Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






eee

Harba



ESTABLISHED 1895

\





Vestry Move To Take

Scavenging Dept.

Expansion Desired

THE Board of Guardians of

Mr. C. A. Brathwaite, Mr. A

. R, Toppin—Mr. E. D. Mottley

and the Chairman of the Commissioners of Health Mr. J. M.
Kidney were yesterday appointed by the Vestry to meet

the Dean and Cathedral
acquiring by the Vestry of a
Department.

The motion for the a
by Mr. E. D. Mottley.

the Commissione
the purpose of extending
o any other purpose which

Mr. V. W. A. Chase, member of
the Commissioners of Health, said
that the matter had been gone
into very carefully by the Com-
missioners and they had arrived
at the conclusion that it would be
very desirable indeed. It would
relieve congestion,

Mr. Mottley who made the
motion, said that the suggestion
for the acquisition was the result
of the Commissioners going eare-
fully into the matter, The ultimate
decision rested with the Vestry for
an approach to the Legislature to
be made in the matter. |

He hoped he would not be
astonishing them too much when
he said that they would be having
to employ more men that year be-
cause of extensions, There was!
not sufficient room at the depart-
ment to provide an adequate store
room, especially now that more
areas would be scavenged and more
stores would be needed.

The Department of Education
had seen fit, in their wisdom, to
close down the Church Village
School—he understood that the!
building was dangerous for school |
children—and it was felt that it:
was a good opportunity to extend |
the department. He then moved
that a small Committee be
appointed to meet the Dean and
Cathedral Council who are in
charge of the building.

Mr. Brathwaite said that they
should not have to purchase the
building, but it should be handed
over.

Wait For Maude Report

MreeMiltey Was opposed to the
view of acquiring the building,
partly on the grounds that they
should wait until the Maude Re-
port went to the House of Assem-
bly and because, he said, there |
was sufficient space at the present |



Council to consider the possible

site adjoining the Scavenging

ppointing of a Committee was made

The site is the Church Village Girls’
School which is now not in use. te

The Vestry were asked by

rs of Health to consider its acquisition for
the Scavenging Department and

the Commissioners may think

Hon. V. C. Gale
Churchwarden

Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., de-
scribed by the outgoing Church-
warden, Mr. McD. Symmonds as
a man whose sterling character,
integrity and genuine gifts fitted
him to hold, not only the office of
Churchwarden, but he would say
without hesitation, any office in
this colony, was unanimously
elected Churchwarden of St.
Michael at its Vestry meeting yes-
terday.

The Vestry also made appoint-

ments to various Boards yester-
day.
» Seconding the motion for the
election of Hon. V. C. Gale as
Churehwarden, Mr. E. D. Mottley
first thanked last year’s Church-
warden for his painstaking and
formulative report which he pre-
sented to the Vestry before the
new appointment was made.

Mr. Mottley said that one thing

{that could be said of the report,

Pspecially in
there is so

these
much

days when
trumpeting of
persons about social work, was
that it could help assure them
that none of them could say they
had anything to be ashamed of as
far as their duty to the under-
privileged was concerned.

Worthy Heritage

“Not only that,” he said, ‘but
We ,are.proud of the heritage
whieh ‘was passed on to us by
many Vestrymen who served here
before us. For indeed whatever
may be said of the system by
some individuals, it can be said
that there has always been on

the St. Michael =



Over Site Of School

Automobile
Assoc. Has
370 Members

CAPT. St. John Hodson
re-elected President when

Wai
the
First Annual General Meeting of
the Automobile Association of
Barbados was held at the Boveli

and Skeete Building, Coleridge
Street, yesterday afternoon.
Hon, V, C.

Gale, former Vice-
did not stand for re-
election. Col. R. T.:Michelin was
elected Vice-President in his
place. Mr, E, A, Way was re-elected
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer,
The

President

Committee appointed are:
Messrs. Blair Bannister, Ronnie
Gittens, George Challenor, Jnr.,
R. S. Nicholls, Bernard Bannister
and Lieutenant-Colonel
There is a
this

Connell,
vacancy on

will be
lady,

Committee which
filed by an enthusiastic
accepted by the Committee,

Arising out of the minutes Capt.
Hodson
the Honorary
Treasurer

said that their choice of
Secretary
well

and
was carried out,
Without

not

Mr. Way there would
have an Automobile Associa-

tion,” he said.

said that courtesy was one of the

tinues at 10 o'clock. this moa

oe

FRIDAY. MARCH 28, 1952





FINE FI





‘hurchwarden for the ensuit
year. She knew that it w:
irst time that a woman had b
‘lected to such an office in tt
island and although some peo
The finish of the 80 yds. Sprint in the Senior Division at St. Michael Girls’ School Athletic Sports yes were likely to be critical, sh
terday. First was 8S. Worrell and second V. Alleyne who was Victrix Ludorum of that Division. hoped that with the assistance «

Crown Closes Case. U.C.W.1. Hope

—~ t

To Study

In Murder Trial vx. piatects |

THE CROWN

its case against Joseph Gibbs at |
3.30 yesterday afternoon after calling another four wit-



Professor A, K. Croston, head of

members of the Vestry, her t
of office
ably
decessors,

Commissioners



Mrs. H. A. Talma First
Lady Churchwarden
Appointed In B’dos

MRS. H. A. TALMA the wife of His Worship Mr, H. A,

Taima, City Police Magistrate created history when si cM,
came the first lady Churchwarden to be appointee m Bar
bados. This took place yesterday at a meeting of the

Christ Church Vestry. é :
Mrs. Talma who was senior guardian for the !



chial year was proposed by Mr. C. S. MeKehizie, the out-
her : a

going Churchwarden who described
proper person to fill the office.”

Mr. H. St. G. Ward seconded
Mr Talma thank
Mr. McKenzie
had

replying t
the kind
about he

t
tor
made
ured the Vestry
vork she had done as a guard
vas in the interest of the ps
She thanked the propose
econder and also the Vestry {co
taving elected her to the office «

nee he

that





he Board of Guardians

and othe

would
with

compare
those of

favour
her |

Other Appointments



Other appointments made \
follows:
*oor Law Guardians: Mr, Cc. Il

and Mr. C, B. Brandford 5
of Highway MRS. Bf A. TALMA

S. Me-



‘his term. of office, Unfortunately

He said that the membership ; H. St.G. Ward, Mr, C
; the English Department of the - . . ’
. ha dene, arly 0. p roma | oe 8 Pp onzie . ’ ravin r

Ee eine ete at nesses to substantiate the charge of murder brought against | University College of the West Kenzie, Mr. C. M. Drayton , :

He informed members that the “ & " : | faslnn Mr, T N. Peirce, Mr. H oo
British Automobile Association’s]| the forty-two-year-old\peasant proprictor for the death of | eae ee: the Advocate yester Garnes mat

: . : a g 5 | > t re. tte
Annual Convention would be held Duncan Headley.—-his Brother-in-law—-on the 18th of Jan- |@®¥ that his department was pre ‘ommissioners of Health: Mr. C. S P; | ribute
br. -Lendowt ite this bebe uary last ” ; paring students for the General McKenzie, Mr. H. SUG. War ay
d . Degree of the University of Lon- : “) St.G ard ;

eee mae +S ppd as Among the four witnesses who ra |don. The courses in English aré 7 . = BR ene - ea T M: ‘Kenzie
WORE OO et ee Se coats. # |gave evidence yesterday was | the London courses with som MBisdundictt and would represent Automobile) Eulise Headley, widow of ithe modifications, but the standard i Representatives on the Boa
Association of Barbados at this|deceased, who occupied the wit- lthy , . “University {2° appointing the Rector | . , )
Recantion. nies MAGA’ foe the ace @iithe jet ot Ee. London Universit; Vicars: Sit Dudle, ca anal ; MEMBE RS of the ¢ bret co! reh

Members then discussed thelafternoon session which lasted | | “He nit that the main moai-|M®- J. E. Webster for the Paris) \ h ry At mene iN Pla Mi mar
various problems —confronting}from 145 to 3.30 o'clock, She ; fc teed opping of Ola{chureh: Mr, H. C. Sealy and Mr | {he manner in tied One 4

Hnaiidte eried on the witness stand as| | feations “are the dropping of, Ole}; ntiel AM : for St Ber} MacKenzie had carrie ou 1
Mr. Way pointed out that the|she underwent long and. detailed | English and the introduction of a ae ee es eee - luties Churchrt . den of h
A.A, had no voice in the stopping |cross-examination by Mr. B, K considerable amount of “practical’’ «70. 1g Representative ond Mrs-| "en. aud aise fou tt ah
of parking at Shepherd Street, but| Walcott, Q.C., “Senior Defer ee rmer me Dae SORES Of 1: a! tales, Chanwerded, tr totes ae han cen to ae
businessmen of the area had com-|Counsel, and blamed the whol | poems and passages of prose whic! Officio sieving the eeu of the Re
plained to the authorities that they |incident which led up to the cas: jwere not taken from the text Trustees of the Archer Gitten: {port Mr. Cc. M. D no
aha inconvenienced on another sister who she said | book lhe department laid great i t r i: Mr. A. G iat Ape care toate Chur 1¢
were e Pe hy. in ‘evidence “told the defendant | | Stress on the development of eriti rus nara r G. Gitte nat the ‘ 7 OIng it : :

Two Suggestions — to cut the second bunch of bane- | eal ability of students readin; |Mrs. H. A. Talma a ed ' “iota Bens ca ,

Mr. an vr y= wae tend nas “over which the dispute | | English rather than a mere stock Sas ao . ~~ 7 ue at the Pari ae as + : ‘ PS ae
He said that as in Trinidad, re | arose: leriticism of set books from!Church r. B.S ouvier oug por Bie
could be a daily broadcast »ver Mr. Walcott, Q.C., who is asso | histor ies of English literature, | "Tuner of the weer ut St Rat eehane 2 pep 3 tie reiv
Rediffusion reminding people oflciated with ‘Mr. J. S, B. Deas “Course are not ‘exclusively | tolomew's Chapel: Mr. L. ©, Git Mi Stacktanste thenited
me meee one range s about and instructed by Mr, D, Bape concerned with modern jiterature; | tens. t membe vs for their kind word

The second suggestion was about |field, Solicitor, ‘will start | hi even though Old English has been| Keeper of the organ motor 4 ured them that he had tried
courtesy on the road bt a a address to the jury on behalf of jecliminated; there is quite a full|the Parish Church: Mr, F. W. God to do the best he could during
said was lacking in Barbados. He|the defence when hearing « Middle ara

main objects of the Association,
Each member should be courteous,
setting an example for others to
follow. In this way they wouid be
able to launch a large scale
courtesy programme. l
Col, Michelin appealed for mem-



Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
conducting the case on
the Crown, will then address the
jury in
Mr, Justice G, L

|
who |
behalf |
|

'

|

reply, and His Lordship
Taylor will sum
ip the case.



\course in Engiah litera. |d
ture and there ly for that partic
{lar course some linguistic study,”
Allin all, the student who has
followed the courses for ‘three
jyears in Intermediate and B.A
| (General) in English, will have a
| g00d outline knowledge of English



SERETSE KHAMA

Seretse Turns







| ho’ Wage NY duvinise that thes bit
quite at ise «

cause he had a very reliable and

Mussons
Must Leanne 2 8

{while he Vil



his mind wa

person of

















































uarters, is Vestr, ‘Ss, no matter g aes Heard A Voice | literature from 1350, plus detailed (From Our Own Correspondent islanel
Should ngeRg into any” capita |t0 what walk of life they belonzed,| bers. He said that the, Association own Job Tn jicniee ee ee me eseese| sowrOr-SPAIN March yy, | al
sana Ml . aecision we |who were always interested in| Was in need of funds to carry out| seven witnesses gave evidence |fied books and authors; but above} Mr. Beaumont Celestain, acting RN ee eee cane
a . t es wade Report in | the welfare of the under-privil- their programme, ,On Wednesday, the first day’s . ie, he should have developed his]Chief Magistrate today orderec ar seat eo os ar ins
made as to the Maude . In © Wakave “pl 5 . hearing of the case, and on re- J leapacity for reading with diseri-|Captain Roy Musson, an English- | @ble : nount worh ang wer
amr bine Et sete? 2ate oo oie eee ee sumption yesterday morning, the! amaica \" Eiation See man and his British Guiana-born | a recat sg 2 4 av
i 3 re : ‘ 7 nn lie ive Belle} ! é ; , E Le R. ae a on should also go to Mr
oa eased to the. catia The St. Michael's Vestry, he , Fi h pe Tne co — oe a LONDON, March 27 Professor Croston said that “dt} wife Vivienne to be removed from | yi). well, He was very pleat-
. : said, could hold its head high. ti ts = eee ev tte The British Government \-|is hoped to start research within]the colony. They will be detainee ed that the Vestry was quite
building. 2 : ; . She said that she knew the accus- | ri ver a eres ir iatal sate Te etati q > sat
me S0gee that ..all the: lorstes Cuneo ts te fe as 2 ed well and also knew .the de- nounced to-day that Seretse | the next few years on West Indian Making ne Ps & i ws onl isfied with the manne zo which
oy ‘ara | S¥mmonds as he made reference Pl Lt l eased ‘ell. Winifred Belle of: Khama, Chief designate of the |cialects. ! e er on the appiica~ hig work was carried out :
used could e oa a ny Jin | 30 the effect of the three or fou | en l u — ct sous all On! Bam a ito tribe, banished from The language departments of|tion of immigration authorities! yy, caid that he had to thank th
oF ap by Se ato disicinn? two or| thousand dollars for paying for Re 18 at bout 4.30 pn, she the reserve in Bechuanaland after |several English Universities have|the Magistrate refused the appeal two Guardians, Mi | Ima a
a an a | shingles for the poor and destitute | FOR the past two weeks there wan we sae sister’s house and! his marriage to Ruth William | hown great interest in this} and also disallowed bail. Mr. Tfill. the Poot Li ROOTES
® hether the Gov-| in the parish, he felt that Mr. have been large quantities of fly-|peard a voice calling out “Joc! | London white girl, would never be | scheme and the University College Thirty-five minutes after the the Matron h orekeey and
Seekh wend umate ich x. ;Symmonds seemed very cowie in “Ash on sale around the City Joe!” : recognised Chief of the Bam-|bhas promises of help in the way|order was made an_ Immigration ' {he Parochial Treasurer who fron
ernment ee ee Suen ex" Tt was a service which they pr in surrounding districts. Osi Then she went to the window of | angwatos ; jf staff from the University of| Officer escorted the Mussons to a time to time rendered Se eee
penditure, anyway, were responsible for + ors many occasions fish were sold be-}the house and saw the accused, | I Salist C nwealth | London as soon as the scheme is| waiting taxi to take them to the uable as intanes aed conte! uted
: : z sent and he ha : . cote pa vw % ord Salisbury! Commonwea ae a “i
In Right Direction ee ues te now the Gov-| low the scheduled price, Gibbs coming down the “bank it ae ee etary. told the | underway. Royal Gaol, °
Hon, V. C. Gale observed that if}... rould have seen the wis- Late on Tuesday night people|with the deceased rushing dae cf Lata, tie wine wold | aaaiiabeaaenemeetmtecgineeien
the recommendations of the Maude oe — aside a sum of| were buying fish at one cent each. |down” behind him with ee Se inivited %. heminate dnathert C D W Will Chen ===
SOME tinmn: thet they weave. | Sane’ to, ances In Weaporery 19-| Bethe of eS lata anf ee ide ot Bevavs Bee noer | Chief in place of Seretse,, Chet UW. J bi ”
would mean that they would re- irs to the homes of the destitute} in cold storage plants and sold on |s ? yi ad. 7 cUS=\ Designate or his uncle sekdi |, a a
j. Fears 40 ; the following da ed was walking with a knife in] 75°)" = Hected a: | 300 F War 8
> y: ; vo | Khama, Regent, who objected to or
@ on pase 5 @, mH page 5 During the week plenty of iced|his hand and was ee ie his marriage Seretse Khama | ® ; fn
2 roast iatiias tals asec oa aed Ail ere bald nthe. ko MaeaeNes [80 front of the deseasee deniy | Who has been in London since hy | At U.C.W.I. Hospital
: eae od h from the previous day’s;™men, were = walkin Pas cp was exiled.two years ago has been | 4
RIDING AT ANCHOR cateh, this fish brought six cents | 17" rth Toe fie but . the offered a Government post in | KINGSTON Jamaica, March 27,
. each early in the afternoon if to - he ated Mon the | Jamaica, Lord Salisbury said, CD. & W. will ive 2 10,800 tc
aiiiiane 7 ety dhe accusec never Jaite the ' .D, + Wi e
th at From about 6.00 p.m. every day blow and both of them went into Seretse was exiled for five | build two additional wards at th
the price of fish drops to four cents @ tiinch. ‘i years by the former Labour Gov~- | University College Hospital té en-|
each and a few hours ‘ater they | i T Genseent Seretse’s marriage has|syre world recognition of the ad
are sold at three cents each. | Before they “closed ee cach" caused a dispute in the tribe. hospital as a teaching hospital for
' | A housewife told b Tees eet be omens named ace Since marriage Pareten's wile | training, doctors and nurses, d
| vesterday Ce Se oat ee eee en ae *" has given birth to daughters. Jamaica is bearing the whol oO d li an !
| | ari i ing ; accused retreated, s ting the rd Salisbury sé F ur delivery vans
| !dried a large quantity of flying‘ accused retreated, still facing Lord Salisbury said the post |.) oe rukeine th 6 hospital
i | ; She will be able t use them | deceased.. a ffered to Seretse Khama injoo on ‘ il }
' } wae flying fish are out of season. | The accused “went into” the Faiaic a was that of Administra- Minister f Social Walfore told the } OVEN FRESH SERVICE |
ae ¢\deceased after ihe (the deceased) | tive Assistant at a salary of £770 House ft Re sanacitativas it. 13 6xe! : |
i | e raised the stick as if to hi om a year with the prospect of pro- ae ot Pe World Heakh O: |
{ {When they clinched both of ther stion to the rank of Assistant | pected tha : y satth a” J
13 Injured In tugged at each other and ae Seomstery at a higher salary ganization would set up a regions now make it possible for you to i!
they both fell to the ground. She} : : 7 area office in Jamaica which, :
| 1 | i t did not see the stick after thé Beretse told abr Ma Coven gradually is becoming the heac get our Biscuits from your grocer i
; | era men “closed in” on each othet oday ne tee ek ree “| quarters of health and — f th h t te you in }
Before both men fell to the! ment’s offer of a4 po . ee n the British Caribbean e e sho neares
WINNEMUCCA, _—— 27 ground they held on to each opher} ( mum ating ot ag tig ey or trom p
arch 27. as they were hugging @f¢W) ernment’s decision the e woul -
Thirteen persons were treated |S it ~ _ ever be recognized as Chief ot 8 AWARDED any part of the Island.
| 'for minor injuries after a land~| Phe head of the deceased was} the Bamangwato tribe in Bech - ION
| pslide derailed a locomative and. the chest of the accused, The|analand but would be offeres COMMENDATIO Each shop or grocery is fitted with |
‘ | [three cars of the Chicago bound |} nds of the accused were around| job in Jamaica he declared ; CERTIFICATES Cc p !
i Western Pacific Railway train|i}. neck of the deceased, They! feel { cannot possibly be, pré . 2 i t kee the ||
i “California Zephyr.” | struggled for sometime before} pared to take bread out al THE Non-Commissiondd Officer air tight containers Oo p
_ The accident took place last hey fell to the ground, Jamaican mouth, By this ine lund’ ibs of the ‘Babbados Pouce Es s g f mn
| nist “ = oh Se The deceased fell to the ground| tion the British Gee = he Mg ag oa yes Pag biscuits crisp and resh.
j , about nes pet ame jon his) side. (the witness agaim, Gying to: placate Bouth eee foe vtination or the Lucy
| Ja cut in a remote hilly part of 4\ demonstrated how the deceased | by offering me a post as far away os eee a ae =
| desert about 40 miles outside | fell to the ground.) Hi back | as possible from South gerd tron i} valk a 1 aly eee. ps
| | Winnemucca. * | was to the bank of the road. She|by a great desire to do right b Atal tai “ebesenor Police Statior
| Aboard “y a se 149 | could not say which side of his Brits Africa oven if let ea “ reper = ) Station
) | Passengers an crewmen. body the deceased fell on, Mean-| alienating thousands of Africans.” | yesterda é. i
| including the injured stayed on nile the accused was on the! He said ha had informed Lord | The award to Station Sergear SE D F R SO E TO-DAY
| | the train. body of the déceased but she|Salisbury y« terday thet An Clarke was a posthumous one. N ( ) M |
a i ioe fon could not say what part of the) would fuse the off of | He died ares year a ‘|
hauled to anagan, Nevada from! |... f the deceased the accused! post 11 Jamaicar the case was sti in progre a ‘ nen - ‘ }
where the train will continue to; soy a Ce i csi a the [wife received the certificate MARIE (SWEET) 4 (ents Per Pound
' Chicago. Tons of storm loosenec' | j ; a Neouie it J , uld Those awarded certificates wer . r 2 oe @ ome een an as
Ss .. \earth slid onto the tracks tipping | Accused Walks Off | Jamaican jf o on . inaneliaee watenes Hadion, Bereta: Ti ena ae !
j | | the locomotive and baggage car to Oe aca e aoe I can be even |Clarke, (deceased), Sgt. Alleyne SHORT CAKE cra te a ae a " H
a 45 degree angle. After bending over the de my ‘ » the Bamangw to /CpL*’ 289 Babb, Cpl, 477 Bryan |
A railway spokesman said two}oq for some time, thi s sani : : P« 336 Sergeant, P.C. 399 ' j 46 {
a =f) .E jlamy and i Se " Spemenan amends =e ‘ ij
i —U.P. @ on page 5
aninabohe estate

GRAHAM CRACKERS_...46- ,, ,, ,,

‘ + aa oe = r s T > aa > “is
Ste unisian Protest
Auriol Rep lies Sternl} lo WIBIX (SODA CRACKERS) 36, 4, |

light of the trouble



PARIS, March 27. were scheduled to fly to Tunis th The text of Auriol’s reply was | 1D the which | = hall aad |
President Vincertt Aurio] and his afternoon to present the Pre not disclosed but Ramond spate eetae ve Pisce Te a i}
| | Ministers drafted a new note to dent’s reply to the Bey'’s protes!|lin, official spokesman fo; Nido » me oe and ria as ga
*’; |the Bey of Tunis and delegeted|against the arrest of Tunisian | Government said the Ministers ae. ves a rains cy a a
two of the President's Aides to| Premier Mohammed Chanib ) Cees are te + de 3 that eb p ge Or to !
take it personally to the Tunisian three other Tunisian Minister taken, during the past ow A ee unis . ys ie Fel eine Prats ab : . ; pana : _ |
| ruler, The Ministers’ nree by the French Mesi¢ent ere eee Rea cal q ie to the pr ) THE WESI INDIA BIN [ I ( () I) }
| Jean Forgot, Secretary General| emergency jmecting was devcte I ‘ Je Hauteclocg : iicave Pra Gotlve a ‘ 1 0 j dh L [ \ oe El . |
WILLIAM HOWELL and Frank McNulty, two Australian yachtsmen, /to the French Presidency and the! entirely to the study. of the « were “completely justified.” — ~ eat ce tir 1 ah nails 2 re| |
look around the harbour from their yacht “Wanderer II” which arriv Director of Auriol’s personal plosive situation in the tect Marcellin said the Minister ‘f my "80 1 i a a6! intusad een
ed in Carlisle Bay from Las Palmas yesterday. Story on Page 8 Cabinet, Jacques Koscusko Morizet | orate. viewed Hauteclocque’s measures | Han ere ane = — ey







—U.P







8

PAGE AGE TWO





Caub Calling




RS ROBERT RANDALL,
headmistress of Queen's
College whe will read her report
at the School’s Speech Day this
afternoon is the widow of Dr

Randall of England who up to the
time of his death in,.195U0 was a
Research Scientist and Assistant
Director of Research of the Na-
tional Coal Board.
Mrs. Randall
small sons,

who has~~two
took up her appoint-
ment at the College in October
1951. She succeeded Mrs. E. J. D.
Corbin who resigned in Decem-
ber 1950.
She hold
gree from

a B.Sc. honours de-
Reading University
Before coming to Barbados she
was Senior Science Mistress,
Balgowan Secondary School,
Beckeram. Previously, she was at
the North-Western Polytecnic
from 1936—49, While there, she
taught Mathematics and Science
at a Technical School for girls.
During the war she was a
Mathematical Instructress to the
Fleet Air Arm and R.A.F. Cadets.

The programme at the College
Speech day to-day will comprise
three songs by the Upper School.
In addition, there will be an
Epilogue to “Saint Joan” by
George Bernard Shaw. This will
be staged by a cast of over ten
senior guards directed by Mrs
R. Bynoe and assisted by Miss E.
Nurse,

Thére will be an address by
Sir John Saint, Kt. C.M.G. while
Lady Saint will present the
prizes and certificates.

Headmaster
HE new Headmaster of
Charterhouse is Mr. B. W.
M. Young. elder son of Sir Mark

Young G.C.M.G.
ernor of this
promoted to

a former Gov-

island who was
Hong Kong later
captured by the Japanese and
who~ resumed his governorship
after the end of the war.

Mr, Brian Young who was an
Etonian Scholar went to Cam-
bridge afid returned to his old
schogl as Assistant Classics Mas-

ter in 1947. He has now been
appointed head of Charterhouse
to succeed Mr, George Turner
who retired in September.

To many Barbadians who re-
member the brilliant administra-
tion of Sir Mark Young and the
intellectual attainments of the
family the appointment to this

post at the age of 30 will come as
no surprise. They will join in
sending congratulations 16 his
parents and to him.

Back to Canada

R. C. J. MOREAU of the C

nadian Bank of Commerce
and Mrs. Moreau returned to
Canada on Wednesday by T.C.A.
after spending two weeks’ holi-
day staying at the Marine Hotel.

Ca-

Other Canadians returning
Home by T.C.A. on /Wednestiay
after spending a holiday at the
Marine were General Me Laren,
‘ir. Perley Robertson and Mr.
and Mrs. Alex Patterson who
were down here for about a
month,

MRS. R. RANDALL

For Youth Congress

EV. E. W. Dunbar and Pro-
fessor V. E. berry, General
Secretary and Youth Secretary of
the Inter-American Division of
Seventh Day Adventists of the
U.S.A. are now in Barbados for
the purpose of conducting the
Youth Congress which opens at
the Drill, Hall tonight and con-
tinues until Sunday.
They arrived here
from Martinique and
at the Hastings Hotel.

on Monday
are staying

Rev. Dunbar and _ Professor
Berry are cn a South American
and Caribbean tour conducting
youth Congresses. They leave
here on Monday afternoon by

B.W.LA. for Trinidad

+ Rev, Dunbar will be broadcast-
ing over Rediffusion on Sunday
night at 8 o’clock giving his im-
pressions of his recent tour of
Europe.

Welfare Adviser
M* W. H. CHINN, Social

Welfare Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
left yesterday ‘morning by B.G
Airways for Dominica where he
will remain for one week. He is
now winding up his tour of the
Caribbean area.

Mr. Chinn expects to be back
in Barbados on April 3 when he
will take T.C.A. for Bermuda
before returning to England.

While here, he attendeq the
Conference of Social Welfare
Officers of the British Caribbean
area at which he was the guest
speaker,

Winter Visitors
R. AND MRS. COLLES COE
regular winter visitors to Bar-
bados, left for the U.S.A. via An-
tigua by B.W.I.A. yesterday.
Also leaving yesterday was
Mr. Glyne Mahon, Assistant
Branch Manager of B.W.1.A. in
Jamaica who returned home by
B.W.LA.



Mathematical Prodigy
ISS SHAKUNTALA DEVI,
India’s 2l-year-old mathe-
matical prodigy who can find the
cube root of a nine figure num-
ber in the fraction of a second is

now back in Barbados forâ„¢about
ten days. She arrived last night
by B.W.1LA. from British Guiana

and is the guest of Thani Bros.

While here, Miss Devi will be
appearing at the Empire and
Roxy Theatres giving perform-
ances of her mathematical skill.

Returning Next Year
FTER spending three weeks’
holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Scott
of Toronto, Canada will be re-
turning home to-day by T.C.A.
This is their first visit to the
island which they like so much
that they are planning to come
back next year for a longer stay.
Mr. Scott is Assistant General
Manager of Ditto, manufactur-
ers of office equipment.
Short Holiday -
R. A. E, TAYLOR left on
Wednesday evening by
B.W.LA. for Trinidaq for a short
holiday during which time he
will look after the final distribu-
tion of the estate of his late sis-
ter, Mrs. A. E. McCutcheon.

Off to the U.S.A.
RS. S. A, McCASKIE of

“Manchester”, Beckwith
Street, left on Wednesday by
B.W.LA. for Antigua and San

Juan on her way to the U.S.A. to
join her mother in New York

City.

Fourth Visit
RRIVING on Wednesday
night by B.W.IA. from the
U.S.A. Via Puerto Rico were Mr.
and Mrs. Richard W. Sidenberg
of Ithaca, New York who will be
spending a week's holiday stay-

ing at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Sidenberg who is paying
his fourth visit to the island is
Director of Research at the Ag-
ricultural Advertising Research
Inc. This is the second visit here
for his wife.

For Three Weeks

N Barbados for three weeks’

holiday are Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Clarke of Trinidad. They
arrived earlier in the week by
B.W.LA. accompanied by their
two children John and Ann and
they are ‘staying at the Hastings
Hotel.

Mr. Clarke is Material Super-
intend@nt of U.B.O.T., South
Trinidad,

Interesting Race
ACHTSMEN are reminded
that the handicap
the Sixth R.B.Y.C. Regatta which

will be sailed in Carlisle Bay on
Saturday are the same.

Many yachting enthusiasts
forecast that the race will be a
very interesting one. They feel
that the wind will be much
Stronger than in the Fifth Re-
gatta. .

Ae



Women Im ane ews=5

Mrs. Olga Sym monds



Mre. Symmonds,
and. ‘kindly nature,
“Olie” by her friends, She is a
hard worker and from a very
early age has played a great part
in Social Welfare in this Island.

of lively step
is known as

Mrs, Symmonds is the widow
of the late Mr. A. F. Symmonds,
brother of Mr. McD. Symmonds,
Churchwarden of St. Michael.
She-has three children, Algy,
Noel and Pat. Mr, Algernon
Symmons is an articled Solici-
tor’s Clerk while Mr, Noel Sym-
monds is Clerk of the Sugar
Industry Agricultural Bank, Pat
is now at Reading University
taking a Teacher's Diploma.

News has been recently
of her suecess in her
inatfon,

Mrs. Symmonds was a member
of the Girls’ Industrial Union
from its inception and was then
a member of the Committee and

received
first exam-

Helper of a Club, She is now
Registrar Mrs, Symmonds
through her spirit of enterprise

fas helped in all departments to
make the Union the successful
Institution’ it now is. As Leader
of Club 6 she contrives to give

entertainments and shows every
vear, Already this year this
Club staged a Variety Show and
Dance at the Union Rooms.

Social Welfare



Once President of the Child-
8 Goodwill League and
Mrs, Symmonds is still

a@ great supporter of the League.
She is very proud of the good
work done to help the

R.



MRS.
children of the island,
she
Conference of Social
Trinidad,

OLGA SYMMONDS
In 1936
represented the League at a
Workers in
Again in 1938 she was
sent as Island Representative to
British Guiana by the Members
of the Women's Social Welfare
League of which she is a member
of the Committee. She was once
President of the Riverside Club
and is now on the Committee of
Management,

Mrs. Symmonds is a member of
the Barbados Welfare Committee

poor and the Welfare organised by Mr.
RES ~

EXCELLENT

Cc, S. Stanley,
Secretary, Barbados,
a member of the Wages Board
for Shop Assistants; on the En- |
quiry Committee of the Black
Rock Baby Clinic and Sematary
of the St. Thomas Nutrition
Clinic,

Mrs. Symmonds is very thank- |
ful that the widespread distress,
of mothers and their children
in this island has met with the
ready response of the public and

Ex-Colonial
She is also

hopes that one day there will be

many more Clinics to cope with
the needs of the people.

Girl Guides
She is a member of the Lana
Girl Guides’ Association and
also on the Selection Comiittes|
for girls to work in an Auxiliary
Hospital in the United on
She was made a Justice of
Peace in March 1949,

Mrs, Symmonds is a prominent
member of the James’ Street
Methodist Church and Sunday
School Teacher, She is also on
the Committee of the James’
S‘reet Scout Group and organises
the programmes of entertain-
ment, harvest festivals and other
social events of this Church.

times for

BARBADOS

Folies-Bergeres

One hundred and sixty thousand pounds worth of |

ADVOCATE



spangled, feathered tourist bait was cast with a strictly |
Parisian “boum” along the Grands Boulevards to-night.

It is the 28th Folly of the
Folies-Bergeres — naturally the
costliest, most brilliant of show
business extravaganzas.

The new star of the show, 2 22-
year-old lovely who began in —-
back row of the nudes at
Yvonne Menard, has been Ba
moted to clothe.

She is, even more, worth seein;
and they let her speak a few lin
now, too,

New nude star is a young
Swedish mannequin, Siv Norden,
who takes a bath in 17,000 galions
of tepid water in a gass pool that
rises from the stage.

In 2) hours 41 iast-moving and
fantastic pieces of scenery take
you from full fledged railway
trains in the Gare St, Lazare to
the smoky depths of a vast opium
den and up to the crystal gates
of a Negro Heaven.

The opium den is a king never
seen east of the Seine, and the
Negro Heaven is strictly the foyer
of a Ritz run amok.

While they are building some of
these scenes there is time for two
rather interesting little sidelights
on the orchestra edge of the stage,
One Js called, rather spitefully
a a Foreign travel allowanee

ritons) and the *
Notions? ) other “United

Mark well the first. The
Frenchman's idea of “un Ang.ais”
green pork-pie hat and tweed
jacket staggers bellowing into
Paris. In a few swift moves he
mixes his drinks and loses his
allowance,

A charming young thing com-
plains to him: “The trouble with
you English is that you think all
Paris lies between the Opera and
the Madeleine” — a few hundred
yards. She gives him a kiss and
a free ticket on the underground
and says “Come back with the
other £25 next year.”

They know something about the
cost of living, apparently ‘hese
French.

The United Nations piece is a
satirical picture of the “

average
European of 19€0.” He, apparent-
ly, will chew gum, tweak in-

delicately, drink cola, read books
called “Blook in the ‘Geraniums, *,

Mage. ians and

dance the rumba,,and shout most |

of the time unintelligibly.

Those 41 scenes are magnificent- |
ly handled by %9 hard-working
engineers back-
tage

“Les girs” wear 10) miles of
gorgeous material and fathoms of
feathers almost half the time,

Gilded girl cages pop out of the |

oof. Revolving stages, now scenes

and moonlight—definitely wet —

pools succeedeq each other with
astonishing rapidity.

It certainly is not culture.
mag not be art. But what en-
gineering!

Vive le mecanisme.
verdict.

DIRECTOR SIGNS

HOLLYWOOD, March 27.

Argentine Director Hugo Freg-
nese signed to direct Mike
Frankovitch’s _ technicolor pro-
duction of “Decameron Nights’
starring Louis Jourdan and prob-
ably Joan Fontaine in the femin-
ine lead and Peter Ustinov in the
chief supporting role.

Exteriors will be filmed in
Spain interiors in England.

Financing will be provided by
the Anglo-Americah Film Cor-
poration of Greenwich, Connecti-
sut.an and Bros Films of London.

That's my

}

It |

cage _—





|




fa

Across
Led Peg to make the vow. (6,
Shifty. (3)
. A sable rat (anag.). (9)
| 10; Turn back. (6)

11. May have a life line? (4)
. I simply invade the nave.

(5)



4. Brief tissue. (5)

is: How you would pursue WW
falconry. (4)

| 16, Natis well finished off. (5)

19. Makes resting easier. (7)

21. You do on 19 for comfort. (3)

22, Scent 1 get from a creeper. (6)

23. Rabbit upset by poetry. (3)

24. Potentate to make hash of. (4!

Down

1. Do they go shares with a stern
rap? (8)

2. Usetul sort of hangovers. (5)

3. Sharing to embellish. (7)

4. A way to found his stable. (9):

6. A small street with atmo
spars. (5)

6. A mumber take op 4 curtatied

| 2 Down. (5)

8. wauea. ‘In’ song, with carrots.
(4 9. Water grass. (4)

12, Gard in rotten shape. (6)

17, Measure of a feature. (4)
18. Espy a brief communication. (4),

20. Title of his irritation. (3)
Solution — of poazerday's pussle)
Across: 1, Fortress; 9, (ap) Pea(se);
Rein: 11, Stanza; 12. ‘Present: 3, ial.
® ‘stroll a at Hate
ler: ie
Ai nt; Opera: nS Fave ;
tention: 6. _
8 Snap: 10, Hany feel!
+ 16 Pears’ 18 Nose if on



Rupert ane the New Bonnet— 20



The great squibs fling out their
stars with such force that the pals

have difficulry in holding them,
and Bill fails to note where his
sparks are falling. Suddenly. with-
out the shighcest warning, there is
a gigantic ‘‘swoosh” and a



column of fire just in tront of them
As they topple over in fright, a
cloud of thick smoke surrounds
them. Very shakily Rupert crawls
forward for his basket. Then he
stops and stares in horror. Where
his basket stood there is now only
a patch of blackened grass |



BY THE WAY e ee By Beachcomber

VEN those romantic people
who base their judgments on
Statistics must have been rather
astonished to read the statement
of a politician that “Every fourth

bite of food enjoyed (sic) in
Britain last year was not paid
for.” gia!

If this is universally accepted,
it will introduce a kind-of rhythm
into eating; at every fourth bite,
the eater will mutter, “This one
is not paid for.” But imagine
the ingenuity and toil that have
gone into the preparation of this
Statement. Not only have the
nation’s mouthfuls to be counted
by vigilant officials, but allowance
has to be made for the size of
each mouthful, before striking an
average. For instance, in the
case of a greedy man who crams
his mouth it may well be the
second mouthful that is not paid



| ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT
ROODAL THEATRES,
THE GREATEST BRAIN ON EARTH
SHAKUNTALA DEVI

See and Hear her Unbelievable Gifts at the

EMPIRE—TONIGHT 8.30
and ROXY ON TUESDAY APRIL 1ST at 8.30

|



REMEMBER — CALYPSO NIGHTS BEGIN AT
THE EMPIRE ON THURSDAY MARCH 27TH



for. What is wanted is a Stand-
ard Mouthful, established by law,
in ordei to facilitate the findings
of the Statistical Committee,

Horse’s hat filled with
beetroot unofficial

Sometimes his pigeons travel
in his two Rolls-Royces.
Morning paper
O get a new car for your
animals is not as easy as it
was. For instance, in the matter
of pigeons, a conscientious official
might ask, “Can théy not use an
airline service like other ani-
mals?” And it will be pointed out
that even important dogs often
have to use buses and trains
nowadays. A ruder official might
even ask why they can’t use their
wings to get about, as other

birds often do.







at 84 cents each. Nylon Briefs

Also ON SALE Nylon Stockings

:

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singers)

JUST ARRIVED—Lovely Cocktail and Cotton Dresses, Jacq-
mar Scarves and Squares, Pure Linen Men's Handkerchiefs

at $2.23 and $3.22,
at $2.50 for 2 pairs.e







Her hobbies are reading, story

and play writing. She is very
fond of music and singing. Not
only does she enjoy classes at
the Union in cookery and pastry
but at home she does her own,
In the past she has travelled only |
on business but it is her wish to|
see New York and England in
the future,



VALUE

SATIN 36 ins. at $2 ets.

WHITE,

BLUE, PINK,

LEMON.

Butterick Patterns in oll Coming Styles.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS





DIAL 4220
S aeaiaieeiarrn
COMING EB TOWN
PORCE OF ARMS
Wifiam HOLDEN--Nanc OLSON





—_—_—_———
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310



YOU R SHOE STORES

“PLAZA €







TODAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING DAILY 4.45 &8.30 P.M

TOMORROW

5S ANOTHER DAY

MIDNITE SPECIAL

SAT
| Triple Attractior

29th

RAIDERS OF THE DESERT
CHEYENNE COWBOY &

RUTH STEVE
ROMAN COCHRAN
ALSO THE COLOR SHORT—CIRCUS TOWN
SAT, SPECIAL 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.n
BADMAN'S TERRITORY
ndolph Seott & Geo. “Gabby” Hayes
} RIDER FROM TUCSON
R Tim HOLT, Richard MARTIN





|



| aoe

Tex Beneke



Glenn Miller Orchestre
SS SSE

DIAL 4606

“CINEMAS

——| BARBAREFS —Dial 5170
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing DAILY

Warners Spectacular Action Hit!

“HIGHWAY 301”

Stevo Virginia
COCHRAN GREY







SAT. SPECIAL 1.30 p.m

ALIAS BILLY THE KID



|
|



wer




Gary
Merrill

— and —

Oskar

Werner

British News and

COMING: BARBAREES
OUTRAGE



OISTIN—Dial 8404
TODAY & TOMORROW 445 & 8.30

STROMBOLI

Ingrid BERGMAN &

TALL IN THE SADDLE

John WAYNE



aa

Special 1.30
Law of the West

Midnite Sat. 29th
Outlaw Gold

- ’ ; Johnny Mack Johnny Mack
Sunset CARSON & BROWN & “oat
: an
CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE |} miaie: tee th ttord
Wild Rill ELLIOT as Red Rider Tex RITTFR Whip Wilson
SaaS OSS SSO



GLOBE ‘x,

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing



Now a Movie of Breathtaking Suspense
Now a Movie of Breathtaking Suspence



Starring P ted
Papa) \i\ yy ‘By 20th
- Richard ntury-
Basehart

iFEFORE DAW Nie
:



Extra— ONE NOTE TONY (Cartoon)

20th

Uny Fo,

A dramatic
expression
of our time
in a Motion
Picture
hera‘ding
a New Day
of Screen
greatness

News of the Day

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY to SUN. 8.80 p.m

MATINEE: SUN 445 p.m.

BUCCANEER'S GIRL

(Color)
Maria MONTEZ—Jon HALL &

FOREIGN LEGION
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO
“MIDNITE SAT. 29th

RIO GRANDE PATROL

Tim Holt & Richard Martin &

FIGHTING GRINGO

George O'BRIEN

|

His life story

He applied for the job; was
Tejected,
But when he’d got jover the
shock,
He saw that the man they'd
selected
Had a taut and impeaccable
sock!...
His dreams have now come to
fruition,
And one thing he’ll never for-
get—

When applying for any position,
Wear a Thorogrip Garterette.

B.B.C. Radio
Programmes

FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952
11.15 am. New Records; 12 noon The

News: 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4.00—7.15 p.m. 19.76; 25.53 & 31.32 M







4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m, The
Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. From the
Third Flrogramme; 4.37 p.m. Interlude;

4.45 p.m.
vrini, 5.15 Listeners’ Choice 6 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme; 6.15 p.m.
Have a Go; 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up
and Programme Parade; 7 p.m, The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis.
7 1G—10.30 p.m 25.53; 31.32 & 49.42 M
7,15 p.m, Indian Dian;;
p.m. Record Vafety Bill, 8.15
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs,
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week; 9
p.m, English Magazine; 9.30 p.m. Cele-
brity Quintet; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m.
The Debate Continues; 10.30 p.m. From
the Third Programme

PLAZA |.

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)

Music Magazine; 5 p.m. Sem-



7.45
p.m.

West





OPENING TODAY FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

TERROR-ROAD orn
Tri-State Mos!




















Clete cara
PMN SiC)
Fnac s

STEVE COCHRAN
VIRGINIA GREY - GABY AND:

Warren ane oraceree ay ANDREW STONF



(DOWNTOWN) | R.K.0's Theil

FRIDAY,



MARCH, 28, 1952

| Teddy Wrote Hanid a Letter

—It Was Very Shor
By MAX TRELL

TEDDY, the Stuffed Bear, said
to everyone else in the playroom:
“How do you write a letter?”

Mary-Jane, the rag doll, thought
for a minute. “It all depends on
what kind of a letter you want to
write, Teddy.”

“That’s right,” said Mr. Punch,
“Suppose you went to a party and
you wanted to write a letter of
thanks. That would be one kind of
a letter.”

“And suppose,” added General
Ti... the tin soldier, “you wanted
to write a friend of yours inviting
him to come to your party. That
would be another kind of letter.”

A Third Kind

“And suppose you ‘wanted to
write to your grandmoth jer teiling
her about all the things that hap-
pened since the last time you saw
her. That would be a third kind of
fetter,” said Knarf, the Shadow.

Judy and Hanid and Mrs, Cuckoo
and Whoz, the Hobby Horse, all
spoke up now, telling about other
kinds of letters. Such as a- letter
thanking somebody for a birthday
present, and a letter telling some-
body else to have a very happy
birthday, and a letter hoping some-
body whom you know gets well
soon, and a letter asking somebody
to come and visit you.

“There are lots and lots of differ-
ent kinds of letters,” Knarf said.

“Yes,” said Teddy, “but how do
you write them?”

“First,” said Mr. Punch, “you
get some paper and a pen and an
envelope and a stamp. Then you’re
ready to begin.”

“Then,” said General Tin, “you
write the date at the top of the
letter. You don’t,” he added, “just | ‘
write down Tuesday or Wednesday
or Thursday—or whatever other
day of the week it is—but you write
se the whole date, like July 14,

49,”

“Why do you have to do that?”
asked Teddy.

“So that whoever is reading your
letter will know just when you

t But It Said a Lot—







|“You need paper and a pen,”
told Teddy.

Punch
wrote it. You see, Teddy, there's a
Tuesday and a Wednesday in every
weet:. But there’s only one July 14,
1949 in all the world.”
“Then,” said Hanid, “you start
writing your letter. Now suppose—”
“Suppose,” interrupted Teddy, “I
wanted, to thank you for inviting
me to your party. How would |
write it?”

“Just like this,” said Hanid.

July 14, 1949
Dear Hanid,

I had a wonderful time at
your party yesterday. The ice
cream and the cakes were the
best I’ve ever had. Thank you
very much for asking me to
come,

Your friend,
Teddy

“Oh,” said Teddy smiling. “That’s
@ fine letter. But I think it’s too long.
I think it should be much shorter,

! think it should be like this—”

July 14, 1949
Dear Hanid,
Your happy friend,
Teddy

Everyone in the playroom looked
at Teddy in surprise, Then they all
laughed. “I think,” said Hanid,
“that Teddy knows more about
__ citer will Snow just when you | letter-writing than he told us.”___ than he told us.”



GIRL HAS HALF HEART

FORT WORTH, March 26,

A three-month-old girl Sharon
Bussey may have only half a
heart and will undergo a delicate
test to determine if she can be
helped by surgery.

Sharon now lies in an oxygen
tent at Fort Worth hospital.
Doctors say she is in constant pain

A heart specialist said previous
X-Ray pictures indicate that the

ROODAL





right side of her heart may not
be working or might not be there
at all.

The test will involve injection
of dye into Sharon’s body. X-ray
pictures will be taken every half
hour of the outlines of the heart
chambers to indicate to doctors
how her blood flows and the condi-
tion of her heart,

—UP.

THEATRES







EMPIRE

OPENING TODAY at 2.30
and Continuing SAT to THURS

(only) (No 8.30 Show)

445 & 8.30 p.m.

All the Excitement, Suspense and Gripping Drama







HENRY STEPHENSON o! evoteene

Screenplay vy Vavid Loan and Sianiey Haynes -AL Aitices Rank’D ga

TOMORROW 9.30 SPECIAL
MANHUNT OF MYSTERY ISLAND



- of the
world’s most
cherished
story comes

brilliantly
to life!

by CHARLES DICKENS

ALEC GUINNESS-KAY WALSH FRANCIS 1. SULLIV AN
FOUN HOWARD DAVIES #: ove

Directed by Dovid tee
Ati d PrOdCtion > tymund anny EAGCE Lise

iatwan Preseatat tee
| TOMORROW NIGHT MIDNITE
Whole Serial—

THE roe

SHADOW



OLYMPIC

TODAY to MON, 4.30 &
ll-Packed Double—



VICTOR MATURE.
TERRY MOORE

8.15 p.m. TUES 4.30 (only)

We eer

occult racket’ revealing

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FRIDAY, MARCH, 28,



1952

Staffing

Boys Leave School

Too Young— fammona

EXPRESSING concern

over some of the school’s ex-

amination results, Mr. J. C. Hammond, Headmaster of Har-
rison College in presenting his report at the school’s speech
day on Wednesday afternoon blamed the present standard

on three main causes.
Firstly, the

instability of

staffi—the frequency of

changes and a large number of temporary acting masters:
secondly, the economic pressure which results in boys of
good ability having to leave school young in order to earn
a living and in contrast boys of mediocre ability remaining
on because they cannot find jobs and masters having to take
on out of school tuition and thirdly, the growing pressure of
subjects at the fifth form level.

He said:
The School has had a most suc-
cessful year. In the public ex-

amination last July we entered that

ance of the academic school. La-
dies and Gentlemen I am old-
fashioned. I agree, of course,
this type of education has

53 candidates for the Advanced only value for a limited number

Level of whom 51 were success-
ful in at least one subject, and
many secured three subjects. Due
to the peculiar circumstances of
a tie between the Nicholls broth-
ers in Classics, and the generosity
of the Government, the School
had the unique distinction of
winning five Barbados Scholar-
ships in one year, In two of
these cases we share the credit
with other schools, since the boys
were transfers at Sixth Form
level: Hutson whose work in
Mathematics was quite outstanding
had spent only two years with us,
and came from the > School,
while Phillips, who had spent
three years here, came om
Foundation.

But, I think, more significant
than the actual award of Schol-
arships was the generally high
standard of the work produced,
and that six other boys from the
School were declared of Exhibi-
tion standard. The results in
Science rival the consistent reli-
ability of the results in Classies,
and our Sixth Form well main-
tained their reputation

In addition to the Barbados
Scholarship winners, J. A. Wil-
liams won an Exhibition to the
University College of the West
Indies, C. K. Laurie, who had
recently left, was awarded an
Exhibition to the Imperial Col-
iege of Tropical Agriculture, and
R. St. C, Cumberbatch who
reached Advanced Level in four
scientific subjects, was offered the
Bovell Scholarship which he had
to decline since he had accepted
a good post with an oil company.

I would like to digress for a
moment here to comment on the
“golden eggs.’ You have in Bar-
bados three First Grade Schools
which take their better pupils
— and there are numerous — up
to first year University standard.
These boys can win exemption at
school from their Intermediate
examinations and their first
Medical examination; they are
generally exempted from the first
year of study at a Canadian Uni-
versity, and find even at’ an Eng-
lish University, where the course
of work is shorter, that they
have covered much of the early
groundwork. This standard is no
sudden achievernent; it is the out~
come of years of tradition; it is
something of which we are proud,
and of which I think you, the
public of Barbados, are also
proud. I have said many times,
but I will repeat, that it is this
quality of academic work which
js the primary contribution of
these schools to the Island,

But to return to the analogy
of the “golden eggs,” the goose
needs a careful diet. These schools
find the recruitment and reten-
tion of staff far more difficult than
those that have no sixth form
work. Let the figures speak for
themselves: This is my third
speech day, and I have made
18 appointments since my arri-
val m this Island!

Furthermore, the size of forms
cannot be increased without loss
of efficiency. It is quite surpris-
ing to those who have not been
si asters, what a difference
five or six boys in a class can
make. Most of our forms here
are now 30 in number, and any

increase beyond 25 is, in my opin-*

ion, progressively damaging.

am probably as well aware as any
man in this Island of the pres-
pure to enter the School; every

who have the particular ability
to use it, and it is all to the good
that different curricula should be
provided for those with differ-
ent talents. For instance there is
an obvious need for the devélop-
ment of technical education in
this Island.
not difficult to see the danger
that the extension of many va-
rieties of educational project may
hold for the academic school. It
would be a grave and probably
irreparable mistake if the stand-
ard of those schools which are
the necessary source of supply
for the néw University College of
the West Indies was neglected.

There is a second fashionable
fallacy which also needs scotch-
ing. Briefly, it is that anyone can
teach anything provided he has
some smattering of knowledge
about it. I do not believe that to.
be true; I believe that a boy’s
education depends on the quality
of the man who teaches him, I
believe that contact with a truly
scholarly mind is of real -value to
any student, and that if a school
loses the services of men like Dr.
Hamilton, Mr. Isaac, Mr. Sweet,
and Mr. Springer, that it loses
more than just a man with the
necessary knowledge to cover a
particular syllabus.

One of the most gratifying as-
pects of Barbados to me, and I
think to. any schoolmaster, is the
deep interest almost everyone in
this Island takes in education. It
is that. that encourages me to be-
lieve that if we state our prob-
lems clearly, you Will keep a
watchful eye to see that our
standards are protected. :

Though the results at Advanc-
ed and Scholarship Level were so
gratifying, I do not consider that
those at the Ordinary or Fifth
Form level were of quite the
Same standard. The new Certi-
fieate as you know, is a subject
examination, and a Certificate is
awarded if a boy satisfies the
Examiners in only one subject.
It is true that they will not be
satisfied with less than the old
Credit standard, but, none the
less, it is very easy for a school
to conceal its failures beneath an
imposing figure of certificate
awards, I have therefore made
a careful analysis of our results
this year in comparison with
eredits gained in the School Cer-
tificate in previous years. The
analysis is comparatively reas-
suring : we secured this year very
nearly the average of five cre-
dits per candidate, and with the
exception of English, our results
have remained proportionately
constant or improved. Particular
improvement was shown in His-
tory, Chemistry, Botany, and,
though still a weak subject, in
French. You may well ask there-
fore why, if analysis shows our
results to have been maintained,
I should cast doubts fn our
standard. My answer is that the
new examination has exposed
weaknesses more ruthlessly than
did the old one which allowed a
lower. or pass standard. There
were the same number or more
credits gained, but there were
necessarily more failures. My
second answer is that the results
were too “patchy” for my liking.
A number of boys gained truly
excellent certificates, but many
gained comparatively poor ones
We have been shown for instance
that the standard of Mathematics

None the less it is .



Difficulties

and methods of expressing them

were rath’ tco uniform and
lacking in freshness. This ina-
bility to think for themselves,

even under examination condi-
tions, showed itself especially in
the work for the Scholarship
paper”. Schoolmasters are al-
ways contending—or if they are
not they should be—against this
so-called practical outlook
amongst their Sixth Form pupils,
who wish to read nothing and
study nothing which has not im-
mediate and obvious relevance
to the narrow syllabus of the ex-
amination paper for which they
are next sitting. They distrust
the romantic notions of idealists
about the value of English ex-
pression or of ideas about other
aspects of life than the narrow
field they are studying, Mr. Joad



Mr. J. C. HAMMOND

in one of his books tells the
amusing and apochryphal story
of the elephant who slipped over
the edge of a precipice and fell,
trumpeting with terror, uprooting
trees and startling birds and ani-
mals, and the student who de-
scribed the incident in terms of
the co-efficient of friction be-
tween the elephant’s posterior
and the face of the cliff. It is
that deliberate limitation of out-
look against which we must in-
veigh. The new scholarship
papers of the General Certificate,
and even more the Scholarship
examination of the University
College of the West Indies, will
continue, and vightly, to penalise
the candidate whose scope of
knowledge is too limited.

We have tried to provide the
opportunity for the correction ef
this by Library periods. Seniors
have up to four a week, where
the only rule is that something
other than a school textbook must
be read. If properly used, these
times can be of more value than
most boys. realise.

To criticise examination re-
sults which have yidlded very
nearly the average of the old
Matriculation standard is prob-
ably unconventional, and may
well seem hyper-critical. I would
rather fac@ jsuch charges how-
ever, than one of complacent op-
timism. To criticise without an
attempt at assessing causes or
remedies would be largely pur-
poseless, and even though any
such assessment must be specu-
lative, I propose to try.

. The most obvious suggestion is
that the standard of boys we are
receiving for entry is lower. En-
trance examinations are said to
show less accuracy in the ground-
work of English and Arithmétic.
I have probably not been here
long enough to give any judge-
ment on that; but by and large I
doubt whether it is the explana-
tion. What is true is that there

are certain groups of boys in
various forms in the School
whose standard is not what it

should be. Last year for instance,
we had to be unduly lenient in

allowing promotions from the
second to the third forms.
Much more important jin my

view ,is the instabifty of staff.
The frequency of changes, and
the large number of temporary

1

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

acting masters, is bound to have
a cumulative effect by under-
mining the groundwork of the
lower forms. A. boy of high
natural ability can generally
surmount this difficulty; but not

so his less talented neighbour.
A further cause is the present

economic pressure. So far as
boys are concerned this results
in boys of good ability leaving

school young, often before they
have sat for public examinations,
s0 as to start earning a_ living,
and also, by contrast, in boys of
iédiocre ability staying on at
school longer than is profitable
because they cannot find employ-
ment, So far as masters are
concerned it too often means the
strain of a number of out of
school tuitions and lectures un-
dertaken as an economic neces-
sity, but which unless treated
with care and moderation reflect
on school tuition.

I have already referred to the
size of forms, which is more
serious in some subjects than in
others.

Finally, there is the growing
pressure of subjects at the Fifth
Form level, That pressure -is
relieved in the Sixth Forms
wihere boys specialise; but it is a
serious problem in the fourths
and fifths,’ where ¢xaminin
bodies, while preaching a genera
education, have a tendency when
setting the syllabus for a particu-
lar subject to forget the pessible
time that can be allocated to it,

This is a problem which has, I
know, been exercising the minds
of headmasters everywhere, and
1 think it is particularly severe
here; since there is little doubt
that it is not so easy to work long
hours at high pressure here as
it is in a more temperate climate.
We intend in future years to aim
at a boy taking not more than
eight subjects at the Ordinary
Level. This means a_ reduction
of subjects offered, particularly
by the Science forms, and in
some cases it may cause heart-
burn; but I feel sure that some
stich surgical operation on the
curriculum is essential,

I think it possible that this
section of nry report may be mis-
understood; and that, either I
shall be accused of undue anxiety,
or else that I shall be misrepre-
sented as a Cassandra foretelling
the coming collapse of our exam-
ination results. I should like to
repeat therefore that our Sixth
Form results were truly excellent,
and that our Fifth Form results
averaged five credits per candi-
date with the better candidates
securing as many as nine or ten.
There is a shrewd remark in ope
of Saki’s short stories about the

effect of “hours of laboured
boasting” in which he _ suggests
that the audience must be care~-

fully selected. I have too great a
respect for the public of Barbadoy
to imagine it would prefer from
a Headmaster fair words rather
than a_ straightforward expres-
sion of doubts. We are determin-
ed to set a high standard and
not to rest content with anything
lower.

Before I leave the subject of
examinations there is one. final
point to which I should like to
refer—that of strain on the can-
didates. .1 have been disturbed
by the breakdown of boys during

the examination through over-
work, This happened to one boy
in 1950 and to two others in

1951. It is generally scholarship
eandidates who suffer; and it is
not possible to judge whether
others who are able to sit all the
papers, do not do worse than
they would have done had they
not overworked towards the end
of the school year. The average
boy, as all adults know, can al-
most always work harder with’
benefit; but it is as serious a mis~
take for the conscientious boy to
attempt too much, as it is for the
slacker to do too little. I would
ask parents io guard the too stu-
dious boy against that error,

In the same connection I think
that the younger boy can be
pressed too hard by an anxious
parent. I find _too many _ small

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Hinder Progress—

boys leaving school on an after-
noon for some special tuition
We would rather that a parent
saw to it that his son did the
schoo! preparation thoroughly
and was content with that, than
that he paid additional money to
ask a child, tired after his day's
work, to try to cram in a little
extra knowledge. There are
eecasions when for some reason
a y needs: special help, but it
wo be wiser that this was
provided only after consultation
with his masters, and preferably
in the holidays when the mind:
of both boy and tutor are fresher.

The Staffing problem has been
as usual the greatest anxiety;
indeed the constant changes are
most disturbing to the work and
are probably the most responsi-

ble cause of those patches of
lower standard which are to be
found in certain particular forms
throughout the school. The
clever boy absorbs knowledg
easily from various sources; but

the less clever profits by a more
mechanical routine.

We have been in particular
difficulties over science staff, and

seem as though we are going to
face a similar problem with
mathematicians, This term we

lose two mathematicians each of
whom holds a First Class Hon
ours degree,—Mr. Springer be-
comes Headmaster of the Coler-
jdge-Parry School, and Mr.
Jarvis, who, though he only joined
us last September, has already
shown his ability as a_ teacher,
becdmes a Schoo! Inspector of the
Department of Education, Mr,
Springer has been on the staff of
Harrison Colege since 1934 with

one short break. He is a man
with a brilliant mind who has
also a rare gift for the’ under-

standing of a boy. *We shall miss
him greatly but we congratulate
him on his new appointment,
thank him for his many years of
service here, and wish him every
success in his new school,

The School should be most
grateful to Mr. Queree who has
voluntarily offered to postpone
his long leave to help us in our
emergency, and to Mr. Fields who
has undertaken such a heavy bur-
den of work with our Science
Sixth Form since the loss of Mr,
Carmichael to take the post of
Government Analyst.

The School Games record dur-
ing the year has been encouraging.
The biggest events were the tour
to Queen's Royal College, Trinidad
last April, and e visit of a,

jueen’s College, Br. Guiana, and
a Windward Islands team here in
August. We lost both matches of
football in Trinidad but only by
a one goal margin on each occa-
sion, and we showed ourselves
superior at cricket. Here in August
we defeated the Windward Islands
at cricket and had a level draw
with Queen’s, B.G., who, however, |
completely outplayed us at foot- |
ball on a very wet ground, where |
they ruthlessly exposed the weak- |
nesses of dry season footballers.
} think these tours are of great
value, and I am_ sure the last
Trinidad one was. I treasure 4
most friendly letter from Mr
Hamer, Headmaster of Q.R.C,, in
which he was kind enough to com-
pliment our team both on the
cricket fleld and off it, Unfortun-
ately the expense is becoming in-
creasingly heavy, and in spite of
the considerable sum the boys
raised by a play and their own
efforts, we have only just managed
to pay off the last of our debt to
the Barbados Amateur Footbal!
Association who so generously
lent us money interest free, I men-
tion this for two reasons; first to
express publicly our gratitude to
the B.A.F.A. for its friendly co-
operation and a generous donation,
und also as an example of the
difficulty that we constantly face
in trying to maintain the old
stanglards.

To turn to more local rivalries:
We probably had a better cricket
eleven last season than the one
before, though we were not quite
as suecessful. Nevertheless, we

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Our real triumphs were in the
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which has remained high i oO D ? S
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BARBADOS fg ADVOGATE |

Gee cae SS Poses)



Friday, March 28, 1952

cUL BONO?
IN RECENT years the whole burden of
the progressive has been the cry that pro-
gress is restricted by the reactionary or
die-hard and the word conservative, a good
word which has always been used to denote
the excellent human custom of preserving
for posterity what its own and earlier gen-
erations have built up, has been twisted
to mean something opposed to progress.

In fact the cloak of progress can very
often hide the identity of the truly restric-
tive person whose actions are motivated by,
the sole idea of keeping some things or
most things under control if only be-
cause his livelihood or influence is threat-
ened when controls are removed. The mer-
its or demerits of controls are therefore
not examined because the self-styled pro-
gressives have deemed them to be neces-
sary.

No consideration is paid to logic or reason
and if a picture is built up to reveal the
hollowness of the foundations on which the
edifice of controls has been erected it is
laughed out of court by the empty-minded
and not admitted by whatever arbiter of
public policy happens to hold the reins of
power.

To accept this position of negation as
inevitable would be to bow our heads under
a yoke from which we must struggle to be
free if ever we are to escape from the
shackles of those whose claim to leader-
ship depends on the abuse of others as re-
actionary or opposed to the will of the
people.

If this abuse were justified, it would be
a simple thing for the people abused to
shift their allegiance from the discredited
party and to hitch their wagon to the rising
new party of progress in the hope that their
services will bring a reward and a forget-
fulness in time. The rights of the common
man have often been similarly betrayed in
many countries and“at”many periods of
change. But in countries where the lamp
of true freedom and the torch of justice,
honesty and commen sense have been held
aloft there has often been final victory for
those who seemed to be more concerned
with ultimate values and the triumph of
honesty and common sense than with their
own schemes of personal aggrandisement.
Dislike of unpopularity and dislike of
swimming against the tide are despicable
characteristics, and bring no honour to
those whose conduct is guided by such pre-
occupations.

What is wanted now and at all times,
here and in every country, is disinterested
endeavour to do what is best in the inter-
ests not of a majority or minority but of
all.

If this philosophy of life is applied, as
indeed it should be, to the current practice
in Barbados of the government’s attempt to
control the island’s internal and external
trade, the only question which should be
asked is cui bono?

If it can be proved that controls and their
accompaniment subsidies serve the real
interests of the people they should be kept
in force. If it can be proved that they do
not serve the purpose for which they were
intended they should be removed.

But controls must not be practised for
controls’ sake nor because dogmatic asser-
tions have been made that without controls
and subsidies the cost of living would rise
and the poor would suffer while the rich
would still be able to prosper. :

It has been proved beyond all possible
doubt during the past ten days that a con-
trol price is incapable of getting more than
between one cent and three cents apiece for
flying fish on nights of glut, while every-
one knows of its failure to keep the price
of flying fish dawn to the control price at
periods of shortage.

Controls have diverted deep sea fish from
Barbados to Martinique and Trinidad.
Controls have made it impossible for live-
stock owners to operate at a profit even
though they are permitted to sell meat at
the same price as imported meat.

Controls have seriously impeded and
may eventually ruin the six agricultural
stations which were founded with the ex-
cellent intention of encouraging mixed
farming in Barbados.

Controls have so far discouraged local
market gardeners that carrots and toma-
toes can be imported from other islands
and are sold here at the same price as the
local product.

All efforts to grow more food and to in-
erease livestock and fish production are
impeded by controls because controls are
mainly responsible for the lack of any effi-
cient distributive agency which is pre-
réquisite to the success of peasant co-oper-
atives or market gardening. And while
controls failed subsidisation does not serve
the purpose for which it was intended.

‘ The only motive for subsidisation in any
country is to keep down the price of essen-
tial foods so that wage increases become
+ unnecessary. This is not happening here.
Yet subsidisation is continued while wage
increases occur with regular frequency.

If the intention of the government were
to ruin the local economy of the island
(and this suggestion cannot seriously be
contemplated) controls and subsidies seem
to be serving this intention.

But this is the reverse of the position
and the government only continues con-
trols because it genuinely considers them
to be necessary. Others do not. And the
onus of proving that controls do not ad-
versely affect local food production rests
with the government.
















































Mir.

LONDON, March 18.

Any Chancellor who sets out to
plot. the course of the national
economy for more than a year
ahead must base his decisions on
certain more or less arbitrary
assumptions. To say, therefore,
that Mr. Butler’s Budget is a bud-
get of risks is simply to confirm
the fact that no man can predict
the future.

The test by which his Budget
should be judged is, not by the
number of risks he has taken but
by whether, given certain facts
and figures, those risks are good
or bad, Mr. Butler’s Budget con-
tains a mixture of both,

The greatest task confronting
the Chancellor was how to set.
aside enough of the _ nation’s
resources to enable Britain to pay
her way in the world and, at the
same time, ‘carry ‘out her heavy
defence commitments,

Last year, Britain had a deficit
in its balance of payments of no
less than £516 million, The deficit
in the second half of the year
was running at an annual rate of
nearly £800 . million. Moreover,
the loss of gold and dollars con-
tinued at an alarming rate during
the first two months of this year,
The reserves fell by 299 million
dollars in January and 266 million
dollars in February.

In order to close the gap in
Britain’s balance of payments, at
least a further £600 million must
therefore be found from U.K.
resources and applied to
external position. Here Mr. But-
ler made the first of his major
assumptions. He assumed that
between £200 million and £250
million would be forthcoming as
a result of an increase in our
invisible earnings and an
improvement in our terms of
trade.

From the remaining £350-£400
million, the Chancellor deducted
about £150 million for the reduc-
tion in imports — assuming that
half the total amount of the
“real” cuts, as compared with the
fiscal year 1951—52, would be
made good by withdrawals from
stocks—and a further £50 million
for the expected expansion in the
volume of U.K. exports.

‘The remainder — about £200
million—represents the amount by
which resources will have to be
set aside and devoted. to external
purposes. To that the Chancellor
added the ine’ cost of the

the -



BARBADOS ADVOCATE 2. +

Butler's Budget
—~| Arouses Hopes-And Doubts



Hy Ronald Boxall

million in the Government's own
civil expenditure in terms of
resources, and a £100 million cut
in home investment,

Mr. Butler then went on to
make his final major assumption
—that private spending on per-
sonal consumption would remain
at roughly last year’s level. He
based this on the belief that ris-
ing prices would mop up all
excess spending power. Prices
were already a good deal higher
than last vear, he said, and that
would mean about another £400
million on the bill for the same
amount of goods and services.

_ The Chancellor therefore re-
jected the argument. chat he
should make a further substantial



Mr. BUTLER.

cut in home consumption by
increasing the Budget surplus. He
believed that if he left the sur-
plus broadly where it was, “the
money people will have to spend
in the coming year will. .. only
be just about enough to pay for
the goods that are likely to be
available if exports expand as
we hope.”
7 .

The Chancellor, however, did
not take these risks without cer-
tain safeguards. His assumption
that home investment--would be
reduced this year by £100 million
should be guaranteed by the
effect of the increase in the Bank
rate from 2'% per cent, to 4 per
cent.

This increase was immediately

1952—53 defence programme, and reflected in the movement of
arrived at the final figure of £400 Stock Exchange prices. The
million—“the total, so far, of the adjustment in gilt-edged prices

additional claims on our

So far, the most risky of Mr.
Butler's major assumptions was
that increased invisible earnings
and an improvement in Britain’s
terms of trade would help to close
the payments gap by £250 million.
His other more or less risky
assumptions were that the £400
million of additional claims on
Britain’s resources would be met
by an expansion of home produc-
tion by £250 million (the same
as in 1951), a reduction of £50

SOCIALIST Rebel

fard “Q” Martel should have an
early talk together.

Not about the past.

Because the General* blames
the Socialist Party—especially
the “embittered intelligentsia”—
for most of our political follies
since the war, like yielding al-
‘ternately to the pressure of the
Russians and the Americans.

Not about the future.

Because the moment we are
strong enough the General wants
jto counter the Russian cold war

Soviet Union and its disaffected
‘satellite States, showering down
airborne propaganda.

If this does not stop the Rus-
sians from stirring up trouble
abroad—by having to deal with
so much trouble themselves at
home—General “Q” proposes
that we erect our own “Velvet
Curtain” around the Soviet lard
bloc, by which he means we
should make a sea-blockade. He
says we should also tell Stalin:
Get out of Europe.

Steamroller?

So far, “Nye” and “Q” are not

Our Readers Say:

Well Done

To The Editor, the Advocate—

SIR,—The Directors of the Bar-
bados Government Savings ‘Bank
are to be highly.complimented on
their recent wise and thoughtful
decision to allow depositors to in-
crease the maximum of their de-
posits from $1,440 to $2,400.

What this decision means to all
depositors, but especially to the
many horny-handed sons of toil
whose hard-eatned deposits are
left in the safe custody of the
Bank Authorities is best known to
these depositors themselves.

tt is well known that one of
the chief objects and aims of the
Government Savings Banks as an
institution is to encourage thrift
among the masses. The wealthy
end the well-to-do have numerous
sources to tap. and myriad chan-
nels through which to work ‘in
order .to proyide against rainy
days. But the sorry spectacle of
the aged labouring and middle-
class man with the shows of age
upon him, with muscles. and
sinews worn out, and yet without
‘adequate wherewithal even to pro-
vide proper sustenance, is one that
has too often caused me a shudder
= moved me to unrestrained

ars.

Many a wise and thrifty son of
toil with a very modest income
but frightful financial family obli-
gations-and commitments to meet
will see to it that while he has
muscle and brawn his deposits if
microscopic and irregular, are yet
cumulative, And his main object
is to have a deposit to draw upon
when he can no longer earn an
income, or, as is often the case, to
haye a smal) deposit from which
Intérest aecrues, which Interest he
uses to supplement small and ir-



in response to the raising of the
Bank rate was followed by a
sharp rise in the banks’ interest
rate for loans and advances and
also in the rate of interest charged
by building societies for loans on
mortgage.

The_ effect on industry of this
general rise in the interest rates
will be to increase the cost of
borrowing for such purposes as
investment in new plant and
machinery and the carrying of
large stocks of raw materials. If
this further resort to orthodox



What Fd Do To Stalin

‘= By The Tank General

“Nye”
Bevan and Tory General Sir Gif-

liable to have much in agree-
ment, either past or future,

But if they stick to the pres-
ent, this unlikely pair may find
themselves sharing a lot of com-
mon ground in the great politi-
cal argument of the hour: “How
strong is the Soviet Union?”
For soldier agrees with politician
that the Russian steamroller is
less powerful than it looks.

The General (one of the pion-
eers of British tanks) spent a
year in Russia during the Ger-
man invasion, as head of the
British Military Mission,

by a) Western much-warmer

wie, ," The Germans were able to
He advises ‘planting local “Re- outfight the Russians in tank

sistance’ lenders inside the warfare because the half-million

lorries which American Lease-
Lend gave the Russians were en-
tirely used on the lines of com-
munication.

And there they were eaten up
in the quagmire of,the roads,
which were still better than the
broken-down railways.

Now Lease-Lend (for the
Russians) has stopped. Have the
Soviet motor works replaced the
lost lorries? Has Soviet industry
provided the railway rolling-
stoek, the radio and radar equip-
ment which that brave peasant
Red Army was so starved of



régular money gifts given by
grateful children so few of whom
are to be found today.

This brings me to the question
of the Rate of Interest, (3% p.a.)
paid ny the: Government Bank
Authorities on Deposits.

For some time it has been felt
and in point of fact, fervently
hoped that the annual rate of
interest on deposits in this Bank
should be raised from 3% to at
least 4%. And you, Mr, Editor,
and no doubt many of your
readers will recall a letter writ-
ten in these columns a few years
ago by some correspondent obvi-
ously in the know, giving a clear
financial statement of the
Accounts at this Bank and, sug-
gesting why the Bank Authorities
could easily r the annual Rate
of Interest on deposits to 4% and
this without ding violence to its
funds, His © ‘mathematics, IT
remember, were clear, and the
force of his argument convine-
ing.

If such was urged a few years
ago, it should be urged with
tremendously greater force today.
And, it is to be hoped that the
Bank Authorities will at an early
date give this matter the consid-
eration which it merits.

With the purchasing power of

money so frightfully shrunk
today following upon the phe-
nomenal rise in the cost of liv-
ing, this added 1% (at least)

would indeed go a long way in
making ends meet with those who
have not long purses. And one
must be excused for repeating
that Government should in duty
bound fecus their attention on the
matter with a view to giving even
greater encouragement to more
determined efforts at thrift.

HORNY-HANDED,
March 25,. 1952,

.—would be less easy to under-

FRIDAY, MARCH, 28 1982

Sacer ec araecaacearetecenccsssstcestlt DAA

‘China's Reds Step Up Their
Propaganda In Honé Kong |

HONG KONG, March,

THE Chinese Communist attitude towards
Hong Kong has taken a new turn since the
beginning of this year.

Before, the Reds had, outwardly at least
kept scrupulously clear of entanglement in
Hong Kong’s affairs.

Apart from occasional complaints in their
press there was no sign of hostility.

In recent weeks, however, they have been
ary. weapon is that, unlike: other agitating openly by keeping up a ceaseless
Budgetary measures, it can be| propaganda campaign of abuse against the
a at any time during the) colony, They have also attempted to stir up

disorder.

And now, it is undeniable that the Chinese
Reds are trying to make things more difficult
for the British administration than hitherto.
stand if he had not given wor This undisguised agitation began early in
ers the incentive to make the| January thisyear following the deportation
erage Contin natant of séven Communist propagandists. They
had a lot to say about the effect) consisted of three film stars, an editor and
6 ogg pan of |playwright, two women Left-wing trade
the poorer families who will’ get | union leaders, and a man who called himself
ae a ee sf tie an pitntnd chairman of a squatters’ camp which had
out that the income tax reliefs—| been destroyed by fire.
bape | eee proved ye i. The Hong Kong government had deported
lower-paid worker—are intended|them because of their subversive political
not as a sort of bonus for work activities.

Their deportation was followed by violent

attacks in the mainland Communist press and

radio against the Government for what Red
propaganda called ‘oppression.’

monetary policy has the desired
effect, it should therefore reduce}
home investment by the required
amount and lead to substantial}
reductions in the stocks built up|
by industrial users last year,
The rise in Bank rate has been
attacked by the Opposition as a
measure likely to lead to defla-
tion and widespread wpecuptoy> |
ment. Criticism of this kind,
however, overlooks the important
point that Bank rate is a flexible
weapon that ¢an be pointed in
either direction. But the most
obvious factor in favour of the
use of Bank rate as a disinflation-

CANASTA SETS



Another of Mr, Butler’s
assumptions—that production will
increase this year by £250 million

SNOWCE

already done but as an incentive
for still harder work in the
future. The immediate effect of
these changes will be to make
some families worse off, even
after account has been taken of
the increases in social benefits.
However. by working longer
hours a man will be able to gain
a larger net reward than he
could have done under the previ-
ous system, of taxation.

Ph. 4472

These attacks were taken up by. two Hong
Kong Left wing Chinese newspapers.
At the same time Communist propagan- £
In certain respects, however, dists, both within the colony and outside
roe see's a; a _, Bs sought to fan up a minor labour dispute.
ea! even fu er inflation. e |
tax reliefs will place more sperid=| Further, the Reds. sought to exploit. the
ing power in ae of Tareas situation arising from unemployment caused |
nsumers, an refore : 5 2 .
forse’ ereonal consumption, | PY the allied embargo on strategic materials.
pees the oe broke Then, when they found their agitation \}}....
axation on indus will m : ase °
Haat on ceade into company sav-|@mong the labour ranks failing, the Com-
ings. Mareqver. 207. ge munists turned their attention to the
y a
the aoe that oa thatieae in pro- thousands of squatters rendered homeless
— will pcevey St to| when a fire destroyed their camp.
hee tae prince or Gana Despite the aid which had been given to
for a limited amount of resources.| the victims both by the Hong Kong Govern-
These are the most obvious : tumat
risks, but they should be con- ment and by charitable organisations and
sidered against the background of|although resettlement schemes for these
the positive improvements which : -
jhe “Budget has brought about. squatters had been planned, Communist pro
The chief of ait a return paganda continued to plug the anti-Hon®
to a more flexible s m of ;
monetary control—with its power- Kong line to the utmost. 3
ful intsenee, oa, pyeneens, Senaice In addition the Communists alleged’ that
—and the substitution of incen- sys :
tive for austerity with its salutary the Hong Kong authorities had permitted
éffect on wos moma Foe these Chiang Kai-Shek’s guerrillas to operate from
reasons, . Butler’s Budget has sats :
bean desasaadiy well seceived. within the colony to make raids on Red
border territorv.







| “White Nylon Lace
14” to 2'l2" widths

Seeking more ammunition for further pro-
paganda attacks, they accused the British
Government of agreeing to make Hong Kong
a “base for aggression by American imperial-

White

seven years ago. ists.”
We've More Steel .



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‘Q’ claims no. He says the Leftists papers in Hong Kong meantime,
Russian tanks are good, aes became so virulent that on February 21, the
not outstanding, Nor are they so : : .
numerous as suggested, Government issued a warning against the

The Red Navy? “Q” says they| publication of false and malicious reports

dispose only three capital ships, ene ‘ 4
a dozen cruisers, and though they calculated to incite disaffection.
Despite this warning,, however, the two


































INTRODUCING—

“BUBBLE WASHERS”

THE COMFORT OF THE HOUSEWIFE

claim 300 submarines the Rus-

ian ae developed any | Red news sheets taking their cue from Can
The Red Air Force? Good|ton, played up the proposed visit of a “com-

Sere _ bees “i sone fort mission” to the fire victims.

*Q’ oubts e total air . :

strength has grown. This touched off the riots of March 1 which,
Finally “Q” prints a little table | according to the best evidence, appeared to

‘of comparative resources in raw
materials, whieh will surely have been planned.
bese 2 a agenda Sort shat om Able handling of the situation by the Hong
with “Nye: i ;
Goanihalmin uy Netter breeches | HONE police, however, gave confidence to the
tap Routt in steel, oil, copper, | people.
‘and aluminium :

Soldiers ‘will’ téad. with inter: Now, although a food blockade might cause
est Martel’s theories ‘on Korea:|temporary difficulties, Hong Kong is not

SIMPLE AND INFALLIBLE

Connect to the Pressure side of any Vacuum Cleaner
and have your washing ....

itn) ‘ : 4 ”
Gah; ateekion con ye afraid of being starved out. There are ample ee “BUBBLE WASHED
stop ‘Asia from breeding—and stocks and the colony has never depended on AND

Field-Marshal Montgomery on| the China mainland for rice. In addition to

the subject of Field-Marshal ; BUBBLE RINSED
Tanwhavenery. : rshal) Australian frozen meat, recently arrange-
*“East v. West,” Lieut-Gen-| ments have been made to ship cattle from

al Sir Giff: - : . :
bd teas ‘ard Martel (Meth-| Indo-China, and an experimental first ship-
ment of 200 cows has already been made.
The colony produces half its requirements
Family Planning of vegetables, and it is self-sufficient in fish.
To. The Editor, the Advocate— | Other sources from where Hong Kong might
.—In the Sunday Advocate ‘Ol its requi i. * -
Ot ey tea tet con tables BF cure its requirements have also been ex- |%
letter from Miss’ Cecile Walcott plored.
headed ‘Family ‘Planning’. Lest} Recent Communist military movements in

it be thottght that there is nothin ;
more to be said ig this matter,| S0Uth China, however, have caused nervous-

—L.E.S.

°
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Electrical Dept.











‘ e
I would like to draw the atten-| ness among some of Hong Kong’s population, | ¢
tion of your readers to s "1S EA ARE { PRICES
words spoken by the Bishop| aud there has been a spate of rumours. SY TO PREP. pain ccges
of Barbados in his recent Charge} No impending direct threat, however, is ANCHOR PRODUCTS
‘gichasl's, Gathedsel on March er provided the present state of affairs
. in the Far East remains unaltered Kellogg's Cornflakes
“The Community is ill ; 3 bays rn ; ”
by areas F tae ee Aim of the Communists, it is believed, is to peloans eo
oe ee oe Se influence British policy in the Far East by Weet-a-bix $
The Bishops of the Provines| Keeping the political situation tense. The Fee inate x
declared their minds clearly} communist blasts against Hong Kong appear Quaker Oats
and unequivocably at the +6 be f ‘ d - Sausages
Seoeipetel Synod held ‘in = part of an attempt to demoralise Hong _ Minced Steak
amaira in February 1946. I| Kong’s i i
quote from the Pastoral Letter = popula pereneteinelty — Tr ;
which was directed to be read their mind in constant anxiety. — OOO
in ‘all the Churches of | the . Sy
rovince: ‘To the further safe- VEC 3ETAB
avvin ot Sacredness of ‘ T. LES
iC atrimony, we, the M. ta ’ i ° x
Bishops in Sygod assembled auretania For B. W. I. Cruise Tins
unequivocably the recommen-
dations contained in the Report NEW YORK Anchor Evap. Milk —
f the West : oe s
of the Wes Bee nest Com-| _ THE Cunard liner Mauretania has sailed ae Sere Andie ek faa
prevention meastres!” as con-| {rom New York’ ‘a 14-day cruise, her third Kale 2) size $2.24 per tin
trary to the laws of God. The] thi Y : Broad Be: Anchor Mil =
aro oe e a cae ps season, to the West Indies and South Heing Peas “ 1b. ino Peis per tin $
social. problem is to be sought merica.sSome 625 passengers are taking Bo Ge Peas Anchor Skimmed ook eve x
and found in the teaching of|part in the cruise, including ma ll etit Pols E eee,
Individual responsibility and . : 8 ny (MEU ‘Petit Pois Pea Dn os ae
ant control’. ar trust. that} Known business men. Smedley Peas B ote ee %
wherever “measures are sug- i i i i =: aeeyeeree
geal fee Gua Doe bate arena the cruise, the liner will call at pC Y .82 per Ib.
lems of population, wherever|St- Thomas, Portsof-Spain, La Guaira, Thick Salt Fish .37 per 1b
euch peek ree eed nee will) Havana and Nassau. To-morrow, the liner ents g~ 28 Pam 1b: kaniCheee 515 ie ib.
iven to these Words, and/_. . 3 é : i aon) wey ee
the destructive pitfall of. arti-| will again sail from New York.on her fourth Tomatoes — .30 per lb. Sardines ........ -19 tin
_ Pane a will be/and final cruise of the season, also to the
Thanking you for space. West Indies and South America, and will
Time iE eet tie then return to her normal trans-Atlantic
25.3.62 ~" service.—B.U.P,



FRIDAY, MARCH, 28, 1952





BARBADOS

Crown Closes Case In Murder Trial “ff Diffiewtties

@ From Page 1 mother went to the deceased. Mr.
Barnes then held the accused.
raised up himself and walked off.
After the accused moved off she » Crowd Gathers
There were many people on the

heard him say that he (the
accused) did not do it. road. Mr. Inniss told the accused
She was about 40 feet away that he had killed the man. She
from the place where the inci- could not say what happened to
dent occurred. Another woman the knife. She did not see the
She saw other stab, She saw the deceased

was present.
people but they came after the “waving the stick about.”
incidentoccurred. The window ‘The bananas were taken up.
she was at was about 20 feet Cross-examined Estaline Glubs
from the beginning of the road. said that in 1948 the deceased
When this incident was going on Was found guilty of wounding the
there was no one in the road. the deceased was
After the incident the first person pja, on a bond. The accused
she saw was the wife of the de- was taken to the Hospital after
ceased. The wife of the deceased he was wounded. She does not
lifted the bead of the deceased, know anything about the will.
and then a man named Inniss ar- The accused went to the house
rived at the scene, She first saw for the bananas and her mother
Inniss about 20 feet away. spoke to him, The accused left
Mr. Walcott had no questions pd wenn mood. He did
to ask this witness. To the Court As the accused left, the deceas-
Belle said that when she first ed came out of the house with the
saw Inniss he was about 20 feeit stick in his hand, He (the de-
away and on the road which sh€ eased) was about ten feet behind
could see from her window, the accused and her mother fol-
, ed e dece e saw
Edward Millington of Bryan's, [OW ased,
St. Thomas said that he knew the deceased make an effort to
the accused and his family. He

take up a bunch of bananas.
also knew the deceased, On 2 >
January 18, 1952, about 4.30 p.m. W*ow’s Evidence
he was on Welchman Hall road The eleventh
He saw a gang of men working. eyidence on behal
He saw the accused with a bunch
of bananas and he put it on the puncan Headley
bank of the road. The deceased ~ She said they
took up this bunch of bananas Bryan's Village,
and took it to his wife’s house. tothe time

witness to give
f of the Crown
was Eulise Headley, widow of

lived together at
St. Thomas, up
of his death on the
18th January 1952. She identified
the body to Dr. A. C. Kirton who
performed the post mortem ex-
amination at the St. Thomas
Mortuary.

Her. daughter Estaline, and
two other children lived at the
same house. She and her husband

More Bananas Cut

The accused went to the wife
of the deceased to get the bana-
nas. The wife of the deceased
told the accused to leave her
house, Then he saw the deceased
and the accused. The accused

was walking behind the deceased lived together from 1949 and
with a knife. The accused cut “Sate ae ae or
another bunch of bananas. The y arr’

Headley. helped her to “work”
her father’s land. This was the
e- case for some years before her

father died on the 21st June, 1951.

a stick, went to the bananas and ed father left 134 acres of land.

took them up, and the accused - looked after it prior to her

held him and both the accused father. and mothe:

and the deceased pulleti at the jiiy of the meee iine “ciost on

bananas. Finally the bananas After her father ‘died, she con-

dropped te the ground and thé tinued to. “work” the land. Her

accused held the deceased around father tett a will which her

his neck with the left hand while brother Oliver Gibbs the execu-

nm knife was in his right hand. to, kept.

The deceased dropped a stick “phe profits were handed over

which he had in Mis hand and to the executor to pay off a debt

the deceased tried to brewk away, 46 Joseph Gibbs,

from the accused. The . defendant,
“T then saw the accused stab ig "her brother, * Jane Murray is

the deceased with the knife in giso her sister. There were

his left breast and the deceased 4 i i
fell to the ground. The deceased lie paula Whe Minyived: bee
fell on his back on the abovad Byerything was in her posses-
part of the road,” Millington told sion after her father died. Every-
the court. bt well until her sister
¢ ” ane called home Oscar Gibbs
Falls On “Bank from Curacao. Oscar however,
Wis fas cca Mast he Hace these ae to Curacao shortly after
of the road with his back to the ~The will had been proved, but
bank. The accused turned to him che could not say when it was
(the witness) and told him that proved. It was sometime this

he did not know what he did. year.

The sister of the accused took “ Joseph Gibbs and her husband
away the knife from the accused were not_on friendly terms, They
and also the bananas. A man “fel] out” in 1948 when a_ fight
named Inniss told~ the accused took place between Jane Mur-
not to run away. ray, Joseph Gibbs, her husband
He saw the wife of the deceased and herself. That’ fight was the
sometime before the incident result of a contention between

happened. Shq@ was standing by neighbours and her sister Jane.
the bank of the road.
Finger Lost

While the two men were strug- Joseph Gibbs lost a finger dut-

gling there were people around. ,
; 5 ia ing that fight, and her husband
To Mr, Walcott: Millington said as “bound over” by the Assize

that he was present when the in-
cident occurred. He saw Police Court.

aceused again .put this second
bunch in the road and said: Touch
these bananas now.” The

Joseph Gibbs,

Jane and she fought earlier
Constable Walker but he never 7

: during that same day.
baw the wife of the accused, The family used to have

The story he gave before the bickerings over the land. Other
Magistrate was right, but he children, Jane and Joseph want-
could not remember all the evi- ed their share of the land which
dence. When the men fell to the she was working to pay off a
ground the bananas were in the debt to the defendant, left by the
road. The accused ran behind father,
the deceased with the knife, Thq To the Court: The row came
deceased ran to the bananas and over tihis land.
turned about to face the accused. To Mr. Reece:— On the

The deceased was a man with 18/1/51, she had bananas grow-
a medium size. Both men lifted ing on the land. She used to
up the bamanas and as they Occupy both her father’s house

) clinched both of them dropped as well as her own which was on

the bananas.
Deceased Stabbed

The accused stabbed the de-
ceased moving the knife straight
across to the body of the deceased.

He usel to help the deceased
= the canes when they were Bunch Put Dow

eimg cut. n

Estaline Gibbs of Bryan’s, St. Gibbs put down the second
Thomas, told the Court that the bunch, followed her husband
deceased was not her father, On home and said he wanted the first
January 18 at about 4.30 p.m. she bunch.
was home and saw the accused Her husband told Gibbs that he
coma to her mother’s house ask- couldn’t come in the house. Jane
ing for a bunch of bananas which came up between her father’s
the deceased had taken away. house and her (witness’s) house
The accused who had a knife in and called Joe.
his hand, stayed at the house for
about five minutes while the
deceased was inane the ae
with a stick. he accus' eft ing the house
and the deceased followed him . ay
and her momner went after Me was not working ‘on. his “own

jlecea: eft, e saw a 7 a
banat ot bananas in the road and og meer aoe aig Reon
as the deceased tried to take up taae 4 0 Me n th ere;
the bananas, the accused held on — a a e oo Be? , more
to him. ,

° Both men clinched together “Joe”, (the defendant) turned
and the deceased fell to the away, and she and her husband
ground on his grace ee ee “s Dees and followed “Joe”
accused remained stan t e- down the road,

fore the deceased fell to the “Joe” had a knife in his hand.
ground, the) stick which he was Her husband had a stick—the one
holding dropped from his hand. with which he barred the defen-
After the deceased fell, her dant out of the house,

the land.

On the 18th January, Joseph
Gibbs came up not far from the
place where her home is, cut a
buneh of bananas and put it down
He went for a second bunch and
her husband took the first bunéh
and carried it home.

Her husband took up a stick
and when “Joe” attempted to
enter he barred “Joe” from enter-







They went to the place where
the second bunch cf bananas was
in the road, She told her husband
“the. bananas are mine.” Her
husband and Joseph Gibbs stoop-
ed to take up the bananas at the
same time.

Jane Murray told Gibbs: “Don't
let him (the deceased) take up
the bananas, juck him with the

knife.”
A “Necktie”

The bananas fell from both of
them, and Gibbs, holding the
deceased in a “neck-tie, jucked
him with the knife. Her husband
stumbled and fell. There was no
fight or ‘long tarrying’. It was no
longer than seven minutes or so.

During these “seyen minutes
tarrying”, the stick which her
husband had under his left arm
dropped, immediately he was
stuck with the knife.

Her husband “staggered” back-
ward to the right and fell. He
was stretched out. He went down
on his back. .

“Joe” left when her husband
fell, and went on to a hadgerow
and sat down, “Joe did not fall
down, There is a “bank” at the
side of the road. Her husband
fell into the gutter. He did not
fall next. to the embankment.

After her husband fell, she
went and held his hand. She
called “Sonny ! ! “Sonny ! ! ”
and when he did not answer she
said “oh Lord, he is dead.”

She only saw “Joe sit on the
hedgerow. She could not say
where he went after that. She
was concerned over her dead hus-
band,”

She did not stay until the Po-
lice arrived. She went home.

When she, her husband, Jane
Murray and the Defendant came
out from the house, there were
more people in the road includ-
fing her daughter Estaline. Mr.
Inniss was there when the inci-
dent occurred.

Basket Taken Wp

Sam Murray was under a
breadfruit tree not far off. “Son-
ny” Boyeq was also in the road.
When “Joe” stuck Duncan.
“Sonny’ took up the basket which
“Joe” had brought for the bana-
mas and ran away. She saw
“Sonny” bring the basket for the
bananas.

Olive Belle was there. She saw
her about 20 feet off the road
near a house, She called Belle to
her assistance when she saw her
husband fall. Belle came, but
her husband had died already.

Jane (her sister) took the knife
from the defendant, took up the
bunch of bananas and went to her
kitchen window.

Nathaniel Millington was also
there. Estaline and other people
were also there and after Head-
ley fell, they ran away and said
they “can’t stand that.”

To Mr. Walcott: I remember
giving evidence before the magis-
trate. I did not know Cephas
Boyce by the name of Cephas at
the time. I heard him called
“Sonny” Boyce.

I can’t remember whether I
said in the Court below that
Olive Belle was at her mother’s
gap, about 20 feet away, and I
was there when my husband got
the stab.

Deposition Read

Mr. Walcott asked, that her
deposition be read to the jury. I
saw when my husband got the
stab. Olive Belle was about 20
feet away by her father’s house
where Winifred lives. I am sure
of that. I saw Olive Belle’s face
looking from her father’s house
20 feet away,

She was inside the house look-
ing out from a window.

I can’t remember using the
word gap before the Magistrate.
I hadn't told the Court that Belle
was looking from the window
until asked by you (Mr. Walcott).’

When I came to the scene, Olive
Belle was at her father’s window
looking out. I didn’t say that be-
fore because one can’t remember
everything at the same time.

Belle’s Evidence

Before the magistrate I gave
my evidence before Olive Belle.
I was in court when Olive Belle
gave evidence. I can’t say what
any of the witnesses said at all.

My__husband, Joseph Gibbs,
Jane Murray and myself all step-
ped down in the road together.

So far as land was concerned,
my father died on 2ist June. My
mother died on 28th July. I did
not read the will. I don’t know
to whom it shares out the prop-
erty. Oliver never showed me the
will, I knew my father said he
would give each child a portion.
He also said I was the last child
and the land on which his house
stood was for me.

Prior to their marriage, her
husband was a paid servant of
hers. Her father and mother
were aged people, and she looked
after them.

Possession Of Land

I did not take possession of the
land. My father gave me posses-
sion of it in 1945. It is not true
that the row of 1948 cAme about
because ‘Joe’ Gibbs forbade
Leader from trespassing on the
and.

Nobody gave evidence in that
case to the effect that my father
paid Headley as a watchman, My

@ On Page 8



Hinder Progress

@ From Page 3

School shouia become Scouts, and
exactly half’of those selected for
the Jamboree in Jamaica this
month were members of Harrison
College.

Our great out of school activity
this last school year was the pro-
duction of Shakespeare’s “Julius
Caesar.” Roughly 1,000 persons
saw this play, and many of the
audience as well as Dr. Hamilton
were kind enough to praise the
production, I think only those who
have taken part in such things
can appreciate the magnitude of
the effort involved, but I am con-
fident that it was well worth
while. We owe a great debt to
Mr. D. A. Fowles for his untiring
work, and also to Miss Weston,
Miss Nurse, and the Queen’s Col-
lege girls for all their sartorial
help. I think both Mr. Fowles
and some of the cast.have set us
a very high standard; but I hope
that you will all come to see us
try to emulate it in the future.

Although most of our limited
building funds have been spent,
as in recent years, on combating
the tireless depredations of wood-
ants, we have constructed one
new large classroom since last
Speech Day from the store room
vacated by the Department of
Science & Agriculture. We ho
to add the upper storey next holi-
days. Our greatest addition how-
ever has been the four new
Laboratories in the upper floor
of the Science block. I hope
many of you will take the oppor-
tunity of looking over them this
afternoon, and if you do so will
agree that the generosity of Gov-
ernment has been used to good
purpose.

I confess I had hoped to be
able to announce to-day that we
should have a School Canteen in
the near future. It would be un-
reasonable not to realise the many
demands. which are made from
Government, and it would be pre-
sumptious to attempt to assess
their comparative importance; but,
comforted by the Scriptural lesson
upon importunity, I venture once
more to state our needs. We draw
our boys. from .a wide area, and
I believe both our work and our
games would benefit if every boy
could easily obtain a hot midday
meal. The Governing Body thas
formulated plans but the cost is
admittedly high. I hope that -be-
fore too long has passed: we shall
see a canteen here and I shall be
able to omit this plea from suc-
cessive annual speeches.

A short word about books: The
growing cost of books is one of
the most serious dangers to edu-
cational standards. Our Library
grant has recently been increased
to the same figure as that of other
schools. Mr, Millington has been
making most excellent use of his
rather larger funds, and one of
the most valuable developments
has been the creation of a special
Junior section for the younger
boys. So far as School textbooks
go we are steadily accumulating
school copies of some expensive
Sixth Form books in regular use,
so reducing the charge on the
sixth form boy. For instance, Wé
are now providing the expensive
Biology books for the Seience
Sixth, and some of the expensive
History textbooks for the Modern
Sixth, We hope to extend this

help to Classical dictionaries,
Classical Histories, and Mathe-
matical textbooks. This is how

we are utilizing the small profits
we have to make on our book
room schemes to be sure of a
erédit balance. We have not
much money in any one year but
we are doing what-we can,

Our purchase and sale of sec-
ond hand books was quite a suc-
cess and I believe a benefit to

parents. The more it is used the
better for all members of the
School.

I hope it may not seem ungra-
cious in me that I have not think-
ed all those, Governors, Staff, and
Old Boys, who have helped the
School and worked for it. during
the year. It is not that I am un-
appreciative, but merely that the
list is long, and in any case I
find the victims seldom like it.
But I do wish to record a special
word of thanks to the Prefects,
whose co-operation and growing
sense of responsibility have been
of great value. Few things have
given me greater pleasure or more
encouragement.

I trust I have not detained you
too long with this record of the
School’s activities; but I have
tried hard to bear in mind that
lady in Jane Austen's novel who
was admirable at least in this
that she “was not a woman of
many words; for, unlike people in
general, she proportioned them to
the number of her ideas”.

Vestry Wants School Site

@ from page 1
quire more space to house their
equipment as the boundaries of
the parish would be extended,
Therefore the move for the acquisi-
tion was a move in the right
direction.

Mr. Mottley replied that there
was no room for more lorries \a
the department. Hessaid that with
the building of Housing Schemes
and the extension of their scav-

enging, mora men had to be em- *

ployed, more brooms and shovels
bought and more space would
necessarily be required.

ADVOCATE

Michelin Asks Aid

For Animal Society

A. Tag Day.
Cemmissioner of Police, Vice-President
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Barbados
S.P.C.A., gave a broadcast over Rediffusion last night.

TO-DAY
Michelin,

is the S.P.C

He said:

Hon. V. C. Gale

-Churchwarden
@ from page 1

of the country who at one time or
another contributed to the back-
bone of this country and the La-
bour Welfare Fund.

hile they could not claim to
be labourers now, sometime ago,
“ were labourers.

e said that there was always
the Barbadian pride in not with
ing to go to an institution and if
fhe houses were repaired, it would
be allowing the old labourers to
pass their days in peace,

He said he hoped the Vestry
would again ask for assistance
from the Labour Welfare Fund
for that use.

Speaking on Hon, V. C. Gale's
election as Churchwarden, he said
that if Mr. Gale made a mistake,
he did-it honestly believing he
was right and hé had much pleas-
ure in secending the motion for
his election. Knowing Mr. Gale's
sympathy for the under-privil-
eged, he felt sure that they would
be in safe hands.





Excellent Report

Hon. V.C. Gale first thanked
Mr. Symmonds for proposing him
as Churehwarden and Mr, Mott-
ley for seconding the proposal.

Referring to Mr. Symmonds’
work as Churchwarden, he said
that he had given a very excellent
report of his stewardship. Ne
knew Mr. Symmonds had taken
his duties very seriously and con-
scientiously and done his very
best for the affairs of the parish,
He trusted that while he was
Churchwarvien, he would get the
full support and co-operation of
the Vestry for all the work to be

carried out.
The ‘ollowing other appoint-
ments were made:— Guardians:

Mr, C. A. Brathwaite, J.P. and
Mr, A. R. Toppih; Commissioners
of Health: Messrs. E. D. Mottley,
T. Bowring, V. W. A. Chase, A. R.
Toppin, Hon. V. C. Gale and as
non-members of the Vestry,
Messrs. J. M. Kidney, E. V. God-
dard, C. B. Layne, and T. H. H
Wilkinson; building supervisor-
inspector : Mr. J. T. C, Ramsay;
Vestry Counsel and Solicitor: Mr.
W. W. Reece, Q.C. and Carrington
& Sealy; tuner and repairer of the
Cathedral organ, Mr. John Kirton,
repairer and winder of the cathe-
dral’s clock, Mr. R. D. King. The
Churehwarden and Messrs. H. A
Tudor, Hon. G. B. Evelyn were
ppointed for the Cathedral con-
rregation and Mr. D. G, Leacock
for the Vestry under “Appoint-
ments Under the Anglican Church
Act, 1907.”

In each case except, that of Mr.
Toppin as Junior Gu rdian, these
appointments were the same as
last year,

New Member For Old

When the Vestry came to ap-
point the Commissioners of Health,
discussion was introduced by Mr,
T. W. Miller as to whether an old
member should not give place to
a new one,

Mr. Miller said that an oppor-
tunity should be given to young
members so that they might gain
experience, He moved that Mr.
Tudor and Mr, Hewitt be appoint-
ed to the Board of the Commis-
sioners of Health, but the motion
was not seconded.

Mr. Hewitt who agreed with Mr.
Miller’s suggestion, proposed that
Mr. Miller should be a member
and this was seconded by Mr,
C. A, Brathwaite. Mr. Miller only
secured half of the lowest number
of votes when the six nominated
for the five appointments were
balloted for,

When he nominated Mr. Brath-
waite to be Senior Guardian,
Hon. V. C. Gale said that Mr.
Brathwaite had been Church-
warden on more than one occa-
sion. He had worked with hir
on other occasions : the two of
them being Churchwarden and
Senior Guardian respectively. | He
was pleased to have him working
with him again, He was a man
who took great interest in the
affairs of this parish and of Bar-
bados. He had represented thi»
narish for many years in the
House of Assembly and people of
all shades of ovninions would admit
that Mr. Brathwaite was a man
with strong heliefs who did not
fenr saving what he had to say.

Mr. Brathwaite said he appre-
ciated the remarks Hon, V. C,
Gale had made concerning him
and he would endeavour to work
for the interest of the people of
Barbidos.

The Junion Guardian (Mr.
Toppin) promised to give every
assistance he could to. the
Churchwarden.







, larger





















































































Colonel R. T
and

“I am going to speak to you oi
the S.P.C.A, and ask you all t
give generously to thew Annua.
dag way which takes piace to
morrow. What does 5S.2’.C.A. stan
tor? It is the Society fer tn
Prevention of Cruelty to Animais
The Society which has been work
ing in this Island quietly an
efficiently for 46 years. It is th
organisation that looks after al
those animals who are i l-treate:
and suffering. It is a comfortin,
thought to knew that there is som,
Society that is all the time leok-
ing after the welfare of animals.

“The existence and work of thi
Society have béen made possibh
over all these years through th
generosity of you and your parents
Every person giving a donation t
the Society can have the satisfac
tion of knowing that he is helpin,
to maintain machinery for the wel
fare and protection of our dum.
friends. It is not possible for ai
of us to maNe an active part i
locking after these unfortunat
animals, but by financial help
you enable the, Society to take can
of this for you... ' *

“You will rightly want to khov
what the S,P.C.A. in Barbado
does, and what are their fund
used for. The Society has thre
(3) Inspectors stationed in differ
ent parts of the island. Thesc
Inspectors look out for overwork
ed, overloaded, underfed and un
cared for animals, and take step
to relieve their sufferings and im
prove their conditions, The
Society has a van which is ready
to hasten to anyone who has
suffering animal or anyone want-
ing an anima] destroyed in. ;
humane manner. OQur Chief In
Spector is on the telephene. His
number is 2624 under §.P.C.A, ir
the Telephone Directory, He is at
your service to give help and ad-

vice in the suffering of your
animals,

“Our Inspectors visit th
slaughter house and see tha

a~imals brought in for slaughte
are fed and watered during thei
Stay at the market that they hav:
No unnecessary suffering befor
slaughter,

“The Society is about to build ;
Modern Dog Refuge. As soon a:
this is done, dog catchers wil
be employed and equipped wit!
suitab’e equipment for catchin:

the half-starved and disease
stray dogs that live on the gar bag:
bins and that are a disgrace «

Bridgetown and Barbades,

“We want to extend our educa-
tional programme, and Lring to th,
notice of the public the number.
of thoughtless acts which daily
bring suffering to animals in thi
island and which must be rectifiec
Without funds, the Society.
actions are restricted and scop
limited, With more money wi
could expand and bring relief to i
number of sufferin;
animals, and enlightenment t
those owners and users of animal
who are apt to forget that th
correct thing to do is to get off :
loaded donkey cart going up a hil
and other thoughtless acts, alsc
that animals have feeling and mus
not be treated only as a means t
an end,

“Tomorrow our §S.P.C.A, col
lectors wil] be all over the islanc
asking you to buy a S.P.C.A, tag
Please but one and give generous
ly. Remember the Society has.:
large family to look after and wit)
the increased cost of everything
cannot do it efficiently withou
funds. We look to everyone t
give something towards thi
worthy cause and so enable th
Society to look after more of thos
whe cannot look after themselves

“On behalf of our dumb friends
IT thank you for your support to
morrow,” he ended.

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PAGE FIVE

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F PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY)! MARCH, "28, 1952

‘craceneieteenneeeemenenaaateT

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: ET A ROOM FOR RENT—Apply to Palm} @teathy in making his duties as} and nominated Mr. C. ; ac- The M.V. DAERWOOD wid
ge, wirthe, Marrings ot Engagement | FOR SALE BUSINESS PREMISES —One two storey | Cot, Pontabelle of ring 4373 "T Bleasant as possible Kenzie. Mr. F. C. Goddard, Mr STEAMSHIP CO. . accept Cargo and Paswengers for
announcemen 5 i , Ps 0 » sea at Oistin a 41 that mm ak oe , ‘ : : id .
charge is $3.00 for any number of words Diane seers ie sulted rT eek a a . : Mr. Goddard said that he did] T N. Peirce and the Churchwar- SAILING FROM EUROPE & — St Ginie Weauneand
to 60 and 6 cents per word for each ann emeermatasn business riced to sell. Apply | BE RD rl not want to dwell on the Maude] den to sign the promissory note, | M.S. HECUBA. on 4th April 1962 2eth inst
ub kina of busi: P pp ERESFORD—the modern Bui : $$. BOSKOO! 952 26 mn
additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2608 AUTOMOTIVE to D’Are; A. Scott, Middle Street, Dial | Maxwell Road, fully furnished all mo Report, but if the Vestry system . \ wes BON ATRE on eth ya Mos!
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death | _ a mn | 2648S 26.3.52—2n. | conveniences, five tes walk t had te come to an end, he wanted] The Vestry fixed the rental | y's' srenror S oua aay 1008. The M.V. CARIBBEE will
Notiees only after 4 Dm AUSTIN VAN—One (1) 10 HP. Austin | pecs | from the Ist April. Apply: Nurse Pil-|to say that it had not outlived it: | value of an acre of land at $19.20. accept Cargo and Passengers for
Van in good working order. Thone| HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | grim Phone 8101 usefulness. There were some part: SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
— 4821, D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd house, all conveniences, with party 28.3.52 . 4 SPPIIOSIBOCOS AMSTE Nevis and St. tts. Sailing Sut-
13.3.53—t.f.n. | sured living room, open verandah, kitchen | — ie of the Vestry Bill which needed | ,>*°OOO%>> | M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952 urday 29th inst.
RIAM and utility room Gerage, laundry, 2} BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, | ‘0 be amended, The work which } RE
IN MEMO “Aiciiliman ar new 3,000 tics only | “my,Ut rooms and storage foom under. | perfect bathing, quiet. All meals mast, | 10 De, santa eee Voolses over the BE WISE | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMA BO tre 14.0. MOREIRA wilh acbaak
all $2,000, Phone 2001 (evenings 4885) On attractive hiliside site, Rockley New | services supplied from main house, Own | }ast 300 vears—although that was nook S.S, COTTICA on 7th April 1952. Gade a sdomenioet, “ eye aaa
28.3.52~2n.| Boag. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476.| Telephone. Suitable married couple, | | : hj one of the popular Gas Cookers M.S. BONAIRE on 6th May, 1952 ntigua, at, Nevis
‘ sipersoaci 52—t.f a long time — was still fresh in | St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
CLARKE—In loving memory of Our Geer] “CAR: Austin 10, 1946—in good condi Eee ee ee ey eee ot James ej their memories, The Vestries B orn Resi SABLING TO TRINIDAD AND April 1952
moth a namother Bille Clarke ; . - a | people. Apply: hiands, St. James or e 5. . ig oven w io - CURACAO
who Cried om 2ath March, 1981. tion $900.00. Dial 2004 on’ 06 “To live in We Peete Or — ee —————————————— | and galvanize palings. and the other is HOUSE—Board and shingled con- ws es = . aan oo See ae : Burner _ ” ASSOCIATION (INC.)
We love is Wilma Clie CAR—Chevrolet (1939 Handle Gear] 14 yg with kitchen and galvanize pal-|teining verandah, drawing, dining and out what would happen when the Easy to keep clean, Econo- Ss P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
sh di ance a CS 3.so—in. | Shift model). Perfect condition, good | it. “she price for both is $850.00, and ‘two bedrooms, kitchen, toilet, bath, Maude Bill was implemented mical to use. Reoste $3 ot SS
ve Apply: D. W. Gale, as they can remain on the ee mater facilities. Butlers Gap, Spooners} would be another matter. Call and see them before all :
ten EO mae OY Sanat Ra Mgmavim Aer Greene Colao Doce | "ie fat Meat whehever happened | cessaenahl «a.
j » of Alice] CAR — 1947 Morris 10 hp. in A 1) pint 2645 ee ak. Pimpcimmiialibiisliabibiiinnae {WOUd be more expensive ands 5
MMEEER—In loving memory ot Alice condi - & a Sizes completely, over- ais ee | “MARISTOW, Maxwell Coast, Ch. Ch.| Whether the poor of the parish { anadian N ti nal Steamshi
Doreen, Price . ne . 5 of
on the 28th day of March, 1949. act P. L. Kelly, c/o Musson's Office. AUCTION — os Py Sere | Fe m ist} would benefit much more than a 10 ps
A dear face i misisng: 19 3 52-t in = a” én they did under the present system %
om ieee 45 stil abe dapetlh, | client cn: lesa ae VAR Outen i | sacain 3 *" | was left to be seen, because a lot | ;
memory * Fea *) VAUXHALL VELOX-—In excellent con- DODGE PICK- —Damag j Ss N PDe — ——_
we live are in out as iad dition ~— just completed 10,000 miles. Dial] aceident. We are instructed oe = | joe eee a ee. arn want eo Seo ee ee le '
Ever to be remembered , je 2 5 G 4616 vhicle for sale by_ auct a Good - =a a s e as j
Mildred (parents), Billic (her sist®). ne eee 22,3.52~-6n| Courtesy Garage on Friday 28th Mareb | Forty Ne. PCoral Sunda, w to Alma | taxes of the particular parishes. PALACE | SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sefts Arrives Bails
Buddie, Luther and Attlee (her DrOts@ns) | er | yee John M. Bladon & Co., Auc- : eta tte Whether or not the people who MEI ss a — 2 etoe
var eet] rae ree Pe ee tioneers SON eens did the work now were exchang- HEADQUARTERS FOR | CANADIAN CRUISER “ = = sey a thee. = Mar.
2.700 miles — Owne ; —| | oR IENT—Upper Bay Street, on-the-sea.| ed for someone else, he that ; LADY 7 9 Po Age Apr. Pr.
nn | clivery end April—$2,400, No. offers KustiIn A-40 VAN 199 MONEE. | confortable. tae stocky thy are eee we i tae Waetrh i felt a a SOUVENIRS 'ApY NELSON * a 16 Apr 17 Apr. 2 Apr, aon,
a Dial 4616 22.3.52—6n | namaged in accident. We are instructed | Sui "modern conveniences. Furnished or | cc y in the Vest ries, had done an ROM ‘INDIA, CHINA & | CANADIAN CRUISER 2 ie 2 May _ 11 May ‘May
PERSONAL Did 4016 | tee’ this vehicle for sale by auction | unfurnished. Apply on premises. especially in Christ Church, and CEYLON | CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR. . 9 May 12 May a 21 May 23 May
ELECTRICAL at Eckstein Garage, Nelson Street, on 28 3 62-—-2n. | Were doing very good work and it 4 LADY RODNEY oon 2” May = Fn % May 3.Sine a Jun
aD arte ene | PERS, OO March, at 2.30 pm noes | Was for someone else to say if | CANADIAN CHALLE “ ay =e e une
ELECTRIC FANS—12 and 15 inch M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers 4 MODERN FURNISHED FLATS—Four]| the time had come for a change. LADY NELSON .. + * 9 June om 4 June 2 June 2% June
, inst bly priced. Also many other 25.3.52—4n. | Aces, St. Lawrence Gap. From April Ist oo . | CANADIAN CRUISER «20 June une = 2Juy 3 July
The public are hereby warned against | Reasonably priced - a he _————— |Apply: Mrs. L. Hassell. Phone 4003 The report was then adopted. CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.. 30 June 3 July ie 12 July 13 July
giving ‘credit to any Person of Tiersons jclectrical appliances. K. BR, leunle & . 3 ‘The Vestry agreed to the annual| | Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 9}, (apy RopNEY li July 14July 16 July 28 July 98 Jul
Shomacever in my name as t do Not) Co. Ltd Dial 6196, 2.3.52. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER 28.3.82-In-| int of $480.00 for Sanitation ae : ci tg
hold myself responsible for anyone con- | - | 7 Lae - - gre $300. a chee a ieee
eting y debt or debts in my name yea from the LET—Furnished three Bedtoom| and Repairs at the Elementary :
wa bd b By ‘instructions receiv House “‘Doverdale”, Nelson Road, Navy] Schools in th arish ?
unless by a written ord or signed by me LIVESTOCK Insurance Co. I will sell at Messrs. Gardens. May--August. Ring 3961 100!s In e Di . . NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Artives Arrives, Afrives
LIONFL, DANTEL, nappa enone peearney & CO, 1td., on Frey; F Sn 5 seh The Vestry also passed a Reso-! B’dos B'dos Boston 8¢. John. alifax Montreal
TWweedside Ra, Carrington Vilinge, |" Gowocone Grey Guernsey and Jersey| Mareh 28th, (1) | 199}-30, TF Ford | 52 | 1 tion to obtain a loan not exceed- THE BIG EVENT LADY NELSON .. 23 Mar. 24 Mar, 3 Apr. 4 Apr 2 Apr. =
st. Michael ust calf @0 pints last calf. Phone 8336.| Thames Truck, complete with platform ing $7200.00 f the C di CDN. CRUISER... 4 Apr. 17 Apr. — | 14 Apr. 7 Apr, ae
28.3.52—2n jae § 28.3.52—8n.| ete. Only done 1,700 miles (Damaged | WANTED ing $7, y rom e Canadian LADY RODNEY |. 2 Apr. 26 Apr. 5 May; = 6 May 10 May
—— ene | in accident). Terms cash, Sale at; , OF THE YEAR LADY NELSON . 3 3 = 22 May| . yun S ii i gene
ii ieee ae nt eens CDN. CRUSER .. ‘ ay ay ~ une ‘un
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) = MISCELLANEOUS 2pm vincent arurritn, | CDN. CRUE | aa dune
UERAN@FFR AND REMOVAL) | Auctioneer: | MAIL NOTICES CONSTRUCTOR 3 aune 8dune | — | 16 June” 28Junq af June
The application of Millicent Forte of | “HRICKS—A quantity of good oosends rete | HELP ae ie at ‘is THE LOYAL BROTHERS ee RODNEY .. 15 June 17 June 27 June —, @Juneq 1 July
Ivy Road, St. Michael, the purchaser of | ae West | f ‘or Dominica ntigua, Mont- DIAN
: . and fire bricks. Apply: The Ss " HALLENGER 23 J 28 June — S July 8 nl J
Liquor License No. 156 of 1952, granted wo Biscuit Company. Phone 4464 ‘ ‘ BUTLER—House Maid, sleep in. Apply | 77% Nevis and St. Kitts yy the M.V OF THE STARS c + 23 June P ¥. uly
to Leonard Forde, in respect of a boarded Indian Piscul —_—__" 52—5 HL TICES ; A . sleep in. Apply | CARIBBEE will be closed at the General LADY NELSON ... 6 July 8 July 18 July — | wes 2 su
and shingled shop situated at Arch Hall, ete a oe PU rc NO oe een eee ae a Post Gee, oF undies Pr Saar «6 M4 July 19 July, 7 26 July; 8 July = & Aug.
St. Thomas, to remove sald License to a| “77 ooar eLAN 2 weet er = oy ; Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 28th esent LAN | ‘
Ped and shingled shop attached to. CLEAM FLANNEL for Tipusts. ” SSABOWH a cae, Wine to GOlE ca] eaten eae (Mall st 9.99 ar CONSTRUCTOR %4 july 9 July ~ 8 Aug, 8 Aug: 16 Aus
residence situated at re all, t yrdinary 2} at 9 a.m. on the - a
Piotes and to use ie 3 ee fast is %8.3.62—t.f.n. NOTICE medium commission. Write D. A. C/o Mareh eet in ashes LADY BOGS eee =e eee , —_ we
described premises. as a ete te Orders for OLIVER/CLETRAC Crawler Advocate Co., Ltd. 26.3.52--6n MAILS for Dominica and §t. Lucia ve

CLOTH—Domestic Cloth, good quality





e

Dated this 26th day of March, 1982. | . fi rompt delivery are now ———- by the Sch. LAUDALPHA will be closed

MILLICENT FORDE, only @c, a yd. At Thane Bes tn Tae cacentia- We shall be pleased to| one, STORE KEarES. —_Pretmably | at the Genetal Post Oe ev undes—

Applicant. a hes aw ly further information on applica- : le ce Parcel Mail at 3 p.m, on the 28th

Fo ey Geers, wale “FLANNELETTE for underwear and tion, Orders are also being received for win caeanee 0" Box cea Kewoeete ees ae mag Mal) a 0:8 A

Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “D.” other purposes 64c. and White, Blue, Pink BULLDOZER/ANGELDOZER of U-K-| Agvet. Dept i Beet ee en Ce, Se at On June 5th & 7th

N.B.—-This application will be con- | Thani’ 28.3.52—t.f.n. | manufacture for use with all types U.S. arch 195 a

sidered at a Licensing Court to be held | ** as MAILS for British Guiana by the Sch.

on Wednesday, 9th day of April, 1952, or
at 11 o'clock a.m. at Police Court, GUM ARABIC--Britains Best (cleaned)

District “D" by the 100 pounds or in 25 pound lots,

FRANKLYN D.R., will be closed at the at Queen’s Park

ess n the U
about one quarter or | tha: Hands) only those with experience need} General Post Office as under:—
further Particulars Later

URTESY GARAGE Dial 4616.
vary. o=" 22.3.52—6n





apply P. C. S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd P el and Registered Mails at 3 p.m





: lay, 26.3. 52.40. / arch: |
G. B. GRIFFITH, at 52 cents per pound. Do_not de! etn 3. 4.2. -om-the 28th March; Ordinary Mail at 8}
Ae. "Poiee Magistrate, | omlY # small quantity let Sos 2 ixseees ski @-m. om the 28th March 1952.
Dist. “D’'—St. Thomas 28.3.52—3n #he BARBADOS AQUATIC CL MISCELLANEOUS
28.3.52—In. | RON SWING—With Spring, Cushions NOTICE TO MEMBERS d



Ce on ee +





a and hood. Ci be seen at Woodville,

TAKE NOTICE Yontabelle. lephone 3940. bite oa0n

NOTICE is hereby given that in
accordance with Rule & the Club will be
closed to Members on Saturday, March



D'ARCY A. SCOTT Auctioneer & Real Estate Agent

QUALIFIED BRITISH CHEMICAL caer emer ee rae TTD, ¢ ty,







F a
Type Crawler Tractors. The price fs TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket









. ; ENGINEER (B.Sc.) §eeks suitable of Middle Street has on his list oe - oe
—_—_—$—$—$—$— $$$ | 2 from 7.30 to 9.45 p.m. for Water e! uita t s on his list some of the best properties in
JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts, ary Matches. Shiatee, Expert Plant Management and the island offering for sale. The list which is tbo extensive i LE & e eG
MENTASOL including — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid] By order of the Committee Frocems = Bevelopineny. aid Rasaareh to advertise includes the best house at Hastin, the Sei ¥ hoes
Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also H. P. SPENCER, hitton, Seaview Guest House. Phone with front:-back ‘and sid : ee on te wee é ed Bd the

Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre Secretary. eis 27.3.52—3n : ront; back and side lounges, spacious drawing and din-

That PEPSODENT LIMITED, a Com-| Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets. 27.3.52--3n ing rooms, (4) four large & two small bedrooms, three baths Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
pany inéorporated under the English} Phone 2696. 20.3 Se—t.f.n. . one with tub, also hot and cold water, garage, servants’ room bad Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
Companies Act, whose trade or business ell pean NOTICE ADVERTISE and nicely laid out flower garden. Suitable as est hi ’ Barbados, ’

Paes is a eae ae oad ben JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS— Extra 1 or small hotel : gis”: ee thampton Arri Barbados
» London, E 4, England, #8! Light Soda Biscuits. The Best Cream P . From Sow ives
applied for the registration of a trade! Cracke: 8 sat, possible Price. ile Annual General Meeting of the; Also the most modern house at Maxwell Coast
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect pt ae Bs tien a BRUCE Barbados Basketball Association will be IN THE with 4 “COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... .. S8ist March, 1952

very large bedrooms three having tiled baths. Why not dial
2645 and make an appointment to overlook the list or for an

ins ion, N gati
ADVOCA TE poet oad ap okie For real estate of any

held at the ¥.M.C.A. on FRIDAY, 4th
April at 7,30 p.m :
‘All clubs desirous of aMiliation should
send their applications to Secretary, C/o
YÂ¥.M.C.A. so that they may be elected
offillated clubs by the General Meeting
228 .3.52—6n



*“DE GRASSB”....24th April, 1952 2... 6th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... «.. Qist May, 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados. Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIB” .... 11th April, 1952... 23rd A) 1952

of tojlet preparatighs for cleaning natural | WEATHERHEAD Ltd.

teethi and artificial teeth, soaps, per- 28.3.52—4n
fumery, essential ofls, cosmetics, and, ————————_—__-———_— —
tollot preparatidt, and will be entitled | KBROSENE BURNING ELECTROLUX
tw register t\- came aiter one month); FRIG: Small model in perfect order
from the 27th day of Mareh, 1952, unless | Revd. Mellor, St Margaret's Vicarage,
som@ person shal in the meantime give | st. John 28.3.52-—3n
notice In duplicate to me at my office | —.———____________--___----—

































ae ee

TAKE NOTICE ee |

SPF ELS SLE FPO LOSS














of opposition of such registration. The | LINCAN PEAS—J. N. Goddard & Sons. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF \ ae, /
trade mark can be seen on application | Ltd., Alleyne, Arthur & Co. Ltd., and) [HE WEST INDIES LECTURER ‘ A er ~ *“DB GRASSE” ..., 19th May, 1952... ... 29th , bi
at my office | MeDonald Sealy have just received a IN MEDICINE ' Se / “COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... ... 13th June, 1952
Dated this 2th a ou wh 1982. ome lot of ere brand of Zagiish APPLICATIONS are Invited for the VES «LLAMS, garden peas in 1 Ib. tins, sold at 3 per|. 7 < oa § *
Registrar of Trade Marks. i John F. Hutson Ltd. Agents pest of Lecturer in Medicine, Te oem AEN a Sailing direct to Southampton rm
= = ae at %i.3.52—2n. | Vergityy College Hospital and instruction ‘~ “ —————————————————————————————— oo =






OUGLOTH AND STRAW MATS— of students working for the Medical

“Wiost beautiful designs. Beautify your
ome. Available at Thani Bros. Dial
2466 28.3,52—t.f.n
PRINTS—American Prints, Lovely Big
Flowers for House Coats or Bed Sheet-

ing at 77c. a yd. Thani's.
28.3,.52—t.f.n

10 DAYS
CARIBBEAN CRUISE

From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD
Venezuela-Curacao
Colombia & Jamaica

the LUXURY LINERS

. COLOMBIE & DE GRASSE

FOR INFORMATION

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

PHONE 3814

3 of the University of London
Salary seale is £800 rising by £50 per,
annum to £1,000, Point of entry in the
seale according to qualification and!
experience

Child allowance and temporary cost ot
living allowance is paid. Superannua-
tion is under FSSU arrangements. Un-
furhished accommodation is avaliable at
a fental of 5% of basic salary. The
cessful applicant will be expected to
@ up the post during September 1952,
Applications (Tweive copies) giving full
particulars of qualifications and the names
of three referees, should be received be-
. fore Aprid 25th, 1952 by the Secretary,
CLUB Cabbage, Beet, Carrot, Lettuce, Turnip, | senate Committee on Higher Education
pps ree also a ig Flower Garden | in the Colonies, Senate House, University
(Local & Visiting Members Seeds, Zinnia, hiox, Petunia, Candy | of London, W.C.1,, from whom further

uft etc., at BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

Only) \htd 28.3,52—2n particulars may be obtained
on +
| WEETABIX—A fresh shipment of thi

SATURDAY, March 29th, }}}| \(eliclous cereal which is more then 8) LOST & FOUND

A are in

That AMERICAN RADIATOR &

STANDARD SANZTARY CORPORATION,

a corporation organized under the laws 2
of the State of Delaware, United States
of America, whose trade or business
address is 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburgh 22,
Fepnaylvania, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of plumbing supplies and equipment and
sanitary installations and appliances, in-
eluding bath tubs, drinking fountains,
combination lavatory fittings—namely,
pop-up drain valve, hand valves, and
mixing spouts, and metal pipe and metal
pipe fittings, baths of all kinds, bath-
room equipment of all kinds, bathtubs,
bidets, cabinets of all kinds including
bathroom and shower types, drinking
fountains, faucets, fittings and parts
thereof for use with the goods in this



LADIES & GENTS WATER |
POLO MATCHES BY



SHOES—Ladies White Shoes and Hats
tor Easter, you go to see these at Thani
E



LOSSSSOS FOPSPOOS GOS F OF OC FS GIF F 1 FOF

FLOODLIGHT
at



fros. Dial 3466 28.3.52-—t fin.

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC |
|



SEEDS: Arrived yesterday 40 differ-
ent kinds Fresh Vegetable Garden Seeds,

28.3.52—1n





SDRSSSSOS SSS ISOS FOSSIS OS POS SPOS





















at 8.30 p.m, avatlabl it popular list; flush tanks for water closets and 65655600 0000S099SS9SSSSSOOS
ake a a Th 30e fe Raitt urinals, Hospital tables, hydrants, hydro- “SSOP PPO PSPSPS PISS SSS iG
Admission (Dance & aw , sma . John F. Hutson :
Ltd. Agents. 21,.3,.52—2n therapeutic equipment, laundry trays, Lf hulfor’s ae
Water Polo—$1.00 nga ; ; LOST lavatories, sinks of all kinds, showers, ae
. . WIND BREAKER ” s stops for bathtubs and sinks, urinals, VSOSSO9SS9E9 OCP PIOSSVOSSVISVOODIS VSS VOSS I SFIS
admission for Water Polo Colours $4.95. Meet anc thassiat int water closets, parts thereof and seats 9 %
only—2/- tros. Dial 3466. 28.3.52--t.f.n therefor, tanks, tools, and apparatus for IF You WANT
G eae : Y SWEEPSTAKE BOOK — In Jamaica| making the Lsted goods, and will be
(Games will be played WHITE SHARKSKIN is here again, in Turf Club Races to take place April 26th | entitled to register the same after one | ,
8.30—9.30 p.m.) |} qualities, $1.47 up. Very beautiful | 10%, Sstics ee hes “SPE: | cath Sem. the aah Gay of Myron 1952, | A house paint, a roofing paint, a wall paint, a boat paint,
: t s T2623 ; - ; er please | unless some person - i ‘ i
Admission after Water Polo REG, "SEOy Se Nearee bay: a s2—-t.t.n, | return to Advocate Advertising Dep:t- time give notice in duplicate ta mea | , M / L K S | OV’) \ * a dull paint, a bright paint, a cheap paint, an expensive
for Dance only — 2/6 abd . ment. Reward offered. 27.3.52—3n. | my office of opposition of such registra- | paint.
(Cc in * SPECTACLES Srond “i pt Ap trade mark can be seen on é AT =
ommencing 9.45) * — Monday etween | app tion at my office, | Y SNe
crabank | / Boas
x 245)... Hi For Best Results-ADVERTISR |Siiener n't Gk. sas, Suz. | Peet mis 38 gov ge ttrsyi at . * CENTRAL EMPORIUM
eet anseecess|)|| senecooesesesocossosecee| newer. ME sistas aay Soe (Corner Broad & Todor Streets)
Pease B.8.08-t. AGENTS
.



CHILDREN’S VESTS & PANTIES, 3for $1.20 FOR GENTLEMEN
BORDERED Good Quality SPUNS nw $1.08 é
os corel CREPES, CAFFERAN, SELES, die vitae, SILK SPORT SHIRTS 5 shades 2 for.... $4.50

PRICES — YOU WILL BE GLAD TO PAY | mow. io... cess, $10 POLO SHIRTS from sfc, to..........- SLAM ¢
SERVICE Siac TH AT IS SURE TO PLE ASE | SPUNS, white, blue, pink, biege, brown, now NEW NYLON BLEND SPORT SHIRTS$4.95










ae ys ONLY oe. cece ccc ccececevevceseesssee-. €O@ THOUSAND OF OTHER SHIRTS at

PRINTS & HAIRCORDS Per Yard. 48, 79. 86 | ART SILK, white, pink, blue, now only....... TZe lowest prices .........).00...ee eee

SS WHITE CALICO yd 45e FUGI Pink, blue, gold, yd 34¢ A | i | -« SHANTUNG in 8 shades, now only.......... $1.12 RIBBED VESTS, imagine! 3 for only.... $I.

SPECIAL NYLON GOLD BLENDED D! a . ;
LINEN FOR UNIFORMS yd____.__ 72 & B4e! _ | MATERIALS 6 shades 44” ew $2.64 SOCKS at killer values! now 2 for only... . $1.

LADIES. COTTON VESTS two for only __—s_—s—s S$ .OOD | TH E ehh bie hiner SPECIAL MEN’S 2 tone SHOES pair.... $8.25 ¢

A NEW MULTICOLOURED SHOES, *HAKI SHIRTS each now only....... $3.25
JERSEY NIGHTIE 5.5 sid habtny d ’
S 2for 5.50 RAYON PANTIES ove dusty 1.44 | | HATS, BAGS. _ KHAKI per yard only ........ 9Oe & $1.03



GADIES INTERUOCK PANTIES 2... from @@ and up | ” ay ao 3 Sia
SNYLON HOSIERY pair only $1.20 TOWELS each now Ble & GB BARGAIN HO w SE
CHILDREN'S INTPRLOCK PANTIES... — _._________. _ Ade 30 SWAN STREET DIAL 2702 S. ALTMAN —
VIVECC CCW CTW ww CTW WT WWW ¥ BIEEEEGEQGQ GO GG) CQ GGGGGGGGGGGGGG-GGGbGGGGGGGGGO> rire oe











FRIDAYy: MARCH, .28,. 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







PAGE SEVEN







——
SEP LOSSLSO SEES PSPIS PPI IE

e

BY CARL ANDERSON





¢ ADD THESE SPECIALTIES » +
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Cape. 1992, King Benner Syodicape, tax World sights reserved * K Oral L xs
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FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... p K K ik sendeseeseseseeesereneee 5
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S yee) BRS nhintiibaess
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I CANNOT TEL OH, PAGWOOD | [f= | = | Wi BUT CONT
eer aa ip !

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IT HAPPEN




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BLONDIE LIKES :

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LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

TO - DAY.









SE AE ESSER ER RT RN Ste LPR oY
Senet

__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE :













SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

eo —
————

oo
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside, ;
Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually Now

Usually Now
Bots. Green Label Mango
. 55 50 Tins Select Powdered Milk .. 1.05 95

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Tins Rio Grande Chocolate Pkgs. Post Toasties ee Se Al 36
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: q ae =! ; Bottles Carljngs Beer ,, ee 26 2h ,
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D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

e ‘
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

BRITISH
HONDURAS

By STEPHEN L. CAIGER




AH-~ BUT, M'SIEU~
HOW UNFORTUNATE /
WITH BANDAGES SHE
CANNOT TALK /



AH - BUT, DOC-
HOW FORTUNATE...





WITH PENCIL
AND PAPER SHE
CAN WRITE /

















just |
A ‘
LITTLE

TIMELY
ADVICE



British Honduras is _per-
haps the most neglected of
¢ all English colonies. Even the
larger histories of Colonial
development barely mention
it. The author has now told
the story of the interesting
country from the early days
_ of its settlement by the log-
,» Wood-cutters and buccaneers
{up to the present.

Beginning with the discov-
Â¥, ery of British Honduras by
the Spanish Conquistadores

he describes the growth of the
colony under its ‘occupation

MOTHER IS QUITE WHY S' GHH- SHH WHY DO
UPSET ABOUT YOUR || GET ANGRY?/--GHE BUT JUST TO YOU HAVE TO MAKE
ET TING ‘| |WAS REARRANGING KEEP PEACE IN ET” | SO MUCH NOISE 7/-+
THE FURNITURE AT THE FAMILY -/'LL| i e ~, YOU KNOW MY
MIDNIGHT - WHILE : ” | BROTHER IS TRYING
a

TO SLEEP’


















to our numerous -cus-
tomers and the general
public .

DON'T MISS SHOPPING AT —

and settlement by British
adventurers, and consolida-
tion by the buccaneers after
the “conversion” of Harry
Morgan. He gives an account
of the early quarrels with the
Spaniards which were later
followed by controversies

ith neighbouring Central
American Republics especial-
ly Guatemala. The dispute
with Guatemala ended in the
territorial agreement of 1859,

but : ve _ of agg! apn i aa :
Saiab die una Mae ¥ Caller. iB EG I N § 4 4). DA % e



LIAR! You'VE BEEN MOONING OVER HER FOR
MONTHS! I KNOW WHAT'S GOING ON! YOURE
TWO-TIMING ME .. AND NOBODY TWO-TIMES
be LILI LAVELLE AND
GETS away

WILSONS

during their Easter Parade and

YOU WERE GOING
TO DROP ME OFF

Store wide clearance which

red to U.N,O.

The concluding chapter

e
deals with the Colony to-day



Our Air Conditioned Store, efficient and courteous
Staff will make shopping a pleasure. There will be no
closing of doors

with special emphasis on its
economic and commercial
status and recent Government
proposals for development.
The writer shows that its
agricultural | and other re-
sources have been gravely
neglected, and that this fertile
land ceuld maintain a popula- : |
tion many times its present |
size. '



EVERYONE WILL BE EASILY SERVED
DOORS OPEN AT 8 A.M.







YOU RENO HELPY WE'VE BEEN IN THE

JUNGLE FOR WEEKS2 I'VE LEARNED

NOTHING ABOUT TH

1 DIDN'T ALREADY axe
KNOW!

(VE HAD
ENOUGH.
IM GOING





PROFESSOR, THERE ARE
SOME MYSTERIES THAT
SHOULD BE LEFT ALONE+
AND NOT PRIED INTO?

MYTH~+A MAN WHO CANNOT

21 DIE~LEAVES A SKULL MARK

Bl WHERE HES BEEN+*
——_ 72°

| SAW THAT MASKED MAN s
N MY DREAMS THEN | SAW
HIM HERE INTHE FLESH? op



N.E. WILSON
& CO.

The Store where your dollar yields more cents.

GET IT AT THE...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BROAD ST.

DIAL 3676 31 Swan Street









z7accr

care




wt,

aeayowecrs

“

Hoan

as

er ee

PAGE EIGHT

Notre Dame Defeat Lmpire 2—

NOTRE DAME
EMPIRE

(Daniel 2) ,

(Robinson

1) 1

A CROWD estimated at about 4,500 went to Kensington
Oval yesterday afternoon and saw Empire suffer their
second defeat for the season and this time it was at the

hands of Notre Dame who

defeated them to the tune of

2—1 in their First Division Football match.

The mutch which was looked
upon as “the match” in the
return fixture provided thrills for
the many fans and every move
was watched with interest. Two
goals were scored in the first
half while one goal was kicked
lin the second half.

Inside right Daniel for Notre
Dame proved to be the hero of
his team by kicking in two well
placed goals — one in the first
half afd one in the second half
— to give his side victory. Robin-
son scored the only goal for
Empire. Notre Dame who was
blow to get off the mark played
a better game in the second half
while the Empire forwards failed
to take the opportunities they
were given.

Again Grant and Smith’ played
a good game for Empire. They
kept the ball well in the midfield.

Wilkinson kept goal well for
Notre Dame but sometimes he
was undecided about coming out
of his goal or staying in, in the
face of the approaching Empire
forwards.

Empire Presses
Notre Dame won the toss and
skipper Mandeville decided to
defend from the northern end of

the pitch against Empire
Both teams started the game
fast and soon the Empire for-
wards were in the Notre Dame
goal area. But«shortly after goal
keeper Symmonds was. tested.
Taylor immediately after tried to
draw first blood tor Empire but
the ball went high over the cross

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Australian Yachtsmen

FRIDAY, MARCH, 28, 1952



Call Here On Way Home

TWO Australians, 27-yea

r-old William Howell and26-

year-old Frank McNulty anchored the white-painted 24-foot





oe. Sag Empire . yo was yacht Wanderer II off the Aquatic Club yesterday morning,
kicked by Rudder right in the completing the fourth leg of their voyage from England to
goal and Robinsei: took the Australia :
chance and headed the ball into They have joined the ranks of fresh fish—the only fresh food
the goal. Wilkinson tried to save trepid yachtsmer who risk during the voyage. They could
but he was too late. With one ocean going nothing else than only hook one fish which* freed
goal to their credit Empire never decked-in ghies. Already itself after they got it on deck.
slackened up and Taylor again they have sailed 5,000 miles from Asked how they felt at sea so
tried to score. Notre Dame was ihe Isle of Wight to Barbados. many.gays without seeing land,
still trying for the equaliser but T! ross Atlantic run from Las they said “we look on the sea as
the Empire backs Smith and Palm: to Barbados which is we look on our front garden; the
Grant were clearing their area 2,700 miles of aulir without rippling waves, the swells, fish
faultlessly. When it was about sceing land, they did in 29 day pooking, around the boat en-
three minutes before half time “Wanderer II” took a half day chant us. We read most of the
Notre Dame cqualised and this longer from Las Palmas here time and attend to our ship.”
goal was scored by Daniel at than the 19-foot Sopranino which The only thing is that they. lack
inside right. c was here last month. vP — reise when the weather is
“It w all idder he fine,

After half time both teams still ian. baciteraee eae William, “We kept fairly dry throughout

continued to press but Notre Wanderer Ii’s owner, who was the trip although Wanderer II is

Dame was playing more construc-
tively and their passing was more
accurate than in the first half.
When this half was about 20
minutes old Daniel again scored
for Notre Dame. He kicked the
ball powerfully and well in the
wight hand corner of the nets,

After this goal Empire made
renewed efforts but the final
blast found the score unchanged.

The teams were :

Empire: Symmonds, Smith,
Grant, Alleyne, Maynard, Rudder,
Norville, Taylor, Robinson, Dray-
ton, B. Morris.

Notre Dame— Wilkinson,
Straughan, Browne, Roberts,
Archer, Daniel, Headley, Cc
Daniel, Parris, Mandeville F
Daniel.

The referee was Mr. O. §S
Coppin,

nae



Alleyne Is Victrix Ludorum
At St. Michael’s Girls’ Sports

A large number of spectators were present at the Ath-
letie Sports finals at St. Michael’s Girls’ School yesterday.
Very great interest was taken in the sports by the girls, and
this will no doubt be realized when it is considered that
over 950 points were gained in standard points.

There was very keen rivalry be-
tween the four Houses throughout
all.the events, and in the Senior
Division V, Alleyne of Boadicea
was Victrix Ludorum, in the
intermediate division. J. Mayers
of Anne, and in the junior division
N. Holder of Boadicea. J. Mayers
was very outstanding in her
division, winning both flat events
in fine style.

Among the events, the High
Jumps could be said to have been
the most exciting, causing many
shouts from the crowd. The Little
Visitors’ Race which was won by
Enid Niles was also very amusing
and there were over two dozen
entrants.

On the conclusion of the sports
the trophies were presented by
Mrs. Riseley Tucker. The vote of
thanks was made by Mr, H. F
Alkins-and after thanking Mrs.
Tucker for presenting the trophies,
he assured Miss Burton and her
staff that the sports were very
enjoyable. He hoped that in the
Inter-School Sports now approach-
fing, St. Michael’s would more
than do her best.

Savannah Club
Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

Ladies Doubles Final
Miss D. Wood and Miss G, Pil-
grim beat the Misses Bowen 6—2,
6—4.
Men's Doubles Semi-Final
E. P, Taylor and Dr. C. G.
Manning beat J. D. Trimingham
and D, E. Worme 6—1, 6—3, 9—7
Mixed Doubles Handicap
Mr, and Mrs. P. McG. Patterson
-} 40 beat Viscount and Viscount-
ess Dangan 4+ 15 6—3, 6—1.
The Tennis courts will be close:|
today.





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Art Exhibition at the Museum
at 10.00 a.m.

Speech Day at Queen’s College
at 2.30 p.m.

Football at Queen’s Park at
5,00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Home Agricul-
tural Station Yard, st.
Philip—7 .30 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Hastings
Rocks at 8.00 p.m.



| They'll Do It Every







OH, CUFFBERT-
I TINK THAT
MAN BACK THERE
| WAS TRYING TO
| GET YOUR EYE
| ISN'T HE THAT BIG
MOVIE PRODUCER
FRIEND OF
YOURS








VON Kwicky» ¥
YES~I’ SURE

IT IS > MUST
SAY HELLO TO
HIM» BARDON

50 Will Sail
Sixth Regatta

Over forty yachts are expected

to take part in the Sixth Regatta
of the R.B.Y.C. which will be
sailed in Carlisle Bay at 2.30

p.m, tomorrow, No changes have
been made in the handicap times
which remain the same way as
they were in the Fifth Regatta.

The handicap times published
in yesterday’s Advocate were
those for the Sixth Regatta in
1951 and can be compared with
the present times. The handicap
system has been changed this
year,

















The times for the Sixth Regatta
are as follows: —

No. Yacht Start At Flag
B 10 Wizard 2.30 Red
Bli Ranger Yellow
B 4 Hi Ho 2.32 Red
B 3 Resolute
B 481 Fantasy 2.33 Yellow
B 6 Furt
B 7 Mayra Biir
BK 8 Rascal 2.4 Red
B 9 Okapi
D 8 Peter Pan
D 4 Seabird Yellow
D 12 Rainbow . Red
D 9 Olive Blossom Yellow
D 10 “Van Thorndyke 2.09 Red
B 5 Mischief 2.41 Yellow
B 1 Gypsy :

D 8 Rainbird 2.42 Red
D 2 Imp ‘

D 7 Sinbad 2.43 Yellow
I 8 Skippy

D 14 Hurricane 2.44 Red

1 7 Mohawk

I Ul Reen 2.45 Yellow
1 2 Wmvader 2.46 Red

.! Dauntless _ Wish de

I 122 Dawn 2.47 Yellow
K ‘Tornadoes 2.48 Red
C 1 Miss Behave
© 3 Madness
Cc 9 Folly 2.49 Yellow
1 1 Gnat
1 4 Coronetta
1 8 Clytie 2.51 Red
cn Magwin 2.52 Yellow
Cc 2 Seamp 2.53 Red
Cc 9% Rogue 7
Cc 10 Gannet 2.54 Yellow

“N.B.—The following date has
been fixed for the
Regattta: Saturday, April 5th.





‘Time

Heghrered US. Parent Ofteo

,tunate to have flying fish flying
Seventhfjaboard the



dental surgebn in
Enzland and his friend Frank whe
is. a newspaperman and corres-
pondent for*Reuter, decided to go
back to their home in Australia
after being vay for two years
in England

Frank had done
of oceam racing in small
and William quite a bit
Ing around the English coast. So
they dared to try the eaworthy
little Wanderer HI as their means
of transportation to Australia,

Shake-Down Cruise

working




deal
yachts
of cruis-

great



Wanderer II, 3.76 tons, was
taken on a shake-down cruise u
September last year from the
Isle of Wight to Gibraltar and
fatisfying the yachtsmen, they ,
sect about to refit her there fo
her cruise “down under.” Lock-
ers were crammed wit food,
water cans filled to capacity,—49
galions of water bottom cop-
per sheathed and 475 square feet

of sail clothed
voyage. incide
Al carries more
any yacht of its size

From Gibraltar they called at
Gpain betore going on to Las

the yacht for her

ilally,
tile thar

area

mas. Bad weather in the Eng-
Jish Channel greeted the yachts-]]
men at the outset of their voyage.
A gale lashed them about after

they had hove-to for a few hours,
The weather grew fair and
they were on their way again.



were only

She wa

Wanderer [Little Ship Club.
gone in for racing

spend 5
Pal-jing which time they will get stores
for

but a small boat,” they said. “We
wet through when we
got rainy squalls; and nobody got
seasick.’ -
Wanderer If was designed as
an ocean cruiser by Laurent
Giles, famous dinghy builders of
England who also_ designed
Sopranimo. Her overall length is
24 feet, she measures 21 feet on
her waterline, carries a beam
of seven feet and draws five feet
of water. Her timbers are af
pitch pine, her mast of spruce
ind she relies on sails alone.
Living Space

Living space aboard, is limited,
but midship the yachtsmen are
fairly comfortable. Two small
anvas bunks are neatly arrang-
ed on either side and nearby is
the pocket-size kitchen,

Wanderer II is 16 years old.
under the burgee of the
Royal Cruising Club but since
she was sold over to William,
she was under the burgee of the
She had never
William and Frank expect to
about two weeks here duf-

their Pacific crossing
ook around Barbados,

TABLE TENNIS
POSTPONED

and



But two more gales — one in\ pjay in the Ladies’ Inter-Club
the Bay of Biscay and the oth-|pypie Tennis Competition, which







er off French Morocco in the
Atlantic — were in store for
them. They had to
twice again, the last time
104 hours. And it was very
cold. They could only enjoy
their passage from Las Palmas
when the weather was kind
and the winds fair throughout.
They averaged 96 miles a day.

Reefed Down

Rigged as a gaff-cutter, Wan-
derer Il had to be reefed down
all the way from the Isle of Wight
to Las Palmas but she sailed un-
der full sail from Las Palmas to
Barbados. William and Frank
were kept busy until she reached
Las Palmas. They could how-
ever afford to turn in to bed from
10 o'clock .at night and wake at
7 o'clock in the morning during
their cross-Atlantic run because
Wanderer II is self steering with
twin-spinnakers attached to her
tiller. “We are so accustomed to
the motion of the ship’ that if
anything goes wrong, we are uj}
at an instant,” they said,

Frank learnt to navigate an
aircraft while he was in the
Royal Australian Airforce during
the last war and that has certain-
ly come in useful. Wanderer II is
equipped with a similar chart
table to those used in aircraft and
Frank is doing the navigating
from it. His sextant is a yachts-
man's. “It is a new type of navi-
gating introduced in the airforce
during the past few years,’
Frank explained, “and it has beer
found to be very applicable t
seiling ships.”

But the yachtsmen’s chief dif-
ficulties on their adventure are
cooking and sleeping. Wandere
If rolls badly, spilling the foo
from their plates, “Although thei:
Primus stove is set on gimbals,
they had quite a few spills, Ani
as for sleeping, they had to
themselves in their bunks,
nights Wanderer I
much that they could
and tried to
cigarette,

Three Meals A Day

However when they met fine

weather, they cooked three times

for

. a day and even baked in a pres-

sure cooker. All washing during
the voyage is done with sea
water. About 35 gallons of wate:
remained in the tanks when
they reached here. They carry
enough food and water to last
them for 100 days. The reason?
They are going to Sydney via
Cristobal and the Pacific where
they will have trouble in getting
stores.
William and Frank

were for-

yaoht during
morning they

|

the

had
Jimmy Hatlo '
|

night. Next





















B





THE TABLE-HOF
WHO MAKES A G4

OUT





|
as
A TT |
|

heave-to | roy

tie
Som:
rolled s }
not sleep t ‘aps some bad disease that will
find comfort in a ner or later cause your teeth to
|

FSF POSS PEO

was to have taken place to-night
has been postponed until tomor-
nieht at the Y.M.C.A.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.25 ins.

Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 71 2 °F

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.959,

(3 p.m.) 29.890

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m.
Moon: New, March 25,

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Tide: 5.00 a.m., 5.53 p.m.

Low Tide; 11.27 a.m, 11.24
p.m.



SOOO POPPIES FOOCRS
‘

A
*Grand Dance

will be given by

ALFRED GITTENS &
McDONALD HOLDER

TO-NIGHT

At QUBEN’S PARK HOUSE
Queen’s Park
ADMISSION 2/-
Music by Mr. MeLeslie’s Ork
Refreshments on Sale
Please invite your friends x

5

PPPOE

Messrs,

ECC OE PS SS FS SS

ts
x
Â¥

%,
SSCS SES OSSOOOSSR





Sore Mouth

Loose Bloody Teeth

leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
! e Teeth mean that you may
Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or

'r out and may also cause Rheu-
\tism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
tops gum bleeding the first day,
is sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens th eth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosa ust make your mouth w
and save your teeth or money back
on return of empty package. Get
Amosan from your chemist today
The guarantee protects you





Unguentine

216. wk Oarorr,

Relieves pain.of






-



pe ef oy ewe
an ic.
Sauvee Pain—Gives

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



Year Book of the West
indies and Countries of the
Caribbean

Latest Edition $14.40
Locks for. the Press

» Locks for the Gate

’ Locks for the Drawer
% all at

~» JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
‘ and

, HARDWARE

POSES TO OSGSVOSSSS OS OOOO

7 Crown Closes Case

In Murd

From Page 5

father did’ not give orders about
the “working” of the land. I saw
to that.

Joseph Gibbs went into the land
the day after her father died, cut
a bunch of bananas, and said he
came to take .possession of the
land. ’

He cut the bananas and went
straight home. All of us went to
the father’s home on December
30th and talked together about
“qnaking peace” and “living good.”

I did not worry to put “Joe’*
Gibbs in Court when he cut the
first bunch of bananas because my
father had just died. :

My father in making the will
said that the debt of $170 should
be paid to Joe Gibbs before the
property was divided. I do not

“Joe” Gibbs worked outside of
Barbados. I don’t know whether
“Joe” sent money to my father.

When “Joe” cut the first bunch
of bananas on the 18/1/52, I sent
my husband for it. I would have
gone for it-myself if I could have
lifted it up. Headley was home
at my house when I sent him for
the bananas.

It is true I did not see where

he cut the second bunch of
bananas from.
When Joseph came and stood

up at my house door, Duncan took
up his stick from the corner and
said “Joe” man, you can’t come
in here. * My husband was a strong
man,

It was my intention that as fast
as “Joe” cut the bananas, I would
go and take them up. :

All of us went into the road in
peace. After Jane called “Joe” |
and told him to cut more bananas.
I told my husband to take it up. |
I would have given him the
bananas if Jane had not urged
“Joe” to cut more.

My husband did not take up the
bananas on his own. I told him
to take them up. I walked in
front of my husband when we
were going from the house to the
road.



At The Door Step

When Ioe was at the door step, |
he did no. quarrel when my hus-
band barred him from entering.
Joe did not put down the stick)
after he took it up from the
corner.

“Joe” ‘got to the spot at which
the bananas were first. The bas-
ket was empty. Joe was not
backing me when he took up the
bananas. He turned around and |
faced me and my husband when ,
ae took up the bananas. I don't;
know why he turned to face me}
whey he took up the bananas, All
three of us went to the bananas
together. I was a little way off. |

'y husband put his stick under |
his left arm when he went to take
up the bananas.

My husband did not pass any
blow with the stick. The stick
dropped from her husband after
“Joe” had stuck >

Bananas Drop

The bananas dropped from the
two men when they had raised it |
only some distance off the ground. |
She could not say who let go of |
the bananas first. |

I told “Sonny” to take ur the
bunch of bananas “for me”. |

When the bananas dropped, |
“Joe” grabbed “Sonny” (the de-|
ceased) in a “neck tie”, and |



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er Trial

“stuck” him with the knife in
his left side The two men did
not clinch except for the “neck
tie”.

No time elapsed between “Joe’s”
holding the deceased and the
“sticking.”

When Mr. Inniss arrived on the
spot, I was still there. I was
about two feet off the two men.

To the Court:—“I saw Inniss
coming down the road before the
stabbing.” He could have seen us.
He was not blind. S

At this point the Solicitor Gen-
eral closed the case for the Crown.

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Full Text






eee

Harba



ESTABLISHED 1895

\





Vestry Move To Take

Scavenging Dept.

Expansion Desired

THE Board of Guardians of

Mr. C. A. Brathwaite, Mr. A

. R, Toppin—Mr. E. D. Mottley

and the Chairman of the Commissioners of Health Mr. J. M.
Kidney were yesterday appointed by the Vestry to meet

the Dean and Cathedral
acquiring by the Vestry of a
Department.

The motion for the a
by Mr. E. D. Mottley.

the Commissione
the purpose of extending
o any other purpose which

Mr. V. W. A. Chase, member of
the Commissioners of Health, said
that the matter had been gone
into very carefully by the Com-
missioners and they had arrived
at the conclusion that it would be
very desirable indeed. It would
relieve congestion,

Mr. Mottley who made the
motion, said that the suggestion
for the acquisition was the result
of the Commissioners going eare-
fully into the matter, The ultimate
decision rested with the Vestry for
an approach to the Legislature to
be made in the matter. |

He hoped he would not be
astonishing them too much when
he said that they would be having
to employ more men that year be-
cause of extensions, There was!
not sufficient room at the depart-
ment to provide an adequate store
room, especially now that more
areas would be scavenged and more
stores would be needed.

The Department of Education
had seen fit, in their wisdom, to
close down the Church Village
School—he understood that the!
building was dangerous for school |
children—and it was felt that it:
was a good opportunity to extend |
the department. He then moved
that a small Committee be
appointed to meet the Dean and
Cathedral Council who are in
charge of the building.

Mr. Brathwaite said that they
should not have to purchase the
building, but it should be handed
over.

Wait For Maude Report

MreeMiltey Was opposed to the
view of acquiring the building,
partly on the grounds that they
should wait until the Maude Re-
port went to the House of Assem-
bly and because, he said, there |
was sufficient space at the present |



Council to consider the possible

site adjoining the Scavenging

ppointing of a Committee was made

The site is the Church Village Girls’
School which is now not in use. te

The Vestry were asked by

rs of Health to consider its acquisition for
the Scavenging Department and

the Commissioners may think

Hon. V. C. Gale
Churchwarden

Hon. V. C. Gale, M.L.C., de-
scribed by the outgoing Church-
warden, Mr. McD. Symmonds as
a man whose sterling character,
integrity and genuine gifts fitted
him to hold, not only the office of
Churchwarden, but he would say
without hesitation, any office in
this colony, was unanimously
elected Churchwarden of St.
Michael at its Vestry meeting yes-
terday.

The Vestry also made appoint-

ments to various Boards yester-
day.
» Seconding the motion for the
election of Hon. V. C. Gale as
Churehwarden, Mr. E. D. Mottley
first thanked last year’s Church-
warden for his painstaking and
formulative report which he pre-
sented to the Vestry before the
new appointment was made.

Mr. Mottley said that one thing

{that could be said of the report,

Pspecially in
there is so

these
much

days when
trumpeting of
persons about social work, was
that it could help assure them
that none of them could say they
had anything to be ashamed of as
far as their duty to the under-
privileged was concerned.

Worthy Heritage

“Not only that,” he said, ‘but
We ,are.proud of the heritage
whieh ‘was passed on to us by
many Vestrymen who served here
before us. For indeed whatever
may be said of the system by
some individuals, it can be said
that there has always been on

the St. Michael =



Over Site Of School

Automobile
Assoc. Has
370 Members

CAPT. St. John Hodson
re-elected President when

Wai
the
First Annual General Meeting of
the Automobile Association of
Barbados was held at the Boveli

and Skeete Building, Coleridge
Street, yesterday afternoon.
Hon, V, C.

Gale, former Vice-
did not stand for re-
election. Col. R. T.:Michelin was
elected Vice-President in his
place. Mr, E, A, Way was re-elected
Honorary Secretary and Treasurer,
The

President

Committee appointed are:
Messrs. Blair Bannister, Ronnie
Gittens, George Challenor, Jnr.,
R. S. Nicholls, Bernard Bannister
and Lieutenant-Colonel
There is a
this

Connell,
vacancy on

will be
lady,

Committee which
filed by an enthusiastic
accepted by the Committee,

Arising out of the minutes Capt.
Hodson
the Honorary
Treasurer

said that their choice of
Secretary
well

and
was carried out,
Without

not

Mr. Way there would
have an Automobile Associa-

tion,” he said.

said that courtesy was one of the

tinues at 10 o'clock. this moa

oe

FRIDAY. MARCH 28, 1952





FINE FI





‘hurchwarden for the ensuit
year. She knew that it w:
irst time that a woman had b
‘lected to such an office in tt
island and although some peo
The finish of the 80 yds. Sprint in the Senior Division at St. Michael Girls’ School Athletic Sports yes were likely to be critical, sh
terday. First was 8S. Worrell and second V. Alleyne who was Victrix Ludorum of that Division. hoped that with the assistance «

Crown Closes Case. U.C.W.1. Hope

—~ t

To Study

In Murder Trial vx. piatects |

THE CROWN

its case against Joseph Gibbs at |
3.30 yesterday afternoon after calling another four wit-



Professor A, K. Croston, head of

members of the Vestry, her t
of office
ably
decessors,

Commissioners



Mrs. H. A. Talma First
Lady Churchwarden
Appointed In B’dos

MRS. H. A. TALMA the wife of His Worship Mr, H. A,

Taima, City Police Magistrate created history when si cM,
came the first lady Churchwarden to be appointee m Bar
bados. This took place yesterday at a meeting of the

Christ Church Vestry. é :
Mrs. Talma who was senior guardian for the !



chial year was proposed by Mr. C. S. MeKehizie, the out-
her : a

going Churchwarden who described
proper person to fill the office.”

Mr. H. St. G. Ward seconded
Mr Talma thank
Mr. McKenzie
had

replying t
the kind
about he

t
tor
made
ured the Vestry
vork she had done as a guard
vas in the interest of the ps
She thanked the propose
econder and also the Vestry {co
taving elected her to the office «

nee he

that





he Board of Guardians

and othe

would
with

compare
those of

favour
her |

Other Appointments



Other appointments made \
follows:
*oor Law Guardians: Mr, Cc. Il

and Mr. C, B. Brandford 5
of Highway MRS. Bf A. TALMA

S. Me-



‘his term. of office, Unfortunately

He said that the membership ; H. St.G. Ward, Mr, C
; the English Department of the - . . ’
. ha dene, arly 0. p roma | oe 8 Pp onzie . ’ ravin r

Ee eine ete at nesses to substantiate the charge of murder brought against | University College of the West Kenzie, Mr. C. M. Drayton , :

He informed members that the “ & " : | faslnn Mr, T N. Peirce, Mr. H oo
British Automobile Association’s]| the forty-two-year-old\peasant proprictor for the death of | eae ee: the Advocate yester Garnes mat

: . : a g 5 | > t re. tte
Annual Convention would be held Duncan Headley.—-his Brother-in-law—-on the 18th of Jan- |@®¥ that his department was pre ‘ommissioners of Health: Mr. C. S P; | ribute
br. -Lendowt ite this bebe uary last ” ; paring students for the General McKenzie, Mr. H. SUG. War ay
d . Degree of the University of Lon- : “) St.G ard ;

eee mae +S ppd as Among the four witnesses who ra |don. The courses in English aré 7 . = BR ene - ea T M: ‘Kenzie
WORE OO et ee Se coats. # |gave evidence yesterday was | the London courses with som MBisdundictt and would represent Automobile) Eulise Headley, widow of ithe modifications, but the standard i Representatives on the Boa
Association of Barbados at this|deceased, who occupied the wit- lthy , . “University {2° appointing the Rector | . , )
Recantion. nies MAGA’ foe the ace @iithe jet ot Ee. London Universit; Vicars: Sit Dudle, ca anal ; MEMBE RS of the ¢ bret co! reh

Members then discussed thelafternoon session which lasted | | “He nit that the main moai-|M®- J. E. Webster for the Paris) \ h ry At mene iN Pla Mi mar
various problems —confronting}from 145 to 3.30 o'clock, She ; fc teed opping of Ola{chureh: Mr, H. C. Sealy and Mr | {he manner in tied One 4

Hnaiidte eried on the witness stand as| | feations “are the dropping of, Ole}; ntiel AM : for St Ber} MacKenzie had carrie ou 1
Mr. Way pointed out that the|she underwent long and. detailed | English and the introduction of a ae ee es eee - luties Churchrt . den of h
A.A, had no voice in the stopping |cross-examination by Mr. B, K considerable amount of “practical’’ «70. 1g Representative ond Mrs-| "en. aud aise fou tt ah
of parking at Shepherd Street, but| Walcott, Q.C., “Senior Defer ee rmer me Dae SORES Of 1: a! tales, Chanwerded, tr totes ae han cen to ae
businessmen of the area had com-|Counsel, and blamed the whol | poems and passages of prose whic! Officio sieving the eeu of the Re
plained to the authorities that they |incident which led up to the cas: jwere not taken from the text Trustees of the Archer Gitten: {port Mr. Cc. M. D no
aha inconvenienced on another sister who she said | book lhe department laid great i t r i: Mr. A. G iat Ape care toate Chur 1¢
were e Pe hy. in ‘evidence “told the defendant | | Stress on the development of eriti rus nara r G. Gitte nat the ‘ 7 OIng it : :

Two Suggestions — to cut the second bunch of bane- | eal ability of students readin; |Mrs. H. A. Talma a ed ' “iota Bens ca ,

Mr. an vr y= wae tend nas “over which the dispute | | English rather than a mere stock Sas ao . ~~ 7 ue at the Pari ae as + : ‘ PS ae
He said that as in Trinidad, re | arose: leriticism of set books from!Church r. B.S ouvier oug por Bie
could be a daily broadcast »ver Mr. Walcott, Q.C., who is asso | histor ies of English literature, | "Tuner of the weer ut St Rat eehane 2 pep 3 tie reiv
Rediffusion reminding people oflciated with ‘Mr. J. S, B. Deas “Course are not ‘exclusively | tolomew's Chapel: Mr. L. ©, Git Mi Stacktanste thenited
me meee one range s about and instructed by Mr, D, Bape concerned with modern jiterature; | tens. t membe vs for their kind word

The second suggestion was about |field, Solicitor, ‘will start | hi even though Old English has been| Keeper of the organ motor 4 ured them that he had tried
courtesy on the road bt a a address to the jury on behalf of jecliminated; there is quite a full|the Parish Church: Mr, F. W. God to do the best he could during
said was lacking in Barbados. He|the defence when hearing « Middle ara

main objects of the Association,
Each member should be courteous,
setting an example for others to
follow. In this way they wouid be
able to launch a large scale
courtesy programme. l
Col, Michelin appealed for mem-



Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C.,
conducting the case on
the Crown, will then address the
jury in
Mr, Justice G, L

|
who |
behalf |
|

'

|

reply, and His Lordship
Taylor will sum
ip the case.



\course in Engiah litera. |d
ture and there ly for that partic
{lar course some linguistic study,”
Allin all, the student who has
followed the courses for ‘three
jyears in Intermediate and B.A
| (General) in English, will have a
| g00d outline knowledge of English



SERETSE KHAMA

Seretse Turns







| ho’ Wage NY duvinise that thes bit
quite at ise «

cause he had a very reliable and

Mussons
Must Leanne 2 8

{while he Vil



his mind wa

person of

















































uarters, is Vestr, ‘Ss, no matter g aes Heard A Voice | literature from 1350, plus detailed (From Our Own Correspondent islanel
Should ngeRg into any” capita |t0 what walk of life they belonzed,| bers. He said that the, Association own Job Tn jicniee ee ee me eseese| sowrOr-SPAIN March yy, | al
sana Ml . aecision we |who were always interested in| Was in need of funds to carry out| seven witnesses gave evidence |fied books and authors; but above} Mr. Beaumont Celestain, acting RN ee eee cane
a . t es wade Report in | the welfare of the under-privil- their programme, ,On Wednesday, the first day’s . ie, he should have developed his]Chief Magistrate today orderec ar seat eo os ar ins
made as to the Maude . In © Wakave “pl 5 . hearing of the case, and on re- J leapacity for reading with diseri-|Captain Roy Musson, an English- | @ble : nount worh ang wer
amr bine Et sete? 2ate oo oie eee ee sumption yesterday morning, the! amaica \" Eiation See man and his British Guiana-born | a recat sg 2 4 av
i 3 re : ‘ 7 nn lie ive Belle} ! é ; , E Le R. ae a on should also go to Mr
oa eased to the. catia The St. Michael's Vestry, he , Fi h pe Tne co — oe a LONDON, March 27 Professor Croston said that “dt} wife Vivienne to be removed from | yi). well, He was very pleat-
. : said, could hold its head high. ti ts = eee ev tte The British Government \-|is hoped to start research within]the colony. They will be detainee ed that the Vestry was quite
building. 2 : ; . She said that she knew the accus- | ri ver a eres ir iatal sate Te etati q > sat
me S0gee that ..all the: lorstes Cuneo ts te fe as 2 ed well and also knew .the de- nounced to-day that Seretse | the next few years on West Indian Making ne Ps & i ws onl isfied with the manne zo which
oy ‘ara | S¥mmonds as he made reference Pl Lt l eased ‘ell. Winifred Belle of: Khama, Chief designate of the |cialects. ! e er on the appiica~ hig work was carried out :
used could e oa a ny Jin | 30 the effect of the three or fou | en l u — ct sous all On! Bam a ito tribe, banished from The language departments of|tion of immigration authorities! yy, caid that he had to thank th
oF ap by Se ato disicinn? two or| thousand dollars for paying for Re 18 at bout 4.30 pn, she the reserve in Bechuanaland after |several English Universities have|the Magistrate refused the appeal two Guardians, Mi | Ima a
a an a | shingles for the poor and destitute | FOR the past two weeks there wan we sae sister’s house and! his marriage to Ruth William | hown great interest in this} and also disallowed bail. Mr. Tfill. the Poot Li ROOTES
® hether the Gov-| in the parish, he felt that Mr. have been large quantities of fly-|peard a voice calling out “Joc! | London white girl, would never be | scheme and the University College Thirty-five minutes after the the Matron h orekeey and
Seekh wend umate ich x. ;Symmonds seemed very cowie in “Ash on sale around the City Joe!” : recognised Chief of the Bam-|bhas promises of help in the way|order was made an_ Immigration ' {he Parochial Treasurer who fron
ernment ee ee Suen ex" Tt was a service which they pr in surrounding districts. Osi Then she went to the window of | angwatos ; jf staff from the University of| Officer escorted the Mussons to a time to time rendered Se eee
penditure, anyway, were responsible for + ors many occasions fish were sold be-}the house and saw the accused, | I Salist C nwealth | London as soon as the scheme is| waiting taxi to take them to the uable as intanes aed conte! uted
: : z sent and he ha : . cote pa vw % ord Salisbury! Commonwea ae a “i
In Right Direction ee ues te now the Gov-| low the scheduled price, Gibbs coming down the “bank it ae ee etary. told the | underway. Royal Gaol, °
Hon, V. C. Gale observed that if}... rould have seen the wis- Late on Tuesday night people|with the deceased rushing dae cf Lata, tie wine wold | aaaiiabeaaenemeetmtecgineeien
the recommendations of the Maude oe — aside a sum of| were buying fish at one cent each. |down” behind him with ee Se inivited %. heminate dnathert C D W Will Chen ===
SOME tinmn: thet they weave. | Sane’ to, ances In Weaporery 19-| Bethe of eS lata anf ee ide ot Bevavs Bee noer | Chief in place of Seretse,, Chet UW. J bi ”
would mean that they would re- irs to the homes of the destitute} in cold storage plants and sold on |s ? yi ad. 7 cUS=\ Designate or his uncle sekdi |, a a
j. Fears 40 ; the following da ed was walking with a knife in] 75°)" = Hected a: | 300 F War 8
> y: ; vo | Khama, Regent, who objected to or
@ on pase 5 @, mH page 5 During the week plenty of iced|his hand and was ee ie his marriage Seretse Khama | ® ; fn
2 roast iatiias tals asec oa aed Ail ere bald nthe. ko MaeaeNes [80 front of the deseasee deniy | Who has been in London since hy | At U.C.W.I. Hospital
: eae od h from the previous day’s;™men, were = walkin Pas cp was exiled.two years ago has been | 4
RIDING AT ANCHOR cateh, this fish brought six cents | 17" rth Toe fie but . the offered a Government post in | KINGSTON Jamaica, March 27,
. each early in the afternoon if to - he ated Mon the | Jamaica, Lord Salisbury said, CD. & W. will ive 2 10,800 tc
aiiiiane 7 ety dhe accusec never Jaite the ' .D, + Wi e
th at From about 6.00 p.m. every day blow and both of them went into Seretse was exiled for five | build two additional wards at th
the price of fish drops to four cents @ tiinch. ‘i years by the former Labour Gov~- | University College Hospital té en-|
each and a few hours ‘ater they | i T Genseent Seretse’s marriage has|syre world recognition of the ad
are sold at three cents each. | Before they “closed ee cach" caused a dispute in the tribe. hospital as a teaching hospital for
' | A housewife told b Tees eet be omens named ace Since marriage Pareten's wile | training, doctors and nurses, d
| vesterday Ce Se oat ee eee en ae *" has given birth to daughters. Jamaica is bearing the whol oO d li an !
| | ari i ing ; accused retreated, s ting the rd Salisbury sé F ur delivery vans
| !dried a large quantity of flying‘ accused retreated, still facing Lord Salisbury said the post |.) oe rukeine th 6 hospital
i | ; She will be able t use them | deceased.. a ffered to Seretse Khama injoo on ‘ il }
' } wae flying fish are out of season. | The accused “went into” the Faiaic a was that of Administra- Minister f Social Walfore told the } OVEN FRESH SERVICE |
ae ¢\deceased after ihe (the deceased) | tive Assistant at a salary of £770 House ft Re sanacitativas it. 13 6xe! : |
i | e raised the stick as if to hi om a year with the prospect of pro- ae ot Pe World Heakh O: |
{ {When they clinched both of ther stion to the rank of Assistant | pected tha : y satth a” J
13 Injured In tugged at each other and ae Seomstery at a higher salary ganization would set up a regions now make it possible for you to i!
they both fell to the ground. She} : : 7 area office in Jamaica which, :
| 1 | i t did not see the stick after thé Beretse told abr Ma Coven gradually is becoming the heac get our Biscuits from your grocer i
; | era men “closed in” on each othet oday ne tee ek ree “| quarters of health and — f th h t te you in }
Before both men fell to the! ment’s offer of a4 po . ee n the British Caribbean e e sho neares
WINNEMUCCA, _—— 27 ground they held on to each opher} ( mum ating ot ag tig ey or trom p
arch 27. as they were hugging @f¢W) ernment’s decision the e woul -
Thirteen persons were treated |S it ~ _ ever be recognized as Chief ot 8 AWARDED any part of the Island.
| 'for minor injuries after a land~| Phe head of the deceased was} the Bamangwato tribe in Bech - ION
| pslide derailed a locomative and. the chest of the accused, The|analand but would be offeres COMMENDATIO Each shop or grocery is fitted with |
‘ | [three cars of the Chicago bound |} nds of the accused were around| job in Jamaica he declared ; CERTIFICATES Cc p !
i Western Pacific Railway train|i}. neck of the deceased, They! feel { cannot possibly be, pré . 2 i t kee the ||
i “California Zephyr.” | struggled for sometime before} pared to take bread out al THE Non-Commissiondd Officer air tight containers Oo p
_ The accident took place last hey fell to the ground, Jamaican mouth, By this ine lund’ ibs of the ‘Babbados Pouce Es s g f mn
| nist “ = oh Se The deceased fell to the ground| tion the British Gee = he Mg ag oa yes Pag biscuits crisp and resh.
j , about nes pet ame jon his) side. (the witness agaim, Gying to: placate Bouth eee foe vtination or the Lucy
| Ja cut in a remote hilly part of 4\ demonstrated how the deceased | by offering me a post as far away os eee a ae =
| desert about 40 miles outside | fell to the ground.) Hi back | as possible from South gerd tron i} valk a 1 aly eee. ps
| | Winnemucca. * | was to the bank of the road. She|by a great desire to do right b Atal tai “ebesenor Police Statior
| Aboard “y a se 149 | could not say which side of his Brits Africa oven if let ea “ reper = ) Station
) | Passengers an crewmen. body the deceased fell on, Mean-| alienating thousands of Africans.” | yesterda é. i
| including the injured stayed on nile the accused was on the! He said ha had informed Lord | The award to Station Sergear SE D F R SO E TO-DAY
| | the train. body of the déceased but she|Salisbury y« terday thet An Clarke was a posthumous one. N ( ) M |
a i ioe fon could not say what part of the) would fuse the off of | He died ares year a ‘|
hauled to anagan, Nevada from! |... f the deceased the accused! post 11 Jamaicar the case was sti in progre a ‘ nen - ‘ }
where the train will continue to; soy a Ce i csi a the [wife received the certificate MARIE (SWEET) 4 (ents Per Pound
' Chicago. Tons of storm loosenec' | j ; a Neouie it J , uld Those awarded certificates wer . r 2 oe @ ome een an as
Ss .. \earth slid onto the tracks tipping | Accused Walks Off | Jamaican jf o on . inaneliaee watenes Hadion, Bereta: Ti ena ae !
j | | the locomotive and baggage car to Oe aca e aoe I can be even |Clarke, (deceased), Sgt. Alleyne SHORT CAKE cra te a ae a " H
a 45 degree angle. After bending over the de my ‘ » the Bamangw to /CpL*’ 289 Babb, Cpl, 477 Bryan |
A railway spokesman said two}oq for some time, thi s sani : : P« 336 Sergeant, P.C. 399 ' j 46 {
a =f) .E jlamy and i Se " Spemenan amends =e ‘ ij
i —U.P. @ on page 5
aninabohe estate

GRAHAM CRACKERS_...46- ,, ,, ,,

‘ + aa oe = r s T > aa > “is
Ste unisian Protest
Auriol Rep lies Sternl} lo WIBIX (SODA CRACKERS) 36, 4, |

light of the trouble



PARIS, March 27. were scheduled to fly to Tunis th The text of Auriol’s reply was | 1D the which | = hall aad |
President Vincertt Aurio] and his afternoon to present the Pre not disclosed but Ramond spate eetae ve Pisce Te a i}
| | Ministers drafted a new note to dent’s reply to the Bey'’s protes!|lin, official spokesman fo; Nido » me oe and ria as ga
*’; |the Bey of Tunis and delegeted|against the arrest of Tunisian | Government said the Ministers ae. ves a rains cy a a
two of the President's Aides to| Premier Mohammed Chanib ) Cees are te + de 3 that eb p ge Or to !
take it personally to the Tunisian three other Tunisian Minister taken, during the past ow A ee unis . ys ie Fel eine Prats ab : . ; pana : _ |
| ruler, The Ministers’ nree by the French Mesi¢ent ere eee Rea cal q ie to the pr ) THE WESI INDIA BIN [ I ( () I) }
| Jean Forgot, Secretary General| emergency jmecting was devcte I ‘ Je Hauteclocg : iicave Pra Gotlve a ‘ 1 0 j dh L [ \ oe El . |
WILLIAM HOWELL and Frank McNulty, two Australian yachtsmen, /to the French Presidency and the! entirely to the study. of the « were “completely justified.” — ~ eat ce tir 1 ah nails 2 re| |
look around the harbour from their yacht “Wanderer II” which arriv Director of Auriol’s personal plosive situation in the tect Marcellin said the Minister ‘f my "80 1 i a a6! intusad een
ed in Carlisle Bay from Las Palmas yesterday. Story on Page 8 Cabinet, Jacques Koscusko Morizet | orate. viewed Hauteclocque’s measures | Han ere ane = — ey







—U.P




8

PAGE AGE TWO





Caub Calling




RS ROBERT RANDALL,
headmistress of Queen's
College whe will read her report
at the School’s Speech Day this
afternoon is the widow of Dr

Randall of England who up to the
time of his death in,.195U0 was a
Research Scientist and Assistant
Director of Research of the Na-
tional Coal Board.
Mrs. Randall
small sons,

who has~~two
took up her appoint-
ment at the College in October
1951. She succeeded Mrs. E. J. D.
Corbin who resigned in Decem-
ber 1950.
She hold
gree from

a B.Sc. honours de-
Reading University
Before coming to Barbados she
was Senior Science Mistress,
Balgowan Secondary School,
Beckeram. Previously, she was at
the North-Western Polytecnic
from 1936—49, While there, she
taught Mathematics and Science
at a Technical School for girls.
During the war she was a
Mathematical Instructress to the
Fleet Air Arm and R.A.F. Cadets.

The programme at the College
Speech day to-day will comprise
three songs by the Upper School.
In addition, there will be an
Epilogue to “Saint Joan” by
George Bernard Shaw. This will
be staged by a cast of over ten
senior guards directed by Mrs
R. Bynoe and assisted by Miss E.
Nurse,

Thére will be an address by
Sir John Saint, Kt. C.M.G. while
Lady Saint will present the
prizes and certificates.

Headmaster
HE new Headmaster of
Charterhouse is Mr. B. W.
M. Young. elder son of Sir Mark

Young G.C.M.G.
ernor of this
promoted to

a former Gov-

island who was
Hong Kong later
captured by the Japanese and
who~ resumed his governorship
after the end of the war.

Mr, Brian Young who was an
Etonian Scholar went to Cam-
bridge afid returned to his old
schogl as Assistant Classics Mas-

ter in 1947. He has now been
appointed head of Charterhouse
to succeed Mr, George Turner
who retired in September.

To many Barbadians who re-
member the brilliant administra-
tion of Sir Mark Young and the
intellectual attainments of the
family the appointment to this

post at the age of 30 will come as
no surprise. They will join in
sending congratulations 16 his
parents and to him.

Back to Canada

R. C. J. MOREAU of the C

nadian Bank of Commerce
and Mrs. Moreau returned to
Canada on Wednesday by T.C.A.
after spending two weeks’ holi-
day staying at the Marine Hotel.

Ca-

Other Canadians returning
Home by T.C.A. on /Wednestiay
after spending a holiday at the
Marine were General Me Laren,
‘ir. Perley Robertson and Mr.
and Mrs. Alex Patterson who
were down here for about a
month,

MRS. R. RANDALL

For Youth Congress

EV. E. W. Dunbar and Pro-
fessor V. E. berry, General
Secretary and Youth Secretary of
the Inter-American Division of
Seventh Day Adventists of the
U.S.A. are now in Barbados for
the purpose of conducting the
Youth Congress which opens at
the Drill, Hall tonight and con-
tinues until Sunday.
They arrived here
from Martinique and
at the Hastings Hotel.

on Monday
are staying

Rev. Dunbar and _ Professor
Berry are cn a South American
and Caribbean tour conducting
youth Congresses. They leave
here on Monday afternoon by

B.W.LA. for Trinidad

+ Rev, Dunbar will be broadcast-
ing over Rediffusion on Sunday
night at 8 o’clock giving his im-
pressions of his recent tour of
Europe.

Welfare Adviser
M* W. H. CHINN, Social

Welfare Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
left yesterday ‘morning by B.G
Airways for Dominica where he
will remain for one week. He is
now winding up his tour of the
Caribbean area.

Mr. Chinn expects to be back
in Barbados on April 3 when he
will take T.C.A. for Bermuda
before returning to England.

While here, he attendeq the
Conference of Social Welfare
Officers of the British Caribbean
area at which he was the guest
speaker,

Winter Visitors
R. AND MRS. COLLES COE
regular winter visitors to Bar-
bados, left for the U.S.A. via An-
tigua by B.W.I.A. yesterday.
Also leaving yesterday was
Mr. Glyne Mahon, Assistant
Branch Manager of B.W.1.A. in
Jamaica who returned home by
B.W.LA.



Mathematical Prodigy
ISS SHAKUNTALA DEVI,
India’s 2l-year-old mathe-
matical prodigy who can find the
cube root of a nine figure num-
ber in the fraction of a second is

now back in Barbados forâ„¢about
ten days. She arrived last night
by B.W.1LA. from British Guiana

and is the guest of Thani Bros.

While here, Miss Devi will be
appearing at the Empire and
Roxy Theatres giving perform-
ances of her mathematical skill.

Returning Next Year
FTER spending three weeks’
holiday staying at the Hotel
Royal, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Scott
of Toronto, Canada will be re-
turning home to-day by T.C.A.
This is their first visit to the
island which they like so much
that they are planning to come
back next year for a longer stay.
Mr. Scott is Assistant General
Manager of Ditto, manufactur-
ers of office equipment.
Short Holiday -
R. A. E, TAYLOR left on
Wednesday evening by
B.W.LA. for Trinidaq for a short
holiday during which time he
will look after the final distribu-
tion of the estate of his late sis-
ter, Mrs. A. E. McCutcheon.

Off to the U.S.A.
RS. S. A, McCASKIE of

“Manchester”, Beckwith
Street, left on Wednesday by
B.W.LA. for Antigua and San

Juan on her way to the U.S.A. to
join her mother in New York

City.

Fourth Visit
RRIVING on Wednesday
night by B.W.IA. from the
U.S.A. Via Puerto Rico were Mr.
and Mrs. Richard W. Sidenberg
of Ithaca, New York who will be
spending a week's holiday stay-

ing at the Marine Hotel.

Mr. Sidenberg who is paying
his fourth visit to the island is
Director of Research at the Ag-
ricultural Advertising Research
Inc. This is the second visit here
for his wife.

For Three Weeks

N Barbados for three weeks’

holiday are Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Clarke of Trinidad. They
arrived earlier in the week by
B.W.LA. accompanied by their
two children John and Ann and
they are ‘staying at the Hastings
Hotel.

Mr. Clarke is Material Super-
intend@nt of U.B.O.T., South
Trinidad,

Interesting Race
ACHTSMEN are reminded
that the handicap
the Sixth R.B.Y.C. Regatta which

will be sailed in Carlisle Bay on
Saturday are the same.

Many yachting enthusiasts
forecast that the race will be a
very interesting one. They feel
that the wind will be much
Stronger than in the Fifth Re-
gatta. .

Ae



Women Im ane ews=5

Mrs. Olga Sym monds



Mre. Symmonds,
and. ‘kindly nature,
“Olie” by her friends, She is a
hard worker and from a very
early age has played a great part
in Social Welfare in this Island.

of lively step
is known as

Mrs, Symmonds is the widow
of the late Mr. A. F. Symmonds,
brother of Mr. McD. Symmonds,
Churchwarden of St. Michael.
She-has three children, Algy,
Noel and Pat. Mr, Algernon
Symmons is an articled Solici-
tor’s Clerk while Mr, Noel Sym-
monds is Clerk of the Sugar
Industry Agricultural Bank, Pat
is now at Reading University
taking a Teacher's Diploma.

News has been recently
of her suecess in her
inatfon,

Mrs. Symmonds was a member
of the Girls’ Industrial Union
from its inception and was then
a member of the Committee and

received
first exam-

Helper of a Club, She is now
Registrar Mrs, Symmonds
through her spirit of enterprise

fas helped in all departments to
make the Union the successful
Institution’ it now is. As Leader
of Club 6 she contrives to give

entertainments and shows every
vear, Already this year this
Club staged a Variety Show and
Dance at the Union Rooms.

Social Welfare



Once President of the Child-
8 Goodwill League and
Mrs, Symmonds is still

a@ great supporter of the League.
She is very proud of the good
work done to help the

R.



MRS.
children of the island,
she
Conference of Social
Trinidad,

OLGA SYMMONDS
In 1936
represented the League at a
Workers in
Again in 1938 she was
sent as Island Representative to
British Guiana by the Members
of the Women's Social Welfare
League of which she is a member
of the Committee. She was once
President of the Riverside Club
and is now on the Committee of
Management,

Mrs. Symmonds is a member of
the Barbados Welfare Committee

poor and the Welfare organised by Mr.
RES ~

EXCELLENT

Cc, S. Stanley,
Secretary, Barbados,
a member of the Wages Board
for Shop Assistants; on the En- |
quiry Committee of the Black
Rock Baby Clinic and Sematary
of the St. Thomas Nutrition
Clinic,

Mrs. Symmonds is very thank- |
ful that the widespread distress,
of mothers and their children
in this island has met with the
ready response of the public and

Ex-Colonial
She is also

hopes that one day there will be

many more Clinics to cope with
the needs of the people.

Girl Guides
She is a member of the Lana
Girl Guides’ Association and
also on the Selection Comiittes|
for girls to work in an Auxiliary
Hospital in the United on
She was made a Justice of
Peace in March 1949,

Mrs, Symmonds is a prominent
member of the James’ Street
Methodist Church and Sunday
School Teacher, She is also on
the Committee of the James’
S‘reet Scout Group and organises
the programmes of entertain-
ment, harvest festivals and other
social events of this Church.

times for

BARBADOS

Folies-Bergeres

One hundred and sixty thousand pounds worth of |

ADVOCATE



spangled, feathered tourist bait was cast with a strictly |
Parisian “boum” along the Grands Boulevards to-night.

It is the 28th Folly of the
Folies-Bergeres — naturally the
costliest, most brilliant of show
business extravaganzas.

The new star of the show, 2 22-
year-old lovely who began in —-
back row of the nudes at
Yvonne Menard, has been Ba
moted to clothe.

She is, even more, worth seein;
and they let her speak a few lin
now, too,

New nude star is a young
Swedish mannequin, Siv Norden,
who takes a bath in 17,000 galions
of tepid water in a gass pool that
rises from the stage.

In 2) hours 41 iast-moving and
fantastic pieces of scenery take
you from full fledged railway
trains in the Gare St, Lazare to
the smoky depths of a vast opium
den and up to the crystal gates
of a Negro Heaven.

The opium den is a king never
seen east of the Seine, and the
Negro Heaven is strictly the foyer
of a Ritz run amok.

While they are building some of
these scenes there is time for two
rather interesting little sidelights
on the orchestra edge of the stage,
One Js called, rather spitefully
a a Foreign travel allowanee

ritons) and the *
Notions? ) other “United

Mark well the first. The
Frenchman's idea of “un Ang.ais”
green pork-pie hat and tweed
jacket staggers bellowing into
Paris. In a few swift moves he
mixes his drinks and loses his
allowance,

A charming young thing com-
plains to him: “The trouble with
you English is that you think all
Paris lies between the Opera and
the Madeleine” — a few hundred
yards. She gives him a kiss and
a free ticket on the underground
and says “Come back with the
other £25 next year.”

They know something about the
cost of living, apparently ‘hese
French.

The United Nations piece is a
satirical picture of the “

average
European of 19€0.” He, apparent-
ly, will chew gum, tweak in-

delicately, drink cola, read books
called “Blook in the ‘Geraniums, *,

Mage. ians and

dance the rumba,,and shout most |

of the time unintelligibly.

Those 41 scenes are magnificent- |
ly handled by %9 hard-working
engineers back-
tage

“Les girs” wear 10) miles of
gorgeous material and fathoms of
feathers almost half the time,

Gilded girl cages pop out of the |

oof. Revolving stages, now scenes

and moonlight—definitely wet —

pools succeedeq each other with
astonishing rapidity.

It certainly is not culture.
mag not be art. But what en-
gineering!

Vive le mecanisme.
verdict.

DIRECTOR SIGNS

HOLLYWOOD, March 27.

Argentine Director Hugo Freg-
nese signed to direct Mike
Frankovitch’s _ technicolor pro-
duction of “Decameron Nights’
starring Louis Jourdan and prob-
ably Joan Fontaine in the femin-
ine lead and Peter Ustinov in the
chief supporting role.

Exteriors will be filmed in
Spain interiors in England.

Financing will be provided by
the Anglo-Americah Film Cor-
poration of Greenwich, Connecti-
sut.an and Bros Films of London.

That's my

}

It |

cage _—





|




fa

Across
Led Peg to make the vow. (6,
Shifty. (3)
. A sable rat (anag.). (9)
| 10; Turn back. (6)

11. May have a life line? (4)
. I simply invade the nave.

(5)



4. Brief tissue. (5)

is: How you would pursue WW
falconry. (4)

| 16, Natis well finished off. (5)

19. Makes resting easier. (7)

21. You do on 19 for comfort. (3)

22, Scent 1 get from a creeper. (6)

23. Rabbit upset by poetry. (3)

24. Potentate to make hash of. (4!

Down

1. Do they go shares with a stern
rap? (8)

2. Usetul sort of hangovers. (5)

3. Sharing to embellish. (7)

4. A way to found his stable. (9):

6. A small street with atmo
spars. (5)

6. A mumber take op 4 curtatied

| 2 Down. (5)

8. wauea. ‘In’ song, with carrots.
(4 9. Water grass. (4)

12, Gard in rotten shape. (6)

17, Measure of a feature. (4)
18. Espy a brief communication. (4),

20. Title of his irritation. (3)
Solution — of poazerday's pussle)
Across: 1, Fortress; 9, (ap) Pea(se);
Rein: 11, Stanza; 12. ‘Present: 3, ial.
® ‘stroll a at Hate
ler: ie
Ai nt; Opera: nS Fave ;
tention: 6. _
8 Snap: 10, Hany feel!
+ 16 Pears’ 18 Nose if on



Rupert ane the New Bonnet— 20



The great squibs fling out their
stars with such force that the pals

have difficulry in holding them,
and Bill fails to note where his
sparks are falling. Suddenly. with-
out the shighcest warning, there is
a gigantic ‘‘swoosh” and a



column of fire just in tront of them
As they topple over in fright, a
cloud of thick smoke surrounds
them. Very shakily Rupert crawls
forward for his basket. Then he
stops and stares in horror. Where
his basket stood there is now only
a patch of blackened grass |



BY THE WAY e ee By Beachcomber

VEN those romantic people
who base their judgments on
Statistics must have been rather
astonished to read the statement
of a politician that “Every fourth

bite of food enjoyed (sic) in
Britain last year was not paid
for.” gia!

If this is universally accepted,
it will introduce a kind-of rhythm
into eating; at every fourth bite,
the eater will mutter, “This one
is not paid for.” But imagine
the ingenuity and toil that have
gone into the preparation of this
Statement. Not only have the
nation’s mouthfuls to be counted
by vigilant officials, but allowance
has to be made for the size of
each mouthful, before striking an
average. For instance, in the
case of a greedy man who crams
his mouth it may well be the
second mouthful that is not paid



| ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT
ROODAL THEATRES,
THE GREATEST BRAIN ON EARTH
SHAKUNTALA DEVI

See and Hear her Unbelievable Gifts at the

EMPIRE—TONIGHT 8.30
and ROXY ON TUESDAY APRIL 1ST at 8.30

|



REMEMBER — CALYPSO NIGHTS BEGIN AT
THE EMPIRE ON THURSDAY MARCH 27TH



for. What is wanted is a Stand-
ard Mouthful, established by law,
in ordei to facilitate the findings
of the Statistical Committee,

Horse’s hat filled with
beetroot unofficial

Sometimes his pigeons travel
in his two Rolls-Royces.
Morning paper
O get a new car for your
animals is not as easy as it
was. For instance, in the matter
of pigeons, a conscientious official
might ask, “Can théy not use an
airline service like other ani-
mals?” And it will be pointed out
that even important dogs often
have to use buses and trains
nowadays. A ruder official might
even ask why they can’t use their
wings to get about, as other

birds often do.







at 84 cents each. Nylon Briefs

Also ON SALE Nylon Stockings

:

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singers)

JUST ARRIVED—Lovely Cocktail and Cotton Dresses, Jacq-
mar Scarves and Squares, Pure Linen Men's Handkerchiefs

at $2.23 and $3.22,
at $2.50 for 2 pairs.e







Her hobbies are reading, story

and play writing. She is very
fond of music and singing. Not
only does she enjoy classes at
the Union in cookery and pastry
but at home she does her own,
In the past she has travelled only |
on business but it is her wish to|
see New York and England in
the future,



VALUE

SATIN 36 ins. at $2 ets.

WHITE,

BLUE, PINK,

LEMON.

Butterick Patterns in oll Coming Styles.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS





DIAL 4220
S aeaiaieeiarrn
COMING EB TOWN
PORCE OF ARMS
Wifiam HOLDEN--Nanc OLSON





—_—_—_———
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310



YOU R SHOE STORES

“PLAZA €







TODAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING DAILY 4.45 &8.30 P.M

TOMORROW

5S ANOTHER DAY

MIDNITE SPECIAL

SAT
| Triple Attractior

29th

RAIDERS OF THE DESERT
CHEYENNE COWBOY &

RUTH STEVE
ROMAN COCHRAN
ALSO THE COLOR SHORT—CIRCUS TOWN
SAT, SPECIAL 9.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.n
BADMAN'S TERRITORY
ndolph Seott & Geo. “Gabby” Hayes
} RIDER FROM TUCSON
R Tim HOLT, Richard MARTIN





|



| aoe

Tex Beneke



Glenn Miller Orchestre
SS SSE

DIAL 4606

“CINEMAS

——| BARBAREFS —Dial 5170
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing DAILY

Warners Spectacular Action Hit!

“HIGHWAY 301”

Stevo Virginia
COCHRAN GREY







SAT. SPECIAL 1.30 p.m

ALIAS BILLY THE KID



|
|



wer




Gary
Merrill

— and —

Oskar

Werner

British News and

COMING: BARBAREES
OUTRAGE



OISTIN—Dial 8404
TODAY & TOMORROW 445 & 8.30

STROMBOLI

Ingrid BERGMAN &

TALL IN THE SADDLE

John WAYNE



aa

Special 1.30
Law of the West

Midnite Sat. 29th
Outlaw Gold

- ’ ; Johnny Mack Johnny Mack
Sunset CARSON & BROWN & “oat
: an
CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE |} miaie: tee th ttord
Wild Rill ELLIOT as Red Rider Tex RITTFR Whip Wilson
SaaS OSS SSO



GLOBE ‘x,

TODAY 5 & 8.30 p.m. & Continuing



Now a Movie of Breathtaking Suspense
Now a Movie of Breathtaking Suspence



Starring P ted
Papa) \i\ yy ‘By 20th
- Richard ntury-
Basehart

iFEFORE DAW Nie
:



Extra— ONE NOTE TONY (Cartoon)

20th

Uny Fo,

A dramatic
expression
of our time
in a Motion
Picture
hera‘ding
a New Day
of Screen
greatness

News of the Day

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY to SUN. 8.80 p.m

MATINEE: SUN 445 p.m.

BUCCANEER'S GIRL

(Color)
Maria MONTEZ—Jon HALL &

FOREIGN LEGION
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO
“MIDNITE SAT. 29th

RIO GRANDE PATROL

Tim Holt & Richard Martin &

FIGHTING GRINGO

George O'BRIEN

|

His life story

He applied for the job; was
Tejected,
But when he’d got jover the
shock,
He saw that the man they'd
selected
Had a taut and impeaccable
sock!...
His dreams have now come to
fruition,
And one thing he’ll never for-
get—

When applying for any position,
Wear a Thorogrip Garterette.

B.B.C. Radio
Programmes

FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952
11.15 am. New Records; 12 noon The

News: 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4.00—7.15 p.m. 19.76; 25.53 & 31.32 M







4 p.m. The News; 4.10 p.m, The
Daily Service; 4.15 p.m. From the
Third Flrogramme; 4.37 p.m. Interlude;

4.45 p.m.
vrini, 5.15 Listeners’ Choice 6 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme; 6.15 p.m.
Have a Go; 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up
and Programme Parade; 7 p.m, The
News; 7.10 p.m. News Analysis.
7 1G—10.30 p.m 25.53; 31.32 & 49.42 M
7,15 p.m, Indian Dian;;
p.m. Record Vafety Bill, 8.15
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs,
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week; 9
p.m, English Magazine; 9.30 p.m. Cele-
brity Quintet; 10 p.m. The News; 10.10
p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m.
The Debate Continues; 10.30 p.m. From
the Third Programme

PLAZA |.

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)

Music Magazine; 5 p.m. Sem-



7.45
p.m.

West





OPENING TODAY FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

TERROR-ROAD orn
Tri-State Mos!




















Clete cara
PMN SiC)
Fnac s

STEVE COCHRAN
VIRGINIA GREY - GABY AND:

Warren ane oraceree ay ANDREW STONF



(DOWNTOWN) | R.K.0's Theil

FRIDAY,



MARCH, 28, 1952

| Teddy Wrote Hanid a Letter

—It Was Very Shor
By MAX TRELL

TEDDY, the Stuffed Bear, said
to everyone else in the playroom:
“How do you write a letter?”

Mary-Jane, the rag doll, thought
for a minute. “It all depends on
what kind of a letter you want to
write, Teddy.”

“That’s right,” said Mr. Punch,
“Suppose you went to a party and
you wanted to write a letter of
thanks. That would be one kind of
a letter.”

“And suppose,” added General
Ti... the tin soldier, “you wanted
to write a friend of yours inviting
him to come to your party. That
would be another kind of letter.”

A Third Kind

“And suppose you ‘wanted to
write to your grandmoth jer teiling
her about all the things that hap-
pened since the last time you saw
her. That would be a third kind of
fetter,” said Knarf, the Shadow.

Judy and Hanid and Mrs, Cuckoo
and Whoz, the Hobby Horse, all
spoke up now, telling about other
kinds of letters. Such as a- letter
thanking somebody for a birthday
present, and a letter telling some-
body else to have a very happy
birthday, and a letter hoping some-
body whom you know gets well
soon, and a letter asking somebody
to come and visit you.

“There are lots and lots of differ-
ent kinds of letters,” Knarf said.

“Yes,” said Teddy, “but how do
you write them?”

“First,” said Mr. Punch, “you
get some paper and a pen and an
envelope and a stamp. Then you’re
ready to begin.”

“Then,” said General Tin, “you
write the date at the top of the
letter. You don’t,” he added, “just | ‘
write down Tuesday or Wednesday
or Thursday—or whatever other
day of the week it is—but you write
se the whole date, like July 14,

49,”

“Why do you have to do that?”
asked Teddy.

“So that whoever is reading your
letter will know just when you

t But It Said a Lot—







|“You need paper and a pen,”
told Teddy.

Punch
wrote it. You see, Teddy, there's a
Tuesday and a Wednesday in every
weet:. But there’s only one July 14,
1949 in all the world.”
“Then,” said Hanid, “you start
writing your letter. Now suppose—”
“Suppose,” interrupted Teddy, “I
wanted, to thank you for inviting
me to your party. How would |
write it?”

“Just like this,” said Hanid.

July 14, 1949
Dear Hanid,

I had a wonderful time at
your party yesterday. The ice
cream and the cakes were the
best I’ve ever had. Thank you
very much for asking me to
come,

Your friend,
Teddy

“Oh,” said Teddy smiling. “That’s
@ fine letter. But I think it’s too long.
I think it should be much shorter,

! think it should be like this—”

July 14, 1949
Dear Hanid,
Your happy friend,
Teddy

Everyone in the playroom looked
at Teddy in surprise, Then they all
laughed. “I think,” said Hanid,
“that Teddy knows more about
__ citer will Snow just when you | letter-writing than he told us.”___ than he told us.”



GIRL HAS HALF HEART

FORT WORTH, March 26,

A three-month-old girl Sharon
Bussey may have only half a
heart and will undergo a delicate
test to determine if she can be
helped by surgery.

Sharon now lies in an oxygen
tent at Fort Worth hospital.
Doctors say she is in constant pain

A heart specialist said previous
X-Ray pictures indicate that the

ROODAL





right side of her heart may not
be working or might not be there
at all.

The test will involve injection
of dye into Sharon’s body. X-ray
pictures will be taken every half
hour of the outlines of the heart
chambers to indicate to doctors
how her blood flows and the condi-
tion of her heart,

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FRIDAY, MARCH, 28,



1952

Staffing

Boys Leave School

Too Young— fammona

EXPRESSING concern

over some of the school’s ex-

amination results, Mr. J. C. Hammond, Headmaster of Har-
rison College in presenting his report at the school’s speech
day on Wednesday afternoon blamed the present standard

on three main causes.
Firstly, the

instability of

staffi—the frequency of

changes and a large number of temporary acting masters:
secondly, the economic pressure which results in boys of
good ability having to leave school young in order to earn
a living and in contrast boys of mediocre ability remaining
on because they cannot find jobs and masters having to take
on out of school tuition and thirdly, the growing pressure of
subjects at the fifth form level.

He said:
The School has had a most suc-
cessful year. In the public ex-

amination last July we entered that

ance of the academic school. La-
dies and Gentlemen I am old-
fashioned. I agree, of course,
this type of education has

53 candidates for the Advanced only value for a limited number

Level of whom 51 were success-
ful in at least one subject, and
many secured three subjects. Due
to the peculiar circumstances of
a tie between the Nicholls broth-
ers in Classics, and the generosity
of the Government, the School
had the unique distinction of
winning five Barbados Scholar-
ships in one year, In two of
these cases we share the credit
with other schools, since the boys
were transfers at Sixth Form
level: Hutson whose work in
Mathematics was quite outstanding
had spent only two years with us,
and came from the > School,
while Phillips, who had spent
three years here, came om
Foundation.

But, I think, more significant
than the actual award of Schol-
arships was the generally high
standard of the work produced,
and that six other boys from the
School were declared of Exhibi-
tion standard. The results in
Science rival the consistent reli-
ability of the results in Classies,
and our Sixth Form well main-
tained their reputation

In addition to the Barbados
Scholarship winners, J. A. Wil-
liams won an Exhibition to the
University College of the West
Indies, C. K. Laurie, who had
recently left, was awarded an
Exhibition to the Imperial Col-
iege of Tropical Agriculture, and
R. St. C, Cumberbatch who
reached Advanced Level in four
scientific subjects, was offered the
Bovell Scholarship which he had
to decline since he had accepted
a good post with an oil company.

I would like to digress for a
moment here to comment on the
“golden eggs.’ You have in Bar-
bados three First Grade Schools
which take their better pupils
— and there are numerous — up
to first year University standard.
These boys can win exemption at
school from their Intermediate
examinations and their first
Medical examination; they are
generally exempted from the first
year of study at a Canadian Uni-
versity, and find even at’ an Eng-
lish University, where the course
of work is shorter, that they
have covered much of the early
groundwork. This standard is no
sudden achievernent; it is the out~
come of years of tradition; it is
something of which we are proud,
and of which I think you, the
public of Barbados, are also
proud. I have said many times,
but I will repeat, that it is this
quality of academic work which
js the primary contribution of
these schools to the Island,

But to return to the analogy
of the “golden eggs,” the goose
needs a careful diet. These schools
find the recruitment and reten-
tion of staff far more difficult than
those that have no sixth form
work. Let the figures speak for
themselves: This is my third
speech day, and I have made
18 appointments since my arri-
val m this Island!

Furthermore, the size of forms
cannot be increased without loss
of efficiency. It is quite surpris-
ing to those who have not been
si asters, what a difference
five or six boys in a class can
make. Most of our forms here
are now 30 in number, and any

increase beyond 25 is, in my opin-*

ion, progressively damaging.

am probably as well aware as any
man in this Island of the pres-
pure to enter the School; every

who have the particular ability
to use it, and it is all to the good
that different curricula should be
provided for those with differ-
ent talents. For instance there is
an obvious need for the devélop-
ment of technical education in
this Island.
not difficult to see the danger
that the extension of many va-
rieties of educational project may
hold for the academic school. It
would be a grave and probably
irreparable mistake if the stand-
ard of those schools which are
the necessary source of supply
for the néw University College of
the West Indies was neglected.

There is a second fashionable
fallacy which also needs scotch-
ing. Briefly, it is that anyone can
teach anything provided he has
some smattering of knowledge
about it. I do not believe that to.
be true; I believe that a boy’s
education depends on the quality
of the man who teaches him, I
believe that contact with a truly
scholarly mind is of real -value to
any student, and that if a school
loses the services of men like Dr.
Hamilton, Mr. Isaac, Mr. Sweet,
and Mr. Springer, that it loses
more than just a man with the
necessary knowledge to cover a
particular syllabus.

One of the most gratifying as-
pects of Barbados to me, and I
think to. any schoolmaster, is the
deep interest almost everyone in
this Island takes in education. It
is that. that encourages me to be-
lieve that if we state our prob-
lems clearly, you Will keep a
watchful eye to see that our
standards are protected. :

Though the results at Advanc-
ed and Scholarship Level were so
gratifying, I do not consider that
those at the Ordinary or Fifth
Form level were of quite the
Same standard. The new Certi-
fieate as you know, is a subject
examination, and a Certificate is
awarded if a boy satisfies the
Examiners in only one subject.
It is true that they will not be
satisfied with less than the old
Credit standard, but, none the
less, it is very easy for a school
to conceal its failures beneath an
imposing figure of certificate
awards, I have therefore made
a careful analysis of our results
this year in comparison with
eredits gained in the School Cer-
tificate in previous years. The
analysis is comparatively reas-
suring : we secured this year very
nearly the average of five cre-
dits per candidate, and with the
exception of English, our results
have remained proportionately
constant or improved. Particular
improvement was shown in His-
tory, Chemistry, Botany, and,
though still a weak subject, in
French. You may well ask there-
fore why, if analysis shows our
results to have been maintained,
I should cast doubts fn our
standard. My answer is that the
new examination has exposed
weaknesses more ruthlessly than
did the old one which allowed a
lower. or pass standard. There
were the same number or more
credits gained, but there were
necessarily more failures. My
second answer is that the results
were too “patchy” for my liking.
A number of boys gained truly
excellent certificates, but many
gained comparatively poor ones
We have been shown for instance
that the standard of Mathematics

None the less it is .



Difficulties

and methods of expressing them

were rath’ tco uniform and
lacking in freshness. This ina-
bility to think for themselves,

even under examination condi-
tions, showed itself especially in
the work for the Scholarship
paper”. Schoolmasters are al-
ways contending—or if they are
not they should be—against this
so-called practical outlook
amongst their Sixth Form pupils,
who wish to read nothing and
study nothing which has not im-
mediate and obvious relevance
to the narrow syllabus of the ex-
amination paper for which they
are next sitting. They distrust
the romantic notions of idealists
about the value of English ex-
pression or of ideas about other
aspects of life than the narrow
field they are studying, Mr. Joad



Mr. J. C. HAMMOND

in one of his books tells the
amusing and apochryphal story
of the elephant who slipped over
the edge of a precipice and fell,
trumpeting with terror, uprooting
trees and startling birds and ani-
mals, and the student who de-
scribed the incident in terms of
the co-efficient of friction be-
tween the elephant’s posterior
and the face of the cliff. It is
that deliberate limitation of out-
look against which we must in-
veigh. The new scholarship
papers of the General Certificate,
and even more the Scholarship
examination of the University
College of the West Indies, will
continue, and vightly, to penalise
the candidate whose scope of
knowledge is too limited.

We have tried to provide the
opportunity for the correction ef
this by Library periods. Seniors
have up to four a week, where
the only rule is that something
other than a school textbook must
be read. If properly used, these
times can be of more value than
most boys. realise.

To criticise examination re-
sults which have yidlded very
nearly the average of the old
Matriculation standard is prob-
ably unconventional, and may
well seem hyper-critical. I would
rather fac@ jsuch charges how-
ever, than one of complacent op-
timism. To criticise without an
attempt at assessing causes or
remedies would be largely pur-
poseless, and even though any
such assessment must be specu-
lative, I propose to try.

. The most obvious suggestion is
that the standard of boys we are
receiving for entry is lower. En-
trance examinations are said to
show less accuracy in the ground-
work of English and Arithmétic.
I have probably not been here
long enough to give any judge-
ment on that; but by and large I
doubt whether it is the explana-
tion. What is true is that there

are certain groups of boys in
various forms in the School
whose standard is not what it

should be. Last year for instance,
we had to be unduly lenient in

allowing promotions from the
second to the third forms.
Much more important jin my

view ,is the instabifty of staff.
The frequency of changes, and
the large number of temporary

1

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

acting masters, is bound to have
a cumulative effect by under-
mining the groundwork of the
lower forms. A. boy of high
natural ability can generally
surmount this difficulty; but not

so his less talented neighbour.
A further cause is the present

economic pressure. So far as
boys are concerned this results
in boys of good ability leaving

school young, often before they
have sat for public examinations,
s0 as to start earning a_ living,
and also, by contrast, in boys of
iédiocre ability staying on at
school longer than is profitable
because they cannot find employ-
ment, So far as masters are
concerned it too often means the
strain of a number of out of
school tuitions and lectures un-
dertaken as an economic neces-
sity, but which unless treated
with care and moderation reflect
on school tuition.

I have already referred to the
size of forms, which is more
serious in some subjects than in
others.

Finally, there is the growing
pressure of subjects at the Fifth
Form level, That pressure -is
relieved in the Sixth Forms
wihere boys specialise; but it is a
serious problem in the fourths
and fifths,’ where ¢xaminin
bodies, while preaching a genera
education, have a tendency when
setting the syllabus for a particu-
lar subject to forget the pessible
time that can be allocated to it,

This is a problem which has, I
know, been exercising the minds
of headmasters everywhere, and
1 think it is particularly severe
here; since there is little doubt
that it is not so easy to work long
hours at high pressure here as
it is in a more temperate climate.
We intend in future years to aim
at a boy taking not more than
eight subjects at the Ordinary
Level. This means a_ reduction
of subjects offered, particularly
by the Science forms, and in
some cases it may cause heart-
burn; but I feel sure that some
stich surgical operation on the
curriculum is essential,

I think it possible that this
section of nry report may be mis-
understood; and that, either I
shall be accused of undue anxiety,
or else that I shall be misrepre-
sented as a Cassandra foretelling
the coming collapse of our exam-
ination results. I should like to
repeat therefore that our Sixth
Form results were truly excellent,
and that our Fifth Form results
averaged five credits per candi-
date with the better candidates
securing as many as nine or ten.
There is a shrewd remark in ope
of Saki’s short stories about the

effect of “hours of laboured
boasting” in which he _ suggests
that the audience must be care~-

fully selected. I have too great a
respect for the public of Barbadoy
to imagine it would prefer from
a Headmaster fair words rather
than a_ straightforward expres-
sion of doubts. We are determin-
ed to set a high standard and
not to rest content with anything
lower.

Before I leave the subject of
examinations there is one. final
point to which I should like to
refer—that of strain on the can-
didates. .1 have been disturbed
by the breakdown of boys during

the examination through over-
work, This happened to one boy
in 1950 and to two others in

1951. It is generally scholarship
eandidates who suffer; and it is
not possible to judge whether
others who are able to sit all the
papers, do not do worse than
they would have done had they
not overworked towards the end
of the school year. The average
boy, as all adults know, can al-
most always work harder with’
benefit; but it is as serious a mis~
take for the conscientious boy to
attempt too much, as it is for the
slacker to do too little. I would
ask parents io guard the too stu-
dious boy against that error,

In the same connection I think
that the younger boy can be
pressed too hard by an anxious
parent. I find _too many _ small

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boys leaving school on an after-
noon for some special tuition
We would rather that a parent
saw to it that his son did the
schoo! preparation thoroughly
and was content with that, than
that he paid additional money to
ask a child, tired after his day's
work, to try to cram in a little
extra knowledge. There are
eecasions when for some reason
a y needs: special help, but it
wo be wiser that this was
provided only after consultation
with his masters, and preferably
in the holidays when the mind:
of both boy and tutor are fresher.

The Staffing problem has been
as usual the greatest anxiety;
indeed the constant changes are
most disturbing to the work and
are probably the most responsi-

ble cause of those patches of
lower standard which are to be
found in certain particular forms
throughout the school. The
clever boy absorbs knowledg
easily from various sources; but

the less clever profits by a more
mechanical routine.

We have been in particular
difficulties over science staff, and

seem as though we are going to
face a similar problem with
mathematicians, This term we

lose two mathematicians each of
whom holds a First Class Hon
ours degree,—Mr. Springer be-
comes Headmaster of the Coler-
jdge-Parry School, and Mr.
Jarvis, who, though he only joined
us last September, has already
shown his ability as a_ teacher,
becdmes a Schoo! Inspector of the
Department of Education, Mr,
Springer has been on the staff of
Harrison Colege since 1934 with

one short break. He is a man
with a brilliant mind who has
also a rare gift for the’ under-

standing of a boy. *We shall miss
him greatly but we congratulate
him on his new appointment,
thank him for his many years of
service here, and wish him every
success in his new school,

The School should be most
grateful to Mr. Queree who has
voluntarily offered to postpone
his long leave to help us in our
emergency, and to Mr. Fields who
has undertaken such a heavy bur-
den of work with our Science
Sixth Form since the loss of Mr,
Carmichael to take the post of
Government Analyst.

The School Games record dur-
ing the year has been encouraging.
The biggest events were the tour
to Queen's Royal College, Trinidad
last April, and e visit of a,

jueen’s College, Br. Guiana, and
a Windward Islands team here in
August. We lost both matches of
football in Trinidad but only by
a one goal margin on each occa-
sion, and we showed ourselves
superior at cricket. Here in August
we defeated the Windward Islands
at cricket and had a level draw
with Queen’s, B.G., who, however, |
completely outplayed us at foot- |
ball on a very wet ground, where |
they ruthlessly exposed the weak- |
nesses of dry season footballers.
} think these tours are of great
value, and I am_ sure the last
Trinidad one was. I treasure 4
most friendly letter from Mr
Hamer, Headmaster of Q.R.C,, in
which he was kind enough to com-
pliment our team both on the
cricket fleld and off it, Unfortun-
ately the expense is becoming in-
creasingly heavy, and in spite of
the considerable sum the boys
raised by a play and their own
efforts, we have only just managed
to pay off the last of our debt to
the Barbados Amateur Footbal!
Association who so generously
lent us money interest free, I men-
tion this for two reasons; first to
express publicly our gratitude to
the B.A.F.A. for its friendly co-
operation and a generous donation,
und also as an example of the
difficulty that we constantly face
in trying to maintain the old
stanglards.

To turn to more local rivalries:
We probably had a better cricket
eleven last season than the one
before, though we were not quite
as suecessful. Nevertheless, we

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In football during the last short
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hope for better seasons to come. s OF

Our real triumphs were in the
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which has remained high i oO D ? S
Sa, endtne tan oarenie’ oo amongst the better candidates is| L
their son shali be successful in. well below the English average | 8
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and was noticeable at the Ad-
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those vague words like democra-
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PAGE

BARBADOS fg ADVOGATE |

Gee cae SS Poses)



Friday, March 28, 1952

cUL BONO?
IN RECENT years the whole burden of
the progressive has been the cry that pro-
gress is restricted by the reactionary or
die-hard and the word conservative, a good
word which has always been used to denote
the excellent human custom of preserving
for posterity what its own and earlier gen-
erations have built up, has been twisted
to mean something opposed to progress.

In fact the cloak of progress can very
often hide the identity of the truly restric-
tive person whose actions are motivated by,
the sole idea of keeping some things or
most things under control if only be-
cause his livelihood or influence is threat-
ened when controls are removed. The mer-
its or demerits of controls are therefore
not examined because the self-styled pro-
gressives have deemed them to be neces-
sary.

No consideration is paid to logic or reason
and if a picture is built up to reveal the
hollowness of the foundations on which the
edifice of controls has been erected it is
laughed out of court by the empty-minded
and not admitted by whatever arbiter of
public policy happens to hold the reins of
power.

To accept this position of negation as
inevitable would be to bow our heads under
a yoke from which we must struggle to be
free if ever we are to escape from the
shackles of those whose claim to leader-
ship depends on the abuse of others as re-
actionary or opposed to the will of the
people.

If this abuse were justified, it would be
a simple thing for the people abused to
shift their allegiance from the discredited
party and to hitch their wagon to the rising
new party of progress in the hope that their
services will bring a reward and a forget-
fulness in time. The rights of the common
man have often been similarly betrayed in
many countries and“at”many periods of
change. But in countries where the lamp
of true freedom and the torch of justice,
honesty and commen sense have been held
aloft there has often been final victory for
those who seemed to be more concerned
with ultimate values and the triumph of
honesty and common sense than with their
own schemes of personal aggrandisement.
Dislike of unpopularity and dislike of
swimming against the tide are despicable
characteristics, and bring no honour to
those whose conduct is guided by such pre-
occupations.

What is wanted now and at all times,
here and in every country, is disinterested
endeavour to do what is best in the inter-
ests not of a majority or minority but of
all.

If this philosophy of life is applied, as
indeed it should be, to the current practice
in Barbados of the government’s attempt to
control the island’s internal and external
trade, the only question which should be
asked is cui bono?

If it can be proved that controls and their
accompaniment subsidies serve the real
interests of the people they should be kept
in force. If it can be proved that they do
not serve the purpose for which they were
intended they should be removed.

But controls must not be practised for
controls’ sake nor because dogmatic asser-
tions have been made that without controls
and subsidies the cost of living would rise
and the poor would suffer while the rich
would still be able to prosper. :

It has been proved beyond all possible
doubt during the past ten days that a con-
trol price is incapable of getting more than
between one cent and three cents apiece for
flying fish on nights of glut, while every-
one knows of its failure to keep the price
of flying fish dawn to the control price at
periods of shortage.

Controls have diverted deep sea fish from
Barbados to Martinique and Trinidad.
Controls have made it impossible for live-
stock owners to operate at a profit even
though they are permitted to sell meat at
the same price as imported meat.

Controls have seriously impeded and
may eventually ruin the six agricultural
stations which were founded with the ex-
cellent intention of encouraging mixed
farming in Barbados.

Controls have so far discouraged local
market gardeners that carrots and toma-
toes can be imported from other islands
and are sold here at the same price as the
local product.

All efforts to grow more food and to in-
erease livestock and fish production are
impeded by controls because controls are
mainly responsible for the lack of any effi-
cient distributive agency which is pre-
réquisite to the success of peasant co-oper-
atives or market gardening. And while
controls failed subsidisation does not serve
the purpose for which it was intended.

‘ The only motive for subsidisation in any
country is to keep down the price of essen-
tial foods so that wage increases become
+ unnecessary. This is not happening here.
Yet subsidisation is continued while wage
increases occur with regular frequency.

If the intention of the government were
to ruin the local economy of the island
(and this suggestion cannot seriously be
contemplated) controls and subsidies seem
to be serving this intention.

But this is the reverse of the position
and the government only continues con-
trols because it genuinely considers them
to be necessary. Others do not. And the
onus of proving that controls do not ad-
versely affect local food production rests
with the government.
















































Mir.

LONDON, March 18.

Any Chancellor who sets out to
plot. the course of the national
economy for more than a year
ahead must base his decisions on
certain more or less arbitrary
assumptions. To say, therefore,
that Mr. Butler’s Budget is a bud-
get of risks is simply to confirm
the fact that no man can predict
the future.

The test by which his Budget
should be judged is, not by the
number of risks he has taken but
by whether, given certain facts
and figures, those risks are good
or bad, Mr. Butler’s Budget con-
tains a mixture of both,

The greatest task confronting
the Chancellor was how to set.
aside enough of the _ nation’s
resources to enable Britain to pay
her way in the world and, at the
same time, ‘carry ‘out her heavy
defence commitments,

Last year, Britain had a deficit
in its balance of payments of no
less than £516 million, The deficit
in the second half of the year
was running at an annual rate of
nearly £800 . million. Moreover,
the loss of gold and dollars con-
tinued at an alarming rate during
the first two months of this year,
The reserves fell by 299 million
dollars in January and 266 million
dollars in February.

In order to close the gap in
Britain’s balance of payments, at
least a further £600 million must
therefore be found from U.K.
resources and applied to
external position. Here Mr. But-
ler made the first of his major
assumptions. He assumed that
between £200 million and £250
million would be forthcoming as
a result of an increase in our
invisible earnings and an
improvement in our terms of
trade.

From the remaining £350-£400
million, the Chancellor deducted
about £150 million for the reduc-
tion in imports — assuming that
half the total amount of the
“real” cuts, as compared with the
fiscal year 1951—52, would be
made good by withdrawals from
stocks—and a further £50 million
for the expected expansion in the
volume of U.K. exports.

‘The remainder — about £200
million—represents the amount by
which resources will have to be
set aside and devoted. to external
purposes. To that the Chancellor
added the ine’ cost of the

the -



BARBADOS ADVOCATE 2. +

Butler's Budget
—~| Arouses Hopes-And Doubts



Hy Ronald Boxall

million in the Government's own
civil expenditure in terms of
resources, and a £100 million cut
in home investment,

Mr. Butler then went on to
make his final major assumption
—that private spending on per-
sonal consumption would remain
at roughly last year’s level. He
based this on the belief that ris-
ing prices would mop up all
excess spending power. Prices
were already a good deal higher
than last vear, he said, and that
would mean about another £400
million on the bill for the same
amount of goods and services.

_ The Chancellor therefore re-
jected the argument. chat he
should make a further substantial



Mr. BUTLER.

cut in home consumption by
increasing the Budget surplus. He
believed that if he left the sur-
plus broadly where it was, “the
money people will have to spend
in the coming year will. .. only
be just about enough to pay for
the goods that are likely to be
available if exports expand as
we hope.”
7 .

The Chancellor, however, did
not take these risks without cer-
tain safeguards. His assumption
that home investment--would be
reduced this year by £100 million
should be guaranteed by the
effect of the increase in the Bank
rate from 2'% per cent, to 4 per
cent.

This increase was immediately

1952—53 defence programme, and reflected in the movement of
arrived at the final figure of £400 Stock Exchange prices. The
million—“the total, so far, of the adjustment in gilt-edged prices

additional claims on our

So far, the most risky of Mr.
Butler's major assumptions was
that increased invisible earnings
and an improvement in Britain’s
terms of trade would help to close
the payments gap by £250 million.
His other more or less risky
assumptions were that the £400
million of additional claims on
Britain’s resources would be met
by an expansion of home produc-
tion by £250 million (the same
as in 1951), a reduction of £50

SOCIALIST Rebel

fard “Q” Martel should have an
early talk together.

Not about the past.

Because the General* blames
the Socialist Party—especially
the “embittered intelligentsia”—
for most of our political follies
since the war, like yielding al-
‘ternately to the pressure of the
Russians and the Americans.

Not about the future.

Because the moment we are
strong enough the General wants
jto counter the Russian cold war

Soviet Union and its disaffected
‘satellite States, showering down
airborne propaganda.

If this does not stop the Rus-
sians from stirring up trouble
abroad—by having to deal with
so much trouble themselves at
home—General “Q” proposes
that we erect our own “Velvet
Curtain” around the Soviet lard
bloc, by which he means we
should make a sea-blockade. He
says we should also tell Stalin:
Get out of Europe.

Steamroller?

So far, “Nye” and “Q” are not

Our Readers Say:

Well Done

To The Editor, the Advocate—

SIR,—The Directors of the Bar-
bados Government Savings ‘Bank
are to be highly.complimented on
their recent wise and thoughtful
decision to allow depositors to in-
crease the maximum of their de-
posits from $1,440 to $2,400.

What this decision means to all
depositors, but especially to the
many horny-handed sons of toil
whose hard-eatned deposits are
left in the safe custody of the
Bank Authorities is best known to
these depositors themselves.

tt is well known that one of
the chief objects and aims of the
Government Savings Banks as an
institution is to encourage thrift
among the masses. The wealthy
end the well-to-do have numerous
sources to tap. and myriad chan-
nels through which to work ‘in
order .to proyide against rainy
days. But the sorry spectacle of
the aged labouring and middle-
class man with the shows of age
upon him, with muscles. and
sinews worn out, and yet without
‘adequate wherewithal even to pro-
vide proper sustenance, is one that
has too often caused me a shudder
= moved me to unrestrained

ars.

Many a wise and thrifty son of
toil with a very modest income
but frightful financial family obli-
gations-and commitments to meet
will see to it that while he has
muscle and brawn his deposits if
microscopic and irregular, are yet
cumulative, And his main object
is to have a deposit to draw upon
when he can no longer earn an
income, or, as is often the case, to
haye a smal) deposit from which
Intérest aecrues, which Interest he
uses to supplement small and ir-



in response to the raising of the
Bank rate was followed by a
sharp rise in the banks’ interest
rate for loans and advances and
also in the rate of interest charged
by building societies for loans on
mortgage.

The_ effect on industry of this
general rise in the interest rates
will be to increase the cost of
borrowing for such purposes as
investment in new plant and
machinery and the carrying of
large stocks of raw materials. If
this further resort to orthodox



What Fd Do To Stalin

‘= By The Tank General

“Nye”
Bevan and Tory General Sir Gif-

liable to have much in agree-
ment, either past or future,

But if they stick to the pres-
ent, this unlikely pair may find
themselves sharing a lot of com-
mon ground in the great politi-
cal argument of the hour: “How
strong is the Soviet Union?”
For soldier agrees with politician
that the Russian steamroller is
less powerful than it looks.

The General (one of the pion-
eers of British tanks) spent a
year in Russia during the Ger-
man invasion, as head of the
British Military Mission,

by a) Western much-warmer

wie, ," The Germans were able to
He advises ‘planting local “Re- outfight the Russians in tank

sistance’ lenders inside the warfare because the half-million

lorries which American Lease-
Lend gave the Russians were en-
tirely used on the lines of com-
munication.

And there they were eaten up
in the quagmire of,the roads,
which were still better than the
broken-down railways.

Now Lease-Lend (for the
Russians) has stopped. Have the
Soviet motor works replaced the
lost lorries? Has Soviet industry
provided the railway rolling-
stoek, the radio and radar equip-
ment which that brave peasant
Red Army was so starved of



régular money gifts given by
grateful children so few of whom
are to be found today.

This brings me to the question
of the Rate of Interest, (3% p.a.)
paid ny the: Government Bank
Authorities on Deposits.

For some time it has been felt
and in point of fact, fervently
hoped that the annual rate of
interest on deposits in this Bank
should be raised from 3% to at
least 4%. And you, Mr, Editor,
and no doubt many of your
readers will recall a letter writ-
ten in these columns a few years
ago by some correspondent obvi-
ously in the know, giving a clear
financial statement of the
Accounts at this Bank and, sug-
gesting why the Bank Authorities
could easily r the annual Rate
of Interest on deposits to 4% and
this without ding violence to its
funds, His © ‘mathematics, IT
remember, were clear, and the
force of his argument convine-
ing.

If such was urged a few years
ago, it should be urged with
tremendously greater force today.
And, it is to be hoped that the
Bank Authorities will at an early
date give this matter the consid-
eration which it merits.

With the purchasing power of

money so frightfully shrunk
today following upon the phe-
nomenal rise in the cost of liv-
ing, this added 1% (at least)

would indeed go a long way in
making ends meet with those who
have not long purses. And one
must be excused for repeating
that Government should in duty
bound fecus their attention on the
matter with a view to giving even
greater encouragement to more
determined efforts at thrift.

HORNY-HANDED,
March 25,. 1952,

.—would be less easy to under-

FRIDAY, MARCH, 28 1982

Sacer ec araecaacearetecenccsssstcestlt DAA

‘China's Reds Step Up Their
Propaganda In Honé Kong |

HONG KONG, March,

THE Chinese Communist attitude towards
Hong Kong has taken a new turn since the
beginning of this year.

Before, the Reds had, outwardly at least
kept scrupulously clear of entanglement in
Hong Kong’s affairs.

Apart from occasional complaints in their
press there was no sign of hostility.

In recent weeks, however, they have been
ary. weapon is that, unlike: other agitating openly by keeping up a ceaseless
Budgetary measures, it can be| propaganda campaign of abuse against the
a at any time during the) colony, They have also attempted to stir up

disorder.

And now, it is undeniable that the Chinese
Reds are trying to make things more difficult
for the British administration than hitherto.
stand if he had not given wor This undisguised agitation began early in
ers the incentive to make the| January thisyear following the deportation
erage Contin natant of séven Communist propagandists. They
had a lot to say about the effect) consisted of three film stars, an editor and
6 ogg pan of |playwright, two women Left-wing trade
the poorer families who will’ get | union leaders, and a man who called himself
ae a ee sf tie an pitntnd chairman of a squatters’ camp which had
out that the income tax reliefs—| been destroyed by fire.
bape | eee proved ye i. The Hong Kong government had deported
lower-paid worker—are intended|them because of their subversive political
not as a sort of bonus for work activities.

Their deportation was followed by violent

attacks in the mainland Communist press and

radio against the Government for what Red
propaganda called ‘oppression.’

monetary policy has the desired
effect, it should therefore reduce}
home investment by the required
amount and lead to substantial}
reductions in the stocks built up|
by industrial users last year,
The rise in Bank rate has been
attacked by the Opposition as a
measure likely to lead to defla-
tion and widespread wpecuptoy> |
ment. Criticism of this kind,
however, overlooks the important
point that Bank rate is a flexible
weapon that ¢an be pointed in
either direction. But the most
obvious factor in favour of the
use of Bank rate as a disinflation-

CANASTA SETS



Another of Mr, Butler’s
assumptions—that production will
increase this year by £250 million

SNOWCE

already done but as an incentive
for still harder work in the
future. The immediate effect of
these changes will be to make
some families worse off, even
after account has been taken of
the increases in social benefits.
However. by working longer
hours a man will be able to gain
a larger net reward than he
could have done under the previ-
ous system, of taxation.

Ph. 4472

These attacks were taken up by. two Hong
Kong Left wing Chinese newspapers.
At the same time Communist propagan- £
In certain respects, however, dists, both within the colony and outside
roe see's a; a _, Bs sought to fan up a minor labour dispute.
ea! even fu er inflation. e |
tax reliefs will place more sperid=| Further, the Reds. sought to exploit. the
ing power in ae of Tareas situation arising from unemployment caused |
nsumers, an refore : 5 2 .
forse’ ereonal consumption, | PY the allied embargo on strategic materials.
pees the oe broke Then, when they found their agitation \}}....
axation on indus will m : ase °
Haat on ceade into company sav-|@mong the labour ranks failing, the Com-
ings. Mareqver. 207. ge munists turned their attention to the
y a
the aoe that oa thatieae in pro- thousands of squatters rendered homeless
— will pcevey St to| when a fire destroyed their camp.
hee tae prince or Gana Despite the aid which had been given to
for a limited amount of resources.| the victims both by the Hong Kong Govern-
These are the most obvious : tumat
risks, but they should be con- ment and by charitable organisations and
sidered against the background of|although resettlement schemes for these
the positive improvements which : -
jhe “Budget has brought about. squatters had been planned, Communist pro
The chief of ait a return paganda continued to plug the anti-Hon®
to a more flexible s m of ;
monetary control—with its power- Kong line to the utmost. 3
ful intsenee, oa, pyeneens, Senaice In addition the Communists alleged’ that
—and the substitution of incen- sys :
tive for austerity with its salutary the Hong Kong authorities had permitted
éffect on wos moma Foe these Chiang Kai-Shek’s guerrillas to operate from
reasons, . Butler’s Budget has sats :
bean desasaadiy well seceived. within the colony to make raids on Red
border territorv.







| “White Nylon Lace
14” to 2'l2" widths

Seeking more ammunition for further pro-
paganda attacks, they accused the British
Government of agreeing to make Hong Kong
a “base for aggression by American imperial-

White

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‘Q’ claims no. He says the Leftists papers in Hong Kong meantime,
Russian tanks are good, aes became so virulent that on February 21, the
not outstanding, Nor are they so : : .
numerous as suggested, Government issued a warning against the

The Red Navy? “Q” says they| publication of false and malicious reports

dispose only three capital ships, ene ‘ 4
a dozen cruisers, and though they calculated to incite disaffection.
Despite this warning,, however, the two


































INTRODUCING—

“BUBBLE WASHERS”

THE COMFORT OF THE HOUSEWIFE

claim 300 submarines the Rus-

ian ae developed any | Red news sheets taking their cue from Can
The Red Air Force? Good|ton, played up the proposed visit of a “com-

Sere _ bees “i sone fort mission” to the fire victims.

*Q’ oubts e total air . :

strength has grown. This touched off the riots of March 1 which,
Finally “Q” prints a little table | according to the best evidence, appeared to

‘of comparative resources in raw
materials, whieh will surely have been planned.
bese 2 a agenda Sort shat om Able handling of the situation by the Hong
with “Nye: i ;
Goanihalmin uy Netter breeches | HONE police, however, gave confidence to the
tap Routt in steel, oil, copper, | people.
‘and aluminium :

Soldiers ‘will’ téad. with inter: Now, although a food blockade might cause
est Martel’s theories ‘on Korea:|temporary difficulties, Hong Kong is not

SIMPLE AND INFALLIBLE

Connect to the Pressure side of any Vacuum Cleaner
and have your washing ....

itn) ‘ : 4 ”
Gah; ateekion con ye afraid of being starved out. There are ample ee “BUBBLE WASHED
stop ‘Asia from breeding—and stocks and the colony has never depended on AND

Field-Marshal Montgomery on| the China mainland for rice. In addition to

the subject of Field-Marshal ; BUBBLE RINSED
Tanwhavenery. : rshal) Australian frozen meat, recently arrange-
*“East v. West,” Lieut-Gen-| ments have been made to ship cattle from

al Sir Giff: - : . :
bd teas ‘ard Martel (Meth-| Indo-China, and an experimental first ship-
ment of 200 cows has already been made.
The colony produces half its requirements
Family Planning of vegetables, and it is self-sufficient in fish.
To. The Editor, the Advocate— | Other sources from where Hong Kong might
.—In the Sunday Advocate ‘Ol its requi i. * -
Ot ey tea tet con tables BF cure its requirements have also been ex- |%
letter from Miss’ Cecile Walcott plored.
headed ‘Family ‘Planning’. Lest} Recent Communist military movements in

it be thottght that there is nothin ;
more to be said ig this matter,| S0Uth China, however, have caused nervous-

—L.E.S.

°
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Electrical Dept.











‘ e
I would like to draw the atten-| ness among some of Hong Kong’s population, | ¢
tion of your readers to s "1S EA ARE { PRICES
words spoken by the Bishop| aud there has been a spate of rumours. SY TO PREP. pain ccges
of Barbados in his recent Charge} No impending direct threat, however, is ANCHOR PRODUCTS
‘gichasl's, Gathedsel on March er provided the present state of affairs
. in the Far East remains unaltered Kellogg's Cornflakes
“The Community is ill ; 3 bays rn ; ”
by areas F tae ee Aim of the Communists, it is believed, is to peloans eo
oe ee oe Se influence British policy in the Far East by Weet-a-bix $
The Bishops of the Provines| Keeping the political situation tense. The Fee inate x
declared their minds clearly} communist blasts against Hong Kong appear Quaker Oats
and unequivocably at the +6 be f ‘ d - Sausages
Seoeipetel Synod held ‘in = part of an attempt to demoralise Hong _ Minced Steak
amaira in February 1946. I| Kong’s i i
quote from the Pastoral Letter = popula pereneteinelty — Tr ;
which was directed to be read their mind in constant anxiety. — OOO
in ‘all the Churches of | the . Sy
rovince: ‘To the further safe- VEC 3ETAB
avvin ot Sacredness of ‘ T. LES
iC atrimony, we, the M. ta ’ i ° x
Bishops in Sygod assembled auretania For B. W. I. Cruise Tins
unequivocably the recommen-
dations contained in the Report NEW YORK Anchor Evap. Milk —
f the West : oe s
of the Wes Bee nest Com-| _ THE Cunard liner Mauretania has sailed ae Sere Andie ek faa
prevention meastres!” as con-| {rom New York’ ‘a 14-day cruise, her third Kale 2) size $2.24 per tin
trary to the laws of God. The] thi Y : Broad Be: Anchor Mil =
aro oe e a cae ps season, to the West Indies and South Heing Peas “ 1b. ino Peis per tin $
social. problem is to be sought merica.sSome 625 passengers are taking Bo Ge Peas Anchor Skimmed ook eve x
and found in the teaching of|part in the cruise, including ma ll etit Pols E eee,
Individual responsibility and . : 8 ny (MEU ‘Petit Pois Pea Dn os ae
ant control’. ar trust. that} Known business men. Smedley Peas B ote ee %
wherever “measures are sug- i i i i =: aeeyeeree
geal fee Gua Doe bate arena the cruise, the liner will call at pC Y .82 per Ib.
lems of population, wherever|St- Thomas, Portsof-Spain, La Guaira, Thick Salt Fish .37 per 1b
euch peek ree eed nee will) Havana and Nassau. To-morrow, the liner ents g~ 28 Pam 1b: kaniCheee 515 ie ib.
iven to these Words, and/_. . 3 é : i aon) wey ee
the destructive pitfall of. arti-| will again sail from New York.on her fourth Tomatoes — .30 per lb. Sardines ........ -19 tin
_ Pane a will be/and final cruise of the season, also to the
Thanking you for space. West Indies and South America, and will
Time iE eet tie then return to her normal trans-Atlantic
25.3.62 ~" service.—B.U.P,
FRIDAY, MARCH, 28, 1952





BARBADOS

Crown Closes Case In Murder Trial “ff Diffiewtties

@ From Page 1 mother went to the deceased. Mr.
Barnes then held the accused.
raised up himself and walked off.
After the accused moved off she » Crowd Gathers
There were many people on the

heard him say that he (the
accused) did not do it. road. Mr. Inniss told the accused
She was about 40 feet away that he had killed the man. She
from the place where the inci- could not say what happened to
dent occurred. Another woman the knife. She did not see the
She saw other stab, She saw the deceased

was present.
people but they came after the “waving the stick about.”
incidentoccurred. The window ‘The bananas were taken up.
she was at was about 20 feet Cross-examined Estaline Glubs
from the beginning of the road. said that in 1948 the deceased
When this incident was going on Was found guilty of wounding the
there was no one in the road. the deceased was
After the incident the first person pja, on a bond. The accused
she saw was the wife of the de- was taken to the Hospital after
ceased. The wife of the deceased he was wounded. She does not
lifted the bead of the deceased, know anything about the will.
and then a man named Inniss ar- The accused went to the house
rived at the scene, She first saw for the bananas and her mother
Inniss about 20 feet away. spoke to him, The accused left
Mr. Walcott had no questions pd wenn mood. He did
to ask this witness. To the Court As the accused left, the deceas-
Belle said that when she first ed came out of the house with the
saw Inniss he was about 20 feeit stick in his hand, He (the de-
away and on the road which sh€ eased) was about ten feet behind
could see from her window, the accused and her mother fol-
, ed e dece e saw
Edward Millington of Bryan's, [OW ased,
St. Thomas said that he knew the deceased make an effort to
the accused and his family. He

take up a bunch of bananas.
also knew the deceased, On 2 >
January 18, 1952, about 4.30 p.m. W*ow’s Evidence
he was on Welchman Hall road The eleventh
He saw a gang of men working. eyidence on behal
He saw the accused with a bunch
of bananas and he put it on the puncan Headley
bank of the road. The deceased ~ She said they
took up this bunch of bananas Bryan's Village,
and took it to his wife’s house. tothe time

witness to give
f of the Crown
was Eulise Headley, widow of

lived together at
St. Thomas, up
of his death on the
18th January 1952. She identified
the body to Dr. A. C. Kirton who
performed the post mortem ex-
amination at the St. Thomas
Mortuary.

Her. daughter Estaline, and
two other children lived at the
same house. She and her husband

More Bananas Cut

The accused went to the wife
of the deceased to get the bana-
nas. The wife of the deceased
told the accused to leave her
house, Then he saw the deceased
and the accused. The accused

was walking behind the deceased lived together from 1949 and
with a knife. The accused cut “Sate ae ae or
another bunch of bananas. The y arr’

Headley. helped her to “work”
her father’s land. This was the
e- case for some years before her

father died on the 21st June, 1951.

a stick, went to the bananas and ed father left 134 acres of land.

took them up, and the accused - looked after it prior to her

held him and both the accused father. and mothe:

and the deceased pulleti at the jiiy of the meee iine “ciost on

bananas. Finally the bananas After her father ‘died, she con-

dropped te the ground and thé tinued to. “work” the land. Her

accused held the deceased around father tett a will which her

his neck with the left hand while brother Oliver Gibbs the execu-

nm knife was in his right hand. to, kept.

The deceased dropped a stick “phe profits were handed over

which he had in Mis hand and to the executor to pay off a debt

the deceased tried to brewk away, 46 Joseph Gibbs,

from the accused. The . defendant,
“T then saw the accused stab ig "her brother, * Jane Murray is

the deceased with the knife in giso her sister. There were

his left breast and the deceased 4 i i
fell to the ground. The deceased lie paula Whe Minyived: bee
fell on his back on the abovad Byerything was in her posses-
part of the road,” Millington told sion after her father died. Every-
the court. bt well until her sister
¢ ” ane called home Oscar Gibbs
Falls On “Bank from Curacao. Oscar however,
Wis fas cca Mast he Hace these ae to Curacao shortly after
of the road with his back to the ~The will had been proved, but
bank. The accused turned to him che could not say when it was
(the witness) and told him that proved. It was sometime this

he did not know what he did. year.

The sister of the accused took “ Joseph Gibbs and her husband
away the knife from the accused were not_on friendly terms, They
and also the bananas. A man “fel] out” in 1948 when a_ fight
named Inniss told~ the accused took place between Jane Mur-
not to run away. ray, Joseph Gibbs, her husband
He saw the wife of the deceased and herself. That’ fight was the
sometime before the incident result of a contention between

happened. Shq@ was standing by neighbours and her sister Jane.
the bank of the road.
Finger Lost

While the two men were strug- Joseph Gibbs lost a finger dut-

gling there were people around. ,
; 5 ia ing that fight, and her husband
To Mr, Walcott: Millington said as “bound over” by the Assize

that he was present when the in-
cident occurred. He saw Police Court.

aceused again .put this second
bunch in the road and said: Touch
these bananas now.” The

Joseph Gibbs,

Jane and she fought earlier
Constable Walker but he never 7

: during that same day.
baw the wife of the accused, The family used to have

The story he gave before the bickerings over the land. Other
Magistrate was right, but he children, Jane and Joseph want-
could not remember all the evi- ed their share of the land which
dence. When the men fell to the she was working to pay off a
ground the bananas were in the debt to the defendant, left by the
road. The accused ran behind father,
the deceased with the knife, Thq To the Court: The row came
deceased ran to the bananas and over tihis land.
turned about to face the accused. To Mr. Reece:— On the

The deceased was a man with 18/1/51, she had bananas grow-
a medium size. Both men lifted ing on the land. She used to
up the bamanas and as they Occupy both her father’s house

) clinched both of them dropped as well as her own which was on

the bananas.
Deceased Stabbed

The accused stabbed the de-
ceased moving the knife straight
across to the body of the deceased.

He usel to help the deceased
= the canes when they were Bunch Put Dow

eimg cut. n

Estaline Gibbs of Bryan’s, St. Gibbs put down the second
Thomas, told the Court that the bunch, followed her husband
deceased was not her father, On home and said he wanted the first
January 18 at about 4.30 p.m. she bunch.
was home and saw the accused Her husband told Gibbs that he
coma to her mother’s house ask- couldn’t come in the house. Jane
ing for a bunch of bananas which came up between her father’s
the deceased had taken away. house and her (witness’s) house
The accused who had a knife in and called Joe.
his hand, stayed at the house for
about five minutes while the
deceased was inane the ae
with a stick. he accus' eft ing the house
and the deceased followed him . ay
and her momner went after Me was not working ‘on. his “own

jlecea: eft, e saw a 7 a
banat ot bananas in the road and og meer aoe aig Reon
as the deceased tried to take up taae 4 0 Me n th ere;
the bananas, the accused held on — a a e oo Be? , more
to him. ,

° Both men clinched together “Joe”, (the defendant) turned
and the deceased fell to the away, and she and her husband
ground on his grace ee ee “s Dees and followed “Joe”
accused remained stan t e- down the road,

fore the deceased fell to the “Joe” had a knife in his hand.
ground, the) stick which he was Her husband had a stick—the one
holding dropped from his hand. with which he barred the defen-
After the deceased fell, her dant out of the house,

the land.

On the 18th January, Joseph
Gibbs came up not far from the
place where her home is, cut a
buneh of bananas and put it down
He went for a second bunch and
her husband took the first bunéh
and carried it home.

Her husband took up a stick
and when “Joe” attempted to
enter he barred “Joe” from enter-







They went to the place where
the second bunch cf bananas was
in the road, She told her husband
“the. bananas are mine.” Her
husband and Joseph Gibbs stoop-
ed to take up the bananas at the
same time.

Jane Murray told Gibbs: “Don't
let him (the deceased) take up
the bananas, juck him with the

knife.”
A “Necktie”

The bananas fell from both of
them, and Gibbs, holding the
deceased in a “neck-tie, jucked
him with the knife. Her husband
stumbled and fell. There was no
fight or ‘long tarrying’. It was no
longer than seven minutes or so.

During these “seyen minutes
tarrying”, the stick which her
husband had under his left arm
dropped, immediately he was
stuck with the knife.

Her husband “staggered” back-
ward to the right and fell. He
was stretched out. He went down
on his back. .

“Joe” left when her husband
fell, and went on to a hadgerow
and sat down, “Joe did not fall
down, There is a “bank” at the
side of the road. Her husband
fell into the gutter. He did not
fall next. to the embankment.

After her husband fell, she
went and held his hand. She
called “Sonny ! ! “Sonny ! ! ”
and when he did not answer she
said “oh Lord, he is dead.”

She only saw “Joe sit on the
hedgerow. She could not say
where he went after that. She
was concerned over her dead hus-
band,”

She did not stay until the Po-
lice arrived. She went home.

When she, her husband, Jane
Murray and the Defendant came
out from the house, there were
more people in the road includ-
fing her daughter Estaline. Mr.
Inniss was there when the inci-
dent occurred.

Basket Taken Wp

Sam Murray was under a
breadfruit tree not far off. “Son-
ny” Boyeq was also in the road.
When “Joe” stuck Duncan.
“Sonny’ took up the basket which
“Joe” had brought for the bana-
mas and ran away. She saw
“Sonny” bring the basket for the
bananas.

Olive Belle was there. She saw
her about 20 feet off the road
near a house, She called Belle to
her assistance when she saw her
husband fall. Belle came, but
her husband had died already.

Jane (her sister) took the knife
from the defendant, took up the
bunch of bananas and went to her
kitchen window.

Nathaniel Millington was also
there. Estaline and other people
were also there and after Head-
ley fell, they ran away and said
they “can’t stand that.”

To Mr. Walcott: I remember
giving evidence before the magis-
trate. I did not know Cephas
Boyce by the name of Cephas at
the time. I heard him called
“Sonny” Boyce.

I can’t remember whether I
said in the Court below that
Olive Belle was at her mother’s
gap, about 20 feet away, and I
was there when my husband got
the stab.

Deposition Read

Mr. Walcott asked, that her
deposition be read to the jury. I
saw when my husband got the
stab. Olive Belle was about 20
feet away by her father’s house
where Winifred lives. I am sure
of that. I saw Olive Belle’s face
looking from her father’s house
20 feet away,

She was inside the house look-
ing out from a window.

I can’t remember using the
word gap before the Magistrate.
I hadn't told the Court that Belle
was looking from the window
until asked by you (Mr. Walcott).’

When I came to the scene, Olive
Belle was at her father’s window
looking out. I didn’t say that be-
fore because one can’t remember
everything at the same time.

Belle’s Evidence

Before the magistrate I gave
my evidence before Olive Belle.
I was in court when Olive Belle
gave evidence. I can’t say what
any of the witnesses said at all.

My__husband, Joseph Gibbs,
Jane Murray and myself all step-
ped down in the road together.

So far as land was concerned,
my father died on 2ist June. My
mother died on 28th July. I did
not read the will. I don’t know
to whom it shares out the prop-
erty. Oliver never showed me the
will, I knew my father said he
would give each child a portion.
He also said I was the last child
and the land on which his house
stood was for me.

Prior to their marriage, her
husband was a paid servant of
hers. Her father and mother
were aged people, and she looked
after them.

Possession Of Land

I did not take possession of the
land. My father gave me posses-
sion of it in 1945. It is not true
that the row of 1948 cAme about
because ‘Joe’ Gibbs forbade
Leader from trespassing on the
and.

Nobody gave evidence in that
case to the effect that my father
paid Headley as a watchman, My

@ On Page 8



Hinder Progress

@ From Page 3

School shouia become Scouts, and
exactly half’of those selected for
the Jamboree in Jamaica this
month were members of Harrison
College.

Our great out of school activity
this last school year was the pro-
duction of Shakespeare’s “Julius
Caesar.” Roughly 1,000 persons
saw this play, and many of the
audience as well as Dr. Hamilton
were kind enough to praise the
production, I think only those who
have taken part in such things
can appreciate the magnitude of
the effort involved, but I am con-
fident that it was well worth
while. We owe a great debt to
Mr. D. A. Fowles for his untiring
work, and also to Miss Weston,
Miss Nurse, and the Queen’s Col-
lege girls for all their sartorial
help. I think both Mr. Fowles
and some of the cast.have set us
a very high standard; but I hope
that you will all come to see us
try to emulate it in the future.

Although most of our limited
building funds have been spent,
as in recent years, on combating
the tireless depredations of wood-
ants, we have constructed one
new large classroom since last
Speech Day from the store room
vacated by the Department of
Science & Agriculture. We ho
to add the upper storey next holi-
days. Our greatest addition how-
ever has been the four new
Laboratories in the upper floor
of the Science block. I hope
many of you will take the oppor-
tunity of looking over them this
afternoon, and if you do so will
agree that the generosity of Gov-
ernment has been used to good
purpose.

I confess I had hoped to be
able to announce to-day that we
should have a School Canteen in
the near future. It would be un-
reasonable not to realise the many
demands. which are made from
Government, and it would be pre-
sumptious to attempt to assess
their comparative importance; but,
comforted by the Scriptural lesson
upon importunity, I venture once
more to state our needs. We draw
our boys. from .a wide area, and
I believe both our work and our
games would benefit if every boy
could easily obtain a hot midday
meal. The Governing Body thas
formulated plans but the cost is
admittedly high. I hope that -be-
fore too long has passed: we shall
see a canteen here and I shall be
able to omit this plea from suc-
cessive annual speeches.

A short word about books: The
growing cost of books is one of
the most serious dangers to edu-
cational standards. Our Library
grant has recently been increased
to the same figure as that of other
schools. Mr, Millington has been
making most excellent use of his
rather larger funds, and one of
the most valuable developments
has been the creation of a special
Junior section for the younger
boys. So far as School textbooks
go we are steadily accumulating
school copies of some expensive
Sixth Form books in regular use,
so reducing the charge on the
sixth form boy. For instance, Wé
are now providing the expensive
Biology books for the Seience
Sixth, and some of the expensive
History textbooks for the Modern
Sixth, We hope to extend this

help to Classical dictionaries,
Classical Histories, and Mathe-
matical textbooks. This is how

we are utilizing the small profits
we have to make on our book
room schemes to be sure of a
erédit balance. We have not
much money in any one year but
we are doing what-we can,

Our purchase and sale of sec-
ond hand books was quite a suc-
cess and I believe a benefit to

parents. The more it is used the
better for all members of the
School.

I hope it may not seem ungra-
cious in me that I have not think-
ed all those, Governors, Staff, and
Old Boys, who have helped the
School and worked for it. during
the year. It is not that I am un-
appreciative, but merely that the
list is long, and in any case I
find the victims seldom like it.
But I do wish to record a special
word of thanks to the Prefects,
whose co-operation and growing
sense of responsibility have been
of great value. Few things have
given me greater pleasure or more
encouragement.

I trust I have not detained you
too long with this record of the
School’s activities; but I have
tried hard to bear in mind that
lady in Jane Austen's novel who
was admirable at least in this
that she “was not a woman of
many words; for, unlike people in
general, she proportioned them to
the number of her ideas”.

Vestry Wants School Site

@ from page 1
quire more space to house their
equipment as the boundaries of
the parish would be extended,
Therefore the move for the acquisi-
tion was a move in the right
direction.

Mr. Mottley replied that there
was no room for more lorries \a
the department. Hessaid that with
the building of Housing Schemes
and the extension of their scav-

enging, mora men had to be em- *

ployed, more brooms and shovels
bought and more space would
necessarily be required.

ADVOCATE

Michelin Asks Aid

For Animal Society

A. Tag Day.
Cemmissioner of Police, Vice-President
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Barbados
S.P.C.A., gave a broadcast over Rediffusion last night.

TO-DAY
Michelin,

is the S.P.C

He said:

Hon. V. C. Gale

-Churchwarden
@ from page 1

of the country who at one time or
another contributed to the back-
bone of this country and the La-
bour Welfare Fund.

hile they could not claim to
be labourers now, sometime ago,
“ were labourers.

e said that there was always
the Barbadian pride in not with
ing to go to an institution and if
fhe houses were repaired, it would
be allowing the old labourers to
pass their days in peace,

He said he hoped the Vestry
would again ask for assistance
from the Labour Welfare Fund
for that use.

Speaking on Hon, V. C. Gale's
election as Churchwarden, he said
that if Mr. Gale made a mistake,
he did-it honestly believing he
was right and hé had much pleas-
ure in secending the motion for
his election. Knowing Mr. Gale's
sympathy for the under-privil-
eged, he felt sure that they would
be in safe hands.





Excellent Report

Hon. V.C. Gale first thanked
Mr. Symmonds for proposing him
as Churehwarden and Mr, Mott-
ley for seconding the proposal.

Referring to Mr. Symmonds’
work as Churchwarden, he said
that he had given a very excellent
report of his stewardship. Ne
knew Mr. Symmonds had taken
his duties very seriously and con-
scientiously and done his very
best for the affairs of the parish,
He trusted that while he was
Churchwarvien, he would get the
full support and co-operation of
the Vestry for all the work to be

carried out.
The ‘ollowing other appoint-
ments were made:— Guardians:

Mr, C. A. Brathwaite, J.P. and
Mr, A. R. Toppih; Commissioners
of Health: Messrs. E. D. Mottley,
T. Bowring, V. W. A. Chase, A. R.
Toppin, Hon. V. C. Gale and as
non-members of the Vestry,
Messrs. J. M. Kidney, E. V. God-
dard, C. B. Layne, and T. H. H
Wilkinson; building supervisor-
inspector : Mr. J. T. C, Ramsay;
Vestry Counsel and Solicitor: Mr.
W. W. Reece, Q.C. and Carrington
& Sealy; tuner and repairer of the
Cathedral organ, Mr. John Kirton,
repairer and winder of the cathe-
dral’s clock, Mr. R. D. King. The
Churehwarden and Messrs. H. A
Tudor, Hon. G. B. Evelyn were
ppointed for the Cathedral con-
rregation and Mr. D. G, Leacock
for the Vestry under “Appoint-
ments Under the Anglican Church
Act, 1907.”

In each case except, that of Mr.
Toppin as Junior Gu rdian, these
appointments were the same as
last year,

New Member For Old

When the Vestry came to ap-
point the Commissioners of Health,
discussion was introduced by Mr,
T. W. Miller as to whether an old
member should not give place to
a new one,

Mr. Miller said that an oppor-
tunity should be given to young
members so that they might gain
experience, He moved that Mr.
Tudor and Mr, Hewitt be appoint-
ed to the Board of the Commis-
sioners of Health, but the motion
was not seconded.

Mr. Hewitt who agreed with Mr.
Miller’s suggestion, proposed that
Mr. Miller should be a member
and this was seconded by Mr,
C. A, Brathwaite. Mr. Miller only
secured half of the lowest number
of votes when the six nominated
for the five appointments were
balloted for,

When he nominated Mr. Brath-
waite to be Senior Guardian,
Hon. V. C. Gale said that Mr.
Brathwaite had been Church-
warden on more than one occa-
sion. He had worked with hir
on other occasions : the two of
them being Churchwarden and
Senior Guardian respectively. | He
was pleased to have him working
with him again, He was a man
who took great interest in the
affairs of this parish and of Bar-
bados. He had represented thi»
narish for many years in the
House of Assembly and people of
all shades of ovninions would admit
that Mr. Brathwaite was a man
with strong heliefs who did not
fenr saving what he had to say.

Mr. Brathwaite said he appre-
ciated the remarks Hon, V. C,
Gale had made concerning him
and he would endeavour to work
for the interest of the people of
Barbidos.

The Junion Guardian (Mr.
Toppin) promised to give every
assistance he could to. the
Churchwarden.







, larger





















































































Colonel R. T
and

“I am going to speak to you oi
the S.P.C.A, and ask you all t
give generously to thew Annua.
dag way which takes piace to
morrow. What does 5S.2’.C.A. stan
tor? It is the Society fer tn
Prevention of Cruelty to Animais
The Society which has been work
ing in this Island quietly an
efficiently for 46 years. It is th
organisation that looks after al
those animals who are i l-treate:
and suffering. It is a comfortin,
thought to knew that there is som,
Society that is all the time leok-
ing after the welfare of animals.

“The existence and work of thi
Society have béen made possibh
over all these years through th
generosity of you and your parents
Every person giving a donation t
the Society can have the satisfac
tion of knowing that he is helpin,
to maintain machinery for the wel
fare and protection of our dum.
friends. It is not possible for ai
of us to maNe an active part i
locking after these unfortunat
animals, but by financial help
you enable the, Society to take can
of this for you... ' *

“You will rightly want to khov
what the S,P.C.A. in Barbado
does, and what are their fund
used for. The Society has thre
(3) Inspectors stationed in differ
ent parts of the island. Thesc
Inspectors look out for overwork
ed, overloaded, underfed and un
cared for animals, and take step
to relieve their sufferings and im
prove their conditions, The
Society has a van which is ready
to hasten to anyone who has
suffering animal or anyone want-
ing an anima] destroyed in. ;
humane manner. OQur Chief In
Spector is on the telephene. His
number is 2624 under §.P.C.A, ir
the Telephone Directory, He is at
your service to give help and ad-

vice in the suffering of your
animals,

“Our Inspectors visit th
slaughter house and see tha

a~imals brought in for slaughte
are fed and watered during thei
Stay at the market that they hav:
No unnecessary suffering befor
slaughter,

“The Society is about to build ;
Modern Dog Refuge. As soon a:
this is done, dog catchers wil
be employed and equipped wit!
suitab’e equipment for catchin:

the half-starved and disease
stray dogs that live on the gar bag:
bins and that are a disgrace «

Bridgetown and Barbades,

“We want to extend our educa-
tional programme, and Lring to th,
notice of the public the number.
of thoughtless acts which daily
bring suffering to animals in thi
island and which must be rectifiec
Without funds, the Society.
actions are restricted and scop
limited, With more money wi
could expand and bring relief to i
number of sufferin;
animals, and enlightenment t
those owners and users of animal
who are apt to forget that th
correct thing to do is to get off :
loaded donkey cart going up a hil
and other thoughtless acts, alsc
that animals have feeling and mus
not be treated only as a means t
an end,

“Tomorrow our §S.P.C.A, col
lectors wil] be all over the islanc
asking you to buy a S.P.C.A, tag
Please but one and give generous
ly. Remember the Society has.:
large family to look after and wit)
the increased cost of everything
cannot do it efficiently withou
funds. We look to everyone t
give something towards thi
worthy cause and so enable th
Society to look after more of thos
whe cannot look after themselves

“On behalf of our dumb friends
IT thank you for your support to
morrow,” he ended.

POO OSOFOOOOS OOOO POOH"

‘LIBROX’

MADE BY

, seawoms gre | |
‘BOOTS PURE

DRUG (0.

A DENTAL BATH —
cleanses all Dentures with- ¥
out brushing — Removes all %
FILM FOOD PARTICLES
and Smokers’ Stains.



Cannot harm your False ¥
TEETH in any way. ‘5

Put dentures in a solution ¢
of LIBROX at night—Rinse ¥
thoroughly every morning.

‘BOOTS P.R. TABLETS’













PAGE FIVE

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edding PILLOW COTTON 36" wide. Per yard ......-...---. DANISH SLICED BACON—per Lb 1.59
, 32. 2/- per Bottle RED FEATHER HAMBURGER STEAK—per Tin ‘60
Gift BUTTER MUSLIN 36” wide. Per yard ...........+..++- SOc, & 32c Botall le. cach. CROSSE & BLACKWELLS CALVES FOOT
Ss sin JELLY—per Jar 44
GREEN LABEL MANGO CHUTNEY SAUCE—per Bot. 55
Prices to suit all DANISH SLICED HAM—per Lb oes 191
BUTTER MUSLIN| Cave Shepherd & Co, Ltd. | |) Mur Nemattt 9) Soe on oe
. ' ? per ot io”
LIMA D » LUG. | Hk
Y. De $ SELLING AGENTS COCKADE FINE RUM
. TD. he > ‘i 1 ¢
«& co., I 10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET ? Boots Pure Drug (0.

20 BROAD STREET



STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.

LPP



Re
















F PAGE Six BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY)! MARCH, "28, 1952

‘craceneieteenneeeemenenaaateT

CLASSIFIED ADS. | PUMLEC SALES ee Vestrymen Pay Tribute | SHIPPING NOTICES

TELEPHONE 2508 |


























































































































r menpy=—iengesoes oenut et
REAL ESTATE HOUSES @ from page 1 3ank of Commerce to run the THERLA
é 2 ad a parish until taxes were ee. ROYAL NE NDS |
: ET A ROOM FOR RENT—Apply to Palm} @teathy in making his duties as} and nominated Mr. C. ; ac- The M.V. DAERWOOD wid
ge, wirthe, Marrings ot Engagement | FOR SALE BUSINESS PREMISES —One two storey | Cot, Pontabelle of ring 4373 "T Bleasant as possible Kenzie. Mr. F. C. Goddard, Mr STEAMSHIP CO. . accept Cargo and Paswengers for
announcemen 5 i , Ps 0 » sea at Oistin a 41 that mm ak oe , ‘ : : id .
charge is $3.00 for any number of words Diane seers ie sulted rT eek a a . : Mr. Goddard said that he did] T N. Peirce and the Churchwar- SAILING FROM EUROPE & — St Ginie Weauneand
to 60 and 6 cents per word for each ann emeermatasn business riced to sell. Apply | BE RD rl not want to dwell on the Maude] den to sign the promissory note, | M.S. HECUBA. on 4th April 1962 2eth inst
ub kina of busi: P pp ERESFORD—the modern Bui : $$. BOSKOO! 952 26 mn
additional word, Terms cash. Phone 2608 AUTOMOTIVE to D’Are; A. Scott, Middle Street, Dial | Maxwell Road, fully furnished all mo Report, but if the Vestry system . \ wes BON ATRE on eth ya Mos!
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death | _ a mn | 2648S 26.3.52—2n. | conveniences, five tes walk t had te come to an end, he wanted] The Vestry fixed the rental | y's' srenror S oua aay 1008. The M.V. CARIBBEE will
Notiees only after 4 Dm AUSTIN VAN—One (1) 10 HP. Austin | pecs | from the Ist April. Apply: Nurse Pil-|to say that it had not outlived it: | value of an acre of land at $19.20. accept Cargo and Passengers for
Van in good working order. Thone| HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | grim Phone 8101 usefulness. There were some part: SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
— 4821, D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd house, all conveniences, with party 28.3.52 . 4 SPPIIOSIBOCOS AMSTE Nevis and St. tts. Sailing Sut-
13.3.53—t.f.n. | sured living room, open verandah, kitchen | — ie of the Vestry Bill which needed | ,>*°OOO%>> | M.S. WILLEMSTAD on 22nd April 1952 urday 29th inst.
RIAM and utility room Gerage, laundry, 2} BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, | ‘0 be amended, The work which } RE
IN MEMO “Aiciiliman ar new 3,000 tics only | “my,Ut rooms and storage foom under. | perfect bathing, quiet. All meals mast, | 10 De, santa eee Voolses over the BE WISE | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMA BO tre 14.0. MOREIRA wilh acbaak
all $2,000, Phone 2001 (evenings 4885) On attractive hiliside site, Rockley New | services supplied from main house, Own | }ast 300 vears—although that was nook S.S, COTTICA on 7th April 1952. Gade a sdomenioet, “ eye aaa
28.3.52~2n.| Boag. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476.| Telephone. Suitable married couple, | | : hj one of the popular Gas Cookers M.S. BONAIRE on 6th May, 1952 ntigua, at, Nevis
‘ sipersoaci 52—t.f a long time — was still fresh in | St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
CLARKE—In loving memory of Our Geer] “CAR: Austin 10, 1946—in good condi Eee ee ee ey eee ot James ej their memories, The Vestries B orn Resi SABLING TO TRINIDAD AND April 1952
moth a namother Bille Clarke ; . - a | people. Apply: hiands, St. James or e 5. . ig oven w io - CURACAO
who Cried om 2ath March, 1981. tion $900.00. Dial 2004 on’ 06 “To live in We Peete Or — ee —————————————— | and galvanize palings. and the other is HOUSE—Board and shingled con- ws es = . aan oo See ae : Burner _ ” ASSOCIATION (INC.)
We love is Wilma Clie CAR—Chevrolet (1939 Handle Gear] 14 yg with kitchen and galvanize pal-|teining verandah, drawing, dining and out what would happen when the Easy to keep clean, Econo- Ss P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
sh di ance a CS 3.so—in. | Shift model). Perfect condition, good | it. “she price for both is $850.00, and ‘two bedrooms, kitchen, toilet, bath, Maude Bill was implemented mical to use. Reoste $3 ot SS
ve Apply: D. W. Gale, as they can remain on the ee mater facilities. Butlers Gap, Spooners} would be another matter. Call and see them before all :
ten EO mae OY Sanat Ra Mgmavim Aer Greene Colao Doce | "ie fat Meat whehever happened | cessaenahl «a.
j » of Alice] CAR — 1947 Morris 10 hp. in A 1) pint 2645 ee ak. Pimpcimmiialibiisliabibiiinnae {WOUd be more expensive ands 5
MMEEER—In loving memory ot Alice condi - & a Sizes completely, over- ais ee | “MARISTOW, Maxwell Coast, Ch. Ch.| Whether the poor of the parish { anadian N ti nal Steamshi
Doreen, Price . ne . 5 of
on the 28th day of March, 1949. act P. L. Kelly, c/o Musson's Office. AUCTION — os Py Sere | Fe m ist} would benefit much more than a 10 ps
A dear face i misisng: 19 3 52-t in = a” én they did under the present system %
om ieee 45 stil abe dapetlh, | client cn: lesa ae VAR Outen i | sacain 3 *" | was left to be seen, because a lot | ;
memory * Fea *) VAUXHALL VELOX-—In excellent con- DODGE PICK- —Damag j Ss N PDe — ——_
we live are in out as iad dition ~— just completed 10,000 miles. Dial] aceident. We are instructed oe = | joe eee a ee. arn want eo Seo ee ee le '
Ever to be remembered , je 2 5 G 4616 vhicle for sale by_ auct a Good - =a a s e as j
Mildred (parents), Billic (her sist®). ne eee 22,3.52~-6n| Courtesy Garage on Friday 28th Mareb | Forty Ne. PCoral Sunda, w to Alma | taxes of the particular parishes. PALACE | SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Sefts Arrives Bails
Buddie, Luther and Attlee (her DrOts@ns) | er | yee John M. Bladon & Co., Auc- : eta tte Whether or not the people who MEI ss a — 2 etoe
var eet] rae ree Pe ee tioneers SON eens did the work now were exchang- HEADQUARTERS FOR | CANADIAN CRUISER “ = = sey a thee. = Mar.
2.700 miles — Owne ; —| | oR IENT—Upper Bay Street, on-the-sea.| ed for someone else, he that ; LADY 7 9 Po Age Apr. Pr.
nn | clivery end April—$2,400, No. offers KustiIn A-40 VAN 199 MONEE. | confortable. tae stocky thy are eee we i tae Waetrh i felt a a SOUVENIRS 'ApY NELSON * a 16 Apr 17 Apr. 2 Apr, aon,
a Dial 4616 22.3.52—6n | namaged in accident. We are instructed | Sui "modern conveniences. Furnished or | cc y in the Vest ries, had done an ROM ‘INDIA, CHINA & | CANADIAN CRUISER 2 ie 2 May _ 11 May ‘May
PERSONAL Did 4016 | tee’ this vehicle for sale by auction | unfurnished. Apply on premises. especially in Christ Church, and CEYLON | CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR. . 9 May 12 May a 21 May 23 May
ELECTRICAL at Eckstein Garage, Nelson Street, on 28 3 62-—-2n. | Were doing very good work and it 4 LADY RODNEY oon 2” May = Fn % May 3.Sine a Jun
aD arte ene | PERS, OO March, at 2.30 pm noes | Was for someone else to say if | CANADIAN CHALLE “ ay =e e une
ELECTRIC FANS—12 and 15 inch M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers 4 MODERN FURNISHED FLATS—Four]| the time had come for a change. LADY NELSON .. + * 9 June om 4 June 2 June 2% June
, inst bly priced. Also many other 25.3.52—4n. | Aces, St. Lawrence Gap. From April Ist oo . | CANADIAN CRUISER «20 June une = 2Juy 3 July
The public are hereby warned against | Reasonably priced - a he _————— |Apply: Mrs. L. Hassell. Phone 4003 The report was then adopted. CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.. 30 June 3 July ie 12 July 13 July
giving ‘credit to any Person of Tiersons jclectrical appliances. K. BR, leunle & . 3 ‘The Vestry agreed to the annual| | Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 9}, (apy RopNEY li July 14July 16 July 28 July 98 Jul
Shomacever in my name as t do Not) Co. Ltd Dial 6196, 2.3.52. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER 28.3.82-In-| int of $480.00 for Sanitation ae : ci tg
hold myself responsible for anyone con- | - | 7 Lae - - gre $300. a chee a ieee
eting y debt or debts in my name yea from the LET—Furnished three Bedtoom| and Repairs at the Elementary :
wa bd b By ‘instructions receiv House “‘Doverdale”, Nelson Road, Navy] Schools in th arish ?
unless by a written ord or signed by me LIVESTOCK Insurance Co. I will sell at Messrs. Gardens. May--August. Ring 3961 100!s In e Di . . NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Artives Arrives, Afrives
LIONFL, DANTEL, nappa enone peearney & CO, 1td., on Frey; F Sn 5 seh The Vestry also passed a Reso-! B’dos B'dos Boston 8¢. John. alifax Montreal
TWweedside Ra, Carrington Vilinge, |" Gowocone Grey Guernsey and Jersey| Mareh 28th, (1) | 199}-30, TF Ford | 52 | 1 tion to obtain a loan not exceed- THE BIG EVENT LADY NELSON .. 23 Mar. 24 Mar, 3 Apr. 4 Apr 2 Apr. =
st. Michael ust calf @0 pints last calf. Phone 8336.| Thames Truck, complete with platform ing $7200.00 f the C di CDN. CRUISER... 4 Apr. 17 Apr. — | 14 Apr. 7 Apr, ae
28.3.52—2n jae § 28.3.52—8n.| ete. Only done 1,700 miles (Damaged | WANTED ing $7, y rom e Canadian LADY RODNEY |. 2 Apr. 26 Apr. 5 May; = 6 May 10 May
—— ene | in accident). Terms cash, Sale at; , OF THE YEAR LADY NELSON . 3 3 = 22 May| . yun S ii i gene
ii ieee ae nt eens CDN. CRUSER .. ‘ ay ay ~ une ‘un
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE) = MISCELLANEOUS 2pm vincent arurritn, | CDN. CRUE | aa dune
UERAN@FFR AND REMOVAL) | Auctioneer: | MAIL NOTICES CONSTRUCTOR 3 aune 8dune | — | 16 June” 28Junq af June
The application of Millicent Forte of | “HRICKS—A quantity of good oosends rete | HELP ae ie at ‘is THE LOYAL BROTHERS ee RODNEY .. 15 June 17 June 27 June —, @Juneq 1 July
Ivy Road, St. Michael, the purchaser of | ae West | f ‘or Dominica ntigua, Mont- DIAN
: . and fire bricks. Apply: The Ss " HALLENGER 23 J 28 June — S July 8 nl J
Liquor License No. 156 of 1952, granted wo Biscuit Company. Phone 4464 ‘ ‘ BUTLER—House Maid, sleep in. Apply | 77% Nevis and St. Kitts yy the M.V OF THE STARS c + 23 June P ¥. uly
to Leonard Forde, in respect of a boarded Indian Piscul —_—__" 52—5 HL TICES ; A . sleep in. Apply | CARIBBEE will be closed at the General LADY NELSON ... 6 July 8 July 18 July — | wes 2 su
and shingled shop situated at Arch Hall, ete a oe PU rc NO oe een eee ae a Post Gee, oF undies Pr Saar «6 M4 July 19 July, 7 26 July; 8 July = & Aug.
St. Thomas, to remove sald License to a| “77 ooar eLAN 2 weet er = oy ; Parcel Mail at 3 p.m. on the 28th esent LAN | ‘
Ped and shingled shop attached to. CLEAM FLANNEL for Tipusts. ” SSABOWH a cae, Wine to GOlE ca] eaten eae (Mall st 9.99 ar CONSTRUCTOR %4 july 9 July ~ 8 Aug, 8 Aug: 16 Aus
residence situated at re all, t yrdinary 2} at 9 a.m. on the - a
Piotes and to use ie 3 ee fast is %8.3.62—t.f.n. NOTICE medium commission. Write D. A. C/o Mareh eet in ashes LADY BOGS eee =e eee , —_ we
described premises. as a ete te Orders for OLIVER/CLETRAC Crawler Advocate Co., Ltd. 26.3.52--6n MAILS for Dominica and §t. Lucia ve

CLOTH—Domestic Cloth, good quality





e

Dated this 26th day of March, 1982. | . fi rompt delivery are now ———- by the Sch. LAUDALPHA will be closed

MILLICENT FORDE, only @c, a yd. At Thane Bes tn Tae cacentia- We shall be pleased to| one, STORE KEarES. —_Pretmably | at the Genetal Post Oe ev undes—

Applicant. a hes aw ly further information on applica- : le ce Parcel Mail at 3 p.m, on the 28th

Fo ey Geers, wale “FLANNELETTE for underwear and tion, Orders are also being received for win caeanee 0" Box cea Kewoeete ees ae mag Mal) a 0:8 A

Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “D.” other purposes 64c. and White, Blue, Pink BULLDOZER/ANGELDOZER of U-K-| Agvet. Dept i Beet ee en Ce, Se at On June 5th & 7th

N.B.—-This application will be con- | Thani’ 28.3.52—t.f.n. | manufacture for use with all types U.S. arch 195 a

sidered at a Licensing Court to be held | ** as MAILS for British Guiana by the Sch.

on Wednesday, 9th day of April, 1952, or
at 11 o'clock a.m. at Police Court, GUM ARABIC--Britains Best (cleaned)

District “D" by the 100 pounds or in 25 pound lots,

FRANKLYN D.R., will be closed at the at Queen’s Park

ess n the U
about one quarter or | tha: Hands) only those with experience need} General Post Office as under:—
further Particulars Later

URTESY GARAGE Dial 4616.
vary. o=" 22.3.52—6n





apply P. C. S. MAFFEI & Co., Ltd P el and Registered Mails at 3 p.m





: lay, 26.3. 52.40. / arch: |
G. B. GRIFFITH, at 52 cents per pound. Do_not de! etn 3. 4.2. -om-the 28th March; Ordinary Mail at 8}
Ae. "Poiee Magistrate, | omlY # small quantity let Sos 2 ixseees ski @-m. om the 28th March 1952.
Dist. “D’'—St. Thomas 28.3.52—3n #he BARBADOS AQUATIC CL MISCELLANEOUS
28.3.52—In. | RON SWING—With Spring, Cushions NOTICE TO MEMBERS d



Ce on ee +





a and hood. Ci be seen at Woodville,

TAKE NOTICE Yontabelle. lephone 3940. bite oa0n

NOTICE is hereby given that in
accordance with Rule & the Club will be
closed to Members on Saturday, March



D'ARCY A. SCOTT Auctioneer & Real Estate Agent

QUALIFIED BRITISH CHEMICAL caer emer ee rae TTD, ¢ ty,







F a
Type Crawler Tractors. The price fs TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket









. ; ENGINEER (B.Sc.) §eeks suitable of Middle Street has on his list oe - oe
—_—_—$—$—$—$— $$$ | 2 from 7.30 to 9.45 p.m. for Water e! uita t s on his list some of the best properties in
JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts, ary Matches. Shiatee, Expert Plant Management and the island offering for sale. The list which is tbo extensive i LE & e eG
MENTASOL including — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid] By order of the Committee Frocems = Bevelopineny. aid Rasaareh to advertise includes the best house at Hastin, the Sei ¥ hoes
Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also H. P. SPENCER, hitton, Seaview Guest House. Phone with front:-back ‘and sid : ee on te wee é ed Bd the

Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre Secretary. eis 27.3.52—3n : ront; back and side lounges, spacious drawing and din-

That PEPSODENT LIMITED, a Com-| Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets. 27.3.52--3n ing rooms, (4) four large & two small bedrooms, three baths Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
pany inéorporated under the English} Phone 2696. 20.3 Se—t.f.n. . one with tub, also hot and cold water, garage, servants’ room bad Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
Companies Act, whose trade or business ell pean NOTICE ADVERTISE and nicely laid out flower garden. Suitable as est hi ’ Barbados, ’

Paes is a eae ae oad ben JACOBS CREAM CRACKERS— Extra 1 or small hotel : gis”: ee thampton Arri Barbados
» London, E 4, England, #8! Light Soda Biscuits. The Best Cream P . From Sow ives
applied for the registration of a trade! Cracke: 8 sat, possible Price. ile Annual General Meeting of the; Also the most modern house at Maxwell Coast
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect pt ae Bs tien a BRUCE Barbados Basketball Association will be IN THE with 4 “COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... .. S8ist March, 1952

very large bedrooms three having tiled baths. Why not dial
2645 and make an appointment to overlook the list or for an

ins ion, N gati
ADVOCA TE poet oad ap okie For real estate of any

held at the ¥.M.C.A. on FRIDAY, 4th
April at 7,30 p.m :
‘All clubs desirous of aMiliation should
send their applications to Secretary, C/o
YÂ¥.M.C.A. so that they may be elected
offillated clubs by the General Meeting
228 .3.52—6n



*“DE GRASSB”....24th April, 1952 2... 6th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952... «.. Qist May, 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados. Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIB” .... 11th April, 1952... 23rd A) 1952

of tojlet preparatighs for cleaning natural | WEATHERHEAD Ltd.

teethi and artificial teeth, soaps, per- 28.3.52—4n
fumery, essential ofls, cosmetics, and, ————————_—__-———_— —
tollot preparatidt, and will be entitled | KBROSENE BURNING ELECTROLUX
tw register t\- came aiter one month); FRIG: Small model in perfect order
from the 27th day of Mareh, 1952, unless | Revd. Mellor, St Margaret's Vicarage,
som@ person shal in the meantime give | st. John 28.3.52-—3n
notice In duplicate to me at my office | —.———____________--___----—

































ae ee

TAKE NOTICE ee |

SPF ELS SLE FPO LOSS














of opposition of such registration. The | LINCAN PEAS—J. N. Goddard & Sons. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF \ ae, /
trade mark can be seen on application | Ltd., Alleyne, Arthur & Co. Ltd., and) [HE WEST INDIES LECTURER ‘ A er ~ *“DB GRASSE” ..., 19th May, 1952... ... 29th , bi
at my office | MeDonald Sealy have just received a IN MEDICINE ' Se / “COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... ... 13th June, 1952
Dated this 2th a ou wh 1982. ome lot of ere brand of Zagiish APPLICATIONS are Invited for the VES «LLAMS, garden peas in 1 Ib. tins, sold at 3 per|. 7 < oa § *
Registrar of Trade Marks. i John F. Hutson Ltd. Agents pest of Lecturer in Medicine, Te oem AEN a Sailing direct to Southampton rm
= = ae at %i.3.52—2n. | Vergityy College Hospital and instruction ‘~ “ —————————————————————————————— oo =






OUGLOTH AND STRAW MATS— of students working for the Medical

“Wiost beautiful designs. Beautify your
ome. Available at Thani Bros. Dial
2466 28.3,52—t.f.n
PRINTS—American Prints, Lovely Big
Flowers for House Coats or Bed Sheet-

ing at 77c. a yd. Thani's.
28.3,.52—t.f.n

10 DAYS
CARIBBEAN CRUISE

From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD
Venezuela-Curacao
Colombia & Jamaica

the LUXURY LINERS

. COLOMBIE & DE GRASSE

FOR INFORMATION

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

PHONE 3814

3 of the University of London
Salary seale is £800 rising by £50 per,
annum to £1,000, Point of entry in the
seale according to qualification and!
experience

Child allowance and temporary cost ot
living allowance is paid. Superannua-
tion is under FSSU arrangements. Un-
furhished accommodation is avaliable at
a fental of 5% of basic salary. The
cessful applicant will be expected to
@ up the post during September 1952,
Applications (Tweive copies) giving full
particulars of qualifications and the names
of three referees, should be received be-
. fore Aprid 25th, 1952 by the Secretary,
CLUB Cabbage, Beet, Carrot, Lettuce, Turnip, | senate Committee on Higher Education
pps ree also a ig Flower Garden | in the Colonies, Senate House, University
(Local & Visiting Members Seeds, Zinnia, hiox, Petunia, Candy | of London, W.C.1,, from whom further

uft etc., at BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

Only) \htd 28.3,52—2n particulars may be obtained
on +
| WEETABIX—A fresh shipment of thi

SATURDAY, March 29th, }}}| \(eliclous cereal which is more then 8) LOST & FOUND

A are in

That AMERICAN RADIATOR &

STANDARD SANZTARY CORPORATION,

a corporation organized under the laws 2
of the State of Delaware, United States
of America, whose trade or business
address is 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburgh 22,
Fepnaylvania, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Part
“A” of Register in respect of all kinds
of plumbing supplies and equipment and
sanitary installations and appliances, in-
eluding bath tubs, drinking fountains,
combination lavatory fittings—namely,
pop-up drain valve, hand valves, and
mixing spouts, and metal pipe and metal
pipe fittings, baths of all kinds, bath-
room equipment of all kinds, bathtubs,
bidets, cabinets of all kinds including
bathroom and shower types, drinking
fountains, faucets, fittings and parts
thereof for use with the goods in this



LADIES & GENTS WATER |
POLO MATCHES BY



SHOES—Ladies White Shoes and Hats
tor Easter, you go to see these at Thani
E



LOSSSSOS FOPSPOOS GOS F OF OC FS GIF F 1 FOF

FLOODLIGHT
at



fros. Dial 3466 28.3.52-—t fin.

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC |
|



SEEDS: Arrived yesterday 40 differ-
ent kinds Fresh Vegetable Garden Seeds,

28.3.52—1n





SDRSSSSOS SSS ISOS FOSSIS OS POS SPOS





















at 8.30 p.m, avatlabl it popular list; flush tanks for water closets and 65655600 0000S099SS9SSSSSOOS
ake a a Th 30e fe Raitt urinals, Hospital tables, hydrants, hydro- “SSOP PPO PSPSPS PISS SSS iG
Admission (Dance & aw , sma . John F. Hutson :
Ltd. Agents. 21,.3,.52—2n therapeutic equipment, laundry trays, Lf hulfor’s ae
Water Polo—$1.00 nga ; ; LOST lavatories, sinks of all kinds, showers, ae
. . WIND BREAKER ” s stops for bathtubs and sinks, urinals, VSOSSO9SS9E9 OCP PIOSSVOSSVISVOODIS VSS VOSS I SFIS
admission for Water Polo Colours $4.95. Meet anc thassiat int water closets, parts thereof and seats 9 %
only—2/- tros. Dial 3466. 28.3.52--t.f.n therefor, tanks, tools, and apparatus for IF You WANT
G eae : Y SWEEPSTAKE BOOK — In Jamaica| making the Lsted goods, and will be
(Games will be played WHITE SHARKSKIN is here again, in Turf Club Races to take place April 26th | entitled to register the same after one | ,
8.30—9.30 p.m.) |} qualities, $1.47 up. Very beautiful | 10%, Sstics ee hes “SPE: | cath Sem. the aah Gay of Myron 1952, | A house paint, a roofing paint, a wall paint, a boat paint,
: t s T2623 ; - ; er please | unless some person - i ‘ i
Admission after Water Polo REG, "SEOy Se Nearee bay: a s2—-t.t.n, | return to Advocate Advertising Dep:t- time give notice in duplicate ta mea | , M / L K S | OV’) \ * a dull paint, a bright paint, a cheap paint, an expensive
for Dance only — 2/6 abd . ment. Reward offered. 27.3.52—3n. | my office of opposition of such registra- | paint.
(Cc in * SPECTACLES Srond “i pt Ap trade mark can be seen on é AT =
ommencing 9.45) * — Monday etween | app tion at my office, | Y SNe
crabank | / Boas
x 245)... Hi For Best Results-ADVERTISR |Siiener n't Gk. sas, Suz. | Peet mis 38 gov ge ttrsyi at . * CENTRAL EMPORIUM
eet anseecess|)|| senecooesesesocossosecee| newer. ME sistas aay Soe (Corner Broad & Todor Streets)
Pease B.8.08-t. AGENTS
.



CHILDREN’S VESTS & PANTIES, 3for $1.20 FOR GENTLEMEN
BORDERED Good Quality SPUNS nw $1.08 é
os corel CREPES, CAFFERAN, SELES, die vitae, SILK SPORT SHIRTS 5 shades 2 for.... $4.50

PRICES — YOU WILL BE GLAD TO PAY | mow. io... cess, $10 POLO SHIRTS from sfc, to..........- SLAM ¢
SERVICE Siac TH AT IS SURE TO PLE ASE | SPUNS, white, blue, pink, biege, brown, now NEW NYLON BLEND SPORT SHIRTS$4.95










ae ys ONLY oe. cece ccc ccececevevceseesssee-. €O@ THOUSAND OF OTHER SHIRTS at

PRINTS & HAIRCORDS Per Yard. 48, 79. 86 | ART SILK, white, pink, blue, now only....... TZe lowest prices .........).00...ee eee

SS WHITE CALICO yd 45e FUGI Pink, blue, gold, yd 34¢ A | i | -« SHANTUNG in 8 shades, now only.......... $1.12 RIBBED VESTS, imagine! 3 for only.... $I.

SPECIAL NYLON GOLD BLENDED D! a . ;
LINEN FOR UNIFORMS yd____.__ 72 & B4e! _ | MATERIALS 6 shades 44” ew $2.64 SOCKS at killer values! now 2 for only... . $1.

LADIES. COTTON VESTS two for only __—s_—s—s S$ .OOD | TH E ehh bie hiner SPECIAL MEN’S 2 tone SHOES pair.... $8.25 ¢

A NEW MULTICOLOURED SHOES, *HAKI SHIRTS each now only....... $3.25
JERSEY NIGHTIE 5.5 sid habtny d ’
S 2for 5.50 RAYON PANTIES ove dusty 1.44 | | HATS, BAGS. _ KHAKI per yard only ........ 9Oe & $1.03



GADIES INTERUOCK PANTIES 2... from @@ and up | ” ay ao 3 Sia
SNYLON HOSIERY pair only $1.20 TOWELS each now Ble & GB BARGAIN HO w SE
CHILDREN'S INTPRLOCK PANTIES... — _._________. _ Ade 30 SWAN STREET DIAL 2702 S. ALTMAN —
VIVECC CCW CTW ww CTW WT WWW ¥ BIEEEEGEQGQ GO GG) CQ GGGGGGGGGGGGGG-GGGbGGGGGGGGGO> rire oe








FRIDAYy: MARCH, .28,. 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE







PAGE SEVEN







——
SEP LOSSLSO SEES PSPIS PPI IE

e

BY CARL ANDERSON





¢ ADD THESE SPECIALTIES » +
| x TO YOUR LIST % >
1% Tins Pears » é

iss Peaches ®
A i< Apricots xy
s Pineapple %
. a is Apricot Jam 8
~~ % Bots. Marmalade MS
» Guava Jelly
\ Strawberry Jam > +e
1% Raspberyy Jam Ss
a Tins Heint Tomato Soup x -
* . Vegetable Salad ta ¥ :
s Mayonnaise sy no
- ~ Chicken Soup 8 -
. Imperial Meatlunch %
x . Red Feather Wham % —
x Nateo Minced Beef %
x Smorgon’s Luncheon “Beef «os
XX Loaf o
% » Champion Beef Loaf >
Ss Pickled Herrings > -
a Pickled Mackerel XN
Eschalot ‘
*
% OpT! ) 1 1 | s
$ STUART & SAMPSON
Cape. 1992, King Benner Syodicape, tax World sights reserved * K Oral L xs
‘
: LTD %
X (1938) . 3 Ns

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... p K K ik sendeseeseseseeesereneee 5
Sy cee te Lim = ag: (GES SSS t JUST RECEIVED §
S yee) BRS nhintiibaess
BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG B I S ( ; | I T S
I CANNOT TEL OH, PAGWOOD | [f= | = | Wi BUT CONT
eer aa ip !

Â¥

Pkgs. Tate & Lyle Castor
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacor

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna ¢
Sausages

Pkgs. Goddard Plague Pow-
der

Tins Stove Polish

Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad %

Pkgs. Bridal Icing Sugar 7

Tins Gelatine

Tins Asstd. Sweet Biscuits

Tins Pineapple Chunks

Tins Strawberries



Also:






TIN HAMS



Special price to Shopkeepers

° F=cg
All these things get from - - | %

IT HAPPEN




A LIE, DEAR YOU'RE A DARLING (you EVER LET
BLONDIE LIKES :

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

TO - DAY.









SE AE ESSER ER RT RN Ste LPR oY
Senet

__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE :













SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

eo —
————

oo
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside, ;
Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually Now

Usually Now
Bots. Green Label Mango
. 55 50 Tins Select Powdered Milk .. 1.05 95

Chutney Sauce

Tins Rio Grande Chocolate Pkgs. Post Toasties ee Se Al 36
Ass. Biscuits a os 1.97 1.60

; cage Tins Rowntrees Cocoa } Ib. .. 26 23
Tins Tapestry Biscuits .. ee 2.33 2.00 . ,

: q ae =! ; Bottles Carljngs Beer ,, ee 26 2h ,
Tins Good Companion Biscuits 1.95 1.60



D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

e ‘
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

BRITISH
HONDURAS

By STEPHEN L. CAIGER




AH-~ BUT, M'SIEU~
HOW UNFORTUNATE /
WITH BANDAGES SHE
CANNOT TALK /



AH - BUT, DOC-
HOW FORTUNATE...





WITH PENCIL
AND PAPER SHE
CAN WRITE /

















just |
A ‘
LITTLE

TIMELY
ADVICE



British Honduras is _per-
haps the most neglected of
¢ all English colonies. Even the
larger histories of Colonial
development barely mention
it. The author has now told
the story of the interesting
country from the early days
_ of its settlement by the log-
,» Wood-cutters and buccaneers
{up to the present.

Beginning with the discov-
Â¥, ery of British Honduras by
the Spanish Conquistadores

he describes the growth of the
colony under its ‘occupation

MOTHER IS QUITE WHY S' GHH- SHH WHY DO
UPSET ABOUT YOUR || GET ANGRY?/--GHE BUT JUST TO YOU HAVE TO MAKE
ET TING ‘| |WAS REARRANGING KEEP PEACE IN ET” | SO MUCH NOISE 7/-+
THE FURNITURE AT THE FAMILY -/'LL| i e ~, YOU KNOW MY
MIDNIGHT - WHILE : ” | BROTHER IS TRYING
a

TO SLEEP’


















to our numerous -cus-
tomers and the general
public .

DON'T MISS SHOPPING AT —

and settlement by British
adventurers, and consolida-
tion by the buccaneers after
the “conversion” of Harry
Morgan. He gives an account
of the early quarrels with the
Spaniards which were later
followed by controversies

ith neighbouring Central
American Republics especial-
ly Guatemala. The dispute
with Guatemala ended in the
territorial agreement of 1859,

but : ve _ of agg! apn i aa :
Saiab die una Mae ¥ Caller. iB EG I N § 4 4). DA % e



LIAR! You'VE BEEN MOONING OVER HER FOR
MONTHS! I KNOW WHAT'S GOING ON! YOURE
TWO-TIMING ME .. AND NOBODY TWO-TIMES
be LILI LAVELLE AND
GETS away

WILSONS

during their Easter Parade and

YOU WERE GOING
TO DROP ME OFF

Store wide clearance which

red to U.N,O.

The concluding chapter

e
deals with the Colony to-day



Our Air Conditioned Store, efficient and courteous
Staff will make shopping a pleasure. There will be no
closing of doors

with special emphasis on its
economic and commercial
status and recent Government
proposals for development.
The writer shows that its
agricultural | and other re-
sources have been gravely
neglected, and that this fertile
land ceuld maintain a popula- : |
tion many times its present |
size. '



EVERYONE WILL BE EASILY SERVED
DOORS OPEN AT 8 A.M.







YOU RENO HELPY WE'VE BEEN IN THE

JUNGLE FOR WEEKS2 I'VE LEARNED

NOTHING ABOUT TH

1 DIDN'T ALREADY axe
KNOW!

(VE HAD
ENOUGH.
IM GOING





PROFESSOR, THERE ARE
SOME MYSTERIES THAT
SHOULD BE LEFT ALONE+
AND NOT PRIED INTO?

MYTH~+A MAN WHO CANNOT

21 DIE~LEAVES A SKULL MARK

Bl WHERE HES BEEN+*
——_ 72°

| SAW THAT MASKED MAN s
N MY DREAMS THEN | SAW
HIM HERE INTHE FLESH? op



N.E. WILSON
& CO.

The Store where your dollar yields more cents.

GET IT AT THE...

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BROAD ST.

DIAL 3676 31 Swan Street






z7accr

care




wt,

aeayowecrs

“

Hoan

as

er ee

PAGE EIGHT

Notre Dame Defeat Lmpire 2—

NOTRE DAME
EMPIRE

(Daniel 2) ,

(Robinson

1) 1

A CROWD estimated at about 4,500 went to Kensington
Oval yesterday afternoon and saw Empire suffer their
second defeat for the season and this time it was at the

hands of Notre Dame who

defeated them to the tune of

2—1 in their First Division Football match.

The mutch which was looked
upon as “the match” in the
return fixture provided thrills for
the many fans and every move
was watched with interest. Two
goals were scored in the first
half while one goal was kicked
lin the second half.

Inside right Daniel for Notre
Dame proved to be the hero of
his team by kicking in two well
placed goals — one in the first
half afd one in the second half
— to give his side victory. Robin-
son scored the only goal for
Empire. Notre Dame who was
blow to get off the mark played
a better game in the second half
while the Empire forwards failed
to take the opportunities they
were given.

Again Grant and Smith’ played
a good game for Empire. They
kept the ball well in the midfield.

Wilkinson kept goal well for
Notre Dame but sometimes he
was undecided about coming out
of his goal or staying in, in the
face of the approaching Empire
forwards.

Empire Presses
Notre Dame won the toss and
skipper Mandeville decided to
defend from the northern end of

the pitch against Empire
Both teams started the game
fast and soon the Empire for-
wards were in the Notre Dame
goal area. But«shortly after goal
keeper Symmonds was. tested.
Taylor immediately after tried to
draw first blood tor Empire but
the ball went high over the cross

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Australian Yachtsmen

FRIDAY, MARCH, 28, 1952



Call Here On Way Home

TWO Australians, 27-yea

r-old William Howell and26-

year-old Frank McNulty anchored the white-painted 24-foot





oe. Sag Empire . yo was yacht Wanderer II off the Aquatic Club yesterday morning,
kicked by Rudder right in the completing the fourth leg of their voyage from England to
goal and Robinsei: took the Australia :
chance and headed the ball into They have joined the ranks of fresh fish—the only fresh food
the goal. Wilkinson tried to save trepid yachtsmer who risk during the voyage. They could
but he was too late. With one ocean going nothing else than only hook one fish which* freed
goal to their credit Empire never decked-in ghies. Already itself after they got it on deck.
slackened up and Taylor again they have sailed 5,000 miles from Asked how they felt at sea so
tried to score. Notre Dame was ihe Isle of Wight to Barbados. many.gays without seeing land,
still trying for the equaliser but T! ross Atlantic run from Las they said “we look on the sea as
the Empire backs Smith and Palm: to Barbados which is we look on our front garden; the
Grant were clearing their area 2,700 miles of aulir without rippling waves, the swells, fish
faultlessly. When it was about sceing land, they did in 29 day pooking, around the boat en-
three minutes before half time “Wanderer II” took a half day chant us. We read most of the
Notre Dame cqualised and this longer from Las Palmas here time and attend to our ship.”
goal was scored by Daniel at than the 19-foot Sopranino which The only thing is that they. lack
inside right. c was here last month. vP — reise when the weather is
“It w all idder he fine,

After half time both teams still ian. baciteraee eae William, “We kept fairly dry throughout

continued to press but Notre Wanderer Ii’s owner, who was the trip although Wanderer II is

Dame was playing more construc-
tively and their passing was more
accurate than in the first half.
When this half was about 20
minutes old Daniel again scored
for Notre Dame. He kicked the
ball powerfully and well in the
wight hand corner of the nets,

After this goal Empire made
renewed efforts but the final
blast found the score unchanged.

The teams were :

Empire: Symmonds, Smith,
Grant, Alleyne, Maynard, Rudder,
Norville, Taylor, Robinson, Dray-
ton, B. Morris.

Notre Dame— Wilkinson,
Straughan, Browne, Roberts,
Archer, Daniel, Headley, Cc
Daniel, Parris, Mandeville F
Daniel.

The referee was Mr. O. §S
Coppin,

nae



Alleyne Is Victrix Ludorum
At St. Michael’s Girls’ Sports

A large number of spectators were present at the Ath-
letie Sports finals at St. Michael’s Girls’ School yesterday.
Very great interest was taken in the sports by the girls, and
this will no doubt be realized when it is considered that
over 950 points were gained in standard points.

There was very keen rivalry be-
tween the four Houses throughout
all.the events, and in the Senior
Division V, Alleyne of Boadicea
was Victrix Ludorum, in the
intermediate division. J. Mayers
of Anne, and in the junior division
N. Holder of Boadicea. J. Mayers
was very outstanding in her
division, winning both flat events
in fine style.

Among the events, the High
Jumps could be said to have been
the most exciting, causing many
shouts from the crowd. The Little
Visitors’ Race which was won by
Enid Niles was also very amusing
and there were over two dozen
entrants.

On the conclusion of the sports
the trophies were presented by
Mrs. Riseley Tucker. The vote of
thanks was made by Mr, H. F
Alkins-and after thanking Mrs.
Tucker for presenting the trophies,
he assured Miss Burton and her
staff that the sports were very
enjoyable. He hoped that in the
Inter-School Sports now approach-
fing, St. Michael’s would more
than do her best.

Savannah Club
Tennis Tournament

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

Ladies Doubles Final
Miss D. Wood and Miss G, Pil-
grim beat the Misses Bowen 6—2,
6—4.
Men's Doubles Semi-Final
E. P, Taylor and Dr. C. G.
Manning beat J. D. Trimingham
and D, E. Worme 6—1, 6—3, 9—7
Mixed Doubles Handicap
Mr, and Mrs. P. McG. Patterson
-} 40 beat Viscount and Viscount-
ess Dangan 4+ 15 6—3, 6—1.
The Tennis courts will be close:|
today.





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Art Exhibition at the Museum
at 10.00 a.m.

Speech Day at Queen’s College
at 2.30 p.m.

Football at Queen’s Park at
5,00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema, Home Agricul-
tural Station Yard, st.
Philip—7 .30 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Hastings
Rocks at 8.00 p.m.



| They'll Do It Every







OH, CUFFBERT-
I TINK THAT
MAN BACK THERE
| WAS TRYING TO
| GET YOUR EYE
| ISN'T HE THAT BIG
MOVIE PRODUCER
FRIEND OF
YOURS








VON Kwicky» ¥
YES~I’ SURE

IT IS > MUST
SAY HELLO TO
HIM» BARDON

50 Will Sail
Sixth Regatta

Over forty yachts are expected

to take part in the Sixth Regatta
of the R.B.Y.C. which will be
sailed in Carlisle Bay at 2.30

p.m, tomorrow, No changes have
been made in the handicap times
which remain the same way as
they were in the Fifth Regatta.

The handicap times published
in yesterday’s Advocate were
those for the Sixth Regatta in
1951 and can be compared with
the present times. The handicap
system has been changed this
year,

















The times for the Sixth Regatta
are as follows: —

No. Yacht Start At Flag
B 10 Wizard 2.30 Red
Bli Ranger Yellow
B 4 Hi Ho 2.32 Red
B 3 Resolute
B 481 Fantasy 2.33 Yellow
B 6 Furt
B 7 Mayra Biir
BK 8 Rascal 2.4 Red
B 9 Okapi
D 8 Peter Pan
D 4 Seabird Yellow
D 12 Rainbow . Red
D 9 Olive Blossom Yellow
D 10 “Van Thorndyke 2.09 Red
B 5 Mischief 2.41 Yellow
B 1 Gypsy :

D 8 Rainbird 2.42 Red
D 2 Imp ‘

D 7 Sinbad 2.43 Yellow
I 8 Skippy

D 14 Hurricane 2.44 Red

1 7 Mohawk

I Ul Reen 2.45 Yellow
1 2 Wmvader 2.46 Red

.! Dauntless _ Wish de

I 122 Dawn 2.47 Yellow
K ‘Tornadoes 2.48 Red
C 1 Miss Behave
© 3 Madness
Cc 9 Folly 2.49 Yellow
1 1 Gnat
1 4 Coronetta
1 8 Clytie 2.51 Red
cn Magwin 2.52 Yellow
Cc 2 Seamp 2.53 Red
Cc 9% Rogue 7
Cc 10 Gannet 2.54 Yellow

“N.B.—The following date has
been fixed for the
Regattta: Saturday, April 5th.





‘Time

Heghrered US. Parent Ofteo

,tunate to have flying fish flying
Seventhfjaboard the



dental surgebn in
Enzland and his friend Frank whe
is. a newspaperman and corres-
pondent for*Reuter, decided to go
back to their home in Australia
after being vay for two years
in England

Frank had done
of oceam racing in small
and William quite a bit
Ing around the English coast. So
they dared to try the eaworthy
little Wanderer HI as their means
of transportation to Australia,

Shake-Down Cruise

working




deal
yachts
of cruis-

great



Wanderer II, 3.76 tons, was
taken on a shake-down cruise u
September last year from the
Isle of Wight to Gibraltar and
fatisfying the yachtsmen, they ,
sect about to refit her there fo
her cruise “down under.” Lock-
ers were crammed wit food,
water cans filled to capacity,—49
galions of water bottom cop-
per sheathed and 475 square feet

of sail clothed
voyage. incide
Al carries more
any yacht of its size

From Gibraltar they called at
Gpain betore going on to Las

the yacht for her

ilally,
tile thar

area

mas. Bad weather in the Eng-
Jish Channel greeted the yachts-]]
men at the outset of their voyage.
A gale lashed them about after

they had hove-to for a few hours,
The weather grew fair and
they were on their way again.



were only

She wa

Wanderer [Little Ship Club.
gone in for racing

spend 5
Pal-jing which time they will get stores
for

but a small boat,” they said. “We
wet through when we
got rainy squalls; and nobody got
seasick.’ -
Wanderer If was designed as
an ocean cruiser by Laurent
Giles, famous dinghy builders of
England who also_ designed
Sopranimo. Her overall length is
24 feet, she measures 21 feet on
her waterline, carries a beam
of seven feet and draws five feet
of water. Her timbers are af
pitch pine, her mast of spruce
ind she relies on sails alone.
Living Space

Living space aboard, is limited,
but midship the yachtsmen are
fairly comfortable. Two small
anvas bunks are neatly arrang-
ed on either side and nearby is
the pocket-size kitchen,

Wanderer II is 16 years old.
under the burgee of the
Royal Cruising Club but since
she was sold over to William,
she was under the burgee of the
She had never
William and Frank expect to
about two weeks here duf-

their Pacific crossing
ook around Barbados,

TABLE TENNIS
POSTPONED

and



But two more gales — one in\ pjay in the Ladies’ Inter-Club
the Bay of Biscay and the oth-|pypie Tennis Competition, which







er off French Morocco in the
Atlantic — were in store for
them. They had to
twice again, the last time
104 hours. And it was very
cold. They could only enjoy
their passage from Las Palmas
when the weather was kind
and the winds fair throughout.
They averaged 96 miles a day.

Reefed Down

Rigged as a gaff-cutter, Wan-
derer Il had to be reefed down
all the way from the Isle of Wight
to Las Palmas but she sailed un-
der full sail from Las Palmas to
Barbados. William and Frank
were kept busy until she reached
Las Palmas. They could how-
ever afford to turn in to bed from
10 o'clock .at night and wake at
7 o'clock in the morning during
their cross-Atlantic run because
Wanderer II is self steering with
twin-spinnakers attached to her
tiller. “We are so accustomed to
the motion of the ship’ that if
anything goes wrong, we are uj}
at an instant,” they said,

Frank learnt to navigate an
aircraft while he was in the
Royal Australian Airforce during
the last war and that has certain-
ly come in useful. Wanderer II is
equipped with a similar chart
table to those used in aircraft and
Frank is doing the navigating
from it. His sextant is a yachts-
man's. “It is a new type of navi-
gating introduced in the airforce
during the past few years,’
Frank explained, “and it has beer
found to be very applicable t
seiling ships.”

But the yachtsmen’s chief dif-
ficulties on their adventure are
cooking and sleeping. Wandere
If rolls badly, spilling the foo
from their plates, “Although thei:
Primus stove is set on gimbals,
they had quite a few spills, Ani
as for sleeping, they had to
themselves in their bunks,
nights Wanderer I
much that they could
and tried to
cigarette,

Three Meals A Day

However when they met fine

weather, they cooked three times

for

. a day and even baked in a pres-

sure cooker. All washing during
the voyage is done with sea
water. About 35 gallons of wate:
remained in the tanks when
they reached here. They carry
enough food and water to last
them for 100 days. The reason?
They are going to Sydney via
Cristobal and the Pacific where
they will have trouble in getting
stores.
William and Frank

were for-

yaoht during
morning they

|

the

had
Jimmy Hatlo '
|

night. Next





















B





THE TABLE-HOF
WHO MAKES A G4

OUT





|
as
A TT |
|

heave-to | roy

tie
Som:
rolled s }
not sleep t ‘aps some bad disease that will
find comfort in a ner or later cause your teeth to
|

FSF POSS PEO

was to have taken place to-night
has been postponed until tomor-
nieht at the Y.M.C.A.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.25 ins.

Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F

Lowest Temperature: 71 2 °F

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.959,

(3 p.m.) 29.890

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m.
Moon: New, March 25,

Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Tide: 5.00 a.m., 5.53 p.m.

Low Tide; 11.27 a.m, 11.24
p.m.



SOOO POPPIES FOOCRS
‘

A
*Grand Dance

will be given by

ALFRED GITTENS &
McDONALD HOLDER

TO-NIGHT

At QUBEN’S PARK HOUSE
Queen’s Park
ADMISSION 2/-
Music by Mr. MeLeslie’s Ork
Refreshments on Sale
Please invite your friends x

5

PPPOE

Messrs,

ECC OE PS SS FS SS

ts
x
Â¥

%,
SSCS SES OSSOOOSSR





Sore Mouth

Loose Bloody Teeth

leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and
! e Teeth mean that you may
Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or

'r out and may also cause Rheu-
\tism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
tops gum bleeding the first day,
is sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens th eth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosa ust make your mouth w
and save your teeth or money back
on return of empty package. Get
Amosan from your chemist today
The guarantee protects you





Unguentine

216. wk Oarorr,

Relieves pain.of






-



pe ef oy ewe
an ic.
Sauvee Pain—Gives

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



Year Book of the West
indies and Countries of the
Caribbean

Latest Edition $14.40
Locks for. the Press

» Locks for the Gate

’ Locks for the Drawer
% all at

~» JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
‘ and

, HARDWARE

POSES TO OSGSVOSSSS OS OOOO

7 Crown Closes Case

In Murd

From Page 5

father did’ not give orders about
the “working” of the land. I saw
to that.

Joseph Gibbs went into the land
the day after her father died, cut
a bunch of bananas, and said he
came to take .possession of the
land. ’

He cut the bananas and went
straight home. All of us went to
the father’s home on December
30th and talked together about
“qnaking peace” and “living good.”

I did not worry to put “Joe’*
Gibbs in Court when he cut the
first bunch of bananas because my
father had just died. :

My father in making the will
said that the debt of $170 should
be paid to Joe Gibbs before the
property was divided. I do not

“Joe” Gibbs worked outside of
Barbados. I don’t know whether
“Joe” sent money to my father.

When “Joe” cut the first bunch
of bananas on the 18/1/52, I sent
my husband for it. I would have
gone for it-myself if I could have
lifted it up. Headley was home
at my house when I sent him for
the bananas.

It is true I did not see where

he cut the second bunch of
bananas from.
When Joseph came and stood

up at my house door, Duncan took
up his stick from the corner and
said “Joe” man, you can’t come
in here. * My husband was a strong
man,

It was my intention that as fast
as “Joe” cut the bananas, I would
go and take them up. :

All of us went into the road in
peace. After Jane called “Joe” |
and told him to cut more bananas.
I told my husband to take it up. |
I would have given him the
bananas if Jane had not urged
“Joe” to cut more.

My husband did not take up the
bananas on his own. I told him
to take them up. I walked in
front of my husband when we
were going from the house to the
road.



At The Door Step

When Ioe was at the door step, |
he did no. quarrel when my hus-
band barred him from entering.
Joe did not put down the stick)
after he took it up from the
corner.

“Joe” ‘got to the spot at which
the bananas were first. The bas-
ket was empty. Joe was not
backing me when he took up the
bananas. He turned around and |
faced me and my husband when ,
ae took up the bananas. I don't;
know why he turned to face me}
whey he took up the bananas, All
three of us went to the bananas
together. I was a little way off. |

'y husband put his stick under |
his left arm when he went to take
up the bananas.

My husband did not pass any
blow with the stick. The stick
dropped from her husband after
“Joe” had stuck >

Bananas Drop

The bananas dropped from the
two men when they had raised it |
only some distance off the ground. |
She could not say who let go of |
the bananas first. |

I told “Sonny” to take ur the
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When the bananas dropped, |
“Joe” grabbed “Sonny” (the de-|
ceased) in a “neck tie”, and |



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No time elapsed between “Joe’s”
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PAGE 1

I'.i.l Hll'lt BARBADQS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH MB] lftKTOOS Friday. March 28, 1*52 Mr. 111 %  11 %  s Budget Chinas Reds Step Up Theii \i MIN< s IIO|H s-Aiitl Doubts Propaganda In Hong Kong 4 11 HOXOf IN RECKXT yan the whole burden of • %  has been the cry that progreas is restricted by the reactionary or die-hard and the word conservative, a good word which lias always been used to denote U nt human custom of preserving it\ what its cwn and earlier ginhave built up. has been twisted to mean something opposed to progress. Ill fact the cloak of progress can very often hide the identity of the truly restrictive perron whose actions arc motivated by the sole idea of keeping some things or under control if only because his livelihood or influence is threatened when controls are removed. The merits or demerits of controls are therefore not examined because the self-styled pros have deemed them to be necesNo consideration is paid to logic or reason and if a picture is built up to reveal the hollowness of the foundations on which the %  dlflH of controls has been erected it is tatd out of court by the empty-minded and not admitted by whatever arbiter of public policy happens to hold the reins of To accept this position of negation as inevitable would be to bow our heads under a yoke from which we must struggle to be free if ever we are to escape from the shackles of those whose claim to leadership depends on the abuse of others as reactionary or opposed to the will of the people. If this abuse were justified, it would be a simple thing for the people abused to shift their allegiance from the discredited and to hitch their wagon to the rising new party of progress in the hope that their .services will bring a reward and a forgetfulncss In time. The rights of the common man have often been similarly betrayed in many countries and at many periods of change. But in countries where the lamp of true freedom and the torch of justice, honesty and common sense have been held aloft there has often been final victory lor those who seemed to be more concerned with ultimate values and the triumph of honesty and common sense than with their own schemes of personal aggrandisement. Dislike of unpopularity and dislike 01 swimming against the tide are despicable characteristics, and bring no honour to those whose conduct is guided by such preoccupations. What is wanted now and at all times, here and in every country, is disinterested endeavour to do what is best in the interests not of a majority or minority but of all. If this philo'ophy of life is applied, as indeed it should be, to the current practice in Barbados of the government's attempt to control the island's internal and external trade, the only question which should be asked is cui bono? If it can be proved that controls and their accompaniment subsidies serve the real interests of the people they should be kept in force. If it can be proved that they do not serve'the purpose for which they were intended they should be removed. BUI control! must not be practised for controls' sake nor because dogmatic assertions have been made that without controls and subsidies the cost of living would rise and the poor would suffer while the rich would still be able to prosper. It has been proved beyond all possible doubt during the past ten days that a control price is incapable of getting more than between one cent and three cents apiece for flying fish on rughls of glut, while everyknows of Us failure to keep the price of flying fish down to the control price at periods of shortage. Controls have diverted deep sea fish from Barbados to Martinique and Trinidad. Controls have made it impossible for livestock owners to operate at a profit even though they are permitted to sell meat at the same price as imported meat. Controls have seriously impeded and may eventually ruin the six agricultural stations which were founded with the excellent intention of encouraging mixed farming in Barbados. Controls have so far discouraged local market gardeners that carrots and tomaM can be imported from other islands and are sold here at the same price as the local product. All efforts to grow more food and to increase livestock and fish production are p led by controls because controls are mainly responsible for the lack of any efficient distributive agency which is prerequisite to the success of peasant co-operatives or market gardening. And while controls failed subsidisation does not serve the purpose for which it was intended. The only motive for subsidisation in any country is to keep down the price of essential foods so that wage increases become • unnecessary. This is not happening here. Yet subsidisation is continued while wage increases occur with regular frequency If the intention of the government were to ruin the local economy of the island (and this suggestion cannot seriously be contemplated) controls and subsidies seem to be serving this intention But this is the reverse of the position and the government only continues controls because it genuinely considers them to be necessary'Others do not. And the onus of proving that controls do not adversely affect local food production rests with the government. LONDON. M.irch IH — „ Any Ctwurellur who *ets out to att* lion,.Iff III.X.I.I plot the course of tfte naUi economy for more than a ; ahead must bate hit decisions on civil snetary policy has the desired. efteet. it thould therefore reduce home investment by the required the Government'! own amount and lead to substantial expenditure in term* of reduction! in the stocks built up certnln more or les* arbitrary resource*, and a £100 million cut by Industrial users last year. assumptions. To say. therefore, In home Investment. The rise in Bank rate has been that Mr Butler's Budget Is a budMr Butlcr lhen W( n „ to attacked by the Opposition as a ff* i^J 1 !?!. 1 Impl> to eomn P n •*•: ft* BB| major assumption measure likel to lead SB denatfie fact that no man can predict _. % .,.* .,..,..,„ ttt L,u nm ,„ %-.. ton and widespread ~" c.^PU^would^renS.n !" nt. CrUicu level. He HONG KONG. March, THE Chinese Communist attitude towards Hong Kong has taken a new turn since the beginning of this year. Before, the Reds had. outwardly at least nemptoykept scrupulously clear of entanglement — Jj; Hong Kong's affairs. -.28 e Mtt H 2 ZXl^i^X ZSr&SZSXX atte! Apart from occasion,, complaints in the.r and figures, those risks are good %£\^SS a w deli £2£ obviou. factor n favour of the 1 In recent weeks, however, they have been or bad. Mr BuUar-a Budsfft eonth n liut „.'„. ^ w and lhml use of Bank rate ai;a disinflationaRiulin g openly by keeping up a ceaseless tains a mixture of both, w.wi.i m.-an ahmal another £4fKI %  %  > weapon is that, unlike other K e. p j j T? ... The greatest task confronting m\?\\ on w the bVll torthc same B<<<**ry measures, it can bo propaganda campaign of abuse against the !?.-!£ •"*"" of i"ods sod atrvk !" modified > ny time during the po^ny They have aIso attempted to stir up aside enough of the nation resources to enable Britain to pay The her way In the world and. at the Jajctod fame lime. <-arry out her heavy defence commitments. lM*t year. Britain had a deficit In Its balance of payments of no less than CMS million. The deficit in the second half of ihe year was running at an annual rate of nearly 1800 million. Moreover. the loss of gold and dollars continued at an alarming rate during %  he fkrrt two months of ihis year The reserve* fell by 2811 million dollars in January and 266 million. dollars in February. Chancellor therefore rethe argument .hat should make a further substantial Another of Mr Butler's assumptions—that production will increase this year by £2M million —would be less easy to understand if he had not given workers the incentive to make the greater effort needed to achieve this aim. The Opposition naturally had a lot to say about the effoct of higher prices, arising out of the cut in the food subsidies, on the poorer families who will aet diets. But it has been pol In order to close the gap In ^gT* % %  out thtt Uie incom l reliefs— Britain's baiancv ol payments, at ^Mf Jj^^^k* i which fcdmittcdly benefit the betleasl a further 1*00 million LaaHlaaaaiaaBBBBBBBaaL ?' r "" ff T"' V S7 i!XLS5i I* found from UK '1 \ ^k A lower-.naid *"*"-*'* iffSfc resources and applied l the J g^^^*^^H^U not V *. * rl £ '. *** US L ,.' extemal porttlon. llere Mr But* %  ^M ^M already done but as an ineent ve lcr made the first of his ma|or BsaV JSal ^ataSsalSalaaal for cull harder work in IJ as.un.pnons. lie assumed that future The immediate eftect of between 1200 million and £2S0 Mr BDIUB. **" %  %  • *'" ** T "V*J^ million would lie forthcoming as !" families worse off. en a result of an increase in our eut In home consumption by after account has been taken of Invisible earningand an increasing the Budget surplus He the increases in social benefits improvement in our terms of believed that if he left the surHowever by working longe. trade/ P'"* broadly where it was. "the hours a man will he able to gain From the remaining C3SO-E40O money people will haw to spend a larger net reward mfUIOfl in.Ch.mcillor deducted in the coming year will. . only could lun about £150 million for the reducbe Just about enough lo pay for ous systa tion In imports — assuming that the .goods that are likely to be ...-.„-„*. however for the expected expansion in ihe tain safeguards. His assumption the additional burden of than he • done under the prevli of taxation. Lonsumer*. and therefore tend to S^s ilrs'&asKi a "" m a r*-.r g^S^S?5 SdidThe increase,! coal of the This increase was immediately g^g?J5ff-*?gJBSBg 11ST: 1952—53 defence programme, and reflected in tlM arrived at the final figure of £400 Slock Exehangi i hit increase in ages, and thereif demand disorder. And now, it is undeniable that the Chinese Reds are trying to make things more difficult for the British administration than hitherto. Tins undisguised agitation began early in January this'year following the deportation of seven Communist propagandists. They consisted of three film stars, an editor and playwright, two women Left-wing trade union leaders, and a man wh- called himself chauman of a sq been destroyed by fire. The Hong Kong government had deported them because of their subversive political activities. Their deportation was followed by violent attacks in the mainland Communist press and radio against the Government for what Red propaganda called 'oppression.' These attacks were taken up by two Hong Kong Left wing Chinese newspapers. At the same time Communist propagandists, both within the colony and outside sought to fan up a minor labour dispute. Further, the Reds sought to exploit the situation arising from unemployment caused by the allied embargo on strategic materials Then, when they found their agitation among the labour ranks failing, the Communists turned their attention to the thousands of squatters rendered homeless when a fire destroyed their camp. Despite the aid which had been given lo U> prices. The a " %  %  •!• '"_*" %  SSS-^BL" -' SfSSSS &"Sffii JTS S^tS SSS^. !" ,„. &. both by the H„n K Kon K GovernBank r* was tollnwed by a Thwe are ihe moat otivloua ment en j by charitable organisations and vjioultl tie con-1 aaaaaaaaaaaBaaal the banks' Interest risks. are but they atMl Hank rate So far. the most risky of Mr. sharp rUe ipttons was rate for h thai inaeaaid Invisible eamlnirs ulao In the rate of interest eharjed the positive Improvements which and n Impmvement In Britain's bv bulldlnj societies for loans on • Btidjet baj b.„uht about. term, of trade would help to elow mort.aje. The chief of the.e Is the return the pavments lap bv fSSO million. The. effect on industry of this to a more flexible system of His other more or less riskv seneral rise in uhe Interest rates monetary control—with its powerasaumptlona were that the £400 will be to Increase the coat of ful Influence, on.overseas opinion million of additional claims on borrowinK for such purposes as —nnd the substitution of inccnBritatn's resources would be met Investment In new plant and live for austerity with Its salutary bv an expansion of home producmachinery and the carrying of effect on public morale For these lion by am million (the same lane stocks of raw materials If reasons, a*. Butler s Budjet has as In 19511. a reduction of E50 this further resort to orthodox been deservedly well received. What I'd Do To Stalin Hv The lank l.nMii.l SOCIALIST Rebel "Nye" Bevan and Tory General Sir Glffard "Q" Martel should have an (.til. i.ilk toKtthcr. Not about the past Because the OfJMfal* blame* the Socialist Party—especially lbs "I'lnlnttcred intelligentsia"— /or most of our political follies alnct the war. like yielding alternately to the pressure of the .Russians and the Americans. Nut about the future. Because the moment we are strong enough the General wants ;u counter the Russian cold Ml by a Western much-warmer war. He advises planUng lo. .,1 Resistance" leaders insidethe Soviet Union and ,ta damflsetsd satellite State*, aho^-erlng down airborne propaganda. If thU does not %  top Ihe Russian* from stirring up trouble abroid—by having to deal with to much trouble themselves at home—General "Q" proposes that m erect GUI DM "Velvet Curtain" around the Soviet lar"d bloc, by which he means w should make a vea-blockade. He %  tyi ". %  should also tel) Stalin: Gat our of Europe. Steamroller? So far. "Nyc" ..nd "Q" are not liable to have much in agreement, cither past or future. But if they stick to the present, this unlikely pair may find thcm-sclves sharing a lot of common ground in the great political argument of the hour: 'How strong li the Soviet Union?" For soldier agrees with politician lhat the Russian ste imrollcr I less powerful than it looks. Tiie General (one of the pioneers of British tanks) spent u year in Russia durlnn the OfCBASal invasion, es head of the British Military Mission. The Germans were able to tulflght the Russians in tank w .il.tri because the half-million lorries which American l-eascInd gave the Hussions were nnr-ly USSd increase the maximum "f their deposits from $1,440 to $2,400 What this dccisi.'ii m* dapotittors, but espeelBll Family Planning To The Editor, the Adeocaic— fc SIR.—In the Sunday Adrocoi.regular money KlfU i.en by of ^ Q Mrd ,,„, you „ grateful children so few of whom |etter (rom Mlgs C ecil are to be found today. headed 'Family Planning-. Let This brings me H the question „ ]>c xhogM that there Is nothing the Rale of Interest. <3 pat more te ^ Mid tn tn „ m> tter, Jd by the Government Bank T would like to draw the atteniithorilies on Deposits. ti on of your raaders to some -, .„„ ,, w-. i, !" .-it woidi spoken by the Bishop For M-me time ii has beat. '<" Br rot £a ^ hll ,-^e,,, Charge -* In point of tact. Half-""" to .ill hoped thnt the annual to the interest on deposits In thU B-ink horny-handed sons of toil should be raised from 31 to at whose hard-earned deposits art) Una* % %  And you. Mr Editor, left in the safe custody of the and no doubt manv (1 f vmir Bunk Authorities is best known to reader* will recnll a letter wrilthesp depositors themselves ten In iheso columns a few years ago by some correspondent obvitt is welt known that one of ouslv in the know, giving a clear the chief object* and iiims of lbs tlnunnjl stitemcnt of the Government Savings Hanks as an Account ii 'his Bank nnd. sugInsUlution Is lo encourage thrift gr-sting why the Bank Authorities among the massas. The wealthsrould easily raise the imnual Rat* ."nd the well-ns-iio hive numennis of Interest on Vteposlts u> 4% and sources to tap and myriad ChanAh wlthoul doing violence to its nels through which to work In funds. His mathematics. I order to provide against i.iim remember, were dear, and the days But the sorry spectacle of fWce of hi* argument convineihe age.1 labouring and middlein* class man with the shows of ng-' If tuch was urged a few year* upon him. with muscles and ago. It should be urged with .•.mews worn out, and yet without tret i b neater force today. adequate wherewtfchal *van to proAnd, it is to be hoped that the vide proper sustenance, is one that Bunk Authorities will at an early has too often caused me a shudder date give thin matter the consldand moved mo to unrestrained ei.i-i-m which it rm feajan with the purc'ia^ng power of M -%  fc ... „ money so frightfully nnrunk Many a ***!<• ""''>' %  "" ' todnv followtnfl upon the pheo,l w.th a very modest menme „,„„,.„.,! M „. J thp 0 ,, nt \ tv but frightful fin metal family obllt h 4 |(Hl M f % ,„, ,„„,, gal oiirund commitment.-, to meet „. mi||| ni| „. (1 m „ /. lize 29 Tin Anchor Milk Powder — 2i size $3.24 per tin Anchor Milk Powder — I lb. size .SO per tin Anchor Skimmed HUlc — .40 per lb. JVST ARRIVED Butter Concentrate .82 per lb. Thick Salt Pish .37 per )l> Cheddar Cheese .74 per lb. Kraft Cheese .SI pkgc Sardine* 19 tin J. N. GODDARD & SONS



PAGE 1

f PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY' MARCH. t. IMS CLASSIFIED ADS. PI Id H SAIK-S icirmoNc isoa IN MEMORIAM ^o live in the heart, of. t*oee „* thBin **J * March. >*** A dear fas* b m-teng A dew (v 1 1 You'll Li%" lurr-' 1 ' B5*L =; ;;•"".£?*£.*? SSST U'I.H ; >-4 A.tU* nrr brStoaw*' IMIISOWI I OK UU AUTOMOT1VK AUT VAJS—Oss m tt r A I'l'. older I1B •ran at Co.. IU CAR HiUmM as ae-a %  "•** tJSSa PheWS SB* la-en l-W .-AH awn Shift nwdeb rea Apply lorn pi CAJ. tatt Mam. indlttea Oeod tyre.. I KAIIIM lriee 11.SBU v'AlTHIAU. VSBLOX —i jurt comply.'' VAUXHA1J. WYVEW* JTQO mile* OtfBBI 1" v.rrhd A pi I *>.* •MB Ju*t under vlng laland — n. N -.tier* ELECTRICAL raxcTRic FAN* warned as*lntt HruoMMy ???**i_ n *on or Ti*M*jna *itartrtcal appiinr-e* ,v ae I *• hot C-. Ltd Dial tUB iriM m da*. "^^(^Thv^r T -M ? s h fiei2*~ REAL ESTATE %  a Amelia. MtdUV *H*" U..I •U *.w~. -* e"**' TWO HOMS •• . i" ~"SJS, M2IU. tnri -"""""^R^T^ I.UI 1 AUCTION DODGE PICK UP VAN uWl4.nl W. %  >* m.lliJCW. ..Mri. (of Ml. W tl 1 W *n rrtZ; anh March. M>M J ** m M Bladon • C>. *^<^ >a 4n UNDER THE IVORY JAMMER LIVESTOCK LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICF W tBA*rr* BMWVJL, MISCELLANEOUS ._ i Mpl.rat.oii <•! Ivy lo*C Michael .. %  U Uibwurt Forde. '• %  r •did *h nulled (hop *ili *. The* !" .. th^ purrhMrr •>. I of lt. Tntl ipn-t n* %  hofdd l"l at Arc'i Hall. aald LHwnM to •MUCKSA fluantlU ot toad *>"*brWka AppJy^ Thr W*-l ,1 '.hinftcd .l">l alta**-* la> itnatrd al At*h Mall. d to ii*r 't at nch %  -• boatdnl r*dido %  Thoma* and ta DOT n dtdtrtbMl prml DalI thrt >U dav c M1IJ.K-ENT kb.ch. tB POHDC Applk-iml %  n. DM I To C H aHIFF'/ni AK polk- M*i>tral N H.—ThW applH-alion -... %  •IdtiVd at IJn.rn rouft t I on WrdnaMa.. tlh dar cf Apn at II otltHX n m at PoUcw Dittnn -D" o f awirrrni Afl I""' Macuir Dill -D"—4H. 1 TAKE NOTICE MENTASOL caXAM FIAIWWA. t Trou-" " Mr-** !" ** ^VBTU pfi J-. a d At Than^ *vm^ ( ^ riANNUJrrTr Ui punpoaa* •* %  ii i Thanl-a. SUM ARABIC B-naln. B-t pound,x, _" 0, J* !" > rlv a amall quantity I-<1Dta J !" "itUIN 1WIKO Wll *P'I". Cahlon COTb. ^WB Cooat C* ui < r.manad • b dr c*w w Pr April D-Arcy A Scolt Dial M> FVRNaUKD FLAT W Sirrar and Una*. Good %  aa-aainv Tar lurthar particular* Appar lo A:i LaOOay No • Coral aand*. Woithma T Uppac Bay Mrrt*. on-Mr-. •nlorUbl* twa •ti>i<-% imdrmr tnodarn ronvatiWiic*^ FunnahnJ rurntahrd ApplT on prrmlMa. MODERN rtlHNu.HEI> FLATS Fowl Acts. SI la-rwvtr Oap From April Ut Apply Mr* L Haaaall Pr->r •003 OTl U 3n ro LET—Funilihtd HIT*" Badrou'i ru*o DovvUI*>" Nelaon Road. Nivi 11ton* May Auiuit Ring >Mi a i is-an UAMIII tuticft u n i w *. M. Indid %  ii if the VeHry lystctn wtniad to *M Itiat It had nul OUt uOTfuBPtai* ThPTtwere aome part' of ihp Vsartrj Hill which nevded '.o bp iimuiKl Thf work which by thf Vrwtrri* la,t SfO >-••?*— allhourh a loruj. tint*? — wm "till rrrh in notltai The Vtrttrlei j-crtnrmint imul work %  f the pariah would benefit much more than they did under the present ytrm .it left to be peen, because a tot would depend <>n thoar who were gotnt to administer the funds and lie iMimcular psrtaiwi. or not the people who did the work now were exchanged for someone else, he felt that Ihe-v in the Vestries, had done and especially In Christ Church, and were doing very good work and it wu for someone else to aay iiad come for a change. The report WM then adopted. Ths Vestry agreed to the annual grunt of $480.00 for Sanitation %  nd Repairs at the Elementary In thr psnsh. try jlao passed a Besol to .btuln a loan not exceeding $7*00.00 from the Canadian Hank of Commerce to run the u..rish until taxea were colatettd. and nominated Mr. C. S MacM, r C Goddard^Mr gad the Churchwarden to sign the promiasory not* SHIPPING NOTICES PI ui ii mmaoM NOTICE ,, oiJvnu'CUtniAC cr.i. to. orompi d-lLV.r %  • "> (n)W d W. rti.H &• P.""d lo sss %£55z IIIXP Bl'TT-Mt-l ..hW %  Apply 1 rpaj l> at Kani Lhureh M 1 %  s-an. 11UUJ>0EVC ANO El DOZWt aimlacui W COUlTTlaTT OAJtAOB **%,, • illi all lyp** U I Txial PasPRODEVT IJMITTJl. a Col pany incorporated under IK* Enajli Conipamaa Act, "V-ml^do or tn'rini addreaa Is nnirt* HouOT. aT-rt*rst l-lara, London. F. t' •. EnaUnd. Ram %  i uppurd lor id.r*l*UsUali al a l.ad* n.ark In fart "AOf Hltld tn r**OTCI . 'It r^nurtu*. and ItTST RECEaVKD Valor Stcwa parti inriiafllal Chlmwya, Spraader*. Qna Top Malaa. Wltka. and Ovens Al-> Prrtautr glovr part* &^ulr AutoTI'rCofussiiy. Trafalgar •pry ***** Till StiMDO. AQtATU ! %  NOTICE TO MFMMBa ,.OTOTaa.OT -llh lUJa Iha CTub -III %  load*! to Mrnvbcrs on SaTu*d.i. MAT Mh, from T SO to t 45 i -III V .vlstri %  ad < dan of Maicli. lM. PSUM SMBSP parsar, .lian m iha maanlin^ giea I ootiM in duiuccta to ma at m>arF., o* apJosrllo-i of auch rai'.slratlo* Tha tiada n^rk can b*> wan or. abplwsuon at nay tmru Hlh .Uv of Mairh. ItW • SB ClirAV tKAC-KFII-N s..u.i Hi* nil* Tha Baal -p-r large Tin Oet triem at IIBtXTE WXATlirRllEAD I.id •".ttiadl K*o4jr: BtnucTNa XLI-CTTIOIA'X JRIQ: Small model tr. perfact ordec rr*L Mxllol. St Margaret* %  .lahn %  aa—* UMCAN PKAS—I. N. Oaddard A Som .Id Allne. Arthur A Co Lid an ^Donald Saa, have JJ*I lacalvto c.i M of thU popular brand of En* IW [alrhn r ol the Co. M'lNIt" •Wtrr^ary riwai NOTICF. MAN -With a car. %  eomm rornmiaalon. Advneale Co. Ltd | i %  gi MAIL NOTICES MAIL.H fas %  .nd Si Km* i> ih M.HUIKK -il br tloaed at ina t t Om. r .1 muter — .1 at 3 p m on II '.-red Mail •! II Mad i--' •ii ie a-TOBE KCCli:iI I trnowledge ft Drugs Our riookKeai>er Appt' In own hand *>rttlng lth referenee to Boa c o Advocata 1 Dept Tl lll-S. TAIIRS-Journeymrn Tailors. iJarliat Handii only thoee with axperlenca need *Ppl PCS MATFBI co. Ltd m M >* I a MISCELLANEOUS gUAUTaXD UfUTIBfl CIIEMK AT MiiNEEh B .i aw*iln-illon. BKpr>t llant ManaaSMnent an* •ton— Developanent and Kaaaairh ,. %  •mi 'U-ii DANCE LADIF.S ft fiENTS WATER POLO MATCHES BY FLOClULltJllT it T.r. B.\RBADOS AQUATIC CLUB (Local i Vbltinx Members Only* SATllHiAY. M,.rch 2th, SI 1.20 p.m. Admlaalan (Dance A. Water Polo—$1.00 UtmlBdon for Water Polo only—2/(Oames will be played -9.30 } %  in.) Admission after Water Polo foi Dnncr only ND STRAW MA ._ d—lgn* Beaili*' Aeallable al Thani Broa fHINTS Amertciuy PrlnU. Loverr Big Houae CoaU or Bad Bfceet. at TTr a )d Than).. ta 1 H-t I r. SHOE?*Lad-ra While !it Fattrr. yau go to * froa Dial SaH BV-t fOgU' Arrived yasierday 0 dinarnl klnda Ft*)**. V-gatable (lardan Sards. %  olinsf Itret. Carrot. Laltuce. Turnip "Jan etc al.o 3d hind* Flower Garden arda. glnnla. ihlo. Palunla. Candy v.rt etc .1 nitUl-T WIATHCRIIfcAD M .ii. • Thr A |tsrl be aasctad .llulated dub. by the ClenerW U J^J UMVKRSITY ( 'H I M.I 111 THE tVKHT INDIES LECTl RtU IN MEDICINE APPIOCATION* era lnvtte.1 for Uve „( ltur*r I" Mrdlclra Tha duties w|l| inrlude ellnlral woifc n the UnltMtKr Collage Hospital and in.uueUan rj| %  i.tdenl* worlttng for the .kegceo* ot o. I Tslar, arwlla Ir*. rlrins b' .iirBiiii lo £1.000. Point nf eatsr* in tsss ^ao> -ocording to gualiH.aiiw. and Child allowanca and temporary coat ot living illowance I* paid !.iorrnn.mailoa i* under FSBIJ srrangaroent. t'nhnniihrd ... _..liable ..t ., rrotiil ..' *-. of h...r .. .1 .1 n nt will be .KperUKl lo lake UP UM il*>t i .. .uing lull parllcuUnof qunllfValioo* an .i| Hirer i.-fnie*. >hnutd be nrreivad ba(M Aprd Z)th. IPU by tha aacreUry, r>e>tale CMnsiltaa .... Higher EduceUor. IB BI4 Colonie*. Senate Houaa. Vntverslt of LOfMkin. W C I fiom whom lurthe I*i1-..lai* ma* be '.blamed u i ui ADVERTISE AW THE for Domlnir;. .nrt St Lueta lAlDAUIIA .ill be .laaed it (>ftVe .*a under-IBM on tha gtn 'i>trrrd Mall al I 10 a.m OrdinaryMall at a in on the SJth March ltrH MAIIJl lor Brii..h fluiar... by the Sch. i II-'KIVN n it will b* eloaad at tbe (ienrral Poat otnea a* under Parrel and Re*p*lerad Malta at 1 p m •an MSB Vth March Ordinary Mall at I he Snn March 1PM ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SAItJNi. SOM II Hi> \l %  HECUBA on h April law BOSKOOP on llth April fSB I BOH A IRK on IPth April, lafla iorm*arTos ASIU April raS> .AHINC TO TBiNIDAD. rAIAStllSO AMD BBITPSB ••> IAN A % S COTTICA on llh April ISU \: s BQWABi g % %  • % %  %  ABUNO TO laiMli CVBACAO M 3 HECVBA XI*t April "• 5 % B04KOOP rh AprU IBM Tba M V DAIITWOOO eriH r.apt €^mw^ and Pam gill fat I LAMIA. Si Vineent Oraaada M B WUJX ANB Ta, M V LiliBlBBBll Will accept Cargo and Paaaangera for Doaainira. AnOgua. MantatrtM. rsa-rla and St Kitta SolSMaj Satueday *Stf> mat The M V MONEBLA wul < mm -"1 i Antigua. at Kilt* April ItSff B W | SCHOONER A sacK. IATIOM i DSC. I romignre Tele No. M Canadian National Steamships CANADIAN CRL'ISEK ADY RODNaTT ADY NE>*N „ CANADIAN CTflTJWH CANADIAN CONBTRl |. ADY RODNEY i ANADIAN CltALLEN I ADY NELSON CANADIAN cmi'F't ANADIAN CONSTRV IJOJY RODNEY I' Mar U Api 3 Apr IT Apr. 11 Apr, ST Apt.. as Mar DJ Apr B> A:-. CTOR 6MM CTOat > Apr • May 11 May 30 Me t Jurr t9 June M June 11 July 3 (.• ii May SS •.' 3 Jon* 11 Jun. 1 July 1* Juli M May 14 JtSRg if July 11 May SI May S June ll Jane SS Jus* S Juky i> July St Inly U vS> Ma. g J 11 JUI.e *% Jun* I July II Jul. •i July MUBTBBOfND Arrlvaa Baa. SaiM ArM... Ante** H Jaha Arm-. BUUI.i At*T<*. M.alr-.l U Mar. M Mar. g Apr Apr 1 Apr | -nN cRtmrri 1 ADY RODNEY l ADY NELSON I'DN CRVJ1SXB 4 Apr M Apr 10 Mia M May 1 Apt SS Apr 11 "•• m May • Me^ Xt May 9 Junr t Ai.. • May S3 Ma i S Jun.' W M ST v 11 Jvii.CANADIAN SI June 11 June IS J..-. PS June, M aw* l July CANADIAN i llAlJiNOER .. •ADY NELSON .. DM CRUISE* X3 Juno July H July %  June g July is Jul-. IS July • July %  Juit; %  -*Ulvf II July %  Ju) 1 A \NADtAN (•ONBTBtnrTTJIt i* July 1 Aug. M Ms • Aug it Aug • Aug. a CS A as A ADVOCATE H UK \ A. Mini \m liunn-r & RMI Estate Agent nf Middle Street has on his list some of the beat properties In thg island offering for sale. The list which la too extensive u> Advertise Includes the best house at Hastings on the Sea with front, back and sK-te lounges, spacious drawing and dining rooms. (* i four large A two small bedrooms, three baths one with mb. .il*o hot and cold water, garage, servants' room. and nicely laid out flower garden. Suitable as a guest house ii note! Also the most modern house at Maxwell Coast with 4 pT) Urge b*druarns three having tiled baths Why not dial %  i make an appointment to overlook the list or for an inspection. No obligations attached. For real estate of any description see D'Arcy A. Scott. Poe further particulars, aoorf ta>GARDINER AUSTIN & COLTD.—Ag**t*. TAKE NOTICE \\\ KiAUIX A lir*h .hlpnuint Of '•Ik-iou* cereal which K mor* lhan a ..aahfaat food, had |ual arrrve.1 and la tillable ol nil popular srocer* l-il' nchagaa Bar inuiU 30c John T Hutaun ltd Ag.-m 11 J 2i> nia.*KKH JACKETS h. Aa>d st ** Opsjts git OI.M.. at Thani [H..I MOB SB 3 M—t I a AMITT fHtAIIKSKIN U hare again. In q.utlitin*. SI 41 up Very beauUful hop al Thani Bros. SS 3 S3 -t LOST A I Ol Ml LOST & iixei niimg* iand valves, and al pipe and metal AWF-ES-RTAKr. fMNlK In Jam. Tarl Hub Rare, to take place April 1Mb 1WI. Sari— O F SUJO81411 B3I4S -HIW TJMJTBSXJ. matB31SS. Finder plM -nan, to Advocate Advertning D.-p.|t iwil. Reward offered. ft 1 SS—an That AMTOIICAN RAIIAT<>H .STANPAtU) RAN7TAHY CtHPOHATIN i CorperBUon orannad under the law* f the SUla of Dataware. Untte^ MBMt ,* Amartra. wto trade or bu.U.^a* iddrcM Is 100 th SUeet. PtttMnugh 11. Iwpna>lvanla. UA. ha. applied for ,1 .,„ of a trade mark in Part of Regular In reapect of all klnda ..I plumbing aupplles and wlprAenT and anltarv Inilaliationa and appUaneas. inludlug bath tuba, drinking fountains. .jr.binatl.in lavatory "* pop-up drain valve, minng ipnuta. and me Ml". Siting*, bath* ol „~,m equlpma.it ol -11 klnda. balhUO... bldeU, cabtnaHa of all kind^ tt '^.throorn and shower type*, drinking fou (i tains, (sue eta, At ting* and part* iferrof for u**> with Ihe gooda In Uu. Ii*l. flu.h tanks for wator rloaal. Bjvd III jails. Hospital table*, hydrants, hvdm Ihxapeutlc equlprnant. laundry traps. kvatortaa, atnks of aH kinds, sfrawaa*. %  top* for bathtubs and ainka. urinal.. tntb* cloaeta. parts thereof and K*H UXfrefor. Unhs. tool*, and .ppjrat.i SOI lu.ktng the Hated gooda. and wlU b* .ii |p rpglBter Ihe aim after onr> sh from tha SSIh day of March. 1BU inlfaa aotne perwxi shall In the nvraif dupllcalr U) nta at n* oftVe of oppoaillon ion Tha trade mark .(.plication al my offke. paied lhi llth day of March, isal K WILUAMS. Rac.ttrar of Tl*.!Mark C'G^fi^SATlANTIQUE MIIIIKIr 9o.lh.DU.ton to OmmJ-tow^BJaSHM B^rbulo.. Trinidad. La Qualm, CT raa a luuW Fr. Ho.lh.iwto. SEt&Bt'm* •COLOMBIE" 18lh March. 1952 U* BUrch. 1*52 •DE GHASSE2.th April. 1*93 * "W. { %  COLOMBIE' 81h May. I9SJ .... OB May. 1*81 •Not calling al Guadeloupe •Ml IN.. FROM BAEBADO* TO EUROPE l ...... BarbadM. Arrive MtkaUW %  •COLOMBIE" .. llth April. 1JS2 'SS.'X* SS -DE GBASSE... 19lh May, 952 29th May, 52 -COLOMBIE" I June. l2 ,Slh June RW 'Sailing direct to Southampton IO HAYS t AIIIIUM A\ CRUISE From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD Venezuela-Curacao i oloimbia A Jamaica H> l.e HXII1Y LI.VEKS COLOMBIE aV E CJRASSE FOR INFORMATION K. M. JtlOB A C*. LTD^Agemla. F1IUNE Ml* ^**_*.w WM'WS'W"'*'' miiyiMi •MILK STOV3TMANNING & CO., LTD. IF YOl' WAM9 A houM paint, a rooting paint, a wall paint, a boat paint, a dull paint a bright paint, a cheap paint, an expenaree paint. A CENTRAa. KMPOBIUM (Oaraer Broad a Todae SlreeUI PRICES — YOU WILL BE QLAD TO PAY SEnVICE— T HAT IS SURE TO PLEAS£ % PRINTS & HAIRC0RDS Per Yard "ill. 7. • | ^^ WHITE CALICO yd l.te FUGI Pink, blue, gold, yd .. I r /^ | •LINEN FOR UNIFORMS yd. 7*Je A le' (LADIES' COTTON VESTS two for only S l.OO [JBBSEY NIGHTIES 2 lor .S.-IO RAYON PANTIES o<^ l<" 1.44 ^LADIES' INTERLOCK PANTIES I rom 60 and up ."NYLON HOSIERY pair only $1.20 TOWELS each now 31c A 6r _4:i CHILOREN S VE3TS PANTIES, 3 for $1.20 BORDERED Good Quality SPUNS now 91.08 CREPES. TAFFETAS, SILKS, large variety, now S l.OO SPUNS. white, blue, pink, biege, brown, now only HO. ART SILK, white, pink, blue, now only 72c SHANTUNG in 3 shades, now only S I. 12 SPECIAL NYLON GOLD BLENDED CRESS MATERIALS 6 shades 44 now S2.fi 1 Also on show NEW MULTICOLOURED SHOES, HATS. BAGS. THE FOR GENTLEMEN SILK SPORT SHIRTS 5 shades 2 for. S4.50) POLO SHIRTS from 84c. to $1.44 NEW NYLON BLEND SPORT 8HIRTS$4.95j THOUSAND OF OTHER SHIRT8 at lowest prices RIBBED VESTS, imagine! 3 for only Sl.OO ;'-0CKS at killer values! now 2 for only. $1.00 SPECIAL MEN'S 2 tone SHOES pair $0.2.1 1 KHAKI SHIRTS each now only $3.25 KHAKI per yard only 00e *. $1.03*j HAIU.MV IIOISI DIAL 2702 S. ALTMAN Proprietor CH'T nnPN-C. TMTTRI flPK PANTTFS _^leSr 130 SWAN STREET rpWiy^^ ^^^ ^^S^St^^r^l^^f^^l^rr^^^^^^^l^f^g^P^^I



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fRIDW. MARCH. M. 1M2 IIVRIlVIHis VDVOCATR rvr.i -iMs HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES W^-i*\ Ayr ^^M m fell %  / • "1 fcJrr BL0ND1E BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS IMtrAK JT M3LN LAST MflwT* _WHY $HOUtX."^ I T AN6ev.'*--6H£ **6 6T*v*ffOAA*3 N0 TV-C CJ^.-. % %  w %  • %  I H*TR-3TO St_P."' RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND A REMINDER BUY P JJE K K J FREAK BISCUITS TO-DAY. • ADH TUMI M'l I 'i TO VOIR U8T %  han NllfcM %  > Mia r I .••!• <> % %  •* 1-11. *••••" %  • —• • Mr la.' laaul•na BftamaaaM I klrkra **g Iwarrlal H — II — %  •*) tr.ik.r Wlum M.kl.4 iMttM I %  MrMM SII \KI \ SAMPSON :: (1938) LTD. .....................vU^ JUST RECEIVED Pkp. Tat* L>le Cuttr Suar BMI mm and Baron Lfr. and Small Tina Vienna hiiuMca Pkpi (ioddard I'lasur Pow. der Tin* Stovr Polish Tin. Ilptni Vrr.rUt.tr Salad R Bridal Icing Sucar Tina (irUltnr Tina Aaatd. Sweti RUcnkta Tim I'tnrapplr Chunk* Tina Strawberries Also: TIN HAMS KprrUI price to Shopkeeper* All Ihr.e Uilnn M rrnm INCE & CO. LTD. 5 I t. FOFRl ( K ST. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SI>M IAI. OFFERS arc nun -itiiilubirTil our UriMukira l^trrdsTcirT S|irij4llllolt II mil San Sir.. I Rots. n 1 .. 1.. I Mm.. f'hulnry Saurp .55 Tins Kio Cirunde Chiicululr AM, Biscuits 1.17 Tin. Taprslrv His.iilU .. .. 2.33 Tini, Guod Cumpuiiioii Biscuits 1.95 Nim ."•II I.GII 2.IMI I.CO Tins Srlrcl IWdrrrd Milk Pkn. Nrt Timikw 'fins Kownlrrr* I J lb. Bullies t'urljni|!> Brer .. Usually 1115 II .26 •26 Now .95 JIG .23 .21 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE C O L O \ A A D i; I. Ill) I I II I I s Hill HONDURAS By Sll l-lll \ |.. (AK.Ill British llnnilurus is perhaps the most iieKlectcd of all I .ni;lisli colonies. Kvrn the larger histories of Colonial developmi ill h.m l\ mi in i<>n it. The Biilhor has now told the ftlory of the int.i, in. 'country from the early day* of h settlement by thr log „ I utters mid hiiernneers up to the present. BcginninK with the discovery of British Honduras by the Spanish Cnnquisladores he describes the growth of the Colony under its occupation nd settlement by llriiisli adventurer*, and consolidation b> the biicciineers .ifh-i the "i onversion • %  I II. MI Morgan. He |{ives mi accuunl of the early quarrels with thr Spaniards which were later followed by tfatrmrilM ith neigh I -.: Central American Republics especially Guatemala. The dispute with Guatemala ended in the territorial ntf.recmei.1 of 1X59, hut the aflermalh of diul" malic strife remains to Ibr present day. and nin\ be referred to UN.*). The concluding rhuplcr deals with the Colony to-da> with special emphasis on it* %  .i.nomir and commercial '-.tiiand recenl (imrrnmenl propttsaU for de\ebipinent. The writer shows that if* agricultural and other resource-, hove been fravlj neifletled. and ihnt this fertile land ceuld maintain a popuhilion many limes its presii.l size. GET IT AT THE ... ADVOCATE ST.vm\i;itY BROAD ST. JUST A LITTLE TIMELY ADVICE to our numerous customers and the ::III.'! public DON'T MISS SHOPPING AT WILSONS IIIMIIIL: their Kasler I'arade and Store wide clearance which IIII.IVS TO-DAY tlur Air Conililioneil Store, efficient and courteous Sl.iff will make shoppin,: a pleasure. There will be n > llMtoj of doors KVKKYctNK wn.i. BI EASILY SERVED DOOM OPEN AT x AM. N.E. WILSON & CO. The Eton uherr your dollar yield* more < niDIAL :it.7t; M BtrB Btt*


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PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE IKIDAV. MARCH. 28. 1*52 Notre Dame Defeat Empire 2-1 Crown Closes Case In Murder Trial NOTRE DAMK KMIMRF (Kutni. 1 A CROWD estimated at about 4.500 went to KcnsinKton 0\-al yesterday afternoon and saw Empire suffer thou second defeat for the season and this time it was at the hands of Notre Dame whn defeated them to the him ol I 1 in their First Division Football match. The RMdch vshich was i-ikod i>..r The Bm Ire. kick ws* upon i "ihc match" in th given to Empire and thai wa* return llxture provided thrills (or kicked by Huddet r>*:hl In thu ihe mirn tans and every move Eoal and RoMa *u watched with mlrmt. Two chance an<| BBadad goals were arored in :he Ant the goal half whue one goal eras kicked but be a in 'he •eeond half. gcal to llteir credit Empire never PMMM right Daniel for Notreslackened perne proved to be the hero of tried to I Australian Yachtsmen Call Here On Way Home TWO A r-old William Howell and 26Mttiored the white-painted 24-foot yaohl v. in'!. m %  %  %  completing the fourth lei from E-nj/land to Austt %  > Fran race 5 fother did not give orders about his let' -..de kith die knife The two men did xcept for the "neck he "working** of the land I saw no; lo that de"'. ^^ Joseph Gibb* went into the land No time elapsed betwi the day ater her father died, cm ho WJag the deceased g bunch of bananas, and nald ho %  'licking. came to take posse*ivn of UM When Mr Ir ^ t "^ ved ? n "? i BrM j spot. I was still there. 1 wi He cut tb* bananas and went .ibout ln feet off the two men straight home All of us went to To the Court:— I saw the father's home on December .oti.mg d; n "Joe' and the In i the road before the the only fresh food >0th KI talked togetner about ^*>w*r rU could have een ua rbs, ro jkl 'making peace and living MOf* H \"2A !" * U 1 { hf Solicitor 0n•* %  > going in noth.m ele, leb frewi I did not worry to put Joe"A .\.'^^ h n _(0?the Crown Ihey got ., on deck. Gibbs In Court when he cut the cial closed the casej or_t_heLrown. up and Tailor again I -000 miles fron AiKOd. how they felt at aea w first bunch of bananas because my Notre Dame was ,r>, hi > Barbados many jlays without sreing land, father had just died in fr. n [id "we look on the hM team by kicking In two well M* an '" 'rum '-" they id "we %  -* on the sea as }****}**' in a? S'MJ. u ?. i! oat, PCM ,„ the flrrt the rfanpin be WmSi I * " '"'•".; the od that the debt of si.o shoui.i hall and one in th c second half Qrani were clearing then an i -• %  % %  "wUs, >' '* P !" ^ ST .' to give hu side vlctorv RobinfaiHllassli When it e about '" %  around the boat *,.• property was anridaa I do not *on scored the only goal for three nun .i.. ll '.'.. ..... ma Of ih know* whi thei that waput In the Fmpire. Notre Dame who waa Notrr Dame i-qu..lise %  <•• <>*" %  •hip" wl „ ._ How to get off the mark played goal was scored by Daniel at than keatBattas ah* Inn i that they lack llma-aiiri Sent %  better game in the wcond half Inside right : month. % %  ,. eia Hl B T e Joe" Glbbs worked outside of while the Fmpire forwards failed .,,„ u it .,_*... 4.,—. .tin •' nn ''' Barbados. I don't know whethn to take trrT OD^r^^ lhev both terns %  MI .. Wr ko ^ f rf lhrYlUghoul .. Jliv .^.t momy x „ my father were given opporturm,0B '^continued to press bui N'" „. „. i| Jthoufh Wanderer n iWhen "Joe" cut the first bum h Again Grant and Smith nlaved ?""? W *J l ? l >,|n morr *" in but a small In^at." they said. "We of bananas on the 18/1-51. I sent MO.KI nTtoMi Thi-v "*V '"'" """* V %  %  U wet throuith when w. my husband for it 1 would have kept the ball well mThe mid '.rt.i SS!"^! '^ .'." • %  IM, nobod %  * %  ,onr for i,n '> s 1( l f could ha v. Wilkn kern L.uaTr..|l I % %  W '"*" "'" nair w;,B ;,bo,lt 'ul.i lifted It up. Headiey was hotne Notre n,m„ K?.i mn.i;L hi n.uiule!, old Daniel again scored WPanderer II was designed a* t my house when I aent him for was uiuirSaH .LHiS !" ,r Notrr UanM '"' U '> La"nt the bananas JThta^-rS eKS/^lT^ ?h '"•" ^*'"""y "Ml Mil in tlw ,., | imghy hullden of It Is true I did not vee where nf right hand comer of the r l( w ho also designed he cut the second bunch of face of the approaching Frnpi" iurwards Fmpire Prtsses Notre Darne won the toss and skipper alanctavlllc decided to defend from the iMfthei i • the ptlefa against Empue Both teams started the gaBM fast and soon the En>pirc (orwards were In the Nona 1) tme Straugha goal -HI Bui a) aftei iioal Archer. keeper Symmonds w.is tested. Daniel, Taylor immediately after tried to Hai.it draw first blood for Empire but The thi bull went high over thc cross C'oppin After this uoal Empire mailBipraajpa. Her overall length reneweil efforts hut Ha mi tba %  core unehasi i ran tapaTai Svn.m-.nd Srniir.. %  ••!. \\ ..ndrriT II Grant. All. rne, Hajnard, Ruda> horrUle, Taylor, Rabfa Shake-Doun < rtslac ton. B. Mom N M ii Natre Isame— VHklnSi Browne, Rob. I Danhn %  i -• Alleyne Is Victrix Ludoruin Al StMichael's Girls' Sports WandWer it %  t In the £HKA lar>>>> numboi of spex-tators were present al the A'i letic Sports finals at St. Michael's Girls' School yesterday. Very great interest was taken in the sports by the girls, and this will no doubt be realized when it is considered thai over 950 points were gained in standard points. %  %  her side and nearh; t-stse kitehen. fcMXL Wanderer II is 10 ycara old. water can • Sha undar the burgee of the it — botUim copHoyal Cruising Club hut sine** per Mieatned ... Ad over to Wllli.in .ail i rJar the burgee of th-Little Ship Club. She had never for racing. V/Ullam and Frank expect to oul two weeks here dia* : i Ihay will gc-t store. Pacific crossing and bananai 24 feet, she measures 21 feet on When Joseph came and stood itarUne. carries a beam up at my house door. Duncan took Of *ven feet and draws live fart up his stick from the corner mm i. ben are of said "Joe man you cant come mast of spruce in here • My husband .. |i AI riag Tucker for presenting the trophies, ii io *n-m > so am he aaaurad Miss Burton and hi al UM ou'si't "I thf: DUt aflei few hours. The urather (i. fair and Ihey were on their uav asaln. But two more gales — one in (he Bay of Ui.i> and the ther off I rriirli Moroeeo in the AtlaUtle — WOTS in -Lire Inr them. The* had lo assj-nj I iwire again. Um la->l lime foi Hi' hour*. And it > ur> cold. They could onl> enjo\ their pasNtgr from l-i Talma*, when Ihr v.r.itlinr Mas kind and the winds fair thrnuche il They averaged !il> mile, i d.i* Keeled lluvsii RlMad as a gaff-ciittor, Wanderer ii had to b rssal all the way from the IslSfOj Wigli: to Las Palmns but she ndad UD puhlisl i-i %  cole were Bail i ware kept nuhyjjnUl she rcstched und Rarbados, TABLE TENNIS POSTPONED Qttld howTba BSkBtMi n •ver affoi.i to tum in to i-ed from 10 staff that the sports wer 0 very enjoyable. He hoped that in the [nter-School Sports now approaching, St. Michael's would mot. than do her beat. n n S 31 Veil"* 4 Mi H.. a n 3 33 Savannah Club Tennis Tournament *. i *.i i mm > RKSILTS Ladles Doubles Final Miu D. Wood and Mis& G. Pil grim bent the Misses Bowcn 6-2. a—4. M. r. IkouMea Keml-Mnal E. P. Taylor and Dr. C (; Manning beat J D Trtmingh.ii and D. E. Wormc 6—1. 6—3, 9. Mixed ItouWes Handicap Mr. and Mrs. P. McG Patterson -I 40 beat Viscount and Viscounti aai Dangnn + 15 ft— t. ft—I The Tennis court" will be close today. • run a as Bj I VrlU.Ho.1 Vrlim. a M D It Van T1-rr-lk* a 3* itI %  %  taasd %  i tsz* ii %  i Suntsa WHATS ON TODAY Ooart of Orand %  easlo&i at 10,00 %  m Art EihlHlUon at the MUHimi it 10 00 i a flpeecb Day at <*fne sn's College at 2 SO p. %  Football at Qoeei 's Park at S 00 p m. Mobil. Cinema. Be roe Agricaltural Itataoo Tard. ft Philip v SO p %  Pollct Band Concrrt, naiUni' Books at B 0C P %  %  1... I. ...I Mtcht lock in tba morning during Dtlc i un Ixvause U.mderer II %  ring with lA in | in „| to her tiller. "We aie M> aevti the motion of |he ahlp anything goes wrong, we are> n, at an instant." they said. learnt lo navigate nn aircraft %  rhile ha was in thi Royal Australian An force durins the last war and I l> come in useful Wanderer II i.equipped with .< .similar chart i. bis tn tttoM ussd 111 aircraft and rrorn it Has aextaat Ii %  i %  i trod i .":.; during thg pa i fe-i geapa KiaiiK explained, "anjd Ii hai bain found to l*. verj appllcabli b But :tw tue( ,|,fMihias on UMII ao^aotura at vVandcrr %  ** II rolls i the foo fronUM U platas, AJinouj I 1 on Kimbal i %  I d q Itc i f. .< spills. An i ... 'foi 'livping, they had to t" hi a all hunks. Som. nights Wanderer U mil. VagjH mmh tdi.it tliev could i t Irtod to find comfort (a Three Meals A Day Howi \.r when they me! BBC thttj miked three timea day und even baked In a pre; sure cooker. All washing during the voyage is done with aaa ratal Aboul s.^ Kulions of watei in the tanks when ad bara Biay carrv eiuiutih food and W.i'ei In l;c i I rtaaq are aoln| to aydoay M I Cristobal and Ua I dJBs) • %  .:l| I ITC 'rouble bj getting Bsoraa. William and frank were forTkai fotlowins date has. ".'' % %  '' hava Bylni At The Door Step When Joe was at the door step. he did no 1 quarrel when my huband barred him from entering. Joe did not put down the stick after he took il up from the i (irnor. "Joe" got to the spot at which i) in ihr L.adMB* intrr-t.lub me bananas were flrst. The baspawlon, which kM WM anpty. Joe was not • .Ken place to-night backing me when he took up the loaned until ton*orKg-nnti He turned around -nd (hi v M.C.A faced me and my husband when ^ie took up the uananas. 1 don't know why he turned to face me whre he took up the bananas. All three of us went to the banana'' together. 1 was a little way on. My husband put his .stick undci his left arm when he went to taki up the bananas. My husband did not pass any blow with the stick. The stick dropped from her husband after From 1 uuHlad r decked II I'n largest mint I l>iie-t H.ght. t. -... baraoi to IfSal i i.l tl i.lilridente." world'i Coa*ninit cOB* nectiofit at Rio for SIo Psukt. ... .-•.,,; KI.OWr.HMI MOVKAKHEI.I. PLAIN .HOV.AKIIKI.I. In shades of Blue, Red, Beige. Pink. Tan. Grey and Gram 'M> ins widi-. Prr Yard SI -Si In Beige. Pink. Rust. Saxe. Pea Green. Gold. 36 ins. Per Yard $1.84 III (.roen. Blue. Pink. Beige and Brown 36 Ins, Per Yard S1.S1 PLAIN MOYuASHELL FOR FURNISHING In Green and Navy 36 ins. wide WEATHER REPORT YE8TBRDAY Rainfall from Codrtoglon: ml Tot-d Rainfall for mwth U date: 2 26 Ins. Highest Temperatnre: B5.B 'T Lowest Tpmperatwte: 71 t '1 Wind Velocity 12 mUea per hour Barometer (9 a m ) 2P.9MI. <3p ml 29 890 TO-DAY flnnnse: 8 am Biuuet: 6 12 pm Moon: New. March 25 Llnhtnm: (t 30 p in IliKh Tide ii.no a.m., 5.D3 im Low Tide. 1127 a.m.. 11.21 P at. Montevideo Buenos Aires Connect with populsr, s eas-aailai l "TO Tunda" IMH type Cbppar' ..lid ItrjpiUr eTvlee via Ilelem to K.o. Sio Psuk,. MosSavideo end But mi* Aim. ,::::',::'.'.;'.: •Joe 1, had stuck him. Bananas Drop The bananas dropped from the | two men when they had raised It ( only some distance off the ground She could not say who let go of lha bananas flrst. I told "Sonny 1 to take up th. bunch of bananas "for me". When thc bananas dropped Joe" grabbed "Sonny" (the deBsjfSBH in a "neck tie", and PAN AMERICAN Hiittt/t l/f/lt it \ Pa CMH ftCs_lN S>ad 5lt*ci BrW <•••. 1133 All-%  3BJ| 1 43 344 ia II..I Herl Ml* BMiili Wadnni facto 3 4* 3S1 I St I M YHIonc4 Ye*.Yrllnn Grand Dance TO-NIGHT v H t •*.-. I'MIK UOUBB IJJBBBUHOM %  M M. i—ii i .u-r l:lnun mud Mxart Tfiibl*. AIDXM BUtn l-lfeiHn* Ih* nr.1

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I'M.i nwi RAKBAUOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. MARCH. tf. BS8 Qahib Callinq M RS HOHERT RANDALL, of gueen's Collem uli* will read her report hi 3<-ti.ors Speech H afti-i Randall of England who up to the time of his death in I9i>u h .enlist and Auutuit Director of Research of %  tional Coal Board. Mr. Randall who has twsmall ron took up her appoint: at the College in I I 1991. She succeeded Mrs. E. J. D. Corbtn who resigned .n December 1050. She holds a BSc honour? degree from Reading Uni i Be!. m i Raibados she was Senior Stien.v II Belgowan Second :>\< School. Becker.* %  Pi evanish, he was at the North-Western I'.: !!3B— 49. Whilo there, she taught Mathematics and N at a Technical School for girls. During the war she was a Mathematical Instructress to the Fleet Air Arm and R.A.F. < The programme at the College Speech day to-day will e %  three songs by the Upper School. In addition, there will be an Epilogue to "Saint JoH C.rorge Bernard Shaw. This will be staged by a east of over ten senior guards directed by Mn R Bynoe and assisted by Mi E Nurse. There will be an address bv Sir John Saint. Kl CJf.0 H %  %  nt the prizes and certificates. Headmaster T IIF: % %  %  %  ...sler of ('harwrhousr is Mr. B. W. M. YUUIIR ildtl on of Sir Mark Young rJCJsta u former Governor of this island who was promoted to Hong Kong later captured In the Japanese and who n-Mirnnl hi governorship after the end of the war. Mr. Brian Young who wa an Etonian Scholar went to Cambridge and returned to his old school a Assistant Classics Master in 1947. He has now been appointed head of Charterhouse Mr George Turner who retired III September. To many Barbadians who remember the brilliant ado %  tion of Sir Mark Young and the Intellectual attainments of the family the .ipiximtment to this post at the age of 30 will come as no surprise. They will join In sending congratulations to his parents and to him. Back to Canada M R. C J MOREAt' of the Canadian Bank of Commerce nnd Mr:. Moreau returned to Canada on Wednesday by T.C A spending two weeks' holiday staying at the Marine Bob I Othri Canadians returning i | !%  T C A on Wednesd,i> -f it -.pending a holiday al the Marine were General Mr Laren. Mr I'erley Rol.it of a nine figure number m the fraction of a second is now back in Barbados for"about ten days. She arrived last night l>> HWIA from British Guiana and is the guest of Thani Bros. i -•, Devi will be appearing at the Empire and Hoxv Theatres giving performances of her mathematical skill. Returning Next Year A spending three weeks' holiday staying at the Hotel Royal. Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Scott of Toronto, Canada will be returning home to-day by T.C.A. This is their first visit to the island which they like so much that they are planning to come back next year for a longer stay. Mr. Scott is Assistant General Manager of Ditto, manufacturer of office equipment. Short Holiday M R. A. E. TAYLOR left on Wednesday evening by BW.I.A. for Trinidad for a short holiday during which time he will look after the final distribution of the estate of his late sister. Mrs. A. E McCutcheon. Off to the U.S.A. M RS. S. A. McCASKlE of "Manchester*", Beck with Street. left on Wednesday by IIW.I.A. for Antigua and San Juan on her way to the U.S.A. to join her mother in New York City. Fourth Visit A RRIVING on Wednesday night by B.W.I.A. from the USA. Via Puerto Rico were Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Sidenberg of Ithaca. New York who will be spending a week's holiday stay. Ing at the Marine Hotel. Mi Sidenberg who is paying nil fourth visit to the island is Director of Research at the Agucultural Advertising Research Inc. This Is the second visit here for his wife. For Three Weekt I N Barbados for three weeks' holiday are Mr. and Mrs. frank Clarke of Trinidad. Thty arrived earlier in the week by B W.I.A. accompanied by their two children John and Ann and they are staying at the Hastings Hotel. Mr. Clarke Is Material SuperlOtonoajnl of U.B.O.T. South Trinidad. Interesting Race YACHTSMEN are reminded that the handicap time for the Sixth R B.Y.C Regatta which will be sailed l n Carlisle Bay on Saturday are the same. Many yachting enthusiasts forecast that Ihe race will be a very interesting one. They feel that ihe wind will be much stronger than in the Fifth Regatta. • Folies-Bergeres j rj One hundred and sixty thousand pounds worth of spangled, fwithered tourist bait was cast with strictly Parisian "bourn" along the Grands Boulevards to-night. It is th* 28th Folly of the Folies-Bergeres — naturally the dance the rumba, and shout moat costliest, most brilliant of show of nv ''ndled by hardyear-old lovely who began in thev*|* clrlc jn nd *oa"l n **" btckback row of the nudes at lfl,^ **5 .„, ., Yvonne Menard. has been pro' Lri "'* wc r 10 m "*" ! moted to clothe. gorgeous material and fathom? of She is, even more, worth seeirut' catncr i alm ?• half the time, and uiey let her speak a few lmesB Glided gm cages pop out o. the now. loo. ^toof. Revolving stages, now scenes New nude star is a young -*"* moonlight—deflrute.y wtt — Swedish msnne*juln, SJ V Nordon P* 01 succeeded *>ch other with who takes a bath in 17.000 galloni' %  ""' %  'ditng rapidity, of tepid water In a g*s: pool that '* certainly is not culture. It rises from the stage. may not be art. But what cnIn 21 hours 41 fast-moving and Ilreerin.i! fantastic pieces of scenery take Vlv Ie rnecanisme. That s my you from full fledged railway v rdirt trains In the Gar* St. Lazarc lo the smoky depths of a vast opium den and up lo the crystal tales of a Negro Heaven. The opium den it a kind never %  eon east of the Seine, and the p Negro Heaven is strictly the foyer 5. of a RiU mn amok. ( IIOSSUOIIII '"in: %  -ii-IT] his" r r : ii r 1 w ir —^ TT DIRECTOR SIGNS HOLLYWOOD. Mirch 27. Argentine Director Hugo Fregnese signed to dire '. IBSBDB .kov itch's technicolor production of "Decameron Nights" While th. u ^-~"VTUJ> atarnng Louis Jourdan and problhS^ne7tkT bulId,n "^ ot b iy Joan Fontaine in the feminralher^ini?."* % V"* for two ine lead and Peter Ustinov in the !hr I '"^"^"ns liltle sidelights chief supporting role, on the orchestra edge of the slage. ExtenorT win be filmed in " li. Hoe tou stouio punrua in falconry. (•! IS. Kalis well nnUhaO uR (*) IS MM rrstlni raurr. ill I 31. YOU Oo on : ror euoafott. ISI 22. Scent I st 'rom %  creeper, if* i K lutoDit upset by poetry. (31 j H, Potentate to made naah Of. (> IHH I, Do thsy go ttiarM witn a sum rsp t ill 3. L'nctul ort or turnovers, lii 3. Snaring U tmballlab. (71 4A way u found nu i'.ibf. (Sr B. A small •irert *ltn atren 7 bere. iS number Use oo a curuiiM .. .rater grass, iti 12. Card In ro:ien aliape. il 11. Measure of a lasture. ll 1 a brut communication |4I Rupert and the New Bonnet—20 %  •nt .y.i.bi fl.n% out (hen liars with such (one inn iht pals h,\t dfTnui'y in holding then, •nd Ml Uili IO iot> where hit spjtki are tilling. Suddenly, without ;h slighitit wirnifis. there a sjajarlf 1 awooih and column ol fire lust in front ol ;h*m Al (hey !opv> over in :• iv. • cloud ol in^k imoac sutiound* ihnn. Very shakily Rupert .'.-I. lorward lor Ml baakei. lh*n he uopi and stare* m horrot. Wh.re hi* baikrt stood there i now only a pauh ol blackened gran I BY THE WAY... *fcaafc Teo'dy Wrofe Hanid a Letter —/r WMS Very Short Suf It Said a Z.of— Hy MAX fHHL TEDDY, the Stuffed Bear, said to eTerjrone else In the playroom: "How do you write a letter T" Mary-Jane, the rag doll, thought tot a minute. "It all depends on what kind of a letter jou want to • rite. Taddy." "That's right,' said Mr Punch. I vou went lo a party and you wanted to write a letter of thanks. Thai would be aas kind of a l.-tter." "And suppose," added General Ti thi tin soldier, "you wanted to wnte a friend of yours inviting him io come to your party That / Mid be anoth" 'kind of letter." A Ikird Kind "And suppose you wanted to A.-.'e lo four grandmothet telling her about all the iMnes that happened since the last lime you saw her That would be a third kind of letter." said Rnarf. the Shadow. Judy and Hanld and Mrs Cuckoo and Whoa, the Hobby Hcrte. all *poke up now. telling about other kinds of letters. Such as a letter thanking somebody for a birthday present, and a letter telling somebody else to have a very happy birthday, and a letter hoping somebody whom you know gets well soon, and a letter asking somebody to come and visit you. "There are lots and lots ot different kinds of letters." Knarf said. 'Yes.said Teddy, "but how do you write themT" "Kirit," said Mr. Punch, "you get some paper and a pen and an envelope and a stamp. Then you're ready to begin." "Then" said General Tin, "yoo write the date at the top of Ihe letter. You don't," he added, "just writs down Tuesday or Wednesday or Thursday—or whatever other day of the week it is—but you write down the whole date, like July 14, iB4y." "Why do yoo have to do that?" asked Teddy. "So that whoever Is reading your letter will know lust when vou wrote It You see, Teddy, there'i a Tuesday and a Wednesday In every e*t\. But there's only one July ;i 1114* in all the world." "Then," said Hanld, "foo sum writing your letter. Now suppose—" "Suppose," interrupted Teddy. -I wanted to thank you for tnviti-g me to your party. How would 1 write It!" "Just like this." said Hanid. July 14, l'JU Dear Hanld, had a wonderful time at your parly yesterday. Tha Ice cream and the cakea were the best I've ever hadThank you eery murh for asking me to coma. Your friend, Teddy "Oh." said Teddy smiling. "That's i fine letter. But 1 think It's too long. I think It should be much shorter. %  think It should be like this—" July 14,1949 Dear Hanld, Your happy friend, Teddy Everyone In the playroom looked at Teddy in surprise. Then they all laughed. "I think," said Hanid. "that Teddy knows more about icltcr-writing than he told us." Wonifii In The iN>we.T Mrs. Olga Symtnonds pVEN those romantic people *—' who base their Judgments on statistics must have been rather astoni'i'ied to read the statement of a politician that -Every fourth bite of food enjoyed (stc) In Britain last year was not paid for" r If this Is universally accepted. It will introduce a kind-of rhythm into eating; at every fourth bite, the ea'er will mutter. "This one is not paid for" But Imagine Ihe ingenuity and toll that have gone Into the preparation of this statement. Not wily have She nation's mouthful* to be counted by vigilant officials, but allowance has to be made for the size of each mouthful, before triktnf an average. For instance, in the ease of a greedy man who cram* his mouth It may well be thisecond mouthful that is not paid for What Is wanted is a Stand//i fifo $torv ard Mouthful, established by law. In ordet to facilitate the findings of the Statistical Committee GIRL HAS HALF HEART FORT WORTH, March 28. right side of her heart may not A three-month-old girl Sharon be working or might not be there Buasey may have only half a at all. heart and will undergo a delicate The, test will Involve injection test to determine if she can be of dye into Sharon's body. X-ray helped by surgery. pictures will be taken every half Sharon now lies in on oxygen hour of the outlines of the heart tent at Fort Worth hospital, chambers to Indicate to doctors Doctors say she Is in constant pain how her blood flows and the cond:A heart specialist said previous Uon of her heart, X-Ray pictures Indicate that the —UJ. JeWttal Hut fillfil tiilh gessj&jagdj unofficial Sometimes his pigeon* travel In fill tu-o Rolls-Royc's. Morning puper T O get a new car for your animals Is not as easy as It was For instance, in the matter of pigeons, a conscientious official might abk, "Can they not use an airline service like other animals?" And it will be pointed out that even important dogs often haee to use buses and trains nowadays. A ruder official might even ask whv they can't use their wings to get about, as otrier birds often do. of Uvoly stop nnd kindly nature. Is known n. %  %  %  i. 1 She is s hard worker and from a \ • irtt aaa h i plays*) .. Basil i.. • in Social Welfare In this Island. Mrs. Symmonds is tin widow f st u,, hssOL E.ie has three children, Algy. Noel and Pat. Mr. Algernon '' is nn nTtifUM Solicitor's Clerk while Mr. Noel Symmonds U Clerk of the Sugar Agricultural Bank; P. is now m Heading Unlvei It) taking %  Teacher's Diploma. %  "f her MK'ccss in her first exa.ninallrKi. ads was a member Of Ibg Olrta 1 Industrial Union ttiception and was then %  if ihe committee and Club Shr is now Mrs. Svinmonds her spirit of enterprise Mas helped In alt depart) make the Union Ihe successful institution II now is. Al leader of Club • she eontiivaa to give ••ntcrtainrnent* and show ever) vi'i.r. Already this year this Club staged a Variety Show and Dance at the Union Rooms. Social Welfare Once President of the Children's OoodwUI league and C reche. Mrs Symmonds Is still a creat supporter of the League. BJM b von nrjud of the good work done to help the poor MRS. OLC.A SYMMONDS children of the Island. In IQ36 she represented the Ixrague at a Confarenre of Social Workers in Again in 1938 she was sent as [stand Hep,antattva i" British Guiana by the M of the Women's Social Welfare League cf which she is a member of the Committee. She was once of ti,MvoraMo Pub iW on the Cormniihr ( .f ment Mrs. Symmonds Is a member of the Barbados Welfare Committee and the Wclfaic oiganiaod by Mr. B I s Stanley. Ex-Colonial Barbados. She is also i ->f iJ,e Wages Board f' i Bbop Assistants; on the Enquiry Committee of the Black Rock Bwbv Clinic and Sectary nf ( the St. Thomas NuTiTtion Mm. Symmonds is very thankful that the widespread distress Of mothers and their children in this island has met with the DOOM f the public and ll one day there will be many more Clinics to cope withi nf the people Girl Guides Sh. iv i, member of the Local t-irl GuideV Association and is also on the Selection Committee for girls to work In an Auxiliary Hospital In the United Kingdom. She was made a Justice of the Peace in March 1949. Mrs. Symmonds Is a prominent member of the James' Street Methodist Church and Sunday School Teacher. She is also on the Committee of the James' S.recl S'.oul Group and organises the programmes of entertainment, harvest festivals and other social events of this Church. Her hobbles are reading, storv and play writing. She is very fond of music and singing. Not only does she enjoy classes at the Union in cookery and pastr\ but at home she does her own. In the past she has travelled *njv on business but it is her wish to %  at New York and England In ihe future. ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT ROODAL THEATRES. THE GREATEST BKAIN ON EARTH MltkllMill HIM See and Hear her Unbelievable Gifts at the EMPIRE—TONIGHT S 30 and ROXY ON TUESDAY APRIL 1ST at REMEMBER — CALYPSO NIGHTS BEGIN AT THE EMPIRE ON THURSDAY MARCH 27TH He applied for the job; u-as rej-ffed. Buf u-hen he'd pot ]orer Ihe •hock. He sou' that Ihe man they'd selected Had a taut and impeaccablc $ock!... His dreams hare now come to fruili.Mr, And one thing he'll never forget— Whi'ii appluing for anu posilli U'car a Thoroyrip Gaiered. JANETTA Hitiss SHOP PL As? A B.B.C. Radio Programmes miDAV. MARCH ?S. IMS* 11 IS -m New Rrcorda. IS nooel The <•*.. II IO p m Se— a Analyst* I as—1 IS a.m. %  • M !S u a Sl.lt Bf ROODAL THEATRES EMIM II I %  : HPIMMO TOitAr 4pm Th* New a; 4 Daily ftTMc*. 4 IS p Tfclrd I itunmiw. 4 ST p 4 tt pm Music Mafaiutf: S p r twlnt. IS UalenmChott Mrrth.nl Navy Pnfranvnv. a. > C>. • tt p m Sport. ... and P-rofT-mme Parade; t p n. Th Newa. 1 10 p in Nf.. Analvali 1 ii i m p a* sv.vt Sl.n lit i: M 111 pm Watt Indian Di-n T pm Raw-aid V.ltlv Dill. II) gm Radio Nr..nl. I 30 p in World Aftjli*. S U p nt Compoaar al iti* Wt. p m Enaitan Mafailnr. 30 p m CaUbril* Qulntrl 10 p m Th* Nawa. 10 10 p m From Ih* EdltorUla. IS IS p m T*a l>bat* ConUnuwa. 10 30 p m Ftom thf Third Proarinnw (NMl Door fo Sincers) JfST ARRIVED—Lovely CoehUll and Cotton Dresses, ).,.,. mar Scarves and Sousres. Pure Linen Mens Handkerchiefs at R4 cento each. Nvlon BHefs at tt- and 1MB. Also ON SALE Njlon Stockincs st .50 for I pairs.* EXCELLENT VALVE SATIN 36 ins. at H2 ets. WHITE. BLUE. PINK. LEMON. Butterick Patterns in oil Coming Styles. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 422 0 roKi i YOUR SHOt STORI5 GLOBE *****. BUIB4Bi.S I'l.l .170) IKIMN | OWN OPENING TODAY FRIDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. TERROR ROADOFTHC TRI-STATE MOB I the Excitemenl, Suspense and Gripping Drama of the world's mast cherished story comes brilliantly to life! *' RORFRT\KWT0Nti>y MINMSSKWALSIIIRASIISLSITJIH.V iitv;. van ^ %  %  ".' i.w. ". T(lM.>HROW UTCIA1. TOMOPJIOW NIOHT MIDNITK 1.1. 1,1 Xr*Tl. I.I.AND I nil .NADOW ""** O I V >l !• I C m mo TOCO" BSBMlBTOaVN—DM M1B jTODAY 2 30.4 45 a 8 30 PM. CONTINUING DAILY 4.45 6 30 PM UIH snvi | llllKllill> ROMAN C0CHRAN IS V.OIMIIt U41 ALSO THE COLOR SHORT—CIRCUS TOWN BADMANS TERRITORY RIDER FROM TUCSON MARTIN mplr A RAIDERS OF THE DESERT CHEYENNE COWBOY a l.i H...K. A QIMM Mill.i "i.h...FgmgES PIAZA tIN EMAS anei iron TODAY -1 S p m nV John WayaV. IVnnla UKrMt in TWr V.AC.IX AAD TBS BANK Tnil.1 IN |A I.I: IV" CALTr-SO SBOW &' World rSmsnii Calypaonlan 1*4 by THE POPt'l.AR BM'ALI. BSUAND i niDt Jan." CAONCV SutrmaErrol Pl.YNN •^



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FRIDAY, MARCH, a. IKi BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Staffing Difficulties Hinder Progress Leave School Boys Too Young11>mi in nml ER g^^K BSRSSS §35*33 SMS SM S £8 ~^SCKH fegs '^ — <~ to the narrow syllabus nt the emination paper for which EXPRESSING concern over some ofthe school's examination results, Mr. J. C. Hammond, Headmaster of Har rison College in presenting his report at the school's speech day on Wednesday afternoon blamed Ihe present standard study on three main causes Firstly, the instability ol staff— the frequency of changes and a large number of temporary acting masters: a "ra next" stiting. Thty dlftrurt secondly, the economic pressure which results in boys of the romantic notion* of idealist? mem a* .... % %  __ -rz*^* NO.MORE GREY HAIR AFRICAN MIXTURE CakMra tin Hair InaUMTr. k l ukuelvttti what M % %  %  >Mild af *: GENUINE HAIR COLOURIHa BOOKER'S (Barbado*) DRUG.STORES LTD. MOAD STREET. MHXSITOWN MvuincurM t flOUTIt* LTOSanm~. I Al-.r, FLEUROIL MIUIANTINE Mo.,i DM Mir Mfl and glmsf ftala la 2 tltaa !" madmen. >bOtn flyn. on at "J "". !?' da 1 "5 !" !" (~taer %  ""•>" * wer ""••'^ •.<** I UW .ehool MR tnan B proMaMr"< >? ^.T^i^SSL^^lTEJ-: Second D,vlon. But - . %  *• truM %  *"•"• ""> 'anno. "" employTl *?*?J" ESS !" "".^T -I %  •> unbeaten record and are. masters an good ability having to lve school young inorder to earn jSi'ioo^or "oi L '.d. SrTuToth.. a living and in contrast boys of mediocre ability remaining t n f | lfp trian .f,,. narrow *criiio tunion* and on because they cannot find jobs and masters having to take neld they are studying Mr. Joarl on out of school tuitinn and thirdly, the growing pressure of subjects at the fifth form level. He said: ance ol Ihe ..cademic school. LaThe School has had a most suedies and Gentlemen I am oldceasful year. In tho publkenfashioned. I agree, of course, -.mlnaiion last July we entered thai this type of education hat S3 candidate* for the Advanod only value for a limited number Level of whom 51 were successwho have the particular ability ful in at least one subject, and fo use it. and it is all to the Rood many secured three subjects. Du-hat different curricula should IK to the peculiar circumstances of provided for those u ith differ%  tie between tho Nicholls brothent talents. For instance there a. ers in Classics, and the gem-realty an obvious need for the developot the Government, the School ment of technical educaimr %  had the unique distinction of Uns Uland. None Ihe less it .< winning rive Barbados Scholarnot difficult to see Ihe danger ships in one year In two of thai the extension of many vaIhese cases we share ihe credit rieties of educntional project mav with other schools, since the boys hold for Ihe academic school, ft wentr..ns'ers at Sixth Form would be a grave and probably level: Hutson whose work in irreparable mistake if the standMathematics was quite outstanding ard of those schools which are had spent only two years with us, the necessary source of supply and came from the Lodge School, for the neV University College of while Phillips, who had spent the West Indies was neglected three years here, came from There is a second fashionable Foundation. fallacy which also need? scotchBut, I think, more significant (ng. Briefly, it is that anyone "n than the actual award of Scnolteach anything provided he hai lal the git MS. the constant rein lectures un•£• l>robabl) dertaken as M I %  •* %  '''' slty. but which oataM treated witfi care and mnderaln>n raOtl OTI School Ulitirttl. the Mr. J. C HAMMOND books tells the arships the generally high Qmi Foirn ,'iessu Stxtt. F.rni. weleic boys speciahse. hut it i%  m Ihe fourth-, and fifths, where I \ bodirr. while prasschlU %  have .1 lendeTM \ srben setting the ->llabns fur a partlcuinn. that i.tn b<\u at a boy taking nut more sh.tn eight subject* Jit the Ordinary standard of the work produced, about It. I do not believe that to. £ of knowledge %  mu8lna %  ?* %  apuchryphal story ^^ Thl!( means iK ui K.iit><*i tenches Science rival the consistent rcllbelieve that conUct with a truly ability of the results In Clussies, scholarly mind is of real value to and our Sixth Form well mainany student, and that if a school lalned their reputation loses the services of men like Dr. In addition to the Barbados Hamilton. Mr. Isaac. Mr Sweet, Scholarship winners. J. A. Wilaoc | Hi", Springer, that it loses liams won an Exhibluon to the ^^ hwi "£,, n man w.ih the £*. ,MU & "* we mU 1 m University College of the Wast ie cessary knowledgi Indies. C. K I pU%  Ilivi.j." ort mi •' %  '" Th -' %  ••>"""' "' ,onlb "" ,t inaunx" "'• fcbool %  t I'm iimmenl pjlchru -t .sbowlng improvement, and v.*-1 id .Inch are ti. be hope nsr better aeojon. to come %  : 3ZA nsa asteirtJiw sat though l ull OUT suceeas m both lhe-e similar problem Wttfe -txirts was largely dlM la the anlam i %  teni • uittaan ol t*w laaras and 'heir mathemaUcians each at .onstant training, and UM .ids a Fii-i ciaeii He cemOur ,.11 .H>, n M -. • %  M.Kliifl l.-aitmastcr of the Coleran ,| M, 1 >...11. %  ; ( %  .t' 1 U (dgr-Parrv School. and Mr ,. ( hlB J.IIMS. who. ii Fbric and benulifiil Se Style-. Stew II— IIIM> Hall SVica THE MODERN DRESS SHOPPE BROAD but I %  UTglcal operatic urrkulum Is ei %  un the Wm. WGAUT! (BDOS) LTD. veigh papers and even n %  MMnattosi continue, and I think it posslbta that this .... Mttton "f my report may l,e misden %  ! wiwk W'" undeistood; and that, either I Sixth Foim since the loss of M shall bo accused of undue anxiety Carmichael to take the io*t ..< or else feat I hall be mtsrepreHoveuiment Analyst. srnted a% a Cassandra foretefilng The School Games record durthe isrhnYarshYi. 1h* coming collapse of our examILK the year has been encouraging the UmvatsI v I"-'""" *•*&* > •h'" (, ''" • T,, %  b '" p 1 VW,U *" 22 U "" est Indies w ill repeat therefore that our Sixth T Queen's Royst College. Trtnldnd ightiy. to penalise Form results were truly excellent. i*st April, and ge The new* scholarship he General Certificate. ,hi.rl tli' pla> ftei tlii-.pii; %  '..., I %  Luted cnoo] Iroup "t ScouU navi that Mime of our Cub Pack, started a vear ago. has grown t-> Scout age It i. new thing, and I thuik a |Md tlunif that the S. hOOl slu iild IrauB of itawn; but it %  n.w tint boys m this • < I,I rage a fer. Guiana, an. reached Advanced Level_ In four hl9 Illand takes in education. It „.[i?ae 1oo browed average,! flve ersdttl per candi7 w.ndward Islands team here n 'm-nT We hSJe tried to proMde the date with the better candidates August We lost hmh matches ., opportunity for the correction of ^curing as many as nine or ten football in Trinidud IHII only I IhUby Library periods. Seniors T t ? I r ls u hrow l T f m,,r l."i ^1 "* g ^ Bl "^^ "". MC,, J*T" have un to four a week, where of Sakis short stoneab->ut the at „ n UIK | we showed t scientific subjects, was offered tho „ tha t that encourages Bovell Scholarship which he ha'l )i e ve that if we state o to decline since lie hnd accepted lems dearly, you Will a good post with an oil company I would like to digress for a moment here to comment on the "golden eggs." You haviin B.ubados three First Grade Schools which take xhelr better pupilj — and there are numerous — up to first year University standard. probkeep tchful eye to see that standards are protected. Though the results at Advanc ed and Scholarship Level were so gratifving, 1 do not consider that those at the Ordinary or Piftl Form level were of quite thi same standard. The new CertiTtoese boys can win exemption at nea r „ ou knoW( ,„ a lu i,j w t school from their Intermedlato t xllI1 inaUoni an d a Certificate is ardsd Examine It is tru satisfied with 1> Credit standard. t l Ll veiy easy for a school ••xaminauons and their first Medlrul examination; they are generally exempted from the first year of study at a Canadian Unl verslt), and'find even af un English University, where the course of work is shorter, that tbey have covered much of the early groundwork. This standard is no auddei.i achievement It IS the out\ C( ,. ffu \^3^ of come of years of tradition; it Is 5omething of which we are proud, and of which 1 think you. the public of Barbados, are also proud. I have said many times. If a boy satisfies l in only one subject that they will not than the old but. to conceal its failures beneath an %  !" Jr. Imposing figure of certificate r *_ m ~! rt awards. the only rule is that something f" hours of '"houred auperiPT at cricket.Here in August other than a school textbook must u-Mstrngin, wench he suggests w defeated the Windward slands be read. If properly used, these \ h ** ,n "tidlence muat be en e, t fnr ket and had a Fifth* mr cmn ** of most boys realise. To criticise examination re'" m "f n "_ ,l *?"*£?J52 suit, which have yielded vr.> ;' "^"^"JKL^^JSSI nearly the average of the old '"•" %  "tii"-!tit" ,rw r d expu.Mafr.culation stand.it i .prob^ of J ou ( J u V ably unconventional, and may i*„ well seem hyper-critical. 1 would rather face) < Headmaster of (J.K.C.. In MOB Cough Relief! ad to set a high („>t to rest .un' lower. ll ;i> tinnl which he was kind enough to. I have therefore made poseles*, suits %  uon year In companion with credits gained in the School Certificate in previous years. The analysis is comparatively reaS' secured this year assess in e ould be largely puiand even though any must be specu. I propose to try. The most obvious suggestion Is at the standard of boys we an I receiving for entry is lower. trance examinations point to whiott 1 should like to plbnenl our team both Ml tin i-fn that of strain on the cancricket field and off it. UnlOCtundin.iies. 1 have Wen disturbed atly the expanse is becoming b> ba the bic.kdown tf beyt during eieaslngly heavy, and In spite of ihe examination through overthe considerable sum the boys Work. Thihappened tOOVM boy raised by a phy and their Own in 11150 .ind to two others in efforts, we have only just managed 1M1. It i generally scholamhip (n pay off the last of our MM > said to l -i,nd,d..i. who -ulTer; and Ihe Barbados Amateur Foot tail bat I will repeat, that it u thi T^fX h BV r -„ 0 f five ere• how leM accuracy in the ground, n^ possible to judge whether Association who so generous! mdidnte. and with the * 1 rk „?'_? na l !" h nd : Arlthmellc. mhers who are able to sit aU the j cnt us money interest free I quality of academic work which i* the primary contribution of ihese schools to the Island. But to return to the analogy of the "golden eggs." the goose needs a careful diet. The,e schools dits per pt Of English. results ,u,vc P'obobly not been here papers, do not do worse than (on thl f or lwi i proportionately l*n enough to give any judge, h> .. onstant or Improved. Particular "wJlMtWli but by and large I not mprovement •• Chemist tar shown in Hisrtou, >t whether it is Ihe explana,4 the Khooi year The average Botany and. ** %  What is true Is thai there boy, as all adults know -jld have done had they ..^..^i publicly our gratitude trworked towards the end „,,. B.A.F.A. for its friendly ollnd the recruitment and reton|"' ft ; ,, w k uri iect in ar certain groups of boys in most always work tion of staff tar morfc difficult than £ !" : h that have no ixth Let the figures speak f'>r „_,,,,, t „ _...,' v,--,,' mainlained, should be. Last year for instance, attempt too much, ,-au T*.l> 1.-.-%  .Ilir.'l "' a • Ulal HQ.1 In Hal linrjlllu Upianl .,1 ..l...aer >., .1.. lim thi work themselvef. This Is my third speech day, and I have made 18 appointments since my arrival hi this Island! Furthermore, the size of forms cannot be increased without loss of efficiency. It is quite surprising to those who have not bevn schoolmasters, what a difference fire or six boys in a class can !" i French. You may well ask thereerm fore why. It analysis sho-^ whose the School not what II should cast doubts /. our we had 10 be unduly lenient ,.i Itanuard. My answer is t'hat the %  £*'"* £"" ^tg !" '" new examination has exposed 9econ 1 d ,0 (0 th ^. ,h '^S' !" iri _. weaknesses m ruthlessly than ucl \ "}" ""^r" 1 "! In did the old one which allowed a y*5* f* ">, lower or pass standard. There The 'requ. were the same number or more "if largharder withIwnefll, but it is as serious a misWke fur thi.oniclentliMis boy to I It is for th* redita gained, but ihere were necessarily more failures. five or six boys in a class can _• -£.. %  H that the result' make Most, of our form.^ here J^ !" ^**.^-. for m hking ulv .re now 30 in num^r. and any -„ ~^ '^ ^, galI ^d trufv Incrcane beyond 25 I. .n my opin.. reitiflcates. but manv July T am deeply moved by the whtjm^ na. ^^ candida!f|1 well below the English averag _.brious anxiety of parents that their son shall be successful in r*" ~VTi, sfTjm %  a whole I our entrance KMnSSZ but g^^g C^^.qaSle, If the quality of our work is JJ^chSJi.trv our standar to be preserved we cannot ^d ^^U been above th. overload our forms. I do not be^Tj h BVcrMC ; but it is well lieve that yu can -slab .Sh %  t=o^'" ll w "£!& try to profit K luta parity of conditions and Jh-t *J J"^^,, Well ,cgulaon.maU schools unleM ^l^ aw rtrenBths rbb^.!ely^^ac?re lV youl B, to the mos, *******: h 'Sta-tt become one of ST mroug'h^ VtSllJI 1^.;^.^ Sf >=;; vancerv^^: 1 aj£ .bounds, and which seem to dcI*v,l. I ^''J^J'^J^'^V; velop an emotional reaction and quota from the Fxamincrs repoit 3* defy accurate doflnition. n, the 7fr&* __}?£l. *£ Education used to mean the type aaneraj m*d !" \"> "J of academic curriculum which Jt,or >„^o h f f **"^f .*"-?S wo still teach In this School. With two candidates failed extension of educational Advanced l*\el slacker t<> do tod little. I woul I ,sk Darenta Ui guard tho too studious lx*v against that error. ,tiie .onnectirm 1 think ...jtabifty of staff, that the younger bov can be y of changes, and pressed too hard by an anxious I mber of temporals panni. 1 Hnd too many MUMM Kper.ition and a generous donation, and also as an example of thdifficulty thai WO constantly race in trying to maintain the old Mantfardj. Ti> tun> t more local rivalries*. We probably had a better cricket; eleven last season than |hj ot> bef'ire, though we were not quit ful Neverthelesa, w !!io"t'"hM" n beconie fashionabTe the oUiar hand, to belittle the value and importdistinguished There was. on i lack of really ork. Opinions .W#H 1 I Ml I Hi I .. VERY Mont n\. # # n\isiii-:n SEASIDE FLATS On the incomparable St. Lawrence Coast • Excellent and safe sea bathing • Beach right in (rout ul flats • Tree-bordered and plea.tanlly quiet • Verandah, living room, two bedroom*, communit.ittn:: bathrooms and kitchenette i Modern furniture, linen, cutlery, china, glass and kitchen ware b Individual telephones, and musquito proofing. refrigerator and gas stove MARESOL BEACH FLATS .! ST. I.AWRKM K GAP. I'HONK Mitt A "NERVES" A SIGN YOU'RE GROWING OLD? Often as a woman Woaches m,ddlr luV, h nerves get bad. and shp accepts this • %  sign (rf age. Bui hy let youiadi becocne *•>" *••" %  orora bavc been neetiag this •rtu.iK.> aSMSsV — by gelling pirn I y ol re*. .reJ> air WBOIPSMI^1W .,..] by tak.ni Dr Cliase a Nrrvr Fo-l 10 buiH tbu up. For the ViUmin B.. maa -ad other KMded n.iner.tU ua that Uas c Isa T ad took help bu.W ap your vitaLiy •ad aid B toning ap USr eassra %  yatern w you can laoetaef more with o-nfinVace. Give Dr. Chaae's Nerve Food a chance tn help buna* nervou* fears and d-ubt.. ll helnjyoa rest better, and teel better. The name erjr. Chase" roar aaseraace It TAILORS OF PROVEN RELIABILITY AND EXCELLENT FITTERS We cany a wide range of HIGHGRADf SUITINGS lo choose from OUR GUARANTEED CUTTING AND TAILORING WILL TRANSFORM YOUR CHOICE INTO A start or MfflaWCTMN Wm. FOGARTY CTDOS] LTD. >--*-'-'---*•'-'-*''-' '...... -}::r/^/ii^%i^Ci^^X:XC-^X-X Apply 'Dettol' at once on insect stings D E T T O L' THE MODMN ANTISfPTlC SM i %  N • P •n SMI I i %  DOIIN-T PAIN D" ••gsfsasMgjgjgjaai FOR GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES including:— BELTINC1. in lx-alhrr. C'amrl Hair, and Canva-Iti tlfc al BELT KASTENKRS. Oil. CANS, PKESSl'RE (iAUGES GALVANIS£D & STEAM PIPE & FITTINGS KILTER CLOTH. — WHITE COTTON TWILL SIM M.c III) and KITO M \STI( Ifor Boilrr Wall.) ENIilNK.. CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS unil GREASES For "EVF.RITE" ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING, RIIMIIO C APS Send yaajr orders to THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. I; Phone: 4528 White Park Road. WATCMB& lar l.jdH-. and (>enU at Price* lo suit all Pockeia At Veur Jewellers— V. lie LIMA A CO.. LTD. M BROAII STREET WE HAVE JUST OPENED PILKINGTON BEVEL-EDGE MIRRORS DOME & SQUARE TOP WARDROBE MIRRORS 16' x 60 and 18"x60". Triple MIRRORS — Ogee, Clipped Edge and Dome Top. MIRROR CORNERS, CLIPS, REFLEX HINGES. & MOVEMENTS. • THE CORNER STORE. •>'% % % 



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ESTABLISHED 1899 Vestry Move To Take Over Site Of School Scavenging Depl. Expansion Desired . JPT' £ oard f Guard 'ans of the St. Michael Vcstrv A ^ 1 Bralhw a"' Mr A R Toppin-Mr. F D M and the Chairman of the Commissioners of Health Mr J M Kidney were yesterday appointed by the Vggftn to m.rt the Dean and Cathedral Council t u conwder the poaaible jictio:rin K by tinVMtry of a ,.uadjoining the Scavenging K. J^V^'w f0 T th '' "PP*""""^ should not have to purchase the building, but it should be handed over. him 10 hold, not onlj. u> Churchwarden, but he would !" > without haahatlnii. ah) oftice w this colom anu unnnimouslv. elected Churchwarden of St Michael at its Vestrv meeting ves%  a, terday. Wait Kor Maude Report ataeHShitCk * opi%  view of arquinnK the bulldl the try also made lupuintment* to various Board. %  day. Seconding th. motion for the election of Hon. V. C. Gale a> Churchwarden. Mr. E. D Mottle-. kad last year's Church^ warden for his painstaking and School—Ac understood that the' *" r,nul "ve report which he preoulldlng was dangerous fo r school | %  %  "•" '" the W-trv before th %  ; ointment was made %  I thai ..re thinn th II 'mild l>e said of tin '•i'iiii in ttM • • %  %  1%  1 %  %  l-.lf HCl ,| .. I that it could help assure them f them could sav thev inythii i snad of s* far U then* duty to u 1 Worthy Heritage "Nol only Uiat." he • jnd, "but we .are proud o( the heritage wtiiah was passed on to us by partly on the grounds that they I man) Voirymen who served here should wait until the Maude Ra> baftm lal, K01 indeed whatever port went to the House of Assem1 may be said of the system by bly and because, he said, there some individuals, it can be said waa uiiiuci • Dpaca at the ptaaasnl thai than hai alwayi btan 01 quarters. Ha a)d lh.it the Vestry j this Vestry, members, no matieto What walk of life they belonged. • • alwayii.'ci. Uaa VM-If.ue oi BM uodsjr*privfJ 1 daauttita "' aahi coua%  The St. Michaels Vestry, be •aid, rould hold Its head high He said thai UataDlng u. Mr. Symmonds as he made i-fcn-nt lo the effect of the three or four thousand dollars for paying for shingles for the poor and dssstttuta psuTasn. ba iNalt that Mr Symmonds seemed verv moved. It was a service which list) were responsible for but could not afford at present ind he had been hoping that by now ti 1 Q n einmvnl would have sen* dom of laying aside a sum monev to assist in temporary roIhc homes of th. Hr .1. not go should not Tgo into any capital expendrtadaj'until a de-1 made as to the Maude Report. li. any case, if space were needed to store equipment, another storey could be added to the present building. He added that all the lorries used could be kept in the yard of the department und yet allow for space for an additinn.il two 0 three lorries. He doubted whether the Gov• em men t would sanction such expenditure anyway. In Kight Direction Hon. V. C. Gale observed that 1/ the recommendations of the Maude Report' were implemented. it would mean that they would rasa, on pair :. hnd now increased to QOOflj WO la ml %  %  • %  %  Annual ConvtntlOD would be held in London later tbia year Fortunately two of their memben would l>e in the II.K. al the t.me 1 rapraaanl Automobile Association of Barbados at this it inn 1: discussed the 1! lOUS I %  %  • otorlsts Mr V. A.A. had 1. I ." % %  • %  in Ilk parking ai shepherd B) buslneasmeii of the area had comttaa that they 1 MI ad Two Suggestion* Mr. W,i> made two suggestions He laid that at Lfl Trinidad, there could IHJ .. d-iib r oad**! Radii lalen ranlndlng ix*opic of the various driving rules. ['he %  %  .olid .. fcetl %  :. .v.i ..Ix.li! ourlesy on the road which lie aid was lacking In Barbados. Ho said thai %  %  >< "• %  ici-t* of the Aaauciatinn. h member should be 1 setting an example lor others to follow, hi thiway tlWj WOUld hlaunch a ll |iiogiamme Col. Michtlln appealed for members. He said that the Association was in need of fund(0 t xi„w, the, forty-two-year-old |>e.. 1 for ihe death 1 Duncan Headley—his hroth.r in l.iu on the 18th ol January last. Among the four witnesses wm> S ave evidence yesterday wns ulise Headley, widow of Uu deceased, who occupied the witness stand for the whofe oi tl hie)i last* 'i from 1.4S to i 30 o/cl •led on the wttneai %  he underwent long and dstsilc. Mi y K %  I %  wb|oh led up to the r >n anotlu 1 %  I bunch of ban. la* "over which that dl%W \: w %  ac who la m> :.d. .1 with Ml J S 1 [><•• md instructed I €r. D M Held. Solicitor. ili address to the jury on Urfulf %  ha daft •.. • %  ban in-ui n Mr W W. Reece QC eondiK-ting the %  %  i„Cm IUIA HI II.' ,ill tluii ,.n the afternoon. From about 6.00 p.m %  the price of flsh drops to four rent* each and a lew hourater Us are sold at three cents each A housewife told the Advocate „•,,. yesterday that she has already I und faced the deceased ana the dried a large quantilv of flyini' .mused retreated rtill fa flsh. She will be able t use them 1 deceased.. when flying flsh are out of season The accused 'went mur the '(deceased after *e 11m '^"ssM) %  did not - %  Indies told the Advoeale yestet 1." -Ii.d lus department was pi. poring siudenis for tin Itegrev of ihe i: don The aaavaai m Knau-n an Uia londtm emirseii wn -,.n but Ihe 1 %  %  1 %  11. tl .od the Intnsauaaaon of 1 u 1 psasBjB .,.1,1 pj ... ,-.. of p oaa a hat Horn the lev 1 1 1 ha dapartanani uid grs-M • of ertti ..1 ..milt' of siiiib-nt 1. din '.,!:., ||1 (i lustveh % %  1 v. u though old RncHah has baaai ... 'course in Middle kugli hit partl.Li All in all lbs studanl ho hai tot conniaa '"1 'hn %  1 i-i-ri m Uat and it A %  %  . i from 1350, pin lirtalrtil of speel1 ad b ssh and auUiot but ..hove 111. he ahould have dc*. 1 I !i..|wcity for reading with dlgcrl%  1 thai "it %  ihoped t.t -tait resemch ..itInn the next fan* roai on w-i Indian 1 .icuaicc depaitiu.il' ->! i. I'll-, have liown grest mleie.l In thk s heme and the University College las promises of help in the w;il>f sUff from tho University of %  a soon as the uudrtway. Mrs. H. A. Talma First Lad) Churchwarden Appointed In B'dos MRS II A TALM \ %  |j Churchwarden to be aup Tins took place %  Chriai Church Vmto) Ura Tulma who waa araioi uardiao lo ehtal y—r was proposed bv MC S McKg liuinn Churchwarden *' on ii> All the Mr. ll St. G irdaw Mi t 1 UcKi %  %  %  1 %  %  iving :. ear. Shi' knam lr>t URM %  %  I %  %  %  nbers of the ofnei wouM aoiy win, in %  Other Appoinlini'iii' %  %  '." %  > U OianUi %  md Mr c. u Braodtord f Hi 11. St<; Ward, Mi 1 a, Mr c. M Tu %  > %  Mr. TNI'. I hma* 'ommlsalonen of rleaKa Mi c i MeKaruua Mi M MJO W Mi H t; it 1. .' 1 %  11 • % %  appointing ihi Su 1 1 Mi %  1 in* i', t( 1 i .1 %  %  Mr, c. 8. Maelf 1 Vesfryihen Pa) Tribute To MacKeiizie %  p l 1 list fund Mi M A.I runei "< MI. 1 V I %  BoUVrSI Tuner of ., dom f ,. O 0 l"IIS. K'-en r of th> e Parish Chui Mr F w '' %  ..I 1 ed was walking with a knife m his hand and was aboui in front of the dejoaaad Both men were walkma tlie dceeoseri raised the Itlck "4 the accused but the accused never waited /oi the 4 then. '. % %  Int., a clinch 13 Injured In Derailment 1 : Lords, thariba wouio r u ah anothat Chief in plaea "f Sereb %  1 un< le Taeldl objecti %  • Kham %  %  .cars ago has bee irnment post Bahabur) said. :. I r m M Lahoui 1 % %  > 1 marriage hi I dispute in ihe tribe, marriage Sereise'a wife has given hlrth to daughtera. %  aid the prr ratal Khnma lo t was thai of Administrative Assistant at a salary of C77fi a year whh the prospect of pre\ Secretary at a higher salary WINNEMliLX'A. Nevada. March 2 1 [h,it,, n ,%  !...n were treated t;,^., (or minor injiineafter a land, h slide dersiled .1 lecomative am three cars of tin' Chicago hourm : Western Pacillc Railway liain California Zephyr." The' accident took place last th* train was going alK.ni 40 tude* per hour through a cut in a remote hilly part of a det itorra loosenc onto the track" tippin; he locomotive .,itd haggage car t< a 43 degree angle. A i*iluay pokesnan said two coaches were also derailed -1 r l<4>ed in" on CSH i-gh men fell to th< hi held on to wrre *. %  J ir 1' %  .' %  1 %  %  The Si hands of the aec he ifcacfc "f ihe aeceosed truggled foi sometime The doeeased fell to Ihe n his demonstrated how Uie d ran to the ground 1 II. wa* to the Iwnk of the nM lid no' ,i irhJl I Ths efo a gala M-ase-l hack 1.1 rf hi* 1 %  %  %  %  OUl •I I . trying AhTlc CJJ.W. Will Give £10,300 Tor Wurd B ; AtL.C.w.I.HoHpilal roif. Jain.li. .1 MaraD n CJD. w. will give *;)u.30U f build two addltionul wards at th. age H ;ital to civ %  %  hospital as a teaching hospital foi training; doctors and nu fi a a Jamaica Ho 1 peeled (hat the Wot Id 11. all . 1. I.: graduall) %  saraM •>* health JO I 1 f \fusl IAHIVH* %  %  .1 %  .11 %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  I %  %  I %  %  %  %  I dr. Beaumonl Cek %  I blot Magkttrob 1 (..plain Hoy \lu wifJe vivieiLio' to ba raanovod Iron oalooj rhev will ba d< talnee 1. iftritlna % % %  M aki n g lh t > order on the applies ion of imuiigraiioii authoriUt Die Magli b %  tha appeal md also disallowed ball. Thnty-llvc minute, .iflei n>. .10 lniiniKi.ili"! Ofttcer escorted the Mussons to a watting tagj u takr mam ba Uu Itoyal Oaol. to Mr v.V. ll. nd I %  • thi Paroi %  Uma '" M + On rase 8 \ w A.xDi I) COMMtNDATION CERTIFICATES ki 1 ight i Sooth Af '. %  %  .,.'. d %  I,, si Luc* rdad coa 1 Pared Central I %  idy the .liie.i 1-1 f. ll vtitic ti tha lie '' : '' %  ; '' Tog award 1 Station Ban 4 trudeceased bui lhal hi Clark) U UM I Ha dkad ithe case holding Accused Walks IMI Aftei bai %  %  leate Those award I larke, (de.-eae*li Hitt. Alleyn % %  : 1 opta MS^SSTQ I I 3a Sergeant. %  %  B m WILLIAM HOWELL .1 look around the barbou ad la Carlisle Bar froi nd Frank McNulty. two AnstrsUan yachtsmen. from their yacJit "Wanderer IT' which srrlv \ La& Pslma>> yartarday. Sri", un /'..j,r Auriol Replies Sternh To Tunisian Protest FAKIS. March 77 .WMIIMH,. (toJOSB fSBply WSJ n tha light of President Vincent Aum, ...I hiaftan < losed but Bam..Ministers drafted a new note to the Bey of Tunis end delegated \ against the aneo r.overnmenl wld the Mm Premier take it personallv to ihe Tumsuii. three other Tuin-f.ii Minisien taken during Ihe pai ruler. Th, Minis Jean Forgot Secretary General emergency meetini MsnpnniUvocalm to the rrench Presidency and tb> wercompletely Dfrector of Auriol's personal plosr.. Marcellin aald the Minister.* month ol "Kts more Cabinet. Jacques Koacusko Morlret orste aiawad -n aV lives and 200 muted "OVEN FRESH" SERVICE Our delivery vans and OVEN FRESH SERVICE now make it possible for you to get our Biscuits lrom your grocer or from the shop nearest to you in any part of the Island. Each shop or grocery is fitted with air tight containers to keep the biscuits crisp and fresh. SEND FOR SOME TO-DAY KtfJI (SWUf) iil U*h IVr Pound Mllllll CAIi 54' sHIKUV M GIAIAM ll!\(Kilts 4I> KIBIX (SODA eiACIBS) :{ Illi; WfSI INDIA BISCUIT CO, LIDJ



PAGE 1

rUDAY. MABCII. M. 1U2 BARBADOS ADVOOAM r\r.r nvi Crown Closes Case In Murder Trial *£***££ Michelin Asks Aid Hinder Progress iVMsxAxPof Animal Society .. man, r*op„ Uh.,b„d^ Jj-^C.bU .loop,„, %£% ff7i oS itr. were member* or Harrison • *"raaa> Page mother went to the deceased. Mr. They went to the place where Barnes then held the accused. the second bunch o( bananas was raised up himself and walked nn*. After the accused moved off iM S^IH! 11 ^ SJ I*". 1 n (lh There wfre'many" people on the h road. Mr Inniss told the accused <•** t0 'a*** "p "" %  bananas at th Sh. wu about 40 feet awa> tn „ nff hjd wu#d lhe marL 5^ Mmc from the place where the incicould not , wha hanpenad to Jne Murray told Gibbs 'Don't %  %  the knife. She did not dent urred. College. PP M| people i>ut they can other she indent -u irred. The was about after the sub She saw trie deceased the banana: ^ S* ftL"* .femff JS? -^ th** Uit school >-ear was the ."waving the nick about." knife." The bananas were taken up. < !" ,,w ^jjjuy *. ,-* .snersrvaj •srajsrs Thi When this ineule.il was going on there was window feet tuck him wi.h tho ducIlon Qf Shakeape Caesar." Roughly 1.000 person A "Necktie saw this play, and man> of the nanas fell from both of audience as well as Dr. Hamilton lent was going on „._. £L H -..iiiv „r iWmAtaV^ lhpm and GlDb *' ho'dinit th were kind enough to praise the ... one in the road. £ ccu iTaM XSSSS^i^. <>*•* " %  neck-tie. jutked produelwn. I think OOl) tho*who After the incident the first person £22? J?Z *£!. ThT^u^rt him w,,n *"* knUe H r husl>and & %  • ahcn part m such things she saw was the wife of the dew „ Ukm to the llosiutal aftar tumbl d and '*" Th, re *** " can appreciate the magnitude of ceased The wife of the deceased he wa wounded aacdan inai fl,ht *" ,lon Urr > m %  w * no ">• ffort involved, but I am eonliftrd lhe bead of the deceased, know anything about the will on than seven minutes or so. fidenl that it was well worth %  Ad ;hen a man named Inniss arThe accused went to e house Durlns; these "seven minutes while. We owe a great debt to of the country who at one time or in '" ,n ,,Und quietly nved at the scene. She first saw for the bananas and her mother Carrying", the stick which her Mr. D. A. Fowles for his untiring another contributed to the b.ich. en K e ,,1 > for 48 years. It is th. Inniss bout 20 feet away. spoke to him. The accused left husband had under his left arm work, and also to Miss Weston. bone of this country and the La•" %  arusaiioii that looks after ai the house in a quiet mood. He did dropped. i immediately he wm Miss Nurse.^and the Queen's Col**-ur Welfare Fund. those animals who are 1 1-lrcatc* TO-DAY is the S PC A Tag Day. Colonel K T Micbctin, Ccmmissiurirr of Pottn. Yin-. Pre* %  Chaumun of the Executive Committee of lhe BarbanV S.P.C.A., Rave a broadcast over Rediffusion last night. He said "I am going to speak to you 01 v .. s . you a || •, give ge.ieious.j |Q men ftltsgli lag Uaj Srtuafi takes piace to %  1 A. slain 101 It is the Soc.eiy I-r Uh I*revcntion of Cruelty to Animal* The Society which has bean wora Hon. V. C. GaitChurchwarden m 'rsm pace 1 Mr. Walcott had to ask tbin wlinos5. Uollc tald thai when hho nrst saw Innlwt he was about 20 /e %  As the aec'used left, the dec*..ed came out of the house with Uie aw Inniss he was about 20 *,•. ""„"'•• !" !" '"f '"~ "" '" some of the cast have set Us %  •'> were labourers, Society that is ull lhe lime l.-ok was stretched out. He went down a very high stindard; but I hope He said that there was always •"* tXcT th * welfare o( anim-ls t,~* hoS.,.K ^H S? 1 ,^ 11 *. 1 .' C T *? aee us "' Barbadian pride in not wish"The •> lUooa and work of lliv hen her husband try to emulate it in the future. %  lo g 0 to fln institution and if Society have been made poMbl. most of nw r.TJ .IflL ....".. .I?^ 1 !" ...o elevenih witness to give After her husband fell, sho Speech Day from the store room for iha?use w *' Fu '"' t" maintain machinery for the wel a?.^"?.. 0 /. 1 ".^ WO r k .!i evidence on behalf of the Crown went and held hlr hand. Sho vacated by the Department!! Speaklna on H. was Eulise Headley. widow of called "Sonny I "Sonny I Science A Agriculture We hope ,-lection as Churchwarden" he" hddgerow "Joe did not fall building 'funds hav s a "bank" at the as in recent years, _.. side of lhe road. Her husband the tireless depredations of wood._iut I'l'oteilion of our dunv .k^. —•" — %  -. ...^IVI, iuwn v> • n.'i-M .II. ,11 otniiir *\'iiv •• iikiiiuuun* rtr none rliTItnn nc rhnr.iM.--.i„ ._ %  """'OS. '* '">% puSSIole lOr a< i' u'"".'';; M S K L !" .^ Dunc n t %  " hm ne did not answer she to add lhe upper stores "exl hX oSttTJS Gate !" d^ S.^t. "' u '" ""* : V """ "'" hank of the | ror.d The deceased She .aid they .'Ived toplher at ssid "oh Lord, he Is dead." d.,s Our iraaUal atfaltlo?^ !" \£> 2£iJX?^JJ£*??: *tasl alter these nniortuna J* up s, .". K7 "'Ananas Bryan's Villas*-. St. Thomas, up She onty saw I look it to hu wit*, house. to u, c Umc rf h,, daath.on the hed^row She .. More II.in.in The accused went to the of the deceased to get the baneff"?! !" nas. The wife of the deceased MO Jl_ told the accused %  the deceased lived together from with a knife. The accused cut w ^T r raarTi *ii n ""i another bunch of bananas. The „***£* Jey re accused again put this second "tL^^J 1 *' '. „,, K.,i-h in ihi-orM in.rl B*MT.mrh "" r l *er's land. This was the Joe „. on thoevcr ^S^TSS "K ^^" %  S^^Sff'S.i: -fcj"* fe '""""" "-" IM January 1.52 She .dent.nid ,he„ „ c ^ .£?*T Jhi of "SSSSjS tUTi K E XSSr^SjS/iS^ ffK* P> "" *-ut the body to Dr. A. C. Klrlon who was concerned over her drstrt husmany of you will take the oppor-vmnathv fn. TH„ Znnm,'*.!,<% Yu ' nihlly want to kho\ performed the post monem exbond." Im.it. of lookln, over them this ried h'fel : ure thai theVwaiId h "' "'•' SJ>.cX In BarUido amlnatton at the St. Thomas She did not stay until the Poafternoon, and If you do so will ,{ ln ,afe hands. ** "" l *•< %  "•' ""'" '""•* lico arrived. She went home. agree that the iccneronty of Govo lcavo her Her "afKh 1 "" Estallne. and When she. her husband. Jane ernment has been used to flood hottse. Then he saw the deceased lwo ""l" 1 children lived at the Murray and the Defendant camo purpose and UK iccusad The accused ? anlc house. She and her husband out from the house, there were confess I had hoped to be was walkuM behind the deceased v d wins* 'rom 1MB and more people in the road Includable to announce to-day that we <_ ,_ .„.. |n< h „ d u n „. r &lalmo Mr should have a School Canteen In married Inniss was there whan the Inci,1|C near future. It would be "work" dent occurred. bunch Tn the road and soldTouch ^_ , these bananas now" Th, de',2Z„"%J?£?,J"!" V 0 '""', *?' r Basket Taken l.'p ccascl came down the road with JflJ'.'LSS uS.".1 2 ~ n .' ,'"1 Sam """ %  w "•*" a stick._wcnt to the bananas and HJT !„ w ", tr. !" 'T d l !" "i"""> Tea not far olt. "S look then, up, and the accuscl ?"' '?f""',•' '"'' J>"r. '? h ">" Boyeo was also in the re "n'd" thr-c^assS'VlKl "iT U Si '.S S „a"m„*e h r who^ed^ ^Z y ££' ^."'baske? wh^h -"Ore to state our n-eds. We drVw C J .. h on th. te'.ph. ne M, fSnani; *£"." "the banai.1 Ju A .,f r " !" ft" <>• "JcV'h.d Tb^Sji *fo? S." Sana9VJSS ."T *"" >'"L an,J !" ej ,h *, \ ,, o„! "w {L""'^ J £ij£3* S *£* %  dropped ta the iround and thd .i^.'ilM!*.' 'jJ h ".S W *5* 'S" '" "" d rim %  "> %  3I •" %  'J£L' V .' t! ,, ii ,,r !*T 1 ,nd P" Churchwarden, he would sel ,l" ""• Telephone Directory 11.1s.' accuiad hold the deceased around H"J ' "* "" '!" d Hjr -Sonny bring the basket for tho ' m ,? "i J £if„ m ''.J',"!^ 1 ?" 'ull support and co-ope.alion of W" %  £"* %  " S2 ""'P "<1 •"" The-ieceased dropped" a sUck %&"„„, %  ,., w „„ „, "•? bout 20 *,Ut 5?' iS* road .".'""'St? £'"„" M "".b'T'J* ""'"""" "Oir Inspector, ,1,11 ,h, -hlcrThe had in Ms hand and ,„ T ,£ ,^' u Lr uTna off a debt i?'" !"""* Sh Callpd ""'* W forT long'has passS li? ,Sli """ r Jl "> <""or appoint, s'augti.cr houand M tha ZJ'Z'^cn^ '" *""* W y ^^SSk 0> "" drt,t nSb.^'"." "£',5,0^?;," tu, • ~nS" h hVS^I *.in" ~*" -" CuaM-an, """V "rough, ,„ for .laugh., g Af Th^d= fe^S; s^edXJ ^h^b^Shd'Sen,^ £ | fell on hLs hack on lhe ahnv^ Everything was in her possesKxcellent Report reasonable not to really the many demands which are made from Government, and it would be premV.rhe'had'gnVn sumptions to attempt to assess their comparative importance, but, comforted by lhe Scriptural lesion hls duU ^ verV"rYously",nd upon importunity. 1 venture once UM.I1 fin The Society has th: (31 Inspectors stationed in differ ent parts of the Island. The Hon. V. C. Gale first thanked Inspector* look out for overwork Mr Symmonds for proposing him ed. overlojde.1. underfed and un .1. Churchwarden and Mr. Mntlcared for animals, nnd take step kfl for lajot ra ll n g the proposal to relieve lln-n urT.-iiii^s and im lt.(,rrlng to Mr. Symmonds' prove their conditions. Th. as Churchwarden, lie said Society has a van which Is read.. Went to hasten to anyone who has ". '" .. i,' 5 *wf d t"PH" fullering animal or anyone want "' ,if ..?:\ mm ond !. h d lakrn ln n animal destroyed In i l hmnuiip manner. Our Chief In I'leiitfously and done hk .-r. kitchen window. IhTconrr mad Wm m ,0,d £?B ^ d ^= .hJrr^l m e n Fall The deceased of the road bank. The a (the witness) and told him that proved !" ngton was also nd other pcopl *• .'.llowing other % % %  made— Guardia... C A ItrathwHite, JJ, arm "r.fe.| and walered "," l SSST' mn ,,,ffcrln b ,or onn of ""wr"".. V. W. A. c hase, A H, siniighter. lhe most serious dangers to eduTn P p 'n. Hon. V. C. Gale and as "The Society i almui to l.uild catlonal standards Our IJbrarj' '^n-rnembers of the ,Vestry. M.-d-in Dog rteluge. As S.K.II a grant has recently been incre-ised tns f" J "* %  Kidney. E.V.r.odthis is donn. dog r B tetters wii to the same flgurt % %  thai of other J*^l 'f^fan " %  H %  be employed and equipped he did not know what he did. lag of the accused took year. %  tsmatt, .his ihc'\,m;"l'h,aS'"hmJ "c.ned %  "' school 1 Sixth Foi steadily aeeumulaunS t'plr\ of BOON t'Xp-'iiMV.' lalso the banana. A m n -Teii ci',-"n 'IM"."^ !" "";n'.TTt oTve'llclle'' .'" h^m •' 'Sr&&\&3F IR named Inniss told the accused ,„„„ „„„ ,„,„„„ Jan0 M ^ !" >* a at temottjA lxlh fca-m bov For Inalan..-, -.not to run away. rav Jn ., ph c ,ibbs, her husband S2 !" i,i2. Jj re nw Provldlnfl the expenUv, He saw the wife of the deceased a „ a h^, 1 ,,. Tlul Mil .„ Ito l" J." mV h !"!" 11 *" n lJ books for the Science SSSSftlKS S''bFTo-urt' below^fha, Z a J M? 48 Wn V a aO""* ,lvc B *" p WM l h mother's Jane MurfaP( about 20 feet away, and I sometime befi happened Sh lhe bank of the road. That fight was tho the .t au the incident nmlAt of B contentior, between standing by neighbours and her sister Jane. Deposition Read „. , Mr. Walcott asked that her While the two men were strug, 'Inner Lost deposition be read to the Jury I gling Ihtre were people around. J**ph Gibbs tost a finger duraaw when my husband got the To Mr. Walcott: Millington said '"• inaI n nt. and her husband stab. Olive Belle was about 20 that he was present when the Inwa bou !" over" by the Asslie feet away by her father's house cident occurred. He saw Police t.ourt. where Winifred lives. I am sure Constable Walker but he never J ne "J 1 ,he fought earlier of that. I saw Olive ll.llc fa.-e saw the wife of the accused, "L, e lh al f. amo dfly looking from her father's house The family used to have 20 feet away. The story he gave berorc the bickerings over the land. Other She was inside the house lonkMasistrntc was right, but he children. Jane and Joseph wanting out from a window, could noliremember all the cvled their share of the land which I can't remember using tho rienre. Whin the men fell to the $hv was working to pay off a word gap before the Magistrate ground the bananas were in the debt to the defendant, left by the I hadnt told the Court that Ilelle road. The accused ran behind father. was looking from the svfndknV the deceased with the knife. Thr. To the Court: The row came until asked bv vou (Mr. Walcott) deceased ran to the bananas and over tins land. When I came to the seemOHvB turned about to face the accused. To Mr. Reccer— On the Belle was at her father's window The deceased was a man with 18 1/51, she had bananas growlooking out. I didn't say that lier,, a medium size. Both men lifted ing on the land. She used to fore because one can't remember / \, \ up the bananas and as they occupy both her father's house everything at the same time. clinched both of them dropped as well as her own which was on the bananas. the land. Belle's Evidence On the 18th January. Joseph Before the magistrate Gibbs came up not far froi Deceased Stabbed SixthT'and some of lhe ••xnenstve A<-t Hislorv textbooks for the Modern Sixth We hope to extend this help to Classical dictionaries Classical Histories, and Malheinatienl textbooks. This Is how we are utilizing lhe small profits we have to make 00 our boot room schemes to be sure of a ercVlit halnnre We have not much money in any one year but liig what we can. Our purchase nnd sale of seeOOd hand book* was quite a success and I believe a bem-m to parent* The more it Is used the better for all members ..f the School. I hope It may not seem ungracious In me lhat I have not thinkcd all those. Governors. Staff, and Old Bov* who have helped the I worked for it during the jf.ar It is not that I am unappreciatlve. but merely that tho list is long, and in any case 1 %  n ve find the victims seldom like It and winder "f lhe rathe"We want to rxtend our ed 1 eloeJc, Mr R I. KIIIK The 0 "-' 1 piogrammc. ana bung to th, rhunhwaraWi and MM I H A notloa <>( Iho public the Dumbai Tudor. Hon. C, n Ivclvn were of thoughlless act., whith o-il> tod for the Cathedral eonbring -utTenng to animals in Un Oil nd Mr n. G. I^aeock Island and which must b: tnt the Vaatr* under "AooolntWithout funds, the ."tsiindertheAnglicanChur.il actions are restricted and scop. limited. With mor. money w. Id expand and bring reliel t. in each eaaq except thjit ol Mr Jtti % %  i Ou it larger number Of MIIT.'IIII. animals, and enlightenmeiit t< those owners and user* of animal who are apt to forget that th .orrect thing to do is t. net • ff loaded donkey tart going up a hit to apand olher thoughtless acts, a'st 4 llralth. that animals have feeling and *nui liiMUision was introduced by Mr, not he treated only as a means t 1. W. Miller as to whether an old .,,, end i diould not give place to "Tomorrow our S.I'.CA aaj w 5M: %  ^ %  • tors will be all over lhe ia|an< Mr. Miller said that an oppornf ,|,| n| yl(U Io buy a S.P.C.A. Ua SSSJ^^JS £! %  'V Vm ". ,i£ P'~* ^ut one and give generoumember. >o that they might a I ri(h( r hi Sliri „ y h „ j large family to look after and whl tho Incnaaad coal oi everythini <-anti.it do It etnriently wkthou funds. We look to eveiyone tg I v e something toward: •ini-iiiitinenis were the sa lam venr. New Member For Old When lhe Vestry came Io i pouil im Commi xperience. Himoved that M. TudM and Mr Hewitt Idappointed to the Board of the Commissioners of Health, but the nwUori .' r %  >" % %  < %  HI. id!. Mr. Hewitt who agreed with Mr. Miller's suggestion, proposed that worthy Mi Miller should be a membe and this was seconded by Mi the my evidence before Olive Belle. „,,, , ln v ,. n lo rccord #ptclt l C. A Brathwalte. Mr HlUtl Onlj The accused slabbed the deFK* *."*'* nCr nome is. cut a was In court when olive Belle wof(1 of (hanks to lhe Prefects, secured half of the lowest number ceased moving the knife straigh*. f !" >" f %  "*">*• andI put it down "** J^'Jr** can /. a >' wh al whose co-operation and growing 0# votes when the six nominate:! across to Inc borlv of the de:eas?d. e **"' tor l second bunch and •ny of the witnesses said at all w^. o( responsibility have been for the five appointments were He usttl to help the deceased ftCr nusband took the ffrst bunt*. My husband Joseph Gibbs. of great value Few things have balloted for. with the canes when they were and carried It home. Jane Murray and myself all step_ lvcn mp griglcr pleasure or more When he nominated Mr llralhbeing cul. Bunch Put Down **L d ?.T,. ,n 1 !!3i r ' d ,0 rthor encoi.ragement waite to be Senior Guardian Estahne Gibbs of Bryan's. St. Gibbs put down the second -^,-it„ nlT V. r onc tn *' i I trust I have not detained you BOB. V. C. Gale s .id lhat Mr Thomas, told the Court that tho bunch, followed her husband ?li it nurn be r 0 f her ideas" who took great Interest in the %  %  %  — iffatn of this parish and of Birrnarnaiir. her Vettry Want* School Slle t-ados. He had represented thite ji%JS^3:Ss3 aus? ~ ^r,-; %  a'lrr ihpm oqu pmcnl as Ih*. boundaries of h !" Ihn parish wouMbe .atandad. •" I' %  .ii i n I ,.,.1 Thi^-fore thr move for tba acquisl I did not lake possession of lhe llun was """'• '" *• rt n land My father gave me possesdirection. ihrr "Joe" /the .Menriani)"iur !" lion "' '" 1 5 " " true Mr. MolUey replied that Iher. e.~.J .L""T1f„ ..!i r ^ '"at the row of IMS rime about a. no room for more Ion*. > because "Joe" Gibbs forbade the department. He* said that with :ccus£l rerni'l^Wr^nd'iAr lieS^TaTrSi."" '"""""' '"* J,!^' """ •"-Pa"'"! " ththe laslldln. of Hou.ln S.-home. .."Joe" had. kolfeinhl. hand. *$>*, .,. evident In ,ha, S.in'^m^rne^^MoV !" : Th. Junlon Guardian fMr. "; c *. ">eone case to the effect that my father plove-1. more brooms and shovels Toppini promised to give even ^thedefenp* d „ead,ey„ a^watchm.n. My !" ^^ !" ^ !" -$*££,£ could to the E" 1 ?.-. 0 ^TT^Z^ifcu couldn't come in the house. Jane wilt I knew my fat he, ItS JJJ^ \H t.n ali? came up **"<*" her father's would g.v. „rh hit.. „ rTe Se? w.h h o d h.d ak a CI knrfe a i y n ETJSt £ ^^ ^ Sd^liS l.r 'deceased wa T nude Tl* hoSS ""? ?' h n JoC nPtd to fc Prior to Ihtlf wUhTstick The aecused^en cnter he bBrml Jop trom "*"UKband was a paid servant of Jnd u^'dec^sTdSollowe? Km ,n ^ h 2* % „ v htTf " father and mothor and her mother went after the **"* twitness) told 'Joehe deceased left. She saw another !" !" working on his "own bunch of bananas In the road and *ff P'oee. nd Jane said -Joe. as the deceased tried to take up Joe eome. donl go In there; tho bananas, the accused held on they want to kill you more lo him. D *. nana ar 1 ( he ground.' Both men clinched nnd the deceased fell to the away, and she and her husband the left the house and followed "J< Bedown lhe road, tho "Joe" had a k-..r.ha Ms be> ground, the, stick which he was Her husband had i holding dropped from hii henri. with which be barred the defenpj d Headley M a watelAftcr the deceased fell, her dant ouof the house. ii^fti,| ill shades of OOUlaOM amuld adtr i| Mi I'.r-lhwaile %  1B Stmog l-elleN w*in did no! fe-sf savin* what he had to sav. Mr. Brathwalte said he appre. Hit remarks Hon. V C C.le had made concerning him •nd he would ondravoui to WOrl '.r th" interest of the people ol and so enable th i ietv tu t-ik alter more of 'ho* %  l. %  iiinut look after themselves On hehalf of our dumb friendI thank vou for your support to drd LIBR0X MADE BY mfi*vik DRUG to: A wide assortment af Wedding Gifts Prices to suit all Y. De LIMA A CO.. I I'll10 BROAD STBErr SHEETS PILLOW CASES SHEETING BKX WE >R SIIF.PTS fl x IM rarh tlM n x n.rt 3 x so IJ.M RKXWKAR PII.I.OV. (ASKS 20 x 30 each 1.K UOMBSI SIIKKTS 90 x 108 each M.29 COTTON SIIKrH'INC. SO" wide. Per yard J PILLOW COTTON .16" w id*. Per yard 11JJ BUTTER MUSLIM 36 wide. Per yard 60c* 32c. BUTTER MUSLIN Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13, WOAD STREtt DRINK & ENJOY COOLING & REFRESHING 2iiv. ranA llCNTAL BATH — rleanse* all Hn.luif. without brushlm Rrmovf. all FILM FOOD PAItTIt LF.S and Smoken' Hlalm. <'annul harm your fr'alac TKaTn In an* wa. Put denture* In a wlutlon of LIHROX at night—Blo-r li'i.rmn:lil i ever> nuiriitiix BOOTS P. K. TABLETS' I for thp Npeedr relief of pain llesdaehe Neuralgia Rheuanatlun NrurltU i.n.Hi ,t ),. and all Nerve pains. A safe and rertaln Remedr far Inflarnia. vevere rutAs nd rhllU. Boola P R. Tablets have the fnrmula written on Ihr Bottle Cantaln no harmful drug. Kill nol upael the Heart ar out Dlgeillve dUlurb^nrr t/per B.lllr RrUll U. rach. I hutWrathrrhrad lid. II g SELLING AGENTS | : : Iiii"i> Purr Drug To. |l SENSATIONAL O F 1 E It TO MAKE ROOM FOR NEW STOCK, WE HAVE DECIDED TO OFFER FOH OAK ll/M. ##.VM i vA snvn simiiiix OF LADIES DRESSES AT 2 FOR $5.00 AMI \ NIMH IAI. IHS. Ol M 25/ a ox AI.I. mill II mil ssi s l\ SI'lllh N. B. — No Alterations Undertaken C.F. HARRISON & Co. (B DOS) Li,|. DIAL 2352 PRUNE CREAMS TODAY? SPECIAL ill knights Phoenix Sotlu I minium FOH THE THttllTY HiniiVS ASi'Ai: \QVS WOVf I.KTONA QUEEN l'r\ S< >Vf p | MAHK1.A SPANISH BTUPPBD OUV MAKKI.A PLAIN BP per |ar ( RAWI'dllDS < BEAM < BACKERS per tin AUSTRALIAN LEG HAM-. || Tor <> i Thu Waak n 30 :t 32 i I I.ne 1 I I I ftl 1.60 i 4il AC1K PEANUT HirriKlt—per Jar fll KHAKT CHEESI ,36 N1 W ZEAL "•'' (MH'liMi fll \\ DANISH si ED B v l U "Hi PEATHER HAMBURGER MF\K % %  Tin .60 %  JEI ; V j .44 GREEN LABEL MANGO < HUTNEY SAUCE—per Ilot. M DANISH si.K ED HAM %  : 1 SI CROSSE At BIACKWEt.: BoL .75 COCKADE FINE RUM STAJVSFEMM. s##f.\ to. I.in.