Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Barbados



ESTABLISHED 1895

W. INDIES NEED SO



Social Welfare Officers’
Task Is Very Important

OPENING the Conference of Social Welfare

Officers at Hastings House
Sir George Seel, Head of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Organisation, told about forty dele-
gates and observers present that their task “is to

create a society in which ideas will generate and
circulate; a society in which problems such as the
political future of the West Indies, and the risk of
its frustration through over-population, will be!
measured soberly, and met with solutions in which
every man and woman can play a part.’’

} Sir George added : “Your task could not be more
important. If the means at your disposal are modest
and ~ pam of your trade simple, yet your work must be
carried out on the highest pl * hur =
_The Conference, the first of ite pen Mapeaveur.
kind to be held at Hastings
House in five years, is being at-
tended by delegates and observers
from the various Caribbean terri-
tories, as well as Mr, W. H. Chinn
Social Welfare Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
who is on a tour of the West In-
dies. The meeting is being presid-
ed over by Miss Dora Ibberson,
Social Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller for Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West In-
dies, The meeting will continue
until Friday 21st instant

Training

Yesterday morning's session was
devoted to an account of his tour
of the region by Mr. Chinn who



Sonuts Will
Return Home

On Thursday

*
The contingent of Barbadian
Scouts who left here for the
pony nae ne ge in Jamaica,
re expec to return home on

Thursday by ‘plane at 5.30 p.m
A cablegram received by the lo-
cal Secretary of the Boys’ Scouts
Association from Major J. E. Grif-
fith, Island Commissioner, stated
that the Jamboree has been a

yesterday morning, |

Scheme For

W.I. Workers
In U.S.

At its first meeting in June,
1951, the Regional Labour Board
made certain provisional arrange-
ments for central administrative
and accounting work in connec-
tion with the scheme for employ-
ment of West Indian workers in
the United States.

In December it requested Mr.
F. C. Catchpole, O.B.E., the Dep-
uty Chairman, to review these
provisional arrangements, partic-
ularly with a view to avoiding
delays in clearing the accounts of

workers on their return to the
West Indies,

Mr. Catchpole and Mr. S.
Hochoy, Labour Commissioner,

Trinidad, who was associated with
him in this investigation, visited
Washington in February, 1952,
and as a result of their recommen-
dations it has been decided that
e@s from. 3lst March, 1952, the
accounting work shoul@ be per-
formed in the office of the Board's
=— Liaison Officer in Washing-
Aton.

This will make it unnecessary



led off discussions on “A perma-
nent pattern for Welfare” and on
“Training”. Other sessions dur-
ing the week will deal with the
correlation of welfare with other
services; the necessity for the in-
tegration of social and economic
development; community, organi-
sation; work for the family group; |
probation and the social work of
the courts; protection of juveniles,
juvenile reformative institutions;
youth work; welfare and local
government; welfare and indus-
try; the place of voluntary bodies
in a permanent plan; and the con-
tribution of research.

Declaring the Conference open,
Sir George Seel said: —

I see that it is exactly five years
since a Conference of Social Wel-
fare Officers was held at Hastings
House, and I think«that most
people here, if not all, will agree
that that is an over-long interval
for a subject which more than
any other depends upon the per-
sonal devotion and enthusiasm
of its upholders, and the inspira-
tion which they can derive from
sharing their experiences and dis-
cussing their problems with others
engaged in similar work. I am
very glad indeed that, thanks
almost entirely to the enthusiasm
and persistence of Miss Ibberson,
my Social Welfare Adviser, it has

great success.

Our Correspondent writes from
Jamaica :—

The first Caribbean Jamboree
ended today at Briggs Park Camp
with colourful ceremonies. H. R. H.
Princess Alice, The Earl of Ath-
lone, Chief Scout Lord Rowallan
and Jamaica Chief Scout Sir Hugh
Foot took part in the closing cer-
emonies.

At the regional conference of
Scouters on Friday it was un-
officially mooted that the second
Caribbean Jamboree should be
held in Trinidad.

Lord Rijwallpn presided and
matters pertaining to Caribbean
scouting were discussed.

NAVAL OFFICER
RECUPERATING

Second Officer Albert Johnson,
ex R.F.A. “Wavemaster”, who
was left behind in Barbados a few
weeks ago by his ship for medical
attention at the Hospital, is ex-
pected to get passage back to his |
home in the U.K. sometime this
week.

It is anticipated that either an-
other R.F.A. ship will call at
Barbados for Johnson or that he |
will go on to Trinidad to take}
a ship for the U.K. Johnson is



@ On Page 5 staying here at the Y.M.CA. ]





|

Cuban Senators |

Driven Off By Shots

HAVANA, March 17. |

AN ARMED GUARD at the $20,000,000 National ,
Capitol Building firing air rifles drove off a group of six- |
teen opposition Congressmen seeking to resume Parlia- |

ithe result

to retain the administrative and
accounting office in Kingston, and
at the request of the Government
of Jamaica, arrangements are be-
ing made for the secondment of
Mr. R. E. Mais as Executive Sec-
retary to the Board to be termin-
ated, and for his return to duty
in the Jamaica Civil Service.

The Chairman of the Board has
expressed warm appreciation of
the services of Mr. Mais as Execu-
tive Secretary during the past
nine months.

Ambassadors
Prepare Note

LONDON, March ¥i,
Anthony Eden was meeting
this afternoon with United States



Ambassador, Walter Gifford and
French Ambassador Rene Mas-
sigli to put the final touches to

the draft note.

They will also prepare for talks
in Paris later this week with
French Foreign Minister Robert
Schuman, United States Russian
Expert, Charles B. Bohlen and
German Federal Chancellor, Con-
rad Adenauer.

Official quarters made it plain
today that the West will tell
Moscow its proposal for the cre-
ition of an all-German govern-
ment which is to participate in
suggested talks on a peace treaty
at an International Conference is
a step in the right direction.

But that Government must be
of Free All-Germpn
election carried out under inter-
national supervision after the
U.N. Commission set up in Pafis
earlier this year by the General

‘ Assembly has studied conditions! those needs.
mentary defiance of Batistas 45 day suspension of Congress. ‘in East Germany.—U.P.






TUESDAY, atARCH 18, 1952

:



LC CCT



"FREIGHT CARS IDLE IN NEW YORK CENTRAL STRIKE”,

r eo ;

HUNDREDS OF FREIGHT CARS @re at a standstill in the yards at Buffalo, N, Y., following the walkout of |
18,000 New York Central trainmen. The government warned !t would take “appropriate action If the pres- 4

ent work stoppage continues or spreads.” The line js tied up west of Buffalo, (International Soundphoto)
tll nn it _ — -

CWI et Dir ector| Tanks, Ship
Of Education Dept Smash Reds

TOKYO, Mareh 17
MR. PHILIP SHERLOCK, Vice-Principal of the Uni-

Big tanks plunging across rice
versity College of the West Indies, who is at present | paddy fields have made one of the

attending the Social Welfare Conference at Hastings et eacueng rae on Segende Rerelan Ministers broke the

=, 5 os av , - ee P a” raftin aban anr

House, told the Advocate y sterday that they have now imonths, United States Army head- ther World War it’ pease treat

appointed a Director of the University College Department j quarters disclosed today. The raid/ies, provided for a Soviet voice

of Education, Dr. D’Aeth, who has had a distinguished | took place on the Western Sector) 9 Japanese affairs on United

academic and war record, Research Fellowship at Har- ae ot Metindee Gaming" |samn iter ans, made progress to-

vard and Wing Commander in the R.A.F. He is now Her . es: ms ' Ware Croaening nee cone

. > : sovernment of Romania and Bul-

Majesty’s Inspector of Schoolgein England and will prob-} Tanks destroyed 36 bunkers and| aria, produced new agreements

ably take up his appointment in May and will study the ica positions. wo, slmly con-|on China, won Russian assent to

t epar a ion i i i entrations were blasted and|the exeating of a U.N. Commis-

oetane Departments © ) eek B ee Kargdon apie prasghad through or shelled | sion to auidy Atomic Energy. con-

“There are two significant pow? ne work of this-Upiversity Golf} m sya hove in whieh! trol lett porego} ved only. the

‘ne in mind,’ |leae education department,” he] ese were belleved to have/question of what to to the

which arg to be borne in mind,”| lege education dep , tored supplies. Communists on|Red revolution in northern Tran
: “ t. fi |

Mr. Sherlock said. “First, from he East Front were pounded last! UP.

the start we hope to award ow
ewn diplomas. Under our char-
ter, we have the power. Ou,
degrees are those of the Univer-
sity of London, with whom w«
have a valuable and helpful
special relationship.

“Our courses of study are not
the same as those for the Londo:
external degrees, but they are
closely. related to the British!
Caribbean, to its history and en-j
vironment. But from the start, |
the diploma which will be pos’!
graduate and of a high standar«

i

@ On page 8
| light by the 45,000-ton U.S. ship
{ Wisconsin by heavy calibre shells.

The Communist truce delegates
at Panmunjom today alleged that
1 United Nations plane yesterday
trafed a prisoner of war camp in
North Korea killing British pris-
mers. The camp was marked
the agreed manner.—U.P,

|
in



U.N. PLANES
KILL 75 REDS

SEOUL, March 17

American Shooting Star jets
sprayed frontline Communist
roops and artillery positions with
rockets, bombs and bullets, Pilots
reported killing more than 75
Red soldiers, destroying 15 guns
ind 28 troop bunkers and dam-

will be our own and the coursé

will be worked out to meet Carib
bean needs. This means that wher
the newly appointed § director
comes out, he will go round the
region consulting and making use
of experience in the area.”

Regional Training
He said that training for ‘téach-
ers at graduate level will be om



r ic i aging a tank. Eighty-six Sabre

a regional basis, taking fall x
seamunt of the educational need a fying See a oe
‘ a Ps dt ect Slars exe mangea shots with a

of the region and designed to m Communist M.LG, 15 jets but

Mr. A. P. SHERLOCK

“But there are other aspects of reported no hits, —U.P.





The wild outburst of shooting —
panicked downtown Havana,
brought dozens of prowl cars
screaming to the scene but none
were hurt. An early police report
that the Palace guard had been
fired upon by unidentified persons |
from the roof-tops of comanerca
establishments facing the capitol
proved false. Army and Navy !
regulars carried out a thorough!
search of the buildings in the
neighbourhood.

From Our Own Correspondent '
ANTIGUA.
Last year’s seventy inches of!
rainfall have resulted in An-|
tigua’s bumper sugar crop. It is
expected to be the bi ever.
Estimate at the beginning of
this year was thirty thousand
tons of sugar but now some au-
thorities maintain that if the
whole erop is reaped the yield
will be thirty six thousand tons.
The largest production from

Sehate President Tony Varona,
one of the leaders of the former |
Government Autentico party had|
notified all legislators several days |
ago reminding them that Congress |
was legally due to reconvene to-:
day at 4 p.m., hence the possibil-!
ity of outbreaks such as occurred !
had no} been overlooked. !

However sixteen Senators,
Congressmen of the Auentico and
the Cuban Peoples Party, led by
Varona Who approached the capi-
tol retired in an orderly manner

“Open Verdict” Over
Labourer’s Death

ANTIGUA EXPECTS BUMPER

this island so far was 32,000,
tons of sugar in 1937 and there
is no doubt now that if reaping |
continues as well as in recent |
weeks this record will be broken. |
Dry weather has set ih and it |
is felt that this may affect the |
late ratoons,

Originally, about 5 per cent
of cane ground was supplied by
the peasants and transportation
was by means of donkeys or

|, MISS ISRAEL 1952 VISITS ENGLAND |
7 br i : m =f Ae

tation Fund for peasants, There
were no trailers with these trac-
tors but the Antigua Syndicate

Peasant supplies
gradually increasing
year they have reached

cattle carts.
have been
until this

reap all of their canes this year. |

His Excellency Mr. K. W.
Blackburne appointed a commit



30 per cent. Transportation has) jee under the Chairmanship of Estates have supplied trailors
been their big problem because | ine papour Commissioner Mr. c,| from their stocks in order to
carts available are far beneath! © Low-achee with a view o| S8i8t this endeavour to enabl
requinements to cope with theit | organising peasant reaping and, peasantseto take off their crop
fncreayed production, Peasant| transportation. At the sugges-,; Two tipper trucks have also
supplies of cane to the factory tion of Mr, Jd. C, MeMichael,, been purchased to assist in
were extremely slow at the Manager of the Antigua Sugar peasant haulage and the Sugar

Factory, two tractors have been
purchased through the Rehabili-

start of crop and it was feared

Factory is
that it would be impossible to

equipment,

servicing all of their







ER-MINDED SOCIET



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Y

President’s Papers
Show He Feared
World Wer Li

wasnin tron, March 17.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN Secretly |feared on two occa-
sions in recent years that World War lll was about to
break out ;
He saw an explosive threat first inthe Berlin cvisis
of September 1948 and again in United Nations. reverses
; in Korea in December 1950 after Red China intervened.
> : > + : 4,
frunan’s concern over world problems including Stalin,
Russia, preventive war and various other foreign matters
was recorded in his personal papers published to-day in a
book entitled “Mr. President.”
The book was published by- :
}Farrar, Straus and Young In- e
orporated and written by Wil- Steel Will
am Hillman, former newspaper-

lan and now radio commentator 9

The personal papers also dis- Lose 3 Days
losed that Truman once sent a

nessage to the Kremlin that . f °
} Stalin was not a man of his word P, uction

Foreign Policy
| And the President once read WASHINGTON, March 17
1Secretary of State James F An industry spokesman said the
Byrne harply worded letter oa) nation will lose at least two or
}\vho was boss of United States|ihree days of vital steel produe-
| Foreign Policy and on Whe need! tion even if the Steelworkers’
for a tough attitude toward Rus- Union agrees to another postpone-
In Byrnes’ memorandum is} nent of its often deferred nation-

possibly the most sensational; wide strike. The strike deadline
tem in the book. Truman said now set for Sunday at mid-
lpointedly he and not Byrnes night
jwould make final Foreign Policy Union President Philip Murray
lecisions and added bluntly L| notified the Wages Board on Sun-
lam tired babying the Russians’

. , Gay that no decision on postpone-
That occurred in January 1946 sage

ind Bytnes who was then one of

the President's closest adviser
had just been to Moscow where
{he made agreements which cri-|
tics characterized as appease-

; nent of the Russians,

In his own book five years ago
tiled “Speaking Frankly” Byrnes
aid the Moscow meeting of th
United States, British and Soviet



|



Gairy Denied
Entrance To St. Lucia

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Mareh 17
Lucia Executive Coun-
here to have
lecided not to permit Gairy te
visit St. Lucia until the current
jabour unrest has ended.

The

St.
understood

} Union strategy 1s to held off the

















ment will be made until the Steel-
workers’ Policy Committee meets
here on Thursday
Informed sources indicated tha
,ostponement promise until the
Wages Board issues its recom-
nendations for settling the dis-
pute. The Board has promised
etion by Thursday.
It Government
cerms are favourable and indica-
ions are that they will be, the
Union probably will agree to hold
off the walk-out The Union ‘
postponed the strike date three
imes so far in its drive for 18%
cents an hour increase for
650,000 basic steel workers. The
latest request by the Board is in-
tended to give the parties a
chance to negotiate its recom-

recommended




request to maintain production
provided the Union also agreed.
With the strike threat still hang-
ing however, the companies
warned they must begin curtail-
ing operations early this week
Industry spokesmen said that at
best the situation will mean a loss
of “two or three days production”
before production goes back to
normal, They said a three-day
urtailment would cost the De-
fence Programme about 870,000
tons of badly needed steel.—U.P.

SUGAR CROP

U.N. Think Moscow



St. Martin’s New
Viear Arrives

THE REV. M. J. DENINGTON who has been appoint-
ed Vicar of St. Martins, St. Philip, arrived here from Nevis
yesterday by the 60-ton schooner “Excelsior Hodge”.

He was not the smiling passenger who alights from
a ‘plane looking debonair, but a tired man with a stubby
beard, after two days of rough sailing under unpleasant
conditions,

7 Wearing short white pants, a
khaki “navy” jacket with decora-
tions on the breast-——for he spent
54 years in the British Navy—a
white shirt underneath and a
broad rimmed straw hat to keep
Last week’s improvement in]|off the sun, Rev. Denington ut

peasant supplies of cane to the] tered a sigh of relief as he put

factory have so increased that foot on Barbados.

they have almost reached their With him were his 90. year-old

allocation and with their new} rothoer—the best ailor of the

haulage system it is highly pro-| ¢ompany—his wife, three children
bable that all of their canes will} (two girls and a boy) and a friend

be reaped. The factory ground}of his from Nevis named Edward

10,286 tons of cane with approx-}| Bates. Only the old man braved
imately 34 hours out of cane}the weather and was not sear
ind made 1,234 tons sugar,} sick

| their largest amount for — the Rev. Denington did not want it

| season. hat way but he could not do bet-

ter. The time was drawing close
for him to take up his appointment
here and there was no prospect of



when entrance to the building was

to emphasize the warning.—U.P.



U.S. Arsenal To Get
Guided Missiles

WASHINGTON, March 17

The armed forces revealed that
they have stepped up their guided
missile training programme in an-
ticipation of adding ‘the missiles
to the United States’ arsenal of
ready weapons.

Guided missiles have been in
the experimental stage, but the
Air Force said six months ago at
least one missile would be avail-
able soon.

The Army disclosed at the same
time it had tactically useful mod-
als of guided missiles in produc-
tion.

The Navy said its guided missile
propects have been speeded up for
early use. It
addition of these weapons to the
fleet would strengthen greatly
both its offensive and defensive
capabilities

Althcugh none of

the services





will admit having guided missiles
n actual use now, all are bearin
do on training men ile
t -U.P.

opposed and shots fired in the P. |

predicted that the/

A CORONER'S JURY returned an “Open Verdict”
when an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the
death of 44-year-old Lione! Burton of St. Martins, St.
Philip, was concluded before Coroner Mr. C. L. Walwyn
at Distriet ‘A’ yesterday. ‘

Burton, a labourer of Searles—
Factory took ill at the same fac-
tory on March 8. His wife took
him to the General Hospital where
he died on the following day.

Dr. A. S. Cato, who performed
the post mortem examination, gave
evidence yesterday after ich
the Coroner addressed the jury.

| Politician Jailed
}

New Plan Will
Encourage Banks

LISBON, March 17.

A “New Deal” expansion pro-
gramme of fresh financing and
emigration is being completed by
the Government here for Portu-
gal’s far-flung colonies.

The principal Portuguese col-
onies are Mozambique, Angola
and Portuguese Guinea in Africa.
The colonies which supply much
raw material for mainland indus-
tries have a total population of
11,000,000.

The Government Bill to open
the door to Colonial financial ex-
pansion now before the National
Assembly for approval would
permit foreign Banks to open
branches 4n the colonies provid-
ed certain qualifications arer met
Authorization is received from
| Portuguese authorities
faced}; At present the sole banking

forganization in the colonies is
the Overseas Bank.—U.P



CAIRO, March 17.

Extreme Socialist leader Ahmed
|Hussein was today found. guilty
on three counts of resisting the
Sovereign State and sentenced to
18 months’ imprisonment. He was
arrested close on the heels of
the rioting and arson of January
26 and convicted of offences com-
mitted prior to that date.

He

doors

was tried behind closed
before a Civilian Penal
Court which sentenced him to six
months in prison on each of the |
counts but he still
re undefined charges,
—U.P.

three

mi | :
MI88 MICHAL HARREL
just arrived in Pnugland on a goodwill mission from Israel.



Israel” has
She joined
the armed forces at outbreak of hostilities between Jerusalem and {
the Arab States While in England she will officiate at a contest to
find “Miss Anglo-Jewry” 1952 Exrpre

recently elected ‘Miss





$$ ee

his getting a plane or steamship
. 7 "> ts Apart from having animals and
i ; other personal and household
/ f ; ® ¢ 99 effects to bring up to Barbados
Will Answer oe No which made it impossible for hin
i id ne to get a passage by ‘plane, a doc-
| tor told his father that he could
not travel by ‘plane. So out went
i LONDON, March 17. the idea of an air trip.

THREE WESTERN POWERS will ask Russia whether No Alternative
she will support the holdin of free elections for all of sae tpare wey Se ene counee of
rermany atic c »g dic chartering the Excelsior Hodge to
fermany, Diplomatic circles predicted ae eh eae ta hae
1" : : Rev. Denington squirmed at th
I'he auestion designed to test the sincerity of the charge of $900 but could do no

latest Soviet proposals for a German Peace Treaty may be
put to Moscow by the end of this week





Informant i the United
W ing A $ aai ! ; :
arning f gainst States, Britain and France held
o great hope of a clear affirma-
ap. i ne tive answer from Moscow If
ver-Contidence
loscow’ inswer negative or
TORONTO, Mareh 17 rita crippling qualification
the t will regard the Soviet
Prime Ministe Laurent } wil -— a 7 Sevi
warned the West last nt tt posals u nother propa- |
‘ - . : ; oe nda move
gains overcor lence hat i
rowing military might t fri ; sie :
ned off R 1 a i} ed Na ions Commission i
peace | 1 ¥ to launch an investi-
. | gatio determing whether
Western peopl have t 10k f ich an election ir
make more sacrifice na continue i Germany is possible.
to build up their 1 foree he
, a graduating « of St Mi-} It } ba elcomea by the |
hael’s College. “The foundations | w, rn Allies High Commission
f combined strength we already l, nd by West German Chaneellor
have laid in the free v t have! Konrad Adenauer. But two letters
- a greater sense of security |to Soviet General Vassily Chuikov
a , fo pe that wa king for permission to enter the
‘ nt ‘ ed ' have not
be prevel OP UP

other than hire the schooner
About 42 packages of person:
effects, eight goats, two horses a
two donkeys were packed away
in the schooner’s hold, the famil
aboard and the Excelsior Hodg
set sail from Nevis for Barbado
ev, Denington’s father had to be
helped on board and was actuall)
‘lifted off the schooner when she
jtied up alongside the Pier Head

Rev. Denington, who is now 3¢
| years old, passed examinations i

| Theology in England but before

‘being ordained, Woeld War I
came along and he joined the
navy He spent 5} years, rising



to the rank of Lieutenant and was

then demobbed

still to preach “the
Denington was soon
Modwenh; an
Sutton-in-

Determined
|}word”, Rev
lafter ordained to St.
|} Anglican hurch
| Ashfield, Notts. He left England
|for Nevis where he s Rector of
St. George Church for tw «
@ On page &








PAGE TWO



M:®: J. D. M. BELL, research
i worker and lecturer in in-
caustrial relations at Glasgow
University, arrived in Barbados
yesterday evening by B.W.LA.

irom Trinidad.

vir, Bell who was expected over
the jast week-end was unavoid-
ably delayea, He has now comie
to lecture on Trade Union subjects
to the twenty West Indian Trace
Union officals attending the
school here on Trade Unionism.

Vean of the Course is Mr. P, C.
Catcnpole, Labour Advisez to the
Compwoller for Development and
vy elfare,

iiarley Street Specialist

D* JENNER HOSKIN, heart
| specialist from Harley Street,
wwiidou, teit by B.W.LA. on Sun-
aay evening for British Guiana
via Trinidad after spending three
and a half weeks’ hgliday staying
at the Ocean View @otel.

Dr. Hoskin said tijat it was hi
first visit here induc intended
Spending half of his time in Trin-
idad, but liked Barbados so much
that he remained here for his en-
tire holiday,

Dr. and Mrs. Hoskin have gone
to Georgetown where they wil!
take the S.S. Bonaire for England

For Trinidad Holiday
wise
Ame the passengers leaving
on Sunday evening by
B.W.LA. for Trinidad to spend a

holiday was Miss Betty King,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Victor
King of “Kimberley,” 9th Ave.,

Belleville and an employee of the
Barbados Electric Supply Corpor-
ation. She will spend three weeks
in Port-of-Spain,

Attorney-At-Law

R. AND MRS, ALBRIDGE C.

SMITH of New Jersey, ar-
rived here on Sunday by B.W.LA.
via Puerto Rico and Antigua for
about two weeks’ holiday and are
Staying at the Paradise Beach
Club. They were in Barbados fif-
teen years ago on their haney-
moon,

Mr. Smith is an Attorney-at-
Law with offices in New York and
Princeten, New Jersey.

Travelling with them is Mr
T. W. Delehanty of Princeton, New
Jersey who is paying his first visit
to the island.

Mr. Delehanty is a free lance
journalist who writes for maga-
zines like the New York Herald
Tribune, the New York Post and
Redbook. ta

Will Spend A Month

RS. LILIAN’ SPRINGER,
Clinic Nurse of the St,
Joseph Infirmary, left on Sunday
by B.W.LA. for Trinidad where
she will spend a month’s holiday.



Carib Calling

— Off To The U.S.A.
EAVING by B.W.I. on Sun-
day morning for Puerto Rico

on her way to the U.S.A. was Mrs

Muriel Rollins who resigned her

post at the Barbados Advocate

lest month. She has now gone to
join her mother and sister.

During her five years on the
newspaper staff, Mrs. Rollins was
among. other things Children’s
Editress. She hopes to continue
in the journalistic field.

At the airport to wish her good
luck anc bon voyage were a
luck and bon voyage were a
number of her’ relatives and
friends. ¥

Visited Beauty Spots

FTER spending two weeks
holdiay in Barbados, Mrs

W. Marshali accompanied by her

son-in-law and daughter, returned

to Trinidad on Sunday evening by

B.W.LA. They were staying ai

“Maristow,” Maxwell Coast.

Mrs. Marshall is the mother of
Mr. “Bunny” Marshall of Messrs
Barnes and Company, who took
the family to the various beauty
spots of the island during their
short stay here.

Celebrated Birthday

RS. GERALDINE ROGINSON

of Toronto, Canada cele-
brated her fifty-seventh birthday
mn Saturday. A party was held
jat the home of Mr. L. B. Marshall

- ; waat Prospect, St James, in her
She qualified honour.

year ago and was las Mrs. Robinson, who is in the
1950 island for health reasoms, arrived



MISS DORA BYNOE

Two Nurses

T present holidaying in Bar-
A bados is Miss Dora Bynoe,

daughter of the late Mr. and,Mrs
Bruce Bynoe, formerly of “Inch-
keith,” Pine Hill.





Dora who has been living in'
Canada since 1948 has been study-
ing nursing there
almost a
here in

ries , in December and was staying at
Accompanying her is a friena in : 7
Miss Martha Johnson of Torontor se nee ~ a ae =
who graduated with her at St io of Mr Seieeehen en the
Joseph’s Hospital, Toronto. euees Of Mr. aa
She will be returning to conate
* * in May via St, Lucia and Trinida
Agricultural Officer ‘where she expects to spend a few
days.
"AR. ERNEST MOLL, Agricul-*"*> Thotas :
Avi tural Officer of Trinidad is Visiting Relatives ON
now in Barbados for two weeks’ HERBERT SHILSTONE,

R.
holiday. He arrived on Sunday by’ M Jnr., from Houston, Texas,
ace > s »fis now in Barbados on a visit to
B.W.1.A. accompanied by his wife.f 15. 4
they are staying at Grazettes, St. his uncle Mr. E. Maxwell Shilstone
They are staying at Grazettes, St.
Michael “and his aunt Mrs. A. E. Armstrong.
He is staying at “Hillsbury”, St.
George
For Welfare Talks Mr. Shilstone is an enginess
Pei os . ane Wey, Working with Shilstone Testing
M* S. SHARP, Resident Tutor | ahoratories of Houston. He is the
in the Leeward |slands for gon of Dr, Herbert M. Shilstone,
the University College of the West head of the New York Office of
Indies, arrived here on Sunday by the Shilstone Testing Laboratories.

B.W.1.A. from Antigua to attend :

the Conference of Social Welfare Six Months rs en

Officers of the British Caribbean MONG the passengers e

Area. route to England by the S.S.
He is steying at the Marine Golfite which left here on Friday

Hotel. is Miss Laurie Patterson of Has-
tings. She is on her way to spend
six months’ holiday with friends

Fer Two Months in London,

PENDING about two months’ To Study Nursing In U.K.

holiday here with her rela- ISS PATRICIA MAYNARD.
tives at My Lord’s Hill is Mrs, a nurse of Antigua, arrived
Gwen Trotman who came in from here on Sunday by B.W.1.A. on
Antigua on Sunday by B.W.LA. a short visit prior to going to the
Her husband who is Assistafit United Kingdom via New York
Federal Engineer of the Leeward to further her studies in nursing.

Islands is expected to join her in She is staying at the Cosmopolitan
about two weeks time. Guest House,



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

Teddy Bear Was Dissatisfied

After 35 Years

AYING his first visit to the
island since he left it in
1917 is Mr, Athelston Skeete fors
merly of Jackman’s, St. Michael.
He returned on Sunday from thé
U.S.A, via Puerto Rico by B.W.LA
and is spending three weeks’ holi-
day staying at the Cosmopolitan
Guest House.

Brothers f

R. KEITH B, INNISS, a Bar-

badian resident in New York
for many years, returned here on
junday via Puerto Rico and An-
tigua for three weeks’ holiday. He
has come over to visit his mother
who is ill.

Mr. Inniss is a brother of Mr.
Kyle ‘ Inniss, headmaster St
Barnabas Boys’ School. In the
U.S.A., he is employed with the
Board of Transportation in New
York City.

Education Officer—T’dad

R. C. OTTLEY, Chief Educa-
tion Extension Officer Trini-
dad who arrived on Sunday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. for the Confer-
ence of Social Welfare Officers pf
the British Caribbean area, met
at Seawell Mr. Rawle Jordan,
Chief Inspector of Schools here.

Mr, Ottley was the guest at
luncheon later in the day of Mr.
and Mrs. Jordan.

Editor Returns Home

R. C. E. HITCHINS, Editor of

the Trinidad Guardian who

arrived here on Friday last week

from Antigua, returned to Trini-
dad on Sunday by B.W.I.A.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

TUESDAY, 18TH MARCH, 1952
1115 am _ Appointment With Music,
11 30 am Cyril Smith and Phyllis Sel-
lick (Pianos), 1200 noon The News,
1210 pm News Analysis
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19 76m., 25 53m,







31.32m.
400 pm The News, 410 pm _ The
Daily Service, 415 pm Marching and

Waltzing, 445 pm Semprini at_the
Piano, 500 pm _ Take it from Here,
530 p.m BBC _ Scottish Orchestra,
600 pm. Personal Portrait, 615 pm
Welsh Magazine, 64 pm ‘Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 17.00
pm The News eee ae

i .m, — 25.53m, 3 ‘
7.15—10 30 p. Siem.

715 pm Rendezvous, 745 pm
Generally Speaking, 800 pm The

Cheque, 815 pm _ Radio Newsreel, 8.30
pm Composer of the Week, 9 00 p.m.
Meet the Commonwealth, 9.30 pm

Ray's A Laugh, 10 00 pm The News,

1010 pm. From The Editorials, 10 15
pm Herbert Hodge Talking, 1030
pm Tip Top Tunes.



The Girls Industrial Union-

THE Girls’ Industrial Union is the outstanding insti-

tution in this island conduct

was begun in 1912 and incorporated by an act of the legis-

lature in 1922. Its members

The Union rooms are situated at Constitution Road.

The Union was formed t

Miss Adah Evelyn who while in the United States, saw the ;
need for instructing girls in domestic scienc
them elementary training in technical subjects.
Evelyn, many ladies have given of their time and energy &
and to-day the Union stands as a monument to that fore-

sight.

Among those who have helped
to make the Union the flourishing
institution it is today are the late
Mrs, C. A. Gale and Mrs. Olga
Symmonds, J.P. Mrs. H. A.
Ballou, Mrs. D. W. Bentley and
the untiring Secretary Miss
Williams.

The object of the Union is to
provide such means of instruction
and recreation as will promote the
mental and physical improve-
ment and increase the mutual
helpfulness of its members. The
Union is divided into Clubs, There
are 17 Clubs which are run under
the supervision of a Committee
of Management. Each’ Club has
its own Secretary and Assistant
Seeretary. Business meetings
are held the first two weeks of
each month for the purpose of
afranging entertainments, physi-
cal training, lectures and any
other activities that are desired.

Commercial Subjects Also
Girls -are drawn from all the
parishes of the island to receive

training and many of them,
through the training received,

ed by women for women. It

hip is now oVer five hundred.

hrough the instrumentality of ;

e and to give
Since Miss

cluded

in the syllabus, All of
these

classes are Government
classes. For the typing classes
the Pitman’s Gramophone In-
structor was recently introduced.
This mechine has improved the
girls’ concentration and also
produced more rythmic taps,
There are special classes for be-=
ginners and juniors. Those girls
who are backward can practise
in the afternoon before classes
begin. Many girls have received
certificates frofn the London
Chamber of Commerce.



MRS, OLGA SYMMONDS

or Groups and each section has

In the Estimates of the Barba- jts teacher,

own On Monday
dos Government for 1949—50 afternoons the classes are in-
provision was made to continue structed in cross stitch, quilting,
these classes under the super-

tufted wool work, knitted socks,

vision of the drawn thread, wax flowers, wool-

Barbados Evening

Institute which was inaugurated jon embroidery and typewriting.
in 1948, English is an additional
subject and is the key to satis- Tuesday afternoons are devot-

factory results in both Shorthand ed
and Typewriting. In January
boolq-keepipg and uaccounitancy
classes were begun, the teacher
is a Government clerk.

The Classes

to smocking, babies’ coats
embroidery and applique, plaited
shoes, candle wick work, turkish
lace, designing of posters, pihysi-
cal culture, decorated cake icing
and shorthand, .

On Wednesdays there is madeira



have now become teachers. There There are classes from Monday work, wreaths and bouquets,
are over thirty voluntary teach- to Friday Tasting from 4.30—6.00 umbrella, covering, knitting,
ers, Commercial subjects are in- p.m. The girls work in Sections babies’ booties, slipper making,
TRIO A AEA EE SA RTO BIOs EEE EAE,
NEW ARRIVALS
WHITE SHARKSKIN .....................cc000 sen Lep $2.20
BLACK & WHITE MATERIAL ....................... . $11
EUUPERERECIOED, PAPE UGE | Gein 650k ss vis vino vcadeebaviebacs $1.44
WIDTE CREPE BACK SATIN ....................0c0ee $3.00 & $3.02
j WHITE STAMPED CREPE 54” .................. sage $2.00
FLOWERED SPUN ................... eam 0 0b ae ceseees $1.59
ALSO
A NICE SELECTION OF LADIES STOCKINGS.

| T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4606

&

SAT. Special 930 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

“OUTLAW GOLD”
Johnny Mack BROWN

BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW



YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220

BTOWN

“ARIZONA TERRITORY"
Whip WILSON

BARBAREES (DOWNTOWN)
4.30 & 8,30 P.M.

SSSA
PLAZA CINEMAS

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-

upholster, cooking (pastry, sal-
ads and desserts, bottling pre-
serves.)

On Thursdays there is cake
icing, dress making, and oil paint-
ng.

On Fridays there is _ Irish
crochet, tatting, weaving alpar-
gatas, Bulgarian’ embroidery and
nursery motives, crepe paper and
table decorations.

Extra Classes

Miss Harper is now instructing
the members of the Bay Street
Girls’ Club in cooking. These
classes are for six weeks’ dura-
tion. The girls are given special
instructions in table service
and butlering. The subjects
under the head of Household
Furnishings, handicrafts and
cookery are arranged by the Reg-
istrar. In 1941 C. D, & W. grant-
ed £400 to cover a period of five
years for instruction and equip-
ment for commercial subjects,
hygiene, designing and embroid-
ery. These classes are organised
by the General Secretary, Miss
G,. Williams and submitted to the
Director of Education for his
approval.

The Union is financed by a
membership subscription of 1/-
monthly, a Grant-in-Aid from ti}
Barbados Government, the pro-
ceeds from the Annual Fete and
other social engagements.







Wuen 4 Girt doesn't want to leave
class~~and have to make embarrass-
tg explanations—it's Paradol she
asks for. For Paradol means quick
relief from suffering caused by
Periodic Pains—headache, too—
without disagreeable after-effects,
Ask your druggist for Paradol

scientifically compounded from 4
ingredients, The name “Dr. Chase”

‘* your assurance.

22
DR. CHASE’s
PARADOL
eme= Quick Relief from Pain mane



—Dial 5170
DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

“FABIOLA”

OPENING FRIDAY 21st

SAMUEL GOLDWYN Presents
“lr WANT YOU” FABULOUS
GODDES OF LOVE IN A CITY OF SiN!
Dana Dorothy Farley Peggy Starring: Michele MORGAN—Henri VIDAL & Thousands in The Cast!
ANDREWS-—-McGUIRE—-GRANGER-—DOW Wed. & Thurs. 430 “& 6 pm.
Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m, Opening THURS. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m ABBOTT & COSTELLO in
also FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 r FOREIGN LEGION &
THE ARKANSAS SWING fect hg

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS é&

BONANZA TOWN

Charles STARRETT & Sr
———— oo

uley BURNETT

and Continuing 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

ONLY THE VALIANT

Starving Gregory PECK

“BUCCANEER GIRL" (oolor)

Special Sat. 22nd
“ARKANSAS
“BONANZA TOWN”

1.30 p.m.
SWING



4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
TAP ROOTS

a (Color by Technicolor)
Van HEFLIN & Susan HAYWARD

7
aie Tee ee ee “WOMAN FROM TANGIER
Tomorrow * ames Gl & 8.15
MY WELD IRISH ROSE
{ Starring
DENNIS MORGAN

TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952



—He Wanted Parents Like Other People Had—

By MAX TRELL

“I WISH,” said Teddy, the Stuffed |
Bear, “that I had a mother and |
father like everybody else.”

And he sighed. Because he felt
quite unhappy. Then he looked all
around the playroom, at the other
toys. None of them said anything. |
They all pretended to be busy, and |
as though they - a heard |

e had just said. |
+ think,” Teddy said to
the Tin Soldier, “that 1 have a
mother and father?”

The Tin Soldier coughed once or
twice. “H’m. .. of course, of course

have, Teddy.” :
ap woth ie a mother and |
father,” Mary-Jane the rag doll |
said. E

“Certainly you have, my boy,
«x.id Mr, Punch cheerfully.

Mr. Punch’s wife Judy nodded
and smiled. Mrs. Cuckoo opened the
door of her cottage in the clock and
said: “Of course you have!”

Shadows Agreed

Then Knart and Hanid, the Shad
ows, came into the room. And when
Mr. Punch and the Tin Soldier and
Mary-Jane explained to them that
Teddy, the Stuffed Bear was won-
dering if he had a mother and father
like everyone else, they also agrecd
that of course he had, 33

“Then where are they?” said
Veddy “lf I’ve got a mother ard
father, where can Lk find them? I'd
like to see them. I’dMike to see thenr |
right away.” i

At this everyone fell silent. Fi-
nally Mr. Punch said: “They left
you here when you were very small, |
But they haven't forgotten about
you. I’m sure of that, Teddy.”

" “) wish 1 could see them,” said’
‘Leddy. “1 wish they’d come back so
that 1 could see them.”

Now everyone in the playroom |
knew that Teddy didn’t have any)
father or mother. He was just a)
stuffed bear. Stuffed bears dont |
have anything. But they all would
have given anything in the world |
to find a proper mother and father |
for Teddy to keep him from feeling

3

bad.
And suddenly Mrs. Cuckoo, who



'There’s a picture of them in a



Teddy asked General Tin about
his parents.

had been listening all the while (and
thinking as hard as she could in-
side her cottage in the clock), threw
open her door again and called out:
“There's 4 picture of them in a book!

book!” o
. “What hook?” shouted Teddy.

“What book?” shouted everycne
else.

Bat Mrs. Cuckoo disappeared in-
side her cottage again and shut the
door without answering,

A Long Time

it took everyone a long time to

guess what book Mrs. Cuckoo
meant. But it was Hanid, the Shad-
ow-girl, who finally did. She darted
over tc the book-shelf, and took
lown u book, and opened it to the
story of Goldilocks and there !ig
and grand and smiling —were Popa
Bear and Mama Bear!

“And even a pictue of you, Tedily,
when you were a baby bear!” cried
Hanid.

‘Teddy, the Stuffed Bear, was so
happy he almost had tears in fis
eyes. He kept looking at the picture
of his mother and father. “And they
were here the whole time,” he kept
saying. “Oh, it’s wondertul to be
able to see what they look like-Jts
wonderful to have a mother «ii
father.”



Theatre Expert For Jamaica

LONDON.

Mr. Charles Thomas, lecturer
and adjudicator on production
and theatrical design for the Brit-
ish Drama League, of London, is
adjudicating at the Secondary
Schools Drama Festival in King-
ston, Jamaica, from March 10 to
15, announces the British Council.

| JANETTA_DRESS SHOP

He will also advise and lecture
to drama _ organisations and

schools in Mingston, Port An-
tonia, St. Ann’s Bay, Spanish
Town, Mandeville and Montego

Bay. He is expected to return to
Landon in the middle of April.

—B.U.P.

—



——

(Next to Singers)

FOR TRAVELLING

NYLON UNDIES—Slips,
STOCKINGS—45, 51 and

Half-Slips, Panties
60

PURE WOOL TWIN SETS—
* Sweater and Cardigan Sets from $22.98

to $27.98 for BOTH



WATCH

NEXT SUNDAY’S

ADVOCATE

BIG
EVENTS
THE
ROODAL
THEATRES

ROODAL
EMPIRE

TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Broderick Crawford = in—
ALL THE KING'S MEN
— and







— and —
DANGER ‘SIGNAL

THURS, 20th at 1.30 pan . &
SAT. 22nd at 9.30 am.
PHANTOM SPEAKS
& GRAND CANYON TRAIL



MID-NITE
DANGERS of the CANADIAN
MOUNTED



OLYMPIC

“0-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.16
Brenda JOYCE, Richar FRAZER
in

THUMBS UP &
TROCADERO

Wed @ Thurs. 4.30 8.15
Whole Serial r
DRUMS of FU MAN CHU
eennrnseilittindinmnennsiens
THURS. 20th at 1.30 p.m
HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE
VALLEY with Rocky Lane &
LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE
with Roy Rogers, Dale Evans



SAT. 22nd MIDNITE
Whole Serial—

KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED
—




RDA
“HIGHWAY 31”

Steve —Virginia GREY

OISTIN—via 8404
Last 2 Shows Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ALL MY SONS
Edward G. ROBINSON— ,
Burt LANCASTER &

GIPSY WILD CAT
(Technicolor)
Maria MONTEZ & Jon HALL

Wed (only) 445 & 830 p.m.
“LAW of the WEST”
Johnny Mack BROWN &
“RIDING the CHEROKEE TRAIL”

Tex RITTER

|

|-—=

| KG. M. ‘PLAYFIELD,
|

|

|







pieces

2S}

1 COUNTRY FAIR

in aid of
A COMMUNITY SCHOOL
PROJECT
given by
THE ORGANISING COMMITTEE
it

St. Philip
on
EASTER BANK HOLIDAY,
MUTH APRIL, 1952
TICKETS: Adults — 1/-
Children — 64.
A variety of entertainment in
store, including:— Bingo Game,
Greased Fole, Field Races, Lucky
Dip, Music
Stalls, Snack Bars, Tent Show
FAIR - DAY ;— 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
For enquiries,
with :—
CEDRIC DeC. TAYLOR,
(Sec

& Dancing, Rented

etc., communicate

Fair Committee)
Village,
St. Philip.

Draxes’

Other particulars in later Adverts.



THEATRES
ROXY

Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8 15
Philip Reed— Hillary Brooks in—

BIG TOWN SCANDAL
— and —
UNION 8TATION
William Hoiden,
Nancy Olson
WED. & THURS, 4.30 & 8.15
MICKFY ROONBY in
BIG WHEEL and
THREE. STEPS NORTH
— with -
LLOYD BRIDGES

Starring

THURS. 20th at 1.30 p.m
DOWN MEXICO WAY «&
ROLL ON TEXAS MOON

SAT. 22nd MIDN7TE

Whole Serial—
KING OF THE
FOREST RANGERS

Today Last 2 Shows 430 @ 8.15





KING OF THE
FOREST RANGERS



— with —
PAUL KELLY and
BRAZIL

SAT. 22nd At 9.30 A.M
HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE
- and
LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FFE
— with —

WED. & THURS. 4.30 & 8.15
SPOILERS OF THE NORTH ,
Roy Rogers — Dale Evans





GAEETY |

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 490 PM.

STAGE FRIGHT

Jane WYMAN—Richard TODD &

GUNS OF THE PECOS

ck FORAN



Wed (Only) 8.30 p.m.
“OPERATION PACTFIC”

John WAYNE — Patricia NEAL
Ward BOND



THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“ARKANSAS SWING” &













& Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
P.M.



“BONANZA TOWN”

‘MU lt ONL. ©) 238.8888)








Liquid or
‘ablets

Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders.
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood. cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health,

Pope) SP Owe oN oT

—



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acre

Here you have in one bottle
a complete First Aid Kit.



}it

1. A Massage for Sprains, 1g

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HEALING OIL

STOKES & BYNOE LTD.~AGENTS ==>



m6... GLOBE 20a, Century Fon
BEST im FILMS, SOUND and COMFORT

TO-DAY, 5.00 & 830 P.M. LAST SHOWS

“THE DESERT FOX”

James MASON — Jessica TANDY — Sir Cedric HARDWYCKE
OPENING TOMORROW, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.






THRILLER!

"ANN HARDING -Bapey SULLIVAN

An M-G-M Picture
with

KEEFE BRASSELLE - Lewis STONE - EDUARD FRANZ - RICHARD ANDERSON » DAWN ADDAMS
«Witten by RONALD MILLAR ond GEORGE FROESCHE!. Directed by RICHARD THORPE
Produced by ROBERT THOMSEN

ALL THE FLAMING FURY OF
GLORIOUS ENTERTAINMENT {

PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2310)



BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
Walter WANGER




presents

TAP
ROOTS

Color by
TECHNICOLOR!
Starring
Van Susan
HEFLIN HAYWARD

~ With

Boris KARLOFF
Julie LONDON — Ward BOND
— Richard LONG
Introducing
WHITFIELD CONNOR
(From the Thrilling pages

of JAMES STREET’S MOST
EXCITING NOVEL!)

A Universal-International
Release!

OPENING FRIDAY 21ST

445 & 8.30 p.m. &
Continuing Daily

Also The Shert
TEX BENEKE & GLENN
MILLER’S ORCHESTRA

0) There
EVGA

ABA PAYTON - WARD BOND Si cu SOD
wat BORON DOUGLAS Tamme

ond Harry Brome
From the Nowe! by Cheries Margo Warren + Muti by Front Waama@

ALLAN CAGHET race. ousrmoureo oy WARNER BROS
OPENING THURS. 20th
4.45 & 8,30 p.m. Also

Friday 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.



Midnite Special Sat. 22nd

ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

Starring The Hoosier Hot Shots
Hezzie, Ken, Gil and Gabe.
&

RIDING THE OUTLAW TRAIL

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

Sat. 22nd. Special 1.30 p.m.
THE ARKANSAS SWING

Hoosier Hot Shots &

BONANZA TOWN
Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

‘Tig

: —



TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952



Russian

Subs In
Caribbean?

Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Re-
public — The Government of the
Dominican Républic has accused
Russia of sending submarines in-
to the Caribbean, only 800 miles
from the Panama Canal. It is
planning a protest to the United
Nations Security Council, on the
grounds of flagrant violation of
Dominican sovereignty and of
the elementary principles of in-
ternational law.

An official in Ciudad Trujillo
said it had been definitely con-
firmed that the mysterious sub-
marines sighted recently off the
Republic’s coast were Russian.
They carried lights burning a
special gas used only by Russian
vessels, he said.

Dominican warships and ‘planes
were ordered to the area to in-
vestigate reports that several
foreign submarines had been
sighted. A number of U.S. Navy
submarines were in the Caribbean
on manoeuvres and the U.S. naval
Commander in the Caribbean
has been asked to check that none
of his submarines were involved
in the incident. —B.U.P.

Tug Goes To
Sugar Ship

FALMOUTH, England
The Falmouth salvage tu g





Differences
In Jamaican

P.N. Party

LONDON.



~







B.G. Population Rise Is
Indication Qf Progress

~ LONDON.
BRITISH GUIANA’S population is now rising steadily

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Further Progress
On World Sugar Pact

LONDON
PROGRESS towards the conclusion of a hew Inter
national Sugar Agreement, fixing output quotas for the
Major sugar-produciug countries of the world, has been
speeded up by the conclusion of the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement, signed in London last December,





j
}
}
}
|
|
|
|

A special commiuttee of the In- Sugar Agreement Nor do they}
ternational Sugar Council was include @stimates of production by
formed in London in August, the United States and her pos
1948, to consider the desirability sessions or by the French

of such an agreement, but had Colonies.

been unable to make great head But they do include an esti-

way until the position of Com- mate by the Cuban delegate, made

monwealth producers was clari- on Mareh Ist, that Cuba would

fied. - produce 6,180,000 metric tons of
A five -day meeting of this com- sugar thi, year,

mittee which has just concluded

however, had before it a new With just over one-third of thi,
draft agreement and it was de- Surplus sold so far, Cuba still ha
cided that this should supersede t? find markets for some 2,000,-
all earlier drafts for the purpost 000 tons of sugar, a formidable
of further consideration. ~ tonnage when it is recalled that

Details of the new draft aré Cuba’s competitors in the world
unknown, but it is believed almost}©Pen market to-day have
certain that it provides a} sugar to dispose of than in the
Britis, Commonwealth produc-|P8st few years.—B.U.P.
tion quota of 2,375,000 tons of
Sugar a year, which was the fig-
ure set by the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement.

International Conference

The committee has also agreed
that amy delegation may ask, al
a timer it considers opportune
for the United Nations to conven
an International Conference fo:
the discussion of a new Inter
national Sugar Agreement,

The increasing need for such a

for



Pyorriea and

Trench Mouth
Stopped in 24 Hours

“Turmoil,” which gained ‘ world-
wide fame by its efforts to save
the “Flying Enterprise” off the
English Atlantic coast in January,
has gone to the aid of a vessel in

trouble on a voyage trom Ja-
maica to London with a sugar
cargo,

In ‘its first rescue mission since
the “Flying Enterprise,” the tug
dashed from Falmouth to a point
ten miles off Bishop’s Rock light-
house, in the English Channel, to
take in tow the 3,390—ton British

Differences which have split the and, although the Colony

People’s National Party of Ja-
maica may be coming to a head
as a result of a recommendation
by Mr. Norman Manley, leader of
the Party, of the expulsion of
four left-wing members says the
London “Times,” in a leading
article.

“In order to compete with Mr.
Bustamante’s agrarian p h a l-
anxes,” says the paper, “Mr. Man-
ley has been compelled to keep
his party as broadly based as he

population over the last te’

Pulp Making





ship
trouble —B.U.P,



“Baron,” adrift with engine



RATES OF EXCHANGE

Prospects

GEORGETOWN,
B.G., March 17.
The Conference of the Econo

can and in order to compete with
his rival’s appeal to the crowd he
has tended to rely upon extrem-
ists in the left wing of his party.

is one of the most thinly-popu-

lated areas in the whole Caribbean area, the increase in

n years is one of the most con-

vincing indications of British Guiana’s progress.

B.G. Has Good

The number of people in British
Guiana declined from 309,000 in
1911 to 807,000 in 1921. But the
inerease began after that, slowly
at first and then accelerating in
the last few years, until it reached
425,156 by the end of 1960.

The Colony’s annual report for
1950, just published in London,
discloses these figures and says:
“The remarkable results which
have followed the DDT house-
spraying campaign have establish-
- ed the year 1945 as one of great

Among these are the four ex- Mic Commission for Latin Amer- significance in the Colony’s social
17th March, 1952 pelled men. ica to be held in Rio in Febru- and economic history.”

12.2/10% Chee ck tankers to doy, Natutally, the great bulk of ary 1868 will likely hear of the — The sepost dss nov mention the
Sight or Demand moderate, steady-minded Jamai- possibilities of producing pulp proposals to relieve over-popula-
a 2 Draft 702/10% cans would like to see a man of from wallaba and other species of Uon in other West Indian terri-
a 10 Cable eeien sw re oa ae _— British Guiana woods, British a ae a Fain

Coupons 68 2/10% rea with e mo eaders. ju These ar state be very if . s
SIVET «ADA 20% the danger is that the only im- gar ope rs Quintana: out that some 56,000 square miles
73A/10% Chequeson Bankers 714/10, ‘mediate gainer from such a Industrial Chemist attached to the of iar tots Di Eee un colone.
Demand Draft 71.25 breach might be Mr. Bustamante. peonomic Commission for Latin of the total area of the Colony,
Sight Drafts 711/10% It is that knowledge which has America. and Jose C. Leone; a to be inaceessible

73 1/10 Cable > » Pa We ati . . , _a resent.

TH O/LOR Currency ore sdonivar he ng ae yong Bagg 3 Chemical Engineer who special- he Colony’s trade position im
506% fie eso again.”"—BUP. * F ises in pulp and paper, who have proved somewhat during 1950. but
just completed a preliminary sur- there was still some excess of im-
a ER RR eS nn vey and plan a more extensive ports over exports. There was a
{ study at a later date. trend for imports to increase at a

CEE LEELA LLL SFG

Por

NIGERIA {4

4)

)

ti (
4)

























BELGIAN font
wee)
CONGO . nf

Proposed
Central
African





‘ rr: ue th .
Gee RHODESIA
ofa

/? 8, Ne
RHODESIA

I GEM ANAL ANOLE :
apical nf :
> le




ration af the near-Domiuuon of Southern
fesia and the territories 1 ~=Northern
land Povulaiion 170,000 Europeans =
Assets, Gold, silver, copper. cotton. tea
1R GODFREY iGINS. surg Premier
= her Rh A ROY WELENSK\



Rhodesia s

u nist legislatur
; 3ERT

Rhod esi

rnor

FFREY COLBY Governor of Nyasaland

leader ¢
RENNIE, Go of Northern



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During their stay,

Sunday last, these experts work-
ed mainly with the Assistant Con-
servator of Forests, D. B. Fan-
shawe and also called on His Ex-!

cellency the Governor and con
ferreq with the Acting Colonia

Secretary D. J. Parkinson, O.B.E.

They were shown around

which ended faster rate than exports.

The re-emergence of Canada as
the Colony’s biggest export mar-
cet is also shown in the report.
{nm 1938, the last full pre-war year,
. Canada took 53 per cent of British
1 Guiana’s exports and the United

Kingdom took 34 per cent. After
the war, these positions were re-

two versed, but over the post-war protected by

sawmills owned by B.G Timbers years, Canada has gradually

Ltd. (C.D.C.) and
plant,

They were greatly impressed for 54 per
with the amount of mechaniza- export trade, while the
tion at the sawmills as well as

the modern methods of extracting
They also studied

near the Bartica Triangle and hac
discussions with
Electric Company Limited.

To continue their survey over :
wide area they left to visit Sout!
Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay

the hydro-
electric possibilities of waterfalls worth

the Demerara

} in-
an extraction creased its imports from British

Guiana, until in 1950 it accounted
cent of the Colony’s
United
s Kingdom accounted for 29 per
. cent,
Sugar éxports in 1950 were
$23,137,999 and accounted
j for almost half the Colony’s total
exports. Bauxite exports were
worth $13,832,442 and next in
order of importance were rice,
' rum, diamonds and molasses.
1 Timber exports increased con-
siderably from 1949 to 1950, but

Columbia, Peru, Cuba, and Mex- still accounted for only a relative-
ico. They had already visited the ly small proportion of the Colony’s

French and Dutch Guianas.—

New Town Planner

For Jamaica
LONDON



trade, Exports of round and hewn
timber increased from $570,324 to

$617,001, while exports of sawn
timber rose from $453,167 to|
86,235.

There are hundreds of different
species of timber in British Gui-
ana’s 70,000 square miles of for-

A new Assistant Town Planner ests, the report says, but many of
is to be appointed in Jamaica by them are at present unmarketable

the Colonial Office )
man between 25 and 45 is sough

in London. A The Colonial Development Cor-

t poration is spending £1,000,000 on

and he must be a member of the the development of timber re-

Town Planning Institute and the sources

Royal Institute of British Archi

ts. The post is a permanent one tial increase in production is likely /
na Rr £945 to until the new sawmill is produc-

and a salary scale of
£1,045 is offered.—B.U.P.

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to your list.
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Apricots *
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» Red Feather Wham
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1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rurn

Beef

ours

>



:

a

LA LELLEELLLELLOCLL EL
SLESSSS SIO



in the Colony, but the
- report points out that no substan-

ing BOP.

Ms

PFO LISS ESSE

x

m |

agreement, and the possibility that



one may have to be concluded & y \!
quickly in the event of a sudder !
crisis in the world’s — statistica! |
sugar position, is underlined |

the Council's forecast
Sugar surpluses this year

of heavy

It estimates that some 6,507

ks a





000 metric tons of sugar will | Bleeding gums, sore mouth, or looac
available in the free market in the | }ieeehitrench Mouth af avtne bad data
crop year ending August ist) Set WaLcvengealhy 19s, de eatap teeth
next, but estimated requirement before your time, Bince the great World
to the same date are only 5,250 Sracushont yous ci eevee Dae wees



000 metric tons. This will result tists sey that four out of every five people
, tas are sufferers sooner or later. Be warned in
in an estimated addition to stoc} time and stop there disoases before I ie
” “fp too late, because they often cause not only
of 1,257,000 metric tons, repre the loss of teeth, but alag ehronic Meuma-
senting a surplus nthe fy tism and heart trouble,
market, | New Discovery:Saves Taeth
The statistical position of world | — Amesen, the discovery of an American
sugar has thus weakened consick | er eats k naa 1 par ctrat 4 fight To the
ably since 1950, when the com-! edt of the trouble, stops gums from blerd-
Fy : . ing the very first day, quickly sures the
mittee estimated that there wou! soreness out of your mouth, and soon
‘ 25 e f\ tightens the teeth vw following letter
be a surplus of only — 490,01 from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results that

Wmetric tons of sugar on the fre Amosan users get: “) sulleved from Trench



: Mouth and Pyorrhea fer ten years. My
marke; in the year up te Augu gums were sofe and bleeding and L had
3). 1950 lost four teeth, while several other teeth
’ were getting looser all th 1 tried
Alarm many things and then heard of this new

discovery Amosen In 24 hours after using

} : Amoson my gums had stopped bleeding

On that occasion, the commi | ‘The soreness In my mouth disappeared in
wre alar ‘ . three days and in two weeks | found that

tee expressed alarm at the po my loose teeth were much tighter and that

I could eat the hardest of food

sibility of an unmanageable sug

surplus and recommended Guaranteed

proper international agreeme t Amosan works pe fant and so certain
d al .| that it is guaranteed to stop your qums
should therefore be ready befo:*} from bleeding, end sore mouth and tighten

your teeth to your complete satisfaction or
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suffering the dangers from rheumatiam
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ehemist today under this iron-clad guaran-

i tee. You risk
| Amosa

nothing as the
tects you
For Pyorrhea--Trench ‘Mouth

any emergency arises.”

The committee’s estimate
production and requirements du
ing the current crop year do n
i--lude supplies produced by Bri
aim and the Commonwealth co
tries, which are regulated
the Commonweal {

gp

+

@uacantee pro-









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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

No Smiles For The

Generals

LISBON was a struggle between
the generals and the politicians
It was a victory for the politic-
ians. But the generals were
declared the winners.

How was this illusion carried
out? Simply by deciding at half-



—_—

BARBADOS Sg ADVOGATE

Gaeta SS tase





TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952

Nobody is better qualified to judge the
authenticity of a book describing the ex-
periences of a Far Eastern prisoner of war
than a man who was himself a prisoner
in Japanese hands for 34 years. LESLIE
JONES, a gunner, who contributes the
following article, was captured at the
time of the fall of Singapore in February
1942, and spent the rest of the war in
Japanese prison camps. After working ©
on parties in Singapore and a long and

Tuesday, March 18, 1952








LEADERS

FOR hundreds of years Harrison Col-
lege, Lodge and Combermere have been
producing responsible leaders of society,

in Pastel Shades
B0c, per 100.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

|
Bradley's 100 divisions in combat}
reediness, there is the consola-
tion that the promise has not
been withdrawn.

By CHARLES FOLEY

on condition it was understood
that this represented the mazi-
mum of Europe’s capabilities.

The formula did not represent
what the ehiefs cf staff thought

Means test

’
}
j
{

not only in the British Caribbean but time on what score should be an- was the essential minimum to ..ACHESON can take back to) “
further afield in the United Kingdom, the | nounced, Why was this done? defend Europe. Washington at least a mock-up| bitter spell of slave labour on the “Death _
British Dominiong and Colonies and even TO PUT moral fibre into the Se it was enough to line up yall one defence, He has} Railway” in Thailand, he was transferred |

He has submitted
12 nations to a means test. <

Britain is showing that she is
acing her best. France, groan-
ing and shuddering under the

European nations and unite

them sufficiently to issue a glow-
ing communique.

Winning spirit ;

IT was often asked at Lisbon

Continental nations of the West;

TO FRIGHTEN the Kremlin ;
TO IMPRESS a Congress which
otherwise would baulk at bigger



to Japan where, shortly before the end of
the war, he witnessed the atom bomb
explosion at Nagasaki.

in the United States. Other schools in
Trinidad, British Guiana and Jamaica can
make similar claims but no other British

1




; . cis taxes h “Tee” di j f ;

Caribbean school could claim the distinc- Cadi rr why ha did — enpees, Tee ae has been asked to do still fe ancl .

tion which has always been Lodge’s of gee ae of the three bet: ly a eee Germany, although her prob-| @ THE NAKED , TYET) | GLAZED
attracting pupils from all over the Brit- bstion nS oo tine He stood by at SHAPE a /€M8 at one time dominated and| ADDS Me

: os : ‘ t aris, r might have wrecked the confer-
ish Caribbean, the Latin American repub- little clue — but at least the con- Paris, ready %0- mete & Grunete ence, will not have a man or *



flight to Lisbon in case of dead-

: : ‘ : f ssible the pro- Lan 9 sw \ | 7
sven fr he United Kingdom. erence made possible pr lock. gun to contribute this year. rs
eee cet aren sce. the eee tee duction of bright (if mystic) “He would then have told the | For our part we must remem- : - e NON «GLAZED
To-day Lodge is finding it increasingly aera announcing sUC- quarrelling leaders that if they ber. ded Yee : eS oe, _ Se 5
j aint is re i ears j did not compose their differences '¢™'n he gener a n, inter
difficult to maintain this reputation of As Mr. Eden put it — in the 4, would Sead to give up his the Normandy invasion was car- Reviewed by Leslie Jones eis
being a regiondl school and disappoint- pene la gee gn, Aa roe mission and go home. a, off with a regne the i # wa eo
J : s s pre ily hi ilita: estima s
ment has already been experienced by | unstated) hopes. That is, the ny Nie Naan. Sataee pik ere’ tes of what was) War or no war, governments have made aN \
parents in other West Indian islands when eienty of a breakdown w@ the London talks Gaeen ob Remember, too, Ks car experiments to assess the powers of endu:- :
stifie 7 : averted. Big Three Forei Minis’ n weapons may add an inc able Sie al cs =
they have been notified that there is no Hee targets pat Bite tere on Weapons wey Sreneth by 1964-—{/ ance of the human body. Their aim h Sinks of )
vacancy at Lodge for their sons. BEHIND the walls of the close- army infused the delegates with the year which is believed to be| been to find out the limits of heat and col
Lodge’s difficulties are by no means |!¥ guarded committee rooms and the winning spirit, the peak Of danger as far @S/ fatigue and hunger which their fighting Porcelain &
. ‘ Kia lied t It iy b th at dinner tables where the few Bradley’s targets for 1952 be- Russia is coreerned. t it a
unique in this respect. as been e top men met, public faces drop- came, instead a “goal of 50 We need _ » misies ya roops can wl hstand.
om in the United Kingdom for years |ped the rosy confidence which divisicns in appropriate conditions suggestion that Europe oe The Western nations ‘have on occasic ,
cust s y radiated at press conferences in ; aD rg 7 ‘nassive armies to hurl ihe i. Aluminum

to put down a child’s name for famous
English public, schools as soon as the
child is born. And even at quite humble
schools in the United Kingdom to-day
booking of school places has to be made
at least one year ahead,

Everywheré’ pressure on the schools is
being experienced and Lodge may consid-
er itself fortunate that it has so far not
been compelled to restrict admission more
noticeably. Yet Mr. Farmer’s account of
the growth in the number of pupils from
one hundred in 1911 to 350 in 1952 shows
how near is the danger which threatens,
It is no good paying lip service to the tra-
ditions and achievements of a_ school
while taking no action to see that those
same traditions and achievements are not
endangered. If Lodge is to continue as a
regional school catering for the education
of boys from all over the Caribbean and
beyond, it cannot continue to expand into
another Harrison College or Combermere
where numbers have made it impossible
any longer to train responsible Caribbean
leaders of the highest calibre, although
these schools continue to preduce good
scholars and worthy citizens.

The very word leader implies exclusive-
ness. A society composed of all leaders
needs no leading. These are truisms but
are too often overlooked by those who
rightly stress the necessity at all times in
any society of responsible leadership.

If Lodge is to maintain its “cosmopolitan”
reputation, a reputation which is even of
greater value than the more restricted
value of being a West Indian centre for
training boys, it cannot continue to expand:
it must set definite limits to its capacity and
concentrate on improving the quality of
the education offered; it may even be
forced to contract.

How limits are to be set without strain-
ing local loyalties and ignoring local needs
requires much study and great tolerance.
This island has such a high appreciation of
its secondary schools that the suggestion
that admittance to any one school should
be restricted on the plea of regionalism or
of ability to pay higher fees will provoke
immediate public outcry and will be de-
scribed as discriminatory.

Yet if responsible leadership is admitted
to be worthwhile and to be in need of nur-
ture and if Lodge is selected as a school for
responsible leaders the fact must be faced
that Lodge will automatically become ex-
clusive. To a generation which has grown
up to believe in expressions like the “equal-
ity of man,” and to parents who will not
readily admit that their children are one



another building. There the 250
journalists “covering the confer-
ence” were confined.

General Omar Bradley, top-
ranking military leader with the
old complex defence set-up, had
stated his targets at 50 divisions
in Europe by 1952, and 100 divi-
sions by 1954. He set ’em up and
he kept ‘em up.

Nobody will be able to say in
future that the military men
underestimated what was needed
| when responsibility is finally ap-
portioned

Mr. Harriman, representing the
| political side, argued that
| Europe’s budgets could not sup-
|port, nor could European
{industry survive, such gigantic
; military burdens.

He further added that America
could not produce the munitions
and materials needed for it in
time without going on to an
almost wartime basis.

The dispute was settled by a
tormula Military-man Bradley
agreed to the “realistic” basis
proposed by politician Harriman
}





I HAVE a bone to pick with the
London Mask Theatre which, on
Wednesday, presented NIGHT-
MARE-ABBEY at the Westmins-
ter Theatre

Particularly I wish to express
extreme annoyance with drama-
tist Anthony Sharp and producer
John Fernald. And to finish the
indietment' 1 am out of temper
with nearly every member of the
cast. {

With an. u per disregard for my
feelings they’ Shave spoiled _ the
whole plan for this week's Eve-
ning Standard theatre article. I
had intended to declare that the
London theatre is in such a de-
cline that one goes to it as a pen-
ance Wondering what one has
done to deserve such punishment.
I was going to state with candour
and honesty that for some time
I have sat and listened to dia-
logue on the stage that no man
of sensibility could endure in
real life.

Warming to my task I was de-
termined to say that I have seen
actors and actresses merely being
themselves and making no
attempt whatever to be anything
else, with particular reference to
one acter who would play Faust
and Mephisto with exactly the
same interpretation. As for the
authors I was about to suggest a
mass purge in the Russian style.

And then the Mask Theatre
has to go and spoil the .whole
thing!

If only the directors of this
enterprise had consulted any
competent commercial manager
ithey would have been told that
Nightmare Abbey could not have
ia dog’s chance of success. In
\fact, I can imagine the dialogue
lthat would have taken place be-
ltween Mr. Fernald and the said





of combat readiness.”
Military men openly admit that
they would think themselves
lucky to have 30 divisions in the
field if Russia attacked.

However, assorted reserves

might muster some 15 divisions, ~

and they would have to include
territorials and other half-trained
troops without artillery or tanks.
Even that would scrape the
European barrel clean.

Five more?

WHERE would the remaining
five divisions come from? No
more can be sent from America
without Congressional approval.

The only way to avoid a fight
in Congress—almost certainly a
losing: one—is to keep these five
divisions back on the other side
of the Atlantic until after the
presidential election.

In an emergency they would
have to come over piecemeal,

At all events, everyone went
off happily. The fair, round
figures are a comfort for the
Continentals.

lt there is no actual mention
in the final communique of

Mr. Peacock (06 years d
Wakes Up The Theatre

ify Heverley Raxter, MP

the customers want these days is
bedrooms and comics. Couldn't
you put in a spicy bedroom
scene? T’ll square it with Mr.
Peacock.”

“I’m afraid that will be diffi-
cult, You see he died 86 years
ago.”

You mean
tume play?”

“Yes—with incidental music.”

“Good morning, Mr. Ferning.
Don’t fall down the stairs.”

Any similarity to a particular
manager in the above is purely
coincidental and intended. And
now we shall get on with the
critic’s job of dealing with the
play itself and how it was pre-
sented to us.

In the first place what a relief
it is to see an author dealing with
the feminine and not merely the
female. Fiirtation is so much
more amusing than _ seduction,
Here we have no guys and dames,
but a romantic youth sincerely in
love with two young women at
once with appropriate music to
indicate, which is in the ascend-
ant.

to say it’s a cos-

The producer does not present
it as realism, but rather like a
ballet with words, There is the
aged butler, delightfully played
by Gerald Cross, whose legs give
out at the Knees; there is a punch
bowl in the shape of a skull:
there is a ghostly sleep-walker;
and there is a secret tower where
the young man hides one of his
loves while he tries to make up
his mind,

In addition we have Geoffrey
Dunn in good form as the Hon-
ourable Mr. Listless, who is so
exhausted that he relies on his
manservant to remind him where
he was last night, and there are





called for volunteers, subjected them to tes.s |
carried out under strict medical supervision, |
and then dismissed them with thanks and a
pat on the back. {|
ie * a The Nazis chose concentration camp vic- | :
TH isbon mass meeting w.is| ,; . , 3 ‘ Stak
a piece of window dressing. 1/| ‘IMS as their guinea-pigs. Uniformed Hitler |”
it did not frighten te pipsslans, Guard doctors, notebooks in hand, cold- |)
at least it did not ghten vs. ‘ ‘
Harriman, Bradley, and the few bloodedly” watched while the experiment
men who know what the Smmsine were carried out to their planned conclusion
future strength of Europe will be,|__ R
See Pea cites, the death, often, of the patient.
‘The true figures, the detailed The Japanese had not even a scientific pur
plans of whether and hae aun pose in mind.
when the real, as apart from the) The hardships, mental and physical tor-

paper, divisions will be raised
are known.only to a handful c'| ture, starvation and disease to which their

Russians back this year, next
year, or in 1954.

We must look to
defences. “~

our own

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4472





‘Cosmic secret’












PLASTIC HOSE

















“beer oe is marked with the} Prisoners were exposed, nevertheless com-
pertentous —_ warning, “Cosmic| prised one of the most cruel and exacting Oz’
“*Vesierday, with all the other| ‘Tials ever carried out on a mass of human
decisions agreed and_initialed| beings. | \
these papers were loaded in'o |
army trucks in Lisbon under} There is a tendency, now that Japan is -
a, be ag hisked aw°Y! about to be re-admitted to the community of Cleaner
—LES. | nations, to forget their inhuman behaviour.
_- — But we, who were the unwilling victims <-| Lighter
their cruelty, find it hard to forget. So w.l!
ead) those, I fancy, who read Russell Braddon’s | s h
indictment of the Japs in his book “The | moother
Naked fsland” (Werner Laurie). .
However, Braddon, an Australian Gunner, Hrighter
makes the mistake—no doubt pardonable in
an ex-prisoner of war—of over-dramatising Lengths of

some aspects of prison life. Yet other im-
portant events are overlooked.

I was at Changi, on Singapore Island,
which Braddon describes, Changi, which
developed primarily into a hospital camp. t
was controlled by an allied administration. |;

Braddon criticises the sort of jobs we were |;
given by our own administration. An office:
he says, ordered him to sweep a path, and then
made him do it again because he finished tc o
soon. However, Braddon forgets to menticn
that much of the work we did was for the
good of the communtiy. It was necessary ic
collect water for the hospital—which was ir
short supply because the Japanese refused to
repair the damaged pipes. It was necessary
also for parties to go to the beach to wash
dirty hospital bedding in the sea, the best
“disinfectant” we had for the purpose. And
we needed to grow food as our rations wer¢
utterly inadequate. Sweeping up was eas:
compared with the work we did on these
tasks,

Tnroughout, Braddon hits hard at the Jap-
anese guards, and—with somewhat less juc-
tice, I thought—at certain Allied officers.
share his cordial dislike for the Jap guards,
but I cannot agree with all he says about the
officers.

I have seen the guards beat prisoners merci-

And behind all this is the war
of ideas which, if not always
profound or amusing, does offer
the intellect’some sustenance, In
fact, the play is written, as was
the original book, for men and
women who are not put off by
words of more than one syllable.
It is not for those who can never
get out of the hollywood, nor is
it for those who regard love as
nothing more than a_ physical
condition,

In fact, this impact of Peaco:k
upon the London theatre comes
like a wind dispelling fog. He
was a romantic who satirised
romance, a thinker at war w.‘h
contemporary thought, a_ satir st
in an age of sentimentality. Ile
did not possess greatness, being
too much of an iconoclast, but |:e
had vigour, humour and _ intel i-
gence.

25, 50, GO & [°) ft.

DACOSTA & CO., LID.












°

And now if you do not go to
the Westminster in droves I shail
be forced to the conclusion that
it is not the theatre which is sick
—but you.

Mr. Ross Hutchinson who wro.e
NAVY AT.SEA (now at the
Comedy), fought a gallant fig/t
against Mr. Herbert Morrison at
the last election. I wonder wiy
he did not write a play about that
instead of this harmless trifle wi-h
the same old recipe of susceptibie
sailors and innocently designing
women, i

Of course, no one can equal
Hugh Wakefield as an amorous
captain who maintains his mono-
cled dignity no matter how the
plot rages against him. And it i
was good of him to include lis! lessly at the slightest provocation. In fact,

in the ot
young daughter Margaret in the) have been victim of many such assaults.
However, I well appreciated the effort our

Can be easily attached to your
Bicycle.

Minimum of Maintenance.

PRICE $95.00



°

DA COSTA & CO. LTD.—Agents

There were three uproarious
moments in the play but unfor-











whit less intelligent or less capable of be- | manager: oe “. peereee ge- tunately they all came at the} Wn officers made to keep the men occupied. | & ° : — :
; ; ; “ v ,e r ne e p volution ° iffic intaini 19 Seay See ee 1 ich eae ’
coming responsible leaders than soineone’s | piey?™ 5 ee end he worthlessness of every going — és bs = on ch They-had the difficult wah of mariteining ce % x
else, this idea of exclusiveness will appear || “It’s the dremationtion, ot ws Bias i gaa eunerares. the ladies rang the|Cipline when there was a tendency for many * At *s 9 >
. eles : |}Thomas Peacock’s novel, Night- ut holding it all together is a alarm bel for cocktails, This 0 " x
shocking or maybe reactionary. But no one | mare Abbey.” most attractive young actor, Alan ] agree, is almost. as funny as to lose personal values and moral codes. And} g
can, or ever will be able to, produce re- | “Sort of The Cat and the meaner, = J comments anything that can happen in an| keeping the men’s minds occupied with the) FOR .
x | Canary?” delightful as ythrop Wry, election. i he : x
sponsible leaders en masse. Whether the | ~ «Not quite It’s a satire on the who could have been so conten: With so little to commend 1 tasks they set them helped to preserve those S x
contribution of responsible leaders (which oer 19th eee ae ae tril ws. a a. ony te oe gladly pay tribute to a young] Values. % s
‘ modern civilisation a e@ were away. ( acNaughtan actor nam +h pets i :
Lodge, Harrison College and Combermere | march of intellect.” 4 speaks his lines beautifully and had the etait = ot 4| Under such conditions, I thought the offic-| x >
has been making among many generations) “IT’S WHAT?” with intelligence. With or with- yery Guardee Second-lieutenant | ers did their job as well as it could be done. 13 y
: ; | “I told you.” out a wig, here is an actor of (mysteriously an RE) who never ; : : x %
will be adequate to counterbalance the evil | “Is it sexy?” great promise. stepped out of his part. for a| _/ Worked side by side with many officers on | ¥ >
ps * s . “ i y ina yi 4 i :
effects of irresponsible leaders is a question ls Well, it is amusingly roman- eeany we bevy. Valois Meme moment. I eumpect that Mr. Stoll| the “Death Railway” when the Japanese] ,
4 . c. . oo ~ as e mi n * :
which also requires an answer. But no | “Listen here Mr. Ferdinand.” Anne Trego as the determined romedian. gs of a g00d/ were using every available man to speed up %
. “ ” sve
effort to Pp roduce bOee onsible leaders should Leen het Mr. Ferner, what on hak Rage® = —— oS Tea eee wee LES the work. I saw ay of them humiliated
ever be despised. | ‘ and beaten in front of their men for attempt-
aS hha e ing to reason with the guards.
: “~~ | Braddon emphasise throughout the book AS
Our Readers Say; Mati Ra Sahay BS gamomgmousdonoy for 2 moet | she bad time, he had as a P.O.W. but in some|§ _, MAMIE et
. $. Piteher & Co, Lid 10 00 fm i Laie A : 7 ’ ase
J B Leslie & Co ” Ltd 10 00 and dollars. cases I consider he had a better time than|% Gheaant '(to’ cut) Dressed Rabbit per tb 42c.
womens Canadian Club Alleyne Arthur & Co ., Ltd Hull & Son 10.00 in SehMiae toni “ the —— oer: others. Cheddar (5tb tins) Dressed Tripe.... per Ib 32c. x
Says Thank Knight's Ltd British American Tobacco Co. 10 00 ing rm place at the dance 3 Cheddar (1202. tins)
ays anks Colling Ltd. James A. Lynch & Co., Lid. 10 99 wees, Uirs, gan re _ ae Apart from these points, though, I fount} Edam Ox Tails ..... .... per I 42c.
To The Editor, The Advocate,— Pr neat eee ee 2 a eek ee 3 Holbrook — one basket of flow- Braddon’s account wholly accurate and we}! bx “Fonte Ox Tongues ... per Tb 60c
’ ; 5 vP s b ober om m 3 me. re "
ae : cae cere yg ano P Alleyne, Arthur & Co, Lid. 10 00 ath ond ¥ Bartlett, who von told. The passages dealing with the events} Meats for x
‘ub wi e to express e ub acknowledges with JN), Harrlaman .é& Co 10 00 a galion of rum.) \) i i ar-|<
sincere thanks to all those who grateful thanks the donations re- See ee ass a. oe an Cmte, tare ee, ek ve Zz ae of Singapore are par- % . Easter ALE %
assisted with their annual dance ceived during the year as Bradshaw & Co * 10.00 of whic , o ave m dis- leularly informative, ; x s
held at the Marine Hotel on Feb- follows ‘-— Bata Shoe Store 5 00 tributed to the following chari- 2. pod pi : : Ham Legs (Cut or Whole) Bass >
ruary 23rd., particularly those who Singer Sewing Machine Co, .. $ 25.00 Allonso Be DeLima a Co 5 00 Sess - ver f 8 picture of the action in Hams in Tins 1}1, 2tb, 4Ib : %
donated flowers, loaned games and Gsperal Traders Ltd. . 25.00 ¥ jDelame, & Co . ta 5 00 ae ee = _ ee Malaya prior to the capitulation. And he aoe of eget oe Worthington 8
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aeveeene a ros ad- %, Geddes Grant tad ; a a 7 a a ne ia al ca St Mans ‘see vo 0 ported Japanese troops were able to create Danish Bacon Guinness Stout 3
vertisin is free of cost, and als Vm. Fogarty LAd. aod eiaowde ons St Vincent de Paul 9% i ir i ion’ i
to thank the following merchants GaneeRreR nian” ns|| ieee ae te $0 GE'S" Hostel 30 Ob ant RavOS with thats Sanit eHen 5 SAS Ee SgrEnE “SOP eRE ANCHOR MILK 3
for donating prizes for the Hoopla Plantations Toe Payal 35,00 = we) = Co Ltd 5 00 g F $ Holiday House 50 00 against our own men, who had hardly any x
* arbados Gulf O 5 & 3 s 8 -
game a Barbados Telephone Co. 18.00 eth % tel e 3.0 St, Patrick's Poor School 80 00 air and naval support and suffered from a $ ° ° %
Alex. Bayley ASS mgn & Soge 8 Eg PS Bs «BS [shortage of equipment. Had the odds been|? AE's GODDARD'S
Caaanee gins Ince BOS, thd es OF KR inunte & Co, itd 88) Auenme Ales go oo eee een Soins Pee, Tie eae Pennees TT, S
arbad Hard T. Her py ev ‘s i. i r ,, . i - ; | ¥ >
Barbados Hardware 5 Bee eee gt ak daar 90 00 ie: Were GansAian. ‘Chis Rev. Francis Godson's Chari | might have been very different during the % FOR BE ER SERVICE %
Dr. & Mrs, Jack Knights Ltd. 10.00 especially wish to thank an @ On page 5 | ensuing years. $4,6666599569559S09SSSS905! " Sy

=~





TUESDAY, MARCH 18,

1952



Big Crowd

Attend Case

DEFENCE COUNSEL, Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., and
Solicitor General, Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., for the Crown,
yesterday exhausted the Jury List after 15 “challenges”
and 16 “calls” for standby as the Carlos Smith Falsification,
Larceny and Embezzlement cases began at the Court of
Grand Segsions before His Lordship Sir Allan Collymore.

Whe

the Jury List had been exhausted, there was

still another juryman needed and one was eventually

selected from the standby list. ‘ :
Smith is charged on three counts of falsification: of

accounts, one of larceny as a Civil Servant® and two of

embezzlement as a Civil Servant.

Mr.‘E: K. Walcott is

associated with Mr. E, W. Barrow for the defence.

A packed court listened to the
first day of hearing as the
Solicitor General outlined the case
and then five witnesses gave evi-
dence, The case continues t-
day. *

Carlos E. Smith was placed be-
fore the court on three counts
of falsification of accounts, one
count of larceny as a public ser-
vant and two counts of embez-
zlement as a public servant. On
the first count the charge was
Petty Cash Book the receipt of
$3,000. The second count read
that on April 6, 1945, while em-
ployed as a clerk he did with in-
tent to defraud omit from the
that on April 6, 1945, with intent
to defraud he omitted from the
Petty Cash Book the receipt of
$5,000.

Third Count

On the third count he is charg-
ed with having on April 6, 1945,
with intent to defraud, concurred
in omitting from or in the Cash
Statement Record Book a material
of $3,000. The fourth count read
that on April 6, 1945, he stole
the amount of $3,000 belonging to
His Majesty, and on the fifth
count he is charged with having,
while he was entrusted by virtue
of his employment with the cus-

tody of control of $2,000, fraudu- ;

lently applieq the sgme amount to
hig own use.

On the sixth count he is charg-
ed with having on April 6 1445,
by virtue of his employment be-
ing entrusted with the amount of

,000, fraudulently applied the
same amount to his own uce.

Outlining the case to the jury,
Mr. Reece said that it
which would
time and some

last a fairly long

of the evidence
would be tedioug to listen to in
that many witnesses would be
called to deal with book, ac-
counts and documents anc they
would be asked to look st them.
He was nevertheless asking them
to give strict attention to all the
evidence.

He said that Smith had been
employed at the Treasury from
the time he entered the Civil Ser-
vice until June 1951, when he
was transferred to the Audit De-
partment.

The alleged offence occurred a

long time ago, April 6, 1945, but.

it was not until July last year
that any irregularity in the Trea-
sury was discovered,

Any person employed in the
capacity of treasurer and whose,
duty it was to keep accounts had
to do so as carefully as possible.

“IT am not suggesting to you,”
he said, “that the mere fact that
a clerk makes a mistake in itself
amounts to falsification of ac-
counts and is a criminal offence.
It is not.”

Motives of Fraud

But if at the time of the mis-
take in making the accounts, this
putung in something or fauing to
put in something was actuated by
motives of fraud, then he was
submitting that it would be a
criminal offence,

The facts of the case to be
established were that the money
was in the possession of the
Colonial Treasurer at the time and
that Smith as clerk about the
vault of the treasury used to
take money from it to pay out
over the counter.

“It will be a question for you,”
he said, “whether on the evi-:
dence which will be before you,
you do mot find that under the
circumstances of this case, he
wag taking money for himself.”

In July 1951, shortages were
discovered. The evidence of Mr.
Jordan would be to the fact that
he went on that date to the ‘trea-
sury for the purpose of getting
money to pay out over the coun-
ter and when he took out what
he imagined to be five thousand
dollar bundles of notes, and open-
ed it, there were not what they
were supposed to be.

After the lapse of a short period
of.time, the matter was reported
to the Accountant General and a
further search was made, Then
it was discovered that _ certain
other irregularities were present
and the Accountant General in due
time reported to further author-
ities, Then certain statements
were taken, some from Smith.

Payments
He told them it would be nec-
essary to look at the Petty Cash
Book of that date and the record










was one ©

TRAY CLOTHS, Each

HOME PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT

ca
book in which notés were made
of payments. made! and | monies
received.

On the date in question, there
was an entry of $2,000 in Smith's
hand writing: in the same book
which showed money was taken
out of the vault—in other words
$2,000 was taken by him for the
purpose of paying out to numer-
ous people, The record would
show that on April 4, there were
certain monies in the vault and
they were notes of $2,000 denom-
ination, :

He said that on April 5. 1945,
there were two thousand in twos,
two in ones and fifteen thous-
and in fives. On April 6, the
record book showed twenty-five
thousand in fives and two thous-
and in ones. In other words, a
bundle of twos had disappeared.

He said that D, E. W. Gittens
was in 1945 Colonial Treasurer
and Commissioner of Currency
and C. E. Stoute was then Man-
ager of the Savings Bank. They
would prove that on April 5
they issued $4,000 in twos and
ones to the Commercial banks,
but in truth and fact that money
never went into circulation be-
cause it was stopped by Gittens
and put into the public vault.

imoney Transferred
The Prosecution was saying
that the twos were always there
at the vault masqueraded as fives,
They would see that the accused
wrote in the record two thous-
and dollars were taken from the
vault and placed in the till. The
record did not refer to having
taken any other note of twos,
but twos nevertheless found their
way in the till under the guise
fives,

The Treasury vault is locked
by combination, he said. Several
clerks knew, but no one knew
all. Some knew the top and some
the bottom. For someone to go
normally he would have to have
someone with him.

After the outline of the case,
the witnesses were called.

Walter D. Charlton, Accountant
General, said the had taken up his
appointment on May 14, 1951.

Smith was working in the
Treasury as paying teller. Smith
left that Department and went to
the Audit Office in June.

On July 7, George Amory came
to him and made a report. He
showed him some currency notes
which he examined. Two pack-
ages labelled fives were cut
open and one of them con-
tained two dollar notes instead
of fives, The other contained
blank paper, Two other bundles
were also shown ‘him.

He went to the vault and made
a further examination, Returning
from the vault he took charge of
the four bundles and reported the
matter to the Financial Secretary
after he had examined the seals,
The seals, stamps and bundles he
‘anded to the Police.

Cross-Examined

Cross-examined, he said that
about June a new currency was
about to be introduced here. The
date fixed was August though
there had previously been the in-
tention of introducing it on July
10. That would have meant the
destruction of the old notes, The
date would ‘have been known to
everybody. The key to the com-
bination is kept in the Colonial

Secretary's Office in case of
an emergency .
He said he normally left the

office when the cash for the day
had been balanced, He alone had
been in the treasury once, a bank-
holiday.

He was present on three oc-
easions when statements were
taken by the police. He did not
supply Inspector Bourne with any
questions he felt Bourne should
have asked. He may have told him
certain things he wanted asked
Bourne never followed him out
of his office asking for an explana-
tion of a question to be asked.

He went to Smith on July 9
and asked him whether he knew
anything or could help him in any
way. Smith did not tell him he
had no theories and to formulate
theories might throw suspicion on
someone,

He had gone there in a friendly
manner, he said and Smith told
him he did not wish to incrimin-
ate anybody. He was present
when Inspector Bourne asked
Smith about that same statement.

He said he told Smith he might
be in a very difficult position him-
self,



did not wish to incriminate any-

one was such an astonishing reply
that he had been induced to tell
him to look after himself.

He stopped him while he was
speaking about | incrimineting
someone else; for if he was going
cn like that he wanted somebody
else to be present.

He said he had been satisiied
that a fraud had been commited
and he went to get information
as to how it was done and who
aid it,

At this stage he denied having
said he had told Smith to jook
after himself. He had told Smith
he migat be in an awkward posi-

. Won because he had handlea ove

cash ior a Lumber of years.
On no oceasion had-he ever

gone to Inspector Bours re

Smith and enquiied whethe,
Smith, had been calling him ;
Caarlton, a liar, He never sugg vt-
ed to any of the clerks that they

he,

were nol co-ape:atin’ and such
lack would go against them as
eivi ts He had never

discussed it with any of them,

Re-examined he said he
never asked any help from
police.

had
th

The Bank-Holiday ne went to
the Treasury was June 7 He hav
forgotten certain parade tickets in
his office and had gone for them.
He was not there more than two
minutes, At the time he did not
know the combination, though h:
now knows one.

Cyril Stoute of Collymore Rock,
St. Michael, said he is a Retired
Manager of the Savings Bank.

During the year 1945 he was
one of the Currency Commission-
ers. On April 5, 1945, Mr. D.
Gittens was the other Currency
Commissioner, Exhibit wag. the
log book on April 5, 1945, there
was an entry in his hand writing
of the transactions of the Cur-
rency Department that day. There
was a record of notes for Bar-

clays Bank and the Royal Bank
of Canada.

Notes Checked

The old notes were checked
and cancelled. One thousand $2
notes were issued to the Royal
Bank of Canada and Mr, Gittens
and himself signed it.

Sometimes he went into the
vault and might take a clerk when
notes are taken out of the vaults.
During the war notes used to
come signed and then it was de-
cided’ to bring down the notes
from the U.K. unsigned,

When they are unsigned they
have to be taken to the vault of
the Currency Department and
then they would be sent to the
Advocate in the custody of two
clerks to have the signatures af-
fixed. They are then returned to
the Currency Dept, and locked
up. Before they are locked up
they are checked at the Treasury
Dept. On November 20, 1944,
some notes were returned from
the Advocate with the signatures
affixed and he made an entry in
the book,

Cross-examined Mr, Stoute
said that the issued to the Royal
Bank on April 5 $2,000 in $1
notes. The transaction was clos-
ed at about 12.15 p.m. He could
not say if the Bank wanted a
particular denomination, If Mr
Gittens wanted a particular de-
nomination he would get it. Cur-
rency clerks had their desks in
the Currency Dept., but he coult
not say if they had a desk op-
posite the vault in the Treasury.
He could not say anything about
the sealing of the packages.

The log book is kept in the
Currency Vault and the Curren-
cy Vault is not the same as the
Treasury Vault. On September
19, 1951, the log book was shown
to him and the Accountant Gen-
eral took the book out of & steel
cabinet,

: An Alteration

To Mr. Reece Mr. Stoute said
on November 20, 1944, there was
an_alteration in the book,

Darnley Gittens said he is a
retired Currency Commissioner.
In 1944 he was Colonial Treasur-
er in the Treasury and was also
Currency Commissioner, Mr.
Stoute was the other Currency
Commissioner. On April 5, 1945,
there were transactions with Bar-
clays Bank. Old notes were re-
ceived and new notes issued,
Three thousand one dollar notes,
one thousand two dollar and five
thousand five dollar notes were
received from Barclays Bank and
$30,000 one dollar notes were is-
sued in exchange. Notes were also
issued to the Royal Bank of
Canada. Some of the notes that
should have gone to the Royal
Bank of Canada went to the
Treasury and the, Bank was
handed a cheque for $4,000. This
cheque was signed by him.

The cheque was filled in by
Mr, Jordan. On April 4, 1945
$15,000 in five dollar notes were
stored in the vaults, and on the
day before the transaction $19,000
were in the vaults,

Cash Checked

At the end of the day the vault
Clerk checks the cash in the
hands of the Paying Teller.

The first entry in Exhibits—
the Petty Cash Book—was made

Astonishing Reply on March 11, 1944, and ended
The reply from Smith that he : @ On Page 8



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Civil Servant Stands Trial On Larcen



AFTER ROUGH



SAILING

REV. W. T. DENINGTON (left in shorts) looks at his stock after
they were landed on the Pier Head from the Schooner “Excelsior

Hodge.”

Rev. Armstrong of St. Philip, wearing grey suit and bib, is

discussing a goat with Rev. Denington.

West Indies
Minded
From page 1
been possible to arrange this fur-
ther Conference, and I extend to
you all a very warm welcome to
Hastings House.
Children Acts

You may, I think, justifiably
take the view that progress has
been made in the intervening
period, in the directions recom-
mended at the last Social Welfare
Conference,

For example, Children Acts
have been brought into operation
in Jamaiva and the Leeward
Islands, While Barbados and
B itish Honduras are about to
take a similar step. In British
Honduras, poor relief has been
provided for by legislation, an
effective probation service has
been started, and Social Welfare
work has bsen reorganised, with
a strong emphasis on co-opera-
tives and handicrafts.

Barbados has established and
strengthened its Welfare depart-
ment, and built up a probation
service; indeed, probation has by
now almost everywhere | secured
recognition as an essential service
in a civilised state, A new em-
phasis has everywhere been
placed on the domestic subjects,
or es I suppose we must call them,
home-making and nutrition, In
British Guiana, for example, two
women welfare officers have been
given scholarships for professional

in this field, In Trinidad
a child protection service is being
built up. Some of the smaller
ccmmunities are not behind hand
in their attitude to welfare. [|
might mention the youth work ia
Antigua: boarding out of children
in Dominica and Grenada: women
work and an approved school in
St. Vincent: community council
in St. Kitts: steps to combat de-
linquenev in St. Lucia.

Help for Services

A school of film-making has
been held in the West Indies, and
West Indian documentary films
produced, Experts, have visited
us from the United States to ad-
vise on the marketing of hand-
craft products. Another wel-
come development is that the
Government welfare services
are being supplementel by un-
official efforts through such
agencies as the Sugar Industry
Labour Welfare funds, the Extra-
Mural Department of the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies,
and its Institute of Social and
Economic Research, Moreover,
industrial welfare is making steady
progress in private businesses and
industries. We in Hastings House
nurse the hope of establishing a
regional institute to give a full-

time training to teachers and
social workers in the domestic
subjects.

Yet, in spite of these modest
but encouraging signs of prog-
ress, there is no doubt that
social welfare workers are sti)l
moving in anxious times
The original schemes for settiny

up welfare staffs, financed under
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Acts and devised mainly
during the first four years of this
Organisation's life by Professor
Simey, are, in spite of various ex.
tensions, almost all at an end, o:

nearing completion, and West
Indian territories are facing the



Household Items

KITCHEN TOWELS, Fach______.__ $1.50
MILK COVERS, Each... 72, & Bde.

ICE BAGS & MALLETS, Set, S160

TABLE CENTRES, Each



-— Se ee ee

$2.25 & $2.75

Lsalibion cana lovihe com enthatieaiiicesienapeene

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET











— $$$ $$$ —

Need Sober
Society

problem of how to provide for
official welfare services from their
own funds, at a time when all their
commitments are increasing faster
than their public revenues, Your
discussions and your planning at
this Conference must take place
in the knowledge that these serv-
ices, like all other activities of
Government, must be so organiseu
that they will increase the national
productivity, and not add unfruit-
fully to the burdens upon a na-
tional economy which is already
being overstrained, and which as

we see can only be expanded
siowly and by much painful
ffort.

I do not think there is any
real danger, at this stage, that
the British West Indies will fail
to recognise that social welfare

services can make a positive con-

tribution to the national wealth,
Social services aim at making
better citizens, and better citizens

are better producers. They make

more intelligent leaders, and a
better and more adaptable and
enterprising labour force; better

and wiser spenders of the national
wealth. In every progressive coun-
try in the world, the most success+
ful and stable enterprises are
those which most readily recognise
the value of paying attention to
the welfare of their workers.

The Objective

Yet, while recognising that in
these times of difficuit nnwnce
social welfare must be judgea \o
a large extent by its material re-
sults, you social workers and tne
people you represent can never
torget that your main objey. is
to raise human values. Al!
thing you teach, such as thrift,
self-help, and social duty; the
stimulus of recreation to abolish
the sheer boredom of life in many
rural areas, and the encourage-
ment of self expression trough
the arts, are primarily designed
to lead to richer lives for ordinary





men and women. Your tass
is to create a society in which
ideas will generate and circulote
and be measured by correct

standards; a society in which pro-
blems such ag the pouitical future
of the West Indies, and the risk
of its frustration through over-
population, will be measured
poberly, and met with solutions
in which every man and wom n
can play a part. Your task could
not be more important. If the
means at your disposal are mod
est, and the tools of your trace
simple, yet your work must be
carried out on the highest plane
of human endeavour,
Warm Welcome

I shall not attempt to. define
your problems: your “hairran is
much more qualified to dv that
But I am especially glad that, i:
dealing with them, you will hav
the co-operation of Mr. Wilfred
Chinn, the Secretary of Stat
Social Welfare Adviser. Mr, Ch'nn
has alfeady spent oine week
informing himself of the sta oe «
Welfare work in this region. H
has a unique first-hand knowled:
of welfare work throughout thi
Colonial Empire, and his counsel!
will be most helpful thi
extend to him on ve
particularly w.

on pege 8

to u

week. I
behalf a

rm wel





Patek: |

Charge

Vews In Brief

16 WATCHES
STOLEN

SIXTEEN WATCHES | valu
$299, two alarm clocks value
¥.20, 14 tins of cigarettes valu.«
$13 and a number of ear-rin «s
were stolen when the drug sto.
of H. D. Rock at Tudor Strect
City, was broken and entered bk.
ween 9.30 p.m. on Friday and 8
+m. on Saturday. They are tc
property of Mr. Rock. ,

NESTA VAUGHAN of Codrir«-
ton College, St. John, repori od
saat her leather handbag valucd
-15 was stolen while she was at
(the Modern Dress Shop, Broaa
otreet, on Saturday.







The handbag contained a cheque
fov $40, a wrist watch valued $15,
a peir of spectacles valued $10, 4
compact case valued $10, a leath«
purse containing $5.72 and othe
articles, total value $96.40.

TWO BATHING SUITS valu
$20 were stolen from a_ cloth
line at the home of Arthur Harr
at “tIriston,” Worthing, Chr
Church, between 7.00 and 11.00
am, on Saturday. They are |
property.

WHITFIELD STOUTE of st
~:iistopher Village, Christ Church
reported that his bicycle valu.
was stolen from outside the
some of Bertram Clarke at the
same address between 6.30 aod
Uv p.m. on Sunday,

Fires Burn
: u
er i

Crop Canes

SIX aeres of second crop vip<
canes were burnt w hen a fire o -
curred at Frere Pilgrim Plantat o.1
Christ Church, at about 9,00 p.m
on Saturday. They are the property
of C. M. Drayton and were insure:

At Horse Hill Plantation, Si
Joseph, a fire at about 3.00 p.m
on Saturday burnt two and thr«
quarters acres of third crop 1
eanes and three quarters of
acre of trash. The canes are |
property of Joes River Ltd,
were insured,

Ten acres of third crop rij
canes were burnt when a fire or
curred at Castle Grant Plantati
St. Joseph at about 3.00 a.m



Saturday, property of E. C
They were insured,

A fire at Gall Hill, Chr
Church at about 1.30 am. @
Saturday burnt a quarter mf 4
acre of fourth crop ripe cane *
property of Jonathan Nurse «

Lodge Road, Christ Church. Ti «
were not insured.

Five acres of first crop ry
canes were burnt when a_ fir
broke out at Seniors Plantatio
St. Andrew, at about 7.00 p.m. o

Sunday, They are the proper
of J. A. Haynes and were insure:
A fire at Haggatts Hall Planta-
tion, St. Michael burnt four sere
of first crop ripe canes, proper|
of Dowding Estates and Tracin
Co., Ltd. They were insured



31 PASS FIRST AID EXAM

Certificates have just bee
received for the following suc-
cessful candidates in a First Aioa

examination held by Dr. A. L.
Stuart and Dr. B. Skinner tt
Wecember, 1951:—

Gordon Spooner, Hartley Bron
ker, Miriam Cadogan, Graci
Crawford, Merle Blackman, Grace
Mayers, Sybil Yearwood, Shirle
Gibbs, Marion Worrell, Lucili
Holder, Elaine Benjamin, Lucin

Hunte, Theodore Agard, Louis
Greene, Coral Harper, Glori
Forde, Ardith Young, One
Haynes, Marcia Skeete, Ottalcss
Johnson, Patricia Greene, Erle

Young, Daphne Chase, Phyllis F.t
Joan Collymore, Joan Gill, Esthe
Brome, Eula Yearwood, Clorc:
Holder, Ernesta Norville,
Oreita Bannister.

Ten candidates failed to qualify
The course of lectures was give
by Dr. O, James, assisted by mem
bers of The St. John Amvbula:
Brigade.



Womens Canadian Club

@ From Page 4

ties am





Baby Health League (Mrs
00 0S (yscecy
St Lawrence Child Health
League wo
Â¥Y 4 P.C HO OF
t. John Eye Fund 60 00
Blind, Deaf & Dumb Institute 60 60
SPCA 0 0
St Matthias Charitic 30 00
nen's Fund, Port Welfare 60 00
y League Fund 60 00
erving Charities 120 00
The balance of the dan
profits will be distributed
Christmas.
. Again with sincere thanks
you and everyone who assisted

in, making this function a succes
LEE NIBLOCK
Hony. Secretary
“Cleveland”,
Brittons Cross Rd.,
17th March, 1952,



A REALLY
SAFE
Liou

ANTISEPTIC

Though a powerful and penetrating germicide, it can be used

not only on the skin, in the

nose, throat and eyes, but alsu

taken internally.
RELILVES PAIN AND PROMOTES RAPID HEALING

ON SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES

KNIGHT'S LTD. — Distributors

J









PAGE FIVE











|
|
|
|

| HARRISON'S

INVESTMENTS

If you are the holder of —

Commonwealth of Australia
o% Debentures due 1952-55
you should consult us

without delay regarding the

exchange of these securities

A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.

Barbados Correspondents For

ROYAL SECURITIES CORP. LTD.





‘- Ask your
ther Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders are wonderfully
M bo at teething time. They ensure regular easy
; motions, cool the blood and are absolutely safe, Try
give you them next time baby is fretful through teething,

INFANTS’ POWDERS *

aba



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years of smooth comfortable, scheduled
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For Complete Information, See
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD

lower Broad Str, Btown
Phone — 4704
TRANS-CANADA
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HARRISON'S Broad si. .
INTRODUCING

“ORIAC™

IMPROVED SYNTHETIC
CHAMOIS LEATHER









THE
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Does not become slimy

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Is soft and pliable in use

Has no thin patches

Possesses a long life of useful service

Motor Cars, Mirrors, Windows

and Glassware, Household
Paintwork Etc.

SIZE 22” x 181/,”

only $4 cents each





Hardware Dept.
2364









SELECT THESE NOW.

)

des \

For Mt

Originally This |}

Week {

BIDDY’S ASPARAGUS SOUP $ .33 $30 j
LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP... 32
MARELLA STUFFED QUFEN OLIVES 1.80 1.60 fh
MARELLA PLAIN QUEEN OLIVES 1.08 96
CRAWFORD’S CREAM CRACKERS 1.64 1.40 i
IMPERIAL LEG HAMS 12-1516) per 1b... 1.61 136

per Jar $ .61 {
per 4'b tin d

\

i

APIE PEANUT BUTTER ‘
4.20 )

per tin .69 {
per $lb 95 5
)

!

IMPERIAL CORNED BRISKET BEEF
SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK LOSSTER
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE

NEW ZEALAND CHEESE

CANADIAN PICNIC HAMS 5—7Ib
NEW ZEALAND CHEDDAR CHEESE

{!
COCKADE FINE RUM \

°
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.

per 5%6 tin 4.10
per ft 1.73
per 15 74



ne
























































































































































































































































































































si BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952
. WwW TV $EFSS5S5595596595555599596955959SS9 SS FOG FFF FOG IOG,
ac PUMLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES! x
S te i a! Have You Ever Cooked in an
TELEPHONE 2508. ___ BEAL ESTATE ESTATE i Ni a IMUM SAUCE N 3
ne ar ee Ain RAE Tenamtry known ss LODGE SCHOOL | “Monmneie. “qpriaaed pee ™ ALUN” SAUCEPAN ?
enantry nown as
for Births, Marriage or Engagement “Alkins Tenantry” containing about $ Will those. ue a (M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M/V. “DAERWOOD” will IF NOT — NOW is YOUR CHANCE 8
afmouncements in Carib Calling the FOR SALE Asses: of “land “situned st eae 5 |, a. aaa er ae ae ene accept Cargo and Passengers for You ean gbtain them in sets of five or individually >
cNarge is $3 00 for any number of words For pariculars and terms and conditions| ;),. 1s oor banks tia ba we 8.5 TEKOA” is scheduled to sail St. Lueie, St. Vineent, Grenada.
up te © «na 6 cents per word for each of sale apply to the wu adersigned 952 fromm Adetnide February 15th Melbourne and Aruba. Date of sailing to CE)! WTRAL EMPORIUM
adic ore erms cash. Phone 25) AUTOMOTIVE The above will set up for sale at ou eminded that Schoo] fees Mareh 3rd, Sydney March 10th, Bris- be notified |
cetween § 40 .o¢ 4 p.m., 3113 tor Death Office on zriday the 2ist day of Marcl in aavanney tae eae ae bane Marci 33nd astivias at Trinidad | (Corner Broad & Tudor Streets)
Satloes ork er ¢@ om 1952 at 2.20 5 whan fae : i : ‘ aboy pr ind and Barbados about The M/¥Y. “CARIBBEB” will
me mpremrieipemnnastia seagrass — vhase : waid by the 20th 5
_— - CRRRINGTON & SEALY ee ee ee y jAprid goth accept Cargo and Passengers for Choo EOOe
DILD Var OSTIS "i aon oe eS HP _—- Lucas Street , be refused ae stg ee Fe School. | ' tot abidition to general cargo this wee | Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, SPERSSOIRSSOSOOe SOOO IOCSS 8
ve > vy Be ote ke ing order hone sk ae ee ee 3. 52—9n q he RMER \sel tas ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of \ 999950060 06S%
; - - _ jecott & Co., 1Ad. Secretary & Treasurer, | frozen cargo sailing to be notified. COP OOT PODOVOVTOGOS
PE rial residince, Cotes Gally. Bt 2.52—t fn. -ETTDING SPOT: A desirable bulld- eee | agin eneptes oe ree tie ’
Joseph, James " {“Cossie") Brath- Standard 8 h.p. 197. | ing spot situated st Brittons Hill next | British if eos at (TFrinidee to | a ene: MV —"MONERA® | will $
waite, Age 71 years, His funeral] Brand New All_ new parts,|to Mr. Maurice Cuve, overlooking the [ts ws accept Carte 9ee 1. atenbeet anes JUS I REC ‘“EIVED Fes
i s e a : eside " q ’ o } ~ run- P Hy urse av avy ardens, : al ica, .
ime weeny =o Tenens Parise ih a wate ye or "ae : eee oF ee ay 17,000 sq. ft. 2 Fo jvctier perticclars apply — i Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing %
Church 18.3.52—6n For further particulars, “Grav — NOTICE WiTHY &@ CO., LTD. Friday 21st’ inst.
Gertrude Brathwaite (Widow), | eee |W. Corin, c/o T. Geddes Grant. 1 a pate
Pomroy, Eltjah (sons) ae CAR ~- Ford Prefect in excellent con- ee neenieenmeret 4442, 8.3.52—-13n] 15 Haney td a ans Ms a . as B.wW.l eee OWNERS" ik
18.3.52—1n | Jition, 5 sxood tyres, Price $700. Apply tention ie o Parish o ASSOCIATION (INC.)
“Scaatie .. On March 17, 1008, on - Cc. S Hamilton, 91—35, 16 3 52 bn. HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 “OUSE, Brand new, ample 3 bedroom pee Bam g oe seas re fae TA & ©O., Consignee. Tele. No. 4087
DSO? On arch 17, 1952, at gee house, all convenie™ces, with = party~] intr ure © is DAcORTA & 60. ——— —~
her ~residence “Ceres, Navy Qar- MOTOR CYCLE: One two and halt sized living room, open verandah, kitchen | Is!and a Bill authorising the said Vestry :
dens, Elsie Hudson, matron, General] (2%) h.p. B.S.A., O.H.V Can and utility soom Garage, laundry, 2] to raise a loan not exceeding £2,500 to
Hospital, 1931... Her funeral will take} seen any day at T. Herbert Ltd. aed servant rooms and storage room under. ] enable the said Vestry to purchase a
nae a , #15 today at St. Michael's] ber Yard. Phone 4367 18.3.52—In Ss a hillside 7, “age bm pereel of — at Gall Hil, St. ; be
‘athedra! & Co. A a nd to erect ereon a communa
Clara, and Gerald Hudson VAUXHALL VELOX MODEL CARS— oe 13,.2.52—t.f.0 ond Latrine
Ul to est These are 1/18 Seale and are Powered ————= Dated this 14th day of March, 1952.
ae pets by 3 dry cell batteries. Forward « REIL, Baimoral Gap, Hastings, CARRINGTON & SEALY. ' W
IN ME MORIAM reverse geurs. Only" 1 ited "yaitaber RON PAR 22,137 square feet of land Solicitors for he Vestry ILL NOT STAIN OR MARK
gaia “vailatile!. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4301. fhe house contains four bedrooms, of St. John. CANADIAN SERVICE
UTCHE in ever loving memory of 2.58—Hn. | fiving rooms. water cee 15.3. 52-80. | 2a. IDEAL FOR TABLE TOPS
mr dear wife Phylis Butcher, wht hout, servan rm a5 *
emacs, “TRUCKS: Two Fordien Thames 5-ton Rookies pe eeeeintment, phone 31TO. | From St, John and Halifax, N.S.
I had not wandered far and wide ealee ane weed woming coder, a The above lie be a on ad = NOTIC
With such an angel for my guide. | UP@Ct miles. For particulars. Apply [gt public com) jon a - v
Nor heave nor earth could then} “1. Biscuit Co:, Ltd. Phone 4337. hy the 2ist day of March at the Office E Expected Aretyst = ~¢ =e
ee ne, 18.3.52-—-6n } o¢ the Ute ETON & SEALY BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE St John Halifax Dates, aoe etown,
: she Nad lived, and lived to 5 LD Bar
seve Ee TIRUCKS: Tho Austin Two-Speed axle Lucas Street. Nowicn i Bauer atte het tel ae. “eee 2 Feb 16 Feb. 20 March SUPPLIED IN + & 1 GAL. TINS
St, Clair Butcher, 18.3.59—In ais ari ata idles ageita te Y 2 2 1.9.82—-100 3.52—10n Annus} General patoeting of Division %. 8.5. “SUNRAY” 5 ++ 1M March is March 2'April
a . CSA w e in e olice|s §. “POLYTRADER . + 5 i ;
THANKS Stronciy built bungalow... © SS bt bungalow, revenily Magistrate’s Court, District “A”. on|ss.. "A VESSEL” Sy each March 0 Anat ©
___ LIVESTOCK _ geen wt ten aa perches of land. |2"1ceyr ine Stet aay OF March, 1968, at is 5 VESSEL" 30 April 5 May 25 May GE HARDWAR
; oma: \ “ BARROW —, THE undersigned | teturn | Cow: Giving 35 pints p day. Second [inspection | Permanes, Mp, "Perms and AGENDA elie NERAL SUPPLIES
the funeral, sent wreaths, cards, { CA!f Apply: Norwood oR #1 Blackman aa a apply to Gilbert » eaeemeales iets dl aint UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE Tr Saami
letters and in any other way sym- 18.3.52—-6n Jillage, St. James i a
Siiner, Fitts. Village a seerneah FROM LIVERPOOL AND GLASGOW
pathised with them on the recent 18 3 52—In 4 : hatin x i
death of dear Terr POULTR =e ol 3 Other Business 5 Txpsehed, Arava! RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4918
* ; . U Y — Avenue All members are specially asked to
Clyde Barrow °ud yamny . 12) TWO HOUSES at ist vents atta dennat: meade we Dates Bridgetown x .
3.5211 oURE , °G One 6x 9 : oO Barbados COOOL OOS SSSSESSS
. PUREBRED LEGHORN—one cock, six] Marts Gap, Ch. Ch pailinss, Mr. H A_ Vaughan, the President and| . 5, “guNVALLEY” 21 Feb 2 - SAA AAP ELS ¢
ANKER. aie eakncin liek . hens, Owner going on leave. Telephone|@ied, kitchen and salvanise the General Secretary will be present a aoe toe eb. 6 Feb. 19 March SRR SOS OPO OOOO FOP OOP OSOSOO Ht pt st sbgt -.
vedio? an . died tne tat artarnoont, S0eT Tek “is 3 ab. ‘in fd the anes, a Fae 505 0.00 “re during the first part of re aa . 4 Herere Vereen Me aaa oes basi + ae R gt cima rent ny
vewis nker, who died on the 18th vanize pallings ce is $85 , a. ARRO 4
March, 1991 8 4 they can remain on the spot Secretary, Division 2. %
There's anvopen gate MECHANICAL path aa tenanted Apply to Miss ¢ . 3 52—2: in s
At the end of the road Both rs siadle Street Furniture Depot 16.8 Sa~in TED KINGDOM ANP CONTINENTAL SERVICE »
Through whieh each must £o plone. | TRUCK TIP-END HYDRAULIC HOISTS. | pial 2645 : 9 2 -htiessahnan pa Sapabpceatate x e
And the na light we carmnot « Ony « limited few available; secure : N | Expected Arrival %
Our Father claims Fils own yours now! COURTESY GARAGE, Dial AUCTIO Antwerp Rotterdam Lond Dates Bridgeto 8
Beyond the gate our loved” one, | 4616 , ml 4 NOTICE ” ontee Some, 12 i
Finds happiness and rest. aca ta = a aoe Mie Se OL ncn cen’ res ne hon Oe ial marpeses % We have Just Received
An here is Comfort in the thought y ins to” i> PL F 5 s o 2 cs as , %
That a loving God knows. best MISCELLANEOUS - 1 will sell at her gesidence Me PARISH OF SAINT MICHABL |) 5) “SUNBELI’ 18 March 17 Match 2% Marek 7 April % a Shipment of
Pearl (Wife), Grace, Lionel, Evelyr Maxwell Coast on her evtire] SFALED TENDERS in duplicate %
Hartley, Keith, George (Children), Gers A GAS STOVE — 2 burne one Grill | March beginning at 12.30 p.m Le > etena a . “TENDER |
aldine (Sisterl;"Aticiie (Sister-in-laws. J#2d Oven. Phone 25% 16 3 52—2n | jot of household furniture" whiely In irked jon: (hk, siVeens eae Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 i
18,3.52 1 ae4 oye “4 —— | cludes: —Mah nina a 5 1 . € o he ' \
ee BED TICK — S4 ins. wide. Thani Shuive with spring Glied oi Fa eeie ss tock 7 ' on Th ‘ ylag th aoe a ae %
Bros, Dial 3466. 18 3 52—t.fn.| Radio and centre tables, Ma een nterie See tha’ annerenee y
f » M < ul ndermentioned *.
Aes sealant Bentwood chairs, Small carpet, Ma ad Be at canned a1 or teers | %
Ww AN* r kD BIBLES trom 4/- up. “Testaments 18c. Wardrobe, painted dressing table, Leaeis gsuppnes tp Buch quentiss .- e y
each. Books & Text Cards. Bible House,] desk, tea sets, silver ware, Ice cream me to time be ordered f one year, | %
55 oT nade with mattresses, ]ommencing on the Ist April next — *
HELP Bs ae i 14.3.52—6n.* ouinted ye other items of FRESH MILK (oN 0. %
a sina dal one 7 ae FRESH BREAD
gemeannapemmemipeinastieis joo res Terms cash.
ASSISTANT MANAGER Montserrat a " : interest 4 , aA. SCoTT, Fach person tendering must send in Inc. e £ ‘ ;
Company Limited require married trips ned Mabeine viEW ouRTS “. it RAY: Auctioneer » letter, along with the Tender, signed ¥ ¥ xR for all occasions.
as Assistant Manager. Experience man-| Barbados View ‘Pare. Silk s , >» 15 5e-- 4n.]}by two properly qualified persons (not _ =
agement livestock essential also ability | Barbados Map $3.98. Th: on, arves wit ba od er being members of the Vestry.) statin re ne
to manage cotton lime estates. House pew ae _— their willingness to become bound with Pl ° Patt ed
provided. | Apply stating experience and ao UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER the Tenderer in the event of their Ten- NEW YORK SERVICE ain of ern 8
alary required to Box 221, Plymouth, z der being accepted for the due fulfilment ée
Montserrat, B,W.1. "\3 36s en BALLERINAS Rubber Seled Shoes oe i sell on fof the Cont ict - its: Mee S.S.. “RIO DALE” 1 7 res vo 5 x oa Y
m. 1 $1.69 o pr. AN sizes. Thani Bros. Dial By instructions received 1 WwW) i .E” sailed 7th March arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952. 2 : %
ee eo 3466 meeday March 200 at Messrs. Cecil 1] With respect to the tender for A STEAMER sails 28th March — — arrives Barbados 10th April, 1952. % Champagne Glasses Cocktail Glasses :
STENOGRAPHER recuired, preferehly 18 9 5—t.f.n. \Straker & Co's ‘Office, Spry Street, an | FRESH MILK, the probable quantity
ak with are peer in Book- . Slanciment of bicycle accessories which | required for one year is 24,000 gallons] -—————-—--—---_____-—_- -——__ ——_-— - —— g Sherr Liqueur *
Keeping. Apply Caribbean Confection] bLANKETS — Coloured and Fancy. [includes, Front & Rear mud, Kiar toe i an een enor more. thin one NEW ORLEANS SERVICE y ” ”
o., , se pias Sap, ens Sing iM, Be: Double $3.98, —- Thani Bros. ' sports and Standard models, Saddies,]eccept the Tender of more than one co
iii eMail adh head. eee oe ae 18 3 Sat tn | Peaals,, Axles, Cones, € a ie ee peter, fee hb aes < “ — ae ee sailed Tih March - arrives Barbados 2ist March, 1952 Port ” Snap e 2
MANAGER--Required for the Grenada C —— soe. fae ets, Hubs, Spanners, Re ‘ ge use ae See) STE/ E sailed 12th March arrives Barbados 29th Mareh, 1952. 4 .
Pg. Rag 7s gg Net eng snormeead rare re gd tread Foundry Coke for Pump connections, Dunlop sali. + flong with their tender, Pony Whiskey _,, Half-pint Tumblers x
Applicants “must supply ctedentinis.1Co., Lid, Phone 4 arr Wie. aaa én ere Seiaty = Pat rs. Tool | Veterinary Practitioner stating that the} ct Pee. . n x
state experience, age and salary re-] ~ Eieeesved lop rs a ir NetsoL “3 |cattle from wiich the i y © sup- | ¥
a aoe rn “te. Hair Nets, Ladies ich e milk will be sup —_~ =
quired, i380—an.| “COLOURFUL FANGY BRAW Tame | DRS, Valve, Rubber ste Meee cet ‘Frames | blicd are tree from ‘Tuberculosis CANADIAN S8ERVIUE % 3
. just right for Sunny Barbados, 66c, each | Cricke lis. Bats, Batting & Wicket- orms of tenders can be obtained ot sou IND 5 ,
faut time “Respuntant needed — not (at Thani Bros., Pr. Wm. Hry, Street 7 napping proves, Football Outer & Inner] he Vestry Clerk's office THERE Also, a special offer of Half-pint Tumblers @ 8c. only
ingen ie eeek, 8 an 12 ates Bult 18 3.52—t fn. | covers, size 5, Football ae e ines Ec Mera Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados S
ed : ew winches : > 7 7 20 cases Bicarbonate of da + ’ fas eee bd == ¢§
carmen wereon. Reply with credentiat, | FROWRIFD, SPUN SILK in Dartigg Drums "Disinfectant, 2 cases Damaged Clerk, St. Michael's Vestr ‘ALCOA PILGRIM” March 14th March 24th | %
MBBS , c/o Advocate ae et a Thani Bros. Dial} uyjnts, Epsom Salts, Baking Powder 54.52—Tn, € 0. d.|“ALCOA PTONEER" March 28th April 7th
oe tate ee Lee 183 62—1n. | iixed Spice, Table Jellies and many | “ALCOA PARTNER" April 13th April 23rd
ae aR ane eins Sioo' numerous to "mention | : PLANTATIONS L
: ng GADIOLL @ DAHLIA Orders are ie at 11.00 a.m, Terms Cash i hee oi NORTHBOUND Due Barbados x e
OG RENE | peti oe ciation stag |“ “ancy nr PASPO Mant Still oY ratty voc sy, tawrence muvee]
~ . ae jecember 1002, parties Auctioneer 660606066 654, 45 OOOO COOF 64 SEES
HOUSES Spe pe Acorn F please pone Se 16.9.52—4n — Pl ‘A STEAMER” April 23rd For St. ohn, Ee. and St. 9O0SCS0C0000S00CCCSO 5OS0060000CCCOCE™=
S 3 be a6
Scie a ays In London awrence River Ports.
she antareuescneneninis | topeeber-tieetvelend itecingndepragiartuenedyGiisiaatiilann:
BRACH COTTAG St. James wt HBAVY SPUN LINEN—In Pink, beige | LI UOR LICENSE NOTICE y These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation
8
perfect bathing, quiet All r and] @8d Gold 36” wide usually $1.64. Re- The application of Beatrice Henry & LONDON
services supplied fro he Own duced for a week to $1.41 yard at] Golbourne Jackmah, trading as Henry ee > ee
Telephone. Suiteble married couple, | SURF ALANI, 62 Swan Street, 18.3,52—1n | & Co., Shopkeepery of Suttle Street, pone wn ees the only go 7 MOLT o1 G vi
25.00) per dey American Pilon for twe —ctensianncefinn | { or License No. 148 off member of the Trinida -stee! BERT THO) D. — NEW RK AND GULF SERVICE.
oe Apply: " Beavhienda, St ania Oo L RUBBER MATTING © 42 inches wide. Oe led te Basket Henry in rnspect Percussion Orchestra rian at ¥
one 0 . 5 a © urfacer, it y ay -
Bat ei 3*!" | Spark Plugs. Ete, ree... Tr Snaing in “Suttle Street, City, for mained behind in London after! APPL¥:—DA COSTA # CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE on
HOUSE: “Homestead”, Upper Belmont FORT ROYAL GARAGE, LTD., permission to use said Hquor license the band returned to Trinidad} a 4 iia ace
Road. Drawing and Dining rooms, @ hed- Telephones 2362 or 3208, At said premisas, Suttle Street, City from its tour of Britain last year, |
rooms. ranktast ) a Y a 2 5 j
ane Drsaktast . m, tole re ic St eee 3 S40; ae: aie oe oer aaa h 1852 is still appearing before London | PP. A. TAG DA
; ie $2--in | yFMBELLISHERS — In chrome, for} police Magistrate, Dist. “A audiences, playing his ping-pong GO V
Ela) Dera verre Velox 15” rim only. Beautify] ~ B. ALLEYNE, as a novelty soloist with dance} a
A FURNBRFaaT—w | 2M, Can wh the ategstive wheel tr pbmceni. | Bande | iday 2st
Liner 700 ea-bathing r - : B. This application wul be coasid- z “ “ d Mw 2
mae areeraee Pgs 6. Almay 15.3.52—6n. | ered at a poenting Court to Ee ; se Han beret tut TAM? Plane BARBAD S GE L H ITAL wu ay + ar.
o Soral Sands, Worthing 4 Salt apron al Police Court, ist. “A on idmy | é ar | ¢ ) NERA ¢ »SP
25,2.52—41.1 a = D white Suaweneoe’ Z x in the 28th day of March 1962, at 11 o'clock, | and is looking forward to joining
me - . * x ,
oe I a Super, LAURIE a.m up with the band again, but he
PLEO FS SSE OSS" =» DASH& Co,, Tudor H. A. TALMA,
S WHAT . bes atl | i 61 ar Police Magisirdte, Dist. “A” See know any details of their) TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES.
q f r awe 5.3. n, 18,.3,52—1n a a * ‘
ae Ay THEY ‘SAY! | TYRES—Git Edged BR, lor | feeeesenrmnneree erent Another Trinidadian musician, SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12
a Ty n ij
: 80 Gas Cooker passenner car tven at, vers. reagonable {LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ons ree eis plays Beg o'clock noon on Wednesday, 19th March, 1952, for supplying articles
$ 2 : ario > s 0
§ one cum nner monny sy’ ph |Miee P'S Tad Ga ee" | NOL, Wedite te eet: | by Phil "Mose, eManchestor | the following Unes for a perlod of aia magins fram ist Apri,
. \R SPENT” 0 s eer > or ‘
Desist meee 52k, | lnalbaeig dagen Mle on- | Pha So, Peneerasece arene nas [aanoe-bend leader, He Rad never | 977.
» | 1s Bs 2 t
Q at ely hillthentic - quotatic x. | HADENSA OINTMENT 1952 granted to Marion Brathwaite in}Played with a band until a month (1) FRESH BREAD. .
* 4 een these noms * | Gg wHY SUFFER?” Hadensa the new|respect of a wall building at Black] ago. Mr. Moss believes =s | (2) ALCOHOL.
eye owroor w mot | an intment for Haemorrhoids, | Rock, St. Michael, for permission to use rig velop into one © ;
> oak them before all aro * | Immediate relief from pain and bleeding. | sald liquor license at a wooden building O'Brian will develop layers! § (3) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of the
% deli » | Obtainable from all Drug Stores. with shedroof attached near Police Sta- one a ae aye dead at the Westbury Cemetery
5 . 12.3.52—7n. | tion, Black Rock, St. Michae! in the jazz world, —-B.U.F, | i ‘
BOBO 4 OP REBECOBOBBSES ; Dated this 17th day of March 2952 (4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pints a day
SOI LA AOC LILIOT WHITE SHARKSKIN — lovely to look) To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq = ' only.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
MARION BRATHWAM#TE,
for Applicants
N.B. This application will be consid-

Dial 3466, 18 3 52—I1n
WELDING MATERIAL & EXPAND-

Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application
to’ the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not be

|
i: at, and best value only, $1.47 at Thani's.
|

$ rr a 7
TODAY'S NEA





S FLASH ELECTRICAL SERVICE




















iano ING METAL—~Electrodes, bre . 7 , je i
f. a AWING ree : th Expanding metal from ae to Fated ee the hae on Serta — ecietained “Apres Wey 8 oO sone supplied by Be- anavel
eg 2 a i |Tratagar “Spry "Sireeta“Pnone a the 28th day of March 1952, at 11 o’elock Hospital.
YOU MONEY AND TIME. *! 13.3, st tn. ne ere Since the prices of astvien! _ Persons tendering must submit at the time of tendering letters
BOOTS THE STAPLES 7a fh ‘ Police Magistrate, Dist. “A° he a aes gee high ye. []| from two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
Pain gakasuin Ge ‘{ ee an accurate estimate of the cost willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the
HAMMERING * : ORIENTAL . LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE of wiring your building on pre- contract.
PLASTIC BY THE YARD — IN ¥) | Tne application of ‘Kathleen Weekes, as your eEane ne - ty ’ Terms of contract and any further particulars may be obtained
DI aw opkeeper of Bi Road, St. Michael, before you even start to ; ;
euaews etamneant } | for perrniiien "30 ea Spirits, Malt ss . jon application at the General Hospital, 13,3.52—3n.
‘AND | Liquors, &e at a board and shingle shop WILLIAM A. CORBIN j , ijeaccitaiaheiiiaelile
HARDWARE j arsed oe ch agg at Bay Land, sane, Cae =
d, St. Michael a sOSTge,
iithiaenepemenssnansal HEADQUARTERS FOR Dated this 17th day of March 1952. : : UNIFORMS FOR MALE NURSES AND ORDERLIES.
CLL APPA POPPSE, SOUVENIRS ry E. A, McLEOD, Esq Hrolder of Fitmans, Coxbegentes: 2
§ FROM INDIA, CHINA & Police Magistrate, Dist ig Se General Education; SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12
WANT TO SELL AS CEYLON : ab tus eaeie on Diploma in Blectrietty trom ff | ©’@lock noon on Wednesday, 19th March, 1952, for the MAKING OF
% LNBs, This aceiien ties can Ne Seed Nornal College, London; UNIFORMS FOR MALE NURSES AND ORDERLIES for a period
§ A GOING CONCERN § THANIS hath’ cae BM: abate lll gms cs nye, inm, or ww [fff ane year from Ist April, 1952
the 28th day of March i952, a o’ele . aE, SS es ; ; i
% ed a ee x Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 a h arch i iu lock Tech aaah i ‘ Tender forms will be supplied an application to the Secretary,
3 business of 40 years standing ss a E. A. McLBOD pee Ceneral Hospital, and tenders will not be entertained except they
% iw the Island of Dominica, | 4 Pe ee re eee aes aré on forms supplied by the Hospital.
[in wd. bane tit oS Pa P tendering must submit at th dering lette
S 8 ‘ sin & ersons su t at e time of ten rs
General Merchandise. ss seler tien ee ee FOR SALE trom two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
‘For further particulars ¥ X ° his | illingness A Pp f A i Is
% Apply: XCY.P. x FREE HOOK * JUST “RECEIVED ae to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the sa. rayer or nima
» C/o The Advocate Co. & | | com :
% 15.3.52—3n Sis Which Makes ne particulars may be obtained from the Secretary, General
: ab Miia Di held Hospital. 13.3,52—3n.

* 8
APP AAA AAA LA AAS ALAA LAA A AY 8

GOD'S WAY OF
1}
: SALVATION
PLAIN”

S. Roberts, Gospei
Book & Tract Service, 30

just received a shipment
of 1} h.p. Call early and
secure one.

Showroom - -



Hear our humble prayer, O God, for ‘
our friends the animals; especially for
Animals who are suffering; for all that

ae ave overworked and under-fed and
, treated; for all wistful crea-

Pkgs. Tate &
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacon

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna
Sausages

Pkgs. Goddard Plague Pow-
der

Lyle Castor





Barbados Horticultural

Society's
UNHIBITION

FOR SALE

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S

GARAGE LTD.

SAL OA OLLI LILLE ALOE

15.3.52—3n. I will offer for sale by Pubtic Competition at my office

B. S. A. Motor Cycles

———
> *?

Â¥

3

: ij

LLL LOI ALL ALISO



































%
* Central Ave., Bangor, N.L
eseseseststet AOA Tins Stove Polish % |) VICTORIA STREET, on FRIDAY 2ist at 2 i)
: = Tins Hei 1 p.m. 2,400 sq. ft. ¥
40 BE HELD A'T ik SS 5 |p SSS |8 pes. Bria Neuetable Salad 3 |); land with the Chattel Dwelling House, containing ‘Open Gallery, ; in eaptivity that beat against
i rhhy i oo ‘ae di, g Sugar 3 caeke tacit 4 gl notyan usual Out Offices, Water and | j 1 ted
: " +) i SSESSION, » bars; for i : .
jue DRILL HALL i THE BRITISH i FUR NISH \ Tine Amstd Bereet ‘incule x MICHAEL. ON, situated at the IVY, ST. their bars; for any that are hunted or
; i COUNCIL ik i — rineepay seems ¢ lost or deserted or frightened or hun-
iarrison { i s Strawberr - f fe ‘ .
ot i | NOW IT’S EASY |: ib, Booteca woopins Shae aunt standing on sbout 10,000 ery; for all that are in pain or dying;
IN — } ) { Also: p ft. lands 1 mile trom vided M
SOM iy eet esacH " WAKEFIELD The Money Saving Way | {i} ‘modern conveniences. Good gm for all that must be put to death. We
1962, from 3—7 p.m. \} } Popular | Bureaus, Bedsteads, | TIN HAMS eae Sei , Mas- wits
SUNDAY, 23rd MARCH i} HAR Bate, Craton. Wnopes. Wash aie |}! A comfortable dwelling house standing on about % acre of tana ff entreat for them all Thy mercy and
1952, from 3—6 p.m. \} FOLK LORE & FOLK {{\'}} Springs — ‘TABLES for Dining | Special price to Shopkeepers at “DERRICKS", ST, JAMES, house contains Open Gallery, 2 pity, and for those who deal with them
z The Public are invited to i MUSIC OF TRINIDAD is {i wage ae aan: it} o % |} fides, Drawing, Dining, 3 bedrooms with running water, Kitchen- fe
ehibit; mks ALA the title of an illustrated boards—Kitchen, Reid ee iit * | })) ette, W.C. and Bath, Electric Light and Water in Kitchen, Garage we ask a heart of ¢ ompassion and gen-
‘i aye) ing Plants in Tub \ ture to be given by iH} zoe Cabinets, Lig ; HH S| and Servants room, enclosed well and several fruit trees. {kind} 1 Mak
or Pols, j $5.50 up DRAW 200] Al thi t -- ¢ » pi Ss < yr words, 4 2 US
2. Flowering Plants 1 MR. ANDREW PEARSE, FURNITURE, Rush Furniture for All these things get from S|} a tle hands and kinc cre s ake "
4. Cut Flowers, 1 }) Resident Tutor in Trinidad ete aa as coe Tl INCE & CO * SINGER TREADLE MAGHINE IN RERFRGE ORDER, 1947 ourselves to be true friends to animals
5 Table and Floor Decor.- |||} Ong ee eaty coca SAPING “Braces. * oe ee - 2 and so share the blessings of the merci-
tions. ie West Indies at the Brit- \3 ‘ r rift ; ii
6. Vegetables and Fruit | | ish Council at 8.15 p.m. on , LTD. % Dial 2947 ful. For the sake of Thy Son the ten-
\j Admission: ADULTS 36c. ||\{\} Tuesday, March 18. a S. ‘WILSON i! * ( y 1 4 iJ cae ne
CHILDREN Vid Admission Free. s % R ARCHER M KENZIE Stree der-heerted, Jesus Christ our Lord.
under 12 yrs. 18¢, | i Open to the Public SPRY STREET. DIAL 409 i 6 a 0. PERRO PF. $ e dik, ietoria {.
— >! | SSS DSSS FS |“neseatessecoesesstsese: (SSS













~—



TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952

BARBADOS



HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON



















BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

an
f SHE'S SAILING ALi AUGHT-
HERES ER NAME ON

fp edgg es a .





DID YOU GET AN EYE-FUL

< \ |) (7onawT vou RECOSN a HER?
OF YOUR SHIPMATES, FLINT >

THAT'S MRS. PEARL DE LAZLC
RICH AMERICAN WIDOW






(MUTTON DRESSED UP 4S LAMB...)
STILL - THATS SETTER THAN
4 LOAD OF CROOKS...



PETA PALMER!
1 SEEM TO KNOW
THAT NAME..





BY CHIC YOUNG



I WE'RE HOME, yim) |



















~ DEAR ~— / , | “ea
eae: | _( 1 DONT KNOW oi! © SI SLEPT
B A WHETHER ye ALL THRU
, —£ | ig. XN 1 DIDOR IT
(ener DM bes, ti] C NOT tl
Sl alt | f= ’
meld af
— php i
\ © =£ Dy XY i
»~. >! » Be)
~ \ Y SS :
mm pe be Vix












irigios —
a D | | —ONLY BECAUSE © CHANGE HE WAN" ED \\OH ‘HE DID HOLD ON NOW! IF HE'D
â„¢\ NOW WE'RE | | HE CAN HELP US NASTY W > 1 OF AN IT ALL FOR} | WANTED HE COULD HAVE

SOC THIS IS THE KENT TRYIN' TO | | FIND FLASH AND ESCAPE’ THE SAKE BEEN OuT OF HERE By

CHAP WHO DOPED ME SAVE HIS | | THE WARDEN / DIDN'T YOU SAID HE'D HOPED To JENCE!| | NOW — BUT HE WOULDN’/T



AND STARTED THis

HOW'S WILKS
FANTASTIC PRISON

Doc?

/ SAY KENT TRIED
TO HELP YOU
AFTER THE
PRISONERS BROKE
LOOSE, TEX?

| STOW AWAY ALONE
ON OUR SHIP AND

PLAY BALL WITH THOSE
CONVICTS / NOW HE GETS
SHOT TRYIN’ TUH SAVE
THE WARDEN.’ MAYBE IM
CORNY, BUT FOR MY,

TO JUPITER! HE'S
A PHYSICIST
Y' KNOW

HE STOLE IT FROM
ME... AND IT WANT TO
FIND OUT WHY / Bee —

aL DH, LADVIE, SINCE ~VHN AA
‘TIS MY RING THAT'S ats
STOLEN, I'M GOING

CHECK, WEE porRIE /
RIGHT NOW I'M SURE
THE RING IS IN THE
HANDS OF A MAN
NAMED D@ ANTON /

MONSTER O° LOCH
MESS! TH! INSCRIPTION
YOU QUOTE PROVES ‘TIS

MY RING, JOHNNY /

















I THINK I HID ’EM IN
HERE-BUT IT DON'T
LOOK LIKE IT-

MAYBE I PuT
THEM UNDER
HERE-IN AN

IDLE MOMENT!

“AND JUST
WHAT ARE YOU






| HUH! YOU'LL FIND
NOTHING IN THOSE
EMPTY BOTTLES
YOU HAVE IN He
BOTTOM DRAWEI

OF YOUR DRESS’ eon!








A MIGHTY VOICE RINGS OUT OVER THE |
DIN OF THE BATTLE «THE VILLAGE I8
SUDDENLY SILENTS
WAMBESI! |
LLONGO!
= DROP
NOOR |
WEAPONS! |





ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



Famous
for flavour!







?

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _



SPECIAL offers to all



Cash ane Credit ‘Customers for Thursday Thursday to to Saturday only








. OSPE « TAL ‘OF FE cei available at our Hranches Tweedside, —
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually Now
Tins LAMB’S TONGUES $1.09 $ .96 Pkgs: JACK STRAWS 61 Se
i 2ESE (Per 1 74 68
a oe ; LEG HAMS (Tender Sweet)
ins ‘HE S PEAS 39 36
Tins BATCHELORS PEAS } Sls ais ta i ae
Bots: HORLICKS MALTED MILK .72 68



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES









€sso} HANDY OIL



3 | Lower Hroad St.







THE WORKS
OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE

on This



ST.
GRUMMAN GOOSE

VINCENT

Notes Edition.

@ The Whole Works of
Shakespeare in one volume, print-
ed in clear and beautiful type
under the direction of the Shakes-
peare Head Press.

AIR SERVICE

@ The text is based on that

PRESENT SCHEDULE

prepared for the Shakespeare
Head Press by the distinguished
MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent Elizabethan scholar, Arthur Henry
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 am Bullen.
Arrives Barbados 10.00 an
Departs Barbados 10.30 a.m :
Arrives St. Vincent 11.30 n @ The scene in the play, Sir
Thomas Moore, which eminent
TUESDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent scholars accept as Shakespeare's
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 a is printed for the first time in any
Arrives Trinidad 10:30 am edition of his Works.
Departs Trinidad 11.30 am
Arrives St. Vincent 1.00 p.m
BS : A new and full Life of
WEDNESDAYS s¢, vincent/Grenada/St, Vincent Shakespeare, embodying the con-

Departs St. Vincent
Arrives Grenada
Departs Grenada
Arrives St. Vincent

temporary records, the legends
10.30 a.m gathered by subsequent writers,
11.20 a.m and the discoveries of recent
12 noo research is here printed for the

; first time.

10.00 a.m

Additional Flight From St. Vincent °
to Trinidad Times on Application

@ The characters’ names are
set above their speeches for
clearness and. pleasure in reading.

@ The Plays are arranged in
the chronological order of their
composition: not gathered into
Comedies, Histories, and Trage-
dies—the method dating from
the First Folio and followed in
the conventional three-volume
plan of publication.

TRS St. Vincent/Barbados / Dominica
Seema es Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent
Arrives Barbados
Departs Barbados
Arrives Dominica
Departs Dominica
Arrives Barbados
Departs Barbados
Arrives St, Vincent

8.00 ¢
9.00 ¢
9.30
11.30
12.30
2.30
3.00
4.00 pn

FRIDAYS 8t. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent Readers can now approach
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 4.1 tne hedy of the Plays as a vital
Arrives Trinidad 10,30 p.n and growing organism revealing

11.30 a.m
1.00

Departs Trinidad

the evolution of the poet's inspi-
Arrives St. Vincent

ration and genius.

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

and

pn
5

GARDINER AUSTIN
& CO... LTD.

AGENTS Broad St. the Village,
Phone 4704

Gréystone Shops, Balmoral Gap.





be




















































































PAGE EIGHT



Carlton Defeat H.C.

BRICKIE LUCAS

SCORES TWO

feated
Footb
One
second.
7 Collepe te

CARLTON

melt. £37 Livision

im Gave ¢

irlton













stages the game
Carlton, “Brickie”

“Peppy” Hutchinson one.

roal but Luea

Harrison College took the
touch Cartton defended the
southern goal kicking into the
wind, Lucas, their inside right
took a long shot which Cammie
Smith, College custodian, allow-
ed to go outside,

The Carlton forwards began to
attack. G. Hutchinson at centre
forward passed’ to Clairmonte
who ran in from the right wing
and took a shot. The ball w:
kicked out of play by one of the
College backs to give Carlton a
corner, Clairmonte took a beau-
tiful corner but Smith saved.

Penalty Saved

A few minutes later Simmons
the College left half back top-
ped the ball with his hand in the
penalty area, Lucas took the pen-
alty kick but Smith ived and
cleayed, The Carlton forwards
kept up their attack on the Col-
lege goal. Smith saved a few dif-
ficult shots from G. Hutchinson
Clairmonte missed many good
opportunities.

Brickie Lucas opened the ac-
count for Carlton about seven
minutes before half time. He beat
Smith with well placed shot
through the air in the left cor-
ner of the goal

College missed a golden oppor-
tunity to get the equaliser when
Paul Tudor, after beating one of
the Carlton full back kicked
high over the cross bar.

Lucas took a shot a few sec-
onds before half time but Smi
was in position and saved, At
half time Carlton still one
goal in the lead

On the Offensive

On resumption Cariton was
again on the offensive After
about ten minutes they increased
their lead. Harold Cox on the
left wing received a pass and
outran Mayers the College righ‘
back. Cox centred beautifully
and “Peppy” Hutchinson punch-
ed the ball out of the reaches of
Smith,

College missed another oppor-
tunity to open their account.

They were awarded a free kick.
Smith took the kick and Griffith
at inside right, received the ball,
He passed to F. Tudor who
kicked wide of the goal.
Carlton scored their final goal
shortly before Referee Amory
blew off. Cox ran down the left
wing and centred. Lucas made
no mistake.
The teams were as
Carlton; Warren,
nedy, C. Cox, H
liams, Marshall, R
G. Hutchinson,
Lucas.
Harrison College: C. Smith,
Squires, Mayers, Pilgrim, Mr.
Smith, Simmons, Medford, Grif-
fith, P. Tudor, F. Tudor and
Morris,
Referee;

follows:
Porter, Ken-
Cox, C. Wil-
Hutchinson,
Clairmonte and



Mr. E. Amory,

Harrison
all match at Kensington Oval
voal was scored in the first half

GOALS

College three-nil in

me of their worst performances

was on top throughout the game.

was very slow.
Lucas scored two goals and

Carlton could have had another
; failed to make use of a penalty kick.



FOOTBALL
FIXTURES

Division One
Thursday 20,
Empire vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: W. F. Hoyos,
Linesmen: A, Parris and L.
King.
Saturday 22,
College vs. Spartan,

Referee: G. Haworth.
Linesmen: W. Hoyos and J.
King.

Division Two
Tuesday 18,
Everton vs.
Referee: C,
Friday 21.
Spartan vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: R, Hutchinson.
Division Three
Tuesday 18,

P.-Rovers
B. Williams

Carlton vs. C. O. Boys at
Black Rock.
Referee: C, Roachford.
Y¥.M.P.C, “A” vs. Rangers at
Beckles Road.
Referee: R. Parris,

C, & W. vs. Wanderers at Bay
Referee: R. Hutchinson.
Combermere vs. Lodge at Com-
bermere.
Referee: A. Parris.
Wednesday 19.
College vs.

Regiment at Col-
lege.

Referee: O, Robinson.

F. O. Boys vs. Everton at
Foundation.

Referee: I, J. King.

Notre Dame vs. P.-Rovers at
Bay.

Referee: F. Edwards.

Police vs. Wanderers at Park
Referee: L. King.

Friday 21.
Cc. O. Boys vs, ¥.M.C.A. at
Combermere.
Referee: C. Roachford.
Carlton vs. aki M.P.C. “A”
at Black Rock

Referee: ‘J. Archer.
F. O. Boys vs. Police at
‘ Foundation.
Referee: H. Wilson.
Cc. and W. vs. Rangers at Shell
Referee: F. Taylor.
Y.M.P.C, “B” vs, Regiment at
Beckles Rd.
Referee: A. Thomas.
Saturday 22.
Inter-school
Combermere vs, Foundation
at Combermere,
Referee: R. Parris.

NEW TITLES
NEWCASTLE, March 17.
European flyweight champion

Teddy Gardner Monday night
added the British and British Em-
pire titles to his list when he beat
British title-holder Terry Allen
on points over 15 rounds, Gardner,
aged thirty, weighed 110 pounds
14 ounces. Allen 28, scaled ‘1114
pounds.—U.P,





Savannah Club
Tennis
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Men’s Singles

D. E. Worme beat G. L, Hunte
6—3; 6—3.

Mixed Doubles

Mrs. C. I. Skinner and A. M
Wilson beat Mr. & Mrs. R. Chal
Jenor 7—5, 6—2

Mrs, P. Mc. G. Patterson and
R. S. Bancroft lost to Miss Ena
Bowen and C. L, L. Bowen 6—3,
2—6, 1—6.

Men's Doubles

Dr, C. G. Manning and E. P.
Taylor beat J. W. Mc Kinstry
and J. C. King 6—2, 6—1.

D. I. Lawless and C. B, Sisnett
lost to C. B. Lawless ahd W.
Crichlow 1—6, 6—1l, 5—7.

P, Patterson and G,. H. Man

ning beat V. N. Roach

Gittens 6—2, 6-4,
TODAY'S FIXTURES

and T

Ladies’ Doubles
Miss M. King and Miss Worme
vs. Mrs. Gibbons and Mrs, Barne
Mixed Doubles
Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and P
Patterson vs. Mrs, Legge-.and W.
crichlow.
Mrs. J. A, Mahon and C. B.
Sisnett vs. Mr. ang Mrs. Field

Men’s Doubles
R. S. Nicholl, and F.
. BH. UA. Cuke,: Jn
Cuke.

D. Barnes
and D. E.



| They’ ‘il Do It E very |

| Wren DIMBULB WAS
12 A GALE GMA HE
| THOUGHT
|





WERE

4
4)



Thi
EE: aot Wh
(WHAT HAPP



"ENS ¥ HE






HAVING THEM Th
june a UPHOL ae ck

Charge Against
Boxing Clubs

NEW YORK, March 17.
The International Boxing Club
of New York and Illinois were
charged to-day with conspiring to
monopolize professional cham-
pionship boxing business in the
United States,

The Department of Justice com-
plain mas made in a civil action
in the Federal Gourt. Owners of
the Clubs, James D, Norris of
New York and Arthur M. Wirtz
of Chicago and the Madison
Square Boxing Corporation of
New York, also were named as
defendants.

Defendants are accused of con-
spiring to restrain and monopolize
championship boxing bouts,

CP.

Malvern Defeat
Erdiston 15—5

Yesterday the Malvern
team defeated Erdiston
to 5 at Erdiston,
were Miss G,

netball
15 goals
The goal scorers
Garner and Miss H,.

Springer who scored 8 and 7 goals public are cordially in

Malvern.
Erdiston,

respectively for
Stuart seored for

Mrs.

! Ci ime

Regisiered U. 5. Patent Office

By THE OLD MAN LIKES TO HEAR
HIMSELF RAVE“WE JUST HAP

ONE OF THESE PEP TALKS

LAST MONTH! I SUPPOSE

pale er US HERE ALL

\ PROOUCE ANY RESUL:

SLAB~ BLAB- BLAH



GONNA
GUYS GET OFF THE
AND GET HOTBLABBIT Y=

3—O

‘AIR TRAFFIC

ARRIVALS BY B.W.1LA.

ON SATURDAY
From Trinidad ;
J Hoppin, M. Edghill, M
A. Pearse, V_ Marshall, W
W. Simpson, M. Simpson, M

Previte,
Garrett,
Alex-

ander, A. Walker, E. Walker, C Chad-
erton, A Naaous, D Griffith, B Dun-
ega-Pinedo R Dunega-Pinedo, G
Goetz, M. Goetz, E. Maynard, C May-
nard, P. Maynard, K Maynard, A
Adamson, A_ Inniss, V. Millington.
From preante :

ow eit, W ease, wee. ¢ Be
Riany, e a og

From Venesuela :
Doreen Lowe.
From Martinique :
Lue Marius.

From St. Lucia:

Jagith Finch, Dorothy Austin, Nicho-
jas Taylor, Robert Hale, Karis Man-
ning.

From St. Kitts :
Wilfred Gumbs, Anna Gruny.
From Antigua :
George Gadogan
From Guadeloupe :
Emmanuel ‘Sieyes, Carmen Sieyes.
ON MONDAY
From Trinidad :
B. Sealy, J. Baptiste, E. Moll, S. Moll,
L. Applebaum, D_ Iloo, PB, De Caires,
D! De ees M_ De Ve |» G Mose,

Cc Ottley, « S@lomon, R :
Collins, +* ho, W. u.
Craighton, W ‘aighton

From San Juan;

Herbert Shilston, Albridge C. Smith,
Margaret R. Smith, Thornto Delehanty,
William Belknap, Edith Belknap, Keith
B.,Inniss, Louise Mottley, Rolins Skeete,
Samuel A, Skeete.

From Antigua;

Osear Bird, Gwendolyn Trotman,
Stanley Sharp, Anthony Lowe, Audley
Stanley, Patricia .

DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
ON SATURDAY

For oe .

Peter ‘olmer, Anna y, Magz-
guerite Gummerson, Lue! Lembke ibke,
Mollie Bakman, Campbell Yearwood,
Isuray Yearwood, Lesley Yi 3
Kenneth Highton, Ralph Hayes,
Corbin, Lawrence Mitchell, Coun
Turner, Frank Clarke, Eric Holder,

Hugh Dixon, David Spranklin, Aristotle
Onassis, Jeane Phinelande, Wilfred
Gumbs, Courtney Hitchings.

For Grenada :

Glad; Millman, Willuan Rushton,
Rose ushton, Dudley Ferguson, Grace
Leedman, Richard Agostini, Barbara

Agostini, Wiector Cecilioni, June Cecilioni,
For St. Lucia:
Gertrude Chapman, Arthur
Jones, Adrien Monpiaisir
ON SUNDAY

Howard-

Por Antigua:
Guy Neale.
For Trinidad :

Marjorie O'Neil, Vincent O'Neil, Wini-
fred Marshall, Terrence Hawkins, Lilian
Springer, Elvira Trotman, Curtis

Rolph Hive, Blanka Spencer, Betty
King, Dr. Jenifer kine haay.” Hoskin,
Frances Dent, Chinon Averboukh, John
Bayne, Jean Bayne, Elspeth McCormick

Sinetta Parahoo, Cyn-





this.
ahoo,
Por Puerta :

Andrew. s 2 Mi
Stephen le thier,
Clarke, Howel,

Karen Howell, Helen i
Noble, Mary Marquis, Roger Marquis,

George y, Vivia Godley, William
Blair, ‘Helen ‘Blain



Harbour Log



In Carlisle Bay

. Lady Silver, Sch. Lady Noeleen,
Seh. Excelsior Hodge, M.V. Caribbee,
Maris Stella, Sch.

Florence Emanuel, Sch. Mary M, Lewis,
Sch, United Pilgrim S., Sch. Lucille M
Smith, Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Seth
Anita H., Sch. Enterprise S., Sch, Bel-

queen, Sch. Mandalay I1., M,V. Jen-
kins Roberts.
ARRIVALS
Schooner Excelsior Hodge, 60 tons
net, Capt. Aunt, from Nevis.

RES
. Smith, 56 tons net,
Ollivierre, for British Guiana.

Schooner Cyril
Capt

M.V. T. B, Radar, 116 tons net, Capt
Mitchell, for St, Lucia,

Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tens net,



Capt. Selby, for Dominica,
In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.)
advise that they can now commu
with the following ships through t
Barbados Coast Station :—

R.M SS. Mauretania, S®. Giert z¢°



geen, . * men Integrity,
revinee, Se! r. SS. ee,
sair, SS William oe ‘st
antia, $S Crlapia, 3.8
S.S. Sundial, SS. heats s
Argentina, © 8. Esso Bayway, §S. In-
dian City, SS Golfito, SS. Ragnhild
Brovig, 54 orth Sua. SS. E ess
Of Scotland, o, SS
townshend, ©,S. Loide Motduras, S S
Sises, SS Gerona, SS S. Monica
SS. Ariow, SS. Samana, SS. Mac.
oris, S® Loida, SS. Atlantic, SS.
Esso Pittsburgh, S.S. re tain
SS Prospector, 5S Rio

Puerto Rico, SS. Salte 5

ores, & S_ Katrinemaersk, SS. Mette
Marsk, $8. Utilitas, SS. Esso Brazil,
SS. Ocean Mail, SS ag $.s.
Lil U, SS General : x
menton, £ S Seaglobe, ‘. Rose,
SS ingleton, $8.8. Norselady, ; Ss
Thorbjorg, SS _ Selector, SS. Eassc
Glasgow, SS. Esso Bristol, S®. Alcos
Pegasus, SS. Sugar Refiner, $8. Esso
Manchester, ss Corinthic, 3.8

Tiberius, SS Rude Etar, S S. Del Mar,
ss Del Viento, S S. Sommerstad, $.S
Siram, SS. Orwell SS. Northleigh,



BRANDON TROPHY
PRACTICE TODAY

The practices for the Br dou,
Trophy series continue this a’
noon at Bellerie at 4.30, The
will be an rdmission charge ¢
one shilling.





By jimmy Hialo

ee SS









eae L yesTERDAys MEETING DONT C4

SEEM TO



COPK ist, KING FEATURES SUNGAME, ine, WORAP MS Bak OS



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SOBER-MINDED ;

SOCIETY

@ From Page 5

come to this Conference,

And now, in conclusion I am:
going to offer you some personal
thoughts which some of you may
regard as er especially
as coming from the Comptroller
of Development and Welfare whc
{s, or is Supposed to be, an ortho-
dox civil servant. In the (first
place, this is primarily a Confer-
ence of weigare workers design-

U.C.W.E. Get
Director Of

' Education Dept.

3

@ From Page 1
aid. “One is concerned with the
aching of primary school teach-

Ts. Valuable and indispensable nial Treasurer he has seen the
ork has been done by the differ- book in the cage of the
ent institutions for training of accused. The hand writing in the in this beautiful

teachers and it may be that these
would welcome the possibility of
having a common Board of Studies
with the University College de-
artment of Education actively
gcollaborating and it may be possi-
le to work out some method by

ated by their Governments, withâ„¢ which there may be a common

some distinguished and very wel-
come guests. It will no doubt be

examining body and the establish-
ent of a system of qualifications

largely concerned with. tan per-ach will be accepted through-

ticipation of Governments in wel-t:
fare work, but I feel that we must
all recognise with gratitude the’

ing done in these territories,and the

cut the region,

“T am putting my own personal
views,” r. Sherlock said, and he
added: “I must be careful not to

appointed director.

voluntary social work which is the} raise any difficulties for the newly
a

time and effort devoted ‘to. such
work by all sorts of people, both;
in the Churches and in lay organ-'‘,
isations, with the idea of being
of service to their fellowmen and
women. We wish that there
were more of services, and

that they could receive wider
public support; but I should
fail in my duty if 7 did not pay
tribute on this occasion td the
Sconiinien which has . been
made | voluntary. individuals
and ies, often before Gov-
ernment welfare services were
introduced; and if I did not, let
me express the hope that this
Conference will provide help-
ful guidance and encourage-
ment to the volunteers. as well

#-8s, ug You will
this particular
question me detail, I hope, at

your ninth session.

My otner thought is this. Many
of you, I know, recognise that
religious faith—I am not speak-
ing of any particular religion—
must be the ultimate inspiration
of enduring welfare work. Since
‘I took up the post of Comptroller,
I have been puzzled to notice how
rarely social welfare workers as a
group permit themselves to make
any outward acknowledgement of
the spiritual content of their work.
Improvement in material con-
ditions is indeed desperately
needed by thousands in the West
Indies, But it would be urifor-
tunate, as I am sure you will
all agree, if the social welfare
services came to be regarded
simply as an instrument of mater-
fal betterment. Our aim is to
make for better and more pros-

us citizens; surely it is equally

make for better and more

souls? At any rate, this

is in my mind as I ex-

press my pleasure in declaring

this Comference 7pen, and wish

you every possible measure of
success.

VICAR ARRIVES - from 1.

Asked of his experience aboard

the schooner, Rev. Denington said


it, but we had a rough trip.” He

said that he will take up his ap-

pointment as soon as he settles
into the Vicarage.







WHAT'S ON TODAY

Social Welfare Conference,

Hastings House at 8.30 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil at 2.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Dist.

“EB” Police Station at 7.45

pm.

Mr, A. Pearse lectures on
“Polk Lore and Folk Songs
ef Trinidad” at the British
Council at 8.15 p.m.

WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil.

Total Rainfall for month to
date: .

Highest Temperature: 86.5 ’“F

Lowest Temperature: 68.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per

hour.
Barometer (9 am.) 29.968
(3 p.m.) 29,896

-DAY
> 6.16 am.
‘oon: Last Quarter, March 18
Sunset: 6.12
High Tide: 7.54 a.m., 9.57 p.m.
Lew Tide: 12.59 a.m., 3.20 p.m.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m. 5

ee enema



Cocoa

ng and torment from

e iscovery of i (tormerty
work in ea C nara) Peete starts to
ie pera a

ut also takes out the swel
bleeding and combats nerve

thereby curbing other trou-

jeu Caused by Plies such as Headache,
oh cd caarey

debility, and irritable

me Get tex from your

Hytex must stop your pile

and troubles or money back on

Backache, Constipation,
Sisporitton
SE Cie y under the positive
urn of empty package.

MUMMY ...

IT know the

I lave the
DIFFER

foo



to do is to emphasise the fact that
when the new department
education has been estawlished, it
‘will exercise a very
and powerful influence, and will
speed up the regional approach to
education. By ‘regional approach’
I do not mean uniformity, but I
mean the acceptance of common
objectives, of the establishment of
common. standards of training
end of qualification, the placing of
emphasis on the study and under-

standing of the communities of the th, Treasury Vault up to Au-
British Caribbean, both of the gust, 1951, Pe
physical and social environment. The wax is melted on a hot
Here again, then, is another pjate and it takes about ten min-
example of the way in which, ytes to melt the wax 8 e
gradually, the effect of the estate j

of the University College of tha
West Indies is affecting the whole
region and the effects are coming
with extraordinary speed when

CIVIL SERVANT

@ From Page 5
in October 25, 1944, In this book
is kept the record of the Paying
Teller’s cash,

He as not acquainted
the kind of book. The book is
kept by the Teller for his own
use. During the time he was Colo-

















with

book is that of Smith’s. The right
hand side of the book shows the
amount of money the Cashier has
in hand for the next day.

At this stage Clarence Patterson
said in 1945 he was clerk in
the Royal Bank of Eanada. A
cheque was handed to him sik
it was passed through his hands
as Cashier of the Bank on April
5, 1945.

Joseph Hope told the court that
he is a clerk in the Currency Dept.
@n July 7, 1951, he assisted in
sealing bundles of notes in the
presence of the Accountant Gen-

ury. Sometimes packages are
sealed in the Treasury near the
Vault. Clerks go over for the pur-
pose of cancelling notes.
Cancelled notes are kept in the
Currency Vault which is distinct
from the Treasury and before
destruction they were sorted near

At this stage further hearing
was adjourned until 10 a.m, today.

you consider that teaching began
only four years ago.”







Unbelievable
VALUE

assortment of . . .

READY-MADE
SUITS

TROPICALS and

What I want eral.
He heated the wax and used
of seals similar to those produced TWEEDS
in the Court. Prices from 92
important Cross-examihed Mr, Hope said om
that the seals belong to the Treas- to $76.90

If these suits were locally

made they would cost
nearly double the price.



TUESDAY, MARCH 18,



10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET





He

DIFFERENCE

I can taste the
DIFFERENCE

ENCE

GUARD AGAINST
COUGHS ana COLDS!











A





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proves to the world



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medium power cars

Down the years of Morris’s long
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which have set the pace for high
performance in automobiles of
modest horse-power.

To-day, the Morris Oxford with

its modern

finish and engineering excellence
is a car with proved appeal.
specification reads like the cata-
logue of features describing many
of the world’s costly big cars—



FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.

Phone 2385



ner

x W% in. : ; ep
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Y STE SUL RT

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is

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because you are low in A&D Vitamins,
build up your stamina now with good-
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more than just a tonie~

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It’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT y
Scott's Emulsion fs a gold mine of PLENTY OF ICE o

—— satural A&D Vitamins, Valuable for all $
the family—in rainy season or dry season, y

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HENNESSYS



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Sole Distributors Phone 4504





| We offer the foliowing

TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

UlaTEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. long
@ 19}c. per sq, ft.

for covering joints—@ 5c. per ft.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
The Board of 1,000 Uses,
thick, 4ft., 8ft., 10ft. long—@ 18e. per sq. ft.

‘LEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS :
% in. thick, 4ft., x 6ft., 8ft., 10ft. long—@ 3e, per sq. ft.

SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS
\% in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft.—@ 40c. per sq. ft. f
3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft—@ 29, & 32c. per sq. ft.

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| 3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft.—@ 28e. per sa. ft.
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All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack
of Wood Ants and other Termites.
Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID.











Full Text

PAGE 1

PACK TOO HARBVIios lOV> %  — %  • in M R. J D. M. BELL. research relations hi Glasgow -v. amvd in Barbados • evening by B.WJ.,\. Hum Trinidad. M • K -vnd was urunoio& bjM Ml BOB* "ii Ti-ue Union subjects nan Trat.-IILCILS intending 1 b I %  CtWOi litre on Trade Unionuni. ix-an ol die Count la Mr. r*. C la, Lauour Adviae. to the LUST lor Development anti ...trie) street Specialist D t: JLNNEk HOSKIN boa Harley Strati. — %  O". H ly U.W.I.A. on Suru-y .veiling for British Guiai. < v..i li.m.ud after upending thrv. IU weeks' holiday stavtr. al the Ocean View, fotet. Ur Hoakin aaid Ufat it was ft BrM visit heiv andlhe intend.. spending half of InsTimc in Trmload, but liked Barbadoa to muab that ha catnuiiied here tor hiniire holiday. Dr. and Mm. Hoakin have gooe lu Georgetown where they wilt s S. Bonaire for Englanc Off To The U.S.A. | EAVING b> B.W.I on SunAfter 35 Ya*ra P AYING hit tint visit to the Island since he left it in -I WISH."aaid Teddy, the Stuffed Baar. "that I had a mother and father like eeerybodj alee." day morning for Puerto Rico >AYlNG his first visit to the And ha sighed. Because he felt io the USA. was Mrs island since he left it in Mite -in hippy. Then ne looked all Muriel Rollins who resigned her 11H7 is Mr Athelaton Skeete for* around the playroom, at th* thei poet al the Barbados Adveente mr1y of Jsckman's. St Michael' tovs. Noae of them said anything l*st month. She has now gone to He returned on Sunday from ih# rf-.ey ail pretended to be bu-y and join her mother and sister. U.S.A vi u Puerto Rico by B W I.A • %  though they hadn't e*n heart he r / V i '"',"., 2 ,h nd u "P*"dlng three weekhoU1 SSSnJS 9 'JSt "ftlKJS! -W fVing a, the Coamo M „.n Curst House. r.i.!.. oifiet things • hiliirivi'i ( %  She hopes to continue u naUatic field At the airport to wish her good ck an* bon voyage were u %MH Uck arm bon vayao wore I jyl i .umber of her relatives and Brothers For Trinidad Holiday %  M IXIK \ nvsiii Two Nurses A T present holidaying in Bar* bedel iM • !*>m Hj x fc daughter ol the lute Mi-ndUii\M %  %  "'jiiVX with," i'n inn KEITH B. INNISS, a Barbadian resident in New York or many years, returned here on "•./• •. J o ._ a .unday via Puerto Rico and AnVisited Beauty Spot* tigua for three weeks' holiday He A FTER upending two weekb haa come over to visit his mother hold my in Barbadoa. Mr* "ho is ill W. Marshall accompanied by nor ... ,, .,_ ... taw and daughter, retumr.l Mr Inniss i* a brother of Mr !. Trinidad on Sunday evening l.s >'* nnl ^ "admaster of St. IIWU. They were staving U Barnabas Boys bchool. In the -aid Marlstow," Maxwell Coait USA he Is employed with the Mrs Marshall In the mother of 5^" * Transportation In Nee Marshal) of Messrs Yor Cll Education Officer %  hat Teddy had just said. -Do roo think." Teddy said io the Tie Soldier, "that 1 hate a mother and father?" The Tin Soldier coughed once or twice. "H*m ... of course, of coorae you ha' aad isaisnssi vkia dlsordera. CBH*MT*l Blood M.i;ur. helps Io purify the Mm..I > iJII~- the vi. ru aid Bi if % %  •. tc-u.J hfalth. all the %  %  *• sas'SXii id Barnes and Company, who took '. '., % %  I) to iiuvarious beauty spots of the island during the if short stay here T'd.d r of her cottaew in the clock 'Of course you hee!" Shadows Agreed Then Knarl and llanid the Shal into the Celebrated Birthday M R C OTTLEY. Chief Education Extension Officer Trinliad who arrived on Sunday morning by B.W I A. for the ConferRS. GERALOINK RO&INSON once nf Social Welfare Ofncersfif f Toronto. Canada cvleIn British Caribbean area, met A MO the p.^senaxrs'ieaVtng * im Sunday evening l> \ 11 \\ I A. for Trinidad to spend a holiday was Miss Ben. K | liBughler of Mr, and 111 King of 'Kimbcrley.'* tn Ave. Belleville and an employee of tho Baibados Electric Supplv Corporation. She will spend three weeks in Port-of-Spain. Attorney-At-Law M R. AM) MRS. ALBRIDGE C. sUTH of New Jersey, arN Ofl Sunday by BW.l.A. rtfl Ki.-o and AnUgua for about two wwkv holiday and are .-laying at the Paradise Beach Club. They were in Barbados ufteen years ago on their honeyDora who has been living b] Canada since 194 has bean ing nursing there She qualified almost a yet* ago and was las in 1 IS .1 -ing her Jonnaot 10 graduated witli hei M pfri Hospital. Toronto. Agricultural Officer KKNI ted her fifty-seventh birthd.iv Saturday A party was htld I the home of Mr L B. Marshall I'lospeet. St James, in her ,t>nour Mrs. Roblnaon, who ts in the .land for health reasons, arrival |in IJecember and was staying at S€.twell Mr Rawle Jordan. Chief Inspector of Schools here. Mr oitley wi oncheon Inter in ind Mr^ Jordan. B the giesi at the day of Mr Editor Returns Home Punch and the Tin Sold Mary-Jane explained to them that Teddy, the Stuffed Bee,r was wondering tf he had a mother and fnt her like eeervone else, they also agre-d tha.1 nf course he had. "Then where ar theyT" aa.d I eddy "If I've ot a mother ami father, where can 1 And them' "d Ike t" se. them. IMIike to e them". "*_ nrht awa>." At this everyone fell ailent r i nail; Mr Punch said. "The> lft you here when you were very side her k. and opened it to t^e lory al UcJdlkseka and there And suddenly Mr Cuckoo, wtio falhei ind "grand and smiling were l'i .dear anil Mama Bear! "Andfv.-ni ptetueof you, Ted 1 when you were a baby bear!" cr II an id Teildy. the Stuffed Bear. SnU nappy he almost had tears Hi ..* lie kept looking i tba i>" el his mother and father. And II *ere here th< whole lime.' tie h .raying %  Mih. it'a wonder I ul tu ihle to ^what thev look like sfenderfol to have a mother ; nun: IK A in. it i\in,\i> Here you havr* In one bottle a complete First Aid Kit. 1. A Maasage for Sprains. Sir.iins, etc. 2. Quick Relief for Sore Throats, Colds, etc. 3. A DressinK for Cut* and llruies. that's .... MAGI III Al l\(, OIL -Sro.tS a BYMOi ved he,,, on Sunday l,> lh shilstone Tesling Uberatories. B W I A mm Antigua to attend Conference of Social Welfai. Tt'EIDAV. ISTII MARCH. 1SU 11 11 %  m ApiH>lntment WIUl Muiic. 1 SB %  m Cyril mllh and Pbyllu S*l,- i Pis no* i. II OS noon The New-. Yd k Office Of i| io p m Km Anslji" it pea, — is iea* sa r~ of the British Carlbbi is si. vmc .M the Marine I. For Two Months Six Months A MONG the passengers en route to England by the S.S Gwlnte which left here on Friday Flue. 1n Miss Laurie Patterson Of MasJ *> o tings. She is on her way to *pend $*,* run friends n, nu ,a Theatre Expert tar Jamaica LONDON. He will >1K adv and leclu Mr Charlw Thorn.,, tectum m %  ''"*"'" Kj production school. In -tintJion. F and adjudicator on *i ^ D ,r rn : ,c £ir.' n o! o Lot 0 on:"a ?ss. avssi.s,sss M tumc.TTn.TVc' ^ondir, Bay, ** ~*2£?'_rX2, l Island^ is expected to join her ibout two weeks time month in Ix>ndm. To Study Nurting In U.K. M *" '" M ISS PATRICIA MAYNARD. S nurse of Antigua arrived •> a % here on Bundaj trj B W I A on Kfi iW a nhort visit prior to Bolnn to the p m Ceaspeaer • ~ I Comi laaSJfk, • B p m SentDHnl al the adjudicating BI U1C i-; 7~'j"",~ .Z^L'~IAA\, 00 e?-T^ ^'MIV'TKIS! Schools Druma FesUval ln KingLondon In th ;' iCrSonei RrtnHt e pm *ton. Jamaica, from March 10 to Muuine su pm Spot., i f, announces the British Council. -. %  1 jhegtawawi Patade •"• S PENDING about two months' holiday here with her relaMv Ij>ri Hill is Mrs. %¡ wen Tntman who came in from AnUgua on Sunday by B.W.I A Her husband who Is Assistarrt United Kingdom via "New York "*~i raeral l.iiKlnrer Of the I*eward |„ further her studies In nursing ""^ She is staying l the Cosmopolitan Mt.ir,10 IS p m frrotn The editorials. IS IS p m llt'drM Hodse Tslhlni. IS SO p m Tip Ti>p Turin THE Girls' fndustrial Union |g the OUtaUndlllg instiluiion in thla island conduclttl by women for women. It was bemifi in 1912 and incorporated by an act of the legia latiirc in 1922. Its membership is DOW oVeV Bvt hundnd I he Union rooms are situated al Constitution Road. The Union was formed throui-h the iiusirumt'iitahtv 0| Misg Adah Lvelyn who while in the Unitetl States, gg tl o n.ttl for instructing girls in domestic science and to fftv* ihrm elementar>training in technical subjects. Sum"'w Evelyn, many ladies have given of their time and m 1 and to-day the Union stands as a monument tu that loresight. Among those who have helped eluded in the syllabus. All of %  <> make the Union tho flourishing these ctaSMg ,ue CrOVerutaSBJ 11-litutl.e, It is today are the Uto rJagege For the typing class*. 1 A *-.'liind Mr Ol,, %  ,,. |.„ ..„/, ,;,.„,, ,,,,,,., |„. SS2 n Sft f',,,""' %  5 ,ruc,or * recently intn-lueed. Ballou, Mrs D W. Bentley und Tin, i-cehlnc has unprored tho isni u t,ni,,t SecreUry Miss girls' concentration and also WUUBSM, arodueed more ryttuisa tops, rbl „bieel of the Unicn. is to Thenan special classes for Uprovlde such means of instruction ginnert n %  %  % %  in-pm. The girU work in .Sect lone The Classes In, %  Ian claassM fiftjl MRS. OLOA BYMM0ND8 or Groups and each section has its own teacher. On Monday afternoons the classes are instructed in cross stitch, quilting, tufied wool work, knitted socks, drawn thread, wax (lowers, woollen embroidery and typewriting. Tuesday afternoons are devoted to smocking, babies' coats embroidery and applique, plaited >IIIH-S. tiindle wick work, turkish lace, designing of posters, physical culture, decorated cake icing and shorthand. • On Wednesdays there is msdeira work, wreaths and bouquets, umbrella. covering, knitting, babies' booties, slipper making, upholster, cooking (pastry, sal* ads and deaacrts. bottling preOn Thursdays there is cake clng. dress making, and oil painting. On Fridays there Is Irish crochet, tatting, weaving alpargatas, Bulgarian embroidery and nursery motives, crepe paper and table decorations. Extra Classes Miss Harper is now instructing the members of the Hay Street Girls' Club in cooking. Th classes are for six weeks' duration. The girls are given special instructions in tabU* service and buttering. The subjects under the head of Household Furnishing*. handicrafts and cookery are arranged by the Registrar. In 1941 C. D. o. W. granted ;400 to cover a period of five years for Instruction and equipment for commercial subjects, hygiene, designing and embroidery. These classes are organised by the General Secretary, Miss G. Williams and submitted to the Director of Education for his nmhU The Union is financed by a membership subscription of 1 monthly, a Grnnt-ln-Aid from tv'V Barbados Government, the proceeds from the Annual Fete and other social engagements. JAX ETTA.DRESS (Next to Singer,) I OU THAVELLUVG NYLON UNDIES—Slips. Hall-Slips. Panlin STOCKINGS—15. 51 and (0 PURE WOOL TWIN SETS— Sweater and* Cardigan Sets Iron, J22.98 Io K7.S8 lor BOTH pieces MEW IKKM US WHITE SIIAKKSKIN B'.ACK & WHITE MATERIAL BORDERED TAFFETA WHITE (IU:IM: BACK SATIN WHITE STAMPED CREPE M" FLOWERED SPUN ALSO A MCE SELECTION OF LADIES STOCKINGS $2.20 $1.11 $1.44 $3.00 & $3.02 $2M $1.5* T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS %  os yw %  •* t Paradol tablet?' tt"K Ciai. doeu'i „,„, ,„!„„ H..M .,nd have ,o oiakr mh^^ "• "Vl**t,.„.-i,; p Jnrfo , h Mbfar. ,„, p,„ „ _.„,,, t**J iiimt iunrrin| rjuwd br P-riodic W i„, hradache, loo•ilhoai Ji^rcblc alirr^bn^ A,k roar drug„l l„ l;,„ u acirnuflcilv Compounded Iron 4 jaimlKaia The name "Dr. < %  „," a rour JMurancf. Dial 4606 rOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 __ OS. CHASI'S PARADOL CINEMAS lllillM.t TOWN—DUI 1310 TO-DAY A TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8 30 P.M. L (iOIJIWYN PirmtiU 'I-WANT YOU" I'. \> n M.l I -. (IIOUNTOWN) —Dial 5110 LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 a 8.30 P.M. FABULOUS "FABIOLA" ooo D wa or LOVI IN A CITY or sw SUrrlns Mlchflr MtHtCAN 11-nH VtDAI. a Thi-iunia In Tha Caif OPENING FRIDAY 21ST M. C. St GLOBE AV. 500 i JO P.M. L*ST SHOWS •-THE DEEHT FOX** James MASON — Jessies TANDY — Sir Cedrtc HARDWYCKE OPEN'INf. TOMORROW. 5.00 it 8.30 P.M. ', WATCH ,\E\T SU.\D.WS ADVOCATE BIG EVENTS BI THE noon Al. THEATRES THE TRUE TO LIFE, "EHIND THE SCENES rORY OF A ^*E XORD!~ ..-, WALTER P1DGE0N ANN HARDING B ARRY SULLIVAN HUH HUUUI • U*IS SIONi • IDUAB0 (/ • PICHW0 laMISOH • 0AW AOOUIS a..!... M 10HA10KIIIM aa CEOBSt FMtSCHII • OMM n RICHMO IM0rt Pi^ucMt. PCDIB1 IHfl^VM AMM. THE //I1/1W, 11 III OF I.IIf IIIII! S E.XTEHTAi.XMEJVr! PLAZA llll HIKES OI8T1N—oui MM t— t naaa i.... .u a aa> %  ALL MY SONS %  Swsrd O ROBINSON— Hurt LANCASTER GIPSY WILD CAT 1 TPC l\n K jlar' I MON-TXZ Si J.., n.,i | The Garden—St. JSBBCS ropr toairi sss ral. STAGE FRIGHT t*m WYMAN Richard TODU & GUNS CF THE PECOS I>l--W rORAN W.S lOalrl SSS .m optaATiox r\i IMI %  John WAYNE P. in,,, NEAL Ward DOND tOai-ii %  as rst. ARKANSAS SWLNO" a IWMANIA TOWN' wmamaaemmmm .CAW!-*** ^^rlaWn OPLN1XG THI'sUt. 20th 4.45 A H.30 p.m. Also Friday 2.30. 4 45 A 8.30 p.m. I Coiitiniiinr Ilallj 4.45 as S.S* I'M Mul i'.. -.!" % %  i it Sat, J2nd ROSE OF SANTA ROSA KUfrtiu Thf HoMlrr Ho4 ShoU II.-/#i.-. Km. GU sad Gab*?. A RIDING THE OUTLAW TRAIL Charles STARRETT at Smiley BURNETT HiNMillll*, (Dial 5170) Walter WANGER presents TAP ROOTS Color by TECHNICOLOR! Starring Van -Susan louts IIWVWKl) With Boris KARLOFT roUa LONDON — Ward BOND — Richard LONG Introducing WHITPIELD CONNOR (From the Thrilling pages of JAMES STREETS MOST EXCITING NOVEL') A I ii.wT-.illnU-ri..Uio,L.L RHsass! OPENING FRIDAY 21 ST 4 45 A 8.30 p.m. it Contlnolng Dally Also The Short TEX BENEES GLENN Mil i it: ORCHESTRA Sit 22nd. Special 1.80 p.m. THE ARKANSAS SWING Hoosler Hot Shots Ac BONANZA TOWN Charles STARRCTT & Smllry Bl-RNrTT



PAGE 1

l-\.i mi | SUNDAY ADVOCATE I I I SDAV. MARCH IS. I5! ft\KBAl)()S^|iAU\0(TF ,.., J f -1 TMfeft March IS, 152 '•' LEADERS KOK hutulr.-Us .>1 yeail Harrison College. Ld 'ibermere have been producn. I society. not only in the Brl^ib Caribbean but further .itield bl the United Kingdom, the British D nd O-loines and even m tinUnited SUtw other schools in Trinidad. British Guiana and Jamaica can i Othn British Caribbean KhMl COUld -hum tfat disiinction which has always been Lodge's of atti.uung pupils (rum all over the British Caribbean the Latin American republics and "I Kingdom. To-day Lodge IN tindiiiK it increasingly difficult in maintain this reputation of being a region*}! %  cbaol and disappointment has already been experienced by parents in other West Indian islands when they have been notified that there is no vacancy at Lodge (or their sons Lodge's difficulties are by no means unique in this respect. It has been the custom In the United Kingdom for years to put down a child's name for famous English public, schools as soon as the child is born. And even at quite humble schools la the United Kingdom to-day booking of school places has to be made at least one year ahead. Everywhere 1 prfeseifl* on the schools is being experienced and Lodge may consider itself fortunate that it has so far not been compelled to restrict admission more noticeably. Yet Mr. Farmer's account of the growth in the number <>f pupils from one hundred in 1911 to 350 in 1952 shows how near is the danger which threatens. It is no good paying lip service to the traditions and achievements of a school while taking no action to see that those same traditions and achievements are not endangered. If Lodge is to continue as a regional school catering for the education of boys from all over the Caribbean and beyond, it cannot continue to expand into another Harrison College or Combermere where numbers have made it impossible any longer lo train responsible Caribbean leaders ol the highest calibre, although these schools continue to prcduce good scholars and worthy citizens. The very word leader implies exclusiveneat. A society composed of all leaders needs no leading. These are truisms but are too often overlooked by those who tight] ity at all times in any society of responsible leadership. If Lodge is to maintain its "cosmopolitan" reputation, a reputation which is even of greater value than the more restricted value of beini! a West Indian centre for training boys, it cannot continue to expand: it must set definite limits to its capacity and concentrate on improving the quality of the education offered; it may even be forced to contract. How limits are to be set without straining local loyalties and ignoring local needs requires much study and great tolerance. This island has such a high appreciation of its secondary schools that the suggestion thai admittance to any one school should be restricted on the plea of regionalism or of ability to pay higher fees will provoke immediate public outcry and will be described as discriminatory. Yet if responsible leadership is admitted to be worthwhile and to be in need of nurture and if Lodge is selected as a school for responsible leaders the fact must be faced that Lodge will automatically become exclusive. To a generation which has grown up to believe In expression* like the "equality of man." and to parents who will not readily admit that their children are one whit less intelligent or less capable of becoming responsible leaders than someone's tsst, this idea of exclusiveness will appear shocking or maybe reactionary. But no one can, or ever will be able to, produce responsible leaders en masse. Whether the contribution of responsible leaders (which Lodge, Harrison College and Combermere has been making among many generations) will be adequate to counterbalance the evil Bta of irresponsible leaders is a question which also requires an answer. But no effort to produce tesponsible leaders should ever be despised. IV Smiles For The Cileiierals LISBON was atrugghbasnets the Kens-rals and UM pol It was %  victory for the p-ditir|HM Hut the generals were declared th* 1 wil H B* CHARLES FOLEY Iff divi..ns in comL.il i.ru. there U the consoUon Kindltion it was understood lion that thj promts* has not l.i* "iun. > %  vithdrswi. Mim of Europe's capabilities this illusion carried The formula did not represent (pre out" Simply liv d'-c-idin* at halfwnv ihe svhlefs el staff thought Me. n. test ime on what wore should be ana< ihe essential miMnHia tr .., A £ H> ]SOIt can take back to nottocad, Why was Urn done? defend Europe W.shjni rton a l fcast a mock-up TO PUT moral fibre into the But it was enoush to Una up ol a European deience. He has Continental nations of the West; th* European nations and unite Jr.e his DNL Me has submit!'--! .urtlelentlv to issue B glow'.• nations to a means test _nique. lir.tain la showing that she is Winning spirit H "** •* France. a*oanr. isked at Lisbon *f n ;? %  Juddering under the Iks" did not appear. Eisen"SBS. has been asked U> do still [ I am told, was NATO's mor _, t -in-the-holc Germany, although her problems at on* tune dominated and might have wrecked the confer TO PNIf.HTEN thr Kremlin TO IMPRESS a Congresa which otherwise would baulk at bigger haSM fnr helping Europe in America's election year. Whether any of the three ibject* will be achieved u a ,uestlon on whith Lisbon gl tittle clue — but at least the con* jj_j In cest of dead*'"*'• w,n noX %  * • nwn 'erencr made possible the pro^.Lgun to coniribute this year tight (if mystic) ||p wou | d nC|| „,,„. w i d th* For our pan we must remeinmlqUM ..lin'-uncing sueQU .. IS lh „ it xhry Oei lhal the poUticlar. BSSSfS did not compose Iheir differences -cn.n.ded the generals at List* n. As Mr Eden put it — in the -,, /*/ „„,. up nU Ihe Normandy invasion was earotood by at SHAPE %  ad* t make a dramatic .HI : gi h"ine ksd <>ff with fraction ol the the usual language of NATO — these successes were far beyond his tMcMy hl pretC nce was not ""^Jew estimates ol what • (unstated) hopesThat is. the neea>(l Rvilrt al me .access ol needed. ..,„ of a breakdown -a, h L^on mfc, between tb* R^ember. too. that JJ' Big Thret Fore.gn Ministers on wenpons may add %  n" lcu ij u The target* ,vs part in th* European |**** * ou T ^'""^J'L 1 ?",BBOMD the wails of the clots the ASwith *• r^J***"*} 1 *?? 1 ,* £ • committee room, and mtut asp aesi look to our 'Cosmic secret' called lor volunteers, subjected them to tes... rairied out under strict medical supervise and then dismissed them with thanks and ;i I pat on the back. The Nazis chose concentration camp nlUrriman, nraoiey. ano • i-~ men who know what the genumc i were carried out to their planned conciusK n r the death, often, of the patient. The Japanese hud not even a scientist pi pose in mind. The hardships, mental und physical torild eonala itelrncr el-up. "<1 „ n d thry would luvr lo Include ur , ald hU uririi l 50 div>^> territorial, and other hnlt-tralned !" F. I.i.b,i ma„ mmm. t ms „ rimr g mn e a .pip;. Unltormcd Hill. %  TnJhPTinT *gJsJfS^t? g* 0 !?"**" *^?:.^.' M ft. ffJ **Z S!SJL\a>>Ud doctor,, notebooks .n hand, coldfuUm thai Ihe mlUurr men fj yr mor ,' mated what w M needed WHE RE would the remaimng '"<"" ''.^^'Sd I when rtpaMlbflttji . nn.llv ap|lv d i v „ lonl „„. rom7 N o " not too perturbed portioned mor e can be sent from America The true nnurra, the detail.d I Mr. Kairtnan, represenlinit the wlInout Congressional approval. plana of whether and I.JW ... I poUtlcal side. argued that T||e ollly wdY to avoid a light "hen the leal, as apart from Uw Europe's liudgels could not supm c on-Tes>—almost eertatnlv a paper, divisions will be raised port, nor could European loBmJ( on ^_i J to keep these live .ire known, only lo a handful tllre. starvation and disease to which thin industry survive, such gigantic ,| 1V11 „. 11S hack on the other side theexperts .prisoners were exposed, nevertheless com-' military burdens „t the Atlantic until after the Every page is marked with the K """ !" s l~ !" H^further added that America presidential election. ptttmtous warning, "Cosm c prised one ol the most cruel and exact Dig could not produce the munitions In an emergency they would lecrel %  .trials ever carried out on a mass of hunun i .nd materiaLs neeaed for It in have to come over piecemeal. \cslerday. with all the oili. r Ume without going on lo an At all events, everyone went decision, agreed a n d initial..-i I beings, almost wartime ba.V %  %  • "aPPy Th. fair round th.,. pat*, were loaded The dispute was settled by a llgures are a comfort for the army trucks In LUbon Worrmila Military-man Bradley (-..nlinenuls tommy-guns, and whllked ..aareed to the -realistic" basis 11 ihere Is no actual menUon lor further study. ed by politician Harriman In the Onal communique ol %  % %  I.IV/III .\o\..i.Ay.i:n C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phone 4472 und ei prspsta Mr. Peacock (•• ***• **) Wakes Up The Theatre its Ms—lay iLnirr. Mi* b 'he I.,,, ruftni'ier* iconl (hear dam W And behind o Couldn't i>f ideas which. I HAVE .. bone lo pick London Maak Theatre which, on hedroomi and comics. v,\-.iif~i..i,,11-ti.U'i NiaKT. i,-i. put m 'i issti BBEY jl Hie We-tminasrersff I'll muare ter Thenlie Pvamck." II this Is the vrai if not alwii, amusing, doea oito: mutenance. tr (u* t. the play Is writt* physic ,il Particularly I wish to espres" -Tin afraid that will be difflthe original book, for men extreme unnovance with dramacult. You we he died M yearwomen who are not put off i tml Antli"! ^ Sharp and i-n-diicer ago" words of more than one syllab (John Fenuiid And lo flnisl. th.Y*'*h*vf Bpotled tm Any aimllartty to a porllcular In fact, this impact of Peac 'whole plan lor in %  i.anager in the above is purely upon the London theatre con 1 nlng Standard theatre article. 1 coincidental and intended. And like a wind dispelling fog had intended lo declare that the now we shall get on with the wai n romantic who sutiri leundun theatre Is in such a decritic's Job of dealing with the romance, a thinker at war w .line that one goes U> it as a penplav itself and how it was precontemporary thought, a saUi .1 has ,,cn ted to u*. In an age of aenUmenlality done lo dt*erve such punishment. in the first place what I relief did not posse** greatness, bei.ig I was going lo slate with candour u t a to see an author dealing with :oo much of an Iconoclast, but and honeaty that for some time the feminine and not merely the had vigour, humour and intel iI have sat" and listened to dlafemale. Flirtation is so muoh gi-nce. IOBUC on Ihe blage That no man m ore amusing lhan seduction Df^BBalblllt^ could endure %  Here we have no SOTS and oStnSS. Am SMI U fOU gfl Ml) BE |1U , n^manlic youth sincerely in the Westminster In droves I sh,il Wanning lo mv task 1 was dclove wilh two young women at be forced U> the conclusion ti it lermined to ay Ihiit 1 have seen once with appropriate music to it is not Iho theatre which is %  actura and actresses merely t-lng indicate* which ll in the ascend—but you. 'themselves alid making no ant. Mr. K Muichlnson who wro altemp whatever to be anything NAVY AT SEA (now at ti else with particular reference lo The producer does not present Comedy), fought a gallant n| one actor who would-play Faust It a* realism, bul rathe, like ^ against Mr Herbert Mormon .....i Mtohisto with exactly Ihe ballet with words. There u Ihe the last election. 1 wonder u. snnie'lnienuvtalion Afor thaged butler, delightfully played hedldnotwnteaplayaboulth.it mtluir* I was about to suggest a by Gerald Cross, whoso legs give instead of this harmless trifle wi h 'mass purge in th* Russian sU 1' "ul at tcie BsSM; there Is a punch u.e s-ime old recipe of susceptil If And then ' Mask Theatre bowl in the tthape of a skull: sailors and innocently designi>.4 : has to go and fpoil 'he whole ihere Is a ghoatly sleep-walker; woman. • n _i md Ihtfll i.i MCIS. tOVra. whenof ,-ourse. no one can ein: >l If onlv Ihe direiiors of thU the young man hides one of his Hugh WakeOekt as an amoroj* •ntsnrue had consulted any loves while he trlea to make up captain who maintains his mono(iimtietent n-nmerclal manager his mind. cled dignity no matter how t <. the. would have been told that In addition we have Geoffrey plot rages against him. And it Nmhtirare Ahl--. coUsd net have Dunn in good form as the Honwas good of him to Include Ms H wi chance o( auceass. In ourable Mr. Ustltss. who is so young daughter Margaret in the 1 fact I can Imagine the dialogue nohaustcd that he relies on hi.cast. She will train on. thai would have taken place bemanservant lo remind him where There were three uproar lo iiween Mr rVrnnUt and the ald he was last night, and there are moments in the play but imf rrjugaji romanticists and pessimists detunately they all came at 'ie "ll'lia.'* "ic ffoey of uour nouncmg the French Revolution same Ume. It was when, aft-r olau** nd *"e worthlessness of evervgoing to sea for hush-hu -h H-: the dramatisation of thing. manoeuvres the ladles rang the i Thomas Peacock's novel, NightUui holding ll all together is a alarm bell for cocktails TV.is 1 itv.re Abbev " ual attractive young actor. Alan i agroe. Is almost as funnv ,ix Cort of" The Cal and ihr MucNatighton. who is consistently anything that can happen In an Canary*" delightful as Scyshrop Clown' election. "Not quite It's a satire on the who could have l>een so contend With so little to commend 1 early lth .enturv worship of with MM gnl if only the t^her gladly pay tribute to a young modern civilisation and Ihe were away. Mr. MacNaughlar. actor named David Sloll >.o march of intellect 4 speaks his lines beautifully and had ihe Insignifloant part of | •IT'S WHAT 1 '" with intelligence With or withvery Guardee Second-lieuten-mt ••I told, you." %  % % %  '" %  %  •''• %  r if...-.t.i..-,.iv an RFI who net r %  •If K Ken.? 1 great promise. stepped "ui of his part for a "Well It is amusinglv romanFinally we have Valene Hanmoment. I suspect that Mr. Stoll Heson as ihe lively Munoni-tla and has the makings of a good "I,ieit here Mr. Ferdinand." Anne Tregc. as the determined mmedlan. "Fernald" Stella. No wonder Scylhrop uoni.i, rupviunHT nFsr*vrn %  LisfcTi hen-. Mr. Ferner, u-hat could nul make up his mind. —UK.S Our Reader** Say; • umvns I 'tirmtliiiu Club SuvK Thank* To The Editor, The Adeocaie,— SIR.—The Women's Canadian Club would like to express tbsir i inccre thanks to all those who assisted with thei, annual dance held at the Marine Hotel on February 23rd.. particularly I iti.ii.iu.i bViwsn lost ad astnsi and helped run the games. The Club woulj uk r io thank lite Barbados Advocate fur v, i f g*U vextislng lhiDfSS ol cost, and also to thank the following for donating prizes loi UM Hoopla game: Al*. Iiarlrv Allr.ne Arlha A C If" Knishtl li.l Colllni LUI We.ihrihi-.iila HamcHvll, Larscn A IM H % %  Hani* SI Co i-hri I— rmia The Club acknowl.-t,N %  ISlaCuJ thanks the d) I cslved during the year follows:— Mngn Srlng HwhWr Co > TU*ii*,.ii TlaS>n LU ldd> •• %  * IS nto. is 1 N UoSssnl S ***** LUI 13 T 0 a Joluoon* Biauonttry • Mr CharlM M>cKr>n* B i.irasr k Ft SI Jcno. A < S llarhad.s. Oull nil i Smith A AtwvU S BAG Chalhroot Lid. 9 Ltd 9 %  lot*! %  K it swaM Co Lit a Women's Canadian C especially wish to thank anonymous dooor for a most generous donation of one thousand dollars. The winners of the prlss drawing which took place at the dance wr#. Mrs. Polly Roberts — two baskets of flower*. Commander Holbrook — one basket of flowers, and Mr. Bartlett. who l oi. a gallon of rum. The dance realUed $3,600.00. of whuh S1.87V00 have been distributed to the following chariUes: Family WrlUlf Iaar n.a.1* VMiwood MoWw •3 Hwnr lor gldrtlv •.rnUvm Goodrtds* Honw St Marv. Horn* : do Paul r • How .. %  -S HolMa Si 1'-trull Poor M-hool Arir.> Old LadMa' Horn* Mr IW.il.-a BabT CrottM BrhoUnnip Fund S3 • 00 BO 00 TO 0* J Aid* Pram-la Codaon • Chan m Oa pace 5 There is a lenaency, now that Japan Ls, about to be re-admitted to tlie community others. Apart from these points, though, 1 foumlBraddon's account wholly accurate and an U told. The passages dealing with the < .< i leading up to the fall of Singapore an' | J ticularly informative. I He gives a good picture of the action In Malaya prior to the capitulation. And he shows how the well-equipped and well-supported Japanese troops were able to create such havoc with their infiltration tactics against our own men, who had hardly any air and naval support and suffered from a shortage of equipment. Had the odds been more even then, the Far Eastern picture might have been very different during the ensuing years. PLASTIC HOSE yorthe LAWN SmiMilliir KVil{l.acr C It-iii M-r l.iij I % %  .%  Leiiittliss of 2.->. so, o \ r > ft. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. MINI-MOTORS a Can be easily attached to your Bicycle. Minimum of Maintenance. PRIstE $95.00 a DA COSTA & CO. LTD.-Agents it's GODDARD'S \ FOH tMtaBSB SMtrfAt^S Oirdasr (to eut> Dressed Rsbblt tr l Sr •Thrddar **f-d Tripe $k %  • 3S. rhMsr (lies, ttaa) Mass Oi Tails n-r n> tb. Qesssa pn Ik Mr ttt'ttts for f.1 ti */•#• AEM Ham Legg (Cut or Whole) Baa. Himi In Tins 1 lb. Ztb. 41b Brisket of Beef In lins IVurthlngtoii Corned Berf la tun Tubor. i in i" ii Mutton In tins Danish Bseon ..IJIJIIW .. Stoat :MI>IRE COFFEE ANCHOR MILK n\ Linn* \itirs j FOR BETTER SERVICE



PAGE 1

TLKSDW MARCH IS U32 B.\KI;\l>iiv AllVOCATF i M.I TIIBFF. Russian Subs In Caribbean? CWdad Trujillo. Dominican KepuMir The Government o( the Doanni.an lUpubU* ha* accused I'.UMKI of tending submarines tn%  ubean, only 800 mile* nom the) Panama Canal. It is lUnniiiK a protest to the United Nations flu in lii CmocM kioundK of flagrant violutkuu of Dominican tovereignty %  ad "' the elementary principles of international law An official in Ciudad TrujilU. %  aid H had been definitely cont-rmed that the mysterious submarine! sighted recently o€ the Republic's coast were Russian. They carried lights burning a special gas used only by Russian vessels, he said. Dominican warships and 'planes were ordered to the area to investigate reports that several foreign submarines had been Mghted. A number oi U.S. Navy mbmarines were in the Caribbean on manoeuvres an d the U.S. naval Commander in the Caribbean haa been asked [o check that none of his submarines were involved in the incident —-B.t'.P. Tug Goes To Sugar Ship PALMOUTH. England The Falmouth salvage t u g l." which gamed worldwide fame by its efforts to save the "Flying Rnierprisc" <(t the Knglish AlUuktic coast in January. has gone (.. the aid of u vessel In ""iible in n voyage Irom Jath.flth a sugar f"u Further Progress On World Sugar Pad EtESS lOWWdl Uw l iw Inter nd'iuiial Su^ur A^reeim .tput quotas : IIM)i UM wuild. n- bacn apeadad up by the %  vealth SUCH AKiaenii-ni signed in 4.ti\i. IUKI Dpcombei. A ipe-i.ii committee M th,. inRuj larnaisonal Sugar Council formed in London in AugU 18H8. to considei Ihr of such .in agic-ciitciii. uui n... > dlonies. %  oil ku make great headBut UM) do l nc lud an esti-' way mil the position of Commat* by the Cuban ,id*gaW PU I monweLith producer., "as clar. %  >n March 1st. that Cute would i fiad. product MMiMO metric tons of sugar ml. yaar. Alka-Seltzer for UPSET STOMACH r .. **&**•' Differences In Jamaican P.N. Party B.G. Population Rise Is Indication Qf Progress A five-da v meeting of Lfc inittee which has just howtvr. had b. : %  Iralt .tgreement and 11 idad ihat this should .ill eailin (itaft% fa il., ( furuiei conaadai I I*eta iif tli. i Mil" hut it is believed utmost "it if that It provides for a Hr f-i. i nmioonwltt •-1. ...... etegar a ssajr, which. %. .'• • i. Syg.ii Agreement Intel u.iti| corurtderi for the United Nation., Ui an Internationa i I I the dtacoaatai of national Sugar Agracoii I-ONDON. DlfatMBMM which have split the People's National Party of Jamaica may he coming to a head %  I .1 i exult of a rceommendatioii by Mr. Norman Man ley. leader of Patty, ol the expulsion of left-wing members savs the Times." i„ ., leadiHK maica t<> l-ondot, — cargo. I In its llrst rescue mission since art*at the "Flying Enterprise." the tug *In order to compete with Mr. dashed from Falmouth to a point Bust nnantc's agrarian p h a 1un mile %  i Rock paptr, "Mr. Man.. the English Channel, to ley bas been eompellru V Imp %  il.i:i.3l> Ion British '" %  party as broadly based as he can ami in order to compete with LONDON. 1SK1T1SH GUIANA'S population is now rising steadily jiid. although the Colony is lated areas in the whole Caribbe population over the last ten vine in* indications of British tiuiana s progress. ___^^ Toe immU. ol prople m llrilWh *gar piMitiun. U uncji Ciumna declined &om SOti.uuo In the C"un'il* forecasi .< 1911 to 307.000 in 1921. Out in ,(.-* Ixg.n after that. loly ft ^^ ooo Bietrlc t"ns oi x>pulation isnow nsm^ steadily y^ irwr Bslnf „,^| fl „ Mll( ^; ; *^S B i "V is one of the most thinly-popuairre.'ineni ,,„! th. ,v iii ( t\ ,, fVy* '0 ' %  Caribbean area, the increaM In ona i %  have lV\[ f I T i\^i vers is one of the most tonquickl) %  veni I ]M\ 1 / IE W I TaV With iu*t OVW urphsi SBM ao %  . In HOO tons of MII i %  n it l raoaUad th-t | Cuba's coflapvUtoi ngi|i> dlsf'S' "' *ti.iii in the nir Pyorrhea and Trench Mouth Slopped in 24 Hours Foe over 20 year* people have relied on pleaaanMasliag Alien-Sell in fof prompt. genffe lehef ("Hi the i.inwf Upset Ai [d Stomach. Pro/npf liecause , nkling aatarvaOMM helps Alka-Sellaer go to work right away. Gentle because Atka Selljer contains no lasntive, and can be taken antlimrGet Alkn-Seltin tadty. and keep it handy alwrnym! fwkis m Saltier Mis **M' III it bttf fM tM iiaG. 11 as Good Pulp Making Prospects ship Ban uble—B.V.P. rift wltli ir HATES OF tXCBANGE Itlh March, tail Kg* oak I —oc. .. IW.B. IU Siflif " D*mna o.*hTl IK :? 3 m TBIIII:' ..ppe;il to the crowd ho hag tended to rely upon extremists in the tail wing or his party. Among these are the pelled men. GtUHUbTlUWN. H.O.. Marcb IT. The Conference m BH *.••>•> %  four~"exmic Conuniaalon for Latin Au.'-iica tu be held In Rio in PebruI Coupoi UfauM fiirque on B-nki' Urinai") OI.IC 5ihi Din 73 i iv. Cablr ^l !'. I :' :i4 lo-: 1IH 111 1 'Naturally, the great bulk ol ary 1953 will likely ne;ir 0 moderate, steady-minded JamalpoitstbluUes of producing cans would like to see a man of from wallaba and other specMi Mauley's intellectual quality ynti'h (iulana woods. bre;ik with the mob leaders^ but ijiese arc stated lo be very ."t/er is that the only imgrw by Messrs. Carlos Quint gainer from such at first nnd then accelerating in ?s.?5 geiu&JVT" u*bin u Tin colony'i annual lepuri fo* C !" P ,-r tndlng Augu i *l l5u, iu>t publi>he.t Is U'ndoii, next, but etttmnted reqi jliulflggg these ugures and sayn: to ttic same dnti %  "The remarkable results which "DO miMm have followed the DDT houseIn an estimated addfl mruing cainpaign have establishof 1.257,000 metrli ed the year 1945 us one "f great smting %  ignihunie m the Colony' •oclgl market. JO d economic lil-itory." ^ gtoUatical po The report does not mem ion me pulp proposal, * -*"-' %  ;Hruish Quana, but I do point be a aurpKiof .ieurinat some 56.000 squ-ire miles hietrtc tonof sugar on if forests, or roughly two-thirdi markei in the surplu the mediate gainer from such a industrial Chemist attached to th. ££ ^J ^^rf'u,. Colony. SI ISAo breach might be air. Busumante. £,^00,,^ commuv..on for U1i.11 Bt .\J rslderi vd to be ItellVaTlbt It Is that knowledge which has America and Jose C. Leone, ".f*;,^.^ helr U"' rurrent rron yaar d" Qulina's exp"i kade --iiii!>lle nmHireH hv Hrl Kini-dom took 34 per i-enl Aftei .in and the Cnmmonwe-.H'i the war. these positions were Ittries, which are reoul versed, but over the post-war protected by the Gpsnn years. Canada has gradually mmi creased Its Imports from British Guiana, until in 1950 it accounted for 64 per rent of HIP Colon/ export Uadf. while the United Kingdom Sccounted lof 29 per r*ar the Bartic. Triangle and h-d ^ Bauxi(( ^rta were dLscuattOOg with the Derm-mra wofth $l3iMa .442 and next in Fleetric Company f,lmltei order of importance were rice To continue their survey over a nim diamonds and molasses wide area they left to visit South •Timber exports UMrsssl Brazil, Argenlini. Paraguay .jderably from 1949 to 1950. i>u'. Columbia, Peru. Cuba, and MexMtlll accounted for only a relatlve> %  •<• Thav had already visited the jy small proportion of the Co' French and Dutch Gui *— tr> %  %  % %  ,i threi nforiei tot %  !x-ui; £ [fon leu • IIIE rt MR 1 %  raar 01 % %  iwssWaaaaaWM %  H I I -iftr in fVgBU llll .... ; 1 'Mil HiM.i.M.lHihlltl 1. Now Town P\ana<*r For Jamaica lX>NDON A new Ajuustant Town Planner Is to be appointed In Jamaica by the Colonial Office in London A man between 25 and 45 u sought and he must be a member of the trade. Exports of round and hCwtl timber increased from 5570.124 H W17.001. while exports of |gwn timjber rose from M53.1B7 •HUM There are hundreds of differed' species of timber In British Guiana's 70.000 square mill M EM asta, the report sa>s, but man) 1 1 them are at present uiunarketal l( The Colonial Develop! 1 1 at inn is spending £1.000.000 on ilevelopment of timber Lilcs an>) wuodwutk wKani and -pJiklc after a quick ruh with Vim on a elanip cjngh, Vim -leans lUK'klv, IflWOth/) KC|M IIV£KCS Pfjfhi and polishej.vviilinii! 1 .< t I'JI 1 i Uadpaat) wnks and hjih tZr Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved Jardeoioc. painting, odd jobs round the bouse can he a pkasurs again when you ate t tec from baUuanc, passBBSsal psiiu, stiff, achuuj rauulct and i'luus. lumbago as T" !" 1 urbsry troublr* due to unpontles 10 the blood. Whs not get taps j relief by taking Doso's lladtactas Kisswy Pilk. Tbey help tha kidneys to rid tha bkmd if Tin uric acid sod other impuntica which otharwiss sascbt colkct in tha 171100 and cause distress %  n 6S" HALF A CBNTUR V at IIH > i rtluvty s cleans everything smoothly in*i spec '.lily n Plannlnl Inililulr and Ihc murcM In'iin Colony, but Ibrj Royal lnitiwtc ot Brill.h Archirfporl polnn oul thai.no tuMUn lccl The po l> a prmanml oiw lial increaw In produrtKin and a salary icato ol tM5 lo (1,049 U oBcred— B.V.T. %  llkcl: 1 iawmill U producliaaaaaw Its m*d r~*4 ./ OWl P1U1. Onu/ud mm mi mmmt 4/ mli ap% MM and ncommmd Imi tffmmi mwine mid mimry jmtfptie 10 dmr/nmmli md wtighbmrt. Everyone loves a SBIOOU.. Lovely Skin.—bat they detest UnslghUy Hsir, especially in Wotssn .to:— "GET RID OF DN8IOHTLY HAnt" with YEET Rrniombci .-,*.-For the Beach. Dance. Balling, or any time when becomes Unsightly, use VEET. VEET is extremely useful for men who bare tough beards or Who find It uncomfortable to Shave "V E T" rmoves Unsightly, Buperttaous Hair In exactly "THREE MINUTES" %  BJT ITS CLEAN I ITS CERTAIN ! ITS BATE.! I I That's VEST RT 2/1, 4/per tube Obtainable at;— BOOKERS (B'doi) DRUG STORES LTD. HROAD STREET and HASTINGS (Alpha Add Tbeae SasotaKles to your Iht Tiu rers „ r•.,<>.• aeriMU .'. April -l >-"• r.U Menae*4,. Oeeea !•" Slrwb*rrT l" I-...1-I.— I.m TIBI n-t-i T.indU S.e ,. v.e*ufel> -' M..— .1.. .. 1 hl'S-x Beef „ imr.-l.l n*>l



Barbados



ESTABLISHED 1895

W. INDIES NEED SO



Social Welfare Officers’
Task Is Very Important

OPENING the Conference of Social Welfare

Officers at Hastings House
Sir George Seel, Head of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Organisation, told about forty dele-
gates and observers present that their task “is to

create a society in which ideas will generate and
circulate; a society in which problems such as the
political future of the West Indies, and the risk of
its frustration through over-population, will be!
measured soberly, and met with solutions in which
every man and woman can play a part.’’

} Sir George added : “Your task could not be more
important. If the means at your disposal are modest
and ~ pam of your trade simple, yet your work must be
carried out on the highest pl * hur =
_The Conference, the first of ite pen Mapeaveur.
kind to be held at Hastings
House in five years, is being at-
tended by delegates and observers
from the various Caribbean terri-
tories, as well as Mr, W. H. Chinn
Social Welfare Adviser to the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies,
who is on a tour of the West In-
dies. The meeting is being presid-
ed over by Miss Dora Ibberson,
Social Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller for Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West In-
dies, The meeting will continue
until Friday 21st instant

Training

Yesterday morning's session was
devoted to an account of his tour
of the region by Mr. Chinn who



Sonuts Will
Return Home

On Thursday

*
The contingent of Barbadian
Scouts who left here for the
pony nae ne ge in Jamaica,
re expec to return home on

Thursday by ‘plane at 5.30 p.m
A cablegram received by the lo-
cal Secretary of the Boys’ Scouts
Association from Major J. E. Grif-
fith, Island Commissioner, stated
that the Jamboree has been a

yesterday morning, |

Scheme For

W.I. Workers
In U.S.

At its first meeting in June,
1951, the Regional Labour Board
made certain provisional arrange-
ments for central administrative
and accounting work in connec-
tion with the scheme for employ-
ment of West Indian workers in
the United States.

In December it requested Mr.
F. C. Catchpole, O.B.E., the Dep-
uty Chairman, to review these
provisional arrangements, partic-
ularly with a view to avoiding
delays in clearing the accounts of

workers on their return to the
West Indies,

Mr. Catchpole and Mr. S.
Hochoy, Labour Commissioner,

Trinidad, who was associated with
him in this investigation, visited
Washington in February, 1952,
and as a result of their recommen-
dations it has been decided that
e@s from. 3lst March, 1952, the
accounting work shoul@ be per-
formed in the office of the Board's
=— Liaison Officer in Washing-
Aton.

This will make it unnecessary



led off discussions on “A perma-
nent pattern for Welfare” and on
“Training”. Other sessions dur-
ing the week will deal with the
correlation of welfare with other
services; the necessity for the in-
tegration of social and economic
development; community, organi-
sation; work for the family group; |
probation and the social work of
the courts; protection of juveniles,
juvenile reformative institutions;
youth work; welfare and local
government; welfare and indus-
try; the place of voluntary bodies
in a permanent plan; and the con-
tribution of research.

Declaring the Conference open,
Sir George Seel said: —

I see that it is exactly five years
since a Conference of Social Wel-
fare Officers was held at Hastings
House, and I think«that most
people here, if not all, will agree
that that is an over-long interval
for a subject which more than
any other depends upon the per-
sonal devotion and enthusiasm
of its upholders, and the inspira-
tion which they can derive from
sharing their experiences and dis-
cussing their problems with others
engaged in similar work. I am
very glad indeed that, thanks
almost entirely to the enthusiasm
and persistence of Miss Ibberson,
my Social Welfare Adviser, it has

great success.

Our Correspondent writes from
Jamaica :—

The first Caribbean Jamboree
ended today at Briggs Park Camp
with colourful ceremonies. H. R. H.
Princess Alice, The Earl of Ath-
lone, Chief Scout Lord Rowallan
and Jamaica Chief Scout Sir Hugh
Foot took part in the closing cer-
emonies.

At the regional conference of
Scouters on Friday it was un-
officially mooted that the second
Caribbean Jamboree should be
held in Trinidad.

Lord Rijwallpn presided and
matters pertaining to Caribbean
scouting were discussed.

NAVAL OFFICER
RECUPERATING

Second Officer Albert Johnson,
ex R.F.A. “Wavemaster”, who
was left behind in Barbados a few
weeks ago by his ship for medical
attention at the Hospital, is ex-
pected to get passage back to his |
home in the U.K. sometime this
week.

It is anticipated that either an-
other R.F.A. ship will call at
Barbados for Johnson or that he |
will go on to Trinidad to take}
a ship for the U.K. Johnson is



@ On Page 5 staying here at the Y.M.CA. ]





|

Cuban Senators |

Driven Off By Shots

HAVANA, March 17. |

AN ARMED GUARD at the $20,000,000 National ,
Capitol Building firing air rifles drove off a group of six- |
teen opposition Congressmen seeking to resume Parlia- |

ithe result

to retain the administrative and
accounting office in Kingston, and
at the request of the Government
of Jamaica, arrangements are be-
ing made for the secondment of
Mr. R. E. Mais as Executive Sec-
retary to the Board to be termin-
ated, and for his return to duty
in the Jamaica Civil Service.

The Chairman of the Board has
expressed warm appreciation of
the services of Mr. Mais as Execu-
tive Secretary during the past
nine months.

Ambassadors
Prepare Note

LONDON, March ¥i,
Anthony Eden was meeting
this afternoon with United States



Ambassador, Walter Gifford and
French Ambassador Rene Mas-
sigli to put the final touches to

the draft note.

They will also prepare for talks
in Paris later this week with
French Foreign Minister Robert
Schuman, United States Russian
Expert, Charles B. Bohlen and
German Federal Chancellor, Con-
rad Adenauer.

Official quarters made it plain
today that the West will tell
Moscow its proposal for the cre-
ition of an all-German govern-
ment which is to participate in
suggested talks on a peace treaty
at an International Conference is
a step in the right direction.

But that Government must be
of Free All-Germpn
election carried out under inter-
national supervision after the
U.N. Commission set up in Pafis
earlier this year by the General

‘ Assembly has studied conditions! those needs.
mentary defiance of Batistas 45 day suspension of Congress. ‘in East Germany.—U.P.






TUESDAY, atARCH 18, 1952

:



LC CCT



"FREIGHT CARS IDLE IN NEW YORK CENTRAL STRIKE”,

r eo ;

HUNDREDS OF FREIGHT CARS @re at a standstill in the yards at Buffalo, N, Y., following the walkout of |
18,000 New York Central trainmen. The government warned !t would take “appropriate action If the pres- 4

ent work stoppage continues or spreads.” The line js tied up west of Buffalo, (International Soundphoto)
tll nn it _ — -

CWI et Dir ector| Tanks, Ship
Of Education Dept Smash Reds

TOKYO, Mareh 17
MR. PHILIP SHERLOCK, Vice-Principal of the Uni-

Big tanks plunging across rice
versity College of the West Indies, who is at present | paddy fields have made one of the

attending the Social Welfare Conference at Hastings et eacueng rae on Segende Rerelan Ministers broke the

=, 5 os av , - ee P a” raftin aban anr

House, told the Advocate y sterday that they have now imonths, United States Army head- ther World War it’ pease treat

appointed a Director of the University College Department j quarters disclosed today. The raid/ies, provided for a Soviet voice

of Education, Dr. D’Aeth, who has had a distinguished | took place on the Western Sector) 9 Japanese affairs on United

academic and war record, Research Fellowship at Har- ae ot Metindee Gaming" |samn iter ans, made progress to-

vard and Wing Commander in the R.A.F. He is now Her . es: ms ' Ware Croaening nee cone

. > : sovernment of Romania and Bul-

Majesty’s Inspector of Schoolgein England and will prob-} Tanks destroyed 36 bunkers and| aria, produced new agreements

ably take up his appointment in May and will study the ica positions. wo, slmly con-|on China, won Russian assent to

t epar a ion i i i entrations were blasted and|the exeating of a U.N. Commis-

oetane Departments © ) eek B ee Kargdon apie prasghad through or shelled | sion to auidy Atomic Energy. con-

“There are two significant pow? ne work of this-Upiversity Golf} m sya hove in whieh! trol lett porego} ved only. the

‘ne in mind,’ |leae education department,” he] ese were belleved to have/question of what to to the

which arg to be borne in mind,”| lege education dep , tored supplies. Communists on|Red revolution in northern Tran
: “ t. fi |

Mr. Sherlock said. “First, from he East Front were pounded last! UP.

the start we hope to award ow
ewn diplomas. Under our char-
ter, we have the power. Ou,
degrees are those of the Univer-
sity of London, with whom w«
have a valuable and helpful
special relationship.

“Our courses of study are not
the same as those for the Londo:
external degrees, but they are
closely. related to the British!
Caribbean, to its history and en-j
vironment. But from the start, |
the diploma which will be pos’!
graduate and of a high standar«

i

@ On page 8
| light by the 45,000-ton U.S. ship
{ Wisconsin by heavy calibre shells.

The Communist truce delegates
at Panmunjom today alleged that
1 United Nations plane yesterday
trafed a prisoner of war camp in
North Korea killing British pris-
mers. The camp was marked
the agreed manner.—U.P,

|
in



U.N. PLANES
KILL 75 REDS

SEOUL, March 17

American Shooting Star jets
sprayed frontline Communist
roops and artillery positions with
rockets, bombs and bullets, Pilots
reported killing more than 75
Red soldiers, destroying 15 guns
ind 28 troop bunkers and dam-

will be our own and the coursé

will be worked out to meet Carib
bean needs. This means that wher
the newly appointed § director
comes out, he will go round the
region consulting and making use
of experience in the area.”

Regional Training
He said that training for ‘téach-
ers at graduate level will be om



r ic i aging a tank. Eighty-six Sabre

a regional basis, taking fall x
seamunt of the educational need a fying See a oe
‘ a Ps dt ect Slars exe mangea shots with a

of the region and designed to m Communist M.LG, 15 jets but

Mr. A. P. SHERLOCK

“But there are other aspects of reported no hits, —U.P.





The wild outburst of shooting —
panicked downtown Havana,
brought dozens of prowl cars
screaming to the scene but none
were hurt. An early police report
that the Palace guard had been
fired upon by unidentified persons |
from the roof-tops of comanerca
establishments facing the capitol
proved false. Army and Navy !
regulars carried out a thorough!
search of the buildings in the
neighbourhood.

From Our Own Correspondent '
ANTIGUA.
Last year’s seventy inches of!
rainfall have resulted in An-|
tigua’s bumper sugar crop. It is
expected to be the bi ever.
Estimate at the beginning of
this year was thirty thousand
tons of sugar but now some au-
thorities maintain that if the
whole erop is reaped the yield
will be thirty six thousand tons.
The largest production from

Sehate President Tony Varona,
one of the leaders of the former |
Government Autentico party had|
notified all legislators several days |
ago reminding them that Congress |
was legally due to reconvene to-:
day at 4 p.m., hence the possibil-!
ity of outbreaks such as occurred !
had no} been overlooked. !

However sixteen Senators,
Congressmen of the Auentico and
the Cuban Peoples Party, led by
Varona Who approached the capi-
tol retired in an orderly manner

“Open Verdict” Over
Labourer’s Death

ANTIGUA EXPECTS BUMPER

this island so far was 32,000,
tons of sugar in 1937 and there
is no doubt now that if reaping |
continues as well as in recent |
weeks this record will be broken. |
Dry weather has set ih and it |
is felt that this may affect the |
late ratoons,

Originally, about 5 per cent
of cane ground was supplied by
the peasants and transportation
was by means of donkeys or

|, MISS ISRAEL 1952 VISITS ENGLAND |
7 br i : m =f Ae

tation Fund for peasants, There
were no trailers with these trac-
tors but the Antigua Syndicate

Peasant supplies
gradually increasing
year they have reached

cattle carts.
have been
until this

reap all of their canes this year. |

His Excellency Mr. K. W.
Blackburne appointed a commit



30 per cent. Transportation has) jee under the Chairmanship of Estates have supplied trailors
been their big problem because | ine papour Commissioner Mr. c,| from their stocks in order to
carts available are far beneath! © Low-achee with a view o| S8i8t this endeavour to enabl
requinements to cope with theit | organising peasant reaping and, peasantseto take off their crop
fncreayed production, Peasant| transportation. At the sugges-,; Two tipper trucks have also
supplies of cane to the factory tion of Mr, Jd. C, MeMichael,, been purchased to assist in
were extremely slow at the Manager of the Antigua Sugar peasant haulage and the Sugar

Factory, two tractors have been
purchased through the Rehabili-

start of crop and it was feared

Factory is
that it would be impossible to

equipment,

servicing all of their







ER-MINDED SOCIET



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Y

President’s Papers
Show He Feared
World Wer Li

wasnin tron, March 17.
PRESIDENT TRUMAN Secretly |feared on two occa-
sions in recent years that World War lll was about to
break out ;
He saw an explosive threat first inthe Berlin cvisis
of September 1948 and again in United Nations. reverses
; in Korea in December 1950 after Red China intervened.
> : > + : 4,
frunan’s concern over world problems including Stalin,
Russia, preventive war and various other foreign matters
was recorded in his personal papers published to-day in a
book entitled “Mr. President.”
The book was published by- :
}Farrar, Straus and Young In- e
orporated and written by Wil- Steel Will
am Hillman, former newspaper-

lan and now radio commentator 9

The personal papers also dis- Lose 3 Days
losed that Truman once sent a

nessage to the Kremlin that . f °
} Stalin was not a man of his word P, uction

Foreign Policy
| And the President once read WASHINGTON, March 17
1Secretary of State James F An industry spokesman said the
Byrne harply worded letter oa) nation will lose at least two or
}\vho was boss of United States|ihree days of vital steel produe-
| Foreign Policy and on Whe need! tion even if the Steelworkers’
for a tough attitude toward Rus- Union agrees to another postpone-
In Byrnes’ memorandum is} nent of its often deferred nation-

possibly the most sensational; wide strike. The strike deadline
tem in the book. Truman said now set for Sunday at mid-
lpointedly he and not Byrnes night
jwould make final Foreign Policy Union President Philip Murray
lecisions and added bluntly L| notified the Wages Board on Sun-
lam tired babying the Russians’

. , Gay that no decision on postpone-
That occurred in January 1946 sage

ind Bytnes who was then one of

the President's closest adviser
had just been to Moscow where
{he made agreements which cri-|
tics characterized as appease-

; nent of the Russians,

In his own book five years ago
tiled “Speaking Frankly” Byrnes
aid the Moscow meeting of th
United States, British and Soviet



|



Gairy Denied
Entrance To St. Lucia

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Mareh 17
Lucia Executive Coun-
here to have
lecided not to permit Gairy te
visit St. Lucia until the current
jabour unrest has ended.

The

St.
understood

} Union strategy 1s to held off the

















ment will be made until the Steel-
workers’ Policy Committee meets
here on Thursday
Informed sources indicated tha
,ostponement promise until the
Wages Board issues its recom-
nendations for settling the dis-
pute. The Board has promised
etion by Thursday.
It Government
cerms are favourable and indica-
ions are that they will be, the
Union probably will agree to hold
off the walk-out The Union ‘
postponed the strike date three
imes so far in its drive for 18%
cents an hour increase for
650,000 basic steel workers. The
latest request by the Board is in-
tended to give the parties a
chance to negotiate its recom-

recommended




request to maintain production
provided the Union also agreed.
With the strike threat still hang-
ing however, the companies
warned they must begin curtail-
ing operations early this week
Industry spokesmen said that at
best the situation will mean a loss
of “two or three days production”
before production goes back to
normal, They said a three-day
urtailment would cost the De-
fence Programme about 870,000
tons of badly needed steel.—U.P.

SUGAR CROP

U.N. Think Moscow



St. Martin’s New
Viear Arrives

THE REV. M. J. DENINGTON who has been appoint-
ed Vicar of St. Martins, St. Philip, arrived here from Nevis
yesterday by the 60-ton schooner “Excelsior Hodge”.

He was not the smiling passenger who alights from
a ‘plane looking debonair, but a tired man with a stubby
beard, after two days of rough sailing under unpleasant
conditions,

7 Wearing short white pants, a
khaki “navy” jacket with decora-
tions on the breast-——for he spent
54 years in the British Navy—a
white shirt underneath and a
broad rimmed straw hat to keep
Last week’s improvement in]|off the sun, Rev. Denington ut

peasant supplies of cane to the] tered a sigh of relief as he put

factory have so increased that foot on Barbados.

they have almost reached their With him were his 90. year-old

allocation and with their new} rothoer—the best ailor of the

haulage system it is highly pro-| ¢ompany—his wife, three children
bable that all of their canes will} (two girls and a boy) and a friend

be reaped. The factory ground}of his from Nevis named Edward

10,286 tons of cane with approx-}| Bates. Only the old man braved
imately 34 hours out of cane}the weather and was not sear
ind made 1,234 tons sugar,} sick

| their largest amount for — the Rev. Denington did not want it

| season. hat way but he could not do bet-

ter. The time was drawing close
for him to take up his appointment
here and there was no prospect of



when entrance to the building was

to emphasize the warning.—U.P.



U.S. Arsenal To Get
Guided Missiles

WASHINGTON, March 17

The armed forces revealed that
they have stepped up their guided
missile training programme in an-
ticipation of adding ‘the missiles
to the United States’ arsenal of
ready weapons.

Guided missiles have been in
the experimental stage, but the
Air Force said six months ago at
least one missile would be avail-
able soon.

The Army disclosed at the same
time it had tactically useful mod-
als of guided missiles in produc-
tion.

The Navy said its guided missile
propects have been speeded up for
early use. It
addition of these weapons to the
fleet would strengthen greatly
both its offensive and defensive
capabilities

Althcugh none of

the services





will admit having guided missiles
n actual use now, all are bearin
do on training men ile
t -U.P.

opposed and shots fired in the P. |

predicted that the/

A CORONER'S JURY returned an “Open Verdict”
when an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the
death of 44-year-old Lione! Burton of St. Martins, St.
Philip, was concluded before Coroner Mr. C. L. Walwyn
at Distriet ‘A’ yesterday. ‘

Burton, a labourer of Searles—
Factory took ill at the same fac-
tory on March 8. His wife took
him to the General Hospital where
he died on the following day.

Dr. A. S. Cato, who performed
the post mortem examination, gave
evidence yesterday after ich
the Coroner addressed the jury.

| Politician Jailed
}

New Plan Will
Encourage Banks

LISBON, March 17.

A “New Deal” expansion pro-
gramme of fresh financing and
emigration is being completed by
the Government here for Portu-
gal’s far-flung colonies.

The principal Portuguese col-
onies are Mozambique, Angola
and Portuguese Guinea in Africa.
The colonies which supply much
raw material for mainland indus-
tries have a total population of
11,000,000.

The Government Bill to open
the door to Colonial financial ex-
pansion now before the National
Assembly for approval would
permit foreign Banks to open
branches 4n the colonies provid-
ed certain qualifications arer met
Authorization is received from
| Portuguese authorities
faced}; At present the sole banking

forganization in the colonies is
the Overseas Bank.—U.P



CAIRO, March 17.

Extreme Socialist leader Ahmed
|Hussein was today found. guilty
on three counts of resisting the
Sovereign State and sentenced to
18 months’ imprisonment. He was
arrested close on the heels of
the rioting and arson of January
26 and convicted of offences com-
mitted prior to that date.

He

doors

was tried behind closed
before a Civilian Penal
Court which sentenced him to six
months in prison on each of the |
counts but he still
re undefined charges,
—U.P.

three

mi | :
MI88 MICHAL HARREL
just arrived in Pnugland on a goodwill mission from Israel.



Israel” has
She joined
the armed forces at outbreak of hostilities between Jerusalem and {
the Arab States While in England she will officiate at a contest to
find “Miss Anglo-Jewry” 1952 Exrpre

recently elected ‘Miss





$$ ee

his getting a plane or steamship
. 7 "> ts Apart from having animals and
i ; other personal and household
/ f ; ® ¢ 99 effects to bring up to Barbados
Will Answer oe No which made it impossible for hin
i id ne to get a passage by ‘plane, a doc-
| tor told his father that he could
not travel by ‘plane. So out went
i LONDON, March 17. the idea of an air trip.

THREE WESTERN POWERS will ask Russia whether No Alternative
she will support the holdin of free elections for all of sae tpare wey Se ene counee of
rermany atic c »g dic chartering the Excelsior Hodge to
fermany, Diplomatic circles predicted ae eh eae ta hae
1" : : Rev. Denington squirmed at th
I'he auestion designed to test the sincerity of the charge of $900 but could do no

latest Soviet proposals for a German Peace Treaty may be
put to Moscow by the end of this week





Informant i the United
W ing A $ aai ! ; :
arning f gainst States, Britain and France held
o great hope of a clear affirma-
ap. i ne tive answer from Moscow If
ver-Contidence
loscow’ inswer negative or
TORONTO, Mareh 17 rita crippling qualification
the t will regard the Soviet
Prime Ministe Laurent } wil -— a 7 Sevi
warned the West last nt tt posals u nother propa- |
‘ - . : ; oe nda move
gains overcor lence hat i
rowing military might t fri ; sie :
ned off R 1 a i} ed Na ions Commission i
peace | 1 ¥ to launch an investi-
. | gatio determing whether
Western peopl have t 10k f ich an election ir
make more sacrifice na continue i Germany is possible.
to build up their 1 foree he
, a graduating « of St Mi-} It } ba elcomea by the |
hael’s College. “The foundations | w, rn Allies High Commission
f combined strength we already l, nd by West German Chaneellor
have laid in the free v t have! Konrad Adenauer. But two letters
- a greater sense of security |to Soviet General Vassily Chuikov
a , fo pe that wa king for permission to enter the
‘ nt ‘ ed ' have not
be prevel OP UP

other than hire the schooner
About 42 packages of person:
effects, eight goats, two horses a
two donkeys were packed away
in the schooner’s hold, the famil
aboard and the Excelsior Hodg
set sail from Nevis for Barbado
ev, Denington’s father had to be
helped on board and was actuall)
‘lifted off the schooner when she
jtied up alongside the Pier Head

Rev. Denington, who is now 3¢
| years old, passed examinations i

| Theology in England but before

‘being ordained, Woeld War I
came along and he joined the
navy He spent 5} years, rising



to the rank of Lieutenant and was

then demobbed

still to preach “the
Denington was soon
Modwenh; an
Sutton-in-

Determined
|}word”, Rev
lafter ordained to St.
|} Anglican hurch
| Ashfield, Notts. He left England
|for Nevis where he s Rector of
St. George Church for tw «
@ On page &





PAGE TWO



M:®: J. D. M. BELL, research
i worker and lecturer in in-
caustrial relations at Glasgow
University, arrived in Barbados
yesterday evening by B.W.LA.

irom Trinidad.

vir, Bell who was expected over
the jast week-end was unavoid-
ably delayea, He has now comie
to lecture on Trade Union subjects
to the twenty West Indian Trace
Union officals attending the
school here on Trade Unionism.

Vean of the Course is Mr. P, C.
Catcnpole, Labour Advisez to the
Compwoller for Development and
vy elfare,

iiarley Street Specialist

D* JENNER HOSKIN, heart
| specialist from Harley Street,
wwiidou, teit by B.W.LA. on Sun-
aay evening for British Guiana
via Trinidad after spending three
and a half weeks’ hgliday staying
at the Ocean View @otel.

Dr. Hoskin said tijat it was hi
first visit here induc intended
Spending half of his time in Trin-
idad, but liked Barbados so much
that he remained here for his en-
tire holiday,

Dr. and Mrs. Hoskin have gone
to Georgetown where they wil!
take the S.S. Bonaire for England

For Trinidad Holiday
wise
Ame the passengers leaving
on Sunday evening by
B.W.LA. for Trinidad to spend a

holiday was Miss Betty King,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Victor
King of “Kimberley,” 9th Ave.,

Belleville and an employee of the
Barbados Electric Supply Corpor-
ation. She will spend three weeks
in Port-of-Spain,

Attorney-At-Law

R. AND MRS, ALBRIDGE C.

SMITH of New Jersey, ar-
rived here on Sunday by B.W.LA.
via Puerto Rico and Antigua for
about two weeks’ holiday and are
Staying at the Paradise Beach
Club. They were in Barbados fif-
teen years ago on their haney-
moon,

Mr. Smith is an Attorney-at-
Law with offices in New York and
Princeten, New Jersey.

Travelling with them is Mr
T. W. Delehanty of Princeton, New
Jersey who is paying his first visit
to the island.

Mr. Delehanty is a free lance
journalist who writes for maga-
zines like the New York Herald
Tribune, the New York Post and
Redbook. ta

Will Spend A Month

RS. LILIAN’ SPRINGER,
Clinic Nurse of the St,
Joseph Infirmary, left on Sunday
by B.W.LA. for Trinidad where
she will spend a month’s holiday.



Carib Calling

— Off To The U.S.A.
EAVING by B.W.I. on Sun-
day morning for Puerto Rico

on her way to the U.S.A. was Mrs

Muriel Rollins who resigned her

post at the Barbados Advocate

lest month. She has now gone to
join her mother and sister.

During her five years on the
newspaper staff, Mrs. Rollins was
among. other things Children’s
Editress. She hopes to continue
in the journalistic field.

At the airport to wish her good
luck anc bon voyage were a
luck and bon voyage were a
number of her’ relatives and
friends. ¥

Visited Beauty Spots

FTER spending two weeks
holdiay in Barbados, Mrs

W. Marshali accompanied by her

son-in-law and daughter, returned

to Trinidad on Sunday evening by

B.W.LA. They were staying ai

“Maristow,” Maxwell Coast.

Mrs. Marshall is the mother of
Mr. “Bunny” Marshall of Messrs
Barnes and Company, who took
the family to the various beauty
spots of the island during their
short stay here.

Celebrated Birthday

RS. GERALDINE ROGINSON

of Toronto, Canada cele-
brated her fifty-seventh birthday
mn Saturday. A party was held
jat the home of Mr. L. B. Marshall

- ; waat Prospect, St James, in her
She qualified honour.

year ago and was las Mrs. Robinson, who is in the
1950 island for health reasoms, arrived



MISS DORA BYNOE

Two Nurses

T present holidaying in Bar-
A bados is Miss Dora Bynoe,

daughter of the late Mr. and,Mrs
Bruce Bynoe, formerly of “Inch-
keith,” Pine Hill.





Dora who has been living in'
Canada since 1948 has been study-
ing nursing there
almost a
here in

ries , in December and was staying at
Accompanying her is a friena in : 7
Miss Martha Johnson of Torontor se nee ~ a ae =
who graduated with her at St io of Mr Seieeehen en the
Joseph’s Hospital, Toronto. euees Of Mr. aa
She will be returning to conate
* * in May via St, Lucia and Trinida
Agricultural Officer ‘where she expects to spend a few
days.
"AR. ERNEST MOLL, Agricul-*"*> Thotas :
Avi tural Officer of Trinidad is Visiting Relatives ON
now in Barbados for two weeks’ HERBERT SHILSTONE,

R.
holiday. He arrived on Sunday by’ M Jnr., from Houston, Texas,
ace > s »fis now in Barbados on a visit to
B.W.1.A. accompanied by his wife.f 15. 4
they are staying at Grazettes, St. his uncle Mr. E. Maxwell Shilstone
They are staying at Grazettes, St.
Michael “and his aunt Mrs. A. E. Armstrong.
He is staying at “Hillsbury”, St.
George
For Welfare Talks Mr. Shilstone is an enginess
Pei os . ane Wey, Working with Shilstone Testing
M* S. SHARP, Resident Tutor | ahoratories of Houston. He is the
in the Leeward |slands for gon of Dr, Herbert M. Shilstone,
the University College of the West head of the New York Office of
Indies, arrived here on Sunday by the Shilstone Testing Laboratories.

B.W.1.A. from Antigua to attend :

the Conference of Social Welfare Six Months rs en

Officers of the British Caribbean MONG the passengers e

Area. route to England by the S.S.
He is steying at the Marine Golfite which left here on Friday

Hotel. is Miss Laurie Patterson of Has-
tings. She is on her way to spend
six months’ holiday with friends

Fer Two Months in London,

PENDING about two months’ To Study Nursing In U.K.

holiday here with her rela- ISS PATRICIA MAYNARD.
tives at My Lord’s Hill is Mrs, a nurse of Antigua, arrived
Gwen Trotman who came in from here on Sunday by B.W.1.A. on
Antigua on Sunday by B.W.LA. a short visit prior to going to the
Her husband who is Assistafit United Kingdom via New York
Federal Engineer of the Leeward to further her studies in nursing.

Islands is expected to join her in She is staying at the Cosmopolitan
about two weeks time. Guest House,



BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

Teddy Bear Was Dissatisfied

After 35 Years

AYING his first visit to the
island since he left it in
1917 is Mr, Athelston Skeete fors
merly of Jackman’s, St. Michael.
He returned on Sunday from thé
U.S.A, via Puerto Rico by B.W.LA
and is spending three weeks’ holi-
day staying at the Cosmopolitan
Guest House.

Brothers f

R. KEITH B, INNISS, a Bar-

badian resident in New York
for many years, returned here on
junday via Puerto Rico and An-
tigua for three weeks’ holiday. He
has come over to visit his mother
who is ill.

Mr. Inniss is a brother of Mr.
Kyle ‘ Inniss, headmaster St
Barnabas Boys’ School. In the
U.S.A., he is employed with the
Board of Transportation in New
York City.

Education Officer—T’dad

R. C. OTTLEY, Chief Educa-
tion Extension Officer Trini-
dad who arrived on Sunday morn-
ing by B.W.I.A. for the Confer-
ence of Social Welfare Officers pf
the British Caribbean area, met
at Seawell Mr. Rawle Jordan,
Chief Inspector of Schools here.

Mr, Ottley was the guest at
luncheon later in the day of Mr.
and Mrs. Jordan.

Editor Returns Home

R. C. E. HITCHINS, Editor of

the Trinidad Guardian who

arrived here on Friday last week

from Antigua, returned to Trini-
dad on Sunday by B.W.I.A.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

TUESDAY, 18TH MARCH, 1952
1115 am _ Appointment With Music,
11 30 am Cyril Smith and Phyllis Sel-
lick (Pianos), 1200 noon The News,
1210 pm News Analysis
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19 76m., 25 53m,







31.32m.
400 pm The News, 410 pm _ The
Daily Service, 415 pm Marching and

Waltzing, 445 pm Semprini at_the
Piano, 500 pm _ Take it from Here,
530 p.m BBC _ Scottish Orchestra,
600 pm. Personal Portrait, 615 pm
Welsh Magazine, 64 pm ‘Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 17.00
pm The News eee ae

i .m, — 25.53m, 3 ‘
7.15—10 30 p. Siem.

715 pm Rendezvous, 745 pm
Generally Speaking, 800 pm The

Cheque, 815 pm _ Radio Newsreel, 8.30
pm Composer of the Week, 9 00 p.m.
Meet the Commonwealth, 9.30 pm

Ray's A Laugh, 10 00 pm The News,

1010 pm. From The Editorials, 10 15
pm Herbert Hodge Talking, 1030
pm Tip Top Tunes.



The Girls Industrial Union-

THE Girls’ Industrial Union is the outstanding insti-

tution in this island conduct

was begun in 1912 and incorporated by an act of the legis-

lature in 1922. Its members

The Union rooms are situated at Constitution Road.

The Union was formed t

Miss Adah Evelyn who while in the United States, saw the ;
need for instructing girls in domestic scienc
them elementary training in technical subjects.
Evelyn, many ladies have given of their time and energy &
and to-day the Union stands as a monument to that fore-

sight.

Among those who have helped
to make the Union the flourishing
institution it is today are the late
Mrs, C. A. Gale and Mrs. Olga
Symmonds, J.P. Mrs. H. A.
Ballou, Mrs. D. W. Bentley and
the untiring Secretary Miss
Williams.

The object of the Union is to
provide such means of instruction
and recreation as will promote the
mental and physical improve-
ment and increase the mutual
helpfulness of its members. The
Union is divided into Clubs, There
are 17 Clubs which are run under
the supervision of a Committee
of Management. Each’ Club has
its own Secretary and Assistant
Seeretary. Business meetings
are held the first two weeks of
each month for the purpose of
afranging entertainments, physi-
cal training, lectures and any
other activities that are desired.

Commercial Subjects Also
Girls -are drawn from all the
parishes of the island to receive

training and many of them,
through the training received,

ed by women for women. It

hip is now oVer five hundred.

hrough the instrumentality of ;

e and to give
Since Miss

cluded

in the syllabus, All of
these

classes are Government
classes. For the typing classes
the Pitman’s Gramophone In-
structor was recently introduced.
This mechine has improved the
girls’ concentration and also
produced more rythmic taps,
There are special classes for be-=
ginners and juniors. Those girls
who are backward can practise
in the afternoon before classes
begin. Many girls have received
certificates frofn the London
Chamber of Commerce.



MRS, OLGA SYMMONDS

or Groups and each section has

In the Estimates of the Barba- jts teacher,

own On Monday
dos Government for 1949—50 afternoons the classes are in-
provision was made to continue structed in cross stitch, quilting,
these classes under the super-

tufted wool work, knitted socks,

vision of the drawn thread, wax flowers, wool-

Barbados Evening

Institute which was inaugurated jon embroidery and typewriting.
in 1948, English is an additional
subject and is the key to satis- Tuesday afternoons are devot-

factory results in both Shorthand ed
and Typewriting. In January
boolq-keepipg and uaccounitancy
classes were begun, the teacher
is a Government clerk.

The Classes

to smocking, babies’ coats
embroidery and applique, plaited
shoes, candle wick work, turkish
lace, designing of posters, pihysi-
cal culture, decorated cake icing
and shorthand, .

On Wednesdays there is madeira



have now become teachers. There There are classes from Monday work, wreaths and bouquets,
are over thirty voluntary teach- to Friday Tasting from 4.30—6.00 umbrella, covering, knitting,
ers, Commercial subjects are in- p.m. The girls work in Sections babies’ booties, slipper making,
TRIO A AEA EE SA RTO BIOs EEE EAE,
NEW ARRIVALS
WHITE SHARKSKIN .....................cc000 sen Lep $2.20
BLACK & WHITE MATERIAL ....................... . $11
EUUPERERECIOED, PAPE UGE | Gein 650k ss vis vino vcadeebaviebacs $1.44
WIDTE CREPE BACK SATIN ....................0c0ee $3.00 & $3.02
j WHITE STAMPED CREPE 54” .................. sage $2.00
FLOWERED SPUN ................... eam 0 0b ae ceseees $1.59
ALSO
A NICE SELECTION OF LADIES STOCKINGS.

| T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4606

&

SAT. Special 930 a.m. & 1.30 p.m

“OUTLAW GOLD”
Johnny Mack BROWN

BRIDGETOWN—Dial 2310
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW



YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220

BTOWN

“ARIZONA TERRITORY"
Whip WILSON

BARBAREES (DOWNTOWN)
4.30 & 8,30 P.M.

SSSA
PLAZA CINEMAS

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-

upholster, cooking (pastry, sal-
ads and desserts, bottling pre-
serves.)

On Thursdays there is cake
icing, dress making, and oil paint-
ng.

On Fridays there is _ Irish
crochet, tatting, weaving alpar-
gatas, Bulgarian’ embroidery and
nursery motives, crepe paper and
table decorations.

Extra Classes

Miss Harper is now instructing
the members of the Bay Street
Girls’ Club in cooking. These
classes are for six weeks’ dura-
tion. The girls are given special
instructions in table service
and butlering. The subjects
under the head of Household
Furnishings, handicrafts and
cookery are arranged by the Reg-
istrar. In 1941 C. D, & W. grant-
ed £400 to cover a period of five
years for instruction and equip-
ment for commercial subjects,
hygiene, designing and embroid-
ery. These classes are organised
by the General Secretary, Miss
G,. Williams and submitted to the
Director of Education for his
approval.

The Union is financed by a
membership subscription of 1/-
monthly, a Grant-in-Aid from ti}
Barbados Government, the pro-
ceeds from the Annual Fete and
other social engagements.







Wuen 4 Girt doesn't want to leave
class~~and have to make embarrass-
tg explanations—it's Paradol she
asks for. For Paradol means quick
relief from suffering caused by
Periodic Pains—headache, too—
without disagreeable after-effects,
Ask your druggist for Paradol

scientifically compounded from 4
ingredients, The name “Dr. Chase”

‘* your assurance.

22
DR. CHASE’s
PARADOL
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—Dial 5170
DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

“FABIOLA”

OPENING FRIDAY 21st

SAMUEL GOLDWYN Presents
“lr WANT YOU” FABULOUS
GODDES OF LOVE IN A CITY OF SiN!
Dana Dorothy Farley Peggy Starring: Michele MORGAN—Henri VIDAL & Thousands in The Cast!
ANDREWS-—-McGUIRE—-GRANGER-—DOW Wed. & Thurs. 430 “& 6 pm.
Thurs, Special 1.30 p.m, Opening THURS. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m ABBOTT & COSTELLO in
also FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 r FOREIGN LEGION &
THE ARKANSAS SWING fect hg

HOOSIER HOT SHOTS é&

BONANZA TOWN

Charles STARRETT & Sr
———— oo

uley BURNETT

and Continuing 4.45 & 8.30 p.m

ONLY THE VALIANT

Starving Gregory PECK

“BUCCANEER GIRL" (oolor)

Special Sat. 22nd
“ARKANSAS
“BONANZA TOWN”

1.30 p.m.
SWING



4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
TAP ROOTS

a (Color by Technicolor)
Van HEFLIN & Susan HAYWARD

7
aie Tee ee ee “WOMAN FROM TANGIER
Tomorrow * ames Gl & 8.15
MY WELD IRISH ROSE
{ Starring
DENNIS MORGAN

TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952



—He Wanted Parents Like Other People Had—

By MAX TRELL

“I WISH,” said Teddy, the Stuffed |
Bear, “that I had a mother and |
father like everybody else.”

And he sighed. Because he felt
quite unhappy. Then he looked all
around the playroom, at the other
toys. None of them said anything. |
They all pretended to be busy, and |
as though they - a heard |

e had just said. |
+ think,” Teddy said to
the Tin Soldier, “that 1 have a
mother and father?”

The Tin Soldier coughed once or
twice. “H’m. .. of course, of course

have, Teddy.” :
ap woth ie a mother and |
father,” Mary-Jane the rag doll |
said. E

“Certainly you have, my boy,
«x.id Mr, Punch cheerfully.

Mr. Punch’s wife Judy nodded
and smiled. Mrs. Cuckoo opened the
door of her cottage in the clock and
said: “Of course you have!”

Shadows Agreed

Then Knart and Hanid, the Shad
ows, came into the room. And when
Mr. Punch and the Tin Soldier and
Mary-Jane explained to them that
Teddy, the Stuffed Bear was won-
dering if he had a mother and father
like everyone else, they also agrecd
that of course he had, 33

“Then where are they?” said
Veddy “lf I’ve got a mother ard
father, where can Lk find them? I'd
like to see them. I’dMike to see thenr |
right away.” i

At this everyone fell silent. Fi-
nally Mr. Punch said: “They left
you here when you were very small, |
But they haven't forgotten about
you. I’m sure of that, Teddy.”

" “) wish 1 could see them,” said’
‘Leddy. “1 wish they’d come back so
that 1 could see them.”

Now everyone in the playroom |
knew that Teddy didn’t have any)
father or mother. He was just a)
stuffed bear. Stuffed bears dont |
have anything. But they all would
have given anything in the world |
to find a proper mother and father |
for Teddy to keep him from feeling

3

bad.
And suddenly Mrs. Cuckoo, who



'There’s a picture of them in a



Teddy asked General Tin about
his parents.

had been listening all the while (and
thinking as hard as she could in-
side her cottage in the clock), threw
open her door again and called out:
“There's 4 picture of them in a book!

book!” o
. “What hook?” shouted Teddy.

“What book?” shouted everycne
else.

Bat Mrs. Cuckoo disappeared in-
side her cottage again and shut the
door without answering,

A Long Time

it took everyone a long time to

guess what book Mrs. Cuckoo
meant. But it was Hanid, the Shad-
ow-girl, who finally did. She darted
over tc the book-shelf, and took
lown u book, and opened it to the
story of Goldilocks and there !ig
and grand and smiling —were Popa
Bear and Mama Bear!

“And even a pictue of you, Tedily,
when you were a baby bear!” cried
Hanid.

‘Teddy, the Stuffed Bear, was so
happy he almost had tears in fis
eyes. He kept looking at the picture
of his mother and father. “And they
were here the whole time,” he kept
saying. “Oh, it’s wondertul to be
able to see what they look like-Jts
wonderful to have a mother «ii
father.”



Theatre Expert For Jamaica

LONDON.

Mr. Charles Thomas, lecturer
and adjudicator on production
and theatrical design for the Brit-
ish Drama League, of London, is
adjudicating at the Secondary
Schools Drama Festival in King-
ston, Jamaica, from March 10 to
15, announces the British Council.

| JANETTA_DRESS SHOP

He will also advise and lecture
to drama _ organisations and

schools in Mingston, Port An-
tonia, St. Ann’s Bay, Spanish
Town, Mandeville and Montego

Bay. He is expected to return to
Landon in the middle of April.

—B.U.P.

—



——

(Next to Singers)

FOR TRAVELLING

NYLON UNDIES—Slips,
STOCKINGS—45, 51 and

Half-Slips, Panties
60

PURE WOOL TWIN SETS—
* Sweater and Cardigan Sets from $22.98

to $27.98 for BOTH



WATCH

NEXT SUNDAY’S

ADVOCATE

BIG
EVENTS
THE
ROODAL
THEATRES

ROODAL
EMPIRE

TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Broderick Crawford = in—
ALL THE KING'S MEN
— and







— and —
DANGER ‘SIGNAL

THURS, 20th at 1.30 pan . &
SAT. 22nd at 9.30 am.
PHANTOM SPEAKS
& GRAND CANYON TRAIL



MID-NITE
DANGERS of the CANADIAN
MOUNTED



OLYMPIC

“0-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.16
Brenda JOYCE, Richar FRAZER
in

THUMBS UP &
TROCADERO

Wed @ Thurs. 4.30 8.15
Whole Serial r
DRUMS of FU MAN CHU
eennrnseilittindinmnennsiens
THURS. 20th at 1.30 p.m
HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE
VALLEY with Rocky Lane &
LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE
with Roy Rogers, Dale Evans



SAT. 22nd MIDNITE
Whole Serial—

KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED
—




RDA
“HIGHWAY 31”

Steve —Virginia GREY

OISTIN—via 8404
Last 2 Shows Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ALL MY SONS
Edward G. ROBINSON— ,
Burt LANCASTER &

GIPSY WILD CAT
(Technicolor)
Maria MONTEZ & Jon HALL

Wed (only) 445 & 830 p.m.
“LAW of the WEST”
Johnny Mack BROWN &
“RIDING the CHEROKEE TRAIL”

Tex RITTER

|

|-—=

| KG. M. ‘PLAYFIELD,
|

|

|







pieces

2S}

1 COUNTRY FAIR

in aid of
A COMMUNITY SCHOOL
PROJECT
given by
THE ORGANISING COMMITTEE
it

St. Philip
on
EASTER BANK HOLIDAY,
MUTH APRIL, 1952
TICKETS: Adults — 1/-
Children — 64.
A variety of entertainment in
store, including:— Bingo Game,
Greased Fole, Field Races, Lucky
Dip, Music
Stalls, Snack Bars, Tent Show
FAIR - DAY ;— 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
For enquiries,
with :—
CEDRIC DeC. TAYLOR,
(Sec

& Dancing, Rented

etc., communicate

Fair Committee)
Village,
St. Philip.

Draxes’

Other particulars in later Adverts.



THEATRES
ROXY

Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8 15
Philip Reed— Hillary Brooks in—

BIG TOWN SCANDAL
— and —
UNION 8TATION
William Hoiden,
Nancy Olson
WED. & THURS, 4.30 & 8.15
MICKFY ROONBY in
BIG WHEEL and
THREE. STEPS NORTH
— with -
LLOYD BRIDGES

Starring

THURS. 20th at 1.30 p.m
DOWN MEXICO WAY «&
ROLL ON TEXAS MOON

SAT. 22nd MIDN7TE

Whole Serial—
KING OF THE
FOREST RANGERS

Today Last 2 Shows 430 @ 8.15





KING OF THE
FOREST RANGERS



— with —
PAUL KELLY and
BRAZIL

SAT. 22nd At 9.30 A.M
HOMESTEADERS OF PARADISE
- and
LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FFE
— with —

WED. & THURS. 4.30 & 8.15
SPOILERS OF THE NORTH ,
Roy Rogers — Dale Evans





GAEETY |

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 490 PM.

STAGE FRIGHT

Jane WYMAN—Richard TODD &

GUNS OF THE PECOS

ck FORAN



Wed (Only) 8.30 p.m.
“OPERATION PACTFIC”

John WAYNE — Patricia NEAL
Ward BOND



THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“ARKANSAS SWING” &













& Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
P.M.



“BONANZA TOWN”

‘MU lt ONL. ©) 238.8888)








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“THE DESERT FOX”

James MASON — Jessica TANDY — Sir Cedric HARDWYCKE
OPENING TOMORROW, 5.00 & 8.30 P.M.






THRILLER!

"ANN HARDING -Bapey SULLIVAN

An M-G-M Picture
with

KEEFE BRASSELLE - Lewis STONE - EDUARD FRANZ - RICHARD ANDERSON » DAWN ADDAMS
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PLAZA THEATRES

BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2310)



BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
Walter WANGER




presents

TAP
ROOTS

Color by
TECHNICOLOR!
Starring
Van Susan
HEFLIN HAYWARD

~ With

Boris KARLOFF
Julie LONDON — Ward BOND
— Richard LONG
Introducing
WHITFIELD CONNOR
(From the Thrilling pages

of JAMES STREET’S MOST
EXCITING NOVEL!)

A Universal-International
Release!

OPENING FRIDAY 21ST

445 & 8.30 p.m. &
Continuing Daily

Also The Shert
TEX BENEKE & GLENN
MILLER’S ORCHESTRA

0) There
EVGA

ABA PAYTON - WARD BOND Si cu SOD
wat BORON DOUGLAS Tamme

ond Harry Brome
From the Nowe! by Cheries Margo Warren + Muti by Front Waama@

ALLAN CAGHET race. ousrmoureo oy WARNER BROS
OPENING THURS. 20th
4.45 & 8,30 p.m. Also

Friday 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.



Midnite Special Sat. 22nd

ROSE OF SANTA ROSA

Starring The Hoosier Hot Shots
Hezzie, Ken, Gil and Gabe.
&

RIDING THE OUTLAW TRAIL

Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

Sat. 22nd. Special 1.30 p.m.
THE ARKANSAS SWING

Hoosier Hot Shots &

BONANZA TOWN
Charles STARRETT &
Smiley BURNETT

‘Tig

: —
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952



Russian

Subs In
Caribbean?

Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Re-
public — The Government of the
Dominican Républic has accused
Russia of sending submarines in-
to the Caribbean, only 800 miles
from the Panama Canal. It is
planning a protest to the United
Nations Security Council, on the
grounds of flagrant violation of
Dominican sovereignty and of
the elementary principles of in-
ternational law.

An official in Ciudad Trujillo
said it had been definitely con-
firmed that the mysterious sub-
marines sighted recently off the
Republic’s coast were Russian.
They carried lights burning a
special gas used only by Russian
vessels, he said.

Dominican warships and ‘planes
were ordered to the area to in-
vestigate reports that several
foreign submarines had been
sighted. A number of U.S. Navy
submarines were in the Caribbean
on manoeuvres and the U.S. naval
Commander in the Caribbean
has been asked to check that none
of his submarines were involved
in the incident. —B.U.P.

Tug Goes To
Sugar Ship

FALMOUTH, England
The Falmouth salvage tu g





Differences
In Jamaican

P.N. Party

LONDON.



~







B.G. Population Rise Is
Indication Qf Progress

~ LONDON.
BRITISH GUIANA’S population is now rising steadily

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Further Progress
On World Sugar Pact

LONDON
PROGRESS towards the conclusion of a hew Inter
national Sugar Agreement, fixing output quotas for the
Major sugar-produciug countries of the world, has been
speeded up by the conclusion of the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement, signed in London last December,





j
}
}
}
|
|
|
|

A special commiuttee of the In- Sugar Agreement Nor do they}
ternational Sugar Council was include @stimates of production by
formed in London in August, the United States and her pos
1948, to consider the desirability sessions or by the French

of such an agreement, but had Colonies.

been unable to make great head But they do include an esti-

way until the position of Com- mate by the Cuban delegate, made

monwealth producers was clari- on Mareh Ist, that Cuba would

fied. - produce 6,180,000 metric tons of
A five -day meeting of this com- sugar thi, year,

mittee which has just concluded

however, had before it a new With just over one-third of thi,
draft agreement and it was de- Surplus sold so far, Cuba still ha
cided that this should supersede t? find markets for some 2,000,-
all earlier drafts for the purpost 000 tons of sugar, a formidable
of further consideration. ~ tonnage when it is recalled that

Details of the new draft aré Cuba’s competitors in the world
unknown, but it is believed almost}©Pen market to-day have
certain that it provides a} sugar to dispose of than in the
Britis, Commonwealth produc-|P8st few years.—B.U.P.
tion quota of 2,375,000 tons of
Sugar a year, which was the fig-
ure set by the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement.

International Conference

The committee has also agreed
that amy delegation may ask, al
a timer it considers opportune
for the United Nations to conven
an International Conference fo:
the discussion of a new Inter
national Sugar Agreement,

The increasing need for such a

for



Pyorriea and

Trench Mouth
Stopped in 24 Hours

“Turmoil,” which gained ‘ world-
wide fame by its efforts to save
the “Flying Enterprise” off the
English Atlantic coast in January,
has gone to the aid of a vessel in

trouble on a voyage trom Ja-
maica to London with a sugar
cargo,

In ‘its first rescue mission since
the “Flying Enterprise,” the tug
dashed from Falmouth to a point
ten miles off Bishop’s Rock light-
house, in the English Channel, to
take in tow the 3,390—ton British

Differences which have split the and, although the Colony

People’s National Party of Ja-
maica may be coming to a head
as a result of a recommendation
by Mr. Norman Manley, leader of
the Party, of the expulsion of
four left-wing members says the
London “Times,” in a leading
article.

“In order to compete with Mr.
Bustamante’s agrarian p h a l-
anxes,” says the paper, “Mr. Man-
ley has been compelled to keep
his party as broadly based as he

population over the last te’

Pulp Making





ship
trouble —B.U.P,



“Baron,” adrift with engine



RATES OF EXCHANGE

Prospects

GEORGETOWN,
B.G., March 17.
The Conference of the Econo

can and in order to compete with
his rival’s appeal to the crowd he
has tended to rely upon extrem-
ists in the left wing of his party.

is one of the most thinly-popu-

lated areas in the whole Caribbean area, the increase in

n years is one of the most con-

vincing indications of British Guiana’s progress.

B.G. Has Good

The number of people in British
Guiana declined from 309,000 in
1911 to 807,000 in 1921. But the
inerease began after that, slowly
at first and then accelerating in
the last few years, until it reached
425,156 by the end of 1960.

The Colony’s annual report for
1950, just published in London,
discloses these figures and says:
“The remarkable results which
have followed the DDT house-
spraying campaign have establish-
- ed the year 1945 as one of great

Among these are the four ex- Mic Commission for Latin Amer- significance in the Colony’s social
17th March, 1952 pelled men. ica to be held in Rio in Febru- and economic history.”

12.2/10% Chee ck tankers to doy, Natutally, the great bulk of ary 1868 will likely hear of the — The sepost dss nov mention the
Sight or Demand moderate, steady-minded Jamai- possibilities of producing pulp proposals to relieve over-popula-
a 2 Draft 702/10% cans would like to see a man of from wallaba and other species of Uon in other West Indian terri-
a 10 Cable eeien sw re oa ae _— British Guiana woods, British a ae a Fain

Coupons 68 2/10% rea with e mo eaders. ju These ar state be very if . s
SIVET «ADA 20% the danger is that the only im- gar ope rs Quintana: out that some 56,000 square miles
73A/10% Chequeson Bankers 714/10, ‘mediate gainer from such a Industrial Chemist attached to the of iar tots Di Eee un colone.
Demand Draft 71.25 breach might be Mr. Bustamante. peonomic Commission for Latin of the total area of the Colony,
Sight Drafts 711/10% It is that knowledge which has America. and Jose C. Leone; a to be inaceessible

73 1/10 Cable > » Pa We ati . . , _a resent.

TH O/LOR Currency ore sdonivar he ng ae yong Bagg 3 Chemical Engineer who special- he Colony’s trade position im
506% fie eso again.”"—BUP. * F ises in pulp and paper, who have proved somewhat during 1950. but
just completed a preliminary sur- there was still some excess of im-
a ER RR eS nn vey and plan a more extensive ports over exports. There was a
{ study at a later date. trend for imports to increase at a

CEE LEELA LLL SFG

Por

NIGERIA {4

4)

)

ti (
4)

























BELGIAN font
wee)
CONGO . nf

Proposed
Central
African





‘ rr: ue th .
Gee RHODESIA
ofa

/? 8, Ne
RHODESIA

I GEM ANAL ANOLE :
apical nf :
> le




ration af the near-Domiuuon of Southern
fesia and the territories 1 ~=Northern
land Povulaiion 170,000 Europeans =
Assets, Gold, silver, copper. cotton. tea
1R GODFREY iGINS. surg Premier
= her Rh A ROY WELENSK\



Rhodesia s

u nist legislatur
; 3ERT

Rhod esi

rnor

FFREY COLBY Governor of Nyasaland

leader ¢
RENNIE, Go of Northern



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WORLD'S MOST COPIED TRACTOR









During their stay,

Sunday last, these experts work-
ed mainly with the Assistant Con-
servator of Forests, D. B. Fan-
shawe and also called on His Ex-!

cellency the Governor and con
ferreq with the Acting Colonia

Secretary D. J. Parkinson, O.B.E.

They were shown around

which ended faster rate than exports.

The re-emergence of Canada as
the Colony’s biggest export mar-
cet is also shown in the report.
{nm 1938, the last full pre-war year,
. Canada took 53 per cent of British
1 Guiana’s exports and the United

Kingdom took 34 per cent. After
the war, these positions were re-

two versed, but over the post-war protected by

sawmills owned by B.G Timbers years, Canada has gradually

Ltd. (C.D.C.) and
plant,

They were greatly impressed for 54 per
with the amount of mechaniza- export trade, while the
tion at the sawmills as well as

the modern methods of extracting
They also studied

near the Bartica Triangle and hac
discussions with
Electric Company Limited.

To continue their survey over :
wide area they left to visit Sout!
Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay

the hydro-
electric possibilities of waterfalls worth

the Demerara

} in-
an extraction creased its imports from British

Guiana, until in 1950 it accounted
cent of the Colony’s
United
s Kingdom accounted for 29 per
. cent,
Sugar éxports in 1950 were
$23,137,999 and accounted
j for almost half the Colony’s total
exports. Bauxite exports were
worth $13,832,442 and next in
order of importance were rice,
' rum, diamonds and molasses.
1 Timber exports increased con-
siderably from 1949 to 1950, but

Columbia, Peru, Cuba, and Mex- still accounted for only a relative-
ico. They had already visited the ly small proportion of the Colony’s

French and Dutch Guianas.—

New Town Planner

For Jamaica
LONDON



trade, Exports of round and hewn
timber increased from $570,324 to

$617,001, while exports of sawn
timber rose from $453,167 to|
86,235.

There are hundreds of different
species of timber in British Gui-
ana’s 70,000 square miles of for-

A new Assistant Town Planner ests, the report says, but many of
is to be appointed in Jamaica by them are at present unmarketable

the Colonial Office )
man between 25 and 45 is sough

in London. A The Colonial Development Cor-

t poration is spending £1,000,000 on

and he must be a member of the the development of timber re-

Town Planning Institute and the sources

Royal Institute of British Archi

ts. The post is a permanent one tial increase in production is likely /
na Rr £945 to until the new sawmill is produc-

and a salary scale of
£1,045 is offered.—B.U.P.

Add These Specialties
to your list.
Tins Pears
Peaches
Apricots *
iPnecappie Jam
Apricet Jam
Bots. Marmalade
Guava Jelly
» Strawberry Jam
» Raspberry Jam
Tins Heinz Tomate Soup
Vegetable Salad
Mayonnaise
” » Chicken Soup
» Imperial Meatlunch
» Red Feather Wham
» Nateo Mineed Beef
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PAGE FOUR

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

No Smiles For The

Generals

LISBON was a struggle between
the generals and the politicians
It was a victory for the politic-
ians. But the generals were
declared the winners.

How was this illusion carried
out? Simply by deciding at half-



—_—

BARBADOS Sg ADVOGATE

Gaeta SS tase





TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952

Nobody is better qualified to judge the
authenticity of a book describing the ex-
periences of a Far Eastern prisoner of war
than a man who was himself a prisoner
in Japanese hands for 34 years. LESLIE
JONES, a gunner, who contributes the
following article, was captured at the
time of the fall of Singapore in February
1942, and spent the rest of the war in
Japanese prison camps. After working ©
on parties in Singapore and a long and

Tuesday, March 18, 1952








LEADERS

FOR hundreds of years Harrison Col-
lege, Lodge and Combermere have been
producing responsible leaders of society,

in Pastel Shades
B0c, per 100.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

|
Bradley's 100 divisions in combat}
reediness, there is the consola-
tion that the promise has not
been withdrawn.

By CHARLES FOLEY

on condition it was understood
that this represented the mazi-
mum of Europe’s capabilities.

The formula did not represent
what the ehiefs cf staff thought

Means test

’
}
j
{

not only in the British Caribbean but time on what score should be an- was the essential minimum to ..ACHESON can take back to) “
further afield in the United Kingdom, the | nounced, Why was this done? defend Europe. Washington at least a mock-up| bitter spell of slave labour on the “Death _
British Dominiong and Colonies and even TO PUT moral fibre into the Se it was enough to line up yall one defence, He has} Railway” in Thailand, he was transferred |

He has submitted
12 nations to a means test. <

Britain is showing that she is
acing her best. France, groan-
ing and shuddering under the

European nations and unite

them sufficiently to issue a glow-
ing communique.

Winning spirit ;

IT was often asked at Lisbon

Continental nations of the West;

TO FRIGHTEN the Kremlin ;
TO IMPRESS a Congress which
otherwise would baulk at bigger



to Japan where, shortly before the end of
the war, he witnessed the atom bomb
explosion at Nagasaki.

in the United States. Other schools in
Trinidad, British Guiana and Jamaica can
make similar claims but no other British

1




; . cis taxes h “Tee” di j f ;

Caribbean school could claim the distinc- Cadi rr why ha did — enpees, Tee ae has been asked to do still fe ancl .

tion which has always been Lodge’s of gee ae of the three bet: ly a eee Germany, although her prob-| @ THE NAKED , TYET) | GLAZED
attracting pupils from all over the Brit- bstion nS oo tine He stood by at SHAPE a /€M8 at one time dominated and| ADDS Me

: os : ‘ t aris, r might have wrecked the confer-
ish Caribbean, the Latin American repub- little clue — but at least the con- Paris, ready %0- mete & Grunete ence, will not have a man or *



flight to Lisbon in case of dead-

: : ‘ : f ssible the pro- Lan 9 sw \ | 7
sven fr he United Kingdom. erence made possible pr lock. gun to contribute this year. rs
eee cet aren sce. the eee tee duction of bright (if mystic) “He would then have told the | For our part we must remem- : - e NON «GLAZED
To-day Lodge is finding it increasingly aera announcing sUC- quarrelling leaders that if they ber. ded Yee : eS oe, _ Se 5
j aint is re i ears j did not compose their differences '¢™'n he gener a n, inter
difficult to maintain this reputation of As Mr. Eden put it — in the 4, would Sead to give up his the Normandy invasion was car- Reviewed by Leslie Jones eis
being a regiondl school and disappoint- pene la gee gn, Aa roe mission and go home. a, off with a regne the i # wa eo
J : s s pre ily hi ilita: estima s
ment has already been experienced by | unstated) hopes. That is, the ny Nie Naan. Sataee pik ere’ tes of what was) War or no war, governments have made aN \
parents in other West Indian islands when eienty of a breakdown w@ the London talks Gaeen ob Remember, too, Ks car experiments to assess the powers of endu:- :
stifie 7 : averted. Big Three Forei Minis’ n weapons may add an inc able Sie al cs =
they have been notified that there is no Hee targets pat Bite tere on Weapons wey Sreneth by 1964-—{/ ance of the human body. Their aim h Sinks of )
vacancy at Lodge for their sons. BEHIND the walls of the close- army infused the delegates with the year which is believed to be| been to find out the limits of heat and col
Lodge’s difficulties are by no means |!¥ guarded committee rooms and the winning spirit, the peak Of danger as far @S/ fatigue and hunger which their fighting Porcelain &
. ‘ Kia lied t It iy b th at dinner tables where the few Bradley’s targets for 1952 be- Russia is coreerned. t it a
unique in this respect. as been e top men met, public faces drop- came, instead a “goal of 50 We need _ » misies ya roops can wl hstand.
om in the United Kingdom for years |ped the rosy confidence which divisicns in appropriate conditions suggestion that Europe oe The Western nations ‘have on occasic ,
cust s y radiated at press conferences in ; aD rg 7 ‘nassive armies to hurl ihe i. Aluminum

to put down a child’s name for famous
English public, schools as soon as the
child is born. And even at quite humble
schools in the United Kingdom to-day
booking of school places has to be made
at least one year ahead,

Everywheré’ pressure on the schools is
being experienced and Lodge may consid-
er itself fortunate that it has so far not
been compelled to restrict admission more
noticeably. Yet Mr. Farmer’s account of
the growth in the number of pupils from
one hundred in 1911 to 350 in 1952 shows
how near is the danger which threatens,
It is no good paying lip service to the tra-
ditions and achievements of a_ school
while taking no action to see that those
same traditions and achievements are not
endangered. If Lodge is to continue as a
regional school catering for the education
of boys from all over the Caribbean and
beyond, it cannot continue to expand into
another Harrison College or Combermere
where numbers have made it impossible
any longer to train responsible Caribbean
leaders of the highest calibre, although
these schools continue to preduce good
scholars and worthy citizens.

The very word leader implies exclusive-
ness. A society composed of all leaders
needs no leading. These are truisms but
are too often overlooked by those who
rightly stress the necessity at all times in
any society of responsible leadership.

If Lodge is to maintain its “cosmopolitan”
reputation, a reputation which is even of
greater value than the more restricted
value of being a West Indian centre for
training boys, it cannot continue to expand:
it must set definite limits to its capacity and
concentrate on improving the quality of
the education offered; it may even be
forced to contract.

How limits are to be set without strain-
ing local loyalties and ignoring local needs
requires much study and great tolerance.
This island has such a high appreciation of
its secondary schools that the suggestion
that admittance to any one school should
be restricted on the plea of regionalism or
of ability to pay higher fees will provoke
immediate public outcry and will be de-
scribed as discriminatory.

Yet if responsible leadership is admitted
to be worthwhile and to be in need of nur-
ture and if Lodge is selected as a school for
responsible leaders the fact must be faced
that Lodge will automatically become ex-
clusive. To a generation which has grown
up to believe in expressions like the “equal-
ity of man,” and to parents who will not
readily admit that their children are one



another building. There the 250
journalists “covering the confer-
ence” were confined.

General Omar Bradley, top-
ranking military leader with the
old complex defence set-up, had
stated his targets at 50 divisions
in Europe by 1952, and 100 divi-
sions by 1954. He set ’em up and
he kept ‘em up.

Nobody will be able to say in
future that the military men
underestimated what was needed
| when responsibility is finally ap-
portioned

Mr. Harriman, representing the
| political side, argued that
| Europe’s budgets could not sup-
|port, nor could European
{industry survive, such gigantic
; military burdens.

He further added that America
could not produce the munitions
and materials needed for it in
time without going on to an
almost wartime basis.

The dispute was settled by a
tormula Military-man Bradley
agreed to the “realistic” basis
proposed by politician Harriman
}





I HAVE a bone to pick with the
London Mask Theatre which, on
Wednesday, presented NIGHT-
MARE-ABBEY at the Westmins-
ter Theatre

Particularly I wish to express
extreme annoyance with drama-
tist Anthony Sharp and producer
John Fernald. And to finish the
indietment' 1 am out of temper
with nearly every member of the
cast. {

With an. u per disregard for my
feelings they’ Shave spoiled _ the
whole plan for this week's Eve-
ning Standard theatre article. I
had intended to declare that the
London theatre is in such a de-
cline that one goes to it as a pen-
ance Wondering what one has
done to deserve such punishment.
I was going to state with candour
and honesty that for some time
I have sat and listened to dia-
logue on the stage that no man
of sensibility could endure in
real life.

Warming to my task I was de-
termined to say that I have seen
actors and actresses merely being
themselves and making no
attempt whatever to be anything
else, with particular reference to
one acter who would play Faust
and Mephisto with exactly the
same interpretation. As for the
authors I was about to suggest a
mass purge in the Russian style.

And then the Mask Theatre
has to go and spoil the .whole
thing!

If only the directors of this
enterprise had consulted any
competent commercial manager
ithey would have been told that
Nightmare Abbey could not have
ia dog’s chance of success. In
\fact, I can imagine the dialogue
lthat would have taken place be-
ltween Mr. Fernald and the said





of combat readiness.”
Military men openly admit that
they would think themselves
lucky to have 30 divisions in the
field if Russia attacked.

However, assorted reserves

might muster some 15 divisions, ~

and they would have to include
territorials and other half-trained
troops without artillery or tanks.
Even that would scrape the
European barrel clean.

Five more?

WHERE would the remaining
five divisions come from? No
more can be sent from America
without Congressional approval.

The only way to avoid a fight
in Congress—almost certainly a
losing: one—is to keep these five
divisions back on the other side
of the Atlantic until after the
presidential election.

In an emergency they would
have to come over piecemeal,

At all events, everyone went
off happily. The fair, round
figures are a comfort for the
Continentals.

lt there is no actual mention
in the final communique of

Mr. Peacock (06 years d
Wakes Up The Theatre

ify Heverley Raxter, MP

the customers want these days is
bedrooms and comics. Couldn't
you put in a spicy bedroom
scene? T’ll square it with Mr.
Peacock.”

“I’m afraid that will be diffi-
cult, You see he died 86 years
ago.”

You mean
tume play?”

“Yes—with incidental music.”

“Good morning, Mr. Ferning.
Don’t fall down the stairs.”

Any similarity to a particular
manager in the above is purely
coincidental and intended. And
now we shall get on with the
critic’s job of dealing with the
play itself and how it was pre-
sented to us.

In the first place what a relief
it is to see an author dealing with
the feminine and not merely the
female. Fiirtation is so much
more amusing than _ seduction,
Here we have no guys and dames,
but a romantic youth sincerely in
love with two young women at
once with appropriate music to
indicate, which is in the ascend-
ant.

to say it’s a cos-

The producer does not present
it as realism, but rather like a
ballet with words, There is the
aged butler, delightfully played
by Gerald Cross, whose legs give
out at the Knees; there is a punch
bowl in the shape of a skull:
there is a ghostly sleep-walker;
and there is a secret tower where
the young man hides one of his
loves while he tries to make up
his mind,

In addition we have Geoffrey
Dunn in good form as the Hon-
ourable Mr. Listless, who is so
exhausted that he relies on his
manservant to remind him where
he was last night, and there are





called for volunteers, subjected them to tes.s |
carried out under strict medical supervision, |
and then dismissed them with thanks and a
pat on the back. {|
ie * a The Nazis chose concentration camp vic- | :
TH isbon mass meeting w.is| ,; . , 3 ‘ Stak
a piece of window dressing. 1/| ‘IMS as their guinea-pigs. Uniformed Hitler |”
it did not frighten te pipsslans, Guard doctors, notebooks in hand, cold- |)
at least it did not ghten vs. ‘ ‘
Harriman, Bradley, and the few bloodedly” watched while the experiment
men who know what the Smmsine were carried out to their planned conclusion
future strength of Europe will be,|__ R
See Pea cites, the death, often, of the patient.
‘The true figures, the detailed The Japanese had not even a scientific pur
plans of whether and hae aun pose in mind.
when the real, as apart from the) The hardships, mental and physical tor-

paper, divisions will be raised
are known.only to a handful c'| ture, starvation and disease to which their

Russians back this year, next
year, or in 1954.

We must look to
defences. “~

our own

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Phone 4472





‘Cosmic secret’












PLASTIC HOSE

















“beer oe is marked with the} Prisoners were exposed, nevertheless com-
pertentous —_ warning, “Cosmic| prised one of the most cruel and exacting Oz’
“*Vesierday, with all the other| ‘Tials ever carried out on a mass of human
decisions agreed and_initialed| beings. | \
these papers were loaded in'o |
army trucks in Lisbon under} There is a tendency, now that Japan is -
a, be ag hisked aw°Y! about to be re-admitted to the community of Cleaner
—LES. | nations, to forget their inhuman behaviour.
_- — But we, who were the unwilling victims <-| Lighter
their cruelty, find it hard to forget. So w.l!
ead) those, I fancy, who read Russell Braddon’s | s h
indictment of the Japs in his book “The | moother
Naked fsland” (Werner Laurie). .
However, Braddon, an Australian Gunner, Hrighter
makes the mistake—no doubt pardonable in
an ex-prisoner of war—of over-dramatising Lengths of

some aspects of prison life. Yet other im-
portant events are overlooked.

I was at Changi, on Singapore Island,
which Braddon describes, Changi, which
developed primarily into a hospital camp. t
was controlled by an allied administration. |;

Braddon criticises the sort of jobs we were |;
given by our own administration. An office:
he says, ordered him to sweep a path, and then
made him do it again because he finished tc o
soon. However, Braddon forgets to menticn
that much of the work we did was for the
good of the communtiy. It was necessary ic
collect water for the hospital—which was ir
short supply because the Japanese refused to
repair the damaged pipes. It was necessary
also for parties to go to the beach to wash
dirty hospital bedding in the sea, the best
“disinfectant” we had for the purpose. And
we needed to grow food as our rations wer¢
utterly inadequate. Sweeping up was eas:
compared with the work we did on these
tasks,

Tnroughout, Braddon hits hard at the Jap-
anese guards, and—with somewhat less juc-
tice, I thought—at certain Allied officers.
share his cordial dislike for the Jap guards,
but I cannot agree with all he says about the
officers.

I have seen the guards beat prisoners merci-

And behind all this is the war
of ideas which, if not always
profound or amusing, does offer
the intellect’some sustenance, In
fact, the play is written, as was
the original book, for men and
women who are not put off by
words of more than one syllable.
It is not for those who can never
get out of the hollywood, nor is
it for those who regard love as
nothing more than a_ physical
condition,

In fact, this impact of Peaco:k
upon the London theatre comes
like a wind dispelling fog. He
was a romantic who satirised
romance, a thinker at war w.‘h
contemporary thought, a_ satir st
in an age of sentimentality. Ile
did not possess greatness, being
too much of an iconoclast, but |:e
had vigour, humour and _ intel i-
gence.

25, 50, GO & [°) ft.

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°

And now if you do not go to
the Westminster in droves I shail
be forced to the conclusion that
it is not the theatre which is sick
—but you.

Mr. Ross Hutchinson who wro.e
NAVY AT.SEA (now at the
Comedy), fought a gallant fig/t
against Mr. Herbert Morrison at
the last election. I wonder wiy
he did not write a play about that
instead of this harmless trifle wi-h
the same old recipe of susceptibie
sailors and innocently designing
women, i

Of course, no one can equal
Hugh Wakefield as an amorous
captain who maintains his mono-
cled dignity no matter how the
plot rages against him. And it i
was good of him to include lis! lessly at the slightest provocation. In fact,

in the ot
young daughter Margaret in the) have been victim of many such assaults.
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There were three uproarious
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whit less intelligent or less capable of be- | manager: oe “. peereee ge- tunately they all came at the} Wn officers made to keep the men occupied. | & ° : — :
; ; ; “ v ,e r ne e p volution ° iffic intaini 19 Seay See ee 1 ich eae ’
coming responsible leaders than soineone’s | piey?™ 5 ee end he worthlessness of every going — és bs = on ch They-had the difficult wah of mariteining ce % x
else, this idea of exclusiveness will appear || “It’s the dremationtion, ot ws Bias i gaa eunerares. the ladies rang the|Cipline when there was a tendency for many * At *s 9 >
. eles : |}Thomas Peacock’s novel, Night- ut holding it all together is a alarm bel for cocktails, This 0 " x
shocking or maybe reactionary. But no one | mare Abbey.” most attractive young actor, Alan ] agree, is almost. as funny as to lose personal values and moral codes. And} g
can, or ever will be able to, produce re- | “Sort of The Cat and the meaner, = J comments anything that can happen in an| keeping the men’s minds occupied with the) FOR .
x | Canary?” delightful as ythrop Wry, election. i he : x
sponsible leaders en masse. Whether the | ~ «Not quite It’s a satire on the who could have been so conten: With so little to commend 1 tasks they set them helped to preserve those S x
contribution of responsible leaders (which oer 19th eee ae ae tril ws. a a. ony te oe gladly pay tribute to a young] Values. % s
‘ modern civilisation a e@ were away. ( acNaughtan actor nam +h pets i :
Lodge, Harrison College and Combermere | march of intellect.” 4 speaks his lines beautifully and had the etait = ot 4| Under such conditions, I thought the offic-| x >
has been making among many generations) “IT’S WHAT?” with intelligence. With or with- yery Guardee Second-lieutenant | ers did their job as well as it could be done. 13 y
: ; | “I told you.” out a wig, here is an actor of (mysteriously an RE) who never ; : : x %
will be adequate to counterbalance the evil | “Is it sexy?” great promise. stepped out of his part. for a| _/ Worked side by side with many officers on | ¥ >
ps * s . “ i y ina yi 4 i :
effects of irresponsible leaders is a question ls Well, it is amusingly roman- eeany we bevy. Valois Meme moment. I eumpect that Mr. Stoll| the “Death Railway” when the Japanese] ,
4 . c. . oo ~ as e mi n * :
which also requires an answer. But no | “Listen here Mr. Ferdinand.” Anne Trego as the determined romedian. gs of a g00d/ were using every available man to speed up %
. “ ” sve
effort to Pp roduce bOee onsible leaders should Leen het Mr. Ferner, what on hak Rage® = —— oS Tea eee wee LES the work. I saw ay of them humiliated
ever be despised. | ‘ and beaten in front of their men for attempt-
aS hha e ing to reason with the guards.
: “~~ | Braddon emphasise throughout the book AS
Our Readers Say; Mati Ra Sahay BS gamomgmousdonoy for 2 moet | she bad time, he had as a P.O.W. but in some|§ _, MAMIE et
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ays anks Colling Ltd. James A. Lynch & Co., Lid. 10 99 wees, Uirs, gan re _ ae Apart from these points, though, I fount} Edam Ox Tails ..... .... per I 42c.
To The Editor, The Advocate,— Pr neat eee ee 2 a eek ee 3 Holbrook — one basket of flow- Braddon’s account wholly accurate and we}! bx “Fonte Ox Tongues ... per Tb 60c
’ ; 5 vP s b ober om m 3 me. re "
ae : cae cere yg ano P Alleyne, Arthur & Co, Lid. 10 00 ath ond ¥ Bartlett, who von told. The passages dealing with the events} Meats for x
‘ub wi e to express e ub acknowledges with JN), Harrlaman .é& Co 10 00 a galion of rum.) \) i i ar-|<
sincere thanks to all those who grateful thanks the donations re- See ee ass a. oe an Cmte, tare ee, ek ve Zz ae of Singapore are par- % . Easter ALE %
assisted with their annual dance ceived during the year as Bradshaw & Co * 10.00 of whic , o ave m dis- leularly informative, ; x s
held at the Marine Hotel on Feb- follows ‘-— Bata Shoe Store 5 00 tributed to the following chari- 2. pod pi : : Ham Legs (Cut or Whole) Bass >
ruary 23rd., particularly those who Singer Sewing Machine Co, .. $ 25.00 Allonso Be DeLima a Co 5 00 Sess - ver f 8 picture of the action in Hams in Tins 1}1, 2tb, 4Ib : %
donated flowers, loaned games and Gsperal Traders Ltd. . 25.00 ¥ jDelame, & Co . ta 5 00 ae ee = _ ee Malaya prior to the capitulation. And he aoe of eget oe Worthington 8
. oe hho ady Savage ‘ 15.00 Vilkinson aynes Co., Ltd. 5 00 . ‘orned Bee
oe like & thanks the eons TN. Goddard & Bons Ltd. 8 0 ine ke Co. gum 3 0 Home for mitierty Gentlemen 30.00 shows how the well-equipped and well-sup- Corned Mutton in tins 7 S
aeveeene a ros ad- %, Geddes Grant tad ; a a 7 a a ne ia al ca St Mans ‘see vo 0 ported Japanese troops were able to create Danish Bacon Guinness Stout 3
vertisin is free of cost, and als Vm. Fogarty LAd. aod eiaowde ons St Vincent de Paul 9% i ir i ion’ i
to thank the following merchants GaneeRreR nian” ns|| ieee ae te $0 GE'S" Hostel 30 Ob ant RavOS with thats Sanit eHen 5 SAS Ee SgrEnE “SOP eRE ANCHOR MILK 3
for donating prizes for the Hoopla Plantations Toe Payal 35,00 = we) = Co Ltd 5 00 g F $ Holiday House 50 00 against our own men, who had hardly any x
* arbados Gulf O 5 & 3 s 8 -
game a Barbados Telephone Co. 18.00 eth % tel e 3.0 St, Patrick's Poor School 80 00 air and naval support and suffered from a $ ° ° %
Alex. Bayley ASS mgn & Soge 8 Eg PS Bs «BS [shortage of equipment. Had the odds been|? AE's GODDARD'S
Caaanee gins Ince BOS, thd es OF KR inunte & Co, itd 88) Auenme Ales go oo eee een Soins Pee, Tie eae Pennees TT, S
arbad Hard T. Her py ev ‘s i. i r ,, . i - ; | ¥ >
Barbados Hardware 5 Bee eee gt ak daar 90 00 ie: Were GansAian. ‘Chis Rev. Francis Godson's Chari | might have been very different during the % FOR BE ER SERVICE %
Dr. & Mrs, Jack Knights Ltd. 10.00 especially wish to thank an @ On page 5 | ensuing years. $4,6666599569559S09SSSS905! " Sy

=~


TUESDAY, MARCH 18,

1952



Big Crowd

Attend Case

DEFENCE COUNSEL, Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., and
Solicitor General, Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., for the Crown,
yesterday exhausted the Jury List after 15 “challenges”
and 16 “calls” for standby as the Carlos Smith Falsification,
Larceny and Embezzlement cases began at the Court of
Grand Segsions before His Lordship Sir Allan Collymore.

Whe

the Jury List had been exhausted, there was

still another juryman needed and one was eventually

selected from the standby list. ‘ :
Smith is charged on three counts of falsification: of

accounts, one of larceny as a Civil Servant® and two of

embezzlement as a Civil Servant.

Mr.‘E: K. Walcott is

associated with Mr. E, W. Barrow for the defence.

A packed court listened to the
first day of hearing as the
Solicitor General outlined the case
and then five witnesses gave evi-
dence, The case continues t-
day. *

Carlos E. Smith was placed be-
fore the court on three counts
of falsification of accounts, one
count of larceny as a public ser-
vant and two counts of embez-
zlement as a public servant. On
the first count the charge was
Petty Cash Book the receipt of
$3,000. The second count read
that on April 6, 1945, while em-
ployed as a clerk he did with in-
tent to defraud omit from the
that on April 6, 1945, with intent
to defraud he omitted from the
Petty Cash Book the receipt of
$5,000.

Third Count

On the third count he is charg-
ed with having on April 6, 1945,
with intent to defraud, concurred
in omitting from or in the Cash
Statement Record Book a material
of $3,000. The fourth count read
that on April 6, 1945, he stole
the amount of $3,000 belonging to
His Majesty, and on the fifth
count he is charged with having,
while he was entrusted by virtue
of his employment with the cus-

tody of control of $2,000, fraudu- ;

lently applieq the sgme amount to
hig own use.

On the sixth count he is charg-
ed with having on April 6 1445,
by virtue of his employment be-
ing entrusted with the amount of

,000, fraudulently applied the
same amount to his own uce.

Outlining the case to the jury,
Mr. Reece said that it
which would
time and some

last a fairly long

of the evidence
would be tedioug to listen to in
that many witnesses would be
called to deal with book, ac-
counts and documents anc they
would be asked to look st them.
He was nevertheless asking them
to give strict attention to all the
evidence.

He said that Smith had been
employed at the Treasury from
the time he entered the Civil Ser-
vice until June 1951, when he
was transferred to the Audit De-
partment.

The alleged offence occurred a

long time ago, April 6, 1945, but.

it was not until July last year
that any irregularity in the Trea-
sury was discovered,

Any person employed in the
capacity of treasurer and whose,
duty it was to keep accounts had
to do so as carefully as possible.

“IT am not suggesting to you,”
he said, “that the mere fact that
a clerk makes a mistake in itself
amounts to falsification of ac-
counts and is a criminal offence.
It is not.”

Motives of Fraud

But if at the time of the mis-
take in making the accounts, this
putung in something or fauing to
put in something was actuated by
motives of fraud, then he was
submitting that it would be a
criminal offence,

The facts of the case to be
established were that the money
was in the possession of the
Colonial Treasurer at the time and
that Smith as clerk about the
vault of the treasury used to
take money from it to pay out
over the counter.

“It will be a question for you,”
he said, “whether on the evi-:
dence which will be before you,
you do mot find that under the
circumstances of this case, he
wag taking money for himself.”

In July 1951, shortages were
discovered. The evidence of Mr.
Jordan would be to the fact that
he went on that date to the ‘trea-
sury for the purpose of getting
money to pay out over the coun-
ter and when he took out what
he imagined to be five thousand
dollar bundles of notes, and open-
ed it, there were not what they
were supposed to be.

After the lapse of a short period
of.time, the matter was reported
to the Accountant General and a
further search was made, Then
it was discovered that _ certain
other irregularities were present
and the Accountant General in due
time reported to further author-
ities, Then certain statements
were taken, some from Smith.

Payments
He told them it would be nec-
essary to look at the Petty Cash
Book of that date and the record










was one ©

TRAY CLOTHS, Each

HOME PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT

ca
book in which notés were made
of payments. made! and | monies
received.

On the date in question, there
was an entry of $2,000 in Smith's
hand writing: in the same book
which showed money was taken
out of the vault—in other words
$2,000 was taken by him for the
purpose of paying out to numer-
ous people, The record would
show that on April 4, there were
certain monies in the vault and
they were notes of $2,000 denom-
ination, :

He said that on April 5. 1945,
there were two thousand in twos,
two in ones and fifteen thous-
and in fives. On April 6, the
record book showed twenty-five
thousand in fives and two thous-
and in ones. In other words, a
bundle of twos had disappeared.

He said that D, E. W. Gittens
was in 1945 Colonial Treasurer
and Commissioner of Currency
and C. E. Stoute was then Man-
ager of the Savings Bank. They
would prove that on April 5
they issued $4,000 in twos and
ones to the Commercial banks,
but in truth and fact that money
never went into circulation be-
cause it was stopped by Gittens
and put into the public vault.

imoney Transferred
The Prosecution was saying
that the twos were always there
at the vault masqueraded as fives,
They would see that the accused
wrote in the record two thous-
and dollars were taken from the
vault and placed in the till. The
record did not refer to having
taken any other note of twos,
but twos nevertheless found their
way in the till under the guise
fives,

The Treasury vault is locked
by combination, he said. Several
clerks knew, but no one knew
all. Some knew the top and some
the bottom. For someone to go
normally he would have to have
someone with him.

After the outline of the case,
the witnesses were called.

Walter D. Charlton, Accountant
General, said the had taken up his
appointment on May 14, 1951.

Smith was working in the
Treasury as paying teller. Smith
left that Department and went to
the Audit Office in June.

On July 7, George Amory came
to him and made a report. He
showed him some currency notes
which he examined. Two pack-
ages labelled fives were cut
open and one of them con-
tained two dollar notes instead
of fives, The other contained
blank paper, Two other bundles
were also shown ‘him.

He went to the vault and made
a further examination, Returning
from the vault he took charge of
the four bundles and reported the
matter to the Financial Secretary
after he had examined the seals,
The seals, stamps and bundles he
‘anded to the Police.

Cross-Examined

Cross-examined, he said that
about June a new currency was
about to be introduced here. The
date fixed was August though
there had previously been the in-
tention of introducing it on July
10. That would have meant the
destruction of the old notes, The
date would ‘have been known to
everybody. The key to the com-
bination is kept in the Colonial

Secretary's Office in case of
an emergency .
He said he normally left the

office when the cash for the day
had been balanced, He alone had
been in the treasury once, a bank-
holiday.

He was present on three oc-
easions when statements were
taken by the police. He did not
supply Inspector Bourne with any
questions he felt Bourne should
have asked. He may have told him
certain things he wanted asked
Bourne never followed him out
of his office asking for an explana-
tion of a question to be asked.

He went to Smith on July 9
and asked him whether he knew
anything or could help him in any
way. Smith did not tell him he
had no theories and to formulate
theories might throw suspicion on
someone,

He had gone there in a friendly
manner, he said and Smith told
him he did not wish to incrimin-
ate anybody. He was present
when Inspector Bourne asked
Smith about that same statement.

He said he told Smith he might
be in a very difficult position him-
self,



did not wish to incriminate any-

one was such an astonishing reply
that he had been induced to tell
him to look after himself.

He stopped him while he was
speaking about | incrimineting
someone else; for if he was going
cn like that he wanted somebody
else to be present.

He said he had been satisiied
that a fraud had been commited
and he went to get information
as to how it was done and who
aid it,

At this stage he denied having
said he had told Smith to jook
after himself. He had told Smith
he migat be in an awkward posi-

. Won because he had handlea ove

cash ior a Lumber of years.
On no oceasion had-he ever

gone to Inspector Bours re

Smith and enquiied whethe,
Smith, had been calling him ;
Caarlton, a liar, He never sugg vt-
ed to any of the clerks that they

he,

were nol co-ape:atin’ and such
lack would go against them as
eivi ts He had never

discussed it with any of them,

Re-examined he said he
never asked any help from
police.

had
th

The Bank-Holiday ne went to
the Treasury was June 7 He hav
forgotten certain parade tickets in
his office and had gone for them.
He was not there more than two
minutes, At the time he did not
know the combination, though h:
now knows one.

Cyril Stoute of Collymore Rock,
St. Michael, said he is a Retired
Manager of the Savings Bank.

During the year 1945 he was
one of the Currency Commission-
ers. On April 5, 1945, Mr. D.
Gittens was the other Currency
Commissioner, Exhibit wag. the
log book on April 5, 1945, there
was an entry in his hand writing
of the transactions of the Cur-
rency Department that day. There
was a record of notes for Bar-

clays Bank and the Royal Bank
of Canada.

Notes Checked

The old notes were checked
and cancelled. One thousand $2
notes were issued to the Royal
Bank of Canada and Mr, Gittens
and himself signed it.

Sometimes he went into the
vault and might take a clerk when
notes are taken out of the vaults.
During the war notes used to
come signed and then it was de-
cided’ to bring down the notes
from the U.K. unsigned,

When they are unsigned they
have to be taken to the vault of
the Currency Department and
then they would be sent to the
Advocate in the custody of two
clerks to have the signatures af-
fixed. They are then returned to
the Currency Dept, and locked
up. Before they are locked up
they are checked at the Treasury
Dept. On November 20, 1944,
some notes were returned from
the Advocate with the signatures
affixed and he made an entry in
the book,

Cross-examined Mr, Stoute
said that the issued to the Royal
Bank on April 5 $2,000 in $1
notes. The transaction was clos-
ed at about 12.15 p.m. He could
not say if the Bank wanted a
particular denomination, If Mr
Gittens wanted a particular de-
nomination he would get it. Cur-
rency clerks had their desks in
the Currency Dept., but he coult
not say if they had a desk op-
posite the vault in the Treasury.
He could not say anything about
the sealing of the packages.

The log book is kept in the
Currency Vault and the Curren-
cy Vault is not the same as the
Treasury Vault. On September
19, 1951, the log book was shown
to him and the Accountant Gen-
eral took the book out of & steel
cabinet,

: An Alteration

To Mr. Reece Mr. Stoute said
on November 20, 1944, there was
an_alteration in the book,

Darnley Gittens said he is a
retired Currency Commissioner.
In 1944 he was Colonial Treasur-
er in the Treasury and was also
Currency Commissioner, Mr.
Stoute was the other Currency
Commissioner. On April 5, 1945,
there were transactions with Bar-
clays Bank. Old notes were re-
ceived and new notes issued,
Three thousand one dollar notes,
one thousand two dollar and five
thousand five dollar notes were
received from Barclays Bank and
$30,000 one dollar notes were is-
sued in exchange. Notes were also
issued to the Royal Bank of
Canada. Some of the notes that
should have gone to the Royal
Bank of Canada went to the
Treasury and the, Bank was
handed a cheque for $4,000. This
cheque was signed by him.

The cheque was filled in by
Mr, Jordan. On April 4, 1945
$15,000 in five dollar notes were
stored in the vaults, and on the
day before the transaction $19,000
were in the vaults,

Cash Checked

At the end of the day the vault
Clerk checks the cash in the
hands of the Paying Teller.

The first entry in Exhibits—
the Petty Cash Book—was made

Astonishing Reply on March 11, 1944, and ended
The reply from Smith that he : @ On Page 8



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Civil Servant Stands Trial On Larcen



AFTER ROUGH



SAILING

REV. W. T. DENINGTON (left in shorts) looks at his stock after
they were landed on the Pier Head from the Schooner “Excelsior

Hodge.”

Rev. Armstrong of St. Philip, wearing grey suit and bib, is

discussing a goat with Rev. Denington.

West Indies
Minded
From page 1
been possible to arrange this fur-
ther Conference, and I extend to
you all a very warm welcome to
Hastings House.
Children Acts

You may, I think, justifiably
take the view that progress has
been made in the intervening
period, in the directions recom-
mended at the last Social Welfare
Conference,

For example, Children Acts
have been brought into operation
in Jamaiva and the Leeward
Islands, While Barbados and
B itish Honduras are about to
take a similar step. In British
Honduras, poor relief has been
provided for by legislation, an
effective probation service has
been started, and Social Welfare
work has bsen reorganised, with
a strong emphasis on co-opera-
tives and handicrafts.

Barbados has established and
strengthened its Welfare depart-
ment, and built up a probation
service; indeed, probation has by
now almost everywhere | secured
recognition as an essential service
in a civilised state, A new em-
phasis has everywhere been
placed on the domestic subjects,
or es I suppose we must call them,
home-making and nutrition, In
British Guiana, for example, two
women welfare officers have been
given scholarships for professional

in this field, In Trinidad
a child protection service is being
built up. Some of the smaller
ccmmunities are not behind hand
in their attitude to welfare. [|
might mention the youth work ia
Antigua: boarding out of children
in Dominica and Grenada: women
work and an approved school in
St. Vincent: community council
in St. Kitts: steps to combat de-
linquenev in St. Lucia.

Help for Services

A school of film-making has
been held in the West Indies, and
West Indian documentary films
produced, Experts, have visited
us from the United States to ad-
vise on the marketing of hand-
craft products. Another wel-
come development is that the
Government welfare services
are being supplementel by un-
official efforts through such
agencies as the Sugar Industry
Labour Welfare funds, the Extra-
Mural Department of the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies,
and its Institute of Social and
Economic Research, Moreover,
industrial welfare is making steady
progress in private businesses and
industries. We in Hastings House
nurse the hope of establishing a
regional institute to give a full-

time training to teachers and
social workers in the domestic
subjects.

Yet, in spite of these modest
but encouraging signs of prog-
ress, there is no doubt that
social welfare workers are sti)l
moving in anxious times
The original schemes for settiny

up welfare staffs, financed under
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Acts and devised mainly
during the first four years of this
Organisation's life by Professor
Simey, are, in spite of various ex.
tensions, almost all at an end, o:

nearing completion, and West
Indian territories are facing the



Household Items

KITCHEN TOWELS, Fach______.__ $1.50
MILK COVERS, Each... 72, & Bde.

ICE BAGS & MALLETS, Set, S160

TABLE CENTRES, Each



-— Se ee ee

$2.25 & $2.75

Lsalibion cana lovihe com enthatieaiiicesienapeene

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET











— $$$ $$$ —

Need Sober
Society

problem of how to provide for
official welfare services from their
own funds, at a time when all their
commitments are increasing faster
than their public revenues, Your
discussions and your planning at
this Conference must take place
in the knowledge that these serv-
ices, like all other activities of
Government, must be so organiseu
that they will increase the national
productivity, and not add unfruit-
fully to the burdens upon a na-
tional economy which is already
being overstrained, and which as

we see can only be expanded
siowly and by much painful
ffort.

I do not think there is any
real danger, at this stage, that
the British West Indies will fail
to recognise that social welfare

services can make a positive con-

tribution to the national wealth,
Social services aim at making
better citizens, and better citizens

are better producers. They make

more intelligent leaders, and a
better and more adaptable and
enterprising labour force; better

and wiser spenders of the national
wealth. In every progressive coun-
try in the world, the most success+
ful and stable enterprises are
those which most readily recognise
the value of paying attention to
the welfare of their workers.

The Objective

Yet, while recognising that in
these times of difficuit nnwnce
social welfare must be judgea \o
a large extent by its material re-
sults, you social workers and tne
people you represent can never
torget that your main objey. is
to raise human values. Al!
thing you teach, such as thrift,
self-help, and social duty; the
stimulus of recreation to abolish
the sheer boredom of life in many
rural areas, and the encourage-
ment of self expression trough
the arts, are primarily designed
to lead to richer lives for ordinary





men and women. Your tass
is to create a society in which
ideas will generate and circulote
and be measured by correct

standards; a society in which pro-
blems such ag the pouitical future
of the West Indies, and the risk
of its frustration through over-
population, will be measured
poberly, and met with solutions
in which every man and wom n
can play a part. Your task could
not be more important. If the
means at your disposal are mod
est, and the tools of your trace
simple, yet your work must be
carried out on the highest plane
of human endeavour,
Warm Welcome

I shall not attempt to. define
your problems: your “hairran is
much more qualified to dv that
But I am especially glad that, i:
dealing with them, you will hav
the co-operation of Mr. Wilfred
Chinn, the Secretary of Stat
Social Welfare Adviser. Mr, Ch'nn
has alfeady spent oine week
informing himself of the sta oe «
Welfare work in this region. H
has a unique first-hand knowled:
of welfare work throughout thi
Colonial Empire, and his counsel!
will be most helpful thi
extend to him on ve
particularly w.

on pege 8

to u

week. I
behalf a

rm wel





Patek: |

Charge

Vews In Brief

16 WATCHES
STOLEN

SIXTEEN WATCHES | valu
$299, two alarm clocks value
¥.20, 14 tins of cigarettes valu.«
$13 and a number of ear-rin «s
were stolen when the drug sto.
of H. D. Rock at Tudor Strect
City, was broken and entered bk.
ween 9.30 p.m. on Friday and 8
+m. on Saturday. They are tc
property of Mr. Rock. ,

NESTA VAUGHAN of Codrir«-
ton College, St. John, repori od
saat her leather handbag valucd
-15 was stolen while she was at
(the Modern Dress Shop, Broaa
otreet, on Saturday.







The handbag contained a cheque
fov $40, a wrist watch valued $15,
a peir of spectacles valued $10, 4
compact case valued $10, a leath«
purse containing $5.72 and othe
articles, total value $96.40.

TWO BATHING SUITS valu
$20 were stolen from a_ cloth
line at the home of Arthur Harr
at “tIriston,” Worthing, Chr
Church, between 7.00 and 11.00
am, on Saturday. They are |
property.

WHITFIELD STOUTE of st
~:iistopher Village, Christ Church
reported that his bicycle valu.
was stolen from outside the
some of Bertram Clarke at the
same address between 6.30 aod
Uv p.m. on Sunday,

Fires Burn
: u
er i

Crop Canes

SIX aeres of second crop vip<
canes were burnt w hen a fire o -
curred at Frere Pilgrim Plantat o.1
Christ Church, at about 9,00 p.m
on Saturday. They are the property
of C. M. Drayton and were insure:

At Horse Hill Plantation, Si
Joseph, a fire at about 3.00 p.m
on Saturday burnt two and thr«
quarters acres of third crop 1
eanes and three quarters of
acre of trash. The canes are |
property of Joes River Ltd,
were insured,

Ten acres of third crop rij
canes were burnt when a fire or
curred at Castle Grant Plantati
St. Joseph at about 3.00 a.m



Saturday, property of E. C
They were insured,

A fire at Gall Hill, Chr
Church at about 1.30 am. @
Saturday burnt a quarter mf 4
acre of fourth crop ripe cane *
property of Jonathan Nurse «

Lodge Road, Christ Church. Ti «
were not insured.

Five acres of first crop ry
canes were burnt when a_ fir
broke out at Seniors Plantatio
St. Andrew, at about 7.00 p.m. o

Sunday, They are the proper
of J. A. Haynes and were insure:
A fire at Haggatts Hall Planta-
tion, St. Michael burnt four sere
of first crop ripe canes, proper|
of Dowding Estates and Tracin
Co., Ltd. They were insured



31 PASS FIRST AID EXAM

Certificates have just bee
received for the following suc-
cessful candidates in a First Aioa

examination held by Dr. A. L.
Stuart and Dr. B. Skinner tt
Wecember, 1951:—

Gordon Spooner, Hartley Bron
ker, Miriam Cadogan, Graci
Crawford, Merle Blackman, Grace
Mayers, Sybil Yearwood, Shirle
Gibbs, Marion Worrell, Lucili
Holder, Elaine Benjamin, Lucin

Hunte, Theodore Agard, Louis
Greene, Coral Harper, Glori
Forde, Ardith Young, One
Haynes, Marcia Skeete, Ottalcss
Johnson, Patricia Greene, Erle

Young, Daphne Chase, Phyllis F.t
Joan Collymore, Joan Gill, Esthe
Brome, Eula Yearwood, Clorc:
Holder, Ernesta Norville,
Oreita Bannister.

Ten candidates failed to qualify
The course of lectures was give
by Dr. O, James, assisted by mem
bers of The St. John Amvbula:
Brigade.



Womens Canadian Club

@ From Page 4

ties am





Baby Health League (Mrs
00 0S (yscecy
St Lawrence Child Health
League wo
Â¥Y 4 P.C HO OF
t. John Eye Fund 60 00
Blind, Deaf & Dumb Institute 60 60
SPCA 0 0
St Matthias Charitic 30 00
nen's Fund, Port Welfare 60 00
y League Fund 60 00
erving Charities 120 00
The balance of the dan
profits will be distributed
Christmas.
. Again with sincere thanks
you and everyone who assisted

in, making this function a succes
LEE NIBLOCK
Hony. Secretary
“Cleveland”,
Brittons Cross Rd.,
17th March, 1952,



A REALLY
SAFE
Liou

ANTISEPTIC

Though a powerful and penetrating germicide, it can be used

not only on the skin, in the

nose, throat and eyes, but alsu

taken internally.
RELILVES PAIN AND PROMOTES RAPID HEALING

ON SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES

KNIGHT'S LTD. — Distributors

J









PAGE FIVE











|
|
|
|

| HARRISON'S

INVESTMENTS

If you are the holder of —

Commonwealth of Australia
o% Debentures due 1952-55
you should consult us

without delay regarding the

exchange of these securities

A. 8. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) LTD.

Barbados Correspondents For

ROYAL SECURITIES CORP. LTD.





‘- Ask your
ther Ashton & Parsons Infants’ Powders are wonderfully
M bo at teething time. They ensure regular easy
; motions, cool the blood and are absolutely safe, Try
give you them next time baby is fretful through teething,

INFANTS’ POWDERS *

aba



A e
U6 LINKING Tig
WITH THE WoRtp eet |
7
s HIGHWays
Over 100 flights daily, 800,000 passengers
flown 4 year on 47 Sicviiners along 18,090
miles of “Maple Leaf" routes. The 7th
largest airline in the world—T.C.A, has
built its great reeord of reliability on
years of smooth comfortable, scheduled
fiving
For Complete Information, See
GARDINER AUSTIN & CO, LTD

lower Broad Str, Btown
Phone — 4704
TRANS-CANADA
Alr Lines

International Trans-Atiantic
Transcontinental





HARRISON'S Broad si. .
INTRODUCING

“ORIAC™

IMPROVED SYNTHETIC
CHAMOIS LEATHER









THE
4

THE -ORIACâ„¢

|

Ideal for use with=—

Does not become slimy

Does not become stiff when dry

Is soft and pliable in use

Has no thin patches

Possesses a long life of useful service

Motor Cars, Mirrors, Windows

and Glassware, Household
Paintwork Etc.

SIZE 22” x 181/,”

only $4 cents each





Hardware Dept.
2364









SELECT THESE NOW.

)

des \

For Mt

Originally This |}

Week {

BIDDY’S ASPARAGUS SOUP $ .33 $30 j
LETONA GREEN PEA SOUP... 32
MARELLA STUFFED QUFEN OLIVES 1.80 1.60 fh
MARELLA PLAIN QUEEN OLIVES 1.08 96
CRAWFORD’S CREAM CRACKERS 1.64 1.40 i
IMPERIAL LEG HAMS 12-1516) per 1b... 1.61 136

per Jar $ .61 {
per 4'b tin d

\

i

APIE PEANUT BUTTER ‘
4.20 )

per tin .69 {
per $lb 95 5
)

!

IMPERIAL CORNED BRISKET BEEF
SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK LOSSTER
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE

NEW ZEALAND CHEESE

CANADIAN PICNIC HAMS 5—7Ib
NEW ZEALAND CHEDDAR CHEESE

{!
COCKADE FINE RUM \

°
STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.

per 5%6 tin 4.10
per ft 1.73
per 15 74



ne





















































































































































































































































































































si BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952
. WwW TV $EFSS5S5595596595555599596955959SS9 SS FOG FFF FOG IOG,
ac PUMLIC SALES PUBLIC NOTICES! x
S te i a! Have You Ever Cooked in an
TELEPHONE 2508. ___ BEAL ESTATE ESTATE i Ni a IMUM SAUCE N 3
ne ar ee Ain RAE Tenamtry known ss LODGE SCHOOL | “Monmneie. “qpriaaed pee ™ ALUN” SAUCEPAN ?
enantry nown as
for Births, Marriage or Engagement “Alkins Tenantry” containing about $ Will those. ue a (M.A.N.Z. LINE) The M/V. “DAERWOOD” will IF NOT — NOW is YOUR CHANCE 8
afmouncements in Carib Calling the FOR SALE Asses: of “land “situned st eae 5 |, a. aaa er ae ae ene accept Cargo and Passengers for You ean gbtain them in sets of five or individually >
cNarge is $3 00 for any number of words For pariculars and terms and conditions| ;),. 1s oor banks tia ba we 8.5 TEKOA” is scheduled to sail St. Lueie, St. Vineent, Grenada.
up te © «na 6 cents per word for each of sale apply to the wu adersigned 952 fromm Adetnide February 15th Melbourne and Aruba. Date of sailing to CE)! WTRAL EMPORIUM
adic ore erms cash. Phone 25) AUTOMOTIVE The above will set up for sale at ou eminded that Schoo] fees Mareh 3rd, Sydney March 10th, Bris- be notified |
cetween § 40 .o¢ 4 p.m., 3113 tor Death Office on zriday the 2ist day of Marcl in aavanney tae eae ae bane Marci 33nd astivias at Trinidad | (Corner Broad & Tudor Streets)
Satloes ork er ¢@ om 1952 at 2.20 5 whan fae : i : ‘ aboy pr ind and Barbados about The M/¥Y. “CARIBBEB” will
me mpremrieipemnnastia seagrass — vhase : waid by the 20th 5
_— - CRRRINGTON & SEALY ee ee ee y jAprid goth accept Cargo and Passengers for Choo EOOe
DILD Var OSTIS "i aon oe eS HP _—- Lucas Street , be refused ae stg ee Fe School. | ' tot abidition to general cargo this wee | Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, SPERSSOIRSSOSOOe SOOO IOCSS 8
ve > vy Be ote ke ing order hone sk ae ee ee 3. 52—9n q he RMER \sel tas ample space for chilled and hard Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of \ 999950060 06S%
; - - _ jecott & Co., 1Ad. Secretary & Treasurer, | frozen cargo sailing to be notified. COP OOT PODOVOVTOGOS
PE rial residince, Cotes Gally. Bt 2.52—t fn. -ETTDING SPOT: A desirable bulld- eee | agin eneptes oe ree tie ’
Joseph, James " {“Cossie") Brath- Standard 8 h.p. 197. | ing spot situated st Brittons Hill next | British if eos at (TFrinidee to | a ene: MV —"MONERA® | will $
waite, Age 71 years, His funeral] Brand New All_ new parts,|to Mr. Maurice Cuve, overlooking the [ts ws accept Carte 9ee 1. atenbeet anes JUS I REC ‘“EIVED Fes
i s e a : eside " q ’ o } ~ run- P Hy urse av avy ardens, : al ica, .
ime weeny =o Tenens Parise ih a wate ye or "ae : eee oF ee ay 17,000 sq. ft. 2 Fo jvctier perticclars apply — i Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing %
Church 18.3.52—6n For further particulars, “Grav — NOTICE WiTHY &@ CO., LTD. Friday 21st’ inst.
Gertrude Brathwaite (Widow), | eee |W. Corin, c/o T. Geddes Grant. 1 a pate
Pomroy, Eltjah (sons) ae CAR ~- Ford Prefect in excellent con- ee neenieenmeret 4442, 8.3.52—-13n] 15 Haney td a ans Ms a . as B.wW.l eee OWNERS" ik
18.3.52—1n | Jition, 5 sxood tyres, Price $700. Apply tention ie o Parish o ASSOCIATION (INC.)
“Scaatie .. On March 17, 1008, on - Cc. S Hamilton, 91—35, 16 3 52 bn. HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 “OUSE, Brand new, ample 3 bedroom pee Bam g oe seas re fae TA & ©O., Consignee. Tele. No. 4087
DSO? On arch 17, 1952, at gee house, all convenie™ces, with = party~] intr ure © is DAcORTA & 60. ——— —~
her ~residence “Ceres, Navy Qar- MOTOR CYCLE: One two and halt sized living room, open verandah, kitchen | Is!and a Bill authorising the said Vestry :
dens, Elsie Hudson, matron, General] (2%) h.p. B.S.A., O.H.V Can and utility soom Garage, laundry, 2] to raise a loan not exceeding £2,500 to
Hospital, 1931... Her funeral will take} seen any day at T. Herbert Ltd. aed servant rooms and storage room under. ] enable the said Vestry to purchase a
nae a , #15 today at St. Michael's] ber Yard. Phone 4367 18.3.52—In Ss a hillside 7, “age bm pereel of — at Gall Hil, St. ; be
‘athedra! & Co. A a nd to erect ereon a communa
Clara, and Gerald Hudson VAUXHALL VELOX MODEL CARS— oe 13,.2.52—t.f.0 ond Latrine
Ul to est These are 1/18 Seale and are Powered ————= Dated this 14th day of March, 1952.
ae pets by 3 dry cell batteries. Forward « REIL, Baimoral Gap, Hastings, CARRINGTON & SEALY. ' W
IN ME MORIAM reverse geurs. Only" 1 ited "yaitaber RON PAR 22,137 square feet of land Solicitors for he Vestry ILL NOT STAIN OR MARK
gaia “vailatile!. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4301. fhe house contains four bedrooms, of St. John. CANADIAN SERVICE
UTCHE in ever loving memory of 2.58—Hn. | fiving rooms. water cee 15.3. 52-80. | 2a. IDEAL FOR TABLE TOPS
mr dear wife Phylis Butcher, wht hout, servan rm a5 *
emacs, “TRUCKS: Two Fordien Thames 5-ton Rookies pe eeeeintment, phone 31TO. | From St, John and Halifax, N.S.
I had not wandered far and wide ealee ane weed woming coder, a The above lie be a on ad = NOTIC
With such an angel for my guide. | UP@Ct miles. For particulars. Apply [gt public com) jon a - v
Nor heave nor earth could then} “1. Biscuit Co:, Ltd. Phone 4337. hy the 2ist day of March at the Office E Expected Aretyst = ~¢ =e
ee ne, 18.3.52-—-6n } o¢ the Ute ETON & SEALY BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE St John Halifax Dates, aoe etown,
: she Nad lived, and lived to 5 LD Bar
seve Ee TIRUCKS: Tho Austin Two-Speed axle Lucas Street. Nowicn i Bauer atte het tel ae. “eee 2 Feb 16 Feb. 20 March SUPPLIED IN + & 1 GAL. TINS
St, Clair Butcher, 18.3.59—In ais ari ata idles ageita te Y 2 2 1.9.82—-100 3.52—10n Annus} General patoeting of Division %. 8.5. “SUNRAY” 5 ++ 1M March is March 2'April
a . CSA w e in e olice|s §. “POLYTRADER . + 5 i ;
THANKS Stronciy built bungalow... © SS bt bungalow, revenily Magistrate’s Court, District “A”. on|ss.. "A VESSEL” Sy each March 0 Anat ©
___ LIVESTOCK _ geen wt ten aa perches of land. |2"1ceyr ine Stet aay OF March, 1968, at is 5 VESSEL" 30 April 5 May 25 May GE HARDWAR
; oma: \ “ BARROW —, THE undersigned | teturn | Cow: Giving 35 pints p day. Second [inspection | Permanes, Mp, "Perms and AGENDA elie NERAL SUPPLIES
the funeral, sent wreaths, cards, { CA!f Apply: Norwood oR #1 Blackman aa a apply to Gilbert » eaeemeales iets dl aint UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE Tr Saami
letters and in any other way sym- 18.3.52—-6n Jillage, St. James i a
Siiner, Fitts. Village a seerneah FROM LIVERPOOL AND GLASGOW
pathised with them on the recent 18 3 52—In 4 : hatin x i
death of dear Terr POULTR =e ol 3 Other Business 5 Txpsehed, Arava! RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4918
* ; . U Y — Avenue All members are specially asked to
Clyde Barrow °ud yamny . 12) TWO HOUSES at ist vents atta dennat: meade we Dates Bridgetown x .
3.5211 oURE , °G One 6x 9 : oO Barbados COOOL OOS SSSSESSS
. PUREBRED LEGHORN—one cock, six] Marts Gap, Ch. Ch pailinss, Mr. H A_ Vaughan, the President and| . 5, “guNVALLEY” 21 Feb 2 - SAA AAP ELS ¢
ANKER. aie eakncin liek . hens, Owner going on leave. Telephone|@ied, kitchen and salvanise the General Secretary will be present a aoe toe eb. 6 Feb. 19 March SRR SOS OPO OOOO FOP OOP OSOSOO Ht pt st sbgt -.
vedio? an . died tne tat artarnoont, S0eT Tek “is 3 ab. ‘in fd the anes, a Fae 505 0.00 “re during the first part of re aa . 4 Herere Vereen Me aaa oes basi + ae R gt cima rent ny
vewis nker, who died on the 18th vanize pallings ce is $85 , a. ARRO 4
March, 1991 8 4 they can remain on the spot Secretary, Division 2. %
There's anvopen gate MECHANICAL path aa tenanted Apply to Miss ¢ . 3 52—2: in s
At the end of the road Both rs siadle Street Furniture Depot 16.8 Sa~in TED KINGDOM ANP CONTINENTAL SERVICE »
Through whieh each must £o plone. | TRUCK TIP-END HYDRAULIC HOISTS. | pial 2645 : 9 2 -htiessahnan pa Sapabpceatate x e
And the na light we carmnot « Ony « limited few available; secure : N | Expected Arrival %
Our Father claims Fils own yours now! COURTESY GARAGE, Dial AUCTIO Antwerp Rotterdam Lond Dates Bridgeto 8
Beyond the gate our loved” one, | 4616 , ml 4 NOTICE ” ontee Some, 12 i
Finds happiness and rest. aca ta = a aoe Mie Se OL ncn cen’ res ne hon Oe ial marpeses % We have Just Received
An here is Comfort in the thought y ins to” i> PL F 5 s o 2 cs as , %
That a loving God knows. best MISCELLANEOUS - 1 will sell at her gesidence Me PARISH OF SAINT MICHABL |) 5) “SUNBELI’ 18 March 17 Match 2% Marek 7 April % a Shipment of
Pearl (Wife), Grace, Lionel, Evelyr Maxwell Coast on her evtire] SFALED TENDERS in duplicate %
Hartley, Keith, George (Children), Gers A GAS STOVE — 2 burne one Grill | March beginning at 12.30 p.m Le > etena a . “TENDER |
aldine (Sisterl;"Aticiie (Sister-in-laws. J#2d Oven. Phone 25% 16 3 52—2n | jot of household furniture" whiely In irked jon: (hk, siVeens eae Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 i
18,3.52 1 ae4 oye “4 —— | cludes: —Mah nina a 5 1 . € o he ' \
ee BED TICK — S4 ins. wide. Thani Shuive with spring Glied oi Fa eeie ss tock 7 ' on Th ‘ ylag th aoe a ae %
Bros, Dial 3466. 18 3 52—t.fn.| Radio and centre tables, Ma een nterie See tha’ annerenee y
f » M < ul ndermentioned *.
Aes sealant Bentwood chairs, Small carpet, Ma ad Be at canned a1 or teers | %
Ww AN* r kD BIBLES trom 4/- up. “Testaments 18c. Wardrobe, painted dressing table, Leaeis gsuppnes tp Buch quentiss .- e y
each. Books & Text Cards. Bible House,] desk, tea sets, silver ware, Ice cream me to time be ordered f one year, | %
55 oT nade with mattresses, ]ommencing on the Ist April next — *
HELP Bs ae i 14.3.52—6n.* ouinted ye other items of FRESH MILK (oN 0. %
a sina dal one 7 ae FRESH BREAD
gemeannapemmemipeinastieis joo res Terms cash.
ASSISTANT MANAGER Montserrat a " : interest 4 , aA. SCoTT, Fach person tendering must send in Inc. e £ ‘ ;
Company Limited require married trips ned Mabeine viEW ouRTS “. it RAY: Auctioneer » letter, along with the Tender, signed ¥ ¥ xR for all occasions.
as Assistant Manager. Experience man-| Barbados View ‘Pare. Silk s , >» 15 5e-- 4n.]}by two properly qualified persons (not _ =
agement livestock essential also ability | Barbados Map $3.98. Th: on, arves wit ba od er being members of the Vestry.) statin re ne
to manage cotton lime estates. House pew ae _— their willingness to become bound with Pl ° Patt ed
provided. | Apply stating experience and ao UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER the Tenderer in the event of their Ten- NEW YORK SERVICE ain of ern 8
alary required to Box 221, Plymouth, z der being accepted for the due fulfilment ée
Montserrat, B,W.1. "\3 36s en BALLERINAS Rubber Seled Shoes oe i sell on fof the Cont ict - its: Mee S.S.. “RIO DALE” 1 7 res vo 5 x oa Y
m. 1 $1.69 o pr. AN sizes. Thani Bros. Dial By instructions received 1 WwW) i .E” sailed 7th March arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952. 2 : %
ee eo 3466 meeday March 200 at Messrs. Cecil 1] With respect to the tender for A STEAMER sails 28th March — — arrives Barbados 10th April, 1952. % Champagne Glasses Cocktail Glasses :
STENOGRAPHER recuired, preferehly 18 9 5—t.f.n. \Straker & Co's ‘Office, Spry Street, an | FRESH MILK, the probable quantity
ak with are peer in Book- . Slanciment of bicycle accessories which | required for one year is 24,000 gallons] -—————-—--—---_____-—_- -——__ ——_-— - —— g Sherr Liqueur *
Keeping. Apply Caribbean Confection] bLANKETS — Coloured and Fancy. [includes, Front & Rear mud, Kiar toe i an een enor more. thin one NEW ORLEANS SERVICE y ” ”
o., , se pias Sap, ens Sing iM, Be: Double $3.98, —- Thani Bros. ' sports and Standard models, Saddies,]eccept the Tender of more than one co
iii eMail adh head. eee oe ae 18 3 Sat tn | Peaals,, Axles, Cones, € a ie ee peter, fee hb aes < “ — ae ee sailed Tih March - arrives Barbados 2ist March, 1952 Port ” Snap e 2
MANAGER--Required for the Grenada C —— soe. fae ets, Hubs, Spanners, Re ‘ ge use ae See) STE/ E sailed 12th March arrives Barbados 29th Mareh, 1952. 4 .
Pg. Rag 7s gg Net eng snormeead rare re gd tread Foundry Coke for Pump connections, Dunlop sali. + flong with their tender, Pony Whiskey _,, Half-pint Tumblers x
Applicants “must supply ctedentinis.1Co., Lid, Phone 4 arr Wie. aaa én ere Seiaty = Pat rs. Tool | Veterinary Practitioner stating that the} ct Pee. . n x
state experience, age and salary re-] ~ Eieeesved lop rs a ir NetsoL “3 |cattle from wiich the i y © sup- | ¥
a aoe rn “te. Hair Nets, Ladies ich e milk will be sup —_~ =
quired, i380—an.| “COLOURFUL FANGY BRAW Tame | DRS, Valve, Rubber ste Meee cet ‘Frames | blicd are tree from ‘Tuberculosis CANADIAN S8ERVIUE % 3
. just right for Sunny Barbados, 66c, each | Cricke lis. Bats, Batting & Wicket- orms of tenders can be obtained ot sou IND 5 ,
faut time “Respuntant needed — not (at Thani Bros., Pr. Wm. Hry, Street 7 napping proves, Football Outer & Inner] he Vestry Clerk's office THERE Also, a special offer of Half-pint Tumblers @ 8c. only
ingen ie eeek, 8 an 12 ates Bult 18 3.52—t fn. | covers, size 5, Football ae e ines Ec Mera Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados S
ed : ew winches : > 7 7 20 cases Bicarbonate of da + ’ fas eee bd == ¢§
carmen wereon. Reply with credentiat, | FROWRIFD, SPUN SILK in Dartigg Drums "Disinfectant, 2 cases Damaged Clerk, St. Michael's Vestr ‘ALCOA PILGRIM” March 14th March 24th | %
MBBS , c/o Advocate ae et a Thani Bros. Dial} uyjnts, Epsom Salts, Baking Powder 54.52—Tn, € 0. d.|“ALCOA PTONEER" March 28th April 7th
oe tate ee Lee 183 62—1n. | iixed Spice, Table Jellies and many | “ALCOA PARTNER" April 13th April 23rd
ae aR ane eins Sioo' numerous to "mention | : PLANTATIONS L
: ng GADIOLL @ DAHLIA Orders are ie at 11.00 a.m, Terms Cash i hee oi NORTHBOUND Due Barbados x e
OG RENE | peti oe ciation stag |“ “ancy nr PASPO Mant Still oY ratty voc sy, tawrence muvee]
~ . ae jecember 1002, parties Auctioneer 660606066 654, 45 OOOO COOF 64 SEES
HOUSES Spe pe Acorn F please pone Se 16.9.52—4n — Pl ‘A STEAMER” April 23rd For St. ohn, Ee. and St. 9O0SCS0C0000S00CCCSO 5OS0060000CCCOCE™=
S 3 be a6
Scie a ays In London awrence River Ports.
she antareuescneneninis | topeeber-tieetvelend itecingndepragiartuenedyGiisiaatiilann:
BRACH COTTAG St. James wt HBAVY SPUN LINEN—In Pink, beige | LI UOR LICENSE NOTICE y These Vessels have limited passenger accommodation
8
perfect bathing, quiet All r and] @8d Gold 36” wide usually $1.64. Re- The application of Beatrice Henry & LONDON
services supplied fro he Own duced for a week to $1.41 yard at] Golbourne Jackmah, trading as Henry ee > ee
Telephone. Suiteble married couple, | SURF ALANI, 62 Swan Street, 18.3,52—1n | & Co., Shopkeepery of Suttle Street, pone wn ees the only go 7 MOLT o1 G vi
25.00) per dey American Pilon for twe —ctensianncefinn | { or License No. 148 off member of the Trinida -stee! BERT THO) D. — NEW RK AND GULF SERVICE.
oe Apply: " Beavhienda, St ania Oo L RUBBER MATTING © 42 inches wide. Oe led te Basket Henry in rnspect Percussion Orchestra rian at ¥
one 0 . 5 a © urfacer, it y ay -
Bat ei 3*!" | Spark Plugs. Ete, ree... Tr Snaing in “Suttle Street, City, for mained behind in London after! APPL¥:—DA COSTA # CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE on
HOUSE: “Homestead”, Upper Belmont FORT ROYAL GARAGE, LTD., permission to use said Hquor license the band returned to Trinidad} a 4 iia ace
Road. Drawing and Dining rooms, @ hed- Telephones 2362 or 3208, At said premisas, Suttle Street, City from its tour of Britain last year, |
rooms. ranktast ) a Y a 2 5 j
ane Drsaktast . m, tole re ic St eee 3 S40; ae: aie oe oer aaa h 1852 is still appearing before London | PP. A. TAG DA
; ie $2--in | yFMBELLISHERS — In chrome, for} police Magistrate, Dist. “A audiences, playing his ping-pong GO V
Ela) Dera verre Velox 15” rim only. Beautify] ~ B. ALLEYNE, as a novelty soloist with dance} a
A FURNBRFaaT—w | 2M, Can wh the ategstive wheel tr pbmceni. | Bande | iday 2st
Liner 700 ea-bathing r - : B. This application wul be coasid- z “ “ d Mw 2
mae areeraee Pgs 6. Almay 15.3.52—6n. | ered at a poenting Court to Ee ; se Han beret tut TAM? Plane BARBAD S GE L H ITAL wu ay + ar.
o Soral Sands, Worthing 4 Salt apron al Police Court, ist. “A on idmy | é ar | ¢ ) NERA ¢ »SP
25,2.52—41.1 a = D white Suaweneoe’ Z x in the 28th day of March 1962, at 11 o'clock, | and is looking forward to joining
me - . * x ,
oe I a Super, LAURIE a.m up with the band again, but he
PLEO FS SSE OSS" =» DASH& Co,, Tudor H. A. TALMA,
S WHAT . bes atl | i 61 ar Police Magisirdte, Dist. “A” See know any details of their) TENDERS FOR SUPPLIES.
q f r awe 5.3. n, 18,.3,52—1n a a * ‘
ae Ay THEY ‘SAY! | TYRES—Git Edged BR, lor | feeeesenrmnneree erent Another Trinidadian musician, SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12
a Ty n ij
: 80 Gas Cooker passenner car tven at, vers. reagonable {LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ons ree eis plays Beg o'clock noon on Wednesday, 19th March, 1952, for supplying articles
$ 2 : ario > s 0
§ one cum nner monny sy’ ph |Miee P'S Tad Ga ee" | NOL, Wedite te eet: | by Phil "Mose, eManchestor | the following Unes for a perlod of aia magins fram ist Apri,
. \R SPENT” 0 s eer > or ‘
Desist meee 52k, | lnalbaeig dagen Mle on- | Pha So, Peneerasece arene nas [aanoe-bend leader, He Rad never | 977.
» | 1s Bs 2 t
Q at ely hillthentic - quotatic x. | HADENSA OINTMENT 1952 granted to Marion Brathwaite in}Played with a band until a month (1) FRESH BREAD. .
* 4 een these noms * | Gg wHY SUFFER?” Hadensa the new|respect of a wall building at Black] ago. Mr. Moss believes =s | (2) ALCOHOL.
eye owroor w mot | an intment for Haemorrhoids, | Rock, St. Michael, for permission to use rig velop into one © ;
> oak them before all aro * | Immediate relief from pain and bleeding. | sald liquor license at a wooden building O'Brian will develop layers! § (3) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of the
% deli » | Obtainable from all Drug Stores. with shedroof attached near Police Sta- one a ae aye dead at the Westbury Cemetery
5 . 12.3.52—7n. | tion, Black Rock, St. Michae! in the jazz world, —-B.U.F, | i ‘
BOBO 4 OP REBECOBOBBSES ; Dated this 17th day of March 2952 (4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pints a day
SOI LA AOC LILIOT WHITE SHARKSKIN — lovely to look) To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq = ' only.

Police Magistrate, Dist. “A”
MARION BRATHWAM#TE,
for Applicants
N.B. This application will be consid-

Dial 3466, 18 3 52—I1n
WELDING MATERIAL & EXPAND-

Forms for the respective tenders will be supplied on application
to’ the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not be

|
i: at, and best value only, $1.47 at Thani's.
|

$ rr a 7
TODAY'S NEA





S FLASH ELECTRICAL SERVICE




















iano ING METAL—~Electrodes, bre . 7 , je i
f. a AWING ree : th Expanding metal from ae to Fated ee the hae on Serta — ecietained “Apres Wey 8 oO sone supplied by Be- anavel
eg 2 a i |Tratagar “Spry "Sireeta“Pnone a the 28th day of March 1952, at 11 o’elock Hospital.
YOU MONEY AND TIME. *! 13.3, st tn. ne ere Since the prices of astvien! _ Persons tendering must submit at the time of tendering letters
BOOTS THE STAPLES 7a fh ‘ Police Magistrate, Dist. “A° he a aes gee high ye. []| from two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
Pain gakasuin Ge ‘{ ee an accurate estimate of the cost willingness to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the
HAMMERING * : ORIENTAL . LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE of wiring your building on pre- contract.
PLASTIC BY THE YARD — IN ¥) | Tne application of ‘Kathleen Weekes, as your eEane ne - ty ’ Terms of contract and any further particulars may be obtained
DI aw opkeeper of Bi Road, St. Michael, before you even start to ; ;
euaews etamneant } | for perrniiien "30 ea Spirits, Malt ss . jon application at the General Hospital, 13,3.52—3n.
‘AND | Liquors, &e at a board and shingle shop WILLIAM A. CORBIN j , ijeaccitaiaheiiiaelile
HARDWARE j arsed oe ch agg at Bay Land, sane, Cae =
d, St. Michael a sOSTge,
iithiaenepemenssnansal HEADQUARTERS FOR Dated this 17th day of March 1952. : : UNIFORMS FOR MALE NURSES AND ORDERLIES.
CLL APPA POPPSE, SOUVENIRS ry E. A, McLEOD, Esq Hrolder of Fitmans, Coxbegentes: 2
§ FROM INDIA, CHINA & Police Magistrate, Dist ig Se General Education; SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12
WANT TO SELL AS CEYLON : ab tus eaeie on Diploma in Blectrietty trom ff | ©’@lock noon on Wednesday, 19th March, 1952, for the MAKING OF
% LNBs, This aceiien ties can Ne Seed Nornal College, London; UNIFORMS FOR MALE NURSES AND ORDERLIES for a period
§ A GOING CONCERN § THANIS hath’ cae BM: abate lll gms cs nye, inm, or ww [fff ane year from Ist April, 1952
the 28th day of March i952, a o’ele . aE, SS es ; ; i
% ed a ee x Pr. Wm. Hy. St. Dial 3466 a h arch i iu lock Tech aaah i ‘ Tender forms will be supplied an application to the Secretary,
3 business of 40 years standing ss a E. A. McLBOD pee Ceneral Hospital, and tenders will not be entertained except they
% iw the Island of Dominica, | 4 Pe ee re eee aes aré on forms supplied by the Hospital.
[in wd. bane tit oS Pa P tendering must submit at th dering lette
S 8 ‘ sin & ersons su t at e time of ten rs
General Merchandise. ss seler tien ee ee FOR SALE trom two other persons known to possess property, expressing their
‘For further particulars ¥ X ° his | illingness A Pp f A i Is
% Apply: XCY.P. x FREE HOOK * JUST “RECEIVED ae to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the sa. rayer or nima
» C/o The Advocate Co. & | | com :
% 15.3.52—3n Sis Which Makes ne particulars may be obtained from the Secretary, General
: ab Miia Di held Hospital. 13.3,52—3n.

* 8
APP AAA AAA LA AAS ALAA LAA A AY 8

GOD'S WAY OF
1}
: SALVATION
PLAIN”

S. Roberts, Gospei
Book & Tract Service, 30

just received a shipment
of 1} h.p. Call early and
secure one.

Showroom - -



Hear our humble prayer, O God, for ‘
our friends the animals; especially for
Animals who are suffering; for all that

ae ave overworked and under-fed and
, treated; for all wistful crea-

Pkgs. Tate &
Sugar

Sliced Ham and Bacon

Lge. and Small Tins Vienna
Sausages

Pkgs. Goddard Plague Pow-
der

Lyle Castor





Barbados Horticultural

Society's
UNHIBITION

FOR SALE

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S

GARAGE LTD.

SAL OA OLLI LILLE ALOE

15.3.52—3n. I will offer for sale by Pubtic Competition at my office

B. S. A. Motor Cycles

———
> *?

Â¥

3

: ij

LLL LOI ALL ALISO



































%
* Central Ave., Bangor, N.L
eseseseststet AOA Tins Stove Polish % |) VICTORIA STREET, on FRIDAY 2ist at 2 i)
: = Tins Hei 1 p.m. 2,400 sq. ft. ¥
40 BE HELD A'T ik SS 5 |p SSS |8 pes. Bria Neuetable Salad 3 |); land with the Chattel Dwelling House, containing ‘Open Gallery, ; in eaptivity that beat against
i rhhy i oo ‘ae di, g Sugar 3 caeke tacit 4 gl notyan usual Out Offices, Water and | j 1 ted
: " +) i SSESSION, » bars; for i : .
jue DRILL HALL i THE BRITISH i FUR NISH \ Tine Amstd Bereet ‘incule x MICHAEL. ON, situated at the IVY, ST. their bars; for any that are hunted or
; i COUNCIL ik i — rineepay seems ¢ lost or deserted or frightened or hun-
iarrison { i s Strawberr - f fe ‘ .
ot i | NOW IT’S EASY |: ib, Booteca woopins Shae aunt standing on sbout 10,000 ery; for all that are in pain or dying;
IN — } ) { Also: p ft. lands 1 mile trom vided M
SOM iy eet esacH " WAKEFIELD The Money Saving Way | {i} ‘modern conveniences. Good gm for all that must be put to death. We
1962, from 3—7 p.m. \} } Popular | Bureaus, Bedsteads, | TIN HAMS eae Sei , Mas- wits
SUNDAY, 23rd MARCH i} HAR Bate, Craton. Wnopes. Wash aie |}! A comfortable dwelling house standing on about % acre of tana ff entreat for them all Thy mercy and
1952, from 3—6 p.m. \} FOLK LORE & FOLK {{\'}} Springs — ‘TABLES for Dining | Special price to Shopkeepers at “DERRICKS", ST, JAMES, house contains Open Gallery, 2 pity, and for those who deal with them
z The Public are invited to i MUSIC OF TRINIDAD is {i wage ae aan: it} o % |} fides, Drawing, Dining, 3 bedrooms with running water, Kitchen- fe
ehibit; mks ALA the title of an illustrated boards—Kitchen, Reid ee iit * | })) ette, W.C. and Bath, Electric Light and Water in Kitchen, Garage we ask a heart of ¢ ompassion and gen-
‘i aye) ing Plants in Tub \ ture to be given by iH} zoe Cabinets, Lig ; HH S| and Servants room, enclosed well and several fruit trees. {kind} 1 Mak
or Pols, j $5.50 up DRAW 200] Al thi t -- ¢ » pi Ss < yr words, 4 2 US
2. Flowering Plants 1 MR. ANDREW PEARSE, FURNITURE, Rush Furniture for All these things get from S|} a tle hands and kinc cre s ake "
4. Cut Flowers, 1 }) Resident Tutor in Trinidad ete aa as coe Tl INCE & CO * SINGER TREADLE MAGHINE IN RERFRGE ORDER, 1947 ourselves to be true friends to animals
5 Table and Floor Decor.- |||} Ong ee eaty coca SAPING “Braces. * oe ee - 2 and so share the blessings of the merci-
tions. ie West Indies at the Brit- \3 ‘ r rift ; ii
6. Vegetables and Fruit | | ish Council at 8.15 p.m. on , LTD. % Dial 2947 ful. For the sake of Thy Son the ten-
\j Admission: ADULTS 36c. ||\{\} Tuesday, March 18. a S. ‘WILSON i! * ( y 1 4 iJ cae ne
CHILDREN Vid Admission Free. s % R ARCHER M KENZIE Stree der-heerted, Jesus Christ our Lord.
under 12 yrs. 18¢, | i Open to the Public SPRY STREET. DIAL 409 i 6 a 0. PERRO PF. $ e dik, ietoria {.
— >! | SSS DSSS FS |“neseatessecoesesstsese: (SSS













~—
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952

BARBADOS



HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON



















BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

an
f SHE'S SAILING ALi AUGHT-
HERES ER NAME ON

fp edgg es a .





DID YOU GET AN EYE-FUL

< \ |) (7onawT vou RECOSN a HER?
OF YOUR SHIPMATES, FLINT >

THAT'S MRS. PEARL DE LAZLC
RICH AMERICAN WIDOW






(MUTTON DRESSED UP 4S LAMB...)
STILL - THATS SETTER THAN
4 LOAD OF CROOKS...



PETA PALMER!
1 SEEM TO KNOW
THAT NAME..





BY CHIC YOUNG



I WE'RE HOME, yim) |



















~ DEAR ~— / , | “ea
eae: | _( 1 DONT KNOW oi! © SI SLEPT
B A WHETHER ye ALL THRU
, —£ | ig. XN 1 DIDOR IT
(ener DM bes, ti] C NOT tl
Sl alt | f= ’
meld af
— php i
\ © =£ Dy XY i
»~. >! » Be)
~ \ Y SS :
mm pe be Vix












irigios —
a D | | —ONLY BECAUSE © CHANGE HE WAN" ED \\OH ‘HE DID HOLD ON NOW! IF HE'D
â„¢\ NOW WE'RE | | HE CAN HELP US NASTY W > 1 OF AN IT ALL FOR} | WANTED HE COULD HAVE

SOC THIS IS THE KENT TRYIN' TO | | FIND FLASH AND ESCAPE’ THE SAKE BEEN OuT OF HERE By

CHAP WHO DOPED ME SAVE HIS | | THE WARDEN / DIDN'T YOU SAID HE'D HOPED To JENCE!| | NOW — BUT HE WOULDN’/T



AND STARTED THis

HOW'S WILKS
FANTASTIC PRISON

Doc?

/ SAY KENT TRIED
TO HELP YOU
AFTER THE
PRISONERS BROKE
LOOSE, TEX?

| STOW AWAY ALONE
ON OUR SHIP AND

PLAY BALL WITH THOSE
CONVICTS / NOW HE GETS
SHOT TRYIN’ TUH SAVE
THE WARDEN.’ MAYBE IM
CORNY, BUT FOR MY,

TO JUPITER! HE'S
A PHYSICIST
Y' KNOW

HE STOLE IT FROM
ME... AND IT WANT TO
FIND OUT WHY / Bee —

aL DH, LADVIE, SINCE ~VHN AA
‘TIS MY RING THAT'S ats
STOLEN, I'M GOING

CHECK, WEE porRIE /
RIGHT NOW I'M SURE
THE RING IS IN THE
HANDS OF A MAN
NAMED D@ ANTON /

MONSTER O° LOCH
MESS! TH! INSCRIPTION
YOU QUOTE PROVES ‘TIS

MY RING, JOHNNY /

















I THINK I HID ’EM IN
HERE-BUT IT DON'T
LOOK LIKE IT-

MAYBE I PuT
THEM UNDER
HERE-IN AN

IDLE MOMENT!

“AND JUST
WHAT ARE YOU






| HUH! YOU'LL FIND
NOTHING IN THOSE
EMPTY BOTTLES
YOU HAVE IN He
BOTTOM DRAWEI

OF YOUR DRESS’ eon!








A MIGHTY VOICE RINGS OUT OVER THE |
DIN OF THE BATTLE «THE VILLAGE I8
SUDDENLY SILENTS
WAMBESI! |
LLONGO!
= DROP
NOOR |
WEAPONS! |





ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN



Famous
for flavour!







?

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _



SPECIAL offers to all



Cash ane Credit ‘Customers for Thursday Thursday to to Saturday only








. OSPE « TAL ‘OF FE cei available at our Hranches Tweedside, —
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually Now
Tins LAMB’S TONGUES $1.09 $ .96 Pkgs: JACK STRAWS 61 Se
i 2ESE (Per 1 74 68
a oe ; LEG HAMS (Tender Sweet)
ins ‘HE S PEAS 39 36
Tins BATCHELORS PEAS } Sls ais ta i ae
Bots: HORLICKS MALTED MILK .72 68



THE COLONNADE GROCERIES









€sso} HANDY OIL



3 | Lower Hroad St.







THE WORKS
OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE

on This



ST.
GRUMMAN GOOSE

VINCENT

Notes Edition.

@ The Whole Works of
Shakespeare in one volume, print-
ed in clear and beautiful type
under the direction of the Shakes-
peare Head Press.

AIR SERVICE

@ The text is based on that

PRESENT SCHEDULE

prepared for the Shakespeare
Head Press by the distinguished
MONDAYS St. Vincent/Barbados/St. Vincent Elizabethan scholar, Arthur Henry
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 am Bullen.
Arrives Barbados 10.00 an
Departs Barbados 10.30 a.m :
Arrives St. Vincent 11.30 n @ The scene in the play, Sir
Thomas Moore, which eminent
TUESDAYS St. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent scholars accept as Shakespeare's
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 a is printed for the first time in any
Arrives Trinidad 10:30 am edition of his Works.
Departs Trinidad 11.30 am
Arrives St. Vincent 1.00 p.m
BS : A new and full Life of
WEDNESDAYS s¢, vincent/Grenada/St, Vincent Shakespeare, embodying the con-

Departs St. Vincent
Arrives Grenada
Departs Grenada
Arrives St. Vincent

temporary records, the legends
10.30 a.m gathered by subsequent writers,
11.20 a.m and the discoveries of recent
12 noo research is here printed for the

; first time.

10.00 a.m

Additional Flight From St. Vincent °
to Trinidad Times on Application

@ The characters’ names are
set above their speeches for
clearness and. pleasure in reading.

@ The Plays are arranged in
the chronological order of their
composition: not gathered into
Comedies, Histories, and Trage-
dies—the method dating from
the First Folio and followed in
the conventional three-volume
plan of publication.

TRS St. Vincent/Barbados / Dominica
Seema es Barbados/St. Vincent
Departs St. Vincent
Arrives Barbados
Departs Barbados
Arrives Dominica
Departs Dominica
Arrives Barbados
Departs Barbados
Arrives St, Vincent

8.00 ¢
9.00 ¢
9.30
11.30
12.30
2.30
3.00
4.00 pn

FRIDAYS 8t. Vincent/Trinidad/St. Vincent Readers can now approach
Departs St. Vincent 9.00 4.1 tne hedy of the Plays as a vital
Arrives Trinidad 10,30 p.n and growing organism revealing

11.30 a.m
1.00

Departs Trinidad

the evolution of the poet's inspi-
Arrives St. Vincent

ration and genius.

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

and

pn
5

GARDINER AUSTIN
& CO... LTD.

AGENTS Broad St. the Village,
Phone 4704

Gréystone Shops, Balmoral Gap.





be

















































































PAGE EIGHT



Carlton Defeat H.C.

BRICKIE LUCAS

SCORES TWO

feated
Footb
One
second.
7 Collepe te

CARLTON

melt. £37 Livision

im Gave ¢

irlton













stages the game
Carlton, “Brickie”

“Peppy” Hutchinson one.

roal but Luea

Harrison College took the
touch Cartton defended the
southern goal kicking into the
wind, Lucas, their inside right
took a long shot which Cammie
Smith, College custodian, allow-
ed to go outside,

The Carlton forwards began to
attack. G. Hutchinson at centre
forward passed’ to Clairmonte
who ran in from the right wing
and took a shot. The ball w:
kicked out of play by one of the
College backs to give Carlton a
corner, Clairmonte took a beau-
tiful corner but Smith saved.

Penalty Saved

A few minutes later Simmons
the College left half back top-
ped the ball with his hand in the
penalty area, Lucas took the pen-
alty kick but Smith ived and
cleayed, The Carlton forwards
kept up their attack on the Col-
lege goal. Smith saved a few dif-
ficult shots from G. Hutchinson
Clairmonte missed many good
opportunities.

Brickie Lucas opened the ac-
count for Carlton about seven
minutes before half time. He beat
Smith with well placed shot
through the air in the left cor-
ner of the goal

College missed a golden oppor-
tunity to get the equaliser when
Paul Tudor, after beating one of
the Carlton full back kicked
high over the cross bar.

Lucas took a shot a few sec-
onds before half time but Smi
was in position and saved, At
half time Carlton still one
goal in the lead

On the Offensive

On resumption Cariton was
again on the offensive After
about ten minutes they increased
their lead. Harold Cox on the
left wing received a pass and
outran Mayers the College righ‘
back. Cox centred beautifully
and “Peppy” Hutchinson punch-
ed the ball out of the reaches of
Smith,

College missed another oppor-
tunity to open their account.

They were awarded a free kick.
Smith took the kick and Griffith
at inside right, received the ball,
He passed to F. Tudor who
kicked wide of the goal.
Carlton scored their final goal
shortly before Referee Amory
blew off. Cox ran down the left
wing and centred. Lucas made
no mistake.
The teams were as
Carlton; Warren,
nedy, C. Cox, H
liams, Marshall, R
G. Hutchinson,
Lucas.
Harrison College: C. Smith,
Squires, Mayers, Pilgrim, Mr.
Smith, Simmons, Medford, Grif-
fith, P. Tudor, F. Tudor and
Morris,
Referee;

follows:
Porter, Ken-
Cox, C. Wil-
Hutchinson,
Clairmonte and



Mr. E. Amory,

Harrison
all match at Kensington Oval
voal was scored in the first half

GOALS

College three-nil in

me of their worst performances

was on top throughout the game.

was very slow.
Lucas scored two goals and

Carlton could have had another
; failed to make use of a penalty kick.



FOOTBALL
FIXTURES

Division One
Thursday 20,
Empire vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: W. F. Hoyos,
Linesmen: A, Parris and L.
King.
Saturday 22,
College vs. Spartan,

Referee: G. Haworth.
Linesmen: W. Hoyos and J.
King.

Division Two
Tuesday 18,
Everton vs.
Referee: C,
Friday 21.
Spartan vs. Notre Dame.
Referee: R, Hutchinson.
Division Three
Tuesday 18,

P.-Rovers
B. Williams

Carlton vs. C. O. Boys at
Black Rock.
Referee: C, Roachford.
Y¥.M.P.C, “A” vs. Rangers at
Beckles Road.
Referee: R. Parris,

C, & W. vs. Wanderers at Bay
Referee: R. Hutchinson.
Combermere vs. Lodge at Com-
bermere.
Referee: A. Parris.
Wednesday 19.
College vs.

Regiment at Col-
lege.

Referee: O, Robinson.

F. O. Boys vs. Everton at
Foundation.

Referee: I, J. King.

Notre Dame vs. P.-Rovers at
Bay.

Referee: F. Edwards.

Police vs. Wanderers at Park
Referee: L. King.

Friday 21.
Cc. O. Boys vs, ¥.M.C.A. at
Combermere.
Referee: C. Roachford.
Carlton vs. aki M.P.C. “A”
at Black Rock

Referee: ‘J. Archer.
F. O. Boys vs. Police at
‘ Foundation.
Referee: H. Wilson.
Cc. and W. vs. Rangers at Shell
Referee: F. Taylor.
Y.M.P.C, “B” vs, Regiment at
Beckles Rd.
Referee: A. Thomas.
Saturday 22.
Inter-school
Combermere vs, Foundation
at Combermere,
Referee: R. Parris.

NEW TITLES
NEWCASTLE, March 17.
European flyweight champion

Teddy Gardner Monday night
added the British and British Em-
pire titles to his list when he beat
British title-holder Terry Allen
on points over 15 rounds, Gardner,
aged thirty, weighed 110 pounds
14 ounces. Allen 28, scaled ‘1114
pounds.—U.P,





Savannah Club
Tennis
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Men’s Singles

D. E. Worme beat G. L, Hunte
6—3; 6—3.

Mixed Doubles

Mrs. C. I. Skinner and A. M
Wilson beat Mr. & Mrs. R. Chal
Jenor 7—5, 6—2

Mrs, P. Mc. G. Patterson and
R. S. Bancroft lost to Miss Ena
Bowen and C. L, L. Bowen 6—3,
2—6, 1—6.

Men's Doubles

Dr, C. G. Manning and E. P.
Taylor beat J. W. Mc Kinstry
and J. C. King 6—2, 6—1.

D. I. Lawless and C. B, Sisnett
lost to C. B. Lawless ahd W.
Crichlow 1—6, 6—1l, 5—7.

P, Patterson and G,. H. Man

ning beat V. N. Roach

Gittens 6—2, 6-4,
TODAY'S FIXTURES

and T

Ladies’ Doubles
Miss M. King and Miss Worme
vs. Mrs. Gibbons and Mrs, Barne
Mixed Doubles
Mrs. R. S. Bancroft and P
Patterson vs. Mrs, Legge-.and W.
crichlow.
Mrs. J. A, Mahon and C. B.
Sisnett vs. Mr. ang Mrs. Field

Men’s Doubles
R. S. Nicholl, and F.
. BH. UA. Cuke,: Jn
Cuke.

D. Barnes
and D. E.



| They’ ‘il Do It E very |

| Wren DIMBULB WAS
12 A GALE GMA HE
| THOUGHT
|





WERE

4
4)



Thi
EE: aot Wh
(WHAT HAPP



"ENS ¥ HE






HAVING THEM Th
june a UPHOL ae ck

Charge Against
Boxing Clubs

NEW YORK, March 17.
The International Boxing Club
of New York and Illinois were
charged to-day with conspiring to
monopolize professional cham-
pionship boxing business in the
United States,

The Department of Justice com-
plain mas made in a civil action
in the Federal Gourt. Owners of
the Clubs, James D, Norris of
New York and Arthur M. Wirtz
of Chicago and the Madison
Square Boxing Corporation of
New York, also were named as
defendants.

Defendants are accused of con-
spiring to restrain and monopolize
championship boxing bouts,

CP.

Malvern Defeat
Erdiston 15—5

Yesterday the Malvern
team defeated Erdiston
to 5 at Erdiston,
were Miss G,

netball
15 goals
The goal scorers
Garner and Miss H,.

Springer who scored 8 and 7 goals public are cordially in

Malvern.
Erdiston,

respectively for
Stuart seored for

Mrs.

! Ci ime

Regisiered U. 5. Patent Office

By THE OLD MAN LIKES TO HEAR
HIMSELF RAVE“WE JUST HAP

ONE OF THESE PEP TALKS

LAST MONTH! I SUPPOSE

pale er US HERE ALL

\ PROOUCE ANY RESUL:

SLAB~ BLAB- BLAH



GONNA
GUYS GET OFF THE
AND GET HOTBLABBIT Y=

3—O

‘AIR TRAFFIC

ARRIVALS BY B.W.1LA.

ON SATURDAY
From Trinidad ;
J Hoppin, M. Edghill, M
A. Pearse, V_ Marshall, W
W. Simpson, M. Simpson, M

Previte,
Garrett,
Alex-

ander, A. Walker, E. Walker, C Chad-
erton, A Naaous, D Griffith, B Dun-
ega-Pinedo R Dunega-Pinedo, G
Goetz, M. Goetz, E. Maynard, C May-
nard, P. Maynard, K Maynard, A
Adamson, A_ Inniss, V. Millington.
From preante :

ow eit, W ease, wee. ¢ Be
Riany, e a og

From Venesuela :
Doreen Lowe.
From Martinique :
Lue Marius.

From St. Lucia:

Jagith Finch, Dorothy Austin, Nicho-
jas Taylor, Robert Hale, Karis Man-
ning.

From St. Kitts :
Wilfred Gumbs, Anna Gruny.
From Antigua :
George Gadogan
From Guadeloupe :
Emmanuel ‘Sieyes, Carmen Sieyes.
ON MONDAY
From Trinidad :
B. Sealy, J. Baptiste, E. Moll, S. Moll,
L. Applebaum, D_ Iloo, PB, De Caires,
D! De ees M_ De Ve |» G Mose,

Cc Ottley, « S@lomon, R :
Collins, +* ho, W. u.
Craighton, W ‘aighton

From San Juan;

Herbert Shilston, Albridge C. Smith,
Margaret R. Smith, Thornto Delehanty,
William Belknap, Edith Belknap, Keith
B.,Inniss, Louise Mottley, Rolins Skeete,
Samuel A, Skeete.

From Antigua;

Osear Bird, Gwendolyn Trotman,
Stanley Sharp, Anthony Lowe, Audley
Stanley, Patricia .

DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
ON SATURDAY

For oe .

Peter ‘olmer, Anna y, Magz-
guerite Gummerson, Lue! Lembke ibke,
Mollie Bakman, Campbell Yearwood,
Isuray Yearwood, Lesley Yi 3
Kenneth Highton, Ralph Hayes,
Corbin, Lawrence Mitchell, Coun
Turner, Frank Clarke, Eric Holder,

Hugh Dixon, David Spranklin, Aristotle
Onassis, Jeane Phinelande, Wilfred
Gumbs, Courtney Hitchings.

For Grenada :

Glad; Millman, Willuan Rushton,
Rose ushton, Dudley Ferguson, Grace
Leedman, Richard Agostini, Barbara

Agostini, Wiector Cecilioni, June Cecilioni,
For St. Lucia:
Gertrude Chapman, Arthur
Jones, Adrien Monpiaisir
ON SUNDAY

Howard-

Por Antigua:
Guy Neale.
For Trinidad :

Marjorie O'Neil, Vincent O'Neil, Wini-
fred Marshall, Terrence Hawkins, Lilian
Springer, Elvira Trotman, Curtis

Rolph Hive, Blanka Spencer, Betty
King, Dr. Jenifer kine haay.” Hoskin,
Frances Dent, Chinon Averboukh, John
Bayne, Jean Bayne, Elspeth McCormick

Sinetta Parahoo, Cyn-





this.
ahoo,
Por Puerta :

Andrew. s 2 Mi
Stephen le thier,
Clarke, Howel,

Karen Howell, Helen i
Noble, Mary Marquis, Roger Marquis,

George y, Vivia Godley, William
Blair, ‘Helen ‘Blain



Harbour Log



In Carlisle Bay

. Lady Silver, Sch. Lady Noeleen,
Seh. Excelsior Hodge, M.V. Caribbee,
Maris Stella, Sch.

Florence Emanuel, Sch. Mary M, Lewis,
Sch, United Pilgrim S., Sch. Lucille M
Smith, Sch. Marion Belle Wolfe, Seth
Anita H., Sch. Enterprise S., Sch, Bel-

queen, Sch. Mandalay I1., M,V. Jen-
kins Roberts.
ARRIVALS
Schooner Excelsior Hodge, 60 tons
net, Capt. Aunt, from Nevis.

RES
. Smith, 56 tons net,
Ollivierre, for British Guiana.

Schooner Cyril
Capt

M.V. T. B, Radar, 116 tons net, Capt
Mitchell, for St, Lucia,

Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tens net,



Capt. Selby, for Dominica,
In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.)
advise that they can now commu
with the following ships through t
Barbados Coast Station :—

R.M SS. Mauretania, S®. Giert z¢°



geen, . * men Integrity,
revinee, Se! r. SS. ee,
sair, SS William oe ‘st
antia, $S Crlapia, 3.8
S.S. Sundial, SS. heats s
Argentina, © 8. Esso Bayway, §S. In-
dian City, SS Golfito, SS. Ragnhild
Brovig, 54 orth Sua. SS. E ess
Of Scotland, o, SS
townshend, ©,S. Loide Motduras, S S
Sises, SS Gerona, SS S. Monica
SS. Ariow, SS. Samana, SS. Mac.
oris, S® Loida, SS. Atlantic, SS.
Esso Pittsburgh, S.S. re tain
SS Prospector, 5S Rio

Puerto Rico, SS. Salte 5

ores, & S_ Katrinemaersk, SS. Mette
Marsk, $8. Utilitas, SS. Esso Brazil,
SS. Ocean Mail, SS ag $.s.
Lil U, SS General : x
menton, £ S Seaglobe, ‘. Rose,
SS ingleton, $8.8. Norselady, ; Ss
Thorbjorg, SS _ Selector, SS. Eassc
Glasgow, SS. Esso Bristol, S®. Alcos
Pegasus, SS. Sugar Refiner, $8. Esso
Manchester, ss Corinthic, 3.8

Tiberius, SS Rude Etar, S S. Del Mar,
ss Del Viento, S S. Sommerstad, $.S
Siram, SS. Orwell SS. Northleigh,



BRANDON TROPHY
PRACTICE TODAY

The practices for the Br dou,
Trophy series continue this a’
noon at Bellerie at 4.30, The
will be an rdmission charge ¢
one shilling.





By jimmy Hialo

ee SS









eae L yesTERDAys MEETING DONT C4

SEEM TO



COPK ist, KING FEATURES SUNGAME, ine, WORAP MS Bak OS



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SOBER-MINDED ;

SOCIETY

@ From Page 5

come to this Conference,

And now, in conclusion I am:
going to offer you some personal
thoughts which some of you may
regard as er especially
as coming from the Comptroller
of Development and Welfare whc
{s, or is Supposed to be, an ortho-
dox civil servant. In the (first
place, this is primarily a Confer-
ence of weigare workers design-

U.C.W.E. Get
Director Of

' Education Dept.

3

@ From Page 1
aid. “One is concerned with the
aching of primary school teach-

Ts. Valuable and indispensable nial Treasurer he has seen the
ork has been done by the differ- book in the cage of the
ent institutions for training of accused. The hand writing in the in this beautiful

teachers and it may be that these
would welcome the possibility of
having a common Board of Studies
with the University College de-
artment of Education actively
gcollaborating and it may be possi-
le to work out some method by

ated by their Governments, withâ„¢ which there may be a common

some distinguished and very wel-
come guests. It will no doubt be

examining body and the establish-
ent of a system of qualifications

largely concerned with. tan per-ach will be accepted through-

ticipation of Governments in wel-t:
fare work, but I feel that we must
all recognise with gratitude the’

ing done in these territories,and the

cut the region,

“T am putting my own personal
views,” r. Sherlock said, and he
added: “I must be careful not to

appointed director.

voluntary social work which is the} raise any difficulties for the newly
a

time and effort devoted ‘to. such
work by all sorts of people, both;
in the Churches and in lay organ-'‘,
isations, with the idea of being
of service to their fellowmen and
women. We wish that there
were more of services, and

that they could receive wider
public support; but I should
fail in my duty if 7 did not pay
tribute on this occasion td the
Sconiinien which has . been
made | voluntary. individuals
and ies, often before Gov-
ernment welfare services were
introduced; and if I did not, let
me express the hope that this
Conference will provide help-
ful guidance and encourage-
ment to the volunteers. as well

#-8s, ug You will
this particular
question me detail, I hope, at

your ninth session.

My otner thought is this. Many
of you, I know, recognise that
religious faith—I am not speak-
ing of any particular religion—
must be the ultimate inspiration
of enduring welfare work. Since
‘I took up the post of Comptroller,
I have been puzzled to notice how
rarely social welfare workers as a
group permit themselves to make
any outward acknowledgement of
the spiritual content of their work.
Improvement in material con-
ditions is indeed desperately
needed by thousands in the West
Indies, But it would be urifor-
tunate, as I am sure you will
all agree, if the social welfare
services came to be regarded
simply as an instrument of mater-
fal betterment. Our aim is to
make for better and more pros-

us citizens; surely it is equally

make for better and more

souls? At any rate, this

is in my mind as I ex-

press my pleasure in declaring

this Comference 7pen, and wish

you every possible measure of
success.

VICAR ARRIVES - from 1.

Asked of his experience aboard

the schooner, Rev. Denington said


it, but we had a rough trip.” He

said that he will take up his ap-

pointment as soon as he settles
into the Vicarage.







WHAT'S ON TODAY

Social Welfare Conference,

Hastings House at 8.30 a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions at
10.00 a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil at 2.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Dist.

“EB” Police Station at 7.45

pm.

Mr, A. Pearse lectures on
“Polk Lore and Folk Songs
ef Trinidad” at the British
Council at 8.15 p.m.

WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington: nil.

Total Rainfall for month to
date: .

Highest Temperature: 86.5 ’“F

Lowest Temperature: 68.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per

hour.
Barometer (9 am.) 29.968
(3 p.m.) 29,896

-DAY
> 6.16 am.
‘oon: Last Quarter, March 18
Sunset: 6.12
High Tide: 7.54 a.m., 9.57 p.m.
Lew Tide: 12.59 a.m., 3.20 p.m.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m. 5

ee enema



Cocoa

ng and torment from

e iscovery of i (tormerty
work in ea C nara) Peete starts to
ie pera a

ut also takes out the swel
bleeding and combats nerve

thereby curbing other trou-

jeu Caused by Plies such as Headache,
oh cd caarey

debility, and irritable

me Get tex from your

Hytex must stop your pile

and troubles or money back on

Backache, Constipation,
Sisporitton
SE Cie y under the positive
urn of empty package.

MUMMY ...

IT know the

I lave the
DIFFER

foo



to do is to emphasise the fact that
when the new department
education has been estawlished, it
‘will exercise a very
and powerful influence, and will
speed up the regional approach to
education. By ‘regional approach’
I do not mean uniformity, but I
mean the acceptance of common
objectives, of the establishment of
common. standards of training
end of qualification, the placing of
emphasis on the study and under-

standing of the communities of the th, Treasury Vault up to Au-
British Caribbean, both of the gust, 1951, Pe
physical and social environment. The wax is melted on a hot
Here again, then, is another pjate and it takes about ten min-
example of the way in which, ytes to melt the wax 8 e
gradually, the effect of the estate j

of the University College of tha
West Indies is affecting the whole
region and the effects are coming
with extraordinary speed when

CIVIL SERVANT

@ From Page 5
in October 25, 1944, In this book
is kept the record of the Paying
Teller’s cash,

He as not acquainted
the kind of book. The book is
kept by the Teller for his own
use. During the time he was Colo-

















with

book is that of Smith’s. The right
hand side of the book shows the
amount of money the Cashier has
in hand for the next day.

At this stage Clarence Patterson
said in 1945 he was clerk in
the Royal Bank of Eanada. A
cheque was handed to him sik
it was passed through his hands
as Cashier of the Bank on April
5, 1945.

Joseph Hope told the court that
he is a clerk in the Currency Dept.
@n July 7, 1951, he assisted in
sealing bundles of notes in the
presence of the Accountant Gen-

ury. Sometimes packages are
sealed in the Treasury near the
Vault. Clerks go over for the pur-
pose of cancelling notes.
Cancelled notes are kept in the
Currency Vault which is distinct
from the Treasury and before
destruction they were sorted near

At this stage further hearing
was adjourned until 10 a.m, today.

you consider that teaching began
only four years ago.”







Unbelievable
VALUE

assortment of . . .

READY-MADE
SUITS

TROPICALS and

What I want eral.
He heated the wax and used
of seals similar to those produced TWEEDS
in the Court. Prices from 92
important Cross-examihed Mr, Hope said om
that the seals belong to the Treas- to $76.90

If these suits were locally

made they would cost
nearly double the price.



TUESDAY, MARCH 18,



10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET





He

DIFFERENCE

I can taste the
DIFFERENCE

ENCE

GUARD AGAINST
COUGHS ana COLDS!











A





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proves to the world



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finish and engineering excellence
is a car with proved appeal.
specification reads like the cata-
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of the world’s costly big cars—



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Phone 2385



ner

x W% in. : ; ep
oD & R B R E A bD WALLBOARD MOULDING



Y STE SUL RT

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exclaimed = this certainly is







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FOR THE TROPICS
is

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OR GINGER ALE and

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be dangerous, If you catch cold easily
because you are low in A&D Vitamins,
build up your stamina now with good-
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more than just a tonie~

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It’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT y
Scott's Emulsion fs a gold mine of PLENTY OF ICE o

—— satural A&D Vitamins, Valuable for all $
the family—in rainy season or dry season, y

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HENNESSYS



THE BRANDY



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Sole Distributors Phone 4504





| We offer the foliowing

TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

UlaTEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. long
@ 19}c. per sq, ft.

for covering joints—@ 5c. per ft.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
The Board of 1,000 Uses,
thick, 4ft., 8ft., 10ft. long—@ 18e. per sq. ft.

‘LEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS :
% in. thick, 4ft., x 6ft., 8ft., 10ft. long—@ 3e, per sq. ft.

SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS
\% in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft.—@ 40c. per sq. ft. f
3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft—@ 29, & 32c. per sq. ft.

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| 3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft.—@ 28e. per sa. ft.
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All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack
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Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID.












PAGE 1

TUESDAY. MARCH 18, 1IS2 HARHMH)kOVOCATC PACE FIVE Civil Servant Stands Trial On Larceny Charge [ Big Crowd Attend Gase *-' •"" %  * *ueh an astonishing reply DEFENCE COUNSEL. Mr. E. K Walcotl. Q.C. and hm! ? iSok .fta? Ju'lnle'i? ' "" Solicitor CieiK-ral, Mr. W. W. Recce. Q.C. for the Crown. "• -M-ped him while he was yeaWrdav exhausted the Jurv List after M YhallenMj" "*"'"" abou. "•'•• and 16 "calls" for standby a., the Carlos Smith Falsification. [TEaT'h *"J" ',' Larceny and Embezzlement cuas beuan at the Court ol etaa to upn Grand Baaftoaa before His Lordship Sir Allan Collymore Hp said he had been Whan the Jur>' List had hoen exhausted, there was ,hul %  %  "<* hMl h • • still another jurvman needed and one was evemuallv '""'. "? "'"' '•" •" """ '" % %  "" selected from the standby lUt. "d n "" "* Smith is charged on three counts of lahiftcation of At this stage he denied ha.ina account*, one of larcenv as a Civil Servant and two of said he had laid Snnili embezzlement as a Civil Servant. Mr. IE: K Walcott is ariar hlmseTr. He had told s*ni.h associated with Mr E, W. Barrow for lh defence %  ml 11 *• 'n an awkward p...lA packed court listened to the %  m uauta aa bad Banalaa lay of hearing IU the book in whlcn a 0 were made c.--h .„, a i.umoer of .veaia. Solicitor General outlined the rase ' Par !" "" "aaaa and moimon no oeea.lon had-Is aadil % %  nveevi. '".V"*.. ... """ %  1 1 dence. day. Carlo* E. Smith was pla..l be„•,,., %  .. rhowed (ore the court on three cums oul ol the vault—in" other word* of falsification of accounts, one 81000 was taken by him foi the >_-_, count of larceny as a public serpurpoM of paying out to numet. \. and two counts of embei8tM people. The record WHO! 1 \IIIH HOI (.11 WHIM. A H*9* atta and h 'ni!ri Ko against ihem an Hi bad never Jement as a public servant. On snow that on April 4, there wer."" K,'.' rx"„ ^i" ,',',? "' lhrm the flrM count the charge was certain monies in the vault and __,.,.. .,,.„ %  Petty Cash Book the receipt of £•* • notes * W.000 denom"* *3 000 The second count read %  *• %  %  that on April . 194S. while em. '" %  %  •* ,h *t on April 5. 1MJ, ployed as a clerk he did with inthere were two thousand in two*, tent to defraud omit from the that on April 6, 1945, t" defraud he omitted from the a* %  h. H LW had lu-lp rr. m lit I %  two in onei" aid fifteen thuus. and in fives. On April 6. the record book showed twenty-five thousann in fives and two thousjytty Cash Book the receipt of Md n mrs In ^hrr words •''""> bundle of twos had disappeared. He said that D. E W Omens was in IM5 Colonial Treasurer J~ .JA" and Commissioner of Currency ed with having on April 6. IMS. and c ncurrrd x #5 Third Count On the third count he i REV W. 1 they were Hodge' B discussing The Bank-Holiday ne went to Bat Treasury waJune 7 He haforgotieti aartaln parad his iiflUand had gone ft-i them. He wa* nut there more than two .: .mites At the time he did not know the cornbinaUon, though h' row knows one. Cyril Stout,of Colly more Rock, St. MuhaeL satd he i s a Reliren „, E. Sloule was then ManManagjrr of the Savuigx Bank With intent to defraud, concurred ager „f lhe Savings Bank. Thev During the year 194a he was |n omitting from or in the Cash would urwc that on April 5 one "ftna Currency ConimissionStatement Record Book a material they issued $4,000 In twos and ff* ^ A P rii 5 '•. Mr. D. of 13.000. The fourth count read ones lo the Commercial banks. i'. ltw "R was Uie other Currency that on April 6. 14S, he stole but in truth and fact that money ^^"iisaloiier Exhibit was the the amount of 3,000 belonging to never went into circulation bef,> l 0 "" ,m -^P 1 "" 5 'M5. there His Majesty, and on the fifth cause it was stopped by Glttens *,**"'' !" tr >! "' ^ hand writing count he is charged with having. * P"t Wthe public vau... ^C^SrtrSnMhaf dj* Th"; ^hT/efmXr.n, U w,?h b 5h V >l,,m, > Trnnnferrcd |5 a record of note, for Barof his employment wHh the cusT PlWi ^ utluIl w „ ^^ clays Bank and the Boyal Bank tody of control of $2,000, fraudulha thc two wcrp a \ wav% "$n* of Canada lently applied the W*me amount to fl lhf VHU „ masqueraded at fives v , , 'her Cnremicc his own use. They would s.-e that the accused Notes Checked >ou m \\ On the sixth count he is chargwrote in thc record two thQUST*,. „M -. ., i, ^ Hastings House. -d with having on April a ijiS. and dollars were taken from the .JttMmSmr -^-!" f* Thlldn-n Aclw by virtue of hi. employment bevault and placed in the till. The nots'Tcre^sueiTV^Rtyil You inly. 7 !" ji,|t.bly log entrusted with the amount of record did not refer to having ^ tlK of Canada ar^^cItSS "*** "• view that progress baa SSTOOO, fraudulentlv applied the Uken any other note of twos. lun ^]7 *(*nJ-4 tt ** llwn h--ma(I ,_ lh ln V etve lillt SS amount to K owTu-e !Vr„ M lh rtd.^Sr 'S? att ^^ ^t-nt into the 1^. !" **!? di'recUor^ r^oai! OuUlning the case to the jury. %  £_* lh* till under the guise vaul alld mili. i. H04t with Rev Deniiigtoii West Indies Need Sober IVIindecl Soeielv Vetr. In llrirf 16 WATCHES STOLEN %  ULinM rtATCHts valu ISM t\v i.ntr, eaocaj vahn' aa M, M ;ms of cigarettes valu .1 *13 and .i number or ear-rln J ., ir ilaleri when the drug st* %  of H D Kock at Tudor Sure I 1 M p.m. on Friday and 8 K • in. on Saturday. They are t f art} of Mr. Bock. NBaraVI VAK.IIAN of Codru %  ton ollegi. st John. rapa. i handbag) vuiu> J •IS was stolen while she was at iha Modern i>'.-.shop. Broao '.iiilav. The handbag contained a cbe*|i •* f..i it.' | .lueti $l <. I t>ir o| spectacles valued $10 i valued I .laming $5 12 and ath* u.tat value (M4U lt> HAT1I1NU mtfft val. |M ware tolen from a cloU> ke (mine Of A.llnii ll.ri at "Iristtm." Wuithing. Chi Church, U'tween T.oo aim li : i ii. on Saturday, TM i ropajtj tUIITIIII.II NTUl-TF of • pnei V .,: .,-. Christ Chu I i be< ycle valu %  tolan from euWda u %  %  %  "'..of Bertram Clarke at lha between Mo .. d Hit p m. on Sunday. Fires Bum Crop Cktnos six an ,., i „,i ens % %  IBM mra burnt at PNaaaafal irobieui of bow lo aiwiila i.n runadatl">nniavtmRani been |xnble lo arrange this -,irotWal welfare aar H eaa iron, inn, vhrt „ JwS ' %  '."'[ „ ,. .ce. and I extend to •.„ fund., at a Hma ail 11 th.l, ,„, s urd., TI," • L. L.Z.: el come to uniii I Intents ant than then publ i*lng fastei Yoi of fives. The Treasury vault by combination. < Icrks knew, but ivo one knew all Some knew the top and some the bottom. For someone to go c ~ normally he would have to have someone with him. After the outline of the case, Saturday. They are the t C. M. Dravton and were In*a i At Horse Hill Plantation. Si v quarters acres of third crop cane-* and three quarters of acre of trash. The canea are i all othor Mr. Reece said that it which would last a fairly long time and some of the evidence would be tedious to listen to In tha' many witnesses would be died to deal with book count* and documents mri 'hev would be asked to look t ihem He wa. nevertheless agftdng '*em the witnesses were called to give strict attention to all lhe Walter D. Charlton. Aecountan evidence. General, said he had taken up hi notes are taken out of the vaults. Confc h. sa",d_ Scvcra. Dur,n ,he War noU "*^ l %  cerna signed and then it was deelded to bring down the notes from the U K unsigned. When they anunsigned they have to be taken to the vault of the Currency Department and then they would be sent to the Advocate in the custody of two elerk.s tp have the signatures affixed. They are then returned to He aeid Aat Smith had been aprmmrneni on way M. II lnc Currenc Dept and lQckf, the lime he .ntered thc Civil SerTreaaury as paying teller. Smith lhcy are chtcko J ftl he Treaaury vice until June 11)51. when he left that Department and went to ix-pt. On November 20 11144 was transferred to the Audit Dethe Audit Office in June. some notes were returned from s'"'^ 1 '"* 1 "' ,l lepartparunent. On July 7. George Amory came the Advocate with the signature* f 10 1 and DUI U P a probation i The alleged offence occurred a Xv him and made a report. He ufflxed and he made an entry in sa-rvic*. Indeed. prolMtlon has by %  long time ago, April 6, 1945, but_* huv>>ed him some currency notes the book. now almost everywhe r e secured %  it was not until July lat year which he examined. Two packCroy-examined Mr. Stoute recegnlllon as an essential service thai any Irregularity aury was diBcovered. cinment. must be so organ!*., thai they a/Ml pn-.. mOH add unfmltFbr example, Children Acts 'ully t<> lha burden] UBOI have been brought into ntw-ratton Ikinal ewMteraj irhlalB is already in Jam an.i ano the lav.-warit '"'inn tiverstrained. and which Islands, while Barbados and we MIcan only be expaiu^. D itish Honduiai are about to s owly and by much painful ? J legialnthm, en %  • < tha". a, ,j r n( ^.^ lilU j.iMballon service ha. Itiitisli W. %  fail i>i,ii-eh ui ,!.,in I *tti beer %  alart.-.l.,,.,l w.-;.,,. ,.„urd., burnt a ,.'.. win k h.e. !> %  VII reorganised, with a Bttong %  mptuuii on Mi-oeaieutlon %  the natwnal wealth. lives and ham'icratu Social -ivi.es aim al owkln| Barbados has established and betta I %  %  i pruptvrty of Jow River l.ld. were Insured. Ten acres of third crop n iii". were burnt when a flie < canonlv' be expanded t rre d %  Castle Grant Planlah as I bo Dane* painful |" tin • norih al abuu' 1.30 .m B Saturday burnt a ojuarlei i i acre of fourth crop 11|' UgOPagtJ of Jonathan Nin Ilge Road, Chrit ihni.li 1 I Any person employed ..era Thev make W, JJ no1 '" ,ur ^„ m „.-.li.„,„ I. ,„„1 a "' •'"•< "< "••! %  \ attai adaalabla and ""' %  w r b n " ntanalalni laboui i .,.,-. boua, broke ...u %  lanM P s. Andrew, at about 1.00 |i in lh c Treaages labelled five, weia cut aald that be laaued to the Koyal In a eivUlaod atate. A now ejnBWil9i In evor) proBTaaalvo oounSunday, Thev are llir effopi open and one of them conBank on April a 12.000 In $1 phasfc. haa everywhere been ur* In lha warM, laa moat auceante ofjTX lloynea and the l.lned two dollar note, Inalead note.. The tranaacUoii <-anacllv nf liaaajnai and whtw of flvM Tnc olher rontabiwl ed at about 12.15 p.m. duly itVa, ."Jeep aecounu htS bUmk paper. Two other bundle* not „, ,f the Bank to do so a. carefully a< possible. "^ ala afcaall Mat. "1 am not suggesting to you," ha aaid. "that the mere fact that A lire al Maggatts Hall I'lnnl. '•' tlon SI Mkbae] burn! foal I paying attention u „ r nr „ ,.,„„ n|. „„,. of Dowding Eatate-. and Pi Co.. LUI. They were imufad • of Ibelr I BM amounts to counts a It Is not TlM Objective .tin. I. agniaifig mev o| dintouil in. ill.ill in., i I., juUfcvl . '<"*• had ihelr desks In tnOnlng In this Held. In Trinidad yet, lo falsification of ac"" four bundles and reported the h .""?,"" D,p '', bu h coul1 a child protection service la being UMM nd h %  criminal ofTence """" '" ,he R "a ncu Secretary "£.,** lhp J ^"J J opbuilt up Some ol lhe .mallei %  """""" ""'"" alter he had examined the seals. H' J| !" " '" the Treasury. „„„„„„,,„.,. : r .„,„„ hand „ la,,. %  n.l.catcs have Just M rhe seals, sumps and bundle, he "' C,H, U nM aay anything .bout ,„ ,„,.„. ,,,„ u ,|,. .„ ..clfapI Tulls ,.,,. sulul* ....iv,M for lhe following %  MoUvea of Fraud landed ,„ the Pol.ee ""rh"''" !" i^k tTklofm .h. mltrn. mc,m',n ,hc v..,,,h ,,., ^J^oH^S^lm S^SSi '!\\ V "A But U • in. urn. Of ,ne mCroM-Examined CuTrSic^viuU and St? CurreS*""""• >" ,"•";", V %  ? s. „, *, taac in making the accounts, this CroM-examlned. he said thai „ Vault I, not the B ~ aTlhe ln '>•"'"'" %  """""' ill lha KSLSTlSl pulling m sonictning or laumg lo about June a new currency was Treaaury Vault. On September wotk u a '" appiovad sehocH in thug you loach, taMIl U lortfl i'i„i,„,n bL..a.,r llarlliv In put in somelnuig ,| acluaicu oy ;il.ml I.. I !" introducer! heir. Thc 19. 1951. lhe log book was shown s Vinicnl community count ., .oil KMlal duly; on Rer Ulrlani Cadogan Or mouves ol traud, then he was date llxed was August though to him and the Accountant Gen'" SI. Kill* stop .. ..: ,. ;„... o. -, ,'„(,;,,, M,,,I,. iila.kinaii. (*,i submitting that it would be a there had previously been lhe Ineral took the book out of a steel louo-or. o, st UKL.I ,!,„,. ut Iltl In „ (1J Mover* stabil Vaarwaod, Shit ctlmloal offence. Icmion of introducing it on Jul, cabinet. .... „ niral m lha mrmiraat Olbba, Marlon Wi.nell l.o, The f.cls ol the cave lo be 10 Thai would have meant thc Help lor Service. ,„,„, „, ^j eapreaaum llo ugh HoUJor, BalBa Banlamln. I.ui estaollshed were that the money destruction ol the old notes. The sag rllterallon A school ol nlm-makiiik '•"* the aru, an pinn-iiU ,n,.s,nn,,i llunle. Tbcxlorc Agard. !*->' was in the possession of the date would have been known to ' %  "' %  Koevo .Mr. Moot,s.,ul been held in thc West Indie, and nj u-ad to nchci live, lor ordm.iv Greene, Cor.l Harper. Colonial Treasurer al the tune and everybody. The key to the cn%  "' 'lr"' moer !" IM. met* waa Weat Indian documentary nlme m that Smith a. clerk about the blnatlon is kept in lhc Colord.l "".''"r."' 10 ",'" the hooh produced, Eapens hay. Mailed „ ,„ ,,„,,,„. ,., „, vaul. of the u-e.mr, ud to Secrebary. omee ,n caao of re S?S'currency' Comml,on.r "' '""" !t U n ?,f M ,' J" : "' h. moaa, from „ m out an emerg^cy g l^S^S^SSS^SS: Sft "JlaeS j., ar In the Trjaaury .nd was also come development %  !h„t th. atandarda. a aoclely In wl, — Government welfare lanital "I'm, such m lhe |K,.llic. lulu, %  urreiicy „„. hl ., llK >U ppltmenlel by un ""e Wrt no. •'--• n-iia,, V"...-.. x.i April 3, 1943, ( ,mcial efforts through IUI h "' "• '' ustraUOn Ihtough 01 ithat unde, lhe '" '> „,,,„. were uancllona with BarXnrles a. the Sugar Indu Ira population, will I,. -,,V. rasion. va.tcn sl.temcnt. wS. """ .""""j ' d !" !" wer '•" Labour Wcjfar. fund., .he IMro' '•!>, Sid oW Mil wa, laklng money for hl.ru.lf '^^^IIOUeTHe did nW SteX? .b^.S?" "-"S '"".^ Mural l>ep.r.menl „f .be imv. In whl. djeovired. ISi SSSS'.TS. <£* Vf^ "". T, ^^^^^ITlJTi ** Co.le,. „,. ,he W„. Indies, can pbiy a p.. V Jordan would be to the fact that """""'?'•' f* B ? urnc ,houM Ihouaand five dollar note, werne wenl on lha, dale to .he Uea|21f*lt ~*222&i!!S !" i2 d .' !" . r?"" 1 '" Bank and over the count It will be ha sa dencc you do .not ilnd clrcurnstancea of th whhh Hill be before you, b^ In tho treasury once, a bankC omm,ss£er Cm A pn! 3.7S Institute of Social Economic Research. Mor Induatrlnl araUarall making stca id not ba non nporl if UM mean, al your disposal in ami the tooli uf V0UI rorda. Anlith Young. Ontti Huynei, Marcla Skeete, oil .1 • I'atrlc.a Cni-iif, Fal. Vounc, i)..|)hi. Chaaa, PI J CoUravva. Joan OlIL B ll t I.Miii.i-. Kula VearwoiaJ, Clorsi HO&dar, Krneiila Norvillc ( .i.-n.i I; Tin i .ii.tiilahf.nlr.l in inii.ii' The coufH ">f leeturai waa gWe i% in o James, assisted by mini .1 I o Si John Ainiiulallrigadc ^St ll'i sS ert *" lhln >* wanted Isked iaSSoo o^doE TSSm' SS*T Industrial -Ifar, .-making stcan, •£ and the too aury for the purpos,of get. ng BfM nrvor followfd him ^ BUed ln pschaaie No^Wire allo Pr->t' os ln P"vale Lu al n ii H i al l rimple, jrarf l" 00 ^ 0 ?" y f ?^ 2f.S on.UofflccartlniKor.nfxpli.na. u,ued to the* SE& l Sink 15 Industries We in HasHou ter and when he lc->k oul wbai ,, .„ _.-,.--,-., .„ w. m .\.-* <••.*>.,*.. s^^. ..* ajl_ __.. .i__. nni%i> ih* Inn*..f Mtahllahlnir B Of human t-mleav Mi HUM ba money to pay but over the coun^ n iromce'asklng'"forVn aapUlHVIx.-.ued"' To"'the* fhlvaT Sink "Tt industries We in Hagtiiucs Hou ml on lha lu,:t.. ter and when he took out whai |un of a que artion to be asked Canada Some of the note* that ntin *"* ho I* <*' *Ubli8hing %  or human endeavour, he Imagined to be five thou-and He wai (u Smith m Ju|y 9 ^^^ hBVe Kom to the R r ^(„.„ n i Inattllita lo give a fullHarm Welcome dollar bundles of note*, and openam) aak(id n m whe|her he knew Bank of Canada went to the time training lo teachers and i >ha ,„,, ;i ,ir.,i,,i ed It, there were noi what they anything or could help him ir. an> Treaaury and the Bank waa iOc.al workers in the ilmn.--' v „, n rxebterna: voui 'Tialnr-n >• Wom-r.i Canadian Club # I'r..i.i rage 4 were supposed to be. ^y^ Smith did not loll him he handed After the lapse of a short period hfld „„ theories and to formulate Cn J3 u# of time, the matter wa, reported theories might throw suspicion on Thf> to the Accountant General and a someone. further eareh was madv Then „ c had ^ ^^ (|| frir|ull tain It discovered that manner, he said and Smith told other irregularities were praant h)m ,„, (Ud ^ m%h .„ imTlmlll and the Accountant General In due ale anybody. Me was present time reported to further author^^ lnspei1ur Bourne aske told Smith he might be In a very difficult position hlmheque for $4,000 Thl! was, fUgned by him. heque was filled In by Mr. Jordan On April 4. 1M5 JI3.000 In five dollar notes were Mlored in Hie vaults, and on the day before Mie transaction ilfl.Oou Payments He told them It would be necessary to look at the Petty Cash Book of thai date and the record %  If Aalonisiiinic Reply The reply from Smith that he re In lhe vault*. Cash Checked At the end of lhe day the Clerk checks the cash In hands of the Paying Teller. Qrax The first entry In Exhibits Sine v. a the Petty Cash Book—was made tensions, mi March II. 1944, and ended nearing completion. • n *—*J. Indian territories ui much morr quanta-," :.. du t' y.-t. m igdta ol UMae modi Bu1 j tm egptcUUy (lad • but WKourajfing sign* of |M.-Bfd M h n g with them, you will hat ress. than U m. doubt lhat ,, Hjperauon ol Mr, Wiif...i .-.,.,1 jvelUre •Wflxai Hi I rhinn. UM B au a toll -.1 l moving in anxious in I ,| w ]' ,. Advl ..ginaljcheniel Aioufi tlon's m by Professor c,,,,,,,,,' ,,'," wfiZ" re msplte of varh.u. .-• Wl) alnoal all al an and, ; .,,,..,_ ,. >t( |(| ': and w• facing tti Household Items KITCHEN TOWELS, E.ch $1.50 MILK COVERS, Escfi 72c. & 84c ICE BAGS & MALLETS, Sl $1.60 TRAY CLOTHS, Each $2.23 & $2.75 TABLE CENTRES, Each $3.00 HOME PeODUCTS OEPAHIMtNI Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. H, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET r — P* %  Baby H*nii l*a 'Ura JlT 05 !-*...— niiM iiLeaavs %  i i' < • %  I John t>' I % %  iiii-.j D,..i A Du m.iiaas i%  P C A %  -. M.I...... i li.nl.. * • I ,.i i..... i %  e %  as Sm. The balance .,1 i *ill br di-ti | CruUtmaa. Again with sincere U POU and everyone who assl-l' %  | thU function a sure. I.ER NIBLOCK llon% land**, Rrlttons Cross Rd.. I March, Utt*. INVESTMENTS II you ate lhe holder of — Commonwealth of Australia 5 Debentures due 1952-55 you should consult us without delay regarding the exchange of these securities A. S. SIKVM:N & SONS (Barbados) ITU. Barbados Correspondents For ROYAL mmm CORP. un. "Ask your . %  __ Asauw a p>rMu ii.ra.Diir-.-ti !" -"*MI .HI *1 V.liimi •! %  milra ..I M>i>l* l.f rovilM Th ,! lall"! %  IillnIn lhf *-rfl.l T C A I... limit lla trmt rarord ot rallabllil' on Mtfl < %  nna..1li ...in.ortnh;. aihfilulsd %  *S I \1\l,\ titSTaata, HARRISON'S Broa d St. I \TIIOl BN "OBIAC M Till-: nii'iiniiii sv.M 111:111 in asm s 11 uniii Mil. •OIIIA4 PMg 1.0I bccmtie slimy llors mil In < 01111stiff u In 11 dr> I. soil and pliable in use Ha. no Ihin patches I'lissesses a lolly liftof llsi-ful .. i w, < III fill tnr 11 s#. 11 i ih .• Motor Cars, Mirrors, Windows and Glassware, Household Paintwork Etc. SIZE 22' I 181/,' i.ui" HI ....is .... 1. HARRISONS Hardwarp Dept. Tel. 2364 T. C. P. 1 in\ 1.1. atrUK 1 un in rimusli I powerful -mil print iiins crrmkldc. It ran be used not onl> on lhe -.km. In Ihi nose, throat .mil e\es. but als.. Uken Internally. KMIIVIs I'AIN AMI I'KCIMOTI.S KAP1D UK A LING ON SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES KNIGHT'S LTD. Distribums SELECT THESE NOW. Hlltl.Y'S ASPAMA'M'S SOI P I.FTONA ORsTCN PEA BOI P \ HTurrsD Q 'm OLIVES kfARfcXIaA rl \IN QUECN OUVE8 rRAWFORlYS CREAM l R kCKEM IMPERIAJ LEO HAMS '2 I51D) per ID S 33 1.08 1 64 1 ( %  1M Her I. S 3l. ..12 l.tfu 1.40 1.36 %  T 'TTER IMPERIAL CORNED BRISK! I SOUTH AFRICAN IWX'K LOBSTER MAXWKU. HOl'SK fOFFEK NEW ZEALAND CMEESk. CANADIAN PICNIC HAMS i NEW ZEALAND l HE! jar I 61 %  in 4-20 per ilh per 5,b tin per leper lb 4 M COCKADE FINE RUM srtxsihn*. vroif & #w. UA




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DAI M \K( H IKAUHMMIs lllVdl \ I I PAGE SP.rEK HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES *-SBL*" BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG I I r ow ru. err j KNOW L*, N T o Y-1 WHAT DADDVS 8f?\\ Xv ^-twf1 DO-*; WHILE v.i c ( >v WEPE SHOPP-NG jfi fftlfr -'"^X FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY F= !" SO TMI CAP WHO POPfP ANP STAKT6P THIS FANTASTIC PKISON BREAK' -ONL* CAgS€ -e CAN KlP US THE nAKPEM' HOW* W1(XS POC* PtPN'l SA> KtHT TWHEP TO 2£if 3W AFTee THE •v.-.. m m -r locse. iex' r -MM ET \CH 'HE PIP • AN \iT All FOR tsjApf' )TNE:>AK.E "CPfcP TO /C IflMMj VO* .*<%A* AlONE "CW75*NON OU*C S-lP ANP \CAN THESE I JO* cue exTpincw V IWINA L^ TO JUPITER' HE5 A PXSIOST KNOW f "OlP ON W 'P NJ MANTEP NC .'OU.P HA* MEN OUT 0 neE v NOW—PUT ME aOiiiPN'r n.A> PAIL WITH mpse CONVICTS NOW HE *ETS SHOT TRTIN'TUM SAVE THP WACPEN MAVM /M COBWV, BUT FOB MV WJNev HE'S AN_ ONV 6V> JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS .UP KIRBY THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK 8c RAY MOORES A MGHT1 VOK£ QJNSS OUT O/Eff THE 0!NOfTHFBAm£ + THEVIU/£t K 3UPDENLY'$IL£ NTf WOP KXV0*S4 IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only MMI l.\l Ol I I'.IIS arr nun ailahlr at our Hrunrhrn Twrrdoidr. S|it-iitk Islow % %  and Snan Kirrrl Uully Now Usually Now Tins LAMB'S TONGUKS S1.M .• NX CHKKSK (IVr IUI .74 .88 Tin* BATC HKI.OKS PKAS :l9 31 Bi.ls: IIOKI.K'KS MA1.TKI) MII.K .72 All GltCllIII CLEANS, LUBRICATES, PREVENTS RUST [cSfOj HANDY OIL BY ALEX RAYMOND V RIM MAX GOOSK A in %i:u\ II I NUSENT MiniMii; MtlMlAVS St Vlm.til ll.nl.,,(.-. -i Vlnrrnl Iparfe> Si Vincent Win.. II it l> i.l.., j„,„, Depart. It-rltado. IQJO Arrive. St Vincent 11 M St Vlnrenl/Trlnlil.id SI. Vlnrrnl Ihparta SI. IkMM \> %  1 r.n.il ,.| Depart-. Trinidad Arrive* St Vlirent i M Hi DO 10.30 II 20 | tjo | i BOO a.i M 30 I I l M .. i Mill I1MUWA1I| VlncrDt/Grrnada/Rl. Vlnrenl % %  Irt St \ i -. Arrive. Craiadi I' %  i> rl. ,r. ,i."l Arrivr-n St \ in. •HI \tfdlliiMiml MiHil From SI. Vin.i i.l lo 'I riin.l ,.t llm.s .,„ Appli.MM TIII'RSDAVH ^ Vinmit/Barbadn^ Ihim'iiit %  Mulwdw/Ht V in. .. %  IH-p-rb. HI. \|..rnl Arrt-va rUrtwrfo* iMFtmrlH rUrb44M Arrlvn IKMMAIO I llrpxU I *.,III,.,|. ArrlriHi K.iii.i<. l>rp*HA BarhadoArnv !" Ht Vloernl IIIHU St Vim. -I I..-, i.li.l %  V Ilrparti Ii Vlt... -II Arrive, Trinidad IK part* Trinidad Irrivr-i st Vlnrrnl I.MIIUMIt AISIIV A tO.. I Til. ASEMTS l.o.r II..,..I St. I'hoiM'Till Till: WOIIKS OF WILLIAM MlAlvlM'l AIM Notes on This Edition. I Thr Wholr WurlK ol i" <' %  In mi. vulumr. prlnlrd In Hear and beautiful tja* undrr Ihe ,|n-. i,,.„ af U,e >i.... • %  • %  * iirjd I'rrw The texl U hated n >hal prafMni for Ihe Hhakr*p<*rr II*-4,| |',r h, Ihe dlallna-iiUhrd Illi.heUian oholar. \rthnt Hem. Rullen. ^ The MMi In Uie plat. Sir Ilmma* Mwire. which eminent -.I..1.1-II •'iii a* Shjiii-i""' i| nnled for Uir lirnl lime In JII edition f hio Work-. •> \ n.- .ml full Life of sliakeapeare. embodylni Uu* MI*I MI i>; %  i > rrrordN. the leienda iili< n-,1 h> uh*e hare printed for Ihe llrl time. 0 Ihe rhararterV iwitiei are si'l above their wperchet for 'learnem and pleasure In rradtnf. a> The Playa are arranied In Ihe rhronolofllral order of their • ompn-iltion. not lathered lnla> t omrdle*. llUlorles. and Trair'!''the method -iiim, from (he ln-t 1 •>! %  <> and folloued in Uie ronvenllonal threr-volume plan of puhlleaUon •> Header* ran nou apprM-h Hie IHMI> of the Flava aa vllal and .t..is in., .ir.. ini.iii ri- i ilin Ihe e\olullon of tha poet't Inapirallon and senlua. ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad St. and the Village, Greystone Shops, Balmoral Gap.



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PACI I Kill BARBADOS AOVOCATF. U bSDAV. MABCH IK. 1M2 Carlton Defeat H.C. 3-0 BMCKIE LUCAS AIH TRAFFIC SCORES TWO GOALS SOBER-MINDED r SOCIETY • Fram Fag* 5 U.C. W.I. Gel birvcior Of Education Dept. 0 .rum P.fco CIVIL >'EK\A\T SHHOBH i Hainson College ihren-ml in .it Kensington Oval i %  rod in the first half >nd. %  >it Then worst performances for tho on 'op throughout the game. %  m '.WIN very slow. For Bl Dkio" LUCU scored two goals and Adi Ctrlton could have hud another "a l io mahuse of a penalty kick. IIVAU Ml MM ON vil M>t Tram riBMM I ii Min, M r-nti.il. M i A l'-.rx. V Mar.lu)l. W I M -(impa.*.. M ...,.i. A Walltar, WaiKar. C %  A v..... D 'iMfltn. II fu-Fiwdo B Duiirta-Pliwui QaMCt, M Oal/. E M.,IJM. come to Ulii Coniavtrui And MOW, In conclusion I __ going to offer you some perwnaljj taoufhte which some of vou may recar^ as unorthodox. especially aa coming from the Comptroller of Devctopanam and Welfare whi, !• or i supposed 10 be. ft] % l£d' civil aervant In the flr^t jujT' pUce. thai N primarily %  Confer caatd erire of >-.rtrr worker: designated, by Ihelr Goveroinei" 'UK.I caching of primary school tea Valuable Mat A bin N W I touch. southern sool h wind. Lw took long thot MUd laltodisaa, %  JlMr%  toi wa Htl began tit .i centra %  %  grit winu and took I tfttt Tha hall wu ku-ked out <.f pi %  I tifui corn ISnaltj |gn i Simmon %  baU %  %  %  Mack on the Colfew dlfflcull at* • %  niiW4'd noi opportunities. Lu %  opaw ut seven H for-half tin i Smith v. ". In 'he led cor! PMll Tudi ks%  %  was In p v • %  %  FOOTBALL FIXTURES Division One Thursday 20. Empire vs. Notre Dame. Referee: W. F. Hoyos. Linesmen: A. Parris and L. King Saturday 22. College v. Spartan. Referee: G 11a worth. Linesmen: W. Hoyos and J. King. HvifkM Two Tuesday 18. i vi P -Rovera Rafara. C n. Williams Friday 21. m v Notre Dame. Referee; K. Hutchinaon. Division Three riie.ony 18. Carlton v*. C O Boya at r "" Black Rock B J, Rafarao; C. Ronrhrord. MO TMPC. "A" v*. Rangers nt m Heckles Road. hVferor: It I'-.rrR RMBVi %  Rowlw Fran w.ia*i. : Dort*n Low*. I — ".rllK I M Marlua *ri3i:; aaft.j i ..... Paae 5 • 25. I1M4. In %  %  eaoV He was not acquainted with iba kind of book The book n kept l>v the Teller fOl uaa. During the time he was ColoIHI indispensable nlal Treasurer he has wn the ork has been done by the differbook in the rage of the istitution* for trainm* of -ccusatl The hand wilting in the eachvrs u nd it may be that these, book la that of Smith's. The right wild welcome the possibility or hand side of the book shows tho having a common Board of Studies amount of money the Cashier has With the University Collage dein hum. for the next das partnier.t of Education actbfOl) At this stage Clarence Patterson collaborating and it may be posaisaid in 1945 he was a clerk in ble to work out some method by the Royal Bank of Canada. A which than may be a common cheque was handed to wii passed through his hand* —. aa Cashier of the Bank on April larffclv concerned with the >* i"" lin w,u •* accepted through5. IMS uciyatiou of GovatmneoU in welT'' ,l 1 the "^l?" Jome P h *? %  ,hi *• ( " uri ,h,,t .ng done in these lerritorie... n dthelppomtea drtor What I Taniral to do is to emptaa; ise the fact that He heated the wax and used those produced i!T u£aome diiUngubdied and vat} wel-- nm '''*' bo ^i and "" *£* h }£l' i>n.f. A come gutan. It will no douhi be*"? 11 *, 1 *^* •" ** "" — %  '" %  %  % %  i*-'g—^-— -----" i '„'/ ?w^ _._ awhich will be aecepted through5, the Accountant Oe I ..*l KI1U Wilfred OumM. Anna Orow If.m *tll|ii : Ororsr (1MNII< Irani i.iililiir' I fniminufl Oanas fiimn Htni ON KONDA* I-— I"iO M Katy. J BBBUIW. E Moll. S Moll, !. Ai'plrbaum. D IIo, **D Calte*. II Or Cairra, M D Vrrlr^l. Q Ham. U1 Hay, C. Salomon H HIWMJI. I 'A CrlHtlllaV %  tram San %  > %  %  Harorrl ShilaWi OM OBianton Aibudce n.im i.. ..— lierta %  Datarainn llrllinBp. M>l' sin*av Skar. ';.nd..i.n Trolmar. AMMir La>w. AwaSBV in !" MajhiM an io BV n v, i \ ON Ml I'M \Y time and effort devotad to iu ^!f %.'"..*"*? P ^ P e bo,h wher > he "** department ofgeah at in the Churches and m lay organ-'.education ha* been established, it n the Courv .sations. with.the idea of being will exercise a very important: C r*s -examined Mr Hope said or service to their feUowmen and and powerful influence, and will tha' the seals belong to the^Treaswornen. We covud wish thai tkare "peed up Uaa regional approach to U ry SornaUrncs packagei; ara were more of tkese services, and education. By -regional %  f proa c h' sealed in the Treasurv near the that they c-old receive wider llL'X,^^ S^Si,! ^ffit^ pubhc support; but I should ttgao Uva a, of the eabliahmenl ot %  "SrxUadTSSf *akBfft in the fail in my duty if I did not pay common standard* of training <: urrcn cy Vault which la distinct U-lbuli on Lhu occaaWMi to the and of qualulcati-.n. the placing of f tor ,i tha Treasury and before contribution which has been empna^ on the study und undermade by voluntary indlv.duaW tanding ol \u. .ommumtlcs of the and bodies, often before C*vBritlah Cju-ibbean, both of the physical and social Mvuoninoni 'Here an.uii. then is anothei rxample of the way in which. [radually, Ihe effect of the esUti )f the t'n |a of th.t West Indies is mteetlng thi wnoli ernment welfare services Introduced; and if I did not, let me express the hope that lhi Conference will provide help*: ,, ful guidance and encouragement to the volunteeib as well tnt ruction they were sorted nea ury Vault up to AugosO, I9SJ Tha -vax is melted on a hot plate and it takes about tei utM to 1'ielt the wax At this ttOgO further hearing was adjourned until 10 J.I aa toe pfOjBMlooals. You w.ll "' l ,,, *""' !" fccU ,M comln i-_ _^._3JTIST_ I.I_ i?..... With extraorrl nnrv SIIDOH -hen Lodge at ComOn the OataMhrg .ton was Again on tl' offerudve. Afli'i %  road Cox on the left urn* received a pass and outran U i otlaga rij;!il>ock. Cox centred beautlXulb %  :. pun> had UH ball out ol Smith. missed anot' Ulnity to open thcii They were awarded a Smith took the kick and Griffith %  He passed '*> t. Tudor who kicked Cartton Bjcorod their unai rrool shortly before Referaa Anon %  trad, I.UCUB made no mistake. The htai '.How.; O a l l a aai Warren. P. nedy. C. Cox. tl < • C Wllllams. Mai-h.dl |{ H 'CM. Hutchlnson, CUiirn Lai ll HiiTi*en OoUoga: 1 %  C I vl Referee: Comhermei %  \ i'.irris. kicked Wednesday 19. Co)]en Wanderers at Park Refrree: L King. Kriiav 21 C O. Boys TO. T.M.C.A. at Coml*ermere. Referee c. Hoackford. Carlton vs Y.M.P.C. "A" at Black Mock. Referee: J. Archer. P. O. Boys vs Pollen at Foundation. Referaa: ll Wilson. C and W. v< Rangers at Shell Referee: F Taylor. Y M PC "H" vs. Regiment at BVcklcs Rd. Referee: A. Thomas. Saturday 11 Inter-school Combermerc vs. Foundation nt ComberTnere, Referee: R. Parrls. na OfUMv. MMi .11, l.mlik.. mpb.ll Yrarwodd. Yr at wood. LMlay Ytarwoed. m IMhU.ii Ralph llavi i Baa-Sir i 'i m UWNDN M Uh-ii r-l.: Frank Clarka. BTrlc be oonaidcrini! this particuLi question in detail, I hope, your ninth aeoslon. -\~ you consider that teaching bag* 'iily four years ago." My otner thought Ig thai. Many of you, 1 know, recognise tha' religiou-' faith -J am nut apeak^ lug of any particular rebgi Wanderers at Bay Waa* "faiaaaT^aaal stiranniin. AnatoU* must be the ultimate inspirit!. It Hutchinaon "'^"' c iSSaL t^H^*mUrr W enduring welfare work. Since 9vm thmtX^ m """^ I took up the post of ComptroUe,. i.-d.v. Miamao. wiiluan Riathton. I hav c been puzzled to notice bow n..* n c-nioni. Junr caeituMii. group permit themselves to make lot si. Leaks i any outward acknowledgement ol l£Z"ZuJi -ffltw.*" 1 "" """•"" •/. Bau>' all agree, if the social wetf;i , JasaOar-aaaOV WjbS services red Manhai •WaSf John came be regarded ... 0a VM -. EUa-th Mccormirk s'"PW ** "• 'nstrurnent of materVafahaMt. MiMia raiabou. Cyn Andrew attupaj r im 'Uirpay. |o snake for better and mon.rr^^.trS-?'^ ( ^U*lonu-? A, any rate this Karen rfowtfl Hal*.. •*.*!.• ek*M n Ihauaht a M my mind as I ex< %  %  ?>" %  _"*••' Marow". press my pleasure in declaring: Will .an, GUARD AGAINST COUGHS =nd COLDS/ OB* P'i : %  tip f*aiitaoca with ihli %  daatific, good isumg ionic Minor %  ilmcnti caa be -Li;ou are low ia A A I) V.rjiuina, build up your iiiii.ini now wiia aoodUiung Seoul Hmuliioo. mora than just a tonicIt's POWERFUL NOURISHMENT Scoili I ...:.., .-i h gold alas of natural AAI> Viiaoiin*. Valusbla tor all the family m rainy araaoaoc dry sagagOi Harbour Log this Cagtferencc fpen, you ovary possible fcucceasand wish measure of VICAR ARRIVES from 1. -fit* SCOTTS EMULSION Ht&H 6NCKGY FOOD TONIC NEW TITLES NKWCASTLE, March 17. European flyweight champion Teddy Gardner Monday night added tha llntish and British Empire titles to his list when he beat llnluui title-holder Terry Alien AakM ol bis experience aboard the schooner. Rev. Denlngton said I "I ilon't want to talk much about i Lady Noaiean. it but we had a rough trip." He rn M l(lu r WarX id mat he wU1 X kt UD D sea. Laudaipha. M.V. Daaawpwl, Sen. polntment s soon as he settles; Mary r l.t Carlisle Bay •ch Ladv 8Ui %  ...,. t .i..i II Smith,JSlnunona, UedJ n polnU over 15 round"'Gardner, flth. p Torjor, F Tudor and %  gad thinv. weighed 110 pounds Allen 28. scaled III* Referee: Mr. E. Amorv l I .1 —tl F Savannah Club Tennis VEBT1 RDA1 '8 RJ >i i n i Q. L. Hume D. E. Woraat 6—3; •—3. Mixed Dim bleu Mrs. i Ad A M %  lenor I—I, > %  .., I liowen and t' L I. Ilowen 8—3, 2—8. 1—3. Men's Douhlr. l>r I <; %  %  %  and E. P. i W. MKinstiy und J. C. King 6—2. fl u. i. Law Ian and C. IOM to i and W. AM 1—fl. 0—1, B p Path ii Mail ning beat V. N. Roaofa Ud 1 i % %  na 6—2. 6—4. TtlD.W S UMI Ki > Indies' Double* Mn 0 i %  Mix..I l..i,h|.s P Patterson v.s Mrs. Laggl Crlehlow. Mr and Mi Men's Dnul Charge Against Boxing Clubs NKW YORK, March 17. The International Boxing Capb ot New Yoik ,,nu llUnoks ware •-hargtHl to-ilav with conspiring to piotc*islonn) chainI 'I Mil 11, tlll' United Statesh UniWd Pilinm H. Sch l.*iilr at Smilh. SetMarlon Brlle Wolfr, 4rh Anita l(, Sch EnlarpriW S Sch Bel Urull I Roaario. ft a W. SB WHAT'S ON TODAY Social Welfare Conference, Hastings House at B. 30 a.m. Oe*m af tteaad %  iiilmi at woo aaL MeeUng of Legislative Council at 2.00 p.m. aHHaa Band Concert at Dlst. %  Police StaUon at 7.*6 saga, Mx. A. Pearse lectures on -PoDx Lore and Tolk Songs at Trmldad" at tha British Council at B If. p.m. MUIMTH Defeal Ij'li-lun 1.1—5 ) tha Mahrrn nctball i.-aiii (let. 15 goals i-i-',.iT. 8 8 S Seltcier. s a u r.u.i Biuud. * AJvot sugar ncrinw 8 8 aaaa a a Corinuiic. a.a Tioariu. S 9 Rude ilar. 8 S Dal Maj. Drl Vianlo S S Rommanlad. 8 i. S 8 Orwell S S Norihbrialv BRANDON TROPHY PRACTICE TODAY The practices for the Brandon The goal scorers Trophy series continue this afteren riMa O Garner and Miss H. noon ot HellevUle at 4.3Q. Tha KprniBBr who scored B and 7 goals pu blic are cordially invited. There draaBtlon charge *at WEATHER REPORT VKSTRBDW Rainfall from Codiington ml. TwUl Rslnfrll for month to data: .83 fan. Higbast Temperaturr. ae.6 "P Lowest Temperature: 68.fi *P Wind Velocity: 9 miles per hone. Barorawtar (9 *-m ) 29 968 (3 pa.) 2B 896 TO-DAY %  uarlse: 8 ia a.m. Moon: Last Quarter, March 18 Sunset: 6.18 p.m. Mag. Ttte: 7.84 am 9 67 p.m. Law Tide: 12.60 am 3 20 p.m. LlghUag: 8 30 pni _. itrKIn* and (arananl Iroa* ... iaadU-.„v.. t ,,f Mytaxformerly %  Mown eaCklnarM>. M,M %  ork in iiminu^.i (ha aaia k( alao lak, krag, etape haadin( and inrnhala nrv* Ttrtaatkraa tharobf rurtlna olhar ireu W.a,**aad h' Pll- aurh a. Ha.d .*aNarv.iuaaaaa Ua.Karha. •\>nall|talk>n. Waa aa aaaar* dahlllir. and Irntaul* dlapo.llloi, .i.i H,u. from your ' made I hey would cot! nearly double the price. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET THE PERFECT DRINK FOR THE TROPICS is HENNESSYS THREE STAR BRANDY WITH SODA WATER OR GINGER ALE and PLENTY OF ICE HENNESSYS THE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS Britain builds the best medium power cars Down the years ol Morn*\ long history, cms ha*e been produced "QtMilin 1 '>r"F[gTWfS nhich have set ihc pace tor high pcrforntancc in automobile* of modcM horse-power To-day. the Morns Oxford with ' > "-a*" ib modern styling, precision -A ta. linuh and cngineenng excellence *§> is a car iih proved appeal. Its -4-jQf-a •pecilk-an. n rogdl like the catalogue of featurcs i!c>.Tihingmany of ihc vvoiM's costly big cars— dl 1791 ** YOUXL FAVOUR FOR ITS DOWNRIGHT FLATTERY, COMFORT AND LONGLASTING QUAUT*I Oil I II8VAI I.AllA4.I LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Distributor? Phone 4504 MUMMY Hi.-../...# —this fvrlaimlfi in J iV K BREAD The Suedette -PLAYDAY" aaaas. Ktre's Ihe Shoe for yo.i Smart as a new Paris aVack. comfortable aa a house Shoe and so economically A variable in i, WHITF *; BLACK PRICED AT ONLY 57.25 afaes M 1K&U&A We oft -T the following .. IVI111 -I'liiilH BUILDING MATERIALS t'.TK.V INSI LATINO HALLBOARD SHEETS Ihleil, 4ft. x 8ft. 9ft. Itrtt.. 12ft. long %  l|r per ia. fl. WAI.I.KOAKD MOULDING \a joint*—• 5c. per ft. I knoii tinaaafVaaatawaatV • I run l.i.fr **• MW-FIIIVXIE I low thv MFFEIWXfl-; loo ^£"STAMIAKII IIARIIBOARII SHEETS ih* Board or I,uaa Uaaa. > in. tlii-.lt, 4ft., x Oil.. 8ft.. 10ft. long—# Me. pee aa. fl. IKMflRHI HAKUBiiAKl) SHEET.-* i* In. thick, 4ft.. x ft., 8ft.. 10ft. km :- ate. per go. It SI'KINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS thwak, 4ft x 8ft.—a ate. gar sq. Ii. 3/16 In. thick, 4ft. x 8ft.—8 2c. af 32r. per so. ft I I KNAI.I. ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS 3.16 In. thick. 4ft. x 81.—


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w ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY. .1ARC11 II PRICE %  FIVE CENTS QPINING the Conference of Social Welfare Officers at Hastings House yesterday morning, I Sir George Seel, Head of the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisation, told about forty dele gates and observers present that their task "is to' create a society in which ideas will generate and circulate; a society in which problems such aa the political future of the West Indies, and the risk of its frustration through over population, will be measured soberly, and met with solutions in which every man and woman can play a part" !" „ s '. r '. ]eor ,5'' ;" ldl '' 1 Ynur '••"• k !" ui tot b :mpni-aiit. If • rube more .oo. s o, jjou/SS SLgrJ&2£& ZSfc kind to be held House In live yean tended by delegates from the various l\ tories. a* well a* Mi HastlflsB is being stand observers rihbean lerrlW H Ch Social Welfare Adviser lo the Secretary of State for the Comnle*. who is on it toiu of the VW Incus* The meeting In balna Presided over by Miss Dora ibberson Social Welfare Adviser to the Comptroller for Colonial Development an, a west Indies. The meeting will continue 21tt w dutv m the Jamaica Civil Service The Chairman of the Board has I-.|;II-.-,I w.n:n appreciation of the services of Mr. Mais aa Executive Secretary during the past nine month*. NAVAL OFFICER RECUPERATING Ambassadors Prepare Note Second Officer Albert Johnson. LONDON. March *7 n R F A. "Wavemaster", wbp. Anthony Bden was meeting in-hind in Barbados a few) 1 "" "'leniuun with United Stales weeks ago by his ship for medical Ambassador, Walter Clifford and attettUoo si :hHospital, is ex-'French Ambasaador Ren* Mapeeled to get passage back to his s 'ttii lo put the fln.il tourhes I nOBM in the U.K. sometime this the draft note w el( . They will also prepare for talks It Is nntinpaied that either an-I fl| Paris later this week with ship will call at f-rench Foreign Minister Robert f : ...7* ISvhuman. United States Russian FREIGHT CARS OLE IN NEW YORK CENTRAL STRIKE W. INDIES NEED SOBER-MINDED SOCIETY President s Papers Show He Feared World War III Social Welfare Officers 9 Task Is Very Important WASrilNlrToN. Man b I PRESIDENT TRUMAN secretlyiteered on t lloni HI rtCWsl years that World War 111 was about lo He utw an explosive threat fti-*t in the Be-i %  ptembx-M 194H and again m Unttrv in K Ii Decembei IWO ait mnrir.n:. concern i \vi v\orld problems including S ninf war and various other foreign mailers rdwt in his personal paper* published today b a Ul ( i,,HI.-.* "Mi I'r.-Mu.'nt." The l-k was published bsj Steel Will Lose 3 Iktys' Prtniuction WASHINGTON. March IT An industry r polsistnsiB nation <> %  lU was rt ksssM i">> n Of viml steel producksa even if the H the. i-outponeand written hy Wi! iiam iliiim.ui. foi %  %  ilso di*. T„ fCronriin thai bj (stsrd Foreign I'nln \ • %  ...I i %  leUM i B %  i Hid "ii Ue nevil HUNDREDS Of FtilOHT CARS mn n s staadfhll In the yards at I' .ffa>\ N. T, following tba walkout of 14,000 New YorkCantral Iratssnitn. The gmrmment warned It wuuld take "appropriate action If thsprss' •sat work iloppsga contliwts or spreads.'' Tht Una Is Had up west of Buffalo, ifnrcnwfionat Soundphotol IN.li UCWI Get Director Of Education Dept Tanks* Ship Snujsh R&ds MK 1M!1.II' SHKRLOCK. Vice-Principjil of the Un versily College of the W> | Indies, who la at present attending the Social Weii. ire t>nle>rence al Haslinns House, told the Advocate >' sterday ihai they have now appointed a Directoi ..I Un I rilvenlt* College I >'p.u tment of Kdiieation, l)r M'Aelh, g/ho has liad a dialinuuibhed RsvdCtsssVg and war record. "Vscarch Fellowship at Harvard and Wing Commande In tl e I! A F He is now Ml i Majesty's Inspector of Sch^ils. in England and will probably take up his appointing nj In Ma> and will study th work of the Departments o llducatiuii m United Kiaiidon unwttraities. _, %  ognuicwm poo. lete ertuerlion department.*" gk on pair TOKYO, ssteoh I I Big tanks pluiiKiiiit .icross rice luiilily Uel %  OM f the most damaging raids on Communist forces in Korea in recent months. United States Army he..ttook place on the Western sectoi truce ulks town near Panijotn on Saturday morning Baibados for John will go on to ,i s'np for the staying here at th S riniciad lo take K Johnson ti Cuban Senators Driven Off By Shots HAVANA. March 17. AN" ARMED GUARD at the $20,000,000 National I Building firing air nlles drove off a ifroup of sixE> lecn opposition Congressmen seeking to resume Parlia.Assembly has studied condition mentnry defiance of Batistas 45 day suspension of Congjress. in Cast Germany.—fJ.i*. The wild outburst of shooting Expert, Charles B Bohlen am' nerman Federal Chancellor, Conrad Adenauer Otlki.il quarters made it plain today that the West will tell 'Moscow its proposal for the crcition of an all-German government whirsi is to participate In uggr-teil talks on n peace treaty at an International Conference rB -te|! in the right direction Hut ;hat (io\-ernmnt must be the resull of free All-Cl.rnt)' election carried out under international supervision after the L'.N. Commission K-1 up in Part' earlier this year by the Cenei.l ich are o be borne m mind.' rleek wld "i the start we hopown dlplomiii^. tinder eur chnr ter. we h^ve IBe p4 %  degreci are Ihose "f Ul I Bit) of Lotiikm. witlk .vliom w< Ii ive .i helpful si>eeial rsl*tmtiship. Our .ourses of iturb an n. Uu* same as those foi in. L MCtemal degrees, but they .crosaly n-lateaV to Ute Bntlah C.-irihni'j n, to its Ugtoi vi moment. But frori the the diploma which will Dt Kt-iiduate and of a high si <• %  > will be our own asHi tl will be worked nut U. Bseet l ai l*jin need-*. Thl ttte nawly appointed directo comes out. he wll region consult of • % %  ( %  •I b "• • %  KeRional Training Hi and that training I ers at graduate, level will be < a regional basis, inkui* ful account %  >' the educational neo-t of the ivgion and designed to me those needs. "But there are nine* aspect' •>! th. the i 'anka destruyed 36 bunkers and i. con* < II lil.isU-il Ml't Byrnes' memorandum MM moat sensationnl tern In lbs !>* Tinman said i.nntedly he nnd not H. i ould makr f\ua| Poreigi lo'isions and adde in i. .. t. cidloek on drafting Italian an'l thcr WorUI W. ( .i rttdad foi .• mm i Japanese affaiion Ututefl Hgassj teims. made progreea toward broadening Bed eeaitroUotl jovemmenl of Romania and Buie.irla. prifhui-il nc* ggjn ISBBSSSM i China, won tsuaaian ssetit t<> the ajjstgtlng of a UN I'oniml* to iUnlv Atomic Energy coriahkink>ne*t hausss. in wliWhi lyi' f^ S Irit unf^ssd'gnif iat I raststiUon a. belle veil i„ nJMI^IUassoal tf Wftaf VMs aWI' Ine ^Wisasll lUmuanien agpm! n. rtiH M" DOUI 000-ton r r atigvasffi of % %  u i imp In < i Hi Korea killing Hi u tten The eaanp was marked in h agreed in^nn-i IT Gairy Dcni?d I 'ii..in. %  • To St. Lucia ottri deferr< wi.ic tnk The -ink..leadline %  %  nlgbl Union President Philii< Hurra) i otifled the Wages Board on Sun. thai no decision on postponenu nt will be made until 'he Steclwurkers' P ttee meet rn-re en Th' (llol III. 1 lo held ..ii ibe .'i tponcment prumism until the (or settliasj the diai •. The Board hits nrombed %  If Govern men i recommended .ii %  ,,',. :i I. i-.l %  lie i .Ions artthat the> *ill be. Ihe 'iiion probably will agree lo hold iff the walk-out The Union ,nstponed the strike date lhic<* far in Its drive for m> n hour increase lor a&o.ooo basic steel worki t request by ihc Board In tended to gieo the parties n •sajeUate reiiuest tii maintain pnxlucfioo provided the Union also agreed. With the M bang ng however. I h icompanies ....iiutt ihej gsuai hegin ing opera I ion cen iheir big p • > carts avoilable are (ai rtsystsBBsju nt with then Increaaed production Peasant gj ..... %  %  at the geat) >>nd it was feared thai It would be impossible to reap all of theli canes t> II. | ... i" i.. | Mi. K W. Blackburne apiiointed <• tee under the Chairmanship of heLaboU i .n.inissioner Mr. C. Lsw aettea organising peasant reaping and '•taon At Use suggestion ot Mi .1 C, Hi alauiager of the Antlsjua fiugai Factoi>. two tr.nt'i" have been purchased through the It' tation Furn I !"i I 'railer* with |1 tors but the Aj|tlgUjg I Ektatos ha\.BUHsUad trallors trOSB then itsjggUj in ggfl t •issist thit sssssssl peasanth*to take off th> Taso tip|-i trucks have also been ssjUthasad P. .insist in peasant haulage and ttsa Sugai Factory f> servn.' h • %  Laat week's improvement in peasant supplies of r.inc to th %  ised ihat ihey havu almost reached then allocation and with thl llsusj H .t.iM U i. oighly prob ible that nil of then < be reaped. Thr fnc'ory mound 10,308 |on< Of < '>m*ilh ipproxU hours out ind made 1.234 fon* sugar i • • U.S. Arsenal To Get GtlidetJ Missiles WA3HINOTON. March 17 ,eaied thai they have stepped up their guided missile naming piogramme in aniicipation of adding ih e mississ* lo the United States' arsenal of ready weapons. Gutded ItllssOes have been in the axpM % %  but th' said six months ago St least one missile would be available sgasa, The Army disclosed at the same time It had tactically useful nxlnls of guided missile* m production. Tba Navy said its guided misaili Open Verdict" Over Labourer's Death A CORONER'S JURY returned an "Open Verdict' when aa inquiry into the circumstances surrounding Ihe slraath of 44-year-old Lionel Burton of St. Martins. St. Philip, was concluded befoi .• Coroner Mr C. L. V.'altvyn Diairu'l 'A' vsterday. gsssTfsM l labotahsf i>f Searle> Faelory look ill al Use same faclorj on March 8 Hii wife took hirn to Ihe Oeneral Hw*pital where he died on tinrolkiwuig day. Dr A S. Caso, who performeeserttay after sstiieh the Coroner addressed the lur.. Politician Jailed CAIRO, March 17 F.xreme Socialist leader Ahmed lb -sem was today found guilty on three counts of resisting the Sovereign State and sentenced to 18 month'' imprisonment He wag rested dose on the heels of propects have been speeded up for the Hciim? and arson of January i.redlcted that theijg Bn0 convicted of offences com.skbtior. of these weapons to Un %  to S^JI ^p.. MHihl 'trengthen gn both its offensive and defensive He was tried behind closed I doors before a Civilian Penal Although none of the service* Court which sentenced him to si* %  will admit having guided mlsafl prison on each of the in actual use now. all are bearing three counts but he still faced down on training aM — undefined charges. P —t'.P. Ni H Flan Will Knrnuraj'r Banks LISBON. March 17. A "New Deal" expansion progranunO of fresh financing and migration h t*-tng complete,! by Iha OovernmenT here for PortUsal't far-flung a| The principal Portuguese colonies are Mozambique. Angoi .-.nd Portuguese Guinea in Africa The colonies which supply much .aw material for mainland Industrie. ha**e ,i • %  • :i aaniiigiioi f II 000.000 The 'lovernment Bill to open Ihe door to Colonial f.nancial expansion now before the National Assembly for approval would permit foreign Bank, to open branches in the color.ic* provided certain qualifications arc reet Authorization is received frorr Portufueee authorities At present the sole banking organization in the colonl— the Overseas Bank.—U.P. Miss isu u i ins-i VINITN K\i.l AMI U.N. Think Moscow Will AnsWCT -No" LONDON. March 17. THREE WESTERN I I battfe wbe4haf .! free elections for MI ol r. Diplomatic circlca piciiicted. :, bnt thi i"i ii itv ol the . %  • Soviet • % %  : i %  %  i.nf to MfaKOw by Uit and t this week Ii,forrn.nl.. said IsM 'Htalea, Brit;... act ri arnrmti| I V-ariiinp \piinsl O\rr-Co!ifi will ofRclat st s contest to flug "Miss Anglo-Jssrry'* 1962 -Crpren tlte We %  .. ImiUI i old a gr^i .tin The foundation!! 1 given J Kic.iSei %  sssssyol leot rtty and greua 'nst war —C P ' I ,e,l UP .dongsi.ii %  Wearing vhort white punts, a khaki "navy" jacket with %  Uons on the breast—for he spent %  4 years In the British Navy—i irhlte shirt underneath and .. broad rimmed strjw hut to kee,. off the sun, Rev Denlngton ul • %  foot PCI Rnrbados With him were hiWI f ,iher the %  •' %  \ ^inlor Of the nt* wife. Ihr.-.Chlldrei ;two girls and ,i boy) and a frien.i i %  the old man btswed i was not seof hut way but he eould not do betrtw UBM %  .^ drawing close (oi him to take up his app here and there was no pj hirjttlni %  puna ot steamship. Ai ..r. hii effects to bring up to Barbados Ida ii unposslbli to get a passage by 'plain tor lold his father Ihat he could not travel bv 'plane. So out wen'. ii trip. No Alternative iji II re • II D chartering the Krrclsior Httdge to bring them down to B %  t .it the charge of *B0O but could do .... other than hire Ihe %  effects, eight goals, two hoises and two donke) wen pack* In the schooner's hold tl ad ih.sTareu* %  %  rupon's father h helped on 1 M "etuallv lifted off the xehoonei the Pie* H %  :^ngtoii who is now 3t examinations In ''.. bef0 !' h ?' > %  "". wnriit *jr i ,, ,camc nhKiR and .he Jc rmany u pounhie. leutenant and v then demobbed. II hi'i %  'i ted t.. tl % %  i i imeral VaaSlly Chuikov asking for permission ti. %  been answered I t ned siill to preach "the ti iN-mngton was soon "•' Anglicnn -hurch in Sutton-lnAshflMd. Noll* He left England for Nevis where he was Rector of i Church for '" ga On pace B



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PACT SB B.XRIIWMI-. \II\III Ul ITF.Mm MARCH IS 1952 CLASSIFIED ADS. itLEPHONF ISO*. 11.1*. \au (>rr t .H.krd Ml >n AM Mil M S.%1 4 WAN I ii sin \ou u von ( II UH %  § %  :.VTIt.t I. E.MPIHtil '.# (Corner Bto.nl A Tudor Streets) — JUST RECEIVED — TEOLOID FURNITURE LACQUER WILL NOT STAIN OR MARK IDEAL FOR TABLE TOPS SUPPLIED IN & 1 GAL. TINS HARDWARE SUPPLIES ute Post Office) PHONE 4918 O RICKETT STREE. Ji tlnl %  I r.-ne" m •wmilial mi MUM lira* MUIM II.*— Aiiplj *uians npertene* arid lM to Bo. Ml. fl^mooih. .1... B.ft 1 HOUSEWIVES! We have Ju\l Received u Shipment uf DRINKING GLASSES for all occasions. %  i n bk >:.. I... W-Vl I'lM J<\ %  : M;|.M ". i .. gra rBrlnry |.M A '< %  % %  %  M AM.lt rradtsiml %  q u .i L %  •** *' K. • %  %  1 I ixtton. P^plv will (itlnf e; I I UWY STNAH HATS %  %  nl llirbsdoa. Mi l!f„ I'. WT. II.Sir. II J H HTklfSPS MUCH r*TTA %  II I I* '.I^LHOLl JAHl.lA MM H %  IXIL* Iet.au U nd ll.l.ii.t M ,. %  ***t IIMN QI lit 1 Id II S 11 I*I il.AVY HV\JN LLNS* -nd Oold SS" widuauslly II S* •M I II 41 >.rd al I II, £JSail Slrrel II J KUBOSH MATTIIO Inch-* wide, irquei flurfocw. Palnla, Thinna*. %  UH ffelll EIc rOHT KUVAI. GAKAUI. LTD, Tclrphunr. 1M2 or IMS, It J |2— ntMiir:;j.l5iiDlB In i Vaushall Win* IS" rim onl Wtlh tiio* aiu-a. U MM ClAing. 43SI n-';.,t I IttM wharl ( h.ini|i.i. ii' Sherry Port Pony Whi-key Plain or Patterned QIMMI Cocktail (llasses Liqueur %  Snup M Hulf-pinl Tunililer*. i | Wkh-lI %  .irr I, ruoU'.H *>" %  fM*tnf't-*nl 1 (see %  Baiwx SOlU. Beams I.I meni Sal a< II 30 a in Tim* C.*ti V1NCBKT OHUrrVTH It 3 W-* LIOUOK 1-lCENSr. NOTICE I no appl'll..n i Bortn-Jarhn^i I.1IM Of 0-1 I SI tto p-.nlrd to Unlim llcmy in iP"' if Ikalloin V0T ' • *mor> "•• U.UIUid IK SulUi' Hltr.t. CM, W rrn|aaMm Iff UN Mid "I 1 "" ".'* % %  I Hid prmi-. "iiW •HO* LMtcl ii. Hi" <1*> %  • '" ro II A VMM* I '"" '"n .• f^. Appl-aM* WHAT THEY S Ml H0N>1 t %  ...<. %  %  IM-.I. lubr.. ..IS I x I', I .„ Ruadalrr. . I", LAUIUK IIASII* ('„. Tud..i l itrtl T* rYKBd Ofll FdBM B.T.B. lorry -nd l "*'"" 1 "i l?i i' on IMMUMI utWOI Mr Uirm al u> -luiwroom K P I %  Ml Lid. Hi.I ..i I11U-3" %  "'!'•( IIIM MM %  UFFaOlr* HaltAH lb* n* OWUrwnl for Hamoriho.d. Imrindiat.rsllrl from pain ultd bitdui) lUblUMbto from all Dnn MfM %  11.2 ALMfS MWS n-vsn IM* VUIITB KIIARKMKIN II *d ll vlur Ofil>. l *7 al Thnk >ial 3IOI. || i M—|| IN^. T ..-I I i ITRK'KllIt lAVBn ml srAFLti :s A %  rfACTio*. '-; A WCONV \ 1HUI A %  %  '•! I' l T|U'Mil l'HI*SVI*i; Ul( IIAMMUIIM; A ri-%nTir Bl riir. rn — is v lilt I I I S l < OI.OI I If JOHS'IIN MIIIOMIV 3 MAI-I.H1AI. & IXI'ANK AL -KlMttMaa. MM M IM* tndtofj mrial ir.jri 1 " t. a i i . IIJI-WU II Spr SltrrU PhonMM II 1 W -t fn ^ WANT TO SELL AS I 5 A GOING CONCERN ;' I l. ..HI rsUl.li-h. .1 .'* \ btwlnrt* <>l In v-.li. .iindtni \ . In Uu> UUnd ul 1' ' .* § UUalh U.u.1 llralrt, m ** V, > OtHtnl MM I % % %  < %  — ;o 5 For i.uilifi paili'iiUi'I S ;• \H' s . f/o Thr UUo.iUO i ; 8; ; ORIENTAL PALACE !!EADQl'AHTEHS KliU SCH VKNIRS t'K(WI 1MHV I IIIN \ .1 CKVLON THANI'S n r.l al LMOBun. Court lo M htw Courl. Dit "A" on FTtOn % %  . II A TALMA %  It 3.51—ll LLQL'OU I.K:I:NSK NOTU;K ThT tpulK-atlon i I Utathwailr t % % %  ,. %  i | .. I No J13 % % %  -' %  %  I M %  wall buUdmi at MM Ho. M MKkML " !'•""> %  „iij liquoi ii.-t.ac at a w-l< i ,. aiUttiod non F i |I.H>. Black H.H. l>altl llili ITlh d,, vt Mar>li IBM To E A MclIOD bq ( %  uliciXLiaiilraia I %  1 B Thla oppln 1 al a I J. .: • %  |S.ltcCourt. Diat 7litli Ua> of March II /.M HH w m pM irt lo bo bld A" on rnd* TAtfPO Miui Still PIUVS 111 I ,OMIIMI LONDON Sterling Itotiint-iturt, the "*><>' ... %  nil. i of UM Tainldad Mt-ttttl iii.iiosirn who rtniamed behind in London alter 1 Ihr ..mil returnod to Trinidad lOUr of Britain ) I still appearing befoi. 1 • playing his ping-ponn ., DOVfwgr soloist with dunce I..TUV. He has heard that TASPO plans .i return visit to L'lidun thik rwi and it looking forward to Joining up wild the band again, but he does not know any details of their plans. Another Trmldadlan musician. Chris O'Brian, who plays the double, has., has bttn "discovered" i,v I'lul IfOgfl, a Manche^iei d leader He had never' h n band until a month Mr MOM u-lirves that l ill develop into one of %  bio bass pl.iycis ,,.. world. —B.U.P. 1.IIITKK A l S1KVIII ;i ,.'.:i." i%a*o MMM hav April MM \\ r Rt i*in.'i' Riv •Ml r SI John. N.B and St Unttwf Biv*r Pon AM u Miti r Alo. a special Oflar of Balf-plal Tumblers ftf 8c. only PLANTATIONS LTD. ,::' r ',*j>x*.'* v KOflEKT TiHiH L.TD — NXW VUKI AND Ul'LF alRVIC'B MTH:-!)A OOftTA a> CO.. LTD.—CANADIAN HKBVICI GOVERNMENT NOTICES E A M. I l-M' i|i'lra|r IM.i %  %  ,\ HISS ugi'OK LICENSE NOTICE I The application of Ka|i> %  %  • S' BfattM "* nt-cfcl Rood. St Mirb.ipl — .on lo aril SpiniMaU I tt a board %  >• I .ituthrd to miilttir* al II" 1i Bnhlea Itu-d. SI MKharl DaU-d Ihl* HUl day of March 1S61. TO >" A McUnD. Eaq POIITP M.Il.tT .! % %  I' K WEKKKb V B Thla appbcaUM wUl bo coMtd.1 .1 I | %  MSM OS .il I-bo I.H.1 I i Birti.iilir lluiiiiiiliunil Sorirly's :\IIIP.lilll\ I ilH.D \-r MDJ KALI. ON — 8ATURDAY, 22nd MARCH HK.2. fi.. 1 .,. Mourn %  ni wntag i *' %  II I.IAX t ""BIN Thorp" Cultas* %  aOsw i |aa BARBADOS GENERAL HOSPITAL TENDERS FOR 8CPFLIE8. SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Hospital up to 12 D'dlOtk noou on Wednesday. 18th March. 1912. lor supplying article; in the following lines for a period of sin months from 1st Ap. l. iy&2 (1> FRESH BREAD. (2) ALCOHOL. (3) COFFINS, and providing HEARSE for the burial of the dead at the Westbury Cemetery. (4) PURE FRESH MILK, between 200 and 250 pints a day only. rottM for the respective tenders will be supplied on application to the Secretary of the General Hospital and tenders will not be :,iert;iined except they are on forms supplied by the General, Hospital. Persons leaderlo. must submit at the time of tendrrinc letters i mm luo other persona known to possess property, expreaslni their .vHllnxnrM to become bound as sureties for the fulfilment of the footracl. Terms of contract and any further particulars may be obtainei on] application at the General Hospital. 13.3.52—3n. GIVE GENEROUSLY • % %  S.P.C.A. TAG DAY Friday Mm*. 2iUh JUST RECEIVED ? jusl received a shipnient of 1| h.p. ill early and necure one. Sin,\\ [ mil]] . REDMAN TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD. l!i.:i.52—Sn THE BRITISH COUNCIL WAKEFIEL0 POLK 1-ORK K FOLK numoAD ii nT a illustrated MR. ANDREW T-KARSI itM m Trinidad Of the I .li'ge of tho Wr-tt Indies at Ihr llritish Council at 8.15 p.m. on TuevJay. March IB. Admission Free Open to the Public FURNISH NOW IT'S EASY Taw Mniifti Savliiii tta\ WaSSnti A l.tOl-l C.'llWM I tO er fr Animals Hi .i ..inbumble prayar, o Qoi, for our irii-inlil..' iiniinalm especially for nuimala win. nre -uiicriii-: tor all thai ;ii.' overworkrd .-mil under-fed and i null) Iri'.-ili-d: for nil wistful creaii, c .;i|ilivily Dial lieal uffainKl ili.-iibant! for mi) thai are bunted or I,,-i or deserted or frightened "i bnn(rryj tor all that are In pain or dying; for all thai nm-i be pnl ts death. W* entreat for them all Thy mercy and pitj. .-mil for those i ho deal iiii then ri ..-I. a heart "V t passion and genndi and kindl) words. Make us ounelvM i" intrue friends to animate and so share the blessings ol the merciful. For the sake >-i Thy Bon the tender hearted, Je i oiir Lord. ....