Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




:



ESTABLISHED 1895



MURDER TRIAL:



Peasant Proprietor
Acquitted

NEW INDUSTRIES:





BARBADOS,



SPECTATORS SHOUT AS \— ;
VERDICT IS ANNOUNCED

AN ASSIZE JURY after deliberating for half an—~—
hour yesterday acquitted forty-two-year-old
Joseph Gibbs of the murder charge brought against

him for the death of his brother-in-law Duncan)
Headley who died on the 18th of January last.

The tall slenderly built peasant proprietor who had sat |

silently in the dock during

the three-day trial while he}

heard eleven witnesses give evidence against him, stood
in that same silence as he heard the foreman of the jury
announce a verdict of not guilty of any offence, and His
Lordship Mr. Justice Taylor say to him that “the jury have | the British Guiana delegate to

found you not guilty; you may go.”

Even after His Lordship had
left the Bench, he stood there a
if riveted to the dock. |

Immediately the Judge ieft the

Bench, a shout went up from
spectators both inside the Court
and those who had waited all

merning on the square in front!
of the Public Library to hear the
outcome of the case.

Hundreds flocked around and
ran behind the police wagon which |
took Gibbs to his home, and when

Mr. Walcott, Senior Counsel for}
the Defence anq his learned |
Junior attempted to leave the!

court yard by cir, hundreds of |
others flocked around his car,|
patting him on the back and con-
gratulating him on his success, {
2% Hour Address

When hearing resumed yester-|
day morning, Mr. W. W. Reece, |
Q.C., Solicitor General, who!
prosecuted the case on behalf of
the Crown addressed the jury for}
ancther two hours and a half, and
then His Lordship Mr. Justice Tay-
lor summed up the case for an
hour and a half.

Stick Raised |

Mr, Reece continuing his address

yesterday morning said they would

recall that Estaline Gibbs said she

did not see the stab, but she did
see the deceased raise his stick,



s had a

and that

| second
; corroborated in the statement of | that the General Elections under

; was liable to get stuck.”

|
with the knife. I
bungh of bananas and a
knife, the deceased rushed me, and
the force with which he rushed |
me, the knife jiable to “juck” him.
We both fell to the ground.”

He argued that at the time the
wound is alleged to have taken
place, according to the statement
of the accused, there was no ques-
tion cf his being wounded when he|
wes on the ground. |

His learned friend, being ex-|
perienced at the Bar, and know-!
ing thmt the Crown Prosecutor
would have to speak after him,
did not press the theory which}
emanated from the doctor, be-|
cause he realized that the state-!
ment of the accused was there
he would destroy the}
fallacy of his argument. !

Story Corroborated }

He suggested that the — story
told by Millington Thursday
for the first time about the
bunch of bananas, was

not juck him



on

the accused when he _ admitted

;that he cut a bunch of bananas, | place early next year.

put it in the road, and when the
deceased took it up, carried it
home, ai.d refused to give it to}
him, that it was when he had. cut
the second bunch, and on his way |
home with it that the deceased
rushed him, and “in the rush, he|

They would remember also that Evidence and witnesses are
from her demonstratiom the stick difficult things. They say one
did not fall until the deceased thing before the Police Magistrate }
staggered, which was probably at and varied it before the jury,
the time he received the wound. | but that did not mean that he

Tt was obvious that’the daughter was a wilful Jiar. It was for,
and the wife were clos¢ly connect- them to decide whether the
ed with the dead man, but that did charge was of such a nature as_to
net necessarily mean that they | make. obhauana Pare all oer
were liars. He would therefore| W!ness evidence. was a mat~4
ask them to accept the evidence | ww Sve what value they felt |
given by the two women, to a statement.

Admitting that Edwafd Milling- Knife Never Found
ton was a “self-confessed liar, | In rebuttal to the suggestion
Mr. Reece told the jury that be|that if no blow was struck, they
that as it may, it did not mean| could that it





conclude was an

that the other witnesses were also|
liars They had to examine th |
evicence of each witness, and on
the whole of the evidence, arrive
at their decision.



Knife Taken Away
Barnes had told them that the
defendant had said that the knife}
and bananas had been taken away
by Jane Murray, and this was sub-
stantiated by other witnesses.
There were, certain cases in
which no witness actually saw
what happened, but certain facts
were proved, and if the inferenc#s
which they could draw from those
facts led to one direction and one
directicn only, and that wag that
the defendant was guilty, they
should return a verdict of guilty,
It did not therefore follow in the
case before them that when wit-
nesses said no blow passed, that no
wound was inflicted, because it
did not take any sweeping blow
with a sharp edged instrument. |
The doctor had to'd them that a
knife could have caused the weund
which resulted in the death of
Duncan Headley. It was a matter
for them to decide, and they should
take into consideration that the
twe men had clinched, and that
one had the other in a “neck-tie,"
on which point he would suggest
to them that if the man fell back-
ward as was stated by witnesses
the wound would have been in th:
back.
Evidence Considered
There they had all the witnesses
relting facts, telling the story of
what they saw, and even in the
case of the man Edward Milling-
ton. they had te consider all the
evidence. Mr. Reece once again
drew the attention of the jury to
the statement given by the de-
fendant in which he said “I did







| days after.

2.0L TOMATO

unintentional act, Mr, Reece asked
then to take into account that the
knife which was taken away was!
never found by the police, and
that the stick which Inniss took
up did not reach the police until 8
It was all those little
points which would help them
to assess the evidence as a whole.'

In the light of the mental strain
resulting from the knowledge of
the death of her husband, could
they believe that Eulise Headley
could place Miss Belle in strict
chronological order in the sequence
of the events which took place.

Mr. Reece suggested that the
jury was not bound by the spoken
words, because if they were, they
could not draw certain conclus-
ions, and would have to accept
every word spoken by a witness.
They should weigh the evidence,
and come to a_ conclusion as to
what facts were established on
the evidence,

A Protest

Mr. Walcott protested that if
the witness for the Crown had
given evidence and

is not at
lenged by cross-examination or
by his own Counsel, it is not open
for Counsel on either side to say!
that that witness was not true. |
The Crown particularly could!
not place two witnesses in the}
stand, representing them as being}
people of credibility, he could}
not, if they were not challenged, |
discredit one and credit the evi-

j}dence of the other. |
Mr. Reece termed the sugges-

tion as “one of the most
lous”, and this
iate objection from Mr.
who appealed to His Lordship to
counsel the Solicitor General not}
to use such a word, since sueh |
conduct often led to abuse be-/

ridicu-



jof the

met with immed-|
Walcott |

Bauxite

Expanding

Hon’ble W. J. Raatgever,

the Regional Economic Com-
mittee Meeting told the Ad-
vocate yesterday that the B.G.
bauxite industry is still ex-
panding. Another kiln has re-
cently been put down for
processing bauxite for export
and the company is expand-
ing its operations to increase
its output in view of the world
shortage.

He said that last year’s rice
crop was a bumper one and the
colony was able to supply all the
quotas to the islands in full. It
is proposed to put in a drainage
irrigation scheme which will in-
crease further the land available
for rice cultivation.

With regard to the sugar crops
he said the estates hope to
the target set this yepr in order
to take advantage of the ‘satis-
factory agreement concluded with
H.M. Government.

reach

Industry

Mr. Raatgever said it is hoped

the new will take
The Gov-
ernor has sent on his recommen-
dations to the Secretary of State
for the Colonies after hearing tae
views of the members of the Leg-
islative Council.

constitution

He said that it is also proposed

,to appoint enumerators to regis-

ter voters who will be entitled to
vote under Adult Suffrage.
A minority recommendation

was that the Colony should have
one Chamber with elected
and nominated members, while

the majority were in favour of
having an upper end lower cham-
ber.
Council favoured the latter sys- |
tem.





Kden Explains
What Peace Is

BIRMINGHAM, Eng. March 29.

British Foreign Secretary, An-
thony Eden, gave his own defini-
tion of peace on Friday night.



“Peace is made up of innumer-
able points of agreement and in-
numerable acceptances of common
purpose. Peace is a_ condition
where both individuals and groups
of individuals take enough account
of the needs and rights of others
to refrain from pressing their own
to the ultimate point. Peace is a
state of neutral forbearance.”

Eden spoke at dinner of the
Coal Trade Benevolent Associa-
tion.—U.P.

.

HUK Celebration
Alerts Police

MANILA, March 29.

All entrances to Manila were
under heavy guard Saturday and
army patrols were on the move
throughout the island to prevent
violence on the Tenth Anniversary
formation of the Commu-
nist-led HUK. rebel movement.
The Defence Department said it is
“unwise to underestimate the
strength of the rebels.”

The Nineteenth Battalion com-
| bat team is being trained for
| Korean combat and the First Phil-



ippine Airborne Battalion was
held in readiness to go to Manila
in the event of HUK raids.—U.P.



tween Counsel who only had a! °° le 7 4 1a a”?
duty to perform. | We W anit Prieste
On Page 7 e. 1.
© Pe She | Italians Shout

ROME, March 29.
Cries of “We want Trieste”
| mingled with shouts against
| America and Britain Saturday
}night when more than 4,000

MISS OLGA SPENCE of St. Martin's, St. Philip, brought an extra

ordinarily huge tomato into the
vegetable garden and said that a
ing on a vine with other tomatoes
two pounds,

“Advocate” yesterday. She has a
friend pointed it out to her grow-
of normal size. The tomato weighs



| Romans massed in the
|Popolo to demand Trie s return
|to Italy at an open air rally
sponsored by Britain war veternas
| But most of the anti-Allied shout-
ing came from youths, Many
| youngsters carried signs identify-
| ing them as suppcrters of the new
| Fascist Party.—U.P.

jazza Del





| By HARRY KELLY

| LONDON, March 29.

| The walls of Jericho probably
| came tumtfing down more than




once. That is one conclusion that
{| can be reached from discoveries
of the British Archaeolo al
expedition currently excavating
the ancient city.
i The leader of the expedition?
| Kathleen Kennon, 45, Director

of the British School of Archae-

Members of the Legislative | gi, Ralph

Britain's ambassador to Egyp'
Stevenson conferred
this afternoon for the second

time to-day with Egypt’s Foreign

which

t

eee

T’dad’s Chick Aim
Says Gomes®

| Peasant Proprietor

$4 ----

J



ne eeees +:

MARCH 30, 1952

YACHT DAMAGED







WAR PLANES:







Than U.S.

ie
OLIVE BLOSSOM scored her first vidtory for the season when the R.B.Y.C. Sixth Regatta was sailed yos-
terday. After her great victory, she collided with a fishing boat and broke her spar.

Russia Has - Thousand



(Story on Page 5)





More Planes Than U.S.

Red China Is Also
Major Air Power

WASHINGTON, March 29,

Sir Ralph
Confers With
Hilaly Pasha

CAIRO, March 29

Minister.

This _ first
lasted

yeen called

talk this
for two hours

the Ambassador's request.

For

a half with his Prime Minister
Naguib Hilaly Pasha. Neither
would make any comment except
to say that the statesmen hed

‘

Their
afternoon
tatesmen

n what

meeting
one hour.
to

discussed,

second
lasted
refused
they had

After first
in Minister

meeting





‘exchanged views.”—U.P,.



Finds Opera

pan eee



VICTIM of a bang-up performance,
Metropolitan Opera star Rise Ste-
vens wears her arm in a sling as
she goes over a score at her New
York apartment. Miss Stevens,
hurled against a prop staircase a
bit too enthusiastically by tenor
Mario del Monaco during last act
of Carmen, suffered a strained
wrist but managed to finish the
performance. (International)



| Walls Of Jericho Fell Many Tim

ology in Jerusalem, wrote to the
Palestine Exploration Fund here.
Some interesting facts about
Jericho's history were revealed

in her letter.
‘





It seems pretty certain from
evidence une hed by Miss
Kennon’s expedition that a large
city existed there ‘some 3,000
years before Christ

Traces of seven lls were
found round the city indicating

morning
had
forward two days at

tno
Both
comment

Bgyptian
f Khalek Hassou-
ana, they talked for an hour and

Strain |

In a testimony “just re
_Committee General Hoyte
Aurforce Chief of StalT wa

‘leased by the Appropriations

S. Vandenberg United States
rned“that Russia, hes “several

thousand” more planes than the United States and has

developed atomic weapons

which are “the most ominous

threat this country has ever known.’

He said that by 1955 the
entirely jet propelled. He
planes not counting “sev«

Grenada Has
Dry Season

Grenada has had an extremely

dry season with the result that
cocoa, the staple product of the
issand will be short, Hon'ble
J. B. Renwick who is now in
Barbados for the R.E.C. Meeting

fold the Advocate yestarday.

He said that they are fortunat’
that they are receiving morg val-
uable prices than they had anti-
cipated at the beginning of the
crop. These prices are due to the
faet_ that there has been a world
éhortage.

“At present Grenada is produc-



ing more sugar than is requ

for loeal consumption,” he

and added that their duty was
to produce it sufficiently eco-

nomically to enable them to sell
in the world’s markets.

Sir John Saint will shortly be
visiting the colony to investigate
and report on cane cultivation
and the sugar production and his
report will be anxiously awaited

He said that they are hopine
shortly to set up an entirely new
telephone system in colony
on modern lines which will en-
able them to take in more sub
scribers than is the case at pres



the



In reply to a query about the





working of the Legislative Coun
cll under the new constitution
Mr. Ren said: “It is working
more harmoniously than had





Eastwood Visils
St. Kilts

(Fron Our Own Correspondent)
ST. KITTS, March 29,
The Under-Sec ary of State




for the Colonies,
companied by his wife arrived by
B.W.1.A. plane Wednesday
leaves for Antigua today
During his stay he visited place
of interest, the Government Stock
Farm, peasant holdings, the sugar
and the







factors social centre run
j by the factory
} He met political heads and
| others He was impressed with

the beauty of the island and was
/ apparently satisfied with the pres-
ent industrial relations,

he
Jeo

it had bee; ilt several time







The exi of these wall
confirms the 1928 expedition di
coveries of Professor J, Garstar
who found ft Is of
Jericho | d
They were f flat ir
f t of the found ' but

ith f an
—UP

been anticipated by, most people.”

Eastwood, ac-

and

Russian airforce will be almost
said Russia has 20,000 combat

ral thousand” in reserve and in
its European and Asiatic satellites,



He called Communist China a
, ‘major air power” with many alr
| base
j Vandenberg said Red air power
jin the Far East tops that of the
1 U.S. even though the United
| State has about a third of its
fcombat planes in that theatre,
i In listing the Army’s accomplish-
|} ments since the Korean outbreak
jand setting its goals for future
} peace he said the Uniterd’ States
army has grown from 590,000 to
1,560,000 officers and men

Vandenberg aid “We have
made important pragre in the
fields of tactical atomic weapons,
guided missiles, improved tanks
and anti-tank weapons, lighter,
more economical equipment and
deadlier ammunition,—U.P.



Roof Burnt

A portion of the roof of a house

at Sherbourne, St, John, wag
burnt, when a fire occurred at
about 11,25 p.m.’ on Friday. The

dama is estimated at $200 but
the hou is not insured,
It is the property of Muriel

Holder ond Pearl Bascombe,

At

fire at

Maxwell, Christ Church, a
ibout 8.30 p.m, on Friday
quantity of second crop
, property of several
of the district
other fire at Salt Pond,
Christ Church at about 10.00 p.m.
m Friday burnt 250 holes of
second ripe canes, property
Fitz sarratt of the same
They were not insured.

burnt a

ripe cane

peasant
A

crop

Eastlyn, St. George at
um, on Friday burnt
of an acre of trash

not insured, The







ing Hints
4 Sidelights
Feotball
cer Lessons;
Snorts Review
Chafs on Swimming;
Yachting
6 Cooking; Sewing; Your
Baby And You;
Clarke's Column
Peasant Proprietor Not
Guilty of
& Editoria Sitting On

The Fence;

Church
9 Contemporary
ings
Girl

on Spert;
Report; Soc-
Athletic

wo

Mrs,

~~

Murder



Garrison
Paint-
10

Guides’ and

B.A.A, Reports !
11 The Lives Of Harry
Lime
12 The Dancing Master
13 Comic Strips
16 Local News {|



Russia Has More

if
addre
A-fire at
ibout 5
a quarter
vhich 1
rash i the propert of the|
xecutor of the estate of Joseph,
Devonishs
On Other Pages
Page
2 Carib Calling
3 Cinem+; Farm = and
and Garden; Garden-
|
}
|



ANAT

Wires
Witz,



G7

B.G. Expansion Plan
Continues

BAUXITE:



ot Guilty Of Murder

In troduction Of
New Industries Is

T’dad’s Chief Aim

HON’BLE ALBERT GOMES, Trinidad’s Minister» of
Labour Industry and Commerce told the Advoeate yester-
day that their chief aim in Trinidad is to introduce as many
new industries as possible in order to provide employment
opportunities for their rapidly increasing population.

He said that they had just achieved an important addi-
tion to the colony's economy in the form of the Trinidad
Textiles Mills belonging to Safie Bros. at Arima. They were
about to start work soon on the cement project so that
sometime in the near future they could look forward to
having a cement industry. In addition, he said that there
were several other industries at the moment in the diseus-
sion stage.

Mr. Gomes arrived here yester- ye Ta TTS t
day morning from Trinidad to pre- ‘
side over a meeting of the Execu-
tive of the Regional Economic
Committee which took place later
in the afternoon at Hastings House.

He is staying at Sandy Beach
Hotel.
He said that he was primarily

interested in increasing the pro-
ductive capacity of Trinidaq and
Tobago, because he thought it was
more important than anything els¢
in the final analysis. “‘What th«
average citizen wants is an op-
portunity of employment, a home
in which, to live and to be able to
lead a decent and proper life, The
basic requirement therefore j
employment and it is this aspect
of affairs on which we are
centrating he said.

“The essential prerequisite of
industrial expansion is mainten-
ance of stable conditions of Gov-
ernment. Without this important
prerequisite, if is impossible to at HON. ALBERT GOMES
tract new capital to amy country)

We are fortunate in Trinidad ir.pwill be possible for us to keep the
that we possess one the chief{country stable and prosperous and
factors in any industrialisation,|continue our work of adding to its
and that is fuel. But even with] prosperity and Sstabilliy.”’

this asset, industrial expansion Asked about Federation, he said

con-



would be almost impossible with-
out stable conditions of Govern-
ment,

“We have been very fortunate
within recent months im that we
have been able to’ provide those
conditions, but 1 sineéreiy ‘hope
that it will be possible for us to
preserve these conditions and
avoid any symptoms of unrest that
would lead almost inevitably to a
discouragement of further invest-
ment from abroad.

“It is a source of great satis-
faction to me that the relations
between labour and capital have

that so far as Trinidad and Tobago
were concerned, they had made
themselves quite clear in the
matter. They had,accepted the
report of the Standing Closer
Assoctatign! Committee. and the
moment the othér-yerviteriés were
wiling to implement its recom-
mendations, Trinidad and Tobago
would be only too happy to fall
in line,

“Our attitude is not isolationist
in any way” he said, “because we
feel that the West Indies have a
commen destiny and that so long
as they fail to realise the fact that



K.W.V. WINES & BRANDY
{



been on a very reputable basis jas isolated communities they
within recent months, and I can}mot hope to gain the respect anc
omly hope that this relstionship|regard of the other peoples in the
will be maintained, seeing that] world, they will remain weak and
without it, our prospects of in- | insignificant.

dastrial development would be “Trinidad and Tobago have al-
very meagre. ways been very forthright in their

Extremism ittitude to West Indian Federa-
“The great enemy of politica’ltion.” — 3 ;
stability is extremism’ he said Speaking for himself. Mr, Gome

ind “a political extremist thrives ssaid that he lamented the fact that
on the economic disabilities of thejthere was so much delay and so
people. If therefore, we can con- {much reticence being shown in re-
tinue to provide adequate avenues |lation to this very important
of employment for our people, it "matter.

a
——$



K. W. V.

THE LABEL WITH
THE KEY

To Health & Happiness

°

K. W. V. PAARL TAWNY
K. W. V. Coronation Wine
K. W. V. Old Brown Sherry
K. W. V. Amontillado Sherry
K. W. V. Old Oloroso Sherry
K. W. V. Sweet Vermouth
K. W. V. Dry Vermouth
K. W. V. VAN DER HUM LIQUEUR
K. W. V. Superior “Key’”’ Brandy



Se ee tebe eth be be he fe te ee ete te tee Neer fe ee tae tf te he fa

Nothing but the product of the GRAPE

enters into the blending of ...

INEXPENSIVE BECAUSE

OF |
PREFERENTIAL }

DUTIES.









BRIDGETOWN—Dial
1} TODAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.30P.M.



PAGE

rwo

SUNDAY

ee

1. KLIMi; pure, safe milk
2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration







—————

is always uniform




quality

In €










h very tin of nourishing KLIM
you get benelts found only in the finest
fresh cow's milk. Exactly the same amounts

of important food
KLIM
ANCE OF CONmSIS

ntials are yours in
s uniformity is your assur-
wily ine milk!

y un.





growing children

5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes

6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding |

7. KLIMis safe in the speclolly-packed tin






SS tae ee
\ Take pure water, BS |
\ add KLM, “22 stir and you pure safe
| Frowrwentenh J MELE |
ae SS ee



FIRST IM PREFERENCE THE WORLD over, ‘ 1980 Bordes Co.

aca |
GUARANTEED |
SERVICE "|

Remember any Watch anf
Clock Repairs will be deliv

2

Vee Sab tle clibes atl. } ie See, ate



erred te

GLOBE

TO-DAY Last Showing 8.30 P.M.

DECISION BEFORE DAWA

With RICHARD BASEHART — GARY MERRILL



TEE a ae
















MONDAY & TUESDAY 445 & 830 P.M. Raat eh
A DOUBLE \t_J. BALDINI & CO.
‘ wfice at Lashley’s Ltd.
WEELOW SKY hs
ene EE I SOLE AE DEE ATER 6 N
With RICHARD WIDMARK — GREGORY PECK Se aac ne itd me Ista =F
AND
acces wi’ Wsiailenly JSANETTA DRESS SHOP
With REX HARRISON — MAUREEN O’HARA (Next Door to Singers)

SETS |



OPENING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2ND, 5 & 8.30 }

Se ae i

JUST ARRIVED—Lovely Cocktail and Cotton Dresses, Jacq-
mar Searves and Squares, Pure Linen Men's Handkerchiefs

at 84 cents each. Nylon Briefs at $2.23 and $3.22.
































a
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TO-DAY to THURS. 4.45 & 8.30

i |'
LAUGHS! | |

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tases 72" x 100". $6.25

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story comes
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| 12 High Street 12 High Street






ee



ptt Mote eee tet* 4 toe 4 4, 7 q
et eee ee a

A COUNTRY FAIR

AT

ST. JAMES’ COMBINED SCHOOL
; (HOLETOWN)

ROBERT NEWTON. ay CUINNESS-KAY W.
HENRY STEPHE Ns \ i







ROODAL
EMPIRE

THEATRES
ROW





A4.6644
PP®PIPL PPPS PEE ELLIS, |



POLE PPP PPLE PPL APSO.













To-day to Thursday 445 & 8.30 TODAY to ‘Tt 15
Republic Freseni
. “OLIVER TWIST THUNDER ACROSS ON > |
By CHARLES DICKENS RHE PACTEK ° 3 hee,
- - Starring \' ») >)
SAT. Sth at 9 40 am Wendell COREY-—Forest TUCKER ih e >|
“HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE ee <
Vaamny PLEASE NOTI %
and S 3.00 P.M. 1 ) 9.00 P.M >
ERTIES OF OED RANTA 9 THE SHAKUNTAL DEY! SHOW ; x
l 1d er th . age »
OL YMPIC HAS BEEN CANCELLED i itronage of |
4 a . : .
—— — —— | MR. & MRS. .. 1. WILKINSON $|
To-day to Mon. 4.90 & &15 y J y
Tues 4.40 only RO} AL ‘ IN A\tD OF % |
Victor MATURE—Terry MOORT % x}
. nday st 2 Bows 4.90 4 f > " . |
“GAMBLING HOUSE nett Mines cacaey MS ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST VICARAGE x
and in x : .
. ed % 5
“BUNCO SQUAD" WRITE iPART" * . .
Re ae : x Teas, Ice Cream, Lucky Dip, Plants, |
Robert STERLING “SEA TY \WK x Vegetables, Hoop-La x]
iia egal aati
CALYPSO CALYPBO . . Dene ‘ » . " »
vu Dae ta Is Dancing — Steel Band — Etc., Ete. x |
wine . b |
TUES. 18ST AT 8.20 ve ee ees $ ' > |
1S ul Seat a x |
OaLyria wien fs 3 Admission to Fair: $
World Famous Calypsonians John RIDGELY 5 aint % |
; Led by an x ADULTS 1 - “te CHILDREN 6d. y)
SMALL ISLAND PRIDB “BORN FOR TROUBLE” & y |
espieibiatiinn . + |
Wed. & Thurs. 4.40 & & 15 Wed. & Thurs, 4.40 « 8.45 % %
John WAYNE . ONFLICT a F >
in benile asia ERT isd ins teas s 2 Bicycles to be drawn for. s
‘a < A P f an x
BACK TO BATAAN ee } Tickets now on sale 1/- Each $
a %
it
“FOLLOW ME QUIETLY” Denni MoRG AN % : }
- aes - . s ¥
All Balcony & Box Tickets for all Showi f OLIVER ‘ ‘ 4 j Door Prize Give “tai icket x
Will be on sale in a avanee ty eeyatl, Showings of OLIVER ‘Twist 3s >= r Prize Given. Retain Ticke >
‘ ‘
* x

ELLE ALLELE MAA MEAL
SS eee

INEMAS

AEE POSE EAE KI AEE EME







iG PRIDAY
OUTRAGE
with MALA POWERS

FORCE OF BARBAREES

1 HOLDEN—Nan

ARMS















2310 |



OISTIN—Dial 8404 =
4145 & 8.90
BEAT THE BAND

Francis LANGFORD &

to Tues. 445 &
Spectacul

Te-day
Warners

“HIGHWAY

Steve

so » . q
2-4 To-day & To-merrow p.m

on Hit

Act

RUTH STEVE ”
301
Virginia

TOMORROW

ROMAN COCHRAN iS ANOTHER DAY













BARBAREERS —Di ul S170
ALSO THE COLOR SHORT—CIRCUS TOWN Ao the COLOR SHORT set ie
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 4.30 & 8.30 P.M. Wee SS Se er eee ae
eran % KED Double Bil : om 2 ‘ r ; ‘ i » : - = THE “FUGITIVE
CROSSFIRE = & BROTHERS IN Ti SADDLR) reuse es |” praying “GRINGO
PSE SIs SS He : IN t ve Mayo 1 George O'BRIEN








DD":

I 30.3.52.—1n.



ADVOCATE





SUNDAY, MARCH 30,
een

. Carib (Calling

Dp" ROBERT DUNLOP, head
of the Seventh Day Adventist

Clinic in Port-of-Spain, arrived

here on , Friday evening by
B.W.LA., from Trinidad to attend
he Youth Congress now in pro-
gress at the Drill Hall, He was
x3ccompanied by his wife Dr. Lois

ember of the staff of

the Clinic
For R.E.C. Talks
JEGATES arriving on Fri-
g night from Jamaica for
Meeting which apens



he R.E.C

at Hastings House on Monday
were Hon'ble D. B, Sangster,
Jeputy Leader of the Jamaica
Labour Party and Minister of
Social Services, Mr. J. B. -Clegg,
Economic Adviser, and Mr. D.

y, Managing Director of Levy

ind Sons, merchants of Kingston.
They are staying at the Marine
Hotel,

Arriving yesterday morning
vel the Trinidad delega-
ion comprising the Hon'ble
Albert Gomes, Minister of La-
sour, Industry and Commerce
ind Mr. O. C. Papineau, Econo-
mic Adviser to the Government
wf Trinidad.

Transferred
RRIVING on Thursday night
from British Guiana _ by
B.W.LA. was Mr. Anthony Mc-

Conney, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Owen MeConney of “Frankville’”’,
“hrist Church. ;

Anthony who has been working
vith Barclays Bank in George-
‘own, has now been transferred
© the Bridgetown branch. y

Mr, Bete Rovira of Pete Rovira
Teurs Ine. of Puerto Rico is now
n Barbados for a short stay. He
arrived on Friday by B.W.I.A.
and was accompanied bv his
wife

U.C.W.1. Registrar

R. H. W. SPRINGER, M.A.,

Registrar of the University
College of the West Indies, arrived
in this colony on Friday evening.
The main purpose of his visit is
available for consultation

) incent and hopes to reach
aan about the middle of April.
Married Yesterday
‘NARIB dropped in at Powell
| 4 Spring Hotel, Bathsheba,
yesterday to find a wedding re-
ception being held shortly after
| Miss Elsie Jordan, daughter of the
late Mr. Marcus Jordan and Mrs,
Jordan of “Mirieburne”, Bar-
barees Road, St. Michael, | was
married to Mr. Gane en
| son of the late Mr. James Sarjea
aa Mrs. Sarjeant of Hindsbury

Road, St. Michael,

Rev. lL, C. Mallalieu conducted
the ceremony at St. Joseph
| Church. Mr. Ernest Weir was
| bestman while Mr. Cameron Tudor
| gave the bride in marriage.

The honeymoon is being snent
at Powell Spring Hotel.

B.B.C. Radio Programmes



NDAY, MARCH 0, tO
| p.m. 19.76M 25.58M 812M
} 400 pm. The News; 4.10 p.m. Inter-
| Iude; 4.15 p.m, For the Common Good;
| 4.30 p.m. Sdnday Half Hour; 5.00 p.m.
| Merely Players Society; 6.00 p.m. Com-
posers of the Week; 6.15 p.m. English
| Magazine; 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade
jand Interlude; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10
|} p.m, News Anatysis
T15—10.45 p.m.
7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices; 7.45 p.m.
Sunday Service; 8.15 p.m, Radio News-
ree!; 830 p.m. Song and Dance; 9.00



1007.1

25.538M

31.32M,

|

pir British Concert Hal! 10.00 p.m.

The News; 10.10 p.m. From the Edi-
torials; 10.15 p.m. London Forum; 1045
p.m, Christian & Liberal Values.

MONDAY, MARCH 31,
100 pm7.15 pm. 176M
25.53M 41.32M



lone



4 p.m. The news; 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service; 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pro-
gramme; 5.0 p.m. Patrick Murdock
5.15 p.m. Souvenirs of Music; 6.00 p.m
Welsh Miscellany; 615 p.m. Take it
from Here 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up
and Programme Parade; 7.00 p.m, The
News, 7.10 p.m Analysis.

7 1510.15 p.m. Woe & 41.32 M





News

Man Overboard; 7.45 p.m



7.15 pan
Happy Hoe-Down 815 pany Radio
Newsreel 830 p.m. African Survey;
8.45 p.m. Composers of the Week; 9 00
p.m. Listene Digest; 9.30 p.m. Music

| of George Gershwin; 16.00 p.m, fhe
News; 10.10 p.m, From the Editorials;
10.15 p.m. Science Review; 10,30 pm

Tip Top Tunes

DANCE
at

THE BARBADOS

AQUATIC CLUB

on

SATURDAY, APRIL 5TH
9.00 P.M.







For Local and Visiting





Members
mers ae ||!
Musie by Mr. C. Curwen’s
Orchestra '
o3es i
(No Admission Charge }

to Ballroom)



GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
Last 2 Shows To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m

BUCCANEER'’S GIRL

(Color)
Maria MONTEZ—Jon HALL & |

FOREIGN LEGION
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO
Mon Tues. 6.30 Dim
Fredric MARCH & Edmond O'BRIEN

AN ACT OF MURDER &
Shelley WINTERS &
MacDonald CAREY

SQUTH SEA SINNER }



|

1952



A SCENE from the Epilogue to Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan.
VII of France, Anne Raison as Bishop of Beauvais, Christine Parker as Joan, Aun Burrowes as Chaplain

de Stogumber, Shirley Seale—Engli
The play was staged at Queen’s

Barbadian Medico Leaves

R, EDWARD FIELD, a Bar-
badian who has a practice
in Derbyshire, England, returned
to the U.K. via Canada by T.C.A.
on Friday after spending about
ten days’ holiday with his rela-
tives.
He is the son of Mr, and Mrs.
E. S. A. Field of “Blenheim”,
My Lord’s Hill.

French Music

T THE monthly meeting of
the Allianee Francaise on
Thursday night, April 3, at 8.15



shouted, “This won’t do!” He was
escorted out, and as he went he
said, “None of it is true. And even
it was, it’s nothing to do with me.
Absolutely no business of mine.”

Ping-pong must be
cleaned up !

HE great debate as to whether
the people of Bognor should
be allowed to play ping-pong on
a Sunday is complicated by the
further question of clothes. If
ning-pong clothes are worn, and
the game takes place in public, it
is as bad es a theatrical perform-
ance, But if the game is played
behind closed doors, and in Sun-
day clothes, idle tongues will wag



Wedding

N Saturday, March 22, at 6.00
p.m., a quiet wedding took
place at James Street Methodist
Church when Miss Gloria Hare-

wood, daughter of Mrs. G.
Harewood of St. Lawrence Gap
was married to Mr. Jeffery
Newton of Bush Hall,

The bride who «= of ron” ih

Marriage by her
Mr. D'Arcy Scott,
charming picture dressed in a
bouffant skirt of white tulle
bedecked with lilies of the valley
and a beautifully draped bodice
with a stole effect.

brother-in-law
presented a

She carried a bouquet of Orchids
and Queen Ann’s lace. Her sole
attendent was her sister Mrs,
D’Arey Scott who filled the role
of matron of honour.

The ceremony was performed
by Rev. J. S. Boulton and the
duties of bestman were performed
by Mr. David Lewis.

A reception was held at the
residence of Mr. and Mrs. D'Arcy
Scott at Cavell. Ave., Barbarees
Road after which the couple left
for Fleet View, Bathsheba to spend
their honeymoon,

NO HIGH PRICE

DOMESTIC 30”
FINE WOVEN

sh soldier, Shirley Clarke as Duncis.

College speech day on Friday.
Gramophone Concert
USIC lovers will be interested
to hear that the Gramophone
Concert at the British Council
“Wakefield,” on Wednesday Apri!

2, will consist of a slightly
abridged Version of Handel's :
“Messiah,” performed by the
famous Huddersfield Chora)
Society with the Liverpooi

Philharmonic Orchestra.

The Concert will start at 5.00
p.m. and will last about two
hours.

There is no charge for admission
all are welcome.

tion of all that is worst in Englisn
sport.

In passing

MAN of 81 who met a woman

of 79 proposed to her the

same day and was married a week
later, was asked, with singular
lack of imagination, what had
made him act so impetuously. He
gave the perfect reply: “I dislike
long engagements.” And now I see
that in Spain a man of 125 is to
marry a woman of 100, “whom he
has known for 50 years.’ Probably
the silly little thing couldn’t make
up her mind. Or perhaps the man

believed in getting to know her

thorovthly.
%



Ey



CHECK RAYONS 36”







FIGURED ORGANDIES WHITE & COLOURS 36”
FIGURED MUSLINS WHITE & COLOURS 54” .......
WOVEN STRIPED RAYONS 36”
GREY FLANNEL WOOL TROUSERING _
Women’s QUALITY TAN CANV

» BLACK & WHITE & BR



AS SHOES Wedge Heels
OWN & WHITE SHOES

Left to right are Barbara Cole as Charles

Canadian Lumberman

M* H. LARKIN who is well
}

known in the lumber busi-

ness in Canada, returned home on
Friday
spending

morning by T.C.A.
three weeks’ holiday
aying at the Marine Hotel,

He was accompanied by his wife,

Third Visit
AYING his third visit to the
island is Mr, Edward Gomes
of Georgetown, British Guiana
He arrived here on Thursday
night by B.W.LA. and will be re-
maining for two weeks staying at

after

“Acera”’, Rockley.
Mr. Gomes is Secretar )
Ferreira and Gomes, Ltd., Gen-

eral Merchants of Georget

From Jamaica
RIGADIER OLIVER DADD

the Salvation Arm)
among the arrivals by B.W.1.A
‘riday evening from Jamaica



Courtesy

UNE 27 has been chosen for the
Mammoth Road Safety and
Courtesy Rally in London. Entries
are expected to be in +he neigh-
bourheod ef 500,000 vehicles ~
cluding motor - cycles. Special
courtesy police in fast courtesy
cars will patrol the streets, rais-
ing their hats to the competitors,

Aiso ON SALE Nylon Stockings at $2.50 for 2 pairs. to sg members of the Regional o’clock, the Cameo Music Club Leaving Tomorrow
with me ers , - ‘ ” . x pn . > >
| ; ri ittee matters Will give a short Concert of French EAVING tomorrow by the
Ppp! BE AN ! PEPSI SARA AGES RSLS REISS SS meena tha Uatemeiie College Music. The meeting as usual takes French S.S. Colombie _ for
es 3 PPE PDOPEPOCOC PSEA E FEL PLEO OO A POLO SEECO of the West Indies, He is in resid- plane ia the British Council, Svieiied = be 4
‘ h ance ¢ Xolli yovernment “Wakefield, . arrington o ree ae
j eo % Tepe Cl VA) ’ LOPADY g an ni ae hs return to A member of the Alliance Michael who plans to spend the
i % WEBSTER’S NEW COLLEC LATE e rah, bay: Whuraday April 3 Francaise said that she ‘hopes all Easter holidays with her rela-
wp 8 , 4 I % pAPOALCe on L T, 7 other members will attend as the tives, Mr. and Mrs, Walter Stokes
” ‘s 7 | y % On W.I. Tour Concert should be very interesting. of San Juan.
ah LET'S« 18 DiC THONARY 3 R. WALLACE TANNER
ALL GO | % , % M U.K. businessman who left
8 | am. $| London early in February on a BY THE WAY By Beachcomber
ALONG iX This latest edition has been newly edited and Type %| tour of the West Indies, arrived eee y heombe
|| set. It is based directly.on Webster's New internation- }| here from British Guiana a ' ;
WITH 11% al Dictionary, the finest general-purpose Dictionary. %| Thursday night for a short visi N article about the people There will be suggestions o
ely, ' ran ree nee “?* 1 ond is staying at the Marine Hotel, who seem to go to the gambling on the game, of drinks,
® i iFTON | * ni A Dinatve bd Rapes! Sasi ane theatre to have a thoroughly bad ne, -~* wary eer ee
Ses 11a : & | Co., Ltd., London, presentative®’ time and make a habit of protest- orror. Personally, eel that the
~ ne % ROBERTS & Co. e Dial 3301 $ throughout 4 wa p Fae Bourne ing at first nights might have re- time hae come to clean up ping-
Pure Foc dl r ; stalls j ry int
Vv’ EBB 8 See C OAV OOO ALON Varn Ceecaie “Ck tak, called the | geaisleman 1 We Made Bone, ond w held an iequiry into
' en = Tanner is now winding up his He had be n iet, bi in the ers, which makes the game, even
THE , oe Barbados he goes to e ha een quiet, but in the . Ani - 7
our, From Barbados middle of Act II he rose and on weekdays, a seandalous exhibi-

ind shouting courtesy slogans
through megaphones. At stated
courtesy. points there will be

radio talks on courtesy. Frequent
courtesy checks will be made by a
courtesy committee, and badges
will be awarded for courtesy by
the Courtesy Council. The idea
is to promote safety through cour-
tesy and vice versa.

Tail-piece

Wide agreement has been
reached on three hundred and
forty-one possible courses to
adopt. (Mrs, E. H. Killick.)

LS



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1.00
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Te-day




pees



SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952
Ta aaa

At The Cinema

Se Se eee ee

ELOPEMENT —

By G. B.

A thoroughly delightful, wholesome farce-comedy, for~

all the family, “ELOPEMENT” opens at the Globe next
Wednesday. Unsophisticated, except for Clifton Webb’s in-

imitable contributions, the

picture contains many shrewd

comments on family life, on the relations between in-laws
as well as on the doubts and hesitations of the young couple.

It might be described as a richly
comic family stew, seasoned with
wit, wisdom and humour. When
Clifton Webb's streamlined daugh-
ter decides to elope with a young
psychology professor, the fuse is
lit, and two indignant sets of par-
ents promptly pursue the eloping
youngsters with a view to prevent-
ing the marriage. Under the cir-
cumstances, there is not much love
lost between the four parents but
there is plenty of broad comedy in
the predicaments encountered dur-
ing the pursuit and commonsense
comes to the rescue when they are,
perforce, all bedded down to-
gether in a barn after an all night
chase. Their own differences set-
tled, they discover that the young
lovers have had a quarrel and
called off the marriage, where-
upon parental opinion does an
about face, the quarrel is patched
up and everyone is happy ever

after.

An excellent cast headed by
Clifton Webb. William Lamdigan
Ann Francis, a pretty newcomer,
Charles Bickford, Margalo Gil-
more and Reginald Gardiner does
a top notch job in characterizations
that are human and_ believable.
Two delightful supporting bits are
contributed by J. Farrell Mac-
Donald and, Julie Dean, veterans

of the screen and stage, as Mr.
and Mrs. Simpson, who believe in
hospitality, even to putting up
guests in their barn.

A delightful human _ interest

comedy, intelligently written and
directed.
HIGHWAY 301

The Plaza, Barbarees, is show-
ing “HIGHWAY 301”, a film which
conforms in pattern to the “Crime
Does Not Pay” school. Sensational
and well produced. it is a gangster
melodrama that claims social sig-
nificance in the United States by
virtue of a realistic documentary
background.

The members of the gang de-
picted were known as the notori-
ous Tri-State gang because of their
nefarious operations in the states
of Maryland, Virginia and North
Carolina, and the picture opens
with strong statements by the
Governors of these states to the
effect that crime does not and
never will pay, and that all mem-
bers of the gang are either dead or
behind bars.

The plot is concerned with the
hold-ups and murders of the
group, and the systematic track-
ing down and destruction of the
gang by the combined police
efforts of the three states involved.
Emphasis is given to the relent-
less efficiency of modern police
methods. More vicious, cold-
blooded criminals would be hard
to imagine and decent people must
have heaved a sigh of relief when
their reign of terror came to an
end,

Steve Cochran is once again cast
in a gangster role and as the lead-
er he is menacingly brutal. The
rest of his friends aren’t any bet-
ter and it seems that the women
are the only onés to see things in
their true perspective and I can’t
say that it does them any good.
The acting is good, and Gaby
Andre, a young French actress is
fascinating, One wonders how
she ever got mixed up with such
a crowd! There is no glamouriz-

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ing of the criminal types depicted
and direction is convincing with
suspense building up to a violent
climax—a fitting end to a criminal
whose brutalities leave you cold
with horror.

Based on fact, “HIGHWAY 301”
points a bitter lesson to all would-
be. criminais.

TO-MORROW IS ANOTHER
DAY

At the Plaza, Bridgetown, “TO-
MORROW IS ANOTHER DAY”
stars Steve Cochran and Ruth
Roman in a_crime melodrama
which gets off to an acspicious
start but develops into a prolonged
routine chase. The story concerns
a young man who is released after
spending 18 "years in prison. Un-
familiar with the outside world,
he meets a dance-hall hostess and
is innocently involved in a shoot-
ing committed, unknown to him,
by the girl The two of them take
to the road and What with living
fram hand to mouth and under as-
sumed names, the ex-convict
nearly gets himself into serious
trouble—but for a contrived end-
ing, that saves both of them.

Both Steve Cochran and Ruth
Roman give sound performances
and Miss Roman gets a chance to
show her versatility as the brassy,
platinum blonde dance girl. Mr.
Cochran's role makes no demands
on him and the majority of the
supporting cast are adequate.

ee

-

FARM and GARDEN Gardenin

CANE

, wee SL Oe ——

SUNDAY

FIRES
a

By AGRICOLA
It was made abundantly clear from its inception that
this column would devote itself mainly to general princi-

ples as affecting crop growth

words, subjects of interest n

, With special emphasis on food

production and matters related to home economics; in other

ot only to farmers and garden-

ers but to the average householder and the general reader

as well.

We make no apology, there-
fore, for including in our purview
today the subject of cane fires,
for the simple reason that they
aim a blow at one of the main
principles of good husbandry; and
g00d husbandry is inextricably
concerned with the maintenance
of soil fertility and, therefore,
soil capital.

It is not for us to examine
questions pertaining to the direct
monetary losses involved as a
result of these fires; those who
suffer the most are well-organ-
ized and, as business people,
naturally know best how to pro-
tect themselves by insurance and
the adoption of managerial meas-
ures designed to offset mediate
losses, Small farmers, however,
whose fields and homes, by acci-
dent or otherwise, are menaced
by the fire bug stand to lose
materially, Firstly, they carry no
insurance as a rule; secondly,
with cane fires on the present
seale, factories are naturally
busily engaged in taking off their
own burnt canes first. Farmers,
in the process of reaping their
crop or afflicted with the burnt
cane problem—for it is an afflic-
tion—will suffer as a result of
possible delays in their canes
reaching the factory. Canes
already on the ground and burnt
canes three or four days old soon
lose both in weight and quality
and, if rains happen to intervene,
the position goes from bad to



B.B.C. Radio Notes

As a climax to the weekly play
readings which have been on the
special beams to the Caribbean
for the months of February and
March, in which Shakespeare
‘King Lear’ has been examined,
the BBC will now broadcast the
full play in two parts with John
Gielgud in the title role, Whether
you have been listening to the
Monday programmes in which an
attempt has been made to show
that ‘King Lear’ can be acted by
any keen group and is not beyond
the range of the interested ama-
teur or whether this will be your
first meeting on the radio with
‘King Lear’ the coming production
in two parts can be highly recom-
mended. Gielgud has played Lear
three times on the stage and is
certainly one of the three leading
actors onthe British stage. The
play is being broadcast in two
parts in Radio Theatre on Satur-
day, 29th March and 5th April,
beginning at 8.30 p.m. each part
taking one hour and a quarter.
Broadcasts will be in the 31 me-
tre - band on both evenings. The
first broadcast will also be heard
in the 49 metre band and the
second in the 25 metre band.

Changes in B.B.C, Schedules

With the start of a new quar~-
ter there are a few changes in
BBC schedules and wavelengths.
The beam on the 49 metre band
will now be withdrawn and you
will be able to tune in on the 25
and 31 metre band beams right up
to the close down of the G.O.S.
at 11.00 p.m, Both of these beams
come on at 6.00 p.m. Before that
this service is heard in the 19
metre band starting at 4.00 and

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ending at 7.15 p.m,

Other changes of importance—
particularly to ‘exiles’—are to be
noticed in the English, Scottish,
Welsh and Ulster Magazine pro-
grammes. The first is now on the
air at a convenient time for this
area—6.15 p.m. on Sundays, Scot-
tish Magazine and Welsh Maga-
zine have been reorganised and
are now to be broadcast in two
fifteen-minute programmes in-
stead of one of thirty minutes in
length. Scottish Magazine will be
on Wednesdays and Saturdays and
Welsh Magazine on Mondays and
Thursdays all four broadcasts
starting at 6.00 p.m, Ulster Maga-
zine has been expanded into a
fifteen minute programme week-
ly and will be heard at this same
time on Tuesdays.

Other changes are slight varia-
tions in the times of talks and
these you will soon be able to find
for yourselves.

‘Oliver Twist’ As New Serial

Charles Dickens’s famous novel
‘Oliver Twist’ begins as a radio
serial on Thursday next. when the
first of twelve episodes will be
broadcast. The radio adaptation
is by Giles Cooper an actor with
a growing reputation as a radio-
writer who was commissioned to
make the radio version after sub-
mitting a synopsis and a first epi-
sode to the B.B.C, in competition
with two other authors, His adap-
tation emphasises the dramatic
other than the purely literary
qualities without breaking away
from the spirit of the original or
upsetting Dickens enthusiasts.

Broadcasts will be on Thursdays
beginning at 10.30 p.m. from April
3rd onwards.




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9)
%,

worse. OSL Tuliceis Knuw Usa
Dut are poOwetlieos,
Yhey are iurwer handicuppea

by the tact that wey
Mana ahy reguiar savour ivivce lw
4@5ei5 Ml Wie reapwig aud, lew, 1
any, Oven lorries, A iiilie cu-Uupera-
live enaeavour amoug Wmemseives
would certaimly heip at reaping
time. So, they are up against it
and, in many areas, cane is their
only cash crop.

Now, we have heard of several
reasons why cane fires have
reached their present proportions,
It wouid be futule to examine them
here. We pause only to dismiss as
puerile the suggestion in the
local press from some not unim-
portant source that these fires
result from the sun’s excessive
heat or words to that effect. If
the suggestion was intended in
jocular vien, the sooner that sort
of irresponsible utterance is sup-
pressed, the better; it can do harm
and certainly will not stop cane
fires.

We will be told, of course, that
in many countries it is a recog-
nised practice to burn canes betore
reaping. True, but in those cases
there are compensations. Most of
these centre on the question of
water supply avaiiabie for crop
growth and moiswre is 90 per
cent of the culuvatuon probiem
be it canes or cabbages. To-day,
sarge cane-growing areas have
irrigation systems or an adequate
rainfall to take care of their mois-
ture probiems, But, areas like
this island which can suffer ‘from
drought and must depend on
natural precipitation can find
themselves in serious economic
difficulties from low crop yields if
they neglect to maintain the or-
ganic matter of their soils. In
previous notes, we have stressed
the functions and value of organic
material, not the least being its
Spongy nature and, therefore, its
supreme importance as a retainer
of moisture and an improver of
soil texture generally. The unique
fertility of this island’s soils has,
to a large extent, resulted from
the consistent attention in past
years to the replacement of or-
ganic matter losses either by pen
manure or heavy mulching with
cane residues or other similar ma-
terial. Fire is a destructive agent,
sometimes advantageous it is
true, but it is always destructive
of something and, in the case of
cane, destroys the very material
which constitutes our soil capital.
It becomes, therefore, qa type of
economic lunacy if we dismiss
cane fires as unimportant in the
island’s economic life.

We respectfully suggest, there-
fore, to the authorities that some
sort of judicial enquiry be set up
to take evidence over a wide field
and to sift the sarne with a view
to determining, if possible, the
under-lying causes. Obviously,
hand-in-hand with this, is the
need for a considerable amount
of educational propaganda in
which the local cinemas might be
induced to take part. We hesitate

@O LYl Cult

to think that people well
informed, even if not fully
informed, on such an important

issue will not actively respond.

Round

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ADVOCATE

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BUDDLEAH, HOLLYHOCKS
TAMARISK

BUDDLEAH is a lovely peren-
nial and is well worth a place
in any garden. The flowers are
spires of sweet smelling purple
or mauve, and under favourable
conditions this plant grows into
a sigable bush. Buddleah is one
of those blessed perennials which
when once established, goes on
for years wiring only an
occasional cut back, and little else
in the way of attention,

Position

Plant Buddleah in an open
sunny spo but one that is shel-
tered if possible from excessive
wind, Any good garden soil will
suit it and it needs just the
ordinary garden care by wav of
water and manure,

Propagation

This plant is propagated by

cuttings, which as a rule, strike

easily. After some time the plant

may get rather straggly, When
this stage is reached cut it back
Strongly, after which with the

help of manure and water it will
spring wigorously again, Buddleah
does nut last particularly well as
a cut flower, but in spite of its
short life in water, it is a general
favourite, and is used a great deal
for decoration.
HOLLYHOCKS

A bed of Hollyhocks makes a
lovely show in a garden, and al-
though these plants take a long
time to come to flower, yet they
grow very easily, Tt must be re-

membered however t! when
Hollyhocks (especial iouble
ones) are planted f yorted
seeds it is eighteen). 11 vo two
years before they tiowe:. When

local seeds are used the plants
flower in six months from seed
planting. If is best therefore to
get seeds from a loeal plant.
Position

Hollyhocks require a well pre-
pared rich bed in an open sunny
position, As the flower spikes are

tall, they may need a stake to

support them, especially if the

bed is at all wind swept.
Propagation

Hollyhocks are grown from seed,
and as has already been said. it
is best to use local seeds, that is
to say seeds from plants that have
flowered and seeded in Barbados.
The seeds can be put straight into
the prepared bed in which they
are to grow. Plant them quite
two feet apart as the full grown
plants take up a considerable space
bunching low, and having very
large leaves, These plants send
up tall strong flower spikes close-
ly covered with flowers, After the
first flowering is over, the old
spike should be cut down to the
ground, and the plant will then
send up one or two more spikes,
more slender*than the first but
quite worth while having.

The colours of the Hollyhocks
are red, pink in varying shades,
and white. They can be single or
doyble flowers,

TAMARISK

Tramarisk is a lovely perennial,
both for its delicate lavender
flowers and its dainty feathery
foliage. The foliage when used
with other flowers than its own,
lends itself as charmingly as as-
paragus and fern, It is strange
that this lovely plant is not more
commonly grown.

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PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR



SPARTAN HEAD SENIOR —

FOOTBALL LINE-UP

Ken Farnum Invited to Olympic Games

BY O. 8. COPPIN
\PARTAN, playing

of football to t

a comparatively superior branc









s tan have sco






and it is not impossible that their co-leaders Notre
: Dame and Empire, ght points each in six games
ee “before yesterday’s fixture, will again catch them up
when they nave each played their seventh game.

always argued that points in the bag already
and this being so, the team which has already
made sure of its points is in a better position than those teams who
still are required to fulfil their corresponding fixtures,
NOT BEST TEAM YEP

AM not at all giving Spartan the credit for being the best team

in the First Division this season, nor am I predicting that be-
cause they have now assumed a temporary lead, that they are the logi-
cal winners of the Cup for the, senior championship this season. :

I remember too well how faltering were their early steps in this
division this season and how, as senior champions for the past three
@easons they injected a tinge of anti-climax in their performances
when they were beaten by Empire, aoe held oo ee cee by Notre

é m € > he newly promotec arrison College tea ; .
Oe et ie t vraditional tenacity and their indisputable
reputation of coming fro behind with a rush. This they have done.
They have since beaten Everton by the only goal of the match, pons
out a sound three-love béating to Harrison College in ao turn
fixture and now have je no bones a fixture with Carlton

rhic resulte: another clear win yesterday, : :
ee Seine the aaah there is ample indication that Spartan will
figure most prominently in the final race for the championship.

NO INITIATIVE
services of their forward “Brickie”’
apparent initiative throughout the
nt but this was not good enough
to negative the tack, most capably spearheaded by
Cadogan at centre if and well supported by Gittens and Medford
as wing halves. Grant and Ishmael gave good individual perform-
ances as inside men and I could find little fault with the wing play
of Jemmott and Griffith, Jemmott has given satisfactory perform-
ances since he has been substituted at left wing for Boyce but Griffith
gave his best per -e of the season yesterday afternoon,

Haynes is not a e-forward and although I give him every
credit for converting an excellent centre from the wing by heading
into goal yet his complete misplacement at centre-forward might
weigh heavily against the chances of the Spartan team if they find
themselves in a needle match, opposed.to a team who gave them
slender and more sustained battle than Carlton yesterday.

A GOOD WIN

YOTRE DAME this week defeated Empire by two goals to love in
i a return fixture. Empire who bad beaten them by one goal
to love when they met earlier In the season dominated piay for the
most part of the first halt.

Tne vigilance’ of the Empire defence, especially that of the full-
backs Grant and Smith broke up every menacing .orward movement
by Notre Dame and when the “Dames” seemed @ven to have over-
come this bastion of defence even momentarily, they met with me
long limbed Algie Symmonds in goal who played a sort of third back
game. i

However this made Notre Dame rise to great heights in the
realm of local first class footbail achievements and inside right Dan-
iel climaxed a swift forward movement With a pile drivdr from close
range and from a dilticult angle as well.

Playing in the second half of the game with the wind behind
them Notre Dame, the fittest team to take the field this season literally
Yan the Empire defence aimost off their legs. It 1s true that Grant

However I have
are points already we
















Star



ARLTON, without
A Lucas did not ¢

game. They tried hard r we










ce

hat which they have been playing

this season, yesterday scored an impressive win by
four goals to love at the expense of Carlton and so
have placed themselves at the head of this season’s
Fi Division Cup line-up.

i their ten points in seven games

SUNDAY



Spartan Defeat

Carlton Four—Nil

SPARTAN . . . Ishmael, Grant, Cadogan, Haynes—4

1

Division football

afternoon. A large crow

only one goal was scored.

centre forward,

SPARTAN defeated Carlton four—nil in their First
match at

Kensington Oval yesterday

d saw Spartan play well to put in Inter-colonial meeting at Whitsuntide.
three goals in the second half of play while in the first half
7

The Spartan goal scorers were Grant—inside right,
Ishmael—inside left, Cadogan—centre half an
Gibbons and Bowen proved to

Haynes—
a tower

of strength against the Carlton forwards while the help
they gave to their forwards was readily accepted.

“Boogles’’ Williams with his ex-
perience helped Cariton a great
aeal, Dut their wingers were: al-
ways too slow in geiting to the
ball when they were givea a pass,

inere Was only one penaity
kick awarded during the wnhoie
game and Mat went to Spartan,
Caaogan kicked the ball into ‘the
goal, The game started with Spar-
tan defending the goal at ‘the
northern end of the field and very
soon it was apparent that Spartan
was on the offensive, Spartan
made a good forward movement
but before Haynes could get with-
in gocd shooting distance, jeft full
back Kennedy intercepted and
cleared his goal area, ‘

Free Kick

Shortly after Ishmael @ried. to
draw first blood, b&& the ball went
wide of the goal. Spartan was
now awarded a free kick which
was taken by Gittens who kicked
in the Carlton area, but the
Carlton custodian Warren rushed
out of his goal, caught the ball and
kicked it in midfield. About 12
minutes after the start of this half
Grant opened the scoring for
Spartan after receiving a good
pass from Jemmott on the left
wing. Grant,who found himself
alone on the ball, kicked the bail
well along the ground into the
Carlton goal, giving Warren no
chance to save.



falf time found the score un-
changed. On the _ resumption
Spartan again piled 6n the prés-
sure, but Carlton did not slacken
up. A free kick was awarded to
Carlton and this brought the fans
to their feet when Carlton nearly
scored from a melee in front of the
Spartan goal. Three minutes after
Ishmael scored the second goal
and again Warren had no chance
to save, After this second goal

and Smith were ever steadfast but they could not stem the tide of
these) young players, seemingly inspired with renewed energy and

determination,
ANOTHER GOAL

TT FELL to Daniel again to convert at close range as the result of

another swift forward movement that saw Notre Dame sweeping
at terrific pace down the field right through their opponents’ defence
and into their penalty area.

They kept up this pressure and it was soon evident that Empire
had no chance of equalising. Wilkinson in goal was clean and confident
in his saving while Daniel at left wing, his brother at inside right

SOCCER

MR. GRAHAM WILKES.
Games Master at the Lodge

3 a School and a_ well-knowr

ave ver ood performances indqed. a ; rb a
: “Passion” Drayto® was the brains of the Empire attack and he care in local and Inter-
gave some excellent passes to Robinson whose shooting accuracy is colonial football circles is
now a negligible force.. Taylor was speedy and he too rendered good bt ined “a series of articles
service. I was impressed with the cool, and confident precision of ace ere ee Uni
the left wing. He should render fruitful service for Empire in this vocate,

Today he simply sets out
the fundamentals as an in-
troductory to Soccer Lessons.

The Fundamentals

position before the season is finished, .
Empire’s defeat means that they have scored eight points in six
games and still have a possible 10 points with Spartan in seven

games. They are’ by no means out of the running and the cup will fu
be decided on the points which Empire, Notre Dame and Spartan get In building a house ‘the
foundation. must be laid

in their remaining fixtures, four in the case of Notre Dame and Em-
pire and three in the case of Spartan. f

FARNUM’ FOR OLYMPICS
The Janfaica Olympic Association are agreeable to the Colony’s
class Cycle Champion rq@presenting Jamaica in the forth-
coming Olympic games at Hel-
sinki. 5

securely to ensure the house
will develop and improve.
Likewise in Association Foot-
ball the fundamentals of the
game must be mastered be-
fore the more advanced ideas
of dribbling and swerving
may be introduced; team
play and tactics are useless
unless a player is able to pass
with the inside or outside of
the foot, trap a ball in any
position, head a ball in what-
ever direction he chooses, or
run into a position to receive
a Dall.

“ay

ee ,

In view of the fact that similar
local Olympic body has not get
*been affiliated to the Internation-
al Olympic Federation, and it is
not possible that such affiliation
could be aceomplished before the
commencement of the games this

summer, Mr, Farnum cane These fundamentals may

compete under the Barbados tend to become tedious but

colours. they are.only mastered “by

i repetition, ©and constant

It is therefore proposed that practice alone develops the
a fund be opened to cover habit of good ball control.

the necessary expenses to allow
Farnum to take part in these
games. We all know what Far-
num kas done for Barbados and
South Caribbean cycling. We are
also conscious of the fact that
Farnum’s participation in the
, Olympics would be a good means
for putting the West Indies on
the world map, therefore I hope
that when the fund is open’ this
week it will receive the support

KENNETH FARNUM from all ranks of the sporting
community which it so abundantly merits. =

The secret of top-ranking
players such as Matthews,
Mortensen, Mannion, lies in
their ability to keep the ball
close to their feet so that the
ball is constantly in their
possession and not yards in
front of them.

Constant attention to kick-
ing with the instep, passing
with the outside or the in-
side of the foot, heading







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the Cariton players made another
attempt to “pull themselves to-
gether” and shortly after the sec-
ond goal Cadogan kicked in the
third goal from a penalty.

With three goals to their credit
Spartan never released their grip
and time and time again their for-
wards tested Warren. The fourth
goal came when Griffith at right
wing centred well across the Carl-
ton area. Warren rushed out in an
effort to catch the ball, but centre
forwerd Haynes who got ‘to the
ball before him, headed it inte the
open goal.

The teams were:—

Carlton:— Warren, Kenned y,
Porter, Clairmonte, Cox, Williams,
H. Cox, R, Hutchinson, Marshall,
C. Hutchinson ang Andrews,

Spartan:— Atkins, Gibbons,
Bewen, Medford, Cadogan, Git-
tens, Griffith, Grant, Haynes,
Ishmael and Jemmott.

The Referee was Mr. S, Gittens.

Savannah Club
Ty .
ennis Tournament

Yesterday’s Results

Mixed Doubles:

Miss M. King and J. D, Trim-
ingham beat Mrs. J. A. Mahon
and C. B. Sisnett 6—1, 9—7.
Mixed Doubles Handicap

Miss .D. Wood. and.Dr. C. G.
Manning “—— 40 beat Miss Ena
Bowen and G. O. N, Skinner 4
15. 6—3 6—2.

Monday’s Fixtures
Meni’s Doubles Final

E. P. Taylor and Dr, C. G. Man-
ning vs. G. H. Manning and P.
McG. Patterson.

Mixed Doubles Handicap

Mrs. Gibbons and R. S. Nicholls

vs. Mrs. and Mrs. F. D. Barnes.





LESSONS

By Graham Wilkes

correctly, breasting’ a ball
down onto the ground, trap-
ping with all faces of the
feet, will gradually develop
the control of the ball which
is the most necessary factor
of the game if a player
wishes to become a worthy
member of his team.
PRACTICE MAKES
PERFECT

The B.A.FP.A. Football
Training School, conducted
by Mr. A. G, Wilkes opens at
Kensington at 8 a.m, today.

’

The personnel is as fol-}
lows: —

Spartan: H. Cadogan
(centre-half), K. Bowen

(full back), W. Gibbens (full
back), Grant (inside right)
Cc, O, Gittens (left half). {

Empire: E. W. Grant (full :
back), S. I. Smith (full f
back), F. B. Taylor (inside ;
left), W. A, Drayton (inside '

right), S. Douglas (left
wihg). '
Everton: R. Haynes (in-

side left), K. Weekes (left
full back), K. Hall (right
full back), N. Holder (left
wing), C. Reece (goal).

Notre Dame: _.C, Daniel
(inside right), K. Greenidge
(left wing), L. Daniel (cen-
tre half), S. Headley (right
wing), D. Grannum (right ,
half).

Harrison College: F.
Squires (full back), D, Trot-
man (full back), C, Tudor
(centre forward), E. Griffith
(inside right), R. Morris
(left wing).

Carlton: R. St. C, Hutch-
inson, G. Hutchinson, P.
Kennedy, N. S. Lucas.













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52

ADVOCATE

REFLECTIONS ON
ATHLETICS

BY TREVOR GALE

MARCH 30, 19

SUNDAY,



-DAY we will give that poor chap “Bookie” a rest and fill this
column with some thoughts on local athletics, with special empha-
sis on the recent Inter-s¢hool Sports. To begin with I see that the
- local athletic body will be holding their annual Inter-club meeting
on the 17th of April and this will be followed shortly by the bigger

I am sorry I will not be here for the second but I advise all
school boys, especially the senior boys, to keep in training as it is
* fairly certain that there will be some events for them especially at
the latter fixture. I do not know if the schools are usually invited
to the Inter-club meeting but it would not be a bad thing if they
were given one or two events and so they could keep in trim for
the bigger occasion. I throw this out as a suggestion to the A.A.A.B,
So many of our local athletes go-to pot mainly because they do
not have ‘tthe opportunity to get regular practice when they leave
school. This is due solely to the lack of any continuity in local
athletic meetings which occasions the complete absence of anything
that might be. called a local Athletic season. The school boys, on the
other hand, have a regular term for athletics and every year they
have their individual schools’ sports meetings followed by the Inter-
scnool Sports at which they round off their activities,

I can think of nothing better than to begin with the schools if
we are hoping to improve the standard of local athletics. Nor can
I think of anything that will be of more benefit to a promising athlete
in the senior school division than the fact that he could get in four
meetings in the space of three or four months. A good example of
this was the form of the Lodge School's David Inniss at the three
sports meetings in which he took part last year.

His first meeting was naturally the school sports, followed by
the Inter-school Sports and finally the Intercolonial meeting at which
he ran in school boy events. By the time the Inter-school meeting
came off he was in better form than he had been at the Lodge Sports
and although, he told me himself, that after this he stopped training,
at a few short weeks’ notice he was able to get himSelf in shape and
to return better times for the hundred yards sprint at the Inter-colo-
nial Sports than he had at the Inter-school.

Of course if this is good for the athletes it is even more important
for cyclists. This year we have the interesting case of Ken Farnum
who, I am told, has been invited to go with the Jamaican team to
ride at the Olympic Games in Helsinki.The experience will no doubt
do.him a tremendous amount of good. But this is the beginning of
April, the Olympics are in July and Farnum has not ridden at a
meeting since sometime last year. To be really warming up he
should have had three in 1952 already.

I see he has refused an invitation to go to Trinidad on the grounds
that he is not anything like ready. This I quite believe. I do not
see how it could be otherwise. But I think he has been caught be-
tween the devil and the deep blue sea. His riding in Trinidad, al-
though. he might be beaten, will do him no end of good in his prep-
aration for the bigger events. Yet he probably feels that if beaten
there, it will jeopardise his chances to go with the Jamaican team
to the Olympic Games. It is a position I would not like to be in
myself.

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generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality It fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
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Take home a bottle today

BUCKEAST

TONIC WIRE

VSS

RNING to the Inter-school Sports which took place on Friday

before last there are one or two points which never fail to come
up for discussion no matter how much we enjoy the day’s events
from vear to year. A rather tall school-master friend of mine did
not fail to remind me on this occasion that one of these is the vexed
Guestion of awarding points for the events, and, furthermore, that
he will never cease to make himself heard on the subject until a
change is brought about.

I gather that my friend has quite a few people, nearly all fellow
school masters, on his side in this campaign and I trust he will not
mind if I join the band waggon.

All those conversant with the problem already know how the
points are awarded so I will not go into detail here. But in order
to let readers judge it is enough to say that the points are scaled
down from 9, 5, and 3 for the first, second and third places respective-
ly in the Senior Division (Division 1), to 3, 2, and 1 for similar hon-
ours in the most junior division (Division IV). There are six events
for the Senior Division (excluding the Relay) and three for Divisior
IV. It is therefore plain to see that the School with the most talen:
in the Senior division has an overwhelming chance to win the sports.

To my mind the most favourable argument in favour of change
in the points system is the fact that for years the Inter-school Athletic
Union has been racking their brains to make the meeting more in-
teresting for the smaller schools like The Coleridge (now Coleridge-
Parry Combined), the Alleyne and the Foundation Boys. They first
gave a cup for the one, out @f these four, which gained the most
points at the meeting. Now, I understand this has been changed to
a cup for the school which gains the most points in the Junior Divis-
ions,





‘
Well, if it is recognised by the Union that the small schools have
more strength in the Junior Divisions why not give them a better
chance at winning the Championship itself by equalizing the entire
points system. Nothing could make the meeting more interesting to
them.

Emphasis is on the word “better” because even with equal points
the larger schools, Harrison College, Lodge and Combermere, will
still have the greater advantage for two very simple reasons viz: (1)
more boys remain at these schools until they are between the ages of
16 and 19 than is the custom at the smaller schools, (2) There are
more events in the senior divisions.




a, *

4

HE present system is of course supported strongly by the large
schools for obvious reasons. But surely in a contest of any kind
nobody likes to see the dice so heavily loaded in favour of one side.
Nobody will deny that senior events are not more important than

.
those for the juniors. But the very fact that there are more of the
former proclaims their importance. But to add guch a huge advan-
tage in points only makes the result a foregone conclusion and the
entire contest ridiculous, He

Vexed question No. 2, and I shall be brief: “The long jump pit”.
How much longer are we going to put up with such a farce, This
year's was the worst I have ever seen.

TITH regard to the standard of the performances this was on
the whole good, while in the Senior Division I would say it was
high, David inniss is one of those athletes who gets the maximum

amount of speed with an apparent mimimum amount ot ‘ °
effort. L. L. Crichlow was also like this but Inniss seems inex pensive
to be even more so.

Inniss actually managed to lower Crichlow's
record in the 220 yards and might have done so in the hundred also
had it not been for track and wind conditions. An interesting com-
parison between himself and Crichlow is that the latter was excep-
tionally good from the time he was in the 12 to 14 class. Inniss did not
start to break records until he reached the Senior Division. David,
should very definitely do all he can to further his progress as an

athlete. Preferably in England or some large country,

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SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Oxford Win Boat Race

Oxford Now Have 44
Wins: Cambridge 53

Chats On Swimming

The Crawl:
Starting And
‘Turning

iy Ian Gale

This week's’ instalment is
meant primarily for those who
intend taking part in competitive
swimmine

Although I intend dealing with
the start and the turn, we. will

begin in the middle and take
some advice from that great
crawl swimmer Johnny Weiss-
muller. He writes: One thing

most young
whether it is best to sprint at
the start, the middle, or at the
end of a race. My theory of the
best way to race is not to sprint
at all, but to find the fastest gait
you can hold over the distance
you have to go, and then hold
that even gait all the way. By
this I don’t mean that you swim
at your utmost strength and
power, because this destroys re-
laxation. You swim your fast-
est, yet somewhat within your
power, for this is the only way
te achieve the style that makes
for efficiency.

Then if you need a little extra
power in order to win at the end
of the race, you. can call upon
this reserve. There is a fine
distinction between swimming
within your power and retaining
a reserve, on the one hand, and
holding back until the last few
yards and then sprinting. A fine
distinction, but a real one and an
important thing to understand
clearly.’

And now for the start, which
is, when all the trimmings are
removed, a simple shallow dive.
Stand with your big toes just
over the edge of the pool, knees
slightly bent, trunk bent forward
with arms flung out behind and
if you are being started with a
pisto] keep looking straight down
the pool, As soon as the start-
ing signal is given throw your
arm forward, push off with your
legs and perform as_ shallow a
dive as you can.

Here are the refinements: Your
body should shoot forward near-
ly parallel to the water, with your
arms above your head and one
leg raised. When you hit the
water bring the arms down with
a powerful slap and at the same
time bring the raised leg down
with a strenuous plop. Look at
the water when you are in the
air so as to time the slap of arms
and leg exactly at the time of
entry into the water, This slap
will keep you high in the water
and you will be able to begin
swimming without delay.

In any swimming race in a
pool, turning is of very great im-
portance,

In the hundred yards sprint the
efficient turn is “probably more
important than it is in the longer
distances. The rest to be gained
by a slower turn may be of value
in the longer race, but in the
hundred, fhe question of endur-

ance does not enter, and it is
worth while putting all the
energy needed into an efficient
turn,

Perry McGillivray, one of the
world’s greatest swimmers in his
day, gives this advice on turn-
ing:

“As you swim up and _ touch
the end of the tank with the tip
of your right hand, turn your left
ear down and go deep in the
water. Do not touch the end of
the pool with your left hand, but
use it as a paddle in the water to
aid the body in pivoting on that
left ear. Go deep into the water
and make your push-off, and as
you shoot away, plane upward
until you hit the surface just at
the right place to begin your
arm action.”

Remember, whereas the start-
ing plunge is shallow, the push
off after the turn should be deep.

competitors ask is



HALF SUBMERGED







JOHNNY WEISSMULLER under full steam.

Olive Blossom Scores
First Victory: Collides
With Fishing Boat

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

ONE accident occurred when the Sixth Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C. was sailed in Carlisle Bay yesterday afternoon.

D boat Olive Blossom, skipper
ers, after scoring a magnific

involved in a collision with a fishing boat.

broken.

This was a very unfortunate
incident as Olive Blossom sailed
a really beautiful race. I was
looking forward to her giving
another good performance in the
Seventh Regatta. Hurricane how-
ever, which came second, was
not easily defeated. With about
20 more yards to go, Hurricane
would have won, Olive Blossom
received six minutes from Hurri-

cane. “a
All the D Class boats turned
out, Olive Blossom’s average per

round was 42 minutes, 37% sec-
onds. Tihird in this Class was

red by one of the Evelyn broth-

ent victory in her Class, was
Her spar was

Tornadoes

Only four Tornadoes started
The race was a very fast one, the
first boat, Vamoose, finishing in
less than an hour. Vamoose was
in the lead in all three laps. Her
average per round was 19 min-
utes and 45 seconds, Second was
Edril while Thunder came third.

The wind was moderate, the
sea calm, and the boats sailed
south about.

The Seventh Regatta of the
R.B.Y.C, will be sailed on Satur-
day, April 5,

The results were as follows:—

ren eos Seabird, Seabird B ae

has been sailing very well in the me
last few races, Fourth was ee a
Rainbird and fifth Rainbow. 13. Ranger 4.19.21 36 oT 1
4 Hi Ho 4.19.2 35.50 2
B Class 481 Fantasy 4.19.45 35.54 3
Ten boats started in the B94 Okapi 430.88 a3 5
Class. Honours went to Ranger. 38 Raseal 4.21.13 35.42 6
In the first lap Ranger overtook 5 Mischief 4.21.56 43.38 7
Wizard to whom she gave a : ore Blair 4.23.07 36.16 8
minute. From then on she kept 19 Wicara tan ‘< 3 :
the lead. Second was Hi Ho and © Class ;
third Fantasy. © 3 Madness 4.00.19 39.33 1
Ranger’s average per round 4, Roeue 4.09.30 31.48 2
was 36 minutes, 7 seconds Hi Ho.| 19 Garnet 4 18'b0 Sa” i
which also sailed very well,| 3 Scamp 4182 ait 5

averaged 35 minutes
seconds per round.

Madness was the winner in the
C Class. She started along with
Miss Behave and Folly, but later
went into the lead. Gerald
Nicholl’s Rogue, a scratch boat of
the Class, gave an excellent per-
formance. She quickly got away
from Gannet, the other scratch
boat, and went on to overtake
Scamp, Folly and Miss Behave.
Madness finished with an aver-
age of 39 minutes and 33 sec-
onds. Rogue’s average per round
of 37 minutes and 43 seconds was
better than Madness’. Third was
Folly and frarth Gannet.

Seven bouts raced in the Inter-
mediate Class. Skippy has been
fitted with a new set of sails
“Dipper” was cruising around
yesterday, “breaking in’ his new
sails,

Honours in this Class went to
Mohawk. She averaged 40 min-
utes and 39 seconds per round.
Second was Reen and third Dawn.

and 50





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used in chemical apparatus. Moissan, the famous French scientist who in |
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acid, |



A.A. A.B.

INTER-CLUB
CYCLE & ATHLETIC

SPORTS
MEETING

Kensington
Oval
Thursday, April 17th.

-ommencing at 12 noon



CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD.

Dozens of Houses, a Church, Warehouses, Filling Stations, Guard Walls,

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NOT A



LONDON, March 29.

Oxford University confounded all the critics by beating
Cambridge in their inter-Varsity boat race over the four
mile, one furlong, 180 yards,.course by a matter of feet. It
was one of the finest races in the long history of the event,

both crews rowing side by
driving blizzard.

Carlton Lose
To Everton

sEVERTON (Sealy 1, Morris 1)
CARLTON ..... (Cox 1) i

At Queen’s Park Friday
Carkon met Everton and was de-
feated two goals to one in their
2nd division fixture. Morris and
Sealy scored for Everton, and C,
Cox for Carlton.

Everton took the touch off and
for the first fifteen minutes
neither side had the edge on the
other, Soon after however, the
ball came along the to



te

Collymore got to it first but mis-
kicked and Cox scored easily.

Play continued with opportuni-
ties to score being wasted on both
sides, and at half time the score
remained at one love in favour
of Carlton.

The Everton goalkeeper had the
tendency to come out to the ball
without properly timing it and
soon after play resumed this
almost cost his team another goal.

The game became a little faster
and as Everton pressed in an at-
tempt to equalise, play was con-
centrated in front of the Carlton
goal and Morris headeq the ball
into the nets out of the reach of
the Carlton goalkeeper.

For some time play eviitinued
without further score, and
long before the close of play Ever-
ton scored the winning 1. Mor-
ris at left wing took a d shot
which Cozier did not hold re
ly and Sealy was there wa in
time to push the ball into the
Car¥ton goal.

In the short time left for play
Carlton pressed their opponents
but the game ended without any
addition to the score.

The teams were as follows:—

Carlton; Cozier, Alleyne, Por-
ter, Connor, Andrews, Bagot,
Chandler, H. Cox, C. Cox, McKen-
zie.

Everton: Collymore,
Simpson, Roach, Fowler,
Seale, Archer, Weekes,
Morris.

Referee: Mr. E. Amory.

nee

Connell,
Daniel,
Sealy,

1 Misbehave 4.16.56 43.50 &
1 Class
Mohawk 4.06.58 40.39 L
1 Reen 4.07.23 41.10% 2
2 Dawn 4.09.50 41.23% 3
2 Invader 4.41.12 42.90%) 4
4 Coronetta 4.12.19 40.37% 5
18 Clytie 4.15.15 41.50% 6
1 Gnat 4.17.48 43.@% 7
D Class
9 Olive Blossom 4.03.18 42.37% 1
14 Hurricane 4.03.30 39.4744 2
4 Seabird 4.04.19 44.37% 3
3 Rainbird 4.07.05 42.28 4
12 Rainbow 4.07 44 45.18's 5
10 Van Thorndyke
4.08.17 34.35 6
7 Sinbad 4.09.50 43.18 7
2 inp 4.10.22 43.18% 8
8 Peter Pan 4.21.25 53.08% 9
Tornadoes
K 40 Vamoose 3.47.19 19.45 i
K 35 Edril 3.49.26 20.26 2
K 38 Thunder 3.50.47 20.49 a
K *# Comet 3.50.50 20.59 4





SG WcmHr.. (tS

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SINGLE COMPLAINT BUT



side throughout the race in a

Since the race was first rowed
in 1829 none could remember
worst conditions, with snow and

eet and an icy wind hitting the
ccews as they came over the
tumey to the Mortlake course,
iong the banks 6 inches thick in

.ow and almost bereft of specta-

rs. lt was a magnificent strug-
.se@ Unroughout and not until the
st lew hundred yards did Oxford
take the small lead that prevented
Cambridge winning their sixth
successive boat race. This is oniy
we fifth race that Oxford has won
since the first world war.

“A Canvas”

The official distance Oxford won
by was given as a canvas. Not
since the deadheat in 1877 has
there been such a close finish. The
official time was 20 minutes 23

* seconds,

This year’s contest rowed in a
Christmas card setting was almost
a repetition of the 1949 event. In
that year, however, it was Cam-
bridge who came through along
(he fital stretch to deprive Oxford
of vietory by a quarter of a length.
‘he race was a triumph for Ox-
ford’s stroke Christopher Davidge
who was the losing stroke in 1949
and again last year. Oxford have
now won 44 races to Cambridge's
53 with one deadheat. uP

This Week’s
Football

DIVISION ONE

Mon. 31. College vs Notre Dame
Referee G, Amory.

Linesmen ©, Robinson and A.
Thomas.

Thurs, 3, Everton vs, Kmpire
Referee O, Graham
Linesmen A, Parris and S. Par-
ris,

Sat, 5.. Notre Dame
Referee W. F. Hoyos
Linesmnn C.. Roachford and J.
Archer,

DIVISION TWO

Spartan vs Everton.
Referee O. Robinson

Fri. 4. Notre Dame
Referee O, Graham.

DIVISION THREE

Tues. 1. Notre Dame vs Lodge at
Bay—F. Edwards,

College vs Everton at College
—B,. Williams,

Foundation vs, Police at Foun-
dation. —I. J, King.

C. & W. vs Y.M.C.A. at Board-
ed Hall—A Parris.

P-Rovers vs Combermere at
Kensington—A, Thomas.

Fri. 4. College vs Carlton at Col-
lege —J. Archer
Rangers vs Foundation Old Boys
at Shell—R. Hutchinson,
Wanderers vs Pickwick-Rovers
atBay—K. Walcott.

Fri. 4. Y.M.P.C, “A” vs Notre

Dame at Beckles Rd.,—D. Wilson,
Combermere vs Everton at
Combermere—O, Robinson.



vs Spartan

Tues, 1,

vs Empire



INTERSCHOOL
Fri. 4. Foundation vs. Lodge at
Foundation —I. J. King.









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)



MAR, 30 —

The Topic
of
Last Week














Who dare deny this whipping’
Who dore to challenge Joe?

For boys if you were fbsent
ft simply happened so

last Wednesday in the evening
The YM.P.C. third

Were beaten by the Bays’ Club
Suppose you all have heard

Michelin boys’ paraded
They showed Y M.P.C
The values of Enriched Bread
To beat them nil to three
These poor boys in their “booties
Some wearing “Adam's gear”
Skipped here and there like young rams
When sharp boot brads appear

“Chinie” played like @ master
The veteran centre half
And while he beat his way through
Lou killed herself with laugh
‘ . .

P.C. Long scored the third goal
A beauty, one should see
This then had the whole boys’ club
Just revelling in glee
* * .
And when the referee blew off
A shout to wake the dead
Affirmed the strength and vigour
Of J. & R. Enriched Bread
. ‘ .

Talk what you like of welfare
Michelin has done his best
He's saved many a poor boy
From being a wayside pest
* . .

How are the mighty fallen’
oO, 8S. Coppin can tell
Twas be who carried the whistle

When “Dames” beat “Blues” in hell. |

Empire start off like bombers
Shooting their rivals down

And boys throughout the first haif
They held the crowd spell-bound

That smartie! Joe's friend, Robt
Scored one with a good head
You find he eats in secret
Some 5; & R. Enriched Bread
* +

At half time sides were equal

The Dames and Blues; each one
But mid-way in the last half

The Blues cried out “we're gone.”

You then should see the
Miskickings like a miss
At sunset “blues turned yellows
Lou erted out; what is this. |

panting

Send for the undertaker
Eleven blues are dead
How could they beat the bay boys
Who live on Enriched Bread’
. . "

Daniel in midst of lions
Backed by @ roaring crowd

A bullet sent to Symmonds
Like lightning from the cloud

And all the bayside damsel«
Kissed Daniel Thursday night
The hero of the evening
Who beat the blues outright
. “ .

Right then Lou said Dan kiss me
If the Dames beat the Blues
Let's drink J. & R, together
Not one; let's drink “two-twos

sponsored by
J&R _ BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM |

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OVERSEAS











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PAGE FIVE







PAGE SIX





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SUNDAY

What's Cooking
In the Kitchen

Here is an easy recipe for a
very economical pie. You can
use left-over meat or fish for the
stuffing and the pastry is quite
if you follow the instruc-

| easy

ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952



Your Baby
And You

By SISTER CHARLOTTE
Bathing An Infant

t Requirements:
useful of eo he | tions carefully. A plastic apron.
as built up an S) PUFFED PASTRY PIE. Both, on
t »nviabl stae I w chair.
a. fortable, adorned in the font. “me se. rm i -Dastey : Bath, one third full of water.
curacy © vis . r ; Temperature 100° F. Chair with
frasrance men love. | de bound stone ; 7 pinch of salt | babies clean clothes and napkins
cal advice con- , | eae well aired. A tray or basket con-
tained in bis | 1 tablespoonful of margarine taining — :
doroscopes on (butter or lard)
sion Wieiiane af. glass lukewarm water Cotton-wool in a container
Love’ - affairs, '4 Ib. lard, Powder in a box and a cotton-
Friends, Enemies, Sift the flour on the kitchen
Lotteries, etc., |



















NEW — Cutex Lipstick! Smoother,
longer-lasting. It flatters your lips. Cutex
comes in many becoming fashion



Naturally! Not even the most
expensive ncil polish gives a finer
lustre to your nails than CUTEX.

Only Catex contains the

have astounded
educated people
the world over
George Mackey
of New York be



ileves that Tabore must possess some sort
of second~-sight.

To popularise his system Tabore will
send you FREE your Astral Interpreta-
ion if you forward him your full name
(Mr. Mrs. or Miss), address and date ‘of |

of his statements yay roy and toe
affairs, Write now as this offer may not)
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TARORE, (Dept. 213-D), Upper Forjett
Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India
is 4 cents.







Makes Men Old |

table or pastry board. Break an
egg in the middle of the flour,
add 1 pinch of salt and 1 table-
spoonful of margarine (or butter
or lard), Work the dough until
smooth. With the rolling pin
rell the pastry until it is more
or less like a square sheet of
paper, 44 inch thick. Take some

inches wide, just as if you were
hemming a dress. Spread some
more lard on this, fold it over
again. Spread some more lard
again on the next fold and so on

cut it us shown in the diagram.
Take half of the cut stripe and

start rolling it until it will loox
like this :



wool puff.

A container to hold any soiled
ear and nose swabs.

Zine and castor oil cream or
baby antiseptic lotion,

Soap in a covered dish.
Baby brush and comb,

. Safet ins, nail scissors and
birth all elearly written by yourself. No| lard (mind that it is not cold) orange "elclcs,”

money wanted for Monee anise | and spread it with your hana

Postage etc., but sen - in ir } 7

Postal Order for stationery, testimonials | OVer all the sheet of pastry. Now A large towel.

and other interesting literature. You will| take the bottom piece of the two wasning flannels.

be amazed at the remarkable accuracy| sheet and fold it over about 2

Two paus for soiled napkins ana
hm basket for soiled clothes, A
babies’ chamber.

Tne child is undressed and pot-
ted. ‘I'he baby is nen wrappea in

race clotn, and the eyes are swab-
bea witn poric lotion from the
mner corner outwaras;
pad for eacn eye.

ot wool also dippe

juntil y ave > 3! ike a large towel, ‘The tace aud ears
Lustrous ? | tig, Ot Reve: the pastry a are gently swabbed witn a special
we | | Getting Up Nights tou se sue deca!

a fresh
jAnotner shred
in the lotion



Getting up nights, ourning sensa- BE CAREFUL that the part js used for esch nostril, ‘The
wonderful, new ingredient tion of organs, whitish discharge, where it tas been cut is on the face is then dried, special atten-
e | .
Enamelon. It makes your dull ache at base of spine, groin top. Leave the two rolls of tion being paid to the ears. The
oa ; ; : and leg pains, nervousness, weak- | ,.. > ; 4 ° a head is then held over the bath
nails retain their lustre for ness and loss of manly vigour are pastry on the kitchen table for th the le hand and tt hair
ays and days. No chipping, caused by a disease of the Prostate about one hour. Prepare your ‘wh e left hand and the hair
da PE y
vie peeling, no fading. Gland (a most important sex gland

shades that harmonize with your favorite

nail polish,








in men). To overcome these troubles
in 24 hours and quickly restore
Vigour and health, take the new
Scientific discovery called Rogena.
No matter how long you have suf-
fered Rogena is guaranteed to set
you right, reinvigorate your Pros-
tate Gland and make you feel 10 to
20 years vounger or money back, Get
Rogens from your chemist The
Guarantee protects you.



stuffing and then take the rolling
pin and one roll of pastry. Put
a tiny bit of flour on the kitchen
table or pastry board. Put some
|more flour on the rolling pin BUT
NONE ON THE ROLL OF PAS-
TRY. Roll the pastry until it is
about 44 inch thick and put it at
the bottom of the cake tin. Fill
the cake tin with meat or fish

THE CROCHET HAT

Materials: Coats Chain Mercer-
Crochet ‘No, 20, 4 balls Selected
Colour, 2 balls Contrasting Col-
our. Milwards Steel Crochet Hook
No, 2, (Slack workers could use

round, increasing 7 de evenly in
each round.

Repeat last row until piece
measures 5} in. (14 cm.) in diam-
eter,

1 de into each ch across, fasten off, thoroughly,

TASSELS

With selected colour, make 2
Starting at centre

cups for tassels.
make 2 ch.

ts soaped with the right hand,
| gently rinsing it with a flannel
while still holding the head over
j the bath. After drying the hair
with weil soaped
hands pass them over the neck,
arms, body, and legs with special
attention being paid to the creas-
es above the knees and in the



7 L 1 ‘ the groin. (If the cord is not yet
—-—_--—____—_—— | and white sauce or whatever you|" a 1}). Use double thread Next Row: 1 de into each St 18t Row: 6 de into 2nd ch from separated this area is Kept dry;

want to use for stuffing and a No. 1}). Use double thread all round, Repeat last row until Hook. - if it has, the umbilicus is

° cover with the other roll of | roushout. piece measures 5} in. (14 cnt.) 2nd Row: 2 dc into each de. thoroughly washed.) Turning

Ring Os”... pastry. _ Tension 10 de and 10 rows = 1 deen from starting point. 3rd Row: 1 de into each de. him over towards you, soap the

STUFFING. ins Next Row: 1 dc into each Ge, 4th & 5th Rows: As 3rd row,|back and buttocks.” Now, taking

5? % Ib. minced meat or fish Abbreviations eh — chains; de— decreasing 10 times ( 9 necrease fasten off. the baby in the crook of your

margarine " double crochet. miss 1 de, 1 de into next dec). With contrasting colour, make left arm, and holding the baby’s

nent pepper . DIRECTIONS Next Kow: 1 de into each dec 2 tassels and fix into cups, sew to|jeft arm with your l@ft hand,
white sauce Crown Starting at centre with all round. cord and tie cord in bow, fixing|Pupport the buttocks with ‘the

| 1 tablespoonful grated cheese. | ®*lected colour, 2 ch. Next Row: 1 dc into each dc, bow at centre of crown, and|tight hand and lower him into







| Fry the meat or fish with a bit
of margarine. Season with pep-

kind of jam you like. Why
you try. The children will
it.

don’t
love

SEWING



Ist Row: 8 de into 2nd de from
hook.

de all round, increasing 8 dc even-
ly in each round,

10th Row: 1 de into each de alk

CIRCLE

decreasing 10 times. Work 6 mpre
rows of dc without decreasing.

Cord With contrasting colour,
make a ch 18 in. (45.5 cm.) long,
into 2nd ch from hook work 1 de,

DULL ENGLISHMEN?

tacking dord to rim of hat at

side as illustrated.

piece of work from any of
the patterns appearing in It
this newspaper during the

year,





the water. Rinse off the soap with
the body flannel, and after a min-

per. Make a thick white sauce) 29d Row: 2 dc into each de, Break off. Roll up-so easy to pack — The | Ute of two take him out of the
and add about one tablespoonful} 3rd Row: * 1 de into next dc, Brim With wrong side of hat ‘very latest crochet hat from | Water. Pisce ~ en ore
of grated cheese. Mix the white|2 dc into next de (1 de in- facing, attach contrasting colour, Paris. It is worked in 25 hours, a ates t amary” ne taal
sauce with the meat or fish. Fill] creased); repeat from * all round, 1 de into each de all round. (No. 3910). finished rig ane his shee ana
This fine old whisky the cake tin, Cover with the 4th Row: * 2 de into next de, Work 21 rows in all of contrast- Note:—A prize will be given at creases a him, and look
. Ap Mend | pastry, — 1 de into each of next 2 de; repeat ing colour, fasten off. the next Annual Industrial | any ,
contains all the ri Thisivie is very 1 ole itl a 6% - ; ae after any sore spots that need
sess Of cman. yoote u stuffing enone —* rcs — ‘ine Turn back 9 rowg and slip stitch Exhibition for the best soothing with lotion or cream.
7 a Ow: 1 dc into each down on wrong side.
maturing.

He is now ready to be dressed.

is not always that your
baby’s cord separates in time for
your departure from the nursing
home and you should know how
to look after the area. A few
inches of water, only are put into

OW nice to return to the metro. the bath and the baby is rinsed
(By PENNY NOLAN) cloth in one piece yqu have more company of the dull English jy. not true that he kisses ‘your ow, weing — aoe ae
CUTTING HINTS ®pportunity to change the style to| male after a week among the “hand, buys you flowers or flatters ae by eeaehch make asia ee a
Ye inves aalanen he wear the cloth. Therefore always| gallant Latin lovers. you with delightful compliments ne ot clean linet OF bekite cts or,
* ; e 1 pom your) lay out all pieces before cutting|The idea that the Frenchman is ; : " - ;
basic the following list of ques: | anything. e ng Ge rah Set Gare: den eis Ane dictrs ta) Sent he has an ulterior) put around it. This dressing is

jtions will be helprul in avoiding

Be sure all grain lines are cor-

usually sprinkled with some as-




which is. stitched. A binder is
not necessary after the cord has
separated, unless ordered by the

: ne “ the Englishman is nonsense. tringent powder or lotion and the
eee jen ee ees esd) rectly Placed parallel to the|He will steal a taxi right under The Englishman may be unroman- Beaming a then folded like a
, tere ineiag the pattern cae the ag hao ee ! your nose slam restaurant doors tic. But how nice to be given aj packet around the cord. It is kept
The beauty cloth “| to te cha ol te at ae “— in your face, if he is not trying seat in the bus once more; to be|in position by @ crepe binder
"| : 5 J age e pattern. This j 3s you: 4 she safe 5
of Ferguson cottons... 1. Do all pieces include me See the material less along Ae Seas alts tc eae. . WO tee ee





wherever necessary? the edge to be cut,

relentlessly aside in a queue, and
Note: Unless an edge is to be} While

road; have one’s parcels carried,
race you to the last seat in the

and doors held open once again.



°
exquisite designs blossom across seersuckers, cambrics, voiles,

cutting hold the pattern





















an an cut on a fold it must have a and material flat on the table) sk Sete vo, oro
and haircords . , . sparkling colours stay unchanged through seam allowance, with your free hand. Cut with
] 2 ; there a facing pie p "lee ai r 3
wash afier wash . . . these are the lovely crisp Perguson .F a * 6 ors piece for the long clean strokes. Never hack.
on nec ine? ‘ As you finish cutting each, piece
cottons that make 1p so beautifully into clothes ig ie a oon facing lay it earefully in a stack. Avoid
bo : anal or a Dias 1s required, wrinkling. Leave the pattern
for your children / and yourself. 3. Is there a facing piece for the pinned on, the piece until ready
_ back neckline? to sew that piece, a
Ae eee) Re aeem 14. Is there a hem, facing or cuff When you have cut all the pieces
CPSU Peemse | for the bottom of the sleeve? make your sewing easier by mark-
© AN /NDEPENDENT HOUSE 9. Has a facing been planned for jng carefully. Mark all darts, i i ;
Obtainable from all leading stores ; the collar?) pleats and style details. Mark] 4s he losing Interest? “My boy- my dear, I feel could be so much you spend your time trying to
; ate 6. Do a pieces . have grain centre front and centre back with | friend never pays any attention better answered by the “Family make an impression on the boys
#THE GUARANTEE carried by all Ferguson Fabrics— PERKINS & CO., LTD. Mea Seen eed fone ew of a different! to me when we are alone teeth octor.”” ra aan e him bape = ba me Dot - be . aw
~ a . colour a = material s é or re she re gl arties @ ure he wi o his ver. est Ya yay. Phe re
satisfaction assured or the material will be replaced 7. If a button-down-the-front n the material so that/er. Yet, when we go to parties am sure he y

Always look for the name Ferguson on the selvedge.



Agents
Roebuck Street





style, has allowance been
made for lap and seam or
facing and is centre front line
marked on pattern?





pattern should be ready to cut by. tracing carbon paper made especi-)

To prepare your material pre-
shrink and press. Be sure ,it is

it will show clearly. This basting
should be left in until the dress
is finished.

The decision as to the method of

ally for cloth and a tracing wheel.
Be sure to test this on a scrap of

or visiting friends he
so affectionate, stays with me and
pays me all sorts of attentions.
Do you think he is losing interest



is always to advise you in the best possible
proper and
cause

and

Lack of the
knowledge may
upsets, both mental

way.
correct
many

dear, your »oyfriend is shy and boyfriends and I find that I am
it is only when he is in a crowd not as popular as she. This makes
that he is able to enjoy your com- me very jealous of her, and al-

Be interested in the opposite sex
in what they say and do. Bea
yood listener and do not try.to
push yourself. Remember that

——/ 8. Has a belt been planned? marking style details depends on| in: me? It makes me doubt his physical. Pe orate me never ate foot pe they
If you can answer all the above the material. Most materials may | love.” as __ Jealous ee x 2 A ree aa the Scie themselves. So
juestions in the affirmative, your be Marked on the wrong side with; To ‘Worried” Perhaps, my is very popular and has many - sing s *

do stop pushing yourself and you
will find that like your girlfriend
you will also be very popular

free of wrinkles and that’ the material to determine whether the| pany and has the courage to show eure coe _ bg oo areas with the opposite sex,

selvages are straight. , colour shows through and whether | his true feelings. If he is so ob- good ne oe ~~ Ae under. To “Bride.” At reser, iny
If you are cutting your skirt by | the teeth of the tracing wheel will] viously interested in you in pub- or. er a a Aout avertall: dear f° aks preparing ‘some

measurement, mark off the length mar your material. For delicate! lic. I feel you can be assured Stand why she s ave , a g

required to cut the skirt before materials always use tailors’ tacks | that he is really in love with you. the fun.

laying out the blouse pattern. Do|or crossed pins to avoid marring.| His shyness needs much under- am the pretty one.”

» not cut off skirt length until you

t have laid out the rest of the pat- :
‘ern as you may find you have , another time, but do keep your | at times.
insufficient material for the style | material smooth and flat and all
planned. While-you still have the






If you have limited time, plan
to cut at one time and mark at

together.



AND YOU CANT
GO WRONG!

The regular use of
Lanalol Hair Food
will, by its action on
the roots and scalp,
nourish every hair
gland and encourage
richer growth. It
provides nourishment
to the scalp and hair
roots and corrects
such troubles as

DANDRUFF
PARTIAL BALDNESS

standing and patience on your
part. Tell him you are worried
I’m so sure he will re-
assure you about his love.

Your Guarantee of
satisfaction,

Now, Jealous Heart, you must
You are
than
your girl-friend — yet she is the
To “Milly M.” Your problem, popular one. It seems to me that

get a grip on yourself.
prettier and dress better

‘JOYANCE?

‘Joyance' is probably the most

Everybody says that 1

pamphlets that will give you all
the information you seek, You
realise that I cannot answer your
very personal problem here. Any-
way, do not worry but write again
soon and I will let you know

where you can get a copy.

KIDNEY
TROUBLE

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i tn lt a ra a aie
shi eit a i i i ith i tal tt i ese ei aaa liiails



SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

Peasant Proprietor Not Guilty

@ from page 1

His Lordship upheld Mr. Wal-
cott’s objection, and Mr. Reece
replying said all he meant was
that the submission made by
learned Counsel was one which
could not be supported by reason.

Mr. Reece suggested that if
they accept the story told by the
“Headley group”, then that was
how it happened.

There was no question of kill-
ing in the minds of the men,
seeing that each had the oppor-
tunity to strike first, but the pro-
minent thought in their minds
was to get the bananas.

A Neck Tie

It did not who turned
fi and it was‘a fact that they
he the nas, that they
clinched, and that one held the
other in a “neck tie”.

It was a matter for them to de-
cide who was doing the warding
off, but he would suggest that
the man with the stick was doing
the warding off and defending
himself from the man with the
knife.

There was no intention of mur-
der, the idea was to get the ba-
nanas, but if they accepted that
the two men were after the
bananas, and in the heat of the
argument they clinched, and
the accused held the other in a
“neck-tie’ and pushed home the
knife, it would be “plain; undi-
lu murder.”

ere was no question of an
accident in that case,

“Neck-tie” or no “neck-tie”, if
the two men were clinched to-
gether, the stick could not then
remain under the arm of the de-
ceased. No one, even the contes-

tants, who could say exactly
what took place.
Murder

What happened in the clinch?
One man sags at the knees, and
slumps to the ground, what hap-
pened, is a matter for you, and I
submit that if you accept that
evidence, it is a pure case of
murder and nothing else.

“I submit that in this case
there could be no question of
manslaughter. The lethal weapon
which was just a weapon be-
came a dangerous weapon at the
time when the mind of the man
who used it was bent on doing
a certain thing. That is all the
premeditation wanted”, Mr.
Reece said.

If you took the view that the
man had a knife in his hand, and
the other man rushed madly
upon him, it is no manslaughter,
but a case of a man rushing into
the other with no regard for
what would happen. ’

Judge: Would you tell the jury,
Mr. Reece, what it would be in
that case?

Mr. Reece: “I will come on to
that Sir. If the facts are such as
I set out above, it is no offence.

Assuming that they clinched,
and they stumbled and the other
man had a knife quite lawfully
to cut bananas, and they fell and
the other got stuck, nv offence
whatever. erefore there is no
case of manslaughter. .

The real question for you is,
“what are the facts?”

Self-Defence

He asked the jury to diseard
the theory of the fall, and to dis-
card also the question of self-de-
fence.

The bananas were the import-
ant thing. It was not a question
of each man standing his ground
in defence of himself, they stood
there in defence of the bananas,
and if in the clinch and struggle
one was injured and died, there
is no offence to answer.

If in the heat of the argument
one struck another, it would be
manslaughter, but if it happened
as Inniss said, it is pure, simple

os

ie submitted that on the
evidence before them, there was
one.or other of two verdicts, guilty
of murder or not guilty at all. No
manslaughter.

At the invitation of His Lord-

, Mr. Reece dealt with the
question of provocation, and sug-
gested that in this case there was
no provocation.

In conclusion Mr. Reece re-
minded them that the prosecution
had a duty to perform right up
to the last minute, and that they
were not shifting from that re-
a ee

urys 7.

oe See eS. Coy
community to “well and truly try
the issue between your Sov

the Queen and the prisoner
al

t te bar, The could not fail in
that very important duty. There
was also a duty to themselves, to

be conscientious to the duty which
they swore to perform, and lastly
that they had a duty to resolve
any reasonable doubt they had_in
the favour of the prisoner.

If on the other hand they were
convinced that the prosecution had
done its duty, they should say
guilty.

Mr.
Justice Taylor said:—

“Mr, Foreman and gentlemen of

the jury, the prisoner is charged
with murder for that he at the
parish of St. Thomas on the 18th
day of January 1952 murdered
Duncan Headley.
Now you have listened to two
very long addresses by both
Counsel, but two very able ad-
dresses, and you and I now have
our difficult tasks to perform, and
we are greatly indebted to both
Counsel for those two addresses
because doubtless many points
will be present either for or against
the accused which had not oc-
curred to your minds, and the law
has been explained to you al-
though of course you will take
the law from me.

Now, you have been very well
told you will go only by the evi-
dence which you have heard in
this Court and not by anything
which you might have heard out-
side and it is on the evidence
which you have heard in the
Court that you will go on that and
that alone. Briefly the facts in the
ease are that the father of the
accused died in June, 1951, leav-
ing an acre and three foods of
land. He made a will and one of
his sons, Oliver Gibbs, was ap-
pointed executor and it would ap-
pear that with his death, the
testator owed the accused some
money, He left eight children sur-
viving him, Jane Murray who was
mentioned and Eulise Headley a
witness in the case and the wife
of Duncan Headley whom the ac-
eused is charged with m
on the 18th of January this year.

Profits Shared

On the testator’s death the de-
ceased and Eulise were living on
the land and working her wake
by agreement, sharing the ts
with Oliver Gibbs and taking a
portion for herself. All the chil-
dren, including the accused, bene-
fited under their father’s will.
Eulise Headley tells you that
Oliver Gibbs the Executor, told
her to reap the crops she had m
the land to continue working the
land in order to pay the debt by
the testator.

Apparently the accused objected
to this and po will remember
that Mr. Walcott pointed out. to
you how strong that objection
was. There were fights and quar-
rels and law suits between the
accused, Jane Murray and their
family on the one side and the
deceased and Eulise and her fam-
ily on the other side. In 1948 the
deceased was convicted in this
court for biting off one of the
fingers of the accused.

About 4.15 p.m. on the 18th of
January, the accused cut a bunch
of bananas and put it on the
hedgerow and went to cut another
bunch, At the instigation of Eulise
Headley the deceased carried the
bunch, of bananas into her house
and the defendant cut another
bunch and put it on Bryan’s road
and went to the house of Eulise
and the deeeased and demanded
his bananas. It may be, that he
‘went to the house after cutting
the sceond bunch of bananas, any-
way Eulise and Duncan refused
to give up the bananas and would
‘not allow the accused to enter
their house and Jane Murray told
the accused that there were more
bananas on the land and the de-
fendant left the house and went
to cut another bunch.

Evidence Conflicting

From this stage on, the evidence
is very conflicting. But there can
be no doubt that there was some
kind of struggle between the de-
ceased and the accused in the
course of which the deceased re-
ceived a wound under his left
breast, causing his death. It is
also clear that the deceased was
armed with a stick but did not in-
flict any blow on the accused.
Apparently he dropped it when
the defendant held on or, he could
have dropped it before. All the
witnesses also agree that when
the two men clinched and came
together the accused was holding
in his right hand the knife with
which he had cut the two bunches
of bananas.

Murder has been defined where

fa person of sound memory and d

discretion unlawfully kills a reas-





onable person and being under the
King’s peace, with malice afore-
thought, expressed or implied. In
other words, where one kills an-
other with malice aforethought,
that is murder. If anyone unlaw-
fully kills another with malice
aforethought, that is murder.
Malice aforethought means the
intention to kill or do some great
bodily harm and it may be ex-
pressed or implied. Express malice
is where a person deliberately or
by a formed design kills another
and malice as implied by law is
a deliberate act.

Malice

If I put poison deliberately in
another man’s coffee and kill him
the law would imply a deliberate
act and imply from that malice on
my pert. course I would be
eonv a Boe the murder of that
man. o where a wil-
fully stabs another without suffi-
cient provocation or in self de-
fence, the law will imply malice,

Manslaughter is the unlawful
or felonious killing of another
without malice. In murder you
have the malice. In manslaughter
there is no malice. Voluntary
manslaughter is where two per-
sons upon a sudden quarrél fight
and one kills the other or where
& man greatly provokes another
by some personal violence and
so on, and the other immediately
kills him, the law says that is
manslaughter. So that where a
man greatly provokes another and
the other immediately kills him,
the law will call that manslaugh-
‘ter if the provocation is sufficient
because the killing which would
otherwise be murder is reduced to
manslaughter if there is sufficient
provocation. Even though you find
that the defendant deliberately
stabs the accused, you will return
a verdict of manslaughter if you
find such provocation on the part
gf the deceased as would deprive a
reasonable man of his self control
«+ + + not only the accused, but
deprive of his self contro! any
reasonable man under the cir-
cumstances. .

Provocation

You have to ask yourselves in
considering the facts as you find
them from the evidence thatthe
provocation was in fact enough
to lead a reasonable person to do
what the accused did... from
the facts of the case as you find
them was the provocation
enough to lead a reasonable per-
son to do what the accused did
and if so did the accused act
under the duress of the provoca-
tion and stabbed him.

If of course you entertain any
reasonable doubt as to the an-
swer to this question, you should
give the benefit of the doubt to
the accused as you will remem-
ber both counsel very strongly
put to you that any reasonable
doubt should be given to the
accused. Of course in consider-
ing the possibility of manslaugh-
ter, you have to take into account
the weapon useq and all the cir-
cumstances of the case and it is
said the law of reasoning must
bear a reasonable relationship to
provocation for the offence to be
reduced to manslaughter. The
whole doctrine of provocation
depends on the fact that it cause
or may have caused a sudden ‘and
temporary loss of self control.
Provocation which causes a sud-
den or temporary loss of self con-
trol is the provocation which you
will have to consider.

I will read to you a passage
which describes what kind of
provocation you should look for,
“Provocation is some act or
series of acts done by the dead
man to the accused which would
cause any reasonable person and
pesuslly cause the accuse sudden
loss of self control, thus render-~
ing the accused so to speak no
master of his or her mind.”

(Case Law Read

“Let me distinguish some of
the things which provocation in
law is not. Circumstances which
merely predispose of some act is
not enough.” Mr. Taylor read
case law.

“So assuming that you found
the defendant did strike the
blow, was there such provoca-
tion as I say, as to reduce the
killing to manslaughter. Here in
this case you will remember that
the defendant cut two bunches of
bananas which rightly or wrong-
ly the accused considered he had
a right to cut. The deceased took
away the first bunch and was
trying to take away the second
bunch. In addition to that the
defendant tried to prevent the
leceased who raised his >

one witness describes with

|

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

hands. Remember the evidence
on that point. One witness de-
scribes how the deceased raised
the stick with both hands and of
course you will remember that in
1948 the deceased had bitten off
one of the fingers of the accused,
Here you have these two men,
a long feud between them—you
forget that for the moment—the
accused had suffered at the
hands of the deceased, evidence
of the blow on the head and cer-
tain the loss of the finger, and
the deceased had been convicted.
The accused considered tly
or wrongly that in his mind he
had a right to go and cut the
as. That is clear from the

evil e.
Eulise is telling you, ‘No; I
was in control, my father left me
in conrol and the executor told
me to carry on. Therefore nobody
could get any.’ The accused said
money is owing to me and I have
been left a share in the land. I
have a right to go and cut them.

Matter Settled
There is evidence that just
after the father’s death he cut a

bunch of bananas and that Eulise
protested, but nothing was done
about that. Another brother came
from Curacao and they patched
up everything for the time being
and then nothing being done up
to the 18th of January he goes to
cut the bananas. He cuts the
first bunch, puts it down and
goes to cut the second bunch, The
deceased at the instigation of
Bulise takes up the bananas and
puts them in her house. The
accused finds out that the bana-
nas have been put in the house
and he goes and demands his
bananas thinking he has a per-
fect right to them.

They refused to give him the
bananas, saying, ‘No you cannot
come in here.’ He is refused and
he cuts another bunch or he
might have cut it before he went
to the house, but that does not
matter. He puts them in the
road. Deceased goes and takes up
the bananas, He objects, saying,
‘IT have cut one bunch and you
take it away. I cut another bunch
and you cannot take this away,
no,”

The deceased had his stick
raised to strike the accused. If
you find that he raised it to strike
the accused . . . there it is the
man who has bitten off a finger
already, the man who is a strong
man and has already taken
away one bunch of bananas, now
coming to take away another
bunch. It is a question for you
to ask whether that is sufficient
to put him in such a rage as
would deprive him, not him
alone but as would deprive any
reasonable man of his self con-
trol. If you find that these are
the facts, and if you find that
those facts are sufficient to de-
rive any reasonable man, any
Body who would find himself in
those cireumstances of his self
control, you would say not guilty

An Accident
If you find that that is sufficient
and that the accused stabbed the
deceased, that is sufficient to re-

duce the charge which would
otherwise be murder to man~
slaughter. I mope that is clear. If

you find that these events were
such that when he went to cut the
second bunch of bananas, having
already lost one, he was not al-
lowed to keep that, he has not only
fought for them or been deprived
of them, perhaps I should say, but
a stick was descending on him. If
you believe that that was sufficient
to deprive a reasonable man of his
self control that he would plung
a knife into the other man, he
would be guilty not of murder,
but of manslaughter.

Gentlemen, if death results from
a fight upon a sudden quarrel, the
person who causes death is gen-
erally guilty of manslaughter only,
but if the evidence shows that
there was the malicious intention
on the part of the prisoner who
cause death to the person, he is
guilty of murder. All struggles
in anger, and al] fightings are un-
lawful and as such, in such strug~
gle, the death of one person is
caused by the unintentional act of
another although the intention is
not to cause death, the person
causing death is guilty of man-
slaughter.

Sudden Quarrel

But of course even in a sudden
quarrel, if you find that in this
sudden quaryel in tMis case though
it was a sudden quarrel, that the
accused deliberately intending to
get rid of this man who caused all
this trouble, if you find that he

—

says, ‘Now is my chance,’ that is
murder, If you find that in the
heat of passion in the struggle he
struck the blow without knowing
or realising that the knife was in
his hand, that would be man-
slaughter.

And of course gentlemen, there
is considerable evidence, perhaps
you will agree with me in this
case, that there “was a sudden
quarrel and that the two of them
were tossing about and in that
quarrel if you find that the knife
was thrust into the deceasec
man's body in the heat of passion,
that woulq be manslaughter. If
of course you find that the knife
entered the body accidently, in
the struggle, he is not guilty, as
Mr. Walcott put to you. If they
were holding on, whether by fall-
ing or ducking or anything else
and the knife entered the body.

not guilty, If he made a de-
liberate blow in the heat o
passion, you will remember the

evidence in the case — that they
held on to struggle ang 1 think
you will come to the conclusior
that there was a struggle for ne
long time, if you come to the con-
clusion that while they were
struggling, in the heat of passion
he pushed the knife into the de-
ceased man’s body, that would br
manslaughter.

As I said already, if you find
that he said, ‘Now is my chance
to get rid of him,’ that is mur-

der. If he had no time to reflect
in the heat of passion and he
struck the blow, that would be
manslaughter.

Self Defence

Now the defence has also been
put to you by Mr. Walcott about
the case of self defence. If two
people fight upon a sudden quar-
rel and one, after great endeay-
ours to avoid entering furthe:
struggle and attempts to retreat
as far as he can and he finds that
there is no means open to him, to
escape and he turns to avoid Ris
destruction and kills the other,
that is self defence, You will
know gentlemen in such a cage
a man retreats and tries to get
away to avoid a struggle and
only when he finds his own life
is endangered, if he does not do
something the law allows you to
kill under those circumstances.

I suggest to you, although it is
a matter entirely for you—if it is
a suggestion I make on the fact,
you can take it or reject it as you
please—I suggest to you ‘hat in
this case the facts do not warrant
you to hold that this case is one
of self defence. There is no evi-
dence of the accused trying to
avoid this struggle. The only
evidence is the statement of
Belle that he was backing away.
You remember she says he was
backing away while Inniss says
he was advancing. Of course this
evidence may be evidence of try-
ing to avoid the struggle, but that
is only evidence of taking a few
steps backwards.-It is only when
you come up against something
and cannot run any more that
the law allows you to kill. The
law does not allow you to kill
except to save your own life.

Life Endangered

Mr. Reece has told you he was
not afraid. Do you think that his
life was in great danger—this
man with a stick and he with a
knife? Was his life in such dan-
ger that he had to plunge the
knife into the other man? And
if you accept that his life was in
such danger, then it is self de-
fence, otherwise it is not self
defence, I suggest that in this
case there is no question of self
defence. Of course if you find
that the accused had as his ob-
ject the getting of the bananas
and having lost the first bunch as
Mr. Reece puts to you; if you find
he changed his mind and was out
to kill the deceased or to give

him a tremendous beating -
cause, remember that a person’
who is attacked cannot gauge

everything with exactitude, but
if you think that the circum.
stances were such that he was
justified in order to protect him-
self in driving the knife into the
deceased, then you will say 80
and I am suggesting to you gen-
tlemen that that is no case of
self defence. The circumstances
of this case would not justify
you, considering that he was in
such danger, at 4.30 in the after-
noon with the houses

that in order to protect himself,
he had to drive the knife into the
deceased. It is only in cireum-
stances such as that, only where
he had to protect his life that he
would be justified in doing that.

@ On Page 16

Zevcing bn fords

Man About Town

The popular Singer Sewing
Classes are again attracting new-
comers for their new term begin-
ning sometime in April. Have
you phoned 4927 and enrolled?
This is where to learn independ-
ence in pattern making (to your
own size) dress designing and
embroidery. And you'll learn
how to cut a skirt straight from
the measurements—no paper pat-
tern for this, Singer, Sewing
Academy is in the James Lynch
Building on McGregor St. It’)
pay you to take a few minutes
and go in.

* . Ld

Holiday clothes suggest colour-
ful shirts i other things, At
the N OP on Lower
Broad St. there’s a huge variety
of Elite Sea Island Cottons and
Fancy Sports Shirts — picture
prints, tropical scenes — every
colour under the sun and tip-top
value, Socks, Ties, Bow Ties and
ine Linen Hankies are natural
ccessories for the Fine Tweeds,
Worsteds and Tropical Suitings,
custom-tailored and ready-made
This is a man’s shop and that
means everything for men.....

* . *

Creating a new standard of
motoring — not just another new
car, That's the claim of CONSUL,
the 5-Star wonder car by FORD.
A new shipment is at Chs. Mc-
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Sand, Alan Trotter, dial 4493,
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little less attractive than the
CONSUL. It has the whole story.
Chs, McEnearney & Co., Ltd. have
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simple, really, Choose your col-
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owner of the car of the year.

* * *

Electro - plated Spoons, Forks,
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‘ange of Rodger’s Cutlery in Can-
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oo €

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G. W. HUTCHINSON’S are dis-
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. . *

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PAGE EIGHT



——
ats

SAKBADODS Sg ADVUGALL

<—se- Tt



&.--.5-) cera r)

Sunday, March 30, 1952

IMMEDIATE ACTION

THERE is a conflict of opinion which
must be settled before any progress can be
made with industrial or other economic
development in Barbados. That conflict of
epinion has resulted in a state of suspicion
and mistrust which is the reverse of the
conditions necessary for economic develop-
ment. What is holding up private inVest-
ment in new industries in Barbados is lack
of confidence in the government’s inten-
tions with regard to investors in general.

It is not true, as some people assert,
that there is a great deal of money look-
ing around for investment in Barbados.
Most of the money available for invest-
ment locally is already employed. :

Only one thing, so far as investment in
new undertakings in Barbados is concern-
ed, is abundant, and that thing is uncer-
tainty.

Everyone is uncertain. Even local busi-
nessmen do not know what plans to make
about expansion until some decision has
been made about the deep water harbour.
And investors from outside do not consider
that Barbados has enough to offer.

The investors in London for example
are deterred from setting up new indus-
tries here for several reasons, which can
be listed briefly.

First the double taxation system cancels
out the incentive effects of the Pioneer
Industries Bill.

Secondly the limitation of power for
industry is no incentive whatever since
industries cannot operate without power.

And thirdly the government still seems
far from recognising the real impediment
that the Public Utilities Bill has proved
to the Electricity and Gas Company in
their efforts to raise additional capital in
London.

Any attempt to draw parallels between
the Telephone Company and the Gas and
Electricity Companies is wasted effort
because the resources of these companies
are not similar. The suggestion that the
Electricity Company or the Gas Company
are protesting against certain clauses in
the Public Utilities Bill for any other
reason than because these clauses are
deterrent to the London investor is unwor-
thy of those who make it. The public of
Barbados must realise the great difficulties
that are being experienced in raising even
colonial government loans on the London
market. The investors in London, like
the investors in Barbados to-day, have less
spare capital than they had to invest and
they are showing greater and_ greater
reluctance to invest: in colonies where
political motives are suspect. ‘

What is Barbados’ recent record in this
connection? 4

No one can exaggerate the adverse effect
which the Barbados government’s treat-
ment of the British Union Oil Company
has had on the irivesting public in England.
It was shattering to British confidence in
an island whose pro-British reputation
had been painfully built up during long
years and until that confidence has been
regained it is wishful thinking to suppose
that a fiscal survey or an industrial devel-

opment corporation will be successful in
restoring confidence.

How can confidence be restored?

There are two immediate actions to be

taken.

First let us put an end to the stupid
activity which is being promoted in cer-
tain influential quarters of compelling the
Electricity Company to withdraw its pro-
test to the public utilities Bill or to be
nationalised, Intelligent treatment of the
Electricity Company and recognition of
the real difficulties it is encountering will
automatically benefit the gas .company,
and will give the first real incentive to the
potential industrialist who may be think-
ing of manufacturing certain products or
parts of products in this island.

That is the first immediate action to be
taken,

Then let us follow up this gesture of
goodwill by deciding next week or next
month, not next year what action is to be
taken with regard to the proposed deep
water harbour.

It may have escaped the government's
notice that the same engineering firm
which was commissioned to advise Barba-
dos as to a deep water harbour is now
engaged in a similar service for the Gold
Coast.

\nd the Gold Coast government 1s pre-
pared to spend up to £9 million and to
open its new port by 1956,

Barbados instead is still toying with the
idea whether it can afford a deep water
harbour or not. ;

It has had ample opportunity to make
up its mind and excuse after excuse is
brought forward to justify the delay.

,resign her membership.



Our Readers Say so

Wrong Indictment Schools,

It has been

To the Editor of the Advocate

SIR,—I noticed in your issue of
the 25th irst. a dirty letter writ-

ten -by Phantom in which he
wrongly, indicts the Schools of
Barbados, but made especially wee sod
nasty references to the Primary thankfulness.

always observed
that in nearly all such cases, the
highbrow but base critic owes his
very existence to the very schools
which he abuses, but because of
his vicious ingratitude he speaks
thus of an institution for which he
should offer up a daily prayer of

If the figures quoted for the new port
in Gold Coast are any guide to present
costs of port construction it seems unreal
to suppose that an island as small as Bar-
bados will ever be able to foot the bill for
the North Scheme Harbour unless it finds
oil in very great quantities. But the find-
ing of oil is uncertain and the date of com-
pletion of the first oil well is receding
into the distance and the presence of oil
cannot possibly be ascertained this year.

What then are we to do?

Are we to continue to paralyse every
suggestion for the improvement of the
docks until oil is discovered? It may never
be discovered. The only thing to do now
is to count the cost of implementing the
Deep Water Harbour as recommended by
Sir Douglas Ritchie in his report and if
the government is still confident that it
can afford the highly increased expendi-
ture required for the North Scheme let
it request the Crown Agents for the Col-
onies to arrange for the issue of a deben-
ture loan by underwriters in London: let
it guarantee one third of the sums to be
raised and let it obtain from the United
Kingdom government an undertaking to
guarantee the other two thirds of the loan.

If a loan can be raised on such terms
then let the Government implement the
Deep Water Harbour scheme.

But if the government of Barbados post-
pones the issue and the government of the
United Kingdom are not prepared to dis-
play such confidence in our ability to
repay whatever loans will be necessary for
the building of the Deep Water North
Scheme Harbour, then let us have done
with crippling indecision and consider at
once the practicability or desirability of
implementing by stages “Scheme A”
which, despite dis-advantages ought not
to be dismissed as an alternative.

Time is not on our side.

If we can afford the North Scheme Har-
bour, investors will be convinced that we
have confidence in ourselves and will be
attracted to our island. If we decide that
we cannot afford such a harbour let us

plan for a harbour we can afford and let
us take prompt action to allow the electri-

city and gas companies to carry out the
expansion they plan in order to accommo-

date new industries.





PEOPLE'S WILL

THE action of Dr. Malan’s government
in seeking to invalidate a ruling of the
Courts on the pretext of the will of the
people being sovereign illustrates in a
way that many people can understand
the dangers inherent in the idea of the
absolute sovereignty of the people. As
expressed through parliament as the su-
preme legislative organ.

Dr. Malan is doing in the field of human
relations exactly what Dr. Mossadegh has
done in the field of oil: both these Prime
Ministers are attempting to justify actions
which have been declared to be legally
invalid by an appeal to the will of the
people.

But whereas the Persian Prime Minis-
ter's action was felt with greater acuteness
at the centre of the Commonwealth, Dr.
Malan’s action by reason of its subject mat-
ter is being more widely resented on its
circumference,

In the British Colonies the action of the
South African Nationalists must be intol-
erable to predominantly coloured people
whose sympathies are naturally directed
to anyone who is the victim of racial dis-
crimination. Alone among the peoples of
the British Commonwealth South Africa
continues to pursue a racial policy which
can never win acceptance by coloured
members of the Commonwealth and which
is heartily condemned by the majority of
other British governments.

Even the Court which decided against
the-Separate Representation of Voters Act
was composed of five white judges.

The strength of the British Common-
wealth lies in its ability to reconcile the
irreconcilable and the fact that South
Africa whose racial policy is emphatically
out of step with that of the United King-
dom should remain within the fold is
tribute to that strength. i

But there is no doubt that South African
nationalism and racial intolerance is
undermining the very strength which its
membership of the Commonwealth was
meant to sustain.

At meetings of the United’ Nations and
in its relation with the British African
territories the United Kingdom's associa-
tion with South Africa is flung in its face
and even in the West Indies where noth-
ing like the South African system has
ever existed (not even in times of slavery)
prejudice and animosity is generated in
communities where only racial unity pro-
vides the path to further advance. If South
Africa continues her policy of racial
fanaticism the greatest service she can
render the Commonwealth would be to

“| S35"7, HR Now I have spoken to several
teachers and I have been observ-
ing the work and the influence of
the children of many schools, and.
as a grateful citizen of Barbados
who has never been a pupil of
these schools, I give the “lie di-
rect” to this evil suggestion. How-
ever, from what I have gathered
within the last couple of years, all

SUNDAY



Sitting On The Fence

An American writer has sug-
gested that, after the honeymoon,
a Young husband should tactful-
ly make his bride food-conseious
by bringing the subject into the
conversation at every oppor-
tunity.

IN our own home at last. Don’t
you like the dark oak panelling
in the dining-room, even if it
isn’t oak?

Perfect. It reminds me of
stewed ox tail.
Really? How peculiar. Of

course, I’m not quite sure about
the off-white walls of the draw-
ing-room, though they do set off
~ goldly-brown carpet rather
well,

When I look at the walls and
the carpet together I think of
sole cooked with mussels. When
I look at the walls alone they
remind me of tripe and onions.

Is this the romantic dreamer
I married? I suppose the sun-
shine-yellow wallpaper in our
ew reminds you of omel-
ettes?

Sometimes omelettes. More

often sweet corn with fried
chicken,
. I think it’s revolting to think
of food in our be when
we've only been married a
month,

I can’t help it. Even the bath-
room sponge reminds me » of
golden pudding.

Do you remember when my
eyes reminded you of dark pools
fin the starlight?

Yes. I remember.

What do they remind you of
now? Mushrooms on toast?

No. Thick brown gravy.

And the pale porcelain cheeks
you loved? Stuffed veal, I sup-
pose?

Not stuffed, darling.

Boiled leg of pork with mash-
ed turnips, maybe?

No turnips, dear,

Just a plain boiled leg of pork
without even turnips? That’s
me, is it?

, Well, darling . .
Goon. Say it, you pig.
With your pale skin,

eyes, and golden fringe,

going to say you reminded’ me*
more of roast k with brown
gravy and crackling.

PROBLEM CHILD |=
An application for a licence to
make alcoholic ice- cream con-



ee fath

ADVOCATE

By NATHANIEL GUBBINS

taining one part in eight of Dram-
buie, peneaicune, apricot pranay
or rum, for adults only, was re-
fused after opposition by many
clergymen, inciuding the Rev. T.
*l’ncmpson, who saia there was a
danger that young people migh}
get a taste for it,
(After the old song.)

IT was only a humbie home
they had in an old world village
btreet.

Each stick and stone in that
humble home was ever so clean
and neat.

For .ove it oe in that hum-
ble home, though it’s now but a
beauuful dream.

Since the man with the ice-
cream barrow called and sold our
boy ice-cream.

Don’t give no ice-cream to our
Johnny,

it makes him so strange and
so wild.

We remember the time he was
bonny,

A normal and dutiful child.

We remember him saying his
lessons

And praying for Daddy and

um,

Till they sold him an ice-cream
cornet

Full of apricot brandy and rum.

As midnight strikes in that
humble home his anxious parents
wait

For a boy at an ice-cream par-
lour bar, although he is only
eight.

They weep as they look at the
things he loved, the smashed and
the broken toys,

And remember the day when
ice-cream was cream, and blue-
eyed boys were boys.

Don’t give no ice-cream to our
sonny,

Don't give no ice-cream to our
dear,

For after
funny,

His language is shocking to

ir.

ice-cream he goes

ear.
The night he insulteg his

‘ather,
The night he assaulted his
Mum _
Was after a lick at
cream brick .
Full of apricot brandy and

rum.
_ DREAM ENCOUNTER
A PIG was driving the taxi

‘

an ice~

which was taking me to the
House of Commons to hear tne
puaget speech.

Wren we stopped at the Brit-
{sh IMduseuma I offered the pig
a tem—shiling note, As he had
no cChhaange he gave Me a piece o1
toffee instead.

While | was eating the toffee,
the pag said: “What is the time
of your wedding?” | said; “11.49
am.”* The pig said: “What
day?”* I saia: “I don’t know.
She’s been waiting at the chyrch
three weeks as it is,’

Ten the pig took the ring
from his mose and said: “As
you won't be able to afford a
wedding-ring after the Budget,

you better put this on her
fin, l hope it won’t be too
big.”

I said; “It will probably be

too srmall, as I am marrying The
Fat Iuady from the circus, who
has Frands as big as hams.”

The pig said: “It’s not polite
to mention hams in my pres-
ence.”” I said: “I beg your par-
don.” The pig said: “Granted
as soon as asked.”

Then the pig said “If you mar-
ry this fat lady she will either
smother you or you will get
three years for bigamy. Which
do you prefer?” .

I said I would rather have
some more toffee.
* * *

The pig then drove me from
London to Manchester, via Car-
lisle and Dublin.

When we arriveqd at Minsk.
Staliraz called out: “Hullo, Gub-
bins. How would you like to
work for me?”

I said: “What at?” Stalin
said; “A daily column for
Pravda.” I said: “What about?”
Stalima said: “You only have to
keep on saying I'm wonderful.”

1 said; “My terms are a ten-
year contract at 50,000,000
roubles a year, with a special
‘tax-free Budget for columnists.”

Stalin said; “Done.”
lookimg at the pig, he
“Who’s your friend?” I said:
"One of our visiting members
of Parliament.”

Stalin said: “I thought so, Why
don’t you ~slaughter the lot
and increase your bacon ration?”

As they led the. pig away,
Stalima said: “This-is. the first
spy we've Caught that we can
eat, Too,”

—L.E.S.



Garrison Church

On the 24th wecember 1840 the
Most Reverend Doctor Richard
Patrick Smith, Bishop of Agna
(with headquarters in Trinidad)
jaid a corner stone of the first
Catholic Church in the island of
Barbados sub invecatione Sancti
Eduardi, confessoris, Regis Ang-
liae, dedicandae.

On Easter Sunday March 27th
1842, John Haly, Chairman of a
meeting called to assess the
catholic congregation of St. Mich-
ael for taxes in support of their
first pastor, the Reverend William

Rogers, signed his address at
poret Edward’s Glebe, Bridge-
own,

Why then was the church which
was opened by Bishop Smith 6n
March 17th 1848, according to an
outline of its history published
in the Catholic Standard of No-
vember 1946, shown in local
Church Records of 24th October
1848 as St, Patrick’s Church.

The suggestion has been made
in the same publication that the
name St. Patrick is due to the
presence in Barbados at a later
date of the Leinster Regiment,
out chuech records prove that the
Church was known as St. Pat-
rick’s as early as 1848, and from
the beginning the idea ‘of a
Catholic Church was intimately
connected with the presence in
Barbados of British troops at the
Garrison.

As early as May 17th 1840
Richard Hart, Major of the 8lst
Regiment had written to the
stoman Catholic hody a reply ex-
pressing his willingness to “work
out a plan forthwith” for the
proposed “Catholic Chapel.” And
on the 29th September 1840 there
4s notice of a resolution to ascer-
tain whether the Lieutenant
General Commanding the Forces
(Sir S. Whitington) would be
inelined to give the Reverend
William Rogers leave of absence
for three months without requir-
img a substitute as Catholic chap+
lain to the forces during that
period.

But the connection between the

local Forces at the Garrison and
the Chufch now known as St
Patrick’s in Jemmott’s Lane is
proved beyond all possible doubt
by a record in the same minut
of the meeting on 29th Septe:
1840 wherein the suggestion 1
made “that the medical officer
at the Garrison should be request-_
ed to walk the distance from the
Garrison to the grotind just
purchased (that is in Jemmott’s
Lane) to obtain his opinion
whether or not he would consid-
er it too long a distance for the
soldiers to march to prayers.”

In the same minutes Reverend
William Rogers’ Garrison salary

ee, by him is recorded af,
£75,

At the very first meeting of the
Catholic body held in Barbados
on Sunday February 24th, 1839,
t was resolved to raise a “Church
in this island to the service of

God, according to the rites an@ Proved so much in a period of

forms of the Catholic Ritual, and
that the same when erected shall
be dedicated to St. Edward the
Confessor in accordance with the
desire of the talented learned and
vious Bishop of this diocese.” d
It was this same Bishop who laid
the corner stone of the chureh
dedicated in Jemmott's Lane to
the illustrious British monarch St.

is not well in the schools.

It is because of this fact that
we should place on record our
best thanks to Dr. Massiah who
apparently has been able to put
his finger on the bad spot of the
system, and like him I demand
that a non-political commission of
enquiry be set up and unearth
once and for all those responsible

By GEORGE HUNTE

1849 at a

meeting attended
amongst others by Captain Gore













Edward the Confessor on 24th and Quarter Master Boden of the
December 1840, and according to 72id Regiment Revd. I O'Don-
the writer in the Catholic Stanaard lly is congratulated on the
pad 1846 it was the same Bishop ©mpletion of St. Patrick Church.
ee Tem tele We ee Bishop Smith is still in Trinidad
the Church in Jemmott’s Lane ° the 18th July 1849 because he
which the Catholic body had writes on that date to the Rev-
agreed in February 1839 should be erend I, O’Donnelly but there is
dedicated to St. Edward the Con- " mention in this letter of the
fessor, referred to in church ‘hinged dedication of the Church
records of 24th October, 1848 as.’ ee he On the’ 20th
St..Patrick Church? And if a e island of Barba-
church which could ‘only have {8 Ws annexed to the Apostolic
been called St. Edward Confessor Vicariate of British Guiana, By
was opened on March 17th 1848, May 12th 1854 there was no per-
why do the records of October â„¢nemtly resident [Pastor in Bar-
mn 1848 refer to “shingles and ™*40S-
cther materials required for cov- On 20th Januar

'y 1858 the Revd.
ering St, Patrick Church? . Henry SEGRAVE informed a

“Had the Church of March 17th Meeting at Saint Patrick’s Pres-
1848 been opened without a roof bytery¥ that when the Church and
or had it been completely destroy- Presbytery were repaired the
ed between March 17th 1848 and Society to which he belonged
October 24th 1848? If that were % represented here would care
so it seems incredible because of it foster it and use every effor
the many difficulties recorded in e maintain the Progress of the
getting money to build the -
seer, ae Ae pay the, salary of By a Church continued to strug-

aoe gle against financial difficulties

These difficulties are vividly and on Sunday 10 July 1859 at a
recorded in - eloquent treatise meeting held at the Presbytery
oroctinn on Merch 21th 1842 which Mt. O'KEEFE was. solicited and
begins with the quotation “to all P'mised to draw up petitions te
such as serve the altar of God, the Colonial Legislature as alsc
is conceded the privilege of living the British Government for aia
by the altar.” “inasrmuch as nearly the whole

si onpaay was occupied by the Mili-

John Haly details some of the tay the mumber of civilian:

: i *g being very small.” The writer
Sale puttered a4 pea eng wee of the outline of St. Patrick’s in
ee esiine sebtirignions Shrousb= the Catholic Standard of Novem-
ont the islands for the Church of er 1946 states that in 1857 the
St. Edward Bis Sonar: — Uh Caer eee ana
Pe “the travel- .
ine por akan. nian in boats. Apparently the only contribu-
of 5 to 7 tons burthen—he had to pa rece towards the Church
suffer much Speen} soo Berallaeurh pasetie to the “eae
and deep mo’ . — = winks lic Chaplain of the Forces,”
in. cute ee cenit Wee con- The names of all the Regi-
ta am his mission searching for Mts whose soldiers benefited
act on h, ffom the spiritual administrations
subscriptions for this very Church, of this “unofficial” ti
whose purpose it did not suit to garrison







be parties to the good work, any. Churata can still be seen in the
more than it suited them to con-

vey their declension in mild

tful language.

' id we now find him in the
fourth year of his Apostolic Mis- poedfordshire
Sion, not only without a reserve Scots Fusiliers,

fund of a dollar against a day

wherein sickness might overtake The
and overpower him but absolutely Royal

without the means of discharg-
ing debts.”

Whilst he deplored “the state of ment,

to which this fine
island has been subject for ‘the
years 1840 and 1841 by long con- Connataght: Rangers,

martyrdom

present Church of St. Patrick’s in
Jemmott’s Lane today. They are
the Lancashire Fusiliers, the
(Kings) Liverpool Regiment,
Royal Sussex, East Kent,
Regiment, Royal
Royal Irish Regi-
(The Duke of Wellington's)
West Riding Regiment, The
Berkshire Regiment, The
East ‘Yorkshire Regiment, (the
Prince of Wales) LEINSTER
Regiment, the Leicester Regi-
the Royal Scots, the North
Staffordshire Regiment, the York
and Lancaster Regiment, the
the Loyal

ment,

tinued drought “and regretted” North Lancashire Regiment, the

the individual losses

he looked forward to more pros-
perous times and propos: an
assessment of taxes on each mem-
ber of the congregation.

Conditions could not have im-

little more than six years to have
permitted the Catholics of Bar-
bados to complete one chureh
dedicated to St, Edward the Con-
fessor by the middle of Mar
1848 and to have another St.
Patrick, requiring shingles and
other materials for covering in
October of that year.

In the records for 29th July

for this great disservice to the
Cause of Education in Barbados.

BARBADIAN PARENT.
27.3.52

hilatelist Wanted
SIR,—I take the liberty of
writing you as I am a very keen
philatelist and would like to ex-
change stamps of my country
with a stamp collector of your

to which Royal
. many of us have been exposed” Shropshire Light Infantry.

Scots Fusiliers and the

With 4 roli call Such as this is
it not strange that a garrison
church originally dedicated to St.
Edward the Confessor should
from so early a period have been
known as St. Patrick, and that
subséquent Catholic Churches in
Jemmett’s Lane rebuilt after tire
shoulg have retained that dedica-~
tion?” When the Catholics of Bar-
bados whose numbers today are
counted’ in thousands bulld their
second church in some other part
of the island it will no doubt be
dedicated ‘to St. Edward Confes-
oh tire illustrious British mon-
arch,

colintry.
Thamking you in anticipation.
Yours truly,
A. ANDERSON.
My mame and address are as
follows:
ALBERT ANDERSON, |
PAMPA 2895
BBUENGS AIRES
ARGENTINA

273.1952

| —_———

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——_——_— - == = =.

SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

AT THE MUSEUM:

CONTEMPORARY PAINTINGS



THE Exhibition of contem-
porary West -Indian painting at
the Museum is largely Barbadian
This is no uncommon feature of
such exhibitions that. the locus
should be better represented than
adjoining colonies, where trans-
port difficulties and inertia prevent
potential exhibitors submitting
paintings, The Trinidad Art
Society has sent an interesting
representative collection of work
of which the oils are well framed;
there are aiso two paintings from
Antigua. Among the local contri-
butors are y to the island.

The general impression of the
exhibition is good: there is a wide
variety of subject and technique,
the latter varies fromthe meti-
culous work of Robert J. McLeod
to the dream-like impressionism
of Muriel Mathieu. There is a
bi t John Harrison by Carl
Br gen rightly hung with a
laurel wreath, a tribute to Harri-
son’s many services to art in the
Caribbean. Over this collection of
paintings Harrison watches with
a bland half-smile, as though he
approves of the art creations
which surround thim, Many of
these might. be described as his
“childken”, for to the younger
artists of the Caribbean he brought
syimpathy, encouragement and un-

derstanding. His, driving sense of |

the importance of art also infec-
ted some more experienced and
slightly disillusioned artists. To
the more academic and realistic
Painters Harrison had. less to
give’ for they were unwilling’ to
meet him half-way, But, in the
long run even they gained from
the new interest in art, for their
work being the most straight-
forward and easily understood
was the first to find new buyers,
Although Harrison is lost to the
Caribbean, his enthusiasm lives
on in this, and, it is to be hoped,
in future exhibitions.

_ Among the oil paintings they3
is some interesting work by G. Cc,
Stevenson, who shows landscapes
ame portraits. His palette is quite
unlike that Of any other exhibiior,
and the effect of sun-drenched
landscape is achieved by the use
of. clean colour. Elmer Jordan’s
painting continues to progress:
apart from his Speightstown
Scenes, he ‘exhibits a delightful
Sea-scape patterned with fishing
boats, and, a still life in which
the economy of colour used is
remarkable. Ivan .~ Payne’s
Speightstown is an entirely differ-
ent place to that of Jordan, and
the work, of these artists has
nothing in common. For Payne,
Speightstown is full of detail
which he records for its own
sake. In “Bananas” and _ in
“Coconut Trees near Trent's”
Payne skilfully employs tones of
green of different



———————— ES SS Oa ee hCO —_—— -



.

Phe amet

JOHN HARRISON

achieve recession. Both paintings
are highly successful, and ‘a rest-
ful calm is created in each wich
is unruffled by the Trade breeze.
The artist-is to be congratulated
on-the framing of his work,

Of the work of Trinidadian
artists Geoffrey Holder’s is un-
doubtedly, the ‘most exciting in
this exhibition. Here isa highly
individual artist whose work has
elan not found in any other artist
in this exhibition, It is to be
hoped that Geoffrey Holder will
consider giving another one-man
exhibition at the Museum. Cecily
Forde’s “Slipway” ‘is well com-
posed and of unusual colour.
Muriel Mathieu's delicate and in-
dividual patterning in “Refiec-
tions” and “Still Life With Saucer”
is responsible for highly decora-
tive work, “Still Life with Tropi-
cal Fruit” is arresting, M. Wyke
is to be congratulated on the skil-
ful composition and subtlety of
colour in this painting. “Twin

Palms” by Garner Francis is

intensity tobolder in style than that of this

By Karl Broodhagen

work recently exhibited here, this
painting gains enormously from
the technique employed and the
recession is excellent.

Dorothy St, John’s .- realistic
treatment of coconut fronds in
“Lullaby” conveys the impression
of these being ruffled by a gentle
wind, and the dancing light on
the sea has been admirably
achieved in this painting and in
“Fish Row.” Robert. McLeod's re-
cent exhibition is tod fresh in
one’s memory for new observa-
tions, but in revaluing his pictures
one must admire the amount of
colour he gets into his shadows,

for this only comes with long
observation. Eileen Hamilton
shows an_ interesting portrait,

there are two fine flower paintings
by Harold Connell and a flower-
piece by E. A. Parry of pleasing
colour, which shows much
promise. “Old Railway Bridge” by
J. C. Bailey is a very pleasant
painting: some of this artist's
work recently exhibited here, this
paintings gains enormously from



Scientist Versus F aker

In 1945 the art. world was
startled by a Dutchman called
Van Meegeren who claimed to
have painted eight pictures which
had been accepted as genuine
seventeenth century Dutch paint-
ings. Dr, Paul Coremans, Director
of the Belgian Museum’s Central
Laboratory, showed the decisive
part played by science in proving
that the pictures were modern in
a recent book, and Dr. Anthony
Werner, a research chemist at the
National Gallery in London, sum-
marised the methods of detec-
tion in a BBC talk. There are
four layers in a painting, starting
at the back with the support of

or canvas. The ground
work usually consists of a layer
of chalk (or gypsum) in glue,
though white lead in a drying oil
is sometimes used. The paint
layer is essentially composed of
particles of coloured pigment
embedded in a suitable medium.
Varnish comes last, enhancing the
picture’s brilliance and _ protect-
ing it against atmospheric cor-
rosion. Paintings of doubtful au-
thenticity are tested in a museum
laboratory. First comes examina-
tion through powerful binoculars
to ascertain the general condi-
tion, the structure of the “cra-
quelure’—a network of crackle
which exists on every old paint-
ing—and the existence of any
overpainting or restoration. Next
come X-rays, the degree of their
penetration depending on_ the
nature of the paint used. If
X-ray. photographs reveal areas
of paint bearing little resem-

GOOD

HEALTH
Se Oe
greatest

blessing

can have .

own doctor,

Good health is the greatest asset a man or woman
. . in fact, it is the only REAL. asset.
depends on good living habits. It is doubly assured
by a REGULAR visit to a physician.
at all times to fill all prescriptions written by your

Be sure to send us your next prescription and be
assure of pure drugs compounded with aecuracy.

‘KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

blance to tihe superficial image
further detailed investigation is
needed, which involves taking
small samples of paint from the

pictures,

The Van Meegeren support
was found to be canvas. IPoten-
tial buyers’ are impressed by

old canvas and fakers buy old
pictures, clean off the original
paintings as completely as pos-
sible to avoid detection by X-rays
and paint on the supposedly old
picture. Van Meegeren adopted
this practice and under one
pseudo-Vermeer painting of “The
Last Supper” remains of a hunt-
ing scene were found. Van
Meegeren had bought a hunting
scene by Honduis in 1940 and this
had been photographed. When
the protograph was compared
with the clearly recognisab!:
areas of paint that the X-rays
showed to be lying under “The
Last Supper” they were identical.
The next examination was of the
actual paint layer, This was
very hard and resisted the action
of organic solvents as old paint-
ings do, but stowed a porousness
foreign to them, It also behaved
oddly when treated with strong
alkalies and acids for seventeenth
century paintings would be se-
verely attacked by these whereas
the paint layer of his picture was
unaffected. I became clear that
his medium was unique and the
key to the mystery of.his tech-
nique lay in _ it. After many
analytical tests it was established
that he used a synthetic resin



It

We stand ready



“OVEN FRESH”














first patented in 1907. When
dealing with such a medium, an
artificial craquelure which is
superficially convincing can be
produced by rolling the painting
round a cylinder, The craquelure
of a really old painting contains
a mixture of dust, fatty material
and particles of disintegrated
varnish collected by time. The
craquelure of the suspected paint-
ings contained a_ blackish sub-
stance, a sort of ink which, owing
to the porous nature of the
medium, had diffused into the
paint on either side,

Pigments are not a sure guide
in proving age for intelligent
fakers use those known to the
artists whose work they are
imitating. Van Meegeren used
only pigments known in the
seventeenth century but in two
samples of blue taken there were
traces of cobalt. Now, there are
two blue pigments containing
cobalt, Smalt, in use at that time,
and Cobalt Blue, a later pigment
discovered in 1802, and further
analysis showed that Van Meeg-
éren’s blue was _ undoubtedly
Cobalt Blue. He had _uncon-
sciously used a sample of ultra-
marine which had been adulter-
ated with Cobalt Blue. Further
examinations were made under
the microscope but Dr, Werner
thad said enough to convince

listeners of the value of the skill-
ed and patient work carried out
by the scientists who reveal the
faker’s deception.






and Brown Derby










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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



a

observation than inability to re-
cord. Miss Kendall’s work at
times also suffers from this defect,
which no amount of paint, can
cover. Her study of a Harbour
Policeman and that of the much
painted Busby’s Alley are both
of lively interest.

Of the drawings and water-
colours, Madame deKuh's’ pencil
work is unrivalled and her head
studies excellent. A. Roberts shows
several watercolours of unusual
charm, “Waterfall”, “Patio” and
“Sundown” being especially
worthy of note. Gordon Corbin
has a good sense of thé limitations
ef watercolour and his work
benefits thereby, for his drawings
are never dull. The limitations of
watercolours as a medium are
not appreciated by many exhibs
tors, whose work varies from being
tight and hard to being extremely

messy. Because watercolours are
easly applied to paper it does
not follow that this is a simple

medium to use. Nor can water-
colours be employed to do ‘the
work of oils. The work of A, E.
Taylor of Trinidad is a good
example of the proper use of
watercolour, His work has an al-
most 18th century quality, and,
by expert use of his mediumhe
is able to light his work in a
manner which gives pleasure to
the visitor and is the envy of his
brother artists.

Alf Codallo’s romantic “Bath-
sheba” has about it a quality found
in the work of Jean Lurcat, it is
unusual and arresting. Some of
B. McD. McClean’s work has a
charming naivety, but “Sanctum
Sanctorum St. Peter” is an exer-
cise in architectural drawing only,
and not a picture, for it is al-
most completely flat and devoid
of lighting. Golde White shows a
delightful beach group, Peggy
Merrick seascapes have a clarity
which some exhibitors might study,
Mrs. Delamere shows a landscape
of delicate colouring and Kathleen
Hawkins a well balanced: drawing
of a.donkey and cart,



ATLANTIC



BAY

Last,



STREET

PAGE NINE





Ivan Payne *



but by no means least, beauty, His head of John Harrison |

there is the work of Carl Brood- is a fine example of his portraiture, |

hagen, who must first receive our
congratulations on the award of
a long delayed British Council
schola;ship, He is the first local
artist to be so rewarded, Brood-
hagen’s sculpture is strong and
the warm colour of the pieces ex-
hibited . greatly enhances their

RHAPSODY R. J. MacLeod

Removal Of Import Duty Of
Fishing Equipment Urged |

(Frorn Our Own Correspondent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Mar, 28.

One of 58 recommendations
made at the conference of Fisher-
ies Experts of the Caribbean
which concluded at Kent House
yesterday afternoon, askeq that
Territorial governments give ur-
gent consideration to the removal
of the import duty on equipment
used in the Fishing industry.

Another asked that Territorial
governments be asked to review
the existing price control regula-
tions for fish with a view to ‘re-
moving them. The conference,
which began Monday recom-
mended that the Caribbean in-
vestigate the possibility of launch-
ing a joint effort of territorial and
metropolitan agencies to explore
fisheries sources of Caribbean off-
shore waters.

In considering the application
for technical exploration and de-
velopment of new fisheries, the
conference laid stress on training
fisheries officers.

Among recommendations on this
point were an annual seminary
for technical officers for the ex-
change of ideas and data on the



Brogues.

—_——





shop at

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although his most virile work is!
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The exhibition shows to advan- |
tage at the Museum when one}
recalls - the rooms at
Queen's Park.

gloomy



Capt. Musson Can Apply
For Order Of Mandamus

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Mar, 29.

Leave to apply for an order o!
mandamus was granted to Capt |
Roy Musson and his wife
Vivienne by Supreme Cour
judge today.

The order directed by a clerk
of the peace of the Port-of-Spain
Magistrate’s Court is returnable
on Monday.

The Mussons by mandamus are
seeking a court order to compel
ihe clerk of the péace to accept
neir appeal notice, to grant them
bail and forward the proceedings
to the full court for hearing and
determination, The City Magis
trate earlier in this week ordered
the removal of the Mussons from
the colony when he delivered
judgment against them in’ a case
charging them of being prohibit-
ed immigrants and having failed
to leave when ordered to do so,

It wag also ordered that they
be held in custody pending de-
portation; they were refused
bail and it was told them thero
was no appeal.

a



4,44









PORE OOPS OPPOOY os.
organisation of technical educa- x MARCH and APRIL SHOWERS x
tion programmes such as those g TAK x
conducted by the Food and Agri-|% = bring FLOWERS in June, x
culture organisations, and Fishery | $
tomining eonited and demonstra- % GLADIOLUS BULBS %
tion projects, 4 1& Gold y
Another recommendation of in- ¢ Soft Orange %
terest asked that in view of evi-| % Bright Orange Salmond x
dence that the fish supply banks st Red g
off British Guiana were being de- | % Purple with Redish Glow
pleted, that territorial govern- | Begonia-Rose
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obtain statistics of fich landed|$ panLIA BULBS
from these banks in the terrlior-| § Red .
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tinique, Barbados, Trinidad, Al x Dark Purple .
recommendations are to be con- | ba Maroon-Red %
sidered by the Commission at x White : x
their Guadeloupe meeting early | Ԥ Orange with White Tip x
in May. ae |
Salmond Pin! .
MINT HAD NO MONEY 8 Lilac %
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STOCKHOLM, March 26. |% — Bright Scarlet 3
Employees of the Royal Mint 1 Deep Blackish Red x
were awarded a pay inerease but 10 Deep Ciravan Red %
the red faced government dis-/| %
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money available to cover it. 1% : »
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a*

PAGE TEN ~ SUNDAY ADVOCATE
LLL ALLL LLL ALAA,



~ Annual Girl Guides’ The B’dos Automobile |

ee ae. Association

ssociation on Scout, Lord Rowalian honoured us
Peacchey, sist March the Island by attending a a, aa ANNUAL REPORT FOR 195]

ion ave the following Companies at Pax Hull. 510 at-
went =o tended. Since the last General Meeting As an experiment, three gentie-
as ’ ; On 15th February 21 Commis- held on the 27th of February, 1951 men were asked to att as Region-
The Girl Guides Association was sinners and Guiders attended tn€ your Committee of Management a: Supervisors for the Farisues of
very shocked by the death of H.M. \omorial Service at St. Michaels have made every endeavour to St. John, St. J St. George
the King and the following C“Os© Cathedral for H.M. the King. promote the interest of the and St. Peter witha to keep-
was seni to the Overseas Com- “O, 24th February the Annual Association and we are very happy ing a general watch for road
mussioner:—“The Guides of Bar- soouts and Guides Own was held to record that the ees has signs either damageg by accident
bados desire to join in expressions 2+ s+ Michaei’s Girls’ School. 670 increased from 94 to 352 which is or ob.iterated by canes and for
of deepest sympathy to H.M. the Rangers, Guides and Brownies very encouraging. _ corners rendered dangerous by
Queen and to the Koyal Family.” were present. In March 1951, His Exceileney canes being planted too close vo
Lady Stratheden, the Chief Com- “These are the big events, but the Governor kindly consented to the edges of the highway for
missioner, sent us this reply”. We throughout the Island in }! the be Patron of the Association which traffic safety. These supervisors
thank you for your kind message Companies ang Packs Guiding, was greatly appreciated by all. were given authority by the Com-
of sympathy on the death of our goes on week by week and the After negotiation with the Auto- mittee to eall if necessary on per-
beloved King”. There is : woe Guiders play a very important mobile Association in the United sons concerned and request them
of great pride in to ae uide Sart. Kingdom we signed an Agreement to be good enough to cut back the
Movement that we have a very “ When the news was received of Federation with them in canes or take other action for the
special link with our Queen, for spout the hurricane in Jamaica, September, 1951. gafety of all users of the roads.
on Se nt chine ‘seam ‘ot te we were very anxious to help the Members of the A.A. may now We are happy to record that in

, Guides who were still paying for become Members of the B.A.A. by ey case where this has been
Commonwealth and Empire. We their sgeadquarters and had had payment of half of the subscrip- acon and there have been several,

ali wish for her a long, peaceful th. roof damaged. We had no tion and vice versa. re immediate co-operation was forth-

Furthermo
and happy reign. money for this purpose so it was the metal car badges of the B.A-A. coming and this has been h
It gives me great pleasure tO Gecideg to try and raise some. will be recognised by the personnel appreciated. In some oe
welcome once aguin the members some of the’ companies had a of the A.A. if used in England. owners of plantations have offered
of the Local Association to our jumble sale, others had a Concert,

to plant grass at corners on

Headquarters, We regret that while some gave donations from The B.A.A. have already been tne highwage to a visibility to
Mrs. G. H. Adams, owing to the their own slender company funds. instrumental in assisting several approaching traffic at all times of
pressure of school work, found it | am very pleased that the sum of its Members in taking their th. year, and this should save
impossible to continue as Chair~ o¢ $169.02 has been sent to the cars to the U.K. on holiday as well mony accideats,
man. We are however delighted jsiand Commissioner of Jamaica, as when making a permanent “7,” cog where road signs have
that Mrs, O'Mahony, who has Today I received a letter from change of residence, and several } 4, damaged the Highways and
been closely connected with Guid- the Chief Guide. I know you will more are on our books for atten- Transport Department hate been
ing in the Leeward Islands — in }. interested to hear what she is tion later on in the year, The A-A. 24 0i.64 by telephone ang the
fact she wos Acting Island Com- doing. She is in America on a Overseas Relations Officer is keep- have taken prompt action o
missioner of St. Kitts—is the new jecture tour with her Secretary, ing us well up to date with any remedy the trouble
Chairman of the Local Association. pridget. These lectures ang talks changes in the U.K, Regulations Reco! tions b: your As-
Mrs. O’Mahoney is also the Re- arg principally given to Girl Scout concerning this subject. sbalation luies Gaab inte he
corder of the Trefoil Guild and we Councils and) Women’s Clubs etc. To assist our members’ our Authorities for:
are very grateful to her for the She will visit more than 40 cities Association took on the task of “U ee
sincere interest she takes in vin 19 weeks travelling to Louisiana, renewing Driving Licences for j) ‘The: increase of Bus Stop
Guiding. 2 Texas, Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan, them thus saving them or their signs in country areas.

At the end of the Guide year Virginia, Pennsylvania and servants much time in waiting In 9) Phe erection of Dangerous
last September we numbered 878 Ajapama to mention some of the queues. This facility will be ex~- Corner signs, the building of

warranted and.enrolled members, states. Bridget also sent a letter tended to them again this year. roundabouts and the erection
an increase of 142 over the year

“ : igns i
before. There were 43 unwar- ome eee etusnsns en During the Summer Race Meet- of are major road signs and
Wind saat and 257 Recruits kind to us. It was most moving so gh ogg Bight ¥ vg Mets 3) The elimination of existing
the largest number we have ever 4” $e how they have all reacted parade Ground in the Garrison road dangers. Is
hai, Considering the masses of *°.'°¢, King's death. Png would vith two taxis available to take 4) Legislation for compulsory
girls in Barbados our growth is ~ Ventas Ga We tee a then to the entrance of the Grand 3rq party insurance.
my sow. i oy to be — for 2 sympathy poured out over us.” guns eee coe ogni re We understand that considera-
Company or Pack cannot be start- 7 r i es r s wa tion is being given to these re-
eu without trained Guiders. We ne gomar Curae apes on f° and was appreciated by those Who commendations, indeed Item 4 has
for. permission to start Companies \eture and does not arrive home “Ely in te year several mov. Slveedy eon made the suoject it
and Packs. The first step is to until about the middle of June. able standards for road ~— = * 5 4 Co eo ;
find two suitable women to be And back to our own needs. In 24 sign boards were made and We regret to e re-
trained before any children can be November it was decided to build have beem used to assist the signatica of Major Lenagan, —
recruited. If the prospective a wall on the Southern Boundary police in supervising heavy traffic President, who has left the Is. ond,
Guider has been a 2nd Class of our Headquarters. We had no which occurs during Race Meet- and Mrs. Maxwell owing to i
Guide, she ¢an be trained in a funds but due to the rising cost ings, Coney or | a ar og is Sinise
shorter time than the one who has of materials and labour, we were Public cial fun 8 S The Commi’
nef been q Guide. Perhaps you advised to build at once. It was Armistice Day Services etc., etc. appointeg Captain St. John Hod
will ask why two—when there is a finished just a few days before The flow traffic Rm been <= to be ee = oe nd
shortage of Guiders. This is done Christmas and has cost approx- observed and on occasions recom- Bannister
hepause if one is shifted to another imately £620. We hope that this mendations have been made to until the next Annual General
Sita cuit. ne Ha See GeePBule In Saktrday, oaks’ ie nese ‘have, reccived Gur grateful thanks must be
e cl en, e in turn raised a e Fair on Saturday, e .
must find someone to fill the gap. 10th May. Our Headquarters is every consideration and we have expressed to Mr. Richard Nicholls
There is great difficulty in finding an example of united effort and enjoyed experiencing the etd who has placed one of his offices
Guiders. No one should be pitch the children themselves have play- co-operation from himself and ail at the disposal of the Association
forked into Guiding because she ed and are playing a big part in his Officers whenever we have re- and given free legal advice to
belongs to the staff of the school, helping to pay for it. We yr quested advice or assistance. hisevees. This is iC meet rae
I mention schools because the to every member of the Loca D a tribution .
majority of our companies are at- Association to help us. I do not _A Patrolman, selected 7 i as our funds are not great. We
tached to schonis. The wish to know if the members of the Local Coe eee teh te ae are abe Sy, oe to eet
join should come from the in- Association realise how important n. traffic Law onnell survey
dividual and forcing anyone to be- it is for us, the uniformed mem- time was engaged in ceung designed the Car Park at Bolton
a Guide, does not help the bers to have your backing and Members to park their cars Lane ang to Messrs. Fitzpatrick
ent. support and how vitally this can public car parks and generally Graham and Co, who audited



We were very pleased that Miss a the whole Guide Movement keep an eye on the vehicles during gyr *ccounts free of Cost.
Mipiorie Pemive rton, through the in Barbados, their absence. Just before Xmas Next year we hope to extend
generosity of the British Council,

however, your Committee were oy Membership to Motor Cyclists.
trained at 3 of the Guide Training fortunate to be able to rent tem-

. crea: ser-
Centres in Great Britain, Shehas 1.G. Wateffront _ porarily a car park near oo ae RE et ay
gained the Guide Training Cer- tre of Broad Street in Bolton ; perating with the Barbados
umeate ae v4 Pan Head - Strike Still The ee ae at Publicity Committee in dissemina-
quarters, e hope shortly that man were 0 vhiy ting information regarding motor-
Miss Pemberton will be able t om Soluti now looking after this site wh f as-
start a Cadet Company. This will Far Fr ; lution is very popular with morning ing matters which may oO!

al-
help in the training of future (From Our Own Correspondent) shoppers who find it most con\e- arg aaa roe the
Guiders and will greatly further GEORGETOWN, B.G., March 27. _nient. Sak. Canada and South Adrice
the growth of the Movement in The waterfront workers strike To give assistance in attracting »°"""\ Coctive visitors to Bar-
Barbados. entered its seventh day to-day new Members, Messrs. J. B. Les- by aes
It has been a very busy Guide With no sign of an oy settle- bados,

lie & Co., have consented to re- the
hipping Guee by 10% their car insurance Given more support from

year and each year seems busier Tent. The Georgetown Public it is obvious that much

than the last.. Just to mention a “SS80ciation issued a statement to-

remiums to all Members of the ote
ew . day to the effect that the B.G. more can be done to prom
: In wer Labour Union had written Bookers oe ore geveNS acurrent Seater safety for all users of the
Rally at i: an oe ee Chairman on the fourth day of the ““€™ D : roads and we look forward to

‘ to alleged griev- _ 4 Motoring Manual is now be- the gay when we can employ
Rangers, Guides, Brownies and re- ee raat dt aaeaaren eOy- ing compiled and should be ready out epee patrolmen breakdown
cruits were present ployed by Bookers but of water- for distribution to Members in the

‘ enities.
From 4th—7th January we had front workers generally and sug- Near future. It will be found to pervices fad Other Sam



a canvas Training Camp for gested the meeting of representa- be most informative on motoring ST. J. HODSON, (Capt.)
Guiders at Pax Hill, with Mies tives of both parties with the view matters and a short Spanish-Eng- President, F
Burton, Commissioner for Camp- of bringing the stoppage to a close lish vocabulary will be embodied Barbados Automobile
ing, as Commandant. Te in it for the assistance of visitors. Association.

as early as possib






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SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952



cepaneceenen seems













* When Harry Lime enter-

ed the boxing game he
aimed to come out of it the
winner, But his plan went
astray when his lovely ac-
comptice took the “winner's”
end of the purse! You'll
thrill—and smile — at this
new adventure of the engag—
ing rogue who starred in the
film “The Third Man.” To-
day’s in the Harry
Lime story is called “It’s a
Knock-Out.”



HERE'S an old saying, and
it’s just as true as it’s old:
can’t cheat an
man.”
However, I know there are

very few honest men; and that.

means a world full of people
who can- cheaied.. A world
full of mice larcenous oe
...Suckers like a _ well- o
American businessman whom I
will call\Al Pierce,

He was'a sucker for what he
thought was a sure thing. The
day I completed my little plan
for fleecing shim, fold Jenny
Warren, my p accomplice:
“Its a knock-out¥?

- We were standing on La
Guardia airfield, watching the
big non-stop. plane from New

York to Miami, Florida, load
up. I told Jenny: “That's
Pierce. In the polo coat. He’s

worth at least 30,000 dollars to
me, if yeu do as I told you.”

“Don’t worry,” she said, “I’ll
have him in Havana with his
thirty thousand on a plate in-
side of 48 hours.”

“O.K., O.K.! Now go and get
a seat near him. on the plane.
And don’t forget — when you
meet me in Havana, I’m _ not
Harry Lime. I’m J. Harrington
Lime, the Wall-street tycoon.”

DOUBLE CROSS

He'll lose it...

HEN an American business

' man like Al Pierce goes on
a Florida vacation and finds
himself sitting on the plane
next to a pretty girl, he makes
my work simple. I had known
Jenny would be able to pick him
up easily. The next night in a
Florida night club sne was telling
him the story. the story, I'd
coached her in. And by that time
he was ready to believe anything
she told him.

And briefly, what she told
him was that J, Harrington Lime
was a stinker — particularly to
his secretary. If she could
only make a little money on the
side, she'd quit her job. And,
then, by a lucky coincidence,
the idea seemed to strike her.

“Mr. Lime’s a great

man,” she told Pierce, “He
loves to gamble on the fights,
the races, almost anything. He’s

got this big palace of a place in
Cuba, near Havana. You know
—mink-lined swimming pool.
tennis courts, the works. And
right on his estate he found that
one of the workmen,.a Cuban,
is a wonderful boxer. Pancho
Cordobas is tis name. The
trainer Mr, Lime brought down,
and the doctor and cverybody,
they all say Pancho’ll be world
champion,”

“Funny,”
never heard of him,”

Jenny laughed. “It would be
funny if you had heard of him.
He’s had ten fights. Won every
one by a knock-out, But, don't
you see? Mr, Lime is keeping
him under wraps. All his fights
are in secret. So when Mr.
Lime matches him in New York,
he'll be unknown, Mr, Lime
will be able to get simply won-
derful odds. See?”

“I'm. beginning to. But I
don’t see how you figure to make
any money out of this.”

Jenny got confidential, “Mr.
Lime has arranged to have Kid
Burke fly over for Pancho’s next
fight, his big test. In secret, of
course. Now Mr. Lime always
tries to get his guests to bet
against him. He takes Pancho,
and he’ll give big odds because
he’s so sure. But Pancho has
agreed with me he’ll lose this
next fight if I give him the
word. He'll 48

“Take a dive?”

“That's it. For a price. Mr.
Lime has been giving him a
purse of five thousand every
time he wins. Pancho wants
twice that from me if he loses.”

Pierce said: “That’s a smart
scheme for a_ girl to have
thought up. What's the hitch?”

“Even with all my savings, I
couldn’t win enough to pay off
Pancho,” Jenny said mourn-
fully.

AT 31, HE FELT LIKE AT
OLD MAN








found the remedy te restere
YOUTHFUL VIGOUR

This young man was b

prema rely e ed, Bi xidneg
e.

how Kraschen seve Him, Ms

health after weeks of pain :~ 4

purified

restored @ e
Ask yout nearest Chemist oF

Drug Store for Krusohen. i

SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

mused Pierce, “I.

Pierce’s eyes gleamed. He said
softly: “What would you say if
I offered to put up some of the
capital for you? Business pro-
position of course. I'd expect
half the profit after Pancho had
been paid off.”

“But—haye you got that kind
of money?”

“On a sure thing like this, I
sure have! On this kind of pro-
position. I'll have 30,000 dol-
lars cagh, at least.”

Jenny
“Oh, Al! How !

Pierce registered at the Hotel
Nacional. I already had my
luxury estate rented—for a
week. Now all that remained
was to & to work. But fast!

That t evening I contrived
to meet Pierce at the cock fights.
I even let him win money from
me. And at the end of the
session I paid out. “That's 75
dollars you’ve won from me.” I
said. “There you are. Uh—
What was your name again?”

“Pierce,” he told. me. “Al
Pierce from Cleveland. I’m in the
insurance game. I'd — er like
to give you a chance Ww
win some of this back. When's
the next cock fight?

INVITATION
Al Sees Pancho

“ BELIEVE it’s next week...

Well, good-night, Pierce.
It’s, been pleasant. Maybe I
will undertake to win that 75
dollars back from you at that.
Like boxing much?”

“Oh, yes. I get to the fights
whenever I can.”

“Mmm! Where are you stay-
ing? At the Nacional?”

Now my plan involved letting
Pierce stew in his hotel room
for a while. Get him worried
By now he’s figured out that if
he bets 30,000 dollars at 10 to
1 he'll clear 300,000—or 150,000
clear profit. Sounds good to
him. But will I invite him out
to my swanky country place?
Was he too obvious? Maybe not
obvious enough?

Then I give Jenny the signal
to call him, Beetgndins to be my
secretary. f course, he falls
over himself to accept my invi-
tation.

First I fed Pierce lunch, and
then. a good Havana cigar, Then
we went for a stroll, and I led
them down to the specially out-
fitted training quarters where
Pancho was working out on a
heavy punch-bag.

“What do you think of him?"
I asked Pierce. “He's fast, isn’t
he? I call him Young Pancho.
Of course, I don’t know wheth-
er he’s any good, He hasn't
fought a single fight,”

Pierce stared at me. “He
hasn't?” Then, recovering
quickly: “I mean—uh-oh, he
hasn't. He looks so sharp, I'd

have sworn that—”

“No. He's fighting for the
first time next Thursday.
You've heard of Kid Burke, the
middleweight? I’ve got him to
come over and go a few rounds
with Pancho. I'm making up a
purse for the winner.”

TEMPTING BAIT
The Victim Falls

HERE was a pause. Then
Pierce said slowly: “Maybe

I could give you a chance to win
back your 75 dollars, Mr, Lime.”

I spluttered amusedly over
my cigar, and he said, offended:
“What's the matter?”

I recovered myself, but con-
tinued to smile, “Well, don’t’
you see?” I said gently. “I
was planning to make up a purse
of 10,000 dollars on the | fight.
Any side-bets I placed on
Pancho—I’d want to make sur:

my winnings would cover’ the
purse, what?” . chuckled
again, “Seventy-five dollars!”

Nothing is better calculated to
make a chump impatient than
to twitch the bait away as
though maybe he isn’t going to
get a chance to grab it. I was
hoping Pierce’s neck was hot
under his collar as I walked
away after giving him that little
brush-off. I wanted to give
him a chance to talk to Jenny
without anybody else around.
Sure enough, I could see him
moving over to her side. And
after a minute or two, they
were joined by Pancho.

“Don’t forget, now, Pancho,”
Jenny said, “Third round.
That’s our agreement.”

“Si si! Third round!” And
Pancho moved off to the show-
ers.

“Well, Al?” Jenny inquired.

Pierce took a big breath. “I'll
go in with you, Jenny. Looks
good to me. And Lime has got

ALSO

IN HALF POUND AND ONE



me a little sore. I'm going to
snow him. Ili take him for
plenty .... Ill have to convert
some bonds, maybe borrow a
few bucks, but | think I can put
my hands on 45,000 dotlars.”
THE FIGHT

A surprise ending

NE of the “guests,” alleged

to be General van Sickle,
played canny. I told him: “This
Pancho is terrific. Wait till I
unveil him at Madison Square
Garden or in the Yankee Stadi-
um! ‘That'll be your chance to
win back some of your money.”

“You really think he'll beat
Burke?”

“Fire and thunder, man! I'll
give you ten to one!” Y

That’s when Pierce jumped in,
fast. “I'll take those odds, Mr.
Lime,” he snapped. “My wager
on Burke is 46,000 dollars.”

“Fine, fine,” I said casually.
“You've got cash? Give it to
Jenny, here. And, Jenny —
here’s my end...”

She made a face. “Mr. Lime, I
hate carrying all this money
around.” :

“Getting heavy, is it? All
right. Pierce! Suppose you be
appointed custodian of the
stakes. I’m sure everyone here
trusts you....”

It was sheer delight to watch
Pierce carrying that satchel. You
ever watched a man that you
know is guilty trying to act
innocent? Down we went
through the gardens to where
the ring was set up. Everyone
there was in on my little scheme,
except Al Pierce.

First round! The fighters were
pretending to feel each other
out, Pancho putting on a show
of fancy footwork, Of course,
they were putting on an artistic
show. We couldn’t have Pierce
getting worried about how raw
it would look when Pancho
took his dive.

Wup! That was Pancho down
on his knees. Burke really
clipped him. Looked good, too.

Round two—and Pancho’s eye
was cut. Looking over at Pierce
I could see him adding up his
profits again, Forty-six thousand
at 10 to 1 is 460,000 dollars,
Minus 10,000 dollars to Pancho,
that leaves 450,000. Split two
ways with Jenny, and there’s a
clear gross of 225,000 smackeroos!
Wouldn’t Pierce be surprised if
he opened that satchel and
found that most of the notes
were torn-up newspapers? He

,

looked like a kitten lapping up a}

* GIVE YOUR

bowl of cream. . :

Wup! Pancho down again. I
yelled: “Watch his right, Pan-
cho”!

Round three! This is where it
happens, Look at Pierce, grop-
ing to make sure he’s still got
that satchel. Thinking, now i
when he can reach right out anc
grob 225,000 dollars.

Pancho takes a right cross,
dances back.
down. It sure looks like Pancho’s
guard is wide open....Burke is
measuring Pancho .... Here it

comes, a terrific right, and—it
misses! Pancho ducks, dances
away and— .

The crowd wants to know

what happened to Burke. Pierce
—he’s stunned, Why? Because
Burke is down on his back, with
blood spurting out of his mouth.

For just a second there’s dead
silence. Then, as the doctor
ducks into the ring and bend:
ovér Burke's still body, pande-
monium breaks out.

Scared stiff , white as a ghost,
poor Pancho moaned: “Sanctis-
sima Madre de Dios. I never

touch him”.
BOXER ‘DIES’

Jenny Vanishes
RAVELY the doctor straigh-
tened up. “Apparently you









POUND OVAL TINS



ane a ll

His hands are,



SUNDAY

didn’t need to touch him”, he
said. “This man is dead
When he missed with that blow
he burst his blood vessel. Com-
pletely chance. Couldn't have

been predicted”.
The crowd hushed into
silence.

As I turned away, I heard
Pierce’s frantic voice. Jenny!
We're liable to be arrested on a
homicide rap”. And her hard
reply: “Don’t you think I know”?
Go on, beat it. I'll meet you in
Palm Beach. Hurry”.

“But I've no money left”.

“Here, quick before they see
T've got the satchel. Here's a
hundred. Now hurry”!

The most artistic aspect of
the swindle was that the chump
fled, convinced he was in for
real trouble, completely forget-
ful of his 45,000 dollars. Pretty,
wasn’t it? One of the neates’
jobs I ever pulled off. And as
soon as he was safely off my
rented estate, my confederates
gathered around for the pay-off

“You were wonderful,” I told
Pancho. “And Burke — the way
you hit into the bladder of
chicken blood, I thought it would
never stop coming out. Now
where's that satchel? We'll split
up the profits now . . . Where’s
Jenny? She’s the one that
deserves some praise.”

A man said: “She must have
gone inside for something.”

“Well, well,” I said, happily,
“T'll take her out and give it to
her later. Hand me that satchel.
Ah! Whenever I think of the
expression on Pierce's face—
What's this?”

I guess my face must have
been a study, too.

“That vixen!” I yelled. “That
double - crossing — no, sextuple-
crossing, wry-necked witch,
Jenny Warren! She's run off with
my money!”

They couldn't believe it,
“What? Our money?”

FINAL TRICK

Not Just Luck

* OT yours, I've got enough
to pay off your salaries,
penny,” I told them. “It’s
the bet e’s absconded with,
One of the best schemes I've ever
hatched, and she has to throw
the queer in it! Listen to her note
She says: ‘....and I’m leaving
5,000 dollars for your end, Harry
That'll be enough to pay for a
long-distance phone call to +«
me what you think of me. I'l]
be in New York to-night, bur
after that who knows where I'll
be? Love, Jenny.’ ” '
But what the crew didn’t
know, and what Jenny would
find out later, was that I had)

slipped out 10,000 dollars)
through a little dexterous
sleigh-of-hand in packing the}

money into the satchel.

It’s always wise to anticipate,
That's what they call the famous
Lime luck. But I don't think
it’s luck. Do you?

AB

GIVE
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ADVOCATE

The Lives Of Harry Lime |















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PAGE TWELVE " SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

a,

HOW THE FROG BECAME

Tales Of Barbados: - By Lionel Hutchinson A PRINCE Cie ee NS aS

Jhe Dancing Master

preparas On, tow gor Sak i \

vat choc » oe ~)

tat and but







otch,

Like everything else, this bados and declined to prosecute, A Roy & i
blessed isle of. ours is fairly rich No 4 having once been counsel on_ the +) Fai
in old tales and recondite leg + ° ° other side and the Solicitor Gen- | 7 “Pm ti hungry,” he whi ; : ee ; fn

is. Go yr us, many eral was. given brief for the | tired and hungry, whimpered ... there stood a handsome Prince: s pe
roy rah tc meal ge for . bg _ ot ; Crow . The is S was empanel- | So she carried him into the house aid bewitched,” he said, “until yo. sery a DINE it
of our forefathers were moved «.. academy here, and on the 9th in a few minutes, to all appear- _ ay Yer be } : set a dish of Royal Pudding before him. ] me this Royal Pudding.” So the two wer *
by many of these erstwhile sagas, } 1... 1794 a surprising thing hap- ances, walked Out into the sun- ted, the evidence and all other He took one taste—and poof .. - married and lived happily ever after. | 5
and have left us records or evi- pened to the roving Frenchman— shine at peace with both God and proceedings carried on at the last °
dence of some of these incidents he got married. Yes he married mar As he prepared this cheese ee sions were read over to them, bisetimes
and speculation, the themes of | wics Sussana Ashby, one of the in toasted fashion he must have @"G after a short deliberation

emai “pute tt Nee” wealthiest and also one of the pictured the warm_ satisfaction these twelve men brought in a
amme, “ eve It or No

. « ”
ions gttve cover a wide tance mom comely of our eligible mai- and glow on his wife’s face at ‘‘ rdict of “guilty.
s s é ide ange i

; : ; ns slieve that I can safely the sight of this her favourite q e

of controvertible topics, which cla : co ore e meé ny delicacy it was ready to be Black Cap Y r p bl
include legal blunderings, experi- eee aoe akit eae di aed We its destination, he They, Sere lots ey in the our air appears Caressa e
ences in questionable principle while some wagged their heads called a little mulatto boy to take Island along with pte ; advise .

of the occult, pathetic dramas ana over its. prospects and others it to his wife with these instruc- exe who were not satisfic d with oad issa e

nautical tales which could well hoped and prayed that Peter tions — “Tell her to eat it her- this verdict, or with the way the eee

provide intrigue for such able






would pay stark deference to the self, and not give any of it to Mrs. proceedings were conducted; and

a
aa
—_
cS

ms as C. S. Forrester or Rafael ne ; Ouag ’ in appeal was made to the Gov-
ini canons of the Protestant faith. Llewellyn. 3 , chiace emia 2 ‘

ee é ha 1 ni , Though young Peters and Sus- ; ae oar ae Pony Ben

eo oe rolling, + sanas came along, Peter remained Tousted Cheese - Enel e f heir’ ae Off 7

would like to tell you a story — 4)... inevitable Peter and subse- The cheese arrived at its des- in England for their advice and

a story which is true, and a story
which is a black mark in the
annals of our Court of Grand

> , caught the hearts tination, and the following morn- ©P!nion These Law Lords cere-
is tele walter welsh had ing Sussana was found dead in moniously shook out their gowns

: . . burnt by his recent mar- her bed, while Mrs. Llewellyn and wigs, and after scrutinizing
Sessions, an institution establish- riage, And in addition to that he and three servants were ill in the evidence declared that in
ed by that colourful character in jecume a staunch disciple of bed, though they ultimately re- their opinion the last twelve
eeneden Bistory, Captain ps Zacchus and never failed to keep covered. An inquest was imme- sutywen nad rendered the tax-
Hawley, the man who ruled Bat= (on ctant company with rum diately held, and a Dr. Cutting payers yeoman service . . . Peter
bados to his peculiar liking be- (acic- nnd as the years rolled on, tested the contents of Sussana’s SW the Judge don a black cap
tween the years 1630—1639 ' in his tipsy fits he developed the stomach, the rejected matter from and sheard that he was to be

I ELLE AO A a EN SE i tt et A imams

been

oS
=
=
—
cf
. “ao
fa
i="
ion
=
5 —)
ce
~<
—







































2 SS Re REO

SS Se —— ee















7 PARE Male na oe ne ee er a ange + the nec i ve
f° a comeemmable case of }..nit of viewing his wife in the the servants who were still Ganges by the neck until he was Cool, minty
onsieur seville, ame light as a boxer views a bag ®uffering and the remainder of . olynos foam cleans | |
But before we move on to the |onging from the roof (you the cheese which was left in the On Monday the 14th February ' }
story proper, I want you to know Evane ‘something to punch at.) dish... In every thing Arsenic 1825, the Crown took the life of fl 3 ‘
that there are no less than three , k was found. our Dancing Master “between I PN MENS
authorities to vouch for the ; As Grand Sessions opened on the hours of nine and twelve in
authenticity of this story — (1) Sussana Veparts — a's bright June morning ue 1824 in the forenoon, in the jailyard in '
The Journal of the Barbados _ Dear old Sussana never claimed 1). r nitiar Town Hull which yet the town of St. Michael” accord- SOUP. LOBED, FBROHSS ' h
Museum & Historical Socicty, to be Job's sister or even @ Gis” oa. between the Police Head- ins to the warrant signed by the "hose hidden surfaces where , wit
1 Vol. vill. of 1941; (2) The Barbat tant descendant of this man of Governor Henry Warde. As the decay so often starts i
i dian Newspaper of the 4th Octo- patience, and finally decided to Frenchman felt the rope around Aemivteenthdaaeeneicnctinninnieant— PA LMOLIVE BR !
a ber 1823 and (3) an American Step out of the ring. One morn his neck, his voice boomed out H f ? | ILLANTINE!
» Magazine, known as “Harper's ing Peter woke up to find that in the electrified atmosphere, ne ep Ce Oi youn
; Weekly” published in 1864. = = i a we a proteting ne innocence and his Be doubly sure your hair is soft...caressable...easy to
3 e eculia : is a contemp or British Justice.
i A Dancing Frenchman them seemed to be annoyed with Thus ended the career of a Danc- ' manage by using Palmolive Brillantine the DOUBLE
‘ Gis vevnatkabia eifair takes u = actaams oueee ane i. et er, a Cyprian and a tippler . ' | USE Way:
. - 5 . . eter went on s danelir ’
. back to the year 1794. The yeu? gal vhile Sussana lived th Sc rears lat , m :
5 before th ; . yeu saloon while Sussana lived with Some years later, whey Pete toothbrush is } j P .
at the French people had oT . . Ww i ras ‘ . g . s Mass st sfore ‘washi .
; Rikected their. bine —, her sister Mrs. Lie wellyn was forgotten, a black man éaedate. That's wit i As an Oil for Ma ages: Before washing hair,
very other Britich aol sues quite a ee of armen lengt " gp on were who had been Selgnes ie se teonomica ' | massage scalp briskly with Palmolive Brillantine.
. M voor : > away from her pugulistic-mindec a slave in the possession of Mrs. r ic | at LR 7 oi .
West Indies, Barbados was inter- husband; but she still sent him D’Egville, and who, by her fath- +t | Leave ofl op a alp for 10 minutes and then wash,
ted in fitt a y ! Ti
to Marti ine ee eerentoD presents of fruit, fish or dainties er’s will was to receive his manu- | Chis massage helps remove dandruff . .. prepare
' 0 Martinique to watch Britis peguiarly, while Peter in good mission, confessed that he hac scalp for perfect cleansing.
interests in that colony, while faith would do the same if and received the cheese from the ga | | : ' ”
Many of the French royalists when one of his Is came 8 he 7 Your chiliren © |
' ) W Ss pupils came to mulatto boy, and had put the “oer ren $ > » te: P
often sought refuge here in board with a fee. arsenic into it; as he was aware = \ teeth need — | = enn ane Weston sein: Pat
! , -
Barbados. Thus when a dap- By now you are asking your- that his freedom was to follow Kolynos to keep them I a little Palmolive Brillantine in the
" ae A a pg ” the self what ~was there in a man upon his mistress’ death. All this strong and heaithy i palm of the hand. Rub hands
{ chae arvey, y a tentperame: ce Peter’s : - ; . , . j
i . , : > with a temperament like Peter’s, he confessed upon his death-bed They'll love the minty together; smooth over he UJ
f _s, William, Henry _D'Egville that attracted Sussana so deeply to the great discomfiture of those flavour. too 8 b! 3; smooth over hair. And Wether
, ‘Handed at Carlisle Bay in that and conscientiously yet. I sym- who had condemned the wretch- | Pe ssiaceatatallaaall |
\ ar no one noticed anything pathise with you if you do not ed Peter to a shameful death. A 1 ; ?
x th renee about him, but find the answer since I have not death which was the issue of a Years of experimen’ 1 Then, notice the dancing highlights...
. e thirty Piaeh Mite fe ments found dl myself; the fact or Sym ee pe by the Crown on | } the beautiful grooming of your hair!
, mains that when Sussana made 4 i1ypothetical circumstantial evi- ! :
aie news in hoe colony, her final will, she left her hus- ee eee dence. | |
{pat Dis name would be on band £500, and I daresay that A FUB DURING THE WEEK, ! he E
ee eetion the tongue of every Peter used to keep up minor ; ne Public Lib i Baa
flirtations with her in an effort Quarters and the Public Library, d } |
Chea im ; Lees aan a . it . have perfected an idea i + ‘en
’ D’Egville was a aancer py pro- Sere her not to change her per ee an he en U.S. Pastor Will special formula for | | -B R i L LA N ¥ i RY &
fession; his ancestors before him ™!"™ ; Kolynos Dental Cream. | “eee d
iba ts a





able lawyer in the person otf Ad :
ay
this art in fashionable Drug store and called for some . he
¢ircles in London and elsewhere jrecnic The inguisiti ir Gatence on the fact that _ the
s rsenic. The inquisitive drug- ¢ se against Peter was Pastor Danie
@m the continent. His father haa @°°™ € q e drug- charge against Peter was founded aniel Gavin, a noted

gist, like all true druggists, en- on circumstantial evidence, and Bible scholar from The United

been the ballet-master at the quired if he wanted the arsenic that a link in the chain of this States, will address the public at
Qpera House in London and jg kill rat it is difficult to evidence was missing. I should Queen’s Park Steel Shea on
* < Peter hid recently given determine Peters mind at that point out here that prior to 1832 Sunday 6th April at 8 o'clock.
a fashionable academy “in particular moment, but he quick- po slave could testify in a court His tour is sponsored by the Lay-
Hurope and turned tq the poten- fo replied, “Yes; and I shouldn’t of law, and because the boy who ™eén’s Home Missionary Move-

b i. os our sunny climate. I éare much if there were two- carried the cheese could not be Ment, an interdenominational
should also add that Peter was jegged ones,” A little time later called into Court, Hinds argued Movement composed of Christians
also noted for other efficacious peter was strolling along the that the Crown had a right to be from all denominations, His sub-
; impulses besides that of dancing. street and noticed cheese display- in a position to say what hap- ject will be, “Restitution—Wiat
a a eh son of the French soil eq in a store for sale. Peter pened between the time the |S it?” Mr, Gavin, who was born
nature would capitulate to stopped. Cheese was hard to get, cheese left Peter’s hand and be- ‘" Scotland, has devoted over 30
wine and women in addition to although there were no Control fore it arrived in Sussana’s, Years to Bible study and re-
song, which was actually re- Boards, quotas and Import Li- earch. He has travelled exten-
seeesible for his downfall in cences in those days as we are Hind’s point carried weight, and sively among the churches of the
a 7, I dare say that when he subjected to at present. His after long consultation, the jury ‘%e Untedi State and other coun-
tee a on Barbados, he had hands expectantly eased into his reported to the court that they ‘ties, and his simple, forceful
oped to turn over a fresh page, pockets and was surprisingly re- could not agree on a_ verdict. “appeal to their hearts has en-

but it seems that the Atlantic yw by t i i » Nine w im, ¢ itte ile deared him to many thousands.
breezesand the voluptuous en. eine eee! he melodious tinkle Nine wanted him acquitted while y

We other dentifrice does. more than *KOLYNOS'

to fieh? ‘soth denay °

rs



St. VIN CENT Grumman Goose
AIR SERVICE

a

One Way Return One Way Return

i ; s image. He smiled the other three shouted ‘Guilty.’ [t is said that his address on|| BARBADOS-ST. VINCENT ................ $33.00 — $ 62.70 GRENADA-DOMINICA o............. $ 95.00 $180.50
ie teat wi the tropics never to himself as he thought of Sus- The Judge discharged the jury “Restitution—What is it?” is one xRE! f J 5
es ‘at leaf an opportunity to sana’s remarkable fondness for and Peter was remanded until me is full of hope for a weary BARBADOS-DOMINICA ............0.... $43.00 $ 81.70 ST. VINCENT-TRINIDAD ................ $ 41.00 $ 77.90
wiusmee grey “Peer IGE, touted, chew the folowing "Decembr “Asis. artery waa he pull

sordially invit o hear is 4 ; - ‘vtTANTA-@ 00 .
Peter D’Egville sans facon. He went into the shop and In the meantime Hinds was ap- address. Admission free to all, BARBADOS-GRENADA_ 0.0.00... $51.00 $ 96.90 ST. VINCENT-BRITISH GUIANA $§ 96.00 $182.40

However, he did open a danc- bought some of the cheese, and pointed Attorney General of Bar- and no collection will be taken. T. VINCENT-DOMINICA «oo... $74.00 $140.60 DOMINICA-TRINIDAD ooocecceccocciens $113.00 $214.70

ST. VINCENT-GRENADA. ................ $23.00 $ 43.70 DOMINICA-BRITISH GUIANA .... $171.00 $324.00





j
1
I
i
1
1
!
1
|
1
i
i
!
.

- *@OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

You can now get our New Delicious “SHIRLEY SWEET BISCUITS” from

your grocer or from the nearest shop at 46 cents per pound

Charter Bates on application

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.. Lid.
AGENTS

Phone 4704

Lower Broad Street

—




Ask for “SHIRLEY HISCUITS” To-day
FAESEEEESAE 2








CHILDREN’S VESTS & PANTIES, 3for $1.20

somata teecs eeciad ile oe FOR GENTLEMEN
ood Quality NS now |
CREPES, TAFFETAS, SILKS, large variety, SILK SPORT SHIRTS 5 shades 2 for... $4.50

PRICES pes ‘YOU | WILL BE GLAD TO PAY eer seg a eet au $1.00 040 SHIRTS from 84e. to....... as
7 - SPUNS, white, ne, pink, bieg b NEW NYLON BLEND SPORT SHIRTS$4.95
SERVIC E only . eerste pee , (2 ee mn SOc $$‘THOUSAND OF OTHER SHIRTS at

PRINTS & peconns Per Yard 48, 79, 36 | ART SILK, white, pink, biue, now only... 72e MN Nn. 5... verte ces
A T | SHANTUNG in 8 shades, now only.......... $1.12 RriBBED VESTS, imagine! 3 for only.... $2.00
SPECIAL NYLON GOLD BLENDED DRESS . si
ee | MATERIALS 6 shades 44” now...... $2.64 SOCKS ay Kiet values! now 2 for only... $1.00

HLADIES COTTON VESTS two for only $1.00 | | " E ~ | Also on show : SPECIAL MEN'S 2 tone SHOES pair... $8.20

ese Sa aaa ‘NEW MULTICOLOURED SHOES, !'AKI SHIRTS each now only......... $3.25 A
» JERSEY NIGHTIES 2 for 5.30 RAYON PANTIES sint-qualie 1. 4A - HATS, BAGS. KUAKI per yard only .... O0e A $1. O3

LADIES’ INTERLOCE PANTIES 0 from @@ and up me nat
\ >
SNYLON HOSIERY pair only $1.2Q@ TOWELS each now Bie & Ge BARGAIN Ho F | SE
) 2702























1 AS
CHILDREN'S INTERLOCK PANTIES__.___ ales 30 SWAN STREET DIAL S. ALTMAN — Proprietor
Mn Whe ~ oA - ~~ 4 to~tl~t~ tl ~da~d~ ded c ~ gs ~ BABASF ' ess : a ~
SABES ESEESEEF FASS ZEESSSSS GAG ASG EFSF EEESESESS IPG BPt test gst tet GtgPtFttghPttEssegsFgggsFee

{

te
ee
me











SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952 © “* ° SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

{Canc
AnD>BRION ——~







TABLE BUTTER!

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR TABLE BUTTER ?
IF SO WHY NOT TRY

| GLOW - SPREAD

TABLE MARGARINE
FLYING. § _SEOREE_D GLOW-SPREAD IS EXCELLENT FOR
ae, | (SS). (EF TABLE USE
/ ef ORDER SOME TO-DAY FROM YOUR GROCER



lib. Pkgs. ai G2e. each
Oo ib. Tins at 60c. per tb.

CONTAINS VITAMINS A & D



DAGWOOD QuiICK !
RUSH DOWNSTAIRS
AND GET MEA
SANDWICH —

DSS, Tt em |

§ OH, DON'T BE SUCH
ewan oo W, G/ REMEMBER
ss. THATS HOW I GOT

MY ULCERS




M-M-M ++ BLONDIE
CERT. Y FIXED














SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE









a ——— a N
SPECIAL OFFERS are now ®vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually Now
|
POTATOES — 4 Ib for ... . $48 $40 Tins LOBSTER .... i ila 66
Tins JACOBS CREAM Bottles TENNENTS STOUT i 30 26
; ERS» 2... 1.82 1.60 i
aa Tins CONDENSED MILK |... 33 3
} Tins BROOKS PEACHES (2!2).... 81 75











HE’S RIGHT
BEHIND YOU,

DON'T GIVE
ME THAT
OLP DODGE...







A ciumsy
STRATEGY = BUT,






GET IT IN
THE BACKS

SIX... SEVEN... I’M
COUNTING TUH TEN! IF
YUH DON'T TELL ME
WHERE KENT (S, THE
GUN GOES OFF!... RY





S BIG MOE IS

O& Nd | EASY PREY...

| HE HESITATES,
Ry | THEN TURNS...



IF YOU'RE f ee |
LYIN'... edt We ; ma (|
5 5 5 . |
“ ' ‘
f
"

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES











aE

BY FRANK ROBBINS

RIT STOICLOPST OPS ISTO. + se

eo) Th * YES, MY DEAR, T KNOW..
-- LET your

) , : SO NEAR AND YET SO




of a
NNY

Phe me es.





PATIENT DECIDE
THAT, POC /



IMMEDIATELY NO |
MORE QUESTIONS | 6 -qgpemg!





BY GEORGE MC. MANUS
dus la a

Se Ir
Ena MAA








a Nar 4
LITTLE DID HE t Epa a7"
KNOW -I JUST ( * Nw
WANTED THE teste | HEY/COME BACK /
wv "LL TAKE THE
BIG FRAMED
PICTURE!



Hh
|

Eh Hillman Estate Car is designed to fulfil a multiplicity of purposes—a truly versatile vehicle

catering for the needs of country and town—adaptable for business, social or recreational requires



a ear ap ments, The spacious interior provides exceptional roominess for passengers and equipment
eS Tae tas|

and the new Hillman ‘Plus Power ’ engine gives proved performance, reliability and economy.

BY ALEX RAYMOND;

weVO

LILI, IT’S LIKE OLD TIMES
AGAIN... YOU AN’ ME... BEENJ-
CARRYIN'A HEAVY TORCH,



WELL, MAYBE THERE'S SOMETHING YOU
JAN 00...A GUY'S BEEN PUSHIN’ ME Bf
AROUND, DUDE ... HE NEEDS TO BE
TAUGHT A LESSON! 44

I'M WHACKY ABOUT

YOU, GORGEOUS...

1'D DO ANYTHING
TO MAKE YOU








BABY... (a



* New styled elegant coachwork * Independent front suspension

* All-steel Body Construction Se eat
* Lockheed Hydraulic Brakes % Weather-proofed Brake drums * Double Dipping Headlamps

| ng eae

HELLMAN eszame car

| COLE & CO., LTD.

DISTRIBUTORS — BARBADOS



THE PHANTOM
(MARE RNY Tos cURL

: Jus DE?
r | NEEDED YO.

pian\ FAILED ME ==






CRAFTSMAN BULLET “BY, 2ROOTES GROUP



i il i a i tr i i a ce cl i





PAGE FOURTEEN








































Pimples G
Cause Killed in 3 Days

The very first application of Nixo-
dérm begins to clear away pimples
like Inngic, tse Nixoderm tonight
afd vou will soon see your skin be-
coming soft, seth and elegr. Nixo-
dérm is a new discovery that kills
warms and parasites on the skin that
edtse Plinples. Bolla, Red DBlotehes,
Tezema, Ringworm, and Eruptions
You can't get rid of your skin troubles
until you remo, he germs that hide












in the tiny pores of your skin. So
get Nixoderm from your chernist to-
day under the Pere guare re that
Nixoderm will banish piniples and
clear your skin seft and smooth or
money

back on

MOGESKRM veiien “ot

For Skin Troubles jackige.



FURNITURE
AUCTION

KINNOUL



BANK HALL ROAD
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2ND
at 11.50 am

We are instructed by Mr. R, E
Field to dispose of the following
Furniture and Effects

Viewing morning of sale
Single Ended Settee, Oval Table,
Oce. Tables, Kidne Tables,
Rockers, Plant Stands, Dining
Table with Brass Feet, Sideboard,
Dinner Wagon, Dressing Table &
Mirror, Bedside Tible,

All The Above in Mahogany
Rush Rockers, Cane Chairs, Bent-
wood Chairs, Step Ladder, Cup-
boards, Kitchen Tables, Larder,
Congoleum, oil Stoves, won
Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows,
Towel rails, Pine Dressing Table
and Mirror, Misc. Books, Pictures,
China, Glassware, Kitchen Articles
and other items

——

AUCTIONEERS
John ed. Biadon
& Co.

A.F.S., F.V.A.

Phone 4640, Plantations Building












































































































‘ravel”. 17,2.52—t.f.n





OILCLOTH—Wonderful Quality and
jeautiful Designs,
© $1.50 per yard, 45” wide
isit. Amazing Bargains await you
the STANWAY STORE, Lucas Street.

30,3.52—1n
et
OILCLOTH AND STRAW MATS—

Pay us 4
at

Most beautiful designs. Beautify your
ome, Available at Thani Bros, Dial
3466, 28,3.52—t.f.n.

‘PINE OFFICE RAILINGS—L. M. B.
Meyers & Co., Ltd. 29,3.52—2n



PRINTS—American Prints, Lovely Big | House, Garrison.
TROTMAN & CO.

‘lowers for House Coats or Bed Sheet-
ng at Tie, a yd. Thani's.
28.3.52—t.f.n

a)



REFRIGERATOR—One

Electrolux
Kerosene Oil

Refrigerator, 4 cu. ft,
‘apacity. Im perfect working order.
Apply: Mrs. Keith Webster, Harrisons
Plantation, St. Lucy. 29,3. 52—6n.
SHOES—Ladies White Shoes and Hats
‘or Easter, you go to see these at Thant
Bros, Dial 3466. 28,3,52—t.f.n.

SEEDS:
ent Kinds Fresh Vegetable Garden









Arrived yesterday 40 differs | w



CLASSIFIED ADS. |" ©"=



























SUNDAY












Thursday 3rd Mrs. Roberts Sale
Beachy Head, St. Philip
Tuesday 8th Mrs. A. A. Harris's

Reduced from $1.68 | Sle “Mannings House” Holetown

Thursday 10th Mr
Sole, Dunkirk, Worthing

7 A



Tuesday 15th — Mrs. L. R. Wests Sale,
‘Victoria Club", Prince Wm. Henry
Street

Thursday 17th -- Mrs. G, Adams Sale, |
Sweetfield, St. Peter

Tuesday 22nd — Mr, D. A. Thani’
Sale, “Gandhi Villa", Brighton, Black

Hock

Thursday 24th -
“Lunden Grove’, Eagle Holl Rd,
Tuesday 2th —- Dr, Gardener

BRANKER,

Auctioneers
30.3. 52—Lr

PUBLIC NOTICES

BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE
ASSOCIATION
DIVISION I.
NOTICE is hereby given that the meet-
ing of Division I of the B.C.S.A, which
as held on Monday, the 24th of March









Seed$, | was adjourned until Tuesday, the ist of

‘abbage, Beet, Carrot, Lettuce, Turnip. April, 1952, to consider

snion ete., also 36 kinds Flower Garden

Seeds, Zinnia, Phlox, Petunia, Candy
Putt ete., at BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
Ltd 28.3.52—3n



TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti-
ul Condition, excellent juipment, good

racing. record. Cost $700.00 now .
No offers, Wicks, Telephone h

18.11,51—t.£.0

ee
WHITE SHARKSKIN is here again, in
2 qualities, $1.47 up.
ndeed,

Shop at Thani’ Bros,
28.3.52—t,f.n,



Colours $4.95. Gents get these at Thani
Tiros. Dial 3466. 7 28.3.82—t.f.n.

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, VERCILLA
SPENCER (nee Blackman), as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
nm’ name unless by a written order
signed by me

FREDERICK A, SPENCER,

Guily House,

Roebuck Street,
30.3.52—2n,











\OTICE

T. CHATLANT desire
my patrons that I am
taking two months rest due to my
health having become impaired
nd all payments should be made

Mr. J. C. Hutson, who can
be located at Central Station,
Bridgetown

TELEPHONE 4888

J. N. T CHATLANI
(Hindu Christian Proprietor)
GENERAL MERCHANT
Office and Residence:
Cornet &



o inform

Passage Baxters

0.3

Roads
In

PISSS SOSSSSOOOSCSSSS a

Very beautiful |

(i) Three
Mr.
(") Any

Resolutions
R. P. Parris,
other business.

submitted

a

by

All members of Division I are asked

to make a special effort



to attend the
meeting on Tuesday, Ist April, which |
will be held at the Leeture Room,
Department of Science and Agriculture
F.L. COZIER, .
Hon, Sec.
29.3.52—2n
NOTICE

The Annual General Meeting of

held at the Y.M.C.A

on FRIDAY, 4th
April at 7.30 p.m

All clubs desirous of affiliation shouid |
send their applications to Secretary, C/o |

Y.M,C.A. so that they may be electec
affiliated clubs by the General Meeting
28.9. 52—5n











THE BIG EVENT
OF THE YEAR

THE LOYAL BROTHERS

OF THE STARS

Present

Carnival

On June Sth &

at Queen’s Park

7th

further Particulays Later



n

i

Kinch’s

The Miss Carter's Sale,

Brigade

the |
WIND BREAKER JACKETS—in Assd| Barbados Basketball Association will be |

3



FOR RENT

























|

I

®

I

t



Back Bacon—$1.20 per lb. @ r SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 LOWER BAY STREET

oe e

“SSSSESSCSSSSSS FOV GLOF3F 7 oF

en ro oF | This Two Storey Modern Building, having a frontage of | 72 it.
y eco . : ; ete mL .
1% Us Oo ‘MIVD YoU... , and Cover Space Ground 6,000 sq. ft., Upstairs 5, .

% J " REMI f % Lends itself as an ideal Business Investment, being Light and
x when you purchase from % Cool, already Floodlight, Power and Light Points are i
| y ’ y yr , also ‘Three Toilets.
| 8 CENTRAL EMI ORIUM % | Available for use on eee samc Sie

> seme a aa ; 4 AVAILABLE FOR US .

% Our. Moor Ven Delivers eae ar $i} Bargain Price £12,000, or can be Rented on 1, 2, or 3 Years’
. ¥ ' . Lease.

$ CENTRAL EMPORIUM % Apply at Showrooms 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

% Corner Broad & Tudor Streets Phone 5010. After Hours 8657.
Daicseamnes - o>










our
Bacon,
counter at Messrs General
Hardware Supplies, Rickett
St., when you are next in

































2.

3.
4;



{elp Barbados to help itself

by supporting

LOCAL INDUSTRIES,

BARBADOS FOOD
PRODUCTS

f you have not already tried
locally cured Ham &
why not visit our

own.
We can supply: —
Leg Hams—$1.30 per lb.
Shoulder Hams—
$1.10 per lb.
Boneless Butt Hams
$1.20 per lb.
Streaky Bacon—
$1.15 per Ib.

“OVEN FRESH”

ADVOCATE
















s

'SHIPPING NOTICES

LOST A FOUND































































Vigie Airport and bathing beach (1) miles from Castries) are being
offered for sale in situ at reasonable prices ranging from $5,000 to
| $7,000 (B,W.1.), fully furnished or unfurnished, Electricity and water
are laid on.

A substantial former Military brick building in the same
locality is also being offered for sale at a price of $26,000 (B.W.1.).
No reasonable offers will be refused. .

Inquiries and applications should be made to the Govern-
ment Agent for the Sale of Vigie Peninsula, Office of the (Commis-
sioner for Reconstruction, Castries, St. Lucia, B.W.1.)

28th February, 1952.

9.3.52.—4n.



FURNISH



Larders.

’

Kitehen and Fancy ‘se,
Waggons, Tea Trolleys,
boards—Kitehen, China and Bi
room Cabinets, Liquor Ca 3
up—DRAWING ROOM NI-
TURE, Rush Furniture for Little
and Big—PIANOS, Pram, Ice
Boxes Typewriter, and other Nice
Things—ALL AT MONEY SAVING
MRICES.

L. S. WILSON




















’







: : AUCTIONEERS
FOR EASTER {| HAROLD PROVERBS SrIShae ng
isnearer than you think Co. LID LDING CONTRACTOR!
‘FASTER NICE Bureaus, IM. ° elas on-
Srna bs up, Gol “and flat . 6666000"
Springs — TABLES for Dining, So OS



cosconcaanneenmensanientt



You can now get our New Delicious

your grocer or from the nearest shop at 46 cents per pound

Ask for “SHIRLEY



























yards from the famous Rockley
Beach, This Bungalow has never
been
price.

Owing to currency re-
strictions this American
feed is likley ot be scarce
in the near future.

lived in. Very reasonable

PARAGON
Compfising Four Bedrooms, Din-
ing and Living Room, Pantry,
Kitchen, and a very nice Study
Standing on 7% acres of land,
Situate near Seawell Airport.
Price veny reasonable. Inspection
by appointment only.

BUNGALOW
Rockley New Road: on approx:
imately 19,000 square feet land,
Magnificent view including Gold
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing
and Dining Room, Kitchen,
Downstairs: Garage, Servants
Room with Bath and Toilet, and
enough room for Laundry or
Workshop. *
——

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

Wholesalers — Retailers
& Poultry Keepers would
be wise to stock up now
with ....

GIBBONS
TELDS

at prices that defy com-
petition from... .







Fok SALE @2 BRENT

RALPH BEARD'S SHOWROOMS

SERVICE

“SHIRLEY SWEET BISCUITS" from

BISCUITS” To-day
























|

UNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952

REAL ESTATE



sale at a very competitive figure.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, St.
James A 2 storey house on
coast with good grounds and in-
teresting possibilities. There is
excellent bathing from secluded
and private sandy cove,

“IN CHANCERY”, Inch Marlow.
~~Modern

well designed and
soundly built bungalow on the
eoast where there is always a
cooling breeze, There is a large
combined lounge/dining roorn,
kitehen with serving hatch, 2
bedrooms, built in garage and all
usual offices. Open to offers,

“WYNDOVER”, St. Peter—A
solid one storey stone residence
with shingled roof, lately ex-
tensively re-modelled with great
care by the present owner. The
house has 2 wide roomy verandahs
at front ee sat! large drawing
room, separate dining 3 good
bedrooms (with ‘wast bao),
kitchen, laundry, servants’ quar-
ters and garage. Grounds are
over 4% acres with productive
orchard, flower and vegetable
gardens, driveway and large park-
ing space for cars. “Wyndover"

Well elevated on the ridge,
always benefits from a breeze and
commands perfect views of the

“MALTA”, St, Peter—Modern
coral stone house of exceptionally
construction—extensive re-

most at-
tractive seserepe views. The three
bedrooms are fitted with built-in
Sil SS te Sed te

have H/C
water. Kitchen and pantry are
well fitted out and are supplied
with H/C water. Ground floor
contains 2 garages, large store-
rooms and servants quarters,
grounds of about % of an acre
are well laid out and fenced. Mains
and well water. A most desirable
and highly recommended property.

RENTALS

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
HOUSE—Near Yacht Club, avail-
able June to Dec. (inclusive).

MODERN FURNISHED HOUSE,
Sandy Lane—Immediate possession,
ROSE HILL, St. Peter—Furnished,
Immediate possession,
ss ad LODGE, Maxwell

—-Funished, mediate -
Session as

WHITEHALL FLATS — Unfurn-
ished, early possession, earie

RESIDENCE, 2 Mile Hill—Beau-
tifully furnished, swimming pool,
close to town, excellent staff.
Available to approved tenants.

HIGHGATE — Unfurnished fiat.

ATTRACTIVE FURNISHED
SEASIDE PROPERTY, Paynes
Bay—Available to approved ten-
ants from May to Nov.

XICALES— Wildey— Available
about 6 months.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building













TELEPHONE 2508 : . - HOUSES i FOUND | ROYAL NETHERLANDS |
siispiticial —-_———— - HANDBAG Broad | }
—————- : : ° i M.V. DAERWOOD wil H Rel
‘ e one « Spectactes, | AMSHIP co The ond Penal. va
ave sutthe. Marriage or Enescemest| = FON SALE ae oa paar par A = ror twther mee}. STE A. EE eopant Coens, ong, Dooenees 2
@nnouncements in Carib Calling the PURI we s al ES s R ‘ | SAILING FROM Et ROPE i end Aruba. Seiling Wednesday
charge ‘5 $3.00 for any number of words ale » ~ E «Oe nveRA 0.2 691m, | 1.5. HECUBA ith April J958 26th inst e
ap te 90 and 6 cents per word for r-~ ak ge Pompeo t a Ys encnitiimmaianionmnatl ° . 30.3. 59—1 }$.8. BOSKOOP April 7” 7:
yAitional word. Terms cash. Phone 25° - é <7 | se a M.S. BONAIRE ¢ ons j The M.V CARIBBEE wi
zetween 8.30 and 4 p.m.. 3113 for Deash AUTOMOTIVE REAL ESTATE s t ma, penn | 2 m IMS. STENTOR on and May 16 [Mf sccept Cargo and Pagsengers for
Netiees only after ¢ p.m Te in een con one ww AN TrED SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND Dominica, Antigua, es
- haere PROPS oo ” ; oe AMATERD AM Nevis and St ts. ling
_ ec USTIN VAN--One (1) 10 BLP. Austin th Avenue, New < wm. S : sl iu. S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952 urday 29th Inst.
DIED Var in good works < — Phone i Sa 2. * — ¥ = “4 * st oe HEI j SALLENG TO TRINIDAD, PARAMALING %. most wih see & coe.
DANIEL: On March 20th. 1982. at his Es, D, V. Geet & Oe TEs ete, |e poenen. Apeer &. Ww. a ACH COTTAGE On St. Jamen Conn S ica | AND BRITISH GUIANA ee psec Possengers fo = v.A
” “ sherponc nantry., s1 come. com . . th Grew t b&b gr “a n j s “SOTTICA on Tt prii 1952 * ¥-
Frssens” Cech Daniel, Bis fanen catieen [OM AMIS A % s.se-an oS Sopmiced cm anatn noses, ag] BUTEA wre Mai. Seg og Apoly: /Si8, COTCA en Th Apt Hise | Anti, Monioemea, (Nevis and a,
leaves the above residence at 4.90) | a keels C. A. Proverts, Car] | Soi Telepnane Sulladle married couple, eee A ee eS 8 teen. | SABLING TO TRINIDAD AND ‘April 1962 e COMPREHENSIVE _LIST-
p.m. today for St. Augustine's pington Plantation. Dini 2425 : i -N.” Pine Hill $55.00) per day Amerioan Pian for two} Chered . | CURACAO ; INGS ALWAYS AVAIL-
Cou tune Destel (Wid wi, Morton cain nomena Ae : t eS ae 7 HOUSE BOY—Or general maid. Must | M he hg i B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’ ABLE.
Daniel (Brother) 30.3.52 a enn A newls -constructed J a ane ' have expertence of general house-work | 5.5 BOSKOOP 2? At 1952 ASSOCIATION (INC.)
iii aceasta CAR-Singer 1,000. Bn SOE fan. | THD Polished pine Boors toresideatial = Marre EDd references. Call between 10 & 1) nti: eee Consignee. Tele, No. 4047
SsIMMO On the 29th March 1962,| Dial 5145 | ceo! Sea a cana ™ IR falls mished ali “The Moorings”, Marine Gardens 5. P. MU erm % « + LTD.
Laura Lorenza, The funeral eet CAR: Austin 10, 1946—in good condi- | *™) hh ae a t sces, five minutes walk to sea, 30.3.88—In eee FOR SALE
her late residence dartingale’,} . "$900 00. Dial 2964 l verandah, @rawing 3 t April. Apply: Nurse Pil- - $ °
ti at 4.30 joc this eve-s tion * . 28.3.53—3n | VeT™* . : ontin : hes 81 COOK—Good Cook, male or female, ‘ ° . s 18." St. James
hing for St. Paul's Chureh and thence cicaieg ciesniaCneeainacieesinastotmencns | Deetetne, Sed SERS Seaaty quit es 26.3.52—3n | Wed fo cooking for over twenty people acdian athona eams ps regeernagnn ota stone
% ‘the Westbury Cemeten ENGINE—One Swallow Gadabout 1.22 | toile ana large garafe with direct access : hoes if possible, Reply M. K. C/o are penny ine floors and shingle roof.
Ercil (Daughter), Dr. T. A. How-| | iiers Engine. Good Condition. Apply | °"")cuce Front grounds laid out in| AY rence From oe EE aie eel alnnnhenrenae > Facute. rooms, 5 bedrooms,
el (St. Lucia}, Alwyn, Jacks. Cuke, C/o A. Barnes & Co.. Id. | garden beds, lawns, hedges, ornamental +e 3 Jan tneenen. | Oe ea verandahs etc., also gavage. and
Gladys 30.39.58, 1° 30.3.52—In | = ad ornamental plants good sea-bat Apply “Holly- ILO Q The house
and shade ‘trees and ‘ o.3 Hands) only those with experience need ‘ usual outbuildings
i — , n fruit trees and | w xt door 30.3.52—1n ¥ ont nC SOUTHBOUND Satis Sals Sats Arrives Sails acres of well
THANKS pres Siben etacn, ‘ “ am ee a ek ok ae Riitek Ree. eee: S| ee finbered land * mahogany) aP-
BRATHWAITE—We the undersigned bee | ELECTRICAL Inspection by appointment with mrs. _c Maxwell _ Coast. From | lst : LADY RODNEY Bote i 2) Mar, 2 Apr. 11 Apr, 12 Apr. proached by a long driveway
§ medium to return thanks | Lioyd B.. Aaron, c/o K. R. Hunte &| Apr ee et ee = anageress for | LADY NELSON sf — Apr 17 Apr. 27 Apr. 38 Api ed with closely _ plante
through this me Street, Bridgetow: 0.3.52—t.f.n WANTED—Assistant Manag { flank tstanding
to all those kind friends who sent Co., lowe: Broad, estat eee pastes 20.3.5 “| small good Class Hotel in Barbados—- { CANADIAN CRUISER rca 29 Apr. ‘ oe - z May 2 ny mahogany Seyi et reap
hs, letters of condolence or im) “FT bop r and 15 inch For further percus wuss Maatety.| COMPORT AR = Pleasant sonality essential. Reply ;} CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.. 9 May 15 May omy May attraction of “ =. ,%
MMy way expressed their sympathy in|, ELECTRIC FANS—12_ and i Cie. a. P. Mandeville, Christ Church Reetory,| COMFORTABLE COTTAGE in the ‘a. 30.3.52—In | LADY RODNEY . oe )~= 9 May «82s May, % May 2June 3 June Very lovely site which has the
any wa Pp z nabby riced Also many r . ery 7 di
ouf recent bereavement caused by the | . ee 5 a iho K. R. Hunte &| or dial 5187 between 5 p.m and 6 p mt Mariné Gardens, Fully furnished. Dial ANADIAN CHALLENGER 30 May 2 June a 11 June 12 June advantage of being well aren
th of: mec Se ; 28.3.52—3n. | on any day Monday to Friday, inclusive. | 8 29.3.52—2n LADY NELSON... 9June 12Jume 14June 23 June 2% June and cool, with fine views on al
Sime Gaeitate \iGessie),. Gertrude |CO- Ltd Diel 618. i SPSL SS Ranger NOTICE CANADIAN CRUISER |" _ 20 June 28 June - 2Juky 3 July sides. Coast is less than a mile
(widow), Elijah, Pomray (sons) } ONE ELECTRIC PAINT SPRAY OUT- AUCTION MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR. 30 June 3 July -— 12 July 13 July away and town is 6 miles
ONE Ei " Siiver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing. estate of y y
3 In. | a Jars Re LADY RODNEY ae ie 11 July 14 July 16 July 25 July 26 July ‘ =
30.3.52—1n. | erp _aimost new, for full Een ————_—~._—~ | For further particulars. Apply to Almal DANIEL EUSTACE GASCOIGNE | “BRANDONS", St. Michael .
Ronee : : {| please dial 2766 weer % have been instructed by the exetu- | ( osniey No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing. BRATHWAITE | 2 Raping bee ag mellowed old stone property 0}
DEANE—We thank all friends who sen tors of the estate of Delbert Graham 23.2.52-ti.n. Gadtated the Coast with good boat anchorage
wreaths and sympath? on tM deetane, |, REFRIGERATOR: 4 cub. foot Freese: | necourcy Leacock better known as Brings | NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that au| NORTABOUND Artives Sails Arrives Arrives. Arrives, _ Arrives and about 1 mile from. town, with
our brother Charles Berring on NC.) ux Gas Refrigerator. melee th to set up for Sale by public auétion at MODERN FURNISHED FLATS—Four | persons having any debts or claims upon B'dos B’dos Boston St. John Halifax Montrea) 3% acres of enclosed gyounds, * e
Miriam Griffith, Alicia Deane 30.3.52—1n | 1n& order Dial 4739 29.3. my Office Middle Street on Thursday | aces st. Lawrence Gap. From April Ist. |o¢ affecting the estate of Daniel Eustace | CoN. CRUISER F 4 Apt. 7 Apr. — | i Apr. 7 4 - major part of it planted with
a8 | eienssiora a next 3rd April ot 2 p.m. 1 acre 82/ ani: Mrs. L. Hassell. Phone 4003. Gaséoigne Brathwaite deceased late of | LADY RODNEY __ 24 Apr. 5 May, we 6 ry 10 Ma, roduetive coconut and fruit trees.
One Kolstan| Brand shecker Hall, St. 1uc ign bp 26 Apr. yi me “9
M . ADIOGRAMS ee Sect Villa’ Cuneden | petcnee of land at Checker Hall, £0, Tateu 28.3.52—2n. | Dayrells Road in the parish of Christ LADY NELSON | 10 Ma) 12 Mes 22 May} — May af May ere are 3 reception rooms,
IN MEMORIA Radiogram. Apply abutting on lands of Roy Gr 4 — Church who died in this island on the) CDN. CRUISER .. 24 May 29 May ~ SJune 8 June WM Jun » galleries, garages, etc.
———————— | Road or Dial 4668, Vaneeryres: s2~2n. | Belfield Graham. iis pper Street, on-the-sea. }10th day of February 1952 are hereby | CANADIAN y é : Suitable either for continued use
MILLINGTON: In loving memory of my | i + Also 2,843 Rabat Aad oA im Osea | two-storeyed residence with |required to send in particulars of their CONSTRUCTOR + Sune 8 June ec. 15 June 18 June, a Jun as a private residence, a club or
dear friend Lavina Millington, who was} - Moon Fort, St. Lucy on the § ne ee conveniences, Furnished or [claims duly attested to me the under-| LADY RODNEY .. 15 Jun. 17 June 27 June — |} 28 June 1 July boarding house.
called away Mareh 20th 1949 FURNITURE on lands of McDonald ne ae f 1. Apply on premises signed C/o D. Lee Sarjeant, Solicitor, 12,) GaNADIAN : rn “CASABLANCA” Maxwells Coast
for what Is your life? ; Bis sp oe ty together with the chatte: | 28.3.52--2n. ]James Street, Sane vate “aihee Ee CHALLENGER ..Q 23 June 28 June ~_ 8 July 8 July) 1 July —A beautiful property embodying
It is even a vapour that appeareth 7 Y — 9u8 “en _ a ae ANh — the Sth day o ay after which! LADY NELSON ., 6 July 8 July 18 Jul — | 9 Jul: 22 Jul) Ww workmanship.
For @ Mfttie time and then vanished | ~TiyRniTURE—One ay Mahogany DARCY A ene ; TO LET—Furnished three Bedroom |date & shall proceed to distribute the| Con CRUISER ;: 14 Soe io Jab arti 26 Fast 2 July, 1 Aug oe en ee sane eae
aWay-—ds. Iv, 14 | le to seat 8 and one (i) Ma- Auctioneer, Middle Stree | House “Doverdale”’, Nelsow Road, Navy {assets of the estate among the parties) © Dining Tab! " : - CANADIA» with 2 reception rooms,
Rev. Hammond PB. Chase in, |howany | China Cabinet Apply i a ®.3.82—4n _| Garder May—August ne 6) a emptied thereto heving regere P CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July ~ 5 Aug| (8 Aug. 10 Aug rooms, verandah, kitchen, pantfy,
20.3 n. | Poster 2465 2 —2n. meena tee P | 28.3.52— debts and elaims only o eh I sha ¥ g sib Aug. a ¥ : 5
paaaentencoe eam | eae rt Oe a gcuart | then have had notice, and that 1 shall LADY RODNEY .« 7 Aug. 9 Aug 19 Aug. ' » a Aug garage, storeroosss ~ SS
MAXWELL—in loving memory of our! town, consisting of 2,885 square feet o not be liable for assets 50 distribu — et s .
beloved son Evan Maxwell, who de-| LIVESTOCK land together with the chattel dv ine | NOTICE to any person of Whose debt or claim I vegetable gardens, ee
parted this life om April ist 1961. 7 me house palings and out-offices thereon, | shall not have had notice at the time of For further particulars, apply to orchard & coconut grove. ?
\ : COW-—One Grey Guernsey and Jersey ty of the Estate of Desdemona | pa hiealh : acre walled gatden may be sol
Who shall go to that bright land | ts last calf. Phone 8336. the property o! a The above will TENDERS are invited for the rights to | such distribution. tely a5 a building site.
All who do the right just calf 40 pints las * 98.8.52—3n, | Foster-Turton, deceased. The abo tition sell liqours and refreshments at the Local] And all persons indebted to the said GARDINER AUSTIN & co. LTD.—Agents. sephra
en ten — ea go “oes z= aireet “on Prlday Athletic and Cycle Sports meeting to]estate are requested to settle their ac- « “BWEET FIELD”, St. on
their robes of white Se EUR ETE PE: SOR ET ee, James street, ~ | be held at Kensington Oval on Thursday, | counts without delay. ae dienineaeaetiaa reine The house is of the Estate ty!
For that Heaven so bright and blest | | PUPPEES—Three smoothtalt et one lth April, 1952, at 2 pm. For inspee- | 7 1G A) and at the Intercolonial meet: | Dated this ist day of March, 1952. ——————— SSS with 2 storeys, solidly built of
SS CUE OSORIO TOR ae | ey ee OR ne 80.8.b0—in | ton apply on the premises, For further |<" to be heid May 3ist, June 2nd and co Ley TeTLL. stone with parapetted roof. There
Leotta Maxwell (mother), Reginald Max- 70 w ae particulars apply Stl ; , Qualified ecutor, is a dining room large lounge
eth CAEL: Danmar pees wel) TOTO) | ANTE Pure—Communicate M0 HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD w“Penders must reach" the Secretary of | fst. Daniel Bustace Gascoigne - with Freneh windows leading on
PODS meee teeter). The Clanact | Sean guinea, Bi Pair. celapnene SO 5 $26n |the Amateur Athletic Association of rathwaite, to tovered Verandahs from which
Family. poGheseaat sea Bt peta ae 30.3.52—n 7 Berbados P.O, Box 36 not later than beter ys When planning your vacation, thete is an unobstructed view of
ANNOUNCEMENTS | FOR SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION [7th April 90. et ace come to Sunny St. Vincent. Enjoy forth ; Se eee ne latte had
« TUESDAY Ist April Pie ees bt ae the placid homely atmosphere of AT the ort coming has its own bathroom
: MECHANICAL Skee nee ir chattel, use PART ONE ORDERS Dttea's betel, whats vi ah tude Meeting of the SHOP- {Il} So tun ‘bmw ana” hot water
WANTED — O'cloék on the spot Lohag ? ; ’ There is ample scope for improve-
~ ee enn diewing & ait luxuriously comfortable at very KEEPERS’ ASSOCIA- mon to be
PRIVATE TU?TION—Shorthand. Typ- | Office equipment of all kinds—Steel | called “Hyleourt” with \ ing ¢ y By f ments and médernisation to
ing, Spanish and General Subjects. | Safes, Skandex Visible a nie | ees aa iene teivenise: Sais) Licut.-Col, J. CONNELL, 0.B.E., B.D doancnadt tes. consuit us WI WON to be held. at carried out without the property
Write “Maestro” Box 75 Bridgetown or ony a Btandare TT aiaee, Duplicating ce Koveean Png attention: +o th a Sees . beforé wou decide ’ oe its Gin Sea ae oo eee
Dial 3611 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. | an alculati , é : ‘ a ] The Barbados Regimen S ax * The grounds are approx. 2%
. 30.3.52—1n | Machines. tenant No. 18 28 Mar. 52 S. N. BALLANTYNE, well planted with trees and
_ } BRADSHAW & COMPANY. WEDNESDAY 2nd April Toque Ne. 1 ———_—___-—_— ms ees flowering shrubs of all varieties.
iM . 3 be Bee shel ede lias thal (Manage
pawn eee eae | Absentee At my office roe fo ra hae | a. a Sewing | ee eo ee canst consists of almost| | All ranks will parade at Regt HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 3rd April, 1902. v on THURSDAY right of way over the beach with
: 3 - 1 NG MACH en T. Alder, 118 | Deacons Road. at a mouse which has| HQ—Coy—will carry out specialist training, A" Coy—will Eee eT ann excellent bathing.
’ ‘ | ae pee cist toe 1 : 1 sare rae ge ig dining direction of th Company Commander. “BY Coy—is eed ee open 4 A il 3 «2 “LYNCHBURG”, 5th Ave. Belle-
; FREE YOURSELF ' | Roshuck Street. - * 99.9.62—0n peony a tremroores, ieitshen, water toilet miniature ranges: _tnowe not firing will carry out weapon . : a a Aprt a pm. vile = As Ce set Re
nad bath, and spacious yard Fnspec- — Wenge tes 5 a ‘ednesday in addition to the nor-| %& ‘ . : yn: ise 8
t i tt : on a ieation on the premises. | Band es rong Wi). He he ag Me Mond ee ae until "nurther notice. uM y JOAN % will be discussed matters ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
! MISCELLANEOU: On OP WEDNESDAY 2nd April Py tcl ia adele age tam $ MR. ABERDEE! 3|\} om importance. ft. Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed),
: . PAY } , d t . ,
t ANTI mi every desert At Ist Ave. Harts Gap, at 2.30 pm ‘Those Volunteers who did not draw pay on Thursday 27 March 52, may parade % x large drawing room, study, modern
a old Jewels, fine 2 chattle houses (1) 16 x ® with shed-| 4, draw pay at Regt HQ at 1800 hours on parade days. s JON ' s Kitchen, 3 bedrooms, gafage etc.
ster Early books, Maps, Auto-| kitchen, closet, galvanize palings and) 5 REGIMENTAL SHOOTS py RMS. |% vv |) Come One ! Come All! ! iY seater cae
D eetete, at Gorringes Antique Shop| the other is 14 x 8 with kitchen, closet The Major H. §. Pinder Cup—1.M.G.—open to all ranks was won by RMS. | s. SiN 30.3.39.—1n sale, owner going abroad,
} s and palings. | Marshall, H. B. G. and CSM Carter, G. A. w poin ‘ . p . ae ee WINDY MILL, Rendezvous Hill,
{ [oeeeree ee Seer MPS 2 so-tt.n, THURSDAY Srd April | |4. ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK re Desires through this me- & . Ch. Cha eteaees built bungalow
1 evans peat ct Wein st Reatiny | 7 APREy 1 sseut. P. Lx C. Peterkin, S$ dium to thank all his friends 3) 3 bedrooms, lounge, kitchen,
ONSTIPATION i BOATS: Two Sailing Boats, Mallard | 33,000 square feet of land at Rockiey | Orderly Officer ‘Sit. Reid, N. E |} and well wishers who at- | gaaas garage, sérvants’ quarters, walled
| rN ny ith Morris Auxiliary | New Road, Nr. Golf Course 6,185 sq. | Orderly Serjeant 409, Sit. Reid, N. E. es anc is 5 $ and standing of 8,000 sq, ft. land.
ET eee ae a conmion (pment| feet of Jand at Knight's Land, Lower| Next for Duty % tended his Service of Song % In good atea with unobstructed
| Merine Engine and scontional tomada | Westbury Road, It has a well in it ahd Orderly Officer Lieut, C. G. Peterkfh | $ & Dance, also to express $/% view. Any reasonable offer
ith $1,500.00 Also. Seyeran uitable for kitchen garden, Also Orderly Serjeant 381, L/Sjt. Robinson, V. s . . We Vis a
nd) well built. with good Racing Record | is. suita feet at N: a en M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,| 4s thanks and sympathy to X% y adcepted.
d. 2 PI ay’ arcens 7. D. & a 5 . *
G $450.00, Apply: Secretary Yacht atin, Le Se A. Gein: ‘ S.O.L.F, & Adjutant,| $ those who were unable to % “BEMERSYDE”, St, Lawrence
OR 9 8. Auctioneer, Middle Street, The Barbados Regiment. ¥ attend. 30.352—1 % % rn wn eee wore built paneeee
2A ——1n. le , very well plan-
. REAM FLANNEL for Trousers in 2 | 20,3.52—4n : PART If ORDERS ‘ % 3. %
ay hOL st) RoR | Shia ‘g.s.s0-t¢.0.| ~ UNDER THE SILVER | ae Receecotn ities tnd "aide," enclosed "pallerie
+0, Oa-~8. 5.2. Y eee : 1 —— |¥ large airy lounge and dining room,
BE
LEA E LY A some : 7 “a” Granted 3 weeks P/Leave wef ea AGENTS 3 double bedrooms, kitchen and
ROOT CLOTH—Domestic Cloth, good quality HAMMER RSE H. W. ee air ha Biter gon phat % 2 Semele Seen Sean sae
only 39¢. a yd. At Thani Bros. On Thursday 3rd April by order o} 1 v, d outhe The land i
: 28.3,52—t.f.n. | Miss Roberts, we will sell the Furniture leave the colony. % and outhouses. The land is com.
_ a at “Beachy Head” The Crane’ St. Philip. |2. POSTINGS nd to RO. Canaan % FOR SALE pletely entosed and there is direct
e Headache, backache, Gillevenees ' FLANNELETTE for underwear and . = which includes — 683, Pte. Quarless, D, — Post ‘o ot cae. Pie. Durant Important ° access to the sea w: go ath-
: page Ang sab ~ | | other purposes 64c. and White, Blue, Pink | Arm Chairs, Couch, Sideboard, Liquor 684, ‘Pte. Bourne, M. 625, Pte, Best, 00s, Fhe, crane, ee et a va, % ing.
@ Dr. Morse's is contain six active Thant’ 28.3.52—t.f.n. | Case; in Mahogany: Dining Tables & O, 687, Pte, Branker, B88, 2 =m ai s —— — MODERN RESIDENCE Maxwells
a> Seees. : lon es Palins Jones DeT 2
te eee | Chaits in Cherry wood; Folding, Berbice | , ppehe ‘aa? —Very well built stone house near
© Gentle, effective 9-hour action will wo! | FySgp RECERVED—Valor Stove patts,|ord Deck Chairs, Pine Waggon: Glas The above mentioned are posted to “A COMPANY: | oa. ee Harri. Announcement \¥ SWEET FIELD Slee telths scuculis aaweice voor
C ; “ . 691, Pte. Carter, H, C. 692, Pte. Ward, J. , Pte. Lewis, Lovely Stone House; comprising
disturb your rest. | including — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid] and China; Phillips Battery set Radio : si cos pte. Quarless’ N. 696, Pte, Mahon, D. 697, Pte. Alleyne, D. 698 19 upstairs th Bed Large having French windows leading
@ Special TONIC ingredient helps restore Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also) in perfect condition: Old Fashion Stump pin Clarke, K. 699, Pte. Holligan, C. 760, Pte. Straker, F. A, 701, Pte. Moore, 1% Living Room: Dining Room, 2 pda ped 693 ve Og er tygtieg 8
normal bowel conditien. } | Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre} Bedstead and Canop Bedstead in Ma- Ete : oe ait. eee Tolligan, C- te, Woodrof, M° 704, Pte. Barrow, O. J. é Motes, a ae ian hut room, breakfast room, fitted
' @ No discomfort, even for hemorthoid Com| , Trafalgar & S&S Streets. | hogany: Pine and Iron Bedsteads all | ey ee _t | yO y kitchen, 4 double bedrooms, 2-car
' 1 pany, 7 . ane | Pte, Lovell, A, D. : |@ Bath and hot and cold water, .
' rene Phone 2606. MeL thane wee etatransbess be ee ta aire aubiae, The above mentioned ate posted to “B” Company. We have just received a ()'% Gallery, Downstairs: 3 Spare’ Prerate jae eh =
; Presses; Dressing Tables, : “COX, Maior, € Jui | . i ‘ ecess to each.
' A TRUSTED REMEDY | JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS— Extra | Washstands; Painted Bedroom Furnituce; M, b. D. SHEWES-COX Mant'|{ shipment of... B Rooms, Kitchen, “and Shower This property which also includes
1 [| Light Soda Biscuits. The Best Cream | Canvas Cots; Large Oil Burning Refrige- he Barbedos Regiment. | §) Room., Standing on approximately ® detached and readily saleable
“st alk FOR OVER 50 YEARS Cracker made at the best possible Price. |rator, Kitchen Tables, Larders, Coal The - | R 2% Acres of land about 100 yards building plot is offered at
' t J) gityer large ‘Tin, Get them ut BRUCE | Stove; Sheets of Bverite, Wallabn Posts | ee ee 4 B ors |B from Gibbs Beach. vt Ai MCO me. neae fleas which tances
io ater sn 3 nen sn ahaa emsbenh ard WEATHERHEAD Ltd. and other items. | ispection by appointment only, represents extremely sound value
' BEWARE orwornms! | 28.3.52—@n | Sale eS eee ms CASH ST. LUCIA ) Hew BONOALOW and carries our strongest recom-
—_ BRANKER, & CO. | mendation.
© Worms threaten old and like, Be |! LADIES AMERICAN SPRING COAT— or : 2 Comprising three Bedrooms,
. young atike, Be ‘ 4000 Auctioneers, SUPER QUALITY |% Dining and living Room, Kitchen, BUNGALOW, Maxwell Coast—
beta Breas be es | See ee BEACH BUNGALOWS FOR SALE ects FEED |% Toilet and large tiled bath. Stand- A well built bungalow with 3
vel Ne beh Me Sc ancdien fe rea ee ieee . - | @} ing on approximately 11,000 square rooms, large living room,”
Rs octicgies a Tew ~OIL—The world’s finest motor oil UNDER THE SILVER TWELVE attractive wooden bungalows, with about one acre of feet of land. Situate at Blue kitchen, garage, servants’ quarters.
A = vetdol, at al} tending Garages and Betvice HAMMER land each, on the Vigie Peninsula, St, Lucia, in close proximity to = Waters, and approximately 250 A pleasantly located property for
Stotions. Your vehicle deserves the best. x ,
SALES IN APRIL
VEEDOL. “Found wherever fine cars



SUNDAY, MARCH 36, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

GOVERNM ENT NOTICE Copper plates, Sheets and Flat or Coiled Strip, Phosphor Copper and

Cupre-Nickel Strip

PROGRAMME OF REQUIREMENTS OF SCARCE INDUSTRIAL = | Thus NEW TIMES! NEW FASHIONS : NEW SHIRTS :
MATERIAL Pounds Brass .

and bronze pipes and tubes

Importers of the articles set out in the schedule attached hereto Copper-Wire Mill Products

are hereby notified that they should submit returns of their minimum | 7?°US : wer 4 3 : iN
essential requirements for the 2nd and 3rd Quarters of 1952 and 1st} Pounds Copper wire and cable bars, for electrical conduction only
ind 2nd Quarters of 1953 Other Copper Wire and Cable J

2.The return should set out the quantities which it is expected | Thous





PAGE FIFTEEN





































‘will have to be imported from: — Pounds Building Wire and cable, fibrous covered and/or jacketed | me ii
(1) The U.S.A ee a | THE SHIRT BARBADOS LOVES
(2) other sources. Pounds Building cable, service | 4
(3) Estimated stock at end of June, 1952. Thous :
3 Returns should be submitted to this effice not later than the | Pounds Building cable, metallic, armored - oem
‘Oih Auell iOKS ; Thous. eT ————— $OPSS995959595 99599990 SORE DHE POE NO VAIS
SCHEDULE Pounds Building wire and cable, synthetic, no braid | } x %
" | oe .
cn St = eo COSTUME |} ATTENTION:~ |
S. Tons Other carbon steel bars and reds (hot-rolled) die and | Pounds Insulated copper wire, n.e.s af x + x
sae Aluminum | | R 3
S. Tons Concrete reinforcement bars (from new or old billets) Thous. s , x i% ¢
S. Tons Iron bars Pounds Aluminum bars and rods, rolled JE W EI ] ER ) im %
Carbon Steel Sheet, Plate and Strip, hot or cold rolled Thous. ' y
S. Tons Steel sheets, carbon, hot-rolled Pounds Wire and manufactures, aluminum e y
. . %
S, Tons Strip, hoop, band and seroll, carbon steel, hot-rolled Thous. 1% ae i %
S. Tons Iron and steel manufactures, n.e.s. (carbon steel circles) |Pounds = Aluminum bars and rods, extruded : orb ia : i WE CAN SUPPLY A FULL RANGE $
S. Tons fron sheets, blank, Thous. . : A new shipment of this attractive, inexpensive 1 FROM 4” TO 4” x
jalvanized Sheets and Terneplate Sheets Pounds Unmanufaciured molding, aluminum and aluminum base JEWELLERY from Czechoslovakia 1% STEAM PIPE %
EWE ‘ , slovakia STEA)
S. Tons Other galvanized steel sheets alloy >} oa a S
Tinplate Thous. just opened. x * FITTINGS %
S. Tons Tinplate, electrolytic Pounds Tubes and tubing. aluminum % GALVANISE PIPE
. > J T Ss. ‘Re } se >
Carbon Steel Structural Shapes and Piling hous. ; eer ce ihn) phe naeeeleetae chedl RHINESTONE NECCKLACES included, | : is PITTINGS $
S. Tons Structural shapes, plain not fabricated, carbon steel Pounds Aluminum sheets, plates, I I * ree bs xg
S. Tons — Sheet piling, carbon steel Aluminum Foil and Leaf “ if STEAM JOINTING %
Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes Thous. ; x ALL TYPES “DICK’S” PACKINGS §
S. Tons Seamless easing, carbon steel Pounds Aluminum foil (less than .006 in. thickness) x
>. s . a +
S. Tons Welded casing, carbon steel Thous. k ’ LOUIS a BA Y LEY %
S. Tons Seamless black pipes and tubes Pounds Aluminum or aluminum bronze powders and paste. ll ee ee %
S. Tons Welded black pipe and tubes, steel Asbestos of HARDWARE
S. Tons Welded black pipe and tubes, wrought Lbs. Asbestos cloth ; GENERAL SUPPLIES :
S. Tons Welded galvanized pipe and tubes Carbon or Graphite Products, n.e.s._ s Bolton Lane and Aquatic Club Gift Shop pana ARNT aay 3
S. Tons Welded galvanized, pipe and tubes, wrought Lbs. Blocks, bricks, shapes, artificial graphite ’ ‘ ’ ce
S. Sent” ‘Mamdud dee alk meal. cachte: cami” Nickel dudes’ weene 4007 § RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Omtce PHONE 4918 §
S. Tons Boiler tubes, seamless, carbon steel Lbs. Nickel metal in ingots, bars, grains, rods, sheets "| 4. 555:65666655 4566665 OOP OV OCS OGG 5S GOOG FIVOOOOGOR
S. Tons Boil t ¢ lded ‘s Zin .
Gas een sitins eee Tae ee Lbs. Other zinc cast in slabs, pigs, or blocks LESGVOGOSS POSE LSPS OPO CODCOD SOSSOSS OOS,
S. Tons Wire Nails (other coated) Other Non-Ferrous Metals and Alloys : FOR :
S. Tons Galvanized Wire Lbs. Babbit metal, lead or tin base %
S. Tons Barbed wire Chemicals x r . %
S. Tons Other nails and.staples: cut nails, carbon steel Lbs. Toluene or Toluol % GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES %
Other Mill Forms and Products Lbs. Phenols q 4 A 4 R
S. Tons Carbon Steel billets, blooms and slabs Lbs. Resorcinol N
Alloy Steel Bars Penicillin , including: —
S. Tons Steel bars, alloy, cold-finished, except stainless Oxford Parental preparations — %
S. Tons Other steel bars, alloy, hot-rolled except stainless (high | Units ‘ BELTING, in Leather, Camel Hair, and Canvas-stitched
speed tool) Oxford Tablets, pills and other solid forms BELT FASTENERS, Of. CANS, PRESSURE GAUGES
5S. Tons Other alloy steel bars. hot-rolled, tool, (except high speed, | Units GALVANISED & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS
except stainless) Oxford Elixirs, syrups, etc., solutions and suspensions NOT ALL THE PAINT, ONLY THE BEST! FILTER CLOTH, — WHITE COTTON TWILL
Alloy Steel Sheets and Strip Units ' %$ SUMALOID and RITO-MASTIC (for Boiler Walls)
S. Tons Alloy steel sheets, hot-rolled, except stainless Oxford Other forms ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES
S. Tons Alloy steel sheets, cold-rolled, except stainless Units | Pai ; f tt bi items in 2
Stainless Steel Ingots, Blooms, Billets, Slabs, Tube Rounds etc. Gram Streptomyein aint is one o 1e gi “PURE "9 ESTOS CEMENT ROODING, &
Thous. Pounds Steel sheet bars, and tinplate bars, stainless Lbs. Hexylresorcinol : | Builders’ Hardware and we always Woe “EVERITE NEAL Cine " %
aware’ ite. Comper sulphate ov blue vitye will be G.H.Q. for the best; B-H , 3
Pounds Tube rounds, stainless Lbs. Napthenic acid a
, aints are right there, and here , : ea
Stainless Steel bars Glycerine P & Send your orders to'- -
Thous. Lbs. Glycerine, refined |
Pounds Steel bars, cold finished, stainless Lbs. Carbon ‘tetrachloride THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.
Thous Potassium | e
Pounds Other steel bars and rods, hot-rolled, stainless Lbs. Potassium bichromate BARNES & co LTD
Stainless Steel Wire Rods and Wire Products Sodium A. 2 Phone: 4528
Thous. Lbs. Sodium bichromate | White Park Road.
Pounds Wire Rods, stainless Phosphorus | ‘HR Lmao ane notes tanta st rte ten tet BPSCCO:
Copper and Copper-Base Alloy Brass Mill Products Lbs. Phosphorus, elemental white and yellow }
Copper-Unalloyed | 30.3.52—2n. | poe
Thous. pe ae aie Saas 1 ns esha ieadiuabhireteamiiibeiil | =
Pounds Copper rods and bars (excluding wire bars and redraw : SS
rods) SSS \ |
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Pounds Copper wire and cable, bars, except electrical transmis- —— | =
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Thous. TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM
Pounds Copper plates, sheets and strips







Cupro-Nickel Strip




Thous. (With The Distinctive Flavour) ny :
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Pounds Copper pipes and tubes You are sure of having the Best. vi =
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nae 5g Base-Alloy Try It and Be Convinced if} Se
Pounds Wire brass and bronze bare and insulated (including phos- ' ‘ =
phor bronze) excepting welding electrodes and weld- ge «SIP IT — TO ENJOY IT! i ZB

ing rods. or aT \ S

Brass and Bronze Extrusions Blenders : H| =
Thous. y ye { =
Pounds Brass and Bronze bars, rods, (extruded, rolled or drawn) JOHN D. TA YLOR & SONS Mad. i Ss
Copper plates. Sheets and Flat or Coiled Strip, Phosphor Copper and a a
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interest paid on Savings Bank Accounts as from April 1st., 1952 will be
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unchanged). Rates of Interest payable on deposits for fixed terms of not
less than 3 months or more than 12 months, will be advised on application
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PAGE SIXTEEN



PROPRIETOR NOTGUILTY | Self Help

@ From Page 7
st to you that this is n
of self defence. You do not
anything retreating or




ot

anything about trying to get
ay In fact, many witnesses
bed how the two men went

into a clinch.

An Accident 4 € 3

Now gentlemeu, u.-ce i one
other alternative and that is an
accident. If you find that dur-
ing the struggle the deceased is
stabbed or that he was stabbed
as a result of the force with
which he went into the other
man, not guilty of murder, not
guilty of manslaughter or any~-
thing at all. If you find that in
falling the knife went into the

deceased, not guilty. Unless you
come to the conclusion that the
aceused picked him up and threw
him down, that is something dif-
ferent. There is no such evidence

in this ease. If you think that
when they came together the
knife went into him as_ the
accused described in his state-

ment, then he is not guilty and
death would be accidental. And

of course gentlemen, if you are
left in reasonable doubt as to
whether it is manslaughter or
whether, if you consider the

question of provocation and the
question of striking the blow in
the heat of the passion and sud-
den quarrel and you cannot make
up your minds and are doubtful,
as you find that the question of
manslaughter is so doubtful, well
then not guilty at all.

%

Reasonable Doubt

If in considering the question

of murder you should consider
whether he deliberately pushed
it into him, saying. ‘Now I got

him’ and if you find that the evi-
dence is not sufficient to say that
it is murder, if you have a rea=
sonable doubt and you think it
would be a grave thing on the
evidence as you have it to come
to the conclusion that he pushed
the knife into the accused delib-
erately intending to kill him. If
vou are doubtful about that, he
is not guilty of murder and you
coma down to manslaughter. In
considering manslaughter, if you

say the provocation was so and 4;

so on one side and so and so on

the other side and you have a
reasonable doubt, then, say not
guilty. F

If you are considering the

question of the blow on the head
and the passion
doubtful—not guilty. If you do
consider the question of self de-
fence and you are Goubtful—not
guilty.

The matter now in this case is
the fight and how it started and
in considering that you will have
to consider the witness or the
witnesses and you will remem-
ber that some of the witnesses
are intimately connected with the
deceased—-Eulise and Estaline—
and in considering the evidence
of these witnesses and also the
evidence of Millington who told
you that he gave evidetce of this

Jong nistory of quarrels and
fights and law suits. ,

alee. i
- Cereful Consideration

and you are |

B' £14





no doubt come to the ‘conclusion
that he is a witness who it would
be dangerous to believe anything.
I do net prepose to go into it, Mr.
Walcott did it admirably. Better
than I coulg do it. And Mr, Reece
has. admitted that. 1 do not in-
tend to go into it, but F will tell
you this that. before you can
accept anything Millington tells
you you will have to serutinise
his evidence very very carefully.
You may come to ‘the conclusion
that you cannot believe anything
he says and if, you come to that
conclusion, you will have to dis-
credit him.

His Lordship then referred at
length to the criticisms made by
the defence in respect of the evi-
dence adduced on behalf of the
Prosecution, the submissions and
points stressed by both counsel
and reminded the jury’ that. it
was the duty of the Prosecution
to establish beyond all reason-
able doubt and to their satisfac-
tion, the guilt of the accused. He
re-emphasised the points of law
on which he had earlier directed
them and set out again the al-
ternative verdicts at which they
could arrive.

Addressing the jury for an
hour and thirty-five minutes, His
Lordship invited them to retire
and consider their verdict. “The
Jury returned to the Court after
deliberating for half’ an hour’ and
on being asked by the Registrar
what was the verdict of the jury,
the foreman announced a verdict
of not guilty of any offence.

His Lordship discharged the
accused who was whiffed away
in a police waggon which waited
outside the Court,



St. Joseph Round-Up
Manjak Mine
May Be
Re-opened

EGOTIATIONS are afoot to
reopen the Manjak mine
Lower Parks, St. Joseph, it

was lesrnt yesterday.. The Man-
jak
owned by Raymond H.
was closed down many. yeas ago.

mine which was formerly
Emtage

EPHAS BISPHAM a 17-year-
old shoemaker of Church

View got into difficulties while

bathing about 24 yards from
shore at Bathsheba on Thursday
morning: He was rescued by
Princley Bispham, his 22-year-
old trother. Chephas who was
suffering from an attack of
cramp was taken for medical
treatment and was discharged.

LYING-FISH were plentiful
in St. Philip for the past
three weeks, but sales were not
as encouraging as was anticipat-
ed, a fisherman from Long Bay
told the Advocate yesterday.
Thirty-eight fishing boats and a
motor-boat are fishing, for St.
Philip residents, but on. many
occasicns, fish are taken from St.

Philip to distant parishes to be

eans to give evidence
side and therefore

i

Ma fem you will know

sold; and at prices cheaper than

fe ollicr those scheduled.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

The Horticultural ‘ ASTHM A Mu CUS

Exhibition :
Dissolved First Day





{

Your Date with a Dance y
THE CANADA DRY

__, (By a Correspondent) (World Famous Beverages)

Philosophize,

Enterprises

; < criticise, admire! ing, gasping, wheezing
Hold Meeting Pere ’seow atine Dan] sat cec boars ost} Dance & Floor Show
Hall venue provided wonderful ioe health and weaken your heart.

n 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre-
scription of & famous doctor—circu-
lates through the blood, quickly curbe
ing the attacks. The very first day the
strangling mucus is dissolved, thus
giving free, easy breathing and rest-
ful sleep, No dopes, no smokes, no
Injections. Just take pleasant, taste-
less MENDACO tablets at meals and
be entirely free from Asthma and
Bronchitis in next to no time, even
though you may have guffered for
years. MENDACO #3 so suceessful
that it is guaranteed to give you free,

scope for two of these three fac- At QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P., ets of the wormal conversation.
was re-elected to the Board of Criticism was at a record low.
Directors of Self Help. Enterprises Besides, what could anyone crit-
Lid. at the annual gerieral meet- icise? We thought we did hear! /
ing of the company on Thursday a pharisaical comment about
at the Children’s Goodwill League opening the exhibition on Sunday.
building. Mr. Brancker was the But, what harm? Was there not
only. director. who retired under 4 mystery, indeed a sermon, in
the constitution of the company every bloom, in every petal even?

On FRIDAY, APKIL 4,
at 9 p.m

1952

Floor Show by
South American
Ena King and the
Bros. (Acrobats) — Fox Trot
Dance Contest — Prizes
Music: Keith Campbell & His
Society 5
ADMISSION:

Harvey Rogers’
Varieties with
Bood Hoo

2/6



Wo d p easy breathing in 24 hours and to 7
but was olgiie o OT the Was it Keats who musé@d: beauty}, completely stop your Asthma in 8 days
fa i again chairman ¢ is truth and truth beauty and BR eS BLOT tea ee SOPOeTen eR eH SSO Tree

that is all we need to know? And

Owner Directors present were such a feast of beauty unrolled
Mr. T. O. Bryan, M.C.P., Mr. S. itself before us. Our minds wan-
Lashley,” Mr. E, Layne, Miss C. dered back to the hot houses at

chemist. The guarantee protects you.

NOTICE x
THE DANCE

SOLSCO OSE I IEEE & |S

PGS = :

:

SSO CLSS ———
a oon nee
—
{





























Foster, Mr. Lloyd Smith, M.C.P. Eastertide in other climes—the BE WISE |% which was to have been

Managing’ Director and Mr. T. L. array of Easter lilies, giant chry-| % BOOK 1% held by &

5h a a eel io 9 a

CxS " s, hydrangeas , < on Saturda , May ,

statement, of accounts for the year and all the rest. Here in Barba- + TR ONE EE i$ “1952

oad Se erakiaat” 7 Se be paid des was a show, not one whit ..4 Boiling Qurners eng 1 rut ‘% at QUEEN’S PARK :
at a or hin: spring al s urner. ti. 7 ty

to all shareholders: we beeuay at lie mot ecstatic beak] Bo MMS Ser en Eemne BIS” Actas ang, 3008
The meeting ‘also tr me Outside, the savannah wore a .-Call and see them before all % owing to unforeseen circum-

Mr. E. C. Hewitt, Auditor, “— bien and. withered’: logis, ae of Hts aiincnt ks aslveces, 2 wy

the thanks of the ine ire dry weather vieing, it would] sesesseecsecessoossooss | % 30.3.52.—In.

” ere ee eee , ee ee - winter's killing » 4,4 4,4, 646 tt 6664 bt bt OF,

Tee frost to produce a similar scene, | 4854 eee eeeeeta
Mr. Lloyd Smith, Managing Inside, there was spring—lovely, R : ey ws ~~ 3

Director of the Company ence vibrant ring-togered on the feamie ae as nl nee 3 GFS.

the business activities during faces of the blooms and of those . és S

year and telling of future expan- who admired them. The shade: a ra to-day. So get BS THE ANNUAL SALE

sion plans said that they hoped of colour and their variout e time x

by October to have erected their nyances as one looked over the of

gasolene station. Plans for this tables would defy description by PORTRAIT THE GIRLS’

were far advanced and construc- the most expert artist. Yes, the FRIENDLY SOCIETY

tion would soon commence. island’s gardeners were on theh dale tes oes ‘ ae Le kata at
They were other plans whic forward march. Uhictaeenker tee Marcel ee itera,

included the establishment of a Glancing over the names of the NY? graduate of

drug store and toilet necessities. the exhibitors, we caught those me ae hi) Now located at SATO RIAC APR wake
Mr. Smith appealed to the of many long recognised in the Slivérton,” Cheapside. | ; Tr 26

shareholders to take an active local gardening hierarchy, And 30.3.52.—In. ar ee

part in the business and when- it is to their pioneering _ spirit ater

ever possible to induce their that the success of these exhibi- |? === |) 95666966666696966696600

relatives and friends to take tions is due, On and on they go So seas aap aT

from one high standard to

was another. Barbados owes these|I] JS YOUR ROOK LEAKING ?

noted pioneers a debt of gratitude which

shares in the company. .
The meeting before it
adjourned by the Chairman

ith appreciation the work ca e be repaid, Happily hk
which ne ae uaa during the thewg ‘are followers in inayeonbig We.can supply from stock:
pe’ y the Directors rumbers ready and willing to carry
cieipchicomibieneenite on the good work. It was pleas- GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
SCOUT NOTES ing to note that splendid exhib- 6 ft. 7 ft. 8 ft. long

its from both the higher and
lower topographical levels com-
peted, enone rene that, —_
4 in the less favourable sea-level
To Be Launched areas, keen gardeners exist and
know how to make the best out
The Boy Scouts Association, of soils and sites regarded as
local Branch, launches Bob-a-Job jnimical to good gardening, The
Week in Barbados for the first dry, exposed Graeme Hall ter-
time on Monday, 14th April. race, for example, was well rep-
During this week every inv{sted jeacented: and is a fair exampl
member of the Movement—\/olt of what we mean.
Cub, Scout, Senior Scout, Rover Productions from the favoured
Scout, Cubmaster, Scoutmaster parish of St John need no boost-
and Commissioner—will be under~ ing, Nevertheless, it takes en-
taking jobs of every description thusiastic gardeners to produce
in St effort to.@atn money for: the such a varietal wealth as we are
aoenation oe . qnose e pa accustomed to from that area. I
5 Oe tar that helt connotes, we think, that indivi-
ee prereres te ee ad re En Pp. dual requirements of each kind of
mts ae: Fae Hee plant or plant group are studiec
land four: years ago and met with vith the requisite care, One par-
ape. Copa: Shesten, Tt Whe: St. ticular exhibit that we specially

Bob a Job Week EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS

6 ft. 7 ft. 8 ft. long

RED CEDAR SHINGLES

GALVANISED DRIVE NAILS &
DRIVE SCREWS

GALVANISED WIRE NAILS all sizes
MAXOID PROOFING COMPOUND

A black paste for stopping leaks in roofs,



PHONE: tet 4267, 4458

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

1 IS9SSS8S°
~ . 6%
GOSSS POPS SOPS ISOS SOPFPLIPPP PPPS PSPS EE







ees ae ae a mo admired was that of Buddleias. <
th@re is no reason why the local This most attractive plant, SSS %
efforts should not find public sup- Babys of China, 1g Be st 3
port. io Peharatvonial at the Todds OPINION IS ALWAYS DIVIDED REGARDING 3

The sincere and hearty co-oper- specimens were excellent. To THE SOLUTION OF WORLD PROBLEMS ;

°
ation of the public is earnestly this highland horticultural centre e
solicited and to secure this it will we can only suggest, if it has nov + $
be our policy to publish from now already got a plant, to enquire of B UW T $

when you consider the evidence of wate ba actual Week of wae Bermuda for the yellow Buddleia. s g
of these three people you will A\ Foul Bay 18 boats go. out ts of information with which the ]t flowers in that island and some
have - look - it Vety ceryhisty. dalis. and varies with Sheoiuans public should be familiar. years ago, we aoe . pines THERE IS ALWAYS UNANIMITY WITH
Y. eece as. a es ‘ing catches and there is no ex- it grew luxuriantly bu rT
these people are liable to be pre- ception at the Crane where there In the first place it should be uced a single bloom. RESPECT TO THE $
judiced and are liable to Say are 17 boats; At Long Bay there eae eee ine ane the nae Space forbids us from any de- ‘ %
rage eee “ey and theretore ae only four, beals including @ ling should be paid for the work dierent blooms. Undoubtedly, HIGH QUALITY OF %
you will have to scrutinise their TOF poal, our oe catches here, gone such is not meant to be the bi - ‘ y
zou hans ecu tore Rept te, Vendors on the eet cae, "A shing“ahould te the 82, QM Ge ‘a wel
you say, you accept this or t ’ minimum paid for a job of work. d. as Ss, were
' lye the past three weeks. One fishing ; represented and, as groups, / } x “EY =) ~
pnt of tele edenes: And of We Po aren TIT) eleven bags puRoweebalers and others giving ihe'high ints of the show, THerell| MARFER MADE SUITS = |;
in the case of all the witnesses, Of flying fish © ne evening Gordance with the worth of the wete, as ol aes eos
you will have to consider all the last week in addition to other job, Some jobs may be worth many aie eee h ee ted attention
evidence also carefully. They knds of fish. One bag of fish is shillings. © . Baars th “ai oY > ot Con ea al
are not connected in any way, approximately 650 fish, and on wes kof Abe ball previnad an %
but you will remember in cross- such oceasions the residents get Secondly, every Scout asking taeily striking background In %
examination that they contra- their supplies at rates cheaper for a job must be dressed in the assing, it may be of interestl x
dicted themselves on what they than those scheduled. Uniform of the Movement and Pemnee to mention that the only %s
said before the Police Magistrate. A fisherman criticised the must be in possession of a Job of annual we did not observe among x
You will remember their de- Schedule prices of fish, saying Work Card duly signed, the varied and comprehensive x

meanour in the box and from all “Fishermen should be allowed to

y one presenting himself for assortment was Torenia, Nor have



ODO POO F999 O09 9906595656665 9 9200959509

that you come to your conclus- sell their catches at prices that @ job of work not in uniform and

jon. Mr. Reece has pointed out pleave
that because a witness changes a catches.”
statement he gave before the Po-
lice Magistrate, it is not enough WO. FISHING-BOATS
+o condemn that witness unless
of course the difference in his Mayers and ‘Unity’ owned by ers must not be imposed upon.
evidence is vital. You will have Oscar Holder overturned in the ‘
to eee. Oe eae bar re- surf pene returning to shore at
member the differences awn Bathsheba on esday last. Sea
to your attention and say what Queen whith also overturned on WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:

you believe or disbelieve in any Gaturday last was damaged.
witness. Before you can say he
nil,
Total rainfall for month to
date: 2.25 ins,

was certainly right on that point, WO St. Joseph’s houses were
you will have to serutinise his recently sawn in two parts.
evidence very carefully because One at Saint Bernard’s Village
you find a witness contradicting fig been separated already, Temperature: 69.5°F. (Mini-
himself on one point or another while the other at Hortons Vil- mum).
and you should therefore scruti- jage is still standing under one | Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
nise the evidence very carefully }oo¢ At St, Bernard’s the re- * hour.
ware Ssantian 2 R gerci as this. maining part of the house is only | Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.996;
e question of who is €N- threg sides of a shed with no (11 a.m.) 29.994,
itled to the land or not is not a top, and it is cccupied. by a TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.00 a.m,

Sunset: 6.10 p.m.

Moon: New, March 25,

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

Card is-ah imposter.

matter for you. Tt r i
Rony oe ne great thing woman, Nearly 300. persons

is that the defendant had a right

fo some of ‘the produce of the Watched the division of the house

land or occupation of the land. ona were ne’ ae i
‘vide: ‘ and son were weeping. oug!
Evidence Criticised the house in Horton’s has been

Mr. Walcott has criticised the
evidence of Eulise Headley and Sawn already the separation is

them, according to ‘the not in possession of a job of Work handsome, little bedding or bor-

i . Thirdly, no one house should be blue and violet flowers, borne in
of Sea visited more than once unless by profusion,
Queen” owned by Lloyd request. Kind-hearted household- acquisition, Native of india, it is



ae Tide: 6.07 am., 7.11 ho! the officers of the
mm.
Low Tide: 12.41 p.m, Te teh eaie eureri sam

we geen it in local gardens. This

der, pansy-like plant with its

would be a_ useful
practically naturalized in Trini-
dad and Demerara. After aes
established, it re-seeds _ itsel
readily and so there is little
chance of losing it. Suitably
arranged, the flowers make an
attractive table,decoration, It is
listed in Sutton’'s catalogue. There
were some good specimens of
vegetables on exhibition, but
these, like the foliage plants on
the lawn, were somewhat dwarfe:
by the outstanding excellence an
numbers of the flower section.
This review would not be com-
plete without reference to the
care taken by those responsible
for the staging of the exhibition,
They can feel that the time and
energy spent were most fruitful
and greatly appreciated by the
large number who attended, We




SOPSPSS



“
*
x
S
Pr. Wm. Henry
Street .











Millington and as far as Milling-
ton is concerned, I think you will

Theyll Do It Every Time

RKLEY SOUND OFF THE "THEN HE GOT HIS ORAFT NOTICE»:
To ye ac HAVE. CLEANED THINGS AND TO HEAR HIM NOW, ITLL TAKE TILL

D
uP IN ABOUT





t 8-BUT NEXT
a ne J aa ent oa pet “aiegady Gone 0, cust weit The Helt
\ NOW WHAT ARE THEY STA EaSenic Gor uneieo carr ing List Form Madd chin by Eldonia in fine
RoC Se ee [he gin's "Birth Certificate, “nat leather—clip fastening.
is é | 1952. than Thursday, Ist May,
biplane, muse ® pears ad ———
only vacancies are for pupils by Rice’s in tail-

FEATURES SYNDU
te RESERVED.

THREE DAYS**

still to be seen. (In this case it

is man and wife).

Mogistered U. 5. Potent Othe
















1955 FOR HIM TO GET READY:





next few months enrolling new
rmembers of an organisation whieh
is doing so much to. spread
“beauty, pleasureful activitiy and
garden knowledge in this island
community.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE |
ENTRANCE See er ARIES,



By Jimmy Hatlo







The Shirt

by Consulate
pleasing pastels.













The Entrance Examinations for
the School Year beginning 16th
September, 1952, will be held at
Queen’s College-early in June.

in
CANT REPORT









aged 9, 10 or 11 years.

ORIENTAL
PALACE

HEADQUARTERS FOR
SOUVENIRS

ored Gabardine.

Woollen Hose by
Morley—short,
elastic tops.

SPP PLDPE ALLELE TALS AEE PAPA CLL SEE

ys,

C.B. Rice |%
& Co.

SCO Fy

4;

FROM INDIA, CHINA &
CEYLON

THANIS

Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466

Merehant
Tailors

}
: %

| x
j ts
i









$

<

Z D5 AOOLOCCSt < 54
QSOS OSF POS POOLE PLP LP A PILLS 5%

SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1952



She’s lovely

she uses

Coty ©

BEAUTY
PREPARATIONS

FACE POWDER in Boxes.
BABY POWDER in Boxes.
BODY POWDER in Tins...
LIPSTICKS. | Per Stick

ROUGE. Per Box



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COMPACTS, PMOR Aas scchiladssnicduadtes tauieies 1.84
SOAP in Boxes of 3 Cakes, Eacheeccecccsccssesseseeseeees 2.22



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They're Attractive, Comfortable, Economical.
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Less a special 10% discount during
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MADEIRA WICKER CHAIRS $13.50 to $25.00 ea.
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ESTABLISHED 1895



MAJOR ACCIDENTS C

Four Die In Tank: -

One In Bus Mishap
Twenty-six Injured

TWO major accidents claimed five lives yesterday.

Four men died in a concrete vat at M-uat Gay Distil-
leries, St. Luey, at about 8.30 a.m. The vat, which is used
= distil rum is (15 x 13 x 12 feet) and holds 12,000 gal-
ons.

One woman, 35-year-old Beatrice Foster, a hawker of
Rock Hall, St. Andrew, was killed when a bus overturned
at Spring Vale Hill, St. Andrew, at about 1.30 p.m. Foster
was a passenger on the ‘bus. Twenty-six others were in-
jured. Some were taken to the General Hospital in an un-
conscious eondition.

The victims at Mount Gay were:

ALLAN CARLYLE NORVILZE, better known as

a carpenter of Harris’, St. Lucy;
SAMUEL CLARKE (51), a
Peter;
GLYNE GREENIDGE (28), a labourer; and
LYSTAL GREENIDGE (30), labourer and
who is a residént of Rose Hill, St. Peter,

DAY OF MOURNING

An expression of grief was on the faces of many
people of St. Lucy yesterday. It was a day of mourning
for them. The death of the four men was the topic of dis-
cussion at every street corner, under trees, in shops and
in cane fields,

Over 2,000 people gathered in the yard at Mount Gay
Plantation. Weeping parents, relatives and friends mixed
with the crowd. They wrung their hands, moaned and
spoke words of praise about their lost ones while sym-
pathisers nearby expressed their regrets.

This is the second catastrophe within ten years to
come to Mount Gay. It was on June 19, 1942, when the
late Mr. A. F. Ward was Manager, that the Distilleries
was flattened by fire. At the time of the fire about 20,000
gallons of rum were in the vats.

“Ben” (39),

cooper, of Indian Ground, St.

a cousin to Glyne

Lystal Greenidge, one of the men who died yesterday,
was slightly burnt in the 1942 fire.

Mount Gay Distilleries is one of the oldest in the
island. For over 100 years it had been manufacturing rum.

Very little work was done at some of the surround-
ing plantations. Labourers walked from as far as Welch
Town and Nicholas to Mount Gay yard.

As the lorry, which took the four covered bodies from
the Distillery to the Mortuary. at District “E”, pulled out
of the yard, many people ran behind it to get their last
glimpse of the victims.

The vat ich the men died contained 11 inches
of molasses. It has a depth of 12 feet. At one side there is
a pipe line running over the top. It is through this line
that the molasses enters the vat.

ONE CAME BACK

Twenty-three-year-old Hazel Edwards an engineer
who narrowly escaped death, also entered the fateful vat.
He told the Advocate that he went into the vat to see if
he could assist Lystal and Glyne Greenidge who were
then inside.

Telling the story of a man who came back from the
jaws of death Edwards said: “I was in the centre of the
the distilleries when I heard a shout. Some one was
screaming for “Help, Help”. I went in the direction of the
shouting. When I got over the vat I looked into it and saw
the Greenidges. Lystal was lying in the molasses while
Glyne was holding him around the waist. Glyne asked m«
to help. I climbed down the stern stick which is in the
corner of the vat. When I got to the bottom of the vat !
was only able to touch Glyne. Then I fainted. When J
regained consciousness I was at the top of the vat

A RESCUER

Fitzgerald Agard (49) was the man who saved Ed-
wards. He said: “I followed Edwards to the tank. When
he got to the bottom he began to struggle as if he had a
fit. He held on to the stern stick while I shouted for help.
Others came and we pulled him out.”

“Clarke and Norville came into the room. Norville held
on to one of the beams and went down into the vat. He
was closely followed by Clarke. After a few seconds they
too began to struggle. Rufus, a chauffeur then came on
the scene.”

Rufus Austin said: “I went into the vat. I was only
two steps from the bottom. My hand could have touched

@ on page 5



ROOF DETACHED

THE BUS A-66 owned by the Rocklyn Bus Co.,

Andrew was killed on the spot.

Twenty-six including the driver Springer, were taken to the Genera

of Beatrice Foster who died on the spot.

Cen ata

and driven by Cyril
Vale Hill, St. Andrew. While overturning the roof of the bus was

4

ANY 47,,

Advocate
































































































































































4 ms 4
te, \
TUESDAY. APRA) 1, 1962 PRICE : FIV Be
NY inet iahetenectactempnctnsisitiinmsnnnianenin i ecient IAAL seahiapdlaeietapmeatiilat
| BW AAs. Newig,
d Province
Of Canada?
aa. eee Re ee eae ao if By NORMAN MACLEOD
Py a British United Press Staff
ry } ey Correspondent
kaw er ies S| OTTAWA
{ 7 1 ] 'T 4 y Ne proposals for the incor
. | cf if ‘ a wation. of the British West In-
us verturns ; dian colonies as an eleventh
{ HAZEL EDWARDS (right) the man who escaped the ineaee bales ee
DEA PH came suddenly and quickly to _35-year-0 . into the vat to save the Greenthgus but he in tum had te Curing is — =
hawker BEATRICE FOSTER of Rock Hall, St. Andre >} to be saved by another man. Senator Nei) McLean, New
when the motor bus A-66, owned by the Rocklyn a Em } es Brunswick. a
and driven by Cyril Springer (45) of Spooner’s Hi | elatives and friends (below) crowd around the Senator McLean, y
i , lorry with four covered bodies 8 : . The ot ot xem behind |
Michael over turned while it was being driven down Sprit are gotting a last glimpes of the vichind Gofore ths Terry the union of Newtfoun
Vale Hill, St. Andrew, about 1.30 p.m. yesterday, leaves for the District “E” Mortnary Canada in 2949, Sas’ be
Twenty-six passengers werey OLYDE BEST (38) labourer et of pport tor his new proposals
injured and.taken to the General Waikers, St. Andrew, _ The crowd (second from bottom) in Mount Gay m Senators son beth sides of
Hospital, some in arm unconscious GEORGE BARNES (70) cas i ) ation yard numbered over 2,000. People came from 1e -Bhouse.
condition. Seven of them were de- taker of baths of Bei, as far as Nicholas and Welch Town. Each face bore an vera Scnators % side
tained including the driver, plaine. ) expression of grief. The canes (background) were not that the schen s. ais?
Cyril Springer, who was taken to} DORIS BEST (35) labourer 0: carried to the factory as people, who were interested in th; ypproval ree
the Operating Room. Hagegatts, St. Andrews ey the in it, did not work, fian.. House of Comnu .
Beatrice Foster, who leaves a JOHN CLARKE, (45) labour ; Mi: Wilde Wied GUN), atanagec ch ‘Modht Gay silaet cites soMtient Tulane
son to mourn, was sitting in one he tn ey Tere. ‘ Distilleries, was preparing to enter the fateful vat. One of being favourable to .
of the rear seats of the bus with Sal of the victims, “Ben” Norville, went down before Mr. Nothin in be done, however,
a tray filled with nuts, oranges months) of Bellepliine. Ward could do to + ier Ane West
and sweets when the incident oc-| GLORIA GRIFFITH (19) of t 80. W . ne ba be ae * at
curred. Belleplaine, i pape s + rk. ; : eae
Surrounded by a dazed crowd] GERALDINE HEADLEY (25) ne K ¢ suffi
and wringing his hands, Colvin labourer of Lakes, St. Au ic :
Foster, son of the deceased, said drew, p} ‘
“Mother left home early this CLEOPATRA IFILL (88) la- 5 » be
morning to go to town and some- bourer of Corbin’s Village, Visits To W.1I
how I felt that something was St. Andrew. y te ates
going to happen to her. Then I] BERYL JORDAN, labourer of rel t e W Ii to
heard that she was the only one Chalky Mount, St. Andrew. Fstudy’ the viars ible
killed in a bus accident on the| EDITH JORDAN (22) labour-| ist 1d. Many | i ;
hill.” er of Haggatts, St. Andrew. ae veucde i tr f
Herbert Nicholls of St. Thomas,| IRVINE LOVELL (28) labour-) West Indian proble ex
the conductor of the bus, said it er of Corbin’s Village, St.| ressed a fear that the Colo
all happened quickly. Andrew, ic i vot feder h Canada
All the seats, thd engine and| LALITIA MARSHALL (7) he may irift ) oR
steering column were damaged. hawker of Bellepiaine, vith the United States. This, gpex
The top of the bus was lying * HILDA PHILLIPS (38) of eras 4 eed ~ aeamiiton,
the road and the chassis and up-* Douglin’s Village, St. An- foy Canadian trade F
rights in a canefield, when His drew. : bs ates. tee: wae the x R-tinie
Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith ar- CYRIL SPRINGER (45) ei as deltas anne (onnbel on:
rived on the scene to view the ‘bus driver of Spooners| : its Sex tee he ‘ rete triciion
dead body of Beatrice Foster, Hill, St. Michael, ST ee eae wer ASiious
which was later remover to the] MILLICENT RUDDER, labour- ade ek
St\. Thomas Mortuary. er of Belleplaine. ; : Under pineaes
The: injured were:— NATHANIEL RUDD (44) nt et ori :pout
WARREN BOVELL (49) car- labourer of Bellep! ; ; : : ati hea.
penter of ‘Triopath, St.| CARMINE WARD (19) of Canc eee gse Sak sia Aa rod ,
Andrew. Garden, | aorta wo ncding oo. ie ee:
OLIVE BOWEN (35) labourer} ELAINE WORRELL (17) of — tor Canadian goods ‘se
of Douglin’s Village, St.) Shorey's Village. } pet et OO RT CAMEE is —
Andrew. ‘ @ on Page 3 Chief Source or ¢ Supgls
Canada i “ primecipa
ource of upply Lor tuft
required in the West Indic ct
ring the war, when 1 United
Kingdom + unabt ply
many I rocessca irt « y tne
rrie ine a larg k y of
i the anyta ured ired
St. Josep 1 Ves ‘try He were pies ete
lees c anand
i t with the
tion ef currenc
a hurel den |ag =
ec ul Cc war el { neem Five: obpiiged 7
mas so" currency area
Mr. R. A. Lee, last year's Junior Guardian of the S1.}{h8t they would rather
Joseph Vestry, was appointed Churehwarden by a 6-——4 satina: eat eee ee
majority at a Vestry meeting yesterday. The other perso ‘ahadinn exports 't “British
who had been nominated, Mr, Gooding, was the Senior | west Indies
Guardian last year At the ime time nadiay
tt L. E, Smith who seconded * surchase in the We Indie
r, J. H, Branch’s motion for KB ‘ H > yarticularly f re in-
the appointment of Mr, Lee said our 8 creasing and the 4 1949 sa
that Mr. Lee was a man of in e > or the fit time
(elligence and as @ young mem Quit P. N, . e urplus of Canadia i
ber should be given a chance a the We Indies ove exports to
Churchwarden Sin Oir Own C onder hat area,
Mr. Gooding was first nomina& KINGSTON Tamnaion March Mutual Benefit
ted by Mr. J, Haynes Ken Hill, Frank Hill, Richa If the West Indian Colonie
Mr, Haynes said that he war Hart and Arthur Henry resigne were absorbed as a j}
very pleased when he heard thc from the People's Nations il Part Canada such =o barrie:
Senior Guardian intimate — that on Sunday afternoon when would sutomaticalls
he would be willing to carry special conference of the part; y+ laway, believe Canadi
out the duties of Churchwarden| voted to accept the findings to the mutual benefit of ex
Be He thought the parish would be} Marxist charges by the eeitliias al X ind importers in both
very lucky in, getting Mr, Good-linat. they ave “guilty of leading: [* reas.
, ing to serve if he were appointed.| seeret Communist activities con Union of the West Indies witl
He had had very great experience] trary to the policy of the party “te anada need not interfere wit!
OW Ta e O on and had just been Churehwarden The decision Was reached at ;the pians for the federation of the
of St. Thomas, producing 000 |the end of the second day of Vest Indies, it is believed, Ir
B | results turbulent meeting in which Le deed, federation within the We
ay @) “N Experience Wing and Right Wing supporters: Indies is almost a prerequisil
} oo - © ost ore He had nothing against aliy|clashed culminating in two it for confederation with Canad:
| /\cther Vestryman, but a member|jured as the gallery threw chairs since, as a Canadian province, i}
should have a certain number ofjand bottles into the meeting, West Imdies would have the
From Our Own Correspondent years’ experience. As time wentiwhen the decision was taken « own provincial government an
; n young members would learn|the vote by 128 to 75 vould preserve all their old ati
LONDON, March 31. and would get a chance, Beside: Manley led the move tg oust |fonomy.
The colonies will pay more for low grade cotton piece | was the usual practice in 4llling four H’s while Ken Hill le Under such a scheme, too,
goods in the immediate future—unless they can buy from [the other parishes that the Senior), group arguing against the} West Indies would send M.P’s
Boe aaeahs Member be nominated as Church recommendations of a tribunal, » Ottawa, who would be as ele-
foreign markets es ted whieh was that they resign or be] @ible iny Canadian M.P
. 4h re r ranch who nominated) eynelle 3 8 th vote} become a member of the Cana
This is the effect of the suspension of further licences], Lee said he would agree aa a Petts ata!’ vend atian la Claeinet. “Alboot easeEe
for the import of grey cloth from Japan, announced|that Mr, Gooding had been alihus making it unnecessary the Canadian Government wou
during last week’s Commons debate on the textile industry. {conscientious Vestryman, but itlin expulsion motion and follow-|appoint a Minister, probabl
MR. LISLE WARD The suspension was one of the measures proposed to com mn ie gt deninn” Guardian ed one other T.U.C ectiti We eS 1 Hen, to be ‘ 5
‘ bat Britain’s textile slump hadits Ba Guischwasrdes member Bancroft § ' ; \
British textiles which will ré SLO Be Mune Daigle Be although — he Vus equ tu} oo ea ere
{IM jac Japanese cloth will cost fiv He me ue ee hed vats resign only hi offices ‘ ss
jo ten per cent more as Lancashire chee a ve é ane smovesitt party resigned from the i Truman Is
carmel afferd t« st Bie f ai iardiun,. vat. Me. Cartes ; (a 5
even to secure’ the vast colonia hike i eg ri mference al
market from foreign competitor ae i re oe nd foqislon lisadliliate | Ma si ished
This decision came as a surprise Meee “aia Gs ng WM nounce the N.L.C, the formatio: |
to many exporters who believec true that Mr sO0GsIg = yt last November lt te | WAS INGTON Warch
ee Aah teada arenild » +. (hard«working Vestryman, During!) fad’ dnistructe PINE i sc cases :
at British trace woud pay # tthe last parochial year Mr, Good ! | ;
ention to the suggestion mac n o have ne ‘ rr Pru
ing has been Churehwarden of - ‘ ;
uring the debate by the Presiden |. : aviat nd was quite with 1 fat union altho h i tha F i
the Board icf Trade, Mr, Petor [another parish a othe t Kelly and Wellingtory| ¢
. shive mus. emilior with the po There Ma harsh ave At bers of t de 1 an
SB} Thorneycroft that Lancashire m had been talk of experience but PNP | 1
| produce goody it prices pot fat ne could. . scarcely jain : i} fy
removed from those of her com- : ‘oft S tonee ate ‘scl Meanwhile Ken. Hil anc ui seeme ;
pelitor he w to keep ‘heb a dire eke ay n s supporter are reported o wh pI
substantial share of the ‘colontal pre opportunity plannin form a new politic f Governor Adlai Steve
markets, Mi Lee wa an ‘intelligent}! rt i illit :
\ . yan who had worked honestly : ; Mi Pa atu ty
| British Prices and faithfully as Junioy Guard-|#!bounece . ¢ i I
British prices have reache¢ Jian and be believed he was quite}Kin, cl PT OS aeLOn . ae the einckivratt 1 ;
rook hettom level’, declared Mr Joapable of being Cihurchwarden, } Us ei raan Teg. Ph RGR SAON I der Lf i
F, I. Aickman, Director of tht especially as he would get the| "0? ember: it 5 a ‘ pared text to Ll she
€xport section of the Manchester [co-operation of Senior members, | Parkin Pehrp a 2 b candidat« for re-electior
Cotton Board in an interview thi Mr. Coward supported Mr! The Right Party Si have serve : yuntr r
morviin “They cannot be ¢x- [Lee's nomination Pe er I ae 4 oo : a Up hink efficient] ind th
pected to go any lower while ray . ; L ot Bae es DO: CRS eat eres li not aecce; =e n r
COUR » COmmands: the) presen kee heaed fabaje arco ov Ren Hill who in PNP etsd to! a ee
} high prices, he appointment of the two) 0). president Sale Witig Mayor otf writs inn, ae ety ee
We consider our prices are MW IGuardians, Mr. Lee nominated plait date area Ubtil June White House cP)
1 reasonable level, We know Mr. Mc D. Chandler and Mr.|~ %
ss we Consent 10 40 On reef mare and. Me. Smith nomina-| qiyy HACKED 10 oeATH | Higher Level Truce
e consent to go on ‘rice lied Mr, C. F. Holder in place o
for our workers—and Mr. Coward Mr. Chandler and re Corres ; = io
ever do. At presentinn, Gowerd: Mr. Charity aet| POR OF ‘SPAIN, March 31, Talks Proposed
price + only five to ten pointed Bay a as he aan . : Ny
cent ahead of Japanese prices g to. death . an ee Nei By LEROY HANSE
They have dropped about 20 per Other appointment nade | “manu w “ oe nae iM ra ae vd) fie eee
cent since the middle of last vear. Commissioners of Figt vi gunded ms 1 2 eu las in ng Co i $ Offi vers \
ys Messrs. Haynes, Gill and ape Het hdbdeanis Ps ps tc ae i : de an
It is absolutely untrue to sug-| Branch; Commissioners of Health SA outin Pring | ie +
gest that. Lancashire is trying to}Messrs, Coward, Smith, Lee, a To pane South. tt tea
fo high pr ces on the colonies. [Chandler and Branch; Social!jy this mornins
re ee _ But it’s true that we [Committee, Messrs, Branch, Car-|” po} wished. to cene and| t ‘ 4
Springer which overturned at about 1.30 p.m. yesterday on Sprin | ‘ ontemplate further price Rter, Coward, Lee, Gooding, the found the’ girl dead, he rothey} O ) k Wo y
detached and 35-year-old hawker Beatrice Foster of Rock Hall, St { Rector and Mrs, Vaughn, the| pleedi t from choy all hi | pl ‘ \dmiral ¢
' | for color Pew Rent Committee, the f rd} pedy, and her m«¢ ut m- | T ner oy Allied C f Negot
1 Hospital. Seven were detained. The arrow points to the covered bod } ¢ Sitting on the Fence’.Sof Guardians; Orga Tune ir. |say, lashed tc ol T} s * i I 1 i
! @ On Page 6 L. O. Gitten ondition ritical T UP.

ion





. PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

EV. W. E. TOWERS, B.A.,
B.D., of the Methodist
Church, arrived yesterday morn-
ing by the Colombie from Eng-

land where he had been on one
year’s furlough. He has now come
to take up an appcintment
Superintendent of the James
Street—Speightstown Circuit,

He was accompanied by his
wife and three children. On board

as

to meet them were Rev. Frank
Lawrence and Mr. Vincent St.
John.

Before going up to the U.K.,
Rev, Towers had worked in Ber-
bice, St. Vincent and Trinidad
with the Methodist Circuit.

On Wednesday evening at 7.15,
there will be a welcome meeting
at the: James Street Church for
Rev.. and Mrs. Towers,

Retired Schoolmaster

R. AND MRS. R. L. STEMP
of Bournemouth, England
are now dn Barbados to settle.

They arrived yesterday morning
by the French S.S. Colombie and
are residing at “Wasons”, the
Crene St. Philip.

Mr. Stemp was formerly head-
master of Ford End School in
Chelmsford, Essex.

Agriculturai Assistant
R.° W. A. MCMILLAN, a
elvil servant of Trinidad
who is ‘on six months’ leave, ar-
rived here yesterday from the
United Kingdom by the Colombie
after spending four months‘there
He was accompanied by his wife
end they wil be remaining here
for about two weeks’ staying
with Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Gittens
of “Kenvilie.” Collymore Rock
Mr. McMillan who is Agricul-
tural Assistant in the Department
of Science and Agriculture said
that he intends spending the re-
mainder of his leave visiting the

various islands in the area

Honeymoon Couple

R. AND MRS. MERCHAN

LUIS of Caracas, Vene-
zuela who were spending their
honeymoon in Barbados staying
at the Ocean View Hotel, re-
turned home on Sunday by
B.W.LA. via Trinidad.

Mr. Luis is Inspector in the
Agricultural Department in
Caracas.

Divisional Manager
R. H. ASCOUGH, Divisional
Manager of Messrs, Cable
and Wireless, left for Puerto
Rico on Sunday morning by
B.W.LA. on a visit,

Mr. Punch Had



—But It Finally Moved Into the Zoo—

By MAX TRELL

“WHEN you were a boy,” Knarf, |
the Shadow, said to Mr. Punch, “did |
you ever have a dog?”

“Or a cat?” asked Hanid,

Mr. Punch, who was busy darning
a hole in-his socks with a long needle
and two thimbles, finally looked up.
“What was that you just asked, my
dears?”

Knarf and Hanid repeated their
question,

“Why yes,” replied Mr, Punch
with a smile as he stuck the needle
in the sock and took off the two
thimbles, “When | was a bey | had
three pets. | had a dog named Sam, |
a cat named Angelica and a giraffe.” |

“A giraffe!” Knarf and Hanid ex- in
claimed in amazement.

A Long Neck

“A nice giraffe with a long neck.
His name was Edmund. t liked Ed-
mund very much. Sam the dog, and |
Angelica the cat also liked Edmund
very much. And Edmund was very
fond of Sam and Angelica, though
he never told anyone he did.”

“Why didn't he?” Knarf wanted
to know.

“Because,” said Mr. Punch, “Ed
mund couldn't say a single word. |
Giraffes can't talk, But Sam and An
xelica and Edmund were great
friends just the same. Sam lived in
a dog-house out in the yard behind
our house. Angelica lived in a box
in the cellar. Edmund couldn't fit in
any house because of his long neck
so he stayed out under a tree.

“At dinner time,” said Mr. Punch
going of with his story, “Sam had
his dinner out of a dish on the porch
Ancselica had her dinner out of a}
saucer ip the kitchen, and Edmund
had his dinner out of a bag tied to
the chimney at the top of the roof,

“Sam adtook a bath in a tub, An
gelica washed herself with her paw
Edmund-had to stand out in the rain |
When they wanted to see what was |
happenifig on the other side of the
garden, Sam hed to run around

OPPS SORSOP SESS POS SFPD POOP OVGVOSS

COLON

CEPODPPOOOOFO SS FOSS,

The Club Dances wi

will be held on Saturdays, starting 7th June.

| sighed,

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

The Colony Club announce that they will hold the
last of their Wednesday Night dances on April 2nd.

Tourist Attraction
R. and Mrs. Pete Rovira of

* os

Visiting the Islands

R. JAMES FAIRBANK, For-
Puerto Rico who were in eign Representative of Pepsi

Barbados for a short holiday, re- Cola in the Caribbean with head-

turned home on Sunday morning

by B.W.LA.

Mr. Rovira who was paying his
first visit here said that it was for
Ahe purpose of getting an impres-
sion of what the island had to
offer for the benefit of tourists
coming here from Puerto Rico.

He said that many Puerto
Ricans travel to St. Thomas from
their country for a short stay and
also do quite a bit of shopping.
Now that he has seen the island
and conditions, for himself, he
said that Barbados can offer more
to tourists than St. Thomas. He
hopes that his short visit would be
of great benefit in this respect.

Mr. Rovira who is President of
Pete Rovira Tours Ine. Travel
Agents of Puerto Rico hopes to
set up a Travel Bureau between
Puerto Rico and Barbados,

Film Unit
ILMS produced by the Barba-
dos Film Unit and shown
by the Mobile Cinema all over the

on Sunday by B.W.LA.,

islands.
Off to Trinidad
R. VERNON KNIGHT, Man-
ager of the Oil Department
of Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.,
left for Trinidad on Sunday by
B.W.LA., on a short visit.
On Six Months’ Leave
ISS SHIRLEY BACCHUS,
Civil Servant of British
Guiana attached to the Public
Works Department, arrived here
last week by B.W.LA, for a
holiday. She is on six months’
leave and is staying with Mr.
and Mrs. Creighton Birch
Paynes Bay, St, James.
Intransit.
MONG the passengers
ing here yesterday morning

, y ; , intransit from England on the}
island still attract eager and en- Colombie intransit for St. Lucia!
thusiistic crowds. Large numbers was Mrs. Nat Kanski, wife of

attend these films every night.

The programme for this week
includes highlights of the late
King’s life and his funeral in ad-
dition to films of the Caribbean
Commission,

After Three Months
RS. LESTELLE TROTMAN
of the U.S.A., returned on
Sunday by B.W.LA., via Trinidad
after spending about three and a
half months’ holiday here with
her relatives at Gittens Road, Gov-
ernment Hill. She is the mother of
Mr. Fred Jordan, linotype oper-
ator at the Advocate.

U.K. Director

R. and MRS, D, F. HINK-
LING of Bishop's Stortford,
Hertfordshire, were among the
passengers making the round
trip from England to Jamaica on
the Colombie which called here
yesterday morning.
Mr. Hickling is a Director
Donald Hickling Ltd.

Dr. Kanski who came out from
the U.K. early last month to take
up an appointment as Medical
Officer of St. Lucia
Mrs. Kanski is staying at the
Hastings Hotel. .
Station Officer
a Soe spending two weeks in
Barbados, Mr. Tony Ramal- |
ho, Station Officer of B.W.LA.,
British Guiana, left for Trinidad
on Sunday by B.W.1LA., intransit
for Canada on holiday and busi-

ness.

He came over here principally
to relieve Mr. N. Nicolle, Station
Officer, Seawell Airport. He was
Mare Guest

«staying at Super
House, Worthing.



of

- From Venezuela
PENDING about two weeks’
holiday here is Mr. Qarlos
Diaz of the California Shop,
Caracas, Venezuela, He arrived
last week by B.W.LA., and is stay-
ing at the Ocean View Hotel.

a Pet Giraffe

CALYPSOES!
CALYPSOES!
CLUB
Pe MORGAN
o

to-morrow
night



Mr. Punch’s giraffe.

Hear Trinidad’s most
popular Carnival
Singers in person

e

the wall, Angelica had to squeeze
through a hole under it. But Ed-
mund just had to stand still and look
over it,
Sad Voice

“But one day,” said Mr. Punch in
asad voice, “Sam and Angelica and
Edmund all went to the Zoo, Sam
saw the lions and got so frightened
he ran and hid himself in his dog-
house. Angelica saw the bears and
got so scared she rolled herself
into a ball in the darkest part off
the cellar. But Edmund- dear Ed-
mund—"

“What happened to him?" Knart
and Hanid cried in alarm.

“Edmund saw another giraffe
with a neck just as long as his and
decided to stay in the Zoo. And |
suppose he was right,” Mr, Punch
“If L were a giraffe with a
very long neck, I'd stay in a Zoo,
too But | was sorry to lose him And
so were Sam and Angelica. Sam
barked for several days, and An.
gelica meowed for several nights.
But Edmund just stood looking over
the top of his cage in the Zoo and
didn't say anything at all, Because,
as | mentioned before, he couldn't
talk.”

SMALL ISLAND ~
PRIDE

MIGHTY ZEBRA
SIR GALBA

SPOILER
VIKING

Admission $1.00

e
Dial 4000 For Reservations



GLOBE

To-day Only, 4.30 & 8.15
A Double:

“WELLOW SkY”

Richard Gregory
Widmark Peck

x CLUB |

x And
g Fexes of Harrow
% Rex Maureen
y HARRISON OHARA
% OPENING WEDNESDAY,
S APRIL 2ND

e g The Screen’s Foremost
x Entertainer
x CLIFTON WEBB
x In
S| “ea

; On

ll recommence in June and }} An 4, & Ng
Ril} ee my, &
% Peg 2, \ r







. 64
(SE OOCOCCES PLLA —

NO MIGH PRICES HERE.









DOPTRS TIC BO” |. .cssoyssipsscesevesses scessetttiovsonscststnevedsstdviectueeueh Atessdianeess $ .40
FINE WOVEN CHECK RAYONS 36” .........0.0.6: * .00
FIGURED ORGANDIES WHITE & COLOURS 36 85
FIGURED MUSLINS, WHITE & COLOURS 54” 1.20
WOVEN STRIPED RAYONS 36” 12
GREY FLANNEL WOOL TROUSERING . 2.97
Women’s QUALITY TAN CANVAS SHOES Wedge Heels 3.00

» BLACK & WHITE & BROWN & WHITE SHOES 5.25



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606

quarters in San Juan, arrived here
from
Puerto Rico. He was accompanied
by his wife and they will be re-
maining for a short holiday be-
fore going on to some of the other

of)

arriv-



al Marr 3
age s
cent. 3 s
and, as i
wasn't enough,
man did this










BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



The Housekeeping Money .. .

How much of it does a good
husband need to hand over
each week to keep his home
together ..

By JAMES, LEASOR

OW’ much money is too
little money to give your
wife every week?

Judge Norris’s comment in
Birmingham Divorce Court that
a £5-a-week husband who
gave his wife £3 for house-
keeping—and expected her

pay the weekly rent of 10s. 2d.%

out of it—“forced her out of the

house” must stir the hearts and

minds of many married
Consider this extraordinary”

case again. The man said that

when he married in Feb:

1946 he allowed his wife £3 a

week housekeeping, and he paid
the 25s. a week rent on ir
one-room home. So he had 1$s,

a week at the most.

His wife thought her £3 too
little, so she let him. Later,
they were reunited and—with a
child as well by now—the hus-
band still allowed his wife £3
a week. But now he told her
she would have to pay the 10s.
ad. rent,

“This,”
judge,
on the

remarked the learned
giving the wife a divarce
ground of desertion,
“reduced the amount available
to 50s. yet the wife had had
£3 when they were living to-
gether before, wit Rout the added
burden of the «hi

ramily first
AN anyene fx a percenscago

that the good dusband

should give his wife regularly
out of his salary?

No, says Joseph Brayshaw,

general secretary of the Nation-
Marriage Guidance Council.
“It’s not a matter of percent-
This man paid 60 per

of his salary to hig wife,
things turned out, it
But if a rich
there would be
far too much to housekeep on.”
What,

as

then, is the lesson of

the case? Says Mr. Brayshaw:— *:

“There can be no hard and
fast rule, but the needs of the
family must come first.”

“The husband should not, in 3.

my opinion, be entitled to any
spending money until all these
needs have been met.

“Surely, it may be difficult,
But in a really successful mar-
riage each partner should be
willing to give up anything. .

orrying ...

EW will quarrel with that—

in principle. But there are
other, deeper factors to consid-

er, The Rev. J. W Griffiths,
vicar of St. Augustine's, Ful-
ham, father of two — small

daughters and a committee man
of the Marriage Society, names
one: financial divorce.

“By this, to me, extraordinary
verdict, it seems that economic
factors are undermining the
spiritual and moral factors of
marriage. I’m not competent
to judge the legal aspects, but
as a parson the decision seems
to me to have far-reaching
effects,

“The £3 seemed reasonable—

Take advice from Betty Hu
She never neglects a daily
Lux Toilet Soap — it carrie
really fresh.
Soap. And you'll love the

that clings. Be lovelier tonig

~

TOILET

er

OMING ‘TOWN
“TWO TICKETS TO BROADWAY"
(Color) Tony MARTIN

BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310

TODAY & TOMORROW

R.K.O.-RADIO DOUBLE ane

Obert ective

YOUNG era

Thues, ang 1.30 p.m.

im HOLT in
“RIO GRANDE PATROL”

“FIGHTING GRINGO”
George O'BRIEN

| CROSSFIRE & - BROTHE

«





MARIE_



Soap—it leaves your skin fragrant with a flower-like perfume
P I

LUX

The fragrant white soap o/

having regard to the man’s total
salary. If this kind of divorce
is going to become common, all
women will start claiming more
housekeeping money.

“Breadwinners these days
usually want to give their wives
ag much money as they can—
but there just isn’t any more to
give, and husbands are entitled
to some for themselves.

“Surely we're not going to
have divorces on financial
grounds now? This could lead
to a clamour for divorce. It’s a
ware straw in the wind...”

‘Change the law’

‘OW WHAT do the wives

‘have to say? Mrs. Doreen
Gorsky, chairman of the Married
Women's Association, married,
with two children of her own,
and two adopted children, ap-
proves of the verdict,

“If it is accepted without
appeal,” she says, “it goes a long
way towards the goal we have
been working for.
wemen don't get enough house-
keeping money, I now of
— who get only £3 out of
x

“We don't want people run-*

wg for divarces as the way
out ef their matrimonial and
financial troubles. We think the
law should be changed along
the Hees of the memorandum
Mrs. Helena Normanton, @.C,,
owe president, suggested to the
Roya Commission on Mar-
riage and Divorce.”

This memorandum suggested,
in brief, that:—
“A HUSBAND should pro-

1 vide from his resources so
that his fa-““ly can live as well
as he does; ind,

2 “THE VALUE of the work
the woman does in the}
home as her contribution should |
be recognised when there is any |
surplus money.”

Adds Mrs. Gorsky: “A wife
is just as much entitled to
pocket money as her husband

i;
x3 —LES.

B.B.C. Radio

Programme

TURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m. 0 He, 25.53M, 31 32M





4 p.m. The " News. 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records.
4.45 p.m. Sandy

rs of the

wealth, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up and

Paseo Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
0 p.m. News Analysis.

ipo one ¥ . 25 63M, 31.22M





7.15 p.m. Rendezvous with Common-
wealth Artists, 7.45 p.m. Personal
Portrait, 8 p.m. Make Mine Country
Style, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsree!, 8.30
p.m. Report from Britain, 8.45 p.m.
qnnhosers of the Week, ® p.m. Rooks

Reed, 0.10 pm, Film Review, 9.3¢
- m. Ray's a Laugh, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m, From the Editorials, 10.15
p.m. Moray McLaren Talking, 10.30 p.m,
Focus on the Stock Exchange.



1, Do intelligent people heed
superstitious traditions such
as the following? It is bad

luck to marry on Fridays or
during the month of May, or
to stir favours into the bride’s
mak The Bridesmaid who
catches the ‘bride’s bouquet
will be next to marry.





Is it correct for a secretary
to stop at the same hotel as
her employer when on a
business trip?

How do people “dress’ when
guests at a Captain’s table?
4. When does a woman rise?

Rupert ond the



In spite of the fog Bill knows
the way out of the wood, and as
the air gets clearer the two friends
go slowly, gazing carefully around
them for (any sign of the missing
basket. ‘* It's not likely that we
shall find it for a long time,”

murmurs Rupert rather miserably,





tton, star of Paramount Pictures.
Active-lather facial with fragrant
s away dust and dirt, leaves skin

You smooth beauty in when you use Lux Toilet

delicate perfume of Lux ‘Toilet

ght — use Lux Toilet Soap!

‘SOAP

him





4.30 & 8.30 P.M.

Richard

HOLT MARTIN



ma. {) Opening 3 Thurs, 445 & 8.90 > m
William Nancy Frank
, OLSON LOVEJOY

RCE OF ARMSâ„¢






raft FO

—._...4e. Per ib.

SHORT CAKE..54e. Per tb.



“Active-lather facials with Lux
Toilet Soap leave skin softer,”

says dynamic Betty Hutten, * it
feels like smoothing beauty in.”

in



“OVEN FRESH™

You can get from-your grocer or from any shop in the Isiand the following
Biscuits Fresh from the oven:—

The Women’s Editor Asks...

5. Is it ever correct for a woman
to telephone a man for an en-
gagement?
Is it ever polite to criticise a
place or people incessantly
with such expressions as
“Ah, what a place!” or “At
home we don’t qo things
that way!”?
Is it allowable to “Cut”
someone whom one has met?
When at a public gathering
is it correct to allow a small
child to do tricks, or move
about in the room to amuse
himself or others?
Answers on page 3.

New Bonnet—23

“* That rocket shot off so suddenly
that we don’t know where it went.

It may not have come in - direc.
tion at all."" At length they reach
his cottage. “I suppose Td beret
go in,” he ee * thoug) sh
what Mummy will think J cas’ t
imagine.’


















X-LTS 756-1453-50

PLAZA CINEMAS

BARBAREEFS —Dial 5170
To-day 445 & 8.30 p.m.

Warners Spectacular Action Hit!

SEE 301”

Virginia
GREY

Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Biggest Action—PACKED DOUBLE!
“COLORADO RY"
Joel McCREA—Virginia MAYO &
FLAME & THE ARROW” (Color)
Burt LANCASTER & Virginia MAYO

|

f

|





RS IN THE E SADDLE Ait te COLO SHORE










_RIO GRANDE PATROL.

APRIL 1, 1952

TUESDAY,





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singers)



JUST ARRIVED—Lovely Cocktail and Cotton Dresses, Jacq:
mar Scarves and Squares, Pure Linen Men's Handkerchiefs
at 84 cents each. Nylon Briefs at $2.23 and $3.22.
Also ON SALE Nylon Stockings at $2.50 for 2 pairs.



SS —————— SS ———
= Sa SS ESA = = =
Everyone loves a Smooth, Lovely —— they detest
Unsightly Hair, especially in Women. . .

“GET RID OF UNSIGHTLY HAIR” with

< VEET ”

For the Beach, Dance, Sailing, or any time when under-arm Hai
mre becomes Unsightly, use VEBT.

is extremely useful for men who have tough beards, or
ae a it uncomfortable to Shave

Remember: “V E E T” removes Unsightly, Superfiuous Hair
or in exactly “THREE MINUTES”

@— ITSOCLEAN! IT’S CERTAIN! ! IT’S SAFE,!!!
Thats VEET
R.P. 2/3, 4/- per tube”
Obtainable at:—

BOOKER’ Ss. ox(b.d08) DRUG STORES LTD. }
)

BROAD and HASTINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)

GOOD NEWS!
TO ALL SHOPPERS

We have just received a New Shipment of the
following !

SHANTUNG ... +++e+36” wide @ $ 1,29

WHITE NEOCORD ..............36” wide @ 97

GINGHAM PLAIDS ............ 36” wide @ 87 !
FLOWERED SPUNS .........36” wide @ 1.13 & .96
PLAIN SPUNS ..............36( wide @ $1.03 & .84 \
WALDORF PRINTS ............36( wide @ 84 |
BLACK & WHITE PRINTS ......36( wide @ |
REXWEAR COTTON SHEETS ...70” x 90” @ $ 9.00

s . 80” x 100” @ $10.92
» PILLOWCASES 20” x 30” @ $1.78
COTTON SHEETINGS .........80” wide @ | $ 2.39
eesseesee 2” wide @ $ 2.12
is cesesees 59” wide@ $ 1.73
TROPICAL “ANDAR” SUITINGS 54” wide @ $3.02

NAVY mee & MAROON BLAZER CLOTH
—54” @ $2.42

eau oe & Ladies BELTS— etc., etc.

O REMEMBER
AVE $$$ $ by
HOPPING AT

GEORGE AHELY & Co.
19 Swan St.

FOR BEST VALUES
AND EFFICIENT SERVICE

” ”

”

”

”

ROODAL THEATRES



ROXY

To-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.15
Republic Presents—

“THUNDER ACROSS
= THE PACIFIC”

EMPIRE

"To-day te Thur. 445 & 8.30
OLIVER TWIST”
By CHARLES DICKENS

Opening Friday 4th o ne
“WHEN WORLD COLLIDE” Starr!

—_—_——— Wendell COREY—Forest TUCKER

SAT. Sth at 9 30 a.m.

“HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE
VALLEY"



PLEASE NOTE
THE SHAKUNTAL DEVI SHOW
HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Thur, 3rd & Sat. Sth 1.30 p m.
“GRAND CANYON TRAIL”



“LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE”
Sat. 5th Midnite



and
“DANGERS OF THE a ”
. ‘PHANTOM SPEAKS
CANADIAN MOUNTED’ Not Suitable for Children
Sat. 5th Midnite

OLYMPIC

To-day 4.30 only
“GAMBLING HOUSE”

and
“BUNGO SQUAD”
Tonite at 8.30

GRAND CALYPSO SHOW
By World Famous Calypsonians
Led B

“THE SHADOW”

ROYAL .

To-day Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
ns gee:



John RIDGELY
and
“BORN vor ie vee
Van JOHNSON

iy.
The Famous Small Island Pride.

Wed, & Thurs, 4.30 & 815
John WAYNE

in
“BACK TO BATAAN”
and
“FOLLOW ME QUIETLY”

ceases
Thur, 3rd & Sat, Sth 1.30
“DOWN MEXICO WAY"

id

an
“TEXAS MOON”



"Wed. @ Thur. 490 & 8.15
ROOTS BOGART

“CONFLICT”
and

“THE TIME THE PLACE
AND ae GIRL”

Dennis 1 MORGAN

ND ited actnstnresicesinenieeseneanensnenteeesti®
All ve” Box Tickets for all Showings of OLIVER TWI8T

will be on in Advance this Week—9 a.m.—i2 noon.





“GAIETY

The Garden—St. James"

Iast Show Tonite 3.30 p.m

Fredric MARCH & Edmond O'BRIEN
AN ACT OF MURDER &








Mala POWERS “Tod ANDREWS
i ,
OISTIN—Dial 8404 .
To-day & To-morrow 445 & 8.30 p.m
THE FUGITIVE
Henry FONDA &
FIGHTING GRINGO
George O'BRIEN

Thurs. (only) 445 & 8.30 p.m.
HOLT Double!

BROTHERS IN THE SADDLE

AND

Shelley WINTERS
MacDonald CAREY

SOUTH SEA SINNER

p.m.
‘wPANG! GIERS” &
“IMITATION OF LIFE”
Claudett COLBERT











Ingri
“TALL IN TH THE SADDLE”
sons eas








SHIRLEY... 46¢. Per th.
GRAHAM CRACKERS
WIHRIX SODA CRACKERS 36c. Per th.

SERVICE





46ec. Per th.







TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE THREE



B.G. Gets Court Of .

Criminal Appeal

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, March 28.
The newly created Court of Criminal Appeal was form-

ally opened at the Victoria

Law Courts here on Tuesday

morning in the presence of a large gathering of Legal Prac-

titioners and the general pu

Before proceeding to hear argu-
ments in the first appeal, the Chief
Justice, Hon, Mr. Justice Bell said
he thought it was a historic occa-
sion and should be marked with
a few words. For many years
past, he said, it has been possible
for a person convicted of a crim-
inal offence by a Magistrate to
appeal on a large number of
grounds to the Full Court of the
Colony, but if he had been con-
victed on indictment by a jury, he
possessed no right of appeal as of
right to any Court.

It is true that it was open to
him to try and persuade the Trial
Judge to reserve any question of
law which had arisen at the trial
for the consideration of the West
Indian Court of Appeal sitting as
Court for what is called “Crown

blic.
SY
C.0.L. Bonus
Discussed
When discussing the report of
the Committee appointed to con-
sider salaries of Parochial Em-
ployees, Mr. J. A, Haynes at a
meeting of the St. Joseph Vestry
yesterday said that the Committee
had had to be careful not to raise
the cost of living bonus more than
the 40% that was the limit.
The Parochial Treasurer and

two former Parochial Treasurers
get $700 between them.
* . *

The- over-all increase on the
basic salaries of the parochial
employees was agreed to be 10%.

ldo eicneceennait

se

PETS AND TOYS SAVED FROM TORNADO’S FURY

Prk



EARS

ie |
io)
4
ee ra ae s
par MON TREAI u rch 26 Helps to cleanse the system n
, rmstrong, 69, economic : ae
dome auace” te ha: Cn from blood impurities 5
Pacific Railway, died here sud- Impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
denly yesterday. aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
Funeral will be held from boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
mee Christ Church Cathedral Thurs- Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
day at 2 pm, owing to organ the blood, cleanses the system end assists
construction going on at St in restoring good health.
Mathias Church, Westmount, of
‘ : oe caususeeos TenJIRR IEeesEEEE
which Mr. Armstrong was a ea saa Caergsaseaa: 2)
member for many years, The
service will be conducted by



’

BARR BREET RO The name speaks for itself S2aawnenece

(Clarke? B food Me

BarbadianDies

In Montreal

Liquid or
Tablets

am. >












the Lord Bishop of the Diocese,
Rt. Rev. John Dixon, assisted by
the Dean of Christ Chureh
Cathedral, the Very Rev. Ken-
neth G. Evans, and Canon
Gilbert Oliver, rector of St
Mathias.

Born in Barbados, Jan. 16, 1883,
and educated at Harrison College
there, Mr. Armstrong followed a
career in engineering from 1901
until 1918, when he became a
farmer in the Eastern Township
of Quebec and a_ free-lance
journalist.



Before he joined the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company in 1930,
Mr. Armstrong had built up a re-
putation in Canada and the Unit-
ed States in three different fields

Cases Reserved’, but as it was
within the discretion of the Judge
whether or not he would reserve
the point of law and as it was

SITTING IN THE RUINS of one of the tornado-shattered dwellings in Judsonia, Ark., a grim-faced resident
of the stricken town (right) comes upon two kittens who had hidden in a sink and escaped unscratched.
At left, Don Hopkins, 8, recovers Some of his toys from the wreckage of his home. About 250 persons
were believed to have been killed in the storms that swept ower six states, International Soundphoto)

Mr, Haynes said that some em-
ployees were getting 50 and 60%
and they had to increase the basic

—engineering, farming and writ-
ing. He was made economic
consultant for the C.P.R. in 1944,

FIERY JACK



only a point of law which could be * ;
specie r sentative in the
so reserved, the remedy available The Vestry accepted the estima- s ee Am d”’ A I . pecia} be ~eninaenl 2
to a person convicted on indiet- ted amount of $10,297 to be spent Lionel Luckhoo use t HA WKER DIES gence of the vice-president of Joints An¢ 4% Muscular Aches And Pains
ment was very limited indeed. on Sanitation, Last year the ‘ WwW. W. S Ph. D.
ith W. . Swanson, a

But now witn we setting up of
the Court of Criminal Appeal
which today holds its first sitting

eee chial Treasurer 4o get aloan from WILL CONTINUE FIGHT AGAINST «GODLESS PEARL SCANTLEBURY, —-“"obinson, M.A. to write: “City
for’ 2 person convicted ae made, the Canadian Bank of Commerce = rpeQLOGY OF COMMUNISM”—UNDETERRED ARUNDELL GREAVES. re Gk tenia cite Seas ate

ment by a jury may as of right
appeal to the Court of Appeal
against his conviction on any
ground which involves a question
of law alone and with the leave of
the Court or on the Certificate
of the Trial Judge that it is a
fit case for appeal, may appeal
against his conviction on any
ground which involves a question
of fact alone, or a question
of mixed law and fact or any
other ground which appears to
the Court to be a= suffi-
cient ground of appeal. He may
also, with the leave of the Court,
appeal against sentence.

‘BANANA
INDUSTRY



tee te then returned home. tah . fight against the godless ideology Some of the patients only got oe ; so :
IMPROVES Sree geitent Siete oe ert te of Communism, which aims at the slight injuries and were able to poten nee ae el Fore) “ Fas to Draw ”
av A b : * when asked to comment: enslavement of the people.” tell visitors to the Hospital what ube i ma ded. the nidon chit, y
W A. Cricket Board “IT am amused. Amused because had happened, ; clubs inclu au *

Dominica has had one of the
driest years for an exceedingly
long time, but in spite of that, the
banana _ industry
retarded is improving. Hon. H. D.

Shi ord told the Advocate to explain that it was directed T F ; 2 ’ z Gury: af sonein-law, W. 8: Many:
y into the Col (From Qur Own Correspondent) ¥y; as ee uly;
yeste a (From Our Own Correspondent) al peeins oO oster PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 31. and three grandchildren, Philip,

He arrived earlier in the morn-
ing ty) ine Colombie for the meet-

ing he I_, Economic West Indies Cricket Board will be i ‘ : i
*s K 4 overthrow of the State, I illustrat- in mandamus case until Friday.
Saar mene is staying at ioig at the Carib Hotel, British ed my point with the type of lit- — Wiles Ward in the third Supreme Court
He said that the adverse Guiana, April 16—17, visiting erature which the Communist this morning heard arguments for NURSES WILL HOLD

weather conditions did not only
affect the progress of the banana
industry, but of food crops and
ground provisions.

At present, the colony is hand~
ling about 70,000 stems of bananas
a month and it is likely to
increase that monthly output to
about 90,000 or 100,000 stems by

June
“Our

lime is eouie ona ot sone Christian! Was maces seisotor. Ste wast rai ae found it —_ — to =
letter on account of markets”, he into an unequal struggle by fight- pose of t eir catches to other
islands where more attractive

said and added that the only
citrus export was in the shape of
canned juice and segments which
was not considered very remun-

erative. 7
C.D.Cc. had erected a_ packing

shed in Dominica but there was

no market for fresh fruit and it

is understood that C,D.C. are now yinj “lement Attl = fore z ; “Bvery Picture

leaving the island. mae = but ded the of the Youth Communist League of be jo al a 7 omen - , tolip a Story” Round
Mr, Shillingford® said that. the test st th of the Western America, a group for training ccording to Mr. es, the ,

prospects of the island would be Sreaveps. siteneen ee foasait Communist leaders. I felt that in only Brouse of Barbados fisher- Backach

very good if they were given countries lies in their diversity. «ho interests of all the peoples of men is lack of refrigeration, His ackache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved Vitrolite

proper road development. At

present e ‘N= stand against the evil infiltration ©

to the echt ur bed ou nual Membership enrolment din- of Communism. I have conceived the Government on deep-freezing bea pl sectatnee tron tle e Clear
handicapped the transport of the me ag os his ry it my hush duty, 6 take Eh et ving fist a: He hopes that iby eeu es er oming te

Tops, anana als arty Government ©! action an would gladly do itn year t is mn wo aa OF pains: oa nd jo um

be particularly the b Britain —U.P. again, 2% Wyd¥esa refrigeration plant we espe rinary troubles due to impurities ° Bla



Answers to “Women’s Editor Asks”

1. Most certainly not. Intelli- an adjoining room, and feel no duces women of her own age. and be complimentary. b. keep women of all ages use and recommend this efficient diuretic an’ urinary
gent people do not accept these more sensitive than if she were 5. Yes, oceasions arise when it quiet. c. return to his own para- antiseptic to their friends and neighbours. ‘ x
sayings seriously and usually in her secretarial room. and he is permissible, When the right dise. .
smile at them. Of course, any- in his office. cali” is made, any man should 7. No! If one prefers not to Deka 5 t/
thing that will add to the gaiety 3. Men must wear dinner feel complimented. Of course, a speak to an undesirable acquaint- y 29 COTTON FACTORY LTD
of a wedding would be correct, jackets and women wear either woman should do this only on ance, it is always possible not to Dealer for B 3 A
but anything done, or not done, rare occasions to make social see him. To look straight at him ackache Kidney Pil! |-

for the sake of pure superstition
is absurd.

salaries and reduce the bonus,
* *

famount spent was $9,716.27.
. . a
The Vestry authorised the Paro-

to carry on the business of the
parish until the rates are laid.
“ w *

The Vestry will write tne Lord
Bishop and the Rector of the St.
Joseph ‘Parish Church, asking
them for permission to sell cer-
tain trees at St. Anns Church so
that they could complete build-
ing the walls around the grounds
of the church. ,

* * +

The Vestty yesterday stood in
silence for a short while as a
mark of respect fora late mem~
ber, Mr. Eliza Brathwaite. Mr.
Brathwaite was referred to as a
good and conscientious Vestry-
man and the Chairnian told of an
instance when Mr. Brathwaite
though ill, attended a meeting so
that a quorum would be had and
when the meeting was going on
and another member came, he

Will Hold Meeting

April 16-17 In B.G.

GEORGETOWN, B.G. March 31.
The Annual Meeting of the

members arriving April 15—April

8.

On April 16 the B.G, Board will
entertain the visitors at a cocktail
party, also Christiani and Trim at
the Hotel Tower. The B.G, Board
may decide to introduce the 65
over new ball rule into local first
class cricket from June 1.

All board members were
elected for. the current year while

re-



U.K. CANNOT BE
ABSORBED IN A
FEDERATED EUROPE

PHILADELPHIA, Mar. 31.

Britain “cannot be absorbed in
a federated Europe former Prime

Speaking before the Philadel-
phia Fellowship Commissions An-

evening sovne or dinner dresses
4. en she is a hostess, she
should always rise to greet and



T.U.C. Vote

The Hon. uionel Luckhoo issued
a reminder to trade unions in
Sritish Guiana that it was the
‘red” policy to worm their mem-
bers into trade organisations and,
having used the organisations
then to destroy them. Behind the
ron Curtain, he warned signifi-
eantly, there were no trade unions.

Mr. Luekhoo who was comment-
ing on the Trade Union Council's
vote of censure on him in connec-
tion with his motion banning sub-
versive literature etc., from the
Colony, recently approved by the
Legislative Council, labelled the
T.U.C.’s action ridiculous. “Shall
we,” he enquired, “enter into. an
unequal struggle with the com-
munists and communist agents in
our midst by fighting them with
gloves when the enemy were
armed with a rapier?”

this is what I would expect of the
P.P.P., to whom the motion and its
repercussions are a bitter pill. In
moving the motion, I was at pains

is synonymous with seditious, i.e.,
material which is aimed at the

Party was sending down to this
Colony by the thousands to breed
discontent, strife and revolution.
In this Colony there are Com-
munists and Communist agents.
Under the cover of democracy,
must we permit these Commun-
ists to run rife and destroy our
democratic system by their caleu-
lated lies and subversive propa-
ganda? It is evading the point to

ing them with gloves when they
are armed with a rapier?

I am undeterred by any ridicu-
lous resolution on the part of the
T.U.C. I did not rush into this
motion. I gave it every considera-
tion. I made my enquiries and
discovered that the Secretary of a
political party here was a member

Guiana, we should take a firm

engagements, and never unless
she knows the suggestion will be

Of Censure

Let me remind the Trade Unions

that it has been the

“Red” policy

to worm their members into trade

organisations, and,

having used

the organisations, then to destroy

them, * Behind the

there are no trade unions.

Iron Curtain

It has been gratifying to find the
substantial acceptance of muy mo-

at in the Legislative
i

Council,

4. Among the 16 were many

elected
people.

representatives of

the
The T.U.C. flatters me by

singling me out for their attention,
For the past week I have received

hundred of

congratulations from

people in ali walks of life, but
whether it is censure or congratu-
lations, | propose to continue to do
what I conceive to be my duty in

the best interests of the

Colony.

One such duty is to continue the



Government

Fish Trade

From Our Own
PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Mr. Dudley. W.

March

Correspondent)

27.

iles, Fishery
Officer of Barbados, who attend-
ed the conference of The Fisheries

Experts at

House

opened here
last Monday,

Kent
told news-

paper men that the Barbados Gov-

ernment

had to a smell extent

encouraged deep-sea fishing. Peo-

ple interested in this, he said, had

priees were obtained

The number of boats now en-
gaged in the fishing ima@ustry is
About three to four
years ago it was 325 Value of the
) year was
about $1,000,000, and this year it
this figure will

mbout 580.

fishing industry’ last

is expected that

department, he said, was now car-

rying out an experiment te advise

and not to
rude.

speak is



thoroughly

. nly! An executive to bid good-bye to her guests, and welcomed. 8. Never! Just because the
woudl dooean aise and not incon- of course to make introductions. 6. Certainly no one cares to mother might enjoy the little
venience. If he has suggested She should rise when she intro-. hear his town or the people in it actor ts no indication that the

anything immoral, a secretary has
no business: to make the trip;
otherwise, she might even have
Sete Ln eageaee amen

Petrol Rises
In Trinidad

(From Our Own Se nae

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Marc .

The price of gasoline in Trini-
dad has gone up by another cent
per gallon as from last Tuesday.



duces a person older than herself
to any other person, though a
woman may sit when she intro-



Trinidad
May Lack Meat

(From Our Own Corres ent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March _ 27
Trinidad stands a good chan



of running
shortage during the

ce
into another meat
last two
Gasoline is now being sold at 43 weeks of April if the British Gui-

ridiculed. A person who wants

audience will.

A restless child

to complain should do one of should be kept at home, or forced
three things: a. Change his mien to sit quietly beside the mother.

|





WEEKLY flights to Montreal and Toronto.

DAILY flights from Montreal to London,
Glasgow, Shannon. Regular flights to Paris- S

ana Government does not come to
Latest increase means that the jts aid Frozen’ meat stocks of the
price of gasoline has risen by 8 Colony are fast running out and
cents in four years: It jumped by are not expected to last more than
five cents in 1948, from 35 to 40 another two or three weeks
cents a gallon, Subsequent in- The Pioneer Gem due _ this
creases were at the rate of one month from Australia with sup-

cents a gallon instead of 42. ,



All lay-over expenses and

&
|

From page 1
“GENIES NICHOLLS” (the
‘bus conductor).

It was a pathetic scene at the
Hospital, doctors sisters and nurses
moving up afd down the Casual-
ty giving injections, bandaging
dislocated and sprained limbs and
stitching lacerations.

Men, women and a little 13-
month old child—some with many
scratches and cuts about their
faces and lower body, some with
joints swolLen—were echoing pain-
ful cries from the Casualty while
they were being attendeq to. One
woman, wha was pregnant, re-
turned with her face all patched
up.

Cyril Springe., 45, the driver of
the "bus, was carried straight into
Surgery without heaving attention
at the Casualty. He gave indica-
tions that his back was badly in-
jured. There were unconscious
patients too.



JUDGMENT IN MUSSONS
CASE RESERVED

His Honour Mr, EB. R. L. Ward
this morning reserved) judgment

the application for an order of
mandamus made by English-born
ee ee i and hig wife

being directed against a
Clerk of the Peace. The order
is to compel the clerk to accept
their appeal notice against the
city Magistrate’s order for their
removal as being prohibited im-
migrants.



Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
help the kidneys to rid the blood
of excess uric acid and other impurities which other-
wise might collect in the system and cause distress.

HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving ailments due to inadequate

3

Kidney Pills. They

kidney action is the proud record



















Gardening, painting, odd jobs round the house can { “~





and for 18 years before that was

The Modern Rubbing Ointment For Stiff










he was the author of “Wheat”

and he combined with F. E. M. “GIVE PAIN THE SACK WITH FIERY JACK”

suthor of several other books and
many pamphlets and
conomic subjects.

articles on
On sale at all
DRUG STORES

During the First World War he
was works manager of the Domin-
ion Bridge Company at Lachine,
Que., engaged in munitions pro-
duction. He built transmission
lines for Ontario Hydro in 1911,
for Shawingigan W ater and
Power Company in 1912 and for
the Southern Power Company in
Georgia in 1913. He joined the
Dominion Bridge Company in
1918 as engineer of construction
later becoming sales engineer and
then works manager:

Frank B. Armstrong Lyd.
Agents :



He was lay delegate to the Sy-
nod from St. Mathias, and a mem-
ber of the Advisory Board,

He was also a member of the
Canadian Political Science Asso-
ciation, the American Academy of
















Ottawa, and the United Services
Club, Montreal.

He is survived by his wife, the
former Helen Wyatt Baines, o
Yoronto; 4 daughter, Mrs, W. S.

Curtain

Charles and William Bury, all of
Montreal,



KIRSCH
&

Self-Acting
Roller Spring
Blind Fittings
$1.28

MEETING FRIDAY

The Sixteenth Annual Meeting
«wf the Barbados Nurses’ Associa-
tion, and the second meeting of
the Past and Present Nurses’

Union will be held at the Nurses’
Home, General Hospital on Friday
afternoon at 4 o'clock.





* Green

of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and





There is no substitute for

EEZIT

RELEASES ALL
RUST BOUND
METAL PARTS

lies has been delayed and is not For complete information: see your Travel Ageat or... . ” i
CeMgason for this latest increase expected to artive before April GARDINER AUSTIN & CO. LED» + Pint, 1 Pint & 1 Quart Tins
ower a _— 74.



1951, the 22. Meanwhile, Trinidad meat

is that in November,
Gulf export price for kerosene in-
creased by a little more than one
cent (B.W.I.) per gallon. The in-
crease was not then passed om to
the eonsumer because the Gaso-

importers are negotiating with
the Government of British Gui-
ana with a view to getting meat
from that Colony but they are not
very nopeful of success since Brit-

line a Kerosene Price Stab!

ith Guiana is experiencing a meat





S3e. $1.01 $1.76 =

Obtainable at:—

ation Fund, set up by the Trinidad shortage
Government and the distributors
RATES OF EXCHANGE

a few years ago was able for
MONDAY, MARCH 31, 1952
NEW YO








“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

You can get from your grocer or from any shop in the Island the following
Biscuits Fresh from the oven :—

ECKSTEIN BROS.

Bay St. Phone 4261

some months to Subsidise kerosene
and keep the price at the existing
le Cheques on Bankers 70.1 % pr.
Sight or demand

1.8% pr

The Fund can no longer subsid- ;











ise kerosene and the ne nr Drafts 09.9 % pr

is intended to ki it solvent. Gov- 71.8% pr. Cable ; Se

ernment decided that the increase, *" ® Corona aa 6 % oe. | MARIE 54c. Per tb. SHUIRLEY AGe. Per th. GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES
which is necessary, should fall on ANADA : | ‘ # ee i .

gasoline rather than ee ee 13.7% pr Cheques on Banker u 1% be SHORT CAKE___ 34e. Per ib. GRAHAM CRACKERS 4Ge. Per tb. Rickett St Phone 4418
car owners can better bear the in-~ Demand Des ts 11.16% Be 3 : : i

crease than users of, piteh-ll i pr. Cable or WIHKIX SODA CRACKERS 36c. Per lb.

lamps, Taxi and "bus fares have »2.2% pr. Currency 10:4 % pr. | :

hot been affected. ‘ .... Coupons 69.7 % pr













‘



PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS DVOGATI
“fssese)

eae Al
bee eS tases ee



Tuesday, April 1, 1952
STERLING

ALL members of the sterling area have
vested interests in the improvement and
eventual convertibility of sterling as a
currency. Where, as in most of the Brit-
ish Colonies, the whole economy of these
territories is integrated with the economy
of the United Kingdom a healthy sterling
currency is indispensable to progress in
the Commonwealth.

That is why the increase in the Bank
of England rate has been welcomed by
financial experts in many parts of the
world and why large hopes were raised
when the sterling rate on the London
Foreign Exchange market rose since the
budget speech to $2.811/8, and showed a
premium of 11/8 cents for the first time
since sterling was devalued.

Confidence in sterling and a rise in the
value of sterling must be reflected bene-
ficially’ throughout the whole sterling
area.

But that objective cannot be obtained
without sacrifice.

The purpose of raising the Bank of
England Rate was to combat inflation.

In his statement in the annual report
for the year ending September 30, 1951,
Mr. J. S. Crossley, Chairman of Barclays
Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas)
had said that inflation was not inevitable.,
It was largely of our own creation and
Great Britain had, he said, been for years
past deliberately encouraging inflation on
a grand scale. “It is unfortunately true,’
he said, “and the fact must some day be
faced that..much of the doctrine of the
welfare state is essentially inflationary. It
is subsidising the consumption of more
goods and services without requiring any
commensurate increase in productive
effort.”

Now it is unfortunate for us in Barba-
dos that whereas Mr. Butler’s budget is
designed to combat inflation in the United
Kingdom, no sueh action is being taken in
Barbados to combat ours while the very
contribution which this island is being
asked to make towards Great Britain’s
recovery and that of the whole sterling
area will necessarily increase Our own
local inflationary state.

How will this happen ?

First Mr, Butler hopes that the loss of
foreign markets for British goods will
mean either deflation in the United King-
dom because of more goods on the home
market or alternative sales elsewhere (e.g.
Commonwealth).

Secondly if these policies fail, un-
employment will result and_ deflation
always follows unemployment. The severe
cuts of imports from the United Kingdom
imposed by Australia have already hasten-
ed the deflationary process of unemploy-
ment.

It is obvious that no Conservative Gov-
ernment would have dared to find a solu-
tion to Great Britain’s economic difficul-
ties by relying on unemployment to strike
a balance of payments somewhere near
starvation level.” But even their studied
moderation in applying the scales of sacri-
fices to be suffered by the British people,
will fail to restore confidence in sterling
if political agitation leads to wage in-
creases and strikes and other restrictive
action at a period of crisis for the whole
sterling area.

Barbados’ contribution, infinitesimal as
it is, to the recovery of the sterling area
must be scrutinised in this tight.

We are apparently continuing in Barba-
dos a policy which in the words of the
Chairman of Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.)
“is subsidising the consumption of more
goods and services without requiring any

commensurate increase in productive
effort.’ The only effect therefore of a
reduction of our imports from certain areas
will be to increase the eventual price of
our goods and to raise still higher our own
rapidly increasing infldtiorfary — spiral.
Should sterling recover we will gain to-
gether with the rest of the Commonwealth,
but will our gains be sufficient to offset our
losses ?

On Sunday the three leading Commer-
cial banks of Barbados announced their
intention to increase the interest paid on
Savings Bank accounts as from April Ist,
1952 to 2 per cent. The rate of interest
payable by borrowers will also be revised
from to-day.

How is this linked with Barbados’ and
other British Caribbean hopes of attracting
investments? No great knowledge of bank-
ing is required to see that at once the con-
sequence of an increased bank rate will
encourage savings and discourage borrow-
ing.

This will be a deflationary process but it
will be discouraging investments regarded
as necessary for our special needs atthe
moment.

If this restrictionary effect on invest-
ments is considered together with another
statement of Mr. Crossley’s in the annual
report of Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.) hopes
of industrial expansion in the British
Caribbean do not seem well founded.

Mr. Crossley asks by whom will British
resources overseas be developed? He
replies to his own question. P

“It seems unlikely any longer that much
ean be expected through | government
agencies, nor is it likely to be in the main
to be through the operation of companies
liable to United Kingdom taxation, for it
cannot be expected that new enterprises
will be initiated here for such a purpose if
they are to have their competitive power
thus handicapped from the outset... .

Capital which is the accumulation of sav-
ings needs encouragement because it has
an essential function to perform if enter-
prise is to be promoted.

There is no other way except through
the clumsy and inefficient mechanism of
the government agency.

To put the capitatist system into a strait-
jacket and then blame it for failing to
function efficiently does not contribute
towards the solution of the problems of
to-day.”

Yet that exactly describes the policy of
our present government in Barbados, How
then can we benefit even if sterling does
appreciate in value as a result of Mr. But-
ier’s courageous budget ?

Our own frightening ir flationary system would
with us in even greater strength than 1 is to.
day.













By 6.8. Hawkins

“But with what an intense
desire we should watch for
the Southern Cross...”

“The emblem of redeeming
love.”

AN ancient one did God
speak “out of the whirlwind”
and say in part—Job 38: 31, 32—
Cans't thou bind the cluster
of the Pleiades,
Or loose the bands of Orion?
Cans’t thou lead forth the
signs of the Zodiac in
their season?
Or cans’t thou guide the
Bear with her train?

Job has immortalized the middle
and northern skies. The southern
sky is quite the equal of the
northern, and the Southern Cross
is popularly “as characteristic of
the southern sky as the Great
Bear is of the northern.”

Perhaps mankind lives about
30°N in the average: which is the
latitude of Jerusalem approxi-
mately. London is 52°N, Ottawa
45°N, New York 41°N in round
numbers. Stars in the diagram
that are within the arcs of circles
marked “Ottawa”, “New York”,
ete., are below the horizons of
those places. In practice, further,
we do not see.stars that are less
than about 5° above the horizon;
while their brilliance increases
until they are much more elevated.
It should just be mentioned, how-
ever, that the Cross would have
been elevated about its own height
above the Jerusalem south-hori-
zon in the days of our Lord, would
have been something higher still
in Job’s sky.

James Montgomery, than, to-
day, would partly advise a trav-
eller south from the levels of
Canada or the U.S.A., or lower,
respecting the hours of tropic
dark,

When tropic gloom returns,

Mark what new stars their
vigils keep.

How glares the Wolf, the
Phoenix burrs;

And on a stormless deep

The Ship of Heaven, the
patriarch’s Dove,

The emblem of redeeming
love.

The traveller from north ar-
rivedgjn the tropics, and the tropic
resident previously unaware of
his starry privilege, from which
persons soever he ‘should first
hear further of the other constel-
lations should first ‘hear further
of the Southern Cross from the
author himself now of the old
but delightful “The Midnight
Sky,” Dunkin, as follows: —

It is related by (MM. Von
Spix and Karl Von Martius, in
thair accounts of their scientific
travels in Brazil, in 1817-1820,]
that “on Jufie 15, in latitude
14°S, we beheld for the first
time that glorious constellation
of the southern heavens, the
Cross, which is to navigators a
token of peace, and, according
to its position, indicates the
hours of the night. We had long
wished for this constellation as
a guide to the other hemis-
phere; we therefore felt inex-
pressible pleasure when we
perceived it in the resplendent
firmament. We all contemplated
it with profound devotion, as a
type of our salvation; but the
mind was especially elevated at
the sight of it by the reflection
that even into the regions which
this beautiful constellation illu-
mines, under the significant
name of the Cross, the European
has carried the noblest attri-
butes of Christianity, and, im-
pelled by the most exalted feel-
ings, endeavours to spread them
more and moré extensively in
the remotest ragions.” Tha
scientific Humboldt has express-
ed his thoughts in almost sim-
ilar terms. Referring to his first
view of fhe constellation, he
observes that “We saw dis-
tinctly, for the first time, the
Cross of the South, on the night
of the fourth and fifth of July,
in the sixteenth degree of lati-
tude; it was strongly inclined,
and appeared from time to time
between the clouds, tha centre
of which, furrowed by uncon-
densed lightnings, reflected a
silver light. Tha pleasure felt
on discovering the Southern
Cross was warmly shared by
such of the crew as had lived in
the colonies. In the solituda of
the seas we hail a star as a
friend, from whom we have
been long separated. Among
the Portuguese and the Span-
iards peculiar motives seem to
increase this feeling; a religious
sentiment attaches them to a
constellation the form of which
recalls the sign of the faith
planted by their ancestors in
the Deserts of the New World.”
“How often”, Humboldt again

tells us via Dunkin, “have we
heard our guides exclaim, in the
Savannahs of Venezuela, or in the
deserts extending from Lima to












Truxillo, ‘Midnight is past, the

Cross begins to bend!’” Yes, tha
Cross “turns over” (ie. very
quickly changes from slanting

exst to slanting west) at midnight
at the emd of March, at 10 p.m.
at’the end of April, at 8 p.m. at
the end of May, at 4.30 a.m,
around the 22nd January, at mid-
day at the end of September, and
so on. As the sky performs @
revolution around us in 24 hours
(less approx. 4 minutes), and so
a motion of 90° in 6 hours, it
follows that if we wera to observe
the Cross at a westward slant
estimated to be about 45° on 15th
April we should know that the
hour was around 2 a.m. And so
the Southern Cross, lika the Great
Dipper in the north, “according to
its position” and the time of the
year, may very closely indicate
“th@ hours of the night” to any-
one knowing the little just told.

Our constellation is “Crux”
(Latin) to astronomers, i.e. “The
Cross. It is often styled “The
Southern Cross” to distinguish it
from that portion of the northern
constellation The Swan (Cygnus)
that is styled “The Northern
Cross.”

A visitor to Barbados a few
years back, an amateur astrono-
mer from the U.S.A., remarked
that he viewed the Cross as pen-
dant from the brooch that we may
make out of tha two Centaurus
stars above it, This suggestion is
pretty in some moonlight.

The celestial lights are neither
qQquidistant from us, as if against
some dome, nor distant only a
few miles. «Were we to represent
the Sun’s 93,000,000 miles from us
by one inch the nearest of the
stars (other than the Sun) would
be 4.3 miles away. On this scale
Acrux is about 225 mileg away!
The distance of beta gamma and
deltadelta Crucis are unknown to
the writer. Alpha and beta and

Centauri would be also at 43
miles and at about 180 miles
respectively.

Alpha Crucis (ie. Acrux) is—
by appearance, or “apparently”—
the thirteenth-brightest of all the
Blars. It is, yat again, about 1600
times as bright as the Sun!

There is exquisite jewellery in
the firmament for tha telescope,
and Crux can make an outstand-
in contribution. Close to beta
Crucis is a star which the great
Sir John Herschel (1792-1871) is
said to have declared “the fullest
and deepest maroon red, the most
intense blood-red of any star [
have ever seen. It is like a drop
of blood when contrasted with
the whiteness of beta Crucis.”

Partly within the bounds of
Crux there is the Milky Way, to
the left of Acrux, a dark patch,
pear-shaped, 8° long by 5° wide,
“which the early navigators and
astronomers called the Coal Sack.

Continues the late Sir james
Jeans (“The Stars In Their
Courses”) ;

! Early Australian folk - lore
interprets this as a yawning pit
of darkness, and also as the
embodiment of evil in the shape
of an emu which lies in wait at
the foot of a tree represented
by the Stars of the Cross for an
Opposum driven by its perse-
cutors to take’ refuge among its
branches. We now know that
the Coal Sack is not a hole at all,

but a cloud of dark matter (Ea

pie blots out the stars behind
i

Not far to the west of Crux,
where the asterisk is, under the
“Jerusalem” line, in a particularly
brilliant part of the Milky Way,
is the place where a remarkable
thing was happening 100 years
ago. Persons privileged to view

.
New ee ae

* Pa) ee ‘
: .

THE SOUTHERN cROSS)
oo.



NTA. ee |

~
the Cross and its environs should

not do so in ignorance of the
story of Eta Argus.

The Cross is bounded on the
south by the only insect among
the 85 (or, who prefer, 88) con-

stellations.

At about latitude 40°S—the
mpst southerly points of Aus-
tralia, Tasmania, New Zealand and
and South America are closely 39°S
43°S, 47°S and 55°S—the Cross
would begin to be always visible.
It would there swing through
rection at 70° and inversion at
about 10° above the horizon. Be+
yond about 60°S it could never be
seen erect and over the South
Pole it would circle forever in-
verted one-third down the sky,

Just two of all the celestial
objects have been honoured with
“Pointers”. The North Star,
Polaris, in consequence of its posi-
tion the most important of the
stars, pointed to by Merak-Dubhe
of the Big Dipper, is one of these.
No other than the Cross’ is the
other. Nor is that the whole
story. Nowhere else in the sky is
there to be found such a juxta-
position of such searchlights as
signpost the Cross—alpha and
beta cent., the third-brightest and
tenth-brightest of the stars, 1.3
times and about 1,100 times as
bright as the Sun.

The Cross also honours. The
line of its long dimension pro-
tuced upwards 5} times points
beta of the constellation. The Crow
whose principal Stars form a
quadrilateral slightly larger than
that of the Cross,

The upright of the Cross and
the business end of the Big Dipper
are in precisely the same position
in their respective skies! This Big
Dipper is clock for the northern
hemisphere; and this Cross is clock
for the southern hemisphere, But
the northern hemisphere possesses
also a compass in the Big Dipper.
And the southern hemisphere is
provided a compass by the Cross!
The long dimension of the Cross
produced downward 4% times
ends not far from the celestial
South Pole.

The beautiful Cross and thé
“magnificent” Ship, which almost
touch, are the smallest and the
largest-by-far of the constella-
tions; and we cite the “rule” that
good things are wrapped up in
small parcels,

“But with what an intense de-
sire we should watch for the
Southern Cross, whose stellar fame
has been chronicled by navigators
since the days when Vasco da
Gama and his companions beheld
its glittering gems from the deck
first vessel which reached
India round the Cape of Good
Hope.”— Dunkin.

In our southern hemisphere, on
the continent of the Amazon and
the Andes and more, at about
33°S, on the boundary between
Argentina and Chile, in an Andean
pass, is a bronze figure 26 feet tall
surmounting a 5-feet-tall half-
sphere showing those countries
under the right toe of the figure,
the half-sphere resting upon a 22-
feet-tall base on which are inscrib-
ed the words “Soongr shall these
mountains crumble to dust than
the peoples’ of Argentina and
Chile break the peace which they
have sworn to maintain at the
feet of Christ the Redeemer"
rth cannot have fad before
1904, among its glories passed
away, anything more fair than, 40
minutas west and 46° south of
Barbados, as though 14 times as
high in the air above our St.
John’s Church as this church
stands above the sea, The Christ
Of The Andes understanding The
Cross Of The Heaven !



@UR READERS SAY:

Birth Control

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—There are still a great
many more words to be heard be-
fore the last one on Birth Control
has been reached.

Not only the Royal Commis-
sion but the United Nations is at
work endeavouring to enlighten
the ignorant and uneducated on
the need of slowing down the
present increase in population
which throughout the world
amounts to. 68,000 births a day.

Scientists know that the earth’s
surface cannot after a time pro-
duce sufficient food even with the
most modern methods to support
the population if it continues at
this rate,

Those who advocate a calm
continuance of this state of affairs
must be contented to have a
population of half-fed under-
privileged people. Any married
couple can figure out for them-
selves that their income may ac-
cording to its size, comfortably
feed, clothe, house, educate and
give social amenities to say five
persons, Mother, Father, and
three children. It does not take
much arithmetic to calculate that
if the number to be supported is
ten, then each, will be on only
half as well off as the five and
their physical and mental needs
will not be met, They will then
be classified as the underprivil-
eged. But had the number of
children been limited, the whole
family would have been prosper-
ous,

It is quite easy to say birth
control “should be” effected by
means of self-control. Although
it “should be”, it is not and the
multiplication continues at the
same disastrous pace. Why not
then be realistic and offer the
unintelligent ones the practical
scientific methods?

Yours truly,
MARGARET SHELDON
Fish Price

Sir,—I read in your Journal on
28.3.52 that large quantities of
Flying Fish have been caught
recently. So much so that on
certain occasions they have been
sold at one cent each. A house-
wife said that she is drying them
so that when they are scarce she
can resort to them. On the other
hand, some housewives have to
bay seven cents for one fish
according to the schedule price.
_Sir, don’t you hold that the
time has come for the Govern-
ment to delete Fish from the
Control list and let the vendors
sel! them according to how they
have bought them? At present
they are sticking to the price laid
down by the Government, even
if they could sell them cheaper.
Take a poor woman with say five
to eight in her family. How in the
name of all that is reasonable can

Thanks

To The Editor, the Advocate—
SIR,—On behalf of the Elemen-
tary Schools, I desire to place on
record my very best thanks to
“Barbadian Parent” for his reply
on behalf of our schools to the
nasty charges which were made
against us by that unworthy
West Indian, “Phantom.”
I “= about to reply when I
Saw in yesterday’s ‘Advocate’
that “Barbadian Parent” had
a forward our case in as effic-
tent a manner as any expert
school master,

The Elementary Teachers are
the victims of, several well-
known but unredressed grievan-
ces, but in the last couple of
years, we have had to suffer
even more trials.

It is for this reason that our
Association forwarded on the
19th. inst. a Memorandum on
last year’s 13 plus eTest to the
Director pf Education for his
transmission to the Governor-in-
Executive Committee.

We further hope to do justice

to the Cause of
presenting ALL THE TRUE/his
FACTS in due course to that

I,

ungle John,’ The Farmer

Who Saved A Nation

By DON TAYLOR

I HAVE often thought that Don Stephen
Senanayake, the Prime Minister of Ceylon,
|who died recently in ‘Colombo, was the
greatest man in the Far East. His very suc-
cess kept him out of the news.

Other leaders in the post-war melting-pot
of Asia came to power through blood and
destruction.

Don Stephen led his people to independ-
ence without one drop of blood being shed.

SIMPLE MAN

Perhaps that was why so few in Britain
knew of this Abraham Lincoln of the East.
“Jungle John” was the affectionate’ name
his fellow-countrymen gave to him. For the
simple, rugged man had been a farmer in
his youth.

Even when he was a world statesman he
still carried with him the earthy honesty
of the soil.

“T am an agriculturalist by training and
by choice,” he would say. And he could still
find peace and relaxation behind a plough.

A PLANTER

He was educated at St. Thomas’s College
in Ceylon, winning fame at football, cricket,
wrestling—but not in scholarship.

This lack of scholarship worried his father,
but not Don Stephen.

Out to the jungle he went, as a farmer.
He was a coconut and rubber planter for
some years—and then owned and managed
a plumbago mine.



Those were the days when Ceylon was
climbing fast to independence — and Jungle

John soon gave proof of his leadership. But
it was the towering honesty and sincerity of
the man that gave him greatness.

He became the first Minister of Agricul-
ture and for 15 years he led the people in
“a back to the land” movement.

THE ' HARD WAY

To his countrymen he became a symbol of
independence. He meant Ceylon to obtain
self-government the bloodless way, even if
it was sometimes the hardest way.

And so, when Ceylon became a full
Dominion, in 1948, there was no trampling

down of the innocent and no persecution of

minorities.
Ceylon—the Gibraltar of the East in the

last war, and a bastion against Communism
in the present cold war—started governing
herself in peace, and in full friendship and

accord with Britain.
HOW DIFFERENT !

The transition from colony to dominion
has been a model for the rest of the colonial
empire.

How different it all was from Burma,
Malaya, India, Indonesia, China, Indo-China

and the rest.
And the one man behind this was Don

Stephen Senanayake. You can understand

now why Churchill said, on Friday night,
“Spare nothing—get a plane in the air at

once.” » 4 a Ree

He knew the worth of the farmer states+
man—not only to his own people, but to the
Far East. "

When, in 1948, Jungle John came to the
Prime Minister’s conference in London his
rugged common sense made a deep impres-
sion. igs |

LED 7,000,000

He was the leader of 7,000,000 people. Be-
sides the Sinhalese and the Tamils, there
are Malays, Eurasians, Europeans, Moors,
Burghers (descendants of the Portuguese
and Dutch). There are Buddhists, Hindus
Moslems, and Christiaris.

Out of all these Don Stephen was welding
a nation—a nation which was climbing back
to an old glory.

For Ceylon, remember, was a centre of
advance civilisation when we in Britain were
still painting ourselves with woad.

King Solomon sent his emissaries there to
buy jewels for the Queen of Sheba.

FRIEND TO US |

What will Ceylon do now without the
father of the nation ?

He had never lost touch with his people
despite the heights to which he had climbed.
That was the real secret of his greatness.
That was why people thought of him as the
Abraham Lincoln of the East. And that is
why his loss comes as a grievous, personal
blow to them.

There are those in Ceylon who will plot
to break the Empire link now that Jungle
John is gone. It is up to Britain and the

Education by|Empire to see it is maintained by helping

lieutenants to carry through’ his plans

she purchase fish at 7c. to satisfy NON POLITICAL Commission of| for his people,

their hunger? I repeat, let the
Government delete Fish from tne
Control list.
Yours truly,
ANOTHER HOUSEWIFE.

Enquiry on Education which has
been so wisely advocated by Dr
Massiah and Barbadian Parent,
31,2.52,

HEAD TEACHER

Jungle John was a great friend of the Em-
pire, and a great believer in its value to his

country.



TUESDAY,

APRIL If, 1952

Playing Cards from_._....._.._60e.
Patience Cards per set ........ 72c.
CANASTA SETS

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SCOTLAND’S BEST

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CREAM

BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY

A Favourite at all The Leading
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Ask for SCOTTISH CREAM WHISKY
at Your Grocer.

Retter Buy
Butter To-day

Cooking Butter—1 I tins only
Butter Concentrate in tins
Melo Cream Margarine

Glow Spread Margarine

SPECIALS

Beef Suet 40c. per Ib

Cooks Paste—6 cents per tin

Tea Time Paste, 15 cents per
bottle

Prepared Mustard, 6 oz.—25
cents



, Fresh Carrots—30c per Ib

Lucozade Tonic—80c. per bot.
Slightly Corned Beef — 60c.
per bot.

CHEESE

Cheddar
Kraft

Gouda
Edam











Sardines
Anchovies
Mackerel

Pilchards

Anti Plasto
Frozen Salmon
Frozen Cod Fillets
Frozen Haddock
Smoked Kippers

JUST ARRIVED

Peanut Butter
Fig Preserves
Guavas
Marmalade
Grapes in Tins
Brussel Sprouts
Cauliflower
Broad Beans







TUESDAY, APRIL 1, . 1952





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



Sentence Postponed In Larceny Case

Youth Pleads Guilty _

Of Indecent Assault

AT the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday His Lord-
ship the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore postponed sen-
tence on Duncan Trotman Who pleaded guilty of stealing

14 sheets of galvanised iron, the

on November 30, 1951.

Mr. E. W. Barrow who appear-
ed on behalf of Trotman, told the
court that the accused at the time
of the offence was employed as
a porter at Manning and it was
clear from the evidence that he
was given those sheets of galvan-
ise to deliver to an unauthorised
person.

“However, the accused has
shown his remorse by pleading
guilty and I am asking the court
to extend leniency to the accused
who has a clean record.”

INDECENT ASSAULT

His Lordship the Chief Justice
.also postponed sentence on Fitz
Haynes who pleaded guilty of in-
decently assaulting a woman on
January 1. In asking the court
to extend leniency, Mr, Barrow
said that the accused was 17 years
old at the time of the incident and
had shown his sorrow by plead-
ing guilty of the offence and the
court should pay some considera-
tion to him as he is a youth,

His Lordship said that there
were cases before the court of a
similar nature, he was not going
to bear that against him but would
ask the Probation Officer to make
investigations about him.

Before adjourning the court
His Lordship told the jurors that
in the two cases,that were fixed
for hearing both men had pleaded
guilty and therefore they could
go but should come prepared to
remain overnight the next day.

Carpenter On
Murcer Trial Today

Twenty-nine-year-old carpenter
Cyril Lashley of Government
Hill, St, Michael will be placed
in the dock at the Court of Grand
Sessions this» morning and will
be charged with the murder of
Eltine Hoyte of Government Hill
on January 11.

Mr. Denis Malone will be
appearing on behalf of the
accused Lashley, while Mr, F. E.
Field, Assistant to the Attorney
General will be appearing for the
Crown,

School Children
See “Oliver Twist”

Schciol children from Ccmber-
mere School and other schools
were afforded the opportunity
yesterday morning to see the film
“Oliver Twist”, screen version of
Charles Dickens’ drama’





property of Manning & Co.,



“Wining And
Dining” In W\I.

Miss Joyce Martin, an author of
California, U.S.A. who was in
Barbados on her two-month tour
of the Caribbean collecting ma-
terial for a book entitled “Wining
and Dining in the West Indies”,
left yesterday by B.W.1A. for
Grenada. :

Miss Martin who was here from
Sunday morning was staying at
the Marine Hotel.

She said that she is working as
co-author with Mr. Deane Dicka-
son of San Francisco writing a
series of books called “Wining and
Dining Around the World.”

Mr. Dickason is a well-known
world traveller and lecturer hav-
ing been around the world on 25
occasions,

Miss Martin said that they are
hoping to publish a book every
year and the next one would be
“Dining and Wining in the Capi-
tals of Europe.”

She has already written 1,000
stories and articles in dozens of
children’s and adult magazines
throughout the U.S.A. in addition
to writing one book called “Allan
and Brenda on a Clipper.”

Miss Martin has visited the West
Indies before but this was her first
time to Barbados. She said that
to the visitor from the States, the
fsland offers an immense personal
chatm and appeal. The people are
so hospitable and eager to show
you a wonderful time. ~The food
and drink are delightful and a
pleasure to report upon.

She said that she was captivated
by the first glimpses of the island
from the air and regretted having
to leave so soon but was looking
forward to returning next year.

“Colombie”’ Calls
On Carib Cruise

The French passenger ship
“Colombie” arrived in Barbados
from Southampton via Martinique
yesterday morning with 360
passengers, 34 of whom got off
at Bridgetown,

The “Colombie” is on a ten-
day Caribbean cruise which will
take her up to Jamaica through
Trinidad, Venezuela, Curacao and
Cartajena. She is expected to
return to Barbados on April 11
to sail on to England.

Quite a number of the cruise
passengers came ashore to take
refreshments in City restaurants
and to go on country tours,



MAYOR ACCIDENTS—rrom pase 1

Clarke's head. Suddenly I felt faint. I rushed to the top

NARROW ESCAP#

Mr. E. Lisle Ward, Manager of Mount Gay Plantation
and who is Managing Director of Mount Gay Distiller-
ies Ltd., told the Advocate that he too was taking off his
shoes to enter the vat. “While I was taking off my shoes
Norville went past me and climbed down into the vat,‘

of the vat.

he said,

Clarke, the oldest victim, leaves a wife and eight

children, Wife and children,
lowed the body to District

crowded in a small car, fol-
“BE” Mortuary. His wife is

Albertha and the children are: Ethan (28), Clariston (26),
Iretha (25), Carlisle (23), Avonda (19), Lorraine (14),
Adina (11), and Michael, the last, who is six years old.

He was rnarried in 1923.

Carlyle or Ben Norville leaves a wife, Carmen, and
four children: Thyra (13), Marlene (8) and twins, Bernard
and Sherville, who are only six months old. He was mar-

ried in August 1942,

Glyne Greenidge was only married in July last year.
He leaves a wife, Gweneth, and one child, 18-months-old

Judy.

Lystal Greenidge is not married but he also has

children.

The post mortem examinations were performed by
Dr. A. C. Kirton in the presence of Coroner S. H. Nurse

and the inquiries fixed for a





later date.



for





COLVIN FOSTER of Rock Hall,
relative after viewing the dead body of his mother Beatrice Foster,
who died instantly as the bus A-66 overturned on Spring Vale Hill,
St. Andrew, yesterday afternoon.

All Is Not Well At

SORROWING RELATIVES

St. Andrew, weeps ~with another

St. Joseph Church

COWARD

FOLLOWING the sounding of a warning by the out-
going St. Joseph Churchwarden, Mr. W. R. Coward while the additional, prize of a bottle
giving his report, that all was not well with the Parish of Scott's Liqueur Rum.
Church, the St. Joseph Vestry yesterday asked the Rector

Rev. L. C. Mallalieu, to reduce the cost of Communion Ele- the “runners
Parish Church.
communicants should contribute to the cost.

ments at the

Members suggested that
Mr, Coward

said that $36 was voted for Communion Elements last year

and $108.60 was spent.

Mr. Coward first said that
$2,450.10 was spent on Parochial
Buildings during last year. The

whole amount budgeted was not
spent as it was at times difficult
to find efficient workmen. The
buildings which were in most
need of repairs were looked after
and in some cases the amount
voted on certain buildings were
overspent as in the case of the
Rectory for which $240 was voted
and $481.60 was spent. At the
dispensary $240 was voted and
$323.74 spent. The enclosure for
the Parish Church of $98.80 was
also overspent.

He said he thought that when
the amount estimated for build-
ings this year was spent the build-
ings would be in very good order.

He said “I would like to draw
to the attention of members that
all in my opinion is not well at
the Parish Church, I have noticed
that the sum of $36.00 voted for
Communion Elements, and that
the amount spent was $108.60,
cf this amount $12.00 was paid for
last year. Where St. Anns is
concerned a fix sum is voted and
never overspent where the Vestry
is concerned.

Cnurch Yard Expense

“I think this Vestry made a
very sad mistake when we allow
the Rector to spend the ratepay-
ers money in spending $520.00 on
the Church Yard, and the posi-
tion is that there is another en-
closure which is in a filthy con-
dition and the Rector would not
call on the man who is cleaning
the Church yard to clean it. We
have plantation owners and man-
agers here who know that it is
disgraceful to spend the sum of
$520.00 per year on an area as
small as the Church Yard; we
should see that the ratepayers
money is well spent regardless of
who is spending it.

“I would like to add that Poor
Relief was well administered, and
the poor throughout the Parish
were made as happy as funds







Lotus Shoes

Gentlemen



I would like to
thank the Parochial Officers for
the able manner in which they
carried out their duties.”

Speaking on tha question |
of high Communion Elements |
costs, Mr. J. A. Haynes said |
he wanted to know how the —
Communion Elements were
left unfettered as to the
amount to be spent, It seem-
ed to him that there should
be a limited grant,

The Vestry should com-
mend Mr. Coward for bringing
it to their attention.

The Chairman, Rev. Mallalieu
explained that the number of com-
municants had increased and this

available allow.

was the chief reason for the in-
rease. '
Contribution
Mr. Haynes replied:—‘It is
nothing more than this,” he said,

“if you have this large number of
communicants—which I only hope
you have, which you say you
have, which I believe you have—
they must realise that they must
give some contribution themselves
and not let taxpayers pay all.

In that parish, he would not sas
the Anglican Church did not have
a great following, but there were
other denominations which had to
seek for themselyes, at the same
time supporting through taxation
he Anglican Church.

pen

Heligion was a most delicate
subject, he said and he did not like
touching on it because he would
not know on whose corns he would
be treading. 3ut if money was
voted for a purpose, he thought it
was Within the power of the Ves-
try to curtail the amount. spent.

“Mr. Gooding agreed that the
number of communicants was in-
creased, and besides the cost of
items for Communion Elements
was also increased.

Mr. L. E. Smith said that the
amount spent seemed very high
and he would agree with the re-
marks of Mr. Haynes. The time
had come when communicants

@ on page 6

_———————







A

St. Kitts, Nevis
Expect Record
Sugar Crop

_ The sugar crop in St. Kitts-
Nevis this year is expected to be a
reeotd one. It is estimated to be
45,000 tons. This is even better
than last year’s figures of approx-
imately 43,000 tons which was also
a record, Mr. J. E. Knight, Ad-
ministrative Officer of the Presi-
dency told the Advocate yester-
day. °

Mr. Knight is in Barbados at-
tending the Regional Economic
Committee Meeting as an observer

He said that up to recently, the
rainfall was very poor but during
the latter part of last week they
had some very heavy showers.

Touching on the political side,
he said that the Legislative Coun-
eil would be meeting on April 7
to consider the enactment of the
constitutional Bill under
Adult Suffrage.

new

At present the Council is com-
prised of five elected members,
three nominated members and two
official members.

Musical Guessing
Competition

HERE was a full house at the
Police Band Concert at the
Hastings Rocks on Friday last.
the listeners were invited to
another “Name The Tune” com-
petition. The test piece was a
medley of 30 tunes culled from
well known Music Comedy shows

which were blended together
with entertaining and amusing
results, !

Congratulations are due to the
winners, Mrs. H. G. St. Hill, No 8
flat, Abergeldie, Dayrell's Road,
and Mrs. W. S, Atkinson. (no
address given). Both ladies
guessed 20 titles correctly a
very creditable performance, Will
Mrs. W. S, Atkinson please phone
Capt. Raison.in order to receive

The following list represents
up”. Better luck

next time. Mr. W. Turner (Ocean

View). 19; Mrs, Harley Hughes
(Greystone Fats) 19; Ernies
Wakelam 17; Miss Armstrong

(Storms Gift) 17; Doreen Kinch

18; Mrs. R. Martin (Marine
Hotel) 15; Mrs. Etta Kirton 15;
Iris Archer 14; Margaret Hoad
13; Mrs, S. E. Doane (Marine

Hotel) 13; Mrs, Hugh Mammiy 9;
P. M. Rawlinson (Hastings) 9;
Mrs. Wilde (Marine Hotel) 9.



all different styles and
types available

From 72¢
to about $9.00

Call TODAY at your
JEWELLERS

Y. De LEMIA
& €O.. LTD.

20 Broad Street,










ROA

the

Morris bui
Cars that
millions of
fied owners
buying a
remember
proved the



MORRIS

Quality Fiat Range

A.B.R.S.M.
Examiner

Due April 3

TC teat stent



PAGE FIVE





Arriving in Barbados on Thurs- |

day, April 3, will be Mr. Guy
Jonson, who will conduct the ex-
aminations of the Associatec
Board of the Royal Schools of
Music this year. Mr. Jonson will

give a Pianoforte Recital . at
“Wakefield,” Whitepark, on April
g

Guy Jonson was educated

at Highgate School, London, and!
in 1930, at the age of sixteen he!
won the Ada Lewis Scholarship
te the Royal Academy of Music.





MR. GUY JONSON

After a successful studentship
during which he gained eleven
competitive prizes for piano (in-
cluding the Macfarren Gold Med-
al) and made’ several appearances
at the Queen’s Hall both as con-
ductor and solo pianist with the
R.A.M. Orchestra under Sir Hen-
ry Wood, he continued his studies
with Tobias Matthay.

Associate of R.A.M.

In 1938, he was appointed to
the staff of the Tobias Matthay
Pianoforte School and elected an
Associate of the Royal Academy
of Music in 1939,

He served from 1939-1946
first in the Royal Artillery
and later in the War Office
and upon release from the
Army was appointed a pro-
fessor of pianoforte at the
Royal Academy where he
now teaches and examines.

He has given many solo re-
citals in London and Paris,
has broadcast over the radio
since 1936.

Amongst his many diverse mu-
gical activities, he has directed
music for ballet (and has collab-
orated with Edwin Benbow as
duo pianists for this madium) and
is much occupied as adjudicator
at the competitive musical festi-
vals in London and the provinces,
OPS POV OBDOOOPSSSSOF

&







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x Begonia-Rose
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1% White Pink.
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x Red
| x Orange-Red ~_
| x Dark Purple
1% Maroon-Red
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x Salmond Pink
x Lilac
1 Bronze
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126 Deep Blackish Red
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5 Tins at 60c. Ib.

Contains Vitamins A & D

Broad St.

HARRISON'S
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Our Trial Quantity sold out in a week
but a more appreciable shipment has
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THE PRICE 1S UNALTERED —
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sty
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EXTRA VALUE

SMASHING REDUCTIONS

In JACOB'S CREAM CRACKERS and
ASSORTED SWEET BISCUITS

SELLING OFF AT COST PRICE

JACOB'S CREAM } VARIOUS ASSORTED

CRACKERS SWEET BISCUITS
Tins | in }-lb, Packets
Originally Now . | Originally Now
$1.64 $.20 72c., 62c., 54c. 42¢.



KNIGHTS }=DRUG STORES.







WE ARE PLEASED to announce the arrival of our first shipment of this

famous brand. Only the BEST Materials and Craftsmanship have
been used in the production of these Shoes.

Obtainable in Black Box Calf Oxfords, Brown Willow Oxfords
and Brown Derby Brogues.





_ MORRIS OXFORD high
â„¢. efficiency 41 hp. engine:
Mono-construction” of

body and chassis for

lightness and strength,

Independent front wheel

Suspension, Draughtless

intertor ventilation. Gear

shift on steering column,

—_——



We are the sole Distributors of these SHOES in
Barbados and they are on sale only at

they at Cave Shepherd & Co,

: 10, 1, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

Ltd.

MORRIS MINOR
Worts's biggest smalicar
buy! Within-the-wheel-
base seating for four.

Originally This Week
AUSTRALIAN LEG HAMS 1}

15-lbs.

-per lb. 1.61

y
| 1,36
CRAWFORD’S CREAM CRACKERS—per tin 1.64
LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP—>per tin 38
Ewings PURE ALMOND ESSENCE-—per bottle ;
}
!
}
|
}
|
|








rorpemiens ST bp ex Se
gine. Basy to steer 32
sruen teettis lass BIBBY’S ASPARAGUS SOUP—ver tin 33 30
‘ er + a. SPANISH STUFFED OLIVES— per jar . Ao 1.60
“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE ae ee
: d MORRIS SIX 70 bp innova
i fer engine In- , . $ .42
z | dependent front whee wings PURE RASPBERRY ESSENCE—»per bottle 42
You can get from your grocer or from any shop in the Island the following || Late tik ae aoe Ewings PURE CHERRY ESSENCE—per bottle 42
3 i | unit. Over 10 cubic feet Crosse & Blackwells CHOW CHOW-—per bottle . .53
Biscuits Fresh from the oven :— | ige eeeee: thee Crosse & Blackwells PICCALILLI—per bottle . .53
j yuality first’ features Crosse & Blackwells REAL TURTLE SOUP—>per tin . ak
‘ P . in rated in this Dutch YOUNG EXTRA FINE PEAS—per Tin . 65
=, M adaniasians! i . 4 i °
MARIE S4e. Per th. SHIRLEY AGe. Per tb. oink manera Dutch WHOLE CAULIFLOWER per ‘in 40





KOO GUAVA JELLY
COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.

SSS

SHORT CAKE 54e. Per lb. GRAHAM CRACKERS

WIBIX SODA CRACKERS 36c. Per th.

4ée. Per th.



FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504





















PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS. | remuc sae















BARBADOS ADVOCATE









AIR TRAFFIC







| Reds Demonstrate

CATTLE POSITION |



BREST, March 31.



‘GRAVE’ }
TELEPHONE 2508 REAL ESTATE ARRIVALS — BY B.W.LA. Against P inlay CANBERRA, Australia, OBSERVANCE OF HER MAJESTY’S BIRTHDAY
bagens _ ON SUNDAY March 27. |
——. BUNGALOW—One modern Bungalow| From Puerto Rico

GOVERNMENT ‘NOTICE

: , inistrator of Northern | for The
on St. James’ Const. 3 bedrooms, two} James Fairbanks, Betty Fairbanks.) cyponojy armed bile guards nu Aone The Queen has approved the date already announced for
eur sirths, Marriage or Engagement toilets & baths. Hot and Cold running | J Cullingsworth, Hollis Cullings- Strongly armed mobile guarcs Territory F. J. Wise chosen
announcements in Carib Calling the FOR SALE water, and all caadeon conventeanes. rorth, Aaa Cullingsworth, John Cul-| to-day broke up a Communist the outlook on the cattle industry | King's Birthday this year, namely Thursday, 5th June. being ‘
charge is $3.00 for any number ot words Dial 2492 1.4.52—2n. | lingsworth inspired “Hunger March” of mae as “extremely grave”. He said: for the celebration of her own official Birthday in 1952. Her Majesty
aD ta cents per wor Tr eac ee ee —— ——- a from ntigua © 9 ) sorke 5 ; . i
dditional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 BUNGALOW—A newly constructed ‘Carlyle Bailey, Vere Bird. than 2,0( 0 wor — a cee the position was grim not only; has also approved that her official Birthday should always be cele-
Detween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death AUTOMOTIVE stone wall Bungalow situated at Charles} From Trinidad _ {against the “Anti Workers” policy this season but in succeeding; brated on a date to be chosen on the same principle as that adopted
Notices only after 4 D.m “7 aa Rowe Road, St. Michael, comprising open Blunt, E. Weekes, M. Clarke, C./ of Premier Antoine Pinay. There seasons because of the high mor- by His late Majesty, namely a Thursday early in June.
AUSTIN VAN—One (1) 10 H.P. Austin} Verandah, Drawing and Dining rooms, habe, 1. Tie, Mt Richardson p. —_ were no casualties, tality rate of young stock and a ajesty, aoe - rn yf »
var ia eoad working ander. Phone | unree bedrooms, and all modern conve” [97 Courtenay," kiperman, - Xiper:| , The. demonstration, called by breeders. 12 secondance with the provisions of the Banik Beliday Act,
$21, D. Sc * “18.3.88—t.f.n. | ‘Spacious yard’ and land available for!man, I. Davy, J, Martin the General Labour Confedera~ Northern Territory probably) 1905, Thursday the 5th of June, 1952, will be a Bank Holiday.
D Kitchen garden From Grenada Yesterday tion as a “trial of strength” in was the worst in the ’ 25.2.52—2n
Car—Hillman Sedan 1951 ma@% in| Apply HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD |A. akaee Rajpati 4 Manhoul, ‘Mak-| the face of the mounting popu- Fo .
ie ana cane toon noe fing BR ontin Dee ae Home os 2 say ata ee Pye houl, J. "Westgate, G. Falconer, M. Med | larity of Pinay’s “Defend The a
SHILLINGPORD (recently , . — - le a ” amme,
arrived from Roseau, Dominica). The | 8324 1.4. 52—t.f.n. sninaiiainiiaaie: ume sh tte Franc progr: 5



of Hinds & Co.,

funeral leaves from the Funeral Parlour
Tweedside Road, at



a ia aa
CAR—192 CHEVROLET Car:

spots of Land with a mari-

LAND—3
g00d | hole, Connecting 3 Bus Lines; situated /»,.

condition, good tyres. Apply H. Rayside./ 4; Fairfield Land, Tudor Bridge Gap.












ON SUNDAY
Trinidad
Anthony Namalho, Lestelle

despite a police ban. About 600
in all downed tools as the hunger

CHANCERY SALE

j
tock place |

Gums Bleed,



































4.15 o'clock this evening for St. Patrick's oot Trotman.|march began, The hunger BARBADOS.
Chureh, Jemmotts Lane and thence tc] Glebe Land, St. John. Dial @>o200 , | Apply H. Stuart. 1.4-52—18- | Eleyne Greenidge, Ian Greenidge, Doris | archers walked only three miles The undermentioned property will beset up for sale at the Registration Office,
the Westbury Cemetery a sony Parris, Gladys Howard, Harry Merry, of a proposed 50 mile hike to Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between the hours of 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the
Howel D. Shillingford (Marine| >So paereor in excellent AUCTION Doreen Merry, Ann Merry, Agatha proposed sum and on the date specified below. If not then sold, it will be set up on each
Bom) . Sa eager good tyres and battery, Baptiste Jean Merry, Ralph Stoute,|Chapal of Quimper before police succeeding Friday at the same place and during the same hourg until sold. Full
_———_$_—_————— pg a 10,000 miles. Owner Five Barbados Government Debentures zrer Sousa, ian Sie, Date oa intervened and turned them ee 00 particulars on application to me.
IN MEMORIAM leaving island. Dial $103 and day ex-| of £500 each at SiG. These, Debentyon [Vernon Knight, Luis Merchan Violet | back to Brest. 4 i. ° Plaintiff: PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON
Sonia — , | at our Omiee, Jeanne Street, cmt: Shs vor St Lacie oman 4. % a was x i Debaigent: TINRAD WS
CAR—FORD PREFECT. One second| 0th instant at 2 p. sai. Sinan } PROPERTY: All that certain piece or parcel of land situate in Upper Coltymore
REID—In loving memory of our dear|hand Ford Prefect in good working YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Feed Ee ora Hiine Marsal, |Oacked by the local branch of the Rock in the parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barbados con-
mother and sister Millicent Reid, who) order. Apply Barbados Agencies, Del-| | Solicitors. | Charles Canali, Mathew Innocent, Cecil | Catholic Workers’ Union —U.P. taining by admeasurement one rood be the same more or less butting
fell asleep on ist April, 1951. ephone 4908. 1.4.52—6n. | 1.4.52—5n. Hunte = bounding on lands now oe late of Jones a Wiles, of Catherine
Asleep in Jesus, peaceful rest _———————— TT ate
Sit uN but sever ot‘ mind | “GAR FORR MERCURY, One ond 1, "af" he"aaucta bebe “oiatam | “euineme Daas, Dore nicarteor| Low Grade Catton oe a a
Ever remembered by— hand Ford ereury, el, y . mesmangh
Doris (daughter), St Clair (son), Edith, upholstery and in good working order. | DeCourey Leacock better known as Briggs Sheila Heath, Philip Ernest, Norah

to set up for Sale by publie auction at | Abbott, Barbara Abbott.
my office Middle Street om Thu Fer Puerto Rico

Mrs. Violet Wright (sisters), Odrie,
next 3rd April at 2 p.m. 1 acre 32 William Pollard, William Beiknap,

Archibald (brothers), Mrs. Clara Perry-
. Mrs. O. Dottin (nieces), Winstone

Barbados Agencies, Telephone
14.52—6n,

Apply
4908.

Goods Te Cost More |

and being with the appurtenances.



. Pete UPSET PRICE: £700
J letn, v little | perches of land at Checker Hall, St. Lacr Belknap, George Cooke, "
(nephew) 1.4.52—1n nee AS = , abutting on lands of Roy Griffith and} Rovira, Carmen Rovira, Albridge Smith, | . @ From Page i DATE OF SALE: 18th Apil, 1952,
Co., Ltd 1.4.52—3n, | Belfield Graham Margaret Smith, Cyril Horton, Claire | enough prices will come down, In H.
& Co., 5 ‘ Also 2.843 square feet of land at Half Taishoff, Eunice Riexinger, William | this case it is a fallacy, WILLIAMS, >
THANKS *CARS—Hillman Saloons from $1400.00] Moon Fort, St. Lucy on the Sea, abutting | ¥eefwood, Miriam Yearwood, Lilian Registrar-in-Chancery

Price War
“If Japan should wage a real

on lands of McDonald Armstrong and | Volney, Herbert Ascough, Herbert Upton
THANK YOU!| UP. COLE & Co., Ltd. 1.4,52—3n. | Blackman et al. together with the chatte:









|
|
|
|

8 P.CA 1.4.5%—In house thereon. Harbour Lo, price war we know cou.d loose
—pivestock ey o et oer ING NOTICES
_ 5 : Sch. Esso Aruba, Sch. Marea Henrietts.| that question, If the colonies trade
NT SPANIEL PUPS—Communicate Mrs. | 2.3,52—in - .
FOR REN | tutson, Stirling, St. Philip. ‘Telephone Yacht Caribbee, Sch. Gardenia W., M.V

extensively with Japan to the



Lady Jay, Sch



Maris Stella, M.V









































Blue : . ¥
ee ta ae 20.3.08& | FOR GALE BY 2UmLAC , aoa Star, Sch. Turtle Dove, Sch. Rainbow M.,{ detriment of the British textile in- now MONTRRAL. AUSTRALIA, NEW
HOUSES MECHANICAL At Lower Mason Hall Street ot 2] 8c) Mois N Jones, Sch At Cast, sen’ | CUsuy they will deal a hard blow i SBALAND 15N8 WauERD. ant
o'clock on the spot (1) chattel house) Dortac, Sch. Zita Wonita, Sch. Philip H.|‘ British economy and they will | tiie se is PAS, LD aap Cargo od Petaars tee
; n “Hy ” with draw din- ae t y P only ace! ani
BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, | “RicycLE—Girls’ Raleigh Bicycle, in| faved “Hylcourt” with drawing é& din: | Davidson, Sch. Franeis W. Smith, Sch not Oe, ee oe one Soe Bea | ss. «rexoar ws scheduled to sail|{{{ Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
perfect bathing, quiet. All meals and jis: class condition. Mrs. Haslett. Tele- closet, water and light, galvanize pal- Everdene, Sch. Jenkins Roberts slump in this country. tism ee of | trom Adelaide February 15th Melbourne Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
services supplied fron: main house. Own phone 331. 14.52ein.} ings. Inspection om application to the ARRIVALS Mr. Aickman added that Lan- > Saves Teeth March ard, Sydney Maren 10th, Bris-
Telephone. Suitable married couple, | eed Schooner Esso Aruba, % tons net.| cashire cotton executives had had | New Discovery |bane March 22nd arriving at Trinidad
*$25.00) per day American Plan for two) MISCELLANEOUS WEDNESDAY 2né April Cept. Bristol, fyom Grenada. ad ha Amoson, the of ap American | about April 22nd ‘and Barbados ‘about
reople, Apply: Beachlands, St. James ot | At my olttee Middle Street ett o'clock, |, Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net,]@ mumber of meetings with sclentist, ‘Aghts these Sigkt to the | April 25th.
phone 0157. 14,3.89—t.£.00, | emer mnrennnnm——ny | the property called “The Crotons” at|c>*. Selby, from St. Lucia. colonial representatives from the | 424 92'6% 8¥inie, stops from bleed- n addition to general cargo this ves-
~_. | "CLOTH—Domestic Cloth, good quality proper s” ati 's.§. Colombie, 7,381 tons net, Capt ; ? root » Siickly takes the | sel has ampl for chilled and
MODERN FURNISHED FLAT with |only 39. a yd. At Thani Bros. Deacons Road. It consists of almost] pipont, from Martinique textile trade to discuss their re- ing the very ars day, quicely Sesh |e ce Oe hard
Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing. 28.3, 52-—t.f.n. | Bere 9S Bes = — ee DEPARTURES quirements, tightens the teeth: “The following letter | Cargo accepted on through Bills of
Por further perticuate APD 0. RIN asers tw 2) Slt, 3 Dettgeina Tees, rater tat | Senogner Frankl D. ., 62 tons net im, WW, Bato tng enue hat | ding” for ttansbigment ‘at Tekntdad
ley No. ora . Worthing. > a Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana. mo: 4 British Leew: indward
23.252—t.4.n. | qualities at Thani Bros. Dial 3466. ond bath, and spacious yard. imspec- | ‘Schooner Laudalpha, 60 tons nae Capt ST. JOSEPH CHURCH Mouth and Byorrhea for fen yen BM nico Guiana, ard and W. and
j 28.3.52—t.f.n. ]| tion a creer Ok. She premises. | Gumbs, for Dominica. @ From Page 5 {ost tour teeth, w epeveral other teeth | For furtner particulars apply — fangs only for St. Vincent.
NEW MODERN FLAT om Blue Waters ee ot ak ae, Eee eae 4 Schooner Molly N. Jones, 37 tons net, should think of pulling their | were i the time. I tried te of sailing to be notified.
Terrace. Spacious cupboards modern FLANNELETTE for underwear an : ane e. ye 7c at 2.30 P.M.) Capt. Cloude, for Dominica weight. There were tax er: many 5 oe Ly Re a FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., B.WI scnoo:
kitchen and plumbing, running water | other purposes @4c, and White, Blue, Pink |? chattle Houses (1) 16 x 9 with shed.) M.V. Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt. es e taxpayers | discovery Amosan. In 26 hours after using cantata . 8 NER OWNERS’
in all bedrooms, near to Rocklay Beach,| at Thant’s. $8.3.50—t.f.n. | Kitehen, closet, a jwanise | palings and|Gumbs, for Dominica. who necessarily contributed to | Ameson my gums Tein x ‘ ASSOCIATION (INC)
sad’ fag inaien wa ror, Gal CMD. | = por -Lanny aad Hap see | o elge A * Mite Mtehem, low 'S'3" Galante ahi tone net, cupt,| the Church and, belonging to | tse davs qed ates trie /raad at DACOSTA, & ©0., LED Se ee ate
e \ 1.4524 i - Dupont, K, i c 7
a ®- | wile Fasteners. Roberts & Co. Dial 3901 THURSDAY 3rd April pont, sor 0.e. other nominations, had | to | my logge teeth were much Senter. BARBADOS. RW
| 1.4.52—In.] At my office Middle Street at 2 p.m. sere eir own denomina- G teed
WANTED } —___—_ } 33,000 square feet of land at Rockiey HAIR \ Ss tions. He was told some had to uearantee:
. me. GUM ARABIC—Britains Best (cleaned) | New Road, Nr. Golf Course. 6,185 sq. - contribute eggs. A in works erie. and so certain
by the 100 pounds or in 23 pound lots, | feet of land at Knight's Land, Lower It was agreed to increase last pd o eo eek mouth ond tighten
‘ at 52 cents per pound. Do not delay, Westbury Road It has a well in it ahd 5 * aot f $36 to $60 jour tees: to your complete satisfaction or
HELP only a small quantity left. Dial 2766. ¢| is suitable for kitchen garden. Also year’s provision of $36 to $60.

NATIONALIZED















o
f empty package. Steamship ( 0.
28.3.52—3n. | 7,330 spuare feet at Navy Gardens Before the new Churchwarden | jion(takes chanee on losing your teeth or Abcoa
—____—_--___-__—__. -— - D’ARCY A. SCOTT, was appointed, Mr. Gooding sai suffering | the Gangers £ gorge

oted ater t eats ax ROG RO lek See eee we cede ae ans [wane | asters In commune Cuscho-| ihe antag, tocar’ to be made of | Sinai tediy eater mitner thy Sis Ine.
C/o Advocate Advertising Dept. “or deliv in December 1952, parties A -| the conscientious and strenuous . ee.

1.4.52—2n. letaensted. hooking please paths 4442, slovakia have been forbidden to| work: Mr. Coward, the outgoing Amo er aoe:

: T. Geddes Grant, Ltd. 18,3.52-14n] PUBLIC NOTICES |'%25582¢ scalps, wash hair or offer | Churehwarden, had put in during iE Sreuth NEW YORK SERVICE
used' to cooking Teton chdete oe JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts. , : brilliantine since hair cutters have | his term of office. For Pyorrhea--Tre ™ |
or ve *

if possible. Reply M. K. C/o Advocate. | including — Chimneys, ‘Spreaders, Grid ae page vo | of the state ac- A STEAMER sailed 28th March— arrives Barbados 10th Agen. aH2.

90.3.52—3n | Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also NOTICE cording to Radio Free Europe. A STEAMER sailed 18th Apml— arrives Barbados 20th , 1982.



Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre

The keeping of ;
Company, Trafalgar & Spry _ Streets. 7 private TANGER
Phone . 2696. 20.3.82—t.f.n.

for steady customers is an
“egoistie relic signifying a secret
craving for the return to Fascist
days;” according to Radio Free

The Annual General Meeting of the
Barbados Basketball Association will be
held at the ¥.M.C.A. on FRIDAY, 4th
Aprii at 7.30 p.m.

All clubs desirous of affiliation should

a their applications to Secretary, C/o

COOK — General. Apply McKinstry,
Bellevue Gap, near Waterford.
14.52—3n.

TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket
Hands) only those with experience need





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE



nr
LADIES AMERICAN SPRING COAT—
In good condition. Phone 4909.

ob, tenan. A STEAMER sailed 27th March—orrives Barbados 12th April 1952.



























































































THE LOYAL BROTHERS

-



wood Chairs, Step Ladder, Cup- with ....

X-Â¥ 400-308

OG OSUSSUROUWYAGUOOOO,





§ -C.A. so that they may be elected} Furope.—U.P. A STEAMER sailed 10th April—arrives Barbados 26 April, 1952. 3
apply. “P. C. S. MAFFFI & Co., Ltd. aeteihahitiaeatintingnipeen | § y =
6.3. 52—t.f.n Wanaad’ ek A toy. Motateet Wood- rer ae eee kawaal eg
WANTED-—Assistant Manageress for ey ragaboliaain cate eee ts32 mS a CANADIAN SERVICE
quan ens a hg int we 3 29.3.52—2n REMOVAL NOTICE ( bY SOUTHBOUND
3.52—3n OLLCLOTH—Wonderful Lit nd ur Ou? a @$
Beautiful uses I $1.08 Dr. C, MeCONNEY, Chiropractor begs it is no longer necessary to suffer Name of Ship Salles Halifax Afrives Barbades
Resident Waving island recommends | to $1.60 per yard. 45” wide. Pay us aj to announce that his office in Spry Street| Pains, itching and torment from Piles ;
General rvants, Hastings district.| visit. Amazing Bargains await you at] will be closed from Monday March 3ist, Since the discovery of Hytex (formerly. “ALCOA PILGRIM” .. March 14th Ma tes
elephon@ Mrs, Hughes — 2410. | The STANWAY STORE. Lucas Street. {\o Saturday April Sth and will re-open | SROWn as Chinavold), Hytex starts to eos TOReae Monch som _
.52—Sn, 20.3. 52—i1n en Road, next to ne cab ber ae ee oe i oa aa Te ALCOA PARTNER Sor 15th son 8
7 ee ‘a College. 30.3.52—1n. o bleed! 4a bal
7 LRINTS—American. Prints, Lovely Bis ihadtaie thersby curbing other trou: “ALCOA “PURITAN” Due Zor oth For_ St, Lawrence River
nae ea ena Ta en | LOST & F peeareere Reasete Couari it, ro
20,5 .08--$ 8.08 ‘OUND loss of Gebility, and irritable ee oct stot. Pes He Be. Ecce’ Meee
IN THE eee disponition Get 4 kon from your
REFRIGERATOR—On ruggist today e passen accommoda' ‘
A DVOC. ‘ATE Kerosene Oil Refrigerntor, 4 cu. ft. guarantee hytex must stop your pile Those yeomsls Daye: Unger om ton,
; capacity. In perfect working order. LOST pains and troubles or money back on ‘
Apply: Mrs. Keith Webster, Harrisons return of empty package.
. Plantation, St. Lucy. 29.3.52—6n | LADY'S GOLD WRIST WATCH with ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
ROWING “MACHINE. For reducing expanding bracelet, either near Goddard's }
weight and building muscle, One Set] Churehyard. Will finder "kindiy return Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANAD*“N SERVICE
ne low Strands, Inspection at Frank B.{ io Miss Alda Williams, Marattson, BARBADOS .
Armstrong Ltd., James Street, ‘Phone] rontabelle. Reward offered i
2840 or 5044. 1.4.52—2n, 1.4,62-2n, OLD CLOTHING AGENCY
' SHOES—Ladies White Sh a Hat a P Vy
PALACE ce tae gue se thane 4 in | YrOBDoroOnecooodousoocers |S (ex) ArT SAGUENAY TERMINALS Sango
tros, Dial 3466. 28.3.52—t.f.n. BE WISE CO-OPERA’ Se = =
HEAD TERS BARBADOS DIOCESAN MAG. pi oS ee ——$
' eee =_— “iN fe ero "April's instle with } one of ts peandee Gas Cookers © x s Deal
FROM eth. came & aie oe Oe - othe aves ate a ule We Solicit Your Patronage x CANADIAN SERVICE
a ' j ae eee is here again, in ..4 Boiling desea and 1 Grill My oe % From St. John and NS.
5 THANI'S |ahstra. co RS Bune : —
. i. . Easy to keep clean, Econo- Tweedside Road 1
28.3.52—t.f.n a migal to use: : mised Surin
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 _WIND BREAKER JACKETS—in Assd “Se this shipment io delivered. G4 Misheol x c s Ca
, Colours $4.95. Gents get these at Thani a ial Spe SOS ++ 11 Mareh 18 March 6 April
, Bros. Dial 3 52—t.f.n POO OBOPR AEA | LESSEE SOS ‘2 a eee ; " Mate 3 ae 20 Apri)

A Vaasa pr i 6 May
ss “A VESSEL’ 30 April 5 May 25 May
PERSONAL are
PROFESSIONAL NOTICE important FROM LIVERPOOL AND GLAS
’ 4 R L AND GLASGOW
Th bli against e . P UTS Expected Arrival
iving "credit to ag a or Announcement A sprinkle of Vim on a damp cloth—a quick Dates Bridgetown,
SPENCER (nee Blackman), as I do not ANTHONY C. LEWIS, b d th di thi will LIVERPOOL GLASGOW Barbados
1old myself responsible for her or any- A.B.LB.A., B.Arch., rud — an ose dirty, greasy things sparkle 8.8. “FEDERAL VOYAGER” ..20 March 24 March
‘nm are unieas wy, A ae M.Se.C.P., F.R.S.A, = like new again ! Vim leaves surfaces shining and permenant netetiniininrinietndnrieenetmneec aaa aE
: me. : ‘ ; : : TiRane Fale .
FREDERICK A. SPENCER, Chartered Architect = have just received a gleaming, so quickly and easily ! UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SEK Vice
FURNITURE Rosbiigh Street. has pensprred._ bia 0M. x shipment of . . . : : “4 Expected Arrival
A -3.52—2n No, 32 ELLER:
| GIBBONS sy Aan inte RAE
giving credit to any person or persons 1.4.52.—-1n.
AUCT Wold naoentt nets ee 00 net ss. “SUNRELL” 21 March 22 March 24 March 31 Apri
res] rrr i.
contracting any TASt te ithe se oS SUPER QUALITY mv “SKA ;
KINNOUL same ieee ty writen order signed | 8 GFSs $ POULTRY FEED Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
TALL ROAD “aoe, 6s : cleans everythin
won ent Bn ud. |S THE ANNUAL SALE § ° ything
R 4.52—2n, urr -
We ore instructed by Mr, R. B. % of § Owing to ¢ ensy | a smoothly and speedily
Field to dispose of the following ’ strictions this American , hi chase fro!
Furnitvire and Bffects. % pt THE GIRLS Xl} feed is likely to be scarce Whe 70R Se ”
i f sal % FRIENDLY SOCIETY : -
wing ER SiS Salmo, |% will be hela at |\ im the near future, CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Ong tables, ana me he THE HOSTEL & e Our Motor Van Delivers the Goods at Your Door.
Table with Brass Feet, Sideboard, s on ‘
sven Wagon, Dressing Table & OF TH % SATURDAY, APRIL 26th % |i} Wholesalers — Retailers CENTRAL EMPORIUM
vor, Bedside Table, E YEAR s trom 3—6 p.m. % & Poultry Keepers would Corner Broad & Tudor Streets :
All The Above in Mahogany % Details later % |} be wise to stock up now
Rush Rockers, Cane Chairs, Bent- VLOSOSSSOSSSSO ISS SOOSOS
boards, Kitchen Tables, Larder, OF THE STARS
sense yftiesnee ue GIBBONS

Mattresses, Pillows, ”

Towel rails, Pine Dressing Table Present T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
| and Mirror, Misc. Books, Pictures, ‘



China, Glassware, Kitehen Articles
and other items.

FEEDS

i Year Book of the West

INTEREST RATES

e ® Indies ang Consietas of the
TN arn iva Latest Edition $14.40 at prices that defy com- In consequence of the recent increase in the Bank of England rate
john h4. Biadesn Locks for the Press petition from ....

Locks for the Gate
Locks for the Drawer
all at

JOHNSON’S aererees.
an
HARDWARE

interest paid on Savings Bank Accounts as from April tst., 1952 will be
increased from 1% per annum to 2% per annum and interest ezrning bal-
‘ances will be increased. from $2,500 to $4,000 (all other conditions remain
unchanged). Rates of Interest payable on deposits for fixed terms of not
less than 3 months or more than 12 months, will be advised on application :
by intending depositors. The rate of interest payable by borrowers on

bank advances will also be revised from above date.

On June Sth & 7th
at Queen’s Park

& ce.

A.F.8., F.V.A.
Phone 4640. Plantations Building

HAROLD PROVERBS
& C0. LTD.









“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

You can get from your grocer or from any shop in the Island the following
Biscuits Fresh from the oven:—

MARIE 34e. Per th. SHIRLEY Ate. Per th.
SHORT CAKE 54c. Per ib. GRAHAM CRACKERS 46c¢. Per th.
WIBIX SODA CRACKERS 6c. Per ib.

BARCLAY'S BANK (DOMINION. COLONIAL AND OVERSEAS)
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE

















x







TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1952









BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
= ae EERSTE TENAeneenesneninilisndioaints
POSS POSS SOOO CFs
| |} ADD THESE SPECIALTIES $
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON 1% TO YOUR LIST %
| Tins Pears >
“ Peaches x
s Apricots x
So Pineapple
x . Apricot Jam %
] g Bots, Marmainde &
R Guava Jelly %
XX . Strawberry Jam )
% » Raspberry Jam >
% =: Tins Heinz Tomato Soup ~
XS . Vegetable Salad in @
} a Mayonnaise 4
} ° ; , Chicken Soup 8
j * Imperial Meatluneh ¥
~ Red Feather Wham x
x Nateo Minced Beef ,.. %
~ Smorgon’s Luncheon Beef %&
x Leaf eo
x » Champion Beef Loaf g
\% Pickled Herrings 3
% Pickled Mackerel >
x Eschalot
TAAT
% STUART & SAMPSON
x »
% ( LID
% 1 938) . g
@ Headquarters for Best Rum x

*.
LLL FEEL LE

¢

;

Pkgs. Tate & Lyle Castor
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacon

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna
Sausages

Pkgs. Goddard Plague Pow-








The popularity of John White shoes is built on
VALUE, as well as DEPENDABILITY. Comfort
and style ?—- Yes, certainly —they areas easy-
fitting and smart looking as you could wish, But
their outstanding VALUE is what men expect and
always get when they insist on shoes made by
John White. See them for yourself in leading
stores throughout Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

means made just right

der
Tins Stove Polish

. JUST RECEIVED

oetintinlgnaaiin

Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad

Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar
Tins Gelatine
Tins Asstd, Sweet Biscuits
Tins Pineapple Chunks

8

BOBO D BOSCO SS SOO CE SESE SS

Also:
>» OH, GOLLY --] FORGOT #4
i TO SNEAK IN HER ROOM
1 PUT MY TOOTH AND PUT A DIME
UNDER My PILLOW UNDER HER PILLOW
AND THE FAIRY’ ~ a
DIDN'T LEAVE ME
A DIME!

Tins Strawberries
TIN HAMS

Special price to Shopkeepers



A

|

All these things get from - -

FI

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

SBOSOSOSS




S36







FLASH GORDON

Soe | An
Fo ae FichTING THE
EFFECTS OF THE
| / YOU WON'T BE % DRUG THAT IS
NEEDING THIS DULLING HIS
SENSES, BIG MOE
STRIKES BACK FAST,
WITH THE FIERCE | GOLDILOCKS/.
,| STRENGTH OF A
TRAPPED ANIMAL..

a

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER














GET ‘A
ran AlL OF
v7 a>.
ear

s
Ye
D

F YOU! SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
ee SS |







SS
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually Now



POTATOES — 4 Ib for wc. = $ AB $ 40 Tins LOBSTER

ee Se at Sateries 74 66
Tins JACOBS CREAM Bottles TENNENTS STOUT. ........ 30 26
CRACKERS. .....cecccssereeeeees 1.82 1.60
, Tins CONDENSED MILK ............ 33 31
Tins BROOKS PEACHES (21%)... 81 15
me \




D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

@
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

You can get from your grocer or from any shop in the Island the following
Biscuits Fresh from the oven:—
MARIE. 54¢. Per Ib. SHIRLEY A6e. Per tb.

SHORT CAKE 54c. Per lb, GHAHAM CRACKERS 416c. Per Ib.
WIKBKX SODA CRACKERS 36c. Per th.








HUH # OH- NOTHING
.«« NOTHING AT

BUT, JOHNNY, YOU
SEEM PUZZLED...
WHAT'S WRONG #

NOTHING IS WRONG...
BUT NOTHING SEEMS
RIGHT EITHER /










T’M THANKIN’ YE
FROM THE BCTTOM O'
MY HEART, JOHNNY

YOU'RE WELCOME,
WEE .DORRIE... GLAD
YOU GOT WEE LAURIE'S




























1

THE TRUTH i

HURTS - 7k}
vz g |
C fd










HAND IT HERE!
HOW DO YOU
KNOW _(TS FROM
MY BROTHER

NEW HOPES FOR
A CHANGING
WORLD

NO-IT WAS
SENT __,
COLLECT.










YOU'LL FAVOUR FOR ITS Kertrand Russell
DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY,
COMFORT AND LONG- This book, which is based upon

the broadcast lectures, “Living in
an Atomic Age’, is concerned
with the methods of curing three
kinds of conflict which have af-
flicted mankind. They are the con-
flicts of man with nature, with
other men, and with himself. Of
these, the first is the concern of
science, the second of politics, and
the third of religion and psycho-
logy.
Modern techniques have made
p poverty unnecessary, and have
— provided the possibility of a much
——-" higher level of general well-being
than has ever existed at any form-
er time. Failure to realize this pos-
sibility is due to the persistence
cf beliefs, principles, emotions, and

LASTING QUALITY.

SI WANT

HIM OUT OF |
THE WAY...

FoR GOoD!




WHAT 1 WANT,
OUDE, DARLING...




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habits of thought that were ap-
i a propriate in earlier ages, but
| Suedette which should now be obsolete.
} The new techniques have made
co-operation more important and

PU (iN



competition less desirable than at
any earlier time. The gloomy fears
by which our ¢ime is oppressed are
unnecessary, and if men in general






“PLAYDAY”



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AY MOORES +o ee < “fg odern knowledge and skill ren-

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GET IT AT THE...
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BROAD ST.

a LE ELE EET,



; 4

ge hw e tarde’ so

‘
'
‘

eee Bae ge 6 ee? S

S23 SH

2S WET OG HES







PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE



















pounds was five
pounds better



over five feet eight inches
John Marshall was selected Mr.




















$1.79

range. ’ team who was making his first wrs. R. Challenor and Hon. R.
appearance in first @ivision foot-

N. Turner vs. Mr. and Mrs.

































& CO., LTD.





———— . TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1952
ee ———-, onion hie
3 | P
. Marshal Crowned Mr Barbados Jr Don’t let Upset Stomach
. eu on’t let Upset Stomac
ize . s ‘ : Bisco j 6 iaeaac cao
Shirley Best—Miss Bridgetown | — | F 7
_ . ‘ | ,
teh & Y. MISS BRIDGETOWN 1952 || WEATHER REPORT |! upset your aay...
John Marshall, a Customs Clerk, Was crowned Mr. | _— ee j 2
Barbados Jnr., when the Junior Weightlifting Show and } _— from Codrington—
Male and Female Body Beauty Contests took place at Total Rainfall for month to at e to ie ysl
Queen's Park on Saturday night. Marshall, formerly a : date : 2.25 ins.
pupil of Combermere School, has been taking a keen in- — Temperature : 87.0 , Ps
terest in weightlifting for over two years. i ik : ape Sa a g| | eM Le !
tn..the Miss Bridgetown Con- up to Nurse and Cammie Barker. Was Vaule 0 aia. 4 | , °
test “-honours went to sixteen- He is a mutch improved lifter. } hour —— ee |
year-old Shirley Best. Shirley, Clean And Jerk ! anes i
who also gave a performance in Roy Goddard lifted against G ma pm) 29 “3 or I i i i
hand balancing , with Simeon Jordan in the Featherweight Di- - "PO-DAY ndigestion makes it hard to work,
Fields and “Berry” Alleyne, is vision. Jordan, who gave a spec- Sunrise: 5.57 a.m ; impossible to have fun. But why suffer
also the first lady balancer ever tacular performance, won by 20 Sunset: 6.12 p.m. | — when sour Upset Stomach is so easy ss
to. take part in one of the pounds. At the, end of the press Moon: New, March 25 to relieve? Take Alka-Seltzer! Simply
A.W.A.B., shows. the lifters were tied off with 17h Lighting: 6.30 p.m. | s : ; f
She is deserving of the title pounds. Jordan took the lead High Tide: 7.08 a.m., 9.27 || drop a tablet Gr two. 400d. 8 glass ¢
Miss Bridgetown, Seven ladies from the snatch in which he beat p.m. : | water, and drink the sparkling,
contested for the honour. Miss Goddard by 15 pounds. In the Low Tide: 12.31 a.m. 2.00 }} pleasant-tasting solution. Alka-Seltzer
Best was easily the winner, hav- clean and jerk he was five pounds p.m. | will not only relieve your Headache
ian ace a ee ane a poster o Gesu He seenvied quickly, but will also help set your
- anc ‘Yr success 230 pounds.on two occasions bu : : Son?
for the A.W.A.B. The Junior failed. | eaatce peg mt ay ytd tee
lifters in the lighter classes were Lifting in the Lightweight j laxative, you can take a-Seltzer
of a very high standard and Division was extremely interest- WHAT'S ON TODAY | anytime! é
should be able to hold their own ing. The odds were on Blenman R.E.C. Conference, Hastings i
against the senior lifters when to outlift Layne, ® House—9.30 a.m. Famous Atka-Seltzer helps mittions.
the time comes. In his first attempt at the press, Coat Grand Sessions — Let it help you too.
‘ Blenman was successful with 10.00 a.m. Tubes of 12 and 30 tablets. y
: Quick Lifts 160 pounds, He was also suc- Art Exhibition, Museum — a a ; -
Blair Blenman of Unique C.ub, eessful in his other two attempts 10.00 a.m. ‘ 2 * Paseo tm ar
lifting in the Lightweignt Class, with 170 and 175. See ee 2 ap e tzer ee atk ee
was most impressive, His styie i Layne, for his first attempt, natin Oh Bel Wt : :
the quick lifts enables him to took 165. He went on to press bile Cinema, mont
get a great amount of weight into 175 and 180. oo Bee 7-38 ae =
ss Saas ¥ bod igt 146 In the snatch Layne started 4 oat - ‘ais wretetowrn
rtmpede yweight of 146 with 170 with . which he was SHIRLEY BEST, (16), was crowned Miss Bridge town 1952, at the A.W.A.B. Show at Queen's Park Memorial Site, 4.30
hayes ; as ‘ , ' § 952, W.A.B. I Site, 4.30 p.m.
pounds and lifted against . successful. He also snatched 18v. on Saturday night. She won from seven contestants. Daphne Welch (left) came second and Blaine ~
2 artad Prt os ss rem. He but failed with 185. Blenman Jordan (right) third. She’s lovely
a Bi anatche 35 5 3 : : Si uses Sse eas Sat sll es 4
labs wag Maagivep beter int tee eet i ne cculll alate ean 293999999 F000 GOOFOOT1Y
OOKCC as oO y , € saSsit) ‘a .
press. His 180 pounds was five have done 210. the game lapsed into a tame affair. x If not saved but seekine $
pounds better than Blenman’: It was all Blenman in the clean The first bit of excitement came % Salvation, please write fo:
best. and jerk. Layne was successful when the College forwards initi- 4 % | she uses
The show was however, high- jn his first attempt with 235 wa oe ae ap vt hee % FREE HOOK x | .
lighted by a Judo Knife Display put failed twice with 245. Blen- Hin with one the Danes cunorie Which Makes *| &
given by F, Green and hig part- man cleaned and jerked 235, 245 Wik to bed, Gut once adam’ Ae is 3] ’
ner, This was a hair-raising feat, and 250 in fine style. He totalled ) bungled play. “rT “o" P % GOD'S WAY OF +} 3
especially when one man attack- 625 as against Layne’s 595. e e ay College had lost their chance to y % | 0)
ind Mimvelt ‘Atiig thrcdgh the Middléwélght Division equalise, and this brought the! = SALVATION |
oug he y s his = de inal oe + 4 %
eiv, ~ aad oe i oss eas ions Maakianl NOTRE DAME swamped Harrison College at football Pe os into the 'Aght,: wii 3 PLAIN” >
F. Mustor must be compli- ©) defeated G. Proseod of P: yesterday evening when they defeated them six-nil before “They scor a an-i . x
Pp Club defeated G. Prescod of Palm : . : ’ > They scored one, and then an * S. Roberts, Gospel! * BEAUTY
mented on his very good dis- Springs in the Middleweight a crowd at Kensington Oval. Darcy McCollin scored four other from a free kick which % Hodk .& ‘Srect- Service 70 x
play of acrobatic juggling. He Pjyision, Brathwaite,, who was goals while the other two were shot by Paul Mandeville. | Mandeville took from just outside} Gentral Ave. Bangor, NI. > PREPARATI
ae eee enone, ae an much better in the quick lifts, Yesterday evening’s win placed the Bay Land team on ‘he area. Gitisseten ania a | r A ONS |
best loc. ntertainers. His firs’ 1” : "esc vas fete : ‘ 5 SSSSSSSCSO |
Act wan fo butane” neces cu? 0% 20 pounds, Preseod was g level with Spartan, both of whom now have ten points * Efforts Redoubled eee |
dozen bottles one on top the pyees Brathwaite’s best lifts were: each, and lead in this year’s first division fixtures, Empire ee va , ee pee
other) on his chin. He next | ress 185, snatch 210, clean and — With a game less than both the above teams, have 8 points oe, Oe tists. of |} FACE POWDER in Boxes. Eachus $ .84
iepemeed chairs and finally 4 jerk 250, He failed with 260 in to their, credit. rth dah i ' 1 doubled. their ‘efforts.. Two more | BABY POWDER in Boxes. Each...
. is final attempt in the clean and e attack, and another goal re- oT ed jainid \diccesal s Se 2 ; iy
The Rockley Balancing ‘Team rock. pieced ae. irles 190, Notre Dame, who throughout the suited from a good forward move- ea ee — ot ae these Ses : }]] BODY POWDER in Tins.......csecscsssesessestonsessensssnsee :
aso“ held the audience in sus- snatch 185 und clean and jerk Season have shown great stamina ment, but the referee ruled ape put doer thing into their play. — 3 - Se, t LIPSTICKS. Per Stick 1.50
pense as they built a variety of 959 He was six .and .three #2 condition brought these two of the attackers off-side. p The Danna were six up, five of me ' ars o ks
pyramids. This was a first G\yartey pounds heavier — than errr ita a bear a ve coer Within two minutes of this, them coming in jugt over 15 min- ‘ Sh rs | ROUGE, Per Box ............. 84
a - Vy. t fame, and during e las s 9 Ss, 2 u s J e
in a ene tuies ae ee : ouramme of Minutes of play, so completely Mandevilte found Smith out of waa eee aoe ite Met ae BRILLIANTINE. Per Bottle 1.08 ;
_To climax the programme dominated the game, that they position, and sent through a hard ; . A atte > 2ACTS
— Seca) zt aa lifting, D, Stuart of the Middle- jiterally ran the school boys olf grounder, but the ball hit the right On the attack, and winners by six COE A Frets BEN on cichexccgh Ducbhssdelnsacokesesoambansancatabenaed 1.84
A ‘Grant ae toe Bava Che an y anna gs a ni their feet. It was during this peri- upright and rebounded ve play; goals to nil. \ SOAP in Boxes of 3 Cakes. Bacchi... 2.22
; ; F. seerere . arios Clarke Of we lls a the game that five of the six Smit icked up the ball and i
pitted gpaive ary ere of we weight Class. ers br +. oa ae eet tenteae ; ' b
5 ra with a bodyweight of was 25 pounds etter an ere
118%, two and three quarter Clarke's. College kicked off towards the Saar were again able to or- Savannah Clu Ww " | AVE
pounds lighter than Riviere, was There were over 20 entrants Northern end. The Dames were ganise a forward movement, and ; . y : C
the winner by seven and a half in the Mr. Barbados Jnr. Contest. soon on the offensive ‘and their twice their opponents conceded Tennis Tournament a ets
pounds. For the eliminations contestants efforts were immediately reward- corners on the right wing. .These SH EPH ERD
In the press were divided into two classes— ed when Mandeville beat Smith were nicely kicked by ichaet TODAY'S FIXTURES
Grant's 150 under five feet eight inches and with a hard grounder from close Clarke, the baby of the College Mixed Doubles Handicap
r. ;
each |
Mrs. and Mrs. F. D, Barnes vs.
Mrs. Gibbons and R. S. Nicholls.











































































Barbados, Second was Roy God- First Goal ball. Nothing resulted from his or .
heres a pisaat dard, third Chris Springer and F efforts, however. MG. Patterson. 10-13 BROAD ST
ae fourth Johnnie Evelyn. In the ’ insi be rf
beat fin ii she Miss Bridgetown Contest, Shirley a A NR one RC ae abe. interval, was saken a. 108 Mr. and Mrs. R, S. Bancroft vs
snatch by two Best came first, Daphne Welch t ff the seconds later with Dames one up. Aer, ane sl B= Me op nae ba . + — =!
da half de Ayst ich Smith was able to clear off the Miss D. Wood and Dr. C. G. Man- Y. De LIMA
i a “a eh § second and Elaine Jordan third. jine, but in the skirmish that fol~ Attack Renewed hing e el 4
wha "seek. Grant ; Oat OY de ak Sehtor ene ’ lowed Mandeville drove hard and 4 | FOPCSCS 9000099909009 S TODO SOOO Oa OOO OE
n r r the Senior - 3 . ; , ‘ . % les ‘
ae. euccaeatal sianikion” vaieh will roe oe true to put his team in the lead. Notre Dame renewed the at- ane of soe wea s Double s| & CO., LTD. x §
with 205 while later tihis year. Notre Dame continued tu press tack when the game was resumed, started tg til pg Re: fa mt nT %
Riviere failed in : hard, and twice Smith’s good but it was not long before play ished and will be re-played on : i
his final attempt jor t averted the tisest.. ‘The lost the zip of the first half, and Friday, 4th April 20 BROAD STREET Y
with 210. c SPORTS AT C. H. S. seueinere fiterally stampeded the *
At the A.W.A.B Codrington High School are College goal, but after about three , =o X
Inter-Club ‘olding a Sports Meeting on Wed- minutes, the schoolboys came into | Sq { x x
Championships { nesday, April 2. at 4 p.m. Thefithe attack, and were able to even S & %
dest year Grant = . Headmistress, Miss Griffith hasM lay up somewhat. : - >
was the runner J- MARSHALL invited all old girls to attend, Notre Dame were soon again on : ¥% 2
en Ahern — ia ee eile ii SaaS :
FOOTBALLERS IN TRAINING SCHOOL ee x ;
4 We can supply this in
%
5 . 3s
‘ . ay ' x /
! , wR RED OR GREEN
MO I HERS! ~ fg HT in lengths of
. \| 3%
‘ : ‘ ‘ 50 ft. 75 ft. and 100 ft.
FEED THE = WR
a : ‘ patina ! \ at reasonable prices.
CHILDREN ON = 8
$ This Hose is long lasting, easy to use, and easy
| J & R ENRICHED :
to clean.
| BREAD | SECURE YOURS NOW —
. FROM
, — ’ 1g) rem at
THEY LOWE If... BECAUSE IM})\< PLANTATIONS LTD
| .
| GIVES STRENG?YW & ENERG) .
| SAE SOUDVIPODOSIOGIOGS SUDIOO TN HF PP GIGI OVI PPPS LY PV DLELL APPEL PPE LAP POPPE, a .
| wai as
| WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTO pean |
me 8)
—_—_——OoOOO %| We can supply from stock:—
| : . eo)
MR, GRAHAM WILKES opened the B.A.F.A. Football School at Kensin : - |
ers have been nominated by their clubs to attend the enutne. ‘In the Geiitce ata, aie Wilkes tienes | ee yet the ONLY one the? 7-—_-e—— ees eee | GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
lecturing to the school on (ho art of “trapping the ball.” iy | 6 ft. 7 ft. 8 ft. long
eee nae —- — gives you ALL the revolutionary : EVERITE CORRUGATED SHEETS
rae cao TEN TE
| iney ll Do It Eve: yt LIME eens tra s FERGUSON SYSTEM features! % 6 ft. 7 ft. 8 ft. long
— ST | 3 ;
Coe sore wane VY 1,2 ¥E MA. \ : RED CEDAR SHINGLES
KeTT B cet THAN THE PIANO'S = THE 8
GANNETT N TOWN=SHe, Ci JON Tae lone J wMEsMEY COULD RK BEST BUY FOR || GALVANISED DRIVE NAILS &
| REALLY DON'T TEACH HIM \~ 9 THATS ({ SAVE A LOT OF TIME * E SCRE
A THINGTHEN WE CHANGED | LIKE BLAMING THE AND MONEY BY , x DRIV WSs
TO MRS. CREEVY= WHAT A | WAGON WHEN THE) /° FORGETTING THE \ ' * |
WAGs AND ao | HORSE WONT GO! WSC AND TEACHING , = TESY TRANSPORT AND *: || GALWANISED WIRE NAILS all sizes
“JUNIOR TOO Se THE KIO A . ;
cme) \ & COURTES ‘ || MAXOID PROOFING COMPOUND
COULDN'T REA . i)
A NOTE “NOW HE'S TAKING % G * A black paste for stopping leaks in roofs.
1ST AEC, ‘ ARAGE AGRICULTURAL :
™ a . q IR: as ‘
x $ ROBT. THOM S PHONE: to: 4267, 4450
fe ee PURPOSES || WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LID
. < e \ .
Se |} Whitepark~ Dial 4616 s " , |
hime \
fe | | “OVEN FRESH” V |
f | Oo ‘{SH” SERVICE
ed 60) cage You can get from your grocer or from any shop in the Island the following
; TEACHERS MAY COME | | Biscuits Fresh from the oven :— .
IND TEACHERS MAY GO, | | ’
oN . rie ate ee | « ey ;
Ry ea ean ae MARIE 54e. Per th. SHIRLEY ___46¢. Per Ib.
= ATP OF HE HATLO SHORT CAKE___54c. Per tb. GRAHAM CRACKERS 46c¢. Per th.






MARTY HORN, @‘
Pal




WIRIX SODA CRACKERS





3G6e. Per tb.
| pi chLRE SOR RBNNORRIORET MR UR CINE A NN ALOU LO NN NN ROP RRNA ARC NS INTL NN



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. AFBII. 1. lt_ CLASSIFIED ADS.l rvmx ***** 1 AIR TRAFFIC TCLEPHONE 2SM KKAI, ESTATE IWMMMa'u u> Carfb CnUaw* lb* •furs* ani> an> nunM at naadp or, %  M and %  !"• per war* to* aerb tlfWMl !" d Term* c**t> man* essa o*t. W n a M> and t p m HIS MMl < %  > %  ODir after 4 p.P* •ULUN Tw-daulBoad. % e-clac* irua H" %  irrr, Sapaai Shiittnaford (Mart"' IN MEMORIAM XI ID-In lovmi iMroonof •"de*r mother and MM U**I Itotd. %  • fell aileep on 1-1 Anil. IBM Aikrp In JH. pea. < Out of tight but never otil of Mia* TV>na idaua;nlrt at Clalr 'n Hn Va.iA M 1fr Car -lllt.man Sedan Ul rand : cwdiUam. Don* enly saBP %  noil*. OrBpa Jam tart' IAK IW CHSTVBOIJrT Car: nndllien ion* tyre* Apply II N Otobe Lend, at John Dial PS—m CAB FOBD P*KTMCT in e.c.llent %  ofi.uM nrdee. Pond tyree and M-torv. *ltot ondar %  **• .*•0"-.M.ukC il*nd. Dial MM and day ea> • ifajajaji 1.4 SB-AP. lAII 1'DBU PREFECT One eevood tand Ford Prefect in led worains ,r*er. Apply Barbadoe Aawin JVi, A ."KM Mf.iuvi'i OM %  aSBSnl MP4 Far* Mercury, I*** aapdaL hew upaBHtarr •* " S-a* working "">*• flaabr aWtaado. Arrnclea. Taarpnon. ['Alt A .mi. A ajgi DM dateSt A Co.. Ltd. FOR HI: VI LIVESTOCK Phi Up HOl'SES HLACII COTTAOr MISCELLANEOUS MOOttN FVlUaBSHEIl Meet and Lir.r. Good For aru*PL*. B* I FIATwit* Good aaa-baUrirf rAppl' to Alma Send* Worth.!* CLOTH--Don NEW MODERN FLAT aI Tartar*. Ion ">u. i ...ooaM Hitrhan and plmiiatof runnin* waarr in all aadroonii. nrni to PaxKlw aaarh. and a faw niin.l" w %  fmn> Ooll Cluk f-->r* ajan 1 4 _ t f „ W VMIII CVaaAV PIAintm. far Tta w wa M ...l.llra it Than) Bioa Dial MM U IM-I ( > %  jltN*. ML* 1 i Jaiaaa' 1 *jdj 1 SaM ato>. Hid all bag BM m o darn Bundalow %  UNO ALOW A aaarl. %  MNM wall Manaalo*/ altualad al Cbaito* K..MI 1. i Huoaal. paMfjraaaaj %  %  VnuOil. Drawmt! and Dmlna" rooma. tr.raa b*"ooma, and a* l ada r a ton*-., n,—n aaraa* nd aan^nV-' nam apwioua >-rd aa* toad aaalldaM for tUtobaa aardart Afddy HVTCHIHaON A BANPIBU) ,, I M I .-, MB BBj -f"M'-r. bMai IA,VD-.t t>U ( ,!• Connactlnd Paliflaid L_ind. Apply H atuart I Land with a iwarl%  ua Linaa. Mtualad ftodM arwtoa '-K AUCTION kav* aara to da 1,1 H al b (tot aa—a .( Oar aatoto of Dilirl Qiaaaa. DaCaunr La—a ra aanar toatn aa mpv > at ua tor MUa a paalto a w at l—^ a fit Ird April at 1 p I aara B 1.1-rtM of Uaf H Ctorttr Mm. lwa> abbtUm aa toada of taa> Oriflth aad 11. .Via Oraham Aa. 3*U idjuaia (aat of land at Half DARCV A SCOTT Aurtlona*! MHIb Mraat ilVAl — %  lfi ON iivuu .aa ratrl* MMa arr*. PairbaniK B*tty Fairbaaka. iMa CulUParwartb. MollU Culanaaworth Aim Cull Inaa worth. Jonn CulPraaj Aalaraa Carljla Batlay. Vara Blid rram Trlaldad WaillMj M. Clafkt. C Mtt l_ Moodaan. H ll law ~ Caaartona. C Kipa % %  Ora don Miina Manhall Char'* CapaHl. Maihaw biacrm CacM Hunt* I.. -Uaa Owiihrnnr Daatlva. Dana* Bactiara H P. Phtlap Rnal Norah CANBERRA, AuaUaUa, March 27. BREST. March 31. jho AdmlrUatTBtor at Northern StroBfly arm-d mobilf gu*td* TerniorjF. J. Wot daBBlibld to-day broka up a Communist nc w tlook on the cMttle industry inspir-d Ituiigar March of more to wxlrmciy gTBT-T. Re ald than 2.000 workers demonstrating ho position waa grim not only against ">e "Ann Worker*' policy this %  — nn but in auoeMMlIng, br-icd The demonstration, called b* breadpr* .. the Uenrial Labour ConlataaraNorthern Tftrrttory probably Uon is 1 "trul of >tran s -th' a in was the worst in the dttKta***. WUll. •"UJT 1 OH itu ar riuit ALCTIOM TI'IBOAT lal Aanl At Loawr Maaon Hall Rlrarl al 1 rajtod H>Ko*irtwith drawing A din* nip rooma. 3 brdroonu. kilrKrn and .-loaat. a/aJMT mm lipht. r—ivam/. palnp liniM-clkon on application In lh^ MIBNIIDAT tod AprM Al i ofBra Mlddla Slnral at I a'rrark. %  ha pinpaitr tailed "Tho Crotona" at DaPSaM Road It coniitti af almoat ', aero of IwaS aral a toMao wtaach haa upon v—andan. drawlap and datiinp uaaa. ) brdroorBA. kiubao. walar toUct i.d oath, aad rpackoua )ard inapri;• •• Faarto BBM ... F-Hard. Barb a Caiappn Rawt,. Marfarrl Snuu>. t'tt" Mi. TabPtofT. Buaara BUmiBfa yrar-n.4. Miriam Ytanaaf U..-i Tatoa. Haraart Aarouh. Hrrwrrt fpton Harbour Log Brh Xaao Aruba. tkh Mar-. Yacht Canbbop Brn OanSrnta W M V Lad* J.i Per. Maria Hl.lla M V 111... Star. Brh Turlla Da* a. Brh H.mP. M Brh Hmry D Wallaaw. "rh LawUlpha Br* Malls N Jorvaa. Sell Al laul. Sen VOTtoc. arh zito WoaMla, pen PltiUp H Franria W Smiin ch Jrribln* Robert. AaBIVALA lao Aruba. M tana net r.pt Briautl. faun Orvnada Vhoonar Msraa HannoMa 1 luni net. tit Sell... Ittan St Lucto S n Colombia 1 SSI ton. net. Ciot Dupont. fremi Mart' HELP • A HAJJOUfAN for COnod aatory to artiva w^*. Appl. ; Ft Q C o Advatate Ad.erMaine Dept QL'M ARABIC—Britain. Beat (cleaned. %  Uae la* poiinda or Ml SB pound tola. I U cenla per pound. Do not delay sa 1 it an 'GLADIOLI fa DAHLIA"—Order! now balag token for CladtoU an* Dahlia. •ar drlUary in December IMS. paiti-. miere.Ud In boohina plraap phone **tj T Oaddra Orant. LU. IS S SS Ian 1.1 A' 1 ehatte h .teaen. al HarU (. ibta i|> | p a with ahed Ft. tfalranlie palmpi and na other u it x S with kilt hen. ctoart %  Ml palti.u rprrRBBAT .trd April At my antee Mlddla BtraM at S p.M D.aaa aquan feet of land al ii„.,-,' w Road, Nt Oolf Cauna feat of land al Knight %  Lan, • aataury Read H hai a well a a uW aale for Mrtrnen paratoa AMD :.at apuare feet al Nav* Uardaii n-AF*CT A SCOTT. AKeUanear. Middle btre. 1 B.a,fj ... BaaMa %  Rtl HAS %  rhoaaai Fnuiklyn D H fil Ci.pt Sraly. for B.illah 0..1. Bchoanar Laudalpha. *o tn> bunbt tor Dentlatoa tfainaBpr Ma4l> H Jonaa. Capt Cloiide. for Dotrmlca M V Carlbbaa. 100 torn m GunJra. lor DwaAUca. B8 Catorrabla. 1.381 kina n DvponL for U K. the l*ce of the muunUng popularity of Pinay's "Defend The Franc" programme, took place despite a pohc ben. About 00 111 all downed tools as the hunger march began. The hunger marcher. walfaBa only three rnuea of a proooa*d M mile hike te Chapal of Quimper before police intervened and turned them beck to Brest A %  (range feature o. the derniNiiU.iwn WM that it also wea backed by IBM* Vacal branch of the ( %  ..iholu Workers' Union —UP. LOH (.ratltCotton Goods loCoet Mon* • )NHM rage I 11 tough pricvp will come down. In thu case >t u a fallacy. Pratat Ww "If Japan phould wage a real price war we know tney cou.u i'. ul but then' another Bide to that question. If the colonies trauv fxtnsivelr with Japan lo the .letruuent of the British textile industry the? will deal a hard blow to British economy and they will not benefit from the general .-lump in this country." Mr. Alckman added thai Lancashire cotton executives had had a number of meetings with colonial representative* from the textile trade to discuss their requirements. ^to.r. OBHVKVAN< E OT HER MAJESTTB aMsTTlBDAT The Queen has approved the date already aniwunced lor The King's Birthday this year, namely Thursday. 5th June, baing chosen for the ceia^ratiori of her own official Birthday in IBM. Bar Majest> has also approved that her official Birthday should always be celedate to be chosen on the same principle as that adopted Thursday early la June. 2. ID accordance with the provisions of the Bank rW4day Act. lat. Thursday the 5th of June IW2. will be a Bank Holiday Ml 53— 2n Gums Bleed. Teelh Loose! CHANCERY SALE BARBADOb Capt Cap! m mil voi'iiis HAIR CUTS NATIONALIZED MUNICH, March 26. liarbers in communist Czechoslovakia have been forbidden tu massage scalps, wash hair or offer brillianUne since hair cutters have become employee* of the state ding to Radio Free Europe. The keeping of private razors for steady customer* is an "egoistic relic signifying a secret craving for the return to Fascist daya;" according to Radio Free Europe.—OJ*. ST. JOSEPH CHURCH a> From Fag* 5 should think of pulling their weight There were taxpayers who necessarily contributed to the Church and, belonging to other denominations, had to support their own denomlna%  was told some had to contrimitc eggs. It was agreed to increase last Stop r^orrha>a and Trench Mouth In 24 Hour. StH5tf!R9Brsrs.M Iba laal of taatb, to* Uao cnroaM rbeuaiatuai aa* baart uaabla. Now Discovery Saves Teelh Imiaip. UM diara*-rr of aa Sa mrl aaa an S •tbar toeui "day* !" njKraa^^Ki that Friday at the aame place %  parUruUra on applicatton to me PUlntlaT ncTTR NIGat. KUA* JOHNBOft Itelcndpni DOBCAS WHJJAMB l-H-UfarTT: AH that rertain piece or parcel of land attoala in Upper Cotrvmore Bock to the pariah af ftatot Michael aa* Island of Barbadoa conUlnlna by i dw l— if—a i it one nmd be ihe am m-ira ar leap IjutDBI aa* bom-iinp on laada now or i-le of Jamaa H WUaa. ol CaSfeartpa WikM. l Claaaaat Laapaa. af Jaroaa Far* and of Ml a. Loulap M-Uett arid an the public road or howaavr air* lha aaana may buH and bou nd Topctnor wnh lha n.iaanaga or dwalllnphouM caOad "AVatDOJT" and all and amsuiar other tha h iu n i aad oulbouaaa both freehold and ha net on the aald land rratted and built aUndlnd an* baUtp with the appurtonancn. ate*. OATg OF RAU .,,, A pu. itsg II WILLIAMS. I tafjetrar-ui-Chancery SHIPPING NOTICES IbLAJf.S. MM. S S ~TEKt>A" ir achadulrd to tall | front Adelaide February i: ih Melboarne Marrh led, S>dney March 10th. BrUnar.p March Und aim Ins al Tilnidad aacHit April Zlnd and Barb a dot about April BBUv I In addition la %  tic til rarao thli rap.


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TUESDAY. APBIL I. 1K2 BARBADOS ADV Ot ATE PACE B.G. Gets Court Of Criminal Appeal