Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




ee ee a ee a ane...

Harvbados



ESTABLISHED 1895





Trade Union Leaders Must ©



f

a ee
WEDNESDAY,

Give People A Fair Deal

Future Of W.I. Can
Rest With Them

DECLARING the twelve weeks’ Trade Union Course
open at the Y.M.C.A. yesterday morning, Sir George Seel,
Head of the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion in the West Indies, told the students attending the
Course that if they succeeded in their duty of seeing that
their people got'a fair deal, they would have a tremendous
influence over them, and would really have the future of
the West Indies in their hands.

Sir George added “I do hope you will want to lead
them in the direction of building up a really good people in
the West Indies. I wish you every possible success during
this Course.”

The course, the second of its kind to be held in Barba-
dos, has been made possible by a further grant under the
Colonial Development and Welfare Act to enable the Comp,
troller to organise a school of West Indian Trade Union
Officials. It is being attended by 19 students from Barbados,
British Guiana, Trinidad, British Honduras, and the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands. Dean of the school is Mr.
F. C. Catehpole, Labour Adviser to Colonial Development
and Welfare.

Among distinguished persons who attended the opening
session wereyMr. Philip Sherlock, Vice Principal of the
University College of the West Indies, Mr. C. A. Gross-
smith, Administrative Secretary, C.D. & W., Mr. P. Hewitt-
Myring, Press Relations Officer, C.D. & W., Mr. F. L. Wal-
cott, Secretary General of the Barbados Workers’ Union,
Mr. Jack, Labour Commissioner, Barbados, and Mr. Denis
Bell, lecturer in Trade Union and Industrial Relations at
the University of Glasgow, who will lecture on the history
and development of the Trade Union Movement. Mr. Beil
also addressed the gathering, welcoming students at the
opening session.

After the addresses of welcome by Sir George Seel, and
Mr. Bell, a vote of thanks was moved and seconded by two
of the students, Mr. H. W. Crichlow of British Guiana, and
Mr. G. H. Charles of St. Vincent.

The Dean of the school then discussed briefly with the
students the syllabus and other activities of the school.

@ On page 7

24 Ships Lost| Anti-U.S.
In 5 Years |Vemonstrators
During the past five years over Smash Cars

two dozen schooners and. Motor
Vessels, which called at Barba- ROME, March 25.
A milling crowd of 6,000 young

dos, were either lost at sea, burnt
students massed before the United

or wrecked. The majority of the
vessels lost were schooners and] States embassy here and demand-
ed that a delegation of about ten

had they been equipped with
radio-telephone sets they could be received by United States|
Minister Llewlleyn Thomson, jnr.

have been warned against bad
weather or any other danger such
as floating logs. The students waving Italian and
Trieste flags were met at the open
The Schooner Zenith was} iron gates of the Embassy by Chiet ;
recently lost at sea. She left here} Security Officer Norman Schute
on December 19 and nothing has The spokesman of the demon-!
Seen eee oe aes na strators speaking in English said|
on her way from BG to Barbe- ane = ee eee
: ae col ceiv by the bassador “they
dos in 1950, carried with her the} vou not be held responsible for
future acts of the demonstrators”.







skipper and two passengers.

The Alberta Compton made

‘ Schute told the youths that the
ee: — “s ene delegation could not be allowed in!
destroyed by fire in Port-of- the Embassy as long as they were'
Spain harbour a few weeks later.| Tepresenting the mob. He said|

“Come back this afternoon with-,
out the mob and we will be happy |
to receive you but we do not in-
‘tend to be intimidated.”—-U.P.

In 1949 Schooner Alna Leotaud
was involved in a collision with
the Lady Nelson. She also sank.



Some of the other boats: lost !
during Les period Mecca or rites |
Buen peranza, Schooner Critics °
which was wrecked ‘off the Public | Blast Kills 35
Market in 1949, Schooners |
Deliverance, Endeavour W, G. G. NAPLES, March 25.
Glory, Princess Louise, Reginald; Thirtyfive workers were re-
Wallace, War Risk, Voltara M,|ported killed and more than 40
United Brothers, Uncatina, M.V./injured in an explosion in a
Trader Horn, Royal Rio, Rio|tunnel being built for a hydro-
Hatcha, Manana, Gloria Henri-'electric project near here today.

etta, M.V. Goodwill and Potick| The tunnel was under construc-
which is lying on the bed of tne|tion by a private company.
inner basin of the Careenage. Ambulances rushed to
scene from Caserta Capula
The big three masted Schooner, | Naples itself. A doctor and medi-
Frederick P. Elkin was scrapped | cal equipment was flown to
off Brandon’s coast. She was the | Caserta from Rome as soon as
last of the old fleet of three mas-|the news was flashed to police
ted boats which traded between |headquarters in Rome,
the West Indies and Canada. t

the
and

—U-P.










>





LLOYD TAITT, a lorry driver of Salters, St. George,
died immediately after he was involved in an accident
along My Lord’s Hill, St. Michael, at about 6.45 a.m
yesterday .

The lorry, G. 125, owned by Bulkeley Ltd., and driven
by Taitt, was carrying sugar to Bridgetown. It ran off the
road and struck an electric pole. The pole was broken,
and Taitt was pinned between the metal hood of the lorry
which was broken by the weight of the sugar; and the
steeving wheel

rter

examination was performed yesterday

MAIL FOR THE
“OLIVE BLOSSOM”

A POSTMAN walked into
a Government Department
yesterday with mail—among
which was a letter addressed
to the “Olive Blossom” — a
yacht. Putting the letter

through a pigeon hole to an
attending lady stenotypist, he

asked “is the ‘Olive Blossom’
here?” And back came the
witty reply “Olive Blossom!
Why, that has not been here
since 1605". The Stenotypist
obviously recollected the land-
ing at Holetown of the first
English settlers and was in a
humorous mood. The postman
sfemed bewildered. An

yway
the yacht is lying in Carlisle
Bay.

“Strong Steps”
Urged Against

CAPETOWN, SOUTH
AFRICA, March 25

A “save-the-constitution” de-
bate was initiated in the Senate
by Opposition United Party
leader G. Heaton Nicholls.
Nicholls charged that Prime
Minister Daniel F. Malan had
precipitated South Africa into
the most serious crisis since the
union (of English and Africans).



West Reject

Sovi
viet
Proposals
By K. C. THALER
LONDON, March 25.
reaffirmed in identical notes t

Moscow Tuesday their desire fo
a “just and lasting peace treaty



jected Soviet proposals for
been created for free elections” in
the Soviet zone of Germany and
in Eastern Berlin.

The notes of the United States
Britain and France rejected the
Soviet suggestion for the creation
of German national forces and
urged instead “participation of
Germany in a purely defensive
European community.

The notes were delivered to the,
Kremlin in reply to Soviet pro-|
posals of March 10 which suggest-
ed a four-power conference n the}
German peace treaty with the
participation of an _ all-German
Government,

The six-point reply imvited
Soviets to allow the United Nations
Investigating Commission to enter
the eastern parts of Germany and
Berlin to ascertain whether ‘‘firs!
essential conditions” exist for
holding genuinely free elections.

The notes were hammered t
in length in top level discussi
of Big Three Western Powers, and |

Nicholls said that Malan’s aim;in consultation with Federal Ger-

ty
the Nationalist Party supreme in
South Africa.

He moved that the Senate take
“strong steps” against the de-
clared intention of the govern-
ment to overrule the Court of
Appeal judgment refuting Ma-
lan’s Apartheid Bill and demand-
ed that government act in ac-
cordance with the Constitution;
failing which it was “in duty
bound” to resign.

Meanwhile in Pretoria anti-
government “Torch Commando”
said tear gas and stink bombs
which were thrown at a protest
meeting against the Apartheid
Bill last night were manufactured
in the laboratories of Pretoria
University.

A girl hit squarely in the face
with a bomb during the demon-
stration was reported in danger
of losing one eye.

—U-P.

K.L.M. Finds Gold
After Crash

FRANKFURT, Germany
March 25.

Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM)
officials said they have recovered
all but $10,125 worth of gold
from the wreckage of the KLM
plane which crashed here Satur-
day.

They said the plane carried 500
kilograms of gold valued at
$562,500. Earlier officials said
$125,000 worth of gold coins and
$65,000 worth of gold ingots were
missing, but they were recovered



j from the crash area.

‘UP.

32 Sabre Jets
ight 60 MIG’s

SEOUL, March 25.

One Communist M.I.G. 15 was
destroyed and another probably
destroyed in a high altitude air
battle between 32 United States
Sabrejets and 60 M.I.G.’s East of
Sinuiju.

The jet battle took place as Red
jets tried to ‘break through a
screening force of Sabrejets pro-
tecting fighter-bombers attacking
supply routes and storage areas in

—U.P.”



| North Korea.

} LLOYD TAIPY, driver of

‘ conveying to the City.

In the other picture



is not to fight for the Sovereign-|man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer |
of Parliament but to make|in Paris last week.—U.P.

LORRY DRIVER
\SMASHED TO DEATH

eRe



Terrorists
Kill Twelve

SINGAPORE, March 25.

|

’ e
Communist terrorists killed eight! — _

policemen, two European-born
government officials and two gov-

; ; have’ signed |

ernment technicians in ambush a covenant

early today. ‘pledging
Eight other policemen were en es to

woundeq fm the trap sprung by}

the Red band only a few miles

from Tanjong im on
Perak-Selangor border.

Escorted by the local police, the
government officials were en route
to a rubber estate on the outskirts
of Tanjong Malim to repair a pipe-
line which had been sabotaged by

the



bandits, lcomplete break with Britain
One of the Europeans killed] much in the way of the Eire
was R, M. C. Codner, holder of the} breakaway Another extreme |

Military Cross and a veteran of
World War II. Codner was assist-
ant District Officer for Tanjong
Malin.

Communists after killing or
wounding every armed man in the
party escaped wit! 13 police guns. |

| They left behind two of their dead
| —UP.



*‘News Blackout”’
On Truce Talks

PANMUNJOM, KOREA,
March 25

U.N. negotiators meeting with
Communists under the newly
imposed news blackout made a
new attempt to break the dead-
lock in prisoner of war discus-
sions.

United Nations staff officers
submitted a “preliminary state-
ment” on the Communist pro-
posal made on March 5 to con-
tinue negotiations for exchang-
ing prisoners of war on the basis
of lists already echanged.

There is no indication of what
the United Nations Command
said since this statement was
made in “Executive Session’.
However observers believed it
either altered the rejection al-
ready made by the United Na-
tions or that it invited the Reds
to alter their orginal proposal.

this lorry, was killed when he was

involved in an accident at My Lord’s Hill yesterday morning.
Top picture shows the load of sugar which the lorry was

the electric pole which the lorry

struck is shown. The X shows where Taitt was pinned.



The Big Three Western xe

with a unified Germany, but re-!
four }
powers talks “until conditions have!

it

|

“MARCH 26, 1952

SIR GEORGE



SEEL

SIR GEORGE SEEBL, K.C.M.G., Head of GO. D. & W,, addressing
students at the 12-weeks’ Trade Union Course which opened at the

Y.M.C.A. yesterday morning.
Dean of the Course is Mr.
co. D. & W.

F.

Queen Will |
Visit Scotland
In June

(By ROBERT MUSEL)

LONDON, March 25

Queen Elizabeth the Second
will make her first journey to!
Seotland since her accession in|
June and Court circles suspect
that one reason for her visit will
be to sample for herself the!
trength of the revival of Scot-
h nationalism

|

There’s been rumbling north|

of the border which has been}

eausing some disturbing echoes |
in hitehal!








"More than

half the adult |
— population of |
Scotland)




liament for
their country
They want
QUEEN eLIzABETH self rule, The
vast majority of the two million
signers want it “in all loyalty to
the Crown”. But there’s a small
but restless group which wants a|



group wants a Scottish Dominion

There have been “revolution”
and home ruie and_ self-rule
movements before, and England}

has watched them come and go}
without too much concern, This |
time the Scots seem to be insist-
ent and a Royal Commission will



Cc. Catchpole,

Attlee Wins
Vote Of
Confidence

LONDON, March 25
Prime Minister Clem-
won resounding vic-
tory within the Socialist Party
when Labour Members of Par-
liament gave him a hearty con-
fidence vote in the leadership

Former
ent Attlee

Attlee had been fighting bitter-
ly with Leftwinger Aneurin Be-
van over forcing Labour Mem-
bers of Parliament to support the





Defeat Labour
Motion

LONDON, March 25



probably be set up to examine Prime Minister Winston Chur
the entire administrative set-up ,chill’ Government Tuesday
between the two countries. That|night defeated a Labourite mo-
isn’t all. Many Scots are not|tion seeking to censure it for
happy about the Royal title)/“skimping” on education at the
“Elizabeth the Second”. It is said|expense of school children.
that since the first Elizabeth did The vote was 312 to 283.
not rule Scotland north of the fis ‘ ; Be
border the present Queen should The Commons then passed by

be Elizabeth the First

Stone of Scone

There's still considerable feel-
ing over the Churchill Govern-
ment’ decision to keep the
Stone of Scone in Westminster
Abbey. This slab of stone most
sacred of Sotland’s relics was



dragged from the Abbey by na-
tionalists on Christmas Day 1950
and brought to Scotland where it
was eventually discovered amid
the ruins of Arbroath Abbey,

It used to rest under the Coro-
mation Chair in the wide open
Chapel of St. Edward the Con-|
fessor. Now it has been chained)
to the 600 year old chair built to}
receive it when the English|
brought it down from Scotland
and’ placed it behind a tall iron
grille

Twice in the past few days
police guards in the Abbey have
been. strengthened on_ tips
that another attempt might be
made to take the stone. That
this. will happen has been pre-
dicted by Dr, John MacCormick

head of the Scottish Nationalist
Party.

Recently in the House of
Lords Viscount Elibank whose

direct ancestor signed the agree-
ment of 1296 which King Ed-
ward I “betrayed” when he took
the stone from Scotland suggest-
ed that it be returned after the
coronation. He was supported by
Baron Calverley who said that
the English by keeping the stone
have become “receivers of
property”.

Rich Country

The Scots
ern Ireland

often point to north-
which is a smaller
nation with less population but
completely controls its own do-
mestic affairs instead of being
integrated with London. As one
Scot, Ian Coloquehoun the writer
put it’“Scotland is a much richer
country than northern Ireland”

She produces more food per head
of her population than England
does. She export her beef and
her electric pc nto England
get iothing 1 return except
meat rationing uel hortages,
and ct f vil ervants
whi te ar f
prod liger us

2

@ On Page

311 to 282 a Government coun-
ter motion which stressed for
economy in the school system

but promised the essential fabric
“of the educational system will

be preserved. ae
The Labour opposition motion

demanded the restoration of ci

made in the original educatio

budget estimates for the comir

financial year

They charged that the cuts im-|

paired the maintenance of hig
education standards and planne |
expansion pr ogrammes

—U.P.



Malcolm
Recalled From
Executive

From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, J’ca., March 25
Joseph Malcolm was today re-
called from the Executive Council
as Minister for Education when
the House of Representatives
voted to revoke his appointment
on the grounds that he had not
attended meetings of the Execu~
tive Council for three months.

had not attended the
arrest last}

|
|



Malcolm
Council since his
December on conspiracy charges |
in connection with the farm}
workers ticket fraud and const:
tently refused to resign his ap
pointment as a Minister pending
the result of his trial which i
now before the Appeal Court

I'he call for his resignation in-|
creased when he was convicted |
last week but Malcolm refused to |

«

ADDRESSES TRADE UNION




PRICE.: FIVE CENTS

OFFICIALS



Federation Now
Will Not Aid W.l.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 25,
Federation now will not help the West Indies. Instead
a truce to political experiment is needed in order that the
changes which have already been made can be digested.
These views are expressed in a letter to the Daily Telegraph
by Mr. C. E. Shepherd a retired lawyer whose experience
of the West Indies goes back over 50 years and who until

last year had been living in Barbados.
—_—_—— ——— Mr. Shepherd say the recent
introduction of universal adult

| suffrage has resulted in lessening

Three Steal
$600,000

|the ability in different legisla-
tures Capital investment is
needed to raise the standard of

living of the islands. 3ut invest-







re-armament Programme and _ it Sned:: en *et/e ; Lae 4
. ’ é going to be tempted
was disclosed last night that one 1 4 : eee
; t Bev an’s supporters intended BOSTON, March 25, /|'0 put their money into an area
2 ma ; The if the legislature may be domi-
to challenge Attlee’s rght to rhree men held up a truck |r ay by the irresponsible
preside at Party Parliamentary here and esca with an- esti- | N 7 s ¥
meetings on the ground that he} mated $600,000. The trio it was ot Easy
is not impartial. reported, fff in a black sedan! Referring to a recent article by
but police from surrounding com-| Mr. Bernard Braine, M.P. advo~-
When the Parliamentary party munities lost the men although | cating West Indies federation he
met to-day it was immediately)they bad set up road blocks inggays it has been agreed that the
apparent that the charge es the greater Boston area. _VStand OR ee in
s Ai arty V J ised
carci See wa eee The holdup was the largest in | by qpresenting the OTN RETES to
inatienously endorsifig Alttlee's|New England since seven hal- | increase earning capacity, But it
leadsrinip. ” , | lowetn mesked gunmen hauled | is not easy to see how this —
"i F 310,000 in 1950, be helped by adding to the exist-
Bevan was not present but his Th y ing burden of high taxation the
| Thad ae ¥ : e armoured truck belonged | |.,° ; al Govyerament
cul ast thallene Witdss Woo to the United States Trucking i ge ey Gislnad. tie fed-
~ on : come who. attended | Corporation of Boston but offi-| eration is that it would enable
ing »& * ‘ 3 » “tails . F ; ‘
the meotitig. 2 cials knew no details. ne the West Indies to speak with one
—UP. ne voice. But, he says, to whom or
* \what about is not indicated
| , Defence and foreign relations
‘ ti 2c LANDSLIDE would be out of bounds and it
onser Va ves y ‘ has been proved at the recent
KILLS 30 Commonwealth sugar conference

that there are no difficulties in
making commercial representa-
tions

SUGAK MARKET FIRM
NEW YORK, March 25.
The Jowrnal of Commerce said
that Germany is expected to buy
20,000 tons of sugar Wednesday
result of heavy rains the and an additional 10,000 tons at
vious day, a later date using $3,000,000
The victims were cutting rice| allotted by the Mutual Security
on the slopes of a hill when the} programme
landslide occurred, This contributed to the firm-
—U.P. ‘ness in the overall sugar market.

INDONESIA, March

Thirty persons, mostly women,

were killed Sunday by a land-

slide at Tjobodas, a village north

of Bandung, West Java accord-
ing to reports received here,

25.



the
pre-|

The slide was presumably



‘And ve smoked

them ever since!”

7



















“You're fan to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it new cocktail: this
time it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.”*

was a

“We do our best to
please. | thought you'd
like them. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? [ suppose
you'll tell me that’s the secret 7
of the exquisite flavour.”’

‘No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

tobacco.” =
“ee 4
Me



“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy's just introduced me



resign until the Appeal is decided
Under the constitution a two-
thirds majority of the whole;
House is needed to revoke a Min
ister’s appointment
In view of the circumstances of |
Malcolm’s case and in the inter-|
ests of public good, the opposition
on Frid nformed Bustamante)
} t ere willing to assist him |
i ment he made on
inister position
rk otior evoking Malcolm’:
meé Minister wa

|

_ morning with
ind arrangment

n r made by the Jar

4 unan

ire
or
“

rsday.

to my first du Maurier.”’

“You are behind the times.
Nina's been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1.04 for 50

MADE IN
Smoke to your throat’s content ENGLAND

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

EB DISTRIBUTOR ON & HAYMES CO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN
ed



s

WILKINS





PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

S® KENELM y Liste
saea cl rdhand “win had

4

* hoeidaying in Barbados since
staying
paid a
to Trinidad and
returned by B.W.I1LA.

t i

ihe beginning ot Fe yuary
at the Ocean View Hotel
two-week visit

Tobago and
on Monday evening.

Off fo St. Lucia

MONG the passengers leaving
by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia
rday were Mr. Donald




and Mrs.
Mrs. Henry Grist
spending a holiday here.

Spent Three Weeks

RS. P. PUNNETT of St. Vin-

cent who was holidaying here
for the past three weeks staying at
the Marine
returned home on Sunday by the
Canadian Challenger.

Canadian Judge
M* JUSTICE C. Gordon Mac-Â¥
Kinnon and Mrs. MacKinnon
from Monfreal,
home on Monday
Lady Nelson after spending twe
weeks’ holiday
Marine Hotel.
Mr. MacKinnon is Judge of thi
Superior Court of the Province o
Quebec. ~«
Other passengers returning t
Canada by the Nelson after spend

ing a holiday here included Mrs.
New|
Parsons,
Secretary to the Deputy Minister
of Highways and Public Works of

A. J. Fenwick of Bathurst,
Brunswick, Miss Ena

the Province of Nova Scotia, Mr,
J. Dunwoody,

Accountant and Mrs.
of Oakville, Mr., and Mrs. R. 8.
Chaffe of Toronto, Mr. E, Kremers,
Treasurer of Wright and Kremers,

Construction Engineers of Niagara
and Mrs.

Falls, New York, Mr.
H. J. Symington and Mr. and Mra
W. Cochrane.

1es, Director of Barnes & Co.
Barnes and Major and
who had been

and the Hotel Royal,

hand Mr












Canada returned
night by the

staying at the

Chartered
Dunwoody

Attended Welfare Talks

M* a ROBERTS, S

Ollice ft Domini
returned home on Mondas night
after attending the Conference of
Social Welfare Officers of the Brit-
ish Caribbean area which con-
chided at Hastings House on
Friday.

While here, he t r
the Hastings Hote},

Also returning fo Dominica by
the Lady Nelson after spending a
short holiday here was Miss E.
Giraud who had been taking a
nursing course for the past six
years in the United
Mr.. Peter Dewhurst
Portsmouth, and Mr. C. Philip
merchant of Roseau and hi
daughter Natalie,

Miss Giraud was staying at the
‘Hastings Hotel, while Mr. Dew-
turst was the guest of Dr. and Mrs.
oR. M. L love Still of Deacons Road,

Philip and nis daughter
staying at “Allworth”,
heapside.

S. Consul General
M": ROBERT HALE, U.S. Con-
sul General, returned to hi:

ig at

Kingdom
P ie inter of

short visit here. He was staying
at St. Lawrence Gap as the guest
lof Mr, Philip Ernst, the American
Consul.

Also leaving for Trinidad by
B.W.1.A, yesterday were Mr. Vic-
tor Marson, Proprietor of the
Ocean View Hotel and Mr. and
Mrs. Robert O. Lord of St. James.

Visited Relatives
RS, R. LIVERPOOL who was
in the Caribbean spending a
holiday with her relatives in
Georgetown and Barbados, re-
turned to Boston on Monday night
by the R.M.S, Lady Nelson.

Mrs. Liverpool is a sister of Mr.
Robert King of Jackson.
Â¥

Ting-a-Ling Tells a Story

—He Says a Weeping Willow Really Weeps—

By MAX TRELL

“TING-A-LING,” said Hanid, the
shadow-girl with the turned-about
name, “why is this tree called the
Weeping Willow? Does it really
weep?”

For a moment Ting-a-Ling was
silent. He and Hanid were sitting
on the bank of the brook, ahd over
the brook hung the Weeping Wil-
low. Its slender green branches
drooped over the water, almost
touching it as it flowed slowly past.
It looked quite sad.

Ting-a-Ling finally spoke. “Yes,”
he answered; “the Weeping Willow
really weeps. If you come early in
the morning, just as the sun rises
and the air is filled with mist, you
will see the tears on the branches,
dripping one by one into the brook.

“And why does it weep?” Ting-a-
Ling went on. “I'll tell you. [t’s an
old, old story. But perhaps you've
never heard it. Yet it is true. For
it happened in the time of our
grandfathers.

Long Ago

“Once, in that old time so long
ago, there was a beautiful dog. She
had long silky hair that reached al-
most to the ground. Her eyes were
deep green, like grass on the side of
a hill. And her name,” said Ting:a-
Ling, “was Willow.”





Hanid listened to ling-a-Ling’s
story

bed. But he patted her and said:
‘Go down to the brook, Willow, to
the place where we always sit, and
wait for me there. I’ll soon come. ...
Don’t go far away. Tl) soon come....’

Waited Patiently
“So Willow went down to the edge
of the brook and waited patiently

for her little master to come. But
the day passed and he didn’t come.

| And the next day passed, and the
| next.,.and many,

many days. But

Canadians
M* LESTER TURNBULL, Mr
John Heather and Mr. Harvey
C, Hall trom Hamilton. Ontaria are
now in Barbados for a couple of
weeks’ holiday staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

They arrived on Monday even-
ing by B.W.1LA., from Grenada
where they spent ‘five days staying
at the Santa Maria Hotel, after
paying a short visit to Tobago.

Mr. Turnbull who is President
of Robert Duncan & Co., of
Hamilton and Mr. Heather his
assistant were in Barbados in 1948,
while Mr, Hali is paying his first
visit to the island. He is store
manager of Thomas Lees & Co.,
Jewellers, in Hamilton.

Leaving Today
| COL, ana Mrs. G. Ross
Robertson of Montreal.

en will be returning home to-
day by T.C.A., after spending three
weeks’ holiday faving . we
Ocean View Hotel.

Lt. ‘Col, Ross Robertson is
partner of G. Ross Robertson and
Sons, Insurance Brokers of Mon-
treai. His wife is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. C. E, Gausaen also
ot Montreal who were holidaying
here since February 1, and wiil be
remaining for another: two weeks,

Resident Tutor Leaves
R. B. H. EASTER, Resident
Tutor in the Windward

Islands for the University ——
of the West Indies, ed to his
headquarters in St. Lucia yester-
day by B.W.IL.A. after having dis-
cussions with the Vice-Principal
of the University College, Mr.
Philip M. Sherlock.

While here Mr, Easter also at-
tended as an Observer, the Con-
ference of Social Welfare Officers
of the British Caribbean Area.

nm Pleasure Trip

i R. AND MRS, HARRISON B.
it Miller of New York City who
| are on a pleasure trip, travelling
through the West Indies arrived
here yesterday by-B.W.1LA., from
St. Lucia on their first visit and
will be remaining for about a
week staying at the Ocean View
| Hotel,

Mr. Miller who is a financier of
New York said that they had al-
ready visited St. Thomas, Puerto
Rico, Martinique and St. Lucia sta:

and will probably stop at some

of the other islands before return-
ing home

On Holiday
RS. A. G. HAZELL of St.

Vineent arrived in Barbados

on Monday by ’plane for a short
visit and is staying with her
daughter, Mrs. A. H. Masterton-
Smith,



Across

*
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HOLLYWOOD PAYS TRIBUT E br OUTSTANDING STARS

ONORED with filmdom’s
est award, a trio of “
winners (right) pose in

wood’s Pantages Theater with

their coveted trophies. In
group (1. tor.) are: Karl

best supporting actor; Greer Gar-

sen, who received the best actress

award for Vivien Leigh, and
Humphrey Bogart, named best
actor of the year in a startling

Named Desire.” Below, right, Vi-

vien Leigh is kissed by her hus-

band, Sir Laurence Olivier,in New
York, on winning the best actress
award for part in “A Streetcar

Named Desire.” (International)

With Barclays Bank
FTER spending two weeks’
holiday in Barbados, Miss

Ruth Nicholas, an employee of}

Barclays Bank, Dominica, return-
ed home on Monday night by the

Lady Nelson, While here she was |
staying with Miss ae of

BB.C. Radio
Programme

NESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952
"tee m, Listeners’ Choice, 11,40 a.m
The Lincolnshire Handicap, 12 (noon)
‘tthe News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis. .
4.0—7.15 p.m. 19.76M, %5.58M, St 2M





s, 4. â„¢ a
Ni w The ih;
4p.m. The ew! P. +

and
News, 7.10 p.m. WN Analysis.
7.15-—10.30 p.m. 35, , 122M, 0.4eM

a

7.15 p.m. Talk on Jamaica and Feder-
ation of the B.W.%., 745 p.m. Over to
You, 8.15 p.m Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m.
Statement of Account, 8.45 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week, 9 p.m. IT was a Com-
munist, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
From the Editorials, 10.15 pm. Mid-

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

DRESSES—Just arrived—a lovely selection of



(Next Door to Singers)

Cotton and Cocktail Dresses

STRAPLESS BRAS. 32 to 38 from $3.96
BATHING SUITS—A large selection of styles,

colours and prices









WEDNESDAY

MARCH

| Sy

; Can, “Sp,
| we GLOBE “Sue,

fo,
5 &AS.30 p.m.

LL























OPENING TO-DAY





From G. Howes Christopher’s Novel
“CALL IT TREASON” |

‘

This is an outstanding Film — ]
|
|
|

< Cal ar red
:
) EC Po Pe :







ALL VHE IMPACT OF THRILLING
ENTERTAINMENT!

PLAZA THEATRES
Present WARNER BROS.

SCREEN ADVENTURES AT ITS MIGHTIEST!

B°TOW™N (Dial 2310) BARBAREL S$

OPENING THURS (Dial 5170) (DOWNTOWN)

OPENING FRIDAY 28th
27th 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. 445 & 8.30 p.m.





eeerereanye
-- Pm dead if § don’t!"

Tri-State Mos!



Coa |

Stardom’s exciting iff ,
a, tom of today in

ton

ie Cal
Bet AE ay



i ” ¥ * » Cargo week Taik, 10.30 pm, Marching and
“Just like the name of the tree?” |gtill the little boy didn’t come. But Soa? with, propeliers, (4) Waltzing. Rare Oh iM
said Hanid ‘ ill she waited Entangie. re fe "
“Yes, just like the name of the “And when people came and told Severud by merit x (

t @ out to bearer, (6)
\. Upset in Across. (3)

Gaudy-looking tnlets. (6)

Driven abead for security. (4)

tree. Now this beautiful dog had a | her not to wait any more, that her
master. The mastey was a young /|little master would never come

boy with a pale face and golden | again, she wouldn’t move, She had |
|
|
|
|








curls. He was not a strong boy, and | promised to wait for him no matter
often, when he walked down to sit | how long he tvok and she knew
at the edge of the brook, he leaned | that by and by he would come and
on Willow and rested until he fe it | they would sit together at the edge
strong enough to walk on again

5 an et
re i y
Ne
26
=

Exclusive Shopping Centre ‘ OE
* *« * ok | ® : - a 5

tread. (5)
Down



she jof the brook all through the long

| TERROR-ROAD orn:
|











was happy to have him rest on rc | eee “Ni as on always did. 1. eky eat no turf. (9 nee HENRY £ h
feed, she never felt. happy unle she kept on waiting , B heorene roo! * ' . i Cates Pay WALE-C iy YY
she was with her master She obeyed | “And one day 1 kind elf took pity z After winter wvbeeotes ho ett DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts. .
him in everything on the faithtul Willow, for now | Rrodncing pi (5) Exira Special The Col Short
“Byery day, when the weathe ometimes tears came to her eyes | 5 One a fatal (s), ss ® : oxtra Spec e Color sho
was fine,” Ting-n-Ling continued, | when she thought of her little mas- ] & ee (4) at, Ho 3) Ad ¥. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts. “CIRCUS TOWN”
“Willow and her little master came | ter and how lonely he must be all +s op Ay of t ate. taken. (4) f - =
down to sit at the edge of the brook. | by himself; and the elf changed her 1; # io "Prenen to a a Yak punien- ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery. Special Shows at Bridgetown :
And every day, just before it was | into a tree. lor lung silky hair be- | mae » (5 ’
‘ime to return home, the boy would | came long given branches, and her | 38- Fell @ wayside. (5) MIDNITE SAT. 29th
bid Willow to wait at the edge of | tears became the morning dew. And fe. ts Ear (3) CARIB SHOP: Carved Maho, gany, Native ' < :
the brook while he wandered off to |'still she keeps wailing by the edge ticn of pears poset, — Across rene: Barbadian Wares Indian Bags and Belts. Triple Attraction ! * *
' | fe Sot 2h y =
pick some flowers for his mother. j| of the brook still waiting and Peseavour: es ty 8, ( (arene “me We Srowerweenaent es aS
aa ne Coe : umber, rt B: 1. Tex Beneke & Glen Miller|| , *%
Then one day the little boy did | weeping for ior | » master who pet Bi, 2. GREYSTONE GALLERIES: 1 1
not so down to the brook, Willow] promised to come down to her go + 8 ikon © bra geting opens at 8 p-m. ~ Comp etely Orchestra ‘
came to his room. He was tying in Jona, soni & ago Bh river! 15 qs ee 15. new Technique, designs and Finishes. in

for
EXCELLENT VALUE

mh GREY BY MORE

TEN AnD O1AECIED BY ANDREW ST F



Barbados Pottery. “Cheyenne Cowboy”

2.
3
STANSFELD SCOTT & CO: Wines, Spirits E





“Raiders of the Desert” i “




and Groceries. ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT

ROODAL THEATRES.
THE GREATDST BRAIN ON EARTH
SHAKUNTALA DEVI

See and Hear her Unbelievable Gifts at the

EMPIRE ON FRIDAY MARCH 28TH at 8.20
and ROXY ON TUESDAY APRIL IST at 8.30

REMEMBER — CALYPSO ‘NIGHTS BEGIN AT
THE EMPIRE ON THURSDAY MARCH 27TH



THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked
by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts.

Dinner
SATIN 36 ins.

WHITE,

BLUE, PINK,

and BETTINA LTD: Gowns, Lingerie,’

Gifts,
ete.

LEMON,

CLUB POINCIANA:

Bar,
Guest Rooms,

Restaurant,
Butterick Patterns in all Coming Styles. e





BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hair-
dressing, Beauty treatment.

(Except Sunday) Balmoral Gap.

Every Night













ROODAL
EMPIRE

TODAY 4.20
TOMORPOW 4 30 foniw)
Robert MITCHUM, Janet LEIGH ja
HOLIDAY. AFFAIR

and Tim HOLT in—



TMEATRES
eee S aaw
ROXY

% a.
Today & Tomorrow 4.00 &
Howard DUFF, cer BRENT

mitecau’ ENTRY

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE
Sy

Hastings.



STORES DIAL 4606



t. rbarees
“ALIAS “BILLY THE KID" &
CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE”

BADMAN’'S TERRITORY Randolph SCOTT
RIDER FROM TUCSON Tim HOLT




“GALETY





NTO) Th —St. MASK : & SUSPECT
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 BARBAREES (DOW: WN) —Dial 5170 etIN—Dial 8404 ace —— 5 Mae on sabia
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 & 3.30 P.M. |! ropay & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.30 PM. Day go-onnow 30. ae

THURS. 27th 1.30 p.m
SAT. 29th 1.30 p.m

THURS RS. 27th 1 30 p.t

LAW OF THE WEST

Johnny Mack BROWN & | SAT. BO 6.3

TANGIERS &

HONEYMOON LODGE = RIVER LADY! AN ACTOR MURDER & SOUTH SEA SINNER































IMITATION OF SINEONE | Oy MPARADISE. VALLEY
re . OF PARADISE VALLE
Harriet HILLIARD—David BRUCE by Technicolor) : Claudette stipe aomaraaieied RIDIN’ THE CHEROKEE TRAIL — : —_ & LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE
Ozzie NELSON & Band Yvonne DeCARLO & Rod CAMERON] Fredric MARCH, Edmond O'BRIEN Shelley WINTERS & MacDonald CAREY ————— Tex RITTER a tee FRI anne 2.30 (or Sat, 29th MIDNITE
Dan DURYEA, Helena CARTER . = = 7 —— mtinuing 445 & 8 90 7
eshtitidltet . > Special Midnite Sat. OLIVER TW
cs SHURS SPECIAL 1-30 pin MEDNITE SPECIAL! SAT. 20th THURSDAY SPECIAL 1.90 P.M. OPENING FRIDAY 4.45 &8.30 P.M. an ‘so Bs en sie THURSDAY (©"'y) 8.30 P.M. hy dehaeriks Hotes KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED
> RCEY & The Bowery Boys in][{ Triple Attraction Alan “Rocky ” LANE Double — Joh, SIERRA P, epee s 2 at 8.30
04 + now Mack Johnny Mack ASSAGE AT. 29th at
LUCKY LOSERS & RAIDERS OF THE DESERT || cHeRIFF OF WICHITA & HIGHWAY 301° Brown Brown

Wayne MORRIS &

YUKON MANHUNT

Riding The and
Cherokee Trail
Tex Ritter
en

LAW OF THE WEST i

Johony Mack BROWN

OLYMPIC
CHEYENNE COWBOY &

CALYPSO NIGHT







Tex Beneke & Glenn Miller Orehestte

SUNDOWN IN SANTA_

Today & Tomoerro we 1W & 8.0



Arizona Territory
Whi






Stevo SOGHRAN and Veumnts GREY















: a a John PAYNE Dout
cd a Kisby GRANT and “Chinook! CAPTAIN CHINA ROYAL
= BAGLE AND THE HAWK 1
Today & Tomarrow 4.30 & 8.15
Now in Stock THURS. 27th 1.30 Columbia Whole Serlal—
*s oa ADVENTURES OF DON COYTY THE SHADOW
Watch tor the Advertisements ... (TERRAZZO) MARBLE CHIPS ————— ——————
erates nat meenteentitentaoennias ee
° EBONITE IVID TRIP OPENING FRI. 28tt - a sdacee
D ING s ee aoe FF t FRI. 28th 4.30 (only)
ON OouUuR And Vietor MATURE ji THE EAGLE AND THE HAWK
G BUNC ANG HOUSE ee t one
c T ____BUNCO squap Ee FRI. 28th 8.30
a “a EMENT in Buff, Red, and White mA “te: -abepaeeie CALYPSO NIGHT
. EN FRESH” SERVICE ® mena "sare aw a
s ‘ HAUNTED HARBOUR SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15
TUES WHITE HEAT
: r. le € AL ¥PSoO NIGHT & SEA HAWK
@ y 7 ve . 1 nn ‘ |
THE WEST INDIA RBESCHUIT CO. LTD. Magazine Lane, :-: Dial: 4367 | wilt be ts TWIST

OLIVER



2
=—

















WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE THREE





| Harbour Log |
In Carlisle Bay

Tax Concessions For -







Colonial Ventures? “iN as eo eS ae |

Marion Belle Wolfe, Seh Laudal-

Sch. Everdene, Sch. At Last
ARRIVALS
PHELIP H. DAVIDSON, #7 ton

But Still Some Obstacles

et, Capt Sealy, from British Guiar

In Touch With Barbados

For Investment In B.W.1.

LONDON.

Minor tax concessions made for firms operating in the

Colonies and controlled in
some way towards speeding

the United Kingdom may go
up the flow of urgently-needed

investment capital to the British West Indian territories, it

is believed in London.

Exactly what form these con-
cessions will take will not be
known until Britain’s new Fin-
ance Bill is published, but hopes
have diminished that they will
@eal with the anomaly under
which full tax is charged in the
United Kingdom on profits made
in Colonies which grant a “tax
holiday” to new investors.

{In introducing his Budget in the
House of Commons in London,
Mr. R. A. Butler, the Chance.lor
of the Exchequer, made only a
passing reference to the need for
toncessions to enterprises in the
Colonies, when he said:

“United Kingdom mining ven-
jures
where overseas will be helped in
tarious ways. Businesses will be
able to sei off losses against sub-
fequent profits without time
limit.”

' There is speculation in finan-
tial circles in London that these
toncessions could be on such items
‘ts exploration expenditure and on
he grievance of many mining
‘ompanies that they have not been
thle to “lay off’ money spent on
ton-mining projects, such as
tousing schemes and other muni-
fpal amenities, Such concessions
vould probably stimulate further
aterest in the investment of min-

og capital in the Colonial terri-
ories.

Hope has not yet been given up,
wowever, that the reforms refer-
ed to be Mr. Butler will include
n adjustment of the ‘tax holiday”
inomaly, an important one to the
sritish West Indies. It is pointed
aut that in his Budget speech, the
thancellor gave only a few ex-
mples of the changes he proposed
o make.

British territories in the Carib-
wean which hope to develop their
ndustrial resources are out to at-
ract not only U.K., but also U.S.,
apital investment and many ob-
tacles have still to be overcome
‘efore the U.S., capital can flow
moothly into these Colonies.

Some of these difficulties have
outlined by Mr. I. F, Baker,
president of the Westinghouse
: ic International Co,, who
aid that a major difficulty faced
U.S. companies that want to
ch out into overseas opera-
is is the tax barrier set up by

ie U.S. Government itself.

Mr. Baker, who recently return-
‘d to New York from a tour of

tin America, urged that the U.S.

vernment should consider both
i’ cut in taxes on profits qr over-
‘eas investment and a scheme for
franting loans for enterprises
vishing to branch out overseas.

He admitted that the U.S. Gov-
wnment has made eflorts to pro-
note foreign investment through
tommercial treaties with other
tations providing for fair treat-
Qent and through guaranttes to
Bvestors that reasonable profits
Ray be returned, But these meas-
tres, he said, were not enough.

“The deafening silence with
rich investors have greeted
e desirable and well-intention-

id measures is an indication that

the Government has not found
he solution to the problem,” he
feclared.—B.U.P.









It cleans,




er (||

@

AREFULLY,,**"
tL

CALL AT....

COLLINS DRUG STORES

BROAD and TUDOR STREETS Y

in the Colonies and else- *

2 West Indies
In Commons

LONDON.

In the House of Commons en
March 12, Mr. Henry Hynd (La-
bour, Accrington) asked the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
what increases in wages and im-
proved welfare facilities have re-
sulted from the increase in the
price of export sugar granted to
Jamaica for 1952.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, re-
plied: “I am asking the Governor
for this information, When I have
his reply I will write to the hon.
Member.”

Jamaica Rice Cultivation

Mr, Bernard Braine (Conserva~-
tive, Billericay) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps are being taken to increase
rice cultivation in Jamaica.

Mr. Lyttelton replied: “The
Jamaica Government are anxious
to increase the production of rice.
I am asking the Governor for de-
tails of what is being done and
will write to my hon, Friend when
I have @ reply.”

Land Reform In Under-
Developed Territories

Mr. W. T. Williams (Labour,
Hammersmith) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps he is taking to implement
Resolution VII on land reform in
under-developed countries, which
was adopted by the United
Nations General Assembly in Paris
on 12th January, 1952, designed to
give effect to the Economic and
Social Council’s recommendations
on land tenure, the welfare and
living standards of rural popula-
tions, and related technical organ-
isational, fiscal and social ques-
‘tions,

Mr. Lyttelton replied: “The re-
commmngnceteue embodied in this
Resolittion cover a very wide field
of agricultural policy and recog-
nise that no one means is suited
to the conditions of all countries.
Much of what is proposed is al-
ready being carried out by Colo-
nial Governments in the course of
developing agriculture in their
territories. The recommendations
are being studied in my Depart-
ment and I will send the text to
all Colonial Governments.”

Freight Tax On Cuban Sugar

On March 13, Mr. Arthur Dodds -
Parker (Conservative, Banbury)
asked the President of the Board
of Trade whether he is aware that,
since the sugar agreement with
Cuba in 1951 to purchase 1,500,000
tons of Cuban sugar over a three-
year period, the Cuban Govern-
ment has continued to levy a
freight tax of 64 per cent. of the
gross freight on all shipments of
sugar to the United Kingdom; and
what expenditure in dollars has
been incurred so far to meet this
freight tax,

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-
plied: “I understand that this tax

For leather “
of every colour—

preserves—and how it

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s.
Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
the difference it makes to your shoes!

FOR

PURE DRUGS

AND
ACCURATE

PRESCRIPTION;

SERVICE



ture, particularly at the hands.
How do they strike you? They
look strong, capable, workman-
like but at the same time gentle
and steady. They are good
hands, You can understand why
the poor, starving, rain-soaked
mongrel puppy has that wistfally
trusting look in his eyes as he
gazes into the face above him—
the face we cannot see but can so
easily imagine.

For the dog has recognised a
friend, someone ready to be
actively helpful and not merely
content with the negative attitude
of not causing pain.

The dog in this picture might
be one of hundreds roaming the
streets and alleys of this lovely
island of ours, Unwanted and
starving they form part of the
enormous family, not only of
dogs, but of all types of animals
for which the Barbados §,P.C.A.
is responsible,

Have you ever thought how
lucky you are compared with,
let us say, a donkey or a dog?

If your employer treats you
unfairly you can appeal to your
Trade Union. If you are sick
you can be admitted to hospital—
if destitute to the almshouse, If
your neighbour beats you up
there are police and lawyers to
bring him to book. If you have
the misfortune to be maimed or
blind the Social Welfare Depart-
ment is there to help you. One

ee —

is a revenue tax levied on all
exports irrespective of destination.
It is a combination of taxes on
freight and passenger fares which
date back to 1928 and 1932 and
have been several times increased,
and it has no particular relevance
either to sugar or to the Anglo-
Cuban Trade Agreement. My right
hon. and gallant Friend the Min-
ister of Food estimates at $364,789
the element in the freight charges
for our purchases of Cuban sugar
which is attributable to this levy
between 10th August last, the date
of the trade agreement, and 29th
February, 1952.”

Mr. Dodds-Parker: “In view of
this new tax—I think my right
hon. Friend agrees that it is a
new one—and the dollar cost of

loading sugar, would the Minister
to

consider doing all possible
switch our purchases of supplies
of sugar to non-dollar

wealth and Empire,”

Mr. Thorneycroft: ‘This is not a ‘ping activities in
new tax; it has been on for a very

long time.”—B.U.P,

BLINDING .

HEADACHES

MADE HER HELPLESS



KRUSCHEN
h

brought relief 5) CERY tFom
severe head-

aches will be interested in

reading how this woman
ended her troubles :—

“Tl was subject to terrible
headaches.

le they lasted, I
seemed to lose my sight and all
power in my hands and was forced

to lie down for hours at a time.
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for years, suggested my
trying them. I did so, and I've
not had a return of those terrible
headaches for months. In fact,
I feel quite cured.”"—M.W.

Headaches can nearly always
be traced to a disordered stomach
and to the unsuspected retention
in the system of stagnating
waste material, which poisons
the blood. Remove the poisonous
accumulations — prevent them
from forming again—and you
won't have to worry any more.
And that is just how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief
by cleans the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
waste.@

Ask your nearest Chemis? or
Stores for Kruschen.

~~ ———

RAE

sources,
particularly from the Common-

Reprinted from the American Weekly.

Do These Hands Belong To You?

Take a good look at this pic-

could go on indefinitely listing

the provisions for your well-
being.
But for animals there is only

ONE organisation which tries to
provide all these services. It is
the S.P.C.A.

And the S.P.C.A, has only three
salaried inspectors and one
handy-man. On its staff and it
relies solely on voluntary con-
tributions to pay its way.

“Of course they can’t possibly
do it” you say, and then you re-
member other things the Society
does. You wonder how all the
posters, newspaper articles and
announcements, the broadcasts,
get done, What about Animal
Welfare week with its lectures,
film shows and Band concert?
And you think to yourself “Why,
the S.P.C.A, runs a Humane Edu-
cation Bureau as well.” How
can they do all this with only
four paid workers?” The answer
is that we cannot.

We rely on a few, pitifully few,

enthusiastic men and women who
give their time, energy and
money to the service of the

island’s animals. Some of them
will be calling at your home,
office, factory or store or meeting
you in the street on Friday morn-
ing, March 28th. They will ask
you to buy a tag and thus help

to keep the work going. But it
isn’t only your money we want,
We want YOU as well! ‘Me”

you exclaim, “What can I do?”

Rain Holds Up
Work In Harbour

Intermittent showers in Bridge-
town yesterday caused outdoo:
work to cease on many occasions.
Businessmen, clerks and | other
City workers were not caught un-
prepared, Early in the morning
dark clouds had begun to form in
the sky. Because of this gloomy
appearance, nearly everyone car-



ried raincoats and umbrellas to
work with them.

High winds at sea caused
damage to fishing boats’ sails.

At about 3.30 p.m. one boat towed
another into Carlisle Bay.

The rainfall returns between
Monday and up to six o'clock
yesterday morning were however
very low.

In Speightstown, the morning
opened with light showers until
around 8 a.m. when they abated,
This was after nine parts of rain
fell on Monday night,

The showers also affected ship-
the harbour.

essels discharging cargo had to
cover the hatches on more than



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Sight or De 1
mand Drafts 70 |
72 Cable j
70 5/10 Currency 68 7/10% |
Coupons 68% }
50% Silver 20%
CANADA |
7a 4/10 Cheques on
Bankers 70 7/10%
Demand Drafty 70, 95%
Sight Drafts 70 4/10% |
72 4/10 Cable |
70 9/10 Currency 68 2/10%
Coupons 68 5/10
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animals you own or are responsi- a, LOADA |
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ble for get the very best condi-} 72 4,10 ee
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you cases of neglect or cruelty] ;, jj, ue Drafts 70 3/10%
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Society is treated as confidential.)

Thirdly, if you have children
you can train them in the ways of
kindness for most children are
inherently kind and need only
training and example to develop

‘their characters,

Fourthly, if you are asked to
undertake some special voluntary
work for the Society such as
serving on a Sub-Committee,
consent readily; don’t back away
like a startled fawn and murmur
hurriedly “Oh! I wouldn’t be any
good at that sort of thing!” You
wouldn't be expected to cut the

toe-nails of the Queen’s Park
alligator or to descend a well to
rescue a cat. In America and
the U.K. it is considered a great
honour and privilege to help
further the work of Humane
Societies. That spirit of service

should prevail here,

Will you do something for me?
Will you take another look at
the hands in the picture and then
look at your own, They are iden-
tical, aren’t they? YOURS are
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one occasion to prevent the cargo
getting wet. Passengers were
afraid to use row boats.

Queen Will Visit
Scotland In June

@ From Page 1
sources as she wanted them”.

He pointed out that if Scotland
could retain the proceeds of her
export of whisky and tweeds
alone she would have no short-
ages of raw materials or con-
sumer goods.

The Queen is half Scottish—
her mother Queen Elizabeth is
one of the Strathmores who have
lived for centuries in Glamis
Castle. Princess Margaret was
born in Glamis, There is natur-
ally much sympathy for Scotland
in the Royal Family.

But there has always been the
apparent inability in Whitehall
to decide whether the Scots mean
business. The Queen during her
residence at the Palace of Holy-
roodhouse in Edinbur, from
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PAGE FOUR

—

Al N OGATI

BARBADOS tat
t

eae see

Wednesday, March 26, 1952

LUAURY PORT
of Bridgetown continues,
people say, to be one of the
perisive in the world. But a deep
ilence hangs over any attempts to
et the matter right. And elementary nuis-
ances such as pilferage of goods, and the
scattering of cement powder» over the
offices of the’ Comptroller of Supplies con-
tinue as normal features of life on the
wharf. Plainly the port of Bridgetown is
the nerve centre of Barbados’ economic
life. On its efficiency and smooth running
depends the easy export of our major ex-
ports of sugar and molasses and the quick
delivery of the large volume of imports on
which we depend for food, clothing and
homes. The dock workers of Barbados are
the key workers of this island. Without
their co-operation and their efforts the
prosperity of the island is endangered. The
dockworkers fealise this and eannot wish
to damage the prosperity of an island
which needs every penny it can earn to
educate the people and train them as good
citizens and skilled workers. :

PORT

responsible





Yet Bridgetown continues to enjoy the
uneviable réputation of being the mostr
expensive port in the Southern Caribbean,

What is lacking?

According to the report of the Depart-
ment of Labour for 1950 “the Joint: Port
Committee and the seven divisional com-
mittees .. . continued to work well, All of
the many matters affecting work in the
port which these committees dealt with
were settled amicably, Twenty four meet-
ings were held and eight agreements affect-
ing wages and conditions of employment
were signed.”

According to thisreport’ good will is not
lacking. Ae :

Yet the port of Bridgetown continues to
be so expensive; turn-round of ships is so
delayed that freight rates have been in-
creased by more than 15 per cent. to cover
the great expense of calling at Carlisle Bay:

erties between
“Sterling Area,

BARBADOS - ADVOCATE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952



News From Britain

LONDON, March 14,

Well, the Budget did not make
anybody as unhappy as they had
expected it would, but the new
keeps coming along. of trade re-
cessions and financial restrictions
abroad,

The spate of press articles
heralding the “New Elizabethan
Era”—it too easy a catch
phrase, anyhow—are dying down,
and Britain is back to earth again

Australia’s sudden import cuts
have shattered the ideas of the
Prosperity Planners who thought
they could work out Britain's
future on paper.

A section of Tory and Labour

M.P’s have'stocd up in the House
to voice their protest in discon-

certed chorus as if Australia’s
action were a personal affront to
Britain.

Said Socialist M.P, Mr. Wilfred
Burke; “On top of the menace of
Japanese competition it is a
staggering blow to Lancashire,
Markets once lost cannot be
regained.” *

Said Tory Mr. Walter Ftetcher;
“It is a crippling blow not only
to Lancashire cotton but to many
other industries.”

Said Socialist Miss Elaine
Burton; “Something must be done

@about it or skilled engineers in

Coventry will be

work.”

Viewed With Disquiet
Said Socialist Mr. Glenville Hall,
with an eye on the other members
of the Commonwealth; “We view
with disquiet any iessening of the
members of the
and -especially of

thrown out of

the Commonwealth. What has
happened in Australia may ex-
tend. Already South. Africa is

‘talking of taking the same roacL”

And Socialist Mr, George Strauss
former Minister of Supply, added
it would be impossible to find
other markets for the vehicles
Australia has been taking,

So Mr.Peter Thornycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade had
to tell them the hard fact that
Australia was cutting other
peoples’ imports as well, and that
inflation and postwar scarcities and
a sellers’ market couldn't last for
ever, and that things end with a
jolt.

So here we are where we came
in.

The spring sun shines warmly
today, and the mild winter departs;
the trees come out in bud and
pretty girls look prettier and gayer
in thei; fluffy new spring fashions,

But it’s the same old story;
work harder and longer to produce
more for less money we must, or
none of us will be very gay in a
year or so,



By
VAUGHAN JONES

And around Westminster there
are other M.P.s who are saying a
little mischievously perhaps, that
our last government was maybe
premature in pointing out to other
countries that they should “pro-
duce the right goods for export”.
And that “wasteful” luxuries
should not be foisted on us,

For we are trying to produce
just the right kind of goods which
everybody ought to want to buy,
such as those cars which the
family needs, and Australia says
she can't take them.

Perhaps those foreign makers of
exotic perfumes and not so
sweetly-smeliing cheeses, to whose
import Socialist Mr, Dalton took

xception, are now laughing
gently.

Commonwealth Conference

However, the Empire Crusaders,
with justification, are urging that
we should call a_ great, all-
embracing Commonwealth Con-
ference, to weigh up the wealth
in our territiories and decide how
best we can develop and distrib-
ute our resources,

Whatever the results, at least ¢

it would give us a sense of the
Community of the _ British
Commonwealth,

Oh, yes, it is the same all over
Britain. The achievements of our
forefathers in building up the
Empire are taken too much for
granted and there is often little
enough thought about the peoples,
of all colours and kinds, who
make up the community. Tin,
rubber, cocoa, manganese, wool,
tropical hardwoods and all the
rest? Why, they are just a God-
siven heritage to Britain, Canada,
Africa, Australia, New Zealand,
India and the others, They are
places one sees on the movies,
Despite aeroplanes and radio, our
horizon is not expanding quickly
enough.

* * *
The splendour of debutante
courts may be seen again in

London next year, the Coronation
year,

The young Queen, they say,
would like to see the debutantes,
who include the tilted youth and
beauty of England, presented
again wearing the traditional
stately and graceful gowns and
three feathers. These evening
presentations discontmued since

A ship's captain who visited Barbados re | ’ NOW, MR. CHURCHILL ;

Give The. Seots Their
Stone Back

cently estimated that it cost his shipping
company £1,200 for each day spent in Car-
lisle Bay. He can hardly be blamed for
impatience at a three days’ delay.

Why is there delay?

Sir Douglas Ritchie, Vice Chairman of
the Port of London authority details some
of the reasons in his report on the proposed
construction of a deep water wharf.

With regard to stevedoring he notes: “the
quicker the men work, the greater is the
profit to the contractors and this is-parficu-
larly the case in overtime hours. The whole
system causes resentment among the men,
which is expressed by a slowing down of
the work.”

Plainly theystem is wrong,

Again he notes that “in view of the fact
that the full evertime trip rate is payable
for only a few minutes’ work outside nor-
mal hours, the tendency is for afternoon
work to be slowed down in order to ensure
the additional payment... The origin of
this system no doubt lies in the fact that
the whole cost of overtime is borne by the
ship and for the same reason there is
no incentive for either the men or the con-
tractor to alter the arrangement.

The deleterious effect of this system both
direct and indirect on freight rates which
are ultimately borne by the goods must be
obvious.”

It is. We all pay more for our goods.

The system is wrong. Because there is
little incentive on the part of anyone en-
gaged in the port to improve the state of
affairs, if the additional costs are borne by
the ship.

But, as Sir Douglas points out, the effect
on the goods is twofold, and the consumer
must pay not only the additional costs of
the operation but also the additional costs
of the ship caused by the delay. So long as
the consumer continues to accept this un-
satisfactory state of affairs without com-
plaining so long.it seems the costs of goods
entering and leaving Bridgetown will con-
tinue to rise. Because, judging by the re-

port of the Department of Labour, 1959, |

the major occupation of the Joint Port
Committee and the seven divisional port
committees seems to be the amicable set-
tlemeiit of conditions affecting wages and
employment. Relations between ernployers
and employees apparently continue to be
excellent and will no doubt continue to be
so until a stage is reached where the con-
sumer decides that he can no longer afford
the luxury of continuing to buy goods im-
ported under such conditions by which
neither the shipping companies, the local
shipping and mercantile association nor the
dockworker bear the increased costs, but
only the local consumer. Until the consum-
er begins to complain the Port of Bridge-
town will continue to become more ex-
pensive.

Only the consumer seems to possess the
incentive necessary to improve conditions,



COMMENTING the other day
on the wrath aroused in Scot-
land over the Queen's title
of Elizabeth It., I wrote of “the
age-old inability of the English
to understand the minds of oth-
er people.”

I little “thought that Mr,
Churchill, the greatest living
Englishman of them all, would
so goon illustrate my point by
the ham-fisted way he handled
the re-emergence of the Coro#
nation Stone from the deep,
dark dungeons of Westminster
Abbey.

Tomfoolery

I ‘don’t know who
him if indeed anyone did.
is suspiciously cagey on
point. f

But whomever he sought ad-
vice from, I would suggest that
before he makes the next move
he might do better to consult
the newspaper astrologers.

For there has been so much
official tomfoolery over this
lamentable business that I can
only €onclude. the Stone’s birth
stars have (got crossed,

advised
He
that

ANY man possessed of ‘a little
tact, a little common sense, and
the invaluable gift of being able
to laugh when someone makes
shim. look - foolish, could have
had th@ Stone back in a week.

That was obvious in the first
few days after it was stolen.

Those- who ‘took the Stone
couldn’t do anything with it,
didn’t want to keep it, were too
patriotic to destroy it, and, as
they have told us since, had to
carry it up. and down the coun-
try because they couldn’t find
anyone to give it to,

The Dean of Westminster, a
sensible Scot, took the right line
in the first hour, He made a
joke of it. If he had been able
to keep it on a joke level the

Stone would have been back
the next day.
But the palace kicked his

pants and he was compelled to
pour out a lot of portentous
nonsense over the radio which
blew the affair up to the size of
a national catastrophe,

Leg-pulling

After that it was inevitable
to anyone who understood the
Scots mind that all\Scots—even
those who at first. disapproved
of the entérprise—would range
themselves‘ on, the side of the
Stone-takers, feeling that what
had been done had been done
for Scotland.

Moreover, there is of course
no joke the Scots enjoy better
than pulling the’ legs of the
English, "

The more the Palace, the
Abbey, the politicians, and the
police moaned and groaned, the
more pompous blather they
poured out, the more they
‘threatened that the perpetra-
tors of the foul deed when
caught would suffer everything
short of being hanged, drawn,
and quartered, the more Scot-
land rocked with laughter.

And the more solidly the
Scots massed themselves. behind
the men who had pulled off the

trick,

By JOHN GORDON

As a result the handing back
of the Stone became more difli-
cult than the purloining of. it.

I HAD some personal expe-
rience of that, for at one point
I found myself the “go-between”

empowered to negotiate its
return,

The terms were easy. “No
prosecution. and a_ dignified

handing-over in keeping with
the venerataus which the Scots
have for the Stone.” A vener-
ation much deeper than most
Englishmen appreciate.

To make it easier still for the
authorities those who had the
Stone in their keeping did not
seek any public admission that
it was given back on terms.”

An offer

The Palace, priests and poli-
ticians in London were at that
time very anxious about the
condition of the Stone, for a
rumour had spread that it had
been seriously damaged.

I was empowered to pass on
the first complete and accurate
description of the damage, how
it had been caused, and how
carefully and soundly it had
been repaired.

With the agreement of those
concerned I offered that the
Stone would be placed reverent-
ly in St. Giles’s Cathedral, Edin-
burgh, late one night without
any ceremony that would attract
publie attention.

I suggested that if it were
left there for three weeks before
being taken to London, it would
be a_ gesture much appreciated
by all Scots, and bring a happy
ending to a sorry business.

‘Prosecution’

For a few days that solution
seemed possible. Then sudden-
ly stupidity reared its head again.

ack came London's ultimatum.
“We intend to prosecute with all
vigour, and we shall whisk the
Stone out of Scotland the
moment we lay hands on it.”

“Prosecution would be folly,”
I cautioned, “You can’t do it.
It will merely provide a sound-
ing board for the most fanatical
nationalistic ropaganda. You
will have Scotland boiling over
in a week.”

I toyed with the idea of end-
ing the deadlock by putting the
Stone one night in the sleeping
car of Mr. Hector MeNeil, then
Secretary for Scotland, which I
fear might have caused him
some acute embarrassment.

WHEN finally the stone was
returned, those who had delay-
ed its return because they
wanted vengeance discovered,
as I had warned them, that
they dared not prosecute.

But apart from that one glim-
mer of sense they continued to
pile stupidity upon stupidity.
If they had sat down deliber-
ately to devise the perfect way
to lacerate the patriotic feelings
of the Scots they couldn’t have
done it better,

A bearer party of young Scots
laid-the Stone with reverence



the war’s outbreak have been part
of Court ceremony for many
reins.

Duchesses, countesses and other
proud mothers, who regard a
presentation at Court as a life
asset for their daughters, would
be more than happy.

They do not Uelieve that the
Present courts—held during the
afternoon—are q the same fcr
the debutantes wear afternoon
aress, with hats.

We are always hearing that.
this is austerity Britain, and that
we don't get enough to eat. But
it seems to me that it all depends
on how much money we have in
our pockets to buy off-the-ration
foods or spend in restaurants.

If we are rich, we can grow
very fat; if we are not so rich per-
haps there is plenty fish, If we are
poor, it is just too bad, anyway.

Se it is a reliet, pernaps, to be
told plainly that British monne-
quins are fatter than the girls who
do the same job in America.

Just back from New York is
Gaby Young, very pretty too, who

has 120 1S wiaer contract to
her fashion agency,

Gaby has m searching for
four English to model clothes
on the other the Atlantic,

and she finds &.difficut to finu
et:

She wants them to be tall,
slim and betweefr-5ft. Gin, and 5ft.
9in, Other measurements; not more
than 33 in. bust, 22in. waist, 33 in,
thip.
Fatter

But most British mannequins are
fatter than that, says Gaby. Some
of them have a 36 in. hip and
would come into the “matron”
class over there, she adds,

A joyous piece of news for
Britain’s old people, It seems
likely that tea rationing may be
abolished during the coming year,
as the trade is building up suffi-
cient stocks for this to be done.
For tea drinking is to the aged
not only a measure of comfort. It
is a British tradition, an oft re-
peated introduction to friends, a
solace in loneliness,

It is a substitute for the glasses
of beer and gins and lime, which
their working sons and daughters
order in the pubs, It replaces the
cups of coffee over which Con-
tinentals linger in the cafes.

But the effect on the working
man; Will we have to provide
more cups of tea to the carpenter
and the plumber, the decorator
and the bricklayer, when doing
a job in our houses, they pause
once again for a rest?



amid the ruins of Arbroath
Abbey. That was the last touch
of reverence and dignity it was
to enjoy for many a long day.

Whisked away

Within minutes it was seized
and thrown into a police cell.
Within hours it was put in a
car and raced across the Border
in the style of gangsters mak-
ing their getaway with the loot.

In London it spent another

night in a prison cell, and was
then moved across and dumped
into the deepest cellar of the
Abbey, there to lie for months,
in much the same condition ag
a criminal would hide his stolen
property,

And now Mr. Churchill adds
the final touch of degredation.
He has the Stone brought out
of the dungeon im chains, and
blithely tells the House of Com-
mons that that is what his ad-
visers advised him to do.

No wonder he dare not give
their names, Especially if they
are Scots. No wonder every
Scottish M.P. who could get on
his feet gasped with horror and
challenged him immediately.

I WOULD suggest .to Mr.
Churchill, with all the respect
and deference he has so justly

earned by greater achievements!

than this, that he should lift his
eyes from Europe for a moment,
turn them across the Border, and
try to understand the ming of
Scotland,

For he has lit a fire in Scot-
land that will take some damp-
ing down. ©

Scotland wants the Stone
back. He should send it back.

Grievances

The relations between Qcot-
land and England are not as
happy as they should be at this
moment,

Scotland has many just and
reasonable prigvances. Tt feels
that the recent over-centralisa-
tion of government in London
has brought it too much under
the heel of England.

The Scots are a peculiarly
sensitive people, Perhaps they
suffer from too great respect for
their history. But that is not
Something that can be eradi-

cated. Or indeed of i :
need feel ashamed, wae

THE Coronation Stone to
them | is something more than
rer a bit of the furnishings
of estminster Abbey. They
regard it as their historic prop-
erty, stolen from them.

_They are proud that British
kings should be crowned sitting
upon it. And they would be
very proud to send it with al)

the ceremonial dignity to the|

Abbey at all coronation times.

But they think that between
coronations it should rest in
Scotland, where Scotsmen could
See it, guard it, and cherish it,

So give the matter some more
thought, Mr. Churchill, And
get some wiser Scottish advisers
than you seem to have,

For if you don’t stmd the
Stone back the Blue Bonnets
may be over the Border again.

SSS











SCHOONER
SAFETY

THE announcement made during the last ||!
few days that one schooner owner was fitting |
his vessel with radio telephone will be re-
ceived with much satisfaction throughout
the West Ihdies.

Intercolonial travel since the years of the
war has been largely confined to plane or
schooner. Steamship facilities remain ex-
tremely limited despite all the pleading and
protests of West Indian governments and

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peoples. ,
But Intercolonial trade had been limited

to schooners. Fruit, vegetables, firewood
and coals which form the bulk of this trade,
are taken from one island to another by

schooner mainly because of the facility for
travel and the reduced ccst.

The cargoes are not expected to go back
and forth without being accompanied by
human beings. And those people who by
reason of their business are forced to travel



SNOWCEM

Unsurpassed for Indoors & Out

C. S. Pitcher & Co.

Ph. 4472

between the islands by schooner are expos-
ed, not only to the dangers of the deep, but
the agony of being without the means to
call for help in time of stress.

It does seem illogical fhat West Indian

governments should subscribe financial sup-
port for an elaborate weather bureau and a
modern system of forecasting and transmit-
ting conditions of weather and approaching
storms and then refuse to compel vessels
travelling in the area to carry equipment

which would pick up the warnings sent out. | \\
For many years now, it has been pointed i|

out in this newspaper that many of the Cap- ||

tains of sailing craft did not hold Master Mar- ||

iner Certificates. This in itself created a

hazard when they were allowed to take
passengers without knowing the sea ways.
On oceasions they have gone off course and |
delayed the ship’s arrival several days as a of |





——————— ==

————



——





result. It must also be added now that even
in the event of warning of an approaching |

storm, they were unable to chart another by ee |
course to a haven of safety. SUITCASES & HANDTRUNKS |

ing storms that such equipment as _ radio
telephone or transmitting sets are necessary.
Within recent years several vessels plying





And that would be deplorable,
—L.E.S.

intercolonial trade have been lost without
trace in normal weather conditions. It may
be that a vessel had sprung a leak or a sud-
den squall caused her to overturn. A brief
call on a radio telephone might have sent

vessels in the vicinity to the rescue. In its
absence all was lost and lost without trace.

But it is not only for the purpose of avoid- Light ona exceptionally strong |

It should be easy for the West Indian gov-
ernments to demand, by way of legislation,
that each vessel registered and carrying
passengers should have radio telephone as
part of its normal equipment. Now that such



Six Sizes

equipment is easily obtainable at small cost °

there should be no hesitation in enacting and D ( { & ( Ltd ‘

enforcing such law. a OS a 0., e
Already there is the inadequacy of life || fi





boats on many of the smaller vessels plying
between these West Indian Islands despite
the law which compels them to carry enough
boats to accommodate crew and passengers.





INTRODUCING—

“BUBBLE WASHERS”

THE COMFORT OF THE HOUSEWIFE

People who travel between the islands are
entitlea to protection and it should be the
duty of the West Indian Governments to
afford them that protection. And schooner ||;
owners should not be allowed to make money
at the expense of other people’s discomfort
and possibly their lives. Radio equipment is
as necessary to intercolonial schooners as
life-boats,

Truman Thinks It Over
On A-Palm Beach Isle

By R. M. MacCOLL

KEY WEST.

THIS is Truman’s time of decision.

Here some tyme during ‘the next three
weeks, the President must make up his
mind whether he runs in the November
election or steps aside in favour of some-
body else.

It is an ideal spot for him to decide any-
thing so momentous.

As far as it is possible for a President of
the United States to obtain some sort of
privacy. Key West gives it to Truman.

Although the town is enjoying a tourist

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e
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boom, this little island, where the trade = :
winds sigh gently among ‘the palms, stil) ]@ Black Magic Chocolates HAMS
oe feeli f isolati 1 and 1% pounds. ”
gives a feeling of isolation. Fry's Chocolate Salencne Whole or Cut
: : . 5: Carr’s Tea Biscuits in tins
Hustling, bustling America might be ‘a Churchman's Cigarettes DANISH in tins
th 7 Embassy Cigarettes 14 lb. to 6 Ibs. ,
ae miles rer: < GOLD BRAID RUM
n his holiday “White House’—the mod- 3 yr. old DARE BACON. ,
est home of the commandant of a big. naval ,
base—Truman is safe from sightseers an¢
ESH TAL
from the constant stream of callers whc ae Pee .
plague him all day long in Washington. VEGETABLES
Here he can really sit back undisturbed Tomatoés — .30 per Ib. Mixed Nuts — .96° per Ib.
and weigh all the factors which make thi; Carrots — .30 per lb. oe “46 per bot
year’s contest for the Presidency so tre- - Meltis Dates $1.30 per tin
mendously important not only to America MEAT DEPT. en" oa oe
but to the world. HS $1.21 per bot.
aa Ts bie: ey ; Calves’ Liv
In a very real sense, history will be made Calves? Rersiihiiciile Celery Salt .36 per bot. _ %
at Key West in the coming weeks. Ox: Tails See oe
When Truman arrived on Friday night it Boone Ralnits eee n28 per bot.
Was pouring rain. A reporter of a news-
paper in Miami, thé nearest big town to Key |]% e
West, jealous of Florida’s reputation, des- 2
cribed it as “California-style weather.” $
: : ® * = i > '
a Miami my taxi-driver, a Hebrew, noted $ a N. GODDARD & SONS
my accent and spoke in glowing terms of 3
ithe British. ; SSOSSS6S6S55666S:
29956999966 669 ; ote









WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952



Steel Band Leader Gu

SENTENCE on steel band leade

yesterday postponed by the Acting Puisne Judge His Lord-
ship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor after a jury found him guilty

of receiving nine shirts valued $32.35, knowing them to
have been stolen. The shirts were the property of Paul

Paster of No. 42,

Swan Street and the offence was commit-

teg between October 30 and November 3 last year. The
shirts were used as costumes for the band members.
Springer was charged on another count, shop breaking

and larceny, but the jury brought hi

that count.

Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to
the Attorney General, prosecuted
for the Crown. Springer was not
represented.

The prosecution’s case was that
Paster had got some shirts of a
special design on Saturday, Octo-
ber 27. He visited the store on
the following day and left every-
thing. When he returned on
Monday the shirts were stolen.
Some days later he noticed a steel
band passing Swan Street, the
members of which were dressed
in the sports’ shirts. He inform-
ed the police, :

The first witness to be called
yesterday was Maisy Brathwaite,
a clerk at Paster in October last
year. She said Paster gave her
some shirts onthe evening of
October 27 and she placed them
in the show case. None of the
shirts were sold that evening and
when she left the store some
sninutes before 5 o’clock, she left
them in the show case. The fol-
lowing Monday when she went to
work, the contents of the show
case were disarranged and she
Gaew it to Paster’s attention.
Some of the shirts were missing.

Cross-Examined

_. Cross-examined, she said that
it was about 8.30 a.m. that she
noticed the disarrangement, Simi-
lar sports shirts were being sold
about town.

Paul Paster, the proprietor of
No, 42. Swan Street, said he re-
ceived some sports shirts, six of
which were of a special design,
on October 27, and gave them to
Brathwaite to place in a show
case. He left the store at about
5 o'clock that evening after he
had closed it. On the following
day he returned with a_ porter
Dennis and an electrician to

m in “not guilty,” on

November races. He asked him
whether he had anything to say
and he shook his head. F
Everton Bullen who is a mason
and also a member of the steel
band of which Springer is leader,
said that early in November he
went home one evening and found
wo sports shirts on his bed.

Shirts Identified

Shown the shirts at Court which
Paste had identified as the shirts
he missed, he said they were the
shirts he had seen on his bed.

He and other members of the
band wore the sports shirts at the
November races. Before they had
worn them, Springer had
told them not to wear them until
he told them they might do so.
On the Friday after the races they
again wore the shirts at a con-
test at the Globe theatre.

Cross-examined, he said that it
was usual for Springer to tell the
members of the band, not to wear
costumes other than on_ special
occasions. Springer usually pro-
vided anythin

r Austin Springer was —-——

HOME EXTENDED

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ilty Of Receiving Stolen Shirts



that
for the band, tha: was needed wrg McD. SYMMONDS, wife of the Churchwarden of St. Michael, opens the new wing of the Nightin-

Cpl. Clyde Nurse said that on
November 23 he went to Charles
Beckles’ house. Beckles handed
him a shirt and made a statement
concerning it. This shirt was
afterwards identified by Paster
as being one of the shirts of
special design. He saw Springer at
the Central Police Station, and
showing him the shirt, told him
that Beckles had said he had
given it to him.

Other members of the steel band
Frank Mavers, Adolphus Scott,
Cheste field” Thorne and Milton
Brathwaite also gave evidence as
to Springer’s giving them sports

whom he had promised to give Shirts:

some old lumber. The lumber
was taken away and the store
closed,

On the next morning when he
went to the store he found that
some money was missing from
his cash box and nine shirts from
the show case. Some days later
he saw a steel band pass Swan
Street, six of the members of
which were dressed in the shirts
of special design and another in
blue. He informed the police,

He said that on the Sunday on
which the lumber was taken from
the store there was no opportunity
for anyone to take away anythi
without his noticing it. He ha
looked at all the windows before
he left that Sunday.

Fifteen-year-old Dennis Out-
rum who was porter at the store
at'the time, said that Paster, one
Patrick and himself went to the
store on Sunday, October 28, and
Patrick and He took out-some old
lumber. When they were leaving,
he closed the windows,

Porter Trusted

He said that Paster was never
in the habit of examining the
windows to see whether he (Out-
rum) had properly closed them.
Paster felt he could be trusted to
close them well.

He said that on Monday when
he went to the store, he noticed
a window of the upper storey
closed, but unlatched. He had
latched this window’ on the Sun-
day.

He said that there is a building
belaw the window and one could
step on the roof from the window.

Cross-examined, he said that
Paster had been present while
they were taking out the old lum-
ber and had never gone upstairs
and left them downstairs.

Cpl. Herbert said that on
November 23 he was carrying out
certain investigations concerning
the larceny and_ interviewed
Everton Bullen who gave
him a_ sports shirt and made
a statement concerning it. He
also saw Chesterfield Thorpe of
Litterary Row, St. Michael, who
gave him a similar shirt. Paster
identified the shirts as his. He
later saw Springer at the C.I.D.
and told him that Bullen and
Thorpe had told him that he,
Springer, had given them the
shirts a few days before the





(To All Cash CUSTOMERS) From Monday 24th March—to—Saturday 29th March

Cross-examined, Mayers said
that Sprinrer had told him before
he bought the shirts that he would
buy them with the money he had
got after the band had played at
the Empire Theatre.

The last witness was George
Denny, a tailor of the Reliance
Shirt Factory where the sports
shirts were made. He said he had
made the shirts of special design
for Paul Paster about five months
ago. He had since made similar
shirts, but those he had made five
months ago were the first of that
design he had made.

' his. addess to the jury,
Sp inger said that he had bought
he shirts with money he had got
after they had played at the
Empire Theatre.



ENCOURAGEMENT
FOR W.I. DRAMA

MR. PHILIP M. SHER-
LOCK, Vice-Principal of the
University College of the
West Indies, told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that the Ex-
tra-mural Department of the
University “wishes to do all
that it can to encourage
dramatic production in the
West Indies.”

“One way of doing this’ he
said, “is to publish plays with
a West Indian setting that
are suitable for production by
dramatic societies and groups
of amateur actors in the
region’.

The Department therefore
is prepared to purchase plays
of this sort and to pay $25
(W.1.) for each play accepted
for publication.

He said that authors who
wished to submit manuscript
should send them to the Direc-
tor of Extra-mural Studies,
Mona, Jamaica. The name
and address of the author
should be plainly written on
the manuscript.

The author will retain the
copyright of plays accepted
for publication, it being un-
derstood that groups in the
British Caribbean will be free
to produce any of these pub-
lished plays without the pay-
ment of fees or royalties to
anyone,



SPECIAL

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ELECTRIC IRONS

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

RS

gale Memorial Home, Black Rock.
(l. to r.): Mr. E. D. Mottley,
Bryan, Matron of the Home.

The function took place yesterday evening. In the background are:
Dean Hazlewood, Mr. McD. Symmonds, Mr. John Beckles and Miss

New Wing Of Nightingaie °° 8 8oNs we.

Home Opened ae

IT IS very fitting that we
in Barbados should have a
home of this kind, Hon. V. C.
Gale, Senior Guardian of St,
Michael, told an audience at
the opening of the new wing
of the Nightingale Memorial
Home yesterday evening. He
said that it was to men such
as Dr. Nightingale to whom
the community owed a great
lebt—those far-seeing men
who had used their wealth for
the betterment of the com-
munity.

The children of the Home, as
well as Vestrymen and _ friends,
witnessed the new wing opened
by Mrs. McD. Symmonas., wife of
the Churchwarden of St. Michael,
fter Dean Hazlewood hed given
it his blessing.



4 cd on the eo ster:
lilding, the new win ip-
rox motely 40 feet long by 20
font wide. The second storey forms
an extension of the girls’ dormi-
tory while the dining hall is sit-
uated on the extended part of the
first floor, The old dining hall has
now heen fitted as a dormitory
for the older boys. This permits
of more space in the dormitory for
the smaller bovs. Formerly the
Home housed 35 children. It now
bes a capacity of 60.

After the onening Mr. MeD.
Symmonds, Churchwarden, gsaic
that he was very pleased that it
had heen his privilege, during hie
term of office, to sunerintend th
extension ‘of the Home. Amon
the many social services ettablish-
ad and maintained bw the s+
Michael Vestry. the Nightinenle
Home was the landmark and had
horne testimony of the Vestry
since 1947

Public Service

He said that it would always
remain a memorial to the public
services of a distinguished Por.
badian, the late Dr. Nightingale,
who had donated some of the
money which hed been available
for the extension.

“When in December 1947 Si~
Hilary Blood, then Governor o!
Barhados, opened this Home. a
heginnine was made in the good
work, which it is my hone will
epread and develop as the years
nass.” Mr, Symmonds said, It was
his wish that at the outset, the
Home would not only serve St.
Michael, but the entire ‘fend in
order to provide 1 good training
for many of the children of the
colony.

“The devortment of these chil-
dren here this evening is evidence
of the fact that the usefiiness of

OFFERS

USUALLY

64c.
50c.
$22.50
$5.00



No. 16 Swan Street

Phone 2109, 4406, 3534



should not be confined to the
of St. Michael,
Mottley said that it was
e solemn duty of the people in
chorge to see that the wishes of
r Nightingale were respected,
He hoped that by the end of the
year o‘her parishes would have
children in the Home.

}

this work is appearing before our
eyes,” he said.

When the Home was opened
eight girls and two boys were
admitted. Shortly afterwards a:
additional ten boys were taken Dean Hazlewood congratulated
n. Since th t time the number «)o St, Michael Vestry and Mr.

h "iv increased, Some of gy»mmonds on the splendid work
the children have grown wu that had been done, He” said
Eight are now apprenticed at -bot one of the cooperate acts of
vorious trades and soon a Com=>merey was that they should
mittee will assist 1n steering ‘he «natter the homeless. That had |
lives of these children when.the) pordy fulflled in the gen-
leave the home. of Dr, Nightingale and
He sald that two or . throne ' edditional funds, — the
were nearing the ace of 18. He Churehworden had extended the
w>s sure that the training wile usefulness of this purpose,
they had had at the Home

would stand them in sood stead pointed out in Chapter 25)
when they began to niny their of S!. Matthew, Jesus Christ!








part in the community. , sade it quite clear that those

Hon, V CGC. Goole naid great tri- » did not perform those acts
bute to Dr. Niehtinesle and. the © condemned,
Voctry of St. Michael for estab- ‘A work such as this cannot
lishing and running the Home. Tt et with the approval of
served a very usefil nirnse God and christian people,” he
lnnkine ofter the children who To the children present,
had no one to Tonle oftar thom » those children whose lot

might be to live in ‘he home, 1

will And tt real home

nd wi'l have many vears of
happiness here’, he ended

fiood Adminictration

v 1 that he had visited the
an mony oeensions andwar
much imoressed with than Potty Arne Social Wel-
The children Were fora Officer, congratulated the
well looked after St. Miahael Vestry and the Board
“We can do our part by teach- of Guardians for the great job
ing and inculcating the best We ahey had done She too paid
have into them but it is for them tribute to Dr, Nightingale and
not to let us down,” he said. He referred to him as “a publie
hoped that the elder boys would «)irited Barbadian,” She also
tolen arhat heA Bar congratulated Miss Bryan, Matron

sideration and when they left the .¢ iy, Home,
1 f Reckles, M.B.E.,

ood example of its ' Tahn

moved a vote of thanks. At the
id‘ that he end of the function refreshments
were served.





very

minietretian

work.

N Mottlew s
ad had many differences with
i former Bishop Although
they differed on Church policy,
he thought a great deal of him.
It was that Bishop and Hon, V. C.
Gale on whom he had to depend
when he was accused of throwing
away money to establish the
Nightingale Home.



“DAVIDSON” HERE
FROM B. GUIANA

The &7-ton schooner Philip H.
Dovidson returned to mareedes
» gaid that whenever they from sritish Guiana — yesterday

saunas Dr. Nightingale, they with a cargo | Soren e 1,200
thought of a big minded man who o gs of .110@, 500 bags 9 ¥ aane
fiad set an example for others to bran baes of ehareoa ev
follow {t was no fault of the ‘ons of firewood and
child if in this world it hadino nieres of greenheart, She af con-
opportunity. It was incumbent signed to the Schooner _o
upon them to give the child that
opportunity.



MURDER TRIAL

The mantle which Mr. C.
Braithwaite and Mr, John Beckles The trial of Joseph Gibbs, a
carried fell pon many of their jshourer of St. Thomas, for the
shoulders to establish the Night- murder of Duncan Headley on
ingale Home. Those of them, January 18, 1952 will start at the
who on many oceasions got some Court of Grand Sessions to-day.

praise, must pay due respect and Mr. E. K. Walcott QC. will be
regard to the fight .which Mr.





. the counsel for the defence.
Braithwaite and Mr. peice pee pri
thy > iildren
put up to remove the ct : eo ; ;
an ael’. ms- In yesterday's letter re Canadianising
f the St. Michael’s A Burbados by C. E. Gausden, it was
house. stated that he had been residing in
He said that whatever little Canada since 196 This shou'c have
support he gave was given prin= read since 1906.
niall
SSS he PU ee

CONQUERED
NOW

56c. Nett
40c. Nett
$20.00 Nett
$4.00 Nett
|
|

SACROOL

CONQUERS PAIN.

vale at
| NIGHT'S LTD.

SOOO A OOM 6H, 1,00 ,0,0,0)

PPLE

Watch for the Advertisements .



ON OUR

“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT CO.

LTD.

severa!

New Science

Laboratories
sor U.C.W.L. Soon

MR. S. L. MARTIN, Lectur-
er in Physical Chemistry at
wie University College of the
West Indies, told *he Advocate
yesterday that by the end oi
ims summer, the Science
Faculty will have occupied all
the new laboratories which
will be fully equipped for
veaching chemistry, physics,
botany and zoology.

Mr. Martin arrived here on
Sunday by B.W.LA, from Antigua
reccompanied by Professor A. K.
Croston, head of the department
of English at the University. They |
have now come to join Mr, P, M. |
»iertoek, Vice Principal of the
‘university, for the purpose of in-

rv.iewing prospective candidates

admissior, to the University



LL, ES TE a a



his October.

Mr. Martin said that in general,
the Science Faculty had not re-|
ceived the maximum in the way}
ef applicants for entrance with |
which it was built to cope. For |
inctance, numbers of applicants
for entry into the science faculty |
had so for, been well below those
for entrance into the arts anc
medical faculties,

Qualitications

In partucuar, we would prefer
to receiVe applications from peopk
wo have some previous qualifi-
cation in the science subjects” he
said, and added that where there
were obviously sound reasons fo.
the .ack of those previcus qualifi-
cations, it was still possible for
people with a genuine interest in
science subjects to be considerec
tor admission,”

This situation was probably
due at least in part to the in-
complete awareness of the
potentialities of a scientific
career within the Caribbean
area—not only in teaching, in

@ On Page 8

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PAGE SIX



Trinidad House Pass
Resolution Of Concern
Over Adams’ Speech

From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 21.
[Trinidad Legislature by a 140 to 3 majority vote
pted a resolution moved by the Honour-

nan, Deputy Speaker,
th profound concern and regret the
ed in the Barbados Legislature by Mr.







G y Adams, regarding

I ( Trade Commissioner

The resolution also asked the
Legislatur to agree that Adar

in unwarrant-
t Indian poli-
ulated to in-

irreparable hasn
f W.I. political unity

eech in which he
y from the Closer
‘ommittee on W.I
z 1 branded








which called the

the appointment of a West
to the United Kingdom

something better and worthier

’ for themselves being sons and

daughters of Trinidad.

Hon. A, P. T. James said that
any statement coming from
Adams must be taken as a state-
ment of policy from the Barba-
dos Government and every West

Indian who had West Indian unity ,

at heart must consider it very
grave and as likely to destroy the
future of West Indian unity.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SENATE RATIFIES JAPANESE TREATY

Hearing In
Larceny Case
Adjourned

His Lordship Mr. G. L. Tay-
lor, Acting Puisne Judge at
the Court of Grand Sessions,
yesterday adjourned further
hearing until today in the
case in which George Good-
ing, a labourer of Station
Hill, St. Michael, is charged
with stealing a tweed suit
valued at $85, the property of
Ralph Edgehill, and receiving
stolen property. The adjourn-
ment was granted so that
three defence witnesses could
be summoned to the court.

The offences are alleged to
have been committed sometime
between December 10, 1951, and
January 6, 1952. Miss M. E.
Bourne, Assistant Legal Draughts-
man, is prosecuting on behalf of

INDIAN SEAMAN |
REQUPERATING |

THIRTY-ONE-YEAR-OLD In-
dian seaman Neah Omar of Cal-
cutta) who was taken to the
General Hospital on March 2]
from the Sramchip Meee for
an injury to one 0 is ers on
the left hand, told the ‘Avene
yesterday at the Y.M.C.A. that
he likes Barbados, although he
had up to that time seen very
little of it.

Neah Omar—a father of two
children, a boy and a girl—while
operating a wrench—on the Ma-
jaha sustained.an injury to his
third finger on the left ‘hand and
was taken < oe Seperet Hos-
pital from the p where a
of this finger was Seovlelel ts
an operation.

“lt was an ordeal, but I smiled
in the face of everything,” Omar
said laughing. Omar has been
away from home for about five
months on this trip afd is now
awaiting an opportunity to get a
ship which will take him to the
United Kingdom and then to
Calcutta.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952

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the Crown whi i ~ -
- d e appointment James said that he took strong cal a 7
fa W litician to the post of objection to Adams’ statement Yesterday the. prosecution CANES BURNT ee
onde ( oner as a danger- that so long as the politician was called on six witnesses and then AT WALKERS TN
fee aoe Prpached (eens oe ee ee Mat rae wes bone IN WASHINGTON, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Tom closed its case. Then Gooding NINE ACRES of third crop Th Wr lds B t Niz At
the eve of Federation talks in the to be political racket. Connally (D-Tex.) and Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.), right, look on told the court that he had three ripe canes were burnt when a kal € F¥O $ es Gs ' *:
U.K." , Sinanan stressed that at Butler who stoutly opposed ~; Senate Secretary Leslie BiMe affixes his signature to the Japanese ver to call and after a short fre occurred at Walkers Planta- _-
ae. SOC, Sie ee the on declared that Adams _ jcace It was ratified by a vote of G ic 1¢ (Internations:: ?4journment His Lordship said tion, St. George at about 11,15 , S
apport @ the Regiona “a i pe ca » iment. TS was 3 Pe ere eek ce ee ______. *hat he had made inquiries about ,m’ on’ Monday. They are the SS
mie Committe, if it made a > express _— —- the witnesses and found that they property of C. L. Davis and were * oa mies .
1 appointment to the Wi. ce oO an . even 99 a ee eae = — when the insured. m ™~
Made Cotiniiesiouer was carries g other speak- . | case Was fix or, and as it was fltshire Plan- *
ld conclusion it might ers — the ewe es ad Nelson Gets = for 4 accused to eall his tate Bt. Philip WS about 6.45
n ar l represented 65 r— bn sat een ; omen the case = have p.m. on Monday burnt six acres
. aioe aa 3 the dens saat aul: — a journed for these wit- Gf tine canes which were insur-
‘ 1ave 1 way, Was go- . : seen. ed
ing to use the threat of secession

Gooding is on a two count in- 5
dictment. On the first count he a etn at Oar, Pye
is charged with stealing one »-" P “ re

brown tweed suit valued at $85 Monday burnt six acres of ripe

Hon. L. C. Hannays, said he had
been privileged to read comments
ind encomiums not only of

Mojority Decision

A New Skipper

Sinanan declared that Adams Gomes but also of some other MONTREAL, from the dwelling house of Ralph tty tak we fee mrepeey
wt pre ito abide with the ministers by rsons on both 3 . : ~ nceict. Edgehill sometime between De- . s
he was prepared to re- sides of the Atlantic and he was Appointments of Capt. Neil J. Roach, O.B.E., as assist- cember 10 and December 15, ee
the democratic procedure proud to be able to say that the ant marine superintendent, Canadian National Steamships, 1951. On the second count he FISHING BOATS
ent by the majority House possessed Ministers ot and Capt. D. C. Wallace, O.B.E., D.S.C., as master of the stands charged with receiving DAMAGED
TT lore that th aati - 7 : sto or ty sx %
casi 0 the “ogee ins SPOTS eae ngneamaad PH ie Lady Nelson to succeed ‘him, were announced to-day by #oleh property sometime between
if tive recrimination be proud. 2 Capt. R. A. Clarke, general manager of the company. Capt. 6, 1959. ' % The two fishing boats “Unity”
nor would > his intention to “I do not think that it is any Roach will replace Capt. P. A. Kelly, O.B.E., who has re-

r é and “Sea Queen” overturned in
vuld agsravate or news to the members of this First Witness



i i 3] ‘; the surf at Bathsheba yesterday
the situation which al- House or this community or to signed aD he Sa eny after serving as assistant marine while heavy waves dashed against
ady was delicate and dangerous. the whole W.I. community ifIsay Superintendent for the past nine years. First witness called in the case the shore.
What he was concerned with was we can safely send Gomes to any The appointment of Capt. From 1935 to 1939 he served as

: yesterday was Ralph Edgehill of “Sea Queen”, owned by Lloyd
the implication of Adams’ speech conference in any part of the Roach comes after more than 30 chief officer en the Lady Somers; Welches, St. Michael who said Mayers, was badly damaged
id the far-reaching consequences world which has to do with the Years’ service with the C.N.S.S. Lady Hawkins; Lady Drake; and jhat on’ December 9, 1951 he while “Unity,” owned by Oscar
t a situation such as this could subject of his ministry and we Born in Margaretsville, N.S. in Prinee David. In April, 1939, he wore his brown tweed suit and Holder, was slightly damaged.
have, coming from a-responsible can rest satisfied that he will 1900, he served with the RCNVR was appointed master of the on returning home hang it near “Sea Queen” was also overturned
t Indian leader give us a fair, full and adequate during the First Workd War before Lady Somers and in September t9 g window. The window is on Saturday,

representation, It is therefore entering | the Canadian National of the same year, enlisted in the about two feet from the ground. High winds and rain had caused
ose speech W&S wirely idle and inaccurate for eamships as a 2nd officer aboard RCNR. On, December 10 in the morn- the fishermen to return to shore
sed mainly on three points, he anyone to suggest that if Gomes the Canadian Recruit in June, c 3 ; ing he did not see the suit an he before they reached the fishing
id emerged ‘ a rene sue were appointed it could only be 4981. nang ot WMC to nad oe thought that his wife had taken banks
peech, quer whether it was .. ; iti ” : el oe | a ; i ‘MC. a i > sui » : A
peck ime to debate the ® result of a political racket. He served as third, second and senior officer of a convoy escort ie i Be eh eSegnoee
was still pending chief officer of various ves- group was awarded the D.S.C. in ap. ne



Sinanar wh

HERE are very good reasons why ‘ Ovaltine’ is the world’s

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taken at bedtime, helps to soothe the nerves, assists you to relax








5 2 ; stor’ pa = aw 2 missing. The suit was made t and composes the system for natural, refreshing sleep.
R.E.C d whether Adams was aakaae aa Certificate noe ie Master's 1843 and the O.B.B. in 1945. He CB. Rice & Co. ee LIGHTERS DRIFT WEST While you sleep ‘Ovaltine' provides food elements-—including
2 in necusing R.E.C. of tak- T’DAD GOVT. FAVOURS er + _ e - ir aioe SP held the rank of commander a ate ind blowine vitamins—of exceptional nutritive value, in easily digestible form,
ing part in a political racket. ; one neat he oe 7 oe ¥ the end of the war and on his re- Qn January 6, he saw his brown ../* arene ye Ad esterds: to reinforce your nervous vitality, your strength and energy. That

nl three members voting FREE SECONDARY ail nae ‘Te a a Peer a turn to the C.N.S.S., was appoint- suit at District 4A” Police Station Acryey. the ~ ai hie rf is why ‘ Ovaltine’ sleep is the best kind of sleep—so tranquil and
against the resolution were Uriah EDUCATION ay D A ena ao heat ed master of the Chomedy. In Gjoria Edgehill, wife of Ralph mage it Giieult Sor He Peet ? restorative that it helps you to greet the morning bright-eyed and
Butler and two members of his times. uring the last war, Capt. 1946 he was transferred to the Edgehill told the Court that sh control their craft — whether cheerful—feeling and looking your best.
tino. (hott: Os Gas eirtaciseh Mac) Roach received the O.B.E. for ser- Canadian Cruiser in the same lait caw the brown sult an Dew laden or empty — from ship to

The Trinidad Government has Vites afloat and in 1946 was capacity and in June of the same :

Doctors and nurses everywhere recommend ‘ Ovaltine’ as a bed-
time beverage. it definitely stands in a class by itself. It costs
so little—it gives so much.

E F shore.

a ; : . amed master of the Lady Nelson, Vo. i cember 10. It was hanging near “at” one time three empty
Peevish Motion accepted in principle the scheme P@™¢¢ . iv ‘es, YCaT was appointed master of the the window when she saw it. On ., *

for free secondary education but see will SOSH ee: ety Sulies Canadian Constructor, a position December 16 she noticed that the lighters with their crews were
Maharaj, due to financial’ problems it is ' 7 part =,

Honourable $tephen Also serving over 80 years with he has held until this appoint- suit was missing from the house, Gifting fast to the west after



1 7 m. descri ing ; i i ent to the elson, , 7 t . they had left the Harrison Liner

CO ear eRe) eR 8 Cee tee Se the C.N.8.8,, Captain Dickson” + Saey ene os aoe Ghat pe Hall, St. Selector lying in Carlisle Bay.

of SabRY. He id une one whe then hounend 4 the Hon. Roy Joseph, Catlisle Wallace was born in Capt. Kelly joine¢ the company jacket of the bronn ee. -y The lighters had taken out sugar
952". He did not s ay vy 6 on ; ; oak ’ ; 4 paige | s > :

should be peeved at Adams Minister of Bducation and Social Pictou, N.S., in 1904 and joined in 1923 an served in various



as a j i . ana athlon a : Rice & Co, The name of the t?,the Sel ,
speech or ao io asked the Mouse Services Yeuerday morning when 3, Mm ePprentice, im, March 1921, capacities, | He was chief OMS Derson for whim ther‘ auft te The crews of the three lighters
“to view with profound concern he opened the new science wing tne Canadian Prospector in 1925 was torpedoed and sunk in Janu- @° Was written inside the coat, not Pe Selector but they
and regret such a speech,” Ph Saat Sc Ri large gath- 204 became 2nd officer of the ary 1942, and was master of the geen ecle ek of Central Police found the breeze too strong for
“He aia not see any justifica- ering that Government war in- Same vessel a year later. Sub- Lady Drake when she was sunk Went to the house fhe ta use them. When about half mile
tion for asking the House to take reasing the number of scholar- sequently he served as 2nd officer by enemy action in April of the with a search send . ‘woused from the Selector, a launch went
that motior as only by true ships each year and was trying to OQ" the Canadian Volunteer, same year. He was made assistant bedroom he saw ¢ i » In. the out to them and took over for 15
and constructive criticism that place school fees as low iG ze Canadian Pioneer, and Canadian marine superintendent in 1943, ‘ a brown suit in minutes to tow them into the
tiney would be able to at least do sible, Pp Pathfinder, obtaining his Master’s and won the O.B.E. for services| @ on page 8 Careenage
’ ante Certificate in January, 1929. during the war. e o

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH

26,

Ee

1952

a



@ From Page 1
ddressing the meeting, Sir
ie Seelgaid :

7)"I ‘have been asked to convey
personal message from the
retary of State for the Colonies
you students at the opening of
s Trade Union Course. Mr.
elton says:

“IT am glad to be able to make
further grant under the
lon al Development and Wel-
Act to enable the Comp-
lier to organize this second
thool for West Indian Trade
ion officials. I hope it will
of great help and value to
those attending the school. I
id you my good wishes during
e course and in your future





































ponsibilities in the Trade
ion movement.”
ey Good Wisbes

gives me very great p.easure
come you here and to add
‘own good wishes for the suc-
of this training course. I was
for the space of about twelve
ths a trade union secretary
, and I feel that I can offer
fraternal grestings in assuring
of our anxiety that the course
Id be successful and should
benefit to you all,

“have also had a message from
Trades: Union Congress in
m, Which you may have seen
local newspapers, I will
bit to you——.

The Trades Union Congress
ome the holdi

bados. As a token of practi-
interest, the General Council
made a donation of £50 to
er a number of small bur-
es towards out-of-pocket ex-
es, The appointment as
urer On trade unionism of
. Bell, who has a long ex-
ence in the service of the
rkers’ Education Association
been reported to the General
il, and they wish him and
school maximum success,”

arrangements for « this
have taken a good deal of
out, and I should like to
this early opportunity of
wledging the work of Mr.
tchpole, my Labour Adviser, and
| associates. I can assure you
haye spent a good deal of
and ‘care in doing their best
ensure that the Course will be
iecessful, and that you will have
interesting, enjoyable, and com-
fortable time. I would also like to
S appreciation of the co-
ition of Captain Williams and
management and staff of the
oung Men’s Christian Association
Barbados, without which I do
think we could well have made
necessary arrangements,
extend. a particularly warm
ome on your behalf to Mr.,
mis Bell, who has been selected
the co-operation of the
des Union Congress in the
ed Kingdom to come out and
we lectures on the history and
evelopment of the Trade Union
ent. We are looking to Mr.
for help in a good many other
hings and in many other directions
“securing the success of the
resent Course.
you look back into history,
will realise that the trade
movement is a comparative.
ent development in the his-
our civilisation. It is only
out a century and a half since
the first effective beginnings were
=" Great Britain. The trade
movement really springs
from the development of indus-
trial effort, out of an affair of
employers who knew their
ers personally, into the highly
nised enterprises that we know
. When it became impossible
' workers in any industry to
direct with their own em-

I





























ployers and to represent their
needs to those employers at first
hand, they felt the necessity of
organizing, so as to make sure
that they could be properly re-
presented in the settlement of such
matters as the terms and condi-
tions of employment, In the past
century and a half trade unions
have developed into powerful
organizations, able to obtain for
the workers they represent a fair
share in the proceeds of industry;
but as the movement has develop-
ed, it has: been realised that trade
unions also owe an _ obligation
to the community of which their

constituent workers form a
part. The same obligation
rests upon employers, and it is

now a major duty of both parties,
employers and workers, to see
that industry is so organized and
conducted as to secure a fair re-
ward for all the different kinds
of effort which are put inio it,
and also that the result of those
efforts is to enrich the community
at large.

This Course is designed to
help you, who have been select-
ed as leaders, or potential lead-
ers, in your own territories, to
build up your Union org2nisa-
tions on sound lines, and so to
develop your work that you are
better able to serve your mem-
bers and through them the Col-
ony in which you live, It is de-
signed to extend the bounds of
your knowledge, and also to
encourage you to form a sober
judgment upon the problems
which will face you, and the cor-
rect solutions to those problems.
Knowledge is partly gained by

experience and partly by study.
In getting experience men make
many mistakes. Fortunately they
have recorded their experience in
books and this enables us to profit
by that experience, and if we are
wise to avoid some at least of
their mistakes. During this Course
you will have a series of talk
which ‘will be based upon the ex-
perience and accumulated know-
ledge of the lecturers, so that you
may profit by what others have
done, The Course will cover a
wide field, and in addition to talks
about trade union organization and
relations with employers and other
problems of industry, time will
be giyen to sueh_ subjects as
economics, agriculture, social
services,,and so on.
Changing Circumstances

I hepe you will not imagine that
when the Course is finished you
will know all the answers. Nong
of us know all the answers} for
cireumsiances are’ continually
changing and no two problems are
identical in all respects, The
intention of the Course is to give
you as much guidance gnd infor-
mation as possible, so that you can
realisa the aims of good trade
union leadership and be equipped
to achieve such leadership in
your own home areas,

The Course will be a two-way
cperation, The lecturers will be
experts in their own subjects, but
they will not achieve their objects
unless you bring to the discussion
an enquiring mind and make your
own contributions based on your
own experience, I hope you will
talk over-the lectures in your free

time and exchange your ideas
with your fellow students, The
twelve weeks which you will

spend here can be very valuable
to you in after life, and to your
fellow workers, if you make the
most of your opportunities. May
I quote to you the words of Fran-
cis, Lord Bacon, who was a great
Lord Chancellor of England in
the time of the first Queen Eliza-
beth, nearly three hundred years
ago: —

“Reading maketh a full man:
conference a ready man: and
writing an exact man: and,



TOBAGO-.-------
GRENADA -------
TRINIDAD _----.-—
MARTINIQUE.-----
GEORGETOWN...-.
CARACAS......--.-.
RIT UA io icinsnnr
SAN JUAN_---.—-

KINGSTON ..--.-..

$ 37.00

200.00



therefore, if a man write little,
he had need have a_ great
memory: if he confer little, he
had need have a present wit:

and if he read little, he had
need have much cunning. to
seem to know what he doth

not.”

We do not want to see cunning
in our trade union leaders: we
want to see knowledge, wisdom,
and the desire to serve their
fellow men, We want to see you
playing a responsible and helpful
part in industrial and agricuitural
effairs when you return to your
home communities
. That, I think is -specially im-
portant in the organising of this
Course,

I had the pleasure of speaking
last week to the Social Welfare
conference Barbados and I

in
could not help thinking that,
apart from all the. experts_ on

economics and agriculture and so
on, the real work of the world
has to be done by ordinary men
and women, who need leadership
above all else.

I thought that the Social Wel-
fare Worker was one of the most
important means of providing
that leadership, but there is no
doubt that you as officials and
leaders of Trade Unions are at
least equally important, and I
think probably more so, because
you will have the duty of seeing
that your people get a fair deal,
and, if you succeed in that duty,
you will have tremendous in-
fluence over them and will really
have the future of the West Indies
in your handg..

I do hope that you will want
to lead them in the direction of
building up a really good people
in the West Indies. l wish you
every possible success during this
course,”

A Newcomer

Addressing the gathering, after
Sir George had spoken, Mr. Denis
Bell said he wanted to associate
himself with the welcome which
had been extended by Sir George
Seel, but he thought it would
perhaps be more appropriate for
them to welcome him, because
although they were some of them
new comers to Barbados, he was
a new comer to the West Indies
as a whole. Mr. Bell expressed
the hope that at the end of the
{hree months he would be in the
West Indies, that he would be
much wiser and more fully in-
formed on the problems of the
area,

He said he was in Barbados to
talk to the students aout trade
union history, with partieujar
reference to the United Kingdom,
and he thought that there were
at least two reasons why trade
unionism in the United Kingdom
was worthy of study by trade
unions in the West Indies.

Firstly, there was the similarity
of cultural traditions and legisla-
tive framework, and secondly that
the problems of trade unionism
were somewhat the same the
world over. He felt that trade
unions in the West Indies could
learn much from the British
Trade Unions which were perhaps
the most powerful, probably the

most responsible and certainly
the most matured in the free
world,

He was not suggesting that

trade unionists in the West Indies
should accept practices simply
because British Trade Unions ac-
cepted them, ner: should they
reject them because they were
rejected by the British Trade
Unions. He would say, however,
that where British Trade Unions,
with their two centuries of
experience have accepted or re-
jected particular methods of
working, then the reasons for
their decisions were at least
worthy of consideration,

SSN

29.00

37.00

34.00

74.00

101.00

MMS MMM AMM MMMM MMMM MMO OEE

3

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——————
AAAANARANSSSSESNSNN 8
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Personal Greeting

Mr, Bell said he had been asked
to personally extend the fraternal
greetings from the British Trade
Union Congress which had beer
read by Sir George Seel in the
official message, and added that he
came, not as a full time officer of
the T.U.C., but as one with a con-
siderable and varied experience
in the teaching of trade union
principles, organisation and
methods, which he had dene in
courses run hy the British T.U.C,,
individual trade unions or the
Workers’ Education Association.

His own interest in trace unions
was derived partly from a family
background, and partly from an
academic interest, but mostly from
the belief that the ideals of trade
unionism were based upon the
acceptance of their values which
to his mind formed the foundation
of a good society. Particularly did
trade unions believe in fraternal
asociation and human community,
and in the words of William Mor-
ris... .“that fellowship is life: lack
of fellowship is death.”

“It would be foolish,” Mr, Bell
said, “to pretend that British
Trade Unions are perfect organ-
isations, or that they do not make
mistakes, or act selfishly and con-

trery to the general interest; but }

their ideals are nevertheless of a
high order. Although their ap-
proach is practical, it is influenced
by their deeper beliefs.

In conclusion Mr. Bell quoted
the exiled Spanish thinker
Salvador de Madariaga who said
that in democratic action, three
things are necessary “to know
what is desirable, to know what
is possible within the sphere of
what is desirable, and to do what
lg pos.‘ble in the spirit of what i
desirabie.” He ended, “I cannot
think of any better description of
the right trade union precept and
practice.

Students attending the Course
are Mr. McD. Brathwaite, Mr.
R, L. Green and Mr, C, L. Barrow
(Barbados); Mr. Ivan Edwards,
Mr. H. W. Critchlow and Mr. R. C.
Tello (British Guiana); Mr. A, J.
Arzu, Mr. L. Benguche (British
Honduras),

Mr. A. J, R. Riley, (Montserrat) ,
Mr. A. N. Warner (St. Kitts); Mr.
Cyril Gonzales, Mr. I, Cellymore,
Mr, D. C. Granado (Trinidad);
Mr. E. L. Laronde (Dominica);
Mr. N. J. James, Mr. D. Paterson
(Grenada); Mr. M. Baptiste, Mr.
C, Marulay :(St. Lucia) and Mr.
G. H. Charles (St. Vincent).

During the afternoon, Mr. P.M.
Sherlock, Vice Principal of the
University College of the West
Indies, delivered a lecture on the
Social History of the Caribbean.

The students later dined with
Mr. Chinn, Socia) Services Ad-
viser to the Secretary of State for
the Colonies,

Today Mr. Bell lectures on
Trade Union History in the United
Kingdom, ang Mr, Sherlock will
continue to lecture on Social
History in the Caribbean,





Jdlst March, are three Scott

The first is a Powder Horn bearing on its lid the mono
of Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, or Bonni
Prince Charlie as he is still romantically known.
ogram is surmounted by the Royal Crown with the initial
“C.E.S.” beneath which is the letter “R”-—for Rex.

The horn is greyish-yellow in
colour, with silver mounts of the
thistle motif, and on one side there
is an oval cairngorm surrounded
by thistle leaves. At the narrow
end of the horn is a silver nozzle
in the shape of a ball fitted with
a screw thread, this was unscrewed
when powder was to be shaken
from the horn into the barrel of
a gun. The aperture: is j inch
in diameter,

On the inside of the lid are the
maker's initials “I.H."; he was
either John Hally of Edinburgh
cirea 1740, or, James Humphrey
of Elgin 178 The remainder of
the mark is worn and difficult to
decipher, so that it is not possible
to state categorically the date or
maker, The Powder Horn is 11%
inches long.







An 18th Century Snuff Mull is

also exhibited. This is made from
a ram's horn with a silver mount
and lid in which a cairngorm is
inlaid,

The third item is a dress Dirk of
the Jute 18th or early 19th century
of elaborate design, The scab-
bard is leather covered with
pinchbeck mounts decorated with
the thistle motif, and, the figure
of Andrew—the Patron Saint
of Scotland, supporting his cross,
The scabbard contains two side
pockets for a knife and fork.

The handles of the Dirk, knife
and fork are of ebony carved with
an int@rlaced pattern, in the handle
of each of which is a tourmaline,
The blade of the Dirk is beautiful-
ly chased with the Rose of Eng-
land and the Thistle of Scotland.
The waker of the blade was
“Gorden, 200 Piccadilly, London,”
The Dirk is 17 inches long from
handle to blade tip.

St.

Two Porters Get 12 Months Each’

Livingston Bishop and Adol- a very bad case and he was afraid
of he could not put them on proba-
in
e might term a wholesale

phus Hoyte, two porters
Spooner’s Hill who were earlier
in the sessions found guilty of
stealing 12 bags of oilmeal, the
property of Da Costa & Co, Ltd.
were yesterday each sentenced to
12 months’ imprisonment

Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice
G. L. Taylor,
His Lordship said that it was

tion. They were engaged

what h

robbery from their employers.

The probation officers had spoken
but
with for the fact that they both had a
hard labour by the Acting Puisne good record and were hard work-
0 would sen-
tence them to a very long term

favourably about them and

ing young men, he

of imprisonment,



We'll





with

GERMOLENE soothes at

POCO

POLO CPSPOSPSIOOS

SELEC





THE CITY GA
(0.,

Â¥
%
°

COVDOSGOGOOP



soon have that better.

Germotene

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

\ Children’s accidents quickly re-

spond to the soothing and healing
properties of Germolene which
draws out the dirt and sti tes
the growth of new skin over
the damaged area, Keep a tin
handy for family use.

SPOTS, BRUISES,
RASHES,
ABRASIONS, Etc.

Oo OS
a touch—heals in record time.

FOR PERFECT COOKING

a

Bonnie Prinee Charles

Relic At The Museum

ON special exhibition at the Museum until Mor

4 ers
%
’

PAGE SEVEN

a



ish items of unusual interest
















@ Grand breakfast main dish!
Here's the “‘power’’ of corn.
Tastes powerfully good!
Crisp, sweet, fresh! Your
bargain in goodness—
Kellogg's Corn Flakes.

His mon



The above exhibits have b
lent anonymously, and Mr. Vix
Gorringe has kindly loened a b MOTHER KNOWS” a BEST!
with a colour print of the YÂ¥

Pretender wearing Horn

which is shown with them,

a Powder

Also on exhibition at the |
Museum is a fine coffee service <«
Royal Sevres porcelain, which
been generously presented to the
Museum through the Museum Col
lections Fund by Mrs. Ronald Tree.
This fund was started last year at
the instance of Mr, Tree for th
purchase of china, silver, glas
furniture and other antiques wit
loca) associatians for permanent
exhibition at the Museum Th
coffee service was formerly in the
collection of the late Felix Haynes

t
la

Esq.

The porcelain has a roy
ground and is decorated with gok
leaves and flowers, eat

h pi









of excellent design and
interesting feature of the service
is that its pieces are marked wit!
three different factory mark
Charles X, Leuis Philippe and
Napoleon III and Napoleon III
alone.
Mrs. Tree has also present If you feel worn out, depressed, or
the Museum several fine pieces of
Englisch lustre ware which are also generally run down a glass or two
exhibited.
a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and
U.K. Oaiziet Bre tone up the whole ne system.



Giving new vitality it fortifies you

Full Merber Of
“Green Pool”

(By SYDNEY SMITH)
PARIS, March 25.

Britain is not prepa
the new European Agricultutr
“Green pool” at the cost of C
monwealth trade or



against fever and exhaustion and
remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine

is especially valuable

after illness.



ed to



1) no

Te Lue

Cl
in



market



At the opening meeting of 15} we
nations in Paris to-day Parliament. | ia
ary Under-secretary fo ign ; le: = ve
Affairs Andrew Nutti arned eee tet

1 full

pean

that Britain cannot becont
member of any purely Eure
Agricultural authority and
“We derive a large part of ou
supplies of imported foods from
cur Empire and ¢ ealth
with whom hav a special
tariff and ictural arrange
ments.

“IT am sure it will be generally
appreciated that we cannot enter
into new relationships with
Europe which re le
with our Commonwealth
tions.”—U.P.

uid

i BUCKEAST |

we on mnthleenn a

contr

incompatil
ela-

TAKE

CC NCCT CeeeRteintet

COME A BOCTELE TOO AY:



— al
Cenacle














ate



The Commer and Kerrier range
includes a vehicle for every

Commercial and Municipal task
COMMER 500 G.P.M. FIRE PUMP

COMMER / TON DUMP TRUCK

COMMER 1) TON ‘SUPERPOISE’ VAN
COMMER EXPRESS DELIVERY VAM

COMMER 2-3 TON ‘SUPERPOISE’ DROPSIDER
COMMER 10 TON F.C. TRACTOR TRAILER
“KARRIER-TRANSPORT” ‘LOADMASTER’

su O@wehwne












» } o | 6G “KARRIER . YORKSHIRE”
> R SWEEPER COL.
%| ! lf t

Y 7 | 3 9 KAARIER ‘CK3" 3-4 TON
7 THE | eon MINEHAL WATER LORRY
i 10 KARRIER ‘MANTAM’

2 TON DUMP TRUCK
KARRIER ‘BANTAM'T CU
| YO. REFUSE COLLECTOR
$2 “KARRIER- YORKSHIRE”

FLORENCE

STOVE

OVEN

Beauty
and

Quality

Combined

RAGE TRADING
LTD.

Ps]
93960000000005000055000 1090009000000 HHO DOOD

oS

COCO

oF

POS




750 GAL
POOL EMI

COLE & CO., LTD.
DISTRIBUTORS BARBADOS

LLY & CESS-
THE








WS eet at



iv



NOW

iN STOCK
TON TRUCK AND TWO 15 CWT. COMMER PICKUPS

ONE COMMER 5



re












































































































































































































































































































































































PAGE EIGHT iad BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952
r
7 ‘ ~J ~
| PURLIC SALES H ° I t W R t ]
; Hearing in |Sugar Industry—Wage Rates
| : ee eres
Soetnetnttiens tail nisin
TELEPHONE 2506 REAL ESTATE | arceny ( ase ae followimg Wage Rates have been discussed and agreed upon | ROYAL NETHERIL ANDS '
ss. s by the Sugar Producers’ Federation of Barbados and the Bar-| ) The M.V DAREWOOO wm
. si
DIED FOR SALE BARBAREES HOUSE—That A d ourned bados Workers’ Union and represent the new scale of wages for 1952. | STEAMSHIP CO. Se hucin at. Vigcent, Grownda
% | Soedinn an kevee 13.5 esto 4 J The 15% increase on wage rates is included in the last column|,,, {AUZING FROM EUROPE and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
COMER: On March 25. ‘ ry —aponenintpaa—astign | SONCUME OF 5 nerves ie). perenes . S i= 26th inst
vere i - Phite- | The house conta 4 bedr r ab m ist January, 1952, and m | S.S. BOSKOOP on Lith April 1962
Se ee tdkne Bremen | AUTOMOTIVE | dressing rooms attached, drawing, dining from page 6 ee ee “as ’ rid Me ae §. BONAIRE on 18th April, 1982 Tee M.V. CARIBEEE will
eek : feave es ggnmniipiin | other usual rooms. Kithen ete ‘ se is ? an » - } STENTOR on jay for
Cozier (76 years}. Her funeral leave aaneanatin a and a her 1 room valise and this conformed with . . accept Cargo and s
; ” | ISTIN VAN— @ 9 arge acious erandah, garages,|, = here ro SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND tava Seerrat,
eee ue aittacy Cometry: [Veco aoe working ‘order, Phone | servants rooms etc., in yard. "All services| the description, of the suit which AMSTERDAM Nevis and St’ Kitts, Sailing Sat:
today for the Westbury Cem 4821, DV Scott & Co, Lad installed, wind mill, orchard containing] Was reported missing by Ralph A. PIECE WORK M.S. ORONJESTAD on 25th March 1952. urday 20th inst
ore ee cael * "18.3.52-t.£.n. | many variety of fruit trees, garden ete.| Edgehill , SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
a, a u a ght 6 view Phone. Mrs BRITISH GU: . MONBKA will accept
Se Gives, Coser, ee CAR—Singer 1,500. In good condition. | Beti anes » 3 = 8.3 ‘32 tf a Suit Identified a LN a Teak a % ‘. COTTICA on ‘oe 4eue = ene FA, a a a te Dashinien,
Oe iat ett ctecciienes teiehdttemngnenants 5145 26. 3.523 a. - . - Eee ~« | M.S. BONASRE on ay. Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
HAWKINS: On March 25, 1952, at ow emerdiacol an) aati BUSINESS PREMISES—One two storey] Later the accused arrived and QPERAmION , _— a } eae SAELING oe AD AND St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
residence “‘Hillrise”, Graeme Hall, GAR—Chevrolet (1939 Handle Gear|pusiness premises on the at Oistins| he. asked him if the suit was his.} 8 ss Solicit ‘ihdlaaitgiaratienienst egdadeaimnitipamdedeiilaaeaied: | nefS. MOMBILBA oncdeth. March 1008 April 1952
Terrace, Christ Church, Millicent [Shift model). Perfect “condition, good) near Market. Ideally suited for any|The accused said that he had | | | M.S. HECUBA 2ist April 1952. ‘ B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
Hawkins, widow of the late Dr. } tyres. Apply: D. W. Gale, Bathsheba, St. | kind of business _ Priced to Wing bought the suit in Swan Street,|,;). PREPARATION OF LAND. } j | be “| oa TION (INC.)
H. W. Hawkins Her funerui will | Joseph. 19.3.53-—-6n | to D'Arc), A. Scott, Middle Stre ~ |S.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1952
leave her late residence at 4.30 this was 26.3.52-2n.J}The same day Ralph Edgehill | | P= ; ‘x. ‘a Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
afternoon for St. George Parish CAR—197 Ford Super de Luxe V-8. identified the suit as his property 1. Seed: } | | | S$. BP. MUSSON, SON & oe . i pe
Chureh Excellent condition. Always owner driven HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom] jn the presence of the accused. (i) Raking and packing: i | Agents. = =
Tiguis OC. Panett, C. B. Simnett. | AUaS Ce or CN. C.D. Fackrees, house, all conveniences, with patty-!'The accused made a_ statement fa) Without Cane wps 100 cane =| aie S4e. |
26.2.52 13 2.52--t.£-n. | sized living room, open verandah, kite! eh oe ae to him. Cpl holes -
and utility room. Garage, laundry, 2} which was read over le 4 (b) With cane tops 100 cane from 52c. up | from 60c. up < e s ;
CAR 1947 Morris 10 Bip. in A 1/ servant rooms and storage room under.| Yearwood signed the statement, holes | a Oo s
ANNOUNCEM condition. Good fuze, completely ever-| Ba attractive hiliide ate, Keckiey New!” “After “making the ‘statemené| «in Windrowing with cane
) auled, rice ’ ; Road. A. Barnes 0.5 . ° > acc ui . tops) : |
ATTENTION LADIES: Fashion ee ee an ek “ere Bae . it oe oes es? > had (a) 1/1 2 row on 1) ei 09¢. 10¢.
py gS SBS nee in eae teat aa. te Pt , ye a {b) 2/1. (2 rows on 1) ef oy si i, SOUTHBOUND Satis Sails aie Arrives Sails
4 fe Ge ee noe _ , pay ae, oP oe 0. urnin, 0 s Montreal Halifax Boston ‘des s
Copies left, Upper Reed Street pleted 2,000 miles. Courtesy Garage |) 7 C/o Advocate Co., Ltd h used made a second state (e) 3/1 (3 rows on 1) 100 cane 18. atc
2—2n | 4616 20,3.52--6n 25.3.52—Sn.} the accused mai 8 “ : hole: CAN CRUISER Fe - 13 Mar. — 3 Mar. 23 Mar.
. - #6. 08—8n SORA (abate —jment, ~ (d) 4/1 (4 rows on 1) 100 cane 2c. 23c. LADY RODNEY 8e - 21 Mar. 2-Apr At Apr. 12 Apr
ON THURSDAY, March 27th, Miss M VAUXHALL VELOX—In excellent con- TWO HOUSES at Ist Ave. Harts Gap To the accused Cpl. Devonish / holes LADY NELSON _.. : oe 16 Apr 17. Apr. 27 Apr., 38 Ap:
Rebbitt, (Member of S,P.C.A. Executive | dition — just completed 10,000 miles. Dial} ry, Ch. One is 16 x 9 with shed, kitehen| nig that he saw other clothes in CANADIAN CRUISER .. 2 Apr. 2 May = M May 13 May
(Committee) will give a special talk in | Courtesy Garage. 4616 sn and galvanize palings, and the other is})) | bed. besid the bi 2. Cane stumps, digging out : 100 cane 7c. S4e. CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR. . @ May 12 May _ 21 May 23 May
the Rediffusion Children's Hpur Pro- 22.3.52—6n | 44° '@ with kitchen and galvanize pal-} the room. sacl e brown holes LADY RODNEY air wd 19 May 2 May May 2June 3 June
gramme at 6 p.m. 26.3.52—in - ings. The price for both is $850.00, and|tweed suit. A search was made 3. Ploughing with oxen, fpr “ CANADIAN CHALLENGER .. % May 2 June - ii June 12 June
VAUXHALL Wiveny ~ ee oe they can remain on the spot a on the strength of a search war- each cut per row : per acre | 1. 1.91 LADY See ba § Tune 1 Dane 14 June = | seme
The Barbados Automobile Association | 2,700 miles —- Owner leaving Islan Apply to Miss C. DANTEL, ant. 4. Lin : IAN CRUISER F 20 June une - wl uly
are now admitting sean cyclists 46 Delivery end April—$2,400, No. offers Middle Street Furniture Depot en 1, Yearwood, the next wit- ne xy 1 acre } 2 4.01 CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.. 30 June 3 July —- 12 July 13 July
‘membership on payment of half sub- | Dial 4616 22.3.52—6N Pryins 2645 26.3.52—2n ay carweniiiie ? ue a e (ii) 5%" x 5447 : oe S14 er LADY RODNEY ve os 11 July 14July 16 July 2 July 26 July
Ecription 26.3.52—in. —— ee SS, ted videnc (iii) O° x & . vf
eat Wie’ aaiusensae’ aeiee tecltecen loo ELECTRICAL “MELLYN,” Pine Hill of Cpl. Devonish. He formally} 5. Cane holes - x he
ee eee tos “htcoet on Thue BELECTROL UX REFRIGERATORS. 4% A be aiemierietai ae ia aS a = ieee @ Wher hte 109 cose Ble. 93c NORTHBOUND Asses Saile Arrives Arrives Arrives, Arstves
J § a newly-c ucte ste s . 5 "
Gay night 20th March, please return and 7 cu. ft. Kerosene burning units| with polished pine floors throughout th 100 cane ee. e es > 33 Mar. B'dos Boston 8+. as; mares Montres
same to me, C/o B.W.I.A. Office, Broad i tial Made. (b) & deep ‘ S00. LADY NELSO: 24 Mar. 3 Apr. 4 Apr. 7 Apr.
. oe . and may be easily converted to gas or| cool and increasingly popular residentis . holes CDN. CRUISER .. 4 Apr. 7 Apr. —_— 14 Apr. 7 Apr. —
Street : ’ t At this stage the case for the pr { t
: sine electric units. On display now K. R.]area. H ix compact and ea 7 da (c) for supplementary LADY RODNEY .. 4% a 26 Apr. 5 May, - 6 May 10 Ma)
C. C. KING. Jfuunte & Co, Ltd. Dial 5136 with minimum labour and contains front prosecution was closed an es. 100 cane oe. | be: LADY NELSON . 10 12 May 22 May| = 3 Mw) 8! May
25.3.52—2n 25.3.52—3n. | verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 3 Gooding gave evidence. He said wor! holes GDN, CHUMER oo May «ap May eam e Sond a ey
~ FOR. RE ' | tollet itches Jaundrs, servants quar [thet on January 6 at about 11 (ii) Forking out mould : 100 cane =| = 52—8Ie te J 1 aunh 9
NT oilet, , . : . . CONSTRUCTOR . = '
/ MISCELLANEOUS ters and large garage with direct accessJa.m. he went to his mother’s ; holes | 60—83¢ oe 2 dune : ie 5 June 18 June at June
iivecaalelintipesigin - description | '@ house, Front grounds laid out in {home at Station Hill and there saw 6 Whiting : , " pe ae June 17 June une 28 June 1 July
ss — jon - . edges, orna mM 2. y s til-
HOUSES oer ae Ga Jewels, Sne Sliver | earden beds, lawns, hedges, See Cpl. Yearwood and Cpl. Devonish. io no previou | CHAIAENGER .. 2% Jung 28 June es hiduie << AOR . She Sul
. vd shade trees and ornamental p ‘!Gpl. Devonish told him that he | } i 8
BAY VIEW—St . Ga F Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- | pock grounds in fruit trees and| CPI. Vv t 4 he (a) All round } | LADY NELSON .. i que 8 duly 18 July — | 1 Jul 22 Jul
ast April. Fully fuynished 2 Bedrooms, sajoining Hoyal Yeoh Club | Kitchen garden h a pg rt some ae pales” — ™ CANADIAN 0 EE ee = a eee ee
, - : adjo: joya ‘ section by appointment with Mrs § es P , ‘
Very | good sea-bathing. Apply ‘“Holly- 3.2.69-t.f.n.| 1 j0vq B. Aaron, c/o K. R. Hunte &lolothes which he said were his 5%4" x B14 ion. | oi a CONSTRUCTOR | % July 29 July ve S Aug; (8 Aug: 10 Aus
ee ew Bae eS 8 ie ,|Co., Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown. |" ooo) Both policemen ar- “se | holes | | LADY RODNMY .. 7 Aug. 9 Aug 19 Aug. — | @ Aug BaAv
BREAD KNIVES, Stainless Serrated For further particulars contact Rev ‘operty. ¥ x } 100 cane 88e.
BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, Ed his knife will also cut icing with- endeville. ~ h Rectc rested hhim for the clothes. At holes 5 1.01
pertect bathing, quiet. All meals and) out cracking and is useful for cutting | A: F. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory, | Festa’ Mh, {Or se station he Was (>) Straight Bank: — | - For further particulars, apply to—
Services supplied from main house. Own} temons and Tomatoes, the knife cut®} on any day Monday to Friday, {clusive shown a brown suit which he yxy 100 cane 58c. 67c. |
cee ei. i. eee. ate both when pushed forward and es " Snuaae nothing about é éu nee GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents.
" y Am an ‘OF tWOT back, only $1.07 each. Chandler's Hard- . a’ x 54" cane 64c. ‘Tac, Z
people. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or]... A 1 nce! jes, Reed and * holes
‘phone 0157. Uses line ee ein AUCTION He was taken from District © A" ¥xe 100 cane Be. te.
: tation in the Police van to pn holes : :
HOUSE: “Vermont”, Pine Road, fur- BRICKS—A quantity of good second- | — = - meee ere Saceniit's house. (i) Second (previously
wnished or unfurnished. Tent OP 8 4102, hand fire bricks. Apply: The West] DODGE PICK-UP VAN—Damaged in Cpl. Devonish and Cpl. Year- tilled)
-3.52—Tn Tindian Biscuit Company. Phone 4464. |accident. We are instructed to offer this . . ict “A” (a) AN pound ;
25.3.52—Sn. | vehicle. for sale by auction at the} wood beat him at District ;
neat eine oe res, ee aaeeine —- |Couttesy Garage on Friday 26th March} Station after he told them that vx 100 cane 61—22c. 10—83¢, canna juniiniesiveine
ng room, rooms with run-|~ BicyCLE ACCESSORIES, wholesale |at 2 p.m. John ladon & Co. Auc- 1 Te knew nothing about the brown Sia" x 8%"
ning water, toilet and bath, garage and il s to mention. | tioneers 23.3.52—4n e kne ” at x eR 100 cane 20—81c, 80—~95e,
oe See es < fee eae Se natee aoa 25.3 53-—2n. 1N ee 40 VAN 1949 . MODE poe “in 1 xe 1 te ¥v¥x ow 100 a 7 1 93 OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
, Wi y of fru recs, r os i § a | stater a O—Blec. 8—93c.
Bellamy 8365. 8.3.52—t.f.n GLUE ew discovery, Neverpart,| Damaged in accident. We are instructed Worthing Christ Church. holes Due
Heatproof, Waterproof will’ join. wood | offer this vehicle for sale by auction , . (») Straight Bank : v. tu
MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with permanenily, can be used for, Celluloid | at Eckstein Garage, Nelson Stree ‘°"] At this stage Gooding told the 7 100 cane 40—52c. 46—60. essel : From Leaves Barbados
“Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathi Poy or le,| Friday, 28th March, at 2.30 p.m. John]| ., ' tnesses : ‘oles :
‘For er particulars, Apply to Alma oe ae a ert fn aoe Bhonite M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers Court that he had three wi Sia’ x SY 100 cane 47—58e. 54—67C S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London 26th March 18th Apr.
Lashley No, 6 Coral Sands, Worthing, | siate Glass, Earthernware, Toys, rate 25.3.52-4n | to call but they were oot ae eee | ygholes | S.S. “ASTRONOMER” ‘1 Liverpool 29th Mar. 1th Apr.
ee |e gh as eerie. inteoquction lina Min Ratgons = a ae eee se fk ae
. Y ‘ ne 5s ’ a und ; 1 | rv. .
PERSONAL fon Sens, ee cate oe pede PUBLIC NOTIC ES vx 109 cane | Bic. 93e. S.S. “TRIBESMAN” ..M/brough & .
3 ist). peeesennorEesesoneN ae | Lond 25th April 16th May
: Chandler's Hardware (Stockist). a Shar x SM | 100 cane 88c. | 1.01 on Pp ay
4 25.3.52—2n ISE holes ; .
The public are hereby warned against — BE W vx & 100 |
cane 88c. 1.01
giving credit to my wife, Aileen Spooner! %RON SWING—With Spring, Cushions NOTICE BOOK \
(nee King) as I do not hold myself}and hood, Can be seen at Woodville, C one of the popular Gas Cookers ik Seis Backs holes HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
eects cog bee Se epeaie else con-|Fontabelle. Telephone 3940 eae Fd ee ae ewe .< ae, 1“ vx 100 cane 58c. 67c.
@ any or in my name 26,.3.52—3n ractors for promp eliver d y ig oven wi egu. holes
unless by a written order signed by me. { ———————2— | cing accepted. We shall be pleased to (Thermostat) SMe x Star sen | 4c. 140. s.s “INTERPRETER” For Closes in Barbados
Signed DOUGLAS SPOONER, JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts,| supply further information on applica- 4 Boiling Burners and 1 Grill | holes } ss. HE - London 5th April
Taitt Hill, including — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid|tion. Orders are also being received for Burner. vyxe 100 cane 64e. | 4c. .S. “MUTLAH . Liverpool 19th April
St. George Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also ere aa wr Easy to keep clean, Exono- holes |
26.3.52—2n. | Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre | manufacture for use with a ypes § mical to use. 7. Mould: Information
: — | Company, Trafalgar i aes Streets. | Type Crawler Tractors. The price is also Call and see them before all (i) Digging mould and/ per “square” | For further apply to...
Phone 2696 20.3.52—t.f.n, | about one quarter or less than the U.S of this shipment is delivered, filling baskets of 400 c. ft. |
Ss | TYPE. COURTESY GARAGE Dial 4616. of mould 3.49 4.01 | DA COSTA & co, LTD, Age
LAMPS, Bedroom, Glass with glass 223 52 Gn | #66896666666666006990006% (ii) Carrying, each rod (10| per “square” 7 —_— nts
handles, pre war pattern, (good) only on s a3 ao 2 ft.) of 400 c. i. eo. 12¢.
$1.96 each. Chandler's Hardware ee of mould
25.3.52—8n. | BARBADOS ‘ :
PALACE |e e| IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY ai et
ie suetpanle 2 yd., @ ro 3 lb. EN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby ave. tga all of oS ft. | 1.54 in 2
, all sizes. handler's Hardware.| persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or urn "
HEADQUARTERS FOR 25.3.52—2n.| brance in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (Ce. Beoperty of the (ii) Surface per square”
SOUVENIRS defendant) to bring before me an account of their claims wii witnesses, of 400 c. ft. 1.39
FROM INDIA, CHINA & OTL--The “world’s finest motor oil} documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday oF between : of soil i 1,60
CEYLON Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service | the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the tion Office, 9. (i) Digging Current drains | per square”
Stations, Your vehicle deserves the best. | public Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 16th day of May, 1962 in order that such (in flats) of ped 5 ft. 1.54 1.07 s
. ' VEEDOL, Found wherever tine cars| cigims may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority ao i. ‘ .
T H A N | § travel". 17.2,52—t.£.n. | thereof respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded trot the benefits (i) (a) Digene mein con- oR age %
——————--——--—-—— | of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property. urs (drains } " 1.39 1.60 ey
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3406 J|siover sna pons chanaier's nore Plante. ORORGE, WALLACE PARREER ©) Clasine out, main | per stare 3 G“ TRANSATLANTIQUE
; 25.3. 52—2n e ¢ ’ contours {drains) | © c.
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Paynes Bay 1g" x 6” of soil said 1.60 %
TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti- : n piece ots : t
ful condition, excellent equipment, good in toe, pariah ot Spek Zemee and island eens Sees, bf or thereabouts | (ii) (a) Digging a‘ furrows per Gens. | | Sailings from Southampton to. Guadeloupe, Martinique, %
Help Barbados to help itself No o! tr Wihs titieece ee abutting and bounding on lands of Mrs. Annie Phillips on the sea on lands now | r planting } of soil 1.39 | 1,60 Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica x
by supporting . 18.11.51—t.f.n | or late of the estate of one Gaskin, deceased, on lands now or late of Alfred > yoer (b) Cleaning out furrows | Per. “square” x
LOCAL INDUSTRIES. ond ae Sn ree a areere ber ie ae ay ee ee fi or plenting 4 [OS amet es $
100 EMPTY RUM BARRELS— $8.00] hereditaments a : | | , ’
ech. Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd Dated 3rd March, 1952. (iv) (a) Forking and filli | From Southampton Arrives Barbados +>
BARBADOS FOOD rf rare “i °b5.3.52—@n, | Bill Filed :— 11th February, 1952 =. | in furrow drains = “COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... ..... 31st March, 1952 &
PRODUCTS "Registrar in Chancery, a per 100 cane (% *sDE GRASSE”.”24th April,” 1952 | “6th May,” 1952
£ you have not already.tried WANTED , i: Se width of in. ene} a tose. | “COLOMBIE” wpe May, 1962 cng tist May, 1952, &
© not already trie a — holes ot calling at Guadeloupe *
gur locally cured Ham & oa —-- (b) Forking furrow | | 70-Bic. 80—98. e P 3
acon ank only | | conti e "ae vee pais HELP WARCY A. SCOTT Ametioncer & Real Estate te t . § width | per 00 cane | | SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE x
Hardware Supplies, Rickett: f SCOTT i & | Agen 544” and up | at thee 40—52c. | 46-600 x
. ——-— ani j x
St, when you are next in BUTLER—House Maid, sleep in. Apply D ARCY A. Auctioneer Rea sta : i iets e pee | i From Barbados. Arrives Southampton +:
town. Murphy, Dumbarton (near Kent) Christ of Middle Street has on his list some of the best properties in 10. Hedgerow work: cleaning, | per rod of 10 : 54—87c. “COLOMBIE” llth April, 1952... .... 23rd April, 1952 x
We can supp S ee icy RE a + eee. the island offering for sale. The list which is too extensive & feet from 05 c. up! from 06c. up “DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 ... 29th May, 1952
Leg Hams—$1.30 per ib. GENERAL SERVANT—Apply: Mrs to advertise includes the bes: house at Hastings on the Sea — -- % COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952 x
Shoulder Hams— a, A. Millington, ““Jamdor” | “Maxwell, with front, back and side lounges, epenpne. Sxewing 6 e e a is chain cend x
. $1.10 per 1b, rist. Chugh. 25.3.52—2n. ing rooms, (4) four large & two small bedrooms, three ba Ww Lab t ailing direct to Southampton .
Boneless Butt Hams SAN—With & tar, willing to wark on one @ith tub, also hot and cold water, garage, servants’ room, cience ora ories “ eeoeessooosososesesoesesosooonnnes >
$1.20 per lb, medium commission. Write D. A. C/o and nicely laid out flower garven. Suitable as a guest house Srent tense ment es SS eee enpneennensenneneemennens
Streaky Bacon— Advocate Co., Ltd 26.3. 52—Gn or small hotel. a“ nih called @ From Page 5 cently in Jamaica. This Associa-
$1.15 per 1b Also the most modern hcuse at Maxwell Coast w: tion has among its objects. f
: NURSE HOUSE MAID — Reference aos rae : z > : agricultural and industrial un- = Jects, foster-
Back Bacon—$1.20 per lb. hecesaary, Apply: Mrs, Boa, 6th Avenue very large bedrooms three having tiled baths. bh nt Gat dertakings with a definite bi ing common interests between
[ Batlevile 26.3,52—1n 2645 ‘and aoe Spllmetions att oa gree oe on any towards the practical applica- °“@"¢e teachers ang encouraging
—— inspection. o obligations attached. ‘or re ; wa
Se ee ee experienced ‘Stenes rm are + description see D’Arcy A, Scott » 1 ‘unt f science has to play te tal eee
xperience Stenographer & ypist, no & i
0 ; ’ co , ; :
REALTORS LIMITED | 2"‘iecse“oins. Sae8 ee Aemy Piatti et ee storms and ‘also among the genet
Mayers & Co., Ltd. 3.52—t.{ where a e genera
Se eee Mae ik 8. | seme knowledge of P°PUIace. As such, the Associa-
TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket ( tion is very keen to make contact
Hands ; sclence and its applications was |’ . cts
REAL ESTATE oe) only, those with experience need | an advantage. with organisations or persons with
; 26.3,52—t. fon | He said that the good material aa Bote in the various
AGENTS CHES for these careers in science was ote ee Led Corthiten and he
f ! woo HEA available within the area. prepared to act as a go-
FOR SALE ADVERTISE | WHITE » With regard to the academic between for any such contacts.
side, he said that he was mainly ;
IN THE ‘ This is a beantifully wooded choice beach area situated near the Four interest ed in — solid inter- ti A Jamaican by birth, Mr, Mar-
Winds Club. Plans are under way (o build some very attractive bun ,. tin was educated at Wolmer’s
Winds Clu actions and phenomena in Boys’
|B tows. Also two half acre building lots at the very low price of 250 per which spheres he had done soma ‘oys’ School. He won the Jamaica
bindiiiee Geter Tastins Gonbtenins ADVOCA TE sq. foot. Further particulars from MARTIN GRIFFITH, Four Winds Club. ; Scholarship in 1937 and was in
































upstairs three Bedrooms, Large
Living Room, Dining Room, 2
Toilets & Baths, one with Tub
Bath and hot and cold water,
Gallery. Downstairs: 3 Spare
Rooms, Kitchen, and Shower
Room. Standing on approximately
2% Acres of land about 100 yards
from Gibbs Beach.

aspection by appointment only,

NEW BUNGALOW
Comprising three Bedrooms,
Dining and living Room, Kitchen,
Tollet and large tiled bath. Stand-

TAKE NOTICE

ing on approximately 11,000 are {

feet of land. Situate at tie That AMERICAN RADIATOR &

Waters, and approximately 250 STANDARD SAN?TARY CORPORATION,

yards from the famous Rockiey @ corporation organized under the laws

Beach, This Bungalow has never of the State of Delaware, United States

oe lived in. Very reasonable of America, whose trade or business
ce.

sae address is 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburgh 22,

Fennaylvania, U.S.A., has applied for

PARAGON the registration of a trade mark in Part
Comprising Four , Din- “A” of Register in respect of all kinds
Ritction” Living Room, Pantry, of plumbing supplies and equipment and

len, and a very nice Study sanitary installations and appliances, in-

Standing on 7% acres of land,

cluding bath tubs, drinking fountains,
Situate near Seawell Airport, combination lavatory fittings—namely,
Price Vveny reasonable. Inspection pop-up drain valve, hand valves, and

by appointment only. mixing spouts, and metal pipe and metal

pipe fittings, baths of all kinds, bath-

BUNGALOW room equipment of all kinds, bathtubs,

Rockley New Road: on approx bidets, cabinets of all kinds including
imately 19,000 square feet of land, bathroom and shower types, drinking
Magnificent view including Gold fountains, faucets, fittings and parts
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing thereof for use with the goods in this
and Dining Room, Kitchen, list; flush tanks for water closets and

Downstairs: Garage, Servants

+
%
Room with Bath. and Toilet, and

urinals, Hospital tables, hydrants, hydro-



therapeutic equipment, laundry trays,

enough room for Laundry or Javatories, sinks of all kinds, shower
Workshop Nl] stops for bathtubs and sinks, urinals,
eae water closets, parts thereof and seats

therefor, tanks, tools, and apparatus for
making the listed goods, and will be

REALTORS Limited

CPCS SSOO

entitled to register the same after one
#]) month from the 20th day of March, 1952
REAL ESTATE AGENTS 1 unless some person shall in the mean-
AUCTIONEERS Qj} time give notice in duplicate to me at
VALUERS “| my office of opposition of such registra-
BUILDING CONTRACTORS | tion, The trade mark can be seen on
151/152 Roebuck Street, X% | application at my affice
Bridgetown % Dated tt 15th day of March, 1952
Phone 4900 ° H. WILLIAMS.

> Registrar of Trade Mark

$99S6S64 SOS ESEEGS 26.3.52—3n

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England from 1938—1949. He was
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WEDNESDAY,

MARCH 26,

1952 PAGE NINE

Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic:

rong foods and drinks, wor
overwork «nd frequent colds often p
@ strain on the Ridnevs and Kidne
and Biadter Troubles are the true
Excess Acidity, Getting Up
urning Passages, Leg Pains
> vousness, Dizziness. Swollen An
kles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids. end
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GROCERIES



BY FRANK ROBBINS |

| THE COLONNADE

(N PACT, IT WAS JUST
SAYING TO MY PAL HERE-
WHAT A NICE GUY YOU

.. ANP HOW WE JUST KNEW
YOU'D NEVER DREAM OF GIVING
US ANY TROUBL =

com









LONG
INNINGS

The Autobiography of
SIR
PELHAM WARNER



ST.

VINCENT
GRUMMAN GOOSE

AIR SERVICE |

PRESENT SCHEDULE



YOU WORM! SNEAKING OUT
OF THE HOLISE LIKE THAT’
I HAD AN APPOINTMENT
WITH MY DRESSMZ

YES - YOLR WIFE
WANTS YOU TO
CALL HER BACK!’

MAGGIE WAS STILL) SLEEPING
a I LEFT THE HOUSE!
L BET SHE'LL BE PLEASED
THAT I GOT ———-











ARE PUNISHED FOR THE WIFE-RAIDS













MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs 8t. Vincent a -» 9,00 am. Engiand, as a cricketing entity,
Arrives Barbados 10.00 a.m may justly call “Plum” Warner
Departs Barbados 10.30 azn her — but Englishmen cannot
, on claim him so exclusively, for there
sara Seediomamed ae is Irish and Spanish biood in his
WUREDAYS .: 2 , veins as well, while the first thir-
‘i ips ene Vincent ! teen years of his life were spent
re ay a BY ALEX RAYMOND _ | Satrives Trinidad eee 4: in Trinidad, the land of his birth.
& ey eae ~ 4 ¢ i 4 ~ r back-
RIP KIRBY, oo aim t LORE oo. oy = thn Tom . Departs Trinidad $1.30 a.m. phon 9 cenivbana with ‘his pre-
Arrives St, Vincent 1.00 p.m digious travel, that has enabled
THE DRESDEN ROOM OF THE BEVERLY- STPATHMORE WEDNESDAYS}, Vincent/Gre /St. Vincent Sir Pelham to achieve a only
RNs Sevres wate ates: Departs St.Vineent = 10.00 aun. sortianons Vat sins ‘pet eniance
ae) aanciermaee, Arrives Grenada 10.30 a.m as diplomat and elder statesman,
(ak p RICKY LAMBERT AND I'LL Departs Grenada 11.20 a.m of cricket
TOLD ME CHECKS ¢ al BE THE HAPPIEST aude Gi Gicesns ny .
WITH MY OWN JS GUY THIS SIDE OF Al ves St. en ‘ 12 noon
PARADISE / s All the great events, contro-
, Additional Flight From St. Vincent | versies and personalities of the
to Trinidad Times on Application game over a period of more than
sixty years are mirrored in this
St. Vinc@nt/ Barbados /Dominica book, in a very intimate and per-
THURSDAYS Barbados /St. vVineout | sonal way. Moreover, the author's
Departs St. Vincent 8.00 am | association with a host of people,
Arrives Barbados 9.00 a.m. | famous and obscure, in all parts
Departs Barbados 9.30 a.m of the world, has endowed him
Arrives Dominica 11,30 a.m } with a store of anecdotes (and
' Doninics 1230 p.m often rare Knowledge) on a wide
Departs roe 2.30 ; , range of subjects-material which
Sextem Gartedos roe ee Sir Pelham uses to the full, thanks
Departs Barbados ER oes to the ald of an excellent mem-
Arrives St, Vincent 4.00 p.m ony.
FRIDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent | ;
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 a.m |
KS Arrive, Trinidad - 10.30 p.m | ,
‘e] fee ne AND THE PROUD WAMBES/ MALES THE NEWS SPEEDS THR Departs Trinidad 11.30 am. §| A D V Oo C A T E
8Y PHANTOM ORDER, THE WAMBES/ BEGIN THEIR SU-MONTHS STRETCHES Arrives St. Vincent 1,00 p.m | 8
; j
}

SIX MONTHS OF EXILE AT HAR.





Zia on
i 9 at

ite



GARDINER AUSTIN |
& €O.. LTD. |
AGENTS

Lower Broad St.




F241) shy

MU (tip) VY

Phone 4704



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and
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the Village,

STATIONERY

Balmoral Gap.





PAGE TEN



» (No. 1.) Intentional tripping.

(No. 2.)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



AAD oa

8

ee

fs

Charging goal-keeper not in possession.

Know Your Football—uw

Al

FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

A player who intentionally com-
mits any of the following offen-
ces shall be penalised by the
award of a DIRECT FREE-KICK
to be taken from the place where
the offence occurred.

(a) Kicks or attempts to kick
an opponent,

(bo) Trips an opponent, i.e
throwing or attempting to

throw him by the use of the
legs or by stooping in front
or behind him.

(c) Jumps at an opponent.

(d) Charges an opponent in a
violent or dangerous man-
ner.

(e) Charges an opponent from
behind unless the latter be
Obstructing;

(f) Strikes or attempt to strike
an opponent. 7

(g) Holds an opponent with his

hand or any part of hi:
arm.

(h) Pushes an opponent with
his arm or any part of his
arm. a

(1) Handles the ball, ie. car-
ries, strikes or propels

By O. S. COPPIN

necessary that this law shoula be «xcept when he —

vigorously enforced by referees
to prevent improper conduct and
it is the duty of the B.A.F.A., to
see that players who have been
reported to them for persistent
infringement of this law, do not
escape punishment.

Assist The Referee
Club officials too should use
all means in their power especial-

ly in the case of teams in the
Second and Third Division com-
petitions using bad language or
addressing observations to or at
the referee on or off the field.
There have been instances of
this in the past and even this

season and it behoves the B.A.F.A,
to mete out such punishment to
guilty offenders as would dis-
courage the others.

Indirect Free-Kick
A player committing any of the

following five offences shall be
penalised by the award of an
INDIRECT FREE-KICK to be

taken by the opposing side from
the place where the infringement

(a) is holding the ba.!

(b) is obstructing an op-
ponent
(c) mas passed outside his
goal-area.
(5) When playing ag a goal-
keeper, carrying the ball i.e. tak-
ing more than four steps while

holding the ball without bouncing
it on the ground.
Charging From Behind

Now that I have mentioned ob-
struction | should like to make ;
few observations with regard to
charging a player from behind as
much confusion seems to exist in
the minds of the crowds that at-
tend football and even in the
minds of the players themselves

A player may be charged from
behind when he is intentionally
obstructing an opponent whether
he is facing his own goal or not;
but the charging must under no
circumstances be violent or
dangerous.

The offence of charging an op-
ponent from behind is not.com-
mitted where a player in playing

3 Ex-world

Champions

Offer Olympic Help
But The Amateurs

Remain

Cautious

By GEORGE WHITING
RANDOLPH TURPIN, Freddie Mills and Terry Allen
are all willing to put their services at the disposal of Bri-
tain’s Olympic Games amateur boxers this summer—not
necessarily as teachers, trainers or coaches, but as men who

have achieved the hig
fession.

Turpin, Mills and Allen may or
may not be experts in the arts of

imparting boxing knowledge, but
they have all won world cham-
pionshiy and that fact alone
vould ensure them a_ respectful
hearing by any ambitious ama-
teur,

Until a few weeks ago, any
suggestion of Olympic aspirants
being allowed within earshot of
professionals would have been
regarded as treasonable and
may still be regarded within
the inner hierarchy ef the ABA

Yet, since the ABA and the
BBB of C have now admitted —
albeit cautiously official reg-

ognition of each other’s existence,
the idéa of Olympic co-operation
may not seem quite ridicu-
ifter all

so
lou

‘Keen and grateful’

Mr. J. Onslow Fane, Board of
Control chairman, let it be known
this week that during lunch with
ABA representatives he had put
forward this uggestion of the
pros. lending the Helsinki boys
ashand. He also mentioned that
the ABA attitude to the proffered
assistance had been “keen and

grateful.”

But Mr. J. ©. MelIntosh, com-
bining the twin functions of
chartered accountancy and the

honorary secretaryship of the
ABA, took refuge in Scottish cau-

hes® honour attainable in their pro-

Empire Defeat
Pickwick-Rovers
3I—]

In their 2nd Division fix-
ture at Queen’s Park yester-
day, Empire defeated Pick-
wWiek-Rovers by three goals
to one. The game was very
slow and combination was
almost entirely lacking
pmong the members of the
teams.

Empire took the touch off and
frim.the beginning were masters
of their opponents. After a cou-
ple of attacks were warded off
by the Pickwick Rovers’ back
line, Norville, playing at left
wing for Empire took a shot from
short range which beat Pickwick’s
goalkeeper, M. Foster, and open-
ed the scoring.

Many of the Pickwick Rovers’
players had the tendency to play
too far back and this was a great
hindrance in their attempts to
score on Empire. As the game
continued, Empire made more at-
tempts to score but quite fre-
quently the ball was kicked over
the bars. At half time the score
remained at one love in favour



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, °1952
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final of the London Cham-
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Cellular Clathing Co. Lid,
485, Oxford Street
London, W.1, Ragland

eecercececnseesenesannnenes scene sssserseerageersnssenenrnuness



enrrrerrrrrrr rrr rr



Paice







Counters etc.
last a life-time

For Permanent Floors,
that will

WE OFFER...

ENGLISH UNGLAZED FLOOR TILES

in Red and two shades of Speckled Cream
and Red
6” < 6” and 3” x 3”



for a score of 980.

oo “Se neenenesrneessesoeneessscnsnseeuenseed
__London Express Service.

Savannah Club
‘Tennis Toursament

Owing to rain no play
possible yesterday.

was

TO-DAY'S FIXTURES ALSO...
Men’s Singles Final
aD. B: Worme ws. J. D. Triming- GLAZED TILES for Walls
am, ‘
ae Ta vein cal Ste in Blue, Black, Green and White
rs. »_ ge a Royce ° ° 6” x 6”
ate So a WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

Miss G. Rilgrim and G. H.
Manning vs. Miss Ena Bowen and
Cc, L, L. Bowen.

RED & BUFF COLORCRETE CEMENT
PORTLAND CEMENT in Bags













+ SEA ga such stalwarts as, say Alf Gallie the goalkeeper, succeeded in scor-







; *Phone : 4456, 4267
the ball with his hand or occurred. the ball touches a player behind tion when I sought confirmation of Empire. :
arm. (This of course does (1) Playing. in a manner con- Unless there is an intention to of his association’s keenness and For the greater part of the sec- WHAT’S ON TODAY WILKINSON & HAYNES C0 LID
not'apply to the goal-keeper sidered by the Referee to be _charge such a player. gratitude. Re bale play pap lecereennnns * i
within his own penalty dangerous, e.g. attempting to kick Intention CHA | ate sibilities. but in 7 wie oro ia ot Art Exhibition at the Museum
area). the ball while held by the goal- The referee is the sole judge of | tins detinite nue aa vk as eee ee resumption, Rudder at 210,00 som.

Should a player of the defend- keeper, such intention, but it has been ia Bate definite has been done, oe ae. ‘eee © shooters Court of Grand Sessions— —==
ing side intentionally commit one (2) Charging fairly ie. with noticed that some referees con- Me nt i backs * ee pounded the bail 10.00 a.m. ese |
of the above nine offences within the snoulder, when the ball is strue the law more strictly than tt i ay ea ra an here E heping ints Che opponents? goal Speech Day at Harrison Col-
the penalty area he shall be penal- NOT wfthin playing distance of jis necessary to secure fair play, ‘nose ig cette’ te } . pbntonmes With sade latte lode cin lege—2.30 p.m.
ised by a PENALTY KICK. the players concerned and they and in consequence of such de- Pel ‘than itp Sine ena oe favour of Empire, play, continued ge >, eas’. t
A etaliy ice can be aWvaried are definitely not trying to play Fi As progress of the game is ji'soned over lunch to the BBB ot without further scoring on either ‘ wae. tC OI I le TO ) S
irrespective 0’ e position o e it. ° C gesture. side for some time. enalty
ball, if in play, at the time en (3) When not playing the ball, If a player turns so as to face ee Wal awardee: aiainat eotse sepals decassieas: Benabiacell ti.
offence within the penalty area is intentionally obstructing an op- his own goal when he is tacklec Friendly hint which was saved by Grant. Then ture, St. Thomas at 7.30 Z .
committed, ponent, i.e. running between the by an opponent, or is obviously ? about eight minutes before the pn. that relatives and friends overseas

This is an importent law and a cpponent and the ball or imposing aware that he is about to be The ABA clubs have their own close of play, W. Greenidge at Police Band Condéert, St.
referee taking the initiative where the body so as to form an obstacle tackled by an opponent, he is in- instructors, amateur and profes- centre forward for Pickwick Luke’s Boys’ School at enio
he sees necessary, can prevent to an opponent. tentionally obstructing and may sional, available. as Olympic Rovers received a long pass, ana 8.00 p.m. JOY
rough play developing. It is most (4) Charging the goal-keeper be charged from behind. coaches, Nobody suggests that with no one to contend with but



and Len Brooker, should being the lone goal for his team.
superseded. But @ friendly hint Empire pressed their opponents, GUAVA GUAVA
i or two from active or recently and a lovely shot taken by Nor- WEATHER REPORT
active: professional champions ville at left wing was pushed over
; a r would surely not come amiss. If the bars by Foster, Morris YESTERDAY CHEESE CHEESE
might even help. kicked the corner and Rudder Rainfall from Codrington: .29
: ue receiving the ball scored the third in. ‘—_ i .
/ Turpin and Allen have told me goal for Empire. Play ended Total Rainfall for month to — in bars each in packages each
4 through their managers that they without further score. date: 2.11 ins
} would be more than willing to Tem}

THE “unchanging Orient” will
set a new fashion“in cricket this
spring. The Indian team intend
to fly here in mid-April—the first
air-borne “invasion” of this land
by a full team of cricketers,

I talked to honorary-advance-
agent-for-visiting teams HAROLD
GILLIGAN, who used to play for
Sussex. “This latest Test victory
by India should stimulate interest
in their doing a lot,” said he.

' I agree—it both sides can raise
a gallop instead of a jog-trot_in
scoring. A dreary 30-runs-an-
hoyr rate just will not do,
Seventh Tour

This will be Gilligan’s seventh
tour as preliminary arranger. He
captained the MCC side in New
Zealand in 1929-30, and since then

has “done” for New Zealand
twice, South Africa twice, West
Indies once and now India a
second. time. He arranges the
fixtures and socia] engagements,

puts the journeys and hotels in
the hands of a travel agency and
submits the complete itinerary to
the visitors for approval,

I should say the West Indians
would have been happy to have
him arrange their tour in Aus-
tralia. The itinerary there was
s‘rongly attacked by JOHN GOD-
DARD, the visiting captain and
no wonder,

Support From Africa

SIR EUGEN MILLINGTON-

. DRAKE, Eton and Oxford oars-
man, now on a lecture tour of the
Gold Coast, is also representing
there the Amateur International
Boxing Association The Gold
Coast, he writes, is full of en-
thusiasm for affiliation to AIBA
now Nigeria has come in, too. He
also has been told that an East
African association, covering
Uganda, Kenya and Tanganyika,
is likewise applying for member-
ship.

















“LL -A









having nothing to fear.

They'll Do It Every Time







President of AIBA is’ EMILE
GREMAUX, French industrial
chief in Lille. Hon. secretary
and treasurer is Lieut.-colonel

R. H. RUSSELL, whose offices are
in London.
Not Yet Thirty

LEW CULLANS, who has kept
goal for the Erith and Belvedere
iootbail club, but recently lett
inem, is 29 years of age. 1 have
that assurancertrom him by letter

because the other day he was
aescribed as 33.
“We hear of footballers lower-

ing their age,” he writes, “but for
someone to put it up seems a little
crazy. Four years makes an im-
portant difference to a footbaLer.”’

Quite so. A footballer, amateur
or professional, has as much right
to be pernickety about his age as
an actress. May Collins, in those
four extra years, stop many an
unstoppable shot,

Nothing To Fear
WILL Britain’s racing cyclists
have anything to fear from the
Russians should the two countries

meet in the Olympic Gameg at
Helsinki in July? Russia's ap-
plication to become affiliated to

the international Olympic Body is
expected to be granted when
world delegates meet in Paris at
the end of this month,

In the 1000 metres the Russian
title-ho.der, I. IPPOLITOC, would
be a danger, If he had ridden in
the 1948 Oiympic Games at Wem-
bley, and clocked the same time
of 1 min., 14.2 secs., his Russian
record, it would have earned him
second place. J. DUPONT
(France) won the event in 1 min,,
13.5 sees,

Britain’s record for the distance
—obtained elsewhere — is 1 min.,
14 secs, by WILF WATERS. In
similar conditions British cyclists



Registered US Paras Ofiee



UST'VE LEFT HE EXPECTS TOO BUSY TO BREAK
wy MMU TATION BIG-HEARTED JOE, THAT BILL. BUT WATCH
TICKET IN MY OTHER THE CONDUCTOR, TO HEWON'T GET HIS J
SUIT HOW MUCH IS fag LET HIM RIDE FREE \ /) HE NEVER WAZ CHANGE BACK TILL 43}
THE FARES GOT [4 BUT HE DON'T KNOW TICKET: HE ONLY YA WE PULL INTO THE /

A WHILE »-HIS



Ds

(ze ZN]
|————px|



GOES IN ONCE IN



Muster Aurcrattman

VHUVGH buwmnax waomUuLLs
Whil ve
l@w WeeCKS IL Wiil De as an aiuinah
Wheat he Will G@lena nis AbA van-
said-welgn, Championship,

He wul be making an attempt
to win his second ttte by way ot
the KAF and Iimperia. Services
eliminators rather than tnrough
his civilan ciub at Weillingto.
(Shropshire),

Reason is that Nicholls will be
on demobilisation leave when the
KAF championships begin. If he
reaches the Wembley finals on
April 25 he will be entitled to
be announced trom the ring as
“Mister” and not “Aircraftman,”

Golfing Bishop

CHIGWELL GOLF CLUB have
Monsignor GEORGE ANDREW
BECK, Roman Catholic Bishop of
Brentwood, as a member. He told
me to-day that he is a beginner
and has no handicap.

The youthful looking bishop is
a keen sportsman, Formerly head-
master of a school in Nottingham,
he is a useful cricketer and a
qualified football referee. He has
a house in South Woodford,

Title Change?

WILL the All-England women’
badminton singles title return to
Canada this year?

Mrs. KAE GRANT, Canadian
champion from Saskatchewan, now
living in Montreal, has entered for
the championships in London in
March. The last Canadian entry
was Mrs, W. R. WALTON, who
took the cup back to Canada with
her in 1939,

The Danes have so monopolised
this event over the last four years
that any additional opposition is
welcome,

Money To Burn

ONE JIM HEARN has resigned
for the Giants, who play not foot-
ball, but baseball. Had it been



By jimmy Hatlo

eee




7 YE THINKS OL’ ‘S
“TICKETS, PLEASE'IS. )








STATIONâ„¢ _/

[ir







IF HE'S GOT
ANOTHER Su'T,

WATCHING THE ONCE-

IN-A-WHILE TRAIN
TRAVELER HOPING a |
TO GET IT FOR FREE~ ©

Â¥
“THANX AND A TIP OF
THE HATLO HAT TO



@ CiViliaid Wiattlin Tne next

“every

lend a hand
further .. ‘

Any amateur fly-weight or ban-
tam who fanciés it may

— and Allen goes

next month at’ Allen’s quarters Foster.

at Brighton, where he will be Empire: Grant, Haynes, Jor-
training for his championship de- dan, St. John, Rudder, Clarke
fence against Teddy Gardner, No Morris Hutchinson, |
liberties taken and no ABA rules ' ges mete

broken,
Age-old prejudice

Freddie Mills jumped at the
idea. “It is surely time,” he
told me, “that everybody pocket-
ed their pride and got together
on this Olympic business. Count
me in,”
Unfortunately,
dice is not easily mellowed.
Nevertheless it is worth remem-
bering that we have not won an
Olympic boxing title for 28 years.
With that melancholy rec
their

age-old preju-

The teams are as follows:—

Pickwick Rovers: M. Foste,
Webster, Robinson, Fitz Gerald,
n= Mc Kenzie, Lewis, Kelly, Carter,
drop in W. Greenidge, D. Greenidge, L.

Douglas, Norville

Referee: Mr. 9. M. Robinson

Ladies’ Water Polo
Practice Match

The two ladies’ teams for the
water polo game to be played at
the Aquatic Club on Saturday
March 29 at 830 p.m. will be
selected fyom the ‘following 17
players :

Peggy Pitcher, Marion Taylor,



ord on' Jill Gale, Barbara Hunte, Rober-
conscience the ABA havelta Vidmer, Mary Knight, Ann







cause to be “keen andjTaylor, Jean MacKin: is
grateful” for all the help they . ae ee
can get. ——
Whether we like it or not,

several members of our Olympic
team will eventually be turning
professional—just as Jack Gard-
ner, Don Scott, Johnny Wright,
Ron Cooper, Tommy Profitt and
Henry Carpenter did after the
1948 Games at Wembley.

So what harm could there
in a little fraternisation before
Helsinki, instead of after? It
could be controlled, and I am sure
the ABA escutcheon would
main unsullied.—L.E.S,

be

the other way round, and in Eng-
Jand, Hearn might have earned
in all somewhere near £1,000 a

year. But as a base ball pitcher,
what?

“The guessers are guessing,”
writes a New York columnist

“that he signed for about 23,000
dollars.”

Which is £8,000 and some
considerable hundreds,

in-
Some of

‘| our boys have chosen the wrong

|
|

vocation. So have many of our
eminent men,—L.E.S,





Un¢guentine

#16. UR Oar orn

Relieves pain of
er 0D gd





















2a reat burn’ cem-
edy that is antiseptic.
Relieves” Puia-Gives Y
Comfort--Promotes Heal
ing. ‘Tubes or jars.




re-s

TOP SCORERS AT THE
INTERSCHOOL SPORTS

‘ehe Lodge School |

e
TOP SCORERS IN

“Gailoring
L.C.S. Maffei & Co.,
aid.

Pr. Wm. Henry Street



MAFFEI & CO., LTD, .EXTENDS HEARTY
CONGRATULATIONS TO .

LODGE SCHOOL
ON THEIR RECENT VICTORY

Highest Temperature: 80.5 °F I2e 20¢.
Lowest Temperature: 71.0 °F
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005
(3 p.m.) 29.921
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m.
Moon: ..New, March 25
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.46 a.m., 4.26 p.m.

GUAVA
CHEESE

in tins

GUAVA
JELLY

each per bottle







an ee 10.10 a.m., 10.22 || 90c. & $1.80 3Be

aR a oe eee See them all in our Home Products Dept.
MacKinnon, Jean Chandler,
Phyllis Chandler, Janice Chand-

ler, Frieda Carmichael, June Hill
(St. Winifred’s), Shirley Walton,
Phyllis FitzPatrick and Betty
Williams.

There will be a practice match
at the Club on Thursday, March
27 at 5.00 p.m. The above play-
ers are asked to attend,

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street



“Yos—usually Rice's
on Bolton Lane
have wenything

9 need in Clothes.”

The int
‘by Consulate in
pleasing pastels,
The Kelt
by Eldonia in fine
leather—clip fastening.
Woollen Hose by

’ The Slacks
by Rice’s in tail-
I ored Gabardine.
Morley—short,

ne



Phone 2787

elastic tops.

C. B. Rice

Merchant
Tailors

& Co.

=>

Wateh for the Advertisements ...

“OVEN FRESH”

THE WEST INDIA

ON OUR

SERVICE

HISCUIT CO. LTD.







Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. P,BLM SALES WEDNESDAY. MARCH . 1*52 TELEPHONE 250f IFI> .* On March . 1SE at •>" Wvde.-.w. ltd ['ppa. Wh.b park Boed MM FVuren..Ftedn.k Colter %  •* reefi Bet ""I*** the ikotf r**i.enee -1 4 p "i 1U> *<*r Ihe Weatbun Comelrr Friend, are nlr lo attend UU Pearl >la fti.--: jTlN H.-klr... .laVo* M W H *a\e her la1> AN.\4M .M i >ii: Vis ATTTNTIQ.N l-ADItS Jnunuli in French and Speiiili ttylri lor 1962 are now %  TlHrttll oiilv a f a Win left, tipper Reed Street ON ThfKHWV. March IUh. Mter M Member ol S.P C A EXecui,.. iConuiUtleei mil ri%e a ipnul t.iik n the K..Hi.-ion Children's Ifcmr % *PIMM at a p m ) M-ln T>r Barbaoo* Aulomobtk %  re now admitting motor c membership on payment of Will th* prtlrain who borrowed wh aa alta c .Pencil at In* Airport on Th.x*04, mint nth March. pWee.rrv.rr. %  rolWIA Oft.tr Broad IOK *.% %  >: Al'TOMOTIVr. Al'TlN VAN-One ii r %  %  king order lliene lcl A Co. Ltd u i is• l m. ItAKBAKUS IIOl 4 ISlisraB a at IUIIMUC<< till:. SI. Ml andlng on t acre* 11.1 perches of land Tha hu**> rantauia 4 bidroarai with MUM aaaaaa ..U..-I1..1 ."...-. %  mt Kll'ien eV l_ile pacloua servant* room. a**.. In rani All .evvlrea inel.il,ed. wind mill, orchard contain"". %  artel, sf fn.il tree., serde Shift I*.*J-1< lyres. AppiJoaeph II-...: | l.-.l -<* %  •—* v. .... MbMH. p| l J hs-An CAR IM1 Feed Super da Lear V-l re-ller.t rendition Alwav*. owrcr driver fling 44U or BUS C B J auk man IJ2 If r i ...mpte'ely o on Htra. CAB IfU Matria Uatord -luet eeawIrtad JOtO inllrl Courte.v Oarege wia j. | Bj %  .. LAND %  BPP1 VAl'XHAU. VE1"X I. • %  Iltlon Just completed 1&.0S0 n.ilea Dla '..urlciy Oarage MIS VAUXHAIJ. WVVEBN Mas miles Owner le. Dallvorv and Apri. si*" Dial 4*1*. Juet unon ,.? l,Ui,.| No nflerr %  j I C ". KLrXTRKAI. FOH HCaVT MOUSES BAT VKW Lawrence Gap :-t APTII lllllv fttflnahed 1 rtadi< Vary good era-bathiiiar Am.i-. I wood,„ i door JI1H HCAOi COTTAOK or. Si Jamaa Coaat l-arfarl balhlns. qulal AU mcala and %  rrvir *uDpliad from main houar Own Tlli h l—. guiubla marrird roupla. H#0' par il-i V Ammcan Plan fur Iwo iroplr Apl> BrachiBMda. S*. Jaanai oi pnoh* *1T 14 1 U 1 I n ANTiqi %  — rvary daaerlpUon ..aa. China. oM J-wala. taw SUvaa A.larcoV. II. Barly booka. Mapa. Aula^rapha C at (Icnlrin AMkQUa BM* .ajoinim Royal Vachl Club. l(n lao tut kin* w .< cull ... Tamalor.. Iha I | both whan puahad forward and dra*i bch, al> II m aarh Chandlar'a MBfw war* ft Barrel* Accaaaorwa. Bard MM Tudor Sirral M S -*. HOU*r untumUMd. Dial I i Road, i IRIMDAUT llarbaraaa Hill, draw and diiiii.* room. 3 hrdioona with ( Mi* waiar. lollet and bath. U>. %  da Glaai, Earthamwara. Toy,. Ebonite. ~ wa. F a bric P. Book Binding. Marhinerv inaulallng. Mc. lu-taii(I m per pound. InlroductioM r I month. I orPacket for lr Sa ml action guarantaad or mon ey back. CnandWi • ll..rd--rr iStdCSMli IS 3 M-n ORIENTAL PALACE HEADQUARTERS FOR Mil M-NI.H-, FROM IM>1\ CHINA ft CBVLON THANI'S I'r Wm H7. St. in. I 3466 loo r-Mj-rv HUH Help Barbados to help its* if b> supporting LOCAL INDUSTRIES BARBADOS FOOD PRODUCTS It you hive not already tnea our locally cured Uara & Bacon why not visit our counter ut Hessrs OenciaJ Hardware Supplier, Rlckell St., when you are next in town. Iff cap supply: — LS llarna--$i.30 per i b Shoulder Hams— $110 per lb. c **- Chu h Boneless Butt Hams 11.20 per lb. Streaky Bacon— m 1.15 per lb Back Bacon—$1.10 per lb. Mi BLBCTBOLUX lUarBiaEBATORS. 4', and T cu ft Keroarna burning umu and may be really converted lo gaa rm irt. r.iu On Outplay now K K MISCELLANEOUS rUMCKSA ajuanlity ol hand "re bncka Apply: Indian BUrult Company. P llanlwai 1 W 1 ;W>N SWIN(, With Rpni ltd hood. Can bs aaan a nnUI*llr Telephone H*" | -!.,..„ Jt_:4rt<. op Plataa. Wlrki. and Onrn. Preunre Vote part* Enquire Auk Company. Trafalgar ft Spry Si I>l..,r.r Ml Bfj M HEAL rMAII IlilUsr Brand n*w. ample ruse. B n eonrenle-wea, with parlyled living ronni. open verandah, kitrhan HI uiutk* room Oarage, laundry. I and rtorage room under hlllalde die. Horklry Nee VayflWi UPMND • •dvocalr Co %  ajkhj "" i'"l'lis ..I Ch One to IS I it galvanM. | ii -ih klb %  %  Tlie prwe kr. b. ,.i r.ir. i-iwrrn S p m and I > day U'.'ida\ ti> ( AUCTION DODOI 1'ti K II' VAN namaaed In accklenl. We are Inilrorlrd 1 i ..ffer this Mid Bf -.-ti.-i al the ..--.ut.on Frtdaj nth March ..t -.ns 1 %  •.fire IhM vehicle for aale tor Frm.v Mth Match, at I SO i. Bladoi ft Co Hearing In Larceny Case Adjourned a> frwas page valise and 'hit conformed with pti'xi of the so:* which was reported miSMnt* bv Ralph Edge hi II Suit lwMliiW*i Latei the act used arrived and .'i. H the suit WM hts. The accused said thai he had l-uuEht the suit In Swan Street. The same day Ralph KdcehiM identified the suit as his property the presence of the .ircused. The .icrn.ted made a stati read over to him. Cpl. Yenrwood signed trie •ttatrmem. After making the ttjiement '•d pointed out Mr Edgr-hills house arid said that he had taken the suit, from there. Reluming to District "A" Station the accused made a second state.iccused Cpl. Devonian said that he saw other clothes in the bedroom besides the brown tweed suit. A search was made on the strength of a search warrant. Cpl. Yearwood. the next witness, ccrroborated the evidence .rf Cpl Devonian. He formally charged the accused and signed aHe statement which the ,i made. At this stage the case for the prosecution was closed and Goodlng gave evidence. He said that on January 6 at about 11 a.m. he went to his mother's home at Station Hill and there saw Cpl. Yearwood and Cpl Devonish. Cpl. Devonian told him that he had a search warrant and he (Goodlng) was shown some clothes which he said were his property Both policemen ar: %  reM aim for the clothes. At V Police Station he ws shown s brown suit which he knew nothing about. taken from District "A" Station in the Police van to Ralpn Edgchill'a house. Cpl. Devoolsh and Cpl. Yearwnod heal him at District 'A" Station after he told Hiem tha'. be knew no'.hlnf about the brown null. He refused to sign the -t.itcmrnt .ind he was taken t" W.irthlna. Christ Church. vi Ki i< NOTICES NOTICE • late with glaaa rrn. igoDdi only Hardware X l 93—an Ordera (or OUVER CLETHA4' Ot Trueti>ri lor prompt del. "pled %  i I It--tion tiijria are aftso belne re Mfi.ij-i/Mi USOBl DCMfl ufacture for uae with al %  cr.-ii-ft a sta ii Tha i COafssarV flnBVUJI DM tait IJNES White Colt..-ii.hlng and Seln< rwlne obtainable %  ao yg,, | u, •anfcj. all airea Chandler*! undaur OIL Th' world'. flre.t Vaedol al aU leading Garage. SUIIom Vour vehl, la deeervr VEXUUL "Found wherever travel". ITS BBS U t i i-t J-RlMts ACCieg^tuBBJ. Lanteme. Chandler'a llaieaare J Mv -*n TORNADO Inurnatlonal K 41 ful condition, elcellenl equlpm* racing record. Coal IWB noa No offen Wlckr Telephonp 1 Sugar Industry-Wage Rates SHIPPING NOTICES •-pjii, '.. i... %  %  Yy the : g Wage Rate* hat. Iid .nuced upon I Su-r Producer*' Federation of Barbados and the Barbados Workers' Union and represent the new scale of wages for lt32.. The I9*e increat* on wage rates is included in the last column hercundtr ai.d Is retrospective from 1st January. 1WJ. and must be paid not later thsr. tfth March. IPS]. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. The M V OAEBWOOO UAKHAIMkH IN IVA.MIII MBgat %  IVAMT A tl ply Mr* Jeendo. Maxwell. KAM Wilh a car. Milling -tedium eaBB*sgn v ..... REALTORS LIMITED REAL ESTATE AGENTS FOR SALE SWEET FIELD I*>vrlr Slone Housw: comprtiing iipatalra three Dedroomi. Large Living Room. Dining Room. I Toilet. A It.,th.. one with Tub Bath and hot and cold ...tee nailery Doanniir.: a Spare Hooma. Kitchen. and Bhower Ktiom Handing on approatmaleli %  • %  Ariea of land about |0Q v n tda Irnm Ulhba tleacli NEW Bisn.M.ow Comp Dining %  n. KlUbeii. T .^t e tilrd feel of .,.,, imaiely d Sllua i -re auN r d t. W..HT-. nately jvi .v.lr< 3 and Dinlns Room. Kitchen i Dnwi .mi. Garag Servants V Boo-n nllh naU> .. i T.ilrt. .nd NURSE HOUSE UAID H,l,,r.. rceaaary App|r : Mr* Boa. etli Aven ... M .: BTEKOGRAmiKB ft TYPIST. To er.peileiu'ed Slanogiapher ft Li'.". M Olher need appl> Gocid nalan Ap|lv TAIlAIRS Journe..,,-.. Tailor*. SANrTARV COHIMHATTi a cxyuratu.n organised under the k Ol the Bute nf DeUware, United Wales of America, whnar Irade nr l.uatneaa addre I. 100 Sixth Itreel. I'tlldiiirgh SB, IVnne l.anla. I' S A K* applied fo. tl-r reinalratlon Ol a trade mark In Part A ol Brguter In ir-pect ol ail klnda t.l iiliiinlnng upplie -ml rdiilpment and aanltary inaUliaUons and appliance*, including bath lube, drinking fminiiniui. lombinalKMi lavalory ilttlug* namely. %  i i i .in lining. I. i room equlpmnt %  ili '. REALTORS Limited BEAL UTATE AGENT" ArcTioNBErm VALUERS BUII-DlrfO CON'TRACTORSJ A 111 1*1 Roebuck Street. A nrb Pboni 4PM md ahoi m | luntaln rreof lor uae with %  I. flush tanks lor • M ll>' pH rQutp-'irnl. I da, IMIII. i.itiu .1... including types iiiinkinr >ga and p irdraaai. lu Sa o laundry tray Mind., .howera. >lopa for bathtub, and rank., urinal watec rkiaeU. part. Iheroof and pea 1 .. Lreralor. tanks, loola. and apparatua lor maklns the Hated awad.. and will be mtitlefl to rrgaaUr Ihe oar. month from th. sen dsj „, M.nh. IpM i" n„t mr office of oppeeilliin of -ucii regurfrauoa The trade mark can be seen on appiKetion at n,v idnce Dsled Ull '.etwccn I science teachers and encoumginu 1 •m awareness of the part that I science has to play m our modern loniinunily, both in the sixth lorms and alto umong the general populace. As auch. th,. Assocla-! tion is very keen to make contacts with organisations or persons with •imllar interests in the various parts of the Caribbean and he would be prepared to act as a goictween for any such contacts. A Jamaican by birth. Mr. Mar-' ami uov. Wi' Offer Kr;ill Ice < retim >li\—Mixed Pickles— Pirceiilli—Chef Saun— Alymtrs (...Itlen (urn—Bottles t A It Table Salt—"Little Chip" Marmnladi'—Chivers (•emon Mariii.il.nl.' —Seville Omnge Miirmaladt-—Scheppes Tonic Water—l.actni'pn—Klitn—Peters Cocoa. Hollies SOt TIIWrl.LS MINCE MEAT. rdfOJff.V tK I \MOIl A S&NSM4A •acne bd-ckgrwand knowledg, vieevce. and Its asHMleauoiu nsa *B advaaaiace. Ha said that the good material for those careers in science was a valiant* within the area. With regard to the academic side, he said that he was mainly inleraataU in gas — solid interlin actions and surface phenomena in iJ.*S hfl 2 u ? ,ed a L ^ oIn r< which spheres he had done aomg, s o,^ u? 1 ^ He ia w^ ^ Jam lcfl original work while iu England. Y J awa b jainiiSr m-in, ,„ he maWr ui [CK ,„i. IcrMlcd In Ihe development ol !..tH, r aloties of Philip. Electric Mian teaching within the Wrt Ltd. and wa. evrntiuUv head I lnd.es and Is lor UlU year. Preslthe Physical Chemistry Department of th. Association of Science ment there until he left to go '. teachers which was formed rethe University College in Jamaica vouu. DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY, COMPORT AMD LONG. LAsnttc quaUTY. requirement. KTMTBEX I Ii:\SIIS at I i:\IHAI I MPOHII M (OarMT Bread a Tader Bareeu) 1% tilth I'tn//• \m*>nls ... 9K Ol It -OVE\ FRESH" SERVICE I III H 1 si IMHV ll I St l || (O. LTD. The Suedette •VLAYDAY hare's she Shea for you Smart as a new Paris cumfnrtseilr as a house Shoe ssad A vailabie in a WMSBF SWMS-8 ... PSICBD AT ONLY $7.25 I fldta "1






ee ee a ee a ane...

Harvbados



ESTABLISHED 1895





Trade Union Leaders Must ©



f

a ee
WEDNESDAY,

Give People A Fair Deal

Future Of W.I. Can
Rest With Them

DECLARING the twelve weeks’ Trade Union Course
open at the Y.M.C.A. yesterday morning, Sir George Seel,
Head of the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion in the West Indies, told the students attending the
Course that if they succeeded in their duty of seeing that
their people got'a fair deal, they would have a tremendous
influence over them, and would really have the future of
the West Indies in their hands.

Sir George added “I do hope you will want to lead
them in the direction of building up a really good people in
the West Indies. I wish you every possible success during
this Course.”

The course, the second of its kind to be held in Barba-
dos, has been made possible by a further grant under the
Colonial Development and Welfare Act to enable the Comp,
troller to organise a school of West Indian Trade Union
Officials. It is being attended by 19 students from Barbados,
British Guiana, Trinidad, British Honduras, and the Lee-
ward and Windward Islands. Dean of the school is Mr.
F. C. Catehpole, Labour Adviser to Colonial Development
and Welfare.

Among distinguished persons who attended the opening
session wereyMr. Philip Sherlock, Vice Principal of the
University College of the West Indies, Mr. C. A. Gross-
smith, Administrative Secretary, C.D. & W., Mr. P. Hewitt-
Myring, Press Relations Officer, C.D. & W., Mr. F. L. Wal-
cott, Secretary General of the Barbados Workers’ Union,
Mr. Jack, Labour Commissioner, Barbados, and Mr. Denis
Bell, lecturer in Trade Union and Industrial Relations at
the University of Glasgow, who will lecture on the history
and development of the Trade Union Movement. Mr. Beil
also addressed the gathering, welcoming students at the
opening session.

After the addresses of welcome by Sir George Seel, and
Mr. Bell, a vote of thanks was moved and seconded by two
of the students, Mr. H. W. Crichlow of British Guiana, and
Mr. G. H. Charles of St. Vincent.

The Dean of the school then discussed briefly with the
students the syllabus and other activities of the school.

@ On page 7

24 Ships Lost| Anti-U.S.
In 5 Years |Vemonstrators
During the past five years over Smash Cars

two dozen schooners and. Motor
Vessels, which called at Barba- ROME, March 25.
A milling crowd of 6,000 young

dos, were either lost at sea, burnt
students massed before the United

or wrecked. The majority of the
vessels lost were schooners and] States embassy here and demand-
ed that a delegation of about ten

had they been equipped with
radio-telephone sets they could be received by United States|
Minister Llewlleyn Thomson, jnr.

have been warned against bad
weather or any other danger such
as floating logs. The students waving Italian and
Trieste flags were met at the open
The Schooner Zenith was} iron gates of the Embassy by Chiet ;
recently lost at sea. She left here} Security Officer Norman Schute
on December 19 and nothing has The spokesman of the demon-!
Seen eee oe aes na strators speaking in English said|
on her way from BG to Barbe- ane = ee eee
: ae col ceiv by the bassador “they
dos in 1950, carried with her the} vou not be held responsible for
future acts of the demonstrators”.







skipper and two passengers.

The Alberta Compton made

‘ Schute told the youths that the
ee: — “s ene delegation could not be allowed in!
destroyed by fire in Port-of- the Embassy as long as they were'
Spain harbour a few weeks later.| Tepresenting the mob. He said|

“Come back this afternoon with-,
out the mob and we will be happy |
to receive you but we do not in-
‘tend to be intimidated.”—-U.P.

In 1949 Schooner Alna Leotaud
was involved in a collision with
the Lady Nelson. She also sank.



Some of the other boats: lost !
during Les period Mecca or rites |
Buen peranza, Schooner Critics °
which was wrecked ‘off the Public | Blast Kills 35
Market in 1949, Schooners |
Deliverance, Endeavour W, G. G. NAPLES, March 25.
Glory, Princess Louise, Reginald; Thirtyfive workers were re-
Wallace, War Risk, Voltara M,|ported killed and more than 40
United Brothers, Uncatina, M.V./injured in an explosion in a
Trader Horn, Royal Rio, Rio|tunnel being built for a hydro-
Hatcha, Manana, Gloria Henri-'electric project near here today.

etta, M.V. Goodwill and Potick| The tunnel was under construc-
which is lying on the bed of tne|tion by a private company.
inner basin of the Careenage. Ambulances rushed to
scene from Caserta Capula
The big three masted Schooner, | Naples itself. A doctor and medi-
Frederick P. Elkin was scrapped | cal equipment was flown to
off Brandon’s coast. She was the | Caserta from Rome as soon as
last of the old fleet of three mas-|the news was flashed to police
ted boats which traded between |headquarters in Rome,
the West Indies and Canada. t

the
and

—U-P.










>





LLOYD TAITT, a lorry driver of Salters, St. George,
died immediately after he was involved in an accident
along My Lord’s Hill, St. Michael, at about 6.45 a.m
yesterday .

The lorry, G. 125, owned by Bulkeley Ltd., and driven
by Taitt, was carrying sugar to Bridgetown. It ran off the
road and struck an electric pole. The pole was broken,
and Taitt was pinned between the metal hood of the lorry
which was broken by the weight of the sugar; and the
steeving wheel

rter

examination was performed yesterday

MAIL FOR THE
“OLIVE BLOSSOM”

A POSTMAN walked into
a Government Department
yesterday with mail—among
which was a letter addressed
to the “Olive Blossom” — a
yacht. Putting the letter

through a pigeon hole to an
attending lady stenotypist, he

asked “is the ‘Olive Blossom’
here?” And back came the
witty reply “Olive Blossom!
Why, that has not been here
since 1605". The Stenotypist
obviously recollected the land-
ing at Holetown of the first
English settlers and was in a
humorous mood. The postman
sfemed bewildered. An

yway
the yacht is lying in Carlisle
Bay.

“Strong Steps”
Urged Against

CAPETOWN, SOUTH
AFRICA, March 25

A “save-the-constitution” de-
bate was initiated in the Senate
by Opposition United Party
leader G. Heaton Nicholls.
Nicholls charged that Prime
Minister Daniel F. Malan had
precipitated South Africa into
the most serious crisis since the
union (of English and Africans).



West Reject

Sovi
viet
Proposals
By K. C. THALER
LONDON, March 25.
reaffirmed in identical notes t

Moscow Tuesday their desire fo
a “just and lasting peace treaty



jected Soviet proposals for
been created for free elections” in
the Soviet zone of Germany and
in Eastern Berlin.

The notes of the United States
Britain and France rejected the
Soviet suggestion for the creation
of German national forces and
urged instead “participation of
Germany in a purely defensive
European community.

The notes were delivered to the,
Kremlin in reply to Soviet pro-|
posals of March 10 which suggest-
ed a four-power conference n the}
German peace treaty with the
participation of an _ all-German
Government,

The six-point reply imvited
Soviets to allow the United Nations
Investigating Commission to enter
the eastern parts of Germany and
Berlin to ascertain whether ‘‘firs!
essential conditions” exist for
holding genuinely free elections.

The notes were hammered t
in length in top level discussi
of Big Three Western Powers, and |

Nicholls said that Malan’s aim;in consultation with Federal Ger-

ty
the Nationalist Party supreme in
South Africa.

He moved that the Senate take
“strong steps” against the de-
clared intention of the govern-
ment to overrule the Court of
Appeal judgment refuting Ma-
lan’s Apartheid Bill and demand-
ed that government act in ac-
cordance with the Constitution;
failing which it was “in duty
bound” to resign.

Meanwhile in Pretoria anti-
government “Torch Commando”
said tear gas and stink bombs
which were thrown at a protest
meeting against the Apartheid
Bill last night were manufactured
in the laboratories of Pretoria
University.

A girl hit squarely in the face
with a bomb during the demon-
stration was reported in danger
of losing one eye.

—U-P.

K.L.M. Finds Gold
After Crash

FRANKFURT, Germany
March 25.

Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM)
officials said they have recovered
all but $10,125 worth of gold
from the wreckage of the KLM
plane which crashed here Satur-
day.

They said the plane carried 500
kilograms of gold valued at
$562,500. Earlier officials said
$125,000 worth of gold coins and
$65,000 worth of gold ingots were
missing, but they were recovered



j from the crash area.

‘UP.

32 Sabre Jets
ight 60 MIG’s

SEOUL, March 25.

One Communist M.I.G. 15 was
destroyed and another probably
destroyed in a high altitude air
battle between 32 United States
Sabrejets and 60 M.I.G.’s East of
Sinuiju.

The jet battle took place as Red
jets tried to ‘break through a
screening force of Sabrejets pro-
tecting fighter-bombers attacking
supply routes and storage areas in

—U.P.”



| North Korea.

} LLOYD TAIPY, driver of

‘ conveying to the City.

In the other picture



is not to fight for the Sovereign-|man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer |
of Parliament but to make|in Paris last week.—U.P.

LORRY DRIVER
\SMASHED TO DEATH

eRe



Terrorists
Kill Twelve

SINGAPORE, March 25.

|

’ e
Communist terrorists killed eight! — _

policemen, two European-born
government officials and two gov-

; ; have’ signed |

ernment technicians in ambush a covenant

early today. ‘pledging
Eight other policemen were en es to

woundeq fm the trap sprung by}

the Red band only a few miles

from Tanjong im on
Perak-Selangor border.

Escorted by the local police, the
government officials were en route
to a rubber estate on the outskirts
of Tanjong Malim to repair a pipe-
line which had been sabotaged by

the



bandits, lcomplete break with Britain
One of the Europeans killed] much in the way of the Eire
was R, M. C. Codner, holder of the} breakaway Another extreme |

Military Cross and a veteran of
World War II. Codner was assist-
ant District Officer for Tanjong
Malin.

Communists after killing or
wounding every armed man in the
party escaped wit! 13 police guns. |

| They left behind two of their dead
| —UP.



*‘News Blackout”’
On Truce Talks

PANMUNJOM, KOREA,
March 25

U.N. negotiators meeting with
Communists under the newly
imposed news blackout made a
new attempt to break the dead-
lock in prisoner of war discus-
sions.

United Nations staff officers
submitted a “preliminary state-
ment” on the Communist pro-
posal made on March 5 to con-
tinue negotiations for exchang-
ing prisoners of war on the basis
of lists already echanged.

There is no indication of what
the United Nations Command
said since this statement was
made in “Executive Session’.
However observers believed it
either altered the rejection al-
ready made by the United Na-
tions or that it invited the Reds
to alter their orginal proposal.

this lorry, was killed when he was

involved in an accident at My Lord’s Hill yesterday morning.
Top picture shows the load of sugar which the lorry was

the electric pole which the lorry

struck is shown. The X shows where Taitt was pinned.



The Big Three Western xe

with a unified Germany, but re-!
four }
powers talks “until conditions have!

it

|

“MARCH 26, 1952

SIR GEORGE



SEEL

SIR GEORGE SEEBL, K.C.M.G., Head of GO. D. & W,, addressing
students at the 12-weeks’ Trade Union Course which opened at the

Y.M.C.A. yesterday morning.
Dean of the Course is Mr.
co. D. & W.

F.

Queen Will |
Visit Scotland
In June

(By ROBERT MUSEL)

LONDON, March 25

Queen Elizabeth the Second
will make her first journey to!
Seotland since her accession in|
June and Court circles suspect
that one reason for her visit will
be to sample for herself the!
trength of the revival of Scot-
h nationalism

|

There’s been rumbling north|

of the border which has been}

eausing some disturbing echoes |
in hitehal!








"More than

half the adult |
— population of |
Scotland)




liament for
their country
They want
QUEEN eLIzABETH self rule, The
vast majority of the two million
signers want it “in all loyalty to
the Crown”. But there’s a small
but restless group which wants a|



group wants a Scottish Dominion

There have been “revolution”
and home ruie and_ self-rule
movements before, and England}

has watched them come and go}
without too much concern, This |
time the Scots seem to be insist-
ent and a Royal Commission will



Cc. Catchpole,

Attlee Wins
Vote Of
Confidence

LONDON, March 25
Prime Minister Clem-
won resounding vic-
tory within the Socialist Party
when Labour Members of Par-
liament gave him a hearty con-
fidence vote in the leadership

Former
ent Attlee

Attlee had been fighting bitter-
ly with Leftwinger Aneurin Be-
van over forcing Labour Mem-
bers of Parliament to support the





Defeat Labour
Motion

LONDON, March 25



probably be set up to examine Prime Minister Winston Chur
the entire administrative set-up ,chill’ Government Tuesday
between the two countries. That|night defeated a Labourite mo-
isn’t all. Many Scots are not|tion seeking to censure it for
happy about the Royal title)/“skimping” on education at the
“Elizabeth the Second”. It is said|expense of school children.
that since the first Elizabeth did The vote was 312 to 283.
not rule Scotland north of the fis ‘ ; Be
border the present Queen should The Commons then passed by

be Elizabeth the First

Stone of Scone

There's still considerable feel-
ing over the Churchill Govern-
ment’ decision to keep the
Stone of Scone in Westminster
Abbey. This slab of stone most
sacred of Sotland’s relics was



dragged from the Abbey by na-
tionalists on Christmas Day 1950
and brought to Scotland where it
was eventually discovered amid
the ruins of Arbroath Abbey,

It used to rest under the Coro-
mation Chair in the wide open
Chapel of St. Edward the Con-|
fessor. Now it has been chained)
to the 600 year old chair built to}
receive it when the English|
brought it down from Scotland
and’ placed it behind a tall iron
grille

Twice in the past few days
police guards in the Abbey have
been. strengthened on_ tips
that another attempt might be
made to take the stone. That
this. will happen has been pre-
dicted by Dr, John MacCormick

head of the Scottish Nationalist
Party.

Recently in the House of
Lords Viscount Elibank whose

direct ancestor signed the agree-
ment of 1296 which King Ed-
ward I “betrayed” when he took
the stone from Scotland suggest-
ed that it be returned after the
coronation. He was supported by
Baron Calverley who said that
the English by keeping the stone
have become “receivers of
property”.

Rich Country

The Scots
ern Ireland

often point to north-
which is a smaller
nation with less population but
completely controls its own do-
mestic affairs instead of being
integrated with London. As one
Scot, Ian Coloquehoun the writer
put it’“Scotland is a much richer
country than northern Ireland”

She produces more food per head
of her population than England
does. She export her beef and
her electric pc nto England
get iothing 1 return except
meat rationing uel hortages,
and ct f vil ervants
whi te ar f
prod liger us

2

@ On Page

311 to 282 a Government coun-
ter motion which stressed for
economy in the school system

but promised the essential fabric
“of the educational system will

be preserved. ae
The Labour opposition motion

demanded the restoration of ci

made in the original educatio

budget estimates for the comir

financial year

They charged that the cuts im-|

paired the maintenance of hig
education standards and planne |
expansion pr ogrammes

—U.P.



Malcolm
Recalled From
Executive

From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, J’ca., March 25
Joseph Malcolm was today re-
called from the Executive Council
as Minister for Education when
the House of Representatives
voted to revoke his appointment
on the grounds that he had not
attended meetings of the Execu~
tive Council for three months.

had not attended the
arrest last}

|
|



Malcolm
Council since his
December on conspiracy charges |
in connection with the farm}
workers ticket fraud and const:
tently refused to resign his ap
pointment as a Minister pending
the result of his trial which i
now before the Appeal Court

I'he call for his resignation in-|
creased when he was convicted |
last week but Malcolm refused to |

«

ADDRESSES TRADE UNION




PRICE.: FIVE CENTS

OFFICIALS



Federation Now
Will Not Aid W.l.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, March 25,
Federation now will not help the West Indies. Instead
a truce to political experiment is needed in order that the
changes which have already been made can be digested.
These views are expressed in a letter to the Daily Telegraph
by Mr. C. E. Shepherd a retired lawyer whose experience
of the West Indies goes back over 50 years and who until

last year had been living in Barbados.
—_—_—— ——— Mr. Shepherd say the recent
introduction of universal adult

| suffrage has resulted in lessening

Three Steal
$600,000

|the ability in different legisla-
tures Capital investment is
needed to raise the standard of

living of the islands. 3ut invest-







re-armament Programme and _ it Sned:: en *et/e ; Lae 4
. ’ é going to be tempted
was disclosed last night that one 1 4 : eee
; t Bev an’s supporters intended BOSTON, March 25, /|'0 put their money into an area
2 ma ; The if the legislature may be domi-
to challenge Attlee’s rght to rhree men held up a truck |r ay by the irresponsible
preside at Party Parliamentary here and esca with an- esti- | N 7 s ¥
meetings on the ground that he} mated $600,000. The trio it was ot Easy
is not impartial. reported, fff in a black sedan! Referring to a recent article by
but police from surrounding com-| Mr. Bernard Braine, M.P. advo~-
When the Parliamentary party munities lost the men although | cating West Indies federation he
met to-day it was immediately)they bad set up road blocks inggays it has been agreed that the
apparent that the charge es the greater Boston area. _VStand OR ee in
s Ai arty V J ised
carci See wa eee The holdup was the largest in | by qpresenting the OTN RETES to
inatienously endorsifig Alttlee's|New England since seven hal- | increase earning capacity, But it
leadsrinip. ” , | lowetn mesked gunmen hauled | is not easy to see how this —
"i F 310,000 in 1950, be helped by adding to the exist-
Bevan was not present but his Th y ing burden of high taxation the
| Thad ae ¥ : e armoured truck belonged | |.,° ; al Govyerament
cul ast thallene Witdss Woo to the United States Trucking i ge ey Gislnad. tie fed-
~ on : come who. attended | Corporation of Boston but offi-| eration is that it would enable
ing »& * ‘ 3 » “tails . F ; ‘
the meotitig. 2 cials knew no details. ne the West Indies to speak with one
—UP. ne voice. But, he says, to whom or
* \what about is not indicated
| , Defence and foreign relations
‘ ti 2c LANDSLIDE would be out of bounds and it
onser Va ves y ‘ has been proved at the recent
KILLS 30 Commonwealth sugar conference

that there are no difficulties in
making commercial representa-
tions

SUGAK MARKET FIRM
NEW YORK, March 25.
The Jowrnal of Commerce said
that Germany is expected to buy
20,000 tons of sugar Wednesday
result of heavy rains the and an additional 10,000 tons at
vious day, a later date using $3,000,000
The victims were cutting rice| allotted by the Mutual Security
on the slopes of a hill when the} programme
landslide occurred, This contributed to the firm-
—U.P. ‘ness in the overall sugar market.

INDONESIA, March

Thirty persons, mostly women,

were killed Sunday by a land-

slide at Tjobodas, a village north

of Bandung, West Java accord-
ing to reports received here,

25.



the
pre-|

The slide was presumably



‘And ve smoked

them ever since!”

7



















“You're fan to know, Jimmy.
The last time we came here
it new cocktail: this
time it’s my first du Maurier —
and very nice, too.”*

was a

“We do our best to
please. | thought you'd
like them. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke.”

“What's the real purpose
of the filter tip? [ suppose
you'll tell me that’s the secret 7
of the exquisite flavour.”’

‘No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the

tobacco.” =
“ee 4
Me



“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy's just introduced me



resign until the Appeal is decided
Under the constitution a two-
thirds majority of the whole;
House is needed to revoke a Min
ister’s appointment
In view of the circumstances of |
Malcolm’s case and in the inter-|
ests of public good, the opposition
on Frid nformed Bustamante)
} t ere willing to assist him |
i ment he made on
inister position
rk otior evoking Malcolm’:
meé Minister wa

|

_ morning with
ind arrangment

n r made by the Jar

4 unan

ire
or
“

rsday.

to my first du Maurier.”’

“You are behind the times.
Nina's been lyrical about
them for years.”

$1.04 for 50

MADE IN
Smoke to your throat’s content ENGLAND

du MAURIER

THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

EB DISTRIBUTOR ON & HAYMES CO., LTD., BRIDGETOWN
ed



s

WILKINS


PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

S® KENELM y Liste
saea cl rdhand “win had

4

* hoeidaying in Barbados since
staying
paid a
to Trinidad and
returned by B.W.I1LA.

t i

ihe beginning ot Fe yuary
at the Ocean View Hotel
two-week visit

Tobago and
on Monday evening.

Off fo St. Lucia

MONG the passengers leaving
by B.W.LA. for St. Lucia
rday were Mr. Donald




and Mrs.
Mrs. Henry Grist
spending a holiday here.

Spent Three Weeks

RS. P. PUNNETT of St. Vin-

cent who was holidaying here
for the past three weeks staying at
the Marine
returned home on Sunday by the
Canadian Challenger.

Canadian Judge
M* JUSTICE C. Gordon Mac-Â¥
Kinnon and Mrs. MacKinnon
from Monfreal,
home on Monday
Lady Nelson after spending twe
weeks’ holiday
Marine Hotel.
Mr. MacKinnon is Judge of thi
Superior Court of the Province o
Quebec. ~«
Other passengers returning t
Canada by the Nelson after spend

ing a holiday here included Mrs.
New|
Parsons,
Secretary to the Deputy Minister
of Highways and Public Works of

A. J. Fenwick of Bathurst,
Brunswick, Miss Ena

the Province of Nova Scotia, Mr,
J. Dunwoody,

Accountant and Mrs.
of Oakville, Mr., and Mrs. R. 8.
Chaffe of Toronto, Mr. E, Kremers,
Treasurer of Wright and Kremers,

Construction Engineers of Niagara
and Mrs.

Falls, New York, Mr.
H. J. Symington and Mr. and Mra
W. Cochrane.

1es, Director of Barnes & Co.
Barnes and Major and
who had been

and the Hotel Royal,

hand Mr












Canada returned
night by the

staying at the

Chartered
Dunwoody

Attended Welfare Talks

M* a ROBERTS, S

Ollice ft Domini
returned home on Mondas night
after attending the Conference of
Social Welfare Officers of the Brit-
ish Caribbean area which con-
chided at Hastings House on
Friday.

While here, he t r
the Hastings Hote},

Also returning fo Dominica by
the Lady Nelson after spending a
short holiday here was Miss E.
Giraud who had been taking a
nursing course for the past six
years in the United
Mr.. Peter Dewhurst
Portsmouth, and Mr. C. Philip
merchant of Roseau and hi
daughter Natalie,

Miss Giraud was staying at the
‘Hastings Hotel, while Mr. Dew-
turst was the guest of Dr. and Mrs.
oR. M. L love Still of Deacons Road,

Philip and nis daughter
staying at “Allworth”,
heapside.

S. Consul General
M": ROBERT HALE, U.S. Con-
sul General, returned to hi:

ig at

Kingdom
P ie inter of

short visit here. He was staying
at St. Lawrence Gap as the guest
lof Mr, Philip Ernst, the American
Consul.

Also leaving for Trinidad by
B.W.1.A, yesterday were Mr. Vic-
tor Marson, Proprietor of the
Ocean View Hotel and Mr. and
Mrs. Robert O. Lord of St. James.

Visited Relatives
RS, R. LIVERPOOL who was
in the Caribbean spending a
holiday with her relatives in
Georgetown and Barbados, re-
turned to Boston on Monday night
by the R.M.S, Lady Nelson.

Mrs. Liverpool is a sister of Mr.
Robert King of Jackson.
Â¥

Ting-a-Ling Tells a Story

—He Says a Weeping Willow Really Weeps—

By MAX TRELL

“TING-A-LING,” said Hanid, the
shadow-girl with the turned-about
name, “why is this tree called the
Weeping Willow? Does it really
weep?”

For a moment Ting-a-Ling was
silent. He and Hanid were sitting
on the bank of the brook, ahd over
the brook hung the Weeping Wil-
low. Its slender green branches
drooped over the water, almost
touching it as it flowed slowly past.
It looked quite sad.

Ting-a-Ling finally spoke. “Yes,”
he answered; “the Weeping Willow
really weeps. If you come early in
the morning, just as the sun rises
and the air is filled with mist, you
will see the tears on the branches,
dripping one by one into the brook.

“And why does it weep?” Ting-a-
Ling went on. “I'll tell you. [t’s an
old, old story. But perhaps you've
never heard it. Yet it is true. For
it happened in the time of our
grandfathers.

Long Ago

“Once, in that old time so long
ago, there was a beautiful dog. She
had long silky hair that reached al-
most to the ground. Her eyes were
deep green, like grass on the side of
a hill. And her name,” said Ting:a-
Ling, “was Willow.”





Hanid listened to ling-a-Ling’s
story

bed. But he patted her and said:
‘Go down to the brook, Willow, to
the place where we always sit, and
wait for me there. I’ll soon come. ...
Don’t go far away. Tl) soon come....’

Waited Patiently
“So Willow went down to the edge
of the brook and waited patiently

for her little master to come. But
the day passed and he didn’t come.

| And the next day passed, and the
| next.,.and many,

many days. But

Canadians
M* LESTER TURNBULL, Mr
John Heather and Mr. Harvey
C, Hall trom Hamilton. Ontaria are
now in Barbados for a couple of
weeks’ holiday staying at the
Ocean View Hotel.

They arrived on Monday even-
ing by B.W.1LA., from Grenada
where they spent ‘five days staying
at the Santa Maria Hotel, after
paying a short visit to Tobago.

Mr. Turnbull who is President
of Robert Duncan & Co., of
Hamilton and Mr. Heather his
assistant were in Barbados in 1948,
while Mr, Hali is paying his first
visit to the island. He is store
manager of Thomas Lees & Co.,
Jewellers, in Hamilton.

Leaving Today
| COL, ana Mrs. G. Ross
Robertson of Montreal.

en will be returning home to-
day by T.C.A., after spending three
weeks’ holiday faving . we
Ocean View Hotel.

Lt. ‘Col, Ross Robertson is
partner of G. Ross Robertson and
Sons, Insurance Brokers of Mon-
treai. His wife is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. C. E, Gausaen also
ot Montreal who were holidaying
here since February 1, and wiil be
remaining for another: two weeks,

Resident Tutor Leaves
R. B. H. EASTER, Resident
Tutor in the Windward

Islands for the University ——
of the West Indies, ed to his
headquarters in St. Lucia yester-
day by B.W.IL.A. after having dis-
cussions with the Vice-Principal
of the University College, Mr.
Philip M. Sherlock.

While here Mr, Easter also at-
tended as an Observer, the Con-
ference of Social Welfare Officers
of the British Caribbean Area.

nm Pleasure Trip

i R. AND MRS, HARRISON B.
it Miller of New York City who
| are on a pleasure trip, travelling
through the West Indies arrived
here yesterday by-B.W.1LA., from
St. Lucia on their first visit and
will be remaining for about a
week staying at the Ocean View
| Hotel,

Mr. Miller who is a financier of
New York said that they had al-
ready visited St. Thomas, Puerto
Rico, Martinique and St. Lucia sta:

and will probably stop at some

of the other islands before return-
ing home

On Holiday
RS. A. G. HAZELL of St.

Vineent arrived in Barbados

on Monday by ’plane for a short
visit and is staying with her
daughter, Mrs. A. H. Masterton-
Smith,



Across

*
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

HOLLYWOOD PAYS TRIBUT E br OUTSTANDING STARS

ONORED with filmdom’s
est award, a trio of “
winners (right) pose in

wood’s Pantages Theater with

their coveted trophies. In
group (1. tor.) are: Karl

best supporting actor; Greer Gar-

sen, who received the best actress

award for Vivien Leigh, and
Humphrey Bogart, named best
actor of the year in a startling

Named Desire.” Below, right, Vi-

vien Leigh is kissed by her hus-

band, Sir Laurence Olivier,in New
York, on winning the best actress
award for part in “A Streetcar

Named Desire.” (International)

With Barclays Bank
FTER spending two weeks’
holiday in Barbados, Miss

Ruth Nicholas, an employee of}

Barclays Bank, Dominica, return-
ed home on Monday night by the

Lady Nelson, While here she was |
staying with Miss ae of

BB.C. Radio
Programme

NESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952
"tee m, Listeners’ Choice, 11,40 a.m
The Lincolnshire Handicap, 12 (noon)
‘tthe News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis. .
4.0—7.15 p.m. 19.76M, %5.58M, St 2M





s, 4. â„¢ a
Ni w The ih;
4p.m. The ew! P. +

and
News, 7.10 p.m. WN Analysis.
7.15-—10.30 p.m. 35, , 122M, 0.4eM

a

7.15 p.m. Talk on Jamaica and Feder-
ation of the B.W.%., 745 p.m. Over to
You, 8.15 p.m Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m.
Statement of Account, 8.45 p.m. Com-
poser of the Week, 9 p.m. IT was a Com-
munist, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
From the Editorials, 10.15 pm. Mid-

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

DRESSES—Just arrived—a lovely selection of



(Next Door to Singers)

Cotton and Cocktail Dresses

STRAPLESS BRAS. 32 to 38 from $3.96
BATHING SUITS—A large selection of styles,

colours and prices









WEDNESDAY

MARCH

| Sy

; Can, “Sp,
| we GLOBE “Sue,

fo,
5 &AS.30 p.m.

LL























OPENING TO-DAY





From G. Howes Christopher’s Novel
“CALL IT TREASON” |

‘

This is an outstanding Film — ]
|
|
|

< Cal ar red
:
) EC Po Pe :







ALL VHE IMPACT OF THRILLING
ENTERTAINMENT!

PLAZA THEATRES
Present WARNER BROS.

SCREEN ADVENTURES AT ITS MIGHTIEST!

B°TOW™N (Dial 2310) BARBAREL S$

OPENING THURS (Dial 5170) (DOWNTOWN)

OPENING FRIDAY 28th
27th 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. 445 & 8.30 p.m.





eeerereanye
-- Pm dead if § don’t!"

Tri-State Mos!



Coa |

Stardom’s exciting iff ,
a, tom of today in

ton

ie Cal
Bet AE ay



i ” ¥ * » Cargo week Taik, 10.30 pm, Marching and
“Just like the name of the tree?” |gtill the little boy didn’t come. But Soa? with, propeliers, (4) Waltzing. Rare Oh iM
said Hanid ‘ ill she waited Entangie. re fe "
“Yes, just like the name of the “And when people came and told Severud by merit x (

t @ out to bearer, (6)
\. Upset in Across. (3)

Gaudy-looking tnlets. (6)

Driven abead for security. (4)

tree. Now this beautiful dog had a | her not to wait any more, that her
master. The mastey was a young /|little master would never come

boy with a pale face and golden | again, she wouldn’t move, She had |
|
|
|
|








curls. He was not a strong boy, and | promised to wait for him no matter
often, when he walked down to sit | how long he tvok and she knew
at the edge of the brook, he leaned | that by and by he would come and
on Willow and rested until he fe it | they would sit together at the edge
strong enough to walk on again

5 an et
re i y
Ne
26
=

Exclusive Shopping Centre ‘ OE
* *« * ok | ® : - a 5

tread. (5)
Down



she jof the brook all through the long

| TERROR-ROAD orn:
|











was happy to have him rest on rc | eee “Ni as on always did. 1. eky eat no turf. (9 nee HENRY £ h
feed, she never felt. happy unle she kept on waiting , B heorene roo! * ' . i Cates Pay WALE-C iy YY
she was with her master She obeyed | “And one day 1 kind elf took pity z After winter wvbeeotes ho ett DECORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts. .
him in everything on the faithtul Willow, for now | Rrodncing pi (5) Exira Special The Col Short
“Byery day, when the weathe ometimes tears came to her eyes | 5 One a fatal (s), ss ® : oxtra Spec e Color sho
was fine,” Ting-n-Ling continued, | when she thought of her little mas- ] & ee (4) at, Ho 3) Ad ¥. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts. “CIRCUS TOWN”
“Willow and her little master came | ter and how lonely he must be all +s op Ay of t ate. taken. (4) f - =
down to sit at the edge of the brook. | by himself; and the elf changed her 1; # io "Prenen to a a Yak punien- ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery. Special Shows at Bridgetown :
And every day, just before it was | into a tree. lor lung silky hair be- | mae » (5 ’
‘ime to return home, the boy would | came long given branches, and her | 38- Fell @ wayside. (5) MIDNITE SAT. 29th
bid Willow to wait at the edge of | tears became the morning dew. And fe. ts Ear (3) CARIB SHOP: Carved Maho, gany, Native ' < :
the brook while he wandered off to |'still she keeps wailing by the edge ticn of pears poset, — Across rene: Barbadian Wares Indian Bags and Belts. Triple Attraction ! * *
' | fe Sot 2h y =
pick some flowers for his mother. j| of the brook still waiting and Peseavour: es ty 8, ( (arene “me We Srowerweenaent es aS
aa ne Coe : umber, rt B: 1. Tex Beneke & Glen Miller|| , *%
Then one day the little boy did | weeping for ior | » master who pet Bi, 2. GREYSTONE GALLERIES: 1 1
not so down to the brook, Willow] promised to come down to her go + 8 ikon © bra geting opens at 8 p-m. ~ Comp etely Orchestra ‘
came to his room. He was tying in Jona, soni & ago Bh river! 15 qs ee 15. new Technique, designs and Finishes. in

for
EXCELLENT VALUE

mh GREY BY MORE

TEN AnD O1AECIED BY ANDREW ST F



Barbados Pottery. “Cheyenne Cowboy”

2.
3
STANSFELD SCOTT & CO: Wines, Spirits E





“Raiders of the Desert” i “




and Groceries. ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT

ROODAL THEATRES.
THE GREATDST BRAIN ON EARTH
SHAKUNTALA DEVI

See and Hear her Unbelievable Gifts at the

EMPIRE ON FRIDAY MARCH 28TH at 8.20
and ROXY ON TUESDAY APRIL IST at 8.30

REMEMBER — CALYPSO ‘NIGHTS BEGIN AT
THE EMPIRE ON THURSDAY MARCH 27TH



THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked
by hand, Skirts, Shirts, Shorts.

Dinner
SATIN 36 ins.

WHITE,

BLUE, PINK,

and BETTINA LTD: Gowns, Lingerie,’

Gifts,
ete.

LEMON,

CLUB POINCIANA:

Bar,
Guest Rooms,

Restaurant,
Butterick Patterns in all Coming Styles. e





BRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hair-
dressing, Beauty treatment.

(Except Sunday) Balmoral Gap.

Every Night













ROODAL
EMPIRE

TODAY 4.20
TOMORPOW 4 30 foniw)
Robert MITCHUM, Janet LEIGH ja
HOLIDAY. AFFAIR

and Tim HOLT in—



TMEATRES
eee S aaw
ROXY

% a.
Today & Tomorrow 4.00 &
Howard DUFF, cer BRENT

mitecau’ ENTRY

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE
Sy

Hastings.



STORES DIAL 4606



t. rbarees
“ALIAS “BILLY THE KID" &
CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE”

BADMAN’'S TERRITORY Randolph SCOTT
RIDER FROM TUCSON Tim HOLT




“GALETY





NTO) Th —St. MASK : & SUSPECT
BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310 BARBAREES (DOW: WN) —Dial 5170 etIN—Dial 8404 ace —— 5 Mae on sabia
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 & 3.30 P.M. |! ropay & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.30 PM. Day go-onnow 30. ae

THURS. 27th 1.30 p.m
SAT. 29th 1.30 p.m

THURS RS. 27th 1 30 p.t

LAW OF THE WEST

Johnny Mack BROWN & | SAT. BO 6.3

TANGIERS &

HONEYMOON LODGE = RIVER LADY! AN ACTOR MURDER & SOUTH SEA SINNER































IMITATION OF SINEONE | Oy MPARADISE. VALLEY
re . OF PARADISE VALLE
Harriet HILLIARD—David BRUCE by Technicolor) : Claudette stipe aomaraaieied RIDIN’ THE CHEROKEE TRAIL — : —_ & LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE
Ozzie NELSON & Band Yvonne DeCARLO & Rod CAMERON] Fredric MARCH, Edmond O'BRIEN Shelley WINTERS & MacDonald CAREY ————— Tex RITTER a tee FRI anne 2.30 (or Sat, 29th MIDNITE
Dan DURYEA, Helena CARTER . = = 7 —— mtinuing 445 & 8 90 7
eshtitidltet . > Special Midnite Sat. OLIVER TW
cs SHURS SPECIAL 1-30 pin MEDNITE SPECIAL! SAT. 20th THURSDAY SPECIAL 1.90 P.M. OPENING FRIDAY 4.45 &8.30 P.M. an ‘so Bs en sie THURSDAY (©"'y) 8.30 P.M. hy dehaeriks Hotes KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED
> RCEY & The Bowery Boys in][{ Triple Attraction Alan “Rocky ” LANE Double — Joh, SIERRA P, epee s 2 at 8.30
04 + now Mack Johnny Mack ASSAGE AT. 29th at
LUCKY LOSERS & RAIDERS OF THE DESERT || cHeRIFF OF WICHITA & HIGHWAY 301° Brown Brown

Wayne MORRIS &

YUKON MANHUNT

Riding The and
Cherokee Trail
Tex Ritter
en

LAW OF THE WEST i

Johony Mack BROWN

OLYMPIC
CHEYENNE COWBOY &

CALYPSO NIGHT







Tex Beneke & Glenn Miller Orehestte

SUNDOWN IN SANTA_

Today & Tomoerro we 1W & 8.0



Arizona Territory
Whi






Stevo SOGHRAN and Veumnts GREY















: a a John PAYNE Dout
cd a Kisby GRANT and “Chinook! CAPTAIN CHINA ROYAL
= BAGLE AND THE HAWK 1
Today & Tomarrow 4.30 & 8.15
Now in Stock THURS. 27th 1.30 Columbia Whole Serlal—
*s oa ADVENTURES OF DON COYTY THE SHADOW
Watch tor the Advertisements ... (TERRAZZO) MARBLE CHIPS ————— ——————
erates nat meenteentitentaoennias ee
° EBONITE IVID TRIP OPENING FRI. 28tt - a sdacee
D ING s ee aoe FF t FRI. 28th 4.30 (only)
ON OouUuR And Vietor MATURE ji THE EAGLE AND THE HAWK
G BUNC ANG HOUSE ee t one
c T ____BUNCO squap Ee FRI. 28th 8.30
a “a EMENT in Buff, Red, and White mA “te: -abepaeeie CALYPSO NIGHT
. EN FRESH” SERVICE ® mena "sare aw a
s ‘ HAUNTED HARBOUR SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15
TUES WHITE HEAT
: r. le € AL ¥PSoO NIGHT & SEA HAWK
@ y 7 ve . 1 nn ‘ |
THE WEST INDIA RBESCHUIT CO. LTD. Magazine Lane, :-: Dial: 4367 | wilt be ts TWIST

OLIVER



2
=—














WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE THREE





| Harbour Log |
In Carlisle Bay

Tax Concessions For -







Colonial Ventures? “iN as eo eS ae |

Marion Belle Wolfe, Seh Laudal-

Sch. Everdene, Sch. At Last
ARRIVALS
PHELIP H. DAVIDSON, #7 ton

But Still Some Obstacles

et, Capt Sealy, from British Guiar

In Touch With Barbados

For Investment In B.W.1.

LONDON.

Minor tax concessions made for firms operating in the

Colonies and controlled in
some way towards speeding

the United Kingdom may go
up the flow of urgently-needed

investment capital to the British West Indian territories, it

is believed in London.

Exactly what form these con-
cessions will take will not be
known until Britain’s new Fin-
ance Bill is published, but hopes
have diminished that they will
@eal with the anomaly under
which full tax is charged in the
United Kingdom on profits made
in Colonies which grant a “tax
holiday” to new investors.

{In introducing his Budget in the
House of Commons in London,
Mr. R. A. Butler, the Chance.lor
of the Exchequer, made only a
passing reference to the need for
toncessions to enterprises in the
Colonies, when he said:

“United Kingdom mining ven-
jures
where overseas will be helped in
tarious ways. Businesses will be
able to sei off losses against sub-
fequent profits without time
limit.”

' There is speculation in finan-
tial circles in London that these
toncessions could be on such items
‘ts exploration expenditure and on
he grievance of many mining
‘ompanies that they have not been
thle to “lay off’ money spent on
ton-mining projects, such as
tousing schemes and other muni-
fpal amenities, Such concessions
vould probably stimulate further
aterest in the investment of min-

og capital in the Colonial terri-
ories.

Hope has not yet been given up,
wowever, that the reforms refer-
ed to be Mr. Butler will include
n adjustment of the ‘tax holiday”
inomaly, an important one to the
sritish West Indies. It is pointed
aut that in his Budget speech, the
thancellor gave only a few ex-
mples of the changes he proposed
o make.

British territories in the Carib-
wean which hope to develop their
ndustrial resources are out to at-
ract not only U.K., but also U.S.,
apital investment and many ob-
tacles have still to be overcome
‘efore the U.S., capital can flow
moothly into these Colonies.

Some of these difficulties have
outlined by Mr. I. F, Baker,
president of the Westinghouse
: ic International Co,, who
aid that a major difficulty faced
U.S. companies that want to
ch out into overseas opera-
is is the tax barrier set up by

ie U.S. Government itself.

Mr. Baker, who recently return-
‘d to New York from a tour of

tin America, urged that the U.S.

vernment should consider both
i’ cut in taxes on profits qr over-
‘eas investment and a scheme for
franting loans for enterprises
vishing to branch out overseas.

He admitted that the U.S. Gov-
wnment has made eflorts to pro-
note foreign investment through
tommercial treaties with other
tations providing for fair treat-
Qent and through guaranttes to
Bvestors that reasonable profits
Ray be returned, But these meas-
tres, he said, were not enough.

“The deafening silence with
rich investors have greeted
e desirable and well-intention-

id measures is an indication that

the Government has not found
he solution to the problem,” he
feclared.—B.U.P.









It cleans,




er (||

@

AREFULLY,,**"
tL

CALL AT....

COLLINS DRUG STORES

BROAD and TUDOR STREETS Y

in the Colonies and else- *

2 West Indies
In Commons

LONDON.

In the House of Commons en
March 12, Mr. Henry Hynd (La-
bour, Accrington) asked the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
what increases in wages and im-
proved welfare facilities have re-
sulted from the increase in the
price of export sugar granted to
Jamaica for 1952.

The Secretary of State for the
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, re-
plied: “I am asking the Governor
for this information, When I have
his reply I will write to the hon.
Member.”

Jamaica Rice Cultivation

Mr, Bernard Braine (Conserva~-
tive, Billericay) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps are being taken to increase
rice cultivation in Jamaica.

Mr. Lyttelton replied: “The
Jamaica Government are anxious
to increase the production of rice.
I am asking the Governor for de-
tails of what is being done and
will write to my hon, Friend when
I have @ reply.”

Land Reform In Under-
Developed Territories

Mr. W. T. Williams (Labour,
Hammersmith) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies what
steps he is taking to implement
Resolution VII on land reform in
under-developed countries, which
was adopted by the United
Nations General Assembly in Paris
on 12th January, 1952, designed to
give effect to the Economic and
Social Council’s recommendations
on land tenure, the welfare and
living standards of rural popula-
tions, and related technical organ-
isational, fiscal and social ques-
‘tions,

Mr. Lyttelton replied: “The re-
commmngnceteue embodied in this
Resolittion cover a very wide field
of agricultural policy and recog-
nise that no one means is suited
to the conditions of all countries.
Much of what is proposed is al-
ready being carried out by Colo-
nial Governments in the course of
developing agriculture in their
territories. The recommendations
are being studied in my Depart-
ment and I will send the text to
all Colonial Governments.”

Freight Tax On Cuban Sugar

On March 13, Mr. Arthur Dodds -
Parker (Conservative, Banbury)
asked the President of the Board
of Trade whether he is aware that,
since the sugar agreement with
Cuba in 1951 to purchase 1,500,000
tons of Cuban sugar over a three-
year period, the Cuban Govern-
ment has continued to levy a
freight tax of 64 per cent. of the
gross freight on all shipments of
sugar to the United Kingdom; and
what expenditure in dollars has
been incurred so far to meet this
freight tax,

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-
plied: “I understand that this tax

For leather “
of every colour—

preserves—and how it

polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert’s.
Nothing else is quite the same. Watch
the difference it makes to your shoes!

FOR

PURE DRUGS

AND
ACCURATE

PRESCRIPTION;

SERVICE



ture, particularly at the hands.
How do they strike you? They
look strong, capable, workman-
like but at the same time gentle
and steady. They are good
hands, You can understand why
the poor, starving, rain-soaked
mongrel puppy has that wistfally
trusting look in his eyes as he
gazes into the face above him—
the face we cannot see but can so
easily imagine.

For the dog has recognised a
friend, someone ready to be
actively helpful and not merely
content with the negative attitude
of not causing pain.

The dog in this picture might
be one of hundreds roaming the
streets and alleys of this lovely
island of ours, Unwanted and
starving they form part of the
enormous family, not only of
dogs, but of all types of animals
for which the Barbados §,P.C.A.
is responsible,

Have you ever thought how
lucky you are compared with,
let us say, a donkey or a dog?

If your employer treats you
unfairly you can appeal to your
Trade Union. If you are sick
you can be admitted to hospital—
if destitute to the almshouse, If
your neighbour beats you up
there are police and lawyers to
bring him to book. If you have
the misfortune to be maimed or
blind the Social Welfare Depart-
ment is there to help you. One

ee —

is a revenue tax levied on all
exports irrespective of destination.
It is a combination of taxes on
freight and passenger fares which
date back to 1928 and 1932 and
have been several times increased,
and it has no particular relevance
either to sugar or to the Anglo-
Cuban Trade Agreement. My right
hon. and gallant Friend the Min-
ister of Food estimates at $364,789
the element in the freight charges
for our purchases of Cuban sugar
which is attributable to this levy
between 10th August last, the date
of the trade agreement, and 29th
February, 1952.”

Mr. Dodds-Parker: “In view of
this new tax—I think my right
hon. Friend agrees that it is a
new one—and the dollar cost of

loading sugar, would the Minister
to

consider doing all possible
switch our purchases of supplies
of sugar to non-dollar

wealth and Empire,”

Mr. Thorneycroft: ‘This is not a ‘ping activities in
new tax; it has been on for a very

long time.”—B.U.P,

BLINDING .

HEADACHES

MADE HER HELPLESS



KRUSCHEN
h

brought relief 5) CERY tFom
severe head-

aches will be interested in

reading how this woman
ended her troubles :—

“Tl was subject to terrible
headaches.

le they lasted, I
seemed to lose my sight and all
power in my hands and was forced

to lie down for hours at a time.
My aunt, who has taken Kruschen
Salts for years, suggested my
trying them. I did so, and I've
not had a return of those terrible
headaches for months. In fact,
I feel quite cured.”"—M.W.

Headaches can nearly always
be traced to a disordered stomach
and to the unsuspected retention
in the system of stagnating
waste material, which poisons
the blood. Remove the poisonous
accumulations — prevent them
from forming again—and you
won't have to worry any more.
And that is just how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief
by cleans the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
waste.@

Ask your nearest Chemis? or
Stores for Kruschen.

~~ ———

RAE

sources,
particularly from the Common-

Reprinted from the American Weekly.

Do These Hands Belong To You?

Take a good look at this pic-

could go on indefinitely listing

the provisions for your well-
being.
But for animals there is only

ONE organisation which tries to
provide all these services. It is
the S.P.C.A.

And the S.P.C.A, has only three
salaried inspectors and one
handy-man. On its staff and it
relies solely on voluntary con-
tributions to pay its way.

“Of course they can’t possibly
do it” you say, and then you re-
member other things the Society
does. You wonder how all the
posters, newspaper articles and
announcements, the broadcasts,
get done, What about Animal
Welfare week with its lectures,
film shows and Band concert?
And you think to yourself “Why,
the S.P.C.A, runs a Humane Edu-
cation Bureau as well.” How
can they do all this with only
four paid workers?” The answer
is that we cannot.

We rely on a few, pitifully few,

enthusiastic men and women who
give their time, energy and
money to the service of the

island’s animals. Some of them
will be calling at your home,
office, factory or store or meeting
you in the street on Friday morn-
ing, March 28th. They will ask
you to buy a tag and thus help

to keep the work going. But it
isn’t only your money we want,
We want YOU as well! ‘Me”

you exclaim, “What can I do?”

Rain Holds Up
Work In Harbour

Intermittent showers in Bridge-
town yesterday caused outdoo:
work to cease on many occasions.
Businessmen, clerks and | other
City workers were not caught un-
prepared, Early in the morning
dark clouds had begun to form in
the sky. Because of this gloomy
appearance, nearly everyone car-



ried raincoats and umbrellas to
work with them.

High winds at sea caused
damage to fishing boats’ sails.

At about 3.30 p.m. one boat towed
another into Carlisle Bay.

The rainfall returns between
Monday and up to six o'clock
yesterday morning were however
very low.

In Speightstown, the morning
opened with light showers until
around 8 a.m. when they abated,
This was after nine parts of rain
fell on Monday night,

The showers also affected ship-
the harbour.

essels discharging cargo had to
cover the hatches on more than



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24th MARCH, 1952 |

advise



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24 Cheques on
Bankers 70 2/10 |
Sight or De 1
mand Drafts 70 |
72 Cable j
70 5/10 Currency 68 7/10% |
Coupons 68% }
50% Silver 20%
CANADA |
7a 4/10 Cheques on
Bankers 70 7/10%
Demand Drafty 70, 95%
Sight Drafts 70 4/10% |
72 4/10 Cable |
70 9/10 Currency 68 2/10%
Coupons 68 5/10
First, you can see that any] Silver 20%
animals you own or are responsi- a, LOADA |
' ~ .
ble for get the very best condi-} 72 4,10 ee
tions, feeding and care available. Bankers 70 6/10%
Secondly, when you see around Demand Drafts 70,46
you cases of neglect or cruelty] ;, jj, ue Drafts 70 3/10%
° ai x , 8, : 7 : able
you ean bring these to the notice] 5, 9/10 Currency 69 1/10%
of the owners or the S,P.C.A, Coupons 68 4/10
(All information sent to the] 5% De

Society is treated as confidential.)

Thirdly, if you have children
you can train them in the ways of
kindness for most children are
inherently kind and need only
training and example to develop

‘their characters,

Fourthly, if you are asked to
undertake some special voluntary
work for the Society such as
serving on a Sub-Committee,
consent readily; don’t back away
like a startled fawn and murmur
hurriedly “Oh! I wouldn’t be any
good at that sort of thing!” You
wouldn't be expected to cut the

toe-nails of the Queen’s Park
alligator or to descend a well to
rescue a cat. In America and
the U.K. it is considered a great
honour and privilege to help
further the work of Humane
Societies. That spirit of service

should prevail here,

Will you do something for me?
Will you take another look at
the hands in the picture and then
look at your own, They are iden-
tical, aren’t they? YOURS are
the HELPING HANDS to the
Barbados S.P.C.A.



























one occasion to prevent the cargo
getting wet. Passengers were
afraid to use row boats.

Queen Will Visit
Scotland In June

@ From Page 1
sources as she wanted them”.

He pointed out that if Scotland
could retain the proceeds of her
export of whisky and tweeds
alone she would have no short-
ages of raw materials or con-
sumer goods.

The Queen is half Scottish—
her mother Queen Elizabeth is
one of the Strathmores who have
lived for centuries in Glamis
Castle. Princess Margaret was
born in Glamis, There is natur-
ally much sympathy for Scotland
in the Royal Family.

But there has always been the
apparent inability in Whitehall
to decide whether the Scots mean
business. The Queen during her
residence at the Palace of Holy-
roodhouse in Edinbur, from
be able



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PAGE FOUR

—

Al N OGATI

BARBADOS tat
t

eae see

Wednesday, March 26, 1952

LUAURY PORT
of Bridgetown continues,
people say, to be one of the
perisive in the world. But a deep
ilence hangs over any attempts to
et the matter right. And elementary nuis-
ances such as pilferage of goods, and the
scattering of cement powder» over the
offices of the’ Comptroller of Supplies con-
tinue as normal features of life on the
wharf. Plainly the port of Bridgetown is
the nerve centre of Barbados’ economic
life. On its efficiency and smooth running
depends the easy export of our major ex-
ports of sugar and molasses and the quick
delivery of the large volume of imports on
which we depend for food, clothing and
homes. The dock workers of Barbados are
the key workers of this island. Without
their co-operation and their efforts the
prosperity of the island is endangered. The
dockworkers fealise this and eannot wish
to damage the prosperity of an island
which needs every penny it can earn to
educate the people and train them as good
citizens and skilled workers. :

PORT

responsible





Yet Bridgetown continues to enjoy the
uneviable réputation of being the mostr
expensive port in the Southern Caribbean,

What is lacking?

According to the report of the Depart-
ment of Labour for 1950 “the Joint: Port
Committee and the seven divisional com-
mittees .. . continued to work well, All of
the many matters affecting work in the
port which these committees dealt with
were settled amicably, Twenty four meet-
ings were held and eight agreements affect-
ing wages and conditions of employment
were signed.”

According to thisreport’ good will is not
lacking. Ae :

Yet the port of Bridgetown continues to
be so expensive; turn-round of ships is so
delayed that freight rates have been in-
creased by more than 15 per cent. to cover
the great expense of calling at Carlisle Bay:

erties between
“Sterling Area,

BARBADOS - ADVOCATE



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952



News From Britain

LONDON, March 14,

Well, the Budget did not make
anybody as unhappy as they had
expected it would, but the new
keeps coming along. of trade re-
cessions and financial restrictions
abroad,

The spate of press articles
heralding the “New Elizabethan
Era”—it too easy a catch
phrase, anyhow—are dying down,
and Britain is back to earth again

Australia’s sudden import cuts
have shattered the ideas of the
Prosperity Planners who thought
they could work out Britain's
future on paper.

A section of Tory and Labour

M.P’s have'stocd up in the House
to voice their protest in discon-

certed chorus as if Australia’s
action were a personal affront to
Britain.

Said Socialist M.P, Mr. Wilfred
Burke; “On top of the menace of
Japanese competition it is a
staggering blow to Lancashire,
Markets once lost cannot be
regained.” *

Said Tory Mr. Walter Ftetcher;
“It is a crippling blow not only
to Lancashire cotton but to many
other industries.”

Said Socialist Miss Elaine
Burton; “Something must be done

@about it or skilled engineers in

Coventry will be

work.”

Viewed With Disquiet
Said Socialist Mr. Glenville Hall,
with an eye on the other members
of the Commonwealth; “We view
with disquiet any iessening of the
members of the
and -especially of

thrown out of

the Commonwealth. What has
happened in Australia may ex-
tend. Already South. Africa is

‘talking of taking the same roacL”

And Socialist Mr, George Strauss
former Minister of Supply, added
it would be impossible to find
other markets for the vehicles
Australia has been taking,

So Mr.Peter Thornycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade had
to tell them the hard fact that
Australia was cutting other
peoples’ imports as well, and that
inflation and postwar scarcities and
a sellers’ market couldn't last for
ever, and that things end with a
jolt.

So here we are where we came
in.

The spring sun shines warmly
today, and the mild winter departs;
the trees come out in bud and
pretty girls look prettier and gayer
in thei; fluffy new spring fashions,

But it’s the same old story;
work harder and longer to produce
more for less money we must, or
none of us will be very gay in a
year or so,



By
VAUGHAN JONES

And around Westminster there
are other M.P.s who are saying a
little mischievously perhaps, that
our last government was maybe
premature in pointing out to other
countries that they should “pro-
duce the right goods for export”.
And that “wasteful” luxuries
should not be foisted on us,

For we are trying to produce
just the right kind of goods which
everybody ought to want to buy,
such as those cars which the
family needs, and Australia says
she can't take them.

Perhaps those foreign makers of
exotic perfumes and not so
sweetly-smeliing cheeses, to whose
import Socialist Mr, Dalton took

xception, are now laughing
gently.

Commonwealth Conference

However, the Empire Crusaders,
with justification, are urging that
we should call a_ great, all-
embracing Commonwealth Con-
ference, to weigh up the wealth
in our territiories and decide how
best we can develop and distrib-
ute our resources,

Whatever the results, at least ¢

it would give us a sense of the
Community of the _ British
Commonwealth,

Oh, yes, it is the same all over
Britain. The achievements of our
forefathers in building up the
Empire are taken too much for
granted and there is often little
enough thought about the peoples,
of all colours and kinds, who
make up the community. Tin,
rubber, cocoa, manganese, wool,
tropical hardwoods and all the
rest? Why, they are just a God-
siven heritage to Britain, Canada,
Africa, Australia, New Zealand,
India and the others, They are
places one sees on the movies,
Despite aeroplanes and radio, our
horizon is not expanding quickly
enough.

* * *
The splendour of debutante
courts may be seen again in

London next year, the Coronation
year,

The young Queen, they say,
would like to see the debutantes,
who include the tilted youth and
beauty of England, presented
again wearing the traditional
stately and graceful gowns and
three feathers. These evening
presentations discontmued since

A ship's captain who visited Barbados re | ’ NOW, MR. CHURCHILL ;

Give The. Seots Their
Stone Back

cently estimated that it cost his shipping
company £1,200 for each day spent in Car-
lisle Bay. He can hardly be blamed for
impatience at a three days’ delay.

Why is there delay?

Sir Douglas Ritchie, Vice Chairman of
the Port of London authority details some
of the reasons in his report on the proposed
construction of a deep water wharf.

With regard to stevedoring he notes: “the
quicker the men work, the greater is the
profit to the contractors and this is-parficu-
larly the case in overtime hours. The whole
system causes resentment among the men,
which is expressed by a slowing down of
the work.”

Plainly theystem is wrong,

Again he notes that “in view of the fact
that the full evertime trip rate is payable
for only a few minutes’ work outside nor-
mal hours, the tendency is for afternoon
work to be slowed down in order to ensure
the additional payment... The origin of
this system no doubt lies in the fact that
the whole cost of overtime is borne by the
ship and for the same reason there is
no incentive for either the men or the con-
tractor to alter the arrangement.

The deleterious effect of this system both
direct and indirect on freight rates which
are ultimately borne by the goods must be
obvious.”

It is. We all pay more for our goods.

The system is wrong. Because there is
little incentive on the part of anyone en-
gaged in the port to improve the state of
affairs, if the additional costs are borne by
the ship.

But, as Sir Douglas points out, the effect
on the goods is twofold, and the consumer
must pay not only the additional costs of
the operation but also the additional costs
of the ship caused by the delay. So long as
the consumer continues to accept this un-
satisfactory state of affairs without com-
plaining so long.it seems the costs of goods
entering and leaving Bridgetown will con-
tinue to rise. Because, judging by the re-

port of the Department of Labour, 1959, |

the major occupation of the Joint Port
Committee and the seven divisional port
committees seems to be the amicable set-
tlemeiit of conditions affecting wages and
employment. Relations between ernployers
and employees apparently continue to be
excellent and will no doubt continue to be
so until a stage is reached where the con-
sumer decides that he can no longer afford
the luxury of continuing to buy goods im-
ported under such conditions by which
neither the shipping companies, the local
shipping and mercantile association nor the
dockworker bear the increased costs, but
only the local consumer. Until the consum-
er begins to complain the Port of Bridge-
town will continue to become more ex-
pensive.

Only the consumer seems to possess the
incentive necessary to improve conditions,



COMMENTING the other day
on the wrath aroused in Scot-
land over the Queen's title
of Elizabeth It., I wrote of “the
age-old inability of the English
to understand the minds of oth-
er people.”

I little “thought that Mr,
Churchill, the greatest living
Englishman of them all, would
so goon illustrate my point by
the ham-fisted way he handled
the re-emergence of the Coro#
nation Stone from the deep,
dark dungeons of Westminster
Abbey.

Tomfoolery

I ‘don’t know who
him if indeed anyone did.
is suspiciously cagey on
point. f

But whomever he sought ad-
vice from, I would suggest that
before he makes the next move
he might do better to consult
the newspaper astrologers.

For there has been so much
official tomfoolery over this
lamentable business that I can
only €onclude. the Stone’s birth
stars have (got crossed,

advised
He
that

ANY man possessed of ‘a little
tact, a little common sense, and
the invaluable gift of being able
to laugh when someone makes
shim. look - foolish, could have
had th@ Stone back in a week.

That was obvious in the first
few days after it was stolen.

Those- who ‘took the Stone
couldn’t do anything with it,
didn’t want to keep it, were too
patriotic to destroy it, and, as
they have told us since, had to
carry it up. and down the coun-
try because they couldn’t find
anyone to give it to,

The Dean of Westminster, a
sensible Scot, took the right line
in the first hour, He made a
joke of it. If he had been able
to keep it on a joke level the

Stone would have been back
the next day.
But the palace kicked his

pants and he was compelled to
pour out a lot of portentous
nonsense over the radio which
blew the affair up to the size of
a national catastrophe,

Leg-pulling

After that it was inevitable
to anyone who understood the
Scots mind that all\Scots—even
those who at first. disapproved
of the entérprise—would range
themselves‘ on, the side of the
Stone-takers, feeling that what
had been done had been done
for Scotland.

Moreover, there is of course
no joke the Scots enjoy better
than pulling the’ legs of the
English, "

The more the Palace, the
Abbey, the politicians, and the
police moaned and groaned, the
more pompous blather they
poured out, the more they
‘threatened that the perpetra-
tors of the foul deed when
caught would suffer everything
short of being hanged, drawn,
and quartered, the more Scot-
land rocked with laughter.

And the more solidly the
Scots massed themselves. behind
the men who had pulled off the

trick,

By JOHN GORDON

As a result the handing back
of the Stone became more difli-
cult than the purloining of. it.

I HAD some personal expe-
rience of that, for at one point
I found myself the “go-between”

empowered to negotiate its
return,

The terms were easy. “No
prosecution. and a_ dignified

handing-over in keeping with
the venerataus which the Scots
have for the Stone.” A vener-
ation much deeper than most
Englishmen appreciate.

To make it easier still for the
authorities those who had the
Stone in their keeping did not
seek any public admission that
it was given back on terms.”

An offer

The Palace, priests and poli-
ticians in London were at that
time very anxious about the
condition of the Stone, for a
rumour had spread that it had
been seriously damaged.

I was empowered to pass on
the first complete and accurate
description of the damage, how
it had been caused, and how
carefully and soundly it had
been repaired.

With the agreement of those
concerned I offered that the
Stone would be placed reverent-
ly in St. Giles’s Cathedral, Edin-
burgh, late one night without
any ceremony that would attract
publie attention.

I suggested that if it were
left there for three weeks before
being taken to London, it would
be a_ gesture much appreciated
by all Scots, and bring a happy
ending to a sorry business.

‘Prosecution’

For a few days that solution
seemed possible. Then sudden-
ly stupidity reared its head again.

ack came London's ultimatum.
“We intend to prosecute with all
vigour, and we shall whisk the
Stone out of Scotland the
moment we lay hands on it.”

“Prosecution would be folly,”
I cautioned, “You can’t do it.
It will merely provide a sound-
ing board for the most fanatical
nationalistic ropaganda. You
will have Scotland boiling over
in a week.”

I toyed with the idea of end-
ing the deadlock by putting the
Stone one night in the sleeping
car of Mr. Hector MeNeil, then
Secretary for Scotland, which I
fear might have caused him
some acute embarrassment.

WHEN finally the stone was
returned, those who had delay-
ed its return because they
wanted vengeance discovered,
as I had warned them, that
they dared not prosecute.

But apart from that one glim-
mer of sense they continued to
pile stupidity upon stupidity.
If they had sat down deliber-
ately to devise the perfect way
to lacerate the patriotic feelings
of the Scots they couldn’t have
done it better,

A bearer party of young Scots
laid-the Stone with reverence



the war’s outbreak have been part
of Court ceremony for many
reins.

Duchesses, countesses and other
proud mothers, who regard a
presentation at Court as a life
asset for their daughters, would
be more than happy.

They do not Uelieve that the
Present courts—held during the
afternoon—are q the same fcr
the debutantes wear afternoon
aress, with hats.

We are always hearing that.
this is austerity Britain, and that
we don't get enough to eat. But
it seems to me that it all depends
on how much money we have in
our pockets to buy off-the-ration
foods or spend in restaurants.

If we are rich, we can grow
very fat; if we are not so rich per-
haps there is plenty fish, If we are
poor, it is just too bad, anyway.

Se it is a reliet, pernaps, to be
told plainly that British monne-
quins are fatter than the girls who
do the same job in America.

Just back from New York is
Gaby Young, very pretty too, who

has 120 1S wiaer contract to
her fashion agency,

Gaby has m searching for
four English to model clothes
on the other the Atlantic,

and she finds &.difficut to finu
et:

She wants them to be tall,
slim and betweefr-5ft. Gin, and 5ft.
9in, Other measurements; not more
than 33 in. bust, 22in. waist, 33 in,
thip.
Fatter

But most British mannequins are
fatter than that, says Gaby. Some
of them have a 36 in. hip and
would come into the “matron”
class over there, she adds,

A joyous piece of news for
Britain’s old people, It seems
likely that tea rationing may be
abolished during the coming year,
as the trade is building up suffi-
cient stocks for this to be done.
For tea drinking is to the aged
not only a measure of comfort. It
is a British tradition, an oft re-
peated introduction to friends, a
solace in loneliness,

It is a substitute for the glasses
of beer and gins and lime, which
their working sons and daughters
order in the pubs, It replaces the
cups of coffee over which Con-
tinentals linger in the cafes.

But the effect on the working
man; Will we have to provide
more cups of tea to the carpenter
and the plumber, the decorator
and the bricklayer, when doing
a job in our houses, they pause
once again for a rest?



amid the ruins of Arbroath
Abbey. That was the last touch
of reverence and dignity it was
to enjoy for many a long day.

Whisked away

Within minutes it was seized
and thrown into a police cell.
Within hours it was put in a
car and raced across the Border
in the style of gangsters mak-
ing their getaway with the loot.

In London it spent another

night in a prison cell, and was
then moved across and dumped
into the deepest cellar of the
Abbey, there to lie for months,
in much the same condition ag
a criminal would hide his stolen
property,

And now Mr. Churchill adds
the final touch of degredation.
He has the Stone brought out
of the dungeon im chains, and
blithely tells the House of Com-
mons that that is what his ad-
visers advised him to do.

No wonder he dare not give
their names, Especially if they
are Scots. No wonder every
Scottish M.P. who could get on
his feet gasped with horror and
challenged him immediately.

I WOULD suggest .to Mr.
Churchill, with all the respect
and deference he has so justly

earned by greater achievements!

than this, that he should lift his
eyes from Europe for a moment,
turn them across the Border, and
try to understand the ming of
Scotland,

For he has lit a fire in Scot-
land that will take some damp-
ing down. ©

Scotland wants the Stone
back. He should send it back.

Grievances

The relations between Qcot-
land and England are not as
happy as they should be at this
moment,

Scotland has many just and
reasonable prigvances. Tt feels
that the recent over-centralisa-
tion of government in London
has brought it too much under
the heel of England.

The Scots are a peculiarly
sensitive people, Perhaps they
suffer from too great respect for
their history. But that is not
Something that can be eradi-

cated. Or indeed of i :
need feel ashamed, wae

THE Coronation Stone to
them | is something more than
rer a bit of the furnishings
of estminster Abbey. They
regard it as their historic prop-
erty, stolen from them.

_They are proud that British
kings should be crowned sitting
upon it. And they would be
very proud to send it with al)

the ceremonial dignity to the|

Abbey at all coronation times.

But they think that between
coronations it should rest in
Scotland, where Scotsmen could
See it, guard it, and cherish it,

So give the matter some more
thought, Mr. Churchill, And
get some wiser Scottish advisers
than you seem to have,

For if you don’t stmd the
Stone back the Blue Bonnets
may be over the Border again.

SSS











SCHOONER
SAFETY

THE announcement made during the last ||!
few days that one schooner owner was fitting |
his vessel with radio telephone will be re-
ceived with much satisfaction throughout
the West Ihdies.

Intercolonial travel since the years of the
war has been largely confined to plane or
schooner. Steamship facilities remain ex-
tremely limited despite all the pleading and
protests of West Indian governments and

Playing Cards from.......-..c.00e.

'{} Patience Cards per ot Jae.
| CANASTA SETS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Broad Street & The Village, Balmoral Gap



peoples. ,
But Intercolonial trade had been limited

to schooners. Fruit, vegetables, firewood
and coals which form the bulk of this trade,
are taken from one island to another by

schooner mainly because of the facility for
travel and the reduced ccst.

The cargoes are not expected to go back
and forth without being accompanied by
human beings. And those people who by
reason of their business are forced to travel



SNOWCEM

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C. S. Pitcher & Co.

Ph. 4472

between the islands by schooner are expos-
ed, not only to the dangers of the deep, but
the agony of being without the means to
call for help in time of stress.

It does seem illogical fhat West Indian

governments should subscribe financial sup-
port for an elaborate weather bureau and a
modern system of forecasting and transmit-
ting conditions of weather and approaching
storms and then refuse to compel vessels
travelling in the area to carry equipment

which would pick up the warnings sent out. | \\
For many years now, it has been pointed i|

out in this newspaper that many of the Cap- ||

tains of sailing craft did not hold Master Mar- ||

iner Certificates. This in itself created a

hazard when they were allowed to take
passengers without knowing the sea ways.
On oceasions they have gone off course and |
delayed the ship’s arrival several days as a of |





——————— ==

————



——





result. It must also be added now that even
in the event of warning of an approaching |

storm, they were unable to chart another by ee |
course to a haven of safety. SUITCASES & HANDTRUNKS |

ing storms that such equipment as _ radio
telephone or transmitting sets are necessary.
Within recent years several vessels plying





And that would be deplorable,
—L.E.S.

intercolonial trade have been lost without
trace in normal weather conditions. It may
be that a vessel had sprung a leak or a sud-
den squall caused her to overturn. A brief
call on a radio telephone might have sent

vessels in the vicinity to the rescue. In its
absence all was lost and lost without trace.

But it is not only for the purpose of avoid- Light ona exceptionally strong |

It should be easy for the West Indian gov-
ernments to demand, by way of legislation,
that each vessel registered and carrying
passengers should have radio telephone as
part of its normal equipment. Now that such



Six Sizes

equipment is easily obtainable at small cost °

there should be no hesitation in enacting and D ( { & ( Ltd ‘

enforcing such law. a OS a 0., e
Already there is the inadequacy of life || fi





boats on many of the smaller vessels plying
between these West Indian Islands despite
the law which compels them to carry enough
boats to accommodate crew and passengers.





INTRODUCING—

“BUBBLE WASHERS”

THE COMFORT OF THE HOUSEWIFE

People who travel between the islands are
entitlea to protection and it should be the
duty of the West Indian Governments to
afford them that protection. And schooner ||;
owners should not be allowed to make money
at the expense of other people’s discomfort
and possibly their lives. Radio equipment is
as necessary to intercolonial schooners as
life-boats,

Truman Thinks It Over
On A-Palm Beach Isle

By R. M. MacCOLL

KEY WEST.

THIS is Truman’s time of decision.

Here some tyme during ‘the next three
weeks, the President must make up his
mind whether he runs in the November
election or steps aside in favour of some-
body else.

It is an ideal spot for him to decide any-
thing so momentous.

As far as it is possible for a President of
the United States to obtain some sort of
privacy. Key West gives it to Truman.

Although the town is enjoying a tourist

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e
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boom, this little island, where the trade = :
winds sigh gently among ‘the palms, stil) ]@ Black Magic Chocolates HAMS
oe feeli f isolati 1 and 1% pounds. ”
gives a feeling of isolation. Fry's Chocolate Salencne Whole or Cut
: : . 5: Carr’s Tea Biscuits in tins
Hustling, bustling America might be ‘a Churchman's Cigarettes DANISH in tins
th 7 Embassy Cigarettes 14 lb. to 6 Ibs. ,
ae miles rer: < GOLD BRAID RUM
n his holiday “White House’—the mod- 3 yr. old DARE BACON. ,
est home of the commandant of a big. naval ,
base—Truman is safe from sightseers an¢
ESH TAL
from the constant stream of callers whc ae Pee .
plague him all day long in Washington. VEGETABLES
Here he can really sit back undisturbed Tomatoés — .30 per Ib. Mixed Nuts — .96° per Ib.
and weigh all the factors which make thi; Carrots — .30 per lb. oe “46 per bot
year’s contest for the Presidency so tre- - Meltis Dates $1.30 per tin
mendously important not only to America MEAT DEPT. en" oa oe
but to the world. HS $1.21 per bot.
aa Ts bie: ey ; Calves’ Liv
In a very real sense, history will be made Calves? Rersiihiiciile Celery Salt .36 per bot. _ %
at Key West in the coming weeks. Ox: Tails See oe
When Truman arrived on Friday night it Boone Ralnits eee n28 per bot.
Was pouring rain. A reporter of a news-
paper in Miami, thé nearest big town to Key |]% e
West, jealous of Florida’s reputation, des- 2
cribed it as “California-style weather.” $
: : ® * = i > '
a Miami my taxi-driver, a Hebrew, noted $ a N. GODDARD & SONS
my accent and spoke in glowing terms of 3
ithe British. ; SSOSSS6S6S55666S:
29956999966 669 ; ote






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952



Steel Band Leader Gu

SENTENCE on steel band leade

yesterday postponed by the Acting Puisne Judge His Lord-
ship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor after a jury found him guilty

of receiving nine shirts valued $32.35, knowing them to
have been stolen. The shirts were the property of Paul

Paster of No. 42,

Swan Street and the offence was commit-

teg between October 30 and November 3 last year. The
shirts were used as costumes for the band members.
Springer was charged on another count, shop breaking

and larceny, but the jury brought hi

that count.

Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to
the Attorney General, prosecuted
for the Crown. Springer was not
represented.

The prosecution’s case was that
Paster had got some shirts of a
special design on Saturday, Octo-
ber 27. He visited the store on
the following day and left every-
thing. When he returned on
Monday the shirts were stolen.
Some days later he noticed a steel
band passing Swan Street, the
members of which were dressed
in the sports’ shirts. He inform-
ed the police, :

The first witness to be called
yesterday was Maisy Brathwaite,
a clerk at Paster in October last
year. She said Paster gave her
some shirts onthe evening of
October 27 and she placed them
in the show case. None of the
shirts were sold that evening and
when she left the store some
sninutes before 5 o’clock, she left
them in the show case. The fol-
lowing Monday when she went to
work, the contents of the show
case were disarranged and she
Gaew it to Paster’s attention.
Some of the shirts were missing.

Cross-Examined

_. Cross-examined, she said that
it was about 8.30 a.m. that she
noticed the disarrangement, Simi-
lar sports shirts were being sold
about town.

Paul Paster, the proprietor of
No, 42. Swan Street, said he re-
ceived some sports shirts, six of
which were of a special design,
on October 27, and gave them to
Brathwaite to place in a show
case. He left the store at about
5 o'clock that evening after he
had closed it. On the following
day he returned with a_ porter
Dennis and an electrician to

m in “not guilty,” on

November races. He asked him
whether he had anything to say
and he shook his head. F
Everton Bullen who is a mason
and also a member of the steel
band of which Springer is leader,
said that early in November he
went home one evening and found
wo sports shirts on his bed.

Shirts Identified

Shown the shirts at Court which
Paste had identified as the shirts
he missed, he said they were the
shirts he had seen on his bed.

He and other members of the
band wore the sports shirts at the
November races. Before they had
worn them, Springer had
told them not to wear them until
he told them they might do so.
On the Friday after the races they
again wore the shirts at a con-
test at the Globe theatre.

Cross-examined, he said that it
was usual for Springer to tell the
members of the band, not to wear
costumes other than on_ special
occasions. Springer usually pro-
vided anythin

r Austin Springer was —-——

HOME EXTENDED

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





ilty Of Receiving Stolen Shirts



that
for the band, tha: was needed wrg McD. SYMMONDS, wife of the Churchwarden of St. Michael, opens the new wing of the Nightin-

Cpl. Clyde Nurse said that on
November 23 he went to Charles
Beckles’ house. Beckles handed
him a shirt and made a statement
concerning it. This shirt was
afterwards identified by Paster
as being one of the shirts of
special design. He saw Springer at
the Central Police Station, and
showing him the shirt, told him
that Beckles had said he had
given it to him.

Other members of the steel band
Frank Mavers, Adolphus Scott,
Cheste field” Thorne and Milton
Brathwaite also gave evidence as
to Springer’s giving them sports

whom he had promised to give Shirts:

some old lumber. The lumber
was taken away and the store
closed,

On the next morning when he
went to the store he found that
some money was missing from
his cash box and nine shirts from
the show case. Some days later
he saw a steel band pass Swan
Street, six of the members of
which were dressed in the shirts
of special design and another in
blue. He informed the police,

He said that on the Sunday on
which the lumber was taken from
the store there was no opportunity
for anyone to take away anythi
without his noticing it. He ha
looked at all the windows before
he left that Sunday.

Fifteen-year-old Dennis Out-
rum who was porter at the store
at'the time, said that Paster, one
Patrick and himself went to the
store on Sunday, October 28, and
Patrick and He took out-some old
lumber. When they were leaving,
he closed the windows,

Porter Trusted

He said that Paster was never
in the habit of examining the
windows to see whether he (Out-
rum) had properly closed them.
Paster felt he could be trusted to
close them well.

He said that on Monday when
he went to the store, he noticed
a window of the upper storey
closed, but unlatched. He had
latched this window’ on the Sun-
day.

He said that there is a building
belaw the window and one could
step on the roof from the window.

Cross-examined, he said that
Paster had been present while
they were taking out the old lum-
ber and had never gone upstairs
and left them downstairs.

Cpl. Herbert said that on
November 23 he was carrying out
certain investigations concerning
the larceny and_ interviewed
Everton Bullen who gave
him a_ sports shirt and made
a statement concerning it. He
also saw Chesterfield Thorpe of
Litterary Row, St. Michael, who
gave him a similar shirt. Paster
identified the shirts as his. He
later saw Springer at the C.I.D.
and told him that Bullen and
Thorpe had told him that he,
Springer, had given them the
shirts a few days before the





(To All Cash CUSTOMERS) From Monday 24th March—to—Saturday 29th March

Cross-examined, Mayers said
that Sprinrer had told him before
he bought the shirts that he would
buy them with the money he had
got after the band had played at
the Empire Theatre.

The last witness was George
Denny, a tailor of the Reliance
Shirt Factory where the sports
shirts were made. He said he had
made the shirts of special design
for Paul Paster about five months
ago. He had since made similar
shirts, but those he had made five
months ago were the first of that
design he had made.

' his. addess to the jury,
Sp inger said that he had bought
he shirts with money he had got
after they had played at the
Empire Theatre.



ENCOURAGEMENT
FOR W.I. DRAMA

MR. PHILIP M. SHER-
LOCK, Vice-Principal of the
University College of the
West Indies, told the “Advo-
cate” yesterday that the Ex-
tra-mural Department of the
University “wishes to do all
that it can to encourage
dramatic production in the
West Indies.”

“One way of doing this’ he
said, “is to publish plays with
a West Indian setting that
are suitable for production by
dramatic societies and groups
of amateur actors in the
region’.

The Department therefore
is prepared to purchase plays
of this sort and to pay $25
(W.1.) for each play accepted
for publication.

He said that authors who
wished to submit manuscript
should send them to the Direc-
tor of Extra-mural Studies,
Mona, Jamaica. The name
and address of the author
should be plainly written on
the manuscript.

The author will retain the
copyright of plays accepted
for publication, it being un-
derstood that groups in the
British Caribbean will be free
to produce any of these pub-
lished plays without the pay-
ment of fees or royalties to
anyone,



SPECIAL

ENAMELLED PUDDING BASINS 18 cm.
do. 16 cm.

PRESSURE COOKE
ELECTRIC IRONS

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

RS

gale Memorial Home, Black Rock.
(l. to r.): Mr. E. D. Mottley,
Bryan, Matron of the Home.

The function took place yesterday evening. In the background are:
Dean Hazlewood, Mr. McD. Symmonds, Mr. John Beckles and Miss

New Wing Of Nightingaie °° 8 8oNs we.

Home Opened ae

IT IS very fitting that we
in Barbados should have a
home of this kind, Hon. V. C.
Gale, Senior Guardian of St,
Michael, told an audience at
the opening of the new wing
of the Nightingale Memorial
Home yesterday evening. He
said that it was to men such
as Dr. Nightingale to whom
the community owed a great
lebt—those far-seeing men
who had used their wealth for
the betterment of the com-
munity.

The children of the Home, as
well as Vestrymen and _ friends,
witnessed the new wing opened
by Mrs. McD. Symmonas., wife of
the Churchwarden of St. Michael,
fter Dean Hazlewood hed given
it his blessing.



4 cd on the eo ster:
lilding, the new win ip-
rox motely 40 feet long by 20
font wide. The second storey forms
an extension of the girls’ dormi-
tory while the dining hall is sit-
uated on the extended part of the
first floor, The old dining hall has
now heen fitted as a dormitory
for the older boys. This permits
of more space in the dormitory for
the smaller bovs. Formerly the
Home housed 35 children. It now
bes a capacity of 60.

After the onening Mr. MeD.
Symmonds, Churchwarden, gsaic
that he was very pleased that it
had heen his privilege, during hie
term of office, to sunerintend th
extension ‘of the Home. Amon
the many social services ettablish-
ad and maintained bw the s+
Michael Vestry. the Nightinenle
Home was the landmark and had
horne testimony of the Vestry
since 1947

Public Service

He said that it would always
remain a memorial to the public
services of a distinguished Por.
badian, the late Dr. Nightingale,
who had donated some of the
money which hed been available
for the extension.

“When in December 1947 Si~
Hilary Blood, then Governor o!
Barhados, opened this Home. a
heginnine was made in the good
work, which it is my hone will
epread and develop as the years
nass.” Mr, Symmonds said, It was
his wish that at the outset, the
Home would not only serve St.
Michael, but the entire ‘fend in
order to provide 1 good training
for many of the children of the
colony.

“The devortment of these chil-
dren here this evening is evidence
of the fact that the usefiiness of

OFFERS

USUALLY

64c.
50c.
$22.50
$5.00



No. 16 Swan Street

Phone 2109, 4406, 3534



should not be confined to the
of St. Michael,
Mottley said that it was
e solemn duty of the people in
chorge to see that the wishes of
r Nightingale were respected,
He hoped that by the end of the
year o‘her parishes would have
children in the Home.

}

this work is appearing before our
eyes,” he said.

When the Home was opened
eight girls and two boys were
admitted. Shortly afterwards a:
additional ten boys were taken Dean Hazlewood congratulated
n. Since th t time the number «)o St, Michael Vestry and Mr.

h "iv increased, Some of gy»mmonds on the splendid work
the children have grown wu that had been done, He” said
Eight are now apprenticed at -bot one of the cooperate acts of
vorious trades and soon a Com=>merey was that they should
mittee will assist 1n steering ‘he «natter the homeless. That had |
lives of these children when.the) pordy fulflled in the gen-
leave the home. of Dr, Nightingale and
He sald that two or . throne ' edditional funds, — the
were nearing the ace of 18. He Churehworden had extended the
w>s sure that the training wile usefulness of this purpose,
they had had at the Home

would stand them in sood stead pointed out in Chapter 25)
when they began to niny their of S!. Matthew, Jesus Christ!








part in the community. , sade it quite clear that those

Hon, V CGC. Goole naid great tri- » did not perform those acts
bute to Dr. Niehtinesle and. the © condemned,
Voctry of St. Michael for estab- ‘A work such as this cannot
lishing and running the Home. Tt et with the approval of
served a very usefil nirnse God and christian people,” he
lnnkine ofter the children who To the children present,
had no one to Tonle oftar thom » those children whose lot

might be to live in ‘he home, 1

will And tt real home

nd wi'l have many vears of
happiness here’, he ended

fiood Adminictration

v 1 that he had visited the
an mony oeensions andwar
much imoressed with than Potty Arne Social Wel-
The children Were fora Officer, congratulated the
well looked after St. Miahael Vestry and the Board
“We can do our part by teach- of Guardians for the great job
ing and inculcating the best We ahey had done She too paid
have into them but it is for them tribute to Dr, Nightingale and
not to let us down,” he said. He referred to him as “a publie
hoped that the elder boys would «)irited Barbadian,” She also
tolen arhat heA Bar congratulated Miss Bryan, Matron

sideration and when they left the .¢ iy, Home,
1 f Reckles, M.B.E.,

ood example of its ' Tahn

moved a vote of thanks. At the
id‘ that he end of the function refreshments
were served.





very

minietretian

work.

N Mottlew s
ad had many differences with
i former Bishop Although
they differed on Church policy,
he thought a great deal of him.
It was that Bishop and Hon, V. C.
Gale on whom he had to depend
when he was accused of throwing
away money to establish the
Nightingale Home.



“DAVIDSON” HERE
FROM B. GUIANA

The &7-ton schooner Philip H.
Dovidson returned to mareedes
» gaid that whenever they from sritish Guiana — yesterday

saunas Dr. Nightingale, they with a cargo | Soren e 1,200
thought of a big minded man who o gs of .110@, 500 bags 9 ¥ aane
fiad set an example for others to bran baes of ehareoa ev
follow {t was no fault of the ‘ons of firewood and
child if in this world it hadino nieres of greenheart, She af con-
opportunity. It was incumbent signed to the Schooner _o
upon them to give the child that
opportunity.



MURDER TRIAL

The mantle which Mr. C.
Braithwaite and Mr, John Beckles The trial of Joseph Gibbs, a
carried fell pon many of their jshourer of St. Thomas, for the
shoulders to establish the Night- murder of Duncan Headley on
ingale Home. Those of them, January 18, 1952 will start at the
who on many oceasions got some Court of Grand Sessions to-day.

praise, must pay due respect and Mr. E. K. Walcott QC. will be
regard to the fight .which Mr.





. the counsel for the defence.
Braithwaite and Mr. peice pee pri
thy > iildren
put up to remove the ct : eo ; ;
an ael’. ms- In yesterday's letter re Canadianising
f the St. Michael’s A Burbados by C. E. Gausden, it was
house. stated that he had been residing in
He said that whatever little Canada since 196 This shou'c have
support he gave was given prin= read since 1906.
niall
SSS he PU ee

CONQUERED
NOW

56c. Nett
40c. Nett
$20.00 Nett
$4.00 Nett
|
|

SACROOL

CONQUERS PAIN.

vale at
| NIGHT'S LTD.

SOOO A OOM 6H, 1,00 ,0,0,0)

PPLE

Watch for the Advertisements .



ON OUR

“OVEN FRESH” SERVICE

THE WEST INDIA BISCUIT CO.

LTD.

severa!

New Science

Laboratories
sor U.C.W.L. Soon

MR. S. L. MARTIN, Lectur-
er in Physical Chemistry at
wie University College of the
West Indies, told *he Advocate
yesterday that by the end oi
ims summer, the Science
Faculty will have occupied all
the new laboratories which
will be fully equipped for
veaching chemistry, physics,
botany and zoology.

Mr. Martin arrived here on
Sunday by B.W.LA, from Antigua
reccompanied by Professor A. K.
Croston, head of the department
of English at the University. They |
have now come to join Mr, P, M. |
»iertoek, Vice Principal of the
‘university, for the purpose of in-

rv.iewing prospective candidates

admissior, to the University



LL, ES TE a a



his October.

Mr. Martin said that in general,
the Science Faculty had not re-|
ceived the maximum in the way}
ef applicants for entrance with |
which it was built to cope. For |
inctance, numbers of applicants
for entry into the science faculty |
had so for, been well below those
for entrance into the arts anc
medical faculties,

Qualitications

In partucuar, we would prefer
to receiVe applications from peopk
wo have some previous qualifi-
cation in the science subjects” he
said, and added that where there
were obviously sound reasons fo.
the .ack of those previcus qualifi-
cations, it was still possible for
people with a genuine interest in
science subjects to be considerec
tor admission,”

This situation was probably
due at least in part to the in-
complete awareness of the
potentialities of a scientific
career within the Caribbean
area—not only in teaching, in

@ On Page 8

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PAGE SIX



Trinidad House Pass
Resolution Of Concern
Over Adams’ Speech

From Our Own Correspondent
PORT-OF-SPAIN, March 21.
[Trinidad Legislature by a 140 to 3 majority vote
pted a resolution moved by the Honour-

nan, Deputy Speaker,
th profound concern and regret the
ed in the Barbados Legislature by Mr.







G y Adams, regarding

I ( Trade Commissioner

The resolution also asked the
Legislatur to agree that Adar

in unwarrant-
t Indian poli-
ulated to in-

irreparable hasn
f W.I. political unity

eech in which he
y from the Closer
‘ommittee on W.I
z 1 branded








which called the

the appointment of a West
to the United Kingdom

something better and worthier

’ for themselves being sons and

daughters of Trinidad.

Hon. A, P. T. James said that
any statement coming from
Adams must be taken as a state-
ment of policy from the Barba-
dos Government and every West

Indian who had West Indian unity ,

at heart must consider it very
grave and as likely to destroy the
future of West Indian unity.







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SENATE RATIFIES JAPANESE TREATY

Hearing In
Larceny Case
Adjourned

His Lordship Mr. G. L. Tay-
lor, Acting Puisne Judge at
the Court of Grand Sessions,
yesterday adjourned further
hearing until today in the
case in which George Good-
ing, a labourer of Station
Hill, St. Michael, is charged
with stealing a tweed suit
valued at $85, the property of
Ralph Edgehill, and receiving
stolen property. The adjourn-
ment was granted so that
three defence witnesses could
be summoned to the court.

The offences are alleged to
have been committed sometime
between December 10, 1951, and
January 6, 1952. Miss M. E.
Bourne, Assistant Legal Draughts-
man, is prosecuting on behalf of

INDIAN SEAMAN |
REQUPERATING |

THIRTY-ONE-YEAR-OLD In-
dian seaman Neah Omar of Cal-
cutta) who was taken to the
General Hospital on March 2]
from the Sramchip Meee for
an injury to one 0 is ers on
the left hand, told the ‘Avene
yesterday at the Y.M.C.A. that
he likes Barbados, although he
had up to that time seen very
little of it.

Neah Omar—a father of two
children, a boy and a girl—while
operating a wrench—on the Ma-
jaha sustained.an injury to his
third finger on the left ‘hand and
was taken < oe Seperet Hos-
pital from the p where a
of this finger was Seovlelel ts
an operation.

“lt was an ordeal, but I smiled
in the face of everything,” Omar
said laughing. Omar has been
away from home for about five
months on this trip afd is now
awaiting an opportunity to get a
ship which will take him to the
United Kingdom and then to
Calcutta.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952

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the Crown whi i ~ -
- d e appointment James said that he took strong cal a 7
fa W litician to the post of objection to Adams’ statement Yesterday the. prosecution CANES BURNT ee
onde ( oner as a danger- that so long as the politician was called on six witnesses and then AT WALKERS TN
fee aoe Prpached (eens oe ee ee Mat rae wes bone IN WASHINGTON, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Tom closed its case. Then Gooding NINE ACRES of third crop Th Wr lds B t Niz At
the eve of Federation talks in the to be political racket. Connally (D-Tex.) and Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.), right, look on told the court that he had three ripe canes were burnt when a kal € F¥O $ es Gs ' *:
U.K." , Sinanan stressed that at Butler who stoutly opposed ~; Senate Secretary Leslie BiMe affixes his signature to the Japanese ver to call and after a short fre occurred at Walkers Planta- _-
ae. SOC, Sie ee the on declared that Adams _ jcace It was ratified by a vote of G ic 1¢ (Internations:: ?4journment His Lordship said tion, St. George at about 11,15 , S
apport @ the Regiona “a i pe ca » iment. TS was 3 Pe ere eek ce ee ______. *hat he had made inquiries about ,m’ on’ Monday. They are the SS
mie Committe, if it made a > express _— —- the witnesses and found that they property of C. L. Davis and were * oa mies .
1 appointment to the Wi. ce oO an . even 99 a ee eae = — when the insured. m ™~
Made Cotiniiesiouer was carries g other speak- . | case Was fix or, and as it was fltshire Plan- *
ld conclusion it might ers — the ewe es ad Nelson Gets = for 4 accused to eall his tate Bt. Philip WS about 6.45
n ar l represented 65 r— bn sat een ; omen the case = have p.m. on Monday burnt six acres
. aioe aa 3 the dens saat aul: — a journed for these wit- Gf tine canes which were insur-
‘ 1ave 1 way, Was go- . : seen. ed
ing to use the threat of secession

Gooding is on a two count in- 5
dictment. On the first count he a etn at Oar, Pye
is charged with stealing one »-" P “ re

brown tweed suit valued at $85 Monday burnt six acres of ripe

Hon. L. C. Hannays, said he had
been privileged to read comments
ind encomiums not only of

Mojority Decision

A New Skipper

Sinanan declared that Adams Gomes but also of some other MONTREAL, from the dwelling house of Ralph tty tak we fee mrepeey
wt pre ito abide with the ministers by rsons on both 3 . : ~ nceict. Edgehill sometime between De- . s
he was prepared to re- sides of the Atlantic and he was Appointments of Capt. Neil J. Roach, O.B.E., as assist- cember 10 and December 15, ee
the democratic procedure proud to be able to say that the ant marine superintendent, Canadian National Steamships, 1951. On the second count he FISHING BOATS
ent by the majority House possessed Ministers ot and Capt. D. C. Wallace, O.B.E., D.S.C., as master of the stands charged with receiving DAMAGED
TT lore that th aati - 7 : sto or ty sx %
casi 0 the “ogee ins SPOTS eae ngneamaad PH ie Lady Nelson to succeed ‘him, were announced to-day by #oleh property sometime between
if tive recrimination be proud. 2 Capt. R. A. Clarke, general manager of the company. Capt. 6, 1959. ' % The two fishing boats “Unity”
nor would > his intention to “I do not think that it is any Roach will replace Capt. P. A. Kelly, O.B.E., who has re-

r é and “Sea Queen” overturned in
vuld agsravate or news to the members of this First Witness



i i 3] ‘; the surf at Bathsheba yesterday
the situation which al- House or this community or to signed aD he Sa eny after serving as assistant marine while heavy waves dashed against
ady was delicate and dangerous. the whole W.I. community ifIsay Superintendent for the past nine years. First witness called in the case the shore.
What he was concerned with was we can safely send Gomes to any The appointment of Capt. From 1935 to 1939 he served as

: yesterday was Ralph Edgehill of “Sea Queen”, owned by Lloyd
the implication of Adams’ speech conference in any part of the Roach comes after more than 30 chief officer en the Lady Somers; Welches, St. Michael who said Mayers, was badly damaged
id the far-reaching consequences world which has to do with the Years’ service with the C.N.S.S. Lady Hawkins; Lady Drake; and jhat on’ December 9, 1951 he while “Unity,” owned by Oscar
t a situation such as this could subject of his ministry and we Born in Margaretsville, N.S. in Prinee David. In April, 1939, he wore his brown tweed suit and Holder, was slightly damaged.
have, coming from a-responsible can rest satisfied that he will 1900, he served with the RCNVR was appointed master of the on returning home hang it near “Sea Queen” was also overturned
t Indian leader give us a fair, full and adequate during the First Workd War before Lady Somers and in September t9 g window. The window is on Saturday,

representation, It is therefore entering | the Canadian National of the same year, enlisted in the about two feet from the ground. High winds and rain had caused
ose speech W&S wirely idle and inaccurate for eamships as a 2nd officer aboard RCNR. On, December 10 in the morn- the fishermen to return to shore
sed mainly on three points, he anyone to suggest that if Gomes the Canadian Recruit in June, c 3 ; ing he did not see the suit an he before they reached the fishing
id emerged ‘ a rene sue were appointed it could only be 4981. nang ot WMC to nad oe thought that his wife had taken banks
peech, quer whether it was .. ; iti ” : el oe | a ; i ‘MC. a i > sui » : A
peck ime to debate the ® result of a political racket. He served as third, second and senior officer of a convoy escort ie i Be eh eSegnoee
was still pending chief officer of various ves- group was awarded the D.S.C. in ap. ne



Sinanar wh

HERE are very good reasons why ‘ Ovaltine’ is the world’s

most popular aid to sleep. Experience has amply demon-
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taken at bedtime, helps to soothe the nerves, assists you to relax








5 2 ; stor’ pa = aw 2 missing. The suit was made t and composes the system for natural, refreshing sleep.
R.E.C d whether Adams was aakaae aa Certificate noe ie Master's 1843 and the O.B.B. in 1945. He CB. Rice & Co. ee LIGHTERS DRIFT WEST While you sleep ‘Ovaltine' provides food elements-—including
2 in necusing R.E.C. of tak- T’DAD GOVT. FAVOURS er + _ e - ir aioe SP held the rank of commander a ate ind blowine vitamins—of exceptional nutritive value, in easily digestible form,
ing part in a political racket. ; one neat he oe 7 oe ¥ the end of the war and on his re- Qn January 6, he saw his brown ../* arene ye Ad esterds: to reinforce your nervous vitality, your strength and energy. That

nl three members voting FREE SECONDARY ail nae ‘Te a a Peer a turn to the C.N.S.S., was appoint- suit at District 4A” Police Station Acryey. the ~ ai hie rf is why ‘ Ovaltine’ sleep is the best kind of sleep—so tranquil and
against the resolution were Uriah EDUCATION ay D A ena ao heat ed master of the Chomedy. In Gjoria Edgehill, wife of Ralph mage it Giieult Sor He Peet ? restorative that it helps you to greet the morning bright-eyed and
Butler and two members of his times. uring the last war, Capt. 1946 he was transferred to the Edgehill told the Court that sh control their craft — whether cheerful—feeling and looking your best.
tino. (hott: Os Gas eirtaciseh Mac) Roach received the O.B.E. for ser- Canadian Cruiser in the same lait caw the brown sult an Dew laden or empty — from ship to

The Trinidad Government has Vites afloat and in 1946 was capacity and in June of the same :

Doctors and nurses everywhere recommend ‘ Ovaltine’ as a bed-
time beverage. it definitely stands in a class by itself. It costs
so little—it gives so much.

E F shore.

a ; : . amed master of the Lady Nelson, Vo. i cember 10. It was hanging near “at” one time three empty
Peevish Motion accepted in principle the scheme P@™¢¢ . iv ‘es, YCaT was appointed master of the the window when she saw it. On ., *

for free secondary education but see will SOSH ee: ety Sulies Canadian Constructor, a position December 16 she noticed that the lighters with their crews were
Maharaj, due to financial’ problems it is ' 7 part =,

Honourable $tephen Also serving over 80 years with he has held until this appoint- suit was missing from the house, Gifting fast to the west after



1 7 m. descri ing ; i i ent to the elson, , 7 t . they had left the Harrison Liner

CO ear eRe) eR 8 Cee tee Se the C.N.8.8,, Captain Dickson” + Saey ene os aoe Ghat pe Hall, St. Selector lying in Carlisle Bay.

of SabRY. He id une one whe then hounend 4 the Hon. Roy Joseph, Catlisle Wallace was born in Capt. Kelly joine¢ the company jacket of the bronn ee. -y The lighters had taken out sugar
952". He did not s ay vy 6 on ; ; oak ’ ; 4 paige | s > :

should be peeved at Adams Minister of Bducation and Social Pictou, N.S., in 1904 and joined in 1923 an served in various



as a j i . ana athlon a : Rice & Co, The name of the t?,the Sel ,
speech or ao io asked the Mouse Services Yeuerday morning when 3, Mm ePprentice, im, March 1921, capacities, | He was chief OMS Derson for whim ther‘ auft te The crews of the three lighters
“to view with profound concern he opened the new science wing tne Canadian Prospector in 1925 was torpedoed and sunk in Janu- @° Was written inside the coat, not Pe Selector but they
and regret such a speech,” Ph Saat Sc Ri large gath- 204 became 2nd officer of the ary 1942, and was master of the geen ecle ek of Central Police found the breeze too strong for
“He aia not see any justifica- ering that Government war in- Same vessel a year later. Sub- Lady Drake when she was sunk Went to the house fhe ta use them. When about half mile
tion for asking the House to take reasing the number of scholar- sequently he served as 2nd officer by enemy action in April of the with a search send . ‘woused from the Selector, a launch went
that motior as only by true ships each year and was trying to OQ" the Canadian Volunteer, same year. He was made assistant bedroom he saw ¢ i » In. the out to them and took over for 15
and constructive criticism that place school fees as low iG ze Canadian Pioneer, and Canadian marine superintendent in 1943, ‘ a brown suit in minutes to tow them into the
tiney would be able to at least do sible, Pp Pathfinder, obtaining his Master’s and won the O.B.E. for services| @ on page 8 Careenage
’ ante Certificate in January, 1929. during the war. e o

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH

26,

Ee

1952

a



@ From Page 1
ddressing the meeting, Sir
ie Seelgaid :

7)"I ‘have been asked to convey
personal message from the
retary of State for the Colonies
you students at the opening of
s Trade Union Course. Mr.
elton says:

“IT am glad to be able to make
further grant under the
lon al Development and Wel-
Act to enable the Comp-
lier to organize this second
thool for West Indian Trade
ion officials. I hope it will
of great help and value to
those attending the school. I
id you my good wishes during
e course and in your future





































ponsibilities in the Trade
ion movement.”
ey Good Wisbes

gives me very great p.easure
come you here and to add
‘own good wishes for the suc-
of this training course. I was
for the space of about twelve
ths a trade union secretary
, and I feel that I can offer
fraternal grestings in assuring
of our anxiety that the course
Id be successful and should
benefit to you all,

“have also had a message from
Trades: Union Congress in
m, Which you may have seen
local newspapers, I will
bit to you——.

The Trades Union Congress
ome the holdi

bados. As a token of practi-
interest, the General Council
made a donation of £50 to
er a number of small bur-
es towards out-of-pocket ex-
es, The appointment as
urer On trade unionism of
. Bell, who has a long ex-
ence in the service of the
rkers’ Education Association
been reported to the General
il, and they wish him and
school maximum success,”

arrangements for « this
have taken a good deal of
out, and I should like to
this early opportunity of
wledging the work of Mr.
tchpole, my Labour Adviser, and
| associates. I can assure you
haye spent a good deal of
and ‘care in doing their best
ensure that the Course will be
iecessful, and that you will have
interesting, enjoyable, and com-
fortable time. I would also like to
S appreciation of the co-
ition of Captain Williams and
management and staff of the
oung Men’s Christian Association
Barbados, without which I do
think we could well have made
necessary arrangements,
extend. a particularly warm
ome on your behalf to Mr.,
mis Bell, who has been selected
the co-operation of the
des Union Congress in the
ed Kingdom to come out and
we lectures on the history and
evelopment of the Trade Union
ent. We are looking to Mr.
for help in a good many other
hings and in many other directions
“securing the success of the
resent Course.
you look back into history,
will realise that the trade
movement is a comparative.
ent development in the his-
our civilisation. It is only
out a century and a half since
the first effective beginnings were
=" Great Britain. The trade
movement really springs
from the development of indus-
trial effort, out of an affair of
employers who knew their
ers personally, into the highly
nised enterprises that we know
. When it became impossible
' workers in any industry to
direct with their own em-

I





























ployers and to represent their
needs to those employers at first
hand, they felt the necessity of
organizing, so as to make sure
that they could be properly re-
presented in the settlement of such
matters as the terms and condi-
tions of employment, In the past
century and a half trade unions
have developed into powerful
organizations, able to obtain for
the workers they represent a fair
share in the proceeds of industry;
but as the movement has develop-
ed, it has: been realised that trade
unions also owe an _ obligation
to the community of which their

constituent workers form a
part. The same obligation
rests upon employers, and it is

now a major duty of both parties,
employers and workers, to see
that industry is so organized and
conducted as to secure a fair re-
ward for all the different kinds
of effort which are put inio it,
and also that the result of those
efforts is to enrich the community
at large.

This Course is designed to
help you, who have been select-
ed as leaders, or potential lead-
ers, in your own territories, to
build up your Union org2nisa-
tions on sound lines, and so to
develop your work that you are
better able to serve your mem-
bers and through them the Col-
ony in which you live, It is de-
signed to extend the bounds of
your knowledge, and also to
encourage you to form a sober
judgment upon the problems
which will face you, and the cor-
rect solutions to those problems.
Knowledge is partly gained by

experience and partly by study.
In getting experience men make
many mistakes. Fortunately they
have recorded their experience in
books and this enables us to profit
by that experience, and if we are
wise to avoid some at least of
their mistakes. During this Course
you will have a series of talk
which ‘will be based upon the ex-
perience and accumulated know-
ledge of the lecturers, so that you
may profit by what others have
done, The Course will cover a
wide field, and in addition to talks
about trade union organization and
relations with employers and other
problems of industry, time will
be giyen to sueh_ subjects as
economics, agriculture, social
services,,and so on.
Changing Circumstances

I hepe you will not imagine that
when the Course is finished you
will know all the answers. Nong
of us know all the answers} for
cireumsiances are’ continually
changing and no two problems are
identical in all respects, The
intention of the Course is to give
you as much guidance gnd infor-
mation as possible, so that you can
realisa the aims of good trade
union leadership and be equipped
to achieve such leadership in
your own home areas,

The Course will be a two-way
cperation, The lecturers will be
experts in their own subjects, but
they will not achieve their objects
unless you bring to the discussion
an enquiring mind and make your
own contributions based on your
own experience, I hope you will
talk over-the lectures in your free

time and exchange your ideas
with your fellow students, The
twelve weeks which you will

spend here can be very valuable
to you in after life, and to your
fellow workers, if you make the
most of your opportunities. May
I quote to you the words of Fran-
cis, Lord Bacon, who was a great
Lord Chancellor of England in
the time of the first Queen Eliza-
beth, nearly three hundred years
ago: —

“Reading maketh a full man:
conference a ready man: and
writing an exact man: and,



TOBAGO-.-------
GRENADA -------
TRINIDAD _----.-—
MARTINIQUE.-----
GEORGETOWN...-.
CARACAS......--.-.
RIT UA io icinsnnr
SAN JUAN_---.—-

KINGSTON ..--.-..

$ 37.00

200.00



therefore, if a man write little,
he had need have a_ great
memory: if he confer little, he
had need have a present wit:

and if he read little, he had
need have much cunning. to
seem to know what he doth

not.”

We do not want to see cunning
in our trade union leaders: we
want to see knowledge, wisdom,
and the desire to serve their
fellow men, We want to see you
playing a responsible and helpful
part in industrial and agricuitural
effairs when you return to your
home communities
. That, I think is -specially im-
portant in the organising of this
Course,

I had the pleasure of speaking
last week to the Social Welfare
conference Barbados and I

in
could not help thinking that,
apart from all the. experts_ on

economics and agriculture and so
on, the real work of the world
has to be done by ordinary men
and women, who need leadership
above all else.

I thought that the Social Wel-
fare Worker was one of the most
important means of providing
that leadership, but there is no
doubt that you as officials and
leaders of Trade Unions are at
least equally important, and I
think probably more so, because
you will have the duty of seeing
that your people get a fair deal,
and, if you succeed in that duty,
you will have tremendous in-
fluence over them and will really
have the future of the West Indies
in your handg..

I do hope that you will want
to lead them in the direction of
building up a really good people
in the West Indies. l wish you
every possible success during this
course,”

A Newcomer

Addressing the gathering, after
Sir George had spoken, Mr. Denis
Bell said he wanted to associate
himself with the welcome which
had been extended by Sir George
Seel, but he thought it would
perhaps be more appropriate for
them to welcome him, because
although they were some of them
new comers to Barbados, he was
a new comer to the West Indies
as a whole. Mr. Bell expressed
the hope that at the end of the
{hree months he would be in the
West Indies, that he would be
much wiser and more fully in-
formed on the problems of the
area,

He said he was in Barbados to
talk to the students aout trade
union history, with partieujar
reference to the United Kingdom,
and he thought that there were
at least two reasons why trade
unionism in the United Kingdom
was worthy of study by trade
unions in the West Indies.

Firstly, there was the similarity
of cultural traditions and legisla-
tive framework, and secondly that
the problems of trade unionism
were somewhat the same the
world over. He felt that trade
unions in the West Indies could
learn much from the British
Trade Unions which were perhaps
the most powerful, probably the

most responsible and certainly
the most matured in the free
world,

He was not suggesting that

trade unionists in the West Indies
should accept practices simply
because British Trade Unions ac-
cepted them, ner: should they
reject them because they were
rejected by the British Trade
Unions. He would say, however,
that where British Trade Unions,
with their two centuries of
experience have accepted or re-
jected particular methods of
working, then the reasons for
their decisions were at least
worthy of consideration,

SSN

29.00

37.00

34.00

74.00

101.00

MMS MMM AMM MMMM MMMM MMO OEE

3

53.00



93.00





SS

——————
AAAANARANSSSSESNSNN 8
~ ——= S —S——SS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Personal Greeting

Mr, Bell said he had been asked
to personally extend the fraternal
greetings from the British Trade
Union Congress which had beer
read by Sir George Seel in the
official message, and added that he
came, not as a full time officer of
the T.U.C., but as one with a con-
siderable and varied experience
in the teaching of trade union
principles, organisation and
methods, which he had dene in
courses run hy the British T.U.C,,
individual trade unions or the
Workers’ Education Association.

His own interest in trace unions
was derived partly from a family
background, and partly from an
academic interest, but mostly from
the belief that the ideals of trade
unionism were based upon the
acceptance of their values which
to his mind formed the foundation
of a good society. Particularly did
trade unions believe in fraternal
asociation and human community,
and in the words of William Mor-
ris... .“that fellowship is life: lack
of fellowship is death.”

“It would be foolish,” Mr, Bell
said, “to pretend that British
Trade Unions are perfect organ-
isations, or that they do not make
mistakes, or act selfishly and con-

trery to the general interest; but }

their ideals are nevertheless of a
high order. Although their ap-
proach is practical, it is influenced
by their deeper beliefs.

In conclusion Mr. Bell quoted
the exiled Spanish thinker
Salvador de Madariaga who said
that in democratic action, three
things are necessary “to know
what is desirable, to know what
is possible within the sphere of
what is desirable, and to do what
lg pos.‘ble in the spirit of what i
desirabie.” He ended, “I cannot
think of any better description of
the right trade union precept and
practice.

Students attending the Course
are Mr. McD. Brathwaite, Mr.
R, L. Green and Mr, C, L. Barrow
(Barbados); Mr. Ivan Edwards,
Mr. H. W. Critchlow and Mr. R. C.
Tello (British Guiana); Mr. A, J.
Arzu, Mr. L. Benguche (British
Honduras),

Mr. A. J, R. Riley, (Montserrat) ,
Mr. A. N. Warner (St. Kitts); Mr.
Cyril Gonzales, Mr. I, Cellymore,
Mr, D. C. Granado (Trinidad);
Mr. E. L. Laronde (Dominica);
Mr. N. J. James, Mr. D. Paterson
(Grenada); Mr. M. Baptiste, Mr.
C, Marulay :(St. Lucia) and Mr.
G. H. Charles (St. Vincent).

During the afternoon, Mr. P.M.
Sherlock, Vice Principal of the
University College of the West
Indies, delivered a lecture on the
Social History of the Caribbean.

The students later dined with
Mr. Chinn, Socia) Services Ad-
viser to the Secretary of State for
the Colonies,

Today Mr. Bell lectures on
Trade Union History in the United
Kingdom, ang Mr, Sherlock will
continue to lecture on Social
History in the Caribbean,





Jdlst March, are three Scott

The first is a Powder Horn bearing on its lid the mono
of Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, or Bonni
Prince Charlie as he is still romantically known.
ogram is surmounted by the Royal Crown with the initial
“C.E.S.” beneath which is the letter “R”-—for Rex.

The horn is greyish-yellow in
colour, with silver mounts of the
thistle motif, and on one side there
is an oval cairngorm surrounded
by thistle leaves. At the narrow
end of the horn is a silver nozzle
in the shape of a ball fitted with
a screw thread, this was unscrewed
when powder was to be shaken
from the horn into the barrel of
a gun. The aperture: is j inch
in diameter,

On the inside of the lid are the
maker's initials “I.H."; he was
either John Hally of Edinburgh
cirea 1740, or, James Humphrey
of Elgin 178 The remainder of
the mark is worn and difficult to
decipher, so that it is not possible
to state categorically the date or
maker, The Powder Horn is 11%
inches long.







An 18th Century Snuff Mull is

also exhibited. This is made from
a ram's horn with a silver mount
and lid in which a cairngorm is
inlaid,

The third item is a dress Dirk of
the Jute 18th or early 19th century
of elaborate design, The scab-
bard is leather covered with
pinchbeck mounts decorated with
the thistle motif, and, the figure
of Andrew—the Patron Saint
of Scotland, supporting his cross,
The scabbard contains two side
pockets for a knife and fork.

The handles of the Dirk, knife
and fork are of ebony carved with
an int@rlaced pattern, in the handle
of each of which is a tourmaline,
The blade of the Dirk is beautiful-
ly chased with the Rose of Eng-
land and the Thistle of Scotland.
The waker of the blade was
“Gorden, 200 Piccadilly, London,”
The Dirk is 17 inches long from
handle to blade tip.

St.

Two Porters Get 12 Months Each’

Livingston Bishop and Adol- a very bad case and he was afraid
of he could not put them on proba-
in
e might term a wholesale

phus Hoyte, two porters
Spooner’s Hill who were earlier
in the sessions found guilty of
stealing 12 bags of oilmeal, the
property of Da Costa & Co, Ltd.
were yesterday each sentenced to
12 months’ imprisonment

Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice
G. L. Taylor,
His Lordship said that it was

tion. They were engaged

what h

robbery from their employers.

The probation officers had spoken
but
with for the fact that they both had a
hard labour by the Acting Puisne good record and were hard work-
0 would sen-
tence them to a very long term

favourably about them and

ing young men, he

of imprisonment,



We'll





with

GERMOLENE soothes at

POCO

POLO CPSPOSPSIOOS

SELEC





THE CITY GA
(0.,

Â¥
%
°

COVDOSGOGOOP



soon have that better.

Germotene

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

\ Children’s accidents quickly re-

spond to the soothing and healing
properties of Germolene which
draws out the dirt and sti tes
the growth of new skin over
the damaged area, Keep a tin
handy for family use.

SPOTS, BRUISES,
RASHES,
ABRASIONS, Etc.

Oo OS
a touch—heals in record time.

FOR PERFECT COOKING

a

Bonnie Prinee Charles

Relic At The Museum

ON special exhibition at the Museum until Mor

4 ers
%
’

PAGE SEVEN

a



ish items of unusual interest
















@ Grand breakfast main dish!
Here's the “‘power’’ of corn.
Tastes powerfully good!
Crisp, sweet, fresh! Your
bargain in goodness—
Kellogg's Corn Flakes.

His mon



The above exhibits have b
lent anonymously, and Mr. Vix
Gorringe has kindly loened a b MOTHER KNOWS” a BEST!
with a colour print of the YÂ¥

Pretender wearing Horn

which is shown with them,

a Powder

Also on exhibition at the |
Museum is a fine coffee service <«
Royal Sevres porcelain, which
been generously presented to the
Museum through the Museum Col
lections Fund by Mrs. Ronald Tree.
This fund was started last year at
the instance of Mr, Tree for th
purchase of china, silver, glas
furniture and other antiques wit
loca) associatians for permanent
exhibition at the Museum Th
coffee service was formerly in the
collection of the late Felix Haynes

t
la

Esq.

The porcelain has a roy
ground and is decorated with gok
leaves and flowers, eat

h pi









of excellent design and
interesting feature of the service
is that its pieces are marked wit!
three different factory mark
Charles X, Leuis Philippe and
Napoleon III and Napoleon III
alone.
Mrs. Tree has also present If you feel worn out, depressed, or
the Museum several fine pieces of
Englisch lustre ware which are also generally run down a glass or two
exhibited.
a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and
U.K. Oaiziet Bre tone up the whole ne system.



Giving new vitality it fortifies you

Full Merber Of
“Green Pool”

(By SYDNEY SMITH)
PARIS, March 25.

Britain is not prepa
the new European Agricultutr
“Green pool” at the cost of C
monwealth trade or



against fever and exhaustion and
remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine

is especially valuable

after illness.



ed to



1) no

Te Lue

Cl
in



market



At the opening meeting of 15} we
nations in Paris to-day Parliament. | ia
ary Under-secretary fo ign ; le: = ve
Affairs Andrew Nutti arned eee tet

1 full

pean

that Britain cannot becont
member of any purely Eure
Agricultural authority and
“We derive a large part of ou
supplies of imported foods from
cur Empire and ¢ ealth
with whom hav a special
tariff and ictural arrange
ments.

“IT am sure it will be generally
appreciated that we cannot enter
into new relationships with
Europe which re le
with our Commonwealth
tions.”—U.P.

uid

i BUCKEAST |

we on mnthleenn a

contr

incompatil
ela-

TAKE

CC NCCT CeeeRteintet

COME A BOCTELE TOO AY:



— al
Cenacle














ate



The Commer and Kerrier range
includes a vehicle for every

Commercial and Municipal task
COMMER 500 G.P.M. FIRE PUMP

COMMER / TON DUMP TRUCK

COMMER 1) TON ‘SUPERPOISE’ VAN
COMMER EXPRESS DELIVERY VAM

COMMER 2-3 TON ‘SUPERPOISE’ DROPSIDER
COMMER 10 TON F.C. TRACTOR TRAILER
“KARRIER-TRANSPORT” ‘LOADMASTER’

su O@wehwne












» } o | 6G “KARRIER . YORKSHIRE”
> R SWEEPER COL.
%| ! lf t

Y 7 | 3 9 KAARIER ‘CK3" 3-4 TON
7 THE | eon MINEHAL WATER LORRY
i 10 KARRIER ‘MANTAM’

2 TON DUMP TRUCK
KARRIER ‘BANTAM'T CU
| YO. REFUSE COLLECTOR
$2 “KARRIER- YORKSHIRE”

FLORENCE

STOVE

OVEN

Beauty
and

Quality

Combined

RAGE TRADING
LTD.

Ps]
93960000000005000055000 1090009000000 HHO DOOD

oS

COCO

oF

POS




750 GAL
POOL EMI

COLE & CO., LTD.
DISTRIBUTORS BARBADOS

LLY & CESS-
THE








WS eet at



iv



NOW

iN STOCK
TON TRUCK AND TWO 15 CWT. COMMER PICKUPS

ONE COMMER 5



re









































































































































































































































































































































































PAGE EIGHT iad BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952
r
7 ‘ ~J ~
| PURLIC SALES H ° I t W R t ]
; Hearing in |Sugar Industry—Wage Rates
| : ee eres
Soetnetnttiens tail nisin
TELEPHONE 2506 REAL ESTATE | arceny ( ase ae followimg Wage Rates have been discussed and agreed upon | ROYAL NETHERIL ANDS '
ss. s by the Sugar Producers’ Federation of Barbados and the Bar-| ) The M.V DAREWOOO wm
. si
DIED FOR SALE BARBAREES HOUSE—That A d ourned bados Workers’ Union and represent the new scale of wages for 1952. | STEAMSHIP CO. Se hucin at. Vigcent, Grownda
% | Soedinn an kevee 13.5 esto 4 J The 15% increase on wage rates is included in the last column|,,, {AUZING FROM EUROPE and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
COMER: On March 25. ‘ ry —aponenintpaa—astign | SONCUME OF 5 nerves ie). perenes . S i= 26th inst
vere i - Phite- | The house conta 4 bedr r ab m ist January, 1952, and m | S.S. BOSKOOP on Lith April 1962
Se ee tdkne Bremen | AUTOMOTIVE | dressing rooms attached, drawing, dining from page 6 ee ee “as ’ rid Me ae §. BONAIRE on 18th April, 1982 Tee M.V. CARIBEEE will
eek : feave es ggnmniipiin | other usual rooms. Kithen ete ‘ se is ? an » - } STENTOR on jay for
Cozier (76 years}. Her funeral leave aaneanatin a and a her 1 room valise and this conformed with . . accept Cargo and s
; ” | ISTIN VAN— @ 9 arge acious erandah, garages,|, = here ro SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND tava Seerrat,
eee ue aittacy Cometry: [Veco aoe working ‘order, Phone | servants rooms etc., in yard. "All services| the description, of the suit which AMSTERDAM Nevis and St’ Kitts, Sailing Sat:
today for the Westbury Cem 4821, DV Scott & Co, Lad installed, wind mill, orchard containing] Was reported missing by Ralph A. PIECE WORK M.S. ORONJESTAD on 25th March 1952. urday 20th inst
ore ee cael * "18.3.52-t.£.n. | many variety of fruit trees, garden ete.| Edgehill , SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
a, a u a ght 6 view Phone. Mrs BRITISH GU: . MONBKA will accept
Se Gives, Coser, ee CAR—Singer 1,500. In good condition. | Beti anes » 3 = 8.3 ‘32 tf a Suit Identified a LN a Teak a % ‘. COTTICA on ‘oe 4eue = ene FA, a a a te Dashinien,
Oe iat ett ctecciienes teiehdttemngnenants 5145 26. 3.523 a. - . - Eee ~« | M.S. BONASRE on ay. Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
HAWKINS: On March 25, 1952, at ow emerdiacol an) aati BUSINESS PREMISES—One two storey] Later the accused arrived and QPERAmION , _— a } eae SAELING oe AD AND St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 4th
residence “‘Hillrise”, Graeme Hall, GAR—Chevrolet (1939 Handle Gear|pusiness premises on the at Oistins| he. asked him if the suit was his.} 8 ss Solicit ‘ihdlaaitgiaratienienst egdadeaimnitipamdedeiilaaeaied: | nefS. MOMBILBA oncdeth. March 1008 April 1952
Terrace, Christ Church, Millicent [Shift model). Perfect “condition, good) near Market. Ideally suited for any|The accused said that he had | | | M.S. HECUBA 2ist April 1952. ‘ B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
Hawkins, widow of the late Dr. } tyres. Apply: D. W. Gale, Bathsheba, St. | kind of business _ Priced to Wing bought the suit in Swan Street,|,;). PREPARATION OF LAND. } j | be “| oa TION (INC.)
H. W. Hawkins Her funerui will | Joseph. 19.3.53-—-6n | to D'Arc), A. Scott, Middle Stre ~ |S.S. BOSKOOP 27th April 1952
leave her late residence at 4.30 this was 26.3.52-2n.J}The same day Ralph Edgehill | | P= ; ‘x. ‘a Consignee. Tele. No. 4047
afternoon for St. George Parish CAR—197 Ford Super de Luxe V-8. identified the suit as his property 1. Seed: } | | | S$. BP. MUSSON, SON & oe . i pe
Chureh Excellent condition. Always owner driven HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom] jn the presence of the accused. (i) Raking and packing: i | Agents. = =
Tiguis OC. Panett, C. B. Simnett. | AUaS Ce or CN. C.D. Fackrees, house, all conveniences, with patty-!'The accused made a_ statement fa) Without Cane wps 100 cane =| aie S4e. |
26.2.52 13 2.52--t.£-n. | sized living room, open verandah, kite! eh oe ae to him. Cpl holes -
and utility room. Garage, laundry, 2} which was read over le 4 (b) With cane tops 100 cane from 52c. up | from 60c. up < e s ;
CAR 1947 Morris 10 Bip. in A 1/ servant rooms and storage room under.| Yearwood signed the statement, holes | a Oo s
ANNOUNCEM condition. Good fuze, completely ever-| Ba attractive hiliide ate, Keckiey New!” “After “making the ‘statemené| «in Windrowing with cane
) auled, rice ’ ; Road. A. Barnes 0.5 . ° > acc ui . tops) : |
ATTENTION LADIES: Fashion ee ee an ek “ere Bae . it oe oes es? > had (a) 1/1 2 row on 1) ei 09¢. 10¢.
py gS SBS nee in eae teat aa. te Pt , ye a {b) 2/1. (2 rows on 1) ef oy si i, SOUTHBOUND Satis Sails aie Arrives Sails
4 fe Ge ee noe _ , pay ae, oP oe 0. urnin, 0 s Montreal Halifax Boston ‘des s
Copies left, Upper Reed Street pleted 2,000 miles. Courtesy Garage |) 7 C/o Advocate Co., Ltd h used made a second state (e) 3/1 (3 rows on 1) 100 cane 18. atc
2—2n | 4616 20,3.52--6n 25.3.52—Sn.} the accused mai 8 “ : hole: CAN CRUISER Fe - 13 Mar. — 3 Mar. 23 Mar.
. - #6. 08—8n SORA (abate —jment, ~ (d) 4/1 (4 rows on 1) 100 cane 2c. 23c. LADY RODNEY 8e - 21 Mar. 2-Apr At Apr. 12 Apr
ON THURSDAY, March 27th, Miss M VAUXHALL VELOX—In excellent con- TWO HOUSES at Ist Ave. Harts Gap To the accused Cpl. Devonish / holes LADY NELSON _.. : oe 16 Apr 17. Apr. 27 Apr., 38 Ap:
Rebbitt, (Member of S,P.C.A. Executive | dition — just completed 10,000 miles. Dial} ry, Ch. One is 16 x 9 with shed, kitehen| nig that he saw other clothes in CANADIAN CRUISER .. 2 Apr. 2 May = M May 13 May
(Committee) will give a special talk in | Courtesy Garage. 4616 sn and galvanize palings, and the other is})) | bed. besid the bi 2. Cane stumps, digging out : 100 cane 7c. S4e. CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR. . @ May 12 May _ 21 May 23 May
the Rediffusion Children's Hpur Pro- 22.3.52—6n | 44° '@ with kitchen and galvanize pal-} the room. sacl e brown holes LADY RODNEY air wd 19 May 2 May May 2June 3 June
gramme at 6 p.m. 26.3.52—in - ings. The price for both is $850.00, and|tweed suit. A search was made 3. Ploughing with oxen, fpr “ CANADIAN CHALLENGER .. % May 2 June - ii June 12 June
VAUXHALL Wiveny ~ ee oe they can remain on the spot a on the strength of a search war- each cut per row : per acre | 1. 1.91 LADY See ba § Tune 1 Dane 14 June = | seme
The Barbados Automobile Association | 2,700 miles —- Owner leaving Islan Apply to Miss C. DANTEL, ant. 4. Lin : IAN CRUISER F 20 June une - wl uly
are now admitting sean cyclists 46 Delivery end April—$2,400, No. offers Middle Street Furniture Depot en 1, Yearwood, the next wit- ne xy 1 acre } 2 4.01 CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR.. 30 June 3 July —- 12 July 13 July
‘membership on payment of half sub- | Dial 4616 22.3.52—6N Pryins 2645 26.3.52—2n ay carweniiiie ? ue a e (ii) 5%" x 5447 : oe S14 er LADY RODNEY ve os 11 July 14July 16 July 2 July 26 July
Ecription 26.3.52—in. —— ee SS, ted videnc (iii) O° x & . vf
eat Wie’ aaiusensae’ aeiee tecltecen loo ELECTRICAL “MELLYN,” Pine Hill of Cpl. Devonish. He formally} 5. Cane holes - x he
ee eee tos “htcoet on Thue BELECTROL UX REFRIGERATORS. 4% A be aiemierietai ae ia aS a = ieee @ Wher hte 109 cose Ble. 93c NORTHBOUND Asses Saile Arrives Arrives Arrives, Arstves
J § a newly-c ucte ste s . 5 "
Gay night 20th March, please return and 7 cu. ft. Kerosene burning units| with polished pine floors throughout th 100 cane ee. e es > 33 Mar. B'dos Boston 8+. as; mares Montres
same to me, C/o B.W.I.A. Office, Broad i tial Made. (b) & deep ‘ S00. LADY NELSO: 24 Mar. 3 Apr. 4 Apr. 7 Apr.
. oe . and may be easily converted to gas or| cool and increasingly popular residentis . holes CDN. CRUISER .. 4 Apr. 7 Apr. —_— 14 Apr. 7 Apr. —
Street : ’ t At this stage the case for the pr { t
: sine electric units. On display now K. R.]area. H ix compact and ea 7 da (c) for supplementary LADY RODNEY .. 4% a 26 Apr. 5 May, - 6 May 10 Ma)
C. C. KING. Jfuunte & Co, Ltd. Dial 5136 with minimum labour and contains front prosecution was closed an es. 100 cane oe. | be: LADY NELSON . 10 12 May 22 May| = 3 Mw) 8! May
25.3.52—2n 25.3.52—3n. | verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 3 Gooding gave evidence. He said wor! holes GDN, CHUMER oo May «ap May eam e Sond a ey
~ FOR. RE ' | tollet itches Jaundrs, servants quar [thet on January 6 at about 11 (ii) Forking out mould : 100 cane =| = 52—8Ie te J 1 aunh 9
NT oilet, , . : . . CONSTRUCTOR . = '
/ MISCELLANEOUS ters and large garage with direct accessJa.m. he went to his mother’s ; holes | 60—83¢ oe 2 dune : ie 5 June 18 June at June
iivecaalelintipesigin - description | '@ house, Front grounds laid out in {home at Station Hill and there saw 6 Whiting : , " pe ae June 17 June une 28 June 1 July
ss — jon - . edges, orna mM 2. y s til-
HOUSES oer ae Ga Jewels, Sne Sliver | earden beds, lawns, hedges, See Cpl. Yearwood and Cpl. Devonish. io no previou | CHAIAENGER .. 2% Jung 28 June es hiduie << AOR . She Sul
. vd shade trees and ornamental p ‘!Gpl. Devonish told him that he | } i 8
BAY VIEW—St . Ga F Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- | pock grounds in fruit trees and| CPI. Vv t 4 he (a) All round } | LADY NELSON .. i que 8 duly 18 July — | 1 Jul 22 Jul
ast April. Fully fuynished 2 Bedrooms, sajoining Hoyal Yeoh Club | Kitchen garden h a pg rt some ae pales” — ™ CANADIAN 0 EE ee = a eee ee
, - : adjo: joya ‘ section by appointment with Mrs § es P , ‘
Very | good sea-bathing. Apply ‘“Holly- 3.2.69-t.f.n.| 1 j0vq B. Aaron, c/o K. R. Hunte &lolothes which he said were his 5%4" x B14 ion. | oi a CONSTRUCTOR | % July 29 July ve S Aug; (8 Aug: 10 Aus
ee ew Bae eS 8 ie ,|Co., Lower Broad Street, Bridgetown. |" ooo) Both policemen ar- “se | holes | | LADY RODNMY .. 7 Aug. 9 Aug 19 Aug. — | @ Aug BaAv
BREAD KNIVES, Stainless Serrated For further particulars contact Rev ‘operty. ¥ x } 100 cane 88e.
BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast, Ed his knife will also cut icing with- endeville. ~ h Rectc rested hhim for the clothes. At holes 5 1.01
pertect bathing, quiet. All meals and) out cracking and is useful for cutting | A: F. Mandeville, Christ Church Rectory, | Festa’ Mh, {Or se station he Was (>) Straight Bank: — | - For further particulars, apply to—
Services supplied from main house. Own} temons and Tomatoes, the knife cut®} on any day Monday to Friday, {clusive shown a brown suit which he yxy 100 cane 58c. 67c. |
cee ei. i. eee. ate both when pushed forward and es " Snuaae nothing about é éu nee GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents.
" y Am an ‘OF tWOT back, only $1.07 each. Chandler's Hard- . a’ x 54" cane 64c. ‘Tac, Z
people. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or]... A 1 nce! jes, Reed and * holes
‘phone 0157. Uses line ee ein AUCTION He was taken from District © A" ¥xe 100 cane Be. te.
: tation in the Police van to pn holes : :
HOUSE: “Vermont”, Pine Road, fur- BRICKS—A quantity of good second- | — = - meee ere Saceniit's house. (i) Second (previously
wnished or unfurnished. Tent OP 8 4102, hand fire bricks. Apply: The West] DODGE PICK-UP VAN—Damaged in Cpl. Devonish and Cpl. Year- tilled)
-3.52—Tn Tindian Biscuit Company. Phone 4464. |accident. We are instructed to offer this . . ict “A” (a) AN pound ;
25.3.52—Sn. | vehicle. for sale by auction at the} wood beat him at District ;
neat eine oe res, ee aaeeine —- |Couttesy Garage on Friday 26th March} Station after he told them that vx 100 cane 61—22c. 10—83¢, canna juniiniesiveine
ng room, rooms with run-|~ BicyCLE ACCESSORIES, wholesale |at 2 p.m. John ladon & Co. Auc- 1 Te knew nothing about the brown Sia" x 8%"
ning water, toilet and bath, garage and il s to mention. | tioneers 23.3.52—4n e kne ” at x eR 100 cane 20—81c, 80—~95e,
oe See es < fee eae Se natee aoa 25.3 53-—2n. 1N ee 40 VAN 1949 . MODE poe “in 1 xe 1 te ¥v¥x ow 100 a 7 1 93 OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
, Wi y of fru recs, r os i § a | stater a O—Blec. 8—93c.
Bellamy 8365. 8.3.52—t.f.n GLUE ew discovery, Neverpart,| Damaged in accident. We are instructed Worthing Christ Church. holes Due
Heatproof, Waterproof will’ join. wood | offer this vehicle for sale by auction , . (») Straight Bank : v. tu
MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with permanenily, can be used for, Celluloid | at Eckstein Garage, Nelson Stree ‘°"] At this stage Gooding told the 7 100 cane 40—52c. 46—60. essel : From Leaves Barbados
“Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathi Poy or le,| Friday, 28th March, at 2.30 p.m. John]| ., ' tnesses : ‘oles :
‘For er particulars, Apply to Alma oe ae a ert fn aoe Bhonite M. Bladon & Co., Auctioneers Court that he had three wi Sia’ x SY 100 cane 47—58e. 54—67C S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London 26th March 18th Apr.
Lashley No, 6 Coral Sands, Worthing, | siate Glass, Earthernware, Toys, rate 25.3.52-4n | to call but they were oot ae eee | ygholes | S.S. “ASTRONOMER” ‘1 Liverpool 29th Mar. 1th Apr.
ee |e gh as eerie. inteoquction lina Min Ratgons = a ae eee se fk ae
. Y ‘ ne 5s ’ a und ; 1 | rv. .
PERSONAL fon Sens, ee cate oe pede PUBLIC NOTIC ES vx 109 cane | Bic. 93e. S.S. “TRIBESMAN” ..M/brough & .
3 ist). peeesennorEesesoneN ae | Lond 25th April 16th May
: Chandler's Hardware (Stockist). a Shar x SM | 100 cane 88c. | 1.01 on Pp ay
4 25.3.52—2n ISE holes ; .
The public are hereby warned against — BE W vx & 100 |
cane 88c. 1.01
giving credit to my wife, Aileen Spooner! %RON SWING—With Spring, Cushions NOTICE BOOK \
(nee King) as I do not hold myself}and hood, Can be seen at Woodville, C one of the popular Gas Cookers ik Seis Backs holes HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
eects cog bee Se epeaie else con-|Fontabelle. Telephone 3940 eae Fd ee ae ewe .< ae, 1“ vx 100 cane 58c. 67c.
@ any or in my name 26,.3.52—3n ractors for promp eliver d y ig oven wi egu. holes
unless by a written order signed by me. { ———————2— | cing accepted. We shall be pleased to (Thermostat) SMe x Star sen | 4c. 140. s.s “INTERPRETER” For Closes in Barbados
Signed DOUGLAS SPOONER, JUST RECEIVED—Valor Stove parts,| supply further information on applica- 4 Boiling Burners and 1 Grill | holes } ss. HE - London 5th April
Taitt Hill, including — Chimneys, Spreaders, Grid|tion. Orders are also being received for Burner. vyxe 100 cane 64e. | 4c. .S. “MUTLAH . Liverpool 19th April
St. George Top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens. Also ere aa wr Easy to keep clean, Exono- holes |
26.3.52—2n. | Pressure Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre | manufacture for use with a ypes § mical to use. 7. Mould: Information
: — | Company, Trafalgar i aes Streets. | Type Crawler Tractors. The price is also Call and see them before all (i) Digging mould and/ per “square” | For further apply to...
Phone 2696 20.3.52—t.f.n, | about one quarter or less than the U.S of this shipment is delivered, filling baskets of 400 c. ft. |
Ss | TYPE. COURTESY GARAGE Dial 4616. of mould 3.49 4.01 | DA COSTA & co, LTD, Age
LAMPS, Bedroom, Glass with glass 223 52 Gn | #66896666666666006990006% (ii) Carrying, each rod (10| per “square” 7 —_— nts
handles, pre war pattern, (good) only on s a3 ao 2 ft.) of 400 c. i. eo. 12¢.
$1.96 each. Chandler's Hardware ee of mould
25.3.52—8n. | BARBADOS ‘ :
PALACE |e e| IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY ai et
ie suetpanle 2 yd., @ ro 3 lb. EN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby ave. tga all of oS ft. | 1.54 in 2
, all sizes. handler's Hardware.| persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or urn "
HEADQUARTERS FOR 25.3.52—2n.| brance in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (Ce. Beoperty of the (ii) Surface per square”
SOUVENIRS defendant) to bring before me an account of their claims wii witnesses, of 400 c. ft. 1.39
FROM INDIA, CHINA & OTL--The “world’s finest motor oil} documents and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday oF between : of soil i 1,60
CEYLON Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service | the hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the tion Office, 9. (i) Digging Current drains | per square”
Stations, Your vehicle deserves the best. | public Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 16th day of May, 1962 in order that such (in flats) of ped 5 ft. 1.54 1.07 s
. ' VEEDOL, Found wherever tine cars| cigims may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority ao i. ‘ .
T H A N | § travel". 17.2,52—t.£.n. | thereof respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded trot the benefits (i) (a) Digene mein con- oR age %
——————--——--—-—— | of any decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property. urs (drains } " 1.39 1.60 ey
Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3406 J|siover sna pons chanaier's nore Plante. ORORGE, WALLACE PARREER ©) Clasine out, main | per stare 3 G“ TRANSATLANTIQUE
; 25.3. 52—2n e ¢ ’ contours {drains) | © c.
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Paynes Bay 1g" x 6” of soil said 1.60 %
TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti- : n piece ots : t
ful condition, excellent equipment, good in toe, pariah ot Spek Zemee and island eens Sees, bf or thereabouts | (ii) (a) Digging a‘ furrows per Gens. | | Sailings from Southampton to. Guadeloupe, Martinique, %
Help Barbados to help itself No o! tr Wihs titieece ee abutting and bounding on lands of Mrs. Annie Phillips on the sea on lands now | r planting } of soil 1.39 | 1,60 Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica x
by supporting . 18.11.51—t.f.n | or late of the estate of one Gaskin, deceased, on lands now or late of Alfred > yoer (b) Cleaning out furrows | Per. “square” x
LOCAL INDUSTRIES. ond ae Sn ree a areere ber ie ae ay ee ee fi or plenting 4 [OS amet es $
100 EMPTY RUM BARRELS— $8.00] hereditaments a : | | , ’
ech. Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd Dated 3rd March, 1952. (iv) (a) Forking and filli | From Southampton Arrives Barbados +>
BARBADOS FOOD rf rare “i °b5.3.52—@n, | Bill Filed :— 11th February, 1952 =. | in furrow drains = “COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... ..... 31st March, 1952 &
PRODUCTS "Registrar in Chancery, a per 100 cane (% *sDE GRASSE”.”24th April,” 1952 | “6th May,” 1952
£ you have not already.tried WANTED , i: Se width of in. ene} a tose. | “COLOMBIE” wpe May, 1962 cng tist May, 1952, &
© not already trie a — holes ot calling at Guadeloupe *
gur locally cured Ham & oa —-- (b) Forking furrow | | 70-Bic. 80—98. e P 3
acon ank only | | conti e "ae vee pais HELP WARCY A. SCOTT Ametioncer & Real Estate te t . § width | per 00 cane | | SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE x
Hardware Supplies, Rickett: f SCOTT i & | Agen 544” and up | at thee 40—52c. | 46-600 x
. ——-— ani j x
St, when you are next in BUTLER—House Maid, sleep in. Apply D ARCY A. Auctioneer Rea sta : i iets e pee | i From Barbados. Arrives Southampton +:
town. Murphy, Dumbarton (near Kent) Christ of Middle Street has on his list some of the best properties in 10. Hedgerow work: cleaning, | per rod of 10 : 54—87c. “COLOMBIE” llth April, 1952... .... 23rd April, 1952 x
We can supp S ee icy RE a + eee. the island offering for sale. The list which is too extensive & feet from 05 c. up! from 06c. up “DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 ... 29th May, 1952
Leg Hams—$1.30 per ib. GENERAL SERVANT—Apply: Mrs to advertise includes the bes: house at Hastings on the Sea — -- % COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952 x
Shoulder Hams— a, A. Millington, ““Jamdor” | “Maxwell, with front, back and side lounges, epenpne. Sxewing 6 e e a is chain cend x
. $1.10 per 1b, rist. Chugh. 25.3.52—2n. ing rooms, (4) four large & two small bedrooms, three ba Ww Lab t ailing direct to Southampton .
Boneless Butt Hams SAN—With & tar, willing to wark on one @ith tub, also hot and cold water, garage, servants’ room, cience ora ories “ eeoeessooosososesesoesesosooonnnes >
$1.20 per lb, medium commission. Write D. A. C/o and nicely laid out flower garven. Suitable as a guest house Srent tense ment es SS eee enpneennensenneneemennens
Streaky Bacon— Advocate Co., Ltd 26.3. 52—Gn or small hotel. a“ nih called @ From Page 5 cently in Jamaica. This Associa-
$1.15 per 1b Also the most modern hcuse at Maxwell Coast w: tion has among its objects. f
: NURSE HOUSE MAID — Reference aos rae : z > : agricultural and industrial un- = Jects, foster-
Back Bacon—$1.20 per lb. hecesaary, Apply: Mrs, Boa, 6th Avenue very large bedrooms three having tiled baths. bh nt Gat dertakings with a definite bi ing common interests between
[ Batlevile 26.3,52—1n 2645 ‘and aoe Spllmetions att oa gree oe on any towards the practical applica- °“@"¢e teachers ang encouraging
—— inspection. o obligations attached. ‘or re ; wa
Se ee ee experienced ‘Stenes rm are + description see D’Arcy A, Scott » 1 ‘unt f science has to play te tal eee
xperience Stenographer & ypist, no & i
0 ; ’ co , ; :
REALTORS LIMITED | 2"‘iecse“oins. Sae8 ee Aemy Piatti et ee storms and ‘also among the genet
Mayers & Co., Ltd. 3.52—t.{ where a e genera
Se eee Mae ik 8. | seme knowledge of P°PUIace. As such, the Associa-
TAILORS—Journeymen Tailors, (Jacket ( tion is very keen to make contact
Hands ; sclence and its applications was |’ . cts
REAL ESTATE oe) only, those with experience need | an advantage. with organisations or persons with
; 26.3,52—t. fon | He said that the good material aa Bote in the various
AGENTS CHES for these careers in science was ote ee Led Corthiten and he
f ! woo HEA available within the area. prepared to act as a go-
FOR SALE ADVERTISE | WHITE » With regard to the academic between for any such contacts.
side, he said that he was mainly ;
IN THE ‘ This is a beantifully wooded choice beach area situated near the Four interest ed in — solid inter- ti A Jamaican by birth, Mr, Mar-
Winds Club. Plans are under way (o build some very attractive bun ,. tin was educated at Wolmer’s
Winds Clu actions and phenomena in Boys’
|B tows. Also two half acre building lots at the very low price of 250 per which spheres he had done soma ‘oys’ School. He won the Jamaica
bindiiiee Geter Tastins Gonbtenins ADVOCA TE sq. foot. Further particulars from MARTIN GRIFFITH, Four Winds Club. ; Scholarship in 1937 and was in
































upstairs three Bedrooms, Large
Living Room, Dining Room, 2
Toilets & Baths, one with Tub
Bath and hot and cold water,
Gallery. Downstairs: 3 Spare
Rooms, Kitchen, and Shower
Room. Standing on approximately
2% Acres of land about 100 yards
from Gibbs Beach.

aspection by appointment only,

NEW BUNGALOW
Comprising three Bedrooms,
Dining and living Room, Kitchen,
Tollet and large tiled bath. Stand-

TAKE NOTICE

ing on approximately 11,000 are {

feet of land. Situate at tie That AMERICAN RADIATOR &

Waters, and approximately 250 STANDARD SAN?TARY CORPORATION,

yards from the famous Rockiey @ corporation organized under the laws

Beach, This Bungalow has never of the State of Delaware, United States

oe lived in. Very reasonable of America, whose trade or business
ce.

sae address is 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburgh 22,

Fennaylvania, U.S.A., has applied for

PARAGON the registration of a trade mark in Part
Comprising Four , Din- “A” of Register in respect of all kinds
Ritction” Living Room, Pantry, of plumbing supplies and equipment and

len, and a very nice Study sanitary installations and appliances, in-

Standing on 7% acres of land,

cluding bath tubs, drinking fountains,
Situate near Seawell Airport, combination lavatory fittings—namely,
Price Vveny reasonable. Inspection pop-up drain valve, hand valves, and

by appointment only. mixing spouts, and metal pipe and metal

pipe fittings, baths of all kinds, bath-

BUNGALOW room equipment of all kinds, bathtubs,

Rockley New Road: on approx bidets, cabinets of all kinds including
imately 19,000 square feet of land, bathroom and shower types, drinking
Magnificent view including Gold fountains, faucets, fittings and parts
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing thereof for use with the goods in this
and Dining Room, Kitchen, list; flush tanks for water closets and

Downstairs: Garage, Servants

+
%
Room with Bath. and Toilet, and

urinals, Hospital tables, hydrants, hydro-



therapeutic equipment, laundry trays,

enough room for Laundry or Javatories, sinks of all kinds, shower
Workshop Nl] stops for bathtubs and sinks, urinals,
eae water closets, parts thereof and seats

therefor, tanks, tools, and apparatus for
making the listed goods, and will be

REALTORS Limited

CPCS SSOO

entitled to register the same after one
#]) month from the 20th day of March, 1952
REAL ESTATE AGENTS 1 unless some person shall in the mean-
AUCTIONEERS Qj} time give notice in duplicate to me at
VALUERS “| my office of opposition of such registra-
BUILDING CONTRACTORS | tion, The trade mark can be seen on
151/152 Roebuck Street, X% | application at my affice
Bridgetown % Dated tt 15th day of March, 1952
Phone 4900 ° H. WILLIAMS.

> Registrar of Trade Mark

$99S6S64 SOS ESEEGS 26.3.52—3n

-
















... and nttow We Offer

Kraft lee Cream Mix—Mixed Pickles—Piccelilli—Chef

Sauce—Alymers Golden Corn—Bottles C & B Table

Salt—"“Little Chip” Marmalade—Chivers Lemon Mar-

malade—Seville Orange Marmalade—Scheppes Tonic
Water—Lactogen—Klim—Peters Cocoa.
Bottles SOUTHWELLS MINCE MEAT.

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS Lid.

ON OUR



THE



“OVEN FRESH”

original work while in England.
He was to continue with
this at the University now that
they had been settled into their
ew laboratories.

W.I. Teaching
Mr. Martin is personally in-
terested in the development of

science teaching within the West

Indies and is for this year, Presi-

dent of the Association of Science
teachers which was formed re-

$9599900999500000900000000500900059999050 93007 4
You can get your requirements
of

KITCHEN

at
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

(Corner Broad & Tudor Streets)



Watch for the Advertisements ...

LTD.



SERVICE

WEST INDIA BISCUIT CO.



England from 1938—1949. He was
at the Royal College of Science in
South Kensington until January
1942 during which time he got his
B.Se., M.Sc., and D.1.C,

|

From 1942—1949 he was work-!
ing in the material research |
laboratories of Philips Electrical
Ltd. and was eventually head of
the Physical Chemistry Depart-
ment there until he left to go to
the University College in Jamaica.



|

UTENSILS

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ee ee ee ee a er ae, Ca

WEDNESDAY,

MARCH 26,

1952 PAGE NINE

Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic:

rong foods and drinks, wor
overwork «nd frequent colds often p
@ strain on the Ridnevs and Kidne
and Biadter Troubles are the true
Excess Acidity, Getting Up
urning Passages, Leg Pains
> vousness, Dizziness. Swollen An
kles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids. end
feeling olt before your time Help your
kidneys purify your blood with Cys
tex. The very first dove starts helping
your kidnevs clean out excess acids
and this will quickly make you feel like
new. Under the money-back guarantee
Cystex must satisfy completely or cost

BARBADOS ADVOCATE










BY CARL ANDERSON



nothing Get Cystex from vour chem
Cystex °°
ex (he Guar-

oe tY os:

For Kidneys, Rhewmatiom, Bladder tecta you.

Vigour Restored,
Glands Made Young
In 24 Hours

Tt is no longer necessary to suifer
from loss of Vigour and manhood,
yeak memory and body, nervousnes
mpure blood, sickly skin, depression
ind poor sleep, because an American
Doctor has discevered a quick, easy
way to end these troubles,

‘This discovery ts In pleasant, eas)
o-take tablet form, ts absolutely

armless, does away with gland ope
tions and js bringing new youth ar

vigour to thousands. It works direct
yn the glands and nerves, and put
yew, rich blo and energy in you
veins. In 24 hours you can see and fe
yourself getting younger. Your ey
parkle, you feel alive and full «
ithful vigour and power.

And this amazing, new gland ani
vigour restorer, called VI-TABS, |
ruaranteed. It has been proved |
housands and fa now distributed by
hbemists here under a guarantee
atisfaction or money back, VI-TAT

ust make you fee! full of vigour a:
nerey and from 10 to 20 years your
r, or you merely return the em;

eckage and get your giony bea

VI-TABS costs little, and the gu

"i-Tabs*

* Manhood and Vitality

ab /, FLINT 2 WELCOME
- A

Till SS MV COMAANIONA~
BOARD THE MEDUSA’.

MISS LOVAT..WE HAVE
MOS. DE LAZLONOE ) ADUACENT CABINS...
1M FRANK -YOUR

STEUAAO..




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| “EWER THE SETTER B : | 2 { ‘ ‘ec
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USELESS TO BUY the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn
your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of t
remove it,

sues to

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Tissue Hankies are so absorbent that they will quickly soak up the
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There are so many uses for these Tissues all the time, everywhere.

Used as hankies, they are softer than the finest cambric,
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Get a packet today, and keep it handy.







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out Pond's Tissue Hankies. At all the best TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH x
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D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

GROCERIES



BY FRANK ROBBINS |

| THE COLONNADE

(N PACT, IT WAS JUST
SAYING TO MY PAL HERE-
WHAT A NICE GUY YOU

.. ANP HOW WE JUST KNEW
YOU'D NEVER DREAM OF GIVING
US ANY TROUBL =

com









LONG
INNINGS

The Autobiography of
SIR
PELHAM WARNER



ST.

VINCENT
GRUMMAN GOOSE

AIR SERVICE |

PRESENT SCHEDULE



YOU WORM! SNEAKING OUT
OF THE HOLISE LIKE THAT’
I HAD AN APPOINTMENT
WITH MY DRESSMZ

YES - YOLR WIFE
WANTS YOU TO
CALL HER BACK!’

MAGGIE WAS STILL) SLEEPING
a I LEFT THE HOUSE!
L BET SHE'LL BE PLEASED
THAT I GOT ———-











ARE PUNISHED FOR THE WIFE-RAIDS













MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs 8t. Vincent a -» 9,00 am. Engiand, as a cricketing entity,
Arrives Barbados 10.00 a.m may justly call “Plum” Warner
Departs Barbados 10.30 azn her — but Englishmen cannot
, on claim him so exclusively, for there
sara Seediomamed ae is Irish and Spanish biood in his
WUREDAYS .: 2 , veins as well, while the first thir-
‘i ips ene Vincent ! teen years of his life were spent
re ay a BY ALEX RAYMOND _ | Satrives Trinidad eee 4: in Trinidad, the land of his birth.
& ey eae ~ 4 ¢ i 4 ~ r back-
RIP KIRBY, oo aim t LORE oo. oy = thn Tom . Departs Trinidad $1.30 a.m. phon 9 cenivbana with ‘his pre-
Arrives St, Vincent 1.00 p.m digious travel, that has enabled
THE DRESDEN ROOM OF THE BEVERLY- STPATHMORE WEDNESDAYS}, Vincent/Gre /St. Vincent Sir Pelham to achieve a only
RNs Sevres wate ates: Departs St.Vineent = 10.00 aun. sortianons Vat sins ‘pet eniance
ae) aanciermaee, Arrives Grenada 10.30 a.m as diplomat and elder statesman,
(ak p RICKY LAMBERT AND I'LL Departs Grenada 11.20 a.m of cricket
TOLD ME CHECKS ¢ al BE THE HAPPIEST aude Gi Gicesns ny .
WITH MY OWN JS GUY THIS SIDE OF Al ves St. en ‘ 12 noon
PARADISE / s All the great events, contro-
, Additional Flight From St. Vincent | versies and personalities of the
to Trinidad Times on Application game over a period of more than
sixty years are mirrored in this
St. Vinc@nt/ Barbados /Dominica book, in a very intimate and per-
THURSDAYS Barbados /St. vVineout | sonal way. Moreover, the author's
Departs St. Vincent 8.00 am | association with a host of people,
Arrives Barbados 9.00 a.m. | famous and obscure, in all parts
Departs Barbados 9.30 a.m of the world, has endowed him
Arrives Dominica 11,30 a.m } with a store of anecdotes (and
' Doninics 1230 p.m often rare Knowledge) on a wide
Departs roe 2.30 ; , range of subjects-material which
Sextem Gartedos roe ee Sir Pelham uses to the full, thanks
Departs Barbados ER oes to the ald of an excellent mem-
Arrives St, Vincent 4.00 p.m ony.
FRIDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent | ;
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 a.m |
KS Arrive, Trinidad - 10.30 p.m | ,
‘e] fee ne AND THE PROUD WAMBES/ MALES THE NEWS SPEEDS THR Departs Trinidad 11.30 am. §| A D V Oo C A T E
8Y PHANTOM ORDER, THE WAMBES/ BEGIN THEIR SU-MONTHS STRETCHES Arrives St. Vincent 1,00 p.m | 8
; j
}

SIX MONTHS OF EXILE AT HAR.





Zia on
i 9 at

ite



GARDINER AUSTIN |
& €O.. LTD. |
AGENTS

Lower Broad St.




F241) shy

MU (tip) VY

Phone 4704



a a eS wt tt a ee

Broad St.

and
Greystone Shops,

the Village,

STATIONERY

Balmoral Gap.


PAGE TEN



» (No. 1.) Intentional tripping.

(No. 2.)

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



AAD oa

8

ee

fs

Charging goal-keeper not in possession.

Know Your Football—uw

Al

FOULS AND MISCONDUCT

A player who intentionally com-
mits any of the following offen-
ces shall be penalised by the
award of a DIRECT FREE-KICK
to be taken from the place where
the offence occurred.

(a) Kicks or attempts to kick
an opponent,

(bo) Trips an opponent, i.e
throwing or attempting to

throw him by the use of the
legs or by stooping in front
or behind him.

(c) Jumps at an opponent.

(d) Charges an opponent in a
violent or dangerous man-
ner.

(e) Charges an opponent from
behind unless the latter be
Obstructing;

(f) Strikes or attempt to strike
an opponent. 7

(g) Holds an opponent with his

hand or any part of hi:
arm.

(h) Pushes an opponent with
his arm or any part of his
arm. a

(1) Handles the ball, ie. car-
ries, strikes or propels

By O. S. COPPIN

necessary that this law shoula be «xcept when he —

vigorously enforced by referees
to prevent improper conduct and
it is the duty of the B.A.F.A., to
see that players who have been
reported to them for persistent
infringement of this law, do not
escape punishment.

Assist The Referee
Club officials too should use
all means in their power especial-

ly in the case of teams in the
Second and Third Division com-
petitions using bad language or
addressing observations to or at
the referee on or off the field.
There have been instances of
this in the past and even this

season and it behoves the B.A.F.A,
to mete out such punishment to
guilty offenders as would dis-
courage the others.

Indirect Free-Kick
A player committing any of the

following five offences shall be
penalised by the award of an
INDIRECT FREE-KICK to be

taken by the opposing side from
the place where the infringement

(a) is holding the ba.!

(b) is obstructing an op-
ponent
(c) mas passed outside his
goal-area.
(5) When playing ag a goal-
keeper, carrying the ball i.e. tak-
ing more than four steps while

holding the ball without bouncing
it on the ground.
Charging From Behind

Now that I have mentioned ob-
struction | should like to make ;
few observations with regard to
charging a player from behind as
much confusion seems to exist in
the minds of the crowds that at-
tend football and even in the
minds of the players themselves

A player may be charged from
behind when he is intentionally
obstructing an opponent whether
he is facing his own goal or not;
but the charging must under no
circumstances be violent or
dangerous.

The offence of charging an op-
ponent from behind is not.com-
mitted where a player in playing

3 Ex-world

Champions

Offer Olympic Help
But The Amateurs

Remain

Cautious

By GEORGE WHITING
RANDOLPH TURPIN, Freddie Mills and Terry Allen
are all willing to put their services at the disposal of Bri-
tain’s Olympic Games amateur boxers this summer—not
necessarily as teachers, trainers or coaches, but as men who

have achieved the hig
fession.

Turpin, Mills and Allen may or
may not be experts in the arts of

imparting boxing knowledge, but
they have all won world cham-
pionshiy and that fact alone
vould ensure them a_ respectful
hearing by any ambitious ama-
teur,

Until a few weeks ago, any
suggestion of Olympic aspirants
being allowed within earshot of
professionals would have been
regarded as treasonable and
may still be regarded within
the inner hierarchy ef the ABA

Yet, since the ABA and the
BBB of C have now admitted —
albeit cautiously official reg-

ognition of each other’s existence,
the idéa of Olympic co-operation
may not seem quite ridicu-
ifter all

so
lou

‘Keen and grateful’

Mr. J. Onslow Fane, Board of
Control chairman, let it be known
this week that during lunch with
ABA representatives he had put
forward this uggestion of the
pros. lending the Helsinki boys
ashand. He also mentioned that
the ABA attitude to the proffered
assistance had been “keen and

grateful.”

But Mr. J. ©. MelIntosh, com-
bining the twin functions of
chartered accountancy and the

honorary secretaryship of the
ABA, took refuge in Scottish cau-

hes® honour attainable in their pro-

Empire Defeat
Pickwick-Rovers
3I—]

In their 2nd Division fix-
ture at Queen’s Park yester-
day, Empire defeated Pick-
wWiek-Rovers by three goals
to one. The game was very
slow and combination was
almost entirely lacking
pmong the members of the
teams.

Empire took the touch off and
frim.the beginning were masters
of their opponents. After a cou-
ple of attacks were warded off
by the Pickwick Rovers’ back
line, Norville, playing at left
wing for Empire took a shot from
short range which beat Pickwick’s
goalkeeper, M. Foster, and open-
ed the scoring.

Many of the Pickwick Rovers’
players had the tendency to play
too far back and this was a great
hindrance in their attempts to
score on Empire. As the game
continued, Empire made more at-
tempts to score but quite fre-
quently the ball was kicked over
the bars. At half time the score
remained at one love in favour



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Owing to rain no play
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TO-DAY'S FIXTURES ALSO...
Men’s Singles Final
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the ball with his hand or occurred. the ball touches a player behind tion when I sought confirmation of Empire. :
arm. (This of course does (1) Playing. in a manner con- Unless there is an intention to of his association’s keenness and For the greater part of the sec- WHAT’S ON TODAY WILKINSON & HAYNES C0 LID
not'apply to the goal-keeper sidered by the Referee to be _charge such a player. gratitude. Re bale play pap lecereennnns * i
within his own penalty dangerous, e.g. attempting to kick Intention CHA | ate sibilities. but in 7 wie oro ia ot Art Exhibition at the Museum
area). the ball while held by the goal- The referee is the sole judge of | tins detinite nue aa vk as eee ee resumption, Rudder at 210,00 som.

Should a player of the defend- keeper, such intention, but it has been ia Bate definite has been done, oe ae. ‘eee © shooters Court of Grand Sessions— —==
ing side intentionally commit one (2) Charging fairly ie. with noticed that some referees con- Me nt i backs * ee pounded the bail 10.00 a.m. ese |
of the above nine offences within the snoulder, when the ball is strue the law more strictly than tt i ay ea ra an here E heping ints Che opponents? goal Speech Day at Harrison Col-
the penalty area he shall be penal- NOT wfthin playing distance of jis necessary to secure fair play, ‘nose ig cette’ te } . pbntonmes With sade latte lode cin lege—2.30 p.m.
ised by a PENALTY KICK. the players concerned and they and in consequence of such de- Pel ‘than itp Sine ena oe favour of Empire, play, continued ge >, eas’. t
A etaliy ice can be aWvaried are definitely not trying to play Fi As progress of the game is ji'soned over lunch to the BBB ot without further scoring on either ‘ wae. tC OI I le TO ) S
irrespective 0’ e position o e it. ° C gesture. side for some time. enalty
ball, if in play, at the time en (3) When not playing the ball, If a player turns so as to face ee Wal awardee: aiainat eotse sepals decassieas: Benabiacell ti.
offence within the penalty area is intentionally obstructing an op- his own goal when he is tacklec Friendly hint which was saved by Grant. Then ture, St. Thomas at 7.30 Z .
committed, ponent, i.e. running between the by an opponent, or is obviously ? about eight minutes before the pn. that relatives and friends overseas

This is an importent law and a cpponent and the ball or imposing aware that he is about to be The ABA clubs have their own close of play, W. Greenidge at Police Band Condéert, St.
referee taking the initiative where the body so as to form an obstacle tackled by an opponent, he is in- instructors, amateur and profes- centre forward for Pickwick Luke’s Boys’ School at enio
he sees necessary, can prevent to an opponent. tentionally obstructing and may sional, available. as Olympic Rovers received a long pass, ana 8.00 p.m. JOY
rough play developing. It is most (4) Charging the goal-keeper be charged from behind. coaches, Nobody suggests that with no one to contend with but



and Len Brooker, should being the lone goal for his team.
superseded. But @ friendly hint Empire pressed their opponents, GUAVA GUAVA
i or two from active or recently and a lovely shot taken by Nor- WEATHER REPORT
active: professional champions ville at left wing was pushed over
; a r would surely not come amiss. If the bars by Foster, Morris YESTERDAY CHEESE CHEESE
might even help. kicked the corner and Rudder Rainfall from Codrington: .29
: ue receiving the ball scored the third in. ‘—_ i .
/ Turpin and Allen have told me goal for Empire. Play ended Total Rainfall for month to — in bars each in packages each
4 through their managers that they without further score. date: 2.11 ins
} would be more than willing to Tem}

THE “unchanging Orient” will
set a new fashion“in cricket this
spring. The Indian team intend
to fly here in mid-April—the first
air-borne “invasion” of this land
by a full team of cricketers,

I talked to honorary-advance-
agent-for-visiting teams HAROLD
GILLIGAN, who used to play for
Sussex. “This latest Test victory
by India should stimulate interest
in their doing a lot,” said he.

' I agree—it both sides can raise
a gallop instead of a jog-trot_in
scoring. A dreary 30-runs-an-
hoyr rate just will not do,
Seventh Tour

This will be Gilligan’s seventh
tour as preliminary arranger. He
captained the MCC side in New
Zealand in 1929-30, and since then

has “done” for New Zealand
twice, South Africa twice, West
Indies once and now India a
second. time. He arranges the
fixtures and socia] engagements,

puts the journeys and hotels in
the hands of a travel agency and
submits the complete itinerary to
the visitors for approval,

I should say the West Indians
would have been happy to have
him arrange their tour in Aus-
tralia. The itinerary there was
s‘rongly attacked by JOHN GOD-
DARD, the visiting captain and
no wonder,

Support From Africa

SIR EUGEN MILLINGTON-

. DRAKE, Eton and Oxford oars-
man, now on a lecture tour of the
Gold Coast, is also representing
there the Amateur International
Boxing Association The Gold
Coast, he writes, is full of en-
thusiasm for affiliation to AIBA
now Nigeria has come in, too. He
also has been told that an East
African association, covering
Uganda, Kenya and Tanganyika,
is likewise applying for member-
ship.

















“LL -A









having nothing to fear.

They'll Do It Every Time







President of AIBA is’ EMILE
GREMAUX, French industrial
chief in Lille. Hon. secretary
and treasurer is Lieut.-colonel

R. H. RUSSELL, whose offices are
in London.
Not Yet Thirty

LEW CULLANS, who has kept
goal for the Erith and Belvedere
iootbail club, but recently lett
inem, is 29 years of age. 1 have
that assurancertrom him by letter

because the other day he was
aescribed as 33.
“We hear of footballers lower-

ing their age,” he writes, “but for
someone to put it up seems a little
crazy. Four years makes an im-
portant difference to a footbaLer.”’

Quite so. A footballer, amateur
or professional, has as much right
to be pernickety about his age as
an actress. May Collins, in those
four extra years, stop many an
unstoppable shot,

Nothing To Fear
WILL Britain’s racing cyclists
have anything to fear from the
Russians should the two countries

meet in the Olympic Gameg at
Helsinki in July? Russia's ap-
plication to become affiliated to

the international Olympic Body is
expected to be granted when
world delegates meet in Paris at
the end of this month,

In the 1000 metres the Russian
title-ho.der, I. IPPOLITOC, would
be a danger, If he had ridden in
the 1948 Oiympic Games at Wem-
bley, and clocked the same time
of 1 min., 14.2 secs., his Russian
record, it would have earned him
second place. J. DUPONT
(France) won the event in 1 min,,
13.5 sees,

Britain’s record for the distance
—obtained elsewhere — is 1 min.,
14 secs, by WILF WATERS. In
similar conditions British cyclists



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VHUVGH buwmnax waomUuLLs
Whil ve
l@w WeeCKS IL Wiil De as an aiuinah
Wheat he Will G@lena nis AbA van-
said-welgn, Championship,

He wul be making an attempt
to win his second ttte by way ot
the KAF and Iimperia. Services
eliminators rather than tnrough
his civilan ciub at Weillingto.
(Shropshire),

Reason is that Nicholls will be
on demobilisation leave when the
KAF championships begin. If he
reaches the Wembley finals on
April 25 he will be entitled to
be announced trom the ring as
“Mister” and not “Aircraftman,”

Golfing Bishop

CHIGWELL GOLF CLUB have
Monsignor GEORGE ANDREW
BECK, Roman Catholic Bishop of
Brentwood, as a member. He told
me to-day that he is a beginner
and has no handicap.

The youthful looking bishop is
a keen sportsman, Formerly head-
master of a school in Nottingham,
he is a useful cricketer and a
qualified football referee. He has
a house in South Woodford,

Title Change?

WILL the All-England women’
badminton singles title return to
Canada this year?

Mrs. KAE GRANT, Canadian
champion from Saskatchewan, now
living in Montreal, has entered for
the championships in London in
March. The last Canadian entry
was Mrs, W. R. WALTON, who
took the cup back to Canada with
her in 1939,

The Danes have so monopolised
this event over the last four years
that any additional opposition is
welcome,

Money To Burn

ONE JIM HEARN has resigned
for the Giants, who play not foot-
ball, but baseball. Had it been



By jimmy Hatlo

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@ CiViliaid Wiattlin Tne next

“every

lend a hand
further .. ‘

Any amateur fly-weight or ban-
tam who fanciés it may

— and Allen goes

next month at’ Allen’s quarters Foster.

at Brighton, where he will be Empire: Grant, Haynes, Jor-
training for his championship de- dan, St. John, Rudder, Clarke
fence against Teddy Gardner, No Morris Hutchinson, |
liberties taken and no ABA rules ' ges mete

broken,
Age-old prejudice

Freddie Mills jumped at the
idea. “It is surely time,” he
told me, “that everybody pocket-
ed their pride and got together
on this Olympic business. Count
me in,”
Unfortunately,
dice is not easily mellowed.
Nevertheless it is worth remem-
bering that we have not won an
Olympic boxing title for 28 years.
With that melancholy rec
their

age-old preju-

The teams are as follows:—

Pickwick Rovers: M. Foste,
Webster, Robinson, Fitz Gerald,
n= Mc Kenzie, Lewis, Kelly, Carter,
drop in W. Greenidge, D. Greenidge, L.

Douglas, Norville

Referee: Mr. 9. M. Robinson

Ladies’ Water Polo
Practice Match

The two ladies’ teams for the
water polo game to be played at
the Aquatic Club on Saturday
March 29 at 830 p.m. will be
selected fyom the ‘following 17
players :

Peggy Pitcher, Marion Taylor,



ord on' Jill Gale, Barbara Hunte, Rober-
conscience the ABA havelta Vidmer, Mary Knight, Ann







cause to be “keen andjTaylor, Jean MacKin: is
grateful” for all the help they . ae ee
can get. ——
Whether we like it or not,

several members of our Olympic
team will eventually be turning
professional—just as Jack Gard-
ner, Don Scott, Johnny Wright,
Ron Cooper, Tommy Profitt and
Henry Carpenter did after the
1948 Games at Wembley.

So what harm could there
in a little fraternisation before
Helsinki, instead of after? It
could be controlled, and I am sure
the ABA escutcheon would
main unsullied.—L.E.S,

be

the other way round, and in Eng-
Jand, Hearn might have earned
in all somewhere near £1,000 a

year. But as a base ball pitcher,
what?

“The guessers are guessing,”
writes a New York columnist

“that he signed for about 23,000
dollars.”

Which is £8,000 and some
considerable hundreds,

in-
Some of

‘| our boys have chosen the wrong

|
|

vocation. So have many of our
eminent men,—L.E.S,





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Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005
(3 p.m.) 29.921
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.12 p.m.
Moon: ..New, March 25
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.46 a.m., 4.26 p.m.

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PAGE 1

I'M.I SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATl: 1VEDM.SUAI. MAKCH M, MM, Trinidad House Pass Resolution Of Concern Over Adams* Speech 1 ram Our Own I in-respondent POHT-OF-SPAIN. March 21. .-iature by a 140 to 3 majority vote Itlon moved by the HonourDoputy Speaker, which called the %  ith wofoui I I %  fend reret the t i u 1*1 IWuadus Legislature b> Mr rditi£ ihe appointment of a West fad i Id the United Kingdom T h < i i .skert the -urneihlng better and worthier (hat Adams' ror themselves being sons and inn irranldaughter* of Trinidad. Indian pollHon. A. P. T. James said thai dated to in*ny sutamem coming from ham Adams must be taken as a statet W.I. i : %  policy from trie Barbados Government and every West In the lAuu tpeceh in which he Indian who had West Indian unity from ihe Clo*er -I heart mu>l consider it very He* on W.I grave and -s likely U. destroy the b randed future ,f Wt Indian umi> Adsr f s'.irr* on Ihe appointment James said that he took *.rong ihe post of objection to Adams' statement i a dangerthat so long the politician wa* coming on from Ihe W.I there was bound %  n talks In the to be political racket SENATE RATIFIES JAPANESE TREATY f^^j K. %  BaV" ^.JE Mfeb. gM -j'-'^sl %  r rv && Hearing In larceny Case Adjourned INDIAN SEAMAN KEOLTERATENG IIIIKM CAI in I I Indian seaman Nrah Omar of Calcutta who waa taken to the ... w %  General Hoapital on March 21 Mi I,.i Iship Ml I, 1. Tayi !" ,„, steamihip Halaha foi lor. Al .Judtfe at an injury to one of nil fin.ara on thr Court of Grand Sessions ,h e left hand, told the AaVaaal* 0 adjourned further g-fiS ^.^WSS^S until today in the! had up ,„ ,., lme „„ „„ case in which George Goodlittle <.r ii. labourer of Station '*•'• Otnar-a father of two ll.li ... \f,..i....i im % %  -%  cluldten. a hoy and a gill—while Hill .Michael, is charxtd „„,,„„, wrench-on the alawitli .ujlui.: .i Iwevd suit ,aha austaiued an injury to Bta IfaUIMd .,1 iKS, the properly of third linger on the left hand and Ralph Kdnehill. and receiving "**, 'i" 1 "" } "P* '^•'•• ""stolen pi.ipert.v. The adjourn" $*•£?£ S SffAlt ment was granted so that an operation. three defence witnesses could "It was an ordeal, but I smiled be summoned to tht court. '" h ,ac *. of v r Z* lhlt, f; : Sllli', said laughing. Omar has been The offences are aliened to away from home for about five have been committed sometime months on (his trip afd Is now between I>ecember 10. 1951. and awaiting; an opportunity to get o January . 1952. MMS M. E ">hip which will take him to the '.-Mtan. Legal Draught*Lifted Kingdom and then to man. ipioneculmg on behalf of Calcutta. 'InCrown while Gooding is un— r.ress"d that Of withdrawinr. / lbs i %  [1 madi" i the W.I. It might %  • en ted on I DOS which did not hove ii* own way. was foIng to use the thresl of secession Better who stauUy opposed lb. moUon declared that Adams wan free to stpnas opiBiwn on jnylhlng arlbhean and even II.IMI. MM g| Ihe olhee speaker* upporled Ihe motion while i %  % %  who ssl through the drbale with arm* folded ma*t •f Ihe lime, said nothing. IN a/ASWNCTOM, Senate Fore'*CofiBsJly (D-Tex.) tnd San %  at* Secretary L ..can llillj U was ratified by i lag Commlltee Chairman Tom r A ttey (R-Wi, right, look un h .i OK to the Japanese of 6e .r It flitters**. repreaei.ted. Yesterday theprosecution .died xi six witnesses and then closed its case Then Gooding Md tli %  court that he had three uitnej 1 v !>r--mon an. L. C. Hannays, said he had a privileged lo read comments md encomiums not only of •al that Adams Gomes but also of some other rill Ihe minister* by persona on both I ired to rejUdes of the Atlantic and he WB Hi to be able to say that the ipe canes were burnt when a J" fll l ,n f %  JJ" %  ho 2 tire occurred at Walker, PUnU. ijuurmnem nis Lordship said ,„.„ a, ru.r ni .hum 11 1 l id m„de inounie, about _*£ g^JJ "Vh,, a ',e",i. %  an ail found Ihat lhe> XJ^-fS, o!CLD.*.M er -ipparently did nut know ease was fixed for. and a. rlghl for the accused to ul! hi. w.tndsass. the case would have to be adjourned for these witnesses. Gooding i$ on a two count indictment. On the tirsl count he chained with stealing one Another fire at Wiltshire Plantation. St. Philip at about ..') p m. on Monday burnt six acres OfJ rtjM canes which were injured. A fire al Oldbury Plantation, St Philip, at about 8.45 p.m TK. appottUnenl of 'Capt. From IMS to 1939 he served as veJ£rda W ne S>IN '^ C oach comes after more than 10 chief officer un the Lady Seiners service with the CN.S.S v.ere appointed it could only be re-ult of a political racket." FREE SECONDARY EDUCATION rin riuudad Government lu accepted In principle the scheme lor free secondary education but due to financial problems it is ai-c-sKlble to implement the I present This was anMU1 mi by U.c Hon. Hoy Joseph, Of Education and 9KW Onlv ':.e: niters voting i nieniben of hit bloc. M ik-n :i.lo Stephen of if 2' i iv th"> ... Adams i the Hou-ie b--rvices yesterday morning, when • i.tened the new science wing iind rekivt Such a go t Si. Maiy'i College. Joseph alto told the large gathv liictillcacrlnif that Oovernmi'iit was Intha iiuinlx-iof scholarhJps aacfa year and was trying to and cnti-iructivc cril •• aehool fees u low as uos.. luM IV ..blc (o at least do THE PERFECT DRINK a FOR THE TROPICS I is MONTREAL. ,roo1 *• dwaHing huuse of Ralpl Appomlmenu ol Capl. Neil J. Roach. O.BE., as assis!!" *'!< .Tl'nd" r!?S Ts" anl marine bupennlendcnt. Canadian National Steamships, lasi. on the second count he and Capt. D. C Wallace. O.BE., DSC, as master .if the land' charged with receiving Lady Nelson lo succeed him. were announced to-day by r < -j !" >" ""??',„?P e, !" < ^eieen Capt R A. Clarke, jieneral manager o( the company. Capt STm"' %  M and J ,u *" Roach will replace Capt. P. A. Kellv. O.B.E.. who has resigned from the company after serving as assistant marine Firs! Witness superintendent for the past nine years From 1 chief offlcar on th. K irs servicv with thp C N.S.S Laaly llawkiaa; Laalj Draka: rn in Maigaielsvillc. N.S. In Praaea DavM. In April 1939 he I8O0. Uv served with the RCNVR Waa .ippoinled maater of the during the First Worid War before Laal. iaaan and In September entering the Canadian National of the same year, enlisted in the fraciinsnips a* a 2nd omecr aboard KCNfi. the Canadian Recruit la June. 1921 Capt. Wallace served in comH. >er, M ., nurd, second M £a^cSnvo,"^^ ". i hiel ,.race, .A various ves'"Z waT.w2d*a^Mto ", h ""S" 1 ln 1 hl ul1 w " MU and obtained his Masters r. P a M ui Jffi E ta liu 'lE mi ""K The tuil waa made by Certificate in 1927 II, !" (,e" ",n. ,a of co^ rninue, ( B "* C pointed master of the lavlr Draka ..... „, d ,., .„„ „„,.,„ '7, „,' „.. master of !„!„,„' %  N s"s w.. ami.,M "' • ~aw h„ brown Hie Choaieay. In G | or EdgeliUI, wife . 1 Iraiiafornul In IKo •_ a .... Roach received the O.BE. for seeII assume his new duties g-aoaai.. Caoatructoe. fcr..ar.uBa3 ss ^-^r. ^rz>s They are the property of uKioury Ltd. and were insured FISHING BOATS DAMAGED The two tlfhing boats "Unity" iind "Sea Queen" overturned in the surf at Bathsheba yesterday while heavy waves dashed agslnit the shore. was Ralph Edgchill of "Sea Queen", owned by Lloyd St. Miohacl who Bald Mayers, was badly damaged that mi December 9. 1951 he while Unity." owned by Oscar wore his brown tweed suit and Holder, was slightly damaged. %  MI returning home hang it near -Sea Queen" was also overturned to a window The window is ,, n Saturday. ab SI^ t wo ,ect from ,ne around. High winds and rain had caused On December 10 In the mornthe Hsherinen to return to shore ng he did not see the suit and he before they reached the nshlng thoughthat his wife had taken hanks the suit. Then on December LIGHTERS DRIFT WEST A strong east wind blowing ross ihe harbour yesterdny ide it difficult for lightermen to 11.36 and has all live "Lady"* boats at different limes. During the las. war. Capt. Koto^rM &JS5T* the JSg* W£ 2oSt IgftS -""ol their craft whether <....d.an Jm..er ln the same K I brown Sit i 1^ ,ade OI m **V rrom 9nl P ipacity and in June of the same em U. 10 He wdl assume hu"neW dubes lg-.g •*****. '""" <*. • w:„dow_when she saw"!, On in the latter pan of March. position Deeenibe Al -r^Uv, .,,, 3o,., r „„ Sjn,*e £3, c^.r,'""""the C.N.SS Captain Dickson Carlisle Wallace was born In Capt. Kelly joiner' 1'ictou. N.S.. In 1004 and joined in 1023 and served .ie an apprentice In March 1021. capacities. Ho was thief officer ppomted third officer of uf the Lady Hawkins when she Pjj ihore. At one time, three empty lighiei with their crews were 18 she noticed that th .u. nu Miehael, said Ihflt he mad; ths. 5? tortw ly,ng ln c "" lUta % %  %  S %  ( k 1 '>' the brown suit fo7 C B Th "'"" ,le had ,ake OUt 8U ar hice 4, Co. The name of th suit was for whom the the Selector. The crews of the three light' the Can-dlae Prospeeloe in 1025 was torpedoed"and"iWYn"ianu" nm "'\ * w'tten Inside the coat, !.j-. rted ._P uU .l ng J !" _* OT T.... V !" and became 2nd officer Ol the try 1041 and WM master of the. ., C 1 "on.sh of Central Polioe l f hc >' J lc 1 "" 8 **r' U,r b JJi. U f ir s<>quenlly he served as 2nd officer 1>> enemy action In April of the "uaV to me " um of th ccused V on the Canadian Volunteer, v.me year. He was made assistant t,"V " rch wanrant. In the < jnadiaii riuneer, and Canadian liwtM superintendent in 1943 r a,oom h e "W a brown suit I'alhlindrr. obtaining his Master's 1 and won the O.B.Ffor services them When about half mile .... the Selector, a launch went out to them and took over for 15 minutes to tow them Into the Certificate in January, 1929 ring the war. Careenage. Whether 3f^ it's hot HENNESSYSI Whether it's cold THREE STAR BRANDY WITH SODA WATER OR GINGER ALE and PLENTY OF ICE HENNESSYS IHE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS Dunlopillo tttptemety C&fH^>^S& FOR GENERAl ENGIKE ROOM STORES ineluding:— a II LTING. in I .• Mlicr. C'ninrl Hair, and Canvas-slilched BE1 II H ERR.OILCANS PRESSURE C1AUUKS i U.VA! I D A STEAM I'lI'K & FITTINGS FILTER CLOTH. — WHITE COTTON TWILL M M MOID and KIT!)..MASTIC (l..r Boiler Walls) ENGINE, CYLINDER & MOTOR OILS and GREASES Foi "I VERITE" ASBESTOS CEMENT ROODING. SHI CAPS Send your orders lo • THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. -because Dunlupiltn. i l "ii-liii.mii.; is iiniile nl leea, pure RlbbCf win. I QOstf-tWsf ol tlie liuinui springs back into sssfcp interconnecteil air nel latmii and nir-oontlitu You don't know wliat vuu'vo tried — lie iiriginnl l-ater ""i.^ni rx-.-iiillv treated .-I..inncraldi ilfjnlf to eren i triiint'. vi-t in.-t;uitU %  The million-, of tin\ U give perfci %  niiiK In any i I'oinfort rmlUj is until M1DE IN tNOLAND BT DDNLOP CltrTSMI N r I'IM.I.I-: 4528 •.'.'.-.".'.'.-.'.".-.-.'.*.-.---*.. While Park Road. ECKSTEIN BROS. BAY STREET j! Ihir TaUorlnc 11.„,, ,,,„,„ ha. j oldp ranfe of Ihe OSM n.ti. II.I. for Men's Sous I Our II ir.nit.-M ratting ami uilorlng will Uinsform your rhalre Into a Milt of distinction Wm. FOGARTY (VMS) LID. BROAIl STREET ^.^^.>^>y.*.'.'^.*.'.*^><^aoaaaaaaaa>a^aaaa>aaa<>aaBaaaasaaa II tilth for liltXtlit'tlisfiiit'iils ... OA OI'H **OVEN FRESH" SERVICE I ill nisi l.MIIA illsiiEi CO. LIW. 1. KLIMi. awa. tats aa> 2. KLIM kft wnaa.4 falrltaraHaai SCUM ojuoithj is always uniform — —>h sad every no at %  %  uritfaing K1JM • ou cci hrarht, fouod ,ml\ ,o ibe bocu I'tib tout milt, tmctil ihe aair Amount i of iB|-rum food e*tcousl* Air youn evry UB. K1IM unifonniiy u *oux iiK t of fm,„UMh anr milk! 4. KLIMit HMHHI f*r .•..., 5. KLIMeddt sssVMsfsal H ceelUHl .-• %  4. KLIMl. IsstJlBsssMsM far lafeat teedlaf 7. KLIMla sefe la tea •a-sciollyeacaed He t. KLI M I, B-rdC*d % %  d.r ttrktait c.r.l ToSa pwra •alM. £. •ad SUM. CZ, Hi. a. iota ai.lt near m •einatMCi mi woeie ovss x*2L* KLIM MILK Die World9 Best Night-Cap 'T'HtHE are veri RKI Ovaltine I* the world'p.'pil*r aid i" -I"rp 1 Spariss.fi kes ampl> demon'trated II* t>iil-(*nJtr.K i|iuliin-. \ npul ihidrliciuui hevcrasw. taken at bedtime, lu-lpt •ilntlum*rr-. •*ii you to relsK and compose* the -i-trm lot nauif.il, rrlrc*l.ing aleep. White you alrrp 'Otallinr' pn>\ ulo I.KI element* — incliiJIng vilamin*—of exieptional nntHiivr Maine ineaiily .iiuc-nhl* form. to reinforce \onr saWVOSM MUII!>. roof BHength amlenergv. That ia wh\ 'Ovaltlne" leep ithe fc^.r kind ol alaap ID tranquil and r**torattvc ihai it lulpyotl M urret the mornln,; hrishi-ryed and .herful--leelinii -ivd |ookfaa| VOUf beat. Doctor* and ssirtis seali wheea irccpissswid 'OeaJcsH a* %  bdiimr b'i-uit. H >iriimu-i\ ataitdi !• a essei i" ItaeMi It COMB %.. little K gtHrS W BSSKha •VALTIWK BUM l IT* t > %  %  | aoJ deliaiMtull v cnip. -• %  %  hey M 'Orink drttcinui i.i. in.. a .i a,M ilrta %  uniemb*. IS IB • pfcMt I HI B> -U. V,a Hi! (k, w# fffsfhtf and Restorative Strep ili.iintiui.haJ t In uoftJ jmighi JNJ. kj; • Let us help you Plan your Pilgrimage 35'" INIERNAIIONtL Eucharistic Congress BARCELONA. MAT ?6 10 JUNE I For tliis special occtJkm PA A offers I direct setvice from New Voik to BapMlona Or you can fly n I ttbon travg, overland to tinHasilica at Fatiin.i when the 15th itraUvorsvy ol lag apparition ol llu Blssswd Vitfjjn will h.cflebratcd on May 13tli...aiul contimir down through Spain to BswCMtJoM for tluCongrata. Make your vWl I oooapletl pilgrimage to the sacred sliriney ol Eorope. to Lourdcs and the Eternal City where you m.ty enjoy the privilege of an asjouence wftfa the Holy Patter. Wit i "UK' direct to London, Paris, I Lbbon to ever) m.i|or European city. Pan Anictu.iii World Airways offers you the lowwMge o| : ) yestra international travel sft> ptrltfMe to help you plan >our trip. England S PA IN A%t vour Mvti a|ent uboul 22 and W day aU-eipenie pilgrimage, to Europe iiKludUag lull arfangeini.-i.ti for >Cur vlt to Dio Euchanstic Congreu. For reirrvattoni tee |^*r Tractl Agent o Uo/ita ItftH II s Worldi Mosl Expcri.nced Airline • C.iw 1 c. IM. l:.,i |.„ t,i tmw **"• 311] amVaM b.i.n.u aaaaa, Iiai)



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WBWMOAr MAMCM M, 1J5J B.VRE.U>OS ADVOCATE FACE FIVF Steel Band Leader Guilty Of Receiving Stolen Shirts SENTENCE on st! band leader Austin Spi: > ^ e w ay r>l ' ,he Ac, '" P" 15 !" J^Be His Lordship Mi Justice G. L. Taylor after a ;ur>found him nifty ol rocemrn. nine shirts valued $32 25. knowing them to have been stolen The shins were the property ot Paul j u , Nn JT" Swan Streel and ,h<"f*nce was commitll between October .10 and November 3 last w Tl, .hirts were used as costumes for the hand members bpringer was charged on another count, shop break im that Mum*'' Ur> broushl h,m ,n no1 H"'lty." en ih^a.^ E /"' d A ' 1 ' to Vovcmbtr rjcw. He asked him %  •:c-.hr he had annhuuto HV KT!!2i ^, Everton Bullen who u a maun f£?ui ISJ.** "i"* *""' < a band of which Spr.n~rul.idir the following day and left IKMII IVIIMIIII huuie one evening and found •porn shirts on his bed. Shirt* Identified which thing When he returned Monday the shirts were stolen Some davs later he noticed a Heel m. I 2Ji aMi ? 8 £*•?" Slrect ,n '' Shown ,np *'ru at Court The first witness lo he called v and ." lcr m amlri ot Ihe a clerk al Paster In October la w ~ mb t r fc !" '? U -'" rc ""> fad year She said Paster nave her ?„T„„'* m ; *•""" had some St, on the ev"ln t 5 h ' d .',"."7, !" ! WM r "" < % %  " h!^n Ut fn K^ !" 0 C .~ k ^^£ e J < ? Cross-examined, he said that it ELTnJu^ i."". The f0 '" w "*""> for Springer to tell the wTrl? g Jnd 'J[. W ^ n f*SL2 r ^! ' "> of the band, not to wear *•*_ %  q **—* r the "how costume, other than on special and ihe occasions. Springer usually procase were disarranged c" -w it to Paster's attention Some of the shirts were missing Crou.-F.xam.ned Cross-examined, she said that it was about 8 30 a m. that she noticed the disarrangement. Similar sport* shirts were being sold about town. vided anything tha'. was needed lor the band. MRS McP 8YMM0ND8 wife of th* Oh turn warden gala Memorial Homo, Black Rock Tlio function took (1to r.,: Mr. E. D. Mottlcy. Dean Haaltwftad. Bryan. Matron cf the Horn* Cpl. Clyd? Nurse said that on November 23 he want to Charles Heckles' house. Bt-kles handed him a shirt and made a statement concerning it This shirt was afterwards identified by Paster PS helne one of the shl-ta of special design. He saw Springer at the Central Police Station, and showing him the shirt, told him IT IS verv fitting that wo VLrKZJ^ 4 sald he had in Bwbadog should havi i given it to him. hfl|w of ^ ^ H ^ y Q Oth-r members of the steel band CrUw, S.njor C.uardi;n of M. Adoiphu* Scott 'i.,.h:,H. told an nuduM.tr ..• St. Mlch-i'l. opcn the ni*w wing of tho NighUn ca y at nUjr evening. In tha background are: M I> %  ymm " College ol the •Id ho .tdvuciiit > IhBl b., the end ol immer. the Science Faculty VfUl have occupied all ihe new laboratories which mil be lulJy equipped lor physics. Botany and zoology. Mr. M. rim arrived here on B •> i A maa AnUguProleasor A. K bead ol du djtMirtnHBi of Engluh at Ihe University. The) ban no.. eooM ; %  > j>un Mr. I*. M. i ipal of the % %  fa tha i>iir.>ose" of inrvhe,r wealth 1,. bis cash box and nine shirts from The last witness was George n< ^ Vermont o[ the mmthe show case. Some days later Denny, a tailor of the Reliance munity. he saw a steel band pass Swan Shirt Factory whe'e the snorts Street, six of the members of shirts were made He said he had The children of the Home, as which were dressed in the shirts ma( ie the shirts of special design writ tl Vast | frta New Wing Of nightingale Home Opened %  ipalty on Dr Nightingale'. a that the should not tie confined lo the of St. Michael. Mr Mov v nld U >t it waa ill tlutv <>f thepeople In '. vent i pad Ihal bf tin' end of th<* year o'tier parishes would have i inn fan 6M HO 11 ood congralulated s Mlohael Vastrj :nd Mr. '"I "oik that had >>een done He" Said the oooperab .,, Ill assist m ste-r.. m That had of special design and another i blue. He informed the polio He -id that on .he Sunday on *&*t^'tfl2"S £2 which the lumber was taken from the store there was no opportunity for anvone to take away anything without his noticing it. He had looked at all the windows before he left that Sunday. Fifteen-vear-old Dennis Outrum who was porter at the store Empire Theatre, at the time said that Paster one and himself went to the store on Sunday. October 28, and Patrick and He took out some old lumlxr. When they were leaving, he closed the windows. hs agi> were the first of that gn he had tmde •n hi* add ess t thtun =p inger said that he had bought he shirts with money he had got %  ftai ttM* had played at the Porter Trusted He said that Paster was never in the habit of examining the windows to see whether he (Outrum 1 had properly closed them. Paster felt he could be trusted to close them well. Hi l that on Monday when he went to the store hc noticed n window of the upper storey closed, but unlatched. He had latched this window on the Sunday. He said that there is a building I oli.u tlM window and one could step on the roof from the window. Cross-ex am ined, he said that Paster had been present while they were taking out the old lumber and had nver gone upstairs and l-ft them downstairs. Cpl Herbert said that on November 23 he was carrying out certain investigations concerning the larceny and interviewed Everlon Bullen who gave him a sports .hirt and made a statement concerning It. He also saw Chesterfield Thorpe of Litterary Row. St. Michael, who S ve him a similar shirt. Paster Entitled the shirts as his. He later saw Springer at the C I.D. and told him that Bullen and Thorpe had told him that he Springer, had given them the shirts a few days before the ENCOURAGEMENT FOR W.I. DRAMA MR. PHILIP M. SHERLOCK. Vice Principal of the Dnlvarslty College of the West Iiidi-s. told tha "Advo rate" yesterday that the Extra-mural Department of the University "wishes to do all that It can to encourage dramatic production In the West Indies "One way of doing this" he said, "Is to pnbli'h play* with a West Indian setUng that ara suitable for production by dramatic societies and group* of amateur actors in tha region". The Department therefore Is prepared to purchase plays of this sort and to pay *&". (W.I.) for each play accepted for publication. He said that authors who wished to submit manuscript should send them to the Director of Extra-mural Studies, %  fona. Jamaica. The name and address of the author should be plainly written on the manuscript. The author will retain the copyright of plays accepted for publication. It being understood that groups in the BrlUsh Caribbean will be frea to produce any of these published plays without tha payment of fee* or royalUes to anyone. for Paul Poster about five months witnessed the new wing OBvned BgjOv He had since made similar by Mrs. McD. Svrnmond) ih* Churchwarden of St. Michael. rrrv n Haxlewood h d given !• hl Mewing. i i side of %  .. 1 4n hwt long iv | i i i %  ion of the girls* lory while t 1 '-dl itng h II --er 147 SiHilary Blood, then Got ooened 'hiHOBM voftfnme WPS made l th>> ?(>nd rh %  hWl it <-mv hone will -. wish that at the mil Ihe "•>m WOtlld DO) onlv senre St. Miehael hut tha rhl nrdjar to prnetna a m fir manv <-f the chll.lren ut th colon V. "Th" r'nie't '.f %  ,!.„., ,,..-,. -1 i. ...... %  -if h fiethv the uaahdneea >.* BywaV* he said. ba Bonu nwi opened :. i swa boys wara %  -I wards ai rial ten boys were take" %  t time 1 S mi ,-f th" children have grown "ii Eight are now appi thaae ehlUrao when u^ leava. T r. Me Hid ihnt tu" • 'H M .... thnv h ' • Hon,%  ... in m ly thati part in t!e eommunitvII v c c %  .. id greai trl%  -; .-.,1 ••.tr,._ v nf Sf Michael for eatabIdren who • %  Gm-d freWn. s t'S'l M I ,ed the '--.-, om->"V ... • ... %  I wll li.ke.l utter by teaching and In • gualilications %  /a arould praBM ram peopi. I oiuiprBVtoui tiualiilhnine cation In the science SUByaCU'' M :hat where lher> wendiivloudy sound reasons fo. UM ack of those |irevlcus Qusliilcations. It was still possible foi paopee with a BaanUna interest in abyaeta to be consKleiei. Thl* oltuatlon %  • proh*bl> due at tesol in part to Uie in. %  I-MI 'i.i.awarrneuM of th< pot< nllallile. of a arlrnlln. • ithln the larlhbean area not only In learhlm. In %  %  booed "iat the BsW %  f..r *h-"> he BwM H boys would idernti..n an.d when they left the ipie of i's 'iil'll'efl in the gen.' n Nightingale iMi'lonM funds. I r'i-n '"''d extended the •i afu lnaai ol this purpose. Chi tWM I I i s Matthew, Jesus Christ > nlc it oulte clear Irnit thoi i TI .' it.-1'funn those id \ WOrk •ti-r, ns this cannot Itti -tie ani"-oval of "i t pie," the rhlldratl present. .' Idren whu* lot t in rta homa nd I* -""n' horn'' t %  .. : haBpinaai hara" hi ended krm SoeUI Wal' ro%p'. connaHil'iti-d the • %  i %  . md tha Boat %  > ..I, (oc Uie gn-at )itt •hev haddona. She too pah tribute to Dr. NiuhtiniMie and nl'ir'-d to him ai u.\ I ..nan." She ids* 'onir.-iliilatvt Miss Bryan. Matron f the H %  • hrVehlai M n K rnOvm SPRATTS PUPPY BISCUITS' The best fcr camine Health. Teeth and Digeation SPRATTS OIAKCOAI. OVALS'' DOC. CAKKS AQt'AKIl'M FISH FOOD MIM i> IUKI) SEED d'ks) CANARY MIXTl'KF. tPks.) CUU LIVER OIL in 1 .ii FOOD %  had bad many aMferencf ) lahOB Althmitfh eh i-iiu-y. |. t thought a great bat Bishop and HOfl \ < vhnii! ha had when hO was accused of , (0 | tl NlsjhMlagtla Home. %  '" '"*">' Ihoiight •" function refreshment were served. "DAVIDSON'" HF.RF. FROM B. GUIANA The 117-ton schooner PfllMp II litiimed to Barbado' v-der*ln% >i l| % %  b ing 1.20' i.r rlea ,,., ->r>n .-" %  ..' el • .' "o' "prnnwd an' She is ronthe Rrhoonel'<.l naspact nna Wr E K w n i ro ti Q.C 'H he regard t< the fight Which Mr „ QQUB^I [,„ ^ v defence. put up to remove the children St. Michael's Almsfi i ;; t ^'\^\^ ^.^, l '" 1 *' ,.i^ He said that wnateTer ii'iie ,„n*4* Mitc iste This nw i nvieuDPort he gave wa* given prlnr*-d .im ISM 55=^ SPECIAL OFFERS (To All Cash CUSTOMERS) From Monday 24th March-to-Saturday 29th March USUALLY NOW ENAMELLED PUDDING BASINS 18 cm. 64c. 56c. Netl do. 16 cm. 50c. 40c. Nelt PRESSURE COOKERS $22.50 $20.00 Nett ELECTRIC IRONS $5.00 $4.00 Nett BARBADOS HARDWARE CO., LTD. No. 16 Swan Street Phone 2109. 4406. 3534 11 tilth for th*' \ilii-rli\iiiu-nl\ ... O.V Ol H "OVEN I III SS II SERVICE mi; wisi I.VIMA IIISII IT to. i/ni. The trial of Jos labourer of $1 Th" of Duncan January 18. 1952



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WEDNESDAY. MARC II 2S. 1U2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACI SEVEN Trade Union Course Opened 4 • Fraaa Pace 1 plovers and to represent thoir •Addressing the meeting. Sir need* to th a full I the T.U.C., but JIS one with a con.. w ilderable and the liomiie Prince Charles Kelic At The Museum paciaj exhibition al UM) Museum untJ %  H %  %  Stuart, the Young Pret. % % % %  %  Prlnc* Charlie u ha is still romantically know n Hi i is surmourted by the Royal Crown with th< "C r S %  beneath which is the W-lUi Ml The horn u Rrtyuh-yello. ^„, — trade ummi leaders n"^.!.? !" n'.""'^ J.i e '-•". "hie to obta.n for v.nl to >er knowledge, wisdom. ,„ -^ "teaching "of I ',nu' ZJ the T ai^ ***** entandWeU the workers the* represent a fair nd the des.'e to serve their n c ^*LTLw .S* ££*. ahar '" "* l* !" "** "' * I"* ^T-Ti methods, which h c h an oval cairngorm surrou. >l for West Indian Trade *d. It has been realised that trade "> mdu-tnal and agricultural j nrilv dll „i ,__,,_ „ m „ n or iriC oV £S^L> ZTJL w £ """"• • %  — %  " bu -""" 1 ?""" w h,n c r ,um to ,out wiVc,;w !" ..'on S,.",, or great help and value to lo lhe communitv of 'i ii,. tJin m Pr ert which are p %  nte It, I of this training course. I was and also that the result of th< I Museum i% .. m t code" rrvn tut'Il lll'lll I t for the spare of about twelve efforts giths a trade union secretary at large u-h the < nmunity %  If. and I feel that I can offei fraternal gre -tings in assuring of our anxiety that the course be successful anu snoulu benefit to you all. [have also had a message from Trades Union Congress in %  n. which you may have seen r ur local newspapers. I will it to you _•**"•* Trades Union Congress -• to develop tour uork that >ou are better able to ~. r. %  >nur n-.-r. aers onv In la a silver Donle *'^'' u,c ... ,, ll:i which la shown srltl a screw thread, this was unscrcwe,) r. The spertun. m in aiamiier. Museum through in, Mu On the inside of the lid are tlu Hi lam II!': lie WO! T 01 fu,, ou to form • *h<-r Judgnieni upon the problrmt which will Taee you. and the correct solHtioiiv lo Ihnse problem. Knowledge is part hat your |ieople gel a fair deil. proach U pr c i| < a |_ it j, influenced %  Ad, if you succeed in that duty, b hc|r tw ., H r ^XtoU. you will have tremendous mover them and will really m conclusion Mr. Bell quoted have the future of the West Indies the exiled Sp-ni-h t h i n K %  r in your hand*.. Salvador de Madartaga who said l"do nope that you will want thai in daasOCfatk BCtl It burexperience "ond partly by study, to lead them in the direction of things are necessary to K desirable, to Know the West Indies. I wish you is possible within the sphere ol %  possible sueces* during this wha; is desirable, gad A Newcomer Addressing the gathering, after Sir George had spoken, Mr. Denis i I he wanted to associato himself with the welcome which ix'.i-iuled by Sir George would el. but he perhaps i %  thought although they were some of their i* pos 'ble in the spirit of what desirable." He ended think of any bettM lhe righ' tiade union preeei practice. Students attending ti.. I .ii,. Mr. .\M hi..tir..i.'... M; R. U Green and Mi 1. I; %  % %  i Mi. Ivan Edwards. Mr. II. W. Cntchlow nnd Mr. R. C. Mr A. J. Mr IBengucho (Untish rles towards out-of-pocket exIn' getting experience men make building up a_ really good people what The appointment as many mistake* Fortunntrlv they in fturcr on trade unionism of have recorded their experience In Bell, who ha* a long oxbooks and this enable. rlence in the service of the by that experience, and if are are .irkers' Education Association *ie to avoid gome el Jasj; Ijeen reported to the General their mistake?. During Ihl Cauru'il, and they wish him and you will have a teVMM of lalh$] the jchool maximum success." which will be based upon the cxpenence and accumulated ki The arrangements for this ledge of the lecturers, h0 that you hud been Ceueae have taken a good deal of may protlt hy what others have ereeltiiig out. and I should like to done. Tho Course will cover take this oarly opportunJly of wide ti. Id. and in addltton to talki actoowledging the work of Mr. about trade union organisation and Caarhpole. my Labour Adviser, and \ elation* with emplo.eii; and ollV hie associates. I can assure you problems of industry, time will ;| iCW hety have spent a good deal of be given to such subjects as .,„ a vthole Uaae and caio in doing thoir best economics, agriculture. loetal |h hope Hud at the end of thi lo er.sure that the Course will bo services, and so on. he would be In tliL. aucc.^siul. and that >oti will have Chanyin:: rirrumsliinres V. In* would IHM' J" I I agtlnieresiiug. enji.\.ible. and i-om1'i>> vou will not Imagine thai much wiser and more fully InMr. N. J. Jamae, M forti-ble time. I would alsj like to „->.,.,, -he Course is Btuahad !; ,no problems of the fGrenadai; Mr. M. Baptist*, Mr. >"-'Hi express appreciation of the co...Jn j,,. !" ,11 ,.,. C Miu.l.v i St UieU) ami Mr, P thlfltl* mol f, pin '"'"' ation of Captain Williams and 0 f us know all the He s -' ,rt hc was ln narbadog to G. H. Charles (St. Vincent). I I the Patron Saint ^gemod and staff of the circums ances '" "" students %  ^ut trade ^_,„ m h .„ „ n M Ol Scotlai d, lupportlnf his cross. ting Men s Chiistian Association changing and "o two | LBarbads, without which I do u1e nlicd in aU reapects. tdhss, daUverad %  laetura on the i I Int er ea U ng is that its i three dtflerani i Charles \ 1 %  reapnlaon in i alone. MiTYee hai alee pre* n|ed i Engird luab %  HEARtY facts ihipssM. offiomi %  Grand breakfast mo\ Here's the "powtr" of MOTHII KNOWI MADE BY THE MONKS OF 8UCKFAST A[ l.K. (V..TJI-.I Be I'idl M-i.ih. -r Of "Green l*n>l" (By SYIIMV SMITH) I'.M ;h^ IMW I Cm %  moawMMi ;i Qrrt OonialM, Mr. I. Ccllymom, '•" W %  Mi II (' I irnnado (Ttinul (Domli An 18th Century Snuff Mull is Barbados he will Hnirk Is 17 inches long (TORI handle to blad<' tio A. W %  t appliea %  •' i inRmpli e and < %  i %  Hint •1 nm sure it will !-• %  I %  %  %  %  uteigtj If you feel worn out, depressed, or generally run down a glati or two a day o' BucfcfMt Tonic V. quickly re.tore lott energy and] tone upthe whole ncvo-1 Giving new vitality it fortifies you agilnu fever jnd exruuiiion and remember, Buckfait Tone Wme pccially valuable after illness. IMC Kl AST TOW WISE nd make your x rH de Unions which, were perhaps based on vour (h( M| ., s! i.o.verful, probably the tainly free Two Porter* Get 12 Months Each not suggesting that iwelve weeks whuli you will trade unionists In the West Indies spend here can bo very valuable •.tiuuld accept practices simply to vou in after life, and lo your because British Tiade Unions %  "beginnings were „ %  Livingston Bishop nnd Adola very bad case and he ms Hoyte. two portera of he coild in* put their ill realise lhal the trade Ufa*,* said exchange your ideas wot \^ illi your fellow students. The Spo.">nef'V'HVu who wire earlUM Uon Ih-v were t agalnni found guilty <>f whai ha mlghl larm ataaUag n hags of oiimeni. ihe robbery rn-m wieir kers. If you make the copied them, nor should Ihcy property d [>„ Ciwta ft Co. Ud. The • opporun m bacaufc they were U(>Ii v ,. sl ,. T ,| i|V N rl tentenccd lo favou %  .il by '* %  %  %  %  i.. at Britain. The trade most of ; 221' movement redly springa | qU otc to you the*words of FVanthe development of IndusC|J ^^ Bacon, who was a great erTort, out of an affair of Lord Chancellor of England in employer:, who knew their [n e lime of the first Queen BilBpersonally. Into the highly beth. nearly three hundred years rusedciiterpnsi-stli.it we know ago; — When it became impossible "Reading maketh a full man: orkeis in any industry to conference %  ready man Mid ilircvt with their own emwriting an exact man: tad, mi %  frasd on proba jaaaad la a wholesale employers. %  __bly iboul lharn and but %  Uah Trade 2 In(>ll tl [mpruwrunenl with %  that they L-.ih had a Id say, however. nnr(1 |„| loU r bv the Actli UN were hard work* that win de Unions with their two centuries o a a paria n ce I.^I accepted or re jeeted particular methods of working, then the reasons for thoir decisions were at least worthy ol consideration. Judge His u-rdship p|r. Justice I nan, he would sen G. L Taylor. 1 "> lu "* lcr His Lordship said that it was of Imprisonment. We'll soon have that better, with MERKARRIER TOBAGO S 37.00 i GRENADA 29.00 5 TRINIDAD 37.00 § MARTINIQUE. 34.00 § GEORGETOWN.... 74.00 ^ I CARACAS— 101-00 & I ANTIGUA.... 53.00 i SAN JUAN 93.00 KINGSTON 200.00 ASEPTIC OINTMENT .hcalcnu quickly rfibc woihing and healinf of GcnroilM* whith I Ihc dm and MMnulau* ... giowlh of new .kin owr he damaged area. Kccpatio handy lot family use. FOR SPOTS, BRUISFS, RUHES, tlrUSIONS, He. in tti-'Td lime. ,-ss.::v.:ws. s-m-h i on PEBTE€T COOKING SF.t.Ktr Tin: FLORENCE STOVE AND OVEN &f Beauty and Quality Combined aj THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. r @=*m£ •fM" Pri? cr tOHMIS tOO CPM tUM Fur < U HNI/ icaaar tu< IOM Minaeoni' ON BSSSCI aauraw %  %  rOM*Hl-IION -lOHlfCM ooi rw > ( I'uioa IUIU ...|R l-fN'-ORllOUtHIMI IfSlG a 111*11.1 jr COLE & CO., LTD. DISTRIBUTORS BARBADOS PRODUCTS OF ,T, E ROOTES GROUP NOW IN STOCK ONE COMMER 5 TON TRUCK AND TWO 15CWT. COMMER PICKUPS



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BARBADOS VIIV1K ATI. um-i SDA1 l\' !l % % %  |,,Vi #ZA*P ^t/ZcVitjr HOLLYWOOD PAYS TRIBUTE TO OUTSTANDING STARS .*.! '!• Oce.li V. Attended Welfare Talk. VI !I Hi M tWt.-WC, Off to St. Lucia c**V,i : While her. %  %  yesterday wenMr Donald A!-. 'Hiinn n • Borne*. DirccUu of Bam--fCo '•>•* %  -•*> Not**!, sfti-j •.<-**> %  ,,.,. ,, ami Mr. Barnr* and Minor and **" Mr Hani) OH* wtlo >*• **•" CHmiMi wr, hii.1 h*-^i L f*fe lnc „ Spent Thrtv Weeks M" %  %  td Royal DMll.t,, I hlllrlicri Canadian Judge M R. JUSTICE i Gordon M K \ t K from Monlpral. Canada rctur.. home on Monday mxht bv the l.ad Nrlaa* afttl -ii-tidlnu t weeks* holiday atayini t I Hotel. ind Mi ( (; Phihi Porlamnulh. mere* (it of Itr-wan %  tall*. Man Giraii'< w< stag % %  %  I %  | a ,. .., U.S. Consul General XMV. ROBMtT BALI 1,1 l (ienrral. returned I,, hi: %  -'" m Trinidad bj Mr. M. i I ,.• of The B-* vesta-day after payIn* %  Super%  PYnvin QMbae. i < nhorl vi.il herr. ~||, t Si LartrTMa] %  Olher paaaaru '< '' Mi PI Hip fermt, tha American Canada b) UM NeKon aftei MimdConsul Ins n ho! luderi Mr.-. Brunswick MOU Serrrtnrv to ">< %  Dr-putv Minfstt of H.irt. the PT-. y and PwH Work' ..f N J M l>tinwn..iv ChartarM k -, ;t „ %  MI— % %  Accountant and Mr* Dunw-l. M ,!S '^ V ^l POOL r>f Onkvlll-. Mr md MrIt 8. ,*"' ,h C r, bb *" n l Chafla i>f Toronto, Mr E Kremcr*. Treasurer of Wrnthi and Kremen Constructiini Enftneerf. of Niagara Falls. New York Mr. and Mr* M. J Svminalor ..rwl Mr. tind Mra W I'orhranc %  \ivm,. Hal %  Mai Aim. laavlm fm Thntdad by A J Fensvick of llnthurM. ItVw IIW I A vriterdav wenMr. VirMi Marson. Proprietor of the n View Hotel and Mr. and llnbert O Lord <>f St. James Visited R.lati who spending holidiv with bar relatives an and aawtaal rned lo Honioh on Men %  Ihl It MS 1-adv Nelson. MrLiverpool far a sister of Mr. Robert KIIIK of Jacfaon. Ting-a-Ling Tells a Story -He Says a W. H MAX IHeXI cpinn Willow Really Weeps "TINli-A-I.INt:." satd Hanid. the •hadow-rirl with tha tiuned-aUmt mtM, "why is this tree called the Wsepuitf Willow ? Does it really weep" For a moment Tint's 1 .rig-a-Uas ""*' silent. Ha and Hamd *rar> aitkn K on the bank of tha Lrook. at il N \n the brook hunjt the Weeping Wlllow. Its slender trreco branches drwoped uvtT the water, almost touching it as it flowed slowly pasL It looked quite sad. Tinc-a-Linir linally spoka. "Yea," ha answered; "the Weeping Willow really weeps. II you COBM early m the morning, just a* the sun nsv* and the air is lilted with mist, you will see the tears on the branches, dripping one by one into the brook "And wby does it •rasp*" Ting*aLing went on. "I'll tell you. It's an old, old etory. But perhaps you've nevar hoard it. Yet il Is true, t'oi it happened in the time of our Crtu4f.U*.. Long 'ABO "Ones, in that old time so long ago, tli.Tv was a ftvauiilul .log. She had long silky half that rawcliad almost to HN <" %  Mssl II i a*H, like gra' SB I I hill And hsi "imf." said Ttng'a%  "•i" Willow %  i. Of tilt' I master. The mnatac n buy with A pala (Ma and golden curls. He waj not a lUong boy. ami often, when he walked d • daa of the broul.. on Willow and it i again ;i>e nil happy to lift < i %  .' i %  %  | I I was line." Ttnf-a-l,ir> %  down irvey < Hall troni Hamilton. Ontaria ate now in Barbados for .. couple of waoka* holiday %  Utying u the ocean View Hotel. Thr> arrlvoal on Monday e\ennig by B.W.I A., from Grenada where they apeni live d*ys sUying at She Sanu. Maria Hot*!, aftei pastas • short visit to Tobago, Mr TurnbuU who Is President. Of ftobert Duncan A Co., of Hamlltor, and Mr. Heather his i: ... ;w< •h,N M, Hall is payin* hinr-t i: i' to the tslanti He %  (tore mtinagei of Thntna, Lees & Co Jewellers, i n Hamilum Leavint Today I T. COL. arm Mrs. O. Ross aRobertaoti of Montreal. Canada will be returning home to" a > b >. T £A* af ^' Pending three woaaut' holiday flaying a' tne Ocean View Hotel. Li COl. Ross Robertson u partner of G. Roaa Robertson and Son.. Insuranei BroKen irf Montreal. Hit wife bthe daughter of Mr. and Mrs <_. E Gausoen aUo ofJM ontie al_ w nii were hoiiduyinn here since Fobruary I, and will DO em-ming for another two wos k *. Resident Tutor Leaves WR. 11. 11 EASTER. Resident AT* Tutor in ,the Windward 1 sinnda for the Univeraitj College <.f Uie Weal Indie*, returned to hia iieadquartcrs in St LAICUI yesterday by B.W.I A. after having discussion* with the Vlce-IMncipal of the University College. Mr. I'hilip M. Sherlock. While here Mr. Kinder also attended as an Observer, the Con'< rence of Social Welfare Officer ol the British Caribbean Area. On Pleasure Trip M R. AND MRS. HARItfsON B Miller of New York Uty who are on .i pleasure trip, traveliing tlllougll the Wen) Indie here yesterday b> -It.W.I.A. from St. Lucia on their first visit and will I-* remaining for about a woek staying nt the Ocean View Hotel I Mi Millei who Is %  llnancler of 1 New York said that they had already visited St. Thomas, Puerto HM.I. Martinique and St. Lucia I and will probably atop at aoma of thr other Islands before returnInfl rsosM On Holiday M RS A U. IIA/.H.I. Of St. Vincent arrived In Barbadivon Monday by 'plane for a short visit and is staying with her daughter. Mrs. A H. MsttertonS.nith. H ONORVD with flbnessm's higheat award, a trio of v inneri (right) pose in Holly* wood's PanUgea Theater with their coveted trophies. In th* a roue eolre.'• Below, right. Vivien Leigh Is kissed by her hus1 and,Sir Laurence Olivler.lnNew York, on winning the best actress %  ward for part In "A Streetcar N'amed Desire." (Intrt-not d.HMH IIIMMM. TO>BAl •" A .: !••"• %  % %  Cl.rM..|ihf "Winston". River Road. B.B.C. Radio Programme WSPHstllAI M*S< II :* %  MSS II is s in !**!>"•• Cboare. tl *S %  Ihr LlncolrsMrt Handwse 1* 'ssmu Thf NSW" It 10 P %  !••.. Ami'"' JAXETTA HIIISS SHIM* (Next Door lo Sinners) eji'ne 10 111" l II. bed. But he paUed livi and said: %  OS] down to the brook, Willow, to the place where we always sit. and wait far m there., ill soon coma.... Don't go far away. Ill soon eome... Walled Patiently "So Willow went down to tha edge of the brook and waited patiently !.rningder. And still she keei i ig by the edge of the hroo! Still waiting and %  mnster who wi lo her so 1 r • 1 o P* i* il %  • I* 0 1 > tr '• n %  DRFSSEh—Just arrived—a lovely selection of Collon and Cocktail Dresses MH.U'I.KSS BRAS. XI to 33 from *3.W I1ATHING SLITS—A large selection of styles, colours and prices !#.#. TIDE I Ml'.Ml OF IHIIIVI.IM. ENTEnTAMNMENTl PLAZA THEATRES •at WAKNEK BROS. SCREEN ADVENTURES AT ITS MIGHTIEST! BIOS|ml / MO, OPI-MNt. HUI|, 27th LM A S 30 pm. rn crazy t< •I'm dead if i don't!' tpm The W#w. 4 tOp nThe nwn* issrrtce, 1 9 m Sawrt. mains Tru i S p m Composer tA nw Weoli. s p i The Untotashire W—Ol rs p I IS f t aiyl'S I* P n. U .iXTaa(sn. p m Bporla swasSS^-P Nrwi Ai—tv.t. a. %  sm Am*. OSBJB i ' Husr aL'.li piotMlloi Mm. ,. %  i tipwt in 1 Aen* •') ejomris inlets T IS pm Talk oo Jaasairs ana rod. r •Hl.-r. rrf the B.W.* T.4S P ni Over lo Vou. S IS p m flaeto NowsreoS. • SO p m B>"U>menl of Account. • P "> Compo^e of the Weofc. S p m 1 wso Commtini.1 to p m Thr Kew>. S M B %  swo, tl,.. runertai 10 l m n> M.or-B Talk. 10 SO p m Maerrimi .i.l waasstag iV SSKs ro'', . U| Thk) ni 1. CIOTIC (Tl •'i-t>tread. (S) prooijruin pisni. (6> j. One -sr tue i rsmtiT. ti a. us* s. (tl *. SSopo. tai Ji. ssss asi s t without nomsr. fsi U. Manv Sinda of it ore taken. II l. Tun* return tu rttrt. f*l T. it 'ta> %  >,- xmi rut ounisn%  •*• Preann rneiif c JS. rHI Vtl.fi wsrsMlr • fling, lone ago Hasp • fnitt crop { This ta bitter in appin WetSSB of T T <11 %  riiii? i ^rlarr: IV B'Mm 14. <|SJ*' I 1 EXCELLENT I. \ EUE SATIN 36 ins. at 82 c.. WHITE. BLUE. PINK. LEMON. Butterick Patterns in all Coming Stylos. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 Yillaqe Sxclusioe Shopping Centre * * IHTORATION HOUSE: Antiques, Gifts. V. DE LIMA & CO: China, Jewellery, Gifts ADVOCATE CO.: Book Shop, Stationery t'ARUi SHOP: Carved llaho^ny, Kalivc Barbadian Wares. Indian Bags and Belt*. GREVSTONE GALLERIES: Completely new Technique, designs and Finlshea in Barbados Pottery, STANSFELD SCOTT & CO: Wines. Spirits and Groceries, THE ENGLISH SHOP: Materials blocked by hand, Skirts. Shirts, Shorts. BETTINA LTD: Gowns, Lingerie, Gifts, etc. CLUB POINCIANA: Bar. Restaurant. Guest Rooms. HRENDA BEAUTY SALON: Ladies Hairdressia*, Beauty treatment. PLAZA CINEMAS BKIlMll:TOWN—bill 2SI0 LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 t. 3.30 P.M. RIVER LADY HONEYMOON LODGE LUCKY LOSERS & LAW OF THE WEST & SIDNITT M'l"\l SAT JSih ..Uor RAIDERS OF THE DESERT CHEYENNE COWBOY ft LJ1_* .-""'-'*-'-!'-" ""'-" '""-'-"i, RARBAREFN ItMUVNTOWNI — lUI 111* TODAY ft TOMORROW 4.30 ft 8.30 P.M. AN ACT OF MURDER & SOIJTHSEASINiNF.lt staaoi c.in B h i O-RRIKN sM4.r. wucnata A sifciion.id t-.prv THURSDAY SPECIAL I .SO P.M. AUn "Rotty LANf Doubt. SHERIFF OF WICHITA a SUNDOWN IN_SANTA FE^ OPENING FRIDAY 4 45 8 30 P M HIGHWAY 301" I COCMtAN and II ,iu-h far ihi\,In, lis, n,,. „ls . o\ Ol II "OVEN FRESH" SERVICE THK WEST* IMIIA HIM %  II •. LTD. MAN COCHRAN Brtn ^prclil The Color Short "CIKCUi imvv Sppc-UI Shows nt BrldsoUun I MlllMTE SAT. 3h I rlplc Attraction | 1 Tex Brnrkc & QtM Mills Orchestra 2 "( hrtrmir Cowbo)" 3 "Raldrn. ol thIr~'rrt IB i it ii \ nits (Dial MTOi (DOU'MOwN UPENING FRIDAY Ulh TERWmROADoFm TRI-STATE MOB! j!"i!A GUEY • GABY AMJRL % % %  ANDREW STOWf ITS ENTERTAINMENT WEEK AT ROODAL THEATRES. THK OBEATBtTI SSJIJN ON EARTH Ml 1KHS I 41 V %  %  > I Sr. and llrjr tin I iihrlirv.ble Gifts at Uir I MI'lltl HN li:il.\V MAKt'H 2BTH at 1.20 and RtlXV UN 1 I l:slv\v VI'IMI. 1ST al 8.30 laW.VIII %  iii-c, NIGHTS BEGIN AT mi rnriiti oTIII it~n\v MAKC-H TH



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. MAKCH H. 1M Know Your Football— LAW FOULS AND MISCONDUCT \// 3 Ex-world Champions Offer Olympic Help But The Amateurs Remain (.'km I inns By (KORGK WHITING RANDOLPH TURP1N, Freddie Mills and Terry Allen put their services at the. disposil of Briuna amateur boxers this summer—not ilv as teachers, trainers or roaches, but at men who - honour attainable in their proHT By 0. S. COPPIX A player who uHciitimially comIMMK1 trial thi* law should be mill My "f the following oftenvigorously enforced by refcreeces shall be pcna.ised by the to prevent improper conduct and %  .ward 0* a DIRECT FREE-KICK It U lb* duty of Ihf B.A.F.A.. to have achlewd III Cession. %  Mif arts of | knowledge, but orld Chamami that ( : %  leur. to be taken from EM pl ihc offence occurred %  ,. %  .. Kuk la) KuKui attempt: an OppOQMI En tor jfersisten' infringement of this law, do not punishment. vpt when he — ta) u holding the Da ib) is obitructiiig an poneol te( naa paved outside goal-area. Until I •• itiu "I 1 ( rofi Empire Defeat I'ickwick-Rovers 3—1 In their 2nd Division flxilliln earl...t nt lu „. a Queen', Park yesler<|my. Empire defeated PickFASHIONED *^\ fit FITNESS throw him by IB Assist The Keforrc (lull officials loo should legs or by stooping or behind him. (c) Jumps at un oppoi (d) Charge* an OppOtt violent or dangero ner. (e> Charges nn opporn i fron' M ll1 Charifiiiu From > "> '*" "" Now that i have ma. Ad Third Mvieton sonMru ,tlon i ^.^id i lkr ,.. using bad language or f) w obsetvetioeu with n addressing observations I al fuil ... ing p i uyer from ri til ll < .illfuSKIII eferee i< have been ; this in the |>st r otr the fteld, %  %  the mind: behind unkssa'the lanes b. ",^r,J "\\ behove" 'th.' VIA FA !'''''' obstructing; ,,, ,,„.,, ,„„ Sllc n ,„ m „hmenl to (O Strikes or attempt to strike „, p/tinO— Bl would dlf opponent. rourag, th,. ot The came was very .ng the bail ir lak-nn idmltted • combinaiion _as iu neoro bun (our offleial rec"'most entirely lacking holding the boll withoi.. nrnonK the members of the it on the ground th* Olympic cn-operntion teams, m ooite -n ridicuEmpire took the touch off. and fn.m the beginning were masters o' Hi. ii opponenta. After a urn'P„ n _* TaiilrilJIlUflli pic of attack! were warded off ClUsIS lUUriWHIt 1st Ing lunch with *£ %  '" r ^^ ,ook possibly | Shoit range %  '• Roilkeepcr. ._. ed the scoring. o f the Pickwick Rovers' harn. the tendency to play Ml*ed Devblea Keen :iiir> critlrflll' of the crowds that *E olu i (uotball jn,j evi-i minds of the play. huh beat Pickwlck'e T 0- AV 'S "XTl'RKS ', E &£&£ FMtCr Und "*'"' ^V^wfeTl? J. D. Trirnin. bgrsad fron iieMnki boys "* ,,i hand or any part of hi Indirect Kree-Kick '>">* his own go arm. A player commuting an) ol tha b,, lh ! BO dangerous. arm. INDIRECT PUB-KICK to be Th ^ offence of charging at (I) Handles the ball, l* WUkM by the opposing side from Pon*" 1 T m behind ll rles, strikes or propels the place where tha infringement the ball with his hand or ocCurTCd. arm. (This of course does < 1 > Playing in I manner conplayer may be behind when he Ls lm>nttonll> sshand Ha %  JM n.ciitloned that obstrucUng an opponent Vbetha. the KBA ittllude IO lh prnlTerod f/-. SP taS not had baan TOM I ..nil '.ii : k ami thl: %  hindrance in their attempt: score on Empire. As the game. But Mi .1 O, Milntotiii. comcontinued. Empire made more atii> twin functions of lompts to score but iiuito fre%  ntancy and the uuenlly the ball was kicked over rranorai bip of tho the t>ars. At half time the score litted where a player in pUyui \|..\ look ntfuga Rl Scottish cauiem.une" Kr.litu.le „d hjlf. pl.>• wa. eonemtrale.! Shou d a player of the delendkeeper. such intention, but it has been t-.ai.nH hoth lha Pickwick's m B side intentionally commit one (2> Charging fairly i.e. with noticed that some I oft '"'%"g ^^^S^STSZ of the above nine Offence, within ,,„ %  moulder, when the ball is s, ru e the UW mo,. ; i^To^^^S. "* "* th*pennltvare.,heshallbepen.-.l. NOT wfhm playing distance of Js necessary to secure fair ,lay. "Jj* A ^ r ^[ %  J a [;1"'*^*^; With the^score at two love in %  ed by a PENALTY KICK. th. players concerned and they and In consequence of such de{^f than ps,r\ Ice when they 'vour of Empire, play continued A penalty-kick can he iwanUd ,,. .lettniicKnot trying to play cislons the progren of the game is \ l *U T irreapective of the poalUon i>f the it. impeded. tall, if in play, at the time .n <3i When not playing the ball. If a player turns so as to faci offence within the penal'v i i icntlon.illy obstructing an ophis own Kl when hfl kl IMfcll enramrttod ixinent. i.e. running belwe'ii the by an opponent, or Is obvlouslv This i> .n In ppononl and the ball or imposing, aware that he is about to br referee bsklng the Initiative whom tha body H as to form an obstacle tackled by an opponent, he is Inh ^ces neeesr two from Bcttvo or recently und a lovely shot taken by Nor"iial champions vllle at left wing was pushed over ui-'ly not come amiss. I' the bars by Foster. Morris n help. kicked the corner and Rudder receiving the ball scored the third rurpini and Allen have (old ma goal for Empire. Play ended through their managers that they without further score, would be more than willing to The teems are as follows:lend a hand — and Allen goes Pickwick Rovers: M. Fotte) Webster. Robinson. FT Gerald. tOUT fly-weight or banMc Kemie. Lewis, Kelly. Carter. tarn who fancies nuv irop In W Grecnidge. D. Greenldge. L. •nil at Aliens rniarters Foster mm be Empire: Grant. Havnes. Jor%  or his championship dcdan. St. John. Rudder, Clarke. K Cardnaf No Morris. Hutchinson. Harper. Iit*rties taken and no ABA rules Douglas. Norville Art Eshibltlon at the Museum — 10.00 a m Court of (li.o.J Sf.MOiL10.00 am Speech Day at Barrlsori Col lege—2 30 p m Meeting of the Advisory Board. Oentral Hospital 3pm "ken. THE "unchanging Orient' will PreaJdent €.f A1BA is' EMILE sot a new faahiftn *in crlckOI this GREMAl'X. French industrial spring. The Indian team intend chief In Ulle. Hon. secretary will oe a CiVllwu Wtuun to fly iicre In mid-Ainl lha Oral and neai.ici Is Lieut.-colonel itw weviu ll WUl M as insUi .iir-oonie inv.iMi.ii" of this land I. II. RI'SSEI,!,. whose offices are inai n w will ueicnu mAssA alt by a full team of crickoton, la London ....o-wviikot cnampmnampi I talked to honorary-advancev v i ThiriL "* %  wul * m "' ll " •' agcnt-for-vwniiig teams IIAKOUt '* ul 1 1 "* %  > i 0 wm his second true by way oi t.IIXIGAN. who used to pla> to. '1 %  *"i-l-i>>. WWIW Kept M ltA1 illlu inssBTM Sussex. "This latest TttM vtctOT) -"ll l,,] '"* %  *-""' *" ,u Bviveuera ciimmalors rather man linougn by India should stimulate micie-t "Kiioail club, but rcccmly leu lm civdian c.uu Bl W'atunsnu.. in their doing a lot," said he. .,. m, ,.^ years ol age. I have ltMmim unJ. ii;. jumped at I agree—It b-.lh "' ,.. %  -aian. e-tioni Him by leliei Kcason is that Nicholl* will bt Nlon, It i tuciy tune." nu a gallop instead of a jog-trot in because the other day ne was ull demooiiisation leav e when U* i>body pockcthcorlng. A dreary 30-runa-indescribed as 33 hAJ .. C hampiotinips begin. Ii he !" "'" (-"•''' and got together hour rate just will not do w o " or footbaUors lowerr,,^. m e Wemoley hnals on "" il "* Olympic ousiness. Count The two ladies' teams for the MacKinnon, Jean Chandler. Seventh Tour m . "" %  '" ,"^"'\ c wnu B %  JiS A V rtl M he rtU u '•"""•' ll "",•!', ,, to , M (J waler P 0 0 K am * he played at Phylhs Chandler. Janice ChandTh.s wUI be GlLtgan'l aaventh -'"' %  "'le ^ put it up seems a little „,. lilin(UllltCa IIom ^ Tinil M tntortun itely. age-old prejuthe Aquatic Club on Saturday ler. Fried, Ca.michael. June Hill tour BS preliminary arranger. He ^SLA ,0LZ£L?, ^.,W\ "M'*^' and not "AircraHma..." v ,.,,:.,' V, V *' MIJ me Collins. ,n those secoivi time He arrange, 'he ,out *' X,I ; *V-?htu P '""ny an llXtures a nd social engagement*, ""stoppable shot. puts the journeys and hotels the hands of a travel agency ; submits the complete itinerary ... the visitors for approval. have anything to fear irotn the h RUBBtani should the two countries Olympic Gamca at I'llli.WELL GOLF CLUB ha% have not %  I title fi pl.lVl-l-i Peggy 2 SP" CJ IU 11 "T AB A haveli; Vtdn\..r M-S K" h. Ann 2 %00 pm brentwood. .s „ member B>tOtd Mjn be "keen and Taylor. Jean MacKinnon. Chris cr* ,irc asked me to-day that he la a beginner grateful' for all the help they !" !" arm has no handicap. l "' get. I %  %  ~ %  %  — r •Nothing To Four WILL BriUui's racing eycllata I ahould say the West In would have been happy An Itcl.siuki in July? Russia t aphe and has no handicap. The youthful looking bishop ll keen sportsman. Formerly lic.imaster of a school in Nottingham, useful cricket. qualified football referee. He has a house in South Woodford. Title Change? Wnethei we like it or not, povera] memben of our Olympic teem will eventually be turning ma!—just as Jack GardQ Scott, Johnny Wright, Ron Cooper. Tommy Profltt and Henry Carpenter did after the Wi nibley. Hat harm coul<( llicre be in a little-fraternisation before bead of after? i i>t i ontroUed, and I am sure thAHA ould remalD unsullied —L.E 8. tetui %  i,tm arranga th* tralfa. The Itinerary there plication lo become -111bated ,_ s-rongly ittacked by JOHN QOD""' "-•".'tionai Olympic Body is ^ !" hZJ !" J££ *S£* D3S £5 ^ 3 '^£J?n^ !" j£?l Canad'^Uiu yet"•*• %  (t ,. ,,„! ol u„s moidli Mrs. BAE GRANT. Support Fron Africa In the IWO metres the Husaian champion rromSaskatch. .--1K Kl'OIN Mill IM. ION tille-li der. I. II'POIJTOC. would '"vmg in Montre-1, has entered loi DRAKE. Eton and Oxford 0*1 "• %  d..ngci 11 lie had t iddeii |B ,h e ihanipionship. in London In najL BOW on a lecture tour of the the 1948 Olympic Games at WemMarch. The Gold Coast, is also representing bley, and clocked the same time w %  %  w *-, YVT 0 W ," ,i„. _ there QU A of I mm 14J sees., his Russian took the cup back to Canada H -l. and in Engrio>JB| AaaocUUon The .;.;.i .cord, it would have earned him herin B3P. d. Hean nUght ...e a Uned Coaat he wrltOI Full %  econJ place. J. DUPONT Tho Danes hove so m L 1.000 a ihuaieam for afltllation to AIBA I rrence) wen the event m 1 min.. 'hi. event over the last four yeeri WHut as a bas. ball pitcher now Nigeria has come in. too. Ha 18.3 aeca. ,h " n additional oppositi-n I also has been told that an East Britain's record for the distance welcome. African aaaoclatinn, covet in K obtained elsewhere — is 1 mln,. Money To Bum Uganda. Kenya and Tanganyika. 14 sec*, by WUf WATBBB. In ONE JIM HEARN has (a likewise applying for mernbei similar conditions British cyclists for the Giants, who ploy not foot% hip. having nothing to fear. ball, but baseball. Had it been what "The guessers are guessing." writes n New York columnist that he signed for about 23,000 dollars They'll Do It Ev.fy 1'imc — BY JinuiiY Hatlo K'ifi }; WhtrJl is LH.000 and some considerable hundreds. Some of our boys have chosen the mot | vocation. So have many of oi, I men —L.E.SUnguentine Relieves pain of TOP SCORERS AT THE INTERSCHOOL SPORTS 'TBhe Xodge School • TOP SCORERS 'tailoring JP. e. S. fMaffei & Co., Pr Wm Henry Street MAFFEI 6 CO, LTD. EXTENDS HEARTY CONGHATULATIONS TO LODGE SCHOOL ON THEIR RECENT VICTORY — raaf bora ren cJr last Is sndttp Rcllctet' Piio— %  Coorfbrt—Pronotea ing. Tubes or jsrs.' Total Rainfall for month to date: 2-11 Ins Highest Temperature: 80S *F Lowest Temperatnra: 71.0 F Wind Velocity: 12 mileper hour Barometer (BID) 30 003 (3 pm ) 29 921 TODAY Sunrise: 6.16 am Sunset: fl 12 p m Moon: .New. March 2ft Lighting6 30 p m High Tide* 3.46 am.. 4.26 p.m. LOW Tide: 10.10 am 10 22 p m William: There II anh tar tinor ii i iu:sir SERVICE THE WIM IXIA IIIMIII CO. LTD. •OVEW



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\>IJ>MSI>\y MARCH M, IH2 il \KHAIHls VOVtK'.ATi: I'M.I \l\f HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD . BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG Be kind to your face UMUMla I CM Crc.im ... torn oonphi rim you ike uvc ihe partw ol irmovc ii. Duo'l at.*.* your MIKMC tliri. There's mi nerd l\>nJ\ MHI Tn.su* Hanlies jrr •*> ahforbrnt thai Miq adj MB*M) s lot the** Tittuet all the now. .vewhere I Ml J hankie*, ihev air wflci than the |M .arnbtiv. ifkl law you noun ol MBtJiuia and iron** l>e-iro% ihcm OIKT you haw uted thorn today, and keep n handy. Ml you ewr MMM -I -iili1 Hankie* Ai all the beat i Ml -4 1*1 a I'-KI lod* > K^~ *T Vow -ill -onder hi.* "•*/ "*-^/ out Pond'i Iiuof M Vf A ^7 MOW*. M /.„. IOT STRONG MIOUINT Pains in Back. Nervouj, Rheumatic. •tlam. Pi**> *>wl. Kn.%a l-ff.r. y..iiMood Mh n oral .lr. IHteVUUat." • .wer M'-ail -1*1* .ktn. aefaaaatDn i .Im, l...•..„-. an Amafiear r-d a qnkii. •* %  > • %  •tonll*ittrNMM. thin **"<" l t" pi**"' <.-*>•> lablet foraa. It akaolut. I .. away with Bland on. i i*a *rd t keiNftaf aaw rouih a c-*r to lh.-is*da. Il w.**a dtr and r %  '"'TIH iotinfa* Tour *• TOU fa*l aMva and full m< ar and power. ul il.iamailni. naw Bland a %  ,....r .~t.*.r. called VI /.larant-ed It baa b**n proved ....".!. and la now ottotrtl i --.(. here an.lrr a Buaranf%  ,-ta-li. n.* naati back. VI-T.M %  H-.IIyeii faat hill "1 vla-ur ferry **.! from !• to Pr"pi -. B.ec.4* rM*r* kaa and sat your tyiinr r* HTAM •eete llitl. -Tabs M.hW %  -. vi". FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS TODAYS NEWS HASH M-HILTi) N_si PTNL-lli LN \ MANY i>.' H i i J WIW lOVI'l I..I BJM l**d 'Aanr-1'AKi ii T HYMN AM) II 1'AMtl IHJOII KKM \ JOHNSONS BTATTONKRY and II\I %  %  | i i TO£f KIP KIRBY ,.,/,:?* .-„. ^^^^ tOfFOV HATE5 W BUTlftKCMEOlOMm 50MPV *X*T MOMCA—1= WCDOESaTT P TttfTMO-GOCpyOMw Pt*CAW>.y HKMkffa* I^Mfca^athMBV.IttWiirwI E gMCMCA) THAWlt VOU, > MU wBU..9UE *•• &N CaTPMAN.../WS* AatVW.Tuy *t**.TM^..(fMCP..A OUiET. Z..WUAT yoj MvE UMSLV GB?L WHO WAS H VW r TOlO ME CHtCKS WTTU My OWM e*' S1TMKT i^yr THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES ma % % % %  -: %  %  Haina n AND TUG POOC H&WBCQ MAlfi C^L-,.V V • IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPE CIAL o ffers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SPECIAL OFFEiM~~~arr nun otailablr al • HrunrhrT lr< %  Kid.. S|im -(211.) Tim Imprriiil Vlmnu Frank SausK*s DsiuUly K N %  -' .SO Usually Now Tins I'N.r.u! ( h, .,. (3-ltl) 4.10 38 rk|{s. Jacob's I r.-.nil Crurkcrs .49 .38 l*K HAMS. Tender. Sweel (CoM Slorace) Whole or %  %  1.44 1.14 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE 4 O I. O \ N A D B II O i I II I I. S ST. VI^CEXT f.'llf'IMfl.V GOOSE \m SERVICE I'HISIM SI III IM I I si. Vlieeni/IUrtiaMlo-/SI Vlncmt l^partN se. Vlnrmnl . 9.00 a.m. Arrives Rarbadov . 10.00 | m t). I. .r t-. Rarbadoa . 1030 aJTi. Arrive. HL Vincent LI N H t.00 10.30 11 SO 1.00 10.00 10 3') 11.20 12 l St. Vlnce.t/THnJdad/St. Vlnrent Depart* SI. Vincent Arrive* Trinidad Depart*. I nnld...I Arrive* ftt \ m• M HI DM s|i\vs s viiKenl/.reis*da/Sl Vlnrenl UtpiTtm 81. Vlneent Arrive* (.reoBda U-**rU Grenada Arrlvea Si. Vincent Addlllflnal ni*hl From SI. Vlnrenl lu Trinidad Time* on Application •fata********* Sl Vlnetol/iar*-dlo*/Doinlnlea IBLWMII.II Brfc*do*/St Vincent Departa Ht. VUicenl \rrlVB* Rarbado* I'-njrU Karbadon Arrive* Dominic. lirparlA Homlnlia Arrives RarlMil"< iMVarla Barbado* ArriveSt. Vlneent FRTPAVN HI V**eat'Trl-ldBd/SI Vincent l'l*rtHt Vlneent S.00 ML \rriv, lrlnid.,1 • 10JO I'" DeaarU Trlnhlad 1130 a.m. Arrive* W. Vlneent 1.00 |> m 800 .i 9.00 ,i i. mi 11.30 .i 2.30 p 3.00 n 400 i I.AHIIIM It VIMI\ A CO.. LTD. Maven I %  . r Rroad ... Phone 71 LONG INNINGS The Autobiography of SIR PELHAM WARNER Pnnand, a %  crlrhetlni entity. mar ju-ils rail I'luin" Vtarnrr ber own. but I nrlixhinrn cannot claim him an enelualvelv tar tin nla Irian and KpaitJih hlood In In veins aa well, tvhile Ihe lir.t lliu teen -.rof bin life were spent In Trinidad. Ihe land of aa* birth Perhaa* It I* thla broader l>.i k %  round, rotnhlned with In%  Mr' dlllaum travel, thai Ins enabled Mr Prlham lo achieve nnt nnU %  MUlandhiB iiHfrw aa player and aaortMnan. but al*o pre-emlnerwe UH diplomat and rliler %  .'..'-m n,.t erlekel. All the treat event*, veralee and peraoHalltlet r,a*ae over a period of mr abrty yaara are mirrored book, in a vtry Intimate a tonal way. Moreover the aaorl*tlon with a ho*l of famoUH and ottneure. In al of the world, haa endon with a Uafe of anecdote..ften rare knowle <>( %  raaie of siiitti<-iin it' -Mi •tlr Felhani uae* to the full to the aid of an ev.etlent ory. %  .iilr., of the re than In (Ins id Periuth*r*peuple I parts I him land Mlde uhhli hank ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Si and ihe Village, Grsyilone Shops. Balmoral Gap.


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H\Rli\i>os AIM OC ATI i* AIM m AH % .—i— t —--1 M..rch 2t. 1S52 Xcws From Britain SCHOONER Bv t Al I.IIA.V JfRD 'J*' * r '' oulbr k hav # been part of Court ceremony fur mnv 1.1 \I IIY POUT %  | %  pie say. 1 I Id But a deep ny a .tempts to And element iiry nuisI |00f life on tho %  %  v UM port of Bridgetown is f Barbados' economic lift. On its efficiency and smooth running depend port of our major ex' sugar and molasses and the quick large volume of imports on which we depend for food, clothing and homes. The dock workers of Barbados are %  workers ofl this island. Without i .%  id %  i their efforts the Ity "i" the 0H and The n.; end K*nno4 wish of an Island every penny it run earn to < ducnti rid train them as good lUtted workers. v'i Bri ( ojoy the He iei'UUtlon of be-in* the most expensive pori in the Southern Caribbean. • i. lacking? According to the report of the Depart: Labour for 1950 'the Joint Port I I the 0 vet) divisional com. continue.:. Id work well. All of ttten %  fleeting work In the which these committees dealt with amicably, Twenty four meetheM and eight agreements affecting wages and conditions of employment %  to this report good will is not lacking. Yet the port of Bridgetown continues to be so expensive; turn-round of ships is so U .1 fn. [hi ratt have been inbj ii.' if than 15 per cent, to cover i t expense of callini; at Carlisle Bay. A ship's Captain who visited Barbados recently tim.vrd that it cost his shipping companv S' 1.200 for each day spent in Car an hardly be blamed for impatience at a three days' delay. V.'l i l,,y? Sir Douglas Ritchie, Vice Chairman of the Port of LondCD authority details some of the reasons in his report on the proposed construction of a deep water wharf. i to stevedoring; he notes: "the quicker the men work, the greater is the profit' | rs and this is partialit Ime hours. The whole • resentment among the men. which by a slowing down of the work.* 1 %  m to wrong. i he notes that "m view of the fact that the lull overtime trip rate is payable IcOul Is %  I M H %  is for afternoon w cii down in order to ensure UUonal payment . The origin of this system no doubt lies in the tad (hat tiic whole cost <>( overtime is borne by the ship ami for the same reason there is %  ntive fur cither the men or the contractor to alter the arrangement. The deleterious effect of this system both direct anin a be more than hanif %  mischievously perhaps, that w i iment was ma VIMThey do not b(iev that the I hnse. anyhow—are dying >urta—field during the %  ttosy should "pinafternoon—arc. quite the -amc ftr Australia'* audden Impon -'will goods for export'. 'he ^ afternoon W luxuries <"• %  *.h hats I I nners wh<. thought eied on u We "re always hcartu* that i *a tnls ii austerity Hntain. and that; I ]*pcr. F "i trying to produce we don't get <40UEh to A se< %  'the right kind of goods which It teems to me that it all depends M.P> I., ought to want to buy, on how much money we have in' tan. which the our pockets to buy off-lhe-utioTi' WS J and Australia says foods or spend in restaurants. k,tt em. I'riUin. * are rich, we can grow' Said Socialist H P Mr Wiiiied P 'hap* tlir*e foreign maksrs of very fat; If we arc not so rich peiBurkc: mtnaea Of eaesk i*rfumes and not ao haps thtr e is plen'.v fish. If *e sis Japsnsss nailing chees,*. u> whose Pr. it is Just too bad, anyway, ftaggeiing blow to Lnncashirv. hB| I Mr. Daiion took •• it is a reiici. parnapa. to be Msrkela once lost cannot bo xception. are now laughinR "' plainly that jlniish m nneregaini-. gently, quins are fatter than the girls who do the same job In America. %  Ii is a crippling blow not only Commonwealth Conference to Lancashire cotton but Kmpire Crusaders, I tfgrtea Said Socialist Mils Elaine • %  " %  EW a*s anh f a ihi'n Burton; "SsmHblng must be done embracing O mnionwealth Con"**. '"*"*!" •*'"f'' enet, to weUBo up the wealUi .„„*2?„.,"?*J3! r : <..n rlcvtlfp and dlstrlb„„^ _,^ .^rT^ .. Just back from Ner York with lurtlll, .lion, „o ur,n th. ?" b ^ 0U ?*' "^ pre "' ""• who lld _U a nJ.V: .1,. ^ J£' %  • _% %  • —'-' ching for i. • %  i isults, at least i sense or the the British Vlesral With Disquiet vith an eye on U.e othci 0 I %  niig of the iir* laatarat n n* ben sf iiw Mti-'iinv Area, and eapeetalty of UM Cc4NBM.wSa.th. What has %  i in Australia mav r\K t-rwi. • %  ugh thought about the peopti 't;-llunR of taking th*anns road." ^ fche finds a dHPcu-t u> ti them. She wants them to be tall, slim and between 5ft Sin. and 5ft. Sin. Other DMMun roanta: not more than 33 in. bust, 22m waist, 33 In. cup. Fatter But most British mannequins are often little 'atter than that, *ays Gab>. Some Ihe peoples *' them have a 36 ir11 cotouta and kinds, who w 0 "'* 1 "me inio the matron" iiuike uj> the community. Tin. clMa ov r *"•"*. 'h* Bdas 11 would itvs us i'"inmunity of Conunonweslth. il is the same all over Britain. The achievements of our forefathers In building up the much for Otsd r.r.cl their i iiigane-e. wool, dwoods and all the joyous pi^ of news for former Minister of Supply, miiJ.-j "iblxT ii would be ImpoassbU to find "I'lcal narcwooos ana ill tn* Britain's old" people. It ether markets f ,r the vc %  • lhc V are Just sOodhkely ^^ tca rMlon ing maybe Australia has bssa taking. to Brttaln, Canada. ubo | lsncd during the coming year. 3b Mr.l"eter Thornvcroft. preslArnca, Australia, Hew aeaiand, aa lhe lrade ls | hl „|djiig up ufildent of the Board of Trade had ,ndui an,t "* others They arc (iCfll llockg for m t o be done. them the hard fact that Pjww <> nv • e *V on J 16 navl€t For tea drinking is to the aged % %  ''• ll 10s an d rad, V" r not only a mSSSUTC of COt&fOft It! peoples' Imports u* well and Hun hort ff B %  ,,ul l,x P d,ldul s quickly lt a ltntllh tradition, an oft reUUlaUon and posti :'id P"ugh. peated Introduction to friends, a a sellers* market couldn't last foi • e solace In loneliness, .v.i. ;ui i (hat thuiA and witn a jolt. The splendour of debutante It Is a .u^bslitute for the glaasei So here we arc where we came com^ mtf he seen again In , r bccr and !'" %  %  '" ld 1 j m ,, %  *** in. LondOQ next year, the Coronation their working son, and d-ughters The uprlng sun shines wa-mly ycar order In the pubs it replaces the tndav, and Die niihl wituu-departs, cups of coffee over which Conine trees confe out In bud and The young Queen, they say. linentala linger in the cafes. pretty girls look prettlm and gayer would like to see the debutantes. But the effer. on the working ,,, the! Buffs n.w -string fashion who include the tilted youth and man; Will we have to provide But it's the same old story; beauty of England, presented more cups of tea to the carpenter work harder and longer to produce again wearing the traditional and the plumber, the decoraUM more (Oc MMS money nd graceful gowns and and the bricklayer, when doing rone of us will bo I'ery gHy In %  three tsa ta Sff S. These evening a Job In our aWUSSl. they JNIUSC year or ao. pre antanons discontinued since once again for a rest? AOW. MR. CHURCHILL Give The Scots Their Si out' Hark COasalENTING %  •* %  •* iai on Use nralh aroused In Scotland over the Queen's tiUe of tliiabelh II.. I wrote ol "Iho axe-old taubUltj f Ihr B— WSS In iinderxliiid Ihe mind* of oilier people." i i.tt:,. though) '!' % %  Mr. r i.unlnli, tingreatest living Englishman of tfitlT all. would Bo soon illustrate my point by the hsn-fuaed way he handled the re-* met get .. of ths Coren mi the deep. dark dunsjaona of \v. Aboajf, Tomfoolery 1 ilonl know who advised him if indeed anysns fUU Ha is suspiciously cagey on that nut whomever he sought aitald suggest that before he makes Ihe next move he inighi do belUrr to ror then i so much official tomfoolciv over UiU larnentabu) I only conclude the Stone's birth 'ars *.% %  • ANY man possessed or %  Lttle tact, a little common the Invsluable n.ft of being able to laugh when someone makes lmn look fooUsb, could hu\e ha.i Uia Stone buck In n week. That was obvious in the drat Itw days Hs H % % %  stolen Those who took Ufet eouldnt do %  nyUUng with it. didn't want to KOSp It. wen too h d %  i'. and. as D told carry it up and down the country because they couldn't lind M give ft to, Tlio !'• .MI \\.--tii.instcr. a sensible Scot, took the right hnu in the llrNt hour. He made a ,..ke -.f ,t If he had hen Bblo t. keep it on a |oke level tinBtOM anwld ha\x been back ti %  %  • 1 But the palace kicked his pants and he was compelled to [Mur out a lot of portent.wi I over the radio which blew the affair UP to the sire of a national eata^tiophe. f %  j. %  : 11 %  r %  %  ; After that it u i taMtvltahla to anyone who QbdafMood l' 1 Scots mind that ipprovi %  of the enterprise—Would ran<(f the ilde of tha : %  had been done bad bssa done for Scotland Morsovei then no joke ihe bv. %  i ...iv betfa r than pulling the" hi. I The more Ihe Ihe politmnny. and the police moancil and groaned, the more pompous buttl • uuuii' Mill A (.OIIOOX As a result the handing back Of Uie Stone became more difllCUlt than Ihe purloining of it. I HAD some personal experience of that, for at one point 1 found myself the "go-between" empowered to negotiate its return. The terms were easy. "No ion. ond a dignified lumtinx-over In keeping with the vsnsrstauji which the Scots f iho Slorte." A venerDUCh deeper than moat appreciate. to make it easier still for Iho authorities those who had the StOne In their keeping did not %  y public admission that it was given back on terms." An 00 cr The Palace, priests and pollUetans IB London were at that tune very anxious about the condition of the Stone, for a rumour had spread that it had i ess '. rfously damaged. empowered to pass on %  i i %  %  %  • and Mcumts description of the damage, how It had been caused, and how cirefully and soundly It had bees reps With the agreement of those I OfflSied that tinstone would be placed 11 ly in St. Giles's Cathedral, Edinburgh, late one night without any ceremony that would attract public attention. I suggested that If it were )< tt there for three week-, before being taken to London.lt would be a gesture much appreciated by all Scots, and bring a happy ending to a sorry business. 'Prosecution' For a DBS days that solution possible. Then suddenly itupadatf reared Its tu Back came London's ultimatum. "We intend to prosecute with all vigom. and we .'hall whisk the Stone out of Scotland Iho moment we lay hands on it." "TtOSSCUtloa would be folly." 1 cautioned "VIHI can't do it. M uill merely provide a sounding board for the moat fanatical naUOnaUStle propaganda. You will have Scotland boiling over t toyed with the idea i>f enjiieadlock by putting the Oa night in the Bleeping .MI of Mr. Hector McNeil, then I land %  rhleh 1 %  tilt have caused him nle embarrassment. WHEN finally Uie stone was returned, those who had delayed Its return because they vengeance discovered. as I had warned them, that they dared not prosecute. Hut apart from that one gllmMfUJt they continue,! to ,,iditv upon stupidity. If they had sat down deliberde.'ise the pci 'to lacerate the patriotic fsattDSS of the Siots they couldn't have done it I A bearer party of young Scots laid the Stone with reverence amid the ruins of Arbroath Abbey. That was the last touch of reverence and dignity it w to enjoy for many a long day. Whisked away Within minutes it was seized and thrown Into a police cell. Within hours it was put in a car and raced across the Border in the style cf gangsters making their getaway with the loot. In London it spent anothef Btfijhi in a prison cell, and was then moved across and dumped into the deepest cellar of the Abbey, thorn to he for months, in much the tame condition as a criminal would hide his stolen property. And now Mr. Churchill adds the final touch of degradation. He hae the Stone brought out of the dnnsjeon ba ehaSis. and blithely tells the House of Commons that that is what his advisers advised him to do. No wonder he dare not give their names. Especially if they are Scots. No wonder everv Scottish MI', who could get on h /eel gasped with horror and challenged him immediately. I WOULD suggest .to Mr. Churchill, with an the respect and deference he has so Justly earned by greater achievement's then this, thnt he should lift his eyes from Europe for a moment, turn them across the Border, and try to understand the mind ot Scotland. For he has lit a flr c in Scotland that will take some damping down. Scotland wants the Stone beck. He should send it back. Grievances The relations between Scotland and England are not as happy as they should be at this s, '"i:.>'vi ,, „!.„., ,., „. reasonnble grievances, a feels that the recent over-centralisation of government in London h a blo 1 J l t 'I too much under the heel of England. The Scots are a peculiarly sensitive people. Perhaps thev the.r history But that is nor something that can be eradiVtS\ 9 1 ind ^ d of wh h thev need feel a.shimed, T '1E Coronation Stone to them IS something more than ;",%  hii ,f ihe fumish.ng* of Westminster Abbe. Thev regard it as their historic prop^ eity. stolen from them. They are proud that British kings should be crowned sitting upop II. And thev would bo very proud to send it with nil the ceremonial dignity to the Abbey at ell coronaUon time* But they think that between coronations it should rest | n Scotland, where Scotsmen could •ee it, guard il. and cherish it. So give the matter some more thought, Mr. Churchill. Ami get some wiser Scottish advisers than you teem to have. FT u you don'ti srrid the Stone back the Blue Bonnets mny be over the Bord. And that would be deplorable —L.E S. I SAFETY THE announcement made during the last iew days that one schooner owner was fitting his vessel with radio telephone will be re. eive-1 with much satisfaction throughout Mdies. Intercolonial travel since the years of the. %  var has been largely confined to plane or I schooner. Steamship facilities remain exremely limited despite all the pleading and : protests of West Indian governments and peoples. i But Intercolonial trade had been limited 'o schooners. Fruit, vegetables, firewood and coals which form the bulk of this trade, ire taken from one island to another by schooner mainly because of the facility for travel and the reduced cost. The cargoes are not expected to go back and forth without being accompanied by human beings. And those people who by reason of their business are forced to travel i.etwLcn the islands by schooner are exposed, not only to the dangers of the deep, but the agony of being without the means to call for help in time ol It does seem illogical mat West Indian governments should subscribe financial support foi an elaborate weather bureau and a modern system of forecasting and transmitting conditions of weather and approaching storms and then refuse to compel vessels travelling in lhe area to carry' equipment which would pick up the warnings sent out, For many years now, it has been pointed out in this newspaper that many of the Captains of sailing craft did not hold Master Mariner Certificates. This In itself created a hazard when they were allowed to take passengers without knowing the sea ways. On occasions they have gone off course and delayed the ship's arrival several days as a result. It must also be added now that even In the event of warning of an approaching storm, they were unable to chart another course to a haven of safety. But it is not only for the purpose of avoiding sloims that such equipment as radio telephone or transmitting sets are necessary. Within recent years several vessels plying intercolonial trade have been lost without trace in normal weather conditions. It may be that a vessel had sprung a leak or a sudden squall caused her to overturn. A brief call on a radio telephone might have sent vessels in the vicinity to the rescue. In its absence all was lost and lost v/ithout trace. It should be easy for the West Indian governments to demand, by way of legislation. that each vessel registered and carrying passengers should have radio telephone as part of its normal equipment. Now that su'h equipment is easily obtainable at small cost there should be no hesitation In enacting and enforcing such law. Already there is the inadequacy of life boats on many of the smaller vessels plying between these West Indinn Islands despite the law which compels them to carry enough boats to accommodate crew and passengers. People who travel between the islands arc entitled to protection and it should bo the duty of the West Indian Governments to afford them that protection. And schooner owners should nut be allowed to make money al the expense of other people's discomfort and possibly their lives. Radio equipment is as necessary to intercolonial schooners as life-boats. UEDSESCMV. MAJICW M. MM Playing Cards from. 60c. Patience Cards per set 72c. CANASTA SETS ADVOCATE STATIONERY Brod Srreel & Iho Villg, Balmoral Gap Truman Thinks It Over On A Palm Beach Isle By R. M. MacCOLL KEY WEST. THIS is Truman's time of decision. H.-:v some ivme during the next Ihrei WMkSi the President must make up hii mind whether he runs in the November election or steps aside in favour of somebody else. It is an ideal spot for him to decide anything so momentous. As far as it is possible for a President o! the United States to obtain some sort ol privacy. Key West Kives it to Truman. Although the town is enjoying a tourist boom, this little island, where the tradt winds sigh gently among nhe palms, stil gives a feeling of isolation. Hustling, bustling America might be a thousand miles away. In his holiday "White House"—the modest home of the commandant of a big nava! base—Truman is safe from sightseers anc' front the constant stream of callers wh( plague him all day long in Washington. Here he can really sit back undisturbed and weigh all the factors which make thi year's contest for the Presidency so tre mendously important not only to America but to the world. In a very r,-al sense, history will be madi at Key West in the coming weeks. When Truman arrived on Friday night il was pouring rain. A reporter of a newspaper in Miami, th$ nearest big town to Key West, jealous of Florida's reputation. dc.< cribed it as "California-style weather." In Miami my taxi-driver, a Hcbr. my accent and spoke in glowing terms of the British. THIS ?S ? is ^N the ^ Paint! SNOWCEM Unsurpassed (or Indoors & Out C.S. Pitcher & Co. Ph. 4472 by 'GLOBE-TROTTER 1 in SUITCASES & HANDTRUNKS Light and exceptionally strong Six Size3 Da Costa & Co., Ltd: INTRODUCING— 'BUBBLE WASHERS" THE COMFORT OF THE HOUSEWIFE SIMPLE AND INFALLIBLE Connect to the Pressure side of any Vacuum Cleaner and have your Mashing .... "BUBBLE WASHED" AND BUBBLE RINSED DA COSTA & CO. LTD. Electrical Dtpt. I JUST RECEIVED ... EASTER PRESENTS Black Magic Chocolates 1 and i a i pounds. Fry's Chocolalc Almonds Catr's Tea Biw-uits in tins Churchman's Cigarettes Embassy Cigarettes GOLD BRAID RUM 3 jr. old FRESH VEGETABLES Tomatoes — .SO per lb. Carrots — .30 per lb. MEAT DEPT. Calves' Liver Calves' Sweetbreads Ox Tails Dressed Trlpc Dressed Rabbits HAMS Whole or Cut DANISH in tins 1| lb. to 6 lbs. DANISH BACON SPECIALS Mixt* Nuta — M per lb. Italian Ketchup — 46 per bot. Mcllii Dalci Jl SO per tin MclU FIM — (1.41 per tin Stem Ginger — $1 21 per bot. Oatary Salt .38 per bot. Marmalade .32 per 1 lb. tin Prepared Mustard— .2S per bot. i: J. N. GODDARD & SONS &*AVSS&+SSW+fSSS*'S*^



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Trade Union Leaders Must Give People A Fair Deal Future Of W.I. Can Rest With Them SIH I.IOIH.I MQOL VIHMIISMS I HUH I MO\ OIIIHVIS DECLARING the twelve week*' Trade Union Course open at the Y.M.C.A. yesterday morning. Sir George Seel. Head ol the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisation in the West Indies, told the students attending the Course that if they succeeded in their duty ol seeing that their people got a fair deal, they would have a tremendous influence over them, and would really have the fut the West Indies in their hands. Sir George added "! do hope yuu will want to lead them in the direction of building up a really good people in the West Indies. I wish you every possible success during this Course." The course, tinncond of II kind to be held m Barbados, has been made possible by a further grant under the Colonial Development and Welfare Act to enable the Comp-, troller to organise a school of West Indian Trade Union Officials. It is being attended by 19 students from Barbados, British Guiana, Trinidad, British Honduras, and the Leeward and Windward Island?. Dean of the school is Mr F. C. Catchpole. Labour Advisei to Colonial Development and Welfare. Among distinguished persona who attended the opening session wereMr. Philip Sherlock. Vice Principal of the University College of the West Indies, Mr. C A Grosssmith. Administrative Secretary. CD. Government Department ><--t*rday with mill UUD| wtiii-ti was %  letter addressed to the "Olive BIcMiom" — a yacht. Putting the letter thread, a pigeon hole to an attending lady -teiiotypl-t he aaked U the Olive Blossom' here?" And back cane the witty reply Ollre Bloaaomt Why, that nan not been here inte 160S". The SteaotypUt obrtoualy recollected the landing at Holetown of the Ant English settlers and wu la • humoroua mood. The po-traan %  a>med bewildered Anyway the yacht L lying In Oarll-lr Bay. "Strong Steps" Urged Against Dr. Ma Ian West Reject Soviet Proposals ft) K • l II \ I I LON1XJN, March 25 The BIB Threa WoStari P.>^< reafllrmeif in identical notes Moscow Tu—ilaj their pV lust and las!Iin peace treaty' artth %  uatAa | Qermaay, jeeted Soviet proposals I pnwpr.. taUta "until conditions hv.been created for free Minions'* in M Soviet /one of many ,.n-i 111 Eastern Iterhn rtw notes of the Untti Britain and Franc,, rejected th Sovi.-i suggestion for the creation of Oerman national forces and Urged instead "participation of (jermany In a purely defensive European community. Tlie notes were delivered to ihe Kremlin in reply to pVviet proposals of March 10 tV.li uggeMcd a four-power conference n the German peace U-rt> with the participation of an all-l.ciiiian government. The nx-poinl reply lavllcd Soviets to allow the United Nation* Investigating Commission to enter SIR ilEOROE 8EEU K C M O %  tndetil> at the 1.! weeks' Trade Y.HCA yesterday morning. Dean of the Curse Mr. F C D ft W CAPETOWN. SOUTH AFRICA. March 25 A "savo-the-conslitution" debate was initiated m the Senate by Opposition United Parti th e eastern parls of Gen. eatnn Nicholr,. r h n Io -K erl.un wheUn MI L^ %  >' %  -' rendition*" exist to. The notes were hnmmered osu jengtli in top level discussles* ider G Nlrholls eharged Minliter Daniel precipitatod South Africa into the most serious crisis since the union (of English und Africans Queen Will Visit Srotlanil In June Illy KOBKRT Ml'KrX) Head of 0. D ft W, sdg f asat a g Union Course which opened at the C Oatthpole. labour Advl-er tit Attlee Wins Vote Of Confidence ROME. March 25. A milling crowd of 6.000 young itudents matsed before the United States emb .say here and demanded that a delegation of about ten be received by United States! Minister Llewlleyn Thomson. Jnr. The students waving Italian ami Trieste lags were met at the open HI. gate* of the Embassy by Chief Security Officer Norman Scbutc [ Tnu spokesman of the demonstrators speaking In English said j that unless the delegation was received by the Ambassador "they would not be held responsible for future acts of the demonstrators". Vessels, which called at Barbados, were either lost at sea, burnt or wrecked. The majority of the vessels lost were schooners and hsd they been equipped with radio-telephone sets they could hive been warned against bad weather or any other danger such as floating logs The Schooner Zenith was recently lost at sea. She left here on December 19 and nothing has since been heard of her crew. Schooner Gloria May. which sank on her way from BG to Barbados in 1BS0, carried with her the skippcand two passengers The Alberta Compton made her last trip to Barbados on December 14. 1048 She was destroyed by lire in Port-ofSpaln harbour a few weeks lalar. In 1948 Schooner Alna Lcotaud was Involved In a collision with the Lady Nelson. She also sank. Some of the other boat* lost during that period were: Schooner Buen Esperanza, Schooner Critics which was wrecked off the Pub' e Market in 1W8. Schooners Deliverance, Endeavour W. G. G. | NAPLES. March 25. Glory. Princess Louise, Reginald Thirtyllve workers were reWjilaee. War Risk. Voltara M. ported killed and more than 40 United Brothers, Uncatlna. M.V i injured in an explosion in a Trader Horn. Royal Rio, Rio' tunnel being built foe a hydroffatcha. Mamma. Gloria Henrielectric project near here today. etui. M.V. Goodwill and Potlck The tunnel was under construcwhich ii lying on the bed of tne> tion by a private company NicholU said that Malan's aim not to fight for the Sovereignt> of Parliament but to make tinN..lion;iliP.irli Mipiome n South Africa. He moved that the Senate take "strong steps" against the declared Intention of the government to overrule the Court of Appeal judgment refuting Malan's Apartheid Bill and demanded that government act In cordance with the Constitution, failing which it was "In dul bound" to resign Meanwhile in Pretoria aniigovcrnment "Torch Commando" aaid tear gaa and stink bom tie which were thrown at a protest meeting against the Apartheid Hill last night were mnnufartti in the laboratories of Pretoria I 'n;vi'T-it> A girl hit squarely In the fare with a bomb during the detm stration was reported In danger of losing one eye. —U.P. of Big Three Western Powei am' in consultation with Federal Gerill M) i ;.iN!">N i Chancello Paris last Terrorists Kill Twelve SINGAPORE, March 2i Communist terrorists killed ci_ policemen, two European-bo: government officials and two g eminent technicians in amb early today. Eight other policemen o ouiidcd m the trap sprung Ihe Red band only a few m from Tanjong Maltm on Perak-Selangnr border M-ith 2.'> He JMBOPd journey to •cession In Court circles suspo t i icason for her vbrlt will IKto sample for herself the i iiigtli of the revival of Seol%  Konrad Adenauer **wUnd unca hoi that i.uMKiN. March 25 indlna victory within the RaadsjJ .hour Members of PorUftBMDl ll.ive MO) I lu.irl. .-on AMlee had been lighting biltei l with lA'ltuingi i Aneuiin Bt' van over forcing I.,IIKIUI Mem| I'.o li..niii.t tii hupport the lUmbllng north re-arW*WMOI Piogramm...ni II %  f the bOTCtai which l... ' %  uMurbing icbo PJ '|'" ^^St in Whitehall ' %  hallciii i %  > % %  < %  % %  '*''• "' More thanlpietide at Pawtj Parliament I .ilf thfl adult nieetings on the ground that he n of i* not impartial. K.I..M. Finds Gold After (irasli FKANKFUHT, utno) March 2ii. Kus.i Uulch A.i In ofllcialo said they hav* recovered all but I0.12S wurlli of gulu from the. wreckage of the Kl.M plane which craihed here SaturSehUU in" the >outh5 that the ""rhej ,ald the plane carried 5001 JclcjauoncouldnotbeaUowcdln • ^ %  o| gg represer.t,n £• mob. He a.1,11 „ 2 5.000 worth of gold coin, ami •Come baclt this •tUrnoon withM5 ooo wonh „, JJ „ oU w „, Escorted by the local police, the government ofr.cn.1* were en rout-to a rubber estate on the outakins of Tanjong Mulim to repair a pipeline which had been sabotaged i>y bandits. One of the Europeans killed was R. M. C. Codner. holder of the Military Cross and a veteran of World War II. Codner wa* assistant District Officer for 1.mjon K Malta, Communists after killing Of Ul wounding every armed man in the £?££5 party escaped wlt 13 poatca p They left behind two of their dead IT to receive you but we do not i tend to b Intimidated.''—U.P. litast Kith 35 ,fr. ; they i the crash area. U.P. inner basin of the Careenage Tho big three masted Schooner. Frederick P Elkm was scrapped off Brandon's coast. She was the last of the old fleet of three masled boats which traded between the West Indies and Canada. Ambulances rushed to tho scene from Caserta CapuJa and Naples itself. A doctor and medii id equipment was flown Caserta from Rome as soon as .vas flashed to polios headquarters in Rome. —U.P. 32 Sabre Jets Fight 60 MG'i SEOUL, March 2a. One Communist M.I.G. 1ft was destroyed and another probably destroyed in a high alutude air battle between 32 United Stales SabrejeU and 80 M.I.G.' East of Sinuiju. The jet battle took place aa Red jets tried to 'break through a bcreenlng force of SabrejeU protecting fighter-bombers attacking supply routes and Ktorago aroaa U North Korea. —U.P.* "Nmm Mackouf' On 7Yuce Talks PANMUNJOM. KOREA. March 25 U.N negotiators meeting wilh CommunUU under the newly imposed naws blackout made a new attempt to break the deadlock in prisoner of war discussions. United Nations staff offk-'rs submitted a "preliminary stai tnent on the Communist proposal made on March 5 tlnue negotiations for exchanni '.era of war on the ban of lists already cthanged. TIKU M no indication of what the United Nations Command said since this statement mnl> n. 'Executive Soasio However observers believed it either altered the rejection al>ead> made by the United Nations or that it invited tho Bed* to alter their orglnal proposal t I a hava signed covenant pledging I tneni"*eivef \> work for a separate Paricnl for their counts They want self rule. The Jill. the Part 1.1 %  immediate! Wh met to-da> apparent thai ihe charge had 1 e greate nnsjered abigost the gOUtl p f .HKI die raaetatten was passe.' unanimously endonojhg Attli l.^driship Federation iNow Will Not Aid W.I. (rroni Our Own I orreapundenl) LONDON, M.irt U ^.. I'.-leLiihui imw will not helptlie Weat Indies. Instead ft truce t" POUtiCe.. exuei iiii.nt la needed in order that, Ihe Chftngsjg which ha\e alu-.i'l'. IHHH made can t*' di geste d. n % %  I are expressed in %  lattvf t! thiIhulv Telos-raph t Mi. C K. Sheph.-n! | i. Mied Uwyei whoftft .-giyeiiencc ol the West Indies K-S h ch 0Vf 5U fmn ftd who until last year had been living in Barbados. Mr Sliephard says ti introduction .f universal ..dull siiflrnge has rSMlltad In lwsenlng ,n .lirfei.-ni legnUturos CapllaJ Uivaaul 'tie standard of Uvtnft "f U M investnra .ne not folni lo ba tempted U) put (heir money mio an arwa nag b ml H.I..I b) tha uri'sponsible. No* Easy iloferi ing I KSCII irttoai b ,li ii.m. 4 I" advof'liii.itlon ho Three Steal $600,000 BOSTON. Man-h 25. ilneimen held up a lru k inii .Mid escaped with an esllmaUtl IMOflpfl Tho trio it M iTKl In a black aadan sjt poltea from surrounding comtat the mii BRhasaSh n. bad rt "p KNKI Mocks i'v ir aVsaion area Tba hwaSup %  "• the taigest \ Ne England 1 since sevm lia o,>t an ant hut hi 1 '" .or .II it trues. Ul ll\ III/ MO II! vast maloriK of ll„ ., signers want it "in all loyalty to *" ' %  th" Crown" But there's a small l""mp *" n but restless group which wants %  I complete break with Britain uch in the way of the Bn breakaway Another extreme. group wants a Scottish Dominion There have been "revoluti<. tin leoti "mi to ba insist-. eiit and a Royal i ajjft pmbably be set up lo examine I .nhi.nii-li ..tlve sat-Up 'no two rniiiitni lli.ii isn't all. Many Scots are not happy about the Royftl title Second''. K is said tit Kli/abeth did Scotland north of the present Queen should be Elizabeth the F..-1 M.p^rters were very d-Mle ..nd;, n ^ Un ,„d States did not challenge Attlee i.c.ord-, ^^ he lunged Iru.-hii irils hn-w no del.ul? Conservatives Defeat Labour Motion LONDON, March 2S I'r.o Minister Winston Chui i ,11 Government Tuesdii t, .n -eekmg to rensure il fi % %  %  KinipuiK" an education at thi Ol ihildren The voto was 312 to 283. Stone of Scone LORRY DRIVER SMASHED TO DEATH LLOYD TA1TT. dnver of this lorry, was killed when be wsa involved in an accident at My Lord's Hill yesterday awrnlng Tap picture shows the load of sugar which the lorry was 'onveying to the Olty In the other picture the electric pole which the lorry truck l* shown The Z 'howwhere Tain was pinned. I-LOYD TAITT. a lorry dnver of Sailers St George. died immediately after he was involved in an accident ..long My Lord's Hill. St Mlrhael. at about 6 45 a m yesterday. The lorry. C. 125 owned by Bulkeley Ltd., al by Taitt. was carrying sugar to Bridgetown It ran off the road and struck an electric pole The pole was broken, snd Taitt was pinned between (he metal hood of the lorry broken b* Ihs weight of the sugar, and the %  r. .-.heel -iinen examinaUon was performed yesterday The >.ti)l considerable feeling over the Churchill Government'deci on to keep th< .in Westminster Abbey Thi slab of stone most Sgotluisd's relief Wat dragged fiom the Abbey by nationalists on Christmas Day IwV) and brought to Scotland where it waa eventually discovered amid the ruins of Arln-i.ith Abbey. 1 l rn.itioii Chail .n the wide open OupsJ "f si Bdw ird the ConKOW it ha.s in % %  th< that another attempt might made to take the atone That this will happen has been predicted by Dr John MacConnick head of the Scottish National!'* Party. Recently in the House of Lords Viscount Ellbank whose :lirect ancestor signed 'he ugree12PS which King Elward I "betrayed" when he too* tho stone fron. Set.tland sugge'led tli.d it he leturned after the i'.ion.iii• %  Baron Calverley who said that the Engll U by keeping the stone have become "receivefB of stolen property" Rich Country The Bool ..ten point lo northern Ireland which is a smaller .th less pop u I.. i T.nipiit.-lv controls its own domestic affairs instead of being Integrated with London As one Scot. In Coloquehoun the writer | la a much rtrhei country than northern Ireland" She pr<" ; per head of her population than England : beef and Fngland and a i %  i dlgetieouj • On rage 1 Commons then passed by 3ll to 282 a Government coun tei motion which stressed for etonnmy In the school system but promised the essenUal fabric "of the educational system will be preserved. f The Labour opposition mote tton "f 11 made in the original educati< %  nnaacial year. LANDSLIDE KILLS 30 INDONESIA, March 25 Iliiitv psnOfja, mostly wuiiien. wen kill. -I Sunday by a landslide at Tjohodas. a village north at n.Miduun w. I ; II HI: %  IIetvsd 1 MffSi Tho slide was presumably the result t*t heavy rains Uw prerioii din The vlcUms weie euttu.g rlo* on the slopes of a hill when the landslide occurred. —U.P. t has been agreed that tha kodaid of living Ol the poor in Went Indies should be uued in riui ;t is io4 easy to sea haws this would IH< liulpi I In I ii' exi*t%  urdetl "f nigh luxation the ., i;..-. .-T nmeni Tinidv.mt.i^i' chinned for fedarattoa Is that H would enablo ^peok with ono voice But. he says, to whom or what about Is not indicated : kef i,.I foreign relations would Is out "' bosjini %  Bar runjtrsnee lliat ih-re are no difficulties in %  %  i.reaentaSUGAk MARKET FIRM NEW YORK. March 25. The %  "" Pee said that v. nany li espsctad to buy 211.000 ii>ns of sugar Wednesday end an iddltlonal lo.ooo tons at a later dale using $8,000,000 allotted by Hie Mutual Security programme This contrl'Mited to the firmness In the overall sugar market. 'And I \ them oked ever since!' The, 'huige.1 that Uie I uts in thi ni.ilNVli.il. I hi, II standards and plann* program m es. Mulcolm Recalled From Executive KINGSTON. J'ca.. March 2 Joseph Malcolm was today recalled from the Executive Count I as Minister for Education when thiHot) ' AV i r. tentative. voted to revoke his iipp-JinUm-n' on the grounds Uiat he had not attended meetings of the Executive Council for three months Malcolm had DundJ gtnog ... emhsi ..n „;|. II... ,, ti arrest la a I "You're Funlakaaw. Jimim. Hi. I.i-l lime we came here it was a new rocktailt due lime il'nit lint Sa Mauner-~ noil ery nice, lee." "tie Jo >mr h+tt lo plrair. I AtSaSjM you'd Wm in,.I hey do \ttm to K'l'r a (leaner and u rnnler smoke." tion wflli the f.m ttekel fraud an %  Aiasd t" Mgn his w|i M %  % %  : I ill Of his trial whiLli i %  IS BBS ApB 1 I..i ins resignation u. .hen he was %  but Malcolm refuted to %  l the Appeal idecid.-d a twnthlrds majority of the whole Bmaa la iiasdaq to tsvokg i Mb i "f the circumstancee of %  erilall M %  ; %  %  %  ra %  %  tion of "WtaBt'l Ihe real %  I 11Idler i.p.* I nH lll'lliuelhar-lbe-e< •fllli rvi|iii-ilr Ha V#, rhe flavour, Urangi t0 relate, lobaieo." -You are behind the Urn Sinn's betn lyrital about them for years." $1.04 for SO N*M as INOIANO Smoke to your throat's contsni du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVE 1 eiLEIMlOW PILTEB TIP CIGARETTE a %  avuss os-. IT., aaioaSTOwn





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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2. 1M2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THREE Tax Concessions For na Colonial Ventures? But Still Some Obstacles For Investment In B. W.L LONDON. Minor lax concessions made Tor firms operating in the Colonies and controlled in tin United Kingdom • :.. some way towards speeding up the flow of urgently-needed investment capital to the British West Indian territories, it is believed in London. Exactly what form ihes> conmm West Indies In Commons the Ho cessions will take will not known until Britain's new Finance Bill is puUlMtietl. but bOfJS* have diminished that tiujwill deal with the anomaly under which full tax Is charged In the United Kingdom on proltts made In Colonies which gram %  "tax Holiday'' to new investors. In introducing his Budget in the March 12. Mr. Hear* IlysO (!-•Howe of Commons in London, hour. Accrington) asked the SecMr. R. A. Butler, th. Cham.lor letary of State for the lolonics Of the Exchequer, made only a what increases in wages and impasting reference to t!need for roncessions to enterprises in lh< Colonies, when he said: "United Kingdom mining ven lures in the Colonies and elsefrhere overseas will be helped fartous wayv Businesses will be able to an off losses against sub. lequem piollb without time his reply I linilt." Mem he Ther e Is speculation in linan%  ial circles In London that these wncessions could be on such items a exploration expenditure and on he grievance of many mining xxnpjnie-i that they have not been ible to "lay off* money spent on ion-mining projects, meh sg tousing schemes and other muniI^'M"" 10 ''^'^ S .f Ch c ? nc ^' i ? n to increasethe production of rW vould probably stimulate further %  am ask i n g uie Governor for deOteresl in the investment of min, .^ „f wn at I* being done .i-irl ng capital in the Colonial terriW1 )| wnle u, mv hon. Friend when orle* I.ONDON : of Commons proved welfare facilities hav< suited from the increase in the I export sugar granted to Jamaica for 1852. The Secretary of Stale for the Mr. diver LjtteUen. r.-pUed "I -in asking the Governor for this informulion. When I h.ivHarbour Log In Carlisle Bay ID Touch With Barbados Coastal Station fU*-. C inliii i. de Citsmtu. u! taa SAMTW. UMssMrsr. s*n* ... K. K n> M. iMMi. 1H--x.nl Mot WavaleM. BHi No rill SUi K\T£S Of t:\ai.\WE !\n M Mil II I s.. v.. I I. Oasaass %  %  i' .. '•:;.., cw* Dr.Hi 7t | Do These Hands Belong To You? Take a good look at this ptccould no on indeflnilelj I -nng J****J 0 c n * "* % %  lure particularly at the hand., the provisions for yo*r wellanlmala you own or are P"n'SoS rtT. thev strike you' They I b %  • ** *l <"* 0 Vst cowdlthe hon. „* st i.mg. capable, workmant la "*• fttding and car* arallabie like but at the samo Ume gentle ONE organisation which trie* to Secondly, when you see around and steady. They are auod provide all these services. It la you eases of neglect or cruattj Jamaica Hire Cultivation *_!**. Y ou can understand why the SPC.A. ff" 5 ; "' brtnthr c t t , lh S o'^'s* Ihe poor, starving, rain-soaked And the S-I*.C.A. has unl> three of the owners or the SP.CA Mr. Bernard Braise ary of State for the Colonies what KliW i n | 0 ihe face above him— rtusg solely on voluntary steps are being taken to increas lice cultivation in Jamaica. Mr. LyUrllon reoued: "Th* Jamaica Government are anxi DM tees wo mami % %  • bul BOB M u-ibwooni to • itwoj easily imagin the Thirdly, if you have children ou can train them in the ways of Uidnesa for most children are For the dog h,i recognised a do It" you say, and then you reInherooU) Kind and need only friend, someone ready t.> be member othsi things Ihe Society training and example to develop actively helpful and not marsh dogs. You wonder how all the their chara.t' i content with the negative alUtudo porters, lies pop iiivles and -k-rf m *Z ssrs P*SH ...*. -TSSTBL *£&$& mE&mU3& ----be on.u? hundreds roaming the Welfare week with II.. leelures "orklor Hope us not >el been given up, ... %  .-___ i„ Under. >lrl nd alley, of lhi lovely lllm *ows mid Band eone"" Mn owever. th.l Ihe relornu, ,e(eilj,nd K " rm ln vna 1-Mld „ f „ u „. Ui,w.,„led and And you think to voi.oell "Why. {"'•'"<'. •d to be Mr. Duller will include Developed Territories %  tarvlni: they form part ..( UM tha SPC A. runs a Humano Edulike i" !" ,*','."."' n adjustment ol the u holiday monnou. family, not only of cation Hureau a. well How hui i led ly ol i^ I .. uuInt i. . momaly. an Important one to tie Mr %  T. WUIlajn. (Labour. dog >. but of all WPM of animal, can they do all Utla with onl, aood.at lh.l ton, of h "_ You Irltw, Wot Indies. It If pointed Hammeramlthl aaked the Secre, or „ hlch ,„,. Barbados SPC A lour paid wsirker-The answer .ouMn !• eap,-.'"J ' • u, „"'J ll that in his Budget .peeeh. the ttt of State lor the Colonies what „ reaponalble. la that we cannot ^Si? or to ILcend a well to :hanccllor ,vo only a few exatep. hci. ta k, ",."" m j'" m '''', H av. you ever llu,ht how We rely on .. few. pitifully few. SK. cat In Amerle. and mples of the changes he proposed Kejo lull on VII.^>" '-"f !" '' !" | u cky you are compareS will., enlhu.iaM,,men .u.,1 women who ,. U.K. it is considered a great 0""l undr-devrioped counlrt .h* !" ^ > donkpv ^ r ioC vr hrlr lmr eneigy and honour and privilege to help —. • "Wi, ? y tf. ."SI'S If your employer treats you n„„ev to the service of ... f„nher Ihe wotk of Humane !" SJ;^? a fi"" Na, ,T; V"'""' *tSS*H}£2fc. unfairly you ran appeal to your SSl animall Some of them Sociel,.-s That spirit of service can which hope to develop their on 12th January. 1952. designed t. "d" lUi.imi If you arc sick will nc n| .it rour home, should pi.v.ll here ndustnal reaourcea are out -o at„,.. _ellect to the Economic and nad. i am J. r y ^ ^ f ^ J^, ~ ^^^ treats you money to the J*ScSa?lS rr.d i 1> Un con.' C, 7f a y B o P u" nre .S S aSSS rac, no, only U.K.. bu, .U. U.S.. Social Coun, la reeommendati,-,. j !" J ^r&^^JSSSS" SKloW j •?*£ ' JjMj -J-g* 'S^"' M jpital investment and man, obon landI Intn. the welfare and vl ,r neighbour lat, you up ing. March 28th The, will ask Will you take airthar look a Ucles have still to be overcome living standards ol rural populn|lu(re nr v0Ucll Jnd lawJ ,r, to you to buy a tag and thua_ help i^ 1 '^^, 1 "^ !" P T„ey YttUHS are the welfare — --.-cfore the U.S.. capital can flow HonsT and related technical organjJJJJ j;^ t 0 bo ok"'~|f'7;, u ~ Viav'e i', "keep"ihe w.ik grifiig "Blit Tl I"* al your own Jhey are Idenoioothly Into theaa Colonlaa. isaUonal, fiscal and social ques(he mu lur unc „, be maimed or isn't only your mortal wa wuu g ,,;',';i'.| N ,; lfANns uT ihe lions. %  fce president of the Westinghouso commendations embodied in thur ^... loctric International Co., who ResolQtion cover a very wide field Old that a major difficulty faced of agricultural policy and recot> u a p^,,,,.,,, ux levied We ssxli YOU as well* "Whut ran I %  JoT" Barbados S.P.C.A. Htiliia sishi i>-.nSUVH ( IS M>\ IMit MA1H1I ISO. U-ti.e... 7* S •. ... > it Draft. TS VIS* ii@a TOS.GA., aa j^ -y B ''asirf. ut-COLOu'NB.o-t> ^i> jrlP # U5. companies that" wantto ni*e that no one means I* suited i* •anch out into overseas operalo lhe condltiono of all countries, feo* is the tax barrier set up by Much of what is proposed ..ll Ike U.S. Government itself. Mr. Baker, who recently returndevelouim, si to New York from a tour of territorial exports Irrespective of destination It is a combination of taxes on ',". V freight mid passenger fares which ready being carried out by ColoSSTs. 1 Governments in the course of ;igrit;ulture in their The recommendations atln America, urged that the U.S Jovernment should consider both I cut in taxes on profits or overeas investment and a scheme for (ranting loans for enterprises fishing to branch out overseas. He admitted that the VS. Govownem has made efiorts to prooote foreign investment through rommerclal treaties with other intlons providing for fair treatOent and through guarantees to ovestors that reasonable profit^ Oay be returned. But these measBrea, he said, were not enough. with date bock to 1928 and 1932 have been several limeo inereased, and It has no particular relevance %  Ither to sugar or tn the Angloing studied hi my department and 1 will send the text to all Colonial Governments." Freicht Tax On Cuban Sugar On MfSJOh 13. Mr. Arthur Dodd. Farker (Conservative. Baubury) between 10th Augunt last, the date asked the President of the Board of the trade agreement, and 29th of Trade whether he is aware that. February. 1952" thc_.ugar agreement with m ,. |||fc ^ „ In vlpw ^ v tax—I think my right Rain iMdx Up Work In Harbour intermittent llSM-rOI Ul PrtdiOS UUtl • I e..se on many occaion>. clerk!* mid olhei am rkers were not caught hon. and gallant Friend Ihe Mmpicpared Early In ie niorniiij,later of Food estimates at S364.789 dark clouds had t>egun to form in the element in the botfbl ih,nges the sky. Because of this gloomy for our purchases of Cuban sugar ,iu,icaranee, nearly ever>on OOffwhich is attrlbuuble Ui this levy sources as she wanted them". II.i-mitrd out that if Scotia could retain tlupiocead. of her export of whisky and tweeds ; %  •. ^brena. i.. ^jgEBgry's: High winds at OM caused !" ' l^ damage to Ashing boats' sails. ,ne *!"**" _.• %  .r— mmHiiz^Mt ,, DM l->at towed her mother Queen Elizabeth %  bout 3.30 p.ir Cuba in 1951 to purcha tons of Cuban sugar i • 1,500,000 r three1" u period, the Cuban Government has continued to levy a freight tax of 61 per cent, of the gross freight on all shipments of th sugar to the United Kingdom; and The deafening "kneew -h ^ expenditure In dollars has rhich Investors ^ greeted ^ incurr ,. (1 K rnr tfl mcct hl Friend agrees that it Is hose desirable and wcll-intcntl< d measures Is an Indication that ha Government has not found Oe solution to the problem." he leclared.—B.U.P. freight tax. Mr. Peter Thi.r rr.< rufi President of the Board of Trade, replied: "I understand that this Ux new one—and the dollar cost of scsterday morning loading sugar, would the Minister very lo consider doing all possible t switch our purchaserof uup|ie of sugar to non-dolLii sourcei particularly from Ihe CommonJjui wealth and Empire. Mr. Tsm-neycrefl: new tax; it has been on for a ver; long time."—B.UJ. one of the Slrathmores who have m S m "vi^^^nr'i^mm I'ved tor ootturioj In oiomio Monday and up o'clock t'astle. Princes' Margaret were liowayer horn in Cllami. There 11 naturlly much sympathy lor bcolland in SpeighUtown, UM mornini: 01 the Hoyal ramlior. ..prned with light allow.,, o,,m Bul there h always be., I around 8 aJn. whan they abated, waion! inhlUty In 'h"''; 1 s alUl nine parts al rain '" decide whether Ihe Scott mean fell on Monday nlghT """"• 1*5. QU „",',' '".', f.oU The shower, also affected shipie.ldar.ee at ta Wj'9* "" %  • Tbla M nol a ping activities In tha harl-.ur igndlwe in Edinburgh fiom v Vest-Is discharging cargo had to lune ^ to June 10 will be able tovar the natches on more than to sea lor herself -IIJ. For leather ol vriTfi rolour— It cleans, preserves—and how il polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert's. Nothing else is quite the same. Watch ihe dilTerence il makes lo your shoes! BLINDING HEADACHES MADE HER HELPLESS PURF DRUG§ ACCURATE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE CALL AT .... COLLINS DRUG STORES BROAD and TUDOR STREETS us Psopl* who tvoufht reJIel Buffer from sever* beadAcbea will ba iDtaraited in reading bow tbla %  .niSTi coded her trooblaa :— "I woo asbjeot to mrrtbls „ budscboi WhllB ibey Issi'd. j S seamotl I" lose my sight sod all ivivv.T in my nsnilssnd waafOrced lo lie down for hours it time. M v aunt, who baa lalten Krai'-hea Salts for ysers. %  uggssted my Irving them. I did so, and re not nad a return of those Urrlbl a h-'adael"'" for months. In fact. I leal quite cored."—M.W. Headaches can nearly always be traced to a laorder*d etoma. h and to tha enausoecte-t retention lo the system of etagnatlug wall* motorUI, which poleoi.fi the blood Reraoss the poleonou*c-.un.ul*tlons — prsrent them from formlns aoaia—and you won't have to worry any mor. And that Is ]ost how Krusrhrn bring" swift an-1 lasting r*U"f by (.loaoBlng tha system thorouihlyofailharmful.pain-glvlng XWutvh far tin* Ad%veriiH**mvntH . • OV OUR "QVm FRESH" .SERVICE THE WEST INDIA BIM'I'IT O. l/r. IV populaiilv ol ..**. Wh.itSIWR-V o. Iiudl • \ M I I as ".Il as IH |'l Ml Mill in < nnifml ..nil o|>|i.f.aws%0. ri-laiiH> — IV. anat ssss*. Iillin;: mil snufl i'..'-ni. .,u MN tsw* "•" Hl.ll nitlsl Mi.liH V Ml I rs -litf nt.-.IVMN*l *">*i thmyt m* *\" iv imi^i M 4mm madr b> .John WMot. s "' iVm Inr .oiirs.ll in Wt4ir% •Jou-k ihrnughauil Barhadti*. JOHN WHITE means made just right ::-s.:::::-S'V*.-AS.' "SEE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU" WE HAVE JUST OPENED PILKINGTON BEVEL-EDGE MIRRORS DOME & SQUARE TOP WARDROBE MIRRORS 16 x 60 and 18" x60". Triple MIRRORS — Ogee, Clipped Edge and Dome Top. MIRROR CORNERS, CLIPS, REFLEX HINGES, & MOVEMENTS. • THE CORNER STORE.