Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
LL







ESTABLISHED 1895



Blow Dealt Against Racial’j,
Segregation In South Africa’

OPPOSITION ASKS DR. | WL Cricket

MALAN TO RESIGN

CAPETOWN, March 20.

DR. DANIEL MALAN declared in the House of
Assembly that he could not accept as constitutional the

Position created to-day by the Supreme Court judgment
which dealt a blow at his aparteed (racial segregation)
policy—the gornerstone of his government.

The South African Prime Minister made the announce-
ment shortly after he had been told that five judges of
the Appelate Division of the Supreme Court, South Africa’s
highest eourt, sitting at Bloemfontein, had ruled as invalid
a Government Act placing coloured voters (mixed race)
on a separate electoral roll.

Before speaking in the House of ——-——----_-
Assembly, Dr. Malan had called

the South African Cabinet to dis- |

cuss the position which brings to a om ete
head one of the most important

constitutional issues South Africa C il |
Crui

has ever faced.
Opposition leader Jackonus
From Our Own Correspondent)

Strauss demanded that the govern-
ment should resign on the Court's
ruling.
General Election ?
There _Was speculation that
Malan might call a snap general

election in a bid to bolster his ANTIGA, March 20.
hairline Parliamentary majority.| _ Amidst showers of rain Nel-|
There also was some talk that | *0"’S dockyard was a colourful}

scene to-day when hundreds of
friends of the Society of !nglish
Harbour crammed galleriés above
the ancient officers quarters which
was decorated with flags and
bunting on the occasion of the
celebration of the climax of the

Government might try to curb the
powers of Courts, making it im-
possible for them to overrule
Parliament,

The country’s nof-whites, ne-
grces, Asiatics and mulattoes, are
planning to defy race laws in a
national passive resistance move-|fitst Caribbean yacht cruise
ment beginning April 6. { While Governor Blackburne

The court rule today against so- | WaS making a welcoming address
called Separate Representation of |the yacht “Ternthree” glided into
Voters Act. which four coloured |the English Harbour followed by
voters had challenged. “Blue Goose”, half an hour later.

The law would have barred|Finally six yaehts anchored the
mulattoes in the Cape Province, |Search Vesta, Mollihawk, Maria
virtually the only non-whites in| Katharina, Ternthree, Bluegood,

the Union who have the
from voting directly in
mentary elections.

Instead they would have been
given power to elect only four

ballot, | Entertainments include a_ pro-
Parlia- | gramme by the Police Band, the

ceremonial lowering of the Union
Jack and a _ cocktail party at
which naval officers from H.M.S

white men to represent them in|Sparrow were among the guests,
Parliament.

Mrs. Blackburne presented the

prizes which were designed and

Constitutional Right given by Mr. Robertson Ward of

Mill Reef Club, Prizes consisted
of old cannon balls, naval buttons,
buckles, signal cannon all mount-
ed on lignum vitae from the gun
carriage at Fort Harman.
qveping. Clarence House and
dockyard were transformed to an
illuminated picture while a steel
band Brute Force added to the
gaiety.

The mulattoes, many of them
descended from Cape slaves to
whom the Province’s 19th century
rulers felt they owed a debt, wer
given voting rights equal wit
whites after they were freed,

Those rights were entrenched
in the South Africa Act, the coun-
try’s Constitution, Government op-
ponents claimed, and the Appeal
Court backed them that the Con-
stitution could be changed only
by a two-thirds majority of both
Houses of Parliament sitting to-
gether.—U.P. & C.P.



Licences

Cancelled

5 eee, Be 20.
: “ rime Minister Rober énzies
Challenge Budget } announced to-day that the Aus-
tralian Government had decided
LONDON, March 20. !|to recall all import licences for
Clement Attlee’s Socialists will! goods of dollar origin and for all
challenge the new British Budget other goods which had been sub-
in a series of votes but the| ject to import licensing.
Churchill government was expect-| The Prime Minister said the only
ed to survive easily with its mar- | exception would be licences issued
gin in the Commons. | for the main types of leum
The votes will come late in the | products and for goods being im-
day on a number of Budget reso- | ported under the 100 million dol-
lutions providing for increasing | lar loan granted by the Interna-
the gasoline tax and entertain- | tional Bank. m
ment duties and changes in the! Customs Minister Néil O’Sullivan
purchase tax. However the real| announced later that all recalled
debate and crucial votes on cuts| licences would be invalid unless
in food subsidies and other dis- jconfirmed after review.
puted Budget points will not come! The effect of the announcement
until the Budget the |is that all ticenees issued before
Finance Bill stage. | Mareh 8 for imports from the dol-
—U.P.|lar area, Japan and the Soviet
| Union will be reviewed and per-
| haps reduced or even cancelled.

Dr. Hutson Is Director | —UP.
Of Agriculture, T’dad

It has just been announced that
Dr. LR. Hutson. Chief Veter- | The motor lorry G—224, be-
inary ‘Officer of the Leeward) longing to’ Fairview Plantation,
Islands has been appointed Dep-| St. George. was found ditched in
uty Director of Agriculture (an-| a field on Lears Road after strik-
imal Husbandry) ‘in Trinidad ing a guard wall during the early
Dr. Hutson who is the son Of| hours of yesterday morning.
Mr. & Mrs. John F.’ Hutson of} Damage was slight, and after’
Belleville was formerly. Veterin-\the lorry hadbeen reversed out
ary Officer of the Pine Livestock! ¢¢ the field and the necessary re-

a eue 5B ths a tlad| pairs carried out, it was put back





Socialists Will |

reaches



| DITCHED

4 into use.
7 sanees ee tH. VI It is reported that the lorry
M Beulaes aria afer i nicl was stolen from Fairview Plan-
remains in the department “to| tation yard sometime during
deal with livestock and food| Wednesday night, amd it was
problems. found ditched early yesterday

morning



Tour Was Not
A Success

SYDNEY.
The West Indian ericket tour of

Australia, which ended recently,

was not a real success, consider

cricket commentetors in Sydney.

Summing up their impressions of

the tour, they say that two factors

prevented its suecéss:

1. The failure of the Australian
s@leetors to look for new
blood during the tour stirred
up a great deal of bitterness.

2. The poor record of ‘the tour-
ists themselves left Austra-
lian cricket fans disappoint-

ed.
The West Indians arrived in| that the cost of living had risen

Australia co’
the crushin,
flicted in
great hopes of some fine cricket
during the tour. But, instead, the
Test series turned out to be one
of the worst in history.

Sonny Ramadhin, the young
spin bowler who was the main-|
spring of the West Indian team
in England, was .less successful
on the hard Australian pitches,
developeg to suit the Australian
fast bowlers, There were some
woeful batting performances by

|the tourists, too.

But it was the attitude of the
Australian players to the game
which irritated not only the West
Indians but also Australian spec-
tators. Observers believe that this
may have created an atmosphere
that damaged cricket’s sporting
reputation.

Before the war, Test matches
were sporting events that were
played as such. But since the
war, a new type of cricket has

|grown up in Australia. It is play-

ed just as hard as ever, but there

is a certain grim concentration
about it that the .crowds do not
like.

Crowds Dwindled

There are some observers who
believe that if this is allowed to
continue, it will ruin cricket as a
game, It had its effect during the

In the) jast season. With a drop in the
the| standard of cricket,

the crowds
dwindled.

This withdrawal of public sup-
port meant financial losses. The
West Indians lost about £6,000 on
their tour. This deficit had had
to be made up by the State
cricket associations, which were
already showing large deficits.

English crities have described
the new style of Australian
cricket as “vicious.” This “vicious-
ness” was shown in the bumper
attacks on the West Indian bats-

;men by Australia’s great. pair of
| bowlers, Ray Lindwall and Keith
| Miller.

Australian spectators wefe bit-
terly disappointed with the West
Indians, however, when they saw
such brilliant batsmen as Worrell,
Weekes, Christiani and Stollmeyer
losing their wickets at critical
stages in the game, Spectators
wanted to see players who could
fight back against the Australian
game.

The failure of the Australian
selectors to infuse young talent
into the teams in the season just
ended, observers believe, may re-
sult in a weakened Australian
team in the next tour of England.
It will be practically the same
team that has played in England
ever since the end of the war.

England has developed younger
players who are now _ proving
their worth. Australia, it is fear-
ed, could easily lose the Ashes it
has held since 1938. If England
wins the Ashes, experts believe
it will probably keep them for
many years. —B.U.P.

A UNIVERSITY
NEWS LETTER

Mr. P. M. Sherlock, Vice Prin-
cipal of the University College of
the West Indies and Director of
Extra-Mural Studies, will broad-
cast on the local Extra-Mural



Programme this evening at 845
o'clock. The subject of the broad-
cast will be “A University news-
letter.”



vered in the glory of;
defeats they had in-| months.
There were

‘VESTRY
APPROVE
C.0.L. BONUS

All whole time parochial em-
ployees and pensioners of the
parish of Christ Church will
receive a cost of living bonus at
the rates adopted by Government,
This was the unanimous decision
of the members Of the Christ
Chureh Vestry on a motion made
by Mr. F. C. Goddard and sec-
onded by Mr. C, B. Brandford at
their meeting yesterday.

The rates are: 20% on the first
£100, 742% on the second £100
and 5% on the third £100.

Mr. Goddard pointed out that
this would cost the parish about
$7,500 when they came to lay the
Estimates.

In making his motion he said

the last few
Late last year it was
mooted that something should be
done for parochial employees and
he promised them that the Vestry
would consider them when deal-
ing with the Estimates for this
year.

At the last meeting of the Ves-
try he made the motion to in-
crease the eost of Iiving nt goa

very rapidly in



all parochial employees and
sioners on the same level as ~
ernment,

Follow Government Lead
In St. Michael the try had
already given cost of living bonus,
to their employees gng they
Christ Church show low
Government as clo as possi-~

ble 4
He feit that any depatture
that would entail people
back to the Vestry and asking
assistance. That had happened
other Vestries and he did
want that to occur with
Vestry.
He said that something she
be done For Wiede Craploreee. we
had the figures before him whidh
showed that this cost of living
bonus would cost the pitish ap-
roximately $7,500. is amount
ould be included in the Esti-
mates if the Vestry adopted his

motion.
Merited

The people Were deservin
tila money aiid’ thky as a
cou

as hee Bt ay AY and not do
Re,

fle seid that they wont Rep be’
happy in their job nor did he
think the parishioners would want
them to ignore those employees.
There were a few part time
employees who were also entitled

@ On page 8










Industrial Bodies

(From Our Gwn Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca.. March 20.
The Jamaican Government an-
nounced to-day the establishment
of ah Agricultural Development
Corporation and an Industrial De-
velopment Corporation, The Agri-
cultural Development body is
headed by Hon, G, G, R. Sharp,
internationally known Jamaican
Agricultural industrialist who is
one of the leading members of
the Cameroon Development Cor-
poration in Africa, a tor of
B.W.1.A. as well as Chairman of
the Citrus Company in British
Honduras,

The Industrial is headed by Mr, |SPeed, cargo working and carry-
Ashenheim, solicitor and company,

director who is the principal local
director of the Caribbean Cement

Company which recently estab-| Purposes of loading and discharg

lished a £1,000,000 factory in Ja-
maica,

The corporations aré charged
with the duties of seeuring the
expansion of the industrial and
agricultural development of the
island,

Planter Returns To
Dom’ca With Geese

Mr, Daniel Green, Planter of
Dominica. left the island for home
by the motor vessel “Caribbec”
yesterday after spending two
weeks here, Mr. Green was heré
to visit his mother who is a pa-
tient at the General Hospital.

He is taking back with him 12
geese because he has suddenly
got interested in live-stock farm-
ing. When he gets back to
Dominica, he is going to start a
live stock farm.

But this mew venture will not
cause Mr- Green to give up plant-
ing. He is part owner of Kingfield
Fstate which grows limes and
sugar cane for making rum,

Mr. Green is a much travelled
man. When tem years old, he
went to Switzerland where he at-



tended a French School until he
was 15. He travelled through
Evrope and North Africa before

returning to his homme in Dominica
to take up planting

When he returnech to Dominica,
he could speak German, Dutch and
French fluently but Nttle English
He learnt English Dominica
since he returned.

N.A.T.O.

GENOA, Mirch 20.

U.S, Admir#l Robert Fi Carney.
Commander-iti-Chief of Allied
Forces on Southern Europe speak-
ing before the “Propeller Club” of
Genoa at the conclusion of four
day manoeuvres of NATO land
and air forces along the Yugoslav
border. said no major conflict in




ports, which before the
a three
































f

“



Turn Round

LIVERPOOL.

It is taking six weeks or more
to turn rowhd ships in a humber
of West Indian and Caribbean
ar took
o more than weeks, com-

ins the Liverpool Steam Ship
Owners’ Association, its An-
ual report,
“The root causes of these de-
aay are stated to be in part lack
of fa comparison with
jent to cope with
de, and in part lie in
labour practices de-

pre
increased
restrictive













6 Weeks To |






































=F ARCHER, Notre Dame's right helf back (second from left) in an
effort to frustrate the Empire cent’e forward Robinson -extreme

GRENADA CAN'T yee knocks the ball into his own bars. Empire won the moteh
MAINTAIN
WELFARE DEPT.



Social Weliare In b.G.
Progresses Steadily

PELHAM BAYLIY, Assistant Social Welfare
British Guiana, who is now attending the Wel-
fare Talks at Hastings Hou told the Advocate that on
the whole, social welfare work in his country is showing
progress. Progress is however not as fast as Many social
workers, both official and voluntary, would like it to be,
but the democratic idea seems to demand a slow but sure
development rather than spec Lanheie® results

—- - — -- e saic at oOcla

British Guiana is attached to the

Move Ta Extend © si government department and
tk

» their work of rural betterment,



I think there is need for a fully
equipped welfare department in
Grenada, but the finances of the
colony cannot maintain the set

MR
Officer of

welfare in



to the department in the best
possible way and the existin;
clubs and organisations who need

help by way of advice are given

7 thes >c se Y ouc i th
rived apparently, from ack of ap- consideration Scavenging © 95° Ssrsiletloners” and the
an vier yng of the nature Ge the She said that their set-up i taffs of the District Commissions
situation,” says the report, Gatried oh on a skeleton Seale. In Bepartment ie

Port congestion has plagued] 1949 it was decided to abandor The two sides of the separ
shipowners operatin to many;the welfare department becau: The Sanitary Commissioners of th Baresars I RS ling
parts of the world since the war, | of the lack of funds, Most of the } 31, Michael are hoping to take in) | engtsen each wate. eS
‘notably to South America and | activities : 5 t development has been maint;

Australian ports. But this latest

urvey. indicates that, British
ports themselves are far from
blameless in this respect.

it the. a cargo

pr! en-
gaged in trade between the Uni-
ted Kingdom and the West In-
dies and the Caribbean. Sericus
delays were suffered in the United
Kingdom by inability to get a
harging berth through con-
gestion on the quays.

“This has happened in Liver-
pool, London, Avonmouth and
Glasgow,” says the report, “In

Liverpool, in particular, it
mot unusual for a ship with in-
ward cargoes to be held up for
four to seven days and as a re-
sult, to take twice as long as it
should have done over discharge,
with consequent interference with
the outward sailing programme.”

Commenting on the continua-
tion of port congestion in general
the Association says: “It is
lamentable that carrying power
should continue to be the subject
of so much wastage by delays in
port,

Advantuge Lost

“ft is the fact that the advan-
jtages of the improvements jn

ing capacity at sea offéred by
these fleets are béing lost by time

lunnecéssarily spent in port fo
ing, both in this cduntry ano
abroad.

| “Wastage of carrying power is
cumulative in its evil effect. In
reducing the number of voyage
|which would otherwise be per
formed, it meéfns that less carg¢
ig carried in and out of the coun-
try. It thus hampers the export
drive, both by reducing the
auantity of exports which ough!
to be carried over a given period
anid by délaying production of
woods for éxport by reducing the
quantity of raw materjals whiet
ought to be capable of importa-
tion over a given period.

“Sueh waste is seriously im-
pairing all the efforts of British
shipowners to make the best use
ef their ships and to give the
best and most economical ser-
vice to their customers.

“It is an undoubted fact that
if the turn-round of ships in the
ports of the world were fully
restored tompre-war perform-
ance, the economic reeults would
be of great value, The shortage
of tonnage which now exists ir
consequence of wasteful usc
would disappear: the cost of
transport would be lowered, and
Qn effect of cumulative benefit
would be substituted for one of
cumulative prejudice.”

Lines trading with the
| Indlee which are members
Association ineclide the
| Line Ltd., Constantine Line
{Lted. (agents in Britsin for Sag-
jnenay Terminals), Thos. and Ja
| Harrison, Ltd... and Watts
1Co., Ltd.—B.U.P.



Wes!
of the
Booker

and



Macst Hold Mediterranean

Europe could be won by NATO

forces if Allied shipping were
jdriven from the Mediterranean.
|Carney speaking on the import-

ance of Allied control in that sea
|€aid no cause may be considered
Hlost as long as the Allies control
tthe Mediterranean

j —U.P

was!





were transferred — ti
other departments and the wel
fare department as such was kep
with a small staff through whon
such Committees as the Dis
charged Prisoners Committee, th:
Mental “Hospital Visiting Com
mittee and various
mittees functioned

pproximately 7,000 square feet of
and on which the Church Villag

tirls’ School stands, for the pur-
ove of extending the Scavenging
Yepartment and for any othe

urpose which the Commissioners
nay neeck

n the direction of community
entres, the formation of group
ictivities of all sorts and the
evelopment of cottage industries,

| Bince the appointment of a so-
jal welfare staff in Government,

+heasepeen other develops
ments of social work besides that
yf rural betterment; for instance;
beea

|
|
vices at the moment. Miss Pansy
Rowley, the colony’s Social Wel-
fare Officer told the Advocate
yesterday-
She said that in the meantime
they are carrying out-in a smal)
way such duties as are allocated

other com
Mr. E

t a meeting of the Board yester

D. Mottley made a motion







They also ran a weekly News ‘ he probation service has
Letter until the end of 1951 ana|°®% Moved that they take steps) ocraplished and is working sat?
at the moment the broadcasting to'see it they could acquire th sfactorily. It was recently ex?
experiments are carried — on id. He was seconded by the! cided and a Committee whicl
through the welfare department, | 1°" V. C. Gale made its report a short time ago,

avals tley is » re t rec ‘ndéd further expan*

Miss Rowley is the Grenad This wae after the Chairman, has recommend
delegate attending the Social], . sion.

Welfare Talks at Hi Mr, J. M, Kidney told the Board He gaid that the Social Assists
{ i alks a astings House} nat the Scavenging Department e Sal a a eget
jance Department handled 1
rather inadequate in space|" . 5 Assist-
: }Age Pensions and Public Assis
nad it would be the opportune |‘ * ys has been
Ann | G 2 | ‘ime for them to acquire the piece | #ee The Depatin r. a ' ;
: 5 { . | reorganise qd staff training ha
ua yvUuIC e f land which was adjoining ne een mnised 8 -" the Secre-
Ses : rtmetr t been earried ou y P :
M ti \' — opine Department and ope ny’ sy of the Board, an officer who
ee ing e c | has been given training at the
, Mr. Mottley explained the pre-| London School of Economics “

At the annual meeting of thej#£"t congestion in the Scavenging) Mr Bayley said pes see
Loal Guide Association held yes-|Pepartment and thought it a good}one of the Soe 1 Welfare ted
terday evening at Pax Hill, many} /e@ for the land to be acquired|has been awarded a UNES ;
lay members of the association; 5° that that department could be} scholarship which he believer oe
were present. In addition to the] ©xtended The soard agreed | be the first of its ki a ate
business pertaining directly to} unanimously on the motion Jawarded in the West Indies.
he meeting, an International




Ceremony was performed by the
guides of the St. Michael’s Girls’
School illustrating the guides in
the various countries of the world

BABY KNOWS HIS

In opening the meeting, the
hairman, Mrs. O'Mahony, said ; AV ; q ’
hat she had received a letter At oe

rom Lady Savagé expressing het
egret at not being able to attend
wing to court mourning for His
ate Majesty King George VI.|
fowever, she assured her of her|
sréat interest in the association
ind of her willingness to help in
iny Way in its activitie

Congratulations

Mrs. O'Mahony also weleomed
Lady Seel, wife of the Comp-
roller- of Colonial

ind Welfare, and other new mem-
ers Of the Association and took
he opportunity of extending her
ongratulations to tihe Island
‘ommissioner on the high award
f the “Silver Fish” which had
een conferred on her during the

Development

vast year by Imperial Headquar
‘ers

After the minutes of tht last
neeting and the treasurer's report
vere read, the Island Corrimis-
sioner then read her report com-
prising the period July 1951 t
March 1952. She said that with

$78 warranted and enrolled merr

ers, 43 unwarranted guiders and

237 recruits, the active side of the
sociation was now stronger that



it has ever been. Neverthele:
this increase has been very slov
onsidering the masses in Barba-
fos. She pointed out that what
has b@eh a Bréat handicap was ’ ee
leaders, and though LIKE SO MANY BABIES OF TO-DAY . HE'S

they pave}
had many fequests to start com-
inies, the first step is to find at

ENJOYING —



‘east two suitable women befor
children can be trained
Thé attention of the meeting]
was then turned to general busi- Ps
ness and variows hemes were
liscusséd of ruising futids to clear ’ asi iveste
the expenses, The building of a} @® it's easily Digested
Areeshundred ft. wall had intur-| ® ii adds Vitamin and Iron
ed great debt to the association, | ~ ® It’s a Complete Food
ind it was hoped that the Anthual!
Guide Pair on May 10tt juld >. > con . ss sie StioOom es
ie well wiisortea and go fal a \CTOGEN ONE OF THE FAMOUS NESTLES
‘léaring this debt. It ‘ o| wr new a aaabiaketie tan eee a
cntad chil shat % was nebedbars PRODUCT IS ON SALE EVERYWHERE
to raise a reserve building fund F
specially in the case of ooden _ =: ‘ f _ _"
Sidin nay i. GEDDES GRANT LTD.
The meeting ended after the
Fair had been discussed at lengtl — Agents
and members had. give |
ance of their willingne t|
in the preparation \ i





PAGE TYO



Caub Calling —

R. ROBERT S. HALE, US

Consul-General in Trinidad,
due to arrive here this after-
noon. by B.W.1.A, from Antigua

is

For Schooner Talks

ME: - L. WIGLEY, Managing
Director of De Lisle Wal-
wyn ~and Co. Ltd. Comm

sion Merchants of St. Kitts is now
in Barbados to attend the Annual
Conference of the Schooner Own-
ers’ Association which takes place
on Saturday at the office of the
Association.

He arrived on Wednesday night
by B.W.LA. and is staying at the
Hotel Royal,

Mr, Wigley expects to leave on
Sunday afternoon by B.W.I.A. for
Puerto’ Rico on his way to New
York and England on busines
coupled with pleasure. He will
probably return to the West
Indies sin about three mouths’
time.

Back to St. Vincent
ISS G. M. RICHARDS and
her sister Miss F. M. Rich-
arus of Kingstown, St. Vincent,
returned home yesterday after-
noon by B.G. Airways after
‘pending two weeks’ holiday stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal.
They are cousins of

Mr. Jus-

tice Richards, retired Puisne
Judge of the Windward Islands
and Rev, W. M. Richards, a form-

er Dean of St. Michael’s Cathedral ,
who is at present in Venezuela

On Holiday

R. H. HOROWITZ, proprietor

of Joyeria Mercury a jewel-
lery establishment in Caracas,
Venezuela, is now here. for a
week’s holiday. He arrived yes-
terday “morning by B.W.I.A. from
Trinidad where he had spent four
days and is staying at the Hoia}
Royal.

Canadians Return Home

FLER spending about two

ind a hasf months’ holiday
btaying at the Marine H _ Mrs.
Elbe:t N. Soper of OttaWa, Can-
ada, returned home on “Priday
morning by T.C.A,

Other Canadians who returned
home gn Friday after spending a
holiday staying at the Marine
included Mr. and Mrs. Charle«
Dumais. of Montreal, Mrs. Ethell
Scott, Mrs. Mary Warrington, Miss

Mary Breakey and Miss Eve
Doreli.








POCKET CARTCON

Ir OSBERE LANCASTER

ie | Be



* Excusez-moi, M’sieurs et
M’dames—but is there a

Prime ees, im the

After A Month

RS. c. E. CLARKE of Palm
Beach, Hastings, who wa‘
spending a month’s holiday in

Trinidad, staying with her son-
in-law and daughter, Dr. and Mrs.
R. M. F. Charies of Arima, re-
turned home_ yesterday by
B.W.LA, fe
Leaving Today
| By adh to-day for Bermuda
by T.C.A. on their way back
to Canada via New York are Mi
and Mrs, F. G. Engholm of Toron-
to. They had been holidaying
here for the past month staying
at the Ocean View Hotel.

They told C.urib yesterday that
they ieft home on January 3 and
visited England, New York and
Bermuda before coming here, It
was their first visit to Barbados
and they had a wonderful time.

They had a car for their entire

holiday and toured the island in
addition to stopping at the Rock-
ley Golf Links every day for a
game,

Mr, Engholm is President of
the Macotta Company of Canada
Ltd., Manufacturers and Engin-
eers and Vice-President of F. C

Russell Company of Canada Ltd.,

Manufacturers of Metal Windows.
Their eldest son is Rear Com-

modore of the Royal Canadian
Yacht Club in _in Toronto.

BY THE WAY....

By Beachcomber

I HOPE publishers have read
- about the man who can write
1,000 words on a grain of rice. If
the libraries can be persuaded to
combine food and literature, novy-
els in the form of rice pudding
will enable the public to have its
cake, a8 it were, and eat it,

But I can well imagine that
some of the old-fashioned libraries
will be reluctant té han@le novels
in the form of rice pudding, They

ean always say that it would be
bad for the nation’s sight.
. :

“Forty thousand copies eatén
before publication.”

“As food, Miss Poffie’s new
novel is tolerable; as literature
negligible,” writes a greedy
reviewer,

The Pearl of Chitmagar
ND is this the dam you are
building?” Lettice Ticknold

tried te show an interest in the
work of the handsome engineer.
Paul Froope grinned, “I won't
bore you with technical details,”
he said. “Isn't that Major Trow-
bridge?” she asked, pointing.
“No,” he replied, “it’s Captain

Cc aulfield.” An uneasy silence fell
“Is it a big dam?” she asked
presently. “A small one would be
no use,’ he answered, “Why,
there’s Mrs, Archer!” she cried.
Helen Archer came nonchalantly
towards them, “I suppose he’s
telling you all about his dam,”
she drawled, Froope bit his lip.

Lettice frowned.
cal of India,” said a loud voice,
as George Rampound approached
on his little pony. “We work and
work, and who cares? I've had
thirty years of it, and I know less
te-day than I did

“It’s all so typi-

when I came
out.” Lettice, looking at his lean
brown face, suddenly hated him.

As though aware' of it, he smiled
bitterly at Mrs. Archer. “What are
they all uv to?” Paul Froope asked
himself, conscious that some
drama was being enacted of which
he had not the key.

The ‘psychological

approach’
A’ enterprising American firm,

read, is hiring elephants
to demonstrate the strength and
flexibility of its mattresses, This

will cause so much excitement,
and will be such fun for children,
that the mattresses wi'l sell by
the ton, even if the beasts break
them to bits, It is what. business
men call a “new angle.”

A whale to catch a sprat
LWAYS do the little thing in
a big way,” a school-master
is r@ported as ying in a lecture,
Stich advice may be good, but
may give the wrong idea to those
with more zeal than sense—as was
demonstrated in the case of the
man who, full of good intentions,
tried to shift an egg out of a
drain-pipe witha a bulldozer.

»



First In 27 Years
R. BELFIELD AUSTIN, a}

Barbadian from Pie Corner, |
St. Lucy, who has been residing
in Ge orgetown, British Guiana for
the past 27 years is now back for
three weeks’ holiday which he is
spending with his relatives in St.
Lueyy

He arrived over the last week-
end by the Marion Belie Wolfe.
He said that he was very glad to
be back and was looking forward
to an enjoyable stay.

virst Visit
AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados and remaining for a
short holiday are Mr. and Mrs. J
Sherman of Toronto, Canada,
who arrived here on Tuesday by
B.W.1.A. via Nassau, Jamaica and

Trinidad. They are Staying at
the Ocean View Hotel,

..efurning Next Month

R* JUmiw MUCKHIUGE, re-

titeu Ciergyiiian of ‘1 oronto,
Canada, wno was here since the
tmuddie of December fur the win-
ter, is due to return home early
next month by T.C.A. He is
Staying at Stafford House.

Also returning to Toronto next
month by T.C.A, after spending
about two months’ holiday are
Mr, Haynes Challenor, a retired
Manager of one of the branches
of the Canadian Bank of Com-
merce in Toronto and his sister-
in-law, Miss Frances - Harman.
They are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Mr. Challenor who is a brother
of Hon'ble Robert Challenor, left
here 52 years ago for Canada
where he worked at one of the
Canadian Banks in Toropto. He
has paid frequent visits to Bar-
bados since then, the last being
last year about this time when he
remained for two months,

Canadian Medico

D* AND MRS. \/. MicPHAIL
of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan,
who were spending the winter in

barbados, left tor Bermuda by
T.C.A, ou Friday mvrning for a
further stay before returning

home, They were guests of Parq-
dise Beach Club.

Mr. J. F. Peacock, Export Man-
ager of Victory Millis Ltd., of
Toronto, left during the week by

B.W.LA,* for Trinidad to continue | “Swimming is something that every-

his tour of the Caribbean area.
While here he was staying at the
Marine Hotel.

opent A Week

APT. H. SEAGRIM,
Manager of Uperations,
T.C.A. and Capt. R. M. Smith,
Flight Operations Superintendent,

Geueral

T.C.A. returned to Canada on Fri- , Mrs. Clueky and her chicks.

day by T.C.A, after spending aj}
week's holiday staying at Cacra-

bank Hotel. They were accom- |
panied by their wives,

|

At Crane Hotel

R AND MRS, F. H. BAR-

NARD of St. Lucia who ar-
rived here on Wednesday by}
B.W.1.A. are staying at the Crane
Hotel with Mr. Barnard’s mother
who has been here for several
weeks. They expect to be here
for about five days,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

FRIDAY, ?18ST MARCH, 19%
11.15 a.m. New Records, 12.00 noon
The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analvsis
100—7.15 pom . 19 76M 25.53M 31.22M





400 pm
Datly Service, 4.15
Third Trogramme,
Magazine, 5.00, p.m. Semprini at the
Piano, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6.09
pm. Merehant Navy Programme, 6.15
pm Have A Go, 6.45 p.m Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m The News, 7.10 p.m News
Analysis
71510 3 pom

The News, 4.10 p.m
pom From

445 p.m Music

The
The

. 2 68M 81.92M 49.4eM





FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PPIVATE—**!N Ftp cr ace



IT’

What Guiding Means

al
GUIDING TRAINS our girls to be good citizens an
it is a generally accepted principle that good citizenship

Apply

nce
—the art of living together—is the aim of all a. at O
The first feature in guide training is that it represents = :
every girl a personal challenge in the promise of duty on insect

God, the Queen and all others. |

The interests of guiding are saat
wide and varied and may mean “Some parents = a pe
anything from a_ girl trying to enough a See e ae Si
kindle a fire on a wide open space their children os oon oe
oS 5, ee ee pons Me ge ye wiseleey organi-
See es eee ames dee Sion but once a child joins the

taught the simple techniques in a on ate Saal
i ioti i great movement she 5
ma si patron, Ae that she “belongs” and should try

7 “ion And Sing to live up to the promises made.

The patrol system is one of the
most distinctive features in Guide
training. The patrol leaders are
elected by the girls themselves
and have an opportunity to learn
the qualities of leade:ship, loy-
alty, responsibility, and discipline.
Queen’s College has two guide
companies, There is lst Barbados}
whose Captain is Mrs. A. W.
Scott and 4tn Barbados led by |
Miss Joyce Bowen, Since the first |
Captain resigned from lst Bai-
bados Miss June Clarke, a patrol
leader, along with the other lead-
ers, kept the company going. This
affo.ded them the oppurtunity to
cbserve the Guide Laws which
i1ead: “A guide smiles and sings
under ali difficulties.”





stings

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

Non-poisonous. Pleasant smell.

A Guide’s Honour is to be trust- | Doesn't Pain. Doesn't Stain.

and |
ed, A guide is loyal, useful,

is a friend to all. She is courteous,
friendly to animals, obeys aa
smiles and sings under all diffi-
culties, thrifty,“ and pure in|
thought, word, and deed,



PLAZA

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
Walter WANGER



CROSSWORD

presents

TAP
ROOTS

Mrs. Scott who saw ibe grave
need for leadership, offered ‘her
services. As a guide it Was diilicult |
to “sit back” and watch a patrol |
struggling without a Captain. |




























IN NEW YORK for a round of shopping, theatre-going and —" out, of . aes of a a
screen star Barbara Stanwyck takes time out to lunch with singer helped to maintain the is andé Across (as Color b:
Eddie Fisher, now a PFC on leave from a Virginia camp. Barbara was of good guiding. The ee an L. Eney even make heels pan iy
recently divorced from film actor Robert Taylor. (International) standard reached then the greé se Should cause a mix-up. (4) TECHNICOLOR!
er will be the satisfaction in AO in this you noteh 14) ates
immi achievement. Mrs, Scott enjoys| j9 This torch is for the bir dinitiaa
Swi Ing Lesson for Duc S working and playing with the| 5 Peruse era fern (8)
girls and will continue until a} 3% & 8 inure insurance. (4) Van Susan
—Knarf Didn't Know They Had to Be Taught— ® Captain is trained.¢ 32. Wink equivalent tne bira. (3) | EFLIN HAYWARD
By MAX TRELL | (23 Mar this and a. he ‘artist. (7)
” Learn Morse Code _ | 24 In pa
iid Raeets the Bhar Quack, The “Advocate” on a visit to ee like this. (y? —
sal na e adow en ». ras very impress- Meet a tuner or t
' ueen’s Collere was very im} is 1 inely. (4)
“Good-morning, Knarf,” replied a by the willingness and team | z. Sompany,. (4) enor. Boris KABTASY
Mrs. Quack. : spirit adopted by the girls. First | 4° Seen in Maidstone (8) Julie LONDON — Ward BOND
“Good-morning,” Knarf,” joined Barbados Company was entertain- Fr Bee eet perhaps (1) ‘
in the five little ducks who were | ing the guides from 4th Barba- 8. Extremely eager. Seg 18) — Richard LONG
standing in a line right behind the i dos and also some others from 9. It's fashion 12 Or aeer 1 (5) ;
“iar Clifton Hill Girls’ led by Miss | 4% RIN formation. (5) | Introducing
“Where are you going with all Alleyne, These visiting girls | 4§° ana in father It's , -
your children, Mrs. Quack?” | are received a test in First Aid| 17 Acoording oe 8) et er WHITFIELD CONNOR
“I’m taking them down to the| from Mrs, Taylor. Mrs. Smith, 19 Aeaatsin of 21. (4) | Fr the Thrilling pages
pond to teach them how to avi, ! an old Queen’s conn ees Solution of Saturday's puzzle across: (From e g ges
said Mrs. Quack, was also instructing the girls i Sea eetcale: 1s. Bar; 14, Tyrant: ST
“Oh,” said Knarf, “I didn’t ‘ule Morse code, The afternoon ended | $0" Woigatary. "a8 Aver fo," wwap: 25, of JAMES Ror MO!
that little ducks had to be taught on a note of a general Pyers ne a eecenast : ft EXCITING NOVEL!)
how to swim. I ught they alw: gether of group singing. Prayers | Felar: 6 Storeys; 8. al
knew.” vitebeeee: ners were read and the girls were dis- irae wa A Universal-International
“Certainly not,” said Mrs. Quack. missed. Rel ;
Knarf greeted Mrs. Quack, eee
one has to learn, Come along, dears,” * one OPENING TO-DAY FRIDAY 21ST
she said to her little ducks. And off . a ———
they waddled a after the. other,| “I’m teaching my little ones how

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. &

to fly.” Continuing Daily

“What!” exclaimed Knarf. “Can’t
| birds fly without being taught?”

down to the pond.
A few minutes later Knarf met
Mrs. Clucky apd her five chicks.

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

| your chicks, Mrs, Clucky?”

“Good - seeding, Mrs. Clucky.
Cees Chicks.”
Govud-morning, Knarf,” answered

“Where are you going, with all

Catching Bugs

“I’m taking them out into the |
meadow to teach them how to catch
bugs,” said Mrs. Clucky. “They
have to learn how to eat by them-
selves,”

“Oh,” said Knarf, “1 thought all
chicks knew how to catch bugs and
eat by themselves.”

“Not at all, Catching bugs and

eating by yourself are things that
everyone has to learn. Come, dar-

Everyone Must Learn

“I should say not! Flying is some-
thing that everyone must learn,
Come, babies, beat your wings up
jand down. Ah, there we are! Very
pect Off the ‘ground we gol” ‘And
away went Mrs. Robin with her
three little ones flapping and flut-
tering through the air behind her.

Knarf shook his head. “Little
ducks have to learn how to swim,
| Little ehicks have to learn how to
leat. Little birds have to learn how
to fly,” he said to himself. “And I
always thought those were things
they dic by themselves, just like
walking. No one has to learn how
to walk, of course. Everyone can

Also The Short
TEX BENEKE & GLENN
MILLER’S ORCHESTRA

(Next Door to Singers)









DRESSES.—Just arrived—a lovely selection of
Cotton and Cocktail Dresses

STRAPLESS BRAS, 32 to 38 from $3.96
BATHING SUITS—A large selection of styles,





Sat. 22nd. Special 1.30 p.m.
THE ARKANSAS SWING

Hoosier Hot Shots &

BONANZA TOWN

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

20th

GLOBE CENTURY FOX

colours and prices





EMPIRE

TODAY 2.30 & 8.30
& continuing to Tues. 4.45 & 830

do that. .

At that 4 very instant Knarf saw
the lady who lived next door sud-
eee eae Rine her hands in happi-

Hardly had they gone when Knarf ; "°88: Standing in front of her in the
met Mrs. Roberta Robin with three | S#tden aoe her little baby. “Look
of her young robins, They were II at baby! the lady next door was
standing cr. the ~rass under the tree, | @X¢laiming. “She’s standing up all

lings, hurry along.” And Mrs.
Clucky started walking to the
meadow with her chicks running all
around her.

FOR PRESTIGE MOVIES
TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M. AND CONTINUING





i ,| by herself She’s learning how to
Good morning, Mrs, Robin,’ :
said Knarf. “Good morning, iittle ae really learning how to vy: b> TRUE-TO-LIFE,

robins.”
“Good-morning, Knarf,” they all!
answered.
“What
Robin?”

Poor Knarf! He just had to keep
shaking his head. It seemed that
there wasn’t anything that anyone
Mrs, | knew al! by himself Everything had

to be learned.

UH eps ey ps 8 ee
STORY OF A

are

you doing,



7.15 p.m
Record

West Indian Diary, 7
Variety Bill, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45
p.m Somposer of the Week, 9.00 p.m
English Magazine, 9.30 p.m. Cyril Smith
and Phyllis Seilick (Pianos), 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editori
us, 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues
10.30 p.m. From the Third » Progra amme

45 p.m

OH! SO DEAR

ARIS inthe spring... the
chestnuts in the Bois de
Boulogne moonlight in the
Tuileries Gardens . .. will be just
a..dream this year for British
tourists. Unless they go only for

a. week-end on the £25 for-
eign travel allowane.

Prices have risen steeply in the
last six months,

I stayed at the hotel I visited a
year ago. The same room with



the same bath
30s, to £2 10s,
croissants,

and orange

had risen from
Breakfast (coffee
butter, marmalade
juice) cost 9s. 6d.
My favourite bistro, where a
year ago I could enjoy a 5s.
snack, now charged me lbs.
for the same fare. In the
smallest restaurants was
difficult get under
25s,

it

to a meal

SWIM SuIiIrTs.

A FINE ASSORTMENT HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED

LADIES’ SWIM SUITS,

Plain Satin

Blue, Gold, Black, Turquoise, Red

Flowered Satin Lastex One Piece 16.94

Sizes 36 & 38
‘ Flowered Satin Lastex One Piece ... 14.20
Z Two Piece ... 13.50

Sizds 34 & 36

CENTS’ SWIM TRUNKS
Plain Satin Lastex ............... 7.96
Flowered Satin Lastex .... 9.34

Sizes: Small, Medium, Large
ALSO

MORLEY’S NYLON HOSE 51 GAUGE 15 DENIER............ $2.09 & $2.28

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Lastex One Piece



COMING BRIDGETOWN
“TO-MORROW IS ANOTHER DAY"
**Ruth ROMAN-—Steve COCHRAN






Flowered
cheaper

were 30s.
£3.

hats from one of the
department stores,
in 1951. Now they are



asked my hotel manager
whether he was expecting En-
glish guests this spring. He
shook his head sadly and. spoke
of cancellations and empty
rooms, “How can they do it with
prices so high?”

$15.40 & $18.95

fe

“PLAZA CINEMAS cos”



BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310

TO-DAY (3 sHows) 2.30-4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

AND CONTINUALLY DAILY

AT 445 & 8.30 P.M

WARNER BROS. ACTION-PACKED SAGA |

Gregory

With BARBARA PAYTON
SAT. Special 9,30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

OUTLAW SOLD

in

Johnny Mack .BROWN
ARIZONA TERRITORY

WILSON &
oo

Andy CLYDE
ee

ONLY tHe VALIANT

WARD BOND LON CHANEY

MIDNITE SPECIAL SAT. 22nd

ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS &

Charles STARRETT

SO
ot

Peeks THE OUTLAW TRAIL}}|ARKANSAS . SWING

Smiley BURNETT

The Garden—St. James To-day To Tues 4390 & 8.15 SAT. & SUN 430 & &15
OIs wrar 8404 TODAY (Only) 8.30 PM Bing CROSBY = Fred ASTAIRE Wendell Corey—Margaret Sullivan
y sn in o ho. AY NN" —-in —
RARBAREES (DOWNTOWN) —Dial 5170 pike STEN ts s 8% pmi| RIDERS OF THE DUSK EO cama
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING DAILY SaUccANEER'S Gm. Whip WILSON — Andy CLYDE Gary_ COOPER "George RAFT ne ee ee
. . a Technicolor) ary — je
Jniversal-International Thrilling Technicolor Adventure|! vensizis Jan > — Philip FRIEND mae ‘<5 bake OMOO OMOO Ron Randell
Van Susan — and — Johnny Mack BROWN Whole Serial
HEFLIN HAYWARD in “FOREIGN LEGION” . Seris

“TAP ROOTS”



~ Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO SUN. 5 PM KING or 7am ROYAL MOUNTED ROLL ON TEXAS MOON
(Color by = ee Mat. iy Lane ond
Techniegior) Sat Special Midnite Sat 22 LIFE WITH FATHER ———— DOWN MEXICO WAY
With WARD BOND —- BORIS. SALON? TEE, LOR 4. 3.m. Tim HOLT in (Color) Irene Dunne, William Powell Jou Ray NE = ome “0 SAT 2nd MID-NITE
cone DEERE & Glenn MILLER. Orchestra Smash Te se alone MIDNITE SATURDAY @2nd ie i Whole Serial—
SATURDAY'S SPECIAL 1.30 P.M, “Heldorade” and Johnny Mack BROWN in CAPTAIN CHINA i cians an elena
N and “Fighting “LAW OF THE WEST” & i MANHUN ISLAND”
& BONANZA TOW “Man From Music Gringo"|| “RIDIN' THE CHEROKEE TRAIL
Hoosier Hot Shots Charlies Starrett & Smiley Burac* Mourtain” George O'Brien Tex RITTER
=. =



PRT ee ora tslenemerae a a CRIME -LORD!-
Rupert and the New Bonnet—16





iy
ER
4
H
H





WT POREON
Av HARDING - Bg SULLIVAN

“or JOAN EVANS
MELVYN DOUGLAS

An M-G-M Picture
“Is this wh of my own invention. I've LYNN BARI
hale eens whet Rue etn | iat BS sos
when | saw you before ? at are tainly have."’ exclaim aT . . .
you mu doing ? yon. Oh dear, I didn’ t have nearly killed oe ened en | KEEFE LE ~ LEWAS STOWE + EDUARD FRANZ » RICHARD ANDERSON » DRM

After waiting a few minutes
Rupert moves to the door and
peeps inside. “Good gracious |
So it’s you, Bingo!" he cries.

sighs
“but now you're here come
in and see all the work I'm doing.

I'm experimenting with new fire-
works

mean you to La me,

Bingo, *







Is BACKACHE

CAUSED BY BOTH

Kidneys and Liver?



@ Written by RONALD MILLAR and GEORGE FROESCHEL « Directed by RICHARD THORPE
Produced by ROBERT THOMSEN

ROODAL THEATRES



WATCH
NEXT SUNDAY’S

ADVOCATE



COCKTAIL DANCE

THE BARBADOS

AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members

Fa
|

|
|
|
|
}



When your back aches so you hate to Only) FOR i

straighten up—and short diary twinges ON E MPIRE ROXY 8.15

stab you at every sudden move—your U seat Presents _

backs ieesote may nave several causes that Saturday, ee 22nd B J G ‘AT To TUES. 443 & 8.0 “KISS THE BLOOD OF MY
That's why Dr. Chase's 7.30 p.m. m - eet et : HANDS"

men ya Liver Pills brin — >

s such quick, |

effective relief to many whe suffer with

backache! For this time-proven rem-
edy treats two conditions at once~

contains special remedial ingredients
or both kidneys and liver,

Starring
Burt Lancaster — Joan Fontaine

am SAT. 22ND. MID-NITE
Whole Serial—

“ON THE LOOSE”
Starring
Melvyn (Mouglas

EXTRA

e
Introducing the Island’s
Leading
STEEL BAND:



Joan Evans

EVENTS

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL KING of the FOREST RANGERS
“So if you feel tired, headachy—with “RHYTHM KINGS oe SAT. 2nd at 9.90 AM ao aT 430 & 6.15
painful he and aching back—look ORCHESTRA T Hl E Whole Serial—
to both kidneys and liver! Then look |

PHANTOM SPEAKS

GRAND CANYON TRAIL
to Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills— | i

&
for a reliable product used by Cana-

e
Admission to Ballroom 1/-

ROODAL

DRUMS of FU MANCHU











SAT. “ND MID-NITE
dians for over half a century, The 19,3.52.—4n, T H E A Tv R E s Whole Serial ROYAL
name “Dr. Chase’! is your assurance, 7 4 _ eS Be I. “HAUNTED HARBOUR"
BS











Toes (only) 4.30 & 8.16

E BIG NIGHT
and

MAN WITH MY FACE

COMING BARBAREES
“HIGHWAY 301" sf
Steve COCHRAN—Virginia GREY

GAIETY OLYMPIC

|





& SUN. 830 PM SAT. 22nd At 9.30 A.M.
SAT IN. 8.1
















LAW OF THE 4







FRIDAY, MARCH 2i, 1952

COMBERMERE SCHOOL

DURING THE COURSE of his speech and prize giving

day school report in which he covered every phase of the
school activities during the past year, Major C. Noott,
headmaster of Combermere, on Wednesday said that the
fundamental contribution that technical education would
make in this island is an immediate contribution to the

standard and efficiency of

industry and would balance

their present educational system with its predominantly

academic emphasis.

My Lord Bishop, Mr. Chairman,
Members of the Governing Body,
Ladies and Gentlemen, It gives
me very great pleasure to welcome
His Lordship as Guest of Honour
to this function. It enables me,
first of all, to acknowledge a debt,
for His Lordship kindly consented
to present the Prizes after His
Excellency the Governor withdrew
from the function owing to the
mourning into which the Court
und Commonwealth were plunged
after the death of our late Sover-
eign, In the second piace, it
allows me on behalf of the School
to offer our warm congratulations
to His Lordship on his recent
elevation to the bishopric; we pray
that under his leadership the
work of the church in Barbados
might prosper. But, His Lord-
ship’s presence also restores a link
with tradition, for, as. the com-
memorative tablet in the Court of
Honour reminds us it was largely
due to the efforts of the S.P.C.K.
a century and a half ago that this
School was opened in 1819 on
Constitution Hill in the building

that now forms part of Queen's
College. During your Lordship’s
forthcoming visit to the United
Kingdom, I hope you may find

pleasure in telling the Society how
this School—which owes so much
to them—has flourished and how
important a part it has come to
play in the educational life of
Barbados.
-The Governing Body

The School owes a very con-
siderable debt to the Governing
Body.» They are in every sense
devoted to its welfare and pro-
gress and are the guardians of its
good name. Since last we met,
Mr. D. A. Wiles has resigned on
being appointed Assistant Colonial
Secretary and | take this op-
portunity of offering him our
warmest congratulations on his
promotion in the Public Service.
In his place we gladly welcome
His Honour Mr. Justice Vaughan,
an old boy of this School, and
one in whom I know Combermere
will find a stalwart supporter. In
April last year, Mr, H. A. Tudor
retired from the chairmanship
after having served in that
capacity for a periog of five years.
He was succeeded by The Honour-
able V. C. Gale, M.L.C., who has
maintained the fine tradition of
service set by Mr. Tudor,

Internal Organisation

Our numbers have stabilized
around thé figure 550. These are
organised into three main divisions
—Preparatory with 78 boys rang-
ing from 8} to 11% years of age;
the Junior School comprising four
parallel First Forms and_ four
parallel Second Forms with 240
pupils between the ages of 104 and
14%; and the Middle and Upper
School with some 250 pupi’s of 13
years of age and over. The First
and-Second Forms provide a two-
year course of instruction which
includes English Language and
Literature, Religious Knowledge,
Latin, French, History, Geography,
Arithmetic, Elementary Mathemat-
ics, Physiology and Hygiene,
Nature Study, Art, Music, Physical
Education and two periods of
Reading in the School] Library.
At the end of the second year the
pupils undergo an intelligence tert
as well as tests in mathematical
facility and in the use of English.
These tests are used in conjunction
with their, record of attainment
and the boys are then canalised by
the Stoff and myself into one of
three Streams — Academic, Com-
mercial) and Modern. ‘The A and
C Stredms prepare for the General










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He said :

Certificate of Education of London
University.. The A Stream re-
taining Latin, the C Stream sub-
stituting therefor commercial sub-
jects—Shorthand and Book-keep-
ing. Our first group of candidates
for the G.C.E. of London University
whl be presented in July next.
Our ties with the Overseas Cam-
bridge Centre will be severed next
December, and the boys of last
year’s Form Lower 5 will take
that Examination, The Cambridge
Syndicate has serveqd Barbados
very faithfully in the past and
there is no doubt that the educa-
tional standards reached in this
Island owe that examining body a
very considerable debt. Its ex-
aminations are now being with-
drawn on the implementation of
the recently agreed policy to adopt
the examination system of the
Oxford and Cambridge Joint
Board for all our Secondary
Schools with the exception of
Combermere which, as I have in-
formed you, is preparing its
candidates for the G.C.E. of Lon-
don University.

Curriculum

1 should be misleading you if
I let you think that the organisa-
tion outlined above work as
efficiently in practice as it is sim-
ple to outline on paper. We are
experiencing difficulties of two
kinds —- one caused by problems
of staffing and the other by the

remarkable reluctance of young
boys to fit neatly into ready-
made administrative schemes.

I shall deal with the problem
of staffing later on in this report;
the essence of the second pro-
blem lies in the individuality of
each boy not only in terms of
character and personality, but in
the wide range of interests and
abilities revealed by any group of
boys of the same age. In a few
boys, pursuit of knowledge for its
ewn sake will be the dominant
interest; in others, the main in-
terest will be in the field of Ap-
plied Science or Applied Arts;
but, by far the stronger group,
numerically, will be interested in
concrete things rather than ideas.
To meet this range of interests
and abilities, the School must be
able to offer the most diverse
choice of curriculum and the most
varied facilities in terms of lab-
oratories and workshops. Thanks
+o the foresight of the Govern-
ing Body, Mr, Drakes, a Junior
member of our Staff, was sent to
the U.C.W.I., Jamaica in 1949,
to reaq for his Degree in Natural
Sciences. His degree course fin-
ishes this July and he is due to re-
join our Staff in September next.
Although we have pressed in each
of the last three years for the
necessary capital grant to con-
struct a laboratory, we still find
ourselves approaching the end of
Mr. Drakes’ period of prolonged
Study Leave without having a
General Science Laboratory avail-
able for him to teach in,

I have. said above that the
majority of boys are interested in

concrete things. I have never
failed, since I was appointed
Headmaster, to point out at

School Speech Days the need
which I felt for workshop facil}
ities in which many of our boys
could receive instruction in man-
ual skills and workshop tech-
niques. Technical Education has
recently come 0 occupy 4 promi-
nent place in the public eye in
Barbados, and you’ W ill forgive
me if I take this opportunity and
this moment to offer a brief analy-
sis of the problems which techni-
cal education should be expected




even more



)) is

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





to help solve and the contribution
we should expect it to make Ww
We eaucational prob.ems of our
Second Grade Seconaary Senools.
The fundamental needs that tech-
nical education must meet for
this Island are three-fold. It must
in the first place make a direct
and immediate contribution to the
standard of efficiency in industry;
it must therefore be prepared to
undertake the trade-traming of
apprentices already in induswy—
whether in factory, workshop or
Government Departments. In the
second place and as a middle term
policy in raising the standards of
workmanship in industry, It must
provide a flow of recruits to in-
dustry of a higher calibre than
those hitherto recruited haphaz-
ardly and for the most part with
considerable reluctance from
those recruited. In the third place
I should expect technical educa-
tion to redress the balance of oux
present educational system with
its predominantly academic em-
phasis,

I am convinced that the princi-
pal reservoir of higher calibre
recruits for industry is already in
our existing Secondary Schools.
There are these boys who have
proved their merit by passing a
competitive Entrance Examina-
tion from our Elementary Schools
into our Secondary Schools, but
who are more interested in con-
crete things than they are in ideas.
These boys are to be found at
present in Forms 3-Modern, 3-
Alpha and 4-Alpha at Comber-
mere School, and they are numer-
ically a strong group. To tap this
reservoir of higher calibre re-
cruits to industry, two conditions
in my mind must be fulfilled.
Firstly, they must have access
whilst at School to workshop
facilities where first-hand ac-
quaintance with the — skills and
techniques involved would wean
them and their elders from the
false values at present attached to
Secondary Education in Barbados.
The second condition would have
to be fulfilled by industry which
would have to be prepared to de-
vise and enforce an apprentice-
ship system which would give
different degrees of preferential
treatment according to the type of
school from which the boys came
and the degree of training they
had undergone prior to entry into
industry, It is essential at this
point that I should clear up any
possible confusion which may
arise between the workshop
training which I have just des-
cribed and what is called officially
“Pre-technical Training”, Te-
technical training entails a higher
standard of academic pursuit in
those subjects which have a bear-
ing upon indust and is in fact
the academic side of Technical
Education. It would very pos-
sibly mean therefore that boys
for pre-technical training at
Combermere School would most
likely be found in our Academic
Stream where they would be giv-
en the opportunity of doing Ap-
plied Mathematics, General
Science and Machine Drawing as
alternatives, possibly, to Latin
and Modern Languages. Whilst
for them too I would consider it
desirable that they should have
the opportunity of some training
in workshop techniques and
skills, pre - technical training
would only require a General
Science and Mechanics Labora-
tory. In whatever way therefore
Government may finally decide to
introduce Technical Education, ‘1
do press most “rgently here that
one of the essential conditions
should be that classes from our
existing Secondary Schools shou'd
have access to the workshop facil-
ities to be provided in the scheme.

Where the reform of our cur-
riculum has not been dependent
upon additional buildings, we
have been able to make steady
progress. In no one field is this
progress more in evidence than
in music. Under the combined
tutelage of Mr. Gerald Hudson
and Mr. James Millington, boys
are being trained to a high degree
in vocal and instrumental music.
The violin class, whom you saw
and heard this afternoon, started
with Mr. Millington ip January
1950 and you will agree with me
that the standard of skill which
he has imparted to them in this
comparatlvely short time is quite
vutstanding, A second group
began practising the yiolin in
September last and we hope to
continue in this way — selecting
a small group of boys from each
annual entry to the School —
until we sha be sufficiently
strong to form a School Orches-
‘ra. Less evident in its results
vet equally as valuable is the
work done by Mr. Hudson in the
field of Musical Appreciation.
Mr. Hudson’s work with the
School Choir has maintained the
visual degree of excellence which
associated with him and _ his
work throughout the Island. The
success of the School in the
School Music Festival of last
April when they obtained a Cer-
tificate of Merit in Class II Sec-

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Mr. Hudson's leadership.
Staffing

I referred earlier in this Report
to the problems of Staffing, and



REPORT



|
which will be difficult te equal}
and will seldom be surpassed. |
Acting Staff |

I eannot close this section of
my Report without referring in
brief terms to the members of




in one instance we have been the “Acting Staff. Messrs Taitt,
able to make little or no progress J Lashley, Greaves, Glas-
because of our inability to re- gow, and Wilson, who
cruit a pérson of adequate quali- are ing for variable periods)
fications and experience. | refer du the time that so many of}

% the appointment of a Commer-
cial ialist.

of leave in England, I spent much
time on behalf of the Governing
Body interviewing cadidates for
this post. The applicants were
few in number although good ip
quality. Time and time again
the same question atese about
conditions of service in Barbados
and which, when the answers
were given, caused the candi-
dates to withdraw their applica-
tions. These conditions about
which questions were asked
related to reciprocity of pensions,
leave passages, housing condi-
tions, and cost of living,

So long as an Officer is told that
Barbados has no scheme of re-
ciprocity with the United King-
doin for its Secondary School
Teachers, it sets up a doubt in
the mind of the person interested
whether he is justified in throw-
ing overboard such pensionable
service—maybe of short, maybe
of jong duration—which he has
already put in the United King-
dom. When the answer to
question whether leave passages
were provided was “No”, it be-
came clear — especially if the
applicant were a married man—
that he could not face the pros-
pect of being indefinitely maroon-
ed in a small geographical unit.
I sincerely hope that the new pro-
posals regulating conditions of
service and granting leave pass-
ages and some upward revision
ot salaries may soon be approved
by our Legislature as I believe
that many staffing problems will
be solved when we are in a posi-
tion to re-advertise in the United
Kingdom.

Our School feels that it 1s de-
pendent only in small méasure
upon the need for expatriate
staff to strengthen itself and to
muke its full contribution to the
community. We have found
amongst our young men e
weal qualities awaiting only ~
opportunity to develop them and
to enhance their qualifications,
It is for this reason that I am
pleased to make the following
reports concerning members ef
our Junior Staff on prolonged
Study Leave. Mr. J. C. L. Drakes
will complete his Degree Course
in Natur a1 Seiences at the
U.C.W.L, Jamaica, in July next.
Mr. H. G. Brewster, after a year
at Loughborough, has been
awarded a Colonia] Office Schol-
arship to enable him to continue
his studies there for a further
two years. He will be due to Te-
turn to us ih September 1953. In
September last, Mr. C. W. Wick-
ham was awarded a Caribbean
Scholarship in Printing tenable
at the School of Industrial Arts
in Puerto Rico. He is at the same
time folowing a course in His-
panic Studies in the University
of Puerto Rico. It gives me very
great pleasure to announce that
Mr. K. R. Broodhagen is to be
awarded a British Council
Scholarship for one year pro-
vided that London Headquarters
can get a vacaney for him at a
suitable institution. Mr, C. DeV
Moore is in residence at Durham
University where he is reading
for his degree in Classics. In
September last, Mr. G. A. Holder
returned from a year’s study at
Erdiston College where he ob-
tained a Teacher’s Certificate. I
have also to welcome to the Staff
the following new members who
have joined on the dates indicated
after their names: Mr, Hughes
joined us from Toronto where he
obtained a ond Class Honours
in History gree in September
1950. Both as Master in charge of
History, as a Set Master and as
Masier in charge of Cricket, Mr.
Hughes is already making a most
valuable contribution to the life
of our School. Mr. A. E, Sealy
and Mr. P. C. Scott, who are both
graduates of Durham, whose de-
ass they took from Codrington

ollege, joined us in September
last after serving for a number of
years in other Caribbean Terri-
tories. | would like to say here in
connection with the appointment
of these two officers the value |
place upon comparative experi-
ence in other Caribbean Terri-
tories by young members of our
Teaching Staff; and in this con-
nection also to stress the import-
ance of Barbados adopting @
scheme of reciprocity so that
years in Public Service in other
territories will not be lost to these
young men when they return to
their home Island to take up
appointments in our Secondary
Schools. Also joining us last Sep-
tember was Mr. S. C. Corbin who
left the Department of ation
to come into the field active
practice and to assist us particu-
larly in the teaching of Short-
hand,

In the time which has oyepeed
since my last Report, the ool
has also ered two losses from
its Staff e by resignation and
the a ad aaycoaen. Mr, G.
E. i us
1951 to go to and where he
is studying and we all join
in wishing him every success in
his studies. The retirement
have to record is that of Mr. O.
A. Pilgrim who retired from ac~
tive service in April last. It was
a sad blow to me personally that
Mr. Pilgrim decided to retire at
a still comparatively young age.
He has given most wholehearted-
ly and devoted service to gen-
erations of boys who haye gone
through this institution. Member
of a family which produced 1-
liant mathematicians, Pilly—
through circumstances over which
he had no contrei—never went to
a University to take a Mathema-
ties Degree, though he was bril-
liantly endowed. He was proxime
he 9 his year for the Bar-
bados olarship and from then
until his retirement last May,
cerved almost continuously on
the Assistant Staff of Comber-

ticularly’ remembered for the
fine work he did with the Glee
Club, the Scouts, and with the
cricket teams. He leaves us a
model and a record of service

During my period on

in mu

mere School. Apart from his '
contribution in the classroom
Mathematics, he would be par-




nent Staff are away |
eave. With their names |}
should couple that also of my|
Secretary, Miss Hunte, who has |
been making her contribution to)
the teaching of typewriting in the
Fourth Form. All these mem-|
bers of the Acting Staff are help-!
ing us through a particularly dif- |
ficult time when we deliberately |
accept temporary weakness so
that we may go forward to great- |
ey strength. Reculer pournieur |
sauter most applicably describes |
the present situation with regard |
to our staff at Combermere)
School. |
Equipment }

Since last you were here our |
Library has taken over a second |
classroom and has been enhanced
by the addition of further tables |
and seating accommodation and|
@ very handsome desk unit for

the Librarian which enables
him organise an _ issues
and turns section separately.

The Library is performing valu-)
able service to the School and!
without wearying you with the|
details of its growth since last I}
reported, it is under Mr, St. Hill's)
guidance r@pidly becoming the |
intellectual stock exchange of our)

School
Textbooks }
The Textbook and _ Stationery |
Scheme is continuing to flourish
and is performing a valuable ser-

vice in the School. Mr. Brath-
waite, a member of the Junio:
School Staff, is now the Secre-
tary administering the scheme

and under his careful and meti-
culous control is now on a per
manent administrative basis.

Visual Aids
The Geography Room which
was opened in July 1951 on the
eecasion of our last Speech Day

continués to play a_ stimulating
part in our School life, With ex
perience in the handling of the
equipment, there are Messy
Goddard and Smith who have
maintained the fine method ot
Geography teaching which Mr

"Webster established in our School

I hope that those who did not see |
the Geography Projection Room
in 1950 will not fail to visit it!
this time’and see for themselves
the visual aid equipment in actual
use,

Art Room

The acquisition of tools and
materials for our Art and Handi-
craft Room has proceeded so
rapidly that Mr. Broodhagen has
some difficulty in continuing hi
instructions in one classreon
which we originally converted
for that purpose. There is a dis-
play there of things made by the
classes which he conducts in
modelling, cane-work, lettering
and art, I am extremely grateful
to Mr. Broodhagen for his valu-
able contribution to our School
curriculum and very proud in-
deed that he should be selected
for a British Council Scholarship
There are few more deserving
than he of this recognition of his |
contribution’ to the plastic arts |
in the Caribbean,

Grounds
deeds transferring the
extra grounds to Combermer |
Bchool from the Governor-in-|
Executive Committee were com-
pleted only in March of last year. |
I was still on leave at the time,|
but am happy to place on record |
that the Governing Body lost no|
time between receiving the deed)
and the end of the financial year
for which provision had been
made for the construction of 4
boundary wall to enclose ous
eastern approaches, They lost no|
time, I say, in carrying out that
most necessary enclosure to our
grounds. No single contribution to|
the establishment of order, law)
and control within Combermere |
grounds has been greater
this one. In May last, we were
fortunate in obtaining the ¢co-
operation of Messrs Harriman |
and Company’s personnel equip-
ment which had been in use at)
Seawell runway to come in and
level a total extent of approxi-
mately six acres of ground newly!
enclosed, We have been able to)
set out a Hockey Pitch and thus
introduced Hockey into the or-
ganised games of the School. This
innovation we owe to the know-~
ledge and initiative of Mr. Adams,
and it has aroused a lively en-
thusiasm amongst many boys.
Also across the southern end of
the new enclosure we are now
preparing in time for the forth-
roming Cricket Season our bat~-
tery of practise wickets so that

@ On Page 8

_—

Air Traffic

WEDNESDAY — BY BWIA
ARRIVALS — From Trinidad
M. Kipperman, C. Espinoza
From Antigua
Doreas Richardson, David Gilkes, Jack
Wigley, Milton O'Loughlin, Nellie Faddic
WEDNESDAY—BY BW.LA
DEPARTURFS—To Antigua
Ida Sahely, Nancy Greig, Pade Cross
To Trinidad
Jasmin Beckles, Henry Rameay, Ermir
Yorde, Robert Cabrera, Marjorie Cabrera
Louls Applebaun, Robert Eppeiein
To Puerto Kico
Jack Johnstone, Jessie Johnstone, |
Harold Gaffney, Mabel Gaffney
Reeve, James Thompson, Helen
Kenrick Welch, Chesterfield
Donald Boyce, George Gitten
Welch Elizabeth Florsheim,
Blenman, Kirkwood Blenman,
Richards, Dr. Perey Devaires
Decaires, Agnela Maynard

Harbour Log

The





Radle
Steede

Milto
Colene
Geraldin
Daphn







- .
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lady Silver, Sct Lady Noriee
Sch Excelsior Hodge, Sch. Maris Stell
M V. Caribbee, Sch. Zita Wonita, Ser
Loude pha, M.V. Dearwood, Sch Mar
M. Lewis, Sch United P im, Seb
Lucille M. Smith, Sch. Marion Be
Wolte, Sch. Anita H., Sch. Enterprise §

Sch

Mandalay U, M.V. Jenkins Rob rt
Sch. Franklyn D. R., 8.8. Wilford, Sct







Frances W Smith, S.S. Naturalist
AKRIVALS
M.V. Moneka, 19 tons net, Capt
Hudson, froin Dominica
Sch. Turtle Dove, 82 tons net, Capt
Davis, from Trinidad
Sch h Jone tons net,
Capt f nada
M.Vv ‘ net, Capt
D. Chee an, frorr 1850
DEPARTURES
Sch. Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. R
King, for *. Vincent

than} ¢



Henry | @

}
























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PAGE FOUR





—_—





BARBADOS



BARBADOS a ADVOGATI

Gee i et Fo 5 SS

Friday, March 21,

1952
HORTICULTURE
THE Horticultural Society is to be con-

gratulated upon holding its seventeenth
exhibition at. the Drill Hall. Facing the

Garrison Savannah this hall can easily be |

reached by guests from the nearby hotels.
Visitors to Barbados too often judge the
island’s flowers by what they see from
passing cars and only the small number of
those who visit local homes where there are
gardens realise the large variety of flower-
ing plants and shrubs that flourish here.

This year the long drought and the parch-
ed appearance of the countryside would
not lead anyone to expect any high stand-
ard of flowers, but those who visit the Ex-
hibition to-morrow and on Sunday will be
pleasantly surprised to observe what suc-
cess can be attained by good horticulturists.

Those who have seen previous exhibi-
tions of the Society at Queen’s Park are
already aware of the good work which this
society is doing to encourage and improve
horticulture. Like many other societies in
Barbados membership though cheaply
available at five shillings per year is not
as widespread as it ought to be. But the
society’s achievements are the greater be-
cause of this disadvantage and as a result
of this year’s exhibition they may be in-
creased. The Society has wisely continued
this year to encourage exhibits of vege-
tables and fruit and is thereby playing its
part in encouraging market gardeners, In
this connection the Society’s insistence that
horticulture is a definite craft of itself and
not ‘a department of agriculture is admir-
able.

There has been a tendency in recent
years to condemn Barbadians lock stock
and barrel for being devoid of any interests
or enthusiasms other than those connected
with the material pursuit of gain. This
movement was led and so far as it still
exists, is still led by people with very
superficial knowledge of the Barbadian
way of life. It has deservedly suffered a
setback because it was impossible for any-
one to live in so small an island as this
without encountering in some way the
many cells of activity which are engaged
quietly and without much publicity in
building onthe traditions of the past. The
Horticultural Society is one of those so-
cieties which has perhaps suffered from too
little publicity in the past. Its emergence
into public view this week ought to en-
courage it to continue with renewed vigour
the work which it has been so worthily
performing in the interests of the com-
munity.

% ‘ v _
AGRICULTURE
IN his speech in the Legislative Council
Chamber on Tuesday the Colonial Secre-
tary is reported as saying that “the com-
mercial undertakings are self-supporting

and it is expected that they will make a
profit in coming years.”

This statement may possibly have been
amplified in the Council, but the report as
it stands does not adequately emphasise the
position with regard to the six Agricultural
stations which were financed until 1951
from grants made under the Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Act.

Two of these stations already are self-
supporting but much more is involved in
the commercial success of these stations
than fertility of soil.

The Government Agricultural Stations
are compelled to sell produce at govern-

they are also compelled to pay agricultural
labourers the prices which are fixed by
agreement between the Barbados Workers’
Union and the Sugar Federation. The cost
of labour at the agricultural stations has
been rising and the stations have not been
allowed to raise the prices of their produce.

No commercial undertaking could succeed
if it were run on these lines and unless the
government decides to allow the stations
to sell at prevailing free market prices the
tendency will be for all these stations to
show no profits.

Doubts have also been expressed whether
higher prices in themselves will help the
stations to sell their produce. The absence
of marketing facilities has often led in the
past to the destruction of beans grown on
the stations: at a time when housewives
were paying very high prices for beans in
the free market.

Someone will have to provide better dis-
tribution of locally grown foodstuffs and
fish, but no one will do it until thé govern-
ment abolishes a price control system which
penalises the primary producer,












|

“OPERATION BLOCKADE

LONDON

FROM the British Naval point
of view, the Korean war has
proved a war of blockade, a sea-
man’s war of the traditional
pattern.

During the 18 months of fight-
ing there have been occasional
spectacular actions which have
claimed the public attention, Not
generally appreciated, however,
is the importance of the daily
routine patrols by destroyers and
frigates of the Royal Navy, the
Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal
Australian Navy and the Roya.
New Zealand Navy.

The Navy holds responsibilities
comparable with the American in
this theatre, the broad division
being that the latter look after
the East Coast of Korea while
the particular British commit-
ment is the whole of the West
Coast.

The task entrusted to these
forces can be broadly divided
into four main categories; the
denial of sea communications to
the enemy, the harassing of
troops and supplies in the cvastal
regions, the support of friendly
guerilla organisations and lastly
the escort of.suppiies and air-
craft carriers engaged in offensive
operations off the coast.

Recently an additional role has
been added, the defence of islands
on and North of the 38th parallel.
The enemy would like to occupy
these to enhance his bargaining
power at Panmunjom.

The degree of success achieved
can be judged from Communist
reactions. At no time have they
been able, or recently even at-
tempted, to supply their forces
by sea, and this single factor, in
a country with such sparse land
communications, has tipped the
balance between defeat and

WICKSTEED’'S TOURS

No, 2: BERNARD WICK-
STEED sets out with CHAP-
MAN PINCHER on the re-
sumption of a famous part-
nership,

I took it into our heads the othe
night to go out into a wood and
look for owls.

In the ordinary way
for owls in a fog at midnight
would be a fairly profitless occu-

pation, but when accompanied byfgSÂ¥!vatica, or tawny owl, I
Mr. Pincher it is an experience@lieve.
well flavoured.

full of unexpected interest.

A stuffed owl in a Surrey pub
started us off. “You probably
don’t know it,” said Mr, Pincher,
gazing intently at the case on the
wall, “but an owl is about the
only bird that can waggle its
ears.”

So after closing time we went
into the darkness in search of
pink owls that waggle their ears,

It proved to be a better night
for owls than for owl-watchers.
There was a thick mist that
blotted out the new moon, and
the only way we knew we were
in a wood was by the number of
trees we bumped into.

“Owls’ eyes are about a hun-
dred times more sensitive in the

dark than human eyes,” said the
invisible Mr. Pincher, from
somewhere in the swirling mist.
“But that doesn’t mean they
can see as well at night as we
can in daylight.

“A scientist who has recently

done a lot of good work on owls
has calculated that it is as hard
for an owl to find a_ mouse in
starlight as it would be for a

human being to play tennis by
the light of a full moon,”
Vision secret
Some people used to think that
infra-red rays were the secret
of an owl's vision at night, but

Mr. Pincher says this has been
disproved by a fellow who took
the cornea and lens from the eye
of a dead owl and found that

Arawaks ?
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In his Diary (Advocate,
15th March) “Nobody” gives a
thumb-nail sketch of the pre-
history of the Island and says
that he is forced to go on stress-
ing this fact about Barbados not
being an uninhabited island when
the British took possession.” But
it would be interesting to know
what evidence he relies upon to
support this assertion. This is
not meant as criticism but en-
quiry.

While no one should nowadays
doubt that the Arawaks occupied
the Island for a considerable
period before Settlement, the
contemporary records seem to
show that they had abandoned it
by the time that the British ar-
rived. These contemporary
sources are the depositions and
reports of people who were in a
position to know:—

mariner
Purchas

William Turner, a
of the Olive, 1605?
Pilgrims.

Captain Simon Gordon, mari-
ner, 1625. Colonial State
Papers 1/14 No. 25,

John Dell, settler, 1627, Co-
lonial State Papers 1/14 No, 27.

Report by Sir Peter Courteen,
1625. ‘ John Scott. Sloane Mss.
3662, Brit. Mus.

Nicholas Browne, quarter-
master of the “William and
John,” 1627. Mss. G 4/15, Trin.

Coll. Dublin.

Henry Winthrope, _ settler,
1627. Winthrope Letters. Mas-
sachusetts Historical Collec-,
tion.

Official Report of the Gov-

ernor Sir Richard Dutton, 1684.

Sloane Mss. 2441. Brit. Mus.
Thomas Walduck, settler
1710. Sloane Mss. 2302. Brit.
Mus.
and it is from these sources that
the historians Frere (1758), Bryan
Edwards (1793), Poyer (1808)
and Schomburgk (1847)

have based on their statements to
the same effect,

It is also suggestive that Cap-
tain Henry Powell, later in the
year of Settlement, went to

Af ntra-red

MR. CHAPMAN PINCHER Set

looking {¢T-

Our Readers: Say 3

Ailied Ships Rule
Horean Seas

victory for the greatly outnum-
bered land forces.

A brief survey of the waters in
question is necessary to the ap-
preciation of the problems in-
volved in these naval operations.
The West Coast of Korea is
studded with small rocky islands
ang tortuous channels through
which swirl fast and irregular
tidal streams.

For weeks on end the coast is
shrouded in fog and during the
winter months the bitterly cold
winds blowing from Manchuria
and Siberia cause rough weather
in the Yellow Sea on five days
out of seven. Most of the ports
above the 38th parallel are ice-
bound and, even when they are
free, they can only be reached
by navigating shallow channes
easily mined by the enemy and
often covered by shore batteries.

Charts surveyed long ago are
frequently out of date and a tidal
range of more than 30 feet
coupled with the silting of the
larger river estuaries result in
there being no guarantee that
the ocean bed corresponds to the
chart representation.

The experience of Common-
wealth frigates in the Han
Estuary is well known. There,
sounding from boats ahead of the
ships in tides often running be-
tween 7 and 10 knots, they had
to grope their way in muddy
waters. In all, 29 miles of chan-
nel were sounded and for a
period of 120 days at least two
frigates were continuously using
these waters to harass the
enemy's possib'e build-up areas.

Although East and West Coasts
are, broedly, American and
British Commonwea'th *commit-
ments respectively, the two
navies always exchange one or

Looking For Owls In A Fos
At Midnight

rays
through them.
“Has much experimental work
f this nature been done on dead
owls?” I asked.

“Oh yes, lots,” said Mr. Pinch~
“In the interests of science
the present Duke of Bedford once
te an owl. It was a Strix Aluco
be-
He reported it was quite

would not pass

“Why did he want to know
how an owl tasted? Well, its
aste has a bearing on its plum-

age. Birds that are good to eat
are generally inconspicuous in
their colouring, and those that

taste awful, like the kingfisher,

need no canvouflage.”

You can eat owls’ eggs, too,
Mr, Pincher said. A panel of
Cambridge University eggtasters

scrambled one once, and rated it
as slightly better than a scram-
bled duck’s egg.

At that moment a Strix Aluco
Sylvatica, or tawny owl, let off
a terrifie hoot in a tree almost
above my tead, It startled me
so much I fell into a ditch.

That left ear
What if it had overheard what
we were saying? Mr. Pincher had
said earlier that owls have ex-
ceptional hearing. The left ea’

of a tawny owl is bigger than its» which broke with a_ crack

right, and this probably enables
it to locate with accuracy the
exact whereabouts of a rustling
mouse or an edible journalis:
crouching in a ditch.

Tawn owls do attack people
sometimes. They are most dan-
gerous in the nesting season,
when their tempers are fraved
by family cares. Long-eared
owls are even worse, but they
usually attack only during thun-
derstorms. They hate thunder
so much that they go berser& and
fly at anyone in sight.

Essequibo and brought back some brought to the Island. The pic-

30 or 40 Arawaks to teach the
settlers how to grow tropical food
crops. The purpose of this action
is not very clear if there were
Arawaks already in the Island,
It is probable that these are the
Indians that gave rise to the tra-
ditions mentioned by Hughes
(Natural History of Barbados,
op of Indians residing at the
sanie time as the settlers. Hughes
himself does not claim that they
were actually in Barbados when
the settlers arrived.

The first written suggestion
that the Indians were still resi-
dent at the time of the Settlement
seems to be by the Rev. Greville
Chester (Transatlantic Sketches,
1869), and he is followed by
Fewkes (1918), the American
archaeologist, and also by Sinc-
kler (Handbook of Barbados,
1913, which quotes from the His<
torical Geography of the British
Colonies) and in his article in
“Timehri,” 1918. These writers
rely for evidence on two types of
local place-names, — those with
a tradition as Six Men's Bay and
Three Houses, and those that are
prefaced with the adjective “In-
dian” as Indian Ground and
Indian River, ete. ‘

It is doubtful whether muah
weight can be attached to the
traditions of Six Men's Bay or
Three Houses, since in the earliest
map of the Island, Ligon's, these
places are not mentioned, yet, at
the same time “16 Men” and “5
Houses” are marked and no tra-
dition and no names have been
attached to them. The use of the
word “Indian” surely implies
that they were not living in such
places at the time, but that they
were recognised as sites once in-
habited by Indians in the past.
Otherwise the Indians would
have supplied the native names.
The very lack of Indian names
argues that there were no Indians
to hand them on. The Island is
singularly devoid of Indian
names, Chimborazo is a late
ddition, while another, Yarico’s
Pond, is according to the story
of Ligon, an example of a name
derived from an Indian who was

ADVOCATE



Peace With A ‘Bite’

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON,

America came out with a new hard-hitting
propaganda line to-day. President Truman
and his Secretary of State, Mr. Dean Acheson,
put it over.

The President went aboard a new radio!
ship, the Courier, and broadcast to the Red |
lands. He said America has no quarrel with |
the people—only with their rulers. |

Mr. Acheson challenged the Chinese and!
Korean Communists to allow “an impartial
investigation” into their charges that U.S
troops in Korea are firing artillery shells
filled with disease germs.

He said: “The Communists spread these
charges round the world, and at the same
time they stall on the truce negotiations.”

Acheson pounced on the fact, confirmed |
by prisoners, that there is a plague epidemic
in North Korea.

‘OUR SYMPATHY’

And he spoke of “the inability of the Cor-|
munists to care for the health of the people
under their control.” Rubbing it in,
added: “Our deepest sympathy goes out ‘9
all those behind the enemy lines who arc
sick and suffering.”

The ship from which Truman spoke,
coastguard cutter named the Courier,
anchored in the Potomac River at Washin«-
ton. But soon it will sail to the edge of
Communist countries and broadcast Ameri- |
ca’s message.

Said Truman: “The United States is work-|
ing night and day to bring peace to the world. |
As President, I say with all my heart that w¢ |
yearn for peace, and we want to work wth |
all nations to secure peace.

“We have no quarrel with the people of |
the Soviet Union or the people of any other
country.

“There are no differences between us that
can’t be settled if your rulers will turn from |
their senseless policy of hate and terror and |
follow the principles of peace.” |

This “line” will be part of the new propa-
ganda drive, and there will be tacit sugges
tions that if the Red rulers could be got rid
of, real peace would come to the world.

‘YOUR RULERS’
aeeet Poe pe Fe would) ‘Truman added that it is “the aggressive
tion. After all, it was he who] policy of your rulers which is forcing us ‘o
ioe binds oa ee = aaa arm to defend ourselves.
“But we cannot find in our hearts any hate


























more ships so that Common-
wealth destroyers and frigates
also get their ‘run’ on the East
Coast. Here the Communist main
supply line ang the end og the
battle front run along the coast
and are easily accessible to ships.
Operations are mainly in the
Wosan or Songjin area and a
destroyer’s time is spent in keep-
ing up a running bombardment
of road and rail communications
both by day and night. A ship
usually fires over one thousand
rounds from her main armament
during a patrol and the con-
sequent strain om her guns’
crews and equipment is con-
siderable.

The ‘and round Wonsan is
enemy held and duels with shore
batteries are frequent, as also
recently on the West Coast where
the shore batteries are trying \o
drive away the forces defending
the nearby islands.

However, there are many
patrols on which not a shot is
fired; ships steam long distances
at high speed to protect an air-
craft carrier, escort convoys or
replenish other ships. Some-
times destroyers, deing duty on
the carrier screen, spend three
weeks at a stretch in the Yellow
Sea and steaming distances of
8,000 miles a month are not un-
common,

So the work continues as it
has been doing for eightcen
months: unspectacular but im-
portant; work which has entailed
much seatime and much hurd
steaming under conditions of
great heat in the summer end
intense cold in winter: worl:
which has called for fortitude
and endurance by ships’ com-
penies: work which has earned
the Navy’s traditional measure
of praise, “Well done.”

he

Ss


















There was not a sound from
Mr, Pincher, wherever he ws
hidden in the mist. I almost

But the owl above us had other

oe ie ae yi, aid res] against you. We know that if you are suffer-
that by the joyful way it|ing under aggression and persecution. We
tu-whitted and tu-whooed when

knwo that if you were free to say what you
really believe, oyu would join with us to ben-
Lovers’ duet ish the fear of war and bring peace to the

The tawny owls nesting season| earth.”
starts_in a couple, of weeks nd The Iron Curtain’s Governments, added
these two wits seemed to be dis< 2 ; : 7 ;
eussing whether to woo or not to| the President, might try with their new/s-
won 6 e0-

Farlier in the evening, in ‘he Force and rattio 'to make ao me nee
nub, Mr, Pincher had described} ple,” believe that America is a hostile
this kind of conversation between
wvies sist. is rather Hee a: dust:| couatty; ben t only on war.

The male hoots one motif and the| “But that is not true. I want you to know

female another. that our highest aim is peace and friendship
; 7 —and an end to the horrors of war.”

them at it say the male is con- . = pai

tinually yawning. This is a sign| THE Russian Embassy in Washington

of interest in the bird world, not swings from icy to chummy in its relations

boredom. -

Trying to get into a beiter| with the Press.
position to see if the owl above i he se,
me. waalyeaning-of wnesiine its We are at present in a Hello there, p oe
ears, I stepped on a dry s ick|so I spent a pleasant hour over whiskies <»d

and : : : : . at
that was the end of the duet. soda with Nikolai Vladykin, counsellor a

Mr, Pincber and I continued the embassy.
our owl prowl till long after the . rnlsv
Glockas ais. cluurck.. tower He drew me a diagram of how they play
had struck 12 but all we saw|Russia’s national pastime, Gorrodke—thr w-
was a an creeping — silently]; : : “ om
alongia helgerow, ing sticks into squares, (“Such a good gome
x As he mig bt hawe been sme because men of any age can play.”)

eeper we thought it st to lie ‘ ~ natn “ve
low. till he had gone. After all Other sports items gleaned: “In Russie v2
it would pave been almest im-| have 200,000 Soccer teams and no professi'n-
possible to have convin him im ‘ ”
that on a night like that we were als—only semi-professionals. ;
merely looking for owls, Boxing? “We have a good heavy-wei. ht

ES: | champion. He fights three rounds—that's
all Russian boxers train for—and has beaten
the champion of Esthonia.”

This year’s Olympics? “We have some very
strong women. They will create surprises.”

In Russia vodka—Vladykin pronounced it
' wodka—costs seven roubles a glass, say 14s.

Wow, I said, 14s. a glass?

“Aha, but the drink is good,” and he held
up atumbler. “One like this and you're
happy.” s

IN WALLA WALLA, Washington State,
two weeks ago, the Governor of the jail con-
gratulated the prisoners because, he said,
they had tried no tunnelling for a year. Al's,
now a milk truck driving past the jail crashes
down into a 100ft. tunnel on which the in-
mates laboured for 18 months. |

TIN PAN ALLEY is busily hammering out

another owl answered it from
the other end of the wood.

Birdwatchers who have scen



'

ture of Salymingo and his canoe
in Ligon's map no more argues
his presence at the Settlement
than does the presence of impor-
ted camels which are also
depicted, ’

Is “Nobody” correct when he
states that the name “Barbados”
comes from “bearded ones?” The
first person to suggest that it
might be connected with bearded
Indians is the historian Froude
as late as 1888. Oldmixon (1684)
pours scorn on the idea of beard-
ed fig-trees, which was therefore
a very early theory, but his
suggestion that it was because it
was inhabited by Barbarians is
even more improbable. If one
compares the geographical and
Whysical characteristics of Bar-
bados and Barbuda, which seems
to be a variation of the

same
eat te eee eee og ote | Songs celebrating the life and times of W'liy
similarities between thace we “The Actor” Sutton, fabulous bank hold-up

islands, both lying outside the
main chain of the Antilles, is
responsible for the name and
that it had nothing to do with
beards at all,
Yours truly,
G. T. BARTON.

The Barbados Youth
Movement

SIR,—The Barbados Y 0 u th
Movement, an organisation which
was formed for the uplift and im-
provement of poor Youth has a
total of 250 members and is de-
sirous of making an appeal for
funds, books, m e@ or any-
thing which will tend to further
the progress of the organisation.

The movement is now in its
fifteenth year and has been
assisted by lectures from such
personalities as Mr. J. Cameron
Tudor, M.A., Rev. H. A. Mayer
of the Bringing Christ to the Na-
tions, Mr. Lerranzao of British
Guiana and many others. We are
in need of funds to assist the work
and the opportunity is now taken
to appeal through the press.
Thanks very much for granting

man.

PAUL HOFFMAN, former Marshall aid
boss and now president of the Ford Founda-
tion, warns the Republicans not to miss their
opportunity this year as “one more disastrous
defeat might well make it a splinter party.”

And he plumps for Eisenhower as the mon
to back.

JOHN FORREST, financial editor of the
New York Times, says America may have
bitten off more than even she can chew in
planning £3,700 million foreign aid in a
coming year. } |

It might do more harm than good, he)
thinks, by depressing the value of the dollar
“and inducing a spirit of dependency among
our Allies.”

THE HUMAN TOUCH: In East Moline,
Tllinois, firemen called to a blazing trailer
were puzzled /because the owner, Manuel
Montecino, lay abed while they grappled

yee permission. On behalf of} With the flames. As they left one said sym- :

the ovement, . 60 ’ oy
REV. L. BRUCE-CLARKE. pathetically: ‘What’s the matter, bud ou %
MOSES. ill?” “Naw,” yawned Manuel, “tired. So

—L.2.8.
.



aT







PRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952





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FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 195:



9



BARBADOS

s_ ADVO' oc ATE

2 Counts Withdrawn In Civil Servant’s Case



ACID THROWN
ON CANADIAN

An unknown man threw
some corrosive liquid on a five-
year-old boy, Barry Gittens,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Git-
tens of Worthing on Tuesday
evening between 5 and 5.30
o'clock. The little boy who
was born in Canada and who
came here along with his
mother, brother and sister a
year ago was in front of his
home when the man came
along. He said the man asked
him for money and he turned
to run away when the liquid
was thrown on him. Barry
was admitted and detained at
Dr. Skinner's clinic. The Po-
lice are investigating the mat-
ter.



Several Acres
Of Canes Burnt

The Police are constantly warn-
ing people against throwing lighted
cigarettes from vehicles but still
reports of cane fires continue to
flow into the Police Information
Bureau. The fires occur all over
the island,

A planter told the Advocate
yesterday that in his opinion
some of the fires are not of. acci-
dental origin, He felt that some
fields are purposely caught by
labourers with the hope of get-
ting more work. “If burnt canes
are wet, or in case of rain, they
have to be removed from the
field within three days,”! he said.

Ten acres of third crop ape
canes were burnt when a +=

occurred at Joes River Pinte
tion, St. Joseph, at abut. mtg
p.m. on Tuesday. They ‘aré Mine

property of of Joes River Estates
Ltd., and were insured.

FIRE AT GIBBS

At Gibbs Plantation, St. Peter,
a fire at about 7.30 p.m. on the
same day burnt eight acres of
second crop ripe canes, the prop-
erty of Aubrey Webster of the
same plantation. They were in-
sure

A fire at Wakefield Plantation,
St. John, at about 1.10 p.m. on
Tuesday burnt 13 acres of second
crop and eight and a half acres
of fourth crop ripe canes. They
are the property of E. M. Taylor
and were insured,

This fire extended to Claybury,
Lemon Arbor and Ashbury Plan-
tations and to Lemon Arbor Ten-
antry. At Claybury*it burnt fif-
teen and a half acres of second
crop ripe canes and two and a
half acres of young cane plants,
the property of A. L. Sealy and
insured. |

It burnt six acres of second and
six and three quarter acres of

fourth, and a quantity of fifth
crop ripe canes, six and three
quarter acres of second crop

ratoons, four and a half acres of
young cane plants and a quarter
of an acre of sour grass, the prop-
erty of Hon, J. D. Chandler, The
canes were insured.

At Ashbury it burnt eight and
a quarter acres of second crop
ripe canes which were insured.
They are the p.osperty of W. E.
Nourse. Half an acre of second
crop ripe canes were burnt when
it extended to Lemon Arbor
Tenantry. The canes are the
property of Miriam Wharton and
.Maude Alleyne and were not
insured.

AT FRERE PILGRiM

Seven acres of
canes and 33
and eight acres of
burnt When a fire occurred at
Frere Pilgrim Plantation, Chrsit
Church, at about 11.00 a.m. on
Tuesday. They are the property
of C. M. Drayton and were iiusur-
ed.

This fire extended to Ridge
Plantation and burnt seven acres
of second crop ripe canes, the
property of Ridge Ltd. which were
also insured.

It also caught fields at Edey’s
Village and burnt three acres of
first and seeond grop ripe canes
the property of peasant holders.
These canes were not insured.

Earlier in the week a fire at
Wotton Plantation burnt six acres
of first crop ripe canes, the prop-
erty of G. B. Evelyn. They were
insured.

Another fire at Fairy Valley
Plantation, Christ Church, burnt
six acres of second crop ripe canes,
They are the property of Oldbury
Estates Ltd., and were insured.

A fire at Grazettes Plantation,
St. Michael, burnt ten and a half
acres of ripe canes, four and a
half acres of young cane plants,
five acres of sour grass and four
acres of sour grass, the property
of the Barbados Co-operative
Bank Ltd. The damage is cover-
ed by insurance.

At Four Square Plantation, St.
Philip, a quantity of ripe canes
were burnt. They are the proper-
ty of Four Square Ltd., and were
insured.

first crop ripe
acres of ratoons,
trash were

Evidence

For The

Prosecution Closes

SOLICITOR GENERAL Mr. W

the Crown, at the Court
withdrew the two counts

Reece. Q.C., for
of Grand aan yesterday
of embezzlement in the case

brought against Carlos Smith, Civil Servant of Barbarees
Hill, after a query from His Lordship, the Chief Justice,
Sir Allan Collymore, that he did not see how in any évent

the last two counts in the

Evidence fér the Prosecution in

this case in which Smith is charge

now only on three counts of falsi-
fication of accounts and one of
larceny

who was cross-examined longest,
Inspector Bourne, and a few. other
policemen had given evidence.
To-day when the case resumes.
Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C. for the
defence and the Solicitor General
will address the jury and His
Lordship will sum up the case.

Mr. E. W. Barrow is associated
bo a Mr. Walcott as defence coun-
se

After the query from His Lord-
ship as to the correctness of the
counts of embezzlement, Mr. E. K.
Walcott said he had intended to
make that submission. Mr, Reece
said he had intimated as much in
his opening remarks and would
withdraw them.

The court adjourned compara-
tively early, about 2.40 p.m. after
Mr. Walcott said he hoped in the
event of an adjournment until to-
day to shorten his address.» He
said, too, that he had a headache
then and that was another reason
why he would prefer the adjourn-
ment. He said he could wish to be
no longer than tei: minutes, but he
might be forced into » position of
eovering probably unnecessary
ground.

He said he would be making the
submission that there would be no
evidence to substantiate the other
charges either,

Inspector's Evidence

When hearing began yesterday
morning the prosecution called on
Inspector Bourne of the C.I.D. to
give evidence. He said that on
July 10, 1951, at about 12.10 p.m,
he was called to the Treasury and
there he saw Mr, Charlton and
had a conversation with him, He
was shown four bundles of money;
three bundles contained new $2
notes and each of these bundles
contained $1,000. The fourth. bun-
dle contained slips of paper. He
had a bundle further sealed.

He had many interviews with
Mr. Charlton and duving the time
he was handed the bvoks,

On August 21 he interviewed
the accused at the Treasury and
Superintendent Parris was present.
The accused answered the ques-
tinpns that were put to him and he
read over the statement and signed
a

At this stage Exhibit G and Ex-
hibit C were produced to the
Court. The conversation he had
with the accused on July 10 took
place at the Audit Office. He also
took statements from other people
including the Accountant General,

Further Statement

He had another interview with
the accused on July 16, 1951, and
he made a further statement. On
August 24, 1951, at the Public
Treasury he had an interview with
the accused again and Cpl. Nurse
was present. The accused made
another statement which he
signed. While he inte: viewed the
accused he had the various books
at hand and also the cheques,

He interviewed ‘he accused
again on %ctober 9, 1951, at the
Audit Office and the same proce-
dure followed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Wal-
cott, Inspector Bourne said that
he first interviewed Mr. Charltgn
who gave him some information

He never gave Mr. Charlton all
the information he had but he
never asked Mr. Charlton to get

irformation from the accused.

Shortly after July 9 Mr. Charl-
ton told him that he had spoken
with the accused. He could not
remember well what Mr. Charlton
told him the accused said. Mr.
Charlton was the first person he
took a statement from. He gave
the statement sometime in Octo-
ber. A statement was also taken
from Mr. Chenery.

In the lower Court he was the
Complainant in the case. All the
statements were taken about the
latter part of October. He saw
the accused when all the state-
ments were nearly finished. The
accused said he had nothing to
add to the statements he had
already given.

Accused Not Suspected

He did not teli the accused he
would regret his action by not
making a statement, He took the
statements from the accused to
get information. He did not sus-
pect the accused when he took
the first statement from him.

He checked on the ariswers
that the accused gave in his sec-
ond statement and found that

In this state-
if he owned
and a

they were correct.
ment he was asked
a house, property
car,



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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

SPECIAL PICTORIAL
EDITION OF
KING’S FUNERAL
Will all those customers who
booked this edition please

call in for their copies.
\ JOHNSON’S STATIONERY.

Plastic in “different colours

by the yard -
a

JOHNSON’S HARDWARE

SOOO COSSOSSS

a.



A wide assortment

of

Wedding
Gifts
Prices to suit all
Y. De LIMA
& CO.. LTD.

20 BROAD STREET



as a Public Servant was
closed yesterday after the witness

oner

indictment could be correct

Infant Died By
Natural Causes

Death by natural causes wa
thg majority verdict of a nine-
man jury when the inquest into
the death of a new born infant
which was found in McClean’s
Gap, Britton’s Hill on March 14,
1952, was concluded before Cor-
Cc. L. Walwyn at District
“A” yesterday afternoon. .

Ilene Taylor told the Court
yesterday that as she was walk-
ing along McClean's Gap on
March 14 at about 9.15 a.m., she
heard a crying and on going in
the direction of that crying she
saw @ new born infant lying on
the ground. She then reported
the matter to the Police, The
child was taken to the Hospital.



‘Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination at
the Hospital Mortuary about 11.30
&.m,on March 15 said that the
child was not identified to him.
There were insect bites on parts
of the body and haemorrhage
under the head. Both lungs
showed pneumonia and in _ his
epinion death was due to natural
causes—namely cerebral haem-
orrhage which took place during
the course of birth.



tions, but said
policy for $1,000.

In the third statement the ac-
cused was asked if he was the
Cashier on April 5, 1945, Before he
asked the accused this question,
he could have been told so by
someone else in the Department.
The accused was not under sus-
picion then, He did not cross-
examine the accused while he
was taking the statement. During
the investigation everyone con-
cerned was asked the same type
of question. The questions were
put to the accused so that the
truth could be obtained about
the whole matter. The questions
were not directed to extract an
admission. When he asked the
accused about the cheque, he
(Inspector ~ Bourne) had_ the
cheque in his possession, While
the accused was being question-
ed Mr. Charlton was present.
Sometimes Mr. Charlton left him
with the accused. Mr. Charlton
never told him what questions
he should ask. the accused, While
asking the aecused questions he
made jottings on a j..ece of paper.

he had a_ life

Purchase of Car

had never taken the ac-
cused in the Police Van to his
(the accused) home. He lead
heard that the accused was see-
ing after the purchase of a car
for a Mr, Mapp and was taken
to his home so that he could
produce papers.

He could not say what date the
accused went to his home in the
Police van. The information sup-
plied by the accused about the
car was not completely clear. He
heard that Mr. Mapp was inter-
viewed about the car which the
accused said he purchased. At
home the accused said that he
could not find the letters relat-
ing to the purchase of this car.
He did not send the Police van
to the Public Buildings. As far as
he knew the accused was the only
person from the Treasury who
was taken to his home in the
Police van.

He said Mr. Charlton had
never come to him while he was
interviewing Smith and enquir-
ed whether Smith had been call-
ing him liar. Charlton had
stayed where he was and said
Smith’s answer at the time was

He

not true, but Smith reiterated
that what he was saying was so.
Withdrawal

He said that Smith had never
admitted withdrawing new two
dollar notes. He had not induced
him to say he had withdrawn
the money but only that it was
stated in his Petty Cash Book
that it was withdrawn.

Superintendent Frank
said that on August 21, 1951, he
was at the Treasury while a
statement in the form of ques-
tions and answers was taken by
Inspector Bourne from Smith
Smith read over the statement
and signed it. Accountant Gen-
eral Charlton was in the office
while the statement was being
taken, but he took no part in it.

The Superintendent was not
cross-examined.

Cpl. Clyde Nurse said that he
‘had been present on August 24
at the Treasury when a state-
ment was taken from Smith by

Parris

motor/#Bourne and Smith had signed.
He. said “no” to these ques-j

On October 30 Inspector Bourne
and he again saw Smith who said
jin reply to Inspector Bourne that



SELECT THESE NOW.

MARELA STUFFED OLIVES—

BIDDYS ASPARAGUS SOUP-—per tin
LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP —>per tin
-per jar
MARELA STUFFED OLIVES—per jar
CRAWFORDS CREAM _ scout ceenagiteedhe tin 1.64

Parochial Pensioners Of
St. Philip Will Get More |

PAROCHIAL PENSIONERS of St. Philip will get

News 1 n Brief

For Books

A POLICE OFFICER old
Advocate yesterday that the I
hado Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs
would very much appreciate gifts
* ol4 gramophone records, books,

eriodicals and pk
ture mm anyone These gitt
can be handed in to eny Police

tation in Barbados.

THE S.P.C.A. will be holdir
ite Annual Tas Dav Mareh
The Advocate was told that
parking of lorries and cars bé«
side the animal drinking trough
at Fa'-child Street has prevented
rroper use being made of the
trough. “The police ‘are taki:
steps to restore this amenity by
prohibitine parking within certain
limits,” this member said.

The Visual Aids Section of the
Fducation Devartment is to assist
the S.P.C.A. in the production o/
nhotoeraphs for use in the Anima!
Education programme

FOURTEEN - MONTH - OLD
Marlene Downes died suddenly at
her mother’s home, Ashbury, St
George, at about 5.00 p.m. on
Wednesday. A post mortem exam-
ination was performed by Dr
Mui» and devth was attributed to
natural ceuses

Concert At Rocks

T)







e Polen. at Hastings
b

M

nd Concert
Pocks tonight will be conducted
Cant. C E_ Raison, M BE AR.C
The Concert begins at 8 o'clock
The programme has been chosen
the requests of patrons
Gr Mr MARCH OF
PFROLDS Plater
With metal effeeta by
Trompbets
Tone ? n FINLANDIA
3 Two Valse Songs
‘a) Mighty lak
1b) Missourr]
Two Light Pieces
(a) Be ls across the
Ketelbey (Soloist
Best)
(b) Paderewski's
Duthoit
U.S.A. T'ogpourri From the South
ern Plantations arr, Chambers
NV old Kentucky Home; The Old
Folks at Home; Thezip Coon
dances: Poor old Joe: Essence of
old Verginny: Dixie and Magsa
n the eold, cold ground
Accent on Brass Washingte
Post" “The Rooster
“Ths Stors and Stripe
—John Phillip Seuss
Name the tune competition
Musical Comedy Switch"
Ifmwhich the audience are again
invited to vie with each Other
guessing the titles of well-
known Musical Comedy tunes of
the past deeade, (TMon't forget to
bring your pencil and paper and
win a bottle of Barbados fine
Rum;)
8 6. Medley
Stoddon
To commemorate
Day 17th March
9 Exe rts from s
RK deers
F nale

GOD

fror

nA h TH

Herold



Sibeliu

a Rose Nevin.
Logan

s

meadow

Cpl. W

Minuet arr

for ever

~

Selected

Shamrockland
Matrick's
ith

Pacific

O Canada

SAVE THE QUEEN|!

, would

additional 28 cents added to their present weekly |

Relief Allowance beginning from the coming Vestry Y

This inerease will bring their pension up to $1.00 per w
This was unanimously agreed to by the Vestry on

motion of Mr L

Vestry another
The motion was
red by*Mr, D
A. E. Greenidge
Weekes who said
t which they would incur
ided xpenditure and nse-
cuently increased taxation was
most important of all,

Tae Vestry accepted in
inciple the report of a Com-
the salaries of

i parochial servants during the
ming year, with the proviso
hat the committee would meet
gain and consider increases for
Church Officers who had, al
thouch receiving increases last
year, should also be given some
consideration, It was pointed out
that the increases were in keep-
ing only with the trend of the

H

strongly
D. Garner, Mr
and Mr, R. S
that the cause

also

tee to increase

Princess Alice Field
Gets Motor Lawn Mower

A Dennis motor lawn
came {pr the Princess Alict
ing Field yesterday. It
St. Michael’s Vestry $1.509

The lawn mower was taken \o
the playing field and gave a satis-
factory performance when trie
out on tall and thick grass.

lt is suppesed to cut about ten
acres of grass in one working
day-—eight hours It uses ¢gas-
oline.

“SEREK” BEING
WASHED AWAY

High
on the

mower
Play-



lide and dashing waves
Worthing coast during the
past two days were gradually
causing “Serek”, a wooden house
with conerete supports which was
built on “the beach, to collapse
The house is owned by Dr. T
Sealey

A break-water was no impedi-
ment to the waves which claimed
about six feet of the sand. The
stones of the break-water were
dug away and about 20 feet of
guard wall were dug down, leav-
ng a portion of the house dan-
serously suspended as though it
tumble down at any
moment A carpenter removed
that part of the house. The resi-
dents have moved out.

When “Serek” was built,
between 50 and 80 yards away
from the brink of the water. To-
day the water washes right up to
the breek-water A sewerago
tank of stone at the side of the
house, which was well covered up
to Tuesday, is now exposed. Sand
bags were put down among the
stones of the break-water to keep
out the but to no avail

*»
HOUSE

it was

Smith
$3,500 for Poor

Relief

A moti
that the

mn by

sup- cost of living.

The increase will cost

Public Bath

Mr. R

S. Weck
Vestry consider obtaining

ne

es

egislative consent for securing a

Joan to er

ing dist ic

ect a

ts, and a

Public Bath
verve the Marchfield and surround-
counter mo-

to

tion by Mr. D. D. Garner that two

baths

erected d

both defeated

considered

Speaking

counter
pointed
greater
areas

the areas,
that

view

instead

other
considering the pepulation
and expressed
residents
Marchfield could make us»

of one
uring the

motion,
out that
need = for

than

the

should

be

year—were

in support of
Mr

there
baths

when the Vest
the matter

y

his

Gainer

was

Marchi.

the Bath at Church Village

Mr.

tion
a tie, an
against

be left over until the Ve

it
d the
Mr,

Weekes pressed for
motion; but on the counter m>- |
being put, resolved
Chairman voted
Garner

on

had completed consideration

xX

Mi

was

We

lost on

the supporters . of the counter mo-

eke's

original

year’s Estimates.

‘ar ground w

th

or

ui

the
grounds that the matter should

Soe
ot

motion

tion, and those who advocated
that it should be left over for a
ih

while
mouuon

The St
a Committ
all
increased,
increase
actions of
H.-L,

that he

at least,

in
Reporting to the

Smith,
and the

voted

Insurance

Philp Vestry
agreed on the

ee, that

with a
the

the

against

yesterda

value

on

recommendations
the
parochial buildings should be
correspor. cing
insurance policy:

Vestry
Committee,
Churchwarden,
committee

or

of

)
)

Mi

soic
haa

gone into the matter very care‘ully

with the Insurance Company
was agreed that most of
were

it
parochial
insured.

He quoted as

the main
house,
the
Committee

and
valuation

buildings

the

building
pointed

arrived

of

in

out

, and

the

worst exain

under

the Alms-
or

the

that
at by

clese collaboration

with the Insurance Representative,
the

the total

insured

value of

be

h

parochial buildings would
more than double

The matter of having full «
erage for damage by fire on
buildings, and a separate polic:
for hurricane and other risks,
raised by Mr. R Skeeate,
Churchwarden was instructed
the Vestry to investigate the pos

sibility of
insured in

CRUMBLING

having
the manner

the
sURKRCE

buildings

iter

j



WAVES dashing against “Berek” at Worthing, Christ Church, during the past two days, dug away

the break water and part of a gu



he had nothing further to add
to what he had already said.

Cross-examined he said that
Inspector Bourne did not go on
to tell Smith that the questions
were new questions he wanted
him to answer.

P.C. Wilbert Clarke who also
went with Inspector Bourne when

the statement in the form of
question and answer was taken
from Smith was also called to
give evidence.

After his evidence the Prose-
cution closed. their case. Hearing
continues today,

For |

Originally This Weck
33 $ 30
38 32
1.80 1.60
1.08 - 96
1.40



APIE PEANUT BUTTER—per
KRAFT CHEESE SPREAD —per
DANISH SALAMI—pée Ib.
CHEDDAR CHEESE—per Ib.

COCKADE

IMPERIAL BRISKET BEEF-~per 4- Ib tin
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—-4 Ibs.

DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2} Ibs. ;
HUNTLEY & PALMERS CHEESE STICKS—per tin
CRAWFORDS UFILLIT BISCUITS—per tin

jar $ 61

pkt. ..

5.65
3.76
1.47
1.49

FINE RUM

A

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oe: Le,



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PAGE FIVE












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Further Reductions in Our

HOSIERY DEPT.

TUNIC SHIRTS-—with 2 separate Collars
From $7.05 and $6.55
eee R Aaa isbidey cans ecsaaivaldeses $5.50 and $3.50
COLLAR ATTACHED SHIRTS
in several qualities
From

Te oe ss
SPORT SHIRTS

in plain,colours and fancy designs

From $5.39 and $5.08
$4.50 and $2.64

KNITTED COTTON “POLAR” SHIRTS
with Short Sleeves clearing at

KNITTED ART SILK “POLAR” SHIRTS




$5.39 and $5.08
$4.50 and $2.64

with Short Sleeves clearing at............ $1.59
FANCY PALTUSED WOOLLEN
SWIM TRUNKS. From ............ $8.13 to $4.00

MESH VESTS AND TRUNKS. Clearing at $1.00
COTTON HANDKERCHIEFS. Clearing at 24c.

IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS

MMMM ENGIN «35540113 ahs tancsdedis chan sosedbonsspdavacte> 45c.
SOCKS in several qualities.

Clearing a Na saitiseas 30c., (80c., 49¢., 52 $2¢., 60c., 1 |}



HARRISON'S iat 2004



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heat ‘$13.55

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Per Yard



{













PAGE SIX

; ey _
CLASSIFIED ADS. Ssxerxcemers
° The Barbados Agencies annotuee that
} ey a - tra! and > eo
TELEPHONE 2508 tney NT IS of walk Semele Bay
eon a rence seurest 21.3.52—3n

'

eur wirths, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3 00 for any number of words
vp to 530 and 6 cents per word for each
dditions] word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
detween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Netices only after 4 p.m
















DIABETES CONTROL

FOR SALE








Announcing by urgent request the

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out of 10 cases cured, 9 out 10 con-

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AUSTIN VAN—One (1) (0 H.P. Austin | announce the famous “Chinese Asthma























Var. in good, working order. Phone | ..g Bronchial cure”
DIED 4821, D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd Dispensed at the ‘‘Nature-cure Resort”
iene 13.3.52—+.t.n. | where mechanical obstructions are re-

SEALY—On March 20, at her motirer’s eee ee 7 |moved and God and Nature are at work

residence, College Savannah, St. John, CAR 1939 10 h.p. Ford Good 6M | Other conditions treated are High and
fdna Louise Sealy. Her funeral will | dition, partly new tyres. | Price Low Blood Pressure, Nervous disorders,
leave her mother’s residence at 4.30} Can be seen at C. Smith's Garage, ~| Paralysis, Female disorders and Rhbeu-
this afternoon for St. Mark's Chapel, buck Street. near Craig's — an. matic complaints ;

St. John. oa s >} Dr. W. H. WIGGINS,

Fitz Sealy (Widower). Jonathan, | —— Renken nent est Se ee D.M.T. (Bng.) GC.S.M
ree ence, Diana Sealy (Children), | CAR — Ford Prefect in excellent, gon- iP: Mt, Bae. ee
Miriam Gittens (Mother), Bernice. |dition, 5 wood tyres, Price $700. Agply | Naturopathic Physician
Nits, Monica, Jesse (Sisters), }C 5 Hamilton, 91—35 . “| "Ebenezer", Crumpton St, St, Michael
ae and —, — (CAR: F 1952 Morr Oxtord—just, eom- Dial 415 21.3.52--2n
iether S isimhemintisleeecsali tapers pleted 2,000 miles Courtesy G , sec

‘On March 20, 1952 Martha Ann | 4616 20. 3.5%-Gn FOR RENT

Her funeral will Jeave Binfield. | —" eee steer

, St. Joseph at 4.45 this afternoon for CAR: Standard Vanguard 1952 manag

St. John's Church and the! to St done 1,600 miles, excellent for e .

John’s Cemetery site Sertice- Apply? on a a HOUSES '
Samue!, Worrell, Hamblin, Noel | Works, Roebuck St. or one ‘ —_
and Henry Wilkie, and Etta Clarke. 19.3.52—8| BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast,

21.3.52—In perfect bathing, quiet. All meals and

ee CAR 1947 Morris 10 hp., in A 1} services supplied from main house, Own
IN MEMORI condition. Good tyres, completely o¥er-| Telephone. Suitable married couple,
hauled. Price $1,200 Phone 4075 o1 | ($25.00) per day American Plan for two

een esrniennat ~~ contact P. L. Kelly, c/o Musson's ice. | people. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or
GRIFFITH: In ever loving memory © 19 3 52—t fn | "phone 6157 14.3.52—t. fn
our dé Mother, Miriam Griffitt —___—_--—-- -- atone ibiaintinas
who died on March 21, 1951. STATION WAGON One Chevrolet HOUSE “Vermont”, Pine Road, fur-

God saw the road was getting] Station Wagon with good extra Engine. | nished or unfurnished, Dial 8283 or 4102,
rough, G. E. Ward, Morris Service Station. 19.3.52—7n

The hil's too hard to climb—
He gently closed her loving eyes
And whispered peace be thine.
Ever to be remembered by:—
Husband), Louise (Mother), Daphne,
Leroy, Keitha, Dorothy, Dora, Clistorene.
Carol (Children), Rodney, Grantley
nita, Lenox
na@ Clyde (Sons -in law)
21.3.52—1n

’ TAKE NOTICE
PARLIAMENT

That BENSON & HEDGES LIMITED, a
Company organized under the Jaws of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain ana
Northern Ireland whose trade or busines

dress is 12, Old Bond Street, London
Â¥ 1, England has applied for the regis





tratién of » trade mark in Part “A” of }ment just arrived. The pogss 6 we a

Register in respect of cigarettes, cigars) model. A limited quantity. Cc . ae

and tobacco, and will be entitiead to] MAFFER & CQ., LTD, Dial 2767 REAL ESTATE

register the “same after one month from 19.3.52—-5n

the 19th day of March, 1952, unless some er ee James Street, on Friday

person shall in the meantime give notice TUR e 2ist March 1952, ot 2 p.m. in separate

in @plicate to me at my office of oppost- df: FURNI E 7 ?

tion of such registration, The trade mark ; . The Risk dwelling house standin:
: iss bar: . at 8

can be seen on application at my office ‘ures. a are see on 1 acre 1 rood 19 perghes of land near

Dated this Ist day of March, 1952
H, WILLIAMS, |
Registrar of Trade Marks
18 3.52—3n





‘TAKE NOTICE
SPORTSMAN

That THE LAMBERT COMPANY. 4
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United

s of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is 930 Newark Avenue,
Jersey City-6, New Jersey, U.S.A., has
applied for the régistration of a trade
mark in Park “A of Register in respect
of cologne, after-shaving lotion, hair
lotion, taleum powder, bay rum, persone
uv deodorant, foot powder, insect
repellant and sun screen lotion, and wil
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 20th day of March,
1952, unless some person shall in the
meantime give
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office, .

ch, 1952

Dated this 4th day of M
BH. WILL)
Registrar of Trade Marks

20.3.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE



CAFENOL where 20.3.52—40 ting spot situated at Brittons Hill next
e . to Mr. Maurice Cave, overlooking the
That THE SYDNEY ROSS CO., a cor: | ~COTTON UF ORE cbite sm », PIMC-| Rockley Golf Course and Navy Gardens,
poration organized and existing under] © iL NG ae bait s “ye tie at | Consisting of approximately 17,000 sq. ft.
the laws of the State of New Jersey RP ALAND 52 Gane wi c For further particulars, apply: John
United States of America, Manufacturer. | nn Stree! m.2.52—1 W. Corbin, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd
Whose trade or busines address is 12% = "| Phone 4442. 8.3.52—13n
aren Street, fey a New Jerse Kraft Cheese in Packages
$S.A., has applied for the registration | ¢ 7 bs, , HOUSE: Brand new, araple 3 bedroom
of a trade-mark in Fart “A” of Registe: |‘ wifts Cheese in Tins, 5 Ib Tings Cheese



in respect of pre ation for use i
medicine and pharmacy, and will be
entitled to register the same after on

month from the 20th day of March 1952
unless some person shall in the meantim
give notice in duplicate to me at mr

office of opposition of such registration

The trade mark can be seen on appli
cation at my office.
Dated this 13th day of March, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark
20,3.52——3)

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICI

The application of Levi Boxill of Cher:
Grove, St. John for permission to
Spirits, Mait Liquors, &e at « boar
and shingle shop at Cherry Grove, St
John
Dated

A
Police





this 19th day of March
W. HARPER, Esq
Magistrate, Dist. “C"*
LEVI BOXELL,
Applicant
This application will be consid
ed at a Licensing Court to be id
ice Court, Dist. “C" on Wednesday
e 2nd day of April 1952 at 11 o'clock

1982

i

N.B



A. W. HARPER,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “C’



ain

'
|



FURNITURE



AUCTION

NONPAREIL

Talmoral Gap, Hastings

thursday, 27th March

at 11.30 am.

—

|

|

We are instructed by Mr. Tony
wis, who is leaving the taland

aispose ‘of bis Furniture and
ffecis 23 Mated below

View 'ng merning of sie

acr Choir sholstercd
a7 Mate -Round and Square

Mining Tables, Mah. Oce. Tables,












Tookea Miah. Wardrpbes,
i Drawers. Mah
» and Steel, Mah
Sepet (7? x 9, Bireh
| s Tabic.
we; § Sing Beds and
Mattresses, Chil-
wre Wei drobes, Linen Cab
fet, Tavie Lamps, Steel Desk
Stee! Sink, Child's Desk & Stoo
Grand Piano, Singer Sewing
Machine. Larder, Portable Gramo
phone, Venetian Blind, Baby’
HWigh Chair and Cot, Congoleun
PPrrors, Fact Fig Polisher.
Elec. Kettle Hot ¢
lrons, F , Elee £ G
Refrigerator GEC v
Radio, O Stove ter 1
gauge Winchest r
4-10 Dout ba Shot ¢ z
Remington ¢ vi «
Tools, Ct G hy
Equip
bi intere

s
AUCTIONEERS

John Wa. Bradew
& co.

A.F.S.. F.V.A





James | Trucks

(Grand-children!, Lavan} These are 1/18 Scale and

notice in duplicate to! 4616.

RIMBELLISHERS
Vauxhall Velox 15” rim only. Beautify LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
your Car with these attractive wheel REMOVAL

trims, Courtesy Garage 4391. The application of Wilbert Greenidge
16.3.62—6n. | of Garden, St. James, the holder of

Liquor No. 1106 of 1952 granted

| TENNED MEATS: Sausages, Salmon, | in a@ boarded and shingled
| Corned Beef, Cereal Beef, Luncheon | shop edroof attached, situated at
| eet, Steak & Ki vy Pudding, Veai | Hold . St. James to remove said
| Loaf. W. M, Ford, 35 Roebuck St., Dial | Li to a boarded and shingled shop
| 4338 20,3, 52—2n | with root attached situated ot Gar-
den, St. James and to use it at such

Applicant
Blind, Egbert Clarke, 56, of] ‘o: S. H. NURSE, Esq
| Jordan's, Si. George, Was taken Flolice Magistrate, Dist. “E”

» the General Hospital with al N padtaterebebention will be consid-
fractured left knee yesterday) red at a Licensing Court to be held on
sbout 10.30 a.m. after falling off } the ist April 1952 at 11 o'clock am at
» fodder cart which he was driv-| Police Court, Dist. “BE”. Tor eee
ing, He was detained, N Sais “E"

Clarke was hauling cane fodder Eee? ease ioe *

_

19.3.52—5n









pacts ——- MODERN FURNISHED FLATS—Four
TRUCKS: Two Austin Two-Speed axle | Aces, St. Lawrence Gap. Apply: Mrs
Courtesy Garage—Dial 4616, jL. Hassell, Phone 4003 21,3.52—3n

18.3.52—6n

—— | MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
VAUKHALL VELOX MODEL CARS| Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
are Powered | For further particulars. Apply to Alma

by 3 dry ceil batteries. Forward and|/ Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. Worthing.

reverse gears. Only limited number 23.2.52—t.f.n.

available! Courtesy Garage, Dial AQ |
15.3. 53-—6n New Modern Flat on Blue Waters Ter-

race Spacious cupboards modern
kitchen and plumbing, running water
in all bedrooms, near to Rockley Beach,

ELECTRICAL
and a few minutes walk from Golf

CLOCKS — Electric Clocks made by} oy» Phone 8280 20.3. 82—tfn

Ferranti. Al types for homes, offices, = "
PUMLIC SALES





and factories. KR. Hunte & Co , Ltd
Dial 5136 19.3.52-—3n

_—_—
PYE BATTERY SETS—Another ship-

















Fitts Village, St. James. The dwelling
house is constructed of wall, concrete
and hardwood. Water, electric and tele-
phone services installed. Right of way
to the sea.

Cedar Dining Tables $45. Mag. Dressing
Tables $64, Birch Dining Chairs $15 pr.
Chest of Drawers $45, Easy Chairs

ea. Leatherette Easy Chairs $35. GEC
Electric Stove $80. Combination Safe



875. Child's Cedar Press $45, and many| ?- 13,319 square feet of land on the
others. 19 3.52—$n. | 8e4 coast St. James (opposite the Risk
dwelling house) with the newly efected

LIVESTOCK Bungalow thereon. Water and electric

Services installed,

3. 23,600 square feet of
sea coast, St. James
dwelling house),

4. 6 acres 29% perches of arable land
to the back of the Risk dwelling house,



land on the

—————$
COW—To calf on 22nd. Gave 32 pts. (opposite the Risk

last calf. Apply Gibson, Arch Hall,
Thomas. 21.9.52—1n

——————
COW: Giving 35 pints a day. Second



St. James.
Calf Apply: Norwood Plantation. For inspection apply to Mr. C. A
18.3.52—6P | Coppin on the premises. Telephone 0150
— For further particulars and conditions
MECHANICAL of sale, apply to:—

| HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.



—_
TRUCK See ate pve ec, HOTS 5.3,52—9n
Ony a limi few ava e; secure

pone now! COURTESY GARAGE, Dial ALL THAT Tenantry known as

“Alkins Tenantry” containing about Six
Acres of land situated at Eagle~ Hall
For pariculars and terms and conditions
of sale apply to the undersigned.

The above will set up for sale at our
Office on Friday the 2st day of March
1952 at 2.30 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street.
12. 3, 52—9n.

A desirable build-

MISCELLANEOUS
“ADMIRALTY CHARTS of Barbados.
Carlisle Bay, West Indies, Guadeloupe to

Trinidad. Roberts & Co., Dial 3301.
19.3.52—3n

|

1

BISCUITS: Try our Delicious Short-
eake and Shirley Biscuits on Sale every-





“BUILDING §




‘house, all conveniences, with party~
! sized Living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room Garage, laundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under
‘On attractive hillside site, Rockley New



1 Australian Cheese per Ib
rd, 35 Roebuck Street, Dial 9489.
20.3.52—2n



—
COKE—A quantity of Foundry Coke for



immediate delivery. Apply W.* Biscuit | Road. A. Barnes & Co., i ae ee
Co., Ltd. Phone 4337, 18,3.52—6n ta _
sore rasan
HAMS: Canadian Hams, @ 1b 10 8 Ib) ,NON PAREIL, Balmoral Gap, Hastings,
Hams in Ting 2% I) for $3.12 and 4 Ib' standing on 22,137 square fect of and
Tins Brisket Beef, W. M. Ford, 96 :,7e House Contains su dscner
Roebuck Street. Dial 3489 ‘00.3. 5a—an living ‘rooms, water and electric -lght

throughout, servants’ rooms and garage.
wnspection by eer tek phone 3779.
The above will, be set up for sale

UST RECESVED—Valor Stove par

Nb!















chiding Chimneys, Spreaders, G .
t Fri-

top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens Also at publi com Mon at 2 ®. Ping a
Presar Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre , 0°Y the 2ist teal” March at the Office
Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets. io the WA GRINGTON & SEALY

hone 2696 4 20.9.52—t.f.n. Soba bixedt

JELLY: Calves Feet Jelly, Guava Jelly 7-3.82—10n is tie
nd Melba Sauce. W. M. Ford, 35 Roe- ae “gi eas
buek Street. Dial 2489 20,9.52--2n | AUCTION

OlL—The wirlt’s finest motor oil! I will offer for sale by Public Com-

Veedol, ot all leading Garages and Service



5 petition at my office Victorid Street
Stations. Your vebicle deserves the best. (TO-DAY FRIDAY Bist. ot 2 p.m. 2200
\s OL. “Found wherever fine cars| q ft land with chattel house con-
eomaes 17.2,52—t.f.n. | coining open gallery, drawing, dining,
z : bedrooms, usual out offices, Water and
aQNS DOAK VAT — Capacity appr. | Light @f WV, Ss. MICHARL. UiMmEs-
} gallons. rice . 00. Stansfeld, | , , 7
| Seott & Co., Ltd. 19.3.52—3n ATE POSSESSION DIAL 2

21.3.52—In

\rcher MeKenzie



— In chrome, for







last deBeribed premises
"Dated this ith day of March, 1952
WILBERT GREENIDGE,

Blind Man Injured

21,8.52—1n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

A vacancy exists for a Technical Sergeant Instructor for the Motor
Yransport Platoon on the Permanent Staff of the Barbados Regiment

The salary will be $840 x 48 — 1,080, subject to deduction at the
rate of 4% under the Widows and Orphans Pension Act. It is intended
that the post should be pensionable. Applicants should have ten tc
ffieen years experience in technical motor transport work, and must
be a practising motor mechanic. Previous experience in instructing
ind previous service in the Army will be an advantage. The appointee
will be subject to the current conditions of service and departmental
procedure and discipline,

Written applications, together with testimonials and educational
certificates will be received by the Colonial Secretary, Colonial Secre-
tary’s Office, Bridgetown, up to Friday 28th March, 1952.

21.3.52.—2n

yn Jordan's Plantation,









Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1952, No. 8 which will be published in the Official Gazette
of Thursday 20th March, 1952.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Beef-Salted” are as follows: —







RETAIL
ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE PRICE
(not more than) (not more
than)
B alted:
tra Family, Navel,| $80.90 per bri. of 200
Plate, Rounds, Brisket lbs. or 48¢. per Ib. in

lots of not less than

lbs, ;
20 per bri. of 200
Ibs. or 41ce. per Ib. in
lots of not less than
25 Ibs,

5

48c. per lb



(b)

Flank or Boneless Flank

7












































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

}









EXPERIENCED Cutter d Supervisor |
for Ladies’ Garments. Write, stating
experience, to Box X X C/o Advocate. }
21.3. 53—3r.

MANAGER—Required for the Grenada
Sugar Factory Ltd. A General Manager. }
Applicants must supply credentials, |
State experience, age 8nd ry re
quired 2—6n, |



“a

15.3



Part time Accountant needed
Advanced Book-Keeping Four Morn-
ings a week, 9 tl 12. noon. Suit
married person, Reply with credentials,
giving experience to !-—

MBBS

not |













"NOTICE

LOST CERTIFICATE
THE WEST INDIA RUM REFINERY LTD
Notice is hereby given thet application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the above-named Company for the





10 Shares No, 16753 to 16758,36449 to 36451,
26969 inclusive in the name of Rosamund |
Wolrond Hutchinson, the original of
which has been been lost or misplaced,
and Notice is hereby given that within 14)
days from the date jhereof, if no claim
or representation is made in respect of
such original Certifigate, a new Certificate
will be issued.
By Order of the Board of Directors



di. R. LEACH
Secretary
19.8.52—3n
a ae |
NOTICE

THREE HOUSES FACTORY LIMITED

LOST Share Certificate N& 75 for
1,400 shares numbered 11601 to 11900,
21921 to 32270, SM271 to 32620, 11551 to

11600, 10676 to 10850 and 11026 to 11200 in
the name of Richard Murrell Smith, |
notice is hereby given that a duplicate
Certificate will be Issued in three months
from this date unless valid objection be
lodged with the undersigned prior
thereto.
4 By order of the Board,
E. N. REECE,

Secretary.
Three Limited,
March,

Houses Factory
1952
19.3,52—3n
ee
THE BARBADOS YOUTH MOVEMENT
iSth YEAR
Aims, Activities and Motto; To en-
courage ugeful citizens, and improve the
lives of poor youths Activities, Reli-
gious and General Knowledge, Music
Singing, Dramatic Shorthand, type-
writing, etc. Motto: Lord help us lest
we fall, The Barbados Youth Movement
leads, whilst others follow
Rev L. BRUCE-CLARKE,
Lord President and Founder
J. B. GRANT, L.Th
OLGA BROWNBE,
Social Worker

21



Rev
Mrs





Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904)
(1904-6) & 20)

On Friday the 2ist day of Mareh 1952
at the hour of 2 o’clock in the afternoon
will be gold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the apprais-
ed value

All that certain plece
teining by admeagurement 28.6 Perches
situate at Bath Village, in the Parish of
Christ Chyrch butting and bounding on
Irnds now or late of one Clarke, on a
lene called Spotlane, and on two sides
on the Public Road, together with the
messuage or Dwelling Houses, Buildings,
&c., appraised as follows;—

The whole — property appraised to
EIGHT HUNDRED AND THIRTY THREE
POUNDS = (£835.0.0) Attached from
Ethelbert Johnson foy and towards sat-

faction, &e., |

N.B,—25% Deposit to be paid on da’ |

{ purchase y |

of

Land eon



* 1. 9. HEADLEY,
rovost Marshal
I Marshal's Office

March 1952

ovost
irda





‘EP
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Lolita Walker,
hopkeeper of Roebuck Street, City, for
permission to sell Spirits, Mait Liquor
&c., at bottom floor of a 2 storay wooden |







building at Upper Roebuck Street, City
Dated this 20th day of March, 1962. |
To: -H. A. TALMA, Esq., |
Police Magi > t
Distriet “A". |
LOLITA WALKER, |
Appiicant
N.B.—This application wil be
sidered wt a Licensing Court to be |
at Police Court, District “A’ on Tuesde
the Ist day of April, 1962 at 11 o’elock

acm
H, ‘A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.



VAKE NOTICE
PHILIP MORRIS

That PHILEP MORRIS & CO., LIM-
ITED, a British Company, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is |
& 20 Bateman Street, London, W 1, Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part A" of Register in
respect of manufactured and unmanufec
tured tobace> Including cigarettes,’ and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 20th day of
March 1952 unless some person sha:l in





the mes time give netice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
regis ton The tr mark can be



seen on application at my office
Dated this 13th day of March, 1952



H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks. |

20.3.52—3n



issue of a Duplicate Share Certificate for} the jaws of the State o!



eee

LOST & FOUND

TAKE NOTICE



LOST

WRIST WATCH One Pierce Wrist-

Stop Watch on beach near Yo Cashel, |
We.ehes, Ch. Ch Finder return to T
Gale, Fdmmundton, Weiches, Ch. Ch. or

Adivocate Advertising Office Reward |

Offered 20.3.52—t.f.n. |

TAKE NOTICE
RENOWN

SANFORIZED TRIUNISE
That The RENOWN SHIRT & GAR-
MENT MANUFACTURING COMPANY |


























Registrar of Trade Marks.

substitutes; flour and preparations mac«
19 3.52—3n

from cereals; bread, biscuits, cakes, cak«
mixes, pastry and confectionery, ices
honey, treacle, yeast, baking powde:
mustard, pepper, vinegar, sauce
ice, and will be entitled to regis
fter one month from th
1952, unless som

1 iia atntenpineniianonmenren
TAKE NOTICE
LUMINAL *

salt,
spices;
ter the same @
19th day of March,

That WINTHROP-STEARNS INC., a ioe inate
person shall in the meantime give
corporation organized ond ecietins on in duplicate to me at my ‘aes 0
. aecurans, ‘whose | 0PPosition of such registration, Th«
hoy ye Cee Breed ts 1450° Broad- trade mark can be seen on applicatio:
way, New York, New York, U.S.A., has ee dan dan ot Mase tee
applied for the registration of a trade tt. WILLIAMS,

“A” of Resistes in seeyect
§ preparations for use in cine ani
| Sparmacy, and will be entitled to regis-
‘er the same after one month from the
@#h day qf March 1952 unless some per-
on shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application #5 oe Sire.
Dated this 13th day of March, .
e , H. WILLIAMS,

ark in Part Registrar of Trade Marks.

19 3 52-





TAKE NOTICE

FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952

TAKE ‘NOTICE
CHAMPION

That G. H. HAMMOND COMPANY,
the laws of the State of Miinois, United States o:
trade or business address is Union Stock Yards, City of Chicago,
WS A... bas applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part
in respect of Food products and substances used as Ingredients in a
packing house products, including fresh, prepared, cooked, salted, dried, pen 4
smoked, preserved, frozen, and canned meat and meat products, ay .
beef, pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish, and rabbits, and food pocmets Om. e
therefrom, sausage and Sausage meat, eggs. cheese, chile con carne, lard, shorten _

oils, edible tallow, margarine, cleomargarine, ice cream, butter, butter-

milk, gelatin, canned vegetables, canned baby foods, canned fruits, dried fryit,

pickles and condiments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade, pie filler, mice, meal,

huts, figs, dates, raisins, cod liver oil, salt, stock feeds, poultry feeds, fox
eeds, dog feeds, bone meal, and oyster shells;

Seaps and ingredients of soaps, inchuding soap bars, flakes, liquid roap

including

a corporation organised ond existing —
America, mufacturers,

‘ State of Illineis,

“A” of Register

foods, especially

and powdered soap, cleansing, polishing, and scouring preparations, and

and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 20th day of
Mareh, 1952, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate

c/o Advocate LIM?TED, a company dulyineorporated Fertilizers, particularly artificial fertilizers and ingredients thereof,

18 3 52—4n | in the Colony of Trinidad & Tobago, chemicals, Bone meal, peat moss, animal urea, hard wood ashes, manure ts,

| Garment Manufacturers, whose trade or PUFFIN land bern shavings;

COOK: An Experience Cook with go« 4 | business address ts No, 107 Queen Street, Chemicals, especially superphosphate, sulphuric acid, phosphate rock, soda
references. A pay for the rigit| Rort«t-Spain, Trinidad, British West| That VAN DEN BERGHS (EXPORT) | and soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, ammonium phosphate.
person. Apply: 37 Swan Street lindies, has applied for the registration | LIMITED, a British Company, whose |cyanamid, aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate, manganese sulphate, sulphate of

20.3.52—2n | of a trade mark in Part “A” of anes trade or blsiness —— is es potash, agricultural limestone, gypsum, muriate of potash, calcium nitrate, copper
in respect of articles of clothing, and/ House, Blackfriars, London, . sulphate, and potasshim nitrate;
MISCELLANEOUS Will be entitled to registet the same after | Pngland, Merchants, has applied for the In secticides and fangicides, particularly arsenate of lead, caleium arsenate,
a: | ne month from the 19th day of March | registration of a trade mark in Part “A’ | nicotine sulphate, and paradichlorobenzene,
— |} 952 unless some person shall in the | oi Register im respect of meat, fish Industrial oils and greases, and inedible tallow

PEKIN DUCKS: 2 Ducks and 1 Drake, | meantime give notice in duplicate to me | poultry and same; meat extracts; pre. Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool, benes, horns, hoofs, animal glands,

about 12 months old. Din) 3187. C. A. | at my office of opposition of such rewi8-| served, dried and cooked fruits anc | animal casings and membranes;
Proverbs, Flint Hall 21.93.5219 | tration. ‘The trade mark can be se€n) vegetables; jellies, jams, ees, milk ane Glues and adhesives, including animal, bone and hide glues, and vegetable
ware on application at my aie h, 1988 other dairy products; edible aa and ndpasiven:
Dated this 4th day of March, . |fats; preserves, pickles; coffee, tea ‘ertilizer spreaders, soil testing kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks, and
PUBLIC NOTICES H. WILLIAMS, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffe | bags and containers
- < — ' * . . , *
|
} to me at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be
seen on‘application at my office
i | Dated this 15th day of March, 1952.
. H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade jarks.
| .3.52—3n.



TAKE NOTICE
HAMMOND'S ROSEBUD

That G. H. HAMMOND COMPANY, « corporation organized and existing under
| the laws of the State of Illinois, United States of America, Manufhcturers, whose
| trade or business address is Union Stock Yards, City of Chicago, State of Illinois,
| U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
| in respect of Food products and substances used as ingredients in foods, especially

packin house pradnyine including fresh, prepared, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
smoked, preserved, rozen, and canned meat and meat jucts, hy
beef, pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish, and rabbits, and send produbte abiaves





| therefrom, sausage and sausage meat, eggs, cheese, chile con carne, lard, Ss

Registrar of er CASTORIA | edible oils, edible tallow, margarine, oleomargarine, ice cream, butter, butter -

.3.. \. milk, gelatin, canned vegetables, canned baby foods, canned fruits, dried fruit,

CL i Oates ie adlane ok ae tee Jains marmalade, pie filler, rice, mea,

3, , dates, raisins, © iver oil, t, stock feeds, It i » fox

TAKE NOTICE That STERLING, paonocrs INTER | feeds, dog feeds, bone meal, and oyster shells; Tt eee
on ay pone ae urde Soaps and ingredients of soaps, including soap bars, soap flakes, liquid sop

BETAXIN

That WINTHROP-STEARNS INC., @
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware,
United States of America, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or business address is
1450 Broadway, New York, New York,
United States of America, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of pre-
parations for use in medicine and phar-
macy, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 20th
day of March, 1952 unless some person
thall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
ton of such registration. The trade r@erk
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 13th day of March, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
20.3.52—3n.

e laws of the State of Delaware, U S.A
Manufacturers, whose trade or busi
ness address is 120 Astor Street, Newark
New Jersey, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Par\
“A” of Register in respect of prepara
tions for the use in medicine and phar
macy, and will be entitled to registe:
the same after one month from the 20th
day of March 1952 unless some persor
shall in the meantime give notice ir
duplicate to me at my office of opposi
tion of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office

Dated this 13th day ie ets 1952



Registrar of Trade Marks
20.3.52—3n





TAKE NOTICE

urtis





TAKE NOTICE
MEJORAL

That THE SYDNEY ROSS CO., a cor-
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New Jersey,
United States of America, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 120
Astor Street, Newark, New Jersey,
U.S.A... has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of preparations for use in
medicine and pharmacy, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 20th day of March 1952
unless some person shall in the meantime
eve notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
Yhe trade mark can be seen on appli-

ation at my office

Dated thig 13th day of March, 1952.

H, WILLIAMS



att = CURTIS DISTILLERY CoM
Pp ITHD, a company organized
under the laws of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern
Distillers, whose trade of business
is 86, Mile End , London, E., Eng-
fund has applied ior *ihe registration
of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register
in respect of wines, spirits, lquors ay
cordials (aleoholic) and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 20th day of March 1952 unless
some person shall in the meantime give
e in duplicate to me at my office

of opposition of such registration, The
trade mark can be seen on application
at my office

Dated this 13th day oe

Registrar of Trade Marks,
20.3.52—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
ARALEN

WINTHROP-PRODUCTS ENC., 4



arch, 1952.

That WILLIAMS,



corporation organized and existing under Registrar of Trade Marks:
the laws or the State of Delaware, 20.3.52—3n.
United States of America, Manufactur-

crs, whose trade or busines, acocem

1450 Broadway, New York, ’

United States of America,” has TAKE NOTICE

for the registration of a trade in










and powdered soap, cleansing, polishing, and scouring preparations, and det j
* * ls yerits ;
és oes Perse ee artificial fertilizers and ingredients thereof, inelading
e ; e meal, peat moss, antmal u hard i 6
por horn dorian see ha Wood ashes, manure salts,
Chemicals, especially superphosphate. sulphuric acid
: 5 b » Phosphate rock, sod:
| and soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, ammonium homiitate:
ete SE sulppate. zine sulphate, manganese sulphate, sulphate of
” » agricultura, mestone, gypsum, muriate of Pr
ulpnates and potassium nitrate. rere. CRE eee Canes
nsecticides and fungicides, particularly arsenat
nicotine sulphate, and paradichlorobenzene; mes
ee oe and greases, and inedible tallow;
es and skins, hair, feathers, wool, r i 1
iia casings and membranes; 7 PE Nok ee
aaesnaiine: and adhesives, including animal, bone and hide glues, and vegetabic
Fertilizer spreaders, soil
bags and containers,

and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 20th day of

March, 1952, unless some person shall in th
to me at my office of opposition of such egistration, The trate teach lt Ge



lead, calcium arsenate,

hoofs,

testing kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks, and







—





Seok Mas kcplinntiae lot eet cee registration. The trade mark..can be
Dated this 15th day of March, 1952.

} H. WILLIAMS,

} Reristrar of Trade Marks.

| 20.3.52—3n

SHIPPING NOTICES

|



‘ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

|S.S. COTTICA, 2ist March, 1952.

| M.S. HECUBA, 21st April, '1952

|M.S. BOSKOOP, 27th April, 1952

SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND
AMSTERDAM

us |

e ae cme SA BEE will
ccept Cargo an rASSE| ivy
Dominica, Antigua, Montse
Nevis, and St. Kitts. Date of
Sailing Thursday 20th March 1952,
|
The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
iniea, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts Date of Salling
Friday 2ist March 1952.

The M.V. DAERWOOD will
aecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lueia, Grenada and, Aruba.
Passengers only for St. Vincent.
Date of Sailing to be notified,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

Consignee, Tele. No, 4047

ORGANJESTAD, 25th March, 1952.

SALLING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
: AND BRITISH GUIANA
S.S. COTTICA, 7th April, 1952.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO
M.S. HERS#LIA, 2ist March, 1952.
M.S. HECUBA, 2ist April, 1952,
8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,,
Agents.

Canadian National Steamships



















techy te et meas nd pel °
parations for use ine and phar- SOUTHBCUND
:-aey, and will be entitled to register Montreal Malin eat Me Batis.” ;
fhe same after one month from the 20th CANADIA: , ney Boston —B'dos Bdos
cay of March, 1952 unless some person LADY Lad CRUISER -- 13 Mar. _ 23 Mar, 23 Mar. ~
shall in the meantime give notice in . Cape aon 1 ee _ 21 Mar. 2 Apr 11 Apr, 48 Apr
cuplicate to me at my office of i ; Caekornt ae . : _ 16 Apr 17 Apr. 2 Apr. 38 Apr
t on of such registration. The trade mark ; CANADIA: CRUISER 29 Apr. 2 May ~ 11 May 13 May
can be seén on application at my office [Abe Mee ee 9 May 12 May — 21 May. 23°Mav
Dated this 13th day of March, 1992. ORMADIAN oe ie 19May 22 May % May 2June ‘3 Jun:
H. WILLIAMS, TAnY IAN CHALLENGER 30 Ma; 2 June _ ll June 12 June
Registrar of ks. ep wans oat? 9June 12 June 14 June 2 June 2 June
in. CheaSICn Gone +, 2 June 23 June rae Sau 3 dale
oS LADY Miner 2 30 June 3 July —_ 12 July 13 July
- . " . 11 July 14 July 16 July
_ TAKE NOTICE noondetetel
No
SCOTSMANS HEAD RTBBOUND anes Ae Pearse ree Apayes Arrives
4 - is ston . 2
That THE CURTIS DISTILLERY com.| ESR’ cruusen Mar Meer, oS Ap 4 Ape TAR
, CDN. CRUISER 4 Ap TA . or
PANY LIMITED, a company organized | LADY RODNEY 24 Apr. pr. —- | 14 Apr 7 Apr| : ‘ |under the laws of the United Kingdom! | ADy NELSON 10 M 26 Apr 5 Ma) | “ 6 May 10 Ma:
That of Great. Britain and Northern Ireland./ ¢pN CRUISER *” May BS May 83 May| - 3 Mn) 7 Moy
eA TIO! .¢or- | DI whose of Dasinens oditrese CANADIAN 7 May ~ , SJunc 8 June 11 June
poratian y ted land’ has applied for the st tion cane Scie 3 June 8 June 15 June 18 June; 1 June
States of rad of a trade matk in Part “A” of Register) CANADIAN ew 15 June 17 June 27 June - 28 Jung 1 July
Sa dees : | im ceapect of wingeagbts, avers and | TCRAIRENGER .. 23 June 98 fue | — 8 aah
i laetoraee as ; LADY NELSON 6 July 8 duly ) may 8: Sula (ts We aacty
New rs, Bes |to register the same after one month| (DN CRUISER :; 14 Jule See — | dur) 9 Jul
ru fh enbeet | fom Oe en ahall in the meantime give | CANADIAN rg Poe Po; Pah mig Ee 7a Oe
" "i . some person shall in the meantime give ' ‘
“hepbatins Aor aoe maine ans | SSP" aha ats oie) « KORSRRUGTOR | uly muy | 8 Aug Aur) a8 Aus
the fter one month 1 the 20th |° opposition of such registration. he . ee . a ug. _ 2 ¥ 8 Aug
ty Of Search 195% \iniess some | trade mark can be seen on application — we _ seers
ng at my office.
peueath to'we at me office “notice in Dated this 18th day of March, 1952. For further particulars, apply to~
Lon of such registration. e trade mark TLLIAMS,
com be seen on application at my office mperarat: oF bine ~ saath GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agerts.
Dated this 13th day een 1952. nr . :
Registrar of *_S Marks. POEL EPEP OSV PPP PEPPDPPEP PPD OPEOOPE PPA PCIE.
















TAKE NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE





























0 Ahh hg GP CEEOOEO







|
7 .
. /
° ~ te
| . =F SSS pe new hs
. | 1% > DA « >) mete fy a
} . é oa YT: f QS
‘ SO eo Pat *
>
} . HS
That AMERICAN RADIATOR & STANDARD SANITARY CORPORATION, a | {Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, — \s
corporation organized under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of . Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica x
America, whose trade or business addre 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburg 22, Pennsyl- \,
i as » re ntic a a e 2 i “a ~ : 4
sa USA., has applied for the registro of a trade mark in Part “A’ of Register t From Southampton Arri N
n respect of air heating furnaces, oil burvers, air and gas cleaners and washers, ‘ ‘a aie ' ves Barbados fe
air conditioners, air conditioning systems ond apparatus, air and gas coolers and That STERLING PRODUCTS IN: x COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... .... 31st March, 1962 >.
cooling systems and apparatus; boilers, Munaces, stoves (he d electrically or | TERNATIONAL, = L CORPORATED, 4 ~ *“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 6th May, 1952 %
Wr nold or fluid fuel) and parts thereof aud attachments, ag back draft diverters, | corporation organized and existing under | st “COLOMBIE” 8th Mz 1 1952 2ist Ma‘ 5 1952
gauges, dampers, automatic dampers, contvoiljng devices, fans, water-backs! Bollows | the laws of the State of Delaware, United | s) #2 ay, shee anne s Y> P44
or diaphragms and devices controlled hereby; castings and molded articles-~ | States of America, Manufacturers, ie * Not calling at Guadeloupe a
metal, plastic and ceramic trade or business address is 1% sto. ‘\ .
Clothes washers, clothes driers, dishwashers, kitchen cabinets, drying and | Street, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A. his % SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE °
dessicating apparatus; duct outlet registe avilles, and diffusers; dust collectors, | applied for the registration of a trade “*. .
und precipitators-—mechanical, and elect ie or electronic; fans and blowers and | mark in Part “A” of Register in respect | ‘s i Z From Barbados. i Arrives So Sy
ittachments; of preparations for use in medicine and | \s ‘COLOMBIB” .... 11th April, 1952... 0... April, %
Electric heaters, electronic tubes and circuits; enamels, glazes, and finishes, } pharmacy, and will be entitled to register | * ““DE G SSE” 19th May. 19 y, 1952 4
filters and filter frames, fireplace forms and structures; foundry apparatus, unit) the same after one month from the 20th | ,* “CO ae ie oss ’ peer sone 9th May, s
| blast heaters, gas and fluid fuel engine eas and ‘oil burners, parts thereof and | day of March, 1952, unless some persor % © IE’ ood Ist June, 1952 .... ... 18th June, 1952 pe
| control ‘apparatus therefor, garbage dispo-al or grinder devices or units; Heat | shall in the meantime give notice in | st *Sailing direct to Southampton %
exchangers, all kinds of condensers ‘* ndensing vapors or gases to liquids, | duplicate to me at my office of opposition % ’ &
| Setrigerant evaporators, radiators, includins gas and electrically heated, radiator | of such restraton. The rae alk eee
and pipe supports and jackets or sh heating and cooling systems and] can be seen on application at my office. | \ 0 AY : x
apparatus, humidifiers and humidifying apparatus, hydraulic, magnetic, or fluid Dated this 13th @ay of March, 1952, “ I bD Ss ; , tgs
couplings shaft drive couplings, indicators and gauges, incinerators; valves for BH. WILL) o® & »
controlling fluid flow, hand or mechanical.y operated, mixing, press coos Registrar of "rage en % Cc A a ’ 1 Ss E >
radiator vent and trap valves, temperature operated, liquid level operated, 20.3.52—3») > R B B E A N Cc rR U »
electrically operdt@d} lubricators and oilers. feed Gividers, gravity fegd, mechanical g PS
| feed, steam feed, purtiHs and compressors, motors, electric gr fuid operated, is From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD $
| switches and relays (Gieetric), electrical operated, temperature operated and x
room thermostats, pressure operated | »
| Refrigerators and refrigerating appaieius and controls for, distributor RIENTAL 13 Venezuela-Curaeao
or manifolds, viz: devices for Supptytt refrigerant fror condenser to al % ‘ 2
plurality of evaporators parallel multiple flow arrangement; all kinds of | . € fe
| expansion valves, automatic, pressure operated valves and thermostatic, i.e, | % oroOm ia amaica x
pressure and temperature actuated ve regulators ond governors, pipe and | |S ~
ipe couplings, time controlled — device as clocks, start i ct a a Y , INER 8
)n echantsms, transformers (electric); wat heaters (domestic hot water supply), % By the LI xX TRY L s 2
electric, gas fired, of fired, co fired ators and ventilating apparatus, | HEADQUARTERS FOR ~ % ~
team jet ejectors:; coolers et} for water; deodorizers, SOUVENIRS x COLOMBIE A DE GRASSE x
ed-w heaters, bubb R swert, dehumidifiers, FROM INDIA, CHINA & 1s 4 a s
and apparatus for ps roiler tools " N is " ; >
expanding heat exchange > nings, | CEYLO? x FOR INFORMATION -
jand will be entitle rex a from the 20th day of ’ R .
| me at my office of opposition of re trade mark can be i >
| to me. a cient spoeete nde maric can be | 3K. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.—Agents. 3
| ed this 15th of evel | : ¥
| Se ae een 2 REET TS Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 J | 3 PHONE 3814 >
I WILLZAMS, 1¢ &
Re a Trade Mart 6 hippo MAM ALAC OSL SSL PLL LSPS
‘
‘













FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE wees ‘bis PAGE SEVEN






























5 > OR Fo > 4
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Nad ‘These Bpoctiitt :
% to your list. Xx
‘ iti ilies i wantin : . | | % Tins Pears g
8 Apricots g
- A
. % iPneappie Jam %
x Apricot Jam %
7 x Marmatad °
% Geava Jelly °
R 0 ¢ ‘ a naan <
C S | : rics “Saker Yous, top :
Vegetable Salad in ¥
Mayonnzise y
Â¥, Chieken Soup %
2 ¢ » Imperial Meationch 4
CG os 'e oo ~ —_——— 4 : Red Feather Wise ; g
2 Lee ee

orrosion costs you ? a year 5 x Saeeute tenes ant ©
* ? ediiiadasihank, Cehadain scent a se ‘ oul >
| > Ch e e °. *
a Ht! J O you know th amount * Pickled Herrings “J %
Corrugated | imperted ints S __ Pickled‘ Mackeret 3

)
Pin a tropical countries every viar ? % STUART & SAMPSON 3
Ancenvon — The figure is astonishingy high, and % %
Vb after allowing for uew Works the $ (1938) LTD. ¥
balance represents a heavy forfeit fo % Headquarters for Best Rum. %
hack of taking pfoper precaations “ ¢

+4,
PCOS A LOLI ILI LO

864 -
> SPE SESS SSO AE EEF

JUST RECEIVED

















Protection is easy with

Anti-Corr osive Paint
i —, for every UNCH of metal.

= \ FERROGENE is an. anti-corrosive

1 KNEW 70D SEEN
THAT NAME ! LOOK
AT TH$, HOPELESS. )



Pkgs. Tate & Lyle Castor
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacon s

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna ¥



Tins Stove Polish
Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad
Pkegs. Bridal Icing Sugar
Tins Gelatine %
Tins Asstd. Sweet Biscuits %
Tins Pineapple Chunks .
Tins Strawberries





ae \ gaint designed for the tropics, It clings Sausages .
y closely tc the surtac t metai-work, forming —_ Goddard Plague Pow-
( ¥ a damp-proof, aimproof skin which preserves as
~â„¢}

itslt e¢cl nost tndetin:tely, In three attractiv:
' Shades s-. Red, Grev on4 ” een.
Manufacturers: BURRELL'S PAINTS Mitcham, Surrey
(Pi os.: R. J. HAMBR & SONS (Paint
Limited)
Aly» makers of ~ -
“) CDIGREE" Implement and Machinery
Enamel 5
“rERFECTO” Oil Bound Washable
Water Paint
AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition
‘






passn Pots Pama: oniy devghie of Sv lovely
Delmer the banben seer oF the few giv
oh AR Ms Love at the Theene rotbow

DADDY, IT'S MAMA--
SHE WANTS TO KNOW IF
YOU FORGOT TO TAKE THE
PIE OUT OF THE OVEN









Also:
TIN HAMS





Special price to Shopkeepers x
Sd




All these things get from - - %

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.
——











2b ose
Uhh

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS warsavos LTD.



















EOE POOL OO Oo Oe oe

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE







SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

ABLE TO TURN THE SITUATION Toa RO ae = = = : SS SSS
INTO MY HANDS! I'VE SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,













7 GOT A WILD IDEA... BUT : . . .
I'M ALONE NOW... : Speighistown and Swan Street

ALL THIS APPARATUS

AT MY DISPOSAL. Usually Now ‘ Usually Now

oonY FEET. Pkgs: JELLO PUDDINGS $23 $ 20
Rolls PRINCESS TOILET PAPER 33 30 LEG HAMS TENDER SWEET
Tins BROOKS, PEARS (24) 82 78 (Cold Storage) Whole or 4... 1.44 1.24
Tins CHASE & SANBORNE Bottles CARLINGS BEER ....... 26 21

WHaT's BILL KENT UP | INSTANT COFFEE 87 80

TO? WILL HE BETRAY
FLASH’S TRUST?



>

| THE COL@NRADE GROCEREES



AH, T KNEW THERE WAS

SOMETHING MISSING...THE x
TOME SOMETHING -

1S MISSING / WELL,
HEIGH-HO, THEN...

ES EE ON ET 1 INTE TE Sore Se! nn ent FS EN SN ee ee







ee ee . somutyie sh

Two more in our Series on DOGS
POODLES

by
L. E. NAYLOR

ont eee Cee or sis oe aye weet
—__—__——— ~ | The Poodle i: very ancient breed, which

PON'T woRRY SO \(eur peo | WELL- HAVE You \ No-you MAKE | now stands higher than ever in popula
MUCH-MOTHER- || BE HEARING ||| HEARD ANYTHING || A BIG MISTAKE esteem. Its colourful history, and the many
'M SURE FIFI WILL || FROM SOMEONE: =ROM THE ; | { ‘ l
ML Gt See | Whe J) ea Ore eds | Aus gg lovable facets of its character here receive

} BE FOUND- | SUCH A BIG ||| NEWSPAPER? A LARGE
Ca fort \ REWARD FOR full attention
t cc
(Ay










YES-MRS. HATTIE ANN KRUMPET-
MY PRECIOUS LITTLE DOG

FIFI 16 LOST-I PUT AREWARD
OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS —~

IN THE NEWSPAPER
FOR HIS RETURN / f















INDUCEMENT TO





— REWARD IS AN ||
Breeding, trimming, showing and general



GET HIM BACK-| (MBNics Soe ;

Pp —1| ofa. \ 4 eS yet care have been comprehensively dealt with
CLhy || hee} is s,, HT ae in close consultation with leading Poodle
2 : And Nia’ Pe 9 | breeders and exhibitors, and the advice and



|
|
|
} Gh ; |

suggestion given are practical and based on
experience. Tie illustrations are of famous
Poodles







BULL TERRIERS
T'S ABOUT MY DAUGHTER... edited by
AN ANGEL! I CAN'T

Major Count V. C. Hollender

HELP HER BuT YOU CaN...
AND I'M NOT TAKIN’
NO FOR AN
ANSWER! Major Hollender is well known as one of
the finest judges of Bull Terriers in the
* country, being also for many years Secretary
of the Bull Terrier Club. In this volume,
however, he has not been content merely to
give the reader the benefit of his experience,
extending over fifty years, but he has also
obtained authoritative articles from the lead-
ing personalities in the breed. Thus chap-
ters are contributed by Raymond Oppen-
heimer, Chairman of the Club; T. J. Horner,
Keeper of the Stud Book; and many more.
Another feature of the book is the section
on “The Bull Terrier Abroad” which. in-
cludes articles from correspondents in Amer-
ica, South Africa, Holland, France and East



SORRY... YOU'LL HAVE / WELL, IF IT'S GOTTA BE TW/S

TO GET YOURSELF / Way, IT'S GOTTA ~

ANOTHER Boy! ~ SIT DOWN, ee
KIRBY... :

WAIT’ DON
THERE'S BIG MONEY IN IT!
YOU CAN NAME YOUR OWN
PRICE...ANDL gore
SAID IT WAS



—_—



| GHALL STATION LONGO WARRIORS JT OR,NO, PRANTOMS 3 TORTURE Us











GECOND | SENTENCE ALLMENOF |










R SI) AS GUARDS To KILLUS! Africa.
FIRST, WAMBESI, | ORDER YOU TO WAMBES! TO EXILE FOR ¢ IX aU > fC sie s Nf itat sini
4 y MONTHS AT HARD LABOR SEE THIS DONE! m BUT NOT THAT! | All who own or breed Bull Terriers—an
PE Rach hie ‘sateen IN THE JUNGLE! Te < Sal} 4% y rd “ AER the breed is becoming more popular each
3 ‘ AN vy , , ; year—will want to possess a copy of this
| wecoy LN | book which is illustrated by photographs of
Fe i many leading champions.
} |
= i | Hip ms ¢ }
=i | VOCATE STATIONERY
=. el {\ ) AD abe A id b Le A Ai ;
»\ . : : . :
4 \\ fom J Broad Street and the Village, Greystone Shop, Balmoral Gap, Hastings
ed
Ee |\2HLE = |









PAGE EIGHT



Empire Defeat

Notre |

ONE OF THI

th tr ‘ Empire
in their | )
evenir ortunate the
team wa cored by Arche
back

The game was not very

Jame I1—O

\RGEST CROWDS to attend football was elected

defeat Notre Dame one-nil

iateh at Kensington Oval yesterday

goal for the Bank Hall
the Notre Dame right half

ione
I

After

fast in the early stages.

half time the pace increased but in the final stages it was

again very tame.























Empire took the toucl with
Notre Dame defending the north-
ern goal Th otre Dame for-
wards were first to attack. They
missed their first mal when the
ball bounced off one of the Em-
pire backs and passed the left
upright by few ird

A few minute Charlie
Daniel at inside or Notre
Dame, took a Il > along
the ground but Syn the
Empire custod aved

Empire missed good oppor-
tunity to score wi game
was about ten min Dray-
ton, the inside right, passed to
Robinson who unmarked. He
tapped the ball di t to Wilkir
son, the Notre Dame custodian

Another Miss

Freddie Daniel, the Notre Dame
left winger, after body beating
two of his oppo ent an ex-
cellent pass t unley Roberts.
at centre for Robert ran
out to the nd centred
Paul Mandevil!
centre half, who
through took a_ be
which missed the le
a few feet,

Later the Empire forwards at-
tacked their opponents’ goal. Rob-
inson, their centre fc ird, re
ceived her xi pass but
failed to se As the Bank Hall
forwards up their attack,
Browne and Straughan, the No-
tre Dame full backs, were kept
busy.

Shortly before half 1e F
Daniel received tl ball. After
beating Smith, the Empit full-
back, he ran throug ind cén-
tered McCollin ran from the
right wing and t good one
time shot which passed a few
feet over the cross bar. At half
time Notre Dame forwards were

till
il

ittacking the Empire goal.
Notre Dame Attack

After touching off in the sec-
ond half the Notre Dame for-
wards right away went into the
attack. F, Daniel took a lovely
hot from the left wing but Sym-
monds jumped into the air and
saved,

Mandeville next gave
forward Roberts a long pass, The
Empire back rushed Roberts be-
fore he could settle the ball.
The ball went out and a corner
was taken by F. Daniel but no
resulted.

Empire opened their account
when Hope received the ball and
centred from,the right wing.
Archer, the Notre Dame right
half, was marking Robinson. Un-
fortunately for Notre Dame, the
ball, after Robinson missed



with his head, struck Araher’s
ulder and beat Wilkinson.
Notre Dame now pressed the
ime more than before. They
ed a golden opportunity to
put in the equaliser. McCollin

centred from the right wing but
Roberts who was running through
ist failed to get to the ball.
The game slowed up in the
final stages as the Empire play-

> ers frequently kicked the ball out

of play

The Teams
The teams were as follows:
Notte Dame: Wilkinson,
Browne, Straughan, Greenidge, P.
Mandeville, Archer, McCollin, +L.

Daniel, Roberts, C. Daniel,
Duniel
Empire : Symmonds, Grant,

Smith, Norville, Robinson,
Alleyne, Hope, Maynard, Taylor,
Drayton, Rudder.

Referee: Mr. “Ben” Hoyos.



Keen Interest Shown At
Schools’ Athletic Meets

IN A BROADCAST ove
Capt. D. R. Perkins, E.D., said : The Barbados Inter-School Mr, C. E. Je

r Radio Rediffusion last night,

Athletic Union will be staging their Annual Sports Pro-

t

at

gramme

Kensington Ov
21st, beginning at 12:30 o'clock.

al to-morrow, Friday, March

y

Through the courtesy of Rediffusion, I am able once
again, on behalf of the Managing Committee, to tell you Games Committee but before it

something of these athletic meetings. :

The Union is formed by the Division [V—4 ft. 7 ins.
Secondary Boys’ Schools of tht Long Jump )
island, and these send their best Division I—20 ft. 11% ins.
athletes, as their representatives, Division 11-18 ft. 11 ins.

to the meets, held under the aus-
pices of the Union,

The Meeting, tomorrow, will be
the twenty4sixth of the series,
held over a period of forty-five
years.

The first meeting was held in
1907, and the score, at present, is
College 14 wins, the Lodge School
7, and Combermere School 4

The competitors are divided
into four classes or divisions—
Division I—Boys over 16 years of
age, and the points in this
Division are first place 9, second
place 5, and third 3.

Division iII—14 to 16 -years—

and the points are: first 7, second
4, and third 2.

Division IlI—12 to 14
points are 5,

and the
3 and 1 while Di
vision 1V—-under 12 years, has
2 and 1, as the points for
second and third.

In the Relays, the points are:—
Senior (over 14) 12, 7 and 4, and

a
first,

Division {11-18 ft. 242 ims.
100 Yards
Division 1-10 1/10 secs.
Division 11--10§ secs.
Division I1l—11 sees.

220 Yards
Division I—22% secs.
Division 11—28§ secs.
Division IlI—25 secs.

440 Yards
Division I—524 secs,
Division II—55 1/10 secs.
In Division [V they run 80 Yds.

and 150 Yds., instead of the
nundred and the 220,
In the 80 Yds., the record is

9 9/10 sees., while in the 150 Yds.,
it stands at 17§ secs, In the Half-

Mile—an open event— the record
is 2 mins,, 58 secs, set up by
&. W. Glasgow of the Lodge

School at the Sports Meeting last
year. Incidentally this was the
only record broken at the Sports

last year.
Records

oe Juniors (under 14) 9, 5, ‘The Schools share these records
* ° x in the following manner;—The
An Innovation Lodge School has eight—held by

Two years ago, the Managing F. W. Parris 1, E. V, Thornton 1,
Committee introduced an innova- BE. W, Glasgow 1 and J. Lb.

tion. Not only were there the two
~ Championship Cups—one for the
large Secondary Schools, and one
for the smaller Secondary Schools

-but a Cup was awarded in each
Division, This stimulated even
greater interest because each Di-

vision, from each school, was now
provided with an opportunity to
gain even greater laurels for it
school.

This year the large cup, will go
to the school securing the greates
number of points in the fou
Classes, and the smaller cup will
be awarded to the school with the



winning points in Divisions three
and four—thus one school can
win six cups. As the Sport
Editor of the Advocate is particu-
larly fond of saying Jor
verrons ce que nous verrons.”

Here are the records in thi
various events. I think they bear
favourable comparison, with any
in the Caribbean area:

High Jump
Division I > ft ns
Division Il-—5 ft. 442 ins.

Division TiI—5 ft.



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Five Husky LABorERS
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(GET EM OFF:

Crichlow 5.

Combermere has seven—H. G.
Brewster 1, W. K. Atkinson 1,
F. C, Ramsay 1, R. C. Forde 1,
and C. B. Forde 3.

The College has four tecord
holders in: L, G. Campbell, G. J.
Evelyn, O. M. Browne, J. C. D.
Haynes, and lastly, R. Clarke of
the Foundation School has one.

Here are the results of the 1951
Meeting: — First, Lodge School,
second, College, third, the Cole-
ridge School, then Combermere,
the Parry School, the Foundation
and the Alleyne, in that order.

The Division champions were:
I—D. W. Inniss of the Lodge, II—

Cc. A. H. Evelyn of .the College,
liI—L. O’B. Thompson, Coleridge

id IV—-R. V. Webster—of leap-
ing fame—the College

The Divisi6n Cups, which, you
ill remember,. were mentioned
irlier, were WOn by—Division I
the Lodge, Division %—the
College, Division TI—the Cole-
ridge, and Division IV — the
ollege.

‘Tomorrow, the Sports should

Theol Pn Ik Bonn, Tic
| They'll Do It Every ‘Time svete snmone



PIPES AND
BATH TUBS «+
HURRY UP, MAC





J. W. B. Chenery
Elected A\A.A.
President

Mr. Justi a, W

teur Athletic Association of Bar-
bados when that body held its

annual general meeting last nig.
In accepting tin port, Mr, Jus
Chenery said that he was very

wishatul for the great
they had done him in electing
President of the art.
he would try to do his t
every way for the best interests
the Association. .
The report for, the year id
December 31, 1951 came
criticism from sothe of the mem-
bers and some of the paragraphs
were amended. The report was
eventually adopted.

Tt decided

ot

was tnat a

centre Championship Meeting be hela on

April 17 before the Intércolonial
Meet which will be etime
around Whitsuntide and it is ex-
pected then that cyclists from
Trinidsd and British Guiana will
compete with local riders.

Some of the members were not
in favour of the local Champion-
ship meeting but it was pointed
put by Mr. Maynard that it was
customary for the local meet to
take place before the Intercolonial
meeting. Mr. Maynard said that
some difficulty was being experi-
enced in getting Kensington Oval
but final arrangements have not
yet been made.

No Decision

The question of Ken Farnum—
Barbados ace cyclist—goeimg to the
Olympic games with a Jamaica
contingent was also discussed but
no decision as to how to raise the
funds to send this cyclist to the
Olympic games was reached. Oné
member thought Farnum should
attend the two-day meeting on
March 29 and March 31—In Trini-
dad to re-establish himself as he
was defeated on the last occasion
when he rode there. A cable was
received from Trinidad Spey Be
Association to send over 4
for this meéting but Pornukt sai

that he hadn't sufficient track

practice to ride in such a m g-
Other officers elécted were: Five
Vice-Presidents, Messrs. F. C

Goddard, Marshall, Clarke, Jones

and Mrs. E. Wotton, Treasurer;
Mr. C. B. Belle, Secretary G.
Roachford.

Mr. Maynard was proposed for
the post of Secretary but he de-
clined, saying that his duty does
not afford him much time for the
Association; Assistant Secretary,
mmott and the General
Committee will be Messrs. May-
nard, Richardson, Mayers, Jordan
and Matthews.

The Association is striving to
take its place on the local Olympic

can do that it is seeking affiliation
to the A.A.F. The Association is
composed of 19 affiliated clubs, 82
ordinary members and six life
members.



. B. Chenety
sident of the Affa- effi

Onganists and one or two others,

ut he wes not going to depart
stand taken by the Vv -

ent.

The Doctors made an appiita-

tion last year which was
justifiable.

A report was made as to the
@xtent of service they would ren-
der the poor that would meet
with this increase of salary for
which they had asked.

He had made a motion that the

ors be given an increase but
he matter was deferred. He
would later move that the doctors
be given an increase of salary by
£100 per annum and that the
fae of the Organists of the
tish Church and St. Barthol-
omeéw be inereased by $10.00 and
$5.00 monthly respectively,

If the Vestry were to agrea
with this latter motion he knew
that the employees would be sut-
isfied and happy. He felt that the
incréases would be justifiable to
meet the rising cost of living over
which none of them had any con-
trol. It had gone up very rapidly
and even in some cases it was
continuing to rise,

Mr. C. B. Brandford in sup-
porting Mr, Goddard’s motion said
that everyone knew that the cost
of living had ‘advanced tremen-
dously and he was even in favo
of granting this cost of living td
all parochial employees,

The motion was then . put. to
_ vote and carried unanimous-
v.

very

Increased Salaries
The Vestry then dealt with an-
motion by Mr. F. C. God-
dard in connection with the in-
crease of the salaries of the two
Parochial Medical Officers by £100
per annum and the increase of
the salaries of the organists of
the Parish church and St. Bar-
tholomew by $10 and $5 monthly
respectively.

Mr. Goddard’s motion also sets
out that the details of the work
of the two doctors be worked out
by the Poor Law Guardians.

After Some a ion, Mr.

on Moved that thé Vestry
while in favour of the principle
of granting this increase of £100
to the doctors, should defer their
final decision until the meeting at
which the rates were laid so that
the Poor Law Guardians ean
meet the Parochial Medicgl Off-
cers and discuss with them the
details of having paupers attended
at their office and then report
back to the Vestry.

This was agreed to.

Telephones

The Vestry agreed to a mio-
tion by Mr, C, B. Brandford séc-
ended by Mr, A. G. Gittens that
a telephone be installed at the
residence of Mr. J. O. Gall,
Assessor for Land.

The Vestry agreed to put £50
on the Estimates to pay the cost
of installing a telephone at the
Rectory, the monthly rental to be
paid by the Rector.



Savannah Club Tennis

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Ladies’ Single:
Miss M. King beat Miss P, King
6—0; 6—3.
Ladies’ Doubles

Mrs. Fields and Mrs, Niblock
lost to Mrs. C. I. Skinner and Miss
D. Austin 4—6; 5—7,

Miss D. Wood and Miss Pil,
beat Mrs. Legge and Miss P, Wil-
son 6—1; 6—2,

The Misses Bowen beat Mrs, R.
S. Bancroft and Mrs. P. Patterson
6—3; 6—2.

Men’s Doubles

W. Crichlow and C, B. Lawless
beat G. O’N. Skinner and I. J.
Niblock 6—2; 6—2.



be very keenly contested. All

of the Schools have had thein

annual athletic

from the published

gathers, that that whidah
“springs eternal in human

the
breast” be
their on; ic
mons, Bi le, f -
ter, Watkins, and Haynes of the

College; D. W. Inniss, D. S.
Dougall, N. G. A. Maxwell (a

Ss
star performer, by all Bisse ot

R, C, Hump! and
the Lodge while the
representatives of Combermere
will be K. A, K. 8.
Barrow, W. W. » ©. b.
Kennedy, M. forris, V. 8S.

Rowe and K. H. Lewis.

I have not seen the results of
the Sports at the other schools
and therefore I can say nothing
of their chances, but one thing is
certain—the Foundation School
will be a contender to be consid-
ered.

Public interest, enthusiasm, and
enpanes have steadily increased in

nese athletic Mee’ to

schools, Ba

future inter





















TO-DAY’S FIXTURES

f co Doubles
Mia .. Wood and Miss Pilgrim
vs. aR, King and Miss Worme,
Men’s Doubles

D. E. Worme and J. D. Triming-
ham vs. C. L. L, Bowen and A. M.
Wilson,

P. McG. Patterson and G. H
Manning vs. G. L. Hunte and G.
Watson.

Mixed Doubles Handicap

Mrs. F. Connell and K. Mason
vs. Mrs. Gibbons ang R. 8.
Nicholls.

WHAT'S ON TODAY

‘Welfare Talks Hastings
‘ouse—9.00 a.m.
| Court of Grand Sessions—10.00
a.m.
‘| Art Exhibition at the Mu-
i seum—10.00 a.m. J
Inter.School Athletic Sports at



n—12.30 p.m.
Football, Bey, TI, Queen's
} Park—5.00 p.m.
|| Police Bana, Rocks
—7.45 p.m.
Films at British Council—
\ 8.00 p.m.
=—_—_—
|| WEATHER REPORT
TO-DAY
Sunrise: aa a.m.
Sunset: 6. mm.
Moon: Last Giarter

hi : 6.30 p.m.
en tae: 12.44 am. 1214

.â„¢m.
Low Tide: 6.26 a.m., 7.18 p.m.

aetna






“WHAT THEY SAY”
ian ed husband
Cee ‘era

“L Would

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sensiblé woman — she got her
Cooker a

Possibly the diamond ring too!

Now You Are Able
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SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069 (

=a\
SS





ts

Combermere

School

@ From Page 3

our coach will be able to see 12
pairs of boys—one bowling and
the other batting simultaneously
as he walks up and down the
length of the practise wickets. IL
owe a debt to the Department of
Science and Agriculture for their
kindness in helping me to plan
boundary layouts for trees; and a
debt of a different kind to an
anonymous person who has found
a contrary pleasure in pulling up
our saplings on no fewer than
three separate occasions. I should
offer a word of explanation about
the appé¥ent wilderness to te
west of the School and to the
south of the Canteen. Not only
has that been left untouched be-
cause our Ground Staff has been
hard at work developing thé new
areas I have just been referring
to, but that has held in re-
serve as a Site for a
technical wing. Should Govern-
ment decide not to make use of
it for that purpose, I should
recomménd to the Governing
Body that they lay down two
tennis courts, far whieh the
equipment is already lying in our
storeroom,

Cadets and Scouts

The Cadet Company has had a
very fine record during this last
year, and Captain Perkins has
shown zeal and ability of a very
high order in the training of the
Company. They receivéd a very
fine report when they were in-
spected by the Commandant of
Local Forces. I am _ pleased to
report that at last a very long felt
want is about to be remedied. As
you go around our grounds this
afternoon and look towards the
south-east corner, you will see
the guard wall butts of their new
miniature range already construc-
ted and completed only a day ago.
There remains only the firing
point to be constructed and our
Company will then have their
own miniature range on which to,
practise. Bearing of arms and
their use is of course the primary
purpose of Cadet training. No
training could be complete for
them until they were able to
practisé the use of fire-arms. The

Scouts, under Mr. Brathwaite,
have continued to flourish and
they have a_ successful year’s
record behind them. I only re-

gret that Bushelle was not able at
the last minute to go to the Jam-
boree in Jamaica recently owing
te lack of air passage accommo-
dation.

Sports and Athletics

In Sports and Athletics we have
had another satisfactory year
although we have no outstanding
records to report. There is, how-
ever, one name that is spelt in
bright letters in the mind of every
boy of this School, it is that of
Fran’ Worrell, who would be en
inspiration to every boy at Com-
bermere playing cricket. His
photo-portrait, given by him into
my keeping a year ago at Water-
foo Station in London, for pres-
entation to the School, hangs here
in this Hall,

I would like in conclusion to
refer with gratitude to the very
kind gesture of the Viscount
Combermere, great grandson of
our founder, in presenting two

very handsome portraits of his |

ancestor which are hanging here
—one behind me under the clock



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Report

and the other above the mem-
orial plaque of those Old Boys of
the Sehool who gave their lives
in the 1914-18 War. I had the
privilege of meeting Lord Com-
bermere whilst I was in England
on leave and he was very inter-
ested to learn of the existenc
of this School which bears his
family name, and how it came to
be founded, and the work it is
now doing. Let me leave with you
finally the words of a former
Governor of Barbados, who was
present at the opening of this







building and its official dedication ‘ * | and
to he gperanice “rice ¢ Re | 1 pint Jugs in blue
Island. He said, “I hope that it

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of this island; it should be pos-
sible to build on the other side
of your drive an extension of
the school which would offer
facilities for vocational training,
particularly in the direction of
engineering and allied trades. If
this school, building on its old
standards of good scholarship,
eould combine with them courses
leading on the one hand to @
sound post-certificate commercial
course, and on the other hand
to a training which would in-|
clude academic proficiency with
teohnical skill, I think you would
have a school which would play
its proper part, both in the com-
mercial and industrial activities
of the island and also in the lives
of the young people who will
come here to be educated.



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Full Text

PAGE 1

JMl.l -IV II \ l:ll\l Ml-. XDX1H XII. KRIUAV. MAUCH fl.lIK CLASSIFIED ADS. \ V\OI >l EMEVT*. miPMOHt 2501 . ..-. 1 ad OR o in* prrmMn B*> (>arfr It IS a op M M and ddrnorat am fa Ml. (a..:rg ,,., ,. .I*, : I a. ta ptl -Id Bat %  i OIK BUM AimiMtmvr niF.n Mar. Chapel %  Je-a* .Bmat*r*l. -.• %  i ji ja IB MM Mi I i TO tW MirtW An" will leave lliKN>t1 UJ IhM afternoon lot Chuith and thence to At %  laniut WnrcU. llambun. Noei H. -. Wllkw .iT.d Clbi Cbukc 11 19 -4a IN Ml \iin;i.\>: I 11.Ml. Itu j-ad wai % % %  Hi ." %  v.ign. Th* lm > loo hard to climb— .nil ilowd her lowing *y< And whiapered peace ba MM Kvrr to be remembered by %  —Jaal %  .Mother'. Dapni . tiraniiey arm', L*v. d> Clyde i*on. • m' II 3 34-1 TAKE NOTICE PARLIAMENT %  %  kagMSM Bat .>i-ii BM AUSTIN VAN OPIII Ml HP A*tl,x .., in good W*rh.nS Kt l-a*s.' MM, D v IM I ,B IfcM 1" n P Ford Oood I %  L Prlc* I Mirk Kifi *ar CralS** 0- %  %  MB. Prlc* .1 -M. . % %  .: %  |uM aarni; ,1..,. in Mil n HIM KOI -mm ie*j.. SaluTi! Herbal rafBJ %  a**** ,.(r—\. urine and Bugar %  mil -f 10 MM aa*Mfl %  rolled V announce the Ii*m and %  ** I Dr W II WIOQINA. Ph. D M H "Ml %  %  OCIK 0%J, till t %  Dn>iri Cnwnpiun At St M~ha*l D *> HHI HK>"I CAR Work. Standard Vanguard 1M2 model. Apply: Stiuili Baigliiiinai nrbuck SI or Phone *J hauled 1*17 MMT Prlc* B1.M0 %  to ho. in 4 I ...mplrtel. ofrrrtNk M %  an i tmm IMM ill. HTATIDN' WAOOK On* Chan.na|*t Station Wagon with sol "' %  ** £ *.,-.. a IMtoa TKVIKI TAuetln 1 ..urteay Oarage-thai MIS HOI SP;S WAV. I HUT %  if i*i %  m wai* I" Box X X i LOST A FOI'Wn LOST TAKE. NOTICE TAKE NOTICE ar*J %  %  AppliraM* ntu >u>l • %  |rfiwwc. ad> -n>n(la> Wrttl-_ >ll Aclvaticrd IV-iH K< %  maa a~n I %  atnwl p*(MNi W*V** '" i L.I'< %  TAKE NOTICE RENOWN f.loKI/1 l Ti NKNU HPT i.d COOK An U.P• rr n .r,. A food **'" %  oarann Ap*l. •" W '**l MIK'KIJ.ANEOI'S 1 Dutka and I D DUCK! nbnut U inamilta ""o %  — %  ->-• lXMftl3>, a (.* %  —.. %  kwi, of TnnMUd •> TobMo, .:,,.. -now U> Oi Irl-H n No 1*1 Qu*ti fti r' ( af-ln. .Plil CHAMPION % %  i ,,-(.%  afdMT !*-. _ia. %  >! • ""^^ ~ .'':• %  %  •" %  %  •i J : :; :: r ;v-f, sx-""^-1TL.527. ^J foodTrodM' brl p..r lamb, mutton. L pou'U>. h. "d ""?"• ***^T £rf**i" ^ ra*-n. ou nulk. Bvlalln. cinntO nfntfkf. aarkMa BBd condlmeaiU. WaL pou-lrt. *•". %  aapa ad laa JW bwnkl of aoopa. > id oai*daaad *•>. t-amnalnd. ptiUahin ... parttcuUrly 4rtin.nl 1 %  .1. j'.! .. ,..I..T % %  an t %  l ll.a--" Tb*t VA i dmmo VAN 1-lN I3M.H* tXPORT %  rlUth Cornf*ny. Who*. ___W kddra-k 2?•' ,, Ho.iv. niajcklrurt. London. B-C %  •* rnland. MarrhanU. haa ap|>Udd__foe %  • i March rfiairaiKoi of a Bad* %  in atiall In In* I ,n II.Ri.irr la i d'ipMratr to mc I poultry anJ O rrvad. diMd ^rtablaa. Mlbaa. )i |.-l-t nf to*. ma maul I .. %  1 (iuil •illlal. % %  par day Am*tcn Fla* lor t**o paopka A|.pl) %  > %  hlardt. It Ian-. M •l*. 1* 1 W I f ... 1i I'. ..I -i tart ... tit 19 3 S3 %  %  %  ihiItth nay • imn of "uwh on be ai-" Dalad Hi i. rrtpnl %  %  %  %  %  VA'XhlAU VriliX MUllH. rAFaV ] II tola and an I ry I dr> rail ballrtla* foraaid kiwi %  * %  |Mn .mlv llmllarl nunibfi vallabk' Cnurtr^ OaraC Dial aWI |a 1 %  >-dn lOaCCISICAL %  %  CKriartrlc Clock, inadc by aki.11 Ml DP" 'r homaa. OaaaM, iMtnat K R iii.Pi* c. L Pfl nTTB!Y MAH I I A itl rUENITOM TAKE NOTICE SPORTSMAN Tn.' fin: I f Uat of the BUI* Don! ml*. Ihraa harcaliu. al Kalph i-..r Da* Klreal Mad %  Taut*. Ml Mad DirtdM Lraiiwitita Ea-y Chair IN Comblnall.m TJ Child'. (Trnar pie-. M". and i IBS UOKPANY • iMlai (liiiln r if IH-lawiira. UtaMak %  .** trada or bui am addraaa U MB Newark AWBBNat. .. Nr Je.ar>. II • A haa I I'aik -A" Of llaaTlaatr lo nrai-. afVr-ihavli.d IntMn. %  !< n pcn*daa. hay ruin, paraati(...• poihdar. inarc' r.prll-ni and aun a. reen brfion. and wll 1 |o r-BUter the .arra. altei ?Mh day ol March < I'OB. .nilraa innapriwi *hall III th %  arlce Of MipOa*ilnn of aui-l. IIMlllmi The irjde HiaMl ran ha aaei. • Hth day Ol Mulh. 1MB H wnj IAMB. Hearitli..! i 70 30J—a 1.IVKSTOTK M Ptnu • d*Y Second MKCIIAN1CA1. TllliCK Tll-l-NIl IIYDKAUI.ll H>V*TR Dn >• • Hpnitad Caw available. aaraV. %  u now cOfBTCSV nAl(.f, IMal MISCELLANKOUS AUMIRALTV CHARTS "f Barbi i i .1,. Ii.v Weat Indlea. Ouadeloupa to Ii.t.Uil Botwrta A Co Dial SBBI TAKE NOTICE C\ r EN0L %  i i i %  ;;^. Jam l i ..( B.*i. • ke ..nil *llirtm-NvsHBEn PLAT-WIOI • ilver and Uren Oood Sea-baliU' a I • finer paitlculara Appk' M Ainu hi-) No • Coral Sand. Worthlna MM MPh El .11 |MJ !.. Inane %  *> BID > rima MAMMM REAL ESTATE IM III n HtVlWHI NOTICE milk J lather dairy produria: rdibiml. I |lai. |i.--i-e.. pi.-re. .oflee. and horn BiMrav Chri..lcal>. e.pe. aad ada producti. nitrate oi aooa. i oanaiKul. alurmniim -ilphale. inc %  %  iilpnalr and ptaul'im i It rate Hi *r>'lirtdr. >fid Ii.nBirldaa. pat %  i" B^-dpSa-BD-l '.' %  %  I m M. hard wood aann. rawnura aalu. uerpho.pl -i. i. pho-phatr I I MlBBatll'l iah-le. ijlaeiale of mlf.la. cpB-i iQdtll h->(.. animal ajalapa. t". .1 TAKE NOTICE LUMINAL ii i. "• INI ~l INI.I\ III W lll*-l I II%  %  %  %  for the \. -"ii. CertilW-at* f. IB Sh are* N->. IB113 to f %  'SS" Haw Tark, IB^ Tarh. U**V. •<• aM.l.e.1 foa the naktaUatlon ol a UadW Ike law. of the State ISC a M| oataMt ( DeUa-arr. Unlklkt4Bt..MMI -SM!*, „, AaM Mn B. MMB B atldlB M JtkaM •>f Rotamund I iftfl, „, b,i.in*— addraaa la l3* %  '• %  d-|wLT NTot*. Maw York. U1A. *• or mlaplar^^.laaailir.1 tea ih. raautralion ol a Uaw reitnVale '"*^ ,_., u itt „„, of,. whNh i baen I i Order af tiw I S in* eBtne alarr one naan. -hall tfaa ..i oflVa of .*po" h reBlatraUm Tha tr-ate n*rk E ba aren on applat->n at %  "**" Dated E lam da, o^.^h^^ NOT1CI IIUl HOI BIB IATOB LIBHTatD nncatr Nff IS tor I.MO aharra nuanbered 11*01 to 11BBB. .1 to TATTO 3BJTTI to 33BW. Ill I" l|flOD. IBBIB to lfB*l Ihd I IBM U> ll?M M i kard Muireii smith. •Uta, rake., tat. IJBlBiBBI Ueacle >eaat laakB I .-I..I [%  • %  ..I to IBB lame after one m.mlh Irom II Itth day -! March. IBM. unlaa. * par-on .hall ... the BMakMMM I ... . „.e at Bay oaVa a BkMMtUa*) "* • %  "'• trade mark ran ha i and akirw. h.,ir lr>llui-k aapol. 'mei mul taWBaga "nd mt Ulue. and adha-lvaa. inclvadlnf anin.al. bone and htda Bluet, .ind vaB*t-""' Haalvwi PartllMer apraadara. .oil tratinj klU hatchery ea)uipmenl. baby chlc-TB. and leaf* and rotttable* i. land will ba entitled to rrBi.ler tha lame aller one month from Ihe Mill da* M %  '.?. unla tameperaan thall h U,r fiaaantuna Blva notice In dupura'lua>i aj %  ...ii M my olce Datr.l thi. ISth da. nf Man I. IBS! trade mark f at M il Trade Mark. 3 la %  r Tr..de Mark. TAKE NOTICE HAMMONDS ROSEBUD TAKE NOTICE CASTORIA That U II IIAUMUSl) COA1I-A.NV. %  .Jrporataon Ihe lawa "f the Stale of llllnola. United Slain I trade or MaMaaa addraa. la Union Mark Vaida. CA< ol Chlcaao. 1 U I A hat appued for tha raajMiratlon of a trade mark in Part • i af UN!.-. TAKE NOTICE BETAXIN ntti VUlale. It. Jai kinBaluw thereon Water and rrvlret In .tailed. 3 M.MB aquare feat of land r. coa.1. It Jaswea .app %  t^ weilinB bouaal . • atrea aft. perrhea ot a>ab o Ihe back of the Hi.k daellmi St. Jama* I %  aBk l,u i for tnin i. iiiv-.-. B n\ MII II. i itcirrrr. % %  Pmk MIB ALL THAT Tenantry known a. Alkma Te.. H about At. Acre, of land tibnted at E*Bl*" Uall Fnr pari.ular. and terma and conditiont ot ule apply lo tha undaiai.ried The abovr will art up for mule at oui •hTico on frldBy tha Ht da* of March IM? al )N i-m CARH1N.1TON A SKALV Lucat Street a I llt'HJ>INn SP*7T A d-.irahla build. iiiB apot iltuatad at Britt.i to Mr Maurlat Care. overkxiHiiB 'he llo-al-v Oolf Cnune nnd Mai I apptoKlmatel* II,BOO *q ft Pol 'Ifiee partlculara. % %  : | i % %  l-hime ttta • 3 as %  and will B< %  monlh from the *Mh day of Marrli IBM %  %  • .rk can ba • r-..l*ii nt my offlcr. %  %  il WttJ 1AM lte h .-i.... ol Traoa M. -'' IHH'OK LlrTKNSK NOTIC I Coka lot AppV W I II.-.Ill m u i -on : IIUUSB, llrand new. ar.iple 3 uedi houae, all convenie-eea. will, party%  ned llrinf rtTii. oin verandah. BHrband uUlhW room .larac. %  rvant rooma and atoraBo n tin altractlva hillalde MM, ll.klv N.-w Road A Bane. A d LI I Dl-l ttTC 13 3 SI I'D N.iM PABU n %  1 I....I Sf. HI 1 BB11II,. hone i iir.mSho.it. *>r %  ., arttaa H %  ( The above atar ind afc inU' roomlolntmant. plume 3T7B %  p iiii apana M, Ihr ll.t da* 1 (lie undrraifiied CAI'JtlNOTON A St.\l i :n i C t F.Vl MOXK.L. %  i | S3 lBn v. M rprd, %  K.# ....i Dtai MSB BIB i | DO Tie IM-I Snaal n.ot..r nil I it -II leading Oaraaae and nervtea V-. i aehirle deaervea the ii'. -round whirrvar IM 11 f SB— I IS'. %  Lura* Itrret %  with tha undeniBntd IM aW nnth.l That WrNThaWXPSTTAllN .,. u %  % %  I IB Bad I .1 BMiaan a %  —— prior Ih-law. ot the Stale of Delaware. BHMB ol Anvarlra. fA aaauMBBU r-rdr, of tha Board. ' Ukltad Staleot Amerira ha. appued (or 'ha t-BHalratlon of a Bade rn-xB am l.n A' of IwCUtec la rwaaact at ^praSat'y^ind -rSrbB antltaM BB ,rw4TJU* the tame aftrr one month from tne 10th • h. 1353 unlew aome peraon Has n—llmt " notiea m t,_p4icaie to ma at my offke ol oppotlpa ..f Mich leBUtratlon The? trada ijrk i an be lean on app'.WatVon at my office ticled thl, 13th day of March IBM reaper! %  >( rnod product, and iub*tar.rea uaed at InfredMnta In fooda. vapaclal i parkins houae pioducta. Includlruj freah. praparad. rooked, aaltrd. dried, ciare unnked. praaarved. froaer. aaaa canned meat and meat pradurta. %  apc c lat %  Beef. pork. lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, ftab. and rabbit., and food ptoducta danvi I iherWrom. iauv.gr and tauaapr meat. eBat*. cheraa. chile con cam*, lard. ahonaaUaw rdible oil*, edible tallow, tnariaraar. iileoanaraarine. He (train, butloi milk. i-Liim •.Dined vealablaa. cannrd baby fooda. canned fiuita. dried In. | ptrMlaa and rimdlmrntt. vinegar jaana. laluea. marmalada. pie filler, rkra. mea ....__ larra-ft Peanut. Hi. dalea ral.lni. cod Itaaf otl. .alt. rtork led* poultry leeda. 1r < %  kMpa ud ifaCraflUaKy at -"* %  BchaBBM derad aoap. clearuing. podahing. and NATION AU INCuBPOBATaTl, poiatu.-i orS>t'lel the I,.-, of tn. %  f Of ItrljU J %  .S.i.. Il, I>ad help Tha BarboUoa Youth Movement ill.! other. Man Bl 1. BHUCkVClARKi: %  e\ J B tlKA.NT. I. Th Aortal Wurkaa I'ublii HUM,! Sak DB p] kaM IBB I Ihe hour ol I a rani BI in %  %  %  i da now ot lair of I -'(.otlanr. and on Iwn atdaa I i lloail loaelhe. with the %  Milage or Uw.-llu.g Houaaa, Building. d at fallow.: rti. -hole pn.pril"PI" 'I UIIT IIUNDftKD AMI TIIIHTV niHIl lU.NL* 'CBUM. AlUrhrd hTOM n.iiMit JotarktOB i"i -..'I i%  %  TAKE NOTICE MEJORAL That Tffl SVDNT.V ROSS CO a crK.riaed and ekiatlSd un of March IBM paraun ahall in th* meantime >.. %  in BaaBakHlM to m* at my I oppoaitm n nf nich r.^i-11 >i BB .de mark can be ern on appli it my office th*a lath da* of Maich. IBM H WIIIJAMS. ,( Trade MorV. iiaaa adatraaa I130 Atir StTret. nrwarB*W Jerary. USA. haa appUao Bathe ..gl.tr.Uon of a trada mark In Part -A" -f Kegltter in rrapert of prrpar. rjaagi tor Ihe UM Ni medk-lne and pha. ___,.i r, ontitle.1 lo legitir. | monlh fr->in the IDtl BM Brado. of March IB! IPle.. I M %  duplicate lo ma at my Offcca Bl OPBOBJ lion of auch irgmtrali'.r. Tintrade • %  can ba arm on appln ;, ,,,. ..... ; BB I.BjBaS of March. IBM II WTIXIAMS. RcfMtrBr of Trada Mark. lortllltrra. parttcularly artificial frrulhaara .< rheinkaki bone maal. peat mo*., anhnal iiraa, .nd horn .having., Chamicala. especially .uparphoapha nd aoda producta. rllrnle of aoda. i.lphal. tvanamtd. aluminun ootaah. asrtcullural llmeaton*. gypaum. muriate of potaab, i aulphat*. and polartlum nitrate Inaarticid*. and funaicidr.. pail..ularlv aftaruta of I 'ticotlne aulphale .,nd paradKhlorobenaen*. Iiidii.tc, on. ...d graaaaa. and inedible tallow. Hide, ahd -kin., hair, frnthei.. wool. boiLea, horna. .< %  unal earning! and menvbTanra. Oluea and ad heal ve.. including animal, bona and hMa |] %  dnealvaa. rartlllrf apreaderi. toll taatlng But. balchery rajulpment ar. BOop flake., liquid BBBp prepaKtloo.. and u>l-rge. %  ingf.dtr"!. thereof, uirhidi' %  id DOM i>i ate ilphata ..( t*. copv rarngle. and rontalnera. and will be entitled 1 M-rcn. 1SU. anlm „ u hoofa. animal glair Blue*, and vegetab < %  b.bv ilinkt BSH B .allrl TAKE NOTICE Curtis aSMMH BRH m %  -.•-. a month from the 3B1M day M inlinw gt*e not toe in ehnaBra*' ilion. The trade mark can he if Trad* Marka Mill '' %  SHIPPING NOTICES 40YAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SAILIKt. (BOW II Bull BMBJ %  % % %  1S7 */.: TAKE NOTICE ARALEN m ih* fatal* of Dalawan AlBBaiM, Manulaclu %  %  Yi.iK. That THR CVRTW DISTIt PABTV l.lSirTaaD. a iglaa.il> under tha law. pi of Oteat Britain and rtorthai Oli tllle-a w hoar IradO of h %  BM ..f a trada mark In ntapect of wli l. lakrobolU' and • ..Bit" tha tame -f from the *Mh da* nf Ma aome pri-von ahall In the dupkVM H.l-imark mv ohVe DBpM BaM .,. h an be aei i BJb ,1... ,. Regl.tr.r COTTICA, IVJSKOOr i, r .,.t, -MUM. TO TMISIIIAll PARAMABIB *Ml 1111111*11 I.I IAVA COTTK'A. tlh April, IBM. %  AlUNfl TO TRINIDAD AND 01 RA(AO IIKHSil IA. ll.t March. IBM HECUBA. II.I AprlL IBU. I* P HI'SSON SON* gj CO.. Airnl. Tii* M v cAiunnrr will %  .i net. for Antigua. MontanrraL Nevia. and It Kitla Dale ot Sailing Thin-agp,,SDtii March IBM The M V UONIKA wiM accept Cargo and I'aaaengar. for IXin.nwo. Antigua. Mci.t-etrat. Nrvla ~ .ng Irldav Hat March IBM "Ii..M DAI-JtWuul) QlWMdfl %  !"! Ai .ill %  m.Tn* 1 U W I sen WILLIAMS. f Trade Mark' 30 3 U li. A1TCTION A W HAItlatW UNI i %  %  Cap-.. I '.I .1 H . FURNITURE AUCTION JNPARF.IL r BBBBl ON lla-thar* sdoy, 27lh March at II Sb aa. 1 T"-; I 1-HHis In ciuon*. foi rim only Ucaulif. our Car wuh theae attTSfttrt "*• %  -mv. Courlaaa Carag*l IS 3 Ji on JCATS Swlaa-g*a. Sain... .. i.m lie.-!. Cereal Be*f. Lunche. H*aM A Kui...-v l\.iiding V* i W St Pord. 13 Rorpurk Si D> s ... .i N I iliml Man Iujurrd B .'.I. Egbert ClATke, 56, ol b.. vaeurge, wig nikt-n I i ihe iioncml llusplial with a [: rat-lured It-It knee yesterday j not!! 10.30 a.m. liter falling of! rorMei i-urt which he was driv%  .niicd. i ...uling cane fodder •n Jordan's Planlatlon l-DA\ ilUDAY 3l o t • I.IQIOK LICENSE NOTICE . i .1 Horbuch BBra. I %  4 Bl-I -TBJ BAM* i %  %  11 A TALMA, lag ..I April. I-M .fT. PllBaafJB|I(.N DIAL -041 II rrhaa Mt'Krn/l* i.lOl-V.k I K ENSE NOTICE 1 UMot \i Tbo aaambc.iK' m Wilb-.t l.r*"ida.; .1 aar*'n. 9t Jamr* ih. l,...Jr. qu.ar tlcena* No UM of IBS] n irapart of a i-..rd*d ..nd 1 K Ydrra M, I SI J I icengg to a boani -• .11, .hrrllo I J* 'i-d 1 '* %  I < %  "* ., %  M Ignaaa ... J : itl described premiae. l>t*o) mi wiinmiT IIRI VAKE NOTICE PHILIP MORRIS i..t 1-HIL.r UilKSUI fa CO 1 IV ). a Bflti.n Company. Mainifaclurrr a* Irade or buainea. .•ddraaa la I Bateman Stieat. London. W I IM I vxt "A" of nogdstsr I ua* in i acy, and will be ..Her BM of Minli. 1M3 ... md phar--titled to restate. ...nth from th* Mlh unKfla aome pera-.n TAKE NOTICE Curtis (Canadian INutional Steamships • egtatratio. ... |M %  tfBj %  %  Krglatm vf \l..r.h IBU It Wll I.1AMS r.1 TradMai* BJI-V B) B)agW s H NUhST • -i.n.i .i. •>.•' Ilolatowii N B Thl. appnr.tlon .i I a larrnaing Couit April IBU at II oc D i %  aT'. HI i \,.-i %  %  Table* '.. • %  %  Dirrh I %  v %  -. I %  | .."I SrWini! Marhli.c %  %  %  %  . %  \;*v i i J..l-^i..Uld.sJ 4V CO. GOVERNMENT NOTICES A vacancy exists for a Technical Sergeant IiiKtructui Ii ranspoil Platoon on the Pcrmonct.t Still of the Barbutlo* Hvgimet The aaiaiy will I* W4U x 18 l.OM. subject to deduction at the ,-.• (( 14 under the Widow* and Oriihonn Ptmsion Act. It is intended i poat should be penslonablr. Applicants should have ten v "Ilceii ...ii* .'\p4.iience in technicd motor Iransport work, and mus UlaBf motor meehanic 1'ievloui experience In itnlructiiiK ... Mrvlct ll %  ihe Aimv will be an ndvantage The;.;; v.ll be subject to the current tuiid'.tions of service and deparlm'-ntil ,.1'nccdure and discipline .Vi.uen appllcntions. tonellwn with ttsumonials and educational eiiillcnle will I* received by the Colonial Secretary. Colonial SeenOflset, nndeetnwn up io V< i.li.y 2lh Match. 1*42. JI 3 51— 2n .^etl ol I lured trbacc. In. >dl. t ctgaratMB, and an tha aanw • the 3tlh dav ..i peraon th.nl in %  | ..!, 1 1 irpa 0*2 H %  :i | i taami Heglatr . '. TTMB Maid. %  B 3" TAKE NOTICE BAYER rn-t ITKavLING PRODUCTS DfTBB .TtONAL INCORPORATTD. a •**• [-'•mtUm *rganiiad and a-jaUag lanajar %  law. of th* Itat* Of Dataware, Unltod Iitag of Amartea, whoa* trad* or buai -u addrcaa U 1 Aitor Street Newark Jar*** USA Manutacturara. ha. plied for Ih* raglitration of a trad" .rk In Pan "A of Rrgtatar In H Bptri { ptcparatlon. for ua* m modlcln* BBd r..irnvary and wll be ...tltLed to reglater n aam* after on* month from the Bri" of March IBM unleea aome paraa. meantime Mv* nMkPO 1" .,.* at m* offer* of oppoa. %  relit rat Ion Th* trad* mark .II appliraltain at m> offlre !.ted thlt lath day of March. IBM H WILLIAMS. Ragtatrar of Trad* Mark. D!.tiller., wlioae trad* of la M Bala* laid aVaad, L land ha* applied tor Ul* reglaU.lu.. of a trada mark In Part "A ol Rrgsitri in % %  •pect of wine*, ipuitt. Iiquora and 4MIH %  d ,M TAKE NOTICE i regi.ter th* aam _. ..in the Mlh da* of March INI unl*a. im p*raon ahall In Ihe meantime give nine in duplicate to me nt my onV1 oppoattlon of auch rvgl.lralioo. The idmark can be aeon *B appllralloi '"IIIII.IM. •ANADIAN CRUISER 1 AtY rTODMBTY Any NriAON CANADIAN CRUISER ANADIAh i -ANADIA'. I I ADY Sn.s.,,\ CANADIAN CRIILHCIt VNADLAN CnNSTRUCTOR IADV RODNEY VORTRROI'NP %  !'..' \JV HODNPY VDV NELSON m rniTetta, ANADIAN CONBTRUCTOR A DY AOTJfBBTY "ANADIAN < If ALLXNODt ADY S'EIAON M Jim. M June II Jul) '.all* Ball. It.I,I.. IU.I..I, IS Mar. — II Mar 3 Apr %  S Apl 1" Apr S Ma II Ma. m al. M M.i. > June — IS Jim. M jutii a Jan. > Jut, II July ZZ SI May I j ,:.. II June IS June 1 July II July M July 13 M I Ha. .1 12 J M -I. I Jul* M Jtalv m iSa Arrive. SVa*l*a a Apt \NA M Apr 10 Mi v. XI Jurtr It Jul. B Jun IS June % Julv S Aug Arrt*e. %  aBfa I Apr 1 Apri • Ma. M M.i I Jun<> IB M It atay ii J. 11 Jul. m fan 1 A i Uatt lath da, RVgl.tr.>r March. IBM I WILLIAM! TTBd* Mai M3U-3n POT further partictilar*. apply GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., That A' %  —.leo:. whawe trade or DUBti i heatiu, %  I t I A %  r. pal I I DAJBD lAI I %  OOATlOrl. %  AHention i drnwn to the Control of Priceg (Defence* i Amendr.ientj Order. 18SZ. No. 8 which will^ye published in the Offlei %  I J,iy 20th March. 1952 2. Under this Order the n.iximum wholesale and ret.nl sellim It.-ef-Salted" are as follow.: — IiFTAII. PRICK (not ilion than) I.. i. th KaWi 11.to RftundB, Hn-kfi i or !' %  %  • • %  -: Flank WHOLESALE PR1CF than l Un 90 ptr bft of 200 lbs. or 4Sc. per lb lo f not leas than 2s lbs. $77.20 par brl. ot 200 lbs. or 41c per lb fcn loll ol li'.t 25 lbs. %  1 v aoiid raugea. dampen a.. MtTBfP %  %  ..I UltCBtHlk B| .. and itarhnvnni. BJgmm. heater. I'lteiB and flltn li-mea. hieplat* lorn b a.t hratcra, gaa and fluid I I control appar.li. UM*efor. g-ibaae d. i %  IIIIBJBHH all %  '' 0l tfl .'..It. In. hi %  .puaralot. humluiSna and I ill I and ti-P ^ %  rlertrtoatl. ov*rat** labn.-Uati and Ml I ,1 refc**. (Heel... %  %  %  %  %  :i-bani.i' i %  ou IBM • P nafaurg E. rV,n.a.l "..rt "Aof RegLMi d KB" cleaner, and waaher. .1 . TAKE NOTICE B BAYER % '-*-'.*a'e*e*e*e*e*-'*-e'-*,''e*e'eVe*e'-***a***-", LTD.— Aienta 31 ^ijAe itiANTaQUE frotn %  ni iin|ii.iii In Ouadeloupe. Trinidad. La Gualra. Curacao Martlnlqe. J a male a That STBIUNC PRonUCTS %  1Llt.\*T>NAl INi'.Jll|-OliATkD corpeer-liot' organ.a*. and aal.ilng unawt UMMBMBf Del. From Swatfiamplon "COLOMBIh" . 18th M.IIC'I. 19W ..UK GRA %  il 24t)i April, 1952 ... "COLOMblE" . 8(h May, 1952 Arrives Barb-do* aist March, 1952 6th May, 1952 I May. 1953 ibansta, di.in*; a.ui grtllr*. ami .llltuacrti rt.i*t COlMitnil i ,.nd blower, and .ifirl*. gUli*>. and Sni-tiei j atrwcl . .lalua. unit -.it and ." B ireof and .1 or grinder devire. of (.pom or laer. tn Hguid*. gaa and e:ectiicalV heated, radlato; r/BtaSPS and i ^aratua. hydraulic. magnaiH. or BaBM .nd SB .. I opaCatad mixing, piraatu* operalad to operated liquid ,o.1 t Nrvuik New J*rae>. • S A Vttr | Mir.l %  %  piepaiat.oi.' ih* Mm* altar ,1 Ht|fL.lr' uaa 111 medicine ai" he.il.t Bd to •egl-t.-" month from the < % % %  I .hall III tne wni.nit.eat.."-—" ,i .pla-.t. lo m* at BM efnee M .*poattk. o( auch rrgiatratioo The ttado marl MI ba are.) or. application at my ofBrv Dated mil 13th OM/ of Marrb, ISM. Wll-I.IAMS. il Trada Mai v. Sl •' Begi.li*. . rrntovi. : PJadaj %  i ariLil rat* mm ..n *le per lb PSaSOS: %  **), March. 1952. .t-t tuppl. I, .rntilat.v and .rntiuting .•pparatu.. %  %  I %  h*et or headei opening*. BBth day .a he moantune gi>. The trade mark can ba Regttttar of Trad* Marl ORIENTAL PALACE HEADQUARTERS FOR SOl'VIMRS FROM INDIX t MIS \ %  ini"\ THANI'S Pr. Wm. Ily. St Dial S.M •Not filling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO El ROPE Frarn Barbados. Arrive* Snutharapton MBIE*' .... Ilth April. 1952 2Srtl April, 1952 "DE OKASSE.... IKIh May. 1951 29th May, 1952 "COLOMBIE" .... 1st June, 1952 Uth June. 1952 'Sailing direct to Southampton IO HAYS (All III UK AX I'll I I *i: From BARBADOS TO TRIM."All Veiiexuela-f oracao I. olomliia aV Jamaica II. Ihe I.I \l HY I.IM.IIS < oi OTIHH ni-: 4. I IASSI FOR INFORMATION \ 1 S H. .U. .IOM> A i '.. I.TI.-.\genls. I I-IH.M: Ml. ^. %  %  %  %  ^. %  %  ^. %  %  %  ^. %  %  %  % %  %  % % %  % % % % % % % % %  % % % % % % % % % % %  % % % % % % % % %  % % %  :•.:: % %  • % % % %  %  •



PAGE 1

I K1IH\ MARCH .'I UJH IIVKII II" ADVIMATF p\c.t: FIVE 2 Counts Withdrawn In Civil Servant's Case ACID THROWN ON CANADIAN An unknown gun Hnrw MUM tonsuvr liquid on a B Jar old boy. Batty OIIUIM, •on of Mr and MrIvan Oittens of Worthing on Tuesday •vsnlag MtWMn 6 and 5.30 o'clock. The littl. boy who %  born In Canada and who i-am him along with hu mother, btothot and ststsr a yar ago waa In front of hi homo whan the nan along He .-id the man aakod him for money and he tamed to ran away when the liquid waa thrown on him. Barry was admitted and detained at Dr. Skinner* clinic. The Police are Investigating the mat tar. Evidence For The Prosecution Closes SOLICITOR GENERAL Mr V\ W Heecv. Q.C., I the Crown, at the Court ol Grand Stations, yeslerdav withdrew the two counts of embezzlement in the case \>H In ll.-i-f brouKhi against Carlos Smith, Civil Servant of Barbarees Hill, after a query from His lordship, the Chief Justice. Sir Allan Collymore. that he did nut see how in any event tlM IJSI two counts in the indictment could be %  JUKI It': Parochial Pensioners Of St. Philip Will Get More hi fun l Hied IIy natural Camwae Several Acres Of Canes Hum I %  this case in whi.ii Smith is charge jO*. Ofld* oa ihrer counts of ratification of accounts and one of larceny as a Public Servant am closed yesterday after the witness n. ... i. who wus cross-examinr*] longest '" Inspector Bourne and few %  other '*** %  "" J uriL v Wfdlci <>< .< Bjgftatolicemen had 'given evidence '!'"" '"'> *,** "'*' %  *""* To-day when the cage resume. "9 dea,n * a n w bo Mr E. K Walcott. Q C I'm the £ hKt 2£ TS ,n vV d the Soll?or General && ***" > will address the )ury god H Lordship will sum up the case Mr E W Barrow is associated with Mr Walcott as defence counABC ippeal For Books ; Harcti TI heard it about 9.15 am., she rymg and on going 193.!. was concluded II C IWalwyn ai "A" ywleiday afternoon. Thr Pol, !" a.o conrtanll. w.rnwiTh Mr WakoTt" utotm !" !" "TZ "''l' 0 "** "" ''""" ,.. people atalnst throwing UXhWd %  >iS.rd, tnat as she ... wajk%  ".-. from vehicle, but .Ml *"" the query from HI. Lordgj -'""< .McClcn Gap .. i .'ports of cane fires continue to hl P as to the correctness of the flow into the i\>liee Infonmitkm rounu ur embeuleuient Mi E K Buieeu. The Ares occur all over Wa| cott said he had intended to the island. rnake that .ubmlssion Mr Rcece A planter told the Advocate s '* ,d ne nad 'mlmated as much tn ks> that ,„ hk opmion '".* " < 1 l ",f remarks and would .ome of the fires are not of ace I"' !" ra then. dental or.aui. He lelt that some ., '"V" i i ajo u V^ *P"£> flelds .re purposely e.uht by 8PVB&I '*?'J JT\ '"" labourers with the hop,of eelMr w ") !" f >>' "oped In the tin, more w„,k "I blrn? c.nes ?'"", "' K r"""'""""' u ""l %  ?" are wet or m ra. ., fm£, £... *V ,u -'horten his address.' He ilave %  u, be renuTv^rl fjim .E ld '"*'• th "' *" had a heiKlnche ^ %  3-'^s|S%SHHsi= property of of J„o Hiver Estates *^ e „ id he would llc mnkln , nc ubmisslon that Usflrt would tx no ———_________ %  vidence to substantiate the other harm either uons, but ftaia he had a life ;..". ,. rtll.ll I. OWV I K \.1 I hdo U %  %  %  ; i i •vauld •• > %  % %  iatt u tu I %  rtacag n*u .in hr hai lad %  TII: s r i \ v r be hold •Vt>v Advnalr . lotd lhal the parking of loir < • ile ihi>er use iNeini" iwgstt trough -"rho iiif that crvine"-ihO ,r,l> x rc-lore thi inenitv y limits." this memoir gold. The Visual AMI Section of MM 1 TI Detwrtmeni r* to asatot HM S pr \ the i UN-ti.r, % %  will bring] their \flM pti • This was unanimouslv agi*e\Hl t l>v tin \ r, 04 \li || |. Smith The liuieaMwill r%  IOC t.., Po | !. : < %  t!icti. .(. %  living: 1'iil.lu lt.it. '\ S A n b> M, R S W. Hd that the cause „,.. -MasJwT Ofcd* were insured LM ..nd PIRK AT C.IBBS *fcw a new born infant lying Hsfl gtound She Uien reuorted I ho matt IT to ihe Police. TTICchlld • taken to the Hospital. lit A f>. l uto who performed the post maeteaa examination at Ihe Hospital Mortuary about 11.30 Bum. on March 15 said that thg chdd was not identified to him. her iivtrui" 1 There were inect bits* on parts Qworflr, of the body and haemorrhago Wednesda> A po*l mortran tXgfli under the head. Both lungs million anal psffjMinad by t)t showed pneumonia and In his lifu< .ad %  ) % %  th opinion death was due to natural i.itui.l cr'tv causes—namely cerebral haemnich took place during ^ 1 %  • %  "'"" Concert At KOCm incur II %  -• il all. %  I ...... vautg during lb* rear, with tht thai the I lid meet I ecu del Iflkl Who I %  : %  %  •rva tht Marciuleldand irrooiulii.se dlst lea*, and a counter motion by Mr. D. D Garner that two baths Instead f one should be erected during the year—"rat* Urth drln.le.1 when the Ve t • onmdered the nuiller -11 %  IM.U Of ID A Dennis motoi lawn lAOWfi B1M mi th. Prlocw .-..£ Field St Mi.hael' V. The lawn snowi i :.. %  .ii aassj and gave a MUsf.'etorv paTfnrinnnnwhen ti .% % %  out on tall and tt.ick ,"' molio pi % %  in cut about M > Mi-ii .i k'loundw f „.,. rlUal *• "upporters at the runnier %  I lion, and tit,--.. „(,.. advo. %  Speaking In IUUIIUT iiuilioi liolnlrd nul thai their greater need lat halh' areas other than Marcl i %  %  iimtdrrlii* Ihe itapMUOxi. the areas, and expressed rtM lhal Ihe NsMlfSBI Marrhhcld i uuld nuke M list Ii.iii at IIIIII.II Vlllasr Mr Heekes preaaed f"' motion' hut on Ihe lounlrr i thin bring pm. it sagnlini a lie. and Ihe (hairman %-..! %  in.-i Mr. ..(Mi-, on i ground* thai the matter %  >•. h* left over unlll ths Vr had mmpletrd lOiKkderalio. %  xctr'% I -Um.t.Insperh.r's Kvidenre tloi.s, but said he had policy for SI.000 In Irte third statement the accused was asked if he raj tht When hearing began yesterday Cashier on April 5. I IMS .Before he niorning th, proawcUUon ..died On asked the accused this question ispactor Bourne of the f I I) to he could have been told M b. They were inIJive evidence. He said that on someone else in the Department July 10 1H1 at about 12 10 pm. The accused was not under susat Wakcfleld Plantation, he was called to the Treasury and picion then. He did not crOH;>.. John, at about 1.10 p.m. on there he saw Mr, Charlton and examine the accused while heTuesday burnt 13 acres of second nad conversation with him He was taking the statement. During crop and eight and a half acres wa shown four bundles of money; the investigation evervone conof fourth crop ripe canes.They ^oe bundles contained new $2 corned -a asked the same type of question. The que*tii Al Gihbs Plantation. St I'-tei. a flte al about 7.30 p.m. on the same day burnt eight acres of second crop ripe canes, the properly of Aubrey Webster of the same plantatlc %  %  I I MM h-wltv •I Hal %  v a c w • iuhl ho oUnt .i OR ruvt "SKKEK" W VMIKI) BEING vW A"i are the and property of E M. Taylor injured. notes and each of these bundle contained SI.000. The fourth bun die contained slips of paper. He This fire extended tn Clnvbury. had a bundle further sealed Lemon Atbot and Ash bury PlanHe had many interviews with tat ions ar.d lo Lemon Arbor TenMr. Charlton and du-lng the time anlryAt Clay bury* it burnt flfhe was handed the toks. teen and a half acres of second On August 21 he interviewed crop ripe canes and two and a 'he accused at the Treasury and half acre* of young cane plants, Superintendent Parrls was present. the property of A. L. Sealy and The accused answered the quespj insured. tsMM that were put to him and he Sometime* Mr Charlton left him >ad ovci the statement and signed wlth th e accused. Mr Charlton never told him what questions put to the accused so that the truth could be obtained about the whole matter. The questions %  ran not directed to extract an ad'niwlon. When he asked the about the cheque, he (Inspectoi 'Bourne) had the cheque in his possession. While accused was being qiifXMon. Mr. Charlton was present. Iks* i i BatwaH • aawJura lr.. ,| Kendi %  • PtH, cold tiix.tnd i that It should ba lsft ovar tm a hlle M |. .i/anM h I mu ranee 'ihe st. Philip Viii, vaatarda %  graed mi Ih reeominand i i Conunlilaa, thai Ira I %  II ]'.!] %  hial buUdJflsBj gjbould be increased, with Ineaaaea ba ti. v limirartog pohc? ltepoiling tn the V. %  %  tha C iirn.r-H i sr,.ith. Churahw/ani that he and th. corruntttaa b HI aona Into the math ^ "ith the Insurance Company, and it was agrMd Hi 'i morl of the imnK'hiui buUdlngi tvara und iil-hi.i'e i It burnt six acres of second and it six and three quartet acres of At this stage Exhibit G and Exfourth, and a quantity of fifth hJbit C were produred to the crop ripe canea. six and three Court. The conversation he had quarter acres of second crop with the accused on July 10 took ratoons, four and a half acres of place at the Audit Office. He also young cane plants and n quuttet took statements ftom other people of an acre of sour grass, the propIncluding the Accountant General. erty of Hon J. D Chandln. gasMI wenmsuieil Further Statement At Ashbuty it burnt eight and He had another interview with a quarter acre* oi" second crop the accused on July 16, 19SI. and ripe canes which were insured, he made a further statement. On They are the p. ..perty of W. E. August 24, IW1. at the Public Nourse. Half an acre flf second Treasury' he had an interview with ctop ripe cone* were burnt when the ..ceusud again and Cpl. Nurse it extended to Lemon Arbor was present. The accused made Tenantry. The canes are the another statement which he P"'* u > *'' ITd^v ,W B roperty of Miriam Wharton and signed. While he inte. viewed the V" r V? '.,?'£ y \1V laude Allevnc and wen not a,.us.-d he had the various lx>ks 1, !" r l. th, ^. Mr ii, M PP SS L ^ insured. at hand and also the cheques. vlew ^ fflbou j hc "'^^ A? He interviewed 'he accused "^v"** 11 said he purchased. AT FRKRt: PfLGaUM acaln On n^ber 9. 1951. at the •"£ lh f he should ask the accused. While asking the accused questions he made jottings on a .ece of paper. Purchase of Car He hud never taken the uccuscd in Ihe Police Van to his (the accused) home. He kjad heard that the accused was seeftei the purchase of a CSU a Mr. Mapp and was taken hit home so that he could produce papers. He could not say what date the used went to his home In tho polka van. The informatii 1 Ii.u-I..a Itiu* I n., i a *.... % %  W .i Ihtng i % %  %  %  . i ., wooden Iwtusa % %  %  %  ; huiit on the if.,, i,. to eollapaa %  mad b| Di i Sea Icy. A break-w-..liT .in-iii tn tinsravai which clalmad \ f.X't Of the if (he hreak-w.itei s/ata niti about 20 f-t of He (,,(.le. tre du,, down leu-. ,,„. m rani nr mo.'-than d.mhi. fion. the brink of tha vatoi Pt %  *? S^T r,l ^"^ l "i' %  arssshfa Hght ui In •*• % %  "* aamaw t o n i i '.p. %  u %  %  hit h wrai wall %  irden tructcd h rera put down i,.;ity of nai I isj UM I uilding %  I t to no ivall • % IMM SI i III >llll.|\4. n : gai tha Alms xit thai 01 I at by th. Hi Oil go eiiUutMliJ.li" Vtth the Insuranic H<^>resantativi lha total inau ad vatua of lh* x r.>p ripe ^ure followed i>f ratoons. Crt^s-cxamined by ttash were ,-ott Inanectoi llournc .iid that ss£3 catsjsnms ^^E£s£ Seven acres of first canes and 33 a and eight acres I unit when a I Pllgrii Church, at about 11.00 a.m. on He never gave Mr Charlton the property the Information he had hut he IT%  Kerf Mr Chftllton lo get ed. It-formation f-om th< used said that he Aud.1 Office and the same proear" ld "* "^J^'T^ea'r" l ki M fall MHM " . ,nc Purchase of this car w i He did not send the Polic to the Public Buildings. As fa taken to his home in the Tuesday They of C. M. Dm>! He aid Charltoi to him while he Smith hnd had Charlton here he was and said Smith's answer at the time was not true, but Smith n that ujalaf he was saying was so This lite extended I" Ridge Short,, „n. ; JuW 9 Mr. Chartinterviewing Smith and enqulrPlantatlon and burn'. Sevan acres l( n lold Mm thai he had spoken whether Smith had been -al of second crop ripe cane, the with the .. ru-d He muld not lf n> !" property of Ridge Ltd. which were ramtmbar wall what Mr Charlton t 1, %  ed. told him the accused said Mr It also caught naMS at Edey s Charlton was the first person he Village .-.nd burnt three acres of toOK statement fn.m He gave (list and sect.nda.ioi. n-.w cane ,, .,,nietiinc in Octothe propertv of peasant holders ^p, A sl, cn ient was also taken These canes were nut insured. ,,„ Mr Chcnery. Earlier In the week a fire at [ n lnt lower Court he was the Wot ton Plantation burnt six acres Complainant in the case. All the of first crop ripe canes, the propstatements were taken about the etty of G. B Evelyn They were latter p.irt of October He saw insured. the accused when all the iiateAncther fire at Fairy Valley mentwart nearlv finished. The Plantation. Christ Church, burnt accused said he had nothing to jj* six acre* of second crop ripe canes, udd to the statements ho. had They are the property of Oldbury already given. Estates Ltd., and were Insured. Accuw-d Not Suspected o A J[ T 1 fl i l ? ri ", c, : c, P1 i nU,, ,i?; I"did not tell the accused he St. Michael, burnt ten and a half wOU d (wgM hlfi a( ., lon b n0 acres of ripe canea. four and a makltll[ a statement He took the half acres of young cane plant-. ,!„„„„,,, from the accused to Withdrawal He said that Smith had never admitted withdrawing new two dollar notes. He had not Induced him to say he had withdrawn the money but only that it was stated in his Petty Cash Rook that it was withdrawn. N..j.i :;r:Vr:<*en1 Fr.tr.k Ptl I %  that on August 21, 1951. he was at the Treasury while I statement in the form of quesUkd iiiiswets wa* taken > %  Inspector Bourne from Smith he had riothmi: furthei to Smith lead ovci '"t to what he had already sui> and signed It. Accountant GenCross-examined he said ral Charlton was in lha_oOl WAVES daoliuiK -g-ia.t Ir ths break water and part of R guard wall ll l e %  c 7*.L* !" ,r ihl *^-lrt"i get Infomiation. He did not sus"while "the "statement was "being to leJ] Smith th.tt tht acre* of sour v^ gj^ggjg pect the a.xuse.1 wh-n he took taken, but he took no part in it were n. • qu, I o %  i i -?i. ?.^rVe !" ..r ,ho ""* Element from him. The S.ipennundent was not him to ... Hank Ltd. The damage i* coverHr < .,, prkw1 orl lh( mtttwrr < croM-examlned %  • — — that the areusoi gave in his seeCpl. Clyde Nurse said fiat he went with Inspector Bourn, w) en At Tour Square PbmUUon, St. ^ B tatement and found that had' been" present on August 24 ih.. ** "i-.l.?Thiv y ... ihi^JwMsr lh *^ **"" rorrw t ln ,h """'" ,h Treasury when n" .ta.emt._lhe> ira.UH proparment he was aked if he owned ment was taken from Smith lv from Smith an ty of Four Square Ltd.. insured. Teeth Loose Gums Bleed l .rh.[..fall out a art ni>. Bora Mouth sad mean thai you mar , Trnrh Mouth r i>*4 tlioiv that win aw rear i*-Ul to i in*ti> onMlam" and Heart Trouble Amesaa %  tows guts bl-edlna Ihe flrnt .lav. •atila eare mouth and qulcglr UMafs* the teeth. Iron Clad niarani'your mouth well TO-DAYS \TWS H Wl ^ I'l m % %  IORIAL EpmoN or KING'H rVNEKAL Will all those customers who booked this edition please call in for thfir copies JOHNSON'S STATIONERY. Plastic in different colours by the yard — at JOHNSONS HARDWARE MVOsaasBase house property and a motor f Bourne and Smith had signedgive en.ien. !!. %  -nrl "no" to these ques-J On October 30 Inspector Bourne Af %  %  and he again saw Smith who loply to Inspector Bourne tha i A wide assortment of Wedding Gifts Prkn lo sail all V. He I.IXt A CO.. I I ll 2 BROAD STREET .i„t rutlon clnaad th*ir ... in,,,., t.-l .. ,r HiSELECT III I Si: .Vll BIDDYS AHPARAOU8 SOUP per In LETONA ORCEN PEA SOU!' per Un MARELA STUFFED OLIVER per Jsr MARELA STUFFED OLIVES pet Jar 1 0O CRAWFORD8 OREAaf CRACKERS per Ua 1 4 I 90 For Thi. Week — 1 60 APIE PEAHUT BUTTER—psr Jar KRAFT CHEESE SPREAD per pkt. DANISH SALAMI p€r lb. CHEDDAB CHEESE per lb IMPERIAL BRISKET BEEF par 4 lb Un DENMOR BONELESS HAMN 4 lbs. DENMOB BONELESS HAMS 2[ lbs. ., HUNTLEY S PALMERS CHEESE STICKS per Ur CRAWFORDS UFILLIT BISCUITS -per Un COCKADE FINE RUM ST.t.XSFELD. SfOTT A fO. I.TIt. GEORGE PAYNES is GOOD COCOA FINEPURE SOLUBLE. GUAVA CREAMS 10-DAY'S SPECIAL a* knights Plnii'!ii\ NIHIU Fountain Further Reductions in Our HOSIERY DEPT. TUNIC SHIRTS wilh 2 .eparale Collar* from $7.05 and $6.55 To $ 5.50 and $3.50 COLLAR ATTACHED SHIRTS in several qualities From $5.39 and S5.08 To $4 50 and $2.64 SPORT SHIRTS in plain.coloun and lancy deaigns From $5.39 and $5.08 To $4.50 and $2.64 KNITTED COTTON "POLAR" SHIRTS wilh Short Sleeves clearing at $I.0o KNITTED ART SILK "POLAR" SHIRTS wilh Short Sleeves clearing at $1.50 FANCY PALTUSED WOOLLEN SWIM TRUNKS. From $ 8.13 to S4.00 MESH VESTS AND TRUNKS. Cloaring at $1.00 COTTON HANDKERCHIEFS. Cloaring at 24c. IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS Clearing at 45c. SOCKS in several qualities. Clearing al 3 0c.. 49c.. 52c 6 0c. f HARRISONS DIAL 2664 OJondsihgul TyialeAialA foA ifouk IM.I ism til UOOI <' SKINS big Hunt A II in i %  > ili a ii' Be :\,sl> I MI.IIII s I Ifruwn. I.r|.\ V>\\ llltlr. AIM I.r fink and < DOT] KrH Ml" v.i.l.IV. 1 %  latin*, Pewln in,,. $13.55 CAVE SHEPHERD St Cn LTD I). BROAD STB 10, 12 Ct BLACK COSTUME CLOTH Fur l.udirs' Tr.t\rlltiit: Suitv U vtittf Ptl Yitrd 8.M'2


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PAGE 1

r.\r.r rvrn CaJtib Calling BIRBADOS APCOCATE \vi PPIVATE—**"> WOCT n *** FRIDAY. MARCH 21. 152 M R ROBERT S. HALE. US. Consul-General in Trinidad. due to arrive here this .ifti rnoon kg nWI.A from Ai I ot Schooner I oiks M R. J. i. wi.ii \.\ Msiugint flln %  1 %  I .sle W.,1wjm and Co. Ltd. Cotnui %  Mon Uarrhanu ol St. KJtU u. DM In Bastados to attend the Annual Conference o/ the Schooner Oomii. AanK*iHtn>n which lUrt pL>< on Saturday || the office of the Association. He jrnvnl on Wednesday nigh: by B.W.I.A. and la staying, at th. Hotel Roy id. Mr. tVigley expects to leave on Sunday afternoon by B.W.I.A fi>i Puerto-Rico on his way to New V. rk and England on l>u >uupled with pleasure. He will bb return to the W. Indies ;in about three n t ime. Back to St. Vincent \/I!SN .;. M KIL-IIAHUS and A her siater Miss F. M. Kkh"1 Kingstown. St. Vincent. returned home yesterday noon by B.C. Airway* aftei : pending two weeks' holiday buying at the Hotel Royal. They arc cousins of Mr. Juturdt, retired Puisne J. dge of the Windward Islands •nd Rev. W. M. Richards, a fnimI Si Michael's Cathedral who it. at prexent in Venezuelii On Holiday Vf %  . HOROWITZ, proprietor %  o| Joyerla Mercury a jewellery establishment in Caracas, Venezuela, Is now here for ,, holiday. He arrived yesmorning by H.W.I.A from i where he had spent four days it rid is staying at the Ho. > Royal. • i:..ui mi Return riomc A r* ik.it spending about two %  ** I nd a haj months liulid.iv tlaying M t Hie Marine Hotel Un ElUM N Super of OfttT* %  rrtdau j, by T.( A. vho roturnod Friday after spending .1 iiolidajr staying at the Marine Ucnidtd Mr. and Mrs. CharleOumala of Montreal. Mrs. Ethell Scott. Mrs. Mary Warrlngton, Miss Mary Breakcy and Miss Eve Dorell. POrKPTCARTOON EXCUKC-M M'Oee*-s-*s .. Iher. Prim* MlNlHer hows* 1 .*" After A Month M l *.UHKI. w Palm H"VPg> %  *< upending a month holiday in Trinidad, slaying with her sonin-law and daughter, Dr. and Mis R. M. F. Char.es of Arima, returned home yeaterday by %  WI.A. Leaving Today L EAVING; to-day to. Benoud i by T.C.A. on their on 10 i .mad., rll New York are Mi and Mrs. r. O. Engholm of Toronto Tney had boon holidaylni. In ic tar the past monti too Ocosjn view Hotel. %  day that i.3 ami yi'lted England, New York and bafora i. mui| here. It w-s their llrst visit to Barbados and tney had I wondviful time. Th, y :,ad a car for their entire nd toured the Hi .na m adfllUon io itoppmc ai tl lag Q 'if L %  ) %  rrarj day for a k.iim%  holm .pro Idaot i I the Macotta Company of Canada Ud.. Manufacturers and Engineers and Vice-President of F. C. Rutsell Company of Canada Ud Manufacturers of Metal Windows. Their eldest son is Renr Comof the Royal Canadian Yacht Club in Toronto. BY THE WAY.... By Beachcomber First In 27 Year* M R. 4ELF1KLD AUSTIN, a -• " end by the MmrUm Hrli* Wolfe He said that he was very glad to be back and was looking forward .. .i rirst Visit DAYING their llrst visit to Bar* badoa and remaining for a short holiday ar Mr. and Mrs. J Sherman of Toronto, Canada. %  ho arrived here on Tuesday by Ii W I A. via Nassau, Jamaica and Trinidad. They are staying at ihe Ocean View Hotel. .cturninf Next Moi.th sJt.. ilUna MbCaUUuQatv re** i -o'i h> :ni, „i rarsjfgaa, UfUMB, woo was nere since tile DSSMuMt fr in* winter, is due u return home early nOKl monin by T.C.A. He i slaying at Stafford House. unung to Toronto next monin by T.C.A. after spending aoout two months' holiday are Mr. Haynea Challenor, %  retired Manager of one of the branches Ol IBS] Canadian Hank of Commerce in Toronto and his sister m-Iaw. Miss Frances Harman. They are staying at the Ocean View Hotel Mr Challenor who n, a brother Of Hon'blc Robert Challenor. left here 52 years ago for Canada where he worked at one of the Canadian Hanks In Toronto. He %  bsnusai visits to Barl>ad' since then, the last being last year about this time when he remained for two months. Canadian Medico |V< ANu MRS. ... .•icriiAll, %  a-' oi Sasaatoon, Saskatchewan, woo were spending the winter in u.iihados, left lor Bermuda by H A. 01 Friday m ining for a I uither siay before leturnmg home. They were Bjueatl of Paradise Beach Club. Mr. J. P. peacock. Export Man%  fJIC of Victory Mills Ltd. ol Toronto, left during the week by H.W.I.A." for Trinidad to continue hi* lour of tho Caribbean area. While here he wi. staying at the Marine Hotel. opent A Week /-"APT. H. SEAGKIM. G.n.ial What Guiding Means GUIDING TRAIN'S our RirU to be good citizens and it is : principle that Kood citizenship —the art of living together—u the aim of all education. The first foa'-ure in guide training is that it represents to e\erv _;irl a personal challenge in the promise of duty to (iod, the Queen and all others. The interest*, of guiding are ; Z — ,. ta1 .ide and varied and may mean Some parent! nything tron S kiirl try mg to enough kindle a fire on a wide open soace thei int.-. ,hiMi. a ve>> Aindy da 1*. iiiatina then ignorar— . ..." ^_II-. n kilt V do not take l in the guiding of %  his is due to the featun Apply ai once on insect stings Uuht lb Uiiiple technique, in Uon bul on~ • aiuaiojM ">' ||> rTT ^\ I I ,,.* fff jr;^^nd*SS!d'S D E T T O L •.o live uj> to the promises made. nd kindness. Smile And Sing The patrol *> %  most distitKtiM featunM i Oulda training. The patrol leader: elected and hav he quail Honour i* U be trustI I A guile Is loyal, useful, and 1 n, „.tro leader. • %  ^ •£ „ 0 aU Sh* is courteous. by the glrb themselves y 1|nlmaL obeys orders, .-.tunityu, learn V n !" ,^ n#> under all difflUadftsUn, tarK ttfSff and pure in ultles. thrifty, and pur. iS^ss^-^rtz =•• ^ •<"* M ops 1.000 words on n grain of rice. If the libianes can be persuaded to I f'H| and liteiatuie n u \ els in the form of rice pudding "ill enable the public to have Its <\ and ent It. BUt I can well imagine that %  inold-fashlonad librurle. uetant to banUi ndVi in UM form of nee puddln,-. They raw say thai it would be bad for (ha Mtioafl sight. I thousand copies eaten before publication." A hod. Miss PofllCs new novel is tolerable; as literature writes a greeds lh, fWtf / Chilmtifiui A ND is this the dam you arc building*Lettiea Tleknold in interest In the -.'ink or the ban i';i ii lYnopa rfrtnnad, i won'; technical dataUs,' 1 Isn't that MaJo r Trowslie asked, pointing. "No." In Captain Ciiulfleld." An uneasy silence fll %  ' \ mall one would lino use.'' he answerad "Why, tin, Aicher'" she cried. *' %  .< m "I MI: u all about his dam," she drawled. FVoope btl CSU of India." said a loud Tpfia %  on bis llttto ponj Wi work sad arno i sro rve hsd %  rs of .t. and I know ies tc-day than I did when I caihe .ut." LatUce, looklr it bis ta brown ii e suddenly hated him. As though aware* of It, he smiled I Mrs A chei Whal are %  Ley all UD 1*7" Paul Fi nope asked I'imM'If. CODSCIOOJ that some drama was being enacted of which i n il the key Thv *py*kmhgtoml apprtHirh' A Ann-: nan firm. I read, is hiring Stailiailll %  DJ h Ud Kill !><• Mich fun for children, that the math esses wi I gal] U> UM Ion, tvon ii ths i*-. %  %  ,, them to bits. It H what men call a "new rmfd I li'halr It, nilvl, u n/mit • ALWAYS do the little thing In r\. a big way," a school-master -fdpo tod gi gylal In i \m two, rMeh tdVlea may be good, but %  S sil than sense—as was ited II. the eassj of the i *i tensions, %  sun an an < %  with a iiiiiidoser T.CA. and Capt. R. M. SnnUi, Flight Operations Superintendent, T.C.A. returned to Canada on Friday by T.C.A. after spending a week's holiday staying at Cacrabank Hotel. They were accompanied by their wives. At Crane Hot;l M K AND MRS. F H, BARNARD of st. Uieu who arrived here on Wednesday by B.W.I.A. are staying at the Crane Hotel with Mr. Barnard's mother who has been here for several weeks. They expect to be here for about five days. IN NfW rOKK a i screen star haiuara a i Eddie Fisher, now a Pit. recently divorced from 1 at shopping. ihcalre*guing and steppins out. srsog t.kes time out to lunch arHl from a Virginia camp. Barbara was m sctm R"t>ert Taylor f|al*tiailoali Koarf greeted Mrs. Quack. i ho* B.B.C. Radio Programra; null' Srvi !" I!) pm From "Hnl ttnu-oniiua • *S |> in Maaarli. lm,pm fe-m|>Hni Plsae, s is P ... law v m Mnetiaiil Nav^ Piiiai.iinio a .II lUvc Rm,l Vo l %  ... Th *ll •!• 1 IV-IO -i p A oo. ia I .Ptusianun* VIM %  mu it *>H extM ii ii %  W sos i 'ssl, %  ss p si Starts aJfasra, p m Ct nea>r of th* Waok. S > p m ralih M.(fln'. 1 in „ n Onl Hm.ti%  nd Phyllis SellM-fc IPUIHMV |0 pm riks Ptaws, iMpn Pean. ihr r.ni i i ••. IB IB p m Th rvbat* (VIIIIUH IS %  %  •• pv.,". t 1 ', Thnrt i OH! SO DEAR P ARIS In The spring ... the chestnut* in the Hols de .... moonlight in the Oardens . will be just %  m this year for British Unless Ihev 00 only for on the {35 forelgn travel :,|lowane Prices have risen steeply in the last six months. I stayed at the hotel I visited a >enr ago. The same room with i from Flowered hats from one of the i coffee cheaper department stores, nulade were 30s. in IBM. Now thc\ gra 9s-. 6d. £3. favourite bfotro, wliere a I a -V a 5s. 'i.irgcd me 15s %  -ame fare. In the smallest restaurnnta It was difficult to gel a meal tinder 25s. i d my hotel manager i • • J "i/ nv.i. t(i.t.i. ;u lc 3U ( MS SWIM TRl.NKS Plain Satin Lastex Flowered Satin I. i, Sizes: Small, Medium. I %  n -. %  < %  ALSO MOKLEY'S NYI.ON HOSE 51 GAVGE 15 DENIER $2.0 & $2^8 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS Swimming Lesson for Ducks —Knarf Didn't Know They Had to Be Taught— • By MAX ntBLL -GOOD-MORNISt;. Mrs. Qusek." ssid Knarf. the Shn-W. "Good-momina;, Knarf," repli.d Mrs. Quack. "Good-morning. Knarf," joiriM In the five little ducks who were standing in a line right behind th. ir mothar. "Whrs are you gotng with all your children. Mrs Quack?" "I'm taking them do-vn to the pond to teach them how to iwirn," said Mrs. Quack. "Oh," said Knarf. "I didn't knost that little ducks had to be taug|t how to swim. I thought they alw^i knew." "Certainly not," said Mrs. Quad "Swimming is something that everyone has to learn. Come along.dsars," sha ssid to her little ducks. And ofl they waddled, one after ths other down to the pond. A few minutes Ister Knarf met Mrs. Clucky apd her five chirk. "Good • morning, Mrs. Clacky Good-morning. Chicks." "Good-morning, Knarf.' Mr.. Clucky and her chicks. "Where are you going with all your ehicka, Mrs. Clucky?" Ctrhing Bogs "I'm taking them out Into the meadow to teach them how to catch bugs." said Mrs. Clucky. "Th-v hsv* t learn how to eat by them selves." "Oh," said Knarf. "I ihoughl sll Chicks knew how to catch bugs and sat by themselves." "Not at all. Catching bugs gad eating by yourself are things that everyone has to learn. Come, dar lings, hurry along." And Mi. Clucky started walking to the meadow with her chicks running nil around Her Ilsrdly had they gone when Knarf met Mrs. Robert* Room with ihri* of her young robins. They were II Uaading rt, the -rss. undn the tree "pOOd morning. Mrs. Rohin." .aid Knarf. "Good morning. IrtUf robins." companies. There Is 1st Barbados whose Captain is Mrs. A. W. Scott and 4tn Barbados led by Mis. Joyce Bowen. Since the lint Captain leslfned from 1st Baibados Miss June CUrke, a patrol uong with the other leadvis, kept the company going, 't in* ..Ifo tied them the opportunity to > bserve the Guide Laws which tead: "A guide smiles JUI! sings under ah dlfnculuea." M.-s. Scott who saw ilia fci.vc need for leadership, offered tier faVVtoaa, As a guide it w.. to 'Mi book 1 aiul watch a patrol | struggling wit.lout a Captain. With the irainind of UM helped to maiiitJiu tin of good guiding. Thg standard reached then the greatOF will bo the siiUhfae/tiut, m ;.chic\eiiieot. Mrs. 80i working and playing with the girls and will continue until a M is trained.* Learn Morse Code The "Advocate" on %  Queen*Coll. a snU W ed by the willingness and team spirit adopted by the girls First Barbados Company wus onto lug the niudes from 4th Barbaalso some others from CUfton Hill Oltig* i- 23 Mir thl snd set iM MrOlL 24 In uaiw vou nse sn Mit i" rsMro um tuner oaot US" touw is* i No7 much— minolf Hi seen io MWdston 13. Blscs as coal v Blacker i i6 1* Uti'."> ( >mmian iSl tiger ess one. l* U (UiaS'sm ot 21 "*' %  V'"*' %  Urt.r IA Bar M "'•"! '••; %  ;,..j.;-v"h ,' 11 -Oosd-i %  •\\h ,VlobinT" irninc. Knarf. 1 Ihej : ra you doing. "I'm teaching my little to fly." "Whst!"exclsimed Knsrf. "Can't %  'nls fly without being taught?" Evvryoas Mast Learn "I should say not I Flying Is soms:hing that everyone most lean. Corns, babies, beat your winga up sn-our lrk aeht-s so yuu hate to straighten up-and !.! sharp twingta •ub yra at evrry Hidden move—yujr fi'-iyfmvr several causea that hfttftutn n,„n] TWl why Dr. Club's Kidney ft I ivrr l'ill brings such quick, i li.-f to many ..ao suffer uh >"k>.Jte1 hot this time-pruven rat'v (rrjts tsn CKnliti'.na at once— rootains spe.-i.il nSSIillsl ingrcdiin >' l-tli kidnrvsand liver. So if you frvl tind, headachy—aiih ats and aching Luk-i,.* ii>bnihI.ln.-% iu.,1 liver! Then look BO 0 K:l,u-v-Liv CT rMktl<* a tvha.ile prodad u<*d by CanaBaa* far over ball ,1 ceatarrTha JUI.: %  Ui.Cluisc'lisiXHUSMU.aoce. 7 PLAZA CINEMA! r.ltlIH;i.ItUN— IMal 23I0 TO-DAY (3 SHOWS) 2.30-4.45 & 8.30 P.M. ^ MIM Ml KAIIV A 4 I". A .r M. WAHWn IIROR ACTION-HACKED BAOA I PECK Nl% i HI \4II4SI With HAHRARA PAYTO SAT BpfrM %  m %.m. a I sa OUTLAW GOLD • BUCk BROWN & ARIZONA TERRITORY ON CHANTY "Ii IM HAT. ttaS ROSE OF SANTA ROSA IIOOSLEH HOT SHOTS a RIDIN THE OUTLAW TRAIL ITS STAH HKn Mt BARKIS (DOWNTOWN) —Dial 5170 TODAY 4.45 a 8.30 P.M. ft CONTINUING DAILY gtTSSSBl -•nUi-MtteiMl TBti 'TAP ROOTS" HIS KAHLOVr Jl'LiT LONDON 'vn MUAt vriihi i ARKANSAS SWING W tigsMi Hot aiK.1. & BONANZA TOWN %  %  iron ihe door And aingo. "bui


LL







ESTABLISHED 1895



Blow Dealt Against Racial’j,
Segregation In South Africa’

OPPOSITION ASKS DR. | WL Cricket

MALAN TO RESIGN

CAPETOWN, March 20.

DR. DANIEL MALAN declared in the House of
Assembly that he could not accept as constitutional the

Position created to-day by the Supreme Court judgment
which dealt a blow at his aparteed (racial segregation)
policy—the gornerstone of his government.

The South African Prime Minister made the announce-
ment shortly after he had been told that five judges of
the Appelate Division of the Supreme Court, South Africa’s
highest eourt, sitting at Bloemfontein, had ruled as invalid
a Government Act placing coloured voters (mixed race)
on a separate electoral roll.

Before speaking in the House of ——-——----_-
Assembly, Dr. Malan had called

the South African Cabinet to dis- |

cuss the position which brings to a om ete
head one of the most important

constitutional issues South Africa C il |
Crui

has ever faced.
Opposition leader Jackonus
From Our Own Correspondent)

Strauss demanded that the govern-
ment should resign on the Court's
ruling.
General Election ?
There _Was speculation that
Malan might call a snap general

election in a bid to bolster his ANTIGA, March 20.
hairline Parliamentary majority.| _ Amidst showers of rain Nel-|
There also was some talk that | *0"’S dockyard was a colourful}

scene to-day when hundreds of
friends of the Society of !nglish
Harbour crammed galleriés above
the ancient officers quarters which
was decorated with flags and
bunting on the occasion of the
celebration of the climax of the

Government might try to curb the
powers of Courts, making it im-
possible for them to overrule
Parliament,

The country’s nof-whites, ne-
grces, Asiatics and mulattoes, are
planning to defy race laws in a
national passive resistance move-|fitst Caribbean yacht cruise
ment beginning April 6. { While Governor Blackburne

The court rule today against so- | WaS making a welcoming address
called Separate Representation of |the yacht “Ternthree” glided into
Voters Act. which four coloured |the English Harbour followed by
voters had challenged. “Blue Goose”, half an hour later.

The law would have barred|Finally six yaehts anchored the
mulattoes in the Cape Province, |Search Vesta, Mollihawk, Maria
virtually the only non-whites in| Katharina, Ternthree, Bluegood,

the Union who have the
from voting directly in
mentary elections.

Instead they would have been
given power to elect only four

ballot, | Entertainments include a_ pro-
Parlia- | gramme by the Police Band, the

ceremonial lowering of the Union
Jack and a _ cocktail party at
which naval officers from H.M.S

white men to represent them in|Sparrow were among the guests,
Parliament.

Mrs. Blackburne presented the

prizes which were designed and

Constitutional Right given by Mr. Robertson Ward of

Mill Reef Club, Prizes consisted
of old cannon balls, naval buttons,
buckles, signal cannon all mount-
ed on lignum vitae from the gun
carriage at Fort Harman.
qveping. Clarence House and
dockyard were transformed to an
illuminated picture while a steel
band Brute Force added to the
gaiety.

The mulattoes, many of them
descended from Cape slaves to
whom the Province’s 19th century
rulers felt they owed a debt, wer
given voting rights equal wit
whites after they were freed,

Those rights were entrenched
in the South Africa Act, the coun-
try’s Constitution, Government op-
ponents claimed, and the Appeal
Court backed them that the Con-
stitution could be changed only
by a two-thirds majority of both
Houses of Parliament sitting to-
gether.—U.P. & C.P.



Licences

Cancelled

5 eee, Be 20.
: “ rime Minister Rober énzies
Challenge Budget } announced to-day that the Aus-
tralian Government had decided
LONDON, March 20. !|to recall all import licences for
Clement Attlee’s Socialists will! goods of dollar origin and for all
challenge the new British Budget other goods which had been sub-
in a series of votes but the| ject to import licensing.
Churchill government was expect-| The Prime Minister said the only
ed to survive easily with its mar- | exception would be licences issued
gin in the Commons. | for the main types of leum
The votes will come late in the | products and for goods being im-
day on a number of Budget reso- | ported under the 100 million dol-
lutions providing for increasing | lar loan granted by the Interna-
the gasoline tax and entertain- | tional Bank. m
ment duties and changes in the! Customs Minister Néil O’Sullivan
purchase tax. However the real| announced later that all recalled
debate and crucial votes on cuts| licences would be invalid unless
in food subsidies and other dis- jconfirmed after review.
puted Budget points will not come! The effect of the announcement
until the Budget the |is that all ticenees issued before
Finance Bill stage. | Mareh 8 for imports from the dol-
—U.P.|lar area, Japan and the Soviet
| Union will be reviewed and per-
| haps reduced or even cancelled.

Dr. Hutson Is Director | —UP.
Of Agriculture, T’dad

It has just been announced that
Dr. LR. Hutson. Chief Veter- | The motor lorry G—224, be-
inary ‘Officer of the Leeward) longing to’ Fairview Plantation,
Islands has been appointed Dep-| St. George. was found ditched in
uty Director of Agriculture (an-| a field on Lears Road after strik-
imal Husbandry) ‘in Trinidad ing a guard wall during the early
Dr. Hutson who is the son Of| hours of yesterday morning.
Mr. & Mrs. John F.’ Hutson of} Damage was slight, and after’
Belleville was formerly. Veterin-\the lorry hadbeen reversed out
ary Officer of the Pine Livestock! ¢¢ the field and the necessary re-

a eue 5B ths a tlad| pairs carried out, it was put back





Socialists Will |

reaches



| DITCHED

4 into use.
7 sanees ee tH. VI It is reported that the lorry
M Beulaes aria afer i nicl was stolen from Fairview Plan-
remains in the department “to| tation yard sometime during
deal with livestock and food| Wednesday night, amd it was
problems. found ditched early yesterday

morning



Tour Was Not
A Success

SYDNEY.
The West Indian ericket tour of

Australia, which ended recently,

was not a real success, consider

cricket commentetors in Sydney.

Summing up their impressions of

the tour, they say that two factors

prevented its suecéss:

1. The failure of the Australian
s@leetors to look for new
blood during the tour stirred
up a great deal of bitterness.

2. The poor record of ‘the tour-
ists themselves left Austra-
lian cricket fans disappoint-

ed.
The West Indians arrived in| that the cost of living had risen

Australia co’
the crushin,
flicted in
great hopes of some fine cricket
during the tour. But, instead, the
Test series turned out to be one
of the worst in history.

Sonny Ramadhin, the young
spin bowler who was the main-|
spring of the West Indian team
in England, was .less successful
on the hard Australian pitches,
developeg to suit the Australian
fast bowlers, There were some
woeful batting performances by

|the tourists, too.

But it was the attitude of the
Australian players to the game
which irritated not only the West
Indians but also Australian spec-
tators. Observers believe that this
may have created an atmosphere
that damaged cricket’s sporting
reputation.

Before the war, Test matches
were sporting events that were
played as such. But since the
war, a new type of cricket has

|grown up in Australia. It is play-

ed just as hard as ever, but there

is a certain grim concentration
about it that the .crowds do not
like.

Crowds Dwindled

There are some observers who
believe that if this is allowed to
continue, it will ruin cricket as a
game, It had its effect during the

In the) jast season. With a drop in the
the| standard of cricket,

the crowds
dwindled.

This withdrawal of public sup-
port meant financial losses. The
West Indians lost about £6,000 on
their tour. This deficit had had
to be made up by the State
cricket associations, which were
already showing large deficits.

English crities have described
the new style of Australian
cricket as “vicious.” This “vicious-
ness” was shown in the bumper
attacks on the West Indian bats-

;men by Australia’s great. pair of
| bowlers, Ray Lindwall and Keith
| Miller.

Australian spectators wefe bit-
terly disappointed with the West
Indians, however, when they saw
such brilliant batsmen as Worrell,
Weekes, Christiani and Stollmeyer
losing their wickets at critical
stages in the game, Spectators
wanted to see players who could
fight back against the Australian
game.

The failure of the Australian
selectors to infuse young talent
into the teams in the season just
ended, observers believe, may re-
sult in a weakened Australian
team in the next tour of England.
It will be practically the same
team that has played in England
ever since the end of the war.

England has developed younger
players who are now _ proving
their worth. Australia, it is fear-
ed, could easily lose the Ashes it
has held since 1938. If England
wins the Ashes, experts believe
it will probably keep them for
many years. —B.U.P.

A UNIVERSITY
NEWS LETTER

Mr. P. M. Sherlock, Vice Prin-
cipal of the University College of
the West Indies and Director of
Extra-Mural Studies, will broad-
cast on the local Extra-Mural



Programme this evening at 845
o'clock. The subject of the broad-
cast will be “A University news-
letter.”



vered in the glory of;
defeats they had in-| months.
There were

‘VESTRY
APPROVE
C.0.L. BONUS

All whole time parochial em-
ployees and pensioners of the
parish of Christ Church will
receive a cost of living bonus at
the rates adopted by Government,
This was the unanimous decision
of the members Of the Christ
Chureh Vestry on a motion made
by Mr. F. C. Goddard and sec-
onded by Mr. C, B. Brandford at
their meeting yesterday.

The rates are: 20% on the first
£100, 742% on the second £100
and 5% on the third £100.

Mr. Goddard pointed out that
this would cost the parish about
$7,500 when they came to lay the
Estimates.

In making his motion he said

the last few
Late last year it was
mooted that something should be
done for parochial employees and
he promised them that the Vestry
would consider them when deal-
ing with the Estimates for this
year.

At the last meeting of the Ves-
try he made the motion to in-
crease the eost of Iiving nt goa

very rapidly in



all parochial employees and
sioners on the same level as ~
ernment,

Follow Government Lead
In St. Michael the try had
already given cost of living bonus,
to their employees gng they
Christ Church show low
Government as clo as possi-~

ble 4
He feit that any depatture
that would entail people
back to the Vestry and asking
assistance. That had happened
other Vestries and he did
want that to occur with
Vestry.
He said that something she
be done For Wiede Craploreee. we
had the figures before him whidh
showed that this cost of living
bonus would cost the pitish ap-
roximately $7,500. is amount
ould be included in the Esti-
mates if the Vestry adopted his

motion.
Merited

The people Were deservin
tila money aiid’ thky as a
cou

as hee Bt ay AY and not do
Re,

fle seid that they wont Rep be’
happy in their job nor did he
think the parishioners would want
them to ignore those employees.
There were a few part time
employees who were also entitled

@ On page 8










Industrial Bodies

(From Our Gwn Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca.. March 20.
The Jamaican Government an-
nounced to-day the establishment
of ah Agricultural Development
Corporation and an Industrial De-
velopment Corporation, The Agri-
cultural Development body is
headed by Hon, G, G, R. Sharp,
internationally known Jamaican
Agricultural industrialist who is
one of the leading members of
the Cameroon Development Cor-
poration in Africa, a tor of
B.W.1.A. as well as Chairman of
the Citrus Company in British
Honduras,

The Industrial is headed by Mr, |SPeed, cargo working and carry-
Ashenheim, solicitor and company,

director who is the principal local
director of the Caribbean Cement

Company which recently estab-| Purposes of loading and discharg

lished a £1,000,000 factory in Ja-
maica,

The corporations aré charged
with the duties of seeuring the
expansion of the industrial and
agricultural development of the
island,

Planter Returns To
Dom’ca With Geese

Mr, Daniel Green, Planter of
Dominica. left the island for home
by the motor vessel “Caribbec”
yesterday after spending two
weeks here, Mr. Green was heré
to visit his mother who is a pa-
tient at the General Hospital.

He is taking back with him 12
geese because he has suddenly
got interested in live-stock farm-
ing. When he gets back to
Dominica, he is going to start a
live stock farm.

But this mew venture will not
cause Mr- Green to give up plant-
ing. He is part owner of Kingfield
Fstate which grows limes and
sugar cane for making rum,

Mr. Green is a much travelled
man. When tem years old, he
went to Switzerland where he at-



tended a French School until he
was 15. He travelled through
Evrope and North Africa before

returning to his homme in Dominica
to take up planting

When he returnech to Dominica,
he could speak German, Dutch and
French fluently but Nttle English
He learnt English Dominica
since he returned.

N.A.T.O.

GENOA, Mirch 20.

U.S, Admir#l Robert Fi Carney.
Commander-iti-Chief of Allied
Forces on Southern Europe speak-
ing before the “Propeller Club” of
Genoa at the conclusion of four
day manoeuvres of NATO land
and air forces along the Yugoslav
border. said no major conflict in




ports, which before the
a three
































f

“



Turn Round

LIVERPOOL.

It is taking six weeks or more
to turn rowhd ships in a humber
of West Indian and Caribbean
ar took
o more than weeks, com-

ins the Liverpool Steam Ship
Owners’ Association, its An-
ual report,
“The root causes of these de-
aay are stated to be in part lack
of fa comparison with
jent to cope with
de, and in part lie in
labour practices de-

pre
increased
restrictive













6 Weeks To |






































=F ARCHER, Notre Dame's right helf back (second from left) in an
effort to frustrate the Empire cent’e forward Robinson -extreme

GRENADA CAN'T yee knocks the ball into his own bars. Empire won the moteh
MAINTAIN
WELFARE DEPT.



Social Weliare In b.G.
Progresses Steadily

PELHAM BAYLIY, Assistant Social Welfare
British Guiana, who is now attending the Wel-
fare Talks at Hastings Hou told the Advocate that on
the whole, social welfare work in his country is showing
progress. Progress is however not as fast as Many social
workers, both official and voluntary, would like it to be,
but the democratic idea seems to demand a slow but sure
development rather than spec Lanheie® results

—- - — -- e saic at oOcla

British Guiana is attached to the

Move Ta Extend © si government department and
tk

» their work of rural betterment,



I think there is need for a fully
equipped welfare department in
Grenada, but the finances of the
colony cannot maintain the set

MR
Officer of

welfare in



to the department in the best
possible way and the existin;
clubs and organisations who need

help by way of advice are given

7 thes >c se Y ouc i th
rived apparently, from ack of ap- consideration Scavenging © 95° Ssrsiletloners” and the
an vier yng of the nature Ge the She said that their set-up i taffs of the District Commissions
situation,” says the report, Gatried oh on a skeleton Seale. In Bepartment ie

Port congestion has plagued] 1949 it was decided to abandor The two sides of the separ
shipowners operatin to many;the welfare department becau: The Sanitary Commissioners of th Baresars I RS ling
parts of the world since the war, | of the lack of funds, Most of the } 31, Michael are hoping to take in) | engtsen each wate. eS
‘notably to South America and | activities : 5 t development has been maint;

Australian ports. But this latest

urvey. indicates that, British
ports themselves are far from
blameless in this respect.

it the. a cargo

pr! en-
gaged in trade between the Uni-
ted Kingdom and the West In-
dies and the Caribbean. Sericus
delays were suffered in the United
Kingdom by inability to get a
harging berth through con-
gestion on the quays.

“This has happened in Liver-
pool, London, Avonmouth and
Glasgow,” says the report, “In

Liverpool, in particular, it
mot unusual for a ship with in-
ward cargoes to be held up for
four to seven days and as a re-
sult, to take twice as long as it
should have done over discharge,
with consequent interference with
the outward sailing programme.”

Commenting on the continua-
tion of port congestion in general
the Association says: “It is
lamentable that carrying power
should continue to be the subject
of so much wastage by delays in
port,

Advantuge Lost

“ft is the fact that the advan-
jtages of the improvements jn

ing capacity at sea offéred by
these fleets are béing lost by time

lunnecéssarily spent in port fo
ing, both in this cduntry ano
abroad.

| “Wastage of carrying power is
cumulative in its evil effect. In
reducing the number of voyage
|which would otherwise be per
formed, it meéfns that less carg¢
ig carried in and out of the coun-
try. It thus hampers the export
drive, both by reducing the
auantity of exports which ough!
to be carried over a given period
anid by délaying production of
woods for éxport by reducing the
quantity of raw materjals whiet
ought to be capable of importa-
tion over a given period.

“Sueh waste is seriously im-
pairing all the efforts of British
shipowners to make the best use
ef their ships and to give the
best and most economical ser-
vice to their customers.

“It is an undoubted fact that
if the turn-round of ships in the
ports of the world were fully
restored tompre-war perform-
ance, the economic reeults would
be of great value, The shortage
of tonnage which now exists ir
consequence of wasteful usc
would disappear: the cost of
transport would be lowered, and
Qn effect of cumulative benefit
would be substituted for one of
cumulative prejudice.”

Lines trading with the
| Indlee which are members
Association ineclide the
| Line Ltd., Constantine Line
{Lted. (agents in Britsin for Sag-
jnenay Terminals), Thos. and Ja
| Harrison, Ltd... and Watts
1Co., Ltd.—B.U.P.



Wes!
of the
Booker

and



Macst Hold Mediterranean

Europe could be won by NATO

forces if Allied shipping were
jdriven from the Mediterranean.
|Carney speaking on the import-

ance of Allied control in that sea
|€aid no cause may be considered
Hlost as long as the Allies control
tthe Mediterranean

j —U.P

was!





were transferred — ti
other departments and the wel
fare department as such was kep
with a small staff through whon
such Committees as the Dis
charged Prisoners Committee, th:
Mental “Hospital Visiting Com
mittee and various
mittees functioned

pproximately 7,000 square feet of
and on which the Church Villag

tirls’ School stands, for the pur-
ove of extending the Scavenging
Yepartment and for any othe

urpose which the Commissioners
nay neeck

n the direction of community
entres, the formation of group
ictivities of all sorts and the
evelopment of cottage industries,

| Bince the appointment of a so-
jal welfare staff in Government,

+heasepeen other develops
ments of social work besides that
yf rural betterment; for instance;
beea

|
|
vices at the moment. Miss Pansy
Rowley, the colony’s Social Wel-
fare Officer told the Advocate
yesterday-
She said that in the meantime
they are carrying out-in a smal)
way such duties as are allocated

other com
Mr. E

t a meeting of the Board yester

D. Mottley made a motion







They also ran a weekly News ‘ he probation service has
Letter until the end of 1951 ana|°®% Moved that they take steps) ocraplished and is working sat?
at the moment the broadcasting to'see it they could acquire th sfactorily. It was recently ex?
experiments are carried — on id. He was seconded by the! cided and a Committee whicl
through the welfare department, | 1°" V. C. Gale made its report a short time ago,

avals tley is » re t rec ‘ndéd further expan*

Miss Rowley is the Grenad This wae after the Chairman, has recommend
delegate attending the Social], . sion.

Welfare Talks at Hi Mr, J. M, Kidney told the Board He gaid that the Social Assists
{ i alks a astings House} nat the Scavenging Department e Sal a a eget
jance Department handled 1
rather inadequate in space|" . 5 Assist-
: }Age Pensions and Public Assis
nad it would be the opportune |‘ * ys has been
Ann | G 2 | ‘ime for them to acquire the piece | #ee The Depatin r. a ' ;
: 5 { . | reorganise qd staff training ha
ua yvUuIC e f land which was adjoining ne een mnised 8 -" the Secre-
Ses : rtmetr t been earried ou y P :
M ti \' — opine Department and ope ny’ sy of the Board, an officer who
ee ing e c | has been given training at the
, Mr. Mottley explained the pre-| London School of Economics “

At the annual meeting of thej#£"t congestion in the Scavenging) Mr Bayley said pes see
Loal Guide Association held yes-|Pepartment and thought it a good}one of the Soe 1 Welfare ted
terday evening at Pax Hill, many} /e@ for the land to be acquired|has been awarded a UNES ;
lay members of the association; 5° that that department could be} scholarship which he believer oe
were present. In addition to the] ©xtended The soard agreed | be the first of its ki a ate
business pertaining directly to} unanimously on the motion Jawarded in the West Indies.
he meeting, an International




Ceremony was performed by the
guides of the St. Michael’s Girls’
School illustrating the guides in
the various countries of the world

BABY KNOWS HIS

In opening the meeting, the
hairman, Mrs. O'Mahony, said ; AV ; q ’
hat she had received a letter At oe

rom Lady Savagé expressing het
egret at not being able to attend
wing to court mourning for His
ate Majesty King George VI.|
fowever, she assured her of her|
sréat interest in the association
ind of her willingness to help in
iny Way in its activitie

Congratulations

Mrs. O'Mahony also weleomed
Lady Seel, wife of the Comp-
roller- of Colonial

ind Welfare, and other new mem-
ers Of the Association and took
he opportunity of extending her
ongratulations to tihe Island
‘ommissioner on the high award
f the “Silver Fish” which had
een conferred on her during the

Development

vast year by Imperial Headquar
‘ers

After the minutes of tht last
neeting and the treasurer's report
vere read, the Island Corrimis-
sioner then read her report com-
prising the period July 1951 t
March 1952. She said that with

$78 warranted and enrolled merr

ers, 43 unwarranted guiders and

237 recruits, the active side of the
sociation was now stronger that



it has ever been. Neverthele:
this increase has been very slov
onsidering the masses in Barba-
fos. She pointed out that what
has b@eh a Bréat handicap was ’ ee
leaders, and though LIKE SO MANY BABIES OF TO-DAY . HE'S

they pave}
had many fequests to start com-
inies, the first step is to find at

ENJOYING —



‘east two suitable women befor
children can be trained
Thé attention of the meeting]
was then turned to general busi- Ps
ness and variows hemes were
liscusséd of ruising futids to clear ’ asi iveste
the expenses, The building of a} @® it's easily Digested
Areeshundred ft. wall had intur-| ® ii adds Vitamin and Iron
ed great debt to the association, | ~ ® It’s a Complete Food
ind it was hoped that the Anthual!
Guide Pair on May 10tt juld >. > con . ss sie StioOom es
ie well wiisortea and go fal a \CTOGEN ONE OF THE FAMOUS NESTLES
‘léaring this debt. It ‘ o| wr new a aaabiaketie tan eee a
cntad chil shat % was nebedbars PRODUCT IS ON SALE EVERYWHERE
to raise a reserve building fund F
specially in the case of ooden _ =: ‘ f _ _"
Sidin nay i. GEDDES GRANT LTD.
The meeting ended after the
Fair had been discussed at lengtl — Agents
and members had. give |
ance of their willingne t|
in the preparation \ i


PAGE TYO



Caub Calling —

R. ROBERT S. HALE, US

Consul-General in Trinidad,
due to arrive here this after-
noon. by B.W.1.A, from Antigua

is

For Schooner Talks

ME: - L. WIGLEY, Managing
Director of De Lisle Wal-
wyn ~and Co. Ltd. Comm

sion Merchants of St. Kitts is now
in Barbados to attend the Annual
Conference of the Schooner Own-
ers’ Association which takes place
on Saturday at the office of the
Association.

He arrived on Wednesday night
by B.W.LA. and is staying at the
Hotel Royal,

Mr, Wigley expects to leave on
Sunday afternoon by B.W.I.A. for
Puerto’ Rico on his way to New
York and England on busines
coupled with pleasure. He will
probably return to the West
Indies sin about three mouths’
time.

Back to St. Vincent
ISS G. M. RICHARDS and
her sister Miss F. M. Rich-
arus of Kingstown, St. Vincent,
returned home yesterday after-
noon by B.G. Airways after
‘pending two weeks’ holiday stay-
ing at the Hotel Royal.
They are cousins of

Mr. Jus-

tice Richards, retired Puisne
Judge of the Windward Islands
and Rev, W. M. Richards, a form-

er Dean of St. Michael’s Cathedral ,
who is at present in Venezuela

On Holiday

R. H. HOROWITZ, proprietor

of Joyeria Mercury a jewel-
lery establishment in Caracas,
Venezuela, is now here. for a
week’s holiday. He arrived yes-
terday “morning by B.W.I.A. from
Trinidad where he had spent four
days and is staying at the Hoia}
Royal.

Canadians Return Home

FLER spending about two

ind a hasf months’ holiday
btaying at the Marine H _ Mrs.
Elbe:t N. Soper of OttaWa, Can-
ada, returned home on “Priday
morning by T.C.A,

Other Canadians who returned
home gn Friday after spending a
holiday staying at the Marine
included Mr. and Mrs. Charle«
Dumais. of Montreal, Mrs. Ethell
Scott, Mrs. Mary Warrington, Miss

Mary Breakey and Miss Eve
Doreli.








POCKET CARTCON

Ir OSBERE LANCASTER

ie | Be



* Excusez-moi, M’sieurs et
M’dames—but is there a

Prime ees, im the

After A Month

RS. c. E. CLARKE of Palm
Beach, Hastings, who wa‘
spending a month’s holiday in

Trinidad, staying with her son-
in-law and daughter, Dr. and Mrs.
R. M. F. Charies of Arima, re-
turned home_ yesterday by
B.W.LA, fe
Leaving Today
| By adh to-day for Bermuda
by T.C.A. on their way back
to Canada via New York are Mi
and Mrs, F. G. Engholm of Toron-
to. They had been holidaying
here for the past month staying
at the Ocean View Hotel.

They told C.urib yesterday that
they ieft home on January 3 and
visited England, New York and
Bermuda before coming here, It
was their first visit to Barbados
and they had a wonderful time.

They had a car for their entire

holiday and toured the island in
addition to stopping at the Rock-
ley Golf Links every day for a
game,

Mr, Engholm is President of
the Macotta Company of Canada
Ltd., Manufacturers and Engin-
eers and Vice-President of F. C

Russell Company of Canada Ltd.,

Manufacturers of Metal Windows.
Their eldest son is Rear Com-

modore of the Royal Canadian
Yacht Club in _in Toronto.

BY THE WAY....

By Beachcomber

I HOPE publishers have read
- about the man who can write
1,000 words on a grain of rice. If
the libraries can be persuaded to
combine food and literature, novy-
els in the form of rice pudding
will enable the public to have its
cake, a8 it were, and eat it,

But I can well imagine that
some of the old-fashioned libraries
will be reluctant té han@le novels
in the form of rice pudding, They

ean always say that it would be
bad for the nation’s sight.
. :

“Forty thousand copies eatén
before publication.”

“As food, Miss Poffie’s new
novel is tolerable; as literature
negligible,” writes a greedy
reviewer,

The Pearl of Chitmagar
ND is this the dam you are
building?” Lettice Ticknold

tried te show an interest in the
work of the handsome engineer.
Paul Froope grinned, “I won't
bore you with technical details,”
he said. “Isn't that Major Trow-
bridge?” she asked, pointing.
“No,” he replied, “it’s Captain

Cc aulfield.” An uneasy silence fell
“Is it a big dam?” she asked
presently. “A small one would be
no use,’ he answered, “Why,
there’s Mrs, Archer!” she cried.
Helen Archer came nonchalantly
towards them, “I suppose he’s
telling you all about his dam,”
she drawled, Froope bit his lip.

Lettice frowned.
cal of India,” said a loud voice,
as George Rampound approached
on his little pony. “We work and
work, and who cares? I've had
thirty years of it, and I know less
te-day than I did

“It’s all so typi-

when I came
out.” Lettice, looking at his lean
brown face, suddenly hated him.

As though aware' of it, he smiled
bitterly at Mrs. Archer. “What are
they all uv to?” Paul Froope asked
himself, conscious that some
drama was being enacted of which
he had not the key.

The ‘psychological

approach’
A’ enterprising American firm,

read, is hiring elephants
to demonstrate the strength and
flexibility of its mattresses, This

will cause so much excitement,
and will be such fun for children,
that the mattresses wi'l sell by
the ton, even if the beasts break
them to bits, It is what. business
men call a “new angle.”

A whale to catch a sprat
LWAYS do the little thing in
a big way,” a school-master
is r@ported as ying in a lecture,
Stich advice may be good, but
may give the wrong idea to those
with more zeal than sense—as was
demonstrated in the case of the
man who, full of good intentions,
tried to shift an egg out of a
drain-pipe witha a bulldozer.

»



First In 27 Years
R. BELFIELD AUSTIN, a}

Barbadian from Pie Corner, |
St. Lucy, who has been residing
in Ge orgetown, British Guiana for
the past 27 years is now back for
three weeks’ holiday which he is
spending with his relatives in St.
Lueyy

He arrived over the last week-
end by the Marion Belie Wolfe.
He said that he was very glad to
be back and was looking forward
to an enjoyable stay.

virst Visit
AYING their first visit to Bar-
bados and remaining for a
short holiday are Mr. and Mrs. J
Sherman of Toronto, Canada,
who arrived here on Tuesday by
B.W.1.A. via Nassau, Jamaica and

Trinidad. They are Staying at
the Ocean View Hotel,

..efurning Next Month

R* JUmiw MUCKHIUGE, re-

titeu Ciergyiiian of ‘1 oronto,
Canada, wno was here since the
tmuddie of December fur the win-
ter, is due to return home early
next month by T.C.A. He is
Staying at Stafford House.

Also returning to Toronto next
month by T.C.A, after spending
about two months’ holiday are
Mr, Haynes Challenor, a retired
Manager of one of the branches
of the Canadian Bank of Com-
merce in Toronto and his sister-
in-law, Miss Frances - Harman.
They are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Mr. Challenor who is a brother
of Hon'ble Robert Challenor, left
here 52 years ago for Canada
where he worked at one of the
Canadian Banks in Toropto. He
has paid frequent visits to Bar-
bados since then, the last being
last year about this time when he
remained for two months,

Canadian Medico

D* AND MRS. \/. MicPHAIL
of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan,
who were spending the winter in

barbados, left tor Bermuda by
T.C.A, ou Friday mvrning for a
further stay before returning

home, They were guests of Parq-
dise Beach Club.

Mr. J. F. Peacock, Export Man-
ager of Victory Millis Ltd., of
Toronto, left during the week by

B.W.LA,* for Trinidad to continue | “Swimming is something that every-

his tour of the Caribbean area.
While here he was staying at the
Marine Hotel.

opent A Week

APT. H. SEAGRIM,
Manager of Uperations,
T.C.A. and Capt. R. M. Smith,
Flight Operations Superintendent,

Geueral

T.C.A. returned to Canada on Fri- , Mrs. Clueky and her chicks.

day by T.C.A, after spending aj}
week's holiday staying at Cacra-

bank Hotel. They were accom- |
panied by their wives,

|

At Crane Hotel

R AND MRS, F. H. BAR-

NARD of St. Lucia who ar-
rived here on Wednesday by}
B.W.1.A. are staying at the Crane
Hotel with Mr. Barnard’s mother
who has been here for several
weeks. They expect to be here
for about five days,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

FRIDAY, ?18ST MARCH, 19%
11.15 a.m. New Records, 12.00 noon
The News, 12.10 p.m. News Analvsis
100—7.15 pom . 19 76M 25.53M 31.22M





400 pm
Datly Service, 4.15
Third Trogramme,
Magazine, 5.00, p.m. Semprini at the
Piano, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6.09
pm. Merehant Navy Programme, 6.15
pm Have A Go, 6.45 p.m Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
p.m The News, 7.10 p.m News
Analysis
71510 3 pom

The News, 4.10 p.m
pom From

445 p.m Music

The
The

. 2 68M 81.92M 49.4eM





FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952
BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PPIVATE—**!N Ftp cr ace



IT’

What Guiding Means

al
GUIDING TRAINS our girls to be good citizens an
it is a generally accepted principle that good citizenship

Apply

nce
—the art of living together—is the aim of all a. at O
The first feature in guide training is that it represents = :
every girl a personal challenge in the promise of duty on insect

God, the Queen and all others. |

The interests of guiding are saat
wide and varied and may mean “Some parents = a pe
anything from a_ girl trying to enough a See e ae Si
kindle a fire on a wide open space their children os oon oe
oS 5, ee ee pons Me ge ye wiseleey organi-
See es eee ames dee Sion but once a child joins the

taught the simple techniques in a on ate Saal
i ioti i great movement she 5
ma si patron, Ae that she “belongs” and should try

7 “ion And Sing to live up to the promises made.

The patrol system is one of the
most distinctive features in Guide
training. The patrol leaders are
elected by the girls themselves
and have an opportunity to learn
the qualities of leade:ship, loy-
alty, responsibility, and discipline.
Queen’s College has two guide
companies, There is lst Barbados}
whose Captain is Mrs. A. W.
Scott and 4tn Barbados led by |
Miss Joyce Bowen, Since the first |
Captain resigned from lst Bai-
bados Miss June Clarke, a patrol
leader, along with the other lead-
ers, kept the company going. This
affo.ded them the oppurtunity to
cbserve the Guide Laws which
i1ead: “A guide smiles and sings
under ali difficulties.”





stings

‘DETTOL’

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

Non-poisonous. Pleasant smell.

A Guide’s Honour is to be trust- | Doesn't Pain. Doesn't Stain.

and |
ed, A guide is loyal, useful,

is a friend to all. She is courteous,
friendly to animals, obeys aa
smiles and sings under all diffi-
culties, thrifty,“ and pure in|
thought, word, and deed,



PLAZA

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
Walter WANGER



CROSSWORD

presents

TAP
ROOTS

Mrs. Scott who saw ibe grave
need for leadership, offered ‘her
services. As a guide it Was diilicult |
to “sit back” and watch a patrol |
struggling without a Captain. |




























IN NEW YORK for a round of shopping, theatre-going and —" out, of . aes of a a
screen star Barbara Stanwyck takes time out to lunch with singer helped to maintain the is andé Across (as Color b:
Eddie Fisher, now a PFC on leave from a Virginia camp. Barbara was of good guiding. The ee an L. Eney even make heels pan iy
recently divorced from film actor Robert Taylor. (International) standard reached then the greé se Should cause a mix-up. (4) TECHNICOLOR!
er will be the satisfaction in AO in this you noteh 14) ates
immi achievement. Mrs, Scott enjoys| j9 This torch is for the bir dinitiaa
Swi Ing Lesson for Duc S working and playing with the| 5 Peruse era fern (8)
girls and will continue until a} 3% & 8 inure insurance. (4) Van Susan
—Knarf Didn't Know They Had to Be Taught— ® Captain is trained.¢ 32. Wink equivalent tne bira. (3) | EFLIN HAYWARD
By MAX TRELL | (23 Mar this and a. he ‘artist. (7)
” Learn Morse Code _ | 24 In pa
iid Raeets the Bhar Quack, The “Advocate” on a visit to ee like this. (y? —
sal na e adow en ». ras very impress- Meet a tuner or t
' ueen’s Collere was very im} is 1 inely. (4)
“Good-morning, Knarf,” replied a by the willingness and team | z. Sompany,. (4) enor. Boris KABTASY
Mrs. Quack. : spirit adopted by the girls. First | 4° Seen in Maidstone (8) Julie LONDON — Ward BOND
“Good-morning,” Knarf,” joined Barbados Company was entertain- Fr Bee eet perhaps (1) ‘
in the five little ducks who were | ing the guides from 4th Barba- 8. Extremely eager. Seg 18) — Richard LONG
standing in a line right behind the i dos and also some others from 9. It's fashion 12 Or aeer 1 (5) ;
“iar Clifton Hill Girls’ led by Miss | 4% RIN formation. (5) | Introducing
“Where are you going with all Alleyne, These visiting girls | 4§° ana in father It's , -
your children, Mrs. Quack?” | are received a test in First Aid| 17 Acoording oe 8) et er WHITFIELD CONNOR
“I’m taking them down to the| from Mrs, Taylor. Mrs. Smith, 19 Aeaatsin of 21. (4) | Fr the Thrilling pages
pond to teach them how to avi, ! an old Queen’s conn ees Solution of Saturday's puzzle across: (From e g ges
said Mrs. Quack, was also instructing the girls i Sea eetcale: 1s. Bar; 14, Tyrant: ST
“Oh,” said Knarf, “I didn’t ‘ule Morse code, The afternoon ended | $0" Woigatary. "a8 Aver fo," wwap: 25, of JAMES Ror MO!
that little ducks had to be taught on a note of a general Pyers ne a eecenast : ft EXCITING NOVEL!)
how to swim. I ught they alw: gether of group singing. Prayers | Felar: 6 Storeys; 8. al
knew.” vitebeeee: ners were read and the girls were dis- irae wa A Universal-International
“Certainly not,” said Mrs. Quack. missed. Rel ;
Knarf greeted Mrs. Quack, eee
one has to learn, Come along, dears,” * one OPENING TO-DAY FRIDAY 21ST
she said to her little ducks. And off . a ———
they waddled a after the. other,| “I’m teaching my little ones how

4.45 & 8.30 p.m. &

to fly.” Continuing Daily

“What!” exclaimed Knarf. “Can’t
| birds fly without being taught?”

down to the pond.
A few minutes later Knarf met
Mrs. Clucky apd her five chicks.

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

| your chicks, Mrs, Clucky?”

“Good - seeding, Mrs. Clucky.
Cees Chicks.”
Govud-morning, Knarf,” answered

“Where are you going, with all

Catching Bugs

“I’m taking them out into the |
meadow to teach them how to catch
bugs,” said Mrs. Clucky. “They
have to learn how to eat by them-
selves,”

“Oh,” said Knarf, “1 thought all
chicks knew how to catch bugs and
eat by themselves.”

“Not at all, Catching bugs and

eating by yourself are things that
everyone has to learn. Come, dar-

Everyone Must Learn

“I should say not! Flying is some-
thing that everyone must learn,
Come, babies, beat your wings up
jand down. Ah, there we are! Very
pect Off the ‘ground we gol” ‘And
away went Mrs. Robin with her
three little ones flapping and flut-
tering through the air behind her.

Knarf shook his head. “Little
ducks have to learn how to swim,
| Little ehicks have to learn how to
leat. Little birds have to learn how
to fly,” he said to himself. “And I
always thought those were things
they dic by themselves, just like
walking. No one has to learn how
to walk, of course. Everyone can

Also The Short
TEX BENEKE & GLENN
MILLER’S ORCHESTRA

(Next Door to Singers)









DRESSES.—Just arrived—a lovely selection of
Cotton and Cocktail Dresses

STRAPLESS BRAS, 32 to 38 from $3.96
BATHING SUITS—A large selection of styles,





Sat. 22nd. Special 1.30 p.m.
THE ARKANSAS SWING

Hoosier Hot Shots &

BONANZA TOWN

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

20th

GLOBE CENTURY FOX

colours and prices





EMPIRE

TODAY 2.30 & 8.30
& continuing to Tues. 4.45 & 830

do that. .

At that 4 very instant Knarf saw
the lady who lived next door sud-
eee eae Rine her hands in happi-

Hardly had they gone when Knarf ; "°88: Standing in front of her in the
met Mrs. Roberta Robin with three | S#tden aoe her little baby. “Look
of her young robins, They were II at baby! the lady next door was
standing cr. the ~rass under the tree, | @X¢laiming. “She’s standing up all

lings, hurry along.” And Mrs.
Clucky started walking to the
meadow with her chicks running all
around her.

FOR PRESTIGE MOVIES
TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M. AND CONTINUING





i ,| by herself She’s learning how to
Good morning, Mrs, Robin,’ :
said Knarf. “Good morning, iittle ae really learning how to vy: b> TRUE-TO-LIFE,

robins.”
“Good-morning, Knarf,” they all!
answered.
“What
Robin?”

Poor Knarf! He just had to keep
shaking his head. It seemed that
there wasn’t anything that anyone
Mrs, | knew al! by himself Everything had

to be learned.

UH eps ey ps 8 ee
STORY OF A

are

you doing,



7.15 p.m
Record

West Indian Diary, 7
Variety Bill, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45
p.m Somposer of the Week, 9.00 p.m
English Magazine, 9.30 p.m. Cyril Smith
and Phyllis Seilick (Pianos), 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editori
us, 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues
10.30 p.m. From the Third » Progra amme

45 p.m

OH! SO DEAR

ARIS inthe spring... the
chestnuts in the Bois de
Boulogne moonlight in the
Tuileries Gardens . .. will be just
a..dream this year for British
tourists. Unless they go only for

a. week-end on the £25 for-
eign travel allowane.

Prices have risen steeply in the
last six months,

I stayed at the hotel I visited a
year ago. The same room with



the same bath
30s, to £2 10s,
croissants,

and orange

had risen from
Breakfast (coffee
butter, marmalade
juice) cost 9s. 6d.
My favourite bistro, where a
year ago I could enjoy a 5s.
snack, now charged me lbs.
for the same fare. In the
smallest restaurants was
difficult get under
25s,

it

to a meal

SWIM SuIiIrTs.

A FINE ASSORTMENT HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED

LADIES’ SWIM SUITS,

Plain Satin

Blue, Gold, Black, Turquoise, Red

Flowered Satin Lastex One Piece 16.94

Sizes 36 & 38
‘ Flowered Satin Lastex One Piece ... 14.20
Z Two Piece ... 13.50

Sizds 34 & 36

CENTS’ SWIM TRUNKS
Plain Satin Lastex ............... 7.96
Flowered Satin Lastex .... 9.34

Sizes: Small, Medium, Large
ALSO

MORLEY’S NYLON HOSE 51 GAUGE 15 DENIER............ $2.09 & $2.28

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Lastex One Piece



COMING BRIDGETOWN
“TO-MORROW IS ANOTHER DAY"
**Ruth ROMAN-—Steve COCHRAN






Flowered
cheaper

were 30s.
£3.

hats from one of the
department stores,
in 1951. Now they are



asked my hotel manager
whether he was expecting En-
glish guests this spring. He
shook his head sadly and. spoke
of cancellations and empty
rooms, “How can they do it with
prices so high?”

$15.40 & $18.95

fe

“PLAZA CINEMAS cos”



BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310

TO-DAY (3 sHows) 2.30-4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

AND CONTINUALLY DAILY

AT 445 & 8.30 P.M

WARNER BROS. ACTION-PACKED SAGA |

Gregory

With BARBARA PAYTON
SAT. Special 9,30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

OUTLAW SOLD

in

Johnny Mack .BROWN
ARIZONA TERRITORY

WILSON &
oo

Andy CLYDE
ee

ONLY tHe VALIANT

WARD BOND LON CHANEY

MIDNITE SPECIAL SAT. 22nd

ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS &

Charles STARRETT

SO
ot

Peeks THE OUTLAW TRAIL}}|ARKANSAS . SWING

Smiley BURNETT

The Garden—St. James To-day To Tues 4390 & 8.15 SAT. & SUN 430 & &15
OIs wrar 8404 TODAY (Only) 8.30 PM Bing CROSBY = Fred ASTAIRE Wendell Corey—Margaret Sullivan
y sn in o ho. AY NN" —-in —
RARBAREES (DOWNTOWN) —Dial 5170 pike STEN ts s 8% pmi| RIDERS OF THE DUSK EO cama
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & CONTINUING DAILY SaUccANEER'S Gm. Whip WILSON — Andy CLYDE Gary_ COOPER "George RAFT ne ee ee
. . a Technicolor) ary — je
Jniversal-International Thrilling Technicolor Adventure|! vensizis Jan > — Philip FRIEND mae ‘<5 bake OMOO OMOO Ron Randell
Van Susan — and — Johnny Mack BROWN Whole Serial
HEFLIN HAYWARD in “FOREIGN LEGION” . Seris

“TAP ROOTS”



~ Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO SUN. 5 PM KING or 7am ROYAL MOUNTED ROLL ON TEXAS MOON
(Color by = ee Mat. iy Lane ond
Techniegior) Sat Special Midnite Sat 22 LIFE WITH FATHER ———— DOWN MEXICO WAY
With WARD BOND —- BORIS. SALON? TEE, LOR 4. 3.m. Tim HOLT in (Color) Irene Dunne, William Powell Jou Ray NE = ome “0 SAT 2nd MID-NITE
cone DEERE & Glenn MILLER. Orchestra Smash Te se alone MIDNITE SATURDAY @2nd ie i Whole Serial—
SATURDAY'S SPECIAL 1.30 P.M, “Heldorade” and Johnny Mack BROWN in CAPTAIN CHINA i cians an elena
N and “Fighting “LAW OF THE WEST” & i MANHUN ISLAND”
& BONANZA TOW “Man From Music Gringo"|| “RIDIN' THE CHEROKEE TRAIL
Hoosier Hot Shots Charlies Starrett & Smiley Burac* Mourtain” George O'Brien Tex RITTER
=. =



PRT ee ora tslenemerae a a CRIME -LORD!-
Rupert and the New Bonnet—16





iy
ER
4
H
H





WT POREON
Av HARDING - Bg SULLIVAN

“or JOAN EVANS
MELVYN DOUGLAS

An M-G-M Picture
“Is this wh of my own invention. I've LYNN BARI
hale eens whet Rue etn | iat BS sos
when | saw you before ? at are tainly have."’ exclaim aT . . .
you mu doing ? yon. Oh dear, I didn’ t have nearly killed oe ened en | KEEFE LE ~ LEWAS STOWE + EDUARD FRANZ » RICHARD ANDERSON » DRM

After waiting a few minutes
Rupert moves to the door and
peeps inside. “Good gracious |
So it’s you, Bingo!" he cries.

sighs
“but now you're here come
in and see all the work I'm doing.

I'm experimenting with new fire-
works

mean you to La me,

Bingo, *







Is BACKACHE

CAUSED BY BOTH

Kidneys and Liver?



@ Written by RONALD MILLAR and GEORGE FROESCHEL « Directed by RICHARD THORPE
Produced by ROBERT THOMSEN

ROODAL THEATRES



WATCH
NEXT SUNDAY’S

ADVOCATE



COCKTAIL DANCE

THE BARBADOS

AQUATIC CLUB
(Local & Visiting Members

Fa
|

|
|
|
|
}



When your back aches so you hate to Only) FOR i

straighten up—and short diary twinges ON E MPIRE ROXY 8.15

stab you at every sudden move—your U seat Presents _

backs ieesote may nave several causes that Saturday, ee 22nd B J G ‘AT To TUES. 443 & 8.0 “KISS THE BLOOD OF MY
That's why Dr. Chase's 7.30 p.m. m - eet et : HANDS"

men ya Liver Pills brin — >

s such quick, |

effective relief to many whe suffer with

backache! For this time-proven rem-
edy treats two conditions at once~

contains special remedial ingredients
or both kidneys and liver,

Starring
Burt Lancaster — Joan Fontaine

am SAT. 22ND. MID-NITE
Whole Serial—

“ON THE LOOSE”
Starring
Melvyn (Mouglas

EXTRA

e
Introducing the Island’s
Leading
STEEL BAND:



Joan Evans

EVENTS

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL KING of the FOREST RANGERS
“So if you feel tired, headachy—with “RHYTHM KINGS oe SAT. 2nd at 9.90 AM ao aT 430 & 6.15
painful he and aching back—look ORCHESTRA T Hl E Whole Serial—
to both kidneys and liver! Then look |

PHANTOM SPEAKS

GRAND CANYON TRAIL
to Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills— | i

&
for a reliable product used by Cana-

e
Admission to Ballroom 1/-

ROODAL

DRUMS of FU MANCHU











SAT. “ND MID-NITE
dians for over half a century, The 19,3.52.—4n, T H E A Tv R E s Whole Serial ROYAL
name “Dr. Chase’! is your assurance, 7 4 _ eS Be I. “HAUNTED HARBOUR"
BS











Toes (only) 4.30 & 8.16

E BIG NIGHT
and

MAN WITH MY FACE

COMING BARBAREES
“HIGHWAY 301" sf
Steve COCHRAN—Virginia GREY

GAIETY OLYMPIC

|





& SUN. 830 PM SAT. 22nd At 9.30 A.M.
SAT IN. 8.1
















LAW OF THE 4




FRIDAY, MARCH 2i, 1952

COMBERMERE SCHOOL

DURING THE COURSE of his speech and prize giving

day school report in which he covered every phase of the
school activities during the past year, Major C. Noott,
headmaster of Combermere, on Wednesday said that the
fundamental contribution that technical education would
make in this island is an immediate contribution to the

standard and efficiency of

industry and would balance

their present educational system with its predominantly

academic emphasis.

My Lord Bishop, Mr. Chairman,
Members of the Governing Body,
Ladies and Gentlemen, It gives
me very great pleasure to welcome
His Lordship as Guest of Honour
to this function. It enables me,
first of all, to acknowledge a debt,
for His Lordship kindly consented
to present the Prizes after His
Excellency the Governor withdrew
from the function owing to the
mourning into which the Court
und Commonwealth were plunged
after the death of our late Sover-
eign, In the second piace, it
allows me on behalf of the School
to offer our warm congratulations
to His Lordship on his recent
elevation to the bishopric; we pray
that under his leadership the
work of the church in Barbados
might prosper. But, His Lord-
ship’s presence also restores a link
with tradition, for, as. the com-
memorative tablet in the Court of
Honour reminds us it was largely
due to the efforts of the S.P.C.K.
a century and a half ago that this
School was opened in 1819 on
Constitution Hill in the building

that now forms part of Queen's
College. During your Lordship’s
forthcoming visit to the United
Kingdom, I hope you may find

pleasure in telling the Society how
this School—which owes so much
to them—has flourished and how
important a part it has come to
play in the educational life of
Barbados.
-The Governing Body

The School owes a very con-
siderable debt to the Governing
Body.» They are in every sense
devoted to its welfare and pro-
gress and are the guardians of its
good name. Since last we met,
Mr. D. A. Wiles has resigned on
being appointed Assistant Colonial
Secretary and | take this op-
portunity of offering him our
warmest congratulations on his
promotion in the Public Service.
In his place we gladly welcome
His Honour Mr. Justice Vaughan,
an old boy of this School, and
one in whom I know Combermere
will find a stalwart supporter. In
April last year, Mr, H. A. Tudor
retired from the chairmanship
after having served in that
capacity for a periog of five years.
He was succeeded by The Honour-
able V. C. Gale, M.L.C., who has
maintained the fine tradition of
service set by Mr. Tudor,

Internal Organisation

Our numbers have stabilized
around thé figure 550. These are
organised into three main divisions
—Preparatory with 78 boys rang-
ing from 8} to 11% years of age;
the Junior School comprising four
parallel First Forms and_ four
parallel Second Forms with 240
pupils between the ages of 104 and
14%; and the Middle and Upper
School with some 250 pupi’s of 13
years of age and over. The First
and-Second Forms provide a two-
year course of instruction which
includes English Language and
Literature, Religious Knowledge,
Latin, French, History, Geography,
Arithmetic, Elementary Mathemat-
ics, Physiology and Hygiene,
Nature Study, Art, Music, Physical
Education and two periods of
Reading in the School] Library.
At the end of the second year the
pupils undergo an intelligence tert
as well as tests in mathematical
facility and in the use of English.
These tests are used in conjunction
with their, record of attainment
and the boys are then canalised by
the Stoff and myself into one of
three Streams — Academic, Com-
mercial) and Modern. ‘The A and
C Stredms prepare for the General










Becomes -

SPORT
CLOTHES

EVERY GARMENT
©XPERTLY CUT TO
MEASURE



TAILORED AS YOU
SPECIFY

PERFECT FIT
GUARANTEED

Wm.

(Barbados) Limited

The Foremost Name in |

Tailoring

— >

LEISURE TIME

Pleasant in Distinctive
Well-Tailored ....

FOGARTY

He said :

Certificate of Education of London
University.. The A Stream re-
taining Latin, the C Stream sub-
stituting therefor commercial sub-
jects—Shorthand and Book-keep-
ing. Our first group of candidates
for the G.C.E. of London University
whl be presented in July next.
Our ties with the Overseas Cam-
bridge Centre will be severed next
December, and the boys of last
year’s Form Lower 5 will take
that Examination, The Cambridge
Syndicate has serveqd Barbados
very faithfully in the past and
there is no doubt that the educa-
tional standards reached in this
Island owe that examining body a
very considerable debt. Its ex-
aminations are now being with-
drawn on the implementation of
the recently agreed policy to adopt
the examination system of the
Oxford and Cambridge Joint
Board for all our Secondary
Schools with the exception of
Combermere which, as I have in-
formed you, is preparing its
candidates for the G.C.E. of Lon-
don University.

Curriculum

1 should be misleading you if
I let you think that the organisa-
tion outlined above work as
efficiently in practice as it is sim-
ple to outline on paper. We are
experiencing difficulties of two
kinds —- one caused by problems
of staffing and the other by the

remarkable reluctance of young
boys to fit neatly into ready-
made administrative schemes.

I shall deal with the problem
of staffing later on in this report;
the essence of the second pro-
blem lies in the individuality of
each boy not only in terms of
character and personality, but in
the wide range of interests and
abilities revealed by any group of
boys of the same age. In a few
boys, pursuit of knowledge for its
ewn sake will be the dominant
interest; in others, the main in-
terest will be in the field of Ap-
plied Science or Applied Arts;
but, by far the stronger group,
numerically, will be interested in
concrete things rather than ideas.
To meet this range of interests
and abilities, the School must be
able to offer the most diverse
choice of curriculum and the most
varied facilities in terms of lab-
oratories and workshops. Thanks
+o the foresight of the Govern-
ing Body, Mr, Drakes, a Junior
member of our Staff, was sent to
the U.C.W.I., Jamaica in 1949,
to reaq for his Degree in Natural
Sciences. His degree course fin-
ishes this July and he is due to re-
join our Staff in September next.
Although we have pressed in each
of the last three years for the
necessary capital grant to con-
struct a laboratory, we still find
ourselves approaching the end of
Mr. Drakes’ period of prolonged
Study Leave without having a
General Science Laboratory avail-
able for him to teach in,

I have. said above that the
majority of boys are interested in

concrete things. I have never
failed, since I was appointed
Headmaster, to point out at

School Speech Days the need
which I felt for workshop facil}
ities in which many of our boys
could receive instruction in man-
ual skills and workshop tech-
niques. Technical Education has
recently come 0 occupy 4 promi-
nent place in the public eye in
Barbados, and you’ W ill forgive
me if I take this opportunity and
this moment to offer a brief analy-
sis of the problems which techni-
cal education should be expected




even more



)) is

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





to help solve and the contribution
we should expect it to make Ww
We eaucational prob.ems of our
Second Grade Seconaary Senools.
The fundamental needs that tech-
nical education must meet for
this Island are three-fold. It must
in the first place make a direct
and immediate contribution to the
standard of efficiency in industry;
it must therefore be prepared to
undertake the trade-traming of
apprentices already in induswy—
whether in factory, workshop or
Government Departments. In the
second place and as a middle term
policy in raising the standards of
workmanship in industry, It must
provide a flow of recruits to in-
dustry of a higher calibre than
those hitherto recruited haphaz-
ardly and for the most part with
considerable reluctance from
those recruited. In the third place
I should expect technical educa-
tion to redress the balance of oux
present educational system with
its predominantly academic em-
phasis,

I am convinced that the princi-
pal reservoir of higher calibre
recruits for industry is already in
our existing Secondary Schools.
There are these boys who have
proved their merit by passing a
competitive Entrance Examina-
tion from our Elementary Schools
into our Secondary Schools, but
who are more interested in con-
crete things than they are in ideas.
These boys are to be found at
present in Forms 3-Modern, 3-
Alpha and 4-Alpha at Comber-
mere School, and they are numer-
ically a strong group. To tap this
reservoir of higher calibre re-
cruits to industry, two conditions
in my mind must be fulfilled.
Firstly, they must have access
whilst at School to workshop
facilities where first-hand ac-
quaintance with the — skills and
techniques involved would wean
them and their elders from the
false values at present attached to
Secondary Education in Barbados.
The second condition would have
to be fulfilled by industry which
would have to be prepared to de-
vise and enforce an apprentice-
ship system which would give
different degrees of preferential
treatment according to the type of
school from which the boys came
and the degree of training they
had undergone prior to entry into
industry, It is essential at this
point that I should clear up any
possible confusion which may
arise between the workshop
training which I have just des-
cribed and what is called officially
“Pre-technical Training”, Te-
technical training entails a higher
standard of academic pursuit in
those subjects which have a bear-
ing upon indust and is in fact
the academic side of Technical
Education. It would very pos-
sibly mean therefore that boys
for pre-technical training at
Combermere School would most
likely be found in our Academic
Stream where they would be giv-
en the opportunity of doing Ap-
plied Mathematics, General
Science and Machine Drawing as
alternatives, possibly, to Latin
and Modern Languages. Whilst
for them too I would consider it
desirable that they should have
the opportunity of some training
in workshop techniques and
skills, pre - technical training
would only require a General
Science and Mechanics Labora-
tory. In whatever way therefore
Government may finally decide to
introduce Technical Education, ‘1
do press most “rgently here that
one of the essential conditions
should be that classes from our
existing Secondary Schools shou'd
have access to the workshop facil-
ities to be provided in the scheme.

Where the reform of our cur-
riculum has not been dependent
upon additional buildings, we
have been able to make steady
progress. In no one field is this
progress more in evidence than
in music. Under the combined
tutelage of Mr. Gerald Hudson
and Mr. James Millington, boys
are being trained to a high degree
in vocal and instrumental music.
The violin class, whom you saw
and heard this afternoon, started
with Mr. Millington ip January
1950 and you will agree with me
that the standard of skill which
he has imparted to them in this
comparatlvely short time is quite
vutstanding, A second group
began practising the yiolin in
September last and we hope to
continue in this way — selecting
a small group of boys from each
annual entry to the School —
until we sha be sufficiently
strong to form a School Orches-
‘ra. Less evident in its results
vet equally as valuable is the
work done by Mr. Hudson in the
field of Musical Appreciation.
Mr. Hudson’s work with the
School Choir has maintained the
visual degree of excellence which
associated with him and _ his
work throughout the Island. The
success of the School in the
School Music Festival of last
April when they obtained a Cer-
tificate of Merit in Class II Sec-

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tion is largely attributable to
Mr. Hudson's leadership.
Staffing

I referred earlier in this Report
to the problems of Staffing, and



REPORT



|
which will be difficult te equal}
and will seldom be surpassed. |
Acting Staff |

I eannot close this section of
my Report without referring in
brief terms to the members of




in one instance we have been the “Acting Staff. Messrs Taitt,
able to make little or no progress J Lashley, Greaves, Glas-
because of our inability to re- gow, and Wilson, who
cruit a pérson of adequate quali- are ing for variable periods)
fications and experience. | refer du the time that so many of}

% the appointment of a Commer-
cial ialist.

of leave in England, I spent much
time on behalf of the Governing
Body interviewing cadidates for
this post. The applicants were
few in number although good ip
quality. Time and time again
the same question atese about
conditions of service in Barbados
and which, when the answers
were given, caused the candi-
dates to withdraw their applica-
tions. These conditions about
which questions were asked
related to reciprocity of pensions,
leave passages, housing condi-
tions, and cost of living,

So long as an Officer is told that
Barbados has no scheme of re-
ciprocity with the United King-
doin for its Secondary School
Teachers, it sets up a doubt in
the mind of the person interested
whether he is justified in throw-
ing overboard such pensionable
service—maybe of short, maybe
of jong duration—which he has
already put in the United King-
dom. When the answer to
question whether leave passages
were provided was “No”, it be-
came clear — especially if the
applicant were a married man—
that he could not face the pros-
pect of being indefinitely maroon-
ed in a small geographical unit.
I sincerely hope that the new pro-
posals regulating conditions of
service and granting leave pass-
ages and some upward revision
ot salaries may soon be approved
by our Legislature as I believe
that many staffing problems will
be solved when we are in a posi-
tion to re-advertise in the United
Kingdom.

Our School feels that it 1s de-
pendent only in small méasure
upon the need for expatriate
staff to strengthen itself and to
muke its full contribution to the
community. We have found
amongst our young men e
weal qualities awaiting only ~
opportunity to develop them and
to enhance their qualifications,
It is for this reason that I am
pleased to make the following
reports concerning members ef
our Junior Staff on prolonged
Study Leave. Mr. J. C. L. Drakes
will complete his Degree Course
in Natur a1 Seiences at the
U.C.W.L, Jamaica, in July next.
Mr. H. G. Brewster, after a year
at Loughborough, has been
awarded a Colonia] Office Schol-
arship to enable him to continue
his studies there for a further
two years. He will be due to Te-
turn to us ih September 1953. In
September last, Mr. C. W. Wick-
ham was awarded a Caribbean
Scholarship in Printing tenable
at the School of Industrial Arts
in Puerto Rico. He is at the same
time folowing a course in His-
panic Studies in the University
of Puerto Rico. It gives me very
great pleasure to announce that
Mr. K. R. Broodhagen is to be
awarded a British Council
Scholarship for one year pro-
vided that London Headquarters
can get a vacaney for him at a
suitable institution. Mr, C. DeV
Moore is in residence at Durham
University where he is reading
for his degree in Classics. In
September last, Mr. G. A. Holder
returned from a year’s study at
Erdiston College where he ob-
tained a Teacher’s Certificate. I
have also to welcome to the Staff
the following new members who
have joined on the dates indicated
after their names: Mr, Hughes
joined us from Toronto where he
obtained a ond Class Honours
in History gree in September
1950. Both as Master in charge of
History, as a Set Master and as
Masier in charge of Cricket, Mr.
Hughes is already making a most
valuable contribution to the life
of our School. Mr. A. E, Sealy
and Mr. P. C. Scott, who are both
graduates of Durham, whose de-
ass they took from Codrington

ollege, joined us in September
last after serving for a number of
years in other Caribbean Terri-
tories. | would like to say here in
connection with the appointment
of these two officers the value |
place upon comparative experi-
ence in other Caribbean Terri-
tories by young members of our
Teaching Staff; and in this con-
nection also to stress the import-
ance of Barbados adopting @
scheme of reciprocity so that
years in Public Service in other
territories will not be lost to these
young men when they return to
their home Island to take up
appointments in our Secondary
Schools. Also joining us last Sep-
tember was Mr. S. C. Corbin who
left the Department of ation
to come into the field active
practice and to assist us particu-
larly in the teaching of Short-
hand,

In the time which has oyepeed
since my last Report, the ool
has also ered two losses from
its Staff e by resignation and
the a ad aaycoaen. Mr, G.
E. i us
1951 to go to and where he
is studying and we all join
in wishing him every success in
his studies. The retirement
have to record is that of Mr. O.
A. Pilgrim who retired from ac~
tive service in April last. It was
a sad blow to me personally that
Mr. Pilgrim decided to retire at
a still comparatively young age.
He has given most wholehearted-
ly and devoted service to gen-
erations of boys who haye gone
through this institution. Member
of a family which produced 1-
liant mathematicians, Pilly—
through circumstances over which
he had no contrei—never went to
a University to take a Mathema-
ties Degree, though he was bril-
liantly endowed. He was proxime
he 9 his year for the Bar-
bados olarship and from then
until his retirement last May,
cerved almost continuously on
the Assistant Staff of Comber-

ticularly’ remembered for the
fine work he did with the Glee
Club, the Scouts, and with the
cricket teams. He leaves us a
model and a record of service

During my period on

in mu

mere School. Apart from his '
contribution in the classroom
Mathematics, he would be par-




nent Staff are away |
eave. With their names |}
should couple that also of my|
Secretary, Miss Hunte, who has |
been making her contribution to)
the teaching of typewriting in the
Fourth Form. All these mem-|
bers of the Acting Staff are help-!
ing us through a particularly dif- |
ficult time when we deliberately |
accept temporary weakness so
that we may go forward to great- |
ey strength. Reculer pournieur |
sauter most applicably describes |
the present situation with regard |
to our staff at Combermere)
School. |
Equipment }

Since last you were here our |
Library has taken over a second |
classroom and has been enhanced
by the addition of further tables |
and seating accommodation and|
@ very handsome desk unit for

the Librarian which enables
him organise an _ issues
and turns section separately.

The Library is performing valu-)
able service to the School and!
without wearying you with the|
details of its growth since last I}
reported, it is under Mr, St. Hill's)
guidance r@pidly becoming the |
intellectual stock exchange of our)

School
Textbooks }
The Textbook and _ Stationery |
Scheme is continuing to flourish
and is performing a valuable ser-

vice in the School. Mr. Brath-
waite, a member of the Junio:
School Staff, is now the Secre-
tary administering the scheme

and under his careful and meti-
culous control is now on a per
manent administrative basis.

Visual Aids
The Geography Room which
was opened in July 1951 on the
eecasion of our last Speech Day

continués to play a_ stimulating
part in our School life, With ex
perience in the handling of the
equipment, there are Messy
Goddard and Smith who have
maintained the fine method ot
Geography teaching which Mr

"Webster established in our School

I hope that those who did not see |
the Geography Projection Room
in 1950 will not fail to visit it!
this time’and see for themselves
the visual aid equipment in actual
use,

Art Room

The acquisition of tools and
materials for our Art and Handi-
craft Room has proceeded so
rapidly that Mr. Broodhagen has
some difficulty in continuing hi
instructions in one classreon
which we originally converted
for that purpose. There is a dis-
play there of things made by the
classes which he conducts in
modelling, cane-work, lettering
and art, I am extremely grateful
to Mr. Broodhagen for his valu-
able contribution to our School
curriculum and very proud in-
deed that he should be selected
for a British Council Scholarship
There are few more deserving
than he of this recognition of his |
contribution’ to the plastic arts |
in the Caribbean,

Grounds
deeds transferring the
extra grounds to Combermer |
Bchool from the Governor-in-|
Executive Committee were com-
pleted only in March of last year. |
I was still on leave at the time,|
but am happy to place on record |
that the Governing Body lost no|
time between receiving the deed)
and the end of the financial year
for which provision had been
made for the construction of 4
boundary wall to enclose ous
eastern approaches, They lost no|
time, I say, in carrying out that
most necessary enclosure to our
grounds. No single contribution to|
the establishment of order, law)
and control within Combermere |
grounds has been greater
this one. In May last, we were
fortunate in obtaining the ¢co-
operation of Messrs Harriman |
and Company’s personnel equip-
ment which had been in use at)
Seawell runway to come in and
level a total extent of approxi-
mately six acres of ground newly!
enclosed, We have been able to)
set out a Hockey Pitch and thus
introduced Hockey into the or-
ganised games of the School. This
innovation we owe to the know-~
ledge and initiative of Mr. Adams,
and it has aroused a lively en-
thusiasm amongst many boys.
Also across the southern end of
the new enclosure we are now
preparing in time for the forth-
roming Cricket Season our bat~-
tery of practise wickets so that

@ On Page 8

_—

Air Traffic

WEDNESDAY — BY BWIA
ARRIVALS — From Trinidad
M. Kipperman, C. Espinoza
From Antigua
Doreas Richardson, David Gilkes, Jack
Wigley, Milton O'Loughlin, Nellie Faddic
WEDNESDAY—BY BW.LA
DEPARTURFS—To Antigua
Ida Sahely, Nancy Greig, Pade Cross
To Trinidad
Jasmin Beckles, Henry Rameay, Ermir
Yorde, Robert Cabrera, Marjorie Cabrera
Louls Applebaun, Robert Eppeiein
To Puerto Kico
Jack Johnstone, Jessie Johnstone, |
Harold Gaffney, Mabel Gaffney
Reeve, James Thompson, Helen
Kenrick Welch, Chesterfield
Donald Boyce, George Gitten
Welch Elizabeth Florsheim,
Blenman, Kirkwood Blenman,
Richards, Dr. Perey Devaires
Decaires, Agnela Maynard

Harbour Log

The





Radle
Steede

Milto
Colene
Geraldin
Daphn







- .
In Carlisle Bay

Sch. Lady Silver, Sct Lady Noriee
Sch Excelsior Hodge, Sch. Maris Stell
M V. Caribbee, Sch. Zita Wonita, Ser
Loude pha, M.V. Dearwood, Sch Mar
M. Lewis, Sch United P im, Seb
Lucille M. Smith, Sch. Marion Be
Wolte, Sch. Anita H., Sch. Enterprise §

Sch

Mandalay U, M.V. Jenkins Rob rt
Sch. Franklyn D. R., 8.8. Wilford, Sct







Frances W Smith, S.S. Naturalist
AKRIVALS
M.V. Moneka, 19 tons net, Capt
Hudson, froin Dominica
Sch. Turtle Dove, 82 tons net, Capt
Davis, from Trinidad
Sch h Jone tons net,
Capt f nada
M.Vv ‘ net, Capt
D. Chee an, frorr 1850
DEPARTURES
Sch. Belqueen, 44 tons net, Capt. R
King, for *. Vincent

than} ¢



Henry | @

}
























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PAGE THREE

<= BOTTLE FEEDING AT ITS BEST

There’s no need to worry over






bottle-feeding if milk is modi-

fied with Robinson’s ‘ Patent’

Barley. Baby will then digest
Pt it so easily and sleep
ou) contentedly after

Tv :

° every feed.






ae’
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Bi
HEALTH BENEFITS |

we TONES UP DIGESTION

we ENRICHES THE BLOOD

"x RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY
x BUILDS UP THE BODY







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PAGE FOUR





—_—





BARBADOS



BARBADOS a ADVOGATI

Gee i et Fo 5 SS

Friday, March 21,

1952
HORTICULTURE
THE Horticultural Society is to be con-

gratulated upon holding its seventeenth
exhibition at. the Drill Hall. Facing the

Garrison Savannah this hall can easily be |

reached by guests from the nearby hotels.
Visitors to Barbados too often judge the
island’s flowers by what they see from
passing cars and only the small number of
those who visit local homes where there are
gardens realise the large variety of flower-
ing plants and shrubs that flourish here.

This year the long drought and the parch-
ed appearance of the countryside would
not lead anyone to expect any high stand-
ard of flowers, but those who visit the Ex-
hibition to-morrow and on Sunday will be
pleasantly surprised to observe what suc-
cess can be attained by good horticulturists.

Those who have seen previous exhibi-
tions of the Society at Queen’s Park are
already aware of the good work which this
society is doing to encourage and improve
horticulture. Like many other societies in
Barbados membership though cheaply
available at five shillings per year is not
as widespread as it ought to be. But the
society’s achievements are the greater be-
cause of this disadvantage and as a result
of this year’s exhibition they may be in-
creased. The Society has wisely continued
this year to encourage exhibits of vege-
tables and fruit and is thereby playing its
part in encouraging market gardeners, In
this connection the Society’s insistence that
horticulture is a definite craft of itself and
not ‘a department of agriculture is admir-
able.

There has been a tendency in recent
years to condemn Barbadians lock stock
and barrel for being devoid of any interests
or enthusiasms other than those connected
with the material pursuit of gain. This
movement was led and so far as it still
exists, is still led by people with very
superficial knowledge of the Barbadian
way of life. It has deservedly suffered a
setback because it was impossible for any-
one to live in so small an island as this
without encountering in some way the
many cells of activity which are engaged
quietly and without much publicity in
building onthe traditions of the past. The
Horticultural Society is one of those so-
cieties which has perhaps suffered from too
little publicity in the past. Its emergence
into public view this week ought to en-
courage it to continue with renewed vigour
the work which it has been so worthily
performing in the interests of the com-
munity.

% ‘ v _
AGRICULTURE
IN his speech in the Legislative Council
Chamber on Tuesday the Colonial Secre-
tary is reported as saying that “the com-
mercial undertakings are self-supporting

and it is expected that they will make a
profit in coming years.”

This statement may possibly have been
amplified in the Council, but the report as
it stands does not adequately emphasise the
position with regard to the six Agricultural
stations which were financed until 1951
from grants made under the Colonial De-
velopment and Welfare Act.

Two of these stations already are self-
supporting but much more is involved in
the commercial success of these stations
than fertility of soil.

The Government Agricultural Stations
are compelled to sell produce at govern-

they are also compelled to pay agricultural
labourers the prices which are fixed by
agreement between the Barbados Workers’
Union and the Sugar Federation. The cost
of labour at the agricultural stations has
been rising and the stations have not been
allowed to raise the prices of their produce.

No commercial undertaking could succeed
if it were run on these lines and unless the
government decides to allow the stations
to sell at prevailing free market prices the
tendency will be for all these stations to
show no profits.

Doubts have also been expressed whether
higher prices in themselves will help the
stations to sell their produce. The absence
of marketing facilities has often led in the
past to the destruction of beans grown on
the stations: at a time when housewives
were paying very high prices for beans in
the free market.

Someone will have to provide better dis-
tribution of locally grown foodstuffs and
fish, but no one will do it until thé govern-
ment abolishes a price control system which
penalises the primary producer,












|

“OPERATION BLOCKADE

LONDON

FROM the British Naval point
of view, the Korean war has
proved a war of blockade, a sea-
man’s war of the traditional
pattern.

During the 18 months of fight-
ing there have been occasional
spectacular actions which have
claimed the public attention, Not
generally appreciated, however,
is the importance of the daily
routine patrols by destroyers and
frigates of the Royal Navy, the
Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal
Australian Navy and the Roya.
New Zealand Navy.

The Navy holds responsibilities
comparable with the American in
this theatre, the broad division
being that the latter look after
the East Coast of Korea while
the particular British commit-
ment is the whole of the West
Coast.

The task entrusted to these
forces can be broadly divided
into four main categories; the
denial of sea communications to
the enemy, the harassing of
troops and supplies in the cvastal
regions, the support of friendly
guerilla organisations and lastly
the escort of.suppiies and air-
craft carriers engaged in offensive
operations off the coast.

Recently an additional role has
been added, the defence of islands
on and North of the 38th parallel.
The enemy would like to occupy
these to enhance his bargaining
power at Panmunjom.

The degree of success achieved
can be judged from Communist
reactions. At no time have they
been able, or recently even at-
tempted, to supply their forces
by sea, and this single factor, in
a country with such sparse land
communications, has tipped the
balance between defeat and

WICKSTEED’'S TOURS

No, 2: BERNARD WICK-
STEED sets out with CHAP-
MAN PINCHER on the re-
sumption of a famous part-
nership,

I took it into our heads the othe
night to go out into a wood and
look for owls.

In the ordinary way
for owls in a fog at midnight
would be a fairly profitless occu-

pation, but when accompanied byfgSÂ¥!vatica, or tawny owl, I
Mr. Pincher it is an experience@lieve.
well flavoured.

full of unexpected interest.

A stuffed owl in a Surrey pub
started us off. “You probably
don’t know it,” said Mr, Pincher,
gazing intently at the case on the
wall, “but an owl is about the
only bird that can waggle its
ears.”

So after closing time we went
into the darkness in search of
pink owls that waggle their ears,

It proved to be a better night
for owls than for owl-watchers.
There was a thick mist that
blotted out the new moon, and
the only way we knew we were
in a wood was by the number of
trees we bumped into.

“Owls’ eyes are about a hun-
dred times more sensitive in the

dark than human eyes,” said the
invisible Mr. Pincher, from
somewhere in the swirling mist.
“But that doesn’t mean they
can see as well at night as we
can in daylight.

“A scientist who has recently

done a lot of good work on owls
has calculated that it is as hard
for an owl to find a_ mouse in
starlight as it would be for a

human being to play tennis by
the light of a full moon,”
Vision secret
Some people used to think that
infra-red rays were the secret
of an owl's vision at night, but

Mr. Pincher says this has been
disproved by a fellow who took
the cornea and lens from the eye
of a dead owl and found that

Arawaks ?
To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In his Diary (Advocate,
15th March) “Nobody” gives a
thumb-nail sketch of the pre-
history of the Island and says
that he is forced to go on stress-
ing this fact about Barbados not
being an uninhabited island when
the British took possession.” But
it would be interesting to know
what evidence he relies upon to
support this assertion. This is
not meant as criticism but en-
quiry.

While no one should nowadays
doubt that the Arawaks occupied
the Island for a considerable
period before Settlement, the
contemporary records seem to
show that they had abandoned it
by the time that the British ar-
rived. These contemporary
sources are the depositions and
reports of people who were in a
position to know:—

mariner
Purchas

William Turner, a
of the Olive, 1605?
Pilgrims.

Captain Simon Gordon, mari-
ner, 1625. Colonial State
Papers 1/14 No. 25,

John Dell, settler, 1627, Co-
lonial State Papers 1/14 No, 27.

Report by Sir Peter Courteen,
1625. ‘ John Scott. Sloane Mss.
3662, Brit. Mus.

Nicholas Browne, quarter-
master of the “William and
John,” 1627. Mss. G 4/15, Trin.

Coll. Dublin.

Henry Winthrope, _ settler,
1627. Winthrope Letters. Mas-
sachusetts Historical Collec-,
tion.

Official Report of the Gov-

ernor Sir Richard Dutton, 1684.

Sloane Mss. 2441. Brit. Mus.
Thomas Walduck, settler
1710. Sloane Mss. 2302. Brit.
Mus.
and it is from these sources that
the historians Frere (1758), Bryan
Edwards (1793), Poyer (1808)
and Schomburgk (1847)

have based on their statements to
the same effect,

It is also suggestive that Cap-
tain Henry Powell, later in the
year of Settlement, went to

Af ntra-red

MR. CHAPMAN PINCHER Set

looking {¢T-

Our Readers: Say 3

Ailied Ships Rule
Horean Seas

victory for the greatly outnum-
bered land forces.

A brief survey of the waters in
question is necessary to the ap-
preciation of the problems in-
volved in these naval operations.
The West Coast of Korea is
studded with small rocky islands
ang tortuous channels through
which swirl fast and irregular
tidal streams.

For weeks on end the coast is
shrouded in fog and during the
winter months the bitterly cold
winds blowing from Manchuria
and Siberia cause rough weather
in the Yellow Sea on five days
out of seven. Most of the ports
above the 38th parallel are ice-
bound and, even when they are
free, they can only be reached
by navigating shallow channes
easily mined by the enemy and
often covered by shore batteries.

Charts surveyed long ago are
frequently out of date and a tidal
range of more than 30 feet
coupled with the silting of the
larger river estuaries result in
there being no guarantee that
the ocean bed corresponds to the
chart representation.

The experience of Common-
wealth frigates in the Han
Estuary is well known. There,
sounding from boats ahead of the
ships in tides often running be-
tween 7 and 10 knots, they had
to grope their way in muddy
waters. In all, 29 miles of chan-
nel were sounded and for a
period of 120 days at least two
frigates were continuously using
these waters to harass the
enemy's possib'e build-up areas.

Although East and West Coasts
are, broedly, American and
British Commonwea'th *commit-
ments respectively, the two
navies always exchange one or

Looking For Owls In A Fos
At Midnight

rays
through them.
“Has much experimental work
f this nature been done on dead
owls?” I asked.

“Oh yes, lots,” said Mr. Pinch~
“In the interests of science
the present Duke of Bedford once
te an owl. It was a Strix Aluco
be-
He reported it was quite

would not pass

“Why did he want to know
how an owl tasted? Well, its
aste has a bearing on its plum-

age. Birds that are good to eat
are generally inconspicuous in
their colouring, and those that

taste awful, like the kingfisher,

need no canvouflage.”

You can eat owls’ eggs, too,
Mr, Pincher said. A panel of
Cambridge University eggtasters

scrambled one once, and rated it
as slightly better than a scram-
bled duck’s egg.

At that moment a Strix Aluco
Sylvatica, or tawny owl, let off
a terrifie hoot in a tree almost
above my tead, It startled me
so much I fell into a ditch.

That left ear
What if it had overheard what
we were saying? Mr. Pincher had
said earlier that owls have ex-
ceptional hearing. The left ea’

of a tawny owl is bigger than its» which broke with a_ crack

right, and this probably enables
it to locate with accuracy the
exact whereabouts of a rustling
mouse or an edible journalis:
crouching in a ditch.

Tawn owls do attack people
sometimes. They are most dan-
gerous in the nesting season,
when their tempers are fraved
by family cares. Long-eared
owls are even worse, but they
usually attack only during thun-
derstorms. They hate thunder
so much that they go berser& and
fly at anyone in sight.

Essequibo and brought back some brought to the Island. The pic-

30 or 40 Arawaks to teach the
settlers how to grow tropical food
crops. The purpose of this action
is not very clear if there were
Arawaks already in the Island,
It is probable that these are the
Indians that gave rise to the tra-
ditions mentioned by Hughes
(Natural History of Barbados,
op of Indians residing at the
sanie time as the settlers. Hughes
himself does not claim that they
were actually in Barbados when
the settlers arrived.

The first written suggestion
that the Indians were still resi-
dent at the time of the Settlement
seems to be by the Rev. Greville
Chester (Transatlantic Sketches,
1869), and he is followed by
Fewkes (1918), the American
archaeologist, and also by Sinc-
kler (Handbook of Barbados,
1913, which quotes from the His<
torical Geography of the British
Colonies) and in his article in
“Timehri,” 1918. These writers
rely for evidence on two types of
local place-names, — those with
a tradition as Six Men's Bay and
Three Houses, and those that are
prefaced with the adjective “In-
dian” as Indian Ground and
Indian River, ete. ‘

It is doubtful whether muah
weight can be attached to the
traditions of Six Men's Bay or
Three Houses, since in the earliest
map of the Island, Ligon's, these
places are not mentioned, yet, at
the same time “16 Men” and “5
Houses” are marked and no tra-
dition and no names have been
attached to them. The use of the
word “Indian” surely implies
that they were not living in such
places at the time, but that they
were recognised as sites once in-
habited by Indians in the past.
Otherwise the Indians would
have supplied the native names.
The very lack of Indian names
argues that there were no Indians
to hand them on. The Island is
singularly devoid of Indian
names, Chimborazo is a late
ddition, while another, Yarico’s
Pond, is according to the story
of Ligon, an example of a name
derived from an Indian who was

ADVOCATE



Peace With A ‘Bite’

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON,

America came out with a new hard-hitting
propaganda line to-day. President Truman
and his Secretary of State, Mr. Dean Acheson,
put it over.

The President went aboard a new radio!
ship, the Courier, and broadcast to the Red |
lands. He said America has no quarrel with |
the people—only with their rulers. |

Mr. Acheson challenged the Chinese and!
Korean Communists to allow “an impartial
investigation” into their charges that U.S
troops in Korea are firing artillery shells
filled with disease germs.

He said: “The Communists spread these
charges round the world, and at the same
time they stall on the truce negotiations.”

Acheson pounced on the fact, confirmed |
by prisoners, that there is a plague epidemic
in North Korea.

‘OUR SYMPATHY’

And he spoke of “the inability of the Cor-|
munists to care for the health of the people
under their control.” Rubbing it in,
added: “Our deepest sympathy goes out ‘9
all those behind the enemy lines who arc
sick and suffering.”

The ship from which Truman spoke,
coastguard cutter named the Courier,
anchored in the Potomac River at Washin«-
ton. But soon it will sail to the edge of
Communist countries and broadcast Ameri- |
ca’s message.

Said Truman: “The United States is work-|
ing night and day to bring peace to the world. |
As President, I say with all my heart that w¢ |
yearn for peace, and we want to work wth |
all nations to secure peace.

“We have no quarrel with the people of |
the Soviet Union or the people of any other
country.

“There are no differences between us that
can’t be settled if your rulers will turn from |
their senseless policy of hate and terror and |
follow the principles of peace.” |

This “line” will be part of the new propa-
ganda drive, and there will be tacit sugges
tions that if the Red rulers could be got rid
of, real peace would come to the world.

‘YOUR RULERS’
aeeet Poe pe Fe would) ‘Truman added that it is “the aggressive
tion. After all, it was he who] policy of your rulers which is forcing us ‘o
ioe binds oa ee = aaa arm to defend ourselves.
“But we cannot find in our hearts any hate


























more ships so that Common-
wealth destroyers and frigates
also get their ‘run’ on the East
Coast. Here the Communist main
supply line ang the end og the
battle front run along the coast
and are easily accessible to ships.
Operations are mainly in the
Wosan or Songjin area and a
destroyer’s time is spent in keep-
ing up a running bombardment
of road and rail communications
both by day and night. A ship
usually fires over one thousand
rounds from her main armament
during a patrol and the con-
sequent strain om her guns’
crews and equipment is con-
siderable.

The ‘and round Wonsan is
enemy held and duels with shore
batteries are frequent, as also
recently on the West Coast where
the shore batteries are trying \o
drive away the forces defending
the nearby islands.

However, there are many
patrols on which not a shot is
fired; ships steam long distances
at high speed to protect an air-
craft carrier, escort convoys or
replenish other ships. Some-
times destroyers, deing duty on
the carrier screen, spend three
weeks at a stretch in the Yellow
Sea and steaming distances of
8,000 miles a month are not un-
common,

So the work continues as it
has been doing for eightcen
months: unspectacular but im-
portant; work which has entailed
much seatime and much hurd
steaming under conditions of
great heat in the summer end
intense cold in winter: worl:
which has called for fortitude
and endurance by ships’ com-
penies: work which has earned
the Navy’s traditional measure
of praise, “Well done.”

he

Ss


















There was not a sound from
Mr, Pincher, wherever he ws
hidden in the mist. I almost

But the owl above us had other

oe ie ae yi, aid res] against you. We know that if you are suffer-
that by the joyful way it|ing under aggression and persecution. We
tu-whitted and tu-whooed when

knwo that if you were free to say what you
really believe, oyu would join with us to ben-
Lovers’ duet ish the fear of war and bring peace to the

The tawny owls nesting season| earth.”
starts_in a couple, of weeks nd The Iron Curtain’s Governments, added
these two wits seemed to be dis< 2 ; : 7 ;
eussing whether to woo or not to| the President, might try with their new/s-
won 6 e0-

Farlier in the evening, in ‘he Force and rattio 'to make ao me nee
nub, Mr, Pincher had described} ple,” believe that America is a hostile
this kind of conversation between
wvies sist. is rather Hee a: dust:| couatty; ben t only on war.

The male hoots one motif and the| “But that is not true. I want you to know

female another. that our highest aim is peace and friendship
; 7 —and an end to the horrors of war.”

them at it say the male is con- . = pai

tinually yawning. This is a sign| THE Russian Embassy in Washington

of interest in the bird world, not swings from icy to chummy in its relations

boredom. -

Trying to get into a beiter| with the Press.
position to see if the owl above i he se,
me. waalyeaning-of wnesiine its We are at present in a Hello there, p oe
ears, I stepped on a dry s ick|so I spent a pleasant hour over whiskies <»d

and : : : : . at
that was the end of the duet. soda with Nikolai Vladykin, counsellor a

Mr, Pincber and I continued the embassy.
our owl prowl till long after the . rnlsv
Glockas ais. cluurck.. tower He drew me a diagram of how they play
had struck 12 but all we saw|Russia’s national pastime, Gorrodke—thr w-
was a an creeping — silently]; : : “ om
alongia helgerow, ing sticks into squares, (“Such a good gome
x As he mig bt hawe been sme because men of any age can play.”)

eeper we thought it st to lie ‘ ~ natn “ve
low. till he had gone. After all Other sports items gleaned: “In Russie v2
it would pave been almest im-| have 200,000 Soccer teams and no professi'n-
possible to have convin him im ‘ ”
that on a night like that we were als—only semi-professionals. ;
merely looking for owls, Boxing? “We have a good heavy-wei. ht

ES: | champion. He fights three rounds—that's
all Russian boxers train for—and has beaten
the champion of Esthonia.”

This year’s Olympics? “We have some very
strong women. They will create surprises.”

In Russia vodka—Vladykin pronounced it
' wodka—costs seven roubles a glass, say 14s.

Wow, I said, 14s. a glass?

“Aha, but the drink is good,” and he held
up atumbler. “One like this and you're
happy.” s

IN WALLA WALLA, Washington State,
two weeks ago, the Governor of the jail con-
gratulated the prisoners because, he said,
they had tried no tunnelling for a year. Al's,
now a milk truck driving past the jail crashes
down into a 100ft. tunnel on which the in-
mates laboured for 18 months. |

TIN PAN ALLEY is busily hammering out

another owl answered it from
the other end of the wood.

Birdwatchers who have scen



'

ture of Salymingo and his canoe
in Ligon's map no more argues
his presence at the Settlement
than does the presence of impor-
ted camels which are also
depicted, ’

Is “Nobody” correct when he
states that the name “Barbados”
comes from “bearded ones?” The
first person to suggest that it
might be connected with bearded
Indians is the historian Froude
as late as 1888. Oldmixon (1684)
pours scorn on the idea of beard-
ed fig-trees, which was therefore
a very early theory, but his
suggestion that it was because it
was inhabited by Barbarians is
even more improbable. If one
compares the geographical and
Whysical characteristics of Bar-
bados and Barbuda, which seems
to be a variation of the

same
eat te eee eee og ote | Songs celebrating the life and times of W'liy
similarities between thace we “The Actor” Sutton, fabulous bank hold-up

islands, both lying outside the
main chain of the Antilles, is
responsible for the name and
that it had nothing to do with
beards at all,
Yours truly,
G. T. BARTON.

The Barbados Youth
Movement

SIR,—The Barbados Y 0 u th
Movement, an organisation which
was formed for the uplift and im-
provement of poor Youth has a
total of 250 members and is de-
sirous of making an appeal for
funds, books, m e@ or any-
thing which will tend to further
the progress of the organisation.

The movement is now in its
fifteenth year and has been
assisted by lectures from such
personalities as Mr. J. Cameron
Tudor, M.A., Rev. H. A. Mayer
of the Bringing Christ to the Na-
tions, Mr. Lerranzao of British
Guiana and many others. We are
in need of funds to assist the work
and the opportunity is now taken
to appeal through the press.
Thanks very much for granting

man.

PAUL HOFFMAN, former Marshall aid
boss and now president of the Ford Founda-
tion, warns the Republicans not to miss their
opportunity this year as “one more disastrous
defeat might well make it a splinter party.”

And he plumps for Eisenhower as the mon
to back.

JOHN FORREST, financial editor of the
New York Times, says America may have
bitten off more than even she can chew in
planning £3,700 million foreign aid in a
coming year. } |

It might do more harm than good, he)
thinks, by depressing the value of the dollar
“and inducing a spirit of dependency among
our Allies.”

THE HUMAN TOUCH: In East Moline,
Tllinois, firemen called to a blazing trailer
were puzzled /because the owner, Manuel
Montecino, lay abed while they grappled

yee permission. On behalf of} With the flames. As they left one said sym- :

the ovement, . 60 ’ oy
REV. L. BRUCE-CLARKE. pathetically: ‘What’s the matter, bud ou %
MOSES. ill?” “Naw,” yawned Manuel, “tired. So

—L.2.8.
.



aT







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9



BARBADOS

s_ ADVO' oc ATE

2 Counts Withdrawn In Civil Servant’s Case



ACID THROWN
ON CANADIAN

An unknown man threw
some corrosive liquid on a five-
year-old boy, Barry Gittens,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Git-
tens of Worthing on Tuesday
evening between 5 and 5.30
o'clock. The little boy who
was born in Canada and who
came here along with his
mother, brother and sister a
year ago was in front of his
home when the man came
along. He said the man asked
him for money and he turned
to run away when the liquid
was thrown on him. Barry
was admitted and detained at
Dr. Skinner's clinic. The Po-
lice are investigating the mat-
ter.



Several Acres
Of Canes Burnt

The Police are constantly warn-
ing people against throwing lighted
cigarettes from vehicles but still
reports of cane fires continue to
flow into the Police Information
Bureau. The fires occur all over
the island,

A planter told the Advocate
yesterday that in his opinion
some of the fires are not of. acci-
dental origin, He felt that some
fields are purposely caught by
labourers with the hope of get-
ting more work. “If burnt canes
are wet, or in case of rain, they
have to be removed from the
field within three days,”! he said.

Ten acres of third crop ape
canes were burnt when a +=

occurred at Joes River Pinte
tion, St. Joseph, at abut. mtg
p.m. on Tuesday. They ‘aré Mine

property of of Joes River Estates
Ltd., and were insured.

FIRE AT GIBBS

At Gibbs Plantation, St. Peter,
a fire at about 7.30 p.m. on the
same day burnt eight acres of
second crop ripe canes, the prop-
erty of Aubrey Webster of the
same plantation. They were in-
sure

A fire at Wakefield Plantation,
St. John, at about 1.10 p.m. on
Tuesday burnt 13 acres of second
crop and eight and a half acres
of fourth crop ripe canes. They
are the property of E. M. Taylor
and were insured,

This fire extended to Claybury,
Lemon Arbor and Ashbury Plan-
tations and to Lemon Arbor Ten-
antry. At Claybury*it burnt fif-
teen and a half acres of second
crop ripe canes and two and a
half acres of young cane plants,
the property of A. L. Sealy and
insured. |

It burnt six acres of second and
six and three quarter acres of

fourth, and a quantity of fifth
crop ripe canes, six and three
quarter acres of second crop

ratoons, four and a half acres of
young cane plants and a quarter
of an acre of sour grass, the prop-
erty of Hon, J. D. Chandler, The
canes were insured.

At Ashbury it burnt eight and
a quarter acres of second crop
ripe canes which were insured.
They are the p.osperty of W. E.
Nourse. Half an acre of second
crop ripe canes were burnt when
it extended to Lemon Arbor
Tenantry. The canes are the
property of Miriam Wharton and
.Maude Alleyne and were not
insured.

AT FRERE PILGRiM

Seven acres of
canes and 33
and eight acres of
burnt When a fire occurred at
Frere Pilgrim Plantation, Chrsit
Church, at about 11.00 a.m. on
Tuesday. They are the property
of C. M. Drayton and were iiusur-
ed.

This fire extended to Ridge
Plantation and burnt seven acres
of second crop ripe canes, the
property of Ridge Ltd. which were
also insured.

It also caught fields at Edey’s
Village and burnt three acres of
first and seeond grop ripe canes
the property of peasant holders.
These canes were not insured.

Earlier in the week a fire at
Wotton Plantation burnt six acres
of first crop ripe canes, the prop-
erty of G. B. Evelyn. They were
insured.

Another fire at Fairy Valley
Plantation, Christ Church, burnt
six acres of second crop ripe canes,
They are the property of Oldbury
Estates Ltd., and were insured.

A fire at Grazettes Plantation,
St. Michael, burnt ten and a half
acres of ripe canes, four and a
half acres of young cane plants,
five acres of sour grass and four
acres of sour grass, the property
of the Barbados Co-operative
Bank Ltd. The damage is cover-
ed by insurance.

At Four Square Plantation, St.
Philip, a quantity of ripe canes
were burnt. They are the proper-
ty of Four Square Ltd., and were
insured.

first crop ripe
acres of ratoons,
trash were

Evidence

For The

Prosecution Closes

SOLICITOR GENERAL Mr. W

the Crown, at the Court
withdrew the two counts

Reece. Q.C., for
of Grand aan yesterday
of embezzlement in the case

brought against Carlos Smith, Civil Servant of Barbarees
Hill, after a query from His Lordship, the Chief Justice,
Sir Allan Collymore, that he did not see how in any évent

the last two counts in the

Evidence fér the Prosecution in

this case in which Smith is charge

now only on three counts of falsi-
fication of accounts and one of
larceny

who was cross-examined longest,
Inspector Bourne, and a few. other
policemen had given evidence.
To-day when the case resumes.
Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C. for the
defence and the Solicitor General
will address the jury and His
Lordship will sum up the case.

Mr. E. W. Barrow is associated
bo a Mr. Walcott as defence coun-
se

After the query from His Lord-
ship as to the correctness of the
counts of embezzlement, Mr. E. K.
Walcott said he had intended to
make that submission. Mr, Reece
said he had intimated as much in
his opening remarks and would
withdraw them.

The court adjourned compara-
tively early, about 2.40 p.m. after
Mr. Walcott said he hoped in the
event of an adjournment until to-
day to shorten his address.» He
said, too, that he had a headache
then and that was another reason
why he would prefer the adjourn-
ment. He said he could wish to be
no longer than tei: minutes, but he
might be forced into » position of
eovering probably unnecessary
ground.

He said he would be making the
submission that there would be no
evidence to substantiate the other
charges either,

Inspector's Evidence

When hearing began yesterday
morning the prosecution called on
Inspector Bourne of the C.I.D. to
give evidence. He said that on
July 10, 1951, at about 12.10 p.m,
he was called to the Treasury and
there he saw Mr, Charlton and
had a conversation with him, He
was shown four bundles of money;
three bundles contained new $2
notes and each of these bundles
contained $1,000. The fourth. bun-
dle contained slips of paper. He
had a bundle further sealed.

He had many interviews with
Mr. Charlton and duving the time
he was handed the bvoks,

On August 21 he interviewed
the accused at the Treasury and
Superintendent Parris was present.
The accused answered the ques-
tinpns that were put to him and he
read over the statement and signed
a

At this stage Exhibit G and Ex-
hibit C were produced to the
Court. The conversation he had
with the accused on July 10 took
place at the Audit Office. He also
took statements from other people
including the Accountant General,

Further Statement

He had another interview with
the accused on July 16, 1951, and
he made a further statement. On
August 24, 1951, at the Public
Treasury he had an interview with
the accused again and Cpl. Nurse
was present. The accused made
another statement which he
signed. While he inte: viewed the
accused he had the various books
at hand and also the cheques,

He interviewed ‘he accused
again on %ctober 9, 1951, at the
Audit Office and the same proce-
dure followed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Wal-
cott, Inspector Bourne said that
he first interviewed Mr. Charltgn
who gave him some information

He never gave Mr. Charlton all
the information he had but he
never asked Mr. Charlton to get

irformation from the accused.

Shortly after July 9 Mr. Charl-
ton told him that he had spoken
with the accused. He could not
remember well what Mr. Charlton
told him the accused said. Mr.
Charlton was the first person he
took a statement from. He gave
the statement sometime in Octo-
ber. A statement was also taken
from Mr. Chenery.

In the lower Court he was the
Complainant in the case. All the
statements were taken about the
latter part of October. He saw
the accused when all the state-
ments were nearly finished. The
accused said he had nothing to
add to the statements he had
already given.

Accused Not Suspected

He did not teli the accused he
would regret his action by not
making a statement, He took the
statements from the accused to
get information. He did not sus-
pect the accused when he took
the first statement from him.

He checked on the ariswers
that the accused gave in his sec-
ond statement and found that

In this state-
if he owned
and a

they were correct.
ment he was asked
a house, property
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TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

SPECIAL PICTORIAL
EDITION OF
KING’S FUNERAL
Will all those customers who
booked this edition please

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as a Public Servant was
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indictment could be correct

Infant Died By
Natural Causes

Death by natural causes wa
thg majority verdict of a nine-
man jury when the inquest into
the death of a new born infant
which was found in McClean’s
Gap, Britton’s Hill on March 14,
1952, was concluded before Cor-
Cc. L. Walwyn at District
“A” yesterday afternoon. .

Ilene Taylor told the Court
yesterday that as she was walk-
ing along McClean's Gap on
March 14 at about 9.15 a.m., she
heard a crying and on going in
the direction of that crying she
saw @ new born infant lying on
the ground. She then reported
the matter to the Police, The
child was taken to the Hospital.



‘Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination at
the Hospital Mortuary about 11.30
&.m,on March 15 said that the
child was not identified to him.
There were insect bites on parts
of the body and haemorrhage
under the head. Both lungs
showed pneumonia and in _ his
epinion death was due to natural
causes—namely cerebral haem-
orrhage which took place during
the course of birth.



tions, but said
policy for $1,000.

In the third statement the ac-
cused was asked if he was the
Cashier on April 5, 1945, Before he
asked the accused this question,
he could have been told so by
someone else in the Department.
The accused was not under sus-
picion then, He did not cross-
examine the accused while he
was taking the statement. During
the investigation everyone con-
cerned was asked the same type
of question. The questions were
put to the accused so that the
truth could be obtained about
the whole matter. The questions
were not directed to extract an
admission. When he asked the
accused about the cheque, he
(Inspector ~ Bourne) had_ the
cheque in his possession, While
the accused was being question-
ed Mr. Charlton was present.
Sometimes Mr. Charlton left him
with the accused. Mr. Charlton
never told him what questions
he should ask. the accused, While
asking the aecused questions he
made jottings on a j..ece of paper.

he had a_ life

Purchase of Car

had never taken the ac-
cused in the Police Van to his
(the accused) home. He lead
heard that the accused was see-
ing after the purchase of a car
for a Mr, Mapp and was taken
to his home so that he could
produce papers.

He could not say what date the
accused went to his home in the
Police van. The information sup-
plied by the accused about the
car was not completely clear. He
heard that Mr. Mapp was inter-
viewed about the car which the
accused said he purchased. At
home the accused said that he
could not find the letters relat-
ing to the purchase of this car.
He did not send the Police van
to the Public Buildings. As far as
he knew the accused was the only
person from the Treasury who
was taken to his home in the
Police van.

He said Mr. Charlton had
never come to him while he was
interviewing Smith and enquir-
ed whether Smith had been call-
ing him liar. Charlton had
stayed where he was and said
Smith’s answer at the time was

He

not true, but Smith reiterated
that what he was saying was so.
Withdrawal

He said that Smith had never
admitted withdrawing new two
dollar notes. He had not induced
him to say he had withdrawn
the money but only that it was
stated in his Petty Cash Book
that it was withdrawn.

Superintendent Frank
said that on August 21, 1951, he
was at the Treasury while a
statement in the form of ques-
tions and answers was taken by
Inspector Bourne from Smith
Smith read over the statement
and signed it. Accountant Gen-
eral Charlton was in the office
while the statement was being
taken, but he took no part in it.

The Superintendent was not
cross-examined.

Cpl. Clyde Nurse said that he
‘had been present on August 24
at the Treasury when a state-
ment was taken from Smith by

Parris

motor/#Bourne and Smith had signed.
He. said “no” to these ques-j

On October 30 Inspector Bourne
and he again saw Smith who said
jin reply to Inspector Bourne that



SELECT THESE NOW.

MARELA STUFFED OLIVES—

BIDDYS ASPARAGUS SOUP-—per tin
LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP —>per tin
-per jar
MARELA STUFFED OLIVES—per jar
CRAWFORDS CREAM _ scout ceenagiteedhe tin 1.64

Parochial Pensioners Of
St. Philip Will Get More |

PAROCHIAL PENSIONERS of St. Philip will get

News 1 n Brief

For Books

A POLICE OFFICER old
Advocate yesterday that the I
hado Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs
would very much appreciate gifts
* ol4 gramophone records, books,

eriodicals and pk
ture mm anyone These gitt
can be handed in to eny Police

tation in Barbados.

THE S.P.C.A. will be holdir
ite Annual Tas Dav Mareh
The Advocate was told that
parking of lorries and cars bé«
side the animal drinking trough
at Fa'-child Street has prevented
rroper use being made of the
trough. “The police ‘are taki:
steps to restore this amenity by
prohibitine parking within certain
limits,” this member said.

The Visual Aids Section of the
Fducation Devartment is to assist
the S.P.C.A. in the production o/
nhotoeraphs for use in the Anima!
Education programme

FOURTEEN - MONTH - OLD
Marlene Downes died suddenly at
her mother’s home, Ashbury, St
George, at about 5.00 p.m. on
Wednesday. A post mortem exam-
ination was performed by Dr
Mui» and devth was attributed to
natural ceuses

Concert At Rocks

T)







e Polen. at Hastings
b

M

nd Concert
Pocks tonight will be conducted
Cant. C E_ Raison, M BE AR.C
The Concert begins at 8 o'clock
The programme has been chosen
the requests of patrons
Gr Mr MARCH OF
PFROLDS Plater
With metal effeeta by
Trompbets
Tone ? n FINLANDIA
3 Two Valse Songs
‘a) Mighty lak
1b) Missourr]
Two Light Pieces
(a) Be ls across the
Ketelbey (Soloist
Best)
(b) Paderewski's
Duthoit
U.S.A. T'ogpourri From the South
ern Plantations arr, Chambers
NV old Kentucky Home; The Old
Folks at Home; Thezip Coon
dances: Poor old Joe: Essence of
old Verginny: Dixie and Magsa
n the eold, cold ground
Accent on Brass Washingte
Post" “The Rooster
“Ths Stors and Stripe
—John Phillip Seuss
Name the tune competition
Musical Comedy Switch"
Ifmwhich the audience are again
invited to vie with each Other
guessing the titles of well-
known Musical Comedy tunes of
the past deeade, (TMon't forget to
bring your pencil and paper and
win a bottle of Barbados fine
Rum;)
8 6. Medley
Stoddon
To commemorate
Day 17th March
9 Exe rts from s
RK deers
F nale

GOD

fror

nA h TH

Herold



Sibeliu

a Rose Nevin.
Logan

s

meadow

Cpl. W

Minuet arr

for ever

~

Selected

Shamrockland
Matrick's
ith

Pacific

O Canada

SAVE THE QUEEN|!

, would

additional 28 cents added to their present weekly |

Relief Allowance beginning from the coming Vestry Y

This inerease will bring their pension up to $1.00 per w
This was unanimously agreed to by the Vestry on

motion of Mr L

Vestry another
The motion was
red by*Mr, D
A. E. Greenidge
Weekes who said
t which they would incur
ided xpenditure and nse-
cuently increased taxation was
most important of all,

Tae Vestry accepted in
inciple the report of a Com-
the salaries of

i parochial servants during the
ming year, with the proviso
hat the committee would meet
gain and consider increases for
Church Officers who had, al
thouch receiving increases last
year, should also be given some
consideration, It was pointed out
that the increases were in keep-
ing only with the trend of the

H

strongly
D. Garner, Mr
and Mr, R. S
that the cause

also

tee to increase

Princess Alice Field
Gets Motor Lawn Mower

A Dennis motor lawn
came {pr the Princess Alict
ing Field yesterday. It
St. Michael’s Vestry $1.509

The lawn mower was taken \o
the playing field and gave a satis-
factory performance when trie
out on tall and thick grass.

lt is suppesed to cut about ten
acres of grass in one working
day-—eight hours It uses ¢gas-
oline.

“SEREK” BEING
WASHED AWAY

High
on the

mower
Play-



lide and dashing waves
Worthing coast during the
past two days were gradually
causing “Serek”, a wooden house
with conerete supports which was
built on “the beach, to collapse
The house is owned by Dr. T
Sealey

A break-water was no impedi-
ment to the waves which claimed
about six feet of the sand. The
stones of the break-water were
dug away and about 20 feet of
guard wall were dug down, leav-
ng a portion of the house dan-
serously suspended as though it
tumble down at any
moment A carpenter removed
that part of the house. The resi-
dents have moved out.

When “Serek” was built,
between 50 and 80 yards away
from the brink of the water. To-
day the water washes right up to
the breek-water A sewerago
tank of stone at the side of the
house, which was well covered up
to Tuesday, is now exposed. Sand
bags were put down among the
stones of the break-water to keep
out the but to no avail

*»
HOUSE

it was

Smith
$3,500 for Poor

Relief

A moti
that the

mn by

sup- cost of living.

The increase will cost

Public Bath

Mr. R

S. Weck
Vestry consider obtaining

ne

es

egislative consent for securing a

Joan to er

ing dist ic

ect a

ts, and a

Public Bath
verve the Marchfield and surround-
counter mo-

to

tion by Mr. D. D. Garner that two

baths

erected d

both defeated

considered

Speaking

counter
pointed
greater
areas

the areas,
that

view

instead

other
considering the pepulation
and expressed
residents
Marchfield could make us»

of one
uring the

motion,
out that
need = for

than

the

should

be

year—were

in support of
Mr

there
baths

when the Vest
the matter

y

his

Gainer

was

Marchi.

the Bath at Church Village

Mr.

tion
a tie, an
against

be left over until the Ve

it
d the
Mr,

Weekes pressed for
motion; but on the counter m>- |
being put, resolved
Chairman voted
Garner

on

had completed consideration

xX

Mi

was

We

lost on

the supporters . of the counter mo-

eke's

original

year’s Estimates.

‘ar ground w

th

or

ui

the
grounds that the matter should

Soe
ot

motion

tion, and those who advocated
that it should be left over for a
ih

while
mouuon

The St
a Committ
all
increased,
increase
actions of
H.-L,

that he

at least,

in
Reporting to the

Smith,
and the

voted

Insurance

Philp Vestry
agreed on the

ee, that

with a
the

the

against

yesterda

value

on

recommendations
the
parochial buildings should be
correspor. cing
insurance policy:

Vestry
Committee,
Churchwarden,
committee

or

of

)
)

Mi

soic
haa

gone into the matter very care‘ully

with the Insurance Company
was agreed that most of
were

it
parochial
insured.

He quoted as

the main
house,
the
Committee

and
valuation

buildings

the

building
pointed

arrived

of

in

out

, and

the

worst exain

under

the Alms-
or

the

that
at by

clese collaboration

with the Insurance Representative,
the

the total

insured

value of

be

h

parochial buildings would
more than double

The matter of having full «
erage for damage by fire on
buildings, and a separate polic:
for hurricane and other risks,
raised by Mr. R Skeeate,
Churchwarden was instructed
the Vestry to investigate the pos

sibility of
insured in

CRUMBLING

having
the manner

the
sURKRCE

buildings

iter

j



WAVES dashing against “Berek” at Worthing, Christ Church, during the past two days, dug away

the break water and part of a gu



he had nothing further to add
to what he had already said.

Cross-examined he said that
Inspector Bourne did not go on
to tell Smith that the questions
were new questions he wanted
him to answer.

P.C. Wilbert Clarke who also
went with Inspector Bourne when

the statement in the form of
question and answer was taken
from Smith was also called to
give evidence.

After his evidence the Prose-
cution closed. their case. Hearing
continues today,

For |

Originally This Weck
33 $ 30
38 32
1.80 1.60
1.08 - 96
1.40



APIE PEANUT BUTTER—per
KRAFT CHEESE SPREAD —per
DANISH SALAMI—pée Ib.
CHEDDAR CHEESE—per Ib.

COCKADE

IMPERIAL BRISKET BEEF-~per 4- Ib tin
DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—-4 Ibs.

DENMOR BONELESS HAMS—2} Ibs. ;
HUNTLEY & PALMERS CHEESE STICKS—per tin
CRAWFORDS UFILLIT BISCUITS—per tin

jar $ 61

pkt. ..

5.65
3.76
1.47
1.49

FINE RUM

A

STANSFELD,









SCOTT & CO. LTD.

—————SS

ard wall.







ENGLISH

p
.



ots te

astel Shades ef Brown,
Powder Pink, and Cherry Red.

oe: Le,



Grey,

60” wide.

BROAD



Navy Blue,

Aaua

Per Yard



STRE!

PAGE FIVE












}



~ao eS





!

ALL WOOL DO SKINS
by Mant & Winterbotham





GEORGE PAYNE'S

IS

a



Mais cocoa?

GUAVA |

CREAMS
10-DAYS
SPECIAL

Knights Phoenix
Soda Fountain











Further Reductions in Our

HOSIERY DEPT.

TUNIC SHIRTS-—with 2 separate Collars
From $7.05 and $6.55
eee R Aaa isbidey cans ecsaaivaldeses $5.50 and $3.50
COLLAR ATTACHED SHIRTS
in several qualities
From

Te oe ss
SPORT SHIRTS

in plain,colours and fancy designs

From $5.39 and $5.08
$4.50 and $2.64

KNITTED COTTON “POLAR” SHIRTS
with Short Sleeves clearing at

KNITTED ART SILK “POLAR” SHIRTS




$5.39 and $5.08
$4.50 and $2.64

with Short Sleeves clearing at............ $1.59
FANCY PALTUSED WOOLLEN
SWIM TRUNKS. From ............ $8.13 to $4.00

MESH VESTS AND TRUNKS. Clearing at $1.00
COTTON HANDKERCHIEFS. Clearing at 24c.

IRISH LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS

MMMM ENGIN «35540113 ahs tancsdedis chan sosedbonsspdavacte> 45c.
SOCKS in several qualities.

Clearing a Na saitiseas 30c., (80c., 49¢., 52 $2¢., 60c., 1 |}



HARRISON'S iat 2004



‘\larine, Powder Blue, ‘ ==
heat ‘$13.55

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO; LTD.

a

BLACK COSTUME CLOTH

58” wide.

$5.82

For Ladies’ Travelling Suits.

Per Yard



{










PAGE SIX

; ey _
CLASSIFIED ADS. Ssxerxcemers
° The Barbados Agencies annotuee that
} ey a - tra! and > eo
TELEPHONE 2508 tney NT IS of walk Semele Bay
eon a rence seurest 21.3.52—3n

'

eur wirths, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3 00 for any number of words
vp to 530 and 6 cents per word for each
dditions] word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
detween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Netices only after 4 p.m
















DIABETES CONTROL

FOR SALE








Announcing by urgent request the

Natural Herbal remedy which stands

ee ae arest to @ sure cure Safely reduces
AUTOMOTIVE excessive urine and sugar content i

out of 10 cases cured, 9 out 10 con-

ee = trolled Also for Asthma patients, we



AUSTIN VAN—One (1) (0 H.P. Austin | announce the famous “Chinese Asthma























Var. in good, working order. Phone | ..g Bronchial cure”
DIED 4821, D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd Dispensed at the ‘‘Nature-cure Resort”
iene 13.3.52—+.t.n. | where mechanical obstructions are re-

SEALY—On March 20, at her motirer’s eee ee 7 |moved and God and Nature are at work

residence, College Savannah, St. John, CAR 1939 10 h.p. Ford Good 6M | Other conditions treated are High and
fdna Louise Sealy. Her funeral will | dition, partly new tyres. | Price Low Blood Pressure, Nervous disorders,
leave her mother’s residence at 4.30} Can be seen at C. Smith's Garage, ~| Paralysis, Female disorders and Rhbeu-
this afternoon for St. Mark's Chapel, buck Street. near Craig's — an. matic complaints ;

St. John. oa s >} Dr. W. H. WIGGINS,

Fitz Sealy (Widower). Jonathan, | —— Renken nent est Se ee D.M.T. (Bng.) GC.S.M
ree ence, Diana Sealy (Children), | CAR — Ford Prefect in excellent, gon- iP: Mt, Bae. ee
Miriam Gittens (Mother), Bernice. |dition, 5 wood tyres, Price $700. Agply | Naturopathic Physician
Nits, Monica, Jesse (Sisters), }C 5 Hamilton, 91—35 . “| "Ebenezer", Crumpton St, St, Michael
ae and —, — (CAR: F 1952 Morr Oxtord—just, eom- Dial 415 21.3.52--2n
iether S isimhemintisleeecsali tapers pleted 2,000 miles Courtesy G , sec

‘On March 20, 1952 Martha Ann | 4616 20. 3.5%-Gn FOR RENT

Her funeral will Jeave Binfield. | —" eee steer

, St. Joseph at 4.45 this afternoon for CAR: Standard Vanguard 1952 manag

St. John's Church and the! to St done 1,600 miles, excellent for e .

John’s Cemetery site Sertice- Apply? on a a HOUSES '
Samue!, Worrell, Hamblin, Noel | Works, Roebuck St. or one ‘ —_
and Henry Wilkie, and Etta Clarke. 19.3.52—8| BEACH COTTAGE on St. James Coast,

21.3.52—In perfect bathing, quiet. All meals and

ee CAR 1947 Morris 10 hp., in A 1} services supplied from main house, Own
IN MEMORI condition. Good tyres, completely o¥er-| Telephone. Suitable married couple,
hauled. Price $1,200 Phone 4075 o1 | ($25.00) per day American Plan for two

een esrniennat ~~ contact P. L. Kelly, c/o Musson's ice. | people. Apply: Beachlands, St. James or
GRIFFITH: In ever loving memory © 19 3 52—t fn | "phone 6157 14.3.52—t. fn
our dé Mother, Miriam Griffitt —___—_--—-- -- atone ibiaintinas
who died on March 21, 1951. STATION WAGON One Chevrolet HOUSE “Vermont”, Pine Road, fur-

God saw the road was getting] Station Wagon with good extra Engine. | nished or unfurnished, Dial 8283 or 4102,
rough, G. E. Ward, Morris Service Station. 19.3.52—7n

The hil's too hard to climb—
He gently closed her loving eyes
And whispered peace be thine.
Ever to be remembered by:—
Husband), Louise (Mother), Daphne,
Leroy, Keitha, Dorothy, Dora, Clistorene.
Carol (Children), Rodney, Grantley
nita, Lenox
na@ Clyde (Sons -in law)
21.3.52—1n

’ TAKE NOTICE
PARLIAMENT

That BENSON & HEDGES LIMITED, a
Company organized under the Jaws of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain ana
Northern Ireland whose trade or busines

dress is 12, Old Bond Street, London
Â¥ 1, England has applied for the regis





tratién of » trade mark in Part “A” of }ment just arrived. The pogss 6 we a

Register in respect of cigarettes, cigars) model. A limited quantity. Cc . ae

and tobacco, and will be entitiead to] MAFFER & CQ., LTD, Dial 2767 REAL ESTATE

register the “same after one month from 19.3.52—-5n

the 19th day of March, 1952, unless some er ee James Street, on Friday

person shall in the meantime give notice TUR e 2ist March 1952, ot 2 p.m. in separate

in @plicate to me at my office of oppost- df: FURNI E 7 ?

tion of such registration, The trade mark ; . The Risk dwelling house standin:
: iss bar: . at 8

can be seen on application at my office ‘ures. a are see on 1 acre 1 rood 19 perghes of land near

Dated this Ist day of March, 1952
H, WILLIAMS, |
Registrar of Trade Marks
18 3.52—3n





‘TAKE NOTICE
SPORTSMAN

That THE LAMBERT COMPANY. 4
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware, United

s of America, whose trade or busi-
ness address is 930 Newark Avenue,
Jersey City-6, New Jersey, U.S.A., has
applied for the régistration of a trade
mark in Park “A of Register in respect
of cologne, after-shaving lotion, hair
lotion, taleum powder, bay rum, persone
uv deodorant, foot powder, insect
repellant and sun screen lotion, and wil
be entitled to register the same after
one month from the 20th day of March,
1952, unless some person shall in the
meantime give
me at my office of opposition of such
registration. The trade mark can be seen
on application at my office, .

ch, 1952

Dated this 4th day of M
BH. WILL)
Registrar of Trade Marks

20.3.52—3n

TAKE NOTICE



CAFENOL where 20.3.52—40 ting spot situated at Brittons Hill next
e . to Mr. Maurice Cave, overlooking the
That THE SYDNEY ROSS CO., a cor: | ~COTTON UF ORE cbite sm », PIMC-| Rockley Golf Course and Navy Gardens,
poration organized and existing under] © iL NG ae bait s “ye tie at | Consisting of approximately 17,000 sq. ft.
the laws of the State of New Jersey RP ALAND 52 Gane wi c For further particulars, apply: John
United States of America, Manufacturer. | nn Stree! m.2.52—1 W. Corbin, c/o T. Geddes Grant, Ltd
Whose trade or busines address is 12% = "| Phone 4442. 8.3.52—13n
aren Street, fey a New Jerse Kraft Cheese in Packages
$S.A., has applied for the registration | ¢ 7 bs, , HOUSE: Brand new, araple 3 bedroom
of a trade-mark in Fart “A” of Registe: |‘ wifts Cheese in Tins, 5 Ib Tings Cheese



in respect of pre ation for use i
medicine and pharmacy, and will be
entitled to register the same after on

month from the 20th day of March 1952
unless some person shall in the meantim
give notice in duplicate to me at mr

office of opposition of such registration

The trade mark can be seen on appli
cation at my office.
Dated this 13th day of March, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Mark
20,3.52——3)

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICI

The application of Levi Boxill of Cher:
Grove, St. John for permission to
Spirits, Mait Liquors, &e at « boar
and shingle shop at Cherry Grove, St
John
Dated

A
Police





this 19th day of March
W. HARPER, Esq
Magistrate, Dist. “C"*
LEVI BOXELL,
Applicant
This application will be consid
ed at a Licensing Court to be id
ice Court, Dist. “C" on Wednesday
e 2nd day of April 1952 at 11 o'clock

1982

i

N.B



A. W. HARPER,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “C’



ain

'
|



FURNITURE



AUCTION

NONPAREIL

Talmoral Gap, Hastings

thursday, 27th March

at 11.30 am.

—

|

|

We are instructed by Mr. Tony
wis, who is leaving the taland

aispose ‘of bis Furniture and
ffecis 23 Mated below

View 'ng merning of sie

acr Choir sholstercd
a7 Mate -Round and Square

Mining Tables, Mah. Oce. Tables,












Tookea Miah. Wardrpbes,
i Drawers. Mah
» and Steel, Mah
Sepet (7? x 9, Bireh
| s Tabic.
we; § Sing Beds and
Mattresses, Chil-
wre Wei drobes, Linen Cab
fet, Tavie Lamps, Steel Desk
Stee! Sink, Child's Desk & Stoo
Grand Piano, Singer Sewing
Machine. Larder, Portable Gramo
phone, Venetian Blind, Baby’
HWigh Chair and Cot, Congoleun
PPrrors, Fact Fig Polisher.
Elec. Kettle Hot ¢
lrons, F , Elee £ G
Refrigerator GEC v
Radio, O Stove ter 1
gauge Winchest r
4-10 Dout ba Shot ¢ z
Remington ¢ vi «
Tools, Ct G hy
Equip
bi intere

s
AUCTIONEERS

John Wa. Bradew
& co.

A.F.S.. F.V.A





James | Trucks

(Grand-children!, Lavan} These are 1/18 Scale and

notice in duplicate to! 4616.

RIMBELLISHERS
Vauxhall Velox 15” rim only. Beautify LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
your Car with these attractive wheel REMOVAL

trims, Courtesy Garage 4391. The application of Wilbert Greenidge
16.3.62—6n. | of Garden, St. James, the holder of

Liquor No. 1106 of 1952 granted

| TENNED MEATS: Sausages, Salmon, | in a@ boarded and shingled
| Corned Beef, Cereal Beef, Luncheon | shop edroof attached, situated at
| eet, Steak & Ki vy Pudding, Veai | Hold . St. James to remove said
| Loaf. W. M, Ford, 35 Roebuck St., Dial | Li to a boarded and shingled shop
| 4338 20,3, 52—2n | with root attached situated ot Gar-
den, St. James and to use it at such

Applicant
Blind, Egbert Clarke, 56, of] ‘o: S. H. NURSE, Esq
| Jordan's, Si. George, Was taken Flolice Magistrate, Dist. “E”

» the General Hospital with al N padtaterebebention will be consid-
fractured left knee yesterday) red at a Licensing Court to be held on
sbout 10.30 a.m. after falling off } the ist April 1952 at 11 o'clock am at
» fodder cart which he was driv-| Police Court, Dist. “BE”. Tor eee
ing, He was detained, N Sais “E"

Clarke was hauling cane fodder Eee? ease ioe *

_

19.3.52—5n









pacts ——- MODERN FURNISHED FLATS—Four
TRUCKS: Two Austin Two-Speed axle | Aces, St. Lawrence Gap. Apply: Mrs
Courtesy Garage—Dial 4616, jL. Hassell, Phone 4003 21,3.52—3n

18.3.52—6n

—— | MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
VAUKHALL VELOX MODEL CARS| Silver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
are Powered | For further particulars. Apply to Alma

by 3 dry ceil batteries. Forward and|/ Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands. Worthing.

reverse gears. Only limited number 23.2.52—t.f.n.

available! Courtesy Garage, Dial AQ |
15.3. 53-—6n New Modern Flat on Blue Waters Ter-

race Spacious cupboards modern
kitchen and plumbing, running water
in all bedrooms, near to Rockley Beach,

ELECTRICAL
and a few minutes walk from Golf

CLOCKS — Electric Clocks made by} oy» Phone 8280 20.3. 82—tfn

Ferranti. Al types for homes, offices, = "
PUMLIC SALES





and factories. KR. Hunte & Co , Ltd
Dial 5136 19.3.52-—3n

_—_—
PYE BATTERY SETS—Another ship-

















Fitts Village, St. James. The dwelling
house is constructed of wall, concrete
and hardwood. Water, electric and tele-
phone services installed. Right of way
to the sea.

Cedar Dining Tables $45. Mag. Dressing
Tables $64, Birch Dining Chairs $15 pr.
Chest of Drawers $45, Easy Chairs

ea. Leatherette Easy Chairs $35. GEC
Electric Stove $80. Combination Safe



875. Child's Cedar Press $45, and many| ?- 13,319 square feet of land on the
others. 19 3.52—$n. | 8e4 coast St. James (opposite the Risk
dwelling house) with the newly efected

LIVESTOCK Bungalow thereon. Water and electric

Services installed,

3. 23,600 square feet of
sea coast, St. James
dwelling house),

4. 6 acres 29% perches of arable land
to the back of the Risk dwelling house,



land on the

—————$
COW—To calf on 22nd. Gave 32 pts. (opposite the Risk

last calf. Apply Gibson, Arch Hall,
Thomas. 21.9.52—1n

——————
COW: Giving 35 pints a day. Second



St. James.
Calf Apply: Norwood Plantation. For inspection apply to Mr. C. A
18.3.52—6P | Coppin on the premises. Telephone 0150
— For further particulars and conditions
MECHANICAL of sale, apply to:—

| HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD.



—_
TRUCK See ate pve ec, HOTS 5.3,52—9n
Ony a limi few ava e; secure

pone now! COURTESY GARAGE, Dial ALL THAT Tenantry known as

“Alkins Tenantry” containing about Six
Acres of land situated at Eagle~ Hall
For pariculars and terms and conditions
of sale apply to the undersigned.

The above will set up for sale at our
Office on Friday the 2st day of March
1952 at 2.30 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY
Lucas Street.
12. 3, 52—9n.

A desirable build-

MISCELLANEOUS
“ADMIRALTY CHARTS of Barbados.
Carlisle Bay, West Indies, Guadeloupe to

Trinidad. Roberts & Co., Dial 3301.
19.3.52—3n

|

1

BISCUITS: Try our Delicious Short-
eake and Shirley Biscuits on Sale every-





“BUILDING §




‘house, all conveniences, with party~
! sized Living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room Garage, laundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under
‘On attractive hillside site, Rockley New



1 Australian Cheese per Ib
rd, 35 Roebuck Street, Dial 9489.
20.3.52—2n



—
COKE—A quantity of Foundry Coke for



immediate delivery. Apply W.* Biscuit | Road. A. Barnes & Co., i ae ee
Co., Ltd. Phone 4337, 18,3.52—6n ta _
sore rasan
HAMS: Canadian Hams, @ 1b 10 8 Ib) ,NON PAREIL, Balmoral Gap, Hastings,
Hams in Ting 2% I) for $3.12 and 4 Ib' standing on 22,137 square fect of and
Tins Brisket Beef, W. M. Ford, 96 :,7e House Contains su dscner
Roebuck Street. Dial 3489 ‘00.3. 5a—an living ‘rooms, water and electric -lght

throughout, servants’ rooms and garage.
wnspection by eer tek phone 3779.
The above will, be set up for sale

UST RECESVED—Valor Stove par

Nb!















chiding Chimneys, Spreaders, G .
t Fri-

top Plates, Wicks, and Ovens Also at publi com Mon at 2 ®. Ping a
Presar Stove parts. Enquire Auto Tyre , 0°Y the 2ist teal” March at the Office
Company, Trafalgar & Spry Streets. io the WA GRINGTON & SEALY

hone 2696 4 20.9.52—t.f.n. Soba bixedt

JELLY: Calves Feet Jelly, Guava Jelly 7-3.82—10n is tie
nd Melba Sauce. W. M. Ford, 35 Roe- ae “gi eas
buek Street. Dial 2489 20,9.52--2n | AUCTION

OlL—The wirlt’s finest motor oil! I will offer for sale by Public Com-

Veedol, ot all leading Garages and Service



5 petition at my office Victorid Street
Stations. Your vebicle deserves the best. (TO-DAY FRIDAY Bist. ot 2 p.m. 2200
\s OL. “Found wherever fine cars| q ft land with chattel house con-
eomaes 17.2,52—t.f.n. | coining open gallery, drawing, dining,
z : bedrooms, usual out offices, Water and
aQNS DOAK VAT — Capacity appr. | Light @f WV, Ss. MICHARL. UiMmEs-
} gallons. rice . 00. Stansfeld, | , , 7
| Seott & Co., Ltd. 19.3.52—3n ATE POSSESSION DIAL 2

21.3.52—In

\rcher MeKenzie



— In chrome, for







last deBeribed premises
"Dated this ith day of March, 1952
WILBERT GREENIDGE,

Blind Man Injured

21,8.52—1n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

A vacancy exists for a Technical Sergeant Instructor for the Motor
Yransport Platoon on the Permanent Staff of the Barbados Regiment

The salary will be $840 x 48 — 1,080, subject to deduction at the
rate of 4% under the Widows and Orphans Pension Act. It is intended
that the post should be pensionable. Applicants should have ten tc
ffieen years experience in technical motor transport work, and must
be a practising motor mechanic. Previous experience in instructing
ind previous service in the Army will be an advantage. The appointee
will be subject to the current conditions of service and departmental
procedure and discipline,

Written applications, together with testimonials and educational
certificates will be received by the Colonial Secretary, Colonial Secre-
tary’s Office, Bridgetown, up to Friday 28th March, 1952.

21.3.52.—2n

yn Jordan's Plantation,









Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
ment) Order, 1952, No. 8 which will be published in the Official Gazette
of Thursday 20th March, 1952.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Beef-Salted” are as follows: —







RETAIL
ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE PRICE
(not more than) (not more
than)
B alted:
tra Family, Navel,| $80.90 per bri. of 200
Plate, Rounds, Brisket lbs. or 48¢. per Ib. in

lots of not less than

lbs, ;
20 per bri. of 200
Ibs. or 41ce. per Ib. in
lots of not less than
25 Ibs,

5

48c. per lb



(b)

Flank or Boneless Flank

7












































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

}









EXPERIENCED Cutter d Supervisor |
for Ladies’ Garments. Write, stating
experience, to Box X X C/o Advocate. }
21.3. 53—3r.

MANAGER—Required for the Grenada
Sugar Factory Ltd. A General Manager. }
Applicants must supply credentials, |
State experience, age 8nd ry re
quired 2—6n, |



“a

15.3



Part time Accountant needed
Advanced Book-Keeping Four Morn-
ings a week, 9 tl 12. noon. Suit
married person, Reply with credentials,
giving experience to !-—

MBBS

not |













"NOTICE

LOST CERTIFICATE
THE WEST INDIA RUM REFINERY LTD
Notice is hereby given thet application
has been made to the Board of Directors
of the above-named Company for the





10 Shares No, 16753 to 16758,36449 to 36451,
26969 inclusive in the name of Rosamund |
Wolrond Hutchinson, the original of
which has been been lost or misplaced,
and Notice is hereby given that within 14)
days from the date jhereof, if no claim
or representation is made in respect of
such original Certifigate, a new Certificate
will be issued.
By Order of the Board of Directors



di. R. LEACH
Secretary
19.8.52—3n
a ae |
NOTICE

THREE HOUSES FACTORY LIMITED

LOST Share Certificate N& 75 for
1,400 shares numbered 11601 to 11900,
21921 to 32270, SM271 to 32620, 11551 to

11600, 10676 to 10850 and 11026 to 11200 in
the name of Richard Murrell Smith, |
notice is hereby given that a duplicate
Certificate will be Issued in three months
from this date unless valid objection be
lodged with the undersigned prior
thereto.
4 By order of the Board,
E. N. REECE,

Secretary.
Three Limited,
March,

Houses Factory
1952
19.3,52—3n
ee
THE BARBADOS YOUTH MOVEMENT
iSth YEAR
Aims, Activities and Motto; To en-
courage ugeful citizens, and improve the
lives of poor youths Activities, Reli-
gious and General Knowledge, Music
Singing, Dramatic Shorthand, type-
writing, etc. Motto: Lord help us lest
we fall, The Barbados Youth Movement
leads, whilst others follow
Rev L. BRUCE-CLARKE,
Lord President and Founder
J. B. GRANT, L.Th
OLGA BROWNBE,
Social Worker

21



Rev
Mrs





Public Official Sale

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904)
(1904-6) & 20)

On Friday the 2ist day of Mareh 1952
at the hour of 2 o’clock in the afternoon
will be gold at my office to the highest
bidder for any sum not under the apprais-
ed value

All that certain plece
teining by admeagurement 28.6 Perches
situate at Bath Village, in the Parish of
Christ Chyrch butting and bounding on
Irnds now or late of one Clarke, on a
lene called Spotlane, and on two sides
on the Public Road, together with the
messuage or Dwelling Houses, Buildings,
&c., appraised as follows;—

The whole — property appraised to
EIGHT HUNDRED AND THIRTY THREE
POUNDS = (£835.0.0) Attached from
Ethelbert Johnson foy and towards sat-

faction, &e., |

N.B,—25% Deposit to be paid on da’ |

{ purchase y |

of

Land eon



* 1. 9. HEADLEY,
rovost Marshal
I Marshal's Office

March 1952

ovost
irda





‘EP
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
The application of Lolita Walker,
hopkeeper of Roebuck Street, City, for
permission to sell Spirits, Mait Liquor
&c., at bottom floor of a 2 storay wooden |







building at Upper Roebuck Street, City
Dated this 20th day of March, 1962. |
To: -H. A. TALMA, Esq., |
Police Magi > t
Distriet “A". |
LOLITA WALKER, |
Appiicant
N.B.—This application wil be
sidered wt a Licensing Court to be |
at Police Court, District “A’ on Tuesde
the Ist day of April, 1962 at 11 o’elock

acm
H, ‘A. TALMA,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’’.



VAKE NOTICE
PHILIP MORRIS

That PHILEP MORRIS & CO., LIM-
ITED, a British Company, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is |
& 20 Bateman Street, London, W 1, Eng-
land, has applied for the registration of
a trade mark in Part A" of Register in
respect of manufactured and unmanufec
tured tobace> Including cigarettes,’ and
will be entitled to register the same
after one month from the 20th day of
March 1952 unless some person sha:l in





the mes time give netice in duplicate
to me at my office of opposition of such
regis ton The tr mark can be



seen on application at my office
Dated this 13th day of March, 1952



H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks. |

20.3.52—3n



issue of a Duplicate Share Certificate for} the jaws of the State o!



eee

LOST & FOUND

TAKE NOTICE



LOST

WRIST WATCH One Pierce Wrist-

Stop Watch on beach near Yo Cashel, |
We.ehes, Ch. Ch Finder return to T
Gale, Fdmmundton, Weiches, Ch. Ch. or

Adivocate Advertising Office Reward |

Offered 20.3.52—t.f.n. |

TAKE NOTICE
RENOWN

SANFORIZED TRIUNISE
That The RENOWN SHIRT & GAR-
MENT MANUFACTURING COMPANY |


























Registrar of Trade Marks.

substitutes; flour and preparations mac«
19 3.52—3n

from cereals; bread, biscuits, cakes, cak«
mixes, pastry and confectionery, ices
honey, treacle, yeast, baking powde:
mustard, pepper, vinegar, sauce
ice, and will be entitled to regis
fter one month from th
1952, unless som

1 iia atntenpineniianonmenren
TAKE NOTICE
LUMINAL *

salt,
spices;
ter the same @
19th day of March,

That WINTHROP-STEARNS INC., a ioe inate
person shall in the meantime give
corporation organized ond ecietins on in duplicate to me at my ‘aes 0
. aecurans, ‘whose | 0PPosition of such registration, Th«
hoy ye Cee Breed ts 1450° Broad- trade mark can be seen on applicatio:
way, New York, New York, U.S.A., has ee dan dan ot Mase tee
applied for the registration of a trade tt. WILLIAMS,

“A” of Resistes in seeyect
§ preparations for use in cine ani
| Sparmacy, and will be entitled to regis-
‘er the same after one month from the
@#h day qf March 1952 unless some per-
on shall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
tion of such registration, The trade mark
can be seen on application #5 oe Sire.
Dated this 13th day of March, .
e , H. WILLIAMS,

ark in Part Registrar of Trade Marks.

19 3 52-





TAKE NOTICE

FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952

TAKE ‘NOTICE
CHAMPION

That G. H. HAMMOND COMPANY,
the laws of the State of Miinois, United States o:
trade or business address is Union Stock Yards, City of Chicago,
WS A... bas applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part
in respect of Food products and substances used as Ingredients in a
packing house products, including fresh, prepared, cooked, salted, dried, pen 4
smoked, preserved, frozen, and canned meat and meat products, ay .
beef, pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish, and rabbits, and food pocmets Om. e
therefrom, sausage and Sausage meat, eggs. cheese, chile con carne, lard, shorten _

oils, edible tallow, margarine, cleomargarine, ice cream, butter, butter-

milk, gelatin, canned vegetables, canned baby foods, canned fruits, dried fryit,

pickles and condiments, vinegar, jams, jellies, marmalade, pie filler, mice, meal,

huts, figs, dates, raisins, cod liver oil, salt, stock feeds, poultry feeds, fox
eeds, dog feeds, bone meal, and oyster shells;

Seaps and ingredients of soaps, inchuding soap bars, flakes, liquid roap

including

a corporation organised ond existing —
America, mufacturers,

‘ State of Illineis,

“A” of Register

foods, especially

and powdered soap, cleansing, polishing, and scouring preparations, and

and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 20th day of
Mareh, 1952, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate

c/o Advocate LIM?TED, a company dulyineorporated Fertilizers, particularly artificial fertilizers and ingredients thereof,

18 3 52—4n | in the Colony of Trinidad & Tobago, chemicals, Bone meal, peat moss, animal urea, hard wood ashes, manure ts,

| Garment Manufacturers, whose trade or PUFFIN land bern shavings;

COOK: An Experience Cook with go« 4 | business address ts No, 107 Queen Street, Chemicals, especially superphosphate, sulphuric acid, phosphate rock, soda
references. A pay for the rigit| Rort«t-Spain, Trinidad, British West| That VAN DEN BERGHS (EXPORT) | and soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, ammonium phosphate.
person. Apply: 37 Swan Street lindies, has applied for the registration | LIMITED, a British Company, whose |cyanamid, aluminum sulphate, zine sulphate, manganese sulphate, sulphate of

20.3.52—2n | of a trade mark in Part “A” of anes trade or blsiness —— is es potash, agricultural limestone, gypsum, muriate of potash, calcium nitrate, copper
in respect of articles of clothing, and/ House, Blackfriars, London, . sulphate, and potasshim nitrate;
MISCELLANEOUS Will be entitled to registet the same after | Pngland, Merchants, has applied for the In secticides and fangicides, particularly arsenate of lead, caleium arsenate,
a: | ne month from the 19th day of March | registration of a trade mark in Part “A’ | nicotine sulphate, and paradichlorobenzene,
— |} 952 unless some person shall in the | oi Register im respect of meat, fish Industrial oils and greases, and inedible tallow

PEKIN DUCKS: 2 Ducks and 1 Drake, | meantime give notice in duplicate to me | poultry and same; meat extracts; pre. Hides and skins, hair, feathers, wool, benes, horns, hoofs, animal glands,

about 12 months old. Din) 3187. C. A. | at my office of opposition of such rewi8-| served, dried and cooked fruits anc | animal casings and membranes;
Proverbs, Flint Hall 21.93.5219 | tration. ‘The trade mark can be se€n) vegetables; jellies, jams, ees, milk ane Glues and adhesives, including animal, bone and hide glues, and vegetable
ware on application at my aie h, 1988 other dairy products; edible aa and ndpasiven:
Dated this 4th day of March, . |fats; preserves, pickles; coffee, tea ‘ertilizer spreaders, soil testing kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks, and
PUBLIC NOTICES H. WILLIAMS, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffe | bags and containers
- < — ' * . . , *
|
} to me at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be
seen on‘application at my office
i | Dated this 15th day of March, 1952.
. H WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade jarks.
| .3.52—3n.



TAKE NOTICE
HAMMOND'S ROSEBUD

That G. H. HAMMOND COMPANY, « corporation organized and existing under
| the laws of the State of Illinois, United States of America, Manufhcturers, whose
| trade or business address is Union Stock Yards, City of Chicago, State of Illinois,
| U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
| in respect of Food products and substances used as ingredients in foods, especially

packin house pradnyine including fresh, prepared, cooked, salted, dried, cured,
smoked, preserved, rozen, and canned meat and meat jucts, hy
beef, pork, lamb, mutton, veal, poultry, fish, and rabbits, and send produbte abiaves





| therefrom, sausage and sausage meat, eggs, cheese, chile con carne, lard, Ss

Registrar of er CASTORIA | edible oils, edible tallow, margarine, oleomargarine, ice cream, butter, butter -

.3.. \. milk, gelatin, canned vegetables, canned baby foods, canned fruits, dried fruit,

CL i Oates ie adlane ok ae tee Jains marmalade, pie filler, rice, mea,

3, , dates, raisins, © iver oil, t, stock feeds, It i » fox

TAKE NOTICE That STERLING, paonocrs INTER | feeds, dog feeds, bone meal, and oyster shells; Tt eee
on ay pone ae urde Soaps and ingredients of soaps, including soap bars, soap flakes, liquid sop

BETAXIN

That WINTHROP-STEARNS INC., @
corporation organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Delaware,
United States of America, Manufactur-
ers, whose trade or business address is
1450 Broadway, New York, New York,
United States of America, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in
Part “A” of Register in respect of pre-
parations for use in medicine and phar-
macy, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 20th
day of March, 1952 unless some person
thall in the meantime give notice in
duplicate to me at my office of opposi-
ton of such registration. The trade r@erk
can be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 13th day of March, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
20.3.52—3n.

e laws of the State of Delaware, U S.A
Manufacturers, whose trade or busi
ness address is 120 Astor Street, Newark
New Jersey, U.S.A., has applied for
the registration of a trade mark in Par\
“A” of Register in respect of prepara
tions for the use in medicine and phar
macy, and will be entitled to registe:
the same after one month from the 20th
day of March 1952 unless some persor
shall in the meantime give notice ir
duplicate to me at my office of opposi
tion of such registration. The trade mark
can be seen on application at my office

Dated this 13th day ie ets 1952



Registrar of Trade Marks
20.3.52—3n





TAKE NOTICE

urtis





TAKE NOTICE
MEJORAL

That THE SYDNEY ROSS CO., a cor-
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New Jersey,
United States of America, Manufacturers,
whose trade or business address is 120
Astor Street, Newark, New Jersey,
U.S.A... has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of preparations for use in
medicine and pharmacy, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 20th day of March 1952
unless some person shall in the meantime
eve notice in duplicate to me at my
office of opposition of such registration.
Yhe trade mark can be seen on appli-

ation at my office

Dated thig 13th day of March, 1952.

H, WILLIAMS



att = CURTIS DISTILLERY CoM
Pp ITHD, a company organized
under the laws of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern
Distillers, whose trade of business
is 86, Mile End , London, E., Eng-
fund has applied ior *ihe registration
of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register
in respect of wines, spirits, lquors ay
cordials (aleoholic) and will be entitled
to register the same after one month
from the 20th day of March 1952 unless
some person shall in the meantime give
e in duplicate to me at my office

of opposition of such registration, The
trade mark can be seen on application
at my office

Dated this 13th day oe

Registrar of Trade Marks,
20.3.52—3n.

TAKE NOTICE
ARALEN

WINTHROP-PRODUCTS ENC., 4



arch, 1952.

That WILLIAMS,



corporation organized and existing under Registrar of Trade Marks:
the laws or the State of Delaware, 20.3.52—3n.
United States of America, Manufactur-

crs, whose trade or busines, acocem

1450 Broadway, New York, ’

United States of America,” has TAKE NOTICE

for the registration of a trade in










and powdered soap, cleansing, polishing, and scouring preparations, and det j
* * ls yerits ;
és oes Perse ee artificial fertilizers and ingredients thereof, inelading
e ; e meal, peat moss, antmal u hard i 6
por horn dorian see ha Wood ashes, manure salts,
Chemicals, especially superphosphate. sulphuric acid
: 5 b » Phosphate rock, sod:
| and soda products, nitrate of soda, sulphate of ammonia, ammonium homiitate:
ete SE sulppate. zine sulphate, manganese sulphate, sulphate of
” » agricultura, mestone, gypsum, muriate of Pr
ulpnates and potassium nitrate. rere. CRE eee Canes
nsecticides and fungicides, particularly arsenat
nicotine sulphate, and paradichlorobenzene; mes
ee oe and greases, and inedible tallow;
es and skins, hair, feathers, wool, r i 1
iia casings and membranes; 7 PE Nok ee
aaesnaiine: and adhesives, including animal, bone and hide glues, and vegetabic
Fertilizer spreaders, soil
bags and containers,

and will be entitled to register the same after one month from the 20th day of

March, 1952, unless some person shall in th
to me at my office of opposition of such egistration, The trate teach lt Ge



lead, calcium arsenate,

hoofs,

testing kits, hatchery equipment, baby chicks, and







—





Seok Mas kcplinntiae lot eet cee registration. The trade mark..can be
Dated this 15th day of March, 1952.

} H. WILLIAMS,

} Reristrar of Trade Marks.

| 20.3.52—3n

SHIPPING NOTICES

|



‘ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

|S.S. COTTICA, 2ist March, 1952.

| M.S. HECUBA, 21st April, '1952

|M.S. BOSKOOP, 27th April, 1952

SAILING TO SOUTHAMPTON AND
AMSTERDAM

us |

e ae cme SA BEE will
ccept Cargo an rASSE| ivy
Dominica, Antigua, Montse
Nevis, and St. Kitts. Date of
Sailing Thursday 20th March 1952,
|
The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
iniea, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
and St. Kitts Date of Salling
Friday 2ist March 1952.

The M.V. DAERWOOD will
aecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lueia, Grenada and, Aruba.
Passengers only for St. Vincent.
Date of Sailing to be notified,

B.W.I, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

Consignee, Tele. No, 4047

ORGANJESTAD, 25th March, 1952.

SALLING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO
: AND BRITISH GUIANA
S.S. COTTICA, 7th April, 1952.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND
CURACAO
M.S. HERS#LIA, 2ist March, 1952.
M.S. HECUBA, 2ist April, 1952,
8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,,
Agents.

Canadian National Steamships



















techy te et meas nd pel °
parations for use ine and phar- SOUTHBCUND
:-aey, and will be entitled to register Montreal Malin eat Me Batis.” ;
fhe same after one month from the 20th CANADIA: , ney Boston —B'dos Bdos
cay of March, 1952 unless some person LADY Lad CRUISER -- 13 Mar. _ 23 Mar, 23 Mar. ~
shall in the meantime give notice in . Cape aon 1 ee _ 21 Mar. 2 Apr 11 Apr, 48 Apr
cuplicate to me at my office of i ; Caekornt ae . : _ 16 Apr 17 Apr. 2 Apr. 38 Apr
t on of such registration. The trade mark ; CANADIA: CRUISER 29 Apr. 2 May ~ 11 May 13 May
can be seén on application at my office [Abe Mee ee 9 May 12 May — 21 May. 23°Mav
Dated this 13th day of March, 1992. ORMADIAN oe ie 19May 22 May % May 2June ‘3 Jun:
H. WILLIAMS, TAnY IAN CHALLENGER 30 Ma; 2 June _ ll June 12 June
Registrar of ks. ep wans oat? 9June 12 June 14 June 2 June 2 June
in. CheaSICn Gone +, 2 June 23 June rae Sau 3 dale
oS LADY Miner 2 30 June 3 July —_ 12 July 13 July
- . " . 11 July 14 July 16 July
_ TAKE NOTICE noondetetel
No
SCOTSMANS HEAD RTBBOUND anes Ae Pearse ree Apayes Arrives
4 - is ston . 2
That THE CURTIS DISTILLERY com.| ESR’ cruusen Mar Meer, oS Ap 4 Ape TAR
, CDN. CRUISER 4 Ap TA . or
PANY LIMITED, a company organized | LADY RODNEY 24 Apr. pr. —- | 14 Apr 7 Apr| : ‘ |under the laws of the United Kingdom! | ADy NELSON 10 M 26 Apr 5 Ma) | “ 6 May 10 Ma:
That of Great. Britain and Northern Ireland./ ¢pN CRUISER *” May BS May 83 May| - 3 Mn) 7 Moy
eA TIO! .¢or- | DI whose of Dasinens oditrese CANADIAN 7 May ~ , SJunc 8 June 11 June
poratian y ted land’ has applied for the st tion cane Scie 3 June 8 June 15 June 18 June; 1 June
States of rad of a trade matk in Part “A” of Register) CANADIAN ew 15 June 17 June 27 June - 28 Jung 1 July
Sa dees : | im ceapect of wingeagbts, avers and | TCRAIRENGER .. 23 June 98 fue | — 8 aah
i laetoraee as ; LADY NELSON 6 July 8 duly ) may 8: Sula (ts We aacty
New rs, Bes |to register the same after one month| (DN CRUISER :; 14 Jule See — | dur) 9 Jul
ru fh enbeet | fom Oe en ahall in the meantime give | CANADIAN rg Poe Po; Pah mig Ee 7a Oe
" "i . some person shall in the meantime give ' ‘
“hepbatins Aor aoe maine ans | SSP" aha ats oie) « KORSRRUGTOR | uly muy | 8 Aug Aur) a8 Aus
the fter one month 1 the 20th |° opposition of such registration. he . ee . a ug. _ 2 ¥ 8 Aug
ty Of Search 195% \iniess some | trade mark can be seen on application — we _ seers
ng at my office.
peueath to'we at me office “notice in Dated this 18th day of March, 1952. For further particulars, apply to~
Lon of such registration. e trade mark TLLIAMS,
com be seen on application at my office mperarat: oF bine ~ saath GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agerts.
Dated this 13th day een 1952. nr . :
Registrar of *_S Marks. POEL EPEP OSV PPP PEPPDPPEP PPD OPEOOPE PPA PCIE.
















TAKE NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE





























0 Ahh hg GP CEEOOEO







|
7 .
. /
° ~ te
| . =F SSS pe new hs
. | 1% > DA « >) mete fy a
} . é oa YT: f QS
‘ SO eo Pat *
>
} . HS
That AMERICAN RADIATOR & STANDARD SANITARY CORPORATION, a | {Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, — \s
corporation organized under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of . Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica x
America, whose trade or business addre 100 Sixth Street, Pittsburg 22, Pennsyl- \,
i as » re ntic a a e 2 i “a ~ : 4
sa USA., has applied for the registro of a trade mark in Part “A’ of Register t From Southampton Arri N
n respect of air heating furnaces, oil burvers, air and gas cleaners and washers, ‘ ‘a aie ' ves Barbados fe
air conditioners, air conditioning systems ond apparatus, air and gas coolers and That STERLING PRODUCTS IN: x COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952... .... 31st March, 1962 >.
cooling systems and apparatus; boilers, Munaces, stoves (he d electrically or | TERNATIONAL, = L CORPORATED, 4 ~ *“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 6th May, 1952 %
Wr nold or fluid fuel) and parts thereof aud attachments, ag back draft diverters, | corporation organized and existing under | st “COLOMBIE” 8th Mz 1 1952 2ist Ma‘ 5 1952
gauges, dampers, automatic dampers, contvoiljng devices, fans, water-backs! Bollows | the laws of the State of Delaware, United | s) #2 ay, shee anne s Y> P44
or diaphragms and devices controlled hereby; castings and molded articles-~ | States of America, Manufacturers, ie * Not calling at Guadeloupe a
metal, plastic and ceramic trade or business address is 1% sto. ‘\ .
Clothes washers, clothes driers, dishwashers, kitchen cabinets, drying and | Street, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A. his % SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE °
dessicating apparatus; duct outlet registe avilles, and diffusers; dust collectors, | applied for the registration of a trade “*. .
und precipitators-—mechanical, and elect ie or electronic; fans and blowers and | mark in Part “A” of Register in respect | ‘s i Z From Barbados. i Arrives So Sy
ittachments; of preparations for use in medicine and | \s ‘COLOMBIB” .... 11th April, 1952... 0... April, %
Electric heaters, electronic tubes and circuits; enamels, glazes, and finishes, } pharmacy, and will be entitled to register | * ““DE G SSE” 19th May. 19 y, 1952 4
filters and filter frames, fireplace forms and structures; foundry apparatus, unit) the same after one month from the 20th | ,* “CO ae ie oss ’ peer sone 9th May, s
| blast heaters, gas and fluid fuel engine eas and ‘oil burners, parts thereof and | day of March, 1952, unless some persor % © IE’ ood Ist June, 1952 .... ... 18th June, 1952 pe
| control ‘apparatus therefor, garbage dispo-al or grinder devices or units; Heat | shall in the meantime give notice in | st *Sailing direct to Southampton %
exchangers, all kinds of condensers ‘* ndensing vapors or gases to liquids, | duplicate to me at my office of opposition % ’ &
| Setrigerant evaporators, radiators, includins gas and electrically heated, radiator | of such restraton. The rae alk eee
and pipe supports and jackets or sh heating and cooling systems and] can be seen on application at my office. | \ 0 AY : x
apparatus, humidifiers and humidifying apparatus, hydraulic, magnetic, or fluid Dated this 13th @ay of March, 1952, “ I bD Ss ; , tgs
couplings shaft drive couplings, indicators and gauges, incinerators; valves for BH. WILL) o® & »
controlling fluid flow, hand or mechanical.y operated, mixing, press coos Registrar of "rage en % Cc A a ’ 1 Ss E >
radiator vent and trap valves, temperature operated, liquid level operated, 20.3.52—3») > R B B E A N Cc rR U »
electrically operdt@d} lubricators and oilers. feed Gividers, gravity fegd, mechanical g PS
| feed, steam feed, purtiHs and compressors, motors, electric gr fuid operated, is From BARBADOS TO TRINIDAD $
| switches and relays (Gieetric), electrical operated, temperature operated and x
room thermostats, pressure operated | »
| Refrigerators and refrigerating appaieius and controls for, distributor RIENTAL 13 Venezuela-Curaeao
or manifolds, viz: devices for Supptytt refrigerant fror condenser to al % ‘ 2
plurality of evaporators parallel multiple flow arrangement; all kinds of | . € fe
| expansion valves, automatic, pressure operated valves and thermostatic, i.e, | % oroOm ia amaica x
pressure and temperature actuated ve regulators ond governors, pipe and | |S ~
ipe couplings, time controlled — device as clocks, start i ct a a Y , INER 8
)n echantsms, transformers (electric); wat heaters (domestic hot water supply), % By the LI xX TRY L s 2
electric, gas fired, of fired, co fired ators and ventilating apparatus, | HEADQUARTERS FOR ~ % ~
team jet ejectors:; coolers et} for water; deodorizers, SOUVENIRS x COLOMBIE A DE GRASSE x
ed-w heaters, bubb R swert, dehumidifiers, FROM INDIA, CHINA & 1s 4 a s
and apparatus for ps roiler tools " N is " ; >
expanding heat exchange > nings, | CEYLO? x FOR INFORMATION -
jand will be entitle rex a from the 20th day of ’ R .
| me at my office of opposition of re trade mark can be i >
| to me. a cient spoeete nde maric can be | 3K. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.—Agents. 3
| ed this 15th of evel | : ¥
| Se ae een 2 REET TS Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 J | 3 PHONE 3814 >
I WILLZAMS, 1¢ &
Re a Trade Mart 6 hippo MAM ALAC OSL SSL PLL LSPS
‘
‘










FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE wees ‘bis PAGE SEVEN






























5 > OR Fo > 4
HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Nad ‘These Bpoctiitt :
% to your list. Xx
‘ iti ilies i wantin : . | | % Tins Pears g
8 Apricots g
- A
. % iPneappie Jam %
x Apricot Jam %
7 x Marmatad °
% Geava Jelly °
R 0 ¢ ‘ a naan <
C S | : rics “Saker Yous, top :
Vegetable Salad in ¥
Mayonnzise y
Â¥, Chieken Soup %
2 ¢ » Imperial Meationch 4
CG os 'e oo ~ —_——— 4 : Red Feather Wise ; g
2 Lee ee

orrosion costs you ? a year 5 x Saeeute tenes ant ©
* ? ediiiadasihank, Cehadain scent a se ‘ oul >
| > Ch e e °. *
a Ht! J O you know th amount * Pickled Herrings “J %
Corrugated | imperted ints S __ Pickled‘ Mackeret 3

)
Pin a tropical countries every viar ? % STUART & SAMPSON 3
Ancenvon — The figure is astonishingy high, and % %
Vb after allowing for uew Works the $ (1938) LTD. ¥
balance represents a heavy forfeit fo % Headquarters for Best Rum. %
hack of taking pfoper precaations “ ¢

+4,
PCOS A LOLI ILI LO

864 -
> SPE SESS SSO AE EEF

JUST RECEIVED

















Protection is easy with

Anti-Corr osive Paint
i —, for every UNCH of metal.

= \ FERROGENE is an. anti-corrosive

1 KNEW 70D SEEN
THAT NAME ! LOOK
AT TH$, HOPELESS. )



Pkgs. Tate & Lyle Castor
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacon s

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna ¥



Tins Stove Polish
Tins Heinz Vegetable Salad
Pkegs. Bridal Icing Sugar
Tins Gelatine %
Tins Asstd. Sweet Biscuits %
Tins Pineapple Chunks .
Tins Strawberries





ae \ gaint designed for the tropics, It clings Sausages .
y closely tc the surtac t metai-work, forming —_ Goddard Plague Pow-
( ¥ a damp-proof, aimproof skin which preserves as
~â„¢}

itslt e¢cl nost tndetin:tely, In three attractiv:
' Shades s-. Red, Grev on4 ” een.
Manufacturers: BURRELL'S PAINTS Mitcham, Surrey
(Pi os.: R. J. HAMBR & SONS (Paint
Limited)
Aly» makers of ~ -
“) CDIGREE" Implement and Machinery
Enamel 5
“rERFECTO” Oil Bound Washable
Water Paint
AQUATITE” Waterproofing Composition
‘






passn Pots Pama: oniy devghie of Sv lovely
Delmer the banben seer oF the few giv
oh AR Ms Love at the Theene rotbow

DADDY, IT'S MAMA--
SHE WANTS TO KNOW IF
YOU FORGOT TO TAKE THE
PIE OUT OF THE OVEN









Also:
TIN HAMS





Special price to Shopkeepers x
Sd




All these things get from - - %

INCE & CO.
LTD.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.
——











2b ose
Uhh

A.S. BRYDEN & SONS warsavos LTD.



















EOE POOL OO Oo Oe oe

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE







SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

ABLE TO TURN THE SITUATION Toa RO ae = = = : SS SSS
INTO MY HANDS! I'VE SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,













7 GOT A WILD IDEA... BUT : . . .
I'M ALONE NOW... : Speighistown and Swan Street

ALL THIS APPARATUS

AT MY DISPOSAL. Usually Now ‘ Usually Now

oonY FEET. Pkgs: JELLO PUDDINGS $23 $ 20
Rolls PRINCESS TOILET PAPER 33 30 LEG HAMS TENDER SWEET
Tins BROOKS, PEARS (24) 82 78 (Cold Storage) Whole or 4... 1.44 1.24
Tins CHASE & SANBORNE Bottles CARLINGS BEER ....... 26 21

WHaT's BILL KENT UP | INSTANT COFFEE 87 80

TO? WILL HE BETRAY
FLASH’S TRUST?



>

| THE COL@NRADE GROCEREES



AH, T KNEW THERE WAS

SOMETHING MISSING...THE x
TOME SOMETHING -

1S MISSING / WELL,
HEIGH-HO, THEN...

ES EE ON ET 1 INTE TE Sore Se! nn ent FS EN SN ee ee







ee ee . somutyie sh

Two more in our Series on DOGS
POODLES

by
L. E. NAYLOR

ont eee Cee or sis oe aye weet
—__—__——— ~ | The Poodle i: very ancient breed, which

PON'T woRRY SO \(eur peo | WELL- HAVE You \ No-you MAKE | now stands higher than ever in popula
MUCH-MOTHER- || BE HEARING ||| HEARD ANYTHING || A BIG MISTAKE esteem. Its colourful history, and the many
'M SURE FIFI WILL || FROM SOMEONE: =ROM THE ; | { ‘ l
ML Gt See | Whe J) ea Ore eds | Aus gg lovable facets of its character here receive

} BE FOUND- | SUCH A BIG ||| NEWSPAPER? A LARGE
Ca fort \ REWARD FOR full attention
t cc
(Ay










YES-MRS. HATTIE ANN KRUMPET-
MY PRECIOUS LITTLE DOG

FIFI 16 LOST-I PUT AREWARD
OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS —~

IN THE NEWSPAPER
FOR HIS RETURN / f















INDUCEMENT TO





— REWARD IS AN ||
Breeding, trimming, showing and general



GET HIM BACK-| (MBNics Soe ;

Pp —1| ofa. \ 4 eS yet care have been comprehensively dealt with
CLhy || hee} is s,, HT ae in close consultation with leading Poodle
2 : And Nia’ Pe 9 | breeders and exhibitors, and the advice and



|
|
|
} Gh ; |

suggestion given are practical and based on
experience. Tie illustrations are of famous
Poodles







BULL TERRIERS
T'S ABOUT MY DAUGHTER... edited by
AN ANGEL! I CAN'T

Major Count V. C. Hollender

HELP HER BuT YOU CaN...
AND I'M NOT TAKIN’
NO FOR AN
ANSWER! Major Hollender is well known as one of
the finest judges of Bull Terriers in the
* country, being also for many years Secretary
of the Bull Terrier Club. In this volume,
however, he has not been content merely to
give the reader the benefit of his experience,
extending over fifty years, but he has also
obtained authoritative articles from the lead-
ing personalities in the breed. Thus chap-
ters are contributed by Raymond Oppen-
heimer, Chairman of the Club; T. J. Horner,
Keeper of the Stud Book; and many more.
Another feature of the book is the section
on “The Bull Terrier Abroad” which. in-
cludes articles from correspondents in Amer-
ica, South Africa, Holland, France and East



SORRY... YOU'LL HAVE / WELL, IF IT'S GOTTA BE TW/S

TO GET YOURSELF / Way, IT'S GOTTA ~

ANOTHER Boy! ~ SIT DOWN, ee
KIRBY... :

WAIT’ DON
THERE'S BIG MONEY IN IT!
YOU CAN NAME YOUR OWN
PRICE...ANDL gore
SAID IT WAS



—_—



| GHALL STATION LONGO WARRIORS JT OR,NO, PRANTOMS 3 TORTURE Us











GECOND | SENTENCE ALLMENOF |










R SI) AS GUARDS To KILLUS! Africa.
FIRST, WAMBESI, | ORDER YOU TO WAMBES! TO EXILE FOR ¢ IX aU > fC sie s Nf itat sini
4 y MONTHS AT HARD LABOR SEE THIS DONE! m BUT NOT THAT! | All who own or breed Bull Terriers—an
PE Rach hie ‘sateen IN THE JUNGLE! Te < Sal} 4% y rd “ AER the breed is becoming more popular each
3 ‘ AN vy , , ; year—will want to possess a copy of this
| wecoy LN | book which is illustrated by photographs of
Fe i many leading champions.
} |
= i | Hip ms ¢ }
=i | VOCATE STATIONERY
=. el {\ ) AD abe A id b Le A Ai ;
»\ . : : . :
4 \\ fom J Broad Street and the Village, Greystone Shop, Balmoral Gap, Hastings
ed
Ee |\2HLE = |






PAGE EIGHT



Empire Defeat

Notre |

ONE OF THI

th tr ‘ Empire
in their | )
evenir ortunate the
team wa cored by Arche
back

The game was not very

Jame I1—O

\RGEST CROWDS to attend football was elected

defeat Notre Dame one-nil

iateh at Kensington Oval yesterday

goal for the Bank Hall
the Notre Dame right half

ione
I

After

fast in the early stages.

half time the pace increased but in the final stages it was

again very tame.























Empire took the toucl with
Notre Dame defending the north-
ern goal Th otre Dame for-
wards were first to attack. They
missed their first mal when the
ball bounced off one of the Em-
pire backs and passed the left
upright by few ird

A few minute Charlie
Daniel at inside or Notre
Dame, took a Il > along
the ground but Syn the
Empire custod aved

Empire missed good oppor-
tunity to score wi game
was about ten min Dray-
ton, the inside right, passed to
Robinson who unmarked. He
tapped the ball di t to Wilkir
son, the Notre Dame custodian

Another Miss

Freddie Daniel, the Notre Dame
left winger, after body beating
two of his oppo ent an ex-
cellent pass t unley Roberts.
at centre for Robert ran
out to the nd centred
Paul Mandevil!
centre half, who
through took a_ be
which missed the le
a few feet,

Later the Empire forwards at-
tacked their opponents’ goal. Rob-
inson, their centre fc ird, re
ceived her xi pass but
failed to se As the Bank Hall
forwards up their attack,
Browne and Straughan, the No-
tre Dame full backs, were kept
busy.

Shortly before half 1e F
Daniel received tl ball. After
beating Smith, the Empit full-
back, he ran throug ind cén-
tered McCollin ran from the
right wing and t good one
time shot which passed a few
feet over the cross bar. At half
time Notre Dame forwards were

till
il

ittacking the Empire goal.
Notre Dame Attack

After touching off in the sec-
ond half the Notre Dame for-
wards right away went into the
attack. F, Daniel took a lovely
hot from the left wing but Sym-
monds jumped into the air and
saved,

Mandeville next gave
forward Roberts a long pass, The
Empire back rushed Roberts be-
fore he could settle the ball.
The ball went out and a corner
was taken by F. Daniel but no
resulted.

Empire opened their account
when Hope received the ball and
centred from,the right wing.
Archer, the Notre Dame right
half, was marking Robinson. Un-
fortunately for Notre Dame, the
ball, after Robinson missed



with his head, struck Araher’s
ulder and beat Wilkinson.
Notre Dame now pressed the
ime more than before. They
ed a golden opportunity to
put in the equaliser. McCollin

centred from the right wing but
Roberts who was running through
ist failed to get to the ball.
The game slowed up in the
final stages as the Empire play-

> ers frequently kicked the ball out

of play

The Teams
The teams were as follows:
Notte Dame: Wilkinson,
Browne, Straughan, Greenidge, P.
Mandeville, Archer, McCollin, +L.

Daniel, Roberts, C. Daniel,
Duniel
Empire : Symmonds, Grant,

Smith, Norville, Robinson,
Alleyne, Hope, Maynard, Taylor,
Drayton, Rudder.

Referee: Mr. “Ben” Hoyos.



Keen Interest Shown At
Schools’ Athletic Meets

IN A BROADCAST ove
Capt. D. R. Perkins, E.D., said : The Barbados Inter-School Mr, C. E. Je

r Radio Rediffusion last night,

Athletic Union will be staging their Annual Sports Pro-

t

at

gramme

Kensington Ov
21st, beginning at 12:30 o'clock.

al to-morrow, Friday, March

y

Through the courtesy of Rediffusion, I am able once
again, on behalf of the Managing Committee, to tell you Games Committee but before it

something of these athletic meetings. :

The Union is formed by the Division [V—4 ft. 7 ins.
Secondary Boys’ Schools of tht Long Jump )
island, and these send their best Division I—20 ft. 11% ins.
athletes, as their representatives, Division 11-18 ft. 11 ins.

to the meets, held under the aus-
pices of the Union,

The Meeting, tomorrow, will be
the twenty4sixth of the series,
held over a period of forty-five
years.

The first meeting was held in
1907, and the score, at present, is
College 14 wins, the Lodge School
7, and Combermere School 4

The competitors are divided
into four classes or divisions—
Division I—Boys over 16 years of
age, and the points in this
Division are first place 9, second
place 5, and third 3.

Division iII—14 to 16 -years—

and the points are: first 7, second
4, and third 2.

Division IlI—12 to 14
points are 5,

and the
3 and 1 while Di
vision 1V—-under 12 years, has
2 and 1, as the points for
second and third.

In the Relays, the points are:—
Senior (over 14) 12, 7 and 4, and

a
first,

Division {11-18 ft. 242 ims.
100 Yards
Division 1-10 1/10 secs.
Division 11--10§ secs.
Division I1l—11 sees.

220 Yards
Division I—22% secs.
Division 11—28§ secs.
Division IlI—25 secs.

440 Yards
Division I—524 secs,
Division II—55 1/10 secs.
In Division [V they run 80 Yds.

and 150 Yds., instead of the
nundred and the 220,
In the 80 Yds., the record is

9 9/10 sees., while in the 150 Yds.,
it stands at 17§ secs, In the Half-

Mile—an open event— the record
is 2 mins,, 58 secs, set up by
&. W. Glasgow of the Lodge

School at the Sports Meeting last
year. Incidentally this was the
only record broken at the Sports

last year.
Records

oe Juniors (under 14) 9, 5, ‘The Schools share these records
* ° x in the following manner;—The
An Innovation Lodge School has eight—held by

Two years ago, the Managing F. W. Parris 1, E. V, Thornton 1,
Committee introduced an innova- BE. W, Glasgow 1 and J. Lb.

tion. Not only were there the two
~ Championship Cups—one for the
large Secondary Schools, and one
for the smaller Secondary Schools

-but a Cup was awarded in each
Division, This stimulated even
greater interest because each Di-

vision, from each school, was now
provided with an opportunity to
gain even greater laurels for it
school.

This year the large cup, will go
to the school securing the greates
number of points in the fou
Classes, and the smaller cup will
be awarded to the school with the



winning points in Divisions three
and four—thus one school can
win six cups. As the Sport
Editor of the Advocate is particu-
larly fond of saying Jor
verrons ce que nous verrons.”

Here are the records in thi
various events. I think they bear
favourable comparison, with any
in the Caribbean area:

High Jump
Division I > ft ns
Division Il-—5 ft. 442 ins.

Division TiI—5 ft.



»

Five Husky LABorERS
HANG AROUND “THE
BUILDERS’ SUPPLY Co.
ALL DAY» AND WHAT
COMES IN €



{






BUT THE BOOK-
KEEPER KNOCKS
OFF AND IN
COMES YOU
GUESSED IT!

®
“THANX AND A TIP OF

(GET EM OFF:

Crichlow 5.

Combermere has seven—H. G.
Brewster 1, W. K. Atkinson 1,
F. C, Ramsay 1, R. C. Forde 1,
and C. B. Forde 3.

The College has four tecord
holders in: L, G. Campbell, G. J.
Evelyn, O. M. Browne, J. C. D.
Haynes, and lastly, R. Clarke of
the Foundation School has one.

Here are the results of the 1951
Meeting: — First, Lodge School,
second, College, third, the Cole-
ridge School, then Combermere,
the Parry School, the Foundation
and the Alleyne, in that order.

The Division champions were:
I—D. W. Inniss of the Lodge, II—

Cc. A. H. Evelyn of .the College,
liI—L. O’B. Thompson, Coleridge

id IV—-R. V. Webster—of leap-
ing fame—the College

The Divisi6n Cups, which, you
ill remember,. were mentioned
irlier, were WOn by—Division I
the Lodge, Division %—the
College, Division TI—the Cole-
ridge, and Division IV — the
ollege.

‘Tomorrow, the Sports should

Theol Pn Ik Bonn, Tic
| They'll Do It Every ‘Time svete snmone



PIPES AND
BATH TUBS «+
HURRY UP, MAC





J. W. B. Chenery
Elected A\A.A.
President

Mr. Justi a, W

teur Athletic Association of Bar-
bados when that body held its

annual general meeting last nig.
In accepting tin port, Mr, Jus
Chenery said that he was very

wishatul for the great
they had done him in electing
President of the art.
he would try to do his t
every way for the best interests
the Association. .
The report for, the year id
December 31, 1951 came
criticism from sothe of the mem-
bers and some of the paragraphs
were amended. The report was
eventually adopted.

Tt decided

ot

was tnat a

centre Championship Meeting be hela on

April 17 before the Intércolonial
Meet which will be etime
around Whitsuntide and it is ex-
pected then that cyclists from
Trinidsd and British Guiana will
compete with local riders.

Some of the members were not
in favour of the local Champion-
ship meeting but it was pointed
put by Mr. Maynard that it was
customary for the local meet to
take place before the Intercolonial
meeting. Mr. Maynard said that
some difficulty was being experi-
enced in getting Kensington Oval
but final arrangements have not
yet been made.

No Decision

The question of Ken Farnum—
Barbados ace cyclist—goeimg to the
Olympic games with a Jamaica
contingent was also discussed but
no decision as to how to raise the
funds to send this cyclist to the
Olympic games was reached. Oné
member thought Farnum should
attend the two-day meeting on
March 29 and March 31—In Trini-
dad to re-establish himself as he
was defeated on the last occasion
when he rode there. A cable was
received from Trinidad Spey Be
Association to send over 4
for this meéting but Pornukt sai

that he hadn't sufficient track

practice to ride in such a m g-
Other officers elécted were: Five
Vice-Presidents, Messrs. F. C

Goddard, Marshall, Clarke, Jones

and Mrs. E. Wotton, Treasurer;
Mr. C. B. Belle, Secretary G.
Roachford.

Mr. Maynard was proposed for
the post of Secretary but he de-
clined, saying that his duty does
not afford him much time for the
Association; Assistant Secretary,
mmott and the General
Committee will be Messrs. May-
nard, Richardson, Mayers, Jordan
and Matthews.

The Association is striving to
take its place on the local Olympic

can do that it is seeking affiliation
to the A.A.F. The Association is
composed of 19 affiliated clubs, 82
ordinary members and six life
members.



. B. Chenety
sident of the Affa- effi

Onganists and one or two others,

ut he wes not going to depart
stand taken by the Vv -

ent.

The Doctors made an appiita-

tion last year which was
justifiable.

A report was made as to the
@xtent of service they would ren-
der the poor that would meet
with this increase of salary for
which they had asked.

He had made a motion that the

ors be given an increase but
he matter was deferred. He
would later move that the doctors
be given an increase of salary by
£100 per annum and that the
fae of the Organists of the
tish Church and St. Barthol-
omeéw be inereased by $10.00 and
$5.00 monthly respectively,

If the Vestry were to agrea
with this latter motion he knew
that the employees would be sut-
isfied and happy. He felt that the
incréases would be justifiable to
meet the rising cost of living over
which none of them had any con-
trol. It had gone up very rapidly
and even in some cases it was
continuing to rise,

Mr. C. B. Brandford in sup-
porting Mr, Goddard’s motion said
that everyone knew that the cost
of living had ‘advanced tremen-
dously and he was even in favo
of granting this cost of living td
all parochial employees,

The motion was then . put. to
_ vote and carried unanimous-
v.

very

Increased Salaries
The Vestry then dealt with an-
motion by Mr. F. C. God-
dard in connection with the in-
crease of the salaries of the two
Parochial Medical Officers by £100
per annum and the increase of
the salaries of the organists of
the Parish church and St. Bar-
tholomew by $10 and $5 monthly
respectively.

Mr. Goddard’s motion also sets
out that the details of the work
of the two doctors be worked out
by the Poor Law Guardians.

After Some a ion, Mr.

on Moved that thé Vestry
while in favour of the principle
of granting this increase of £100
to the doctors, should defer their
final decision until the meeting at
which the rates were laid so that
the Poor Law Guardians ean
meet the Parochial Medicgl Off-
cers and discuss with them the
details of having paupers attended
at their office and then report
back to the Vestry.

This was agreed to.

Telephones

The Vestry agreed to a mio-
tion by Mr, C, B. Brandford séc-
ended by Mr, A. G. Gittens that
a telephone be installed at the
residence of Mr. J. O. Gall,
Assessor for Land.

The Vestry agreed to put £50
on the Estimates to pay the cost
of installing a telephone at the
Rectory, the monthly rental to be
paid by the Rector.



Savannah Club Tennis

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Ladies’ Single:
Miss M. King beat Miss P, King
6—0; 6—3.
Ladies’ Doubles

Mrs. Fields and Mrs, Niblock
lost to Mrs. C. I. Skinner and Miss
D. Austin 4—6; 5—7,

Miss D. Wood and Miss Pil,
beat Mrs. Legge and Miss P, Wil-
son 6—1; 6—2,

The Misses Bowen beat Mrs, R.
S. Bancroft and Mrs. P. Patterson
6—3; 6—2.

Men’s Doubles

W. Crichlow and C, B. Lawless
beat G. O’N. Skinner and I. J.
Niblock 6—2; 6—2.



be very keenly contested. All

of the Schools have had thein

annual athletic

from the published

gathers, that that whidah
“springs eternal in human

the
breast” be
their on; ic
mons, Bi le, f -
ter, Watkins, and Haynes of the

College; D. W. Inniss, D. S.
Dougall, N. G. A. Maxwell (a

Ss
star performer, by all Bisse ot

R, C, Hump! and
the Lodge while the
representatives of Combermere
will be K. A, K. 8.
Barrow, W. W. » ©. b.
Kennedy, M. forris, V. 8S.

Rowe and K. H. Lewis.

I have not seen the results of
the Sports at the other schools
and therefore I can say nothing
of their chances, but one thing is
certain—the Foundation School
will be a contender to be consid-
ered.

Public interest, enthusiasm, and
enpanes have steadily increased in

nese athletic Mee’ to

schools, Ba

future inter





















TO-DAY’S FIXTURES

f co Doubles
Mia .. Wood and Miss Pilgrim
vs. aR, King and Miss Worme,
Men’s Doubles

D. E. Worme and J. D. Triming-
ham vs. C. L. L, Bowen and A. M.
Wilson,

P. McG. Patterson and G. H
Manning vs. G. L. Hunte and G.
Watson.

Mixed Doubles Handicap

Mrs. F. Connell and K. Mason
vs. Mrs. Gibbons ang R. 8.
Nicholls.

WHAT'S ON TODAY

‘Welfare Talks Hastings
‘ouse—9.00 a.m.
| Court of Grand Sessions—10.00
a.m.
‘| Art Exhibition at the Mu-
i seum—10.00 a.m. J
Inter.School Athletic Sports at



n—12.30 p.m.
Football, Bey, TI, Queen's
} Park—5.00 p.m.
|| Police Bana, Rocks
—7.45 p.m.
Films at British Council—
\ 8.00 p.m.
=—_—_—
|| WEATHER REPORT
TO-DAY
Sunrise: aa a.m.
Sunset: 6. mm.
Moon: Last Giarter

hi : 6.30 p.m.
en tae: 12.44 am. 1214

.â„¢m.
Low Tide: 6.26 a.m., 7.18 p.m.

aetna






“WHAT THEY SAY”
ian ed husband
Cee ‘era

“L Would

aataae Youll @gree she was a
sensiblé woman — she got her
Cooker a

Possibly the diamond ring too!

Now You Are Able
to Bu

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eae

ight
oH
TABLES in Trefs-

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Polished; framed meraled

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single or Triple light or Bevelled
Mirrors—$15 up

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earlier styles including Marble
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SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069 (

=a\
SS





ts

Combermere

School

@ From Page 3

our coach will be able to see 12
pairs of boys—one bowling and
the other batting simultaneously
as he walks up and down the
length of the practise wickets. IL
owe a debt to the Department of
Science and Agriculture for their
kindness in helping me to plan
boundary layouts for trees; and a
debt of a different kind to an
anonymous person who has found
a contrary pleasure in pulling up
our saplings on no fewer than
three separate occasions. I should
offer a word of explanation about
the appé¥ent wilderness to te
west of the School and to the
south of the Canteen. Not only
has that been left untouched be-
cause our Ground Staff has been
hard at work developing thé new
areas I have just been referring
to, but that has held in re-
serve as a Site for a
technical wing. Should Govern-
ment decide not to make use of
it for that purpose, I should
recomménd to the Governing
Body that they lay down two
tennis courts, far whieh the
equipment is already lying in our
storeroom,

Cadets and Scouts

The Cadet Company has had a
very fine record during this last
year, and Captain Perkins has
shown zeal and ability of a very
high order in the training of the
Company. They receivéd a very
fine report when they were in-
spected by the Commandant of
Local Forces. I am _ pleased to
report that at last a very long felt
want is about to be remedied. As
you go around our grounds this
afternoon and look towards the
south-east corner, you will see
the guard wall butts of their new
miniature range already construc-
ted and completed only a day ago.
There remains only the firing
point to be constructed and our
Company will then have their
own miniature range on which to,
practise. Bearing of arms and
their use is of course the primary
purpose of Cadet training. No
training could be complete for
them until they were able to
practisé the use of fire-arms. The

Scouts, under Mr. Brathwaite,
have continued to flourish and
they have a_ successful year’s
record behind them. I only re-

gret that Bushelle was not able at
the last minute to go to the Jam-
boree in Jamaica recently owing
te lack of air passage accommo-
dation.

Sports and Athletics

In Sports and Athletics we have
had another satisfactory year
although we have no outstanding
records to report. There is, how-
ever, one name that is spelt in
bright letters in the mind of every
boy of this School, it is that of
Fran’ Worrell, who would be en
inspiration to every boy at Com-
bermere playing cricket. His
photo-portrait, given by him into
my keeping a year ago at Water-
foo Station in London, for pres-
entation to the School, hangs here
in this Hall,

I would like in conclusion to
refer with gratitude to the very
kind gesture of the Viscount
Combermere, great grandson of
our founder, in presenting two

very handsome portraits of his |

ancestor which are hanging here
—one behind me under the clock



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Report

and the other above the mem-
orial plaque of those Old Boys of
the Sehool who gave their lives
in the 1914-18 War. I had the
privilege of meeting Lord Com-
bermere whilst I was in England
on leave and he was very inter-
ested to learn of the existenc
of this School which bears his
family name, and how it came to
be founded, and the work it is
now doing. Let me leave with you
finally the words of a former
Governor of Barbados, who was
present at the opening of this







building and its official dedication ‘ * | and
to he gperanice “rice ¢ Re | 1 pint Jugs in blue
Island. He said, “I hope that it

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of this island; it should be pos-
sible to build on the other side
of your drive an extension of
the school which would offer
facilities for vocational training,
particularly in the direction of
engineering and allied trades. If
this school, building on its old
standards of good scholarship,
eould combine with them courses
leading on the one hand to @
sound post-certificate commercial
course, and on the other hand
to a training which would in-|
clude academic proficiency with
teohnical skill, I think you would
have a school which would play
its proper part, both in the com-
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of the island and also in the lives
of the young people who will
come here to be educated.



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PAGE 1

I'M.I M.I l: BARBADOS XDVOCATI FRW.W MUCIM II, 1*32 mm*&mwtt\ *.— i — &f -i I, MI., March || i2 IIOIM 14 I I 11 llh THE Hortteuhun] Society is lo be congratulated upon holding its %  eventgeisth exhibition at Pacing the Savannah this hall can easilv be reached by fUCtta Irni tinn.-arby hotels. irtwdog too often jud^e the island's (lowers by what they see frem Ul .tud only UM .-mall number of than arc I flower%  ;sh here. I Thi-s >< i jnd the parch< %  eountrysida would ]>• continued Rhibttl of vegetables and fruit and is thereby paving its part in aneoui I men In nnccUon the & 'i-ncethat horticulture is %  definite craft of itself and [•r'.ment of ggricUrtun is admirable. There has been a tendency in rwent years to condemn Barbadians lock stock and barrel for beinn devoid of any interests Of enthusiasms other than those connected with the material pursuit of gain This movement was led and so far as it still exists, is still led by people with very superficial knowledge of the Barbadian way of life It has deservedly suffered a setback because it was Impossible for anyone to live in so small an island as this withotit MWOuntaring in some way the many cells of m-tivity which are engaged quietly and without much publicity Hi building on the traditions of tht past. The Horticultural Society is one of those sowhich has perhaps sulfered from too little publicity in the past. Its emergence into public view this week ought to ene it to continue with renewed vigour the work which it has been so worthily perfcCTnilUj In the interests of the community. AGRICULTURE IN Ins %  ^hech In thi La lalativ* Council Chamber on Tuesday the Colonial Secretary is report %  that 'the com%  i, sell-supporting and If If expected that they will make a profit in comiiig years." This statement may possibly have been amplified in the Council, but the repert as it stands does not adequately emphasise the position with regard to the fix Agricultural eh won Bnanced until 1951 from granta made under the Colonial Development and Welfare Act. Two uiily are selfsupporting but much more is involved in the commercial success of these stations than fertility of soil. The Govenunt&l Agricultural Stations are compelled to sell produce at government-controlled uneconomic prices, while they are also compelled to pay agricultural labourers the prices which are fixed by OgreeSMMt between the Barbados Workers' Union and the Sugar Federation. The cost of labour at the agricultural stations has bean rising and the stations have not been allowed to raise the prices of their produce. No commercial undertaking could nico d if it were run on these hues and unless the ment decides to allow the stations to -ell at prevailing free market prices the tendency will be for all these stations to show no profits. Doubts have also l>een expressed whether higher prices in themselVM will help the stations to sell their produce. The absence of marketing facilities has often led in the past to the destructim of beans grown on the stationsat I time when housewives were paying very high prices for beans in the free market. %  one will have to provide better distribution of locally grown foodstuffs and fish but no one will do it until the government abolishes a price control system which penalises the primary producer. III'MI VIIO\ III O* K \lllAllied Ships Hule Korean Seas LONDON FHOM Naval point of view, the Kenan war tin* i-rovi it %  Mf 0) ulockade, a sea;..-.. | *..r •>( During the If months of lighting there have been occasional -pectaculsr acuun* wO claimed the public gtsM I generally appniiaUJ. however. is the importance of the daily routine patrols by destroyers and frigate* of thr Royal Kl Royal Canadian Navy. tha Royal Australian Navy and the Ray* New Zealand Navy. ; %  comparable with the An i this theatre. the br*>a regions, Ihe support >>• igriinsalnmn. .i' the escort of supplies and aircrafl jrriers engaged n. operations off the coast. Recently an additional roll ha* i on and North of the 38' fa The enemy would like lo occupy these to enhance his bargaining power at Panmunjorn. The degree of success achieved can be judged from Communist reactions. At no time have they been able, or recenll> %  tempted, to 'upply their forcer. by sea. and this *ing!r I a country with such an i omnium rations, has U) !M*tweefi daft for the greatly outnumbered land foroM. A brief survey of the waters in question is nect-s-ry to the api of the problem* involved In these naval operations. The West Coast of Korea Is studded with small rocky islands and tortuous channel* through A'hkh swirl fast and irregular tidal at reams. For weeks on end the coast is shrouded in fog and during the winter months tne bitterly cold winds blowing from Manchuria .aid Siberia cause rough weather in the Ytllow Sea on five day* oul of even. Moat of the port* above the 38th parallel are Icebound and. even when they are free, they can only be reached by navigating shallow channels easily mined by the enemy snd %  ••red by shore batteries. surveyed long ago are frequently out of date and a tidal range of more than 30 feet coupled With the silting of the larger river estuaries result In Bto| mi guarantee that I'U to the chart repi-enlMii'n wealth frigates in the Han Estuary is well known. There, MHinding from boats ahead of the ships in tides often running be.tnd 1(1 knots, thoy had to grope their way in muddy waters. In all. 29 miles of channel were sounded and for a period of 120 days at least two frigate* were continuously using these waters to harass t h e enemy's possib* build-up areas. Although Ea-t and West Coasts ..re. l>ro. dly. American and British Common wen In 'commitments respectively, Ihp two exchange one or more shafta so that Commonwaakfc destroys** and (rigates also get their run' on the Bast Coast. Here the Communist maw supply line and the end 'I the battle front run along the coast and ar easily accessible to ships. Operation* are mainly in the Woaan or Songjln area and a destroyer's time is spent in sVeping up a running bombardment of road and rail cooununicatiois both by day and night. A snip usually Area over one rounds from htr main armament •luring a patrol and the e sequent strain on her g crews and equipment is > -iderable. The Bind round Wonsan enemy held and duets with shore batteries are frequent, as al recently on the West Coast whe the shore battcriea arg iryin drive away the forceUM nearby islands. However, there patrols on which MM fired: ships steam long aastac at high speed to protect an B> craft carrier, escort convo\> replenish other ships. Sometimes destroyers, doing duty on th carrier screen, spend thre weeks at a stretrh in the YelU.v Sea and steaming distance? o 8.000 miles a month are not n common. So the work eeassssw hus been doing for eighv U months: unspectacular but a portant; work which has eni.i lei much seatime and much ti i steaming under condition:, a great heal in the summer m intense i"I< "i winter*>•>' which harj.lled for forlitii't and enduunce by ships' eo*n n-nies: work which has earned the Nav> tradhaonal %  %  of praise. "Well done." I.ciokin4 I or Owls In A Fog \l M ill M i-l.l WICKSTIHI. Mil Hs '. I HrTltVARD WICKSTEF-D sets out with CH IPMAN P/NCHER on Ihe rerumpdon of n fatnoui porf,. Tliin. red Bid MR. CHAPMAN PINCMEH I took it into our heads the night lo go out into a wood and look for owls. In the ordinary way )nokini_ for owl. in .i fog %  %  iiiKlniani would be a fairly profitless occu— „ bUl when ..roinpamed l,y| s Mr. Pincher it is an expenencpBi' ,, y ,( full of imgorpgeb J"'' 11 rtl,v A slufled %  Urtad don't know i* udiuj intently at the case on the' „„_ about the ** %  rd that run waggle Its I alni'sl It Wl There m DOl a s* gh them. Mr. Pincher. wherever Has much experimental work hidden in th' mist, this nature been done on dead hoped there would be. ml I .isked have distracted the owl's attves. lou." said Mr. Pinchtton. After all. it was he -. "In the interests of .-ctence had been !;ilk(ne about ent Duke of Bedford once the birds and their eggs not n ile an owl It was a Sftir Alueo But she owl above us had otl: owl, I bethoughts In mind It was a You could tell eporled it was quite intd I owl In a Surrey pubu .,,,,. AtA u„. nllv at the case nn tha*" 1 "l?. 8 • be-rin to know Well, it' Us plumBirds that are good to ent are generally inconspicuous In their colouring, and those that iously that by the joyful way 'u-whitted and tu-whooed wt another or. ; answered tt fi the other end of the wood. 1-rnerV duet The tawny owl* nesting sc.v 'artn In %  couple of weeks -nd srltl seemed to be dts-"••'ng whether to won or nor to RarMer in -rie evening. In ho tub, Mr. Plneher had descrilted 1 kind rj . kn.w an were At that mOfMOt a -SrrLr HIUCO 'Vmnle in a wood wiu by the number of Sve %  S well al night as we ^..id earlier that owls have exme was vamping or waggling Us optional hearing The left ea' earI s'epped on a dry sick of it lawns % %  nich broke with a crack nd ight. and this nrobablv enables tha: wg lie nut of the duet. it to locate wihh accuracy thMr. Pincher and I contn. ied H exact wherealmuts of a rustling our owl prowl till long aftar ;he mouse or an edible Journalis: clock on the old church tner crouching in a ditch. Bad .''ruck 12 but all we Tawn owls do attack people was a man creeping silently sometimes. They are most danalong %  hingerow. geroufi in the nesting season, As he i right have been a gat scientist who DM recently dona a lot of good work on owls ed that I owl to find .starlight as it would human being to play Ul the light of a full moon.'' Vision secret Some people used to think that whin the] •. ,(-, ; ,| P fr nert" keeper welhought it best lo lie mfi.i-rd rays were the secret by fannlv cares. Long-eari-d low till he had gone. After all of an owl's vWaa it night, but owb) are even worse, but thev it would have been almost Mr. Pincher says this ihas been usually attack only during thunpossible to have convinced disproved by a fellow who look dgffatogfna, Thev hate thunder 'hat on %  night like that we v ere the cornea and lens from the eye -. much that thev go berser* ind merely looking for owls, of a deed owl and found thnt fly at %  rtyoM in siajht —lUs-S. Our l.railrrs Say : \rauiik$ t Tu the £di(or. The Adi'ocuu lie, which are itaa Cssequibu and brought back some brought to tht Island. The M Aruwaks to teach tho tttn of Salymingo and his c iatUari how to grow tropical food in lagan's map no more ai cropl Th,. purpose of this action his presence at the Settle In DM Lhaiv (Advavaie. „ (l ,,| k t> lU ;il lf „„.,,. w ,. ie than does the uresence of m lith March) "Nobody give*. .\ ( awaks already in the Wand, ted camela thumb-nail sketch of the pre]t 9 prormble that these are the depleted, history 01 the Island and says j l: ,,. rise to the IraIs "Nobody correct when he that lie U forced to go on sure**dtUons mtntltaMd by Hughes states that the name ''Barbados'' liig this fact about Barbados not (Natural History of Barbados, comes from "bearded ones?" The being an uninhabited island when nSO] of Indians residing at tho ""t person to suggest that it tht British took possession." But Rlin ( r tUTUj M rha settlers. Hughes might be connected with beai led It would be interesting lo know i,m*elf does not claim that they Indians Is the historian Froude what evidence he relics upon to wtn actually in Barbados when u •*•> as 1888. Oldmlxon 84) support this asscruon. Thu is m,. settlers pours scorn on the idea of be rdnot meant as criticism but ened flg-treea, which was therefore qajnr, Iha hrst written suggestion a very early theory, but his While no one should nowadays lh.it lh Indians were still restsuggestion that it was because It doubt that the Arawaks occupied dent al the lime of the Settlement ***aa inhabited by Ilarbarlanis the Island for a considerable seems lo be by the llev. Greville even mon improbable. If one period before Settlement, tho Choatoi (Transatlantic Sketches, compares the geographical and conUHnporary records seem tu 1869). and be is followed by >*i>'*ical characteristics of Itarshow that they had abandoned it Ftwkea (1911). ihe American bados and Barbuda, which seems by the time that the UntM. legist, and also by Sineto be a variation of the —Bflg rived. These conlempoiary kBN (Handbook of Barbados, name. It appears to be more arc the depositions and 1913. which quotes from the Hislikely that one or more of the renortl of paoj In a torical Gcuruphy of the British similarities between these two Uon 10 know:— Colonies) and in his article in islands, both lying outside the iif (11 _. Tiniehn." "1H These WTlters "UttB BbS 0l thfl AnliUe (>. %  f W t l i U n mt rn Vao.V P"'^ "b,forev,denceon twolypesof '^ponslble for the name and of the Olive. 1805. Purchas X(Kal p| ac e-names. — those with that it had nothing to do w lift I'llgnms. a tradition as Six Men's Bsv and %  ***•* at "11. .' %  S^aZT 1 af2; Thlw "• %  . "nd those that are Yours tnUy. ?,"' ?^i M* prafaead rrtn the adjective InGT. BARTON twJfaM, Ground and lunial State Papers 1 14 No. 27 Hepoit by Su ivt -i^. It is doubtful whether mu i25. John Scott. Sloane Mss. weight can be attached to the 3682. llrit Mus. traditions or Six Men's Bay or Nicholas Hn AI., quarterTin. Houses, since m the earliest master of the "VYIlllsm and map of the Island. Llgons. these Pavement ">f poor Youth h.i Jwhn." 162'. Mm. G 4/15. Trin. places are not mentioned, yet, at ,ota ' 50 members and is deColl Dublin the same time "16 Men" and "5 ^ ,rou of making an appeal for Henry Winthmpe. settler, Houses 1 ,>re marked and no brafund sbooks, magazine or any1627 Wmthrope Letters. Masdluoo and no names have been thin whlr h will tend to further sacMusetts HUtorical Collec...t-^ched to them. The use of trie ,h€> pr->frefa of the organisation tlon. Indian" surely implies Th *' movement Is now In Its Official Report of the 0ovate not living In such fifteenth year and has been ernor Sir Richard Duttou. 1684. plaei %  at the time, but that thev assisted by lectures from such Sloane Mss. 2441. Hrit. Mus woe iccognlsed as sites once Ini**r' 'he Bringing Christ to the NaMus. pplled the native names, tions. Mr Iarrranzao of British from these sources thnt Th<%  Indian names Giuan Peixf Wiih A Bile' l reae K vi act OIL hUNOTON, Amencii came out with a new hard-hiiinu propaganda line to-day. President Truman and his Secretary oi State. Mr. Dean Acheauii, put it over. The President went aboard a new radio ship, the Courier, and broadcast to the H- she,I filled with disease germs. He said: "The Communists spread thescharges round the world, and at thr tan %  time they stall on the truce negotiations." Acheson pounced on the fact, confirm-1 by prisoners, that there is a plague epidem e in North Korea. •OUR SYMPATHY' And he spoke of "the inability of ihe C<> mumsts to care for the health of the peo|'<' under their control" Rubbing it in. I fl added: "Our deepest sympathy goes out all those behind the enemy lines who an sick and suffering." The ship from which Truman spoke, coastguard cutter named the Courier, a anchored in the Potomac River at Washu ton. But soon it will sail to the edge i f Communist countries and broadcast Ann-lea's message. Said Truman: "The United States |g M ing night and day to bring peace to the woi Id ) As President. I say with all my heart that wj yearn for peace, and we want to work w th I all nations to secure peace. "We have no quarrel with the people 'if tho Soviet Union or the people of any othtl country. "There are no differences between us |h| can'i be settled if your rulers will turn fri ni I their senseless policy of hate and terror led follow the principles of peace." This 'line" will be part of the new pr ganda drive, and there will be tacit su. tions lhat if the Red rulers could be got rul of, real peace would come to tho world YOUR RULERS' Truman added that it is "the aggressive policy of your rulers which is forcing Ul . arm to defend ourselves. "But we cannot find in our hearts any bate against you. We know that if you are sufTn lng under aggression and persecution. V B knwo that if you were free to say what v sj really believe, oyu would join with U6 to nfl nish the fear of war and bring peace to the earth." The Iron Curtain's Government the President, might try with their nepapers and radio to make "you, the people." believe that America is a hostile country, bent only on war. "But that is not true. I want you to know that our highest aim is peace and friendship —and an end to the horrors of war." T1IK Russian Embassy in Washing'", swings from icy to chummy in its relal with the Press. We are at present in a Hello there, ph. c, so I spent a pleasant hour over whiskies Vi soda with Nikolai Vladykin, counsellorat the embassy. He drew me a diagram of how thev p Russia's national pastime, Gorrodkt—-thrwing sticks into squares. ("Such a good g. nee because men of any age can play.") Other sports items gleaned: "In RtUsst have 200,000 Soccer teams and no DTOfea als—only semi-professionals." Boxing' "We have a good heavy-wci. M champion. He fights three rounds—that'a all Russian boxers train for—and has beat on the champion of Esthonia." This year's Olympics? "We have some try strong women. They will create surprise In Russia vodka—Vladykin pronounce PAPER SERVIETTES in Pastel Shades rtlls. prr III O ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & Greystone. Hastings 14 Thr Harbado Youth Hovrmmt SIR.-The Barbados Youth Movement, an organisation hleh *-as formcM for the uplift and i aid id, wodka—costs sev**t> rouble* a glass, sav Wow. I said. 14s a glass? "Aha, but the drink is good." and he up a tumbler. "One like this and y happy." IN WALLA WALLA. W.tshmgtor Stal two weeka ago, the Governor of the jail i gratulated the prisoners because, he H they had tried no tunnelling for a year A now a milk truck driving past the jail eras down into a 100ft. tunnel on which the mates laboured for IB months. TIN PAN ALLEY is busily hammering songs celebrating the life and times of W l.\ "The Actor" Sutton, fabulous bank hold up man. PAUL HOFFMAN, former Marshall Bid boss and now president of the Ford Foui ition, warns the Republicans not to miss t 1 oil opportunity this year as "one more disastt ol defeat might well make it a splinter ptfty." And he plumps for Eisenhower as the i D to back. JOHN FORREST, financial editor of the New York Times, says America may have bitten off more than even she can chew m planning £3,700 million foreign aid In the coming year. It might do more harm than good, he thinks, by depressing the value of the doll.u "and inducing a spirit of dependency ami*g our Allies." THF. HITMAN TOUCH: In East Moline. Illinois, firemen called to a blazing trailer Unit and 2-piece Toilet Sets Ph. 1172 Corner Basins (With or without pedestal.) 22" x 16 25" x 18" C. S. PITCHER & CO. lightweight suits WDSD joor only thought is to kap cool In tne ahlmmsrlng naat, yon really appraolata UM flos doth of a in ves Ughtwelfht anlt Add" enay utedora. yet perfaot shirt oostrol with ifsksaalf-tuDporUng u-ouaari. No wondtr so many msn hav* haoome Daks convert* for life. £xclu&iujL fa. . (Da Qoidja £r fa., f Indian names Guiana and many others We _.the hlstoruiis Frerc (I7M 'here were no Indians In ne.-d of funds to assist the work Edwards (HM), POJ hem on The Island is and th, <., i-ortunlty is now taken 1 were puzzled because Ihe owner. Manuel and Sehomburgk ('Rt %  d of Indian l" iippe;.l through the press. bara be i I on their %  ;.*• %  %  Q % %  beraae kl I kste Ilsaiikg vtrj irasta Bar p w ting the same effect. while another. Yarieo's us your pormiwion. On behalf of It Is also suggestive that CapPond, Is according to the story tain Henry Powell, later in DM of Ugon. an example of a name REV 1, BRUCE-CLARKE year of Settlement, went to derived from an Indian who was M Montecino. lay abed whilt they grappled with the flames. As they left one said sympathetically: "What's the matter, bud? You Hir "Niw," yawned Manuel, "tired." DESSERTS Custard Powder Hoy a I Puddings Black Grapes White Grapes in tins Apple Sauce tan's Biscuits Kraft Cheese IIIII AKt VST toons EASY TO PREPARE Shredded Wheat Weet a blx Grape Nuts %  Oats Farex Pu bin in !).it.i^i. Be '" %  Anchor Milk J. N. GODDARD & SONS MWHM



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FRIDAY MARCH II. 195! BARBADOS UIVOCATF PACI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Ml am I i • %  i M-. %  H j IIAUEH atom 1 ..1 Mtm .r • ;-;.O.l Implamam and Uarftiiwi Oil lliund Wa.tiahla Walri|>i>iflna Composition .'^jy ,v CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!! REPLACEMENTS COST £'s l-SMMaiW/ f> 0 CorrtWKMi forty you £ / o year [ml ["V 1 • !..imouni ri iNfMcal ra mil Thctiflnrrt %  high. tlter alK-wiiv i tew A^rks ihi biUrtcr KfMttei forfeit 1" lack of uku.! er prtctdtioai Protection la easy with 4nf(-Cor\ Mf Kiinl for every INCH of metal. rt; %  m wir % % %  mat* Bal ..>:-,• fropi. It BBop ctoatlvtt i mrU..wfrk.forn.in| kin which preserve* ... I three ,nr*.!:f ".fCO -.' %  • A.S. BRYDEN&SONS BARBADOS, LTD. %  IO )M I Ml. Ka-ak-ir* Jan % %  i ll ...* II. rf • %  %  • %  *! la .1-* H .. .. I'4 N.'k.r.i IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only NI'M IAI (Ml I IIS nrr % %  nuiilnblr ill our Hrimrhrw Tnrrdoiile. S|-i|(lilloi % %  .mil \%an Slii-rl rk t -JI:I.I.(I ri'iiiiiM.s Rolls PRINCKSS TOII.KT PAPER 3t Tins BBOOU I'lAKS 1211 -' Tin. ( MASK SANBORNI INSTANT (IIIIII Usually Now • H S .211 .311 .7K D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street 4 O I. <> > :s A i I. 1. it o i: II 11. BRINGING UP FATHER .4 BY GEORGE MC. MANUS m e LO*T -1 PUT A OB^WTO OP owe HJMOPFD POLL ABS NTlC NEV50APER JP AT ) %  1 rfjM AN' 1 AC*F s R>i TvecOsi W^,-m if Two more in our Series on DOGS POODLES by L. E. NAYLOR The Poodli very ancient breed, which now itandi hlgl ei man opulai %  attain Iti colourful history, and thi lovable I rats of it-, rh %  ] i I I hi full attention Braadinj trio %  %  rare have baan comprabcnatvaiy deall with in eloaa consultation with laaolna Poodla braadan and exhibitors, and tha aovfcea and i Uon gives irs practfa il %  ""! ba i expartanoa *fl %  lUuatrattoni an I I Poodles. JBULL TERRIERS edited by Major Count V. C. Hollender Major Hollender is well known as one ol i ne finest judges of Bull Terriers in the ountry. being also for many years Secretary of the Hull Terrier Club. In this volume, tvar, he has not been content merely to Hive the reader the benefit of his experience. extending over fifty years, but he has also obtained authoritative articles from the leading personalities in the breed Thus chap%  ra contributed by Raymond OppenLn tr, Chairman of the Club. T .T. Horner. KaspST of tha Stud Book, and many more Another feature of the book is the section mi "The Bull Terrier Abroad" which includes articles from correspondents in America. South Africa, Holland. France and East Africa. All who own or breed Bull Tei raad la becoming more popular each will want to possess a %  ok which is illustrated by photographs of many leading champions. ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street and (he Village. "r~ys!one Shop. Balmoral Gap, Hastings STOAT & SAMPSON ^ (1938) LTD. JTST RECEIVED rk. T*I* a i.*if


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PAGI t.ii.ti. BARBADOS ABVOCATK PtlDAY. MARCH 81. 1WI Empire Defeat %  N otre Dame 1—0 *AVSS7 c0 ^ 3 01111 Combermere President Fran I'Ai. to conudrratloo like the Doc tot >. Organists and onr but he wil not going to de-Bart ..,„ , ,, ,. Mr .'ustloe J. W. B. Chenety ftum the -tnnrf u\ *he .im h-ld it. im Uat yt.r which WBS yw, ' n ,1U Ba ^ Wl ^"^^'-U'P^M^SS: '^S&t was nu.de ... tn Dame riRnl haM fhener.* ssrtri that he was wry eatent of service they would re>tthankfial far the great honour der the poor that would me*' Thr m fast in the early stagea After they na.i done him m elarthut him *' I *\. ,h 1 ! ,n r .^.d but in the final stag*. H Was ^lit wWK tohSfiJ*. School Report t> i '.in Pace 3 %  !•• %  "iber ubnv<< uio mernour road, will be aoU OTtal plaqiM of those Old Boy of pair* of buys--one buwling and ihe School who gave their lira inoih.T batting Mrnultaneoutly in the 1914-18 War. I bad UM as he walks Up and down the privilege of meeting I-wrd O hti'inrreaMea. The report wu „,„,„ „,. lncrwlwl ,, v iioffEi o*Tl Uon ..tmut building and it. oOVuil dediraUon i'iiliiau> adopted. j 5 ^ nvmihiy rrapmivi'lv ppaimil wlldern to Vi~ to the educ:iUon •.crvictof the t. U.M ..-.iH^ !„•.! ,. !_•! " Vslry were to aim "*•' ' 1 Sehool and to the Iiland He sold, "I hope that It iSarx&STustTt ses '45*v b?%ssis isr*^^" """^"" c ro, ndsu h ***" ch n " im """ %  1 iVhool Cwttfle.'ites. but as i %  %  %  to WlHdnHotre Dam* 1 i Another Miss vith local riders. i ill—I past to %  pau %  thrtuigh took a beautiful shot -nd even ln~ nomc'casei "l7**fc technical winf3hould Ouvernof your drive an exteni ... ooersad tbstr account some of thr members were not continuing to rue merit nedde not to make ure of thschool which would offer hen Hope received the hall and „, favour_ of the local ChampionM r. C. a Brandford in nin, '" f ,nl purpose. should facililiw fo. vocational training. wins, ship meeting; but it was pointed poi^nf Mr. Goddard's mot' n .d '" %  •iMnend to Ihe Oovernli irly in ihe direeUon of the iti ^"dy ,hat 'bey lay down two engineering and allied trades. If n* had %  nriv-inn.ui i!" ^ 'ennis courts for which ththis School, building on Its old A hi !" V !" -r. V^ n eiuipmenl Is already Wing in oui standards of ood scholarship. '.M.. %  „ L *\ '," '• VDUt 1 iiiinri-m. could eumblne with them counea „ D. m now p^H, the %£££&***-*" .he^te-Sd-ea^-l-nfr,^ ve^'n^^SS"&"'A^ ^iJl^'S^ ., The, "V. year, and Captain Perkins ha. ( |u[(p ^.j,^,,,. pro i| ol e„cy with Isrrt a nld.-n opportunity to Nq DNiiiw %  ,%  Uinjin jeal and ability of .1 ,.!> „, 4 „„ ri | k u]. I think you would •ho cqualiler. McColIln I !" III IncToaatd Salaries hlih order In tnttr.unmi .,1 the ,. lvr aohoo whlch wou |,| plav Company. t"hey reeelvetl a very JgP .BB''sf' -t by Mr. Maynard that It w. Kl ?cr^S k marking Robinaon Uncu ,omary for the local meat to D f hvlrur had —~ tot Notre Dame, the uk e place before the Intercolonial £Ji, .., wi,km.o„. r^r^'ngT^uSo"^;.! "V"' %  litred from the right wins but Increswed Salaries The queslion of Ken Parnum— The Vestry then dealt with an*-' nm l ,:, "> fine report_ ww a^rnaie. dard m coruUon with the^nl ?%T t&'l^TXSS, to 2 % """ d n '' S2 '" 15T U JS -med but .real, of th. aalarie, of the two „"'', i^'t ', J^J.'tajfell "* ,h f y U "'. p ^ p ".!a h "" l ., —1-„ tv. Ot.w.Ki.i ir^u..i IH w.. _.-, report Hut al IBM a vCly long .en ,„„here to lie educated. yery long felt come np f, to D -„| uc at r d about to be remedied. At mng through Ba'rb^do.'.'ce^cyclVt^mi'to'uw otto moUor. b,"Mr~r. C. Ooda lew loci. just fi led to tfi-t to the ball. Olvmnic mmaa wllh I-iU:vrwards SlTh „ .,..„,_ vw.wawi lin i,, ihe ,vm P lc a*mBS wlin 1 kicked the out d „ mml au cyc ^, Br lncpniie o( WM ^ u ^^ H II nl.mpic games was reached. Ona the aalarlei of the organlnts of aflcrnoon and look ton ,. kepi up their attack. Th ,, Teams member thought Tarnum ahould the Parith church and St. Barsouth-east comer, you I •.am. were a. foUowi • ""i J> !"E" a .! n, T t 'tt "" Uu,lom r w ,' "> "* monthrji the guard wall butts of the a tre Dame full !,,„ w ikfT .„ March 29 and March Jl-In filmn^pectiyely. miniature range already eonstrur. it. .! sT,T.'.han nreenirUt }' to re-establUh hirraakU a he Mr. Ooddards motion also art" led and complete I m.lj n day a(o li. *f ta McroiliT' 1 """ '"''<' on the lort occasion out that the details of Ihe work Ken i. m.ims onk the firing • 1„ r n, V. F *'" %  l "'/ odo '""•• ""•• "' Ib e two doctors be worked out i omt to l constructed and our Roberta. C. Daniel, r. received rnm Trinidad a^roj e by the Poor Uw Guardian. Company will then have thenbeck, i aSLae.. s.,nmnnd. raini A" cl illoii to send over Karhttir, After aome dlscuislon, Mr. ov.n miniature range on which to .U^TtTh „ ?o n '"' '"'""eeSng not r 1 ..n,um selu Dr.yton moved that the Veatrv pgMtlM Bearing of arms and! ts proper part, both in the < .r.cii-ial and iiidu&trt.il actlvttll I THERMOS VACUUM FLASKS 4 pint wide) mouth SI7.HII 2 pint wide mouth refills S4.2.> 2 pint wide mouth SSeSS 1 pint Jugs in blue and Grey S 3.28 1 pint Flask SI.6-1 2 pint Flask SS... SHEPHERD &. Co., Ltvl. CAVE 10—13 Broad Slreel right wii time shot which Hope, Maynard. Taylor. "* 1 II. ii Inn I'lteleUel _.. f^,,, ,, v , . tt hall thidoer Heferer Mr. "Ben Ilnyos. Keen Interest Shown At Schools' Athletic Meets to ride i favour uch a meeting, of granting Ihli of the principle U'*ir u*cis of course the pri iciease of CI00 purpose of Cadet training. Ni ry •— r (—"• %  ^........... IIIU inwinel III 1 I "11 .'—-IOU.er ofncfis elected were: Five to ihe doctors, should defer Iheir 'ra'nln| could be cmplete for 1 "'1 '"""-" 1 Messi. t r Onal decision untU Iho rneattM al "'" 1 %  *!* %  !" n %  *•* %  '' t.oddard, Marshall. Clarke, Jones which the rates were laid so that (""octise the uw cf fire-arms. The M d X"\, E •7Il ,tto ^' Tre ur ": tne Pool Ut Guardian, can *' ouls unflPr Mr Brathwalte. Mr. C. Ii. ueiie. secretary O. „et the Parochial Medicai OH), ft"** continued to nourish and Roachford. „„ aBd dUcu with them hc ihey have a .ucc.wful year* ~i?"a y n rd J^'* 5 ur P d ft deUlta of having peupan attended '?" ^'"g h m ^'r. ^ the pest of Secrelsry but ha de, DM .iblc ; f out no aeM tiielioffice ~aVV" ih^""VeMrl *i rPt mi,t '* u,h %  '' dined, wiyln* that hi s duty does I'.ck to the^V>rtr^ ihp '"' minu,e 1o ao to ,he Jiun i -;K not an or 'l him much time for the This area anweri t ^"^ In Jamalca recently owing l\ A BRO.AIM AS1 0V itadlu RedlfTusion last niht. Association; Assistant Secretary ^JSL "' "* ' %  passage accommoCapt. I' R PerWi E.D., aid : Th Barbados InUT-School Mr C E. Jemmott and the General Telephones datlon. Athli! i '' Ihfir Annunl BpOTta Prot'.mmittoa will be Messrs. MayThe Vestry agreed to a moSports and Athletics -„.,,,, Fndav. March 35f3SB5-T""""" "^ "£'£*?. A. cf^2 SS t|T ^ %  **ffi. s* ljT „ The AMoelation 1. atrivtof to a telephone be mMalled at the iu^uXwThav. neTouUtand nj I ItiillirilMun. I am able onCC t ,ke ,t. pUe. onthe local OlyStpte refldenee of Mr J O. Gall, record, toripon There "£'" %  it Ihe Managint; Committee, to tell vou Garnet CommltU'e but before at Aaaeaaor for Land. Bver „,, namc .K-. U go-n M . .. .. .... Ja tkal lb 1_ * I knll . I *f*l_A IT, a 1 a_ a atatj^ ..... \ M.llllU.l! The Unit %  %  %  ptM of th* Un The M< i ", will ht iiu> \*ei.i>,ikib of the series, iii.i in %  %  • tmny-ftve .n. 11 The in %  held in %  CoUssja ii a. the L 7 anil Combei n The compstj Into four classi 11.'. in of points in i D Yds. D i .HKI the 220. . .. \ .. Division II -H to Hi vears— 9 II'IO sce> while m Hie 111* Yds.. • |<1 seek. In the HalfIV—4 ft. i ms. Lo.C JUMP Division 1—20 ft 114 ins U IH ft. 11 ins. i,l .It ll. .". Hi: IS* VanU ll 1U 1. 1U MGS. Division 11-101 tecs. Ijivlsion ill -11 sees. U Yards Division I -22 H • II—2SR na. li %  . 4 It Yarda .' Division 11—55 I, lu M.TS. in umsion IV Ihey run do that It is seeking sfniiatlon The Vestry agreed to put C5*i hright letters In the mind ofeverto the A.A.r The Association is OD the Estimates to pay Iho cost boy of this School, II Is that a] %  %  omiiosed of IB affiliated clubs. 8f of installing a telephone at the Srar> Worrell, who would be rn dinary members and six life Rectory, the monthly rental to be inspiration to every boy at Comnbers. paid by the Recur Savannah Club Tennis VtMMMTC HESULTB TODAY'S 1l\ 1 Till s Indies' Doubles Miss D. Wood and Miss Pilgrim H Miss M. King and Miss Worm) Men's Doubles D. E. Worme and J. D. Ti KII.UKham vs. C. L. L. Bowen .mil A M. Mrs. Fields and Mrs. Niblock Wilson, lw lost to Mm. C I. Skinner and Miss p. MeO. Patlerson and O. H I>. Austin 4—8; 5—7. Manning vs. G. L. Hunte and O. Miss D. Wood and Miss Pilgrim Watson. 5^*^55 i^i"' and Mi8,, P WU Mixed Doubles Handicap Ladles' Shinies Miss M. King beat Mlsn P KUit fl—; 8—3. Indies' Doubles 80 Yds. hermcre play Inn cricket. His prii.'.o-portmit. given by him Into my keeping a year ago at Waterloo Station In London, for presentation to the School, harms here tn this Hall. I would like in conclusion lo refer with gratitude to the very kind gesture of the Viscount ( abaraMN ire,,i I'I.."!--"-" of our founder, In presenting twr. very handsome portraits of h.s ancestor which are hanging her" —->ne behind me under the rlorV If you are embarrassed with flatulence... heartbiiir and other indir tv<.tii- auJ -lom^l. Put ihings hihi in doubk quick limewnh !)lsa Hitim.itli POwdar. U settles \oui 'lomach. rapid!) ncunalirlng asrass ai.nl sod rsstoriag hcaiihy acid batancs Baasiive, w iw Mn g itetsa is mildly %  nringent in n. action. Dolsa IIIS10BIS 0 I G E S I I 0 N We offer the following TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS I'NITEX INhlLATISG WALLBOAIO SHEETS '4 in. thuK. 4ft x 8ft.. 9ft.. lOft.. 12ft. long • lite mat ft WALLBOAKD MOIXDING for covering )olnt,— It 5e. per ft. -I \MI Mill II Mlliltn Mill -III I I -, The Baarl 1 l.M* I'aaa. >k In. thick. 4ft.. x eft.. ft.. 10ft. long--a lie. per •. ft. IIMI'IKIll IIABDBOAIID SHEETS I. In. thick. 4ft.. x 6ft.. 8ft.. 10ft. long— $ 3e. per aq. ft Sl'RINAM mil SHEETS \, in. Ihltk, 4ft. x an.— 4c. ear ae. ft. /! In thick, 4ft. x 8ft -'„ !c. A He. per .., ft TtlRNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS I'll In thick 4ft. x 8ft tie. per aq. ft All tbear Building Board, have been treated to rea.it the attack of Wood AnU and other Trriull-I'liaae 4267. WILKINSON & BAYNES CO., LTD. ..H1.IV ID <•*.1 •xlwt^fuoati.afl"! %  !• %  H4-.I < %  f %  "' tn aMtto. IV.'. .. .nd.ii-tltt.re.tt,.. IPWP>.l.e,,(1111. til •.ll| l ....1.>lMII>>llHltp. ,..ii ii,^i,ev(f>ii B lii.ia>rUi*n la'-tintlokri •>al SW •* IWi-i ,..-.Ftrl< IM b.e'M.allt r>i'< 'IH—'lit", psgi eviut— the record Th M i# _._ a, iUirn ta a w— a Mrs. Y. Connell and K. Mason Division 111-12 to 14 and ins u 2 tntos., 5| sees., set up by s n lU( r „n : ,rS MrPPaHseson "* M,s Gibbons and R. S. points W Glasgow of Ihe Lodge J_S an S" and M F Patterson Nlcholla vii..n l\ thr Sports Meeting last .<*—*• 2 ..ml I lii.iuintiilly this was the Men'., lkuihlev second and third 1—*— .. .... Knr ~~ '" Ij rseord biokcn at the Sports i year. Senior (ovac Hi IZ. 7 and 4. ;iii(l Keeords in the Jumni(iSBdSr Mi 9. 6, lhl SthwU sl^ie these record• >,ia ir. th,f„l|d.)vvint: inannei — Thr An Innovulion i.-iue School hai .-...tit -held by Two yean ago, u. I S r.m I, K V. Thoniton 1, Comraltte, a w< Cilusgow 1 and }*. L. Uon, Nui mil, .... ra than I Clwnalon bii ( upsone fur fi svan -H. G. 1 :. W. K. Atkinson I. for the SIIKIIIVI Sseondar) Sehool f C Rama* I, Rc. Forde 1, B forde 5. li .:IN lour tecoid I • I 1 .mipbcll, G. J. 0 .1 Hi lama, J. c, i>. pro*** %  and lastly. R. Clarke of : %  Foundation School has one. School. Mere are the results of the 1951 j_| This vasal Ihe large cup will g'i Meeting: — First. I.odge School, %  i' iring thc'crealest second. t_ollege, third. Ihe t'olc%  t.mbs-imere. lasses, and the smaller cup wil %  winning polnti ..ml four—thus one win six .ups. As the So Editor of 1h t Advocate psitlcU111 %  %  %  \ thai baa. %  1 Us lllsh Jump %  Ion 111 -ft ft. Foundation In that order, Pha Divmon 1 hamplons wer-1 i) W Innlsi of the Lodge. II %  • v 11 Evelyn of the College, W. Crichlow and C. B Lawless bent G. O'N. Skinner and I J. Niblock 6—2; 6—2. be very krenly contes t ed. All or the Schools have had Ihetn .111111*1 athleUe Meetaags and from the aebushed reaulfcs, os*e iiiifv that thai tvhloh *prlnis rlernal In the human bressl" wUl be cenarad. b> their friends, mi. Jooea, Simmons, Bashrllr. GrlAth. Brews ter, \\ ilklrr.. and Haynrs of Ihr Collrge: l W. bmhss. D. S. Douaall, N. G. A. Maxwell 4a star performer, b* all aceeunUl R. C. Mnmphrey and Elrook ol the l ..(Inwhile the prlnrtpsl represenUllvrs of ( ombernurr will be K A. OSboerne, K. S Barrow, W. W. Maawett. C. L Kennedy. M. Morrta. V H Rawe and K. H. Lewis. WHAT'S ON TODAY Sjocial Waif are Talks H asti n gs Bouse—9.00 a.m. Court of Orsod Bsaalons—lO.Op ML Art BxhlbtUoD at thr Mn Mam—10 00 'in Inter .School Athletic Sports st %  snatagton -12 30 p.m. Football. Dlr. II. Qusens Psrk—ft.00 p.m. police BanS, Hsating! Rocks —7.46 pm Film, at Brttlah Connell— 1.00 p.m I hat not the i Its ol 1. O'H Thompson. Colertdge the Sports at the othei PiasOOl IV—H. V, Webster—of leapand therefore I can say nothing %  <'.,]|gr. of their chanies. but one thing i> Division Cups, which, you .ortain -the Foundation School %  inner,-, ifvere inentioned v.ill l>e ; ( contender to be conild%  i. ra bj DtrUon I ered. D1, ion !I—ih.. Public interest, % %  nthusiasm, and I'I'IMDII III—the Colesupport have steadily increased in IV — the tn.-Mf -thlelu MwaU. und to t*tt schools. Barbados looks for her Inmorrew. thr Sport*, afcsedd future Inlet -colonial champions WEATHER REPORT TO-DAY Bunri" n li. m. Bonaot: 6 12 psaMoou Last QoartSi Lighting 6 30 p.a High Tide p.m. Low Tide 12.44 a.m., 12.14 f,fiGE*~FIRE jOUCMS You/ ^ QUICK MODERN ANflSEfTtr; '.o-.v-.-.V.-^^y-^a---.-.-.--V0'i^-^0r^^^xe,-.->e^,v.v-.-.-.-.-.-.-- I VIIIAI lOIMIHl Sperla'iise in Hardware of etery desrriptinn IIMII1I IIIIMIII1 I.Tll. (Cororr Broad & 1'udor Slreetsl 0*'->^*-'-0^0^*>0^0'.*-'-'a'.*.'-'a'.*'.' THINGS UPON WHiril VISITORS AND BARBADIANS M-HI 1 Thai the CLIMATE of Barbados Like the QUALITY of our Suits IS UNRIVALLED. Sl'PKRIOR MATERIALS. EXPERIENCED AND IIIC.HLY SKILLED WORKMANSHIP Front • The Top Scorers in Tailoring P. c. s. Pr. Witt. Henry Sl. & CO. LTD. Phone: S7g7 (TERRA7.ZO) MARBLE CHIPS EBONITE DIVIDING STRIPS And CEMENT in Bull. Red. and While T. Hi: It It I HI LTD. Msgaime l.nne, Dial: G7 Now You Are Able to Buy a GOOD TABLE msiNii rams* a Boons. Squirr Si 0*. -"n nnU nr Hr*iStil l*S" "t I* nUl. in MahDtMiO m %  •ki..'4 Ctabworoi I--' II namais-n TAHISS n T ,•-total aUaaBBfi,. r>s*r i> .*'•. 01 Dr il. %  fc*c*-SBVlll. '"'. UT* and b • %  !. ni t W 1 SiaSHu r>-V**-lr, fr !" i IS to 'i • "< L S. WILSON V,V/.V//,V//,O^^^V/*y//AV-V.V-''.V.V//.W-V/.'' FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whitepark Road For an Island so small, Barbados has diversified holiday pleasures that,appeal equally to participant and spectator. C B. RICE A CO. ol Bolton Lane have carefully selected Iheir stock of fine imported Men's Furnish. ins to meet the needs of the moment. Exclusive Dre s s wear from England, original Sportswear. Poplin, Linens. Silks. Travel Ru&nj and Textiles as smooth as velvet make the House of RICK a pleasurable place to visit—and one to return to many times! C. B. BkM •f BMtM I aae



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N V. -z?Blow Dealt Against Racial Segregation In South Africa I.OXI; ;<.%i. 6 Complete Caribbean Cruise OPPOSITION ASKS DR. M VLAJN TO RESIGN CAPETOWN, March 20. DR DANIEL MALAN declared in the House of Assembly that he ctmld not accept as constitutional the powtion created n. day by the Supreme Court judRrVient which dealt , blow at his apartecd (racial segregation* blft cserncrstone of his government. The South African Prime Minister made the announcemrni shortly afler he had been told that five judges of the Appelate Division of the Bupreme Court, South Africa's tolirt, iittinn al Blcu-mfontein. hnri ruled as invalid Qovanunanl Art pudu coloured voters (mixed race) on a separate electoral roll, tlcfore .tpeuking in tinHouse of Assembly Dr. Malun had railed Ih,Soulh African Cabinet to discuss tht position which < I' .id OH of the most important constitutional issues South Africa has ever faced Opposition leader Jackonus strauin demanded! that the government should resign on the Court's ruling General Election ? There was. speculation thai Malun might call a snap general In ii bid to bolster his hairline Parllami HI.IT > majorlt] i t ilk thiit Government might tr.v to curb the powers of Courts, making n impossible for them u owofnila r.u uaratot, The country's non-whiles, negroes, Asiatics and mulattoes. are planning to defy race law* in a national passive resistance movement beginning April 6 The cpurt rule today against socalled Separate Representation of Voters Act which four coloured voters had challenged The law would have barred mulattoes in the Cape Province, virtually th. onlv nonthe Union who have U from voting directly in Parliamentary elect Instead they would have been given power to elect only foul white men to represent them in Parliament. Constitutional Right The mulattoes, many of them descended from Cape slaves to whom the Province's 19th cen tur y rulers felt they owed a debt, gjaxa given voting rights ej u .il irlul whites after they were freed Those rights were entrenched in the South Africa Act th.. oiintry's Constitution. Government opponents claimed, and the Appeal Court backed them that the Constitution could be changed only by o two-thirds ma|orlty of both Houses of Parliament fii. • Church uui receive s cost of living bonus si the rates adopted by ijoveriirueni This was the unanimous decision of the nietnbcis Of Uie ClUisl Liiuun Vestry on a motion mau' by Mr. V. i Goddard and seconded by Mr. I B. BranUIurd at %  .'.•• n iui i.nu > i-..tvr.tiiy. The rates are. 20'* on the first £1U0, 7'-', on the second £100 on the third £100. Mr. Goddard pawled out that _ %  ^,_ I mi. iiiJvu.nii l|ini •*• %  uavt iSts meuueiTBS leXt AUStra-U;.^,,! w lien mcy tame to lay the lian encket tans disappoint-) KMinutes *** %  In making) his motion ho Said The West Indians arrived in'that the e**i <>f living had risen Australia covered in the glory of vef) i.ipnily m the but few ule crushing defeats they bad Inmonths, Late Ust your it was dieted in fcVfVM There were mooted that something should be ijreat hopes of some fine cricket .lone for parochial employees and during the tour. But Instead, the e promised them that the Vostry Test series turned out to be one wm,ld ronsider them when dealof the wont " history. Sonny Ramadhin, tho young bpin bowler who was the mainspring of the West Indian team Nel-ii n England, was .leas successful colourful on he hud Australian pltche*. developed to suit the Australian .ve] f "L, bo% r* ert There were some .<.eni officer* quarters which •" %  *; ]£* performance, by -n lonaseondenii ANTIOA. March 20 Ainul>t rhowers i von's dockyard was BOSSW in-day when hundreds friends of the Society ot seigd Harbour crammed galleries abuv the was decortited with rlag* and bu n ting n the occasion of the celebiatlon of the climax of the tlrst Caribbean yachl i While Governor Bla.kbumc was making a welcoming address the yacht "Tcmlhree" glided into the English Harbour followed by "Blue Goose", half an hour later. Finally six vnehts anchored the Search Vesta, Miilhhawk. Maria Katharine. Ternthiee, Bluegood. Entertainments Include I programme by the Police Band, the ceremonial : %  m ring of the Union Jack and s eosfctail party at which naval officer! tram II M.S nee among the guests. Mrs Blackburrw presented the prizes which were designed and given by Mr. Robertson Ward of Mill Reef Club. Prizes consisted of old cannon balls, naval buttons, buckles, signal cannon all mounted on lignum vitae from the gun miage al Foil Ilarman. In the nist the tourists, too. But it was the attitude Australian players to the which Irritated not only thi Indians but also Austral, f the same Wet enei with the estimates for this At the last meeting of the Vestiy Inmade tho moUon to Increase the eot of riving bonus to -11 parochial employees and i loners on the same level a luneni Follow Go In St. Mitt ahead) gi fe tatera. Observers believe thst th may have created an atmosphere that damaged cricket"' sporting reputation,. Beforethe war. Test matches asare sporting event-, that Weri played as -udi Bui since the war, a new type nf .Tiekrt hn< grown up in Australia. It Is plsyed Jut # hard a> ever, bill there Is a certain gTlm roru*entr.ith"i ftlmiit It that th,nowds |ta n-it like Crowds Dwindled There are some observers who believe thai If this u allowed tu continue, u will luui iriik*.-l as pms, ft bad its SSnct during the With a drop In the evening. Clarence House and the | n -n(lard ot vrlcket, the crowds 'Itx-kyard were transformed to an ,i u ,„ lrt i_rt dockyard were transformed illuminated picture while hand lirnte Force added | %  steel the Socialists W7// Challenge liudget Licences Canceled LONDON. March 20. I CANBRRRA. March 20 Prime Minitr Rol>ert Mn/icnnnininred to-da>' that the Aus, trahan Government had decided recall all import licences for Clement Attlee's Socialists will goods of dollar origin and for all challenge the new British Budget other goods which had been subin a series of votes but the Jeet to import licensing Churchill government was expectThe Prime Minister said the only ed to survive easily with its marexception would be licences Issui-d gin in the Commons. for the main types of petroleum The votes will come late In the I products and for goods being imday on a number of Budget resoported under the 100 million dilution* providing for Increasing lar loan granted by the Internathe gasoline tax and entertain'mml Bank, ment duties and changes in the I Custom* Minister Nell O'Bulllvan purchase tax. However the real debate and crucial votes on cuts In food subsidies and other disputed Budget jxiinti will not rome until the Budget reachei the Finance Bill stage. Dr. Hutson Is Director Of Agriculture, T'dad iinced that inced later that all recalled licences would be invalid unless continued sfter review. i %  -'eet of the announcement ii licences issued before March 8 for Imports loan lbdolarea Japan and the Soviet will be reviewed and perhaps reduced or even cancelled DITCHED ... • D L R. HuUon. Chief. Veter-! The motor lorry Q114, Oilleer "f the Leeward longing to Fan-view Plantat Islands has been appointed DcpSt round ditched In Uty Director of A lUure Hi Id on lar> Boad after Mflfcrlusbandry) in Trinidad Llll luring the early Dr. Hutson who is the son of' h our( i of vesterday morning. Mr. & Mrs John F. Hutson of) Damage w-l ilight. and after Belleville .i tumcrly Veteriny,. lorrj l-il(i bt .,. li rvV waed out nry Officer of • I < %  I, f | nr n e |d and th.necessary reSUtion ln_ ihiisland but repa(rfc ,,„.,„, ouli t 1Vil put back into ue. dwindled. This withdrawal of public J-jpl>urt meant financial losses. The West Indians lost about M.OOti on their lour. Tills deficit had had to be made up by the Slide incket associations, which %  •ilready showing Urge deficits English critics have described the new style of Austral •• cricket as "vicious." This "vlclnii 1 ne*s" was shown In the bump, attack" on th e Wfrt Indian batsmen by Australia's great pair oi bowlers, Ray Lindwsll and Keltl< Miller Australian spectators were bitterly disappointed with the West Indian*, however, when the h brilliant batsmen as Worrell. I tewAlaOj and Stollm'-ver islng their wleastb stages in the game. Spcctat wanted to see players who coukl ght back again-l the Australi same. The failure of the Austral selectors to infuse young talen' Into the teams In the se.i*on jjst ended, observers bekevp, may result in a weakened Australian team ir. ihe next tour of England. It will be practically the same 'earn that has played In Bsngland %  er since the end of the war Kngland has developed younuer Dlayera who are now prmnnp %  heir worth. Australia. H H feared could easily leee the Ashes i' has hel^ *ince ltS8 If %  is the Ashes, experts believe will probably keep them for nv rears-It.f'.P. "mm ill l.i .id KUfOBTON, Jca. March 20 The Jamaican fiovernment or neunced to-day the e*tablishm'*ni of SB Agricultural Development Corporation and an Industrial Development Corporation. The Aa*rlcultural Ih-vi-lopment body is headed by Hon G. G. R. Sharp. inloniationally known Jamaican Agricultural Industrialist who i one "! lbs leading members <• the Cameroon Development Cmi-iiatlon In Africa, a Director itWI.A as well as Chairman Citrus Company t n Briti Honduni GRENADA CANT MAINTAIN WELFARE DEPT. 1 think there U Deed IM I hdl) quipped welfare drp.u tint-nt In Grenada, but the roloiiy e.iiinot mulntam rices at the moment. Miss I*ati'> Row! I ii.,col ny*i Bodal W< ifarc Officer told Ihe Aslvocsie yeelerdas; sinsaid that in the rneanUnw they are carrying oul In a smuh sJteoeted to the department in ibbe possible way and MS clubs and arggnlssllieii who need dvin \K( HKK. NaWc Uasae rlahl I. II aswS I %  ftorl l€i frusiratithe K.mplre "" Mi) knorkt ibr bsii hate 'U %  vrii ben i n a left I In an i-..n -extreme wnn lb in t n si %  Bhi %  •an n 1MB the v o( th. Ibat then i on "ii .i tketee it v..IB> %  %  if .II ,Bsaagrlllieiil lack of funds M %  cade i %  igestUni has plaguen thipowners operating to man) parts of the world since the war notably to South America and Australian ports. But this latest • uivey indicates thai lli.tisl ports themselves are far (rum bUaaaissfcs In this respect It aaenuuns Ihe case of a isigo thargod Prisoner-i Committee, Ih |*nei p >onipany principally en-1 Mental Hospitil Visiting Cair. esged in trade lietween the Uni-f""fiee and virbnu oil asset hnnsleiied Dflhei depsitment* ami (be we) oimenl as BUCh was kep • iti i i tgh when • t. i Social Welfare In li.G. Progresses pteadlly Mil. PELHAI Offices, ol nmi-li Qulsuie, who u now attending Ihj i : id Ihe \dvoeale ll i ui weUen >rk In his counti : afllm both oflketal end i luntery, ayoukl like U lo be, hut the dsjriWCrmtie klsjg •Wit ldemand H HOfl l.ul sure de^oprnenl rithgr than specUculer results %  d to tne %  '"-nt ang %  with ihe %  MSDOT TO I'.xleiut Scavenging Ih'fHU IllH'Ilt ted Kingdom and the West InDies and the Caribbean Sri<< ui m Uu irere lufavreal ta 'he BniteU Kingdom bj inability lo gst >• Ui charging berth Ihrnsigtt son %  hoi, n the ipiays "This has happened m laii'i i >I I.'PFI-IOM Avonmouth and fllaagow,' says threport In Liverpool, in patllciilai, it was not unusual for a ship With mwarej cargoes to Inheld up fuf four to seven days am! as a reult. to take twice as lung ., It ihould have done ovei disehaige. %  quenl kntenereawa with the outward sailing programme." Commenting on the %  tion oi port oorigsetlon In gsoerel the Association says: It U lament.ibir the) oarTying powei should continue tu be Ik* of So much wastage by delavs In port AdvanlugiLoul island but i ( to Antli where he had been stationed lief ore. He now succeed. Cant H. V Metevier art i ifh remains in the dep-iitmenl deal pioblems. aSseX"-s-SJ-a. n perted thai the jerrj toton tri^n Palrvtew I'lan%  r -1 aometime during and it was %  %  !' %  rsgajg A UNIVERSITY NEWS LETTER Mr. P. M Sherlock. Vice Principal of the University College of %  '.\. • Indies and Director of i:vtra-Mural Studies, will broadast on the local ggtra-Mural "rogramme this evening at 8.43 (.'clock. The subject of the broadcaat will be "A University newsleer." dP^ftl" awH| V <^ s all — ^ K/ \m Ph 1 %  s FT ^7^H 1 it 'Vr -.ri:' .1.. It is the fi tages of the rh. Muetrial |> prided by Mr.I^J^TJJ \^ A'henhelm. soUrilor and.comp.m. ing capo, ity a the an la and i offeri'i ii ;vUTVbe\;;;;rcip;-,Toca..heae ,-,, ; ., f tn. ** rector of the r.rihbean fern.-• inn-ce^ril, spent in pot', [o rompany which recently e.lal -I purposes of loading and dlsrhaig Kbed a f 1,000,00(1 factory In J.-|lng. both In this country am ialea. abroad The corporations are ehargrj "WaMsge of carrying power i, ith the duties of securing thcumulative in IU evil Meet Ir IMinalon of the industrisl an 11 reducing the numbei of igiirultural slund de\cloiiment of 1> %  Planter Returnn To DoinV'a With (> %  Mr. Daniel Green PUnler %  I i>.Tinnn„ left the Island for hesw by the natrtoi %  •• m 'Cartbeei' yesterday after spending tao weeks here. Mr Green era h to vls|t his mother who i P" tit-nt at the Oeneral Hospital bskfttg bark with him 12 geese baciave t,.. i H suddenly • t,vi m iive--mrk feen na. When he gets back t ng tn ^tnrt a he llv* stock far llu' thil isew vr^iture will ... up plantI! ... Kingfleld hWl jTow. limes and 1 <• fi>r mv-king Mr Oraen is .- much I | A'hen ten yrm old. went to Sv.it/erl.sjtid wtsBTS l. FV School until he He trevelled through Bll*Vpe and North Afiica before iggi Domlnicn [> plantingterrnen.D retta in Rr"->]t> I Frtnih %  rermnalci. Tti" He learnt English Vi Dnminica : Hnrr'sni. LM. and Watt* a ime he returned I Co., Ltd B.U.P. nttees functioned %  ski] dee i Letter until Ihe Ihe mntneni '(,,. i.,,..,,!, •., parlmeota ire n rled m through the aretfan depssi McM Roe ii) aSgeta Attending tl,, Welfare Tolks at Hastings ll Annual Guide Meeting Ih Id At tinannual rnOStlllg >.( (|„. Leel Guide Aasociat held % ... 'erday evening at Pas Mill, many lay members of the a.*n. Ulion — preae nt in addition v> uv business pertaining directly t.. be meeting, an International 'etemofiy was pi-rformed by the Plidei ..f tele St. Michael's Girls' School illustrating th*guides In he venous countries of the world In opening the meeting, the Hn 0 M its i %  had ressjUsg letagi rom Lads Savage expressing her egret at not tiring abk iwtng i" court tnotinihig for Hit %  M..|i %  King i ;. VI lowever. she aaswied bei 4 I %  i u real in n i ahfcociation nd of her williiu'i %  1 1 'lengtten i .ii \i lopr tn* dlrectli ol ee %  %  and on wh ihe pur. I . s urp"s* whlcti l '-gasrr hair 'll.li' I \|i ID Mol %  I.r i.i-'-lltl) BKJ id ii. %  was seconded by 1 Hea> V.C.l .. rn m. '" .Ii .1 M K %  Its which would otherwise be pet means that less • .ng' ic .rrierl in and out of the COttB Uy. It thus hampers the export drive. both by reducing thi entity of exports which ough 10 be earned over %  given period ind by delaying produetloii W kooos for e|Hirt by fftdui ing US) quantity of raw materials whiel •i:ght to !> %  caiable of Imports ii.,n over a given period 'Such wassc li seriouStj impiniing i, I the QgrOtts of iritlSh Upossmen U make the best us* cf their ships and to give tin beet and most economical seivice lo their tssseBsnen "It i* an undiwibted fact thn' 11 the 'urn-round of rhlp ports of the w'ld were fuIItompre-war performeconomic re-ulls woult' I-* of great value The shnrtag' r.f tonnage which now consequent e of wasteful US* would disappear: the cost of transport would be seW Bn effc' of eumulntive lenefd eWjuld bo BUbeUtuted fta riimiilative prejudice Unes trading with th.Wi-' i %  %  Itof.kei !.U CAnstantlne Unas %  ml ii would be it"i i I r land whli h w ii sdjoi K the %  % %  o that tl could be %  greed n I ince Depari I %  %  %  %  %  I %  %  v of the Hoard. been riven Ireanln i/.. i Bel MI Be leholarship %  busies. 1V.A.T.O. tttml Bold Mediterranean CJtNOA. Miprfi 2*' Emopc could Uwon by NATO I'S Admiral ftohert fX I: t | :ing were ( ommander-m-Chier of Allied, driven from the Mediterranean. !Forces on Southern Europe speak\ Carnev speaking on the importing before the "Propeller Club" of anee of Allied control In that sea it the conclusion of four *sid no cause may be Iday manoeuvres of MA TO land! lost as long ss the Allies control and air forces along the Yuan-lav I the Mediterranean border, said no major conflict In I Cuncratulalionv Mis. O'Mahony also .: aift of v., md Welfero and othei • %  %  %  lie oppoitiimit >i estlendlng bei Ih i i..t,o %  %  %  Pish" wh %  t'li. thi %  After HIT tinnuUs of noeUee and the trea uret leporl vere read, thi I -ioner ther n i"rt c n-ing tin period July 1951 March lt2. Sb.MM na wernanted and enrolled t '.3~ recruit*, the .. i ... %  -.. • i %  %  "i Ida ing the -".'.. in.in%  %  %  .s been a meat baa I 'eaders, and though fequeai %  %  rasi Ii loldn .an I%  1 nil v.-irl'-. The" .Hen' %  it &f re issel %  bad trans -..I great %  bt to tl %  I was a .... build ing. The meeting ended Fair had been dlscn -<-d at length %  HI had give —U.P. In the preparations 11.1111' KXOll S IMS IIIVI l-'OOII!! I.IKI so MAN1 BABIES OP TO-DW Ill s : \JIVIV<; — LACTOGEN • ll'l ...ll, Ililii-.U-.I • Ii nil'K Yitnmin nnd Iron — e ii'i %  ..I II pi.,. F


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FRIDAY. MARCH 21. 152 BABIlAliilS ADVOCATE fli.l THBFE COMBERMERE SCHOOL REPORT DURING THE COCH>L at tut speech and prize giving lo Mlp ^ w ind ^ cmU -. DUU on t|on , lartely attributable day school report In which he covered every phase of the we ittouki UJ-,; u t UWM U. Mr. Hudson's leadership. r J *Kff*H activities during the put jw, Major C. Noolt, m^ euucauonai 1,100. headmaster of Corhbermere, on Wednesday said that the Second Grade bveonoary ScnooU. "W fundamental contribution that technical education would Tne fundaincnui need-s mat techinterred earUcr meal enucauuii mun meet lui to toe problems of SiaOuiR. and brief terms to the members _. this Island art three-fold. It must i n one Instance we have been the 'AcUng S-rT Mews Tain.1 laiahley. Greaves, Glaa( which '..ui be difficult iy en and arUl seldom be surpassed .\clinfc. SUuf 1 < UM vksse thU my Jti'purt without rafarnnj HI this island is an immedutte contribution to the standard and efficiency of industry and would balance |n ^ a^ p^ m ak a 'direct .iblc to make little or no pruares* their piescut educational system with its predominantly and Imm eaiau; contribution to the because of our Inability to w Academic emphaatt. Ha >aid standard of efficiency in industry, emit I parson of.adequate qualiare ^ * £ }£!**?, ££ ,,' My Wo bism*. Mr. chairman. CesnUkale ol Education of London „ mull therefor, be prepared to fiction, ana .xpe. .once. Ufto d "? q < ( ^ ip(ll | r;in .. wrr ,. the lew in n imbcr although Rood Jordan, La gow. Harper and Wdsoti, who Our lira, group ol candidate .11. t.. actnowledgc .. debt lot Il aO.C.l!.oi U lordship kind I v bl presented m July next. „, „ m m %  •< -"—n •• •.— „, Prl* H Dui ii" srnJi H*> Ov* .Cam() ,, lV .de a now ol recruiu lo mft,,. an „. |UVS|IOII orwitndm bridge Cantn *xt dustry of a higher calibre i|i*i> UMUK** •! Krvlc STOMACH upiels When the stomach is upset U a result of hypetscidiiy. a 4OM o* De Wttl* Anla. 1 fVwd>' will dispers* At pain aiij distress nghl a way Flaiuknce, hrartbafa aad indig*uon air SOSM o( thr msmutum* that this xcc* Ol the *(oins*hcanbMnr in IV WiTt *AnUno r soon leat'alises the and and ai the anw time other HitfirdttnH in the wellbalanced (at mula soothe and protect lh" delicate stomach basfl G*t a supply "gbt J away -aislng Ihe bandard %  B*aTsDaasa*htp in imlu—y. H gssksl %  111) rourln Fort.i fUrie agaii "erg ol the Acting St^tT die help gas* ,ib..ui ing us -nrougli a pgrticuhul.. (Ut In Barbados uvult bma srhen we a< [I ,'niwrn accept tentporarv weaknew >andi* lwt "' "11 '' 'o'wafd to greatpplicac streng*. Rrmlrr p i.ter moil appUcably dossnln^ the present titu.itiori with regard Con i i Kquipment from the' function uwing \o the Deo "e boys ol last those hitherto recruited hauhar(|lu which, when the mourn in,into which the Court ycar'i Form Lower 5 will take a ,di y and for th most part with Wf>rr ifivm. caused thi and Commonwealth were plunged that Examination. The Cambrldk. mucWDOl I rum ,[_ l( ^ w withdraw theu* sdier |he death ol our Late SorerSyndicate ha* served Barbados those recruited. In the third plaiv t .,,. Tbatq conditions B .•. elgn. In the secon*ruom and has been ennanosei might prosper. But. His Lordihe .ecently ag.eed lhcy to adopl mrulU lor industry -heady In dom for Its Ssx-muUiy :School Ly Ul. ^ lln ^*J u n^ U !" 5; •hip-a presence also re-tores a link the eamlnauon system of the our „ lsU ng Secondary School*. Teachers. ,t sels up a doubt ... ..ml %  ..ling c nn 3 a, "" 1 ll ^ (ford and Cambridge Joint lfcerTgtWrbS *^' ,bc min, o t ,h ^ pe r T J mt %ZS? * liSST^h !Ua m Court of B o a r d for nil our Secondary ri „ vi (l thrir merit by p*satn K a whether he ^^S^tJSSL hta w .-ruse L TpS Honour reminds us it was largely Schools with the exception ft e ompetMw En, rjulce Eiarnma">^. overboard su. %  '' pcnglo nabh Curpiseetlon -Tarately due lo the offoru of the S.P.C.K. (-ombermere which, as I have inUoIl (rom OUI Elementary Schools ^^J^TSJV 1M ' JSKT Z W Th^* Utrary If a •-•-nuiry and a half ago thai this formed you. is preparing its ml0 „ ur Secondary Schools, bul '"" %  "' a 1 ''",'. ,Vi\jLJ .„!,_ nble en vice to ttie School and School was opened in 1819 on candidates tor the G C F of Lonwho are morr interested in conj^f^WherV the ^r^er^lo the wthHlt Wearying >-ni with Uj questien whether leevr passages were provided m %  a^ "No". It Chat! espeeiaUy 11 BOTTLE FEEDIM. VI ITS BEST Therc'i no need to <>rry H botuc-l'esding if milk u modi led aiih Robinson'• Patent Bsrkrv Baby will then dsgci il so easily and sleep d^( coaamtedly sfte r eggfj feed Tfqic*-* cmv'it milk right fur hnhy POWDER Navi's'ov i foolhs. IlS-naeh • g) fc see away ro^ .o' a a. -*m "*''< *..r.. | t.^ • • > *e.ma>t rehtt 0. WIIl'S 4 • leigj (" %  *osuls lenuUiling conditionh of %  ly put in the United Kinghie> When .be anfWgff to the Jga-.^-.^j^ ^ ^ reported, it is Under all Si Hill I Th,. nidance reV"" 4 becoming the Ml, %  i inge of %  *>HEALTH BENEFITS \-J TONES UP DIGESTION Sr INRICHES THE BLOOD ** RESTORES NERVOUS ENERGY BUILDS UP THE BODY .-Will"' The BaggsB Hi I service and grantu agee and iome ard le play m the edu.-.itional life of kinds one caused by problems Knliy new Inu t navc aiCe g, i %  %  % %  of staffing and the other by the whf|ll at school lo woraanup The Oovernlng Bodv remarkable reluctance of voung fBCI |n„.. when tuM-liaud acThe School owes a very conboyi lo pt neatly into readyquainU „ Cl wlIh th e ritO Mderable deb', to the Governing n '',, %  dm tt,h J iv f 1 trchnlq.iis involved would hody. -They are in every sense *"" "•>*'* ,'K, J'^H ,nem d ' ;! 1 %  OsrVOtad to iU welfare and DMof f,u,ffin K u,cr on in tl ,, ""'"" %  false values at present atUched tn the essence of Ihe second prose^nda^ Education in Barbados. Kingdom. blern LWs m the nd vl(, "i' >. } The second condition would have 0ur <^ hoot f0ls that u u d ,._ Thi each bo) not only In termr ot Ut ^ (^jaued by industry which pendent only in small mcaiure wa ,, to be prepared to dcupon lne OBlMI (or repatriate ^ TexttMMiks %  is continuing to asMlliav Ing a valuable aerine School Mr Ittath M „r the Junto) paeaVaM %  ,_/isi.m wniW. .. „ uiaries may soon h.approved School Btaff, >%  now *••<" bv our Legislature as I believe tary adUnUdstenng the scheme %  an that many stafrlng problems will and u-aler his troni tbe be solved when we are in a posl!" 'u> ronirol i! lion to re-advertlsc In the UtU'ed ,i, '" ,, idmlnlstrartve basil reful and now iii chan %  gress a nd are the guardians of its good name. Since Ian we met. Mi. D. A. Wiles has resigned on helm: appointed Assistant Colonial this opportunity of offering him our warmest congratulations on his promotion in Ihe Public Service ice we glad.y welcome His Honour Mr. Justice Vaughan, .in old boy of thif School, and one in whom I know Combermere Pj 1 *" will find a stalwart supporter. In April last year. Mr. H. A. Tudor retired from the chairmanstij|i after having served in thai rapacity for a period of five >ear-\ He was succeeded by The Honourable V. C. Gale. HLC. who has maintained the fine tradition i f service set by Mr. Tudor. not only in ; nd personally, but in would ha Visual Aids C.cograrhv Room ul. MS I ... Ir .%-•..... .an %  <•#> ..,— . !" —i I, -,,,. in-,-. ii) r niuuii.i ... .isimi of oui last 5l-"*cch l>a ha wide range of interests ana vlle nnd en f or€e an apprenticestan u , lr e, lK the„ itself and to continue* to plaj %  %  "' uwtini revagdM b > :<"> %  uroup ol §M ay aiem which would give n^.tie Us full contribution to the part In our S.h.->1 life V>'.' boys of the same age. in a few different degrees of prefcrenUal eommunifs/ We have found pen-iicv In the handling or tin l ,,,. ill of knowledge for its >} ^ .":..,.• 11>. wlU be inter^ted in p^bU confusion which may rgportl cmcerning members el *e Ccrigrapl eK ihlOgj rathei than ideas. lirWo between the workshop ouf Junior Staff on prolonged U *TtV r School Internal Organisation Our numbers have ^tabili/ei around the ligurc 550. These are organised into three main division thti range of interests fining w h|eh I have just des and .ibilities, the School mu.-t be crlbed and what is called oflkrially able to oiler the mogl diverse "I're-technical Training* 1'choice of curriculum and Ihe most technical training entaili a higher varied facilities in i.rm% of labftan dard of academic pursuit in, oratories and workshops. Thanks thOM jwbjccl .. whR h haVe a ^^ %  „ the foresight of the (.overti, |)(( upon indui ,try and * In fact ing Body. Mr. Brakes, a Junior yhe academic side of Technical the U.CW.I. Jamaica in MB. Blb v mca|1 therrtoiv lhil hoys lum to us iu ft to read BssTlai IX-gre* m natural for pr p-technlcal training at September last. M _ Study I*ave. Mr J. C. IDrakes this t ,..i,l HOI fail to visit for thenisel the vUual aid equipment i will complete his Degree Cou in N a t it r a I Sciences at the U CW.I. Jamaica. In July neat Mr 11 (J llrewster, after a year at though borough, has biM .iw.-rded a Colonial Office Scholrr aft Room anblp to enable him to continue rn pidlv that M (Studies there foe a further CforTH nffleulty due to n m.itei Art Rueaii ui-ltion of tools ing from 81 to 114 years of age; Junior School comprising lour ,0 ,'i -illel Flr*t Forms and Althoi H.r Stall i ' ac *r Stream ugh we have pressed In each parallel Second Forms wiih 240 f " '""• '^ J" *£ pupils belween the agJH of 101 and naces-ary JWjJl,*W t •" HH.: and the Middle and Upper struct a labora!r>. | School with some 250 pupi s of 13 """"^Tf? ^"ISSi "„ nrolor d ,va n yearj of age and over. The first Mr. Brakes' period of P" !" "* for th ,M. .. .^_ Studv Leave without having a a_i_. still And the end of Art and Ilnndlpt. eatles 1 llroodhagen bai i continuing In %  me claasroorr ..orlglnauy i purpoae. ThenH a Of things m.' ; which he conducts In il of Industrial Arts modelling, cane-work, on th. opportunity ot Join, ApIn Puort,. Ru.. He „ .t th. mo jndj-.l^ > ; jntnbutl' W. Wfcl.tor Ihl -Pr.par.tory with 78 boy. rnjSc J e "'T* ,"' "'. Combcrmo-. School would most ham w. rMd.d '%  w'bb^.n ploy II •ihe Ihu Jul> aiidj""* ll lik.ly b. found in our Academic Scholarship in Prlnlmi trtuibl. rlflr— whrr. th.y would be Klvat Ihe Sri, ;.nd Second Formi provide g twoStudy l*ve ynr ro„r.e nf inilructlon which Omml ScUince LaMralory Includes Enalish UnguaK. I n d nbl. tor him to ,..rh in Uleraturc. Religious Knowledge, Scienc. and Machine Drawing a. panic Studies ui the Ur.lveriilv abl. ............... ,ll.m.lives. pn,lbly. to I.11 in of Puerto Rico. 'I !" "' "JJ ',," b! ll.. nd Modem Language.. Whilst greal pteasure to announce th:.t '"'I •" %  "' ( .,^ |I „. I | o, ,, ,, too I would confer i, Mr K. R Broodhwr1 |g to be ii'/.J. 1 ";^",,'.•",....• .I.M.VIMIdesirable lhal Ihey should bain awarded a HritUh Council n ^ of n|< „„,„,„, „f all the opportunity of some training Scholarship for one year pro. 1 rl |,„ u „ n ,„ thV Science and Mechanic tory. In srhatever way therefore Government may flnallv decide t" thai appointed 1 point out at ftT ."TSl introduce Technical tducat "of our hoya do pr,M m0! " ritenl1 ^ h r and nble for him to teach igious Knowledge, I have "f'd a _*'i~,_, Latin. French. lUstcy. Geography, majority o boys are ">tled^n ^^ n J g^ S'^r. ,. m residence Arithmetic. Bam.ntarvMnth.mnt".ncrel. tblng. ISajJJ Science and Mechanics Labor.Moor. u. m evidence at ic. Phvsiologv and Hvglcne. failwl. since 1 Nniur^ Studv Arl. Music. Physical Haa -—;. „^, Education and two p, • n "' ,h nr *' 1 Reading in the School Librar.>. which I IJB' AI ihe .nd of Ul. second vear ihe illes In which many pupil, undergo an Mt.ll.. *n S w^ilSLi teelts well a, testa In mn.h.11 ,l„ ,1 ual nk'"' "•, rSSSSStonh. taclllt, .Ml In ,he of English, nlnuw. T~l„...-.1 Fdnca !" •_ ThesT'laabarcugnl In coniunctuui recently come "•'">;"!'" ... HI., to h. provided In Ih. adi WlU, Ihjfc !" cord ..f an.,,,,,,,,,, nl i.ln... in .. %  pub c and the boya are then rr>nr.h-*e.i hv I'.-M i-iid' %  " .uft.mll-. ih St-.fr snd mviif Into one or me if I take ih.> opportunity three Stream* — Academic Tornthis moment to oner rl sis of the problems The transferring l h 0 io CoTiibermem C.nvenioi -' : one of the essential %  hotltd lv l rxi'ting Second conditiiv fror School* %  mercln 1 and Mfiem. Thi* A C S-reime prei'i, for the nnd ,. brief an'dywhich lechnihi ulum has not been dependent ipon additional buildings, wo been able to make stead LEiSURE TIME Becomes even more Pleasant in Distinctive Weil-Tailored .... SPORT ^ CLOTHES EVERY GARMENT KXPERT1.Y CUT Tl) MEASURE TAILORED AS YOU SPECIFY PERFECT FT (JUARANTEED Win. FOGARI". (Barbados) Limited The Fore most Name in Tailoring AI proirres5. In no one field 1 igresa more in evidence ihan In music. Under the combined tutelage of Mr. Oerald Hud*on ind Mr. James MTDington. boyi dead tTruyersltv where he is reading extra grounds t' fox his degree in Claaslca. In Bthool from the September E Mr G. A Holder ErsmtlVg &*&** were com i7n.r,u-,l from'a year's study el Dieted ly .n March of b.st yen. Fmiaton College where he ob1 was still on leave at the_tlnw n -.ed n Teachers Certlfle.te. 1 but am happy to place h^ve also to wcleome to the Stift lhal IM (.ovcin.ng Body ht m. the following new member, who nme between l4vUu have joined on the dates indicated and the end of the Bnaneial alter then names : Mr Hughes f> from Toronto where hi oola.ned a Second Class Honoui In History Degree m Septembe 1950. Both a* Master in charge History, as a Set Mast* whli h provision had been < |ha i nii:%tiin'tiiiii of -I boundary wall to enclose our eaitern npproathes. They lust no >( lime. 1 ui. inn out thai I,!.-' I % % %  u, charge" of Cricket. Mr ground!.. Ni> single contribution K *" ..L^TT a Ik. ^lnhli.lirtiiml (if PAN AMERICAN S.,.jih.>. i.wth. ail loaslorn %  conUt-tleS .heU. JaU H**. ^'• I"' •*"•• umiii — ihiMn-a law essafaitiBi aasSa. M—.h*.. %  iur auaov ^W.n'niO.rUWIIll.fll. M I' KTlM0t.f hamltvt A I ZUIES IR0M All GOOD Maki dual k a gsrssHsfrtHUaai n-nJ*.<*)oisfcc. m asilat slaH issa. /* % %  "•*> nt h* iii"l lain >'Hjr % %  •.mil -I ih. iwu siRii of s dry uc Mm tbroal. loarei *aw •*< "' I f-'iALtJi 'i .i/iff>. fHfWIirS AND STORES .. II ^^"coKu,^t^^ a !" -ssj. c ; „,,..,,, ; ^ our School. Mr. A E S~ly groiind. ha. tag B hem, M* .is**i. jSaSJJfegj^^ &s i %as %  ,ocol and in.truraental i>,i.r *,,,, ,hcy look fro,,, C..Jr„, B l The violin claw wliom you aw SSw JolnM u In Saptambe. an. CKn par„ nd heard thi* afternoon. .tartM 10 „ lwt wrvlng for a number of a, nl whi, h Ihad l'" !" ^ ,1th Mr Mill.ngton in January v .„ s to ofter Carlbbaan Tarn?*.^all runw._y_,<._coni._m_.no 010 and you will agrw with m. tor |,, j w0u ld Uke to My bar. in hat th. standard of (kill which f „ nn ect,o„ with th. appoinlnie,,' .,. hai imparted to them in this „, lwo ,rfB c „. th. valua 1 tvely.ahart tlm. I. quite ^^ upon comp .„ti,. egperlene. in odwr Carlbbaan Twrl^mb.r. of our i, I,. 1, short tlm. .i,,s,.,,i,ltng. A Mcond group rBini pracUglng Ihe v.ohn in %  ptamber . d IJJ. .J •-J-.g J~. Bd h to-.JS nectlnn also to stress the Importance of Ilgrhados adopting -ont a small group of boys from ea' %  nnual entrv to the School until we shaN be sufUclentiv •trong to form a School Orchc'ra Less evident in its result' vet equally as valuable i the work done by Mr. Hudson in the leld of Musical Appreciation Mr Hudv n'i work with the S. hool Chonhas maintained th; eKcellence is associated with him and Boa work throughout the IslandThe of the School In the Seh.K,l Musk Festival of last Apul whan thi-. obtlned a Ccr'idcate of Merit in Class II Se<-•i a total extent of npproxlinly six nrrei of ground DtwQ CM loacd. We have been nble to net out it Hockey Pitch and DltH Ho %  nlo the in--' aansed games nf the School Thai innorVtbon m owe to the know-, initiative of Mr Adams.. an.I it has aroused I lively enthi.daam amongst many boy". eheme of reciprocity so thai A1 .tars in Public Servic* in other l i„. ww n '.rnti-ri wUl not be lost to these y^j,-,,.^;, in om a [or Uu BrOt•cung men when they return '" -oniiiiK Cricket Season our hat%  .'.'/.'/.W///'//'/vV.'us* he was bull| mllT endowed. He was proxlme Treiwit in his vear for the Barbadoa Seholarship and from %hen ntll his retirement last May, erred almost continuously on the Assistant Staff of Combermere Sehool. Apart from hli rontrlbu'lon in the clawroom in Vftthemali'• <• would be particularly rem--nbered for th" fne work he did wnl 11 club, ihe Scouts, and with law cricket tearna. He leavef ns a model and a record of service Kin*. n >f prartisc wteketi Sj On race a -t • Air Traffic OXouchhn. S'i'i'ini n '%  %  ''%  • %  '' %  %  U Sahri'. Ml I. Tfl-l.i. i*tt,in IV-... ilr. R.awM Cabrava. M-U ut Appiebata.. sv.b-.i T Harbour Lug In Carli.l. Bay 1 v r.nbb— %  ..!.. biu. M V Sail Mf Lai*. IV h i> M anu II *,h Epi-rptl-" • HBnd W M 1 It A a arusord. aVu V. >-T, • %  .i. i H v % %  % % %  Hud— %  %  iHMiUri stji r.r.., '. .-, St VM nat. Cap! • %  I MM it". Capt Oaiisiwi in rASM *• %  tah nlqa*-ti. M Ion. MM. Cap. It SEE YOURSELF AS OTHERS SEE YOU" WE HAVE JUST OPENED PILKINGTON BEVEL-EDGE MIRRORS DOME & SQUARE TOP WARDROBE MIRRORS 16 x 60 and 18" x60". Triple MIRRORS — Ogee, Clipped Edge and Dome Top. MIRROR CORNERS, CLIPS. REFLEX HINGES, & MOVEMENTS. • THE CORNER STORE. 1'MWA'.1W.WIWA M %  .-. %  %  %  .-. %  y.:: %  %  %  %  %  .: %  % % %  % % %  %  -• % % %  %  •'• % %