cotton) you can order tastefully prepared
most famous in the world) and) tuncheon boxes, too.
ihe Internationally known Van| *,
scusen. For slumber, this is| RITZ STORE. Tudor Street is
ymething to dream about!—the) quite one of the most pleasing Dry
IbERTY SILK PYJAMAS are) Goods Stores in Town. The Stock

many



















































AQUATIC CATERING SER-

1
Way

wgeous and so are the CON-|/is always interesting—frequently
»ULATE POPLIN striped and) different, look ! Tropical Suitings
.ain colours. English Socks in| for $3.06, 56 in. wide and Prints

10 Lisle and Argyle Wool, Liberty} from 68c, Then there are Sports
are Silk Ties and Bow Ties and | Shirts from ONLY $2.00 and
.verty Wool Ties all ete a| flowered crepes, underwear, ladies’
chly varied and Mena 1 choice! shoes, brassieres and so much is
f Men’s wear. Cave Shepherd’s | sparkling and now that it’s a de-
known throughout the West|light to shop here—at the RITZ
adies by those who travel, and by | (pn. 2316) with no parking prob-
hoae who prefer good clothes. [lems !
« o .

DOMINICA HANDCRAFT CO.,|

~ °

.
CO-OP COTTON FACTORY is

there is no other store quite! presenting this week in its show-
ike this,- where the fascinating | room, the most pleasing of Cutlery
ut-of-door tropics is brought | ir true Sheffield quality—ideal
‘ght in side! Have you seen it? | fo edding Gift? And Czech-
The wonderful Grass Mats made! o: OVakian Clear Plain Glass in
2 any size carpet the floors; rain-|/C ampagne, Sherry, Cocktail and
ow splashed baskets in myriad|L) yueur sizes ers also) and
shapes crowd the walls and Straw, Dianer Sets that can be pur-

ind Raffia work both original and} c! ised complete or in “replacement j
xclusive, lines the counters. | pi ces. These, too, suggest Wed-

Jominica’s hospitable Ira Dangle-| ¢iig Gifts, don’t you think? Down

en will introduce you to her cool|t: earth Earthenware, Mixing |

ind delicious fruit drinks. Pow!ts ete., ., are many and varied, |
. . . |

Y. DE LIMA'S VILLLAGE ORIENTAL STORE on the cor-

JEWELLERY SHOP in Balmoral|ner of High St. is jam packed

ap, a box of magic where prices|with rich Oriental Cargoes. You |

ire the same as in the town shop.
Wonderful Topaz Rings, Watches
or both Ladies and Men and un-

must see these: Hand-carved
Indian Coffee Tables; Exotic Silks
i Gowns and Pyjamas; Wall Mats

isually attractive and practical |{from Cairo in all colour combina- |
‘Iluminumware — (a Vacuum/tions and designs and _ Silver |
Flask that keeps water ice cold/Filigree Jewellery and Brassware, |

for three days) — and so many | beautifully worked and extremely |

aried and attractivé decorative |decorative, And in the modern

tems. -Y. De Lima & Co. Ltd.,j;manner there is Silver Plated

re well known for their Evening |Ware—Knives, Forks and Spoons
. . *

“ags ond the selection in the
¢ lage Shop is not to be FORT ROYAL GARAGE =]
There’s a new Shipment in! Some- |
one told me you were looking for |
a Convertible. Are you? Here's |
lardware when you want it—and the newest of the dinky Morria, {
hat means a lot! Pitcher’s are|Minors in Green-—gee ! and only |
wesently showing their new Valor |$2160. Two and Four-Door Minor
Stove Models including the tricky |Sedams and the larger Oxford
ttle Table Models of one and two|make up an excellent variety ot |
surners with Ovens ranging|models and colours. Incidentally,
rough small, Medium and Large|there are two (2) J-Vans left,
© meet the two and three Burner | spanking new and ready for the
ype Valor Stoves. By the way,|/road now. They're the smallest |
id you see the Mirrors recentlyb\~ delivery Vans available!

c. 8, Pr TCHER & co. is where
rou i. find almost everything in







To keep that special
appointment. TTT

This is the punctual friendly clock that reminds
the world of its appointments—a VICTORY
Smith Alarm. In cream, blue or green cases
with plated fittings, A 30-hour alarm
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ritish eeecermans by Smiths English
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Smith larg

OBTAINABLE
























AT ALL LEADING JEWELLERS |





LOW

always

dresses with

AAAAALAYw

HIGH FASHION

and

go together with
ee
FABRICS

Yes, you and Your liitle gir) can
at half the cost.

Fabrics—made by one of the
largest ma:ufacturers of cotton

Here are two popular Beverly
Patterns for women's dresses
and children’s wear. Like all
“Tex-made’’ material, each is

easy to handle and sew
drapes smoothly, stays fresh,

wears well and washes quickly.

Look for the *“Tex-made”’ tag and
identification bands .. .
you are huying genuine sun-fast,
tub-fast ‘”

DOMINION TEXTILE CO. LIMITED
MONTREAL:

PAGE SEVEN
—



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Wit BACKACHE

Often due to sluggish kidney acta
IFS 18 NOT ae goad whee rap
L are troul with backache,
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sluggish kidney action,
Why put up with pain and dise

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they stimulate and

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—— — ——_

PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS

Ls ae i ae ee ae ee ae



i ADVOGATE

SSSts= fsnee ce]



1952

————

Sunday, April | 20,

—— ct emai

HOME GROWN

THIS week the Control Board is meet-
ing to decide what answer to make to the
request of the Agricultural Society that
the control price of potatoes should be
removed from three cents per Ib. The
argument of the potato growers is that
it is uneconomic to grow potatoes and sell
them at 3 cents per lb.. No one is in a
better position to know whether potatoes
can be produced and sold at a reasonable
profit if the price is controlled at this
level than the growers and no doubt their
argument will be given every considera-
tion by the control authority.

Whether it is necessary to have controls
on locally produced foods at all is still a
subject for discussion among producers
and consumers in Barbados, In recent
years the government of Barbados has
decontrolled several locally grown vege-
tables such as string beans, tomatoes, car-
rots, beets and cabbage and competition
from neighbouring islands during this
period has tended slightly to prevent the
prices of vegetables rising too steeply,
except at times of great shortages when
prices become prohibitive for most people

The major obstacles to cheap vegetables
in Barbados is the lack of marketing and
consumers’ co-operatives and the failure
of controls to keep down prices was par-
tially recognised when the government
took off controls from several locally
grown vegetables. |

There remain on the control list, how-
ever, certain items such as eddoes, oranges,
grapefruit, julie mangoes, bananas, plan-
tains, sweet potatoes,. potato slips, and
yams when the reasons for keeping them
controlled are not at all clear.

In Trinidad the Government is follow-
ing quite another policy. On the recom-
mendation of the Local Food Production
Committee, price control has been re-
moved from locally produced beef, mut-
ton and pork, while between April 1952
and March 1953, fish, milk, eggs and vege-
tables are to be taken off the control list
on specified dates.

The government of Barbados on the

other hand is still undecided what policy ,

to follow with regard to local food pro-
duction except the vague generic one of
encouraging it.

Some of its methods are open to serious
criticism.

There is, for instance, a law which re-
quires 21 per cent. of the arable acreage
of the island to be planted with ground
provisions. According to informed evi-
dence this law is faithfully observed by
the plantations but is unenforceable with
regard to small peasant farmers who pre-
fer to put every available acre under
cane because of the high price offered.
Little enthusiasm, it is stated again in
reliable quarters, is displayed by the
plantation-owners who comply with the
letter of the law relating to the planting
of ground provisions but who do not re-
gard this enforced planting as economic,

It is interesting to compare conditions
in 1952 when there is a scarcity of ground
provisions with 1951 when according to
a speaker in the House of Assembly on
April 24th; “there are several plantations
today with acres of yams still in the
ground because they have not been sold.”

But comparison with the war years is
still more revealing. According to “The
Caribbean islands and the War”, a publi-
cation of the Anglo-American Caribbean
Commission, Jamaica as a result of com-
pulsory legislation during the war years
abolished the need to import rice in view
of the sufficiency of home grown carbo-
hydrates and in Barbados the planting of
ground provisions on 35 per cent. of the
land of the sugar cane growers resulted
in a total production of carbohydrates
sufficient to offset all of Barbados’ pre-
war imports of rice and 50 per cent of its
pre-war import of flour.

Today Barbados subsidises imported
rice at a cost to the island’s revenue of
$350,000 while the subsidisation bill of
certain grades of flour is not too far
behind.

No one would suggest that Barbados
should swing back to the drastic wartime
system of planting 35 per cent. of the
arable acreage with ground provisions. At
a time when sugar is being sold for good
prices this would be an unwise policy and
the provision of inspectors to ensure that
compliance with compulsory legislation
was being made would add to the cost of
the agricultural department.

The fact remains, however, that Bar-
bados is turning a blind eye to the defects
in its agricultural policy although it real-
ises the advantages of growing more local
food.

It compels the planting of ground pro-
visions but has not got the machinery to
see that they are planted. When they are
planted they cannot be sold at prices
which give a fair return to the producer
because the government still controls the
price of ground provisions.

Meanwhile, an island where, with only
14 per cent. more of its arable acreage
being allotted compulsorily to growing
ground provisions than today, sufficient
carbohydrates were grown to offset all of
its pre-war import of ri¢e and 50 per cent.
of its pré-war import of flour, is now sub-
sidising |imported rice to the exteni of
$350,000 annually.

There is much to be said for the argu-"

ment that rice is a simple food easy to
prepare And requiring less fuel than yams
or potatoes.

It is also true that total dependence on

being serialised on Page 8)
recalls the scientist's phrase to
describe the beginning of life in
the world ... “A single-celled
amoeba in the pretozoic slimé”’

Here is an irnpression of the first
romance written in the manner
of an Irish ballad.

I might have been your sweetr
heart 50,000,000 years ago.

You might have been the kind
of girl amoebas like to knew.

When you and I together gat
before the dawn of time

Two single-celled amoebas in
the protozoic slime.

Sure your eyes they never
shone jike stars
You had no eyes to

shine
You had no voice to tell
me that
Forever you’d be mine
Your hair was not like
en corn
Th pens in the fall
For me darlin bit of jelly
Had no hair at all,
at all,

locally grown. carbohydrates would be an | o-Moeba is an Irish name, it 1s

unwise; policyfor so small an island to
adopt, but hah of these arguments nullify
the fact \thats the artificial stabilization of
one impértéd éarbohydrate (rice) is giv-
ing no encouragement to the growers of
local carbohydrates even to carry out the
requirements of the law which stipulates
that ground provisions should be planted
on 21 per cent. of the arable acreage of
the island. If the heavy expenditure on
rice subgidisation is considered necessary
(and it is not by everyone) the least the
government can do is to allow the people
who comply with the law’s provisions to
sell their locally grown carbohydrates at
a reasonable profit.



TOWARDS SANITY
MR. ACHESON has been saying in
Washington that the United States must
allow other countries to earn dollars. The
immediate cause of this statement would
appear to be a note from the Italian gov-
ernment pointing out that tariff restric-
tions in the United States were not

assisting Italy to earn dollars to pay for
American imports.

Similar representations have been made
in Washington by other European govern-
ments and the manufacturers of motor-
cycles, bicycles and chinaware in the

United Kingdom have been successful in -

obtaining protests to. the American gov-
ernment ‘from the British Embassy
Washington,,.

Mr. Acheson is preaching to Americans
a doctrine that has been long pointed out
by the enlightened school of British poli-
ticians who opposed the first American
loan on the grounds that it attacked the
British imperial preference system while
protecting the American tariff wall.

Mr. Acheson was actually using their’
words when he said that the United States
cannot throw up tariff barriers while urg-
ing the abolition of other nations’ prefer-
ences. If the United States are to survive
as a great manfacturing country they will
have to increase American imports.

The incidence ‘of trade discrimination in
the United States is reflected in Europe
where commentators point out that the
improved position of the sterling area this
quarter is due ‘to a contraction of imports
from other countries. But this improve-
ment is by no means healthy particularly
with regard to the European Payments
Union because it has led to the contraction
of imports from Britain.

Cutting imports is a trade game that
everyone can play and if carried to excess
it can end in “Love “All.”

It is no more than a means of “buying
time” as one London newspaper said last
week. The only sane trade policy is one
which is; conducted. without artificial re-
strictions, Théfe“are signs that London is
fully awaresofwhat is happening and
realises that’ the’éutting of imports is little
more than the_exporting of trade troubles
from one country to another, without end.

These facts are exercising the greatest
financial minds in Europe and the United
States and there should be little surprise
if an announcement is made sooner or
later about a conference to discuss the
impossible trading conditions which exist
throughout the free world today. Mr.
Acheson's forthright declaration that the
United States must import more from
other countries may convince American
business men of the shortsightedness of
protecting local interests at the expense
of the total American economy. If only
our own questions of trade could be con-
sidered positively and freshly by alert
minds on the spot instead of being geared
to a rubber-stamped system applicable to
all colonial dependencies rémotely con-
trolled from Whitehall!

Then the possibilities of promoting our
own trade relations with Canada might be
considered differently than they are at
present. And the value of tourism might
be properly assessed.

begob bebad

It must be just the oldest name
old Ireland ever had

So when we sat together we
were once upon a time

Two single-celled O’Moebas
the protozoic slime.

in

Sure I couldn’t hold your —
little hand
You yes no hand to

But we snuggled up to-
gether
Cos the new world was
cold
There was no one there
to marry us
No mother there to call
But me darlin little jelly
o* care at all, at
a

mother

If your comes from
Ireland, from Killarney or
Kildare

You can bet your bottom dollar
she’s descended from a pair

Labour Policies In The W.L

Everybody will now have heard
of the famous telegram alleged to
have been sent by Lord Baldwin,
then Governor and Commander in
Chief of the Leeward Islands to a
Socialist Secretary of State for the
Colonies in reply to a query asking
for information about Communists
in the West Indies.

Lord Baldwin, the story goes,
sent the following telegram:
“COMMUNISTS NIL;
SOCIALISTS ONE (MYSELF).”

I am not in a position to vouch
for the authenticity or otherwise
of this charming little anecdote,
but I mention it because it reminds
me of another real episode in
which I recently played a humble
but leading part.

Wanting information about La-

in |bour organisations in the West In-

dies, and seeking it from a source
which should know more about»it
than any other, I was greeted with
the somewhat Baldwinian reply
that they aren't any.

The wit who offered this infor-
mation was of course pulling my
leg but he was not so far off the
rails as would appear at first, be-
cause information about Labour
organisations in the West Indies
is far less detailed or available
than is, say, our knowledge of the
ancient Phoenicians, }

We know that there are some
120 orga@sations registered under
the trade union legislation of the
British Caribbean territories but
as to what they are and what they
do, we know very little.

What for instance is the Carib.
bean Labour Congress? That ex+
cellent compilation, the Who’s Who
of Barbados 1951 ‘informs us that
Mr. G. H. Adams C.M.G, is Presi-
dent of the Caribbean Labour
Congress.

Yet a recent manifesto purport-
ing to be issued by the Caribbean
Labour Congress (London Branch)
contains this sentence “The pros-
tituting of the term Labour by
Bustamante of Jamaica, Gomes of
Trinidad and their international
bedfellows like Tito, Attlee, Bevan
will not ensnare us into an alter-
native whose benefit is comparable
b that of the frying pan and the
re

A sentence like this owes more
to Moscow than any other source
and would certainly be repudiated
by our own distinguished elderly
statesman who is however su
posedly still President of an or-.
ganisation whose London Branch_
is so naively Communist in
phraseology.

After reading Labour Policies in
the West Indies (published by the
International Labour Office,
Geneva (1952) price 13s, 6d.) TI
am still in the dark with regard to
the 120 organisations registered
under trade union legislation. in
the British territories of the Carib-
bean, but IT have at least found a
handbook on labour questions
which will prove invaluable to me
on many occasions in the future.

One of the greatest handicaps
to progress in the British Carib-
bean is the cat and dog attitude
which has been injected into la-
bour-employer relations by poli-
ticians anxious to exploit this easy
pathway to political notoriety, if
not power. 7

As a result almost any statement
relating to Labour whether eman-
ating from official publications or
from private individuals with spe-
cial knowledge has been suspect
by politicians who have set them-
selves up to be the only true inter-



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fenee

ACHEL CARSON'S book (now By NATHANIEL GUBBINS. move your hat until Stalin has)

Of single-celled O’Moebas who
were joined up for a time

As a lied O’Moeba

the protozoic slime.

Sure me heart it would
be beatin

. Wf 1 had a heart to beat

And me feet they would

be dancin
oe had no
When we had a million

“oda one
And ®e darlin bit
Didn't care. at alt at alt

Strange Honeymoon

While General Eisenhower
tried to cheer us with “The
situation of the free world is
brighter,” and Joe Stalin
said he does not consdier a
third world war is clbser than
it was three years ago, a
bald-headed man has written
to a newspaper saying he is
frightened to remove his hat
in the presence of women

in

* *" because he loses confidence.

ELL, my dear sir, even if

the fate of the world is in
the balance, let us drop everything
tc consider your problem.

One obvious way out of the
difficulty is to keep your hat on
at all times, though this would
not only make you unpopular in
churches, and look foolish in
restaurants, but excite both re-
sentment and curiosity in your
girl friend.

If you did not raise your hat
to her on meeting and parting,
she would think you were no
gentleman; if you told her it had

* stuck to your head, she would

naturally want to know why and
how long.

As these questions. would be
difficult to answer, you might
take aiother line. Men have
vowed not to shave until there
is universal peace. You might
say you have vowed not to re«







By GEORGE HUNTE

preters of Labour matters and
without whose “imprimatur” no-
thing can be said without provok-
ing accusations of prejudice or in
many instances personal abuse.

_ This primitive cat and dog fero-
city is slowly being dissipated,
largely as a result of the great ex-
tension of responsibility through-
out the area to representatives
elected to legislatures by support-
ers of Labour parties;"and more
and more politicians of the Left
are prefacing their speeches by
references to their new status of
political mellowness or maturity,
The ‘publiqation this year of
Labour Policies in the West Indies
should go a long way to expedite
owe state of maturing and mellow-

ing.

Although the principal compiler
of its 277 pages did visit most of
the territories concerned during
1946 and again dyring 1948-49, the
book is essentially, as is stated in
the introduction, an analysis of
d@cumentary informatian avail-
able to the International Labour
office.

It offers no solution to Labour
problems: it uses none of the re-
grettable political clichés with
which exponents of Labour ideolo-
gies normally present their view-

oint: it attempts to assess what

known about Labour policies
in the West Indies. And it includes
Bermuda and the Bahamas with

all the other territories falling w

within the terms of reference of
the Caribbean Commission.

The value of such an unpreju-
diced analysis can hardly be ex-
aggerated at a period when ( in
the British Caribbean at any rate)
the success or failure of present
government policies will advance
or retard progress for decades.
Until the Labour parties of the
area can approach problems
affecting Labour with the disin-
terestedness which marks the
analysis of this report, little hone
of real progress in the British
Caribbean can be entertained.

I deliberately differentiate be-
tween the British and the non-
British Caribbean because this
book is largely an account of the
British Caribbean for the reason
that no other metropolitan govern-
ment has apparently furnished the
International Labour office with
half as much documentary evi-
dence as the United Kingdom.
That is one reason.

Another is the obvious differ-
ence which exists between the .e-
lationship of say Puerto Rico or
Guadeloupe to the United States
and France, and between Barba-
dos for example and the United
Kingdom. 3

Direct Mhancial aid to Puerto
Rico from the Federal Goyern-
ment, it may be mentioned,
amounted to $580.000,000 from the
date of its becoming an American
territory (1898) to June 30, 1945.
And loans from federal agencies
amounted to $82,000,000 during
the period 1929 to 30 June 1944.

These are only two instances of
the many privileges which Puerto
Rico enjoys from its incorporation
into the Commonwealth of the
United States,

__And the French Departments of
Martinique and Guadeloype to
mention only one thing, benefit
with certain modifications from the
rovisions of legislation concern-
ng the organisation of social se-
curity in metropolitan France,

OUR READERS SAY

Family Welfare Society
To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Would you be so kind as
to publish the following list of
Donations to the Special Appeal,
of the Family Welfare Society.

$c.

rT Beery Sree ee ee Try 5.00
Mrs. Blades (Annually) 10.00
Lady Gilbert-Carter .... 10.00
Mrs. Leicester Challenor 5.00
Mr, Robert Dear (Monthly) 1.00
Donation aM EN 5 Os 5.00
Mrs, Mary Gibson rae 25.00
Anon sen beeres a ehenen 10.00
Mrs. K. M. Shepherd ,.. 13.00
Mrs,, Ethel West . isbe 2,00

TORR]... cccrsdece $86.00

SYBIL, CHANDLER,
Hon. Secretary.

Philatelist

To The Editor, The Advocate—
» SIRI am a Philatelist and
would like you to oblige me
in publishing my name and
address in your newspaper that
fT am interested in exchanging
stamps of British Guiana and
other countries by the hundred
with Philatelists in your island
and other West Indian islands.

Hoping you will oblige me this
favour and thanking you in
anticipation.

Yours sincerely,

RANSFORD CHUNG.
16 New Stteet,
New Amsterdam,
Berbice,
British Guiana,
14.4,52,

shaken hands with the President
of the United States.

Assuming the friendship grows
warmer, you could propose with
your hat on. You could avoid

a church and be married in ali

register office. s
But what happens then?

If you suddenly remove your | {j

hat when you reach the hotel,
your bride may never recover
from the shock.

Tf you insist on wearing your
bowler day and night, I can only
say yours will be an unusual and
uncomfortable honeymoon,

Man Bites Lion
ORLD shortage of meat is
* causing some strange be-
haviour here and im foreign parts.
It has been reported that

President Peron recently spent

a whole night poking his nose

into the dtstbins of Buenos

Aires, ostensibly to see how

many steaks had been thrown

away by spoiled citizens.

As steaks are hard to come by,
even in the beef empire, I suggest
that he was probably hoping to
find a titbit for himself.

Dogs im Brita® killed and

injured 10,900 sheen in 1951.

If this is allowed to go on I
suggest that owners of sheep-
worrying dogs should become
vegetarians to make up for the
loss in rations.

And a man in a village in

Northern Rhodesia has bitten

a lion’s nose,

°

This is, indeed, a desperate
case of meat hunger. Therefore
I suggest that he should be

brought over here to bite the
noses of the dogs who worry the
sheep.

Or, better still, bite the noses
of the owners of the dogs that
worry the sheep.

In fact, if he’s that hungry, he
could eat the dogs and their
owners, too, for all I care.

In this way we could improve
our Sunday dinner and rid our-
selves of a lot of pests.

—L.E.S.

The report however realistically
realises that “the task of adapting
a social security system designed
for an _ industrialised Western
country to the differing social
—_ and organisations of a West

ndian community is clearly a
difficult one.” ri

How often when prudent state-,
ments like these have been made
by men of experience in this com-
munity have their makers been
branded with epithets of reaction-
ary, unprogressive or something
unprintable?

Coming from the stronghold of
Labour activities, the office at
Geneva, this statement cannot be
overlooked.

And with regard to the proposed
extension of French metropolitan
social security arrangements to the
French departments of Martinique
and Guadeloupe a mission of en-
quiry in 1949 concluded that only
if a substantial proportion of the
financial burden were borne by
metropolitan France, in view of
the low level of local resources,
could appropriate arrangements
be made.

No other metropolitan territory

with interests in the Caribbean
could afford to adopt the lavish
spending system of the Continen-
tal United States which has result-
ed in the level of real income and
wages having risen in Puerto Rico
over the past decade a fact which
according to the report “cannot be
established in respect of other
est Indian territories,”
Nor does the report err by sug-
gesting that the ills of West In-
dian society can be remedied
merely by the passage of legisla-
tion. The reverse opinion is ex-
pressed.

It is impressed by “the very
considerable strides made @uring
the past decade in the develop-
ment of employers and workers’
organisations” and concludes that
“to a very large extent the further
development of these organisations
depends on their own efforts and
there ib little that Government
policy can, effect in this regard.”

Its conclusions with regard ta
man power problems confirms the
centuries old fact, which had re-
cently escaped attention because ot
the starry eyed visionaries and in-
tellectuals who came to the West
Indies fresh from Cambridge and
other centres of learning to join
the chorus of those who believed
that the faults of West Indians so-
ciety were due to the wicked stiff-
necked Philistines who comprise
the so-called West Indian upper
and middle classes. This myth
has now been exploded by all
honest searchers
amongst Whom the author of this
report deserves to be numbered.

“In the island territories” he
writes “the rate of population
growth and the progressively

strong demand for higher living
standards make it difficult to en-
visage the islands being capable,
with their very limited resource;
of finding a solution without mi-
gration.”

What seeker after political hon-
ours in say the Barbados House of
Assembly would say words lika
these to his constituents? Yet
here is orthodox Labour stating
the truth from its world headquar-
ters in Geneva. '

“Within the present framework’
however and again many people
irrespective of political tendencies
or affiliation will applaud his ver-
dict “there are directions in which
perhaps more positive efforts
might be made notably in regard
to land settlement and the exten-
sion of vocational training facili-
ties.”

And I can pay no greater com-
pliment to the integrity of the
author of this report than by end-
ing this brief review of a worth-
while labour with a
which I might easily have written
myself:

“The introduction of large scale
rogrammes of vocational train-
ng . . . would not only serve «
variety of internal needs, but
would probably be a step in the
direction of breaking down some
immigration barriers.”

And without emigration, labour
policies in the West Indies cannot
hope to achieve much _ higher
standards of living than those we
now enjoy, if indeed they can
maintain them at their present
level.

F cosoocooeososeneooososoososoeoooooncooescosooss




after truth/¢

sentence | ¥

SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952





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SUNDAY, APRIL





20, 1952

THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS

“ WHITE SERVITUDE ”

By JOHN
The indentured white servant
was the first labourers in this

island, so they
first. To our
thinking, the

will be dealt with
modern way of
system of white
servitude was cruel, because it
subjected such large numbers of
persons to a completely differ-
ent way of life, which was ex-
ceedingly hard, laborious and in
many ways dangerous; in com-
pletely different climates and
undeveloped and strange regions.
Such persons were generally un-
fitted for this type of life, and
were incapable of’making a suc-
cess of it. The extremely hard
part was that once this type of
life had been started on by an
individual, there was no way of
drawing back from it, also they
were subjected to masters that
often ill-used and_ exploited
them; even if the ultimate end
was death. Death it usually was,
for many did not survive the
first five years, and fifty to sev-
enty-five out of every hundred
white indentured servants died
without having ever obtained. a
decent chance of survival. It is
not that the rogues, vagabonds,
and convicts who were sent out
would have enjoyed an easier
time if they had remained at
home; as some of the poor woffld
have been unemployed and be

forced to exist on the miserable were committed to prison with porary
poor rates of that day. Also they 20 lashes apiece, Captain Stan- the beginning of

were liable to have been pressed
into the army or navy when men
were required for these services.
No matter how poor people may
be and the risks they run «at

home. to be picked up and trans- Governor of this Island, whether difficulties

ported to a strange land away
from family and friends does not
relieve the situation, especially
when that transportation ter-
minates in servitude for seven to
ten years under a strange mas-
ter and stranger conditions,

Redemptioneer

There was the redemptioneer,
who sold himself into some state
of bondage for his passage and
keep, so as to escape the condi-
tions which existed at his home,
and being attracted to the wealth
of the colonies, the idea may
have been that when he had
served his time, he may have a
far better chance of attaining
decent indepepdence in the land
of his adoption than he did in
his own country.

Every large plantation had
supervisors who were in charge
of the servants and saw that they
performed their allotted tasks;
these supervisors were not nota-
ble for Christian charity. The
welfare of the servant, therefore,
not only depended upon his own
character and adaptability, but
also upon the temper and dis-
position of his immediate supe-
riors. Ligon wrote—‘I have seen
an Overseer beat a Servant with
a cane about the head, till the
blood has flowed, for a fault that
is not worth the speaking of;
and yet he must have patience,
or worse will follow.”

This was*tmhore than’ Tikely a
product of the times as the
greatest cruelties appear to have
occurred in the earlier years of
colonisation, for this enterprise
called for the hardest types of
pioneers and adventurers, These
men and women bore tremen-
dous difficulties themselves, and
were unsympathetic to those who
were weaker than themselves,
especially the unfortunate ‘ser-
vant. These servants were even
punished if they. so much as
fainted at their labours, Ligon
fecords that as the island be-
came more colonised, and ‘dis-
creeter and better natur’d men’
came into the control of affairs,
there was a marked improvement
in the treatment of servants. He
sums the existing conditions un-
der which white servants lab-
oured in this sentence—‘as for
the usage of the Servants it is
much as the Master is; merciful
or cruel,’

Conditions of Service

Throughout the colonial period,
all white servants arriving at
Barbados came under the follow-
ing conditions of Service. Those
of eighteen years or over serv
five years, and those under eigh-
teen—no matter what age—serv-
ed seven, The number of servants
coming to Barbados declined af-
ter all of the available land had
been granted out to the owners
and other servants who had serv-
ed their time. The price an in-
denture or convicted. servant
brought in the Colonies depend-
ed on two things—firstly, the
current demand for labour in
that particular Colony, and sec-

ondly; the individuals own
worth. Scottish servants were
highly esteemed, and the Irish

Catholics were despised; artisans

and skilled labourers were al-
ways in high favour.
The Council reeords contain

the following incident which gives
some idea of the treatment of
servants.

“Whereas by complaint made
hy John Thomas, servant unto

PRIDEAUX

Francis Leaver together with
Ensign Samuel Hodgkins, his
brother-in-law, did inhumanly

and unchyistianlike tortuze the
say’d John Thomas by hanging
him upon the hands and putting
fire matches between his fingers,
whereby he hath lost the use of
severall joynts and in great dan-
| s to lose the use of his right
and, it is thought fitt and so

ordered that the said Leaver and
Hodgkins pay the said John
Thomas within ten days, 5,000

Ibs of cotton apiece and that he
shall immediately be sett free
from the sayd master and that
the sayd Leaver take a speedy
course for the curing of the sayd
Thomas, and pay the same and that
the said Leaver and Hodgkins re-
main in prison during the Govern-
or’s pleasure.” The case followed
of ‘two varlets having charged
their master Captain Thomas Stan-
hope with the venting of’ unbe-
coming speeches against Governor
Hicks.” To -this charge Stanhope
admitted that on the occasion
referred to, of ‘being undeniably
drunk’, and that.he probably did
use the scurrilous expressions al-
leged: but upon further explana-
tion the same servants “did varie
from their former dispositions”
and being pronounced as “lyars,
also lewd and prophane livers

hope was also sent to prison
during the Governor's pleasure
for his unbecoming _ speeches
against “the Right Worshipful
Serjeant Major Henry Hicks,

at any time, drunk «r sober.”

Cruelty

Richard Ligon, who wrote the
first History of this Island, re-
cords that he saw in Barbados
“such cruelty done to Servants, as
I did not think one Christian could
have done to another.” (5) That
was in the forties of the seven-
teenth century, but this cruel
treatment must have continued
for many years after Ligon vis-
ited this Island, for thirty years
later, it was recorded that in
Barbados the white servants
were “used with more barbarous
cruelty than if in Algiers. re
. -as if hell commenced here
and only continued in the world
to come.” (6).

It was not only of the treat-
ment received by white servants
on this Island that Ligon records,
but also on the method of trans-
portation from England. He re-
cords that on the same ship that
he was voyaging on from Eng-
land to Barbados in 1647, that he
found many women to be sold
as servants, the “Major part of
them, being taken from ‘Bride-
wall, Turnbull Streets, and such
places of education. (7) this cus-
tom appears to have remained
in vogue for over a_ hundred
years, for it is recorded that even
in the middle of the eighteenth
century that it was the custom
of some ship’s captains to visit
bourse ae mete in oe ame
welly . unfortunate female
inmates with drink and ‘invite’
them to go to the colonies.



Gives Korea Views



SECRETARY of State Dean Acheson
testifies in Washington in support
of the Administration's $7,900,-
000,000 foreign aid request. Dur-
ing the hwaring he told the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee that
the Korean truce talks are in “a
difficult period.” He added, how-
ever, that “we should resist all
temptations to be either pessimis-

tie or optimistic. I believe the |



WARRENS LINE

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

UP FOR VITTLES



GOVERNOR EARL WARREN of California, candidate for the Republican
presidential nomination, his wife, and daughter, Nina, line up for
canapes ata reception given in New York by University of California
Club of Greater New York. Holding tray is M. C. Gale. (International)





World Textile Slump

Hits Laneashire

(By RONALD BOXALL)

The situation in the textile
industry looks less like a tem-
recession and more like
a slump for
every day that passes. It might
be easier to agree with the lead-
ers of the industry in their con-
tention that this is a_ trade
recession and not a slump if the
facing Lancashire
were not shared by cotton indus-
tries all over the world. But,
unfortunately, they are.

Reports from all quarters tell
the same story. In Japan, where
a decision has already been
taken to cut back cotton produc-
tion by 40 per cent. the
announcement that Britain will
issue no further licences for the
importation of Japanese’ grey
cloth precipitated a sharp fall in
the price of cotton yarn-in the
Osaka market. The price fell
from the equivalent of about 54
pence per pound to 42 pence—a

third of its post-Korean peak
level—before dealing was sus-~
pended for the day.

From this quarter, too, come

reports that the domestic spin-
ning industry may have to reduce
its output still further. The cur-
tailment of 40 per cent. it is
feared, may prove an inadequa‘e
adjustment to the falling off of
domestic and overseas demand.
This gloomy picture is repeated
in practically every other coun-
try which boasts a_ substantial

cotton textile industry. In
America, some 62,000 of New
England’s 140,000 textile work-

ers are reported unemployed, In
Canada, mills are working only
three days a week. Holland is
contemplating a cut in cottén
production, and France too is
worried about the effects on its
eotton industry of recent import
restrictions. In Sweden, the num-
ber of textile workers has fallen
by 4,000 since the middle of last
year and now stands at the same
level as in 1935,

Grave Concern
The situation in Lancashire is

a matter of grave concern in
Britain. Mr. Peter Thorneycroft,
the President of the Board of
Trade has said that unemploy-
ment in the textile industries

amounts to some five per cent.
compared with rather less than
two per cent, for industry as a
whole. But, he added, the pub-
lished figures probably under-
state the problem. They mask a
good deal of short-time working
and inevitably cl6ak wide differ-
ences between one area and
another.

A Manchester Guardian report
underlines these differences, In
Bolton, it says, forty of the towns
cotton mills will be stopped this
week, The latest available unem-
ployment figures for this area
show that on March 17 there
were 964 wholly unemployed and
7,453 temporarily suspended.
Many mills will be closing for a
fortnight at Easter.

The situation in Oldham is
even worse. This week, 75 mills,
affecti some 12,000 workers,
will either be stopped or working
part-time. Last week 13,000
workers were affected. In Roch-
dale, 35 of the town’s 90 miles
are on short-time,

The Cotton Board’s latest
return, for the week ended March
15, shows that the total output
of single yarn in the spinning
section of the industry was only
15.87 million lbs, the lowest
figure reported so far this year.
It compares with 21.96 million
lbs. in the corresponding week of
1951—a decrease of about 28 per
cent, and was much smaller
than the figure$ ‘returned for any
week during the holiday period
last summer,

Forty-one mills were closed
throughout the week compared
swith 28 in the previous week,
?when output was 16.98 million

Francis Leaver, it appearing on negotiations will be successful.” &Jbs. There was a net loss of 965

sufficient testimony that the said




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full-time workers and 200 part-
timers also left the mills, bring-
ing the total number on
employers’ books down to 116,65
against the peak of 124,910
reached in November,

This loss of workers would be
less alarming, and even désira-
ble, if it led to an automatic
inerease in the number of em-
ployees engaged in defence and
engineering export industries,
But no such automatic transfer
of labour is considered likely,

As Lancashire industrialists
point out, many of the displaced
workers are married women with
family responsibilities, If they
lose their jobs in the cotton indus-
try they might decide to give up
their employment altogether, and
workers once lost in this way may
never be persuaded to return.
What faces the cotton industry
therefore, is not only a decline in
trade but also a loss of a large
proportion of their labour force

The belief is growing, more-
over, that the present recession—
which is generally attributed to
the accumulation of large stocks
in all the principal importing
countries—may reflect something
more than just a temporary
readjustment on the part of buy-
ers. It ‘is feared that some of our
traditional markets may have
been lost for ever.

Paradox

The paradox of a situation in
which world cotton textile
exports are gradually declining
despite a large increase in the
world population, has been com-~
metited on in various quarters
during the past few days.

Mr. Thorneycroft touched on
this aspect of the problem during
the Commons’ debate on the tex~
tile industry. We are a long way
he said, from the days when we
used to make piece goods for
Brazil, India, China and the Far
East. These countries now manu-
facture their own.

“Indeed,” he went on, “one
of the great problems which con-
fronts us is not so much competi-
tion from third parties, but that
the country to which we have
been exparting has set up its
own textile industry and is pre-
pared to supply its-ewn market,”

This, however, is by no means

a new situation. .The growth of

domestic industries, with a con-
sequent lessening of import
requirements, has long been

recognised by economists as an
inevitable outcome of the policy
of promoting the economic devel-
opment of backward areas, In
fact, the decline in the volume
of imported textiles goes back tc
the beginning of the first World
War,
General Decline

Before 1914, the volume of
imported textiles was 9,500
million* yards per annum; it fell
to 8,500 million in 1926—28 to
6,400 million in 1936—38, and to
4,000 million in 1948.,And this
general decline in textile imports
has naturally been reflected in
Britain’s own trade figures. Our
exports of cotton manufactures
alone amounted to 7,000 million
yards in 1913, but they gradually
decline until today they are well
below 1,000 million yards,

So much of Britain’s cotton
industry is concentrated in a
single area that any decline in
the demand for its products
inevitably leads to serious unem-
ployment and hardship. As Mr.
Thorneycroft has pointed out, in
a constantly changing world it is
wise to have facilities for taking
up some of the slack at times of
low demand. It would be a bold
man, he said who amidst all the
imponderables of the world today
sought to predict at exactly what
level of activity the British tex-
tile industry was going to settle
down.

Meanwhile, the



Government part



EMIGRATION

Hy

We ended our discussion of
this subject last week with the
warning that careful preparation
beforehand wok be required as
an insurance against failure of
any land settlement programme
in conjunction with emigration
plans. It is too early yet to con-
sider what preparatory capital
works on settlement areas will
ba necessary before their occupa-

tion. These must await availa-
bility and choice of sites. Fur-
ther, such fundamental prepara-
tion will obviously vary in re-
lation to land factors: bonifica-
tion, drainage, clearing, sanita-
tion and water supplies, roads.
schools, and preliminary work
connected with the breaking of
the land — all are likely to
demand attention in greater or
lesser degree at an early stage.
It is possible that an advance

working party will be part and
parcel of the initial set-up and
their duties might also include
the establishment of quick grow-
ing food and forage crops to pro-
vide a start for the main body
of settlers. Type of housing too
will have to be considered; pre-
fabricated units may be the
answer. Local conditions in the
areas. chosen will naturally re-
quire close study. It is not too
soon, however, to begin consid-
eration of the human factor as
this will over-shadow all else in
importance. We propose now to
examine a few general aspects of
that problem.

At this point, it may perhaps
be fitting to offer a brief com-
ment on Mr. Godson’s recent
article where, if understood cor-
rectly, he suggested in his term
‘beach-head’ a few families going
forth like the Mayflower pilgrims
to establish themselves on un-
known territory and. then, by
their success, persuading a larger
migratory movement. In_ their
case, of course, they were fleeing
from, persecution and almost in-
evitable death. and were quite
prepared to face untold hardship.
Many perished. This is not the
case to-day with the advances in
civilisation which have taken
place. However, we could agree
with him if it was a case of fill-
ing vacancies in already settled
schemes, mainly local in their
application, and which would
have to be arranged between the
administrations concerned. But
where, as in the circumstances
with whieh we are dealing, land
has to be drained and conditioned
in blocks, piecemeal settlement
by driblets of emigrants would
riot be practieal. Questions of
maintenance would arise and
vacant areas in tropical regions
soon revert to their original con~-
dition, necessitating fresh ex-

penditure for capital works. In
addition, deterioration — would
have been taking place in the

drainage and sanitation on occu-
pied holdings. So, from an eco-
nomic point of view, it appears
we must envisage complete occu-
pation block by block from. the
inception. The size of individual
“plocks’ will naturally depend on
the topography of the area and

the facilities to be provided.
Further, it would* be obviously
unfair to saddle a few settlers
with the maintenance charges

which should be borne by all the
occupants in a block. Failure to
recognise these difficulties before-
hand would lead to undesirable
complications: resentment and
dissatisfaction.

“Beach-Head ?”

We return to tne human ele-
ment factor and the problem of
selecting emigrants. We under-
siand that a survey has been
made of the peasant holdings in
the island on an acreage basis
that is, ‘he number of peasants
seitled on plots and the various
sizes of the individual holdings
is known. What apparently is
not known is the sources of
revenue of these people: what
percentage of a peasant’s reve~-
nue is earned on-the-farm and
what off-the-farm, It is probable
that a percentage of the holdings
is self-sufficient, what is the min-

imum size of ‘these? 10 acres,
eight, six, four or any other fig-
ure? Those that are self-sufficient
their owsens reasonably happy
and contented, will not be inter-
ested in emigration and will not

it can, within the limits imposed
by our defence and export pro-
grammes, to enable new indus-
tries to be started in areas
affected by the textile slump. .
That is all to the good, but
many people will regret the
implication that the Bitish tex-
tile industry has entered a per-
manent decline. The textile
industries have played an impor-
tant part in building up our
economic strength and, as the
Times has remarked it would be
only with the utmost reluctance
that anybody would resign him-
self to the idea that they were
to play a_ seriously diminished
in the nation’s future

has decided to give all the help economy,





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ECONOMIST

be encouraged. Next, at what
point in the size scale must the
owner or occupier seek off-the-
farm work and is such work al-
ways available to him and depen-
dents? Are total income resources
ufficient to maintain a reasonable
standard of living? Among. this
class a percentage may be oar
ous of emigrating. is a third
group which Tekeiiy ole houses
and plots just large enough tc
provide the ordinary provision
crop foods; obviously, they mus
seek employment to. live. In thi:
group, a percentage will be desir

cus of trying its fortunes else-
where. There is a firth grou)
owning little or nothing, renter:
may be, which must labow
steadily for their maintenanc
This group may be the least hesi

tant to move but the least re

sourceful in outlook, We ar
only citing typical examples fo:
comparison, there may be other

in the adult, mature class. An:
finally, there is the growing num

ber of young people on the threr

hold of their working life fo
which the future holds little o

no prospects of making a hom

with the population density’ as.i
exists today. Classified informa
tion is possible on each of thes:
various groups by planned sw

veys of adequate: samples chose

in population centres. Only wit!
guidance of this kind can we hop:
to minimise the chances of un-
suitable selectees. Similar inves-
tigations have been carried out ir
other places, but they démanc
efficient organisation with pains

taking enumerators under prope

control, There is plenty of tim

if the work is begun now and
carried out gradually, first in area

selected by the Committee anc
then eventually covering the
whole island, It is not such a vas'
undertaking as might, at firs
thought, appear, since the prim

ary surveys should, we think, in-
clude persons not over 40 years o
age, say. It would seem undesir

able to burden settlements of the
type envisaged with le whe
have less than 20 or 25 full hard-
working years ahead of them. I

may be argued that accurate.in

formation of the kind foreshadow-
ed in these surveys will . prove
difficult to secure as the averag:
farmer and persons of his il!
keep no books. True enough, bu:
they have remarkable memorie
and it is surprising what can b«
elicited from them by the use 0
planned, judiciously framed ques
tions. Followed up by skilfu
cross-checks and careful analysis
close approximation to the fact
is definitely ascertainable, In th:
final screening, hea;th anc
physique tests will naturally de-
termine the ultimate choice o/
individuals,

Simple Instruction

Preparatory educational work
among the experienced selectee.
should not be long or tedious
They would need to be genere'l)
informed’ on the conditions they
are likely, to face, creps to b
grown, health precautions, simple
instruction in the use of hands
tools for work around the‘ holding,
care of implements, handling o
tractors perhaps, and so on, Also,
they would need to be impressed
with the importance of a co-oper-
ative and friendly attitude th
among themselves and in relation
to those responsible for guiding
and helping them to find their feet,
The position is not quite the same
with inexperienced young men, It
is suggested that suitable blocks
of land on Government, estates
might be set aside and worked ‘by
small groups of thege, on a co~-
operative basis, under careful
supervision. The lads would be
drafted in the particular areas and
no questions of housing and feed-
ing should arise. Dodds, Seawell
ond Pine estates occur to the mind
Further, on each of the jeul-
tural Stations an apprenticeshiry
scheme might be inaugurated foi
training small groups chosen ‘in
the respective areas. In this way
it would be possible to cover the
whole isMAnd with a network 0!
training sites at no great expense
This preparatory work would b«
fairly continuous in order, grad-
ually, to fill up the land settle
ments as each site or block i:
prepared and readied for occupa
tion by emigrants who would gv
forth, not, in complete ignorance
but strong in hope and expectation
of making homes for themselve:
and families and having had ‘th:
opportunity beforehand of know
ing their comrades.

The above, in bare outline, may
be helpful in apprising the public
mind of the kinds of problem:
involved in successful emigratio:
with land settlement the goal. No
special merit is claimed for any
of the ideas or suggestions pu
forward, The Committee will have
access to the advice and experi
ence of those best qualified to give
it both locally and wherever set-
tlements is affected. But, we dr
stress that, as far as ible
sound and practical methods of
approach are essential if succes:
is to be achieved. It is easy to
fail and at staggering cost.





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PAGE TEN



Winston

twentieth century.
a modern Gibben, it tells
of the greatest interest, both
one will welcome the new

Lord Randolph Churechil’s
career in politics was meteoric in
every sense of that much-abused
word. Emerging in 1880, he blazed
with ever increasing brilliance
upon the Parliamentary scene,
like Milton’s comet “perplexing
nations with the fear of change”’:
only to vanish in 1886 into the
outer spaces of political extinction.
How did an unknown back-
wencher become in so brief a time
the foremost figure of his party, at
the age of thirty-seven, Chancellor
of the Exchequer and Leader of
the House of Commons? Why did
he fall so suddenly from that giddy
eminence—and fall never to rise
again? These are the questions
which Mr. Churchill’s long and
fascinating biography seeks to an-
swer.

the curious political situation
which prevailed in 1880. Thirteer
years earlier Disraeli had taken
his famous leap in the dark and
enfranchised the yrban working

class . %
The Witty Young Man
The People—that mysteriou
coneept whose virtues the political
philosophers hgve so frequently
acclaimed—hace at last become
sovereign. But both the grept political parties
were singukarly: impervious to the

significance of that fact

Lord Randolph Churchill wa
oung, gay» Witty and remarkabl;
clever. Hé ‘saw at once that the
future lay-wiath the party which
could interpret the inarticulate as-
pirations of the new clectorate

He saw. thatwncither the Liberal
leaders, nor his own leaders—Dis-
racli died in 1881—-had any undet
standing of the new forces in soci-
ety. He perceived golden dividends
for a Tory opposition which at-
tacked the Liberals not for being
too radieal but for being too cau-
tious and too conservative.

The Conservative leaders were
Lord Salisbury in the House of
Lords, Sir Stafford Northcote in
the House of Commons. The latter
was a mild and elderly person
deeply imbued with the traditions
of the House,cand a great admirer

of Mr. » Gladstone . whom he
treated with courtly defer-
ence, irksome to ‘he younger

nembers of. the Tory Pariy Lord
Randolph was determined to drive
him out of active politics,

Tose with ihe cool and
enigma. Arth Palfour, Lord
Randolph Churchill formed the
so-called Pourth Party.

Its obiect was, behind a facade
of civility, to etteck and undermine
ihe prestige of the official Conser-
jJeader, Sir Stafford

» giver m

2 i irreverent allus-
son 46 the shepe of his beard. Lord
Rendolph and_his friends declared
cteynial war wpon ell those whom
he himself once described as old
men who crooned over “the fires
of the Carlton Club.”

Han






Banished

Those ha sing tactics inside

» House of Commons were ar

mpanied by popular appeal

tsic Like his son, Lord
‘andolph was a master of irony
invective, rhetoric. ‘Before
long he becam } iding ex

ponent of tiary Dem cracy” in
the country" Re

The first stage of his ambition
was reachedsiti.1885 when a Con
servative “Careqaker” Government
took office. At Lord Randolph’s
ineistence Six Stafford Northcote
was banistreto the dignified ob

security q
himself became Secretary for
India. et

Only one barrier now lay

between Lord Randolph and the
highest position. But that barrier

* 33.5S$O9906S
\ GPCRS O OO SOE FO PSOE FOE

I NOT ONLY

COST LESS
AND

GO FURTHER»
BUT ‘


eles

TASTE

ALF
59

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‘

SBOE POLST



His success was due in part =|

Tam Farm Fresh

(Not the Ordinary Tinned Bu tter)



’s Father

The Strange Dramatic Stery That Sheds New Light
—After 47 Years on a Tragic and Frustrated Career.

(By ROBERT BLAKE)

MR. CHURCHILL’S Life of his father, Lord Randolph
Churchill; is the finest politieal biography written in the be the last. After reading “My
Couched in the majestic

language of
a strange and dramatic story
political and personal. Every-
edition appearing to-day*, 47

years after the original publication of the book.

was formidable. Lord Salisbury
possessed a fame, a prestige and
n inteliectual capacity of the first
magnitude.

Moreover he hated democracy
and regarded progress as an illu-
on. The House of Cecil has sel—
dom been in the vanguard of the
people's cause, and Lord Salisbury
no exception. He regarded

Rendolph with profound

us
Lora



cepticism and no small appre-
er on.
For «the moment he could do

nothing to halt Lord Randolph’s

progress, The Irish crisis of 1885-6
ito which Lord Kandoiph plunged
vith all his vigour resulted in a

Conservative victory.



LORD RANDOLPH
2 beil on the mock.

1886 Lord
became

Tn the
ndolph

Cabinet of
Churchill

Chancellor of the Exchequer and

eader of the House of Commons.
Yet within six months his political
career was at an end.
It is true that Lord Randolph
roated fimance with a certain

levity. “I forget”, he once said,
“woe La bimetallist at the India
fice” ?”” And on’ another occa-

sion, when some figures

decimals had been explained to
he observed, “I never could
trake out whal those damned dots
mean.”

B his ruin came not from
feulty arithmetic, but an impetu-
us temperament.

After a long series of arguments
with the rest of the Cabinet he
uddenly in December resigned on

minor point concerned with
Army estimates. To his surprise
rd Solisbury accepted his resig-





atic amd mode no attempt to

persu him to withdraw. “Did
you ever know a man,” Lord
sulisbury said, “whe





rid of a boil on his neck wanted
nother?” Lord Randolph never
ueld office again.

His Blunder
new edition throws fresh
ht on Lord Randolph's resigna-
n in the form of a memoran-
um by Sir Henry Wolff, one of
his best friends,
It becomes clearer than ever
how fatal a blunder Lord Ran-
lph had committed in. resign-
ng on such an issue when it wa*
till a Budget secret; clearer, too,
ow determined Lord Salisbury
as to avoid a reconciliation with
s turbulent lieutenant.
In 1891 the triumph
ecils was completed, whe

This

of the
n Lord

of a peerage; and Randolph salisbury’s nephew succeeded to

ie lead in the House of Com-
yos. “So Arthur Balfour is really
der,” wrote Lord Randolph,
and Tory Democracy—the genu-
article--is at an end.” Four



1e

4

4 «
9998S

65964
POPPE PTOSS




SPOTS S998%", |



Hand, Feet And Now The-Post? | for STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial

By IAN GALE

MY TURN TO MAKE THE TEA.
* By Monica Dickens (Michael
Joseph 10/6).

I record with shame that this is
the first of Monica Dickens’s books
that I have read, but it will not

Turn to make Tea” I am a Monica
Dickens fam already and I am
busy looking for some of her
earlier suecesses such as “One
pair of Hands” and “One pair of
Feet.”

This is Monica Dickens’s first
autobiographical book since “One
pair of Feet”, the account of the
first—and only—year of her train-
ing to be a murse. Now we may
have the story of her experiences
on the Dewingham Post, an old-
established small-town paper with
a steady cireulation, a conserva-
tive outlook and not much sym-
pathy with the proposed innova-
tions of a junior reporter.

She tried hard to introduce a
women’s page, and nearly got
fired through her efforts, “Every-
one who comes here,” explained
the Editor, “starts off by thinking
this is a lousy old rag and they
must have been sent from Heaven
to bring it up-to-date ... Do you
know why people read this paper?
Because they’ve been reading it
foy umpteen years, and it’s still
more or less the same as the first
copy they ever read... When
they open the Post they like to
know what they are going to get.
Ged knows there are enough
shocks in this world already.”

Since Monica Dickens was the
first woman reporter the Post had
ever had. she was regarded as
somewhat of an experiment by
her colleagues, who also expecteri
her to do the chores of the office.
Here is a typical scene:

“Joe went over to the corner
where the gas ring was. ‘God
gh?’, he said, haven’t you even got
the kettle on yet? I thought you'd
bave made the tea by now.”

“You make it’ I said. ‘'m in
the middle of something fright-
fully important’

‘Not my turn.’ Joe sat down
with his overcoat on, took out
half a bent cigarette, looked at it
glumly and started to roll another.

Murray came in, rubbing hig

Fair At The

The Modern High School’s
Annual Fair and Bazaar was held
at the school grounds Roebuck
Street yesterday afternoon. The
proceeds of the function will go
to extend the school’s library. The
fair which began at two o'clock,
was attended by a large number
of gaily dressed people. The Police
Band was in atten ce,

There were various games in-
cluding Bingo and Roulette. The
Canteen, supplying ices, soft
drinks and cakes was well
petronised. There were several
rafffes and later in the afternoon
a dress parade was staged

the lawn when tiny tots
(ended to the strains et the wuties

added attraction after 6

haying got Pam. was fortune telling. Long



years later Lord Randolph was
dead,

His career had been tragic and
frustrated, but his pessimism was
only in part justified. Lord Ran-
dolph had done something for the
Tory Party which would never be
entirely reversed,

He had shown that the party
could survive only if it paid at
least some attention to popular
feeling and socfal reform.

The lesson has often been for-
gotten--with disastrous results—

ut it is there to be learned
again, and at least one famous
figure has never forgotten Lord
Randolph’s example, Mr. Church-
ill can say as truly as his father:
“I have never feared English
Democracy.”

* Lord’ Randolph Churchill b

Winston Churchill (Odha 21s.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RES D
—L.E.S.




vf

oe
me
Tesh



PAINTS
PAINTS
PAINTS

Yes, We Have Them in
Sizes and Colours Too
Numerous To Mention.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

hands with a dry sound. ‘Come/}
along then, Poppy,’ he said, like |
a kindergarten teacher, “Your |
turn to make the tea today. I
should have thought you would
have had it brewed for us by
now.”

It was not my turn
writing,

Vietor banging
door, He blew on his hands,
stamped his feet, slammed some |
books about and yelled ‘Shut up! |
at the comps.

‘Tea up?’ he asked me. ‘Come

I went on

came in, the



on girl, get cra 4
‘It’s not my turn. |
‘It's always your turn. You’ll
have to get up, anyway. I want

that phone book you're sitting on.’
He pulled it out from under me.”

I turned my copy upside down
so that no one could see what I
had written, took the kettle and
went downstairs to fill it...” —

Her experiences in the boarding
house run by the chain-smoking
Mrs. Goff make amusing reading.
A procession of colourful charac-
ters run the gauntiet of the au-
oa end readers will de-
igi n her crisp, mer -
traits, ° a ae

This is a book not to be missed.
Readable and witty, with a deep
and sympathetic insight into. the
strength and frailty of human
nature, under the surface.

TORY by G. M. Trevelyan

(Leugmans 21/-)

Only illustrations could have
improved Trevelyan’s now famous
— History.

nm this Illustrated edi
Social History the peer ay Poe
been selegied with scholarly care
both for their relation to the text
and for their intrinsic interest.
They form a eollection as fas-
cinating as it is varied. Woodcuts
ond engravings from eontempor-
ary books, portraits of famous
people and photographs of the
buildings of the period illustrate
the life of the people at every
level, helping to make the text
even easier lo understand,

oe three, which is now
published describes the i ‘
English Civilisation iegime of tne
pee of Anne, end also the - of

- Johnson, the 1
years of George ti an ee



Modern High

waited their turn came

with tales of the fortes 8

urging to redouble their efforts to

do better at their school work.
There was



Sgt. C. Archer will render the

fol programme of music at

the Bay St, Esplanade evening,
at 445 p.m.

Grand March—
FAME AIND GLORY
... Albert E. Matt

ores
HT CAVALRY S&S
Potpoarri— pais
MUSICAL JIG-SAW Aston
Two Pieces—
(a) THE ADIEU... .Dan Godffey
(b) SERENADE ..,. Sehubert

Excerpts From the Messiah—
(a) 1 rad that My Redeemer

Andante Cantabile From the Symp.



No.6 in F Minor, ....Tschaikowsky
Sacred Selection—
SUPPLICATION .. S. Baynes
Cherus—
HALLELUJAH __...... Handel
Hymn 26 A&M—

Praise my¥_ Soul the King of heaven.
Hynm 172 A&M—
Praise to the Holiest in the Hight.
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!

RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADIAN RATES
APRIL 19, 1952

75 3/10% Cheques on

Bankers 73 5/10%
Demand Drafts 73.36%
.... Sight Drafts 73 2/10 %
75 3/10% Cable fans ilk

73 :8/10% #Curreney 12%
. Coupons 11 3/10 %

Ws Silver 20%

























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SUNDAY, APRIL

20,



THE LIVES OF

1952

>



HARRY LIME



J'VE known many places and left

them. Made many friends
and lost them. Won many for-
tunes and dissipateq them, My
fate seems to be linked with a
cosmic yo-yo, and the island of
Haiti was a low point in its
descent.

When I arrived in Haiti I had
money. In no time at all . was
on my bottom dollar. ‘

Of course, I still had my friends
among the natives, but even they
had become devoteq students of
Omar Khay-yam. That is, they
took the cash and let the credit
Zo.

I was in one of the seamier
bars, trying to persuade my old
friend Georges to put still another
drink on the slate, when I heard
my name called in a voice I'd
known once only too well.

I swung round, “Dorna! You
beautiful, wonderful witch! What
—or rather—whom are you doing
here?”

ENTER SAM
How He Gabbled !

ER lovely blue eyes were full
of laughter. “Harry, dar-
ling, three years haven't changed
you a bit.” She inclined her
blonde head towards a table where
an American in a seersucker suit
sat alone. “That's him . . He's
really quite charming, Harry.
You’d adore him. He collects
souvenirs collects money
too.”

“Ah! I might have known it. He’s
with you. Well, let’s meet him
. . . And, oh, Georges, you might
tell your boss that Harry Lime is
on the preferred list again.”

The bartender’s teeth gleamed
in his black face as I followed
Dorna between the tables. As she
snaked her way adrcitly along it
was difficult for me to focus my
attention on our mark. The mark,
in this case, was fat and perspir-
ing. Of course he was bald. His
contributions to the aromas of
the bar were generous—his cigar,
his perspiration, his money.

He didn’t get up when we
reached the table. He just waved
his cigar at Dorna, and bawled:
“Hi-ya, Baby? I was just gonna
send out a searchin’ party for ya.
Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!”

Dorna said: “Sam, I'd like you
to meet an old friend of mine.
Harry Lime . . Sam Torkin.”

“Siddown, siddown! Any friend
of Dorna’s is a friend of mine—
within reason, Ha, ha. Y’know,
Lime this is my firs. vacation in
18 years, Eighteen years! Can
y’imagine it?”

He gabbled. For eternities, he
gabbled. Dorna was obviously
amused by my boredom, but my
patience, as always, had a price.
Yorkin kept gabbling till I almost
considered reducing that price
F . and then he gave me my
cue.

“Sure is hot in these parts,” he
said, ‘Well, baby c’mon, Let’s
get outta this dump and find us
some souvenirs.”

“Souvenirs can be more than
souvenirs,” I told him. “The
average tourist trades his travel-
ler’s chéques for a worthless
trinket to show in his trophy room.
But, Mr. Torkin, instead of paying
money for useless sentiment, why
not use sentiment to acquire
money?”

I held up my hand to stop him
talking, and let him hear the
strange sound rolling in from the
hills, “Listen to those drums,
Torkin. They’re telling you the
secrets of Haiti.”

THE DRUMS BEAT
For Wedding Rites

ORNA asked: “Do you under-
stand them, Harry?” And I
replied: “As much as any civil-

ised man is permitted to.”










remember

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e
—_—



SUNDAY

VOODOO DRUMS

Torkin stirred uncomfortably
“That's that voodoo stuff, ain’t
it?”

“Not ‘stuff,’ Torkin. These

drums are calling to the voodoo
gods to smile vupon the wedding
of a native man and his beloved.
The wedding rites are just be-
ginning. ey’ll continue till
cawn. It is the wedding of Fanse
end Gri-Gri. Fanse works as a
waiter in an hotel here in town.
His father got in a jam once, and
I saved his neck, That counts for
something in Haiti . . Now, if
you'll excuse me—I’m going to
the wedding.”

Torkin was impressed. “You're
goin’ up there? Hey, wait a min-
ute! Siddown What's all
this stuff about souvenirs and
sentiment and all?”

“Well, all right,’ I , said
reluctantly. “Iiook . . Haiti is
crawling with priceless relics
that’d bring fantastic prices from
any museum in the States. But
they’re not selling them, Torkin.
You must know the island and
the people to find them,”

“How come they’re worth so
much?”

‘Sentiment, old boy,” I told
him. “The voodoo brand of
sentiment. The natives protect
their sacred symbols with their
lives. And then, of course, there

are the raw materials . . little
sentimental trinklets . dia-
monds, rubies, sapphires. The

kind of sentiment we understand.”
Dorna sighed: “I love souven-
irs like that!”
“O.K., Lime,” Torkin said. You
can get me one of these baubles.
What’s your deal? ”

CRESCENDO
The Negroes Shriek

“TQIRST let me find a suitable

trinket: Time enough then
to bargain. For now, a small re-
tainer will do. But—as_ those
drums would tell you—sentiment
comes high in Haiti.”

I had a feeling that Dorna
would keep Sam Torkin well oc-
cupied for the present, The future
I'd handle in my own way. And
in the meantime, there was noth-
ing to worry about except keep-
ing a date with two dear friends.

I found them in the clearing
—Fanse and Gri-Gri at the head
«@ the ceremonial party, in a
place of honour. Uncivilised
children of the wilderness they
were , and so completely devoid
of treachery and dishonesty that
it appealed even to this rogue’s
heart.

They greeted me _ warmly.

Fanse said: ‘“M’sieur Harry! We
don’t think you ever come. We
are already married It is

now the moment to pledge our-
selves to the authority . (ce
a tribal custom, We—”

Gri-Gri put a small hand over
his mouth. ‘“Fanse!” Then, to
me: “Please, Harry! These are
tribal secrets. We can trust no
one with them,”

The drums veat insistenly, rose
to a crescendo, Suddenly the
entire gathering of Negroes began
to shriek and yell. The hot air
pulsed with the din.

“Fanse!” I said, _ startled.
“What's happening? What’s that?”

His eyes were wild with excite-
ment and anticipation. “It is the
authority! The sceptre!” he cried.
“The sacred sceptre of Henri
Cristophe!”

The sceptre of Henri Cristophe.
Here was the souvenir for Torkin.
I left my native friends to their
merry-making and beat it back to
town, fast,

But Torkin wasn't interested.
Even when I told him that Henri
Cristophe was the George
Washington of Haiti, he wasn’t
impressed. “Ah, every two-bit
country’s got its own Washing-
ton,” he — scoffed. “Get me



SOAP



COSSSFOD

Washington’s
interested.”

“Listen, man,” I said patiently.
“Cristophe started life as a slave.
He became Haiti’s most powerful
ruler. He stood off the combined
armies of France and England
with only 2,000 men! Up near Le
Cap Haitien, there’s a tremendous
fortress, high on the hill. Wash-
ington didn’t build that. Cristophe
did. He planned it, designed it,
dug rocks out of the mountains
with his bare hands . . . You're
a self-made man, Torkin. That
should appeal to you.”

“What the
Lime?”

“Look, Tlorkin. Henri Cristophe
was a landlocked saint to these
people—and all-powerful earth-
god. While he lived, his sceptre
was his symbol of strength—and
wealth. He had more jewels in
that sceptre than Dorna has
curves, Then there was a revolt
here, and Cristophe was found
dead. But the sceptre was gone.
For over 100 years its where-
abuts have been kept secret . . .
I know the secret, Torkin. I can
get it for you.”

“Yeah? How?” He
interested now, all right.

“That's my business. Your
business is to make it worth my
while,”

He made up his mind, “O.K.,
Lime. How much this time?”

I said: “Plenty, Torkin
But plenty!”

The next morning I climbéd
up.to the little hut Fanse had
built for his lovely bride. They
were like a pair of kids there to-
gether. It was a shame to break
up their happy welcome with
sordid talk of business. But it
had to be done,

and I’m

sceptre,

about sceptre,

was

_I put down the drink they had
given me and said: “Fanse , °
It’s that sceptre . . . the sceptre
of Henri. . . Uh, . , what's the
matter?”

Gri-Gri’s pretty face had gone
a sickly grey.

_She whispered: “Harry, please !
You must not ask. ‘These are
secrets of our people,”

I shrugged and made my way
back to town. It looked like a
hopeless job# I went to my dingy
room and sat on the bed, moodily
figuring how I could raise the
rent. :

Suddenly there came a knock
on the ddor, and I called “Come
in!” A figure slipped quickly
into the room. It was Fanse, and
if he’d looked frightened up there
in his house, he now looked fit
for a strait-jacket. He carried
something wrapped in sacking.

“When you are at my house
to-day, I see that you have great
trouble,” he said. “I tell Gri-Gri
you must have great trouble or
you would not ask for tribal
secrets. But it is all right, Harry.

* Baby revels in the
cream-like lather of
Soap It combines
emollient ana medicinal
which keep



TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

———$—$——
The Year Book of the West Indies



“I hear the drums,
sinister and urgent.”
Orson Welles, who portrays
Harry Lime in the “new
B.B.C. series “The Lives of

Harry Lime.”
From Haiti, mysterious
* isle whose natives still
practise the savage jungle
rites of their ancestors, comes
this new Harry Lime adven-
ture.

Harry Lime, that engaging
rogue, is dead now, He died
in the sewers of Vienna after
a series of escapades that
made screen history in the
film “The Third Man.” But
before that he had lived
many lives ... each
packed with thrills.

The Empire News is telling
them: all—exclusively. To-
day’s story is called “Voodoo
Drums”.

You are my friend. When you
are in trouble, I help you ie 4
Herel take it! And he threw the

bundle on the bed beside me.

The
The jewelled

sacking came unwrapped.
sceptre of Henri

Cristophe blazed up at me.
“You stole it from the high
priest!” I gasped. “What if they

find you took it?
to the police?”

He smiled sadly. “They will not
go to the police. The priest will
be my judge. They will punish
me . . I will die.”

Had I known a man like Fanse
earlier in my life, my ideas about
men might be different to-day.

I tried to explain some of this
to Dorna that night as we had a
drink in the bar, but she was
only interested in the sceptre it-
self, and the chances of Torkin

They won't go

buying it. “What's it really
worth?” she asked.
HYPNOTIC

Rhythm of Death

£ H, twenty thousand dollars,
maybe twenty-five .
Move the ash tray over, hmmm?’

“Bet Torkin would give me
thirty-five thousand for it. I’m
prettier than you. If you let me
peddle it to Torkin—”

I laughed, “Dorna, my sweet,
I lost you three years ago in
Madagascar. The sceptre might
be a temptation for you to leave

me again, Besides, the fact is
. . + I don’t have the sceptre.
Torkin bought it this morning

. for fifty thousand!’
The drums had started again
up in the hills. Before we had
drunk two glasses of champagne

“he noise had become loud, sinis-

ter and urgent. It affected
Georges, the barman, strangely.

With eyes rolling in his black
skull, he told us: “I am sorry, 1

must close the bar ; The
drums, Monsieur Harry. You
understand » . . the’drums!”

I was listening hard now, Dorna,
clutching my arm, said; “Harry
. . . What is it?”

“I don’t know. Those are the
death drums, They mean some-
one’s dead or dying . . . or going
to die.” Then I repeated slowly:
ve . or going to die! Dorna,
I have a hunch . . but 1 hope
I’m wrong.”

I shook off her hand and bolted
towards the door. She called
after me: “Harry! Wait! Where
are you. going?”

When I arrived at the ceremon-
ial grounds I. saw hundreds of
natives, still dressed in the tatter-
ed dungarees of the cane fields,
dancing and shrieking in a half-
hypnotic state, The death drums
were rolling all night. There was
no mistaking them... And as J
crashed through the bush sur-
rounding the clearing I saw

they’d already taken a life. There
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The Truth in
Your Horoscope

Was a body strapped to a post in
the centre of the circle, It was
Tiittilated . . charred . .-al-
most unrecognisable, Sam Torkin!
The voodeo priest danced up and
ack in front of it, waving curses
over it screaming through
the slits in a hideous mask .

afid in his hand he held the
sceptre of Henri Cristophe. The
sceptre had cost Torkin more

than he’d bargained for.
SACRIFICE
The Lovers Wait

J ‘D had enough, I turned to
leave. And then, at the far
end of the clearing, I saw some-
thing else. Two more bodies, tied
together back to back .. hang-
ing by their wrists from a long
-pole strung between two

The two of them together
; Fanse and Gri-Gri
ready to be sacrificed,

I didn’t wait to think. I dashed





Would you like to know what the)
Stars indicate for you? Would you like
to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore, |

India’s most famous Astrologer,
anctent science to

who by

useful purposes
has built up an
enviable reputa-
tion? The ac-
curacy of his
Predictions and
the sound practi-
cal advice con-
tained in. his
Horoscopes on |
Business, Specu |
lation, Finances,
Love -_ affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, ete., |
have astounced |
educated people
the world over
George Mackey



of New York be- 4 }

lieves that Tabore must possess some sort |
of second-sight.

To popularise his system Tabore will |
send you FREE your Astral Interpreta- |
tion if you forward him your full name

(Mr. Mrs. or Miss), address and date of

‘ ‘ 2 , | birth all clearly written by yourself. No |
gut into the centre of that crazy,|money wanted for Astrological Work, |
Dbiood-thirsty gathering, yelling:| Postage etc, but send 1/- in British
“No! ait! S ! is Postal Order for stationery, testimonials

a Stop it! . . . Listen all and other interesting literature. You will
of you.

The swbered

them,

surprise almost

I shovited again: “You're making
a mistake. You're torturing two
innocent people. You can’t do it!

The priest said:
wronged us It
They must die.”

“They can't die. You think they
sold the sceptre to this man, but
they didn’t. I did. I'm the guy
you want, go untie those ropes,
Come on, move, or there'll be a
new voodoo priest holding forth
at your funeral,”

The crowd began to yell again,
and the priest swung his arm
towards them, “It’s no use, Harry
Lime. If you kill me, others will
take the revenge.”

I whipped out my clasp knife
and slashed at the ropes that
bound the girl, “It’s no use to
kill these “two, either,” I said.
*O.K., Gri-Gri, Your'e loose. Help
untie Fanse.”

She moaned: “Get away.
have brought shame to us.”

HEROISM
I Made It Pay

“They have
was forbidden

You

es, K I'll do it myself. . . Hold
still, Fanse There!
You're loose , Now run for

it.’ I yanked out the gun I had
holstered under my armpit. “Stand
back, you lunatics, or I'll start
knocking off voodoos!”

The priest and another man
died before I had convinced them
I wasn’t fooling,

Next morning Dorna and I
were on a steamship, leaning over
the stern rail.

“Well, there goes Haiti,” I said.
“Another corner of the world
chipped off. Haiti is through with
Harry Lime . . . Guess I messed

up your meal ticket, too, er?”
*Sam Torkin,” said Dorn
gently. “Pd@or Sam, Well

don't worry, Harry. You'll take
care of me . until the fifty
thousand is gone.”

I suppose a lot of people might
say 1 was really noble to rescue
Fanse and Gri-Gri. And maybe
I was, because they got away and
I put them on a boat to Cuba,

However, the fact that ]
grabbed the sceptre on the way
out and exchanged it later for a
very substantial piece of change

might have had something to do
with my heroics,
Being a hero is fine, so long as

its profitable. Or at least, that’s
the observation of Harry Lime
Most heroes don’t die broke.

NEXT SUNDAY
Harry Lime tells
another of his
remarkable

adventures.






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PAGE TWELVE

_ EGGED ON BY PROSPECT OF Leola |

8 UK OSMUKD Fs









By Eugene Sheffer

SUNDAY ADVOCATE















ke on the cross? (Mat. sp Settee, Sion. ia -
im mbycid mot
} HORIZONTAL 52—Particle. 39—Chops. 50—The lio: n
| 1—What Gileadite, who had 53—Harden. 41—Indisposition. 52—Hostels. ”
| was buried in 54—What is the first month of the 43—Part of an act. 53—Pig pen.
ene? reg eae 45—What prophet restored to lif 1a aoe
is of events. 5 prophe ite Ji,
5 The Way Toombet'e tether? Gi“ Siasculine name. a mother’s son? (2 Ki. 8:1) 58—Frost.
&~Comfort. Sn itch Sans i. o-oo ee tg book of the 5G-—epoh.
easure 0 . ent? Indian
12—Plant of lly family. o4— Auditory — _ a eee)
13—March e turmeric.
Metric Cube nt. Twelve month PFET AAT Arrrg
a)
lene ae oe veri De ees | ee? frre
awe ~ ee va * mabe, a hol- 7 oS ZL
| Ow lace to S. -
Oita Pua serve eds" ime. lott, Blase, to provide ‘Samson ast tet A et fF
| 1:3) ° 2—W: r
| in 3— rifled particle.
am eetmadiote os ti
26 " aoe. o ications.
What did the Lord t an
The bins to make - set upon ee
29—Alphabet ) Num, 21:
30—The men of what county 7—Make Make confident
| were merchants? (Ezek. 27:1! 8—Italian cely house.
| 31—Meadow. 9—Moun aborigine.
33—How many pounds did the i—Brrors | in printing.
aaa
: Luke 19:16) ig—Correded.
SEEKING TO BECOME the proud mother of twins, Mrs. Jenny Penguin, i Be . 11—Before. .
of the Philadelphia Zoo, turns over with her bill the two eggs she is | %—Who p! with her son 21--Pro posed international tans
hatching. As is the custom with poset is, her mate Johnny will soon ing for him eo ar Esau? a
take over the baby-sitting job. Theirs vas an epic zoo romance, sinee { 27:5) 77
Jenny was hatched in Philadelphia and Johnny is a South American § , | 25—Location. Wai | | {|
Humboldt penguin. They were soon billing and cooing. (International). » see as — sale selative, henounttiok Wy Wy YY Ty
|S Smal on tbe wall Dan, 335) PCA CLA GZ
DARTWORDS =| “ce tnemosx tigha « TY He
come or the new) e compassionate
c Gam sKing of the Jews?" maater“Yoraive Nimes | | | P| Yael Pt | | Pie
int i ete tH
mee” Dartwords $ 48—Small African tree Ly -
DELAY. The fArtieth and island. Peers vier of opprobrium
ie oes Be wis sees
ah ar, bs ‘the freh waned te

“aaa Ss
that Jesus 37—Father a Shallum
Coppuight, 1043, Syndicate,

»-man. Now--you have to a
arrange al! the words in or Chr,
between in such a way Weatures ine.

that the relationship
between any word and +
the one next to it is/
governed by one of six'g






oe Fat-Wat Was in [rouble

Pen Pals

|
|
la | i
| e/o The United Agencies,
RULES \s —All the Clocks in the Land Had Srapped— | sige
2 wor » be —14 Norton St.,
eeretant Ee etre By MAX TRELL | | rion
that precedes it “THE King,” said Genera! Tin | } Wortmanville,
synonym "Of ‘the "word the tin soldier, to Knarf and Hanid, |

that precedes it



“is in trouble. I’ve just received a






Georgetown, B, G.,

ap paaietacs pees letter from him.”” General Tin eae
subtracting one — letter waved the letter. It had a big golden To The Editor, The Advocate—
from or Ghangin one

ae in the preceding word. i
May be associated with | t
Secsale word m a saying

stim ie. Metaphor. -or- association of

oe it may form With the preee

d Ot s wall mage ( Publish my name and address re- |
Dereon, place. or thing. in. fect ‘ iunts ask, too,” added Kuarf. questing Pen Pals. My hobbies
or fiction '

Cliche Corner

mi

6. It may be
he precediy
| action of # book

co




ere

ica sUiccession

seal on the top of it, and two long
blue ribbons hanging down from |
the end of it.

“What king?” Hanid asked.
“That’s what I was just going to

associated With
1g word ‘in title or
Diav or other
n



au (ya te



General Tin said: “King Fat-

Wat, the King of the Land- On-The-

“Oh!” said Knarf and anid to- |



Dear Sir,

May I have the pleasure
im sending you this letter. I would
be very grateful if you could only

are Sports in general, Stamp Col-

lecting, Post Cards exchanging. I |

would like pals between the ages

;of 14 to 24 years, both male and



BECAUSE UPON THE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
HAPPINESS LIFE ITSELF. /

|
Other-Side-Of-The-W all.”

don't have to be & reader gether. “King Fat-Wat!’ | females KAT EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
} of any ee noes author to “His trouble,” General Tin went If you could only grant me this IN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
be es cliche expert. Reading any on, glancing quickly at the letter | . favour, I will be only too pleased MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE

of many wilt qualify you to again, “is very peculiar. It’s also! General Tin held up the letter. | as I do think Soe ae

the | oddiférous and queer.” ¢ on he toa conrespondence, gets CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS,

anawer the following ques- | “What's oddif—oddifer—-what’s | *imple,” he said. “All King Fat-Wat countries, ill i .

: | that word mean?” Knartf wanted to|"¢eds to set all the clocks in his | cio. ‘all letters vessived on FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
1. Christmas ts seldom happy, know. kingdom going at the right time is I beg to remain : FAILING IN THEIR IMPORTANT

is ive. oF it’s al —? | Clocks Stopped a day of sunshine and a—stick.” s ” DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS

y ness!” Hanid exclaimed. Clear Place ‘|
but never —1 pe Ea AO Transpo Be Pape: ee “What appened? What made them!) “Tell His Majesty,” sai@ Mr. PER PORE hcnavs * u
ve va Tay be dome but he's A rope of the theatre, (6) stop?” Punch, “to stand up a little stick in ARE NOT RIGHT — or
ior Sree How pale, (8) serdite, oe eet cane es the middle of his garden, in a clear
* “(6) 13, Everlasting ale rent. (7)! ause everybody in the whole | place where he can see the stick’s
. mw rAny, nice piace te. — pase 1@ {a return to the doctor. berore kingdom forgot to wind them the | shadow. At first the shadow will be 3s aa
‘hee, « sk ee tautee ivam, suits uud-one to | Right before. So now none of the | on one side. But slowly . . . slowly, ARE RIGHT!

& A needle lest is tmvasiably
where?





















15 Across
8. It’s Just habit, (3)
{9. Seems good French to us. (5)
| 21. ae tt, foi ilows

23. High ur
| tive. (5)

1, Extent. (9)
2. Remainder I've found fidgety.

recognised by Toby.
\/. Just a neat difference. ta)



“I haven’t the slightest idea,”
answered General Tin, “But this is
His Majesty's trouble. One day last
week all the clocks in the kingdom |
stopped.”

Avross

clocks in the whole land are run-
ning, and nobody knows what time |
it is. Isn’t that awful?”

“Why don’t they just start them
again?” said Knarf.

General Tin shook his head.“That
wouldn’t do any good. How can they
know what time to start them at? |

ou leave out.
2. A broken vane. (4)

I leave the alterna-



Down

— eo

woulaa t be



thought about clocks in this way be-
| fore It had seemed to them that
No! ie kes always told the right time.

i

|

'

J

Timid: room, coughed slightly.





“A stick!” cried Knarf and Hanid |

in astonishment,
“A little wooden stick.”
“Impossible,” said General Tin,
“But let’s hear about it anyway.”

| as the morning gets on and the sun
| climbs higher in the sky, the shadow
will move around to the front of the
stick, And when it’s exactly right
in front of the stick, at that moment
it will be exactly twelve o'clock
noon! And if His Majesty King Fat-
Wat will shout at that instant, or

it exactly twelve o’eclock, And
when it's exactly twelve o’elock, the

Ld , : They looked ‘ea: tell the right time again, I’m
sleCtipaststaret stotataia pir: 11. svard) Rope: 13, Girl: J aor: ee jou A
BissiisAsi sO AsIOl Uy) §—| Movs: al. mistino. Run! GS Magose, | *' him. He smiled. “it's ver

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Your Servant,
Anthony A, Gonsalves.

stay home, Clutterbuck—
Do you want to be
describeé as a misguided

19 and 20, Is the Insect in ? \dows are aly ways straight~ I'll ‘missile “
HOB (8, 3) Finally Mr. Punch, who was sit- | wiite King Fat-Wat at once. He’ll warvare perrnne germ
Lived S| oS nately a 4 Rohisien of vpmerday's pussie «Aarons! ting quietly on the other side of the | be very jovovlious to hear that he



ACIDS AND POISONOUS

WASTES FROMTHE BLOOD=
THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=










APRIL 26, 1952

SUNDAY,











wee ee



Sew

pens from $1.00 to $1.32.
GALL-POINTS $ 1.08 (Refills 36Z}¢

TA yy 7 3} All the clocks would start at differ- | have the church bells start ring-

aT oTY atcha te dutetiy rent, but olitely (6) ent times. No on» would know which | | ing, then everyone in the kingdom
FADFOREDL | 6: Beat asset to the Upper House, | clocks were right and which clocks | can start his clock at twelve o'clock Cc. L. PITT & CO., LTD.
P A italic! vile 6. ani. ee cana Abin, ths were wrong,’ jand all me clocks will be right.”
Seta ts cE Gpeiges SacnaabNol” | lem Kenaet and Hants ant ro (=v ace sieht te, etal whi Bridget Patheda

AL | th. em. Knarf and Hanid didn’t know | “You're tig » Mr, Punch, en etown si) 8
eas 12, oe 808, spell make « bell | what to say, They had’ never | the sun is in the middle of the sky, Heaven's sake
». The boxer's
















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SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late

King George VI

BY CHIC YOUNG
[You MADE mE)

LOSE MY PLACE
oe A
GRUMBLING? ) ve mn i

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i IN THE HAT SHOOPE /- |

1] PICKING Our [| T WON'T BE VERY LONG! ps
Cc :

A HAT- -
MAGGIE” {3 wD







WHAT'S THIG7--A HAT FULL.














1952, Wiel Peagures Spndicne, tne



Wart tn oooh



/'6 SuRE ‘W I'M AFRAID IT'S a x
e NICE 70 SEE } BUSINESS, CAPTAIN... “=
YOU AGAIN, KIRBY/,A THE LAMBERT
TELL ME, IS THIS A MURDER CASE...
(eociaL CALL OR BUSINESS 2 y ~
\ ’ a |
v egy, ~ Ege
id hlefn
e
a BUT (M FINISHED? THE SIS BUT! eee ee mar ine
A SUCCESS. HE'LL COME TO SOON! WAITING TO SEE IF HE'S ALL IF HE’
ae le aaa icant Wate ME HOME NOW? HMMs» THEY DONT j Nor, IL NEVER /——
4 AVE HERES : \
ITS AMAZING THAT HE SURVIVED! es ee C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
ES, SS: SA a a




PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. , remue sates

TELEPHONE 2508







REAL ESTATE
SALE

























. ; ee, ”
R ALL that bungalow called “SCAFELL
—_ ro with the furniture therein —— °
SOx 11,4@2 Square Feet of land situate ai
nan sate ius oon aie AUTOMOTIVE Station House = = Rig po Rg eo
late . f 3 taining Living an niny » s
fone Dattp’s Fe chee Bedroom: Toilet, Bath, oe dervaane
wins ae retake m (Wife) George AUSTIN PARTS—One (1) Austin MW] with a age for one car, anc s : —
ote Racotier Moseley (Sister-in-Law), Millicent }and other miscellaneous parts. Apply: fe a
a es Pee 5 ; ir signed up to Saturday the
een 20.4.52—1n | Road 17,.4.52—t.f.n ree es ee” aa
On. ri RD “tor “s rimself to accept
BOLBROOK: On April 6, 1952, at Hanps, EDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton chass aoe r + Mine Bs r ae ane ne
England—Viva. wife of Commander | new For immediate ee care niger a ee ats Geotums tal
N. D. Holbrook, V.C. 20.4.52/ Garage 4616 a

295 For further particulars and con-
ditions of sale apply to—
“ina COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,

———————————__———_ —
19th} CAR: One Chevrolet (Stylemaster) 1947
A. G./Model in first class condition. Dial 2550





HEMMINGS—Angelina, on April
4952, at the residence of Mr






















No. 17 High Street,
Johnson at Fitts Village, Ay cae for further particulars 19.4.52—2n Bridgetown,
Age 92 years. Her funeral leaves the ridge
above residence at 8 a.m. to-day for} CAR—Morris Minor. S—40. Two-door 2 2—5n
the Westbury Cemetery, Friends @Ff€/ ssioon. 7,000 miles. Owner driven. As BUNGALOW oe cocina a
ea John @ Gladyn Hem-|"eW: J-° T. Boumphrey, Sandy 240; {built bungalow with all modern conve-
Mabe! mgon an Glady - a r 5



mings (daughters), Lenora Hoppin _______. ] niences, standing on about 12,000 square





Lodge, with a wonder-
rene Suageet) Ar sin, CAR Ge TES COe Me erring ors wm Ge diane oon deank
(son-in-law) . 20.4 ? apply Mr eats Cie oe Theatee Also four fine similar building oo

any time after ST ae a ee in | adjoining. Apply to Miles Cecil. Dia
MRAZR—On April 19th, 1952, at his 2518 or 4367.

13.4.52—12n.
mother's residence, Garden, St. James.

































flat in Marine Gardens. Available May
ist. Phone Mrs. Gibson, Marine Hotel”.



SUNDAÂ¥ ADVOCATE
FOR RENT



_PUHLIC SALES | SHIPPING NOTICES

AUCTION

BY instructions received
Commissioner of Police I will set up for
























|

\
)

ROYAL NETHERLANDS




BEACH COTTAGE on St. James C







Thi M.V CARIBBER will
perfect bathing, quiet, Ail meals Sale by auetion at Central Sta- accept Cargo. and for
Services supplied from main house. Own} tion on y the 2ist, at 2 p.m. the STEAMSHIP co, - Dominica,

Telephone. Reasonable terms to suitable iterns:—(1) Gents nickle plated .


















Antigua,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Mon-
day 28th inst.

The M.V. MONEKA will accept

couple. Apply: Beach
phone 0157,

lands, St. James cr one Watch, (2) Strings of Pearls, several

14.3.52—4.f.n. . Several Bicycle Frames, SAILING FROM EUROPE

tn 7 16) Silver , (1) Stove, (1) Motor|M.s Soros on 18th April im Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
BANNERETTE—At Silv c 1) Sewing Machine,|M.S. ST . On 2nd May 1952. unica, Antigua, Montserrat,
room house, bath, kitchen, _ bh ae ra Ror tnd several other items |M.S. HERA, 9th May 1952. and St. Kitts Sailing P aA)
and garage. G. Barnett near Kings.and, | of ? S.8. COTTICA, 16th May 1952. 2nd May 1952
Christ Chureh. 19.4.52—2n. DLARCY &. SCOTT hide SAILING TO UK @ EUROPE =
cette . . . MS WILLEM . A 1 * )
BUNGALOW —Modern furnished bunga- |’ SAILING TO TRINIDAD, FAKAMARIDO \
low on St. James’ Coast 3 bedrooms 3! MONDAY 2ist at 2 p.m. at LOWER AND BRITISH GUIANA |
toilets and baths running hot water col@|CARLTON, ST. J. * ook ighing, Bos’ | M.S. BONAIRE, on é@th May 1952 i
cg MH Modern conveniences, Dial) “GARGEANT” NO. B90. 2 4” x Y x 9 | SI CORMCAE oP aod Same ioee:
(164 20.4. + | new sails Po puiged | SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
- eat ; eae 6” jibbogn M.S. HECUBA, on 2ist April 1952. i
and July, containing 4‘ bedrooms with| Terma cash fall of hammer. ® °. P Sones see a oo }
running water in each. Fully furnished R. ARCHER McKENZIE, ' pe ” . t
including Refrigerator. Dial 8310, Mrs Auctionest.

Stuart Bynoe. 13.4.52—3n. | 20.4.52—In

— J

FLAT—‘Fully furnished small upper UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER



)
i

13.4.52—t.f.n.



1

Kt
))
for two only,













- penenisesignstintieniennagieememamecamsen” SOUTHBOUND Saths Sat Safle
oo f } ; le End Settee, enc
19 years. His fu-| CAR—Austin A.70, only 6,000, as good | "Te Navy GARDENS. On. ch.| 7°" May ist onwards =~ te relies mye agg Povegy Montreal Halifax Beste doe Paes
RoE" tengen Tdie above venidence atjas new. Apply: Redman & Taylor's A well appointed bungalow in first class errinaercecigaatcingsieiiiemecnntatntaimmasmsiatatite petieaden: Waggons, Eaay Chairs all in pv Se ge — 7 ye 16 Apr 17 Apr, 2 Apr. 38 Ap 1}
4.15 p.m. for the Harbin Alley Ceme-| Garage Ltd 18-4 52-3": J order consisting of large open verandah. | “FLAT—New, very modern, seaside fat. ahogany: Folding Card Tables, What-| CANADIAN CRUISER ae. 8 May =" oe Bee
tery, St, James. Vauxhall 35 fh with 5)47awing rooms, three bedrooms each with | Completely furnished. Telephone, gas, Bots, Painted Cabinet; Oil Paintings and LADY RODNEY ISTRUCTOR.. 3 May a u “May 2 June oo
ee eeues Cinether), ial | (or eed a ees nou Dial | Wash basins, one having large cedar cup~| electricity. Facing sea. Excellent and| Pictures, Glass Dome and Birds; Glass CANADIAN C Ger" oe r 11 June ay
Joun, Vincent, Barbara (sisters) Cleo-] good tyres in excellent “ye . board as well. Kitchen complete with | safe seabathing. Apply to “MARESOL” }and China, Oak and Rush Chairs, Fret LADY NELSON LE ENGER - 30 May June - a3 lune
phas Benn (step-father). 4514 39,4.50-—20: feat in cupboards. Electricity laid on.| ST. LAWRENCE GAP. Phone 8406. w Machine; Black Marble Clock; CANADIAN ones ee a 9June 12 June 14 June ae oo
20.4.52—1n : Vi ard. condi-| This house is in a cool and quiet 17.4.52—t.f.n. iano Torchon Lace Maker, Fret Saw CANADIAN Gono pa 20 June @ June _ july a wu
——--—-—_--- i ae ee Sein Lewes ted to sell, |2€ighbourhood with garden laid out and} TEE achine, Double Iron Bedstead and | CANS RODS RUCTOR.. 30 dyne 3 July ~ July ai
THANKS en ore. oe ge Battle Lta., | Yard macadamised, there are also two FARAWAY—St. Philip coast, 3 bed. ing, Old Mahog. Linen Presses, Cedar Pe “ - 11 July l4July 16 July
eae Dial 4 a i | servants rooms with lavatory and a large | rooms, Fully furnished. Lighting Plant. : Chest of Drawers, Washstands,
IRATHWAITE We desire through this| Pinfold Street 19-4 52-207 | ghrage Watermill supply. Double Car Port, two = Vat, Lege MT. Festy! veavepoukn Arrives Sails | Afrives Arrives he
EAST AITN— Wo dacire Cems oe ieee Aa0, 4 new tres. New! It is available for immediate possession. |vervant rooms. from May ist. Phone [Fables Larder, iitchen Cabinet, Tables wee ‘ete tom ohne >
gent cards, flowers and wreaths sinc?) isint job. Recent rebore. Telephone| Apply to C. A. Pierce, EE a bee 10.4.52—t.f.n OO Gano a cod Boee,| SARE Boker... a Apr. 26 Apr. (5 May; — 6 May ay
BaP Be en, wean “essa | cot AMnca Sindta ameet| Were merch inwion when "Char and) EARY Manage "BAN BRR Ml my i
een) OY 20.4.89—In. |“ Onnis MINOR—Tourer 8,09) miles| Be Wise! “OLIVE BOUGH" (Seaside | Coast, fully furnished including telephone | other items, CANADIAN * ”, r Pa " i
alpeaciarense -—— in excelent condition. Morris’ Minor |a5@__Well Set in off Main Rd) at lend refrigerator. Available for the TROTMAN & CO., | “% Saune 8 June — | 18 June 18 June Mh Jum: |}
CALLENDER — We beg to offer our? 2) 151° 7,000 miles like new. Fort Roya! | HASTINGS—NEAR oN eee ;| months of May, October, November and Auctioneers. LADY ad 15 June 17 June 27 June — , 28 Jung ‘Judy | I
deépest gratitude to those who sent|7— age Ltd. Telephone 4504 A Large (Partly Stone) 3-Storey, 4|December. Telephone 2257 or apply 18.4.52—2n.| CANADIAN ' i
flowers and expressed their aympathy a sa 20.4.52—4n. | Bedrooms with Bastns, Severat ann No. 43, Swan Street. 19.4,52—2n. CHALLENGER 23 June 28 June ~ 6 July, 8 Pind |
nh on the death of wis Rooms, Open Gallery (Fron s . LL oe. t = jubt
Daiender, VAUXHALL WYVERN—In excellent | Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,| JUBILEB—Gibbes Beach. Dial 95268. UNDER THE SILVER CON CROIAaE “0 8 Fo 3 x iy 18 du “3 a 2 mF S
Albertha Colenien sree scenet condition, under 3,000 miles. COURTESY |2 Toilets, eer er eee ane 19.4.52—2n. HAMMER CANAD) = ‘ , fe
slonza, Clarance, St Clair, e : : ¥ .| Good Condition, ce ndy a pty . LAN a
fgons),’ Eulah Gittens (daughter), Clyde |GARAGE. Dial 4616 a= | Good and Bate Bathing, Trees, Garage |S SEG Boe oe Maxwell Road, | «O” , Thursday eas nen a ee LADY Roa Whi t> Ma gery 19 A Psu = a Baus,
Gittens (son-in-law). 20. 4,.52—In E also Garage Shed for 4 Cars, well Made {Christ Church. Fully furnisbed.. Availa, |Btighton, s a ol he Feature ~< ug. ue ug. -
FURNITUR up Yard, Ideal and enough Land to|ble for June and from September.|2> A. Than Moe denntis Wuite tieitae
Mr. ©, S. Coppin and family beg to |, |convert or erect a 60—i0 Room Hotel, | Phone 6139 or 3450. 18.¢.880n, |= Which includes — Mor: ~
tender their sincere thanks to all those and home chairs from |, puiid 3 Bungalows, also Suitable for



















CHAIRS—Office
persone who In divers ways $8.50 up, Plain and upholstered includ-





Inspect! ppoin' Derric’ Up-
twtr sympathy with them in thelr |'ng typists chairs and executive chairs.| ‘mont Only, “AT BRIGHTON, Seunide-e | contains oar oxilars: “arawaae dining |hols: Chairs; all in Mabageny;” salle- Bye Ainmer geveaians, aunty to
. 7 *} men’ y. ’ pons s ‘
rétent bereavement 20.4.sa—1n.)%: R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. Dig Phen Almost New Conerete 3 Bedroom jena Siupdranms {ene seit running wi f} Bivan; Pasig, Bree 3. FS GARDINER AUSTIN & co. LTD,
einen AEE ean Design Bungalow, all Modern hen, servants reom, water dn ees, Tae ee ~— Agents.
i sq. it electric light, enelosed yard. Apply: \R. ice Tapestrys Tea ey, Oak
See ae ee eee na ae POULTRY Onder £2,760 wee ACING NAVY oa Archer McKenzie. Dial 2947, R. ape modi aatiee Saat foes, nee
ee ee in ther tesans DENS.—Almost New 3 Bedroom 12 inch ty 20.4.52—1n. Ref iserators, ures, B a amine * ecaiitetiaiimadel sis
ee get ee ee we Senne Seca Dey oe ent oases April 26th. Parmentery nd Twice i der Baad. Ih Memeo ae By | sheds tiful view over the sea|Tea and Dinner Services, C . Ver-
2958.00 ee eee OO tae production | The Bus €0.,-2-Storey Stone Business |towards South Point; sultab'e for enter- |andah Chairs; Bookshelves; - M
ks and Hens produc \ se 5

IN MEMORIAM

HARTE—In loving memory of our
iene beloved Mother, Caroline DeHarte
Who departed this life om the 19th

April 1949.

Mf life and care would death

rte: .35 each—a White Reck Pullets] ?remises and Residence, Conveniences,
Aieor dove Seain™ 12 weeks old—price } Good Condition, Ideal for any Business,
4.00 Dial 3394 18.4.52—3n | Going Under £2,300. IN TUDOR ST.—
ah : Large 2-Storey Stone Business Premises

NS—25 irs of Utilit. eons,|« Hesidence with a Large Garage or

gine, Cosmeen *Mondeins and ion Workshop, all Conveniences, A-1 Con-
Prices according to selections. W. H.| dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant,



prevent
still be



























. Nel Road, Navy Gardens,|Can Yield $120.00 p.m. Under 22,000
aes ae Shrist Chueh. m "Y9.4.52—2n Can Buy It—UPPER NELSON ST.,—3
mani t Jones (daughter) Glenville Bedroom Residence, Sonvedsnes Good
.4.52—1n. Condition, about 3, sq. ft. Going

as SS ~ MECHANICAL Below £800. AT HASTIN oat
PHILLIPS—| joving memo" f our —————~ |—Almost Stone, 3 Bedrooms, ing
dear son Wesley Phillips who died on| C¥YCLE—One (1) Raleigh, Dyno Hub, Under £3,500. AT FONTABBLLE—A
‘April 18, 1951 ; : ee Boorse Sue. ives, apt cee Bargain: Almost New 3 Bedroom Stone

. . : S. astin

One year has passed since that sad che oe'y , ee in | Bungalow, Tiled Bath & Toilet, about

10,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,300.
NBAR CITY in Avenue, Quiet & Resi-
dential,—A Bargain; Almost New 3 Bed-
room Reinforced Concrete Bungalow,
over 7,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,100.



Since the one we loved has passed
away

We miss him now our hearts are sore

As time go hy we miss him more

His loving smile, his gentle face

MASSEY-MARRIS FARM EQUIPMENT
—Manure spreaderr, Fertilizer Distribu-
tors, Grass Mowers, Rakes, Side-deliverny
‘akes for windrowing cane Trash, Grass





BY FONTABELLE; 2 Bedroom Bungalow,
lace. Loaders, Wheel Strakes for attachment
en the yo Re Sr tee Phillips to Wheel Tractors to prevent wheel- Saari a See oo. AT
20.4.52—In.] spin. COURTESY GARAGE. Dial 4616. = pSidenc jone partly
family and his friends. 20.4.52-—6n, | Stone, and one stone—Almost New), both
anne yield $105.00 p.m., and Going Under
£4,000, AT LOWER BAY ST.,—Seaside,
ANNOUNCEMENTS MISCELLANEOUS 2 Bedroom Stone Residence, yields $25.00



p.m., Going Under £1,000, AT UPPER













aorta ~- os Pose’ § ace ROEBUCK ST.—.. 2-Storey—Partly Stone
itt | Glass, o! ew 3 Bedroom: (possible 4), 2 Toilets yields
In Comfort tt fnd losal_ hand. | Watercolours,” Early books, Maps, Auto- | $30.00 p.m., Going Under £1,200) AT
» all] Staphs etc, Gorringes mtique ROCKLEY NEW RD.,—about 1% Acre,
wack ged int F in. oe 0.90 pm. | sdjoining Hoyal Yacht Chib. Going. for about $4,000. AT LANDS
n mie aa, 3.2.52-t.£.n. | END; New 2 Bedroom (possible 3) Rein:
to : 6.4.52—t.f.n. Coherete Bungalow, and AT LOWER
= | Omice equipment of all kinds—Steel| Ray sT.; 2 Bedroom Stone Residence;
NAL Sate, ae Bi Se Ore Going Under £1,100 each. Dial $111.
Typewriters, ; de Abreu, “ Bough”
PERSO! _ [and Calculating “Machines, “Duplicating Bitte re Pee eh”,
en neste erin inst | Machines, ee
Miepetlis ere hereby warned agains: BRADSHAW '@ SOMacC in. | LAND—First class building -site af
Bust ) ae I do not . on. | Desricks, St. James, on the main road,
any: © minutes s-service, Approx.
ose SE eee ey debt or debts), OFL—The world’s finest p. on 10.009, sa. ft. | Priee reasonable, * Dia
Fame unless by a written ardor | Yeedol, at all leading Garages and Service , John V. Barker. 20.4,52—1n,
‘BY me. ote HOWARD, L. “Found wherever fine cars| — Property consisting of two storied’
‘ Airy Hill, St, George. * 11.9.08—-4.4- Trouse and the Iands on which it stands
20.4.52—2n. wo a j.|@nd situated at Rodgers Rd., Govern-
. PIANO—Carlton Piano, fully trop! ment Hill, St, Michael, Apply K
naneaeny Price $715 oon W popes Sandiford, Spry St. Dial 2374.

: . mahogany. 00, : , s \

GOVERNMENT NOTICE inson & Co, Ltd, 16.4,52—Sn. | 2. Property at St. David's Ch. Ch.

two storied house and land on which
——

i . : ,
OLOSING OF CHAMBERLAIN | RECORDS-Ciearing our stock of MGM | ff. Sands. Apply: IK. Sandiford, Spry
i E A. Bante 7 eae 3. Property at Junction of St. Mat-

choice. A. BARNES & CO., LTD,



. thias d Dayrelis Road, includi tw
The Chamberlain meee et 9.4.52—t.f.n toned “house ete iT Weatite bul ding
a4 bei Sev ys
Be cae ae aa Peicay “zn | Sabsibg get he aly Teeeram | ale ue hy te Seventh. Days
day, = het ok a4 England's leading Daily Newspaper now '
May for the purpose of repairs.

19,4,52—2n.

Sendiford, Spry St. Dial 2374
The three properties are part of the

Estate of D, Brathwaite (Dec)
20.4,.52—2n
Se nen
HOUSE—One attractive New board and
shingle house, 20 x 11 x 8 ft. Shed
20 x 8 put together with bolts and

arriving in Barbados by Air only a few
days after publication in London. Con-
tact: kan Gale, c/o Advocate Co., Ltd.
Local Representative, Tel. 3118.
17.4,52—t.f.n.
TEN nicely bound volumes of The
Children’s by





























Enayclopaedia edited
Arthur Mee. Phone Be. "NT Lietew Mog senien windows and deors
y n “ 7 :

All CLERKS and SHOP Sherlock Field, Foul Bay, Be De
ASSISTANTS are invited to on vines
attend a lecture which will | PU EMILIC NOTWECES | fouse—a trana new cater hose
be given at the Y.M.C.A. on 18x9x8° with shedroof 21x7 and kitchen
M 2ist inst. at 5 pm - _ } 9x7 attached, situated at Pine Land, St.
onday . IT. NO othr de eaters can be rented, Best
TIC offer 350, accepted. For further
Subject:—"“TRADE UNION- BARBADOS, particulars apply next door or Dial 95292.
ISM AMONG SALARIED IN THE ASSISTANT COURT OF z 19.4.52—4n.

WORKERS.” A L

Re Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943.
NOTICE is hereby given that Lloyd
Taitt formerly residing at Haggatt Hall,
Saint Michael, died as a result a
motor lorry accident at My Lord’s Hill,
Saint Michael, and that compensation
has been paid into the Court.

All the dependants of the above-
named Lloyd Taitt, deceased, are here-
by requested to appear at the Assistant

Lecturer is Mr. J. D. Bell,

.A. research worker and
lecturer in industrial rela-
tions at Glasgow University
and an Oxford graduate.

Don’t miss this opportunity
of hearing a lecture of this

“LE TOUQUET” — Maxwell Coast.
Orawing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms,
cunning water, electric light and tele-
ahone. A_ nice property standing on
‘bout 2 acres of land tn one of the most
ittractive and popular parts of the coast,

The above will be set up for sale by
vuetion at the offices of the undersigned
om Friday, 2nd May, 1952, at 2 p.m,

Applications for permission to view
sort. Court See NOReL, Ce. Weeneecey, the 7th Sout pe spade to Mr. F. D. G. Simp-
Come and bring a friend, Dated this 3rd day of, April, jp jon, “Woodland”, St. George, Tel. 95214.
#0.#,68,-—-1n. Ag, Clerk, Assistant Court of Appeal. CARRINGTON & SEALY,
5.4,52—2n. Lucas Street



13.4,52—6n.

Laem
SPION KOP — MAXWELL COAST
standing on approximately 1% acres of
evel land suitable for building sites

in @ commanding position on the coast
NOTICE is hereby given that the one faffording extensive views. It is ullt

Hundred and Eleventh Yearly Ordinary }on rock. The bathing tro “a

General Meeting of the above-named {s excellent. The whole ean none
Society will be held at the Society's} good order, In the main building are
Office, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on]|5 bedrooms, 3sbathrooms a very large

Friday, 25th April, 1952, at 2 o'clock pym. | Jo ining room, an open ver: h
id Erelosed sun-deck, . ge

for the purpose of:— large
(1) Receiving from the Directors their en and two pantries. es
Separate bungalow for staff having 4

THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE
ASSURANCE’ SOCIETY.

ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING

THE GIRL GUIDES
FAIR

will be held at

Report on the transactions of the





society for the year ended 3ist | bedrooms, verandah, separate toil.

December 1951. shower. There is a large double yasene
(2) Electing Directors and an Auditor}and good fowl house and pen. Main

for the current year. water, telephone and electricity. r
| The above will be set up for sale by
C. K. BROWNE, , | auction at the offices of the undersigned
Secretary. | on Friday, May 16th at 2 p.m. Viewing
Under the _ distinguished Beckwith Place. pana 4,306 "p.m. any day Sunday,
patronage of His Excellency war hel sees Chasive *h Thursday, May 15th in-
the Governor and t pr ‘ beaten tee re Furniture available if required

4 vr further particulars apply

Lady Savage CATFORD & CO.,

SATURDAY, 10th MAY tote
on . ’ 20.4.52—1n

1952 FOR SALE

The undersigned will offer f ,
Ga competition at their oe Net

office, No. 17,
Bridgetown. on Thursday.

from 3 to 8 p.m. 1 small table model Gas

Cooker complete with oven.
Only used a few months,

There will be many inter-

Whart “
esting Stalls: art and Prince Willia

m Henry Street
and McGregor Street, Bridgetown, stand-



= island, | OwMEY Tee WH cccupted by Nesssa Rt Sf 2d, now
; OUSEHOLD GIFTS See it at your Gas Co. ae particulars from the under-
» BOOKS Bay Street, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co,
PLANTS so es
SWEETS







TEAS, ICES and CAKES
SNACK and MILK BARS
WHEEL OF FORTU
LUCKY DIPS

| MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

ORIENTAL
PALACE



E



Pre-eminent at work and

ce HEADQUARTERS FOR
ADMISSION— paul 4 SOUVENIKS
This school will re-open » CHINA &
Adults 1/= I on Tuesday 22nd inst. A CEYLON

limited number of new pupils
will be accepted on Monday
21st at 10 a.m.

Children & Nurses |
Scouts & Guides |

in Uniform
20,4.52.—1



THANI'S

20.4.52,—-1n. Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466







ne
“LA PA

taining guests or convalescents,

Mird.
further details, dial 3390. 20.4.52—1n, | Press, Bureau, and Dressing Tabie all in e
Mah ; Cream painted Press with EDENVILLE”
MODERN FLAT—with g Table combined, Cedar (And Commerelal School) Cheapside — Fontabelte
Silver and Linen. Good tead with Box Spring, Electric Lakes Folly ps
Por further egtienion. Apply to Alma Bedside Tables; le The following pupils were on
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing. stead Mir'd Press and Dressing table Term II of the abovementioned cessful in the Chamber
23.2.52—t.t.n.|al; painted white, Electric 4 school begins on Tuesday, 29th ee
——————— rer Oil Stove, Kitehen Table and April. Parents/Guardians ‘desir- Elaine
NEWHAVEN — Crane Coast, 4 bed- Pram; , Cannisters and oa of en i , children/ re © ‘
wets m Plant. er items. wards are invited to communicate —_ . — English (Dis
* ou, ‘tor May and from Oc. MEER, TROTMAN '& GO. Wy Lik te undersigned “petore this Risie FE, Lowe — ;
tober Ist Phone 4476. F Auetioneers.” te Luther C. Walkes — English.
10.4.52—t.f.n. . Sa ee ee c. BEST. os Ae Peenate,
ONE ROOM or an Apartment furnished - 20.4.52—1n
0} unfurnished. Appl. No. 4 flat y
“Clifton Terrace" Bay Street, near LOST «& F ‘OUND ‘
Chelsea Road. 20.4,52—1n.




































2 Arm Chairs); Piano Vitrolite Top;




Gottes Table;

















For }steads with Simmons Springs;

WashingtonPreparatory









PPP PON









ae ete tee Lost : 3 |
unfurn ro \. . a
ites walk to Bridgetown, “a ot : P— Shiver ‘plaid Blue Mother- GLASS ROSE BOWLS

Bracelet, Saturday morning

‘SEASIDH BUNGALOW At Patm Bench, | Und Beckwith Place and Lower Broad
bed-





nd Beckwith, Flace and Lower Broad Come and see our lovely assortment
ia inchs tia ee ated h to Advocate Advertising Office. Reward
rooms, pply : offered. 19.4.52—3n. “ 7
Tt". [ ceemadeneuneitnimaingeinnree CENTRAL EMPORIUM
SEA QUEEN—On the sea, Hastings,|. WATCH: Ladies Gold Wrist Watch
from the Ist May, For further 8 fra ‘sine Bae,’ Wes mn Se eee Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts.
dial 4568. 16.4,63-<3n. a returning same to Advocate



wi on
Advertising Dept. 20.4,52—1n

Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1004

On Tuesday, the 2%nd day of April,

to 4th October. Phone 4138 between | 1952, at the ‘hour of 2 o'clock in the

2—2n oon 80: a iy oO oO

Pi nit. TT ano rf bidder Vor any ‘sum not
TRINITY COTTAGE—Fu nish: under the appr: value

three-bedroom a Romidion —— All that certain piece of Land contain.

SMALL Cottage in St, Lawrence Gap
2 Bedrooms, fully furnished, fea-

bathing, immediate possession, Apply:
“Hollywood”, St, Lawrence ls
.4.52—1n

ite on
pach, Maange ante ne



4

SPRING SUMMER AUTUMN WINTER

But these Seasons change all through the Year

JOHN D. TAYLOR'S SPECIAL RUM

phone, available May. Ph 2959. by estimation 2 Roods, situate at
ede 19:41 4n, eer bounding ‘on lands (with the Distinctive Flavour)
ibbes 6068. \ lands of Ward ; ;
—— ee faa of 'D Chase, on, lands of J. King, Is consistent in Blénd throughout the year.
aah -|and on the Public Road, appraised as



follows:—
The whole area of land appraised to
four hundred and eighty dollars ($480.00)
Attached from Charlotte Priscilla
Marshall for and towards satisfaction,

nos Deposit to be paid on day
of purehase. 27

Provost Marshal's Office,
$rd April, 1952.

WANTED

Try this Blend and prove what others have proved.
BLENDED AND BOTTLED

by
JOUN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.
Roebuck Street Dial 4335

WANTED



HELP

A MESSENGER—Barbados Dye Works.
A messenger must be tidy, neat and
courteous. Apply: Barbados Dye Works.

20.4.52—1n.

A TRACTOR DRIVER and Bulldozer
operator. Apply to “The Manager" Joes
River Factory. 19.4.52—3n .

peng a ere ninenceneptoom one
BUTLER— Experienced Butler-House





5.4.52—3n.









Maid, sieep in. Apply to Mrs. M. A MISCELLANEOUS
Murphy “Dumbarton” Christ Church. —
18.4.52—3n FURNISHED HOUSE with three bed-





rooms for the month of August, must
be on the seashore, St. James, Worthings
or Maxwell Coast. Telephone Mrs.
Shepherd 2342. 16.4.52—4n,
—_—_——.

WANTED TO RENT
PIANO—For one or two years, Will
be kept in good condition. Phone Mrs.

Cee a
PRODUCTION MANAGER — Reliance
Shirt Factory. 17.3.52—7n.

SCHOOL TEACHERS—Wanted for a
Boarding School now to be started in
Barbados—Two School Teachers either
Male teach English to



CARIB BEER BOTTLES

or Female to



Spanish Boys. Apply stating experience MacKenzie 2435. 18.4. 52—4n. .

and salary requined. P. O. Box 256,

Bridgetown, Barbados. 20.4.52—2n. a) Small Did you know that you could get three cents for
From Ist May 1052, for the Coleridge | PUmp ade of Metal other than tron every two Carib Bottles? Bring them to...

and Parry School, a “Secretary to the | Gasks ito sma! ers. A, 8.

School". This Post is a Whole Time BR

Post. The Office of this Secretary shall
be at the School, and the Secretary shail
be required to combine the duties of TYPEWRITER:
Clerk to the Governing Body with those} with eontinental
ot Secretary to the Headmaster, i

2. Applicants shall have had a Sec-
ondary Education, and possess a Cam-
bridge School Certificate or its equivalent, | w, GOOD HOME for a dog, For

ANTED
end be proficient at Typing: ability to rs. 1 8362. 19.4, 52—2n.
write Shorthand being an ariventaget ee _
EXCHANGE

3. The Salary is $100.00 per month, SALE
rising by annual increments of eight dol- oll se a ik for a Ford or
Austin Van, will be cone

Jars to $140.00 per month,
4. Applications to be received by the

Messrs A. S. BRYDEN & SONS

(Barbados) Ltd., Victoria St.

Portable Typewriter
keyboard. New or
offers to Advocate, No.
19.4.52—2n



@idered on either side. Also a number
Headmaster, R. C, Springer, Esq., M.A., of Ford Parts too numerous for listing.
“Collision”, Government Hill, St. Mich- . Barnett, Silver Hill, near Kingsland,

ael, by Post, enclosing recent Testimon-

jals, not later than Saturday 26th April

1952

By Order of the Governors of the School
THEODORE

Honorary & .
ete ee ao
19.4.52—4n

MISCELLANEOUS

eg ernreneern ee
BOARDING and LODGING at Rus-in- |

REGENT HIGH SCHOOL
Pine Rd., near Ist Ave., Belleville,
St. MICHAEL,

Next term begins on Tuesday,

29th April, 1962.
New pupils will be reeeived as
follows :—
























4, Pupils preparing for entrance d
Urbe—Crumpton Street, opposite Harri. and ee ae for an.
son College, Hot and cold lunches served. Government mw
Apply in person. Telephone 4324. and Colleges on Monday ILLO
20.4. . P W

Shania se eee eee ae ae other ony sohanes pupils

BOOKS—One copy each of the f e on_ 22nd April.
ing books: Tacitus - ‘Agricola: Vergil” : 3. for private tuition
Aeneid IV; Caesar - Gallic War Bk.1 a rent | oo time. Pupils ASES
C t
Bittern, Bea C/o Advocate | 1} for L.C.6. and School Certineate

exe



CAR—Wanted to
Car, low mileage,
4425.

purchase 10-12 h p
g00d condition. Dia) |
19.4.52—3n

CAR: Vicar Of St. Martins requires
tourer or drophead Car ten years old
or less (owner driven) Tender by letter
pnly Details and price car.

19.4.52—2n

CRUTCHES—Urgently needed crutehi
| With hand rest for lady 5ft. 5, ty |

B. BROWNE, (Inter B.A.)
Principal.

WE prove that we sell Cheaper than the rest.

Hemstitched Linen Sheets—72x108 @ $10.78 each.

” Pillow Cases—18x28 @ $2.02 each.
Best Quality Cotton Pillow Cases — 20x30 @ $2.08 each
Sheets 70x90.

4

METHODIST CHURCH

Annual Charity Fair

” ”










d for yourself.
|to Harris Stafford House. Apety Hastings Rocks Compare these LINES with others oe see y
20.4.52—In. SA ' AY dun 3ist Cotton Prints 36 inches wide at only 68 cents per yard.
SSS m,— .m.
Proceeds in aid Brae Poor and
FOR SALE Distribution

still we give you 5% Cash Diseount and furthermore there are
no Parking Problems when you shop at

Various Stalls, Household

, Faney Work, Teas,
Cakes and Ices, Games,
Books, Lucky Dips, Joy Rides
for children, Child’s Fancy
Dress Competition at 4 p.m.

Westinghouse Refrigerator
in perfect working order.
At Linden Grove Sale Tues-

A. E. TAYLOR LTD.



Police Band in attendance Coleridge Street — Dial 4100
day 22nd, by kind permission of the A
BRANKER TROTMAN Commissioner, Col. Michelin. where
& CO., Prices are LOW
Auctioneers Adults _ 1/- sae
Children & Nurses 6d. fr
20.4.52—1n. 20.4.52.—1n. > Qualities are HIGH

SUNDAY, APRIL 20,

SS

1952

GIRLS’ FRIENDLY

SOCIETY
ANNUAL FETE

Under the Patronage
Lady Savage -

will be held at
from 3.30 to 6.30 p.m.
The Fete will be opened by

will be the f -
Stalls: ee;

, Sweets,
a Books, Cakes
dips and Pony Rides



ces,
Lucky

— children,
y kind ission of Col.
lin, the Police Band
conducted by Capt. .



REAL ESTATE
JOHN
‘MM.
BLADON

& ce.
A.F.8., F.V.A.

QUE RERENSIVE LIST-
ALWAYS AVAIL-
ABLE.



FOR SALE

“NEWTON LODGE”, Maxwell

house of ne a ructed 2-storey

3 galleries,
ing room, dining room, break.
fa%t_Toom, good airy kitchen, 3
ms, Garages, servants’
quarters and out-buildings, The
grounds are well protected with

stone walls there
entrance d ne = 8 _—

pled by U.s Further
details ana ¥
1 Permission to view



NEW BUNGALow, £3,150-—Well
in

good unspoiled area close >
Club with 8,000 sq. ft. of Taras
walled all round. There’ are
good 8 with washbasins,
Jarge living room, verandah (not
sia aoa ene detached
Servants’ quarters

Unobstructed view.

nee lew. This
below actual cost.
tunity to obtain a
mature at such a low figure .

“BEACH RESIDENCE”, st.
Lawrence — Attractive 2 storey
house with 4 bedrooms, large
living-room, and Balleries. One of
the best spots on this bay with

sandy peach me excellent
£5,000." Very "sont

furnished
investment as Comtinaceis “neh

rentals are obtained,

“SWEET FIELD”, st. te:
Estate type house ipuilt ‘ot nna
Contains large living room with
French windows leading on to
covered verandahs with good view

Sea a short distance away. 3
Tone nets Storerooms and
oane on jcuarters, Saree

es well laid
right of way over

2%,
rounds and
beach.

“BERMERSYDE”, st
we cious stone built a
with shingle Toof, very well
enclosed “9
ainy lounge and
3 double ‘coms,
roasts ie servants’
out-
house is completely enclosed and
aa is direct access to the sea
ith good beach and bathing.

rge
room,
and

rooms, garage

2 storey on roe

with good grounds and interesting
y ne ae is excellent

a sec and

fo sandy cove. About 1%
“MALTA”, St. Petor—a modern
coral stone house with everite
roofing and of exceptionally sound
construction. This. Property has
recently ¢ ively re-
modelled and decorated inside and
cut. There are wide, roomy and
cool roofed-verandahs on two

sides with most attractiv,
across the beach. The living Seoes
‘a i ample dimensions with

ing doors o; onto
front verandah re

rooms are fitted with —
Wardrobes and have wath-Destne
There are two bathrooms
baths and hot and cold water. The
kitehen is well fitted with cup-
and is also supplied with
a water. Adjoining the kitchen
a butler’s pani with all mod-
ern fitments . ground floor
contains two Sarages, large store-
rooms, laundny and fervants’
juarters. e grounds are about
of an acre well laid out and
eewates and electricity
and the garde: =
mee with piped water 708 yen
lectric pump fitted toa d i
‘on the property. eee

with 3 bedrooms,

room, drawing room, lounge
jes, 2 .

quarters for three and all waa
amenities. Wa grounds of
about % of an acre insuring com-
plete privacy. Further details
upon application.

perty
dining

“LYNCHBURG”, 5th Ave. Belle-
ville — An attractive and well
Proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft. Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed).
large drawing room, study, modern
kitehen, 3 bedrooms, Sarage etc.
Low accepted for quick
sale, owner going abroad.

“VAS ABLAN CA”, Maxwell:
Coast—A beautiful property a
bodying the finest pre-war work-
manship. Well designed for easy

“HOLDER’S HOUSE,” St. James
—An estate house built of stone
with pine floors and shingle roof.
3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms,
verandahs etc., also garage and
usual outbuildings. The house
stands on approx. 4 acres of well
timbered land (mahogany) ap-
proached by a long driveway
fianked with closely planted

trees. The outstanding
attraction of “Holders” is the
very lovely site which has the
advantage of being well elevated
and cool, with fine views on all
sides. Coast is less than a mile
away and town is 6 miles.

RENTALS

Several Furnished Houses and
unfurnihed Vlats available.

e
Phone 4640
Plantations Building








SUNDAY, APRIL. 26, 1952



Church Services

ST. LEONARD'S CHURCH







‘ ~ PASTER I. Moore Arriving from the United King- in a sunny climate. He is fond
cae eee ane eee S am THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL dom yesterday morning by the of swimming and is very pleased
Sermon; 3 p.m. Sunday ‘School: eur il am andiie Gad Siiewaes 7 pam Elders and Fyffes S,S. Gelfite were with the swimming facilities here
Evensong and Sermon Evensong and Sermon; Preacher at bot» Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Binney of He has the Life Saving Medals,

i services the Rev. J. 'B. Grant: L.Th —— who have now come to Gold, Silver and Bronze. He was

Minister in Charge; 4.30 p.m. on Mon- Barbados to reside also Physical Training Instrue-

METHODIST day, Wednes : a : S ve P 5
S STRERT—I1 am: Rev, T..F. youths this will’ be condysted be the Mrs. Binney has come to take tor ih the County of Duxham. |
sg ae hay Batwin, Tay tas Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor) ee ao English and
NES 9.20 am. Rey. Edwin and Mrs. Olga Browne rench istress at St. Michael’:
Taylor. 7 p.m. Mr G. McCalister. Ainciniiinaiintmeee ania ca Girts’ School, FROZEN MEAT DUE t
one aa ae = ors 2 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST HERE THIS WEEK !
_ ‘ ; pom. ae * Beltastewn, pper, Bay Street. An Honours B.A. of Liverpoo! |
~ Sundays a.m.an p.m T versity . ‘ane
GILL MEMORIAL—11 am. Rev. K. E. Wwanneta University, »Mrs. Binney wa }
rs. ys 8 p.m. A_ Service whic; . z . A shi e ‘s fro-
Towers, B.A.. B.D., 7 p.m. Mr. J. ineludes Testimonies’ of Christian” 2 trained at Oxford and used to A shipment of chilled and fro-|
¥ ae te teach s lone ti ‘ in Pens zen meat and ot;r foodstuffs

HOLETOWN—8.30 a.m. Rey. F. Law- °** Healing. ng me ago in Penang. i
rence, 7 p.m. Mr. W. St. Hill SUNDAY, APPIL 20, 1952 Recently she taught at Hamp- ‘Tom Australia is,."expected to
BANK HALL—9.30 a.m, “Mr. G. gp “cet of Lesson-Sermen: DQCTRINE stead in London. arrive in Barbados around the
Sinckler, Z p.m. Rev, K, E. Towers, “Geigen Text: Mark 16:45. ‘The a : : end of the week. :
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Mr. H, MR came not to be ministered unto, She has also done a lot of jour- The M.A.N.Z, liner Tekoa is
Husbands, 7 p.m. Rev. FP. Lawrence, but to minister, and to give his life a Dalism, and used to write travel ccheduled to make a call about
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Mr. E. Ll. Ban- "87s0m for many. articies for the North China Daily April 25 She loaded cargo at!
latter The following Citations are ineluded News, the Singapore Free Press

BETHESDA—11 a.m. Mr.





Salvation® Meeting. Preacher

G. Greaves. 1



New Mistress for St. Michael's |



Captain I









\delaide, Melbourne, Sydney and

the Lesson-Sermon: .
“4 2 sane Prisbane and is to arrive here via

Bible: and other papers in the Far East.





























BETHEL—11-a.m. Rev. T, J. Purley, He hath shewed thee, © man, what is : ;

7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant. good; and what doth the Lord require Her husband who is a Mining Trinidad.

DALKESTH—AU m. Mr A. Curwen = ee. eat to ao fuels. and to jove Engineer is looking forward for The Tekoa is consigned |
7 p.m. a AB rley mercy, and to walk humbly with thy the first ti Z stay Messrs a Cc : i

BELMONT—I1 a.m. Mr. G. Bascombe, God? ‘Micah 6:8. ; me to a pleasant stay Messrs. Da Costa & Co, Ltd. =|
7 p.m. Mr. I. Blackman Science and Health with Key to the ee Le eat). Ce Cae os

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m. Rev, T. J Seriptures by MARY BAKER EDDY
Furley, 7 p.m. Mr. G. Harris He to whom “the arm of the Lord” PART ONE ORDERS |

PROV. DENCE—1!1 a.m. Mr. C. Best, is revealed will --+.« Yise into new- |
7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper ness of life with regeneration, By |

VAUXHALL—1l1 a.m. Mr. C. Jones, Lieut -Col. J. CONNELL, O BE. FD |
7 p.m. Mr. G. Brewster . Commanding |

Y * The Barbados Regiment
MORAVIAN SERVICES B.B.C. Radio Programmes frnve We. 16 18 Apr. 52 |

ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning hehe nttedigt-h inarsibinier bee nahi gitiahele penta hos Seiiaiqansion 2 Sic ~~ lan
Service; Preacher: Rev. E. E New; SUNDAY 1. PARADE -—~ TRAINING |
7 p.m. Evening Service; Preacher: Rev. 4 ¢9—7 15 = ee 1952 All ranks will parede at Regt. HQ «st 1700 hours on Thursday 24th April, 1962}
E. E. New beeen ne HQ Coy.—Tent Piiching—Demonstration by R.S.M.(b) “A™ Coy.—Will do Riot |

GRACE HILL; 11 a.m. Morning Ser- 4 { or Sai ri B" Coy.—Interior Economy Checking Kit-—Q M_ to be present— (Those
vice: Freacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.m. ¢ 1S pm eon 10 p.m. Interlude Volunteers whe have not already had their kit checked must bring all articles
ibening Servic: Hier: Ee hCG . ommon Good; 4.30 of clothing and equipment to this parade) |
Fe e a om Sunday Half Hour; 5 p.m. ‘Dick BAND PRACTICES }

lewi urpin; 6 p.m. Co 7 . eek; ae he ‘ , * 4 |

FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6.15 p.m. ‘English Magasine: was Voe* Band Practices will be held on Mon, 21, Wed. 23 & Thurs. 24 Apr. 58 i
Preacher: Mr. G. Francis. 7 p.m. Eve- Programme Parade and Interlude ” - a yer ee a ie — > , r 7 t
ning Service; Preacher: Mr. G. Francis, The News; 7.10 p.m. Home News from 1 & w vy 33 Re Siena), Piaee — See ae ee ae
yj MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser- Britain : 2 ANNUAL CAME
Vices: Exeacba:. Net ee i 0.45 p.m. T 20.53 & 31.92°M The Annual Camp will be held at Walker's, St. Andrew from Priday-t® to
|, DUNSCOMBE: ee rn ee a Sunday 22 June, 52. All ranks who are able to attend and have not yet hand
vice; Freacher: Mr. D. Culpepper Sugg’ Pam Caribbean Voices; 7.45. pm ed in their names should inform the R.S.M. as soon as possible

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service; ran yee 8.15 p.m, Radio News- 4 AUDIT BOARD }
Preacher: M AT tiga Have: is ae S. eee Saree ae Big. SAAS Officer has appointed the following Officers as Audit Boards

k SAL ca % 1 > tt e s cial vear ¢ ! 5 |

OISTIN—11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, From the Editgrials; 9 p.m. ‘BBC Con- OFFICERS" MESS ACCOUNT en Sete Re i
3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvas Cert Hall; 10 p'm. The News; 10.10 Rm Major A. S. Warren, E.D President
tion Meeting. Preacher: Brigadier O. D. Neves eat Pam, London Forum; Capt. H. R, Daniel | Momber
Dadd n eligious Talk : ra “o .

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL—11 a.m MONDAY, APRIL tee sintaerete pier ates’, Member
Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m. Company; Meet- #:60--3 15. p.m. . 26.58 M Major C. E. P. Weatherhead Presidgnt {
ing: ? p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: _ 4 Pm. The News; 4.10 p.m, The Daily Capt. S. E. L. Johnson : Mer ‘ . iy
Maier M. Smith Service; 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pro- 2/Lieut. H. A. Husbands Membes i}

WELLINGTON STREET—11 9m. Hoi gramme: 8 pam. Inia Te Walta: 5.15 p.m. [4 APPOINTMENT , ieee 1g
ness Meeting; 3 p.m. Company Meeting. Souvenirs o: usic; 6 p.m. Welsh Miscel- . ain 3t, 2) is . 7
% p.m. Salvation Meeting, Preacher: Sr lany; 6.15 p.m. Take it From, Here;; wa sat ans R.. Paniel is appointed Assistant Adjutant, The Barbados Remiment
Major T. Gibbs p.m, Sports and Pro- " , PRICE . » > aw . ade an

SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 aum Holiness @ramme Parade; 7 pm. The News; 7.10 >. rere aren ER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 pan. P.m, Home News from Britain, "Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. C, Goddard
Salvation Meeting, Preacher; Sr. Captain 7.15—1@.4 p.m. 6 we & 3132 M Orderly Serjeant nT 278, Sit Williame. 8. D Q
Bishop — — be te ys é 2 af |

CARLTON—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting 7.15 p.m. The Lady on the Sereen; Cr Cen Officer 2/Lieut. H. A. Husband 8
32 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva- 7.45 p.m. Happy Hoe-Down; 8.15 p.m Order\y Serjeant wes 70S 1 as Tor Se E x
tion Meeting, Preacher: Captain E. Radio Newsreel; 8.30 p.m. African Sur- aes | Saha UFneY,s G *
Bourne. : vey: 8.45 p.m Tataginde: 2.08 .m. From M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

CHECKER HALL—1ll a.m Holiness the Editorials; 9 p.m 1c t from S.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m Agrigento; 9.30 p.m. John Glickman; The Barbados Regiment
Salvation Meeting, Preacher: Licutenant 9.45 p.m. Appointment with Music; 10 NOTICE Ss
Re. Reid p.m. The News; 10.10 p.m. News Talk There will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours on Saturday, |

DIAMOND CORNER—11 a.m. Holiness 10.15 p.m. Seience Review; 10.30 p.m 26th April, Honowry Members may attend at 2045 hours »
Meeting, 3 p.m. Compamy Meeting, 7 p.m Tip Top Tunes. sintihenherianenian etd MER SAEEN ihteedelemabidiaaind Ran J



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i s
cougnhing,- Strangiing Asthma
Bronchitis Curbed in 3 inutes
Do you have attacks of Asthma or| J. I. had lost 40 lbs., suffere
vronchitis so bad that you choke , choking and stre ery

ee

cough-







‘
and gasp for breath and can't sieep?
Do







cough so hard you feel like
» bein



ruptured?
e to work
rt to tale

you
have




in over two years




and
foods?

: Money Back Gueranteo
atter how long you have ee 5

ute |. Tha very tirst

* | ‘
ie., lone of YDACO .
ric t work ative .
through your blood and helping na-+
ture rid the efte ot Asthma.
Tn no t c, na >
l l younger .

Pheracetin,



door what you have tried, there
vew hope for you ing Doe tor's
seription called MENTACO, Ne
dopes, no amokes,
atomiser.





no injections, no
you do is take
t s tab at meals
attacks seem to vanish like magic
3 minutes MENDACO etarta work-
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‘to dissolve and remove strangling
phlegm, promote free easy breathing
and bring sound sleep the first night
so that you soon feel years younger
ep’ stronger,
No Asthma in 2 Years

MENDACO not only brings almost
immediate comfort and free breath-
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amily
two
nd your | 2nd st
Ty | ah tron-clad money t




ACO under
wire



niee
You be the judge. Tf y t fee
entirely well, like a new person,
fully satisfied after taking
DACO just return the empty pack.
age and the full purchase price will
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PAGE FIFTEEN





















eee een oan
}
BIS REE SS FE) SOC,
\ %
} . re ‘ “
The Members of 7 4y Come One! Come All ‘% E T g
aaxempe sfamee sue FAREWELL DANCE tothe s SBA VIEW GUEST 8
nvite you to their Annual Spring Dance x HOUSE S$
1 | by . ¥
| of the y
ANNUAL DANCE 4 Members of the CARVER UNITED CLUB % HASTINGS BARBADOS %
at EMPIRE CLUB BUCCANRER LODGE ROOM R Under new management.
QUPEN’S PARK HOUSE Y (m aid of games Tour to Antigua) St. James 1% Daily and longterm rates x
Queen's Park ( | at sd Hy Sas. sae | quoted on vec %
on 1 N's usic by C. B. Brown's entra | ae care Bd
SATURDAY NIGHT, May 3, 1982 {| sere eRe ADMISSION; — &- Hormenent | Susets 8
| THURSDAY th MAY’ ise Refreshments on sale welcome, ?
SUBSCRIPTION W- Dancing starts at 9 p.m Dinner and och °
aia hak Mile a | Music Perey Green's Orchestra Prizes giv eee in the | parties arranged. g
n } Dancing Dress Subseription Gents in the prettiest Shirt and i J, H. BUCKLAND, x
Refreshments on Sale. +9 Informal $1.90 the best Marico Dancer | Proprietor.
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PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, APRIL 20. 1952

B’town Before
Motor Traffic

@ From Page 1

Y t to a desert



2 > . . ry io

| rinidad Sea And Air lraffic '

~ Set Rosarene, Sci Cymii E. Smitt

Sch. Mary M. Lewis, M.V: Charlies A

Race Results McLean, Sch. Mandalay i. Sch. Burma D
, Sch. Cloudia 8., Sch. Melly N_ Jones,
: Sch. Cyclorama O.. Sch. W. L. Eumicia, ,
VISTABELLA STAKES Sch Unieed Piaron G caetiaeres

Seh. United Pilgrim S$... Sth. -Flore-ce
GI and GU Four Years Old Emanuel, Sch. My Own, M.V, T.B, Raaar









New, Natty














































.
and over — 7 Furs. _ ARRIVALS : M t l
“More Donkey Carts My OWN Stee FOr ateridais ’
ne ae i 3.» COWBOY > SS. GOLFITO. 4805 tons net; Capt. 4
a ' “*"l min. 324/5 secs. Sapwotrh, for Trin | z
PENETENGE HANDICAP |. 42° bioniig: “OMAEM, “1 tons net, SHOTTED SPUN in grey
r El and Et! — 7 Furs. j —_-—— , Z
k 1, ASSURANCE : only 36” wide
I 2. ROCK. DIAMOND Erratum
is ho ad 3. PRINCESS RASSIRYA ; per yard... _ wi,
eet ee eos Lia 20 sors "ind Cavett af rucay the Gessbe |
“gk: roms PORE HE Magymicar So sacha ee ree ee |
. ft - that “ was cau! F :
1. CAREFUL ANNIE Quantities of the samples of bis een .t WAFFLE PIQUE
f 2. BRIGHT LIGHT Mr. Carmichzel mere! reported nis}
e Ha 3. MODEL .LIN findings of quantities of iy Rum in the ty
t 3. 1 nL viscera and went on to sii? that if death ; B : da $i |
= : 1 min. 2092/5 secs. was ecausd by drinking Bay Rum then ip | eige ya.____ Dh,
are. ST. MADELINE HANDICAP his opinion tre cause of death would be |
Square where i GI and GIl 3 Year Olds Only due mainly to aleoholic poisoning hit d $1 14
s Nelson , Pere. A Quiet Wedding ite yo.___ Pk.
7 \- ROSETTE |
, 2. BOLES ; iet weds!
On Easter Sunday a quiet wed-
cabs shciter fr he hot 8. Cee a maed ding took place at St. Leonard's NAVY BLUE SPUN
day PRINCESS TOWN HANDICAP Church when Miss Gloria | Byer )
This 1 1 va FI and FI 3 Year Olds Ont of the Ivy was married to Rudolph r ard \4
addition t growing SF ¥ “Walcott of Charles Rowe Bridge, per y ee oe
collection phical mate- 1. GALLANT ROCK ° St. George. The bride who was
rial relating to the island, It will 2 CL E De LUNE given in marriage by Mr Clarence
be on exhibition for the next two 3. MBDITATION Carew, presented a charming ap- WHITE SPUN
weeks. ; ce “>” uinin: 23/5. secs. pearance dressed in slipper satin
Exhibitions of paintings by Ivan . " . FYZABAD HANDICAP ane eee ee. seas, eds per yor << * S2¢
Payne and the late Irene Gill MARGEURITE WOOD, Ladies Island Champion and skipper of the Queen's College team, smashes one Fl and F2 = also carried, a bouquet of
open at the Museum on Wedne against Marion Manning when they met in the Queen's College—Barna Inter-Club match on Priday night. Four Years and over. 8 furs: Queen Arine’s Lace and Anthurium —_—_—_—————
day 28rd April for four weeks The match took place at the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall. Miss Wood won two-nil and Queen's College three-two. 1, LEATON ‘lilies. Her maid of honour was Miss
—_—_—__-— Miss Manning (backing the camera) is a defensive player. ' - 4% 2. HONEYMOON Phyllis: Carter and ines bridesmaid |
W lt D cerve | % | oo. e Beckles Road team, Adelphi beat 3. CHINA DOLL was Miss Masline Bishop. !
eli eservec ( can ‘ t ¥.W.C.A. threeitwo? after for. 1 min, 46 3/5 secs. pinuael staseacad 4 ik
Promotion e e ,ONnSO 1 a e feiting one match to the Y teem. metre week oe ae Lower. 8 furs.
Peay i The points are now as follows: 1. ROCK DIAMOND 1. GOLDEN QUIP 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET
@ Frem Page 1 aden Sen Of eae nama 31, 2. WAVE CREST ’ 2. PHARLITE
Apart from brief spells of nor OSI 10n Adelphi 25, Y.W.C.A. 21, Y.M.P.C. 3. ROSE/MARY 3. NOTONITE
mal police duties, the whol f 22 and Lenville 9 ‘ 1 mth. 1 3/5 secs. 1 min. 41 4/5 secs. |
his service has been ent with o a > a
the band, and he has become a (By P. A. V.)
well known figure throu ‘ QUEEN'S COLLEGE, by ae1eat- Miss Howard was the first to reach
island ing Barna three-—-two on Friday 20 but Miss Clarke deuced the ‘
night, have consolidated their po- game After. a stubborn: battle at , J y,
Music Diploma sition as leaders in the Ladies teuce Miss Clarke won 23-—21 to | )) : 5 herever The Need
His musical stud with the Inter-Club Table Tennis ‘Division ane — Queen's College /
fictoriz oliege of M j London, The atch wa ave at the one, Barna n RED HAND PAINTS
ee ity his being awarded vee hae Fora oe mn Patsy Howard brought honours |
the Diploma of that college in One of the largest crowds ever even by Garesung Ne een Ne ‘ : : 3
1927 to attend a ladies match witnes*ed im the next set. Miss Howard dic 5 Provide reliable protection for Exteriors
During his long service in the the impressive college victory, Ot have to fight very hard to wh | and high-class decoration for Interiors. |
band, he has had tical €X- Play reached a very high stand- 4% Miss Hall rn an 76 off |
perience on most ie brass N= ard and the match between Joyce gers ha = ee = the C a acl | SPECIAL HOUSE PAINTS
struments, and is fully qualified @jarke and Rosie Howard was e@s- | eet Sas st Feet a ie ail . Grey, Dark Grey, Oak Brown, Barbados
to teach the junior members In pecially Interesting oe ns nae u reat ae aot Dark Stone, Red. Tropical White
addition to a thorough knowlec'ge Joyce Clarke displayed a high ro am Ss ene s f Rs
of wind instruments, he also-peS- degree of table tennis wit. She Marion Manning two ~nil a the ‘S’ Enamel-Finish S(ARINE PAINTS
sesses a good working knowledge «ould go very far in the Ladies Next set. Miss Wood's brilliant | Cream, Tulip Green, White.
of the string Bass and violin, is Open Championship. forehand attack left Miss Manning MATINTO FLAT PAINTS
a good arranger, and has com- When the match started Queen’s bewildered. ae | White & Green
posed several pieces for church College had 30 points to their Frem early in the | first game |
and Military Band, Of these, the credit and Barna 29, This match Miss Wood attacked, She won her | E F UND CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS i
bays cate ymposgitions ar€ a took the fe of . , 5 games with hard and well placed } Bright Red, Grey, Mid Green
most successful composi L took the form of a Cup Final a |
Military Quick March “The Fruit both teams have only one match smashes, 1 Biss ete did a | HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN
of Perseverance” and the anthem each to complete the series, Stand a chance agains this accu ‘A firck clans fedsiess G .
“Hear my Prayer O Lord” takeh Queen's College now have 33 points Tate attaek. Miss Wood showed | wa wy The Sign of
from the Psalms and sung by the anq Barna 31 some of the form with which she } PAINT REMOVER
St. Mary’s Choir at a special ser- On Friday night next Queen’s won a ee C ee She For the easy removal of old Paint.
rice in 1951, College will meet Y.W.C.A, while won 21—15, 21—12. | ‘
vice tn_129 amen Barna sas ene ille Ba ile is Dolores Howard defeated Ruth | Phone 4267, 4456
I li | { T tt one of the weak teams in the com- Williams .twe—nil to bring hon- ‘ 7
ore ont aiLleog tition but has recently i ved ours even. Miss Williams de- WILKINSON & Hl Y
Tore a Is oP considerate os acubt attain lighted the crowd with beautiful 9 %
© From Page 1 whether Barna will be able to get forehand smashes but on the gther
Welter, Lrght, Middle and Heavy. five points from this match. They hand she lost many of her points a
Competitors to be at the School will however get at least four through erratic smashing.







by 4.00 p.m. ints which will give them a Miss Howard never lost con-

\ . '
7.30 pan. Inter-Troop Table 4642) of 35 centration. She won 21—18, 21—16. 9
Tenais Competition Each Troop sted ot - ;In the decisive set, Jean Chand-
may enter riot more than 4 Scouts. __Y.W.C.A, Stronger ler of Queen’s College beat Elsie
Friday, 25th to Saturday 26th Y.W.C.A., on the other hand, is Goodridge two—nil. The players

f very much stronger than Lenville were fairly’evenly matched but

5.00 p.m. Inter-Troop Scout but I am quite sure that Queen's Miss Goodridge made her mistake
Competition Each Troop may College can at least defeat the Y by constantly returning the ball

‘
€ oe , .

enter one Patrol of 7 or 8 Scouts team three—two, In this ease the high to her opponent's forehand.

under 18 years of age. Patrol we College team would end up with Miss Chandler won 21—16, 22—20,

Sleeping Equipment to be brought. 4 point more jaan Barna, In the other matches Y.W.P.C.

te at Scout Headquarters by 4.30

. tlowever much depends on Fri- defeated Lenvil'e three—two. One
p.m. in Full Uniform, Eating and night’ game, Should the teams Lenville player did not turn up
Competition t Modern High ond

; up with the same num- and this match was forfeited to the
Saturday, 26th ber ot points, the names of both

8.00 p.m... Aquatie Sports & will be inscribed on the Trophy.
Marine Display -— at Aquatic Joyce Clarke of Queen's Col-

a eee FROSOD IPOS? STOOP $595" HIGH QUALITY OF
i ee ee) ORNS (5 || MARFEL MADE SUITS
\

OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING





THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS
BUT

THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
RESPECT TO THE





Barna match, A iot of respensibil- M o« l

Sunday, 27th ity was thrown on the shoulders i emoria
Individual Group Church Pa- of Miss Clarke. She drew one of
rades or Scouts’ Owns, the hardest Barna players and this

230

A Tablet to the Memory of the



But Ay/ A y/













\
Monday, 28th set decided who would have won late Rev. S. M, Hawthorne will | §
4.30 pm. Inter-Troop Signalling the med. St be unveiled on Burlay 37m Agel % AH. COULD SWEAR Mm ;
Sompetition at Combermere hn the first game both players at James Street Methodist | ¢ HN
es Each Troop may enter began very cautiously Miss How- Church, at 4.30 p.m, g HE WAS HERE Hi} Y,
rs team of 4. Scouts under 18 years ard took the lead from early. Ser- aah ater i was jae % A Ss | 5 ‘
‘ age - either Semaphore or vices changed at 7-—3 in her inister of : ames Street for 1714 Cc | %
on Tear to ‘6a at the School favour. Miss Clarke was the more years, and Chairman of the Bar- 8 & OND AGO | i e |
by 4.00 p.m. with Flags. aggressive but her forehand shots, as and Trinidad District for 8 : . |
é tote on many occasions, had very little Over 20 years, , ? |
A , ‘ *
: on power behind them, Service He was held in high esteem by x
Tuesday, 20th \t Changed at 12—8 in favour of Miss all sections ot the community, $
8-15 pm. _ Werenha + kd at Howard but Miss Clarke took the In public life his service on the
Kensington. t a0 — ; Each next five points and the lead. Later Board of Directors of Y.M.C.A.,
Kensington by ty P Tore! “so. the score read 15 all, Miss Clayke S.P.C.A., Family Welfare and
paiatst a ore tat oren 8°* was playing very sensibly and at- other public bodies will always x 4
curely attached to Staff. tacking oply when she saw an be remembered. %
oppertunity. She won 21—15 The chairman of the i 3
Mics Howard took four of the Rev. J. S. Broomes will preside. %
first five points in the next gome A cordial invitation is extended %
WEATHER REPORT Service changed at 11—9 in her ta _ fae of the community %
favour but Miss Clarke brought ‘® Mend.
YESTERDAY ; : - — % 4
. ae ¥ 2e .7 8 1 + f . %,
Total Rainfall for month to of temperament. Miss Howard Stars For Ribbons % Pr. Wm. Henry



date: 1.99 ins however regained the lead and &
Temperature: 72.5 °F. won 21—17 WASHINGTON, April 18, |%
Wind Velocity: 10 miles per Took The Lead United States Army designated] @

hour In the final game Miss Clarke two new Korean battle cam-!@

Street

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.954 took the

(il a.m.) 29.940

)

| Rainfall from Codrington: Nil points even after a grand display
| Heward brought points even at 6 way for
|

SLOOP GPOVOPSFI OSE POSSE

lead at the start. Miss paigns on Friday preparing the .

service stars on the

TO-DAY all. When the players changed Korean Ribbon, Two new cam-
Sunrise: 5.45 am ends the score read 10—7 in Miss paigns the sixth and seventh so °
Sunset: 6.14 p.m 2. Howard's favour Miss Clarke far in the Korean war were the R
Moon: Last Quarter, April 17 took the next three points to bring United Nations summer fall |
sighting: 8.80 p.m. s the score even. Miss Howard kept offensive applicable within the $
Perna 12.59 a.m., 1.08 a steady one point leod. The score tertitgry of Korea and adjacent *

are. ap oS “A 19-——18 n her favour when waters hetween July 9; and
Low Tide: 7.21 a.m., 7.29 p.m. Miss Clarke patted for about five November 27, 1951. 2



| They'll Do It Every Time

minute to bring pcints level, —UP.

By Jim








OF THE BEST- SSED
IASTIDIA |S ONE OF THE BEST: DRE
Bs IN TOWNâ„¢BUT LAST NIGHT, HUBBY
HUSTLED HER OUT IN HER DOWDIEST DUPSâ„¢ |
1






Ano ALTHOUGH SHE -HAD NEVE! -
THING IN HER LIFE BEFORE ou
GUESSED IT, SHE "(NEED WE GO ON?)



-

Te iienneccbeta
I REALLY SHOULDN'T GO

\{ ANYWHERE LOOKING L
THIS, § kK T'VE 6
CLEANING OUT 7



23-IZ |S THE WINNAH OF
THE CUT-GLASS SHRIMP
AN? GRAVY BOAT! WILL
2, HE HOLDER OF 23-12

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coe es ino rear es pene Hshoveceneuctualiiudeab stele anal uildaianessiasevsntecsahanashiieuadiante’ —




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SUNDAY. APRIL M Ii2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE Church Services New Mfetrem for Si. Michael's pv.-r ruTF.rv •T I ION \K . i| un i %  >n iiPtal EurKanM • m Ch u ,.i K.rh*n4; II %  ., tU*,.. „v4 • "> Pundiv arhoal Tan, tA-n.nrn . Ed* ,n T*>liI p in Ur O %lfC4after WMTt UAIX • ;-. %  II n T p .11 Mr M > MOUAL 11 m ~A.HD.lpm Mr J aer-er Coplaln II %  J B Grant I Tt, at p . an M.%  YMBM Hawkr* iu< 111 W rand.**** by ir~ rurtrt. >A->l>i PM1.K> >*.< MrOi.i Brov % %  Mln_t*r m CM: '"•THI I* •VM*, _r m i. %  • m %  r UP %  wrt trw i r m n.. K i p ". Rev r %  Utt^H 9 SB am Mr %  MM BCTHE&DAII a m Mr -mim— II .i m lUv 1 p m Mr H Or an* DAIJCEJTM —II a m Mr 1 p >., R*v T J fUrWv PEI.MOKT 11 m Mi • f I Hlarkman %  SOUTH DISTRICT - a m Rov T J Purl-i. ; ). .ii Mr O Harris nin.iNCB~ll a % %  Mr C Bnt. PurVv ban.t to rtuniitar. *ti I mm hath .hrwM I ood. and wftai a.h lb* Lard .,„. .>t tW. km !<. ao jutsi>. and to !( mare.-, and In .ilk n ..-bu .: (rum the I't. by that Elder* and Fyffcs S S (Mlk -MTV Mr. and Mrs. Stsiikv R London who have Hum mnv to Barbados to reside. B naay km tarn %  up an appointment % %  English and frcnch Mi ; i imlng Instructor in the County of Du.ham FROZEN MEAT DUE HERE THIS WEEK A shipment o( chilled and frof.KKXStUfTB 'rrtni Auwtratla u.,'expected t*> •rrive HI Barbados around the end of th week. The M A N.Z. liner Tekaa is to rr>..ke eil about She loa,le. nine sr\i.-. rm i Mi Mr O Pranvw. MiiNTi.xMgtlV 1pm Evonuig BMVK-. Pr-achor Mr I Ulr> ut'NATOHaa:T p fa B.WM 4*t lice Prearlirr Mr D rulpepprt SIIW IIUJ 1 p M Kv-.in* Srrvbre Pr_-hr. Mr F O. Smrth TSIP HAI.VATION \v<\ onTIN II a m llollnna Mrrlina, 3 p in Coniiwuv Mt—iinn 1 p ni Salva. %  DaM niltlXi-TOWN l-t.NTIIAI II .. Il_.iiaa M.. .pan Mtri asw MaatMc 1 p ii. SalvatMn M ret in I -TOWN II s.a i ... Ct-npa.iNMcfli.iB.lpni .irrlira ProaHH'. %  l-ann %  saasa CAIU.TOH iea aterilng. Hlatg. PiaorhT: CaatoHt E %  sjaaat. ClIllKFII 1IA1.III I I II.",-. Mn-tins. 3 p i.nii|i.iii UwliM. 1 p.n> gHUHl. Pn-ai-urr I... U SSIWl MM l>'A mi B.B.C. lUilin rilina-m P in SUndJ.' Half He Ttirp..,. a p m Qtntn • 1A p m Knciun %  l'hii(i~i W Pursd* a iia-w ta ail aj %  %  'I'M CanW-aii •JS*-* •^ k %  1 P m lUdio N.V.. •aal. B JO p m Im. MorMon Kaa. a B p m Iniarlndr. Prom lhr EdlioiUla, B p ... %  <- hall in p~K T MT5 T k -^," p "i I %  0 ,o, ro,3n in n ni rltii:io.. Talk MUMIAt APRIL rl 1*1! i* ",' %  • %  • * %  • M p in Th. l, ( l t ~trva is p in rrom ir.. Tl.ird FK>"•"""• %  S p m I..I. T Walta. B II p m *"-*'iUfi of MWW S p n> Wtlili MitcaU lan. Ill pm Taho n Pram_ B 41 p.m sporia Itouad-tv __< Pro%  nai-iM Parad*; pm The Me-a. 7 1 P a. MOi-r N-.t from BeUBln. 1 ~ l %  %  ' * SB • l Si H 'II Pi" Th L-.1J at i> in Hat>p, Hoe-Da-a. S IS ,... Radio New ar eol. la.a Aftwan a.. a> • r. t • imanud* S M p ... rf* %  S m Tha OMI ITV Aa.,w.... a p m jy|y, OIRB !" *t P ni A.i|iuiilin*iil -Hi, Hu*. II p m rna N. 10 IB p ni Nm Talk IF ff~A' GLASS WE HAVE IT! SIIEFT — SPARKLE PLATE GLASS For Windows. Doors, Cabinets Pictures. Shelves, Counters. Show Windows, and manv other uses Mareas-H— Beta Maagoa Chutaey aaoi Hone ftaoia Sanos Tosaate Imir* KoaB'i LI SIB J—lee 0 T OaJi Ox Toturaea—2-lb. Tina Brlakat Beat —A lb Oxo Onha. LactoaiBu „ Caahrw NuU Oaahaw Kata Uftlllt BIsculU A'paragm „ Cnirle Powdai A-orlr.l Biacalta ,. Chirk'n Haddie* Tina Tonato J* Lami) Tongue OooiBberrlea Paara NaMsM Cl.i ir.. liana (Cooked) i (BUoed) lb Manuoii Pollah T.i Whlta Puppei Black I'-pp-r Cocktail BlBctUta Bourn Vita GOLDSS laYrVOH HI tf PERKtXS A CO.. LTD. — Dial 2070 & 4502 CLOCKS c *% % Mr. CONQUER PAIN SCIENTIFICALLY [XNAGlrV,'' eonuirrt '" wtll-pnrtrt meg,cirifi. /r. Pher.atetin k=— ^—' CafJaine, AcBtvlnlicrlic Acid—and QUININ6. Thesa foui medicmat. Klsntlflcaltr ballfKed. work lyne'giuicalljr —ihf n wk] (he/ rclieva pain rut, raitors your tanis ot vrall.bettf SS"A"Cl*7 we, S>-.t Sena.and Boat* arriaa ofldar lba aaan kNtOIR # \./oi TIIK Pl.KAWl'IIKS or lAll.lM. O^" CLOCKS All types includina Travelling. Dressing Table. Office, Wall, Bracket and of course the inevitable Alarm. Aquatir Gilt Sln.p Phone 4897 OBTAINABLE AT BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. No. 16 Swan Si. Jisr iti'i \i it . . A Lovely Assortment of CHROMIUM WARE FRUIT .DISHES <8> $13 12 mch OTS — 7W V U — BW 9 1 •aoh — 8V" .. • I'lirh SMOKER'S STANDS 0 17.26 Mch ASH TRAYS .94 each FLOWER VASES — 7" (u 4.14 each .. 8"


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p.\r.f. six SUNDAY AOVUCATl: -I MlAY U'HII. oap. ..ulls hair. Halo glorifies It! N E v; S for WOMEN Vcnetia the 'unknown' String Embroidery For The Summer WHO will be The Outstanding Debs of 1952—a year of girls more beautiful than London has seen lor nearly 20 yean? Lady Caroline Child-VMirrs Is one M the moat beautiful. Falrhaired, blue-eyed, she la the daughter of Mrs. Robin Wilton. who herself made a stir when ahe "came out" in 1935. I MI' ill* level? U hnr>Monde Venrlla Lane, an "unknown" imoni the Debt. She i not rlaa*d u a rich girl. She makes her own rlothea and haa a ceod dress sense. PALMOLIVE 'SOOTHES BABY'S TENDER SKIN rVmolive—mode of me fined ingredients—gives o creamy, smooth tilromild lather thot soothes away im'o'ion as it gently floats away dirt. A doily Palmoliv* both will keep you* baby comfortable . refreshed . dainty. Remember, Polmolivt is etro-mild . esfro toorrWigf MLMOUVT GOOD rot lAsr rs rsncuuy cooo ton roui far 6*efress4fCher %  >** BATH SIZI PAIMOUVI Others in the running are Rosamond Christie, daughter of John Christie, of Glyndebourne fame; I'.itricia t'ultingham, whose mother. Mrs. Thomas Lilley (of Lllley and Skinner) is said to have an Income of around £ 100,000 a year; and dark, slim, green-eyed Sarah Chester Beatty. HOT recently had photo%  TMssed in one of his dresses. Haw does a pirl become a Deb -•/ the MOT All depends on her beauty, her charm, her manners and her dress sense. Money Is not important. Her parents can be rich or poor, it doesn't matter. What dors "cominy out" mean? Her pets*, hew ahe wean her clothes, and her personality are what really matter. Simply, coming out of the school room into the social world. If not | only meant presentation at Court, but it means that she Is given a chance to meet people of her generation Ud make friends who will be her friends for life. She learnt how to behave, how to dress, and how to face the world SMART CHOKKRS SUMMER jewellery to wear with cotton 'liesset will be gayer than last ytar'a cork and wooden varieties. Smart chokers are made from round white china beads and square rhinestnnes. 1 have teen a 12-row necklace of small bottlegreen bends, and nn tll-wh!te bead necklace. V-shaped, to fit tn the neckline. Earrings larger than a keyring, and made of straw, will be smart for the beach Fashionable Jamalran straw sandals are now plentiful In I iimliiTi. the price recently reduced by 10a to 2. M. a pair. Rut these attractive ihoes with Sin. wedie heela are the last we shall see for some time. Import restrictions now bar them. FOR RRIDKS Pearl pink ithe new colour for wedding headdresses. Home 1952 bridewill wear pink orange blossom with pink pearl veiling Champagne veiling Is also new—with a seed pearl headdress. Platinum weddlnc iin, are not popular with today's brides. The broad (old Victorian ring Is i ..nun,; back, Favourite ruse inscription: "Amor Vincit Omnia" (Love conquers ail.) How to Choose Moo's Socks MEN'S socks are actually bought and mothers. That if why they are often wrong" says sock expert Mr. Gordon HopeMori ey. What k\nd of socks should men treor? "Plain ribbed, not patterned." he told me. "and they thould never wear brown socks with a navy blue or black suit, or grey socks with a brown suit." PERFECT CONTRASTS? "Stifle ttvith a brown suit, maroon wtth a oTi'l/ or nary blue, aruf dark ore./ u-lth a black suit Imperfect? The odd socks, of ililTrr.ni colours sported by Eton boys. "An Etonian." says the College Chronicle, "ran exprrs* in-, sartorial cga ss-ily In the two or three inches between trnoser and ahoe. The remainder of his dresa Is circumscribed." 'Mother of World' LONDON, March *l. The latest epidemic in the fashion world u hand-cmbroidcry. The newest materials for it are procelain sequins, diamante dew and garnet beads, which form intricate and colourful paltern! on all types of dresses, j Have you ever considered the possibilities of embroidering with white string? It made its first appearance at a collection of designs tor our summer, and it looked attractive and unusual on navy cotton dresses. There were shantungs the colour of golden sand and burnt orsngag, silk-nnished crepet patterned with giant flowers and handkerchief cottons delicately checked. Since the accent was on how to remain cool in the neat, sleeve details were particularly important. Suit sleeves were bracelet lengthsilk coats had "Chinese lantern" sleeves which pushed up into giant "puffs" above the elbow, and blouses had tiny cap sleeves, or no sleeves at all. Two styles — one formal, the other informal — are starred from the collection. Elr&tly. a three-piece suit in black duplon (see illustration left). The black Is offset by pink duplon, printed with a black pattern, used for the tunlc-ttjrlt) blouse, the collar and culls. The skirt looks straight, but has a box-pleat at the back LEFT: Thrcr piece suit in blorfc dupton, Collar, cuffs and blouse are in black-printed pink dupton. IlIdHT: Navy faille dress tcirh unite bead and aequin. j embroidery. (By DOROTHY BARKLEY) for easy walking. Secondly, a full •kirtcd dress which illustrates the current interest In embroidery. Chalk white bead and sequin ?mbroidery encircles the skirt and edges the wide V neck. The dress Is In navy faille, and is worn over several stiff petticoats. There is nothing new about a navy and while colour scheme — but that does not mean that It cannot be fresh, crisp and smart. The cummerbund and the spencer jacket ore two details shown In all collections. The cummerbund — any colour, any material —swathes the waistline and is most often used to transform a humble black dress into a cocktail dress. The spencer jacket — any colour, any material — softly draped across the bodice, has cither full or three-quarter length aBd Is worn with everything from cotton beach dresses to organza evening gowns. Sewing Circle By PENNY NOLAN unfortunate that to few a realise the value of mastering fine hand tewing. Although the modern sewing machine will do almost any sewing job there is still a place for beautiful hand work in the construction of fine %  SJB sassafcj A few basic rules will make hand sewing Jobs easier and more • The bulk of the material should be held toward you. In most cases the bulk should be held in your lap. Care should be taken not to crush or wrinkle the material in your lap When so held %  • ;.xed. When the bulk Is on a table and the %  cam or hem is toward the worker the nands stiffen and tension Is felt in the back of the neck. Excellent work can only be done in a relaxed position. A small amount of the material should be held lightly between the thumb and index Anger of the left hand. The needle should be held between the thumb and Index linger of the right hand. Never Use two or three fingers to hold One dress at a collection had a combined cummerbund and spc ear jacket, A piece oi i about three yard* long, wag attached to the dross Just below the arm and could be worn swathed round the wain as a cummerbund, round the shoulders aa a fa M %  ,L ik.,if The .tlii.NCtilinc Influence At various times in various ways men's fashions have baajplred the creators of women's fashions. Some time ago there was the "Little Boy Look" when we cheerfully cropped our hair short nnd wore those little boy caps. More recently there was the "Edwardian Look" with its "masher" Jackets, ties and waistcoat". So it was perhaps inevitable that a ncet ,, e wUn the sid> o( thc vfcfir designer would moke Jackets for nol lhc Up cnd ^ su „ g !" J women cuton the lines of a man's the right needle fo rthc Job. A tailcoat! This type of Jacket -nade needle tha* is blunt or two coarse its first appearance this week in can spoil your best efforts, llfhtweight tweed r>nd was worn If you are right handed you bewith a tailored style of dre*in Bin ut lhc upper right hand cornmatching tweed. er and tew from right to left for The influence of men's fusions Lffito rtESi 'Stl&'tteh^Si mens tJuYting for women's procedure beginning at the left dresses This has obvious odvanand seeing from left to right If lages. It is easy to launder and you arc left handed you reverse cool to wear. But be sure to the procedure. choose a simple style. The mast Lacs requires very fine handpractical Is the s'eevcless buttonwork. Insertion should be basted through style which opens out flat n the right side of the fabric. the needle. The use of a thimble helps to avoid using two fingers hold the needle. Push the for easy ironing. "Mrs, Clarke's Column CHIlE's First Lady. Scnoro Rosa Markmrmn de Gontales-Vldela, poses with one. of her granddaughters at her home In Santiago. Mrs. Videla has been selected as the "Mother of the World" by the American Mothers Committee. She Is active in the field* of anUd care, women's rights and public welfare. (international) BEWILDERED wrlus. "My bo\i says he loves me but fie }u '. cannot resist other girls. He always comes back to me evenluaily. At present he has gone off with another pirl. Should I take him back cyaio' I AM afraid, my dear, that this bogr Is just using you and knowing your good nature, is very much taking you for granted. I would have a serious talk with faithful to you you will have no him. Tell htm that It he is not more to |i<> with him. It may bring him to Ids sense*, though 1 cannot believe his love is true when he treats you as he does. Remember, my dear, that there are mariy more fish in the sea than have ever been taken out of It. FRANTIC writer, I am not married and am expect ma a baby. i am afraid of my people, especially my mother finding out. and do not know what to do. Please help me. 1 am extremely sorry to hear your trouble, my dear, and know of the anxiety and worry you will have to face. However, I must urge you most sincerely tn take your mother into your conflI ta will. I know, do all ho can tn> help you and would be terribly hurt were she to find out accidentally later on—at she surely will. After all, she is your mother ami devote dto the only daughter. so do tell her. A burden shared, my dear, It halved already. TO ROSE. The spots you mention, my dear, nre probably due to bad eating habits. Tnke plenty of greens In your diet. A little witch hazel dabbed on the face before making up will help to tone up vour skin. If the spots do not go soon, do write to THE FAMILY DOCTOR He will, I'm sure, be able to advise you much more fully. A WEODISG I' R O B L E M write*. "I u"i .Kiting married very soon and as we have not much money arc hating a small reception after (he wedding. Now I Both edges should be whipped down trttn .. tiny sharp needle and very line matching thread. On the wrong side trim away the fabric under the insertion leaving enough on both edges .to roll a tiny hem. Hand roll and whip the edge* with boa. To Insert beading roll and whip the edges of the fabric as you insert the beading in a team or between lace and fabric. A fine finish for the edge of an all over lace section is made by hare rsreit'rd trrrrat presents attaching fine lace beading to the from people who were not inriied. edge with tiny running stitches. .'l"i / siii.fH.ifd in atk them to both To Join lace invisibly, trim to fie u'eddina and the reception? match the pattern and pin one N „,„,_,,„_ , ., edge over the other. Whip toture cannot be aiforded and A mitred corner is made In lace think an acquaintance edge by cutting nwnv a triangle who sends p prestnl would exwithout cutting the edge of uafl pect to be treated as relatives or lace. Bring the edges together and close friends. You could send out whip. invitations to the church only and A lace Insert Is made by basting a.-k rel.itivcs or close friends by the lace in place then working l .i kttl >r wu could around the edges with the Satin put a Btmea HI the Dapar saying stitch. The fabric in back of the "All intnds welcome at the insert is then trimmed away close church." Which will moan that to the embroidery. nm will only re for those When attacking a lace edging to el isa lo you u rawledgc you may roll and whip %  iO K. L. You :>r* > harm . i| keepi vi thorn rclngcraiion. lanca >tli kl IM ihcre it no watte or poilsge. you aet our full money's worth of this superior qutltty milk —taint to lhc very Ian miner. 1 KLIMls pure, sofa milk N'LIM KEEPS WITHOUT REFRIGERATION 3 KLIM quality It always uniform 4 KLIM h excellent for growing childrc 5 KLIMadds nourishment to cooked dishes 6 KLIM is recommended for Infant feeding 7 KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin 8 KLIM is produced under strictest control Take pure water, odd KllM, snr and you have pure, iota milk KLIM :: MILK HUT IN ri.FIHENCI Till WOLD OVU So satisfying ...this i Chase & Sanborn If TOO get sharp stabs of pain in your back when you stoop and, at other limes, there is a dull and continuous ache, the cause can very Often be traced to lhkidneys. These vital organs should filter poisons out of the system but sometime t they get sluggihh and congested and the backache you surf.T is Nature's way of warntDt yon that your kidneys need assistance. A trusted medicine for ifiis purpose is De Witts Pills. They have a cleansing and antiseptic action on the kidneys, helping to soothe them, tone them up and restore them to function naturally. There is a long record Of success behind De, Witt's Pills, which have been relieving sufferers in many parts of the world for ever half a century. Ifyou could read een a few of the grateful letters tent ID by backache sufferers who have found relief after taking De Witt's Pills you that your suffering may also be %  r/Why not try them for your trouble? They may be just what you need. Co to your chemist sad get a tipply ught away. DE WITT'S PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles Hare h coffee with the inviting oromo, the heotnly flavor thai make* every tip a soliifying experience With Chose & Sanborn you get oil the flavor your STREET Phone: 4441 or 2041 :-: p. A. CLARKE 'ajs w i :o c aaooc n ooaeooDaBiOaa>asastts>s>ogipqaopeBiB|Bti VALOR COOKER STOVES Short Burners 2 Burner Model ffi $50.14 I Burner Model $ $71.87 Alto WHITE POltCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS With Double Drainboard @> $63.84 complete with waste and overflow %  ataMlahad 18(10 T. HERBERT. Ltd. 10 & 11 Roebuck BtTM Incorporated DM



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t ^r PACE TWO Sl'N'DAY ADVOCATE M M.W \I'IL M, IMS E very or. • loves Siaoeta. Level y Bate,l>. Unsightly Hair. 'M-ciaHy la WiM . %  :— "OST RID Or tJlTBlOHTLY HAD*. •• VEET For the ImB. Daaee. Balling, or any UB* whan nu bKOBH Unsightly, as* VEET. Tr.ET %  cmatnsty nwfal for Bon who %  •• tonj who lud it tui comfortable to Share rrrno M I lb exactly TUBE! 1 ITS CLEAN I ITS OBBTAIV F 1 IT'S 1A I I I That's T B B T If /J. •/ %  par MtM Obtainable at:— BOOKER'S (B'doi) DRUG STORES LTD. UROAD STREKT and HASTINGS (Alph. Ki.im.ry) METRO GOLDWYN MAYER W 1O B I JOTH CENTURY FOX Pmrnt TON1TE H3 p.m. and Cnnllnulne J.IHI H :ill p.m. Wedding Etiquette •DHIUADICR and Mr*. "Hi !** fcrntn win, r M .--MI %  pending the winter in Bart >do*, refnrnalo on Friday by r ( ,\ Tney were accompanied by Mrs. Florence Memck, *trr Of Mrs While here the the Murine HoteL Had Successful Op.* D R. D S GIDEON. Moi. Siipennlrrul.-nt of the 11T < %  <* General Hospital. rfWro rung from Knfci. l after The luinul wedding u nearly always held W church although with your clergyman's permlsmay be nwmM home, In a dub of l hotel. When l of the uiMj mUslou dtnonunal oo, the bride' a a lecta the church.' Together, you and your nBnee ,on in* rector or rabbi \?2l£??£L H '*• advance of the wddln. I .I da m fl min l frpm *" L Be sure to check on lb* seating, %  ? hc !" f aw an abser-e Huge* before"*£"• 1 1 T onlh *out a u.-rtniuInvitation *> %  "• yfdjeon spent moat of hi lake into .oi.Mdcrat.on the ,mc •! Morenalda Hoapiu). Lon.,'nuuiu of space available at lhel don wn r n uisdrneeat a suv paajranu-y. Also *"* eye operation *tudy the interior of the church for beat colour HTOTIM and architectural beauty. The most popular hour* for* formal Protestant weddings are four or four'. thirty in the afternoon. Most of (the fashionable Catholic weddings [are celebrated with a nuptial high mm. Invitation* for a formal wedding are all mailed at lone Urn*, one or two month* I In advance £a)db galling wuu cum WINTERS MERRILL A^raosK, RENNIt WYNN DAVIS un ~i*rnYa RUNMUT JOHNSOI —..WHNEWLESCO Klra : "A DARLING OK A SHORT" TBf WRKCK OF THE HESPEROS" MODERN DRESSES FOR ALL OCCASIONS New Dresses for Cocktails or Weddings Alio . KVEN1NG DRESSES BEACH DRESSES SUN DRESSES MATERNITY DRESSES HOUSE DRESSES AMD HOUSECOATS Kri.in $15.00— *29.75 HANDBAGS of Distindion Imported Conodiar. inH French HANDBAGS in velvet, bengaline, suedine and brocade All Modern Shades From Milt—S6.9K LADIES HATS Smart Styles foi Cocktails or Weddings In a large assortment of colours From 95.19—$8.50 NYLON STOCKINGS 51 and 60 gauge 15 Denier Sheer Lovely Stockings in a new shade* From 82.05—$2.27 EVENING COATS Garbeidinss and Shaikkm ALSO WARM COATS Kn.m |IIM WM THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE four parent* should Isme the nations and announcement* 'ii though you are hot living hocM If your parents are not l.ving. your aunt and uncle oi net rest relative* may sponso* you* wedding Even though ks be an informal wed' diog. if othei ihi.tt etosa fiiends tm are to -• ti %  hould aend fiuinul engmved invitattana Hotn ramiiies tribute to the UHi on %  !> equal liasis. with names ad addressee rurd-UHlexrd for road\ unrkmi ..ml accuracy. If you arc having separate reception gad n*remony lists, file them Indej ..void r'iscnt. but gut| onl to the church arc not i r ; i %  W' %  i are the nnlv chin> iHoweol f< blewfeU iin.-n papi appropri.de fur formal iveddlEB] Invitation A lanp-"ci members of the Council <•• the Barbados Cricket Association who attended the luncheon Wen Mr Ben Hov,.,. M, s O q. Clttens. Mr E L G Hoai Hew York Hc has been spending the past month in Barbados inlrnducing thc prnducts of his company to local sug.ir factory %  l Mr Paviluk was a gucrt a* the Windsor Hotel. AT THE OPENING of Club Boyal, BsaUng-. on Friday night the Cocktail Party ihat raarked tht optning A portion of tin fores roimct A Motion of tkc JOO guasta who attended circnlsr Mrraiio dance floor m In the right %  •MPIIII r_L.-i*Ti TAVi.m nil \ a r-. if a |g II n inn* TNI (Mill M HI ag OKI H M • ass* nan < I I I I v I I i Ii ,,..i H INIT Atoa ( -,ih e?. li ta t"Cs *"* %  •* %  •*" %  •• ---,*•,-'.*-*-*-*-*,*,, Weddinrs Y ESTERDAY afternoon Mai I bias Church. Mi >'ron Bovce dau Mrs Aubrey 1 [liter of "" Oyce of i % %  %  i\s was married to Mi Petrlek Kellman Roach, son of Mr Harry Roach of "Bedford Lodge". St Michael. ..nd [he | n i, Mrs Roach. The ceremon dierti) after 4 o'clock was performed by the Rev M E Grtflwu. The bride who was given In marriage by her father, wore a •bouffant" style dress of while cotton l.ii i filling bod BarritteT-At-Law M R. F G. SLEEPY who passed his bar finals in [•..inSeptember und was c.dled to th Married Yesterday Y ESTERDAY U AUeyne Yearwood. daughter of Mr and Mrs H. G. Yeai of St. Luke's, St. George was married to Mr John 1. C Gay, TOO of Mr. and Mrs L. T. Gay of Brighton Black Rock The iinde who waa given m fTUtrriage by her fethar wore a %  oioideied oigaiiJ.. nvloti with a low scailopesj neckline hein In place with UUe* of the valley, a scalloped bouffant overskirt. long flowing Bad a headdress of lilies of the valloy Her bouquet was of Queen Anne's Lace, pink roserxids and gerbenu. She was attended by her sis*•• Yearwood a.* Maid i tuoui who wore graded net with applluued skirt, low neckline with wrapped front and a stole attached with headdress and shoes to match, she • ,i a bouquet of a horseshoe form. Her bridesmaids were the MIspes Thora King and Gloria Hope who wore graded gold net. and the Misses Monica Scott and Cicely Norrls who wore graded green net. Their dresses were made with strapless bodices, appliqued skirts with stole attached with headdresses ahd shoes to match. They earned bouquets of horseThe cwrernuny was conduiuM A F. C\.lein..n. The ofbcaUiian were performed Fred Ga> while those of fell to Messrs. Tony Atkins. i k Jordan and Arthur Qay, A reeepiion was held at 'Tuilleriea". FlU Vlllaae, St. James, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. <;. Juhnaon and the honeymoon la MUM BfJetkl at "Hillcrest". Bnth.sheb.i. M ISS GRACE PAYNE, oaughf Mrs. G. D. I "Hddathoi*pc", Pino Rood and the ''hilip Bruce Pavne was the United Kingdom. David Taylor, son of Mrs Btairkey said that he had a good time Taylor of "Br ig hton", Black R<-ric at Grays Inn v m Barbados He practise I i -, I .tllO.: | Mr in England, but i h LiMon 1 Kfl K.I: Edmund Shirley %  i. gljd to and the lati %  hlch look place ** tack hom,r Whl1 '' m ,n '' U K r lie look a Trade I nton four %  ,, n on,v w