Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Ha



ESTABLISHED 1895



Tories Survive

By Ten Votes

}

|

|

Socialists Make Bid
To Weaken New Govt.

LONDON

Aroused Socialists came within ten votes of defeating |

Conservaitves in the Commons. It was the Government’s
margin since the new Parliament

narrowest

j
|
began five |

months ago. Close results came in successive votes on|

Socialist amendments aimed at weakenin
atives’ new National Health Bill.

Closest

vote was 279 to 269.‘
Conservatives hold an _ overall
majority of 16 which is often
increased by the votes of six
Liberals.

Tonight’s vote was one rela-
tively minor question and would
not have meant non-confidence. |

The amendment was intended to
put a time limit, April 1, 1954
on charges for national health ser-
vices.

The Government says that the | for

charges are necessary to ease the
financial difficulties of the coun-
try. Conservatives opposed it
saying that conditions in 1954 are
not known now.

The Socialists failed in
effort to block the charges
tuied to weaken the Bill with
amendments, They have accused
the Government of trying to deal
a blow to the entire health ser-
viee seheme introduced by
Socialist Party post-war

Under the service now, people
get medical care without charge
and false teeth and eye-glasses at
half-price.

The new
charges
of its cos

an
but

Bill would add small



—U-P.

The Road Is
Rocky—Juliana

WASHINGTON, April 3.

Queen Juliana of the Nether-
lands told a cheering Congress
that if the nations work together
and develop confidence in one
another, peace may come to “this
poor world.” But the Queen, here
on a three-week tour to thank the
United States for aid it has given
her country, warned that the road
to peace may be rocky. She said
that Congress faées a particular-
ly tough job.

“Mankind in its distress has to
trust largely to your, good judg-
ment for its deliverance, This
places on each of you, the full
burden of a responsibility nobody
will envy you as your decisions
have enormous repercussions al!
through the world,” she said.

U.P.

Chinese Troops
Clash In Burma

RANGOON, Burma, April 3.

Chinese Nationalist and Com-
munist troops clashed near the
Burma-China border Thursday

with the reported loss of 30 Com-
munists killed. Full details are
lacking but reports said the action
took place two miles inside Bur-
mese territory.

It has been reported that one
Nationalist officer and ten men
were captured by oe

—V, >,



COAL STRIKERS CLAIM

15 PER CENT INCREASE

SAARBRUCKEN, April 3.
About 70,000 Saar coal miners
went on a 24-hour strike for
higher wages. It is the second
such walkout in two months in an
effort to win a 15 per cent.
inerease. Union officials said that
today’s walkout was a warning to
a mixed Saar French Commission
which is considering whether
wages in French administered
Saar Mines can be kept at a
lower level than in
French Managers have rejected a
mediators proposal for a five per
cent. wage increase in Saar

Mines.
—U-P.



President Of O

the |

for service to defray part |
t

|

|





France | price

1

g the Conservy-

Hon. Sangster |

Addresses |
T.U. Students

Hon'ble D. B. Sangster, Minister

Social Welfare and Deputy
Party Leader, Jamaica, addressed
the Trade Union Students attend-
ing the Course at the Y.M.C.A,,

|

} yesterday morning.



Hon. D. SANGSTER.

Mr. Sangster spoke on the min-
isterial structure in Jamaica, the
functions of the Social Welfare
Ministry in Jamaica and the re-
sponsibilities of Union officials and
the part that Unions can play ina
the economic development of the
Caribbbean area.

He told the Advocate that he
was very impressed with the stu-
dents and really appreciated the
opportunity to talking to the men
as they were in the position of
making such a great contribution
to the West Indies.

Scout Broadcast

The monthly
Rediffusion is scheduled to take
place tonight when officers of
the Association will discuss Bob-
a-Job Week.

Bob-a-Job Week is an annual
event for scouts, when they offer
their services to householders and
others for “the shilling” to sup
port the Movement.

broadcast over





Jobs are agreed upon and the
fixed. The temporary
employer then signs the job

eard and fills in the amount,

Listeners, to the broadcast to-
night will hear more of the
details.



il

Corporation Makes
“Sunshine Cruise”

It was a great thrill for Mr. Thomas E. Ward when
the launch from the Mauretania swung inside the Careen-
age. Mr, Ward who is President of Oilfield Equipment Co.,
Inc., New York, first visited Barbados in 1910: He was here
22 years ago and Again in 1949. On the last two occasions he
was intransit, just for the day, as he was yesterday.

Mr. Ward who is accompanied
by his wife is making the “Sun-
shine Cruise” on the Mauretania.
They spent the day looking up old
friends and Mr. Ward also saw
Dr. W. F. Auer, Manager of the
Barbados Gulf Oil Co.

Bern in Preston, England, Mr.
Ward now lives in the United
States. Well known in the Oil In-
dustry, his Company has furnished
equipment throughout the world,

In 1927 he originated and con-



cluded negotiations which re-
sulted in the discovery and devel-
opment by American interests of
the oilfields of Bahrein and Ku-
wait in the Persian Gulf by the
Bahrein Petroleum Co Ltd.,
which completed its first oll is

June 1932 and the Kuwait Oil Co

Litd., which struck oil in M 19328.
Half Interest

The Gulf Oil Co

terests

which has in-



in Barbado. wis ¢ un-
divided half interest in the Kuwait}
Oilfields, He spoke highly of the
Gulf Oil Company’s methods :
thought’ Barbados was fortunate

in having them here.

Mr. Ward is also Certific
Public Acecotintant (U.S.A.) and
fellow of the Chartered Institute
of Secretavies (England). He i
member of the Council on Foreig:
Relations, and a Fellow of the
Royal Geographical Society. Dur-
ing the war he rendered valuat

ervic

|
:
:



+ + c
e in connectic ith econ

®mic controls

+ cognition



UEEN BREAKS
ROYAL PRECEDENT

LONDON, ‘April 3.

Queen Elizabeth IT will
break royal precedent by
permitting her mother and
sister Princess Margaret to
live in Buckingham Palace
with her, it was made known
on Thursday. The Queen
and her husband, Prince
Philip, plan te move from
Clarence House residence
into the sprawling Palace

fier the Easter holidays,
probably early in May.
—U.P.



Conference

On Trieste |Panama

LONDON, April 3.
British, North American and

Italian representatives opened the
conference on Trieste today. After

1 tw o-! yur meeting a communique
Said the conference would be lim
ited to achieving closer

Ttaliar
co-operation in the administratioy
of Zone “A”, British-American oc-
cupation area, and would not con-
cern itself with the ultimate
future of the territory as a whole

ers text of the communique is as
follows

Text of Communique

_ “Representatives of the United
States, United Kingdom and Italian
Governments met this morning at
the Foreign Office and had the first
exchange of views on the problem
of reaching closer collaboration in
Zone “A” of the free territory of
Trieste; It was confirmed that any
arrangements arrived at would be
of such a nature as not to prejudice
ultimate solution of the future of
the territory as a whole. The rep-
resentatives will meet again to-
morrow morning.





Western Proposal

Western diplomats will propose
that Italy share in the Civil Ad-
ministration of Zone “A”, The
West expected that the Italian de-

mand for participation by Italy also

in the policing of the area, which
if accepted, would considerably
affect the authority of the Alhed
military government headed by
General Sir John Winterton and
backed by some 10,000 British and
American troops. The West fears
that if it agreed its authority might
be jeopardised in the event of an

emergency

There is no question at present
however, of the withdrawal of
Western military forces, Neither

the West nor Italy want to do any-
thing that would prejudice the
future status of Trieste and both
sides have noted suggestions that
handing over of the zone to Italy
might be interpreted as silent re-
of the present division
irea. Italy claims the en-
area.—U.P.

F.0.B.A. HOLD
MEETING

Members of the Foundation
Old Boys’ Association will con-
sider enterifig an athletic team in
the coming B.A.A. Sports at
their meeting at Foundation
School to-night.

The Association will also re-
ceive the report of activities for
the past year and fix a programme
for the ensuing year.

of the
tire

County Councils To
Be Chosen Int U.K.

LONDON, April 3.

A week of local elections which
started in Britain today will be
the first test of strength between
the Conservative and Labour
Parties since Winston Churchill's
forces won last October's genera!
election.

Voters went to the polls in Lon-
don and 13 other counties to pick
County Councils to replace those
elected in 1949. Sixty two other
Councils will be chosen in other
parts of England and Wales during
the rest of the week of voting

From the political standpoint,
the key elections were in London
where both parties dragged in

national issues and in nearby Mid-
dlesex. However, the main isgues
were local centring on housing
ind schools.

U.P





MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E, WARD who were intransit through here
yesterday by the “Mauretania”.

Mr. Ward has visited Barbados on several occasions
dent of Oilfield Equipment Go., Inc., New York.

In January 1948 a pamphlet on | tion in the U.S. The “Ward Plan” | 6

“Constructive Management of
Foreign Exchange Operations”
written by him was published in
“Oil Forum”, a monthly publica-







“ VNtyet
SAWAUTZ
XY) Ye

\-



FRIDs ©,

—

Taft Seek

Four In A mow

|
|
see anc determined to make it}
iously pleased with his three- |
fold victory yesterday ar i 2 arrived in Joliet, Illinois, to |
begin a three days’ swin: t Illinois before primary next |
Tuesday. “I think primery will be very successful”, Taft

Panama Ships
Liable To °

APRIL 4, 1952



NEW YORK, April 3.

Senator Robert Taf. set forth on a stumping tow
Illinois on Thursday heartc ied by his victories in Wiscon-
sin in Nebraska a ie
four in a row. He was ol

He will be opposed in Mlinois by |
former Governor Harold Stassen |
ef Minnesota whom Taft soundly |
defeated twice Tuesday in Wis- |
consin and Nebraska. He said: “1 |
|thought Stassem vet coll shoulder |
tin isconsin I ‘Wink voters

e a showed him what they thought of |

$10 000 Fin jhim.” |However, Taft said that in|
9 * {his opinion the Nebraska Primary

{was more significant because a!

HONGKONG, April 3. [involved a writing campaign |

The Panamanian Consulate in| which was the method chosen by |
an official announcement Thurs- | the Eisenhower forces.” Most ob-|
day said any ship flying the Pan- ; Servers were inclined to agree
ama flag trading ith Commun. | He picked up 15 of Nebraska's
ist China, would be liable to a / delegates to score the first writing
fine of up to 10,000 U.S. dollars. , victory over Eisenhower. In Wis-
lars. consin he won 24 of the state’s 30

Mario E. Guillen, Panamanian | delegates and the Tennessee Re-
Consul General here said he has | publican convention voted him 19
received instructions from Goy-| of their 20,
ernment to “investigate” all re-. | Double Victory |
ported cases of ships flying the} On the Democratic side Senator
Panamanian flag in Communist | Estes Kefauver won a double vic- |
ports and impose fines if the re-|tory in Wisconsin and Nebraska. |
ports are true. In Nebraska Kefauver won a vic- |

He said that about teh ships|tory over Senator Robert Kerr of
are now believed to be plying | Oklahoma—one of the most prom-
the China coast although none a inently mentioned candidates for
them have been to Hong Kong| Democratic nomination after the
recently and are apparemitly not!withdrawal of Truman from the
calling here. } race. The Taft forces were jubi-

Last year Guillen threatned |lant. The Ohio Senator himself
to cancel the registration of any |hailed them as “substantial vic-
ship calling at Hong Kong ff the | tories” which will “help my cause
vessel was found to be calling at | throughout the nation very great-
Chinese Communist ports, -P.«\ly, The Eisenhower forces on the

—— other hand pointed ta the com-
bined Wisconsin vote for Stassen
and -|Governor Earl Warren of
California which topped Taft's.

They called it an “anti-Taft” de-
monstration.

2,000 Red
Troops Killed

SAIGON, April 3
The steel ring around the trap-
ped pocket of Communist Reébe!

;| Sugar Grows
encircled by French. Union fer:

: In Nyasaland



tightened on Thursday as French
Headquarters announced that ever |
2,000 Red troops had been killed |

(From Our Ow:

or taken prisoner during the: pact | Correspondent
eight days. The French 60m f LONDON, March 18
munique said, operation “Me Satisfactory progress has been

cury” which was started several made by Booker Brothers throug!
days ago by Franco Vietnam foresy ‘their African off-shoot Campbe .
to clean out Rebel troops betwepn , Booker, Carter in the cultiy-
Thai Binh and the sea sume ot; tien of .suger by irrigation in
miles from Hanoi continued “fay-| Nyasaland. The experiment ws
ourably” as French Union troops |@mbarked upon in September at







reduced the pocket. the request of the Nyasaland
French naval units at the mouth | Government. Previously no suge:
of the Son Traly River yesterday |had been grown in the Colon
took a number of Vietminh pris-}und consequently was expensive
oners on nearby beaches trying to |to buf¥. Bookers had proved that
escape from the French circle.|sugar can be grown in Nya
Systematic searches through vii- | lanc although irrigation is ne
| le es in the region led to the ar- | essary because rainfall not
rest of a number of “peasants” |sufficient. Labour and tran por



Suspected of being Vietminh sol-
diers.

In the rest of the Red River delta
Communist troops e active, the
communique said, especially in the

difficulties have been encountered
but [ am told that the experiment
1 t continued anothe
couple of years



be for





Western Zone, north of the Red 6s

River. In the Southern Zone only 12,000 HOMELESS
small scale sabotage operations ,
against French communications

have been re
the Ninth

rted. However, in
Giang area, 40 miles

AFTER FLOODS |

















Two Hold Up Regional Economic
Formation

Of Cabinet

REPRESENTATIVES at the Regional Economic
a friendly chat outside the Conference Room after
Seen left to right in the pieture are Hon. K. R
L. Walcott (B'dos), Hon. V. C. Bird (Antigua),
Baynes (St. Vincent)

F

Tunisia’s new
Dine Baccouch ran
intrigue which delayed the form- |







PRICE : FIVE CENTS





a
Committee meeting held at Hastings House having
a Session yesterday morning

Hunte (B’dos), Hon. Albert Gomme
Hon. W

(Trinidad), Mr.
J. Raatgever (British Guiana), Hon. R. B.

C’mittee Ends 4th Meet

THE Regional Economic Committee held its Fourth
Meeting at Hastings House, Barbados, from Monday 3ist
March to Thursday, 3rd April, 1952, TheMceting was held
under. the Chairmanship of the Hon. W. H. Courtenay,
O.B.E., of British Honduras, and the following member

TUNIS, April 3
Premier Salah Ei }
into a palace |





ation of his Cabinet while the anti and advisers were in attendance ;—
French Opposition party de | Chairman: Hon, W. H. Cour- London in January, 1952, a pre-
nounced new reforms as ijtenay, O.B.E liminary discussion on the pro-
“misleading illusion”. The Prime Deputy Chairman: Professor C.|cedure for the Future Finances
Minister had hoped today to an +. Beasley, C.M.G for the University College of the
nounce the seven-man Cabine!l Barbados: Member: Mr. F. L.| West Indies and a discussion on
which will initiate a reform pro-}| Walcott, M.C.P., Advisers: Hon.|the Report of the Caribbeam-Com-
gramme. But at the last minut sir John Saint, C.M.G., Hon. H.|miasion Conference on—Industrial
two prospective members refused |A. Cuke. C.B.E., Hon. K. R | Development which bad been hela
The Bey meanwhile hurriedly quit} Hunte, Mr. E. S. S. Burrowes, Mr.|in Puerto Rico in February of this
his winter Palace here and drove|D. G Leacock, year
unannounced to his personal sum British Guiana: Member: Hon.| Arising out of Mr. Gomes’*Re-
ner home amid the ancient ruit W. J. Raatgever, port on the Meeting of Common-
of Carthage, Only a small qua British Honduras: Member | wealth Finance Mifilsters, the
iccompanied bim and all trad ton. W. H. Courtenay, O.B.E Committee discussed supply probs
tional ceremony was lacking Jamaica: Member: Hon. D, B,|!ems including Import Policy,
; ; sangster; Advisers; Mr. J. B./"nd appointed a Committee to
Some Cireles linked hi udder legg, Mr. D. Levy explore the possibility of finding
departure with the family ba ti Antigua: Member: Hon, V. C./S0me uniform policy to meet the
apparently in process betwer Bird | exigencies of the sterling crisis
Be y Sidi Mob immed and Ami) Kitts-Nevis ; Observer: Mr.|Situation and to make recom.
Pash Bey and two sons and “ly. &. R. Knight. mendations to the Regional Eco-
daughter. Informed ces sak Montserrat: Member ; His Hon-|"0mic Committee, The following
~ cans sae -F ones aes ae ur Charlesworth. Ross. reemitese were appointed to this
ressing Neodes' A 1, é : Sommittee
peridence) party connections with, Gate ae aes ae - | eG. H, Adams..Hon, W. J. “
Ratsvalai sopertes nine nar [ine HowD 6. Sanger Mone S|
are : 0 ops EB A ‘ s ‘ 4 °
Cabinet This the Bey had hope Renato wianiber s Hon. J.B Bird, Hon. A. Gomes and Mr. C.
ineantbie 300 Tunisians have St. Lucia; Member: Hon. C, A.| 4. Beaubrun
heen rounded up in a big police Beaubrun, At this meeting recommenda-
weep in the Arab quarters of], St. Vincent: Member: Hon. R.} tions were made to the Comptrol-
Sousie, fourth city in Tunisia, fol Baynes; Adviser: Mr. V, D.| ler for Development and Welfare
lowing a bomb attempt on the life] "cher. — in the West Indies for the ap- ®
of its French Deputy Mayor Dominica : Member: Hon. H, pointment of Mr. J. S. Mordecai.
This mass comb out, made last} 2+ Shillingford, C.B.E., Adviser:| Principal Assistant Secretary, das
iight. is the first in the Aral fon. J, Bully maica, as Executive Secretary
tuarters of the big town since ’ } ; es and Mr. D. J. Parkinson, O.BiE.,
Tunisian disturbances began three ue eee Islands : Adviser Deputy Colonial Secretary, Brit-
r, A. Macleod Smith. hy: Ch as Assista Trade
months ago i Secretary: Mr. R. Norris, M.B.E.| (0. oiwsinnor in the ‘ted Ki :
Police said ey woud one The Full Meeting of the Com poneeperamer oo m4
bout 20 people suspect ” e a mittee was preceded by a meet- oun bo ahve’ Chev ebrtinite tt
leased when thelr innocence has|Né of the Executive Committee! was further recommended that
seaged Whe ; mn Saturday, 29th March, and the , : ek : 5
been certilied.—U.P. Appointments Committee on Sun.|#@ post of Assistant Secretary

(Statistician) should not be filled

lay, 30th March until after Mr. Mordecai had as-





e Among the items discussed at} sumed duty. The Committee re-
southeast of Hanoi, engagements CHICAGO, April 3 i Five Hats Go this meeting were the Formal| commended that there should be
between French troops and Reds Rampaging waters in the Mis-| « Instrument for the Establishment] further consultation with the par-

ee ) pag . ’
accounted for 20 killed and 16 |souri River valley made thousands | ; e f the Regional Economic Com-j}ticipating Governments vefore an
taken prisoner among Vietminh | homeless after a state of emer i For A Sail mittee, a Report by the Hon. A | appointment is made to the post
troops. gency was declared in Montanaj{ Gomes on the Meeting of Com-|of Trade Commissioner in the
. eT ee community and the Wéather Bu- monwealth Finance Ministers in' United Kingdom.
Fi es Chi reau warned of new dangers. Everyone agreed that yester eT en ee
Late winter blizzards clogged day was hot But for St. Clair x
arr ance streams from Montana through| Edwards of Dayrells Road and x %
the Dakotas and into Iowa and}five other people there was defin- | %
CAIRO, April 3. Minnesota as flood relief crews} ite proof that it was a windy day & x
Salah Ben Youssef, General} worked feverishly to throw up Within forty minutes Edwards|¢ .
Secretary of the Tunisian Nation-|new dikes and repair old ones iid he saw four hats sail into the x %
alist Party said in an interview Nearly 2,000 persons were hom: tance while their owners|& >
that there was a “fair chance” }less and the damage rose toward | jooked ruefully into the inne % %
that the majority of the United|the million dollar mark.—U.P. jbasin and tried several methods] % ¥
Nations Security Council would —— of fishing them out, All four]
support Tunisian independence ; ,_ . vere blown off at roughly the] 4
demands. Youssef, who fled with New Born Quins Die same spot—crossing the Victoria] & %
another former Tunisian Cabinet | Bridge * s
member from _ Paris to. avaid RIO DE JANEIRO, April 3 Edwards then walked along the % g
arrest said Pakistan, Russia ancl | Quintuplets reported born to | carcenage About a hundrec % Ss
Chile were | definitely slates | Brazilian woman Mrs Julia de| yards fudther on, he overheat & y
with Tunisia and added | that! Souza (35) in wild country near ‘a man telling his friends he had] % Ss
Nationalist China had indicated) Ratalha died Wednesday. Journal{ lost his hat. It had just blow sy <
ee. ps Brazil, Turke, aq) te Alagoas reported on Tuesday | nto the careenage % x
ns a § ? ge Saat t erend ey ‘iving the news of the birth of & %
ameee,. are i" ener ec 1e r 7/ the children four boys and a girl, Eee 4 x
es gy Pea , 4 “| while saying that all were doin, e ‘ x
abstain. e saic le curren ap vell said no other details were ri rige “s a
prochement between Spain and vailable about the children u - % x
ates a ; -cter 0 ; ¢ '
the Arab States was expected { Only living Quintuplets are © © % >
aid Tunisia’s case, He said Spair | Canada’s 17 year old Dionne gir) D ssal \¥ %
was approaching Brazil for assur- re gcd Fo aie ~ dar Poe LEYLA \% %
Annette, Cecile, Emilie, Marie .
ances of support.—U.P. % >
Ciicehiedh tiie aeeadibieeona ..j/4and Yvonne and the Diligent “i ; * ¥
| Quintuplets of Buenos Aires who WASHINGTON, April 3 %
t * rt ‘ ».
vill be eight years old in July Attorne General J Howarc % %
—C.P. MeGrath abruptly fired corrup-|@ <
tion hunter Newbold Morris with-|% x
7 ‘ IT CLEC wut explanation on Thursday and] \ x
GOVERNMENT SEIZES rdered him to turn over hit * x
WVENICA N TELEPHONE lles to the F.B.I Norris’ coldly » ys
" > edna yvorded dismissal notice was|& &
COMPANY SYSTEM rddressed “sir” and informed him % x
MEXICO CITY, April 3 that he would be through at the 1% %
The Mexican Government | close of business today aN ; $
stored limited telephone service The astonishing action climaxed R » a iy eI <
; throughout the country after seiz- i bitter feud between the two mer a 4 ba Sy) it } J] y
ing the strike bound Mexican|,nq made MeGrath at least tem- “ 23 =, f os 5 mee *
‘relephone Company system whose porar winner ir howdown witt ¢ x
8,000 workers were still out ay Mortis. There is immediate spec-| % $
wage dispute. julation that F.B.1 Direct Joist A v
The dial service was operatins | Edgar Hoover might get the job| ‘LUBLE COFFEE bg " S
normally in most large cities but| of ridding government of evils lead P a4 s
the operator ‘service in small) doers, * oy ae ;
towns and long distance were sti!! White House*had no immediate Is , Sy: ‘ ; 2% >
crippled. comment either of hi lisrmmissal | & $
President Miguel Alema hi comme ‘ %
ordered the communication Minis- U.P * nS
r t take over operations % %
avert inent danger to Mex —— x
| heonon after the nation "OM cr? ED i \ * NESCAFE is full strength, full flavoured Coffee s
| Rees Pee Ur. mer © DIES SUDDENL % Plus Added Carbohydrates 2
n ten hours. -. \
’ eee tr ’ ’, ,
VICE-PRESIDENT "St. Mich: it-18 Tie :
,
- . “J 7 “ar ~ ,
| OF ARGENTINA DIES H % EASY TO PREPARE >
me . , » y
He is Presi- : nn ane. Re il 3 ; t EASY TO DIGEST x
Vice *resident yrtencio ; ‘ g
| Quijano, aged 67, died to-da t | gs 4 x
95 a.m rm mortem 1} see .
f the G ; IESTLES } TP s
has for its object the placing of} Quijano suffered a gall bladder rn he Ge LyX A NESTLES QUALITY PRODUCT x
international trade on a sound/|{liness and submitted to three op 1 nN : : x
| hasis of foreign exchange and evi- , eration the last few months Dr. E. I I ‘ h\ On Sale At All Grocers .
dences deep aay of international; when he wa y rtu ll edr ike at $36.6599S00F8 00085955890 OT0RONOCTOD
exchange problems. jin hos ; PPPOE EEO



PAGE TWO











morning by T.C.A. after spending

trar of the University College

late Capt. Cummins, left by
B.W.I.A. on Wednesday for Puerto
Rico on her way to the U.S.A.
She has gone to gain experience in
surgery and X-ray in which she is
particularly interested.

Miss Cummins was trained in
nursing at the St. Joseph Mercy
Hospitai, British Guiana.
afterwards returned to Barbad
and dd private nursing before
joining the staff of Dr, Skinner's
Clinic where she worked for
nearly two years.

Sound Recordings
AKING the SuMahine Cruise

on the Mauretania which
called here yesterday are Mr. and

across the Atlantic by the Queen
Mary to connect with the Maure-
tania in New York,

Co-Op Bank Director
M: PERCY PHILIP, Managing
Director of the Trinidad Co-

Four Months’ Leave

If 4 per cent, excess is to be
charged on a long-term redemp-
tion loan, what becomes of the
4% per cent. promised in cases
of accelerated redemption? My
broker’s advice to the girls is:
ignore the market index and
price movements, stick to bubbly,
aad don't start dancing on the
able

which cannot be stained with
beer” will be welcome news to
the organisers of concerts at the





morning after attending as an

Spence and Co, left for Trinidad

on Wednesday by B.W.1.A. intran-
sit for Venezuela,

While here, he was staying at

the Marine Hotel.

On Cruise
ISS HARRIET PETTIT of the
Theatre Department of War-

She ner Bros. Office in New York was
Os an intransit passenger yesterday

on the Mauretania, She was met
on board by Mr. and Mrs, Ronnie
Gittens. Mr. Gittens is a Director
of Caribbean Theatres Ltd,

U.K. Visitors

HE only passengers to disem-
bark at Barbados from the
tourist liner Mauretania yesterday

joincd the ship at New York.

They are spending a _ holiday
here, staying at the Marine Hotel
until April 12.

As a remembrance of this day
the children will celebrate at St.
Catherine's School, St. Philip, on
Thursday, April 17.

left for the U.S.A. via Puerto Rico





ing her stay a pleasant one.

although he had

re-visited the



encountered rough weather which
was thought by every one to be
rather unusual at this time of
the year,



Ree:

CROSSWORD



| Down
4. Noticed in all Negro dances, (6)
3. The age of veracity. (3)
4. Situated beyond riot rule, (8)
5. Remove the lime in tea. (9)
| 6
7
9

squash court, (6)



BY THE WAY...

school leaving age for dogs
now comes up. There is to be a
school in Sheffield, in which they
will be taught how to cross roads.
Presumably there will be scholar-
ships for clever dogs who want to
go on to Doxsford University, just
as there are scholarships for cats
at Catsford University, where
they are taught how to get down

lodgers are nervous of
latest advertisements,
Continental frills,”
Mr Pearce

her
“Highbrow
commented



By Beachcomber

£3. 7s. 44d. in hand,

Another Traveller: Are we al-
lowed to go out when we get to
Lyons?

Official: There will be a con-
ducted tour of one hour, as per
schedule. Each member of the
party will be given 100 francs
out of his: allowance for refresh-

break for refreshment.

The Foulenough





BARBADOS

Shadows, found Willy polishing his

parade when there isn’t any parade

“Come along,” said Knarf and
Hanid. “Willy says he’s going to
find a parade in a minute, and we're
going with him to see if he can.”

So Hop-a-Long and Christopher
Cricket got behind Knar/ and Hanid,

and Hop-a-Long made a noise like | cause he really had his parade, now,

a drum by rubbing his legs together,

Rupert and the





Programme

Tip Top Tunes, 5 p.m. Composers of the

up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
The Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m. From
The Third Programme

Maturity Means

ability to face realities, to get along |
well with people, to build to ad- |
vantage on past experience, and
to find satisfaction for life in gen-
eral. The behaviour of a well ad-
justed person is marked by flex-
ibility and consistent self control
He is sympathetic and well organ-
ised without being a slave to the
rigors of orderliness. He main-

own behaviour and plans for the|

future with confidence.



Tail-piece

GOOD FRIDAY lith






ADVOCATE

Blackie Beetle; and Mr. Grumph the

pillars and potato bugs. They all

around the hill. “Willy will never
find a parade!” everyone kept say-
ing. “There isn’t any parade for him
to find!”

But Willy just kept smiling be-

right behind him!

New Bonnet—24









From R. M, MacColl.
At the commemorative service
for the King held in Washington

—owing to protocol—did not join

ta!” the success of Wallace Beery
in that superb early talkie “Viva
Villa!” Florence Desmond
paying her first visit to Washing-
ton to appear at a National Press
Club “do” and quipping “Now



Teday 5 & 8.30 p.m,

+ "lk takes
TWO
to get













ee ee ee ee ae ae Se, eee

Dial 4000 for Dinner
Reservations

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.80 only
and continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30

GEORGE PAL: RUNOLPH MATE

Screenpiay by Sydrey Boehm » Based on a novel By
Caen Baimer ang Pro Wyte

Amazing . . . Fantastic














































MISS SHAKUNTALA

DEVI





HERE ARE A FEW PRESS OPINIONS

has the answer in her head, before most
People could open a reckoner,
















Italy

~ ge



Portugal

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952








1
° Willy Had Unif |
° Willy Had a Faricy Uni orm bhé cele wen <9
|
—He Was All Set to March in a Parade— a ev us PY re
By MAX TRELL . Ga, J
| WILLY Toad hada blue uniform | eee
R. RONALD TREE, former Homecraft Course Visited Parents on, As > 7, â„¢ _ } oe" 2
British Conservative M.P. who 7PHE Housecraft Instructors’ ME ERROL BARROW. of ar 8 " aS is aa |
ae eee ee USS, Te Course formally opened on ‘Westward Ho”, Lands End, ® sort of point at one end, like the -
turned on Wednesday by B.W. 1 September 14, 1951 by Mr. E. C. who went up to the U.S.A. to end of a em ar a tos ball t i
via awe “ after spending h 5M. Theobalds, the then Acting spend Christmas with her parents the other end.’ ae -
usual winter | olidays in Barbados fjirector of Education, terminated Rev and Mrs. G. M. Plaskett of | oe ya. ‘
staying at his home, Heron Bay, (oo an. . i . aa aad “ a Everyone in the neighborhood |
7 yesterday afternoon at the House- New Jersey, returned to Barba-| 3
St James. He was accompanied *~ . : eel od ; co : | wondered what Willy was dresse4
by Mrs. T craft Centre, Bay Street. dos on Wednesday by B.W.1LA.! ; ‘

Y, = =, ” The Course was of six month's via Puerto Rico. She was accom-/| ™ the uxiform for, and why he care 4
Crucifixion’’ At Ch.Ch. duration. Visitors ee ee pe <- d by her little ees an a) Done 3
HE Christ Church Parish tained to tea by Miss eyne, Lesley who was born in and , i a

Chureh Choir, assisted ie Organiser. Among those present and was seeing her grand parents band. . 5 bf Ho )aD,.0 a
some well known local artistes Were Hon. and Mrs. R. N. Turner, for the first” time, But he hasn’t ‘got a band,” said ei
will render Stainer’s “Cruci- Mrs. F. A. Bishop, Mr. E.C. M: Miss Flotence Springer, of} Blinky Mole.
fixion” at Christ Church Parish Theobalds, Mrs. Muriel Clarke, “Colliston”, Government Hill and| “Maybe,” suggested Hop-a-Long,
Church on Sunday, April 6 at Mrs. H. A. Vaughan, Major and retired ae of Dorrie the eremmenne. “Willy’s going to
7.30 ' Mrs. Clindon Reed, Miss Betty’ ton's Girls’ who went up to the n a parade.” \ P

es O. Gittens will id Arne Mr. and Mrs. R. Tucker, U.S.A. with Mrs, Barrow, also| “What parade?” asked Blackie ' | . f CMU Gea E ete

at the organ. ae eee Dr, and Mrs. H. G, Cummings returned on Wednesday. She | Beetle. Willy Toad in his uniform. :
Leaving T: d Mr. D. E. M. Malone. took the opportunity to visit Hop-a-Long didn’t know what}
. ey g io-day Mrs. R. N. Turner who gave a many of her relatives in various] parade. and Christopher Cricket made chirp-
rate an ame "Saas short ae. presented the Cer- oh eg Ay Bag E. = Curious Clothes ing sounds like a fife. CAL atte aris ic
0! 0 0, ana f t rizes nany o ; ® 2 -
will be returning home | this — For U. ‘S. Holiday contributed greatly towards mak-| ,, Meanwhile Knarf and Hanid, the} Then they met Blinky Mole and .
ai ane ; “ |

the past ISS GLORIA CHEESMAN, “Vrs. Barrow is th fe of| boots and getting ready, so it|frog and Glive the Snail. And they BARCELONA, EN iy TO JUNE. 1
the ee tc sapenen daughter of Mr. C. L. Chees- Mr, E, Sy Werther, MCP. ane seemed, to march off down the road. | all nrarched along to see if Willy |,

ier oar Meer enka OT Remoaatcn tent Cor the URA. Oe ee Sen wearin Suck scttens aothenioe bi elt be een tee teenage ‘

who was formerly att: ssociation, le or the U.S.A . yas wearing suc rious ¢ as he said he Mr.

Bank of Siuntrest: nag dng via Puerto Rico on yesterday First In 33 Years and what was the meaning of the| made a noise like a big drum, and C L U B - ; " :

first visit to the island which they Morning by B.W.I.A. to spend a R. AND MRS. CECIL H.| silver rod. Glive held aloft an even larger leaf For this special occasion PAA offers a direct ser-

said was made very pleasant due oT, ‘ a oe a = henobngeas Sgetvtag bare’ pester. ‘ ores pons oye said penn in the oe una me ones carried by Knarf vice from New York to Barcelona. Or you can

orin o} ear Water orida as - , ere yester- irits, “I'm a - r. anid. : we) sail asili
wae mee ae te ¢ Attended R.E.C. Talks 48” ™orning on the Mauretania Ponaheat te cond eoeendet majonten M O R G A N fly to Lisbon, travel ove rland to the Basilica at
a from New York. .. “ , 3 » Family of Mice Fatima where the 35th anniversary of the appari-

spend next winter here, R. J. E. R. KNIGHT, Admin- “yy; Coryat, a T jadi h That's what everybody thought, ; : oe : d
University Registrar istrative Officer, St. Kitts, has beon reciain x the tr S.A,| Said Knarf; “but they didn't see how. Finally they met a whole family tion of the Blessed Virgin will be celebrated on

M* H. W. SPRINGER, Regis- Nevis, left for Antigua yesterday fo; many yéars Soda Carib that| YOU could be a drum-major in a} of mice, and a whole family of cater- May 13th.

..and continue down through Spain

” ini , ost to Barcelona for the Congress.
of the West Indies, returned io Observer, the Conference of the West Indies on several occasions} fr you to lead.” followed along to see if Willy could a en aie
Jamaica yesterday morning by Regional Economic Committee at since leaving when he was a|__ Willy chuckled. “I'll have a pa-| find a parade. popular Carn Make your visit a complete pilgrimage to the
B.W.LA. Ph and Ravine consulta- eae ht a He was staying boy, yet this was the first time - ares sar And some ants came ant, ones i Singers in person sacred shrines of Europe, to Lourdes and the
ions with members of the Region- at the Marine Hotel he had been back to Barbados in Ae . . we robins, and several rabbits and chip- ‘ >
al Economic Committee on matters Off To The U.S.A. 33 years. along behind me and you'll see. | munks, anda porcupine, and a dozen a Eternal City where you may enjoy the privilege
affecting the University College. R. GEORGE AMOS at one Mr. and Mrs, Coryat will be| Here, carry these two flags for me{ qucks ‘and chickens, all quacking of an audience with the Holy Father.

Also jeaving for Jamaica by the time Private Secretary to Sir £¢tting off the ship at St. Vincent| if you don’t mind.” And he handed | 5,4 elucking. SMALL ISLAND Witl cul rvice direct to London, Paris.
same plane were Mr. Charles Hiliary Blood, a former Governor t0-4ay for ten days’ holiday and| Knarf and Hanid each a big green Ander ‘the. bead of then.:4i PRIDE ith reguiar ser ice direc 0 London, + aris,
Emtage of Emtage Electrical Co. of this colony, left the island on Will also visit Trinidad for a| leaf with a long stem. narched Willy, tossing the rod up Rome and Lisbon, to every major European city,
enenth gina ati Colic Bee t Wednesday by B.W.LA. for eaeet a oa psing to ay ty aoe ie eee D the air sow, ond catching it as it MIGHTY ZEBRA Pan American World Airways offers you the

n rs 0 > , New York on the SS. Brazil. meadow, Willy first with his silver sates Tabs ; ¢ I Oi eaten. nit ,
! ay t i : : SII: ' sdge 95 ye i Z
the British American Tobacco Co, pusne Rico on his way to the "Ve president. and. Director ‘of rod which ‘he started poking op'and sells one erie aa) eee SIR GALBA know ledge of 25 years intern itional travel ex
who is expected to be back within e . 8 Stein Hall g& Co., Importers,} down in the air and twirling be- | 2°¢,W5iriing It aroun : perience to help you plan your trip.
the next two weeks. Paid Business Visit Exporters and Manufacturers of| tween hi: fingers, and Knarf and | in time with all the drumming and SPOILER
Surgery And X- Ray FTER spending a week here New York, Mr. Coryat said that| flanid behind him carrying the two chirping and quacking and clucking
ISS MARY CUMMINS on business on behalf of his his wife and he had a wonderful] jeaf flags. By and by they met Hop- and squeaking. VIKING
daughter of Mrs. H. S. Cum- £2, Mr. J. Dick, Overseas cruise down from New York| a-Long and Christopher Cricket. So they marched all across the

mins of Crumpton Street and the Representative of Blundell, except for two days when they meadow, and through the woods and



Ask yous travel agent
about 22 and 30 day all-expense
pilgrimages to Europe including full
arrangements for yGur visit to

the Eucharistic Congress.

For reservations see your Travel Agent or

PAN AMERICAN

Mrs, Robert Hohn de Rappard of were Mr. and Mrs. Ian Oliver Hu tf)
Brussels, Relgium. Leaving Bel- from Macclesfield, England, who nee An oe
gium in March they travelled

World’s Most Experienced Airline

STOCKINGS—45, 51 and 60
PURE WOOL TWIN SETS—

} 4) Cathedral, the coloratura voice ~ Ee FETE eT et
operative Bank, returned home * . Unites the neck wear. ( FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 cae 7 ‘ ; $22.98
during the week by B.W.1.A. after pent The Winter at - A twopenhy sum. ®). di in| 4,007.15 p.m. '19.36M, 26 AIM, 81M Sateen ae eee Sweater and Cardigan Séts from $
spending his annual month’s leave “ Spending he winter | bad. (5) — nee . > : ;
ahem at Miramar St 10. Take for granted the donkey, “4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily came to the National Anthem, the R BOTH pieces
oh, Barnes, Se See Se Ss P| 18. OU ee cae (¢ a6 Sau 46 ie Service, 4.15 p.m. Semprini, 4.30 p.m. President stood to attention, but to $27.98 for P

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. — Broad Street — Bridgetown
Across Phone 2122 (After business hours, 2303)
ee Soha de appre pee, Tis Mr. Oliver is Managing Director 1. Baek an evens i gomimon. th.) baad
own business “Rhodera Co.,” in of The Fine Cotton Spinning Asso- 8 St 3) | sana
Brussels. His company makes ciation in England, r 10. Brom a play @ horse wae in a path oad. eannge sisal insta a calee a nitive, “tohe
> t
recs See . In , he School Children Celebrate +} Pane an the tears, By ‘ cottage. Outside his mother’s uncommonly like the new bonnet t SANETTA DRESS SHOP
for U.S. shy and aa Pacacks HE ST. GILES Sunday School +s She tends pr’ ae bunt, (4) ao he fess" bolls eg to ass Lavender’s — shop. F ; ¢# 5
branch of the St. Barnabas e together, takes a deep breath and ‘* Well, upert,”” she says smiling ’ | Next to Singers
wna cae eee Sees Me vic by Rev. 1 Kati batt haa e,iaree sumber in) oe Se on a ms ne en waite i. eemes ey fir v7 WHEN WORLDS c oe
One of his most popular record- aynes Vicar of St. , : : ry Sr ae
ings was a six pute “Sound Barnabas on’ duly 22, 1951, the 30. gah nid tothe’ quats, (a). a word to say, for Mrs. Bear is is_you lik like it. LLIDE Color by =| FOR TRA VELLING
History” of the last war which in- same day rr the Lord Bishop Gh tes ee a aine party © 8) TECHNICOLOR -
cluded V-1 and V-2 rockets in Was consecrated nas now in- § . A Paramount Picture 3 ‘ * *
flight, bomb explosions, etc. , weet its numbers from two a. Buardian for Oy hair? (8) | B. B oe . Radio The Voice ee ai NYLON UNDIES—Slips, Half-Slips, Panties
ozen to over eighty, |

















Week, 5.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m ; g ¢ o
sii ail aes 16. From the fire, remember. (5) Seae in ; in. Mrs. Truman and Margaret
R. F. G. DOUGLAS, Official by B.W.LA. on Wednesday. 17 Rages to be engaged. (5) Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15 p m. sang with the rest of the congre-
» ts, (5) Record Reveals, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round
Reporter of the Legislative C.S.0.B.A. REUNION 18. You ae ee ee up and Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The gation, Margaret in particular
Covmel fn rica arid, egy CTMERE wil be no monthly ce |g eats oun Neate MEL a Sa a wi art fool.
> ‘ ormere ‘obium; ; is 2 = :
on Wednesday by B.W.LA, to union of the Combermere Nioblum: 14, ‘Lion: | Re eee Tentn Williams going like thé VALOR COOKER ee ee ee
spend part of his four months’ School Old Boys’ Association to- Year: 24. Ally: 25. Baie: 20. Drear! 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary, 7.45 Ban. si ae ,
leave with this relatives in Pas- night. The next meeting of the hown: kb gomey fs: municipal: 4: | Song and Dance, 8.15 p.m. Radio News. dickens on Broadway gy, Marion
sage Road. He plans to remain Association will be held on Fri- Ridicule: 11, Nufeey 12 12 Pansat.” Bill! roth fee m ete Altes, se Bm. Brando repeating in “Viva Zapa- Short Burners
here for about two months, day, May 2. \ eer} ; aM,

2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64

ROODAL





, I suppose they’ll be expecting me complete with waste and overflow
T. HAVE not had so much Watney in another's trouble, Uniformed Official: I’m afraid ‘ 5 to mimic the Washington monu- '. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
; :, - Courage in your own. not. Tickets for tea will be given Ag 9 ment. Established
tor siorutanisics unioaded about = , : out at Lyons. Besides, Mrs,’ Pos- Being Your e ~ 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
fourpence worth of Antananarivo Dogsford and Calsbridge _ sett, according to my notes, had a] Being emotionally mature is the PSI
bottl 1 je at Laroche- y = ne RSLS SDSS SSSI
Apteros for es 000 aya E whole question of the Srierings. ana she is Sow only state of mind that includes the | GLOBE



THEA [SOODAL THEATRES

ns

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.30 only ;
And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30



DEVI



To-morrow at 6.30 am.
“HOMESTEADERS OF or
PARADISE VALLEY















“TIGER WOMAN”

—

“THE PASSION PLAY”

ROXY

To-day Last % Shdws 4.30 & 8.15
WHOLE SERIAL
“TIGER WOMAN”



“WHEN ba dag ra with Linda STERLING
until you are perfectly ment in the evening at the hotel, | tains the respect for the accepted | . The Human Calculating Machine Color By Tee’ meee
7 J aaa , aC J ‘ Spectac' Never Bef Film
certain he's not a stuffy old fool, {rom trees, provided that such refreshment | customs and traditions of society. married will appear ROR reset héganhe Sister aieatie:
, a fe tele is consumed on the premises,|And at the same time is open- | , TO-NIGHT AT 8.30 AT THE To-night at 8.30 p.m. and

Occasional showers of beer Mrs, McGurgle is criticised and any change left over will| minded to change and progress. % Ne ee RUNEALA “PHANTOM SPEAKS”

7RHE op OME of Mrs. McGurgle’s old be returned to me until the next|He accepts responsipility for his} # EMPIRE THEATRE GENIUS Miss SH/ 2 Not Suitable for Children
invention “a piano “ent: P i



Opening Sat. Sth 4.80 & 8.15
“TRAPPED” and
“CIRCLE OF DANGER”







big London halls, where the . “All. this about sauces. of Foulenough Macaroon said, “And where The London's ‘Picture Post’ . . “LIGHT OF OLD SANTA FE" WHOLE ae fee
*hrowi about of beer is a dis- Isn't gravy good enough? We Seay - beat all this” time?” SHAKUNTALA DEVI is one of those if “THE SHADOW”
‘ ing don’t want to find the place pack- HE Macaroon of Macaroon| have you en all this time ?") Calculating Wonders Who Haye Aston- Sat. 5th Midnite
grace to good music. remem- ; taee® id - bre ah ds on “In Nicaragua,” replied the exile. ished Py Performing Almost instan- eae f our
ber the Tu hi ed with French artists and ac- sat at breakfast at Macaroon ” 68 . Seren ; “DANGERS OF THE We would like to inform

r the fuss when Peildreiver, the > " ioe 5 6 7 ; “Have you breakfasted? No, | taneous mental calculations, so fantastic, NG é BS t as from Saturday 5th
Czech pianist, put a brimming tresses. Good plain English cook- Castle, Macaroon. The _ butler i” s th | as to seem “SUPER-HUMAN.” When CANADIAN MOUNTED ied Poo yer, boar geht’ ge
glass of beer on the instrument #98 like what the old cook Mrs. announced an early visitor — a but I will, , wes e breezy a, learned professors tested Miss DEVI in eee - 40. yh ‘week-ends
and played a Boccherini minuet Rockett gave us better than all Mr. Macaroon. Intrigued, the |SWet. “What's your real name? London recently, the demonstration fell LYMPIC ‘and mid-week Shows.
so forcefully that the whole thing this chef stuff—frogs in aspiff. I Macaroon said, “Show him in.” |@8Ked | the Macaroon, with a BRE: 35 + SORIRG SUS WS AYRE oO
was a-drip from stem to stern, SUPPOSe, and snails swimming in A red-faced individual in a kilt|ffiendly sneer, “Foulenough, ssnnaiphcnsinithcomenesti ice
Sleghammer, the ‘“Norweigan Champagne. And culture, I know. entered the room confidently, |S@id the visitor, “You may call To-day to Mon, 4.00 & 8.18 ROYAL
Paderewski,” used to cover the Lectures about the National Gal- “I could not,” he said, “visit}me the Foulenough of Foul- dunt 1 Rome . ... . THe young Indian, LAWRENCE TIERNEY as
instrument, except for the keys, lery and Shakespeare, It won't my old country’ without greeting | enough.” er RG. it LORD ten nee te "THE HOODLUM” “ME BROTHERS NBETER”
with a thick travelling rug, Work. This is England, not Mong- the Chieftain of our Clan,”| Tek, Tek calculating Machine in the Rome Uni- papiniawcniy WwoMe with
before waginning - pe e an marten. “How do you comp to be al Technically, her réndering was Cee Seblesusene aed maesetarsoaerlicsh rsh ce eee er
wore a serge hat, so that when +. Macaroon?” inquired the Mace- generally good, although occasion- FRAN | To-morrow at 1.30 p.m gt

5 ° 2 » , n : Fog a “ONCE UPON A DREAM
audience “he "was started in me Travellers Joy roon. “Through my greatgrand-| ally the raised foot in attitude was Anne ‘Ey .cTHE DATLY MIRROR’ London SOV E MREIOG IES aS
Siete Travelier: May Mrs. Possett leanerits ae seen ax "he isons toes v eheianet ie the Charle BICKFORD Baby. Who was proughe up by the ROLL ON TEXAS MOON ae
; OSs Ep c She] ma is Te ed... the bird isa ae

Life is mostly froth and bubble, and I have tickets for a cup of married a MeHiccough.” Smell- | third “fishdive” went astray. anes fas mean mathematician herself, and Sat, Sth Midnite Sat. & Sun 430 & 8.15

Two things stand like stone: tea when we get to Dijcn? ing a not unamusing rat, the (Article on ballet.) William LUNDIGAN 20. when it gomes to figuring things out she WHOLE SERIAL Humphrey BOGART in

“CHAIN LIGHTNING”



y ou and
Hs on the list of useless ac- wm Pocienly Outen ee oetate jute“ wvete tricom rida. ‘th ba xnitica De”
PRINTS PRIN Ss PRIN’ ‘Ss one aa re iP coer ith plicit eer Prices: Orchestra and Box $1.00. %, faiccny 68, Bex Seats oA. Dane CLARK-—Ramond MASSEY
S a 7 z a c p y : 00, )
: 4 feathers, ExtromTALENTED BEAUTIES Cirele 75e., Baleeny G0c.





GALETY





“PLAZA CINEMAS



All Talking)
“THE PASSION PLAY” Aa ANZA THEATRES
A LARGE CONSIGNMENT ae SRS AS Se ae GOODFRIDAY 11th The Garden—St. James
he i “ i BS



















To-day & To-morrow 8.20 p.m.

STROMBOLI

BARBAREES —Dial 5170

BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 OISTIN—Dial 8404

PRINTED COTTONS 36ins. 65c. 70c. 76c.

Midnite Sa’

To-day 44 & 830 p.m & Continuing To-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p m.
2 M. 2 Ingrid BERGMAN &
TODAY (3 sHows) ; Warner Bros present - Oo U rE R A G E Jane Nigh — Rory Calhoun & eas ark
PRINTED WAFFLF PIQUE 36 ins. $2.13 William Naney Frank FORCE OF ARMS “Mala POWERS-—Tod ANDREWS et een
° HOLDEN OLSON LOVEJOY in J
‘

with Roland WINTERS as

also Leon ERROL in THAN

Also the Color Cartoon ; “HIS BITTER HALF" _ “SECRETARY TROUBLE”

Saturday — Special 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

“OUTLAW GOL
Johnny Mack BROWN &
“ARIZONA TERRITORY”









ie RR harlie



MIDNITE SPECIAL » SATURDAY STH

2 New Action Thrillers ! !







Sat. Speci Pe a Se | lee eet

“RIO GRANDE
PATROL















ROSE OF SANTA ROSA Sat. Special 1.30 p.m Oates eos aa Whip WILSON
HOOSIER HOT SHOTS & LAW OF THE BADLANDS LAW OF THE WEST TERRITORY ‘Sh ate oe .
. R EVANS & W HITFIELDS RIDIN’ THE OUTLAW TRAIL Tim Holt — Richard Martin & Johnny Mack Brown & Randolph Scott & “TO BEAT THE BAND”

RIDER FROM
TUCSON
Tim Holt

GUNRUNNERS

Jimmy Wakely

Francis LANGFORD &
“CROSS FIRE”
Robert MITCHUM

eae EEE

PRAIRIE LAW

George O’Brien
me



les STARRETT &

ch
DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606 Smiley BURNETTE

YOUR SHOE



a

George O’Brien

STORES











FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

181 Sat Examination For U.C.W.L.



(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica.
One hundred and eighty-
one young men and women

THE GAMBOLS .

OUS THE Divi IS ONLY ELEVEN





Vit BUY A LITTLE Scare) [ees DO You Ou! | BOUGHT THOSE TO GO

throughout the West Indies TOWILLINGS AND 1 ONLY WADS PIWITH MY WINNINGS | NEW SCARF DEAR 7S” SCARE
and at centres in the United pSIXPENCE ON IT J] J fvery eeetty
Kingdom and the United

HANDBAG, GLOVES,

States took the entrance ex- SHOES AND WAT ?

amination to the University
College of the West Indies
last month. They include
West Indians at colleges over-
seas as well as six Americans
and three West Africans who
seek admission for the aca-
demic year 1952—53.

There were 78 candidates for
the Faculty of Arts, 63 for Medi-
cine and 40 for Science. Tho ap-
plicants for Science courses were
the largest number so far.

Last year there was peak ap-

plication to the University of ap- . ine D B Tr 1
proximately 200, but the Uni- : Ss e e amee
versity authorities consider the

present figure to be nearer the
normal average for applications in

Siren Song O

Gets Baton

the future. Less than 80 were e

admitted last year. D Lt P e rin . LONDON.
In the West Indies the candi- nves ments Mr. Alan Lennox-Beyd, Minis-

dates were divided: Jamaica 63; ter of State for Colonial Affairs

Trinidad 41; Barbados 22; British

24 Billion In
Six Years

LONDON. last month presented the baton
The voite of Spring to many a Canadian is a great deal ©°{, honour to Sub - Inspector

ie met -' S nai eet ine » trillinae of . birds Beharrysingh of the British Gui-
louder—and less melodious—than the trilling of the birds aga Police Force at a pansing oul

Guiana 21; the Windward Islands
17 and the Leeward Islands 3.
At least 23 scholarships and ex~

hibitions will be awarded this as they burst into song as winter passes. Each April they rade of Colonial Police officers
year, The Universite is offering corhe, Sreat development in the . hear a sudden multi-toned fanfare ring out across the vast $7 tendon.
six open scholarships: Trinidad war period, aiden ty oo waters of the Great Lakes — a fanfare coming from the

offers three exhibitions; Barbados



2 ; i 5 ; 5 , All the men were non-gazetted
thr t Y arb lus provided by the Govern- Sirens of the innumtrable steamers that ply the Lakes every wee Ne

on ae two each; and ment’s defence program since year between the months of April to December. During ee oars ee ie
eid ‘Giidesek actanine eh the outbreak of the Korgan War, the short winter months the whole of the Great Lakes are j.. Training School in North Lon-
open to scholars from all parts of terest’ of investors oth -: one frozen solid and not a ship can stir don. The baton itself was a cen-
the Wes lies, < ~xhibitions 11,34, . . nanan ——— 9 " ‘ :
will be awarded to. Jamaicans in United States and Europe. How cae Once the Lakes thaw to liquid "Viktoria ‘Regina’ in gold and
Arts and Sciences from funds pony oe ft - ys = oe a Jamaica Short Of life, meee: the por sgg they was given by Sir George Abbiss.
rena ; the hah mr nt and that including intentions for the Shi P 1 oat i cuaay oer a Assistant Tnspector General of
bela in trust by the University current year, hew investment in Po r.ersonne ’ the Colonial Police, from his pri-

ge.

The names of the successful
scholars will be announced late
April or early May following in-
terviews by a travelling Board.

Full Tinte Govt.
Medical Service
Planned For J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica.
A full time Government medi-
cal service is now proposed for
Jamaica. - Medical officers ap-
pointed to the service in the future
will not be permitted to under-
take private practice but will be
admitted into the service at high-
er salary scales to compensate for
loss of earnings thrbugh private

practice,



The scheme comes into effect
on April 31, 1952, but the option
is given, to medical officers al-
ready in the service to decide to
remain on their present terms or
accept the new salary scales and
restrictive terms. This option will
be open until October 1, 1952.

It is proposed, however, that
holders of specialist posts should
continue to have consulting prac-
tice; and that this privilege should
also be granted to medical officers
in charge of hospitals, if such
officers hold specialist qualifica-
tions or if, by virtue of their ex-
perience, their assistance is sought
by private practitioners in dis-
tricts served by their hospitals,



Proposals For First

Co-operative Farms
Outlined

(From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica,

The Jamaica Government has
outlined proposals for the estab-
lishment of Jamaica's first two
co-operative farms to be run ona
profit sharing basis by farmer-
settlers,

The two properties selected
are Lucky Hill in St. Mary now

being experimentally run as a
communal farming unit with a
C.D. and W. grant, and Grove

Farm in St. Catherine a Govern-
ment Agricultural Centre. These
will be leased for 99 years to two
co-operative societies which will
be formed by present settlevs and
selected farmers from outside the
properties.

Both properties will be operated
under the supervision of the De-
partment of Agriculture to ensure
that the proper agricultural prac-
tices are carried out and that re-
sources are not wasted.

INQUEST ON DEATH OF
HAWKER ADJOURNED

The inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Beatrice Foster (55) of Rock Hall,
St. Andrew was further ad-
journed yesterday until April 17
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Coroner of District
segue

Beatrice Foster who was a
hawker, died on the spot when
the motor bus A-66, the property
of the Rocklyn Bus Co., and
driven by Cyril Springer of
Spooner’s Hill, overturned while

it was being driven down Spring .,
St. Andrew about 1.30

Vale Hill,
p.m. on March 31.







GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES

including:—

BELTING, in Leather, Camel Hair, and Canvas-stitched
BELT FASTENERS, OIL CANS, PRESSURE GAUGES
GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
FILTER CLOTH, — WHITE COTTON TWILL
SUMALOID and RITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walls)
ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES

For “EVERITE” ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, &
RIDGE CAPS

Send your orders to - - - -

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Phone: 4528

PCCP OSH

4



durable physical assets during
the seven years 1946-52 will to-,
tal over $24 billion, an annual
average of nearly $3.5 billion,
more than four times capital ex-
penditures of some $750 million
in the pre-war year 1939.

The 1952 estimate of $5 billion
represents an increase of 9%
over the 1951 preliminary figure
of $4.6 billion, is more than
double the 1947 capital expendi-
ture of $2.4 billion, and three
times the 1946 total of $1.7 bill-
ion. Such intentions provide a
secure base for a high level of
activity in the current year.
although, as in 1951, a number

of “soft spots” could easily de-
velop.
The basis for the increase re-

cently has been largely the three-
year $5 billion defence program
adopted by the Government after
Korean hostilities started. Of the
total, $1.7 billion was appropria-
ted for defence purposes during
the current fiscal year ending
March 31, 1952, and of this, $1.1
billion was earmarked for @x-
penditure on military equip-
ment and installations. The full
amount will not be spent, but
instead about $900 million, How-
ever, it is believed that within
the three-year period, the pro-
gram will be completed, in phys-
ical terms, in terms of construc-
tion put in place and quantities
of supplies and equipment pro-
duced and delivered, and prob-
pbly will be exceeded, for the
country has taken on additiona:
commitments in the meantime.

While defence expenditures in
the current year did not come
up to estimates by $200 million,
the stimulus to industry should
be even greater in the current
year than a year ago since while
on April 1, 195i, Canadian in-
dustry was working on defence
orders from the Canadian Gov-
ernment valued at $500 million
to-day it is working on orders
valued at $1.5 billion. Orders
placed in the current fiscal year
ave estimated at close to $2
billion.

Of the estimated $5 billion to
be spent on capital assets this
year, $3.5 billion is private ex-
penditure, an increase of 5%
over 1951’s $3.4 billion, whiie
public expenditure of $1.5 bill-
ion will be an inerease of 21%
over $1.2 Billion for 1951, indica-
ting the increasing important
role that the Government will
play in the current year. Of busi-
ness spending of $3,227 million
this year, increase of 11% ovel
the 1951 total of $2,290 millions,
manufacturing and utilities will
account for increasing shares.
New investment by manufactur-
img will be up 23%, from $755.
million to $929 million, and that
by utilities will also increase by
23%, from $916 million to $1,130
million. Primary industries and
the construction industry will be
barely ahead, up 1%, from $853
to $859 million while the total for
trade, finance and commercial ser-
vices will decline 22%, from $395
million for 1951 to $309 million
for 1952.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

APREL 3, 1952
CANADA 1
75% Cheques on Bankers 13 2/10%
Demand Drafts 73.05 %
... Sight Drafts 72 9/10
75% Cable
“3 5/10% Currency 71 °7/10%
Coupons 11%
50 Silver 20%

White Park Road.



(From Our Uwn Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica.

Shortage of certified personnel
to serve on small ships to Jamaica
from other Caribbean ports has
created a situation which is now
under study by the Marine Board
and local Government. Due to the
lack of sufficient certified sea-
men—engineers and mates—mas-
ters of ships coming to Kingston
have at times met difficulty in
getting clearance as a result of
being unable to satisfy the re-
quirements of the law, regarding
the number of such officers.

A meeting of the Marine Board
has been called to discuss the situ-
ation and settle policy. Under
consideration by Government is a
scheme to provide local opportun-
ities for training in navigation.

£3 For Stabbing

“Anyone who comes before me
in future and is found guilty of
wounding with a knife, I am going
to send to prison,” His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma told James Hare-
wood, a 24-year-old fisherman of
Chapman’s Lane, St. Michael,
when he fined him £3 for wound-
ing Daisy Norville with a knife on
her hand.

The fine is to be paid by monthly
instalments of £1 or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour. Norville told the
Court that on March 24 she and
the defendant had an argument
and a fight ensued, In the fight
the defendant wounded her on
her hand with a knife.

Sgt, Murrell prosecuted for the
Police from information received.

J'ca Exported 230,000
Stems Of Bananas
Jan—March 1952

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica. —
Jamaica's export production 0
bananas for the first quarter of
1952 was just over 230,000 stems
as compared with 944,000 stems
shipped in the same period last
year.



Reason for the decline is the
devastating hurricane in August
last year which did severe dam-
age to the industry. It is ex-
pected that there will be some
difficulty in providing the 70,000
stems which is due to go forward
to the United Kirfgdom in April.

However the industry expects
that by next year production will
be double and perhaps treble the
production before the hurricane
due to the progress being made in
restoration efforts.

AIR TRAFFIC

From Trinidad

Y. Scott, H. Kirton, M. Harewood, w

Tanner, R. Waliace, S. Taylor, H. er
J. Cates, L. Smith, T. Smith, } ardinna
L. Flower
Fema ons, aun, “noms,
tel illiams, Edgar 10m i
ote r Charlies Berker, Myrtic

kins,

ere Tens Elmes, David Walker
From San Juan

Carolyn Barrow,
Florence Springer, Charles

F. Fairley
MOO EPARTURES By B.WiA ON
WEDNESDAY

For Puerto Rico

Lindsay Williams, Roselie
Alexandra Ee iy oo
Samu ete, ‘ary ree,
— Srances FitzGerald, Russell
Sawens, Jane Sawens, George Coxe
Elizabeth Coxe, Henry Lord, Many Lord
Frém Grenada

Shelby Wilson

Lesies Barro
Vv. Anders

Williams
Williams
Penelope

—



Lipper
Wallets

$1.79
each

Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD STREET



one reason why every ship needs yate collection. Also there to sec
a powerful siren, Moreover, the the ceremony was London’s No. 1}
ships use their sirens as a means po)jiceman, Sir Harold Scott, Com-
of signalling theif presence in the pigsioner of the Metropolitan
numerous narrow channels with porice

which the Lakes abound, From Inspector Beharrysingh has
resonant baritone to piercing @one 21 years’ service in the
soprano, the sirens throb and Gojonial Police.



shriek in a non-stop Neptune’s

every twelve. Concert Af Rocks
A Louder Voice

a new — and even louder The Programme for to-night's

voice, a voice that belonged to the Police Band Concert at Hastings

chorus for nine months out of
°
Tonight
Last April, the Lakes awoke to
biggest vessel of her type ever Rocks which begins at 8 o'clock

!

l

then to have been built, She was is:— ‘ haha
the fresh water oil-tanker, the (1) Suite for Miptary Band—
-y (a) Folk Song March,
Ss Imperial Leduc, whose cost (b) The Song of the Bilackamith
was approximately $4,000,000, and (ec) Fantasia on the Dargason
her mighty siren — a thunderous (intronyeing Urea Steaves”)
bass—soon became a familiar (4, concert Ovature FINGAL'S
s und. Later, she was joined by CAVE—Mendelssohn
a sister ship, the S.S. Imperial This overtars, Uke sthe Boosh
Redwater, and a third sister will Be Nice Britain, ‘wntan, prune
join the pair this year. These delssohn Wade when be Was 19
ships—who represent a total in« years old in 1829. In a letter to his
vestment of some $12,000,000—are fern hae eek
vital links in a new eastern out- ordinarily the Hebrides affected me
let artery for Alberta's oil. First the following came pe erin
link is a 1,127 mile 90 million del- there.” He then quotes rst
lar pipeline from the oilfield to = aden tanetor cath ‘on
qa tanker terminal on Lake Supe- next year, when he was in Italy.
rior. From there, the oil tankers The overturé is like a beautiful
take over. Each ship will cover e cairo matthe pasting. ying
26 chie is
the 662 miles from the Superior bar—the identical phrase which
terminal to a refinery at Sarnia,, pp ated thought of im the cave
ario — ¢ aa of ngal,
Ontario — and then make the re vs) abemat’ Gh “Reedaocsncene ee
turn voyage back—some fifty clarinets Weber
times in an average season, and Bandsman reer pbanternnn x4
each ship will haul in that season Cave; Cpl. tris; Bandsman Cai-
> lender and Bandsman W. Alleyne
a total of about £800,000 tong of (4) Operatic Excerpts — Romeo aa

crude oil,

This is all part and parcel of
the great investments which are
being made by the oil industry in
the development of Canadian oil
resources—on which an estimated
200,000,000 dollars were spent in
1951 alone.

Although oil is fast becoming a
leading item in the Great Lakes
traffic, it is not, however, the
only important bulk cargo. Iron
ore from the Upper Lakes, coal
from the Ohio ports and grain
from the great wheat belts of the
interior are the other chief com-
modities carried. And each year,
the settlers and traders of the
Upper Lakes keep an especially
keen ear cocked for the toot of
the first steamer of the season, For
when the first ship of the year ties
up at Fort William quay, her
Master is always presented by the
local citizens with a souvenir of
the oceasion: a shiny new silk hat!

(10) Rhythmic

Juliet a's ; Gounod
dneluding the duet "Stay but # little

longer’ “The Valse Song” and
‘The Wedding March.”
(5) Nautical Medley—The Jolly Ship-
mates . Barsotti,
(6) Humorous Variations—Three Blind
Mice Lotter

in Which the mice eventually do
get their tails cut off with a carving
knife.

(7) Characteristic On the Dover
Coach 2 6G red oe .. Vinter
Bandsman Walker; Bandaman

Lovelle; Bandsman Bienman,
(8) Potpourri—Pestivalia-Behoes of old
time dances “ Selected.
(9) Wilm MusicTheme Songs of Irving
Rerlin Duthoit.

GOD SAVE THE



Permits To Prospect
For Minerals in
Jamaica Granted

(From Our Own “orrespondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica,
Four permits to prospect for

But to all Canadians living with- â„¢inerals in Jamaica have been
in earshot of the Lakes that dis- s”anted by the Government and
cordant chorus of the steamers’ ®S a result of prospecting done

sirens is sweet music indeed.

It so far,

it appears possible that

means trade—and thus prosperity certain ores containing chiefly
for their country and every new lead and zinc, and some contain-

note is welcomed. That
there was so much rejoicin
the sonorous blare of the juc’s
siren told first all and swndry that
Albertan oil was speeding Lake-
wards down to Ontario, and that
a new outlet for one of Canada’s
most precious mineral assets had
been forged.



FIRE AT BANNATYNE

Five acres of third crop ripe The Government said that con-
canes were burnt when a fire oc- *iderable deposits of iron-ore had
curred at Bannatyne Plantation, been discovered by the Geological

Christ Chureh, at about 7.45 p.m. Department but no application has
on Wednesday. Tney are the pro- so far been received for permis~
perty of J. B. Marsh and were in- sion to propect for
these deposits,

sured.



SPECIAL

Hemmed Sheets, Superior Quality
Sinisa

vara 100",

BLANKETS
46" x 72".

SILKS. per yd.

| ROYAL

| 12 High Street



is why ing manganese,
when mically worked.

Flowered Bamberg



can be econo~

irritated throat
membranes with
throat-easing medi-
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ts of
Vicks VapoRub,
Really medicated!

Really soothing! .





‘Doctors & Nurses Recommend

m-Buk

The World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

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a













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Digestive
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‘owder. They are the most
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just dissolve one or two on the
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anywhere, Pleasant tasting
De Witt'’s Antacid Tablets
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freshness, In handy tear-off
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Standard Size, 24 Tablets.
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This was officially announced by

the Government this week, who
sald that some evidence of petro~
leum deposits have been revealed
but no oil reservoir has yet been

found,
Negotiations over mining leases
in respect of workable ore~dis-

coveries are now taking place be-
tween the Government
prospectors, mainly Americans,

and the

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PAGE THREE



GLI f tt!
A 4

TRIUMPH OVER —

PAIN —

QUININE—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’ :

How does ‘ANACIN’ relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
ago leading scientists discovered that the secret lay in the exact balancing ~
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid)
with a FOURTH ingredient—QUININE. And ‘Anacin's' Quinine acts
synergistically with the other medicines to soothe aches, bring down
feverish temperatures, restore a real sens@of well-being !

yee
‘

Pains from fever ? Colds ? Headaches ?

Do you suffer from Toothache ? Rheumatism ? Neuralgia ?
any of these pains ? Menstrual Pains? Then ‘ANACIN * will
bring you immediate relief, cast out

pain with amazing speed !

CAST OFF PAIN—AT ONCE!

Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ANACIN '—
enough to bring you fast relief from a bout of pain! *Anacin ’ is also
available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets. Share
in the benefits of this great new scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN'* ropay:

Doctors and dentists recommend * ANACIN *. In Great,
e Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.

*ANACIN’ is sold in Great Britain and South Africa under thename ‘ ANARM!

YOU USE

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;

’

‘

‘

‘



PAGE FOUR





LONDON, Marth, 21.

The spring flowers are out and
the days are warm and we are
congratulating ourselves that the
winter was mild and that there
was no fuel crisis. r

Housewives have not even been
chasing “the little man round the



April 4, 1952

Friday,

arene

WANTED: SHIPS.





its belief that the provision of adequate
intercolonial and external shipping ser-
ices and other communications is essen-
tial if progress is to be made towards
federation and recommended that in the
meantime a British Caribbean Committee
should be set up. How little progress has
been achieved towards this end.was em-
phasised by His Honour the Administra-
tor of Montserrat during a public session
of the Regional Economic Committee this
week.

But the future holds no glowing
coal prospects and big business is
worried, What about our indus-
tries, what about our much
heralded export drive? What
about the extra coal our factories
need if we are to pay our way?

Up in Scotland, miners are say-
ing that a five day week is enough
for them. At present, as a con-
cession to Britain’s economic diffi-
culties, they are working a shift
on alternate Saturdays. It means
an eleven day fortnight, or a 434
hour week, as the working day is
74 hours. And this, they say, is
too much.

So the wnole matter will be dis-
cussed at a general meeting of
miners’ representatives from all
over Britain. Only if the Scot-
tish miners are overruled by bal-
lot will they continue to work that
(alternate) Saturday shift.

How the pendulum has swung
in twenty years! The
sleeved worker, no.tonger -fear-
ing unemployment, does not reed
to work hard .for long hours and
at low pay to’keep-his job, And
a good thing, too. But nowadays,
we seem to be ruled by the work-
ers, They make their own terms,
even though the Conservatives sit
at Westminstér.

Our democracy is in a, stage of
slow transition. It will settle down
when the workers forget the “bad
old days” of low wages and un-
employment and join in with a
new pride in their own achieve-
ment and production,


































It was no use increasing production, said
Mr. Ross, if increased products could not
be got out of the island because of lack
of.communications, He was speaking with
experience because Montserrat is at pres-
ent severely handicapped with regard to
expanding its exports of tomatoes to
Canada. It has a steamship service to
Canada once a fortnight.

If the West Indian islands are to become
more closely associated, and they must do
that whether political federation is
achieved in our lifetime or not, the
strength of the chain will be the strength
of the weakest links. And because islands
like Montserrat are so poorly served by
steamship communication their difficulties
and their opportunities and the lessons
they have to teach and to learn from other
West Indian islands are correspondingly
little known. That is a great pity; and it
is symptomatic of a larger evil. Because
if the relations between Montserrat and
Barbados are tenuous beeause of lack of

imposed by successive Chancellors
of the Exchequer, the nation has
briefly voiced its protest and then
accepted the _ inevitable — in
silence, almost, ott

The unhappy circumstances in which we
are placed with relation to Jamaica are
only removed by the enterprise of the

Newspapers have published arti-
cles (with pictures) telling us that
little Jimmy’s father (who lives
in the suburbs) can _ no longer
afford to pay the extra few pence

to take little Jimmy, to the zoo,

steamship service to and from Jamaica by
means of the Colombie and de Grasse.

These are luxury liners and nothing as
elaborate as this has been suggested or
would be requested from the United
Kingdom. Yet how is real progress to be
made towards customs union or political
federation until the bridge connecting
these territories has been built ?

It is a grotesque distortion of fact to
suppose that distances have been obliter-
ated by the advent of the aeroplane. Bar-
bados would have to enjoy the thrice daily
service which the Americans offer be-
tween Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands
before any effect of bridging distances by
air could be observed.



Many of those present
were profoundly moved as
messages of congratulations and
encouragement,, many of them
beautifully engrossed, were pre-
sented to the newly installed
Chancellor, messages from
Harvard and Chicago, from New
Zealand ang South Africa, {rom
Oxford and Campbridge, from
universities in England and Scot-
land and Northern Ireland,
members of the University College
were moved too: it made them
realize that they now had some
claim to belong to the common-
wealth of free universities and that
they must earn their membership.
They were moveq also by the
presence of the Chancellor and
the Vice-Chancellor of London,
their foster mother: it was a sign
that the relationship. between

If federation is to come, it is going to
follow the ships. The conference at Mon-
tego Bay realised that truth. But since
then it has gradually been pushed into
the background. Mr. Ross has brought it
sharply once more into the foreground and
our thanks are due to him for reminding
us of what some of us were forgetting.
Without ships there will be no closer



Catholic Cathedral of Holy Trinity
and in the Anglican Cathedral of
St. Catherine in the ancient
capital, Spanish Town. This latter
is the oldest ecclesiastical building

BRITAIN’S sad condition provides mat-
ter for serious reflection at a time when
the drive towards industrial expansion in
the British West Indies is on. People are
even beginning to talk of a slump in
Britain. The textile industry which is ex-
periencing a real slump throughout the
world is creating much unemployment in
Britain. The light engineering and the
motor industries are forced to contract
their output and now there comes news
of poor conditions in the boot and shoe
and furniture and radio industries.

isting structure dating from 1714
after the first had been destroyed
by hurricane two years earlier.
Some present in the Cathedral
that day heard prayers which they
had last heard in the college
chapels of Oxford and Cambridge
and which they had never expect-
ed to hear in the West Indies. All
these ceremonies ended with the
departure of the Chancellor from
Kingston Harbour in a cruiser,
with members of the staff in
academic dress on the quarter-
deck taking ver leave and the
Chancellor’s™ o' version of the
Royal Standard flying at the fore-
mast. This is all very suitable for
a University College set in an
island in a tropical sea, but it must
be the first time that such a thing
has happened in the long history
of universities.
Race Question

_ For those who do not know the
West Indies it will be as well to
say somevhing of the race ques-
tion. It has been suggested above
that in its earlier history an island
like Jamaica can be compared
with one of the southern states of
the United States of America, but
. the parallel is by no means close

The import cuts initiated by Britain and
followed by France, Australia and other
countries have started something which
will almost certainly reduce the volume
of 1952 trade as eompared with that of
1951. It is excellent to industrialise butt!
unless you can sell what you produce,
what benefit is derived? And where in an
import-cutting world are assured markets
to be found? Industrialisation must be
necessary before it is accepted as a policy.

fertility of the land, whereas industries
encroach on agricultural land and no one
has found nuts and bolts a substitute for
breadfruit or yams.

There is room for carefully planned and
controlled industrialisation in Barbados
but it must never be regarded as a substi-
tute for agriculture or as a panacea for
wholesale raising of living standards. It
must be integrated into the island’s econ-
amy, slowly, and never to the detriment
of agriculture or tourism which are our
permanent assets.

in a recent issue of your news-
paper where the Fire Officer of the
local Police Force is reported to
have stated in an interview that
many of the recent cane fires had
been caused through the heat,
and spme, he said, might have
been caused by careless people
throwing lighted cigarettes from
vehicles.

I have been instructed to state
that if the Fire Officer has been
correctly reported this is a most
surprising statement for him to
make, as it is most unlikely if
not impossible for a cane fire to
start by mere heat, or by sponta-

shirt-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Vaughan Jones

And the, poor typists now walk
part of the way to the office be-
cause they can't afford that extra
penny or so, (What about their
shoe-leather). In the general rise

pepular imagination as an injus-
tice. And that important person,
the “British housewife”, has taken
it as a personal affront. Amongst
the most undemonstrative of
housewives in the world, the Brit-
ish housewife does not worry
much who is running the govern-
ment. But to pay an extra penny
er so on the bus—disgraceful!
And yesterday, a score of men,
bearing the title of the Central
Transport Consultative Commit-
tee, and representing all branches
of industry and commerce, met to
discuss those extra pennies,

POCKET CARTOON
By OSBERT LANCASTER

no more

ve problems
ittle Edison now he's

a = transmitter—he's
appy jor hours of end
just sending radio
the wrong addresses.”



who may bow before the storm
of the angry housewives.

* aK *

We are all getting a little tired
of reading about the split in the

the more flamboyant dailies which
carry a picture of a pretty girl on
the front page and devote their
columns to crime, sport, show
business and the oddities and ec-
centricities of life.

|
|

A change, then, to hear that
the question of the destruction of |
baboons in Gambia has solemnly |
been raised in the House of Lords,
and that an equally solemn assur-
ance has been given that only
those baboons, which are dam-
aging the crops, will be destroyed.

iati corner” who conjures up those in costs, the fare increase is a And in the H * Com ,
THE conference on Closer Association fey t i ¢ S a ‘ nd now, in the House o Cc li f ’ m '
held in 1947 a Monteg Bay expressed ags of poor quality smali thing; but it has caught mons. Sir Herbert Williams hes —the Muslim sect headed by his father the Broad Street & The Vil age, Balmora Gap
i 1 at oO y coal to add to the ration. . i ili

suggested that the starlings which
roost in thousands around Lon-
don’s Trafalgar Square should be
drastically reduced.

The subsequent outcry has been
immediate. “We gould never
poison them” say good - hearted
officials. Shoot them with a gun?
Impossible, Olq ladies would
gather up the dead and dying
birds and attack the marksmen
ewith eir umbrellas. Frighten
them by exploding crackers or
sounding gongs or clappers? The
last state would be worse than
the first, so it looks as if the star-
lings will be reprieved.

* e *

The stories we read of lavish
parties given by our Embassies
and Legations and Consulates
abroad—even if they are exag-
gerated — sometimes makes our
mouths water.

Now Mr, Anthony Eden, For-
eign Secretary, is considering
sending a small team of Civil Ser-
vice inspectcrs (wearing b.ack
coats and pin stripe trousers?) on
a world-wide tour to see if eco-
nomies can be instituted. They
will decide what expenditures
are really necessary, though, it is
said, they will not be too hard on
Britain's missions behind the Iron
Curtain. Private life is dull enough
as it is in Communist countries
without making economy cuts,

* * *

What a joy to find that an un?
spoilt, young 18-year-old girl, a
greengrocer’s daughter, has over-

He * ad ‘ : ‘
inter-communication, those between Bar- te’ Ge pack, “cede aiats: tnd, Mes peceeeniciatank wit ba een eteane oe had seo behalf of his father ranging from ten to thirty
wados arid Jamaica are proportionately | nas been raised and new duties sent to the Transport Commission, expensive finishing schools, no| thousand pounds sterling a time.
greater.

monied background.

So the heart of London’s thea-
‘tre goers has. gone out to her.

She is Shanj Wallis, and is red
haired, demure, and has a tip-

French Steamship Line—Compagnie Gen- The uproar that followed the Labour Party, and the activities tilted nose. o deal sharply with his f ;
erale Transatlantique, which has supplied | recent increase in London’s bus, of Mr. Bevan; in fact it has been After a rapturous first night r ied Py hi : duti . allOMses, Fn cr
Barbados with its only quick regular | 8m and tube fares continues. pleasant — almost — to turn to ‘reception at London’s Coliseum ly carried out his duties quietly and with-

where she sang “The Ocarina” in
“Call me Madam” she packed her
shoes into a suitcase and went
home to Tottenham.

She has not even a special boy
friend, or so she says.



By T.W.J. Taylor

population, African, Chinese,
European, Levantine and Indian.
They differ in colour and physiog-
nomy, but they live together
happily and, as is right and proper,
hardly think of their physical dif-
ferences. So may it remain, There
is no future prosperity or happi-

© mess in’ regions such as these,

where many races have mingled,
if questions of race arise, All must
recognise their equality as men
and work together for the good of
the whole community.

Extra-Mural Studies
There is one Geparunent of the
University Co.lege wnicn raises
special problems and deserves
Special Mention, the Vepartument o.

universities of Great Britain have
assumed extra-mural responsibili-
ties far from their immediate
neighbourhood, but for them far
means at its furthest less than a

the distances are so much greater:
to revert to an earlier parallel, it is
as though the University College of
the South West in Exeter had to
think of organising work in New-
foundland or Constantinople. The
solution is the appointment of a
Resident Tutor in each of the
Colonies to be the chief organizer
of this work, The responsibility
fis great and in some respects goes
beyond what is normally expected
of those who hold extra-mural ap-
pointments, The tutor must be the
local representative of the Uni-
versity College, its cutpost and its
public relations officer, dealing in
the first instance with applications
for admission, enquiries about
syllabuses and a multitude of de-
tails. For the University Coilege
to keep in proper touch with its
Resident Tutors is not easy when
there is so much to be done on the
spot. Nevertheless, there are now
seven tutors at work, from Bgitish
Honduras through Jamaica and the
Lesser Antilles to Trinidad and
British Guiana anq their en-
thusiasm and energy is being re-
warded by the response to their
work, local enthusiasm and energy

The U. C. W. EL. (3)

which they are in personal touch.
Need For Scholarship Funds

They are many other points
which could be discussed; the sup-
port the University College has
already received from generous
benefactors, the further support
that it needs and will continue to
meed. This latter is particularly
‘true in scholarships: the low in-
come for each head of the popula-
tions means not only that many
able boys and girls cannot be
financed at the University College
from family resources, but more
than that, the Government revenue
cannot provide state scholarships
and exhibitions on anything like
the scale which is possible in more
wealthy countries. Generous bene-
faction for this purpose would go
far in assuring the future useful-

association. them was no pretence but an ac- “xwa-Mural Studies, now under jag = wee Pana ee and Nagpur. Sums aden he contributed jointly
tive co-operation, the direction of Mr. Philip Sher- West Indies where mach valuable|DY all the families according to what they Is
There were other ceremonies as lock, a member of the Irvine Com- grain power has saan ee ted in|could afford
be int gan stones were laid miuee, The remarks made above 4,4 oat through lack ae apaeee H 't tal t of a big Koja wedding
e a ° and speeches made and finally on the geography of the Colonies : ere owever, total cost of a big Koja ’
Industrialisation there were services in the Roman show atee a Sroblems lie, The ‘Unity for proper mental training

and discipline.
Conclusion
Let me close on a somewhat dif-
ferent level. Not only do we hope
that the University College will

in the British Caribbean, the ex- hundred miles. In the West Indies become a mental training ground

for the able young people of the
West Indies and that it will be a
centre of intellectual life which
will ‘broaden interests and en-
courage aspirations, but we also
expect that it will provide other
opportunities. Because of its
position, the College has already
had to begin the teaching of cer-
tain trades. It has its own book-
binding shop and its own scientific
workshop and West Indians are
already being trained to bind
books, to blow glass, to work in
wood and metal and to be labor-
atory technicians. All the labora-
tory benches, cupboards and racks,
and all the furniture for under-
graduate rooms and offices are
made from the local woods in the
College’s own joinery shop. (As
the Vice-Chancellor of London re-
marked when she saw this going
on, one of the ‘conditions which it
seems must be fulfilled in choosing
the site of a new universy institu-
tion is that there should be an
example supply of good local

-) As soon as funds can be
obtained, the University College
will undobutedly set up its own
printing press and not only use it
for its own purposes but also, it

News From Britain \l!l(slikeloBes Got j

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952











Playing Cards from_._......606e.
Patience Cards per set ._..._.72c.
CANASTA SETS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

From IAN DUNBAR
CALCUTTA
Prince Aly Khan has discovered what it
is like to be treated as a god.
Sought by beautiful women the world over,
Prince Aly found himself during his recent
tour of India, adored by the Koja community










Aga Khan.

In previous visits to India, Prince Aly has
been kept in the background while gold-tur-
banned devotees prostrated themselves be-
fore his famous father.

The Aga Khan, reputed descendant of the
prophet Mahommed, is more than his peo-
ple’s leader; he is considered sinless, sacred
and above the law.

The Koja Community in India, number-
ing 120,000 is one of the wealthiest in the
world. Its members are reputed to possess
more jewels than anyone else in India.

Originally an excommunicated Hindu
merchant caste in Surat, West India, they
were converted to Islam about six centuries
ago by Aga Khan's evangelising forefather
who became their mullah or high priest.

The sect spread its business activities with
the growth of British power and to-day Koja
merchant princes direct big trading business
in East Africa, Malaya, Burma, Indonesia as
well as throughout India.

Most of the Indian Kojas, however, live
around Bombay where Aly Khan began and
hurriedly ended his tour.

Aly visited community gatherings in the
West Indian capital and flew by private
Dakota to conduct weddings in Baroda and
Bombay State. Wearing faultless tropical]
suitings and a Persian wool cap, he read ex-
cerpts from the Koran and accepted fees on

to Pressure Cook the Safe and Easy Way.
Our new shipment of

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He is estimated to have collected £100,-
000 during his eight-day tour. Part of this
money he will give to charity.

Unlike the Aga Khan, who has been known

out fuss. He did not bid up the bridegrooms’
guarantees as the Aga Khan was prone to
do.

All Koja bridgegrooms pledge hig sums on
marriage. Litivorce is so easy among the
Muslims—the husband has only to say “I
divorce you” three times before witnesses—
that it is necessary for the wife to be well
provided for in advance,

At a big Koja wedding the bridegroom
usually donates about £50,000. But this was
not enough for the Aga Kharf at a Calcutta
wedding last year. He told the stupefied
relatives and guests: “Increase the guaran-
tees or I leave.” The perspiring millionaire
father of the bridegroom hurriedly offered
£70,000. The Aga Khan turned towards the
door. A hundred thousand —'he paused—
one hundred and fifty thousand — the Aga
Khan reverently opened the Koran.

Poorer members of the community—small
merchants in the £1,000 a year class—club
together for mass marriages. Two such
ceremonies awaited Prince Aly at Madras







Moygashel fe

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SCOTLAND’S BEST

SCOTTISH
CREAM

BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY

after the distribution of jewel-studded pre-
sents and a week of feasting, is sometimes as
high as £100,000.

During Prince Aly’s tour a slight hitch
developed over the problem of drink. Kojas
are teetotal but believe wine turns to water
when it touches the Aga Khan’s lips. The
same applies to his son. The Bombay pro-
hibitionist government did not share this
view and Prince Aly officially had a drink-
less stay. Stocks had been laid in for him at
Nagpur, the only place on his tour where it
is still possible to buy liquor.



A Favourite at all The Leading
Clubs.




e
Ask for SCOTTISH CREAM WHISKY
at Your’ Grocer.





10,000 Secret Police To Spy On Farmers

A special corps of secret police 10,000
strong, is to be set up in Communist con-
trolled Rumania to spy on farmers with-
holding crops which they refuse to sell at
Government-controlled prices,

Terms of imprisonment up to 20 years
banishment to forced labour camps and the
death penalty for serious offences are to be
imposed on the unwilling farmers.

ecording to Rumanian refugees who
have broken through the Iron Curtain, this
lain-clothed secret police force, known in
umania as “the terror squad,” is already
operating in Bukovina Province in northern



arettes being thrown into cane
fields from passing vehicles, it
may be of interest to your read-
ers to learn that contrary to pop-
ular belief, it is very difficult to
set fire to canes by lighting them
with a match or a cigarette.
Yours faithfully,
J. ROBERT PETERKIN,
Secretary,
Agricultural Society.

farnum For Finland Fund’
To The Editor, «ne Advocate—

SIR,—The Printer’s devil seems
to have got intp the penultimate





will into effective action and as
evidence of our confidence in him,
the Amatuer Athletic Associa-
tion of Barbados of which I have
the honour to be a Life Vice-
President, has decided to head the
subscription list which opens in
the Advocate this week, with the
sum of one hundred dollars allo-
cated from our slender re-
sources.”

With thanks for the correction, |bank or hidden away.

Yours faithfully,
LOUIS LYNCH,
Hon, Sec. Barbados

$4.82 Olympic Committee.





which is increasing all the time. ; p ;
Even its champions would be the first to | jin later history. There is no colour Mhe best way for the University 2 aeee: oe a Ker Won Rumania. = ; oie
: . ialisation @ bar in the Caribbean Colonies. College to support this work will Indies. Henbe Sonn in the man_|,, Reasons for these drastic measures against Beef Noodle
admit that by itself industrialisation Goes) Children of all races go to the be learnt by experience and it yal trades the University Colle 2|the farmers is that they are held responsible Chicken
not raise the standards of living of a pe eae itech Pateee saa ee ~ has its part to play in the tuture for the failure of the Rumanian monetary Celery
4 I ep ‘e n e wi f th ith ; : : : * Caos
people. Standards of living only rise when | undergraduates population of the and enthusiasm of the people of of the British Caribbean Colonies./reform instituted by former Finance Minis — NOW OFFERED AT
% ducts of industrialisation have an University College contains repre- the Colonies and for more than (Reproduced by kind permission ter Vasile Luca, For, despite the currency Mock Turtle T
the produ fentatives of most of the many half of these the Extra-Mural De- of the Editor of the Universities|"@form, farmers are still refusing to unload Puree Mongole
assured market. strains that have built up the partment is the only one with Review). their hidden stores of grain and crops. Mulliga Tany
1 7 > ein ee wease —| There has been one important result, Mushroem ARDS
Britain today provides the rebattal to Oo R d % however. Finance Minister Luca has been ion
those who proclaim that agriculture is ur eaders ay > prego . oer. ae Mpconad pas Seat Broth
ubsistence stand- at Ploesti, miles from Bucharest is close Asparagus
ete ane rte ~ Sa which agri- Surprising State neote combustion, if this is what paragraph of my letter to you|and pee. z 2 eet that Luca is ae DESSERTS
ng. ‘ 7 the Fire Officer meant by “the dated 3lst. ult. imprisoned in Bucharest.
culture will always have over industry 10 in kee casllae ele Go heat”. j It should read: “In an effort to| Information reaching Belgrade states that Gekr tae
are self evident. Agriculture preserves the | ciety has been drawn to a report eenaenie’ Geman tetat — crystallise vague feelings of good-|the farmers’ refusal to sell at unfair prices CHEESE Chocolate Puddings

fixed by the Government was only one rea- Vanilla Puddings

son for the inflation spiral. Principal cause ioer'y Soon & CPA. - sane
is said to be Russian exploitation of Ruman- Kraft Cheese Grapes
ian oil and other natural resources. Carr’s Cheese Biscuits
According to the same sources of informa- Carr’s Crackers SPECIALS

tion, under the monetary reform arranged Care's | Syaet: Eioeaie

by Vasile Luca, two different rates of ex-
change were enforced depending upon
whether the money was invested in a State

Sheriff's Fruit Puddings
58 per 11'%-oz, tin
Orange Pekoe Tea
50 per } th.
Carib Beer .24 per bottle
String Beans .30 per Ib,
Carrots .30 per Ib.
Gold Braid Rum
3 years old—1.44 pr. bot.



AND ABOVE ALL
J&R
ENRICHED BREAD |

“Favourable” rates were given to those
with bank accounts, but farmers who kept
their savings at home got only nominal rates.

—L.ES.









——



FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952



Labourer Not Gui

Discrepancies In
Evidence Pointed Out

Richard Hall a labourer of Middleton, St. George, was

yesterday acquitted by an

assize jury of the charge of

breaking and entering the house of Josephine Farley of the

same district on October 9,

last year, and stealing $40 the

property of Clement Husbands who lived at Farley.
It took the jury only half an hour to arrive at their
decision after Hall’s counsel, Mr. J. E. T. Brancker had

pointed out discrepancies in

the Prosecution’s evidence and

submitted that the Prosecution had failed to prove their

case,

_ Hearing of the case was pre-
sided over by the Acting Puisne
Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice
G..L. Taylor and Mr. F’.. E. Field,
Assistant to the Attorney Gen-
eral, prosecuted for the Crown.

The case for the Prosecution
was that a family of seven lived
at Farley and for a period, on
the day of the offence no one was
at home, Sixty-nine-year-old
Farley and 33-year-old Husbands
were going home at about 11
o'clock when they saw Hall
dashed out of the house and run
through canes. When they went
into the house $40 was missing.

Sgt. Inniss of District “B” the
first witness called, said that on
October 9 at about 1.25 p.m. he
went to Middleton, St. George, at
Farley in connection with the lar-
ceny reported earlier during the
day. Canes were on the eastern
and western sides of the house,
He was shown the shedroof door
near which a latch and staple
were lying. In the bedroom a
press door was open and seemed
as though it had been forced
open. Clothes were strewn over
the bed and those still in the
press were disordered, A knife
whiah was on top of the press he
examined but found no marks
on it. There had been a mark on
the press as though it had been
ripped open, Cross-examined, he
said he had not found any traces
of finger-prints on the knife.

Doors Locked

Sixty-nine-year-old Josephine
Farley of Middleton, St. George,
said that seven lived at the
house where she lived. Four of
them were under eight years.
Before leaving home at about 10
a.m, on October 9, she locked the
doors and closed all the windows.
She was returning at about 11
o'clock to get breakfast for Hus-
bands who lived there, when she
met Husbands just before she
reached home and the two of
them walked towards the house.
Wihen she got near the house she
saw Hall run through the front
door,

She said she knew Hall from
his childhood. Hall had also been
workifg on the same lorry as
Husbands during this crop.

When she went to the house
she saw a door open and on going
into a bedroom, found the press
door open. She also saw a knife.

When she saw Hall he was
wearing a faded Khaki shirt.

Cross-examined she said that
when she first saw Hall she ran
back leaving Husbands near the
house,

She said that the day was a
Tuesday and on the previous Sat-
urday Husbands had shown her
the $40.00, tied it with a piece of
twine and put it in a black shoe
in the press. Between Saturday
and Tuesday all seven of the fam-
ily were living at the house,

Left For Work

Clement Husbands, 33-year-old
agricultural labourer who lives at
Farley said that on October 9 he
left home at about 7 o'clock to go
to work about two miles away.
He said he did not take breakfast
at any particular time and that
day he returned home for break-
fast at about 11 o'clock. Farley
and he were going home together
when he saw Hall run from the
house and go through the canes.
He went into the house and saw
his clothes scattered about the bed
and when he searched the press
his $40 which he had left wrap-
ped in a piece of paper under-
neath clothes were stolen. The
press, he said, was broken,

He had put the money there on
the Saturday and had left it there
on.the morning before he left
home. The money consisted of
dollar bills,

When he saw Hall, Hall was
wearing a khaki shirt and a white

pants. He had seen Hall earlier
while at work.
Cross-examined, said that

e
after Farley and he Rea seen Hall
running from the house, Farley
went back to call a neighbour and
he went imto the house where
Farley came back and found him,

A very smart



Weatherproofed ty

He had not tied the money with
twine. He had told Farley that he
had put the money in the press
only after he had put it there. He
conceded that he had said during
the preliminary hearing that he
had not told anyone he had put
away the money. He denied he
had told the Magistrate $30.00 but
admitted telling the Magistrate the
money was not near the shoes but
between the clothes.

When he had seen Hall on the
first occasion he had seen him for
about half an hour, while he
(Husbands) was cutting grass.

Cutting Grass

Christopher Moseley, a 4l-year-
old labourer, said that he and Hus-
bands had been working together
about 8.30 a.m. cutting grass when
he saw Hall going along Hope’s
Private Road. The direction in
which Hall was going would have
led him either to his own home
or Husbands’.

Cross-examined, he said that
Husbands and he had only been
working together for about two
weeks. When he saw Hall he
was walking leisurely.

To the court, he said Hall was
dressed in a white pants and white
shirt.

Cpl. Stephen Edwards then gave
evidence as to the accused being
arrested, and his giving an alibi.
This was corroborated by P.C.
Lloyd Ashby. .

Mr. Fie{d for the Crown put it
to the jury that if they believed
Husbands and White who said
they saw Hall while they were
cutting grass, they would have to
disbelieve Hall's alibi that he was
not in St. eGorge on that day. The
consideration that Hall’s alibi to
the police had not been given on
oath like the witnesses whose de-
meanour they had seen, would help
them in deciding whom they
would believe. i

He said that the discrepancies in
the evidence of some of the wit-
nesses was doubtless due to the
fact that they did not have the
advantage of a good education.

Prejudice

He said that Hall had been seen
running from the house. There
had been no question of Farley
and Husbands being prejudiced

@ On Page 6



Students Receive Certificates At

BARBADOS



BALANCING HIS BICYCLE



ONE of the Boodhoo Brothers balances on his bicycle.
cycle he has his feet on the front wheel.

To control the

Acrobats Join In Floor Show

THE Boodhoo Brothers of British Guiana will. give a
performance of hand balancing and acrobatic stunts when
the South American Variety Troupe stage their Floor
Show at Queen’s Park at 8.30 o'clock to-night. The show is
sponsored by Canada Dry.

The troupe is led by Harvey Rogers who visited Bar-
bados a few yeats ago. He will give a series of Spanish
dances with his partner, Bonnie Edinboro,

The Boodhoo Brothers are also contortionists, high wire
walkers and stunt riders. Also with the show are Cecil
Green, a lyric tenor, winner of the 1951 Singing Compe-
tition in British Guiana, Tom Brandt, ballad singer of
Gipsy Caravan programme over Z.F.Y., Enid Kitigy and

.. Ivor Hunte, accompanist and a pianist of the New Luckies
Orchestra of British Guiana,



Homecraft Instructors’ Course

Addressing visitors to the Housecraft Centre yester-
day the occasion of the presentation of certificates and

prizes to the students of

bat

making, sweets and preserves.
Needle*s to say that stimulated
interest in the classes and he was

= . re?
Instructors’ 4 most popular student. During

the Homecraft

Course, Mrs. R. N. Turner, wife of the Colonial Secretary, the first term, the students eried

said that the course was fillin

ga gap that had been left open out fer the amount of work they

far too long in the community. She pointed out that the »#d to cover both in theory and

purpose of the course was
methods to many and that

selected few who had attended the course to do so.

After the welcome address was
given by Maj. Glindon Reed, Di-
rector of Education, there was a
report by Miss Ivy Alleyne, Or-
ganiser of the course, Miss M. I.
King moved a vote of thanks and
the work was open to inspection

Miss Ivy Alleyne said:

Honourable Colonial Secretary,
Mrs. Turner, Director of Educa-
tion, Ladies and Gentlemen, we,
the permanent and visiting staff
and students of the Housecraft
Centre join in extending a hearty
welcome to you for your presence
with us this afternoon, We
would specially like you, Mrs.
‘Turner to’ know how much we
appreciate your acceptance of
our request to distribute our cer-
tificates and prizes. We are con-
scious of the interest you have
taken in our progress and we are
grateful.

This afternoon’s function cli-
maxes a course of study which was
formally epened on Friday 14th
Sept., 1951, by Mr. E. C. M. Theo-
balds, the then Acting Director of
Education, Some of our visitors
here this afternoon were present
with us on that morning, when the



we

WIND-BREAKERS

two-tone

design in Brown and Grey

in two different styles.

Short Waisted

$9.95
JACK=T

$12.95



| CAVE
SHEPHERD & Co., Lid.

10, 11, 12 & 13,

Spm



—_—_—_—_—_



STYLE

BROAD STREET









to spread Domestic Science eae and, as general.y is: the
i : ase, the word examination, which
it would be the duty of the was’ to take place at the end_ of
that term, started from early to
deputy Director in an inspiring make some of them worried, but,
and helpful address quoted from as the weeks rolled on and their
Proverbs the qualities of a good skill improved and _ confidence
woman. This gave us something at was strengthened, they took every-
which to aim, and just added the thing in their stride ang exam re-
necessary finish to the Scheme. sults showed 86.5 % Ist place to

Subjects Covered 51 % 19th place, The other student

The course is called the Home- although only receiving 34.7 %
craft Instructors’ Course, and cov- had still shown noticeable im-
ered such subjects as Laundry- provement.
work, Housewifery, Nutrition Exhibits

Cookery, Cake and pastry making, The Students expressed a desire
Sweets, preserves, baby care and to Send some exnipits to the An-~
Invalid cookery, Pattern drafting, nual Exhibition, I did not dis-
sewing, Handicrafts, Smocking, courage them, but alowed them
Groups Organisation, Home Nurs- fyj] scope to make their decisions,

ing and Public Demonstrations in mppjg they did, and entered guava
Baby care and cookery. l .

and golden apple jelly, golden
The course was designed to apple and mixed fruit jam, coconut

give triining to Primary School , a | ttle 1 dd ale
Teachers and Representatives of and guava chew, “Thos obnea
Clubs and Old Scholars’ Asso- j<1 and 2nd prizes for fud ge and
ciations. These would then be in Ist prizes for ac Ide a in ll
a position to assist in the field 201, bise® for golden apple jelly
of Adult Education. Twenty ° jam and stewed guave s.
students were selected for train- 17 the training in Stitchery,
ing 13 of whom were Primary each student had to make a child’s
School ‘Teachers and tie other dress, and in an effort to send
seven, representatives of clubs. Xmas Cheer to some poor chil-
In addition to that number, 47”, we made up and distributed
there was one male who train- Parcels to the St. Thomas’ Nutri-
ed in cookery, cake and pastry “on Centre, There was then
month’s break, after which
started on our term,

This was more a practical term
wher the students progressed on
the basic principles laid down in
the first term. They undertook
all types and methods of cookery,
laundry,/ cake making, preserves,
housewifery (including electrical
repairs, painting of stores. and
furniture, daily and thorough
cleaning of the students dormi-
tories at Erdiston College and
budgeting), Invalid cookery, mak-
ing of bodices in the smocking sec-
tion, night dresses in the Pattern
Drafting, dresses in the Sewing
and various articles in Handicrafts,
They also had talks from visitors,
one of which was on cooperatives,
kindly given by Mr. Beckles,
Cooperatives Officer.

Pubiic Demonstrations

In addition six students went out
weekly iri twos to give Public
Demonstrations in Baby Care and
Cookery at the Eagle Hall ¢ linic,
St. Thomas’ Nutrition Centre ana
Grace Hill Oid Scholars’ Associa-
tion. They also went to the Gen-
eral Hospital for Bed Making and
Bathing and were given Aids to
comfort ‘in Bed, and to the Mater-

a

we






Pah

nity Hospital for Urine Testing and
Administration of Medicines.
They have also had film shows

on Nutrition, and in their Group
Organisation have visited a poor
home, a middle class home and

the jay and Pine Housing
Schemes. They have organised
| and run a Brains’ Trust, a de-

| bate, a Club Social, a picnic and
} an Exhibition.
These activities



are just men-
jtioned to show the range of
jtraining aimed at and I am
pleased to be able to say that we
{lecturers can feel some measure
jof satisfaction over the results
| mB On Page 8

ADVOCATE



lty Of House Breaking

, 12-YEAR-OLD BOY _

FALLS FROM TRACTOR:
BEATH BY MISADVENTURE

A nine-man Jury at District “A” yesterday returned a
verdict of death by misadventure to Coroner H. A. Talma

when the inquest into the c

death of 12-year-old Fitzgerald Carrington of Cole Hole,

St. George ended.
Carrington was detained
2 p.m. on April 1 after he f

being driven along Locust Hall Hill, St. George, at about
1.30 p.m. the same day. He died at the Hospital five hours

after he was admitted.

Mr. Nicholas Deane, Manager of
Locust Hall Plantation, St. George,
told the Court that the plantation
owns a tractor G-238 and a man
named Basil Proute drives the
tractor. On April 1 Proute was
the driver of the tractor which
Was taking canes from the planta-
tion.

Proute is not allowed to take
passengers or to permit anyone on
the tractor. Sometime between 1
p.m. and 2 p.m, on April 1, he
heard that a boy was injured and
went to Locust Hall Road where
he saw the tractor and trailer, He
then went to the plantation yard
and there saw the boy (the de-
ceased) whom he took to the Gen-
eral Hospital. The name of the
boy was Fitzgerald Carrington
and his age was between 10 and
12,

Bruises On Arm

There were bruises on the right
arm, side and leg and the boy was
groaning as if he was in pain, He
remained at the General Hospital.

“T have spoken to the deceased
on several occasions about riding
on the tractor, The deceased was
not employed at the plantation,”
Mr. Deane told the court.

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination on
April 3 at the General Hospital
said the apparent age was 12.
There was extensive bruising on
the chest and haemorrhage around
the liver. Death was due to shock
and haemorrhage. The injuries
described were consistent with a
heavy object passing over that
part of the body where the liver
was.

Dr. Cato said the body of the
deceased was identified to him by
Charles Carrington who said the
deceased was his brother,

Charles Carrington said that he
last saw his brother alive on April
1, Then on April 2 he identified
the dead body of his brother at the
Hospital Mortuary to Dr, Cato.

Joseph Greaves of Prospect, St.
James, said that he was driving
the tractor G-238 on April 1 about
noon, The tractor was pulling oné »
trailer laden with canes and he
was driving the tractor from Lo-
cust Hall to Applewhaite Factory.
When he started out he noticed
that there were two boys on the
tractor behind the driver's seat,
One of the boys was called “Bow-
ring.”

Tractor Stopped

While on the way down Locust
Hall Hill one of the boys told him
to stop the tractor and he stopped
the tractor, Looking back he saw
the deceased lying in front of the
right front wheel of the trailer.
He took the deceased from the
front of the wheel. The deceased
said, “Lord have mercy”. One of
the legs of the deceased was
bruised and he took him to Locust
Hall Plantation and Mr. Deane
took him (the deceased) to the
Hosvital.

The wheel of the tractor did not
pass over the body. The trailor
was on the left and proper side of
the road.

To the Jury—Greaves said that
he could not describe how the boys
were sitting on the tractor. He
was asked to drive the tractor by
Proute who waég taking his “break-
fast” at the time,

Otho Corbin (14) of Cole Hole,
St. George, said that he knew the
deceased .On April 1 at about
1.30 p.m. he was with thegleceased
on the tractor G-238 owned by
Locust Hall Plantation. They got
on the tractor in a canefield and
he was on the left side of the
tractor while the deceased was on
the right side of the tractor with
one foot on the bolt which con-
nects the tractor to the trailer.
While the tractor was travelling



Death Cf Two Traitors

For four years the grey
the Rue Lauriston, just off

was a house of horror. It was the headquarters of the most
brutal of the German Gestapo inquisitors.
Betrayed men and women of the French Resistance

went in there upright and si

tered and broken to die in concentration camps.

They came to pass through the
torture chambers of their Gestapo
questioners and left as hundreds
of shattered wrecks between 1940
and 1944,

Mot the bravest nor the cunning
of the Resistance groups could dis-
cover who betrayed their members
and led them to the terror house
of the Rue Lauriston.

After the Liberation two French-

men were arrested, Abel Danos
and taymond Monange, both
pre-war criminals with police

records as armed thugs and black-
n-ailers

In twhb years of investigations
they were identified as the French
agents of the German killers of
tue Lauriston,

Armed Escort

At six o'clock on March 17, the
gates of Fresnes prison opened
and Raymond Monange with an
armed mobile escort was driven
out.

At the.same time
Abel Danvos
La Sante prison. Both

linked by radio, met
promptly at seven o’clock at the
great grim gates of the high-
walled military fort of Montrouge,
just south of Paris. Five minutes
later

with another
escort was taken

fron

escorts,

Monange and Danos fell
before a firing squad while a host
of official witnesses watched, Some
of them were those who had been
tortured and broken in that grey

ormer Gestapo building nearby.
Three hours later the cafes of









Mrs. Housewife

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ircumstances surrounding the

at the General Hospital about
ell from a tractor which was

to the Factory the hat of the de-
ceased was blown off and he (the
deceased) tried to catch the hat
and he fell.

The deceased fell on his right
side and he (Corbin) shouted to
the driver to stop. The wheel of
the trailer did not roll over the
body of the deceased. This was





llb Package at 62c. each

the right front wheel of the “
tractor.
At this stage Coroner Talma 3 Tins at 60c. Ib.

















presented the facts of the inquiry
to the Jury who returned a vor-
dict of death by misadventure.

Gill Elected

Churchwarden
For St. Peter

Mr, A. A. Gill, last year’s Jun- \
ior Guardian for St. Peter's Ves-|}
try, was elected Churchwarden
for the ensuing term by a major-
ity vote when the St. Peter's
Vestry met yesterday. He was
proposed by Mr. C, H. P. Jordan
whose nomination was seconded
by Mr, E. L, Bannister,

Mr. Gill succeeded Mr. T. S.
Chandler, The Vestry unani-
mously accepted his nominations
of Mr. G. G. Gill ang Mr. E, L.
Bannister as Senior anq Junior
Guardians for the ensuing term.

Before the election of a Church-
warden, Mr. T. 8. Chandler laid
a report of the work he did in the
parish during his term, It was
not questioned.

The Vestry made the following
appointments :—



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months.



Sanitary Board
Mr. G. G. Gill, Mr. E. L. Ban-

nister, Mr. T. E. Corbin, Mr.
C. A. Thornton and Mr. T. S,
Chandler.

Highway Commissioners
Mr. C. A. Thornton, Mr. A. A.
Gill, Mr. D. V. Jemmott,

Organ Tuner
Mr. Lionel Gittens.

Delegates For The Appoint-

ment of Church Clergy
Mr, C. A. Thornton,

Delegates For Congregation
Mr, E. Jordan and Mr, E. C.
Bayne (St. Peter's Parish Church).
Mr. H. I. Gill and Mr. John
Alleyne (All Saints Chapel).
Mr. H. C. Clarke-Holman and
Mr. J. C. Parris (Boscobelle |
Chapel).

Land Rates Laid
Al $4,59 Per Acre

The St. Peter's Vestry laid the |
rates for land at $4.59 per acre
and for trade at 27 cents in the
dollar when they met yesterday.
This is an increase of 30 cents
per acre on land, and of a half-|
cent on trade. |

Last year, the Vestry budgeted
for $57,000 to cover their expenses
during that session but this year
they have bndgeted for $62,467,
which is an increaso of $5,467 on
last year’s sum,

Included in the estimates this
year is a sum of money for the
purpose of granting salary raises
to their whole-time employees.
The rates set out are :—

Parochial employees within the:
salary scale $1—$49—15%. |

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $50—$74—10%.

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $75—$100—6%.

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $100 and onwards-—
3%.

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TODAY’S
SPECIAL

at
KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX
SODA
FOUNTAIN

PARIS.
, flat stone-fronted building in
the once gay Champs Elysees,

lent and were taken away bat-

the Champs Elysees began to fill
up in the spring sunshine. The
civil servants of the Ministry of
the Interior were just beginning
their work in the building in the
Rue Lauriston.

R
E
A
M
S

—Express,

SUN
SHADES













it
For
| Originally This Week }
BIDDY’5 ASPARAGUS SOUP—per tin $33 — $.30
} LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP—per tin 3 = .32 ,
MARELA PLAIN OLIVES—per Jar 1.60. ~~. 1.00 )
MARELA PLAIN OLIVES-——per Jar 1.08 — .96 i
CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS—
per tin ..... bby caved uae “ 1.64 — 1,40 }
AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS—11—15 lbs i
all different styles and } NG Titah, sadthe.«-supiir's on + nevi ‘ 1.61 — 1.36 i
types ‘available DENMOR LEG HAM in 4-Ib. tins—per tin.......... $5.65 Mi
From 727 | DENMOR LEG HAM in 2}-lb. tins—per tin 3.76
} IMPERIAL BRISKET BEEF—4-lb, tin—per tin .... 4.20
to about $9.00 |, CHASE & SANBOURNES INSTANT COFFEE—per tin -87
iW) KOO GUAVA JELLY—2-Ib tin AT
Call TODAY at your 1%. LION BLACK PEPPER—1 oz. caster .34
JEWELLERS 1 LION WHITE PEPPER—1 oz. caster 49
|} LION CURRY POWDER—4 oz. tin . Teoust'hs kan 46
Y. De LIMA LION PIMENTO—4 oz. tin 5 ica eae .36

COCKADE FINE RUM
& €O., LTD. caieal sa )
ey tate Pe STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO. LTD. ¥

SSS

















PAGE SIX



















































RARRADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952



































a
. ~ . * â„¢ 4% rs
CLASSIFIED ADS ron MENT | remue sates | Labourer Not Guilty
. 4
TELEPHONE 2508 HOUSES | REAL ESTATE @ From Page 5 Farley had said that Husbands had
ree i tigneniibnninaestais a... 5% aevest Mall oe there being any tied the money with twine and she
DIED ' * i BRACK COPTAGE on St James Coad | ow Against So there was saw when he put it in a shoe in
| FOR SALE geetect a Evek A ween aed a & WAN “> @a8e way Uey should select the press while he had said no one
WALCOTT—On Std April, 1952 at his) Tckgheee. Gelade, wemed eet iine anes SU tempi Sed Laan wae to instead of had seen when he put the money
lence, Britton’s Cross Road, St Avenged ea Peon, tox Gem Pak tein im waxtods else @f the melghbour. among some Clothes in the press.
Bicnae' Charles i winston wend AUTOMOTIVE cone. Apely, Beectiiads, S debees of : oh He reminded the jury of other
1 e his rother’s ‘ ‘ . lw 5 . “ + be ob y »w C
conan eae . Michael | ae - <= | phone mn 4d at MELA YN.” Pooo beet Cid Wath be Unat White who discrepancio’, cute, oa one witness
srrake Em, to-day for the Westbury AUSTIN VAN—One (1) t@ BLP. Avs a . . s Sela - : ak Was WeRNty a. white saying Ha as a shirt
Cemetery 1 2 im good working order, Phone we GA bl - Tee : pee a ae tamu vd Witte hoasel? had con- and another he in and
Sylvia Walcott (wife); Caroline we. 4821, D. V. Scott & Co, we. a ds jen st cae Se, on oman s ee = Bt . s is ho poasititity-ealled the told them there ‘wae ho evidence
eott (mother) _— 2 ‘ieobew Dita a ha a LOGwPR CON VeRMRCER. ry term _— » & arn tb “ae § od Shake a white @tyiet, They at all before them for them to
tc aun "| “GAR-FORD PREFECT: in excellent) 0 Bee TH erie, laboun sock conning we emember, too, that at the convict Hall.
—-— } running order, good tyres a “Sam ye a ee es wt wow pretoaaary hearing after Hus- ‘The jury retired half an hour
milage nde 10, miles ner UNGALO y bewky construc | Paden led Badia ; te
IN MEMORIAM millet staan, Dial 3163 and Gay em-| Gone well Buvgalew situated at Caasiva | balvk Kuwhen os weave asi | Buataets tuna said the money he had afterwards -— returned with the
| cept Saturday 1.4 3m. | Rowe Road, St. Michael compraing open are Ones — ee SS Ee ek Deast > - he = eg 9 verdict of not guilty.
EVELYN—In loving memory of our dear Verandah, Drewing sad Dining room, | Deo eee aamenta’ | PARSON and afterwards sa
Fe ee a | Sa an” Coarteee Gate] tae eas tha tatcanet Wee [Gn these teen god cient eee | , s '
fed o h April, on sly to th “ourtesy Gar aiences a van Dy ‘ ~ ~ “hah tebe aael t 2 try h Se
eo cea years have past, yet your; U@. ABey te whe © 2.452-4n.] Spacious yard and land available tur} aed Pack grownts LS — wei oath int ee 4 ll =. — 18-Mont ntence
re ee ee nen sf members a a —— Ture SON & BANFIELD “"Paroee len by appelmtment with Mire | Prameeuts ne reve enone eae te
’ fe and Clarendon : “AR—FORD MERCURY. One secon Apply “HINSON N wer : | ” .
a. 4.4.52—1n. |, CAR Mercury, 12 model, new} and on premises any afternoon deiween agg gg Sa yt "aetieetee * | yond all reasonable doubt and said a p the Chief Tt
oistery and in good working order. / 4—¢ 1a : aioe Gantaet | | that if was not because a man hap- * ce
Toe Tadbatcs ‘i Agencies, (Telephone | mer ee ‘eee anes ae » os uted P nut er uel of
WANTE ppl 1453-6n.| MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—witn| A. F. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory, | pened to be charged that he ne- Fane a eee whi fey
: 08 é cs d pn tae Blea ‘Gonbabenb. dial S187 Between 5 p.m, and & 5 cessarily was guilty of the crime guilty GeFier in the of
— | Gillman Sedan 1951 model 1m] for further particulars. Apply to Alma] ©" ay day Monday to Friday, inclusive | conwmitted. It was for them to de- . in
HELP < ition. Done only 6,000 miles. Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. Worthing | cide whether the witnesses for the ng and entering .
Se asa : ? paca" ie Saee-ste Be ae Crown had reached that standard faoaths’ enpetesnmtea wil ‘ton
ASSISTANT PAADES . a , OFFICE SPACE—Available over Lash AUCTION that they could have perfect con- rane Atns Alleyne had two Tous
Company iivinages. Experience man-} GAR—FORD PREFECT. One second} tq;'s at Prince William Henry St. Apply te ———--- | idence in therm. ; convictions for petty lareen
Sdebeat ih ok ti pilit 4 Ford Prefect in good working T. B. Marshall 4.4.52—1n UNDER THE SILVER He pointed out that while Far- . .y y * iy.
a anton, iit tate ose Jorder. Apply pados Agencies, Tel-} ————_ pee eeea nee ear ee Tey had said that she had left the
to manage cottor r ' r. Apply Barbado ‘ ev had said
Saodeae opty rating experience. at | shome “¥0e | ape HR NUMER SMES TAD. | py recombi aten eT taovas agents | Howse to. go and tell a neighbour |, Seventeen-year-old Fitz, Gerald
seiuy required to Box 21, Tiym ae : like | Lope Street. Dial 4811 th ae pe ‘ to {and had left Husbands outside the Haynes of Hi tt Hall who
Mortserrat, B.W.1 3.4.52--6 CARS—Minor Two-Door Saloon Lower Broad Street $.do-40. ' Ve will sell today at Robert Thor hac d returned and found him pleaded guilty er in the ses
aad 4). 11d. Warehouse, Pnirchild Street puse an ee
GARD! /—Apply before 9.00 a.m { Sa! Very €00d CONKILION | i 2 BALES WRAPPING PAPE! sill outside, Husbands had said sions to indecent assault and who
a. ae Fende. Five Hill. - Dodge, (1938) two-seater, excellent for |" "TO oe So "ed nee Sale 12:30 o'clock. Terms Cast o when she left, he went into had been given a good character
3 eee exten” 1Ap0n, Bt, Se ee eeeationt ” pelnine. Boxee. C/o Aa.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |:ho house and she returned and by the ation Officer, was put
a ——— nn | Sean a 59 tion: ; ths.
TAILORS—Jourheymen Tailors, (Jacket purposes, Wolseley (1947) 6 bp . = voeate Co, 3.4.52—2n Auc re found him in the house. Again on probation for 18 moni
Hands) only those with experience need | 15,000 miles. in very € col "ROOSEVELT —Ma i Coast Road.
y _ S. MAFPEI & Co., Ltd.} Ford Prefect, 17,000 miles, very fine| Ri xwel
ret FCS: Si 26 3.52t.f.n |cadition. FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd.| Fully furnished, including Frigidaire, UNDER THE SILVER

24,52—6n.| Telephone and Re@iffusion.
Ist May. Phone 22%.

Available
44.52—t.f.n

SE Telephone 4504
YOUNG MAN for our office, who must; _

be capable of using a typewriter, Good

salary with advancement commensurate

with obility to right applicant.
MOUNT GAY DISTILLERIES L4d.,

2.4.52—t.f.n







ELECTRICAL

WHITESANDS — St, Lawrence Gap;
fully furnished for May and June. For
particulars phone 3.4.52—n.

A



~PYE BATTERY SETS—A few of these
Call early and
MAFFEI

ry popular Radios left w
oid disappointment. P. C. S

Dial 2787

Shepherd St



Co. Ltd

\
j

a E Minor Tourer 7,000 miles, Morris
{ 3.4.52—4n
i

PUHLIC NOTICES LOST & FOUND















Arm Chairs, Dining Table
upright Chairs, Mir
; Tables ali in
Pyrex Ware,
Lai




























HAMMER CHANCERY SALE

On Tuesday Sth by order of Mrs. A. | BARBADOS

Harris, we will sel) her furniture at The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the stration
Mannings House" Holetown, St. James,| omece, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum
hich imeludess—Bergére Settee and 2/ ond on the date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on h

eac!
succeeding Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full
Particulars on application to me.

Defendant

(to seat 8
Hatstand, ornament
Glass, China
Vases, Jar-

mahogany

T Services JOHN WESLEY BELL
‘ea Services.



prreiaceaee niere and ‘Fruit Stands in Cromium Plaintiff EDWIN LEE BELL
MISCELLANEOUS Lemonade and Cock-tail Sets; Pits.| pRopERTY: All that certain piece or parcel of land gituate at Stewarts Hun in
nen eee ale ea Casseroles, Soup and Fruit Spomns the parish of St. John and Island of Bar jos aforesaid contain’
PLECTION NOTICE. | CROOKES Halibut Liver Oil in 5 c. c. LOST | Cutlery &c, Binoculars, Oil Painting be admensurement one acre and twenty two perehes Abutting an
Barbados Eleméntary Teachers’ Assoc. | 4 15 cc. bottles; also in bottles of lena Pictures; Planter's Desk, Congolium, bounding on the south on lands of Mount Pleasant Plantation on
Two candidates having tied for one), -ules. Can be obtained from ycur DIAMOND. CLIP—-On the St. James] pine Double Bedsteads, Spring Mattress the North and on the West on lands of Mr, B, L, Barrow and on
place, there will be an election next} \ et or E. Johnson & Co., Prince |Coast. Finder rewarded, Please return’) Folding Spring Cot; Jalousie and Folding the East on lands now or late of Mr, John Weatherhead or however
Saturday, April 5th at 12 noon at the) soi, Henry Street, Agents for|to Advertising Dept. C/o Advocate screens; Verandah Chairs; Go Cart, else the same may abut and bound Togethér with the messuage or
Church House, _, |CROOKES LABORATORIES. Phone 2601 2.4.52—3n.| Ware Press, Coal Stove, Linen, Lawr dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings and erections
o Eat = the eae he between 8 and 9 a.m 2 SD) mn | Mower Garden Tdéols and other thereon erected and built standing and being with the appur-
therefore invite: to attenc or Oy cicmene } items. tenances.
Purpose of electing one member. CROOKES LACTO—CALAMINE | LO- TAKE NOTICE jams 1120. d%elock, Terms CASE casita’ titi, dea
_ . TION. The ideal preparation for a N TR MAN co. SE RICE 450. :
Hon. Secretary, skin irvitatjons and the complexion MORNING MIST BRANKER, OT aus » | DATE OF SALE: 18 April, 1952 i) aint
B.E.S.T.A. | cenerally. Can be obtained from your] That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH ccm Registrar-in-Chancery.
Drnggist or E, Johnson & Co., Princ€} AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LIMITED, a 2.4.52—3n
William Henry Street, Agents | for! Company incorporated and existing under
















The Annual General Meeting of the
Barbados Basketball Association will be
heid at the Y.M.C.A. on FRIDAY, 4th
April at 7.30 p.m.

$ y 4452—2n

All clubs desirous of ee shor Street, City,
send their applications to Secretary, DUREX are now
YÂ¥.M.C.A. so that they may be elected) itainable from E. Johnson & Co.

affiliated clubs by the General Meeting
28.3.52—6n.



WEYMOUTH CLUB
: NOTICE .
1s are hereby reminded of the

i General Meeting which takes
plaee tonight, Friday 4th April 1952 at
1,49 at the Hurd Memorial, James Street
L. G. WiTSHIRE,

Hon. Secty.
* 4452—1n



—_———
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Gilpid Harding
eeper of Baxters Road, St, Michac

for, permission to se Spirits, Malt
Liquors &c. at a board and shingle shox
at “corner Crichlows Alley, Chapman’
Lafie, City.

aDated this 2nd day

F H. A. TALMA Eso

© (Signed) FREDERICK MURRELL,

~ for Appiicant

MB .—This..application will be cc
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held



of April, 1952



at Police, Cowt, District “A” on Tue
day, the..iGth..day ot April, 10% at
11 -o’cloeky aan,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist “A”
+. ee 4.4,52—In






WHAT THEY SAY

“L.wenld.pot buy or rent a
house where I could not get gas
for cooking."

We are sure this lady only voiced
the opinion of hundreds of other
housewters.

If youlpaydp"t cot a Gas cooker
yet, callemmd see those in the
% showroom”

You can Book one from our next





SSO SSOOO OO

>
$ shipment.-= x
s ‘



OLLIE OOOO.
So

FURNISH TO-DAY.

The Morey Saving Way

2POOS



FULL-PANELLED and othe:
Mahogany Bedsteads; some in Outstanding
Designs—Vanities with Vario
Mirrors- Wardrobes and Dresser-
robes
* MAHOGANY, Birch pnd Dent

bles for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
wing, Kitchen everal shapes
end sizes—Sid ards, Cabinets
“or China, Kitchen and Bedroom
WITES, and Separate Drawing
m pieces in Morris, ‘Tub, Ber-
ere and Kush, and Many other
ice Things NEW AND RENEWED

L.S. WILSO

* SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069





FURNITURE
AUCTIO



PRELIMINARY
" ANNOUNCEMENT

‘ We are instructed by
Mr. W. D. Chariton to dis-
pose of all his Modern
* Furniture and effects at
? ‘WHITEHALL FLATS,
Codrington Hill, St. Michael
at 11.30 a.m. on
WEDNESDAY, 9th April
e
AUCTIONEERS

John M4. Biadon
& co.

A.F.S., F.V.A

one 4640. Plantations



Building

poms eel aie







CROOKES LABORATORIES, Phone beg
between 8 and 9 a.m.



Mrinee William Henry Street.

8 and 9 a.m

for sale

2.4.52—4n.





CURRANTS—43 cents per Ib. Saltans

ondon Rubber Co.
2.4,52—4n



GOODYEAR TYRES—We now offer
in our store the famous Good-
year Lorry and Passenger Car Tyres.
We will put them on your car or lorry
free. K. R. HUNTE & Co. Ltd., Lr
Broad St. Dial 5136

3.4.52—3n.

——S—__—_——————

“GLADIOLI & DAHLIA"—Orders are
vow being taken for Gladioli and Dahlias
or delivery in December 1952, parties
nterested in booking please phone 4442,
T. Geddes Grant, Ltd. 18.3.52—14n

————————
JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts,
neluding — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid
Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens Also
Pressure Stoye parts. Enquire Auto Tyre
Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets
Phone 4 20.3.52—t.f.n.
OIL—The world’s finest motor oil
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
. Your vehicle deserves the best.
“Found wherever fine cars
17.2.82—t.f.n

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Electrolux
“erosene Ot] Refrigerator, 4 cu. ft,
spacity. In perfect working order.
Mrs, Keith Webster, Harrisons
Plantation, St. Lacy 29.3.52—6n











eevee, | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER AND REMOVAL
The app



sation of Dallas Marshall of
Well Ho St. Philip, the purchaser
f Liquor Li se No. 625 of 1952 granted

Wilbert Green in respect of a Board
ind Gelvanited Shop situated at Pilgrims











oad Christ Church, to remove said
icense to a Board and Galvanized
hop situated at Well House, St. Philip,
d to use it at such last described
sromises,
Dated this 2nd day of April 1952.
(Sed.) GORDON BROWNE,
Applicant
To: A. W. HARPER Esq
Police Magistrate, Dist. “C,"
N.B.—This application will be con-
dered at a Licensing Court to be
wld on Wednesday the 16th day of
ipril 1952 at Eleven o'clock a.m. at
Voalice Courts, District “C”
A. W. HARPER,
Yolice Magistrate, Dist. “C"
4.4.52—in
LANYARD
That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LEMITED, a

‘ompany incorporated and existing under
he limited liability laws of the Union
“0 South Africa whose trade or busi-
ess address is, Argus Chambers, 30,
*hureh Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
sxporters, has applied for the reg@itra-
jon of a trade mark in Part “A” of
‘egister in respect of canned fruits,
ams, fish, dried fruit, crystallised fruit,
ruit juices, fruit squashes, fruit, and fruit
beverages, and substances used as food
© as ingredients in food, and will be
ntitled to register the same after one
nonth from the 2nd day of April, 1962,
niess some person shall in the mean-
me give notice in duplicate to me at
ny office of opposition of such regis-
on application at my office.
itien The trade mark can be seen
Dated this 25th day of March 1962
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4.52—3n,

®LCLLOEPEE OPES SESSA

ADVERTISE
IN THE

ADVOCATE

ALLL PO LPL PCE

ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIKS
FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466











TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

REEDS FOR CLARINETTES
AND SAXOPHONES



Some Pxtra Copies of
ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS
Of the King’s Funeral for Sale

Coloured and Clear Plastic By
The Yard

all at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE

LEEEST PSO SFOS

tion of a trade mah in Part
Register in

jams, fish, dried fruit, crystallised fruit,
fruit juices, fruit squashes, fruit, and fruit

1} the limited Mability laws of the Union | ~
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address

Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
51 cents per Ib., at C. Herbert, 55 Tudor] Exporters, hi

jis Argus Chambers, 30,

as applied for the aes
“A” oO}

respec’ f canned fruits,

Agents for | beverages, and substances used as food
Phone 2691 between | or as ingredients fn food, and will be

entitled to register the same after one
month from the 2nd day of April, 1952,
unless some person shall in the mean-

time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such regis-
tration The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office
Dated this 25th day of March 1952
H



. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4.52—3n
PINNACLE
That HENRY W, PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LEMITED, a

| Company incorporated and existing under

the limited Mability
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address is Argus Chambers, 30,
Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
Exporters, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of canned fruits,
jams, fish, dried fruit, erystailised fruit,
fruit juices, frult squashes, fruit, and fruit
beverages, and substatwes used as food
or as ingredients 1n food, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 3nd day of April, 1952,
unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at

laws of the Union

my office of opposition of such regis-
on application at muy office
tration The trade mark seen




Dated this 25th day

TAKE NOTICE

That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LIMITED, a

-ompany incorporated and existing under
the limited liability laws of the Union
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address is Argus Chambers, 3),
Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
Exporters, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of canned fruits,
jams, fish, dried fruit, erystallised fruit,
fruit juices, fruit squaghes, fruit and fruit
beverages, and subst@hces used as food
or a8 ingredients im food, and will be
entitied to register the same after one
month from the 2nd day of April. 1952
unless some person shall in the mean-



time give notice in duplicate to me at
my, office of opposition of such regis
tration. The trade mark can be see:
on application at my office

Dated this 25th day of March 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks

2.4.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE





That THE “UNIQUE” Pen CO., LIM
ITED, a British Company, whose trade

| or business address is §79, Kingston Road

London, S.W., England, Manufacturers
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of pens, fountain pens, pen hold-
ers, pencils, pen mibs and pen and pen-
cil clips and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 2nd
day of April, 1952, unless some person
shalt in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office
Dated this 25th day of March 1952
H. WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4. 58—In





MR. GUY



Programm





THREE SONATAS :
PRELUDE AND FUGUE IN C
SONATA IN B MINOR, Op. 5





Admission $1.00 or 60c.
All Seats Reserved



Unguentine













PIANO RECITAL

Professor of the Royal Academy of Music,

THE sarttast COUNCIL GARDINER

“Wakefield”, White Park
on WEDNESDAY, 9th April, at 8.30 p.m.

and WORKS by Brahms, Fauré





















Ls
ELE SLGEELLSELLL SEF FEEFSESSFESSSSSSSFS SESS,

JUST TO REMIND YOU...

i when you purchase from

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods at Your Door.
CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

AF OOO IE OTOL

Sore Mouth |

ieose Bloody Teeth

ileeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
l.cose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
perhaps some bad disease that will
ooner or later cause your teeth to
fall out and may also cause Rheu-
atism and Heart Troub'e. Amosan
tops gum bleeding the first day,
ends sore mouth and quickly tigh
ens th eth. Iron clad guarante
Amosahdnust make your mouth w
and save your teeth or money ba
on return of empty pack
Amosan from your chemis
The guarantee protects you

4

OPPO PPRE

Coe



~





FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

5th Avenue, = KEelleville

An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated
om a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
enclosed), large drawing room, difing room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc.

Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AFS., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Plantations Building.



016.08 wer.ore,

Relieves pain of

Phone 4640.



ST. VINCENT
GRUMMAN GOOSE

AIR. SERVICE

PRESENT SCHEDULE

Dienemmmmmeememmdzencintenn teimiedene eae ncateantetioental

DIAMOND
RINGS

om















MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent
. Departs St. Vincent vi -» 9,00 am,
Arrives Barbados ++ 10.00 a.m.
Departs Barbados ‘3 +» 1030 am.
Arrives St. Vincent ue 11.30 a.m.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT (FUESDAYS st. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent
And Departs St. Vincent i -» 900 am.
DIAMOND WEDDING Arrives Trinidad se -» 10.30 a.m.
RINGS Departs Trinidad . ++ $1,80—a.m.
Available Specialy Arrives St. Vincent -» 1,00 p.m.
or in
Your Jewellers : WEDNESDAYS si, Yipoent/Grenads/8t. Vincent
Depa it. Vincent 10.00 a.m.
Y. De LIMA Arrives Grenada v “1030 a.m.
Departs Grenada oe -» 11.20 am.
& co... LTD. Arrives St. Vincent Re +» 12 noon
20, Broad Street Additional Flight From St. Vincent
to Trinidad Times on Application
= St. Vinecent/Barbados/Dominica
THURSDAYS Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent e +» 8.00 a.m. *
Arrives Barbados ee ++ 9.00 a.m,
Departs Barbados ve ++ 930 a.m.
Arrives Dominica re -+ 11.30 am.
‘ Departs Dominica es ++ 1280 p.m.
Arrives Barbados vs +» 230 p.m.
Departs Barbados - -+ $00 p.m.
Arrives St. Vincent oa -. 400 p.m.
FRIDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent oe +» 9.00 a.m.
Arrives Trinidad i -+ 10.30 p.m.
y Departs Trinidad ve Pi 72. a.m.
: Arrives St. Vincent ve «+ (1,00 p.m.
JONSON

AUSTIN
| & CO., LTD.
AGENTS
Lower Hroad St.

e includes:
‘ a Scarlatti
SHARP Bach
8 et Chopin
and Liszt
Phone 4704

Tel. 3249


































|

SHIPPING NOTICES





ROYAL NETHERLANDS 9°°3?*



| The MV “MONEKA" will

accept Cargo and Passengers for

| STEAMSHIP co. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

SAMING FROM EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts and Passeng-

M.8. , on 4th April 1962 ers only dor St. Vineent. Sailing
3.8. ROSKOOP on lith April 1962, to-day Friday, 4th inst,

MB. on 18th April, 1982, The M.V. “CACIQUE DEL

M.S. STENTOR on 2nd May 1952 eee bind accept Cargo and

assengers for St. Lucia, Grenada

we teeta REED AM ND |S and Aruba. ‘and Pussenders only

M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952 mea ee

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIRO The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will

AND BRITISH GUIANA
8.8. COTTICA on Tth April 1952
M.S. BONAFRE on 6th May, 1952
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO

accept' Cargo and Passengers or
St. Laicia, Grenada and Aruba, and e
Passengers only for St. Vincent; $
Sailing Wednesday 9th inst. =

The M.V. "CARIBBEE” will ac-

LOOOPSOOOOGGOPOOâ„¢

M.S. HECUBA 2ist April 1952. cept Cargo and Passengers for ¥
S.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1952 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, .
| 8. PB, MUSSON, SON & Co., LTD. Nevis and St. Kitts; Sailing Wed-

nesday 9th inst

SP LPEPLLPE LPP LOS

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’

COOVSPD



ADVERTISING PAYS BEST

ASSOCIATION (INC)
% c 4087 X
PSOOCOSOOV CCC OSEOD



‘Canadian National Steamships









Sails Sails Salis Arrives
eit: Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos wen
t Yy ee * —- 2) Mar, 2 Apr 11 Apr Apr.
LADY SEL BON ieee ay —_ We Apr 17 Apr. 27 Apr, = Ap:.
CAN 29 Apr. 2 May “> 11 May 13 May
LADY vt more Mer a Me msy Some 2 Mes
- + ay 2 May 2 Jun
CANADIAN IAN CHALLENGER “ 30 May 2 June _ 11 dune 2 =
ae 3d an - sen 2 — 14 June 23 June 24 June
|\ADIAN oe u« une _- "
Ane hel 5a UCTOR.. 30 June 3 July _— PH tu 3 Suiy
AD ve ee 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 36 July
NORTHBOUND Arrives Salle Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
dias, als B'dos B'dos Boston 8%. John Halifax Montreal
be {UISER 4 Apr 7 Apr. _ 14 Apr 7 Apr, =
LADY RODNEY 24 Apr. 26 Apr. 5 Ma - 6 May 10 Ma;
ta Ga + 10 May 12 Ma 22 May, - 23 Ma 21 May
Ce UISER 24 May 4 May — , 6 June 8 June} 11 June
UCTOR 3 June 8 June - 15 June
use . unc 18 June 21 June
LADY RODSEY ev 15 June 17 June 27 June pe 28 June 1 duly
CHALLENGER ., 23 June 28 June bin 5 Jul )
LADY NELSON °° July 8 July 18 July =| oem ae
oe Memos aa 4 July 19 July = 26 July; @ Jus, 1 Aug
CONSTRUCTOR 24 July =. 29 July — 5 Aug) 8 Aug.
LADY RODNEY ., 7 Aug. 9 Aug 19 Aug. ie Ses. 3 Rs
= = * tT er 3 o “* ~~ = Sa -
i = ys





For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD,—Agents.







CG" TRANSATLANTIQUE |

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
% Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952 ....
*““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” 8th May, 1952... ....

Arrives Barbados

«. 81st March, 1952
6th May, 1952
2lst May, 1952



SCPE PSO POSES.
:
x

55 CCOCS SOS SB OOOOOO FOOSE 3



Not calling at Guadeloupe %
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE %

>

From Barbados.
“COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 ....
*““DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton

10 DAYS
CARIBBEAN, CRUISE

From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD
Venezuela-Curacao
Colombia & Jamaica
Hy the LUXURY LINERS
COLOMBIE & DE GRASSE

FOR INFORMATION

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

PHONE 3814
SSSSSSSS SESS SOOO FF FSO SS OS SS SSS SSE OPS OO OOSSSON"

Arrives Southampton
«.. 28rd April, 1952





SOSOOOOTTSE

SOS EE LOSSES POP SSSOS POPS OTE F



SOOSOSOOFOSPOSOSVSSS OF

OOS



° S93G999

Wm. FOGARTY (0S) LTD.

TAILORS OF PROVEN RELIABILITY
AND EXCELLENT FITTERS

































We carry a wide range of

HIGHGRADE

SUITINGS

to choose from



e
OUR GUARANTEED

CUTTING

AND

TAILORING

WILL TRANSFORM YOUR
CHOICE INTO
A SUIT OF
DISTINCTION





































HENRY

ON SECOND THOUGHTS
VOUD SETTER COME

PL DON'T
ALONG AND SEE THE ASS

GIVE ME AWAY..

[aAVE vou)
SEEN MY “\t

FLASH GORDON

TANTS
i TIME TO
WHERE ARE YOU GOLDILOCRE
RUNNING, BIG MOE?

NOT SO STRONG

WITHOUT A GUN IN

YOUR HAND ARE yOu?

JOHNNY HAZARD

FT

BE GLAD WHEN WEE pase
DORRIE AND WEE LAURIE &
ARE FINALLY MARRIED



RIP KIRBY

SEVEN, I'VE VISITED MISS
ABERNATHY'S SCHOOL ...EVERY-
5 THING YOU SAID ABOUT MONICA
/-> HILL SEEMS TO CHECK .,.1’VE
, (DONE SOME OnE:

V2 yrnissins TOO... (

De) ae 4
—— x
ow)





ALIVE #& 1 DONT..
PN

\}
Hu D/I
AROUND i A
TOOTSIE 7? lad
Le



I’M STILL GROGGY!
GOTTA GET AWAY




SHAVE THE FACE, BRUSH
THE TEETH AND HIT THE

BACK TO THE PRISON
HOSPITAL? NOW~+ FOR

tA THE GUIDE o<

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON

LET ME HIDE HERE,

PAGET'S

MOT STUFF ON
STOWAWAYS...





ovine roe) [HERBERT )\ DAGWOOD

wT] ISN'T THAT JUST
BEAUTIFUL ? LOOK
AT THOSE LINES
1 | AND CURVES !/

I EXPECTED THAT,
KIRBY... HERES THE
3. PROOF...OUR MARRIAGE
m LICENSE AND MONIKA'S
Re



My
hal
Ss

Se eo” 3
UR.

SPHAT'S WHAT YOU THINK, JOHNNY.’ WAIT TILL
YOU SEE THE BANDAGED LADY'S NOTE NOW ///
x

AT LEAST UNTIL
WE'VE OROPPED
"LOT a0















WAIT FOR ME,
MUSCLES /

BY FRANK ROBBINS





"Se ‘ eh Z

LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

YOUR MYSTERIOUS GUIDE
| EH? NOW ATLEAST YOULLGEE
HIS FACE. LETS GET SOME OF
THOSE CLOTHES OFF AND
EXAMINE THE
WOUND.







in (ARTO, PASSED OVE
- :
> ‘ ‘
= EASTER IS HERE...
.
* DRINK
e
.



















PAGE SEVEN

. S&S
. RUM

"
% The RUM with a Flavour

WHEN A COLD STRIKES,

°
Ss ACK ST. all its own
TRIKE B FA eee x Expertly Blended and
a . % Bottled by














ere

(1938) LID. ;

“ Headquarters for Best Rum

$ STUART & SAMPSON



4,

Ne
POLL LLL SSE

PPPOE FFE FSB OSSS SI VG99O

JUST RECEIVED

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

gl eg?


















| Pkes.'Tate & Lyle Castor
i % Sugar

» Sliced Ham and Bacon ‘
% Lege. and Small Tins Vienna ¢
s Sausages

% Pkes. Goddard Plague Pow-
y der

» Tins Stove Polish ‘
| Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

* Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar
» Tins Gelatine ,
, Tins Asstd. Sweet Biscuits §
» Tins Pineapple Chunks
x Tins Strawberries

USTERINE Antiseptic kills millions of
germs on throat surfaces...keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Remen>
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!

Also:
TIN HAMS








X Special price to Shopkeepers §
IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS .
® OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS!

isk

% All these things get. from --
re ‘

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.



6969969°96O8956965656554

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

:
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

———————————==—=
SPECIAL OFFERS are’ now ®@vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now







Usually Now

Tins ANCHOR POW: MILK 24%... $2.35 $2.12 Tins HAMS, (21b) cocoon 389 3.50
Tins KRAFT MACARONI 34
WITH CHEESE ..cccccc. Al 38 issctthabveraiier:« sasha cama’ at






Tins TOMATOES ooocccoccccccccccccccccccececes 36 33 Bottles CARIB BEER .................... 24 20

STARTING MONDAY APRIL 7th

Writing



Paper.
Envelopes,

Aceount Books,



Large
School Books,

y e CG fi
Novels. Thrillers, : lo ¢ )



Children’s Books,
‘ee /

Books on Sport,

and a few other miscellaneous items

ADVOCATE eo





s . : >
STATIONERY § \\X,
Broad Street OF RS







L





PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Know Your Football

LAWS XVI & XVH

Today I conclude my _ discus-
sions of the LAWS OF THE
GAME with a study of the last
two Laws—Law xvi—Goal-Kick
and Law xvii Corner Kick,

Goal Kick
When the whole of the bali
passes over the goal-line exclu
ding that portion between the
*goal-posts, either in the air or or
the ground, having last been
played by a member of the

attacking team, it shall be kicked
direct into play, beyond the pen-
alty area, from a point within
that half of the goal-area, nearest
to where it crossed the line, by
a player of the defending team.
A goalkeper shall not receive
the ball into his hands from
goal-kick in order that he ma
thereafter kick it into play. If the
ball is not kicked beyond th
penalty-area, that is, direct into
play, the kick shall be re-taken.
The kicker shall not play the

ball a second time until it has
been touched or has been played
by another player. A goal shall
not be scored direct from such a
kick and players of the team

opposing that of the player tak-\

BY O. 8S. COPPIN



Your Football
Problems

By The Sports Editor

Now that the series “Know
Your Football”, discussions
on the seventeen laws of the
game, have been concluded
to-day, the Sports Editor will
answer as many of your foot-
ball problems as _ possible
in these columns,

No problems will be taken
over the telephone. Address
a letter “Football Problems”

c/o Sports Editor, Barbados
Advocate.



referee would not have allowed
it. However I am cautioning those
players against repeating these
tactics as they are an infringe-

ment of this law, Always remem~
ber, the ball has not been kicked
into play until it has been kicked

ing the goal-kick shall remain BEYOND the penalty area,
outside the penalty-area whilst The only other infringement
the kick is being taken. " vhich I have noticed with regard
There is not much confusiorf§ ° this law is that some players
in my experience with the inter-â„¢ un into their opponents penalty

pretation by players and specta-
tors alike of this rule. There is
only one general controversiai
point. Some players hold the view
that should a defender taking a
goal-kick slice the ball some dis-
tance away in the penalty area
that they can rush in and score.

I have seen this season attempts
at this and much confusion
resulted especially as a spectator
had volunteered to referee the
game in the absence of the officio!
referee who had been unavoidably
detained, These players got away
with it but IT am sure an official





First inter-Schaol ,

area a split second before the
the kick has been taken. This also
is an infringement. They must
remain OUTSIDE until the kick
has been taken,
Punishment 7a
If a player taking a goal-kick
plays the ball a second time after
it has passed beyond the penalty-
area, but before it has touched
or even played by another player
an indirect free-kick shall be
awarded to the opposing team to
be taken from the place where
the infringement occurred.

Girls Sports Planned

By CALVIN

ALLEYNE

AND now after most people have tor years been nod
ding their heads and agreeing with conviction that it would
be a good idea, headmistresses and gaines mistresses o!
the Government aided schools have got together and decid-
ed to stage the first Girls’ Inter-school Sports, possibly on

May 16. The only worry f

or the headmistresses now is

securing grounds, preferably Kensington.

Inter-school boys’ sports stretch
over years and there has always
been the keenest rivalry, and now
for the first Girls’ Inter-school
sports, the girls are itching to be
on the track and they are already
trying to feel out and assess their
rival school athletes.

And after all, this zest is plaus-
ible because the first winners of
the Girls’ Inter-school sports will
make history.

e-schools to take part are
Queen’s College, St. Michael’s.
Foundation and Alexandra, Mrs.
Wotton, Queen's College's games
mi told me, Depending on
the success of their venture, they
will consider allowing other girls’
schools’ to enter.

Usual Divisions

The divisions are the usual divi-
sions—under 12, 12 to 14, 14 to 16
and over 16, and the sports will be
purely athletic. Perhaps it may
seem needless to say purely athle-
tic, but you will remember that in
their own sports, girls include
events of skill such as the Egg and
Spoon race and the Potato race
but there will be no such event in
the inter-school sports.

The longest distance for the
senior girls will be the 220 yards
As St. Michael’s is the only schoo!
with a sand pit, there will be no
Long Jump event.

The girls will deplore the fact
that there will be no prizes as i
the case in the Boys’ sports, Ther
will only be points and a trophy
for the champion school.

An intriguing thing that is mak-
ing the girls train seriously is thai
they have little idea of their op
ponents potentialities. In Boys
sports, a school gets to know the
standard of their rivals, For in-
stance, it did not take the schoo)
boys until sports day to know thai
Lloyd from Foundation would
have won the 440 and 880, and the
880 in record time besides, at the
last sports. Why, everybody knew
that last year when Glasgow from



| They'll Do It Every Time

Lodge won the 880, Lioyd came a
good second despite his stopping a
very short while to assist the Col-
lege best for whom the pace had
got too hot. Everybody knew too,
that Lodge’s Inniss would have
won the 100 and 220 sprints. And
the boys know that certain good
athletes who have not left school
will again put up a good showing.
But in this Girls’ Inter-school
sports, there is no knowing an-
other girl’s capabilities and there
will be many surprises. They are
in the dark too because previously
they have not been keeping times
and records. Also they will be
running on a bigger track,

A Stimulus

For the girls, assurance that
there will be sports, has acted as a
stimulus and one may add that it
has also acted as a stimulus to wo-
men sports in Barbados as a whole.

On evenings you will see them
training. Some Queen's College
girls train on Harrison College
“rounds where they have been
checking up on their times,

As to possible winners, well, one
has to admit that the contest will
be reduced to a tussle between
Queen's College and St. Michael’s
because of their numbers. Queen’s
College will have a slight advan-
tage in their senior division as
their age limit is slightly higher.
Yet their senior girls will be
studying for examinations and this
balances down the advantage.

The only snag to all this is that
there is trouble about getting
grounds that would be most con-
venient for making the sports pay
off themselves—Kensington, Any-
how the hgadmistresses and games
mistresses have not given up hope
that they will be able to persuade
the ma ers of Kensington that
girls spor hould be encouraged.
‘The last resort will be to ask the
headmaster of Harrison College or
Combermere to lend them the
grounds, but as Mrs, Wotton said,
‘That would be just too bad.”







TONIGHT'S POP'S LODGE
NIGHT++- MOM CAN'T
KEEP HIM HOME, BUT

THE MAN NEXT
DOOR

—

STEERED“DONT
LET HiM SEE

YOU*

be, KING PEATURES SYNDU

s

V4

PoP HAD THAT
OPERATION FOUR
YEARS AGO--HE'S
BEEN USING IT AS
AN EXCUSE EVER



Revinered @. 5. Potent OMee B Jimmy Hatlo |

it is the duty of the referee to
see that goal-kicks are pfoperly
taken within that half of the
oal-area nearest the point where
e all went out.

Corner Kick

When the whole of the ball
passes over the goal-line, exclu-
ding that portion between the
goal-posts either in the air or
on the ground, having last been
played by one of the defending
team, a member of the attacking
team shall take a kick from
within the quarter circle at the
nearest corner-flag post, which

must rot be removed, ie, a
corner-kick,
A goal may be scored direct

from such a kick. Players of the
team opposing that of the player
taking the corner-kick shall not
approach within ten yards of the
batt until it is in play, Le. it has
travelled the distance of its own
circumference, nor shall the
kicker play the ball a second time
until it has been touched or
played by another player.

Punishment

For an infringement of this law
an indirect free-kick shall
awarded to the opposing team, to
be taken from the place where
the infringement occurred.

The corner flag-staff must not
be removed when a corner-kick
is taken.

I must emphasise at this point
that if a player takes a corner-
kick and the ball re-bounds to
him after striking the goal-post,
he MUST NOT play it again until
it has been played by another
player.

Referees too can assist in
ensuring that a_corner-kick is
properly taken by refusing to
allow it to be taken while any
opponent is within ten yards of
the ball.

In the Seventh R.B.Y.C. Re-
gatta which will be sailed in Car-
lisle Bay to-morrow, “B” Class
boats Imp, Rainbird and Sinbad
will start at 2.46 p.m. (Yellow

Flag) instead of at 2.45 p.m. as
appeared in yesterday’s Advocate.

Imp, Sinbad and Rainbird will
receive two minutes from Hurri-
cane, the scratch boat of the Class.



TABLE TENNIS

The Return Matches of the La-
dies Inter-Club Table Tennis fix-
tures will be continued at the
Y.M.C.A, Naval Hall to-night.
The games are as follows:—

Queen’s College vs. Lenville—

6.30 p.m.
Y.W.C.A. vs. Barna—7.30 p.m.
Y.W.P.C. vs. Adelphi — 8.30
RR ee gs Sh Foes. ae



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions—
10.00 a.m.

Annual Meeting, Barbados
Nurses’ Association, Gen-
eral Hospital — 4.00 p.m.

Football, Queen’s Park —
5.00 p.m.

Mobile _ Cinema, Checker
Hall Plantation, St. Lucy

—7.30 pan.
Police Band Concert, Hast-
ings Rocks — 8.00 p.m.







WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
nen from Codrington
nid,
Total rainfall for month to
date : .02 ins,
Highest Temperature: 86.5°F
Lowest Temperature: 82.5°F
we Velocity 14 miles per

jour
Barometer (9. a.m.) 29.998
(3 p.m.) 29.928
TO-DAY
Sunrise : 5.55 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m,
Moon: Ist Quarter,
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide : 12.51 a.m., 11. 47

p.m.
Low Tide : 6.19 a.m., 7.02
p.m.

‘

°

Apl.

ED



AND A TIP OF

“THANX

THE HATLO HAT TO
BARNEY LOGAN,
SHEEVESPORT , LA.

Sie)

iS)

THE GRAND
NATIONAL

(By a Correspondent) .
LO} 1N

Phe Grand National, toughest
of all horse races, is once again
at hand. Tomorrow, fifty picked
horses will engage in a test of

speed, stamina and Jumping
ability over four and a half
miles of the most gpuelling

course in the world. :

Watched by thousands, i
ing from the top-hatted punfér
who stakes a fortune to the man
risking a. shilling each way, the

National is rightly claimed the
greatest -steeple-chase race in
the world.

Today's race is a far cry from
that day in 1792, when three
crack gentlemen riders raced
cross-country from Bark Holt,
in Leicestershire to Llesdon
Coplow — four miles distant —
and back again. That ‘field,’
though small, was historic. For
the event — won by Mr, Mey-
nell, son of the famous Quorn
Master — was the first recorded
steeplechase in Britain, the ‘cur-
tain-raiser’ to the National Hunt
racing of to-day, +

Eighteen years later, iff 1810,
some 40,000 sportsmen floeked to
Bedford to watch anothe- his
toric

+

Empire Beat
Everton

EMPIRE (Simmonds 1; Hope 1; Drayton 1)

EVERTON



I—Nil

Sci ciorecabahcs ties 3

EMPIRE playing a much improved game defeated

Everton three—nil in their

match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon.

return First Division Football
A large

crowd watched the game and saw the Empire players

eombine well in the second

»_. Two of the goals were scored in
the second halt by Simmonds and
Hope while Drayton at inside
right scored the first goal off a

enalty in the early part of the
rst half. Veteran in goal
for proved to be a to

opponent, and in both halves he
displayed clever anticipation.

¢ two Everton full backs
Weekes and Simpson played a good
game but in the second half, the
Everton defence went to pieces.
Robinson in goal for Empire was
sound and Grant, Smith, Alleyne
and Drayton paved the way for
the victory.

The game started with Empire
defending the northern end of the
piteh and from the touch off Em-
pire was pressing. Olton at centre-
forward for Everton tested Robin-
two minutes after play

‘ace — the . son sf
chase run over at preppy dad started but Robinson antici-
circuit. By modern standards, Dane od coat: Se. ahvien
the course was_ easy. ight

jumps had to be cleared, each 4ft,
was
the affair held at Roscommon in
, when a steeple-chase wag
Staged over 6-mile circuit inter-
sected by wide ditches and six
stone walls.

In 1830, the army took a step
in popularising the sport, when
sixteen Life Guards officers rode

be in a Regimental steeplechase at

St. Albans, this led to simil
meetings being held in
other parts of the country.

1886 was a milestone in
National Hunt racing. For the
first time, a meeting was held at
the little known village of Ain-
tree near Liverpool. Three years
later the first Grand National
was run there, though it was
then known as the Grand Liver-
pool Steeplechase. The four-
mile course lay over genuine
farm-land and comprised plough,
scrubland and pasture. Rules
forbade competitors taking easy
routes along roads or bridlepaths,
or avoiding jumps by opening
convenient gates.

Today, the 4} mile course con-
sists of two laps of the Aintree
circuit, and 30 obstacles have to
be cleared.

As always Ireland is well
represented, bi\t this year’s chal-
lenge from the Emeral Isle is by
horses little known in Britain.

One of these, which has gained
great favour with home backers
is Icey Calm. Reason i
is that
Irish National over three and a
half miles, Icy Calm has been
given one of the bottom weights
at Aintree. For despite his
Irish National success, he failed

ar
many

in his other six outings last
season.
Besides Icy Calm there are

two other Irish National winners,
ee (1948) and Dominick’s
Bar (1950).

Hamster

is a remarkable entry.
In nearly four years he has run
in two races and was unplaced.
Prior to that he accomplished the
astonishing feat. of winning the

Hurdle Handicap, the
Irish Grand National and the
Ward Union Hunt, within a

space of three and a half weeks.

Royal Tan is one of the most
fane’ horses, This is nut sur-
prising, In last year’s race only
he and the winner Nickel Coin
completed the course without
falling. Thus his staying power
cannot be doubted. This year
too, Royal Tan has shown good

fotm. He won the National
Hunt Handicap in convincing
fashion.

Until recently, Freebooter, one
of the only two previous win-
ners, was firm favourite. Then
running in the Gold Cup, he fell.
So did his popularity with the
backers. Too much importance
should not be attached to his
Gold Cup running, however, as
he is seldom seen at his best on
the Cheltenham course.

The other winner is Russian

Hero, He was perhaps the un-
luckiest ‘horse in last year's
fiasco, Until brought down at

the fifteenth jump, he was goin,
well, and looked all set to ad
to his 1949 success. His form
this year has not been impres-

sive, but his experience in pre- prising if the 1952 winner came

vious Nationals wn stand
him in good stea
The National, however, is





De

ogy

—<$$—<—$————
——

Reece to come out of the goal and
just as Simmonds was getting
ready to score, Reece snatched
the ball from the tip of his boot
and kicked it midfield. Shortly
after Norville receiving a long
pass from Alleyne at centre half,
kicked the ball across the Everton
joal area and Daniel the right
alf back in trying to kick the ball,
handled it in his area thus causing
Referee Graham to award a
penalty kick.



Students Receive Certificates

F @ From Page 5
achieved, We have not only helped
to give i r

c¢ and improved
finishes, but we have also, tried
and in some ways succeeded in
getting at Human Relationships,
and where we started out with 21
individuals, we now terminate as
one large family I should like to
mention one fact that was very
heartening to me and strengthens
this point,
At the last lecture
Organisati
carried, that the

ey,
s continue to meet and

function as the Homemaker’s Club,
meeting once po vad to report

and cit help where
needed.

_ It has been a full and strenuous
time, when there have been blem-
fishes and worties, but, the over-

t in Group
it was proposed yol-

future the Courses’ might be of
nine months’ duration because I
know it w's just the love and keen
int in the course, which have
kept us all, but we are all very,

ver, .
gained Certificates.

13 first class ranging from 94 to
80%.

8 second class, ranging from 79

62%, me

Mrs. R. N. Turner said:
Housecraft Centre has been serv-
ing a most useful purpose and has
been filling a gap that has been

During the past six years the
left open far too long.

The day and evening classes in
all branches of Domestic Science
started by Miss Parry and con-
tinued by Miss Ivy Alleyne, has
been most ably carried on, and
have proved to be of great prac-
tical value to the women of Bar-
bados and through them good
efteets will become increasingly
“pane as time goes on.

he course for Instructors which
you_have just completed is par-
ticularly important, for in your
cases you have not only learnt to
improve your own knowledge and
methods, but you. will now return
to your schools and clubs and pass
on to others what you have
learned here. .

We are relying on you to teach
them, just as thoroughly and con-
scientiously as you have your-
selves been taught here, so that
you will bring credit to the House-
craft Centre, and the purpose of
the Instructors’ Course of spread-
ing improved Domestic rience
methods to the many, through the
selected few, will be fulfilled.

notoriousty unkind to favourites.
It would not be in the least sur-

{rom one of the less fancied en-
tries.
than Brown Jack III,







Of these none looks better

half of play.

This was taken by Drayton who
made no mistake in opening the
scoring for Empire. Reece made
a big effort but this proved fruit-
less. With one goal to their credit
Empire never slackened and half
time found the score unchanged.

After the resumption Empire
again piled up the pressure but
Everton was also making renewed
efforts to put in the equaliser
Reece again through clever anti-
cipation brought off another pbril-
liant save when Nbrville at left
wing cut in and tried to score in
the left corner of the nets.

Two minutes after, Hope at
right wing succeeded in beating
Reece who had come out as the
winger was alone on the ball with
the hope of intercepting him. Hope
kicked the ball into the left corner
of the goal qo put Empire two up.

The game became faster and the
Empire {éfwards Were playing
together well. Five minutes after
the second goal Simmonds kicked
in the third. The game ended
with the score at three nil.

The teams were:

EmPire: Robinson, Grant, Smith,
Rudder, Maynard, Alleyne, Hope,
Drayton, Simmonds, Taylor and
Norville.

Everton: Reece, Weekes, Simp-
son, Culpeppér, Daniel, Hall,
Holder, Sealy, Olton, Haynes and
Heywood.

The referee was Mr. O. Graham,

Let your motto be: “Whatso-
ever your hand findeth to do, do it
with all your might.”

The following received certifi-

cates and prizes presented by Mrs.
Turner:
Myrtle King—First class certifi-
eate, prize for outstanding work
in the course and best work in
her demonstration of cooking.

Bourne—First class certificate,
prize for second place in course
and being the best representa-
tive student.

M

Eee ee eee

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 _







Cabbage
Bark
Baskets

FOR HOME — FOR TRAVELLING
FOR SHOPPING



Cabbage Bark Suitcases $4.50

Upright Marketing
Baskets. Ea. $1.00 & $2.16



Shopping Baskets
Ea. 72c, 84c. 90c. & $1.00





Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



—

|
|







=









PHONE 4267
TO-DAY

FOR
SWLPHURIC ACID

in 5 ewt. drums

D.M. HOILER ENAMEL

in 5 gin. drums
4 times concentrated





S. Thornton—First class certificate,
prize for third place in course.

E. Maxwell—First cla%s certificate,
prize for third place in course.

J. Broome—First class certificate
prize for the best demonstration
in Baby Care.

L, Lawrence—First Class certifi-
cate, prize for the most pains-
taking student.

- E. Ramsay—First class certificate,

prize for the most helpful stu-
dent.

K. Moore—First class certificate.

E. Johnson—First class certificate,
prize for first place in the first
term.

E, Goodman—First class certifi-
cate. ”

A. Young—First class certificate.

G. Walcott—First class certificate,

prize for being the most out-|

standing entertainer.

I, Blackman— First class certifi-
cate, prize for being the most
enthusiastic student.

D, Clarke—Second class certificate.

Marguerite King — Second class
certificate.
E, Benskin—Second class certifi-

cate.
V. Rock—Second class certificate.
M. Edey—Second class certificate.
E, Small—Second class certificate
prize for best sewing.

M, Gibbs—Second class certificate.

Mr. L. Blades—Second clag» cer-
tificate, prize for being the keen-
est student.

DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

’ on

SATURDAY, APRIL 5TH
9.00 P.M.





For Local and Visiting
Members
Musie by Mr. C. Curwen’s
Orchestra

(No Admission Charge
to Ballroom)
3.4.52.—3n.



- to get a
lift with
a

poppy

“The Finest Beer Brewed Anywhere”

ARSENATE OF LEAD

for spraying Food Crops to protect them against leaf-
eating insects.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

——
—

OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS

BUT

THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
RESPECT TO THE

HIGH QUALITY OP
MAFFEI MADE SUITS





SN





The Shirt
by Consulate
pleasing pastels.
The Helt

by Eldonia in fine
leather—clip fastening.

The Slacks

Rice’s in tail-
ored Gabardine,

in

Woollen Hose by }
Morley—short,
elastic tops.

C. B. Rice

i Cc Merchant
Gb.

Tailors

















Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY. APRIL 4, 1K2 BARBAIH>S ADVOCATE PAGF. THREE 181 Sat Examination For LLC.W.I. THE: GAM KINGSTON, Jamaica. One hundred and eightyone young men and women throughout the W.-st Indus and at centres in the United Kingdom and the United States took the entrance examination to the University College of the West Indies last month. They include WM Indians at colleges overseas as well as six Americans and three West Africans who seek admission for the academic year 1952—53. There were 78 candidates for the Faculty ul Arts, 63 (or Medicine and 40 lor Science. The applicantfor Science courses weri' the largest number so far. Last year there unn peak application to the I'tin.-rniv Of ;i|>prxximately 200, but Hi. I'M. present figure ta> be mm normal average for ai %  M future. Less than M admitted last year. in the W. t i ..ndidates w,-rc divided Trinidad 41; Barbado12; British Guiana 21; the Wm.i. 17 and the Leeward Inlands 3. At least 23 scholarships and exhibitions will be awarded this -_ „_ Mammammmm ^ m t ,_ ,,._ year. The University h, offerlDJ ,v^ 1 ?*^L d *^ opm n m ** ...„. t_._i-.* unadian economy i n the postperiod, aided by the stimuli!* provided by the Government's defence program since Canada ".* Post-War Investments 24 Billion In Six Years Siren Song Of The Spring B.C. Trainee Gets Baton LONDON Mr Alan Lstinok-Bsyd, Ussa t.r ol Stair fot ODloasil AfTatr the bntn i ( honour to Sub • Inspect) : Leharrysinfh "> ths Hi dish (.n aia Police Force at a psnelns six open scholarships: Trinidad nfTer= three exhibitions: Barbados and British Guiana hffl S* Lud i one The Farquh. ... part-o. ^."'.r^'eslor, Kh In he aetanes. i !" fund, Z?S*m\Zt? o'SttJ 77!?t \ J f f ; r r %  -eluding intentions for the !" '" "NT, new inve.tii.i-nt hi lw5" r f the Grev Lakes are frozen solid and not a ship <\, Full Time Govt. Medical Service Planned For JYa KINGSTON. J A full time Oomnunsnl msdlban four limes capital txot .some $7Sn million in the pre-war year 1913 The 1952 estimate of $5 btUior. ti an Increase of ft% iiver the 1951 preliminary figure of S4.fi billion. Is more thnn double the 1947 capital expenditure of $2.4 billion, and three times the IB4fl total of $1.7 billBuch lalsottais providt%  al ser\irune base for a high level ol Jamaica. Medical officers apu ;' currant >e;i. pointed to the service Ui the future -'1""HIX'>. "" m 1951, n number will not be i>ermitted to under'" n "** %  rou W * aill > •'1bou| 900 ,„ im ^ Hov ,. ever, it is believed that within %  -u'.,i period, the protram will l>e torn pic ted, in phys. ic.il terirm. in barms of construccharge of nesprtaB, u^fueh do,, ,„„ ,„ p | ace nnd quantities omcers hold specialist .|ualill.-aof tuV oHn and equipment prctlons or ir. by virtue of their exduce) and delivered, and probperlence. their assistance is sought pDtv witt ^ exceeded, for the by private practitioners in dlscountry has taken on additional trlcti served by their hospital*. commitments in the mr.inhm. While defence expenditures in tK current yenr did not come up to estimates by MOO million. thr stimulus to industry should lx> even greater in the current HQ SlncS whil" on April 1. 1951. Canadian lnwSa woiking Qn orders from the Canadian Government valued si *soo million The Jamaica QOVOnUDSOt ha-' SB-day H ll working on orders outlined proposala foe ned H $15 billion. Orders Ushment of Jamaica's ilrst lo placed in the current. Ilscal year .. course at the Metropolitan Polmt %  shoo) in North Lond< n. The baton itself was %  essi ,. . uiry old. inscrlb)''! w.'h the wnrd "" d • -Victoria Iteg.m." in gold, an, raffle they was tlv9n ty S(t Gv0t9r A bb4 ... in. fog. A „„ Ulll („,>.,„„ General c. Miip.i rarMMmCV "'"' ^"^ lM > U-nk*l th.. — ftr Colonial Police, from Ml pit one reason why every ship needs v ,,.. O1 iie Jamau.i numerous narrow channels with p.-n-from pUlSI CanbOOSD port! hSl gphlofa |ba Lakes abound. Fron. ,„—p-inr nehinvsineh h* created a ^luat.... resonant baritone to pierctna „, '"^ivearV -„?,„,, under study by the Marine Bo,. M„-n. Um-h a n d ,. V' J\a2JT and local Government. Du e tot he „„„., u ., l „„ L sll l Neptune', C ,nB,Sl1 ^ZL lack of sufficient certified seachorus f or n ine months out of men—engineers and mates—masevery twelve. ten of ships coming to Kingston have at times met difficu \\ \ |, ou d cr Vssee getting clearance as a result of being unable to satisfy the reLast April, the Lak< quirements of the lasr, regarding a new — and even Juimiint Shod Of RafMniid KINGSTON, Jamaica. Shortage of certified perse the number of such officers. A meeting of the Marine Pssrtl lias been called to discuss the situation and settle policy. Under consideration by Govern m .scheme to provide local oppoftoQ* Hies for training in navigation voice, SSfOta to louder — Concert Ai Rocks Tonight £3 For Stabbing Anyone who'i before i current fiscal year ending March 31. 1952, and of this, fl.l billion was earmarked for •*holders of specialist posts should continue to have consulting pracUos; sod that uua in IvUsgo should %  lap b* 0 IBSI i in in" % %  "%  %  biggest vessel of her type than t" ba*0 Wen built. She was the freah water oil-tanker, the ss iMperlal Lvdgc. whose cost was approximately $4,000,000, and her mighty siren — a thunderous baas—aoon became a familiar b und. Later, she was Joined by i -ister ship, the ss Imperial Kedwater. and a third sister will r wnv w,.^. *~mm .... r """ y~ r T^^ future and is found guilty of "P—who represent a tolal mwoundiim with a knife, I am going vr-tment of some $ 12.n00.000—are |0 MOd to pllSOn/' His Worship Vl,al ""fc* ln u DOW eastern outMr. H. A. Talma told J-mf Harel "'t artery for Alberts'! oil. First wood, a 24-year-old Ibherman of link i. r %  1.127 mile On mKllnn dolChapman'* Lane. St. Michael, lar ptpsUm UMd %  > when he lined him £3 for wounda tanker terminal on Lake Supeing Daisy Norvillc with a knife un riot Prom IherO, the oil tankers her hand. take over. Each ship will coeer The fine is to be paid b> rnonthl) ,,. RH2 miles from the Superior inntalmenU ol £1 or m aOfJUlt terminal to a raanery at Samln. two months' imprisonment with onriu ind then make the rehard labour, horviilc told the IriIM —-. hl) k ^ nmp nflv Court that w. March 24 she snd limcs ln tffM g| ww n aM the defendan had an "gumen Mrh wi)[ h>|i| and a light ensu.f1. In tlu ti.ht m ^ £ ^^ f§00tMO ton< ftf The Programme for to-nlgM'* oice that belonged to the Perlr* Band Concert at Hanlnr" Horas which liegln-i iit B nVlnek ftuHr (... Mi-i.r> a* Kara* >• %  TlihM •' r %  i-i 1 iU, Ml FanlaaU on Ikr But—IT inin-i.rf-tiu: 'dtmi aiv,'. n OOHTAV wosjn. overt..-pmoAH %  A\ K Um %  • % %  Thl o.lurf. IlkP Ihr SfnUh IwTiphmi) o. thi* miti-nm* "I n ..( '...Tlt. Il.n.ln whirli Mr< ftrlwihi, *W> hrn N* •• I* vMn old Si IB IK %  HSW t hi %  lutkiyou II."ITIIII.I %  1 Tl'll.lim Ill'll'l" ih. roln*in| nm* to tMn Hr ll.rl. VMM at of UP nvftiir>. nt .i-njilHia linrh'i .:r*< .( •tir.i hr . i Proposals For Firal Co-operalive Farms Outlined at close to $3 MN es'..::i billion. i >f the estimated $& billion to t*' H>ent o !" irnll KINGSTON, Jamaica. Jamaica's export production o bananas for the first mil 1952 was lost over 230,000 stem* ns compared with 944.000 stern^ shipped Ul the same iwnod b>5' rrude .il This is all part and parcel of investments which a*.being madS by ttlg '"I b ti.<• dtneiopasent of Csnadlan oil re-ources—on which an estimated 200.000.000 dollars were spent m 1951 alone. Although od |i fast becoming a fading item in the Great Lakes a. however, the .inly important hulk cargo Iro,i i per Luke*, coal from the Ohio ports and grain from the great wheat belts of the rhl*f •uto>*t li nmlalnrrt In n-i M* 'HP leMtdr*! *nM whirl **.-!,. !.*•,. 0,<-M nlBIM e-v..I Mns-I m* o et Cawewtl"" "" i',tiiii W*b*> lUndimifi rtu4n a-wamn V imvr. l>i fcin>. BanSsnion OH. lmde< -ml Sundwrn.), W Al^yr* I ii|wriit< Sxrriwli SIHIWI ...H Jitllrl Ooon.w .m-lu nul %  llllk l*ns*r" Ti^ Valv a<>ns" ni^ TKr Wrddinn Mairh Hsaucal Hrtw rii. i..its snip. In wnl.li van i linnThrw Mirvl is****r nMtluall, S nil wifeh a tarins On m -.tin.. I H IVipourrt l>-iivalla-Brho lime dann* 1 nim Mti.aThrrnr fk.no hrrllr. OutM.il SB] BBBS Uambo serrH at oon RAvr THS •* % %  -...I..I No V INQUEST ON DEATH OF HAWKER ADJOURNED The Inquest into the circumstances surrounding the death of Beatrice Foster (55) of Rock Hall, St. Andrew was further adjourned v, ti] April I" by HU Aetin*. Police Coroner ol District -r. Beatrice Foster who was a hawker, died on the spot when the motor bus A-fl. the i>ropert> of the Rocklvn Bus Co., SI driven hv Cyril Springer of Spooner's Hill, overturn, d MAV It was being driven down Sprb Vale Hill. St. Andrew about J.S0 p.m on March 31. *> inff will be up 28 1 from $75r million to $029 million, and thi." bv utilities will also Increase b> 23^. from $916 million to $1,130 million. Primary industries and the construction IndustO' will b harelv ahead, up 1%. from $:• ui $859 million while the tota l w > ...nee and comn%  vices wUl decline 22%. from W %  ,,r 1951 to S80ft million Bgc to trie industry i pected that there will tH-M-mc ^ difficulty In providing >' %  %  ; %v hc„ the Ilrst ship of the year However the industry rpsdB that by next year production win be double o"d perhaps trebl" me pioduction b*f.rth.hurricane riue to the progress being made m restoration efforts. AIR TRAFFIC IIUVM' Bv n * SSI I F.I 1.1.11. i „ „_, w 1 -% %  II KmM H Tanrr. H Wallr s T "'"': H "Sri J r*e.. 1. *>-. T I Sa-eki rio* Ir.Aallcaa ^^_ H., OOiakl Wlllla".-. >"'' ri*IU Pvrklni Oiarl I*".' !" ., Ha.kri j5aw Elm D-vIS W.lkr, cocked for the toot of i.r-t n inn i ol lluseason. Foi ties ii}< at Fort William quay, her resented by the PHM with a souvenir of |0B s hlny new silk hnt! But to all Canadians living within earshot of the Lakes that discordant chorus of the steamers sirens is sweet music Indeed. It means Iradc—and thuv prosperity —for their country and every new note is welcomed. That is why there was so much rejolclns when the sonorous blare of the Leduc't | Brst nil and sundry that Albertan oil war. speeding Lakev.ards down to Ontario, and that %  new outlet for one of Canada's most preciou* mineral asset* had %  'gad. Carolyn HATES OF EXCIIA\Cf. A pan isw v. : %  IICMr C\im*ntr\ Undaay William. Bft^u. W. MaaaeSi i •* %  m —m \ %  m tUNwal S.1M-O T,. J^aaakN-> T,ar mnM rilrtH'•'__ %  ' ^.i-. Jan* tfciwena. Grata* C"' ES, S M.nn !'"! %  ^"" FIRE AT BANNATYNE 'IIIU crop ripe vines wen burnt when m lire oci' Bannatync Plantation Christ Church, at about 7 45 p.m. or Wednesday. Tncy are the proJO la Shrlfav ured ol J. M Mar SBdj were InPermits To Prospect For Minerals tn Jamaica Granted iPmm cjuf Own ",.rn ^cinSanl KINGSTON, Jumalea Four rx-rmlts to prospect | i mends in Jamaica have been E anted by the Government and I. a reaull of prospecting donrf < fnr, It appears possible that lertain ores containing chiefly I. ad and sine, and some contalning manganeee. can be eeonon ks ly worked. Thlwiu officially announced by the Government this week, who I iid that some evidence of petro!< um deposits have been revealed but DO oil reservoir has yet been ;.. md. Negotiations over mining leasea ii respect of workable ore asi i'.wertaa are now taking place beneen the Ooeernmeni and the i rospector*. mainly Americans. The Government *a|d that coniderablr d'-poslt' of Iron-ore he" .een discovered by the Geological irpartmeiit but no appllcaUon has been received for pe Whan your throat tacts dry snd saauhy from hank coughing or over-smoklog. lust Wt a sonthlng, dalkckiui Cough Oop ha the your irritated throat membranes with throat-easing meJi%  inal IngredieniB of Vlckt VaroRub. Kiaflv medicated 1 Ksalfv soothlngl Oecfnes Vurwt rTerom.o. n,l 7am Buk Ih: HWM/MMW ll-rlml "'" % %  AS. TRIUMPH OVER PAIN WHIM -rut fu*rn mntMtitr m MM* Hew does ANACIN' r.i,.. P „, K> ( ut eSecti-ely I A (e yM •go iaau.nj uient HI. eiice.a'KJ ihn |h ^. M tm, ,„ tha aaact baUixieg el ihraeItaww aaetfKinMffhenMetis. Caflaiae snd AeetyKaiKylK Acaf) •nlh a MXISTM ingtedieni—ouiNtNl And 'AaaCftsV Oumina tfta ir-eff.il/iBi/, with itta other m< dinei io iooth xhti. bring donw *aerniL temparaturri. rmoit raffj iante>of wall-o-'dfa I— K ^J b-,nj ,ou U Iross fevae I CoMi HvadachM t Hheumaiitm • H^naljn! f Than -ANACIN' will mediate relief, ust oat pun with imin| ipaad CAtr OFF PAIM—Ar MCtf ' %  kw a eery iittk you esn buy a 1-tsblet aneelopa of ANACtN '— anoojh to bring o u Uit ralicf Irom a boat ot pain 1 'Anacln U also available in hand, iO-ubtet boaes and In botdaa of 50 ubleu. Srwre • tfe benefim of tha graar new icMMiufic ditcovary I ARM Y0URSILF ALAIHST PUN BET SOME ANACIN' T00A V. SKIN OINTMENT Soothv*— I'uri/ifm--llrmls ^ Digestive Upsets After eateasiee •raearch, D* Witt's Laboratoriei havr ( 'oduced Dr Witt's Ant.,i! ableta, new compa.uon%  tadiift to thru renownril Powder Thryarrihr IMSt conwement way of Cawdiua| digestivi d.se*(trria.waT(r>im heiae MeSSSfSe.v*nn..y aiatdiiaolveoneor twoonlhtong..e lot fo^up! ,(../ mnywheir. tVasarii tatting De Witt's Am-.,.I lai.i.i. are senarater* %  r/Z^ca/enl fee frethmaa In hand* tnar-eff atrip* for porkrt or handbag Stanaard lute, 2* lahl.ls Economy Sic. 60 Tabirtt Dociort anddsntiitirecompntnd'ANACIN'. InCn Brtiam alone oer 12,000 uie it In their lurgerk *aCW ,. taM la S^al IHtala and taS Ihm uar taa A.K. POMADE AS YOUR HAIR DRESSING BE YOUR MORE ATTRACTIVE SELF WITH A.K. POMADE ITS MARVELLOUS propect for or to work hsse dstposlt* ','-.-.-.-.---'-'-'-'--•'-----*''-'-'-'FOR GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES including:— llr.l.TIMi. in Ix-alhrr. Camel Hair, and Canvas-slitched BELT KASTKSERS. Oil. CANS, PKKSSl'RK CALCES GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE FITTINCS FII.TI'.K (LOTH. — WHITE COTTON TWILL SIM M.OID and KITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walb) ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS >nd GREASES For "EVER1TI ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, RIDGE CAPS Send your orders to • • %  • THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phonet 4528 White P.rk Road. Zipper Wallet* SI-79 rarfa V. De LIMA A •.. um*. 21 BaOAD STRUT SPECIAL OFFERS Hemmed Sheets, Superior Quolity 72" x 100' $6.25 BLANKETS 46" x 72' Flowered Bamberg SILKS, per yd $2.50 $1.32 ROYAL S IOIU 12 High Slreel 12 High Slreel YOUR FiXKST STOVE VALUE tJV VALOR STOVES 2 & 3 BURNERS &f SINGLE & DOUBLE BURNER OVENS &f THE CORNER STORE -,-,-,'.-.',','-',*-',-0>'-'yV*-'-V



PAGE 1

PACK KOI R BARBADOS AIIVOCATE FRIOW. APRIL lS2 BARBADOS *.—_i— Amoenii l,i,l... April 4. 1*52 News From Britain What It's Like lo Be AUod' From IAN DISBAR WAITED: SHIPS. THE conference on Closer Association held in 1W7 ut Montego Bay expressed its belief that the provision of adequate Intercolonial and external shipping serind other communications is essential if progress is to be made inwards federation and recommended that in the meantime a British Caribbean Committee should be set up. How little progress has been achieved towards this end was emphasised by His Honour the Administrator of Montserrat during a public session of the Regional Economic Committee this week. It was no use increasing production, said Mr. Ross, if increased products could not be got out nf the island because of lack of communications. He was speaking with experience because Montserrat is at present severely handicapped with regard to expanding its exports of tomatoes to Canada. It has a steamship service to Canada once a fortnight. If the West Indian islands are to become more closely associated, and they must do that whether political federation is achieved in our lifetime or not, the strength of the chain will be the strength of the weakest links. And because islands like Montserrat are so poorly served by steamship communication their difficulties and their opportunities and the lessons they have to teach and to learn from other West Indian islands are correspondingly little known. That is a great pity; ana it is svmptomatic of a larger evil. Because if the relations between Mcntserrat and Barbados are tenuous because of lack of inter-communication, those between Barbados and Jamaica are proportionately greater. The unhappy circumstances in which we are placed with relation to Jamaica are only removed by the enterprise of the French Steamship Line—Compagnie Generate Transatlantique. which has supplied Barbados with its only quick regular steamship service to and'from Jamaica by means of the Colombie and de Grasse, These are luxury liners and nothing as elaborate as this has been suggested or would be requested from the United Kingdom. Yet how is real progress to be made towards customs union or political federation until the bridge connecting these territories has been built ? It is a grotesque distortion of fact to suppose that distances have been obliterated by the advent of the aeroplane. Barbados would have to enjoy the thrice daily service which the Americans offer between Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) before any effect of bridging distances by air could be observed. If federation is to come, it is going to follow the ships. The conference at Montego Bay realised that truth. But since then it has gradually been pushed into the background. Mr. Ross has brought it sharply once more into the foreground and our thanks are due to him for reminding us of what some of us were forgetting. Without ships there will be no closer association. CALCUTTA Prince Aly Khan has discovered what it is like to be treated as a god. Sought by beautiful women the world over.! Prince Aly found himself during his recent tour of India, adored by the Koja community LONDON. Maith. 21 A change then, m hear that The spring flowers are out t*d %  !> ailSjIIMM. JHf the question of the dtr the days are warm and we are baboons in Gambia has solemnly congratulating ourselve*. that the And the poor typists now walk been raided In the House of Lords, winter was mild and that there part of tie way to the offlca heand that an equally solemn ai>urwas no fuel crlals. came they can't -fiord that extra ance has been given that only Housewives have not even t-een penny or so. (What about then those baboons, which are damchasing "the little man round the shoe-leather). In ths general rise aging the crops will be destroyed, corner" who conjures up those in costs, the fare increase la a And now in the House o" Cum few extra bags of poor quality .small thing; but .t has caught mons. Sir Herbert William, h... -the Muslim sect headed by his father the coal to add to the ration. pcpular Imagination as an injuisuggested that the starlings which lAffa Khan. But I he future holds nn glowing tice. And that important person, roost in thousands around I-on. -, ,;:,„ ,„ fr .,i,,, pHnr* Alv has coil prospects sn,l big business is the "British housewife", has taken dons Trafalgar Square should be ln P"V10US Visits to India. frdR Al> nas m < %  What about our Indusil as a personal affront. Amongst drastically reduced, trie*, what about our much the most undemonstrative of heralded export drive' What housewives in the world, the BritThe subsequent outcry has been about the extra coal our factories ish housewife does not worry Immediate. "We *ould never need if we arc to pay our way? much who Is running the governpoison them" say good hearted ,, „ ment. But to pay an extra penny official*. Shoot them with a gun? y^i" fy,.,*"?-"!!'^ 1 ,*".^ or • on the bus—disgraceful! Impossible. Old ladles would And yesterday, a score of men. gather up the dead and dying bearing th* title of the Central birds and attack the marksmen Transport Consultative Commitwith (heir umbrellas. Frighten tee, and representing all branches them by exploding crackers or of industry and commerce, met to -oundlng gongs or clappers? The those extra pennie.. last state would be worse than the first, so It looks as if the starlings will be reprieved. .prj^.T~-^T.-".-"—rrr ::Q£H~ =.^.; i^ „60c. Patience Cards per set ._.72c. CANASTA SETS enough ing that a five day week for them. At present, as a concession to Britain's economic difflcultiae, they are working a shift on alternate Saturdays. It means an eleven day fortnight, or J 41| j hour week, as the working day is 71 hours. And this, they say, is too much. So the wnole matter tfflj ba LsV cuued at a general meeting of miners' representatives from all over Britain. Only if the Scottish miners are overruled by ballot will they continue to work that (alternate) Saturday shift. How the pendulum has swung in twenty years! The shirlilecvcd worker, no iunawr ftmi %  ng unemployment, does not rod to work hard for Jung hours and nl low pay to'keep hm job. And a good thing, too. But nowaday wc Mem to be ruled by the workers. They make their own term* even though the Conservatives sit at Westminster. Our democracy Is In a stage of slow transition. It will settle down when the worker.; forget the "bad old days" of low wafi*a and unemployment and Join in with a new pride in their own a -hievement and production. POCKET CARTOON By OSBEKT LANCASTER Industrialisation BRITAIN'S sad condition provides matter for serious reflection at a time when the drive towards industrial expansion in the British West Indies is on. People are even beginning to talk of a slump in Britain. The textile industry which is experiencing a real slump throughout the world is creating much unemployment in Britain. The light engineering and the motor industries are forced to contract their output and now there comes news of poor conditions in the boot and shoe and furniture and radio industries. The import cuts initiated by Britain and followed by France, Australia and other countries have started something which will almost certainly reduce the volume of 1952 trade as compared with that of 1951. It is excel|ent to industrialise but unless you can sell what you produce, what benefit is derived? And where in an import-cutting world arc assured markets to be found ? Industrialisation must be necessary before it is accepted as a policy. Even its champions would be the tirst to admit that by itself industrialisation does not raise the standards of living of a people. Standards of living only rise when the products of industrialisation have an assured market. Britain todav provides the rebottal to those who proclaim that agriculture is necessarily geared to a subsistence standard of living. The advantages which agriculture will always have over industry are self evident. Agriculture preserves the fertility of the land, whereas industries encroach on agricultural land and no one has found nuU and bolts a substitute for breadfruit or yams. There is room for carefully planned and controlled industrialisation in Barbados but It must never be regarded as a substitute for agriculture or as a panacea for wholesale raising of living standards li inusl I).Integrated Into the island's (conomy, slowly, and novtr l the detriment of agriculture or tourism which are our permanent assets. • Wet* no more problems u lift tittle Eduon now Aei B ag a iranju(lT— he'i oppr lor how* u\ end fu*f seadiNp radio-coot to (he wrono addrextesThe stories we read Of lavish parties given by our Embassies and Legations and Consulates abroad—even If they are exaggerated — some'imes makes our mouths water. Now Mr. Anthony Eden, Foreign Secretary, is considering sending a smsll team of Civil Service inspectcra (wearing back costs and pin stripe trousers?! on a world-wide lour to t>co if economics can be instituted. The) will decide what expenditure! are realty necessary, though, It is said, they will not be too hard on Britain's missions behind the Iron Curtain. Private life is dull enough as It Is In Communist countriea without making economy cuts. In the past, when income tax has been raise*! and new dutic. What a Joy to llnd that an un* spoilt, young 18-year-old girl, a greengrocer's daughter, has overnight made a smash hit on the Their recommendations will bo London stage. She has had no sent to the Transport Commission, expensive finishing schools, no imposed by successive Chancellors wn o may bow before the storm monied background, of the Exchequer, the nation has of the angry housewives. briefly voiced its protest and then So the heart of London's theaaccepted t h e inevitable — in • • • llt goers has gone out to her. %  Hence, almost. We are all getting a little tired She Is Sham Wallis. and is red of reading about the split in the haired, demure, and has a tipThe uproar that followed the Labour Party, and the activities tilted nose, recent increase in London', bus. 0 f Mr. Bevan; in fact it has been After a rapturous first night tram and tube fares continues, pleasant — almost — to turn to reception at Ixmdon's Coliseum Newspapers have publi.i.cj artithe more flamboyant dailies which where she sang "The Ocarina' in cles (with pictures) tellm t us that carry a picture of a pretty girl on "Call me Madam" she packed her little Jimmy's father (WOO lives the front page and devolc their shoes inlo a suitcase and wegst ln the suburbs) can no longer columns to crime, sport, show home to Tottenham. afford to pay the extra Jew pence business and the oddities and ecShe has not even a special boy to take little Jimmy, to the zoo. centric!ties of life. friend, or so she says. The I. €. W. I. <:*) .%  %  which they are in personal touch. Ity I.H .1. lailor w.l tor Scholarship Funds They are many other points .nvou.aiivnrc.1*, many oi mem population, African, C h i n e s e which could be discussed; the supbeautifully engrossed, were preEuropean, Levantine and Indian, port the University College has the newly installed The,, differ in colour and physlogalready received from generous Many of those present were profoundly moved as messages of congratulations and Chancellor, messages from but ll.ey live together benefactors, the further support Harvard and Chicago from New hiVppi'ty and, as Is'rlght ,nd p'roper, that it needs and wilt continue to Zeand and South Airica, hum hardlv |nlnk of their physical dlfneed. ~ Oxford and Cambridge, from universities in England and Scotland and Northern Ireland. The members of the University College This latter Is particularly ferences. So may it remain. There true in scholarships: the low in'ospcrity or happicome for each head of the popularegiom such as these, lions means not only that many .... many races have mingled, able boys and girls cannot be 'ed loo: it made ihem lf quca tions of rare arise. All must financed at the University College been kept in the background while gold-turbanned devotees prostrated themselves before his famous father. The Aga Khan, reputed descendant of the prophet Mahommed, is more than his people's leader; he is considered sinless, sacred and above the law. The Koja Community in India, numbering 120.000 is one of the wealthiest in the world. Its members are reputed to possess more jewels than anyone else in India. Originally an excommunicated Hindu merchant caste in Surat, West India, they were converted to Islam about six centuries ago by Aga Khan's evangelising forefather who became their mullah or high priest. The sect spread its business activities with the growth of British power and to-day Koja merchant princes direct big trading busmesj in East Africa, Malaya,'Burma, Indonesia a a well as throughout India. Most of the Indian Kojas. however, live around Bombay where Aly Khan began and hurriedly ended his tou-. Aly visited community gatherings in the West Indian capital and flew by private Dakota to conduct weddings in Baroda and Bombay State. Wearing faultless tropical suitings and a Persian wool cap, he read excerpts from the Koran and accepted fees on behalf of his father ranging from ten to thirty thousand pounds sterling a time. He is estimated to have collected £100,000 during his eight-day tour. Part of thu money he will give to charity. Unlike the Aga Khan, who has been known to deal sharply with his followers. Prince Aly carried out his duties quietly and without fuss. He did not bid up the bridegrooms guarantees as the Aga Khan was prone to do. All Koja bridgegrooms pledge hig sums on marriage. Divorce is so easy among the Muslims—the husband has only to say "I divorce you" three times before witnesses— that it is necessary for the wife to be well provided for in advance. At a big Koja wedding the bridegroom usually donates about £ 50,000. But this was not enough for the Aga Kharf at a Calcutta wedding last year. He told the stupefied relatives and guests: "Increase the guarantees or I leave." The perspiring millionaire father of the bridegroom hurriedly offered £70,000 The Aga Khan turned towards the door. A hundred thousand — he paused— one hundred and fifty thousand — the Aga Khan reverently opened the Koran. Poorer members of the community—small merchants in the £ 1,000 a year class—club claim to belong to the common" ".j'^' 0 rk together'for Uie good of """> tluit ,n Government revenue wealth of free universities and that th wrt „lc community cannot provide t*te scholarships they must earn their membership. . — %  m*nM*m and exhibitions on anything like They were moved also by the txtra-Mural MlUdieg the ^^ wh)ch ^ pouible m morc presence £ *he Charwllor ^ .. J^ for mass marriages. Two __ the Vicc-Chanccllor of London, Umvirsiiy <-o.l. fc v wimn nmm (, ct i on f or ,.,1Dun iQse would HO • „ ,, their foster mother: it was a sign special problems and deserves JJ,. n ssuring the future usefulceremonies awaited Prince Aly at Madras lhat UM rsrU ti o n ahlp Mwgn spaaa. maeruoo, m LKsvaragani M nm ,,, t rmv ,. rMlv ri\]\tm ni tad Nupur. Sums wtrt eflattiteted Jointly them was no pretence but an acC.K-I--.MUI-1 btuuies, now unuer B ,__ tVl ,",,„. j.,,-ii-,_ n _." r *.„ !" *i"" %  ...,_ uvc MWlb .n, iSSS, ut >„.'l.h,i,p amWM lSdta wlSTS vJbta b y M the families according to what they Then, were other ceremonic. a, lock. memuer ol tn. I,v.„e Coraf"l SSJr taTbSST wirt? ,n well. fm&Uen -,„, were laid mWM. The remark! nude above !" '" JP W lh ,„u* l?rk of" ,,„,.,, • od .pcechC! made .mi nn.il, on the eoraph, ot ,hc Colon,., „.£".',*'"""1 2£rt hSS there were rervkes ,n the Roman ,|,ow where the problem. I.e. IM '"". ZdZun? training Catholic Cathedral ot Hoi, Trinity univermics ot c.rc.1 llrluin have %  'J' College will in the Brillih Caribbean, the exhundred miles, ln the Welt Indie, become i mental training ground Ming structure dating Irom 1710 ihe dlitancei arc 10 much greater: J? h ,'.' bl[ >"i U1 ,'" !' eop „?',_ afler the nnt had been de.trocd ,„ revert lo an earlier parallel, it la *"• nd !" !"!' ,hn, ,, .. w111 ^ b, hurricane two vcan earlier a, though the Unlvemt, College ol c€ n ,rc v ' ""ellectual lite which Some preicnt in the Cathedral ihe Soulh Welt in fcxeter had to that da, heard prayers which Oic, think ot organising nded with the ,,f this the chief organ The responsibility BaoaaaM "ollege haa already th teaching ot certain trades. It has its own bookdeparture ot the Chancellor from is great and in some "res'pcc"ts"gio's 2?? 1 n 1 h i „'; n d 1" own seientlrlc Klngsion Harbour in a crubjer. beyond what ,. normally epe*tcd 522?*J£* W "iJ,' ,d ',""\?£ wllh members of the staff In of tho*. who hold extra-mural apV"";', " e '"""^ 1O hind academic dreas on th. quarterpotntmenta. The lulor must be th c boo f' to blow glais. to work In deck taking Kafir leave and the local rcprrsenlallvc of thc Cm; !" d ""t T '"'!,}J*. l t !Sl' Chancellort-.o*n verilon ol the verilt, College, Its outpost and Its Jtor, tcchnlciana. All Ihe laboraRo,al SUndard Hying at thc forepublic rclallon. orllcer, dealing in ""? benth ' rupboards and racks, mait. This Is all vary suitable for the llrst instance wllh applications University College let could afford. However, total cost of a bin Koja wedding, after the distribution of jewel-studded presents and a week of feasting, is sometimes as high as £ 100,000. During Prince Aly's tour a slight hitch developed over Ihe problem of drink. Kojas are teetotal but believe wine turns to water when it touches the Aga Khan's lips. The rations, but wc alo' samc a PP lies lo his 8on The Bom "'y P !" —pect that it will provide other,hlbitionist government did not share this view and Prince Aly officially had a drinkless stay. Stocks had been laid in for him a* Nagpur, the only place on his tour where i* is still possible to buy liquor. will broaden interests and and all the furniture for undergraduate rooms and offices nre 10.000 fan, I'olirr To Spy On Farmers A special corps of secret police 10,000 strong, is to be set up in Communist cona Uniyer.il, College set in an for arfnuMon. enquiries about "%""' ""„"' %  "'"woods'* „ ?Z trolled Rumania to spy on farmers withWsSsM.*sa sr%£ts3uS. SSSSKSsas ". ps aa hey rc use ,o u at has happened in the long hillor, ,o keep in proper touch with Its ,hc Vice-chancellor of Unjdon reGovernment-eonlrollcd prices. of univemtin. n,-„ie ,t Tuu.r,il. no, ..v when marked when ahe , this going Terms of imorisonrnent un to 20 vcars orsitii Race Question there Is so much to be done on the For those who do mil know the spot. Nevertheless, there are now marked when A 0,u ""\ Terms of imprisonment up to 20 years seems must be fulfilled In choosing --; the site of a new universv institudeath penaltv for serious offences are to b< tion. it has been suggested above l-esser Antilles to Trinidad and ^"B J**9 o1 go ^ d loc al According to Rumanian refugees wh. that in Its earlier history an island llritlsh Guiana and the like Jamaica can be compared thus' with one of the southern states of warded the United States of America, but work the parallel is by no means close which in later history. There is no colour 1Jt. bar in the Caribbean Colonies. College to support th ,h Guiana and their en*^>^. s '^, "'""^ " ^ have broken through the Iron Curtiiiii. liiiy asm and energy is being re^ f'"^uIi.Lii" ^"..^ £ olle p plain-clothed secret police force, known in led by the response to their *' *£%£ ^d^t only *uTt l R umania %  "^ lerror S( uad '" is a,n '"'> .ersity ^ft ISMUS 1,1 Ind ork same schools posit on. In Governmust be learnt The .ucees* ot the h „ ilf DflrI ,„ lav in thp fulu ? p ment are-open to all. The present College depends on the goodwill „f the British Caribbean Colonies undergraduates population of thc and enthusiasm of the people of University College contain, reprethe Colonies and for more than (Repeadured by kind pennlaai>m | intahvi". of most of the many half of the.te the Extra-Mural Deef the Editor of the t'alvetattiea Straits that liaw built up the partment is the only one uith Revsem). Our Readers Say: Surpri$infe Slalrment MOQl (""niltuslitm. if this is what paragraph of my letter to you v„ i-i.rj., IM. AA he rirv tlcer meant by "the dated 31-1 ult. To The tailor. The Aavocr'.f — v,-ii" ,, t ,. „-!. .,?„ ._ — ._ f r^^S; gHls ^r; tesrntttjs n r ^VvS-Ja^ In a KeVnt iss of" vour ne^sISi'^^inJ'teRw, 1 "?, S C^ ffl nl V**"" t C J ,0n "S paper where the fire of n,ch %  • many of the rectnt cane llres had Ulai U -U.f, it is verv diffleult lo r^L .Jn. h JiiSl .^^.K; been caused throuah the heat. „., ntv t0 „„,„ by Anting them Sin 1? h h and sme. he said, might have been caused by careless people throwing lighted cigarette, from vehicles 1 have been Instructed to state that if the Fire Officer hm. been correctly reported this Is u most :r: ^iirsft -,S*. U or, !" _ not Impossible for a can* fire to SIR.—The Printer's devil seems %  tart by mere heat, or by spontato have got Into thc pep-iltimatc 3.4.S2. match or a cigarette. Yours faithfully, J. ROBERT PETERKIN. Secretary. Agricultural Society. t'uritum For fintnnil fund' Rumania Reasons for these drastic measures against the farmers is lhat they arc held i for the failure of the Rumanian monetary reform instituted by former Finance Minister Vasilc Luca. For. despite the currency reform, farmers are still refusing to unload their hidden stores of grain and crops. TTiere has been one important result, however. Finance Minister Luca has been sacked in disgrace. His 14-roomed mansion at Ploesti. 50 miles from Bucharest is closed and guarded. It is believed that Luca is imprisoned in Bucharest Information reaching Belgrade states that the farmers' refusal to sell at unfair price, fixed by the Government was only one reason for the inflation spiral. Principal cause is said to be Russian exploitation of Rumanian oil and other natural resources According to thc same sources of information, under the monetary reform arranged by Vasile Luca. two different rates of exchange were enforced depending upon whether the money was invested in a State With thanks for thc correction, bank -or hidden away. Your, faithfully. "Favourable" rates were given to those Louis LYNCH, with bank accounts, but farmers who kept lion. See. Barbados, t heir savings at home got only nominal rates. ubseripUon list which opens Ihe AdraeaU this week, witi the sum of one hundred dollars allocated from our slender reto Pressure Cook the Safe and Easy Way. Our new shipment of Pressure Cookers are — SAFE RELIABLE Ph 4472 -FUEL SAVERS! C.S. Pitcher & Co. Olympic Committee, i Crease resistant, washable of course and superbly practical for the Tropics— it Springtime in the North Da Costa & Co., Lid. SCOTLAND'S BEST MS SCOTTISH CREAM III IMH l> Si WltH IVMiSKY A Favourite at all The Leading Clubs. Atk for SCOTTISH CREAM. WHISKY at Your Croctr. soi %  #* %  Tomato Brrf Noodk In, km Olrry Kidney <) T.ll Mock Turil. r.rr* Mons.lr Mulllra Tar MuhrMSB ( % ni..i. slcli Brolh M> .1 Brolh Asparagaa, FISH In Un. NOW OFFERED AT GODDARDS CHEESE Libhy's Spaghetti a CheesMacaroni and Cheese Kraft Cheese Cirr's Cheese Biscuits C'arr'n Craekers Oarri Sweet Biscuits AND ABOVE ALL J & R ENRICHED BREAD tPESSEHTS Butler Keotch l>uddlnfs Caramel Puddings Chocolate Puddings Vanilla Pudding Jellies Grapes SPECIALS Sheriffs fruit Puddinr* .59 per li >.i. On itr.ii.:.Pekoe Tta, .SB per | IV Cartb Beer .24 per bottle Siring Beans .30 per IV < arroU .30 per lb. Gold Braid RUM 3 yean old—1.44 pr. hot.



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TACK TWO BARBADOS AI>VO( Ml FRIDAY. APRIL I. IH fiakib Callinq M'i % %  •>"^ k Homecraft Course TM!f Ho I Visited Prcnt A 1 i TIROL BARROW "f I on 11 Westward Ho", Lnd nd. 1 R RONALD TREE, former Ilrmsh Conservative M.P now resides in dM ISA irCourse foirrui J'.r^ro nSltrS? !" ,3, W Are September 14. 1M1 by Mr T. C. ,,o ent up lo the USA. %  2S-V55J?'S„|S1V, ,^Srb' a deI M • Thb.l.l.. the ihe.. Acting ,pc,. I .,•>, her parents hi. tone li.mr, Ra? Director ol Eduction I, M Platkett ol Ile^T, a" !" p.Si .eerd., .nernooc. .t the HouseNew J..-y, returned to Barbabv Mrs Trer. Willy Had a Fancy Uniform — He Was All Set to March i By MAX TRELL WILLY Toad bad a blue uniform on, with a tall—a eery tall hat— colored bright red. In his hands h carried a rather long Hirer rod with a sort of point at on* end, like the end of a cane, and a nlver ball at the other end. i a Par ad. T HE Oil Cliurcr dos on Wesbieaaay y HW.IA ••/ %  _...•* %  .. .. The Course was of six month's via I i.comirucinxton At Cn.Ch. ....... v ..| bv her little daughter Church Parish tainexi lo tea by Mi*. Alleyne, l>*ley who was )x>m in England urch Choir, assisted by Organiser. Among those prevent and w_a* sees** her grand parents some well known local artistewere Hon. and Mr* If N Turner, f. t 'he fir*' will render Slatner's "CruelMr F A B'*hop. Mr. E. C. M. Misa Florence Springer. of flxlon" at Christ Church P*rt*i Theobald*. Mrs. Muriel Clarke. "CoiUaton", Government Hill and Church on Sunday April 6 at Mrs. II A. Vaughan. Major and retired headmistress of Caning-' 7.30 p.m. Mrs Clmdon Reed. Miss Betty* ton's Girls' who went up to tho Mr. L. O. Gitten* will preside Arne, Mr. and Mr*. H Tucker. USA. with Mrs. Barrow, also at the organ. Dr and Mra. H. G. Cummings returned on Wednesday. I eav.n* Tn.rlaw Mr. DEM Malone took the opportunlTy to M n av.Wuc I? ^.— Mrs %  ". T-.ri.er who gave a many of her relaUves in VI \A^ MRS W FRASER short addreas, presented the I erpart" of ihe L'SA. She al DKLM of Toronto. Canada tillcates an...I '. 1VI [. Hie .hip at St Vincent. "' "<> dont rrini.And he handed sy^Fsts-ir'S %  .%  s ^ ;; ^ ;r Willy Toad in his unit Let us help you -k Plan vmir PiliiiiiiiaiP i\ al Economic Comn altceting the I'nivi Also leaving for Jamaica by same plane were Mr. Charles ?,'* vis,-. I 1-e. nt Hon-a-Long didn't know what parade. Curious Clothes Meaawhile Knarf and llanid. the Shadows, found Willy polishing his boots and getting ready, so It n-cmed. to march ofl down the road. They asked him to explain why he was wearing each curious clothes end what was the meaning of the tiWer rod. "Old chippies", said Willy In Ihe best of spirits. "I'm a drum-major. I'm about to lead a parade." "That's what everybody thought," %  aid Knarf; -but they didn't see howd] you could be a drum-major In parade when there isn't any parade for you to lead." [ followed along to see If Willy could Willy chuckled. "Ill have a pa* find a parade, rade in s minute If you don't beAn(J ora# .„,. Mme nd Mnv heve rr,c.' he aJdrd. "just march 1 along behind me and you'll %  nd Christopher Cricket made chirping sounds like a fife. Then they met BlinVy Mole and Blackie Beetle; and Mr. Orumph the frog and Glive the Snail. And they all marched along to see If Willy iic to he able to And a parade as he said he would. Mr. Grumph ide a noise like a big drum, and ve held aloft an even larger leaf 6A ti than the ones carried by Knarf md Ilanld. ragajfj of Mice Finally they met a whole family f roue, and s whole family of calernitlars and potato bugs. They all CALYPSOES! CALYPSOES! at 1 Mere, carry these two flags for i who is expected lo be bock within the next two weeks. Surgery And \-Ray M ISS MARY CUMMINS. daughter of Mrs. H S. CumA Fl'EK spvndu on bu U.S.A. Paid Buiinesi Visit behalf of hi I rnInsTrCr*ump'tWrs\rtet^nrt U tI,e "''P'rsentatlvc „f late Capt. Cummins" left by **SP *" d U (l for Trinidad B.W.I A on WtSSSS for Puerto " Wednesday by B W.I.A. iniranRlco on her way to the USA I, U*' 1 Venwuela. She has gone to gain experience in ,„ w >i *••;. he was staying .i surgery and X-ray in which she I. thr Marine HotH particularly interested. Ofl liiiisr Miss Cummins was trained in "VflSS HARRIET I'ETTIT of the H^III l o h t ? V i OW ph M C> iV1 Theatre Department Hospital, British Guiana. She ner Bros. otTice in New York was a,l 7*.^ 11 retur "<* Barbados an Intransit passenger Oh the Mauretanio. She was met on board by Mr. and Mrs Ronnie Glttens. Mr. Gittens is a Director of Caribbean Theatres Ltd. U.K. Visitors Vice-President and Director of H.H s> Co.. Importers. F.xpor*ers and Manufacturers of K, Mr. Coryat said that ..nd he had a wonderful cruise down from New York except for two days when thev encountered rough weather which was thought Mr ever\one lo be rather unusual at this time of and ufd private nursing befo Joining the staff of Dr. Skinner's Clinic where she worked for nearly two years Sound Recordings TtAKI.Nt; the Sunshine Cruise ,. on ,ne Mau r *te*ia which J. bark at Barbados from called here yesterday are Mr. and tourist liner Mtnirerania yesterday Mrs. Itobert Hohn de Rappard of were Mr. and Mrs. I.tn Oliver Brussels. Belgium. Leaving Belfrom Macclesfleld, England, who %¡ urn In March they travelled jointd the ship at New Y..rk T HE only passengers to disci bark at Barbados I i the Atlantic by the Once.. Mary to connect with the Jlfaurrraida in New York. Mr. Hohn de Rappard has his own business "Rhodera Co.," In Brussels. His company makes sound recordings. In 1945 he visited several "I.eave Centrts" for U.S. troops and made recording.-, of then voices for them to tend home. One of his most popular record*-. liayi unute "Sound Barnabr They are spending a holida here staying at the Marine Hotel until April 12 Mr. Oliver is Hanagln| I of The Fine Cotton Spinning Association In England. School Children Celebrate T HE ST QILBi Bunday School branch of the St. i Church which was open* M A Vicar of St. July 22. 1951, the CROSSWORD 3 1 i '• nr rs,. —'nr1 %  — IT E J J" X Jl Knarf and Hamd each a big gree 1 leaf with a long stem. They started walking across the meadow. Willy first with his silver rod which he started poking up and down in the air and twirling between hi. fingers, and Knarf and llanid behind* him carrying the two leaf flags. By and by they met Mopa-Long and Christopher Cricket. "Come along," said Knarf and Hani.l. "Willy says he's going to find a parade In a minute, and we're going with him to see if he can." So Hop-a-l.ong and Christopher Cricket got behind Knar." and Hamd. and Hop-a-Long made a noise like robins, and several rabbits and chipmunks, and a porcupine, and a dosen dicks and chickens, all quacking ar..l clucking. And at the head of them all arched Willy, tossing the rod up the air now, and catching It as It fell; and twirling and twisting it ling it aro'ind oeer his head In time with all the drumming and chirping and quacking and clucking and squeaking. So they marched all across the meadow, and through the woods and around the hill. "Willy will never And a parade!" everyone kept sayi s isn't any parade for him to And!" But Willy Just kept smiling bely had his parade, now. CLUB MORGAN Hear Trinidad's most popular Carnival Saetn in person SMALL ISLANII PKIDK MHiHTY ZEBRA SIR CIALIIA SPOILER VIKING 35 TH IKTERNI1I0NAI Eucharistic Congress IARCELONA, MAY K TO JUNE I For tl.i i ton PAA offers a direct ser\io from New V'.k to M.ucelona. Or you can l'. t,. tsbon trstvei u\.il.in in. (> U ni'd when worn uu; ling wlieu CTODBSaWaT^^ ,J History" of the last war which Insame day that the Lord Bishop eluded V-l and V-2 rockets In i,s consecrated has now inflighi. bomb explosions, etc. areageo it. numberi from two dozen to over eighty. CO-OD Bank Director *J %  "' "'^ day the children will celebrate at St. ii'ioinrai .lim.i. to. IJ t!ie rreueh—l'. (51 •tag party T (•) JJ Admitted to i -ret. (4. a*. Uuardlsn lur tlie Dslr T (I) Pet 1T1 l)lr,.,-l..r ,-f Ihr Trinidad CoKurSIy, April 1. .luri.ia tho >M b. B w.l A olior Spent The Winler spcndInK his annual months lrav.' A FTEH spcndniK In Barbados Four Months' Leave i flsness. Is A mat here staying at Mlran the inter M R. F. G. IXJUGLAS. omcio! Reporter of the Legislative Council in Trinidad, arrive.! bef* ..ii W.-.inesday by B.WI.A. lu spend part of his four month) Mr. .1 left for the 1'SA. via ruerlu Ru.i b) it W i A . ; unites the necu wear. i. i. A la-opennT rim. (V Mm wtieu Uie Hi i" 1 (51 10. r' for granted tin dODlcei. no and mo. (Si IS rnerea more thi Mjumn court 10) Hie nre. — n .. is \ \ i fleet seta lo oae in Femember. (31 li.viwuh sits relatives in Pasnight. The next meeting .t the Mge Road. He plans to remain Association will be held On Fnhere for about two months. day, May 2 i i IS. Dr: 1 im: 80. Oice: 31. Pol : t>. aiit; iaW H Union: i 1 '. 1>M* an KSTS 3 Bne; a i..r. 1lli 11 HdT^.r ipSraf V if -rlsft ;.4 sun! .11. SlMi-i I'l. Sore; "n. is.LaSiei. BY THE WAY... Hy Bbaehoomber T HAVE not had so much VV'alnru la anolh.'r's (rouble, I'nlformrd Oflirlal: I'm afraid financial fun since Mr. HocCoiirauc HI x/our |M l1 1 Tfcketl f^'i lea will be jel tor Koruthaiolos unloaded about "Ot at U'ons. Besides. Mrs. Posfourpencc worth of Antannnahv,. Ih.n'furtl and Calthrittui' < "ting to my notes, had u Consolidated on Mr. Nitty -—.,...i,... _.,„., !" ... >h~ b '"e "' lemonade at LarochcAnteros for £J 000 'TV 11, "hole question of the Mijennei. and she Is now only If I per cent, exceia Is to be sch0 ' leaving age lor data *.{ 7s. |d In hand, charged on a long-term redemp" w ?""" u0 ; T, hc 1 ", ",' '"' Aa^.er Traveller: Are we althm loan, what becomes of the w 'lu-il in Mie.liel.l. m winch ihey lowed to go out when we get to 44 per cent promised in cases wl ** WB '"'" '1', ^ !" I c ? d "L or,? ol accelerated redemption? Mv '"resuni..bl.v llu-re w ill I.• s.-h. 1 .rimirUI: There will lie a conbroker's advice to Ihe airl. Is: %  '"• '" r clever dogs who want to dueled tour of one hour, as per ignore the market index ,„d go oil to I)or:sford Univ.i-ity. ,i"l ., hiilule. E ich member of the price movements, stick to bubbly. Uf mere are scholarships f.,i ...w ,, 1I1V „ ll( o lvcn 1 Q 0 ( ranc t aas -^ n> r *..*a.*rsr-l If .....I, u-l.i.e.i foi reel sskV nd t,-tiiarf'dancing on~ihe n Cataford University, where 01|t of hin „ %  •„.._ Voble unraf uou ore perfectly ro;ik for refroshment certain he' not a $luffy old fool. -*r o m Ocvaniomilnhouvr*of bvvr %  *-• W-i-;l M.Gurgh THE invention of " piano COME of MM McGuml.-s old which cannot be stained with ^ %  i D "JJ* B J •"' %  ,l .'' 1 "."'; ? '. "ee l*er" will le welcome news lo J* advertisemcn's "llighnnw the organisers of concert* at the Continental fnl big London halls, where lhe Mr 'carce • AllUm al Virowing about of beer Is a dls•" J %  'avy good enwiKt. w. grace to good music. I remem"on t wunt to Und the place packhet the fuss when I'eildielvcr the r(1 Wl,h "* nch rtists and ac* %  s-it at bri-akfast -M Macaroon Czech pianist, put a brimming '*"• %  GIKKI plain English eooRCastle. Macaroon. The butli glass of beer on the instrument n llke u n l "'e Old cook Mrs announced an early visitor — and played a Boccherini minuet Rocketl gave U. .11 Mr. Maeaioon. Intrigued, the so forcefully that the whole thing ln,< chrf stuff—frogs Ln l pUl l Macaroon said, "Show him was a-drip from stem to stern. bPP. and snails swimming In A ied-faced Individual In %  kilt Sleghammer. the "Norweigan *nampagi.e And CAUlur* 1 km the room coolldenl'v Paderewski.'' used to cover the J-ec'ures iitoout the National G:.l"1 could not," he said "vfit instrument, except for the kevs. %  1,n < Shukc-penre it wont my old country' without aTeetlng arhB n thick travellmg rug ^__ This is England, not Mong,he Chieftain of our Clan 'How t\<> you tomt" to be Macaroon?" inquired the Mmv.roon. 'Through my greatgranil^ mother," waa the reply. "A Mi-* Ufe h PM* Macaroon of Drumslauchter. Sh Tu 1 unamusing rat, Uj '/>.* %  I l-tl/t IIHII./l of Fmrnfomougk *T*1IE Macaroon of Macarc ling rug. wn,k Th; before beginning to play. He also marter. wore a serge hat, so that when • . the beer-throwing started in the IrarPllvrn joy audience he was comparatively •ate. Traveller: M 11 ,hTf2 W ,n a h ***,**bMe. and I have tickets for a cup ol married a HcHiecough." Smell(hinpi stand like stone: tea when we gel t, l>ij n ? ing a not PRINTS /iu MS Musis A LARGT. CONSIGNMENT PRINTED COTTONS 36 ins. 65c. 70c. 76c. PRINTED WAFFLF PIQUE 36 ins. S2.13 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 I I The Garden—St. James Tv.-, a ge assail %  %  * rsa STROMBOLI Ifnd BDtUMAN a TALL IN THE SADDLE John WAYKE -I.J ,11Sal Mb 111 11 \ UOLD" "'A i/i)s n aatroav r, A M— im 9 m



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TAGE EIGHT BABBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY AHHI. 4. 152 "i !" ^ Empire Beat Everton 3-Nil Know Your Football I MPIKr* (SimnHUMl^ I; I lop. I; Draytnn I) KVKRTON LAWS XVl & XVII BY a A ooivn ) our Football Problem* K >Swrt* t.diUr Todajr | riwichme mv dl*cu*iont of the LAWS OP THE GAME with a study of the Eat! two Uwa—Uw wi—Goal-Kick and I-tn Kvii Comer Kick Goal Kirk WiH-n the whose of the bull |M*M>S OVOT th. db*i thai portion bit won Bw *I(OMl-po*t.<. Manas' ill tbt .HI . beyond I ... frmn ;i point Within that half <>f the goal-area. neorc*t to where it cro a player of the A ipmlkepcr shall 1 1 the hall into M Boal-kirk In on %  kick it Into play, if ii: < hall is not kicked l penalty-areo, lh,.t Is, direct Into DO re-taken. Trie kicker shall not play U :...i % % % %  and Un %  %  %  hi it h. >< %  % %  < % %  • • '^'""nw un-.Dpi itlng thrse pttl shall "* •"' mfrmgcnot b scored direct from such """i •'' thi kick arid players of the learn ber. the ball has not been kicked opposing thai of th< until 1' ha* be lni: the BMl-Mck ehall remain PE 1 : ,u. %  I bsrita Know Voui l USSKWU teen laws of thr %  .1 %  Idltoi will I an looiball problems as possible I iimns. No protolsggg will bt taken %  1 .ak.M no Mi on u S,M,[V I dn.,1 lUrludos Ad vacate. 1 kicked I 'in infringement huh 11 Hh regard CM players .in Into their opponent urea a split second befont the the kick has Urn taken. This also infringement. They must r the kick Is Ix-lng token There r not much nfustoi In mv experience artth the Inter it HpeeL'itors alike of this ml.Then 1 only one general controversial point. Some players hold the flow rsfflftglo OVTSIDE until the kick thai ah (H-en taken. gool-kiek AIM tance away in the penalty area unkshmeul that they can rush in and %  cote, II ;. player taking %  goal-kick f h.ivi-aeen ahla sea-..i lumafter at this ami much cc* hi has passed beyond the penaltyre.tilted OMUI lillj ii 1 tpoctab 1 u belon 11 ha touched had volunteered to referee I another player game In the absenre nt ihe with it but I am sure an official Ihe Infringement oeeui It is the duty of the refrrew t" Cual-kJcks are properly taken within iiuit half of the goal-area neareal the point where went out. (-nrnwr Kick WiMii Hi.*wle of tntbull n 1 the rool-line, excluding thiit iiorUon lietweeu the* in tlKair or on the ground, having laal been a ped bv one of the defndiin! n. a member of the attacking ..II take a kick from within the quarter circle at the nearest corner-flaK puet, which mutt not be removed, i.e. f orner-kick A goal may be scored direct %  learn opposing thai of the player taking the comer-kick shall not %  ithin ten vaids of the ban until d is fn play, l.e. 11 has Uat .ii.-.tam.of IU own • nee, nor shall vte kiiker play the ball a second time until it has been touched or plggwd by another player. !'i mi. I, in c nl I infrlngeincn'. of this law in mini.-. \ fn-. -ki. r. -hall lie ..warded to the opposing team, to I-.taken from the place where the infringement i-i-i. ''i Thecorner llag-.-talT nius: not bo iTmoveti when ,1 cnici-klcK H taken I must emphasise at this point thnt if a player take* a eornerkuk Ud the ball re-bounds to him after striking ihe goal-post. NOT play it again until ii n., 1..., 11 |,l...,d by .mother player. Iteferees too can aasiat In ensuring trait a comer-kick u taken by refusing to %  flow K to b.Uken while any opponent is within ten yards of ififi ball. 3 %  I EMPIRE playing a much improved name defeated Everton thre*—nil in their return First Division F students continue tu meet and pr "* ,or tn,r <* P 1 "*^ n '<>UJ be cleared. luncUon as the Homenuker's Club E "Mtgall—first euaas cartLftsaSal As always Ireland Is well meeting once monthly to roonri itf"* ( r ,hi 1 uluce in course lepresentcd, but this year's cftalprogress ,,nd solicit helu wh^re J Broomc— First class certificate lenge from the Emerai Isle U by needed. l' rl7r for th e best demonstrauon b o rs oi little known in Britain. it haa baon full an .i ,.,.. „ '" Baby Care. rut favour MU. ho.no backer. u2S STworVL & £L ,Z~ "X' p, l". ,or 1 ,n0 V !" .or ,,, JSLKTil-bJSi^SS., '•8Z£3S c , ss ^. he not loo distant prize for the most helpful stu%  raai sports, the girls are itching to be on the Brack and they arc already trying to feel out and assess Their rival school ;tlili-l. And after all. this rest is plausgot too hot. Everybody knew too that Lodge's Inniss would have won the I no and 220 sprints. And the boys know that certain good no have not left school Ibie bee..use the llrst winners ol "dl again put up a good showing the Girls' Inter-school sports will But In this Glrls r Inter-school TABLE TENNIS i'lir id-tin r. Matches of the Lai.i-s Inter-Club Table Tennis flxluros will l>e con tinned at the Y M (A Naval Hall to-nighl. The games are as follows College vs. Lenvdle^— 0.SO P in. Y WC.A. vs. llarna-730 p m. YW.P.C. vs Adeiphl — gJe K, that although he won the 1 j,opc that Irish National over three and a f uUire ihv courses might be"of fSJWSk t*-^' f*£aa.SBS fry tired. E. Goodman—First class certiflAll gained Certificate* eate IS llrst clasi ranging from 01 i„ A. Young— First class certificate. C. Waleotr—First class certificate. prfze for being the most out2%. Mrs. R. N Turner Cabbage Bark Baskets FOR HOME FOR TRAVELLING FOR SHOPPING Cabbage Rark Suitcases $4.50 Upright Marketing flaskets. Ea. $1.00 & $2.16 Shopping Baskets Ea. 72c. 84c. 90c. & $1.00 Cave Shepherd & Co.. Ltd. 10. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Sued RHOWE V2H7 TO-UAY tOK Ml mill 1114 V< III in 5 cwt. drums . M. miii i it I:\AMFI in 5 gin. drums A times concentrated iWWAssl or i.KAi for spraying Food Crops to protect tiicm %  gjssnsl lealeating insects. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. in his other six outings last season. Besides ley Cairn there an two other Irish National wlnncn. Hamster (1M) and Domlakk's Bar (I9S0;. Hamster is <• reu urkablc ontij. I'.ii'; B second class, raoguig Iron .age U The schools to take part are Queen's College. St. Michael's Foundation anil Alegandra. Mrs WOaaaaV Queen s College's gamemistress tld me Drpendlng on Ihe sueress of their venture, the.' will consider allowing other girls' schools to enter. Usual Divisions The divisions are the usual divisions—under 12. 12 to H 14 ti and over 18. and the %  ports wrUI b< purely athletic. Perhaps It may Ports, 'hen Is DO knowing other girl's capabilities and there will I* man.v surprises. They are in tind.irk im. because previously ihc> have not bei n keeping titnos and records Abo the. Ml he ..a | bigger bran A Stimulus Fin ihe girls, assurance thnt then frill be sports, has acted as a stimulus and one may add that it haa also acted as a stimulus tu wo* men spurts in Barbados as a whole. On evenings you will sec them I needless to say purely athlctraining Some Queen's College tic but you will remember that ... their own sports, girls include events of skill such as the Egg and Spoon race nnd the Potato race but there will be the lnter-srhool sports The lassjast :.l I ll.UI grounds whe checking up < As to possible winners, well Harrison College they have been their times, WHAT'S ON TODAY Court or i.r.1,1,1 10 M .in Annual Meeting. Barbados Nurses' Association. General lloapltal — 4.M p.m. Football. Quern's Park — 5.00 p.m. Mobile Cinema. Checker Hall Plantation. St. Lor> —7.10 past. Police Bang Concert, Hastings Racks — 8.00 p.m. senior girls will IKthe 220 vanlAs St. Michael's is the < < %  rtth i sand pit. there win be r* Long Jump event. The girls will deplore the tact that there \ ill i the case in the Boys' sports. Then will only be points and a trophv for the champion school. An intriguing thing thnt Is making the girls train seriously Is tlun thOJ ban Uttig IdM of their op ponenls potenUgUttee In Boysports, a school gets to know thi standard of their rivals For instance, it did not take the lehoo boys until spoils day to kno*J th Lloyd from Found:iti tiave won the 440 and H I 800 in record time iwstdes, at the list sporls. Why. everybody km that last year when Cdasgow fron n..|i-i r.. n vil I^IIV sued event ll ,. ,. tll ;i( | nut ,,,.,, hc nBtm w(n be reduced to a tussle between fr th" Qll %  • nnd St. Michael's because of their numbers. Qm ill have o slight ad vantnge In theli -enior division as limit is slightly higher Vet their senior girls will be studying for examinations and this balances down the advantage The only snag to nil this is that thero is trouble about getting thai woulil W most mnM-tui-tit foi tiLikinn the sports pay ton. Anyhow the headmistresses and gamev mistresses have not given up hope thai tboj mill bo tblo to persuade Kensington that girls sports should be oDcouragoa. IU bt to ask the headmaster ot Harriacm College or CosnbcTroore to HBH) then th> ".rounds, but ns Mrs Wuttcm snld. Thai uouUi bg just too bad." WEATHER REPORT VEHTCRDAY i:.infill from Codrlnglon ill. Total rainfall lor manth to dale : .02 Ins. Ilighcol Temperature: gg.5 Lowest Temperature: • :. l Wing Vrlorlly 14 mile* per beur Barometer (0. a.m.| 29 991 (3 p.m.) 29.92S TO-DAY sunrlae : ..:.;. a.m. %  II % %  -: I -. I .' 1. in Moan: 1st Qoarler. Apl. ". I i,: in.n;: : 6.30 p m. High Tide I ItO a.m.. 11.47 Low Tide : 0.19 s.sa.. 7.0J la nearly tour years he has_rui> Hmweei-aft Centre has been servIn two races and VfM unplaced, .ng a most useful purpose and has Prior to that he occomplkshed he .^n mn% p lh £ h !" \Sir> %  Stordshlng feat of winning the During The past x KilsUr Hurdle Handicap, tha irft open far too lorur Iruui Grand National and the The day and evening classes in Word Union Hunt, within a nil branches of Dome-t; space of three and a half weeks, started by Miss Parry and conRoyal Tan is one of tin* most tlnued by Miss Ivy Allcyne. h.is fancied horses. This is nut surboon most ably carried on. and prising. I" last year's race enly have proved to be of great prache and the wUinor Nickel Com '1 value to the women of Barcompleted the course without hados and through them good falling. Thus his staying power '"ecu will become increasingly cannot be doubted. This year. a "£"•"* aB ''me goes on. too. Royal Tsn has shown good The course for instructorii which form. He won the NaUonal ggLJP *J"^**?**^*." >arHunt H-nduap m convlncmg fSlfalSFiS-c& firfflS improve your own knowledge nnd methods, but you will now return to your schools and clubs and pass on to others what you have learned here We are relying on vou to teach them, lust as thoroughly and con*it-|i j.TiiHislv ... M|| BSVYl Miinselves been taught here, so that you will bring credit to the Houseera ft Centre, and the purpose of Tin.ther winner is Russnui the Instructors' Cours of spreadUntil recently. Freebooter, one ..f the only two previous wuiners. was firm favourite. Then %  unning In the Gold Cup, he gall. So did his popularity with the liackers. Too much importance should not be attached to hid bold Cup running, however, ag he is seldom seen at his best on Cheltenham course Ing Improved Domestic Science methods to the many, through the elected few, will be fulfilled Hero, lie was perhaps tho imkiekie it horse In wM year fiasco. Until brought down M the ilflacnth jump, he was going well, and looked all set to add to bis 1949 success. His form notoriously unkind to favourites, this vear has not been impresIt would not be In the least sursive, "but his experience In preprising if the 1952 winner came vlous Nationals should stand Irom one of the less fancied enhim in good stead. tries. Of these none looks better The National. however. Is than Brown Jack 111 standing entertain i. /tiurj %  Pint i .i rtlflcnte. prire for ocing the most enthusiastic student. D. Clarke -Second class certificate Mirijiieriie Ki'o; — Second clasv certificate. F Benskin Second class certificate. V. Rock —Second class ccrtuicatc elass certificate. K. .Small—Seconn class certificate prize for best >ewing. M. Gibbs—Second class certificate hfr f pl aslg i Bocond clog* certllicate. prize for bring the keene-t student OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS BUT THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH RESPECT TO THE HIGH QUALITY OF >lAl I I I MADE SVm BANCE at THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB NATI'RI.AY. M-RII. STH 9.M P.M. tm LMH .Ml Vi.ilint MenMT. Mr. C Clirwrn'r. '! I .', | (So Vilr.i.-.i.iii Char.r U> ll. 11 r i) ^ 4 52—Sn. They'll Do It Evei y Time —....—.By Jimmy Hatlo SOPOIWSd 16 STILL STUCK UVtYBE IF r JUST NT OJT ^.£7 VX£> MM rPUKE TO MttPMM-BirrcJ taaxTA My LWNS W?E-AV-SZ£.r* WITH THE NefiM&JR N HCEP — THMX MO A nPcm |fi TMB HATIO MX ID 3ARHOLOG*^, sMe&ww^T^u.. MISSED THE you will soon be able to get a lift with 00999 %  %  %  %  %  The Finest Boer Browed Anywhere" yu—uMLcdbf files 'A on SSUBM <&uts hove evsMfihinq 9 need in Cloihti." ll.. Shin by Consulate in pleasing pastela. fta H>l( by Eldonia in fine leather—clip fastening. Thr Murks by Bice's in ttil ored Gabardine. Woollen Hose by Morley—short, elastic tops. C. B. Rice I ^M.-rrliiinl f* f (, t I uilors ^ i \





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FRIDAY. APRIL 4, 15* RARBuxrs IDVOCATE PAGlflV Labourer Not Guilty Of House Breaking Discrepancies In Evidence Pointed Oul IIAI \\< IX*. HIS IKK M I I Richard Hall a labourer of Middleton, St. George, was yesterday acquitted by an assize jury of the charge of breaking and entering the house of Josephine Farley of tinsame district on October 9. last year, and stealing $40 the property of Clement Husbands who lived at Farley. It took the jury only half an hour to arrive at their decision after Hall's counsel, Mr. J. E. T. Brancker had pointed out discrepancies in the Prosecution's evidence and submitted that the Prosecution had failed to prove their He had not lied the money with twine. He had loki Farley that he had put the money in the press ... ..„_ ..„ „,. oni >^"r,ir, h ; d p'L" VTT H Aaalstant lo Uvc Arlorn.y GenJjn^W thai he had ^d durin* Hearing of the case was presided over by the Acting PuisneJudge His U.rdshlp Mr. Justice li. L. Taylor and Mr. F. E. Field, the preliminary hearing that he had not told anyone he had put family of amtThved w y ,h mon ^ "* <*nied he ^-r^ri !" nad told the Magistrate S30 00 but "' admitted telling the Magistrate the eral. prosecuted for the C; The case for the PTuaecution V-as th.it at Farley and f. i*ie day of the offen at Sl.y-„li,..yr.r-old !" "W 7SIZ1I"' "* ""** bU Farley and 33-year-old Husbands were going home at about II o'clock when they saw Hall dashed out of the house and run ,„ through canes. When they went t""* 0 1 ""' w into the house 140 wa missing. Sgt. Imuss of District "B" the first witness called, said that between the clothes. When he had seen Hall on the first occasion he had seen hi..: for about half an hour, while he utting grass. Cutting Grass, ilopher Moaeley. a 41-y October 9 at about 1.15 p.m. he oW labourer, said thai he aiid Hu^ went to Middle*en, BL George, at band J 1 ** becn working together SB s IT* VI *sVb*vlsS> V lit n rr. .ml ,n.i . i SS i t it LJMI Farley In connection with the larceny reported earlier during the about 8 30 a.m. cutting grass when Hall going along Hope's day. Canes were on the eastern pr Vi lf „ Road !" c d,rec Ji? '" and western aides of the house, which Hal was gouig would hav* He was shown the shedroof door '•<< n m cither to his own Home near which a latofl and staple or Husbands. were lying. In the bedroom a Cross-examined he sad that press door was open and seemed Husbands and he had only been as though it had been forced working together for "bout two open. Clothes wen? strewn over weeks. When he saw Hall he the bed and those still m the w walking leisurely press were disordered. A knife To tn0 court. bj whioh was on top of the pn examined but found no mark on It. There had been a mark dressed in a white pants and white shirt. Cpl. Stephen Edwards then gave evidence as to the accused being ^W lat 4/ *^E*" _^aa ^asBBBst^iSk^ ^^BBBBBlw. .^BBBBBe^^ 12-YEAR-OLD BOY I I ALLS FROM TRACTOR: DEATH BY MISADVENTURE A nine-man Jury at District "A" yesterday returned a verdict of death by misadventure to Coronet H. A. Talma u ben the inquest into the circumstances surrounding the ir;ith of 12-y ear-old Fitzgerald Carnnglon of Cole Hole. St. Gcmift ended. Carrington was detained at the General Hospital about 2 p m. on April 1 after he fell from a tractor which was l* nn drivtn along Locust Hall Hill, St. George, at about I M !• m. UM same day. He died at the Hospital live hours iu> WHS admitted. owns a 1 :.nd a man r %  :lor. On April I Proute was Of the tractor which taking canes from the plantaProt (-,| io take pssssengei i or to permit anyone on i • Sometime i>etwten l mi April 1, he a was injured and went to locust Hall Road where he saw the tractor and trailer. He IKII sfcni in itir plantation yard and ther* aiw ihc boy (the dcrhotn he took to UM Gags* %  a] Hospital The name of tho boy WSJ ntagjarala Carrtngton and his age was between 10 and 12. the press as though it hud been ripped open. Cross-examined, he !" sXfd < nd h,s lv ln f ? n a i^ wild he had" not found aer. trace. TM was. corroborated by PC said he had not found any traces of finger-prints on the knife Doors Locked .Lloyd Ashby Mr. Fiefd for the Crown put it to the Jury that If they believed Sixty-nine-year-old Josephine Husbands and White who said Farley of Middleton. St George. xhrv iw Hall while they were said that seven lived at the cul jtng grass thev would have to house where she lived Four of disbelieve Hall's alibi lhat he was them were under eight years. „ ot )n St eGorge on that day. The Before leaving home at about 10 consideration that Hall's alibi to a.m. on October p she locked the tnP p^jrc had not been given on doors and closed all the windows. oa h |,ke the witnesses whose deShe was returning at about 11 meanour thev had seen, would help oclock to get breakfast for Huslhem n deciding whom thev bands who lived there, when she would believe met Husbands just before she He said that the discrepancies in reached home and the two of lhe evidence of some of the wttthem walked towards the house. nes4e WM doubtless due to the When she got near the house she nct ihat they did not have the saw Hall run through the front advantage of a good education. She said she knew Hall from „. „,. .wl^i !" !, 1 !;?.. h*. n .>., SSdRrnS tti"2 J&Sft£? %?££F"lGZ ONE of tiie Boodhoo Brothers bilancas on his bicycle. To control the cycle he has his feet on the front wheel. Acrol>ats Join In Floor Show The deceased fell on his right side and he {Corbin! shouted to UM dftVtt to lop The wheel of UM tralMr did not roll over the body of the deceased. This was the right front wheel of the tractor At thi* stage Coroner Talma presented the facts of the Inquiry u> the Jury who returned a verdict of death by misadventure GUI Elected Churchwarden For St. Peter HruiscH IHi Arm There were brul.es un the rlKht Mr. A. A. Gill. Ia>t >er' Junarm -idr .iiul In und lhe Uiy was lor Gu.rdlan lor SI Pel. i V( %  roanini It he wi In pain. He lryi wml | tclf< i churehwwrten ...Ih.-i.ilal f, ir |he ensuing UTin b\ ^ nisi..r"I have spoken 10 lhe cl.,,-.,.,a „ v vo e wh[ „ hc s t rr ,„ on several oeeaslons about rldlnn ve.trjmet yesterday He WU on the u.ctor. The deecun was plo posd by Mr. C, H. P, Jordan loyad at the planlaim n v „,„, lranlp ,u QI „,, conded VTVoU^ffJl*-V-i^JSsBfB T I ?• ,! „., „?, V.l !" ^S %  "" %  '>• ~pll his nommalK.n, of Mr C! o Gill and Mr. E I Mrs. Housewife ARE YOU LOOKING FOR I Mill i; BITTER? WHY NOT TRY GLOW-SPREAD I Allll >l \H<. \IU\I lib Package at 62c. each 5 Tins at 60c. lb. < oulaius \ i lain ins A A D Chandlei 'III I lrll!. iioodhoo isrotners ... —........ >. u ... u ... ,....a inr rani ,na ninnuiiiuiir IIUUISJ n..-i performance of hand balancinif and acrobatic stunts -then the liver Death wu duo to shoek '' f;?'"I', h g ",„.,* '' *,"L f-hu,< the South American Varietv Troupe |UM their Floor !" d haemorrhage n„. ,.„;..""ggW ajf au ^a. a aaa. A A ~ a. a K I li'air*! lUSl VV f*T*. <'. woik be ,„d,„ _,he p.itt ir Cats said the body of the bados a few veal's aco. He will ghf a scries of Spanish rteceasad was identnicd to him by dances with his partner, Bonnie Edinboro. Charles Carrington who said the r his brolhet The Boodhoo Brothers are also contortionists, hich wire Charles Carrington said that he walkers and stunt r,d,rs Also w.th the show arc Cecil ^^^t^t^Sjjgll A KmSmmSV^t, Green, a lyric teOOT, winner of the 1051 Staging Compethe dead body of his bmlhti -t th. 'handler. titiun in British Guiana. Turn Brandt, ballad singer of Hospital Mortuary to Dr. Cato. iii.,i,. u ,. (,-,„,.; M Gipsy Caravan prog! imnv • w Z F V Enid 1 Jow pn Qnmvm nf |lTMpe( t> St ff^Af>SSSSSiS!T Ivor Huntc. accompanist and a pianist of lhe New Luckies James, said that ha was driving Gill, Mr. U. V. Jemmott, Orcbeitni nf British Guiana. iiifir. (1 '..i (.-23801, April 1 about .•.*WM pulling1. Organ Tuner -^ —^ 9 --, m •>i>* a : ul,h *' t,nct nd n *" Wr Lionel Gittens Students Receive Certificates At SSTS :: %  ;;!. %  • %  A •,-, 11 .I'm bahtnd the irivirs se.it. n-i-.,,.*,,,, i'... ('.... %  .%  .-i;,,.. 1 he boys was railed 'Bow"H. ?*•!*," l SW?"!"? Mr. r.. Jordan and Mr. h. < Addressing visitors to the Housecraft Ceninyettef"' k '"'"'" * preserves, rinf Dajne (St. Pelers Parish Chur.hi. day the occasion of the presentation of certificates and JS2'* O.'S'JS}' Tractor Mopped Mr H <.,„ anrt Ml Jl4l „ prizes o_,he_ students of the Homec,;af, .nstructors w,,,,,,,,. ,h, way^nUn;.. AI M ';"M'1" ??..!.;.,and 10 stop the traeUir and he stopped {J^ C P "'" •""" %  obelle Homecraft Instructors' Course men wnii i-tiin> .11,11 in mi i.itjnri vjitiens ing the tractor from l-oDelegales For The Apuoinl 1 t men. of Church S Left For Work Clement Husbands. 33-year-old agricultural labourer who Uvei Farley said that .11 the 1 lagaw and hi a most popui.ir gtutlaol Durta Course, Mrs. R. N. Turner, wife of the Colonial Sceri'tnrv. t ), t ,., • said that the course was filling a nap lhat had bc-n lrft open oul foi Uw amounl oi LooktagOBS h! far too lonii in the comniumtv. She pointed nut lhat the •''"• '" in front ea purpose of the course was to spread Domestic SCIUH. r el of the iri muthnda to many and that it would be the duly of the SJ'J*, selected few who had attended the court* to do -" thai %  After the welcome address was dcjm.v Director In an Ingptiing make some of them Bvomad/but, the legs of the deceased October 9 he given by Maj. Glindon Reed. Uiinn tktJpful weeks rolle.i l.miseil and he look him lo Locust HARRISON'S Broad St. AUT0BRITE THE AMAZING -NEW .SILICONE PROCESS saw nf UM trinlei the Land Rates Ixiid ... the end ol front ,,( tha wheel The deceased . Iron) eari> t'i said, 'l^rd have mercy" One of J\ / M4*&9 [Vf /XCTt* tinlaa of the deceased was — ••---— -. aa •••••.• %  %  •••, -~,r — >ata sat a>. — •. —-%. %  -. -.. .in 11111 M I v fij i'llll l All ir.tlVIM'e lllll I 1,1: •• > %  ••• rirm .•>, ,-..... ,t_. i... |i,a,|I i,l II Ml HIM ana M a WK^i ,, ?"? 52ffi nr>on by Ml lv >" Alleyne, Orwoman. This gave us something ... r ,. took | um (lll e deceased) to the IJ4 j' r f JJS? '. n„nS^\ n ihr 2 e "?iJlt !" l ,\ n *: br V k i fls : ** nl * o( thp !" ""*Miss It I. which to %  m. and just fsMM the %  ;! ; „ ; „ 3" ' when IhJy met IUte"la 'hat King movod a vote of thanks and necessary finish lo the Scheme, ,, u llshowed afl.r. % 1st 1 1 %  f "' "' ;i '" t <'"' ""' This is an increase'of 501 cents fhc work was open to inspection SulijiiK Covered ^1 %  botu The 'i;" 1 "' pot ten on land, and of a hulfMiss Ivy Alleyne said: The course l| csOUd thg Homealthough ,mly lOOtlVllll M.1 ''" anrt P ru P cr dv ul cent on trade. Honourable Colonial Secretary, rnift IrAtrUCbM •' Com •< %  and OUThad still shown notletal Ic im"'L, *" oa u „ Last year, the Vestry budgiled Mrs. Turner, Director of Educaered uch subjects as Laundryprovement. To ihe Jury (.reaves said tnni fr a7.000 l<. rover their eapenses he could not dwrlbe how the boys (( h b ihiryea_______ were sitting on the tractor He Ul „ w hau ,„.,,„,.,, f „, .---and students of th, at any partlculai day he returned home for breakfast at about 11 o'clock. Farley and he were going home together when he saw Hall run from tho He U went into\Ve rb hSse ,h and*ra*w on UoW"d Gentlemen, we. work. Housewifery. Nutrition Exhibits his clothes scattered about the bed **•. P"anent ? n d vi'iting staff Cookery, cake a nd pastry m,.kir>K, Th< siu this afternoon. W; ; i Otho Corbln lit) of Cole Hole, year is a sum or money for the press, he said, was broken. *"uld specially like you, Mrs. i„g a nd Public Dcmonstr.itlons in TlUi Li , { vl ., ... < ,, ;t said that he know the purpose of granting salary raises and golden '..m.Le,, t.v '^i.„ deceased .Oil Ap.il 1 -t i.ho.n to their wfiole-time employees. they have b-idgeted for $62,487, AUproute who wol taking nil 'break. „___.__.*. ,„_ •< '"""" %  "US in th. nt.rn.Ka th CAR POLISH. Our Trial <<11.nl.ty sold oul in a week hul a more nppreciiihle shipment has just been received. THE PRICE IS UNALTEREDONLY $1.60 PER BOTTLE Isdn't Force! — "AUTOBRITE" contains 4' silit mil's .mil il is . GUARANTEED TO OUT-SHINE AND OUT-LAST ANY CAR POLISH YOU EVER USED. II gives 11 glass-hard finish impervious to lorrenli.il ruin, b I i 1 I r r i n c sun nnd rorrosivc salt nir and the Silicone finish preserve* its hard ulcaminu lustre lor nioiillis. "At'TtHIRITE" Cleans. Polishes und Prelects In hull the time vvilh half the labour. |V* Just Spread It On and Wipe It Offthat's all OBTAINABLE ONLY AT: Hardware Store TI. 2364. HARRISON'S would specially like you, Mrs. ]ng and Pubi He had put the money there on TurnCT to know how much we i^by care gad a . a _. ._ .ami aiaaiatast as a.aMasAAjkonl ssn AS. t\T r. the Saturday and had left it there |Jpreclate your acceptance of on the morning before he left u r request to dlstrtbuie our cerhome. The money consisted of tiflcates and prizes. We are condollar bills. sclous of the interest you have When he saw Hall Hall was taken in our progress and we are wearing a khaki shirt and a white grateful. pants He had seen Hall earlier This afternoon's function cliwhilc at work. maxes a course of study which was Cross-examined, he said that formally epened on Friday 14th after Farley and he had seen Hall Sept.. 1951. by Mr. E. C M. Theorunning from the house. Farley balds, the then Acting EHnet went back to call a neighbour and Education. Some of our visitors he went mto the house where here this afternoon were pre* it Farley came back and found him with us on that morning, when tha The give lr 11,111. to Trschi Clubs and golden apple Jelly. • fSfSt U %  •^"•dmWlTUitJam, ionul 30 t ,n rlmary Srhonl und Ki( Mlt itwad <>MlVas he was wllh thradrcciisrsl rhr raKs s out are : — on th. tiactor G-238 own,". Iy Parochial .mployaa vv.thln Ihc Iy-iist Hall Plantation. Th.y got salary Male .1—140—15%. t lubs -n.1 111,1 ScholarsAsao,, __\ on lhe tractor In a c:.ncfl.l, .,.„, t.. ... i.t in th. held ,'. '"I" '" ,"" 1,1 '<'' %  '•"> a ...•dw.aon Parochial .mploy^s within Ihc •I AMI Kducalion Twenty ""S, J "" "" i.t • %  the tractor w.th .alary scale 7S-|10O-%. stodcr.P. were vl.i led tor train"! '"' ''•uf In Mi „„ il„ l,.,ll which conTarochlal cmploywa within the ln< 13 ol whom were Primary ';"" al"donl h.i.l lo .....k, %  .. -,il.r:. ctOT to Ih. "H'-i s„lary scale |I00 and onward.— Sellout Teachers and th. other ' 't I" send While the tractor was tr.v.lllna J%. cluha. t'lic..iic, aom. pool clill.... represe itati.. addition to thai number, dr. n, wr made up ami there was oil. male who trainPnr'cls lo ihc Si ThoaiU' N'utrled in cookery, rake and rastry Death Of Two Traitors Weather proofed WIND-BREAKERS A very smart two-tone design in Brown and Grey in two different styles. Short Waisted $9.95 JACKET STYLE $12.95 I WE Mil I'll I llll A r-fting, drestes In the S-wlni. Its in Handu r.,( ****• rou .P could disThair also had talks from vl ton, ^^ who strayed Uieir iriembers kiodlv given hv Mr IU-< klrt f '*"• Rue Laui i'• %  %  Cooperative. Ofncer. BCC 1 ^ A: ..n .wo Frenchmen were arrested. Abel Danos rubiir Dnnomtraliuns and Raymond Monange, b-.th In addition six 5,uden' i. police %  rti'ekly in two, t, ,.,..,. i__,,_ I UllUJ ind l>l ,< kDemontratloiis ., Cookery at the Kgle Hall ClUUe, '' ' l '-' "tigUons St. Thomas' Nutrition Cenli, ana "' '' "SBacfc OBVnMIl killers of Hoc 1 %  eral Hospital I Armed Karort BathLig „, Al (X „ ( i ock lin March 17. the comfort In Bad, and to the K IU i %  .,nity Hoapital for Urine Test il-.. %  i nd and Raymond Monange with nn Administration of Medicines. ajoort was driven 1 They have al % %  i | out. on Nutrinon. a nd in theii Group At the saiM t.me with another Organisation have visiied a poor Oa Pwe I Three hours later the cafes of PINEAPPLE TODAYS SPECIAL SUN SHADES all different .trie* and types available From "t -' la uboiii N!HMI Call TOIlAi at your IM\II I IRS V. IfeLl.tIA A IO.. llll 20 Broad Slrert. SAVE HERE! IlIDDYS A.N1'AHAG.S SfltiP—pCv tin LETONA GREEN PEA BOVP per tin %fAI(KI,A IlaAIN OGIVES—pee Jar MAHKGA PLAIN OUVBfl |>er Jar CRAWPORDS <*RrAM CRACKERS— per lin AUSTRALIAN LEQ HAMS—II—15 lbs per Lb, Origln.-slly This Week $33-1 30 38 — 32 ] SO — 1 0 I M — 96 : HI 1.61 — DKNMOlt LKG 11AM in 4-lh tins—per tin DEHMOR LEO HAM in 2l-lb. tinsper Un IMPEHIAL BRISKET BEET 4-lb tin—per tin ... CHASE a SANBOURNES IN.STANT COFFEE per tin KOO Otl V) I-lb tin K PEPPER 1 or caster LION WHITE PEPPER u etsttr LION CURRY POWDER-4 o/ tin LION PIMENTO4 ;r tin COCKADE FINE RUM STAXSFEiM. SCOTT A *'. L'>



PAGE 1

mm ESTABLISHED 1895 Tories Survive By Ten Votes Socialists Make Bid To Weaken New Govl. LONDON Arouseu .me within ten votes of delecting. Conservatives in the Commons. It was the I narrowest margin since tinnew Parliament began five montt Cl .its cam* in succeai Socialist %  wndnw li aimed at weakening inC HIV** i H National Hattn Bill. Clueeii vole ffM 279 to 26. — — Conservatives hold an overall I majority of 16 *hlch often II-,., C„,-,,„.. HSSU 1 "'" '""** f % %  *'"• 3ftHS8tcr Tonight vole was one rela4 Jilr^Ce^L: lively inmo. question and would /IUUI COOT h not have meant non-confidence ___ %  r *-*. enl was intended to I, Sllldolil. put a time limit April 1, ISM •U• ulllUI I1I on charges for national health serj !" 3fi n I D | S-tng--. -. | The Government say* that ttx SS.i ?iS" ry '! t M,f the |P ; in> Leader. Jamaica, addressed %  nanrial dinVuttlae of the countn try Conservatives opposed It lwt lhe counv a „„, .. .saying th-t condition.* in IBM tr morning not known now, The Socialist* failed in unl effort to block the charges but I tried to weaken the Bill with. %  imenrtmenU. They have accused the uevornnwnt of trying to deal! a MOW to the entire health service •chetiiihitroducod bv the. %  Under lhe service now, people get medical care without charge and false teeth and eve-glares at ;>ncc. Th* Mw Hill wottM add rnnaU' I tn defray port. %  —tr.r. The I! oat I Is Rocky— Juliana WASHINGTON April 3 QtMOtl Juliana of if. lands told a cheering that if the nations worn -.. k u.r and develop confidence in onOanother, peace %  poor world" Hut the Queen. b*g* on a three-week tour to thunk thr United St.-.t. fa B M lt nM given her country, warned th,.' ••< oeacm> be rocky. She said that Congress fees* a partfcularlv tough lob "M a n kind in Hi distress has to trust largely to your. p incnt for its deliverance This %  ...i th. In' burden of a responsibility nobody will envy you as your decision* have enormous repercussions all through the world," she said. I I' PRTCt FIVE < Irani I ran % %  %  r..id.m.asaa ihe oatrawUnc Paaton %  %  Her fie Bagler hoi id* v. nraanb h eailt ,„ MJ —r.r. Chinese Troops Clash In Ihtrma RANGOON. BunrM April 3. Chinese Nationalist and Communist troops cl.'ishc.l Dggl the Burma-China border Thursdav Wftb the rci>orted loss of 30 Communists killed. Full details are lacking but reports said the action took place two miles inside Burmese territory. It tias been reported that one Nationalist officer and ten men were captured bv Communists. VI' COAL STRIKE/IS CLAIM IS PER CUM i\t'Ri:\>h SAARHHUCKEN. April 3. About 70.000 Saar coal miners went on a 24-hour strike foi lusher wantl! faj the secon.l such wolkout In two months in n •'Ton to wm %  15 per cent. knankgasj 1'nton officials said that %  plkotri was a warning to a mixed Saar French Commission whioh lg considering whether wages in French administered Saar Mines can be kept at a lower level than in France French Managers have rejected %  mediators proposal for ; %  five per tent wage increase in Saar MM..—r.r lien. IK SWl.MIK ngSter .--poke on the mu.% %  lecture in Jai functions of the Social Welfai | in Jamaica and the r I nion oHUials anJ i ons can play ,i OCak development g| tl c Cgrtbbbaaui area H. Id the Advocate that I* WM very improved with Ihe stl i really appre< opportunity to t ilkinn to the men %  .ere in the posilion of ucn a "jreat contributl'n to the West Indies. Scout Broadcast iMitldy bioadcast ov< RedlffusicHi is scheduled to tak place lonmht when officers -f the Association will discuss Bol a-Job Week Boh-.,-.lob WYek | „ n annu .1 •vent EM Jcouta.wnon -hey offer BTt ices to Ttouseholders ai.d "Lhe ahlllinj;" to su[>port the Movement. D and t'( .HI piewnl • withdrawal of i r..i. warn todoanv%  Mi.uld preludlie the %  nd fi.fii 1 ..' noted mfJUll handing ovi ol II M to It-h %  the praaont division II the enF.O.B.A. HOLD *IEETT]\G in of the Foundation will conU nftg an nthleti B A.A Sports .it their meeting at Foundalu r School to-night. I DCGDOII dl also re%  pen of Kttvtuw f... UM I...-T .r., r nncl fix u pronnunnie for ihp ensuing year. County Councils To Be Chosen In U.K. LONDON. April 3. A week of local elections which started In Britain today will Ix the first test of strength betwetr. Ive and labour Ince Winston Churchill'. forces won last Octobwis icneta, llai tton i ml t<> tha poUj m Lon1.1 other counties U> pick Count) (MIIII.II, t„ replace uSote IBM. Bbrtj two other Councils will be chosen |n othei parts of England and Wales during the rest of the week of voting From 'indpoint ratln London : %  | national iueagnrt m rstaroy MidM .., m lhe Ht-Ul usuos KM in)( and scliools. — U.F, Taft Seeks Four In A Row Samatoi RotMfi Tat Illinois on Thursday ha -in n nd Tat i four m a row He WM fold victory \eatorday i Iwgin a thrge days" gwi Tuesday. "1 think imat, sard. Panama Sliij'Liable To 110,000 Fine HONGKONG April I. The Panamanian Consulate in an official announcement Thtr;day said any ship Bring the a*ariima flag trading with Coggagui.-I China, would be liable to ilno of up to 10,000 u.s dollar^ lam. Mario E Guillen. I'-namau.i Consul General here aaid he h., received instruction* from Go.ermnonl to "investigate" all iported caaea of ships flying the Psaamanign Bag in Comgaunist ports aud impose fines I] 'in port* are true. He said that about ten •dups are iwiw believed to be pljuis the China coast althougli none of ihem have been to Hong Kong recently and are appareskU aot calling here last year Guillen threat oc l to cancel the registration of any ship calling at !lotig Kong 1/ tin vessel was found to be callfcg .it Chinese Communist p.irts.-^.r.. 2.00() Red Troops Killed SAIGON. April i The steel ring around the trapsti pocket of Communist IU % %  anctreled by Fn-n.h t'nlrm t< tiKhtened on Thursday as Fr v '. Headquarters announced that >v .2.000 Red troops had bean keratlnn "Mc cury" which was started aner 1 days ago by Framo VIetnai to clean out Rebel troop Thai Binh and the Ma miles from Huiioi ronUnv Durablyas Freneh Union troi. reduced the pocket French naval units at the mo.ith of the Son Tralv Hivei took a ntunDfl* of Vletmtnh prl the Ninth Glang area, 40 miles southeast of Hanoi. en| i between French troops accoiutted for 20 killed nnr! \r, taken prisoner among Vletmtnh troops Fair Chance CAIRO. Api 3. s.lib Hen Vou.HM'l Secretary of the Tunlslai alut Party said in an IOt vie thai there was a "fnii ngf thai the ma)ontv .rf t| M ("ruVi irataOgU Security Couiuil would .upport Tunisian indepen, ence demand*. Ymissef, wh,. h .mother formei Tunislnn Cabttjai iieml-er from Paris to .void .rrr %  ..id P.iki-tai. Id,.i jn Chile v ,. with Tunisia and added thai Nationalist China had lodhateii iitj/,1 i uke. ssaj %  Ixick Tunisian demands or hi abstain. He said th. %  %  %  %  %  UM Arab itatw mm %  pw %  •; I ild TunlslaH case. He said Spap as approaching Braul fo support _u.r. NEW YORK April 3 .en by h make tl will be i ,; Tafl Me will bv op| Hart u' Minnesota whom T..<\\ H %  'In Wm-onttiI leiuk v 1.1 showed him what Ihey thought f jhim Hmv.vei Tafl sa n ihe Nebraska Prlniim i was more signilicant because il | involved a writing campaign i which was the method chosen by the Eisenhower forces" Most observers were inclined to agree He picked up IS of Nebraska's delegates to score the first writing victory over Eisenhower In WIslonsin he won 24 of the state's 30 .delegates and the Tennessee Baonventtofl *uted him 111 20 Double .Virluty On the Democratic M Istea Kcfauvci wen .i double MC U I v. In and Nebraska In Nebraska Kefauvcr won a \ i< lory over Senator Robert Kerr of Oklahoma -one of the moot | %  lnently mentioned candidates for Demo.-1 itlc nomination after the wllhdiaw.il of Truman from the race The Taft forces were jubilant. The Ohio Senator haBBMll hailed th.m as "substantial vi torles" which will "help my cau>e throughout the nation very greati> TM Fi-.nhower forces on the Other hand pointed to the romhlne.1 Wbcomnu vote for Stasten and lOovernor Earl Warren of C.lifornln which to|i|->d Toft's They <,.,l>d i|t ml .1 rUoti —I'P KLPHIIHBNTATtVCH ol tlir Hi ;\oani Econnm. filendly i-ht autaldr %  %  OOM aftai i %  asalefl yeaierd j gceu left to T in lit iu Ui* Plch ic ire Hon. K R llu.Hc iRdom. IIi r L. Walrott iB'dosi. Hen V C Slid IADU|IUU Hon W J ltt(. v gayus* (at. Vlncoiill Sugar Grows In Nuisnlarifl I iNDOM M .lory progress bg pi iiisir African ofl-ahopt • laatlou The %  •gpti HI September ;i %  e raqua I lhe %  %  .-' lously in. gga ... 1 1 o III be on im beci falj Laboui .n.i %  tail i an told Utat iht a • %  n :,. %  ,; ti.i || SJ %  i Two Hold Up Formation Of Otbinel TUNIS, Apul ] Premier Balah i in'riitue wbioh delayed the forav %  tlon .-f I. C iMnet % %  hllo the snli French tlppoBition pun tl ''.I as pgj t.Klay to an the "TVi-ii-m :i whiah win noil .e Bul Jt UM la I %  to hurriedlv Qtiil aid drove lent II. n %  •as lacking. h Uia 1-niiK DB*I ,l|ll.lll Hi)'. |N pi I %  and two sons and .' d.u fc lilei Infoin %  %  %  i (.. %  .lb WH %  i%  i party i -iliwton * %  i %  Me.mwbile ;iWi Tunisians hav> waasp .'i UM C Kciiitmal l.coiioiiii Cmittee Ends 4th Mwl rHE Regional Bconomu t'uii.iultiaa''ri' < I f< utfh %  llasiiiiiis House, BarbauV. fi In Thursday. ;ini April. 1952 The Mrnn< was held 1 lalrmanship ol the Hon W. H Courtamayi 03.B ol BritiaJi Mondurai. and the following member, 1 AH, III atti nJnnce :— Hon W M Com London U Jai oi ,i % %  >: polii m UM Arab ouai I rth city m Tunisia, fol President Of Oil Corporation Makes "Sunshine Cruise" It was a tfreat thrill lor Mr. Thomas E. Ward when the launch from the Maurriania swung inside the Careen;.(;. %  Mr. Wind who is President of. Oilfield Etjuipment Co Jnr.. New Y h>ggj Barbados in 1910 He Byaa .... |)ir)5 fie was intranait, jusi for the day, as he was yeatci M ^* w *r d wno ,9,12 ind fh K b> his wil %  hV MnareUnU. They spent the da\ looking up old Dr. W. 1 ,-er of the Barbados f.nlf ftarn in I'reMon. Enaland Mr t\^rd now Hiin th. I agtad HUtes. Hell known In the Oil In dutr>. his Company hafurnbhed 'OUipment throuchoMt the warld In IW7 he originated and concluded negotiations which reind development i 'crests of the oilfields of Bahrcn wait in %  %  Petroleum Co.. Ltd.. which completed its first well in Ltd.. which struck ol] Half later if ... divided halt Oulf Oil i thought R in having them here. Public Accountant H'.S A rejlow of !i -rhartered Inatltu:*member of the < Relations, and a~ Fellow of the Royal Ge< ing the war he rendere*! mic controls. L'.OOtt ifQHKLESS AFTER FLOODS CHU A<;<>. AXN u 1 Rampaguii waters fa I %  ouri it-.. %  %  %  %  gnc* WBl declared in Montana %  ithei id reau warned of clogged strcaini n tj ,,., nd mto Iowa and %  worked feverishly to LOOOpoi eri hon hMi lud ihe damage re i the million dollar mark I' r. Nen BoraQuiiiHDif mo DK JANHM'I varfl :t Quintuplets r] Rra/ilian woman Mi. I„h., -. ild Muntn noai •Vi Uurnil •\r llaawas reporti I riving the news of the birth ol Iron four boys and a girl, %  TIB iii..: .ii a*n kri l lable %  .. i .idren tasptota are .1 irflsu old liionn* gu:ia U.oile. M^. < %  T .1 VvctuM and tin tjiiintupU'ls tt llueiio* Alre who i arold in Julv GOVK/t\HL\r SEIZES m:\icw rti. WHOM COmVAN\ SYSTEM RODCICO CITY. April ;i Ti %  M. %  .'int re— %  ti.red limited telephone servi e -ul the cllunlr^ % %  rtrikc bound %  Company ysteni l aawi workers were -til pute %  amally in mOSl n small %  I CO M.guel Alem nraunll '.i"n Mln:i• %  i r i i %  rl %  : for m< n r.f losing ii botnb ..it. mpt on tha Hfi M uroi %  I "ii sine | l II three %  Pollca ul lb) ) iSOUid detain bout 20 i Id I-if%  kg IT. Fiw Hats Go Far A Sail %  % %  < \|i. rUtlM.I-v. Meinbei Mi F I \ -is Hon %  \l Q II..M. II i C B.I Ron K n Muni. Mi E. S S. Rurrowes, Mr a mmauion Con/i n 1 lievelopment which had !.. HI Puerto id. i n Fehrwrj Arisin. ...itgevei. pori oansnogfwealti Cornoilftae discussed %  nippiy problem* including Import Policy. and appointed aaplora U a p %  bility of dnding H aa 4k to meet the exigencies of the Unitng situation mat Eco%  : %  I %  numbers i to thl* Committ.e Mr. G II fl W J Hangover H. i, w H Courtenav. j. B lion l ll BangStei Hon V C Bird, Hon. A aornaa .md Mr. c Beaubriui llrliHh Mondaraa: Membei %  %  l.in.,. Advisers : Mr. J. B lau, Mr. I>. Levy si KiltH-NevIa: Observer Mi Knight. Honlaernt: Membei His Hon %  rworih itt. rr to ktad: Merobar: 11**. A Meinla-i Hoi Hon. C. A. t.rrai.d. Eanwicfi St. I.urla ; Memher .. %  .iiil'iun SI Vincent: Member Hon It Adviser ; Mr. V. D Daaakllea: Member Hon II. > Shillm. t I, C.B 1 Adviser Ion j. iiuih Wladnajd island.: Mr. A Mn.leod Smith SecreUr> M R Nuiilg. M.B.E The Full MasrtUUJ of the Comiiittee wa-. preceded by ,i meetUK Of lhe Rxeculivv Comuotteii S^tuiiln). '.'9th March, ..ml th. \ppointment.N Committee on Sunw>, Pm March Among the item:> discussed at %  iing were the Formnl %  I men t the rUMional Econoti latina %  uttee. %  tba Hon A |apaotnl to ih, Moftll Mi' ..( Com Ai the nimendiitions were made lo the Cmnptrol ler for Development and Welfar" in the West Indiefor the apof Mr. J S Mordecai. PruKlpal \v slant Seen ut ,i %  .oid Mr. ll .1 I Deputy Colonial Secrejai BtrHI Q u, as Asintan; Trade nei m iliu Unitcl Kingdom, both on tec indrnaat from theu ies|h-i live a WH further recommended that the post of Assxt.int Secretary %  ba i.iiI until after Mr. Mordecai had asMimed dots The Coromittaw remould be i. with ihe par" ng ( % %  %  mei.t is msdc to I Trade Commissioner in Ih in' united fUfuadam . %  'Ka* was a vaasffy stay Within f i! ,M .'i I 1 DWIM1 wful %  II,. Inn %  of llkhuig them OUL All du .Mir blown '.IT ;it roughly th • t -< Kissing the vtotorti Bi idgc %  long lb' > bundraa v....i t ifthei 'in in %  1 man telli"K Ins fiiends hr hai It iige. Surprise Dismissal WsUUUNGTON, April ;t ,l J llowaid ., y ... .. %  I %  I tt* wa: f. lined hin ugh J' the e| ( ,se ot bualnes' today The a 1 1 '-r . limaaad two men \l '..wo arffrl %  i .. of i*Vll do-rs. %  i %  .t hag eel the placing ef sg „': s*r !2s,, ci r !',*Jii, \sst written b him wa. published In genees deep slug, of Intrrnattoawl "Oil Forum' a momaJr paketoaexeaaage priblaaae. VICE-PRESIDENT OF ARGENTINA DIES BirtsNoe AiitF-s. Api.i i i i %  Q ed a gall bladder tUnass and nbatftl rations in the bast few moiiMn. /hen he was virtually rii hospital —U.P. Albert ; %  %  %  %  1 lESCAF 5jBu COFFEE rgm % %  lit II SOI'0* CffiT -10I0K>I<' '"' SI >( \H. i l.ill itraasth. lull flu\oud CoBec Plu. idacd I .,rli.,h. ill ... — It's — I \SY TO PRKPARi: l:\SV TO DK'.KST &f \ MSTI.IS avaxrnt PRODUCT on s.,1,\i MI Onon


Ha



ESTABLISHED 1895



Tories Survive

By Ten Votes

}

|

|

Socialists Make Bid
To Weaken New Govt.

LONDON

Aroused Socialists came within ten votes of defeating |

Conservaitves in the Commons. It was the Government’s
margin since the new Parliament

narrowest

j
|
began five |

months ago. Close results came in successive votes on|

Socialist amendments aimed at weakenin
atives’ new National Health Bill.

Closest

vote was 279 to 269.‘
Conservatives hold an _ overall
majority of 16 which is often
increased by the votes of six
Liberals.

Tonight’s vote was one rela-
tively minor question and would
not have meant non-confidence. |

The amendment was intended to
put a time limit, April 1, 1954
on charges for national health ser-
vices.

The Government says that the | for

charges are necessary to ease the
financial difficulties of the coun-
try. Conservatives opposed it
saying that conditions in 1954 are
not known now.

The Socialists failed in
effort to block the charges
tuied to weaken the Bill with
amendments, They have accused
the Government of trying to deal
a blow to the entire health ser-
viee seheme introduced by
Socialist Party post-war

Under the service now, people
get medical care without charge
and false teeth and eye-glasses at
half-price.

The new
charges
of its cos

an
but

Bill would add small



—U-P.

The Road Is
Rocky—Juliana

WASHINGTON, April 3.

Queen Juliana of the Nether-
lands told a cheering Congress
that if the nations work together
and develop confidence in one
another, peace may come to “this
poor world.” But the Queen, here
on a three-week tour to thank the
United States for aid it has given
her country, warned that the road
to peace may be rocky. She said
that Congress faées a particular-
ly tough job.

“Mankind in its distress has to
trust largely to your, good judg-
ment for its deliverance, This
places on each of you, the full
burden of a responsibility nobody
will envy you as your decisions
have enormous repercussions al!
through the world,” she said.

U.P.

Chinese Troops
Clash In Burma

RANGOON, Burma, April 3.

Chinese Nationalist and Com-
munist troops clashed near the
Burma-China border Thursday

with the reported loss of 30 Com-
munists killed. Full details are
lacking but reports said the action
took place two miles inside Bur-
mese territory.

It has been reported that one
Nationalist officer and ten men
were captured by oe

—V, >,



COAL STRIKERS CLAIM

15 PER CENT INCREASE

SAARBRUCKEN, April 3.
About 70,000 Saar coal miners
went on a 24-hour strike for
higher wages. It is the second
such walkout in two months in an
effort to win a 15 per cent.
inerease. Union officials said that
today’s walkout was a warning to
a mixed Saar French Commission
which is considering whether
wages in French administered
Saar Mines can be kept at a
lower level than in
French Managers have rejected a
mediators proposal for a five per
cent. wage increase in Saar

Mines.
—U-P.



President Of O

the |

for service to defray part |
t

|

|





France | price

1

g the Conservy-

Hon. Sangster |

Addresses |
T.U. Students

Hon'ble D. B. Sangster, Minister

Social Welfare and Deputy
Party Leader, Jamaica, addressed
the Trade Union Students attend-
ing the Course at the Y.M.C.A,,

|

} yesterday morning.



Hon. D. SANGSTER.

Mr. Sangster spoke on the min-
isterial structure in Jamaica, the
functions of the Social Welfare
Ministry in Jamaica and the re-
sponsibilities of Union officials and
the part that Unions can play ina
the economic development of the
Caribbbean area.

He told the Advocate that he
was very impressed with the stu-
dents and really appreciated the
opportunity to talking to the men
as they were in the position of
making such a great contribution
to the West Indies.

Scout Broadcast

The monthly
Rediffusion is scheduled to take
place tonight when officers of
the Association will discuss Bob-
a-Job Week.

Bob-a-Job Week is an annual
event for scouts, when they offer
their services to householders and
others for “the shilling” to sup
port the Movement.

broadcast over





Jobs are agreed upon and the
fixed. The temporary
employer then signs the job

eard and fills in the amount,

Listeners, to the broadcast to-
night will hear more of the
details.



il

Corporation Makes
“Sunshine Cruise”

It was a great thrill for Mr. Thomas E. Ward when
the launch from the Mauretania swung inside the Careen-
age. Mr, Ward who is President of Oilfield Equipment Co.,
Inc., New York, first visited Barbados in 1910: He was here
22 years ago and Again in 1949. On the last two occasions he
was intransit, just for the day, as he was yesterday.

Mr. Ward who is accompanied
by his wife is making the “Sun-
shine Cruise” on the Mauretania.
They spent the day looking up old
friends and Mr. Ward also saw
Dr. W. F. Auer, Manager of the
Barbados Gulf Oil Co.

Bern in Preston, England, Mr.
Ward now lives in the United
States. Well known in the Oil In-
dustry, his Company has furnished
equipment throughout the world,

In 1927 he originated and con-



cluded negotiations which re-
sulted in the discovery and devel-
opment by American interests of
the oilfields of Bahrein and Ku-
wait in the Persian Gulf by the
Bahrein Petroleum Co Ltd.,
which completed its first oll is

June 1932 and the Kuwait Oil Co

Litd., which struck oil in M 19328.
Half Interest

The Gulf Oil Co

terests

which has in-



in Barbado. wis ¢ un-
divided half interest in the Kuwait}
Oilfields, He spoke highly of the
Gulf Oil Company’s methods :
thought’ Barbados was fortunate

in having them here.

Mr. Ward is also Certific
Public Acecotintant (U.S.A.) and
fellow of the Chartered Institute
of Secretavies (England). He i
member of the Council on Foreig:
Relations, and a Fellow of the
Royal Geographical Society. Dur-
ing the war he rendered valuat

ervic

|
:
:



+ + c
e in connectic ith econ

®mic controls

+ cognition



UEEN BREAKS
ROYAL PRECEDENT

LONDON, ‘April 3.

Queen Elizabeth IT will
break royal precedent by
permitting her mother and
sister Princess Margaret to
live in Buckingham Palace
with her, it was made known
on Thursday. The Queen
and her husband, Prince
Philip, plan te move from
Clarence House residence
into the sprawling Palace

fier the Easter holidays,
probably early in May.
—U.P.



Conference

On Trieste |Panama

LONDON, April 3.
British, North American and

Italian representatives opened the
conference on Trieste today. After

1 tw o-! yur meeting a communique
Said the conference would be lim
ited to achieving closer

Ttaliar
co-operation in the administratioy
of Zone “A”, British-American oc-
cupation area, and would not con-
cern itself with the ultimate
future of the territory as a whole

ers text of the communique is as
follows

Text of Communique

_ “Representatives of the United
States, United Kingdom and Italian
Governments met this morning at
the Foreign Office and had the first
exchange of views on the problem
of reaching closer collaboration in
Zone “A” of the free territory of
Trieste; It was confirmed that any
arrangements arrived at would be
of such a nature as not to prejudice
ultimate solution of the future of
the territory as a whole. The rep-
resentatives will meet again to-
morrow morning.





Western Proposal

Western diplomats will propose
that Italy share in the Civil Ad-
ministration of Zone “A”, The
West expected that the Italian de-

mand for participation by Italy also

in the policing of the area, which
if accepted, would considerably
affect the authority of the Alhed
military government headed by
General Sir John Winterton and
backed by some 10,000 British and
American troops. The West fears
that if it agreed its authority might
be jeopardised in the event of an

emergency

There is no question at present
however, of the withdrawal of
Western military forces, Neither

the West nor Italy want to do any-
thing that would prejudice the
future status of Trieste and both
sides have noted suggestions that
handing over of the zone to Italy
might be interpreted as silent re-
of the present division
irea. Italy claims the en-
area.—U.P.

F.0.B.A. HOLD
MEETING

Members of the Foundation
Old Boys’ Association will con-
sider enterifig an athletic team in
the coming B.A.A. Sports at
their meeting at Foundation
School to-night.

The Association will also re-
ceive the report of activities for
the past year and fix a programme
for the ensuing year.

of the
tire

County Councils To
Be Chosen Int U.K.

LONDON, April 3.

A week of local elections which
started in Britain today will be
the first test of strength between
the Conservative and Labour
Parties since Winston Churchill's
forces won last October's genera!
election.

Voters went to the polls in Lon-
don and 13 other counties to pick
County Councils to replace those
elected in 1949. Sixty two other
Councils will be chosen in other
parts of England and Wales during
the rest of the week of voting

From the political standpoint,
the key elections were in London
where both parties dragged in

national issues and in nearby Mid-
dlesex. However, the main isgues
were local centring on housing
ind schools.

U.P





MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E, WARD who were intransit through here
yesterday by the “Mauretania”.

Mr. Ward has visited Barbados on several occasions
dent of Oilfield Equipment Go., Inc., New York.

In January 1948 a pamphlet on | tion in the U.S. The “Ward Plan” | 6

“Constructive Management of
Foreign Exchange Operations”
written by him was published in
“Oil Forum”, a monthly publica-







“ VNtyet
SAWAUTZ
XY) Ye

\-



FRIDs ©,

—

Taft Seek

Four In A mow

|
|
see anc determined to make it}
iously pleased with his three- |
fold victory yesterday ar i 2 arrived in Joliet, Illinois, to |
begin a three days’ swin: t Illinois before primary next |
Tuesday. “I think primery will be very successful”, Taft

Panama Ships
Liable To °

APRIL 4, 1952



NEW YORK, April 3.

Senator Robert Taf. set forth on a stumping tow
Illinois on Thursday heartc ied by his victories in Wiscon-
sin in Nebraska a ie
four in a row. He was ol

He will be opposed in Mlinois by |
former Governor Harold Stassen |
ef Minnesota whom Taft soundly |
defeated twice Tuesday in Wis- |
consin and Nebraska. He said: “1 |
|thought Stassem vet coll shoulder |
tin isconsin I ‘Wink voters

e a showed him what they thought of |

$10 000 Fin jhim.” |However, Taft said that in|
9 * {his opinion the Nebraska Primary

{was more significant because a!

HONGKONG, April 3. [involved a writing campaign |

The Panamanian Consulate in| which was the method chosen by |
an official announcement Thurs- | the Eisenhower forces.” Most ob-|
day said any ship flying the Pan- ; Servers were inclined to agree
ama flag trading ith Commun. | He picked up 15 of Nebraska's
ist China, would be liable to a / delegates to score the first writing
fine of up to 10,000 U.S. dollars. , victory over Eisenhower. In Wis-
lars. consin he won 24 of the state’s 30

Mario E. Guillen, Panamanian | delegates and the Tennessee Re-
Consul General here said he has | publican convention voted him 19
received instructions from Goy-| of their 20,
ernment to “investigate” all re-. | Double Victory |
ported cases of ships flying the} On the Democratic side Senator
Panamanian flag in Communist | Estes Kefauver won a double vic- |
ports and impose fines if the re-|tory in Wisconsin and Nebraska. |
ports are true. In Nebraska Kefauver won a vic- |

He said that about teh ships|tory over Senator Robert Kerr of
are now believed to be plying | Oklahoma—one of the most prom-
the China coast although none a inently mentioned candidates for
them have been to Hong Kong| Democratic nomination after the
recently and are apparemitly not!withdrawal of Truman from the
calling here. } race. The Taft forces were jubi-

Last year Guillen threatned |lant. The Ohio Senator himself
to cancel the registration of any |hailed them as “substantial vic-
ship calling at Hong Kong ff the | tories” which will “help my cause
vessel was found to be calling at | throughout the nation very great-
Chinese Communist ports, -P.«\ly, The Eisenhower forces on the

—— other hand pointed ta the com-
bined Wisconsin vote for Stassen
and -|Governor Earl Warren of
California which topped Taft's.

They called it an “anti-Taft” de-
monstration.

2,000 Red
Troops Killed

SAIGON, April 3
The steel ring around the trap-
ped pocket of Communist Reébe!

;| Sugar Grows
encircled by French. Union fer:

: In Nyasaland



tightened on Thursday as French
Headquarters announced that ever |
2,000 Red troops had been killed |

(From Our Ow:

or taken prisoner during the: pact | Correspondent
eight days. The French 60m f LONDON, March 18
munique said, operation “Me Satisfactory progress has been

cury” which was started several made by Booker Brothers throug!
days ago by Franco Vietnam foresy ‘their African off-shoot Campbe .
to clean out Rebel troops betwepn , Booker, Carter in the cultiy-
Thai Binh and the sea sume ot; tien of .suger by irrigation in
miles from Hanoi continued “fay-| Nyasaland. The experiment ws
ourably” as French Union troops |@mbarked upon in September at







reduced the pocket. the request of the Nyasaland
French naval units at the mouth | Government. Previously no suge:
of the Son Traly River yesterday |had been grown in the Colon
took a number of Vietminh pris-}und consequently was expensive
oners on nearby beaches trying to |to buf¥. Bookers had proved that
escape from the French circle.|sugar can be grown in Nya
Systematic searches through vii- | lanc although irrigation is ne
| le es in the region led to the ar- | essary because rainfall not
rest of a number of “peasants” |sufficient. Labour and tran por



Suspected of being Vietminh sol-
diers.

In the rest of the Red River delta
Communist troops e active, the
communique said, especially in the

difficulties have been encountered
but [ am told that the experiment
1 t continued anothe
couple of years



be for





Western Zone, north of the Red 6s

River. In the Southern Zone only 12,000 HOMELESS
small scale sabotage operations ,
against French communications

have been re
the Ninth

rted. However, in
Giang area, 40 miles

AFTER FLOODS |

















Two Hold Up Regional Economic
Formation

Of Cabinet

REPRESENTATIVES at the Regional Economic
a friendly chat outside the Conference Room after
Seen left to right in the pieture are Hon. K. R
L. Walcott (B'dos), Hon. V. C. Bird (Antigua),
Baynes (St. Vincent)

F

Tunisia’s new
Dine Baccouch ran
intrigue which delayed the form- |







PRICE : FIVE CENTS





a
Committee meeting held at Hastings House having
a Session yesterday morning

Hunte (B’dos), Hon. Albert Gomme
Hon. W

(Trinidad), Mr.
J. Raatgever (British Guiana), Hon. R. B.

C’mittee Ends 4th Meet

THE Regional Economic Committee held its Fourth
Meeting at Hastings House, Barbados, from Monday 3ist
March to Thursday, 3rd April, 1952, TheMceting was held
under. the Chairmanship of the Hon. W. H. Courtenay,
O.B.E., of British Honduras, and the following member

TUNIS, April 3
Premier Salah Ei }
into a palace |





ation of his Cabinet while the anti and advisers were in attendance ;—
French Opposition party de | Chairman: Hon, W. H. Cour- London in January, 1952, a pre-
nounced new reforms as ijtenay, O.B.E liminary discussion on the pro-
“misleading illusion”. The Prime Deputy Chairman: Professor C.|cedure for the Future Finances
Minister had hoped today to an +. Beasley, C.M.G for the University College of the
nounce the seven-man Cabine!l Barbados: Member: Mr. F. L.| West Indies and a discussion on
which will initiate a reform pro-}| Walcott, M.C.P., Advisers: Hon.|the Report of the Caribbeam-Com-
gramme. But at the last minut sir John Saint, C.M.G., Hon. H.|miasion Conference on—Industrial
two prospective members refused |A. Cuke. C.B.E., Hon. K. R | Development which bad been hela
The Bey meanwhile hurriedly quit} Hunte, Mr. E. S. S. Burrowes, Mr.|in Puerto Rico in February of this
his winter Palace here and drove|D. G Leacock, year
unannounced to his personal sum British Guiana: Member: Hon.| Arising out of Mr. Gomes’*Re-
ner home amid the ancient ruit W. J. Raatgever, port on the Meeting of Common-
of Carthage, Only a small qua British Honduras: Member | wealth Finance Mifilsters, the
iccompanied bim and all trad ton. W. H. Courtenay, O.B.E Committee discussed supply probs
tional ceremony was lacking Jamaica: Member: Hon. D, B,|!ems including Import Policy,
; ; sangster; Advisers; Mr. J. B./"nd appointed a Committee to
Some Cireles linked hi udder legg, Mr. D. Levy explore the possibility of finding
departure with the family ba ti Antigua: Member: Hon, V. C./S0me uniform policy to meet the
apparently in process betwer Bird | exigencies of the sterling crisis
Be y Sidi Mob immed and Ami) Kitts-Nevis ; Observer: Mr.|Situation and to make recom.
Pash Bey and two sons and “ly. &. R. Knight. mendations to the Regional Eco-
daughter. Informed ces sak Montserrat: Member ; His Hon-|"0mic Committee, The following
~ cans sae -F ones aes ae ur Charlesworth. Ross. reemitese were appointed to this
ressing Neodes' A 1, é : Sommittee
peridence) party connections with, Gate ae aes ae - | eG. H, Adams..Hon, W. J. “
Ratsvalai sopertes nine nar [ine HowD 6. Sanger Mone S|
are : 0 ops EB A ‘ s ‘ 4 °
Cabinet This the Bey had hope Renato wianiber s Hon. J.B Bird, Hon. A. Gomes and Mr. C.
ineantbie 300 Tunisians have St. Lucia; Member: Hon. C, A.| 4. Beaubrun
heen rounded up in a big police Beaubrun, At this meeting recommenda-
weep in the Arab quarters of], St. Vincent: Member: Hon. R.} tions were made to the Comptrol-
Sousie, fourth city in Tunisia, fol Baynes; Adviser: Mr. V, D.| ler for Development and Welfare
lowing a bomb attempt on the life] "cher. — in the West Indies for the ap- ®
of its French Deputy Mayor Dominica : Member: Hon. H, pointment of Mr. J. S. Mordecai.
This mass comb out, made last} 2+ Shillingford, C.B.E., Adviser:| Principal Assistant Secretary, das
iight. is the first in the Aral fon. J, Bully maica, as Executive Secretary
tuarters of the big town since ’ } ; es and Mr. D. J. Parkinson, O.BiE.,
Tunisian disturbances began three ue eee Islands : Adviser Deputy Colonial Secretary, Brit-
r, A. Macleod Smith. hy: Ch as Assista Trade
months ago i Secretary: Mr. R. Norris, M.B.E.| (0. oiwsinnor in the ‘ted Ki :
Police said ey woud one The Full Meeting of the Com poneeperamer oo m4
bout 20 people suspect ” e a mittee was preceded by a meet- oun bo ahve’ Chev ebrtinite tt
leased when thelr innocence has|Né of the Executive Committee! was further recommended that
seaged Whe ; mn Saturday, 29th March, and the , : ek : 5
been certilied.—U.P. Appointments Committee on Sun.|#@ post of Assistant Secretary

(Statistician) should not be filled

lay, 30th March until after Mr. Mordecai had as-





e Among the items discussed at} sumed duty. The Committee re-
southeast of Hanoi, engagements CHICAGO, April 3 i Five Hats Go this meeting were the Formal| commended that there should be
between French troops and Reds Rampaging waters in the Mis-| « Instrument for the Establishment] further consultation with the par-

ee ) pag . ’
accounted for 20 killed and 16 |souri River valley made thousands | ; e f the Regional Economic Com-j}ticipating Governments vefore an
taken prisoner among Vietminh | homeless after a state of emer i For A Sail mittee, a Report by the Hon. A | appointment is made to the post
troops. gency was declared in Montanaj{ Gomes on the Meeting of Com-|of Trade Commissioner in the
. eT ee community and the Wéather Bu- monwealth Finance Ministers in' United Kingdom.
Fi es Chi reau warned of new dangers. Everyone agreed that yester eT en ee
Late winter blizzards clogged day was hot But for St. Clair x
arr ance streams from Montana through| Edwards of Dayrells Road and x %
the Dakotas and into Iowa and}five other people there was defin- | %
CAIRO, April 3. Minnesota as flood relief crews} ite proof that it was a windy day & x
Salah Ben Youssef, General} worked feverishly to throw up Within forty minutes Edwards|¢ .
Secretary of the Tunisian Nation-|new dikes and repair old ones iid he saw four hats sail into the x %
alist Party said in an interview Nearly 2,000 persons were hom: tance while their owners|& >
that there was a “fair chance” }less and the damage rose toward | jooked ruefully into the inne % %
that the majority of the United|the million dollar mark.—U.P. jbasin and tried several methods] % ¥
Nations Security Council would —— of fishing them out, All four]
support Tunisian independence ; ,_ . vere blown off at roughly the] 4
demands. Youssef, who fled with New Born Quins Die same spot—crossing the Victoria] & %
another former Tunisian Cabinet | Bridge * s
member from _ Paris to. avaid RIO DE JANEIRO, April 3 Edwards then walked along the % g
arrest said Pakistan, Russia ancl | Quintuplets reported born to | carcenage About a hundrec % Ss
Chile were | definitely slates | Brazilian woman Mrs Julia de| yards fudther on, he overheat & y
with Tunisia and added | that! Souza (35) in wild country near ‘a man telling his friends he had] % Ss
Nationalist China had indicated) Ratalha died Wednesday. Journal{ lost his hat. It had just blow sy <
ee. ps Brazil, Turke, aq) te Alagoas reported on Tuesday | nto the careenage % x
ns a § ? ge Saat t erend ey ‘iving the news of the birth of & %
ameee,. are i" ener ec 1e r 7/ the children four boys and a girl, Eee 4 x
es gy Pea , 4 “| while saying that all were doin, e ‘ x
abstain. e saic le curren ap vell said no other details were ri rige “s a
prochement between Spain and vailable about the children u - % x
ates a ; -cter 0 ; ¢ '
the Arab States was expected { Only living Quintuplets are © © % >
aid Tunisia’s case, He said Spair | Canada’s 17 year old Dionne gir) D ssal \¥ %
was approaching Brazil for assur- re gcd Fo aie ~ dar Poe LEYLA \% %
Annette, Cecile, Emilie, Marie .
ances of support.—U.P. % >
Ciicehiedh tiie aeeadibieeona ..j/4and Yvonne and the Diligent “i ; * ¥
| Quintuplets of Buenos Aires who WASHINGTON, April 3 %
t * rt ‘ ».
vill be eight years old in July Attorne General J Howarc % %
—C.P. MeGrath abruptly fired corrup-|@ <
tion hunter Newbold Morris with-|% x
7 ‘ IT CLEC wut explanation on Thursday and] \ x
GOVERNMENT SEIZES rdered him to turn over hit * x
WVENICA N TELEPHONE lles to the F.B.I Norris’ coldly » ys
" > edna yvorded dismissal notice was|& &
COMPANY SYSTEM rddressed “sir” and informed him % x
MEXICO CITY, April 3 that he would be through at the 1% %
The Mexican Government | close of business today aN ; $
stored limited telephone service The astonishing action climaxed R » a iy eI <
; throughout the country after seiz- i bitter feud between the two mer a 4 ba Sy) it } J] y
ing the strike bound Mexican|,nq made MeGrath at least tem- “ 23 =, f os 5 mee *
‘relephone Company system whose porar winner ir howdown witt ¢ x
8,000 workers were still out ay Mortis. There is immediate spec-| % $
wage dispute. julation that F.B.1 Direct Joist A v
The dial service was operatins | Edgar Hoover might get the job| ‘LUBLE COFFEE bg " S
normally in most large cities but| of ridding government of evils lead P a4 s
the operator ‘service in small) doers, * oy ae ;
towns and long distance were sti!! White House*had no immediate Is , Sy: ‘ ; 2% >
crippled. comment either of hi lisrmmissal | & $
President Miguel Alema hi comme ‘ %
ordered the communication Minis- U.P * nS
r t take over operations % %
avert inent danger to Mex —— x
| heonon after the nation "OM cr? ED i \ * NESCAFE is full strength, full flavoured Coffee s
| Rees Pee Ur. mer © DIES SUDDENL % Plus Added Carbohydrates 2
n ten hours. -. \
’ eee tr ’ ’, ,
VICE-PRESIDENT "St. Mich: it-18 Tie :
,
- . “J 7 “ar ~ ,
| OF ARGENTINA DIES H % EASY TO PREPARE >
me . , » y
He is Presi- : nn ane. Re il 3 ; t EASY TO DIGEST x
Vice *resident yrtencio ; ‘ g
| Quijano, aged 67, died to-da t | gs 4 x
95 a.m rm mortem 1} see .
f the G ; IESTLES } TP s
has for its object the placing of} Quijano suffered a gall bladder rn he Ge LyX A NESTLES QUALITY PRODUCT x
international trade on a sound/|{liness and submitted to three op 1 nN : : x
| hasis of foreign exchange and evi- , eration the last few months Dr. E. I I ‘ h\ On Sale At All Grocers .
dences deep aay of international; when he wa y rtu ll edr ike at $36.6599S00F8 00085955890 OT0RONOCTOD
exchange problems. jin hos ; PPPOE EEO
PAGE TWO











morning by T.C.A. after spending

trar of the University College

late Capt. Cummins, left by
B.W.I.A. on Wednesday for Puerto
Rico on her way to the U.S.A.
She has gone to gain experience in
surgery and X-ray in which she is
particularly interested.

Miss Cummins was trained in
nursing at the St. Joseph Mercy
Hospitai, British Guiana.
afterwards returned to Barbad
and dd private nursing before
joining the staff of Dr, Skinner's
Clinic where she worked for
nearly two years.

Sound Recordings
AKING the SuMahine Cruise

on the Mauretania which
called here yesterday are Mr. and

across the Atlantic by the Queen
Mary to connect with the Maure-
tania in New York,

Co-Op Bank Director
M: PERCY PHILIP, Managing
Director of the Trinidad Co-

Four Months’ Leave

If 4 per cent, excess is to be
charged on a long-term redemp-
tion loan, what becomes of the
4% per cent. promised in cases
of accelerated redemption? My
broker’s advice to the girls is:
ignore the market index and
price movements, stick to bubbly,
aad don't start dancing on the
able

which cannot be stained with
beer” will be welcome news to
the organisers of concerts at the





morning after attending as an

Spence and Co, left for Trinidad

on Wednesday by B.W.1.A. intran-
sit for Venezuela,

While here, he was staying at

the Marine Hotel.

On Cruise
ISS HARRIET PETTIT of the
Theatre Department of War-

She ner Bros. Office in New York was
Os an intransit passenger yesterday

on the Mauretania, She was met
on board by Mr. and Mrs, Ronnie
Gittens. Mr. Gittens is a Director
of Caribbean Theatres Ltd,

U.K. Visitors

HE only passengers to disem-
bark at Barbados from the
tourist liner Mauretania yesterday

joincd the ship at New York.

They are spending a _ holiday
here, staying at the Marine Hotel
until April 12.

As a remembrance of this day
the children will celebrate at St.
Catherine's School, St. Philip, on
Thursday, April 17.

left for the U.S.A. via Puerto Rico





ing her stay a pleasant one.

although he had

re-visited the



encountered rough weather which
was thought by every one to be
rather unusual at this time of
the year,



Ree:

CROSSWORD



| Down
4. Noticed in all Negro dances, (6)
3. The age of veracity. (3)
4. Situated beyond riot rule, (8)
5. Remove the lime in tea. (9)
| 6
7
9

squash court, (6)



BY THE WAY...

school leaving age for dogs
now comes up. There is to be a
school in Sheffield, in which they
will be taught how to cross roads.
Presumably there will be scholar-
ships for clever dogs who want to
go on to Doxsford University, just
as there are scholarships for cats
at Catsford University, where
they are taught how to get down

lodgers are nervous of
latest advertisements,
Continental frills,”
Mr Pearce

her
“Highbrow
commented



By Beachcomber

£3. 7s. 44d. in hand,

Another Traveller: Are we al-
lowed to go out when we get to
Lyons?

Official: There will be a con-
ducted tour of one hour, as per
schedule. Each member of the
party will be given 100 francs
out of his: allowance for refresh-

break for refreshment.

The Foulenough





BARBADOS

Shadows, found Willy polishing his

parade when there isn’t any parade

“Come along,” said Knarf and
Hanid. “Willy says he’s going to
find a parade in a minute, and we're
going with him to see if he can.”

So Hop-a-Long and Christopher
Cricket got behind Knar/ and Hanid,

and Hop-a-Long made a noise like | cause he really had his parade, now,

a drum by rubbing his legs together,

Rupert and the





Programme

Tip Top Tunes, 5 p.m. Composers of the

up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
The Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m. From
The Third Programme

Maturity Means

ability to face realities, to get along |
well with people, to build to ad- |
vantage on past experience, and
to find satisfaction for life in gen-
eral. The behaviour of a well ad-
justed person is marked by flex-
ibility and consistent self control
He is sympathetic and well organ-
ised without being a slave to the
rigors of orderliness. He main-

own behaviour and plans for the|

future with confidence.



Tail-piece

GOOD FRIDAY lith






ADVOCATE

Blackie Beetle; and Mr. Grumph the

pillars and potato bugs. They all

around the hill. “Willy will never
find a parade!” everyone kept say-
ing. “There isn’t any parade for him
to find!”

But Willy just kept smiling be-

right behind him!

New Bonnet—24









From R. M, MacColl.
At the commemorative service
for the King held in Washington

—owing to protocol—did not join

ta!” the success of Wallace Beery
in that superb early talkie “Viva
Villa!” Florence Desmond
paying her first visit to Washing-
ton to appear at a National Press
Club “do” and quipping “Now



Teday 5 & 8.30 p.m,

+ "lk takes
TWO
to get













ee ee ee ee ae ae Se, eee

Dial 4000 for Dinner
Reservations

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.80 only
and continuing daily 4.45 & 8.30

GEORGE PAL: RUNOLPH MATE

Screenpiay by Sydrey Boehm » Based on a novel By
Caen Baimer ang Pro Wyte

Amazing . . . Fantastic














































MISS SHAKUNTALA

DEVI





HERE ARE A FEW PRESS OPINIONS

has the answer in her head, before most
People could open a reckoner,
















Italy

~ ge



Portugal

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952








1
° Willy Had Unif |
° Willy Had a Faricy Uni orm bhé cele wen <9
|
—He Was All Set to March in a Parade— a ev us PY re
By MAX TRELL . Ga, J
| WILLY Toad hada blue uniform | eee
R. RONALD TREE, former Homecraft Course Visited Parents on, As > 7, â„¢ _ } oe" 2
British Conservative M.P. who 7PHE Housecraft Instructors’ ME ERROL BARROW. of ar 8 " aS is aa |
ae eee ee USS, Te Course formally opened on ‘Westward Ho”, Lands End, ® sort of point at one end, like the -
turned on Wednesday by B.W. 1 September 14, 1951 by Mr. E. C. who went up to the U.S.A. to end of a em ar a tos ball t i
via awe “ after spending h 5M. Theobalds, the then Acting spend Christmas with her parents the other end.’ ae -
usual winter | olidays in Barbados fjirector of Education, terminated Rev and Mrs. G. M. Plaskett of | oe ya. ‘
staying at his home, Heron Bay, (oo an. . i . aa aad “ a Everyone in the neighborhood |
7 yesterday afternoon at the House- New Jersey, returned to Barba-| 3
St James. He was accompanied *~ . : eel od ; co : | wondered what Willy was dresse4
by Mrs. T craft Centre, Bay Street. dos on Wednesday by B.W.1LA.! ; ‘

Y, = =, ” The Course was of six month's via Puerto Rico. She was accom-/| ™ the uxiform for, and why he care 4
Crucifixion’’ At Ch.Ch. duration. Visitors ee ee pe <- d by her little ees an a) Done 3
HE Christ Church Parish tained to tea by Miss eyne, Lesley who was born in and , i a

Chureh Choir, assisted ie Organiser. Among those present and was seeing her grand parents band. . 5 bf Ho )aD,.0 a
some well known local artistes Were Hon. and Mrs. R. N. Turner, for the first” time, But he hasn’t ‘got a band,” said ei
will render Stainer’s “Cruci- Mrs. F. A. Bishop, Mr. E.C. M: Miss Flotence Springer, of} Blinky Mole.
fixion” at Christ Church Parish Theobalds, Mrs. Muriel Clarke, “Colliston”, Government Hill and| “Maybe,” suggested Hop-a-Long,
Church on Sunday, April 6 at Mrs. H. A. Vaughan, Major and retired ae of Dorrie the eremmenne. “Willy’s going to
7.30 ' Mrs. Clindon Reed, Miss Betty’ ton's Girls’ who went up to the n a parade.” \ P

es O. Gittens will id Arne Mr. and Mrs. R. Tucker, U.S.A. with Mrs, Barrow, also| “What parade?” asked Blackie ' | . f CMU Gea E ete

at the organ. ae eee Dr, and Mrs. H. G, Cummings returned on Wednesday. She | Beetle. Willy Toad in his uniform. :
Leaving T: d Mr. D. E. M. Malone. took the opportunity to visit Hop-a-Long didn’t know what}
. ey g io-day Mrs. R. N. Turner who gave a many of her relatives in various] parade. and Christopher Cricket made chirp-
rate an ame "Saas short ae. presented the Cer- oh eg Ay Bag E. = Curious Clothes ing sounds like a fife. CAL atte aris ic
0! 0 0, ana f t rizes nany o ; ® 2 -
will be returning home | this — For U. ‘S. Holiday contributed greatly towards mak-| ,, Meanwhile Knarf and Hanid, the} Then they met Blinky Mole and .
ai ane ; “ |

the past ISS GLORIA CHEESMAN, “Vrs. Barrow is th fe of| boots and getting ready, so it|frog and Glive the Snail. And they BARCELONA, EN iy TO JUNE. 1
the ee tc sapenen daughter of Mr. C. L. Chees- Mr, E, Sy Werther, MCP. ane seemed, to march off down the road. | all nrarched along to see if Willy |,

ier oar Meer enka OT Remoaatcn tent Cor the URA. Oe ee Sen wearin Suck scttens aothenioe bi elt be een tee teenage ‘

who was formerly att: ssociation, le or the U.S.A . yas wearing suc rious ¢ as he said he Mr.

Bank of Siuntrest: nag dng via Puerto Rico on yesterday First In 33 Years and what was the meaning of the| made a noise like a big drum, and C L U B - ; " :

first visit to the island which they Morning by B.W.I.A. to spend a R. AND MRS. CECIL H.| silver rod. Glive held aloft an even larger leaf For this special occasion PAA offers a direct ser-

said was made very pleasant due oT, ‘ a oe a = henobngeas Sgetvtag bare’ pester. ‘ ores pons oye said penn in the oe una me ones carried by Knarf vice from New York to Barcelona. Or you can

orin o} ear Water orida as - , ere yester- irits, “I'm a - r. anid. : we) sail asili
wae mee ae te ¢ Attended R.E.C. Talks 48” ™orning on the Mauretania Ponaheat te cond eoeendet majonten M O R G A N fly to Lisbon, travel ove rland to the Basilica at
a from New York. .. “ , 3 » Family of Mice Fatima where the 35th anniversary of the appari-

spend next winter here, R. J. E. R. KNIGHT, Admin- “yy; Coryat, a T jadi h That's what everybody thought, ; : oe : d
University Registrar istrative Officer, St. Kitts, has beon reciain x the tr S.A,| Said Knarf; “but they didn't see how. Finally they met a whole family tion of the Blessed Virgin will be celebrated on

M* H. W. SPRINGER, Regis- Nevis, left for Antigua yesterday fo; many yéars Soda Carib that| YOU could be a drum-major in a} of mice, and a whole family of cater- May 13th.

..and continue down through Spain

” ini , ost to Barcelona for the Congress.
of the West Indies, returned io Observer, the Conference of the West Indies on several occasions} fr you to lead.” followed along to see if Willy could a en aie
Jamaica yesterday morning by Regional Economic Committee at since leaving when he was a|__ Willy chuckled. “I'll have a pa-| find a parade. popular Carn Make your visit a complete pilgrimage to the
B.W.LA. Ph and Ravine consulta- eae ht a He was staying boy, yet this was the first time - ares sar And some ants came ant, ones i Singers in person sacred shrines of Europe, to Lourdes and the
ions with members of the Region- at the Marine Hotel he had been back to Barbados in Ae . . we robins, and several rabbits and chip- ‘ >
al Economic Committee on matters Off To The U.S.A. 33 years. along behind me and you'll see. | munks, anda porcupine, and a dozen a Eternal City where you may enjoy the privilege
affecting the University College. R. GEORGE AMOS at one Mr. and Mrs, Coryat will be| Here, carry these two flags for me{ qucks ‘and chickens, all quacking of an audience with the Holy Father.

Also jeaving for Jamaica by the time Private Secretary to Sir £¢tting off the ship at St. Vincent| if you don’t mind.” And he handed | 5,4 elucking. SMALL ISLAND Witl cul rvice direct to London, Paris.
same plane were Mr. Charles Hiliary Blood, a former Governor t0-4ay for ten days’ holiday and| Knarf and Hanid each a big green Ander ‘the. bead of then.:4i PRIDE ith reguiar ser ice direc 0 London, + aris,
Emtage of Emtage Electrical Co. of this colony, left the island on Will also visit Trinidad for a| leaf with a long stem. narched Willy, tossing the rod up Rome and Lisbon, to every major European city,
enenth gina ati Colic Bee t Wednesday by B.W.LA. for eaeet a oa psing to ay ty aoe ie eee D the air sow, ond catching it as it MIGHTY ZEBRA Pan American World Airways offers you the

n rs 0 > , New York on the SS. Brazil. meadow, Willy first with his silver sates Tabs ; ¢ I Oi eaten. nit ,
! ay t i : : SII: ' sdge 95 ye i Z
the British American Tobacco Co, pusne Rico on his way to the "Ve president. and. Director ‘of rod which ‘he started poking op'and sells one erie aa) eee SIR GALBA know ledge of 25 years intern itional travel ex
who is expected to be back within e . 8 Stein Hall g& Co., Importers,} down in the air and twirling be- | 2°¢,W5iriing It aroun : perience to help you plan your trip.
the next two weeks. Paid Business Visit Exporters and Manufacturers of| tween hi: fingers, and Knarf and | in time with all the drumming and SPOILER
Surgery And X- Ray FTER spending a week here New York, Mr. Coryat said that| flanid behind him carrying the two chirping and quacking and clucking
ISS MARY CUMMINS on business on behalf of his his wife and he had a wonderful] jeaf flags. By and by they met Hop- and squeaking. VIKING
daughter of Mrs. H. S. Cum- £2, Mr. J. Dick, Overseas cruise down from New York| a-Long and Christopher Cricket. So they marched all across the

mins of Crumpton Street and the Representative of Blundell, except for two days when they meadow, and through the woods and



Ask yous travel agent
about 22 and 30 day all-expense
pilgrimages to Europe including full
arrangements for yGur visit to

the Eucharistic Congress.

For reservations see your Travel Agent or

PAN AMERICAN

Mrs, Robert Hohn de Rappard of were Mr. and Mrs. Ian Oliver Hu tf)
Brussels, Relgium. Leaving Bel- from Macclesfield, England, who nee An oe
gium in March they travelled

World’s Most Experienced Airline

STOCKINGS—45, 51 and 60
PURE WOOL TWIN SETS—

} 4) Cathedral, the coloratura voice ~ Ee FETE eT et
operative Bank, returned home * . Unites the neck wear. ( FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 cae 7 ‘ ; $22.98
during the week by B.W.1.A. after pent The Winter at - A twopenhy sum. ®). di in| 4,007.15 p.m. '19.36M, 26 AIM, 81M Sateen ae eee Sweater and Cardigan Séts from $
spending his annual month’s leave “ Spending he winter | bad. (5) — nee . > : ;
ahem at Miramar St 10. Take for granted the donkey, “4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily came to the National Anthem, the R BOTH pieces
oh, Barnes, Se See Se Ss P| 18. OU ee cae (¢ a6 Sau 46 ie Service, 4.15 p.m. Semprini, 4.30 p.m. President stood to attention, but to $27.98 for P

Da Costa & Co., Ltd. — Broad Street — Bridgetown
Across Phone 2122 (After business hours, 2303)
ee Soha de appre pee, Tis Mr. Oliver is Managing Director 1. Baek an evens i gomimon. th.) baad
own business “Rhodera Co.,” in of The Fine Cotton Spinning Asso- 8 St 3) | sana
Brussels. His company makes ciation in England, r 10. Brom a play @ horse wae in a path oad. eannge sisal insta a calee a nitive, “tohe
> t
recs See . In , he School Children Celebrate +} Pane an the tears, By ‘ cottage. Outside his mother’s uncommonly like the new bonnet t SANETTA DRESS SHOP
for U.S. shy and aa Pacacks HE ST. GILES Sunday School +s She tends pr’ ae bunt, (4) ao he fess" bolls eg to ass Lavender’s — shop. F ; ¢# 5
branch of the St. Barnabas e together, takes a deep breath and ‘* Well, upert,”” she says smiling ’ | Next to Singers
wna cae eee Sees Me vic by Rev. 1 Kati batt haa e,iaree sumber in) oe Se on a ms ne en waite i. eemes ey fir v7 WHEN WORLDS c oe
One of his most popular record- aynes Vicar of St. , : : ry Sr ae
ings was a six pute “Sound Barnabas on’ duly 22, 1951, the 30. gah nid tothe’ quats, (a). a word to say, for Mrs. Bear is is_you lik like it. LLIDE Color by =| FOR TRA VELLING
History” of the last war which in- same day rr the Lord Bishop Gh tes ee a aine party © 8) TECHNICOLOR -
cluded V-1 and V-2 rockets in Was consecrated nas now in- § . A Paramount Picture 3 ‘ * *
flight, bomb explosions, etc. , weet its numbers from two a. Buardian for Oy hair? (8) | B. B oe . Radio The Voice ee ai NYLON UNDIES—Slips, Half-Slips, Panties
ozen to over eighty, |

















Week, 5.15 p.m, Listeners’ Choice, 6 p.m ; g ¢ o
sii ail aes 16. From the fire, remember. (5) Seae in ; in. Mrs. Truman and Margaret
R. F. G. DOUGLAS, Official by B.W.LA. on Wednesday. 17 Rages to be engaged. (5) Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15 p m. sang with the rest of the congre-
» ts, (5) Record Reveals, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round
Reporter of the Legislative C.S.0.B.A. REUNION 18. You ae ee ee up and Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The gation, Margaret in particular
Covmel fn rica arid, egy CTMERE wil be no monthly ce |g eats oun Neate MEL a Sa a wi art fool.
> ‘ ormere ‘obium; ; is 2 = :
on Wednesday by B.W.LA, to union of the Combermere Nioblum: 14, ‘Lion: | Re eee Tentn Williams going like thé VALOR COOKER ee ee ee
spend part of his four months’ School Old Boys’ Association to- Year: 24. Ally: 25. Baie: 20. Drear! 7.15 p.m, West Indian Diary, 7.45 Ban. si ae ,
leave with this relatives in Pas- night. The next meeting of the hown: kb gomey fs: municipal: 4: | Song and Dance, 8.15 p.m. Radio News. dickens on Broadway gy, Marion
sage Road. He plans to remain Association will be held on Fri- Ridicule: 11, Nufeey 12 12 Pansat.” Bill! roth fee m ete Altes, se Bm. Brando repeating in “Viva Zapa- Short Burners
here for about two months, day, May 2. \ eer} ; aM,

2 Burner Model @ $56.14
3 Burner Model @ $71.87

Also

WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMEL SINKS
With Double Drainboard @ $65.64

ROODAL





, I suppose they’ll be expecting me complete with waste and overflow
T. HAVE not had so much Watney in another's trouble, Uniformed Official: I’m afraid ‘ 5 to mimic the Washington monu- '. HERBERT, Ltd. Incorporated
; :, - Courage in your own. not. Tickets for tea will be given Ag 9 ment. Established
tor siorutanisics unioaded about = , : out at Lyons. Besides, Mrs,’ Pos- Being Your e ~ 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
fourpence worth of Antananarivo Dogsford and Calsbridge _ sett, according to my notes, had a] Being emotionally mature is the PSI
bottl 1 je at Laroche- y = ne RSLS SDSS SSSI
Apteros for es 000 aya E whole question of the Srierings. ana she is Sow only state of mind that includes the | GLOBE



THEA [SOODAL THEATRES

ns

EMPIRE

To-day at 2.30 only ;
And Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30



DEVI



To-morrow at 6.30 am.
“HOMESTEADERS OF or
PARADISE VALLEY















“TIGER WOMAN”

—

“THE PASSION PLAY”

ROXY

To-day Last % Shdws 4.30 & 8.15
WHOLE SERIAL
“TIGER WOMAN”



“WHEN ba dag ra with Linda STERLING
until you are perfectly ment in the evening at the hotel, | tains the respect for the accepted | . The Human Calculating Machine Color By Tee’ meee
7 J aaa , aC J ‘ Spectac' Never Bef Film
certain he's not a stuffy old fool, {rom trees, provided that such refreshment | customs and traditions of society. married will appear ROR reset héganhe Sister aieatie:
, a fe tele is consumed on the premises,|And at the same time is open- | , TO-NIGHT AT 8.30 AT THE To-night at 8.30 p.m. and

Occasional showers of beer Mrs, McGurgle is criticised and any change left over will| minded to change and progress. % Ne ee RUNEALA “PHANTOM SPEAKS”

7RHE op OME of Mrs. McGurgle’s old be returned to me until the next|He accepts responsipility for his} # EMPIRE THEATRE GENIUS Miss SH/ 2 Not Suitable for Children
invention “a piano “ent: P i



Opening Sat. Sth 4.80 & 8.15
“TRAPPED” and
“CIRCLE OF DANGER”







big London halls, where the . “All. this about sauces. of Foulenough Macaroon said, “And where The London's ‘Picture Post’ . . “LIGHT OF OLD SANTA FE" WHOLE ae fee
*hrowi about of beer is a dis- Isn't gravy good enough? We Seay - beat all this” time?” SHAKUNTALA DEVI is one of those if “THE SHADOW”
‘ ing don’t want to find the place pack- HE Macaroon of Macaroon| have you en all this time ?") Calculating Wonders Who Haye Aston- Sat. 5th Midnite
grace to good music. remem- ; taee® id - bre ah ds on “In Nicaragua,” replied the exile. ished Py Performing Almost instan- eae f our
ber the Tu hi ed with French artists and ac- sat at breakfast at Macaroon ” 68 . Seren ; “DANGERS OF THE We would like to inform

r the fuss when Peildreiver, the > " ioe 5 6 7 ; “Have you breakfasted? No, | taneous mental calculations, so fantastic, NG é BS t as from Saturday 5th
Czech pianist, put a brimming tresses. Good plain English cook- Castle, Macaroon. The _ butler i” s th | as to seem “SUPER-HUMAN.” When CANADIAN MOUNTED ied Poo yer, boar geht’ ge
glass of beer on the instrument #98 like what the old cook Mrs. announced an early visitor — a but I will, , wes e breezy a, learned professors tested Miss DEVI in eee - 40. yh ‘week-ends
and played a Boccherini minuet Rockett gave us better than all Mr. Macaroon. Intrigued, the |SWet. “What's your real name? London recently, the demonstration fell LYMPIC ‘and mid-week Shows.
so forcefully that the whole thing this chef stuff—frogs in aspiff. I Macaroon said, “Show him in.” |@8Ked | the Macaroon, with a BRE: 35 + SORIRG SUS WS AYRE oO
was a-drip from stem to stern, SUPPOSe, and snails swimming in A red-faced individual in a kilt|ffiendly sneer, “Foulenough, ssnnaiphcnsinithcomenesti ice
Sleghammer, the ‘“Norweigan Champagne. And culture, I know. entered the room confidently, |S@id the visitor, “You may call To-day to Mon, 4.00 & 8.18 ROYAL
Paderewski,” used to cover the Lectures about the National Gal- “I could not,” he said, “visit}me the Foulenough of Foul- dunt 1 Rome . ... . THe young Indian, LAWRENCE TIERNEY as
instrument, except for the keys, lery and Shakespeare, It won't my old country’ without greeting | enough.” er RG. it LORD ten nee te "THE HOODLUM” “ME BROTHERS NBETER”
with a thick travelling rug, Work. This is England, not Mong- the Chieftain of our Clan,”| Tek, Tek calculating Machine in the Rome Uni- papiniawcniy WwoMe with
before waginning - pe e an marten. “How do you comp to be al Technically, her réndering was Cee Seblesusene aed maesetarsoaerlicsh rsh ce eee er
wore a serge hat, so that when +. Macaroon?” inquired the Mace- generally good, although occasion- FRAN | To-morrow at 1.30 p.m gt

5 ° 2 » , n : Fog a “ONCE UPON A DREAM
audience “he "was started in me Travellers Joy roon. “Through my greatgrand-| ally the raised foot in attitude was Anne ‘Ey .cTHE DATLY MIRROR’ London SOV E MREIOG IES aS
Siete Travelier: May Mrs. Possett leanerits ae seen ax "he isons toes v eheianet ie the Charle BICKFORD Baby. Who was proughe up by the ROLL ON TEXAS MOON ae
; OSs Ep c She] ma is Te ed... the bird isa ae

Life is mostly froth and bubble, and I have tickets for a cup of married a MeHiccough.” Smell- | third “fishdive” went astray. anes fas mean mathematician herself, and Sat, Sth Midnite Sat. & Sun 430 & 8.15

Two things stand like stone: tea when we get to Dijcn? ing a not unamusing rat, the (Article on ballet.) William LUNDIGAN 20. when it gomes to figuring things out she WHOLE SERIAL Humphrey BOGART in

“CHAIN LIGHTNING”



y ou and
Hs on the list of useless ac- wm Pocienly Outen ee oetate jute“ wvete tricom rida. ‘th ba xnitica De”
PRINTS PRIN Ss PRIN’ ‘Ss one aa re iP coer ith plicit eer Prices: Orchestra and Box $1.00. %, faiccny 68, Bex Seats oA. Dane CLARK-—Ramond MASSEY
S a 7 z a c p y : 00, )
: 4 feathers, ExtromTALENTED BEAUTIES Cirele 75e., Baleeny G0c.





GALETY





“PLAZA CINEMAS



All Talking)
“THE PASSION PLAY” Aa ANZA THEATRES
A LARGE CONSIGNMENT ae SRS AS Se ae GOODFRIDAY 11th The Garden—St. James
he i “ i BS



















To-day & To-morrow 8.20 p.m.

STROMBOLI

BARBAREES —Dial 5170

BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 OISTIN—Dial 8404

PRINTED COTTONS 36ins. 65c. 70c. 76c.

Midnite Sa’

To-day 44 & 830 p.m & Continuing To-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p m.
2 M. 2 Ingrid BERGMAN &
TODAY (3 sHows) ; Warner Bros present - Oo U rE R A G E Jane Nigh — Rory Calhoun & eas ark
PRINTED WAFFLF PIQUE 36 ins. $2.13 William Naney Frank FORCE OF ARMS “Mala POWERS-—Tod ANDREWS et een
° HOLDEN OLSON LOVEJOY in J
‘

with Roland WINTERS as

also Leon ERROL in THAN

Also the Color Cartoon ; “HIS BITTER HALF" _ “SECRETARY TROUBLE”

Saturday — Special 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

“OUTLAW GOL
Johnny Mack BROWN &
“ARIZONA TERRITORY”









ie RR harlie



MIDNITE SPECIAL » SATURDAY STH

2 New Action Thrillers ! !







Sat. Speci Pe a Se | lee eet

“RIO GRANDE
PATROL















ROSE OF SANTA ROSA Sat. Special 1.30 p.m Oates eos aa Whip WILSON
HOOSIER HOT SHOTS & LAW OF THE BADLANDS LAW OF THE WEST TERRITORY ‘Sh ate oe .
. R EVANS & W HITFIELDS RIDIN’ THE OUTLAW TRAIL Tim Holt — Richard Martin & Johnny Mack Brown & Randolph Scott & “TO BEAT THE BAND”

RIDER FROM
TUCSON
Tim Holt

GUNRUNNERS

Jimmy Wakely

Francis LANGFORD &
“CROSS FIRE”
Robert MITCHUM

eae EEE

PRAIRIE LAW

George O’Brien
me



les STARRETT &

ch
DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606 Smiley BURNETTE

YOUR SHOE



a

George O’Brien

STORES








FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

181 Sat Examination For U.C.W.L.



(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica.
One hundred and eighty-
one young men and women

THE GAMBOLS .

OUS THE Divi IS ONLY ELEVEN





Vit BUY A LITTLE Scare) [ees DO You Ou! | BOUGHT THOSE TO GO

throughout the West Indies TOWILLINGS AND 1 ONLY WADS PIWITH MY WINNINGS | NEW SCARF DEAR 7S” SCARE
and at centres in the United pSIXPENCE ON IT J] J fvery eeetty
Kingdom and the United

HANDBAG, GLOVES,

States took the entrance ex- SHOES AND WAT ?

amination to the University
College of the West Indies
last month. They include
West Indians at colleges over-
seas as well as six Americans
and three West Africans who
seek admission for the aca-
demic year 1952—53.

There were 78 candidates for
the Faculty of Arts, 63 for Medi-
cine and 40 for Science. Tho ap-
plicants for Science courses were
the largest number so far.

Last year there was peak ap-

plication to the University of ap- . ine D B Tr 1
proximately 200, but the Uni- : Ss e e amee
versity authorities consider the

present figure to be nearer the
normal average for applications in

Siren Song O

Gets Baton

the future. Less than 80 were e

admitted last year. D Lt P e rin . LONDON.
In the West Indies the candi- nves ments Mr. Alan Lennox-Beyd, Minis-

dates were divided: Jamaica 63; ter of State for Colonial Affairs

Trinidad 41; Barbados 22; British

24 Billion In
Six Years

LONDON. last month presented the baton
The voite of Spring to many a Canadian is a great deal ©°{, honour to Sub - Inspector

ie met -' S nai eet ine » trillinae of . birds Beharrysingh of the British Gui-
louder—and less melodious—than the trilling of the birds aga Police Force at a pansing oul

Guiana 21; the Windward Islands
17 and the Leeward Islands 3.
At least 23 scholarships and ex~

hibitions will be awarded this as they burst into song as winter passes. Each April they rade of Colonial Police officers
year, The Universite is offering corhe, Sreat development in the . hear a sudden multi-toned fanfare ring out across the vast $7 tendon.
six open scholarships: Trinidad war period, aiden ty oo waters of the Great Lakes — a fanfare coming from the

offers three exhibitions; Barbados



2 ; i 5 ; 5 , All the men were non-gazetted
thr t Y arb lus provided by the Govern- Sirens of the innumtrable steamers that ply the Lakes every wee Ne

on ae two each; and ment’s defence program since year between the months of April to December. During ee oars ee ie
eid ‘Giidesek actanine eh the outbreak of the Korgan War, the short winter months the whole of the Great Lakes are j.. Training School in North Lon-
open to scholars from all parts of terest’ of investors oth -: one frozen solid and not a ship can stir don. The baton itself was a cen-
the Wes lies, < ~xhibitions 11,34, . . nanan ——— 9 " ‘ :
will be awarded to. Jamaicans in United States and Europe. How cae Once the Lakes thaw to liquid "Viktoria ‘Regina’ in gold and
Arts and Sciences from funds pony oe ft - ys = oe a Jamaica Short Of life, meee: the por sgg they was given by Sir George Abbiss.
rena ; the hah mr nt and that including intentions for the Shi P 1 oat i cuaay oer a Assistant Tnspector General of
bela in trust by the University current year, hew investment in Po r.ersonne ’ the Colonial Police, from his pri-

ge.

The names of the successful
scholars will be announced late
April or early May following in-
terviews by a travelling Board.

Full Tinte Govt.
Medical Service
Planned For J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica.
A full time Government medi-
cal service is now proposed for
Jamaica. - Medical officers ap-
pointed to the service in the future
will not be permitted to under-
take private practice but will be
admitted into the service at high-
er salary scales to compensate for
loss of earnings thrbugh private

practice,



The scheme comes into effect
on April 31, 1952, but the option
is given, to medical officers al-
ready in the service to decide to
remain on their present terms or
accept the new salary scales and
restrictive terms. This option will
be open until October 1, 1952.

It is proposed, however, that
holders of specialist posts should
continue to have consulting prac-
tice; and that this privilege should
also be granted to medical officers
in charge of hospitals, if such
officers hold specialist qualifica-
tions or if, by virtue of their ex-
perience, their assistance is sought
by private practitioners in dis-
tricts served by their hospitals,



Proposals For First

Co-operative Farms
Outlined

(From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica,

The Jamaica Government has
outlined proposals for the estab-
lishment of Jamaica's first two
co-operative farms to be run ona
profit sharing basis by farmer-
settlers,

The two properties selected
are Lucky Hill in St. Mary now

being experimentally run as a
communal farming unit with a
C.D. and W. grant, and Grove

Farm in St. Catherine a Govern-
ment Agricultural Centre. These
will be leased for 99 years to two
co-operative societies which will
be formed by present settlevs and
selected farmers from outside the
properties.

Both properties will be operated
under the supervision of the De-
partment of Agriculture to ensure
that the proper agricultural prac-
tices are carried out and that re-
sources are not wasted.

INQUEST ON DEATH OF
HAWKER ADJOURNED

The inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Beatrice Foster (55) of Rock Hall,
St. Andrew was further ad-
journed yesterday until April 17
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Police Coroner of District
segue

Beatrice Foster who was a
hawker, died on the spot when
the motor bus A-66, the property
of the Rocklyn Bus Co., and
driven by Cyril Springer of
Spooner’s Hill, overturned while

it was being driven down Spring .,
St. Andrew about 1.30

Vale Hill,
p.m. on March 31.







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including:—

BELTING, in Leather, Camel Hair, and Canvas-stitched
BELT FASTENERS, OIL CANS, PRESSURE GAUGES
GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
FILTER CLOTH, — WHITE COTTON TWILL
SUMALOID and RITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walls)
ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES

For “EVERITE” ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, &
RIDGE CAPS

Send your orders to - - - -

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Phone: 4528

PCCP OSH

4



durable physical assets during
the seven years 1946-52 will to-,
tal over $24 billion, an annual
average of nearly $3.5 billion,
more than four times capital ex-
penditures of some $750 million
in the pre-war year 1939.

The 1952 estimate of $5 billion
represents an increase of 9%
over the 1951 preliminary figure
of $4.6 billion, is more than
double the 1947 capital expendi-
ture of $2.4 billion, and three
times the 1946 total of $1.7 bill-
ion. Such intentions provide a
secure base for a high level of
activity in the current year.
although, as in 1951, a number

of “soft spots” could easily de-
velop.
The basis for the increase re-

cently has been largely the three-
year $5 billion defence program
adopted by the Government after
Korean hostilities started. Of the
total, $1.7 billion was appropria-
ted for defence purposes during
the current fiscal year ending
March 31, 1952, and of this, $1.1
billion was earmarked for @x-
penditure on military equip-
ment and installations. The full
amount will not be spent, but
instead about $900 million, How-
ever, it is believed that within
the three-year period, the pro-
gram will be completed, in phys-
ical terms, in terms of construc-
tion put in place and quantities
of supplies and equipment pro-
duced and delivered, and prob-
pbly will be exceeded, for the
country has taken on additiona:
commitments in the meantime.

While defence expenditures in
the current year did not come
up to estimates by $200 million,
the stimulus to industry should
be even greater in the current
year than a year ago since while
on April 1, 195i, Canadian in-
dustry was working on defence
orders from the Canadian Gov-
ernment valued at $500 million
to-day it is working on orders
valued at $1.5 billion. Orders
placed in the current fiscal year
ave estimated at close to $2
billion.

Of the estimated $5 billion to
be spent on capital assets this
year, $3.5 billion is private ex-
penditure, an increase of 5%
over 1951’s $3.4 billion, whiie
public expenditure of $1.5 bill-
ion will be an inerease of 21%
over $1.2 Billion for 1951, indica-
ting the increasing important
role that the Government will
play in the current year. Of busi-
ness spending of $3,227 million
this year, increase of 11% ovel
the 1951 total of $2,290 millions,
manufacturing and utilities will
account for increasing shares.
New investment by manufactur-
img will be up 23%, from $755.
million to $929 million, and that
by utilities will also increase by
23%, from $916 million to $1,130
million. Primary industries and
the construction industry will be
barely ahead, up 1%, from $853
to $859 million while the total for
trade, finance and commercial ser-
vices will decline 22%, from $395
million for 1951 to $309 million
for 1952.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

APREL 3, 1952
CANADA 1
75% Cheques on Bankers 13 2/10%
Demand Drafts 73.05 %
... Sight Drafts 72 9/10
75% Cable
“3 5/10% Currency 71 °7/10%
Coupons 11%
50 Silver 20%

White Park Road.



(From Our Uwn Correspondent
KINGSTON, Jamaica.

Shortage of certified personnel
to serve on small ships to Jamaica
from other Caribbean ports has
created a situation which is now
under study by the Marine Board
and local Government. Due to the
lack of sufficient certified sea-
men—engineers and mates—mas-
ters of ships coming to Kingston
have at times met difficulty in
getting clearance as a result of
being unable to satisfy the re-
quirements of the law, regarding
the number of such officers.

A meeting of the Marine Board
has been called to discuss the situ-
ation and settle policy. Under
consideration by Government is a
scheme to provide local opportun-
ities for training in navigation.

£3 For Stabbing

“Anyone who comes before me
in future and is found guilty of
wounding with a knife, I am going
to send to prison,” His Worship
Mr. H. A. Talma told James Hare-
wood, a 24-year-old fisherman of
Chapman’s Lane, St. Michael,
when he fined him £3 for wound-
ing Daisy Norville with a knife on
her hand.

The fine is to be paid by monthly
instalments of £1 or in default
two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour. Norville told the
Court that on March 24 she and
the defendant had an argument
and a fight ensued, In the fight
the defendant wounded her on
her hand with a knife.

Sgt, Murrell prosecuted for the
Police from information received.

J'ca Exported 230,000
Stems Of Bananas
Jan—March 1952

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Jamaica. —
Jamaica's export production 0
bananas for the first quarter of
1952 was just over 230,000 stems
as compared with 944,000 stems
shipped in the same period last
year.



Reason for the decline is the
devastating hurricane in August
last year which did severe dam-
age to the industry. It is ex-
pected that there will be some
difficulty in providing the 70,000
stems which is due to go forward
to the United Kirfgdom in April.

However the industry expects
that by next year production will
be double and perhaps treble the
production before the hurricane
due to the progress being made in
restoration efforts.

AIR TRAFFIC

From Trinidad

Y. Scott, H. Kirton, M. Harewood, w

Tanner, R. Waliace, S. Taylor, H. er
J. Cates, L. Smith, T. Smith, } ardinna
L. Flower
Fema ons, aun, “noms,
tel illiams, Edgar 10m i
ote r Charlies Berker, Myrtic

kins,

ere Tens Elmes, David Walker
From San Juan

Carolyn Barrow,
Florence Springer, Charles

F. Fairley
MOO EPARTURES By B.WiA ON
WEDNESDAY

For Puerto Rico

Lindsay Williams, Roselie
Alexandra Ee iy oo
Samu ete, ‘ary ree,
— Srances FitzGerald, Russell
Sawens, Jane Sawens, George Coxe
Elizabeth Coxe, Henry Lord, Many Lord
Frém Grenada

Shelby Wilson

Lesies Barro
Vv. Anders

Williams
Williams
Penelope

—



Lipper
Wallets

$1.79
each

Y. De LIMA
& CO., LTD.

20 BROAD STREET



one reason why every ship needs yate collection. Also there to sec
a powerful siren, Moreover, the the ceremony was London’s No. 1}
ships use their sirens as a means po)jiceman, Sir Harold Scott, Com-
of signalling theif presence in the pigsioner of the Metropolitan
numerous narrow channels with porice

which the Lakes abound, From Inspector Beharrysingh has
resonant baritone to piercing @one 21 years’ service in the
soprano, the sirens throb and Gojonial Police.



shriek in a non-stop Neptune’s

every twelve. Concert Af Rocks
A Louder Voice

a new — and even louder The Programme for to-night's

voice, a voice that belonged to the Police Band Concert at Hastings

chorus for nine months out of
°
Tonight
Last April, the Lakes awoke to
biggest vessel of her type ever Rocks which begins at 8 o'clock

!

l

then to have been built, She was is:— ‘ haha
the fresh water oil-tanker, the (1) Suite for Miptary Band—
-y (a) Folk Song March,
Ss Imperial Leduc, whose cost (b) The Song of the Bilackamith
was approximately $4,000,000, and (ec) Fantasia on the Dargason
her mighty siren — a thunderous (intronyeing Urea Steaves”)
bass—soon became a familiar (4, concert Ovature FINGAL'S
s und. Later, she was joined by CAVE—Mendelssohn
a sister ship, the S.S. Imperial This overtars, Uke sthe Boosh
Redwater, and a third sister will Be Nice Britain, ‘wntan, prune
join the pair this year. These delssohn Wade when be Was 19
ships—who represent a total in« years old in 1829. In a letter to his
vestment of some $12,000,000—are fern hae eek
vital links in a new eastern out- ordinarily the Hebrides affected me
let artery for Alberta's oil. First the following came pe erin
link is a 1,127 mile 90 million del- there.” He then quotes rst
lar pipeline from the oilfield to = aden tanetor cath ‘on
qa tanker terminal on Lake Supe- next year, when he was in Italy.
rior. From there, the oil tankers The overturé is like a beautiful
take over. Each ship will cover e cairo matthe pasting. ying
26 chie is
the 662 miles from the Superior bar—the identical phrase which
terminal to a refinery at Sarnia,, pp ated thought of im the cave
ario — ¢ aa of ngal,
Ontario — and then make the re vs) abemat’ Gh “Reedaocsncene ee
turn voyage back—some fifty clarinets Weber
times in an average season, and Bandsman reer pbanternnn x4
each ship will haul in that season Cave; Cpl. tris; Bandsman Cai-
> lender and Bandsman W. Alleyne
a total of about £800,000 tong of (4) Operatic Excerpts — Romeo aa

crude oil,

This is all part and parcel of
the great investments which are
being made by the oil industry in
the development of Canadian oil
resources—on which an estimated
200,000,000 dollars were spent in
1951 alone.

Although oil is fast becoming a
leading item in the Great Lakes
traffic, it is not, however, the
only important bulk cargo. Iron
ore from the Upper Lakes, coal
from the Ohio ports and grain
from the great wheat belts of the
interior are the other chief com-
modities carried. And each year,
the settlers and traders of the
Upper Lakes keep an especially
keen ear cocked for the toot of
the first steamer of the season, For
when the first ship of the year ties
up at Fort William quay, her
Master is always presented by the
local citizens with a souvenir of
the oceasion: a shiny new silk hat!

(10) Rhythmic

Juliet a's ; Gounod
dneluding the duet "Stay but # little

longer’ “The Valse Song” and
‘The Wedding March.”
(5) Nautical Medley—The Jolly Ship-
mates . Barsotti,
(6) Humorous Variations—Three Blind
Mice Lotter

in Which the mice eventually do
get their tails cut off with a carving
knife.

(7) Characteristic On the Dover
Coach 2 6G red oe .. Vinter
Bandsman Walker; Bandaman

Lovelle; Bandsman Bienman,
(8) Potpourri—Pestivalia-Behoes of old
time dances “ Selected.
(9) Wilm MusicTheme Songs of Irving
Rerlin Duthoit.

GOD SAVE THE



Permits To Prospect
For Minerals in
Jamaica Granted

(From Our Own “orrespondent)

KINGSTON, Jamaica,
Four permits to prospect for

But to all Canadians living with- â„¢inerals in Jamaica have been
in earshot of the Lakes that dis- s”anted by the Government and
cordant chorus of the steamers’ ®S a result of prospecting done

sirens is sweet music indeed.

It so far,

it appears possible that

means trade—and thus prosperity certain ores containing chiefly
for their country and every new lead and zinc, and some contain-

note is welcomed. That
there was so much rejoicin
the sonorous blare of the juc’s
siren told first all and swndry that
Albertan oil was speeding Lake-
wards down to Ontario, and that
a new outlet for one of Canada’s
most precious mineral assets had
been forged.



FIRE AT BANNATYNE

Five acres of third crop ripe The Government said that con-
canes were burnt when a fire oc- *iderable deposits of iron-ore had
curred at Bannatyne Plantation, been discovered by the Geological

Christ Chureh, at about 7.45 p.m. Department but no application has
on Wednesday. Tney are the pro- so far been received for permis~
perty of J. B. Marsh and were in- sion to propect for
these deposits,

sured.



SPECIAL

Hemmed Sheets, Superior Quality
Sinisa

vara 100",

BLANKETS
46" x 72".

SILKS. per yd.

| ROYAL

| 12 High Street



is why ing manganese,
when mically worked.

Flowered Bamberg



can be econo~

irritated throat
membranes with
throat-easing medi-
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ts of
Vicks VapoRub,
Really medicated!

Really soothing! .





‘Doctors & Nurses Recommend

m-Buk

The World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

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a













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Digestive
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roduced De Witt's Antacid
ablets, new companion.
ae to their renowned

‘owder. They are the most
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digestive disorders away from
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just dissolve one or two on the
tongue for cee velief
anywhere, Pleasant tasting
De Witt'’s Antacid Tablets
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freshness, In handy tear-off
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Standard Size, 24 Tablets.
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This was officially announced by

the Government this week, who
sald that some evidence of petro~
leum deposits have been revealed
but no oil reservoir has yet been

found,
Negotiations over mining leases
in respect of workable ore~dis-

coveries are now taking place be-
tween the Government
prospectors, mainly Americans,

and the

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PAGE THREE



GLI f tt!
A 4

TRIUMPH OVER —

PAIN —

QUININE—THE FOURTH INGREDIENT IN ‘ANACIN’ :

How does ‘ANACIN’ relieve pain so fast, so effectively? A few years
ago leading scientists discovered that the secret lay in the exact balancing ~
of three famous medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetylsalicylic Acid)
with a FOURTH ingredient—QUININE. And ‘Anacin's' Quinine acts
synergistically with the other medicines to soothe aches, bring down
feverish temperatures, restore a real sens@of well-being !

yee
‘

Pains from fever ? Colds ? Headaches ?

Do you suffer from Toothache ? Rheumatism ? Neuralgia ?
any of these pains ? Menstrual Pains? Then ‘ANACIN * will
bring you immediate relief, cast out

pain with amazing speed !

CAST OFF PAIN—AT ONCE!

Yes, for a very little you can buy a 2-tablet envelope of ‘ANACIN '—
enough to bring you fast relief from a bout of pain! *Anacin ’ is also
available in handy 20-tablet boxes and in bottles of 50 tablets. Share
in the benefits of this great new scientific discovery !

ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIN
GET SOME ‘ANACIN'* ropay:

Doctors and dentists recommend * ANACIN *. In Great,
e Britain alone over 12,000 use it in their surgeries.

*ANACIN’ is sold in Great Britain and South Africa under thename ‘ ANARM!

YOU USE

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PAGE FOUR





LONDON, Marth, 21.

The spring flowers are out and
the days are warm and we are
congratulating ourselves that the
winter was mild and that there
was no fuel crisis. r

Housewives have not even been
chasing “the little man round the



April 4, 1952

Friday,

arene

WANTED: SHIPS.





its belief that the provision of adequate
intercolonial and external shipping ser-
ices and other communications is essen-
tial if progress is to be made towards
federation and recommended that in the
meantime a British Caribbean Committee
should be set up. How little progress has
been achieved towards this end.was em-
phasised by His Honour the Administra-
tor of Montserrat during a public session
of the Regional Economic Committee this
week.

But the future holds no glowing
coal prospects and big business is
worried, What about our indus-
tries, what about our much
heralded export drive? What
about the extra coal our factories
need if we are to pay our way?

Up in Scotland, miners are say-
ing that a five day week is enough
for them. At present, as a con-
cession to Britain’s economic diffi-
culties, they are working a shift
on alternate Saturdays. It means
an eleven day fortnight, or a 434
hour week, as the working day is
74 hours. And this, they say, is
too much.

So the wnole matter will be dis-
cussed at a general meeting of
miners’ representatives from all
over Britain. Only if the Scot-
tish miners are overruled by bal-
lot will they continue to work that
(alternate) Saturday shift.

How the pendulum has swung
in twenty years! The
sleeved worker, no.tonger -fear-
ing unemployment, does not reed
to work hard .for long hours and
at low pay to’keep-his job, And
a good thing, too. But nowadays,
we seem to be ruled by the work-
ers, They make their own terms,
even though the Conservatives sit
at Westminstér.

Our democracy is in a, stage of
slow transition. It will settle down
when the workers forget the “bad
old days” of low wages and un-
employment and join in with a
new pride in their own achieve-
ment and production,


































It was no use increasing production, said
Mr. Ross, if increased products could not
be got out of the island because of lack
of.communications, He was speaking with
experience because Montserrat is at pres-
ent severely handicapped with regard to
expanding its exports of tomatoes to
Canada. It has a steamship service to
Canada once a fortnight.

If the West Indian islands are to become
more closely associated, and they must do
that whether political federation is
achieved in our lifetime or not, the
strength of the chain will be the strength
of the weakest links. And because islands
like Montserrat are so poorly served by
steamship communication their difficulties
and their opportunities and the lessons
they have to teach and to learn from other
West Indian islands are correspondingly
little known. That is a great pity; and it
is symptomatic of a larger evil. Because
if the relations between Montserrat and
Barbados are tenuous beeause of lack of

imposed by successive Chancellors
of the Exchequer, the nation has
briefly voiced its protest and then
accepted the _ inevitable — in
silence, almost, ott

The unhappy circumstances in which we
are placed with relation to Jamaica are
only removed by the enterprise of the

Newspapers have published arti-
cles (with pictures) telling us that
little Jimmy’s father (who lives
in the suburbs) can _ no longer
afford to pay the extra few pence

to take little Jimmy, to the zoo,

steamship service to and from Jamaica by
means of the Colombie and de Grasse.

These are luxury liners and nothing as
elaborate as this has been suggested or
would be requested from the United
Kingdom. Yet how is real progress to be
made towards customs union or political
federation until the bridge connecting
these territories has been built ?

It is a grotesque distortion of fact to
suppose that distances have been obliter-
ated by the advent of the aeroplane. Bar-
bados would have to enjoy the thrice daily
service which the Americans offer be-
tween Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands
before any effect of bridging distances by
air could be observed.



Many of those present
were profoundly moved as
messages of congratulations and
encouragement,, many of them
beautifully engrossed, were pre-
sented to the newly installed
Chancellor, messages from
Harvard and Chicago, from New
Zealand ang South Africa, {rom
Oxford and Campbridge, from
universities in England and Scot-
land and Northern Ireland,
members of the University College
were moved too: it made them
realize that they now had some
claim to belong to the common-
wealth of free universities and that
they must earn their membership.
They were moveq also by the
presence of the Chancellor and
the Vice-Chancellor of London,
their foster mother: it was a sign
that the relationship. between

If federation is to come, it is going to
follow the ships. The conference at Mon-
tego Bay realised that truth. But since
then it has gradually been pushed into
the background. Mr. Ross has brought it
sharply once more into the foreground and
our thanks are due to him for reminding
us of what some of us were forgetting.
Without ships there will be no closer



Catholic Cathedral of Holy Trinity
and in the Anglican Cathedral of
St. Catherine in the ancient
capital, Spanish Town. This latter
is the oldest ecclesiastical building

BRITAIN’S sad condition provides mat-
ter for serious reflection at a time when
the drive towards industrial expansion in
the British West Indies is on. People are
even beginning to talk of a slump in
Britain. The textile industry which is ex-
periencing a real slump throughout the
world is creating much unemployment in
Britain. The light engineering and the
motor industries are forced to contract
their output and now there comes news
of poor conditions in the boot and shoe
and furniture and radio industries.

isting structure dating from 1714
after the first had been destroyed
by hurricane two years earlier.
Some present in the Cathedral
that day heard prayers which they
had last heard in the college
chapels of Oxford and Cambridge
and which they had never expect-
ed to hear in the West Indies. All
these ceremonies ended with the
departure of the Chancellor from
Kingston Harbour in a cruiser,
with members of the staff in
academic dress on the quarter-
deck taking ver leave and the
Chancellor’s™ o' version of the
Royal Standard flying at the fore-
mast. This is all very suitable for
a University College set in an
island in a tropical sea, but it must
be the first time that such a thing
has happened in the long history
of universities.
Race Question

_ For those who do not know the
West Indies it will be as well to
say somevhing of the race ques-
tion. It has been suggested above
that in its earlier history an island
like Jamaica can be compared
with one of the southern states of
the United States of America, but
. the parallel is by no means close

The import cuts initiated by Britain and
followed by France, Australia and other
countries have started something which
will almost certainly reduce the volume
of 1952 trade as eompared with that of
1951. It is excellent to industrialise butt!
unless you can sell what you produce,
what benefit is derived? And where in an
import-cutting world are assured markets
to be found? Industrialisation must be
necessary before it is accepted as a policy.

fertility of the land, whereas industries
encroach on agricultural land and no one
has found nuts and bolts a substitute for
breadfruit or yams.

There is room for carefully planned and
controlled industrialisation in Barbados
but it must never be regarded as a substi-
tute for agriculture or as a panacea for
wholesale raising of living standards. It
must be integrated into the island’s econ-
amy, slowly, and never to the detriment
of agriculture or tourism which are our
permanent assets.

in a recent issue of your news-
paper where the Fire Officer of the
local Police Force is reported to
have stated in an interview that
many of the recent cane fires had
been caused through the heat,
and spme, he said, might have
been caused by careless people
throwing lighted cigarettes from
vehicles.

I have been instructed to state
that if the Fire Officer has been
correctly reported this is a most
surprising statement for him to
make, as it is most unlikely if
not impossible for a cane fire to
start by mere heat, or by sponta-

shirt-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Vaughan Jones

And the, poor typists now walk
part of the way to the office be-
cause they can't afford that extra
penny or so, (What about their
shoe-leather). In the general rise

pepular imagination as an injus-
tice. And that important person,
the “British housewife”, has taken
it as a personal affront. Amongst
the most undemonstrative of
housewives in the world, the Brit-
ish housewife does not worry
much who is running the govern-
ment. But to pay an extra penny
er so on the bus—disgraceful!
And yesterday, a score of men,
bearing the title of the Central
Transport Consultative Commit-
tee, and representing all branches
of industry and commerce, met to
discuss those extra pennies,

POCKET CARTOON
By OSBERT LANCASTER

no more

ve problems
ittle Edison now he's

a = transmitter—he's
appy jor hours of end
just sending radio
the wrong addresses.”



who may bow before the storm
of the angry housewives.

* aK *

We are all getting a little tired
of reading about the split in the

the more flamboyant dailies which
carry a picture of a pretty girl on
the front page and devote their
columns to crime, sport, show
business and the oddities and ec-
centricities of life.

|
|

A change, then, to hear that
the question of the destruction of |
baboons in Gambia has solemnly |
been raised in the House of Lords,
and that an equally solemn assur-
ance has been given that only
those baboons, which are dam-
aging the crops, will be destroyed.

iati corner” who conjures up those in costs, the fare increase is a And in the H * Com ,
THE conference on Closer Association fey t i ¢ S a ‘ nd now, in the House o Cc li f ’ m '
held in 1947 a Monteg Bay expressed ags of poor quality smali thing; but it has caught mons. Sir Herbert Williams hes —the Muslim sect headed by his father the Broad Street & The Vil age, Balmora Gap
i 1 at oO y coal to add to the ration. . i ili

suggested that the starlings which
roost in thousands around Lon-
don’s Trafalgar Square should be
drastically reduced.

The subsequent outcry has been
immediate. “We gould never
poison them” say good - hearted
officials. Shoot them with a gun?
Impossible, Olq ladies would
gather up the dead and dying
birds and attack the marksmen
ewith eir umbrellas. Frighten
them by exploding crackers or
sounding gongs or clappers? The
last state would be worse than
the first, so it looks as if the star-
lings will be reprieved.

* e *

The stories we read of lavish
parties given by our Embassies
and Legations and Consulates
abroad—even if they are exag-
gerated — sometimes makes our
mouths water.

Now Mr, Anthony Eden, For-
eign Secretary, is considering
sending a small team of Civil Ser-
vice inspectcrs (wearing b.ack
coats and pin stripe trousers?) on
a world-wide tour to see if eco-
nomies can be instituted. They
will decide what expenditures
are really necessary, though, it is
said, they will not be too hard on
Britain's missions behind the Iron
Curtain. Private life is dull enough
as it is in Communist countries
without making economy cuts,

* * *

What a joy to find that an un?
spoilt, young 18-year-old girl, a
greengrocer’s daughter, has over-

He * ad ‘ : ‘
inter-communication, those between Bar- te’ Ge pack, “cede aiats: tnd, Mes peceeeniciatank wit ba een eteane oe had seo behalf of his father ranging from ten to thirty
wados arid Jamaica are proportionately | nas been raised and new duties sent to the Transport Commission, expensive finishing schools, no| thousand pounds sterling a time.
greater.

monied background.

So the heart of London’s thea-
‘tre goers has. gone out to her.

She is Shanj Wallis, and is red
haired, demure, and has a tip-

French Steamship Line—Compagnie Gen- The uproar that followed the Labour Party, and the activities tilted nose. o deal sharply with his f ;
erale Transatlantique, which has supplied | recent increase in London’s bus, of Mr. Bevan; in fact it has been After a rapturous first night r ied Py hi : duti . allOMses, Fn cr
Barbados with its only quick regular | 8m and tube fares continues. pleasant — almost — to turn to ‘reception at London’s Coliseum ly carried out his duties quietly and with-

where she sang “The Ocarina” in
“Call me Madam” she packed her
shoes into a suitcase and went
home to Tottenham.

She has not even a special boy
friend, or so she says.



By T.W.J. Taylor

population, African, Chinese,
European, Levantine and Indian.
They differ in colour and physiog-
nomy, but they live together
happily and, as is right and proper,
hardly think of their physical dif-
ferences. So may it remain, There
is no future prosperity or happi-

© mess in’ regions such as these,

where many races have mingled,
if questions of race arise, All must
recognise their equality as men
and work together for the good of
the whole community.

Extra-Mural Studies
There is one Geparunent of the
University Co.lege wnicn raises
special problems and deserves
Special Mention, the Vepartument o.

universities of Great Britain have
assumed extra-mural responsibili-
ties far from their immediate
neighbourhood, but for them far
means at its furthest less than a

the distances are so much greater:
to revert to an earlier parallel, it is
as though the University College of
the South West in Exeter had to
think of organising work in New-
foundland or Constantinople. The
solution is the appointment of a
Resident Tutor in each of the
Colonies to be the chief organizer
of this work, The responsibility
fis great and in some respects goes
beyond what is normally expected
of those who hold extra-mural ap-
pointments, The tutor must be the
local representative of the Uni-
versity College, its cutpost and its
public relations officer, dealing in
the first instance with applications
for admission, enquiries about
syllabuses and a multitude of de-
tails. For the University Coilege
to keep in proper touch with its
Resident Tutors is not easy when
there is so much to be done on the
spot. Nevertheless, there are now
seven tutors at work, from Bgitish
Honduras through Jamaica and the
Lesser Antilles to Trinidad and
British Guiana anq their en-
thusiasm and energy is being re-
warded by the response to their
work, local enthusiasm and energy

The U. C. W. EL. (3)

which they are in personal touch.
Need For Scholarship Funds

They are many other points
which could be discussed; the sup-
port the University College has
already received from generous
benefactors, the further support
that it needs and will continue to
meed. This latter is particularly
‘true in scholarships: the low in-
come for each head of the popula-
tions means not only that many
able boys and girls cannot be
financed at the University College
from family resources, but more
than that, the Government revenue
cannot provide state scholarships
and exhibitions on anything like
the scale which is possible in more
wealthy countries. Generous bene-
faction for this purpose would go
far in assuring the future useful-

association. them was no pretence but an ac- “xwa-Mural Studies, now under jag = wee Pana ee and Nagpur. Sums aden he contributed jointly
tive co-operation, the direction of Mr. Philip Sher- West Indies where mach valuable|DY all the families according to what they Is
There were other ceremonies as lock, a member of the Irvine Com- grain power has saan ee ted in|could afford
be int gan stones were laid miuee, The remarks made above 4,4 oat through lack ae apaeee H 't tal t of a big Koja wedding
e a ° and speeches made and finally on the geography of the Colonies : ere owever, total cost of a big Koja ’
Industrialisation there were services in the Roman show atee a Sroblems lie, The ‘Unity for proper mental training

and discipline.
Conclusion
Let me close on a somewhat dif-
ferent level. Not only do we hope
that the University College will

in the British Caribbean, the ex- hundred miles. In the West Indies become a mental training ground

for the able young people of the
West Indies and that it will be a
centre of intellectual life which
will ‘broaden interests and en-
courage aspirations, but we also
expect that it will provide other
opportunities. Because of its
position, the College has already
had to begin the teaching of cer-
tain trades. It has its own book-
binding shop and its own scientific
workshop and West Indians are
already being trained to bind
books, to blow glass, to work in
wood and metal and to be labor-
atory technicians. All the labora-
tory benches, cupboards and racks,
and all the furniture for under-
graduate rooms and offices are
made from the local woods in the
College’s own joinery shop. (As
the Vice-Chancellor of London re-
marked when she saw this going
on, one of the ‘conditions which it
seems must be fulfilled in choosing
the site of a new universy institu-
tion is that there should be an
example supply of good local

-) As soon as funds can be
obtained, the University College
will undobutedly set up its own
printing press and not only use it
for its own purposes but also, it

News From Britain \l!l(slikeloBes Got j

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952











Playing Cards from_._......606e.
Patience Cards per set ._..._.72c.
CANASTA SETS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

From IAN DUNBAR
CALCUTTA
Prince Aly Khan has discovered what it
is like to be treated as a god.
Sought by beautiful women the world over,
Prince Aly found himself during his recent
tour of India, adored by the Koja community










Aga Khan.

In previous visits to India, Prince Aly has
been kept in the background while gold-tur-
banned devotees prostrated themselves be-
fore his famous father.

The Aga Khan, reputed descendant of the
prophet Mahommed, is more than his peo-
ple’s leader; he is considered sinless, sacred
and above the law.

The Koja Community in India, number-
ing 120,000 is one of the wealthiest in the
world. Its members are reputed to possess
more jewels than anyone else in India.

Originally an excommunicated Hindu
merchant caste in Surat, West India, they
were converted to Islam about six centuries
ago by Aga Khan's evangelising forefather
who became their mullah or high priest.

The sect spread its business activities with
the growth of British power and to-day Koja
merchant princes direct big trading business
in East Africa, Malaya, Burma, Indonesia as
well as throughout India.

Most of the Indian Kojas, however, live
around Bombay where Aly Khan began and
hurriedly ended his tour.

Aly visited community gatherings in the
West Indian capital and flew by private
Dakota to conduct weddings in Baroda and
Bombay State. Wearing faultless tropical]
suitings and a Persian wool cap, he read ex-
cerpts from the Koran and accepted fees on

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He is estimated to have collected £100,-
000 during his eight-day tour. Part of this
money he will give to charity.

Unlike the Aga Khan, who has been known

out fuss. He did not bid up the bridegrooms’
guarantees as the Aga Khan was prone to
do.

All Koja bridgegrooms pledge hig sums on
marriage. Litivorce is so easy among the
Muslims—the husband has only to say “I
divorce you” three times before witnesses—
that it is necessary for the wife to be well
provided for in advance,

At a big Koja wedding the bridegroom
usually donates about £50,000. But this was
not enough for the Aga Kharf at a Calcutta
wedding last year. He told the stupefied
relatives and guests: “Increase the guaran-
tees or I leave.” The perspiring millionaire
father of the bridegroom hurriedly offered
£70,000. The Aga Khan turned towards the
door. A hundred thousand —'he paused—
one hundred and fifty thousand — the Aga
Khan reverently opened the Koran.

Poorer members of the community—small
merchants in the £1,000 a year class—club
together for mass marriages. Two such
ceremonies awaited Prince Aly at Madras







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CREAM

BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY

after the distribution of jewel-studded pre-
sents and a week of feasting, is sometimes as
high as £100,000.

During Prince Aly’s tour a slight hitch
developed over the problem of drink. Kojas
are teetotal but believe wine turns to water
when it touches the Aga Khan’s lips. The
same applies to his son. The Bombay pro-
hibitionist government did not share this
view and Prince Aly officially had a drink-
less stay. Stocks had been laid in for him at
Nagpur, the only place on his tour where it
is still possible to buy liquor.



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10,000 Secret Police To Spy On Farmers

A special corps of secret police 10,000
strong, is to be set up in Communist con-
trolled Rumania to spy on farmers with-
holding crops which they refuse to sell at
Government-controlled prices,

Terms of imprisonment up to 20 years
banishment to forced labour camps and the
death penalty for serious offences are to be
imposed on the unwilling farmers.

ecording to Rumanian refugees who
have broken through the Iron Curtain, this
lain-clothed secret police force, known in
umania as “the terror squad,” is already
operating in Bukovina Province in northern



arettes being thrown into cane
fields from passing vehicles, it
may be of interest to your read-
ers to learn that contrary to pop-
ular belief, it is very difficult to
set fire to canes by lighting them
with a match or a cigarette.
Yours faithfully,
J. ROBERT PETERKIN,
Secretary,
Agricultural Society.

farnum For Finland Fund’
To The Editor, «ne Advocate—

SIR,—The Printer’s devil seems
to have got intp the penultimate





will into effective action and as
evidence of our confidence in him,
the Amatuer Athletic Associa-
tion of Barbados of which I have
the honour to be a Life Vice-
President, has decided to head the
subscription list which opens in
the Advocate this week, with the
sum of one hundred dollars allo-
cated from our slender re-
sources.”

With thanks for the correction, |bank or hidden away.

Yours faithfully,
LOUIS LYNCH,
Hon, Sec. Barbados

$4.82 Olympic Committee.





which is increasing all the time. ; p ;
Even its champions would be the first to | jin later history. There is no colour Mhe best way for the University 2 aeee: oe a Ker Won Rumania. = ; oie
: . ialisation @ bar in the Caribbean Colonies. College to support this work will Indies. Henbe Sonn in the man_|,, Reasons for these drastic measures against Beef Noodle
admit that by itself industrialisation Goes) Children of all races go to the be learnt by experience and it yal trades the University Colle 2|the farmers is that they are held responsible Chicken
not raise the standards of living of a pe eae itech Pateee saa ee ~ has its part to play in the tuture for the failure of the Rumanian monetary Celery
4 I ep ‘e n e wi f th ith ; : : : * Caos
people. Standards of living only rise when | undergraduates population of the and enthusiasm of the people of of the British Caribbean Colonies./reform instituted by former Finance Minis — NOW OFFERED AT
% ducts of industrialisation have an University College contains repre- the Colonies and for more than (Reproduced by kind permission ter Vasile Luca, For, despite the currency Mock Turtle T
the produ fentatives of most of the many half of these the Extra-Mural De- of the Editor of the Universities|"@form, farmers are still refusing to unload Puree Mongole
assured market. strains that have built up the partment is the only one with Review). their hidden stores of grain and crops. Mulliga Tany
1 7 > ein ee wease —| There has been one important result, Mushroem ARDS
Britain today provides the rebattal to Oo R d % however. Finance Minister Luca has been ion
those who proclaim that agriculture is ur eaders ay > prego . oer. ae Mpconad pas Seat Broth
ubsistence stand- at Ploesti, miles from Bucharest is close Asparagus
ete ane rte ~ Sa which agri- Surprising State neote combustion, if this is what paragraph of my letter to you|and pee. z 2 eet that Luca is ae DESSERTS
ng. ‘ 7 the Fire Officer meant by “the dated 3lst. ult. imprisoned in Bucharest.
culture will always have over industry 10 in kee casllae ele Go heat”. j It should read: “In an effort to| Information reaching Belgrade states that Gekr tae
are self evident. Agriculture preserves the | ciety has been drawn to a report eenaenie’ Geman tetat — crystallise vague feelings of good-|the farmers’ refusal to sell at unfair prices CHEESE Chocolate Puddings

fixed by the Government was only one rea- Vanilla Puddings

son for the inflation spiral. Principal cause ioer'y Soon & CPA. - sane
is said to be Russian exploitation of Ruman- Kraft Cheese Grapes
ian oil and other natural resources. Carr’s Cheese Biscuits
According to the same sources of informa- Carr’s Crackers SPECIALS

tion, under the monetary reform arranged Care's | Syaet: Eioeaie

by Vasile Luca, two different rates of ex-
change were enforced depending upon
whether the money was invested in a State

Sheriff's Fruit Puddings
58 per 11'%-oz, tin
Orange Pekoe Tea
50 per } th.
Carib Beer .24 per bottle
String Beans .30 per Ib,
Carrots .30 per Ib.
Gold Braid Rum
3 years old—1.44 pr. bot.



AND ABOVE ALL
J&R
ENRICHED BREAD |

“Favourable” rates were given to those
with bank accounts, but farmers who kept
their savings at home got only nominal rates.

—L.ES.









——
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952



Labourer Not Gui

Discrepancies In
Evidence Pointed Out

Richard Hall a labourer of Middleton, St. George, was

yesterday acquitted by an

assize jury of the charge of

breaking and entering the house of Josephine Farley of the

same district on October 9,

last year, and stealing $40 the

property of Clement Husbands who lived at Farley.
It took the jury only half an hour to arrive at their
decision after Hall’s counsel, Mr. J. E. T. Brancker had

pointed out discrepancies in

the Prosecution’s evidence and

submitted that the Prosecution had failed to prove their

case,

_ Hearing of the case was pre-
sided over by the Acting Puisne
Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice
G..L. Taylor and Mr. F’.. E. Field,
Assistant to the Attorney Gen-
eral, prosecuted for the Crown.

The case for the Prosecution
was that a family of seven lived
at Farley and for a period, on
the day of the offence no one was
at home, Sixty-nine-year-old
Farley and 33-year-old Husbands
were going home at about 11
o'clock when they saw Hall
dashed out of the house and run
through canes. When they went
into the house $40 was missing.

Sgt. Inniss of District “B” the
first witness called, said that on
October 9 at about 1.25 p.m. he
went to Middleton, St. George, at
Farley in connection with the lar-
ceny reported earlier during the
day. Canes were on the eastern
and western sides of the house,
He was shown the shedroof door
near which a latch and staple
were lying. In the bedroom a
press door was open and seemed
as though it had been forced
open. Clothes were strewn over
the bed and those still in the
press were disordered, A knife
whiah was on top of the press he
examined but found no marks
on it. There had been a mark on
the press as though it had been
ripped open, Cross-examined, he
said he had not found any traces
of finger-prints on the knife.

Doors Locked

Sixty-nine-year-old Josephine
Farley of Middleton, St. George,
said that seven lived at the
house where she lived. Four of
them were under eight years.
Before leaving home at about 10
a.m, on October 9, she locked the
doors and closed all the windows.
She was returning at about 11
o'clock to get breakfast for Hus-
bands who lived there, when she
met Husbands just before she
reached home and the two of
them walked towards the house.
Wihen she got near the house she
saw Hall run through the front
door,

She said she knew Hall from
his childhood. Hall had also been
workifg on the same lorry as
Husbands during this crop.

When she went to the house
she saw a door open and on going
into a bedroom, found the press
door open. She also saw a knife.

When she saw Hall he was
wearing a faded Khaki shirt.

Cross-examined she said that
when she first saw Hall she ran
back leaving Husbands near the
house,

She said that the day was a
Tuesday and on the previous Sat-
urday Husbands had shown her
the $40.00, tied it with a piece of
twine and put it in a black shoe
in the press. Between Saturday
and Tuesday all seven of the fam-
ily were living at the house,

Left For Work

Clement Husbands, 33-year-old
agricultural labourer who lives at
Farley said that on October 9 he
left home at about 7 o'clock to go
to work about two miles away.
He said he did not take breakfast
at any particular time and that
day he returned home for break-
fast at about 11 o'clock. Farley
and he were going home together
when he saw Hall run from the
house and go through the canes.
He went into the house and saw
his clothes scattered about the bed
and when he searched the press
his $40 which he had left wrap-
ped in a piece of paper under-
neath clothes were stolen. The
press, he said, was broken,

He had put the money there on
the Saturday and had left it there
on.the morning before he left
home. The money consisted of
dollar bills,

When he saw Hall, Hall was
wearing a khaki shirt and a white

pants. He had seen Hall earlier
while at work.
Cross-examined, said that

e
after Farley and he Rea seen Hall
running from the house, Farley
went back to call a neighbour and
he went imto the house where
Farley came back and found him,

A very smart



Weatherproofed ty

He had not tied the money with
twine. He had told Farley that he
had put the money in the press
only after he had put it there. He
conceded that he had said during
the preliminary hearing that he
had not told anyone he had put
away the money. He denied he
had told the Magistrate $30.00 but
admitted telling the Magistrate the
money was not near the shoes but
between the clothes.

When he had seen Hall on the
first occasion he had seen him for
about half an hour, while he
(Husbands) was cutting grass.

Cutting Grass

Christopher Moseley, a 4l-year-
old labourer, said that he and Hus-
bands had been working together
about 8.30 a.m. cutting grass when
he saw Hall going along Hope’s
Private Road. The direction in
which Hall was going would have
led him either to his own home
or Husbands’.

Cross-examined, he said that
Husbands and he had only been
working together for about two
weeks. When he saw Hall he
was walking leisurely.

To the court, he said Hall was
dressed in a white pants and white
shirt.

Cpl. Stephen Edwards then gave
evidence as to the accused being
arrested, and his giving an alibi.
This was corroborated by P.C.
Lloyd Ashby. .

Mr. Fie{d for the Crown put it
to the jury that if they believed
Husbands and White who said
they saw Hall while they were
cutting grass, they would have to
disbelieve Hall's alibi that he was
not in St. eGorge on that day. The
consideration that Hall’s alibi to
the police had not been given on
oath like the witnesses whose de-
meanour they had seen, would help
them in deciding whom they
would believe. i

He said that the discrepancies in
the evidence of some of the wit-
nesses was doubtless due to the
fact that they did not have the
advantage of a good education.

Prejudice

He said that Hall had been seen
running from the house. There
had been no question of Farley
and Husbands being prejudiced

@ On Page 6



Students Receive Certificates At

BARBADOS



BALANCING HIS BICYCLE



ONE of the Boodhoo Brothers balances on his bicycle.
cycle he has his feet on the front wheel.

To control the

Acrobats Join In Floor Show

THE Boodhoo Brothers of British Guiana will. give a
performance of hand balancing and acrobatic stunts when
the South American Variety Troupe stage their Floor
Show at Queen’s Park at 8.30 o'clock to-night. The show is
sponsored by Canada Dry.

The troupe is led by Harvey Rogers who visited Bar-
bados a few yeats ago. He will give a series of Spanish
dances with his partner, Bonnie Edinboro,

The Boodhoo Brothers are also contortionists, high wire
walkers and stunt riders. Also with the show are Cecil
Green, a lyric tenor, winner of the 1951 Singing Compe-
tition in British Guiana, Tom Brandt, ballad singer of
Gipsy Caravan programme over Z.F.Y., Enid Kitigy and

.. Ivor Hunte, accompanist and a pianist of the New Luckies
Orchestra of British Guiana,



Homecraft Instructors’ Course

Addressing visitors to the Housecraft Centre yester-
day the occasion of the presentation of certificates and

prizes to the students of

bat

making, sweets and preserves.
Needle*s to say that stimulated
interest in the classes and he was

= . re?
Instructors’ 4 most popular student. During

the Homecraft

Course, Mrs. R. N. Turner, wife of the Colonial Secretary, the first term, the students eried

said that the course was fillin

ga gap that had been left open out fer the amount of work they

far too long in the community. She pointed out that the »#d to cover both in theory and

purpose of the course was
methods to many and that

selected few who had attended the course to do so.

After the welcome address was
given by Maj. Glindon Reed, Di-
rector of Education, there was a
report by Miss Ivy Alleyne, Or-
ganiser of the course, Miss M. I.
King moved a vote of thanks and
the work was open to inspection

Miss Ivy Alleyne said:

Honourable Colonial Secretary,
Mrs. Turner, Director of Educa-
tion, Ladies and Gentlemen, we,
the permanent and visiting staff
and students of the Housecraft
Centre join in extending a hearty
welcome to you for your presence
with us this afternoon, We
would specially like you, Mrs.
‘Turner to’ know how much we
appreciate your acceptance of
our request to distribute our cer-
tificates and prizes. We are con-
scious of the interest you have
taken in our progress and we are
grateful.

This afternoon’s function cli-
maxes a course of study which was
formally epened on Friday 14th
Sept., 1951, by Mr. E. C. M. Theo-
balds, the then Acting Director of
Education, Some of our visitors
here this afternoon were present
with us on that morning, when the



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to spread Domestic Science eae and, as general.y is: the
i : ase, the word examination, which
it would be the duty of the was’ to take place at the end_ of
that term, started from early to
deputy Director in an inspiring make some of them worried, but,
and helpful address quoted from as the weeks rolled on and their
Proverbs the qualities of a good skill improved and _ confidence
woman. This gave us something at was strengthened, they took every-
which to aim, and just added the thing in their stride ang exam re-
necessary finish to the Scheme. sults showed 86.5 % Ist place to

Subjects Covered 51 % 19th place, The other student

The course is called the Home- although only receiving 34.7 %
craft Instructors’ Course, and cov- had still shown noticeable im-
ered such subjects as Laundry- provement.
work, Housewifery, Nutrition Exhibits

Cookery, Cake and pastry making, The Students expressed a desire
Sweets, preserves, baby care and to Send some exnipits to the An-~
Invalid cookery, Pattern drafting, nual Exhibition, I did not dis-
sewing, Handicrafts, Smocking, courage them, but alowed them
Groups Organisation, Home Nurs- fyj] scope to make their decisions,

ing and Public Demonstrations in mppjg they did, and entered guava
Baby care and cookery. l .

and golden apple jelly, golden
The course was designed to apple and mixed fruit jam, coconut

give triining to Primary School , a | ttle 1 dd ale
Teachers and Representatives of and guava chew, “Thos obnea
Clubs and Old Scholars’ Asso- j<1 and 2nd prizes for fud ge and
ciations. These would then be in Ist prizes for ac Ide a in ll
a position to assist in the field 201, bise® for golden apple jelly
of Adult Education. Twenty ° jam and stewed guave s.
students were selected for train- 17 the training in Stitchery,
ing 13 of whom were Primary each student had to make a child’s
School ‘Teachers and tie other dress, and in an effort to send
seven, representatives of clubs. Xmas Cheer to some poor chil-
In addition to that number, 47”, we made up and distributed
there was one male who train- Parcels to the St. Thomas’ Nutri-
ed in cookery, cake and pastry “on Centre, There was then
month’s break, after which
started on our term,

This was more a practical term
wher the students progressed on
the basic principles laid down in
the first term. They undertook
all types and methods of cookery,
laundry,/ cake making, preserves,
housewifery (including electrical
repairs, painting of stores. and
furniture, daily and thorough
cleaning of the students dormi-
tories at Erdiston College and
budgeting), Invalid cookery, mak-
ing of bodices in the smocking sec-
tion, night dresses in the Pattern
Drafting, dresses in the Sewing
and various articles in Handicrafts,
They also had talks from visitors,
one of which was on cooperatives,
kindly given by Mr. Beckles,
Cooperatives Officer.

Pubiic Demonstrations

In addition six students went out
weekly iri twos to give Public
Demonstrations in Baby Care and
Cookery at the Eagle Hall ¢ linic,
St. Thomas’ Nutrition Centre ana
Grace Hill Oid Scholars’ Associa-
tion. They also went to the Gen-
eral Hospital for Bed Making and
Bathing and were given Aids to
comfort ‘in Bed, and to the Mater-

a

we






Pah

nity Hospital for Urine Testing and
Administration of Medicines.
They have also had film shows

on Nutrition, and in their Group
Organisation have visited a poor
home, a middle class home and

the jay and Pine Housing
Schemes. They have organised
| and run a Brains’ Trust, a de-

| bate, a Club Social, a picnic and
} an Exhibition.
These activities



are just men-
jtioned to show the range of
jtraining aimed at and I am
pleased to be able to say that we
{lecturers can feel some measure
jof satisfaction over the results
| mB On Page 8

ADVOCATE



lty Of House Breaking

, 12-YEAR-OLD BOY _

FALLS FROM TRACTOR:
BEATH BY MISADVENTURE

A nine-man Jury at District “A” yesterday returned a
verdict of death by misadventure to Coroner H. A. Talma

when the inquest into the c

death of 12-year-old Fitzgerald Carrington of Cole Hole,

St. George ended.
Carrington was detained
2 p.m. on April 1 after he f

being driven along Locust Hall Hill, St. George, at about
1.30 p.m. the same day. He died at the Hospital five hours

after he was admitted.

Mr. Nicholas Deane, Manager of
Locust Hall Plantation, St. George,
told the Court that the plantation
owns a tractor G-238 and a man
named Basil Proute drives the
tractor. On April 1 Proute was
the driver of the tractor which
Was taking canes from the planta-
tion.

Proute is not allowed to take
passengers or to permit anyone on
the tractor. Sometime between 1
p.m. and 2 p.m, on April 1, he
heard that a boy was injured and
went to Locust Hall Road where
he saw the tractor and trailer, He
then went to the plantation yard
and there saw the boy (the de-
ceased) whom he took to the Gen-
eral Hospital. The name of the
boy was Fitzgerald Carrington
and his age was between 10 and
12,

Bruises On Arm

There were bruises on the right
arm, side and leg and the boy was
groaning as if he was in pain, He
remained at the General Hospital.

“T have spoken to the deceased
on several occasions about riding
on the tractor, The deceased was
not employed at the plantation,”
Mr. Deane told the court.

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination on
April 3 at the General Hospital
said the apparent age was 12.
There was extensive bruising on
the chest and haemorrhage around
the liver. Death was due to shock
and haemorrhage. The injuries
described were consistent with a
heavy object passing over that
part of the body where the liver
was.

Dr. Cato said the body of the
deceased was identified to him by
Charles Carrington who said the
deceased was his brother,

Charles Carrington said that he
last saw his brother alive on April
1, Then on April 2 he identified
the dead body of his brother at the
Hospital Mortuary to Dr, Cato.

Joseph Greaves of Prospect, St.
James, said that he was driving
the tractor G-238 on April 1 about
noon, The tractor was pulling oné »
trailer laden with canes and he
was driving the tractor from Lo-
cust Hall to Applewhaite Factory.
When he started out he noticed
that there were two boys on the
tractor behind the driver's seat,
One of the boys was called “Bow-
ring.”

Tractor Stopped

While on the way down Locust
Hall Hill one of the boys told him
to stop the tractor and he stopped
the tractor, Looking back he saw
the deceased lying in front of the
right front wheel of the trailer.
He took the deceased from the
front of the wheel. The deceased
said, “Lord have mercy”. One of
the legs of the deceased was
bruised and he took him to Locust
Hall Plantation and Mr. Deane
took him (the deceased) to the
Hosvital.

The wheel of the tractor did not
pass over the body. The trailor
was on the left and proper side of
the road.

To the Jury—Greaves said that
he could not describe how the boys
were sitting on the tractor. He
was asked to drive the tractor by
Proute who waég taking his “break-
fast” at the time,

Otho Corbin (14) of Cole Hole,
St. George, said that he knew the
deceased .On April 1 at about
1.30 p.m. he was with thegleceased
on the tractor G-238 owned by
Locust Hall Plantation. They got
on the tractor in a canefield and
he was on the left side of the
tractor while the deceased was on
the right side of the tractor with
one foot on the bolt which con-
nects the tractor to the trailer.
While the tractor was travelling



Death Cf Two Traitors

For four years the grey
the Rue Lauriston, just off

was a house of horror. It was the headquarters of the most
brutal of the German Gestapo inquisitors.
Betrayed men and women of the French Resistance

went in there upright and si

tered and broken to die in concentration camps.

They came to pass through the
torture chambers of their Gestapo
questioners and left as hundreds
of shattered wrecks between 1940
and 1944,

Mot the bravest nor the cunning
of the Resistance groups could dis-
cover who betrayed their members
and led them to the terror house
of the Rue Lauriston.

After the Liberation two French-

men were arrested, Abel Danos
and taymond Monange, both
pre-war criminals with police

records as armed thugs and black-
n-ailers

In twhb years of investigations
they were identified as the French
agents of the German killers of
tue Lauriston,

Armed Escort

At six o'clock on March 17, the
gates of Fresnes prison opened
and Raymond Monange with an
armed mobile escort was driven
out.

At the.same time
Abel Danvos
La Sante prison. Both

linked by radio, met
promptly at seven o’clock at the
great grim gates of the high-
walled military fort of Montrouge,
just south of Paris. Five minutes
later

with another
escort was taken

fron

escorts,

Monange and Danos fell
before a firing squad while a host
of official witnesses watched, Some
of them were those who had been
tortured and broken in that grey

ormer Gestapo building nearby.
Three hours later the cafes of









Mrs. Housewife

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR



TABLE BUTTER?

WHY NOT TRY

GLOW-SPREAD

TABLE MARGARINE

ircumstances surrounding the

at the General Hospital about
ell from a tractor which was

to the Factory the hat of the de-
ceased was blown off and he (the
deceased) tried to catch the hat
and he fell.

The deceased fell on his right
side and he (Corbin) shouted to
the driver to stop. The wheel of
the trailer did not roll over the
body of the deceased. This was





llb Package at 62c. each

the right front wheel of the “
tractor.
At this stage Coroner Talma 3 Tins at 60c. Ib.

















presented the facts of the inquiry
to the Jury who returned a vor-
dict of death by misadventure.

Gill Elected

Churchwarden
For St. Peter

Mr, A. A. Gill, last year’s Jun- \
ior Guardian for St. Peter's Ves-|}
try, was elected Churchwarden
for the ensuing term by a major-
ity vote when the St. Peter's
Vestry met yesterday. He was
proposed by Mr. C, H. P. Jordan
whose nomination was seconded
by Mr, E. L, Bannister,

Mr. Gill succeeded Mr. T. S.
Chandler, The Vestry unani-
mously accepted his nominations
of Mr. G. G. Gill ang Mr. E, L.
Bannister as Senior anq Junior
Guardians for the ensuing term.

Before the election of a Church-
warden, Mr. T. 8. Chandler laid
a report of the work he did in the
parish during his term, It was
not questioned.

The Vestry made the following
appointments :—



Contains Vitamins A & D

HARRISON'S teu 5.
“ AUTOBRITE™

THE AMAZING NEW SILICONE PROCESS

CAR POLISH.

Our Trial Quantity sold out in a week
but a more appreciable shipment has
just been received.

THE PRICE 1S UNALTERED —
ONLY $1.60 PER BOTTLE

Dén't Forget — “AUTOBRITE” contains 4%
Silicones and it is .. .

GUARANTEED TO OUT-SHINE
AND OUT-LAST ANY CAR
POLISH YOU EVER USED.

It gives a glass-hard finish impervious to
torrential rain, blistering sun and
corrosive salt air and the Silicone finish
preserves its hard gleaming lustre for
months.



Sanitary Board
Mr. G. G. Gill, Mr. E. L. Ban-

nister, Mr. T. E. Corbin, Mr.
C. A. Thornton and Mr. T. S,
Chandler.

Highway Commissioners
Mr. C. A. Thornton, Mr. A. A.
Gill, Mr. D. V. Jemmott,

Organ Tuner
Mr. Lionel Gittens.

Delegates For The Appoint-

ment of Church Clergy
Mr, C. A. Thornton,

Delegates For Congregation
Mr, E. Jordan and Mr, E. C.
Bayne (St. Peter's Parish Church).
Mr. H. I. Gill and Mr. John
Alleyne (All Saints Chapel).
Mr. H. C. Clarke-Holman and
Mr. J. C. Parris (Boscobelle |
Chapel).

Land Rates Laid
Al $4,59 Per Acre

The St. Peter's Vestry laid the |
rates for land at $4.59 per acre
and for trade at 27 cents in the
dollar when they met yesterday.
This is an increase of 30 cents
per acre on land, and of a half-|
cent on trade. |

Last year, the Vestry budgeted
for $57,000 to cover their expenses
during that session but this year
they have bndgeted for $62,467,
which is an increaso of $5,467 on
last year’s sum,

Included in the estimates this
year is a sum of money for the
purpose of granting salary raises
to their whole-time employees.
The rates set out are :—

Parochial employees within the:
salary scale $1—$49—15%. |

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $50—$74—10%.

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $75—$100—6%.

Parochial employees within the
salary scale $100 and onwards-—
3%.

v



e
“AUTOBRITE” Cleans, Polishes and Pro-
tects in half the time with half the labour,

ge Just Spread It On and Wipe It Off—
that’s all!

e
OBTAINABLE ONLY AT:

HARRISON'S "ot", 52"

Tel. 2364.

PINEAPPLE
C








TODAY’S
SPECIAL

at
KNIGHT'S
PHOENIX
SODA
FOUNTAIN

PARIS.
, flat stone-fronted building in
the once gay Champs Elysees,

lent and were taken away bat-

the Champs Elysees began to fill
up in the spring sunshine. The
civil servants of the Ministry of
the Interior were just beginning
their work in the building in the
Rue Lauriston.

R
E
A
M
S

—Express,

SUN
SHADES













it
For
| Originally This Week }
BIDDY’5 ASPARAGUS SOUP—per tin $33 — $.30
} LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP—per tin 3 = .32 ,
MARELA PLAIN OLIVES—per Jar 1.60. ~~. 1.00 )
MARELA PLAIN OLIVES-——per Jar 1.08 — .96 i
CRAWFORDS CREAM CRACKERS—
per tin ..... bby caved uae “ 1.64 — 1,40 }
AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS—11—15 lbs i
all different styles and } NG Titah, sadthe.«-supiir's on + nevi ‘ 1.61 — 1.36 i
types ‘available DENMOR LEG HAM in 4-Ib. tins—per tin.......... $5.65 Mi
From 727 | DENMOR LEG HAM in 2}-lb. tins—per tin 3.76
} IMPERIAL BRISKET BEEF—4-lb, tin—per tin .... 4.20
to about $9.00 |, CHASE & SANBOURNES INSTANT COFFEE—per tin -87
iW) KOO GUAVA JELLY—2-Ib tin AT
Call TODAY at your 1%. LION BLACK PEPPER—1 oz. caster .34
JEWELLERS 1 LION WHITE PEPPER—1 oz. caster 49
|} LION CURRY POWDER—4 oz. tin . Teoust'hs kan 46
Y. De LIMA LION PIMENTO—4 oz. tin 5 ica eae .36

COCKADE FINE RUM
& €O., LTD. caieal sa )
ey tate Pe STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO. LTD. ¥

SSS














PAGE SIX



















































RARRADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952



































a
. ~ . * â„¢ 4% rs
CLASSIFIED ADS ron MENT | remue sates | Labourer Not Guilty
. 4
TELEPHONE 2508 HOUSES | REAL ESTATE @ From Page 5 Farley had said that Husbands had
ree i tigneniibnninaestais a... 5% aevest Mall oe there being any tied the money with twine and she
DIED ' * i BRACK COPTAGE on St James Coad | ow Against So there was saw when he put it in a shoe in
| FOR SALE geetect a Evek A ween aed a & WAN “> @a8e way Uey should select the press while he had said no one
WALCOTT—On Std April, 1952 at his) Tckgheee. Gelade, wemed eet iine anes SU tempi Sed Laan wae to instead of had seen when he put the money
lence, Britton’s Cross Road, St Avenged ea Peon, tox Gem Pak tein im waxtods else @f the melghbour. among some Clothes in the press.
Bicnae' Charles i winston wend AUTOMOTIVE cone. Apely, Beectiiads, S debees of : oh He reminded the jury of other
1 e his rother’s ‘ ‘ . lw 5 . “ + be ob y »w C
conan eae . Michael | ae - <= | phone mn 4d at MELA YN.” Pooo beet Cid Wath be Unat White who discrepancio’, cute, oa one witness
srrake Em, to-day for the Westbury AUSTIN VAN—One (1) t@ BLP. Avs a . . s Sela - : ak Was WeRNty a. white saying Ha as a shirt
Cemetery 1 2 im good working order, Phone we GA bl - Tee : pee a ae tamu vd Witte hoasel? had con- and another he in and
Sylvia Walcott (wife); Caroline we. 4821, D. V. Scott & Co, we. a ds jen st cae Se, on oman s ee = Bt . s is ho poasititity-ealled the told them there ‘wae ho evidence
eott (mother) _— 2 ‘ieobew Dita a ha a LOGwPR CON VeRMRCER. ry term _— » & arn tb “ae § od Shake a white @tyiet, They at all before them for them to
tc aun "| “GAR-FORD PREFECT: in excellent) 0 Bee TH erie, laboun sock conning we emember, too, that at the convict Hall.
—-— } running order, good tyres a “Sam ye a ee es wt wow pretoaaary hearing after Hus- ‘The jury retired half an hour
milage nde 10, miles ner UNGALO y bewky construc | Paden led Badia ; te
IN MEMORIAM millet staan, Dial 3163 and Gay em-| Gone well Buvgalew situated at Caasiva | balvk Kuwhen os weave asi | Buataets tuna said the money he had afterwards -— returned with the
| cept Saturday 1.4 3m. | Rowe Road, St. Michael compraing open are Ones — ee SS Ee ek Deast > - he = eg 9 verdict of not guilty.
EVELYN—In loving memory of our dear Verandah, Drewing sad Dining room, | Deo eee aamenta’ | PARSON and afterwards sa
Fe ee a | Sa an” Coarteee Gate] tae eas tha tatcanet Wee [Gn these teen god cient eee | , s '
fed o h April, on sly to th “ourtesy Gar aiences a van Dy ‘ ~ ~ “hah tebe aael t 2 try h Se
eo cea years have past, yet your; U@. ABey te whe © 2.452-4n.] Spacious yard and land available tur} aed Pack grownts LS — wei oath int ee 4 ll =. — 18-Mont ntence
re ee ee nen sf members a a —— Ture SON & BANFIELD “"Paroee len by appelmtment with Mire | Prameeuts ne reve enone eae te
’ fe and Clarendon : “AR—FORD MERCURY. One secon Apply “HINSON N wer : | ” .
a. 4.4.52—1n. |, CAR Mercury, 12 model, new} and on premises any afternoon deiween agg gg Sa yt "aetieetee * | yond all reasonable doubt and said a p the Chief Tt
oistery and in good working order. / 4—¢ 1a : aioe Gantaet | | that if was not because a man hap- * ce
Toe Tadbatcs ‘i Agencies, (Telephone | mer ee ‘eee anes ae » os uted P nut er uel of
WANTE ppl 1453-6n.| MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—witn| A. F. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory, | pened to be charged that he ne- Fane a eee whi fey
: 08 é cs d pn tae Blea ‘Gonbabenb. dial S187 Between 5 p.m, and & 5 cessarily was guilty of the crime guilty GeFier in the of
— | Gillman Sedan 1951 model 1m] for further particulars. Apply to Alma] ©" ay day Monday to Friday, inclusive | conwmitted. It was for them to de- . in
HELP < ition. Done only 6,000 miles. Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. Worthing | cide whether the witnesses for the ng and entering .
Se asa : ? paca" ie Saee-ste Be ae Crown had reached that standard faoaths’ enpetesnmtea wil ‘ton
ASSISTANT PAADES . a , OFFICE SPACE—Available over Lash AUCTION that they could have perfect con- rane Atns Alleyne had two Tous
Company iivinages. Experience man-} GAR—FORD PREFECT. One second} tq;'s at Prince William Henry St. Apply te ———--- | idence in therm. ; convictions for petty lareen
Sdebeat ih ok ti pilit 4 Ford Prefect in good working T. B. Marshall 4.4.52—1n UNDER THE SILVER He pointed out that while Far- . .y y * iy.
a anton, iit tate ose Jorder. Apply pados Agencies, Tel-} ————_ pee eeea nee ear ee Tey had said that she had left the
to manage cottor r ' r. Apply Barbado ‘ ev had said
Saodeae opty rating experience. at | shome “¥0e | ape HR NUMER SMES TAD. | py recombi aten eT taovas agents | Howse to. go and tell a neighbour |, Seventeen-year-old Fitz, Gerald
seiuy required to Box 21, Tiym ae : like | Lope Street. Dial 4811 th ae pe ‘ to {and had left Husbands outside the Haynes of Hi tt Hall who
Mortserrat, B.W.1 3.4.52--6 CARS—Minor Two-Door Saloon Lower Broad Street $.do-40. ' Ve will sell today at Robert Thor hac d returned and found him pleaded guilty er in the ses
aad 4). 11d. Warehouse, Pnirchild Street puse an ee
GARD! /—Apply before 9.00 a.m { Sa! Very €00d CONKILION | i 2 BALES WRAPPING PAPE! sill outside, Husbands had said sions to indecent assault and who
a. ae Fende. Five Hill. - Dodge, (1938) two-seater, excellent for |" "TO oe So "ed nee Sale 12:30 o'clock. Terms Cast o when she left, he went into had been given a good character
3 eee exten” 1Ap0n, Bt, Se ee eeeationt ” pelnine. Boxee. C/o Aa.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |:ho house and she returned and by the ation Officer, was put
a ——— nn | Sean a 59 tion: ; ths.
TAILORS—Jourheymen Tailors, (Jacket purposes, Wolseley (1947) 6 bp . = voeate Co, 3.4.52—2n Auc re found him in the house. Again on probation for 18 moni
Hands) only those with experience need | 15,000 miles. in very € col "ROOSEVELT —Ma i Coast Road.
y _ S. MAFPEI & Co., Ltd.} Ford Prefect, 17,000 miles, very fine| Ri xwel
ret FCS: Si 26 3.52t.f.n |cadition. FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ltd.| Fully furnished, including Frigidaire, UNDER THE SILVER

24,52—6n.| Telephone and Re@iffusion.
Ist May. Phone 22%.

Available
44.52—t.f.n

SE Telephone 4504
YOUNG MAN for our office, who must; _

be capable of using a typewriter, Good

salary with advancement commensurate

with obility to right applicant.
MOUNT GAY DISTILLERIES L4d.,

2.4.52—t.f.n







ELECTRICAL

WHITESANDS — St, Lawrence Gap;
fully furnished for May and June. For
particulars phone 3.4.52—n.

A



~PYE BATTERY SETS—A few of these
Call early and
MAFFEI

ry popular Radios left w
oid disappointment. P. C. S

Dial 2787

Shepherd St



Co. Ltd

\
j

a E Minor Tourer 7,000 miles, Morris
{ 3.4.52—4n
i

PUHLIC NOTICES LOST & FOUND















Arm Chairs, Dining Table
upright Chairs, Mir
; Tables ali in
Pyrex Ware,
Lai




























HAMMER CHANCERY SALE

On Tuesday Sth by order of Mrs. A. | BARBADOS

Harris, we will sel) her furniture at The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at the stration
Mannings House" Holetown, St. James,| omece, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum
hich imeludess—Bergére Settee and 2/ ond on the date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on h

eac!
succeeding Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold. Full
Particulars on application to me.

Defendant

(to seat 8
Hatstand, ornament
Glass, China
Vases, Jar-

mahogany

T Services JOHN WESLEY BELL
‘ea Services.



prreiaceaee niere and ‘Fruit Stands in Cromium Plaintiff EDWIN LEE BELL
MISCELLANEOUS Lemonade and Cock-tail Sets; Pits.| pRopERTY: All that certain piece or parcel of land gituate at Stewarts Hun in
nen eee ale ea Casseroles, Soup and Fruit Spomns the parish of St. John and Island of Bar jos aforesaid contain’
PLECTION NOTICE. | CROOKES Halibut Liver Oil in 5 c. c. LOST | Cutlery &c, Binoculars, Oil Painting be admensurement one acre and twenty two perehes Abutting an
Barbados Eleméntary Teachers’ Assoc. | 4 15 cc. bottles; also in bottles of lena Pictures; Planter's Desk, Congolium, bounding on the south on lands of Mount Pleasant Plantation on
Two candidates having tied for one), -ules. Can be obtained from ycur DIAMOND. CLIP—-On the St. James] pine Double Bedsteads, Spring Mattress the North and on the West on lands of Mr, B, L, Barrow and on
place, there will be an election next} \ et or E. Johnson & Co., Prince |Coast. Finder rewarded, Please return’) Folding Spring Cot; Jalousie and Folding the East on lands now or late of Mr, John Weatherhead or however
Saturday, April 5th at 12 noon at the) soi, Henry Street, Agents for|to Advertising Dept. C/o Advocate screens; Verandah Chairs; Go Cart, else the same may abut and bound Togethér with the messuage or
Church House, _, |CROOKES LABORATORIES. Phone 2601 2.4.52—3n.| Ware Press, Coal Stove, Linen, Lawr dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings and erections
o Eat = the eae he between 8 and 9 a.m 2 SD) mn | Mower Garden Tdéols and other thereon erected and built standing and being with the appur-
therefore invite: to attenc or Oy cicmene } items. tenances.
Purpose of electing one member. CROOKES LACTO—CALAMINE | LO- TAKE NOTICE jams 1120. d%elock, Terms CASE casita’ titi, dea
_ . TION. The ideal preparation for a N TR MAN co. SE RICE 450. :
Hon. Secretary, skin irvitatjons and the complexion MORNING MIST BRANKER, OT aus » | DATE OF SALE: 18 April, 1952 i) aint
B.E.S.T.A. | cenerally. Can be obtained from your] That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH ccm Registrar-in-Chancery.
Drnggist or E, Johnson & Co., Princ€} AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LIMITED, a 2.4.52—3n
William Henry Street, Agents | for! Company incorporated and existing under
















The Annual General Meeting of the
Barbados Basketball Association will be
heid at the Y.M.C.A. on FRIDAY, 4th
April at 7.30 p.m.

$ y 4452—2n

All clubs desirous of ee shor Street, City,
send their applications to Secretary, DUREX are now
YÂ¥.M.C.A. so that they may be elected) itainable from E. Johnson & Co.

affiliated clubs by the General Meeting
28.3.52—6n.



WEYMOUTH CLUB
: NOTICE .
1s are hereby reminded of the

i General Meeting which takes
plaee tonight, Friday 4th April 1952 at
1,49 at the Hurd Memorial, James Street
L. G. WiTSHIRE,

Hon. Secty.
* 4452—1n



—_———
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Gilpid Harding
eeper of Baxters Road, St, Michac

for, permission to se Spirits, Malt
Liquors &c. at a board and shingle shox
at “corner Crichlows Alley, Chapman’
Lafie, City.

aDated this 2nd day

F H. A. TALMA Eso

© (Signed) FREDERICK MURRELL,

~ for Appiicant

MB .—This..application will be cc
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held



of April, 1952



at Police, Cowt, District “A” on Tue
day, the..iGth..day ot April, 10% at
11 -o’cloeky aan,
H. A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist “A”
+. ee 4.4,52—In






WHAT THEY SAY

“L.wenld.pot buy or rent a
house where I could not get gas
for cooking."

We are sure this lady only voiced
the opinion of hundreds of other
housewters.

If youlpaydp"t cot a Gas cooker
yet, callemmd see those in the
% showroom”

You can Book one from our next





SSO SSOOO OO

>
$ shipment.-= x
s ‘



OLLIE OOOO.
So

FURNISH TO-DAY.

The Morey Saving Way

2POOS



FULL-PANELLED and othe:
Mahogany Bedsteads; some in Outstanding
Designs—Vanities with Vario
Mirrors- Wardrobes and Dresser-
robes
* MAHOGANY, Birch pnd Dent

bles for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
wing, Kitchen everal shapes
end sizes—Sid ards, Cabinets
“or China, Kitchen and Bedroom
WITES, and Separate Drawing
m pieces in Morris, ‘Tub, Ber-
ere and Kush, and Many other
ice Things NEW AND RENEWED

L.S. WILSO

* SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069





FURNITURE
AUCTIO



PRELIMINARY
" ANNOUNCEMENT

‘ We are instructed by
Mr. W. D. Chariton to dis-
pose of all his Modern
* Furniture and effects at
? ‘WHITEHALL FLATS,
Codrington Hill, St. Michael
at 11.30 a.m. on
WEDNESDAY, 9th April
e
AUCTIONEERS

John M4. Biadon
& co.

A.F.S., F.V.A

one 4640. Plantations



Building

poms eel aie







CROOKES LABORATORIES, Phone beg
between 8 and 9 a.m.



Mrinee William Henry Street.

8 and 9 a.m

for sale

2.4.52—4n.





CURRANTS—43 cents per Ib. Saltans

ondon Rubber Co.
2.4,52—4n



GOODYEAR TYRES—We now offer
in our store the famous Good-
year Lorry and Passenger Car Tyres.
We will put them on your car or lorry
free. K. R. HUNTE & Co. Ltd., Lr
Broad St. Dial 5136

3.4.52—3n.

——S—__—_——————

“GLADIOLI & DAHLIA"—Orders are
vow being taken for Gladioli and Dahlias
or delivery in December 1952, parties
nterested in booking please phone 4442,
T. Geddes Grant, Ltd. 18.3.52—14n

————————
JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts,
neluding — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid
Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens Also
Pressure Stoye parts. Enquire Auto Tyre
Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets
Phone 4 20.3.52—t.f.n.
OIL—The world’s finest motor oil
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
. Your vehicle deserves the best.
“Found wherever fine cars
17.2.82—t.f.n

REFRIGERATOR—One (1) Electrolux
“erosene Ot] Refrigerator, 4 cu. ft,
spacity. In perfect working order.
Mrs, Keith Webster, Harrisons
Plantation, St. Lacy 29.3.52—6n











eevee, | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

TRANSFER AND REMOVAL
The app



sation of Dallas Marshall of
Well Ho St. Philip, the purchaser
f Liquor Li se No. 625 of 1952 granted

Wilbert Green in respect of a Board
ind Gelvanited Shop situated at Pilgrims











oad Christ Church, to remove said
icense to a Board and Galvanized
hop situated at Well House, St. Philip,
d to use it at such last described
sromises,
Dated this 2nd day of April 1952.
(Sed.) GORDON BROWNE,
Applicant
To: A. W. HARPER Esq
Police Magistrate, Dist. “C,"
N.B.—This application will be con-
dered at a Licensing Court to be
wld on Wednesday the 16th day of
ipril 1952 at Eleven o'clock a.m. at
Voalice Courts, District “C”
A. W. HARPER,
Yolice Magistrate, Dist. “C"
4.4.52—in
LANYARD
That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LEMITED, a

‘ompany incorporated and existing under
he limited liability laws of the Union
“0 South Africa whose trade or busi-
ess address is, Argus Chambers, 30,
*hureh Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
sxporters, has applied for the reg@itra-
jon of a trade mark in Part “A” of
‘egister in respect of canned fruits,
ams, fish, dried fruit, crystallised fruit,
ruit juices, fruit squashes, fruit, and fruit
beverages, and substances used as food
© as ingredients in food, and will be
ntitled to register the same after one
nonth from the 2nd day of April, 1962,
niess some person shall in the mean-
me give notice in duplicate to me at
ny office of opposition of such regis-
on application at my office.
itien The trade mark can be seen
Dated this 25th day of March 1962
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4.52—3n,

®LCLLOEPEE OPES SESSA

ADVERTISE
IN THE

ADVOCATE

ALLL PO LPL PCE

ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIKS
FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANI'S

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466











TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

REEDS FOR CLARINETTES
AND SAXOPHONES



Some Pxtra Copies of
ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS
Of the King’s Funeral for Sale

Coloured and Clear Plastic By
The Yard

all at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE

LEEEST PSO SFOS

tion of a trade mah in Part
Register in

jams, fish, dried fruit, crystallised fruit,
fruit juices, fruit squashes, fruit, and fruit

1} the limited Mability laws of the Union | ~
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address

Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
51 cents per Ib., at C. Herbert, 55 Tudor] Exporters, hi

jis Argus Chambers, 30,

as applied for the aes
“A” oO}

respec’ f canned fruits,

Agents for | beverages, and substances used as food
Phone 2691 between | or as ingredients fn food, and will be

entitled to register the same after one
month from the 2nd day of April, 1952,
unless some person shall in the mean-

time give notice in duplicate to me at
my office of opposition of such regis-
tration The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office
Dated this 25th day of March 1952
H



. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4.52—3n
PINNACLE
That HENRY W, PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LEMITED, a

| Company incorporated and existing under

the limited Mability
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address is Argus Chambers, 30,
Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
Exporters, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of canned fruits,
jams, fish, dried fruit, erystailised fruit,
fruit juices, frult squashes, fruit, and fruit
beverages, and substatwes used as food
or as ingredients 1n food, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 3nd day of April, 1952,
unless some person shall in the mean-
time give notice in duplicate to me at

laws of the Union

my office of opposition of such regis-
on application at muy office
tration The trade mark seen




Dated this 25th day

TAKE NOTICE

That HENRY W. PEABODY SOUTH
AFRICA (PROPRIETARY) LIMITED, a

-ompany incorporated and existing under
the limited liability laws of the Union
of South Africa whose trade or busi-
ness address is Argus Chambers, 3),
Church Street, Cape Town, South Africa,
Exporters, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of canned fruits,
jams, fish, dried fruit, erystallised fruit,
fruit juices, fruit squaghes, fruit and fruit
beverages, and subst@hces used as food
or a8 ingredients im food, and will be
entitied to register the same after one
month from the 2nd day of April. 1952
unless some person shall in the mean-



time give notice in duplicate to me at
my, office of opposition of such regis
tration. The trade mark can be see:
on application at my office

Dated this 25th day of March 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks

2.4.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE





That THE “UNIQUE” Pen CO., LIM
ITED, a British Company, whose trade

| or business address is §79, Kingston Road

London, S.W., England, Manufacturers
has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of pens, fountain pens, pen hold-
ers, pencils, pen mibs and pen and pen-
cil clips and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 2nd
day of April, 1952, unless some person
shalt in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office
Dated this 25th day of March 1952
H. WILLIAMS

Registrar of Trade Marks
2.4. 58—In





MR. GUY



Programm





THREE SONATAS :
PRELUDE AND FUGUE IN C
SONATA IN B MINOR, Op. 5





Admission $1.00 or 60c.
All Seats Reserved



Unguentine













PIANO RECITAL

Professor of the Royal Academy of Music,

THE sarttast COUNCIL GARDINER

“Wakefield”, White Park
on WEDNESDAY, 9th April, at 8.30 p.m.

and WORKS by Brahms, Fauré





















Ls
ELE SLGEELLSELLL SEF FEEFSESSFESSSSSSSFS SESS,

JUST TO REMIND YOU...

i when you purchase from

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods at Your Door.
CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

AF OOO IE OTOL

Sore Mouth |

ieose Bloody Teeth

ileeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
l.cose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
perhaps some bad disease that will
ooner or later cause your teeth to
fall out and may also cause Rheu-
atism and Heart Troub'e. Amosan
tops gum bleeding the first day,
ends sore mouth and quickly tigh
ens th eth. Iron clad guarante
Amosahdnust make your mouth w
and save your teeth or money ba
on return of empty pack
Amosan from your chemis
The guarantee protects you

4

OPPO PPRE

Coe



~





FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

5th Avenue, = KEelleville

An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated
om a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
enclosed), large drawing room, difing room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc.

Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AFS., F.V.A.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Plantations Building.



016.08 wer.ore,

Relieves pain of

Phone 4640.



ST. VINCENT
GRUMMAN GOOSE

AIR. SERVICE

PRESENT SCHEDULE

Dienemmmmmeememmdzencintenn teimiedene eae ncateantetioental

DIAMOND
RINGS

om















MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent
. Departs St. Vincent vi -» 9,00 am,
Arrives Barbados ++ 10.00 a.m.
Departs Barbados ‘3 +» 1030 am.
Arrives St. Vincent ue 11.30 a.m.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT (FUESDAYS st. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent
And Departs St. Vincent i -» 900 am.
DIAMOND WEDDING Arrives Trinidad se -» 10.30 a.m.
RINGS Departs Trinidad . ++ $1,80—a.m.
Available Specialy Arrives St. Vincent -» 1,00 p.m.
or in
Your Jewellers : WEDNESDAYS si, Yipoent/Grenads/8t. Vincent
Depa it. Vincent 10.00 a.m.
Y. De LIMA Arrives Grenada v “1030 a.m.
Departs Grenada oe -» 11.20 am.
& co... LTD. Arrives St. Vincent Re +» 12 noon
20, Broad Street Additional Flight From St. Vincent
to Trinidad Times on Application
= St. Vinecent/Barbados/Dominica
THURSDAYS Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent e +» 8.00 a.m. *
Arrives Barbados ee ++ 9.00 a.m,
Departs Barbados ve ++ 930 a.m.
Arrives Dominica re -+ 11.30 am.
‘ Departs Dominica es ++ 1280 p.m.
Arrives Barbados vs +» 230 p.m.
Departs Barbados - -+ $00 p.m.
Arrives St. Vincent oa -. 400 p.m.
FRIDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent oe +» 9.00 a.m.
Arrives Trinidad i -+ 10.30 p.m.
y Departs Trinidad ve Pi 72. a.m.
: Arrives St. Vincent ve «+ (1,00 p.m.
JONSON

AUSTIN
| & CO., LTD.
AGENTS
Lower Hroad St.

e includes:
‘ a Scarlatti
SHARP Bach
8 et Chopin
and Liszt
Phone 4704

Tel. 3249


































|

SHIPPING NOTICES





ROYAL NETHERLANDS 9°°3?*



| The MV “MONEKA" will

accept Cargo and Passengers for

| STEAMSHIP co. Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

SAMING FROM EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts and Passeng-

M.8. , on 4th April 1962 ers only dor St. Vineent. Sailing
3.8. ROSKOOP on lith April 1962, to-day Friday, 4th inst,

MB. on 18th April, 1982, The M.V. “CACIQUE DEL

M.S. STENTOR on 2nd May 1952 eee bind accept Cargo and

assengers for St. Lucia, Grenada

we teeta REED AM ND |S and Aruba. ‘and Pussenders only

M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952 mea ee

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIRO The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will

AND BRITISH GUIANA
8.8. COTTICA on Tth April 1952
M.S. BONAFRE on 6th May, 1952
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO

accept' Cargo and Passengers or
St. Laicia, Grenada and Aruba, and e
Passengers only for St. Vincent; $
Sailing Wednesday 9th inst. =

The M.V. "CARIBBEE” will ac-

LOOOPSOOOOGGOPOOâ„¢

M.S. HECUBA 2ist April 1952. cept Cargo and Passengers for ¥
S.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1952 Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, .
| 8. PB, MUSSON, SON & Co., LTD. Nevis and St. Kitts; Sailing Wed-

nesday 9th inst

SP LPEPLLPE LPP LOS

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’

COOVSPD



ADVERTISING PAYS BEST

ASSOCIATION (INC)
% c 4087 X
PSOOCOSOOV CCC OSEOD



‘Canadian National Steamships









Sails Sails Salis Arrives
eit: Montreal Halifax Boston B'dos wen
t Yy ee * —- 2) Mar, 2 Apr 11 Apr Apr.
LADY SEL BON ieee ay —_ We Apr 17 Apr. 27 Apr, = Ap:.
CAN 29 Apr. 2 May “> 11 May 13 May
LADY vt more Mer a Me msy Some 2 Mes
- + ay 2 May 2 Jun
CANADIAN IAN CHALLENGER “ 30 May 2 June _ 11 dune 2 =
ae 3d an - sen 2 — 14 June 23 June 24 June
|\ADIAN oe u« une _- "
Ane hel 5a UCTOR.. 30 June 3 July _— PH tu 3 Suiy
AD ve ee 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 36 July
NORTHBOUND Arrives Salle Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives
dias, als B'dos B'dos Boston 8%. John Halifax Montreal
be {UISER 4 Apr 7 Apr. _ 14 Apr 7 Apr, =
LADY RODNEY 24 Apr. 26 Apr. 5 Ma - 6 May 10 Ma;
ta Ga + 10 May 12 Ma 22 May, - 23 Ma 21 May
Ce UISER 24 May 4 May — , 6 June 8 June} 11 June
UCTOR 3 June 8 June - 15 June
use . unc 18 June 21 June
LADY RODSEY ev 15 June 17 June 27 June pe 28 June 1 duly
CHALLENGER ., 23 June 28 June bin 5 Jul )
LADY NELSON °° July 8 July 18 July =| oem ae
oe Memos aa 4 July 19 July = 26 July; @ Jus, 1 Aug
CONSTRUCTOR 24 July =. 29 July — 5 Aug) 8 Aug.
LADY RODNEY ., 7 Aug. 9 Aug 19 Aug. ie Ses. 3 Rs
= = * tT er 3 o “* ~~ = Sa -
i = ys





For further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD,—Agents.







CG" TRANSATLANTIQUE |

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
% Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952 ....
*““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” 8th May, 1952... ....

Arrives Barbados

«. 81st March, 1952
6th May, 1952
2lst May, 1952



SCPE PSO POSES.
:
x

55 CCOCS SOS SB OOOOOO FOOSE 3



Not calling at Guadeloupe %
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE %

>

From Barbados.
“COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 ....
*““DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton

10 DAYS
CARIBBEAN, CRUISE

From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD
Venezuela-Curacao
Colombia & Jamaica
Hy the LUXURY LINERS
COLOMBIE & DE GRASSE

FOR INFORMATION

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

PHONE 3814
SSSSSSSS SESS SOOO FF FSO SS OS SS SSS SSE OPS OO OOSSSON"

Arrives Southampton
«.. 28rd April, 1952





SOSOOOOTTSE

SOS EE LOSSES POP SSSOS POPS OTE F



SOOSOSOOFOSPOSOSVSSS OF

OOS



° S93G999

Wm. FOGARTY (0S) LTD.

TAILORS OF PROVEN RELIABILITY
AND EXCELLENT FITTERS

































We carry a wide range of

HIGHGRADE

SUITINGS

to choose from



e
OUR GUARANTEED

CUTTING

AND

TAILORING

WILL TRANSFORM YOUR
CHOICE INTO
A SUIT OF
DISTINCTION


































HENRY

ON SECOND THOUGHTS
VOUD SETTER COME

PL DON'T
ALONG AND SEE THE ASS

GIVE ME AWAY..

[aAVE vou)
SEEN MY “\t

FLASH GORDON

TANTS
i TIME TO
WHERE ARE YOU GOLDILOCRE
RUNNING, BIG MOE?

NOT SO STRONG

WITHOUT A GUN IN

YOUR HAND ARE yOu?

JOHNNY HAZARD

FT

BE GLAD WHEN WEE pase
DORRIE AND WEE LAURIE &
ARE FINALLY MARRIED



RIP KIRBY

SEVEN, I'VE VISITED MISS
ABERNATHY'S SCHOOL ...EVERY-
5 THING YOU SAID ABOUT MONICA
/-> HILL SEEMS TO CHECK .,.1’VE
, (DONE SOME OnE:

V2 yrnissins TOO... (

De) ae 4
—— x
ow)





ALIVE #& 1 DONT..
PN

\}
Hu D/I
AROUND i A
TOOTSIE 7? lad
Le



I’M STILL GROGGY!
GOTTA GET AWAY




SHAVE THE FACE, BRUSH
THE TEETH AND HIT THE

BACK TO THE PRISON
HOSPITAL? NOW~+ FOR

tA THE GUIDE o<

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BY CARL ANDERSON

LET ME HIDE HERE,

PAGET'S

MOT STUFF ON
STOWAWAYS...





ovine roe) [HERBERT )\ DAGWOOD

wT] ISN'T THAT JUST
BEAUTIFUL ? LOOK
AT THOSE LINES
1 | AND CURVES !/

I EXPECTED THAT,
KIRBY... HERES THE
3. PROOF...OUR MARRIAGE
m LICENSE AND MONIKA'S
Re



My
hal
Ss

Se eo” 3
UR.

SPHAT'S WHAT YOU THINK, JOHNNY.’ WAIT TILL
YOU SEE THE BANDAGED LADY'S NOTE NOW ///
x

AT LEAST UNTIL
WE'VE OROPPED
"LOT a0















WAIT FOR ME,
MUSCLES /

BY FRANK ROBBINS





"Se ‘ eh Z

LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

YOUR MYSTERIOUS GUIDE
| EH? NOW ATLEAST YOULLGEE
HIS FACE. LETS GET SOME OF
THOSE CLOTHES OFF AND
EXAMINE THE
WOUND.







in (ARTO, PASSED OVE
- :
> ‘ ‘
= EASTER IS HERE...
.
* DRINK
e
.



















PAGE SEVEN

. S&S
. RUM

"
% The RUM with a Flavour

WHEN A COLD STRIKES,

°
Ss ACK ST. all its own
TRIKE B FA eee x Expertly Blended and
a . % Bottled by














ere

(1938) LID. ;

“ Headquarters for Best Rum

$ STUART & SAMPSON



4,

Ne
POLL LLL SSE

PPPOE FFE FSB OSSS SI VG99O

JUST RECEIVED

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

gl eg?


















| Pkes.'Tate & Lyle Castor
i % Sugar

» Sliced Ham and Bacon ‘
% Lege. and Small Tins Vienna ¢
s Sausages

% Pkes. Goddard Plague Pow-
y der

» Tins Stove Polish ‘
| Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

* Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar
» Tins Gelatine ,
, Tins Asstd. Sweet Biscuits §
» Tins Pineapple Chunks
x Tins Strawberries

USTERINE Antiseptic kills millions of
germs on throat surfaces...keeps them
from starting serious trouble. Remen>
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!

Also:
TIN HAMS








X Special price to Shopkeepers §
IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS .
® OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS!

isk

% All these things get. from --
re ‘

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.



6969969°96O8956965656554

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

:
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

———————————==—=
SPECIAL OFFERS are’ now ®@vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now







Usually Now

Tins ANCHOR POW: MILK 24%... $2.35 $2.12 Tins HAMS, (21b) cocoon 389 3.50
Tins KRAFT MACARONI 34
WITH CHEESE ..cccccc. Al 38 issctthabveraiier:« sasha cama’ at






Tins TOMATOES ooocccoccccccccccccccccccececes 36 33 Bottles CARIB BEER .................... 24 20

STARTING MONDAY APRIL 7th

Writing



Paper.
Envelopes,

Aceount Books,



Large
School Books,

y e CG fi
Novels. Thrillers, : lo ¢ )



Children’s Books,
‘ee /

Books on Sport,

and a few other miscellaneous items

ADVOCATE eo





s . : >
STATIONERY § \\X,
Broad Street OF RS







L


PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Know Your Football

LAWS XVI & XVH

Today I conclude my _ discus-
sions of the LAWS OF THE
GAME with a study of the last
two Laws—Law xvi—Goal-Kick
and Law xvii Corner Kick,

Goal Kick
When the whole of the bali
passes over the goal-line exclu
ding that portion between the
*goal-posts, either in the air or or
the ground, having last been
played by a member of the

attacking team, it shall be kicked
direct into play, beyond the pen-
alty area, from a point within
that half of the goal-area, nearest
to where it crossed the line, by
a player of the defending team.
A goalkeper shall not receive
the ball into his hands from
goal-kick in order that he ma
thereafter kick it into play. If the
ball is not kicked beyond th
penalty-area, that is, direct into
play, the kick shall be re-taken.
The kicker shall not play the

ball a second time until it has
been touched or has been played
by another player. A goal shall
not be scored direct from such a
kick and players of the team

opposing that of the player tak-\

BY O. 8S. COPPIN



Your Football
Problems

By The Sports Editor

Now that the series “Know
Your Football”, discussions
on the seventeen laws of the
game, have been concluded
to-day, the Sports Editor will
answer as many of your foot-
ball problems as _ possible
in these columns,

No problems will be taken
over the telephone. Address
a letter “Football Problems”

c/o Sports Editor, Barbados
Advocate.



referee would not have allowed
it. However I am cautioning those
players against repeating these
tactics as they are an infringe-

ment of this law, Always remem~
ber, the ball has not been kicked
into play until it has been kicked

ing the goal-kick shall remain BEYOND the penalty area,
outside the penalty-area whilst The only other infringement
the kick is being taken. " vhich I have noticed with regard
There is not much confusiorf§ ° this law is that some players
in my experience with the inter-â„¢ un into their opponents penalty

pretation by players and specta-
tors alike of this rule. There is
only one general controversiai
point. Some players hold the view
that should a defender taking a
goal-kick slice the ball some dis-
tance away in the penalty area
that they can rush in and score.

I have seen this season attempts
at this and much confusion
resulted especially as a spectator
had volunteered to referee the
game in the absence of the officio!
referee who had been unavoidably
detained, These players got away
with it but IT am sure an official





First inter-Schaol ,

area a split second before the
the kick has been taken. This also
is an infringement. They must
remain OUTSIDE until the kick
has been taken,
Punishment 7a
If a player taking a goal-kick
plays the ball a second time after
it has passed beyond the penalty-
area, but before it has touched
or even played by another player
an indirect free-kick shall be
awarded to the opposing team to
be taken from the place where
the infringement occurred.

Girls Sports Planned

By CALVIN

ALLEYNE

AND now after most people have tor years been nod
ding their heads and agreeing with conviction that it would
be a good idea, headmistresses and gaines mistresses o!
the Government aided schools have got together and decid-
ed to stage the first Girls’ Inter-school Sports, possibly on

May 16. The only worry f

or the headmistresses now is

securing grounds, preferably Kensington.

Inter-school boys’ sports stretch
over years and there has always
been the keenest rivalry, and now
for the first Girls’ Inter-school
sports, the girls are itching to be
on the track and they are already
trying to feel out and assess their
rival school athletes.

And after all, this zest is plaus-
ible because the first winners of
the Girls’ Inter-school sports will
make history.

e-schools to take part are
Queen’s College, St. Michael’s.
Foundation and Alexandra, Mrs.
Wotton, Queen's College's games
mi told me, Depending on
the success of their venture, they
will consider allowing other girls’
schools’ to enter.

Usual Divisions

The divisions are the usual divi-
sions—under 12, 12 to 14, 14 to 16
and over 16, and the sports will be
purely athletic. Perhaps it may
seem needless to say purely athle-
tic, but you will remember that in
their own sports, girls include
events of skill such as the Egg and
Spoon race and the Potato race
but there will be no such event in
the inter-school sports.

The longest distance for the
senior girls will be the 220 yards
As St. Michael’s is the only schoo!
with a sand pit, there will be no
Long Jump event.

The girls will deplore the fact
that there will be no prizes as i
the case in the Boys’ sports, Ther
will only be points and a trophy
for the champion school.

An intriguing thing that is mak-
ing the girls train seriously is thai
they have little idea of their op
ponents potentialities. In Boys
sports, a school gets to know the
standard of their rivals, For in-
stance, it did not take the schoo)
boys until sports day to know thai
Lloyd from Foundation would
have won the 440 and 880, and the
880 in record time besides, at the
last sports. Why, everybody knew
that last year when Glasgow from



| They'll Do It Every Time

Lodge won the 880, Lioyd came a
good second despite his stopping a
very short while to assist the Col-
lege best for whom the pace had
got too hot. Everybody knew too,
that Lodge’s Inniss would have
won the 100 and 220 sprints. And
the boys know that certain good
athletes who have not left school
will again put up a good showing.
But in this Girls’ Inter-school
sports, there is no knowing an-
other girl’s capabilities and there
will be many surprises. They are
in the dark too because previously
they have not been keeping times
and records. Also they will be
running on a bigger track,

A Stimulus

For the girls, assurance that
there will be sports, has acted as a
stimulus and one may add that it
has also acted as a stimulus to wo-
men sports in Barbados as a whole.

On evenings you will see them
training. Some Queen's College
girls train on Harrison College
“rounds where they have been
checking up on their times,

As to possible winners, well, one
has to admit that the contest will
be reduced to a tussle between
Queen's College and St. Michael’s
because of their numbers. Queen’s
College will have a slight advan-
tage in their senior division as
their age limit is slightly higher.
Yet their senior girls will be
studying for examinations and this
balances down the advantage.

The only snag to all this is that
there is trouble about getting
grounds that would be most con-
venient for making the sports pay
off themselves—Kensington, Any-
how the hgadmistresses and games
mistresses have not given up hope
that they will be able to persuade
the ma ers of Kensington that
girls spor hould be encouraged.
‘The last resort will be to ask the
headmaster of Harrison College or
Combermere to lend them the
grounds, but as Mrs, Wotton said,
‘That would be just too bad.”







TONIGHT'S POP'S LODGE
NIGHT++- MOM CAN'T
KEEP HIM HOME, BUT

THE MAN NEXT
DOOR

—

STEERED“DONT
LET HiM SEE

YOU*

be, KING PEATURES SYNDU

s

V4

PoP HAD THAT
OPERATION FOUR
YEARS AGO--HE'S
BEEN USING IT AS
AN EXCUSE EVER



Revinered @. 5. Potent OMee B Jimmy Hatlo |

it is the duty of the referee to
see that goal-kicks are pfoperly
taken within that half of the
oal-area nearest the point where
e all went out.

Corner Kick

When the whole of the ball
passes over the goal-line, exclu-
ding that portion between the
goal-posts either in the air or
on the ground, having last been
played by one of the defending
team, a member of the attacking
team shall take a kick from
within the quarter circle at the
nearest corner-flag post, which

must rot be removed, ie, a
corner-kick,
A goal may be scored direct

from such a kick. Players of the
team opposing that of the player
taking the corner-kick shall not
approach within ten yards of the
batt until it is in play, Le. it has
travelled the distance of its own
circumference, nor shall the
kicker play the ball a second time
until it has been touched or
played by another player.

Punishment

For an infringement of this law
an indirect free-kick shall
awarded to the opposing team, to
be taken from the place where
the infringement occurred.

The corner flag-staff must not
be removed when a corner-kick
is taken.

I must emphasise at this point
that if a player takes a corner-
kick and the ball re-bounds to
him after striking the goal-post,
he MUST NOT play it again until
it has been played by another
player.

Referees too can assist in
ensuring that a_corner-kick is
properly taken by refusing to
allow it to be taken while any
opponent is within ten yards of
the ball.

In the Seventh R.B.Y.C. Re-
gatta which will be sailed in Car-
lisle Bay to-morrow, “B” Class
boats Imp, Rainbird and Sinbad
will start at 2.46 p.m. (Yellow

Flag) instead of at 2.45 p.m. as
appeared in yesterday’s Advocate.

Imp, Sinbad and Rainbird will
receive two minutes from Hurri-
cane, the scratch boat of the Class.



TABLE TENNIS

The Return Matches of the La-
dies Inter-Club Table Tennis fix-
tures will be continued at the
Y.M.C.A, Naval Hall to-night.
The games are as follows:—

Queen’s College vs. Lenville—

6.30 p.m.
Y.W.C.A. vs. Barna—7.30 p.m.
Y.W.P.C. vs. Adelphi — 8.30
RR ee gs Sh Foes. ae



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions—
10.00 a.m.

Annual Meeting, Barbados
Nurses’ Association, Gen-
eral Hospital — 4.00 p.m.

Football, Queen’s Park —
5.00 p.m.

Mobile _ Cinema, Checker
Hall Plantation, St. Lucy

—7.30 pan.
Police Band Concert, Hast-
ings Rocks — 8.00 p.m.







WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
nen from Codrington
nid,
Total rainfall for month to
date : .02 ins,
Highest Temperature: 86.5°F
Lowest Temperature: 82.5°F
we Velocity 14 miles per

jour
Barometer (9. a.m.) 29.998
(3 p.m.) 29.928
TO-DAY
Sunrise : 5.55 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m,
Moon: Ist Quarter,
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide : 12.51 a.m., 11. 47

p.m.
Low Tide : 6.19 a.m., 7.02
p.m.

‘

°

Apl.

ED



AND A TIP OF

“THANX

THE HATLO HAT TO
BARNEY LOGAN,
SHEEVESPORT , LA.

Sie)

iS)

THE GRAND
NATIONAL

(By a Correspondent) .
LO} 1N

Phe Grand National, toughest
of all horse races, is once again
at hand. Tomorrow, fifty picked
horses will engage in a test of

speed, stamina and Jumping
ability over four and a half
miles of the most gpuelling

course in the world. :

Watched by thousands, i
ing from the top-hatted punfér
who stakes a fortune to the man
risking a. shilling each way, the

National is rightly claimed the
greatest -steeple-chase race in
the world.

Today's race is a far cry from
that day in 1792, when three
crack gentlemen riders raced
cross-country from Bark Holt,
in Leicestershire to Llesdon
Coplow — four miles distant —
and back again. That ‘field,’
though small, was historic. For
the event — won by Mr, Mey-
nell, son of the famous Quorn
Master — was the first recorded
steeplechase in Britain, the ‘cur-
tain-raiser’ to the National Hunt
racing of to-day, +

Eighteen years later, iff 1810,
some 40,000 sportsmen floeked to
Bedford to watch anothe- his
toric

+

Empire Beat
Everton

EMPIRE (Simmonds 1; Hope 1; Drayton 1)

EVERTON



I—Nil

Sci ciorecabahcs ties 3

EMPIRE playing a much improved game defeated

Everton three—nil in their

match at Kensington Oval yesterday afternoon.

return First Division Football
A large

crowd watched the game and saw the Empire players

eombine well in the second

»_. Two of the goals were scored in
the second halt by Simmonds and
Hope while Drayton at inside
right scored the first goal off a

enalty in the early part of the
rst half. Veteran in goal
for proved to be a to

opponent, and in both halves he
displayed clever anticipation.

¢ two Everton full backs
Weekes and Simpson played a good
game but in the second half, the
Everton defence went to pieces.
Robinson in goal for Empire was
sound and Grant, Smith, Alleyne
and Drayton paved the way for
the victory.

The game started with Empire
defending the northern end of the
piteh and from the touch off Em-
pire was pressing. Olton at centre-
forward for Everton tested Robin-
two minutes after play

‘ace — the . son sf
chase run over at preppy dad started but Robinson antici-
circuit. By modern standards, Dane od coat: Se. ahvien
the course was_ easy. ight

jumps had to be cleared, each 4ft,
was
the affair held at Roscommon in
, when a steeple-chase wag
Staged over 6-mile circuit inter-
sected by wide ditches and six
stone walls.

In 1830, the army took a step
in popularising the sport, when
sixteen Life Guards officers rode

be in a Regimental steeplechase at

St. Albans, this led to simil
meetings being held in
other parts of the country.

1886 was a milestone in
National Hunt racing. For the
first time, a meeting was held at
the little known village of Ain-
tree near Liverpool. Three years
later the first Grand National
was run there, though it was
then known as the Grand Liver-
pool Steeplechase. The four-
mile course lay over genuine
farm-land and comprised plough,
scrubland and pasture. Rules
forbade competitors taking easy
routes along roads or bridlepaths,
or avoiding jumps by opening
convenient gates.

Today, the 4} mile course con-
sists of two laps of the Aintree
circuit, and 30 obstacles have to
be cleared.

As always Ireland is well
represented, bi\t this year’s chal-
lenge from the Emeral Isle is by
horses little known in Britain.

One of these, which has gained
great favour with home backers
is Icey Calm. Reason i
is that
Irish National over three and a
half miles, Icy Calm has been
given one of the bottom weights
at Aintree. For despite his
Irish National success, he failed

ar
many

in his other six outings last
season.
Besides Icy Calm there are

two other Irish National winners,
ee (1948) and Dominick’s
Bar (1950).

Hamster

is a remarkable entry.
In nearly four years he has run
in two races and was unplaced.
Prior to that he accomplished the
astonishing feat. of winning the

Hurdle Handicap, the
Irish Grand National and the
Ward Union Hunt, within a

space of three and a half weeks.

Royal Tan is one of the most
fane’ horses, This is nut sur-
prising, In last year’s race only
he and the winner Nickel Coin
completed the course without
falling. Thus his staying power
cannot be doubted. This year
too, Royal Tan has shown good

fotm. He won the National
Hunt Handicap in convincing
fashion.

Until recently, Freebooter, one
of the only two previous win-
ners, was firm favourite. Then
running in the Gold Cup, he fell.
So did his popularity with the
backers. Too much importance
should not be attached to his
Gold Cup running, however, as
he is seldom seen at his best on
the Cheltenham course.

The other winner is Russian

Hero, He was perhaps the un-
luckiest ‘horse in last year's
fiasco, Until brought down at

the fifteenth jump, he was goin,
well, and looked all set to ad
to his 1949 success. His form
this year has not been impres-

sive, but his experience in pre- prising if the 1952 winner came

vious Nationals wn stand
him in good stea
The National, however, is





De

ogy

—<$$—<—$————
——

Reece to come out of the goal and
just as Simmonds was getting
ready to score, Reece snatched
the ball from the tip of his boot
and kicked it midfield. Shortly
after Norville receiving a long
pass from Alleyne at centre half,
kicked the ball across the Everton
joal area and Daniel the right
alf back in trying to kick the ball,
handled it in his area thus causing
Referee Graham to award a
penalty kick.



Students Receive Certificates

F @ From Page 5
achieved, We have not only helped
to give i r

c¢ and improved
finishes, but we have also, tried
and in some ways succeeded in
getting at Human Relationships,
and where we started out with 21
individuals, we now terminate as
one large family I should like to
mention one fact that was very
heartening to me and strengthens
this point,
At the last lecture
Organisati
carried, that the

ey,
s continue to meet and

function as the Homemaker’s Club,
meeting once po vad to report

and cit help where
needed.

_ It has been a full and strenuous
time, when there have been blem-
fishes and worties, but, the over-

t in Group
it was proposed yol-

future the Courses’ might be of
nine months’ duration because I
know it w's just the love and keen
int in the course, which have
kept us all, but we are all very,

ver, .
gained Certificates.

13 first class ranging from 94 to
80%.

8 second class, ranging from 79

62%, me

Mrs. R. N. Turner said:
Housecraft Centre has been serv-
ing a most useful purpose and has
been filling a gap that has been

During the past six years the
left open far too long.

The day and evening classes in
all branches of Domestic Science
started by Miss Parry and con-
tinued by Miss Ivy Alleyne, has
been most ably carried on, and
have proved to be of great prac-
tical value to the women of Bar-
bados and through them good
efteets will become increasingly
“pane as time goes on.

he course for Instructors which
you_have just completed is par-
ticularly important, for in your
cases you have not only learnt to
improve your own knowledge and
methods, but you. will now return
to your schools and clubs and pass
on to others what you have
learned here. .

We are relying on you to teach
them, just as thoroughly and con-
scientiously as you have your-
selves been taught here, so that
you will bring credit to the House-
craft Centre, and the purpose of
the Instructors’ Course of spread-
ing improved Domestic rience
methods to the many, through the
selected few, will be fulfilled.

notoriousty unkind to favourites.
It would not be in the least sur-

{rom one of the less fancied en-
tries.
than Brown Jack III,







Of these none looks better

half of play.

This was taken by Drayton who
made no mistake in opening the
scoring for Empire. Reece made
a big effort but this proved fruit-
less. With one goal to their credit
Empire never slackened and half
time found the score unchanged.

After the resumption Empire
again piled up the pressure but
Everton was also making renewed
efforts to put in the equaliser
Reece again through clever anti-
cipation brought off another pbril-
liant save when Nbrville at left
wing cut in and tried to score in
the left corner of the nets.

Two minutes after, Hope at
right wing succeeded in beating
Reece who had come out as the
winger was alone on the ball with
the hope of intercepting him. Hope
kicked the ball into the left corner
of the goal qo put Empire two up.

The game became faster and the
Empire {éfwards Were playing
together well. Five minutes after
the second goal Simmonds kicked
in the third. The game ended
with the score at three nil.

The teams were:

EmPire: Robinson, Grant, Smith,
Rudder, Maynard, Alleyne, Hope,
Drayton, Simmonds, Taylor and
Norville.

Everton: Reece, Weekes, Simp-
son, Culpeppér, Daniel, Hall,
Holder, Sealy, Olton, Haynes and
Heywood.

The referee was Mr. O. Graham,

Let your motto be: “Whatso-
ever your hand findeth to do, do it
with all your might.”

The following received certifi-

cates and prizes presented by Mrs.
Turner:
Myrtle King—First class certifi-
eate, prize for outstanding work
in the course and best work in
her demonstration of cooking.

Bourne—First class certificate,
prize for second place in course
and being the best representa-
tive student.

M

Eee ee eee

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 _







Cabbage
Bark
Baskets

FOR HOME — FOR TRAVELLING
FOR SHOPPING



Cabbage Bark Suitcases $4.50

Upright Marketing
Baskets. Ea. $1.00 & $2.16



Shopping Baskets
Ea. 72c, 84c. 90c. & $1.00





Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



—

|
|







=









PHONE 4267
TO-DAY

FOR
SWLPHURIC ACID

in 5 ewt. drums

D.M. HOILER ENAMEL

in 5 gin. drums
4 times concentrated





S. Thornton—First class certificate,
prize for third place in course.

E. Maxwell—First cla%s certificate,
prize for third place in course.

J. Broome—First class certificate
prize for the best demonstration
in Baby Care.

L, Lawrence—First Class certifi-
cate, prize for the most pains-
taking student.

- E. Ramsay—First class certificate,

prize for the most helpful stu-
dent.

K. Moore—First class certificate.

E. Johnson—First class certificate,
prize for first place in the first
term.

E, Goodman—First class certifi-
cate. ”

A. Young—First class certificate.

G. Walcott—First class certificate,

prize for being the most out-|

standing entertainer.

I, Blackman— First class certifi-
cate, prize for being the most
enthusiastic student.

D, Clarke—Second class certificate.

Marguerite King — Second class
certificate.
E, Benskin—Second class certifi-

cate.
V. Rock—Second class certificate.
M. Edey—Second class certificate.
E, Small—Second class certificate
prize for best sewing.

M, Gibbs—Second class certificate.

Mr. L. Blades—Second clag» cer-
tificate, prize for being the keen-
est student.

DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

’ on

SATURDAY, APRIL 5TH
9.00 P.M.





For Local and Visiting
Members
Musie by Mr. C. Curwen’s
Orchestra

(No Admission Charge
to Ballroom)
3.4.52.—3n.



- to get a
lift with
a

poppy

“The Finest Beer Brewed Anywhere”

ARSENATE OF LEAD

for spraying Food Crops to protect them against leaf-
eating insects.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

——
—

OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING
THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS

BUT

THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
RESPECT TO THE

HIGH QUALITY OP
MAFFEI MADE SUITS





SN





The Shirt
by Consulate
pleasing pastels.
The Helt

by Eldonia in fine
leather—clip fastening.

The Slacks

Rice’s in tail-
ored Gabardine,

in

Woollen Hose by }
Morley—short,
elastic tops.

C. B. Rice

i Cc Merchant
Gb.

Tailors

















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PAGE 1

rRin.W. AI'RH. 4. IMI BARBADOS ADVOCATF. I'M.I -I \ I S HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG DAGWOODXOO-HOO WHEN A COLD STRIKES, 'STRIKE BACK FAST... LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC ;i mm is nit... DRINK s&s RUM The RIM with llivwr till itown ^ Kftpertl* Blrndrd and Bollled by •: STUM \ SAMPSON (1938) LID. Hu.rlfii tot Br>l IUui> I J JUST RECEIVED USTEUNI Afitfaaatfc kills million* of fctiDi on throat lurfam... krepa thent from inaninfc tcrious trouble. Rcmenv her, m the first sign ..i (.old. garglo USTERINE Aotiscpfic, roll .ifcnjth, i .N 1^ and often! IN TESTS OVER fi 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USHU OP USTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COIDSI Pkiv Tale A Ljle Carter Sugar Sliced II .in anil Baron Lir. and Small Tins Vlrnni Siiuin Phxv Ctoddaid I'luur Powder Tin* Mtovr Polish %  in. limn Vrrrtablr Salad l'k(i. Hrldal I. i i: Mint Tin, Gelatine Tina Awld. Surrl Biarufta TinPineapple < hunka Tina straw berru* Abo: TIN HAMS Special price I Shopkeepers &f All in. % %  nun.. ; %  [ n ora INCE & CO. LTD. FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HA7ARD BY FRANK ROBBINS **ULGUES9 ILL SHAVE THE EACE, THE TEETH ANPHIT WCV EABLV.' BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND %  %  >. x MM -; • %  _•.: %  i wonwn ..-BUTI5TitLrT i foua : %  _: %  -" 7 ^ t F'PiC-SDTUAT, >J Y Jft PBOCiS...(X MPBli em p am THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK A RAY MOORES tiUfthMSTEC 3USAJI0I _~f CH? row A'lEAq; .. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only -I'M IA I. Ol I I IIS lire now iimilaliinl our llriuirni- T eedwidr, S|i. .ulilsl.... ii iiuil ftnu Sir.-. I Usually Now Usually Now Tin* ANCHOR POM': MII.K IM 12.35 S2.I2 Tin* KRAFT MACABONI WITH ( IIKKSi: Tins TOMATois .41 .38 .33 Tins HAMS. (211.) .1.89 3.50 Pkgk FRUIT SAI.AD 38 M Botlln (ARID IIF.KR M 3 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE COLO V Tfi A I) E I. IMH I HI I S BOOK & STATIONERY STARTING MONDAY APRIL 7th Writing "Paper. Envelope*. Large Account Hooks. School Hooks. \imls. Thrillers. Children** Hooks. %  look* on Spoil. "_** %  and a few other miscellaneous items f? ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street L



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX %  AUAIHM ADVOCATE FRIDAY APRIL t. IBM CLASSIFIED ADS. tMt HI VI nun WAUOTT-On IW April. IBM el WIIIIUCT. Bnium'i Croea Road Mansei. Ctaarlsa winalon Wan Mitact, Da**** > M - p.m. an-da* II Cam* wry. tilvia sfa'ttitl %  Wllmn 'ino*'". Mti.1* •Ml '• Wsic.u i K i n >. C* -"i %  IN MEMORIAM RTSLTN— %  << losing memory of our. Mr died i 4ih AUIII. net* Int" ssd wn have ossi. yst vour I OH SAIL UTOMOTIYr \ *N on* III r * Van I" too* • %  *• %  "• .11 IMM •f^"""** rOSUUsg orBsr 4if" % %  -' **"*"• rtUMr unalcr !*"•• %  • '**"** nalsB* )1M >M %  • % %  in* Cou i i — f HVMIII nn< MArTIU ft Co., LM YOUNO MAN for b* muMf of using -UK "IBB innmminK and r !" aierrurj. %  -— i -. —%  — ipftolater* • %  •" •B*"* w *4?"i"r*" r 2" *"***" A """~ ^fer %  i rnrrrn one .eeo*>d Hut-ado. AdJBHH, TJH rAHeV-Mlnor Two-toSalussi IjBe ,rw. Moor Tourse T.BM miles Morrta i .(or* Bateon vr-cy good eonaliii.. ; ( dge 'i"*' t*o-.e*irr. d**m. ..king into P* "P_ MJ| SMiubi* tor Kir* 11*47 *JEi Wolsalry 1 nun mltaa In •.<,. lT.OWi mil**, %.ry iw i .i.din FoUT ROYAL OAKAOB Lad. Telephone 4M4 %  %  MJXTR1CAL II mi< wencBS 1 til Dial TTB7 „n ( pea MAffB ... %  •I Ml II MIIS Labourer Not Guilty SHIPPING NOTICES l .-. M. IP*--. eVaf... er. St t w ai Cues* •-* *o. • (V &Brs=jr^ur3= ? W 1 K l*f.-Ba a*a) M> aa %  M ** % %  . a*-4 *B —JO.*— %  •• • PACK A* .ill %  • H *W.i>a,i BTACBVB..ital>i.for AJ, P k F iiCftrr rt Broad Blrset m. ROOBBTB.T M*rrll Pally lumuHM. isxludln. Frigid*, ire. T.lephone and BoBlrTuaaon Available in Mat Phone IBM 4 • IB—I f r> .,.-. Qoj I JUnr Fo >•** rgc Parit7 had paid that Husband! had :*fo> t BMhbOMr> among aomr rlothea In the prata. Mr ri-minded the iury at other iuch aa one witneu >. IIIM %  white >a>lni Hall waa In a white ahlrt f had mnnnd another he waa In khaki and ailed lrn '"'(1 them 'net*, waa no evidence -run The* t .ill itrfnrr ihern for them to i aaaaiii li I Hall The Jury retired half an hour h*i iheiwarda and returned with the MO he had rorrBCted verdi.t rf not lull** .1. .aid ^————rVETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. -HUM. PBOH Minn HBCVBA. on Hi April IBM lllh April 1PU mt' Ap*K itat IK ISA I II. A F •;• %  •#• .IV l-n-tai in."* BortJ. •> daal aiat Brron m m and %  p I* frMav larl* AITTION INDFJI THF Sll.VtJl HAMMKV %  mil tot) bwa* Hi ItoWrt THom PatriMld Slron I BA1XB WrUfPlNC PAPER •> 1JJ0 n'clnk TinI RRANKtlt. TfcOTMAN A CO, l/NDER T1IF. SILVKR HAMMER %  ^"H* %  ..llr.. I M MIS( KIJ.ANFOUS I OSI A I Ol Ml ( %  n T ,—da% Bll> barrr ol Mn A llama. . will %  *" her furnuura ai Ili H dtaWB. i Jam**. l"tif Bailee and t > Table ilo aeat I lira. Mir IbtiUnd. ornament .Tabiea all in mahecan< (. P| aerrtce* V.er.. J.r%  ..I ttl.l and dloOKPR Halib.il Uver Oil m 3 e. e. and 1* c < boltto*. alo In t*nllea "I :. Canaul" Cm be obtained from yru* t>ruCBM <" t Jorioaon B Co.. PMnea v.'iiltam Hmn BOeel. ABBata l. %  llliOKU I^TIOHATOBJM Phone MBI r> tween lindlim I • H-4n Boup "ST?*. NOTICE The Annual tearwrai Medina of t Barbodoa Baafeelball A—ial...,, -HI b. held at the V M C A on rHIDAV. tn Apri. at I B) P I that Ihty ana> < > tot the Orneral Meetinc M 1 s-an IrttUtlMM and the complealnn i, (-an be obtained from your it or E. JaBwann A Co Prince William Henry Strorl. AgniU Id" <-|l(K>KKA I^IIOnATORJXS I'hone >B: l^tween t and I a.m. I • m-+t rtmjlANT—43 centa 1 II cenli par lb. at C. H* aaajat, Cili. I.> Advert i*i In the S rewarded. Plaai I Urpt ( WEYMOUTH CLUB NOTICE Bfc u dVra are hereb* remlndad ol Ui AnKal Genera, Meeting which lake, paaae tn.hi PrWa] 4'-. April l**l ; 4* M The Rnrd MemnflaL JMpaa IO WBl.TBHtRa, Sretv It 13 In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE i* %  UBUor. I %  ion m il Srum. Mall •t a board a-id ah Cilehlr,*! A .i ... La He. C!1 > -Doted U -i and da' of April. IBU tall A TALMA tan. : rnr.DKnirK MUrtreTiJ Idh lo he IMU %  day the liUi aVv ol April. IBU JI II o'cloaB. -I. II A I 4 4 Id— In PWOTTA-TWCB are from C lohnaon A to ii inn> MrnrBtreet AfenU for! hb. r Co I'hone Mr I betweer. in 14 U—An I TAKE NOTICE MORNING MIST Thai tmHRY W PlEABODT AFRICA ipROPMETAIIVi I %  MTTBD. a rmpanv incorporated and riiatlnr unde' I'..United llablllt* laws of the Union of Month Africa whose trade or buslnaaa aadiaaa la Argua Cnamhen. >. ii IT. ft Street Cape Town. South Africa. liKii". has appllad for the r e g a tt a iton of a trade rnark in Part "A" of 'Ir fitter In respect Of canned fnilla. ftah. dried fruit, eryrtalllaed fruit. ( -^r-e \ Dtnorulnra. Oil Paintlnl — [lure* Planti ...... %  BtMtri I rsrdBuj tswim C. JaMuUe and Fatdlnf. Vrrandah Chairs Oo Cart. Preei Coal Blove. Linen. L P. t;ardawi Tdota and I M Bale )l M otldttL Tmr. CABMl IS!; WKI I; TROTHAN A CO.. \ 11 > 11 i -. r 4 4 Jr. •^ IH-Month Sentence llret referred fc. the dut irf IVnaavutKin to prsrve their caee ben*nd aal resiKtiishle danibt and aaid lhat it waa not bsvauaa a man happened it. he i-haided lhat he nere s smtilv ww guilts of the rrime (-iVTRmtTftd It waa for them to deMiLordahlp the Chief Juitlcv Hn Allan Collymore acntenced ."•t-nanut aeller Samuel Alleyne of Weston. 8t. James who was found KUllW earlier In the BfBlond, of IBM the wimesBs, for the i^**"**" 11 ^P"*.^ !" *}""*! I re*, hed that -tandard hou ": %  "* "*** ,ln 19 ?. ' lS %  hai ih.nld h.vr ( -.rfe.t cm'nonthImprtannrnent with hard them 5 0U \. Al 7 n '' hd two previou. ted mi! thai while Fart-onvietlon. for petty larceny. Irs had aa(d that he had reft the rMHtaa lo go and tell a nelghboui Seventeen-year-old F1U Gerald id had left Huihnd5 outside the Hayntd of HagRall Hall who xtse and returned and found him pleBded guilty earlier in the sesiU outside. Husbands had said slop* to Indecent assault and who .at when she left, he wen! into had been given a good character •he hou-*and she returned and by the Probation Officer was put found him In the house Again on probation for 18 months. -MIIOil 1 BIHTMAMtTON 4NII AMBTBBUAM WUJ*M.rTAI> ee. IBad Apr.I IBU aABLINO TO TBIMIBAB, PABASIAKIMO ANO BBIIISM ..I 1\N 1 M COTT1CA on Trh April IBM S K UONAMIIC on Sth M.>. IffN SAIIXSl, to UIMIitti till • I BA( 40 M S HECVDA Hat April IBM S %  BOSKOOP ITU. April IPK B P. Mt'tBON. SON A CO LID Assaaa. llfaUBM PAYS BtSI N^< ---a s. K.m an1 Peeo'!• o*il> ,.r Ml Vincent Maihn. .... „tafBV 'CACTOrTf; nsO. I'AlllllP. win .rcept Cargo and Fwaaangers lo. St Luata, and At ib-. m for St Vm.-i MB |: M The MV %  DAMhixili" will arcopi Canto and rnn|> l *t l^aria, G renada and Ambi. and BaUUng Wsdns-to%t*Bsd' ,, !" : The M V CARIBRFX will anomir.kii. A Sa| • — %  "•" %  *-lBai Wed> Sth mat II. S* ROOMS OWMRA ASSOCIATION (DM (Ml 'e> Canadian (National Steamnhipri -in .mini -.n ADV CHANCERY SALE UIV NSXBA1R < ANAULAN cnUIBJOl ANAlilAN CONBTRLCTUli i AJJV MOOKaTY ANAU1AN I H AIJ H I. M %  -ADV NKLBON .. i ANA1HAM CMUMSR t ANAOIAN Curt*TH l;c -r 1 j| 1 AUV 19>i tm M Junr II July AM,,., %  < 1 Apr. W Apr 11 Ma> Julr 1) Ju). IS July ur-s—rt^ "ill •" t ip tor sale al t"r ResTii 3TPre. P\.sllc rhiiMlnaj, IVrldsewva-n. hetwasn II noon and 1 p m for the sum rd an the da'c • ,*-d below It r-t then .old. It will be act np on sach •n.eeadks, Priday ai the anmr place and during the same hour, until sold Full Parlsrulara on appltreltan to me. DMendani JOHN WPJUJ-y roa.1. Pi.inl ft FDWIN IJX BILL rHOPMITY All thai rertaln puce ... parrel ol land altuatr at Btrwarta Hill In Ihe pariah of Bt. John and lalend of Barbados aroae-ald containing bv pdnteaaursnu-nl one aeie ahd laant two puchr. Abutling anl bounding on 1he wnth on lamia r-r Mouni Plsasant Plantation on UM North and on the West on landof Mr. B 1Barrow and on the Bait on lands now or late of Mr John Weatherhead or however else the same ma* abut and bound Together wilh Ihe mi n us — or rlW*lllngno.ussnd all snd •insular other the building, and erection. thereon erected ;mu bulli .landing and being with thappurBra., U Apr a Jui> u J... SB Ju. MIBTBBOI Mi l-.N CRUMOEH 7 Apr Si Apr : AUY IIUI.M.V U Api I ADY NBLeVON ia Ms i its t-HUkSEH *4 May IB Ma> ANAULAN • oHTRUCTOK t juns IS June • J.i. | 11 asjaj iuv RODsrsrt .. CANADIAN 1 AIJJCNOBJI .. S3 June Bf Jin. AHT NTBajBoM .. a Sub a J >N CXUBSaBl .. 14 July IB Jul.' i ANADIAf. %  .INSTRUCTOR M July M J,.l, ADY BH| .. 1 Aug. f Auf Arrl.-. a I i-l... 14 Ap, BB BBBjj • Aug 1 Ap, g Bn a M-, %  Jun. IB Jul) II Junta Jun. 1 JUI> 11 Jul< II J a A i ]-. •wd %  BBSBH \K TVRES We now offer lor sale in on* .tore th* famous GoodTSor Lorry and Paaaangsr Car TyrssWe will put Ihem on *our csr or lorry free K R HUNTS; A Co LU Lr Broad St Dial MM M*B> -BB. (.UlllllU A DAHLIA lafean for Gladioli and Dahlias HI dstlveey in Dscrmber IBU. parties booNIng plaaa? phone 4441. • Gedlea Qrant. Ltd IB 1 5t14n WHAT THEY SAY 1 -," %  r t .v or rent i JVST RKCBITTJD Valor Btovs part*. % %  :.Hnf — Chrmneya *jpesaderi. Otld 1 Plslea Wick*, and Oven* Also Stove parU Enquire Auto T rt i. Trafalgar •> Spry BUeet. M M I S4— t f n. OILTh* world* Basat motor 'irdol. at all leading Oarage* and Bar. .r vehlels dassrve* the ne-l T">I. '7~md -hei-'.'i hue caia 17 1 M it %  %  sa Ingredient. In illtled to re.M.r lonth from the lnd t snd win be n m. Mis* ons of April. 1BBI. neaa Bins persitn anan in the nican• i' give nollte In duplicate to ms al v ohVe of i.ppualUon of such regliation The trade mark can be Been > application at iresSBee Dale-l iliia BHh day of March ISM II WILLIAMS. Regotrar of Trade MarKi TAKE NOTICE PINNACLE Thai HENRY W PKABODY SOUTH APR1CA • PROPRITTAR* • I.1M1TXD. a Company incorporsled snd *"tinf under the limited liability las* of the Union of South Africa wi.<*r trad* or buM. > • address la Ana Chambers. > '"hureh Sir eel Cape Town. Bo-ith Afrscs. l.aa applied lor the reassm. i. ,.l. Sore Mouth 'Of* Bloody Teeth rrhss. Trench Mc n*i Bad Ciaai U Istar cause your t bleeding 1.. %  aors moulh and qalrkli 11* ' "'1 Y" v|h lr n %  *".]|iKiiul make your nmuili %  and Bars your teeth or mo". bs in rsturn of empty i.a-k.f.i AmaBsn rn^m ...in rh.mn%  i Th* guarantee BtL.trla >uu Unguentine Relieves pain of Jl.ST TO KK.VI.W YOU ... when you purchase from fK.xm.M. aTMMOJVM Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods at Your Door. CENTRAL EMPORIUM Corner Broad A l mint Streeta ..... ......... ..,.-. -^^,->-ve^^'^^,e.'V^^I Fsc fsurtber particulsra. aavir as— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO^ LTD.-/V....U. WW<-//.V,'/aV/,v/,v,-,v//,.,y/ > I r ..i.,„. * I UKJPJIATOR—Ow* II Csfoaspg oil Retriger'itor. 4 cu .. I. perlett working si WrUiT. Barn t I LSIl f.gggBBBBl We are .ae Ihl* lady onlv eatced al hundreds of StBsr FURNISH TO-n \\ !hf Mon-v Sd|Wiy L-l'ANsXLCll snd othei %  kd(. asr • Van i He. srlth Van. %  WsTd.obes and Urea. I.IIft'OK LICENSE NOTICE HAN-IK AVU KrMOt M. The apv.li.ati..., of Dallas Marshall of a purehsssT I liquor License No. t of IBM framed WU-." Orsen In respect of a Board rd Oslvanee) shew aMuatsd .1 Pllgrinsa %  ove soid Jcmse lo a Board and tiahanited >.p rilualed ai Well lluae. St Philip. nd lo use it al iuch laat described %  BBjBJBJ \-.'A ISM iSgd GOItDON niiiWNX. Applicant. HAItfTH Kaq U DM H II Thl. sppllcil'.m will he c Idered at a LatsnUng Court to We-lnesrl... Ihe|. il.nl ISM a \ r.l-ven o'clock a.m. .'..lice ro.irta. Dial." I A W .1A HTTP %  • MAHOGANY. „ S b.e. fi. Dining, Co wbsr K,%  Id I.. '. . .y Kitchen an ... ..„. g-fSU* n plec.a m Mnla ... and llufli, and J flics Thing* NkW AMI L.S.WILSON FURNITURE AUCTION PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT We are instructed by Mr. W. D. Chnrlton to dispose of nil his Modern Furniture and effects at WHITEHALL FLATS, Codrinpton Hill. St Michael at II 30 a.m. on WEDNESDAY, 9lh April O AUCTIONEERS J ...... M. Iff a.alo.. V CO. A F S. F V A ph.oe MM. PUnSatlss. Bsllglsg Hag later lam.. Ilah. Ir'rd fr TH, l i ... li :i ^ rsspset of canned fruHa. crysta. Used fruit, i ..nd fruit itie** uaed ai food .. food, snd will be entitled to isgl.l-r Btaame after one onlh from the end d*i ol April. IBM. ileoa SD-ne person shall In the meanine give noli..In d-ti"g under tie limned llabilili lawa *jf Uvs Union of Bdutk Africa whoa* trade or business add re. a U Argua Chambers, > t hnrch Bteeet Cap* Town, nouth Africa. 1 •ifra-ten n*. applied for inresjiatratum m a trade mark bt Part "A" ol irer-rter In reapNI of canned truR* .am*. Bah. dried fruM. eryelal1iae.t fruii Tuil JiOre.. t.uil sq. sabSB. I. jit and Iill bsvs.-g... and auliatjfcras uoad a* (oon or aa ln*,edi.nl, food, and will b. mUm t.. lesn.ter the aame alter on. 'nasafB from Ihe Snd ds> ol April IMj -usss aom* person ahsll in Ihe mean i m*> jive notice in duplicate to ms -1 •Bare of oppoallion of .uch tsafj. Th* trade mark ran be e**' i i orlite day *f March IBM H WILLiA-tts. Of Trad* U.fi%  m appllci... DaBM Ih FOR SALE I \ \4 II III I.f. 111. Avenue. — Belleville \n attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated on a corner Kite of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries (1 tncUaaed), l.ngt* drawing room, dining room, -ttudy. modern kitchen, t bedroom., garage, etc. L*i llnurr arrrpted for quick sale, owner going abroad. •IOII.\ >1. III.AIIO.X afk CO. C'G'TRANSATLANTIOUE ; s.ilinn from Aotrthamptoii to GQadelaupe. M.iriinique. Barbados Trinidad. La Gualra. (ur.r.o A Jamatea Phone 1 -1 %  %  AKS. K.VA. REAL ESTATE AGENTS Plantation. BaUdlng. —a fsW burn I aJ thai li aotlMptic Rrllr.ti Psia—G1B^ CooJon—ProBotga I lag. Tabes Of jars. TAKE NOTICE TAKE NOTICE LANYARD Tluil IIKNRY W PHABODY SOITN UltaCA IPRUPRIBTAHYI LaMlTtai. a • rp..rated and esislir.g und. .i lunllttv U-* of th* Unla >l SoulB Africa whoae trade or bui isss addrsaa la, Argua Chambers. 1 'hureh Sirse;. Cap* Town. South Africa, -•porter., lie* applied lor the m|'.u-iii of a trade mark Hi Part A of lag Hi in MBpeet of canned fruits. %  n .. iuti dried fruit. crysUlbvd fruit. i ml Juices, fruit fSjuaahc* fruit, and fruit ilVarssBBI, and aubatence. uead aa food r aa inmedlenl. In food, and will he nlllled lo %  sajfariWr th* aame after one nontii from the Snd day of April. iffSS. i.nse givs notics in duplicate to me at v "fr** of opposition of such regi-> sppUesUon al trey offlot. IK* trade nuirk ca n be Been I _JhI TMB "tTNmOK" Pen CO I.IM listed Ihia atn da) of March IPSl '. 1TEJ0. .. Brltl.h Cump-ny. whoae trsilII W1IJ.1AM.S. r^aaoaro, addreee la STS. Klrsrstnn R.^ Regidrar of Trade Maik> "•"*•*. %  **.. bigUnd. Msnulsctu.ee. S4SS—So. '"* %  PP"*** '' >ne regm, %  i 'ide mark In Part A" of Regt'ter h *-'.*-'e*e*e*e*e*e'e'i.'e*e**'e*-V*'.*>'-V'. '**' ' v ""' '•""'*" P">. p-n holdi a> %  pencil!, pen nib. and pen and pen clips and will be entitled to rogicter Mine allri one monlh fr..., the tn-1 .. IBM. unlrsa some psraon /V T//*.' '" ln ""* "tesnllme give notice kl i.• me si say oOVe of ovpo>i lion of iu.li rssnahralki The Irsde marl. •. a be aeen on application at my office Dated ihla Mth day of March ISM H WIIJ.IAJlf*. Reci.tr lr of Trade Marh. ADVERTISE ADVOCATE or. i.ifo.v nrvf.s DIAMOND ENGAGPMIM And DIAMOND WmfMNG RINGS AvslUble Separately or In SeU Vaur Jewellers | . e LIMA A CO.. LTD. to. Broad Slrrrl ORIENTAL PALACE HEADQVARTEBS rOR MM 1 I Ml.-. rilOM INDIA. CHINA a CEYLON THANI'S Pr WBI. Hy. 81 Dial 36 TO-DAYS MWS FLASH I Some Bin Coplea of ILLUsTRATTD lJNIK)N SfV^ Of the Ki-i I aa-ral ter Saae all si JOHNSON'S STATIONERY and HARDWARE I'lAXO IIII I I Al. MR. Prafena GUY JONSON of fh Hoi-al Academy of Mustc, •• THE BRrTWH COUNCIL Wak.nnd White Park on WEDNE8DAT. th April, at S 30 pi Prooraninie includes ; THREI SONATAS PRCLUDI AND FUGUE IN C SHARP SONATA IN H MINOR. Op 58 ..nd WORKS by Irrohinr. FBMPB and J Admlaaloii 1100 or 60c. All Sear* R< Scar lot fi Boch Chopin ST. VINCEIVT <*ltt Mf.lM V GOOSE AIR SERVICE %  insiM SI HI Ml I I SL Vincenl/Barbados/HL Vincent IVp.rU St. Vlnecnl AniTM FUrhados Depart* ttarbados ArTlvrsi 8L Vincent St. Vlncent/Trlnldad .'St. Vlnrenl Irepiirta St. \ in., in Arrlvea Trlnld.d l>rparta Trinidad ArrlvtB St. Vincent 9.00 a.m. 10.00 :i in 10J0 BJTL 11.SO a.m B.00 t0.J0 |1J0 1.00 From Soatbamplon Arrives rurhada. "COLOMBIE" 18th March. 1952 31st March, 1952 *'DE GRASSE". 2
',*,',.',*,*e*,*e*.','SS t '.',~ t '.', --'-'.". ,'/,'//,*//-', WEDNF.SDAVS st V UMnt/OreBdB/Sl. VISKS-BI Depirta SC Vincent ,0,00 n m Arrlvea (iren.d. IOJQ a.tn. I>. parO. f.renaiLt .. HJJ0 a.m Arrives st. Vbieent 12 noon Additional \ 1 irht From St. Vincent to Trinidad tlrnrs on Application St. \ Intent B^rlK-di" Ikiniiulc. Har bad AA si Vinrem Orparta St. Vincent 8.00 a.m. Arrive* Barbados 9.00 a.m. DeparlB Barbadaa .. y.30 a.m. .Vrrlvea Domlnloa -11.30 a.m. Departs Dominies .. 12J0 p.m. Arrives Barbados 2JO p.m leepsxts lUrWdss, ., 3.00 pm Arrived St. Vtoeent 4*0 p.m. nnmsDATi KL VtBcent/Trinldad/SL Drparta St. Vincent \ rrive, Trinidad Deparu TriardM Airrrea St. Vincent 9.00 a.m 10*0 p.m 11.90 a.m. 1.00 p.m UIIIIIMII A CO.. AITSTHV LTD. A'CENTK Inn ee II1 II.MI St. %  •hone I70I 5 Wm. FOGARTY (BDOS)LTD. TAILORS OF PROVEN RELIABILITY AND EXCELLENT FITTERS We carry a wide range of HIGHGRADE SUITINGS lo choose from OUR GUARANTEED CUTTING AND TAILORING WILL TRANSFORM YOUR CHOICE INTO A SI It OF IIIMIMIKIX Wm. FOGARTY (BDOS) ITD.