Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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ESTABLISHED 1895



Removal of C.N.S. fro

W.I. Traders Will Bez"

Greatly Affected

NEwWs that the Canadian National Steamship

Company will discontinue its passenger ser-
vice between Montreal, the Atlantic Ports and the
West Indies, has been received locally with much
concern by everybody alike.

A local shipping authority said: “This step will

to a large extent affect the passenger situation in| inet tion nt Mere: The pottle.
the West Indies, but will have slight repercussions|

on the transportation of
The information reached Barba-
dos yesterday that the “last of the
famed Lady Boats of the Canadian
National

Steamships soon will
vanish from the Atlantic and
Caribbean seaboards.”
Government owred Canadian

National Steamships in its Annual
Report to Parliament last Thurs-
day said that Lady Nelson and
Lady Rodney, ships which had
served valiantly in the second
World War, were being taken out
of service at the end of the sum-
mer season. They will not be re-
placed by similar liners on the
Montreal-Atlantic ports—West In-
dies run, The C.N.S. will provide
prosaic freighters.

At present these Lady Boats
local agents for which are Mes
Gardiner Austin & Co., provide |
the only steamship passenger ser- !
vice from Canada to the West In-!
dies, and in addition provide one
of the main communication links }
between the islands themselves.

Traders Affected

Itinerant traders who do busi-
ness between the islands with their
consignments of West Indian pro-
duce of one kind or another. have |
made much use of the accommo- '
dation afforded them by the Lady
Boats, and many of them will
no doubt be gravely affected.

Informed on the subject this)
morning, one such trader whose |
business takes her through the |

Windward and Leeward Islands

said she was very sorry to learn |

that this service would ro longer
be available to traders like her- |
self, because, she said: “It is
one of the surest means of our
getting our cargo from place to |
place without its perishing for |
long periods at sea. |

“Again many of us, are able
to travel with our cargo, and we |
cannet all depend on the smalicr |
motor ships and schooners for
transportation,

The taxi driver too, is worried
about these ships going out of
service, because the regular sche-
dule maintained by these vessels
provide him with a source of in- |
come during the greater part of
the year when the tourist season
has ended,

Taxi Drivers Concerned

Besides the few holidayers who
come in by these ships from time
to time, it invariably happens |
that passengers from the various
islands come in, and these often
stay at friends out of town, thus
providing added income for the
taxi driver. One taxi driver said:
“It is when these Lady Boats come
that we are able to do some work
without having to compete with
larger garages which now mono-









polise trade during the tourist

season.” ;
Generally, local business men

have not yet given the matter

sufficient thought to discuss it in;
detail, but off hand they express
concern over the news.

One businessman thought it
very grave that these passenger |
liners were to be taken off the!
run. Everybody knew that the cost
of running steamships today, with
conditions as they are, was very
high. i ‘
More was the pity that they
were going out of service be-





“WANDE



ONE THOUSAND MILES from 4

| inter-island

|It was left

cargo.”’

cause these Lady Boats have
been looked upon as a friendly

link between Canada and the} bottle of Scuth African wine in
West Indies for many years. He! existence. .

was, however, satisfied that |

when conditions become more| Wellington: New Zealand's!
favourable, the various West}longest milk run will get under
Indian islands between which way within four months when
the Lady Boats have been a!

means of communication would

be glad to see them back in ser-

vice.
Another Drawback

Another drawb2ck
‘certain loss of hard currency be-
cause many people who are not
permitted to travel by air, or who
do not care to travel this way,
do so by Canadian National Steam-
ers, which is one of the only
other means of coming here.”

“The taking out of service at
the end of this summer of the
Lady Boats will affect to a large
extent the passenger situation in
the West Indies, but will have
slight repercussions on the trans-
portation of cargo,’ a local ship-
ping authority said.

For years now the Lady Boats
have formed the chief means of
transportation for
passengers, he said, and they are






going to be greatly misseq by
West Indians—especially business
men and itinerant traders who

make frequent use of them.
Reviewing the shipping activi-
ties between the West Indies, he
said that passenger ships coming
down from the U.K., like the
French S.S. “Colombie” and the
Elders & Fyffes’ S.S. “Golfito’’,
make Barbados their first port of
call and then sail on to Trinidad.
They return to England by the
route. So these ships are of no
advantage to the Leeward Islands
and the other Windward Islands.

Passenger-Freighters

The Furness Withy passenger-
freighters and the C.N.S. passen-
ger-freighters serviced | through
the islands, both offering limited
passenger accommodation and the
former making infrequent calls.
to the Lady Boats
td bear the brunt of the passenger
trade.

“With T.C.A. promising to ex-
pand their service with Barbados,
the vanishing of the Lady Boats
will not affect very much the
tourist trade batween Barbados
and Canada", was an observation.

A shipping agent agrees with
the shipping authority that the
going of the “Lady Nelson” and
the “Lady Rodney” will have
little or no effect on the inter-
island transportation of cargo.

He said that transhipment
cargo and West Indian produce
which the Lady Boats take from
port to port in the West Indies
can easily be handled by inter-
colonial craft.

As regards the Canadian-West
Indian trade with cargo, he thinks
that the Alcoa Stearmships and the
Saguenay Terminals Steamships
will be able to supply the needs of
the West Indies and could accom-
modate the cargo that the Lady
Boats bring down from Canada.

Another shipping clerk wonder-
ed whether the French Line and
the Elders & Fyffes Line, who run

@ on page 15

) ua”
RER



ny land the 24 ft. Australian yacht
“Wanderer II” steers herself under twin spinnakers on her way across
the Atlantic to Barbados.—(Story on page 9)

will be the!

BARB. US,

mW

¢



ANOUN!D THE CLUB MARK





IN AN OLD
BOTTLE

Cape Town: A 161-year-old
bottle of White Constantia wine,
lent by Conel Frank Mellish,
Manager of the Sprifgbok Rugby
Team, has interested visitors to
the Wine Industries pavilion at

OLD WINE |
|

dated 1791, was given to Colonel
Mellish by the Duke of Northum-
berland at a dinner in honour of
the Springbok Rugby Team dur-
ing their recent tour. It is be-
, lieved to be the oldest unopened



milk from pioneer goat farms in
Canterbury will be flown 505
miles to Auckland. Until herds
lin Auckland are built up, the
milk will help to feed babies and |
young children unable to take
{normal milk. Cost will be 1s. 6d

ja pint plus freight. Cow’s milk!



|costs 4d.
New York: Three bandits in
Danvers, Massachusetts, success-

fully robbed an armoured bank
ear and got away with 600,000
dollars (£35,714), In a_ quiet
street, the driver and two guards
parked the vehicle beside Danvers
National Bank, went off for coffee.
However, they forgot to lock the
car’s door.

Perfumed Post-Cards
Amsterdam: Visitors to the
Dutch bulbfields can send to their
friends the lovely sight and smell
of hyacinths. Picture-postcards of
fields on

buoy.— (Story on page 5)



“B” BOAT “Okapi” and Tornado “Comet” clear the Club mark.
the background other “B” boats and Tormhidges are heading for the

Bronco Teal Wins
Grand National |...
Steeplechase







APRIL 6, 1952

in \— -
Plane Crashes
Into New York
| Housing Lot

NEW YORK, April 5.
that an unidentified
|}plane crashed in the Jamaica
| section of New York City at ap-
proximately 8.30 a.m, E



the hyacinth sale are Police described the plane as
perfumed with the flower’s scent ‘a “big one’ and said at least
which is guaranteed to last for six ‘ l eight houses were on fire at the
months, S : AINTREE, England, April 5, | scene of the crash ‘which is ap-
Set: vhs’ A: Yes ie Teal a reformed bucking bronco, originally bought for | proximately 10 miles from La
™ uve “State of emer : » Gre i 5 se in one] Guardia airfield. 20 ambulances
gency” was proclaiived throush- £43, won the Grand National Steeplechase today in one | Guardia airfielc

out the country to-day and Israelis
are warned to expect an “invas-
ion”—of locusts. If they see any

history of the event.



oi tes » ‘the ae P away from a subway station, a
Signs of the “enemy” they may! between Teal, Freebooter and Legal Joy with Wot No Sun{focal point in Queen’s transpor-| sion,
telephone or send a warning tele- ; str ‘ ached
gram to the authorities free of always in a handy position to challenge the leaders. tation system. ‘The ais eras net
charge. Just before the race it was deeided to use single strand erorey (see One. er eeee

tape instead of a flag to send the unweildy field on its way,| "Residents in six of the houses

but the starter had a very difficult task in getting 47 run-| wore trapped in roaring flames.

Injured
Improving’ |
Reports from the General Hos-!
pital show that the conditions of
the injured that were detained |
after the motor bus A 66 the
property of the Rocklyn Bus Co.,|

overturned on Spring Vale Hill,
St. Andrew about 1.30 on









ners under way.

‘DEAD’ MAN COMES
TO LIFE AGAIN

ROME, April 5.
A patient in a hospital at
Rome “died” on Saturday
during an _ operation,

where a patient has been
restored after such a long
period. They said in pre-
vious similar cases the heart |

driver of the bus at the time of
the incident and who sustained a
spinal injury was taken into the
Surgery as soon as he was admit-
ted to the Casualty. The Advo-'
cate was told yesterday that the
injury is not as serious as it was
before,

It is expected that some of the
injured will be discharged from
the General Hospital, this week.

stopped only a few minutes.

The patient is 51-year-old
Arthur Eeber undergoing
an amputation of the right
leg because of burger
disease which affects arte-
rial circulation.







of the most thrilling finishes in the 115th year in the!

Virtually it was a three-horse race from the start-

a wens ame wee

but >
heart massage restored him |}

p.m,

March 31, are improving. 15 minutes after his heart |
Cyril Springer of Spooner's stopped. Doctors said it iv |;

Hill, St. Michael who cae the the first khown case here

4 ' 7’ ” ”
Printer’s Pie, Freebooter, Roi- A CCEPTED
mond, Brown Jack and Teal im- "
|mediately began to contest the From Our Own Correspondent)
but after the leaders had PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 4.
ed the second ‘jump, Brown} In a considered judgment hand-
Jack was down. ed down by the Supreme Court

minimum and while the leaders

loose
their wake.

and equipment for a three alarm
| fire were sent to the scene.



The crew of the plane in addi-
¥ Iwo Of the ch¢ s were une tion to p policeman were known
ruly and broke the tape and after;to have been killed outright, but
a delay of nearly ten minutes on! there were no authoritative





om-
the field, were off to a good start.| plete death details. The plane
nly 47 horses started over the/was immediately enveloped in
a, 0 a Pa SCE ater fire as it crashed down out of the
exas an 1ac een Wilhndrawn ‘ f rorcae ,
: rainy heavily overcast sky.
from the field overnight. iy F me anti JP.
Rain fell heavily and



skies made it difficult to discern
the colours of riders while the
water on a firm turf made the
ground slippery and treacherous
especially near the take off of the
jumps,

leaden |

APPEAL SHOULD
HAVE BEE!





Visibility was now reduced to a) this morning His Honour E, R, L.

Ward found that the Clerk of the
Peace of the Port-of-Spain
Magistrate's Court should have,

were jumping fluently, a string of
horses were following in

|
|
|
|

The crash occurred one block) there was one paragraph which

| tween the Chairman and Mr, Mot-



accented the “e ‘al from
His heart stopped during As they approached the famous accepted the notice of appe ul r

pee oa but ae Le turn, the race developed in- oe rea ae ny ee

? ; rmanuel Scavo 5s ie to a thrilling struggle between | #!n #oy Musson é a saa

T dad Govt. Takes ~~ vo and a — Teal, Freebooter, Legal Joy and ~ British anilens we peer

. Saging the heart. After the Wot No Sun. the removal ordet nade ;

as eed heart-beat resumed, tha The crowd, huddling in the rain; Acting Chief Magistrate Beau-
Me ures Agaitist patient was given artificial at vantage points alongside fences, | mont Celestain

P 1 . respiration for 30 minutes cheered the small group as they The Mussons had applied to

ou try Disease until breathing and muscu- |} neared the end of the first circuit,|the Court for an order of man-

lar reflexes were restored. hoping that the gallant Freebooter|damus directed against the Clerk |

sors Ons a Covssapondent) The operation was suc- | would join the ranks of all-time|of the Peace but Ward pointed

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 5. cessfully concluded.—U.P. greats by winning two Nationals.|out that it was unnecessary to

The Legislature aye a quick ‘Second Circuit make the mandamus _ absolute

passage to a Bill which aims at At th aoe t of the sasend. & because what the application

applying provisions of the diseases { the start of the second cir- : W

of Animals Ordinance to poultry
with a view to regulating and—
or prohibiting the importation
into the colony of poultry and—
or . poultry eggs intended for
jhatching, to prevent the intro-
;duction of poultry diseases into
the colony.
Hon. Victor

Cuban Robbed
Of $50,000

MIAMI, Florida, April 4
A wealthy Cuban woman signed
a warrant for the arrest of a styl-
ish middle-aged man from Hav-
ana on Charges of fleecing the city

3ryan, Minister of
Agriculture and Lands told the
Legislature during the consider-
ation of the measure that not so with $50,000 of her money

very long ago a fowl cholera] The Miami Herald identified the
outbreak had decimated a large woman as “one of the family” of
part of the poultry population of}the Cubdn President Carlos. Prio



the colony, 7 Socaras now in exile here, En-
_ Experts advised that the}tourage of Prios’ relatives and
importation of frozen poultry’ former government Heutenants are

|eggs might have contributed very|living in exile with him in Miami,
materially at that time to the] Senora Fonseca said she gave
spread of the disease known 4s/the money to Ruiz to take for
the Newcastle disease. - safe-keeping when they landed
here together in a plane from Hav-
ana on Monday night. Police Chief
Norton said ske turned the money
over to Ruiz for delivery to a
hotel or some such place in Miami
or on Miami Beach.

The money was all in 1,000-dol-
lar bills. Norton said his officers
learned that Ruiz caught a Na-
tional Airlines plane for New
York on Tuesday night.



It was also found then that
Government did not have power
to act against importations under
existing legislation. They had to
use currency restrictions to
impose control.



Cuban Council Hold
Ist Official Session

HAVANA, April 5.
The Cuban Council of Ministers
heid their fir$t official session last

U.P.

(Quakes Shake
‘Central Pyrenees



| night in the Presidential Palace

after General Fulgencio Batista’s TOULOUSE, France, April 4
assumption of the provincial Earth tremors shook the Cen-
Presidency and according to|tral Pyrenees region of France
new Constitutional statutes|early today and a number of
ordered a new 45 day sus-|persons were awakened by the
pension of constitutional guar-|jshock, but no darnage or casual

antees. Batista was sworn injties were reported. Observator

immediately after the Council had|of Pic Du Midi recorded a serie
adopted a long series of constitu-|of tremors lasting approximately
tional amendments to make the}30 seconds around 9 a.m. G.M.1
| Act possible. The new statutes | Authorities said that the earth-
approved by the Council dissolved; quake was the strongest in the
{alt political parties, ratified Batis-|areas of Tarbes Haute, Pyrenee
jta’s suspension of Congress and jand Luchon Haute Garonne
provided for a 56 member “Con-|where a number of persons were

|Sultative Council” to advise ‘the| awakened

} Government. All members will be/ tremors

appointed by a council of minis-{ noises,
ters.—U.P.



during
and he

by

the nigh
4 mbling





—U.P.

|
|

has been one of the luckiest mer Herbert Miller, a labouret

on the British turf and surprised} Beckles Hill Michael, wa

both experts and fans last season! en to the General Hospial and «

| by winning the Lincoln Handicap| charged after a ten pound turtle
with Parnes Park » had done} fell on hi houlder while he
nothing since placing one of the inding i 7 t near the

top classics two thousand suinge ‘Interpreter at about 1.30 p.m

ao rae



cuit the order was Teal, Free-|sought had already been done,
booter, Wot No Sun, Legal Joy, Ward then mentioned that
Border Luck, . Roimond, Royaljafter preparing judgment he un-
Stuart, Royal Tan, Menzies and derstood from the Registrar of
Printers Pie, with Uncle Barney|the Supreme Court that the re-
trailing in the rear, followed by afeord of proceedings and notes of,
group of loose horses. evidence and all exhibits in the
The first four contested every matter had been entered by the
yard of the gruelling course and Clerk of Peace
at two fences from the tremendous Tt i question as to costs of the
cheers and excitement, it became appeal ha been reserved
obvious | that the race lay be- nfence Consnea’ Algernon
tween Teal and Freebooter. ; + Ward’ attention
The crowd forgot the dismal) Wharton drew Ward's a e t
weather and shrieked encour- ‘0 t! high bail of $1,000 each
agement to riders who fought, xed by a Justice of the Peace
neck and neck closely chal- | nd described it a unprece-
lenged by Royal Tan, A tre-' dented aN
mendous shout went up 4s MIR, eaten
Royal Tan one of the popular
choices, crashed into the last

obstacle, leaving Teal and Legal

Joy to fight out the issue.
Jockey Arthur Thompson who

rode Teal today and had won in

ON OTHER PAGES

Page
Carib Calling.



1948 with Sheills Cottage, rode 3 Cinema; Farm And Gar-
a hopeful finjsh and forged live den; Gardening Hints.
lengths ahead of Legal Joy with 4 Sidelights On Sport:
Wot No Sun trailing behind in Bookie; Football Re-
the third placing. Only nine port; Table Tennis,
finished. 5 Yachting; Soccer Les-
It was one of the fastest run) sons; Football Fixtures.

races in recent years, the winner | 6 Lady Diplomats; Sew-

covering the course in nine min- ing Circle,

utes twenty and three fifths 7 Your Baby and You

Seconds, one fifth of a second out-| Mrs. Clarke's Column

side the record 3 8 Editorials; Sitting On
The winner provided yet, an- The Fence; Island For-

other Grand National saga. Teal tress.

was first purchased as a children’s | 9 The Hard Way Home,

pet, but he soon developed into a}

10
bucking bronco and was unrid-

Brightly Fades The Don.





| 11 The Lives Of Harry

able q | Lime

It took six months’ hard train-| 12 Local News; The Lives
ing to make Teal tractable and he Of Harry L on
was eventually trained as a suc- 12 Comic Strips .
cessful steeplechaser | 16 Local News; Church

Since he was first purchased he} Services .
was sold on four different occa- F ”
sions, his present owner being
Harry Lane, the wealthy North of

England building contractor

Lane | TURTLE FALLS ABOARD





A. Causes Much Concern

Rent Collector’s

Appointment Causes
Prolonged Debate

A debate lasting two

and three-quafter hours took

place at the meeting of the Housing Board’yesterday when
Mr. E, D. Mottley spoke about two hours eoncerning the

leyality‘of the appointment

of a rent collector and mainte-

nance clerk.at the previous meeting.

Mr: Mottley’s: pt

to the minutes the motion

ipal objection wag that according

was put when he had already

left the scat, leaving the meeting without a quorum. He
objected too that JéePal opinion had since been sought from

a Crown Law Officer as to

the validity of the alleged ap-

pointment and before the opinion was received, the rent

collector had been informec

taken up duties.

During the debate the Secretary
read a letter in which Mr. Adams,
the Chairman, who recently re<

turned to the island and was un;
able

to attend dve to illness,
pointed out that ne harm could
be done to the Board's reputa-

tion if they took a legal opinion.
A motion moved by Hon, F. C.
Hutson, seconded by Mr. Mottley



Was eventually passed that the
Whole issue be postponed. Hon.
F. C. Hutson’s motion was: “In

view of Mr, Adams's letter to the

Secretary relative to the appoint-|

ment of a rent collector and the
discussion regarding the legality
of the appointment taking place
this morning, I move that . the
matter be postponed pending the
receipt of the opinion of the Crown
Law Officer which has already |
keen sought.

Members present were Mr. H. A.

Tudor, Mr. M. E. Cox, Mr. E. D.
Mottley, Hon. F. C. Hutson and
the acting Chairman, Mr. J. B.
Beckles. A non-member present
was Miss Arne, Social Welfare
Officer.

Discussion Opened
Mr. Mottley opened the discus-
sion by informing members that
he intended objecting to the con-
firmation of the minutes. He said
that
sions the clerk's

on memory,

could convey the wrong impres-

He quoted from the minutes
which showed that after stating
that Mr. Cox had seconded Mr.
Tudor’s motion for the appoint-
ment of Mr, Maynerd, Mr, Mott-
ley started to leave the room.
Me wondered whether it was not
more correct to say thatehe left
the room while Mr, Cox was
seconding the motion and not
When he had seconded it. While
it did not matter much because
the following paragraph of the
minutes pointed out that the
motion was put when he was
not in his chair and was already
leaving the room, it still gave
the wrong impression.

This gave rise to a dispute be-

tley as to whether Mr. Tudor and |
Mr. Cox who were present should
not speak concerning Mr. Mott-
ley’s points before the Secretary

without casting any asper- |

1 of his appointment and since

Mr. Tudor or Mr. Cox,

Mr. Tudor said that Mr. Mott-.
ley was stressing the point that
if Mr. Cox seconded the motion,
he did not second it until he left,
but that was not so.

Board's Decision

The Secretary then said that
during his 15 years as Secretary,
the procedure was that ff a mem-
ber felt that anything was wrong
with the minutes, the Board would
decide if the minutes were correct
or not. Asked for a straightforward
,-nswer by Mr, Mottl@Â¥, Mr. Lash-
| ley said that the minutes were a
} true record of his impressions of
jthe meeting.

It was eventually put to the
vote whether the minutes should
be confirmed, and Mr, Tudor and
Mr. Cox voted that they were a

t

true record and they were con-
firmed. Neither Mr. Mottley nor

Mr. Hutson voted.
Mr, Mottley then began to speak

about “Matters arising out of the
Minutes”.
He said, that since the other

members who had been present at
the previous méeting agreed to
| confirmation of the minutes with-
out asking for correction, he took
it that they felt the minutes rep-
resented a true account of what

had transpired at that meeting.
And in the minutes it was said
that while he was leaving the

room, the question for the appoint-
ment was put. Since, that was
agreed, it should be clear to mem-
bers that the appointment was
made without a quorum = and
therefore was invalid,

Mr, Tudor now spoke on a point
of order and said that while Mr.

Mottley had been gat his

papers and flasks, they ad

been put. ,
Mr. Mottley reiterated it he

had alveady left the table and in
any case it hod been stated in the
minutes that he had left and the
two members then present who
had been present at the meeting
had not objected to it. Further,
they had confirmed the minutes.
The Chairman said that he
was not denying that the minutes
as confirmed were correct,
Legal Position



replied, the Chairman having
asked Mr. Tudor and Mr, Cox to



With this admission Mr.
Mottley proceeded to question
the notification of Mr. Maynard
that he was appointed, although

the legal position as to the val-





give their impressions first. Mr. | idity of the appointment was
Mottley. objected and pointed out j|doubtful. He said he had read
that it was a matter for the S in the Press and had confirmed
retary to say what were his re-jit from the Secretary that the
collections and not a matter for on page 7

oe SS ,



MD
(7

M7
(%



You are on



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FOR EASTER LOVELINESS'




IN



ADVOCATE
lor MARTIN HICKS, re-
i tired A.D.C. to His Excel-

lency Mr. K. W. Bilackburne,
Governor of the Leeward Islands,
is now spending a holiday in
|Barbados on his way back to
England. He arrived on Friday Spent Two Months
[by BWIA. from Antigua and R. HAYNES CHALLENOR
is staying at Aquatic Court and his sister-in-law Miss
; Frances Harmon from Toronto,
} Attended I.L.O. Talks Canada, returned home on Friday
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.MG., by T.C.A. after spending two
iM Leader of the House of oe kre at the
editty , sturne - jenev Ocean View Hotel.
oa tone ae siamese oP _ Mr. Challenor, a Barbadian who
T.C.A. on Friday after attending f"* kt Se apis Ps Soa
: the past 52 years, is ¢ ti
me — —— ¢ Zz autideet of ove of the branches of
Committee of Experts on = the Canadian Bank of Commerce

application of International Con-
ventions, a Committee of the
Intefnational Labour Organisa-
tion of which he is a member.

Visited Parents
RS. PHILIP HEWITT-MyY-
RING, wife of. the Public

in Toronto, He is a brother of

Hon'ble Robert Challenor

Spent The Winter
EV. JOHN MOCKRIDGE, D.D.,
a retired Clergyman of Toron-

T.C.A. after spending the win-
Relations Adviser to the Comp- tér in Barbados. He came down
trolléy for Development and here from the middle of December
Welfare, returned from the U.S.A. and was staying at Stafford House

on Friday via Puerto Rico by i g
B.W.LA., after paying a visit to Special Flights
N addition to their

her parents,
flights, B.W.LA

Gone fer Easter
M* ALAN REEKIE, a student ing special flights B. and eee
f t Lodge School, left Caracas for the Easter perioc
for rinidad wa Friday evening There was a special flight yester-
by B.W.LA., to spend the Easter day and there will be one on April
holidays with his relatives,
He is a som of Mr. R. Fraser

9 and another on April 13. These
are the only three up to the pres-
Reekie, A.R.I.B.A., Resident Part-
ner in the West Indies of Messrs

“With The Royal Bank

Watkins and Partners, Archi- PENDING three weeks’ holiday
fects of London and the West here is Miss Myra King of
Indies and Mrs. Reekie of Port-, British Guiana. She arrived on
of-Spain. Thursday night by B.W.LA. and

staying at “Accra”, Rockley

Is
Miss King is an emplovee of the
wren . ae. Guiana Royal Bank of Canada in George-
y I ? ‘ Juian:

{ on Friday by B.W.I.A, were basaie” ag

Mr. and Mrs, Charles King ‘vho On _Tes-Day Visit

were holidaying here for the R. a. ATRICK LABRIE

past two weeks staying at ihe T.C.A's Senior Traffic Repre-

Crane, St. Philip. sentative for the Caribbean Area
Mr. King who is with the ‘s now in Barbados on,a ten-day

visit. He arrived on Friday morn-
ing by T.C.A, from Montreal and
is staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Berbice Bauxite Company, is a
brother of Mr. J. A. King of the

Trinidad branch of Messrs Wm
Fogarty Ltd, 2 Paid Shert Visit
Methodist Minister R, JOSE NUNES, Managing
| EV. and Mrs. Donald F. Director of Messrs. Wm. Fog-
| Henry who arrived from arty Ltd., returned to British
Antigua on Friday by B.W.1.A., Guiana on Friday by B.W.LA.
expect to leave this afternoon after paying a short visit to the
for Trinidad and later for British island.
tuiana where they will spend
Seoul three months’ holiday Intransit
Rev. Henry is stationed at R. R. W. WILLIS, Commercial
| Anguilla with the Methodist on or of pea in Trini-
| Chure Jhile here they are ‘ad, was an intransit passenger
| Seastae’ - ir Cheap- from Jamaica by B.W.1LA,. on Fri-
| side. lay _hight on his way back to
ee Trinidad.

Leaving Tcday
| Ms LILLIAN GOODRIDGE
} a native of this island who has
cen residing in the U.S.A. for the
ast 29 years, spent three and a
half months holiday here with her
| relatives. She is expected to leave

British Embassy, Caracas
R, C. A. MABY who is with
the British Embassy in Cara-

cas, accompanied by his wife is at

present spending three weeks’
holiday here staying at Maresol

| to-day by B.W.L.A. for Puerto Beach Flats. They are due to
Rico via Antigua on her way back Jeave for England later this month
to the U.S.A. by the Colombie.

Off te Canada ¥
| MONG the passengers leaving Attended R.E,C. Talks

on Thursday by B.W.1.A. for M* VALENTINE ARCHER,
Puerto Rico on her way to Canada Treasurer of St. Vincent,
| was Mrs. Edward Barrow of Bank returned home on Friday after-
| Hall Cross Road. She has gone to noon by B.G. Airways after
| spend an indefinite holiday with attending as an Adviser; the
her brother and sister Julian and Regional Economic Committee
Pauline Byer. Meeting which concluded its

° business at Hastings House on
Cricketers Return Home

‘Fhursday last,
*WHREE members of the Wan- While here he was staying at
derers Touring Team _ re-

the Hastings Hotel,
‘turned from St. Vincent on Fri- Other delegates returning home

lday afternoon by B.G. Airways by B.W.LA. on Friday after
lafter taking part in a series of attendihg the ‘Meeting were
| ericket. and. tennis games, They Hon’ble _D. B. Sangster, Minister
| Skinner Norman for Social Welfare, Mr, J. B.
were Tony A . : L
Marshall and Louis St. Hill Clegg, Economic Adviser and
Also arriving by the same Mr. Donald Levy, Director of
‘plane were Mrs. Louis St. Hill Levy Bros. who travelled to
who had accompanied her hus- Trinidad intransit for Jamaica
band on the trip and Miss Grace 8nd Hon'ble W. J. Raatgever,

Gill of Laynes House, St, Joseph â„¢erchant of British Guiana.



who was holidaying in St. Vin- Hon’ble J, B. Renwick, Man-
cent. | aging _, Director of the “West

Two other members of the | Indian Jind Mr. A, MeLeod-
eam Eric Atkinson and Dr. Mal-| Smith, Economic and Financial
‘olm Proverbs will ,be spending | Adviser to the Windward Islanc:
4 holiday in St. Lucia before | left for Grenada yesterday morn-
returning home while the/1ng, while Mr. C, A. Beaubrun,
remainder of the team ate| Merchant of St. Lucia and Hon’-

neal oxdav } | ble V. C. Bird, President .
expected to arrive to-day by the} ee: ’ sident of the
Cacique del Caribe. } Antigua Trades and Labour

Union are due to leave to-day.
They were all staying at the
| Marine Hotel i

} For the Style }\
Conscious

EW LADIES



Police Band At
Queen’s Park
Today

The Police Band will

play at



to, returned to Canada on Friday

regular
will be operat-











UNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

Ss
—_—$_——$—$—$—$——



Carih (Calling

Canadian Journalist
ISS MARION G. ROGERs
Ottawa, Canada, whose «

Operatic Milestone M

holiday in Barbados is a

oming to a close is the on."

Correspondent of Mayf Mo.
ind) =Vice-Presiden;




Ottawa Branch of the
Women's Press Club.

Arriving in Barbados aboy ;
weeks ago on the Canadian Cp,
er, she will be returning io c..”
ida on this ship in a few 4...
time. SEN is a guest at the Wi; dsc
Hotel. | r

Other passengers on the Cruis:
who made the round trip to Brit.
ish Guiana include Mr, and Mi
Elvin M. Wood and Mr. and Mrs
E. H, Dickinson of Toronto,

Civil Aviation Chief
MoM: CARL AGOSTINI, Direc-

tor of Civil Aviation
rrinidad who was intransit from
porary “ Friday evening, ro-
urned to Trinid yes y by
BWIA. ad yesterday by

He said that he went up to
Jamaica with Wing Commander
L. A, Egglesfield, Ditector Gen-
eral of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean area to meet Mr. Gler
Gilbert from the Internationa!
Civil Aviation Organisation wh
is making a factual report of fa-
cilities existing in the Caribbean
area in connection with the e--
tablishment of a Caribbe;
Training Centre,

They assisted him as much
they could by presenting certa
facts which he will employ



OPERA STAR Nadine Conner
toasted by Lucine Amara in New
York on the 10th anniversary of
her debut with the Metropolitan

is

Opera Company Miss Conner his report for ;

; s presentation to the
holds a bust of herself giventoher Coyneil of ICAO for furth«
at the party (International) — consideration.

Commander Egglesfield who

Spent Three Months

was called to Miami for discus-

RS, I CHASE and Mrs. V. sions is due to arrive here toda)
Drayton, two Barbadians
now resident in Brooklyn, New Returns From B.G.

York, returned to the U.S.A., on
Friday by B.W.LA., via Port-of-
Spain and San Juan after spend-
ing three and a half months’
holiday here staying at ‘“Fonta-
mara”, Maxwell Road,

This was Mrs. Drayton’s sec-
ond visit to Barbados in 28 years
and while here, she visited many
of her relatives and old friends.

A the passengers arriv-

ing last Friday by B.W.LA.
was Mr. Kenneth Jones, Manager
of the Yonkers Bus Co., who had
been to British Guiana on a short
holiday.

Mr. Jones, who enjoyed his brief
stay there, said that he considered
Georgetown one of the best laid
out towns of the West Indies.

Mrs. Chase who left here quite

an infant, was paying her first Back From U.S.A.

visit back to the island. Since M . MRS. HALBION
leaving here she has been to WILLS arrived from New

York recéntly and are Staying at
"Windyridge,” Silver Sands.

Mrs. Wills will be remembered
by her many friends who met her
last year at Silver Sands. This
time she has brought her little
niece, Patricia.

“Crucifixicn” at Christ
Church
M®s. JOHN KIRTON, Mr, Pat
* Deane and Mr. H. O, St.c.
Cumberbatch will
soloists tonight
“Crucifixion”

Panama, Cuba ang Canada before
settling in the U.S.A.

She said that she had made
many friends here who contrib-
uted greatly in making her stay a
happy one, She hopes to return
to Barbados in the near future.

Students Return Home

UITE a number of students
Q attending the Lodge School,
Codrington High School and the
Ursuline Convent, returned ito
Venezuela yesterday by B.W.I.A.
to spend the Easter holidays with
their relatives. Some of them went

be the guest
when Stainer’s
u rendered at
Christ Church Parish Church.

is

out by B.W.1.A.’s regular flight, Mr. L : 3 ;
while others travelled by the 4; the ‘ aiea” tae he preside
special flight which brought a service

begins at 7.30 p.m.
“From Olivet te Calvary”
At St. Paul’s

number of Venezuelans to spend
the Easter holidays here.
On Caribbean Tour
. J. L. SABBATH, Propri- Ty AcNens * “From Olivet to

etor of J. L. Sabbath and Calvary” will be rendered
Sons, Exporters of Jewellery of e re. in ee on be ae
Montreal, Canada, left by “3Y, /spri A yma: ues

: : soloists will be Miss Nell Hall
B.W.LA., for Jamaica via Puerto *°
Rico on Wednesday. and Mr, Bruee St. John.

He is making a tour of the One Of Five
Caribbean on business coupled ONGRATULATIONS to M:
with pleasure and expects to re- and Mrs. Wilfred Best of
turn to Montreal about the mid- Roebuck Street, St. John on the
die of the month. While here he birth of their first daughter. This
was staying at the Windsor Hotel. is their fifth child,

Wedding Etiquette

iYow's The Season For Weddings! Are You Planning

Yours? How's Your Wedding EtiquetteP Here Are
a Few Tips to the Brides-to-be —/t all starts with a ring

Strictly speaking, your engage- wedding ring, to be wor: ngly
ment ring should not be worn on or with a guard ring.
the third finger, left hand, un-
til the formal engagement an- When the time comes to shout
nouncement is made, A not-so- the news of your engagement,
stric rule permits you to go scatter the tidings by handwrit-
ring-shopping with our fianee ten notes to close friends and
beforehand, so that you may relatives. Then tell the rest of
make this all-important selection ‘he breathless world by formal
together. Usually the groom-to- announcement in local newspa-
be visits the jewelers in advance pers, both in your town and in
and makes arrangements to have the bridegroom's. The simplest
certain rings set aside for your form is preferred: “Mr. and Mrs.
inspection tour, A ingle dia- John Jones of Jones Manor, an-

mond, the symbol of fidelity and

nounceâ„¢the_ engagement of their











; Queen’s Park to-day ; purity, is the traditional choice daughter, Jane Ann, to George
. p , r Ca . * ay at 4.45 p.m. ’ A. ae , 7 ’
pt. C. E. ° Rais for engagement rings but col- Herbert Jamesy son of Mr. and
ao apylpeed — ee oe DRESSES sri Got ll be the conducto: owed stone are just a, gutable Mrs, F. T."James of Avondale
" 3 ’ To-day te Tues. 10 & 815 and the program i : and often less costly. The ring Ne date has been set for the wed-
And Continuing Dally 445 & #90 I Bridges Bart Payton (HOLETOWN) GRAND MARCH poe aes doesn’t have to be new, but may ding, (or the wedding will take
“WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE ; - , . ; | , Circumstances Edward Elear be a treasure handed down for place during the holidays)”.
wae oe $ ON | e Sore ene the Wesi Suppe generations in the bridegroom's Make the anfouncement prefer-
Color By Technicolor CIRCLE OF DANGER % two ei is —— Pune family, or made up of heirloom ably three or four months be-
- : ‘ ; Starring x stones re-set in a new mounting, fore the wedding, never less than
walasoast «AE eenaint AE sr ” rare x FASTER MONDAY ! 4th APRIL 1952 A FINE ASSORTMENT (f) Demoiselle Chic Fleteher Whatever the ring, it should te six weeks before, if you can man-
OPENING SAT. 12th 4.45 & 8 & WED. & THURS. 4% % = MORCEAN_Petit “Bilers Ravine gc oie tok, Ades Ghee ata n * Aes with the Rehice.
< eS 1T ALWAYS s ¢ “HARACTERISTIC ie bridegroom. After that, your sTaph to appear wi ie notice,
A PLACE IN THE SUN RAINS ON SUNDAYS is 3.00 P.M. TO ).00 P.M. BEAUTIFUL rom Des Clothes Lulgini family and the arobin's should enclose a posey print pM ord
and ~ 4 ) 7 ON — Supplica ton aynes be the first to see it and if } plainly written on the ick, an
OLYMPIC __ MAN FROM PLANET 1X Under the Pat. nage of DRESSES Nang Prelude Chorale * ss. Been family lives at a distaiica, vou send it with. the engagement
; 7e a MR. & S. J. H. WILKINSO pe Te had Palm Sunday : should write them all about it. story a week in advance of pub-
; / ‘ MRS. J. H. SON . ory. laud and honour to An engagement 1g is not a nec- lishing date.
Today & Tomorrow 430 & 81 bta s8 The Latest Styles and “Ride bat ee — 98 A&M. essary acjuinet i Seine wees NEXT ‘WEEK: “Plan your wed-
LAWRENCE TIERNEY 4s TODAY Last 2 Shov | IN AID OF he N ‘ Majesty” 9A & m, hOwever, as some girls prefer to Ging to suit you” and “Measure
“THE HOODLUM" “CHAIN LIGHTNING” | the ewest Fabrics GOD SAVE THE QUEEN have only a hand omely jewelled Your Financial Obligations.
oat Suate hee } ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST VICARAGE . |
ARR i i NESTE ah I acme now, ——————————————rren—"<
“PRE-HISTORIC WOMEN” ae | , For Cocktails or ; ’ E
"TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY “tues 42 ty. i Teas, Ice Cream, Lucky Dip, Plants, Weddi SERVICE NOTIC
Myrna LOY, Richard GREEN in “HOTEL BE OLIN’ Vegetables, Hoop-La eddings ) This to let those eee
sen ahi ee Starring: a dantine | D i Steel Band E Et ‘ We take this opportunity to ers who ete the ship-
MY BROTHERS KEEPER “CHEYEN | Oe = Eee nd — Ete, Ete. % Hats and Bags to match that oe trom i ee oon” peed has _been
—--— - oa with | Pp . ith we will be moving our shop yi sy will be
THURS. (only) 490 & 0.15 _ Pennie Morgan x Admission to Fair : y any Ensemble. William Meter siimit'ty “ogress MII] notiNed as. soon as the
DEAD ON ARRIVAL Tues, at 8.90 . ADULTS 1/- 5 ot CHILDREN 6d. X Building between the Modern Dress Company can fix same after
& ONCE UPON A DREAM CALYPSO NIGHT . > } Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery on aeteal-”
friesiguidinhaieas ut Beinn 5 8 y Broad Street Y
| ; GAS
y oy y , x ; J. BALDINI & CO, THE BARBADOS
THE PASSION PLAY }\3 2 Bicycles to he drawn for. $/} THE MODERN DRESS Coe LTD.
s Tickets now on sale 1/- Each .
AT THE ABOVE FOUR THEATRES % SHOPPE
x choenasenchiteltilipitiiaans
_ ¥ s
DOD) FRIDAY Ith WF Door Prize Given. Retain Ticket BROAD STREET NEW GOODS!
eee sa) tee LEO ELAMAACEG sreecwek Us =
GOOD FRIDAY. Tith ” i a: ae Oo TY PRINTED BEMBERG SHEERS
Pe A. Ee (AU Talking) BE Ee eNO 6 Fhe he Vise haa VOR LEERY boy $1.66
ite Sao ee es Oe CINEMAS AT ALL. | PLAZA THEATRES GAIEE | Ee OI eo. ty isa: sie suea spacers eee $1.62
THEATRES See COO OR MINE ei 6 cok suseuehovcs denier eatin : 2
. a The Garden—St. James , ‘ MONEE 60's si fy dav aalelbeh e hava many ylemen ae ciene $1.62
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 BARBAREES —Dial 5170 OISTIN—Dial 8404 See I MN RI 5 os 5 66 4 58 Hc vdcobh alone see eee bute $1.37
To-day & Monday 4.45 & 8.30pm Tinoagy & To-morrow 4.45 & 830 p.m FINE STRIPED TAFFETA $1.57
TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. HM MAKIS PAREENT Gene Stratton—FORTER'S TO BEAT THE BAND Ce We ie cel pec leh $1.95
Warner Bros presen ¥ , " : rT AvEn Ree ee ut St ose tie Bee sh ew CRE oe alba =
ee “ADOT av OUTRAGE MICHAEL O'HALLORAN Foanete LAEBORE: te CHILDRENS’ WHITE SOCKS—Aiil Sizes "32
HOLDEN OLSON LOVEJOY in OF AR! Maly ae eine eee Scott BECKETT & Allene ROBERTS & CROSSFIRE
si also Leon ER » in Rot TCH
ALSO THE COLOR CARTOON HIS BITTER HALF ‘SORE TARY TROUBLE" . M, ote oer lame ee
ron, Bae = 5 teey bi Tues, & Wed 8.30 p.m
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 4.30 P.M. & 8.30 P.M. Tues. & Wed. 420 & 6.90 pm Saar eee mare nT Wa Gare area a Wal ake
n ® Y mn ) ’ 12 N bate > wa 8H 2m THE FUGITIVE !
Tallin the Saddle & Tarzan & the Slave Gir]||**'0" °&t25 EQNTIERSMAN) nese wane 4 euascr: sae Pon 8 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS
a il / IE a al X 1e il ¢ A me with Joe PALOOKA—Léeon BPRROL & FIGHTING GRINGO \ . *
paps ae ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN fs, nastatrh eh erey Soe came
= a SR SS So RE ee DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606















SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

AT THE CINEMA :

‘

SWEET MUSIC

By G. B.
HAILED as the best picture of 1951 and winner of the
Academy Award for that year, AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

opens at the Globe Theatre
everyone will agree that it

on Wednesday next. Whether
was the best of the 1951 crop

is a matter of opinion, but there is no gainsaying the fact
that M.G.M. has turned out one of the best musicals to
come out of Hollywood, or anywhere, for that matter. The
picture exudes sheer joy throughout and is a brimming

kaleidescope of movement,
Recapturing the spirit of Paris,
it brings to life, in delightful bits
of comedy, the bohemia of the
Left Bank with its cafes, street-

vendors and artists. Occupying
top honours in the film is the
music ff the late George Ger-
shwin. It is in a class by itself,
aud the film includes his most
popular tunes, “Embraceable
You.” “I. .Got Rhythm,” “Pll

Build A Stairway To Paradise,”
to mention just a few, and ends

with the litle ballet.

Against a background of bril-
liant Technicolor sets—some of
which are authentic, and I may
Say Mt is’ very difficult to tell
which are and which are not
the story of the G.I. unfolds. A
struggling artist, he has chosen

to remain in Paris to paint, and
due to lack of funds reluctantly

accepts the patronage of a
wealthy American heiress. In
the meantime, he falls in love
with a little French girl and
complications arise when he dis-
covers she is engaged to one of
his friends.

Gene Kelly’s G.i, is a most in-

gratiating fellow and his d
ing has never been more ni
or varied as he ranges from ten-
der sans with little French
war orphans to the tune of “IG
Rhythm,” through the Gantt
humorous clowning with Oscar
Levant at the piano, to the pril-
liant and compiex fantasy of the
grand ballet inspired by the
paintings of the French Impres-
Sionists. As his sweetheart and
dancing partner, Leslie Caron is
exquisitely graceful and her de-
lightful personality which has a
touch of the gamine is refreshing
and engaging. Problem child of
the musical world, Oscar Levant
plays himself, though under an-
other name! Looking like a dis-
gruntled infant, he plays the
piano brilliantly and delivers his
quips with a puckish astringency
that is unexcelled. His piece de
resistance is his performance of
the famous Concerto in F, during
which, due to his insatiable ego,
he not only plays the solo part but
all the instruments in the orches-
tra as well as conducting!

There is hardly a moment in
AN AMERICAN IN PARIS when
someone isn’t signing or dancing
and there is an air of spontaneous
gaiety that carries all before it
The film sets a new standarg for
musicals and has reached a new
peak in excellence.

FORCE OF ARMS

Showing at the Piaza, Bridge-
town, FORCE OF ARMS is a
tense and appealing love story set
in Italy during the last war.
Based on a_ story by William
Tregaskis it merits attention for
various reasons, Its battle scenes
of the Italian Campaign are ex-
traordinarily realistic; the acting
is sensible and convincing and the
down-to-earth conversation and
backchat among the G.I.’s give a
very good idea of their thoughts
on the war.

The script deals with a cour-
ageous sergeant who falls in love
with a W.A.C. and subsequently
becomes over cautious in battle.
As a result, his superior officer is
killed and he is severely wounded.
During his convalesence, he mar-
ries the girl he loves, only to find
that in order to expiate his feel-
ing of guilt at the death of his
comrade, he must return to his



le



unit at the front.

The story, which unfolds quiet-
ly, is a moving one and William
Nancy Olsen

Hoiden and have



CA at ae:

colour and sound.

dignity and charm as the lovers
whose finest quality is loyalty.—
he to the men with whom
serves, and she to the traditions
of courage and honour which are
part of her New England heritage.
There may not be anything very
new in all this, but the film
paints an effective picture of war,
and in sharp contrast, it idumin-
ates the decency and fineness of

be banal, but nevertheless, I
think you will enjoy the picture.
OUTRAGE

In this film playing at Plaza,
Barbarees, we have Ida Lupino
once again in the director's chair.
All of Miss Lupino’s pictures have
as their themes dramatic con-
flict of one kind or another and
this time she has tackled an ex-
tremely delicate social subject. In
“Not Wanted” she depicted the
problems of the unmarried mother
— and with success — in OUT-
RAGE she has turned her at-
tention to criminal assault, and
I’m afraid, not with the same
degree of success, Though the
subject is handled with restraint,
and the need for more and better
psychiatric treatment of sex
criminals is urgently advocated as
well as understanding in restor-
ing faith and courage to the
emotionally distressed, I found
that the film lacked conviction
through contriveq situations and
obvious oversights. For instance,
a girl of nineteen, engaged to be
married, would hardly return
home alone at 10.15 pm. after
working late at the office, through
a warehouse district in a city.

B.B.C. Radio Notes

VERSE PLAY By
DEREK WALCOTT
Sunday, 6th April, 1952
In December last the B.B,C.
broadcast an original verse play
by Derek Walcott, the West
Indian poet, a play which had
attracted considerable attention
at rehearsals in England. Un-
fortunately reception from Lon-
don in December was not at all
that could be desired and the
broadeast to the West Indies was
not well received. Because of
this the play will be repeated in
‘Caribbean Voices’ to-day
6th April, when reception should
be much better than jit was
at the end of last year, This
is the most lavish production in
the history of ‘Caribbean Voices’,
the weekly programme of West
Indian prose and poetry broad-
cast every Sunday from the BBC,
and, as mentioned above, critics
in England had been impressed
by this play. These included
Dylan Thomas and Louis Mac-
Neice. Entitled ‘Harry Dernier,’
the play portrays the thoughts of
the last man on earth, . . but
listen to-day Broadcast
will be on two beams, 25,53
metres, 11.75 megacyecles; and
31.32 metres, 9.58 megacycles.
It begins at 7.15 p.m, and lasts

for half-an-hour.

Tribute to Sir Charles
Sherrington

Sir Charles Sherrington, O.M.,
one of the greatest scientists of
the modern world, died a few
weeks ago at the age of ninety-
four. In the coming week the BBC
will broadcast a talk by a dis-
tinguished younger scientist,
Professor J. Z. Young, who is

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SUNDAY

Farm And Garden
Cruelty To Aninials

By AGRICOLA v
This subject is very much in our minds just now as a
result of the drive by the local Animal Welfare Society to
elicit support for a relentless campaign designed to allevi-
ate suffering and prevent cruelty in all its various forms to
our dumbs friends. It cannot be denied that in most civil-
ised countries there is a strong and increasing awareness
of the need for encouraging kinder and more humane treat-
ment of animals.
Human nature being what it spite owners through their ani-
is however, and, in spite of the mals, Fortunately, barbarism of

sity still exists for laws control- this island, but there seems to
ling man’s attitude towards his be a fair amount of cruelty in
domesticated animals. In England, general which can only be suc-
an acknowledged leader in all cessfully combatted by a vigor-
that concerns animal welfare, ous public interest in co-opera-
there has accumulated over the tion with an active Society in a
years a tremendous weight of position to undertake advisory
public opinion which exercises and related services of

thoughtlessly unkind actions of animal welfare.
towards dumb creatures. America In this column, we are natur-
is not far behind we have read ally concerned in a special way
that in some States there is a with animals of the economic
‘hit and run’ measure affecting type. Cruelty to such animals
motor vehicle drivers who leave falls under two closely connected
injured animals to their own heads, namely, direct and in-
devices. direct. Under the first may be
It is most desirable that persons included the following examples:
guilty of wanton cruelty should unmerciful beating or similar
be severely punished in the brutality; working a galled, lame
Courts of justice and stringent 0; emaciated animal; prodding
laws for this purpose exist with a sharp stick on a tender
t everywhere nowadays. spot had shoeing or loose shoes
The difficulty is to catch culprits which cause pain; over-
who are usually evil-minded working: over-loading; or bad
persons operating under cover to loading; and badly fitting har-~
ness. The last three are fairly
common on this island’s roads.
Also, if the same girl suddenly And, speaking of harness, we
disappeared from home, surely not infrequently see more har-
enquiries would be made by her ness than ‘hoss’. It is the owner's
parents ang her description circu- or driver’s business to ensure
lated by the police, to say nothing that an animal suffers no need-
of the people who find her mak- less discomfort in the course of
ing an effort to establish her its onerous work. Seemingly
identity. Points like these were small considerations are amply
either over-looked or ignored. repaid in better, more willing
Mala Powers and Tod Andrews and ee servion, well >
ortray their roles with depth and in the lengt ening of the perio
feeling, but the other members of Of the animal's utility. What
the cast do not always succeed in Percentage of drivers, for ex-

i lif ample, remember to offer a
wore Se es oe refreshing drink when they stop

to take one themselves ?

So far, we have directed our
comments mainly to draft ani-
mals, since it is among these that
officers of the Society are likely,
Professor of Anatomy at Univers- most frequently, to move. Our
ity College, London, who will remarks apply equally, in prin-
comment on the work and thought ciple, in certain respects, but
of Sir Charles Sherrington in a with important additions in the
talk entitled ‘Man and his Nature.’ case of animals which produce
This talk which is now in the our food supplies. Thus, we
nature of a funeral oration, was must not forget to provide the
originally broadcast in the BBC’s pigs with a wallow or bath
Third Programme late last year during very hot weather; we
to mark the publication in a re- must not send our poultry to

J market suffocatingly tied to-
vised edition of Sir Charles’s 1937 gether in a container too small
Gifford Lectures on ‘Man and his and without some sort. of shade;
Nature’, first published in 1940. we must not exercise our dairy
The talle is of interest to us in the animals at a trot, especially in
West Indies at this particular the sun; or subject them to
moment as Professor J, Z. Young ynduly harsh and noisy com-
has recently been paying a visit mands or, indeed, to any dis-
to the University College of the quieting influences liable to
West Indies. In this talk Professor excite their nervous tempera-
Young says that Sir Charles’s ment, “This list could be multi-
work on the neryous system has plied, The other day we saw
been called as revolutionary as two fine looking dairy cows
Harvey’s work on the circulation qriyen at some speed on a public
of the blood, It will be broadcast pighway, their pendulous udders
on Friday next, 11th. April, start- swinging violently from side to
ing at 9.30 p.m. and lasting for side, actually striking against
approximately twenty minutes. their flanks, and their mouths

2 x foaming. Apart from experien-
Countries of the Blind cing obvious fear and discomfort,









Feature programme of the week their milk yields must have
in BBC broadcasts is entitled been prejudiced over several
‘Countries of the Blind’ and is part milkings.
of the BBC’s tribute tothe memory There is hardly space left to
of a blind French schoolmaster, treat of indirect cruelty, very
Louis Braille, who died in obscur— jmportant though it is. Amd, in
ity but whose invention of the this connection, it must suffice

alphabet of raised dots which to emphasize that the first care
bears his name has brought im- and the first duty of all livestock
mortality to his memory. The owners should be to see that
programme describes the work their animals, of whatever cate-
done by UNESCO in standardising gory, are properly fed, managed
Braille and surveys some of the and sheltered. e
national systems of blind welfare In conclusion, we bespeak, for
in Britain and other countries to- the Barbados Society for the
day. The broadcast will be on prevention of Cruelty to Animals,
Tuesday next commencing at aj) the help and co-operation it
10.30 p.m. surely deserves.







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ADVOCATI

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Pruning Trees, Shrubs and Vines
About this time of the year —
April to May—it is wise to do a
bit .of pruning on established
shrubs, trees and vines. It is
not every shrub that needs to be
cut right back, but most well
grown shrubs are all the bette
for good pruning at least once
a year and this is the time, be-
fore the heavy raims get in to

jo it





_ By pruning is meant the cut-
ting out of dead wood or over
dense foliage, and the trimming
back of straggly branches, But
care must be taken when prun-
ing a shrub or tree, not to spoil
its shape, for carelessness in
doing this job may result in
ruining it. A lot can be done to
a flowering shrub in good
ul the year round by cut-
ting off the dead flower heads a
good way back or, in the case of
picking the flowers, to cut them
with a long stalk. This keeps
the “shrub fairly well pruned,
and Helps to keep it too in good
shape,

When a shrub is required to
grow in a certain way, pruning
and training must start from the
time the plant is quite young, if
the desired effect is to be suc-
cessfully achieved. Hibiscus,
Exora and Bougainvillaea are
all three among those shrubs
that with training and judicious
pruning can become standards or
other shapes, and once the re-
quired shape is attained it is
skiliful pruning which will keep
it so.

Trees, especially « vely
flowering Cassius of! fer
for the want of a good piuning.

Dead wood left on a tree is
just for trouble provid-
ing as it does large homes for

wood ants (in their first stage)
besides being extremely dis-
couraging for the trees,

Trees “should be pruned yearly
of accumulated dead wood, un-
sightly or misshapen branches or
any crossed branches, that, rub-
bing together may rub off the
bark, and thus leave the tree an
easy victim of disease.

Flowering trees especially
should never be neglected but
should yearly, after flowering
and when the seed pods have
formed, be judiciously pruned,
Seed pods should be cut off and
dead wood removed. If this is
done the response of the trees
will be noticeable, and the
flowering will be appreciably
finer.

There is an art in pruning a

shrub or tree. The cut must be
done with a sharp knife, or saw,
so that a clean healthy cut is
left which will heal quickly. On
no account. must the branch be
broken to leave jagged edges,
for thi atches water and rots
back in a way which invites
diseasé and trouble. When saw-
ing a branch off a_ tree the
branch should be sawn off cleanly
close on to the trunk, and never

left sticking out half a foot
beyond the trunk,
Vines, too, are Often all the

better for a good pruning. Cor-
alita especially gets a lot of dry
leaves and twigs underneath.
But it is hardly worth pruning
this vine, as when cut to the
ground it springs again so quick-
lv. But many of the slower
growing vines respond to care-
ful pruning once in a while,

When pruning is done at the
end of the dry weather the
pruned parts have a chance to
heal and harden before the
heavy rains, and the plants and
trees are then ready for the new
growth that the rains will stim-
ulate.



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"NOTRE DAME HEADS
SENIOR LEAGUE TABLE
Basketball Association Plans

Ladies’ Competition
By 0. S. COPPIN

OTRE DAME are at present at the head of the

First Division cup line-up. Yesterday afternoon
before a huge crowd at Kensington these boys trans-
lated into successful actuality the theory that fitness
and determination pay,

They were tied on points with Spartan, cup win-
ners for the past three consecutive seasons and had
already shared the honours of their first game with
Spartan this season. But although they gained victory
by the clear margin of three goals te nil, yet I did



~
not expect them
dence and perfection of attack.

They kicked with thé advantage of a following wind for the first
half and at once they were on the attack.

What impressed me most was some accurate crossfield passes to
the wing end this proved to be one of their most successful forms of

attack.
NERVOUS

TKINS in goal for Spartan was obviously feeling the importance

of the occasion and the clamour from the large crowd did not
tend to cure his apparent nervousness. As a result he was more vul-
nerable for the most part than ordinarily would have been the case,
for I have seen him play a useful game on more than one occasian,

The fact that Cadogan was positioned at wing half and Tony
Haynds at centre half can hardly be placed out of the category of the
nonsensical, It is not fair to either of these players.

FACE FACTS

ET us face facts. Haynes’ only position is at centre-half. If he

cannot make the team at that position then he should not be asked
to attempt to fill the exacting role of centre-forward.

Again, even if for the sake of argument one admitted that Medford
should be in the team then his position is wing half, for Cadogan is
the best natural centre-half in the island today, in my opinion. He
was wasted at wing half and even when good sense and reason pre-
| vailed and he was brought back to centre-half he still continued to
play a wing half game. ‘

I am not for one moment saying that Spartan could have gained
the honours against Notre Dame on the form they showed yesterday,
but they certainly could have put up a more satisfactory show if they
had arranged the team more intelligently.

NOTRE-DAME WIN AGAIN
{* the other First Division games last week, Notre Dame dealt
out a severe six-love drubbing to College. What was a most
interesting feature of this game was that five of the goals came in the
last fifteen minutes of play.

Up to that time some fine goal-keeping by Smith, the College
Custodian backed up by some fine work by Squires at full-back had
kept the Notre Dame attack at bay.

However, in the last fifteen minutes, Notre Dame, as has been
their wont this season made their superior fitness tell even on school-
boys who must of necessity be fit. They swept down the field in quick
purposeful faids and soon the score piled up. Goal after goal found its
way past Smith into the nets and one particular first time from Paul
Mandeville from without the penaltr s*ea can take its place in any
company of senior football.

“pLUES”







IMPRESSIVE
MPIRE were all over Everton in the other First Division fixture
this week. The “blues” effected a new line-up, Robinson and
| Algy Symmonds exchanging places for goal and centre forward posi-
tions respectively.
With Symmonds at centre-forward this no doubt increased the
| Shooting power of the team as Symrnonds has a powerful shot with
| either foot.
Everton were completely outplayed

Haynes at inside right. their play did not reflect much skill nor
| purpose.

' BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION HOLDS MEETING

T the Annual General Meeting of the Barbados Basketball Asso-

ciation on Friday it was revealed in the Annual Report that

as many as fourteen clubs and one hundred and fifty players
took part in the local competition last season.

1 have studied the report and I too must add my congratula-
tions to the pupils of the Modern High School who carried off the
championship of the Second Division last season and won all their
matches, They will be promoted to the First Division this season
and it will be interesting to follow their progress in the senior divi-
sion,

This part of the report interested me most and I quote: —

“The Committee hopes to widen its scope of activities to include
a junior league for players under fourteen, a ladies’ league with
a view to competing against Trinidad, and competitions for centres

outside the Bridgetown area.”
IF HOPES COME TRUE

F' the hopes expressed in the above paragraph materialise this

season then the Basketball Association will have made strides
that would have earned not only the thamks and appreciation of the
sporting public but their sound financial support as well.

SUPPORT

HAVE always supported any venture to start a special competi-

tion for the younger people and in this case it will be a Junior
League for those under fourteen.

This widens the scope of the competition and algo affords the
opportunity for players to play the game at a competitive level at
an early age.

The ladies, God bless 'em we always like to see in games even
if it is only to foster a porting spirit among them. I am writing
| this at a safe distance away from rolling pins and other handy
weapons. But in all seriousness, if the ladies can be induced to com=
pete in a ladies league it will go a long way towards stimulating
the popularity of this game locally,

303) RIFLE SHOOTING

1E third round of the House competition of the Barbados Rifle

Association was shot yesterday afternoon at the Government

Rifle Range. The conditicns were one sighter and ten counting shots

at 300 and 600 yards giving an H.P.S, of 100 per man, and 500 per
House. :

The weather was good with wind slumping at 600 yards where
mirage was noticeable. The light was unsteady making definition
a difficulty at times. The scoring on the whole was therefore dis-
appointing.

_. Yellow House were first with a score of 424 followed by Red
with 421, Green with 419 and Blue with 409. The position of the
Houses is now Red Majcr Chase 1,308, Blue (Lt. Colonel Connell
nee Yellow (Captain Jordan) 1,273 and Green (Captain Warner)
192.

The individual scores of Yellow the winners yesterday are S. Davis
92, R. S. M. Marshall 89, Captain Jordan 87, M. G, Tucker 81, G. C,
May 75.

In the N.R.A, competitions ten scorés reached Skilled Shot stand-
ard. The next round in the competition has been fixed for Saturday
April 19 when the Spoon Handicap Shoot and the qualifying of the
Frontenac Trophy will be shot for concurrently.



and with the exception of



to start off their match with such consummate confi-,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE ss

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



Notre Dame Beat NEW NAMES AND FACES
Spartan 3—Nil

NOTRE DAME
SPARTAN

(Gill 2, Mandeville 1)...

os
ose Bb soceR/iapieA aoe 0



NOTRE DAME, the team who beat their way through
the junior divisions of the B.A.F.A., and this year proved

themselves worthy of their

promotion, yesterday evening

enhanced their reputation when they defeated Spartan
who carried off the First Division and Knock Out Trophies
in successiye years, three—nil before the largest crowd
ever to witness a local fixture at the Oval.

Yesterday evening’s game was
the match of the season, since it
would decide whether the here-
tofore invincible Spartan wouid
go down to defeat at the hands
of the Dames like their tradi-
tional rivals from Bank Hall, and
which of the two teams would be
knocked out of the running for
the Cup.

From early afternoon, large
crowds, using every means of
transportation went to Kensing-
ton, and by 4.30, the Kensington
and Open Stands were filled to
capacity. The George Challenor
Stand too, for the first time was
filled, and still crowds took their
places behind the wire fence, and
in front of the George Challenor
Stand on the ground.

Fast Game

The team from the Bay Land
played a fast and well organised
game with which Spartan failed
to cope, and during the final half,
so completely outplayed the Park
team that the veterans broke
under the weight of the repeated
attacks.

The Dames took the touch
kicking towards the pavilion end,
and immediately the forwards at-
tacked but the Spartan defenders
cleared.

Play transferred to thé Notre
Dame area, and Tony Haynes al-
most drew first blood for Spartan
when he made a valiant but futile
effort to get one over the goal-
keeper’s head, but it went over the
crossbar.

Spartan conceded a free kick
which Mandeville took, but Tony
Atkins pushed it out, ana fullback
Gibbons cleared.

The Dames pressed the attack,
and C. Daniel tried a good shot
from the inside right position, but
once again the ball narrowly
grazed the upright,

Repeated Attack

Tension mounted as the Dames
launched repeated and furious as-
saults on their more experienced
rivals. The Spartan custodian was
nervous, and inevitably it cost him
a goal when Daniel, the Notre’s
leftwing centred nicely for Gill at
centre to send in an easy one,

It was a big occasion for the Bay
Land team, playing before the
largest crowd ever to witness a
local football game at the Oval,
and they were rising to the occa-
sion.

They were playing it fast, and
the Spartan defence wag going to
pieces under the repeated as-





saults.

Gill missed an excellent oppor-
tunity to put the Dames two up,
when he kicked wide of an open
goal. Another opportunity went
abegging when Gill once again
kicked over after fullback Bowen
miskicked.

Spartan fought stubbornly to
withstand the frequent attacks
which almost completely routed
the entire team at one time, but
in the last couple of minutes be-
fore half time, the forwards or-
ganized one or two forward move-
ments but without results,

The Dames were into the attack
immediately play resumed, and
sheer luck saved Spartan as shot
after shot collided with the goal-
keeper, Gibbons coming to the
rescue on the fourth occasion,

"Keeper Saves

Grant tried hard to put in the
equalizer for Spartan, but custo-
dian Williams thwarted his effort
at the last moment.

The Dames as so often this
Season, speeded up the game as it
began to draw toa close. The
backs cleared clearly and lustily
and their forwards were making
use of it when they got it. Their
short passing was delightful, and
soon their right winger sent in a
perfect centre which Gill made no
mistake in putting it into the
corner with his head.

With two up, they concentrated
on further advancing their lead,
but Spartan put their every effort
into the game at this stage.

They were awarded three corn-
ers in quick succession, but each
time the Dames defence cleared.

The Dames were not out of the
picture and bearing down on the
left wing, Daniel gave Mandeville
a good pass which he sent on like
a pile driver to put his team
three up,

Spartan tried hard but in vain
to put in one, but the Dames de-
fence refused to give one inch of
ground, and the game ended with
Notre-Dame the winners by three
goals to nil.

The teams were as follows: —

Notre Dame: Wilkinson,
Straughan, Browne, D. Archer,
L. Daniel, S. Roberts, D. McCollin,
C, Daniel, L. Gill P. Mandeville,
F. Daniel.

Spartan: Atkins Medford Gib-
bons, Bowen, Ishmael, Haynes,
Gittens, Cadogan, Griffith, Jem-
mott and Grant.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE TAKES
LEAD FROM BARNA

FOR the past few weexs Barna has been holding the

lead in the Ladies Inter-Club ‘lable ‘lennis Division, |
lead was taken over by the Queen’s Col-
a point ahead of Barna and will

Friday night the

lege team who are now

most likely win the Cup.

To keep this lead Barna wouid
have had to defeat Y.M.C.A. five
—nil. They only won three out
of five games. The “Y” team is
a much improved one and went
within a narrow margin of de-
feating the Barna side.

The majority of the ladies have
dropped back considerably. It can
clearly be seen, from their per-
formances, that they have not
been practising enough. The pres-
ent stawdard is below that at the
beginning of the season,

Queen’s College played Lenville
in the first match. The College
team won five—nil. Representing
the College team were J. Clarke,
Margeurite Wood, Ruth Williams,
Nell Hall and B, Chandler,

For Lenville, Angela Perkins
put up a good fight against Mar-
geurite Wood. On many occa-
sions Miss Perkins beat her op-
ponent with her backhand push
shot. She also returned some of
Miss Wood's forehand smashes.

The second match, the most
finteresting of the night, was be-
tween Barna and Y.W.C.A, As in
their first*engagement, the draw
again favoured the “Y” team.
Patsy Howard met Weldina Pil-
grim in the first set. Miss How-
ard took an early lead, Miss



On

Pilgrim brought points even at
13 all. Miss Howard used her
powers of concentration to better
avail. Service changed at 20—15
in her favour, She went on to
win 21—15.

Miss Pilgrim was on top early

in the second game. Seryice
changed at 9—6 in her favour.

Miss Howard played hard for
every point and eventually the
service changed at 16—14 in her
favour. Both players were now
very cautious. Service changed at
20—15 in Miss Howard's favour
but Miss Pilgrim deuceq_ the
game. Miss Howard won 22—20
to claim the set,

Miss E. Daniel won the next
set to bring honours even. She
playeq Miss E. Goodridge, The
players were well matched but
Miss Daniel baffled her opponent
with forehand push shots which
were well lifted. She won the
first game 21—18.

The second game went to deuce
and after a stubborn fight Miss
Daniel won 22—20,

Dolores Howard won the next
set to regain the lead for Barna.
She beat Elsie Bynoe 21—12,
21—13. Miss Bynoe tried to slow
up the game at times. This wor-

ried Miss Howard a little as she
@ on page 5



22 Two-Year-Olds On New
Classification List
By BOOKIE

S USUAL at this time of the year the classifi-

. cation for the B.T.C. August meeting brings
to our attention the names of the new two-year-
olds. This year I notice twenty-two names on the
list which 1 presume must be the new ones and
apart from one or two whose breeding suggests their
names, quite a number of the names I find rather
amusing. 7 ‘

It starts with Apple Sam, being in alphabetical order, and this
chap happens to be a fine upstanding gelding by Jetsam out of Apple
Fritter. Next we hit upon Battle Line who, it is not difficult to see,
is by Battle Front. The dam is Hands Up, being a French Creole
mare owned by Mr. Bertie Proverbs. Then there are two by Burning
Bow, one bred in St. Vincent and the other in St. Lucia. These are
Bow Tie, a colt out of Felicity Bay, and Burnt Gold. The latter is
the daughter of Secret Treasure, the first foal out of this speedy mare.

From, St. Kitts comes Coliana who is by Colrose out of Diana.
She will race under the colours of Mrs. Rosemary Wigly who has
already brought us one or two in the past few years. «

OVING further down the list we come to another which comes

from a line which seems destined to give us names connected
with song. This is Contralto (Jim Cracker Jack out of Night Singer)
and therefore a sister to Lady Re Good and Soprano. No doubt when
the Night Singer colts come along in future we will have Bass, Bari-
tone and Tenor while to keep abreast of times one can also be called
Crooner. For either sex there is also a long reserve list to cull
from such as Boogie-Woogie, Be Bop, Calypso or just Yodle and
Falsetto. If the mare persists with the propagation of the line, after
all these are exhausted, we might even get down to just plain Bing
or Frank.

After Contralto comes Crackers and this I understand to be a
gelding by Jim Cracker Jack out of Indian Spring. He is then followed
on the list by one who is, in truth and in fact, only two years and
three months come last March 31st, but who for racing purposes is
regarded as a three-year-old. This is none other than Mr. Sealey’s
December, by Battle Front out of Taimoina, which had the misfortune
to be born in the last week in December. As all race horses in the
Northern Hemisphere have their birthdays on January 1st, December
was one year old a week after she was born. Hard luck! I suggest
she migrate to the Southern Hemisphere,

The line of Flotsam, Jetsam and Ligan is one which I think lends
itself to nice names if only some thought is applied and ane of the
best named on the list I think is Driftwood, by Jetsam out of Pawky.
This is followed by Faerie Queene who has been given the benefit
of an old English spelling and she is a filly by Burning Bow out of
Chivalry.

HEN in the middle of the list what do we come upon but the

imposing name of Frederick the Great. By Jim Cracker Jack
out of Marsh Light I should have thought that Jack O’Lantern or
Jack Be Nimble would have suited better, but I understand this
colt has such an imposing stature that his very bearing suggests
greatness. Hence the name. I am not surprised however to learn
that he is a big fellow because most of this mare’s offspring have been
well grown and well developed and, as a matter of fact, bigger than
their sire, Battle Front, As Jim Cracker is easily one of the biggest
horses in the West Ifdies today, it is not surprising that a cross
befveen himself and Mursh Light should turn out such a fine
specimen.

Galway Bay, by Jetsam out of Irish Eyes, is another which has
been appropriately named. Galway Bay being in County Galway
in Ireland, Then comes Howitzer, by Battle Front out of Fairy
Queen, and Illusion by Jim Cracker Jack out of Will O’the Wisp II, Gal-
way Bay is another from the Sealy stables while the latter two are
from Mr. Bertie Proverbs’ stock. Then Jealousy from that mare of
great renown, First Love, the sire being Battle Front. She is followed
by one who enjoys the name of Jim La Rue, by Jim Cracker Jack
out of Linseed. Both of these also seem to be well named.

Further down there is May Pole, a filly by O.T.C. out of April
11th, Nit-Wit by Jetsam out of Quick Wit, Rainbow, by Burning Bow
out of Precipitance and Rose Leaves by Burning Bow out of Rose.
To end off there is Stirling Dawn (Stirling Castle-Sunrise), Stirling
Flush (Stirling Castle-Biretta) and Super Jet (Jetsam-Wedding Gift).



OW they will all turn out we have hardly the slighest idea at
present, But of course we can be quite certain that their nameg
will mean nothing in this respect. However on going through tha
list One cannot help noticing how many there are by the Jamaican
stallion Jim Cracker Jack and Trinidad’s Jetsam.” It shall be interest-
ing to see what the progeny of these two creole stallions will da
against those of the imported now that they have been given a fair
chance of representation, If they hold their own then it means that Jim
Cracker Jack’s future will be bright. ,But alas, poor Jetsam, the same
cannot be said for him. Since his return home from these shores it
seems that he has mostly been confined to the field or the stable
Last reports were that he was in a sorry plight indeed, ;
ON CLASSIFICATION
HE latest classification has also come in for its usual share of
comment, adverse and otherwise. There are one or two moved
on which I differ slightly with the classifiers and although it might
mean merely a half class difference, yet I fail entirely to appreciate
their point of view on these particular cases.

Workimg down the list, the first of these I come across is Embers.
Surely this mare ran worse than most horses at the entire meeting
Yet I see she is still in B2, the same class she was demoted to after
her poor showing in Trinidad in A. No matter how poor her form
in Trinidad was, I am sure it was worse here. Yet in the first in-
stance she is dropped a full class while now she remains put. I aan-
not see the reasoning except that it might be felt that her form wag
just too bad to be true and therefore she must improve in the future.

From B2 the next stop is away down in E2 and here we find
fone other than Cavalier. True he has been moved only a half class
but this was from F and as there are no races for class E or E2, it
means that Cavalier will have to run with the D class bunch of horses
of all ages. Relatively speaking it is therefore a bigger jump than
any other in the whole gamut of the classification list where only a
half class is concerned. Especially so to a two or three-year-old for
whom special events are held only in F and F2.

Now if there was one horse at the meeting who was most
decisively beaten on its merits and only managed to scrape home with
an advantage in weights, it was Cavalier. In fact he not only dis~
appointed the public but his connections as well. He collapsed as
easily in the Guineas as a pack of cards and Dunquerque and Cardinal
had no difficulty in beating him at level weights. He then got an
allowance of 4 and 8 lbs. respectively from Cardinal and First
Admiral and only a lucky break on the inside, which it took him
the whole length of the straight run to make use of, helped him to
beat them by a short head. In this third and last race up went his
weight (by only 3 tbs.) and down went Cavalier. Unplaced to Seed-
ling Rambler Rose, Cardinal and First Admiral, who were the first
four in that order, is the best he could de. Yet he was still in
receipt of 2 and 5lbs., respectively from Cardinal and First Admiral.
But on classification he is rated 5 lbs. better than First Admiral and
10 Ibs. better than Cardinal. I fail to see the point,

Thirdly, I think it's about time it was realised that Miss Friend-
ship canont cope with those in F whether they be young or old. This
is the third meeting in a row that she has been most decisively beaten,

come wet or dry going, and yet she still remains in F, ti
with F2? nye wares



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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



Mischief Scores
First Victory

HURRICANE WINS

(By Our Yachtin

MISCHIEF, by scoring

Regatta of the R.B.Y.C., was sailed yesterday,

herself in a good position to
She sailed a beautiful race
Gipsy, to get near her.
that these two boats shculd

Hurricane, as usual, turned in
another good performance in the
D Class. Her victory yesterday
will now put her in a sound posi-
tion to win this Trophy. Rainbird
is still offering a serious challenge.

The race was south about in an
extremely changeable wind, At
times it was hard, but on many
oceasions it dropped considerably.

Nine boats started in the B
Class. Mischief’s win gives her a
total of 72 points. She did the
race in one hour, 50 minutes and
nine seconds. Second was Ranger
and third Flirt which will now be
a point less than Mischief when \
their worst races are dropped.

Mischief’s first round was a very
fast one. She did this in 32 min-
utes and nine seconds. She did
the second round in 34 minutes and
38 seconds and the final in 35 min-
utes and 34 seconds. Ranger did
the race in one hour, 52 minutes
and 56 seconds and Flirt in one
hour, 50 minutes and nine seconds.

Magwin Wins

Magwin scored her first victory
for the season in the C Class. She
gave Miss Behave, and Madness
two minutes and overtook them.
Folly did not sail.

Second was Scamp which also
sailed beautifully and third Mad-
ness. Magwin did the race in one
hour, 22 minutes and six seconds.
She completed her first round in
40 minutes and 10 seconds, and the,

eo. and 44 seconds.

ry Conseipyedemt)

a vietory when. the Seventh
has placed
carry off the B iass Trophy.
and never allowed her sister,

I am still of the opinion however

be started together.

she did not get to the starting line
in time to race. This is the sec-
ond race she has missed this sea-
son,

Hurricane won easily ‘in this
Class. She did the race in one
hour, 27 minutes and 10 seconds,
four minutes and 24 seconds bet~
ter than Sinbad which came sec-
ond. Third was Rainbird whose
time for the race was one hour, 32
minutes and 43 seconds.

Hurricane did the first round in
43 minutes and 45 seconds. Her
second round was 20 seconds bet-
ter. Sinbad’s first round was com-
leted in 44 minutes and 50 sec-
nds, but in the final she took 46
Rainbird

mpleted the first in 47 minutes
and 32 seconds, but her second
round was better than Sinbad’s.
The time for this was 45 minutes
and 11 seconds.

Miss Jean Wilkinson once again
tried her hand at Tornado racing.
Yesterday she skippered her
brother’s boat Fury in the Tornado
Class and finished at that.

Five Tornadoes started. Vam-
oose was again victorious. Second
was Thunder and third Edril.
Vamoose did the race in one hour,
four minutes and 22 seconds. She
did the first round in 20 minutes
and 40 seconds, the second in 22
minutes and 21 seconds and the
third in 21 minutes and 2! seconds.

A full seale with the results will

second in 41 minutes and 56 sec-Flbe published in Tuesday’s Advo-

onds.

Scamp completed her first round
in 41 minutes and 17 seconds while
she did the second a bit faster
Madness sailed a fairly poor first
round. Her time for the second
was 42 minutes.

Mohawk scored another victory
in the Intermediate Class. She
now has a total of 64 points out
of a possible 84. She has a clear
lead in this Class.

Eight boats started. Second was
Reen and third Coronetta, Coro-
netta did her very best, but still
could not catch Mohawk and Reen
after giving them five minutes.
Mohawk did the race in one hour,
24 minutes and 12 seconds com-
pared with Coronetta’s one hour,
23 minutes and 24 seconds. Reen
did it in one hvur, 25 minutes and
29 seconds.

ycate. The Eighth Regatta will be
‘sailed on Saturday, April 19.



TOURNAMENT AT
SUMMERHAYES BEGINS

Summerhayes Tennis Club be-
gan their Annual tournament yes<
terday afternoon. In the Men’s
Singles V. H. Chenery beat D. A.
Wiles in straight sets 6—0, 6—2.

Men’s Doubles:—D. A. Hutch-
inson and L. G. Hutchinson drew
with Col. O, St. A. Duke and
Dr. A. S. Cato two sets all. The
scores were 6—4, 4—6, 6—3 4—6

The tournament continues on
Wednesday next. Messrs, Wm
Fogarty Ltd., have presented a

Maxply racquet for the winner
of the Men’s Singles Champion-









SUNDAY ADVOCATE



—

TABLE TENNIS

‘¥
Soccer Lessons @ trom page 4
By GRAHAM WILKES is accustomed wo the fast gam
In the next Joyce Jones, e
PICTURE NO, 1:

Y.W.C.A. skipper defeated J. Bry-j
ant 21—16, 2i1—6. ‘This was an
easy walk over for Miss Jones
who is about the best player on
the “Y” team. At this stage the
score was Barna 2, YÂ¥.W.C.A, 2
The decisive set was between
Marion Manning and A. Walcott.
Miss Manning won two—-0n
The barracking on some occasions |
worried Miss Manning wh ap- }
pes ars to be very sensitive to noise. |
it was because of this that she |
: lost the second game which wen
deuce My
Miss Manning was
in the first game. She even
visked her forehand smashes, |
something she never does unless |
she finds an easy opponent. Sh
won the first game 21—14, |
In the second game Miss Wal-
eott never allowed her opponen
to get too big a lead. The gam«
vent to deuce. To get the odd
point the players patted for abou
three minutes Miss Walcott wor |
23-—21. }
Miss Manning got down to busi- |
ness in the final game, She ioe

guite coni-

four out of the first five points
and went on to defeat her op-
ponent 21—4.

Adelphi defeated Y.W.P.C. four \

-one. The only player to wir}
for the Beckles Road team wa
Renee Gloummeau. The winner
for Adelphi were Phylis Chandler
Betty Carrington, Heather Dean«
and Molly Chandler.

The line-up in this Division i
as follows: Queen’s College 3¢

KICKING
Notice that the nen-kick-

A DEAD BALL

ing foot is practically level
with the ball to allow for
the body weight and shoul-
ders to be poised over the
ball on impact, thus ensuring
a low trajectory to the bali.
On impact the foot is stretch-
ed and the curve of the instep
fits into the turve of the ball
giving the maximum area of

points, Barna 29 points, Adelph
oe 22 points, ¥.W.C.A, 19'and Len
PICTURE NO. 2: ville seven points.



This Week's Football

DIVISION ONE



Monday 7. Empire vs. Carlton. Referee

oO S. Coppin Linesigen A Thomas
nad R. Parris

sursday 10, College vs. Everton.



Referee 1 F Harris Linesmen ‘O
Robtr mn and G. Amory
Seturday 12. Empire vs Spartan.
Referee S. Gittens. Linesmen A. Parris
nd J. Archer.
DIVISION TWO

Tuesday a Pickwick-Rover vs
Gartton-—G. Amory

Wednesda 9 Empire v Spartar

W. Hoyos
DIVISION THREE

Tuesday 8 Lodge vs. Y.M.P.C. "“B"
t Lodge. Referee J. Archer
Regiment vs. ¥.M.C.A. at Garrison.

Referee A. Thomas
C. & W. vs. Police

at Boarded Hall, j
Referee O. Graham



Cariton \ Foundation Old Boys at
Carlton Referee O. Robinson
Rangers vs. Pickwick-Rovers at Shell
Referee K. Walcott
Combermere Notre D it Com-
F Tayl
Wanderers v College
F. FE
Eve Foundation
LP. A’ at
On connecting with the i

‘ t eferee R. Hutchinson

; Big wun



PRIL 6 NO. 218

The Topic |

of |

Last Week >

|
|
|



ts peppe

© no tast
scrunchy
u

ean't afford

Don't Wneourage his bad
Lou ovied!
never stand in
f all your criticism
For tr quible’ 8 Grawing near
. .
The hommesass centre Robert
You know down in Bay Street
ias Joe mad with excitement
With those sweet things to eat.

absurd bey
fear

te toki me I styould go there
And I would learn to cook
ooking down there is practice
Its different from the book
. ‘ . .
went on a bit further
As though he owns the
“vs when he
tell choose

world
re-marries
a houseeraft girl



said Joe, you're all right
Your belly rules your head
with all the sweetmeat
! till crave Enriched Bread
For Enriched Bread has proven
A great food; super fine
Apart from building musele
Its strength for the daily grind

HOT FROM
THE OVEN

Lou ran and tell Fred Goddard
Bake Enriched Bread to sell
The Enr ed lade fror

1 Bay Land
Just beat Spartan in

hell

fired from the right wing
But cannons from the left

And Notre Dame kept pounding
And had the whole crowd deaf

. . . .

fire! fire!
Defeat! Lou cried, % swear

Send for the Fire Officer
To out the fire down there

Oh fire!

For Spartan burn to ashes

The poor team simply stuck ;
They failed to play their twelfth mat
That “forward” called “good luck !
id this be Spartan first class |
e Dames taunt vesterdas
hould shun eharp
i wars keep away

edged tool

Medford, Tor





Pre et fi Se,
PGOOBR MORN. 4G)
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YOUR SHOES THIS
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

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If Coronetta had saiJed a faster iis i rs a i Combermere Old Bo ». Lodge at liane’ hes tol L, Rd
first round she would most likely ship ey serie = the ermer aan aera cs arris 1 v y, dearest on SATURDAY April 26th
have won. Mohawk did the first ; eels call wae al = Tuesday 6. Foundation vs. College at | *'V® J & R Enriched Bread sdicit
round in 41 minutes and 45 sec- os Seles Of , Foundation, Referee I. King | Three cheers we wive the vere
onds and the final in 42 minutes Harbour Log oo oS, — =~ Foe a ee | Let fits oat ase ny PO | cia
and 27 seconds, Reen’s first round . oO! n bison anc eay ackw . Come Dames raise all your glasses ou 8 ~ular .
was done in 42 minutes and 52 In Carlisle Bay combined strength acts , 3. phe direc tion of the Ar wt with Jo& Ro” It relieves all Muscular Meee tt he the full

nd her last in 42 minutes simultaneously, The non- oe of the non-kicking foot Dace ve, Soe
oon ot dacurain Coronetta did her = Sch. Gardenia W., MV. Blue Star, kicking leg on impact is helps to determine the direcs sponsored by Aches and Pain, ing Stal B Beowacs ae
first round in 42 minutes and four Sch. Everdone, Sch. Mary Me ae tensed and straight but bent tion of the resultant kick. ens ; rear. i ¥ . t
seconds and her last in 41 minutes TuViqron Sen Turtle Dove, Sch. Rain. Slightly afterwards to allow N.B.—Brute strength and | J&R BAKERIES “RUB IN ‘FIERY JACK’ at Baa feo hee eee |
and 20 seconds, the best time for bow M, ‘Sch. D’Ortac, Sch. Rosanene, for the follow through. « long run are not necessary |, and [e«
oe ee ee Sy a ee Nek Paaey 4.3 Ss bce euaher th tol kb cee et makers of RUN OUT PAIN” Lucky dips for the chil
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AN the D Thais meats siartad H, Van eer et course of the kick must be ibove principles is essential; ENRICHED On Sale at all Drug Stores, By kind permission of Col
with the exception of Olive Blos- Schooner Mandalay 11., 30 tons net, focussed on the ball, together with timing and | * BREAD Michelin, the Police Band
som whose spar was broken last Capt. Mitchell, from St. Vincent: 2. If the ball needs to be control they will help to de- FRANK B. ARMSTRONG L/TD conducted by Capt. Raison })
Saturday, Her crew managed to pain’ fom st Vineent. lofted into the air the non- velop direction and sirength | and the blenders of }} will play during the after- jf
fit her with a Tornado spar short- Sehboser Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt kicking foot should be placed | in the kick. A smooth follow Agents. noon
ly before the race. Unfortunately King, from St. Lucia. more to the rear of the ball, §, through adds power and di- | J&R RUM ; ADMISSION 6D

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King on Usher Rose Leaves ‘s wu af ey. _ $7.36 ea. Ultra Modern Sewing Machines, a $60.00 ea
Peri ie E. 2. Seedling | 60% Sea Island Cotton & Hert ' ie c 5 vies ’ onipiete with te & ight: .
peree, See Apoll Soprano | containing SOLV-X 10% Egyptian Cotton, ot Sports Mode #6800.
e Stirling Dawn | ld ‘ . toaudster , a.
Sising eee Stirling Flush | Distributors for Barbados : oo Ble, c am Gre & Carrier ie 87.00 ea.
pear Grass . ° X aE e@. . $6.36 ex bea P Diba -
Sweet Rocket Flame Flower sae | A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD. 5 ea Y
angu . Ane $ . e
0. 1. or ey P.O. Box 403, Bridgetomp “MATTAHAN” SHIRTS by Renown in Blue, White, Vor % adies 4 W
Aberford J F. 1. Viceroy Grey, Tan & Cream : : $5.00 ea 4 r /
a i ae. wal . Sear “EXCELSIOR” by Renown, in Cream, Blue, Grey LADIES You EASTER K
Castle in the Air Irs amare G. 1. hite @ is Geceetes 464 Oe ocean ae te ee ee
Dashing Princess Jolly Miller Ben Hur “DELUXE” by Renown in Blue, Grey & White & cane stan eae Geobanes Ss
Doldrum Miss Friendship Blue Diamond Tan @ ‘i ; ae 4.80, 5 See Tinckh frei cur Hue etook Ws
Fair Front Waterbell Bide Grass BREWSTER SHIRTS (American) in Stripes & eee sekticle ‘aint dbess ‘
Fair Sally * F. 2. Diadem Plain ¢ olours @ ss 5.00 ,, of Dress materials and acces~ Ss
Flee Apple Sa” Bry Lane Hage rs OR Gia: satcy O I prin, 190 dees mp ss
enc! utter e Gavotte 2B [PED SHIRTS with ‘ rubenized collar: ee : Ty in «
High and Low April’s Dream * ; @ eo ; : ‘ ee Ame 60, 68 & 76c. per yd. ; \
Leading Article cca warn Il “MASSCO” American made Shirts in White only : ee NS ome flowered ar a 4 Fr
Red Velvet Battle Line Monsoon ae Bn aig eign eR ES! SY 4.78 in fi $1.00 & $1.20 per yd.\ Sig W
~ Moritz Ritaen, Vigilant | Genuine Khaki Shirts by Renown in all sizes — Viola Cre resisting spun in alls W
opsy : (short sleeves) “e ; iva te te ee 5.48. ,, vi ner 79, ts yd. » b
Windsor Glen Bow Tie : a2 j (long sleeves) vias Sa EG aolo. rs ae \
Burnt Gold ar » yr i@¢ | QBovs’ POPLIN SHIRTS by Renown, sizes 111% to A beautiful assortment of Japan-% »
a. 2. Caprice Beatie iby i i A N oO R EK c i T A L MN ) 13\4 in Grey, Blue, Cream & White ‘i be 2,00 ee @ 72, 84, 90 & $1.00 © g WS
Abu-Ali Cardinal Cotace by RI “EXCELSIOR” Vat colours Sanforized and Tritw- oh ene Ay ee GR et W
Aim Low Seeeeeen II Flying Ann WW) ived collars in Blue & Cream only @ 4,50 ae ate. Sool ” °
Sree oe” Privolity MR. GUY JONSON wy Aime Tee Shirts with beautiful sceneric sand i dian ‘tei 996 per yd ‘ Ww
Eise roe, Seamer” pres Hopper Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, i Y ae n re in ate a ee, I Mas sree 2 00 to 4.50 nbrie:@ 60 & in per yd. ht «
Cantaquisine olombus jallant Hawk { ih | ae eae oe eas rr 6.0 \FFLE PIQUE N ALL >)
Careful Annie Contralto Joan’s Star 2 i Hf | NS ee ‘ be ri sia SHADES @ $1.59 per yd ; K
Darham Jane Crackers Maytime THE BEITISH COUNCIL, i | < Sport Shirts for Boys and M n all sizes a e | kin in White, genuine qual- «
Devil's Symphony December Sea Bequest “Wakefield”, White Park i Ma... o os ease 3 ; ? 3.09 ty 86” wide @ $1.99 p¢ i x
Dim View Diarose Sun Jewel on WEDNESDAY, 9th April, at 8.30 } een ae oe ee te ee : | Hose, finest qualitie \\
Fabulous Driftwood Twinkle : tS TOPE tS aa ; spe | FM oye ; ; ; os 001 from $1.39 per f ip s K
Fille d’Iran Dunese Valeska Frogramme tmcludes : } Ge Shoes by the World’s best St in y Silk Black, Lemon, Blue
Galashiels Bplcure Vonwise THREE SONATAS Scarlatti Hf CLASSIC BROGUE MOC “ae | & Pink, 52” wide @ $1.56 WS
Love Potent acetious Wilmar 1) FUGUE IN ( SH ARP Bach | ‘ | emily tie | per 5 : Ww
Mabouya Faerie Queene Zuleika MINOR, Op. 58... Chopin Hh ee ee ; eae ee: o WS
Subject to change if the event of any horse taking part in an S by Biuhens, Paar! atid Like i | (Por Bargains that are REALLY BARGAINS, visit earinig our entire stoc e
Meeting prior to the Barbados Summer Meeting, 1952. 6 MK N.E. WILSON & Co. THESE FO! WN
‘ - : a Tel. 3249 2) ¥ e DIAI r RSEI . 4>a~h~4~s
G.’A. LEWIS, Secret Bi aes Swan 68 BOON BB 6-9BPA-P AAA PA PF
27th March, 1952 6.5 2— An | Men eciikiatieasll PASSASSSSEEA AS AAS SSS SSS PSS SoS SG GEESE SP EL EEL
i
j .



















PAGE SIX ne BS ee SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL ¢ 2S
The Truth in = «= - ROMANCE I$ UPSETTING A FOREIGN OFFICE IDEA Sewing

Your Horoscope |

aimee Y © ®
, d you like to know what the) Lad ale lo En c® ~
Sta ndieate for you ? Would you like|
to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore, é
: il |

Circle

By Penny Nolan

General Sewing Plan
Much time and effort can
be wasted in dress making
by lack of planning. Uncer-





India’s most famous Astrologer, who by |



What’s Cooking



uracy of Ri ‘ ° tainty as to just what to do

predictions a nd In The Kitchen next often results in doing
e sound practi- - ‘ , i i

oo Bi hg Tomatoes are plentiful. Have the wrong thing, making it




necessary to rip out. The
following general plan may
be adapted to the dress you
are making. It will serve as

s €

you ever tried a tomato suffle?

Tomato Sufile
Friends, Ene
Lotteries



mice wives

For 6 people:














have astoundes ; : a guide in making your own
2 : Ss. a ;
She orexéé eee icin hinge plan. A few minutes spent in
ie world ove ; :
George Mackey by os et Pepper 2 planning before — begin ~
{ New York } Flour: 2 oz. a au sew are definitely worth-
LONGER pte that Tabore must possess some sort W ILL IAM TO ey NSHEND Grated Cheese: 1 tablespoon act while ,
of second-sight Eggs: 4 : a wri
To popularise his system Tabore will SHEP ; BE ¥ is : Beginners should make a writ-
19 | send you FREE your Astral Uiternésth: RETTY Joan Burbidge, one of a" (or margarine) 3 02. ten plan and follow it carefully
ion if you forward mn full She r wa 5 . a. ; “ as
LASTING? |i. he ita him your full name Britain’s two leading wome n Basil | iB if it besemnes, apparent a8 you
| birth all clear itt by y 4 , « . arr . i > . i -* : ih ad
Definitely! Not even the most | money wanted pi “Aatisideioal shore, diplomats, married in New Delhi Milk: % pint. f procedure could have Eee used
|’ Postage ete., but d 1/- in Britis Rite ee “e Te is ¢£ tue * , 2 e g a note of it t
expensive nail polish — ~~ Postal Onder tor stetiowers,
and other interesting literature. You will
be amazed at the remarkable accuracy
of his statements about you and your

> away » seeds and cut themfaid you next time.
wp hy Te eninge: Before first fitting: ~
Machine baste

marriage bar—inust leave the Foreign t SCAN 2 :
Only Cutex contains the exclusive, Service. ~ in very small pieces, Put 1% oz
















































: : . . of butter in a frying pan, the fine
new ingredient, Eaamelon. The fine De tie ee cent Say ont Miss Burbidge is First Secretary to the ly chopped onion and a few leave: 1, All darts and pleats
lustre will re on your nails Pe made again, Address; PUNDIT 4 ; y : : rythi 2. Shoulder seams
: : TAPORE, (Dept. 213-D), U: . High Cc ssione n Ind Although only of Basil and’ let everything ft = . -
for days. No ch sal Pi + Upper Forjett igh ommissioner in India. 8 ’ < Sid nada te: Leave
ays. No chipping, no peeling, Street, Bombay 26, india, Postage to India ‘ she needa se » promotions t gently. As soon as the onion i 3. Side seams note: —Leav«
no fading. Choose from the is 4 cents. 32, she needed three more promotions golden add the tomatoes, seaso left side open for zipper.
many exquisite fashion shades. i tees become Britain's first sg dom anes s with” salt and pepper and let . er
THE Foreign Office ts perturbed Its women everything cook until you have ve . h wry ic.
aia * divisimath iy ai etive that It is losing almost a totato sauce. Make a 6; You my ; baste a or
os them too fast. All their training and experience are white sauce with the flour, the both s eeves in the arm-
M sO} VE AND being lost milk and the rest of the butter. i * 7 print if am
‘ : i ; > w » , . : ite » se is ready wis ut sleeves wi
Give your lips that lovely, more desirable | fs * dite ie bee Sivause “at : an pt SS temas” add 1 have to be removed’ to
look with Cutex Lipstick. Comes i ae: marriage—one-third of the tablespoonful of grated cheese stitch shoulder and side
4 ’ g p eee
in the latest fashion shades that harmonize | os total of 18 recruited since and the 4 yolk of the °se. nom a fest fitting:
with y pori i i at if ~ the Foreign Service was the whites of the eggs until stif a eee hte
hk your favorite nail polish. ¢ opened to women as a SOAN and add gently the rest. Butter a 1, Pin sleeve in armhole if
permanent career in 19 ine BURBIDGE suffle tin (if you haven't got one ‘ Rg ont. bodi
May mean kidney trouble ane mere may ve is a rather large pyrex dish will do) 2. Pin skirt to ice.
y : y : ge gen (above) went to the pour the mixture in it and put 3, Test for ease.
A function of the kidneys is to away. to the altar altar it in a moderate oven for about 1 4. Approve neckline and
| eliminate harmful impurities from months after their * hour. When the top of the suffle collar and markings for
che system, If the kidneys grow a cost to the State has become golden take it out of buttons and buttonholes.
sluggish, these impurities accum- t » Foreign Seer MRS HRISTOPHER "i After first fitting: —
ee Pp c E

“ We've t the oven and serve hot.































| ulate and settle and often become E in snapped rere att MAYHEW 1, Stiteh and press darts and
in See Bee the Foreign ce inio matri R * ” 5 pent ox "
muses, Tikwataartietse ff moni bureau (fe) resigned afer a Butter Beans Suffle Sree aie eens
trouble is to help the kidneys. : PE ee an ie Ae nine-days courtship, $! side seam darts down.)

They should be toned up with * OE ig ee ene Butter corabanpaianes 2 oz. 2. Stitoh and press shoulder

De Witt's Pills—the medicine _With blue-eyed blonde Miss * Flour: }tabieapoontul seams (press open)
. made specially for this pi Monica Milne, the first girl ap- NADIA ities 1 8 1 ae 3. Stitch and ress side

5 \\ De Witt's Pills have a soothing, pointed under the new regulations. McCADDON Grate , ch mee! 1 tablespoonful ‘seams (press open)
FOR HOT-HOT DAYS | oe ite ae ben An Oxford M.A. and daughter Whites of eggs: 4. SS. ‘Stitch. and. press. skirt

tome ie wae Se is London surgeon, Miss daillne (below) 24, attractive, has Ce " ‘seams (press open)

back to perf thei ely surge s , ; . = nee Ri o }
USE COOL: COOL TALC he ra adi This son. had already been posted to Wash- no matrimonial plans, ° Clean po -4 snes... Sienm a 5. Stitch and press sleeve

\ tried medicine is sold all over ington in September 1946 as Sec- t ae AD oe ¢ or r. ti ie, aes oe (press open).
* the world and we have 7 ond Secretary when she fell in in e water when the water 6. Stitch collar, trim seams,

: { love. In a few months she was starts. to boil and let them cook. turn and press.
Soothin fresh and fra rant - letters from sufferers telling ‘ $ ; ; ; is
g g ’ of relief gained, after y the wife of Mr. J. H. Britton, a Put them in a colander when 7, Join front and back neck
keeps you dainty and com- of suffering, by taki the Bristol industrialist. cooked and pour some cold water facings and press seams
Witt's Pills. Try them A second girl met her future husband at Stoke on them. (This is to keep their open,
fortable adorned in the . for your trouble. Go to D’Abernon, the elaborate country manor in Surrey where lovely green colour). Put them 8. Pin and machine baste
, E ._ your chemist and candidates for important State jobs were tested until 1950, in a frying pan with a bit of sleeve in armhole. _
fragrance men love. Ss get a supply when it was closed because it was too costly. viding! butter for a few minutes. Pre- 9. Baste collar and facings
——— y. She resigned the day she was admitted to the Foreign pare a white sauce with the to neckline.
> Service. flour,.14% oz. of butter and the 10, Baste cuffs and facings to
Miss Katherine du Boulay, charming Oxford gradu- milk. Mix the beans with the sleeves.
ate, resigned her diplomatic post at Geneva to marry Mr sauce. Sift everything until you 11, Baste skirt to bodice.

Michael Stewart, a First Secretary, She had been in the

have a puree. Add the table-
service only a year and a half.

At second fitting: —
spoonful of grated cheese.

Beat 1, Approve all lines.






GUARANTEE | Another Foreign Office “glamour girl’—Miss Cicely ithe whites of the eggs until stiff 2. Mark hem.
nie . |Ludlam, Oxford graduate in modern languages—had and add them to the puree gently. After second fitting: —
De Witt’s Pills . ae jserved in Belgrade as a Third Secretary when, back in Butter a suffle tin or a pyrex aish. 1. Stitch sleeve in arm-
condititns cd the nee London, she met Mr. Christopher Mayhew, M.P., then Pour the mixture which will have hole and press. Seam is
wtions and the ingredients con- sign Office Under-Secretary and “the Socialists’ ill i 2/3. “eu
f ty rigid standards of purity, Foreign ce nder-Secretary a 1e ocialists to fill it only up to 2/3. Put the usually pressed toward

most eligible bachelor.”
They were married in August 1949 after a whirlwind
wooing of only nine days.
Mr: Mayhew said yesterday: “Here was Cicely all
set to become Britain’s first ambassadress, but she threw
away her career to become my wife,

pyrex dish in a moderate oven for
about 20 minutes. Serve imme-
diately. «Suffles have to be served
immediately. If you leave them
for a few minutes they tend to

sleeve. Using two rows
of stitching one fourth
inch apart and trimming
seam close to second, row
eliminates bulkiness.





: « BI
| - seein Dace









Pe If women diplomats go down, 2. Stitch collar and facin
Le Ce fall as easily as that it shows how precarious is the Foreign to neck. Wee if
Office hold over them.” Fri bound buttonholes are
TWENTY - SEVEN - YEAR - tion of the ban: “Any member ton suburb of Georgetown. ed. Button Beans to be made this should be
OLD Mrs. Mayhew, snow of the Service is supposed to be Miss Salt is 47. Because of Butter beans, flour, lard or oil. done before applying fac-
* ~ the mother of a seven-month- mobile, able to be sent anywhere her outstanding qualifications the ang.
— — old son, commented: “A girl's abroad at any time. It is ‘assum- Foreign Office might grant a spe- Boil the beans as in the previ- 3. Stitch cuffs to sleeves
— — horizons are broadened in the ed that a married woman would cial waiver and retain her even Our recipe. Do not cook them too and press.
Foreign Service and she usually wish to stay with her husband.” if she married, much. Dip them in flour and fry 4. Stitch skirt to bodice and
e * enjoys a wider social life, so she WHAT of the women envoys But Miss Salt says: “I think them in lard or oil until golden. press,
Qu ick relief from should normally meet more men who have so far resisted mar. I Would resign.” Serve them with meat or fish. 5, Finish seams by pinking
from whom to choose a husband. Yyiage offers? ; : Miss Nadia McCaddon, Third or stitching edges,
I was content to resign. It would Now at the top of the tree is Secretary at the British Embassy 6. Put in zipper,
take a super-woman to run @ Miss Barbara Salt, First Secretary at Oslo, protests; “I have no ; : 7. Tack down facings,
Foreign Service job, a husband, at our Washington Embassy, Her Matrimonial plans at all.” But Age Of Innocence Hem.
‘ and a family, but I do think a phasic salary is about £1,200, with attractive Miss McCaddon is only 9. Sew on buttons and finish
’ woman diplomat should be allow- jjpera} allowances. After’ Miss 24. Mrs. John E. Hayes, Presi- buttonholes,
5 ‘<2 oa cui whether oes marriage she is fore- A Second Secretary has already dent of the Parents’ and aM Gree & Anish. press
on * + most in the race for the novel announce : ageme: shile a 3° va 7 ste :
. i. post of ambasse‘dress, Miss Geitins Galteaith, admits com oe Congress no Los You will find this general plan
Members are Mobile Miss Salt goes to five or six ted to the Service only last year ngeles, said that children adaptable to most ‘dresses you
The Foreign Service is the only receptions and parties each week, “was described as one of the love. C@MMot learn because their are likely to make. If followed
. important profession which still gand in addition plays hostess at liest of the lovelies in the Diplo- minds: are stifled by crime. it will save you time and assure
enforces a marriage _ bar. A {her own receptions given at her matic Corps. Hollywood glitter. and m ral a eames eeeaoe tt reeves
spokesman gave this interpreta-*handsome house in the Washing- —L.E.S. confusion, a ore It may be modified to suit your

individual experience.

Bronchitis



Doctors Prove

Vou loo Gy Win

A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days






ra

iii

Sister says: |

At the first sign of a cold or cough, rub
Thermogene Rub on your chest, throat, and
back. Feel its penetrating warmth doing you
good, stimulating your circulation, dispersing
congestion! Breathe-in its pleasant medicated
vapour to soothe sore lungs and throat, disperse
stuffiness, and ease your breathing! Also stir
a teaspoonful of the Rub into a jug of hot water
and inhale the steam, Relieve muscular aches
and pains by rubbing in Thermogene Rub
where the pain is. So healing! So soothing!

Uo
ab

he




In extra large jars
and handy tins

Head and Chest Colds, Coughs
Massage Thermogene Medicated Rub
array ee ete ead ae Try it—you will say that

Thermogene Medicated Rub
is a real blessing!

Muscular Pains
QGantly massage the painful part with

Thermogene Medicated Rub e |



A me.

The famous threefold action of PHENSIC
tablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES
NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRES-
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matter how weary your nérves, how depressed
you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you
relief and comfort, quickly and safely. Re-
member this — PHENSIC tablets neither
harm the heart nor upset the stomach.



leading skin specialists proved that
Palmolive Soap can improve com-
plexions in many ways. Oily skin looks
less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully
brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears

So, do as 36 skin specialists advised:
1 Wash with Palmolive Soap.

2 For 60 seconds, massage with
Polmolive’s sofi, lovely lather. Rinse!

3 00 this 3 times a day for 14 days.





Obtainable from

‘ finer.

all good stores and chemists



MOLIVE FOR



A LOVELY STE yy
Be prepared — get some Thermogene Medicated Rub today! r
Don’t accept substitutes. Keep a supply of







|
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| YES! JUST ARRIVED:
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MEDICATED RUB & hensic"s | ~,2 Ete.

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Sa AIR AT AE $959569696566% SOOO SO SPE OCSE SCO CE 56600 C OCA SOHO





SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952
qcscasunnmesntniiaeensininsionnnacnamcnameaneansesd







M. A. writes: “Am I fickle? I
am seVenteen years of age and
considered very good _ looking.
However, even though I have a
steady boy-friend, I must confess
that 1 flirt with all the new boys
I meet. My own boy-friend says
I don’t love him and am fickle,
but not withstanding my love
for him, I find myself interested
in all the new boys I meet.
you think this is wrong?

You are still a young girl, my
dear, and cannot yet be expected
to make up your mind fully as to
whom your final love will be. You
have plenty of time really, in
which to take your boy-friends
seriously. Howewer, you must
not get a reputation for being a
flirt. That would not ~ = any

and may come back upon
soe badly when you do fall in
jove seriously. Do not lead your
boy-friend on to believe he means
more to you than-de does. That

~ Rent Collector’s Appointmen

from page 1
Chairman had __ instructed the
Secretary to nonify Mr. Maynard
of his a intment,

He bed been informed too that
a legal opinion was being sought
and he failed to see why, despite
the fact that, such an opinion
was being sought, they should
notify a man of his appointment,
That was not in keeping with
the administration of public
affairs. He felt that if a legal
opinion was sought, it should be
received before a final decision
was made, or jn the present case,
anyone notified of the appoint-
ment.

“Having asked the Secretary to
get a legal opinion,” he said. “I
consider it unnecessary haste to
make the appointment, After all
we are a public Board, with pub-
lic funds and we have the public
to satisfy if we must maintain
their confidence.

The Chairman explained that
the Secretary had asked him
whether* he would get a legal
opinion and he had said “yes.”
The legal adviser; Mr. Reece, he
understood had said he would
prefer to see him, Mr. Beckles,
the acting Chairman, himself. As
far as he was concerned, the
appointment was passed,

At this stage the Board was
informed that Mr. Adams the
Chairman, who had returned to
the island only a few days, but
was not well enough to attend
the meeting, had written a letter
to the Secretary.

Mr, Mottley here enquired
whether the letter was a pri-
vate letter or dealt with the
business of the Board, The
Secretary stated that it dealt
with the appointment and Mr.
Mottley moved that the letter
be read, whether it agreed
with his point of view or not,
as legally speaking, Mr, Adams
by virtue of the Act was
Chairman of the Board, The
ultimate responsibility would
be his. He had been appointed
Chairman for the legislative
Session and Mr. Beckles was
only appointed for the day’s
proceedings. Furthermore they
were only acting in the matter
as agents of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, who,
when they saw the minutes of
the meeting and the haste with
which the appointment was
made, could only feel one way
about the Board.

Letter Read
After some discussion, the
Board decided that the letter

should be read.

In this letter Mr. Adams stated
that if the minutes were correct,
he was strongly of the opinion
that the Board should await the
opinion of the Solicitor General.
As they were spending the tax-



a

Gigilovely Paris
fashion model



be fair or just.
friends with all until you know
where your heart lies.

Be

would not

To Mrs. P. Your experience is
very normal really, and nothing
to worry about. Be patient and
you will find that, though just
married, life has so many won-
derful things in store for
Why not write the “Family

Do tor,” he would advise you Bee:

To “Rose”
tiesp sea~bathing,
and all such may be con
during the times you mention and
cause no harmful results what-~
ever.

“Ruby” writes: “I have had
several affairs with men over the
Jast few years and am now going
to be married. I do not know
what to say to my husband-to-be
as I believe him to be an extreme-
jy jealous man.”

Be honest with your husband-

payers’ and not their own money,
if they had asked for a legal
opinion, he did not see how
could explain to the public why
they did not await that opinion
before doing anything more in
the matter.

Even if the Board then agreed
to ithe present appointment, it
would not. be acting, in his
opinion, as a public body should.
Tt would be, if they thought the
original appointment valid,
superfluous to confirm it; if
irregular, then the making of a
new. appointment then would
not be on the agenda.

“In writing this,’ he wrote, “I
wish to emphasise that I am
saying nothing as to the merits
of the appointment, I am merely
saying that I see no justification
whatever for asking for a
opinion and then not awai!

The Board would
the fact he hoped, he wrote, that
the letter was merely an explan-

ation of his opinion, whi if
accepted, could, he

to no harm to the Board’s repu-
tation.

When the contents of this let-
ter had been di , Mr.
Mottley observed that with all
due respect to the acting Chair-
man, Mr, Beckles, he would say
that Mr. Adams was the Chair-
man and the ultimate responsi-
bility was his. So he would

repeat that he saw no reason for he!

the haste in notifying anyone
that he had been, appointed.

Urgent Need

Mr. Cox said that there was
one question, he-could answer in
respect to the haste. When Mr.
Lashley, the Secretary, had put
the question of the rent collec-
tor, it had ben intimated that
the rent collector was wanted as
quickly as possible, If the Chair-
man had understood the true
position, he might not have writ-
ten in the tone he had,

Mr, M said that Mr, Cox’s
argument held no water, T!
Acting Chairman explained that
he had ascertained from the
Secretary that no written protest
had been made, and having been
informed that the Solicitor Gen-
eral had said he would prefer to
see him in person, he h
fit to exercise his prerogative in
deciding that the appointment
was sanctioned.

Mr. Mottley still insisted that
the legal opinion should be
sought especially in the light of
the Chairman’s letter. He pointed
out to the Chairman that it had
been out of the greatest respect
for him that he had not formally
objected in writing, but had seen
him personally and discussed it
with him, He considered it there-
fore most unfair to take advan-
tage of the fact that he had not
written his objections.

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it. Mottley in protestii

thought Longbridge

to-be. Tell him you knew several
men before you met him but that
wince you met him he is the only
man in your life. After all, my
dear, if you love him and he loves
you it’s your future together that
counts and not the past, or the mis-
takes of your youth. I am sure that
all will be well, and I feel that
you will end secure in the knowl-
‘edge of the love of the man you
are to marry.

. To “P.B.” (Ch. Ch.) Concep-
tion is most likely to occur be-
tween two periods than any other
time during the month. How-
ever, it is never possible to say
definitely whether or not con~
ception will oceur even at these
times, but as you so wish to have
a baby I would first advise that
you and your husband have a
medical check-up to eliminate
any abnormality or such that
might exist.

The Acting Chairman said ne
was not will to open the ques-
tion again Mr. pro-
tested that that attitude should
not be taken and he would not
sit until the matter was settled
honourably.

Mr. Hutson now suggested the
pos nt of the discussion

Mr, Hutson said that Mr.
Adams as a lawyer himself seemed
in some doubt as to the validity
of the matter and suggested that
it would at least do no harm to
await the legal opinion. He would
ask that the matter be postponed
until Mr. Adams was present. It
was a matter that should be
straightened out constitutionally.
He could see no finality to it then.
If they decided to close the discus-
sion en and let it remain as
settled, he would have to join Mr.
ng that it should
not be closed then. :

Mr. Cox said he was quite will-
ing to get the legal opinion and
he would suggest that Mr. Hut-
son’s motion be amended to ask
the Solicitor General to speed up
with his opinion.

Mr. Hutson’s motion was then
passed and the méeting adjourned.

ee Sind eet One
da act as =
oer in place of the
Manager-Secretary, Mr, T. O.
Lashley who is leaving the island
next to study aided self

Ip housing Antigua, Puerto
Rico, Trinidad and Jamaica. Mr.
Lashley will be away for about
seven

P.N.P. LOSE
MEMBER

(From



Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, April 4.
Norman Manley’s Peoples Na~
tional Party continued to fall
apart about him as Fred Evans

M.H.R. for Western Westmore-
land, resigned the y to-day to
he throw in his lot with Ken Hill who

was ousted on Sunday last as one
of the leaders of the ty.

Fred Evans was member
who resigned his seat in the House
last , then regained it in a
bye- ion against JPL’s Gladys
and was the first
member of the House suspended
from duties for flouting the rule
of the Chair.

By Evans’ resignation, PNP
membership in the House is now
oi parther el t in thi

e
TUC we ulcn laered to-day

with the resignation of Frank Hill,
Arthur Henry and Richard Hart
from the General

, Henry, Financial
and’ Hart, Vice Presi-
dent of the TUC.
he





Als perfumed with the famous Yardley Lavender: Soap - Bath Salts - Dusting Powder

YARDLEY

+ vests; lay the

WILLIAM TOWNSHEND
Are the women of to-day
riding in steeplechases, piloting
airplanes, driving racing cars—
braver t h a n_ their Victorian

grandmothers?

Are they—with their
trips on the Continent
adventurous?

And are they tougher
their Olympic records?

If they believe that, t h e ¥
Should ask their grandmothers
about Mary Kingsley

This typical product of a Vic-
torian middle-class household-
her uncle was Charles Kingsley,
the man who wrote “The Water
Babies”—lived among cannibals
in primitive West Africa alone,

Fell On Spikes

A book, West African Explor-
ers, edited by C. Howard, with
an introduction by J. H. Plumb,
(Oxford University Press
7s. 64.), has just been published
telling of her remarkable adven-
tures.

Once she fell into an elephant-
pit 15ft. deep—and landed on
12in. ebony spikes.

Her thick skirt and voluminous
petticoats saved her—she insisted
on wearing these instead of “the
masculine garments” she had
been advised to wear.

When her cance was held up
by rapids she had to leap for
the rock wall and hang on.

Up To Her Neck

She waded through swamps and
marshes up to her neck in water,
and climbed the 13,760ft. Great
Cameroon from a direction never
before attempted.

And she carried on
tigations into native sociology,
religion, natura] history among
the most murderous cannibals in
West Africa—unharmed.

Once she opened a bag hang-
ing in a native hut where she
was sleeping—and found it full
of human remains.

Another time, she crept up to
within 30 yards of a family of
gorillas to watch their behaviour.

Hippos, s n a k e 8, crocodiles,
leopards, elephants, they all
came alike to Mary Kingsley.

Mary (her second name was

hiking
more

with

her inves-

Henrietta) had a keen sense vf
humour.
It must have mystified later

travellers in the Fan country to

hear savages saying “Stuff my

dear sir.” “Dear me now.”
Mary Kingsley had taught

Your Baby

DRESSING FOR THE DAY
(By Sister Charlotte)

It might appear a trifle ridicu-

lous to some of you to be giving

advice on such a simple subject



as this Yet, I have seen so many
mothers struggie with their babies
and sometimes come near to
smothering them, that a little

word here can do no harm,



After the final dusting of pow-
der; if you are lucky enough to
have obtained little cross-over
garment on your
baby’s back and gently pull his
hands through the armhole with
your fingers, next place the nap-
kin, ready folded, in position

W
WW ue
Yi VY {
Se NY Ni) iY
\})
NY)

dy

i




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as OLD BOBD STR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

In Petticoats Among
The Cannibals



Fe Lee SS Te ee ee

PAGE SEVEN





Man About Town

_uite the m o s t enchanting The letters “B ‘H meat
|SKIRTS patterned with hand-| paint, But more than fhat, they
dilee ae Mae mrsad scenes, richly| mean THE BEST PAINT Brand.
r cclourtul, immensel,; ,, You'll} ram-Henderson Paints at N. &B
Six bought, when teaching|see them in individual’ lengths to) Howell’s Hardware Store on Bay
then. nglish words, she would|be made-up to your own meas-|St. are shown to advantage
throw In a few loquialisms| urements at BETTINA’S DRESS| There’s an excellent choice 0!
for “ood measure, ; SALON in the Village, Balmoral| colours and ty for indoors ot
Gap. Skirt and Halter sets; Dresses| out. “B—H” HOLL-EX Enamel

Life of Sin | fox = occasions and Blouses for} a perfect and durable covering for
|easual wear — all in original) such things as Garden Furniture

Wit the common sense typical) renditions of colour and tone make} and Guterior wall f

of her, She listened to a missionary | Rettina’s the very exclusive Salon| Brandram-Hendersor

telling of the “life of sin” which) that it is.
black traders led.

She investigated — instead of
condemning.

Then she found that the-oniy| Here’s a Service tip for a Ser- 5
way the black traders could keep| vice C h e c k for trouble free) yo cou ake UF
alive was to have a wife at “very|™otoring at Easter and all the the vexed prob
point of their route from the|long year round. The Esso Ser-
coast vicenter on Roebuck St (ph. 3938)

That way they knew they would| are equipped for SER-
not have their food poisoned by| VICING and S CHECK -
tribesmen who coveted t h e i r|/ ING of your car. One experience
goods, at the Esso Servicenter will

Wherever she went she was as| émply convince you as it has :
good as a circus visit to the na-|. countless others — a deserving) Mets V< rear
tives+many of whom had appar-| Cause for any car is to have it 6-passenger j
ently néver seen a white person. serviced here. Remember—check | tive with its

Once, when she came a vill- before the holidays! } VANGUA
age, “every child in the place, as ° Seine a
soon as it saw my white face, let (ees p
a howl] out of it as if it had seen| And here we go — into the so want
his satanie majesty, horns, hoofs,| country on a carefree Easter vace~| .°)\," .’ Value Ry
tails and all, and fled into the} ¢ion. What better than to stop at 7 “Es vas sg
nearest Frat. ey Four Cross Roads in St. John's | p,, ene - be |

Friendship py ET | Shirt to go with it for Man, o Boy
Why was Mary Kingsley able|cool and comfortable. In this! jj, Jitterbug Patterns ($2.90) and
to go about unharmed in so savage | scenic spot we can afford to linger | Hose—a very special offes BSc
a land? lend perhaps sample. the Dry | All these and a new shipment of

She says, with a touch of pride:|Goods section or check the gas| Men's Felt Hats are at H
“A certain sort of friendship soon|and oil Jevels at the EBENEZER | Edwards Ltd. on Broad Street.|
arose between the Fans and me.| FILLING STATION. So let's be This is a shop where y¢ spend
We each recognised that we be-|om our way _— the way of the) less and buy more for your dollar
longed to that same section of the| Parade this Easter! H a look at the Khaki shirt
human race with whom it is better | | values when you're
to drink than to fight.” r ° ; ° .

Her slogan for the Africans is : |} Do you
one which is a warning to-day, ELECTROLUX _ Something| ware? Of
when that continent is at the| YOO new. indeed at K. R. Hunie| you'll like
cross-roads, racially. | & Co. Ltd. Prominently displayed!Glassware in Plantation Lad,
She believed that Britain’s|in their new Showroom, these; There are Champagne and Wine,

mission in Africa was to leave! ELECTRIC, GAS OR KEROSENE | Sherry and ae, Pony and,

the native “a free, unsmashed|CIl. operated refrigerators are)/Snap and Liqueur glasses either
man, not a whitewashed slave| beautifully constructed and com-) patterned or plain. What's more
or an enemy.” ‘ pletely noiseless. For all house-| you can buy them in set alee
holds awaiting electricity con-|up your own, a please

Imperishable | nections this ELECTROLUX is a Plantations Ltd. also have attrac

In seven years, Mary Kings-| Splendid investment. It can wvejftive and new Tableware that
ley — the girl who had been) Used on Gas or oil and converted | includes Cake-stands, Sugar
quietly educated at home and had to Electricity as desired. Dial Bowls, Sauce-Boats and Jamjars
studied sociology at Cambridge— | 5136. in Glass.
left an imperishable reputation in|
Africa =
And she died there — but far |

dian name and N. B. H

° will introduce }

o

WHEN I
its going +t be
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= the West Africa where she There is a
ad pioneered so bravely. ,
She died away down in South | Maiden Foun
Africa, only 38, from enteric fever f 1
or every type of figure.

—while nursing Boer prisoners. |
—L.E.S,

*
Ef Bm 7

————.

And You

while he is still contentedly lying
face downwards om your Knee or
on the bed. Now roll him over
and adjust the garments to suit.
You are now ready to put on his
gown which should be open down
the back to facilitate easy man-
agement






















4

\ Seon disappeae,

The agony and maddening itch of

|
|
|
|

If however your vests are the ended ,
usual slip-over type, always leave ore DDD Pre _s .
one eye and one side of his face ym ournting uid ills the
uncovered to avoid fright, or place aac vo Dy me skin and
snaps or buttons on the shoulders \ Peek clenxe up even the aneet obsetinn
and slip it up over the legs. I can 4 7

do no better than to quote a fam-
ous Professor of Child Health who
said that “All infant clothi
mend Oe put s, and taken &
tu feet and not over the
over the feet and Mot over a to| OBTAINABLE FROM ALL LEADING STORES. LOCAL AGENTS: .W.POTTER

|
|
avoid dirty or Soiled clothing going

aver the. qpae.’ MADE BY VERO c EVERITT LIDS ATHERSTONE, ENGLAND

Smooth firm unhurried move-

ments are essential to give your

| ate sores.
HAT | Obtainab

‘like | smart-patterned

baby a feeling of security which
he is so much in need of es) ally
during his first few days. To those
who are busy it is best to avoid
buttons and buttonholes on gar-
ments. Narrow tapes are easier
to handle and much more likely to

stay done up longer.
this part of your

To complete

care, fasten his booties on and
brush his hair with his own hair
brush. He will now be ready and
comfortable for a warm feed or

change of surroundings.



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PAGE EIGH'



BARBADOS iG ADVOCATE

re ee” I yyy
Sunday, April 6, 1952

FISH CO-OPERATIVE

THE suggestion made by a correspondent
in Thursday’s Advocate that the “only
salvation for the poor consumer is more
Government controls not less,” is ty,icai
of the pathetic fallacy which exists on the
subject of controls. But it is more than
that. It reflects the mentality of those who
believe that unless the government fixes a
maximum price the consumer will be over-
charged. Overlooking the poor opinion
which the consumer whe accepts this view-
point must have of the producer or in this
case of the fisherman, let us examine this
contention.

If it is conceded that the object of con-
trols is to protect the consumer and to en-
sure for the producer a minimum return
for his labour then the argument that con-
trols benefit the consumer looks unassail-
able; but is it?

In the first place controls very often
benefit indirectly the producer at the ex-
pense of the consumer. Because the pro-
ducer has no incentive to produce more
than will obtain for him what he hopes
to gain as a result of a guaranteed control
price. The producer in other words has
no incentive to produce great quantities
because if he does the control system breaks
down and the price of his produce falls.

Recent heavy catches of fish illustrate
this point. The fisherman hopes to bene-
fit to the extent of the control price but
the public whenever it sees a glut of fish
refuses to pay and the price is automatic-
ally forced down, and the control system
is laughed at by the very people who turn
to it for protection when there are short-
ages of fish.

It requires no great understanding to

" pedlise then that what really keeps prices
down is plenty.

And what keeps them up is scarcity.

Let us pursue further this investigation
into the present fishing industry of Bar-
bados,

The Fishery Officer has proved by
methods of research not available to Dr.
Brown when he made his pessimistic ob-
servations about the quantities of fish avail-
able in Barbadian waters that the island’s
fisheries can be exploited for our benefit
and that we have sufficient fish to meet
our Own requirements and allow for ex-
port. Further he has by patient study dis-
covered when are the most profitable

times for fishing. |

His conclusions are that the quantities
of fish caught off Barbados could be
doubled if only fishing was scientifically
conducted instead of as at present just
carried on to suit the fishermen.

The very first action to be taken is to
change the hours at which fishing now
takes place. This means that fishing boats
would return ashore after nightfall. It
means therefore that the optimum hours
for fishing can ohly be worked when sharp-
freeze refrigerating chambers have been
installed. Tests have been made by the
fisheries officer which prove that fish can
be kept in a sharp freeze chamber com-
plete as they were caught for periods ex-
céeding two weeks at a time.

If sharp-freeze methods could be adopted,
all fish on reaching shore would be taken
to a central sharp-freeze and would be
sold the following day or even weeks after
to distributing agencies, many of which
would be equipped with deep freeze facil-
ities.

To reorganise Barbadian fisheries on this
pattern would require the enforcement of
discipline so severe that it may be doubted
whether it would succeed in practise. But
it-would result in maximum catches, would
reduce the prices paid by the consumer for
fish and would raise the living standards
of those engaged in the fishing industry.

While a huge sharp-freeze refrigerated
chamber is the ultimate objective of the
fishing industry a beginning could be made
now to improve the present system by the
introduction of a co-operative fishing and
marketing agency. a

If every boat owner in the fishing in-
dustry could be persuaded to join an asso-
ciation which was formed with the inten-
tion of selling fish at a reasonable price
to the consumer and at a fair profit to the
fisherman the fishing industry would cease
to be a competitive cut-throat industry and
would become ah industry whose only ob-

jective would be to catch the greatest possi-
ple number of fish to sell at the lowest
possible price consonant with a fair profit
for the fisherman.

A properly organised central committee
of management elected by members of the
Fishing Boat Owners Association on the
principle of ‘one member one vote would
then be made responsible for the market-
ing and distribution of all fishing boat
catches.

Such an organisation would give all
fishermen an interest not. only in the
catching of the fish but in its marketing.
Their hours of work would be lessened and
they would have no incentive to return
ashore before they had secured optimum
catches. When they did return they would
find instead of as at present a collection of
hawkers waiting to bid for their catches
an insulated and ice-packed van ready to
conduct the bulk of their catches surplus
to local requirements to the sharp-freeze
chamber, or pending its completion to com-
mercial deep freeze chambers.

The central committee of management



“would be responsible for the erection at all

fishing boat centres of simple sheds gquip- |
ped with deep-freeze facilities (where |
necessary) and from which all local area |
sales would be made.

The central cémmittee of management
would assist fishermen with loans to pur-
chase nets, repair and mechanise boats, and
would disseminate knowledge in co-oper-
ation with the Fisheries Officer.

The price at which fish would be sold
would vary with the seasons and would be |
fixed by the central committee of manage-
ment, who would retain a small cess on all
sales from which their working expenses
and reserve*funds would aecumulate.

The Central Committee of Management
would also be responsible for arranging the

sale of all fish catches surplus to local re-
quirements to importers in other countries.

It would also their duty to make a
study of local demands and ascertain how
far it would be practical to educate the
local fish eating public ini an effort to stand-
ardise their fish requirements.

It is the opinion of the Fisheries Officer
for instance that three types of flying fish
consumers exist in Barbados.

One section of the public wants their
fish complete with head tail eyes and in-
sides.

Another section wants their fish complete
with heads but with entrails removed.

A third and minority section requires
their fish boned and cleaned and without
heads, ready for cooking.

Clearly the existence of three consumer
types complicate the central problem of
fish storage.

If fish are to be stored complete they
must be stored in sharp-freeze refrigerated
chambers. This is a very expensive pro-
cedure. . |

If fish are to be stored with their entrails
removed they can be kept for several days
in deep-freeze chambers. Already there is
demand from commercial organisations for
fish in this condition but because no en-
trails are removed by fishermen from the
time of catching to the return of the fish-
ing boats ashore the commercial firms de-
mands are not supplied.

The third section of the public cannot be
served unless the distributor is allowed to
make a charge for this service. This is
impossible under a system of price control
as enforced at present.

There is no denying the fact that the
scheme as outlined above would effectively
reduce the price of fish to the consumer.
The present system of controls is a negative
action which keeps the price of fish at an
artificial level based on inadequate catches
(except at certain limited intervals of glut)
and gives the fishermen just enough re-
turn to remove from them all incentive to
do better.

If, as Mr, Wiles contends, our supplies
of fish are greater than Dr. Brown supposed
them to be we must exploit them in the in-
terests of the consumers, the fishermen and
the whole community.

Cane Losses

DURING 1951 there were 220 cane fires
in Barbados during which 1,451%4 acres of
canes were burnt,

Commenting on this fact on Sunday,
February 10 this newspaper stated that this
was a record of which Barbados ought to
be ashamed.

At that time it was noted that only 73%
acres had been destroyed in January 1952
Se pomanene with 944 acres in January

Since January however cane fires have
en and by the end of March totalled
187.

So extensive have these fires been this
year that already by the end of March,
1,577 acres of ripe canes, 154% acres of
young canes and 2354 acres of ratoons have
been burnt,

This means that despite the smaller num-
ber of fires (187 as compared with 220), a
greater number of acres has been destroyed
by fire in the three months ending March
1952 than during the whole year of 1951.

This is disgraceful.

In a letter dated 12th February 1952 a
correspondent commenting on the Advo-
cate editorial of Sunday 10th February
listed four cardinal losses which result from
cane fires.

The first was loss of trash and grass which
are essential for to-day’s method of cultiva-
tion,

The second was loss of humus.

The third was loss of sugar output if
canes are not reaped and ground immedi-
ately after the fire.

And the fourth loss was the retarding of
young canes growth which affects the fol-
lowing year crop.

The correspondent stressed the need for
instructing labourers that these four losses
affected them because the sugar output of
the industry is reduced by fires and labour-
ers share in the profits of the industry by
way of the Production Bonus.

Less than two months have passed since
these warnings were given and what has
happened?

Barbados has had a record crop of cane
fires?

Instruction must be given. :

The correspondent also suggested that
planters should institute a fire watching
system which would cost each plantation
about $100 a crop,

: It is difficult to believe that this has been.
one. {

The record crop of fires suggests greater
lack of precautions than ever.

The correspondent also supported a sug-
gestion made in this newspaper on Sunday
February 10, 1952 that planters should pay
workers 20 cents less per ton for cutting
burnt canes and that the money saved in
this way should be paid into a Labour
Housing Fund.

He concluded with the hope that these
suggestions would be brought to the atten-
tion of those persons who have the power
to put them into effect, and asked that a
concerted effort should bé made in dealing
with this important matter.

Instead, his appeal and the appeal of this
newspaper of February 10, 1952 met with
no response and to-day we can only ask
whether instruction and action would not
have been better and would not have tn-
creased our sugar output how reduced by a
record number of acres burnt?

SUNDAY

T is reported that, at Seacox
Heath, Flimwell, Kent, country
club of the Soviet diplomats, they
entertain each other at week-ends
with the balalaika and charades.
Here is a charade they might do
in the manner of the 19th century
Russian dramatists, é

CAST: Natasha and Olga (two
sisters), Ivan, Uncle Vanya and @
Village Idiot. .

SCENE: A_ Russian country
house in mid-winter.

Natasha hates Olga because
Olga loves Ivan. Olga hates Nata-
sha because Natasha loves Ivan.
Ivan hates both of them. Uncle
Vanya hates them all, The Village
Idiot hates everybody, every-

where.

NATASHA: The snow is still
falling.
* OLGA: I hate the snow, It is
alwe;’s falling.

: NATASHA; Not in the summer
time.

OLGA: Do you want to drive
me mad with your imbecile re-
marks?

NATASHA: Yes.

(Enter Ivan.)

IVAN: The snow is still falling.

OLGA: How I love the snow.

NATASHA: It is so beautiful.

A: The snow is always fall-

ng:
IVAN: Not in the summer time.
OLGA: Oh, how true. How
simple, but how true.
NATASHA: Only the greatest
minds can say wonderful things
like that.

OLGA: Ivan, you should have
been a writer. I always said so.
NATASHA: I said it first.

(Enter Uncle Vanya.)
UNCLE VANYA: The snow is
still falling.



ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fence

(By NATHANIEL GUBBINS)

IVAN: The snow is always fall-

ing.

ENCLE VANYA: Not in the
summer time.

OLGA: What a stupid remark.

NATASHA: Uncle Vanya is so
tedious.

(Enter a Village Idiot.)

VILLAGE IDIOT: The, snow is
still falling

THE OTHERS (shouting): The
snow is always falling.

VILLAGE IDIOT (shouting
back): Not in the summer time,

OLGA and NATASHA .(to-
gether): I can't bear this any

more.
UNCLE VANYA: It is intoler-
able.
IVAN: Let’s shoot somebody.
OLGA: Shoot me before I go

mad.
NATASHA: Me first.
IVAN: Let me do it. I hate
them both.
UNCLE VANYA: No. Let me.
I hate you all. Then I can shoot
you, too,
VILLAGE IDIOT: Let me do it.
I hate everybody.
(He shoots the lot.)
VILLAGE IDIOT: They are all
dead and I am alive. Yej they
called me an idiot.
Boy Chases Girl
“Can a man be sincere who
swears he has fallen in love at
first glimpse of me and pur-
sues me madly before he
knows anything about me?”

HAT a tiresome, ungrateful
girl you must be, dear. In-
stead of wasting the time of busy
editors asking them silly questions,
you ought to consider yourself
lucky that anybody is chasing you

madly in these unromantic days.

For where are the men who pur-
sue women madly now? Where
are the young Lochinvars who
would snatch a girl from her
father’s house in the middle of her
bridal feast to save her from mar-
riage to “a laggard in love and a
dastard in war?”

You will not find them on the
scage or screen except in a cos-
tume piece, or, occasionally, in

some dirty’ little melodrama in ||

which romance plays no part. If
you found them in real life they
would probably ‘end up in the
police court.

* * *

I think you might
less fortunate girls

Moreover,
have given

some details of the chase. For
instance, is it snarling and
primitive? Does he pounce on

you in the street, grab you by
the hair and drag you, howling,
into the nearest milk bar? Or
is it a happy-go-lucky pursuit
like Harpo Marx chasing a
blonde through a set in Holly-
wood ?

All the same, you May have
mistaken his motive.

A plain girl I knew was once
chased by a determined young
man for weeks on end. When he
called, she locked herself in her
room. Her father slammed the
front door in his face. If she
met him in the street, she
jumped into a taxi.

When he cornered her, at last,

it turned out that she had bor-|,

rowed his cigarette lighter
their first meeting.
He only wanted it back.
L

at

Island Fortress

Barbados has always been
British. No foreign flag has
ever flown over the island.

These are facts which everyone”

learns first about Barbados.
But how many people have
given more than a_ passing
thought to these strange facts
or asked the reason why Bar-
bados shculd have escaped the
fate of Martinique, Guadeloupe,
the Saints, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Trinidad, Tobago, Jamai-
ca, the Virgin Islands and
nearly every other West Indian
island occupied by European
powers?

What was the reason? Did
Barbados bear a charmed life
or did its military defence:
make it impregnable?

The West Indian Atlas o/
1775 published by the late
Thomas Jefferys, Geographer
to the King provides the most
likely answer to these ques-
tions, “Nature” says the author
“has almost entirely surround-
ea it (Barbados) with rocks
and where these are wanting
they have built forts which in
some sort make this island in.
accesible.”

A map in the same atlas, sur-
veyed by William Mayo and
engraved and improved by
Thomas Jefferys geographer to
the King lists these forts which
eccur at close intervals from
Maycocks to Kendals,

In order they are Maycocks,
Half. Moon, Ruperts, Six Men,
Sunderlands, Haywoods,
Orange, Coconut, Denmark,
Margarets, Clarendon, Queens,
Valiant Royalist, Yatcht, Hall-
ets, Fontabelle, James, Wil-
loughby, Line, Ormonds,
Charles, Maxwell, Oistins,
Hoopers and Kendals, Twenty
five forts extending from the
North to the South of an island
whose total length is twenty
one miles!

And how were these forts
equipped?

Pére Labat who visited Bat-
bados in September 1700
who considered that the Fr
could get control of the island
if they mustered an army. of
between four and five thousand
creoles and Flibusticus and a
fleet of 12 war ships, has re-
corded details of several forts.

Describing the east point of
Carlisle Bay “which is alm
entirely surrounded by a
at the level of the water” he
notes that on this point t
stands “a battery @ merlons en-
closed after the style of a large
fortress where I counted
pieces of cannon which accord-
ing to appearances are of large
calitge in order to defend the
ay.”

On the west point of the bay
he noted “a battery a _barbette
completely open on the land
side with eight large cann
which sweep the roadste

Besides the battery. of thirty.

cannons there is another wi
six Pieces a _ bdrbette,

the t and the jetty form
the rt which is opposite






By GEORGE HUNTE

agiining the town. This jetty
Which is on the East side is de-
fended by an octagonal fort
which has eight or ten open-
ings. That of the west is also
defended by a fort which has
twelve pieces of cannon that
sweep the roadsteads at the en-
trance to the port.

The pier opposite the Gov-
ernor’s country house hardly
two leagues from the town “is
defended by a battery a merlons
with six pieces of cannon,
guards and an entrenchment.”

In Jamestown the observant
father noted that the anchorage
was protected by two batteries:
one on tihe east a barbette with
twenty six pieces of heavy
cannon, and one on the west
with ten pieces,

Half of the way from the
governor's house at Jamestown
“there is a very long entrench-
ment along the coast: it is
stonework and very necessary
in this place because the cays
are sufficiently covered with
water to permit shallops and
other flat bottomed boats to
make a landing.” Halfway be-
tween Jamestown and Spiketon
the French visitor notices
ad merlon fort with three pieces
and an entrenchment on either
side. At Speightstown the two
points which form the bay are
defended by batteries ad bar-
bette; the East battery has six

Apparently Father Labat
turned this knowledge to good
account for he notes that an
expedition was ready to go to
Barbados in. 1702 with a squad-
ron of flibustiers and creoles
but was diverted instead to
Vigo.

He was confident that but for
their change of plans Barbados
would have ¢ghanged hands in
that year, but his hope expressed
in the comment “patience, what
is put off is not perhaps lost”
was never. realised and as
everybody knows Barbados has
never changed hands. The rea-
son is not far to seek. Its natu-
ral defences and its fortifica-
tions made it almost inaccessible.
And the author of the West In-
dian Atlas seventy five years
after Father Labat’s visit notes
that the island then had six
regiments of infantry three of
eavalry and one troop of
guards, all stout men and weil
disciplined,

“There is” he explains “a law
whose utility is equal to its
prudence, which assigns

three four or five acres:
what constitutes a yeomanry.

This agrarian law has always

rendered its militia one of the
most respected in the West In-



to
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of his time a little estate of
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dies.”
Father Labat’s impression COMMISSION DEPARTMENT.
was that the poor Irish who

formed the bulk of the island's

teen cannons and the West volunteers would turn against
twelve. their masters in the event of an
invasion but this agrarian law

About three leagues from seems to have been incentive
Speightstown in a colony of enough for the servants to
French refugees, Pére Labat no- identify the island’s defence
a battery a merlons with eight with their own interests. The
cannons, ancient cannons which still can
On the way back to Speights- be seen in several parts of the
town he notices a landing island, the names of many of

wharf defended by a Merlon
fortification with three pieces.
On Sunday 12 September
1700 Pére Labat witnessed a re.
view of the island’s cavalry and
infantry. “There were _ four
companies of cavalry of 100 to
120 men each...the officers
wore red tunics with thick gold
braid and white feathers. The
infantry was also drawn up in
four companies and numbered
in all a little more than two
, hundred men very well armed,
but who only seemed to be the
servants of the horsemen,”
These troops Father Labat
was quick to note were not
militia. They were all drawn
from regular serving regiments.
Father Labat was told that
there were six cavalry regi-
ments in the island at the time
comprising almost 3000 men
ani ten infantry regiments
cofmprising about 5000 men,
Even wh the vessel was
Sailing out of Carlisle Bay this
observant military priest was
noting that two anchorages be-
hind the east point of Carlisle
Bay were defended by two bat-
‘teries, One on the east with six
a barbette and fe other
: merlons with o' four







Our Readers Say;

Simple Language

To fhe Editor, the Advocate,

R—,I was richly entertained
by the report on the meeting of
renal Economie Committee
w

ich was held recently at Hast- ment in labour efficiency; ifves- uneviable reputation of

ings House. T h i s paragraph

‘especially held my attention ; ,

“It was recognized, moreover,
that the present almost world-
wide inflationary situation would
greatly increase the cost of con-
struction and equipment, and
together with the difficulties of
currency moyements, added con-
siderably to the problems asso-
ciated with the establishment of
new industries in regions orn
an industrial tradition. In ali
these circumstances, it was

for government machinery for
the implementation of industrial
programmes; the mobilization of
local resources and the attraction
of tariffs more sympathetic to in-
dustrial development improve-

tigation of potential opportuni-
ties.”

Doubtless there is some hidden
meaning behind this mass of ver-
biage successfully concealed.

not the members of the
R.EC. read their bibles? In con-
trast to this “double-talk”, that
simple and _ beautiful sentence
‘springs to the mind:” Consider
the lilies of the field, how they
gov they toil not neither do

ey spin.” Perhaps if the R.E.C.
could have got at it beforehand

the forts and the Barbados Vol-
unteer Force are still remind-
ers that Barbados did not re-
main ever British by a freak of

history but that its almost im.
pregnable forts and its armed
forces protected this islanc
from the beginning until com-
paratively modern times.

When this century opened
Queens House was still the
House of the General Com-

manding the island's troops.

The antiquity of the island's
Armed Forces may be appre-
ciated by the state of the de-
fences existing in April 1650
when Richard Ligon left the
island. At that time the In-
habitants had built’ three forts
and were able to muster “ten
thousand foot as good men and
as resolute as any in the world
and a thousand good Horse,”

Only twenty three years had
passed since Barbados was
colonised.

No one should be surprised
that the anly foreign troops
ever to subdue the island were
the British forces sent by the
\English dictator Oliver Crom-
iwell. But nobody else has ever
succeeded and the reason sure-
ly is that until recent years
Barbados was an island fortres;

in this group. Expert opinion
points out that statistics support
the view that not only is there a
total absence of entrepreneurship
in the group under consideration,
but that its proletariat bear the
having
registered an inordinately. high
percentage of absenteeism due
either to habitual malingering or.
what is more to be apprehended,
to an alarming lack of interes’
in gainful employment, The num-
ber of man-hours lost from pro-
duction by this group, whose pro-
duetivity per head has now reach-
ed the irreducible minimum,
poses a problem of national im-
portance which should

) y impinge
with peculiar force upon the
consciousness of every thihking

member of the community and

deemed desirable that govern- amd converted it into official jar- galvanize him into action if the
ments should accept responsibility gon, it would have appeared in catastrophic consequences, which

for definite and_ constructive

Holy Writ something like this :

economic laws teach us are in-

measures to assist industrialise- “It is the concensus of enlight- evitably attendant upon a lack
tion, in addition to playing their ened public opinion, ascertained of adaptability to factory condi-

part in the provision of the nec-

as the result of a recent nation-

tions and habits of work, are to

essary capital and fiscal induce- Widé survey, that attention shouli be avoided in the interest of the

ments.

recommendations for the creation upon the quantitative-aspects of

of the psychological and instilu- employment is
“lilium longiflorum’



tional framework necessary for
the acceleration of industrial
activity

among the

It has been rumoured that there

These include proposais .is a widespread lack of activity

The Conference m a d e be focussed, before it is too late, public weal.”

How A. P. Herbert would de-

Benius jight in the prose style of these
leaders of West Indian thought!

Yours, étc

L. A. LYNCH,





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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE NINE

a





————_---—=

THE HARD WAY HOME | marmite -

Two young Australians
sailing half way around
world in Wanderer I1., the
smallest yacht ever to at-
tempt the voyage from Eng-
land to Australia. Here
Frank MeNulty tells the story
so far.

‘ Have you ever settled down
in a comfortable chair gnd, per-
haps with an open atlas before
you, thought about travelling
across the world? You can dream
about the other countries ‘you
would like to visit and at the time
it seems so easy to draw your
finger over the wide oceans and
land-masses on the map.

Just twelve months ago on a
cold overcast and rainy day in
London we were doing just that.
We—that is Bill Howell and my-
self—had decided to buy a yacht
and try to sail to Australia. Bill
had first made the suggestion.
After two years working in Lon-
don he thought it would be a nice
change to get back to warmer
climates. He also wanted to
return to hts family in Sydney,
Australia, because he hadn't seen
his people for two years.

I had spent three years in
England working for newspapers
and r Reuters Press Agency
and also felt bound to begin mak-
ing tracks back towards my home
in Sydney.

Search for a Ship

That atvernoon we bought two
yachting magazines and began
thumbing through the advertise-
ments of yachts for sale.

We were both fairly young —
Bill being twenty-seven and I
twenty-six—and although neither
of us had done very much yacht-
ing we did not let lack of experi-
ence dash our confidence in
succeeding with the plan. Bill
had. done his yachting in the
English channel during his stay
in London. All my sailing had
ebeen in and near Sydney, Most
of it was in small sailing boats
much the same as your racing

are
the

craft of the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club,
But we did have one or two

points in our favour. Bill had
learned to navigate in the Royal
Australian Air Force during ihe
war and, as a dental surgeon, he
should be able to handle many
of the ills we might develop dur-
ing the voyage. Toothache, of
course, would be just too easy.
For my part, I had done some
sailmaking and rigging for those
small boats in Sydney and this
knowledge should come in handy.

After a two-n.onth search we
found the yacth Wanderer II up-
on a beach in Yarmouth, Isle ot
Wight, and we bougnt her. She
was sixteen years old, in gooa
condition, but rather small. In
fact to our eyes at first she seemed
almost terrifyingly small, Her
size had been dictated as much by
pocket as by the fact that we need-
ed a yacht that one of us could
handle easily. This was neces-
sary because for most of the time
one would be sleeping at sea while
the other was sailing her. There
was also the consideration that
Bill or myself might fall over~
board. Ih that case the one per-
gon left on board would have te
be able to sail back in the hope
of picking up the unlucky chap in
the water. And so we had to be
content with the choice of this
yacht.



NAVIGATOR BILL HOWELL with sextant snaps the sun
Shortly he will calculate the ship’s position.

Atlantic.

A 24 ft. Homestead

Wanaerer’s actual size is wwenty-
our feet 1rom end to end overall
but at the waterline sne is omy
twenty feet long. ine. widesy pare
ot ner huli is seven feet, ‘nis
was tO be our home tor possibly
twelve montns,

We began work on her right
away witn paint and varnish and
new rope. There were many
other things to do as wel. The
lockers had to be filled with
tinned and other food, more water
tanks were required: and ail the
stores in spare rope, extra sails,
charts and other things that had
to be packed on board. Extra
sails were an importai® item be-
cause the yacht had no engine and
we had to rely on sails alone.

By the time all this gear had
been crammed and jammed into
the tiny hull the yacht seemed
smaller than ever inside, I shoud
say that the space left was no more
than what you have inside an
average taxi-cab.

After two short cruises — one
nround the Isle of Wight (which is
about the same size as your Bar-
bados) and the other across the
English Channel to France, Bill
and I set out from Falmouth,
England, bound for Australia. It
was September 14, 1951, and the
first port of call was to be
Gibraltar some 1,200 miles away.

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it himself in a Pressure Cooker.

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“FOacnna at Senwing

Out of sight of land we passed
along the west coast of Spain and
then Portugal and on the elev-
enth day at sea we headed in to-
wards the land and late that
evening made a landfall on Cape
St. Vincent at the most southerly
tip of Portugal. Two days late:
Wanderer had passed through
the Strait of Gibraitar and drop-
ped anchor in the shadow of
the gigantic, 1,700 feet high
chunk of limestone that is the
‘Kock’ of Gibraltar itself.

in Gibraltar, Bill and I parted
company for a time. He went
bick to London to terminate his
dental practice there while I began
preparing for the much longer
Atlantic passage ahead.

Bil was back again on January
29 and a week leter we hoisted
sail and got under way this time
bound for Las Palmas in the
Canary Islands. We -anted to
cull there in ordér to pick up
fresh provision before aitempt-
ing to cross the wide stretch of
ocean to Barbados.

Perhaps iv was just our luck but
no sotner hac Wanderer left the
Strait of Gibraltar and re-entered
the Atlantic ocean than another
gale burst upon her. At the time
we Cralt Was Off the coast of
French Morocco. This gale was
the severest we experienced, For
eleven hours Wanderer was but-
feted by the big waves with hard-
ly any shil on at all. We braced
ourse:ves in our bunks as best wé
could while outside the wind
howled through the rigging and
the seas roared and crashed
around, One wave after another
swept the tiny decks from eyd to

end,
Thoughts At Sea
It is quite an eerie experience
to be caught in a gale at sea in a
small boat. You know that you
cannot get away. You just stick
it and bide your time until the





cust osame. waite OECe Be nie

Aasbina alc |

PhAlh ODA On MAME — \ AAOMBILL UPOE£



ANGE ANTE (*\ meres



Â¥en.

CRASHING through the waves before a strong wind in the Bay of
Note the Helmsman's special suit to keep him warm and

Biscay.
waterproor.

worst is over. Out there away
from land there is almost no hope
at all of receiving outside assist-
ance if anything serious does go

wrong Of course you know that
many yachts have quite safely
lived through gales before. But

this doesn’t stop you thinking that
you may be the exception to prove
the rule, A freak wave just
might smash its tons of water onto
those flimsy decks above your
head. it would all be

If it did





astngoe

AORASIIIE, cg
Won tare

acca Bak, at

DECK and profile construction plans of the 44 ton cutter “Wanderer II",

We soon discovered
ocean wasn’t always as blue and
caim in appearance as. it looked
cn that map when we first planned
the voyage, Hardly had Wanderer
left the shelter of Falmouth than
a North Atlantic gale caught her.
It was our first gale in the little
ship and it gave us a violent toss-
ing about. The gale also found
out all the weaknesses in the way
we had stowed things away.

The First Gale

The big waves tossed the yacht
about like a piece of driftwood
and within r inutes potatoes rol.ed
out onto the cabin deck, books
crashed down from shelves and
tins cascaded from their lockers.
At the same time we batiled on
deck in cold sodden clothes trying
to shorten sail and pump out the
water that filled up the yacht’s
cockpit each time” a wave-top
slammed on board, Then the only
pump we had broke down. We
admitted defeat and turned back
to Falmouth. Wanderer had sail-
ed only fifty of the 12,000 miles
between England and Australia.
It didn’t seem a particularly bright
start in view of all our big plans.

Two days later we set off
again having managed to get some
sort of order in the chaos on board,
This time a gentle following wind
under sunny skies whisked Wan-
derer south and well out into the
notoriously bad Bay of Biscay.
The second gale caught Ler there
A darkening sky, falling barometer
and changeable wind had given
plenty of warning this time and so
we were able to prepare for the
wind and heavy. seas which were
to follow. It is useless trying tc
sail a small yacht against the big
seas and strong wind of a storm
and so we just sat below in the
snug cabin while the worst passed
over.

As soon as conditions improved
sail was made again and the
yacht literally roared down south
before the still fairly fresh wind.

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BILL HOWELL takes his daily bath. while the yacht sails herself

along.
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Ic's tasty and it's good! Marmite is @
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Mear, Fish, Vegetable, Egg and Cheese
dishes a// benetit from Marmite—and so
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In jars: loz.,20z.,
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over too quickly. And nobody
would ever know what had hap-
pened to you, At this stage 1
your thoughts you usually finc
something to do to take your minc
off the gale — if that is possibk
when you are being tossed fron
wave crest to wave crest like som,
sort of a marine table-tennis ball
The best thing I have found is t
listen to the radio or to make ¢
cup of tea or coffee and then tr)
to get some sleep,

After this gale Wanderer re
sumed her course towards th
south, As she approached th
Canary Islands it got noticeabl)
warmer each day. At first ou
jerseys came off one by one, Ther
we gave up wearing two pairs o
trousers and went into shorts
Finally we dispensed with shirt
and would sit up on deck baskin,
in the warm sun,

Nine days after quitting Gibral
tar, Wanderer sailed into the grea
artificial harbour of Las Palmas a
the Canary Island called Gre
Canaria, A two-mile long gre)
cement breakwater. encloses this
port and protection it gives t
visiting ships makes Las Palmar
the most important city in thos:
islands Some ten freighter and
big passenger ships call there eac’
day to ‘ake on coal and fresh pro
visions and this trade has placed
Las. Palmas among the rich ports
of the world.

Continued on Page 10





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TPAGETEN = se It ses Sa are SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



« eee

Brightly Fades The Don wavs”: CUCU Ch

the greatest chance of his career. has nct the means of retaliation, Home BEFORE BU YING A =

———
-







BY O. S. COPPIN





In all history, he pointed out only will always bring feeling into @ from page 9
» three Australians had led a side the game, and in showing their Atlantic Voyage Begins

Perhaps it was fortunate for commended on the same grounds 12 England when older than displeasure the Nottingham spec- With fresh stores on board and EF A R
me that I havé only this week out change of language. Bradman. Blackman was 40 in tators were only what the the water tanks topped up to a

reed “Brightly ‘Fades The Don” Mr, Fingleton has written, in 189!, Gregory (Syd) was 42 in Australian had done in brimming Wanderer sailed out of

by J. H. Fingleton ($3.00 Advo- my opinion a fascinating story of 1912 and Armstrong was 42 in the Jardine-Larwood tour. I the port one week later. She was

= Stationery) although it has a most memorable tour “but — writes #B 3 a aa were fully entitled to bound for Barbados which was

n in circulation for some time throughout the book he has never . ites “Bradman’s accep- show r displeasure and should some 2,700 miles of ocean away

now. failed to impress both on the tance of the again meant not have been coerced from so by the route we would take. The COME IN AND SEE THE =

I consider myself fortunate in mind and the Pagination the ‘hat in his f year he was doing by the threat of Notting big trip had begun by far the . |
the respect that now that I am picture of the great Don Brad- attempting the deeds of his ham losing a Test or by intro jongest we had ever attempted. ¥
reliving the historic Australian man saying his last farewell to ™zaculous youth. Bradman him- te Australian war effort. On ‘board had sufficient pro- ;
tour ‘to England in 1948 so vividly equally famous grounds where S¢lf would not have wanted it If sides take and give visions f ‘Sing! da It was L X 4
described in these pages that at he had risen to fame and had that way but by ‘virtue of his bouncers, there can be nO coM= Jiy tna: the s ty days. estgectee
the same time I am afforded an held it, and was now going to "@me and his records it would be pais. Coee when I was writing 4, im that vorere vs thin
intriguingly retrospective view of taxe his rightful place in the COmStrued as such because a 1946—47 M.C.C. tour take t long but if anything ‘
the International commitments of celebrated company of the Champion must always be a of Australia, I drew attention to happened such as the mast break-
England, Australia and the West Immortals—Grace and Trumper, ©@mpion. He is never allowed the Australian method of attack- ing we would be sure to be strand-
Indies since that time and am Hobbs and Macartney. ’ any latitude, Bradman’s deeds pf ing Hutton, particularly, and ed on the seas for much longer
able to relate this series with r ' youth were such that he id drew the obvious parallel. Most than we wanted to be. The food
what has taken place subse- Honest and Just not hope to surpass them. He of the Australian batsmen in the i her lockers included 350 tins of
quently, There is a refreshing ring of Could gain no more but, indeed, Jardine-Larwood tour took ex- Varieq stuffs, sixty pounds ol

For example in the 1948 tour honesty of purpose and justice Stood to lose much, * ception to > Eee of turn- potatoes, twenty pounds of pre-
it was’ abundantly proven that in Mr. Fingleton’s book and [ , Hammond in his last days in ing the other cheek and wanted Served beef steak and a Spanish

England had no answer to the’ make no,apology for quoting the Australia, was a sad, a tragically retaliation but Woodfull Forty-nine gallons of fresh
sustained speed attack of Lind- very words of Sir Norman S#@ instance of a once-famous firm. In cricket as in all r was stored in nine separate
wall, Miller, Johnston primaiily Birkett in his foreward, since [ Player fallen on evil days. The one side must eet eee and in bottles jammed in
and Loxton on occasions, can find no appreciation that 22me gives and the game takes other on equal terms methods corners and crainies of the

si

could more aptly sum up the ®Way, and in coming to England must be adopted to meet a par- ,

W.L. Tour Successful author’s tort Saas had “again in 1948 ‘Bradman knew ticular state of affairs, Finally , she sailed on towards
The West Indies toured Eng- that he was risking his reputa- on the one the trade-wind belt which at that

land since that time, and poscmrmms tion and what was expected of should that the time of year has its northern]!

although their record was not as
brilliant as that of the Austra-
lians yet it was an eminently suc-
cessful one and on the strength
of the outstanding successes
gained on this tour the West
Indies were unanimously con-
ceded the right to challenge

him. The game of had of freed
nothing more to give Bradman, hold ay §
He had praed the —s on In his. book Mr.
ad tasted every sweetness it had answers the questions—Why hould fter six days at sea
to offer. He must have thought England ‘fail so sadly? How & be ane 2: se Ns

deeply of all this in Australia Bradman stand 7 2 wee

in we were well and 2 a .
before he made his decision to with the giants of the past ‘What earns te ON
tour, because so fittingly and are the characteris! which trade d sailing. Down came

near the Cape Verde Islands. |
winds ions d ust
where our nautical ks said they

;
i
iv

fe

Australia. for world cricket without. the slightest trace of have made~him a superlative ‘® mainsail and up went the twin
supremacy. conceit could have uttered of his cricketer and a great captain. spinnakers. These spinnakers,
The M.C.C. have gone to Aus- cricketing career the sentiments Overhaul Needed though the two of them have a
tralia since then and _ again Keats wrote in 1820. And one final quotation gives combined area of much less than
Australia have established their . Now more than ever seems an insight into his candid appre. te other sails, can be rigged to
supremacy though not as hand- it rich to die, ciation of the tour: — ppr actually steer the ship themselves.
somely and then the West Indies To cease upon the midnight “qt would be wrong for an This made it much easier for the
got their chance of chances, with no pain. Australian touring during an STEW because from then on it was
meeting Australia in 1951—52. Close Fielding English cricket Season to com- not necessary fer someone to be
t is significant too that Fin- | Mr. Fingleton has been very sider that he is qualified to Steering all the time.
gleton’s opinion expressed at the | impartial in his book, For exam- express dogmatic iene as Both Slept At Night

end of the 1948 tour was as true
of the M.CC. as it was of the
West Indies—no answer to &%
bumpers with bumpers or speed or
with speed—and so the West fj
Indies too went down to defeat.

It is with the advantage of J
2 © i } : F pocket. That was the closest he systems because it must be she steadily got further an
1b48 four that fable Yo read tie toy’ de’ He had teen ‘Rick: cHeket can do with a good grere tude ‘ot Barbados. we found the
Peres Sir DONALD BRADMAN. mE Me, He had geen Bich © on oe eS ee i ‘
a ea = ree eae ardson field two yards, two yards haul—and in that opinion I have sunny pale blue skies and clean
which have taken place in Inter- “It is written with the know- bdhind point to Grimmett but tried to take into full account tufts of cloud as you have here
ledge of one who has himself the risk on the leg side is con- the distressing times the Home It got much warmer too and very

ple he does not try to justify the most matters. There is so much Once the yacht was clear of the
very close fielding of Barnes to background to — cricket busy shipping lanes on the east
the batsman. that it cannot be quickly assimi- side of the Atlantic we stop
Of the first M.C.C. match he lated, but of one thing I am con- keeping a look-out all the time
writes that Barnes at short leg vinced. There must be a pretty and both went to sleep at nights.
fielded almost in the batsman’s sudden revision of ideas and _ As the yacht sailed te esis hon









© ‘SEALED UNIT “ae

* DOOR LOCK WITH 2 KEYS
CLOSES AT THE LIGHTEST TOUCH

ee erieket circles since that been ‘in the middle’ on great siderable, Country has known in the past soon we were wearing no clothes
“Bri ghtly Fades The Don” is occasions with all that phrase Mr, Fingleton continues “I decade. at all or perhaps just a pair of

implies. It is full of insight and wrote in my°* little note-book “It is against this backdrop of shorts or underpants when we

not merely another of | those great understanding, replete with there and then that some day the hglish standard that one ‘Went on deck.
vende chioft because of & ikke technical knowledge— nature Barnes would collect something must try to assess the strength Day followed day, one much
ture of & ioe of the subiect and of the wicket, the disposition of in that position which he of Bradman’s twentieth Australian the same as the other, We were
a desire for harmless relaxation, M° field, the resources of the wouldn’t like and that came true team. In one regard I think it completely cut off from the world
* bowling, the quality of the bats- in ¢arnest at Manchester when ranked superior to all other ashore. It did not matter to us RUST PROOF SHELVES

Highly Praised manship, the elements of Cap- Pollard laid him low. Australian teams, and that was whether it was Saturday or Wed~
On the ‘ontrary it is written Sw, ve oa 4 e - akan tg ey gah ie a bet. oe good hesday because there were no
‘ : ay strengths, ai makes up a fieldsman does have an - pitches down number nine, offices for us to attend in the x x x .
fy ee aa ae the fascinating story of a mem- datory effect, and I think Barnes, The tricky pitch at Bradford morning, no newspapers to buy AND MAN Y NEW REEF INEMENTS
established’: author. “His “Cricket orable tour. It is a record of the in this ‘position, was of . great some in indifferent and no places to visit at night.
Crisis” published in 1946 received Matches played, the great figures value in a nuisance capacity light and that is why I qual There was just the sunny sky
the highest. praise from a gréat Who took part in them and ' a throughout the tour, them on a good pitch, In 1905, overhead, the lonely sparkling
master in ‘the art of writing on critical appraisement of the per- Bouncers Syd Gregory was going in to bat seas all around and right in the
cricket. Mr. Neville Cardus formances, but throughout the On the question of bouncers in ®t number eight; in 1921, his middle of it all, the splinter of a
praised the book, both for the book the great figure of Bradman the Nottingham Test—Mr, Fin- nephew Jack regory was num- yacht — our home and the centre
mnanner of -writiig and -for the dominates the scene as he dom= gieton writes:—“One should not ber nine, but t are good of the universe as far as we were
contribution..to. the cricketer’s inated the field on his last tour jeaye this Notttingham Test reasons for believing that this concerned.
library. of this country. , without comment on the bouncers twentieth Australian Eleven had Life on board began each day
Sir Norman Birkett, in his Bradman Could Only Lose and the apology by Sir Douglas "© SUperiors as a batting team with the one of us whose turn it
foreward to “Brightly Fades The Mr, Fingleton does not ignore McGraith and the statement by on a good pitch, though here ‘was to prepare breakfast serving
Don’ refers to Mr, Cardus’ praise the fact that in accepting the Captain Brown. qi in one does well to remember it to the other in bed. It was
for “Cricket Criss” and opines captaincy of the 1948 Australian “Bouncers, especially if they that. some batting reputations ay coe. or rice «with
'°)

cop ogg: ol al tot . stand in the light of a “
ha he ure ; nt ho Kk might: be ‘te im that Bradman had taken: are Unlimited and the other side in English bowling. poor period , mili "a Os rg or bis

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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



WAS down on my luck.
Way down . scraping the bot-
tom. A couple of deals had fallen
through and I found myself in
Paris with a lot of time on my
hands and only the price of a

. beer in my pocket.

I was spending my time and
Hhe beer money at Fouquet's.
ou meet a nicer class of people

sre and they let you read the
) Mewspapers free.

/So I was drinking the beer
ind reading a paper when I came
on the advertisement. One of
ose classified advertisements in
the personal column. And it
yas addressed to Harry Lime,
SHarry Lime being me, I read
"©n with some interest.
=) There was no address, no sig-












ature “Mr. Harry Lime”, it
aid, (“will find a _ business
bpportunity of an extremely

profitable nature in the city of



might have thought
is was one of the boys try-
Ing to hustle me out of Paris
just trying to be funny,
: Wexcept that the advertise-

)/ Ment mentioned Tansier, There
are few places in the world I
n't been to, and Tangier
pened to be one of them,
Tangier is full of money
= I couldn't imagine anybody

iting to send me _ there—

ht in the heart of the free
Bold area, where every second
â„¢ Person is an international oper-

tor—just for a gag.
There are probably more
)) chances in Tangier to grab a fast
*buck than you'll find any place
else in the world to-day, so I
was inclined to take the adver-
tisement a little seriously, of
course, it might have been a
police trap. But one of the only
cities left where they don’t hap-
pen to want me for questioning
is the Port of Tangier. That’s
what sold me,

¢ There was just one complica-
tion. My beer was finished and
with it my financial resources,
How to raise the price of the
ticket?

My eye wandered down the
personal column, and a little be-
low the advertisement addressed
to me was this: “Gentleman
travelling to Tangier. A visit to
the desk of the porter at the
Lancaster Hotel on Rue de Bery
; will repay any businessman
planning a -visit to Tangier who
can whistle a certain tune.”

That didn’t have to be Harry
Lime. But there’s a song: I’m
fond of—one I first heard played
by a zither man. I've been
whistling it for years, and any-
body who knew about me would
know about the song. Anyway,
what could I lose?

I went over to the hotel and
approached the concierge,
whistling my little tune.





He listened. Then he said:
“Ah, yes. I have something for
you Mr. Lime.



TICKET TO TANGIER

And a mystery note
M I TOOK the envelope he hand-
ie ed me. There was nothing on it
‘ but my name. He wouldn’t tell
me where it came from, but in it
there was an airline ticket for
Tangier, 50,000 francs in nice
fresh notes and a letter. The
letter said: “When you arrive
in Tangier, go immediately to El
¢ Mirador Hotel, where a suite is
reserved for you. Afteryyou have
dined, go to the Caballa\cabaret.
Wait there for instructions.”

As I was reading it, the con-
cierge broke in; “Excuse me,
Mr. Lime, but it is 2-45 and your
plane leaves Orly at 3-15. A
limousine has been ordered for
you. It is waiting at the door.”

It was a very pleasant trip,
with a very, very pretty air
hostess on board. Her name was
Patsy Smith, and she was friend-
ly. So friendly that I had no
difficulty in dating her for dinner
and dancing at the Caballa
cabaret after we touched down in
Tangier. I began to wonder.

While we were dancing a

s

Bolton Lane and

Phone 3909

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All- types including Travelling, Dressing
Table, Office, Wall, Bracket and of course
the inevitable Alarm.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

THE LIVES OF HARRY LIME

That Zither Tune Led Me To A Ghost Palace

[Heery Lime, as portrayed by Orsen“Welles in the film
and in the new B.B.C. Series.]

Third Mar.”

rumba, I said: “You're a hostess
on an airline, and you're very
good-looking and there are lots
of good looking hotesses that
dance the rumba. But they don’t
dance that well, ang they’re none
of them that beautiful. Really,
you know, you're almost too
good to be true.”

PATSY’S SECRET
‘You’ve been my guest’
SHE stopped dancing. “It’s

awfully close in here,” she said.
“Why don’t we forget the cham-
pagne you ordered and take a
walk outside?”

“Wonderful!”

As we left the cabaret and
stepped out into the ve.vet dark-
ness, I said: “Patsy, I’m going to
take back that word ‘almost.’
The word ‘almost’ could never
be applied to you. Whatever you
are that’s what you are—com-
pletely. You couldn’t be ‘almost’
anything.”

She shook her head. “You're
wrong, Harry. Among other
things, I’m almost very rich.”

“You must be if you treat all
your boy friends to champagne,”
I grinned. “But what does an
airline hostess get paid—enough
to treat people to champagne?
Even special cases like me? No,
Patsy. It doesn’t make sense.”

She said: “I have to work for
my living. I took this job to pay
the rent, and also because it
brings me twice a week to
Tangier.”

“What do you like about
Tangier? A lot of internationa,
lawyers and private banks, with
streets full of American cars and
grimy characters in nightshirts.?”

Patsy contradicted me, “It is
beautiful, Harry, if you know the
right places. Let me show you.”

She called a taxi and directed
the driver to the Villa Moughetti.

The cab twisted and turned
through the native quarter, and
then, .pretty soon, we were out
in the country, _

Patsy had grey eyes and that
clear powdery gold hair that
makes you think of the ashes of
angels’ wing. I’ve known an
awful lot of girls, but none of
them I ever laid eyes on could
have given Patsy a_ worried
moment.

As we climbed up the moon-
bright hills over Tangier, I for-
got completely the strange busi-
ness which had brought me
there. The advertisement in the
paper, the airline tickec and all
the rest of it. With Patsy in my
arms, and her lips on mine, I
didn’t care why I'd been sent fcr
to Tangier and I didn’t care
who'd done it or what he wanted
from me.





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“The

The cab stopped before the
white bulk of a great silent pal-
ace. Below us the bay looked
like.a set, with all the lights
and the moon on the water.

She

Patsy broke the spell.
“T adore kissing you. You

said:
But we've come

do it very well.
to our destination. Now let’s get

out.”
“That enormous place!” I ex-
claimed. “Are you sure we'll be

welcome?”

“I’m certain of it. Here, You
take the key. You’re my guest,”

I was staggered. “But how—”

She said calmly: “You’ve been
my guest all along. I put the
advert in the paper and I bought
your plane ticket......Come in
Harry. Here’s a flashlight. I’ve
got something to show you.”

“My name is Harry
Lime . .” The suave
voice that film-goers first heard
against the tinkly background
of zither music in the film
“The Third Man” was heard
again in millions of British
homes last week. And listen-
ers thrilled to the new adven-
tures of fiction’s most engag-
ing rogue since Raffles.
Harry Lime died in the

sewers of Vienna. But before
his last clash with the police
he had lived many lives, eacb
of them packed with adven-

ture. Now he is telling the
story of them all—and the
Empire News has secured the
exclusive newspaper rights.
When you hear Harry Lime
on the radio, remember, yon
can read him FIRST in the
Empire News every week.



GHOST PALACE
Held a secret

I FOLLOWED Patsy into the
house. It was a huge place, full
of heavy chandeliers and pretty
spooky-looking because it was
covgred with dustcloths. Ob-
viously the place hadn’t been
lived in for months, Patsy push-
ed open a creaking door,

“This used to be a ballroom,”
she told ine. “Close the curtains
and then we'll turn on the lights
+-+++.You're sure they’re tight
all around? We don’t want the
police to come and start asking
questions,”

“You can say that
honey,” I said fervently.

A switch clicked and the big
room was riooded with light. 1
Saw a piano, about thirty gilt
chairs and a big rolled-up carpet.

“All very splendid and grand,”
I said. “But what particular
item am I supposed to admire?

“The carpet.”

again,

+ torted.

. here for months.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









































I sighed. “I’m not @ connois-
seur, Patsy,” I said. “If you
brought me here to get an ap-
praisal, I'm afraid we're both
wasting our time. I don’t know
anything about carpets.”

She didn’t bat an eyelash
“Do you kfow anything about
heroin?” she asked.

There was a slight pause, and
then I said: “Yes. Heroin is a
drug. It is nasty and habit-
forming, and its sale is con-
trolled by international law.”

“Go on. Tell me more.”

“I don’t know any more. Not
anything to speak of. I don’t
use drugs, Miss Smith.”

“But you sell them,” she re-
“Why do you think I
sent for you? Why do you think
1 brought you here? You're
Harry Lime, aren’t you? Now
stop kidding, and let’s get down
to business.

I said: “First of all, I think
you'd better answer a few ques-
tions, Miss P. Smith, air hostess
. .. What’s your real name,”

“What's it to you?”

I looked at her patiently.
“We'll play it my way, sweet-
heart, or we aren’t playing at all.
You must need me awful bad to
take all this trouble to look me
up and move me here. If you
need me, you're going to co-
operate, and we'll start off with
your real name.”

There was another silence, and
then she said slowly: “Did you
ever hear of a man named
Moughetti?”

“Moughetti! Rico Moughetti!
Yes, I thought the name of this
place was familiar. I met Rico
once in Marseilles and another
time in Casablanca. He comes
from Corsica. Isn’t that gight?”

“He came from Corsica,” she
corrected me. ‘

“You mean ... he’s dead?”

“Yes; I was his wife. I killed
him myself....he wasn’t a nice
man, Harry.”

IT WAS MURDER
For a fortune in drugs

“HARRY LIME doesn’t like
murder, Mrs. Moughetti,” [ said.
“Believe me, he stops at that.
It’s messy, it’s silly—and there’s
no profit in it. Besides Harry
Lime’s mother always told him
not to go around killing people.
She said it wasn’t nice... And
now Mrs. Moughetti, why have
you brought me all the way to
Africa to this empty house?”

“There’s a lot of heroin in that
rug. You know how the drug
traffic works, I don’t.
something new for Rico.
kind of big haul. He must have
had a partner, because he would
not have known how to dispose
of it... I’ve been keeping it
The airline
job I have is perfect for smug-
gling the stuff, but I don’t know
who to take it to. I don’t know
what towns pay the best price
. +. you've got to help me,
Harry.” .

“But what about the police?”
IT asked. “You killed Rico. You
must tell me how you fixed your
‘alibi-some time.”

“So you can blackmail me?
No, thanks. Let’s keep our rela-
tionship on a nice clean business
Jevel.”

A man’s voice chuckled: “Now
that’s the way I like to hear you
talk.”

The speaker — a blond giant
of a fellow—was standing in the
doorway, smiling. His right hand
held a heavy Luger pistol, and
fit was pointed at us unwaver-
ingly.

get in?”
He bowed “Through _ the
door. You left it open... Now

then. Where’s the heroin?”
My memory clicked over, and
I said: “Dr. Bessie .. . that’s
your name ., . You began in
Indo-China, and you _ served
three years in a penal colony in
Brazil. Check?”
THE THIRD MAN
Dies at the piano
HE laughted. “What a detec-
ld make, Mr. Lime.
On Page

tive you wou
e



















—
\
N

Exclusive Shopping Centre

* * * *
DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts.

Y. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts.

ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery.

CARIB SHOP: Carved Mahogany, Native
Barbadian Wares, Indian Bags and Belts.

GREYSTONE GALLERIES: Completely
new Technique, designs and Finishes in
Barbados Pottery.

STANSFELD SCOTT & CO: Wines, Spirits
and Groceries.

THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked
by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts.

BETTINA LTD: Gowns, Lingerie, Gifts,
ete.

CLUB POINCIANA:

Bar,
Guest Rooms. ;

Restaurant,

dressing, Beauty treatment.

Balmoral Gap. Hastings.

<<<

BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hair-



PAGE ELEVEN



Bring Prompt.
BACKACHE get

HEADACHE
R

Wine |s especially valuable after illness.

IN



Y:
{TS FOURTH INGREDIENT 1S QUININE !
‘ANACIN’ is the scientific new reliever of pain, Its secret lies in the
exact blending of three well-proven medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine
and Acetylsalicylic Acid) with a FOURTH ingredient. And this fourth
ingredient, which reinforces the soothing action of the other three,
is QUININE

DO YOU SUFFER FROM THESE P
These are the pains ‘ANACIN' relieves; headaches, colds, toothache,
rheumatism, muscular pains, neuralgia, menstrual pains. And, tes
fourth ingredient, Quinine, brings down feverish temperatures fast t

THEN RELIEVE PAIN.., AT ONCE! :
It costs you very little to buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ANACIN '—enough
to bring you fast relief from one bout of pain. Also in handy boxes
of 20 tablets for the pocket, and bottles of 50 tablets for household use.

ren ii TTT Doctors and dentists in many parts of

the world have welcomed ‘ANACIN’ for

the relief of pain, In Great Britain over
12,000 doctors and dentists recommend this
analgesic and use it in their surgeries |

\\ Wy
=O N
“7111 \\

GET SOME ‘ANACIN’ TODAY
AND ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN

*RMACIN’ in sold in Groat Critain and South Africa under the trade mame ‘ANADIN'





i

_—

“{\

<>

PAINTS
PAINTS
PAINTS

Yes, We Have Them in
Sizes and Colours Too

Numerous To Mention.

JUST SEND US YOUR ORDERS
WE'LL EXECUTE THEM.



CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts,

If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality It fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic



|











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q
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x

°

Wim. FOGARTY (os LD,

THIS WEEK’S SPECIAL ITEMS —

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This assurance is given by the Governer of Education Exam.
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MOTHERS!
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COUGH SYRUP
With Vitamin C
STOPS KIDDIES
COUGHS & COLDS

In a Jiffy

— AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE!

Mothers, you'll bless the day this amazing cough syrup, made especially

for little folks, came down from Canada to save kiddies—your kiddies

from the menace of coughs and colds that hang on and lead to
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‘ .
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JACK and JILL is new but thoroughly tested in thousands of cases

and is guaranteed to relieve
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and JILL is SAFE for the tiniest toddler.

kiddies’ coughs and colds faster than
and most important of all JACK

Another famous Buckley Product

JACK and JILL is a product of the

famous Buckley

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that gave you Buckley's Mixture, Canada's largest selling cough and
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Mixture 's for your own.
and have it handy.

Get a bottle of JACK and JILL TODAY







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several colours ........ .. $3.73 per yd.
ALL WOOL TROPICAL —

SIX SHBGOR 6.22.7... 8 kas i A ee
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OM ee 6 ib viene bid oe ‘ee eo
56” SPORTS TWEED T7120 se
56” LINEN CRASH ..... oh, ec
ELITE PHOTOPRINT :

BOLO Re 4 oe cake koees 6.83 each
SPUN SILK SHIRTS ....._ 6.75 ,,
PENMAN’S

SHORT SLEEVE VESTS 2.42 ,,

MEN’S TWO-TONE

LAP FRONT SHIRTS .. 3.89 ,,
STRIPED

ARROW SHIRTS ...... 7.02 ,,
ALL WOOL SOCKS —

WO CRE MR cei isso A 84c. per pr.

PLASTIC WEEK-END

BAGS 7.85 each

OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO LADIES —

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SOR tae . $67.00 and $71.50 each
48” PLASTIC 3

(Floral designs) ........ $1.38 per yd. 9g
WHITE CURTAIN §

NETS ........ From 37c, to 65c. , 5
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NETS ...... From 98c. to $1.87 ,, 5
48” FOLKWEAVE $1.84 ,, 5
48” TAPESTRY SUNS 456%

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SILK-TONE FOUNDATION IS AIRY-
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breathe freely, yet at the same time it protects
the skin from wind and weather.



SILK -TONE FOUNDATION is really a
second skin, concealing while correcting minor
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SILK-TONE FOUNDATION can be used
on every type of skin with perfect results. It
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6.6, 6.6. 6,6 L466 46 66 6,66 656
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s

4



PAGE TWELVE

Freight Cost Lessened
@ from page 11

By Processing Medicinai aly trim iate
Produets In Trinidad 22). 252 soc 3

SUNDAY ADYOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

Asthma, Bronchitis Coughing,
Choking Curbed in 3 Minutes

Do you have aft J. R. had Jost 40 Ibs., suffered cough-







The Lives Of Harry Lime <.°°° °°”.
. pegular





ed. You can carry it
is—in the rug.”

“No thanks. I hate to. stoop.
Why don’t we leave it whete it

just as it

s of Asthma or



Ctenéhitis so bad that you choke | ing, choking and strangling ever)
wintich. 46 , % Se ‘ ant sleep? _cotldn't sleep, expected to die
1 said: “You'll find the heroin is?” ENO’S tanbhilie. 0 Bad. thar at sleep? | Bight, com
is idave ie - 7 rie =" ' ; r . a vec ee MENDACO stopped Asthma spasm

IN Barbados for the Easter holidays is My. Morris J in the piano.” ‘And give up 100,000 dollars take 10,5 ie gp ard you feel ike MENDACO st upped Asthine. seam:

Rogers, Governing Director of Rogers and Howe Ltd., “In the piano? This is prob- worth of heroin? “Are you \ } teal Fak Bn 8» ork and have in oe en
: P 5 ’ ‘ yf f.. ic ; " * i ta be omrese ee Come ae Money Back Guarantee

manufacturing chemists of Port-of-Spain who are now ably a trick, but——” crazy?” i . : } fa : s? hes
establishing : pioneer industry for ne manufacture of Still talking, he moved to- A siren wailed outside, and | 5 | vit Kas Bar ie og Suiekcae tee very Arst dose of MENDAC



goes right to work circulatin:
through your blood and helping n-«
ture rid you of the effects of Asthma

whispered urgently; ‘The police!
Douse the lights, honey!”

wards the piano.
my eye on you,

“I'm keeping

medicinal and pharmaceutical products. title .::. How

fered’ or, what, you have tried, there
. w hope f you in a Doctor's







: -, , Trini eription called M ‘Oo i ‘ -
He arrived on Friday by B.W.1.A. from Trinidad ac- then, ..” She stepped to the switch and . om 1 beipiha. 7 In no tins at sh BERDACO in
companied by his wife and is staying at the Hotel Royal. A second later his voice came pressed it. In the same second | ‘uizer.. All ¥BG, do is take t

yy} and stronger. Try MENDACO under
an fron-clad money batk guarantee.
You be the judge. If you don't feel

sharply; “There’s nothing here. I grabbed her. gun-hand and |

teless tablets at ineals and you
have you ——” twisted it smartly.

icks geet ta.vapish like magic. In
Mr. Rogers told the Advocate What k m Love i
























= $ j : minutes MENDACO starts work-| , teh oo es 6a, on¢
yesterday that they have a fran-“] Patsy snapped: “Put up your “That’s better,” I said. | | wit thru sour blood aiding nature foie w eaGd tee caer a me
chise to manufacture and distri- « hands, Bessie! I’ll shoot if. you ‘“We’ve got darkness, gid I’ve | :9, dissolve, Hil FOmore y preathing | DACO just return the empty pack-
bute Northrop and Lymang don’t!” A small autorfatic sot the gun. You're too .impul- | TPR HR gourd, sleep the first night Me eepaad UEP MER DACO tron
soroducts throughout the Carib- backed up thb threat, sive for firearms, Mrs..Mough- | 20 that you soot feat years younger your Chemist foday and ses. how
an and the Central and South Bessie snarled: “What? You ° ¢tti. ‘ } nd stronger. . well you sleep tonight and how mucit
American countries, The products ” The siren grew louder. Some- | Ne Asthma in 2 Yours hetter you will feel tomorrow. The
they make include Canadian The two guns blazed together. body hammered on the main! ine MDACO Bet gay brings omens Mendaco''.
Healing Oil, Roberts Syrup and Then Bessie coughed once and 0or,of the bouse, . s niit, ip tig aystem to ward) | ch F
Kellogg's Asthma Remedy. crumpled over the piano. The »Jabbing tae d atic into icks, Por instanee, Mr. | Ends Asthma. a Bronchitis w& Hay Fe
As far as the location of the Luger clattered to the floor. re Pheri peas — eae Uae ann ttn EERE
plant is concerned he said that “Well, well,” I said. “Very ‘inured: “Your hus! ilt a 5 t
Trinidad was chosen principally quick 1 must say. Congratula- ice house, but it’s. getting & bit | ching urn ng an mar nig G
because of the conveniegge of tons!” overcrowded. I‘think we'd het- | ’
Shipping in addition to the coun- Patsy said coolly: “He should [er Scram .. . just eos te ect |
try being the centre -for plane have kept his eyes on both of us, ahead of me, . Motighetti, |
‘connections in all directions. and nobody could do that... “— re ee any ig funny,” Sparkling ENO’S “Fruit Salt” fitst
' Local Help is he dead?” e made our out into ont norning freshens FOli ip bot
The cofhpany will be manned “I -wouldn’t ktiow, Mrs. the garden. The cops were. all nis 2 Lod morning feshews Soa i sy
by technicians and chemists from Moughetti. I haven’t asked him. over the place, and a a while mentally and physically. It clears ead,
the home office in Toronto, but We'd better get out of here.” it was clear that our only hope cleanses and refreshes the motith, rettioves ai}
local help will be employed “Take the heroin,” shé.order- Was in separating. whispered: symptoms of liverishness. ENO S$. cbntaitis 0 p D @ n
wherever possible, teh and tha avin ee “Patsy, you go through the no harsh purgatives. Its gentle laxative action
Asked what prompted his aa ind od a FAs spoon Me Po : oan aside tii “Foi pid to | is non-habit-forming. ENO’S is suitable 4 0 M s
company to rt the project eh = cons é p 8 y “ in aris. eate fi ; Pa ind es
the Wate Indi : Mire Ropers sald will no doubt reflect in the lower the town. You can’t miss it” for delicate stomachs, sate for children at eo.
that it. was due to the high rate cost of medicinal products com- “Yes, but what about the invalids. Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy. inae tha discovers, of Mixederm by ap
of exchange on Canadian Cur- ra i. i. ‘ heroin? coplean physictiter from ugly, disgusting
rency which made importation of e said that the advantages to Pr . 4 disfiguring skin bl ig such as
medicinal products from Canada be derived by the Trinidad Gov- hb Ye ody 1 aoe PR a nema, -Fimpies ned Riagnera Toad
almost prohibitive. Mr. MORRIS J. ROGERS ernment will be purchases of Moughetti Just 7 wae! iae's notches, Don't let a bad tin make you BEFORE
The only solution for any i , Taw materials, employment of a joke. hon Yor “anh la h t Sere at akin, Cals Daw eclentific to clear your skin—t! eee we oun
American or Canadian menu- ils are available in this area.” jocal labour and their ability et we ~ Lad ‘ay, ar Ee Giabeet,

at it later when you catch your

facture to overcome the aiffi- plane to Dakar.”

vy. and don’t Jet.a bad skin make people | yon oe more. attracfive,

has brought
ink you are. diseased, = ae f thousands, such as Mr

clearer,
processing these prodiicts

to earn dollars through the sale



: s almost like a minutes. I could see my skin clearing up
estimated that 15 or 20% of their feels, alirios ~

° ° ‘

i here he said that it would save A New Discovery R. K. who writes: “I suffered from terribly
pe agp? as peat cor.siderable freight on account iit ite aaa Of course they got her. Took A Fru it Salt Nixederm 1s, an Ola et a eee or | 19 vests, Tt very hing. Ae ast 1 hea‘
area es! manufac ‘ & ) a hard currency countries, her off the plane on the return ‘ om any ointment you have ever seen or | 12 years. Tried everything. / hing in 1
turing plants here in the Car- of not having to pay the freight Mr. Rogers said that it is run to Paris Somebody tipped i or ELY chew discovery, and is not greasy | of Nixoderm. It stopped the itching in 10
ibbean,” he said, “because the up to Canada on the raw mater- -r . bey

és

paar when you

fais ¢ Pil ; the police off about that murder. * ly tt It penetyates rapidly into the pores | on the second day. All yA kushgaring
i considerable amount of raw isis and the freight back to the factory output will be consumed [It's what you might call the SPECIALLY ae eae eat Burlace ingredients miotclety friends were, amaze at the im-
‘ materials which they use in Caribbean on the finished pro- locally and the balance for export






‘wages of Lime .. . that’s anoth-
er joke, but you don’t have to
Jaugh at it. I'll do the laugh-
« ing.

provement in my appearance.”

Satisfaction Guaranteed

Nixoderm costs absolutely nothing unless
it clears your skin to your complete satis

duct,
This expense will be elimina-

s. Nixoderm
ich fight skin troubles in these 3 ways.
Zz it fights and Kills the microbes or para-
2 : | s often responsible for skin. disorders.
| for IRREGULAR ACTION, it stops itehing, burning and. smarting
7 to 10 minutes, and cools and soothes

* their basic manufacture such

RECOMMENDED
. aS sugar, alcohol and essential

of which approximately 40% will
currency countries.

go to hard





0 Ae) od






















; SICK HEADACHE, skin, 3. Tt helps natyre heal the skin | faction, Get Nixoderm from your gpemalst
bth bo soft and velvety smooth. ' y. Look in the mirror in the ,

| You see, what Patsy didn’t BILIOUSNESS, Oe Works Fd and you will be amazed at the improvement.
know was that I’d picked up the INDIGESTION, ete. Ther just keep on using Nixederm for one

cecatise Nixoderm is scientifically com-

Â¥l



: : f that time it must
rug in the darkness and hid it iuided “to Aght skin troubles, it works Wise Sid Be eee Oe Sort tleat, amioott

J > ter than any ng you have seen in ¥ : 1 ractive— t give yor
et nag bushes just outside the Sold in bottles for before, It stops th Rehing, burning aud | 284 magnefically attractive —must give sor




7 that will ms
I came back later and | the kind of skin that v



raring in @ few minutes, then, starts to | iiteq wherever you go, or you slinply re






| In Tangier I found myself Y fasting freshness. Ke dmmediaeys faane | | turn the empty package find your money
| ‘angling with a lovely girl ‘sty amioetly. 1°) just 4 day_or two your | Will be refunded in full, Get. Nixederm f:0
and a haul of dope. eee cof will tell you that here at last is the | your Chemist today, The guarantee protec



The words “ NO” and“ FRUIT SALT” are Regiss s2/1/3

Of course, the word io 7
was out about Rico’s big con-

red Trade Marks allfle *ee-*ment you have been needing | you.

collected it.





SS

But, honestly, I don’t approve |
of drugs. That’s why IT threw!
the original stuff into the Bay !
of Tangier and delivered seven |
nicely-wrapped packages of con- |
They tell me




fectioners’ sugar.







you can get the habit for that, , }
: ve iiss eae ALAM HEAVY-DUTY BATTERYE |) ==
except for one thing—that is | Luncheons
ee IN COMES nice little prayer rug it was :

wrapped in. I know it didn’t

| Visit the beauty spot of the island
i Rooms with or without _
ons for wer /{} private bath. : ”

| We specialise in Fish



Dinner».



|

|

!
signment and I had no trouble |
getting a good price in Mar-
seilles the next week. |
















belong to me, but it looks very |
nice here in front of my tea-
table. Areal powerhouse!
Will you have milk or lemon
with your tea? And how much Longer life! |
sugar? This is the very best wer
brand, you know .. . a syndicate More po !
of desperate gangsters paid me Quicker, more
50,000 dollars for only seven |
; mines ae ase package. ct ihe same quality. dependable starts |
OF THE HATLO HAT e 4 | even in the
Harry Lime recounts another of |
his remarkable adventures He weather.



calls it “The Golden Fleece.”




Restore Youthtu q
To Glands in 24 Houis

~~ New Discovery Brings Pleasures
, of Life to Men Who Feel Old
' Before Their Time

Do you feel older than you
Tacking. jn youthful snimat
oy the society of beautiful womer
you suffer from lc
ory and body
jokly skin, depre
other words, are you or a
1f your body is devitalized and exhaust
pd, there is no need for you to suffer ar %
pther dav from such Bhysical inferiorit
because the discovery of an emir
cian now makes {t possible for y
store your youthful vigour and a

Youthful Viaor Restored
The penaltics of advancing are and the
resuits of over-ind . ow O-
jarded and vouthful a t 1 anir '
tored to 4 t t
disco





| ESSO STANDARD OIL
_R. M. JONES & CO.—Agents























O50 28 ne 8 oe ee



24-Hour Resuits
Vi-Tabs



Results Guarantecd

and
ean, re
“Many &
the épir
true secret of + Tob
vigour and vit
in the glands. I
my many year
perience, = study
ractioe, it is my
ion that the

BG

fa im

hee ait.

TED} i
/




1 take an interest in
te and how you are able
ver hefore






he
oe



And if for any reason 5

at Vi-Tabs is easily worth

formula known as snvall cost, merely return

Tebs represents kage and the tall purchase

most modern and scien- e will be refunded without question or

! tifle Internal method of sument. Get Vv bs from your chemist
Stimulating and invig- " » Quagentee protects you

} ug ® ToR
Guara zteed Manhood. Vitality
i POPFROOSSSOESSS SSS SSSOSO

FOR
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES

including: —



the



ee en ee





OOO

BELTING, in Leather, Camel Hair, and Canvas-stitched
BELT FASTENERS, OIL CANS, PRESSURE GAUGES
GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
FILTER CLOTH, — WHITE COTTON TWILL
SUMALOID and RITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walls)
ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES

For “EVERITE”

NOT ALL THE PAINT, ONLY THE BEST!

AVAILABLE NOW

Charles Me Enearney & Co.. Ltd.

Paint is one of the big items in
Builders’ Hardware and we always
will be G.H.Q. for the best; B-H
Paints are right there, and here

ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, &

RIDGE CAPS



Send your orders to - - - - |

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

4528 A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

cy

|

Phone: |
Park Road.

“ mm)
. SSSSCSS9SSSS ee

White
}.B0OSSS999555555968S55466650566



Fh FAS eB as eH
é ‘ ‘





«

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
| ee ce RS ec a eR 2

JACK OUTSMARTS THE GIANT | same Royall |





You can't resist that
wonderful flavor @

So smooth. So delicious! And 99 good for
you, too. No trouble to

prepare . . . just follow
the simple directions
on the package. 3
wonderful flavors —






HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ,





















vanilla, chocolate
and butterscotch.















Sees idk tn aii ep EDA PERE A EEE Ms



= ed
7 I
a Y— |
Once upon a time Jack planted a seed, until he reached the top. Suddenly a i Why me, sir, when
very powerful seed, that grew into a giant cried, “Here's a tasty orsel fo ‘ Rk | Be cotch Pud
I bean stalk, So tall that Jack decided my dinner.” But Jack was smart. H So Giant tried it and tiked
climb it. Up and up he went pulled out some Royal Pudd: uch be gave Jack all nis gold






WHAT 1 OUGHT TO 20 iS MARCH " .
YOU STRAIGHT TO THE CAPTAIN. , YOU'RE OKAY - SO

(li TAKE A COWANCE.



By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

ually
GF ECOPAL parnllr

sordons

Stands Supteme s











AN ° ,
A os THELES, §
AS ih ono



























THATS NO FAIR-- GRABBING
THE SOFA WHILE I ANSWER
THE PHONE



OKAY, FRED,
THANKS FOR
CALLING --

\( WAIT, DAGWOOD, HOLD
) THE PHONE=MY WIFE
WANTS TO TALK

4 Ti > iN }
BMW: BLONDIE NOW
MN “
Reh AD
(FPP
x. |
a

s )
\
\

























































SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

: Usually Now Usually Now

Tins KLIM (5-Ib)

ABOVE THE
R OF THE



aN OT, IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
f Tee aevroe 10 sucreR! JZ Ger Nae AND fp SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
COMES TOA STOP F ; ’ S di / ~

HE DOOR GLIDES
OPEN, AND...



beeen eeey oy G4 5.60 Sia PRA Oe pe aa .20

Tins ORANGE & GRAPEFRUIT

JUICE .. e"., oe 30 27 Pkgs SATEN ICING SUGAR .... © Al 36



Bots. HARTLEYS MARMALADE _ .42 38° Tins MEAT LUNCH ...........+.



(s

+ THE BANDAGED GIRL ce l...16 THE GAL THAT'S TRYING LNs
\S... WEE LAURIE! 3 tg TO MARRY WEE DORRIE Z..AND }ie"e}=
“WELP.. W-L"/ NOW ~ 9) //| | BUT THEN WHO...WHO... WHY ? GOT TO GET TO THE
WHY WOULD A STRANGE GIRL ‘ ’ ri €

. BOTTOM OF THIS...GET TO
INA SANATORIUM WRITEAN = &* ER" D> WEE DORRIE..

$.0.5.,USING WEE LAURIE" :
INITIALS ? UNLESS...
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t = 0

5
af

GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH ——

THAT'S RIGHT- GOLLY- YOU MUST BE RIE f THAT'S WHY

JiGGS~-I'M TIRED OF EATING OUT 2 A I'M STILL A

STILL A ALL THE TIME - WHY = BACHELOR

BACHELOR / DON'T YOU COME TO | ——
c 4

|
Se
a 1 Pe :

_
i

RIP KIRBY

Y OH, RICKY, DARLING ...WE’VE WHATEVER YOU Bia
— DANCED EVERY NIGHT THIS WEEK...| | SAY, SWEET... Ase
IT WAS I NEED SLEEP... TAKE ME HOME...
AGRAND SHOW, 00 YOU MIND ?
MONICA...NOW LET'S -
POLISH OFF THE

NEAR HIM. YOUR
my MYSTERIOUS GUIDE |
GETTING MORE





C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS





ES SOS PPE AI LERNER ESTER Ueno 5 eM MPRA TR NN A TE 2 AS PT,







PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. ===















SUNDAY ADVOCATE

AUCTION PUBLIC NOTICES

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER











































TELEPHONE 2508 By instructions received I will sell at
a __HOUSES | Mesars Plantations Ltd. Building, NOTICE
DIED . BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, |Chapel Street, on Tuesday, April th, a . oes :
} n "9 q , r consulied at my office over
* FOR SALE perfect bathing, qaiet. All meals ree Vien eon tae. on Comins Ltda. “Quring the week from 10
DOTTIN—On April Sth, 1952, at her resi- services Supplied from main house, Own |) *F* S am. t 4.30 p.m, except Thursday by
dence Gall Hill, St, John, Jenetha Dot-} ___.__ Telephone. Suitable married couple, |* pr vinchiée. Guiieees: skieiay senuaet

tin. Age 45 years, Her funeral leaves $25.00) per day American Plan for two Auctioneer.{ These rumours of my retirement are

the above residence at 4.30 p.m. for St AUTOMOTIVE eople. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or 5.4.52—3n. J absolutely false. .

John’s Parish Church . ‘ phone 0157. 14,.3.52—t.f.n. ‘nail —- N. L, MITCHELL, D.D.S
Sylvia and Ena (daughters rle an | 6.4. 52—in.
Daphne (grand-children), Velda, Le-} — oo An—one (1) 10 H.P, Austin; FLAT—One (1) Furnished Flat at Dun- UNDER THE SILVER
otta and Beresford Howell Van in good working order: Phone | dee, St. Lawrence, suitable for two only, HAMMER ,

SHEFHERDTON Apr ain Adelina, | 4821, D. V. Scott & Coy, T4d, 4 |). | from May Ist onwards. Phang GoM, | | on Tuesday #th by order of Mrs. A. |THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE
“wife of Charles E. Shepherd of I | | A Thar, we will seid ner fuzniture at ASSURANCE SOCIETY.

Colleton House, St. Peter “CAR: F fair conditior JOUSE—In Bedford Avenue, Upper |“Mannings House" Holetown, St. James, 7
Peacefully, in London, following ~ ae J ollie satuaed "Apply: jay Bay Sthect “prom ist May. Dial 8685. {which includes:—Bergére Settee and 3 ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING
an Spereres, 6.4.58—2 Edghill, Kirton, St. Philip 6.4. 52—2n 5.4.52—2n.|Arm Chairs, Dining ane ie ok 2 a CREE ss hereby om that, the one

a. . celina ——}| upright Chairs, Mir ‘atstand, in en early n
XAR—One Morris 8 H.P. touring in “LA PAZ”, Derricks, St. James, house | Tables all in mahogany, Glass, China etal Meeting of the above-named
THANKS wen good condition, good tyres. | contains 2-sided. verandah, drawing. |Pyrex Ware, Tea Services, Vases, Jar- jety will be held at the Swciety’s
Phone 2825 6.4.52—1n. | dining, 2 bedrooms (one with runuing|diniere and Fruit Stands in Cromium, | Office, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on
GILL—The undersigned gratefully re-| ————________—— | weter), kitchen, W.C. & bath, Servants |}Lemonade and Cock-tail Sets; Pits. | Friday, 25th April, 1952, at 2 o'clock p,m.

turn thanks to all who attended the CAR—Austin A-40 Car Done only om, enclosed yard Good Laocality,| Casseroles, Soup and Fruit Spomns, | for ti purpose of:—

funeral, sent wreaths, cards or letters! 7,000 miles, Dial 4161-2210. T H. | Good "bus service. Dial 247. R. Archer|Cutlery &c. Binoculars, Oil Paimtings a) eiving from the Directors their
of sympathy or in an other we Davis 5.452—3n. | McKenzie 6.4.52—Ir | end Tictures; Planter’s Desk, Congolium, Report on the transactions of the
rendered assistance in their udden {| ————_—— — ——— } Pine Double Bedsteads, Spring Mattress; society for the year ended ist









a :
CABE—One 1934 Chevrolet Car; Sedan, |

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952




















| TENDERS are invited for the rights

tc sel liquors and refreshments at the

Local Athletic and Qycle Sports meeting LOST nT ‘s
to be held at Kensington Oval on ~— es HAMMOND
| Thursday, 17th April and at the 3n :
tercolonial meeting to be held May 3ist,] _ BRACELET—One Identification

June 2nd and 5th Bracelet engraved, Wilson”,

Tenders must reach the Secretary of between C. F. Harrison's Office and Bar- Boylston, St. James
|the Amateur Athletic Association of) >@rees Hill, Finder will be rewarded

| Barbados, P.O. Box 36, not later than
7th April 5.4.52—2n.

(Tel. 0192)

by returning same to L. A. Wilson c/o
Harrison's Office, Broad .
5.4.52—3n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

|\ROVAL N LOPISCPIOLOIOS,
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | §*720#+ssessses@eees

\ STEAMSHIP CO. Aru win accept Cargo "and
only



and everybody to
with his effort to

Funds for St. John the
Baptist Church to clear
off the debt on the new
Vicarage.



95





-

SAILING FROM EUROPE | end Ardea, and. Semana cate i like Old
M.S. HECUBA, on 4th April 1 ior St. Vincent; Tuesda: . *
S.S. BOSKOOP on lith April 1952 &th inst. ~lothes, Household Uten:
M.S. BONAIRE on 18th April, 1952. The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will sils, Books, Toys, Orna-

M.S. STENTOR on 2nd May 1952.
SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND
AMSTERDAM

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and

ments and _ especially











bereavement occasioned by the pass- “MARISTOW", Maxwell Coast, furnish- | Folding Spring Cot; Jalousie and Folding December 1951 ;
ing of ‘Lucille Adelaide Gill, late of | mechanically perfect, Apply BE. Atherley led, refrigerator and telephone includ-|sereens; Verandah Chairs; Go Cart, (2) Electing Directors and an Auditor
Round House, Bay Street Eagle Hall. . 2.4.52—4n.| ed. For further details, Phone 8511. Ware Press, Coal Stove, Linen, Lawn for the current year.
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Brathwaite, | 6.4.52—In.| Mewer, Garden Tvols and other
Doris, May Gill, Jane Millington, CAR—FORD PREFECT. One second | items. , c. K. BROWNE,
Thelma, Mary ‘and Joan Brath- | hand ™p Prefect in good working| MODERN FURNESS. Re. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH! | ORE Secretary.
waite. order. pply Barbados Agencies, Tel-| Silver and Linen. =I a. *
6,.4.52—1n. |'ephone 4908. 14.52—6n. | For further particulars. Apply to Alma BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., Bridgetown,
—_—— —- ~ | Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing. Auctioneers. 6th April 1952.
SHILLING FORD—On behalf of the CAR—Morris 8 H.P., 1936 model. Good 23.2.52—t. 4.4.52—2n. 1 6.4.52—3n



relatives of the late Vernie Shilling-













working order, 30 miles to the gallon. |



































ford (recently of Roseau, Dominica) | Price $350.00. Apply: Clyde Hinds,| OFFICE BUILDING At “Brigade
the undersigned desire to express | Deacons Road. 5.4.52—2n. | House,” facing Garrison savannah, now
thanks to all who in any way ren- | -—--—— — occupied by Dr. Gardiner. Apply C OVERNMEN TI
dered assistance in the sudden CAR—FORD MERCURY. One second|E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Dial 2631.
bereavements hand Ford Mercury, 1942 model, new) Or 3020, 5.4.52-—4n.
HOWEL D. SHILLINGFORD upholstery and in good working order. ee 2
6.4.52—In. | Apply Barbados Agencies, Telephone; SPAC Suitable for storing g@ods etc not os i : 7 at
ie i cindonsn | 14.52—6n,| Apply: K. R. HUNTE & CO., «TD Applications are invited for appointment to the post of Olerk
SIMMONS—The relatives of the late; — ——- | Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611 Peasants’ Loan Bank.
Laura Lorenza Simmons of *“Martin- CAR Hillman Sedan 1951 model in 3.4.52—4n ‘ Ne ; : i : ssessio' rt
dale," ‘Hastings, — gratefully return | perfect condition. Done only 6,000 miles, | —————_____________ | = 2, Connie ar mn a ip pre n of a School Ce
thanks to all who attended the funeral, | Ring R. S. Nicholls, Office 3925. Home| RESTAVILLE Gibb’s Beach, St. |tificate or a certificate of equivalent standard.
sent wreaths, cards or letiers of sym- | 8324 ’ 1.4.52—t.f.n, | Peter. for months June-July, Oct.— 2 te. . similar t hat of the
pathy or in any other way rendered | Dec. 1952 Phone 2818. 2.4.52—2n. 1 3. ie soley oe fae ees es wik eg oS
them assistance in their’ bereavement CARS—Hillman:; new 1952 model, DOVER | serene mennsresseneys —— ——— ong grade in e Loca ivi ablishment, col Zz
Ercil, Dr. T. A. Howell (St Lucia) | used; also 1951 Hillman Estate Car Pie ROOSEVELT—Maxwell coon moes salary of $768.00 per annum,
vy a ° 43987 Home, 4917 Office: Greenidge Pull furnished, including rigidaire, .
Aiwye, Breet 6.4.52—1n | are mT 6.4.52—2n.| Telephone and Rediffusion. Available 4. This post is of a temporary nature, non-pensionable, and sub-
feta ———— oo | 1st May. Phone 2224, 44,.52—t.f.n.| ject to termination with one month’s notice on either side.
CARS—One 1947 Mercury Car, perfect) -——— - —_—— —— . é 4 : ‘ ¥ ae
IN MEMORIAM condition. One Fluid Drive Dodge Car.| SUNSET VIEW — Furnished sea-side 5. Applications in writing, with testimonials, will be received
AGARD—1 said tT our | Apply to Cosmopolitan Garage, Maga-| Bungalow, at Rockley 3 bedrooms and by the Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank, Pinfold Street, St. Michael,
In constant memory of 0 », . e all nveniences, Dial 2455 j ——on,
dear mother and grand mother Mabel | Fim® Lane. Phone ats 5.4.62—5n. | eee ee 7 5.4.52~2n. | UP to the 15th April, 1952. 6.4.52—3n.
Agard, who was ealled to rest on the
Cth a ae, | ae. CARS—Minor Two-Door Saloon like
o |
To-day brings back sad memories, new. Minor Tourer. 7,000 miles, Morris | ‘
NOf a loved one Kone to teat” | Cond Miioge very goed senate | FP UMRLIC SALES PART ONE ORDERS
~~ oe Sooea her tebe Dodge (1938) two-seater, excellent e . . By
“UP. d 1 )
Fe ABMS fenly. Sedan” 16000. thiles, Suitable for | hire REAL ESTATE Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, 0.B.E., ED.
6.4.82—In. ) Durposes. Wolseley (1947) 8 h.p. saloon Commanding
| ee ar tierra aw viman 415000 miles, in very good condition HAROLDVILLE, PERRY'S GAP, The Barbados Regiment a te
ANNOUNCEMENTS, Por. Prefect, 17,000 mites. very fine RORBUCH, STEEST Issue No, 14. $ ap



Shop in Comfort at the Mayfair Gift
Shop, where you will find local hand-
‘work and interesting aifts for all.
Open daily 10—12 a.m, 4-—-6.30 p.m.
Up to date Library.

6.4.52—t.f.n.

WANTED
HELP

ASSISTANT MANAGER — Montserrat
Company Limited require married man
as Assistant Manager. Experience man-
agement livestock essential, also ability
to manage cotton lime estates. House
provided, Apply stating experience and
salary required to Box 221, Plymouth,
Montserrat, B.W.I. 3.4.62—6n.

BUS DRIVERS—Apply to
Motor Omnibus Co. Ltd.,
Road, St. Michael,

TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket
Hands) only those with experience need
apply. P. C. S, MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

26.3.52—t.f.n.

YOUNG LADY Requires position as
Governess or Companion to travelling

—_—









parties, Write: ILM.G. C/o Advocate.
2,.4.52—8n,
MISCELLANEOUS

ONE EMAL. INCUBATOR to purchase.

Contact McKenzie 4536, from 8 to 4 and
after \. 5.4,52—5n



TANK—Second-hand 250 gallon capacity
galvanised iron tank required urgentjy,
suitable storing fuel oil, Full details to
Box A.P. c/o Advocate Co.

5.4.52-—2n.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned
giving credit to my wife, IONE Hi b
(nee INNISS) as & do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-















At 2 p.m., Friday, 18th April
This very comfortable Dwelling house
situated in a well established residential
area and yet within walking distance
of Bridgetown, comprises Drawing and
Dining rooms, three large and one small

condition. FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd
Telephone 4504, 2.4.52—6n

—

MOTORCYCLE—5 h.p. O.H.V. Twin.
Model A-7; New Battery; Engine recently
overhauled. Done 17,000 miles: like new.







1. PARADE—TRAINING
All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. at 1700 hours on Thursday 1th April,
1982. H.Q. Coy.--Interior Economy—Checking kit—Q.M. to be present—
(All ranks are required to bring all articles of clothing and equipment issued).
“A” Coy.—Tent Pitching—Demonstration by R..9.M.(1). “B” Coy.—will do





























* hedrooms, breakfast room, pantry,
$500 P| D. Johnabny Wortsants. ae Kitchenette, toilet and bath and wash 2 oO corte
toom;\with a double servants room in Band practices will be held on Mon. 7, Wed, 9 and Thurs. 10 April 52.
yard, stands on 8879 square feet of land SIGNALS—CGOURS!
ELECTRICAL le ene aual eter ti oe eaalot All N.C.O’s of the Signal Platoon will attend a signal N.C.OQs course to be
aes eng ae St ma held on Mondays and Wednesdays of each week at 1700 hours commencing
Saturdays on naays. on Monday 7th April, until further notice.
For further particulars and conditions 2. ANNUAL CAMP
COOLERATOR—One (1) Coolerator in|of sale, Apply:— r ‘the Annual Camp will be held at Walker's, St. Andrew from Friday 13 to
perfect order Phone 3305. HUTCHINSON & Srey Sunday 22 June 52. All ranks who are able to attend and have not yet handed
5.4.521n, ” $.459-—-6n, in their names should inform the R.S.M. as soon as possible
ee eel vlna EANT r ENDING
LIGHTING PLANTS: Two (2) D.C. FOR SALE 3 oe eee AND ORDERLY SERJ FOR WEEK
K ah ik Bos an ering "Yl at our Office, No. 17 High Street, on Orderly Officer Lieut, Ge G. Peterkin
ee por €.4.52--2n,| Friday the 16th instant at 2 p.m Orderly Serjeant 381, L/Sjt. Robinson, V. N.
aL UPLAND, ard Avenue, Belleville, acing Next for duty
[ha reerme A tele Mine 7. 4.| residence of the late Archdeacon Shan Orderly Officer Lieut. T. A. Gittens
ECE 9S Spee ets land) with land attached containing Orderly Serjeant 234, Sjt. Williams, E. D
ee oe cee fer, Pho > 8332. 11,398 square.feet. The house contains M. L. D. SKEWES-COx, ie
any geasonable offer, we 5.4.52--2n, | Drawing and Dining rooms on the ground _L SOLT yo ne
i, » ‘| floor, 3 Bedrooms upstairs and usual ‘Phe Ba Regiment
cn | offices Garage for 1 car nspection rbados
" oo a ca tan wok va on application at the house amy day ex- PART Il ORDERS
eee eee tuncnt PG. S. MAPFET | CePt Sunday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 13
S G6. Lan Dar ae COTTLE, CATFORD & Co —-
Co. | Ad, Dis ; 9400-% 6.4,52—7n. | 1. LEAVE—SICK
ee 584, Drmr, Hurdle, S. O. H.Q. ca Granted 4 weeks S/Leave wef
A OMe AM One Radioaramn (Phileo) | vANDs.0 square feet of iand at 3 April 52.
aS ae ae Wa a a. (Paitca) Sobers Lane, Bridgetown, adjoining|2,. PROMOTION : 7
Going “Cop ates . * ¢a.sa—in | lands belonging to the estate of T A. M9, L/Cpl. Greaves, W. I. ) The marginally named, ore
stl Herbert, (deceased). 510, L/Cpl. Gardner, M.S.) “B" QOay. promo! Corporals wef
ce ree J The abeve will-be set up for sale to S48, L/Cpl. Tella, C. A » 1 April 52.
phBERIGERATOR — General Electric | public competition on Friday, the 16th| 3, STRENGTED RESIGNATION
etrigerator Sean PATS peeve Roebuck | day of April, at 2 p.m. at the Office of 414, L/Cpl. Weatherhead, H.R. “B" Coy. Permitted” to fesign from the
ape ores, ae eer ne eee | the undersigned, Lucas Street, Bridge- t Regiment wef 3 April 52
were we ae a town * Q
oe CARRINGTON & SEALY, BD. OO, Micr.
IVESTOCK 2.4,52—6n . Hutant,
L s ; The Barbados Regiment
~~ GOATS—3 Young Milch Goats for NEWBURY—With 11% acres of land.

3 A Martin's Vicar uilding and out buildings, 3 lime kilns
it. 5s niedliiead * Ae vermment Water and Electric, next
_.| door to Gun Hill, about 6 miles from





Bridgetown. Also building spots at
Newbury, St, George 12c, per spuare foot,

MECHANICAL

public road, water and electric along the
, Psp nye OGL Modal Super, same land. Apply: 8. W MeConney. Other ‘super-stamina Goodyear work
-inch frames, fitted with three speed | Newbury, St. George 12c, per square foot, tires are: Hard Rock Lug— Road Lug—



fears, Regular price $ 61.35. Our special
price for spot cash $66.35. Noel Roach





Be Wise



“OLIVE BOUGH" (Seaside









































Studded Sure-Grip—Hi-Miler Xtra Tred,
tracting any debt or debts in my name | & Sons, Speightstown. and well Set in off Main Rd.) at ‘ 2 ’
unless by a written order signed by me. 2.3.52—4n. | HASTINGS—NEAR PAVILION COURT;

JAMES HOBBS, a Large (Partly Stone) 3-Storey, 4
Taylors Gap, WIND MILL, tower and pump. Pump} Bedrooms with Basins, Several other
(near Eagle Hall) is like new, tower and mill in working | Rooms, Open Gallery (Front & 2 Sides),
St. Michael. order, $100.00, Phone 4124 Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,
5,.4.52—2n 3.4.52—3n.|2 Toilets, other Conveniences, very
— ——— — | Good Condition, Nice Sandy Beach,
ee wa. + hereby att eee Good and Safe Bathing, es, Garage
© oO my wife, 1 also C le Shed for 4 Cars, well Made
Et haar eg ea e I £8 not) MISCELLANEOUS up Yard, Ideal and enough Land to
spons! 0 her or (einsdeetsa tae ot Seclene ahe D er Prec’ i }
anyone else Srteashing. aan debt or ANTIQUES — ot every description So eeulia s Sunmaiahine dias eae tae
debts in my name unless by a written | @!"s% China, old Jewels, fine Silver | 2" aii or mats Inspection by Appoint
order signed by me. Leone ear eer, Meee ay Spi ment Only, AT BRIGHTON, Seaside:
HENRY ALLEYNE BOYCE, | Sdjoining Royal Yacht’club, | Almost New Conerete 3 Bedroom Ameri-
Nr. Cave Hill, | 3.2.52—t.f.n. | 08" Design Bungalow, all Modern
St. Lucy. a a. a ; | Conveniences, about 11,000 sq. ft. Going
aad LUMINUM—I1 ten foot and 6 eight) Under £2,700. FACING NAVY GAR-
The public are hereby warned against | {00t Sheets and 28 six foot sheets of tare B cee New pa sy Pe
given credit to my wife, CARMAEN {#@!vanised iron, J, Brome, Advocate | voices, about 12,000 sq. ft. Going
BELL (nee ROACH) as I'do not hold | Ce» Ltd $.4.69—2n. | Urder £9100 In NELSON ST. By
n = —— leah ‘ -
ise contracting any debt or ‘debts in | »,NOATS—Two Sailing Boats. Mallard | 50°... and’ Resldenee, Gonvenienees
my name unless by a written order 21 ft. Sailing Craft with Morris Auxillary Good Condition Id 1 for ae Bu ay
signed by y Murine Engine and complete equipment Going Unde £2 ‘00. In TUD oan:
LIo. MeN: BELL #1,500.00. Also International Tornado | 7° s e-itore , § B de ir <
on Noad | well built with good Racing Record | E4'® 2:Storey Stone Business Premises
sion ad, | $450.00. Apply: Secretary, Yacht Club. & Residence with a Large Garage or aad ?
Bank Hall, \ vs 6.4.52—3n, | Workshop, all Conveniences, A-1 Con- GO oO D a i a AR
St. ae death ist dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant, y

5.4.59 a CANADIAN PRINTS—We have just|€@" Yield $120.00 p.m. Under £3,000 “es
received a shipment of Beautiful Cana_ Can Buy It_UPPER NELSON STI.,—3
dian Prints 36” wide at very reasonable Bedroom Residence, Conveniences. Good
prices, See these lovely Prints before Condition, SUS See ft. Going
purchasing elsewhere. Also fine quality Below 2 AT HASTINGS—Seaside

MIAMI LINEN. —Almost Stone, 3 Bedrooms, Going ;
STANWAY STORE Under £3,500, AT FONTABBLLE—A
Lucas street Bargain: Almost New 3 Bedroom Stone st

6.3.52—1n Bungalow, Tiled Bath & Toilet, about
ini? 10,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,300.



FURNITURE











WHITEHALL FLATS
Codrington Hifi, St. Michael
WEDNESDAY 9TH APRIL

AT 11.30 a.m

We are instructed by Mr. W. D.
Chariton to dispose of his modern »
Furniture and Effects

Viewing morning of sale

Dining Tables, Ch: Dining
Chairs with Uphoist i Seats,
Sideboard, Desks, Oce. Tables, Tea
Trolley, Bookcase, Chest of
Drawers, and other Mahogany
Furniture. Upholstered 3 Piece
Suite, Wicker Settee and Arm-
chairs, Rush Rockers, Cedar Chest
of Drawers, Cedar Compactum,
Painted Bookcase, Single Beds
and Spring, Simmons Mattresses,
Frigidaire (small) Electrolux
Refrigerator, Ice Box, Electric
Clock, Large Coll. China, Glass-
ware, Cutlery, Silver (Tea and
Coffee Se 3), Table Lamps
Portable Gramophone, Portable
Rermunington Typewriter New
Model Kodak, Halsmayer Medium
Grand Piano, Falks 3 Burner Oi)
Stove, Pr. Binoculars, Microscope,
Bicycle, Mirrors. Swing Mirror
and Stand, Larder, Kitchen Scales
Kitchen Tables, Marble Top ‘Table
Bathroom Scal Rugs, Carpets
Curtains, Primts, 2 Prs Boxi
Gloves, Books, Garden Tools
other articles

6
AUCTIONEERS
John, Biadon
& co.
A.F.S., F.V.A.

Phone 4640, Plantations Building



JUST RECBIVED—Valor Stove parts,| NEAR CITY in Avenue, Quiet & Resi-



I te dential,—A Bargain; Almost New 3 Bed- OR maximum mileage inimum cost-per:
rep Hilo Saree Perrencem oie room Reinforced Conerete Bungalow, F . ’ Bs and gaighn ow .
Penestire Stove pokes, ae ito Tee | Over 7,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,100. mile get Goodyear giant tires. These tires are
Company, Trafalgar & Sp: Streets. | BY FONTABELLE; 2 Bedroom Bungalow, s ‘ . h ;

Phone 3008. = on A-1 Condition, Going Under £1,200. AT 80 superior that, year after year, more tons, the
ae: o> Ot “| HASTINGS—2 Residences (one partly : t ‘s . :

| “OL 'The ~wond'y fnest motor oii | Rlone and one sone=nAlcat Naw)" both world over, are hauled on Goodyear giant tires

yie . P.m.,

and Going Under

| Veedol,
ecdol, at all leading Garages and Service AT LOWER BAY ST... re

Stations. Your vehiele deserves the

Dest, | £4,000
“Found wherever fine cars

than on any other make.

VEEDOL. 2 Bedroces ne ata yields $25.00 Agents :—
fy p.m, Going Under £1,000. AT UPPER .
rare 172. 8—*-f-2- | ROEAUCK ST.—A 2-Storey-—Partly Stone CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD.,
Office equipment of all kinds—Steel | 3 Bedrooms (possible 4), 2 Toilets yields VICTORIA STREET.
| Safes, Skandex Visible , Por- | $0.00 p.m., Going Under £1,200, AT Dealers :—

table and Standard Typewriters, Adding | ROCKLEY NEW RD.,—about 1% Acre,

H. JASON JONES — SERVICE STATION
























* Goin oO NDS
Mithinae ne, Nee PRUNE |S rDr aes § medooons Condiain $y tater * COURTESY GARAGE
BRADSHAW & COMPANY. [Concrete Bungalow, and AT LOWER K. R. HUNTE & CO., LTD
2.3.52—t.f.n. | BAY ST.; 2 Bedroom Stone Residence; J. A, REID — LONE STAR GARAGE

7 eon Going Under £1,100 euch, Dial 3111.

PIANC—Weser _ Bros., New York,|D. F de Abreu, “Olive Bough",
Cabinet Grand. In good condition. Hastings.
Phone 2368. 6.4.52—4n. OO -
wicket Hal “MELLYN,” Pine Hill Just a reminder of = - -

KITE TWINE——Ctrong Twine for Kites
et 9 cents per ball. G. W. HUTCHINSON | A newly-constructed stone _ house MR. LESTER JONES EASTER MONDAY
& Co. Ltd. 6.4.52—an, | With polished pine floors throughout in and

S coo! and increasingly popular residential MISS GLADYS FARLEY’S

GALVANIZE PIPE—2590 ft. 1%" Gal-| area. H is compact and easy to run

venize Pipe, new. Apply to L, L with minimum labour and contains front
Daxters Plantation, St. Andrew. verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 3
6.4.52—an, | bedrooms, tiled bathroom with separate
é ——— $e | toilet, kitchen, laundry, servants’ quar-
TYPHOO TEA-—-Stocks of this Re-| ters and large garage with direct access
freshing and Delicious Beverage have} ‘© house. Front grounds laid out in
just been received. Get yours today | B#rden beds, lawns, hedges, ornamental
from your Grocer or Druggist. and shade trees and ornamental plants;
KNIGHT'S LTD, and back grounds in fruit trees and
5.4.52—2n, | Kitehen garden.

Gin,

DANCE

TOMORROW NIGHT
AT

PRINCESS ALICE PLAY-
ING FIELD PAVILION
ADMISSION: 2/- |
Music by C, B. Browne's

FAIR

Codrington College
2 p.m. — 6 p.m.
ALL WELCOME



| No offers. Wicks.

$$$ | Inspection by appointment with ars. , Orchestra : Proceeds for Society
TORNADO—International KAl. Beauti. | Lloyd B. Aaron, c/o K. R. Hunte & Bar Solid—We are looking Church
ful condition, excellent equipment, good | ©®., Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown. for you!



For further particulars contact Rev
A. P. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory,
or dial 5187 between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m,
nclusive.

racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.
Telephone 3289.
18.11.61—t.f.n

on any day Monday to Friday















HERE’S WISHING YOU

Come to - - -

THE GRAND BASTER

A VERY HAPPY EASTERTIDE












|
|
| e | PAR ADE ' and hoping YOU will enjoy the many Bottles of }
7 Eb , } ;
Mrs. EDITH SEALY iM} ar TH BETHEL GRouNDs {| TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM:
ut (Beautician) | On EASTER MONDAY
Pap her clients that her }} ae er | (With The Distinctive Flavour)
|{{ Hairdressing Salon has been | Ree bare eeates ee ened which you have already bought 6r contemplate buying.
removed from “Willow Cot” REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
| 7 oe wb Oe ne a ra cae 2 JOH] |] Dp. TA YLOR & SONS Lid.
|
. == =

Donations will be grate-

M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952.







Passengers only Soe Vincent;

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO | 3 "2,08 Wee Pon oe fully accepted and, as
AND STIRS GUIANA cept Cargo and P: rs far as ible, collected.
MS. BONAIRE on Oth, May, 1988, }, gAntigua, | Monteerrat, The Sale and Fair will
s. on ay, . e
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND Nevin and Ot Mitts; Salling Wed-

nesday 9th inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC)
Â¥ Consignee Tele. 404

be held at MHoletown
School on Easter Mon-
day.

Admission 1/-

Teas, Refreshments,
Music, Dancing,
Games, &c.

CURACAO
M.®. HECUBA 2ist April 1952.
$.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1962.
8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Agents.

SLEASLESOO SOLE OPE





















Canadian National Steamships













SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Balls
Montreal Halifax Boston B’dos B'dos
LADY RODNEY 6 - 2) Mar, 2 Apr. 11 Apry 12 Apr.
LADY NELSON .. es es = 16 Apr 17 Apr. 27 Apr. 28 Apr
CANADIAN CRUISER 7. 29 Apr. 2 May - 11 May 13 May
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 9 May 12 May ~ 21 May 23 May
LADY RODNEY te 19 May 22 May % May 2 June 3 June
CANADIAN CHALLENG 30 May 2 June = ll June 12 June
LADY NELSON .. a 9June 12 June 14June 23 June 2% June 0 H |
CANADIAN CRUISER 4 20 June 28 June _ 2 July 3 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.,. 30 June 3 July _— 12 J 13 July
LADY RODNEY oe oe 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 26 July

eee

NORTHBOUND



MM.

Arrives

Bdes ‘Saen “Gesten ai Sone iatitas aontceat

fone ar ; s Aux. 7 Apr. — | a Apr. 7 Apr, -- B L A D 0 &
pr. 26 Apr. 5 May; — 6 May 10 May

cu aus . xumy ous "= 555, Taed hes e& ce
CONSTRUCTOR 3 June 8 June — Bt] dene 18 ‘6 M1 Jun« F ; A.
LADY RODNEY , 1 June oe 2
“CHALLENGER : “ pe : June i a 5 ade can : yd 00) camamenss e
geome RE SRE A A) SRM BRE] Nes atwars av
CANADIAN . | i . ABLE.
Seno. TRE PMP wae, OH OME BAe
wot ..,etm

FOR SALE

“BEACH RESIDENCE", St.
Lawrence — Attractive 2 storey
house with 4 bedrooms, lanes
living-room, and galleries. One o'!
the best spots on this bay with







For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents,
















it
2 ~psemeaaniae Maan ata? & ood x a ndy mish a “es soo, une
. y
% REMEMBER!!! X VIEW UE, furnished 2&5, er, high
yestment as continuous

: ANNUAL PICNIC % SEA GUEST rentals are obtained.
| “NEWTON LODG®”, Maxwell—
% HOUSE Well found 2 storey stone property
CHRIST CHURCH GIRLS’ ¥ HASTINGS BARBADOS with enclosed grounds. Galleries
% % Under new management. on 3 sides, spacious drawing
x ongterm room, dining room, breakfast
% BARTER BOMBAE, Deny and rates room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms,
i ; quoted on sequest garages and servants’ quarters.

Sete Ages Permanent guests Enquiries invited.
% 2—6 “SWEET FIELD", St. Peter—
g " <2 An Estate type house built of
ivi i ; i tains large living room
$ Ciwle Gijens’ Band $ ioe ene west leading on
. ; to covered verandahs with good
» >

% 0. OG-ohm ig view of sea a short distance away,
g 2 bedrooms, kitchen, storerooms
SSESSSSSSSOSSSS ond usual outbuildings, garage
and servants’ quarters. Approx.









2% aeres well laid out grounds
d right of way over beach.

“COVE SPRING HOUSE”, St.
James—A 2 storey house on coast
with good grounds and interesting
possibilities. There is excellent
bathing from a_ secluded and
private sandy cove.

Come te

RESIDENCE, Maxwells Coast—
A handsome well preserved pro-
perty with 3 bedrooms, large
dining room, drawing room,

galleries, servants’ quar-
ters, Walled grounds and about
% acre © a.

“MALTA”, St. Peter—Modern
coral stone house of exceptionally
sound eonstruction—extensive re-
modelling and re-decoration has
just been completed. The lounge,
of ample dimensions, opens onto
wide verandahs with most at-
tractive seascape views. The three
bedrooms are fitted with built-in
wardrobes and also washbasins,
and the two bathrooms have H/C
water. Kitchen and pantry are
well fitted out and are supplied
with H/C water. Ground foor
contains 2 garages, large store-
rooms and servants quarters,
grounds of about % of an acre
are well laid out and fenced. Mains
and well water. A most desirable
and highly recommended property.

BUNGALOW, Maxwell Coast—
A well built bungalow with 3
bedrooms, large living room,
kitchen, garage, servants’ quarters.
A pleasantly located property for
sale at a very competitive figure.

WINDY MILL, Rendezvous Hill,
Go. _ Cnerasogern built bungalow

GIRL GUIDE FAIR

at the
DRILL HALL

from 3 to 8 p.m.
on
SATURDAY, 10th MAY,
1952





Announcement

to notify my friends

the General public that I
ond Real Estate Agent from
am offering myself as Auctioneer
this dey forward My Auction
Mart is situated at Tweedside
Road I am looking forward for
some of your patronage. Dial 4837.
“ours for Service

JOSEPH ST. HILL










as



Adults
Children and Scouts and

We invite you to inspect our assortment

of
CEILING FITTINGS & BRACKETS Etc.

Just opened
at

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets 3
AALS OAL LEPLLIEL LSA ELLE IS ESESESE ISIS
_——$—$———————_—_—————

el





NOTICE





bedrooms, lounge, kitehen,
We beg to notify our Friends and Customers that we will garage, servants’ quarters, walled
not be open for business on SATURDAY, 12th April and in een Oe te a land.
would ask them to arrange their shopping accordingly. cue reasonable offer

R. & G. CHALLENOR. LTD.

Speightstown, Bridgetown, Six Mens.
° 6.4.52—2n

“HOLDERS HOUSE,” St. James
—An estate house built of stone
with pine floors and shingle roof.
3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms,
verandahs etc., also garage and
usual outbuildings. The house
stands on approx. 4 acres of well
timbered land (mahogany) ap-
proached by a long driveway
fianked with closely planted
mahogany trees. The outstanding
attraction of “Holders” is the
very lovely site which has the
advantage of being well elevated
and cool, with fine views on all
sides. Coast is less than a mile
away and town is 6 miles.

“BEMERSYDE”,

—Spacious stone built bungalow
with shingle roof, very well plan-
ned with wide verandahs at front











Everyone loves a Smooth, Lovely Skin,—but they detest
Unsightly Hair, especially in Women . : .80:—

“GET RID OF UNSIGHTLY HAIR” with

< VEET ”

and Bide, 2 enclosed galleries,
For the Beach, Dance, Sailing, or any time when under-arm Hairs , 3 double a kitchen “and

becomes Unsightly, use VEET.
VEET is extremely useful for men who have tough beards, or
who find it uncomfortable to Shave

‘vy BE ET Unsightly, Superfiuous Hair
in exactly “THRED MINUTES”

ge IT’S OLEAN! IT’S CERTAIN! ! IT’S SAFB.!}!
Thats VEET

pantry, 3 servants’ rooms,
and outhouses. oo
fccees to the sea with good bath-

pe ROR. Ave. Betta.
ville — attractive well
proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft, Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed),

» Barage
is com-

Remember:

) large room, study, modern
Obtainable at:— ware i Law figure scenic i, ior ack
BOOKER’S (Bidos) DRUG STORES LTD. aourrmnt

BROAD STREET,

HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)

RENTALS

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
HOUSE—Near Yacht Club, avail-
able June to Dec. (inclusive).

4 pee FURNISHED HOUSE,
andy Lane—Immediate n,
ROSE HILL, st. Peter Furnished,

Immediate possession.

NEWTON LODGE, Maxwell
Coast—Funished, immediate pos-
session.







Secure Those Palings
WITH GOOD

HARDWOOD POSTS.
Obtainable different

various prices.

WHITEHALL FLATS — Unfumn-
ished, early possession,

RESIDENCE, 2 Mile Hill—Beau-
tifully furnished, swimming pool,
close to town, excellent staff.
Available to approved tenants.

HIGSGATE — Unfurnished fat.

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
SEASIDE PROPERTY, Paynes
Bay-—Available to approved ten-
ants from May to Nov.

XICALES— Wildey— Available
about 6 months.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building

in sizes and

N. B. HOWELL

LUMBER & HARDWARE



Bay Street



















SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952 EVENING

_



ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN










- at aia Stn, tien ee 20/- Fine For ea
= WAY HOME ed throughout the t: thera . petter view. Almost dead ahéa ; : t deh ie
HE HARD wes some company t variou oe stain dive) distin. aaeeek Wie Unlawful Possession riAPPYy ELIEF PROTA RAIA IOR HID IAAI AINA IR IAS SAIASASASIAIAS AC
ish that would swin 5 der





tong t grey line just visible through the If you want an alarm clock
the boat (where N ouldn’t ; 5

.
€ t . ‘ < nd l rig —the H Vors Mr Talmz
@ from page 10 we thought the bread quite good 5.04, them with eee eee ee It wa land aul ght—theq we lle Mir H. 4. “res FROMBACKACHE Right wi that you can always trust —
ik ft en a = Spens ) Ole ty is oO sarbados ce Magistrate s d :
cuits and jam. If two or three although a housewife on Jand sunny islan« 3. a
















1 ” r
the several types of sea birds N late re esterday ordered 30-year-old accurate, handsome a
oe e . ¥ . > > , - a Nine hours later Wanderer erda) rdere 3 ? « . ‘
pn Pda tie ee waka an aon a Paes Senties which live out on the ocean dpepped anchor mear the sanc ourer, Prince Worrell, of St Neighbour said Tate Doan’s Pills” se 9 moderately priced—you mut
during the night they would be if ever she _was so d a =m a There was an atmosphere of ex- shores of Carlisle Ba The tr wephen Road, St. Mirhpel, to VW HY PUT UP with needless ime @@6 @ © choose a Smith Alarm.
very smartly popped into the meat. The evening mend, =e like citement on that twenty-ninth Saas pay a fifie of 20s in 14 days or discomfort from backache,
ryir an and we would have this: curried or fried steak with ... , ms hs tng Was ove ’ 7 ss a + ” “4 rheumatic pains, humbago, ¢ =
ane net 4 Or cai four onions and potatoes; rice pudding 24%: We both knew that land “Now after several days’ rest at (9 default one month's imprison achitie ties baad ae ke = Cg gd VICTORY 30-hour dlarin | NEW DAWN W-hout alarm
age wee. = - a ae =o was getting near. From early in Bridgetown we are preparing to|ment for the unlawful possession 7 ; lock in cream, blue or | clock in handsomecream,Zam
mornings did we have this luck OF pancakes; coffee or tea. the morning we had been on deck aa cae tat > a reek we Of _a tin of paint common urinary disorders due to o : blue de green case with 0 9-7
with ihe flying fish and all our Celebrating At Sea watching the horizon in the hope be = _—. t ai ‘the ‘Peneaa The case was brought by Po- r ed. ie when you green case en plated fittings. 4-inch //f Y Ez
93 5 or M & t : xpect to se >» Pan ai... Pr rh . 1 y . iim. +
efforts to catch other fish with Occasionally we would invent @ of seeing it. We really wanted to Sonat Chance through there the}lice Constable 249 Springer. The vi 2 " ~ = ‘7 none P f firtings. ro 2 tat with full lamin | a) Qu
spinners and a fish spear were special occasion and have a sub- see it. After a long spell at sea Soont will be in the Pacific Ocean ffenee was committed on Friday 4 ne bana ry ' * eee \ A with luminous sp Das atari’. falas 9 y
completely unrewarded. eo spread with aoe a away from any shore it is amaz- >°S""N0c4 of her will be sevend Soon'e Bochoake an? Bw Also available mor | apte nonslulind 7
and tinned cream. One of these \ *h y ‘ , ana ; mas : ackac Ls, sb ealialae 4 obits
After breakfast we would both fi ia d : lébrated het ing how much you feel you want inousand miles more ailing be Phis well kfiown liuretic and huminous pre iss : dous supe ’ é
eep out the yacht’s cabin ae hs Ss ODD. te ba ¥ age 10 ,8et back on land again, fore she can expect to end het urinary antiseptic helps sluggish made alarm clock, com- | made alarm clock
ON gt 5 ~, ““o1, the first 2,000 miles of our voyage the ll called out: “Ther Es i ave be ; - that you can always trast a
tidy up above decks and make hag been’ completed. It was on itis wom tee The two of VOvaee- | WEATHER REPORT kidneys to carry out their function wo :



what adjustments were necessary the twenty-fourth day at sea.

to the sails and rigging. Bill At night it was the usual thing
being the navigator would then to reud or write again until we ————— .
— a ae of = ee turned off the pressure kerosene

shots of the day. Two, or r i i went f
still three, of these sights taken =. Sa CS ane TE SO Removal O
with the sextant at_ different Jt probably sounds as if life

of ridding the blood of excess ust

a YESTERDAY acid and other impurities harmaws .
B C Radio Rainfall from Codrington: to health. Grateful people, everye Superbly Ye, LUV ebony
e eLue { nil where, recommend ’s Pills to Britioh made TU. ’ ; Ragen aye

Total rainfall for month to their friends and neighbours. 9» renin a

Programmes ae aoe = oe *DOAN’S a Obtainable at all leading Jewellers.
Temperature; 71.5°F. aur for ee

us scampered up the rigging for












times could be computed to tell quring the voya vas idyllic. It Cdi Shi Wind Velocity: 10 miles per near neeiias
us exactly where the yacht was ees. alma Pe was one lan ips SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1082) hour.
situated on the ocean, Bill made snag, one curse which troubled 1-71.15 pm, 19 1M, % ee Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.992; J
a point of keeping a check of the us for each twenty-four hours of @ from page 1 dpm. The News, 4.10 p.m, Interlude (3 p.m.) 30.033. TT
progress every day. the day. And that was the yacht’s 4.15 p.m. For the Common Good, 4.90 ;
wicked rolling motion. Although steamships from the U.K. to cer- p ™. Sunday Half-hour, 5 p.m. Varie oz a TO-DAY Crew Sights Shark she was swaying from side to tain islands of the West Indies, Bandbox, 6 p.m. Compo ’ Sunrise: 5.54 a.m.




Lunch was usually served at side all the time, each minute or would extend their routes—in-
one o’clock. Because it was warm two she would give a particularly cluding all the Leewards and
in the middle of the day we al- sharp heave to port or to star- Windwards at which the Lady

Oe Bee Mitchie tom || Sunset: 6.13 p.m. | =» WONDER WHEELS N° 4=
a en tee By Moon: First Quarter, April
2 Why Hercules cvctzs .



7.10 p
5pm



i 3M, 31.22M






saucepan dipped over the side. tents into the soup and, as likely we make up for the passenger pr, 32 bie a

We were both frightened to dive as not, the kettle on the stove facilities the Lady Boats offered mt saieinte



ways had a light meal of cold ham board. It was maddening if you boats called—to benefit the West : eee te ne aa. ee i, Lighting: 6.30 p.m, e ‘ ; a!
and potatoes or something like were trying to cook. The teapot Indies when the Lady Boats are . ee a se in. Radio Nowe High Tide: 1.41 am., 1.29 | arrive in Barbados sf
that. After lunch came the daily would slide across the table and taken off. feel, | Song und Dance, 9 p p.m. * ; hoa ca y
bath. Jt consisted of splashing onto the deck, the sugar tin He felt that the West Indies’ B.p.c ony On 10 pr Low Tide: 7.50 a.m, 8.09 in perfect condition a F
yourself with water from a would probably tip half its con- gravest concern was: “How will The New oe n, 10.45 cane ' t
it

sa
ie |



7, ise





oven and some of the results were
quite good, too. That is to



ay ¢ ni ; 9 ‘ e . 14 ik: a , , Rogena is aranteed to set you
day and perhaps 100 or even 120 southbound and on Saturday and jn ts pm. Sek i 10.29°p.1 right, pelkvinorete your Prostate

the next. Not one ship was sight- Wednesday northbound. Tip Top Tunes Gland and make you feel 10 to 20
ple icenclalnn neers taaiiran a I cS os i a ii intake a i i AL years younger or money back. Get

Rogéna from your chemist. The |
guerantee protects you,



. over the side in case a shark would spit boilin water at you. us?” He said that West Indians MONDAY, APRIL 7, oa . ‘ nied
’ should be around. I aetually They say that hinees beings are would welcome an extension in the 400—7.15 p.m. 19 76M, 25 53M, &1.@2M Men Made Younger The special Hercules packing
sighted the fin of one on the third wery adaptable. This rolling is itinerary of those ships. p.m The News, 4.10 p.m. The Dai methods the result of 30 years
day out. However this was to be one think that I am sure nobody According to our B.G. correse gomice, 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pre- | ’ : " She
the only one we encountered dur- could ever get used to. Even at pondent, freight services with the gramme, 5 p.m. Breach Riley, 5.16 BN | By Treating Gland study of packing for countries
ing the whole trip. nicht you would be continually Canadian Challenger, Cruiser and Souvenirs eee 2 Bes oniee | :s..T I+
‘ Ms mg — ope lying in tossed from side to side in the Constreoter are being malitalees Sas atin Bros deals ae ae Cotting: up nights, hursine, sense overseas —ensure this. The we
the shade of the sails sometimes bunks and wake up in the morn- and would be extended if the 27 )'.'y r p.m, The News, 7,1 dull echo al teen i va *
reading books and sometimes ing as tired as ‘hens you Aree tratfye volume warrants > n. News ‘a “a | a ong te OEE Sous } wrapped parts are placed carefully
writing letters which we would went to slec~ : Pan American Airways have 7.—!0 ee | \ Loa of manly Viggur ore oaneed in strong cases so that they can be
post when we reached Barbados. also withdrawn one two-way “>> Dian. Mea Oveeadad Sanat. f°. : ‘oat Timanstané eax giana in . i ly
ze an . on aT began » 120 —— A Day flight on Friday southbound and pappy Hoe-down, 8.15 pm. Radic men), ‘To overcome, these troubles | simply, safely and correctly as-
is duty by baking the day’s one or & total of twenty-nine days the Monday northbound flight Newereel, 8.30 pr African Surve in 24 hours and quickly restore vig- ‘ ses aot ‘
loat of bread. This was done Wanderer sailed on in this man- leaving only two two-way flights 8.45 p.m. The ler, 9.90) er ins teens. ae sembled on arrival at destination,
using a pressure cooker as an ner making good 90 miles one on ednesday and Saturday 2". a ‘ditorials, | matter how long you have suffered
|
|



“ Health Facts " Series

DO YOU KNOW
?

—that your mouth Is a mirror
of events in your digestive
reel If | “ in order
your tongue is clean, your
mouth feels fresh. But if
your system's sluggish
the tongue is coated,
there's @ sour, unpleasant |



° . Ga Uj
Bucy To-4ey vn om wens

DESPATCH DEPARTMEN®






REPRESENTATIVES



BRINGS taste in your mouth. |
ineekls rae you rene
sparkling Andrews Liver
QUICK Salt! Andrews cleansand |
reshens the mouth, stim-
RELIEF ulates the action of ‘the | ; :
' gestive organs and kee} See ie m nf]
FROM : | BABY S your system free from } = rn
ae : | 5 clogging food wastes. | a
Soe KA emember— ,
a cig TEETHIN G A d | SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS
}


















































fo
1 ‘ett T. GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN
| need give you no anxieties for
4 DUE TO INDIGESTION | inner Cleanliness = esi
If you suffer from STOMACH PAINS, FLATULENCE, There need be no restless nights, no tears, no baby disorders, Kaw | ee 6006baebsdbnnen‘ SSeS tiki annkeaheesnelin
HEARTBURN, NAUSEA or ACIDITY due to Indigestion, i ’ 5 FSFE —", PLPC PLPC OOO eS
try just ONE DOSE of MACLEAN BRAND STOMACH if you have Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders handy: 3
POWDER! ‘This scientifically balanced formula gives you | Mothers all over the world have found them soothing and + x
really quick relief! It is also available in TABLET form, | cooling when baby is fretful through teething and, best of all ENJIO } l %
> > ° Dl
| they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE. 3
ACLEAN ie :
%
ASHTON & PARSONS S
f 3
Stomach Powder | INFANTS’ POWDERS 8
»’
nT -YEP@ & Of ‘ PS
SOLE AGENTS . M. B. MEYERS & CO., LTO, | . :
tid ceiown,—Barbadsw — g We can supply this in 8
= meme nen enenrn eat ae e
= EEE SOLOS PODPESOPPCOEDS SS CCOEPE OOOO LAPIS, x
| % Now Available - - - : RED OR GREEN %
VALOR COOKER STOVES | COASTAL & DEEP SEA NAVIGATION FOR YACHTS- > »
; | MEN % in lengths of 3
hori? Eherhibe BROWN’S POCKET BOOK FOR YAGH'TSMEN ‘ %
2 Burner Model @ $56.14 TAIT'S NEW SEAMANSHIP AND NAUTICAL KNOW- 50 ft.. 7 ft. and 100 ft. 3
o Rune: ees Gers DICTIONARY OF SEA TERMS : ; 8
Also BROWN'S STAR ATLAS . at reasonable prices. %
WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS { : — Also — } >
ith Double Drainboard @ $65.64 ° PITMAN'S SHORTHAND INSTRUCTOR, NEW ERA (| . : : -
Complete witty. waste and overmey ; EDITION & DICTIONARY ’ ; This Hose is long lasting, easy to use, and easy
s
Established T. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated | : ‘ to clean. 3
1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926 % ROBERTS & Co. - Dial 3301 ; 3
a +
= SS SE | 49%66699656660510156555655590090900500900400655500" SECURE YOURS NOW — %
’,
‘ ee »
NEW TIMES! NEW FASHIONS! NEW hid iiie. ens
1 1 s
: : NEW SHIRTS! BARBADOS HARDWARE (0. LID :
=" , PLANTATIONS LTD. S
. No. 16 Swan St. Phone 2107, 4406 or 3634 3
Cc K D sts sts t st SO5t50) OC OOS OAL OLA AAA AAA IAL OM
eee
’ “*e ’ , 2GET
: | CALLING pon’ FO!
THE SHIRT BARBADOS LOVES a =— po vOUR






CASTER SHOPPING
AT SAHELY’s

EASTER
SHOPppp, .

WE NOW OFFER YOU THE FOLLOWING LINES __
FOR MEN & HOYS | FOR WOMEN & GIRLS




Se. VINCEN To Grumman Goose














, @ $1.52

TROPICAL “ANDAR” SUITINGS—HM” wide $3.02 SHANTORA—36" wide ...... @
BLAZER CLOTH—54” wide .............@ 242 WHITE NEOCORD—36” wide pi pert ame
“y BLUE DENIM—28” wide .............. @ 120 S8LACK & WHITE DOBBY SILK—9 Bou > 8
A IR SER VICE KHAKI—28” wide ......... @ $118, 1.38 &144 BLACK & WHITE PRINT—36” wide @ ant
PYJAMA STRIPES—36” wide ..........98° @ PAFFETTA PLAIDS—36” wi ms eevessceeens Qo ol
SLUMBERTYME PYJAMAS —each ..... . 547 WATERED TAFFETTA—36” wide .........---- @ ig@
ELITE SHIRTS in White, Blue, Tan and Grey SHANTUNG—36" wide 6.0 c eer @ 96c. to 1.13
sizes 134 — 174 .................... @ 475 PLOWERED SPUNS—36” wide . ""@ Ste. & 9
One Way Rotarn One Way Return RENOWN SHIRTS .................... @ 425 PLAIN SPUNS—36” wide | "11!" @ gle, tae
2 a RELIANCE SPORT SHIRTS |. . @ $4.94, 3.90, 3.85 COTTON PRINTS—36” wide Ent nad be.
BARBADOS-ST. VINCENT. ............... $33.00 = $ 62.70 GRENADA-DOMINICA ............ oo $95.00 $180.50 ELITE PHOTO PRINT SHIRTS ........_@ 6.75 WESTIVAL SILK—36” wide @ 120, 1.30, 1.32, 1.44 & 1.60
TIES—100% Rayon ........,. .... @$1.70 &147 CREPES ........... 20, 1.30, LJe, 144
BARBADOS-DOMINICA .................... $43.00 $ 81.70 ST. VINCENT-TRINIDAD __.. $ 41.00 $ 77.90 B.V.D’s in all Meade ce: s @ 128 FLOWERED “ks ‘“ ar Res o
BARBADOS-GRENADA ................. $51.00 $ 96.90 ST. VINCENT-BRITISH GUIANA § 96.00 $182.40 1 rorie” VESTS: PBeake re iadery 2 .e tn rT) Wages @ 4.50, 4.00, 3.61, 3.06 on5
ST. VINCENT-DOMINICA. ............... $74.00 $140.60 DOMINICA-TRINIDAD .................. $113.00 $214.70 || aaaes he kes . @ 2.20 & 1,87 Assonnnr — . @ 1c. 18¢. & 2ic. each
3 h BeLTS ... 2s... esis | tse steees/@ 49 HANDKE ‘ bvisie #5. bo: Moa Waele D6 7.62
ST. VINCENT-GRENADA ............... $23.00 $ 43.70 DOMINICA-BRITISH GUIANA ... $171.00 $324.00 HANDKERCHIEFS . 1 @ Be. & 53e. each BLACK & BROWN SUEDE SHOES oo a é 497
\i| BE-BOP CAPS ...... sie sures .... @ 83e. & 7c. BLACK & GOLD SUEDE SHOES .. = g9.0che $19.92
Choaiex Rat 4 CO Aho is CE... dok a cekiones @ 194 REXWEAR COTTON Te Chale c. -—a
rter ates om , FELT HATS - @ $4.00, $7.20 & 9.60 REXWEAR C 2 PS ear at so te ai? oe
application BOYS FELT HATS |. Te ee eS SHEETING OI ...... 0” @ $2.39, 72” @ $2.12, 39” @ S17

exeenre cereteemtiiaiciarisiatiliataccaaine aT



REMEMBER = BUYING YOUR EASTER OUTFIT

GEORGE AHELY & Co. a 19 Swan St. — where you will
Phone 4704 AVE $$$$ & G
ne EFFICIENT ERVICE, VALUE & VARIETY Phone 4934

se esssssssestesesessssessesinntisnsnseeensanesensrnmneunite ——————————

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.. Lid.

Lower Broad Street AGENTS







St











PAGE SIX TEEN



Nurses’ Assoc.

As Long As It Gives Service



Public Comes First

ADDRESSING Past and Present Nurses at the Six
teenth Annual Reunion Meeting of the Barbados Nurses’

Association at the General

Hospital yesterday afternoon,

Dr. F. N. Grannum said that an Association such as the
Barbados Nurses’ Association can only continue to exist

as long as it gives service.

: Service first to the community
in which it exists and then to its members.

The first con-

sideration of any medical institution must be the public,

then itself.

Dr. Grannum who was the
Chairman at the meeting was in-
troduced by Matron Graham who
said that the practice of the Past
Nurse meeting the Present Nurse
is ‘carried on in England.

Dr. Grannum congratulated
Nurse Gibson and all the members
of the Association on another year
of progress and of useful work.
He said that he did not know when
Nurse Gibson first conceived the
idea of the Association but it was
now in its 16th year of service.
During the year of its existence the
Association had striven to serve
the public and it provided for the
community a Nursing Bureau
where members of the public could
obtain the service of a trained
nurse.

Free Nursing Service..

It also provided, with Govern-
ment aid ane public donations, a
free nursing -ervice for members
of the community and undertook
a number of free nursing among
the children of the elementary
schools.

Before Dr. Grannum spoke Past
Nurses visited the rooms of the
Hospital and also saw the quality
of work done ‘there. Then they
were given tea on the lawn op-
posite the Nurses’ Quarters.

All the nurses had some good
word for the exhibition. After
Nurse Gibson had read the annual
report of the Association, Miss N.
Burton, M.B.E., Headmistress of
the St. Michael's Girls' School
spoke to the gathering of Past
Nurses. She said there was a
dire need for good citizenship. in
Barbados. “It is the duty of the
mothers and fathers to train their
children to be good citizens. The
training starts at home and it is
only carried on in the schools, The
schools have been criticised but
the parents have the child for the
first five years completely in their
care and that is the impressionable
age.” '

Miss Burton said that there
were various moves afoot to get
more culture in the island of Bar-
bados, but culture came from
within through gentle speech and
gentle manners.

After Miss Burton had spoken
a pageant showing the nursing
through the ages was performed
by the nurses of the General Hos-
pital, The first Act opened with
the Pre-Christian era showing how
primitive man was in taking care
of the sick.







The second Act dealt with the
Early Christian era. The other
progressed and also medicine
three acts showed how nursing
starting from the Florence Nightin-
gale period.

At the end of the pageant Nurse”
Chandler moved a vote of thanks
and the meeting ended with the
singing of the National Anthem.



Obituary



Mrs. Laura Simnions

The death occurred on Satur-
day, March 29th., of Mrs, Laura
Lorenzo Simmons at her home
“Martindale”, Hastings.

“Grannie Simmons” as she was
affectionately known to a wide
circle of friends had reached the
ripe age of 78 and although she
had been suffering from the ill-
ness to which she eventually suc-
cumbed for the past six months,
yet up to a few days before her
death her indomitable will kept
her active and quite cognisant of
conditions obtaining around her.

Mrs. Simmons was married to
Mr. Wellesley Simmons, organist
and Headmaster of St. Bernard's

Boys’ School, Possessed of an
engaging old world charm, her
contemporaries and even the

younger people could always rely
upon her for a kindly word of
sound advice or cheer.

Hers was a christian disposition
that permeated her entire life and
that left a pleasant effect on those
with whom it came into contact.
Her husband predeceased her
many years ago and she spent
thirteen active years in the U.S.A.
She returned to Barbados and has
made her home at “Martindale”
the home of her only daughter
Mrs. Ercil Simmons-Howell.

She leaves too to mourn her
loss, three grandchildren, Mrs.
Giadys Coppin, Mr. Jack Howell,
and Mr. Alwyn Howell and a sis-
ter Mrs. Rosalie Farnum of New
York, U.S.A,

Her funeral took place at St.
Paul's Church on Sunday last
and her last remains were laid to
rest at the Westbury Cemetery.

The large and_ representative
gathering that witnessed the last
rites bore eloquent testimony of
her popularity with persons in all
walks. of life in the community.



ANGLICAN
ST. MARY'S
HOLY WEEK
Monday, Tuesday 7.15 p.m
and Address. Wednesday 7.15 p.m
tions and Solemn Devotions
MAUNDAY THURSDAY
6 a.m. Solemn Mass Procession to
Altar of Repose. Watch throughout da/
before Altar of Repose 12 noon Inter-
cession for the Sick. 5 p.m. Stations of
the Cross 8 p.m. “From Olivet to
Calvary"—Passion Music by the Choir
GOOD FRIDAY
7.30 a.m. Litany, Matins and Altar
Service; 9.20 a.m. Stations of the Cross
in Church 12 noon—3 p.m. Th
Hours, Conductor: The Vicar Coll
tions for Missions; 6 p.m. Evensong; 7.30
p.m. Lantern Service, Silver Collection
at the door
METHODIST
BETHEL. 11 a.m. and 7 p.m

CHURCH SERVICES |

Stations
Sta



Rev

T. J. Fugley. Holy Communion

DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Mr. I. Blackrpan,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Jones

BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. G,. Brewster
7 p.m. Mr. H. Gilkes.

SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 am. T, JI
Furley, Holy Commurion). 7 p.m. Mr
G. Bascombe

PROVIDENCE: ll a.m. Mr. J. Clarke,
7 pm. Mr. A, St. Hill

VAUXHALL ll am. Mr. P. Bruce
7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant

JAMES STREET: il am. K. E. Tower,
B.A,., B.D. (Broadcast); 7 p.m. Rev
K. E. Tower, B.A., B.D

IAYNES BAY 9.30 a.m. Br. W. St
Hill, 7 p.m. Bro. G. H®rper

WHITEMALL: 7 p.m. Br. G. Perkins.

GULL. MEMORIAL 11 a.m. Bro, F
Moore; 7 p.m. Bro, F. D. Roach

HOLETOWN 8.30 a.m. Mrs. Morris;
7 p.m. Bro. D. Scott

BANK HALL: 9.30 a.m. Bro. J, A.
Griffith; 7 p.m. Miss G. Oxley.

SPEIGHTSTOWN 1l a.m. Bro. G

Marville; 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence
BETHESDA: 11 a.m. Rev. F. Law-

rence (Holy Week Service Monday

Thureday).
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning
Service, Preacher; Rev. E. E. New, (fo.-
lowed by Holy Communion.) 7 p.m.
Evening, Service, Preacher: Rev. E. E
New, (followed by Holy Communion)

COLLYMOKE ROCK A_M.E,

CHURCH
11 a.m. Divine Worship, 3.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 7.15 p.m. Holy Commun-
ion. Three Hours Service on Good Fri~
day beginning at 12 noon Minister:
Rev. E. A. Gilkes
ST MeGINLEY'S
GREEK ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL
COUNTRY ROAD
11 a.m. Ordination of a Deacon, 3
Consecration of a Suffragan Bishop
Admission by Tickets only,
at the Presbytery or from Acting Suffra-
gan Bishop Hinkson, O.H_ P
Monday 7th April 1952
Synod begins at 7 p.m

Holy lasting

for five days. Celebrant: His Eminence
Archbishop Jack Deacon: The Suffra-
Assistant: Rev Donald

gan perce:
Sarjeant.
Taylor

Attendant: Sub-deacon 5S
SALVATION ARMY
SPEIGHTSTOWN

Holiness Meeting, conducted
D. Dadd; 3 p.m, Com-

11 a.m
by Brigadier O

pm. |

Will Exist

Training
ducted
(Assistant Iastor) and Mrs. Olga Browne



obtainable |

Free Admission to the public. |

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, |

Preacher: Brigadier O. D. Dadd
CARLTON
1l a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, conducted by Brigadier |




O. D. Dadd; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, |
Preacher: Captain E. Bourne
BRIDGETOWN, CENTRAL
ll a.m. Holiness Meeting p.m, Com- |

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Major M. Smith
WELLINGTON STPEERT
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

Preacher: Sr. Major T. Gibbs
an

pany Meeting
Preache

pany Meeting, 7 p.m
Preacher: Sr

THE 8T

a.m
Evensong and Sermon, Preacher for both





CHRISTIAN SCiENCE :
Bridgetown,
SUNDAYS li a.m
WEDNESDAYS 6 p.m
includes Testimonies of Christian Seience
Healing f

Subject of Lesson-Sermon
Golden Text:
multitude

thou God

The following Citations are included in |
the Lesson-
beginning was
made by
was not

Science and
Seriptures,
Everything good or worthy, God made.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952















=.
OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING | |
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS |

BUT

















THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH iy ae
RESPECT TO THE , DOES YOUR
ROOF NEED
se arastingl| HIGH QUALITY. OF PAINTING ?

‘R)



eting, 3 p.m. Com.
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting
Lieutenant K, Gibbons
PIE CORNER
Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m

Holiness

MAFFEE MADE SUITS

THEN



Com-
Salvation Meeting
Major J. Hollingsworth

BAPTIST



























































AND FORGET IT.

JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST ha ¥
PALM SUNDAY ” , Foaaullt “
Matins and Sermon, 7 p.n For tie best protection against Rust and Corrosion use —



Selvices the Rev: 3. B. Grant, Se; | BOWANRITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT..
x in Charge | Goes Farthest — Lasts Longest.
30 p.m, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, One Gallon will cover 700-1,000 sq. ft.
ene mer kel Meemeotiaaee: Stocked in RED, BLACK, and GREY

BOWRANITE is supplied ready -mixed ang should be well
stirred before use.
If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied

at $2.40 per gallon,
Phone 4456, 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO. LYD.

Upper Bay Street
and 7 p.m
A Service which

SUNDAY, April 6, 1952

UNREALITY.
Ecclesiastes 5: 7. In, the
of dreams and mary words

are also divers vanities: but fear



Bible: In the |
the Word Ail things
Him; and without Him
anything made that was made.

John 1: 1, 3
with Key to the
Baker Eddy

Sermon: The

Pr. Wm. Henry

Health Street

by Mary

Page
























Remember, a comfortable fitting SUIT is our first

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who recognise for themselves the consistently
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IDEAL TAILORING



Wherever it may |
be—there is always one |

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go for Clothes to Suit the Occa-

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of Rice on Bolton Lane, for fine im-
ported Menswear and Custom-Tailor-
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C. B. Rice & Co.

of Boltom Lane

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TAILORING DEPARTMENT

on the first floor of

CAVE SHEPHERD & C0. LTD.

10, 1,





12 & 13° Broad Street







Full Text

PAGE 1

rw.i TWO h I fujim* fry k**M*\j... fir mln&r i cvnttJ evetti*\gs Atti sUUUtuj Mmcittitu', ; $tnjdi Vff, p:.. tkt fevfiime fov beautlfal u/cmu~H...foY Man,I 'No. 5, M ADAY ADVOCATE sl\n\. XI'RII. . 1K2 M AJOR MARTIN HICKS tired A E. nK VT Bta.-kburne. I MM i-ee*..rd .Wanda, ji now spending a hnliriay in | Barbados on Ms way back to England. He arrived on Friday r.y B.W.I A. from And. < Maying at Aquatic Court CoJtib C aiiinx } OperaticMilestone Ff tg u t dm / : .I/TIV.V hriny; hr.iury innyour lift'. . gf, "#u .okurfiil | '>•< ent vai. .in */ imiifrj mmiktn. md*us /// •J. thai VffcffMiMrtb— Thiifaaiitf Af sfiivsfcr. Afafcaag faaft, Pttfmn* Cafaf**, /teM-f /•**>. W Oat. ft ii ft. M. II W*rri at C / id P.O. ft— nfj, HrtAg*** MAM. f.l Olll aUfcC.at—| ff— il-.l IM. %  • %  • •• *fcM iasii.iii-a.ia %  I OI*l vil NT ( LIFT.. W %  III llliMI'lil %  •••, nil !! %  rr.l •(. I Ml # # I' I It I TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 And ( t.ntinuing Dally at 4.45 & 8.30 Attended I.L.O. Talk. (R G H A: Canadian Journalist M MARION G. ROIiERs Ottawa. Canada, who,, „_ • In Barb*** I, \,2T Vlca-Presto. Branca oi Ha A.i.vina in %  arkaaai AO,„ ,. % &• •ill I* reluming '. c „ liis ship In a "l la a auesi „ u paaaanana on the Cr U i„• %  made Ihiround trip :., R PI?.,.?^""^ "'I' ud *' Mr nd Mi ••' ': 5 Woud ar "l Mr. and M„ E. IJ. Dfckinaon „f To,.. M Civil Aviation Chief B CARL AGOSTINI. Dire lor oi Civil Avlalicn u, rnuidrtd wno was mtransit Iron* Jamaica on Friday cvrnlna I.I! ., •— rf.l4. 1 w Ba Spent Two Months M R. HAVST-s CHA1XENOR and his ajaaaff Bylaw Miss H Ha fnim Toronto. Canada, r^lurrrrrt h.imr • %  I M R G H ADAMS. CM G.. by T i \ f aarti Awrmbh via London and Montreal Mr Mi ttendlna Mai matting Coa.rn.ttea ol fctpert, on the Mi in ot ....omaliona, C,,n*; BESU c Z£S"o£J£. * MM K which he Is a aaember. Sp(n yh. Winter Vi.il.il Baaaaaaaal •} TV JOI11 MOCKHIDOF. t) D M RS ran it" lirwiTT MV K %  "'"'" <'"'•""" "' T """RS. PHILIP HEWITT-MY„ ,-unitd |, Canada on Frldaj RING, wile ol the PubUc by TC.A. allrr spendmi ih. Rrlatkin, Adviser to the Coniptr; r | n Barbados H" rame down 11 oiler for Development and here from the middle of December Welfare, returned from the U SA and BhH atarlng at Staffcw-i on Friday via Puerto Klco by B.W LA after paying a visit to Special Flights ber parents. wsj addltlor. jul.ir Gone fcr Easter 1 flight*, BWIA will ba oparat%  %  He said that he i M il. ALAN REEKIE. ,i student Ing special flights to and from B LBiBaBBBBBBl I Jamall i W1,t> Wing Cummandri of the lyidge School, left Caracal for '.: Li til partod B£ij,.'e*' MLj ,v n ^ '' A. Egglesflcld, Director Gcnfor Trinidad on Prlday evening There waa a spaelal flight %  BBBBW -*i-l ? J| "' Civil Aviation in th.hy BWIA.. to ,pend the Easter day and there will or one on Am i % % %  |e\ ,_ J %  Caribbean area to meet Mr, Gin with his relatlv and minlhe, on Aprtl U ThMe \ ^f.^ I M" from the Internal! i .in the onl> three up lo r UK %  %  I ml Aviation Organi.anon %  -. .. A R LB A Resident I .ntu/.-.i, Tk P.l R.~LBaKtT ">raaaaadB -M ,s maltln I a factual report of e. ,e the West Indie. fM With I he Royal Bank BSL _^ -* ..Istln, in the Carlbb. WaU.n. and Partner*. ArchiCPENDINC, three we. BaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaallaM ,,., r „„„,.„„„ "^"Z •ec.s of 1/indon and the West J here i> Ml.. Myra Km %  • ,,.. of Carllil,. Ind-and M... Reekie of P -Brit, Irl ?'fii i" , At T !" .T i. Training Centre Back to B.C. S J-*" uS. r !" h cb'he'TuT'r,. QCTul^Gto?*,,! n.„i, „, c„n, ,; ,Opm .Ccanp • :„, repo,, c ,„ r "^'IS'^ „ K ,.,, K„i.,v l,v BWIA ..,„• '"" %  '„. -. r.., „.., .,,(,.,,' ' 'CAO for forth, Mr. and Mrs. Charles King Me. n Ten-Day Visit at U parly f'f Months „,„ C!1 || M to M| m| |or du ( I>hili|. sentahve for the Caribbean Area JVl I HASE and Mrs. \ sions is due lo arrive here loda King who is with the ,s n !" „ ln Barbados on a fen-day •"*. Draylon. Iwo BJrbii.i.. Berhli e It* ixite Cr.i j-iriv a ; '' *'e arrived on Friday mornnow resident in Brooklyn, N a Krtumg rrom D.Cj. brolher of Mr. J. A. King of the '"'^'l c ,* ,mm Mnnircl „,,] York, returned lo the U.S.A.. on A MONO the paaaengers arrivhldad branch of Messrs Wtr, Maying .1 Ihe Ocean Vicv Hotel Friday by B.W.I.A.. via Port-ofA In. last mds, by B.W.I.A Pataal v,k,... ULu Spain and San Juan after spendwr. Mi Kenneth Jones. Managei M R inir^JvJ "S '"*" ""** nd %  ha month* "' Yonker. Bus Co.. who hart K. Juai NCNES. Managing holiday here staying at "Konlateen to British Guiana on a short Director of Messrs Win Fog. mara", Jim. n Road, ..hday. arty Ltd.. returned to Brillah Thlg was Mrs. Dra.t..,. ,,Mr. Jones, who en)oyed his bri.' .uiana on Friday trj B W 1 A. ond vlsll lo Barbados In 28 years 'b" 'here, said that he considered hile It .1 many Onrgetown one of the best laid 1y Ltd. Methodist Minister R EV. and Mrs. Donald F Henry who arrived 'ran Antigua on Friday by B.W.LA.. leave this afternoon after paving a shnrt visit to.Trinidad and later for Brln.h Guiana where they will spend Bhoul three months* holiday. Rev. Henry i Mationed at Anfuilla with the Methodist Church. While iieie Ih. SM staying at %  Alhvorth." fjhaa p .land. of her relatives and old friends Mrs. Chase who left here qukle ait towns .,f the West Indies. Intranstt Mr *' chas e who lefl here qulle D..L r,^^It c A M p o J iitiVe .• a '"'••" %  *•" P* vin h "'si Back hrcrhi U.S.A. M ,!','., ,,' '-'V" 1 visit back to thT Island Bn-r M* AND MnS HALBION Manager of BW A „. Trim| eav |„, here she has been to 1V1 WILLS arrived from New ', ?",*" T ,'."Jo. J''" "'v' Panama. Cuba :...,! Canada bsforc Y ,„ k recenllv and ar, si,|„, at !-.. I Aon Fr -„„],„,,„ ,he U.S.A. ^""'r.'S.T Silv r S""* She iid that she had made M "w '" w 11 be remembere.1 <""">"> %  manv r |ends here who eonlrlb\\, h '" ">' '''ends who met hei British Embaaay. Car.c gjj *& gsTSfSS t SZA <"> "' fr^MtS fiS ^din, ,n the USA. for the hRS^XSJfS '"^"^ ? " peni three and a SSSSgSSJfflff&fSZ Student. Return Horn"Crucifixlcn" at Christ %  •: %  ,, holiday here with her pr e,e„, .pending three weeks' /SUITE a number ot studanu Church M,c^ expected to have „„„„„. „,„ ,„ %  „ „.„.„,, KJ attending the Lodge School. .„,„ i.aeT^ !" ,,, „. „ V i 'L.!,!,. ,^ Be "'" f 1 "" Tl " are due to Codringlon High School and the M|. !" r ?" la Antigua on her way hack leave lor England l.ler this month Ursullno Convent, returned ;., _.,.L''T."" d .. Mr ."•. .O. SI.C. Leaving Tcday M ISS LILLIAN GOODRIDGE. a native of this island w ho has I USA Off Id Canada ))V the Colorable. tonveni, reiurncn lo (,irot*rla.teh ...ni i. a. n aB A..,J.J u L*• TIL '•• •P c,,d ,he Eai 1 1 hoU^yi with :r r u.-,iixfon-' i, ^LJ?!2 n l H MMftn iMvini Attended K.t.C. Talk* their r*i..t.vp*. Some or ihrm WMII (.'. ^"' £ r e d ,rrt %  t.v BWIA for A>|R. VAIJINTIME ARCHEK. 0U1 by BW.I.A.'s rcRuIar flishl. M r f n n ^ m rch r way to Canada 1V1 Tmiauiw of St Vlncrnt. While Otbtfl travrlUM by the „,' ^ -JJ.' iS* XI ^ l ."" ay afterUeW MAI which br **"' H.ill Cross Road. She hu gone to noon by B.G Alrwavs after number of Venezuelans to spent! ., %  *",, ^ r n Indefinite holiday with .attending as an Adviser, the 'he Easter holiday* here. rrOIIi Ulivet 1 %  %  p I ... Pancini: — Ste*l Band — Etc.. Etc. AIH'LTS I \dmiv-icni tu Fair ( Mil OKI N fi.l £ Bicycles to LM drown for. Ticket-, now nn sale I Each %  .., % %  ,, THI r\s-io\ ri ., MX TAI-KtNGi AT 'All. II .A/-. TMRATlUn PLAZA Msas Priie (liven. Rploin Ticket TiTi r ind I-ui Si Hill Also arriving by the plane <*re Mrt. Louhi St. *ho had accompanied her ... n the triu and Miss Orace und Hon'ble w. j. Ra, lill of I-HMWS Houfa. St. Joseph merrhon' of British Qi vho wi st VftM.ini.i.. |, B, Rgfnrfei cent fgmi Dtreetm ..f Uia W. > Two i if Ihe ""Man rtnd Mr. A. Mr!.eor,, , ,, v..: Atkm>n r.nd nr. Mai-1smith. BeoniNnir and Fiii:. m iii t/ow s The Season for WtMainos' Are Yon Planiiic vitt ,be spcudin.; Adviwr to the Windward lalon.1, rj !K;. '::' yu"? Howi Your Wedding Etiquette? Here Are %  nerchani oi st Lucia nn d HotTa f ew Tips to the Brides-to-be—It alt starts with a nnc We \. C Bird, Preafdent of the %  ,.... Antmu.i Trades nnd Labour ^H"' 1 ding ling, to be worn singly Union nre due t. leave to-day ""' n t n 1 w rn on or with n guard ring. Thev were Ml .tavinc i i't, lho thlrd "niTer Irfl ham). ln> il'iiui !l,.(,l III Ihak f n — H SIl' ..u?.an a.l av_ til the f Whan the time comes to ahou*. made, A not-M>the news, of vour eng-agemen' lha tiding.* by handwri'.' otas to close friends and ihen tell the rtst of breathl*** world by formal •un. i-tnont in local newspam in your town and in Un '"I'lt-Kroom's. The i>impler>t certain ingi set aald.I i^ preferred: "Mr and Mr*. \ %  nude din%  '"hn Jonoa of Jonas Manor, an.'-.e-tiv^engageraent of thair Vueens Park lo-day at 4. p.m ,ur "> ea daughter. Tane Ann, to Georgr aiV. "ainon. M.B.E tltaafSTOftll g. Ma-ri-Tt James/ son of Mr an.l *\ Wl 0 ,he conducto0,ll *•" *'ne\ are 1 a nucnble Mr.. F. T. James of Avondalc Sj..JS*^r.!£f mm wi be; -te hat been set for the wed**^gJy""''•"'"p -IKI Cor the wedding will take 1 ovrjrruM^qu. D, n "•"* •'•'• h ** %  '" %  lawi lot i 1 "" during the holMtayMt" |UITI D.-u,.. „ n >„„„ *'• %  •nercfioni In the inl.lenrrK.m-s Make (he announcement preferTWOM*--. •••M %  l,lv 1' three or four months be,. ,T: !" _„. ,' the wedding, never less than n.is-i,., What; %  i,. (,i before. If you can mann„u, ';' s it. ft you wish your photothe hnd.,.,.-.,. AM, i ii ,| ,.,,.,. graph to appear with the noUce LaiuiBi fannlv and the sroom* should "-ncloar 4 alnsay print with name %  •*••• be tte Rrst to Mte it and if his plainly written on the back, and P*'i> Urni >' "*• %  <<' m the engaiemenr AI Jta?T"i r "'r %  •*" %  h ,l .1 week In advance of pubTW, niai^ !" ,"icTn."'""-'. „ An e n u W^"-t nn, IB date. %  a. ' -.id, vl „, !" n essary NEXT WEEK: "Plan vour •'• rrin _,,„ ?,V*' ,> w A " w,v '"'C to suit TOO' and "Measure COD SAVt THE QUttN ()| ^, v ..r FtlTM T 111 f)MlsilfcHI*. For the Style Conscious NEW LADIES' DRESSES A FINE ASSORTMENT OF BEAUTIFUL DRESSES Tha Lalesl Slyles and the Newest Fabrics For Cocktails or Weddings Hats and Bags to match any Fnaemble. THE MODERN DRESS SHOPI'E BROAD STREET Police band At Queen's Park Today llltllHil.TOWN—Dial 2310 TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4.45 a 8.30 P.M FOIKi: oi ARMS ALSO THE COLOR CARTOON —MIS BITTER Hfti r TUESDAY a WEDNESDAY 4.30 P.M. a 8.30 P.M. TallinlliriSiiililli' & Tar/an&lhr Slave(lirl OUTRAGE AMiiir*' %  IHI I' -I .:l i v> i>iii M i HEI URN OF IHF FRONTIERSMAN ADVFNTURFS OF HQN JUAN c !" Ba ra Wis UIRTER* MICHAEL OHALLORAN efKFTT A Alls),,, KntTmrw .\irr TO BEAT THE BAND FTancM UANGPUIU) A CROSSFIRE Robrrt MITCH I'M THE FUGITIVE FIGHTING GRINGO MORCSAN p^tii a.lffn • HnRAr-rrRifiTir %  Villa Dvs CrVtbaJB SELECTION KuiiisbttUaB NOTICE This to let thoe Custwners who have booked Meters know Wat the *hlpmeni expeeted hus ^o^f" %  —*|| be the after delayed but nollned as Company can arrival THK BARBADOS CAS CO., LTD NEW voonsi PRINTRO BEMBI Ra BHI I : WIIITI. MIAMI MM NS WIIITK CREPE I)' (HIM WIMTK SPINS MM: M Ill T\n H \ PLASTIC TABLE (LOTUS CHIUMENS' WHITE (KM hs -All Shai SIM M M l.6 IJ7 I1J7 UK J2 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606



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SUNDAY, APRIL , UU SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACI. SEVEN Mrs. Clarke's Column In Petticoats Among Man Mvut^cton The Cannibals UIIIMM nmN*m\n Are the "omiri would no* !*• f-tr or Just. .Bo to-be Tell him V-A. km '*"£ nd.n, In I i before you met film out thai -ltl> ian•> IJI %  wall' a NT Brand .s Uirt>< %  SK1MTS patterned wilt) hanai '. p %  Tropical scene-., net.I mean Till'. .loiiul. unmcDklv *y. yu. ibomii', when teaching v Uicm in individual lenauu ioi lu.wel. M i "" .Z?I ^ijili she wDuUl.br mane-up to your own motw-'St. are shown to ..dvntaae Tfi few cooquUMm.o,.,.*.,!.. at HETTINA-S DRESS I There'sn excsrUent .tuace M IftAlON m the Village. Bilmrnl culun and types -£ indoors or airland Halter .wU.l.veaeeslMt B-II" HOLL-EX Fi fo. all occasions and Mh use* lor casual wear — all in original HIT fomi* sense tya< of colour and tone make ,1 Illl-HUf Life of Mm l*" 1 i. iSS .mereited Why not wr.tr the "family 6ocyou wiU rod aocure in the knowU for him. I find myself i !" !" lor E hc ^u^ advise you in tha M of the love of the man you cm m i ihui i h • y Bbould nsk their gramlmothciabout Mary Kmgsley listened to a sniaMooat. the life of sin" wtafcr. black 'radera led. %  Minated — initaad of ing. %  aha found that the oniy Beltinai the very rxrhmvf Salon that It is. *:?*, |ve wa* to have a wife at -very Here's a Service tip for a Seruce C h e c k for trouble free olonnf at Easter and nil the meet Do tor," he would advlae you in tha vdge of RAfti T. t LT M 1 1 .i-"" m ,,n You are .till xoun. ajjtmy ,££,„„*? rSi^VrSEw T. W ICll *.) dear, .nd cennol J j •W"' !" V*J ,„ ^iTma. be eca-tuvuei lion I. mo.1 likely lo occur bebar uncle was Chars.-. K .•', !" %  SJT !" -Z..-"frans "thill"* mr'mM. IV b> om^upyou'.mmdtulU-.:: JJ ;"^, h m !" % u ^ -nuor nd ,,,„, w „ „.„,, ih.n an,uU.ec hl m „„ who .rota "The Water PJ" ' -lr route .Yom the I ^^"SSS^Ltl * 3?"! %  Mo> whom your fln..l love '" bfc ^ have plenty of time """J.„ which to take your boy-friend* %  %  *_ "2^ *"*** for OU b.in B u ^-v""l affair* with men over the ception will occur even at these not frt y repuu.uon^ lor batata ^^ f ^ ^^ ^ ^ MW ^^ ||mf>i ^ M h h %  -rfert ami AuraMa I'vmnl for %  %  %  -ee you Fell On Spike* flirt. m .iniivi %  >^"*~* -"• %  %  ^^" ^^" ^ --~ r 1 do not know a baby I would first advwe that A book. Went African CxplarTh..l be married. ^btrtewe him to bearTexirememedical check-op to eliminate iralouB man." •"> abnormality or uch that ,nfer. Be honest with your husbandmifht exlit. W 1 •it -he wn a* •oSoSt"^."'''tTJK l^" !" !" ^ *.,*^* jS i^r l-bj-^ft" j c5.-,cd b,V: ...-; I. cu. v,..l ,o Ihc n.fovc -ern ti-1. 1>" tOi ''•"' >'n 7.. d.>. luj Jiut own publidied Once, when Ac cm to %  VIUtcUing of her rcr trkablc -dvcimm. "every child in the pl.ee, . lurrn ibon ;i it iw my while face, lei Once Iha fell Into an elephw.-%  > 0"*: out of il M II It hd eeen i I ,, '^ <>•* %  >. tueu, nooo I2.li ebony .pike. I -" %  nd ed Into the Her thick skitt and volumlnou. iicefeai 1ml %  tern n.ic I pyerv .nd nol their own money, Tn. AcUng Chalrmin ..id no ,, < .,„ ,^,td ) trem PMe i I ^ f 1# ^, w „ not „|||ln to open the quo.„, iM| „ ,„,„d of "toe CBimv. W ""7, '? J." Mid M I." I *" M* ""l ""*J*1 .-.111. Kiumenu*c l4 Why w.. Mary Klnnley .b cool Secretary to notify Mr. Ma>nard "Pi !" ""^ !" ,„,. b „ c wh teiud (ha, that attnude Jhould ,„..,, 1( ,. ,., w ,„ ,„ ,„ .bout oiiharnied In o Mvaa, 1 Keinc of his .PPolntmcnl J y did not await lhat opinion not be taken end he would M wh , h , c|uw< WM ,,.,„ up ,.„„. d been '"'"^."^JSt K, doln, anything more in ... uatll the matter was ~mM by „,„,„, ,„„ hj ,„ lo ,,..,„ ,„ Shl „„ wlUl ,„„„, „, vriM ^K..Vinlte the mnttei. honourably th. rock .,ll and hang on. iTJa. o .i ..^.1 Mr Up f„ H Pr N „|, Rent Collector's Appointment equipped for gpecLaliJid ..ING and SAFtTY CH_ INC of your car. One experience the Eaao Serrleenter will .' r. countUaa olhera — a deeervii.,: emu*e for any car Is to have tervlced here. Reinember-*-lH before' the holidays! I ,i, ,ul-lup And henwe go — •Mi In on a carefree Kact< i v. 11. i Wltal t>etter Uian oaa Roads m St Johr' •nd walk into the Parloui (->' of CBENEZGH-S DEIT STOKIC .cool and comfoiiail< In aceinc spot we can afford to Mnifer I ^ • and perhapa tami'litin Dry I Goods section or check the aal£'' H for Shesara. with a touch ol: pnoe: b-.-i.smi.jn c.r ...e,a uw .. ,,, ^ "A KTi.in sci.-t of frtendshlp aoon and oil Jcvels at thMlr.Sh/.l ^^ He had been B lenal opinion and he railed to ere ww.ijJJ||J Even'T'the Board then agreed Mr. Hutson now ** %  £"* lno Up foHer Neck n'roi.betwaan'tSa Fans and me ; FIl-LlNG STATION *" tail.^SugS^ they UouW to lb* prewnt appointment. If !! ^ ^ ^"K Mr Sh, Jrd Ih-.u,,, .,w.m,, ,,.,d We each recunlK that w. beu our f ^.a> W ^,fv m,nT"hi* .ppolntment. would not be acting, in hib Mr. Hulson saidI that_Mr• mBr hr up ft ,,, l(Tt ln ^a.,.,. lo„..„ ,. ma m f sKllon ol the Ptraclr thk K-Uf Si'wrnol in kSnm. wtS -Pin...... • a public body should. Adagag wn lawyer hin^U^my. • n ,. .,„„. ( [r ( hun,,.. .M.. with whom It is betlei TiS? Irimlnwgrmilon of pubttc ft would be. if they thought Uw some doubt as to Je vali I.t> ,.„,„„„,.„ nim M ,M^,on never t., kg fight." Shin. Til "m? li.i f TSS nrlginal -l^"*""!* irt ff iotJlHgiafcto^Wbilin^o before attempt Her Uogan for the Afr.cam U ElECTROLUX ^^ 7Z£.\L L snieht it should be .superfluous to cormrm It; U It would %  least no """"*" And Bn carried 01 nor in.e*one which is a warning to-day, I u ,d.*d .1 K R Hun. -1 %  V \ oier.t Is in at Chelse i (with a D> and Its a beauty) The new > VANGUAKIK. an all '.em. redesigned at fr ml and -.-I S' you ward log n,ily u Valurl..i ICasler and here it K.ani.el from .*o.< Ifcdrt to fO with n % %  : Mao i.i IV • in iitttrbug Haltenu. ($JBV> ami Hose—a very special oefer at S&c Fell I H H 4 \ !of I %  %  1 vaiuvs when you'ra ment. — -Having asked the Secretary lo get a legal opinion," he said. "I consider A um.ecessw> haste to v ~; ^ I',* no jugUft matter that should union*, crnu-ioads caiitiilials In Shr brlleved Hn'ur,'. -ishto -n-phiuua. U, ljun y r„ 1B Ste.,ed out !" .'STo'cn "oiJttZSST*., h.nguying nothing %  u> the macita He could ano nnalily lo it uan -. • ,„„„en, „m merely .-^^..Ided to Hoae Uie^Ucu.; -j in^^ yl/rico war lo leaer; fc |h naflor *"o /Tee. uruoiashed "ion, not a u-hllru"ashcd llapr; or on enemy." 11 spend f i^^e the ap^oln^lntr .CrUr" .11 S^Sui Sing GTHS edhe wiuld have to Join Mr. of human remam^ we are a pSKc loard. with pubJ*S Li*hl? no\ g^Slwfi MmlJyto proteeUn, that 1. Aould ^Anjhg -* -f * a U c (u d .V^ w ^^^.^.Tf ^ThT Board would .ppreclat* ,.ot be closed. th. __ _._ w^to yjrda of. fttooi Do you like beautiful (iiass,..e'' t>f court* >"i d ancl E '.i il ...' %  .%  There are Champa.:' ElaFeCTRIC. GAS OK KEROSENr Sherry and Cocktail P t. operated lefrtgerators i Uqueur gi>-. .utifully consliucled and con tely noi*< b I I I .. Ids awaiting, electricity conup your <•'•'•. M you please liiuierWhuhlr • KI.ECTHtM-UX u P^rOatioiis Ltd nl> r„ ..,,.., !" Uarv lfJna-,aplviidld Invesim* -nd new TaU £ bad oSmlS^ on Gas. or oil and converted ._ndd_ Cakc-i-i, ike girl wh aarffiwJU' "" "* %  .heXt^opeTh. wrXlK Mr"^^-^ wa. ouin, w,U^,J^,-^ k ^ ^,51^ ^, s Jf B ^' rt T^^ a.nvi_ S .uc-B 0 .„ J„a-a ""'I "PISSTJL ..„„.„-. ,K.. 'be letter was merely an e^an| n g lo gel the legal opinion and HipPOa, "• %  • c J ne T 1U 3 .ludon auciology al CambridgeHH %  <•" %  U J h 'sec?e,.r^""h.7 P ^ 15m • j OBld *,.'^SS*i-5 san-^ W.^%. 1 ^ <-T.nk. W KiSay. JJl ^'ion-'and ne-td'Sid'^ Kf-VtTS.Sftl^ra! ggU B M~d UP ^M... ,h„ -"a^wa. A*. ^ uIoera"' 1 rr.d Jr Yd r iTwUo J^"^"^*" IT „.^ed lIK'arSSS .53S-2S *Tnfu* have £****'"L^ZZZS SZft South prefer lo W him. Mr. Heckles. S*,, u i d „,^^ Uwl with ai "ft RC ConneU wa. yeetertraveller, in tha Fun country U She died ^.y now. m S^uth !^!21-^^'nL 2H !" S..lV. H,. appointed to .ct a. MOThe:, >ay,ng ••• aar OH due respect to the acting Chairday -r man. Mr. Becklea, he would My ger-Secretary in pl_ lhal Mr Adam. wa. the ChairManager-Secretary Mr. T._ ^. ind the ultlmaU reaponatU.hlay who I. leaelng the lalanji In, So ha would nejet week to atudy aided of the dear sir." -llear me now Mary Kingsley had taught : fever —while i.ursliig Boer prisoners —I.S1 Your Baby And You seven weak* P.N.P. LOSE MEMBER MtESSING FOR THK DAY (By Sisier Ch.irlotie) mothers struggl [, whether agreed w reni coiiecuir was wanu-a B^ u",,,w." "P^M N.and someln potnf of view or not. quickly a^ possible. If the ChairJS^ILS^SLSSTS fall smol J n ? tn ,hcn v sDCi.kmB. Mr Adamman hnd understood the true Uonal f n J, c Unu !" ^' l 1 word here ca > he is still contentedly lying dou i wards on your knee or Now roll hlra over .,. HQIUM the garmenU to suit It might appear a trifle ridtcuyou are now ready to put on his be giving Mown whirh ,hould be open down udvae an such %  simple nibjeci „, r i,„ ck ,,, f tc iutatr easy as this Yet. I hove wen so many ,,-jemeni light not have writapart about him as ^dEvai'* Wntone he had. M.H.R. for Western Westmorecan do no harm. %  little • yuu \e J: is your*iih mante/i/o, i Frankly awaatll suprii. lift t cenluation -fl. ol wean nt Mm eUa' bra Vou'llsa. il'slli. your figur' Bad ISV..Mlr i titnume fclalA %  slarts are ma !" hTsaw no 'reeaon for heTp housing In Aiitigua Puejo the Island only u few days. ( but P^ notUyinf anyone Rico. Trinidad and Jamaica. Mr K m^tinr'haTwSte^a^er 'Hat he Had been,appointed Lash.ey wiU be away for about to the Secretary. et—... %  J Mr. Mottlev here enquired I'l-Ren* neel whelher the letter was a priMr Co said that there was vate letter or dealt with the one question, he-could answer in business of 'he Board. The respect to the haste. When Mr. Secretary slated lhat it dealt I-otihley. the Secretary, had put with the appointment and Mr. the question of the rent collecMoltlev moved that Ihe letter t.ir. it had ben Intimated that be read, whether II agreed the rent collector was wnnted a with his point of view or not. quickly as as legally speaking. Mr. Adams man had bv virtue of the Act was positi. C**airmail of the Board, The ten in mm • % %  m.am %  .•. r~"V~".-:ii--•. fc y ... _ J_„ a„ ultimata responsibility would Mr. Mottley ^d thai Mr. Cox', and, r..igned the parl) to^ay %  bo hi. He hlVl heeo ,,niv.inlcd a.gumenl held no water. The throw In hla lot with Ken Hill win Chulrman for the leglriatlva Acting Chairman explained that was ouiled on Sunday lat a. otic Session and Mr Beckle. waa lie had ascertained from the of the leader, of the parly, onlv appointed for the day'. Secretary that no written protest Fred Evan, was the mcrooci proceedings. Furthermore they had been made, and having been who resigned his eeal in the House were onlv acting in the matter informed that Ihe Solicitor Genla.t year, then regained it in a aa agents of Ihe Cnvernor-lneral had Bald lie would prefer to bye-election against JPl-s l.lady. Executive Committee. who. sec him In person, he had thought Longbrldge and was the Brat _-^__, when Ihev saw the minutes of lit to exercise hla prerogative In member of the House .Uipended 1 f. -_ %  Smooth llrm unhurried tr,e mealing and the hast, with deciding that Ihe appointment from duUa. for (outing the rule >\ me.il, are MMito ve you. which Ihe nppoinlmenl w.. was sanctioned. of the Chair J-fffl J*":''" ^if"„ rLjTeiN>.laUv made could onlv feel one way Mr Motlley still insisted lhat By Ivans' resignaUon, PHP t T9fta< 5' >' 'LT".'",', e tljf ^Vhea. "oout the Board 'He legal opinion should be merruJarahlp in th. Hou I. now f during hla first f,w_day. To Ihea, sought especially In the light of eleven Instead of thirteen IvJ who :.ie buiy II la beat to .vow lj-llcr Rend the Chairman', letter. He pointed Further development in the ^/ll hull... and huiioraaaaii aei garAl.,.in. maJu-iOn tha oul to the Chairman that II had TUC position followed lo-day ""-4 menl. Narrow' l •JS^f*' rass. !" Td^Seo thS^he lettar bism out of tha greats." respect with th. resignation of Frank Hill. Aftei Ihe final dusting olpowlo handle and much more likely ... SSSi li" !" ^ lot him lhat he had not formally Arthur Henry and Richard Hart ,le.; 11 you a., luck ttr. lone up longex. 8h £'?l,u leT. !" Mr Adams rtated objecled in wr.tlng, bul had seen from th. General Council of lhal have obtained little crosa-wr. to 'oanplele thl^jaart of you. ,h., nlSi w re correcT. him penumally aid discu^d ,. Union and th. offices the, held, veals, lay ihe garment on you. cat. faaten hb> Motfa. on jnd £413 FS ss ss H un,^i?s3;e' .c?v.": jyLttS&eZ sss ,rS„Vh''?i.rShr.uh ^ ~£^M D£T MM0 The.. %  : ..' vcr your vest* are the, usu-l .up-over type, always leave one eve aad one side of nls face uncovered to avoid fright, or place snaps or l.uttons on the shouloais and slip 11 up over the legs. I can jo mi better than to quote a famous ITofessor of Child Health who said that "All infant clothing should bo put on end taken off over the fee* and not over the head, to avoid fright and and to avoid dirty or billed clothing going over the ayes." lot •"-!* The %  fc-iiw and t heb of i ended M UM first Itiu. li at I 1 ( U Pfa-at nulion This dep pi.f iiAiinj lnjuia bsale/ kills ihe BUUOIXI"! .'fin. balaw UM skin snd uuUkly ( 1MH up <•> OM —11 ifc ut a ..... r,. u*T A BOTTLB TODAX. ObuioabW fraa* all <~ OBTAINAalE FROM ALL HADING STORfS LOCAL ACtNTS J.W POTTtB mflOE BY VERD I EVERITT LTD'BTHERSTDnE.EllCLRnD MEN like smart-patterned GALAS >mpuMe UP COLOURS With all the famous cotmet.es in the world to choose from, glamorous Pans and Lonckjn mannequ.rs never hesitate to choose Gala Lip Colours ... richly beautiful colours to harre • • %  dress shade they wear. Lip Line allows lip colours to be changed quickly, cleanly, as each Hefiil. contained in its own metal rhell. is interchaegeH.**"' able !•• samr., Andlher.'iogllel-ungNsalCola to mirtch e.ry Lip Colour. GALA OF LONDON fashwn Cosmetics Uto Gala fact Colour' —matchin t founcVitiori ead fowo.' irawel ', NICHOILS. P.O IOX1U .a.*"*a<*ll !" There i. notiiin. m the world olearant and ratVaghln|'. • • YARDLEY /. IVd'L A VE M Dt 1 shirts Men certainly like rilirtl "f iffl IT1 > **Pll milt"tmrilrl Hi! i'h %  Inking DuIiVrin liegisntc wit'i their handsomi:.iri|' I .m hllhl or dark backgrnnnrl^ %  %  stvouritee! Su OQOl. ""I comfortable, too. And 'Tex-made" maU'rwlnre %  ample to sew —they rlr tpi • .'IKIIS amd handle eir.irll.nsls You'll hi..Cbe way they wash mid iron . •nd the way the colours %  i.i\ Ask for "Tex-ma.li' Ind B l| II by the yard, and l""l fanioiu. identil.i Itf "Tax-made" I..K Th, riiir.iiil.. "f Urp ', laaUni; wear / the world', molt faunoui Lavender U */— la,*, I—ri a ^ f*-Nf %  -* %  1* *-...DL.I .. OLD .O.B .. %  . >• %  • 08IIIHI-H TEXTILE CO LIMITED '" MIITIEAt' t.a "KX-Aaj0r" IS WEtl MADt i



PAGE 1

SI M>\\ M'KII. d, ui anywhere, fur that matter. The oughout and is a brimming colour and sound Niiipliirind the tpn -^nity and iharm as the lovcis U bring* to Hie. in dclighttut blti whose linen quality is loyally.— or comedy. the bohemta of 'he he to ihe men with whom he I^ft Bank with its cafe. streetserves, and she lo the tradition* id artists. Occupying of courage and honour which are ),„"_ "man's" Farm And Garden (rin li> To Animals (JAIiPiNINti HINTS FOR AMATEURS CAase By ACRICOLA This subject is very much in our minds just now as result of the drive by the local Animal Welfare Society lo ( < licit support for a relentless campaign design en* to alh-vi[;", itf suifenng and prevent cruelty ID all its various barn our dumbs friends. It cannot be denied that in most civil. sed countries there is a strung and increasing awareness i nn.tr.* Tree., Shrntw aa Vfc.es •f 'Inyear — A|. ,1 to Mny—.1 Is rf ( bi ol pruning on avtatikishvd ib*. trees an I every shrub that needs to be lack, but most well grown shrub* are all the Wlln od pruning St least once i* the time, be'.'. raias get In Uy pruningU meant the cut' ting out of dead wood or over <>f the need for encouraging kinder and mon humane i> ment of animals Human nature being what it spite owners ihiough their ani* however, and. in spite of the ""da fortunately, barbarism of dvance of education, the necesthis kind is seldom heard of In An ity atlll exisu for Uws controlthis island, but there ,eem* to g**2? '/"** %  %  "*" '^lamig Jtng mans attitude towards his be a fair amount of crueltv in nlnt i %  ..f r.er New England heritage, uomestkated animals. In England, general whleh can only be sueGeorg. may not be anything very „, achne^kdged leader in (U cessfully coeahalted In a vigorlass by Itself, new in ah this, but the Mm that concern* animal welfare, * publu interest m effective picture of war. there has accumulated over the tion with "' nil A '" >n *rp contriist. it illuminV ears a tremendous weight of position U und< IU ales the decency and finance, ol public opinion which exercises and related services of a the human spirit. The ending may „ valuable check on malicious or humane nature over a wide Held vendors top hin %  1 Ing You." "1 Got Build A Stairway To Paradise, to mention just a few. and ends Ubanal, "but nevertheless. 1 thoughtlessly unkind actloni of animal welfare. think yo„ *,|] enjo, the pictura. towards dumb creatures. America In this column. OUTstAGC is not far behind we have read -lly concerned in a special In this Mm playing at Plaza, that in some States there Is a with anJmasi of the cconomi*. \> BsrSSftrees, we have Ida laipino 'hit and run' measure affeclin? type Crueltv to such animals "^ one* aa>nn la ttt' director's chair, motor vehicle drivers who leave fails under to closely Lupino's pictures have injured animals to their own heads, namely, direct the meantime, with a i %  complications arise warn he discovers she is i %  as their themes dramatic candevice*. direct. Under the Hurt may be flict of one kind or another and H most desirable that persons included the foil wing examples: this urnshe has tackled an exguilty of wanton cruelty should unmerciful beating or similar %  social subject. In be severely punished in the brutality. worktn| %  pallid, lame %  Dieted the Courts of justice and stringent o ( emaciated ;inimal: prodding 1 ',''" *-— % %  %  —— •<• —"- %  —" %  -• -• ii*.4^ me straggly branches. But .iM !-• HUM i ^M prunshrub or tree, not to spoil ham i % %  .caiek-ssnea* In 1 ill a ,l H !fl1 ""' ''-' "" 11 1 in nUD n It A lot eau bsj djOag '•' keep a flowering shrub in good 'I the yeau round E) cutv.-i In or, in the case of g the fknrers, to cm them a long stalk. This keeps f..nh well pruned. unneeted Hl W '" "*** It loo in good and inuturway tuaf good with %  %  *•">' 't U ill to tell %  %  •I ti-.*; i he has crspseo dB in Paris to paint, and due to lack of fUOdJ M Iiulantly aeccpla the patr^mage of a ***"* s *— < % %  p".:..::..V.'VTTh^ unmarried nTolb.; I-* 5 — and with success m OUTalmost everywhet* nowadays. ,pot had shoeing or lonse shoes RACE sh e has turned her atThe difficulty is to catch culprits wh4ch ^^^ obvious pain; overon lo crinunal assault, and wft0 " u fV*i | y evu-nunded working. over-loaafa£ n bad "", — %  ,''.';.* '^r„„inr^ '" I'm Sfrsld. not with the sggM P CI " opwdng under cover to toadtaC and I-dly nttlng bar,h w '" J !" 1 "'"* ? n f>* tou d-r M n # .„.. TK r „* h .. I\M> Th P lasi thi-M. u ... fuiriv pnminj: can become standards or this purpose exist When a shrub is required to grow iii a certain way, pruning and tseiiinij: must start from the Unv 5c plant Is quite young, if stick on a tender cegsfulls Exi all th:< rired %  fleet is to b| in ueees Bpus>ln> i inotu: ihs' shrubs degree of success. "ubJ.-ct is handled Though die ith restraint. The last ttn.c ,i %  >• fairly priiuin Othe |i:,;lommun on this islands roads. -* *-• !" !" kln •-"-*.•• SSSl SSL, h.ch win M Gen,i^ graiialing BshVra "-J ,l ' ,,c ed for more and better Also, if the same girl ing has never been more tumble Psychiatric treatment of sex disappeared from home, surely not infrequently see more har^ or varM i I "innab i* urgently advocated as enquiries would be made by her iess than 'hosa*. It is the owner's '* •** %  der fooling witj, i,„i,. pteafih wcl1 •• <">der better, rnon SfiltaVg and efflciont service, as well a. in QM li'ngtht'iiiiut of the of the animal's utility, percentage of drivers, umple, romciitbc refreshing drink when they to take one themselves ? top B.B.C. Radio Notes igh' exquisitely |TSeful and her deJighUul personality which has a touch uf U i child ui leal world, oic plays himself, though other name! Looking like a dlsgrunded infant, be plays the piano brilliantly and delivers hu 1 that is unt\celU-.i His pines d* lesiaeaessj %  which due to his in.saUable ego. i.id^n poet, a play ne not oiUy plays the solo par! but ..matted considerable attention originally broadcast in the BBC s pigs with %  t !" In IBS or th tS ; ,t rehearsals in England. UnThird Programme late last year during very hoi weather; wo don %  conducting: iSfQBlliai from LonIO mark the publication In a remust not semi our poultry to will Th ? r l_ J!-. ha, J dl > T a moment in ^on in December was not at all _. . ._._ market suffocaUngly Ued toflowering tlie. want of a gumi tnuuing. Dead wood left on a tree la just asking for tumble providing aa it does large home* for ,„, wood ant% tin ih.tr tlrst stage) What i**idea being extremely dls., araatafl for the trese. lie. s should be pruned yearly umulaled dead wood, unor misshapen branches or Su far, we have directed our Mj ifomd brancaSJB, that, rubcomments mainly to draft anibuu, t geniei nisy nib off the mals. since it M among these that oaik. and thus leave the tree an officers of the Society are likely, easy victim of disease. VERSE PLAT By Professor of Anatomy at Unlversmost frequently, to move. Our „ in in h WAL*XTT ty College. London, whq will remarks apply equally, in prinFluweung trees .*""'*"' Siind.n lith April. 1952 i-ommcnt on the work and thought ciple. in Cgfftaln icspecU. but should never M u.-gl-vtcii bul In DcemU'r last the B.B.C. of Sir Charles Shernngbm in a van imiJOrtanl additions in the should yearly, after flowering broadcast an urlgjnal verse play talk entitled'Man and his Nature.' case of animals which produce sad when lae seed P"' ""e iv Derek Walcolt, the West This talk which is now in the .>ur food supplies. Thus, we fin mod. bs judiciously i | "" lpa : Indian ooet a Dlay which hsd nature of a funeral oration, was must not forget lo provide the Seed pMs should hcul[off and ,llow or bath dead wood removed. If this 1* response of the trees not maulc. and the will be appreciably AN AMERICAN IN PARIS when" "h^t T-ouh^oe^deJIred'"a'n" the vtap d edition of Sir Charles's 1937 jiether" in "a" container to,, small finei someone i-n t igning or duncing broadcast to the West Indies was Glffrd Lectures on Man and his and without some sort of shade; and there is un air of spontaneous llo i we || received. Because of Nature" first published in 1940. we must not exercise our dairy The gaiety that carries t L tne .,),,,. w nj be repeated in The lalk %  * interest to us in the in lmaU at a trot, especially in shrub The dim sets a new standard for -fjaubbean Voices' to-day Wcfl Indl * ul thl . parti.-ular t he sun; or subject them to done musicals and ha peak in excellent rOKCr: Or AltMs Showing ..' Ihi towh, FOHCK OV Al Based on a story by Wdliam Tl %  Of the I e\down-to-earth coavsnatloB and backchat amont very good idea o( their thoughts on the war. The script deals with I GOD ageous sergeant who falls la love with a W.AC, and ml becomes over cautious in battle. As a result, his superior officer is adtledand %  wounded. During hi* convalesence. hi 1 m.nrie^ the aul he loves, only to tlnd that in order to expiate his feel0th April, when reception should moment as Professor J. Z. Young undu iy harsh and i* much better than it was *>as recent y been P^ymg a visit nwndl ur Uaaead, the end of last year. This to the Ura^roggtty. Coasgg at m quieting In.luen.vs to no ui rrmbroken .af t" 4Ufor thMlttct! jlsy comso that a any disleft huh i the end Ol last year, ITUS !" • %  "; "f,""""'lt,~'r"Cr m '" "** quimng inuuvium liable ,s the most lavish production in West Indies, in this talk ProUnsor excite their norwu* Usnir v of Caribbean Voicar\ Young says that Sir Charles's „ ent. This list could be multlIhe aiskh piogvamme of West work on the nervous system has piled. Tho other day we saw back %  Indian prose and ixwlry broadbeen called as revolutionary aa two line looking dairy cows dlseagi "~ driven at soaw si-i-d on a highway, their | '••* die udders (Manch should be sawn oil cleanly Mdo U> BSOSe 01) ID Hs UlUlk. and never .it-.ui.-i ktfl Uddng out IsaM a foot mouiha beyood tintiuiiK ailed S.r.uay from the BBC. Harvey's work on the circulation mentioned above, eritics of the blood. It will be broadcast in England had been impressed on Friday next. I lth April, startplay. These included lug at VJO p.m. and lasting for Dylan Thomas und Louis Macapproximately twenty minutes. Harry Dernier; foaming Apart from o*perienthe play portravs the thoughts of Countries of the Blind ring obvious fear and dssessstfott, Vines, too. •• Oftej ad man on earth. . but Feature programme of the week their milk Melds moet have better for a good pruning, corlisten to-day Broadcast in BBC broadcasts Is entitled been prejudiced over several alibi especially gets a lot or oiy will be on two beams, 2S.53 'Countries of the Blind' and is part milking*. leaves and twig* un i. la-ain 11.75 megacycles; and of the BBC's tribute to the memory There Is hardly pace left to But it Is hardly worth pmning 31,32 metres. 958 megacycles, of a blind French schoolmaster, treat of indirect cruelty, very this une. as when cut n in* It begins at 7.15 p.nx and lasts Louis Braille, who died in obscur-important thougri it I* Ami. in ground it springs again so gn K.for half-an-hour. ily but whose Invention of the thli Oanneetlon it must suffice ly. But many of the MOW IT alphabet of raided dots which lo emphasize that the first care growing vines respond to '"" Tribute to Sir Charles bears his name has brought imin ,t the Brst duty of all livestock (ut pttaUDg OOOl In %  wnue. SherringliHi mortality to his memory. Tho owners should be to see that Sir Charles Sherrlngton. O.M.. prog.am.ne describes the work lheb an imsls. of wbMOVl %  .u When P*BfJd" %  ^ %  f the greatest .cienlisU of done by UNESCO In standardising R1 „,. ,... pfCSSBtfy fed. managed end of Bs d %  •" gj Z the modern world. cUed a few Braille and surveys some of the llv ,\ hell, M-I e pruned parts have %  "*• *" lng of guilt at the death of his " JHJT* at ibsTigTof ninetynational systems of blind welfar. ta conclusion, we bespeak. Cor heol and harden l. o.e t :;,:' ^^'"^ro^lntternitag S-.nn for tte JjhVOr TJ^^JtJO pMgg M4 unit ... the front. broadcast a talk by a dis-day. The broadcast wlU be on prevention of Cruelty to Animals, trees are then reads an ^^SfS^t^t iuiSSS younger scientbrt. Tuesday ncct commencing at „ ,|, „,, ( o-o,,-.!,,,,, it growth that the rai Solde^ 5MI5 SI,, have ^'oor J. Z. Young, who is 10.10 p.m. surely derves. ulate. will stimIfce poeularitv of John While \hoes i. buill on VAI1 B, sMl as DfaflND tastl ITY. < omfort ni'l Mile? — Yes. ccrtsinli — lhi> arc as tav>lilllfio and smart kinking s> |M rgsjN wish. Hoi ihcir oulslanditn: V M I I h what men ixrjetl sad • IH.Hpi Hhcn fht) iiised on shoes made b> John While. See ihem lor >outsell in lesdiss* stoics Ihroughnul Harladov made by JOHN WHITE means made just right ,v*v*v*vs t I OH PURF IMIIM.S 11 I III! VII in st mi'i HIS SERVICE CALL AT .... COLLINS DRUG STORES BROAD and TUDOR STREETS M OMMMMMMMMM > MMM f? > ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY AVAILABLE! EWING'S (CANADIAN) "CHAMPION" PREPARED MUSTARD fi oz jar — OBTAINABLE FROM ALL GROCERY STORES — For Your SANDWICHES or light SNACK this Delicious MUSTARD is just the THING GET A JAR TO-DAY! .•.-.-.-.-,•,-.---..•.-.-.-.-.---.-...-.-.•.-.---.-.-.•. %  ..-..•.•.-.'.• %  •.• %  • % % %  •.•/.• %  • %  '.-.%  • %  '.w .ww -,-.-.%-.-.--'.-^x^x^^<^------*'----.-^---'---------'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-"'


nile: ie ES A.

sean a a

ok My





ESTABLISHED 1895



Removal of C.N.S. fro

W.I. Traders Will Bez"

Greatly Affected

NEwWs that the Canadian National Steamship

Company will discontinue its passenger ser-
vice between Montreal, the Atlantic Ports and the
West Indies, has been received locally with much
concern by everybody alike.

A local shipping authority said: “This step will

to a large extent affect the passenger situation in| inet tion nt Mere: The pottle.
the West Indies, but will have slight repercussions|

on the transportation of
The information reached Barba-
dos yesterday that the “last of the
famed Lady Boats of the Canadian
National

Steamships soon will
vanish from the Atlantic and
Caribbean seaboards.”
Government owred Canadian

National Steamships in its Annual
Report to Parliament last Thurs-
day said that Lady Nelson and
Lady Rodney, ships which had
served valiantly in the second
World War, were being taken out
of service at the end of the sum-
mer season. They will not be re-
placed by similar liners on the
Montreal-Atlantic ports—West In-
dies run, The C.N.S. will provide
prosaic freighters.

At present these Lady Boats
local agents for which are Mes
Gardiner Austin & Co., provide |
the only steamship passenger ser- !
vice from Canada to the West In-!
dies, and in addition provide one
of the main communication links }
between the islands themselves.

Traders Affected

Itinerant traders who do busi-
ness between the islands with their
consignments of West Indian pro-
duce of one kind or another. have |
made much use of the accommo- '
dation afforded them by the Lady
Boats, and many of them will
no doubt be gravely affected.

Informed on the subject this)
morning, one such trader whose |
business takes her through the |

Windward and Leeward Islands

said she was very sorry to learn |

that this service would ro longer
be available to traders like her- |
self, because, she said: “It is
one of the surest means of our
getting our cargo from place to |
place without its perishing for |
long periods at sea. |

“Again many of us, are able
to travel with our cargo, and we |
cannet all depend on the smalicr |
motor ships and schooners for
transportation,

The taxi driver too, is worried
about these ships going out of
service, because the regular sche-
dule maintained by these vessels
provide him with a source of in- |
come during the greater part of
the year when the tourist season
has ended,

Taxi Drivers Concerned

Besides the few holidayers who
come in by these ships from time
to time, it invariably happens |
that passengers from the various
islands come in, and these often
stay at friends out of town, thus
providing added income for the
taxi driver. One taxi driver said:
“It is when these Lady Boats come
that we are able to do some work
without having to compete with
larger garages which now mono-









polise trade during the tourist

season.” ;
Generally, local business men

have not yet given the matter

sufficient thought to discuss it in;
detail, but off hand they express
concern over the news.

One businessman thought it
very grave that these passenger |
liners were to be taken off the!
run. Everybody knew that the cost
of running steamships today, with
conditions as they are, was very
high. i ‘
More was the pity that they
were going out of service be-





“WANDE



ONE THOUSAND MILES from 4

| inter-island

|It was left

cargo.”’

cause these Lady Boats have
been looked upon as a friendly

link between Canada and the} bottle of Scuth African wine in
West Indies for many years. He! existence. .

was, however, satisfied that |

when conditions become more| Wellington: New Zealand's!
favourable, the various West}longest milk run will get under
Indian islands between which way within four months when
the Lady Boats have been a!

means of communication would

be glad to see them back in ser-

vice.
Another Drawback

Another drawb2ck
‘certain loss of hard currency be-
cause many people who are not
permitted to travel by air, or who
do not care to travel this way,
do so by Canadian National Steam-
ers, which is one of the only
other means of coming here.”

“The taking out of service at
the end of this summer of the
Lady Boats will affect to a large
extent the passenger situation in
the West Indies, but will have
slight repercussions on the trans-
portation of cargo,’ a local ship-
ping authority said.

For years now the Lady Boats
have formed the chief means of
transportation for
passengers, he said, and they are






going to be greatly misseq by
West Indians—especially business
men and itinerant traders who

make frequent use of them.
Reviewing the shipping activi-
ties between the West Indies, he
said that passenger ships coming
down from the U.K., like the
French S.S. “Colombie” and the
Elders & Fyffes’ S.S. “Golfito’’,
make Barbados their first port of
call and then sail on to Trinidad.
They return to England by the
route. So these ships are of no
advantage to the Leeward Islands
and the other Windward Islands.

Passenger-Freighters

The Furness Withy passenger-
freighters and the C.N.S. passen-
ger-freighters serviced | through
the islands, both offering limited
passenger accommodation and the
former making infrequent calls.
to the Lady Boats
td bear the brunt of the passenger
trade.

“With T.C.A. promising to ex-
pand their service with Barbados,
the vanishing of the Lady Boats
will not affect very much the
tourist trade batween Barbados
and Canada", was an observation.

A shipping agent agrees with
the shipping authority that the
going of the “Lady Nelson” and
the “Lady Rodney” will have
little or no effect on the inter-
island transportation of cargo.

He said that transhipment
cargo and West Indian produce
which the Lady Boats take from
port to port in the West Indies
can easily be handled by inter-
colonial craft.

As regards the Canadian-West
Indian trade with cargo, he thinks
that the Alcoa Stearmships and the
Saguenay Terminals Steamships
will be able to supply the needs of
the West Indies and could accom-
modate the cargo that the Lady
Boats bring down from Canada.

Another shipping clerk wonder-
ed whether the French Line and
the Elders & Fyffes Line, who run

@ on page 15

) ua”
RER



ny land the 24 ft. Australian yacht
“Wanderer II” steers herself under twin spinnakers on her way across
the Atlantic to Barbados.—(Story on page 9)

will be the!

BARB. US,

mW

¢



ANOUN!D THE CLUB MARK





IN AN OLD
BOTTLE

Cape Town: A 161-year-old
bottle of White Constantia wine,
lent by Conel Frank Mellish,
Manager of the Sprifgbok Rugby
Team, has interested visitors to
the Wine Industries pavilion at

OLD WINE |
|

dated 1791, was given to Colonel
Mellish by the Duke of Northum-
berland at a dinner in honour of
the Springbok Rugby Team dur-
ing their recent tour. It is be-
, lieved to be the oldest unopened



milk from pioneer goat farms in
Canterbury will be flown 505
miles to Auckland. Until herds
lin Auckland are built up, the
milk will help to feed babies and |
young children unable to take
{normal milk. Cost will be 1s. 6d

ja pint plus freight. Cow’s milk!



|costs 4d.
New York: Three bandits in
Danvers, Massachusetts, success-

fully robbed an armoured bank
ear and got away with 600,000
dollars (£35,714), In a_ quiet
street, the driver and two guards
parked the vehicle beside Danvers
National Bank, went off for coffee.
However, they forgot to lock the
car’s door.

Perfumed Post-Cards
Amsterdam: Visitors to the
Dutch bulbfields can send to their
friends the lovely sight and smell
of hyacinths. Picture-postcards of
fields on

buoy.— (Story on page 5)



“B” BOAT “Okapi” and Tornado “Comet” clear the Club mark.
the background other “B” boats and Tormhidges are heading for the

Bronco Teal Wins
Grand National |...
Steeplechase







APRIL 6, 1952

in \— -
Plane Crashes
Into New York
| Housing Lot

NEW YORK, April 5.
that an unidentified
|}plane crashed in the Jamaica
| section of New York City at ap-
proximately 8.30 a.m, E



the hyacinth sale are Police described the plane as
perfumed with the flower’s scent ‘a “big one’ and said at least
which is guaranteed to last for six ‘ l eight houses were on fire at the
months, S : AINTREE, England, April 5, | scene of the crash ‘which is ap-
Set: vhs’ A: Yes ie Teal a reformed bucking bronco, originally bought for | proximately 10 miles from La
™ uve “State of emer : » Gre i 5 se in one] Guardia airfield. 20 ambulances
gency” was proclaiived throush- £43, won the Grand National Steeplechase today in one | Guardia airfielc

out the country to-day and Israelis
are warned to expect an “invas-
ion”—of locusts. If they see any

history of the event.



oi tes » ‘the ae P away from a subway station, a
Signs of the “enemy” they may! between Teal, Freebooter and Legal Joy with Wot No Sun{focal point in Queen’s transpor-| sion,
telephone or send a warning tele- ; str ‘ ached
gram to the authorities free of always in a handy position to challenge the leaders. tation system. ‘The ais eras net
charge. Just before the race it was deeided to use single strand erorey (see One. er eeee

tape instead of a flag to send the unweildy field on its way,| "Residents in six of the houses

but the starter had a very difficult task in getting 47 run-| wore trapped in roaring flames.

Injured
Improving’ |
Reports from the General Hos-!
pital show that the conditions of
the injured that were detained |
after the motor bus A 66 the
property of the Rocklyn Bus Co.,|

overturned on Spring Vale Hill,
St. Andrew about 1.30 on









ners under way.

‘DEAD’ MAN COMES
TO LIFE AGAIN

ROME, April 5.
A patient in a hospital at
Rome “died” on Saturday
during an _ operation,

where a patient has been
restored after such a long
period. They said in pre-
vious similar cases the heart |

driver of the bus at the time of
the incident and who sustained a
spinal injury was taken into the
Surgery as soon as he was admit-
ted to the Casualty. The Advo-'
cate was told yesterday that the
injury is not as serious as it was
before,

It is expected that some of the
injured will be discharged from
the General Hospital, this week.

stopped only a few minutes.

The patient is 51-year-old
Arthur Eeber undergoing
an amputation of the right
leg because of burger
disease which affects arte-
rial circulation.







of the most thrilling finishes in the 115th year in the!

Virtually it was a three-horse race from the start-

a wens ame wee

but >
heart massage restored him |}

p.m,

March 31, are improving. 15 minutes after his heart |
Cyril Springer of Spooner's stopped. Doctors said it iv |;

Hill, St. Michael who cae the the first khown case here

4 ' 7’ ” ”
Printer’s Pie, Freebooter, Roi- A CCEPTED
mond, Brown Jack and Teal im- "
|mediately began to contest the From Our Own Correspondent)
but after the leaders had PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 4.
ed the second ‘jump, Brown} In a considered judgment hand-
Jack was down. ed down by the Supreme Court

minimum and while the leaders

loose
their wake.

and equipment for a three alarm
| fire were sent to the scene.



The crew of the plane in addi-
¥ Iwo Of the ch¢ s were une tion to p policeman were known
ruly and broke the tape and after;to have been killed outright, but
a delay of nearly ten minutes on! there were no authoritative





om-
the field, were off to a good start.| plete death details. The plane
nly 47 horses started over the/was immediately enveloped in
a, 0 a Pa SCE ater fire as it crashed down out of the
exas an 1ac een Wilhndrawn ‘ f rorcae ,
: rainy heavily overcast sky.
from the field overnight. iy F me anti JP.
Rain fell heavily and



skies made it difficult to discern
the colours of riders while the
water on a firm turf made the
ground slippery and treacherous
especially near the take off of the
jumps,

leaden |

APPEAL SHOULD
HAVE BEE!





Visibility was now reduced to a) this morning His Honour E, R, L.

Ward found that the Clerk of the
Peace of the Port-of-Spain
Magistrate's Court should have,

were jumping fluently, a string of
horses were following in

|
|
|
|

The crash occurred one block) there was one paragraph which

| tween the Chairman and Mr, Mot-



accented the “e ‘al from
His heart stopped during As they approached the famous accepted the notice of appe ul r

pee oa but ae Le turn, the race developed in- oe rea ae ny ee

? ; rmanuel Scavo 5s ie to a thrilling struggle between | #!n #oy Musson é a saa

T dad Govt. Takes ~~ vo and a — Teal, Freebooter, Legal Joy and ~ British anilens we peer

. Saging the heart. After the Wot No Sun. the removal ordet nade ;

as eed heart-beat resumed, tha The crowd, huddling in the rain; Acting Chief Magistrate Beau-
Me ures Agaitist patient was given artificial at vantage points alongside fences, | mont Celestain

P 1 . respiration for 30 minutes cheered the small group as they The Mussons had applied to

ou try Disease until breathing and muscu- |} neared the end of the first circuit,|the Court for an order of man-

lar reflexes were restored. hoping that the gallant Freebooter|damus directed against the Clerk |

sors Ons a Covssapondent) The operation was suc- | would join the ranks of all-time|of the Peace but Ward pointed

PORT-OF-SPAIN, April 5. cessfully concluded.—U.P. greats by winning two Nationals.|out that it was unnecessary to

The Legislature aye a quick ‘Second Circuit make the mandamus _ absolute

passage to a Bill which aims at At th aoe t of the sasend. & because what the application

applying provisions of the diseases { the start of the second cir- : W

of Animals Ordinance to poultry
with a view to regulating and—
or prohibiting the importation
into the colony of poultry and—
or . poultry eggs intended for
jhatching, to prevent the intro-
;duction of poultry diseases into
the colony.
Hon. Victor

Cuban Robbed
Of $50,000

MIAMI, Florida, April 4
A wealthy Cuban woman signed
a warrant for the arrest of a styl-
ish middle-aged man from Hav-
ana on Charges of fleecing the city

3ryan, Minister of
Agriculture and Lands told the
Legislature during the consider-
ation of the measure that not so with $50,000 of her money

very long ago a fowl cholera] The Miami Herald identified the
outbreak had decimated a large woman as “one of the family” of
part of the poultry population of}the Cubdn President Carlos. Prio



the colony, 7 Socaras now in exile here, En-
_ Experts advised that the}tourage of Prios’ relatives and
importation of frozen poultry’ former government Heutenants are

|eggs might have contributed very|living in exile with him in Miami,
materially at that time to the] Senora Fonseca said she gave
spread of the disease known 4s/the money to Ruiz to take for
the Newcastle disease. - safe-keeping when they landed
here together in a plane from Hav-
ana on Monday night. Police Chief
Norton said ske turned the money
over to Ruiz for delivery to a
hotel or some such place in Miami
or on Miami Beach.

The money was all in 1,000-dol-
lar bills. Norton said his officers
learned that Ruiz caught a Na-
tional Airlines plane for New
York on Tuesday night.



It was also found then that
Government did not have power
to act against importations under
existing legislation. They had to
use currency restrictions to
impose control.



Cuban Council Hold
Ist Official Session

HAVANA, April 5.
The Cuban Council of Ministers
heid their fir$t official session last

U.P.

(Quakes Shake
‘Central Pyrenees



| night in the Presidential Palace

after General Fulgencio Batista’s TOULOUSE, France, April 4
assumption of the provincial Earth tremors shook the Cen-
Presidency and according to|tral Pyrenees region of France
new Constitutional statutes|early today and a number of
ordered a new 45 day sus-|persons were awakened by the
pension of constitutional guar-|jshock, but no darnage or casual

antees. Batista was sworn injties were reported. Observator

immediately after the Council had|of Pic Du Midi recorded a serie
adopted a long series of constitu-|of tremors lasting approximately
tional amendments to make the}30 seconds around 9 a.m. G.M.1
| Act possible. The new statutes | Authorities said that the earth-
approved by the Council dissolved; quake was the strongest in the
{alt political parties, ratified Batis-|areas of Tarbes Haute, Pyrenee
jta’s suspension of Congress and jand Luchon Haute Garonne
provided for a 56 member “Con-|where a number of persons were

|Sultative Council” to advise ‘the| awakened

} Government. All members will be/ tremors

appointed by a council of minis-{ noises,
ters.—U.P.



during
and he

by

the nigh
4 mbling





—U.P.

|
|

has been one of the luckiest mer Herbert Miller, a labouret

on the British turf and surprised} Beckles Hill Michael, wa

both experts and fans last season! en to the General Hospial and «

| by winning the Lincoln Handicap| charged after a ten pound turtle
with Parnes Park » had done} fell on hi houlder while he
nothing since placing one of the inding i 7 t near the

top classics two thousand suinge ‘Interpreter at about 1.30 p.m

ao rae



cuit the order was Teal, Free-|sought had already been done,
booter, Wot No Sun, Legal Joy, Ward then mentioned that
Border Luck, . Roimond, Royaljafter preparing judgment he un-
Stuart, Royal Tan, Menzies and derstood from the Registrar of
Printers Pie, with Uncle Barney|the Supreme Court that the re-
trailing in the rear, followed by afeord of proceedings and notes of,
group of loose horses. evidence and all exhibits in the
The first four contested every matter had been entered by the
yard of the gruelling course and Clerk of Peace
at two fences from the tremendous Tt i question as to costs of the
cheers and excitement, it became appeal ha been reserved
obvious | that the race lay be- nfence Consnea’ Algernon
tween Teal and Freebooter. ; + Ward’ attention
The crowd forgot the dismal) Wharton drew Ward's a e t
weather and shrieked encour- ‘0 t! high bail of $1,000 each
agement to riders who fought, xed by a Justice of the Peace
neck and neck closely chal- | nd described it a unprece-
lenged by Royal Tan, A tre-' dented aN
mendous shout went up 4s MIR, eaten
Royal Tan one of the popular
choices, crashed into the last

obstacle, leaving Teal and Legal

Joy to fight out the issue.
Jockey Arthur Thompson who

rode Teal today and had won in

ON OTHER PAGES

Page
Carib Calling.



1948 with Sheills Cottage, rode 3 Cinema; Farm And Gar-
a hopeful finjsh and forged live den; Gardening Hints.
lengths ahead of Legal Joy with 4 Sidelights On Sport:
Wot No Sun trailing behind in Bookie; Football Re-
the third placing. Only nine port; Table Tennis,
finished. 5 Yachting; Soccer Les-
It was one of the fastest run) sons; Football Fixtures.

races in recent years, the winner | 6 Lady Diplomats; Sew-

covering the course in nine min- ing Circle,

utes twenty and three fifths 7 Your Baby and You

Seconds, one fifth of a second out-| Mrs. Clarke's Column

side the record 3 8 Editorials; Sitting On
The winner provided yet, an- The Fence; Island For-

other Grand National saga. Teal tress.

was first purchased as a children’s | 9 The Hard Way Home,

pet, but he soon developed into a}

10
bucking bronco and was unrid-

Brightly Fades The Don.





| 11 The Lives Of Harry

able q | Lime

It took six months’ hard train-| 12 Local News; The Lives
ing to make Teal tractable and he Of Harry L on
was eventually trained as a suc- 12 Comic Strips .
cessful steeplechaser | 16 Local News; Church

Since he was first purchased he} Services .
was sold on four different occa- F ”
sions, his present owner being
Harry Lane, the wealthy North of

England building contractor

Lane | TURTLE FALLS ABOARD





A. Causes Much Concern

Rent Collector’s

Appointment Causes
Prolonged Debate

A debate lasting two

and three-quafter hours took

place at the meeting of the Housing Board’yesterday when
Mr. E, D. Mottley spoke about two hours eoncerning the

leyality‘of the appointment

of a rent collector and mainte-

nance clerk.at the previous meeting.

Mr: Mottley’s: pt

to the minutes the motion

ipal objection wag that according

was put when he had already

left the scat, leaving the meeting without a quorum. He
objected too that JéePal opinion had since been sought from

a Crown Law Officer as to

the validity of the alleged ap-

pointment and before the opinion was received, the rent

collector had been informec

taken up duties.

During the debate the Secretary
read a letter in which Mr. Adams,
the Chairman, who recently re<

turned to the island and was un;
able

to attend dve to illness,
pointed out that ne harm could
be done to the Board's reputa-

tion if they took a legal opinion.
A motion moved by Hon, F. C.
Hutson, seconded by Mr. Mottley



Was eventually passed that the
Whole issue be postponed. Hon.
F. C. Hutson’s motion was: “In

view of Mr, Adams's letter to the

Secretary relative to the appoint-|

ment of a rent collector and the
discussion regarding the legality
of the appointment taking place
this morning, I move that . the
matter be postponed pending the
receipt of the opinion of the Crown
Law Officer which has already |
keen sought.

Members present were Mr. H. A.

Tudor, Mr. M. E. Cox, Mr. E. D.
Mottley, Hon. F. C. Hutson and
the acting Chairman, Mr. J. B.
Beckles. A non-member present
was Miss Arne, Social Welfare
Officer.

Discussion Opened
Mr. Mottley opened the discus-
sion by informing members that
he intended objecting to the con-
firmation of the minutes. He said
that
sions the clerk's

on memory,

could convey the wrong impres-

He quoted from the minutes
which showed that after stating
that Mr. Cox had seconded Mr.
Tudor’s motion for the appoint-
ment of Mr, Maynerd, Mr, Mott-
ley started to leave the room.
Me wondered whether it was not
more correct to say thatehe left
the room while Mr, Cox was
seconding the motion and not
When he had seconded it. While
it did not matter much because
the following paragraph of the
minutes pointed out that the
motion was put when he was
not in his chair and was already
leaving the room, it still gave
the wrong impression.

This gave rise to a dispute be-

tley as to whether Mr. Tudor and |
Mr. Cox who were present should
not speak concerning Mr. Mott-
ley’s points before the Secretary

without casting any asper- |

1 of his appointment and since

Mr. Tudor or Mr. Cox,

Mr. Tudor said that Mr. Mott-.
ley was stressing the point that
if Mr. Cox seconded the motion,
he did not second it until he left,
but that was not so.

Board's Decision

The Secretary then said that
during his 15 years as Secretary,
the procedure was that ff a mem-
ber felt that anything was wrong
with the minutes, the Board would
decide if the minutes were correct
or not. Asked for a straightforward
,-nswer by Mr, Mottl@Â¥, Mr. Lash-
| ley said that the minutes were a
} true record of his impressions of
jthe meeting.

It was eventually put to the
vote whether the minutes should
be confirmed, and Mr, Tudor and
Mr. Cox voted that they were a

t

true record and they were con-
firmed. Neither Mr. Mottley nor

Mr. Hutson voted.
Mr, Mottley then began to speak

about “Matters arising out of the
Minutes”.
He said, that since the other

members who had been present at
the previous méeting agreed to
| confirmation of the minutes with-
out asking for correction, he took
it that they felt the minutes rep-
resented a true account of what

had transpired at that meeting.
And in the minutes it was said
that while he was leaving the

room, the question for the appoint-
ment was put. Since, that was
agreed, it should be clear to mem-
bers that the appointment was
made without a quorum = and
therefore was invalid,

Mr, Tudor now spoke on a point
of order and said that while Mr.

Mottley had been gat his

papers and flasks, they ad

been put. ,
Mr. Mottley reiterated it he

had alveady left the table and in
any case it hod been stated in the
minutes that he had left and the
two members then present who
had been present at the meeting
had not objected to it. Further,
they had confirmed the minutes.
The Chairman said that he
was not denying that the minutes
as confirmed were correct,
Legal Position



replied, the Chairman having
asked Mr. Tudor and Mr, Cox to



With this admission Mr.
Mottley proceeded to question
the notification of Mr. Maynard
that he was appointed, although

the legal position as to the val-





give their impressions first. Mr. | idity of the appointment was
Mottley. objected and pointed out j|doubtful. He said he had read
that it was a matter for the S in the Press and had confirmed
retary to say what were his re-jit from the Secretary that the
collections and not a matter for on page 7

oe SS ,



MD
(7

M7
(%



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FOR EASTER LOVELINESS'




IN



ADVOCATE
lor MARTIN HICKS, re-
i tired A.D.C. to His Excel-

lency Mr. K. W. Bilackburne,
Governor of the Leeward Islands,
is now spending a holiday in
|Barbados on his way back to
England. He arrived on Friday Spent Two Months
[by BWIA. from Antigua and R. HAYNES CHALLENOR
is staying at Aquatic Court and his sister-in-law Miss
; Frances Harmon from Toronto,
} Attended I.L.O. Talks Canada, returned home on Friday
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.MG., by T.C.A. after spending two
iM Leader of the House of oe kre at the
editty , sturne - jenev Ocean View Hotel.
oa tone ae siamese oP _ Mr. Challenor, a Barbadian who
T.C.A. on Friday after attending f"* kt Se apis Ps Soa
: the past 52 years, is ¢ ti
me — —— ¢ Zz autideet of ove of the branches of
Committee of Experts on = the Canadian Bank of Commerce

application of International Con-
ventions, a Committee of the
Intefnational Labour Organisa-
tion of which he is a member.

Visited Parents
RS. PHILIP HEWITT-MyY-
RING, wife of. the Public

in Toronto, He is a brother of

Hon'ble Robert Challenor

Spent The Winter
EV. JOHN MOCKRIDGE, D.D.,
a retired Clergyman of Toron-

T.C.A. after spending the win-
Relations Adviser to the Comp- tér in Barbados. He came down
trolléy for Development and here from the middle of December
Welfare, returned from the U.S.A. and was staying at Stafford House

on Friday via Puerto Rico by i g
B.W.LA., after paying a visit to Special Flights
N addition to their

her parents,
flights, B.W.LA

Gone fer Easter
M* ALAN REEKIE, a student ing special flights B. and eee
f t Lodge School, left Caracas for the Easter perioc
for rinidad wa Friday evening There was a special flight yester-
by B.W.LA., to spend the Easter day and there will be one on April
holidays with his relatives,
He is a som of Mr. R. Fraser

9 and another on April 13. These
are the only three up to the pres-
Reekie, A.R.I.B.A., Resident Part-
ner in the West Indies of Messrs

“With The Royal Bank

Watkins and Partners, Archi- PENDING three weeks’ holiday
fects of London and the West here is Miss Myra King of
Indies and Mrs. Reekie of Port-, British Guiana. She arrived on
of-Spain. Thursday night by B.W.LA. and

staying at “Accra”, Rockley

Is
Miss King is an emplovee of the
wren . ae. Guiana Royal Bank of Canada in George-
y I ? ‘ Juian:

{ on Friday by B.W.I.A, were basaie” ag

Mr. and Mrs, Charles King ‘vho On _Tes-Day Visit

were holidaying here for the R. a. ATRICK LABRIE

past two weeks staying at ihe T.C.A's Senior Traffic Repre-

Crane, St. Philip. sentative for the Caribbean Area
Mr. King who is with the ‘s now in Barbados on,a ten-day

visit. He arrived on Friday morn-
ing by T.C.A, from Montreal and
is staying at the Ocean View Hotel.

Berbice Bauxite Company, is a
brother of Mr. J. A. King of the

Trinidad branch of Messrs Wm
Fogarty Ltd, 2 Paid Shert Visit
Methodist Minister R, JOSE NUNES, Managing
| EV. and Mrs. Donald F. Director of Messrs. Wm. Fog-
| Henry who arrived from arty Ltd., returned to British
Antigua on Friday by B.W.1.A., Guiana on Friday by B.W.LA.
expect to leave this afternoon after paying a short visit to the
for Trinidad and later for British island.
tuiana where they will spend
Seoul three months’ holiday Intransit
Rev. Henry is stationed at R. R. W. WILLIS, Commercial
| Anguilla with the Methodist on or of pea in Trini-
| Chure Jhile here they are ‘ad, was an intransit passenger
| Seastae’ - ir Cheap- from Jamaica by B.W.1LA,. on Fri-
| side. lay _hight on his way back to
ee Trinidad.

Leaving Tcday
| Ms LILLIAN GOODRIDGE
} a native of this island who has
cen residing in the U.S.A. for the
ast 29 years, spent three and a
half months holiday here with her
| relatives. She is expected to leave

British Embassy, Caracas
R, C. A. MABY who is with
the British Embassy in Cara-

cas, accompanied by his wife is at

present spending three weeks’
holiday here staying at Maresol

| to-day by B.W.L.A. for Puerto Beach Flats. They are due to
Rico via Antigua on her way back Jeave for England later this month
to the U.S.A. by the Colombie.

Off te Canada ¥
| MONG the passengers leaving Attended R.E,C. Talks

on Thursday by B.W.1.A. for M* VALENTINE ARCHER,
Puerto Rico on her way to Canada Treasurer of St. Vincent,
| was Mrs. Edward Barrow of Bank returned home on Friday after-
| Hall Cross Road. She has gone to noon by B.G. Airways after
| spend an indefinite holiday with attending as an Adviser; the
her brother and sister Julian and Regional Economic Committee
Pauline Byer. Meeting which concluded its

° business at Hastings House on
Cricketers Return Home

‘Fhursday last,
*WHREE members of the Wan- While here he was staying at
derers Touring Team _ re-

the Hastings Hotel,
‘turned from St. Vincent on Fri- Other delegates returning home

lday afternoon by B.G. Airways by B.W.LA. on Friday after
lafter taking part in a series of attendihg the ‘Meeting were
| ericket. and. tennis games, They Hon’ble _D. B. Sangster, Minister
| Skinner Norman for Social Welfare, Mr, J. B.
were Tony A . : L
Marshall and Louis St. Hill Clegg, Economic Adviser and
Also arriving by the same Mr. Donald Levy, Director of
‘plane were Mrs. Louis St. Hill Levy Bros. who travelled to
who had accompanied her hus- Trinidad intransit for Jamaica
band on the trip and Miss Grace 8nd Hon'ble W. J. Raatgever,

Gill of Laynes House, St, Joseph â„¢erchant of British Guiana.



who was holidaying in St. Vin- Hon’ble J, B. Renwick, Man-
cent. | aging _, Director of the “West

Two other members of the | Indian Jind Mr. A, MeLeod-
eam Eric Atkinson and Dr. Mal-| Smith, Economic and Financial
‘olm Proverbs will ,be spending | Adviser to the Windward Islanc:
4 holiday in St. Lucia before | left for Grenada yesterday morn-
returning home while the/1ng, while Mr. C, A. Beaubrun,
remainder of the team ate| Merchant of St. Lucia and Hon’-

neal oxdav } | ble V. C. Bird, President .
expected to arrive to-day by the} ee: ’ sident of the
Cacique del Caribe. } Antigua Trades and Labour

Union are due to leave to-day.
They were all staying at the
| Marine Hotel i

} For the Style }\
Conscious

EW LADIES



Police Band At
Queen’s Park
Today

The Police Band will

play at



to, returned to Canada on Friday

regular
will be operat-











UNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

Ss
—_—$_——$—$—$—$——



Carih (Calling

Canadian Journalist
ISS MARION G. ROGERs
Ottawa, Canada, whose «

Operatic Milestone M

holiday in Barbados is a

oming to a close is the on."

Correspondent of Mayf Mo.
ind) =Vice-Presiden;




Ottawa Branch of the
Women's Press Club.

Arriving in Barbados aboy ;
weeks ago on the Canadian Cp,
er, she will be returning io c..”
ida on this ship in a few 4...
time. SEN is a guest at the Wi; dsc
Hotel. | r

Other passengers on the Cruis:
who made the round trip to Brit.
ish Guiana include Mr, and Mi
Elvin M. Wood and Mr. and Mrs
E. H, Dickinson of Toronto,

Civil Aviation Chief
MoM: CARL AGOSTINI, Direc-

tor of Civil Aviation
rrinidad who was intransit from
porary “ Friday evening, ro-
urned to Trinid yes y by
BWIA. ad yesterday by

He said that he went up to
Jamaica with Wing Commander
L. A, Egglesfield, Ditector Gen-
eral of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean area to meet Mr. Gler
Gilbert from the Internationa!
Civil Aviation Organisation wh
is making a factual report of fa-
cilities existing in the Caribbean
area in connection with the e--
tablishment of a Caribbe;
Training Centre,

They assisted him as much
they could by presenting certa
facts which he will employ



OPERA STAR Nadine Conner
toasted by Lucine Amara in New
York on the 10th anniversary of
her debut with the Metropolitan

is

Opera Company Miss Conner his report for ;

; s presentation to the
holds a bust of herself giventoher Coyneil of ICAO for furth«
at the party (International) — consideration.

Commander Egglesfield who

Spent Three Months

was called to Miami for discus-

RS, I CHASE and Mrs. V. sions is due to arrive here toda)
Drayton, two Barbadians
now resident in Brooklyn, New Returns From B.G.

York, returned to the U.S.A., on
Friday by B.W.LA., via Port-of-
Spain and San Juan after spend-
ing three and a half months’
holiday here staying at ‘“Fonta-
mara”, Maxwell Road,

This was Mrs. Drayton’s sec-
ond visit to Barbados in 28 years
and while here, she visited many
of her relatives and old friends.

A the passengers arriv-

ing last Friday by B.W.LA.
was Mr. Kenneth Jones, Manager
of the Yonkers Bus Co., who had
been to British Guiana on a short
holiday.

Mr. Jones, who enjoyed his brief
stay there, said that he considered
Georgetown one of the best laid
out towns of the West Indies.

Mrs. Chase who left here quite

an infant, was paying her first Back From U.S.A.

visit back to the island. Since M . MRS. HALBION
leaving here she has been to WILLS arrived from New

York recéntly and are Staying at
"Windyridge,” Silver Sands.

Mrs. Wills will be remembered
by her many friends who met her
last year at Silver Sands. This
time she has brought her little
niece, Patricia.

“Crucifixicn” at Christ
Church
M®s. JOHN KIRTON, Mr, Pat
* Deane and Mr. H. O, St.c.
Cumberbatch will
soloists tonight
“Crucifixion”

Panama, Cuba ang Canada before
settling in the U.S.A.

She said that she had made
many friends here who contrib-
uted greatly in making her stay a
happy one, She hopes to return
to Barbados in the near future.

Students Return Home

UITE a number of students
Q attending the Lodge School,
Codrington High School and the
Ursuline Convent, returned ito
Venezuela yesterday by B.W.I.A.
to spend the Easter holidays with
their relatives. Some of them went

be the guest
when Stainer’s
u rendered at
Christ Church Parish Church.

is

out by B.W.1.A.’s regular flight, Mr. L : 3 ;
while others travelled by the 4; the ‘ aiea” tae he preside
special flight which brought a service

begins at 7.30 p.m.
“From Olivet te Calvary”
At St. Paul’s

number of Venezuelans to spend
the Easter holidays here.
On Caribbean Tour
. J. L. SABBATH, Propri- Ty AcNens * “From Olivet to

etor of J. L. Sabbath and Calvary” will be rendered
Sons, Exporters of Jewellery of e re. in ee on be ae
Montreal, Canada, left by “3Y, /spri A yma: ues

: : soloists will be Miss Nell Hall
B.W.LA., for Jamaica via Puerto *°
Rico on Wednesday. and Mr, Bruee St. John.

He is making a tour of the One Of Five
Caribbean on business coupled ONGRATULATIONS to M:
with pleasure and expects to re- and Mrs. Wilfred Best of
turn to Montreal about the mid- Roebuck Street, St. John on the
die of the month. While here he birth of their first daughter. This
was staying at the Windsor Hotel. is their fifth child,

Wedding Etiquette

iYow's The Season For Weddings! Are You Planning

Yours? How's Your Wedding EtiquetteP Here Are
a Few Tips to the Brides-to-be —/t all starts with a ring

Strictly speaking, your engage- wedding ring, to be wor: ngly
ment ring should not be worn on or with a guard ring.
the third finger, left hand, un-
til the formal engagement an- When the time comes to shout
nouncement is made, A not-so- the news of your engagement,
stric rule permits you to go scatter the tidings by handwrit-
ring-shopping with our fianee ten notes to close friends and
beforehand, so that you may relatives. Then tell the rest of
make this all-important selection ‘he breathless world by formal
together. Usually the groom-to- announcement in local newspa-
be visits the jewelers in advance pers, both in your town and in
and makes arrangements to have the bridegroom's. The simplest
certain rings set aside for your form is preferred: “Mr. and Mrs.
inspection tour, A ingle dia- John Jones of Jones Manor, an-

mond, the symbol of fidelity and

nounceâ„¢the_ engagement of their











; Queen’s Park to-day ; purity, is the traditional choice daughter, Jane Ann, to George
. p , r Ca . * ay at 4.45 p.m. ’ A. ae , 7 ’
pt. C. E. ° Rais for engagement rings but col- Herbert Jamesy son of Mr. and
ao apylpeed — ee oe DRESSES sri Got ll be the conducto: owed stone are just a, gutable Mrs, F. T."James of Avondale
" 3 ’ To-day te Tues. 10 & 815 and the program i : and often less costly. The ring Ne date has been set for the wed-
And Continuing Dally 445 & #90 I Bridges Bart Payton (HOLETOWN) GRAND MARCH poe aes doesn’t have to be new, but may ding, (or the wedding will take
“WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE ; - , . ; | , Circumstances Edward Elear be a treasure handed down for place during the holidays)”.
wae oe $ ON | e Sore ene the Wesi Suppe generations in the bridegroom's Make the anfouncement prefer-
Color By Technicolor CIRCLE OF DANGER % two ei is —— Pune family, or made up of heirloom ably three or four months be-
- : ‘ ; Starring x stones re-set in a new mounting, fore the wedding, never less than
walasoast «AE eenaint AE sr ” rare x FASTER MONDAY ! 4th APRIL 1952 A FINE ASSORTMENT (f) Demoiselle Chic Fleteher Whatever the ring, it should te six weeks before, if you can man-
OPENING SAT. 12th 4.45 & 8 & WED. & THURS. 4% % = MORCEAN_Petit “Bilers Ravine gc oie tok, Ades Ghee ata n * Aes with the Rehice.
< eS 1T ALWAYS s ¢ “HARACTERISTIC ie bridegroom. After that, your sTaph to appear wi ie notice,
A PLACE IN THE SUN RAINS ON SUNDAYS is 3.00 P.M. TO ).00 P.M. BEAUTIFUL rom Des Clothes Lulgini family and the arobin's should enclose a posey print pM ord
and ~ 4 ) 7 ON — Supplica ton aynes be the first to see it and if } plainly written on the ick, an
OLYMPIC __ MAN FROM PLANET 1X Under the Pat. nage of DRESSES Nang Prelude Chorale * ss. Been family lives at a distaiica, vou send it with. the engagement
; 7e a MR. & S. J. H. WILKINSO pe Te had Palm Sunday : should write them all about it. story a week in advance of pub-
; / ‘ MRS. J. H. SON . ory. laud and honour to An engagement 1g is not a nec- lishing date.
Today & Tomorrow 430 & 81 bta s8 The Latest Styles and “Ride bat ee — 98 A&M. essary acjuinet i Seine wees NEXT ‘WEEK: “Plan your wed-
LAWRENCE TIERNEY 4s TODAY Last 2 Shov | IN AID OF he N ‘ Majesty” 9A & m, hOwever, as some girls prefer to Ging to suit you” and “Measure
“THE HOODLUM" “CHAIN LIGHTNING” | the ewest Fabrics GOD SAVE THE QUEEN have only a hand omely jewelled Your Financial Obligations.
oat Suate hee } ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST VICARAGE . |
ARR i i NESTE ah I acme now, ——————————————rren—"<
“PRE-HISTORIC WOMEN” ae | , For Cocktails or ; ’ E
"TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY “tues 42 ty. i Teas, Ice Cream, Lucky Dip, Plants, Weddi SERVICE NOTIC
Myrna LOY, Richard GREEN in “HOTEL BE OLIN’ Vegetables, Hoop-La eddings ) This to let those eee
sen ahi ee Starring: a dantine | D i Steel Band E Et ‘ We take this opportunity to ers who ete the ship-
MY BROTHERS KEEPER “CHEYEN | Oe = Eee nd — Ete, Ete. % Hats and Bags to match that oe trom i ee oon” peed has _been
—--— - oa with | Pp . ith we will be moving our shop yi sy will be
THURS. (only) 490 & 0.15 _ Pennie Morgan x Admission to Fair : y any Ensemble. William Meter siimit'ty “ogress MII] notiNed as. soon as the
DEAD ON ARRIVAL Tues, at 8.90 . ADULTS 1/- 5 ot CHILDREN 6d. X Building between the Modern Dress Company can fix same after
& ONCE UPON A DREAM CALYPSO NIGHT . > } Shoppe and Johnson's Stationery on aeteal-”
friesiguidinhaieas ut Beinn 5 8 y Broad Street Y
| ; GAS
y oy y , x ; J. BALDINI & CO, THE BARBADOS
THE PASSION PLAY }\3 2 Bicycles to he drawn for. $/} THE MODERN DRESS Coe LTD.
s Tickets now on sale 1/- Each .
AT THE ABOVE FOUR THEATRES % SHOPPE
x choenasenchiteltilipitiiaans
_ ¥ s
DOD) FRIDAY Ith WF Door Prize Given. Retain Ticket BROAD STREET NEW GOODS!
eee sa) tee LEO ELAMAACEG sreecwek Us =
GOOD FRIDAY. Tith ” i a: ae Oo TY PRINTED BEMBERG SHEERS
Pe A. Ee (AU Talking) BE Ee eNO 6 Fhe he Vise haa VOR LEERY boy $1.66
ite Sao ee es Oe CINEMAS AT ALL. | PLAZA THEATRES GAIEE | Ee OI eo. ty isa: sie suea spacers eee $1.62
THEATRES See COO OR MINE ei 6 cok suseuehovcs denier eatin : 2
. a The Garden—St. James , ‘ MONEE 60's si fy dav aalelbeh e hava many ylemen ae ciene $1.62
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 BARBAREES —Dial 5170 OISTIN—Dial 8404 See I MN RI 5 os 5 66 4 58 Hc vdcobh alone see eee bute $1.37
To-day & Monday 4.45 & 8.30pm Tinoagy & To-morrow 4.45 & 830 p.m FINE STRIPED TAFFETA $1.57
TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. HM MAKIS PAREENT Gene Stratton—FORTER'S TO BEAT THE BAND Ce We ie cel pec leh $1.95
Warner Bros presen ¥ , " : rT AvEn Ree ee ut St ose tie Bee sh ew CRE oe alba =
ee “ADOT av OUTRAGE MICHAEL O'HALLORAN Foanete LAEBORE: te CHILDRENS’ WHITE SOCKS—Aiil Sizes "32
HOLDEN OLSON LOVEJOY in OF AR! Maly ae eine eee Scott BECKETT & Allene ROBERTS & CROSSFIRE
si also Leon ER » in Rot TCH
ALSO THE COLOR CARTOON HIS BITTER HALF ‘SORE TARY TROUBLE" . M, ote oer lame ee
ron, Bae = 5 teey bi Tues, & Wed 8.30 p.m
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 4.30 P.M. & 8.30 P.M. Tues. & Wed. 420 & 6.90 pm Saar eee mare nT Wa Gare area a Wal ake
n ® Y mn ) ’ 12 N bate > wa 8H 2m THE FUGITIVE !
Tallin the Saddle & Tarzan & the Slave Gir]||**'0" °&t25 EQNTIERSMAN) nese wane 4 euascr: sae Pon 8 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS
a il / IE a al X 1e il ¢ A me with Joe PALOOKA—Léeon BPRROL & FIGHTING GRINGO \ . *
paps ae ADVENTURES OF DON JUAN fs, nastatrh eh erey Soe came
= a SR SS So RE ee DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606












SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

AT THE CINEMA :

‘

SWEET MUSIC

By G. B.
HAILED as the best picture of 1951 and winner of the
Academy Award for that year, AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

opens at the Globe Theatre
everyone will agree that it

on Wednesday next. Whether
was the best of the 1951 crop

is a matter of opinion, but there is no gainsaying the fact
that M.G.M. has turned out one of the best musicals to
come out of Hollywood, or anywhere, for that matter. The
picture exudes sheer joy throughout and is a brimming

kaleidescope of movement,
Recapturing the spirit of Paris,
it brings to life, in delightful bits
of comedy, the bohemia of the
Left Bank with its cafes, street-

vendors and artists. Occupying
top honours in the film is the
music ff the late George Ger-
shwin. It is in a class by itself,
aud the film includes his most
popular tunes, “Embraceable
You.” “I. .Got Rhythm,” “Pll

Build A Stairway To Paradise,”
to mention just a few, and ends

with the litle ballet.

Against a background of bril-
liant Technicolor sets—some of
which are authentic, and I may
Say Mt is’ very difficult to tell
which are and which are not
the story of the G.I. unfolds. A
struggling artist, he has chosen

to remain in Paris to paint, and
due to lack of funds reluctantly

accepts the patronage of a
wealthy American heiress. In
the meantime, he falls in love
with a little French girl and
complications arise when he dis-
covers she is engaged to one of
his friends.

Gene Kelly’s G.i, is a most in-

gratiating fellow and his d
ing has never been more ni
or varied as he ranges from ten-
der sans with little French
war orphans to the tune of “IG
Rhythm,” through the Gantt
humorous clowning with Oscar
Levant at the piano, to the pril-
liant and compiex fantasy of the
grand ballet inspired by the
paintings of the French Impres-
Sionists. As his sweetheart and
dancing partner, Leslie Caron is
exquisitely graceful and her de-
lightful personality which has a
touch of the gamine is refreshing
and engaging. Problem child of
the musical world, Oscar Levant
plays himself, though under an-
other name! Looking like a dis-
gruntled infant, he plays the
piano brilliantly and delivers his
quips with a puckish astringency
that is unexcelled. His piece de
resistance is his performance of
the famous Concerto in F, during
which, due to his insatiable ego,
he not only plays the solo part but
all the instruments in the orches-
tra as well as conducting!

There is hardly a moment in
AN AMERICAN IN PARIS when
someone isn’t signing or dancing
and there is an air of spontaneous
gaiety that carries all before it
The film sets a new standarg for
musicals and has reached a new
peak in excellence.

FORCE OF ARMS

Showing at the Piaza, Bridge-
town, FORCE OF ARMS is a
tense and appealing love story set
in Italy during the last war.
Based on a_ story by William
Tregaskis it merits attention for
various reasons, Its battle scenes
of the Italian Campaign are ex-
traordinarily realistic; the acting
is sensible and convincing and the
down-to-earth conversation and
backchat among the G.I.’s give a
very good idea of their thoughts
on the war.

The script deals with a cour-
ageous sergeant who falls in love
with a W.A.C. and subsequently
becomes over cautious in battle.
As a result, his superior officer is
killed and he is severely wounded.
During his convalesence, he mar-
ries the girl he loves, only to find
that in order to expiate his feel-
ing of guilt at the death of his
comrade, he must return to his



le



unit at the front.

The story, which unfolds quiet-
ly, is a moving one and William
Nancy Olsen

Hoiden and have



CA at ae:

colour and sound.

dignity and charm as the lovers
whose finest quality is loyalty.—
he to the men with whom
serves, and she to the traditions
of courage and honour which are
part of her New England heritage.
There may not be anything very
new in all this, but the film
paints an effective picture of war,
and in sharp contrast, it idumin-
ates the decency and fineness of

be banal, but nevertheless, I
think you will enjoy the picture.
OUTRAGE

In this film playing at Plaza,
Barbarees, we have Ida Lupino
once again in the director's chair.
All of Miss Lupino’s pictures have
as their themes dramatic con-
flict of one kind or another and
this time she has tackled an ex-
tremely delicate social subject. In
“Not Wanted” she depicted the
problems of the unmarried mother
— and with success — in OUT-
RAGE she has turned her at-
tention to criminal assault, and
I’m afraid, not with the same
degree of success, Though the
subject is handled with restraint,
and the need for more and better
psychiatric treatment of sex
criminals is urgently advocated as
well as understanding in restor-
ing faith and courage to the
emotionally distressed, I found
that the film lacked conviction
through contriveq situations and
obvious oversights. For instance,
a girl of nineteen, engaged to be
married, would hardly return
home alone at 10.15 pm. after
working late at the office, through
a warehouse district in a city.

B.B.C. Radio Notes

VERSE PLAY By
DEREK WALCOTT
Sunday, 6th April, 1952
In December last the B.B,C.
broadcast an original verse play
by Derek Walcott, the West
Indian poet, a play which had
attracted considerable attention
at rehearsals in England. Un-
fortunately reception from Lon-
don in December was not at all
that could be desired and the
broadeast to the West Indies was
not well received. Because of
this the play will be repeated in
‘Caribbean Voices’ to-day
6th April, when reception should
be much better than jit was
at the end of last year, This
is the most lavish production in
the history of ‘Caribbean Voices’,
the weekly programme of West
Indian prose and poetry broad-
cast every Sunday from the BBC,
and, as mentioned above, critics
in England had been impressed
by this play. These included
Dylan Thomas and Louis Mac-
Neice. Entitled ‘Harry Dernier,’
the play portrays the thoughts of
the last man on earth, . . but
listen to-day Broadcast
will be on two beams, 25,53
metres, 11.75 megacyecles; and
31.32 metres, 9.58 megacycles.
It begins at 7.15 p.m, and lasts

for half-an-hour.

Tribute to Sir Charles
Sherrington

Sir Charles Sherrington, O.M.,
one of the greatest scientists of
the modern world, died a few
weeks ago at the age of ninety-
four. In the coming week the BBC
will broadcast a talk by a dis-
tinguished younger scientist,
Professor J. Z. Young, who is

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BROAD and TUDOR STREETS



EWING’S
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“CHAMPION”
PREPARED MUSTARD

he advance of education, the neces- this kind is seldom heard of in



SUNDAY

Farm And Garden
Cruelty To Aninials

By AGRICOLA v
This subject is very much in our minds just now as a
result of the drive by the local Animal Welfare Society to
elicit support for a relentless campaign designed to allevi-
ate suffering and prevent cruelty in all its various forms to
our dumbs friends. It cannot be denied that in most civil-
ised countries there is a strong and increasing awareness
of the need for encouraging kinder and more humane treat-
ment of animals.
Human nature being what it spite owners through their ani-
is however, and, in spite of the mals, Fortunately, barbarism of

sity still exists for laws control- this island, but there seems to
ling man’s attitude towards his be a fair amount of cruelty in
domesticated animals. In England, general which can only be suc-
an acknowledged leader in all cessfully combatted by a vigor-
that concerns animal welfare, ous public interest in co-opera-
there has accumulated over the tion with an active Society in a
years a tremendous weight of position to undertake advisory
public opinion which exercises and related services of

thoughtlessly unkind actions of animal welfare.
towards dumb creatures. America In this column, we are natur-
is not far behind we have read ally concerned in a special way
that in some States there is a with animals of the economic
‘hit and run’ measure affecting type. Cruelty to such animals
motor vehicle drivers who leave falls under two closely connected
injured animals to their own heads, namely, direct and in-
devices. direct. Under the first may be
It is most desirable that persons included the following examples:
guilty of wanton cruelty should unmerciful beating or similar
be severely punished in the brutality; working a galled, lame
Courts of justice and stringent 0; emaciated animal; prodding
laws for this purpose exist with a sharp stick on a tender
t everywhere nowadays. spot had shoeing or loose shoes
The difficulty is to catch culprits which cause pain; over-
who are usually evil-minded working: over-loading; or bad
persons operating under cover to loading; and badly fitting har-~
ness. The last three are fairly
common on this island’s roads.
Also, if the same girl suddenly And, speaking of harness, we
disappeared from home, surely not infrequently see more har-
enquiries would be made by her ness than ‘hoss’. It is the owner's
parents ang her description circu- or driver’s business to ensure
lated by the police, to say nothing that an animal suffers no need-
of the people who find her mak- less discomfort in the course of
ing an effort to establish her its onerous work. Seemingly
identity. Points like these were small considerations are amply
either over-looked or ignored. repaid in better, more willing
Mala Powers and Tod Andrews and ee servion, well >
ortray their roles with depth and in the lengt ening of the perio
feeling, but the other members of Of the animal's utility. What
the cast do not always succeed in Percentage of drivers, for ex-

i lif ample, remember to offer a
wore Se es oe refreshing drink when they stop

to take one themselves ?

So far, we have directed our
comments mainly to draft ani-
mals, since it is among these that
officers of the Society are likely,
Professor of Anatomy at Univers- most frequently, to move. Our
ity College, London, who will remarks apply equally, in prin-
comment on the work and thought ciple, in certain respects, but
of Sir Charles Sherrington in a with important additions in the
talk entitled ‘Man and his Nature.’ case of animals which produce
This talk which is now in the our food supplies. Thus, we
nature of a funeral oration, was must not forget to provide the
originally broadcast in the BBC’s pigs with a wallow or bath
Third Programme late last year during very hot weather; we
to mark the publication in a re- must not send our poultry to

J market suffocatingly tied to-
vised edition of Sir Charles’s 1937 gether in a container too small
Gifford Lectures on ‘Man and his and without some sort. of shade;
Nature’, first published in 1940. we must not exercise our dairy
The talle is of interest to us in the animals at a trot, especially in
West Indies at this particular the sun; or subject them to
moment as Professor J, Z. Young ynduly harsh and noisy com-
has recently been paying a visit mands or, indeed, to any dis-
to the University College of the quieting influences liable to
West Indies. In this talk Professor excite their nervous tempera-
Young says that Sir Charles’s ment, “This list could be multi-
work on the neryous system has plied, The other day we saw
been called as revolutionary as two fine looking dairy cows
Harvey’s work on the circulation qriyen at some speed on a public
of the blood, It will be broadcast pighway, their pendulous udders
on Friday next, 11th. April, start- swinging violently from side to
ing at 9.30 p.m. and lasting for side, actually striking against
approximately twenty minutes. their flanks, and their mouths

2 x foaming. Apart from experien-
Countries of the Blind cing obvious fear and discomfort,









Feature programme of the week their milk yields must have
in BBC broadcasts is entitled been prejudiced over several
‘Countries of the Blind’ and is part milkings.
of the BBC’s tribute tothe memory There is hardly space left to
of a blind French schoolmaster, treat of indirect cruelty, very
Louis Braille, who died in obscur— jmportant though it is. Amd, in
ity but whose invention of the this connection, it must suffice

alphabet of raised dots which to emphasize that the first care
bears his name has brought im- and the first duty of all livestock
mortality to his memory. The owners should be to see that
programme describes the work their animals, of whatever cate-
done by UNESCO in standardising gory, are properly fed, managed
Braille and surveys some of the and sheltered. e
national systems of blind welfare In conclusion, we bespeak, for
in Britain and other countries to- the Barbados Society for the
day. The broadcast will be on prevention of Cruelty to Animals,
Tuesday next commencing at aj) the help and co-operation it
10.30 p.m. surely deserves.







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ADVOCATI

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Pruning Trees, Shrubs and Vines
About this time of the year —
April to May—it is wise to do a
bit .of pruning on established
shrubs, trees and vines. It is
not every shrub that needs to be
cut right back, but most well
grown shrubs are all the bette
for good pruning at least once
a year and this is the time, be-
fore the heavy raims get in to

jo it





_ By pruning is meant the cut-
ting out of dead wood or over
dense foliage, and the trimming
back of straggly branches, But
care must be taken when prun-
ing a shrub or tree, not to spoil
its shape, for carelessness in
doing this job may result in
ruining it. A lot can be done to
a flowering shrub in good
ul the year round by cut-
ting off the dead flower heads a
good way back or, in the case of
picking the flowers, to cut them
with a long stalk. This keeps
the “shrub fairly well pruned,
and Helps to keep it too in good
shape,

When a shrub is required to
grow in a certain way, pruning
and training must start from the
time the plant is quite young, if
the desired effect is to be suc-
cessfully achieved. Hibiscus,
Exora and Bougainvillaea are
all three among those shrubs
that with training and judicious
pruning can become standards or
other shapes, and once the re-
quired shape is attained it is
skiliful pruning which will keep
it so.

Trees, especially « vely
flowering Cassius of! fer
for the want of a good piuning.

Dead wood left on a tree is
just for trouble provid-
ing as it does large homes for

wood ants (in their first stage)
besides being extremely dis-
couraging for the trees,

Trees “should be pruned yearly
of accumulated dead wood, un-
sightly or misshapen branches or
any crossed branches, that, rub-
bing together may rub off the
bark, and thus leave the tree an
easy victim of disease.

Flowering trees especially
should never be neglected but
should yearly, after flowering
and when the seed pods have
formed, be judiciously pruned,
Seed pods should be cut off and
dead wood removed. If this is
done the response of the trees
will be noticeable, and the
flowering will be appreciably
finer.

There is an art in pruning a

shrub or tree. The cut must be
done with a sharp knife, or saw,
so that a clean healthy cut is
left which will heal quickly. On
no account. must the branch be
broken to leave jagged edges,
for thi atches water and rots
back in a way which invites
diseasé and trouble. When saw-
ing a branch off a_ tree the
branch should be sawn off cleanly
close on to the trunk, and never

left sticking out half a foot
beyond the trunk,
Vines, too, are Often all the

better for a good pruning. Cor-
alita especially gets a lot of dry
leaves and twigs underneath.
But it is hardly worth pruning
this vine, as when cut to the
ground it springs again so quick-
lv. But many of the slower
growing vines respond to care-
ful pruning once in a while,

When pruning is done at the
end of the dry weather the
pruned parts have a chance to
heal and harden before the
heavy rains, and the plants and
trees are then ready for the new
growth that the rains will stim-
ulate.



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Balls, Boats y

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"NOTRE DAME HEADS
SENIOR LEAGUE TABLE
Basketball Association Plans

Ladies’ Competition
By 0. S. COPPIN

OTRE DAME are at present at the head of the

First Division cup line-up. Yesterday afternoon
before a huge crowd at Kensington these boys trans-
lated into successful actuality the theory that fitness
and determination pay,

They were tied on points with Spartan, cup win-
ners for the past three consecutive seasons and had
already shared the honours of their first game with
Spartan this season. But although they gained victory
by the clear margin of three goals te nil, yet I did



~
not expect them
dence and perfection of attack.

They kicked with thé advantage of a following wind for the first
half and at once they were on the attack.

What impressed me most was some accurate crossfield passes to
the wing end this proved to be one of their most successful forms of

attack.
NERVOUS

TKINS in goal for Spartan was obviously feeling the importance

of the occasion and the clamour from the large crowd did not
tend to cure his apparent nervousness. As a result he was more vul-
nerable for the most part than ordinarily would have been the case,
for I have seen him play a useful game on more than one occasian,

The fact that Cadogan was positioned at wing half and Tony
Haynds at centre half can hardly be placed out of the category of the
nonsensical, It is not fair to either of these players.

FACE FACTS

ET us face facts. Haynes’ only position is at centre-half. If he

cannot make the team at that position then he should not be asked
to attempt to fill the exacting role of centre-forward.

Again, even if for the sake of argument one admitted that Medford
should be in the team then his position is wing half, for Cadogan is
the best natural centre-half in the island today, in my opinion. He
was wasted at wing half and even when good sense and reason pre-
| vailed and he was brought back to centre-half he still continued to
play a wing half game. ‘

I am not for one moment saying that Spartan could have gained
the honours against Notre Dame on the form they showed yesterday,
but they certainly could have put up a more satisfactory show if they
had arranged the team more intelligently.

NOTRE-DAME WIN AGAIN
{* the other First Division games last week, Notre Dame dealt
out a severe six-love drubbing to College. What was a most
interesting feature of this game was that five of the goals came in the
last fifteen minutes of play.

Up to that time some fine goal-keeping by Smith, the College
Custodian backed up by some fine work by Squires at full-back had
kept the Notre Dame attack at bay.

However, in the last fifteen minutes, Notre Dame, as has been
their wont this season made their superior fitness tell even on school-
boys who must of necessity be fit. They swept down the field in quick
purposeful faids and soon the score piled up. Goal after goal found its
way past Smith into the nets and one particular first time from Paul
Mandeville from without the penaltr s*ea can take its place in any
company of senior football.

“pLUES”







IMPRESSIVE
MPIRE were all over Everton in the other First Division fixture
this week. The “blues” effected a new line-up, Robinson and
| Algy Symmonds exchanging places for goal and centre forward posi-
tions respectively.
With Symmonds at centre-forward this no doubt increased the
| Shooting power of the team as Symrnonds has a powerful shot with
| either foot.
Everton were completely outplayed

Haynes at inside right. their play did not reflect much skill nor
| purpose.

' BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION HOLDS MEETING

T the Annual General Meeting of the Barbados Basketball Asso-

ciation on Friday it was revealed in the Annual Report that

as many as fourteen clubs and one hundred and fifty players
took part in the local competition last season.

1 have studied the report and I too must add my congratula-
tions to the pupils of the Modern High School who carried off the
championship of the Second Division last season and won all their
matches, They will be promoted to the First Division this season
and it will be interesting to follow their progress in the senior divi-
sion,

This part of the report interested me most and I quote: —

“The Committee hopes to widen its scope of activities to include
a junior league for players under fourteen, a ladies’ league with
a view to competing against Trinidad, and competitions for centres

outside the Bridgetown area.”
IF HOPES COME TRUE

F' the hopes expressed in the above paragraph materialise this

season then the Basketball Association will have made strides
that would have earned not only the thamks and appreciation of the
sporting public but their sound financial support as well.

SUPPORT

HAVE always supported any venture to start a special competi-

tion for the younger people and in this case it will be a Junior
League for those under fourteen.

This widens the scope of the competition and algo affords the
opportunity for players to play the game at a competitive level at
an early age.

The ladies, God bless 'em we always like to see in games even
if it is only to foster a porting spirit among them. I am writing
| this at a safe distance away from rolling pins and other handy
weapons. But in all seriousness, if the ladies can be induced to com=
pete in a ladies league it will go a long way towards stimulating
the popularity of this game locally,

303) RIFLE SHOOTING

1E third round of the House competition of the Barbados Rifle

Association was shot yesterday afternoon at the Government

Rifle Range. The conditicns were one sighter and ten counting shots

at 300 and 600 yards giving an H.P.S, of 100 per man, and 500 per
House. :

The weather was good with wind slumping at 600 yards where
mirage was noticeable. The light was unsteady making definition
a difficulty at times. The scoring on the whole was therefore dis-
appointing.

_. Yellow House were first with a score of 424 followed by Red
with 421, Green with 419 and Blue with 409. The position of the
Houses is now Red Majcr Chase 1,308, Blue (Lt. Colonel Connell
nee Yellow (Captain Jordan) 1,273 and Green (Captain Warner)
192.

The individual scores of Yellow the winners yesterday are S. Davis
92, R. S. M. Marshall 89, Captain Jordan 87, M. G, Tucker 81, G. C,
May 75.

In the N.R.A, competitions ten scorés reached Skilled Shot stand-
ard. The next round in the competition has been fixed for Saturday
April 19 when the Spoon Handicap Shoot and the qualifying of the
Frontenac Trophy will be shot for concurrently.



and with the exception of



to start off their match with such consummate confi-,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE ss

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



Notre Dame Beat NEW NAMES AND FACES
Spartan 3—Nil

NOTRE DAME
SPARTAN

(Gill 2, Mandeville 1)...

os
ose Bb soceR/iapieA aoe 0



NOTRE DAME, the team who beat their way through
the junior divisions of the B.A.F.A., and this year proved

themselves worthy of their

promotion, yesterday evening

enhanced their reputation when they defeated Spartan
who carried off the First Division and Knock Out Trophies
in successiye years, three—nil before the largest crowd
ever to witness a local fixture at the Oval.

Yesterday evening’s game was
the match of the season, since it
would decide whether the here-
tofore invincible Spartan wouid
go down to defeat at the hands
of the Dames like their tradi-
tional rivals from Bank Hall, and
which of the two teams would be
knocked out of the running for
the Cup.

From early afternoon, large
crowds, using every means of
transportation went to Kensing-
ton, and by 4.30, the Kensington
and Open Stands were filled to
capacity. The George Challenor
Stand too, for the first time was
filled, and still crowds took their
places behind the wire fence, and
in front of the George Challenor
Stand on the ground.

Fast Game

The team from the Bay Land
played a fast and well organised
game with which Spartan failed
to cope, and during the final half,
so completely outplayed the Park
team that the veterans broke
under the weight of the repeated
attacks.

The Dames took the touch
kicking towards the pavilion end,
and immediately the forwards at-
tacked but the Spartan defenders
cleared.

Play transferred to thé Notre
Dame area, and Tony Haynes al-
most drew first blood for Spartan
when he made a valiant but futile
effort to get one over the goal-
keeper’s head, but it went over the
crossbar.

Spartan conceded a free kick
which Mandeville took, but Tony
Atkins pushed it out, ana fullback
Gibbons cleared.

The Dames pressed the attack,
and C. Daniel tried a good shot
from the inside right position, but
once again the ball narrowly
grazed the upright,

Repeated Attack

Tension mounted as the Dames
launched repeated and furious as-
saults on their more experienced
rivals. The Spartan custodian was
nervous, and inevitably it cost him
a goal when Daniel, the Notre’s
leftwing centred nicely for Gill at
centre to send in an easy one,

It was a big occasion for the Bay
Land team, playing before the
largest crowd ever to witness a
local football game at the Oval,
and they were rising to the occa-
sion.

They were playing it fast, and
the Spartan defence wag going to
pieces under the repeated as-





saults.

Gill missed an excellent oppor-
tunity to put the Dames two up,
when he kicked wide of an open
goal. Another opportunity went
abegging when Gill once again
kicked over after fullback Bowen
miskicked.

Spartan fought stubbornly to
withstand the frequent attacks
which almost completely routed
the entire team at one time, but
in the last couple of minutes be-
fore half time, the forwards or-
ganized one or two forward move-
ments but without results,

The Dames were into the attack
immediately play resumed, and
sheer luck saved Spartan as shot
after shot collided with the goal-
keeper, Gibbons coming to the
rescue on the fourth occasion,

"Keeper Saves

Grant tried hard to put in the
equalizer for Spartan, but custo-
dian Williams thwarted his effort
at the last moment.

The Dames as so often this
Season, speeded up the game as it
began to draw toa close. The
backs cleared clearly and lustily
and their forwards were making
use of it when they got it. Their
short passing was delightful, and
soon their right winger sent in a
perfect centre which Gill made no
mistake in putting it into the
corner with his head.

With two up, they concentrated
on further advancing their lead,
but Spartan put their every effort
into the game at this stage.

They were awarded three corn-
ers in quick succession, but each
time the Dames defence cleared.

The Dames were not out of the
picture and bearing down on the
left wing, Daniel gave Mandeville
a good pass which he sent on like
a pile driver to put his team
three up,

Spartan tried hard but in vain
to put in one, but the Dames de-
fence refused to give one inch of
ground, and the game ended with
Notre-Dame the winners by three
goals to nil.

The teams were as follows: —

Notre Dame: Wilkinson,
Straughan, Browne, D. Archer,
L. Daniel, S. Roberts, D. McCollin,
C, Daniel, L. Gill P. Mandeville,
F. Daniel.

Spartan: Atkins Medford Gib-
bons, Bowen, Ishmael, Haynes,
Gittens, Cadogan, Griffith, Jem-
mott and Grant.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE TAKES
LEAD FROM BARNA

FOR the past few weexs Barna has been holding the

lead in the Ladies Inter-Club ‘lable ‘lennis Division, |
lead was taken over by the Queen’s Col-
a point ahead of Barna and will

Friday night the

lege team who are now

most likely win the Cup.

To keep this lead Barna wouid
have had to defeat Y.M.C.A. five
—nil. They only won three out
of five games. The “Y” team is
a much improved one and went
within a narrow margin of de-
feating the Barna side.

The majority of the ladies have
dropped back considerably. It can
clearly be seen, from their per-
formances, that they have not
been practising enough. The pres-
ent stawdard is below that at the
beginning of the season,

Queen’s College played Lenville
in the first match. The College
team won five—nil. Representing
the College team were J. Clarke,
Margeurite Wood, Ruth Williams,
Nell Hall and B, Chandler,

For Lenville, Angela Perkins
put up a good fight against Mar-
geurite Wood. On many occa-
sions Miss Perkins beat her op-
ponent with her backhand push
shot. She also returned some of
Miss Wood's forehand smashes.

The second match, the most
finteresting of the night, was be-
tween Barna and Y.W.C.A, As in
their first*engagement, the draw
again favoured the “Y” team.
Patsy Howard met Weldina Pil-
grim in the first set. Miss How-
ard took an early lead, Miss



On

Pilgrim brought points even at
13 all. Miss Howard used her
powers of concentration to better
avail. Service changed at 20—15
in her favour, She went on to
win 21—15.

Miss Pilgrim was on top early

in the second game. Seryice
changed at 9—6 in her favour.

Miss Howard played hard for
every point and eventually the
service changed at 16—14 in her
favour. Both players were now
very cautious. Service changed at
20—15 in Miss Howard's favour
but Miss Pilgrim deuceq_ the
game. Miss Howard won 22—20
to claim the set,

Miss E. Daniel won the next
set to bring honours even. She
playeq Miss E. Goodridge, The
players were well matched but
Miss Daniel baffled her opponent
with forehand push shots which
were well lifted. She won the
first game 21—18.

The second game went to deuce
and after a stubborn fight Miss
Daniel won 22—20,

Dolores Howard won the next
set to regain the lead for Barna.
She beat Elsie Bynoe 21—12,
21—13. Miss Bynoe tried to slow
up the game at times. This wor-

ried Miss Howard a little as she
@ on page 5



22 Two-Year-Olds On New
Classification List
By BOOKIE

S USUAL at this time of the year the classifi-

. cation for the B.T.C. August meeting brings
to our attention the names of the new two-year-
olds. This year I notice twenty-two names on the
list which 1 presume must be the new ones and
apart from one or two whose breeding suggests their
names, quite a number of the names I find rather
amusing. 7 ‘

It starts with Apple Sam, being in alphabetical order, and this
chap happens to be a fine upstanding gelding by Jetsam out of Apple
Fritter. Next we hit upon Battle Line who, it is not difficult to see,
is by Battle Front. The dam is Hands Up, being a French Creole
mare owned by Mr. Bertie Proverbs. Then there are two by Burning
Bow, one bred in St. Vincent and the other in St. Lucia. These are
Bow Tie, a colt out of Felicity Bay, and Burnt Gold. The latter is
the daughter of Secret Treasure, the first foal out of this speedy mare.

From, St. Kitts comes Coliana who is by Colrose out of Diana.
She will race under the colours of Mrs. Rosemary Wigly who has
already brought us one or two in the past few years. «

OVING further down the list we come to another which comes

from a line which seems destined to give us names connected
with song. This is Contralto (Jim Cracker Jack out of Night Singer)
and therefore a sister to Lady Re Good and Soprano. No doubt when
the Night Singer colts come along in future we will have Bass, Bari-
tone and Tenor while to keep abreast of times one can also be called
Crooner. For either sex there is also a long reserve list to cull
from such as Boogie-Woogie, Be Bop, Calypso or just Yodle and
Falsetto. If the mare persists with the propagation of the line, after
all these are exhausted, we might even get down to just plain Bing
or Frank.

After Contralto comes Crackers and this I understand to be a
gelding by Jim Cracker Jack out of Indian Spring. He is then followed
on the list by one who is, in truth and in fact, only two years and
three months come last March 31st, but who for racing purposes is
regarded as a three-year-old. This is none other than Mr. Sealey’s
December, by Battle Front out of Taimoina, which had the misfortune
to be born in the last week in December. As all race horses in the
Northern Hemisphere have their birthdays on January 1st, December
was one year old a week after she was born. Hard luck! I suggest
she migrate to the Southern Hemisphere,

The line of Flotsam, Jetsam and Ligan is one which I think lends
itself to nice names if only some thought is applied and ane of the
best named on the list I think is Driftwood, by Jetsam out of Pawky.
This is followed by Faerie Queene who has been given the benefit
of an old English spelling and she is a filly by Burning Bow out of
Chivalry.

HEN in the middle of the list what do we come upon but the

imposing name of Frederick the Great. By Jim Cracker Jack
out of Marsh Light I should have thought that Jack O’Lantern or
Jack Be Nimble would have suited better, but I understand this
colt has such an imposing stature that his very bearing suggests
greatness. Hence the name. I am not surprised however to learn
that he is a big fellow because most of this mare’s offspring have been
well grown and well developed and, as a matter of fact, bigger than
their sire, Battle Front, As Jim Cracker is easily one of the biggest
horses in the West Ifdies today, it is not surprising that a cross
befveen himself and Mursh Light should turn out such a fine
specimen.

Galway Bay, by Jetsam out of Irish Eyes, is another which has
been appropriately named. Galway Bay being in County Galway
in Ireland, Then comes Howitzer, by Battle Front out of Fairy
Queen, and Illusion by Jim Cracker Jack out of Will O’the Wisp II, Gal-
way Bay is another from the Sealy stables while the latter two are
from Mr. Bertie Proverbs’ stock. Then Jealousy from that mare of
great renown, First Love, the sire being Battle Front. She is followed
by one who enjoys the name of Jim La Rue, by Jim Cracker Jack
out of Linseed. Both of these also seem to be well named.

Further down there is May Pole, a filly by O.T.C. out of April
11th, Nit-Wit by Jetsam out of Quick Wit, Rainbow, by Burning Bow
out of Precipitance and Rose Leaves by Burning Bow out of Rose.
To end off there is Stirling Dawn (Stirling Castle-Sunrise), Stirling
Flush (Stirling Castle-Biretta) and Super Jet (Jetsam-Wedding Gift).



OW they will all turn out we have hardly the slighest idea at
present, But of course we can be quite certain that their nameg
will mean nothing in this respect. However on going through tha
list One cannot help noticing how many there are by the Jamaican
stallion Jim Cracker Jack and Trinidad’s Jetsam.” It shall be interest-
ing to see what the progeny of these two creole stallions will da
against those of the imported now that they have been given a fair
chance of representation, If they hold their own then it means that Jim
Cracker Jack’s future will be bright. ,But alas, poor Jetsam, the same
cannot be said for him. Since his return home from these shores it
seems that he has mostly been confined to the field or the stable
Last reports were that he was in a sorry plight indeed, ;
ON CLASSIFICATION
HE latest classification has also come in for its usual share of
comment, adverse and otherwise. There are one or two moved
on which I differ slightly with the classifiers and although it might
mean merely a half class difference, yet I fail entirely to appreciate
their point of view on these particular cases.

Workimg down the list, the first of these I come across is Embers.
Surely this mare ran worse than most horses at the entire meeting
Yet I see she is still in B2, the same class she was demoted to after
her poor showing in Trinidad in A. No matter how poor her form
in Trinidad was, I am sure it was worse here. Yet in the first in-
stance she is dropped a full class while now she remains put. I aan-
not see the reasoning except that it might be felt that her form wag
just too bad to be true and therefore she must improve in the future.

From B2 the next stop is away down in E2 and here we find
fone other than Cavalier. True he has been moved only a half class
but this was from F and as there are no races for class E or E2, it
means that Cavalier will have to run with the D class bunch of horses
of all ages. Relatively speaking it is therefore a bigger jump than
any other in the whole gamut of the classification list where only a
half class is concerned. Especially so to a two or three-year-old for
whom special events are held only in F and F2.

Now if there was one horse at the meeting who was most
decisively beaten on its merits and only managed to scrape home with
an advantage in weights, it was Cavalier. In fact he not only dis~
appointed the public but his connections as well. He collapsed as
easily in the Guineas as a pack of cards and Dunquerque and Cardinal
had no difficulty in beating him at level weights. He then got an
allowance of 4 and 8 lbs. respectively from Cardinal and First
Admiral and only a lucky break on the inside, which it took him
the whole length of the straight run to make use of, helped him to
beat them by a short head. In this third and last race up went his
weight (by only 3 tbs.) and down went Cavalier. Unplaced to Seed-
ling Rambler Rose, Cardinal and First Admiral, who were the first
four in that order, is the best he could de. Yet he was still in
receipt of 2 and 5lbs., respectively from Cardinal and First Admiral.
But on classification he is rated 5 lbs. better than First Admiral and
10 Ibs. better than Cardinal. I fail to see the point,

Thirdly, I think it's about time it was realised that Miss Friend-
ship canont cope with those in F whether they be young or old. This
is the third meeting in a row that she has been most decisively beaten,

come wet or dry going, and yet she still remains in F, ti
with F2? nye wares



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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



Mischief Scores
First Victory

HURRICANE WINS

(By Our Yachtin

MISCHIEF, by scoring

Regatta of the R.B.Y.C., was sailed yesterday,

herself in a good position to
She sailed a beautiful race
Gipsy, to get near her.
that these two boats shculd

Hurricane, as usual, turned in
another good performance in the
D Class. Her victory yesterday
will now put her in a sound posi-
tion to win this Trophy. Rainbird
is still offering a serious challenge.

The race was south about in an
extremely changeable wind, At
times it was hard, but on many
oceasions it dropped considerably.

Nine boats started in the B
Class. Mischief’s win gives her a
total of 72 points. She did the
race in one hour, 50 minutes and
nine seconds. Second was Ranger
and third Flirt which will now be
a point less than Mischief when \
their worst races are dropped.

Mischief’s first round was a very
fast one. She did this in 32 min-
utes and nine seconds. She did
the second round in 34 minutes and
38 seconds and the final in 35 min-
utes and 34 seconds. Ranger did
the race in one hour, 52 minutes
and 56 seconds and Flirt in one
hour, 50 minutes and nine seconds.

Magwin Wins

Magwin scored her first victory
for the season in the C Class. She
gave Miss Behave, and Madness
two minutes and overtook them.
Folly did not sail.

Second was Scamp which also
sailed beautifully and third Mad-
ness. Magwin did the race in one
hour, 22 minutes and six seconds.
She completed her first round in
40 minutes and 10 seconds, and the,

eo. and 44 seconds.

ry Conseipyedemt)

a vietory when. the Seventh
has placed
carry off the B iass Trophy.
and never allowed her sister,

I am still of the opinion however

be started together.

she did not get to the starting line
in time to race. This is the sec-
ond race she has missed this sea-
son,

Hurricane won easily ‘in this
Class. She did the race in one
hour, 27 minutes and 10 seconds,
four minutes and 24 seconds bet~
ter than Sinbad which came sec-
ond. Third was Rainbird whose
time for the race was one hour, 32
minutes and 43 seconds.

Hurricane did the first round in
43 minutes and 45 seconds. Her
second round was 20 seconds bet-
ter. Sinbad’s first round was com-
leted in 44 minutes and 50 sec-
nds, but in the final she took 46
Rainbird

mpleted the first in 47 minutes
and 32 seconds, but her second
round was better than Sinbad’s.
The time for this was 45 minutes
and 11 seconds.

Miss Jean Wilkinson once again
tried her hand at Tornado racing.
Yesterday she skippered her
brother’s boat Fury in the Tornado
Class and finished at that.

Five Tornadoes started. Vam-
oose was again victorious. Second
was Thunder and third Edril.
Vamoose did the race in one hour,
four minutes and 22 seconds. She
did the first round in 20 minutes
and 40 seconds, the second in 22
minutes and 21 seconds and the
third in 21 minutes and 2! seconds.

A full seale with the results will

second in 41 minutes and 56 sec-Flbe published in Tuesday’s Advo-

onds.

Scamp completed her first round
in 41 minutes and 17 seconds while
she did the second a bit faster
Madness sailed a fairly poor first
round. Her time for the second
was 42 minutes.

Mohawk scored another victory
in the Intermediate Class. She
now has a total of 64 points out
of a possible 84. She has a clear
lead in this Class.

Eight boats started. Second was
Reen and third Coronetta, Coro-
netta did her very best, but still
could not catch Mohawk and Reen
after giving them five minutes.
Mohawk did the race in one hour,
24 minutes and 12 seconds com-
pared with Coronetta’s one hour,
23 minutes and 24 seconds. Reen
did it in one hvur, 25 minutes and
29 seconds.

ycate. The Eighth Regatta will be
‘sailed on Saturday, April 19.



TOURNAMENT AT
SUMMERHAYES BEGINS

Summerhayes Tennis Club be-
gan their Annual tournament yes<
terday afternoon. In the Men’s
Singles V. H. Chenery beat D. A.
Wiles in straight sets 6—0, 6—2.

Men’s Doubles:—D. A. Hutch-
inson and L. G. Hutchinson drew
with Col. O, St. A. Duke and
Dr. A. S. Cato two sets all. The
scores were 6—4, 4—6, 6—3 4—6

The tournament continues on
Wednesday next. Messrs, Wm
Fogarty Ltd., have presented a

Maxply racquet for the winner
of the Men’s Singles Champion-









SUNDAY ADVOCATE



—

TABLE TENNIS

‘¥
Soccer Lessons @ trom page 4
By GRAHAM WILKES is accustomed wo the fast gam
In the next Joyce Jones, e
PICTURE NO, 1:

Y.W.C.A. skipper defeated J. Bry-j
ant 21—16, 2i1—6. ‘This was an
easy walk over for Miss Jones
who is about the best player on
the “Y” team. At this stage the
score was Barna 2, YÂ¥.W.C.A, 2
The decisive set was between
Marion Manning and A. Walcott.
Miss Manning won two—-0n
The barracking on some occasions |
worried Miss Manning wh ap- }
pes ars to be very sensitive to noise. |
it was because of this that she |
: lost the second game which wen
deuce My
Miss Manning was
in the first game. She even
visked her forehand smashes, |
something she never does unless |
she finds an easy opponent. Sh
won the first game 21—14, |
In the second game Miss Wal-
eott never allowed her opponen
to get too big a lead. The gam«
vent to deuce. To get the odd
point the players patted for abou
three minutes Miss Walcott wor |
23-—21. }
Miss Manning got down to busi- |
ness in the final game, She ioe

guite coni-

four out of the first five points
and went on to defeat her op-
ponent 21—4.

Adelphi defeated Y.W.P.C. four \

-one. The only player to wir}
for the Beckles Road team wa
Renee Gloummeau. The winner
for Adelphi were Phylis Chandler
Betty Carrington, Heather Dean«
and Molly Chandler.

The line-up in this Division i
as follows: Queen’s College 3¢

KICKING
Notice that the nen-kick-

A DEAD BALL

ing foot is practically level
with the ball to allow for
the body weight and shoul-
ders to be poised over the
ball on impact, thus ensuring
a low trajectory to the bali.
On impact the foot is stretch-
ed and the curve of the instep
fits into the turve of the ball
giving the maximum area of

points, Barna 29 points, Adelph
oe 22 points, ¥.W.C.A, 19'and Len
PICTURE NO. 2: ville seven points.



This Week's Football

DIVISION ONE



Monday 7. Empire vs. Carlton. Referee

oO S. Coppin Linesigen A Thomas
nad R. Parris

sursday 10, College vs. Everton.



Referee 1 F Harris Linesmen ‘O
Robtr mn and G. Amory
Seturday 12. Empire vs Spartan.
Referee S. Gittens. Linesmen A. Parris
nd J. Archer.
DIVISION TWO

Tuesday a Pickwick-Rover vs
Gartton-—G. Amory

Wednesda 9 Empire v Spartar

W. Hoyos
DIVISION THREE

Tuesday 8 Lodge vs. Y.M.P.C. "“B"
t Lodge. Referee J. Archer
Regiment vs. ¥.M.C.A. at Garrison.

Referee A. Thomas
C. & W. vs. Police

at Boarded Hall, j
Referee O. Graham



Cariton \ Foundation Old Boys at
Carlton Referee O. Robinson
Rangers vs. Pickwick-Rovers at Shell
Referee K. Walcott
Combermere Notre D it Com-
F Tayl
Wanderers v College
F. FE
Eve Foundation
LP. A’ at
On connecting with the i

‘ t eferee R. Hutchinson

; Big wun



PRIL 6 NO. 218

The Topic |

of |

Last Week >

|
|
|



ts peppe

© no tast
scrunchy
u

ean't afford

Don't Wneourage his bad
Lou ovied!
never stand in
f all your criticism
For tr quible’ 8 Grawing near
. .
The hommesass centre Robert
You know down in Bay Street
ias Joe mad with excitement
With those sweet things to eat.

absurd bey
fear

te toki me I styould go there
And I would learn to cook
ooking down there is practice
Its different from the book
. ‘ . .
went on a bit further
As though he owns the
“vs when he
tell choose

world
re-marries
a houseeraft girl



said Joe, you're all right
Your belly rules your head
with all the sweetmeat
! till crave Enriched Bread
For Enriched Bread has proven
A great food; super fine
Apart from building musele
Its strength for the daily grind

HOT FROM
THE OVEN

Lou ran and tell Fred Goddard
Bake Enriched Bread to sell
The Enr ed lade fror

1 Bay Land
Just beat Spartan in

hell

fired from the right wing
But cannons from the left

And Notre Dame kept pounding
And had the whole crowd deaf

. . . .

fire! fire!
Defeat! Lou cried, % swear

Send for the Fire Officer
To out the fire down there

Oh fire!

For Spartan burn to ashes

The poor team simply stuck ;
They failed to play their twelfth mat
That “forward” called “good luck !
id this be Spartan first class |
e Dames taunt vesterdas
hould shun eharp
i wars keep away

edged tool

Medford, Tor





Pre et fi Se,
PGOOBR MORN. 4G)
’ 51D YOU NUGGET ‘
YOUR SHOES THIS
MORNING 2? ———
NOW A WORD ABOUT
THAT LOVELY NUGGET!

hag TNUT oe 4











FREE

TODAY
MODERN
OINTMENT

VOURSELE
warn THE
RUBBING

CHAINED
BY PAIN?



PAGE FIVE

is produced



Pee ow

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

REEDS FoR oh ARINETTES
AND SAXOPHONES





ILLUSTRATED
Of the King's |



Coloured and Cl Plastic By

all at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE

- teentin 9
(| NR On ee

ORIENTAL |
PALACE

HEANOUAR

SOUVE xt s
INDIA CHINA &
CEYLON

THAN! ae

Wm. Ify. St “3



FO!

FROM

vr.

| GIRLY PRIENDLY.

NOCTETY
wT

of

Cupr, 1950 Borden Co. Intend?) Cope Reserved





| ire
|



ball the leg is straightened Gibbons

FIERY JACK







j }
114K
1 Sh yy +
itt ANNUAL I 4
{ Under the Patronage
ii} Lady Savage
| | will be held at
| THE HOSTEL, Country
if - ohlh
} fror 3.30 to 6
The Fet i of
j Mrs. Peebl
| |
’























If Coronetta had saiJed a faster iis i rs a i Combermere Old Bo ». Lodge at liane’ hes tol L, Rd
first round she would most likely ship ey serie = the ermer aan aera cs arris 1 v y, dearest on SATURDAY April 26th
have won. Mohawk did the first ; eels call wae al = Tuesday 6. Foundation vs. College at | *'V® J & R Enriched Bread sdicit
round in 41 minutes and 45 sec- os Seles Of , Foundation, Referee I. King | Three cheers we wive the vere
onds and the final in 42 minutes Harbour Log oo oS, — =~ Foe a ee | Let fits oat ase ny PO | cia
and 27 seconds, Reen’s first round . oO! n bison anc eay ackw . Come Dames raise all your glasses ou 8 ~ular .
was done in 42 minutes and 52 In Carlisle Bay combined strength acts , 3. phe direc tion of the Ar wt with Jo& Ro” It relieves all Muscular Meee tt he the full

nd her last in 42 minutes simultaneously, The non- oe of the non-kicking foot Dace ve, Soe
oon ot dacurain Coronetta did her = Sch. Gardenia W., MV. Blue Star, kicking leg on impact is helps to determine the direcs sponsored by Aches and Pain, ing Stal B Beowacs ae
first round in 42 minutes and four Sch. Everdone, Sch. Mary Me ae tensed and straight but bent tion of the resultant kick. ens ; rear. i ¥ . t
seconds and her last in 41 minutes TuViqron Sen Turtle Dove, Sch. Rain. Slightly afterwards to allow N.B.—Brute strength and | J&R BAKERIES “RUB IN ‘FIERY JACK’ at Baa feo hee eee |
and 20 seconds, the best time for bow M, ‘Sch. D’Ortac, Sch. Rosanene, for the follow through. « long run are not necessary |, and [e«
oe ee ee Sy a ee Nek Paaey 4.3 Ss bce euaher th tol kb cee et makers of RUN OUT PAIN” Lucky dips for the chil
ew ar : rs ; Zs , ‘ byes 8 e ie ation oO dren is

AN the D Thais meats siartad H, Van eer et course of the kick must be ibove principles is essential; ENRICHED On Sale at all Drug Stores, By kind permission of Col
with the exception of Olive Blos- Schooner Mandalay 11., 30 tons net, focussed on the ball, together with timing and | * BREAD Michelin, the Police Band
som whose spar was broken last Capt. Mitchell, from St. Vincent: 2. If the ball needs to be control they will help to de- FRANK B. ARMSTRONG L/TD conducted by Capt. Raison })
Saturday, Her crew managed to pain’ fom st Vineent. lofted into the air the non- velop direction and sirength | and the blenders of }} will play during the after- jf
fit her with a Tornado spar short- Sehboser Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt kicking foot should be placed | in the kick. A smooth follow Agents. noon
ly before the race. Unfortunately King, from St. Lucia. more to the rear of the ball, §, through adds power and di- | J&R RUM ; ADMISSION 6D

{ with the body inclined more {j rection. | > -_—-—— — =
pe ‘a . vinislinithiinia tdi: | PSE FB FBZ 23: AAS)
——— SSS ee > S°O°BBOBBFB FON ESN BBS me ~BrBoBF BABA FX
BARBADOS TURF CLUB 1 agama 4 estas ie te orgy te "aT. &
a

Cleans your pen |
every time you fill!

Special ingredient prevents trouble caused
by sediment and corrosion



WILSON” & Co

Lfarade

R

| %

NE

OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION
MID-SUMMER MEETING, 1952














Quink is absolutely different
from other inks; it contains

























A: ©. 2, (Cont'd) F, 2. (Gont’d) a special ingredient (called
Fuss Budget Magic Gaye Foxglove Solv - x) which dissolves
Golden Quip Miss. Panic ‘ ‘. i harmful sediment left inside
Frederick the Great . .
bbe? ap Racton Galway Bay | your pen, This sediment is
ebate aoe rk, Hill Prince | one of the chief causes of pen
A. 2. , Hi - Lo troubles.
Notonite ae fan Howitzer Regular use of Quink willkeep Or e? = wi e ¢ 1G} ;
Yasmeen Tiberian Lady Hitiston our pen clean and trouble- »
imbrook Jealousy your pen clean a ) ‘
‘a 2 +. Tr Jim La Rue .' free—free of sediment ith ist di Q
ue Streal D, 1. oint Commanc and free of damaging i s » . , y ristamaain AS
Demure on All Baba Lady's Man acid corrosion. now im full swing, lead the way with on: 2g %
ght it ve Nest . . was e
Gun Site Cross Bow March Winds Sold in five brilliant values like these ®
Landmark Mary Ann May Day colours. Also Royal « ‘
Ft Watercress May Pole Blue Washable Quink, CASUALS, leather Brogue @ 12.75 ,
Red Cheeks D. 2. ott eon which washes out Suede Brogue @ 13.03 , SS
See ce tea meme es ag von Ohare Men Wo TONE SHOES Ra
Sunny Game Dunquerque Nit-Wit =) . a water when spilt on eiade Pi ae afte nee + analities Garbardine, Wor ted,
Top Flight | 2 oz. — 1/6 J clothes or fingers. en li taliban UT TUN Se 8 COTS Oe eae ee nd XS
B. 2. Oatcake Oberon | 4, | 100 Sea ae Cottor Tropical’& Drills at surprisin y pr \
Belle Surprit aa | 4 on, — 2/- PARKER Bec ae eee HOUSEHOLD: Bene ee Lees ae sh in 4
iy The Bagle Rambler Rose | & Grey. sizes “14% ‘> 17 Oil Cloth & $1.73 & $1.97 per yd.
King on Usher Rose Leaves ‘s wu af ey. _ $7.36 ea. Ultra Modern Sewing Machines, a $60.00 ea
Peri ie E. 2. Seedling | 60% Sea Island Cotton & Hert ' ie c 5 vies ’ onipiete with te & ight: .
peree, See Apoll Soprano | containing SOLV-X 10% Egyptian Cotton, ot Sports Mode #6800.
e Stirling Dawn | ld ‘ . toaudster , a.
Sising eee Stirling Flush | Distributors for Barbados : oo Ble, c am Gre & Carrier ie 87.00 ea.
pear Grass . ° X aE e@. . $6.36 ex bea P Diba -
Sweet Rocket Flame Flower sae | A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS) LTD. 5 ea Y
angu . Ane $ . e
0. 1. or ey P.O. Box 403, Bridgetomp “MATTAHAN” SHIRTS by Renown in Blue, White, Vor % adies 4 W
Aberford J F. 1. Viceroy Grey, Tan & Cream : : $5.00 ea 4 r /
a i ae. wal . Sear “EXCELSIOR” by Renown, in Cream, Blue, Grey LADIES You EASTER K
Castle in the Air Irs amare G. 1. hite @ is Geceetes 464 Oe ocean ae te ee ee
Dashing Princess Jolly Miller Ben Hur “DELUXE” by Renown in Blue, Grey & White & cane stan eae Geobanes Ss
Doldrum Miss Friendship Blue Diamond Tan @ ‘i ; ae 4.80, 5 See Tinckh frei cur Hue etook Ws
Fair Front Waterbell Bide Grass BREWSTER SHIRTS (American) in Stripes & eee sekticle ‘aint dbess ‘
Fair Sally * F. 2. Diadem Plain ¢ olours @ ss 5.00 ,, of Dress materials and acces~ Ss
Flee Apple Sa” Bry Lane Hage rs OR Gia: satcy O I prin, 190 dees mp ss
enc! utter e Gavotte 2B [PED SHIRTS with ‘ rubenized collar: ee : Ty in «
High and Low April’s Dream * ; @ eo ; : ‘ ee Ame 60, 68 & 76c. per yd. ; \
Leading Article cca warn Il “MASSCO” American made Shirts in White only : ee NS ome flowered ar a 4 Fr
Red Velvet Battle Line Monsoon ae Bn aig eign eR ES! SY 4.78 in fi $1.00 & $1.20 per yd.\ Sig W
~ Moritz Ritaen, Vigilant | Genuine Khaki Shirts by Renown in all sizes — Viola Cre resisting spun in alls W
opsy : (short sleeves) “e ; iva te te ee 5.48. ,, vi ner 79, ts yd. » b
Windsor Glen Bow Tie : a2 j (long sleeves) vias Sa EG aolo. rs ae \
Burnt Gold ar » yr i@¢ | QBovs’ POPLIN SHIRTS by Renown, sizes 111% to A beautiful assortment of Japan-% »
a. 2. Caprice Beatie iby i i A N oO R EK c i T A L MN ) 13\4 in Grey, Blue, Cream & White ‘i be 2,00 ee @ 72, 84, 90 & $1.00 © g WS
Abu-Ali Cardinal Cotace by RI “EXCELSIOR” Vat colours Sanforized and Tritw- oh ene Ay ee GR et W
Aim Low Seeeeeen II Flying Ann WW) ived collars in Blue & Cream only @ 4,50 ae ate. Sool ” °
Sree oe” Privolity MR. GUY JONSON wy Aime Tee Shirts with beautiful sceneric sand i dian ‘tei 996 per yd ‘ Ww
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Cantaquisine olombus jallant Hawk { ih | ae eae oe eas rr 6.0 \FFLE PIQUE N ALL >)
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Darham Jane Crackers Maytime THE BEITISH COUNCIL, i | < Sport Shirts for Boys and M n all sizes a e | kin in White, genuine qual- «
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Dim View Diarose Sun Jewel on WEDNESDAY, 9th April, at 8.30 } een ae oe ee te ee : | Hose, finest qualitie \\
Fabulous Driftwood Twinkle : tS TOPE tS aa ; spe | FM oye ; ; ; os 001 from $1.39 per f ip s K
Fille d’Iran Dunese Valeska Frogramme tmcludes : } Ge Shoes by the World’s best St in y Silk Black, Lemon, Blue
Galashiels Bplcure Vonwise THREE SONATAS Scarlatti Hf CLASSIC BROGUE MOC “ae | & Pink, 52” wide @ $1.56 WS
Love Potent acetious Wilmar 1) FUGUE IN ( SH ARP Bach | ‘ | emily tie | per 5 : Ww
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Subject to change if the event of any horse taking part in an S by Biuhens, Paar! atid Like i | (Por Bargains that are REALLY BARGAINS, visit earinig our entire stoc e
Meeting prior to the Barbados Summer Meeting, 1952. 6 MK N.E. WILSON & Co. THESE FO! WN
‘ - : a Tel. 3249 2) ¥ e DIAI r RSEI . 4>a~h~4~s
G.’A. LEWIS, Secret Bi aes Swan 68 BOON BB 6-9BPA-P AAA PA PF
27th March, 1952 6.5 2— An | Men eciikiatieasll PASSASSSSEEA AS AAS SSS SSS PSS SoS SG GEESE SP EL EEL
i
j .
















PAGE SIX ne BS ee SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL ¢ 2S
The Truth in = «= - ROMANCE I$ UPSETTING A FOREIGN OFFICE IDEA Sewing

Your Horoscope |

aimee Y © ®
, d you like to know what the) Lad ale lo En c® ~
Sta ndieate for you ? Would you like|
to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore, é
: il |

Circle

By Penny Nolan

General Sewing Plan
Much time and effort can
be wasted in dress making
by lack of planning. Uncer-





India’s most famous Astrologer, who by |



What’s Cooking



uracy of Ri ‘ ° tainty as to just what to do

predictions a nd In The Kitchen next often results in doing
e sound practi- - ‘ , i i

oo Bi hg Tomatoes are plentiful. Have the wrong thing, making it




necessary to rip out. The
following general plan may
be adapted to the dress you
are making. It will serve as

s €

you ever tried a tomato suffle?

Tomato Sufile
Friends, Ene
Lotteries



mice wives

For 6 people:














have astoundes ; : a guide in making your own
2 : Ss. a ;
She orexéé eee icin hinge plan. A few minutes spent in
ie world ove ; :
George Mackey by os et Pepper 2 planning before — begin ~
{ New York } Flour: 2 oz. a au sew are definitely worth-
LONGER pte that Tabore must possess some sort W ILL IAM TO ey NSHEND Grated Cheese: 1 tablespoon act while ,
of second-sight Eggs: 4 : a wri
To popularise his system Tabore will SHEP ; BE ¥ is : Beginners should make a writ-
19 | send you FREE your Astral Uiternésth: RETTY Joan Burbidge, one of a" (or margarine) 3 02. ten plan and follow it carefully
ion if you forward mn full She r wa 5 . a. ; “ as
LASTING? |i. he ita him your full name Britain’s two leading wome n Basil | iB if it besemnes, apparent a8 you
| birth all clear itt by y 4 , « . arr . i > . i -* : ih ad
Definitely! Not even the most | money wanted pi “Aatisideioal shore, diplomats, married in New Delhi Milk: % pint. f procedure could have Eee used
|’ Postage ete., but d 1/- in Britis Rite ee “e Te is ¢£ tue * , 2 e g a note of it t
expensive nail polish — ~~ Postal Onder tor stetiowers,
and other interesting literature. You will
be amazed at the remarkable accuracy
of his statements about you and your

> away » seeds and cut themfaid you next time.
wp hy Te eninge: Before first fitting: ~
Machine baste

marriage bar—inust leave the Foreign t SCAN 2 :
Only Cutex contains the exclusive, Service. ~ in very small pieces, Put 1% oz
















































: : . . of butter in a frying pan, the fine
new ingredient, Eaamelon. The fine De tie ee cent Say ont Miss Burbidge is First Secretary to the ly chopped onion and a few leave: 1, All darts and pleats
lustre will re on your nails Pe made again, Address; PUNDIT 4 ; y : : rythi 2. Shoulder seams
: : TAPORE, (Dept. 213-D), U: . High Cc ssione n Ind Although only of Basil and’ let everything ft = . -
for days. No ch sal Pi + Upper Forjett igh ommissioner in India. 8 ’ < Sid nada te: Leave
ays. No chipping, no peeling, Street, Bombay 26, india, Postage to India ‘ she needa se » promotions t gently. As soon as the onion i 3. Side seams note: —Leav«
no fading. Choose from the is 4 cents. 32, she needed three more promotions golden add the tomatoes, seaso left side open for zipper.
many exquisite fashion shades. i tees become Britain's first sg dom anes s with” salt and pepper and let . er
THE Foreign Office ts perturbed Its women everything cook until you have ve . h wry ic.
aia * divisimath iy ai etive that It is losing almost a totato sauce. Make a 6; You my ; baste a or
os them too fast. All their training and experience are white sauce with the flour, the both s eeves in the arm-
M sO} VE AND being lost milk and the rest of the butter. i * 7 print if am
‘ : i ; > w » , . : ite » se is ready wis ut sleeves wi
Give your lips that lovely, more desirable | fs * dite ie bee Sivause “at : an pt SS temas” add 1 have to be removed’ to
look with Cutex Lipstick. Comes i ae: marriage—one-third of the tablespoonful of grated cheese stitch shoulder and side
4 ’ g p eee
in the latest fashion shades that harmonize | os total of 18 recruited since and the 4 yolk of the °se. nom a fest fitting:
with y pori i i at if ~ the Foreign Service was the whites of the eggs until stif a eee hte
hk your favorite nail polish. ¢ opened to women as a SOAN and add gently the rest. Butter a 1, Pin sleeve in armhole if
permanent career in 19 ine BURBIDGE suffle tin (if you haven't got one ‘ Rg ont. bodi
May mean kidney trouble ane mere may ve is a rather large pyrex dish will do) 2. Pin skirt to ice.
y : y : ge gen (above) went to the pour the mixture in it and put 3, Test for ease.
A function of the kidneys is to away. to the altar altar it in a moderate oven for about 1 4. Approve neckline and
| eliminate harmful impurities from months after their * hour. When the top of the suffle collar and markings for
che system, If the kidneys grow a cost to the State has become golden take it out of buttons and buttonholes.
sluggish, these impurities accum- t » Foreign Seer MRS HRISTOPHER "i After first fitting: —
ee Pp c E

“ We've t the oven and serve hot.































| ulate and settle and often become E in snapped rere att MAYHEW 1, Stiteh and press darts and
in See Bee the Foreign ce inio matri R * ” 5 pent ox "
muses, Tikwataartietse ff moni bureau (fe) resigned afer a Butter Beans Suffle Sree aie eens
trouble is to help the kidneys. : PE ee an ie Ae nine-days courtship, $! side seam darts down.)

They should be toned up with * OE ig ee ene Butter corabanpaianes 2 oz. 2. Stitoh and press shoulder

De Witt's Pills—the medicine _With blue-eyed blonde Miss * Flour: }tabieapoontul seams (press open)
. made specially for this pi Monica Milne, the first girl ap- NADIA ities 1 8 1 ae 3. Stitch and ress side

5 \\ De Witt's Pills have a soothing, pointed under the new regulations. McCADDON Grate , ch mee! 1 tablespoonful ‘seams (press open)
FOR HOT-HOT DAYS | oe ite ae ben An Oxford M.A. and daughter Whites of eggs: 4. SS. ‘Stitch. and. press. skirt

tome ie wae Se is London surgeon, Miss daillne (below) 24, attractive, has Ce " ‘seams (press open)

back to perf thei ely surge s , ; . = nee Ri o }
USE COOL: COOL TALC he ra adi This son. had already been posted to Wash- no matrimonial plans, ° Clean po -4 snes... Sienm a 5. Stitch and press sleeve

\ tried medicine is sold all over ington in September 1946 as Sec- t ae AD oe ¢ or r. ti ie, aes oe (press open).
* the world and we have 7 ond Secretary when she fell in in e water when the water 6. Stitch collar, trim seams,

: { love. In a few months she was starts. to boil and let them cook. turn and press.
Soothin fresh and fra rant - letters from sufferers telling ‘ $ ; ; ; is
g g ’ of relief gained, after y the wife of Mr. J. H. Britton, a Put them in a colander when 7, Join front and back neck
keeps you dainty and com- of suffering, by taki the Bristol industrialist. cooked and pour some cold water facings and press seams
Witt's Pills. Try them A second girl met her future husband at Stoke on them. (This is to keep their open,
fortable adorned in the . for your trouble. Go to D’Abernon, the elaborate country manor in Surrey where lovely green colour). Put them 8. Pin and machine baste
, E ._ your chemist and candidates for important State jobs were tested until 1950, in a frying pan with a bit of sleeve in armhole. _
fragrance men love. Ss get a supply when it was closed because it was too costly. viding! butter for a few minutes. Pre- 9. Baste collar and facings
——— y. She resigned the day she was admitted to the Foreign pare a white sauce with the to neckline.
> Service. flour,.14% oz. of butter and the 10, Baste cuffs and facings to
Miss Katherine du Boulay, charming Oxford gradu- milk. Mix the beans with the sleeves.
ate, resigned her diplomatic post at Geneva to marry Mr sauce. Sift everything until you 11, Baste skirt to bodice.

Michael Stewart, a First Secretary, She had been in the

have a puree. Add the table-
service only a year and a half.

At second fitting: —
spoonful of grated cheese.

Beat 1, Approve all lines.






GUARANTEE | Another Foreign Office “glamour girl’—Miss Cicely ithe whites of the eggs until stiff 2. Mark hem.
nie . |Ludlam, Oxford graduate in modern languages—had and add them to the puree gently. After second fitting: —
De Witt’s Pills . ae jserved in Belgrade as a Third Secretary when, back in Butter a suffle tin or a pyrex aish. 1. Stitch sleeve in arm-
condititns cd the nee London, she met Mr. Christopher Mayhew, M.P., then Pour the mixture which will have hole and press. Seam is
wtions and the ingredients con- sign Office Under-Secretary and “the Socialists’ ill i 2/3. “eu
f ty rigid standards of purity, Foreign ce nder-Secretary a 1e ocialists to fill it only up to 2/3. Put the usually pressed toward

most eligible bachelor.”
They were married in August 1949 after a whirlwind
wooing of only nine days.
Mr: Mayhew said yesterday: “Here was Cicely all
set to become Britain’s first ambassadress, but she threw
away her career to become my wife,

pyrex dish in a moderate oven for
about 20 minutes. Serve imme-
diately. «Suffles have to be served
immediately. If you leave them
for a few minutes they tend to

sleeve. Using two rows
of stitching one fourth
inch apart and trimming
seam close to second, row
eliminates bulkiness.





: « BI
| - seein Dace









Pe If women diplomats go down, 2. Stitch collar and facin
Le Ce fall as easily as that it shows how precarious is the Foreign to neck. Wee if
Office hold over them.” Fri bound buttonholes are
TWENTY - SEVEN - YEAR - tion of the ban: “Any member ton suburb of Georgetown. ed. Button Beans to be made this should be
OLD Mrs. Mayhew, snow of the Service is supposed to be Miss Salt is 47. Because of Butter beans, flour, lard or oil. done before applying fac-
* ~ the mother of a seven-month- mobile, able to be sent anywhere her outstanding qualifications the ang.
— — old son, commented: “A girl's abroad at any time. It is ‘assum- Foreign Office might grant a spe- Boil the beans as in the previ- 3. Stitch cuffs to sleeves
— — horizons are broadened in the ed that a married woman would cial waiver and retain her even Our recipe. Do not cook them too and press.
Foreign Service and she usually wish to stay with her husband.” if she married, much. Dip them in flour and fry 4. Stitch skirt to bodice and
e * enjoys a wider social life, so she WHAT of the women envoys But Miss Salt says: “I think them in lard or oil until golden. press,
Qu ick relief from should normally meet more men who have so far resisted mar. I Would resign.” Serve them with meat or fish. 5, Finish seams by pinking
from whom to choose a husband. Yyiage offers? ; : Miss Nadia McCaddon, Third or stitching edges,
I was content to resign. It would Now at the top of the tree is Secretary at the British Embassy 6. Put in zipper,
take a super-woman to run @ Miss Barbara Salt, First Secretary at Oslo, protests; “I have no ; : 7. Tack down facings,
Foreign Service job, a husband, at our Washington Embassy, Her Matrimonial plans at all.” But Age Of Innocence Hem.
‘ and a family, but I do think a phasic salary is about £1,200, with attractive Miss McCaddon is only 9. Sew on buttons and finish
’ woman diplomat should be allow- jjpera} allowances. After’ Miss 24. Mrs. John E. Hayes, Presi- buttonholes,
5 ‘<2 oa cui whether oes marriage she is fore- A Second Secretary has already dent of the Parents’ and aM Gree & Anish. press
on * + most in the race for the novel announce : ageme: shile a 3° va 7 ste :
. i. post of ambasse‘dress, Miss Geitins Galteaith, admits com oe Congress no Los You will find this general plan
Members are Mobile Miss Salt goes to five or six ted to the Service only last year ngeles, said that children adaptable to most ‘dresses you
The Foreign Service is the only receptions and parties each week, “was described as one of the love. C@MMot learn because their are likely to make. If followed
. important profession which still gand in addition plays hostess at liest of the lovelies in the Diplo- minds: are stifled by crime. it will save you time and assure
enforces a marriage _ bar. A {her own receptions given at her matic Corps. Hollywood glitter. and m ral a eames eeeaoe tt reeves
spokesman gave this interpreta-*handsome house in the Washing- —L.E.S. confusion, a ore It may be modified to suit your

individual experience.

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ra

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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952
qcscasunnmesntniiaeensininsionnnacnamcnameaneansesd







M. A. writes: “Am I fickle? I
am seVenteen years of age and
considered very good _ looking.
However, even though I have a
steady boy-friend, I must confess
that 1 flirt with all the new boys
I meet. My own boy-friend says
I don’t love him and am fickle,
but not withstanding my love
for him, I find myself interested
in all the new boys I meet.
you think this is wrong?

You are still a young girl, my
dear, and cannot yet be expected
to make up your mind fully as to
whom your final love will be. You
have plenty of time really, in
which to take your boy-friends
seriously. Howewer, you must
not get a reputation for being a
flirt. That would not ~ = any

and may come back upon
soe badly when you do fall in
jove seriously. Do not lead your
boy-friend on to believe he means
more to you than-de does. That

~ Rent Collector’s Appointmen

from page 1
Chairman had __ instructed the
Secretary to nonify Mr. Maynard
of his a intment,

He bed been informed too that
a legal opinion was being sought
and he failed to see why, despite
the fact that, such an opinion
was being sought, they should
notify a man of his appointment,
That was not in keeping with
the administration of public
affairs. He felt that if a legal
opinion was sought, it should be
received before a final decision
was made, or jn the present case,
anyone notified of the appoint-
ment.

“Having asked the Secretary to
get a legal opinion,” he said. “I
consider it unnecessary haste to
make the appointment, After all
we are a public Board, with pub-
lic funds and we have the public
to satisfy if we must maintain
their confidence.

The Chairman explained that
the Secretary had asked him
whether* he would get a legal
opinion and he had said “yes.”
The legal adviser; Mr. Reece, he
understood had said he would
prefer to see him, Mr. Beckles,
the acting Chairman, himself. As
far as he was concerned, the
appointment was passed,

At this stage the Board was
informed that Mr. Adams the
Chairman, who had returned to
the island only a few days, but
was not well enough to attend
the meeting, had written a letter
to the Secretary.

Mr, Mottley here enquired
whether the letter was a pri-
vate letter or dealt with the
business of the Board, The
Secretary stated that it dealt
with the appointment and Mr.
Mottley moved that the letter
be read, whether it agreed
with his point of view or not,
as legally speaking, Mr, Adams
by virtue of the Act was
Chairman of the Board, The
ultimate responsibility would
be his. He had been appointed
Chairman for the legislative
Session and Mr. Beckles was
only appointed for the day’s
proceedings. Furthermore they
were only acting in the matter
as agents of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, who,
when they saw the minutes of
the meeting and the haste with
which the appointment was
made, could only feel one way
about the Board.

Letter Read
After some discussion, the
Board decided that the letter

should be read.

In this letter Mr. Adams stated
that if the minutes were correct,
he was strongly of the opinion
that the Board should await the
opinion of the Solicitor General.
As they were spending the tax-



a

Gigilovely Paris
fashion model



be fair or just.
friends with all until you know
where your heart lies.

Be

would not

To Mrs. P. Your experience is
very normal really, and nothing
to worry about. Be patient and
you will find that, though just
married, life has so many won-
derful things in store for
Why not write the “Family

Do tor,” he would advise you Bee:

To “Rose”
tiesp sea~bathing,
and all such may be con
during the times you mention and
cause no harmful results what-~
ever.

“Ruby” writes: “I have had
several affairs with men over the
Jast few years and am now going
to be married. I do not know
what to say to my husband-to-be
as I believe him to be an extreme-
jy jealous man.”

Be honest with your husband-

payers’ and not their own money,
if they had asked for a legal
opinion, he did not see how
could explain to the public why
they did not await that opinion
before doing anything more in
the matter.

Even if the Board then agreed
to ithe present appointment, it
would not. be acting, in his
opinion, as a public body should.
Tt would be, if they thought the
original appointment valid,
superfluous to confirm it; if
irregular, then the making of a
new. appointment then would
not be on the agenda.

“In writing this,’ he wrote, “I
wish to emphasise that I am
saying nothing as to the merits
of the appointment, I am merely
saying that I see no justification
whatever for asking for a
opinion and then not awai!

The Board would
the fact he hoped, he wrote, that
the letter was merely an explan-

ation of his opinion, whi if
accepted, could, he

to no harm to the Board’s repu-
tation.

When the contents of this let-
ter had been di , Mr.
Mottley observed that with all
due respect to the acting Chair-
man, Mr, Beckles, he would say
that Mr. Adams was the Chair-
man and the ultimate responsi-
bility was his. So he would

repeat that he saw no reason for he!

the haste in notifying anyone
that he had been, appointed.

Urgent Need

Mr. Cox said that there was
one question, he-could answer in
respect to the haste. When Mr.
Lashley, the Secretary, had put
the question of the rent collec-
tor, it had ben intimated that
the rent collector was wanted as
quickly as possible, If the Chair-
man had understood the true
position, he might not have writ-
ten in the tone he had,

Mr, M said that Mr, Cox’s
argument held no water, T!
Acting Chairman explained that
he had ascertained from the
Secretary that no written protest
had been made, and having been
informed that the Solicitor Gen-
eral had said he would prefer to
see him in person, he h
fit to exercise his prerogative in
deciding that the appointment
was sanctioned.

Mr. Mottley still insisted that
the legal opinion should be
sought especially in the light of
the Chairman’s letter. He pointed
out to the Chairman that it had
been out of the greatest respect
for him that he had not formally
objected in writing, but had seen
him personally and discussed it
with him, He considered it there-
fore most unfair to take advan-
tage of the fact that he had not
written his objections.

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it. Mottley in protestii

thought Longbridge

to-be. Tell him you knew several
men before you met him but that
wince you met him he is the only
man in your life. After all, my
dear, if you love him and he loves
you it’s your future together that
counts and not the past, or the mis-
takes of your youth. I am sure that
all will be well, and I feel that
you will end secure in the knowl-
‘edge of the love of the man you
are to marry.

. To “P.B.” (Ch. Ch.) Concep-
tion is most likely to occur be-
tween two periods than any other
time during the month. How-
ever, it is never possible to say
definitely whether or not con~
ception will oceur even at these
times, but as you so wish to have
a baby I would first advise that
you and your husband have a
medical check-up to eliminate
any abnormality or such that
might exist.

The Acting Chairman said ne
was not will to open the ques-
tion again Mr. pro-
tested that that attitude should
not be taken and he would not
sit until the matter was settled
honourably.

Mr. Hutson now suggested the
pos nt of the discussion

Mr, Hutson said that Mr.
Adams as a lawyer himself seemed
in some doubt as to the validity
of the matter and suggested that
it would at least do no harm to
await the legal opinion. He would
ask that the matter be postponed
until Mr. Adams was present. It
was a matter that should be
straightened out constitutionally.
He could see no finality to it then.
If they decided to close the discus-
sion en and let it remain as
settled, he would have to join Mr.
ng that it should
not be closed then. :

Mr. Cox said he was quite will-
ing to get the legal opinion and
he would suggest that Mr. Hut-
son’s motion be amended to ask
the Solicitor General to speed up
with his opinion.

Mr. Hutson’s motion was then
passed and the méeting adjourned.

ee Sind eet One
da act as =
oer in place of the
Manager-Secretary, Mr, T. O.
Lashley who is leaving the island
next to study aided self

Ip housing Antigua, Puerto
Rico, Trinidad and Jamaica. Mr.
Lashley will be away for about
seven

P.N.P. LOSE
MEMBER

(From



Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, April 4.
Norman Manley’s Peoples Na~
tional Party continued to fall
apart about him as Fred Evans

M.H.R. for Western Westmore-
land, resigned the y to-day to
he throw in his lot with Ken Hill who

was ousted on Sunday last as one
of the leaders of the ty.

Fred Evans was member
who resigned his seat in the House
last , then regained it in a
bye- ion against JPL’s Gladys
and was the first
member of the House suspended
from duties for flouting the rule
of the Chair.

By Evans’ resignation, PNP
membership in the House is now
oi parther el t in thi

e
TUC we ulcn laered to-day

with the resignation of Frank Hill,
Arthur Henry and Richard Hart
from the General

, Henry, Financial
and’ Hart, Vice Presi-
dent of the TUC.
he





Als perfumed with the famous Yardley Lavender: Soap - Bath Salts - Dusting Powder

YARDLEY

+ vests; lay the

WILLIAM TOWNSHEND
Are the women of to-day
riding in steeplechases, piloting
airplanes, driving racing cars—
braver t h a n_ their Victorian

grandmothers?

Are they—with their
trips on the Continent
adventurous?

And are they tougher
their Olympic records?

If they believe that, t h e ¥
Should ask their grandmothers
about Mary Kingsley

This typical product of a Vic-
torian middle-class household-
her uncle was Charles Kingsley,
the man who wrote “The Water
Babies”—lived among cannibals
in primitive West Africa alone,

Fell On Spikes

A book, West African Explor-
ers, edited by C. Howard, with
an introduction by J. H. Plumb,
(Oxford University Press
7s. 64.), has just been published
telling of her remarkable adven-
tures.

Once she fell into an elephant-
pit 15ft. deep—and landed on
12in. ebony spikes.

Her thick skirt and voluminous
petticoats saved her—she insisted
on wearing these instead of “the
masculine garments” she had
been advised to wear.

When her cance was held up
by rapids she had to leap for
the rock wall and hang on.

Up To Her Neck

She waded through swamps and
marshes up to her neck in water,
and climbed the 13,760ft. Great
Cameroon from a direction never
before attempted.

And she carried on
tigations into native sociology,
religion, natura] history among
the most murderous cannibals in
West Africa—unharmed.

Once she opened a bag hang-
ing in a native hut where she
was sleeping—and found it full
of human remains.

Another time, she crept up to
within 30 yards of a family of
gorillas to watch their behaviour.

Hippos, s n a k e 8, crocodiles,
leopards, elephants, they all
came alike to Mary Kingsley.

Mary (her second name was

hiking
more

with

her inves-

Henrietta) had a keen sense vf
humour.
It must have mystified later

travellers in the Fan country to

hear savages saying “Stuff my

dear sir.” “Dear me now.”
Mary Kingsley had taught

Your Baby

DRESSING FOR THE DAY
(By Sister Charlotte)

It might appear a trifle ridicu-

lous to some of you to be giving

advice on such a simple subject



as this Yet, I have seen so many
mothers struggie with their babies
and sometimes come near to
smothering them, that a little

word here can do no harm,



After the final dusting of pow-
der; if you are lucky enough to
have obtained little cross-over
garment on your
baby’s back and gently pull his
hands through the armhole with
your fingers, next place the nap-
kin, ready folded, in position

W
WW ue
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In Petticoats Among
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Fe Lee SS Te ee ee

PAGE SEVEN





Man About Town

_uite the m o s t enchanting The letters “B ‘H meat
|SKIRTS patterned with hand-| paint, But more than fhat, they
dilee ae Mae mrsad scenes, richly| mean THE BEST PAINT Brand.
r cclourtul, immensel,; ,, You'll} ram-Henderson Paints at N. &B
Six bought, when teaching|see them in individual’ lengths to) Howell’s Hardware Store on Bay
then. nglish words, she would|be made-up to your own meas-|St. are shown to advantage
throw In a few loquialisms| urements at BETTINA’S DRESS| There’s an excellent choice 0!
for “ood measure, ; SALON in the Village, Balmoral| colours and ty for indoors ot
Gap. Skirt and Halter sets; Dresses| out. “B—H” HOLL-EX Enamel

Life of Sin | fox = occasions and Blouses for} a perfect and durable covering for
|easual wear — all in original) such things as Garden Furniture

Wit the common sense typical) renditions of colour and tone make} and Guterior wall f

of her, She listened to a missionary | Rettina’s the very exclusive Salon| Brandram-Hendersor

telling of the “life of sin” which) that it is.
black traders led.

She investigated — instead of
condemning.

Then she found that the-oniy| Here’s a Service tip for a Ser- 5
way the black traders could keep| vice C h e c k for trouble free) yo cou ake UF
alive was to have a wife at “very|™otoring at Easter and all the the vexed prob
point of their route from the|long year round. The Esso Ser-
coast vicenter on Roebuck St (ph. 3938)

That way they knew they would| are equipped for SER-
not have their food poisoned by| VICING and S CHECK -
tribesmen who coveted t h e i r|/ ING of your car. One experience
goods, at the Esso Servicenter will

Wherever she went she was as| émply convince you as it has :
good as a circus visit to the na-|. countless others — a deserving) Mets V< rear
tives+many of whom had appar-| Cause for any car is to have it 6-passenger j
ently néver seen a white person. serviced here. Remember—check | tive with its

Once, when she came a vill- before the holidays! } VANGUA
age, “every child in the place, as ° Seine a
soon as it saw my white face, let (ees p
a howl] out of it as if it had seen| And here we go — into the so want
his satanie majesty, horns, hoofs,| country on a carefree Easter vace~| .°)\," .’ Value Ry
tails and all, and fled into the} ¢ion. What better than to stop at 7 “Es vas sg
nearest Frat. ey Four Cross Roads in St. John's | p,, ene - be |

Friendship py ET | Shirt to go with it for Man, o Boy
Why was Mary Kingsley able|cool and comfortable. In this! jj, Jitterbug Patterns ($2.90) and
to go about unharmed in so savage | scenic spot we can afford to linger | Hose—a very special offes BSc
a land? lend perhaps sample. the Dry | All these and a new shipment of

She says, with a touch of pride:|Goods section or check the gas| Men's Felt Hats are at H
“A certain sort of friendship soon|and oil Jevels at the EBENEZER | Edwards Ltd. on Broad Street.|
arose between the Fans and me.| FILLING STATION. So let's be This is a shop where y¢ spend
We each recognised that we be-|om our way _— the way of the) less and buy more for your dollar
longed to that same section of the| Parade this Easter! H a look at the Khaki shirt
human race with whom it is better | | values when you're
to drink than to fight.” r ° ; ° .

Her slogan for the Africans is : |} Do you
one which is a warning to-day, ELECTROLUX _ Something| ware? Of
when that continent is at the| YOO new. indeed at K. R. Hunie| you'll like
cross-roads, racially. | & Co. Ltd. Prominently displayed!Glassware in Plantation Lad,
She believed that Britain’s|in their new Showroom, these; There are Champagne and Wine,

mission in Africa was to leave! ELECTRIC, GAS OR KEROSENE | Sherry and ae, Pony and,

the native “a free, unsmashed|CIl. operated refrigerators are)/Snap and Liqueur glasses either
man, not a whitewashed slave| beautifully constructed and com-) patterned or plain. What's more
or an enemy.” ‘ pletely noiseless. For all house-| you can buy them in set alee
holds awaiting electricity con-|up your own, a please

Imperishable | nections this ELECTROLUX is a Plantations Ltd. also have attrac

In seven years, Mary Kings-| Splendid investment. It can wvejftive and new Tableware that
ley — the girl who had been) Used on Gas or oil and converted | includes Cake-stands, Sugar
quietly educated at home and had to Electricity as desired. Dial Bowls, Sauce-Boats and Jamjars
studied sociology at Cambridge— | 5136. in Glass.
left an imperishable reputation in|
Africa =
And she died there — but far |

dian name and N. B. H

° will introduce }

o

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= the West Africa where she There is a
ad pioneered so bravely. ,
She died away down in South | Maiden Foun
Africa, only 38, from enteric fever f 1
or every type of figure.

—while nursing Boer prisoners. |
—L.E.S,

*
Ef Bm 7

————.

And You

while he is still contentedly lying
face downwards om your Knee or
on the bed. Now roll him over
and adjust the garments to suit.
You are now ready to put on his
gown which should be open down
the back to facilitate easy man-
agement






















4

\ Seon disappeae,

The agony and maddening itch of

|
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|
|

If however your vests are the ended ,
usual slip-over type, always leave ore DDD Pre _s .
one eye and one side of his face ym ournting uid ills the
uncovered to avoid fright, or place aac vo Dy me skin and
snaps or buttons on the shoulders \ Peek clenxe up even the aneet obsetinn
and slip it up over the legs. I can 4 7

do no better than to quote a fam-
ous Professor of Child Health who
said that “All infant clothi
mend Oe put s, and taken &
tu feet and not over the
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PAGE EIGH'



BARBADOS iG ADVOCATE

re ee” I yyy
Sunday, April 6, 1952

FISH CO-OPERATIVE

THE suggestion made by a correspondent
in Thursday’s Advocate that the “only
salvation for the poor consumer is more
Government controls not less,” is ty,icai
of the pathetic fallacy which exists on the
subject of controls. But it is more than
that. It reflects the mentality of those who
believe that unless the government fixes a
maximum price the consumer will be over-
charged. Overlooking the poor opinion
which the consumer whe accepts this view-
point must have of the producer or in this
case of the fisherman, let us examine this
contention.

If it is conceded that the object of con-
trols is to protect the consumer and to en-
sure for the producer a minimum return
for his labour then the argument that con-
trols benefit the consumer looks unassail-
able; but is it?

In the first place controls very often
benefit indirectly the producer at the ex-
pense of the consumer. Because the pro-
ducer has no incentive to produce more
than will obtain for him what he hopes
to gain as a result of a guaranteed control
price. The producer in other words has
no incentive to produce great quantities
because if he does the control system breaks
down and the price of his produce falls.

Recent heavy catches of fish illustrate
this point. The fisherman hopes to bene-
fit to the extent of the control price but
the public whenever it sees a glut of fish
refuses to pay and the price is automatic-
ally forced down, and the control system
is laughed at by the very people who turn
to it for protection when there are short-
ages of fish.

It requires no great understanding to

" pedlise then that what really keeps prices
down is plenty.

And what keeps them up is scarcity.

Let us pursue further this investigation
into the present fishing industry of Bar-
bados,

The Fishery Officer has proved by
methods of research not available to Dr.
Brown when he made his pessimistic ob-
servations about the quantities of fish avail-
able in Barbadian waters that the island’s
fisheries can be exploited for our benefit
and that we have sufficient fish to meet
our Own requirements and allow for ex-
port. Further he has by patient study dis-
covered when are the most profitable

times for fishing. |

His conclusions are that the quantities
of fish caught off Barbados could be
doubled if only fishing was scientifically
conducted instead of as at present just
carried on to suit the fishermen.

The very first action to be taken is to
change the hours at which fishing now
takes place. This means that fishing boats
would return ashore after nightfall. It
means therefore that the optimum hours
for fishing can ohly be worked when sharp-
freeze refrigerating chambers have been
installed. Tests have been made by the
fisheries officer which prove that fish can
be kept in a sharp freeze chamber com-
plete as they were caught for periods ex-
céeding two weeks at a time.

If sharp-freeze methods could be adopted,
all fish on reaching shore would be taken
to a central sharp-freeze and would be
sold the following day or even weeks after
to distributing agencies, many of which
would be equipped with deep freeze facil-
ities.

To reorganise Barbadian fisheries on this
pattern would require the enforcement of
discipline so severe that it may be doubted
whether it would succeed in practise. But
it-would result in maximum catches, would
reduce the prices paid by the consumer for
fish and would raise the living standards
of those engaged in the fishing industry.

While a huge sharp-freeze refrigerated
chamber is the ultimate objective of the
fishing industry a beginning could be made
now to improve the present system by the
introduction of a co-operative fishing and
marketing agency. a

If every boat owner in the fishing in-
dustry could be persuaded to join an asso-
ciation which was formed with the inten-
tion of selling fish at a reasonable price
to the consumer and at a fair profit to the
fisherman the fishing industry would cease
to be a competitive cut-throat industry and
would become ah industry whose only ob-

jective would be to catch the greatest possi-
ple number of fish to sell at the lowest
possible price consonant with a fair profit
for the fisherman.

A properly organised central committee
of management elected by members of the
Fishing Boat Owners Association on the
principle of ‘one member one vote would
then be made responsible for the market-
ing and distribution of all fishing boat
catches.

Such an organisation would give all
fishermen an interest not. only in the
catching of the fish but in its marketing.
Their hours of work would be lessened and
they would have no incentive to return
ashore before they had secured optimum
catches. When they did return they would
find instead of as at present a collection of
hawkers waiting to bid for their catches
an insulated and ice-packed van ready to
conduct the bulk of their catches surplus
to local requirements to the sharp-freeze
chamber, or pending its completion to com-
mercial deep freeze chambers.

The central committee of management



“would be responsible for the erection at all

fishing boat centres of simple sheds gquip- |
ped with deep-freeze facilities (where |
necessary) and from which all local area |
sales would be made.

The central cémmittee of management
would assist fishermen with loans to pur-
chase nets, repair and mechanise boats, and
would disseminate knowledge in co-oper-
ation with the Fisheries Officer.

The price at which fish would be sold
would vary with the seasons and would be |
fixed by the central committee of manage-
ment, who would retain a small cess on all
sales from which their working expenses
and reserve*funds would aecumulate.

The Central Committee of Management
would also be responsible for arranging the

sale of all fish catches surplus to local re-
quirements to importers in other countries.

It would also their duty to make a
study of local demands and ascertain how
far it would be practical to educate the
local fish eating public ini an effort to stand-
ardise their fish requirements.

It is the opinion of the Fisheries Officer
for instance that three types of flying fish
consumers exist in Barbados.

One section of the public wants their
fish complete with head tail eyes and in-
sides.

Another section wants their fish complete
with heads but with entrails removed.

A third and minority section requires
their fish boned and cleaned and without
heads, ready for cooking.

Clearly the existence of three consumer
types complicate the central problem of
fish storage.

If fish are to be stored complete they
must be stored in sharp-freeze refrigerated
chambers. This is a very expensive pro-
cedure. . |

If fish are to be stored with their entrails
removed they can be kept for several days
in deep-freeze chambers. Already there is
demand from commercial organisations for
fish in this condition but because no en-
trails are removed by fishermen from the
time of catching to the return of the fish-
ing boats ashore the commercial firms de-
mands are not supplied.

The third section of the public cannot be
served unless the distributor is allowed to
make a charge for this service. This is
impossible under a system of price control
as enforced at present.

There is no denying the fact that the
scheme as outlined above would effectively
reduce the price of fish to the consumer.
The present system of controls is a negative
action which keeps the price of fish at an
artificial level based on inadequate catches
(except at certain limited intervals of glut)
and gives the fishermen just enough re-
turn to remove from them all incentive to
do better.

If, as Mr, Wiles contends, our supplies
of fish are greater than Dr. Brown supposed
them to be we must exploit them in the in-
terests of the consumers, the fishermen and
the whole community.

Cane Losses

DURING 1951 there were 220 cane fires
in Barbados during which 1,451%4 acres of
canes were burnt,

Commenting on this fact on Sunday,
February 10 this newspaper stated that this
was a record of which Barbados ought to
be ashamed.

At that time it was noted that only 73%
acres had been destroyed in January 1952
Se pomanene with 944 acres in January

Since January however cane fires have
en and by the end of March totalled
187.

So extensive have these fires been this
year that already by the end of March,
1,577 acres of ripe canes, 154% acres of
young canes and 2354 acres of ratoons have
been burnt,

This means that despite the smaller num-
ber of fires (187 as compared with 220), a
greater number of acres has been destroyed
by fire in the three months ending March
1952 than during the whole year of 1951.

This is disgraceful.

In a letter dated 12th February 1952 a
correspondent commenting on the Advo-
cate editorial of Sunday 10th February
listed four cardinal losses which result from
cane fires.

The first was loss of trash and grass which
are essential for to-day’s method of cultiva-
tion,

The second was loss of humus.

The third was loss of sugar output if
canes are not reaped and ground immedi-
ately after the fire.

And the fourth loss was the retarding of
young canes growth which affects the fol-
lowing year crop.

The correspondent stressed the need for
instructing labourers that these four losses
affected them because the sugar output of
the industry is reduced by fires and labour-
ers share in the profits of the industry by
way of the Production Bonus.

Less than two months have passed since
these warnings were given and what has
happened?

Barbados has had a record crop of cane
fires?

Instruction must be given. :

The correspondent also suggested that
planters should institute a fire watching
system which would cost each plantation
about $100 a crop,

: It is difficult to believe that this has been.
one. {

The record crop of fires suggests greater
lack of precautions than ever.

The correspondent also supported a sug-
gestion made in this newspaper on Sunday
February 10, 1952 that planters should pay
workers 20 cents less per ton for cutting
burnt canes and that the money saved in
this way should be paid into a Labour
Housing Fund.

He concluded with the hope that these
suggestions would be brought to the atten-
tion of those persons who have the power
to put them into effect, and asked that a
concerted effort should bé made in dealing
with this important matter.

Instead, his appeal and the appeal of this
newspaper of February 10, 1952 met with
no response and to-day we can only ask
whether instruction and action would not
have been better and would not have tn-
creased our sugar output how reduced by a
record number of acres burnt?

SUNDAY

T is reported that, at Seacox
Heath, Flimwell, Kent, country
club of the Soviet diplomats, they
entertain each other at week-ends
with the balalaika and charades.
Here is a charade they might do
in the manner of the 19th century
Russian dramatists, é

CAST: Natasha and Olga (two
sisters), Ivan, Uncle Vanya and @
Village Idiot. .

SCENE: A_ Russian country
house in mid-winter.

Natasha hates Olga because
Olga loves Ivan. Olga hates Nata-
sha because Natasha loves Ivan.
Ivan hates both of them. Uncle
Vanya hates them all, The Village
Idiot hates everybody, every-

where.

NATASHA: The snow is still
falling.
* OLGA: I hate the snow, It is
alwe;’s falling.

: NATASHA; Not in the summer
time.

OLGA: Do you want to drive
me mad with your imbecile re-
marks?

NATASHA: Yes.

(Enter Ivan.)

IVAN: The snow is still falling.

OLGA: How I love the snow.

NATASHA: It is so beautiful.

A: The snow is always fall-

ng:
IVAN: Not in the summer time.
OLGA: Oh, how true. How
simple, but how true.
NATASHA: Only the greatest
minds can say wonderful things
like that.

OLGA: Ivan, you should have
been a writer. I always said so.
NATASHA: I said it first.

(Enter Uncle Vanya.)
UNCLE VANYA: The snow is
still falling.



ADVOCATE

Sitting On The Fence

(By NATHANIEL GUBBINS)

IVAN: The snow is always fall-

ing.

ENCLE VANYA: Not in the
summer time.

OLGA: What a stupid remark.

NATASHA: Uncle Vanya is so
tedious.

(Enter a Village Idiot.)

VILLAGE IDIOT: The, snow is
still falling

THE OTHERS (shouting): The
snow is always falling.

VILLAGE IDIOT (shouting
back): Not in the summer time,

OLGA and NATASHA .(to-
gether): I can't bear this any

more.
UNCLE VANYA: It is intoler-
able.
IVAN: Let’s shoot somebody.
OLGA: Shoot me before I go

mad.
NATASHA: Me first.
IVAN: Let me do it. I hate
them both.
UNCLE VANYA: No. Let me.
I hate you all. Then I can shoot
you, too,
VILLAGE IDIOT: Let me do it.
I hate everybody.
(He shoots the lot.)
VILLAGE IDIOT: They are all
dead and I am alive. Yej they
called me an idiot.
Boy Chases Girl
“Can a man be sincere who
swears he has fallen in love at
first glimpse of me and pur-
sues me madly before he
knows anything about me?”

HAT a tiresome, ungrateful
girl you must be, dear. In-
stead of wasting the time of busy
editors asking them silly questions,
you ought to consider yourself
lucky that anybody is chasing you

madly in these unromantic days.

For where are the men who pur-
sue women madly now? Where
are the young Lochinvars who
would snatch a girl from her
father’s house in the middle of her
bridal feast to save her from mar-
riage to “a laggard in love and a
dastard in war?”

You will not find them on the
scage or screen except in a cos-
tume piece, or, occasionally, in

some dirty’ little melodrama in ||

which romance plays no part. If
you found them in real life they
would probably ‘end up in the
police court.

* * *

I think you might
less fortunate girls

Moreover,
have given

some details of the chase. For
instance, is it snarling and
primitive? Does he pounce on

you in the street, grab you by
the hair and drag you, howling,
into the nearest milk bar? Or
is it a happy-go-lucky pursuit
like Harpo Marx chasing a
blonde through a set in Holly-
wood ?

All the same, you May have
mistaken his motive.

A plain girl I knew was once
chased by a determined young
man for weeks on end. When he
called, she locked herself in her
room. Her father slammed the
front door in his face. If she
met him in the street, she
jumped into a taxi.

When he cornered her, at last,

it turned out that she had bor-|,

rowed his cigarette lighter
their first meeting.
He only wanted it back.
L

at

Island Fortress

Barbados has always been
British. No foreign flag has
ever flown over the island.

These are facts which everyone”

learns first about Barbados.
But how many people have
given more than a_ passing
thought to these strange facts
or asked the reason why Bar-
bados shculd have escaped the
fate of Martinique, Guadeloupe,
the Saints, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Trinidad, Tobago, Jamai-
ca, the Virgin Islands and
nearly every other West Indian
island occupied by European
powers?

What was the reason? Did
Barbados bear a charmed life
or did its military defence:
make it impregnable?

The West Indian Atlas o/
1775 published by the late
Thomas Jefferys, Geographer
to the King provides the most
likely answer to these ques-
tions, “Nature” says the author
“has almost entirely surround-
ea it (Barbados) with rocks
and where these are wanting
they have built forts which in
some sort make this island in.
accesible.”

A map in the same atlas, sur-
veyed by William Mayo and
engraved and improved by
Thomas Jefferys geographer to
the King lists these forts which
eccur at close intervals from
Maycocks to Kendals,

In order they are Maycocks,
Half. Moon, Ruperts, Six Men,
Sunderlands, Haywoods,
Orange, Coconut, Denmark,
Margarets, Clarendon, Queens,
Valiant Royalist, Yatcht, Hall-
ets, Fontabelle, James, Wil-
loughby, Line, Ormonds,
Charles, Maxwell, Oistins,
Hoopers and Kendals, Twenty
five forts extending from the
North to the South of an island
whose total length is twenty
one miles!

And how were these forts
equipped?

Pére Labat who visited Bat-
bados in September 1700
who considered that the Fr
could get control of the island
if they mustered an army. of
between four and five thousand
creoles and Flibusticus and a
fleet of 12 war ships, has re-
corded details of several forts.

Describing the east point of
Carlisle Bay “which is alm
entirely surrounded by a
at the level of the water” he
notes that on this point t
stands “a battery @ merlons en-
closed after the style of a large
fortress where I counted
pieces of cannon which accord-
ing to appearances are of large
calitge in order to defend the
ay.”

On the west point of the bay
he noted “a battery a _barbette
completely open on the land
side with eight large cann
which sweep the roadste

Besides the battery. of thirty.

cannons there is another wi
six Pieces a _ bdrbette,

the t and the jetty form
the rt which is opposite






By GEORGE HUNTE

agiining the town. This jetty
Which is on the East side is de-
fended by an octagonal fort
which has eight or ten open-
ings. That of the west is also
defended by a fort which has
twelve pieces of cannon that
sweep the roadsteads at the en-
trance to the port.

The pier opposite the Gov-
ernor’s country house hardly
two leagues from the town “is
defended by a battery a merlons
with six pieces of cannon,
guards and an entrenchment.”

In Jamestown the observant
father noted that the anchorage
was protected by two batteries:
one on tihe east a barbette with
twenty six pieces of heavy
cannon, and one on the west
with ten pieces,

Half of the way from the
governor's house at Jamestown
“there is a very long entrench-
ment along the coast: it is
stonework and very necessary
in this place because the cays
are sufficiently covered with
water to permit shallops and
other flat bottomed boats to
make a landing.” Halfway be-
tween Jamestown and Spiketon
the French visitor notices
ad merlon fort with three pieces
and an entrenchment on either
side. At Speightstown the two
points which form the bay are
defended by batteries ad bar-
bette; the East battery has six

Apparently Father Labat
turned this knowledge to good
account for he notes that an
expedition was ready to go to
Barbados in. 1702 with a squad-
ron of flibustiers and creoles
but was diverted instead to
Vigo.

He was confident that but for
their change of plans Barbados
would have ¢ghanged hands in
that year, but his hope expressed
in the comment “patience, what
is put off is not perhaps lost”
was never. realised and as
everybody knows Barbados has
never changed hands. The rea-
son is not far to seek. Its natu-
ral defences and its fortifica-
tions made it almost inaccessible.
And the author of the West In-
dian Atlas seventy five years
after Father Labat’s visit notes
that the island then had six
regiments of infantry three of
eavalry and one troop of
guards, all stout men and weil
disciplined,

“There is” he explains “a law
whose utility is equal to its
prudence, which assigns

three four or five acres:
what constitutes a yeomanry.

This agrarian law has always

rendered its militia one of the
most respected in the West In-



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dies.”
Father Labat’s impression COMMISSION DEPARTMENT.
was that the poor Irish who

formed the bulk of the island's

teen cannons and the West volunteers would turn against
twelve. their masters in the event of an
invasion but this agrarian law

About three leagues from seems to have been incentive
Speightstown in a colony of enough for the servants to
French refugees, Pére Labat no- identify the island’s defence
a battery a merlons with eight with their own interests. The
cannons, ancient cannons which still can
On the way back to Speights- be seen in several parts of the
town he notices a landing island, the names of many of

wharf defended by a Merlon
fortification with three pieces.
On Sunday 12 September
1700 Pére Labat witnessed a re.
view of the island’s cavalry and
infantry. “There were _ four
companies of cavalry of 100 to
120 men each...the officers
wore red tunics with thick gold
braid and white feathers. The
infantry was also drawn up in
four companies and numbered
in all a little more than two
, hundred men very well armed,
but who only seemed to be the
servants of the horsemen,”
These troops Father Labat
was quick to note were not
militia. They were all drawn
from regular serving regiments.
Father Labat was told that
there were six cavalry regi-
ments in the island at the time
comprising almost 3000 men
ani ten infantry regiments
cofmprising about 5000 men,
Even wh the vessel was
Sailing out of Carlisle Bay this
observant military priest was
noting that two anchorages be-
hind the east point of Carlisle
Bay were defended by two bat-
‘teries, One on the east with six
a barbette and fe other
: merlons with o' four







Our Readers Say;

Simple Language

To fhe Editor, the Advocate,

R—,I was richly entertained
by the report on the meeting of
renal Economie Committee
w

ich was held recently at Hast- ment in labour efficiency; ifves- uneviable reputation of

ings House. T h i s paragraph

‘especially held my attention ; ,

“It was recognized, moreover,
that the present almost world-
wide inflationary situation would
greatly increase the cost of con-
struction and equipment, and
together with the difficulties of
currency moyements, added con-
siderably to the problems asso-
ciated with the establishment of
new industries in regions orn
an industrial tradition. In ali
these circumstances, it was

for government machinery for
the implementation of industrial
programmes; the mobilization of
local resources and the attraction
of tariffs more sympathetic to in-
dustrial development improve-

tigation of potential opportuni-
ties.”

Doubtless there is some hidden
meaning behind this mass of ver-
biage successfully concealed.

not the members of the
R.EC. read their bibles? In con-
trast to this “double-talk”, that
simple and _ beautiful sentence
‘springs to the mind:” Consider
the lilies of the field, how they
gov they toil not neither do

ey spin.” Perhaps if the R.E.C.
could have got at it beforehand

the forts and the Barbados Vol-
unteer Force are still remind-
ers that Barbados did not re-
main ever British by a freak of

history but that its almost im.
pregnable forts and its armed
forces protected this islanc
from the beginning until com-
paratively modern times.

When this century opened
Queens House was still the
House of the General Com-

manding the island's troops.

The antiquity of the island's
Armed Forces may be appre-
ciated by the state of the de-
fences existing in April 1650
when Richard Ligon left the
island. At that time the In-
habitants had built’ three forts
and were able to muster “ten
thousand foot as good men and
as resolute as any in the world
and a thousand good Horse,”

Only twenty three years had
passed since Barbados was
colonised.

No one should be surprised
that the anly foreign troops
ever to subdue the island were
the British forces sent by the
\English dictator Oliver Crom-
iwell. But nobody else has ever
succeeded and the reason sure-
ly is that until recent years
Barbados was an island fortres;

in this group. Expert opinion
points out that statistics support
the view that not only is there a
total absence of entrepreneurship
in the group under consideration,
but that its proletariat bear the
having
registered an inordinately. high
percentage of absenteeism due
either to habitual malingering or.
what is more to be apprehended,
to an alarming lack of interes’
in gainful employment, The num-
ber of man-hours lost from pro-
duction by this group, whose pro-
duetivity per head has now reach-
ed the irreducible minimum,
poses a problem of national im-
portance which should

) y impinge
with peculiar force upon the
consciousness of every thihking

member of the community and

deemed desirable that govern- amd converted it into official jar- galvanize him into action if the
ments should accept responsibility gon, it would have appeared in catastrophic consequences, which

for definite and_ constructive

Holy Writ something like this :

economic laws teach us are in-

measures to assist industrialise- “It is the concensus of enlight- evitably attendant upon a lack
tion, in addition to playing their ened public opinion, ascertained of adaptability to factory condi-

part in the provision of the nec-

as the result of a recent nation-

tions and habits of work, are to

essary capital and fiscal induce- Widé survey, that attention shouli be avoided in the interest of the

ments.

recommendations for the creation upon the quantitative-aspects of

of the psychological and instilu- employment is
“lilium longiflorum’



tional framework necessary for
the acceleration of industrial
activity

among the

It has been rumoured that there

These include proposais .is a widespread lack of activity

The Conference m a d e be focussed, before it is too late, public weal.”

How A. P. Herbert would de-

Benius jight in the prose style of these
leaders of West Indian thought!

Yours, étc

L. A. LYNCH,





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SS ————————EE——eeEeEE———

1 would _
say its
MATURED

| would ~
say it's
MELLOW

| would
say it's
SMOOTH



In other words awe all say
3 YEAR OLD

GODDARDS
comp prap RUM

IS EXCELLENT


SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE NINE

a





————_---—=

THE HARD WAY HOME | marmite -

Two young Australians
sailing half way around
world in Wanderer I1., the
smallest yacht ever to at-
tempt the voyage from Eng-
land to Australia. Here
Frank MeNulty tells the story
so far.

‘ Have you ever settled down
in a comfortable chair gnd, per-
haps with an open atlas before
you, thought about travelling
across the world? You can dream
about the other countries ‘you
would like to visit and at the time
it seems so easy to draw your
finger over the wide oceans and
land-masses on the map.

Just twelve months ago on a
cold overcast and rainy day in
London we were doing just that.
We—that is Bill Howell and my-
self—had decided to buy a yacht
and try to sail to Australia. Bill
had first made the suggestion.
After two years working in Lon-
don he thought it would be a nice
change to get back to warmer
climates. He also wanted to
return to hts family in Sydney,
Australia, because he hadn't seen
his people for two years.

I had spent three years in
England working for newspapers
and r Reuters Press Agency
and also felt bound to begin mak-
ing tracks back towards my home
in Sydney.

Search for a Ship

That atvernoon we bought two
yachting magazines and began
thumbing through the advertise-
ments of yachts for sale.

We were both fairly young —
Bill being twenty-seven and I
twenty-six—and although neither
of us had done very much yacht-
ing we did not let lack of experi-
ence dash our confidence in
succeeding with the plan. Bill
had. done his yachting in the
English channel during his stay
in London. All my sailing had
ebeen in and near Sydney, Most
of it was in small sailing boats
much the same as your racing

are
the

craft of the Royal Barbados
Yacht Club,
But we did have one or two

points in our favour. Bill had
learned to navigate in the Royal
Australian Air Force during ihe
war and, as a dental surgeon, he
should be able to handle many
of the ills we might develop dur-
ing the voyage. Toothache, of
course, would be just too easy.
For my part, I had done some
sailmaking and rigging for those
small boats in Sydney and this
knowledge should come in handy.

After a two-n.onth search we
found the yacth Wanderer II up-
on a beach in Yarmouth, Isle ot
Wight, and we bougnt her. She
was sixteen years old, in gooa
condition, but rather small. In
fact to our eyes at first she seemed
almost terrifyingly small, Her
size had been dictated as much by
pocket as by the fact that we need-
ed a yacht that one of us could
handle easily. This was neces-
sary because for most of the time
one would be sleeping at sea while
the other was sailing her. There
was also the consideration that
Bill or myself might fall over~
board. Ih that case the one per-
gon left on board would have te
be able to sail back in the hope
of picking up the unlucky chap in
the water. And so we had to be
content with the choice of this
yacht.



NAVIGATOR BILL HOWELL with sextant snaps the sun
Shortly he will calculate the ship’s position.

Atlantic.

A 24 ft. Homestead

Wanaerer’s actual size is wwenty-
our feet 1rom end to end overall
but at the waterline sne is omy
twenty feet long. ine. widesy pare
ot ner huli is seven feet, ‘nis
was tO be our home tor possibly
twelve montns,

We began work on her right
away witn paint and varnish and
new rope. There were many
other things to do as wel. The
lockers had to be filled with
tinned and other food, more water
tanks were required: and ail the
stores in spare rope, extra sails,
charts and other things that had
to be packed on board. Extra
sails were an importai® item be-
cause the yacht had no engine and
we had to rely on sails alone.

By the time all this gear had
been crammed and jammed into
the tiny hull the yacht seemed
smaller than ever inside, I shoud
say that the space left was no more
than what you have inside an
average taxi-cab.

After two short cruises — one
nround the Isle of Wight (which is
about the same size as your Bar-
bados) and the other across the
English Channel to France, Bill
and I set out from Falmouth,
England, bound for Australia. It
was September 14, 1951, and the
first port of call was to be
Gibraltar some 1,200 miles away.

FRANK McNULTY produces the daily loaf for approval after baking

it himself in a Pressure Cooker.

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“FOacnna at Senwing

Out of sight of land we passed
along the west coast of Spain and
then Portugal and on the elev-
enth day at sea we headed in to-
wards the land and late that
evening made a landfall on Cape
St. Vincent at the most southerly
tip of Portugal. Two days late:
Wanderer had passed through
the Strait of Gibraitar and drop-
ped anchor in the shadow of
the gigantic, 1,700 feet high
chunk of limestone that is the
‘Kock’ of Gibraltar itself.

in Gibraltar, Bill and I parted
company for a time. He went
bick to London to terminate his
dental practice there while I began
preparing for the much longer
Atlantic passage ahead.

Bil was back again on January
29 and a week leter we hoisted
sail and got under way this time
bound for Las Palmas in the
Canary Islands. We -anted to
cull there in ordér to pick up
fresh provision before aitempt-
ing to cross the wide stretch of
ocean to Barbados.

Perhaps iv was just our luck but
no sotner hac Wanderer left the
Strait of Gibraltar and re-entered
the Atlantic ocean than another
gale burst upon her. At the time
we Cralt Was Off the coast of
French Morocco. This gale was
the severest we experienced, For
eleven hours Wanderer was but-
feted by the big waves with hard-
ly any shil on at all. We braced
ourse:ves in our bunks as best wé
could while outside the wind
howled through the rigging and
the seas roared and crashed
around, One wave after another
swept the tiny decks from eyd to

end,
Thoughts At Sea
It is quite an eerie experience
to be caught in a gale at sea in a
small boat. You know that you
cannot get away. You just stick
it and bide your time until the





cust osame. waite OECe Be nie

Aasbina alc |

PhAlh ODA On MAME — \ AAOMBILL UPOE£



ANGE ANTE (*\ meres



Â¥en.

CRASHING through the waves before a strong wind in the Bay of
Note the Helmsman's special suit to keep him warm and

Biscay.
waterproor.

worst is over. Out there away
from land there is almost no hope
at all of receiving outside assist-
ance if anything serious does go

wrong Of course you know that
many yachts have quite safely
lived through gales before. But

this doesn’t stop you thinking that
you may be the exception to prove
the rule, A freak wave just
might smash its tons of water onto
those flimsy decks above your
head. it would all be

If it did





astngoe

AORASIIIE, cg
Won tare

acca Bak, at

DECK and profile construction plans of the 44 ton cutter “Wanderer II",

We soon discovered
ocean wasn’t always as blue and
caim in appearance as. it looked
cn that map when we first planned
the voyage, Hardly had Wanderer
left the shelter of Falmouth than
a North Atlantic gale caught her.
It was our first gale in the little
ship and it gave us a violent toss-
ing about. The gale also found
out all the weaknesses in the way
we had stowed things away.

The First Gale

The big waves tossed the yacht
about like a piece of driftwood
and within r inutes potatoes rol.ed
out onto the cabin deck, books
crashed down from shelves and
tins cascaded from their lockers.
At the same time we batiled on
deck in cold sodden clothes trying
to shorten sail and pump out the
water that filled up the yacht’s
cockpit each time” a wave-top
slammed on board, Then the only
pump we had broke down. We
admitted defeat and turned back
to Falmouth. Wanderer had sail-
ed only fifty of the 12,000 miles
between England and Australia.
It didn’t seem a particularly bright
start in view of all our big plans.

Two days later we set off
again having managed to get some
sort of order in the chaos on board,
This time a gentle following wind
under sunny skies whisked Wan-
derer south and well out into the
notoriously bad Bay of Biscay.
The second gale caught Ler there
A darkening sky, falling barometer
and changeable wind had given
plenty of warning this time and so
we were able to prepare for the
wind and heavy. seas which were
to follow. It is useless trying tc
sail a small yacht against the big
seas and strong wind of a storm
and so we just sat below in the
snug cabin while the worst passed
over.

As soon as conditions improved
sail was made again and the
yacht literally roared down south
before the still fairly fresh wind.

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BILL HOWELL takes his daily bath. while the yacht sails herself

along.
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over too quickly. And nobody
would ever know what had hap-
pened to you, At this stage 1
your thoughts you usually finc
something to do to take your minc
off the gale — if that is possibk
when you are being tossed fron
wave crest to wave crest like som,
sort of a marine table-tennis ball
The best thing I have found is t
listen to the radio or to make ¢
cup of tea or coffee and then tr)
to get some sleep,

After this gale Wanderer re
sumed her course towards th
south, As she approached th
Canary Islands it got noticeabl)
warmer each day. At first ou
jerseys came off one by one, Ther
we gave up wearing two pairs o
trousers and went into shorts
Finally we dispensed with shirt
and would sit up on deck baskin,
in the warm sun,

Nine days after quitting Gibral
tar, Wanderer sailed into the grea
artificial harbour of Las Palmas a
the Canary Island called Gre
Canaria, A two-mile long gre)
cement breakwater. encloses this
port and protection it gives t
visiting ships makes Las Palmar
the most important city in thos:
islands Some ten freighter and
big passenger ships call there eac’
day to ‘ake on coal and fresh pro
visions and this trade has placed
Las. Palmas among the rich ports
of the world.

Continued on Page 10





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—_—_—--



TPAGETEN = se It ses Sa are SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



« eee

Brightly Fades The Don wavs”: CUCU Ch

the greatest chance of his career. has nct the means of retaliation, Home BEFORE BU YING A =

———
-







BY O. S. COPPIN





In all history, he pointed out only will always bring feeling into @ from page 9
» three Australians had led a side the game, and in showing their Atlantic Voyage Begins

Perhaps it was fortunate for commended on the same grounds 12 England when older than displeasure the Nottingham spec- With fresh stores on board and EF A R
me that I havé only this week out change of language. Bradman. Blackman was 40 in tators were only what the the water tanks topped up to a

reed “Brightly ‘Fades The Don” Mr, Fingleton has written, in 189!, Gregory (Syd) was 42 in Australian had done in brimming Wanderer sailed out of

by J. H. Fingleton ($3.00 Advo- my opinion a fascinating story of 1912 and Armstrong was 42 in the Jardine-Larwood tour. I the port one week later. She was

= Stationery) although it has a most memorable tour “but — writes #B 3 a aa were fully entitled to bound for Barbados which was

n in circulation for some time throughout the book he has never . ites “Bradman’s accep- show r displeasure and should some 2,700 miles of ocean away

now. failed to impress both on the tance of the again meant not have been coerced from so by the route we would take. The COME IN AND SEE THE =

I consider myself fortunate in mind and the Pagination the ‘hat in his f year he was doing by the threat of Notting big trip had begun by far the . |
the respect that now that I am picture of the great Don Brad- attempting the deeds of his ham losing a Test or by intro jongest we had ever attempted. ¥
reliving the historic Australian man saying his last farewell to ™zaculous youth. Bradman him- te Australian war effort. On ‘board had sufficient pro- ;
tour ‘to England in 1948 so vividly equally famous grounds where S¢lf would not have wanted it If sides take and give visions f ‘Sing! da It was L X 4
described in these pages that at he had risen to fame and had that way but by ‘virtue of his bouncers, there can be nO coM= Jiy tna: the s ty days. estgectee
the same time I am afforded an held it, and was now going to "@me and his records it would be pais. Coee when I was writing 4, im that vorere vs thin
intriguingly retrospective view of taxe his rightful place in the COmStrued as such because a 1946—47 M.C.C. tour take t long but if anything ‘
the International commitments of celebrated company of the Champion must always be a of Australia, I drew attention to happened such as the mast break-
England, Australia and the West Immortals—Grace and Trumper, ©@mpion. He is never allowed the Australian method of attack- ing we would be sure to be strand-
Indies since that time and am Hobbs and Macartney. ’ any latitude, Bradman’s deeds pf ing Hutton, particularly, and ed on the seas for much longer
able to relate this series with r ' youth were such that he id drew the obvious parallel. Most than we wanted to be. The food
what has taken place subse- Honest and Just not hope to surpass them. He of the Australian batsmen in the i her lockers included 350 tins of
quently, There is a refreshing ring of Could gain no more but, indeed, Jardine-Larwood tour took ex- Varieq stuffs, sixty pounds ol

For example in the 1948 tour honesty of purpose and justice Stood to lose much, * ception to > Eee of turn- potatoes, twenty pounds of pre-
it was’ abundantly proven that in Mr. Fingleton’s book and [ , Hammond in his last days in ing the other cheek and wanted Served beef steak and a Spanish

England had no answer to the’ make no,apology for quoting the Australia, was a sad, a tragically retaliation but Woodfull Forty-nine gallons of fresh
sustained speed attack of Lind- very words of Sir Norman S#@ instance of a once-famous firm. In cricket as in all r was stored in nine separate
wall, Miller, Johnston primaiily Birkett in his foreward, since [ Player fallen on evil days. The one side must eet eee and in bottles jammed in
and Loxton on occasions, can find no appreciation that 22me gives and the game takes other on equal terms methods corners and crainies of the

si

could more aptly sum up the ®Way, and in coming to England must be adopted to meet a par- ,

W.L. Tour Successful author’s tort Saas had “again in 1948 ‘Bradman knew ticular state of affairs, Finally , she sailed on towards
The West Indies toured Eng- that he was risking his reputa- on the one the trade-wind belt which at that

land since that time, and poscmrmms tion and what was expected of should that the time of year has its northern]!

although their record was not as
brilliant as that of the Austra-
lians yet it was an eminently suc-
cessful one and on the strength
of the outstanding successes
gained on this tour the West
Indies were unanimously con-
ceded the right to challenge

him. The game of had of freed
nothing more to give Bradman, hold ay §
He had praed the —s on In his. book Mr.
ad tasted every sweetness it had answers the questions—Why hould fter six days at sea
to offer. He must have thought England ‘fail so sadly? How & be ane 2: se Ns

deeply of all this in Australia Bradman stand 7 2 wee

in we were well and 2 a .
before he made his decision to with the giants of the past ‘What earns te ON
tour, because so fittingly and are the characteris! which trade d sailing. Down came

near the Cape Verde Islands. |
winds ions d ust
where our nautical ks said they

;
i
iv

fe

Australia. for world cricket without. the slightest trace of have made~him a superlative ‘® mainsail and up went the twin
supremacy. conceit could have uttered of his cricketer and a great captain. spinnakers. These spinnakers,
The M.C.C. have gone to Aus- cricketing career the sentiments Overhaul Needed though the two of them have a
tralia since then and _ again Keats wrote in 1820. And one final quotation gives combined area of much less than
Australia have established their . Now more than ever seems an insight into his candid appre. te other sails, can be rigged to
supremacy though not as hand- it rich to die, ciation of the tour: — ppr actually steer the ship themselves.
somely and then the West Indies To cease upon the midnight “qt would be wrong for an This made it much easier for the
got their chance of chances, with no pain. Australian touring during an STEW because from then on it was
meeting Australia in 1951—52. Close Fielding English cricket Season to com- not necessary fer someone to be
t is significant too that Fin- | Mr. Fingleton has been very sider that he is qualified to Steering all the time.
gleton’s opinion expressed at the | impartial in his book, For exam- express dogmatic iene as Both Slept At Night

end of the 1948 tour was as true
of the M.CC. as it was of the
West Indies—no answer to &%
bumpers with bumpers or speed or
with speed—and so the West fj
Indies too went down to defeat.

It is with the advantage of J
2 © i } : F pocket. That was the closest he systems because it must be she steadily got further an
1b48 four that fable Yo read tie toy’ de’ He had teen ‘Rick: cHeket can do with a good grere tude ‘ot Barbados. we found the
Peres Sir DONALD BRADMAN. mE Me, He had geen Bich © on oe eS ee i ‘
a ea = ree eae ardson field two yards, two yards haul—and in that opinion I have sunny pale blue skies and clean
which have taken place in Inter- “It is written with the know- bdhind point to Grimmett but tried to take into full account tufts of cloud as you have here
ledge of one who has himself the risk on the leg side is con- the distressing times the Home It got much warmer too and very

ple he does not try to justify the most matters. There is so much Once the yacht was clear of the
very close fielding of Barnes to background to — cricket busy shipping lanes on the east
the batsman. that it cannot be quickly assimi- side of the Atlantic we stop
Of the first M.C.C. match he lated, but of one thing I am con- keeping a look-out all the time
writes that Barnes at short leg vinced. There must be a pretty and both went to sleep at nights.
fielded almost in the batsman’s sudden revision of ideas and _ As the yacht sailed te esis hon









© ‘SEALED UNIT “ae

* DOOR LOCK WITH 2 KEYS
CLOSES AT THE LIGHTEST TOUCH

ee erieket circles since that been ‘in the middle’ on great siderable, Country has known in the past soon we were wearing no clothes
“Bri ghtly Fades The Don” is occasions with all that phrase Mr, Fingleton continues “I decade. at all or perhaps just a pair of

implies. It is full of insight and wrote in my°* little note-book “It is against this backdrop of shorts or underpants when we

not merely another of | those great understanding, replete with there and then that some day the hglish standard that one ‘Went on deck.
vende chioft because of & ikke technical knowledge— nature Barnes would collect something must try to assess the strength Day followed day, one much
ture of & ioe of the subiect and of the wicket, the disposition of in that position which he of Bradman’s twentieth Australian the same as the other, We were
a desire for harmless relaxation, M° field, the resources of the wouldn’t like and that came true team. In one regard I think it completely cut off from the world
* bowling, the quality of the bats- in ¢arnest at Manchester when ranked superior to all other ashore. It did not matter to us RUST PROOF SHELVES

Highly Praised manship, the elements of Cap- Pollard laid him low. Australian teams, and that was whether it was Saturday or Wed~
On the ‘ontrary it is written Sw, ve oa 4 e - akan tg ey gah ie a bet. oe good hesday because there were no
‘ : ay strengths, ai makes up a fieldsman does have an - pitches down number nine, offices for us to attend in the x x x .
fy ee aa ae the fascinating story of a mem- datory effect, and I think Barnes, The tricky pitch at Bradford morning, no newspapers to buy AND MAN Y NEW REEF INEMENTS
established’: author. “His “Cricket orable tour. It is a record of the in this ‘position, was of . great some in indifferent and no places to visit at night.
Crisis” published in 1946 received Matches played, the great figures value in a nuisance capacity light and that is why I qual There was just the sunny sky
the highest. praise from a gréat Who took part in them and ' a throughout the tour, them on a good pitch, In 1905, overhead, the lonely sparkling
master in ‘the art of writing on critical appraisement of the per- Bouncers Syd Gregory was going in to bat seas all around and right in the
cricket. Mr. Neville Cardus formances, but throughout the On the question of bouncers in ®t number eight; in 1921, his middle of it all, the splinter of a
praised the book, both for the book the great figure of Bradman the Nottingham Test—Mr, Fin- nephew Jack regory was num- yacht — our home and the centre
mnanner of -writiig and -for the dominates the scene as he dom= gieton writes:—“One should not ber nine, but t are good of the universe as far as we were
contribution..to. the cricketer’s inated the field on his last tour jeaye this Notttingham Test reasons for believing that this concerned.
library. of this country. , without comment on the bouncers twentieth Australian Eleven had Life on board began each day
Sir Norman Birkett, in his Bradman Could Only Lose and the apology by Sir Douglas "© SUperiors as a batting team with the one of us whose turn it
foreward to “Brightly Fades The Mr, Fingleton does not ignore McGraith and the statement by on a good pitch, though here ‘was to prepare breakfast serving
Don’ refers to Mr, Cardus’ praise the fact that in accepting the Captain Brown. qi in one does well to remember it to the other in bed. It was
for “Cricket Criss” and opines captaincy of the 1948 Australian “Bouncers, especially if they that. some batting reputations ay coe. or rice «with
'°)

cop ogg: ol al tot . stand in the light of a “
ha he ure ; nt ho Kk might: be ‘te im that Bradman had taken: are Unlimited and the other side in English bowling. poor period , mili "a Os rg or bis

This Easter... &

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SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952



WAS down on my luck.
Way down . scraping the bot-
tom. A couple of deals had fallen
through and I found myself in
Paris with a lot of time on my
hands and only the price of a

. beer in my pocket.

I was spending my time and
Hhe beer money at Fouquet's.
ou meet a nicer class of people

sre and they let you read the
) Mewspapers free.

/So I was drinking the beer
ind reading a paper when I came
on the advertisement. One of
ose classified advertisements in
the personal column. And it
yas addressed to Harry Lime,
SHarry Lime being me, I read
"©n with some interest.
=) There was no address, no sig-












ature “Mr. Harry Lime”, it
aid, (“will find a _ business
bpportunity of an extremely

profitable nature in the city of



might have thought
is was one of the boys try-
Ing to hustle me out of Paris
just trying to be funny,
: Wexcept that the advertise-

)/ Ment mentioned Tansier, There
are few places in the world I
n't been to, and Tangier
pened to be one of them,
Tangier is full of money
= I couldn't imagine anybody

iting to send me _ there—

ht in the heart of the free
Bold area, where every second
â„¢ Person is an international oper-

tor—just for a gag.
There are probably more
)) chances in Tangier to grab a fast
*buck than you'll find any place
else in the world to-day, so I
was inclined to take the adver-
tisement a little seriously, of
course, it might have been a
police trap. But one of the only
cities left where they don’t hap-
pen to want me for questioning
is the Port of Tangier. That’s
what sold me,

¢ There was just one complica-
tion. My beer was finished and
with it my financial resources,
How to raise the price of the
ticket?

My eye wandered down the
personal column, and a little be-
low the advertisement addressed
to me was this: “Gentleman
travelling to Tangier. A visit to
the desk of the porter at the
Lancaster Hotel on Rue de Bery
; will repay any businessman
planning a -visit to Tangier who
can whistle a certain tune.”

That didn’t have to be Harry
Lime. But there’s a song: I’m
fond of—one I first heard played
by a zither man. I've been
whistling it for years, and any-
body who knew about me would
know about the song. Anyway,
what could I lose?

I went over to the hotel and
approached the concierge,
whistling my little tune.





He listened. Then he said:
“Ah, yes. I have something for
you Mr. Lime.



TICKET TO TANGIER

And a mystery note
M I TOOK the envelope he hand-
ie ed me. There was nothing on it
‘ but my name. He wouldn’t tell
me where it came from, but in it
there was an airline ticket for
Tangier, 50,000 francs in nice
fresh notes and a letter. The
letter said: “When you arrive
in Tangier, go immediately to El
¢ Mirador Hotel, where a suite is
reserved for you. Afteryyou have
dined, go to the Caballa\cabaret.
Wait there for instructions.”

As I was reading it, the con-
cierge broke in; “Excuse me,
Mr. Lime, but it is 2-45 and your
plane leaves Orly at 3-15. A
limousine has been ordered for
you. It is waiting at the door.”

It was a very pleasant trip,
with a very, very pretty air
hostess on board. Her name was
Patsy Smith, and she was friend-
ly. So friendly that I had no
difficulty in dating her for dinner
and dancing at the Caballa
cabaret after we touched down in
Tangier. I began to wonder.

While we were dancing a

s

Bolton Lane and

Phone 3909

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All- types including Travelling, Dressing
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the inevitable Alarm.

LOUIS L. BAYLEY

THE LIVES OF HARRY LIME

That Zither Tune Led Me To A Ghost Palace

[Heery Lime, as portrayed by Orsen“Welles in the film
and in the new B.B.C. Series.]

Third Mar.”

rumba, I said: “You're a hostess
on an airline, and you're very
good-looking and there are lots
of good looking hotesses that
dance the rumba. But they don’t
dance that well, ang they’re none
of them that beautiful. Really,
you know, you're almost too
good to be true.”

PATSY’S SECRET
‘You’ve been my guest’
SHE stopped dancing. “It’s

awfully close in here,” she said.
“Why don’t we forget the cham-
pagne you ordered and take a
walk outside?”

“Wonderful!”

As we left the cabaret and
stepped out into the ve.vet dark-
ness, I said: “Patsy, I’m going to
take back that word ‘almost.’
The word ‘almost’ could never
be applied to you. Whatever you
are that’s what you are—com-
pletely. You couldn’t be ‘almost’
anything.”

She shook her head. “You're
wrong, Harry. Among other
things, I’m almost very rich.”

“You must be if you treat all
your boy friends to champagne,”
I grinned. “But what does an
airline hostess get paid—enough
to treat people to champagne?
Even special cases like me? No,
Patsy. It doesn’t make sense.”

She said: “I have to work for
my living. I took this job to pay
the rent, and also because it
brings me twice a week to
Tangier.”

“What do you like about
Tangier? A lot of internationa,
lawyers and private banks, with
streets full of American cars and
grimy characters in nightshirts.?”

Patsy contradicted me, “It is
beautiful, Harry, if you know the
right places. Let me show you.”

She called a taxi and directed
the driver to the Villa Moughetti.

The cab twisted and turned
through the native quarter, and
then, .pretty soon, we were out
in the country, _

Patsy had grey eyes and that
clear powdery gold hair that
makes you think of the ashes of
angels’ wing. I’ve known an
awful lot of girls, but none of
them I ever laid eyes on could
have given Patsy a_ worried
moment.

As we climbed up the moon-
bright hills over Tangier, I for-
got completely the strange busi-
ness which had brought me
there. The advertisement in the
paper, the airline tickec and all
the rest of it. With Patsy in my
arms, and her lips on mine, I
didn’t care why I'd been sent fcr
to Tangier and I didn’t care
who'd done it or what he wanted
from me.





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“The

The cab stopped before the
white bulk of a great silent pal-
ace. Below us the bay looked
like.a set, with all the lights
and the moon on the water.

She

Patsy broke the spell.
“T adore kissing you. You

said:
But we've come

do it very well.
to our destination. Now let’s get

out.”
“That enormous place!” I ex-
claimed. “Are you sure we'll be

welcome?”

“I’m certain of it. Here, You
take the key. You’re my guest,”

I was staggered. “But how—”

She said calmly: “You’ve been
my guest all along. I put the
advert in the paper and I bought
your plane ticket......Come in
Harry. Here’s a flashlight. I’ve
got something to show you.”

“My name is Harry
Lime . .” The suave
voice that film-goers first heard
against the tinkly background
of zither music in the film
“The Third Man” was heard
again in millions of British
homes last week. And listen-
ers thrilled to the new adven-
tures of fiction’s most engag-
ing rogue since Raffles.
Harry Lime died in the

sewers of Vienna. But before
his last clash with the police
he had lived many lives, eacb
of them packed with adven-

ture. Now he is telling the
story of them all—and the
Empire News has secured the
exclusive newspaper rights.
When you hear Harry Lime
on the radio, remember, yon
can read him FIRST in the
Empire News every week.



GHOST PALACE
Held a secret

I FOLLOWED Patsy into the
house. It was a huge place, full
of heavy chandeliers and pretty
spooky-looking because it was
covgred with dustcloths. Ob-
viously the place hadn’t been
lived in for months, Patsy push-
ed open a creaking door,

“This used to be a ballroom,”
she told ine. “Close the curtains
and then we'll turn on the lights
+-+++.You're sure they’re tight
all around? We don’t want the
police to come and start asking
questions,”

“You can say that
honey,” I said fervently.

A switch clicked and the big
room was riooded with light. 1
Saw a piano, about thirty gilt
chairs and a big rolled-up carpet.

“All very splendid and grand,”
I said. “But what particular
item am I supposed to admire?

“The carpet.”

again,

+ torted.

. here for months.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









































I sighed. “I’m not @ connois-
seur, Patsy,” I said. “If you
brought me here to get an ap-
praisal, I'm afraid we're both
wasting our time. I don’t know
anything about carpets.”

She didn’t bat an eyelash
“Do you kfow anything about
heroin?” she asked.

There was a slight pause, and
then I said: “Yes. Heroin is a
drug. It is nasty and habit-
forming, and its sale is con-
trolled by international law.”

“Go on. Tell me more.”

“I don’t know any more. Not
anything to speak of. I don’t
use drugs, Miss Smith.”

“But you sell them,” she re-
“Why do you think I
sent for you? Why do you think
1 brought you here? You're
Harry Lime, aren’t you? Now
stop kidding, and let’s get down
to business.

I said: “First of all, I think
you'd better answer a few ques-
tions, Miss P. Smith, air hostess
. .. What’s your real name,”

“What's it to you?”

I looked at her patiently.
“We'll play it my way, sweet-
heart, or we aren’t playing at all.
You must need me awful bad to
take all this trouble to look me
up and move me here. If you
need me, you're going to co-
operate, and we'll start off with
your real name.”

There was another silence, and
then she said slowly: “Did you
ever hear of a man named
Moughetti?”

“Moughetti! Rico Moughetti!
Yes, I thought the name of this
place was familiar. I met Rico
once in Marseilles and another
time in Casablanca. He comes
from Corsica. Isn’t that gight?”

“He came from Corsica,” she
corrected me. ‘

“You mean ... he’s dead?”

“Yes; I was his wife. I killed
him myself....he wasn’t a nice
man, Harry.”

IT WAS MURDER
For a fortune in drugs

“HARRY LIME doesn’t like
murder, Mrs. Moughetti,” [ said.
“Believe me, he stops at that.
It’s messy, it’s silly—and there’s
no profit in it. Besides Harry
Lime’s mother always told him
not to go around killing people.
She said it wasn’t nice... And
now Mrs. Moughetti, why have
you brought me all the way to
Africa to this empty house?”

“There’s a lot of heroin in that
rug. You know how the drug
traffic works, I don’t.
something new for Rico.
kind of big haul. He must have
had a partner, because he would
not have known how to dispose
of it... I’ve been keeping it
The airline
job I have is perfect for smug-
gling the stuff, but I don’t know
who to take it to. I don’t know
what towns pay the best price
. +. you've got to help me,
Harry.” .

“But what about the police?”
IT asked. “You killed Rico. You
must tell me how you fixed your
‘alibi-some time.”

“So you can blackmail me?
No, thanks. Let’s keep our rela-
tionship on a nice clean business
Jevel.”

A man’s voice chuckled: “Now
that’s the way I like to hear you
talk.”

The speaker — a blond giant
of a fellow—was standing in the
doorway, smiling. His right hand
held a heavy Luger pistol, and
fit was pointed at us unwaver-
ingly.

get in?”
He bowed “Through _ the
door. You left it open... Now

then. Where’s the heroin?”
My memory clicked over, and
I said: “Dr. Bessie .. . that’s
your name ., . You began in
Indo-China, and you _ served
three years in a penal colony in
Brazil. Check?”
THE THIRD MAN
Dies at the piano
HE laughted. “What a detec-
ld make, Mr. Lime.
On Page

tive you wou
e



















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PAGE ELEVEN



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4
PAGE TWELVE

Freight Cost Lessened
@ from page 11

By Processing Medicinai aly trim iate
Produets In Trinidad 22). 252 soc 3

SUNDAY ADYOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952

Asthma, Bronchitis Coughing,
Choking Curbed in 3 Minutes

Do you have aft J. R. had Jost 40 Ibs., suffered cough-







The Lives Of Harry Lime <.°°° °°”.
. pegular





ed. You can carry it
is—in the rug.”

“No thanks. I hate to. stoop.
Why don’t we leave it whete it

just as it

s of Asthma or



Ctenéhitis so bad that you choke | ing, choking and strangling ever)
wintich. 46 , % Se ‘ ant sleep? _cotldn't sleep, expected to die
1 said: “You'll find the heroin is?” ENO’S tanbhilie. 0 Bad. thar at sleep? | Bight, com
is idave ie - 7 rie =" ' ; r . a vec ee MENDACO stopped Asthma spasm

IN Barbados for the Easter holidays is My. Morris J in the piano.” ‘And give up 100,000 dollars take 10,5 ie gp ard you feel ike MENDACO st upped Asthine. seam:

Rogers, Governing Director of Rogers and Howe Ltd., “In the piano? This is prob- worth of heroin? “Are you \ } teal Fak Bn 8» ork and have in oe en
: P 5 ’ ‘ yf f.. ic ; " * i ta be omrese ee Come ae Money Back Guarantee

manufacturing chemists of Port-of-Spain who are now ably a trick, but——” crazy?” i . : } fa : s? hes
establishing : pioneer industry for ne manufacture of Still talking, he moved to- A siren wailed outside, and | 5 | vit Kas Bar ie og Suiekcae tee very Arst dose of MENDAC



goes right to work circulatin:
through your blood and helping n-«
ture rid you of the effects of Asthma

whispered urgently; ‘The police!
Douse the lights, honey!”

wards the piano.
my eye on you,

“I'm keeping

medicinal and pharmaceutical products. title .::. How

fered’ or, what, you have tried, there
. w hope f you in a Doctor's







: -, , Trini eription called M ‘Oo i ‘ -
He arrived on Friday by B.W.1.A. from Trinidad ac- then, ..” She stepped to the switch and . om 1 beipiha. 7 In no tins at sh BERDACO in
companied by his wife and is staying at the Hotel Royal. A second later his voice came pressed it. In the same second | ‘uizer.. All ¥BG, do is take t

yy} and stronger. Try MENDACO under
an fron-clad money batk guarantee.
You be the judge. If you don't feel

sharply; “There’s nothing here. I grabbed her. gun-hand and |

teless tablets at ineals and you
have you ——” twisted it smartly.

icks geet ta.vapish like magic. In
Mr. Rogers told the Advocate What k m Love i
























= $ j : minutes MENDACO starts work-| , teh oo es 6a, on¢
yesterday that they have a fran-“] Patsy snapped: “Put up your “That’s better,” I said. | | wit thru sour blood aiding nature foie w eaGd tee caer a me
chise to manufacture and distri- « hands, Bessie! I’ll shoot if. you ‘“We’ve got darkness, gid I’ve | :9, dissolve, Hil FOmore y preathing | DACO just return the empty pack-
bute Northrop and Lymang don’t!” A small autorfatic sot the gun. You're too .impul- | TPR HR gourd, sleep the first night Me eepaad UEP MER DACO tron
soroducts throughout the Carib- backed up thb threat, sive for firearms, Mrs..Mough- | 20 that you soot feat years younger your Chemist foday and ses. how
an and the Central and South Bessie snarled: “What? You ° ¢tti. ‘ } nd stronger. . well you sleep tonight and how mucit
American countries, The products ” The siren grew louder. Some- | Ne Asthma in 2 Yours hetter you will feel tomorrow. The
they make include Canadian The two guns blazed together. body hammered on the main! ine MDACO Bet gay brings omens Mendaco''.
Healing Oil, Roberts Syrup and Then Bessie coughed once and 0or,of the bouse, . s niit, ip tig aystem to ward) | ch F
Kellogg's Asthma Remedy. crumpled over the piano. The »Jabbing tae d atic into icks, Por instanee, Mr. | Ends Asthma. a Bronchitis w& Hay Fe
As far as the location of the Luger clattered to the floor. re Pheri peas — eae Uae ann ttn EERE
plant is concerned he said that “Well, well,” I said. “Very ‘inured: “Your hus! ilt a 5 t
Trinidad was chosen principally quick 1 must say. Congratula- ice house, but it’s. getting & bit | ching urn ng an mar nig G
because of the conveniegge of tons!” overcrowded. I‘think we'd het- | ’
Shipping in addition to the coun- Patsy said coolly: “He should [er Scram .. . just eos te ect |
try being the centre -for plane have kept his eyes on both of us, ahead of me, . Motighetti, |
‘connections in all directions. and nobody could do that... “— re ee any ig funny,” Sparkling ENO’S “Fruit Salt” fitst
' Local Help is he dead?” e made our out into ont norning freshens FOli ip bot
The cofhpany will be manned “I -wouldn’t ktiow, Mrs. the garden. The cops were. all nis 2 Lod morning feshews Soa i sy
by technicians and chemists from Moughetti. I haven’t asked him. over the place, and a a while mentally and physically. It clears ead,
the home office in Toronto, but We'd better get out of here.” it was clear that our only hope cleanses and refreshes the motith, rettioves ai}
local help will be employed “Take the heroin,” shé.order- Was in separating. whispered: symptoms of liverishness. ENO S$. cbntaitis 0 p D @ n
wherever possible, teh and tha avin ee “Patsy, you go through the no harsh purgatives. Its gentle laxative action
Asked what prompted his aa ind od a FAs spoon Me Po : oan aside tii “Foi pid to | is non-habit-forming. ENO’S is suitable 4 0 M s
company to rt the project eh = cons é p 8 y “ in aris. eate fi ; Pa ind es
the Wate Indi : Mire Ropers sald will no doubt reflect in the lower the town. You can’t miss it” for delicate stomachs, sate for children at eo.
that it. was due to the high rate cost of medicinal products com- “Yes, but what about the invalids. Keep your “Fruit Salt” handy. inae tha discovers, of Mixederm by ap
of exchange on Canadian Cur- ra i. i. ‘ heroin? coplean physictiter from ugly, disgusting
rency which made importation of e said that the advantages to Pr . 4 disfiguring skin bl ig such as
medicinal products from Canada be derived by the Trinidad Gov- hb Ye ody 1 aoe PR a nema, -Fimpies ned Riagnera Toad
almost prohibitive. Mr. MORRIS J. ROGERS ernment will be purchases of Moughetti Just 7 wae! iae's notches, Don't let a bad tin make you BEFORE
The only solution for any i , Taw materials, employment of a joke. hon Yor “anh la h t Sere at akin, Cals Daw eclentific to clear your skin—t! eee we oun
American or Canadian menu- ils are available in this area.” jocal labour and their ability et we ~ Lad ‘ay, ar Ee Giabeet,

at it later when you catch your

facture to overcome the aiffi- plane to Dakar.”

vy. and don’t Jet.a bad skin make people | yon oe more. attracfive,

has brought
ink you are. diseased, = ae f thousands, such as Mr

clearer,
processing these prodiicts

to earn dollars through the sale



: s almost like a minutes. I could see my skin clearing up
estimated that 15 or 20% of their feels, alirios ~

° ° ‘

i here he said that it would save A New Discovery R. K. who writes: “I suffered from terribly
pe agp? as peat cor.siderable freight on account iit ite aaa Of course they got her. Took A Fru it Salt Nixederm 1s, an Ola et a eee or | 19 vests, Tt very hing. Ae ast 1 hea‘
area es! manufac ‘ & ) a hard currency countries, her off the plane on the return ‘ om any ointment you have ever seen or | 12 years. Tried everything. / hing in 1
turing plants here in the Car- of not having to pay the freight Mr. Rogers said that it is run to Paris Somebody tipped i or ELY chew discovery, and is not greasy | of Nixoderm. It stopped the itching in 10
ibbean,” he said, “because the up to Canada on the raw mater- -r . bey

és

paar when you

fais ¢ Pil ; the police off about that murder. * ly tt It penetyates rapidly into the pores | on the second day. All yA kushgaring
i considerable amount of raw isis and the freight back to the factory output will be consumed [It's what you might call the SPECIALLY ae eae eat Burlace ingredients miotclety friends were, amaze at the im-
‘ materials which they use in Caribbean on the finished pro- locally and the balance for export






‘wages of Lime .. . that’s anoth-
er joke, but you don’t have to
Jaugh at it. I'll do the laugh-
« ing.

provement in my appearance.”

Satisfaction Guaranteed

Nixoderm costs absolutely nothing unless
it clears your skin to your complete satis

duct,
This expense will be elimina-

s. Nixoderm
ich fight skin troubles in these 3 ways.
Zz it fights and Kills the microbes or para-
2 : | s often responsible for skin. disorders.
| for IRREGULAR ACTION, it stops itehing, burning and. smarting
7 to 10 minutes, and cools and soothes

* their basic manufacture such

RECOMMENDED
. aS sugar, alcohol and essential

of which approximately 40% will
currency countries.

go to hard





0 Ae) od






















; SICK HEADACHE, skin, 3. Tt helps natyre heal the skin | faction, Get Nixoderm from your gpemalst
bth bo soft and velvety smooth. ' y. Look in the mirror in the ,

| You see, what Patsy didn’t BILIOUSNESS, Oe Works Fd and you will be amazed at the improvement.
know was that I’d picked up the INDIGESTION, ete. Ther just keep on using Nixederm for one

cecatise Nixoderm is scientifically com-

Â¥l



: : f that time it must
rug in the darkness and hid it iuided “to Aght skin troubles, it works Wise Sid Be eee Oe Sort tleat, amioott

J > ter than any ng you have seen in ¥ : 1 ractive— t give yor
et nag bushes just outside the Sold in bottles for before, It stops th Rehing, burning aud | 284 magnefically attractive —must give sor




7 that will ms
I came back later and | the kind of skin that v



raring in @ few minutes, then, starts to | iiteq wherever you go, or you slinply re






| In Tangier I found myself Y fasting freshness. Ke dmmediaeys faane | | turn the empty package find your money
| ‘angling with a lovely girl ‘sty amioetly. 1°) just 4 day_or two your | Will be refunded in full, Get. Nixederm f:0
and a haul of dope. eee cof will tell you that here at last is the | your Chemist today, The guarantee protec



The words “ NO” and“ FRUIT SALT” are Regiss s2/1/3

Of course, the word io 7
was out about Rico’s big con-

red Trade Marks allfle *ee-*ment you have been needing | you.

collected it.





SS

But, honestly, I don’t approve |
of drugs. That’s why IT threw!
the original stuff into the Bay !
of Tangier and delivered seven |
nicely-wrapped packages of con- |
They tell me




fectioners’ sugar.







you can get the habit for that, , }
: ve iiss eae ALAM HEAVY-DUTY BATTERYE |) ==
except for one thing—that is | Luncheons
ee IN COMES nice little prayer rug it was :

wrapped in. I know it didn’t

| Visit the beauty spot of the island
i Rooms with or without _
ons for wer /{} private bath. : ”

| We specialise in Fish



Dinner».



|

|

!
signment and I had no trouble |
getting a good price in Mar-
seilles the next week. |
















belong to me, but it looks very |
nice here in front of my tea-
table. Areal powerhouse!
Will you have milk or lemon
with your tea? And how much Longer life! |
sugar? This is the very best wer
brand, you know .. . a syndicate More po !
of desperate gangsters paid me Quicker, more
50,000 dollars for only seven |
; mines ae ase package. ct ihe same quality. dependable starts |
OF THE HATLO HAT e 4 | even in the
Harry Lime recounts another of |
his remarkable adventures He weather.



calls it “The Golden Fleece.”




Restore Youthtu q
To Glands in 24 Houis

~~ New Discovery Brings Pleasures
, of Life to Men Who Feel Old
' Before Their Time

Do you feel older than you
Tacking. jn youthful snimat
oy the society of beautiful womer
you suffer from lc
ory and body
jokly skin, depre
other words, are you or a
1f your body is devitalized and exhaust
pd, there is no need for you to suffer ar %
pther dav from such Bhysical inferiorit
because the discovery of an emir
cian now makes {t possible for y
store your youthful vigour and a

Youthful Viaor Restored
The penaltics of advancing are and the
resuits of over-ind . ow O-
jarded and vouthful a t 1 anir '
tored to 4 t t
disco





| ESSO STANDARD OIL
_R. M. JONES & CO.—Agents























O50 28 ne 8 oe ee



24-Hour Resuits
Vi-Tabs



Results Guarantecd

and
ean, re
“Many &
the épir
true secret of + Tob
vigour and vit
in the glands. I
my many year
perience, = study
ractioe, it is my
ion that the

BG

fa im

hee ait.

TED} i
/




1 take an interest in
te and how you are able
ver hefore






he
oe



And if for any reason 5

at Vi-Tabs is easily worth

formula known as snvall cost, merely return

Tebs represents kage and the tall purchase

most modern and scien- e will be refunded without question or

! tifle Internal method of sument. Get Vv bs from your chemist
Stimulating and invig- " » Quagentee protects you

} ug ® ToR
Guara zteed Manhood. Vitality
i POPFROOSSSOESSS SSS SSSOSO

FOR
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES

including: —



the



ee en ee





OOO

BELTING, in Leather, Camel Hair, and Canvas-stitched
BELT FASTENERS, OIL CANS, PRESSURE GAUGES
GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
FILTER CLOTH, — WHITE COTTON TWILL
SUMALOID and RITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walls)
ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES

For “EVERITE”

NOT ALL THE PAINT, ONLY THE BEST!

AVAILABLE NOW

Charles Me Enearney & Co.. Ltd.

Paint is one of the big items in
Builders’ Hardware and we always
will be G.H.Q. for the best; B-H
Paints are right there, and here

ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, &

RIDGE CAPS



Send your orders to - - - - |

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

4528 A. BARNES & CO., LTD.

cy

|

Phone: |
Park Road.

“ mm)
. SSSSCSS9SSSS ee

White
}.B0OSSS999555555968S55466650566



Fh FAS eB as eH
é ‘ ‘


«

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
| ee ce RS ec a eR 2

JACK OUTSMARTS THE GIANT | same Royall |





You can't resist that
wonderful flavor @

So smooth. So delicious! And 99 good for
you, too. No trouble to

prepare . . . just follow
the simple directions
on the package. 3
wonderful flavors —






HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ,





















vanilla, chocolate
and butterscotch.















Sees idk tn aii ep EDA PERE A EEE Ms



= ed
7 I
a Y— |
Once upon a time Jack planted a seed, until he reached the top. Suddenly a i Why me, sir, when
very powerful seed, that grew into a giant cried, “Here's a tasty orsel fo ‘ Rk | Be cotch Pud
I bean stalk, So tall that Jack decided my dinner.” But Jack was smart. H So Giant tried it and tiked
climb it. Up and up he went pulled out some Royal Pudd: uch be gave Jack all nis gold






WHAT 1 OUGHT TO 20 iS MARCH " .
YOU STRAIGHT TO THE CAPTAIN. , YOU'RE OKAY - SO

(li TAKE A COWANCE.



By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

ually
GF ECOPAL parnllr

sordons

Stands Supteme s











AN ° ,
A os THELES, §
AS ih ono



























THATS NO FAIR-- GRABBING
THE SOFA WHILE I ANSWER
THE PHONE



OKAY, FRED,
THANKS FOR
CALLING --

\( WAIT, DAGWOOD, HOLD
) THE PHONE=MY WIFE
WANTS TO TALK

4 Ti > iN }
BMW: BLONDIE NOW
MN “
Reh AD
(FPP
x. |
a

s )
\
\

























































SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

: Usually Now Usually Now

Tins KLIM (5-Ib)

ABOVE THE
R OF THE



aN OT, IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
f Tee aevroe 10 sucreR! JZ Ger Nae AND fp SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
COMES TOA STOP F ; ’ S di / ~

HE DOOR GLIDES
OPEN, AND...



beeen eeey oy G4 5.60 Sia PRA Oe pe aa .20

Tins ORANGE & GRAPEFRUIT

JUICE .. e"., oe 30 27 Pkgs SATEN ICING SUGAR .... © Al 36



Bots. HARTLEYS MARMALADE _ .42 38° Tins MEAT LUNCH ...........+.



(s

+ THE BANDAGED GIRL ce l...16 THE GAL THAT'S TRYING LNs
\S... WEE LAURIE! 3 tg TO MARRY WEE DORRIE Z..AND }ie"e}=
“WELP.. W-L"/ NOW ~ 9) //| | BUT THEN WHO...WHO... WHY ? GOT TO GET TO THE
WHY WOULD A STRANGE GIRL ‘ ’ ri €

. BOTTOM OF THIS...GET TO
INA SANATORIUM WRITEAN = &* ER" D> WEE DORRIE..

$.0.5.,USING WEE LAURIE" :
INITIALS ? UNLESS...
°
t = 0

5
af

GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH ——

THAT'S RIGHT- GOLLY- YOU MUST BE RIE f THAT'S WHY

JiGGS~-I'M TIRED OF EATING OUT 2 A I'M STILL A

STILL A ALL THE TIME - WHY = BACHELOR

BACHELOR / DON'T YOU COME TO | ——
c 4

|
Se
a 1 Pe :

_
i

RIP KIRBY

Y OH, RICKY, DARLING ...WE’VE WHATEVER YOU Bia
— DANCED EVERY NIGHT THIS WEEK...| | SAY, SWEET... Ase
IT WAS I NEED SLEEP... TAKE ME HOME...
AGRAND SHOW, 00 YOU MIND ?
MONICA...NOW LET'S -
POLISH OFF THE

NEAR HIM. YOUR
my MYSTERIOUS GUIDE |
GETTING MORE





C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS





ES SOS PPE AI LERNER ESTER Ueno 5 eM MPRA TR NN A TE 2 AS PT,




PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS. ===















SUNDAY ADVOCATE

AUCTION PUBLIC NOTICES

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER











































TELEPHONE 2508 By instructions received I will sell at
a __HOUSES | Mesars Plantations Ltd. Building, NOTICE
DIED . BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, |Chapel Street, on Tuesday, April th, a . oes :
} n "9 q , r consulied at my office over
* FOR SALE perfect bathing, qaiet. All meals ree Vien eon tae. on Comins Ltda. “Quring the week from 10
DOTTIN—On April Sth, 1952, at her resi- services Supplied from main house, Own |) *F* S am. t 4.30 p.m, except Thursday by
dence Gall Hill, St, John, Jenetha Dot-} ___.__ Telephone. Suitable married couple, |* pr vinchiée. Guiieees: skieiay senuaet

tin. Age 45 years, Her funeral leaves $25.00) per day American Plan for two Auctioneer.{ These rumours of my retirement are

the above residence at 4.30 p.m. for St AUTOMOTIVE eople. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or 5.4.52—3n. J absolutely false. .

John’s Parish Church . ‘ phone 0157. 14,.3.52—t.f.n. ‘nail —- N. L, MITCHELL, D.D.S
Sylvia and Ena (daughters rle an | 6.4. 52—in.
Daphne (grand-children), Velda, Le-} — oo An—one (1) 10 H.P, Austin; FLAT—One (1) Furnished Flat at Dun- UNDER THE SILVER
otta and Beresford Howell Van in good working order: Phone | dee, St. Lawrence, suitable for two only, HAMMER ,

SHEFHERDTON Apr ain Adelina, | 4821, D. V. Scott & Coy, T4d, 4 |). | from May Ist onwards. Phang GoM, | | on Tuesday #th by order of Mrs. A. |THE BARBADOS MUTUAL LIFE
“wife of Charles E. Shepherd of I | | A Thar, we will seid ner fuzniture at ASSURANCE SOCIETY.

Colleton House, St. Peter “CAR: F fair conditior JOUSE—In Bedford Avenue, Upper |“Mannings House" Holetown, St. James, 7
Peacefully, in London, following ~ ae J ollie satuaed "Apply: jay Bay Sthect “prom ist May. Dial 8685. {which includes:—Bergére Settee and 3 ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING
an Spereres, 6.4.58—2 Edghill, Kirton, St. Philip 6.4. 52—2n 5.4.52—2n.|Arm Chairs, Dining ane ie ok 2 a CREE ss hereby om that, the one

a. . celina ——}| upright Chairs, Mir ‘atstand, in en early n
XAR—One Morris 8 H.P. touring in “LA PAZ”, Derricks, St. James, house | Tables all in mahogany, Glass, China etal Meeting of the above-named
THANKS wen good condition, good tyres. | contains 2-sided. verandah, drawing. |Pyrex Ware, Tea Services, Vases, Jar- jety will be held at the Swciety’s
Phone 2825 6.4.52—1n. | dining, 2 bedrooms (one with runuing|diniere and Fruit Stands in Cromium, | Office, Beckwith Place, Bridgetown, on
GILL—The undersigned gratefully re-| ————________—— | weter), kitchen, W.C. & bath, Servants |}Lemonade and Cock-tail Sets; Pits. | Friday, 25th April, 1952, at 2 o'clock p,m.

turn thanks to all who attended the CAR—Austin A-40 Car Done only om, enclosed yard Good Laocality,| Casseroles, Soup and Fruit Spomns, | for ti purpose of:—

funeral, sent wreaths, cards or letters! 7,000 miles, Dial 4161-2210. T H. | Good "bus service. Dial 247. R. Archer|Cutlery &c. Binoculars, Oil Paimtings a) eiving from the Directors their
of sympathy or in an other we Davis 5.452—3n. | McKenzie 6.4.52—Ir | end Tictures; Planter’s Desk, Congolium, Report on the transactions of the
rendered assistance in their udden {| ————_—— — ——— } Pine Double Bedsteads, Spring Mattress; society for the year ended ist









a :
CABE—One 1934 Chevrolet Car; Sedan, |

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952




















| TENDERS are invited for the rights

tc sel liquors and refreshments at the

Local Athletic and Qycle Sports meeting LOST nT ‘s
to be held at Kensington Oval on ~— es HAMMOND
| Thursday, 17th April and at the 3n :
tercolonial meeting to be held May 3ist,] _ BRACELET—One Identification

June 2nd and 5th Bracelet engraved, Wilson”,

Tenders must reach the Secretary of between C. F. Harrison's Office and Bar- Boylston, St. James
|the Amateur Athletic Association of) >@rees Hill, Finder will be rewarded

| Barbados, P.O. Box 36, not later than
7th April 5.4.52—2n.

(Tel. 0192)

by returning same to L. A. Wilson c/o
Harrison's Office, Broad .
5.4.52—3n.

SHIPPING NOTICES

|\ROVAL N LOPISCPIOLOIOS,
ROYAL NETHERLANDS | §*720#+ssessses@eees

\ STEAMSHIP CO. Aru win accept Cargo "and
only



and everybody to
with his effort to

Funds for St. John the
Baptist Church to clear
off the debt on the new
Vicarage.



95





-

SAILING FROM EUROPE | end Ardea, and. Semana cate i like Old
M.S. HECUBA, on 4th April 1 ior St. Vincent; Tuesda: . *
S.S. BOSKOOP on lith April 1952 &th inst. ~lothes, Household Uten:
M.S. BONAIRE on 18th April, 1952. The M.V. “DAERWOOD" will sils, Books, Toys, Orna-

M.S. STENTOR on 2nd May 1952.
SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND
AMSTERDAM

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, and

ments and _ especially











bereavement occasioned by the pass- “MARISTOW", Maxwell Coast, furnish- | Folding Spring Cot; Jalousie and Folding December 1951 ;
ing of ‘Lucille Adelaide Gill, late of | mechanically perfect, Apply BE. Atherley led, refrigerator and telephone includ-|sereens; Verandah Chairs; Go Cart, (2) Electing Directors and an Auditor
Round House, Bay Street Eagle Hall. . 2.4.52—4n.| ed. For further details, Phone 8511. Ware Press, Coal Stove, Linen, Lawn for the current year.
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Brathwaite, | 6.4.52—In.| Mewer, Garden Tvols and other
Doris, May Gill, Jane Millington, CAR—FORD PREFECT. One second | items. , c. K. BROWNE,
Thelma, Mary ‘and Joan Brath- | hand ™p Prefect in good working| MODERN FURNESS. Re. Sale 11.30 o'clock. Terms CASH! | ORE Secretary.
waite. order. pply Barbados Agencies, Tel-| Silver and Linen. =I a. *
6,.4.52—1n. |'ephone 4908. 14.52—6n. | For further particulars. Apply to Alma BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., Bridgetown,
—_—— —- ~ | Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing. Auctioneers. 6th April 1952.
SHILLING FORD—On behalf of the CAR—Morris 8 H.P., 1936 model. Good 23.2.52—t. 4.4.52—2n. 1 6.4.52—3n



relatives of the late Vernie Shilling-













working order, 30 miles to the gallon. |



































ford (recently of Roseau, Dominica) | Price $350.00. Apply: Clyde Hinds,| OFFICE BUILDING At “Brigade
the undersigned desire to express | Deacons Road. 5.4.52—2n. | House,” facing Garrison savannah, now
thanks to all who in any way ren- | -—--—— — occupied by Dr. Gardiner. Apply C OVERNMEN TI
dered assistance in the sudden CAR—FORD MERCURY. One second|E. Clarke, 7 Swan Street. Dial 2631.
bereavements hand Ford Mercury, 1942 model, new) Or 3020, 5.4.52-—4n.
HOWEL D. SHILLINGFORD upholstery and in good working order. ee 2
6.4.52—In. | Apply Barbados Agencies, Telephone; SPAC Suitable for storing g@ods etc not os i : 7 at
ie i cindonsn | 14.52—6n,| Apply: K. R. HUNTE & CO., «TD Applications are invited for appointment to the post of Olerk
SIMMONS—The relatives of the late; — ——- | Lower Broad Street. Dial 4611 Peasants’ Loan Bank.
Laura Lorenza Simmons of *“Martin- CAR Hillman Sedan 1951 model in 3.4.52—4n ‘ Ne ; : i : ssessio' rt
dale," ‘Hastings, — gratefully return | perfect condition. Done only 6,000 miles, | —————_____________ | = 2, Connie ar mn a ip pre n of a School Ce
thanks to all who attended the funeral, | Ring R. S. Nicholls, Office 3925. Home| RESTAVILLE Gibb’s Beach, St. |tificate or a certificate of equivalent standard.
sent wreaths, cards or letiers of sym- | 8324 ’ 1.4.52—t.f.n, | Peter. for months June-July, Oct.— 2 te. . similar t hat of the
pathy or in any other way rendered | Dec. 1952 Phone 2818. 2.4.52—2n. 1 3. ie soley oe fae ees es wik eg oS
them assistance in their’ bereavement CARS—Hillman:; new 1952 model, DOVER | serene mennsresseneys —— ——— ong grade in e Loca ivi ablishment, col Zz
Ercil, Dr. T. A. Howell (St Lucia) | used; also 1951 Hillman Estate Car Pie ROOSEVELT—Maxwell coon moes salary of $768.00 per annum,
vy a ° 43987 Home, 4917 Office: Greenidge Pull furnished, including rigidaire, .
Aiwye, Breet 6.4.52—1n | are mT 6.4.52—2n.| Telephone and Rediffusion. Available 4. This post is of a temporary nature, non-pensionable, and sub-
feta ———— oo | 1st May. Phone 2224, 44,.52—t.f.n.| ject to termination with one month’s notice on either side.
CARS—One 1947 Mercury Car, perfect) -——— - —_—— —— . é 4 : ‘ ¥ ae
IN MEMORIAM condition. One Fluid Drive Dodge Car.| SUNSET VIEW — Furnished sea-side 5. Applications in writing, with testimonials, will be received
AGARD—1 said tT our | Apply to Cosmopolitan Garage, Maga-| Bungalow, at Rockley 3 bedrooms and by the Manager, Peasants’ Loan Bank, Pinfold Street, St. Michael,
In constant memory of 0 », . e all nveniences, Dial 2455 j ——on,
dear mother and grand mother Mabel | Fim® Lane. Phone ats 5.4.62—5n. | eee ee 7 5.4.52~2n. | UP to the 15th April, 1952. 6.4.52—3n.
Agard, who was ealled to rest on the
Cth a ae, | ae. CARS—Minor Two-Door Saloon like
o |
To-day brings back sad memories, new. Minor Tourer. 7,000 miles, Morris | ‘
NOf a loved one Kone to teat” | Cond Miioge very goed senate | FP UMRLIC SALES PART ONE ORDERS
~~ oe Sooea her tebe Dodge (1938) two-seater, excellent e . . By
“UP. d 1 )
Fe ABMS fenly. Sedan” 16000. thiles, Suitable for | hire REAL ESTATE Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, 0.B.E., ED.
6.4.82—In. ) Durposes. Wolseley (1947) 8 h.p. saloon Commanding
| ee ar tierra aw viman 415000 miles, in very good condition HAROLDVILLE, PERRY'S GAP, The Barbados Regiment a te
ANNOUNCEMENTS, Por. Prefect, 17,000 mites. very fine RORBUCH, STEEST Issue No, 14. $ ap



Shop in Comfort at the Mayfair Gift
Shop, where you will find local hand-
‘work and interesting aifts for all.
Open daily 10—12 a.m, 4-—-6.30 p.m.
Up to date Library.

6.4.52—t.f.n.

WANTED
HELP

ASSISTANT MANAGER — Montserrat
Company Limited require married man
as Assistant Manager. Experience man-
agement livestock essential, also ability
to manage cotton lime estates. House
provided, Apply stating experience and
salary required to Box 221, Plymouth,
Montserrat, B.W.I. 3.4.62—6n.

BUS DRIVERS—Apply to
Motor Omnibus Co. Ltd.,
Road, St. Michael,

TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket
Hands) only those with experience need
apply. P. C. S, MAFFEI & Co., Ltd.

26.3.52—t.f.n.

YOUNG LADY Requires position as
Governess or Companion to travelling

—_—









parties, Write: ILM.G. C/o Advocate.
2,.4.52—8n,
MISCELLANEOUS

ONE EMAL. INCUBATOR to purchase.

Contact McKenzie 4536, from 8 to 4 and
after \. 5.4,52—5n



TANK—Second-hand 250 gallon capacity
galvanised iron tank required urgentjy,
suitable storing fuel oil, Full details to
Box A.P. c/o Advocate Co.

5.4.52-—2n.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned
giving credit to my wife, IONE Hi b
(nee INNISS) as & do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-















At 2 p.m., Friday, 18th April
This very comfortable Dwelling house
situated in a well established residential
area and yet within walking distance
of Bridgetown, comprises Drawing and
Dining rooms, three large and one small

condition. FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd
Telephone 4504, 2.4.52—6n

—

MOTORCYCLE—5 h.p. O.H.V. Twin.
Model A-7; New Battery; Engine recently
overhauled. Done 17,000 miles: like new.







1. PARADE—TRAINING
All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. at 1700 hours on Thursday 1th April,
1982. H.Q. Coy.--Interior Economy—Checking kit—Q.M. to be present—
(All ranks are required to bring all articles of clothing and equipment issued).
“A” Coy.—Tent Pitching—Demonstration by R..9.M.(1). “B” Coy.—will do





























* hedrooms, breakfast room, pantry,
$500 P| D. Johnabny Wortsants. ae Kitchenette, toilet and bath and wash 2 oO corte
toom;\with a double servants room in Band practices will be held on Mon. 7, Wed, 9 and Thurs. 10 April 52.
yard, stands on 8879 square feet of land SIGNALS—CGOURS!
ELECTRICAL le ene aual eter ti oe eaalot All N.C.O’s of the Signal Platoon will attend a signal N.C.OQs course to be
aes eng ae St ma held on Mondays and Wednesdays of each week at 1700 hours commencing
Saturdays on naays. on Monday 7th April, until further notice.
For further particulars and conditions 2. ANNUAL CAMP
COOLERATOR—One (1) Coolerator in|of sale, Apply:— r ‘the Annual Camp will be held at Walker's, St. Andrew from Friday 13 to
perfect order Phone 3305. HUTCHINSON & Srey Sunday 22 June 52. All ranks who are able to attend and have not yet handed
5.4.521n, ” $.459-—-6n, in their names should inform the R.S.M. as soon as possible
ee eel vlna EANT r ENDING
LIGHTING PLANTS: Two (2) D.C. FOR SALE 3 oe eee AND ORDERLY SERJ FOR WEEK
K ah ik Bos an ering "Yl at our Office, No. 17 High Street, on Orderly Officer Lieut, Ge G. Peterkin
ee por €.4.52--2n,| Friday the 16th instant at 2 p.m Orderly Serjeant 381, L/Sjt. Robinson, V. N.
aL UPLAND, ard Avenue, Belleville, acing Next for duty
[ha reerme A tele Mine 7. 4.| residence of the late Archdeacon Shan Orderly Officer Lieut. T. A. Gittens
ECE 9S Spee ets land) with land attached containing Orderly Serjeant 234, Sjt. Williams, E. D
ee oe cee fer, Pho > 8332. 11,398 square.feet. The house contains M. L. D. SKEWES-COx, ie
any geasonable offer, we 5.4.52--2n, | Drawing and Dining rooms on the ground _L SOLT yo ne
i, » ‘| floor, 3 Bedrooms upstairs and usual ‘Phe Ba Regiment
cn | offices Garage for 1 car nspection rbados
" oo a ca tan wok va on application at the house amy day ex- PART Il ORDERS
eee eee tuncnt PG. S. MAPFET | CePt Sunday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 13
S G6. Lan Dar ae COTTLE, CATFORD & Co —-
Co. | Ad, Dis ; 9400-% 6.4,52—7n. | 1. LEAVE—SICK
ee 584, Drmr, Hurdle, S. O. H.Q. ca Granted 4 weeks S/Leave wef
A OMe AM One Radioaramn (Phileo) | vANDs.0 square feet of iand at 3 April 52.
aS ae ae Wa a a. (Paitca) Sobers Lane, Bridgetown, adjoining|2,. PROMOTION : 7
Going “Cop ates . * ¢a.sa—in | lands belonging to the estate of T A. M9, L/Cpl. Greaves, W. I. ) The marginally named, ore
stl Herbert, (deceased). 510, L/Cpl. Gardner, M.S.) “B" QOay. promo! Corporals wef
ce ree J The abeve will-be set up for sale to S48, L/Cpl. Tella, C. A » 1 April 52.
phBERIGERATOR — General Electric | public competition on Friday, the 16th| 3, STRENGTED RESIGNATION
etrigerator Sean PATS peeve Roebuck | day of April, at 2 p.m. at the Office of 414, L/Cpl. Weatherhead, H.R. “B" Coy. Permitted” to fesign from the
ape ores, ae eer ne eee | the undersigned, Lucas Street, Bridge- t Regiment wef 3 April 52
were we ae a town * Q
oe CARRINGTON & SEALY, BD. OO, Micr.
IVESTOCK 2.4,52—6n . Hutant,
L s ; The Barbados Regiment
~~ GOATS—3 Young Milch Goats for NEWBURY—With 11% acres of land.

3 A Martin's Vicar uilding and out buildings, 3 lime kilns
it. 5s niedliiead * Ae vermment Water and Electric, next
_.| door to Gun Hill, about 6 miles from





Bridgetown. Also building spots at
Newbury, St, George 12c, per spuare foot,

MECHANICAL

public road, water and electric along the
, Psp nye OGL Modal Super, same land. Apply: 8. W MeConney. Other ‘super-stamina Goodyear work
-inch frames, fitted with three speed | Newbury, St. George 12c, per square foot, tires are: Hard Rock Lug— Road Lug—



fears, Regular price $ 61.35. Our special
price for spot cash $66.35. Noel Roach





Be Wise



“OLIVE BOUGH" (Seaside









































Studded Sure-Grip—Hi-Miler Xtra Tred,
tracting any debt or debts in my name | & Sons, Speightstown. and well Set in off Main Rd.) at ‘ 2 ’
unless by a written order signed by me. 2.3.52—4n. | HASTINGS—NEAR PAVILION COURT;

JAMES HOBBS, a Large (Partly Stone) 3-Storey, 4
Taylors Gap, WIND MILL, tower and pump. Pump} Bedrooms with Basins, Several other
(near Eagle Hall) is like new, tower and mill in working | Rooms, Open Gallery (Front & 2 Sides),
St. Michael. order, $100.00, Phone 4124 Enclosed Back Gallery with 24 Windows,
5,.4.52—2n 3.4.52—3n.|2 Toilets, other Conveniences, very
— ——— — | Good Condition, Nice Sandy Beach,
ee wa. + hereby att eee Good and Safe Bathing, es, Garage
© oO my wife, 1 also C le Shed for 4 Cars, well Made
Et haar eg ea e I £8 not) MISCELLANEOUS up Yard, Ideal and enough Land to
spons! 0 her or (einsdeetsa tae ot Seclene ahe D er Prec’ i }
anyone else Srteashing. aan debt or ANTIQUES — ot every description So eeulia s Sunmaiahine dias eae tae
debts in my name unless by a written | @!"s% China, old Jewels, fine Silver | 2" aii or mats Inspection by Appoint
order signed by me. Leone ear eer, Meee ay Spi ment Only, AT BRIGHTON, Seaside:
HENRY ALLEYNE BOYCE, | Sdjoining Royal Yacht’club, | Almost New Conerete 3 Bedroom Ameri-
Nr. Cave Hill, | 3.2.52—t.f.n. | 08" Design Bungalow, all Modern
St. Lucy. a a. a ; | Conveniences, about 11,000 sq. ft. Going
aad LUMINUM—I1 ten foot and 6 eight) Under £2,700. FACING NAVY GAR-
The public are hereby warned against | {00t Sheets and 28 six foot sheets of tare B cee New pa sy Pe
given credit to my wife, CARMAEN {#@!vanised iron, J, Brome, Advocate | voices, about 12,000 sq. ft. Going
BELL (nee ROACH) as I'do not hold | Ce» Ltd $.4.69—2n. | Urder £9100 In NELSON ST. By
n = —— leah ‘ -
ise contracting any debt or ‘debts in | »,NOATS—Two Sailing Boats. Mallard | 50°... and’ Resldenee, Gonvenienees
my name unless by a written order 21 ft. Sailing Craft with Morris Auxillary Good Condition Id 1 for ae Bu ay
signed by y Murine Engine and complete equipment Going Unde £2 ‘00. In TUD oan:
LIo. MeN: BELL #1,500.00. Also International Tornado | 7° s e-itore , § B de ir <
on Noad | well built with good Racing Record | E4'® 2:Storey Stone Business Premises
sion ad, | $450.00. Apply: Secretary, Yacht Club. & Residence with a Large Garage or aad ?
Bank Hall, \ vs 6.4.52—3n, | Workshop, all Conveniences, A-1 Con- GO oO D a i a AR
St. ae death ist dition, Ideal for any Business, Vacant, y

5.4.59 a CANADIAN PRINTS—We have just|€@" Yield $120.00 p.m. Under £3,000 “es
received a shipment of Beautiful Cana_ Can Buy It_UPPER NELSON STI.,—3
dian Prints 36” wide at very reasonable Bedroom Residence, Conveniences. Good
prices, See these lovely Prints before Condition, SUS See ft. Going
purchasing elsewhere. Also fine quality Below 2 AT HASTINGS—Seaside

MIAMI LINEN. —Almost Stone, 3 Bedrooms, Going ;
STANWAY STORE Under £3,500, AT FONTABBLLE—A
Lucas street Bargain: Almost New 3 Bedroom Stone st

6.3.52—1n Bungalow, Tiled Bath & Toilet, about
ini? 10,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,300.



FURNITURE











WHITEHALL FLATS
Codrington Hifi, St. Michael
WEDNESDAY 9TH APRIL

AT 11.30 a.m

We are instructed by Mr. W. D.
Chariton to dispose of his modern »
Furniture and Effects

Viewing morning of sale

Dining Tables, Ch: Dining
Chairs with Uphoist i Seats,
Sideboard, Desks, Oce. Tables, Tea
Trolley, Bookcase, Chest of
Drawers, and other Mahogany
Furniture. Upholstered 3 Piece
Suite, Wicker Settee and Arm-
chairs, Rush Rockers, Cedar Chest
of Drawers, Cedar Compactum,
Painted Bookcase, Single Beds
and Spring, Simmons Mattresses,
Frigidaire (small) Electrolux
Refrigerator, Ice Box, Electric
Clock, Large Coll. China, Glass-
ware, Cutlery, Silver (Tea and
Coffee Se 3), Table Lamps
Portable Gramophone, Portable
Rermunington Typewriter New
Model Kodak, Halsmayer Medium
Grand Piano, Falks 3 Burner Oi)
Stove, Pr. Binoculars, Microscope,
Bicycle, Mirrors. Swing Mirror
and Stand, Larder, Kitchen Scales
Kitchen Tables, Marble Top ‘Table
Bathroom Scal Rugs, Carpets
Curtains, Primts, 2 Prs Boxi
Gloves, Books, Garden Tools
other articles

6
AUCTIONEERS
John, Biadon
& co.
A.F.S., F.V.A.

Phone 4640, Plantations Building



JUST RECBIVED—Valor Stove parts,| NEAR CITY in Avenue, Quiet & Resi-



I te dential,—A Bargain; Almost New 3 Bed- OR maximum mileage inimum cost-per:
rep Hilo Saree Perrencem oie room Reinforced Conerete Bungalow, F . ’ Bs and gaighn ow .
Penestire Stove pokes, ae ito Tee | Over 7,000 sq. ft., Going Under £2,100. mile get Goodyear giant tires. These tires are
Company, Trafalgar & Sp: Streets. | BY FONTABELLE; 2 Bedroom Bungalow, s ‘ . h ;

Phone 3008. = on A-1 Condition, Going Under £1,200. AT 80 superior that, year after year, more tons, the
ae: o> Ot “| HASTINGS—2 Residences (one partly : t ‘s . :

| “OL 'The ~wond'y fnest motor oii | Rlone and one sone=nAlcat Naw)" both world over, are hauled on Goodyear giant tires

yie . P.m.,

and Going Under

| Veedol,
ecdol, at all leading Garages and Service AT LOWER BAY ST... re

Stations. Your vehiele deserves the

Dest, | £4,000
“Found wherever fine cars

than on any other make.

VEEDOL. 2 Bedroces ne ata yields $25.00 Agents :—
fy p.m, Going Under £1,000. AT UPPER .
rare 172. 8—*-f-2- | ROEAUCK ST.—A 2-Storey-—Partly Stone CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD.,
Office equipment of all kinds—Steel | 3 Bedrooms (possible 4), 2 Toilets yields VICTORIA STREET.
| Safes, Skandex Visible , Por- | $0.00 p.m., Going Under £1,200, AT Dealers :—

table and Standard Typewriters, Adding | ROCKLEY NEW RD.,—about 1% Acre,

H. JASON JONES — SERVICE STATION
























* Goin oO NDS
Mithinae ne, Nee PRUNE |S rDr aes § medooons Condiain $y tater * COURTESY GARAGE
BRADSHAW & COMPANY. [Concrete Bungalow, and AT LOWER K. R. HUNTE & CO., LTD
2.3.52—t.f.n. | BAY ST.; 2 Bedroom Stone Residence; J. A, REID — LONE STAR GARAGE

7 eon Going Under £1,100 euch, Dial 3111.

PIANC—Weser _ Bros., New York,|D. F de Abreu, “Olive Bough",
Cabinet Grand. In good condition. Hastings.
Phone 2368. 6.4.52—4n. OO -
wicket Hal “MELLYN,” Pine Hill Just a reminder of = - -

KITE TWINE——Ctrong Twine for Kites
et 9 cents per ball. G. W. HUTCHINSON | A newly-constructed stone _ house MR. LESTER JONES EASTER MONDAY
& Co. Ltd. 6.4.52—an, | With polished pine floors throughout in and

S coo! and increasingly popular residential MISS GLADYS FARLEY’S

GALVANIZE PIPE—2590 ft. 1%" Gal-| area. H is compact and easy to run

venize Pipe, new. Apply to L, L with minimum labour and contains front
Daxters Plantation, St. Andrew. verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 3
6.4.52—an, | bedrooms, tiled bathroom with separate
é ——— $e | toilet, kitchen, laundry, servants’ quar-
TYPHOO TEA-—-Stocks of this Re-| ters and large garage with direct access
freshing and Delicious Beverage have} ‘© house. Front grounds laid out in
just been received. Get yours today | B#rden beds, lawns, hedges, ornamental
from your Grocer or Druggist. and shade trees and ornamental plants;
KNIGHT'S LTD, and back grounds in fruit trees and
5.4.52—2n, | Kitehen garden.

Gin,

DANCE

TOMORROW NIGHT
AT

PRINCESS ALICE PLAY-
ING FIELD PAVILION
ADMISSION: 2/- |
Music by C, B. Browne's

FAIR

Codrington College
2 p.m. — 6 p.m.
ALL WELCOME



| No offers. Wicks.

$$$ | Inspection by appointment with ars. , Orchestra : Proceeds for Society
TORNADO—International KAl. Beauti. | Lloyd B. Aaron, c/o K. R. Hunte & Bar Solid—We are looking Church
ful condition, excellent equipment, good | ©®., Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown. for you!



For further particulars contact Rev
A. P. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory,
or dial 5187 between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m,
nclusive.

racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.
Telephone 3289.
18.11.61—t.f.n

on any day Monday to Friday















HERE’S WISHING YOU

Come to - - -

THE GRAND BASTER

A VERY HAPPY EASTERTIDE












|
|
| e | PAR ADE ' and hoping YOU will enjoy the many Bottles of }
7 Eb , } ;
Mrs. EDITH SEALY iM} ar TH BETHEL GRouNDs {| TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM:
ut (Beautician) | On EASTER MONDAY
Pap her clients that her }} ae er | (With The Distinctive Flavour)
|{{ Hairdressing Salon has been | Ree bare eeates ee ened which you have already bought 6r contemplate buying.
removed from “Willow Cot” REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
| 7 oe wb Oe ne a ra cae 2 JOH] |] Dp. TA YLOR & SONS Lid.
|
. == =

Donations will be grate-

M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952.







Passengers only Soe Vincent;

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO | 3 "2,08 Wee Pon oe fully accepted and, as
AND STIRS GUIANA cept Cargo and P: rs far as ible, collected.
MS. BONAIRE on Oth, May, 1988, }, gAntigua, | Monteerrat, The Sale and Fair will
s. on ay, . e
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND Nevin and Ot Mitts; Salling Wed-

nesday 9th inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC)
Â¥ Consignee Tele. 404

be held at MHoletown
School on Easter Mon-
day.

Admission 1/-

Teas, Refreshments,
Music, Dancing,
Games, &c.

CURACAO
M.®. HECUBA 2ist April 1952.
$.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1962.
8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Agents.

SLEASLESOO SOLE OPE





















Canadian National Steamships













SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sails Arrives Balls
Montreal Halifax Boston B’dos B'dos
LADY RODNEY 6 - 2) Mar, 2 Apr. 11 Apry 12 Apr.
LADY NELSON .. es es = 16 Apr 17 Apr. 27 Apr. 28 Apr
CANADIAN CRUISER 7. 29 Apr. 2 May - 11 May 13 May
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 9 May 12 May ~ 21 May 23 May
LADY RODNEY te 19 May 22 May % May 2 June 3 June
CANADIAN CHALLENG 30 May 2 June = ll June 12 June
LADY NELSON .. a 9June 12 June 14June 23 June 2% June 0 H |
CANADIAN CRUISER 4 20 June 28 June _ 2 July 3 July
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.,. 30 June 3 July _— 12 J 13 July
LADY RODNEY oe oe 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 26 July

eee

NORTHBOUND



MM.

Arrives

Bdes ‘Saen “Gesten ai Sone iatitas aontceat

fone ar ; s Aux. 7 Apr. — | a Apr. 7 Apr, -- B L A D 0 &
pr. 26 Apr. 5 May; — 6 May 10 May

cu aus . xumy ous "= 555, Taed hes e& ce
CONSTRUCTOR 3 June 8 June — Bt] dene 18 ‘6 M1 Jun« F ; A.
LADY RODNEY , 1 June oe 2
“CHALLENGER : “ pe : June i a 5 ade can : yd 00) camamenss e
geome RE SRE A A) SRM BRE] Nes atwars av
CANADIAN . | i . ABLE.
Seno. TRE PMP wae, OH OME BAe
wot ..,etm

FOR SALE

“BEACH RESIDENCE", St.
Lawrence — Attractive 2 storey
house with 4 bedrooms, lanes
living-room, and galleries. One o'!
the best spots on this bay with







For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents,
















it
2 ~psemeaaniae Maan ata? & ood x a ndy mish a “es soo, une
. y
% REMEMBER!!! X VIEW UE, furnished 2&5, er, high
yestment as continuous

: ANNUAL PICNIC % SEA GUEST rentals are obtained.
| “NEWTON LODG®”, Maxwell—
% HOUSE Well found 2 storey stone property
CHRIST CHURCH GIRLS’ ¥ HASTINGS BARBADOS with enclosed grounds. Galleries
% % Under new management. on 3 sides, spacious drawing
x ongterm room, dining room, breakfast
% BARTER BOMBAE, Deny and rates room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms,
i ; quoted on sequest garages and servants’ quarters.

Sete Ages Permanent guests Enquiries invited.
% 2—6 “SWEET FIELD", St. Peter—
g " <2 An Estate type house built of
ivi i ; i tains large living room
$ Ciwle Gijens’ Band $ ioe ene west leading on
. ; to covered verandahs with good
» >

% 0. OG-ohm ig view of sea a short distance away,
g 2 bedrooms, kitchen, storerooms
SSESSSSSSSOSSSS ond usual outbuildings, garage
and servants’ quarters. Approx.









2% aeres well laid out grounds
d right of way over beach.

“COVE SPRING HOUSE”, St.
James—A 2 storey house on coast
with good grounds and interesting
possibilities. There is excellent
bathing from a_ secluded and
private sandy cove.

Come te

RESIDENCE, Maxwells Coast—
A handsome well preserved pro-
perty with 3 bedrooms, large
dining room, drawing room,

galleries, servants’ quar-
ters, Walled grounds and about
% acre © a.

“MALTA”, St. Peter—Modern
coral stone house of exceptionally
sound eonstruction—extensive re-
modelling and re-decoration has
just been completed. The lounge,
of ample dimensions, opens onto
wide verandahs with most at-
tractive seascape views. The three
bedrooms are fitted with built-in
wardrobes and also washbasins,
and the two bathrooms have H/C
water. Kitchen and pantry are
well fitted out and are supplied
with H/C water. Ground foor
contains 2 garages, large store-
rooms and servants quarters,
grounds of about % of an acre
are well laid out and fenced. Mains
and well water. A most desirable
and highly recommended property.

BUNGALOW, Maxwell Coast—
A well built bungalow with 3
bedrooms, large living room,
kitchen, garage, servants’ quarters.
A pleasantly located property for
sale at a very competitive figure.

WINDY MILL, Rendezvous Hill,
Go. _ Cnerasogern built bungalow

GIRL GUIDE FAIR

at the
DRILL HALL

from 3 to 8 p.m.
on
SATURDAY, 10th MAY,
1952





Announcement

to notify my friends

the General public that I
ond Real Estate Agent from
am offering myself as Auctioneer
this dey forward My Auction
Mart is situated at Tweedside
Road I am looking forward for
some of your patronage. Dial 4837.
“ours for Service

JOSEPH ST. HILL










as



Adults
Children and Scouts and

We invite you to inspect our assortment

of
CEILING FITTINGS & BRACKETS Etc.

Just opened
at

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets 3
AALS OAL LEPLLIEL LSA ELLE IS ESESESE ISIS
_——$—$———————_—_—————

el





NOTICE





bedrooms, lounge, kitehen,
We beg to notify our Friends and Customers that we will garage, servants’ quarters, walled
not be open for business on SATURDAY, 12th April and in een Oe te a land.
would ask them to arrange their shopping accordingly. cue reasonable offer

R. & G. CHALLENOR. LTD.

Speightstown, Bridgetown, Six Mens.
° 6.4.52—2n

“HOLDERS HOUSE,” St. James
—An estate house built of stone
with pine floors and shingle roof.
3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms,
verandahs etc., also garage and
usual outbuildings. The house
stands on approx. 4 acres of well
timbered land (mahogany) ap-
proached by a long driveway
fianked with closely planted
mahogany trees. The outstanding
attraction of “Holders” is the
very lovely site which has the
advantage of being well elevated
and cool, with fine views on all
sides. Coast is less than a mile
away and town is 6 miles.

“BEMERSYDE”,

—Spacious stone built bungalow
with shingle roof, very well plan-
ned with wide verandahs at front











Everyone loves a Smooth, Lovely Skin,—but they detest
Unsightly Hair, especially in Women . : .80:—

“GET RID OF UNSIGHTLY HAIR” with

< VEET ”

and Bide, 2 enclosed galleries,
For the Beach, Dance, Sailing, or any time when under-arm Hairs , 3 double a kitchen “and

becomes Unsightly, use VEET.
VEET is extremely useful for men who have tough beards, or
who find it uncomfortable to Shave

‘vy BE ET Unsightly, Superfiuous Hair
in exactly “THRED MINUTES”

ge IT’S OLEAN! IT’S CERTAIN! ! IT’S SAFB.!}!
Thats VEET

pantry, 3 servants’ rooms,
and outhouses. oo
fccees to the sea with good bath-

pe ROR. Ave. Betta.
ville — attractive well
proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft, Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed),

» Barage
is com-

Remember:

) large room, study, modern
Obtainable at:— ware i Law figure scenic i, ior ack
BOOKER’S (Bidos) DRUG STORES LTD. aourrmnt

BROAD STREET,

HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)

RENTALS

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
HOUSE—Near Yacht Club, avail-
able June to Dec. (inclusive).

4 pee FURNISHED HOUSE,
andy Lane—Immediate n,
ROSE HILL, st. Peter Furnished,

Immediate possession.

NEWTON LODGE, Maxwell
Coast—Funished, immediate pos-
session.







Secure Those Palings
WITH GOOD

HARDWOOD POSTS.
Obtainable different

various prices.

WHITEHALL FLATS — Unfumn-
ished, early possession,

RESIDENCE, 2 Mile Hill—Beau-
tifully furnished, swimming pool,
close to town, excellent staff.
Available to approved tenants.

HIGSGATE — Unfurnished fat.

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
SEASIDE PROPERTY, Paynes
Bay-—Available to approved ten-
ants from May to Nov.

XICALES— Wildey— Available
about 6 months.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building

in sizes and

N. B. HOWELL

LUMBER & HARDWARE



Bay Street
















SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952 EVENING

_



ADVOCATE PAGE FIFTEEN










- at aia Stn, tien ee 20/- Fine For ea
= WAY HOME ed throughout the t: thera . petter view. Almost dead ahéa ; : t deh ie
HE HARD wes some company t variou oe stain dive) distin. aaeeek Wie Unlawful Possession riAPPYy ELIEF PROTA RAIA IOR HID IAAI AINA IR IAS SAIASASASIAIAS AC
ish that would swin 5 der





tong t grey line just visible through the If you want an alarm clock
the boat (where N ouldn’t ; 5

.
€ t . ‘ < nd l rig —the H Vors Mr Talmz
@ from page 10 we thought the bread quite good 5.04, them with eee eee ee It wa land aul ght—theq we lle Mir H. 4. “res FROMBACKACHE Right wi that you can always trust —
ik ft en a = Spens ) Ole ty is oO sarbados ce Magistrate s d :
cuits and jam. If two or three although a housewife on Jand sunny islan« 3. a
















1 ” r
the several types of sea birds N late re esterday ordered 30-year-old accurate, handsome a
oe e . ¥ . > > , - a Nine hours later Wanderer erda) rdere 3 ? « . ‘
pn Pda tie ee waka an aon a Paes Senties which live out on the ocean dpepped anchor mear the sanc ourer, Prince Worrell, of St Neighbour said Tate Doan’s Pills” se 9 moderately priced—you mut
during the night they would be if ever she _was so d a =m a There was an atmosphere of ex- shores of Carlisle Ba The tr wephen Road, St. Mirhpel, to VW HY PUT UP with needless ime @@6 @ © choose a Smith Alarm.
very smartly popped into the meat. The evening mend, =e like citement on that twenty-ninth Saas pay a fifie of 20s in 14 days or discomfort from backache,
ryir an and we would have this: curried or fried steak with ... , ms hs tng Was ove ’ 7 ss a + ” “4 rheumatic pains, humbago, ¢ =
ane net 4 Or cai four onions and potatoes; rice pudding 24%: We both knew that land “Now after several days’ rest at (9 default one month's imprison achitie ties baad ae ke = Cg gd VICTORY 30-hour dlarin | NEW DAWN W-hout alarm
age wee. = - a ae =o was getting near. From early in Bridgetown we are preparing to|ment for the unlawful possession 7 ; lock in cream, blue or | clock in handsomecream,Zam
mornings did we have this luck OF pancakes; coffee or tea. the morning we had been on deck aa cae tat > a reek we Of _a tin of paint common urinary disorders due to o : blue de green case with 0 9-7
with ihe flying fish and all our Celebrating At Sea watching the horizon in the hope be = _—. t ai ‘the ‘Peneaa The case was brought by Po- r ed. ie when you green case en plated fittings. 4-inch //f Y Ez
93 5 or M & t : xpect to se >» Pan ai... Pr rh . 1 y . iim. +
efforts to catch other fish with Occasionally we would invent @ of seeing it. We really wanted to Sonat Chance through there the}lice Constable 249 Springer. The vi 2 " ~ = ‘7 none P f firtings. ro 2 tat with full lamin | a) Qu
spinners and a fish spear were special occasion and have a sub- see it. After a long spell at sea Soont will be in the Pacific Ocean ffenee was committed on Friday 4 ne bana ry ' * eee \ A with luminous sp Das atari’. falas 9 y
completely unrewarded. eo spread with aoe a away from any shore it is amaz- >°S""N0c4 of her will be sevend Soon'e Bochoake an? Bw Also available mor | apte nonslulind 7
and tinned cream. One of these \ *h y ‘ , ana ; mas : ackac Ls, sb ealialae 4 obits
After breakfast we would both fi ia d : lébrated het ing how much you feel you want inousand miles more ailing be Phis well kfiown liuretic and huminous pre iss : dous supe ’ é
eep out the yacht’s cabin ae hs Ss ODD. te ba ¥ age 10 ,8et back on land again, fore she can expect to end het urinary antiseptic helps sluggish made alarm clock, com- | made alarm clock
ON gt 5 ~, ““o1, the first 2,000 miles of our voyage the ll called out: “Ther Es i ave be ; - that you can always trast a
tidy up above decks and make hag been’ completed. It was on itis wom tee The two of VOvaee- | WEATHER REPORT kidneys to carry out their function wo :



what adjustments were necessary the twenty-fourth day at sea.

to the sails and rigging. Bill At night it was the usual thing
being the navigator would then to reud or write again until we ————— .
— a ae of = ee turned off the pressure kerosene

shots of the day. Two, or r i i went f
still three, of these sights taken =. Sa CS ane TE SO Removal O
with the sextant at_ different Jt probably sounds as if life

of ridding the blood of excess ust

a YESTERDAY acid and other impurities harmaws .
B C Radio Rainfall from Codrington: to health. Grateful people, everye Superbly Ye, LUV ebony
e eLue { nil where, recommend ’s Pills to Britioh made TU. ’ ; Ragen aye

Total rainfall for month to their friends and neighbours. 9» renin a

Programmes ae aoe = oe *DOAN’S a Obtainable at all leading Jewellers.
Temperature; 71.5°F. aur for ee

us scampered up the rigging for












times could be computed to tell quring the voya vas idyllic. It Cdi Shi Wind Velocity: 10 miles per near neeiias
us exactly where the yacht was ees. alma Pe was one lan ips SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1082) hour.
situated on the ocean, Bill made snag, one curse which troubled 1-71.15 pm, 19 1M, % ee Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.992; J
a point of keeping a check of the us for each twenty-four hours of @ from page 1 dpm. The News, 4.10 p.m, Interlude (3 p.m.) 30.033. TT
progress every day. the day. And that was the yacht’s 4.15 p.m. For the Common Good, 4.90 ;
wicked rolling motion. Although steamships from the U.K. to cer- p ™. Sunday Half-hour, 5 p.m. Varie oz a TO-DAY Crew Sights Shark she was swaying from side to tain islands of the West Indies, Bandbox, 6 p.m. Compo ’ Sunrise: 5.54 a.m.




Lunch was usually served at side all the time, each minute or would extend their routes—in-
one o’clock. Because it was warm two she would give a particularly cluding all the Leewards and
in the middle of the day we al- sharp heave to port or to star- Windwards at which the Lady

Oe Bee Mitchie tom || Sunset: 6.13 p.m. | =» WONDER WHEELS N° 4=
a en tee By Moon: First Quarter, April
2 Why Hercules cvctzs .



7.10 p
5pm



i 3M, 31.22M






saucepan dipped over the side. tents into the soup and, as likely we make up for the passenger pr, 32 bie a

We were both frightened to dive as not, the kettle on the stove facilities the Lady Boats offered mt saieinte



ways had a light meal of cold ham board. It was maddening if you boats called—to benefit the West : eee te ne aa. ee i, Lighting: 6.30 p.m, e ‘ ; a!
and potatoes or something like were trying to cook. The teapot Indies when the Lady Boats are . ee a se in. Radio Nowe High Tide: 1.41 am., 1.29 | arrive in Barbados sf
that. After lunch came the daily would slide across the table and taken off. feel, | Song und Dance, 9 p p.m. * ; hoa ca y
bath. Jt consisted of splashing onto the deck, the sugar tin He felt that the West Indies’ B.p.c ony On 10 pr Low Tide: 7.50 a.m, 8.09 in perfect condition a F
yourself with water from a would probably tip half its con- gravest concern was: “How will The New oe n, 10.45 cane ' t
it

sa
ie |



7, ise





oven and some of the results were
quite good, too. That is to



ay ¢ ni ; 9 ‘ e . 14 ik: a , , Rogena is aranteed to set you
day and perhaps 100 or even 120 southbound and on Saturday and jn ts pm. Sek i 10.29°p.1 right, pelkvinorete your Prostate

the next. Not one ship was sight- Wednesday northbound. Tip Top Tunes Gland and make you feel 10 to 20
ple icenclalnn neers taaiiran a I cS os i a ii intake a i i AL years younger or money back. Get

Rogéna from your chemist. The |
guerantee protects you,



. over the side in case a shark would spit boilin water at you. us?” He said that West Indians MONDAY, APRIL 7, oa . ‘ nied
’ should be around. I aetually They say that hinees beings are would welcome an extension in the 400—7.15 p.m. 19 76M, 25 53M, &1.@2M Men Made Younger The special Hercules packing
sighted the fin of one on the third wery adaptable. This rolling is itinerary of those ships. p.m The News, 4.10 p.m. The Dai methods the result of 30 years
day out. However this was to be one think that I am sure nobody According to our B.G. correse gomice, 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pre- | ’ : " She
the only one we encountered dur- could ever get used to. Even at pondent, freight services with the gramme, 5 p.m. Breach Riley, 5.16 BN | By Treating Gland study of packing for countries
ing the whole trip. nicht you would be continually Canadian Challenger, Cruiser and Souvenirs eee 2 Bes oniee | :s..T I+
‘ Ms mg — ope lying in tossed from side to side in the Constreoter are being malitalees Sas atin Bros deals ae ae Cotting: up nights, hursine, sense overseas —ensure this. The we
the shade of the sails sometimes bunks and wake up in the morn- and would be extended if the 27 )'.'y r p.m, The News, 7,1 dull echo al teen i va *
reading books and sometimes ing as tired as ‘hens you Aree tratfye volume warrants > n. News ‘a “a | a ong te OEE Sous } wrapped parts are placed carefully
writing letters which we would went to slec~ : Pan American Airways have 7.—!0 ee | \ Loa of manly Viggur ore oaneed in strong cases so that they can be
post when we reached Barbados. also withdrawn one two-way “>> Dian. Mea Oveeadad Sanat. f°. : ‘oat Timanstané eax giana in . i ly
ze an . on aT began » 120 —— A Day flight on Friday southbound and pappy Hoe-down, 8.15 pm. Radic men), ‘To overcome, these troubles | simply, safely and correctly as-
is duty by baking the day’s one or & total of twenty-nine days the Monday northbound flight Newereel, 8.30 pr African Surve in 24 hours and quickly restore vig- ‘ ses aot ‘
loat of bread. This was done Wanderer sailed on in this man- leaving only two two-way flights 8.45 p.m. The ler, 9.90) er ins teens. ae sembled on arrival at destination,
using a pressure cooker as an ner making good 90 miles one on ednesday and Saturday 2". a ‘ditorials, | matter how long you have suffered
|
|



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PAGE SIX TEEN



Nurses’ Assoc.

As Long As It Gives Service



Public Comes First

ADDRESSING Past and Present Nurses at the Six
teenth Annual Reunion Meeting of the Barbados Nurses’

Association at the General

Hospital yesterday afternoon,

Dr. F. N. Grannum said that an Association such as the
Barbados Nurses’ Association can only continue to exist

as long as it gives service.

: Service first to the community
in which it exists and then to its members.

The first con-

sideration of any medical institution must be the public,

then itself.

Dr. Grannum who was the
Chairman at the meeting was in-
troduced by Matron Graham who
said that the practice of the Past
Nurse meeting the Present Nurse
is ‘carried on in England.

Dr. Grannum congratulated
Nurse Gibson and all the members
of the Association on another year
of progress and of useful work.
He said that he did not know when
Nurse Gibson first conceived the
idea of the Association but it was
now in its 16th year of service.
During the year of its existence the
Association had striven to serve
the public and it provided for the
community a Nursing Bureau
where members of the public could
obtain the service of a trained
nurse.

Free Nursing Service..

It also provided, with Govern-
ment aid ane public donations, a
free nursing -ervice for members
of the community and undertook
a number of free nursing among
the children of the elementary
schools.

Before Dr. Grannum spoke Past
Nurses visited the rooms of the
Hospital and also saw the quality
of work done ‘there. Then they
were given tea on the lawn op-
posite the Nurses’ Quarters.

All the nurses had some good
word for the exhibition. After
Nurse Gibson had read the annual
report of the Association, Miss N.
Burton, M.B.E., Headmistress of
the St. Michael's Girls' School
spoke to the gathering of Past
Nurses. She said there was a
dire need for good citizenship. in
Barbados. “It is the duty of the
mothers and fathers to train their
children to be good citizens. The
training starts at home and it is
only carried on in the schools, The
schools have been criticised but
the parents have the child for the
first five years completely in their
care and that is the impressionable
age.” '

Miss Burton said that there
were various moves afoot to get
more culture in the island of Bar-
bados, but culture came from
within through gentle speech and
gentle manners.

After Miss Burton had spoken
a pageant showing the nursing
through the ages was performed
by the nurses of the General Hos-
pital, The first Act opened with
the Pre-Christian era showing how
primitive man was in taking care
of the sick.







The second Act dealt with the
Early Christian era. The other
progressed and also medicine
three acts showed how nursing
starting from the Florence Nightin-
gale period.

At the end of the pageant Nurse”
Chandler moved a vote of thanks
and the meeting ended with the
singing of the National Anthem.



Obituary



Mrs. Laura Simnions

The death occurred on Satur-
day, March 29th., of Mrs, Laura
Lorenzo Simmons at her home
“Martindale”, Hastings.

“Grannie Simmons” as she was
affectionately known to a wide
circle of friends had reached the
ripe age of 78 and although she
had been suffering from the ill-
ness to which she eventually suc-
cumbed for the past six months,
yet up to a few days before her
death her indomitable will kept
her active and quite cognisant of
conditions obtaining around her.

Mrs. Simmons was married to
Mr. Wellesley Simmons, organist
and Headmaster of St. Bernard's

Boys’ School, Possessed of an
engaging old world charm, her
contemporaries and even the

younger people could always rely
upon her for a kindly word of
sound advice or cheer.

Hers was a christian disposition
that permeated her entire life and
that left a pleasant effect on those
with whom it came into contact.
Her husband predeceased her
many years ago and she spent
thirteen active years in the U.S.A.
She returned to Barbados and has
made her home at “Martindale”
the home of her only daughter
Mrs. Ercil Simmons-Howell.

She leaves too to mourn her
loss, three grandchildren, Mrs.
Giadys Coppin, Mr. Jack Howell,
and Mr. Alwyn Howell and a sis-
ter Mrs. Rosalie Farnum of New
York, U.S.A,

Her funeral took place at St.
Paul's Church on Sunday last
and her last remains were laid to
rest at the Westbury Cemetery.

The large and_ representative
gathering that witnessed the last
rites bore eloquent testimony of
her popularity with persons in all
walks. of life in the community.



ANGLICAN
ST. MARY'S
HOLY WEEK
Monday, Tuesday 7.15 p.m
and Address. Wednesday 7.15 p.m
tions and Solemn Devotions
MAUNDAY THURSDAY
6 a.m. Solemn Mass Procession to
Altar of Repose. Watch throughout da/
before Altar of Repose 12 noon Inter-
cession for the Sick. 5 p.m. Stations of
the Cross 8 p.m. “From Olivet to
Calvary"—Passion Music by the Choir
GOOD FRIDAY
7.30 a.m. Litany, Matins and Altar
Service; 9.20 a.m. Stations of the Cross
in Church 12 noon—3 p.m. Th
Hours, Conductor: The Vicar Coll
tions for Missions; 6 p.m. Evensong; 7.30
p.m. Lantern Service, Silver Collection
at the door
METHODIST
BETHEL. 11 a.m. and 7 p.m

CHURCH SERVICES |

Stations
Sta



Rev

T. J. Fugley. Holy Communion

DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Mr. I. Blackrpan,
7 p.m. Mr. G. Jones

BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. G,. Brewster
7 p.m. Mr. H. Gilkes.

SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 am. T, JI
Furley, Holy Commurion). 7 p.m. Mr
G. Bascombe

PROVIDENCE: ll a.m. Mr. J. Clarke,
7 pm. Mr. A, St. Hill

VAUXHALL ll am. Mr. P. Bruce
7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant

JAMES STREET: il am. K. E. Tower,
B.A,., B.D. (Broadcast); 7 p.m. Rev
K. E. Tower, B.A., B.D

IAYNES BAY 9.30 a.m. Br. W. St
Hill, 7 p.m. Bro. G. H®rper

WHITEMALL: 7 p.m. Br. G. Perkins.

GULL. MEMORIAL 11 a.m. Bro, F
Moore; 7 p.m. Bro, F. D. Roach

HOLETOWN 8.30 a.m. Mrs. Morris;
7 p.m. Bro. D. Scott

BANK HALL: 9.30 a.m. Bro. J, A.
Griffith; 7 p.m. Miss G. Oxley.

SPEIGHTSTOWN 1l a.m. Bro. G

Marville; 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence
SELAH: 9.30 a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence
BETHESDA: 11 a.m. Rev. F. Law-

rence (Holy Week Service Monday

Thureday).
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning
Service, Preacher; Rev. E. E. New, (fo.-
lowed by Holy Communion.) 7 p.m.
Evening, Service, Preacher: Rev. E. E
New, (followed by Holy Communion)

COLLYMOKE ROCK A_M.E,

CHURCH
11 a.m. Divine Worship, 3.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 7.15 p.m. Holy Commun-
ion. Three Hours Service on Good Fri~
day beginning at 12 noon Minister:
Rev. E. A. Gilkes
ST MeGINLEY'S
GREEK ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL
COUNTRY ROAD
11 a.m. Ordination of a Deacon, 3
Consecration of a Suffragan Bishop
Admission by Tickets only,
at the Presbytery or from Acting Suffra-
gan Bishop Hinkson, O.H_ P
Monday 7th April 1952
Synod begins at 7 p.m

Holy lasting

for five days. Celebrant: His Eminence
Archbishop Jack Deacon: The Suffra-
Assistant: Rev Donald

gan perce:
Sarjeant.
Taylor

Attendant: Sub-deacon 5S
SALVATION ARMY
SPEIGHTSTOWN

Holiness Meeting, conducted
D. Dadd; 3 p.m, Com-

11 a.m
by Brigadier O

pm. |

Will Exist

Training
ducted
(Assistant Iastor) and Mrs. Olga Browne



obtainable |

Free Admission to the public. |

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, |

Preacher: Brigadier O. D. Dadd
CARLTON
1l a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, conducted by Brigadier |




O. D. Dadd; 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting, |
Preacher: Captain E. Bourne
BRIDGETOWN, CENTRAL
ll a.m. Holiness Meeting p.m, Com- |

pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.
Preacher: Major M. Smith
WELLINGTON STPEERT
11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Com-
pany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting

Preacher: Sr. Major T. Gibbs
an

pany Meeting
Preache

pany Meeting, 7 p.m
Preacher: Sr

THE 8T

a.m
Evensong and Sermon, Preacher for both





CHRISTIAN SCiENCE :
Bridgetown,
SUNDAYS li a.m
WEDNESDAYS 6 p.m
includes Testimonies of Christian Seience
Healing f

Subject of Lesson-Sermon
Golden Text:
multitude

thou God

The following Citations are included in |
the Lesson-
beginning was
made by
was not

Science and
Seriptures,
Everything good or worthy, God made.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1952















=.
OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING | |
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS |

BUT

















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PAGE 1

r PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, APRI1. , MU Brightly Fades The Don The K e Way IIY O. S. COPPl\ > hance of hit career, has net the means of retauatavsn. >, ho pointed out only will always bring feeling ink* ustrutians had led a aide the game, and in shewing their Perhaps It win for me thiii I h,iv<< rer-;' %  BrighlU Fade* The Dun" by J. H Ftneloion (i3.no Advocate Static! jgh it hah been in cftMlanon for aomo time now. 1 consider myself fortunate in the respect that now that I am reliving the historic Australian lour to England in 1948 so vividly described In these pages that at the same time I am afforded an inm-'uuiiflv n-tro'pccin the International commitments of England. Australia and the Wett Indies since that tune and am able to rvl.it %  • thistrict with what has taker, place subsequently. For .xamplc in the 1P48 tour It wos abundantly proven Mist England had no mutt to the' sustained speed attack of Lndwall. Miller. Johnston primal *lv and Loxton on occasions. W.I. Tour Succcssfnl The West Indies toured EngUnd lnce that tfc although their record was not ,••> brilliant as that of the Australians yet it was an eminently successful one and on the strrnifh of the uulguutduix successes gained on this tour the West Indies were unanimously conceded the right to challenge Australia for world cricket supremacy. The M.CC. hnve gone to Australia snee U Austra'ia have established IM supremacy thouth DO) as handsomely and then the Wast Indie" got their chance of chance* meeting Anttrallt m 1951—52 .mlflcan* too that Flnglcton's opinion expressed at the end of the 1948 tour was at true of the M.CC. as It was of the West Indies—no answer to bumpers with bumper* %  > %  --(feed wl'h speed—and to the West Ind'es too went down to defeat It Is with tfae advantage of this added experience since the 1948 tour that I am able to read Mr. Plnglelon's Impressions and relate them to important event! which have t.ik<*n place in International crleket circles since that time. "Brightly Fades The Don" It not merely another of thoe Hfrket publications reads chiefly bccnue of a mixture of a love of the tuhiect and a desire for harmless relaxation. Highly i'r..i*.-l On the contrary it is written by Mr. FingLton. a well-known Test cricketer himself and an established author. Hit Cricket Crisis" published In 1048 received the highest praise from o great matter in the art of wilting on cricket. Mr Neville Cardut praised the book, botti for the manrer of writing and for the con'r,bution to the cricketers librarySir Nortnen Blrkett in his •reward to "Brightly Fades The Don" ref-re to Mr. Cardu*' pruise Atlantic Voyage Begins With fresh stores on boerd ur SSr, baa wrirS' in 1W1 (lrr W {&>*> w Australian crowds had done In L >mnu a Wanderer sailed out ol ; r>2J?r!.rr2!li J* lU %  * Armttrong was 41 in the Jardlng-Larwood taur. I tag port one week later. She was nw opinton^^f^natinf rtory of M ^^ ^ wwn ^ u m**fcm*i ihVhmdM hhu—S-r "" write* "Bradman's acccp*how their displeasure and should tone1"<* mllet of ocean away %  ^ %  T^lrrnV^ffMlssg U u "' lh -E"l ** Bln rn ** nl no hav tum coerced from so „, W e route we would lake. The mind and fcriifrnaSnaticl* the ,haI ,n hU '*•** year ha was doing by the threat of NotUngbi trip iwd begun by far the p. turr of the areetDon Brad<**" 1 P ,l n the. deeds of. hit ham losing a Teat or by Introlonget we bad ever attempted man savin* hie last farewell tt* ""raculoua youth. Bradman himducing the Auatrallan war effort. Onboard wc h„d sufficient pror .-nous groundt^KsrE f*JJ ^V,*, ^"W^J "^ .^T "^"S £t Stofor ninety dtyt. km h, had nten to fame and had *^_T* *^ l .. b y ..^^..?i, %  £ ^""f^**!* can b *_. n _ c ff?: l*t that me v uy *ac *ai He Is never allowed the Australian method of attackll we would be auie u. oe tU^andanv latitude. Bradman's deeds of ing Huttnn, particularly, mmi e a on th "**. for much longei vouth were such that he could drew the obvious parallel. Moat f 0 0 wc w" 1 *** 1 < .ht ; The rood not hope to surpass them. He of the Australian batsmen in the hi her lockers included 350 Una ot ould rain no more but. Indeed. Jardlne-Larwood tour took exvaried 'tuflt, tlxty pounds 01 lood to lose much. caption to the principle of turnpotatoe*. twenty pounds of prellnmmond In hta last days in ing the other cheek and wanted aerved U-ef tUak and J Spanisi. ';Xtfv"7or'7^r*in' M th* Australia, was a tad. a tragically retaliation but Woodfull stood ham. Forty-nine gaUons of fiew. WordTtf Si? Itnriium aH *"* % %  • • once-famous firm In cricket at in all things, water was stored In nine separate player fallen on evil days The one tide must compete against the lank* d nd in bottles jammed In game civet and the game takes other on equal terms and methods odd corners and crajim** r the mlng to England must be adopted to meet a parboat. in 1948 Ttradman knew titular state of affairs. Finally Due smith the sailed on towards that he was risking hit reputaon the barracking angle, one th* trade-wind belt which at that tion and what was expected of should observe thai the principle ume of year has Its northern him. The name of cricket had of freedom of expression must um < t near the cape Verde Islands nothlnc more to give Bradman. head good In all places. The-.winds appeared lust He had scaled the heights; he In his book Mr. Flngleton wn *,Te our nautical books said they H .every sweemess It had answer, the outgone—'Why did 4tu .uld be and after six day, at tea He must have thought England'fall to sadly? How does 17 n and tru i v n hem l Austmlla Bradman stand In comparison .„. ^ nm JL. ,„ „nii A, dedslor. to wim the giant, of the pastrWhat f r S. P Xt1uS Dow f^m*., n^ .n tK. ^.^UMIU. .,hi n h lr * Wind Sailing. 1JOW.1 nstrued brated "company of the f!*Sf** li moniila—Grace and Trumper. „" n, ,S II"111* end Macartney. Honest and .lust I a refreshing ring of hi % %  *' of purpose and JusttOS Mr. Flngleton's book and 1 his foreward. since I author's efforts than this:— nf all this he made hit to ttttlngiv end are the characteristics which .. Down cam* %  ould have uttered of his ng career the sentiment* rote In 1820 cricketer and a great captain. Overhaul Seeded spinnakers. T h e t e tplnnakers. though the two of them have a combined area of much leas th bjwgsxa m 1820 And one final quotation give. 1^'^ S^aTh? rSaTT, Now more than ever seems a „ ituii-hi i n u, hi. /-undid artore,h olhCT u0s i c,n b rl 8 f ci r it rich to di*-. SauSrS the lour "^ actually steer the ship themselves lour:"U would be wrong for Australian touring during This made it much easier for the crew because from then on it w English criclget' nfeason to cotinot necessary IT someone to be aider that he is qualified to 'wn8 all the lime. express dogmatic opinions on attera. There U so much Bolh Slept At Night Once the yacht was dear of the BE FORK BIYMA1* A REFRIGERATOR C03iE f.V 4.V11 SEE TIME — LIGHTFOOT DELUXE MODEL f iMiMl.h BRADMAN. i. wiitleu with the kno' Of To cease upon the midnlfht ith no pain. O CIotc Fielding Mr. Kmglctoii has been ver> unparhaj ui hu book. For example he doe. not try to justify ibe very close fielding of Barnes to background to English cricket bu-y shipping lanes on the east sinsn. that it cannot be quickly aattrnltide of the Atlantic we stopped Of the first M.CC match he lated. but of one thing I am conkeeping a look-out all the time wntet that Barnes ut short leg vlnced There must be a pretty and both went to sleep at nights. lidded almost In the batsman's sudden revision of idea, and As the yacht sailed herself along pocks*. That was the closest he sytrtemt because It must be she steadily got further and \ had ever teen any fieldsman on apparent to all that English further south until near the lalittie leg side. He had seen Richcricket can do with a good overtude of Barbados we found the .-irdson Held two yards, two yards haul—and In that opinion I have sunny pale blue skies and clean l-dntiid point to Gnmmett but tried to take Into full account tufts of cloud as you have here ledge of one who bat himself the risk on the leg side la conthe distressing times the Home It got much warmer too and very be.u in the middle' on great sulerable Country has known In the past toon we were wearing no clothes occus*on.s with alt that phraso Mr. singleton continues "I decade at all or perhaps lust a pair of Implies It is full of insight and wrote In my little note-book "It is against thlt backdrop of short, or underpants when v. • : ^*nduig. replete with there and then that some day the Ehgllnh standard that one went on deck. ,l knowledge—the nature 11, %  nes would collect something mnM try to assess the strength Day followed day. one much wicket the disposition of In that position which he of Bradman's twentieth Australian (he same as the other. We were %  he field, Ibe waources of the wouldn't like and that came true team. In one regard I think It completely cut off from the world bowLltii: the quality of the batsin earnest at Manchester when ranked superior to all other ashore It did not matter to u. inanship. the elements of CapPollard laid turn low, Australian teams, and that was whether it was Saturday or WedLurc-y, the tinlineaart and the if the batsman allows it, such In it. capacity to bat. on good nesday because there were no strengths, and all that make, up %  iield-inan does have an inlimlpitches down to number nine, afflces for us to attend in the i mating htory of a memrhitory effect, and I think Barnes, The tricky pitch at Bradford morning, no newspapers to buy lour. It it a record uf the in this position, was of great showed some In ah indifferent and no places to visit at night. matches played, the great figures value In a nuisance capacity light and that U why 1 qualify There was^Jutt^ the sunny sky I MR UOOIt I.IN k .Mill '2 KI..S HOSIS AT T1IK I.H.'HTKT Ol Ml WC9W IMUNII MIIIAIS AMI tl\\. MU iinnniiMs used by London's Leading Ifoteis GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPUES



PAGE 1

PACK Kir.m BARBADOS Sa> AlMXtfTE t T --f---__.J Suiid:i>. April li, U52 SUNDAY ADVOCATE ••I SHAY. APRIL , 1152 FISH CO-OPERATIVE THE suggestion made by a correspondent in Thursday's Advocate that the "only salvation for the poor consumer is more Government cuntrul* not less," is tv, icai of the pathetic fallacy which exists on the subject of controls. But it is more than that. It reflect* the mentality of those who believe that unless the government fixes a maximum price the consumer will be overcharged. Overlooking the poor opinion which the consumer whe accepts this viewpoint must have of the producer or in this case of the fisherman, let us examine this contention. If it is conceded that the object ol controls is to protect the consumer and to ensure for the producer a minimum return for his labour then the argument that controls benefit the consumer looks unassailable; but Is it? In the first place controls very often benefit indirectly the producer at the expense of the consumer. Because the producer has no incentive to produce more than will obtain for him what he hopes to gain as a result of a guaranteed control price. The producer in other words has no incentive to produce great quantities because if he does the control system breaks down and the price of his produce falls. Recent heavy catches of fish illustrate this point. The fisherman hopes to benefit to the ex'ent of the control price but the public whenever it sees a glut of fish refuses to pay and the price is automatically forced down, and the control system is laughed at by the very people who turn to it for protection when there are shortages of fish. It requires no great understanding to realise then that what really keeps prices down is plenty. And what keeps them up is scarcity. Let us pursue further this investigation into the present fishing industry of Barbados. The Fishery Officer has proved by methods of research not available to Dr. Brown when he made his pessimistic observations about the quantities of fish available in Barbadian waters that the island's fisheries can be exploited for our benefit and that we have sufficient fish to meet our own requirements and allow for export. Further he has by patient study discovered when are the most profitable times for liahtng. His conclusions are that the quantities of fish caught off Barbados could be doubled if only fishing was scientifically conducted instead of as at present just carried on to suit the fishermen. The very first action to be taken is to change the hours at which fishing now takes place. This means that fishing boats would return ashore after nightfall. It means therefore that the optimum hours for fishing can only be worked when sharpfreeze refrigerating chambers have been installed. Tests have been made by the fisheries officer which prove that iiah can be kept in a sharp freeze chamber complete as they were caught for periods exceeding kwo wii'ks at a time. If sharp-freeze methods could be adopted, all fish on reaching shore would be taken to a central sharp-freeze and would be sold the following day or even weeks after to distributing agencies, many of which would be equipped with deep freeze facilities. To reorganise Barbadian fisheries on this pattern would require the enforcement of discipline so severe that it may be doubted whether it would succeed in practise. But it would result in maximum catches, would reduce the prices paid by the consumer for ffath and would raise the living standards of those engaged in the fishing industry. While a huge sharp-freeze refrigerated chamber is the ultimate objective of the fishing industry a beginning could be made now to improve the present system by the introduction of a co-operative fishing and marketing agency. If everv boat owner in the fishing industry could be persuaded to join an association which was formed with the intention of Selling lish at a reasonable price to the consumer and at a fair profit to the fisherman the fishing industry would cease to be a competitive cut-throat industry and would become an industry whose only objective would be to catch the greatest possible number of fish to sell at the lowest possible price consonant with a fair profit for the bshernun. A properly organised central committee of management elected by members of the Fishing Boat Owners Association on the principle of 'one member one vote would then be made responsible for the marketing and distribution of all fishing boat catches. Such an organisation would give all fishermen an interest not only in the catching of the fish but in its marketing. Their hours of work would be lessened and they would have no incentive to return ashore before they had secured optimum catches. When they did return they would find instead of as at present a collection of hawkers waiting to bid for then catches an insulated and ice-packed van ready to conduct the hulk of their catches surplus to local requirements to the %  harp-freeze chamber, or pending its completion to commercial deeD freeze chambers. The central committee of management would be responsible for the erection at all fishing boat centres of simple sheds equipped with deep-freeze facilities (where necessary) and from which all local area sales would be made. The central committee of management would assist fishermen with loans to purchase nets, repair and mechanise boats, and would disseminate knowledge in co-operation with the Fisheries Officer. The price at which fish would be sold would vary' with the seasons and would be fixed by the central committee of management who would retain a small ceea on all gales from which their working expenses and reserve 'funds would accumulate. The Central Committee of Management would also be responsible for arranging the sale of all fish catches surplus to local requirements to importers in other countries. It would also be their duty to make a study of local demands and ascertain how far it would be practical to educate the local fish eating public in an effort to standardise their fish requirements. It is the opinion of the Fisheries Officer for instance that three types of flying fish consumers exist in Barbados. One section of the public wants their fish complete with head tail eyes and inside* Another section wants their fish complete with heads but with entrails removed. A third and minority section requires their fish boned and cleaned and without heads, ready fur cooking. Clearly the existence of three consumer types complicate the central problem of fish storage. If fish arc to be stored complete they must be stored in sharp-freeze refrigerated chambers. This is a very expensive procedure. • If fish are to be stored with their entrails removed they can be kept for several days in deep-freeze chambers. Already there is demand from commercial organisations for fish in this condition but because no entrails are removed by fishermen from the time of catching to the return of the fishing boats ashore the commercial firms demands are not supplied. The third section of the public cannot be served unless the distributor is allowed to make a charge for this service. This Is impossible under a system of price control as enforced at present. There is no denying the fact that the scheme as outlined above would effectively reduce the price of fish to the consumer. The present system of controls is a negative action which keeps the price of fish at an artificial level based on inadequate catches (except at certain limited intervals of glut) .and gives the fishermen just enough return to remove from them all incentive to do better. If, as Mr. Wiles contends, our supplies of fish are greater than Dr. Brown supposed them to be we must exploit them in the interests of the consumers, the fishermen and the whole community. Cane Loe DURING 1951 there were 220 cane fires in Barbados during which 1,451% acres of canes were burnL Commenting on this fact on Sunday, February 10 this newspaper stated that this was a record of which Barbados ought to bo ashamed. At that time it was noted that only 73'i acres had been destroyed in January 1952 as compared with 94^ acres in January 1951. Since January however cane fires have increased and by the end of March totalled 187. So extensive have these fires been this year that already by the end of March. 1,577 acres of ripe canes, 1544 acres of young canes and 23*4 acres of ratoons have been burnt. This means that despite the smaller number of fires (187 as compared with 220), a greater number of acres has been destroyed by fire in the three months ending March 1952 than during the whole year of 1951. This is disgraceful. In a letter dated 12th February 1952 a correspondent commenting on the Advocate editorial of Sunday 10th February listed four cardinal losses which result from cane fires. The first was loss of trash and grass which are essential for to-day's method of cultivation. The second was loss of humus The third was loss of sugar output if canes are not reaped and ground immediately after the fire. And the fourth loss was the retarding of young canes growth which affects the following year crop. The correspondent stressed the need for instructing labourers that these four losses affected them because the sugar output of the industry is reduced by fires and labourers share in the profits of the industry by way of the Production Bonus. I .ess than two months have passed since these warnings were given and what has happened? Barbados has had a record crop of curie tires? Instruction must bo given. The correspondent also suggested that planters should institute a fire watching system which would cost each plantation about $100 a crop. It is difficult to believe that this has been done. The record crop of fires suggests greater lack of precautions than ever. The correspondent also supported a sugUon made in this newspaper on SundayFebruary 10, 1952 that planters should pay workers 20 cents less per ton for cutting burnt canes and that the money saved in this way should be paid into a Labour Housing Fund. He concluded with the hope that these suggestions would be brought to the attention of those persons who have the power to put them into effect, and asked that a concerted effort should be made in dealing with this important matter. Instead, his appeal and the appeal of this newspaper of February 10. 1952 met with no response and to-day we can only ask whether instruction and action would not have been better and would not have Increased our sugar output now reduced by a record number of acres burnt? Silting On The Fence I T is reported that, it Searox Heath. Flint well, Kent, country rlub of the Soviet diplomats, thrr entertain each other at week-ends with the balalaika and charade* Here II a charade the? might do mner of the 19th cer.tury Russian dramatists. CAST Natasha and Olffs lga loves Iran OLga hates Natasha because Natasha loves Ivan. Ivan hates both of them. Uncle Vanya hates them all. The Village Idiot hates everybody, everywhere NATASHA: The snow is Hill falling %  OLGA: I hate the snow It is alwp; %  falling. NATASHA: Not In the summer time. OLGA: Do you want to drive me mad with your Imbecile remarks" NATASHA: Yes (E'Wrr Ivan I IVAN. The snow is still falling. OLGA: How I love the snow NATASHA: It is so beavXtful OCGA The snow is always lallinIVAN Not In the summer time OLGA: Oh. how true. Bow simple, but how trmNATASHA. Only the greatest minds can say wonderful things tike that. OLGA. Ivan you should have been a writer I always said wo. NATASHA: I said it first. ( Enter Uncle VSnua.f UNCLE VANYA: The snow Is still falling. NATHANIEL Gl'BBINSl IVAN: The snow Is always falling rVCI.E VANYA. Not In the time. OLGA What a stupid remark. NATASHA: Uncle Vanya Is so tc-di'K. i Villon.Idiot.) V1I.LACK IDIOT. The snow Is St.11 falling THE OTHERS (shouting): The snw Is always falling. VILLAGE IDIOT (shouUng back). Not in the summer lime. OLOA and NATASHA (together ): I can't bear this any UNCLE VANYA: It Is intolerable IVAN; Lets shoot nomcbodv. OLGA: Shoot me before I go mad. NATASHA Me first. IVAN I*t me do it. I hate them both. UNCLE VANYA: No. Let me. I hate you all. Then I can shoot VILLAGE IDIOT: Let me do it. I hate everybody. (Hishoofs (he lot.) VIM-AGE IDIOT: They are all dead and I am alive. Vcj they oiled me an Idiot. Boy Chases Girl %  Can a man be sincere who swears he has fallen In love at first glimpse of me and pursues) me madly before he knows anything about me?" W HAT a tiresome, ungrateful Kirl you must be. dear Instead of wasting the time at busy editors asking them silly questions, you ought to consider yourself lucky that anybody Is chasing you 0 these unromantic days. For where are the men who purMM women madly now" Where are the young Lochlnvart who would snatch a uirl Bran her father's house in the middle of her bridal feast to sa\'e her from marriage to "a laggard In love and a dastard In war?" You will not find them on the s.age or screen except in a costume piece or. occasionally, in some dirty little melodrama In which romance plays no part. If vou found them In real life they would probably end up in the police court. Moreover, I think you might have given less fortunate girl Mine detail* of the chase. For instance, Is It snarling and priaslUvel Does he pounce on you in the street, grab you by the hair and drag you. gswaU n e Into the nearest milk bar? Or Is it a happy-go-lucky pursuit like Harpu Marx chasing a blonde through a sat in Hollywood ? All the same, you may have mistaken his motive. A plain girl I knew was once chased by a determined young man for weeks on end. Wnsn hi called, she locked herself in her room. Her father slammed the Croat door in his face. If she met him in the street, she Jumped into a 'axi. When ho cornered her. at last, it turned out that she had borrowed his cigarette lightc, at their first meeting. if* only uxinied it back. L.E.S. Island Fortress Barbados has always been British. No foreign flag ha-, ever flown over the island. These are facts which everyone learns first about Barbados. But how many people have given more than a passing thought to these strange fact* or asked the reason why Barbados shculd have escaped the fate of Martinique, Guadeloupe the Saints, St. Lucia. St. Vincent, Trinidad. Tobago, Jamaica, the Virgin Islands and nearly every other West Indian island occupied by European powers? What was the reason? Did Barbados bear a charmed life or did its mi'it >>v defence make It impregnable? The Went Indian Alia* o. 1775 published by the late Thomas Jcfferys. Geographer to the King provides the most likely answer to these questions. "Nature" says the author "has almost entirely surrounded it (Barbados) with rocks ami where these are wanting they have built forts which in gome aort make this Island inaccesible." A map in ttto same atlas, surveyed by William Mayo and By GEORGE Hl'NTC adjoining the town. This jetty which i< on the East side Is defended by an octagonal fort which has eight or ten openings. That of the west is also defended by a fort which has twelve pieces of cannon that sweep the roadsteads at the entrance to the port. The pier opposite the Governor's country house hardly two leagues from the town "is d e fended by a battery a merlons with six pieces of cannon, guards and an entrenchment." In Jamestown the observant father noted that the anchorage was protected by two batteries: one on the cost a barbette with twenty six pieces of heavy cannon, and one on the west with ten pieces. Half of the way from the governor's house at Jamestown "there is a very long entrenchment along the coast: It la stonework and very necessary in this place because the cays are aufncienUy covered with water to permit shallops and other flat bottomed boats to make a landing." Halfway beJamestown and Spiketon engraved and improved by t h 0 French vbiloi Thomas Jefferys geographer to the King lists these forts which occur at close intervals from Maycotks to Kendall. ID order they are Maycocki, Half Moon, Ruperts, Six Men, Sunderlands. Haywoods. Orange. Coconut. Denmark, Margarets. Clarendon. Queens, V.dlant Rovalist, Yalcht, HallKontal-elle. James, WUlimghby, L Charles, Maxwell, OlstiiU. Hoopers and Kendals. Twenty live forts extending from the North to the South of an Island whose total length is twenty one miles! And how ware these forts equipped? Pet* Lobat who visited Balbados In September 1700 asjst who considered that the Frenaffi could gets control of the island if they mustered an army of between four and five thousand Creoles and Flibusiicui and a fleet of 12 war ships, has recorded details of several forts Describing the east point of Carlisle Bay "which Is almost entirely surrounded by a reaf at the level of the water" ha notes that on this point thega stands "a battery a merlons enclosed after the style of a large fortreat where I counted thirty pieces of cannon which according to appearances are of large calibre in order to defend the bayOn the west point of the bav he noted "n battery a barbell'completely open on the land side with eight large cannons which sweep the roadstead.* UcMdcs the battery of thirty cannons there is another with i o t li a m.-rIon fort with three pieces and an entrenchment on either side. At Spcightslown the two points which form the bay are defended by batteries a barbefJe; the East battery has six teen cannons and the West twelve. About three leagues from Speightstown in a colony of Oimondi, Franco refugees, Pere Labal nottery a merlons with eight On the way back to Spei^htstown he notices a landing wharf defended by a Merlon fortification with three pieces. On Sunday 12 September 1700 Pert Labat witnessed a review of the island's cavalry and infantry. 'There were four companies of cavalry of 100 to 120 men each... the officers wore red tunics with thick gold braid and white feathers. The infantry was also drawn up in lour companies and numbered in all a little more than two hundred men very well armed, but who only seemed to be the servants of the horsemen." These troops Father Labat was quick to note were not mllitio. They were all drawn from regular serving regiments. Father Labat was told that there were six cavalry regiments in the island ut the lime comprising almost 3000 men and ten infantry regiments comprising about 5000 men. Even when the vessel watt sailing out of Carlisle Bay this observant military priest was noting that two anchorages behind the east point of CarUalfl Bay were defended by two batteries, one on the east jrith six — _.. _._ jast wi Steves a barbette. bctwegO. .cannons rt barbette and fae other the point and the Jetty forming! a merlons with on1\ f .i the sfert which is opposite and cannons. Apparently Father Labat turned this knowledge to good account for ho notes that an expedition was ready to go to Barbados in 1702 with a squadron of flibujtiers and Creoles but was diverted Instead to Vigo. He was confident that but for their change of plans Barbados would aa*s changed hands in that year, but his hope expressed In the comment "patience, what Is put off is not perhaps lost" was never realised and as everybody knows Barbados has never changed hands. The reason is not far to seek. Its natural defences and its fortifications made It almost Inaccessible. And the author of the West Indian Atlas seventy five years after Father Labat's visit BOtitl that the island then had six regiments of infantry three of cavalry and one troop of guards, all stout men and well disciplined. "There is" he explains "a law whose utility is equal to Its prudence, which assigns to every servant nt the expiration of his time a little estate of three four or five acres: It 1* what constitutes a yeomanry. This agrarian law has always rendered its militia one of th< most respected in the We i hidies." Father Labat's Impression was that the poor Irish whr formed the bulk of the island'? volunteers would turn against Ihcir masters in the event of ar Invasion but this agrarian law seems to have been incentive enough for the servants to Identify the Island's defence with Iheir own Interests. Thi ancient cannons which still car be seen In several parts of the island, the names of many o' the forts and the Barbados Volunteer Force are still reminders that Barbados did not remam ever British by a freak o.' history but that its almost im pregnable forts and its armed forces protected this islam from the beginning until comparatively modern times. When this century opened Queens House was still thi House of the General Commanding the island's troops. The antiquity of the island'i Armed Forces may be appreciated by the state of the defences existing in April 185C when Richard Ligon left th< island. At that time the In. habitants had built three forts and were able to muster "ter thousand foot as good men antes resouite as any in the world and a thousand good Horse." Only twenty three years had passed since Barbados was colonised. No one should be surpriscc* that the only foreign troopever to subdue the island wer< the British forces sent by thi English dictator Oliver Cromwell. But nobody else has evei succeeded and the reason surely is that until recent year; Barbados was an island forties Our Readers Say: Simple Language ToJht Kditor. the Advocate. SIR—.1 was richly entertained by the reiwrt on the meeting <.f the Regional Economic Commit'" which *..., hold recently at Hayings House This paragraph especially held my attention : li .irecognized, moreovc that the present almost worldwide inflationary situation would greatly Increase the cost of construction and equipment, and together with the difficulties of currency movements, added coolidenbfy to the problem* associated with the establishment of new industries in regions locking an industrial tradition. In all these circumstances, it was deemed desirable that governments should accept responsibility for definite and constructive m— u re a to assist industrialismtlon, in addition to playing thr-r part in the provision M eaaary capital and fiscal Indjuci ments. The Conference m a d recommend;-tions for the. of the psychological and lint utional fiamewcrk necessary for the acceleration of Industrial activity These include propotaji for government machinery for tho Implementation of industrial programmes; the mobilization of local resources and the attraction of tariffs more sympathetic to industrial development improvement in labour efficiency; investigation o! potential opportuni. ties." DoubUeas there to some hidden meaning behind this mass of verbiage successfully concealed. Do not the members of the R.BC. read their bibles* In contrast to this "double-talk", that simple and beautiful sentence springs to ihe mind:* 1 Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: thev toll not neither do they spin." Perhaps if the R.E.C. L-ould have got at it beforehand and converted it into official Jaryon, it would have appeared in Holy Writ something like this ; "It is the concensus of enlightened public opinion, ascertained as the result of a recent nationSri %  !# survey, that attention shoul 1 be forussed. before it is too late, upon the quantitative aspects of employment among the genius longlnorum" It has been rumoured that there U a widespread lack of activity in this group. Expert opinion points out that statistics support the view that not oqte ,, then total absence of cntrepreneurshir in the group under consideration but that its proletariat bear the uneviBble reputation of havln registered an inordinately high parcentafl of absenteeism due either to habitual malingering or what Is more to be apprehended. to an alarming lark of lntcrcs" in gainful employment The in ber of man-hours lost from production by this rroup. whose productivity per head has now reached the irreducible minimum, poses a problem of national li portance which should impinge with peculiar force upon the consciousness of every thihkins member of the COBUIK: galvanize him into action if the catastrophic consequences, which economic laws teach us are Inevitably attendant upon a lack of adaptability to factory conditions and habits of wv be avoided in th> public weal." How A. P Herbert would delight in the prose style of those leaders of Wsst Indian thought! Yours, etc U A. LYNCH. Playing Cards from 60c. Patience Cards per set 72c. CANASTA SETS ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & The Village, Balmoral Gap STOCK-UP onfkese III %  fri/inlcr.' Galvanized Rouii't IJ.IIII, (14" to 28") Also available in Oval Shape Galvanized Buckels Galvanized Corrugated Sheets 28 It 30 GaUKO Available in 8, 7 It 8ft. lengths Phonr 4472 C. S. Pitcher & Co. For interior and exterior work where a fine finish is required USE LACOLINE r\ti ne-fd ^^ Trade Mark DA COSTA & CO., LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. The law requires that all workmen, as defined hy the Workmen's Compensation Act, 1943, shall be insured. Allow us to issue you with, A WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION INSURANCE POLICY that will give you full cover and protection. For information and advice, consult the Agents:— DA COSTA & CO. LTD. would say it's SMOOTH I would say it's MATURED In alhrr irortls u-v all sau 3 YEAR OLD GODDARDS i.in.n mi vin RUM g§ EXIEI.I.KXT



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PAGE -.l\ M MIAY ADVOi -1 SHAY, APRIL C, 1932 The Truth in Your Horoscope M Ilk* to KHOW -hat IM %  Mn tttOleaf* far you ? Would >ou la • I i> i-.l frm tha .kill i>f Pundit Tabora, I India • %  fassotia Aatroloas-r. wha b %  aaSSri t %  fam has bulll yp ai MM ..un | ractlral xavico com BOOBourn vita gg ROMANCE IS UPSETTING A FOREIBH OFFICE IDEA Lach diploma' 9 make such nice wives What's Cooking In The Kitchen • %  s ore plentiful. Have you ever tried a tomato sufHe? Tomato Stifle %  M acr... I in Bill..!. i*oatal Order for ataUnnary. Iriti-nomali and other inlr>lin* lltrralur* You will i antarrd a| tha remarkable act-un* %  l mi alKlrmrnU about jou and lour .it.if. wma now aa inn u, be tvadw aialn Add nan I'UNIIIT !>.p IIJ-D.. I'auM Forlan ->tr*t. Bombay M. fculU. Pgatsfa W lr-Sta JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS May mejn kidnmy trouble A (unition o( the kidneys ia to rluoinalr liaiinf u! impurities I tool d>e system. .( the kidneys jrow sluggish, tlsrseimpuriues accumulate and settle *nd olten become a MUM of pain in faints and muscles. The way to tackle the trouble ia to help the kfncs. I h.- should tw toned up with De Witts Pills the mediana made specially ( ,his puj-poae. D< Wilt's Pill* hare a toothing, snd ant i ftcpttc acboa oq th* kKlnrys that bungs utsan bark to perform then natural function properly. 4 Thia areU• tried ntedwine is sold all over le world and we base many etters from sufferers telling of relief gained, alter yeaus ol mflrri-nr. by Ukmg De Witt's Pills. Try them yoor trouble. Goto your chemist and supply today. TALCUM I OUR GUARANTEE De Witt's PilH manufactured unilcr Strictly byeieruc conditions and the ingredients conform to ngid standarda of purity. DE WITTS PILLS 'or Kidney and Bladder Tr 0u b'< i Quick relief from Colds, Coughs Sore Throats Bronchitis Sister says: In extra large jars and handy tmi I CeUJs. C*-i>. i MOx.tU Rat At the first iign of i cold or co^h, rub Thermogcne Rub on your chest, th-oar. and back. Feel Us penetrating warmth dolnj you good, stimulating your circ'.'iiion. dispersing congestion! Brcathc-in its pleasant medicated vapour to soothe sore lungs and throat, disperse stuffiness, and case your breathing! Atto itlr a teaspoonlul of the Rub Into a |ug of Sot water and Inhale the steam. Relieve muscular aches and pains by rubbing in Thermogcne Rub where the pain is. So healing! So soothing! Try It — ycu will say that Thermogcne Medicated Rub ll a real blessing! Obtainable from all good stores and chemists Be prepared — get some Thermogene Medicated Rub toddy! THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB For Colds and Coughs, Aches and Pains by WILLIAM TOWNSHEND P RETTY Joan Burbidgc. one <>i Britain's two leading women diplomats, niarriad in New Delhi and — because .Inn is :i %  narriflfte bar -niul leave Mir Foreign Sai Ice. Mi v. Burbldge is Fun' Si lary lo the High CjmmlsMutier i:i Inrli.i Although only 32. *he needed thrc1 more pRunoUfH become Britain's first ;.mb.issadre.J -t Tllfe For.-un 00M uU-riurDed diplomats ar? so attractive th.\" II them too fast All their trainaig and I b'lnt t I Miss Burbldge Mil be the [ Mxth to resign bec.i marrtantoi %  third ol the tuial of 18 recrulK'H tne Foreign 8r>mcr was opened to women as a permanent career in 19(8 And "mre mav N l-av.nf ..%  same reaton whm tn* n a*-av io the afar onl] %  a cost 'o Hi" S.:r it ':iso a nead> Frre:i(n Beere'ary Mi. Bev;n snapped the Fore;fn 001 tii re au .HI; with blue-eyed blonde Itis* Monica Milne, the first tfirl appointed under the new regulation An Oxford MA. and daughter of a London surgeon. Miss Milne hd already been posted to %  Ington in September 1946 us Second Secretary when she fell in love. In a few months she wa* the wife of Mr. J H Brltton. a Bristol Industrialist. A second girl met her future hust D'Abernon. the elaborate country mai. for important State jobs were tested until 11*50, when it WM clond baeauae It was too costly. She resigned the day she was admitted to the Foreign Banrln Miss Katherine du Boulay. charming Oxford graduate, resigned her .uploni.itic post at Geneva to marry Mr. Michael Stewart, a First Secretary, She had been In the service only a year and a half. Another Foreign Office "glamour girl" Miss Cicely Ludlam, Oxford graduate In modern languages—had served in Belgrade as a Third Se,-returv whan, back in London, she met Mr. Christopher HOybew, II Foreign Office Under-Secretory and the nu-st •liglble baehelor," They wi i. marrtad in August 1M9 utter u whirlwind wooing < %  only nine days. Mr. Mayhcnv said yesterday "Hora mi I comt Britain's first iiiiibastadress. but sinthrew away her career to become my wife. If women dlplomaii fall us easily ns that it shows how precarious is the Foreign Office hold over them." JL 1WINTV SKVKN YEAR lion of th,!,,„: | "Any member ^ OLD Mrs UOTbtW, .DOW Of U ''SmStobL the mother of l • %  rven-moiithmobile, able to be sent anvwhem "A girl's abroad a( im ,,„„. ,, IS ; ttUr J! %  %  % %  % % %  i". i. %  I ...r ; n would wish to .IHV wnh her husband." old son. commented: horizons arc broadened I % %  enjoys a wider social life, so ahe should normally meet more men from whom lo choose a husband. I was content to resign. It would take a super-woman to run Foreign Service Job, and a family, but diplom.it should be allow • WHAT of the loive so fir resisted mar' %  tn husband *!*" Ba r bl "? S". "W B KM wants to resign. mml n |he r;iro (or Jnc novpl ,, _. ... I-" I of ambaaMtdnii l-i..i'.-i are Mobile Miss Salt goes to five or aiit TinFoieinn Seivue i* the only receptions and parties each week Important profession which still-aid in addition pl.iv. ho--. enforces a marriage bar. AI her own receptions given at her spokesman gave this interprets-.*nandsome house in the Washington suburb of Georgetown. Miss Salt is 47. Because of her outstanding qualifications the >(tlce might grant a Special waiver and retain her even if she married. Hut Miss Salt says: "I think I would resign." N.idla McCaddon, Third Secretary at the British Embassy at Oslo, protests: "I have no matrimonial plans at all." But attractive Miss McCaddon Is only 24. A Second Secretary has already announced her engagement while Miss Georgiana Galbralth. admitted to the Service only : *was described as one of the loveliest of the lovollti in the Diplomatic Corps. For 6 people: Tomatoes; 2 lbs. -, 1 Onion P'PPer -a-sssaasai Flour: 2 oz. • aaaaal Grated Cncese: 1 tablespoonTuI K| Butter (or margarme) 3 oz. Salt Basil A L> Milk: N pml. .tomatoes in hot water,! • Mdg and cut in very small pieces. l*ut 14 of buiii r m .i trying pa", the fl ly chopped onion and a few leave r M. 11 and let everything fi gently As soon as the onion 1 golden add the tomatoes, scaso with salt and pepper Mafi let everything cook until you have almost a totalo sauce. Make a Whits) MUOa with the flour, the milk and the rest of the butter When the white sauce is ready mix with the tomatoes, add 1 tdblespoonful of gr.it. and the 4 yolk of the %  tM of the eggs until still and add gently the rest. Butter a .-uftle tin (if you haven't got one -T rather I Mb will do) pour the mixture in it and put it in a moderate oven for about I hour. When the top of the sufflc has become golden take it out of the oven and serve hot. Butter Beans Sufflc Butter beans1 lb BJ J M ar or margarine: 2 ox. Flour: I tablespoonful Milk: 1", glass Grated cheese: 1 tablespoonful. Whites of eggs: 4. Clean the butter beans, cook them in salted water. Put them in the water when the water starts to boil and let them cook. Put them in a colanoYr when cooked and pour some cold water on them. (This is to keep their lovely green colour). Put them m a frying pun with a bit of butter for a few minutes. Prepare a white sauce with the flour, lli oz. of butler and the milk. Mix the beans wfth the .sfauce. Sift everything until von have a puree. Add I spoonful oi grated cheese. Beat the whiles of the eggs until stiff and add them tn the puree gently. Butter a sufBo tin or a pyrex uisb. Pour the mixture which will ban to fill It only up to 2/3. Put the b in a moderate oven for about 20 minutes. Serve immediately. Sumos have to be served Immediately, ir you leave them for a few minutes they tend 10 go down. Fried Butter Beam Butter beans, flour, lard or oil. Boil the beans us in the prevlnur wipe. Do not cook them too much. Dip them in flour and fry them in lard or oil until golden. Serve them with meat or fish. Sewing Circle Hy I'. nil* -Vol.ui General Sewing Pl n Much time and ef! be wasted in dress making by lack of planning. Uncertainty as to just what to do next often results in doiiu; the wrong thing, making it necessary to rip out. The following general plan may be adapted to the dress you are making. It will serve as a guide in making your own plan. A few minutes spent in planning before you begin tu sew uru definitely worthwhile. Beginners should make ten plan and follow it carefully If it becomes apparent aa you follow your plan that an easier irocedure could have been used e auro to make a note of it to id vou next time. Keloi-e first liltingMaohine baste 1. All darts and pleats L\ Shoulder .seams 3. Side seams note:—U-.,. left side open for zlppti 4. Sleeve seams 5. Skirt seams 6. You may baste one or both sleeves in too armholes at this point If you wish but sleo-'cs will have to be removed u. ttMeh shoulder and side M'.ITIIS. At tii-t lilting — 1. Pin sleeve in armhole If not basted. 2. Pin skirt to bodice. 3. Test for ease. 4. Approve neckline and collar and markings for bu'tona and buttonholes, tlrst fitting: — *^c? p Of fnnoeence Mrs. John F, Mayes, President of the Parents' and Teachers* Congress in Los Angeles, said that children c.niiot learn because their minds are stifled by crime. Hollywood glitter, and moral confusion. After 1. Stitch and press darts and pleats (press waist dart* toward side seams and side seam darts down.) 2. Stitoh and press shoulder seams (press open). 3. Stitch and press side seams (press open). 4. Stitch and press skirt seams (press open). 5. Slitch and press sleeve seams (press open i. 6. Stitch collar, trim seams. turn and press. 7. Join front and back neck facings and press a gg ros open. 8. Pin and machine baste sleeve in armhole. 9. Baste collar and facings to neckline. 10. Baste cuffs and facings to %  iMVoa, 11. Baste skirt to bodice. At second fitting: — 1. Approve all lines. 2. Mark hem. After second lilting — 1. Stitch sleeve in armhole and press. Seam Is usually pressed toward sleeve. Using two rows of stitching one fourth Inch apart and trimming seam close to second, row eliminates bulkiness. 2. Stitoh collar and facing to neck. Note:— If bound buttonholes are to be made this should b n done before applying facing. 3 Slitch cuffs to sleeves and press. 4. Slitch skirt to bodice and press. 5. Finish seams by pinking or stitching edges, 6. Put in zipper. 7. Tack down facings. Hem. 9. Sew on buttons and finish buttonholes. 10. Give dress a finish pressing. You -Ail) find this general plan adaptable to most dresses you are likely to make. If followed ll will save you time and assure the proper sequence in procedure It mav lie modified to suit your individual experience. STOP PAIfO QUICKLY with Phensie Doctors Prove A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days /T/j The famous threefold action of PHENSIC "ablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRESSION. No matter how puam the pain, no matter how weary your nerves, how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you relief and comfort, quicklv and safely. Remember this — PHENSIC tablets neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don't accept substitutes. Keep a supply of PHEN SIC tablets by you I Phensie Fot a Bnghlei. Freshet Completion, use Palrnolive Soap as Doclots Advised Lading thin ipsciolitlt proved thai %  g.dawM dk ipMM. •** %  Palmeltva Soap can improvo com. I *-* -* %  *" %  **•— %  plaxiom in many way*. Oily thin laaht 2 '*L2l.\"£'lJ*,"**V *r la., oily—dwtl. drab ikm wondarfwlly 3 " *• *-" • —' ^ '* —* briahror. Coorv. looking .kin appaori tin.. TWO TABLETS BRING QUICK RELIEF FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS ^HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, FLU, COLDS ACmLLsJ SHI JUST ARRIVKD: srRATTS MIXFD mill, SEED WARY SEED Mil Mill M I I -II FOOD M-" \ I il\ I I I tssiiRTMENT III E.isTKH wmrna OMn is voi R nine, STORE — TIIK .IIS.UH'IHIIW S '""!..' '"* '"" %  •" "^ St In PR. WM HV -1 ll I I I pasta 1111 ..rimi >: p. A. n.MiM \



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PACT F01R SINDAY ADVOCVTE -.1 NDAT, APRIL ft 1S2 Every man wants TOOTAL TIES Uutrl TSVliriM r, ir.(.d (|MiHnlMun, a.u)>.vUf Md N"IU flUIUMi V*2&2& Use Brylcrrcm and be sure ,.f having lustrous, viral-looking hair Uie kind of hair thai help, %  man 10 gel un in ihc world. Brylcrccm means good grooming —and clean grooming, too. because iu pure, natural oils, so beneficial to hair and scalp, are mulnjuj. And llryl.rccm contains no gum, no soap, no spirit, no starch, linioy Hrylcrcem's Jouclt benefit of day-long smartness and ^^^ lasting hair health. .Sec how nuusage with fgO Brylcrcem checks Dandruff and gives life ^^^sV and lustre to Dry I lair. Ask lor Drvlcrecm ( |9 ... she perfect fuu-dressu,, ^ J$ %i. < BRYLCREEM K, DAT-IO MO SMAtlNESS AND ISS1IS0 HAIB HIAIIH ;*V^V.V-V.V.-,-,V.V,-.-,-.-,-.-,V.-.-.-,-,-.-,-,','.-i1.V.-.'.-.-.'.-. i am I -'HIni l-'i-fsh BUTTER (Sol Mii' Ordinary TinmrfBolter) I NOT ONLY rovr UBM AND GO n ii im.it BUT TIKSTV. HKTTICII Q.BJI. BUTTER CONCENTRATE The AMISTOCKAT „i in mats WORTH TRYING! Obljiti.Mrrom .ill <.riir.-ii". NOTRE DAME HEADS SENIOR LEAGUE TABLE Ilaskclball Association Plans Ladies' Com/H'lilion lh ii. S. i:nppi\ Notre Dame Beat NEW NAMES mD FACES !Spat*tatl J IS it Classification Lil BY BOOK IK Ni OTItE DAM! in -l prMMM M ihe head of the Pint on cup Uot-up Teats, daj itftcrnoon before a huge ci lii!o;>[% it, nil. yet I did not expert them to start off UMII match with uth consummate) confl-, dance and perfection of attack. They kicked with the" ..(Wantage of a following wind for the first hall and at once they were on the attack. What in.pressed me most was some accurate croufleld panes to the wing and this proved to b. most successful form* of attack. NERVOUS V TKINS in goal for Spartan war. obviously feeling the Importance of the OC CM JOB Bad ihe cl | did not tend to i t n, was more vulnerable In I than ordinarily would have been the cat*, lor I have *een him pi man than one occasion. The fact that Cadogan was positioned „. wing half and Tony flaynos at centre half can hardly be placed out of the category of the nonsensical. It is not f. flayers. FACE FACTS L ET us f :..-lialf. If he cannot maJu '> > .' ixisition then he should not be askod %  Again, even if for tha take of argument one admlttad thai Medford should be in UM team th lug half, for Cadogan la the best natural centre-I .1 i today, In my opinion. He was wasted nt wins hnlf and even when good %  | n aaOO prevailed and ho was brought back ..if be ..till contmuid to pig) .1 uinu half game. I am not foi %  i!..n could have gained the honours against Notre Dana i %  %  UM l"in. the] showed yesterday, but they oartaJnla I ry show If they had arranged i %  • NO'IKK-IIAMK WIN AGAIN I N the other F %  tad with tha exception of llaynes at inside right, thenpuu did not nnstet much skill nor p uf poaa. BASKKTBAI.L ASSOCIATION HOLDS MELTING ota daaUln Marti A S CSUAL at this tUBM of the year cabon for the ll.T.C. August meeting brlng-t to our alleolion the names of tha naw t*o-yeniclds. This year 1 notire tsventy-two namemust b the new one* and apart front one or two whose breeding hURgeits their quite a number of the names 1 And 1 amusing. ..ith Apple Sam, being In alphabetical order, and this to be a fine upstanding gelding by Jetsam out of Apple client opporchnp happen. — U p, f, a hit upon Battle Line whp, it is not difficult to NOTKK OA.MK (Gill 2, Mandeville I) 3 SPARTAN .0 NOTKK DAMK, tie learn who beat their W*JP Ihnui^h ihe junior diTlsioiM of the B.A.F.A., and this yegr prwed uf their promotion, yesterday evening enhanced their reputation when tha* Spartan who earned off the Pint Division and Knock Out Ti ir > awa >. throe—nil before the largest crowd ever tu witness a local fixture at ihe 0\*al. .may avan hM Tg game wa* sauiu. on, since it Gill missed i__. would daeMa whetn. r the heretunity to put the Dames tw „ K ,...-.. — Won invincible Spartan wouul when he kicked wide of an open is by BaUlc Front. The dam is Hands Up. being a French trwwe go down to defeat at the hands goal. Another opportunity went mare owned by Mr. Bertie Proverbs. Then there are two by Burning Bl tfM Dames like their tradiabegging when Gill once again Bow. one bred in St. Vincent and the other in St. Lucia. These are. tional rivals from Bank Hall, and kicked over after fullback Bowen Bow Tic, a colt out of Felicity Bay. and Burnt Gold. The latter is which of the two teams would bq gfttft* th? daughter of Secret Treasure, the first foal out of this speedy mace. knocked out of the running for Spartan fought stubbornly to From St. Kitts comes Coliana who is by Colrose out of Diana. the_ Cup withstand the frequent attack* She will race under the colours of Mrs. Rosemary Wigly who has Iready brought us one or two m the past few years. %  OVING further down the Hat e come to another which comet from a line which seems destined to give us names connected with song. This u> Contralto (Jim O.i.k.i Jack out of Night Singer) nnd therefore .1 ilater to Lady Be Oood and Soprano, No doubt when the Night Singer colts come alone m futura we will have Bass, Barlwhile tu kc.'p abaaaal of times one can also be called ;fther sex thore_ is _also a long reserve list to cull M a From early afternoon, large which almost completely routed crowds, ttStttg every means of Ufea aottai team at one time, but transportation went to KensingIn the last couple of minutes beton. and by 4.J0. the Kensington lore half time, th( for*' and Open SUnds wen* tilled b gaaiiad one 01 i-n forward r capacity The George C"hallcn< r tnenti but adthout reauWa. Stand too. for tha iir>t time WM The Dames were into the attack tolM and Ttan filled, and still crowds took tassir on mediately play resumed, and Crooner. For _.. places be! id sheer luck laved Spartan as -.hot from such as Boogie-Woogie. Ba BOB, 1 dvpso or just Yodle in front of the George Challenur after shot collided with the goalFalsetto. If th mare persists with the propagation of the line, ofteiStand on the ground. keeper, Gibbons coming to the all these are exhausted, we might even get down to Just plain Btng 1 .IM tiai.'.e raaMa on the fourth occasion. or Frank. Th e team from the Hay Land 'Keeper Saves Afu r Contralto comes Crackers and this 1 understand to be a played a fasc and well organised Cr.mt triad hard to put in the gelding by Jim Cracker Jack out of Indian Si ; 1: If. then followed game with which Spartan failed equalizer for Spartan, but custoon ,he ,lsl by olie w ft '" Ul h : ""' '" "'' only lwo >cars and to cope, and during the final half. ,„,, Willums thwarted his effort ,hrcp I nion,h ?"• Urt March 3isi. but who for racing purposes Is so completely outplaved the Para mi ,7*"t moment ragarded as a three-year-old. This is none other than Mr. Sealey'i* team that the veterans brok-3 a| ^ DameV a* sn often this D*" !" 0 "bv Buttle Front out of Taimolna, which had the mi.fat under the weight of the repeated a !" ^ Tneldcd UO th., aorne as it I? ** born 1J ln ," l-"t week In Dec-ember As all race horses in thu tt lii( .Us !" "" frir\ d e ? e %J1 Northern Hemisphere have their birthdays on January 1st. December The Dames took the touch **£ [1 ?S c | C arW and^'lusUlv S 'T Y", "\l VSSH atlC Z ^ K b "' n Hard luck > ,UMesl kii-kiiiK toward* the navilion end :,.,_!, Cl *f riv nd iu f'"y she migrate to the Southern Hemisphere. Ucked buT the Spartan defenders "* ut ll w hl '" ^ ff*£ Tl, *\r itself to nice names if only some thought is applied and one of the cleared ^ flnan *"•' 5 hort passing was delightful, and best named on the list I think is Driftwood, by Jetsam out of I"awkv. Play transferred to the Notre soo thp,r n hl wm sent in a This is followed by Faerie Queer* who has been given 'he benefit Dame area and Tonv Havnrs alP^fect centre which Gill made no of an old English spelling and she is a Ally by Burning Bow out of most drew'first blood for "Spartan mistake inputting it into the Chivalry. when he made a valiant but futile corner with his head. 'T'riKH in trie middle of uie list what do we come upon but tha effort to get one over the goalWith lwo up, they concentrated J). imposing name of Frederick the Great. By Jim Cracker Jack keeper'* head, but it went over the on further advancing their lead, out of Marsh Light I should have thought that Jack C/Lantern of crossbar. but Spartan put their every effort Jack Be Nimble would have suited better, but 1 understand this Spartan conceded a free kick into the game at thh stage. colt has such an imposing stature that Ml very bearing suggests which MandeviUe took, but Tony They were awarded three corngreatness. Hence the name. 1 am not surprised however to learn Atkins pushed it out, and fullback ers in quick succession, but each that he is a big fellow because most of this mare's offspring have I teen Gibbons cleared. tune the Damag defence Cleared. u,,n ^ n, " and well developed and. as a matter of f Tha Dames pressed the attack. The Dames were not out of the h lr 8lre Battle Front. As Jim Cracker is easily one of the biggest and C. Daniel tried a good shot picture and bearing down OB Uie h orSCT m the West Ifldles today. It is not surprising that a cross from the inside right position, but |eft wing. Daniel gave Mandeville %  • %  * himself and Marsh Light should turn out such a fine once again the ball narrowly a B00 d pass which he sent on like "^J"!?!;:,., „-.. .... . .. . er.edt^ur^t lr; T „ pot £. loom O [^ ^ by^ ; ,,,,,,. h ,, ., Tension Counted M the Dame. * ric d hard but in vain JjJ^g J& g^ g^J*J$$J^%* U *gS. launched repeated and furious asto put in one, but the Dames de^-, y ^ y iB anol her from the Saaly stables while theMatter two ire SviX Thl?nartan C cu B ;SinWM fcn """"f 1 ^ £" " e '" Ch ^ ,ro 1 %  *' BCr,ic PrDV bs 3* Thr J^.ou, from thaT m^re of rivals. The Spartan cusodlan was Broun d, and the game ended with g,ca renown, First Love, th c sire being Battle Front, She is followed ul N.ire"s Notre-Dame the winners by three by 0 ne who enjoys the name of Jim La Rue, by Jim Cracker Jack goal wh !" D,n..l. U, :w s gQals |on| wt of u nMcdi Bvth ot n „ 0 ., Isn ^^ to ^ w > cU named n .v 1 *** tcams *•*• ai totttnn:— Further down there i-s May Pole, a filly by O.T.C. out of April Prrs?tior?(nr the Bav No1 s m e : Wilkinson, nth. Nit-Wit by Jetsam out of Quick Wit. H.unbow. by Burning Bow •^ %  •J 00, 5/* 55 I'o StrauSjhiin, Browne. D. Archer, nut of Precipitance an.! Rose Leaves by Burnin L kafte centre to send 1 ng Bow out of Rose, A T the Annual elation on t I as many as lot took part in the local CC4 1 havO studieil the r ti> the pupils ,,f th i'-irbados Basketball Asso' % %  .1 in the Annual Report that uba and i and fifty players last isenson. 1 11. v < ones auhvHOdem High Stliool who corn..I oQ the j, :_"_.,„.. L.I„„ .swr\rjusjioiii, isuwiii. fnn'ii "ui tu IIII.IUIS.IIHV tin.i HUMViivis OV .iunillii' li*.w out Ot tto-l'' Land team playing before the L fggg R Robert.. D. MeCollin. To end off there is Stirling Dawn (Stirling Castle-Sunrise). SmlimV.-dl game at the Oval, c Daniel. L. Gill P. Mandeville. Flush (Stirling Castle-Biretta, nnd Super Jet (Jetsam-Wedding Gift 1. BBd tluy we..i.-uig to the occaF y^"^;. Atkins Mcdrord Glb 1JOW they will al) turn out we have hardly the slighest idea at cruunptonahlp 1 Division last season and won all their msl The> will be 1 1 1 ,. % %  < > >oon thin arason and it win be Interesting to follow ti* 1 ,..1 itiviuon, Thi* iwiit of the n oat nnd 1 quote: — IIN Coo raittea hup,, to widen Its %  .( %  of nctivities to include a junior leasjuo for purj *, iguc uitii a Mew to .'"niK-ting agnin^t Tiiiudnd. nd competition-, for centres outside the BrMSBrtown Brae." IF HOPES ((IMF. TRl i: I V the hopes astpreseed sn U 'naterialise this season then the Basket %  .11 have made m of the sporting public but their round 1 >n 1 arsU sri'poRT I HAVE always nirsportad anj venture to start a special competition for the younger people and In this case It will be a Junior laeaifue for tluuve under ( 1 This petition ..nd also ulTords the ofipoiiunity for rdayera n .day she Kumt at n competitive level at an early age. The ladies, t. : : gsjmOl gVM If it is only to Ba tai %  %  .um-u: them. I am writing this at a safe distance away from rollinu pins and other handy weapons. But in ..I! '.en..11 n. it thl :.. .1. ,.m ba n.'U'.'ii to com• P ,,,r "' % %  a ] eey towards sUmulating the popularity of this name locally. .no.t KIF1.1. SHOOTING *T1IK third round of ihe House competition of the Bartwdos Rifle 1 \ %  "i % %  % %  i"t y. imla aft. rnw n at th. QovernmeJ • Rifle Itanse. Ttk ,. • % %  ..nd tan counting shots it 300 and 800 yards giving an 11 P.8 MI iihi per mar and :0o per Kouea ^ The weather was goo.1 with wind slumpinj! at 600 yards where mirnge was noticeable The liKht was unsteady making dr.'n.iti. 11 a dUBculty at times. The scoring on the whole wa s therefore disi'ppointing. Yellow House were tirsl v. Dj 424 followed bv Red with 421. (ire.11 with 419 and Blue with 40S. The position ol the S'SS'I l!y DOW nvi1 Ma,,T l hasc l3W ,l, r "-'• Colonel ConreUJ 1192 (Captain Jordan) 1,273 and Green (Captain v. oerj The individual scores of Yellow thc winners vesterday are S D Via M, R. S. M. Marshall 89, Captain Jordan 87. M. G Tucker 81, G. C. May 73. In the N.R.A. competit. %  • -Med Shot standard. The next round m the cotnpeution tuu been Oxed for B April 19 when the Bpot 1 Band 1 1 tho qi^utring of the Frontenac Trophy will be shot for concurrenUy. They wen plgyfaal it fast, and bons. Bowen. l"hmael Hnyn. the Sp;.it..n defence wag going to Clttens, Cadogan, G"" 1 pieces under the repealed asmott and Grant. QUEENS COLLEGE TAKES | LEAD FROM BAKNA SfMUian: Atkins Medford Gibf-| ** present. But of course We can be quite certain lhat their namii iftlth Jemw,n m(>a n nothing m this respect. However on going through thu i: t OBe cannot help noticing ho* mai I lh I l> by the Jamaican rtalllon Jim Cteeker Jack and n .1 it shall be interestng to see what the progeny of these two ereole Italuona will do gainst those of the imported now that they bg ma fair iiance of r ap c aaa nt a tlun U than bold u> hown than It means that Jim Jracker Jack's future will be bright ,1ml 1 uu 1 ; .., n .. cannot be said for him. Since his return honje from these shores It iii.it he has moauj bean connrk I to thg Bald or Uu atehla rporu were that he was in a sorry plight indeed. ON CI.ASSIFICATIO.N baa also come 1 L.i-1 1 KUK the past lew weens burna has been holding the lead 111 the Ladies Inter-Club 'iuDle letinis JJivisiun. Un %  pifE latest el r'nddY DlSht the lead was taken over by tne yueen s ColX comment, adverse and otbarwhw. There nre tatt ^ who are now a point ahead Oi tJexna and will "" which l differ slight for its usual share of 1 1 two moves] lego .,.„, who arc now a pom. ahcaa o. uarna ana wau ^,-^^^3 J,,',: .., '"m.'^"^^^ most likely win Ihe Cup. moir polnl ot vltw on these parluuli.i ,.r, To keep ihis lead Uitrn. svoo.il Pilgrim brougilt points •*• %  > Workissg down the li-l, Ihe Hr.1 ol lho,c I come across is Embers have had lo deleal Y.M.C.A. live 13 all. Miss Howard sued ner Su „ ly „,,, „,,„. run wor5c ,„,„ mosl huriM n Uu (|il ii nm Un -—nil. They only mil lure... out powers ol concentration lo W Yel I see she is still in BJ, Ihe same class she was demplcl to after of live games. The T" team is uvail. Service changed al so— la her poor showing in Tnnidad in A. No matter how poor her form a much improved, one untt wcnl In her favour. She went on lo ,„ Trinidad was. I am sure it was worse here. Vet in law sM tasWllhm a narrow margin ol dcwin 21—IS. atance she Is dropped a lull class whlI. i i ,,ins put. I an(ealing the llama side. Miss Pilgrim was on top early not see Ihe reasoning ext-pl mat n might be fell that her form was) The malontv of the ladies have in the second game. Senrlca Just too ba.l to bo tiui she must improve in Ihe future. dropiscd back'considerabl). II en ,h.rnged al -0 In hs usour. From D2 Ihe neat slopll away down In E2 and hero we llnd clearly be seen, from their pM,ss Howard ployed hard for none other than Lasahcr. True he has been moved only a hall class formances thai they have not every point and eventually the but this was from F and as there are no raeM for class E ..,• HI. It he^n nroclisln enough The oresseiviVe changed at 16—14 in her means lhat Cavalier will have lo run with Ihe II .lass bunch of horses LHnWEP SSsESS aQS^Sffi :i^3 team won llye-llll. Hepresentlng ,„ cl ., m „,,, Mt advantage m weiglll... ,t w Ca.al.cr. In fact he not o l"y d ". the tollege team we.e JClarke, Ml „ E Daniel won the next n pp„ lnled u, c publlc bul hls e mnc ,tion, as well lie collapsed .13 Murgeu.ite Wood, llulh, Williams. c 10 brl „g honours even. She „,„ ,„ ,„„ Guineas as a pack ol cards and Dunqueniue and1 Cardinal Ns'U Hal and U. Chandler ,„,„ Mlss E tloodridge The had no diltlcully In Dealing him at level weights. He lhe„ go an In, Unville. Angela Ivrklns piuyers were well matched but allowance of 4 and 8 lbs. respectively from Cardinal mid First put up a good fight against MarMHO. Daniel baffled her opponent Admiral and only a lucky break on trie Ingldt whuh it took him ssatllita Wood. On many occawlln forehand push shots which the whole length of the straight run to make use of helped him to sions Miss Perkins beat her opwcre we ll lifted. She won the heal them by a short head. In Ihis third and last race up went his ponent with her backhand push nrs game 21—18. weight (by only 3 lbs.) and down Wei 1 Csmiller. I nplaied to SeeUshot. She sslfO returned some of The second game went to deuce ling Rambler Rose. Cardinal and First Admiral, who asssn Miss Wood's forehand smashes. nn d after a stubborn light Miss four In that order. Is the best he could ds. Yet he was atill m Thc second match, the most Daniel won 22—20. receipt of 2 and Mr.s ie>peclively from Cardinal and First Admiral Interesting of the night, was beDolores Howard won the next "ul: on clauirtratlori he U rated S lbs. better than First Admiral and tween Barna and Y.W.C.A. As In „, w — nln .he M tor Barns. 1 " %  heller than Cardinal. 1 fail to see the point. """ "tftt ly beaten, wrong their first Engagement, Uie again favoured thr "Y" Patsy Howard met Wcldim grim in the first i MI took an eai (•raw she beat Elsie liynoc team. 1^13 MiB>noe tried to slow' W J ""ffi 1 ^ with those in F whether they be young or old. %  Pit„„ ihe n.o at iimea Thtt wor% ,he h l rd mco,in f ln a row that she has been most decisively b ow[Z^t^mJS^^U^JSi cornewetordo-gutng-andye.^sttllrcminnsinF. What i. Miss #> , nasr 5 uitnr. ^__ I OUNLOP FORT CAR TYRES •A**W*S&S*SSS.V.WSSSS*W*WSSS^MfM**)lllA DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., ITD. fFCKsrf/N BRQS.; Distributors ATLAS PAINTS combine robust and economical protection with splendid decorative finish. Sugar Estate Managers, Engineers, Building Contractors, Architects, specify ATLAS ISOPiCAl CBAOC IFUNOUS RCSISTANT) PAINTS PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF "ATLAS A" WOW PRESERVATIVE Details se.Ma> fnsr H. JASON ]ONES CO. LTD.. P.O. Bo. 141, Barbados ATLAS PRESERVATIVE CO. LTD., ERITH. KENT. ENGLAND IAS as 7, No more after-forty fatigue! -. % %  y life as you should, ss'.i to t k k '' on "" 1 ,ln PPy Interest In an tnat go on around you, tin advertisement nsss good nows for you. During thr laat twenty years, countless numbers of 1 I people all over the world nave proved that. If you ] I talto Phyllosan tableta rcpularlir, your steady 1 V i i 'v v lll,v enc-nry and c*ecrfulneaa stlU M ^s delight imth you and youfriends. To regain M ^k yourlrdc rtiTr. to feel young, gay, and .aST ^ %  ^^full of energy again, sfarf taking ^asSr^ ^essssssss*. / 'l* 1 i T fnnastl la lsn|l f ^ttkmr f. PHYLLOSAN fortifies thc over-forties



PAGE 1

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1*52 -I NDA1 ADVOCATE I'W.l I I I M \ That Zither Tune Led Me To A Ghost Palaee I W \S ,ii wn on my luck %  torn. A couple of deal* had fallen through and I found myself in ttDM on my i hands and only the price of a my pocket 1 was fpendini my time and beer money at Fouqucts. Tangier is full ot money %  P-P* 1 couldn't imagine anybody y"' 1 '* to send me in. rig • in tin. heart of the fre-U *ie>, where every second raon u an international operir—just for a gag. are prooably more < HI Tangier to grab a (art % buck than you ll find any place else in the world to-day so I I was Inclined to lake the adver.i little seriously. Of COUrse; n might have been a police trap. But one of the only D where lhey don't hapin n Io want me for questioning is the Port of Tangier. That's what gold There was just one complication. My beer was finished and with it my linanclal resources. How to raise the price of the ticket'' My eye wandered down the personal column, and a little below the advertisement addressed to me was this: "Gentleman travelling io Tangier. A visit to the desk of the porter at the Lancaster Hotel on Rue de Bery will repay any businessman planning n .visit to Tangier who can whistle a certain tune." That didn't nave to l>e Hftfn Lime. But there's a songI'm fond of—one I first heard played by a zither man. I've Leen whistling it for years, and anybody who knew about me would know about the song. Anyway, what could I lose? I went over to the hotel and %  i> p r o a c h e d the concierge, whistling my little tune. Rg likened. Then he said: "Ah. yes. I have something for ynti Mr Lime. TICKET TO TANGIER And a mystery note 1 TOOK the envelope he handed inc. There was nothing on it but my name. He wouldn't tell me where it came from, but in it there wa>< an airline ticket for Teuifsar, 5o,oon Eruca in nice fresh notes and a letter. The letter said: "When you arrive In Tangier, go immediately to El Mirador Hotel, where a suite is re-erved for you. Aftcrtvou have dined, go to* the Cabal la-cabaret. WUI there for instructions." As I was reading it. the ion:oke in; "Excuse me, III UnM, but it Is 2-45 and your plane leaves Orly at 3-15. A limousine has been ordered for you. It is waitinit at the door." It was a very pleasant trip, with a very, very pretty air hostess on board. Her name was Palsy Smith, and she was friend1. Bo friendly that I had no rtlfflcu ty In dating her for dinner and dancing at the Caballs rabaret after we touched down In Tangier. I began to wonder. While we were dancing a I a "The The cab stopped before the white bulk of a great silent palace. Below us the bay looked like a set, with all the lights and tne moon on the water. Patsy broke the spell. She said: "I adore kissing you. You do it very well. But we've come to our destination. Now let's get out." "That enormous place!" I exclaimed. "Are you sure we'll be welcome?" "I'm certain of It. Here. You lake the key. You're my guest." I was staggered. "Hut how—" She said calmly: "You've been my guest all along. I put the advert in the paper and I bought your plane ticket Come in Harry. Here's a flashlight. I've got something to show you.'* lllfry UMM, as portrayed by Orsrn'WeuYj m p., Th.rd Mar." and in (he ieu> B.B.C. Series | rumba, I said: "You're a hostess on an airline, and you're very good-looking and there are lots of good looking hoi.dance the rumba. But they don't '.il well, and theyie | am of them that beautiful. Really, you know, you'rv almost too good to be true." PATSY S SaaCRR 'You've been my giieM' SHE stopped uaucintt. "It's awluliy close in here," she said. "Why don't we forget Hi pagne ycu ordered and take a walk outside?" "Wonderful:" As we left the cabaret and stepped out into the ve.vet darkness, I said; "Patsy, I'm going to take back that word 'almost.' i.l 'almost* could never be applied to you. Whate\ei you are that's u-ftoi you arc—completely. You couldn't be 'almost' am Hunt She shook her head. "You're wrong. Harry. Among other things. I'm almost very rich." "You mu-t be If you treat all your boy friends to champagne," I grinned. "But what does an airline hostess get paid—enough to treat people to champagne? Kvrii social cases like me? No, Patsy. It doesn't make sense." She said: "I have to work for my living. I took this job to pay the rent, and also because It bring* me twice a week to % %  %  %  "What do you like about Tangier? A lot of internaliona, lawyers and private banks, with Streets full of American cars and grimy characters in nightshirts.?" Patsy contradicted mo. "it u beautiful, Harry, if you know the right places. Let me show you." She called a taxi and directed the driver to the Villa Mougliettl. The cab twisted and turned through the native quart* then, pretty 1MB, we were out in the country. Patsy had grt] clear powdery gold h I fOU think of the ashes ot angels' wing I've known sm awful lot of girls, but Ihem I ever laid rye on could have given Palsy a worried moment. As we climbed up the moonbright hills over Tangier. I forgot completely the strange business which hnd brought me there. The advertisement in the paper, the airline ticke. and all the rest of it. With Pal arm*, and her lip-on mine, I didn't care why I'd been sent f' r to Tangier and I didn't care who'd done it or what he wanted me. • "My name is Harry Lime ..." Taa susvo voice that film-goer* Brut heard %  gainst iho tlnkly background of zither music in the film "The Third Han" was heard again In millions of British homes last week. And listeners thrilled to the new adventures of Action's most engaging rogue since Raffles. Harry Lime died In th* %  ewerof Vienna. But before his last clash with the police he had lived many lives, eacb of them packed with adventure. Now tie In telling the story of them all—and tinEmpire News has secured th* exclusive newspaper rights. When you hear Harry Lime on the radio, remember, yoa can read him TIRST In tLe Empire News every week. c .IK >S i PALACE Held a secret I r-OLLOWED Patsy Into the house. It was a huge place, full of heavy chandeliers and pretty spooky-looking because it was covered with du-teloths. Obviously the place hadn't been lived in for months. IJiisy pushed open a creaking door. "This used to be a ballroom," %  ho lOld Ust, "Close the eurtains •Bd then we'll turn on the lights You're sure they're tight IT We don't want the to lorn,, and start asking %  "You can May that again, honey," I aid fervently. A switch c.icked and the big room was riooded with light. I saw a piano, about thirty gilt chairs and a big rolled-up carpet. "All very splendid and grand," I said. "But what particular item^am I supposed to admire? .P adding, and let's get down to business I said: "Pint of all, I think you'd better answer a few um-si %  atta P Smith, air hostess . What's your real name." "What's it U> you?" I looked at her patiently "We'll pl.n it ,iiv way. sweetheart, or we aren't playing at You must need me awful bad to take all this trouble to look me Up and move me here If you BOSd me. you're going to operate, and we'll start off with your real name. There was another silence, and then she said slowly: 'Did you ever hear of a man named Moughetti'" "Moughetti' Rico Moughett %  nought the name of this place was familiar. I met K once In Marseilles and another time in Casablanca. He comes from Corsica. Isn't that $.ght?" "He came from Corsica,'* she corrected me. "You mean . he's dead 4 1 "Yes; I was his wife. 1 killed him myself... .he wasn't a nice man, Harry." IT WAS Ml'RDEK For a fortune in drug* 'HAItltY LIME doesn't like murder. Mrs. Moughetti." I aald. "Believe me, he stops at that. It's messy, it's silly—and there's no protll in it. Besides Harry Lime's mother always told him not to go around killing people. She said it wasn't nice . And now Mrs. Moughetti, why have you brought me all the way to Africa to this empty house?" %  There's a lot of heroin In that rug. You know how the drug traffic works. I don't. It was something new for Rico. Some kind of big haul. He must have had a partner, because he would not have known how to dispose of it . I've been keeping >' here for months The airnni job I have is perfect for smugfilmg 'ho stuff, but I don't know who to take it to. I don't know what towns pay the best price .... you've got to help me. Harry." "Hut what about the police?" I asked. 'You kiUed Rico. You must tell n* how you fixed your JiU some time." S" you can blackmail No, thanks. Let's keep our relationship tni a nice clean business A man's voice chuckled: "Now that's the way I like to hear yoi talk." The speaker — a blond giant of a fellow—was standing in the doorway, smiling. His right ham) held a heavy Luger pistol, and It n polfHod at u* unwaveringlyPatsy gasped. "How did you get in"' He bowed "Through tl door. You left It open ... No then. Where's the heroin?" My memory clicked over, and I said: "Dr. Bessie "'at' your name . You began Indo-China, and you ser three years In a penal colony in Brazil. Cheek"" THE THIRD MAN I tnat the piano HI liiughted. "What a detective \ou would make, Mr. lame. a on page I* Ail types including Travelling. Dressing Table, Office. Wall, Bracket and of course the inevitable Alarm. LOUIS L. BAYLEY OF Hnllon Lane Phone 3909 Aquatic Gilt Shop Phone 4897 r &f •^BABT (.OWES hi SPECIAL OFFERS Hemmed Sheets, Superior Quality 72" x 100' $6.25 BLANKETS 46" x 72.. $2.50 Flowered Bamberg SILKS, per yd $1.32 ROYAL STOKE 12 High Street 12 High Street Iht YiilcLQl Sxclusive Shopping Oentre * • • DECOBATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts. Y. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gills. ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery. CARIB SHOP: Carved Mahogany. Native Barbadian Wares, Indian Bags and Bella. GBEYSTONE GALLERIES: Completely new Technique, designs and Finishes in Barbados Pottery. STANSFELD SCOTT & CO: Wines, Spirits and Groceries. THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts. BETTINA LTD: Gowns, Lingerie, GilU, etc. CLUB POINCIANA: Bar, Restaurant, Guest Rooms. BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladles Hairdressing, Beauty treatment. ll Qap. BL CONQUER PAIN WITH ITS FOURTH IHG writ* a rou*lH ingredient. And this fourth Ingredient, whteh reinforces the toothing salon of the oihtr three, ... ." 00 YOU SUFFER fHOM THESE ? Thee* are the pa. !" Waal %  r*>**M : hsadsthas. coMt. toothache, itwui'-iaumi. muMulir psmt. "•Mtnlgii. tneMirtial P*!"" And, Ma feu'tti .trgraoient. Qwlnln*. bdngt down twaiiih lam (to attire* last 1 Ml mWfi W.. %  AT OMCEI ii COSH vou *e-x hue io b-jvt 3-ubli anvalopsof 'ANACIN'— enough <• bflng you fan relief from one boui of pain Also in handy boaea of 20 udeii for |he potkei. and boiikt of SO table-it .i personal POSTAL Tl'ITION 1 TOU rui cma ttheCh tbiD q ilif) toil I UeJe or profession, if jn i %  vmr career by mi\*ad < ttppofiunuics -hssrc'i a niwv,,, ad encourst.'ertcni. Guarantied tuttiee •atM tHMiiif.il . Wfeaa MM uiroi ssM nw la teaj itj r* ,.o.iic., a*iu this astwaave a gi\cn K iht i H it*e i oCrse *ho h.i> r.,.H 4 f'livaie luter a*l | ay you lu.e ihc benefi taauawt, bai %  ••* %  saw paotl Ns snirai an ctarpd AII %  took* uc dec io studem. Ygr Ijlot Cltvtrnctt . Your o*n IOIIK .l) hrl|< fOU, I .ml (he rkwrmaj in >ou. Aaai I'aeii n-i.than yo %  i| ma Onalifv' AOiMJualificatHXlirv-an'.; Isri'cmtrnt I,.,t i. u Ihrn arrfl (*.-.l. the IksiiH'ii diVir IH HH CM Of iH(S, I IS luUft lUTIint 3 a *...*., Ifaajssa f— .. C ir ejataii .i tt£L i-r^frMf Hat— tMsjww m .... -,,-. |-| IWI ., ow—iC-t*ii %  asssHSsa Uiivsu* • W—l It-.i ^, A BLESSING TO MOTHERS! JACK and JILL COUGH SYRUP With Vitamin C STOPS KIDDIES COUGHS & COLDS In a Jiffy AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE! yuu'll bleaa in* it) I Bah ISTtea, made e-i-rcially slowii fr..t.i ilnad* lo Mvt kiddle* oui kiddleof (OUS<\i *ii>l i ik|. Dial hana on and Wad Uf ooi eomf.itr.it.tiv. eriih JAI K ..>..! jm, ih.-e aaet] >"*• •*<• eoueli. a., r, >. ,, r p,,ibW And > pleaneni ia.t „i JACK pad 111 i ITS WW. DIFFERENT SAFE %  : %  i .i bj h H i 'n d %  ..i .i el i m MSdlea' cauaTha and i..M* fa.lrr thai ll Imporlant of all JACI Another famous Buckley Product ie • produet of Oni lave you M.., U „, li: .^ %  meeV, and la aa fa.1 aixl rffniive I '" • "" Xour own. tiel a bottle•nd have It handy. Ttou* Rurkley Leboialoiiaa i larifit arlhii cogh and II irhley'i f JAC-K -n.1 JIM. TllDAV THIS WEEKS SPECIAL ITEMSFOR MEN STRIPED TWEED several colours $3.73 per yd. ALL WOOL TROPICAL — six shades 9.00 „ „ 28" SEAPORT KHAKI DRILL 1.45 „ „ 5fi" 8P0RTS TWEED 7.20 „ „ 56" LINEN CRASH .. 3.60 „ „ ELITE PHOTOPRINT SHIRTS 6.83 each SPUN SILK SHIRTS 6.75 „ PENMAN'S SHORT SLEEVE VESTS 2.42 „ MEN'S TWO TONE LAP FRONT SHIRTS .. 3.89 „ STRIPED ARROW SHIRTS 7.02 „ ALL WOOL SOCKS — to clear at 84c. per pr. PLASTIC WEEK END BAGS 7.85 each PAINTS PAINTS PAINTS Yes. We Have Them in Sizes and Colours Too Numerous To Mention. JUST SEND US YOUR ORDERS WELL EXECUTE THEM. CENTRAL EMPORIUM Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO LADIES — astings. S F00ARTY8 SEWING MACHINES NOW $ 67.00 and $71.50 each | 48 PLASTIC S (Floral designs) $1.38 per yd. S WHITE CURTAIN NETS F rom 37c. to 65c. „ „ ICOLOURED CURTAIN NETS From 98c. to $1.87 „ „ % 48" FOLKWEAVE $1.84 „ „ J 48 TAPESTRY $2.52 „ .. | HELENA RUBINSTEIN'S 1 SILKTONE FOUNDATION IS AIKVS I.l*; I IT. soft and fine as the purest silk, giving A visible beauty by invisible means. Instantly ;• your complexion absorbs pure silk until it feels :J like Silk and looks like Silk. Due to the Silk $ content this foundation permits the pores to !; breathe freely, yet at the same time it protects •; the skin from wind and weather. a SILK TONE FOUNDATION is really a MODd skin, concealing while correcting minor I lUws. SILK TONE FOUNDATION can be used !> on every type of skin with perfect results. It H is the perfect base for SILK FACE POWDER.



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I'U.I UUKTIIS M Mill' ADVOCATE SUNDAY. APRIL , 1M2 CLASSIFIED ADS. TELEPHONE 290* DID porriN On April San. ISM. -" bar "•' %  .1 Hill let John. Jenelha !' AM at yearHer | H B—I leevae • .i %  %  Pariah Church '•4 Bha ifljufMrti' Brie and ,n-child "%  Veld*. l Daphne .grand-Child..-. %  MM • %  <1*Mf<4 laOWol i on MU FOII III.* I" HOI'S E9 AUTOMOTIVE HtACH COTTAOB on St Jamaa CM*. 'tMMg. Q3M1 All meal* add asjmaa supplied Ironi mala house. On M^MK SullablO Mrt)M coups*. M* M> per da, AiMrkw Flan foe two tpply: B.a ch lap**. St. Jaw* er pfeaaM • ** %  %  •*-" %  ..i NmtaM Flat at Dun. ... M n.--er.. .u-table lor two only WMfjj* f^Bw CAB, PtM I* h P ' •" aondltlon _. raeaonsble oBer refused Apply flay s %  :. 41 PtllUp S J-*l| 14 1 u sr UAB—Obo Mom* • II P louring In ( .1 ie-Klltlon good Ivr** | pmn> sH-ln %  ,.. A *> Car Dona only I 109* PlUr Dial i 14). : %  Deoitka. St Jamaa. haoae wi.ndah. drawing >>iraom* ion* with nin.i*J • MB W C A beth. Herv.nt* -d )>n Good Le>canty. %  mica Dial : II Anrher I ts—lr • -! %  • -iill.i IM.|ajD On h.h.,lt ,,( Bkg relative, of lha late Venue Shillingford (recently of Roseau. Domlntrai the undent gn>d dcwi* lo rspreaa i' .ii -i lo all who in any aiv renaa.ut.iK* U< lha sudden CAIt-t.se IMt Chevrolet Car. Sedan. n hanlc.llv perfect Apply B. Athara*T LvflM Hll. %  l*S*-4n (AH rnHI> IWBTCT One iccoad | h.r-1 rant Prelect in good working order. Apply Berbado* Agen.ie.. T-l| I %  M 1 • W 4n | MABeeTOU east, furnishm rerrtrerntnr ana) telephone irwludfurther drUlk. Pfcoria SMI !IU In ba %  Howra MM *!'*• The llfcMlim a| Laura lomu SMunom t HamiiiB.. grab thanks to all who attended the funnel ..in. .i %  %  i palhv or in any ether way renders.* *n their* bereavement rail mllaa to lha gal too tie* I3M W Apply Cl%dt llinda. MDUIKN I'L'KNMIUl FTJlT-wllh %  Uvrr and LlMn Good f ja taaaja g For furthar partMnlara. Applr to AM WagkJf No %  Coral .Inn. Worthing mada and Cnk-tail Beta: Pita CuarnhM, Soup and PniH Prona ainonilara. Oil Paaatlnaji Planlar*! Drik. Congoiium. __a Daufela %  adataada. Sprlna; Mattraaa. f-oidli.g •pring Cot J-louawand PaMIng Varandah Chair., tin Cart. WHO Prna. Coal Wova. Unan. Uan Ml IT if. GardWn Towla and other RICANKKR. TROTMAN a% CO.. AuftioisrcrH. <4 *i tAH-TTMU) MKRCUItY. OH aacond ha^al Ford Marotry. laO modal. MO upliUaWry and li food ororklnt otdar Apply Barbadoa Aajanclaa. IMvajkOM orrw-E BUiuxna At -Bngada laai." lacing CarrMon aavannah. iwra t. .'il.nr Afi-l C II 7 ft*. II Btirat I I 1ad. l"! pedal only .ao mile M-rhalla, U*Kaa SM. Hoana I H Ml M I -%  ... ...L%  ii Htirrra A LMMI 11:1-1(1 AUCTION UNDO? THE IVORY HAMMER %  y InatruaUpBM racatvad I will tail at Ha-an Plantation* Ltd Building. fhapal •treat, c.n Tuaad. April aih. a large ajuantMy .,1 %  ••* Hueta." %  %  1'orcaaau. *a.h *-aM. ftna Caab War I pir. UNDFK THE SILVtR HAMMEB Oti Tur*ti> tth T Otdygr ol lire A -ill >*ll her furniture at tl.iieuwn. SI Jmmm. %  hlrh Baelud" Bergare atlaa and I Chain Dining T.bla ito naat •' ..prlght Chair-. Mn *tland. omamant' TabWl a" m iTLaliogany. Claaa. Oil" Tea *er. ea. Vaaaa. Ja.111.:. f, IM Ki.lt NOTICES N'OTICr: NOTICE :oUl'>* l-d dunng the aaak from 10 i. n. to m p m aacept ThuraaM' •' .ar>' raquaoi The-e rtiminifa ol my raUl nl are ikasluialf lalae >L MITCIIIU. D D* TBiOMMM ana imited lor the righu 1. .ell laouoea and rafraaaunanU at the> Loral Athletic and Oacle Bporta meeting to b* Said at Keotlngton 0*.l on Thuradar. 11th April and M lha bitereoaonMl maating to be held May Slit Jtana Sad and Sth Tandan muai learn the %  lha Amateur AlhletK Aamution ol Barbadaa. PO Boa M. not later than Tin April LOST A FOl*D LOST BRACXUrr ne Gold I gaataSaa rh r. bet — aw C T Harrleoti %  Dflac* and Baibaree. Hill. Finder arUl W rearardad by reluming aeme lo L A Wllaon r o ii.rrt.on. OAVe. Broad B a ml S.4 a-an TR BARBADOS MI'TI'AL UP! ASSURANCE SOCIETY OBUINAftI bftMCKAl. HIKTIKO (.'••m u hereby pvan that Murdrad and Blevaath Yr.rlv i K nal Maatlng of the abov etj will ba hakl at the Ofllre. nark*ith PUce. Bridget. 1Mb April. 1*53. at 1 o'clock p.m SHIPPING NOTICES artaay I u I • ol %  H Report on DM UBnaacUona ol lha •orUrty far the K endod Hat [ke.eiiOier IHI > L Dirachm and eat Auditor for tnr cumrB yaar. C K BBOWNF. GOVERNMENT NOTICES j>l>jntment to the post ol Cr*rk — ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  AtlJNfl IRON IIROM M 5 HKCVBA on 4th April l*U S I BOKC*UP on Uth April ISM M H BONAIME on llth April. ISU U S •VTBtrroK on 2nd May 1U mtMLMKO 1I> aOl tSAMPTSN A.1D AMRTIBDAM M S WII.I.FMSTAD OB ISnd April 1SU -Ml IM. HI 1RIMDAS r\u \M\KIHO A\U HI. I il. it l.t I \\.% s s corncA on TU> Aptii isu U B BON AIBI on BU May. 1961. -tlllM, IU I.IMIH" AND IIRAIAU U %  IIKTMA Jl.t April lyJ %  S. BOltOOI> Uth April 1MB, g f MIIHN. gO* A to. LID Agrata I Tlie MV "CACIQUB ; CAKIBI will a.cept Canpa and %  C P.angera for St LucM. Granada V and Aruba. aatd. Paii m aaj r a aaU< V lor St Vincent, mailing Tuaaday \ Sth Inat. Th. DABtWOOD" will pt Cargo anal Paaarnga-ra tor renada and Aruba. and .^i ,(. i %  SI. bailing Wedaaada. Sth pul Tba II.V "CARLBUEB" will ac School on Easter Mon^ day. AdmLtaioa 1/Teas, Befreshments, 5 Music. Dancing, Games, &c. V 2AA2.— 2a S /.•.V////-'///.'// .WX.V/ l .i •.. .i. %  i, t. Cheat o Umwar.. IU | M) .„ Mahogany Fi.nilli.. Upholatered 1 PWcaj Bull* wVk,. s,,,.. 1 Of Dnwan, Cedar Compactum. J >mted Baggagaaa, < "" Bprlng. "Unii-.il Matti ha Bo< Klnrtrtc tl'-k. I-i*r Coll China Glaaa •ana, Culatry. ftilvrr .Ten and ( orte Rervinrai. Table ItruU* &„,.„. HarrasMngtan Typaw.iter. M'-iel Kodak, Halame.cr Grand Piano. Fklka 3 Bo, i MdlMian, Mlcroacope. rWry ajd, Harren si Lard. Km h*n T.blre. Murlile T.^i Tebl" lUlhroom Scale., Huga. Carpeti PriBA* J PAUCTIONEERS r—M Pir r y co. A..8 F.V.A. Pbana *•*>. puaUU.a. Ballalai REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BL4BOS • c. a.r.a, r.r.A. COMPaCBKNSn'E LUTINGS ALWAYS AVAILABLE. FOR SALE -MACS) BBSIOBHCB". 9* good anndy baach and excellent Wilhing Fumianed £SJ00. unrurnUhVd *.• Vary aound .... M tii^nt aa contlnuoua high obtained "N1WTON LODO". MagwaU— Wll lound I atorey alone property wlih ancloard ground*. Oallartea v J aide*, ipaclmia drawing roam, dining room, brroklaal mom. kitchen. 1 badrooma. caragea and aarvant.' quarlara mq u uwa Invitad •SWBBT mi*". St. Pa-ter— An tt1r*~ bypa houw built of imne Contain. Inrge IKing loom Kith PreeKh window* trading on lo covarvd verandah* with good i i*w of aoa a aliort dlatanrr away. | bedroorna. kllrtwn. atoremonia nd UBUAI oulbulkllngp. garage .'txil arrvanla" quarlera Appro* %  Rgggg well tald oi.l ground* .nd right ol way over tyeoch "COVE -HUM. 11..1 .i St A 1 iloeay hotu* on coaat ilh good ground* -nd inlere-lu.g naaibtlltlea There |g eic.lld.t from a areluded and inndy covel ..> la %  F.MDBN'-R. Maxwell* Coaat— A handaorne wall preaarved prooertv with 1 bedroom*, large dining room. drawing room. lounge. *Mllerl*e. arrvant*' q-.arter*. Walled grounda and about >. acr* of land. "MALTA-. SL Patar Modam coral alone houaa of exceptionally %  ound conitrucUon—eatenatve remodelling and re-decor a tion haa lull been completedThe lounge, of ample dlmenalona. open* onto wldd vacandahi with moat ttiactlva aeaafape view*. T>e l'.irr badrooma are Srlad with built-in wardroboa and alao waahbaalna. and the twn bathroom* have H/C water. Kitihm and pantry are well fllled out and ore aupplled with H/C watar O round Boor I garagBB. large Hora>ind aarvanta quarter*, grounda of about >< of an aerg are well Uid oul and fenrad Maine and well water. A moat desirable ard hlgi.H recommended property. BI'NOALOW. Maawell Coaat— A well built bungalow with > badrooma. Urge Uvlog room. kitchen, garage, %  ervanla* quarters. A pleanantly loeatad property for aala at a very competillve figure. WINDT MILL. Rcndeivoua HILL, Cn. Ch.—Modem b.ilt bungalow 1 bedroom*. lounge. kitchen. mirage, aarianta' quarter*, walled nd atandlng on SUM *q ft land In good area with unob. true ted view. Any reasonable offer I cepled HULDF.B* HOI SI. SI Jamaa An rotate house built of rton* with pine (loon and ahlngle roof 3 lereptlon louius. 3 bedroomi. verandahs etc alao garage and il outbuilding* The houae atanda on approx 4 acre* ol well limbered Land • mahogany i approached by a long drlvawnr flanked with ckwely planted mahogany tree* Tha outatandlng attraction of Holder.' la ihe vary lovely alia which haa the advantage of betng well elevated and cool, with Bna views on all aMtee Coaat 1* lea* than a mile %  IMEUlDt SL la.rf.ie. Bpaciou* rtona biull bungalow with ahlngle roof, vary w;i planned with wide verandaht at front and aide. 1 enclosed galleries, large airy lounge and dming room. 1 double badrooma. kitchen and pantry. S servantrooma. a^raSO and out houae* Tha land i* completely ancloerd and Lhara It direct i to lha aeo with good bataLTNCklBI %  •*'. tth Ave BellevUaa — An attractive and wall proportioned 1 iloraay house altuated On a corner aflat of IS,300 aq ft. Contama 3 gailerlaa 11 enclosedi largo drawing room, etudy. modern' kitchen. ) bedroom*, gang* g*jg. U Low §muit accepted for quWk tale, owner going abroad. RENTALS AtTR.trm'l ll'IMIIID BOI'OS—Near Yacht Chib. avaUabla June to Dee tlnchialvei Mi. in .\ IIKS 11.11 -I Sandv lanelanrnedlata p o — Mel on. %  OS BILL, st Peterp urnlMiedi i rru ned late poaaaaaton. NNITSNAII. PLATS Unfumuhad. early poaieaalan. BISIPBNCR. t Mile HlU-riasu. tlfuuy fumiahed. .wunming pool, cloa* to town, excailanl aUff. Hit.aK.ATlUnfuraiahad Bat. ATTaTACnVC F I'SNIIM IB BSABIDI PBOPSJBTT. Parrnea Bay-Available i„ approved tenant* from May to Nov. 3UCALBB— Wllday Ava.iablc ibout S month* Phone 4S40 PlantatiotaS Ibi^l^flBVg



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N WAY, \PRII. S. I52 SUNDAY AI1V0CATF. PACE VISE THE HARD WAY HOME Two joun* Australians arr •ailIn* half wa> around thr world In Wandrrrr II.. thr •m.ilk-1 .a.hi rvrr U> attempi Ihe v.iuir from r nxlanal to Australia. Here Frank Mr\ull> i lu thr *tor> •o far. Have you M In a com(ort;,ble chair amu. perhaps with an open atlas bvfort you. thought about travelling across the world I You can dream about the other rounlries you would hke to visit and at the time it seems so easy to draw your finger over the wide oceans and Und-mas-'o* on the map. Just twelve months ago on a cold overcast and rainy day in London we were doing just that. Wc—that is Bill Howell and myself—had derided to buy a yacht and try to sal) to Australia. Bill had first made the suggestion. Alter two years working in London he thouajht it wuld be a nice change to get back to wanner climates. He aWi wanted to return to his family In Sydney. Australia, bocauw he hadn't fiecn his people lor two years. I had spent three years In S lam! working for newspapers Jpr Hruirn l > ress Agency and also felt bound to begin making tracks bark towards my home in Sydrey Search for u Ship That i t M tm oon we bought two yachting magazines and began thumbing irirough the advertisements ol yachts lor sale. We wan u.ih fairly young — Bill being twenty-seven and I twenty-six—and although neither of us had done very much yachting we did not let lack of experience dash our confidence In succeeding wiih the plan. BUI had done his yachting in the English channel during his stay in London. All my sailing had •been in and near Sydney. Most of It was in small sailing boats much the same as your racing craft of the Royal Barbados tfacht Club. But we old have one or two K lnts in our favour. Bill had irned U> navigate in the Royal Australian Air Force during '.he *Z !" £ 1,xl Wu NAVIOATOR BILL HOWELL with aeitant snaps thr I Atlantic. Shortly he will calculate the ihlp'a position. A 24 11 Homestead Wanuerer s actual BUM % %  twentyIUUI Kei irom end to enu overu but at tne waiemne sue ,> %  Out of bight of land we passed along the west coast of Spam and :ugal and on the eleventh das at sea wr headed in towards the land and late thai evening made a landfall on Cape the moat southerly l p of Portugal. Two days latei VVaadrrer had parsed throui;H .: of GuMaltaf and droops*] anchor m the shadow of the gtgan'ic, 1,700 feet high .hunk of limestone that is thai hock* ol Gibraltar itself. in Gibraltar. Bill and I [> irtr-l f,n a time He went b.ck to London to terminate his dental practice there while I began preparing for the much longer Atlantic passage ahead. bk.l was buck again on January 29 and a week later we hoisted sail and got under way tin time bound for Las Palmas In the Canary islandsWe anted to < u|| mere in order to pick up fresh provision baton. ftiaagaga> %  iig to cross the wide stretch ol ocean to Barbados. Perhaps n was Just our luck but i l bN Wanderer left the Strait of Gibraltar and re-entered the Atlantic ocean than another gale bunt upon her. At the time • %  Bait mm Oal thr coast ol French Morocco. This gale was the severest we experienced. For CRASHING through the wave* before a streng wind lu the Bay of eleven hours Wanderer was bulftiBcay. Note the Helm-man's special suit to keep him warm and feted by the big waves with hardwatrrprooi. ry any sail on at all. We bi ovat loo iuickly. And nobodj ourse.vca in our bunks as best w w . ,.,,,,-, Out then.way wol,M vrr Know whil had hapcould while outside the wind frt .,„ | inn lh ,.re is almost no hope ** nc<1 lu V !" M lnl ***** howled through the rigging and ul a n „, Mtlving outside assistyour "HighU you usually nm the seas roared and crashed nn ,. lf lMVl hing serious docs o *' n f' hln * do to take your mlm around. One wave after another WIOn g of course vo U know that * """ *" lc *" ."/"•' '• P"* u swept the tiny decks from end to m nv VBchls h vr qu ,„. Mlrlv when you are being tossed Iron end. ,„,.,, ih>out K-le-s before Hut wave crest to wave cresthke som. Thoughts At Sea this doean't stop you thinking that •?* f %  "*• ^-tennis bah It la quite an eerie experience you may bi the exception to prove !" f b€ t """* nav< t OUnd y to he caught in a gale at sea In n the rule. A freak wave just ***• > "J *** .* *_*?.* % %  -.iiiyhl in a gale at sea In n the rule. A freak wave just small boat. You know that you might smash !t tons of water onto nnot get away. You just stick those fli.ns; decks above your and bide your time until the head. If u did it would all be 1 Wiui'H asmri war and, as a dental surgeon, he *" nW nuu a ** ven 1M \** should be able to handle many ••* ' ** %  our nome Iot !*<** of the ills wo might develop durtwelve months. ing the voyage. Toothache, of We began work on her right course, would be Just too easy, away wmi paint %  For my part, I had done some new rope. TOero were nun, sailmaking and rigging for those oluer tilings to do as wel.. Tne small boats in Sydney and this lockers had to be tilled with knowledge should come in handy, tinned and oilu-i food, mn After | l.vo-ii.onth search we tanks were required and ail me found the yacUi Wanderer II upstores lit spare rope, extra sails, on a beach la Yarmouth, Isle oi charts and other thing* that had Wight, and are bougAI bar, BOS to be packed on board. Extl i was sixteen years old, in goo.i sails were an import.)!*, item bctondition, but rather small. In cusc the yacht had no engine and fact to our eyes at first she scemeu wc had U> rely on sails alone. _lmosl lernlyingiy small. Hji" in appearance as it looked en that map when we llrst planned the voy.igr. Hardly had Wanderer left the shelter of Falmouth than a North Atlantic gale caught her. It wa our first Kulc in the litlle ship and it gave us a violent tossing about. The gale also found out all the weakiu'M-s in the way we had stowed things awa^. The First Gale The big waves tossed Ihi yacht ,'• like a piece of driftwood ,, .. % %  !! nutes potatoes rol ed out uto uu> eabln deck, book. m i.c i djBflra from shelves and nird from tholt loektlt .; %  %  : %  .!.,• lad an deck in cold sodden filOthtl trying to shorten sail and pump out the water that filled up the y .lit | cockpit each time a wave-top slammed on board. Then the only pump we had broke down. We admitted defeat and turned back to Falmouth. Wanderer had sailed only fifty of the 12,000 miles between England and Australia. It didn't seem a particularly brl£ht start in view cf all our big plans. Two dayi later we set off again having managed to get some sort of order in the chaos on baird. This lime ,i gentle following wine inny skies whisked Wanderer south and well out into the bad Bay of Biscay. The second gale causbt I er there A darkening iky. falling baromete. and changeable wind had given plenty of warning this time and ao tble to prepare for the wind and heavy sea* which were to f..l cm. It is useless trying V sail a small yacht against the blf seas and strong wind of a storm and so we Just aat below in tht snug cabin while the wort passed As soon os conditions Improved sail was made again and the yacht literally roared down south before the still fairly fresh wind BEST EAST EH Ul YS I-Oil GEXTi.EMEN VAN HEfSEN SHIRTS In pin stripes with twa separate rollars and al*o wltn collars attached. Sties 14 la 11. Each Ul 54 A SlO.Sf, SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS with centraatlnc piped rollars. In shades •! grey. blur, cream. Shies U la 44. r*r Salt Hd.37 WHIT! IIEMSlTTCHEn MAMiKI K( HIEFS with Mae InrUals. ELITE SPORT SHIRTS, long Sleeves. In self rolnur-i of erram. blue, ire* aad while. Shirs email, medium and large. Each 15.96 MA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS With trubrnUrd collars attached, in uhltr only. Sbes 14 to i: Each . M 46 CONSULATE SHIRTS wMh IrubrnUed collar attached In self ealours of white, blur. re and tan. flbes 14 to 11. Each S7.7B. II40 A IS.54 HUTU PYJAMAS In Btlrartirr designs Sbtes St to 44. Cave Shepherd k Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & U Broad Street BILL HOWELL Ukaa ala dally b. along. A saucepan sa-laU In the laertage. FOLLOW Your Doctor's Orders . As soon as your doctor'a cxaiui .atlnn is rompletrd and he presents you with a prescriptioc remember he is offering you a hrjlth-rcstonng el >rt You must bring that prescription where only the hi*: iprnsed hy a qualified staff of courto 'iruggists—you must bring your Prescription la -KMClin QUICK AND DEPENDABLE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE GUARANTEED KNIGHTS DRUG STORES iffec and then to get some sleep. Aftrr Ihla gale Wanderer N sunied her course towards Ih south. As she approached tht Canary Island* it got noticeubl< warmer each day. At first uu lerseys i une off one by one. Thei we Ive up wearing two pair* i. trousers and went into shorti Finally we dispensed With ahhi and would ait up on deck baskim in ih,. warm sun. Nine days after quitting Oibr.il tar. Wanderer sailed Into the grew artlflcUl harbour of Las Palmaa a Ihr <'anary Island calh'il Om Cnnarla. A two-mile long gre> cement breakwater encloses thi< port and protection It gives l visiting ahlps makes Las Palnvr the moat important city in thoislands Some ten freighter ami nig pii.wngef ships call tin it i il.iv tn .ukr un ctiiil and fri'sh pn< visions nnd this trade has plocec I-.s. Palmaa among thr rich ports Of thr world. Contlnurd nn Page It Gel your .. EASTER EGGS and Ih while the yacht -tail* herself ii-eration and there i. no water TO-DAY FROM v.niiiminiis (hoe. I.cits 3 alBea, 1/4. 3/-. %  /Manlpan In: In Cup. 1 '• Manlpan E|g. ZOr. Plaallc En wllh Fry s Cites, 1/. I %  %  Card Kir I.HIHII. Char. Egg — t/t Large 4'ard Kn eonUinlm Surarrd Almonds — 2/9 Dark Carriage with Chor. Egg — !/• Glass l KIII Howl wllh 4 large Choe. Kggs — 1*7Chlld's Parrldge Roul wllh Chor. In — Z/t Fanrr Ortnklng Olaaaea wllh (:hor E — t/t riuiar Howl with Choe Egg — IVWarr Tumblera wllh Chor. %  gg — t/t Cadbury* Roars Cher, f lb. A I-lb. Una Cadburya Hard Centre Chor. I aI-lb. Un Cadburya Hrlrrlrd Chor. 1 A III, tins Cadbury Milk Tray Chor. I ir. Una Cadburya Choe. RlsrulU It..IH I IIII'.i .ill • M.I hrii .11.. 1/6 tin 1'JI ,iu MarshmaltuH s 2/boa (•.".IK li.il.-v Sugar 2/1 Jar PsBealls Orchid Fruit Z/ Jar PaaeaJU Mlsed Frail I(roa Z/9 Jar Toffrr In li'.ur.lril in,. |/ Hailed Peanut* In Rota. 3/i Black Mailr Char. I -, lb. Box 4.H Blank Magle Chor. lib tin Mu Blark Maglr Chor. | lb. tin 1.15 Fanry in., miIn Cells. Phs. — IZr. Roval NroUh Hhorlbrrad •/tin "Afternoon Tea" BltculU !/• tin "Balmoral" BlaenHs tta "Playboa" BUmlle 10/Un Almond Shortbread 7/C Un OvalUne in,. ..itIn Pfcs Z/ I tisl.fll ( r. im III'., lilt Zde a 4s>. Peh. Mars Bsr. — lie. DUbrllr Chor. — 75r. h%\ After Dinner MlnU I/pek. else JACOB'* CREAM CRACKERS ImWettfafcttiUi Head of Brnid Slr-1 SELLING AGENTS FOR "BOOTS" DRUGS MARMITE D A \ T t X T I the OmmmSt food for fain iI (' f ""iMiT£ \ r * SOUPS fitness V^5> W> \n ALL MC* r AND ssyl **J } i HI food r1irm.t# ,i a • -c-n.o.ng H hele i fi M %  *• in# b*nl*. rVMacaUe, i|| u*4 CM4M %  Iir I I rm Mtrmiia—and M ro.' %  : TO llliv A BIKE I.BUY THE BEST. -v3 Ami rrmeniher it's HARRISONS FOR HUMBERS %  v'AWiV/y/'Vvv.v'/v.V'Vv'-. ATTENTION.FACTORY MANAGERS MI CAM norm v \ rui.i HAM-.I. FROM '.' TO I" STKAM I'lPK mrmas OAIA'AMSK POT nrns<;s STKAM J.IINTIM; ALL TYI'IS THIK'S." PACKINGS t.l.NI.KAI. HARDWARE %  "> KICKETT STHKET (Opposite Post Office) MARTELL BRANDY xxx <,ul. x\x PI. Il.illl.s Small H:..kMiiualliro H.'llliA xxx PI. FIMIM (I kH nnd S M f .48 and $ .30 l.l|i:i I'll IIIIANIIIKS "\-.S.O.P." "(OKIMISIII.H < OKIM1N AKiiKNT 1.11)1 KL'U BRANDIES "MARTKI.I.". Thi. ...|rl. Fnact C*CU( i> ervrd al Ihr I. ....,.,: %  .lulland holds and Is oblinhlc from Ihc f..lloin^ Di-alrr. : j. N. QOMMBIl a "<>•>•< w. \ MI in LTD. MOUNT OAS DISTll.l.KRII.S LTD. &f StansfeM Scull ft (o.. Lld.-A..n...



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SUNDAY. APRIL S. 1932 i\i MM. vow ATE THE HARD WAY HOME PMI n: ii rxl throughout ti was some compa' f.*ri that would twlm dli>ng under lha boa. (where we rw.vh Um with a spc :-• ul scj birds ;_ Khi.li ttva nut OB the OCaajL There ntcmem on that :.. 01 \\V both knew WH getting Mar From the morning YAP had been on deck m from pace la He thought th* bread qil I JJIII. If l u 1.1 IhlM although a housr flying fish had landed im the deck would probably complain bilterl. during the night they would be If ever she was sold a simila* MrUy popped lalo Uw loaf. The evening meal frying pan urd w* would haxra thl* curried or fried ^d"* .,! '.""?Z '".H* 1 "*" %  '"•'< •* •">• i*n •Bill .. shots of the day. Two. or batUT irou ,„ h ,..,,.,., ,,,,, ,.„,,, , u!l Ih.rf. u, th.-,,sithls UUn |JJJJg '" '" '""" nd "'"' 1O with thr anunt at different „ probably sounds >• If Ufr u-.nes could be computed to tell during thr vovaae was idvllir II u, eaaclly whan thr yarn j, „„ lmo>i: rhim w „ „£ KL iT P 5* h "* oC ""' u ,or •"" twenty-four hour, of protrraa rvery day. hr day. And that ma thr yachf. r i-Li b),. r L wlc.ed rolling motion. Although steamships from thr U.K. to cerv rew sigBiiaain she wl swayint. from side to tain island* of thr West Indira i .;< unully served at „d, a || hp Ilmc Mch ml nute or would ,„„„ thri. routes-inntieoclo... Lecause it was warm n,o .lir would givr a particularly eluding all the lawwtrdi and „. .. n ,, -. %  y *,'.. sl, ru ,1MV "> P"" r to starWindward, at which thr Ud\ II light meal of cold ham bcnl It waa maddrning il you hoat< callrd—to hrncflt thr Wni aloes or aomrthing like wore trying to cook. The teapot Indies when the L-idv Boats arc lunch came the daily would Old* across the table and takrn off. consisted of splaanmg onto thr deck, the sugar tin He felt that thr W.%  self Ml water from a would probably tip half Its congravest It How will id over the side, tents Into the soup and. as likely wo make up for thr passenger not. the kettle on the stove facilities thr lj>dy Boats offered iha. X I most dead %  %  %  % %  •ugh 'he %  ;. : HaJ4err-r dropped the an' • ra riM % %  hip Mr i ordered 30. Worrell, of St rtoad, KT MirhaeL V. i days or %  > default one month's Imarlaonment for Mte unlawful poiaraaioei .if paint Thr eaar was Constable *+* Spr.nger Thc rommltied nr. that. After bath. I il up XI--i Sglng for Removal Of CTdian Ships # fraan page 1 B.B.C. Radio Programmes 4 ll p m for lln> (••HTWIIO I in Varw<> ixnabaa. a p m Oxitpuw • D %  araaa I l. *6 p m %  "** %  • ,v_. u u v VMM. MJM ere both frightened to dive i nhark would tpM boiling water at vou netually Ttcy %  > thai human beings' an over th* ide in raar Should bf "round -ighted the tin or one on the third day out However this waa to bo the onl> 'ered rturIIIK. tinwhi lr trip Afternoons wer, spent lying In the shada of ihe sails anmeiimes reading book* and sometime* writing letters which M WIHlVl post when we reached Barbados The cook for the evening began In tut/ by baking the day's one lonf of braagL This was done u^ing a pressure cooker as an oven ,md some of the results wendav ^nd perhaps 100 ouilr good. too. That H lo -ry Ihe next. Not one ship (If V\. ll Lhi.ll. ajQIlM welcome an extension In the %  %  AccordiiiK *• corres' i the CMaadaan f nalleiiaer. I raiwer | \ -I *om *" o i %  %  MrlaU. !•• HOXDAT. neaii. i. iaat i| lablt ThW rollln. .. on* fhmk thai 1 ;IMI sure rubud'. could ever get used to Even ,.' ftrhl y.iu woulil be enntlnuall\ tossed from side to aide in the bunks and wake up in the morning as tired •* when went to ajaeWEATHER REPORT VKSTtKDAY K.MHJII fn>m (adrlngron all. Taui rainfall for month I.. lesurday: .Tt In. lemperalnrr: 71.5 F. Hind Vclorllt: 10 miles per hour. lUrumeUr it* a.m.) .*• 13 p.m.) :isu.i:; TO-DAY '•uniise \ SI a m Hum..-1 fc.13 II in Moonrirsl Quarter \prll I ifliimi' 3 pm. M., Tide: Ml J m 139 p.m. LM I idr ". a.m.. ••• •SAPPY RELIEF FROM BACKACHE *••§!*# m.4 "Tsasl OM-'I *••\\iv n ,,. llh artdkm dmomfan from backache, r^e. t m.n l c a.in.. hMMMajD, irf. a> I II v. i . ,111.1 Jtunry dm • liffBidl tfclacy nihi gel happv Manv Th^unndi el ryple hlrti (be day taejr aw %  I 1 *IM at Hi wrll tnotati .ItLfWic and •miiwrth.hclpt .locgxh >.srry• alarm BSD, I OH ran n/irava trsif — afe, kamda'om* Bf ratrly pricrd —von .SniiliS naesr* vn., irc SmM/ftakmd JSSL~ Obtainnhlr nl ill ItwHatfl leteellre*. — WONDER WHEELS N' Men Made Younger By Treating Gland RELIEF -"^i? FROM ii\ STOMACH PAINS DUE TO INDIGESTION Ifyou suffer from STOMAOI PAINS, FLATULENCE, III AKIUt HN. :..\l SLA .., M 11)1 IV due lo Imjigntion, I,.I I'M DOS1 ol M.U.LI AN BRAND STOMAl ll ilni MDI l.'.f. whIIUh dlMlM*-*' -I Ian** ot •itlna. srolti mil IIIIVDUIPIHI. *Mikii>-' f<g.. Ha inaitar fcow long rnu haa •ulT*r*• %  nbt, ralavlgoeaiv rinir Pmaial* i.linn and tmlc raa i'H i* to •> in ruiMigrr "f moa>> bck Oal %  • %  >fna from ..ur rh^mlat Tbcuarantoa acutaets %  •. Why Hercules. CLES arrive in Harbados in perfect condition The siYcial Hcrculo packing nicdicK the result of *o vears study of packing for UW as u tWI oversets ensure ilu-.. The wellwrapiied parts are placet! i.ue lullv in strong cases so thai they can be simplv, safely and correct!v assemhlcd on arrival at destination. I'uttDFk' rcsilv q:i. %  ''iiulj give* fl h I% alv .ivjtlahlc m TABLET MACLEAN BRAND Stomach Powder UITER8 & wn-Bi BABYS TEETHING need give you no anxieties There neod be DO restless nigliU, no tears, no babv disorder*. if you have Ashton A Parsons Infants* Powders hands. V all over the world have found ihnn -uuthuig an<) r.M.liiig when Ub> is fretful through teethiug. and. I>est of all. they are ABSOLUTELY SAFE. ASHTON & PARSONS INFANTS POWDERS DO YOU KNOW 9 —*h*t your mouth Is a mirror or event* layouriilgeaLtvi' system? If all la in order your tongue In clean, youi mouth feols fre-ah. But it vour ay at em'a aluggiah ihe tongue la coated, r.iore'aasour. unpleaaant inat* In your mouth. That's when you need imrkllrm Andrews Liver s lt! Andrew* cleans ami hpshena the mouth, atlmJaMa the u.imn of t h--HgeatlTPonrana ami keeps vour ayatem froe from cloMlBw food waataa. K'-membar— ->^aar ,7*# vi* oe macui^ fAdtaM AND Da>ATCM DIPAS"-!'. 1 Hercules TNI Hiacuut even a'aoroa coHajurrlim imiaituN iHuisr VALOR COOKER STOVES Short Burners 2 Burner Model T, $56.14 3 Burner Model | $7187 Also WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS With Double Drainboerd (65.64 complete with waste and overflow •v/,>r/Av/.vv,v.v,v,v,',v,'.v.*.v.'.'/-'r',v.'.-'.-,:-.-, w Available COASTAL ADEFI' SKA N'AVIOATIOM FOR YACHTaV MEN BROWN'S POCKET H<>-)K I OK YACHTSMEN TAITS NEW SEAMANSHIP AND NAUTICAL KNOWLEDGE DICTIONARY OK sKA TERM* IIROWN'S STAR A1 I Alsa PITMAN'S SHOl:rHAND WlTTlUCTOR, NEW ERA EDITION \ IIICI'IONAHY Dial 3301 SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS ffMiuHr*n*n GRANT LTD. BMDGETOW bi :',•.;•,',;•,;',•,•,',', ROBERTS & Co. =? "; .'-*-'-*-*-*,-. NEW TIMES! NEW FASHIONS! NEW SHIRTS' RELIANCE THE sum i it AMI Aims ions <&*an% WMJWCBIVT 1-iiiinin.,,, *..>.,,,. A1H SERVICE Oa. Way BARBADOS-ST. VINCENT pam BARBADOS-rMOIINICA M3.IKI I! MCH MM is l.ln N Ml \ -.-.I.C.I ST. VINCENT-DOMINICA S74.O0 ST. VINCENT-ORENADA S23.00 t lilt III' / %  It On. War ICtlurn S 62.70 | MSI S 43.70 GRENADA-DOMINICA % 95 00 ST. VINCl:\T-TRINIDAD 4I.C.I ST. VINCENT-BRITISH OOIANA KM DOMINICATRINIDAD |1UM DOMINICA BRITISH GUIANA $17 I.mi asm $ 77.HO M.J I" -ill 7" 8324.00 Halls MM appliralinn t. A It III \i: It AUISTI1V & t.. Lid. Lower Broad Street ;i;vis Phone 4704 OBTAINArlLi: AT BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. dO*** 8 ALL EASTER S ""-'-E, ( s ii i -;.vnoi 11 it ion MIA a. mivisi TROPICAL "ANUAR" SUITINGS—M" wide .02 III.A/ER CLOTH—M" widi'a 2.42 BLUE DENIM—IT widr & \M KHAKI-IT idr 'u 11.18. 1.38 & 1.44 PYJAMA STRIPES—36" wldr M@ SI.UMBEHTYME PYJAMAS —ch 5.77 ELITE SHIRTS in White. Blur. T.n and Grey PLASTIC GARDEN HOSE We run supply thib in RED OR GREEN in lengths M 50 11.. 73 fl. and |#J fI at roanonablo prices. This Ihisr is Inny lusIinK, M0JF to us.. ;.nd easy lo clean. SECURE YOURS NOW FROM PLANTATIONS LTD. Don -oww" IK) YOUR lAsrn siioppi\(i t SA||, : Vs 1# IIU: FOtCO W 'f.YtV LIAES 13! — I7( RENOWN SI..KTS REI.IANC I: SPORT SHIRTS ELITE PHOTO PRINT SHUTS TIES—IIHK; Ratnii B.V.I1 ^ in all %irr\ •OTIS" VESTS SOCKS WALLETS BELTS IIAMIKI MIIII.KS HE-BOP < IPS I APS I I I I HATS BOYS FELT II \ Is ii 'a 4.75 <& 4.2S M.M. :i Wi :.':, 'w 6.73 ( SLMJ a i47 I 1.21 S 1.14 %  i 1.43 & .S3 II 2.211 4V 1.87 %  ca .4* .1 2Sc. Ii 53c. ra.li i Bkt. & 70c. fa I.M S4.IMI. 57.211 & 9.611 ( %  1X9 IB j ,i 96c. lo „ Me, *• %  I 65c. (o FOII WOMKX SIIANTORA—36" wide WHITE NBOCOBD—36 wide III.ACK & WHITE IMIBBY SILK—36 wide BLACK WHITE PRINT—36 >vidc I \r'FETTA PI.AIDS-36 wide WATEREI> TAHETTA-36" wld. SHANTUNO—M" wldr I LOWERED SPUNS—36" wide PLAIN SPUNS—36" wide COTTON PRINTS—36" wide I I.STIVAI. SILK—36" wide CREPES l I OWKREO SILKS HATS (STRAW) HXTS (FELT) VSSORTED RIBBONS HANDKERCHIEFS i:i M'K&IIROWN si I HI SHOES HI u K 4 GOLD SUEDE SHOES REXWEAK COTTON SHEETS KFXWEAK COTTON PILLOW CASES SHEETING St 90" >2..I9. 72" %  S2.I2 VI 1.1II IS a 11.52 u W) III .8.1 "i 11.-. 1.29 1.13 .91 %  >.'. u 1.20. 1.30. 1.32. 141 4c LM II 84c. in LI4 %  i 6.40. 5.60. 5.52. .i.25 4.38 i 450. 4.60. 3.61. 3.06 & 2.7S Ti 5c. In .4* 12. I8<-. 21c. each „ 6.0(1 & Ml i -,-jiiJ, 4.97 %  I *a n*M IT1 llhJII.Uill.il GEORGE EFFICIENT s m.nun m VIM. nun EASTEM nrri'iT EE AHELY & Co. — 19 Swan St. — where you will AVE S $ $ $ & GET ERVICE, VALUE & VARIETY Phone 4934 I



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PACK TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE si SI.AY. APRIL t, 152 Freight Cost Lvswnetl Th* Lives Of Harry Lime Z?y PnMwsing M le he taul that it would save idi -i.ible freight on ring to pay the freight \ materrlic freicht back to the 41 lb-bean '* the xiiense will be eliminate fraaa pace II I as—Khali ineas associate of "td lady's husband." 1 say: Vou'll Ami the heroin IbdJ HSBSOb" "In the piano? This Is probably a trick, but •* iking, he moved towards the piano. I in keeping 1 no* 4 A second later has voice cam*' -h. 11 ply; -There's nothing here rffA you ** -napped: "Put up your BwH I'll shoot if you dont!" A small automatic Lip tlilthroat. Bessie snarled: "What": You The two guns biased together. Then Bessie coughed once and 1 rumpled t>vcr thp piano The Ulgei .1..tiered to the llo-.r. Well, well.'' I aald. Very .uick I must say. ConjrratulaPatsy said coolly: "He should have kept his eyes 00 both of us, and nobody could do that . he dead?" "I wouldn't know. VrMoughetti. I haven't asked him. We'd better net out of how." %  Ihe heroin," . td and thf medicinal products commonly In use. He aald that the advantages to ba deiived by the Trinidad Govcininent will IKpurchase* of 1 m materials, employment of local labour and their ability to "' ' \orth of heroin' crazy?" A siren walled ouUlde, and '. whispered urgantly: "The police! Douse the lifhU. honej She supped to the switch and r ressed it. In the same seem 1 grabbed her aun-hand ar.l : UtlV. "Thai's better," 1 said 1 "We've got darkness, and 1 • sot the gun. You're too Impulsive for firearms Mrs. Mough.111." The airen grew louder. Sometody hammered on the main I'OOT of the tttue. Jabbing t.ie .lutomatir into Patsy's smooth back, I imn mured: "Your huiband boill 1 nice house, but if* getting a hi' overcrowded. 1 think we'd bet'or scram . lust keep two Brei .ihend or me, Mrs. Moughett:. ;ind don't try anything funny.'' We made our way out Inline Harden. The cop* were .Ul nver the place, and after a while lear that our only hop.was in separatingI whiipemi "PaUy. you go through llvshrubbery Keep straight ot, down the fields till von get to the town. You can't m hut what about the heroin'"' "Heroin? There Isn't any berobt in this stor. Mr l, Jus! .i hero . that's I kia honey. You can laui;. at It later when you catch your plane to Dakar." Of course they got her. Took her off the plsne on the return run to Paris. Somebody tipped the police off about that murder. It's what you might call the wage* of Lime . that's another joke, but you don't have to laugh at it. I'll do th t UuRhing. You sec. what Patsy didn't know was thai I'd picked up the rug in Ihe darkness and I id it under the hushes just outside the %  rtndow. 1 cam back uttat bid III 1.1 in; it-r I found m>elf tangling with a lovely girl and a inul f dope. d it. Of uurse. the word was out about Hico's big consignment and I hud no troubl" getttbg a good price in Mar-eilles th.* rancl waak. Hut. honesUy. I don't approve I threw the original slulT Into of Tangier am) deliver. I %  toped package* of confcctloncn' augar. They tell mr ")u can get the habit for that. too. But my conscience is clear. AH except for one thing—that Qhsa little pravar rug 11 wai -rappi-d in. I know it didn't l-'lonu to me, but it look* very ice here In front of my tealabaft win you have milk or lemon with your ten? And how much %  ua>r7 This (s tha vary best l-rand, you know ... a sy*4i..w of desperute gangsters paid me I 60,1 dollars for only seven' j packages of the same quality N'EXT WEEK Harry Limr recounls another 0/ tut remarkable adrenturei He I calls it "The Golden Fleece." Restore Youthful Vigour To Glands in 24 HouiS New Discovery Brings Pleasures of Life to Men Who Feel Old Beforo Their Time BELTING, in l 11„ Camel Hair, and Canvin-stilrhrd BELT KASTIM IIS nil. CANS. PRKSSt'RK t. MT.F.S GALVANISED . STEAM PIPE & KITTINGS HI.TKR CLOTH, WHITE COTTON TWILL M'MALOID und RITO M \STIC (for Bollrr Walls) l'.NGINK, CVLINDKR *. MOTOR OILS and GREASES lor 'KVKR1TF' \SBESTOS CBHENT HOODING, & BIDOE ( APS Send ymir orders i„ . THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. I'hone: 4328 To keep regular taketHO'S Asihnia.BronchilisCoughing. Choking Curbed in 3 Minutes Sparkn: I N ihing in ("ic mnrninfT mentally and plnrsicaU; cfc t nses md i • vrnftonis ol livertshDj no haffli purgatives, it is non-habit-tormin".. for delicate Momach*. invalids. Keep four head. he moii*' main. iictson liable sate tor chilJrcn jnd rruit Salt" handj. Ml SI roatriH't .Jin no tlm* >i all '• MtBI> nu.yu ( %  . . I •'.. low h* UM jns*. K SOU e*n rixial'^pfniflo snatMStB g^ r m *ill 1-1 tomorrow. Th* Mendoeo hing, Burning and Smarting ot E c x e Stopped In 0 Minutes Eno's 4 F ruit Salt' H M I III 1 u i IIMMI iotn IP.MII. it U U IKNi Ml K llr\n.'HI. M nu -Ms-. i\i>iwsno\(, '<>!din hollies for ttfng freshness. r th aitw* of NliMWm b u Ua pli.:<:.i II M UHJ" l>^*l* ni^( iurT no. wsaafUai isTEi mm mam mm ....• dut4. A Naw Diacovary N...du ja eHtsmL M r 2; l U i7H O iWW l i>fC0>r'.'i"*l Ii^ol nr K n.l lua poader VBwn jou lapldlv I'i'o llw son* nthii UM aatna ol *ut'a %  "' % %  11 |„ "H^^"r.,I,'.rt,:, maoH'ihir for .tui .ri.liit SIKI — ; m ft *" ii MtiM nalura hasl IM akin %  RWSW. Work I Fas. %  N....HI Mln(incU eoniII dad 10 B|M HIH ItOiNUaa. I' •! %  ti'iist In s lew inlsHlea. uso min m .ik itr.s>rdiatt..i. rt-tlai lod OMlUM ... • % %  .' I-F III ll aanoci. :! a day or loo loot A, IM1 11 111* „ .%  • lail I hrail Usppad lit* Ucbll mTuTi&Ealv. AH (M r.d augeiifi.bkBUlM sad aaalr akin aUaBsaurd In n ds]i. kit liiaodi stir mud ai in 1.:. IBSSSI !'• %  %  -" J .;"' ; Satisfaction L N.. ? d. !" t •nd • %  %  nil n ani.I'-l *'< Imprecmn '. TV. )u krrn on uitri Ni*o4arM Cot or. -rt. .nd .. hiimad* i"'" % % %  %  %  a SSMUCS"* I mlrrd lwraMt OJ ro. or <.-1 i ii|p< O.a unuir pukaic si-.o i NUador* fi I (Ml ChBttal tOaUT. Tha Buaili-.iM piou<". TopsforPoiver ATLAS HEAVY-DUTY BATTERY! Visit the beauty spot of the island A real powerhouse! Lunger life! More power! Quicker, more dependable starts -even in the weather. ESSO STANDARD OIL R. M. JONES & CO. Agents 1952 AVAILABLE NOW Charles McEnearncy & Co., Ltd.



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SUNDAY. APRIL 6. 1952 SI'NDAI \I>\(H MK I'M.l HM Mischief Scores First Victory HURRICANE WINS (By Our YarhtiiiK Correspondent) UI9CHI1 v h. i ring .1 victor; Regatta nt the R.B.Y.C, -v, h.-x.-* placed 1 ihe B Class Trophy She lotted ;i beautiful raco and never allowed her sister. to get near her. I am still of the opinion I tha* these two boats shruld be started together. Hurricane, a* usual, turned in the did not get to the starling line another good performance In the in time to race This Is the seeD Clan Her victory yesterday ond race she ha* missed this seawill now put her in a sound postson. timi to wm thu Tioph\ Rainbird Hurricane won (racily in this taJUllolfi < hnllenge. Class. She did the rare In DM The race waa south about in an houi SI minutes and i< seconds, *ind. A: f.mr minutes and 24 seconds bettimes it was hard, but on many ter than Sinhnd which rame aeeuecasion* it dropped considerably, ond Third waa K.uiiblrd whoso Nine boats slutted in the B i,;>i |. ; the rare was one • Class Mischief's win fives her a minutes and 43 seconds total of 72 points. She did the Hurricane did the first n.unil hi race in one hour, 50 minutes and 43 minutes and 45 >econds. Her nine seconds. Second was Ranger second round was 20 seconds betand Ihlrd Flirt which will now be ter. Sinbad't. first round was coma point less than Mischief when bleted in 44 minutes and M eectheir worst races are dropped. onds. but in the final she took 4<; Mischiefs (lrst round was a very .minutes and 44 seconds. Rainbird fast one. She did this in 32 mlnWompleted the first in 47 minute* utea and nine seconds. She did ami 32 seconds, but her second the second round In 34 minute* find round was baiter than Sknbad's. 38 seconds and the final in 35 minThe time for this was 45 minute* ules and 34 seconds. Ranger did and 11 seconds. the tace in one hour, 32 minutes Miss Jean Wilkinson once again and 56 seconds and Flirt In one tried her hand at Tornado racing hour, 50 minutes and nine seconds Yesterday she -kippered her *1.<: v\ in Win> brother'boat Fury in the I %  Magwln at-1 %  red her first victory Claai mid finished at tl for the season in the C Class. She Five Tornadoes started. Vamgave Miss BohaVt, and Madness oose was again victorious tvw. mlnutW and overlook tnem was Thunder and third Kiln: Folly dki not sail. V;imoose did the race in one hour, Second was Scamp which also four minutes and 22 seconds She sailed beautifully and third Maddid the (list round in 20 minute* ness Magwm did the tare in one and 40 seconds, the second In 22 hour, 22 minutes and six seconds, minutes and 21 seconds ond the She completed her first round In third in 21 minutes and II 40 minutes and 10 seconds, and theA full <..le with the result second In 41 minutes and 50 sec-Rbe published in Tuesday onds. Soever Lrssttns MI IM imin m ii Ki MI Scamp completed her first round In 41 minutes and 17 seconds while she did the second a bit taster Madness sailed n fiiirlv poor first round. Her time for the second '< Mohawk scored another victory in the Intermediate Gl now has a total of 64 points out of a possible 84. She has i dear lead in this Class Eight boats started. Second was Rean and third Coronetla. Coronetta did her very best, but still could not catch Mohawk and Been after &\\ ing them five minutes Mohawk did Ihe race in one hour. 24 minutes and 12 seconds compared with Coronetla's one hour. 23 minutes did it in one 29 > If Coronctta had sailed a faster first round she would most likeh have won. Mohawk did the first round In 41 minutes and 45 seconds and the final in 42 minutes and 27 seconds. Reen's first round was done in 42 minutes and 51! seconds and her last in 42 minutes and 37 second* Coronctta did her first round la 42 minutes and four cote. The Eighth Regatta sailed on Saturday. April I Ihe ship Ma Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay seconds and her last In 41 minutes ,:",,,£,„ and 20 the rare. All the with the I mm who? %  tturtaj fit her wil ly befoi IlVKI..n I •conds. the best time for ^ w M. H<-I< D'Owr. % %  a.—.— Mam llnirlrti [1 W.... ... New Spar D Class boats started attention of Olive Blo*• spar was broken laat Her crew managed to Tornado spar shortthe i Til fort u i'.el% 4 H It IX AI tlancalay It. ss in. pt MltchHI. K.'.L I a lavli. InSthooiirt Htau**n, ** l" net. li LocU OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION MID-SUMMER MEETING. 1952 A. 1. Fuss Budget Golden Quip Harroween Rebate A. a. Notonite Yasmeen B. 1. Blue Streak Demure Flying Dragon Gun Site Landmark Lunways Orchis Red Cheeks Pretty Way Sunny Game B. 3. Ilelle Surprise Embers Firelady King Solomon Mrs Bear Pepper Wine Perfect Set River Sprite Slainta Spear Grass Sweet Rocket 0. L Aberford Bow Bells Castle In the Air Dashing Prince-* Doldrum Fair Front Fair Sally Fllcuxce French Flutter High and Low Leading Article Red Velvet St. Morita Topsv Windsor Glen O. t. Ahti-Ali Aim Low Arunda Best Wishes Blue Nelly Cantaquislnc Careful Ann!* 1 Dsrh:im Jane Devil symphony Dim %  Fakuloui Fille d'lran Galashiels Lore Potent Mabouya O. :' %  (Cont'd) Magic Gaye Miss Panic Racton Red Coat Street Arab Test Match The Thing Tiberian Lady Trim brook D. 1. AU Baba Bright Ught Cross Bow Mary Ann Watercress D. 2 Cross Roads Dunuuerque Top Flight Oatcake B. i. The Eagle Usher B. f. Apollo • Assurance Cavalier Colleton Flame Flower Vanguard F. 1. Diamoa First Admiral Jolly Miller Mis* Friendship WaterbeU F. 2. Apple Sam April's Dream April Flowers Apronusk Battle Line Botaggfl Bow Tie Burnt Gold C Mail I i anttnal Champagne II Chutney CoUana Clementina Col om bus Contralto Crackers December Diarose Driftwood DOBWM %  panm Facetious Faerie Queeno Subject t.. change In the event of Meeting prior to the Barbados Sumsaei F. 2. (Cont'd) Foxglove Frederick '1 Ofjltrny Bav HIM Prince HI Lo Howitrer Illusion JMI Jim IJI Rue Joint Command I %  %  %  Man l-ove Nest March WindMay Day Mav Pole M mil Batt i My Love H Nlt-WIt Oberon Perseverante Rainbow H.irnbbr Ro* Roe* Leave* Rosette Seedling Soprano Stirling Dawn Stirling Flush Sunbeam Sun Fire %  An Ins Super Jet Viceroy O. 1 Hur Blue Diamond Itlue Grass Hasten Drury I low sraj t ttan la tbe ball. Dii uiipj.t ISM IIL.I i. Mrrl.l, eii .ind (he carve etf iiic gaataa Ma tola ha ban KIVIIIK lb. iii..\iniui(i irea ef ronUrl. I'llTI R| \"i I TOURNAMENT AT SUMMERHAYES BEGINS | Summerhajes TetimCl< I i K-in their Annual tournao terdav afternoon. In the Men' Singles V H Change) I Wiles in straight aMl • Men"i Doubles D A ll"'.*'' inson and L. G. Hutehln ..itb Col St A. Duke .n Dr. A S. Cato two sets all The scores were 8—4. 4—0. 6—S 4—8 The tournament COntU Wednesdav next. Messrs. Wm and 24 seconds. Reen pog.rty Ud., have presented %  Minutes and Maaplv racquet for the winner I 'iftinpionleNai wiii! IM ball Ihe lag i ssl tightened %  ii •• with tin diNi. in. tin ball has to Mvel) .ind Ihr inn tfV ankle, calf and lhafh w..ik III gang >i i oflBbaaed slrei I i %  taaaAtaawwaeli rise nanklrklMK lr ..|i inif" I leiisul and >ir.iLti( In.. siisiiiiv afsanrarde la lor Ihe t.ill.iw t'Tinicii MUI-: 1. The area durtns the coarse of Ihe kl.k MBag he i.i. gai .1 u.i |hl b.ll 2. if Uw inn aaada u> be hiftril hlta Ihr a.r the II.HIkukiiu I.M.1 should be Bl I more In Ihe rear of Ihe hail, ^vllli the liodi [netiuefl more TABLE TENNIS # Irean paie 4 %  I In Ui< • •* v v ani 21—16. 21 %  %  tbotlt Ui oci puyei "i learn. At this sb .. ,.,.... %  I i %  .. %  She even i iskael i e unle.n Si14. '.iss WalogaMBMi rag g*rr. l\< get the odi: lotted for abou '..i buai gagflt. She took Bva.n Anti defeat her OpII—4. PX % %  l | l> player to wil for the Beck winMi rii>Us Chandle: ( irrington. Heather Dean. ..ud Molly rhandler. The line-up In this I' l follows: Queen's College Si •tirna 29 points. AHelpb nta Y.W.C.A. \9 vile seven points. This Weeks Fodlliall i ll.rrt. 1 U IS EIVI. %  ,.. MI panti Areaer. IMVIMOS' ll i.n i .in-. nii'< 1 M 1 %  II %  I—1|. itrfrrw J I vi V M C A -I Ciarrlaan. I'hnnvn r w s. p"ii-.>i B %  %  %  II. MIMII I anaaatsa a> %  .' kW.Mll.. | I IK ll,).. 1 11.11 ,,| 111! toe ..I Hi. nun kiikiTit Ue| belt*. U. 0<-l*-ii..in.. ||M .tin. tmn ui (hi rasnllanl kleh. N.B.—Brute .lrei t| tli and a long run ate mil deeeaaar) tit aMi Ihe hall a Ions In) but Ihr ..|i|illi.uio„ of the run. baha ta aaaanllal logethei with Uaabsg and %  ..ntr.il |ha) will li.lp t.. lb refan ggracU— jud Mrrntth III Ihr ki(k. \ M11,>.llll t. II r* ititiMii-b leafs I"" II usd %  %  rae i PRIL 6 NO. 218 The Topic of Last Week GO00 rWt*, % %  *iif. i.irk i-rlfth ' ., p fJte — *N aanuVB| 2 ax. — l/t; 4 0B. — 2/Quins: ii absolutely different Irom other inks; it contains a penal ingredient (called Solv x) which dissolves harmful sediment left inude your pen. This sediment ii one of the chief causes of pen troubles. Regular useof Quink will keep your pen clean and troublefree —tree of sediment and free of damaging acid corrosion. %  Old in live brilliant colours. Alto R">J! Blue ir-JiW* Quink, %  Mdb w.idwe out readily with soap and water when spill UD tl.'thes or lingers. PABKIR Store-wide Clearance mm in full awisuj. lead llie Sffgnr willi oulwlandiiitt liihit's like lliese Quink containing SOLV-X llhlrlhul..r< i..i llurhud.n A. s BBVIM N A S(l\s IIIAIIH.MHIS) I.TI). P.O. II..N to:: liiidurlo v lor >lYn Irtl MI Mln. c. Whit.i'— Hll U, II M. 0% Xca IM Coll.... i ?<'•' %  KnyplUn Culli.i, 1 'im Grey ft kwhit.• 1', %  i w VLS a I ll'-l i 1J.03 LINK SHOES i v HorslM'il.li fllnnl I | %  i %  -> < S7th March 1952 %  rwis I'lWO BBCITAE MR. GUY JONSON Mil sic. Tin; r.KITT.HH -uUNCIL "Waksgsld". Wblta Park on WEDNESDAY. 0th April, at a.30 pro i !\idea : 11 [HARP % %  ** I h>,pin %  Aaaalaaian luw i T*l MATTAHAM %  I (BREWBTEH SHIRT Plain Colours ^llREWS-lt I 1TRIPEO SHIRTS RBOAI. H PBD smif is -nuns i *. Craam i in wn^. hai—' 4 76 i . %  t I'tiig sleevi %  i ia> 7 t.sn „ %  III. r. i I Oil t.i For ladies $ %  ft. K. re I:I XI I \ RARtlAINS, Wt — UIISOX A In. .I EH %  %  I* %  | N •: .'n i-er yd. I %  i I %  %  %  ttmti iiiiiiinn*^*?***************^**



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I'll.I ~l\ II I \ v| Mill VI.!(,( M|i\ II'RII. , Mi Nurses 9 Assoc. Will Exist As Long As It Gives Service Public Comes First CHURCH SERVICES 7 1.1 p in M*jH>r .d.i %  • % %  Hadnaaday 7 til p ... tta%  MAl'NUAY THIH1DAV %  ,. c I MnaWMi Moalf bs -;> rn.i>A%. T 9B a i suiioni In Cliorrti 11 nursing „ot.. (or M,-, %  %  ADDRESSING Past and Present Nurses at teen.h Annual Reunion Meeting if the Bftft. Association al the General Hospital yesterday afternoon Dr. K N (in-miiim said thai an Association luch as the Batrbadoa Nunta' Association cm nut to txfct as Icirv; u it gives service Service first tc the communitv A iu. or P*I !" w*(rn inrausiwx.1 .. ii. | c .i->ui.m> I'MKimi II %  m Mr I BlarNrpin. 7pm Mr C. JotH- BBUIONT tl a in Mr a : ii m Mi II ClilkM BOOTH Dl-rtKICT: ft a n. T J. I^i Ivy. Hot P m Mr O BMComBf m Mr J CLiikr>. i %  ( Ii mi %  v.111 bv to,,. Id .. %  r ... Mi -. I ,i>ur;i Simmons A at urn VAIXILAI H 0 %  : 'iiKirr II Mi P lltiu* Frrkin It K r T.>-ri II A n II PAYNES HAY: ft JD a ... ml), i p m Bra '< %  WM1TMIAI.I T p .. Hi i MuHiAi Ham Bra r I r MorrU. n ScMI HANK HAIJ. ft HI .i m Sio J A Ofllrtih. 7pm MiM O Oxkty. -vT-)N II in Bra O UWfT rv T I*i-ii-'. % %  nrniFADA n > p u. • Xti.tr 'Holy *n- hn:r> Manual The death occurred on trained day. March 2tfth., of Mrs Leresj home Martindale", 1 In ding* Free Nursing Service. .;..,,.,. ... iifTcetionately known to a wide , %  £ isr?va %hr w LSLS Z free nun>lng -erv.ee for members "ft ** e of I B T"" 1 althou 1 ? *„ of the .ommui.'^v and undertook h d been suflerlng f.o.n Uuill_ %  nunOte of free nursinn among n \ to which she even uolly sue„„ J.ilrlren or the elemenUrv eumbed for the past six months. f-chools yet up to a few days befi Before Dr. Grannum spoke Past ieaUi her Indomitable will %  Nurses visited the rooms of the her BctlVfl tDd unite cognisant of MORAVI\N Hospitni and also >aw the quality tonditions obt itnuig arouBd her. ROBBUCK STHKET II J I of ararfc don*there. Then they MiStmmona wj married to s*mcr. Pr-ch*v nv t z were given tea on the lawn opMr. Welleslev Simmons, organs! j"—* iv Holy CMnmun.n ixtflte the Nurses'Qi. T ,nd tleedmaater ot si BemardS 5T"* .iwrt'ii) '' %  Burton. M H F H.-.vtmjstress of l "'" h f ,or *"""> """' < .1 II hoc., slu.i.r: thr St Micha.-!-Olrk) 1 Sthool %  %  und advice or chrCT. ., c A <,„,„ tnoke to Hit. catherlna of Paul Hers was a chrlillan dlspotltH.n M.I.CVU. SSL* 1 s„e i2F$£."*£rl •"; fJJJ* %  "-""•' 0,, ""SSSS?^§SI7-" l dire need for good cituenshlp in 'hat left a pleasant effect on those „ m o-aination * a "* %  •*.. j MB Barbudoi. "It is the dutv ot the with whom It came into rontart. CaahMcfMfcaa t SuBt(ii nuwp mothers and fathers to train their Her hu-band predeceased her ^^Sl^u^^^^Mmrt^hT children to l'e good citizens. The many years ago and she spent ,.,, p,,,.,,,, Minll-vit o ll P %  tali tt home and it Is thirteen active years in the U.S.A. only carried on in the schools The She returned to Barbados and has schools have Ix-en oitnis.d but made her horn the parents have the child for the the home of her only daughti first five years completely in im ,.., u care and that is the Impressionable age." She leaves too to mourn her Mist Burton said that ther* loss, three grandchildren, Mrwere various moves afoot to get fl adys Coppln. Mr. Jat I more culture in the island of Bargad Mr. Alwyn Unwell and a slsbados, but culture came from ier Mrs. Rosalie Farnu within through gentle speech and York, U S.A. gentle manners. tl,., ,, inerj | tonK p | acc ,., st. CHBIBTIAN 'i .1 \< i n>iai'i m WEDNESr>AY %  |. inrl.idr* T'H ii nk ag Ai.ni . iU ••• -I I .-..*.rm^ llJinrALfn ',< %  !• %  rail 7. In fru" "Hi ! Of duan.. rd %  %  ll*MM> arr lulaa'4 lf> I ll %  YS DIVIDED REGARDING TOE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS HIT THERE M ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH RESPECT TO THE HIGH QUALITY OF MAFFU MADE SUITS I'r. Win. Ilmry Slncl vmri Pnone: M.aa.. .Ik Aarll Iftftf ly Synod Malm -17 p m IJHIMR al "UfBvlnrlBlA" '"" v d >* Cvlvblanl lUa rJT,.i.i..<%  'V 1 •iiMii.lmPJMll Dt..nn Th. Sufi— Kan funfiop. AaMrtartl llov Donald Amwdawi ^ .'. gfj %  After Miss Biirtun had spoke Paul's Church SALVATION ARMY %  HolincM M-.li,* Laadd. 3 p n> Company Slavllna*. 7 p m Silvalion MratlnK. if New l-rarhr nn-Hrr I) n Dc-W CAJUaTOM HI'IIIWM MwiinK. 3pm Cnm%  %  %  ses Sunday Uul o D I '. ,K Clilnlii 1 I BRtrXaBTOWN, CENTRAL %  pageant lowing Uie nursing J h V '"" l !" ni, ln we lfl ,! through the ones was performed r *!i L al u,p Westbury Cemetery. „ 1 irses of the General HosH" u"ta %  l, M pltal. The llrs: Act opened with gathering that witnessed the last IT*>H MW r M ""'J^ the Pre-Chn^inn era showing how rltta boro eloquent testimony of „ „ iu:!i'ya*taT jVm r n primitive man was in taking care her popularity with persons In all „.,„, Bw)1 „, p „, *.i v -u.... M..UI of the wn'hs of life In the enmmunlty i-ii-arhv. sr Mj..r T a Remember, a comfortable fitting SUIT If our hrst consideration. There are increasing numbers who recognise for themselves the consistently superb cut, tit and tinish of the IDEAL TAILORING We will welcome the opportunity of proving this to you in our... TAILORING DEPARTMENT mi the flrst floor of (AVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II, 12 I 13 Broad Slreei DOES YOUR .Xr VV ROOF NEED JT^P^ 1 ^~" aiAV 1 s 1 71 i PAINTING? if —. THEN >\^S Bab ik\ BOVVRANITE IT .yrjl f3 / L AND FORGET IT. JJ"! 1 %  ? %  rafiS For ItM best proterlion Ji*in-,t Rust and f'orrosiou BM — HOWANRITK ANTI-fORKOSIVK PAINT Goes Farthest — Last* loninl. One Gallon will covrr 700-1.M0 aq. It stocked In RED. 1.1..U K. and GRFY mmitANTTt b aupplirri !••> -mixed UfJ fthauld be well %  UrnfJ before use. II required, a Spr-il.il Thinner* eaii Inaupplli'd at 12.40 per gallon. Phone M56. 67. • WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. Wherever it may be—there is alwr. to winch you sion. In Barbados, ii is usually the house of Rice on Bolton Lane, for fine imported Uenswtu u I fAutoa-TiUoring. C. II. Kico y Co. al ll.ll.in I r DRY? MISSED THE BUS? YOUR %  %  RST FOR A 0ARIB





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ESTABLISHED 1895 A.PH1L, 6, 195 Removal of C.N.S. from W:L Causes Much Concern W.I. Traders Will Be' Greatly Affected N EWS that the Canadian National Steamship Company will discontinue its passenger ser vice between Montreal, the Atlantic Ports and the West Indies, has been received locally with much concern by everybody alike. A local shipping authority said: "This step will to a large extent affect the passenger situation in the West Indies, but will have slight repercussions on the transportation of cargo." The Information niched Barba" doa yesterday that the "last of the famed Lady Boats of the Canadian National Steamships soon will vanish from the AC Caribbean Beiboards." Govemincni • Hcport bD I'.nti.imrnt !..-.( Thui.*day said that Lady Nebtee and Lady Rodney, ships which hid served valiantly In the second World War. were being taken out of service al the tnd of the nm< mcr season. Thev will not be re laced h> similar liners on the ootreal-Atlantic port* WeM I dies run. The t' N s i proaaic might At present these Lady Boats. local agnail %  x* Messrs. Gardiner Autnn i the imlv Meamship passenger service from Canad.-i u. the dies, and In addition proviri.i of the main eommui between the island.* then Trnriers Affected Itinerant traders who do neatness between the Islands with their consignments of West Ind: .n induce of one kind or anotl made much use of the daUon afforded them by the Ltd* Boats, and many of them will no doubt be enr* Infnrmrd on the subject this morning, one such trader hn*buslne** takes her through |hr Windward and Leeward \ nd said she || ran sorry to Irarn that this servlre would no longer he available lo trader-. Ilk.bar self, hi-i'jiioe. she -nil: "It W one of ihr surrM me>m> of our getting our cargo from place In Place without Its perl-Inn t.ir Ions; periods at NO, "Again many nf u*. are able lo travel ulth our rargo. and <• %  .aim. I all depend on Mir smallc." niotor ships and schooners fur trans por latlon. .imii \ TIII: II.I i* >i\iik cause these Lady Boat* have feed upon a* a frienniv link bet I and the for i was. however, sati.i | %  favourable, the various West djr Boats have been ., of communication would %  to see them bail I Another Drawback drawtrteb will be the 1 M of hard currency because many |>cople who are not permitted %  lir.OT crho % %  travel this way, .nndun National Steam. era, which i* one of thi only other mi'ins of ronvng here." •The taking out of service at the end of this summer of the Lady Boats will affect to a lame •Xtnj the nns'cnper situation in the West fmlies. but will have slight it percussions on the ti..n.:Of. cargo.'' a local shipping authority said rs now the Lady Boats hart formed the chief means of inter-island transportation for [ passengers, he said, and they are roing to be greatly missed by Waal Indiana eepccially business men on l iden who make frequent use of them. Log the shipping .irtivin th %  Wi Indies, he %  aid that passenger ships coming down from the U K.. like the I .'nil SS "Colombo %  KUlers & FyfTes' SS. tnak* Barbados Iheir On) I .11 and then lal] on lo Trinidad. They return to England by the route So these ships are of no advantage to the laieward Islands tnot ->' the Wanda, both offermp limited service, because the regular sche( passenger accommodation and the riule maintained by tin %  rmer making infrequent calls, provide him with a aourca ol Wit wan left to the Lodv Boats come during the greater part of j to bear the brunt of the passenger the year when the tourist --* %  hfj attdad I 'With T.C A promising to exTuxi Drivers Concerned !>'""< loir service with Barbados, NM the few hoUdavtra whn|">* vanishing of the I-ody Boot; rnme in b] these ships from time i *'" %  ael v, lv rm,,h •"* to time, it invariably happens tou r, t "."I" bntween Barbadua that passengeis from the various islands come in. and I stay at friends out of town, thus providing c for the taxi driver (me taxi di "It U when these I-.d. Boats come • %  without hnving to compete with i urw monode during •! Oener.i -icsa men riava nol *et %  tvan the matter sufficient thought to discuss It In detail, but oh* hand they express concern over tinOne businessman thought It very grave that these passenger liners were to bo taken off the run. Everybody knew th tt the cost of running steamships today, with conditions as khq high. More was the pitv that they were going out of %  %  aa an obse A shipping agrnt agree, with the shipping authority that the guh:g of the "Lady Nelson* and the "Lady Rodney" will have little or no effrct on the inter. Island transportation of cargo. He said thai transhipment cargo and West Indian produce v. Iin h the Lad) BoaU Ukr from port to port In the West Indies i an ei.il> be handled by Interrolonial craft. As regards the Canadian-West Indian trade with cargo, he thinks that the Alcoa Steamships and the bla to suppl> the needs of Indie and COtlld accommodate the cargo that the Lady Boats bring down from Canada. %  i shipping clerk wondered whether tin French Line and the Elders l> FyfTes Line, who run • an page 15 U \\l>l 111 it II OLD WINE IN AN OLD BOTTLE Cag* Town: A 161-ycar-ohli bottle of White C lent by Cofmcl Frank ateLUah, Manager of th e Springbok Ruai interested vi Industries pavilion at il Fair here, r doted 1791, was given the Duke of Northumberland at a dinner in honour of! the Springbok Rugby Team dur-' ing their recent lour It la b*-| lieved to be the oldest unopened bottle of South African wme if Wolllngtan: New / in run will get under way within four months when} milk from pioneer goat farms in I Canterbury will be flown 505' mile* to Auckland. Until herds J In Auckland are built up. thei milk will help to feed babies and, young children unable lo take* normal milk. Cost will be Is. fid I a pint plus freight. Cow's milk I rosta 4d. Ne* Vork: Three bandits in Danvcrs, Massachusetts, successfully robbed an armoured bank car and got away with 600,000 dollars (£35.714). In a quiet street, the driver and two guards parked the vehicle Dssstda National Bank, went off for coffee. However, they forgot to lock the rara door. Perfumed Post-Cards Amsterdam: Visitors to the Dutch bulbnelds can send to their friends the lovely sight and smell of hyacinths. Picture-postcards of the hyacinth ilelds on sale ore perfumed with the flowers rcent nlch i guaranteed to last for six ionths. Tel Aviv: A "state of cmei gency was proclaimed throughout the country to-day as : ad to expect an "invasion"—of locusts. If they sec any signs of the "enemy" they maj telephone or send a warning telegram to the authorities free of barge, %  BOAT "Okapi" and Torgatlo "Conwt" elf the background other "B" banto and Titratda* tors; ON jiayiSi Club mark. In i heading for tlia Bronco Teal Wins Grand National Steeplechase Plane Crashes liiloN<>H York lloilr-illji L0l NEW YORK, April I I an uaidonUfled in the Jamj %  York city at Italy 83(1 u.m la crlbad the plane [a "big one' nd said at 1. 1*4 eight ha ua a a wtra on fire at the the eraati whl | I Ren I Collector's Appointment Causes' l > rolonged Debate A deb* two and thicsp-qu a aV i hours took al the meetin L' of the I when Mi K. D Uottat apoke about two hourd concerning the : uSc appointment nf a rent ci>Ht?etor and mi i k it lu* i 'mn Mr. Mntili-v's prtnti|.n ol lection wa| tha; fto to tho minuti a was put when he had ing the miein obldcted loo ihnt leifnl opinion hi i Crt .vn Lara OAcw :i> t(. the validity of the all.' I't'iiilrnon' umi before the opinion was received, Ihr rent collaetar had been informed of his appointnM taken m< dutnm Durtna the db Tudor or Mr. (or eltai III which Id Adama,] Mr. Tudor said that Mi Chairman, who raeantty ieIcy an stressing the point that island and was un r j If | ^\\ tha motion, l but that was not so. Ilmird's Decision Injured Improving Reports from the General llos\ pital show that the conditions of the injured th.it ware dataini I after the motor bus A 66 the' proj>erty of the Rnckl> %  averturned on Spring vala MUli St. Andrew about 1.30 p.m, on. March 31. are improving. Cyril Springer of Spuowr's' Hill. St Michael who was the driver of the bus at U>c Mow ol the incident and who sustained a spinal injury was taken into the Surgery as soon as he was admitted to the Casualty. The Advocate wag told yesterday that the injury is not as serious as it v— %  before. It iv expected that aOB injured will be discharged fr. the General Hospital, this wee TdadGovl. Takes Measures Agaiiisl Poultry Disease "Plcwii Our Own Cm MIIIIIIIIH.I PORT-OP-SPAIN. April 5. The Legislature g B ve a quick ; uaaaa to .. itiii srhlcb aims at applying provisions of the disaa of Animals Ordinance to poultry with a view to regulating and— or prohibiting the importation into the colony of poultry and— or poultry eggs Intended for hatching, to prevent th) poultrj dueases into the colony. van. Minister of Agrtcultura and I-inds told the LaJalatat u ra dunng the contideration of the measure t.'; very long ago a fo*l choler; OUtbraaa had decimated a large prt of the poultry population of the colony. Experts advised that the importation of frozen poultry eggs might have contributed very at thai time to the spread of the disease known a ...... It was also found then Utat Government did not ha. to set against importations undfr existing legislation. Thev h*rv n( ihc BVM '' %  "' r t '" ""' ***** ,. M „ ,. , I I%  Virtually il was ;i tnree-hoise raco from the start| lv (V fui|l( (l ,n,o Wa y stati-'u > between T\ I ret I ootai and i. ,il Joy with Wot No Sun ro. a point in Quaao'a transporin a handy position lo rhallntt> the leaders. | latlon ayttem, The plant Just IWnre the race it was decided to trend ,1|T ta|x> instead of a flag t<> tend I field on its way, but the %  tarter had a very difficult \isk In getUni 47 runnere u ndor I • .i nfl.. or neai Iy ten ml oil io n K'-d start 'DEAD" MAN COMES TO LIFE AGAIN I.I IMI April S. A pit., in In a hospital at Rome "died" on Saturday liurni. jii operation, but heart ma^vicc restored lilm l". minutes ..!* %  r his heart •topped. Doetoes said II Is the first known rase here where 4 nalirnt hs* been restored aH>r >urh .1 long prrlad. They said In previous similar rates the heart stopped only a few minutes. The patient is 51-ycar-ld Arthur l.rber un4ergoing an amputation of the right 1 %  aaeaeaa ••' burger disease Hhlrh affrrh arterial ilnl..in.11 llts heart slopped durini the operation, but surgeon 1 rii.iinni Sravo sll| the alNioiii.in and began messaging the heart. After Ihr heart-brat resumed, tho patient was given artificial respiration for 30 minoic* until breathlns and mutciilar reflexes were restored The operation was aaeceufull) to icluded.—l*,P, -" % %  •"* • %  -" %  ""-.•ijucir oeaui aeians. inp 11 Only 4. In niir mil.. HU n-i. nr %  % %  %  ,.!.,. %  *. In Cuban ltolilicd Of $50,000 MIAMI. Florid.. Apt 11 4 A wealthy Cuban mjn signed .. uh middle-aged %  na on Charges of lie. inf the city With SSU.OOfl Of I:' The MioMi Jferald Idenl %  f UM farmlv" of the Cub.in President Carlos Prlo Socaras now In exile hen I tourage of Prlos' relatives ano former fovernnierit lletiteliving In exile with hm 1 %  atd the mom. |a Km/ >, landed 'her In a plane fion. H.iv%  t.day night. Police Chief Norton said lawlunstd the money i>v r to 1 ary t> h place in Miami four nub856 yard course aftt 1 1 had been > from tin 1 Rain fell he the 1 riders a hita the : ada tha' ground slippery and trea* imperial!;. 00 of BM jumps. Prrater 1 I %  % %  -'ici. Bn b> lead, but I. arod the aacond Jump Jack was down. %  minimum and while tha ping BnanUy, %  loose horaaa tvera paUowtng la their wake. A"in ^ BBproai had the fan % %  '!.' canal turn, the 1 .<• > %  dawelopad into a thrilling struggle I • %  .. .1 Ji and Wol No Sun The crowd, huddling in the rain nt raotago < l.cered la> ip as they %  hoping that the RJ \\'iuld tola tha 1 .11 kof all-time greats by wtenUU two Nationals Sernnil (in nit Al tli. cuu the ordei hooter. Wol No Sun. I 1 Itorder Lo. I Roin* n I Stuart. Royal Tan, Mcngies and %  I %  trailing m the rear, folk Croup Of lO The first four eonti U yard of tna paanui eoui %  it bee that the raj < I %  l-fea ag esssj forgot the dUmal w i: uiMilhrr and b'|rkrd SSM inent houses. In 'ix of th< apara ippod In roaring flames. 1 1 san were known •nghf. but I ilia. The plane in Ih turned bo able tn attend dua io iitn. '"iTlte.l ,,„,; j ba done in ihe boards reputation ii law %  %  A motion moved b) Hon t C anded bj tr. liotitay tually paaaad th >i the ana be poatpona 1 11 %  I Ihi!*-" m's ii;ii|nin vtaa %  f \ii Aii.im.'. Mtar t" tha relative lo uV .01.1 ihc Teg.inlmg the hjvilitv of the appotntmeni Uking place it I lu.ve thai the muter he postponed pending the r.-ceipt of ihe opinion < f ihc Crown at which ha ought, Mr M v 1 r. Mi M 4th v Ron P C Hut iho io ting Chairnian, Mr. .1 11 Heckles A ii.in %  . present was Misj Anie. Social Welf,.rr Officer. Di-.nssion ilpened %  sion by Infomiitig menu he intended ohje,-titig lo • %  ( UM minuti %  Hi Bl 1 i.f "iihinit caathaa an I th.* clerk's munoiv. unp paragraph Which could convey the wrong fire as It crash. A %  Hit ..f the 15 years us Secretary. I -at anything wag wrooa with the naasutes, the Boaan would ide if the minutes ware correct or nut A-.nl for a Mijjgh". Mr M..Mhan. Mr f aatl %  %  1 rrue record of his Impressions of Ihe meetinu It was eventually put to the rota arttethai the mnuitea should be conflrmeii ind Mr Tudor and i ted that thai 1 .oui thev were conr 1m.1l Nl I to speak ail of the %  nice UM other rnemban who had been 1 0UJ meeting Ion of the mlnut* %  n he took it thai thev felt the minutes rep. true aceounl of what h.ul transpiml at that meeting And In the minutes it was said thai while ha was leaving the |. orn, Ihe Nan. il was put. Since, that was He quoted from the minute%  %  uld lw rsMr lo mrinwhlrh showed that after staling I 1 Ibal BOt was that Mr. (ox had seconded Mr. < (( |.without n nuortim and luaors motion for the appointI invalid, ment of Mr. Main rd. Mr. MottMr Turl T now spoke on a point lev -uiied to leave ihr room aid that wbil He wanriereo wlif-th.t II M not ktottUey had been %  atlwring, t*f> ins, it lo say ti^l Ii. nil the 1 flhile Co I o APPEAL SIKiLLI) HAVE BEEN vCCEPTED r dhig Ihr motion and mil 1 Mi Vtnt.lev reitenited^Bsl he ahbaa ae bad inacaead at. IVblta il did not matter much because ., CMC It I 01 thiIhr following paragraph of Ihr id left and the minutes iHiiuti il out thai Ihe I nt who nioiimi oron inn when ba anu not in hir. chair and was already I 1 1 Kurthei Iravina the room, it still n.r %  h..d n.Mlrmcd Ihe minutes, the wrong imprrs-foN. %  I bstthCI Mi 'I 1. %  1 %  1 cut should h.-V h,l 11. Chatman said that that tha rnlautaa lal rositioti With tl 1 Bea land tbo 21 ft Australian yacht ONE THOUSAND MILG8 from nn IM m. t-. (, M>UUU yacnt "Wandtrer II" itasrs herself under twin spuuiakeri oa hei wsy acroaa 1 Government. All members ths AUanUc to Baibadaa.— penslon rf constitutional guarliatlsta wus immediately after the Council bad adopted 11 Inn 1* tarMa of constitutional amendments to make the Act pOSMhl. approveii b> the Council dissolved all political ncurUcB, r .tifled Batla' provided for a 56 member "Cori%  Government. All memr, asey was all in 1,000-dullearned that RffU caukW %  lioael Airlines plane for New York on Tuesday night. —t.P. QlacBafal Shakf -< 11lr.1l l > \rtTH***s TO0I April 4 Earth • %  the n.' r • persons were awakened shock. Out no dumagr el ties were reported. Ohservator. at* Pie Ob 1 ;. seric lasting np; %  0.1 M said that 1 quake wa -i % %  <• ..nd I.i.hon H awakened during the night b: tremor* -and heavy Bgaai —c.r. 1 UN. Apnl I %  uncanta t ourt ng His HortOUl I l< I be dark ol Uia the %  1 . Uusaon end 1 ad British Q liana wife against v..1 ordei made by I.I. 1 MaaMrab I -I mi c isBons had u\ tha Courl %  • H arai nnn.cesaary lo %  1 already been Ward %  r T r pti p lament )v %  1 \\ the record of proceed ii p and 1 xhibils in the %  rink ol Pi of Uv 1 dm high bail of 11.008 ...10 ot lo .ider. anno fo-hi neck and neck rlosrl chat lemrd bv Roral Tan. A tie-'" mendouH shout wrnl up *C Royal Tin one of lh.> popnl ir fhim.s. crashed Into Ihr lot cbttaric leaeaaa > 1111 v before thi > %  lion irf Mr Maynard the liiirman hav I that It %  rotai v lo aey -> < 11 a an hi 11 Ii liona and not a n that he wa dthough 11 aa to the valine ,ip|Klntment wa-. doubtful. He said he had read BBB and had continue •hat th!*. BA' "I0H—Makan ol Ih* WORLD'S CHAMPION a hopeful finish and forsrri live lengths ahead of Legal Jn> wP'i >-.t N., Ram 1 Ihr third placing Only nine l.nished It was one 1 races in n 'winner: covering tin course in nine mm-' rec fifths one fifth of a %  ; %  !. %  • The M.i' othir Grand Nat* %  pet hot l • Bveloped into .11 1 irking bronco and wss unrid-i It took six months' htfi a a sue-1 1 %  %  was told on four dfllen %  lens, his present owner baffle Harry Lal ' -ri mn as cess a as a nn. nr* I URTLE FALLS ABOARD hai lierii one of the lu Miller, a Lnbi %  nothinc since plai Ing ica two thousand guineas. 1 Interpreter at about 1.30 p.m. yesON OTHER PACt-S Pi < Iff* < ailing. i I ii.rnu IJOII \ %  .1 Qai den. '..nlrino Hints I -oh lights (in sport BaCClle; I'notball Krin.rl I ableI iron%  raaasttag: Parner i^sBBBBI I ....lli.U I isiiiit Lady Itiplom-its sew lag Clr.le. Imii Bah. and Vou Mrs. ( |arka*B tulumn R IdilorML: Nillioi; On MM 1 island farUeas. The Hard Way Home. 10 Uriah 11% I Ih. Hoi 11 The Lives Of llarrv Limr It Loral Niw.. I.I Of llirrt lid', r*ai B M-pe Hi Lwal Nrws; t'hur-h Services. You are on a WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A Halalaji 1 ol kg leans—1 Profcni 1 succession, lien1. proot 1 dsa wssdoOl of buying your hi % %  w "h uh grcsl rcihnkal cspcriencv and krumleugr (hat designed and built (tic record-breaking'RALEIGH. RALEIGH THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE CAM. NHHMll.ltll Si CO.. I.TII. III. II. II & II Hr.)H Slrcrl -ir.


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SISDAY. APRIL (1, 195! si VI) \Y \1)\(K ATI! PACE THIRTEEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES JACK OUTSMARTS THE GIANT U>* **J ih.it ft* iUl itu' l*lOf.i.i I pu.lcd oul v %  %  I A'it .-.I mf. t, hm T^YIH-"^ BLONDIEBY CHIC YOUNG |C*X FPEP ^JW-V ~. ^AiwOOO, MOLp T4ANKS CALLING [T4ANKS FC*? />THf PHONfi-MV WFF. FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY II. V,.p.. 1(1 ii l _-l • -I.l[. I II" I.I, hill* (irurfr VI ^ %  r'?'/ v. Stands Supb&me JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS "H£LP Wl V NOW WHY WOULPA ^lEANOt GIPL IN A ^ANAIOVILIM A61TC AN 4Q^,IKING WEf UUjeC^ Hi HALS* UNLE S3 TE R*NCG£PGL BUT THEN *AHQ .ft THE GAL THAT'. TRv*i& *) TOVAPevWCE POKRlE < ANP WHY i' &OT TO GET TO BOTTOM OF THrj...G£T t^, E POKJBE IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only NI'M'IAI. Ol I I IIS niliiint .n.iil.ilil"' %  < iir II in in hi". I i. • i ilsidr. S[ii i^lilsli... ii and Si;ni Sum Tins 1,1 IM (S-lliJ .. Tins OBANOB QBAPBFBUIT JUICE Lslliilly Nnw G.I4 IM Usually Now Tin. ri \s 22 .29 Pkn SATF.N ICINQ SViUAR 41 .24 llnls. HAIITLKVS MARMALADE .12 Tin. MEAT LUNCH .45 .• D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I HE C O I 41 V i\ A I t II O i L H I E S BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  %  IAG3C BECOPE I • 0 ) ftkJHT %  wtom D* i -. %  %  %  -.. nmo G* i i *a OUT AU.TV* Ti*-WMV PCt/T -^_ OOrOUWiNO* m VOWC*..NCW LET'S ff^TvsMfld^Kl PODSHOFPTHE Jfl-~ —-iil.***^! E^NINSAT r^cJ' *T^mllr^^K* THE "GOLDEN 1 V %  ?/ -^1 A^^ ^ V i^T^I GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES ^,,m %  -'^itffiitzz %  %PH l C F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS —. %  ——^^ %  i