Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895





Big Upset In)

Maiden Stakes

JOCKEY SONNY HOLDER straddled four win-'

ners as the B.T.C. three-day Spring Meeting
got underway at the Garrison Savannah yesterday

afternoon in fine weather. Hon. V.‘C. Gale was! “over®
the most successful trainer with three wins.

Although no records were broken the fair crowd |

who attended witnessed
the hard track and some

Biggest upset for the day was in the Maiden | Mr. E
Stakes when Mr. J. R. Edwards’ Castle In The Air |:

a day of keen racing on
good times were returned.



and Mr. M. E. R. Bourne’s Magic Gaye gave the!

lucky punters $59.16.

The Field Sweep reached the $500.00 mark on one |
oceasion and the $400.00 mark on five occasions while the |
Pari Mutuel paid its highest dividend of $9.36 on First}

Admiral in the Chelsea

takes.

The Police Band under Sgt. Archer was in attendance
and rendered some lively airs including the-latest Calyp-

soes during the afternoon.

The Meeting continues on Thursday.

FIRST RACE

Garrison Stakes

A small crowd was present to
see the Meet off to a good start
with six horses of the original ten
entries facing the starter.

Belle Surprise, Lutchman up,
and Flying Dragon, Wilder up,
carried 5 and 3 lbs. overweight
respectively, The race was off to a
fairly good start, and as they
passed the Stand for the first time
it was Flying Dragon, Wilder up,
strongly challenged by Fuss}
Budget with Pat Fletcher in the |
saddle. ,

Fuss Budget, after taking over |
as they rounded the first bend, set |
the pace all the way to the third
furlong where the others made
their effort.

Flying Dragon closed the gap
with Firelady and Red Cheeks in
hot pursuit, and as they turned
into the home stretch, O’Neil
pushed Mr. “Teddy” Jones’ Red
Cheeks into first position on the
rails, and rode her home the win-
ner by a mere neck ahead of Fire-
lady, Joseph up, who made a very
strong bid to come second. Flying
Dragon finished third, a length
behind.

SECOND RACE




starter for the secon
Maiden. Stakes, Class “C” aid
“C2” over 5% furlongs. As the
gate flew, Test Match was caught
up, and although escaping with-
out throwing its jockey, the race
had to be recalled. |
They got off to a better start on
the second try, bunching up to-
gether except for Mabouya, Wilder
up, who got a late jump and was
trailing. When they passed the 3-
furlong pole, they began to spread
out a bit, and ‘Castle In The Air’,
Holder up, took over and came
up the home stretch with a fine
sprint to beat Magic Gaye, Belle
up, by two lengths. “Aim Low”
finished a close third, half @
length behind the second horse.

THIRD RACE
Chelsea Stakes

Sunina and April Flowers were
scratched. Of the remaining nine
entrants Caprice, First Admiral
and April Fldwers each carried
2, 4 and 7 lbs. overweight respec-
tively.





@ On page 16

AN APOLOGY

The “Advocate” wishes to
apologise to Mr. A. H.

Hamilton-Hill for publica-
tion of an article entitled
“New King of Guana Island”
which appeared in this
newspaper from one of our

correspondents.

This article, it has since
been discovered, contained
many inaccurate and mis-
leading statements.

We regret any inconveni-
ence caused to Mr. Hamil-
ton-Hill.



DUNQUERQUE

| little part

J’ca., All Stars

Draw Series

(From Our

JAMAICA, March 1.

The football series in ne jcussion which is expected to be-
| Jamaica beat Caribbean All Stars |
one-nil in a tame game. None of |

ended in a 2—2 draw to-day

the members of the teams showed |
brilliance as in the three former |
games, excepting such outstanding
players as Kruin of Surinam, the
star forward, Gonsalves the Trini-
dad goal keeper, Lester Allcock,
the Jamaica star inside left and
Eplarge, Jamaica’s left half.

Jellie Heron, the Glasgow Celtic
professional, turned out for
Jamaica, but was still suffering
injury to his right knee and took
in the game. New-
comer Greene who occupied inside
right position in this match, scored”
the lone goal after beautiful
passing by Allcock.





THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of obtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, the
Advocate have arranged for
a practising Doctor to answer
reader’s medical queries.

The Family Doctor will be
unable to see any readers
personally, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and












letters will be treated in i
confidence. To make abso }
lutely sure you are asked

not to sign your real name |
to your query but to write
under a pen name. The
answer to the question will
appear under the pen name.

Letters should be addressed |!
to The Family Doctor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week.

The first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate,

Jap Trade Team
Off To Brazil —

|



TOKYO, March 1. ;

Four trade and finance officials}
left by air for Brazil] to partici-!
pate in Japanese trade talks with!
Brazil, They were accompanied)
by Koichi Takani, newly ap-
pointed head of the Japanese
office in Buenos Aires. |
UP

|
Own Correspandent)
i

, treated

-

q -Man Com.
Will Interview
Governor

4



At the meeting of Barbados
faxi Cab Owners Association
held ai the Progressive League,
Fairchild Street, St. Michael on
Friday night : vas decided to

appoint a ‘ven man delegation
to interview His Excellency the
concerning the griev-

ances of the

Island

A ten man Committee was also
appointed to prepare the mem-
indum for presentation. Two
Auditors were appointed and
these are Mr, Edward Bohne and
Cameron Hewitt. They
proposed by Mr. Belgrave

nd Mr. Carl Collins.
Among those present were Mr
J. E, T. Brancker, M.C.P., Presi-
dent in the chair, Mr. C. E.
Talma, M.C.P. Secretary, Mr. C
>. St. Hill, Treasurer, Mr. K
Forde, ‘Vice President, Mr. L.
Codrington, Mr. C. Cobham, Mr,
A. Gittens, Mr. S. Crick, Mr. C.
Green, Mr, M. Barrow, - L.
Mr, W.

Williams M.C.P
Hinds.
Messrs. Belgrave, L. Codring-
ton and James Tudor, M.A. were
appointed the three Trustees.

Taxi Owners of the

were



Estimates To Be
Discussed Tuesday

People who follow politics here
are looking forward to the dis-

gin on Tuesday over
mates,

Subjects of discussion during the
last political campaigning fer the
Elections were Housing, Education
and Emigration and the people
are looking forward to see what
plans are being made for Hous-
ing and Education, |

At present the Housing Loans}
Department is making loans to!
many workers of the Sugar In- |
dustry and the House building
programme at the Government
Housing schemes are being con-
tinued.

A keen follower of the debates
in the House anticipates that the
House will be packed with mem-

the Esti-

to hear the discussion on the Esti-
mates,

The House may sit every day
for a few days to get the Esti-

mates finished.



MAN SHOT:

r Oo Cofrespondent)
ANTIGUA, March 1. |
At five o’clock this morning it
was reported that Clarence |
Clarke, a baer was shot by}
Basil Davis a clerk in) a rum}



shop owned -by Lawrence Gon-
salves in the Bridge area. |
It is said that six men were!
playing with an automatic pistol
and the weapon discharged,
Clarke was hospitalized in aj

critical condition with a punctur- |
ed stomach wound. |



|
Cyclist Injured

Everton Young, a

labourer of
Passage Road,

St. Michael, was
and discharged at the |
General Hospital yesterday at
about 7 p.m. for injuries on his

jface and neck after he fell from

his bicycle which he was riding
along Bank Hall Road,
The bicycle was not damaged.



LARGE CROWD
AWAIT FISH

A large crowd waited in the
Public Market for fish from about
2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The
first quantity of fish was brought
in shortly after three o’clock. This
catch consisted of a large Blue
Peter shark, about six feet long,
and a dolphin.

The dolphin was quickly sold
but only a few people appeared
to be interested in the shark. They
were waiting to see i* the late
boats would bring flying fish.

WINS



DUNQUERQUE, Crossley up, winning the fourth race which was about seven and a half furlongs
in yesterday’s racing at the Garrison Savannah. Cardinal, ridden by Yvonet, was second.



bers of the community who Et
{
|

|
|
{ past

MARCH 2, 1952

os

BARBADOS,



START

7
>, FINE

THE START of the Sixth Race which was Seven and a Half
and Mr. N. M. inniss’s Doldrum ridden by Holder was the winner,

F oreigi Minister To
Diseuss Arab Pact

By WALTER COLLINS

CAIRO, March 1,

Arab circles believe that the Spanish Foreign Minister

Alberto Martin Artajo will discuss the possibilities oi

creating a Mediterranean community pact with Arab states

va he makes his six-nation swing through the Mideast
in April,

ut of the six Arab nations Artajo is scheduled to visit,

three have Mediterranean shorelines, three others are

woven into a Mediterranean pattern by their relations with

their neighbours and an overall defence blueprint for the
eastern Mediterranean y
-——— 2 ~~ ——~ Egypt, Lebanon and Syria are
definitely Mediterranean countries,
while Jordan and Iraq use the

Results A Lt peri sa ihe as ow
A Glance

Tripoli.
Saudi Arabia's oil flows through
FIRST DAY
1, RED CHEEKS (O'Neil)

the Persian Gulf to the Red Sea,

thence to the Mediterranean while

: FIRE LADY (Joseph) ay ipeline also links Arabian oi] to

3. FLYING DRAGON (Wilder) a terminal in Lebanon

L GAstLE fe cae ee ‘ All these countries are united
2; MAGIC GAYE (Belle) by the Arab League Charter.

%. AIM LOW (Crossley) At this time when Egypt in par-

_. THIRD RACE ticular and other Arab states ar¢

J ance Warne eee, generally going through a difficult

%. MISS FRIENDSHIP (Â¥vonew) stage wherein their interest some-

FOURTH RACE times conflict with their suspicions

1, DUNQUERQUE (Crossley)
*. CARDINAL (Â¥vonet)

Se







4 CAVALIER (Holder) | powers a Mediterranean Commu-

; NoroNse te i nity Pact along the lines of the

+2 » (FP, er er) “1 j

2. FIRELADY (Lutehman) | European community Pact is. re-

4. REBATE (Quested) ceiving considerable support
SIXTH CE among the Arabs

1. DOLDRUM (Holde — ” UP

, SWEET ROCKET (Lutenman) en

| LUNWAYS (Â¥vonet) e e
SEVENTH RACE

1, ROSETTE (Holder) Min R t

¢. BETSAM (Quested) ers e ec

%. TWINKLE (Belle)
EIGHT RACE

Compromise

SANTIAGO, Chile, March 1.
Six hundred striking miners

1. USHER (Quested)

2, MARY ANN (Â¥vonet)

', CROSS BOW (Holder)
NINTH RACE

1. YASMEEN (Newman)

2, HARROWEEN (Joseph)

&. PEPPER WINE (Crossley)



Meria Elena and Pedro Valdivia

Antofagasta province rejected
|



a compromise formula presented
by the Labour Minister to solve
the economic
n.anagement.
Then the Minister flew to Iquige
where 2,000 Communist con-
trolled nitrate miners were idle
in support of the petition. The
workers refused direct talks with
the managerhent Yesterday po-
lice arrested four striking leaders
after throwing tear gas bombs at
a workers’ meeting.

A Communist spokesman
that
police

Coalition Govt.
To Be Discussed

PARIS, March 1

General Charles De Gaulle,
French People’s Rally leader, an-
nounced after a Party caucus that
he is willing “to discuss with Pre-
mier Designate Paul Reynaud his
proposed programme of National
Unity Government.”

dispute with the

cir-
some people
intervention

culated
died

word
during
It was the first indication since
1946 that De Gaulle’s group which
now is the strongest pues Party
in the National Assembly was
willing to discuss participation
in a Coalition Government and
greatly increased the chances of
veteran Conservative Reynaud
forming a government to stave off
national bankruptcy.

ties
pr

and the Governor of Tarapaca
—U.P



vince,



Graham Greene
Talks Of Freedom



—U.P. WASHINGTON
British author Graham Gre«
arrives in New York, after
American visa had been tempor
EDITOR DIES arily held up in Iindo-Chi:
— cause he once, “as qa youthfu

NEW YORK, March | prank,” belonged to the Cor
Keith Keat Speed 72 Executive} nist Party, and immediately
Editor of the New York Sun from] vo with some shrewd anc
i943 until it merged with the{ ageous remarks about the U.S
New York World Telegram, died “T like America “ the Amer-
here to-day.—U.P. cans,” he said.

VIENNA, Marth 1 ($5;400,000).”, It added that

|
|
|
|

Slip shod production in the “further losses occurred
Prague branch of Czechoslova- the. insufficient use of r n-
kia's giant Skoda Armament| ery and high absentecism It
Combine delayed shipment of] said that the plant failed

material to Russia, the newspae
per Mlada Fronta admits.

The newspaper said that at the
branch factory in Prague “in the
year the bad and faulty
production cost our economy,
twenty seven million

reach 98 per cent. of it
tion quota for 1951

pro
}

AH branches of Skoda Cor
bine are believed to be pro-
ducing armaments for the Rus-
crows |sian war machine. Mlada Fronta



lof so-called imperialistic Western ,

who closed the big nitrate plants'the servants to turn away

This was denied by the authori-}



Furlongs. Nine horses entered

Scouts Leave
| Tomorraw

Barbados Contingent for the first
Caribbean Jamboree which takes
place in Jamaica will leave Seawel|
Airport at 3.20 pm Monday
Scouts are asked to be at the
airport by 2.15 p.m

The party leaving comprise,
Major J. E. Griffith, V. E. Ma
thews, K. C. Pile, H, Blackman,

E, Thompson, Capt, R, A. Sealy,
T. Carter, M, Husbands, E. Inniss,
H, Lewis, N. Quarless, L. Quin-
tyne, G, Rudder, O. Springer,
D. Trotman, R, Turton, A, Brath-

waite and Cecil Walkes, These|ritish occupation,

scouts will travel to Jamaica via
Grenada,

At 7.30 p.m. the same day Rev,
L, C. Mallalieu who is attached to
the Contingent will leave Seawell
for Jamaica via Trinidad.

The other three members of ti
party FE. Scantlebury, L. A
Springer and S. Bushelle—are
standing by for the first oppor-
tunity to Jamaica

AGA KHAN IS
(SOLATED

NICE FRANCE, Mareh 1,

The fabulously wealthy Aga
Khan lay alone in his sumptuous
}bedroom at Villa ‘“Yakimour
jnear Cannes cut off from his

friends by doctors who feared
jhis heart might stop

The 74-year-old Moslem leader
ealled in Pierre Duchossal, Gen-
eva heart specialist within a few
minutes of his arrival yesterday
by special chartered plane from
New Delhi,

Members of the Aga’s household
said his state of health gave “no
cause for anxiety” but Duchossal
ordered complete rest and told
all
callers, —U.P.





| Truman Will Talk
On Security Plan

WASHINGTON, March 1
President Truman will address
the nation on the mufmal security
programme next Thursday night.
The White House announced the
broadcast and television plans to-
day on the heels of reports that
the administration decided to
fight any cut in its proposed $7,900
million new foreign aid pro-
| gramme. The President will speal

| from 10.30 to 11.00 p.m. E.S.'I
over all major radio and television
networks.

Joseph Short, Presidential Pree
Secretary said that the President
will send Congress his request for

Vee secs

|

‘



and economic aid fund
at about the same time as. his
speec! UP.

REPORT DENIED
CAIRO, March 1
Premier Aly Maher Pasha ce
j nied Egyptian Pre reports tha
| Britain has agreed to the imme
diate evacuation of the Suez Cana!
Zone and recognition of Farouk :
King of Egypt and the Sudan
—U-P.

{
{



Arms Production Drops



| stressed that the Prague ant
one of the most ir t
Prague factorie i it
ducing hines -for the So

Union”

Recently the Czech Gever
ment placed heavy new dem
on the entire Skoda Con
output demanding that 38
cent. more goods be produc
1952 than in 1951.—-U.P.






Jockey Holder Straddles 4 Win

U.N. Raiders
Batter Reds
By Land, Air

Hon, Robert Kirkwood has a
‘motion before the Legislative
;Council asking Government to
|make urgent representations to;
the British Government to the!
effect that British Company taxes
j Should not be charged on the
profits of British concerns in
respect of profits earned from

8TH ARMY HEADQL
Allied tank and infantry
territory inside the “Iron T

while U.N. fighter planes cd:

tanks in. the same sector.

United Nations raider:
and a half threw st
Communist bunkers south

hour

city of the “Iron Triangle.”

fire forced the U.N. raiding
Bomb laden F.51 Mustan
ed a group of Communist
Pyongyang destroying thre«
munist armoured vehicles

Kirkwood Raises
Question Of Taxes
KINGSTON, Feb 29

operations in Jamaica and other

british colonies provided
| such, Profits are retained in
territories in which they are earn.

that
the

fed for the development and ex-
The main body of scouts of tine | paneton of agriculture and indus-

and

—C.P.
LL

Germans Jubilant

URG, March 1.

HAMB
Jubilant Germans set pontires |
on the fortress isle of Heligoland |
celebrating

its return to them
years of demolitions
\ practice bombing on the
former submarine base. The
island 28 miles off the mainland
covers only 130 acres.
fieations were

after seven

blown up under
British and

United States bombers used it for |

tne: Vie

— target.—U.P.



ON OTHER PAGES

. Carib Calling.
Cinema, Gardening
Hints, Farm and Gar
den, B.B.C, Notes,

4. Bookie, O.8.C., Races
5. Flying Club, Chats o»
Swimming,

6. Sewing Circle;
Fashion

7. Women,
8. Editorials,
9

2
3



Tops in

I Saw Naples. And
Lived!
10. Book Review: Local
News

11. Art (Turner),
12. Children,

13. Comic Strips.
16. Shooting Races.





After forti- |



JARTERS, Korea, March
raiders thrust inte
riangle” on the

stroyed

Communist
Front

ine Red



Central

amag



or ed Y
at dawn and for
ims of 90 millimetre fire

of Pyongyang,

jumped off an
into
northernmost
Heavy Communist Mortar
team to return
igs and Marine Corsairs pound
tanks east of Sepori, north of
and damaging six of the Com-
Sore | ere picked
ind returned to f tly lines,
airforce
number stil issing

\k ecuri
withheld th

eas

Ground action ts
he Eighth Army
announced that three teams of
tanks striking on the Western an
Central Fronts limped back to
the U.N. “limes yesterday after
jheavy Comrlinist fire destroyed
one armour Clad vehicle and
‘damaged others These
armour losses believed to be
ithe most four months
Three Sherman tanks
were back to allied lines
retriever is dam-
aged in the attempted rescue

pped u some

Headquarters

nine
ire
severe in

disabled
towed
it but one tank

Raiding units struck
Chorwon in the “iron
sector and southeast and south of
Kumsong Communists ghost
town” which once dominated the
eae Front. Tanks destroyed at
least 48 Communist bunkers and
a concrete tunnel,

On the Eastern
munist infantrymen ambushed an
Allied patrol east of the Mun-
dung Ni valley last night but were
beaten off after a five-minute
mall arms fight,

Reds Repulsed

Another group of 20 Commun-
ist soldiers was repulsed by small
arms fire as they attempted to
probe an Allied position in the
same area, One hundred rounds
of Communist mortar and artillery
fire were received in U.N. posi-
tions in the “Heartbreak Ridge”
ector during the night,

west of
triangle”

Front Com-



tl iir war, fighter-bombers
lestroyed six tanks and damaged
nine others while knocking out
more than 110 gun positions and
inflicting 54) casualtic
; Allied planes cut Red railroad
icks in 2,472 plac troyed
25. locomotive ind 346 box cars
and damaged 50 locomotives 1
ty urs
N, planes coneentrating on
road traffic, destroyed 2,367 ve
hicles and cratered highwa in
108 places, Other claims for Feb-
lary included 30 tunnels, 92
supply carts, 78 bridges and mor



than 1,850 buildings

Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Wedding, or for

your own quiet enjoyment at home—

K. W. V.

can add to that enjoyment, as
K.W.V. WINES are QUALITY WINES,
Popular throughout Great Britain, Canada

tries of the world, incliding the British West

Indies.

And in these burdensome days of High Cost

of Living, K.W.V. comes to your rescue also.

K.W.V. WINES COST MUCH LESS
than Foreign Wines of France, Spain,
and Poftugal, because K.W.V. WINES

are admitted into the Colony under the

British Preferential Tariff.

LLL ESN TDN ORY me



7 A

K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V. Cornation ‘Wine.
K.W.V. Sweet Verraouth, K.W.V. Dry Vermouth,

K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE

WINE,

K.W.V.. SHERRIES.



New Zealand, Sweden and many other coun-







PAGE TWO

SFL PRCE LPP POOP OSE CLEP LCSD

“ROODAL THEATRES |









H.M. KING GEORGE VI LAID TO REST
You have seen the first part of the so temn ceremonies that fol-
lowed His s Majesty’ awa Roodal s now invite you
to see the rest of the moving scenes which e! the gun carriage
is pulled through Windsor and comes to rest at St. George’s Chapel
vhere the body of the dead Monarc} ill remain in everlasting sleep.
Join the millions in London w vatched the mile-long cortege
leaving Westminster See, even be ter than they did the Queen and
Royal family, foreign royalty and representatives in funeral proces-|}
sion. All is unique in spectacle and solemn splendour .
SEE IT ALi, AT the EMPIRE, ROXY & ROYAL THEATRES
it all shows from today ar continuing to Thursda
Come early if you want to avoid the rush
. s
EMPIRE
TODAY to TUESDAY 145 & 815 P.M.

TNE PROWLER

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TONITE 8.30 PM LAST SHOWS

“THE MAN WITH A CLOAK~

Joseph COTTEN Barbara STANWYCK

t set for two Days of Fun
TOMORROW AND TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

— A Double loaded with Fun and Action —
A NEW FILS

re ae
ere TO THE Top.

~) LOVE and









STARRING

VAN JOHNSON.
e HEROES ®% 442nd
rece COMBAT



Coming! Coming!
The Desert Fox

James Mason
Jessica Tandy

with BEVERLY

TYLER
fa
TAY GARNETT

A THOR PRODUCTION
Rohmaned Oy LOD Camteny foe

1)

By Special and | Namerous Request |

| GLOBE PRESENTS ON WEDNESDAY Sth,
rn 8 ANZA

THE GREAT CARUSO

SOE ALS OPCS




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3



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and Save !
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BUTTER DISHES ............ 45c. each
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———_—— oe







ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,



VPLS SLES

Bâ„¢asnun and Mrs. J. B
Young from Hamilton, On-
rio, were among the passengers

here

riving





1g also of Hamilton.

Other passengers arriving by

the same opportunity from Can-

ada for a holiday were Mr. and
Mrs. John McHale of London,
Ontario, Mr. and Mrs. Norman
Jarvis and Mrs. Stanley Con-
yers of Toronto. They are all
staying at the Marine Hotel.
Canadian Medics
Dd" and Mrs. A. J. Gilchrist
f Toronto, Canada whe
left Barbados and flew over to
Trinidad for two days to see the

island, returned on Friday morn-

ing by T.C.A. They are staying
at the Hotl P Beaeh Club.
Hotel P vogrtotors

R. AND SHERWOOD

who are the owners of a

hotel in Bermuda, are now in

Barbados for a sort holiday

staying at Paradise Beach Club.

They passed through here on the
RMS. Lady Redney on Monday

and went down to Trinidad
They returned by T.C.A, on Fri-
\day morning and will be remain-
fing until Mereh. 5,

U.K. Businessman

R. GEORGE M. CLARKE, 4

businessman from Ireland,
arrived here on Thursday by
B.W.LA. from Trinidad on a
short visit and is staying at the

Marine Hotel, 3
Holiday

MONG the guests staying at
the Aquatic Club are Mr.

land Mrs. John Marugg of Vene-
| 2uela, Mr. Marugg is from the
Industrial Relations
lof the Phillips Petroleum
poration.

Legislator’ s Wife
FTER spending three enjoy-

able weeks’ holiday’ in
Barbados staying at Indrame:
Guest House, Worthing, Mrs.
yr Jagan returned to British

Juiana on Friday by B.W.I.A.

Wife of the Hon'ble Dr. Cheddi
Jagan, B.G. Legislator, Mrs.
Jagan is a Councillor the
Georgetown Council and Gen-
eral Secretary of the Peoples
| Progressive Party.

On Inspection Tour
DD" H. FORGAN and Mr
Chris Duncan who are both ,
seeemnesnanivee of the Max Baer



Cor-

4

of

roducts of the U.K. left the
Hites on Friday by B.W.LA, fo:
British Guiana after paying a

short visit here. They were stay-
at the Marine Hotel.

Forgan is on an_ inspec-
tour throughout the West
Indies, while Mr. Duncan whose
juarters are in Jamaica, is
a business visit to some of
islands in the area, From
a he expects to go

Back Again

R, AND MRS. W. M. WHITA-

KER from Columbus, Ohio
who spent part of the winter in
Barbados last year, are now back
again for five weeks’ holiday.
They arrived on Friday morning
by 'T.C.A. accompanied by their
daughter and are staying at Para-
dise Beach Club.

With The Canadian
After Six Weeks

Dr.

tion

read







RS. BRYDON, a Canadian

who had been holidaying
jhere for the past six weeks stay-
jing at the Marine Hotel, return-
led” home by 'T.C.A. on Friday.

Leaving To-day
UE to leave to-day (Sunday)

D

by the Colombie for England
}are Mr. and Mrs. A, K. “Tony”
| Corrigan and their four-month-old
daughter Mr. Corrigan, who is
on the mobile staff of Messrs.

Cable and Wireless has been sta-
tioned here for approximately
three years, during which time he
has been to several of the other
islands on short transfers, His
home in England is Durham, Mr
Corrigan is returning to England
on long leave.

Mrs, Corrigan is the former
Ramona Portillo, daughter of Mr
Ramon Portillo of Venezuela and
| Mrs. Portillo of Bay Street.

Attended Carnival

R. AND MRS. J. M. Sharpe
of Saskatchewan and Dr. and
Mrs, McPhail of Toronto, Canada
| who came out to Barbados early
in January for the winter, paid a
visit to Trinidad for Carnival and
returned on Friday morning by
T.C.A. to complete their holiday.
They are staying at the Paradise
Beach Club.



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Wen



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OVER FIFTY YEARS





AL& PLAZA CINEMAS are equipped

w
WESTERN ELECTRIC SOUND SYSTEM

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Opening Soon
Burt LANCASTER

in

Also the LEON ERROL Short .o=

THURSDAY

CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE

Wild Bill ELLIOTT as Red Rider &

Special: 1.30 p.m i



ALIAS BILLY THE KID |

Sunset CARSON

MAN OF BRONZE
GEESE DSS ODS

S555
SSS





B'TOWN uv TODAY & TOMORROW 445 & 830 pm
RKO - Radio Action-Packed Drama | * 4) ’ y ”
reg BORE in “ON DANGEROUS GROUND



MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY

EXPERIENCE

SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES



))





“PLAZA “CIN

B’BAREES

DORIS DAY
Also The Colorful Cartoon
OPENING

SOON! RKO'S

2» Friday morn-
y T.C.A. from Canada for a

They were accompan-
their son and daughter-
Mr. and Mrs. W. H.

Department (4.



1952

MARCH 2,



JUST before leaving for Antigua on Priday are Mrs.Harvie, Col. Eric Harvie, Mrs. Ross and Mr. Ken-

neth Ross.

They left by the “Maria Catharina” which is taking part in the Caribbean Yacht Cruise.
arina” is chartered by Gol. Harvie.

Cancer Specialist
D* and Mrs, Alejandro Calvo

Lairet who were recently
married in Venezuela, are now
in Barbados on their honeymoon
which they are spending at the
Aquatic Club,

Dr. Calvo is a Cancer Special-
ist from Centro Medico in —
Pas. ia. al
Venezuelan Auditor Leaves
Amon the passengers return-

ing to Venezuela on Friday
by L.A.V. was Mr. Miguel Schon,
Auditor of the Banco Mercantil
in Caracas. He had been spend-
ing a holiday here staying at the
Aquatie Club.

On W.L. Tour

AYING a visit to the West In-
dies in the interest of his firm
is Mr. Ronald Carey, Partner of
Woodhouse, Carey and Browne,
Produce Brokers of London, He
arrived hére on Thursday night by
B.W.LA, from British Guiana and

is staying at the Marine Hotel,
Mr. Carey who has also visited
Trinidad, leaves Barbados later in
the week by B.W.LA. for Jamaica
before returning home via New

York about the end of March.

Second Visit In 45 Years

FTER spending two and a half
months’ holiday in Barba-
dos staying with his relatives Miss
Louisa Green and Mfs, Lilian Gay,
Mr. James Green of Brooklyn, re-
turned to the U.S.A, on Thursday
by the S.S. Fort Townshend.

Mr. Green is a Barbadian who
had been living in the U.S.A. for
the past 45 years. This was his
second visit to the colony during
that period,

He begs to say goodbye to all
those whom he was unable to con-
tact before leaving.

Official Starter
M*. O. P. BENNETT, Official
Starter of Races, arrived
by B.W.LA. on Thursday and is
staying at the Hotel Royal.
For The Races
R. N. TAWIL, Director of
Faulkner Trading Co., and
Mrs. Tawil, arrived on Thursday
by B.W.1LA. to attend the Races.
They are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.



“set in.

“Maria Cath-

The party will be returning to Barbados after the cruise,

Carnival In Barbados
N the night of the Mauretania’s
visit to Barbados, which
coineided with the Trinidad Car-
nival, passengers on the ship were
able to - a general view of what
Carnival looked like when they
dropped in at Chez Jean Pierre,
the French Restaurant in Hastings.

The Management of the Res-
taurant staged a Carnival corre-
sponding with that in Trinidad and
it was deemed a great success. A
steel band was engaged to supply
the music and many Barbadians
took part.

The thrill and climax was
reached at midnight when Lent
So well did everyone en-
joy themselves that it is hoped to
make the festival an annual one.

bassy

T PRESENT holidaying here ,

is Miss Francoise' Vary and
Miss Denise Gaudette of Venezue-
la. They both work at the Cana-
dian Embassy in Caracas,
Still Holidaying Here
HAROLD BEATTY, until
recently General Manager of
the Montreal Board of Trade and
Mrs. Beatty are still holidaying in
Barbados staying at the Windsor
Hotel where they have been for
the past two weeks. They expect
to return to Canada later in the
montn,

Co-operative Bank

Manager
RRIVING yesterday morning
by B.W.LA. from Trinidad
were Mr. and Mrs, Perey Philip
who have come over for a month’s
holiday. They are staying at
Indramer Flats, Worthing.

Mr, Philip, a druggist of Port-
of-Spain, is also President and
Managing Director of the Trini-
dad Co-operative Bank.

St. Kitts Barrister
q® Barbados chiefly for the Races
are Mr. G. P. Boon, Barrister-
at-Law, St. Kitts, his daughter
Mrs. C. G. Rigley and his daugh-
ter-in-law Mrs. G. R, Boon, They
arrived on Friday by B.W.1.A. and
will be remaining for two wecks

staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mrs. Rigley is the owner

Columbus which raced at

Garrison Savannah yesterday.

ol
the

Brothers
R.. STEWART SARJEANT
Barbadian now resident in
the U.S.A. left the island on Wea-
nesday by B.W.IA. for Puerto
Rico where he took Pan Ameri-
can Airways back to the State
He was accompanied by his wif
and son Stewart Jnr. They h
spent a month’s holiday here
Mr. Stewart who has paid h
first visit back here in 33 ye
is a brother of Mr. “Bill” Sar
jeant of the Hastings Hotel with

whom he stayed: hey had ;
seen each other for over thr«
decades,

Mr, Sarjeant who left here at

the age of 16 is now well estab-
lished in the Real Estate Busin«
in New York,

While here he has made a tour
of the island and saw places he
had not visited when a boy. H
was very impressed by the vast
improvements the island ha
made and was overwhelmed
the hospitality of the people. H:
expects to return next year.

Business And Pleaure

N BARBADOS for two weeks on
business coupled with pleas-
ure is Mr. A. S. Graydon, Export
Manager of John Labatt Ltd., on
of the oldest brewers in Canada
He arrived on Wednesday by
T.C.A, aceompanied by his wife
and is staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Graydon has been to the
Caribbean before . but this is
his first visit to Barbados. He
said that he was glad to be here
in this climate because when he
left Montreal it was very cold
with lots of snow.

Scout Raffle
ONGRATULATIONS to Miss
Joan Weekes of “Briggs
Cottage”, Gun Hill, St. Michael,
who won the Boy Scout raffle. The
prize was a Phillips Sports model
bicycle and the Winging number
was 4

_— Carnival
RS. I. V. SPRINGER of
“Beunice’, River Road re-
turned from Trinidad on Friday
morning by B.W.1.A. She went
over to see Carnival there,



The Barbados Maternity Hospital

THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL is situated at Bank
Hill, and was re-converted from a building which was

formerly a private residence.

The grant by Colonial Develop-

; ment and Welfare Organisation of

£24,000 in 1944 for the establisn-
ment of the Barbados Maternity
Hospital and ‘' e subccg ert icing
over by the Government in "1947,
was the answer to public criticism
over the lack of proper training
facilities for midwives in the
Colony.

The Maternity Hospital is under
the direct control of the Director of
Medical Services and is supervised
by a Matron and Visiting Obstetri-
cian, assisted by a staff of trained
midwives,

The Hospital has ‘accommoda-
tion for twenty mothers and their
babies.

Twenty pupils are undergoing
training constantly. Of these, ten
trained nurses undergo a 12-
month period of training prior to
sitting an examination for quali-
fying as midwives, while ten
untrained pupils undergo eighteen
months’ training. Examinations
are held every year.

Clinics are held
Ante-natal Clinic is
weekly,

Patients are interviewed by the
Matron and are given a comple
physical examination by the Visii-
ing Obstetrician and all details are
recorded. Treatment is also given
to patients.

On Clinic days, besides the
routine check-up, patients are in-
structed in all the essential
factors which make for good
health during pregnancy, The im-
portance of an adequate diet is
stressed with its important ele-
ments of meat, fish, dairy produce,
fruit and green leafy vegetablest

Patients are encouraged to seek
the services offered at the Clinic
in the third month of pregnancy
and certainly not later than the
sixth month, Dental services are
also available.

There is a Theatre for the
delivery of the babies; a nursery
for normal babies and a nursery
for premature babies,

weekly, The
held twice

GENTS’ SHOES



TAN & BLACK KID OXFORDS.

After delivery, mothers are en-
couraged to attend the post-natal
clinies where advice is given or
the care and feeding of the infant.

There were 420 deliveries cur-
ing the year 1951, There were also
2,874 ante-natal attendances and
300 post-natal attendances.

Although every patient who
attends the ante-natal c’inic cannot
have her baby in the Hospital due
to the limited ‘accommodation, \
number seeking the servi
offered free at the Maternity
Hospital have increased greatly.

On a visit to the Maternity
Hospital recently the Advocate
was particularly impressed by the
spotlessly clean appearance of the
Hospital, both inside and outside;
the efficiency of the staff and the
cheerful, happy and restful atmos-
where prevailing,

Not only do the patients receive
every care and attention at the
Maternity Hospital but the Colony
ean be justly proud of the up-to-
date training facilities offered to
young women who are interested
in making midwifery their
vocation,

. $10.64 & $11.59

TAN & BLACK CALF SEMI BROGUE OXFORDS .............60000+ 11.19
TAN & BLACK BROGUES ................. a 11.99
TAN CALF MONK STYER. «0.0.0.0... 0000: decisianibnad ho scttneniecl 12.09
BLACK PATENT OXFORDS (Dress Shoes) ...:.::::::cs::s:s00:000iessee 12.14
YOUTHS’ TAN & BLACK OXFORDS—2’s to 5’s 9.75

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4606

YOUR SHOE STORES

TTS
eed

WESTERN FF!
AND



DIAL 5170
TODAY and Continuing DAILY at 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

WARNER'S HAPPY TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL | |

ON MOONLIGHT BAY

GORDON MacRAE — JACK SMITH

7

RE-RELEAGE |!

REAL GLORY

Gary COOPER

SSS =

David NIVEN

Andrea L DS

PROJECTION
SYSTEM
OISTIN >

ey & Tomerrow—445 & 4.80 p.m.

VE IT TO HENRY

His Walburn, Walter Catlett &
SIERRA PASSAGE
Wayne MORRIS
‘deaepeiiiaititiighelpannteainn sania
Tues, (only) — 445 & 8.30 p.m

LUCKY LOSERS

Leo Gotcey & The Bowery Boys &

THE PIONEERS

Tex RITTER





DIAL 8404

Dial 4220
“GAIETY |

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
AT. TODAY — 430 P.M.

VOICE OF THE TURTLE

Ronaki Reagan, Eleanor Parker &

,LOOK For THE SILVER LINING

(Color by Technicolor)
Gordon MacRae & June Haver

TUESDAY (o (only) 8.30 30 PM.

THE GOLDEN MADONNA
Michael Rennie &

HOMICIDE
Robert Douglas











SUNDAY, MARCH

9

195

52

ee a a ee ee ee ee ee



AT THE C1

—



VEMA



On Moonlight Bay

Hy GH,

LAST night was the
Theatre in Barbarees Roa

a opening of the new Plaza
the third theatre under the

management of Caribbean Theatres Ltd. to be opened in

the island. To mark this im

portant occasion, the manage-

ment have selected ON MOONLIGHT BAY as their feature
film and it would be difficult to find more refreshing and
pealing entertainment. Doris Day and Gordon Macrae

Warner Bros. popular song

in this amusing and lightheart
ington’s famous ““Pandro” stories, that is a gay family

comedy, with music.

_ The beauty of a film like this
is that the enjoyment of it knows
no age limit and its youthful verve
is delightful to all.

With a‘background of a small
town in Indiana in 1917, the story
concerns a young tomboy miss
who is much more interested in
playing baseball than romancing
under the. Indiana moon—that is,
until a young college senior makes
his appearance and changes her
ides. Romance follows in practi-
cally no time at all, but its path
thas more thorns than roses, what
with our hero beliaving in Free
Love and his sweetheart’s father
being dead against his suit either
Free or otherwise! However,
graduation day reveals the fact
that all the senior men have en-
listed to go overseas, including our
hero, and possibly due to this fact,
his ideas of matrimony undergo
a rapid about-face. Parental
blessing is finally given, and
everyone is happy.

The plot includes many hilari-
ous episodes, mainly contributed
by the eleven-year-old brother
whose propensities for getting in-
to difficulties are only equalled
by his ingenuity for disentangling
himself. However, one « of the
funniest sequences occurs during
the first date between the young
sweethearts. I'll call it the “pow-
der puff” episode, and if it doesn’t
make you laugh, nothing will.

Doris Day sparkles in her role
of boyish tomboy into grown-up
young lady and with Gordon
Macrae, the two of them sing the
old nostalgic popular songs of
another era. On Moonlight Bay,
Cuddle Up A Little Closer, Till
We Meet Again, Tell Me and I’m
Forever Blowing Bubbles are just
a few of the good old tunes it is
pleasant to remember )

Young Billy Gray, an engaging
and amusing young new star ob-
viously enjoys himself in the
“Penrod” role, while Mary Wickes,
as Stella, the cock says her say
with delightfully astringent hu-
mour,

A real old-time movie is shown
in the picture, with the lurid title
of “The Curse of Drink.” In-
cidentally, this one-reeler has a
decided influence on the young
brother, who imagines his father
in the leading role—with disas-
trous results! :

Good script, direction and act-
ing make this a lively, happy pic-
ture and there are some excellent
touches in costuming and stage

sets.
ON DANGEROUS GROUND
ON DANGEROUS GROUND at
the Plaza, Bridgetown , brings Ida
Lupino back to the screen after
her sojourn in the field of direct-
ing and producing, and presents
her in the type of dramatic role
in which she excells. Robert
Ryan plays opposite her, and be-
tween the two of them, they
manage to put over some drama-
tic entertainment. d
The picture starts off in a
rather hum-drum cops-and rob-
bers manner with Mr. Ryan as a
plain clothes policeman, who is
embittered and hardened by the
sordidness with which he is sur-
rounded in his daily work, and in
consequence, a lonely man.
Brutality gains the upper hand
in his manner of dealing with
suspects to such a degree that
his captain decides to send him
out of town for awhile, and gives



NOT

A









°





In order to meet the demand for serving the
public better in our DRUG STORE we have
closed our SODA FOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT
and will be utilizing this space for expanding
our DRUG DEPARTMENT.

COLLINS” LTD.

and romance team are starred
adaption of Booth Tark-



DORIS DAY

him an assignment up country.
Fro; his arrival in the settle-
ment, that is aghast at the killing
of a small girl, and the entrance
of Miss Lupino, the whole atmos-
phere becomes charged, and the
ection never lets up.

As a blind gitl, whose men-
tally defective younger brother
has committed the murder, Miss
Lupino is completely convincing.
Her performance is sensitive and
compelling, and her belief that
hate destroys him who hates is
instrumental in changing the
outlook of the embittered police-
man. Robert Ryan gives stature
to the role of the lonely officer,
and his change of character is
credible and natural.

The swiftly paced chase scenes,
against a background of bleak
winter snow, together with well
done dialogue and good acting,
make this an _ interesting and
different film, though it must be
admitted that some of the situa-
tions are heavily weighted with
sensational elements.

Tiny Ball Keeps

Woman Alive

BOSTON, Mass. Feb, 29.

A tiny plastic ball inside the
heart of 37-year-old Mrs, Mary
Dansereau is keeping her alive
after a unique operation perform-
ed at Peter Bent Brighm hospital,
A Lucite ball is secured near a
heart valve which had been in-
jured in a childhood attack of
rheumatic fever.



The, ball slips in place during
each heart beat to prevent the
blood from flowing backward.

The injury would have proved
fatal to the mother of two children
had she not undergone the opera-
tion described by surgeons for the
first time yesterday.

The operation was performed on
December 20 by a surgeon who
asked that his name be withheld.
A month later Mrs. Dansereau was
sent home and doctors said she
is recovering rapidly thougn not
completely cured.—U.P.












ICE,




IN THE

DESERT
-~OF DESSERTS—



ONLY

11¢

eee ee ne

Beat today’s High Cost
of Living and ENJOY

‘tensively for decoration,

Raspberry, Lemon,

SUNDAY

ADVOCATI



Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

Annuals in General

With the ideal weather that we
have had so far this year annuals
should have made a good start.
Once a garden can be adequately
watered, this is just the weather
that Snapdragon, Petunias, Ver-
bena, Candytuft, Phlox, and all the
other annuals love. Some people’s
Snapdragon plants are already a
foot high, and other anauals are
equally advanced.

Although flowers that last well
when cut must take first place in
value, yet there are others which,
although not so satisfactory as cut
Saeeeaay ek deserve a place In the
garden their beauty alone.

Queen Ann's Lace

Queen Ann's lace is one of
these, and although it is only a
wild flower (called “Cow Parsley”
in. En id), it is none the less
beautif for that. This plant
grows easily from seed, seeds it-
self, and is unsurpassed in dainty
loveliness. The plants grow to
about four feet in height and the
flowers are pure white, and, as
the name implies are 6f a light
lacy appearance. It looks lovely
grown in a border with other
flowers, or in a bed by itself.

Tn spite of the fact that Queen
Ann's lace does not last very long
when cut, this flower is used ex-
some
Florjsts even tinting the flower
heads pink or blue,

‘ Single Balsam

Single Balsam is another plant
that is not of much value for pick-
ing but which brightens up the
shady spots in a garden. So much
has already been written about
this plant that ne special descrip-
tion is necessary here, and this is
only a reminder to include a few
of these gay little plants here and
there. ere is a great variety
in the colour of these flowers, and
often a new shade can be got from
a friend’s garden.

These plants grow from seed or
——h and like a moist shady
spot.

Red and Blue Salvia

Salvias are also among the
plants whose flowers do not last
well when picked, and yet which
add greatly to the colour of the
garden. These flowers with their
graceful spikes are also, in spite
of their short life, very popular as
an addition to bouquets and bowls.
They grow easily from seed or
cutting, flourish under ordinary
garden conditions, and will do
equally well in dry or wet weather.

Salvias moke a lovely border
to a bed, the red salvia especially
making a bright splash of colour
in the garden.

Little Yellow Daisy

Little Yellow Daisy, although
quite useless for picking, yet
provides a lovely bit of bright-
ness in the garden. This little
plant grows in sizable bunches
of dainty greenery which has a
delicious aromatic scent, and
when in bloom ‘is covered in
hundreds of tiny golden daisy
like flowers. It makes a splen-
did Rock garden or border plant.

Once established Yellow Daisy
is there for ever. It disappears
during the rainy weather, but as
these dry months come around,
up it comes again in all the
expected, and in a lot of unex-
pected places. It does not stand
transplanting well, and to get it
established it is better to collect
a queasy of dried flower heads
and plant those and hope they
will spring the following year.
Yellow Daisy prefers a poor soil,
and will root and grow on a

vel path if the gravel is at all
oose enough for it to gain a hold.

Petunia
Perhaps it may be inaccurate
to class the Petunia among

those plants whose flowers are
only decorative in the garden,
and of little use for picking.
Petunias do last reasonably well
when picked, but, as a rule they
grow so massed in the bed, that
picking is difficult, and so they

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PAG! THREE



FARM AND GARDEN

THE CASHEW NUT (By AGRICOLA)

Following the note on ft
pose a question: are we on
local cottage industries, one
not necessarily good soil at

mitted that there are exposed hillsides and marginal lands
in the hands of peasant proprietors as well as unused plots

1ardiness last week, to-day
the lookout for an addition t
issociated with the soil and

that? We think it will be ad

in seme of the dry, water-short village areas which could

be profitably turned to account if planted to a |

such as the cashew

BB.C. RADIO NOTES

Direct Broadcast & Com-
mentary
Tuesday, March 4,

Budget
Day in Britain, As in

previous

is

years the BBC’s General Overseas '

Service will broadcast the Budget
speeches by the Chancellor of the

Exchequer, the Rt. Hon. R. A.
Butler, on Tuesday at 5435 p.m.
repeated at 9.00 p.m. and by a

Member of Her Majesty’s Oppos-
ition in the House of Commons
on Wednesday at 5.15 p.m, re-
peated at 9.00 p.m. The Chancel-
lor’s Budget proposals for 1952
will be the subject of Andrew
Shonfield’s weekly economic com-
mentary on Thursday at 9.45 p.m.

‘Emergency’ in Malaya

On Friday next, March 7, Hugh
Carleton Greene who returned
recently from Kuala Lumpur

where he was head of the Emer-
gency Information Services, under
General Briggs, will discuss Com-
munism in Malaya in his talk ‘On
Being a Bandit’ in the series ‘From
the Third Programme.’ This is of
particular interest to iisteners in
this area on account of the recent
transfer to Malaya of the Hon
Donald C, McGillivray, former
Colonial Secretary of Jamaica. Mr.
Greene points out that the Com-
munist.army in Malaya consists of
about 4,000 men, armed with pis-
tols, rifles, Sten guns and a few
Brens and is supported by an un-
Cerground organisation of some
15,000 men who provide it with
supplies, particularly food, re-
cruits and intelligence, and can
themselves rely on the regular as-
sistance, willing or unwilling, of
(it’s anybody’s guess but let us
say) another hundred thousand.
For the ordinary non-Communist
Chinese in Malaya the Communist
Party is but the latest and most
ruthless of a long line of secret
societies to which they paid their
contributions under threat of
mutilation or death. The broadcast,
lasting for twenty minutes will be
given twice on Friday, 7th, March
at 4.15 and again at 10.30 p.m.

British Industries Fair

The British Industries Fair, 1952,
will be held from May 5 to 16
simultaneously in Earls Court and
Olympia, London, and Castle
Bromwich, Birmingham, where
heavy industries will be displayed,
‘B.LF. Preview,’ a group of four
programmes starting in the coming
week will outline plans for the
Fairy which is expected to be on
the same scale as last year’s Fes-
tival of Britain B.LF. Soe
this year is largely on new ideas,
frest designs anm improved pro-
cesses which will promote the ex-
port trade and overcome the di-
version of materials to rearma-
ment. The first broadcast will be
on Thursday next, 6th, March at
10.15 p.m,





are not used for bouquets or dec-
oration very often. Petunias love
dry sunny weather, and they con~
tinue flowering for weeks on end
giving no trouble, if, conditions
suit them, They make one of the
loveliest beds of our lovely
annuals. Petunias seed them-
selves and once grown, seedlings
spring up the following year all
about the garden. If no seedlings
are available, the imported seeds
grow very easily. catter them
well in the seed box, and cover
with a very thin layer of sifted
mould. Petunias take twelve
weeks from seed sowing to flow-
ering.

Bathroom Suites
in Ivory

with matching Tiles
and

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BCCE

SD now-skp
Rubber |
Mats

in Colours

BARBADOS CO-OP.
FACTORY
LTD.

hardy tree

Like its near reiation the mango

it thrives well in the vicinity o

pe sea and may be a help too ix

ting erosion. The cashew nu

has considerable value commer

cially and is much in demand. Th

Jruit or so-called ‘apple’, althoug!
Welding an astringent juice, can |

be eaten raw or made into a pre

serve; cashew wine is also men
ned We have seen the ‘ap

ples’ made excellent use of in the

Rupununi district of British Gui |
i where the tree often occur

in fairly
ds in

thick, but scattered, |
the savannahs. During
the fruiting season, the Ameridian

tur: their pigs in to consume the |
fruits, which they do with relish
producing pork of good quality

at the same fime, the nuts are col
lected, roasted, shelled and mark-
ected locally The following brief
eview is based largely on infor-
mation which has appeared in the
Bulletin of the Imperial Institute

As is well known, cashew nut
are a prized ingredient of cake
and sweetmeats and as ‘salted

ts’ are very popular in the Unit

States. In flavour and nutritive
malue they approximate almond

r which thev often figure as a
sitbstitute. The tree, originall
a ‘naive of South America, is/}
now to be found in many parts of

the tropical world, thanks mainly
to intrepid Portuguese travellers
in America, from Mexico to Bra-



ril and the West Indies; in Africa
both East and West; and in Asiati
countries. In the Bombay Presi-
dency of India and the adjoinin
Portuguese territory of Goa, sev-|
eral large sceale factories have
been established for the prepara-



tion of cashew nuts for export
markets. :
Under favourable conditions,

the tree may reach a considerable
size and commences to bear at!
the end of the third year. There
is an interesting feature connect-
ed with fruiting: after the forma-
tion and ripening of the kidney-
shaped nut, the stalk or peduncle
of each nut gradually swells and
assumes a fleshy, turgid appear-
ance somewhat resembling an ap-
ple. These ‘apples’ mature to a
bright red or yellow colour and
are ornamental hanging amid the
green foliage. In the part af India
mentioned, a mature tree of eight
to ten years is said to yield from
100 to 150 1b of ‘apples’ annually
from which about 20 to 25 Ib, of
unhusked nuts are obtained. When
the roasting is carried out by the}
villagers, the entire nuts are first)
placed in earthenware pots per-
forated at the base to permit the)
escape of the pungent, astringent
oil released from the outer husks
during the roasting
These pots hold about one and a
half to two pounds of nuts and
are balanced on three stones over

a low burning fire. While heating, |

the nuts are stirred with wooden
ladles and the expelled oil collect-
ed in an iron spoon, After about
ten minutes roasting, the nuts are
ready for separation; they are
placed in a basket and sprinkled
with wood ashes so as to prevent
any adhering oil, with its blistering
properties, from burning the hands.
The husks are cracked between
stones and the kernels extracted
by hand, There is a good demand.
throughout the West Indies for

home grown cashew nuts prepared |
in this simple way. The factory |

process is, of course, more efficient
and results in the ‘blanched ca-
shew kernels of commerce.’ Large
open pans or perforated rotary |
drums form part of the equipment
and some 8,000 lb of nuts are
roasted in each pan daily. Twen-
ty five lbs of unhusked nuts yield
from six to eight pounds of ker-
nels. :

Thus, at existing prices, it ap-
pears that a few cashew trees
around the cottage door would not
be a bad investment.





|

treatment. |









USED
TO WAKE

FEELING
TIRED

Now rises
full of

| energy ,

What o bad start for a
work if you wake
teeling ‘t and

ii s, instead of being
brisk and full of energy.
One woman who can
ippreciate the difference from
her own experience, writes to

us |
“Refore taking Kruschen, I |
always used to wake in the
morning feeling very tired, Now
(have lost all t gt Hrednene and |
I wake feeling full of energy.
Kruschen has made me feel years
younger I also guifered with
rheumatic pains in my shoulders
and swellings round my ankles
I am now completely ¢ of
these pains and swell et take
Kruschen Salts regularly, and
cannot speak too bighly i

Kruschen keeps you young
because it tones up the liver,
kidneys and bowels and keeps
them all working smoothly and

efficiently. The rew of this
interna] cleanliness is a ened
| and invigorated body. Polsono

Baste canteciels are eae ed an
@ pains of rheumatis i.
ina en you continue with Kr -
somes your t wack body responds
8 pur oree.
Kruschen is obtainable from all
Yomista and Stores.

2m,





2

Too MayWi
4 ae 4




Days



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3 Do this 2 times o doy for 14 days

Leading skin specialists proved that
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PAGE FOUR









/
: ‘OTT 7 RACING RESULTS THE FLYING YASMEEN |
CLYDE WALCOTT SCORES ACL ESULT *{ FL
tir r rey T os a ; + ual a ‘ |
A GARRISO? AVANN: M : 952 r ,
LONE W.1. THOUSAND —ene.* nen 5. oe Dunquerque Wins the Guineas |
WEATHER Fine TRACK Firn ” ° }
’ ° ve a . . . |
Empire Lead In First Division Netonite’s Impressive Victory
. ‘ Ist Race: GARRISON STAKES—Class B and Lower—$1,000 ($335, *
S > reg
oe eee $165, $55)—7% Furlongs. BY BOOKIE
WEST INDIES tour of New Zealand has t ischaemia ie
nd this too marks the end of 1. RED CHEEKS 23 Ibs Mr. E. C. Jones Jockey O'Neil, . al . ‘os ete in the
\ustralia and New Zealand. 2. FIRELADY 118 lbs Mr. S. A. Blanchette ae a : oy en: a an. Par
i Phe justifiable measure of satisfac- Jockey Joseph i tat ane aria need to the circum-
7 tion fel adents of West Indian cricket his- 3. FLYING $0. 60: 30 usually Var SCC ;
o t t this is the first occasion on DRAGON 106 + 3 lbs. Mr.S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilde?, mances, Usually the element of surprise nee =
We team has opposed a New Zea- TIME: 1.34. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.32; Place: $1.88; $1.38. & lot to do with it. But when you on e a ati
a on their own territory in official fixtures FORECAST: $16.20. something to happen and it comes as it
‘ hav efeated them convincingly 5 a le ' . 4 leak «SMa on top of that, you stand amazed at way }
and hi 1efeale : 6 ALSO RAN: Belle Surprise (98 5 lbs., Lutchman); Fuss Budget happens; then you ean be almost dead certain
WALCOTT SCORED ONLY 1,000 : (123 Ibs., P. Fletcher). that such will never fade from the memory.
The statisticians among us will Bs START: Good FINISH: Close. Neck; 1 length. ~ Sueh an «vent was the performance of Mr. Tommy Edwards’
no doubt re pe it "' point in what-#7 a4. WINNER: 4-yr.-old b.f, Linklater-Golden Carp. filly Yasmeen at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon.
ever records they have kept con- a . - Watnhar
cerning this tour, that Clyde Walcott TRAINER: Mr. J. T, Fletcher.

is the only player on the West In-
dies team to have scored more than
one thousand runs and has topped
the first class batting averages
Clyde has scored 1,098 runs in

23 innings, (once not out) for an
average of 49.90. He also put up
the highest score in first class
matches of 186

Frank Worrell is next on the
batting list. Frankie scored 872
runs in 22 innings (four times not

out) with an average of 48.44 runs
and with his highest score 160 not
out,

The figures of the other players
are interesting. Alan Rae’s figures
were 33.27, Robert Christiani 33.13,
Roy Marshall 32.78 and Jeff Stoll-

meyer 31.17,

iG
Everton Weekes, the other Ww",
Was seventh with an average of -
27.85 in 2U innings with lop score
‘a

ee CLYDE WALCOTT
WINS BOWL 500 OVERS



“i ‘t a’? { t »
2 His “twins” Aif Valentine and Sonny Ramadhin bowled more than
200 overs and this y more than 300 overs more than any other
member of the West 1 team
Vaientine took 6] ce at



of 23.85 runs each but this

bowling averages and Ramadhin
next in order,

rey Stoilmeyer, the number one opening

toppea lhe bowling averages, but he did with 8
et Of 10.49 FuUNS each in SY Overs.

mez ran to a jusuiiable second place with 236.7 overs
at a cost of 19./6 runs each,

‘ 2WO WANS

kK MPIRE won fixtures last week and have scored the
maximum points Of six points for three games played since the

ivo2 season opened, f

4ne Diues
ecoring only goal «
most part but poh te

only gained him s
Wilton 40 al

It is ironical
batsman s
WiCKels at

venth piace

a Cost Of 2/,.0/ runs ¢



Wial well
hould have
a c

Gerry G
for 3U wicket

both toeir

are familiarly known—defeated Carlton "by
tne maich. ‘Ine game was a fast one for the
ms were laulty in their finishing efforts,

Linpire Wis season have deveioped a theory of playing the ball in
the air and this proved an advantage against the smaiter Cariton
players, When it is taken into considerauon the fact tnat the entire
Cariton team are under more than medium height and the Empire
Piayers numbering among their ranks people like Charles Alleyne,
Algy Symmonds, iv Smith, and company must at once establish





@ sught edge on the game because of this uvantage even if we
ignore all other siderations for the time being.
NUL MUCH TO CHOOSL

FINUHERE was not much to choose between the teams for the greater

part of the Freddy Hutcoinson was the outstanding
player for Carlton. He played at fullback, inside forward and halt
back at diflerent stages of the game, 1 am not saying that he was

game,

actually assigned to all these positions but he nevertheless impressed
me al one stage or another of the game that he had undertdken the
responsibility of playing in these positions,

Although his ali round play was useful yet I think that his best
posilion is a Wing half. However, he is leaving for England tomorrow
and football fans will wish him the best of luck. Carlton will be
much the poorer for his absence,

SPARTAN DEFEATED
MPIRE completely outplayed Spart: iis week to score their
third consecutive win in the first Livision this season. It is true
that Empire scored the.only goal of.ihe match by the vexatious pen-
alty route. However, in my opinion Empire gave the better perform-
ance and deserved to win.

They adopted their ball in the air policy again and Spartan with
a nonsensical short passing game eminently unsuitable to the wider
field could find no answer to the tactics employed by the Bank Hall
team.

Frank Taylor at inside left for Empire was outstanding. He was
swift in the attack, his ball control was good by all local standards
and his distribution was also good,

The Spartan wingers were quick enough neither did they
receive the type of crossfield pass from which they could have made
the most use,



not

HEROES
KIPPER CADOGAN and Gittens worked heroically in the half
back line but their greatest sia was the fact that they never
thought of lobbing the ball into their opponents area or trying a shot

themselves. They content«
intercepting and clearing.
College defeated Everton by a clear margin of two goals to nil
in their fixture yesterday. Everton is completely out of stride so far
this season and on the other hand I have never such commend-
able team spirit and co-ordination of effort displayed by Harrison
College this season for some year the history of the school.

LAWN TENNIS, PLANS
7JRHE Council of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Association
decided recently to enter a team Br Trophy to
be held in Jamaica in April of this year.

This is a bold bid on the part of the Association and will cer-
financial undertaking since

d themselve

with the negative theory of

in

th
the I

tainly constitute their most ambitious
the formation of the Association.

Jamaica is a considerable di away from most of the other
British Colonies in the Caribbean and transportation and boarding
costs are comparatively high. Nevertheless I think that the Assc-
ciation is quite justified in the effort to place Barbados Association
Lawn Tennis on the map of Caribbe anised rt

The Council of the Association has also accepted the offer of
Mr, Neville Carter of a portion of land at the.Pine Estate and
the Association plan to erect a pavilion there and to prepare two
or possibly three courts.

Obviously the Association w

tance

n «
i

ill be faced







5

“

1952

SUNDAY, MARCH

SUNDAY ADVOCATE







" ss eee sie ‘ I would not say that I knew it was going to happen, but rather
2nd Race; MAIDEN STAKES—Class © and C2 (Maidens)—8900,

that I know it might happen or could happen, I knew all along

















hat e wa f class. This goes right back to the first time
($300, $150, $50)—5% Furlongs. I had 4 look at ne ‘beoedine bua texts. 5 Wattling Street out at ¥ /

—_—____ — ——-—— - ~~ —= Yasna she red by Sir Perey Loraine and is a sister to suc a
1. CASTLEIN THEAIR 112lbs. Mr. J. R. Edwards, Jockey Holder, od horses Nebuchadnezza 2 the Golden Road both of which TS: JW. ER
2. MAGIC GAYE .... 109 lbs. Mr. M. E.R. Bourne. Jockey Belle. ahiciy are a Silas eee, ar england. Her dam, Yasna, is, in| OBTAINABLE FROM ALL LEADING STORES. LOCAL AGENTS POTT
3. AIM LOW ........ 125 lbs. Dr. H. M. Weaver, Jockey Crossley ‘ dasar andi P are. Yasmeen, of course,
TIME: 1.083. PARI-MUTUEL; Win: $6.70; Place: $1.96, $4.14, bidee regen , sat ta cane Wate ea hac socllare but nevertheless | MUI[ iTS DAM aa te aaa iee ae ATHERSTONE, ENGLAND

$4.52. er for uggested that, for the West Indies, something above the 7

; ; yedinary could be expected. *
ALSO RAN: Devil's Symphony (109 lbs., James); The Thing (109 ee ee MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY
\ ‘ 1 ‘ie — ; ) xoks Yasmeen is the sort that would impress both the experi = fee

See, Cepeenes); Manees (eae OM.. coneGi) 5 DEE var et98 Pe th a that think of thoroughbreds as something out of the >

lbs., P. Fletcher); Test Match (112 4 lbs., M. Browne); Abu- si Night At exercise even the most inexperienced ae

Ali (112 + 2 lbs., Yvonet); Mabouya (125 lbs., Wilder); Blue u be impressed by her a. In Trinidad, er ss

Nelly (109 lbs,, Quested); Darham Jane (109 + 6 lbs., O'Neil). for the first time in the West Indies, it was apparen ae tin a

French Flutter (109 Ibs., Thirkell); Fille D'Iran (109 lbs., Lutch- ed a fine ‘urn ot speed. She only _wanted a little more time’

man) ratron for her to get six furlongs. , ;

, -INTS . . { then one ay well ask, did I come to leave her out ot

SEART: Fal. SINISE Somer. = Tenens, $ lene ‘ e uae "The answer is that few horses of this caiibre
WINNER: 3-yr.-old b.c. Windsor Clipper-Aerocomet. ‘ the West Indies unless something is amiss with them,
TRAINER: Hon, V. C. Gale.

wrong with Yasmeen was very clearly indicated
h she displayed at exercise, Furthermore I got the
after her last gallop it was more noticeable than
1d the fact that a horse is « bad starter, are two reasons
preclude them from my tips.

3rd Race: CHELSEA STAKES—Class F and Lower—$800, ($265,
$135, $40)—5% Furlongs,
1, FIRST ADMIRAL 105 + 4 Ibs. Mrs, F. E. C

If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a doy of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restc
energy and tone up the whole nervou:
Giving new vitality it fortifies ou against fever



e los

Bethea.
Jockey Holder.

ich always



i ill s 3 . and exhaustion and remember, Duc be
2. MARCH WINDS 105 lbs. Mr. U, J. Parravicino, But with all the above in mind I still stood in the Stand at the ;
Jockey Lutchman. sarrison yesterday and marvelled at the way she went abcut her Wine is especially valuable after i!iness.
3. MISS FRIENDSHIP . 132 lbs. Mr. F. E. C, Bethell, k

Demure had the edge on the jump and Wilder lost no time
giving her af she had. Harroween was also well off and between
two of them they held on to Yasmeen for the first furlong. It
a display of early pace such as I have seldom seen except by a
few outstanding horses of the past. But at the half mile both Demure
and Harroween had had enough and Yasmeen careered off in front.

Jockey Yvonet.

Place; $2.02, $1.72, $2.58. 4),

the

TIME: 1.09 PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $9.36.

FORECAST: $34.32.

ALSO RAN: Waterbell (125 lbs., Crossley); Jolly Miller (130 Ibs.,
John); Sunbeam (121 lbs., Wilder); Caprice (102 {-2 ibs., Beiie);

Take home a



bottle today

|






oF;
,

> , establishing a lead of a length with almost every stride. By the time ‘ & x i
Clementina (125 lbs., Thirkell); Rambler Rose (102 + 1 ibs., he reached the two furlong pole and turned for home she had five i \ l if
Joseph). or six lengths on the rest of the field and at this stage 1 begun to 1a 39
START: Good. FINISH: Close, neck, 1 length.

wender if she would begin to slow up. But, nothing of the sort, she did
not fade this time, and presently Newman was easing her up cn the
post a winner by what the judge conservatively estimated to be three
lengths, She is without doubt the fastest filly I have ever seen in the
West Indies. «f) JSignl

WINNER;, 3-yr.-old b.g. O.T.C.-Flak.
TRAINER: Mr. F, E. C. Bethell.

TONIC Wit

~~ 4th Race : BARBADOS GUINEAS 1952—Nominated—$900.00
($300.00, $200.00, $100.00) —74 Furlongs

a

. l'rue she did not break the record. She was only 2/5 above it.
1. DUNQUERQUE .... 114 lbs. Hon, J. D. oe tuaat But the day that any horse runs the 5% furlongs at the Garrison
2. CARDINAL 117 ibs. . Mr. J.W, Chandler, ey Crossley. i; less than 1,06, they can ship it back to England, as far as I am
. CARDINAL ........+ . I. W. ; oncertae.
Jockey Yvonet, ©°PCerne :
- " bide ail . : The next most outstanding performance for the day I thought
ime ie id Shhh 117 lbs. Mr. C..Barnard. Jockey Holder. was Notonite’s victory

PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $2.64. Place : $1.06, $1.08, $1.04

FORECAST : $9.72,

ALSO RAN : Seedling (117 lbs., Lutchman), May Day (117 Ibs,
Thirkell), Apronusk (117 lbs., Fletcher), Columbus (117 Ibs.,
Wilder),

START : Good.

WINNER : b.f. O.T.C.-Belledune,

TRAINER: Mr. J. W. Chandler.

"5th Race ; B.T.C, STAKES—Classes A & B Only—$1,100.00
($365.00, $185.00, $60.00) —9 Furlongs

in the Barbados Turf Club Stakes. A colt
wiho had a very modest beginning he has developed into a big,horse
with great possibilities. He might have been better at an earlier
stage of his career but for an unfortunate tendency towards the
proverbial dry coat which he developed on his visit in Trinidad last
June. Nevertheless Trinidad had a taste of his brilliance when in
spite of being sick he defeated the great Lupinus over six furlongs,
although it must be said, he was in receipt of much weight.

After that he was not seen to best advantage last November
and very wisely he was kept at home while the Christmas meeting
went on. With the cooler months upon us he has now benefited as
most of this kind usually do and at this meeting he has really blos-

FINISH : Close, Neck, 3 lengths

, somed out into a fine specimen. He won his race yesterday with

1 PROTON Te ii'essc ds 116 lbs. Mr. C, A, Pierce, consummate ease in the good time 1.554 for the. 9 furlongs and 14

: Jockey P, Fletcher, yards. In fact after Pat Fletcher gave him his head and passed

2. FIRBLADY ..:..... 108 lbs. Mr. S. A, mame £ sa them all around the four furlongs pole it was, more or less, a walk
ockey Lutchman, home for him. I cannot see him being easily beaten agai

3. REBATE .......... 127 lbs. Mr, M, E. R. Bourne. . a ee eee

meeting.

In this race both Fire Lady and Rebate ran well but while the
former had already raced over 74 furlongs on the same afternoon,
the latter looked as if she night have felt the going. The Jamaican
Derby winner Embers, who ran fourth, displayed some early pace
which was not expected by most of us, but she is obviously’ a bit
outclassed in this company.

Jockey Quested.
TIME : 1.654. PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $2.96. Place : $1.28, $1.78, $1,46
FORECAST : $16.44.
ALSO RAN : Landmark (117 Ibs. O’Neil), Slainte (120 lbs., Thirk-
ell), Gun Site, (130 lbs., Crossley), Embers (108 lbs. Belle).
START: Good. FINISH: Easy, 3 lengths, 1 length.
WINNER : br.c. Fairfax-Empress Josephine. The G die ig aah ‘ s eH
A ‘ cir 1e¢ Guineas was not the two-horse-race expected it to r
TRAINER : Mr, J. T. Fletcher. Cavalier I thought had a particularly good ride and was presented
with every opportuinty for winning the classic. But he failed at
‘he crucial moment when entering the stretch and Dunquerque, in |
he best traditions of the O.T.C. get, ran on stoutly to win from

: SPRING STAKES—Class © and Lower—s900.00
($300.00, $150.00, $50.00) —744 Furlongs

6th Race

her stable mate Cardinal by a neck. I was pleasantly surprised

1. DOLDRUM ..... 121 lbs. Mr. N. M, Inniss. Jockey Holder. with the way Cardinal ran while Seedling, who came fourth, also
2. SWEET ROCKET 126 lbs.. Mr. R. C, Gill. . Jockey Lutchmah. turned in a good performance for five furlongs.

LIN WARE i evice ty 126 bbs. Mr. K. D, Edwards.

Jockey Yvonet I do not believe that Dunquerque was one hundred per cent iit.

TIME : 1.34§. PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $4.76. Place : $1.70, $2.02, $2.04 But she won more or less how I thought she would and that was du

FORECAST : $18.24. to supe ce S She is pore a very a addition to the rank:

ATS er a re on ‘+ Noraimacar.5 ea y (120 of our ereoles and so far I give her a very high rating when com area

ALSO RAN : Water Cress (126 lbs., C1 a , ‘Tiberis Lad “" with her predecessors. With the Jamaican tide recsding we ve do

lbs., O'Neil), Dashing Princess (126 Ibs., Joseph Pieuxce with every bit of class in our classics,

Great pity of pities is it there
fore that I learn that Dunquerque is not entered for any of the Trini-
dad classics. We might have to wait until both are four years old

(130 lbs., Wilder), Arunda (121 lbs., Quested), Topsy (126
Newman).

keeps your hair right in

START : Good. FINISH ; Easy, 2 lengths, 1 length ?¢fore we see herself and Bright Light meeting again.
INER Vv. C Gal s : ;
WINNER : ch.f, Wyndham-Serenity. PRAINER : Hon, V. C, Gale { sincerely hope that after seeing fourteen horses start in ihe the picture FOU Spee, lustegua_ hale, use

7th Race: CREOLE STAKES—Class G and Lower—$600 ($200, _
$100, $40,)—5'. Furlongs.

iaiden Stakes that every single one of us is convinced that it is

Brylcreem !
the most unfair kind of horse-race that could be seen in any part of

For handsome,
healthy hair use Brylereem !





Brylereem makes your appearance
the rere I suggest that . member of the Turf Club be given a smart one wherever you go, whatever you do. Massage your
1. ROSETTE ....%... 114 Ibs. Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder, 4 pair of shoes two sizes too small for them and they will soon realise 4 : As - ; .
2s TRAE 0 4s calvean 135 lbs. Mr. J. D. Ifill. Jockey Quested, what a tight fit it is. I was most distressed, but not surprised, to see scalp with Brylereem wrere day and er how its pure oils and
3. TWINKLE .... 102 + 2 lbs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. Jockey Belle. a horse making off in the direction of Dayrell’s Road, which I after- tonic ingredients give your hair that vital, healthy look.
TIME: 1.094. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.30. Place: $1.26, $2.02, $2.50. wards learned was French Flutter. But.under the circumstances I Brylcreem controls the hair without excessive oiliness,
FORECAST: $7.92. > ie ve va a fine job ar be ped wey With both his life and because the oils in Brylercem are emulsified.
ALSO RAN: Gavotte (132 lbs., Crossley); Blue Diamond (135 Ib: he AMY urely this sort of thing cannot continue. That means clean grooming. ‘That means
Lutchman); Joan's Star (118 lbs., Yvonet); Cottage $105 9 Ib Looking around for something to finish off with, what could be} lasting hair health. Ask for Prylcreem,
O'Neil); Diadem (130 Ibs., Joseph); Vonwise (130 it Fletcher); more fitting than the performance of the half-bred Rosette.

Not
She made short shrift
and it was not surprising that she equalled the
class Over this distance. In fact her time was a 1/10

Billy Boy (133 lbs., John).
START: Good.
WINNER: 3-yr.-old h.b.

; the perfect hairdressing.
even the great Andy ever impressed me more.
yf her opponents

record for her

FINISH: Easy, 4 lengths, 1 length

FOR DAY-LONG SMARTNESS AND LASTING
ch.f. Burning Bow-Rosamond.





















with need for funds to NER ess but as the notice board deals in fifths of a second only I could HAIR HEALTH BRYLCREEM your HAIR
i A) iene wi ive TRAI > Hon. V. C. Gale. not have thi ut up. She is another who will be very hard to beat kine’
carry out these projects and it is hoped that all sportsmen will give the ze i. Tit dies vent, a By Be x u ¢ J SeTNT
3 , the rest of the e . one
venture their full support, fy nm pag i . g
Saas
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RESERVATIVE











SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952



B.L.A.C. Hangar Going Up At Seawell

(By Our Flying Correspondent)

The Barbados Light Aeroplane
Club is making rapid ‘strides. It
was only on August 10 last year
when a group of local flying en-
thusiasts met at Goddard’s Res-
taurant and forméd the Club.
These can truly be called “The
Pioneers.”

Ay that time these pioneers
knew not from whence the funds
would come. But they had ¢our-
age; they: were determined; they
did not overlook the smallest
problem and last but not least,
they anticlpated success,

Today we have the B.L.A.C.
constructing a hangar at Seawell.
Probably, tomorrow we may see
the arrival of an Auster Autocrat,
the type of plane which the Club
is expecting to use in the island.

To fail to mention the pioneers
would be an injustice They
were: Messrs. R. A. Beard, D.
Edghill, Jackie Marson Jnr., M.
Reingold, Stanton Toppin, R.
Inniss, R. Peterkin, C. i

Peterkin,
L. Chase, D. Malone, F. E. Miller, th

I. Corbin, S. E. L. Johnson, T. A.
L. Roberts, E. “Dipper” Barrow,
A. Jemmott, P. C. S, Maffei, E. A.
Reece, G. Butcher and Squadron
Leader Henderson.

Every Club, regardless of size,
encounters its difficulties in its
infancy and the B.L.A.C. was no
exception.

When the House of Assembly, a
little over a month ago, were con-
sidering a Bill to amend the Cus-
toms Tariff Act so as to exempt
among other items, aircraft and
aireraft Spare parts from the pay-
ment of customs duty, Mr. O. T.
Allder, Senior Member of St.
John, said: “The Flying Club is
a club that should not be assisted.
It is a club which exist to pro-
duce a little sport for a few.”

In my opinion Mr. Allder knew
nothing about the Club.

Fortunately Mr. E. W. Barrow
and Mr, F. E. Miller, two pioneers
of the Club, were present and
were able to deny these mislead-
ing allegations. They knew that
the Club was opened to anyone
who wanted to join, flying or non-

flying member. The Bill was
eventually passed.

Meeting
« Lhe inaugural meeting of the
Club was held at 8.0U p.m. on
Wednesday, January 16 at the

Chamber of Commerce when the
Memorandum of Association and
the Articles of Association were
approved.

Mr. A. R. Toppin, a prominent
businessman in the City, , was
elected first President of the Club
with Mr, Robert Peterkin as Sec-
retary. The Committee of Man-
agement comprises of Mr. Wood
Goddard, Chairman, Mes:rs,
‘Robert Peterkin, Jackie Marson,
Stanton Toppin, Lance Jordan,
Freddie Miller, “Dipper” Barrow,
Denis Malone and Morton Rein-
gold.

Two sub-committees within the
Committee of Management were
also formed, one for the purpose
of investigating the cost and im-
mediate erection of a hangar at
Seawell, and the other to deliver
a series of Lectures to other mem-
bers of the Club on such subjects
as the “Theory of Flight” and
other related subjects. The lec-
turers in this series are: Stanton
Toppin, Denis Malone, ‘Dipper’
Barrow, Squadron Leader Hen-
derson and Wood Goddard.

The process of having the com-
pany registered in accordance
with the requirements of the Com-
panies Act, 1910, is being looked
after by Messrs. Barrow and
Malone and it is hoped that this
will be completed in the near

future,
Drop Ltd.

Application has been made to
His Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee for permis-
sion to drop the word “ ited”
in the name of the Club. The
Company is limited by personal
guarantee not exceeding $48 in the
case of flying members and one
shilling in the case of non-flying
members,

The job of preparing plans and
estimates of the cost of erecting
the hangar fell to Messrs. John-
son, Miller and C. G. Peterkin and
Mr. Johnson undertook to con-
struct a scale model of the pro-
posed hangar.

Mr. C. H. Roberts of the firm of
Cole & Co. gave the Club two
steel sections for the roof and
the track for the sliding doors; in
addition he has volunteered to
make the necessary changes to the

steel sections to provide a 45-foot {n furthering this venture.”

“If you're

And can't





THIS is the type of ‘plane which is expected to arrive from England

for the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club.

Span nich will be the width of
e

Mr... Peterkin placed his know-
ledge of land surveying at the dis-
posal of the Committee in laying
out the site for the h , pre-
paring plans and supervising the
work of erecting the wallaba

poles.
Site

The site of the hangar was
agreed upon in collaboration with
Mr. Henderson, Airport Manager,
acting on behalf of Government.
Mr. Henderson also offered sug-
gestions. It was estimated that the
cost of the hangar would be in
the vicinity of $1,900 and $2,000.

At a meeting on January 16 it
was agreed to accept the offer re-
ceived by cable from the Auster
Company of a used “Autocrat”
three seater aircraft, similar to
the one which was recently flown
up to the island by two members
of the Trinidad Flying Club. The
cost of this aircraft is £610 and the
Club immediately cabled its ac-
ceptance.

Shortly afterwards the Club re-
ceived a cable informing them
that the shipping charges had been
increased by £90 to £380, and ask-
ing that a letter of credit be open-
ed in London for £1,000, This was
done. Since then the Club has
received another letter stating
that the plane will soon be ship-

d.
Peat present the membership of
the Club stands at 33 flying and
17 non-flying but there are many
others who have stated their
intentions to join. .

At the invitation of the Commit-
tee of Management Mr. J..A. Skin-
ner consented to accept the Hon-
orary position .of Vice-President.
Mr. Skinner’s contribution in the
field of aviation in Barbados is
well known. He was the first per-
son to construct an aeroplane lo-
cally. The comments of experi-
enced aviators who saw this plane
were favourable.

Invaluable

Of Mr, A. R. Toppin, the Club
will derive inyaluable _ benefit
from his ability and experience in
business circles, He will advise
the Club on matters of a commer-
cial nature.

The unsolved problem of fin-
ance still faces the Club. Up to the
present, the receipts from sub-
scriptions, donations and the danct
amounted to $4,830 of which
$4,800 was used to open the letter
of credit in London. There is now
needed to meet expenses in build-
ing the hangar, insurance and
other incidental items required to
put the aircraft in the air, ap-
proximately $3,000.

To meet this expense members
feel that the membership should
be substantially increased and
hope to find many more public-
spirited persons who are willing
to follow the excellent example
set by Mr. berts.

The Barbados Light Aeroplane
Club provides young men and
women with a flair for flying, an
opportunity to indulge in a healthy
form of recreation and at the same
time improve their knowledge.
Then they are thase who may
wish to make flying a profession.
To them the ery is afford-
ed to stud e elementary prin-
ciples of Aviation at a compara-
tively low cost, and in times of
emergency there are many uses to
which an aeroplane can be put.

“The Committee of Management
appeals to all those who can to
assist in any way they think fit,

on your back

get a nap

Through a pain in the back,
Use FIERY JACK,

It'll never come back.”

On Sale at all leading Chemists

— Frank 8. Armstrong

lid., Agents





cal power in this cipprery: w
rich, pa. blood and Iiterally nee

Sports Window

HARRISON COLLEGE who
defeated Everton two-nil on
Friday afternoon at their
school grounds will be meet-
ing Notre Dame at Kensing-
ton Oval to-morrow after-
noon in a First Division
football match. This game
should be Sonpresng.
Other First ivision
matches for the week are
Tuesday, March 4—Everton
vs. Carlton. \
Referee L. F_ Harris,
Linesmen O. Robinson
and W. Hoyos.
Friday, March 7 — Spartan
vs. Harrison College.
Referee G. Amory, Lines-
men D. Archer and A.
Parris.
Division Two
Tuesday, March 4.
vs. Notre Dame
Referee D. Archer
Wednesday, March 5. Spar-
tan ys. Carlton
Referee O. Graham.
Friday, March 7. Empire ys
Everto’

m
Referee K. Walcott.
Division Three
Tuesday, March 4. College
vs. Pickwick Rovers at
College.
Referee L. King
e vs. Foundation Old



Empire

L
Boys at Lodge.
eferee H. King.
Regiment vs, Everton at
rison.

eferee D. Wilson.
Wanderers vs. Y.M.C.A. at

the Bay.
Reterce F. Edwards
Wednesday, March 6.
Foundation vs, Carlton
* at Foundation.
Referee H. King.
Combermere Old Boys vs.
Rangers at Combermere.
Referee O. Robinson.
Cable & Wireless vs. Com-
bermere at Boarded
Hall.
Referee R. Parris.
Notre Dame vs. Police at
the Bay.
Referee C. Roachford.
Friday, March 7. Lodge vs.
College at Lodge.
Referee A, omas.
Regiment vs. Foundation
Old Boys at Garrison
Referee R,. Hutchinson.





Racing Resu

SUNDAY

Results Of 2/-
Field Sweep



ADVOCATE



Chats on Swimming:

The Crawl:

Leg Movement
Bly IAN GALE

let



As usual,













PAGE FIVE



| MAR, 2 NO. 213 Nice to be

| The Topic
| of in his shoes |

| Last W

eek




















ig start on land |
Lie on you omach on a bed or
Prise FEE BAGS Amount |& padded stool, gripping with your
Pirst 1785 $is459|hands to prevent over balancing. |
Second pve = 8 The legs simply flail up and
a, | 26.37 |} GOWN, passing and repassing each
Fitth 1188 meiother, the knees being kept
th 1762 no! leh } ~ 9 “> Pac .
"55.00 each to holders of Tickets > ny yy a - ee
1784, 1786. 0077, Q078, 1723, 1785, | mm Grape é oe
1019. and then rises again, as its fellow
SECOND RACE descends
Rie oe After you have become more}
Shcond Tes }.| proficient, the details of the move- |
Third 84 ment may be adjusted. First the
Fourth . feet t be turned inward, so
ak too} that wk the toes tend to brush
Seventh 10 agaimst each other, the heels are |
Bighth 10 everal inches apart. Also, the feet) 35... Goss:
oe 10 must be kept pointed all the time, | joo nails Notre tf
Eleventh is if you were walking on tiptoe. | Those chaps that eat ched Bread
Twelfth 10 \ slight suppleness of the, Knees | Sandwiched with Goc 's hant
Thirteenth 10 . a ’ radually f- iy :
Fourteenth 2326 106 ee may. be gi ih. a3 |W fe ON eS ee ee
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets N ‘ Np oth ow aie '
1791, 1798, 2408, 2410, 0488, 0490, 1 j bast year we praised the “bay bx
1729. | ae icked it into fame
THIR ce
Prize Heat Amon.) - boys don't be offended
First 6: 3} | We t
Second 1454 269 ‘ We x é t tit
Third og 131 | We ed
Fourth 1582 6
Fifth 214 ul | rr t
Sixth 3395 10 | Te
Seventh 2877 War} ) We jaht dow tt ‘ \
Eighth 0256 10.00 | tA ost left t « b frig?
Ninth 15% 10.06 |
$6.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos. | | 7 pour tall mt Sparta
2679, 2681, 1453, 1455, 0118, 0120, 158! Claimed a tiants bold
1583 You're lowered to-day by thre pe
FOUR ce For Empire scored the goal
Prize oa Amoun! } °
First 0056 $470. i The dressed-up rouge-up damse
Second 3268 268 | Were disappointed; ves
Third 3202 is44 To blame the full-back Bowe
Fourth 0702 Gr.2 Fo jng ha me
Fifth 2464 10.00 |
Sixth 2633 10.06 1 The tried ¢ blame the referec
Seventh 2446 10.00 be ‘ Bt nid thes tallad to sae
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets No It is important to preserve & Pint itue vet aaron nee
0035, 0057, 3267, 3269, 3201, 3203, O70: | Strong sense of rhythm, so that the! poh) love Robie
0703 ae aes thrash is even and of unvaried .
F E speed 1A winger played a sal
A ; | a
Erise Thess jae72| Now, into the water. But do| Corer UE ik’ don tbaniaet
Second 0351 28.1 {not forget to take a surf board or}. sy fans loee one. all
ae Ho ON some other float to hold on to.
Fitth oats too {ASsume a horizontal position anc} Another centre forward
Sixth 1509 10.00 |Start to kick. Let the legs thrash | Befor
Seventn eck a’ asia i uhies 40.00 smeothly up and down, no more | We. eee iM
: each to holgers 0: gkets Nos-\than the heels breaking the gur-|° +
1 3, 0350, 0352, 1827, 1829, 209% aking 8 | F
2002: = ™ i =F face, As before, feet pointed and ‘hovie danced “mabe jamba Leek for this green lobe!
aIEEy RACE turned inward, ankles and knees eo through the. pecond ball Your Guarantee of
Prize icket Amount i 4 Ar . . i au erted look Spartan noodles
First 0400 $449.43 sue at bas but a ny supple And kill herself with laugh satiefoction
Second 0591 igo (ater on. Now, with the wate) :
Third sat 192.61 | resistance you will find that kick | A preacher with a blue flag
a Bd a ing is a far different matter from | And wiih 4 sig voice :
t 00 “, ny} cri play up '’EBmpire play up
Sixth 2510 tooo the land practice. The legs will | rn Py ejoiee
Seventh 0836 10.00 Ot only keep the body in a hari- ° ;
Eighth 0818 10.00 zent4l, positign but will also push | ‘rnen giants turned to weaklings
Ninth 0837 100] you slowly along. Put plenty of | And this Lou wisely said
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos Vigour into the kick th ha} Robert these young footballers
0399, 0401. 0590, 0592, 0536, 0538, 1207,)¥/gour into the Kick, so that tha) Mi Ve i rtched Bread ‘ >
1209 wares swirls strongly about your |!*°ket,!) & Bs Enriched Brand JOVYANCE
SEVENTH RACE ect. Well Friday in the College
First “—— eect At first you will find this ex- ! Schoo! boys and oid men pny
> . ‘cis very tir i4 |} The College toyed with Everton | i aa
Second ts... 2e7..u }ereise yery tiring. But keep it} The py ad | loyance' is probably the most
Third 1hr9 143.69 (up, and make it a rule in futurg| 4°4 "ad things their own way Joya p y
Fourth 0757 71.34/to do five minutes of kicking] another Herman Griffith | famous children's sandal in the world
sixth teas iD ct every time you go to the sea be<]} Appears now in this land } .
Seventh 0922 10.00 | fore actually doing any swimming. Gee mip = ar Lg sacea } today. It is sim and sturdily made from
Eighth 07 10.00 | After a while you will be able nen he grows up 4 an
y ) ij | strong, supple leather 1 thick plantation crepe-
nae, 1194 0 « to discard the float, and breathe! syyiii is » rising goalie | 8 PP ’ P P P
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets No» | by giving a strong downward pull] Joe satd; tm this decade | rubber. Its design a hape was the result of a
0249, 0251, 1872, 1874, 1378, 1980, 0750, | With the arm on the side on which | You'll see him next few seasons | a , :
0758; oe you have chosen to breathe, turn~ | Put Cover th the shade scientific survey of hundreds of children’s feet. It's a
. BIGUTH RACE ing the head at the same time. | young boys will eat Enriched Bread aaa
‘rize Ticket Amount : iy pt : f lovely sandal.
First 0904 $480 27 These are the common faults in| To be bright football stars
Second 0045, 274 44|the leg movement, First; frequent. | The old Mi ge a plying .
need 4 wrt tiy the legs are too much bent at} 4"? swoy 2
é
ritth 3222 7 1009 |}the knees and at the ankles. In sponsored by |
Sixth 1306 iond}such a case tihe thigh, pulled up
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos.|/under the body, or the calf of the R BAKERIES |
; o Pi | :
Sp Se eo. Se: 0179, 0181, 149, leg as it is bent back, and the J&
- NINTH RACE reais feet furnish retarding sur~ makers of |
Prize ket Amount | faces. $ Rey D A L $
Fm ci 1227 = '8) Second; Often the feet ave lift- ENRICHED BREAD A
Secon . - . 7
Third 2 142 53 }e Out of the water with consid~-
Fourth 2812 71.26 | erable splash, They should come and the blenders of |
Fifth 0059 1000} just to the surface of the water, STREET a T. ENGLANI
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos, rf ti tside tk ater J & R RUM MADE BY C, & J. CLARK LIMIT 9, 5 1 ®
1226, 1298, 2889, 2801. 2862, 2004, gait, |10" foot motion outside the water
2813. ‘ee ae , ‘lis completely wasted as far ag the |} ¥ LOCAL AGENTS: A\!

lis From Page 4

CASTLE GRANT STAKES—Class D and Lower—$900,

($300, $150, $50)—714 Furlongs.

8th Race:

1. USHER 111 lbs
2. MARY ANN ...... 127 Ibs.
3. CROSS BOW ...... 130 Ibs.
TIME: 1.35}.

FORECAST: $8.04.

Mr. M. E. R, Bourne.
Jockey Quested
Mr, F. E. C. Bethell.

Jockey Yvonet
Mr. C. Barnard.

ALSO RAN: Colleton (115 lbs., Crossley); Oatcake (130 Ibs., O’Neil)

Apollo (115 lbs., Fletcher).
START: Good.

FINISH: Close, % length, 1 length.

WINNER: b.g. Dunusk-Maid of Honour.

TRAINER: Owner.

9th Race: DALKEITH STAKES—Classes A & B Only—$1,100,
($365, $185, $60)—515 Furlongs,

1. YASMEEN ........ 118 lbs.

2. HARROWEEN ...'. 183 lbs.
3. PEPPER WINE .... 120 lbs.
TIME: 1.06. PARI-MUTUEL:

FORECAST: $14.76.

ALSO RAN: Belle Surprise (102 1
Wilder).
START: Good.
WINNER: b.f. Watling Street-Yasn

TRAINER: Owner.



t

American Doctor’s Discovery
Strengthens Blood, Nerves,
Body, Memory, Brain, Mus-
cles, and Endurance—Better
Than Gland Operations.

Thanks to the discovery of an Americo
Dortor, it is now possibl if those why
{eel prematurely old, un-down an:
Worn-ovt, to experience again the thrill o!
Youthful Vigour, Ambition, and Vitality
This great discovery, which is a simple
home treatment and can be used secret!
by anyone, quickiv brings « sutplus of vi-

Sass

of Mle.

No longer is it necessary for you to suffer
from Loss of Vigour and Man . Wea
Memory and Body, Nervottsness, ite
| Blood, Bickly Skin, Depression: ant ir
Sleep, Instead you spares Cane this simple

home treatment # few days a: ‘ou will
find that your vigour, is t-
ter what ise age, you

gland activity and nerve force is incre:
snd restored. You will find youth i-
hieh as,
ir

body tingle with new energy ahd
This simple home trestasent is io pleasant

an

rasy-ta-take tablet in id fer bere
it is Tar bet!

ho have used It sa:
than any other me
Works in 24 Hours

This new medical discovery, knoWn as
Vi-Tebs, has been tested usands io
America and has ach results that
seem almost miraculous has ton:
obstinate cases that had id alt other
treatment, It has rescued tl ang trom
premature old age and debility It has
made older mn as $334 new. It has
brought happiness be. prite totheu-
sands who believed that y Were Old.

worn-out, and finished with the joys of
life And the beauty of this re-
markable distovery ts that

is brings results so
quickly
you can

1a 24 hours

Se and feel

@ tremendous im-
4 provement and within
one week it will literal-

Vi-Tabs

Doctors Praise

@ Doctors in America and |
in wieny other countries






tality and an ability to enjoy the pleasures |

festored. No mal

Taecse ta tomate |

fal physi- |
Rul

Mr. K. D, Edwards.

Jockey Newman
Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Joseph.
Hon. J. D, Chandler.

Jockey Crossley.

Win: $2.18. Place: $1.64, $2.34.

bs., Lutchman); Demure (123 lbs.,

FINISH: Easy, 3 lengths, % length.

a,

_ Glands Made Adive and Youthful
Vigour Restored in 24 Hours

} too gay that the Vi-Tebs
formula is marvelous
for those who are old
belore their time, Run-
$74. AL Brat
‘or instance, Dr T A
Bilis, of

“Not on!

rently wrote
does this formula en
| tich the blood supply of
ikewise activates the
inne System This is
ed by renewed en-
efgy and ambition. par-
tieulatly gratifyi: t




'
t
wrote. “Tired-

ies sorely need
cueet,2 uence
works ils splendia
is neives and

ite, rings greater
nhetvous, rn-down

upken
@ ¢stablished system
tis formula, “hich
is upon the bicod,
improves
strength to Weak,
people”

Guaranteed To Work

Vi-Tebs are not an S=periment This
tiple home treatment, which can be used
with absolute secrecy. is the prescription
f ap American doctor It is amazingly
Oe end ts giving new youth, vital-
ity, and energy to millions in America Be-
cause of its remarkable sucetrs, Vi-Teos
are Dow distributed by chemists here un-
der & guarantee of complete satisfaction
For this reason you sho net experiment
with Questionable drugs which may be
drastic and pilav AY the delicate gland
and nervous system. Vi-Tebs not only have
proved their sterling worth by hely
millions of sufferers, but are guaranteed !n
your own particular case Put Vi-T,
the test. See for yourself how much
er, stronger, NG more vigourous y
feel with this doctor's prescriptior
Tebs must bring y
rey. atid vitality,
Lory of You sim
age an

vi-
ou @ new feeling of #1
and be entirely satistar
y return the empty pack
it costs nothing under the guar-
You are the sole judge of your own

A_®




d lasts
eight deys. As the guarantee fully protects
you, you should grt your treatment imme-
diately s0 that you foo wll know wh.

Vi-Tabs .2):':

years younger
Restores Manhood



is
7

and full of vigour
and vitality

and Vitality

swimming process is concerned,
and naturally makes the other
foot go deeper and therefore re-
ist more water, in order to have
hody balance,

And lastly, too wide a kick re-
tards the forward movement of the
hody. To make sure that you are
not kicking too wide, make it a
practice at first to let your big
toes brush lightly as they pass
each other,

Jockey Holder. |
PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.78. Place: $1.40, $1.94. |

°

COMMONWEALTH
MEETS MERLYN

| .The Commonwealth Sports
{Club will juay a friendly fix-
‘ture against Merlyn to-day
jat Merlyn grounds, St. James.
The truck will
|Road at 12 noon and players are
asked to be on time,
start at 1 p.m. punetually.
The teams are as follows: —
Commonwealth Sports Club
Graham

{

5, E. W. Barrow,
M.C.P., J . Tudor, Jnr.,
Brereton, B, K. Bowen, J, Lorde,
|E. Eleock, C. Perkins, C. Clarke.
St. C. Blackman, C, Sandiford
| D. Agard, (12th man).

} io L, Best (capt.),
Byer, H, Cumberbatch, V.
L, Reid, T. Taitt, A, Richards, E
Greaves, L.
A. Walcott,

J

Flying Ducks !

Blue Birds

All Wall

POOLE

A

0

Bolton Laae

Phone 3909

and









leave Tweedside |

Play will}

J."
E.'

Todd, |

Hope, G. Bridgeman

Seagulls !

Select Your Favourite Set Early

Louis L.




' Getting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

f up night



ourning sensa |
Whitish discharge, |
wh \t base of spine, g«
, Dervousne
of manly vi
vdinoase oF the
Gland Ca most
in men)
n a4

aul



and w

our are

‘rostate

important sex gland

Co Overcome these troubles

hours and quickly restore
sour and healtt
lentific disedvery

o matter how tong

« Rogeng guare

h Clnvigorate

Hand and make

20 r unger oft

flog Hemist

and

| ane,



tuke the new

ealled Rogena.
mu have suf
nteed to
your Vros
you feel 10 to
oney back. Get
The

|
|
|




@ Baby revels inthe
saet ie echt of
Soap It comb;
emollient ang medicioa
which kee:

| Meader akin healthy end )
free from blemishes, ex-
quisitely softand velvety.




4 before you bath -
before you dress -

ANDREWS

tor Inner Cleanliness!







! Do you wake up in the morning
feeling fitand cheerful, or are you
dull and irritable? It all depend
on Inner Cleanliness !

A morning glass of sparkling
Andrews ensures this /imer Clean
by
and tongue, settling the stomach, |
toning up the and
clearing away food wastes

in

POTTERY

Plaques liness freshening the mouth

liver zently
A teaspoonful in a glass of water
makes a grand “ refresher ”, too.

DO YOU KNOW that your digestrve juices are extremely
| acid and may be over-stimulated by highly seasoned food ?
i Unless your diet contains sufficient alkali to neutralise this

;

i) excess acid you then develop heartburn and indigestion, At
T }| such times the antacid qualities of Andrews are invaluable
if Sparkling Andrews corrects digestive disorders and ensures
B Hi Inner Cleanliness
ayl i
yley |
f 4
i
Aquatic Club Gift Shop
—- Phone 4897
\
Y}
ny
(
_





SS

(
\







ee

SEWING

By PENNY NOLAN

New Slips From Old
This year’s full skirted styles
ill for still full petticoats and
slips. These, of course, you can
make from scratch but consider-
able saving can be effected by re-
naking some of your old straight
ingerie

If you have a slim slip which
is still good you can quickly make
it into a full flounced skirt by add-
ing gathered tiers of some stiff
fabric. If your slip is nylon the
ideal material is matching nylon
net if it is available. However,
any crisp lightweight cloth will do.

You will need two strips about
hree yards long and twelve to fif-
een inches wide, These, of course,



maybe pieced ag necessary. The
width of the material will govern
the quantity required. Remove
ce or trim from bottom of slip
nd roll hem

Measure the width of your slip
| eight inches up from the hemline
| and gather one strip to fit this
|measure, Sew this flounce on to
| the using narrow satin ribbon to
| cover the gathered raw edges.

Next measure width of slip ten



inches above first flounce and
gather second flounce to fit this
measure. Finish gathered edge

| with satin ribbon like the first.
Coshmere Bouquet’s gentle A slim taffeta slip can be trans-
taihet hasbeen proved out- ‘ formed into a bell silhouette of
standingly mild for oll types CG : | three gathered ters with a yard
, i 1 : | of inexpensive taffeta and about
} of skin! fout and a half yards of cording.
|A black, navy or dark coloured
taffeta slip can be made very at-
| tractive by using a plaid taffeta

for the bottom and top tiers.

Cut the slip at the hipline being
Wr) Tae iey ele careful to make an even cut, It
ok is best to chalk this line on the
slip when you have it on, as bias
slips hang so differently on the
body. Use a yard stick measuring
from the floor up as for a hem,
The material cut off from the bot-

a 7"

Adarns yoy





eae ea A At











5 tom of the slip will make the
jmiddle tier, Cut it in strips eight
| or nine inches deep.

The yard of new taffeta will
e a7 a make the top and bottom tier.

| What’s Cooking

This week I am going to give
you recipes on how to make cus-
| tards.
Custard For Filling
| Sugar, 3 tablespoonsful.
| Egg Yolks, 3.
| Flour, 3 tablespoonsful,
| Lemon rind or vanilla essence.
Butter, 1 teaspoonful,
| Milk, 1 pint.

Put the egg yolk anl the —
in a saucepan, mix with a wooden
spoon then add the flour (the flour

| should be the best cake flour) and

EAU-DE-COLOGNE
Cool, Fragrant, Refreshing

the lemon rind or 4 teaspoonful
of vanilla essence. Put the milk
in another saucepan and put it
| on the fire, when it is almost boil-
| ing, pour it over the eggs, sugar
iand flour a little at a_ time,
mix it slowly with an egg
beater or a whip. When you have
| poured all the milk, put the sauce-
{pan on the fire and stir all the
{time until the custard is thick,
{When the custard starts to boil
‘let it boil for about 3 or 4 minutes
so that you won't taste the flour
when it is finished. Pour it in a
pyrex bowl or any other kind of
}bowl and add the teaspoonful of
butter. Stir it from time to time
so that it will not have a skin qn
the top, This custard is too thick
for anything but filling.

| 1. If you want a custard allo
COLD CREAM Zabaione, make the same custard
HAIR CREAM as above and when you pour it

-BROADCLOTH FA -
\

uy 4
e / ; 7

A N\

-By BOURJOIS

FACE PUWDL» ~§ LIOUGE PEX FUME LIPSTICK
TALC * VANISHING CREAM - SOAP * BRILLIANTINE



by

\






EASY TO SEW

{ AT SUCH LOW COST, TOO!
iio X



Watch the excitit.g stripes and
comfortable. cool wear of ‘’Tex-made"’
Raleigh Print Broadcloth please the men
and boys in your family' You’l) like the
easy sewing and washing Raleigh is

_ amooth in texture and unusually durable
* |». ideal for shirts. and blouses. in
addition to pyjamas. The low cost will surprise you!

{Try Broadcloth by ‘“Tex-made” today Women everywhere are buying it. Be
gure to ask for the identification bands and tag—your assurance of genuine
tub-fast “’Tex-made”’ Broadcloth.

¢

oe
»

FABRIC

DOMINION TEXTILE CO. LIMITED
. MONTREAL ~ CANADA






‘*TEX-MADE”’
iS WELL MADE

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



IRCLE Whe ‘Taming’

Make the top tier about eight
inches deep and the bottom tier
about nine inches deep, To achieve
graduated fullness each strip must
be cut fifteen inches longer than
the preceding one.

Gather the tiers and join them
together inserting cording in each
tier to make it stand out. Then
join the tiers to the slip top using
cording here also. Hem the bot-
tom tier.

If the top of the slip is worn
you may cut it off at the waist
and add an elastic band to make
it into a full petticoat.

An old cotton night gown with
a straight skirt can be made into
a crinolined petticoat. Cut the
skirt part of the night gown into
four gores. Make the top of each
‘gore one fourth of your waist
measure plus seam allowances.
Make the bottom of each gore two
and one half times the width of
the top of the gore. Cut four
crinoline bands eight inches deep
to the shape of the bottom of the
gores allowing one fourth inch for
seams. In shaping the crinoline
gores allow for a hem on the petti-
coat gores to be turned under and
hemmed to the underside of the
crinoline, This hem will cover the
raw lower edge of the crinoline
Join the crinoline gore seams flat
and cover the joins with bias tape.

You will need a six inch deep

ruffle edge with two and a. half
inch eyelet trim to sew under the
crinoline to prevent scratching
You may be able to piece this
ruffle out of the left overs of the
gown or you may have to buy new
material.
' Stitch the top edges of the
crinoline and ruffle to the under
side of the slip with the crinolin®
in the middle. Use bias tape to
cover the raw edges. Hem the
_— of the slip over the crino-
ne,

Always look twice before you

discard a garment because the
styles have changed. If the mate-
rial is still good with a little

imagination you may be able to
make something very attractive
and useful from it.

In The Kitchen

out into the pyrex bowl add 1
liquer glass of sweet vermouth or
rum, '

2. If you want a chocolate cus-
tard filling, melt two tablespoons-
ful of grated chocolate( not milk
chocolate) thus: Put the chocolate
in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon-
ful of water or milk, keep the
saucepan near the fire until the
chocolate is melted. When you
have made q_custard as above be-
fore taking the saucepan off the
fire add the melted chocolate, stir
it in the custard and pour into a
pyrex bowl. Put always the
vanilla essence and NOT the
lemon rind when you want a cho-
colate custard.

. English Custard

Ege yolks, 5.

; as Sugar 5 tablespoons-
ul.

Milk, 1 pint.

Orange or Lemon rind or vanilla
essence, (You can put 1 oz. of
cornflour; and 4 glass of cream
that you can add with the other
milk instead of 4 glass of milk.)

This custard is without any

flour and is especially good for
children, as it is very light and
nourishing,
_ Put the egg yolks and the sugar
in saucepan and mix with a
wooden spoon until they are light
anifrothy. Put the milk in an-
other saucepan and put it on the
fire. When the milk is almost
boiling, pour it a little at a time
on the eggs and sugar and work
the mixture with the spoon, Put
the saucepan with the custard on
the fire and stir it all the time. Be
very careful that it does not boil,
when you see that it has started to
thicken, take the saucepan off the
fire, add the vanilla essence or the
lemon rind and let it cool. If you
want to add the cream you have
to add it when you take the sauce-
pan off the fire. In that case you
put } glass of milk less at first and
then add the } glass of cream.

I find it better to add 1 oz
(about 1 level desertspoonful) of
cornflour to the eggs and the sugar
will not fail.



a’

PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel

Of The
Jungle Girl

WHO WED AT 13

ual
By ROBERT GLENTON
BERGEN-OP-ZOOM (Holland).

THE little Mother Superior with
the apple-wrimkled face put a
finger to her lips and opened a
door on the first floor of the con-
vent of St. Francis in the Dutch
market town of Bergen-Op-Zoom.

There in the front row of a class
of 40 girls a child was sewing a
seam in her father’s pyjama
jacket.

She looked about ten. Yet little
more than a year ago the world’s
headlines were calling her a jungle
bride and pictures of her, sultry
in a sarong, with hair about her

shoulders, were in every news-
paper.

You remember her? Bertha
Maria Hertogh was married

when she was thirteen to a twenty—
three-year-old Malay school
teacher. She had been handed
over as a child to the care of a
Malay nurse, Che Aminah, in 1942
when her Dutch parents were
fleeing from the Japanese.

She was baptised a Cxtholic,
but was brought up in a jungle
village as a Moslem. Seventeen
people died in the Singapore riots
when the court decided she should
return to her parents in Holland.

How Could She Settle?

Bertha came back to her
parents’ council house in Bergen-
op-Zoom and psychiatrists shook
their heads, A girl with such 4
background would find it impos-
sible to settle in peaceful, quietly
civilised Holland.

One who offered six to four
against successful rehabilitation
of Bertha Hertogh was Mayo Win-
gate, the psychologist who, writ-
ing in the Sunday Express,
pointed out his hospitality of a girl
—torn from the arms of her foster
mother—to the parents she had
not seen for ten years .. . lan-
guage troubles ... the fact that
she was a married woman who
had once more to become a little
girl.

This is a progress report on
the way Mrs. Adeline Hertogh
faced her problem daughter.

I talked to Mrs. Hertogh in the
kitchen of her home. “There are
no more worries about Bertha”,
she said. ‘She’s a good girl and
we are all happy together. But I
will say that it has been very
hard work.”

Ignored Her Father

When Bertha arrived at Bergen
she would speak to no one but
her mother.

She glared at her brothers and
sisters. She ignored her father.

She complained about the food,
potatoes, meat, bread, sausages,
and cheese her family live on, de-
manding rice with every meal.
Mrs. Hertogh gave in,

Then Bertha started talking to
her slyly behind her hand, and
always in Malay, which Mrs. Her-
togh understands. But she never
disclosed her innermost thoughts.

There were many questions,
particularly about her “marriage”,
to which Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh

wanted an answer.

One day the answers came—
like this,

3ertha sleeps in the same bed
as her sisters, Wiesje, aged 17,
and Corry, 16.

And at night she would tell
them about life in Malaya: “IL
never really lived the life of a
married woman,” she said. “I

just got married and then was
taken back to Aminah’s house.”

So began Bertha’s rehabilita-
tion,

Last March on her birthday her
parents gave her a piece of pat-
terned fabric and some skeins of
gay embroidery silk.

Bertha was so happy. She
clutched the silks, and kissed her
mother. But still she ignored her
father,

One month later Police Chief
Van T. Hof was in the house

F @ on page?







By Dorothy Barkley

LONDON.

Fashion’s latest epidemic, which
broke out this week at the collec-
tion of a leading designer, and is
rapidly infecting everyone, is the
tartan evening jacket,

Its style is perfectly simple: it
has upstanding collar, long sleeves,
collar and cuffs trimmed with
black braid, and it buttons down
as far as the miniature basque. It
was most effective in “Black
Watch” tartan taffeta, (note for
Sassenachs: a black and green
plaid), worn over a white evening
gown, cuffed round the decollet-
age with matching tartan. The
dress skirt fell in four tiers, each
edged with a crinkling of white
lace.

This type of jacket is useful on
a hundred and one occasions.
Wear it by day over a beach dress,
at night over an evening dress.
Tartan is just one suggestion for
material. In gossamer fine silk
surahs or shantungs, it is ideal for
warm climates, In wool ‘or quilt-
ed satin, it is perfect for cold
climates. Another version of the
evening jacket in coffee coloured
satin, embedded with sequins,
was worn with an evening dress
in coffee ne. over dusky pink
taffeta. This little evening jacket
is a welcome change from the
stole which has been the univer-
sal evening wrap in the past few
years,

A second fashionable top is this
season’s version of the cocktail
blouse, for wear with suit or skirt.
It has low shoulder line, plung-
ing neck and three-quarter length
sleeves. With a grey or black
suit the fashionable colour ta
choose is dusky pink, and the ma-
terial is shantung. The blouse is
draped and fastens unusually on
the side seam with a row of
penny-size buttons.

Reflecting the current vogue for
fullness, skirts in this collection
by. Cavanagh, (who formerly
worked with Molyneux), were
gathered, crinolined or pleated.
Pleats were everywhere — half-
inch box pleats on skirts, on dress
bodices to match skirts, and in
groups placed at four-inch inter-
vals round the skirt. Yellow, grey
and navy, trimmed with white,
were the colours featured in the
collection. Illustrated is a typical
dress in lemon yellow shantung:
it has unusual neck with roll col-
lar dipping down to a V-line
pleated yoke to match the pleated
skirt, which billows out over a
stiffened petticoat.

Colourful prints dominated the

@ On Page 15








oe

LEFT: Cocktail blouse in dusky
shoulder line.

with black braid trimming on



| tightness and pain behind the eyes. They
| bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy,
congested feelings, at the same time soothing
the nerves and counteracting depression.
The aches and pains of ’Flu disappear in
no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly
and safely. They neither harm the heart
| nor upset the stomach. Keep a supply of
PHENSIC tablets by you always.

BRING QUICK

Phensic *=

FOR ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS,
LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA




ve ‘
that
eUMAT! ty
gion inputs





TWO TABLETS





4



MARCH 2, 1952



collar and cuffs,

BELOW: Lemon yellow shantung
dress with pleating on yoke to
match pleating on crinoline
skirt.

shantung, with low

Tartan evening jacket





Mile. Bettina, beautiful
Paris model and cover giri,

loves Lip Line .. . it makes
chonging from one refill
edlour to another so simple
«++ 80 quick... so clean



Gala's fashion-right colours are the newest rave among models

in the great Paris and London dress houses ... for Gala colours

are perfectly keyed to the latest dress shades .. . and Lip Line
allows lip colours to be changed quickly and cleanly, as each re-

fill, contained in its own metal shell, is inter-





LIP LINE
changeable in the same case.

NAIL ¢ COLOUR

And there’s a glistening Nail Colour to
match every Lip Colour

GALA OF LONDON ,

Sole Agent and Distributor : ff

F.S. NICHOLLS, P.O, BOX 263 Alsoobsainable fromall the leading Scores



SUNDAY, MARCH, 2, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

“Wasp-Waisted Country Clothes” = Man About Town

PAGE SEVEN...



























. eile | All the rich atmosphere of the! even tell you of the specic ;
a , ‘ a ’ | ‘Tro: o ‘ jal prob-
(By MURIEL SNOW) QUEEN WASHES UP Tropics under one — roof—that’s| lem classes to smooth ae ain: ance
LONDON. teat you'll find at the Dominica) â„¢@kKiag wrinkles. Why not phone?
As alway e new suits fror oe aft Co. and Fruit Market,| The selective stock and fine
Lact ‘ nevitably herald the Newly redesigned and opened—| Quality of it—when you sense thi:
Spri n London and Spring it | the gay colourings of Raffia work jyou know you're in C. B Rice &
he Fast world like New carpets, Baskets, Bags, Calabash | Co.’s Showroom of Men’s wear on!
Year’s Eve — full of promise, of | Rattles, Pandanus Plants and | Bolton Lane ‘known through-: |
anti tion of the unknown, of Palms—and the fascination of OUt the Caribbean and beyond
th futume % h d a | the luscious fruits invite you to | Beautiful Sportswear is shown in
The promise is fulfilled first in jeome in and enjoy them all! And|the new Consulate ‘FREANEZE’ |
the r Edwardian “Masher" line Dri ember the cool fresh Fruit | Shirts in pastels, as well as in the
bu g wit nall rev- pOrinks of Lime Squash, Grape-| original superfine ‘Jacket/Shirts
gene trie. thas hie te | *rult.and: Orange in surroundings ;Fine Neckwear is featured in Wor- |
ine tapering from shoulder of Tropical enchantment. \Wool/Raven with clastic tea” of
n Secondly r . -e50 bs ) ‘ j
t anita of Border | B ‘s’ Khaki Shirts, ideal for °
oo West a a pe and of excellent quality; Another new product from this
j 1) with th seandianidl h Stand lots of wear and tear— |rapidly expanding firm of distri- |
pped-in wv drop} .dded on eat R. H. Edwards Ltd. on butors, K, J. Hamel-Smith Ltd
emia the ae . : ear Street. Value ig tops at| It’s the McCaul Bicycle newly ar-
guider h orter, slightly $3.48. A. new shipment of Khaki | rived on the island together with |
cull > Stockings, fast colours from |the MeCaul Stoves (collapsible and
¢ A d M $1.08 as well as Men's Khaki ideal for limited space—full parts
. Shirts with semi-stiff collars also S¢TVice_available). The bike is a
e d : re of h c |proyide exeellent value. You'll Man's Tourer Model with inflator.
fs r flapped jlike the brightly patterned Men’s | tool kit, oiler and combination |
i /Atlas Sports Shirts and when Spanner in leather bag—all inclu- |
T! he few design- }you’re in, ask to see the range ®ve in the attractive price. Phone
ers Vv a country of Socks from 51 cts. up. Phone | 4748
ot tight that it would prove i Here ¥. : WITH CASHMERE BOUQUET FACE P
not s¢ it would prove “ ere you are for everything in
to be a Cé in’ the first ee Glassware—Cocktail, Dinner and, i OWDER
or a field. Equally me of S > many have found this to be |Champagne and Iced Drinks glass- * Soft textured
resses a such a pleasant drug store with |€5. too, with colourful designs in | * Del | f
ence of distinction for the country. | quick, efficient service. It’s P, A,| Sets of six or individually, They're | icately perfumed
Witness the one of navy blue; | Clare’s Drug Store just off Broad &t the Central Emporium on Broad *% Coshmere Bouquet Face Powder
ul ely pleated skit : as Street, on Prince Wm. Henry St. So are the new Sweet and | gives a satin smooth finish
hoe neckline outlined with big Street. The stock is refreshingly | Butter Dishes for the refrigerator *® Clings light! ly, t
bone buttons and wide pique col- ;new with lots of Baby Gift Sete | phere’ & Hew Kitchen Sani-Can oe eee
lar or the grey, with seams across as well as gifts for Mother (Dad, |for only $2.74 and very large lasting loveliness

the waist at the back, releasing tu too, “with the very new Krank’s | Glass Containers for flour, sugar, |






a fall of material at the side Brushless Shave Kreemer). Of |e. The values are excellent and | FACE POWDER BY

: T Ata sii taimamal ane 14 | course, there’s a full range of the |5° '5 the variety }

aoe aod * eee “ mn e = very best proprietary drugs and) 7) he - - |

cately tailored lace over taffeta ——————— TT = la most efficient dispensing dept ney 'Ll coming——like the six |
seen this season in a new in- fe. 2... esas esses OCS Her snare of ime wash-up aiter an outdoor meal she helped to You'l a pe | hite’ horses © ”

‘ siahaaieamaal a : N= cook when she and Princess Margaret visited a Girl Guides’ camp in Britain. This pict | You'll like the Candy Counter— |W '6 horses—excepting they're |

terprelation coat of bate Angart 1944 “a pore iaaaee TS” |p weet serwertul Sean 29,90 cot, Ses

2 é avy - ° . . , a y |

ta with a ae a . Erne ball dresses — the rustling of tremendous collar folding almost skirts. The whispering, many|, You'd like a deep freeze? jgoming to Chelsea Garage in mid- |

é pe ; te aru aS ress Of their great, sweeping skirts still into a shawl. layered grey chiffon dress. Its} Wouldn't we all and I’m going to March. The 1952 Vanguards have |

brighter hue. Tt is an 4 scot en- echo in the ear. : exquisite bolero embroidered in show you how—now. The new many refinements, the chassis is

semble of considerable elegance. Worth focuses attention on the COLOURS: By day dark greys silver with a big plain bow unty- | Sternette ‘JACK’ zero cabinet has rather larger and the door handles

It can be said that throughout
there the indefinable, subtle
colouring —
Further

is

greys yellows, pinks.
no

that while there is
startling change in outline,
the feminine is further stresse«
this year; expressing the unspoNen
need for practical yet supremely
distinguished clothes.



As these last two years there
has been this trend towards the
rounded line, it seems reasonable

to assume that it will continue
but not to extremes as far as
country clothes are concerned

because it would defeat their ob-
ject. As yet the difference be-
tween this year and last year
is not so pronounced as to neces~
sitate wholesale disearding of
wardrobes except among the
dwindling numbers of those who
must follow fashion closely. On
the otKer hand it does make
clothes of two or three years ago
look rather old fashioned. From
this point of view it is likely to
bring a fair number of orders to
the trade. Being more waisted is
likely to appeal very much to the
Latin American market and even
to North America, where hither-
to it was considered that the typi-
cally English country clothes
were too severe although the
tailoring itself was always highly
esteemed. In South America, in
particular, it tends to reconcile
two conflicting inclinations, that
of wanting to appear very Eng-
lish and at the same time satis-
fying the natural Latin desire
for pronounced waistlines.

this point of view it
augurs well for British export
prospects. The present fashion
is not too elaborate to be copied
to meet the capacity of the slend-
er purse; so narrow waists and
rounded hips will not be the
privilege of the rich but in due
course will come into general
wear.

From

Rustle of Spring

Worth heralded spring in Lon-
don in a way that was noticeably
different from Michael of Lac-
hasse. For at Worth, in contrast
with Lachasse’s Edwardian
“Masher” jackets, and wasp-
waisted country clothes, there
were magnificent evening and



When You Feel

WORN OUT
aud “fired

and drag around each
day, unable to work
took to the cause of
your trouble. Chances
are your kidneys are E {
out of order. Healthy; Fas
active kidneys filter
poisonous wastes and
excess acids from
the blood. When they fail, the system
becomes clogged with pom and you
feel thean and miserable. Then is the
time to take Dodd’s Kidney Pills, Within



tight bodices and feminine skirts
for silk dresses but emphasises a
shade, the front fullness—a diffi-
cult line to wear save by the
young and lean. Doubtless be-
cause of this, there is the alterna-
tive line. Svelte from the
draped, low bodices to the
swathed skirt, often two loose
panels springing from a knot at
the bosom, Sleeves are mostly
short and softly full caught into
a narrow band, In the coats
they are ballooning. The dia-
phragm in most of the day and
evening dresses emphasised by
tight, fine draping. Cuffed bod-
ices are much used for designs
with short, rounded boleros,
FABRICS for day are uncrush-
able surahs, shantungs, organzas
and a glazed gauze—all with an
appearance of fragility but in fact
of remarkable suppleness and
quite firm. Most of the silks are
printed in small, geometrical de-
signs.
‘A new coat fabric was introduc-
which has the appearance of
silk tweed. In silver grey it
sed for a loose coat with

ed
stiff





‘used for a Hoe cont with pepium pling over spreatng
The ‘Taming’ Of The Jungle Girl

predominate and a very lovely
Shallow-sea blue is seen in surah.
For evening palest pink and grey
are the two which are to the fore
but the startling Prussian blue,
now called Cerulean blue, was in-
troduced and was quite electrify-
ing in its suddenness.

SPOTLIGHTED: A neat little
eaped, sleeveless coat of the new
stiff, grey fabric, a jutting skirt
and altogether very pert looking.
Fitted shantung coats; one of
brilliant plum colour.

Jet embroidered waist band to a
black suit.

The piece de resistance — a
ravishing black faille demi-
evening dress: swathed bodice
beneath a minute velvet-banded
bolero, the long hip line tight,
then joined to a deep, wide
fiounce; a half overskirt flung
over to one side making an un~
even hem which was emphasised
by a two-inch band of black vel-
vet passementerie. The thick,
light navy blue grosgrain suit, its
little early Victorian jacket with
peplum hipline over spreading

Who Weds At 13

@ from page 6

talking to Mr. Hertogh
Bertha came in.

She flung her arms around her
father, kissed him and ran out of

when

the room.

The astonished man _ could
searcely speak for emotion, and
the portly Van T. Hof smiled and
left the house
Went Into The Sixth Form

Now Bertha was coming back
into the family. She knew no word
of the language, but a nun came
daily to teach her Dutch and the
other subject a child should
know.

Thereafter
Bertha had

everyone thought
better go to school
sixth form with
Her last
“very good”

She went into the
girls of own ge
report shows “good,”
in every subject.





|B

Dream Girl...

Lustre-

way loveliness
Fragrantly clean
Glisténing with sheen
e Soft, easy to manage

Now she has finished general
education and is learning profes-
sional dressmaking. She is skilled
with her fingers.

Bertha still like playing with
ten-year-olds at “mothers and
fathers.” She can be a little tyrant
at times.

She told me; “I love my mother.

I will never go back to the
Malays.”

That she might be kicnapped
and taken back is a thought

always in the minds of the police.
‘Strangers From The Orient’

When Bertha first arrived she
had an escort. Then it was taken
away. Now there is a plain clothes
man,

Police had reports of Oriental
strangers in the town. Men have
been questioned, But that is
seers Bertha knows nothing
about.

Creme Shampoo gives
your hair soft, glamorous three-

Lustre-Creme’s billowy lather
is a blend of secret ingredients

ing beneath the chin to reveal a
halter
pletely covered
silver beads,

THE GRANDE TOILETTE; |
Magnificent satins and failles are
lavishly used for these, reminis-
cent of a more
graceful mode of living. Chiftons,
muslins,
enter the picture.

Delicate embroidery
used to enhance the
the fabrics, '

To particularise
nile
faille with
panel encrusted
pearl embroidery.
heavy grosgrain
reminiscent of the late 18th cen-
tury in its splendour and lavish-
ness,
tight bodice cut out exposing the
bosom of the black dress beneath.
The
its little cuffed tight bodice a mass
of clustered pearl drops—a de-
sign of the utmost delicacy,

a

She is making a good job of
being a typical little Dutch girl.
watched her take off her
white starched apron and set off
from school for home, She wore
green
with the medallion of the Virgin
Mary round her neck.

Over it all she put a thick coat
and off she went, laughing.

midrif
with the

neck, and com-

same | ¢lusive
Son,

leisurely age and

organzas and tulle also
is much

richness of

— the
and parchment
bodice and centre
with gold and
A palest pink
evening coat—

eau de
coloured

The upstanding collar and

full-skirted white satin —

Do



fe



do

jumper tartan skirt,

to



@ capacity

Ltd
There's

sronchitis
and gasp for breath and can't sleep?

tasteles
attacks seem to vanish like magi
i piautee MENIDACO starts work-
ing th

phiegm, promot
and bring sounc

heated

Price?

the larger

4

(top








pes,
r, All you do



é of 3.9 eu, ft. and it’s |"re flush
just perfect for the home—the ex- |
insulation ensures |
complete freedom from moisture. jclass) and the chance to get one
The distributors are S, P. Musson )/S yours by phoning 4949.

— about $400 “* 7 n
‘EMPRESS’ |
model with a whacking great ca-
pacity of 9.6 cu, ft. and if that’s
what you want, well—here it is!

So you don’t know how and you
want to know and you wish you
could—-let me help by telling you
to phone 4927, That's the Singer
Sewing Academy

‘James Lynch & Co. Lid. Building).
Mrs, Mildred Watkins will tell you
how to enroll (nothing to it, real-
ly): detail much of what you'll
jearn—and how you'll learn! and

coughing,- st
ronchifis Curbed in 3

Do you have attacks © y
so bad that you choke | ing

of the

rangling Asthma,

you cough so hard you feel like
you were be ruptured? Do you
‘| weak, unable to work, and have

! eareful not to take cold and
can't eat certain foods?

No matter how long you have suf-
tered or What you have tried, there
is new hope for you In a Doctor's
prescription called MIENDACO, No
no smokes, ho injections, no
is take two
s tablets at meals and your

In

ugh your blood Aiding nature
dissolve and remove strangling

No Asthma in 2 Yeors



e free easy breathing
i sleep the first night
go that you soon feel yeara younger
ar stronger.





tting. Choice of colours |
(no choice of performance, Van-
guard offers only the best in its

Two and one half pounds for
sixty cents—hi! hold on, where are

we and what am I talking about.
Mil tell you, I’m talking about the
mewly marketed Pearl Brand |
Demerara Whole Grain Rice

Packet which is—you've guessed
it, 24% Ibs. and 60c. per pkt. It’s |
at all the Groceries, it's easily
handled, it’s a ‘must’ for every
larder and remember there's NO|
yicking. Distributed by » Geddes |
Grant Ltd, Pearl Brand is a pro- |
duct of the B.G. Rice Marketing |
Board,



, Th. bad fost 40 Ibs., suffered coug
choking and strangling ¢

nt, coulkin't sleep, expected to dic
INDACO stopped Asthma spasm
liret might and he has had none since
In over two years

Money Back Guaranteo

The very first dose of MENDACO
goes right to w rk @eirculating
through your blooe id helping na
ture rid you of the ef sof Ast hom
In no time at all {DACO may
easily make y f yours youngor
and stronger, Try INDACO under
an tron-clad money back gnarantec
You be the judge. If you don't fee
entirely well, like a new person, and
fully satisfied after tas
DACO just retu D
age and the ff » price
be refunded, G MID ACO from
your Chemist today and see how
well you sleep tonight and how much
better you will feel tomorrow, The



Minutes



u



Book now for a rejuvena 2 Tr



with helpful advice on individual skin-care and makerUp—mee

amy





it's an experience you'll enjoy.







KNIGHT'S LIMITED,
33, BROAD STREET.



|
|



MENDACO not only brings almost guarantee
: A“ . ee ae “s
‘Sometimes, I Wonder’ tmmodiate comfort one tom to ward Mendaco:''': v5 .
olf future attacks, For instance, Mr. | Ends Asthma * Bronchitis w Hay Fe

Is she really just like any other ve li ———-— ——we — oactntinsinnnieectsiominiciait jermpen sichiieancdivesiiagjisincinibdaaiaiiaiati a iil.
Dutch girl? “Sometimes I won- '
der,” said her father. “She can be ; fr |
very Oriental if she wishes to.” Lucky Discovery f="

Occasionally her brown eyes i a
darken and all expression van- Har 0 ear ng \
ishes from her face. It is a legacy Thousands of men and worn mo
of the East. who could not hear well and were ‘

almost deaf because of oar c ara rls + “ " A
But Mrs. Hertogh has no such| are now making the tunity fe I | |
"1 ANTEX, Many now say , fp
worries. She grabbed her daugh- entry taar a ¢ lock. th k 80 feet a m 1 y Cc 101 ce ee Die.
ter, swung her round, and said; away, Get SPANDEX ow inst. tt \\
“Just look how much weight she arne eee Xcecner hearing \
has put on.” .
—L.E.S.
e
More beautiful?
e -

Of course! No other nail polish, at any price,
lends such beauty to your nails as CUTEX,
Cutex contains an exclusive new ingredi-
ent, Enamelon, Your nails will retain their
Justre for days. Cutex does not crack,

off or fade. Choose {rom the many mo:
fashion shades,









Try Cuter Lipstick =
jor true lip-appeal.
View, long:
lusting Cutex comesio

smooth,

1 hour Dodd’s start to help the kidneys
drain away these harmful wastes. Soon

: hades that harmonize
vour ‘all-in’ feeling is replaced by clear- oe

with your favorite nail
polish.

plus gentle lanolin. a |




Roy.

-

headed energy and pep. be sure to hf 4
get the genuine Dodd's Kidney Pills—3 - i i sete ae 4 t
for large bottle at all drug stores, 423 | I we he | Br;
|
Dodds Kidney Pills q_ aye E*&
e







The World's Mast Po ftlar Nail Polish

After The RACES













KLiM is pure, safe milk
KLIM keeps without refrigeration



PAIN

TOBRALCO



























Can ot KLIM quolity is always uniform BELL’S WHISKY Bots. , DRY FLY SHERRY Bots. The { t famit
. | 1¢ famous TOOTAL wash cotton, is a family
CURACAO TRIPLE | MARTINI : , favourite of long standing. So easy to wash, so
CONQUERED KLIRG s by SEC is | VERMOUTH a Whatever the occasion, you ean be certain hard to wear out, it will stay crisp and fresh-
qi a fem DRAMBUIE PAARL TAWNY of success if you choose one of the many woe oe ee , fn . — of wy
ror IOS; ch, dre. ” ” ” ? colours and attractive prints — the idea
oid mg CONTREAU LIQUEUR ,, PAARL SHERRY li lovely fabrics made and guaranteed* by holiday fabric for all ages
© help children develop strong bones and 5 :
teeth and good muse les, to give them energy AICO? BRAS ” BURNETT’S GIN ” rooraL. With their wide variety of beautiful LYSTAV
and stamina f nF s¢ bol of play, and to assure CREME DE MENTHE ,, { Another favourite is LvsTay,.a lovely and
OR te at centre CHERRY BRANDY “asKY [ant ane ore grt ee Po
ous supply of che essential body building HAUT-SAUTERNES | I ” ! . and is perfect for light-weight suits and day-time
gacheors found laiewsh cow's ailke. ” colour range, TOTAL fabrics adapt themselves —_—_ dresses. Lv#rav washes and wears wonderfully
ROYAL CLUB GIN | COCKTAIL | 4 and is marked TEBILIZED for tested crease-
“a BOLS GIN sd | SAUSAGES Tins | perfectly to every fashion need. resistance. In a wide rauge of beautiful
Pas ' i .
SACROOL B® KLIM odes nourishment to cooked dishes GORDON'S GIN » | HAM ROLL » Wl ae
KLIM i fa
’ eu is recommended for infant feeding GOLDEN ARROW RUM G L A R A N T E E D =
CONQUERS PAIN. KLIM is safe in the specially-packed tin * | { A I R I ¢ }
. 3 } S stan ©
KLIM is producod under strictest control . ae
PERKINS re i?

& €CO., LID.

On Sale at

Yy
} ‘y

the registered

* THE TOOTAL GUARANTEE All goods sold by the Company and



MILK.

ne Bi bunt
KEIM “Zz



) KNIGHT'S Lie . Roebuck Str i trade mark TOOTAL or the words A TOOTAL PRODUCT are guarante pany and are —_———
; G9OCCCSS ee FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER on Dial 2072 & 4502 warranted to give satisfaction. Should dissatisfaction arise through any detect whatsoever im —
5696 GO6S6S696S569 OOOO Sp ET Ae

“tit

the material Tootal will replace it or refund the price and pay tlie c«

st incurred in makeinig-up.

\

}

j

‘



PAGE EIGHT

MARCH 2, 1952

a=

| PAPER SERVIETTES

in Pastel Shades
BO0c, per 100.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

SUNDAY,










people. In Jamaica the Weifare-Commis-
the departments — of: education,
agriculture and health work together to
produce better nutrition and better vil-
lages.

These are by no means a list of all the
achievements of welfare in the British
Caribbean from the time that welfare has
been recognised as an agency for assisting
the good life. But enough instances have
been quoted to show that without a wel-
fare department many of the social im-
provements that are visible in the region

1 ana



Sunday, March 2, 1952

—— eee

WELFARE

THIS month Barbados will be the meg¢t-
ing place of Welfare Officers from all parts
of the British Caribbean, when a confer-












EUROPEAN
ARMY

(EUROPEAN |



ence will be held under the chairman-
ship of Mr. Chinn Adviser on Welfare to
the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

Welfare is a subject upon which West
Indians have mixed ideas. Most people
will honestly admit that they know very
little about welfare and are not particu-
larly enthusiastic about finding out. Here
in Barbados, Welfare as a department of
government is in its infancy and Barbados
lags behind other West Indian islands in
appreciating what are the advantages to
be derived from an active and efficient wel-
fare organisation.

The need for welfare is so apparent that
the word remains inscribed in the title of
that Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion, the activities of which are almost
solely responsible for the large strides
which have been taken during the last
decade by the West Indies in social, econo-
mic and political progress.

There was criticism at first that the or-
ganisation was behaving too much like a
fairy godmother doling out largesse and
welfare grants indiscriminately and fail-
ing to stress the fact that true welfare
could only result from economic develop-
ment in which the peoples of the area
themselves played a great part.

If Welfare has suffered because of this
over-priming of the development pump—
and it would be foolish to say that it has
not suffered in Barbados—to-day there is
no less a danger of our forgettirfy that the
whole purpose of development is the pro-
duction of welfare. Emphasis on develop-
ment in recent years although originating
from the laudable intention to persuade
people that material improvement de-
pended primarily on individual efforts has
given rise to a new fallacy that all that
matters is economic development, and that
where there is economic development,
welfare will automatically take care of
itself.

This pre-occupation with development is
itself a sign of failure of the peoples of the
area to understand what welfare is, what
it hopes to achieve and what it has already
achieved in the British Caribbean.

Welfare is essentially the application of
a social science which specialises in the
organisation and assistance of admirable
social principles such as self-help and a
readiness to take responsibility and to
serve others. ,

Welfare teaches that the standard of liv-
ing is not material (as is believed by per-
haps ninety-nine per cent. of the people liv-
ing in the British Caribbean) but is some-
thing in people’s minds. It maintains that
there is no advantage in giving people
money if they have no idea of spending it
on the things that last, such as good homes:
good equipment in field and kitchen: books
and education.

Those who regard welfare as something
opposed to or extraneous to economic de-
velopment display only the shallowness of
their thinking. There is no antagonism be-
tween the two. But since the ultimate aim
of prosperity is a good life for human
beings, Welfare as a social science is de-
signed to give them the concept of a good
life.

Mr. McGillivray, late Colonial Secretary
of Jamaica not long ago told the staff of a
3-F movement—Food for Family Fitness—
that their work was as important a con-
tribution to development as the erection of
factories. This tribute is rooted in the
fundamental economic precept that the
true wealth of a country is its people.
People who eat correctly in proper homes
become more self-reliant, punctual, duti-
ful and co-operative. These are qualities
much sought after in labour forces
throughout the world today and they are
necessary to the healthy and productive
economy of Barbados. Besides the success-
es achieved over 12 years by.Jamaica Wel-
fare Ltd., (now known as the Social Wel-
fare Commission) with a “Better Villages”
campaign, Welfare has helped govern-
ments to think socially in many ways. Its
work in prisons where farms and agricul-
tural schemes have been inaugurated and
with probation is perhaps best known, and
Welfare has begun to persuade authorities
to board out deprived children in carefully
chosen family homes instead of consigning
them expensively and often unhappily to
institutions. In many places it has greatly
improved the administration of Poor Relief
by making it so far as possible a family
eare-work and_ rehabilitation service
‘rather than a mere payment of doles. It
has done much for youth either directly or
through helping voluntary bodies.

\ Welfare although in some respects its
“xk in this region resembles the activities
of the Mome Office and although it is a
depar tment of Government is considered
as a bridge between government and the

would not have been made.

terms of dollars or cents.

ties like Barbados where there exist so
many other voluntary social services with
years of tradition and experience and
where the rugged individualism of every
Barbadian makes the taking of advice more
difficult than the swallowing of castor oil
by a naughty child the work of a welfare
department will inevitably be obstructed
by obstacles.

But Barbados no less than Jamaica’needs
a welfare department and government de-
partments, local government and the pub-
lic Ought to be benefitting from advice and
assistance on welfare, which ought to be
freely available from the Social Welfare
Office.

That this advice and assistance is not
sought by all who should seek it is evi-
dent from the intermittent criticisms
which are made in public and in private
about welfare. The advantages of welfare
are so obvious that failure to utilize its
services because of a misunderstanding of
its function is more than regrettable.



AGRICULTURE

THE aim for the future development of
agriculture everywhere in the West Indies
should be a steady transition to. mixed
farming, according to the authors of the
West India Royal Commission Report
(Cmd. 6607),

This mixed farming involves permanent
as opposed to shifting cultivation and the
complementary use of stack and crops, and
should result in much higher productivity
of the land.

The Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion which came into being directly as a
result of that report has always placed
agriculture at the top of its list of prior-
ities and Barbados has benefitted consider-
ably as a result. Among these benefits was
the establishment of six agricultural sta-
tions where experiments in mixed farming
are presently being conducted

The agricultural stations vary in size and
experiments now being conducted will
give accurate information about various

sizes of peasant allotments and will prove

what sizes are economic, if any. While this
information is being compiled the stations

are acting as advertisements for better agri-
cultural methods and the services of first

class.livestock are gradually improving the
strains of local cattle. All this is excellent
and the news that the taxpayers of Bar-
bados have been asked to foot the bill for
these stations in the new estimates for
1952-53 will be-received with equanimity
in an island where the primacy of agricul-
ture is acknowledged and unchallenged by
the majority of people.

It would however be letting slip an op-
portunity—and no opportunity must be let
slip--if the government of Barbados were
not reminded that financial assistance for
these stations until they can pay for them-
selves is not enough.

The Government of Barbados has shown
a strange reluctance to understand what
are the impediments to a successful agri-
cultural policy for this island.

They realise now, when it is too late,
what a loss was sustained when for chéese-
paring and narrow financial reasons they
permitted the Deputy Director of Agricul-
ture to leave an island where he had done
such valuable work. They have shown no
great alacrity to attract a successor,

That is failure number one.

Despite increasing complaints from
“peasant” agriculturalists, despite the evi-
dence of figures compiled on these same
agricultural stations, the government of
Barbados continues unintelligently and to
the detriment of local agriculturalists to
control meat at prices which must discour-
age cattle raisers from improving the
strains of their livestock.

That is failure number two.

Equally depressing is the invitation ad-
dressed to all Barbadians to grow more
food when every grower of food knows
that even on government-owned agricul-
tural stations at certain periods of the year
loeally grown vegetables and ground pro-
visions have to be destroyed, because of in-
adequate marketing arrangements. There
is no need to go further than failure num-
ber three to realise how slowly the govern-
ment of Barbados takes action to set right
what is glaringly wrong with its agricul-
tural policy.

The necessity
for welfare is increasingly being recog-
nised by more and more people as its
activities become known and understoods ee
But .its utility cannot be measured in
Nor are its ser-
vices always invited. In small communi-



iT SEEMS THEY NEED A KEYSTONE

This Thing Called Gatt



| The word Gatt when spoken
;makes an ugly brutal noise and it
is not surprising that in the lan-
guage of Hollywood it means a
gun.

In international trade circles
however these four initial letters
stand for a Geneva Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade, made in
October 1947. This agreement
was the greatest practical step
taken towards the formation of
jan International Trade Organis-
jation which was outlined in the
Havana Charter of 1948. Failure
|to ratify the Havana Charter was
inevitable in view of the circum-
stances which existed at the time
jand which continue to exist. But
its failure has been a great set-
back for the forces which are
active to promote unity and un-
derstanding between the peoples
of the world.

The Charter was intended “to
assure a large and steadily grow-
ing volume of real income and
effective demand, to increase the
production, consumption, and ex-
change of goods, and thus to con-
tribute to a balanced and ex-
panding world economy.”

The Havana Charter did not
suddenly emerge out of the blue
as a solution to all post-war
problems. The American loan to
the United Kingdom of £938,-
000,000 was made subject to cer-
tain conditions expressed in the
Bretton Woods Trade Agreement
and the United States is still pur-
}suing a policy which is designed
to promote multilateral trade and
to abolish imperial Preference
and other restrictions on Free-
dom of trade.

The ideals of multilateral trade
which are continually being
championed by the United States
at international conferences are
so attractive that they meet with
ready acceptance from members
of the United Nations. Yet the
countries who pay lip service to
these ideals have found it impos-
sible to put them in practice and
so far multilateralism has not
triumphed.

The countries of Western
Europe today are so concerned
with the immediate objectives of
increasing exports and reducing
imports in an effort t6 achieve a
balance of trade that the Havana
Charter seems farther away than
ever.

Great Britain provided an ex-
ample of the obstacles which im-
pede progress to multilateralism
when in aceordance with a con-
dition of the United States loan
it attempted to make sterling
convertible.

By GEORGE HUNTE

tariff system, if the United King-
dom abolishes imperial prefer-
ence. Unfortunately it is equally
no exaggeration to point out that
if the United ‘Kingdom abolished
imperial preference before its
present trading position is bal-
anced, both the United States and
the British Commonwealth coun-
jries which are in the British
preferential system would suffer.

The United States apparently is
aware of this paradox but there
can be no mistuke about its ulti-
mate objectives.

How are the British territories
in the Caribbean affected by these
international efforts at trade or-
RBanisation and have they bene.
fitter or suffered from the ar-
rangements made at Geneva?

In recent months some expo-
nents of a West Indian Customs
Union have been using the alleg-
ed. disadvantages of GATT to
support their arguments. It is
said that a West Indian Customs
Union could participate, in its
own right, instead of through the
United Kingdom Government, in
arrangements made in accordance
with the articles of GATT.

But it is not at all easy to see
what advantages would be gained
from this suggested improvement
in status, in view of the British
West Indies’ special dependence
on the United Kingdom,

There is everywhere in the
British Caribbean today a reluc.
tance to face issues squarely. And
the subject of Customs Union is
in danger of being considered a
substitute for political federation
without full ‘realisation of the
fact that the formation of a Cus-
toms Union would inevitably les-
sen the responsibility of the
United Kingdom with regard to
the p.vovision of guaranteed mar-
kets for British Caribbean pro-
duce.

The British Caribbean territo-
ries could not expect the United
Kingdom to relax exercise of ex-
isting trading controls against
possi the interests of the Uni-
ted Kingdom
same time to remain a sitting
target for a Caribbean’ Customs
Union which found itself less
adept at international bargaining
than is sometimes suggested. It
is possible to compile a list of
Gar uaotee that the West In-

ies now experience as a r t
of GATT, iy

Trinidad has complained loudly
in recent months of an obstacle
which has arisen with regard to

; “clock-making” indus’ be-
Explaining its failure in a mem- a A

orandum (Cmd. 7572) the British Ge"an impediven ens CATT

government said that “the impos- West Indian limitations with

sibility of maintaining the con- regard to si a tecti
vertibility of sterling which was Suaouieh in ute i inna. ieee
attempted in 1947 made it neces- tries like oils and fats: GATT’S
sary to embark upon a system of\ cramping effect on tariff changes
bilateral agreements in order and preferential margins: and
secure the continuance of as large losses which the West Indies have
a volume of international trade experienced because of reductions
as possible.” The United States of preference in Canada for rum
meanwhile continues to cham. are also cited. ,

pion multilateralism and at the But the disadvantages which
Torquay conference a full scale are experienced under GATT do
attack was launched against Im- not appear irremovable even
perial preference, It would in fact within the present arrangement
be no exaggeration to say that by which the United Kingdom
the United States will only con- represents the British Caribbean
sider any great reduction of her at international trade meetings



By BUTE HEWES Producers’ Organisation, repre-
senting primary producers in the
LONDON. Commonwealth,

When Mr, R. A, Butler, Britain’s, This memorandum to Mr. But-
Chancellor of the Exchequer, in- ler is entirely concerned with the
troduces his Budget on March 4, serious effects which existing high
his proposals will be anxiously U.K. rates of duty are having on
awaited not only in Britain but wines, spirits and cigars from the
throughout the Colonies and the Empire, including rum and cigars
Dominions as well, the West Indies,

For the measures he will pro- The Organisation has made
pose may have a vital influence similar Budget appeals every year
upon the prosperity of many Em- for the past three years, but this
|pire producers who contribute year hopes are particularly high
| large sums every year, in the that it may have some success.
form of duties and taxes, to Bri- For one thing, Britain’s Govern-
tain’s revenue, ‘,ment has changed since the last

In the West Indies, for example, Budget and Mr. Butler will at
| people who depend for the liveli- least be examining the problem
j}hood upon exports of rum and from a new angle,
|cigars to Britain will hopefully .
lawait a reduction in the almost _ Since the last Budget, too, the
[prohibitive British duties levieq Jamaica cigar industry has spoken
jon these things that put them out out with an ex ly loud and
lof reach of the mass British mare angry voice agail the Anglo-
ket. * Cuban Trade Agreement, which

In all Colonies which offer a will allow-Cuban cigars into Bri-
“tax holiday” to induce the in- tain for the first time since before
| vestment of capital from overseas, the war, Last summer, Jamaica
|there will be the hope that Mr, submitted a full scheme to the
| Butler will adjust the present sys+ British Government whereby a
|tem which makes tax payable at cut in excise duties on cigars would
}the full British rates and thus inerease net consumption in Bri-
| nullifies the sacrifice of taxes that tain, with the result that revenues



\the Colonies themselves have would be higher than ever while
| made, the Jamaican market was allowed
During the few weeks before to expand.

| Budget Day, Mr, Butler will have The British Empire Producers’
received scores of representations Organisation refers to the Anglo-
from various organisations asking Cuban agreement in its memoran-
for cuts in many taxes and duties, dum to Mr, Butler and declares:
One such appeal has already been “As imports of Cuban cigars on
presented by the British Empire an important scale will again be-

itself, and at the GATT



W.I. Hopes Of British Budget




























Ph. 4472

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Article XVIII of the Geneva
agreement “recognises the prin-
ciple that under-developed terri-
tories may have ‘to impose pre-
tective measures which would
be contrary to other articles of
the agreement in order to build
up their own economies.”

If Great Britain was forced to
aotify the organisation for Euro-
pean Economic Co-operation in
1947. of that country’s: necessity
to “embark upon a system of bi-
Jateral agreements in order to
secure the continuance of as
large a volume of international
trade as_ possible’, how much
the more likely will the dependent
British Caribbean territories be
able to escape from the provis-
ions of an agreement which was
specifically introduced to assist the
freeing of trade between inde-
pendent trading units.

Unless some other advantages of
Customs Union are clearly fore-
seen the British Caribbean terri-
tories can continue to face GATT







are made from

MOYGASHEL
LINENS

with equanimity so far as’ disad-

vantages are concerned. ° BENBURG
There are enough precedents on

the plea of dire necessity for fail- ° BALMORAL

ure to fulfil obligations invoked
under international trade agree-
ments: and the interest which the
United Nations display with re-
gard to dependent territories of
metropolitan powers makes it al-
most impossible for anyone to in-
voke GATT in such a way that it
would cause real hardship to the
British West Indies. There might
of course be reluctance on the part
of the United Kingdom or of the
British territories to seek such re-
dress but neither the United
States nor Canada would want to
be aceused of unfriendly or dis-
criminating action against depend-
ent territories in the Caribbean.

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

in Popular Shades
& Lightweights

It would certainly be unwise for
the British Caribbean territories
to disdain GATT and the bene(its
to be derived from a freeing of
world trade. But the British Car-
ibbean is too dependent on ihe
United Kingdom to enter lightly
into a Customs Union on the
grounds that it would remove the
disadvantages resulting from

Even within a Customs Union
the dependence of the British
Caribbean on the United Kingdom
as a market for its produce seems
inevitable. The best trade policy
for the British Caribbean would
appear to be a flexible policy by
which the area is allowed to ex-
ploit its commercial ability within
definite margins determined by its
earnings and yet is protected from
fierce world competitions by its
membership of the British trading
preferential area. -

The Regional Economic Com-
mittee which will, it is hoped, soon
be functioning properly, will pro-
vide adequate machinery for deal-
ing with things like GATT. Before

lunging into a Customs Union
British West Indian governments
might like to satisfy themselves
that Customs Union will bring ad-
vantages not obtainable through
the Committee,

Not all the British territories can
see the advantages to be gained
from Customs Union as clearly as
British Guiana which has decided
against political federation but
which hopes to earn another
$3,000,000 annually as a result of
Customs Union.



HARTLEY’S

jam

the greatest name in jam-making



gin to enter the United Kingdom
in April next, it is a matter of
urgency that some action shouid
be taken to prevent a further set-
back to the Jamaica cigar indus-

“A substantial reduction in the
duty on cigars which would place
them within the reach of people
with moderate incomes would
seem to be the most effective wa:
of restoring the position and theie
is good reasou for thinking that
it could be done without ap-
preciable loss of revenue.”

This was the policy advocated
by Col. Michael de Cordova, when
he visited London last summer
to make representations on behalf
of the Jamaica cigar industry
against the Anglo-Cuban agree-
ment. He asked that, in order to
increase the market, duty on
cigars should be reduced back to
the 1939 rate of 14s. 2%4d. This,
he said, would
cigar

save Jamaica's |
industry from extinction,
within the

bri cigars
reach of - in Britain
and would possibly increase the
overall revenue to the U.K.
Treasury.

No indications were given at
that time of Government reaction
towards this proposal. But Col, de
Cordova’s full statement is still)
in the hands of the Treasury and |
will no doubt be taken into full)
consideration in the preparation of |
the coming Budget.

One ray of hope is seen in Mr. IW
Butler’s recent announcement that, )))

@ on page 9 p

Enjoy GODDARD'S GOLD
BRAID RUM s# Straight or
Blended a The Goodness all

the same.



SUNDAY, MARCH 2,

1952



I Saw Naples..

. And

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Lived!

A Gun, A Girl And Shots In The Night

@ A revolver shot killed Harry
lume. He died in a _ sewer
beneath Vienna, ag those of you
know who saw the movie, “The
Taird Man.” Yes, that was the
eid of Harry Lime.

@ But he had many lives, and I
can receunt all of them. How do
i know’ Because my name is
hiarry Lime...

THERE was once an exquisite,
huge emerald locket which spent
most of its time looking out at
the world from the rather fleshy
neck of Mrs, Donaldson as she
waddled like a golden duck
across the international social
horizon.

I had rather a strong desire
to change the habitat of this
locket from her cool neck to my
itching palm. That was in Naples,
in 1937.

My plan was complete to the
last detail. But first I had to get
rid of Rubio.

Rubio was a Spaniard, around
35 years of age. He was good-
looking in a nauseous kind of
way and his voice was soft. But
he’d picked up his English from
reading books, not speaking it.

When I went to see him in
his swagger hotel apartment, he
didn’t look happy. He said: “You
kept me impatient for an hour,
Mr. Lime.”

I said: “I’m sorry, Senor Rubio.
I just flew in from London. For-
got to move my watch ahead.”

He smileq sceptically. “It is my
knowledge that you have been
in Naples for three days now.
But it does not matter. I am a
man with a skill for waiting.”

“Well,” I said,
be very brief. I won’t waste any
more of your time.”

“Bueno! But first I must tell
you that ] have made all the ar-
rangements to dispose of the
Donaldson emerald—as soon as
we—ah—possess it, of course.”

I looked at him remorsefully,
“There’s a small item of which
I forgot to inform you, Senor
Rubio. I have decided to include
you out.”

“T do not think I understand,”
“To be brief and simple—I
have decided to dissolve our
partnership.”

“You—you are disposing &
me?”

A gun... buat I
laughed

IL NODDED. “Perhaps
a nicer way of saying it.”

There was a pause. Then Ru-
bio said slowly: “I do not prefer
to be disposed.”

“Naturally not,” I agreed. But
sometimes we get disposed
whether we like it or not,” I
picked up my hat and turned
towards the door.

A black automatic pistol ap-
peared like lightning from un-
der his armpit. He said; “If you

that’s

take one more step towards
the door, I will fire.”
I laughed in his face, “Don't

~ be a complete fool. If they found
a dead man in your room they
would hang you. Rubio, I’m on
my way out. If you fire, the
police and all the hotel detectives
will be here before you can leave
the floor, Buon giorno.’

Ag I opened the door, he said
harshly: “There’s a saying in this
city. ‘See Naples and die!’”

I shook my head. “It only
proves that life is very shért and
uncertain—for us all.”

Believe me, I am not a‘ pro-
fessional hero, but I was not at
all concerned about Senor Rubio
putting a bullet in me—not in
his hotel room. ; hurried to the
pier where the Arcturus was
about to dock, She wags carrying
precious freight—Mrs. Donald-
‘son. IT had already made ar-
rangements for one of the Cus-
toms officials to hold her up on

“I’m going tc’



the pretext of going through her
baggage. A 5.000-lira note did
the trick.

Mrs. Donaldson's high-pitch-
ed outraged voice guided me to
her wi.nout troubie. She was
fiftyish, voluble, gullible and
somewhat foolish. Her fat cheeks
were quivering with rage as she
bawled the Customs man out.
Beside her, looking helpless,
stood a slim and lovely girl.

After a second or two I pushed
between the grinning spectators.
“What seems to be the trouble?”
I asked. As if I didn’t know.

I spoke sharply in Italian to
the Customs man, while they
looked on admiringly. He bowed
with great respect.

Harry Lime, as Orson Welles
Portrayed him in the film
“The Third Man.”

A few minutes later, loveliness
was gracing my car. Loveliness
in the form of the emerald locket
around Mrs. Donaldson’s neck.
And Aimee Colins. She was Mrs.
Donaldson’s hired companion.
She had auburn hair and eyes to
match the emerald. She was as
sensitive and shy as Mrs. Don-
aldson was garrulous and gush-
ing. And she liked me. Every so
often I would catch her eye.
Then she would hastily turn
away as if she were guilty of
something.

After a while Mrs. Donaldson
said: “If it weren’t for you I
don’t know what would have
happened. I wish we could re-
pay you for your kindness.”

I said: “Well, I think perhaps
you can. I’ve got to buy my sis-
ter a gift. I don’t know too much
about jewellery—so I wonder if
either of you could come along
and help me shop.”

“Of course we can.” she gushed
“Aimée does most of my shop-
ping for me. I’m sure she would
be delighted to help you. You go
ahead. Just drop me at the
hotel,”

“Good. That’s a relief. Now
I'd like both of you to be my
guests at dinner to-night.”

Call me Harry.
I said

WE deposited fat Mrs. Donald-
son in her room, and then Aimee
and I went shopping. I took her
along to Corso Vittorio Eman-
uele, one of Naples’ better
thoroughfares.

She said: “What are you look-
ing for, Mr, Lime?”

“Please call me Harry.”

“All right.”

May I call you Aimee?”

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want to buy for your sister?”
“Some nice jewellery. Mrs.
Donaldson was wearing some-
thing pretty. Something like
that.”

She laughed. “You don’t know

much about jewellery, do you”?

I know -what 7 like, But most
of the time the Giings I like you
can find in a dime store”.

“You won't fing Mrs, Donald-
‘son's locket in a dime store,’
Aimee “It cost about
20,000 dollars. That’s a _ real
in the

Did I sound surprised? I said:
“She must be crazy travelling
round with that flashing on her
neck.”

She nodded. “It’s not exactly
wise—but she’s very sentimental
about it. Her husband gave it to
her just before he died. She
swore to wear it every day of her
life.”

Suddenly=that

voice again

WE stopped in front
jeweller’s window, As we were
examming the stock, a ~ voice
broke in on us. A too familiar
voice,

“I am begging your pardon. I
heard you conversing English.”

1 whipped round. Sure enough,
it was Rubio.

I said rudely: “We were talk-
ing Amer.can—a totally different
language.”

Ignoring it, he said; “I—I am
trying to reach Via Salvator
Rosa. Could you inform me how
to go there?’

“Sure, Turn right at the next
corner and go straight for three
squares.”

Rubio still hung around, mak-
ing conversation. When we final-
ly got rid of him, Aimee said:
“He seemed most reluctant to
leave, He acted as if he knew
you.”

I said: “Well, I didn’t care to
know him. Shall we go in now?”

“Yes, of course There’s
just one thing I’d like to ask you.
What do you—for a living?”

ol a

“Oh, I'm a dealer in objets
dart. I wander through the
world, collecting the best
things.”

“It sounds very interesting.”

“It is. Often quite exciting.
Now let’s go in.’

I bought a filligree pin for
2,500 lire. On the way back to
Aimee’s hotel, she was pensive.
I took her by the hand. She did
not object, nor did she react to
the touch. She let me hold her
hand, nothing more. I suspected
Senor Rubio had made too strong
an impression, It was essential
now that I work fast.

Strangely enough, it was Amiee
that bothered me, not Rubio. I
was beginning to be extraor-
dinarily fond of her, and that was
bad. I make it a point not to be
fond of anyone in this world.

At dinner I made sure that
there was plenty of spumanti,
the Italian version of aham-
pagne. Mrs, Donaldson was soon
becoming thoroughly _ relaxed.
Spumanti is a fine relaxer, I
stirred it with a wooden swizzle-
stick, the bottom of which was
well laced with phenobarbitol.
My keynote for the evening was
relaxation. Before the evening
was over, my emeralded guest
was going to be the most relaxed
woman in all Italy,

I lifted my glass. “A toast to
us. May we always be as happy

as we are now.”

Mrs. Donaldson giggled. “A
toast to you, Mr. Lime, You
wonderful, wonderful man!”

I patted her neck. I wanted her
to get used to the touch of my
hand against it. She withdrew a
little. Her neck had become
supersensitive because of the
locket.

ARIS S ES





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i i i tl

FOR COMFORT
RIDE A

HOPPER
BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

” Whitepark Road



As we drank, I studied the
clasp on the locket. It was a
simple device, You turned a tiny
wheel and it released the catch
Just a twist of the wrist

As a special treat for Mrs.
Donaldson I called the musicians
over and had them play Neapoli-
tan tunes for her alone, She
loved it. So did Aimee. She stole

her hand into mine as_ they
played.

When the music ended; Mrs,
Donaldson = sighed “That was
just beautiful They played
divinely.”

I sat up. “Now | have a won-
derful idea. How would you all

like to go for a drive to Pompeii?
T’s only ten o'clock. There’s a
full moon. It will be quite a
thrill.”

Mrs. Donaldson clasped her
pudgy hands. “I'd adore to go
A fascinating place.”

T called ‘he waitersand bent to
sign the check. When I looked
up, Rubio was bowing = § and
smiling at the ladies,

“A coincidence,” he murmured
“Il happen to be dining in the
similar restaurant ... 1 was sin-

cerely wishing you would all join
me ina bottle of Lacrima
Christi.”

“Some other time,” I snapped.
“We're in a hurry.” &

“The coincidence of another
meeting, I fear, would not be
excellent. Permit me to introduce
myself. I am Alfonso Rubio.”

“Nice to meet you, Mr, Rubio,
And good-bye!”

I ignored Rubio's
threats

I HUSTLED my party out of
the restaurant, leaving him
standing there and breathing
hreats.

Mrs. Donaldson exclaimed:
“What an odd iman!” And Aimee
asked: “Are you sure you don’t
know him, Harry?”

“IT know him now,” I said,
“His name is Alfonso Rubio, and
I'm ‘genuinely sorry he didn’t
follow my directions this after-
noon and walk into the Bay of
Naples.” ’

It was less than an hour's ride
to the ancient, extinct city of
Pompeii, lying like a corpse at
the foot of its killer, Versuvius.
We entered through the garden
of an ancient home. The moon
shone down, hard and white.

Aimee gasped with fright as a
lizard ran over her foot. There
are more lizards in Pompeii than
there used to be people. But
they’re harmless.

We walked slowly towards the
Forum, past the ancient mansions
of rich Romans, with signs still
visible on the walls, ordering
“Stick No Bills’—in Latin, of
course. F

Suddenly, Mrs. Donaldsofi said:
“It’s all beginning to make me
feel faint.”

I asked solicitously; “Don’t you
feel well?”

“I feel fine—just sleepy. T
don’t know why I should feel
sleepy when I’m so excited.”

Quickly I seized

the locket

AIMEE was worried. She said:
“I think we bad better go back.”

“We will,” I soothed her.
“But first we'll let Mrs. Donald-
son catch a few minutes’ rest.
There’s a marble bench in the
atrium of the Casa de Ceriale. . .

Here we are. Now you sit down,
Mrs, Donaldson, and rest your
shoulder against mine.”

She murmured sleepily, com-

fortably: “You're a darling, Mr.
Lime.”
I said: “Aimee, if you walk

into the other room to your right,
you will see some excellent
frescoes, beautifully preserved.
Here—take the torch.”

10,



SSCS CSOT LEE LLLLLL LELOLLPLEL LL LALOP LA Ce

- SOPIOOSOOOS,



Mr

Donaldson was sleeping
softly I pressed my fingers
against her neck. There was no
reaction, I quickly unloosed the
catch and with slow care picked
the locket gently off her neck.
It was done quickly. And now IL
was ready to make my silent
departure.

But then I heard a sound ‘that
froze me. Footsteps. And they
weren't Aimee's! There was only
one thing to do, Run!

At Strade Stabione I tutmed
the corner and ran into one of
the old Roman baths. I made for
one of the rooms, expecting it
to have another exit. It was dark,
and I fumbled around, I had a
very unpleasant feeling when I
became aware that the only way
out was the way I came in, I
ran back, but it was too late. My
Pursuer was standing at the
entrance with a. flashlight in one

hand and a gun in the other. It
was Rubio!
I’m not usually a_ reckless

fellow, but this time I did a very
rash thing. I rushed him, He
fired, and the bullet grazed my
shoulder,

We fell on the marble floor, He
Was wiry and very strong. In
a few seconds it was clear that
he was in far better shape than
I was. Then he hit me a very
rude blow on the head with the
gun, and I gave up the fight, I
just lay there, thinking what a
very evil moment of my life this
was.

Rubio panted: “The locket. . .
Thank you!. . . And now I think
I will dipsose of you for having
caused me all this trouble.” He
raised his hand to shoot,

Suddenly the old baths echoed
with shouts and general hubbub,
The voice of a guard came
sharply. “Drop the gun, signor,
or lll fire!”

There
armed
Rubio

several other

the doorway.
his gun, Poor
Rubio! Caught red-handed—with
my goods! I lay there on the
ancient marble floor and laughed.
Then I went out to face Mrs.
Donaldson and Aimee,

Mrs. Donaldson was alrnost
hysterical with admiration for
my courage in chasing the wicked

were
guards
dropped

in

robber. But Aimee said nothing
at all, ‘

I blamed myself for taking
them to Pompeii and_ into
danger But Mrs. Donaldson
cried: “That terrible man would
have tried to snatch the locket
wherever I was. I'm going
to give you a gift. A hundred-

pound note. You must take it.”

im sorry. said

Aimee
I SAID gracefully: “If it
means so much to you, Vl

give it to my favourite charity.”
She wasn’t to know that’s Harry
Lime,

We got back to the car and
drove to her hotel. She went up
to bed, leaving me alone with
Aimee. For a while we stood
silently together. Then I said:
“I’m sorry about this evening,
Let's meet for lunch to-morrow.”

“No, Harry.”

“Why not?”

“Ie never saw the
didn't find them and I walked
all the way around I saw
you from the front entrance.”
Then, after a long pause:
“Besides, a man who deals in fine

frescoes, I

arts would know an_ emerald
necklace from aé_ dime store
trinket.” I should have thought
of that.

As I walked back to my hotel
] thought about Vaffaire emerald.
It had cost me about 100 dollars
to bribe the customs official, and
buy the champagne and the fili-
gree pin. The reward left me
with a profit of 270-odd dollars,
plus a bump on my thead and a
hole in my suit, I had lost the
lovely green emerald and the
lovely green eyes of Aimee

The emerald didn't
much. But Aimee, you nearly
interferred with the great
romance of my life—my love for
Harry Lime,

bother me

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W.I. Hopes
Of British
Budget

from x
Britain® Gpuieee apart
stocks are to be re-arranged tivis
year tO save some £22,000,000
part of the renewed drive to «
dollar spending, If Empire toba
is to be encouraged in Britain,
seems apparent, the West Ind.
must surely benefit to some e::-
tent.

On the question of rum, ho\
ever, the position is not so cler
eut, The present rate of di
levied on rum imports into B
tain is £10 11s, 3d. per proof gi -
lon and while this continues, co
sumption of rum must contin
at a low level. In spite of
vigorous advertising campai..
conducted throughout Britain
West Indian rum companies, ¢>:-

sumption remains distressin |
low.
Britain's rum imports in ‘>

twelve months ending Septem!
30, 1951, totalled 9,200,000 gallo
maintaining the satisfactory ley |i
of imports and even exceedir |
the previous year’s figure, Bs
the tigures for withdrawals of th:
rum from bonded warehous
show a very different picture,

In that same twelve-mon' 1
period, only 1,800,000 gallons of
rum were withdrawn from bond |
for consumption,’ As a_resul,|
stocks in the bonded warehous:
at the end of the year totalled |
14,900,000 gallons, Obviously, ru
importers cannot continue to buy |
West Indian rum if it is merely |
to lie idle in warehouses, tying |
up huge sums of capital. |

The position is, therefore,
that these 14,900,000 gallons |
of warehoused rum have to
be disposed of. This cannot
be done unless consumption
increases considerably; and
this will not take place un-
less the duty and thus the
price comes down,

Whatever Mr. Butler’s de-
cision on rum duties, it seems
plain that Britain's rum im-
porters are considerably over-
stocked and must. shortly re-
duce th@ rate of import
until some of these stock:
have been worked off,

The unsatisfactory income ta
position affecting investment in
the Colonies is more likely to flix
a favourable solution in Mr. But-
ler’s Budget, for many Consery #-
tive spokesmen have deplored
situation under which sacrifices
made by Colonial territorie
sometimes at great cost to them-

selves, accrue to the benefit of |
Britain,
The Institute of Taxation ha

made this recommendation to Mr
Butler: “We submit that the new |
excess profits tax should be ie-|
stricted to profits made in th
United Kingdom and that profit
from trading overseas should («
specifically exempted. If the}
foregoing recommendation to ex-)
empt all overseas profits is no}
accepted, we would urge that t+ |
profits of all companies con-|
trolled abroad should be ex-
empted, even though these com-
panies may be subsidiaries of
companies managed and controll.
ed in the United Kingdom whic! |
are therefore themselves Hable t
excess profit tax.

It has long been a complaint of
British investors in Colonial terri-
tories that the “tax holiday” ar
rangements instituted in these |
territories have little value as |
means of attracting capital while
Britain still levies income tax at
the full rate, This was among the
first of the West Indian problems |
to be studied by the U.K, Govern
ment when it came into power
last autumn, but there has been |
no opportunity to adjust the
enomaly before the presentation of
the Budget.—B.U.P.





















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PAGE..TEN



BARATIA GETS

seen

A HIGHWAY

Ry IAN GALE

A BRIGHTER SUN by Samuel Selvon (Wingate 11/6).

saan

Thijs :is another novel about Trinidad, but unlike Edgar

Mittleltolzgr’s
the complications, of middle



Morning in the Office it does not deal with

class life in Port-of-Spain, but

centres, around thé life of peasants of many races living in

an outlying village.



The story : a:"a Wil

called Chaguat wuoer

mtroduced! to Tiger,

year-old Indian

Ch ay’ the

t € ao]

“ t

- r

up for ra 6

fe when ft

ried wag big &. ple

and drink, plenty ceremony,’
Tiger marri Urmilla, . an

an
they

Indian girl of#bout his age,

modved to 4 village calicd Baratia,
where they hf! body i. mud
hut ar e 1
Ind Chinese reerce
together. Inthe. back streets ths
Indians lived sunpkey»ekserving
their custems ang, tending thei:
fields, selliigâ„¢ the produce in th
vilage_ oy dnemearby San: Juan.
The negroés were never farmers,
and most of them did d jobs
around: the vill worked in
the city, The Ciinece were either
laundeters or shop keepers.
The*War d 3
much. Tige like her In#
dians ‘tended |} rden ind
Urmilla w with child.
Their neighbour re negroes,
and throughout the novel the au
th shows how different

races in Trinidad can get on Well
together if they forget ‘their ori
gims afd remember only that they

are all Trinidadian: But then
the Americans came to build a
road, gnd the rythm of life in
the village w broken. Tiger -and



many Gthers | their gardens and

were ‘hired by the Americans to
help build the road
Tiger became restless and djs-

contented. He had learned to read
and he could not make up his
mind about what he would do
when the Americans left..“What
was he going to do with all the
money he would make working for
the Americans. He would go away
and study. No, he would Stay. anid
build big house. Nar man. Buy
plenty; land and have big garden.
Nar. Send children to Port-of-
Spain-to get big cducation, come
doetor and lawyer. Open up a shop

qd thake moxz mercy Send
Urmilla and the chilaren co Chague
Ss and go awey to another land

with oygie. See America. Go
England”? ---»- eR

Atier ae Lanouga an emo-
tional om ‘Tiger inairages te
arrive:@t a soluiion to his prob-

iccas, Bia we leave him standing
on tagpnew highway wide Geass
Whizthg by chewing a blaieyof,
Brass. 27 het

A Brighter Sun is an interest-"
ing liffle novel and snows ‘great
promise Samwel Selvon, a, Trin-
idadiag-Indiin, has managed by
skilful combination of fact’ and
fictionto tell the story of the effect
of theowar on Trinidad in général
on ong)small community in- pare
ticulare The frequent use of-¢mude
expressions may shock some
readers; and the fact that most of
the beef is written in distemeeaiee
ciseourgv@e others, but there #§ no
doubt ‘that this is one of the best
novels..to be written by a West
Indian; ;

THE MONDAY STORY by James
Leasor (0.U.P. 7/6)

Thig%s not much of a novel, but
it is areexcellent educational book
‘wrapped up in novel form.

Designed for young people it
gives an accurate account of the
aifficulties and rewards of journ-
alism ‘as a career as well as

~



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providing a_ certain
valuable instruction.
The author tells the story of
uree boys who spend their first
year after leaving school in search
f a journalistic career. One gets
very dull job in Fleet Street,
nd spends his time hoping that
one day a reporter will be sick
and he will get a chance to show
what he can do. Another tries
freelancing, and finding it tedious
after a time decides to become a
farmer instead.. The third goes
bout it the right way and joins
he staff of a small provincial
per, planning gradually to work
s way up and then try for a job
on a London daily.

amount of

Al three boys started believing
he glamorous Hollywood ver-
sion of a newspaperman’s life, to
fnd out only too that there is
very little glamour and a lot of
hard work involved.

I strongly recommend this book
tos any school boys and school
girls who are contemplating going
into journalism, The author him
self writes for a London daily, and
has had experienee of all sides of
journalism: he writes with au-
thority, and with the enthusiasm
of one who, knowing all the diffi-

culties, would still follow no other
eareer,

— et SCHOONERS
y asil Greenhill (Percival
Marshall 30/~) a

This book will be of interest to
all those who make a study of
iautical history. It deals with the
schooners, which developed with
the elippers, multiplied with the

big steel ships, and sem
ave-still sailing now HR

They began as carriers of ripen-

ing fruit, racing home from th
Mediterranean oe the Levant, with
their perishable Later
they compe! as g al traders

for car too small for the bi
ships of the time. -

Then the business of carr.
cargoes of salted Newfoundlan:
cod fish across the Atlantic to
Europe expanded at the end of the
19th century, and the schooners
sailed backwards and forwards
with this cargo, in one of the
hardest and most romantic trades
ef all time. In 1930 these little
chips ceased to sail the Atlantic,
end then the last of them took ‘to

-he home trade about the British
isles.

No history of these ships has
ver been written, and this book,
with its text and plans and photo-
eraphs, rescues from permanent
obscurity one of the less known
but most enthralling aspects of
modern British nautical history.







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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



Students Find It Harder
To Get Jobs

THIS is the month when pru-
dent students of London Univer-
sity in the final year call on the
University’s Appointments Board
to discuss their prospects of get-
tiig jobs after they have taken

their examinations in the sum-
mer.
What are those prospects? I

have been talking to the board's
secretary, Mr. H. R. Walters, and

deputy secretary Miss M. C.
Robertson, They both say the
“market” for graduates is hard-
ening.

There is usually a slump in

demand at the time of a General »:

Election; after the election the de-
mand as a rule picks up agaia.
This time it has not done so.

This hardening process made
itself felt first upon the market
for women graduates; it has now
extended to men. The reasons fox
it are twofold. Business firms
and industrial enterprises have
complete the task of making good
wartime staff shortages; and the
number of students at universi-
ties today is much larger than it
was before the war (at London it
is more than double; the 1939-40
figure—11,000, in 1951-52 23,000)

It Takes Longer

“WE see from two to three
thousand people a year,” said Mr.
Walters, “about a third of them
arts students. The average com-

ent person coming to see us in

ebruary would in the past, have
probably been fixed up with a job
by September, With the harden-
ing of the market the interval
between their leaving the uni-
versity and our being able to
place them is likely to be rather
longer.”

The board does not cover the
specialised fields of medicine, the
Church, or the Bar; but it
directs the inquiries of many
hundred students to professional
organisations which have their
own equivalent to an appoint-
Te pan painie fern. thb.orell

“We see people from the cradle
tothe grave,” said Mr, Walters,
a large, friendly man, himself a
B.Sc, of London, and holder of
the Military Cross. “Many
parents bring boys and girls to
see us before they have entered
the university.” At the other end
of the scale, a man of 74 recently
asked help, as a _ graduate, in
finding a Pop,

Registration with the board
costs 2s. 6d. for every six months
of registration. Those registered
receive a weekly bulletin contain-
ing a collation of jobs publicly ad-
vertised and others known to the
board and not yet filled. 3

“Quite frequently,” said Miss
Robertson (a B.A. of Oxford, M.A.
of Glasgow), “we get applications
from graduates of Oxford, Cam-
bridge, the Scottish Universities
who say ‘We've heard you're so
good,’ ”

Does the quality of the degree
taken count in getting a job?

For scientists it matters a lot
whether they get a good degree.
In arts, the larger ine like a
first or second-glass honours,
though they are not, very often,
concerned about what subjects
have been read.

In engineering it does not seem
to matter about the quality of
the degree so long as_ students
have gone through the syllabus
and passed their examination.

What of the pay that young men
and women can expect to receive
when they enter ustry or com-
merce with a university degree
after their names?

For men, the figure is about
£475 at the age of, say, 24,
though this may vary £50 either
way. The average figure has gone
up by some £75 in the past two
years,

Before the war a young man
going into business from _ the
university would expect £250—
equivalent, says the board, to
£500 to-day.

The best appointment
through the board in the

made
last



year was for a man who .got a
second in science. He had no
previous experience in business,



but had served through the war.
His starting salary was £800

Women Score

Women, untroubled by National
Service which, said Mr. Walters,
“has bedevilled the pattern of
recruitment for men,” start
younger and will receive £300—
£350 as a rule. Those who teach

or enter the civil service will
probably receive more.
The views of industry and busi-

upon the value of a univer-

sity training? Big firms have for
a long time set a store upon the
training a degree implies. Not

all smaller firms yet realise how
much of the best materials pro-
duced in the schools is going on
nowadays to the universities.
“They are not as enlightened
we should like,” said Mr.
Walters “but there are signs of an
improvement since the war.”

—LES.

as



Decision On
Stabbing
Confirmed

In the Assistant Court of
Appeal Their Honours Mr, H, A.
Vaughan and Mr. A, J. H. Hane

schell yesterday confirmed the
decision of His Worship Mr. C.
L. Walwyn who sentenced 27-
year-old hawker Undine Hink-|

son of Richmond Gap, St. Michael |
to one month’s imprisonment |
with hard labour for wounding |
Helena Gittens on her
shoulder with a knife.

Gittens appealed against Mr.
Walwynis decision and was also}
ordered “to pay the cost of a peal |
which amounted to 10/4. Gittens |
said that on February 28 about:
12.12 pm. she was on Swan
Street and went up to the tray of
the defendant. While there an
argument arose and the defend-
ant took up a knife from her tray
and cut her on the left shoulder.

Island Constable Theophilus
Holder arrested the defendant.
Sgt. Murrell prosecuted for the
Police from information received.



21 Candidates For
Entry To U.C.W.L.

They are 21 candidates for
entry to U.C,W.I, Two are taking
the entrance examination; 18 are
taking the Barbados Government
Exhibition, These 18 candidates
with an additional one, are taking
the U.C.W.1. Scholarship examina-
tion. The examination started
Monday, Feb, 25 and ended Fri-
day, Feb. 29.

University College Of The West
Indies

Candidates for Entrance Exam-

ination in Arts:—Alma I, Lloyd,
Alvin F, E, Barnett.

Candidates for both U.C.W.I.

Scholarship Examination and
Barbados Government Exhibi-
tion
NATURAL SCIENCE
Geoffrey Rudder, Erskine &,
Ward.
ARTS

Courtney N, McL. Blackman,
Mary ©. Brathwaite, Ernest A.

Cadogan, Shirley I, Clarke; Colin
Cc. Deane, Henry De B. Forde,
Alwin J. Harding; Mitchinson pb.
S. Hewitt, Sheila D. King, Colin
F. Kirton; Marion E. P, Newton,
Peter A, Sobers, Charles H. T.
Thorpe; David Williams, Grace
M. E. Yard; Sylvia E, Yard.

Candidate for U.C.W.I, scholar-
ship only: Arts—Clement A, §S,
Hopkinson,



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One Month
For Stabbing



“This kind of wounding is be-
comin. very prevelant in the
island and I have to make an
example of you. This offence

+

was committed in the middle of
the town and in the middle of the
day," His Worship Mr. C. L.
Walwyn, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”, told 27-year-old
hawker Undine Hinkson of Rich-
mond Gap, St. Michael, yesterday
whee he sentenced her to one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour for wounding Helena Git-
tens on her left shoulder with a
knife on February 28

Hinkson pleaded guilty to the
charge, but appealed against Mr.
Walwyn’s decision, Helena Git-
tens told the court that about 12.12
p.m, on February 28 she was in
Swan Street and went to the de-
fendant’s tray. While there both
of them got in an argument and
the defendant pulled a knife
fromthe tray and made several
stabs at her with it. One of the
stabs “caught” her on the left
shoulder and one of her fingers
was also cut.

- “Murder”

Island Constable Theophilis
Holder said that on February 28
about 12.12 p.m, he was on Swan
Street when he heard shouts of
“murder’. On going to the bot-
tcm of Swan Street he saw the
defendant and complainant fight-
ing, The defendant was making
several attempts to stab the com-
plainant and eventually the com-
plaimant was cut on her left
shoulder. He held the defendant
and another woman managed to
take away the knife.

Asked by Mr. Walwyn what she
had to say, Hinkson said that the
complainant came up to her and



Harbour News
“Lady Patricia”
On Dry Dock

The M.V. Lady Patricia which
arrived here on Monday from St.
Vincent is now in the dock-
yard of the Central Foundry
Limited. It is understood that
the opportunity is being taken of
repainting and doing minor re-
pairs to her.

. & ca

Also undergoing repairs is the
Schooner United Pilgrim. She
arrived here from St. Lucia on
20th February with a leak in her
stem and consequently had to be
towed into the harbour, She is
now leaned to one side in the
inner basin of the careenage.
Repairs are now almost com-
pleted and the United Pilgrim
will be accepting cargo during
the week. :

For the past three days there
has been a great stir of business

on the lower side of the outer
basin of the careenage. Mans
lighters lined the wharf anc

were being laden with cargo for
the S.S. Crofter.

Included among her cargo are
1600 bags of sugar, 500 bags o!

refined sugar, 200 drums ot
syrup, 550 drums of fancy
molasses, and 200 drums of
vacuum-pan molasses. ae

Crofter will be leaving for Lon-
don today,
+ me *

Also unloading her cargo from
the United Kingdom has been the
S.S. Philosopher.. Both the Phil-
osopher and the Crofter are con~-
signed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co.,

Ltd.

aD

started to abuse her. After the
argument the complainant cuffed
her in the face and while they
were fighting she noticed that
the complainant was cut,











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a a



(By CHARLES CLARKE)

Registrar of the Courtauld Institute of
Ait London University

J. M, W. Turner exhibited his

first oil painting in the annual

Roya! Academy exhibition in 1797,
ar the age of 22. By this time he
was already an accomplished
water—colourist and his drawings
had been accepted by the Academy
as early as 1790. His early tuition
in the oil medium is obscure
although tradition has it that he
copied at the studio of Sir Joshua
Reynolds, who died in 1792.
Turner entered the Royal Academy
Schools in 1789 and it seems
reasonable to suppose that he
learnt the elements of his craft
curing this period. His first works
are dark and almost monochro-
matic and betray a lack of
experience in his medium. His
increasing skill and confidence are
reflected in the growing volume
of his work during the next few
years, in which he established a
Feputation as a marine painter.
is aspect of his work reachpd
its full maturity in The sun rising
in a Mist (painted in 1807) where
he outmatched William van der
Velde and Aelbert Cuyp.
Like many another English
inter his early work was often
a@sed upon Dutch 17th century
Models and in addition to marine
painting, landscapes and genre
Subjects were handled with in-
freasing virtuosity. The sea and
everything connected with the sea
fascinated Turner throughout his



life and provided him with endless

subjects both calm and stormy.
Ris interest in fisherfolk is vivialy
reflected in the bustling stormy,
atmosphere of Calais Pier painted
in 1803. As early as 1800 the
calm radiance of Richard Wilson,
the great 18th century English
landscape painter, appeared in
Turner's mythological subject
Aeneas with the Sibyl This
picture was the first of a long line
of paintings in which Greek
mythology and Roman_ history
were later made the vehicles of
dazzling effects of light and colour.
In 1802 the Treaty of Amiens
opened up Europe again for a brief
period to travellers from Britain:
Turner hurried over to France and
Switzerland by way of Calais, and
visited the Louvre, where he made
a number of notes on the pictures.
He was enthusiastic about Titian’s
use of colour and the balanced
light and shade of Nicolas Poussin;
Ruysdael he also admired, but he
disliked Rubens’ system of double
lighting though he thought the
Flemish painter’s technique was
brilliant.

The effect of Poussin’s work
upon Turner is clearly noticeable
in the pictures painted immedi-
ately after this visit to France.
Always a first rate draughtsman,
his painting becomes firmer and
the pattern of light and shade
more decisive. The influence of
Poussin culminates in The Goddess
of Discord choosing the Apple of
Cantention in the Garden of the
Hesperides exhibited in 1806 abt
the British Institution. The in-
fluence of Titian makes itself felt
in the bolder colours which Turner
began to use in 1803 as well as in
subject matter and the echo of
Ruysdael can fbe detected in
Turner’s landscapes for the next







What You Should Know
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Why So Many Students Recommend
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20 years. In 1807 there appeared
a brilliant essay in the manner of
Dutch 17th century genre painting
entitled The Blacksmith’s Shop.
Here we find bright touches of
local colour and an accomplished
treatment of light. This was fol-
lowed in 1808 by The Death of
Nelson in which Tyrner estab-
lished himself as England's
greatest historical painter.
During the first period of Turn-
er’s career as a painter in oils his
earlier topographical drawings had
served as models which were soon
transformed into highly original
compositions. As his confidence
increased the range of his work
became wider and his technique
expanded rapidly. By 1808 his
earlier chiaroscuro, which was
iather like that of Rembrandt,
became charged with an atmos-
phere that was bright and
luminous even in the shadows, and
the whole key of his colour
sightened appreciably. The earlier
works such as Calais Pier were
possessed of a Byronic fury which
gave way during the next four
years to quietness and meditation.
In spite of much ill-considered
criticism a number of influential
patrons and critics supported him;
during the second half of his life
wealthy manufacturers began to
buy his paintings. Throughout his
life Turner enjoyed loyal support
from the majority of his fellow
Academicians, especially the
younger men, and on. at least
one occasion the Academy was
severely criticised for its modern—
ist tendencies in countenancing
his work, Turner did not, how-
ever, rely solely upon the annual
exhibitions at the Royal Academy
to sell his paintifgs. In 1808 he
built his own gallery in Queen
Anne Street West and for some
years held annual exhibitions of
his work. After these exhibitions
were discontinued he kept a num—
ber of his pictures on permanent
show; some of them were sold,
but several others which he called
his “darlings” he refused to part
with and they were eventually
bequeathed to the nation.

Between 1806 and 1810 Turner
painted 12 oil sketches of subjects
connected with the River Thames
and the Wey. All of them were
painted on thin veneer boards and
are among the earliest examples
ef outdoor painting in oils. Swift
and summary in their treatment
they are notes of rapidly changing
effects of light and shade which
foreshadow the oil sketches of
John Constable some years later.
As early as 1709 Turner’s interest
in light led him to study Claude
Gellee whose work made him feel
both excited and unhappy because
he felt it was inimitable. The
influence of Claude lasted through
out Turner's life, more especially
in his classical and mythological
subjects, but by 1814 Crossing the
Brook shows him applying the
idiom of Claude to the English
landscape both in design and in
the rendering of light by subtle
gradations of tone. In Dido build-
ing Carthage, painted in the same
year, the method of the French
master appears just as fully de—
veloped in a classical subject.

This clearly distinguishable
phase of Claudian influence in
which Turner renders light mainly
by subtle gradations of tone ends

ever made, It
numerous

Regent pupils.





Many students say that the moderate fee charged
for the Course is the best investment they have

ve enrol on the recommendation of
S

You will enjoy taking this famous Course.
will find that the lessons are so fascinatingly written



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Oil Paintings of J. M. W. Turner

ASupreme Colourist



———

|



|

ULYSSES DERIDING POLYPHEMUS—Painted by J. W. Turner.

(by Courtesy of the Trustees of the National Gallery, England)
° -~: °

in 1819, the year of his first visit
to Rome with the large painting
of Richmond Hill on the Prince
Regent's Birthday. The influences
of the various European masters
whom he had emulated were
cumulative and cannot be neatly
separated one from _ another:
throughout the remainder of his
life it is possible to detect the
effect of all of them in a single
ecomposijion. Steadily his own
very personal vision unfolds itself,
reinforced by an acute visual
memory, and as early as 1813 he
had produced an astonishingly
modern landscape in Frosty Morn.

ing, a picture which strangely
enough achieved imstant popu-
larity, Archdeacon Fisher, who

was a staunch friend of Constable,
described it as “a picture of
pictures.” Turner paints a simple
picture of a frosty morning in the
country with the calmness of
Wordsworth. It is a detached yet
deeply felt interpretation of that
moment when the winter sun rises
end slowly thaws the frosty land.

An important feature of Turner's
career was his practice of spending
several months each year travell-
ing in search of material for his
pictures. Owing to the unsettled
state of Europe, his visit to France
and Switzerland in 1802 was the
only occasion on which he left this
country until 1817. Thereafter his
visits to the Rhine, Switzerland
and Italy became more frequent
until he was 70 years old ond
failing health curtailed his travels.
His first visit to Rome in 1819
brought about a marked change
in his work, Like Poussin,, Claude
and Richard Wilson before him he
tound lasting inspiration in the
scenery around Rome, Trivoli and
Naples. On his return to London,
Turner’s colour became brilliant
In 1813 he had already begun
priming his canvas with white in
order to obtain greater light in all
parts of the picture. The first
Italian visit clarified his ideas and
from now on colour and light
became indivisible. The first re-
sults of this visit to Italy dis
appointed his admirers, but in
1823 he produced The Bay of
Baiae, a much idealized rendering
ef the subject in which dazzling

—





is not surprising therefore that

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THE REGENT INSTITUTE
(Dept. 501D) ’
Palace Gate, London, W.8, England.

Please send me a free copy of your prospec-
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RR DS Pear
(BLOCK LETTERS)

ADDRESS

a a i



light is rendered in pure colour;
the white ground is stained in
parts like water—colour, in others
Shinly stuinbled.
n Ulysses deriding Po!
painted in 1829™he ‘ostabt eas"
completely. new harmony. All is
light and colour, from the flaming
design of the morning clouds to
the transparent veils of blue in
the shadows. This picture is pro-
bably the greatest historical paint-
ing produced by the’ Romantic
Movement in England. At about
the same period Turner painted a
number of fine pictures at Pet-
worth Park, in the English county
ot Guctas Oph wo Studies of
various effects of light. In Interior
Baa beck eee the room
ransmu a burst of
sunshine into a cascade of jewel
like colour: Through this riot of
colour the structure of the room
can be dimly made out, Colour
and light are swept into a spiral
pattern which leads the eye into
the picture in a manner that be
comes typical of the last 20 year
of his life. In the Petworth
eae are ay some simple and
r pieces li‘:e Th
Pior Brighton. A tole ag
The following decade of Turner's
life is characterized by work in
— the wand is often laid in
v masses of blue, yellow or red.
Norham Castle is a vision of mist
and: sunrise carried out in prim-
ary red, blue and yoltow
worked into a white ground
French

a_ foreshadowing of
Impressionism in

19th century
its colour. The decade closes
with The Fighttng Temer-
aire in which the painter returns

once more to a historical subject.

|

This time he contrasts the graceful)
sailing ship of the past with the
new age of steam represented by
the tug. The colour is nearly a:
limpid as water colour, and the
fiver is painted with all thai
mastery which Turner possessed
when he dealt with water.
From 1840 onwards storms, fires
and elemental forces occupied his
attention. His brushwork becomeag

]





looser and the structure of thing
seen are suggested rather than)
described. The last great con
troversial picture of his career,
Rain, Steam and Speed, w

painted in 1844. Here the elements
are represented by the steam and
speed of the railway train rushin
across the viaduct and by the
driving rain which transmutes the
light into a shimmering opalescent
mist. During the last ten years
of his life ‘Turner exploits every
effect of light and darkness and
his compositions become more
abstract, His inspiration comes
now from the idea lying behind
jus subject rather than from the
outward appearance.
lurner’s importance
largely in the way
anticipated the

lies very
in which he
development of

ndscape painting in the 19th
century. Long before he died the
canvas primed with white and the
light scale of colours which he
used had been widely adopted
The works of the last decade of
his life remained a closed book
until the present century, when
it was realized that Turner's
dreams were nearer to the truth

than had been suspected, Outside
these istands he was unappreciated
during nis lifetime except in Italy

and the United States. ’



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PAGE TWELVE





















SUNDAÂ¥ ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952
1
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i. A farmer ate two eggs every



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order in which they started on A, in 13 moves had po chickens; nobody eve ft
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has to a candle, oil lamp and fire I Josie?" said Mrs Wayz 3
ready to be lit. Which does hy | Brice oe her husband the 3 7
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, ’ PARTIAL BALDNESS =
VORB Db | | mise oil
¥ | Ruane and the New Bonnet—2 THIN & FALLING HAIR rub THERMOGENE
ALL -SATUR DAY PUZ2L | The daily application of this Hair

Food results unfailingly in a really eae Rub all over
E | beautiful glossy head of hair. | your chest, throat, and back.
LANALOL No. | With oil (Yellow It does you good in two Its healing warmth relieves
5.8 | ALOL No. 2 Without oll (Green ways — you rub it on congestion, and breathing the

Label) for hair a is . rey, oily —

the
hem a







aay leasant medicinal
{rom | hee nt and cooli and you breathe it in! ae pe . YAPQUE: If gives
ue vard | LOL CREAt (Blue Label). A ee ears nose, throat, and lungs.
o SQUTRM

eas hair d
ANA lL SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite |
EANAL OL "sobipiriED | DOUBLE- ACTION

LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red

7 SS steer THERMOGENE

r go h work etches a basket and a cloth to | Local Distributors: }
h a ava = Wil 03 frum? w Mise Laven a GENERAL AGENCY CO., Lanalo wan MEDICATED RUB
© instead fetch a new bonnet M good time to catch the ”

Bhat Miss Lavender has been she'says as she gives nhs ‘ (Barbados) Ltd. ft TeoweLs In big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins
|

word)

You have to urrange
il 50 words in suc
in order that the
relationship between
any word and that
next to it is governed
by one of six ruleg.

RULES

i. The word may be
an anagram of
word mh a ae ‘



Rupert finds that his mojher
wants him | oO go on quite



be very, very a
1 '
a long delighted to be







2 1t
synonym of “he we word that pre A typical succession of words
cedes it. * aise k e. Bie ‘ain — Storm
3. It rl ‘orn reen

adiine 08 oarleiter to, aubktaeti

one letter from, or nging one at

letter in, the preceding word. sia tt Wh oe ordi iit
aI aspoala, an—Roman — Manor—Mayor—

the Seine oe in re Co pranien — Patinch — _punes

simile, metaphor. or association Dri ;

of ideas. I
5. It may form with the genue —

preceding word a name of a wy Ba oh gel a Waite

well-known person, place, or: Steak—Steam

thing in fact or fiction, TY im e— Table—Stabie

P.O. Box 27 | = TRSI/! “SS















Kidneys



rid
Firm

6. It may be associated with Film—FUl—C harge—-Onse'! |
the preceding word in title or action of a book. play, or other W'!the-SQUIRM
composition London Express Service



Fly by Constellation to





The Lightning Pick-me
The Safe and Wong



TABLETS
THE LIGHTNING PICK-ME.UP



And Save iis On “Off Peak’ Fares

Your flight by p: ivized Constellation Speedttrd
saves you days of travelling time — extra time
© do and see more on business or pleasure,





| You relax in deep-seated comfort, enjoy complimen:ary
| reals and mealtime qarinks in flight high above the weat! “ YEAST-VITE ” Tabiets give you fast relief from pain and follow it up by
N . a on er helping you to feel better and brighter afterwards. Each ““YEAST-VITE”
pele Sacha pay not eve n a tir Tablet is a scientific combination of analgesic — or pain-relieving ingredients
attentive B.O.A.C, service. —together with the important stimulant, Caffeine and the valuable tonic
B OA C E Vitamin B:, Test the effect with the next pain or cold that attacks you! As the
IN 1908 Prof. C. V. Boys made the following | WATE, takes good care of vou unpleasant symptoms fade and you begin to feel your old self again you will
remarks in his Presidential address to the | , be one more added to the countless thousands of people who have proved the
Physical Society in London : Piaeegitete aes po great benefit of * YEAST-VITE” ‘ Pick-Me-Up’ Tablets! Get a bottle TO-DAY!
BAKBADOS Non “ BH F
“The Lubricating property of oil depends | RET er a as . Qu e Relsoves
on something which is at present un- | | FA FARE | ,
known..... no-one knows what oiliness | | od
is” od LONDON -- 1,560.10 1,301.60
oe Ly | a Paya
This blissful state of ignorance continued until Fed NEW YORK _.. 518.10 st } . ;
is bli ig , 2 icy
March 1920 when Wells and Southcombe pub- ge PARIS +h 1,560.10 1,301.80 i] a U 4 y.. L ¢ | A
lished a paper showing conclusively that the | MIAMI 406.50
“oiliness” of a mineral oil could be substan- ie et ~ 4 ¢) ES é iis
tially improved by additives. Oils made on | Consult {
the Wells Southcombe process became market- | Atrwaye’ Lowes boa or ge West Indian | 4 3 VE R i} H iE ESS
ed throughout the World as a. — bados. Telephone reet dgetown—Bar- | ee

NERVE anv
RHEUMATIC
ails

GERM OIL y
Pag tn uh a. #~ ! Y . Q. 0): A. [
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LID. |

SRITISH OVERSEAS AIR W



AY CORPORATION mde
Pe me weal iS Sereerstenererens i _ st















ee ee Oe

i SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN



HENRY





BY CARL ANDERSON

We never

a let go!

/ Vigilance over the high quality of

e “Black & White” is never relaxed. Bicnded in
= the special “‘ Black & White ” way this truly

eutstanding Scotch is in a class al! its own.

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

Ine Seer th in the Blending

Scotch Whisky Distillers






FOR IT!.. /|

en

> io
HE'S FALLING }|



By Appoir tment te:

to HM. King oge Vi James Buchanan & Co. Led,



JAMES BUCHANAN & CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND









177 DADDY, AREN'T 4"
| (yOu COMING UP
‘7 AND KISS ME P



MC WAS iT you)

I KISSED








DADDY, AREN'T YOU
COMING UP AND KISS
ME GOODNIGHT ?

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

Lh
y



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only





























G SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Brancnes “"Tweedside,
Speighistown and Swan Sirees
Usually Now Usually Now
Tins Brisket-Beef (4-Ib) 4.20 4.00 Tins Anchor Powd. Milk a nie
Tins Aylmer’s Fruit Salad 85 80 Tins Smedleys Peas 49 45
, Pkgs. Shredded Wheat 48 12 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 23 19
IT LOOKS LIKE WE'LL «HE HAS ENOUGH HOSTAGES
HAVE TO PLAY ALONG, --DALE... THE CREW... THE BRAINGOYS! THIS
FLASH {iG MOE KNOWS GUARDS ! NO...ALL WE STIFF WAS SPOILIN'
THE FUEL CAN BE Cua CAN DO IS STALL FOR





MANURACTURED IN THE
PRISON LAB! AND IF

E TRY ANY TRICKS... |

AE... AND PRAY!






THE COLONNADE GROCERIES








, w= OF THIS RING / SHE'LL
Iv LOOK IN THAT POOR, BANDAGED | | BE HAPPY TO GET IT BACK,
GIRL'S EYES/ LUCKY WEE WHATEVER HER NAME 5...








mone Enyoyable by

AUSTIN.



4 OMe pam-[e

~at ee ORNL AE EO Rae SRE TE 84
‘





LOOK AT You! YoU USED
TO DRESS LIP - LOOKED
DAPPER -NOW LOOK AT
YOU / CARELESS -LNTIDY-
LOTHES

THAT I WILL. OO-AND
THERE'S NO TIME LIKE
THE PRESENT-





STRANGE - I'M
WEARIN' THE
GAME SUIT-





| i We have been advised by The Austin Motor








Co,, Ltd. that cars are readily available under
the Overseas Delivery Scheme for visitors
to England,

AUSTIN=You can fiepens on it!

CALL IN EARLY TO ASSURE DELIVERY
70 SUIT YOUR ARRIVAL IN THE U. k.

(I'M. SORRY... SO. SORRY THINGS
. HAD TO TURN OUT THIS
_ WAY?

<.

~ —SsECKSSTEIIN
=. ./ BROS.




YI DONT KNOW? THERES A LOT | DONT
NOW ABOUT YOU. YOUR NAME, YOUR
FACE..WHY YOU DRESS LIKE THAT**IN
THE JUNGLE - re






LEGEND! YOU'RE MY GUIDE. IF YOU DON'T

= oe
DOK Hi! 4
OOK HEDGE GET RESULTS, I'LL FIREYOU++ OH!

GOING IN CIRCLES FOR DAYS!| 1 00
ARE YOU TRYING IO KEEP ME) THAT?
AWAY FROM NATIVE .

BAY STREET










A40 Somerset



A RTL EEE A NET NRRL OND AT NR SONNET ATE TR













PAGE FOURTEE

———L

N







CLASSIFIED ADS.






































SUNDAY ADVOCATE



| PUBLIC NOTICES

TELEPHONE | 2508. NOTICE
grap wnwtibten anus i nile a a tla THE PARISH OF ST. JOHN
All persons or firms de wit
r Parish are kindly asked end the
THANKS FOR SALE sccounts to the undersigned not later than
inniahesscenisttdainieiiinaiaie the 15th inst
aaa RS. FRASER,
CUMBERBATCH The Cumberbatch AUTOMOTIVE Dee id
family beg through this medium to —_-—— — 2.2.52—2r
return thanks to all those kind friends EE
who sent wreaths, letters of condolence T. S. Kinch. Di BARBADOS CLERKS’ UNION
or in any way expressed their sympat! 7 28.50 The Annual General Meeting of the
in our .recent bereavement Good conditior above Union will be held at the ¥.M.C.A
ss Telephone 207. | (Naval Hall) on MONDAY 10th March
aaa. Pa —" ** 1 1952 at 5 por
LEWIS me tie _undersignes sAR—1 oo Notices of ind/or question:
thanks through this med oe i Teng Car. | tor discussion be sent in writing
who sent wreaths, letters, c App schar illaby, St. | 5, a in a yith
other expressions of sympathy Andrew, 2.2.52—1n ices Ee a n accordance wit!
who also attended the funeral of ou . i th at " te eten
beloyed husband and father Charles] | CAR—1995 Ford Engine Gear Box and ot ue ciated tines tome omen |
Mitchell DaCosta Lewis ae fae — ae | ¥ | Sra between the hours of |
Ursula Lewis (Wife), Colvir St. Andrew 2.3.52—1n March 1952,

Da



Sheila: and Keitha





4 p.m and 6 p.m. any evening.

CHRISTIE SMITH,
















































; ae CAR—Austin 10 H.P. Engine, recently zn cho
(Brother). Gladstone : rebored. Price $390.00. Phone 5128. General 7.
ee 2.3.52—1n 7

. CAR: Morris Minor Car, Saloon 12,00} HARRISON COLLEGE SPORTS.

IN MEMORIAM miles. Excellent condition. Ring 8504 | TUESDAY, 11TH MARCH, 195%

1.3.52 ~2n | The School Sports will be he «
1.30 to 5.30 5 on
ARMSTRONG: In joving ry of our CAR: 1950 Hillman Minx condition | March All Old Ha s are
dear beloved wife and Ethe-Jas new. Apply: W. S. L. Tryhane, | cordially invited. Ther
line Eudora Armstrong Shop-] Maxwell, or Phone 8558, 3339. Boys’ Race towards
keeper of Eagle Hall, who was called 1.3.52—~2n | afternoon
to rest on 2nd March 1948 _ % nae
May glory be her resting place, CAR—1 Morris Car. 8 K.p., mileage J
Now absent from our seeing 24,000. For further particulars, apply NOTICE ;
A long provided place is there, H. A. Cuke, (Junior), c/o Bovell & THE PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
When Father calls His own. Skeete, Phone 4231 29.2.52—t.f.n ALL OWNERS OF DOGS
Ever remembered by the Armstrong] ——— —— .. __. | Who have not yet done So are rer
family. 2.3.52—In CAR: 1950 Wolseley 6/80 10,000 miles. | that their license ex d on the
—- Excellent condit'on 1951 Morris Minor | J@nuary 1952, a 5 be re
FOSTER—jn loving memory of my )11,000 miles. A-1 condition Fort Royal | Without any further delay
beloved husband Darry Alfield Foster [Garage Lid. Telephone 4504. WOOD GODDAR D,
who fell asleep on March 2nd 1951. 2.2.52—4n Parochial Treasure
Blossoms may wither 2.3.52—3
Flowers may die —— ——
Friends may forget you ELECTRICAL
But never will I
Bver to be remembered by his loving wife | PU LIC SALES
Elizabeth A. Foster, The Foster family! ELECTRIC Irons, toasters, mincers,

2.3.62—Iin,

and grandchildren,







GITTENS—In loving memory of my dear









| kettles etc. all reasonable prices.
Electric cooking ranges. At our new
showroom, dial 5136,















Also
K. R. Hunte & Co.,





































REAL ESTATE





















soumay, MARCH 2,





























oe
FOU RENT } WANTED
HOUSES ;
a j HELP
At RALPH I {D's Lower Bay St
Lock pet s s available for CAPABLE NURSE — Must sleep in
and be willing to do housework Apply j
Sine 47 having 2 large|to Mrs. J. A, Millington, “Jamdor,” |
tc | Maxwells Road, Ch. Ch. 2.3.52—2n |
Sho x svir Ls ——$—$—$—
Show Window self to’ oilet and} CLERK—A Lady Clerk for office work |
Wash Basir with a knowledge of shorthand and
No Shop 2 x ving 2 . | tybewntting: and general office work.
b ha Totlet Apply by le stating previous experi-
airs 6000 sq. ft. of ome ence, and lity to x A.B. C/o!
€ tior sving Tollet and Wash] Advocate Company. 1.3.82—3n
Basir Aght and delight! cool
Ali the above i 2 year SALESMAN—For Commission y
ease business. Opportunity to travel fslands
Apply Ralph Be Phone 5010 after} with Ta promotion for right man
hours 8657 2.3.52--3n | Salary tmhonthly. Subr Photo- |
roeugenereseeeereereeenomnrenfenreatin era Bes (confidential) |
BAS RA, Bathsheba, $t, Joseph. Apply Box H. J. K. Barbados Advocate. |
R. Pickering. Windy Wold, Hindsbur 2.3.52—3n |
Road, St. Michael. 2.3.52—2n i
—-—— —-———— -- MANAGER Rockley Golf |
BERESFORD — Maxwell Road. Fully = beaters In t over Club |
furnished, from the Ist March, 3 Hed- bedrooms, living: |
rooms and all modern conveniencés oe sconce oentan ete. also free
Apply: Nurse Pilgrim. Phone 8101. | ight. water and Taxes. Know je of
1.3. 62—2n | Gott an advantage, canvassing will dis-
| quality. Apply by letter to Secretary
BUNGALOW Fully furnished on St. | from whom further particulars can be!
James Coast (7 miles from town), 3 bed- | obtained. 1.3.52—t.f.n
rooms, 2 toilets and? baths. All modern
veniences. Dial John Lamming, 2072 ‘ELLAN
29.2.52—3n | MISC EOUS

le
FLAT Avalon”, Collymore Rock, for |

4 months from Ist March. Dial 3696,

BOARDERS: Male,



Local or Foreign,
| quiet respectable district—near to town—



1.3.52—t.f.n | Bus stop at door. Phone r. .
t ISHE| 9OMS, with y
' ae oD pee Manliness mimic | Person interested in running small ex-
2.3.52—1n |clusive Chub catering to tourist trade
» | which will also carry items for sale

on the

FFREK"—House éalled “Ferek" to this type clientele. Attractive prem-
sea at Worthing. Fully furnished, sn- | ‘ses located mie Apply
ding refrigerator. It has 4 bedrooms | (Confidential) x, rbados
Apply at Cnystal’s Guest House Advocate. .2.52—3n

1.8.52—2n

—_—$__——$$—$$—— TT

(NT
REQUIRED TO RENT: Furnished

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with House, 4 bedrooms St. John district or
Since and Linen, Good Sea-bathing. | "ear for 2/3 years. Full particulars to
For further particulars. Apply to Alma Box.G. H. Advocate Co. aniioe:

6 Coral Sands, Worthing.
2.2.52—t.i.n.

Lashley No,

TWO INJURED










































pos

i lich Cause

Fool if
ilied in 4 pay

a and Itching
Stopped in
7 Minutes




po you
































badly “that nearly
« oie you “y woe?
x skin on feet crack and
peel? At blisters between
your toes the s of your
feet? Do the Wisters break and
rub apd cause morg blisters of
form? Do you 1 get 80 ‘Sore &
es that the tually bleed? If zy .
yon suller tr foot troubles, | | Get m from your ohemlat
you should hat the real}today. Al it tonight and yo ;
cause | ' ungus and that| notice @ renee aus impre nt
you ca Ke { yaur trouble | 14 the morning, - in : oe
lyo t is or parasites derm will have kill the germs,
Wipoka ho. trouble parasites, and fungus respopelbie
. F ; or your trouble,
icILLS THE CAUSE for yourself that your skin sapialy
Ordinary ointments and liquids is becoming soft, clean, smooth, and
ean not do much good because they | healthy, but continue it ina the 3 days
do not f or kill the underlying | longer to e sure tha’ results
cause of your tre uble Fortunately | are coneeay tory, and at
it at last is possible to overcome | the end of this . eer feet are
these foot troubles and also even| not completely e itching,
the most stubborn ringworm infec- | cracking, peeling, 6,9

Nixoderm w

doctor's prescription
this guarantee

tion with the
preacrip-

Nixoderm—based on the





tion of a famous English skin s to put Ni mm
clalist and now imported by leading | days and t if one
chemists. Nixoderm is pogitively | istied in eve
guarantced to end your foot trou- the emp!

ble, and has these 3 detinite actions: | will be

1. Tt kills the germs, parasites, and | from your ¢!

fungus responsible for these foot" antee pro



——= a

SHIPPING NOTICES





































1952

REAL ESTATE

JOHN
ha.
BLADON

@ ce.

A.F.8., F.V.A.

Bes ALwAES ‘avai

FOR SALE
































“LYNCHBURG”, Sth Ave. Belle-
ville — An attractive and well
proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft. Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed),
large See Pon study, modern
kitchen, Bedrooms, garage e'
accepted for quick

Low
sale, gwner going abroad.



“BYWAYS”, New Rd.—
A pleasant, * -war stone
bungalow of c construc-

it.
ith wash!



; OURT ‘ .
See eras sprees” fell asleep | Ltd. 29.2. 52—3n HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | gpe y seein — Souler residential ‘ “e vie, Bel taller
ol e288: CO aeen, Sey TTERIES house, all conveniences, with party-| » _arge Ground Floor Flat avail- storey house z
de edhe cor g gig wholesale wa ave ciry GARAGE | *!zed living room, open verandah, kitchen able Ma Ae Uioderate inclusive Sabb. GENOA, March 1. ROYAL NETHERLANDS and dining
Ser oe Bed thks t ny rest CO., 4671 21.2.52-+ f.n.|and edly a Garage, laundry. 2| Redecoration and agreement for approved Two Brazilian women were se- STEAMSHIP co offen” ¥ sig kitenen, nt Al A storerooms:
But Jesus love thee best SOA Uke bie cea Saale Sie wiittide cite, Hockley New | erent Apply F 3. North, Liste {sen |riously injured today in a collision , - Passengers £08 ae tue garage and large wr Getdtens
: seme szo? Be ast eat »y orothy, | Receiver (without Cabinet) Feet | Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476. | CUS’ NN 2-523" lbetween two automobiles, Hos-|arcg pow eing 2tom OES Vincent, wrens and i Ane, Toente sre about % of an agre
nek, stems (wile), Dapuane ROSY» I 3 . 13.2.52—t.{.n YNS TC, a . NAIRE, 22nd February, . sling ednesday 27th inst. w fruit trees and pasture, a
Nellie, Mrs. Viola’ Tudor (children), |*i"s, Opp. George street, Reine Rd =o via ae | eae a mn Wor, Sone pital officials gave their names as| Ms. HERSILIA, Ist March, (1952. contains good building plot on
Cardon Tudor {son-in-law) si niesas = LAND—A small parcel of land situated | 2°74 December 1952. Apply: Mrs, W. T Gotero Boasdas and Nagra Gon ae. FES TUNGSBORG, 13th Marah, 1952, The Mi. jand, Pasgnccrs will ac- corner site.
»3.52—In. DIOGRAM _19 ; — lin Road View, St. Peter the property of | G7 : no . W. 7! but there were not able to reveal | 5:5, COTTICA, list Match, Q cept Cargo for
——. Cee e et a ed ekentiant | Stanley King. Situated on the north by OE EERE Pent Sal their hamnen in Brasil —UP, SAILING ITO PLYMOUTH AND Dominica, rrat, “HOMEMEDE”, Garrison— This
SMALL—In loving memory of our dear} -ONt 0! 00. May be seen|Albert Forde on the south by Rupert ene a ae Aik ee ee a. AMSTERDAM Nevis and St. Sea Friday Drogerty is ideally situated for
friend and God-mother Mrs, Hilda) aocta Ring Pie. ‘Timpson Lodge | Holder butting and bounding to Public ee i M.S. WL EMSA aren wouruarst, 1858, 7th March 195 most people in this ever popular
Small who has departed on March | coool 95.933 M7 2.92--an | Road. Size 100 x 90, Apply to Stanley PART ONE ORDERS SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND i" ", whilst not
1, es ae ee ns s : ; King. Shermans, St. Peter 2.3.52—1n pu hele white sade eins baa cae My. “CLARA” will pooemt . s ce foe, te its
= Me thet stands as all true lives | ee mn : 4 _= * ruary, b. argo an verandah cannot overlooked, a
Rave stood _ WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGERATOR: |7|T.Np NEAR ROCKLEY GOLF CLUB LI£UT.-COL, J. CONNELL, O.BE,ED, *» |S.S. BLATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952, and Sepenes. a so common with modern
Firm-reoted in the faith, that God is} Cubic feet, Ring 8504. 1.3.62—2n | FS eelient building site for sale, good Commanding, SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBU be notified. This bungalow was erect-
TS . :
WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGHRATOR 4.6. | tesidential section, adjoining north side} j..u. wo. 9 THE BARBADOS REGIMENT wiore, lies soo ie out 1939 & {x constructed of
Ever to be remembered by—Ruth Smith | ic feet in Saptaah Badulititen tor OR #5-| of Golf Course,‘ moderate price. For | issue No 2 oe ie .S| BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952. ith a shingle roof. There
and family 2.3.52—1n | tormation dial 2115 or 4972 details see JOHN M. BLADON & Gl i PARADES — TRAINING 2 o< Cea Tah att i \ i 8 Bove Werpodan. living soait, 4
carne ‘ ’ “hi 4640. 8. 51—t.f, i LIN RIN AND CURACAQ bedrooms, , ‘servants’
SMALLIn loving memory of my dear 1.3.52—2n | Fhone 5.8.51- wife Hilda Small, who was called to HQ Coy.—Interior Economy—Checking kit—(All ranks are required to bring 8. P, MUSSON, SON & CO, about 7,400 sq. ft.
higher service on March Ist 1951. FURNITURE AUCTION ae erate s of sigthing and ecuipmant ispuedy. +i rie wai cape ak Agente 5 5 = =
I long for, household voices gone peipiaiiongein oy is on the open and miniature anges; ose not firing w: o . = = . = i,
For vanished hope * long CABINETS: 2 Kitchen Cabinets in Ta CAR—Ford Prefect Saloon 1950 Model ace “B" Coy will do riot ‘drill, —s BRP iene built bangslow
But God has leg my dear one condition “Diat 8545. S. Weatherhead, | damaged in accident. We are instructed |) 7ynnM oe Ca di N\ ti shingle roof, very well front
i. ‘ - , | The Signal's Platoo Cc is fi e des w
weer Tuan” meee Yaatos p's rnin | de, thi went forsale by, sucttin | Sn‘ uondays and Wedngigia. ress ns “PeeP TH NO SRD Pee nadian ‘Navona teams jipe A A Pg
Brereton. "2.3,52—In. LIVESTOCK at 2p.m. John M. Bladon & Company,| Band Practices. ve held on Mon. 3, Tues. 4, and Wed. 5 Mar. 82 nn kh errr || ge ait fe EY jgapde and gine
uctioneers, 2.3.52—4n " | EE kitchen ne Yoom,
Recruits
WEEKES: In loving memory of our dear 7 SOUTHBOUND
husband and father Robert Evans ‘ COW: One Graded Guernsey Cow giv- I will set up for Sale at Chimborazo, |, et ls Mgr training om Monday 3 March 1952. ak 1 AS, ae, pagty, 9 serene poms A of
Weekes who departed this life on|ing twelve pints milk daily, third Calf. | St. Joseph one board and shingled House | ~ Pan . ; a ” closed and there is direct
March 2, 1948. A. W. Williams. Ae db nds | te x 10 and thedrost 80 Mongey March | “She Skidot Wétween the Oppoers and Ws & Santeants for, the, Boris “wcores | | HORM Siiat Cnuimme oe) Tye Re ae eee: : ee ee Recess to Whe yea with good bath-
Till memory fades and life departs, |} ————_—_—_—_—_____________ | 3, 1962 at 12 o'clock noon WOs & th a - Offwern 008 iy, Wee won ne . Serjeants. Se ‘ * + 14 rh, March 24 March ee
You'll live forever in our hearts.| GOAT: One Alpine Goat, fresh in Milk, | Terms Cash, 3. ORDERLY OFFICE . + es :=NDIN:
Remembered by—The Weekes Family,| First Litter. Apply: E. Rayside, White R. A. LER, | ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDE — SERJEANTS FOR WEEK ENDING eiartias dvi iie Hin 'vely
Henry's Lane 2.3.52—I1n | ha oa St. Michael 2.3.52—1n Hoyeninet Auctioneer, | Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. Goddard NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arriy Arrives well constructed modern home
_ : Lat a oe ist. “F | __ Orderly Serjeant 234 Sit. Williams, E. D, | Barbados Barbados Boston St John Halifax cleverly designed for easy running
mith gous weded atta ee, wow | — Nex orderly Office Li “LADY RODNEY" .._». 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March Rae eee ea: oem
yg Sg A Anni? ee ; Ouderiy Cicer Yiieut, we. iti “LADY NELSON” |. ..22 March 24 March 3 April. 4 April? April Pee eee, etie to eae
INTERESTING TO Gibbs, Hindsbury Road, St. ofientel UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER S " 'eg.COX, Maior, — CRUISER +a. @ April TApa = — 14 April 17 April tiled bathroom with separate
hs "| By instructions received from the Th ee & notes For further particulars, apply to— pws , tiled kitchen, laundry,
VISIT: MECHANICAL ean Co. I will sell on Friday, PART JI ORDERS " oe j with st apartets Say Meee Cae?
‘are h at Messrs. Chelsea Garage HE B: AD GIMEN L NO. o iccess
You can now get Pinfold Street (1) 1949 Standard 7 ee ane OFRtAe NO: ¢ f of stone with
Office ecuinpmernt of all kind= Steel] Vanguard. (Damaged in accident) Term rr STRE NGTH DECREASE — Resigna’

Your usual WARM WATER BATH
IF THER

E iS GAS IN HOUSE



Safes, Skandex Visible Records,














cash, Sale at 2 p.m.







|

and and Standard Typewriters, Adding and VINCENT GRIFFITH |
oe at 29ur Gae Shommite Porce: Calculating Machines, Duplicating Auctioneer
lnin Bama Gas Geysers ... Machines. Bradshaw & Company. 2.3.52—4n. |
® minutes you can have warm bath 28 .2.52—t.f.n. a }
SC US UNDER THE SILVER
MISCELLANEO HAMMER
ANTI ON WEDNESDAY 5th by order of Mrs
Gliss, Waa aa Jewels, fre ehiver | ly G. Chase we will sell at “San Souci”
Watercolours, | Early books, Maps, Auto- | %¢nsinuton New Road her Furniture
All_ who are members of grephs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop yn which ineluges
A.M.O.R.C. and other inter- adjoining Royal Yacht Club. i Tip-Top ee Table, Upright |
s ora 2. “hairs, very good erbice Chair, Settee
ested persons are invited to 3.2.53—tEn. | via.” Sideboard, Ornament Tables, |
attend a BO) SPUN—A Uphols Arm C r, Rockers, TFiant |
lovely un from Italy in ¢ Stands all in Mahogany: Glass and China, |
SERIES OF . Thirty Beigns and louts, usually | Single Iron Bedsteads and Beds, Mahog. |
$1.86 reduced for one w to $1.73 yard. | Pressing Table, B.W. Chairs, Larder, |
Visit KIRPALANI an 273 7 Three Burner Oil Stove, Good Coffee |
'2.3.62—1n, | Mill, Kitchen Utensils, Glass Doors,

MEETINGS

ul



BOX CART: One Low Mule drawn



ars, Dial 2622 or Burton,

Pine Road







Windows
items,

and Shutters, Ferns and ot

her |



a Box Cart with spare wheel, built t Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms cash.
2 my ne yest, Breage carny a cow. Apply: Mrs. J. Hi. Wil.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
’ kinson, Erin Hall, St. Michael. Auctioneers, |
ae every Tuesday Night ' 2.3.52—3n 2,3.52—2n. |
a 2.3.52—1n COCOANUT PLANTS: True Dwarf
iE 2 Type, large, healthy Plants. For partic- LOST «& |



et

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

EASTER CARDS '
MOTHER’S DAY
CARDS

Spanish—English, English—Spanish
Dictionary ar
Everything Shakespeare ever
wrote. Rudyard Kipling’s verse
(over 800 pages).
GLASS — $1.50 1
a
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE















sir

ju




ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

st

Py

De

oo

Just Received .

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply

>

G. W. Hutchinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street





NOTICE

not be Modernised.
Whether you are furnishing

a Home or an Office the
Modern Furniture Co-opera-
tion can do the job to suit

Why

ur taste and your pocket.

. why not stop in and give
us your order, whether it’s
omueeey, Birch, Pine, Fir
or Deal. Your orders are
promptly dealth with, so re-
member the place...

THE MODERN
FURNITURE
CO-OPERATION
DEPOT

: }
Opp. Sobers Lane
8 .
Â¥ 99699999950 0965555 5

Tudor Street
FPF LIE EEE EEE ELLIS SSD

500%
‘ :
2 seibiediledneliaeccosesoosoncqesesanee

Shirts with



co.,, LTD., Dustribuicre. Phone:



No

Sailing

nearest.

2.3.52—1n













for a aay coe shirt? ys yave in-
numerable s' designs and qualitieg.
ne ee colourful scenery

THANI BROS,
29.2.82—t.f.n

MENIER’S Breakfast Cocoa in “% Ib, &

1d map a specialty.



ib. tins, At all leading Grocers,

1,3.52—2n



MOSQUITO NETS: Two double,
ygle and oddments. Ring 8504

MENIER’S Brgoktont Cocoa. Shipment
HAMEL-SMITH

st received, K.



LK SCARVES:

Wm. Hy. Street

29,2.52--t

——$—$————————— es

STRAW MATS. Fancy and colourful,
ec Bedrooms and Dining room, also
up. Can you beat it?

por front 88c.



THANI Bros. Dial 3466
29.2,52—t.f.n
TRY a cup of delightful MENIER'S
Breakfast Cocoa TODAY, Take no sub-
stitute ! 3.52—2n



TORNADO—International K.41. ares
«

a ey oe equipment,

Cost $700.00 now
ers. ser Fviews. Telephone L

18.11, 51—t.f.n



“Two SAILING “BOATS— Mallard 21 ft.
Marine
Engine and complete equipment $1,700
Also International Tornado well

Craft, with Auxiliary

AT

He
WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

ROBERT i MacLEOD
AND

PENCIL $ WATER

CQLOUR
FIGURE DRAWINGS

of West Indian Subjects
BY
HAROI.D CONNELL
—

—O-

10 asm, — 6 p.m.

1.3.52—2n



4748.
1.3,52—2n

Barbados View, Pure
Silk Scarves with colorful Sceneries and
Map of the Island $3,968 each, THANI,



BARBADOS MUSEUM

Open February 9—March 8





































POSSS POD PODOSSSIOTGN

NOTICE

Will the friend to whom I
loaned my special Harrison College

Prize Book awarded in 1897 please
return same to Mayers C/o
one Advocate Advertising Dept, This

is very valuable to me.

V. PARRAVICINO.

&

FOR SALE

“OLIVE BOUGH”
(Seaside)

At Hastings. Dial 3111
D. F. DeABREU

The Usual Asking or
Putting On Price. Applies So As
To. get the Upset Price, The House
has 4 Bedrooms, all modern Con
veniences, Very Good Condition,
Enough Land to Erect 3 Bun

galows Inspection Only to Ap-
Seoved Buyers and By Appoint-
ment The Olive being Onk’ of

fn.

for

Native Species certain other
neal Species cannot Thrive unless with
Withered Boughs but the Native
Species Thriv e Luxuriant\y Else-
where; the Seedlings of a Very
Subtile and Enviable Species

Ord built with good racing record, known as Adamites and the lesser
To-day Bi Secretary, Rare Species known as Gomites
, . aici taieicl BP ecie. and Bustamites may be and should

be planted in Clear Soils. Libra
being the seventh and only Zodiac
Sign made of Metal under which
& was Born permits Me to Offer
one and all Real Estate Bargains
even if I am left to Freeze and
tpso Facto I Must Continue as
hitherto to be Honest and will
Never wnlike a Good and Ardent
General resort to Strategy, Pivots
and Balls. Truth and Right must
Prevail! Evil vs Itself! Con-
ecience lent and Exor-

able ak a Yeaduhun swings on
BRIGHTON,

Retribution! AT Sea-
side :— Almost



New Congrats
3 Bedroom American Design Bun-

ere: Modem Conventences,
about 10" . Gotng Under
2,700. iG NAVY GAR-

-_ahaee New 3 Bedroom 12
inch Stone Bungalow, all Modern
eae os about om *~

nder = £31 1

Son exr® By The Bus Co.,

2-Storey Stone Business Premises
and Residence, Conveniences,
Good Condition, Ideal for any
Business. Going Under £2,300. IN
ST.—Large 2-Storey Stone
Business Premises & Residence
with a Large Garage or Workshop,
all Conventences, A-1 Condition,





Teal for any Business, Vacant,
Can Yield $120.00 p.m. Under
£3,000 Can Buy It—-UPPER NEL-
SON ST..--3 Bedroom Residence,
Conveniences Good Condition,
about 3,500 sq. ft. Going Below
£800. Contact Me Almost
Anything in Real Estate uit
Can't-—Who Will’ ¢ Olive
Bough”, Hastings

%56999999996544000649000" S







DOMO SEPERATOR: One Domo Sep- LO
erator and Churn (Large) in good condi- ST
ion, PI b 3.52—
Hon. Ppone bap0, 1.3.52—2n | “CAMERA: One Camera (Kodak Ban- |
HERCULES BICYCLE: Raffle tickets|‘:™) In Leather Case, by | Passen
rt snle 1/- each (for charity}, Call at ady Rodney’ presumably left in taxi
A. -. Taylor's Store 1.3.52—2r between Aquatic Club = and Baggacg
eal rie an Warehouse, Reward offered for returt
L. to Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid. Passer
HO ‘DAY SHIRTS: Are you looking ger Dept. 2.3.52

In}
|

ns
506 Pte. Gibbs, R. A “B" Coy Permitted to resign from
ment ‘wef 1 Feb. 52.

2 LEAVE — Privilege

make an effort to attend.

Elimination Matches to select 4 players to re;
coming inter club tabf tennis tournament
take place on Monday, 3 Mar., 52 at 1 hours in the Drill Hall.

bers are asked to attend.
The Annual General Meeting of the R Sports Club will be held
Tuesday 4 Mar., 52, at 1700 hours in tip Delt Hall Members are asked
attend, especially those recently enlisted/

Will all those in possession of Regimental “tais

kindly return same to
Sports Officer on Wednesday 5 Mar., 52, at












WE ARE INSTRUCTED» te undertake a complete

CLEARANCE SALE at
RALPH DEARD’S SHOWROOMS
BAY STREET

on Monday and Tuesday the ara and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if ‘not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.



JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS

"Phone 4640 Plantations Building







. ¢ < ++ OA F 446
SPCEEEEAA LAE AP APPPDDODAPP D\Ny BEE

FOR PERFECT COOKING
SELECT THE

FLORENCE

STOVE



: AND
OVEN
tA
Beauty
and
Quality
Combined
: THE CITY GARAGE TRADING
‘ os LTD.

the Regi-

resent the Regiment in the forth-
be held at the Y.M.C.A. will
All mem-



on
to



the

AAS

|



&
PLPLPVPEE












Captain J, Redhead Granted 5 months P/Leave wef 1 Mar. AT CENTRAL EMPORIUM
os ae permission to leave the Co
0) . rm treets
| 407 Sit. Quintyne, L, G. “BY” Coy On 4 months’ P/Leave is granted per- ( er Broad & Tudor S )
to leave the Colony . ’
| 448 Cpl. Rudder, G. M. “A” Coy Granted 4 weeks’ P/Leave wef 25 Feb. You will find a fine assortment of
| Soto permission to leave the
7 jv
| 695 Pte. Quarless, N. Granted: 3 weeks’ P/Leave wef 3 Feb. e ‘ARPENTERS’ TOOLS .
62, with permission to leave the 5
Colony. a
556 Pte. Chase, P. D, E. “BY Coy Granted 2 weeks’ P/Leave wef 28 Feb. 1% Buy TO-DAY or pay more TO-MORROW !
52. ¥
M1. D. emurecor mc” | Zeosnennenees
The Barbados Regiment. SOOPIOSS woot 65%
T 1 w ants Mess ‘aie Saturda: Mar. 52. Th
here will be no WOs & Serjeants Mess on turday 8 Mar. e e
next Mess Meeting will be held on Sat. 22, . 52. Members are asked to Now Available

PASSE PARTOUT—In all Colours
BUTTERFLY TRANSPARENT TAPE—In 2 Widths
ART CORNERS—In Black & Grey

Also
An Assortment of
BOOKS ON PHOTOGRAPHY

Y MARCH WINDS DOTH BLow!
WHAT DO YOU KNOW ?
IT IS TIME FOR

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
REMEMBER—
SIP it

—- TO ENgeY IT.
BLENDERS

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SQNS, Lid.

1

foe

TRY IT!

‘MENIER'S
BREAKFAST COCOA





Besides being nutritious you'll

ve no trouble
getting the children to drink it, They

love it!
GET YOURS TO-DAY!
“SA,

On Sale at all leading Grocers.

|| K. J. HAMEL-SMITH & CO. LED,

‘Phone 4748





-O-

Bridge Street













bungalow in ‘lewaant re

ts is over
i ghd there are

near USE”, IN!

Low: BE imber Te
living room, verandah, 3 bedrooms,
bath and toilet, kitchen, garage and
out-buildings. Good arable land
over one acre, all enclosed with

wall and fenci: very suitable
market yor chicken farm
Low figure

WDE, WELOWS, James
ee ae

ia st eee ve

eo evens ooo core

basement.
HOUSE,
Bae

is fe acreage in-
cluding a long streten of the
Crane beach, large coconut grove,
gardens planted with flowering





shrubs and shade trees. The coast-
al views vin id dly be excelled
and the is excellent.
Further tion may be ob-

FA os
tained from the sole agents of
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.



great
care by the present owner. The
house has 2 wide roomy verandahs
at front and side, large

room, separate

bedrooms
kitehen, la

drawing
dining 3 good
(with vane beetes!,

“MALTA”,

St. Peter—Modern
coral house of exceptionally sound
construction

are well laid out and fenced.
and well water. A most desiral
and highly recommended property.

RENTALS

“NEWTON LODGE” — Maxwell
Coast. Fully furnished house
available long lease. Immediate
possession.

RESIDENCE — Beautifully furn-
ished with swimming pool, close
to town with excellent staff.

Available on lease to ap-
proved tenants fr May ist.
Phone 4640

Plantations Building









SUNDAY, . MARCH.,..2,--1952

CHURCH BBC. Radio vews In Brief
SERVICES Programmes |Cooking Class For Girls’ Club



















SUNDAY ADVOCATE









SSS SSS PEO FO

S Barbados Inter-School ATTENTION



PALE KL O








7 rEg.
ee ee 5 Athletic Uni MOTORISTS !!
PAUL'S—i.00 aim. Holy Com- SUNDAY, MARCH ¢ A six-weeks course in Cooking |and overturned. Foster, who wa" | ¢ AueHe nion
H 2 1902 - 1
od, 0.18 aan. Bitene th Precensias and Table Laying was recently on the platform, was injured and | ¥ ? - a. L NOTICE
Zolcmn ass and Sermon. 11.15. a.m. Tnternational Communism,|started at the Bay Street Girls'|the truck extensively damaged.| ATHLETIC SPORTS I
“~~ 4 < eu 2 eee i a m a 4 a
Sunday’ Sehool and Saptians, fine am, Ray's a Laugh, 12 (noon! The/Clyb. This Class if attendéd by M—1065 was slightly damaged i
. 8 Ss, 1220 p.m. News Analysis. - .} 1p. oe
‘ pI. RversiNg and sermon, , rivetner” @B—7.15 p.m % 20 members of the Club_ It is . at
Conant ees P 19 76M %6 58M #1 eM : ae - a ei on eo os
et . : : 08 SOS Set > ’ QIN
eres ae Bsh. jena Rervign at “pe te gee eee a armen caperenes by Miss Harper « CLLLPLPLLEOECLEET OOD 3| KENSINGTON OVAL As trom the 3rd of March,
ane * 449" p.m. “For the Common Good, 4.30) 0S Industrial Union. I offer, as, if and when Q| 1952...
sday: 7.20 p Mission Service pm Sunday Half Hour, § p.m. Music x) Friday, 21st March "wo y
ci a sts Open Ate Okabe sian, 6 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra, A parcel of books was presented issued— x CR (i 5 (i
a 7. » Open / vice 6.45 p.m. What's Cooking, 6.55 p.m./to the Boys’ a irls’ C x}
Chesed Road , Programme Parade and imterlude, 7 p.m. | yy 5 h ae nd Gis a 4 ciTy OF ¥ at ‘ 4
2 Boss Stations of the Cross The News, 70 pan. Mews Analvais, 7.15 | MF. - n ee — ile a x 12.30 p.m. will be at the promises ad-
E f p.m. C&ribbean Voices, 7.30 p.m uis Lynch o e. Modern High x . Stoute’s Dru tore,
Ddubje My Baptis Se: vr 2 joining ute’s & .
yee y Baptism Vow Semprini. aI lh School offered a set of boxing MON TREAL RY Kensington Stand: at the corner of Country ~
MELHOUIST ; ; suicsenaetiariatees gloves. 3 ADULTS: :«: 6 a ck Street e
: 2 ~ | I« / .
Sunday, March ind 1982 | 7.45 p.m. Donald Peers, 815 p.m.| Ten acres of third crop ripe 4% Bonds, payable Can- \| CHILDREN: > St 1 9d. i} shall continue to offer our
i, HY, 2 POUWOOIS Seti Tne: 32h Pm. Beigous! canes were burnt when a fire: oc- ada or New York ; % 3 ee ) customers the usual efficient
J. >. BoUKon, nOIyY Com- 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m Hom a |curred at Apes Hill Plantation, St. | Price> approx. 99 net, New \ | ¢ G Challen service im more 3
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. London Forum, | James at about 3.00 p.m. om Thurs- York funds. — The anege i surroundings.
«AxKe® BAY—9.0 a.m. Rev a 10.45 ‘p.m, Singing is so good a Thing.|day. They are the property of Suitable for Trust funds ne s x Pavilion: :-: 64d. — 4553
MOGUUKet, Oy Collniunon, 4 ~.M. BOSTON - : 2 . restment of proceeds .
Me eee kasi, WRUL 15.29Mc WRUW 11.73Me wRux |S. A. Wallcott of the same p'anta- ey the called Commons < | %
WHITEHALL—9.30 am. Mr. M Blunt, |7.75Mc tion and were insured. from the « yo kan so
o weed - ae Beets sa ‘etnias wealtr ot ustrala we
Coase MONDAY, MARCH 3, 19% George Foster of Bank Hall, St. | 1952/55 * =
‘ a 11.15 a.m, Personal Portrait, 11.30 a.m. i re @ ian Sin
sah ee Variety Fanfare, 12 (noon) The News. ee wie ae. the Gen. | x |
12.10 p.m. News Analysis. eral Hospital on,Friday afternooi Government of ae
Seal = cg am, Me D. Seo, 4607.15 p.m. 19 76M 25.53M 31.8M/in dn unconscious condition an er iS - ~ |
i wis & Joun ; 7 acca : :
4am. The News, 4,10 p.m. The Daily detained. Foster was a passen SOUT HERN .

BANK HALL—¥#.30 a.m. Mr. F. Moore,
Me. ad 2. Areadie
mm hiGas a.m. Mr G



Vie tate Lar reMes
noly Commurnen

Bhi AKL M. A. E
PNoiies, 4 pi. ee. B. Cros. Saera-
ment of we Loris Supper at exca
bes vice

DAAKLsivi-9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E



S, SuCKaNent OF Lue Bord s Supper





C, praiwascte
i, am GU. Brewster,
‘pom a A a inomas pacra-
ment of tne Lomas Supper
auvuin vsoatawe vam hvev bb
Cresvy. Sécrainent of ine Lord's Dupper,
(pom. Mr. &. harris
PROViet NCE —ii Bun, Rev. B. Crosby,
4 piu ovad wv Liarae
VAUXnALL—1li a.m, Mr, C. Jones,
7 p.m. mer i. Blackman
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK Siniidi—i. aan. “Mornin
Service yweu ft hoy Commus.on
rreacner bb. be New, pan.
aVveling Service, t’reacner: nev, Bb.

dvew
GaACS HILL—11 a.m. Mor







Preaener
service y
2 kay ba orning service,
Preache ne 7 m. bwenmMs
bervice, Freacner:; Mr. O. K, Lewis,
MUN. GyM—LnY — ) p.m hvening
Servieé, rr€acner: Mr Keid
DUNSCUMBE A vening Service
Preacher War Ww s
snGr Hata por ening Serv-ce,



Preacner; mc. ft G. Smuw
EGULF BAPTIST CHURCH

TODOK STReaf—Sunday School 9.30
em Morning 10.0 a.m
LiatBeusinc Serve dle p.m Henoes
ot heaven under the auspices of the
bados jis over Rediffusion every Tuédday
und dPursdsv at ¥ p.m.

Worsmip



COLLYMORE ROCK a.M.t. CHURCH
11 am. Divine Worship; 3.30 pm
Sunday School; 7.15 p.m. Holy Com-
munion.

Monday at 7.15 pm the ACE
League will meet,

Minister:— Rev. E. A. Gilkes

8T. LEONARD'S CHURCH

Sunday, March 2nd — Lent 1

8 am Hoiy Communion; 9 am
Choral Eucharist; 10 30 am Holy Bap-
tisms; 11 am. Matins & Sermon; 3
pm ‘Sunday School; 7 pm. Evensong
& Sermon,
Holy Communion’ Celebrated — daily
throughout Lent.
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays &
Saturdays 7.30 a.m., Thursdays with

Hymns at 5 a.m; Fridays at 6 a.m
BAPTIST

ist Sunday in Lent
The ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11 a.m, Matins and Sermon, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon, preacher at both
services the Rev. J. B. Grant, L.Th.,
Minister in chagre,

430 pm Monday, Wednesday, Fri-
day — training for youths, this will be
conducted by the Rey, L. Bruee-Clarke,
Assistant Pastor, assisted by Mrs, Olaa
Browne,

ST. MARY'S CHURCH — Lent 2
Matins and Litany; 8 00
Mass; 9 00 am Solemn Mass

330 pm Sunday €chool;
Children’s Vespers; 4 15 p.m.
700 p.m Solemn Evensong

preacher: Father F. Layne

WEDNESDAY STH
730 pm Solemn Evensong and Ser-
mon, Preacher: Father Frederick.
FRIDAY 7TH

& Sermon;
400 pm
Baptisms,
& Sermon,

, that

Service, 4.15 p.m, Melody from the Stars
{65 p.m. Interlude. 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Nights at the
Opera, 6 p.m. Listeners’ Digest, 6.30
pm Dance Music, 645 pm. _ Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade,
I pm The News, 7.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Play Reading
745—10.30 p.m 25.53M 31 32M 49.42M
—
7.45 p.m Forty Tons of Cherub.
8 p.m. Think on these Things, 8.15 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m African
Survey, 845 p.m Composer of the
Week, 9 p.m. From ‘the Third Pro-
The News, 10.10 p.m
10.15 p.m. Science
Tip Top Tunes

gramme, 10 p.m
From the Editorials,
Review, 10.30 p.m



Tops In Fashion

from page 6
afternoon scene: cerise feather
patterns on dolphin green back-
ground; black butterflies on mid-

» night Blue ground, and an unusual

brown and white scroll pattern on
a-black ground.

The star of the collection was a
proofed tent coat — in pure white
grosgrain. This is the first time
white grosgrain has been
used as a raincoat material, Its
fashion points: round neckline
with. no-colar, round shoulder
line, and the fullness at the back
gathered into a yoke placed mid-
way between shoulder and waist.
The answer to those who doubted
whether this was practical, was
that the coat had already been
dry-cleaned, and had stood up to
the’ test.

Significant touches from the col-
lection: rosebuds rambling every-
where, buried. amongst the straw
ef a hat, placed at hip level on
the hem of a jacket black hats
trirnmed with white Life Guards’
plumes; and a tartan outfit — tar-
tan boater tartan collar on dress,
both matching the crinoline pet-
ticoat which showed a fraction of
an inch below the dres? hem.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street.
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

Healing.

SUNDAY, MARC?TT 2, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: CHRIST
JESUS,

Golden Text: Isaiah 11:1. There shall
come forth a tod out of the stem of
Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of
his roots,
rhe following Citations are ineluded
in the Lesson-Sermon:

The Bible: Then said Jesus.....u@ ye
continue in my word,.,..ye shall know
the truth, and the truth shall make you
free. John 8:31, 32.

Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

The divine image, idea or Christ was,

1130 am Breakfast-time Service, ig, and ever will be inseparable from
Canon Barlee,; 7.30 pm. Stations of the divine Principle, God. y
the Cross. Page 338.
———————





PHONE Us!
CONTRACTORS
and BUILDERS

We are in a position to execute your Orders for

the following :—

PAINTS—from the best Manufacturers
CORRUGATED SHEETS—24 gauge

GALVANISED
% NAILS
PIPE in all

”

PIPE FITTINGS

EXPANDED METAL
REINFORCING RODS
CEMENT



See Us early for Your Requirements

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

No. 16 Swan St.



THE POLISH FOR A
BRIGHTER HOME

O'CEDAR POLISH
4-cz. tins @ 32¢
12-0z. tins @ 66¢
2-pt. tins @ $1.33
1 gin. tins @ $4.00

WET MOPS
—@ 84¢ and $1.52 each.
Let us sipply your
requirements,

aie os aE

O-CEDAR

POLISH




O’CEDAR MOPS—$2.95 each

e *
PLANTATIONS LTD.

LELELE PPPS PPPS LLP LSI PLP L LLLP E






3

sizes
Phone 2107, 4406 or 3534

x
x
%
~
>

4x

oo

|
|
|

ger cna lorry which was involve
in an accident.
The accident occurred at

EUEECRDESEA

ibou

|
2.30 p.m. on Bennets Road, St | 414% Registered Stock due
Thomas, between motor lorry | 1977/82
M—1195, owned by Michael Hunt: | Price: 100 net London,

of Bank Hall and driven by Ken-
neth Scott of Quarry Road, Bank
Hall, and motor lorry M—1065
driven by Samuel Grimes of
Wavell Avenue, St. Michae), |

M—1195 struck an embankment

and/or

Government of

UGANDA





| 342% Registered Stock due
|X 1969.
FRIENDLY CRICKET | Price: 90 net London--
1.33% 5
Yorkshire C.C. will play the Both are full Trustee in-
Veterans C.C. a two-day cricket vestments interest payable
fixture at Friendship Playing} tax-free to residents outside
Field. The match begins to-day the U.K.
and continues the following Sun- 1 WERE
day. Play starts at noon, Lay J
Yorkshire C.C. will be repre- A MM. <
sented by:— Stockbroker.

T. Maynard (Capt.), O. Barrow,
C. Clarke, L. Blackett, C. Clement,
H Harewood, L. Mottley, R. Cum-
mings, A. Carter, K. Payne and
D Haynes.

Dial 4796 Hours 9—3
33 Broad Street, Bridgetown,
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy

SP PAPAL PLPPPLPLPLPLPPPPLPPPLPBLPPLVP®P®PBAAPBL EG PVPVPOUWS

L644 OO IA AAI ALI LAA ALAA MA AMAA A’

ea ol a

“44



4
PEPE EEA ELITE

‘

= SSE

Announcing the arrival of:—

(Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS





in 5 colours

For Verandahs and Floors

}
T. HERBERT LTD.



Magazine Lane,







Thani Bros Lucky Cash Prize Drawing

$50.00 Cash Price goes to the lucky No. 16 bill dated
11/2/52.

Clerk’s initial M.C. also the amount spent which
is $3.57.

Any one holding the bill with above description
may please bring in this bill on Thursday the 6th
March at THANI BROS. STORE and get $50.00 Cash |
Price. To avoid complications it is necessary that.the
bill should have the same item as the one on the

|| FORD



duplicate which is in our possession. .

If the above is not produced within two weeks

time this f $ v n go to deserving _ || . Ltd
A oe eee ee ae oe earns | Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ld.

Radio later.








\ , yo

CCAS =

Profil

FIGURE IT OUT FOR YOURSELF!

For example, let us see the Dollar and Cents difference in net
profit between the use of Cheap and “Pillsbury’s Best’’ Chick Starting

Feed.

PILLSBURY’S BEST CHEAP FEED
$13.60 per bag $12.60 per bag
or 15c. per Ib. or 14c. per Ib.
2 lb. cost 30c. 2 Ib. cost 28c.




a
bigger

SON Se ES
SAAR. GS




Versus

—15c.
—14c.
2c, more
PILLSBURY’S BEST Chick Starter only 2c. more per chick four to six
weeks of age. ss
PILLSBURY’S BEST~ fed chicks average five to six ounces “Heavier” at
six weeks. ¥

FIGURE POULTRY MEAT WORTH 48c. PER LB.

1 oz. = 2c. x 5 oz. — 10c. more value per chick.

10c.—2c. (Extra Feed Cost) = 8c.
8c, more profit per chick
500 Chicks $40.00 more Net Profit to YOU the Feeder, and a

better flock.
T'S SO SIMPLE TO GET BEST



4

LLL LLLCLLLL CCCP LPLPLLPBLPBL PPL PPS

Results. and Bigger Returns feed the Best — PILLSBURY’S BEST
New stocks Starter, Grower and Layer just arrived - - -



ROBERT THOM LTDeacests.

PHONE :—:

2229.






pa
SaaS



1

ee een em





|

——





|



PAGE FIFTEEN





—_—_—_—_

WHY WAIT ?

Switch NOW
To

WORLD FAMOUS

VEEDOL

MOTOR OIL

at all leading Garages

& Service Stations.

“POUND WHEREVER FINE CARS TRAVEL”

ROBERT THOM LTD=Agents

DIAL 2229,







WM. FOGARTY (ao LED.

THE IRISH LINEN
HOUSE

The Things You Need
At Bargain Prices



ONCE MORE FOGARTY’S OFFER

DISCRIMINATING HOUSEWIVES A
: MAGNIFICENT CHANCE OF LAYING

IN SOME REALLY GOOD HOUSE.

HOLD LINENS AT ASTONISHINGLY
oo LOW PRICES...

36” LINEN SHEETING
72"

90” oak

72 x 108” LINEN SHEETS
90 x 108" ii
LINEN PILLOW CASES —

Me MO ack Rie. $2.75 to $3.67 each
.2” LINEN DAMASK $7.50 per yd.
LINEN DAMASK TABLE CLOTH—

Fa WW Gicciey oaths’ .... $25.89 each
LINEN NAPKINS .. $1.38 and $2.20 each
LINEN EMB. LUNCHEON SETS —

13 pieces $7.20 to $8.85 Set
LINEN LUNCHEON SETS--HAND PAINT-

ED — 9 pieces ........ y... $14.00 Set
LINEN GLASS CLOTHS $1.24 each
LINEN GUEST TOWELS $1.80 each
IRISH LINEN—is such a gay luxurious set-

‘ ting, it brings out the rich-

ness of fine silver, China &
Crystal,

$2.70 per yd.
5.33
5.99 ,,
15.00 each
20.00

” ” ”

”

e
Attention Ladies !!

ARE YOU CONTEMPLATING GOING
ABROAD SHORTLY ?

THEN HAVE YOUR

SPRING COAT

MADE TO MEASURE AT —

FOGARTY'S

TAILORING DEPARTMENT
WE HAVE A WIDE VARIETY OF RICH
LOOKING COLOURS AMONG OUR WEST
‘OF ENGLAND DOE-SKINS

e
PLEASE ENQUIRE AT .

Wm. Fogarty (B'dos.) Ltd.

TAILORS AND CLOTHIERS
OF DISTINCTION









PAGE SIXTEEN



SUNDAY





ADVOCATE



SERGEANTS DEFEAT OFFICERS

In Shoot For Royal
Leicestershire Cup







The | isome silver cup pre-
sented to the Barbados Regimen
by the Royal Leicestershire Regi
ment in 1949, was competed for
on the 3! occasion at ine Gov
ernment Rifle Range on S
the 23rd February, 1952

The conditions are as foll«

Teams of 12, firing at 100 yar

nding, and lying at 200 1 30(
vards at 4-foot target

At 100 yd each men

hter ind 7 rds to al
tanding no rest Ai 2uuU ye
each member fires 2
7 rds. to cou

300 ach mem c
r I n at
( yu ng 4
3, fol Rap e
‘ ( d ll w
r ¢

Th
\' ‘ V ir vou f
Office t ’
accurate ci t +1
200 yards Reaching the 300
firing point ith what might V
been considered a comfortable
lead the Officers encountered diffi-

ulty mainly in the snapshooting
resulting in the loss of 69 points



The Sergeants and Warrant Offi-
s by steady rather than spec
tacular shooting gradually out-
listanced their seniors by
deserving 1 of 28 point

Throughout the event which be
gan in blazing sunshine at 2 p.m.
there existed a truly keen and
competitive spirit, and the after-
noon was concluded in the Ante-
Room of the Officers Mess wher
the Warrant Officers and Ser-
geants, guests, responded to
toasts.

as

The outstanding performers
this match were,
who se red 98 out of a possible 114
for the W.Os and Sgts., and Major
Walcott for the Officers, who is
also to be congratulated on secur-
ing 2 possibles at 100 and 200
yards in his excellent score of 108
out of a possible 114,

The following are the scores

in

RSM Marshall ,

WINNERS



MEMBERS of the victorious Sergeants’ team which defeated the Officers to win the Royal Leicestershire

Cup.

Big Upset In
Maiden Stakes

Arunda displaceqd Water Crest
The Field was off to a good between the 4th and 3rd furlong,
start with Caprice piloted by and Doldrum improved her posi-
Johnny Belle in the lead followed tion
closely by First Admiral, Water- As they came into the home
bell ‘and March Winds. They stretch Holder slipped Doldrum
raced in this position until they through on the rails and running
ached the three-furlong pole on strongly she passed Sweet
hen First Admiral (Holder up) Rocket and increased her lead to
took over the premier position. two lengths to win going away.
Coming around the bend places Sweet Rocket, Lutchman up, and
changed quickly but Holder still Lunways, Yvonet up, battled it
kept First Admiral to the fore to out for second place for which
race up the home stretch win- they ultimately dead-heated.
ner by a neck from March Winds —_——— -

who was second a head in front SEVENTH RACE

from page 1

of Miss Friendship.

HFS, PF Mo —
SERGEANTS ee : Creole Stakes
RSM M ! ‘ FOURTH RACE The field of ten got off to a
Ss arshall, H 3. G 96 f - « , rj j € >
8 Pe ‘ fair start with Twinkle, Cottage
Sue ion ot Barbados Guineas and Vonwise each carrying 2, %
CSM. Carter, G. A 89 Seven horses faced the Starter and 8 Ibs. overweight respec-
Set Goodman, R. C. 8 in this event the second 7% for tively.
oa ene re . po the afternoon. Getting off to a yYvyonet got off first with Joan
Set Reid, NE 69 good start, Holder pushed Cav- Star but was quickly overtaken
C QMS Quintyne, K 67 alier to the front and was lead- py Rosette piloted by Holder, by
Py any ane - ing when the field passed the the four furlong pole, They
tat oman, V » Ste ° ° tre ; s tak ‘
CQMS Hail, F. B 5g Stands for the first time. Dun= raceq in this position until they
querque ridden by Crossley was were well past the three furlong
937 running in the second position > ;
, : . t pole.
HLP.S. Per Man — 114 with Seedling third. Twinkle who had not got off
OFFICERS On reaching the four furlong 4 well now started to recover
ol i pole, Seedling challenged and jost ground and was now lying
eanios mcott g : c a! took over the second position jn the third position with Blue
Lieut, Gooding, H. B 2 from Dunquerque, keeping this piamond fourth. *
Lem, mouaatd, E.R a1 Place until the two furlong pole “Tn the meantime Holder keptt
th Gok Connell 7 78 we seat te. ’ ., Rosette well to the fore and com-
Capt, Neblett, C,'E. DunQuerque then made a bid ing around the bend Betsam who
Capt. Jordan, J’ R 77 and soon overtook Seedling. Car- },4q also moved up made a strong
Capt Hunte, GB 66 dinal also came into the picture bid for a place and eventually
Lieut, Peterkin, PoC $b nc ~ Be are up the fgnished second behind Rosette
Capt, Daniel, HR 37 home stretch there was a ding who-had raced up the straight to
. dong tussle for the premier pos : ‘ . > four lengths
i win comfortably by four lengths.
go9 tion and Dunquerque managed



12]- For ‘Bad’ Ese" "

Language

T h e i r Honours Mr, H, A.

Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell, Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday con-
firmed the decision of His Wor-

ship Mr. S. H. Nurse Police Mag-
istrate of District “E”’, who im-
posed a fine of 12/- and 3/- costs
to be paid in seven days or in
default 14 days’ imprisOnment
with hard labour on Helena
Bishop of Waterman’s Village, St
James, for using indecent lan
fuage on Thorpe’s Road on No-
vember 30, 1951.

Rishop appealed against Mr
Nurse’s decision and was yester-
day ordered to pay the cost of
appeal which amounted to 9/8

The evidence of the prosecution
was that while walking along
Thorpe’s Road on November 30,
1951 Bishop saw Julian Carmi-
chael who told her not to walk
over his land on which canes were
growing

Bishop took
Carmichael
abuse him, Two
Ethelbert Boyce a
Boyce—overheard
said to Carmichael.

objection
said and

to what
began to
children—
nd David
what Bishop

In confirming
Their Honours said
not proved the
the evidence of the two children
was manufactured or forced
therefore they had no reason fo:
disturbing the the
Police Magistrate

the decision
that it was

by defence that

decision of

’
| They'll
(I WOULDN'T MIND IF ¥
Y SHE COULD KEEP THE
| TPS, HERSELFBUT ALL
| THESE HAT-CHECK GIRLS
ARE ON SALARY THE
BOSS GETS ALL THE
owe DOUGH» oe

a

ss

I READ
THE Ci




Do At Every

cE
iS PLENTY

\T-OOM

CONCESSION IN A
JOINT LIKE THIS
MAKES A GRAND



iv Twinkle was
behind.

third one length

catch the Judge’s eye first by
neck ahead of Cardinal who was
front of

EIGHTH RACE

"i RACT Castle Grant Stakes
FIFTH RACE Vanguard was the only horse
, @ 7 scratched and the remaining six
B.T.C. Stakes got off to a good start. Passing

Gun Site carried top weight of the stands for the first time, the

Ake earn 4 1 ae a . eee order was Usher with Apollo and
ders ieee” Sprite, Fiving sae Mary Ann lying in the second
gon. and “Harroween : being and third prota respectively.
: ? reac 7 > five rur ug
scratched. The distance was over sy Creme ‘now t egan ; to eee
nine furlongs, the longest for the pole ross vegan t x

up from the outside, but Quested
in the meantime kept Usher well
— to the fore, making every pole a
Embers, J. Belle up, and Re- Wining one,
bate, Quested up, led the field as It was then left to Cross Bow
the horses went past the judges and Mary Ann to fight it out for
for the ‘first time, Landmark the second and third positions and
with O’Neil in the saddle wa
pulled up at this stage of the home stretch.
race due to a burst stirrup leath- Eventually Mary Ann got home
er. second, half a length behind
Between the five and four fur- Usher to beat Cross Bow who wa
long poles, it was still Embers third by a length.

and Rebate with Notonite a close —_——_
NINTH RACE

third, and Fire Lady hot on their
heels,
Dalkeith Stakes
Fuss Budget and Rebate

day,
were

and entrants for
classified

this event
class “A” and

Embers soon gave place to Re-

bate who was quickly caught being

‘ Piodag'h he ; en
oy ee a Fire scratched, the remaining tiv
coer, vere | ee er me 1M horses were off to a good start.

that order. Notonite went on to Y: so Z Seen t
wih an easy race by three clear asmeen, Newman up, went in-
lengths and Fire Lady beat Re- the lead early and sprinting
tate by a length : well moved away from the rest of
sciiiesiibinaeins the field as they went past the sec-

SIXTH RACE ond furlong. Demure who wa
second up to then, weakened
Spring Stakes comewhat, and Joseph pushed
Nine horses faced the starter Harroween into this position. Pep-
in this event with Flieuxce Car- per Wine also displaced Demure
rying top weight of 130 lbs and made a bold but futile ¢ j-
The race was over 74 furlongs, lenge for the position while ? -

and going past the judges for the man kept Yasmeen well
first time, it was Sweet Rocket and rode her home the winner by
followed by Water Cress, Arunda, three lengths, Harroween finishex

in froa





Doldrum and Dashing Princess half a length ahead of P
all the way to the fourth Wine. ‘.
Time sadn Pot Oe By Jimmy Hatlo

Zf_ USTEN TO THE
{ TWO HIGH BRACKETS
\ FEELING SORRY FOR
GERTIE“THEY THINK
THEY SHOULD ONLY,

THE FAT GUY WRAPPED UP
HIS ROAST BEEF BONE TO
TAKE HOME TO HIS
DOG:s HE SAID!















ENTS











WHERE








4 YOU SHOULDA
HEARD ’EM TALKING
ABOUT HOW THEY'RE
GONNA PUMP UP
THE OL’ SWINOLE








HiS HAND
AND THEY



COUPLE OF SELF-MADE
AUTHORITIES:

THANX To JEROLD GROSS,
~ LANA LANE
> BEVERLY HiiS,CALIF. |



this they did while coming up the

2.700 Make
Housing Loans

Since the Housing Loans fund
was started in June 1950 approxi-
mately $800,000 have been lent to!
2,700 people. The number which
applied for loans, however, is ap-
proximately 6,000 who wish
$2,000,000

It is an all day job at the Hous-
ing Loans Department where peo-
ple are always taking applications
for loans and on some days inter-
viewed . by the Manager Mr.
D. A, M. Haynes |

Long queues are always seen at |

Housing Departments. Besides |
these Housing Loans which are
for those engaged in the sugar

industry, there are always long
queues on those days when the
Housing Department at the Garri-
son are interviewing applicants
who seek Government houses at
rent, These are two separate de-
partments

Since the Housing Loans fund
tarted,” Mr. Haynes said yester-
day, “the people have been very
\ppreciative of the loans and make
very effort to repay them.”

Mr. Haynes observed that one
ould readily realise what change
as taken place in housing over
he country districts. The loans
ave been concentrated in par-
hes like St. Andrew, St. Thomas,
nd St, John where housing con-
itions were worse.

Mr, Haynes said that the plant-
rs co-operated well with the de-
artment,



Red China Wants
‘to Free Formosa

TOKYO, Feb. 28
Communist Peiping Radio heard
ere said that Red China is
idamantly determined to liber-
te Formosa by any means” and
; “fully capable of actually lib-

crating Formosa.” The broadcast

as made in the Japanese lan-
uage and +: was translated in
‘okyo.

The Red radio said: “The Chi-
nese people under Communist
ile are not only adamantly de-
rmined to liberate Formosa by
iy means but are fully capable
actually liberating Formosa.”
The programme was made in
celebration of the Fifth Anniver-

ry of the Formosan rebellion on
February 28,

1947.—U.P.



GUARANTEED
SERVICE

Remember any Watch and
Clock Repairs will be deliv-
ered within a week with a
guaranteed note







At J. BALDINI & CO.,
Office. at Lashley’s Ltd.
Prince William Henry Street
|
} ” ’ y
fish BRITISH COUNCIL

Wakefield, White Park

Violin: Recital
by
WILLIAM CLAIRMONTE

'
}
|
(Accompanist: WINSTON
HACKETT)

yn Wednesday, Sth March

at 8.30 p.m



Prograinme includes:

in ‘

Handel—Sonata No, 4
D Major.
Mendelssohn Andante
from Concerto in E
Minor.
} ?
| Beethoven — Romance in
| G Major.
| Elgar — Gavolle.
| Admission $1.00 or 60
All seats reserved
2.3.52.—11

i —

SUNDAY, MARCH 2





















If you have eaten unwisely, or too well, take a dash of ENO’s
“Fruit Sait”. This will set your digestive juices flowing, belp
you: stomach deal with its burden, remove the feeling of discon:-
fort and congestion. And thanks to its wonderful effervescence,
how freshening ENO’S is to the mouth! ENO’S contains no
Glauber’s Salt and no Epsom Salts. Yet, by a gentile laxative
action, ENO’S encourages perfect regularity. Most of us need
our “ Fruit Salt” first thing in the morning. }

Eno’s
‘Fruit Salt’

SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED

for IRREGULAR ACTION,
SICK HEADACHE, LIVERISHNESS,
BILIOUSNESS, HEARTBURN, etc

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness.

The words “ sNo" and“ wnutt saut” are registered Trade Marks

Plunge into fun... hall :
>

There's a wonderful sense of freedom about this



st/24

year's Jantzens. They're designed to make you
slimmer, trimmer, seal-smooth and sleek. For
women we've dreamed up figure-shaping ;
one or two-piece suits with straps that
do all kinds of clever disappearing tricks
for smoother swimming and sunning

For men, brief trunks with comfy
nside supperters., All are in figure-
flactering materials and the prices
are so reasonable you'll never
believe your good fortune !
Take the plunge and get
yours now.

.

———



pewter
Attracticn in Action













DURABLE
CROCKERY

@We have just received a
new shipment of crockery in
flowered designs and plain
in sets or in individual pieces.

Undoubtedly Values i Quality.



CAVE

SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD.
10-13 Broad Street

colours. They can be bought

Why

are people
becoming so
excited about

â„¢ SALE?

WiHlY: The BIGGEST CUT PRICES
You'll ever get in Bridgetown

SHOES $1.00
Size 3 to 34 Per Pair 3

LADIES

HATS cach $1.00 & $2.00
_HRAIDS & EDGES per yd. Ze.

MODEL STORE SALE

from Ist. March
See Our Handbills .











1952







Wherever the Need

aReD Hanp Paints

PROVIDE RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR
EXTERIORS

HIGH-CLASS DECORATION FOR
INTERIORS
We have received New Stocks of ...

SPECIAL HOUSE PAINTS
Grey, Dark Grey, Oak Brown,







AND






tamraacn Kwittine mires Urn skentionme hig Barbados Light and Dark Stone.
RR i ae ae ‘Ss’ ENAMEL-FINISH PAINTS
i ee x ME CPPOE Acinic Cream, Tulip Green, White.
DAN SPRINGER % G.F.S, % MATINTO FLAT PAINTS
MLS \ 1 1 % Cream & Green. .
PURrALL NO. 1 & THE ANNUAL SALE ¥ CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
BLIC MARKET x 4 ? The Sign of Bright Red, Grey, Mid. Green.
Custowess We" have’ _aoed {| THE GIRLS’ N Quality HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN
Fupply of Prime Local staak 3 |% FRIENDLY SOCIETY 3 Se ee te
end Reeth e ese buying & will be held at PAINT REMOVER ;
stock at attractive prices. & THE HOSTEL s for the easy removal of old paint. ‘
s on ’
Dial 2005 ig, aay to 2 pam % SATURDAY, APRIL 26th % Phone 4267, 4456
Dial 3620. after 2 p.m. % from 3—6 p.m, % 1
a betas tater” 8 WIEKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.
$6415995045050500060000." ’





WE GIVE

WE GIVE QUALITY
we GIVE SERVICE

See Us When You

. Want The Three
Combined

EVERY SUIT

MADE BY US

IS “THE BEST”

| SUIT MADE RY
US



P. Cc. S, MAFFEI
& Co. Lid.

Top Scorers m tailoring
Prince Wm. Henry ‘treet

——— SSS SS























COOL SPRING in the
North!— will demand a re-
turn to warmer clothing at
vacation end.

We have a s2lection of the
finest Wo s loomed in
Englanc, well as glorious

Cashmere Pullovers from
Scotland, light weight
Tweeds and crisp Worsted

Suitings for both Ladies and
Men.

The quality of this branded
stock is unquestioned and it
is our Sales Policy to com-
bine this high quality with
excellent value





Merchant Tailors
of Holton Lane



























ee



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWhl.VK M.\I)\Y ADVOCATE SUNDAY. MARCH X, 1S2 ruzzles^lflSimcs i ,i> ,t'i Money In Circulation 60-Secoiui Quiz LACS any lour coin*—quarter, dune, nickel. penP Atr P ,\y Mil .uiUd ->" A. in 13 move*. I i ACM of these brainlt-aacre u ppneeI to he ..nawen-I ne minute. IU %  the coins ,low11 >'" ur "n**"" *" %  *" > jre flmahed. time the B |. A rentier me i v..i egk'• i. InUawu I"?' 1 """ • "'• '^f'"' '' lij.l Be fMffc W i MN| r v i I %  Ml linn say egga, and h%  %  >. | 'HiUfMl. b..tn.w..l. I>-gge.1 of 1.>I iiH r K"'Wawf* did lie %  i Hi %  $* %  I i -'i i a w I J n 3*iL S? .S..I; %  >ti uo M pea i i"*n em itiiu*rn3 •••tiai ::i — %  *\ j^ f %  S. \ fanner li a cl S-3 7 h:< Falling Hair! hair >t a deflaaee tag* ne %  iiw row W ISA, S . .. (nmhonwi lannr FmrrSlhlkrM* groAiiiE Bffa1 Thriving agam f,\ i.ccp n healthy. ( ..ISarc Si*.*r-i naf >-- '' ,...„. %  %  oe .". re* aV> **/•. pM Oil. Bournvlta SjlviKtin % %  .', NATURAL 1000 D RAW a MMM MM tttl doea not %  %  hilt .r in thti,: IOM. and find a weapoa George WMHtaflto I.'Hi; Before he became .1 % %  *l. .1 %  / \ IGin You Figure Ibis? XSKRTLKU a mlnti* aign. muiliplKaUon algr I a dtvlalon atgn where aeeaary. romplete -A-itt: •quatlon: l a • A |a i: •!•"' %  — n a aae i >,• iq papiaip *i*-i> %  .• %  .; -t4*k in "Mr liel'l UHl •. > 1 •UcLa In another flelil II. [ ill. -MI -ill loajethi it he aa*e ihew I. Cull nl llii' lliilili.iia* i nun> alatotw n*•• '< • toattara, iwt eaeii i tti tlatcn lui I-AI.I4> IIUUJ lirw'.h ru -hiinalaU t11 brattora and %  iaton in ih-lliibr.i family f .-.. Nu*el N j I ('. HK'UjUti -hai-k iafenoal lnifl.-,l In %  -m-.. did the IIUHII i i:.. i' i:u li.t'n. rent when he %  nli-. |U "J iinive frorii Hie -%  --' inulth I i.ilo a candle, nil laoiu aad •( ready U> he III. Uhli-h dova h' lilthl ml? q-imn JUJ, '. %  % %  %  i pia| *w* all %  E ACH M appcara la ln|f lu H her In ra< h % %  %  %  % %  \::.\. bera 4. 8, II I j Indicate t' • A. 1.3. 8.8.11 H. 2. 10, 4. 11. 3. 13. . l:. t. I •. IK. 20. 10. 2.. M, 1 it. 25. 28, '.'. n: •i .. 1 puixlfl total "32." both across and dm* i I ii<*t two VKI'.TICAL lulumna muat HM 11 numbera under M, ^hiie the thud column muit have ail FVFN ni.mbera under 23. %  %  IE' t IKTELUGEICE TEST JOSH•, T O MABI II I %  .1.1 MrWlH, i.iiind Hit P: !i .( %  I u •' %  li. • %  ihliiHIUIT I COUGHING IS DANGEROUS Betty Ume vuu utugb your luaa* HI maicrd. uid rur bean n o*cr wotfcad Slop rora cuugb by laUag VBfiai, CatKal fjuTUtBi Taa| wops ''uahiuj. noaaca Iraaif.ii.j •*(. toothci raty aAreacaa. eeanfarU asd puiraa iba langs X % > 1 .1 input me: II >uU muluplt 'Ik. \ ;t OU indeed. now we %  i .i %  N .. tin %  .. dsi la a i '•'. % % %  Haw old la Jeut '* ***wa***a***w*ww*-****w************* • //" you tcanf an alarm clovk that you can aivava friiaf — irrurarr. handnomr % %  nixterately priced—you muii r/iooae a Smith Alar IMhS on Time!.... a Smt'f/t/lfaHm6 I %  ,..!. 11.. %  %  • i.uline Jeuellero i:..au uopa*? %  % pj-. |o jMUinii a *i at" >*\: jo jannfl min aqi *Jlt DUV t Itl H •pOf Oft i uQUinn • ]o %  HIP icuuU NDIIR10S 1S31 33N39I1T11NI % iv it li fli SATURDAY PU^IL Rupert and the New Bonnet—2 %  %  in aarai Vou nuve to anrnnaja ..il M word* in an iii Ti.inp batfafH *n '.:•! ,iml thai nail 10 it u -'.enie! i iiilea RULES 1. rue U rd may Ba an ananun oT iha word Uiai precodaa It 2. It may bf a •ynonym of the ward thai pn cedes, n • 1. it may ue aenwyed D, rld:nf one lrller to. lUMTactiO one letter from, ot changing on letter in the preceding word . It may he aaaoclated wUi> the precedln* wtird In a uylitf aimue. metanhor or amnplRtl'm of IdeaK. I. It may form with Ittt praoadlng ord a name ot a well-known oeraon. place %  thltut tn lie* or fiction. ft. It mav he aaauciated will) the proceding word In title 01 action ot a boo*, plav or other comuosltlop %  % % %  iiii %  %  %  T (Jtrt.ii. Kup:ii i. .''light*.' M i a>-. !i:li -,. • Iwnne! ind nder. Vau'r* in goo.1 l .1 *hr aiv'i hiw %  VOUR HEAD! AND YOU CANT BO WRONC! lite icauUt iiae of Lanalol llair rood will, by its action on the root* and tcaip, noumh every hair gbnd and encourage richer growth. It proido nourishment to the kcahp and nau %  ooti aod korreota Mach troubka aa DANDRUFF PARTIAL BALDNEM THIN It FALLING HAIR %  dally application of this Hair ilia unlalllngly In a really beautiful gloaay ht.ul of hair. LANALOL No. I Wlih oil (Yellow Label) (or dry icalp No. 2 Without oil (Green LANALOL Label) lor h, mrmgei LANA1 i naturally otfyling AM (Hue Label). A (BakelMe (f does y ou good i n two ways — you rub it on and you breathe it in for quick, sure relie' rub THERMOGENf Medicated Rub alt ovti your chwt, throat, and back I" healing warmth relieve: congestion, and breathing the pleaiant medicinal vapour it give^ off clears noie. throat, and lungs. LANALOL SOLIDIFltD bo). An Ideal flutive. LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Had Label). A liquid aoapda luxe. Leeal Ilklrlbulora: GENERAL AGENCY CO.. (Barbadoa) Ltd. P.O. Bex 27 Lanalol ,il! I l Mil 17,11 eae niiiu DOUBLE -ACTION THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB In big glass Jars and bandy dandy Tins •HllUtWII ill BJIUIlUl aonli BAitUki. Oman %  PUlIC nage aie rurr ia %  I ge— rteaal Regan Le.rOanu i tiilog) a — 8lter-S*atei—Wall* ti i ibie—Finn i ii-, :,II.London Eini— berviea Constellation to VERM II119I1 -i IN 1908 Prof. C. V. Boys Ottttl tlio EoHowinfl remarks in his fnillitilllltl %  ddmi to Im Physical Society in London : "The l.ubricalini 1 piuLicily u| uil deae-ntt) on somethinji wliich is ;il nwwit unknown .... no "no knows wh:it oillnesr is" This blissful Male of n noiamv continued until March 1920 when Wdls and Southcombe published a paper showing conclusively that th>' "oilinesaV of a mineral oil could be substantially improved by additives. Oils made on the wells Southcombe process became marketed throuRhout the World m% GERM OIL These Oils are available to you to-day in Barbados thr-.u, h th.• "liKRM" A nl CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. .AndSave$2i:3.50On "Off Peak Fares Your (light by ^i. itized ConsbillaUon Spta mrd aavea you days ol iravellmg lime — extra lime • do and iee more ui\ busineu or i You relax ua de,'catad comfoii, enjoy twnpll meala aod moaitime tnin.s In flifiht hin abnn UM • No uirti to pay — not t\cn a tip — tar attentive B O.A.C. aervicr B.O.A.C. lakes good can of you YEAST-YITE YEAST-V1TB V. ln-lplng you to fwl Tablet Is a sclentlfl< —together with th. Vitamin Bi. Teatthuapleaaant Bympto: be one more aJih-a i great benefit of" Yt. egin to feel your old self again you will i be oountleps ihousandd of people who bavi \sr \TTB" PIck-Me-Up'Tablcu' C.'t ilouleTO-llAY! BAKBAPOS MINIION new YoaK PARIS MIAMI NORMAL HtTltRN KARE 1KH1 MI.10 1.5*0.10 4M.S* "OFF SFASON* RETURN FARE uaut 1.3M.M CoanH your Travel Agenl nr Brill.h Weirt Indian i, \T y y '"~ ,'" .'' r Br ""' Sl ""BHdgelown-Bar"idm. Telephone 45(5 FLY BOM 1,111,11 OVERSEAS AIRWAY* JO 8PUU I I ,i S N. Quickly'f&Uev&s HEADACHES NEURALGIA %  COLDS CHILLS FEVERISHNESS 1 NERVE AND PAINS YEAST-VITE "Pick Me-Up" Tablets



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M SDAV. MARCH 2, 132 SUNDAY ADVOCATI PACE SEVEK. %. 99 ill. Ml H1I 1 SNOW > 1-OhTDOK. \ %  :...i*ion pad i\ Yesa's Eve — full of promise, of %  The proti %  I first in %  1. *e>o lne tapering from shoulder > r i oi i:t:.\ W.\MII:S rp %  nd %  %  irii ;i skirt %  %  %  I WD i | I one Uittons ana wide | : re l ea sin g io a fall of material at Ih The d. %  QW inf bottle tat mounted • %  n t..v> taffei„ uiii t-irt. worn ball ik dresa of their great, sws %  MM. H is M AtCOt toecho In the ear. of considerable elegance. Worth focuses attention It Man Aiout Hunt All (he rich atmc-pAen,.t lhe!v"> Mi you of the •pecial probI one roof—that'a M otaaaaal to aaDOOlh out Ih* dNai at r>Mmmca I •"•!"-** wrinkles. Why not phoi* %  ifl Co. and I'nii, Marhd 1 h selective stock and fine red.-igiied a. d opened -1 *n**li>' of iV—when you sense (ha. l-uniri| of Kama work \iP u now *"' In C M R Baga, Calabash C Show rowan of Men's wear mi *, i Lanta and; Boltuit Lane known through, •—and the f. arinatlon of S" 1 "V Caribbean -ml bt .. >ou IQIBMIUUTUI Sporuwrar is shown tr. f Them all' And lh %  %  %  :. pastel l>in ka of Lb ie Squaia. fruli and Oi >ngr in aun lantmcnL ngaBal superfine 'Jacket k arami is featunu In Wea %  ted and Socks by Mnrley arc ..f Wool. Rayon with clastic tops Another new product from thirapidly expanding Ami of disiuK J Hamrl-S-mth Ltd II the MeCau fceycle wwl) nvad on the UIJUJ losjatfcei etUi tha McCuul Stoves uolUi ideal for limited apace— full part* service avail) Ie). The bike is a Man's Tourer Model with Inftatnr. tool kit. oiler and ecmt>.nation 1 Khak. Shirt*, ideal for of excellent quality of awr and tear— I R. II Edward* Ltd. on ig tops at It.* \ %  of Kii.m 5n DOtowi from II i \> ,\ Khaki %  lirti wlttl Nmi-otlrl collars also pro %  %  Mlleni rah* lik. • %  bi MU patterned Mi H1S Shirts and when >PanncT in icatner oag—ii Igou, ..,,, Ilinjf ,. MVC In the attractive price Phone Up, Phone 7 ** . . a IU-,. ft HI ... 1M .vepythliiR In (.laaaware—Cocktail. DtnM : B, have found U to u C h n mp gp w and IcedP rtnka gla ss. M1( ritk eetourful •> QUi It, . |1, p. A. >'-U"l six -,mmvidu-lK 1 hr% N %  Df| Broad %  ; ',' mtral r-.ti-.i->immoniBroad .,.,, ., SI low the new Sweat and I he rtock is refreshingly ?"" ..iigerator nc with loU of Babv ...ft BM &*** %  1 '' K,U f u '" *.-<" M Waal .is gifts for Mothei (DMI, -.'' only $J .4 nd very UUrf* K | UM Container* for nnur. u.gar in.uahlem Shave Kreemer) Of *< Th. values are excellent and WITH CASHMERE BOUQUET FACE POWDER i Soli la.i-ad | Dl.(olaly parlum.d i Coi^mat* BovQval Fare N-dn gi*t a lottn imooiK fimsh t Cheat lighdv avsnl,. Ir io t i.n B I n ato m Augu.t 1MI. dnanM %  nd Princes* Margaret vwttad ping ustllng of tremendous c skirt* still into a shawl. e b(4eru enibPOkiemd In how y"". ''*'* %  ''l^T'-.I^-"^ the COLOURS; By day dark grey, a.lver w.th .. N. pte oow u.i.yf5/g J .'Ti? '^IS ffi that throughoul Ught bodices and feminine sklrU pradotl inalg and a very lovelv ! %  ?"&^ndlrddnTTnm" lu>t '* rfwt lm ""' honM 'he exertnable. subtle for silk drew* but emphasises a MkUow-gM bUM is seen in surah. haUaj iu|k. -nrt .nidnX cooi, h „^ llllu ,, lllnn ,.„„,„, ie. the front ftlU n f a dimFoi even.ng paleal pink and grey P^W.y cuvcied wtth the M w n ^ Ir riP#dofll from molrturc .i UM |o wear save by the are the two which arcto the for *.ucr bvoda. -ou-,-,^ The .tisim -N^ P Musson Dhanga ... gatf Poubiles. bebut the •tortUng Pruafian bl... THK O K A N D E TjMUtTO U( ^^ -boul ^ .nJ to further alreaaed cause of III !" >w called Cerulean Wiie was inM-k'^" 1 ^ s ff* 1 '^ •" Tht-re th. ltrg KMPnSs hi S rnnpvlnlMhe unapnn*?u Uw Um Irott * induced and wa, quite electrifyi. vl IU y used for these, renunia* V .uinTmely draped, low bodices to the ing In IU suddennow. ,ent of a more leisurely age and — -— S.-OTUGHTEO A neat little *£** ** u( '^-^"To captd. kleweleaa coat of the new w 1, ' "g??* B d lU " ^ suif, grey fabru". a jutting aknt Mei the picture. and altogether very pert looking. Delicate embroidery u. much fitted Bhanlung coats, one of used to enhance the i ichnaaa of brilliant plum colour. the fabrics. Jet embroidered waUt band to u To particularise the eau de black suit. mlo and parchment coloured The piece de resistance — a fjijle with bodice and cenlrt ravishing black faille de">*: panel encrusted rih K"ld and aatre. .. full r.mge rf the ' the variety^ ^ vet> teat proprietary drug* and . . a m.t eftlcieni daapanZng dtM J **> ***&.£ • fttfi You'll bke the r.,nd* CoUnhite hoise, i;xcepting they-* ,, iNtwerful enough to go over and is anneal. # ^ ^ ^ iouDrf nwunUiluv Ulcy n u omlng l<. Chelsea Oarage In BddI'lU' 1952 Vanguards have I ned clothw low bodices swathed -k.it. oftoD two h .i.King from a knot at As these lasl two year* there the bosom. Sleeves are mostly hat K-cn this trend towards the abort and softly full caught into rounded l>nr. it atcnu reasonable a nuiruw Iwnd. In the coata M thai i will continue they are ballooning. The diabut not to extreanes as far as phragm in most of the day anJ .lollies are earned rdadjMj dresses emphasised by It would defeat their object. As yet the difference between this year and last yeai i not **< pmiiounced as to necessitate wholesale discarding of ^aniiobes except anioiig tl ght. fincT draping. Cuffed bodices are much used for designs with abort, rounded boleros. FAHH1CS for day i able surahs, shantungs. gUuod gau—all with an j t^msah* •veiling dress: swathed ,bodice r efn brotderv A palest pink n beneath a minute velvet-banded £. grosgram evening coatbolero, the Ion* hip lute light, t ,. ralni9CCnt of the late 18th centhe other hand it does make uuito firm. Most of the sill mall, geometrical deever to one side making an unhodi-p ,^,1 out exuostng the model with a whacking great canacitv of B cu ft. and if that %  hat you want, well here It W Be rot] don'l know ho Bad |WJ %  ni in know and >ou wtsli you .ukl let me help bj telling you \ phone 27. That's the Singer 5. wing Academy (lo| of the James Lynch f. Co Ltd building). Mr Mildred Watkmv will tell >ou how to enroll (nothing to it. really) detail much of what you'll learn—and how >ou'u learn' and ii.my lellncmenta. thi. chassis mther larger and the door handles .ie flush nttlng. Choice of colours .. %  ii ihmce nf i>erformancc. Vankuard offers only the heal In Its Lias) and the chance to gt one la yourg by phoning 4949 Two and onu half pounds for •ixty cents hi! hold on. where aie era and what am 1 talking about I'll tell \ou I'm talking about the %  ,iewU e.-ikete.l l' .1 brand I •TbOk OnUn Hue pack** which la—you've guessed | and ^d' 1 i"i P hT ll %  I ..ll !lw Gnverles. It's eaady haodsad, t'* a -must" f". aaBjef > Igrder and remcmU-r there s NO i Hekllig. Ui>lribule> I I I Cirant I Ad Pearl Pr nd Is a product nt il BUQ MM Mrkrlin t board. — yhirsi has the weed. a. introduc vet I^Sw^l^v^ mOTB *V WtS cuffed tight bod*. U little ""rfy Vlctonaif jacket with m$ a looae coat Ith Dgplum hlpllne over gpreadirm 'ten The 'Taming' Of The Jungle Girl Who Weds At 13 doth" of two or three years ago ,., look rather old fashioned. From signs. SlT point of view it I; Hteb W A %  " "> ""> rt ak. < %  Ml ('•! l> ruptured \ UMlkaM i lako i.l SHU ia -i. %  I from pae lalsdnj t.. Mr Hertogh B lung her arms „,akmg a good Job o( being a typical little Dutch girl. I watched her lake off nee Now she has finished general white MaTcM ..i>ron -ml set off education and Is learning prutasfrom school fur h'.inc. She wore hn sional dreasmaklng. She is skilled „ K reei. jumper tartan skirt, with her fingers. trltfa the medallion of the Virgin ound her Kcrth > MU Ukf ula.vinn vith M,iy round her neck. i iv.-r II all she put a thick coal id off she went, laughing. She told me: "I love my mother. will never go back to the Ualaya.' 'Sometime*. I Wonder* i she really just like any other T?iT' die might be klfnappod gj* J'T ^SS^Zj ?£. and taken back is a thought dor. Hid her father. always in the minds of the police 'Slranscrs From The Orient' linewnnword ttguifje, but a nun came dnilv to loach her Uuich and the child should ,bl* v know. awoj. %  w'orTt eUS BeTuT: iff T-.ice had reports of OnenU.1 LaeSnsses Edw^rSS She we. form With Granger* In the town. Men hnve and waspgirls u. ' I iitn questioned. Hut that Is When Bertha first arrived sho had an escort. Then It was taken Now there is a plain etotsMi very Oriental If she withes to.' Occasionally her brown ayea (darken and all expression vanities from her face. It is a legacy i | bat HaH ... ,v.ri..l ilw-.. ,,-w Ififor %  ! i • l--"*" -„„,,,„. i ill .nxi-o. No %  „!....* Ml — • Ii->'•" lut,)<-.. tabUta at ISM* and row %  tiarHi**'" !' %  F.i>i-n li..%  ,,„.,. % %  !.!. <..>ra %  ri %  ..bl. i-.or, .,,.. •o .!i4k|v •r.d r'rrt *• """ %  ll|..m aaTOin.-t* fl ..••-. I I ac '1st i" -""" ,rrl '•" %  >""*•' ( -isK M* aas f Taan WRM'A'.'O nt only fart"* %  *. %  *•"' i„ -,-1,in%  .i..f. __., —--n m*fire ,lkSI>Ar I ,.. i \j i % %  %  %  "•' I :., • nl.rl> Nil), tilS I-' |'%  luilvHlixl.itil all' %  %  u nl'rli %  nnis'il B" i Book now fot %  • Itment with helpful advice or. Indivl d imkcWi S it' an ex(>erteni.e you'll e^ioy. KNIGHTS LIMITED. 33. BROAD STREET. 11 h 'Masher' waist<| coutitrv clothe linn were magnificent evening and in lAery M.hjccl. let*, 3-aw "Pttl WORN OUT and *?Oted %  nd if.if sreaad. ti... unabl* la \ %  MI lo (Kt> ( SUM oi i ouf | fou hU. rksr-*. I %  MpsaUM-sarsI alefara.r lUstrky.t .'1„ keta.. hltM ;Hnoui %  ••In ,,,.. t-l. i>ea> *K bus. MM rt-T am, * % •* 1—f.m-. .Unrd -*.•'•"• -i •• i M l ffwan %  '"! rnn.nl.lr. TbM >• tl* '— U t.kr IWdi Kxtna* Pal*. Within t hour Itedd) stsrt lo t-lr nW lndn#.. tbsm %  %  I^.r harmful *aSt*t *^* vaui 'illin ll.nf ll rrplarfd bl 'Vtsi hasd*d (i'|. and (-S BV t '. f* bS* (W.wnr Dodd'a Kidar. PilU IM lart* b(ll l " ruf star*s. an DoddsKidner Pills t;:;!*.:'.;*.-. BeajullrU-Ciefl 1 Dream GiiL LustreCrcme Shampoo givn your hair soft, flamoroul threeway loveliness • finsm-illf •!•" CliiUaiaj wi.k saes. • Sad, ellv la i.^rcCremc's billowy lather „ a bleni of secret ingredients pha gentle lanolin. SHAMPOO KL4M li para, lofs BHU KLIM ktaai witaeet i.-frlaaraliaa KLIM ••silly I. .l.-i, aaWll, •Klini /s exce/fent a>aa*i palepi 'onahoactaad is ash —id •aergi loassur* %  U-n.un.i ., uner mdh than KMM KLIM ,.>r. .... • a rfi. MMI'.mMing nutl. F KLIM add. P--rMit-trit M caaUd 4liMt KLIM it reeaagsMadee" ir iataat ia.q KLIM U sa4 •* th* j pact ally pachsd Ha KLIM i. eradaned under irrirteri eealrsi % KLEM^MILK xf^P' FIRST IN PttfErlErlCi THE WORLD OVfR rOBBALCO Hi.iHI w : I.*. Maaaaag.kaaasi ... -•duhavd I.I aai aw Itafl star) anal '." %  awsaa k-.kini ..it las arsnasel •) In %  aealll of say r*|aur> aa-l -in—i." ariats — H alaal aaaalav f-fc." fa. ll agW LVSTW aawaaai i. i. tad .i..i i,-f'.. i m I., hi |hl W %  -n.l J-> niu* a l I \ It III C S TU TOOTAI. ouasUMTCI: AU .—IIsU I %  inilllli I In lln aaHafcnlsa Ja—M iiiillifilia atsM aVMak • %  ., a Uw nMIrial luotaj will (*! %  !•<• it u* refaad lbs bra* aod p*v Ihe %  nasskasrw ;


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PAGE ax M .su.il vmiKATi: SUNDAV, MAJtCH 1. ltt 1 SEWING CIRCLE p> Tomm* By PENNY NOLAN Make Ih.to lu. ..boui C// I IK' Jungle Girl TOPS IN FASHION WHO WCD AT 13 •nchea deep and the bottom tier Nea Slip, From Old 'bout nine Inchr. d~P To achieve Thli year', full .kilted etyle. padualed fulln<-ea each strip mil nil full petticoat, and * "" nr, ." n """*• lonjet IBM .Up. Theer. of courae, you can ">• preceima one make from arralch but coaatdarGather the r. and lo.n them ablr auvlna can be effected by retoaether tneemng cording in each __ i.ekina aorne of Your old .tratltit >'• <• "••• "•"> <" %  < Th-n Br aOBEBT OLTNTON mcrl* ^ loin the tier, to the slip Top u.ln, BERGEK-OP-ZOOM ai have a allm .Up which cordtn* here al^o Hem the hotTHE Hltle Moth. .! you can quickly make l" !" "Jr. ,. the pplc-ruikleo fan put a full flounced akirt by add ">• to P * in* w'P worn linker to her llpa and opened a • .. gathered tier, of Mime .tiff you may cut It on at the wain UOUI on the Brat floor of the conII row .lip I. nylon the "ml an" an elaatle hand to make VCT|1 of Bv rrancu in the Dutch ideal material u matching nylon ""to .full petticoat market town of Berjon-Op-Zoom. II la available. However. An jold cotton nl.ht .owl, with Tn „e m Ole front row of -, .- anycri.p hghtwci.ht cloth wlU do a %  trallM:aUrt can be made into , u hlw „,, „. Yrn, will need two rtrip. about a crmoUned pvUicoat Cut the ^ ,,,„„., ^„ i lona ..nd twalve to Ofklrt part of the night (own Inly TTSL, . wide Theae. of courae. four gore. Make the lop of each J"'"" nil be pieced at neceiaary The orc one fourth ot your wain -"The w.dth of your dip *U& bands eight inche. deep £oulders. were .,, ever> hes up from the hemline to the shape o. the bottom ul the paper n-t Mthfr nn* strlo to fit this gores allowing one fourth Inch tor %  u remembti hei tsai sAthV/flounce on to Haitit. In shaping the crinoline Maria Hertofh gores allow for Them on the petti* hen she was thirteen to a twentycoat gores to be turned under and w.rue-year-otd Malay hemmed to the underside of the tracher. She had been She looked about ten Yd little K.ore than a year ago the world %  AlB rlbbot %  %  • gathered raw edges JS •SSST^'tS^S -inilin. Thl.h-y will cover the . %  n.1 nounce lo It! Ihll raw lower edge ol • %  B % %  me^re Fini.h gathered edge Join the crinoline !" !" "•> ribbon like Ihe Oral. md cover the loin, with Waa Upe. A .lim taffeta .Up can be tr.n.Vou will need a, . Inch deep Into a bell .ilhouette of ruffle edge with •"" %  ndla lull hree lathered tier, with a yard Inch eyelet trim to eew under UM .1 iiie.pena.vt taffeta and about, crinoline to prevent J" h ^ fouf and a half yard, of cording. Vou may be ab e ••"• %  IBM z a vSrs M^-tlKstya huidi-i .. ul child to the care o( Malay nurse. Che Aminah, in \9*2 when her Dutoh parenU were rleeing from fl" % %  • | I>She was baptised a C ^fsssglr. but waa biought -. ' %  • %  %  village as a M' i people d.ed in the Singapore riot* when the court decided rtie ahould return lo her parents in Holland. H.u CNM Sfce Settle? Rertha came back to he material •Up. h.n no differently' "on the bottom of the .Up over the crlnoBlb lc lo Mile In peaceful, quietly body Utt a yard stick meaiurlnj Une. dvlllMd HoUand Irorn Ihe Boor up at for • hem. Alway. look twice before you one who offered .ix lo four nil off from the boldl.eard n larment becatue the „,,„,, tuecertul rehahilit .tain • the slip will make Ihe .lyle. have changed If the male„, ,„.„„„ Hertoth wa. Mayo Wiri.i.l.llc tu r Cut it In strip ,-nhl ml u "ill good with a little £lW lhp u.ycholon.t who. wrilj—%  — b e able lo Faui. broke c i,„i. HI, he. deep Imagination you ird ot new taffeta will make nomelhlng v.-ry atlractit uke ih,. top and bottom tier and uicful from it What's Cooking In The Kitchen This week 1 am going to give out into the pyrex bowl add I "pes on how to make cualiquor glass of sweet vermouth — ho. kxpro*. lards ( iiI.IKI Fur Filling Sugar, 3 tablespoonsful. Egg Yolks. 3. Hour, 3 tablespoonsful. Lemon rind or vanilla essence. flutter. 1 tea spoonful. M!lk. 1 pint ing In Ihe Sunday pointed out his hospitality of a girl CQ\\ U and cuff* trimmed with -lorn from ihe arms of her foster black braid, and it buttons down mother—to the parents she had M | ftr BS the miniature basque It not seen for ten vears . Ianwu most effective in "Black guage troubles . the fact lhat Watch" tartan taffeta, (note for idie M a married woman who Sassenachs: a black and green had once more lo become a little plaid), worn over a white evenini ir gown, cuffed row— —. This la a prooress report on age with matching tartan, the u-at, Mr. sideline Herfoyh ire laced her problem daughter. I Ulked to Mrs. Hertogt rum. 2. If you want a chocolate custard niling. melt two Ubleapoonsful of grated chocolate ( not milk chocolate, thus: Put Ihe chocolate kitchen of her home. There art in a saucepan with 1 tablespoonno more worries about Bertha ful of water or milk, keep the she said. "She's a good girl and saucepan near the fire unlil the we are nil happy together. But I chocolate is melted. When you will say thai II has been very Put the egg yolk anl Ihe sugar JJJJ",,^ cuaiard as above be. h .rd in a Mucepao. mix with a wooden %  !" £&^S „„--„,,. orf t hc fore taking the saucepan off the ork." n h-n n,UI the floor 'the Hour — melled chScotalet l(r ild be the beat ck el0"r) ancl rd anJ into lemon rind or I HU BROADCLOTH by —^v" whin' it "is finished. Pour it in a milk instead of t glass ol milk > There pyrex bowl or any other kind of This custard Is without any parU cwUrly about hef ••marriage". Bowl ..nd add the teaapoonful of flour and is especially good for £ ?T h r J „* hutier Stir it from time to time children, as it is very light a:.a -.0 lhat it will not have a skin >m nourishing. the top This custard is too thick Put the egg yolks and the augur f.>t ant thing bui tlllinn. la saucepan and mix with ., I ii vou want u custard allo wooden spoon until they are Uiht | -nhnmrie.' make the -.ame custard anlfrothy. Put thc milk in las jltove and when you |>ou % y^^,,^ ^ IS THE LATEST IN PYJAMAS other saucepan nod put it on the lire When the milk Is almo:i boiling, pour it a little at a lime ieggs and sugar and work Ixlure with the spoon. Put the saucepan with the custard on the lire and stir it all the time. Be verv careful that it does not boil. when you see that It has started lo thicken, take the saucepan off th< fire, add the vanilla essence or the lemon rind and let It coot II you want to add the cream you have to add it when you take thg saucepan off the fire. In thai case you put | glass ot milk less at first and then add the I glass of cream tu add 1 LONDON %  II '.s latest epidemic, w huh i this week at the collcvi leading designer, and is rapidly infecting everyone, is the tartan evening jacket. Its style is perfectly simple: it has upstanding collar, long aleeves. skirt fell in lour tiers, each edged with a crinkling of white in the lace. This type of jacket Is useful on a hundred and one occasions. Wear it by day over a beach dress. at night over an evening dress Tartan is just one suggestion for material. In gossamer fine sill* surahs or shantungs, it is Ideal for warm climates. In wool or quiltWhen Bertha arrived at Bergen ^ Mt in, it is perfect for cold she would speak to no one bul cum ates. Another version of the her mother. evening jacket in coffee coloured She glared at her brothers and iin. embedded with sequins. was worn with an evening dress in coffee ne. over dusky pink taffeta. This little evening Jacket is a welcome change Irom the stole which has been the universal evening wrap In the past few ing neck and three-quarter lengt sleeves With a grey or black luit the fashionable colour tT? J .. J % %  u_-r..i. dt the fashionable colour to %  hich Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh choauf (l dusky pl ,, k and xhe m ,,_ wanted an answer. lerlal lB ,hantung. The blouse One day the answers came— fliapQfl and fastens unusually like this. t he side seam with lleith.i llttapl In id" same bed penny.alje bulb a< her sisters. Wiesje. aged 17. Reflecting the current vogue for i d Cony. 10. fullness, skirts in this collection And at night she would tell |,y Cavanagh. (who formcrl>% bout l>fe in Malaya: "1 worked with Molyncux). war* tifvrr really lived the life of a nttwrod, ennolined or pleated. [i .iriKl woman." she said. "1 Pleats were everywhere — halfjust got married and then was )nc h box pleats on skirts, on drc* t..kcn back to Aminah's house." bodices to match skirts, and in So began Bertha's rehabtliiajn-oups placed at four-inch intertion. vals round Ihe skirt. Yellow, grey Lftal March on her birthday her and navy, trimmed with white. iMient/..'-> %  : .'.i' ol pat,.:,. the toun MoturwJ u UM terned fabric and some akelns of collection. Illustrated is a typical Kay embroidery silk. %  in lemon yellow shantung' Bertha was to happy. She it has unusual neck with roll col. lutched thc silks, and kissed her |gr dipping down to a V-hne mother But still she Ignored hei pleated yoke to match the pleteed to tr-c forest dress .hides .. and Lip Line allocs lip colours to be changed quickly md cleanly, as each refill.contained ( n its own metal shell, is interchangeable m the sar-e ca>e. '" N*II i CCHOO* And there's o glistening Nail Colour to match every Up Colour m "NS GALA OF LONDON Wt Aram aW OnvShXr %  F.S. NICHOLLS. P.O. IOX Ul :\,-. -..U''O-I1TI.IJ -i | :.-•-. I





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SI Ml W MARCH 2. 15; SUNDAY ADVOCATI PAGE NIN* / Saw Naples A Gun, A Girl And • A revolver 1...1 hilled H..ir. 1 IIH He iinj In sewer brnratu \innu a* Uiese ml ye*l know Mho uir t, livrv and I can rrrmtnl all uf Utetn. Hew 4* 1 knew Bectus* m> IUIW to lt*rr> Umr. riiEItE wii once an rxuuisiu?, huge amerald locket which *penl nias'. of Its time looking out ut the world from the rather flesh v neck of Mrs. Donaldson as aha waddled like a golden duck aero** the international social hurlioo. 1 had rather a strong desire to change the habitat of this locket from her cool neck to my itching palm That was In Naples, In 1W7. My plan was complete to the U-t detail. But first 1 had to got rid of Rubio. Rubio w.i6 a Spaniard, around 35 years of age. lie was goodlooking in a nauseous kind of way and bit voice was soft. But hid picked up his English from reading books, not speaking It. Whui went Id m him In his swagger hotel apartment, he didn't look hingr. Ha s..id %  Ynu kept me impatient for an hour. Mr. Lime." I said: "I'm sorry, Senor Rubio. I Just flew in from London. Forgot to move my watch ahead." He smiled sceptically. "It i* my knowledge that you have been in Naples for three days now. But it does not matter. I am a man with a skill for waiting." I said. "I'm going t be very brief. 1 won't waste any more of your time." "Basno! Hut first 1 must tell you that 1 have made all the arrangement* to dispose of the Donaldson emerald—a* soon as we—ah—possess it. of course." I looked at him remorsefully. "There's a small item of which I forgot to inform you. Senor Rubio. I have decided to' Include you out." "I do not think I understand." 'To be brief and simple—I have derided to dissolve our partnership." "You—you are disposing St me"" the pretext of going through Lex baggage A 5.000-llra note did the trick. Mis. DoaaJdaon Mgb-pKriv i-d outraged Mafia guided ..And Lived! Shots In The Wght ta> vfce*l ..N.I li rlm*d it.at.h n *** r ,n j*w too* ftt.ooo.uou bag aw llblC .SI 1. hftyish. vOuble. gullible and .somewhat foolish. Her fat cheeks were quivering with rage as aba bawled the Customs man out. Beside bar. looking helpless, stood a slim and lovely girl. After a second or two I pushed between the grinning spectators. "What teems to be the trouble?" I asked. As if I didn't know. I spoke sharply in Italian to the Customs man, while thv looked on admiringly. He bowed with great respect. want to buy tor your sister*" Some nice Jewellery Mi Donaldson was wearing .some thing pretty. Something life that." Just She laughed. You don't *ww softly 1 praasec at neck. TI*NV irartlun. I lUicfcK unh the lockat jenth It was done sjulcklv. And now I was ready \o make p j ilent departure. j.-a ,t~ *•*• ,h— ' f *,,d ">""u that lf^?- frote me Fwai.-ps. And the> "ft t$% W.I. Hopes here was no l Of British Budget *> Iresa page I %  f th.' si.u.-i. 1 lunwd 1 M !' '*• •** '"-'"•l >'' % %  orner and ran into ana of -r spending, if Empi.. U Roman baths I made for Io be encouraged m HriUn, I know what 1 like' Hut most "" -"' < ^" pa "7 IJLl'L'fil 1 One •>! the rooms. rapivtinsit "eeim apparent the West |nd. AWM. urnMd -it cci .bout 1K> •'.. ...... ndaC Mr.." 11 ." '."• " 30.000 dollars. Thai's a real DonBl.i.v tmrrald she hw Bel in th. lurt bc.utiful TlMf ply"l *£ tockM ,U h Hid "iml" Did I sound urpn<*d" I ld I t "P. N— I haw %  • •"•'w „'|, %  Shimult b craiy trawlllni O'rful loci Ho. uuld you all .. |U| .. roun.l %  rttk lh.l n.*i,., on hor "k • < %  %  ?"" iIW<<<. ,,. llTO „„, ,„,, „„ %  t ^H-i •"" t£-" "S^JPSS : !" • %  "• %  ~*i she nodded. "It not exactly •se-but she's very sentimental bout It Her husband gave it to er )ust before he died She Mta tn wo' it everv dav of her SII (I ll' II1 9 mm 1 1| HI tfirirc HfjMill full thrill." MiDonaldson el 1 sped her nudgy hands "I'd adore to go K fasclnn'tng plire %  Ad IK-III to sign the ,-hivk. When I look.-.! up, Rubio was iMiwhtg and smiling at the lad! In. 1 ever, the position Is not so clei ran back, but it was too lak* My cut The present rate of di huraoei was standing at the levied on rum imports into B h a flashlight in one tain la flu 11s 3d per proof g gun in trie other It ion and whlla this continues, eo s umption pf rum must conlii %  .* J m f* Xm at a low level. In iplte of "'" vigorotM nimnalna aagssjai a mm. m eonducted ihrxiughoul Britain .rod and the bullet urarerf my w „ t |ndlan run f rompMWf( \ •umptlon remains dlstreasin I W, fell on the marble floor. He 1,,w .waa wiry and verv strong In Britain'* rum mvporta In t>a few seconds it was clear that twelve n-onth* eoiimg Sept.-m Id far better shape than SO. I9M. totalled 8.300.000 gallr I'hen he ihtl me a very maintaining the MiUafuctory k udc t>li)\ on the head *ilh the of imports and even exceeI I ..v. uo Ike Oifcl. I Ihr ,.r.-. ions ..Mr'ii ngure II ,' n'J'Tr" v "" i" iker. IMnklm yXS Uw tKrw lot wtarla ll • %  "• '" %  l'<-'W .,I.M ..rek.„. ni you would fl MM "'„„„„ ^„„,. r ,„. llK h ,., In_ a IxilIIe of L-i-rtrmi Tnimt lMli An<| M „ w ,, were Mnl) voice me in a nuuie 01 i^rrrmii Tnimt ,,;„. An<1 „„ w t hlnll „ uuu Ckryu. , ^ dio-e o, ?; ,, ^^ ^ ^^ "'Some other time" I snapp "We'ie i "The caused me all this trouble" raised hif hand to shoot. m RTELI^ ud rudely We were talkurn were withdrawn from t 1 tor ronsumptlon. As a reai Suddenly the Old baths echoed ** %  "> > n * bonded warenoi. th arK,u.* and genernl hui>bub. !,T ""' e d of "e year totalU The voice of a guard eame H.WO.OOO gallons Obviously. Nice Io meet you. Mr Rubin. .,., nr lT ltli ^ignor, ini|K>rter. Onnnol rOHtlmW Io bu .1 IIIUKI-IIVIIII*' .1.11.1 1(1 XL' U .. l.lli.U _.._ .f 11 ... -. ..I louUy dlBerenl Al „i 0 „.i-i„,' I itlnorril llubitt's fiC ..NDVfFORi EVERY HOME i)-i ESTA.I.f "".CORDON BLEU *GIHIS7'SINSFEIOTSCOIT CO.. LID MIDGET0WN %  III On.' Tkere wm urmed Kuards Rubio dropped kls nun Pool STLED my. lH .rt> out^of "l^jft ^S*-^ liiiiyli tl t NODDED. "Perhap* Uiat's a ulcer wuy of saying iL" There wa s a paukC. Then Rubio said slowly: "1 do not prefer to be disposed." "Naturally not," I agreed. But sometimes we get disposed whether we like It or not." 1 picked up my hat and turned towards the door. A black automatic pistol appeared like lightning from under his armpit. He said: "If you take one more step towards the door. 1 will Are." I laughed in his face. "Don't be u complete fool. If the) found a dead man in your room they would hang you. Rubio, I'm on my way out. If you fire, the police and all the hotel dili.ln. will be here before you can leave tinBOOf Buon clorno. A ( I opened the door, he said h.irshly "There's a saying in this City. See Naples and die? 1 I shnok my head. "It only proves th;it life is very short and uncertain—for 11* all." Believe me. I am not a'profevlonal hero, but I was not at all concerned aboui Senor Rubio putting a bullet In me—not In his hotel room, j hurried to the pier where the Arcturus was %  teat tn dock Sh P wa* carrying precious freight—Mr*. Donaldson. I had already made arr.ngements for one of the Custom* officials to hold her up on lUrry I.lmr. as tr*on Welles portra>ed him in the film The Third Man." A few minutes later, loveliness WAS gracing my car. Loveliness Jn the form of the emerald locket around Mrs. Donaldson's neck. And Atmee Colins. She wa,s Mrs. Donaldson's .hired companion. She had auburn hair and .vi, to match the emerald. She was as sensitive and shy as Mrs. Donaldson was garrulous and gushing. And she liked me. Every so often I would catch her eye. Then she would hastily turn away as If she were guilty of something. After a while Mrs. Donaldson said: "If it weren't for you I don't know what would have happened. I wish we could repay you for your kindness." I said: "Well. I think perhaps you can. I've got to buy my sister a gift. I don't know too much about Jewcllery--"o I wonder if either of you could come along and help me shop." "Of course we can she (rushed "Aimse doe* most of my shopping for me. I'm sure she would be delighted to help you You go ahead. Just drop me at the hotel." "Oood. That's n relief Now I'd like both of vou to be my guests at dinner to-night" (all in*lluri-T. I K.I ill WE deposited fat Mrs Donaldson 111 ner loom, and than Annee und I went shopping. I took, her along to Corso Vittorio Emanuele. one of Naples' batter thoroughfares. She said: "What are you looking for, Mr. Lime?" "Please call me Harry." "All right." May I call you Almee?" "If you wish . What do you lug Aui*r.can< language." Ignoring it, he .said: "1—I ni trying to reach Via Salvator Rosa. Could you inform me how U) en mere.'" "Sure. Turn right at the next t|w „,,„,„„,. lciiving comer and go straight for three ^ndiruj there and bn aquarea." hreats. Rubio still hung around, makMr, Donaldson exclaimed jng conversation. When we final'What an odd man!" And Aimee Mrs Donalds-m was almost ly got rid of him. Aimee said: asked: "Are you mire you don't hysterical with admiration for "He -earned moat reluctant to know him. Harry" m v courage In chasing the wkfcad leave. He actod as if he knew B| ^^ ^ „^ But Aimee -aid nothing 'Tsald: "Wal, I didn't car. to £ p-j^jj Ru b .,,d him gghfal the indent marble floor and lauihcd. rhan 1 trgstl "n Io DMJ Mrs. Donaldsvm and Aimer. directions this lei %  %  Well. I didn't care to know him. Shall we go in now?" "Yea. <^ i Cours. . There/s ^Wi))k |hIil h „ ,,„ just one thing I'd like to ask you. Naples What do you—for a living?" 'j, wa lp „ v nan u )0 ,„ H ,,i, "Oh. I'm a dealer in abjeta to no mmmmm, extirm citv o| d'art. I wander through the pompeii, lying like a corpse .1 world collecting the bast the foot of Its killer. Versus 1 things'." We entered through the garnet "It soundj very interesting." of an ancient home. The rm "It Is. Often quite exciting, shone down, hard and white. N T S kTjW, pu, %  u *a--5SBfflft& 3.500 lire. On the way back to "re more lizards in Pompeii th blamed myself for taking them to pompru and lnt> dssgsjgff Hut Mi Ihninldson cried: "That terrible man would hava Iried to -natrh the lorket wlierev.i I KnM I'm going to give vou a gift. A hundred* pound note. You must take it Indian rum if it is IMrelj to lie idle in warehouses. tyir.K j wrttl other up huge sunw of capital, the doorway. The position is. theretoie. that these U.900.000 gallouof waiehoused rum have to bo disputed of Tiu* cannot be done unless cotisuinplion increases considerably; and this will not take place unless the duty and thus th< %  nag iown Whatever Mr. Buller'4 decision on rum duties, it seems plain that ftiitain's rum Importers are considerably overstocked and mu't shortly redtkN the) rate of In until some of these stock have been worked off. I in %orr.. -iiii! limi'iThe unsatisfactory income t 1 position aJTacting Investment the Colonies is more Ufa a favourabto sotutkm in Mr. Bu In's Buagastj for many Consei i tive ipokesman have deploretl "If ft *"uation undrr which sacrm-1 IIII made by Colonial ten 1 torn 1 harilv '" fometimea at great cost to that 1 llarrv |, v **. accrue to the benerit BrtUln. 1 SAID gracefully Aimee's hotel, she was pensive. 1heTe y.^ TO ho people. Hut means so muota to you. I took her by the hand. She did i nPV Te harmless. *''''' '• ' mv favourite 1 not object, nor did aho react to u>e wnlkesl slowly towards the fihe wasn't to know thafi the touch. She let me hold her Forum, past the ancient mansion* Mine, h^nd. nothing more I suspected „f rich Romaiv*. with signs still We got hack to the car and institiite nl Tas.tioi, 1 Senor Rubio had made too strong visible on .e walls, ordering dr-vc to her hotel. She went up !" h l "l 1 !" ^ ndntion 10 \l mpreaMon. It was essenU.I "Stick No Bllls"-in Latin. 3 **, jj-ylh, ^-k~ ^ S^JTSSlSS%S S P**: .. •___..._a ..... li i—... I..II... TK— t M M< excess profits tax should be H m.in. : Ami ,' ui-i.Aimee For a while we stood Butler. We subntt ^> Suddenlv. Mrs. Donaldson sa.d sll-ntly together The,, I said excess profit* lax I -It's all beginning to make mo "I'm sorry nb-wt this evening, stneted to profits f 1M .) ftnt" !'' %  mc ** ''*" lunrh lo-morrow." tluiu.l Kingdom a that bothered me. not Rubio. was beginning to be extraor•" '"i" 1 d'narlly fond of her. and that was j BaKPd -ohatously: "Don't you N *o. Harry" bad. I make It a point not to be ^j we ii- Why 1 fond of anyone In this world. •] feel fliM>—Just sleepy. I '** never saw the fresroc*. I don't kn worrlod Sho aid: I ihink wo tuul boiler go back." "We will," I %  o o I n • d her. But nnrt we'll lei Mr.. Douald.1 111.war anmnd I .„,,„ „ t >u „„,„„ %  ,H-kIa.f'm ,. .Ii-ne %  .!....• cniii|*ii...s managed -n.l I irlnkat" I shiruld hove th.-jght '''< '" "* U"> Kingdi •f that. therefore themselves llahli' l rxcess profit tax. As 1 walked back t.. my hotel thought abOMt Vaffalrr emerald. It has long been a complaint nl catch a few minutes' rest. :i had cost me about 100 dollars British investors In Colonial terrta marble bench In the 10 bribe the customs official^ and toiies that the "tax holiday" a< of the Can de Cenale. . buy the champagne and the fllirangements instituted in UM %  When bathing your dog . 'Tetmosol 9 Soap . ton THESE REASONS — Tctinosol' Soap Lontains %  Tctmosol', a safe yet potent medicament which quickly kills fleas, lice ami other skin pests. The Soap is of the highest quality, pleasantly perfumed, and agreeable to use. It is non-irritant and non-in)urious to both man and domestic animals. Tctmosol' Soap also encourages the growth of healthy, glossy coat. 'TETM0S0L SOAP It miLAUE IN 1 02. TAIlETS A pn>diKt ol Imperial (. henuVal (t'harmsceuikalsi ^mm^ I .m.lrJ /|C| A. S. Brydcn & Soni (Barbados! 1 id Agent. I lifted my glass "A toast to Here we are. Now yu sit down, gree pin. The reward left me territories have little value na, May we always be as happy Mrs. Donaldson, and rest vogV ith I profll %  •' iTOodd dollar. .. ,. iins 0 f attracting Oftpttal whil as we are now." shoulder against mine." plus a bump on my head and a n,,i„in still levies Income tax A Mrs. Donaldson giggled. "A ,..] in my suit. I had lost th y,. ft.ii „„. Th i fl wai anv >ng ih toast to you. Mr. lame. You She murmured *.v/>',y// FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE BARNES BUILDING PHONK: 3J5 THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whitepark Road '-'.*>',---y'-*^,-.*--,'.



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rxi.i urn r-,**M-*///.V/ -V^'.W*-'.ROODAL THEATRES II.M KING OROBOI VI I.MII TO RKST •* <.l OBI 'vr, MMIAV ADVOCATK SI Ml XX MAK< II . US* tONN (.MBit B You hat lowed Hi. Majesty'i to m ire raM at da* is pulled IhruuEh W leaving \lVstD-.nit. i sion. ,.t all he Ant part of the •otrmn ceremonies that foipassing %  %  now invite you moving scene* which clmsx as the gun carnshar %  N -in in everlasting sleep. i ihs fT.ilt-lMng concur See. >-vcn be :.-. royalty -in reprttsntaUvaa In lUnera] proces• %  lour <>XY . ROYAL THEATRES from today an i conlinui; ••rly if %  iuih. ^ BIIIIM WDXIH ' un'iiwiw •1MK HAW WITH A u.lHKI I .1 GOTTEN R.rri STARWYCK 1*1 "w lo* ia IH>I tf Faa TOMOI1KOW AND TfttDAY 4.11 & s 10 I' M — A Omltfe I,,.** IU. rll Md Vita. MV* MIX I >l I* I II I IOIIM Is ItrCSDAl 145 # ftJS Mft THE VttOVIUfc* AOo\v>\\a\ Vxe >wo.meo.... \o^e. \oo\omf(Mna\ ue WAS THE FIREBALL., ROAHIHC TO IHE TOP VAN HEFLIN and EVaYN KEYES •ah JOHN MAXWELL •CATHERINE WARREN EMERSON TREACY If'.."rU, by Hua* l,< „ From •noflflinil norm. aaosrt Titwae. •"flMimrt.. %  • %  -, f rW,*4 ft. p.. ", / i S. P. EAGLE • JOSEPH LOStV *% I. r. CMLI % •OOUCTKW I I..I Nrml O I. V | l I I II \ I -l/l HOI 111 I iRIOADIER and Mr*. J B | f art all [staying at the Marine HOW. Canadian Medici id Mn. A. J. Gilehrtflt Toronto. Canada who left Hartwdoa and flew over to for two dav* to *ce the Friday mornQouub Calling D' are slaying Club. SXHWWOOD fog******""*!! moil dnftriii Ulna... Sin Tawn'l mtl tempting ''•— %  •' € untii§f! %  Ike .-*.-. I I... Jo—e MMOO Cl OBI PRESENTS ON WEDNESDAY 5th %  1IIIO I &f .%/ 1 1*1 III! GREAT C4RUSO BEST OF rue BADMEN i •"• %  " ItCHMCOlOR m AND -LOVE All All! IHMIK aoftt lUM Ul NV THIN rti al UJ* eft—i. rrM>[ I aft*. • IHII I l-IM -Ik KM.IK Ml HW i VN M IHI -n BK^IIII MII -*ri ant. .,. •THE IRON CLAW IIO Y A I. II A HI p.m. Ill', mil III I FIGHTI,'G, |lAUOHINoTlOVINO IORHSRIRIAKS % %  OK oioavi Buy Now and Save! GLASSWARE BUTTER DISHES 45c. ch HEAVY PINT TUMBLERS .. 36c. „ SNAP GLASSES (1 gill | 12c. „ CHEESE DISHES 24c. „ NUT OR CANDY DISHES 27c. „ LEMONADE SETS 166 set Ktmiixn \RE FINE TEA STRANERS 20c. each STAINLESS KNIVES 30c. „ SOUP PLATES 44c. „ DINNER PLATES 40c. „ NO. 2 LAMP BURNERS 38c. „ FLY SWATTERS 26c. „ SCRUB BRUSHES 20c. „ • . \v. in n iii\so\ A til.. 1.1II. DIAL : 4222 :—: Broad Street. ." bv TCA They at -i. parad-> Baaai. Hnt-I Propri-ln M R. AND MRS SHESV 4ii> are lh ownara of HI IW-mdN ar* r B"rbadoa for -i *T' I| Paraittaa Heirh Club. Thev pa.r.1 throutti hera on the RMS f.rlt; Rodnev on Mondav dftwn to Trinidad il l*v TCA. on Frid will be remalnln|| i.nlil V %  U.K. Buairicsiman M R GEORGE M CLARKE. buainaaaman bn '-rc on Thuradav by BW1A from Trinidad on a abort viatt and la -laying al ihr Ma.tne Hotel. On Holiday A MONO the cueala BULVing at \.|iiNiu Club an Mi %  no Mm. John Manin of Venoauala Mr. KaruM la from Wve Indunlrn.l RrUti.au Depaitmeni of the Phillip* Petroleum CotLegiilator'a Wife A FTEn apendlnc thrae enjoyable weeka' holiday In llaihado* ataylng at Indmrnei Guest House Worth In*. Mm Janet Jagan returned to Brttath .Guiana nn Friday bv B.W.I.A. Wife of Ilia Han Me Dr rhodd;Jaan. B.O Ix-taUU)i Mn Jajan ia a CounelUor of the Genrfetown Council and Genrt.il Secretary of the Peoplen Progressive Party On Inspection Tour D R H. FOROAN and Mr c'hri-. Duncan who are both i representatives of the Max Hae %  Product.<>i the IK lef: tlv ilaUnd on Friday by n.W.I.A. fo. i.in.t aftei paying %  ".on visit hi-iv Thry wera stay <• Marine Hotel. :>t Foigan is on an inspecthruughuut the West Indie*, wtiil.Mr. Duncan whose 'In Jamaica, la i'it to some of thr i*Jaiida In the area. From Bnth Guiana, he cxpecU to go to Trinidad. Back Afain M R AND MRS W. M. WI1ITAKrTR from Columbus, Ohio wn.) '|u-nt part of the winter In '.' %  % %  .utii1.. %  .1 If .HiM..V IA.II K i five weeks' holiday. They arrived on Friday morning by TCA. accompanied by their daughter and are staying at Parao. Beach Club. With The Canadian After Six Weeka M RS. UKYDON, a Canadian xvhn had been holidaying %  ix Mceiu atayManne Hotel, returned home bg T.C.A. ci Fnd.v. Leaving; To-day D UE to leave to-day (Sunday) by the Celomble for England are Mr. and Mrs. A K. Tonv" ltd Ihatr four-month-'il.l who i on the mobile -tall of Mc*.i Cablt and Wireless has been tntloned here for approximately three yearn, daring which lime he has been to several of thr oth*r i.-lands <>n shod it tnidVr*. Hi* borng in Ragiana] L Dufhava, Mr. Corrlgagi l< retumlns to England on long It gvf Mrs. Corriaan la ItM f..rr--r Ramona Portlllo, dJUShter of Mr Ramon Portlllo of Venezuela and Mn. Portlllo of Bay Street Attended Carnival M R. AND MRS. J M. Sharpof Saskatchewan and Dr. and Mrs. MePh.-ii! Of Toronto. Canada who came out to Barbadoa early In January for the winter, paid a visit to Trinidad fur Carnival and returned on Friday morning by T.C.A. to complete their holidny They are ^laying gl the Paradise Beach Club. i Priday am Mrs Harvi*. Ool Erie Harvte, Mm. Ron aad Mr. Kar.JUST brtor^ leaving for Antlgu. nalh RO-A. Thry ln by Ue "Mwla Cathariua" which m taking part in the Caribbean Yacht CraM. "Biai anna" la charUrnt b, Oal H.ri# Tha party mil ba mtarniag to Bsrbade* after the crnitr i Cath Cancer Specialiat |"V' and Mr>, Alejandro Calvo Carnival In Barbados o QN the Bight Of theM Brother* STEWART SARJEAN: vit to Barbadoa. which 1T1 Barbadian now rcsidr oinculed with the Trinidad Car\tw U.S A. left tha inland or "-^n tha ahjp were neaday by aWJA. for Pu M"„, Lairet who wc reeontl n Venezuela, arc ;n Barhadog un their honeymoon nival, pawengi which thev are spending at tha able to get a general view of what < AatUtfc Club. CaxmvaT looked like when thev R Calvo ia a Cancer Specialdropped in at Chai Jean Plene V>< i (ii>ni Cvntro Medlcn m In Cai ia) a the French Restaurant in Hr The Manageimnt of thi Venezualan Auditor Leave* A MONG the paaaeiiitrn return ing to Venezuela on Fnda' by LAV win Mr. Miguel Sehon. Audilor of the Banco Mercantil took "part. In Caracas. He had been spendTha thrUI ing a holiday here staying ul the reached at n Aquatic Club. 'set in. So well did everyone anOn W.I. Tour P AYING II visit to the Weal Indies in the interest of his firm la MrRonald Carey. Partner of Woodhou-e. Carey and Browne Produce Brokers of Lamdon. Hi arrived here on Thursday night by H.W.I A. from British Guiana Airways back to ttk He was accompanied by his wif< Res' %  ""* * n Stewart Jnr taurant staged a Carnival' eorre% 'P 0 "' month's holiday bar spending with that in Trinidad and Mr. Stewart who has pail h it was deemed a great success. A first visit back here in 33 steel band was engaged to supply is a brother of Mr. ''Bill" S i the_ music and many Barbadians jeant of the Hastings Holel wit whom he stayed.' They had m • and climax was aean each other for over ttm idnighl when Lent decades Btt in So well did everyone enMr Sarleant who tatt hate at tSLl ftC^IS.. 1 ."'.^ .' J?*V 0 h age of 18 Is now waB make the festival an annual <-nr ... ,*._ .._ „„. .... is slaying at the Marine Hotel Mr. Carey who has also visited lished In thr Real E t. m New York, here while here he has made a tour is Miss Francoi-e' Vary and of the Island and saw place he Mb* Denise Cuddle of Venezuehad not visited when a beg la. They both work at the Canawas very impressed by the va nd dian Embassy in Caraca... improvements the island Embaisy AT PRESENT holiday in,. Still Holidaying Here made and was overwh, M R. HAROLD BEATTY. until ,h hospitality of the people. recently General Manager of expect*to return next year. the week by B W.I A. for Jamaica trie Montreal Board of Trade and H..,:--.A A Ptaaiia before returning home via New Mrs. Beatly are still holidaying In 0u inc Ar d rleaurc York about the and of March tlarbados staying at the Windsor TN BARBADOS for two wrrl: Second Vi.it In 4S Y=ar, "^ ?£ l^^T^ L £&* A FTER spending two and a hall ln f"" 1 ' C na * ln "' r They expect In the S o raygasa aa niontn. •* %  months' holiday In Barbu dos staying with his relatives Mist Ivouisa Green and Mrs. Lilian %  • Mr. James Oreen of Brooklyn, returned to the U.S.A on Thur-d..y by the S.S Fort Tawaahesvl. Mr. Green is a Barbadian who had been living in the USA. for the past 45 years. This was hi* hoHdar They are staying second visit to the colony during indramer Flata. Worthing. Manager of John Labatl Lid.. ol the oldest brewerin Canada i'*. ...:... 3..I. Ho arnved on Wednesda. Co-operative dank TCA BCCOB1D nie0 ^ hll ,\ vll Manager and is staying at the Hotel Royal. RR1VINU veaterda) morning Mr. Graydon has been to the by B.W.I.A. from Trinidad Caribbean before .but thi* Mr. and Mrs. Percy Philip ivho have come ovar for a month'n at that period. He begs to say goodbye to .11 Mr. Philip, a druggist of Portof-Spain, is also President and ^J&STi^JE^ Unabfo t0 C0R Managing Director of the Trinidad Co-operaUvc Bank. St. Kilts Barrister by before leaving. Official Starter BENNETT. Official arter of Races, HITIV. I B.W.I.A. on Thursday and ilaying at the Hotel RoyaL For Tha Race* M R. O. Sturti first visit to Barbados. H.' said that he was glad to be herein this climate because when he left Montreal It was very cola with lots of snow. Scout Raffle C ONGRATULATIONS to Miss Joan Weekes of "Brigs* Collage". Gun HID, St. Michael. who won the Boy Scout raffle. The M R. N. TAWIL, Director of arrived on Friday by B.W.I A. and Faulkner Trading Co.. and will be remaining for two w.-eks Mi. TawH, arrived OH Thursday staying at the-Hotel Royal, by 11 W.l.A. to attend the Races Mrs. Rigley is thr Owner Of The* gn SUVMIH at the Ocean Columbii-s which raced at the View Hotel. Garrison Savannah yesterday. I N Barbados chiefly for the U. are Mr. O. P. Boon, Barristerprize was a Phillip* Sports in<-i at-Luw, St. Kitu, his daughter bicycle and the winning numbe Mr*. C. O. Rigley and hidaughwas tog ter-ln-law Mrs. 6. R. Boon. They From Carnival M RS. 1 V. SPRINC1EH I "BesgUoa", Rivei Road i\'turnfd from Trinidad on Frida. morning by B.W.l.A. >ver to see Cai She went ival there. The Barbados Maternity Hospital TRUFORM FLEXIBLE FOOTWEAR FOR CHILDREN •% IDEAL FOR GROWING FEET MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY OVER FIFTY YEARS EXPERIENCE SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES II II V Y io Ml in it aj iu HI mn in i ra F-RJtOl. THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL is situated at Bank II.ill. and waa re-oonverted from u building which was former.v a private residence. The grant by Colonial DevelopClinics are held weekly Thg maul and Welfare Organisation ol Ante-natal Clinic is held twice C24.O0O in 1U44 for the establlsnweekly. mem of the Barbados Materni'y Patients aie IsslefVsawed by the '.. am sub ting Matron and are given a over by the Government in iB47, physical examination by tha Vuat*as the answer to pubUc critiels.n lng Obstetrician and all details are over thr lack of proper training recorded. Treatment is also given r.iciiitie. for nuowives in the to patients. On Clinic days, besides the Tiio Maternity Moapital is under 'outlnc check-up. patttsml I the direct control of the Director ..f siructed in all the essential Medical Services and Is supervisee} fetors which make lor good by a Matron and Visiting Obstotrihealth dunng pregnancy. The |mctan. assisted by a staff of trained l>ortance of an adequate diet ii iMidwives stressed with its important eleTha H'Mpital has aecorrunodnments of meat, fish, dairy produce twenty mothers and their Hull and green leafy v.babies. Patients are encouraged to seek Twenty pupils are undergoing be services offered at the Conk training constantly. Of these, tan ln "* *a*W month of prriinaney trained nurse* undergo a 12and certainly not later than the im-nth period of training prior to l*lh month. Dental services are sitting an examination for quailalso available, fying a> mldwrves. while ten Thers is a Theatre for thuntrnmed puplla undergo eighteen delivery of the babies; a nursery months' trai:unic. Examlnation.1 for normal babies and a nursci..* are held every year. for premature babies. After delivery, mothers are enmuraitcd to attend the post-natal ilinics where advice is riven on the care and feeding ol \-. There were 42(1 dellv* rl ing the year 1951 There 2.874 ante-naul attend.as 300 post-natal atlend.i Although every patient who attends the anle-natal c inic cannot have her baby in thr Hospital due to ths limited accommodation. Unnumber seeking the services "fTered free at the Maternity HogsyMal have Increased Bi 1-. On a visit to the Maternity Hospital recently the Advocate wag particularly impressed by the -ixitlesslv rlean appearance of th-' llosphnl, both Inside and outside: the efficiency of the staff and the cheerful, happy and restful atmosphere prevailing Nut only do the patients receive every car* and attention at the Maternity Hospital but the Colony can bo justly >>roud of the up-todate training facilities offered l> young women who are interested In making midwifery their neat ion. GENTS' SHOES TAN & BLACK KID OXFORDS SUM & SI1.5K TAN BLACK CALF SEMI BROT.UE OXFORDS 1I.W TAN BLACK BROGUES 1L TAN CALF MONK STYLF. RVS BLACK PATENT OXFORDS IDr. SIMM) -_. 11.14 YOUTHS' TAN BLACK OXFORDS— X* I* *•• BM T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DUl 4oa YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 i %  ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN FABIAN" V STH AT I PJI. Mill MTI ATtllDAV STBt 'IIAB^ tmm1 g rmncA crrv I wa.i„,t.i _-•*.-* it ," *at\TtrailAN 11 in a M ininMoi % % % %  %  •%  --%  .*.. r ....j-*.*-...-. ...... I'.t.fjtitlirsaaJ PLAZA CINEMAS AMB i TODAY ft TOMORROW > "ON DAMiFROlS GKOl M" IJ'IMi RYAN In AI M ih. UON ioi shwi.— "CACTUS CAT-UP" rttunaoAV mm i pm CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE Wild Dill tlJ-luTT .. Hrd Bidet A, ALIAS BILLY THE KID SSSOM %  wl lANCASUS MAN OF BRONZE nnARFEN MAI, .,„ TODAY and Continuing DAILY •* 4.45 ft 8.30 P.M. I'tPFY TFCMUK-OIOrl MUSICAL ON MOONLJQHT BAY DOH bUrSLAI JACK SMITM TVYff'9 A fiROWP DOH IS DAY QOPDON hUrSLAI JACK IMITH Alw Ih, Caiadul Carlesa rgNtNO *OOM< HKOS aa-ni-CAf*l' REAL GLORY Q^ry COOVVa D-vld mvCN Andfr. I.RIM IH.HTIN ii] M RIO CiHlar '—..... iu • is M LEAVE IT TO HENRY *kSS**SSM W.la,irB. WalU, SJBBJM J SIERRA PASSAGE wr- Mortal: T** <* a iri iu i* |. LUCKY LOSERS L*o OorMv Th 8w*r* *.. 1 THE PIONEERS % % % %  BRS CAIETV The Oarseii—Si. James TODAY t, TOMOStBOW SSO I'M MAT TOOAV — .*• PM VOICE OF THE TURTLE SIM M StoasM. Brnr Pir a LOOK FOR THE SILVER LINING •Color br Tootatokatt OordoB StMtU* JIM I TfBVDAY ll>l ass ru THE GOLDEN NAD0NNA HOMICIDE %  hasat DsasfJa



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SUNDAY. MABC1I 2, 1*52 SUNDAY ADVOCATF PACE ELEVEN Oil Paintings of J. M. W. Turner Th T - h 0 .01. Your Horoscope A supreme Colourist (B> CH MILKS CLARKE) Flfxtui of llw %  .-' I %  lul I* J M W Turner exhibited his Jirst oil (jointing in ihe .iimu.il %  KhlbtUoil in ITS". the age of H l'> this time he r was already an accomplished waier-colcurtst and hihad bwn m ceptcd by the Academy t early at. I'M. His early tuition in the oil medium IN oaaaaara Mlhough tradition has it that he lopied at the studio uf Sir Joshua Who died in 17V2. Turnei entered the Royal Academy I Schools in 1 "89 and it a eo ms L leaseni'bUto uppo*e that he | learnt the elements of his craft I curing tins period. His Bral work* |_ are dark and almost monochro iatic and betray a lack of in In——" % %  — Hi ,. kill and confidence are Utg hi'uwuig volume %  ork during the next few i which he established a kputation as i marine painter. Ehii [ d of hi* work reached Hi full maturity In The tun rising IB a Mil (painted in 180?) where H^ outmatched Willrun van der VeMc and Aelbert Cuyp. fSX..ke many another English E inter his early work was often pan Dutch nth century %  Mali and in add i tion to marine painting, lnndscitpet and genre aubjecto were handled with in— nuiosily. The sea and everything connoctad with the sea %  fascinated Turner tin ughout his *life and provided him with endless i-oth calm and stormj. rV. Interest in li.'hcrfolk I* vivlaly : reflected in the bustling stormy, n ol Calais Tier painted .n 1B03. As early as 1800 the calm rmOlann or Kit-hard Wilson. • lath century PMrttth .i ; % %  n. .i. Turner's mythological subject AMaftaj with Ike Sibyl. This picture was the first of a long line at p.imting.N in which Greek mythology und Roman histnry i M' btM mi !' %  '>' %  NnJi leg of dazzling effect* cf light and colour. In 1802 the Trinity of Amiens opened up Europe again for a brief period to travellers from Britain: Turner hurried over to France and Switzerland by way of Calais, and visited the Louvre, where he made a number of notes on the pictures. r He was enthusiastic about Titian's use of colour and the balanced light and shnde of Nicolas Poussin; el he also admired, but he dlaukad Kubcns' system of double lighting though he thought the Flemish painter"! wchnique was brilliant. The effect of Poussin's work upon Turner is clearly noticeable in the pictures painted immediately after this visit to France. Always a first rate draughtsman. his painting becomes firmer and the pattern of light and shade more decisive. The influence of i'outsin culminates in The Goddess, of ih-i. ni choosing the Apple of tenlenUen in the Garden f the Hrspertdc* exhibited In 1806 at the British Institution. The Influence of Titian makes itself felt in the bolder colcurs which Turner began to use in 1B03 as well as in tttff and the echo of Ruysdael can r be detected In Turner's landscapes for the next ;0 rears In 1807 there appeared a brilliant essay in the manner of Dutch 17th century genre painting • nulled Ttte Blaekssmikhs Ska?. Here we find bright touches of local colour and an accomplished treatment of light. This wu followed in 1808 by The Death of Nassau in which Turner established himself as England %  greatest historical painter. During the tlrst period of Turner's career as a painter in oils hi* earlier topographical drawings had served as models which were soon transformed into highly original compositions. As his confidence increased the range of his work became wider and his technique expanded rapidly. By 1808 his niaroacuro. which was lather like that of Rembrandt, became charged with an auii.wphere that was bright and luminous even in the shadows, and the whole key of his colour .ightcned appreciably. The earlier works such as Calais PKT wer possessed of a Byromc fury which gave way during the next four years to quiet n e ss and meditation In spite of much ill-considered criticism a number ol Influential patrons and critics supported him. during the second half of his life wealthy manufacturers began to buy his painimgs. Throughout hi* life Turner enjoyed loyal suppoit from the majority of his fellow Academicians, especially the younger men, and on at least one occasion the Academy was severely criticised for Its modernist tendencies in countenancing his work. Turner did not, however, rely solely upon the annual exhibitions at the Royal Academy to sell his paintiflgs. In 1808 Inbuilt hut own galkry In tjuears held annual exhibitions of his work. After these exhibitions were discontinued he kept a number of his pictures on permanent show; some of them were sold, but several others which he called Ins "darlings" he refused to part with and they were eventually bequggtifcad to the nation Between 1806 and 1810 Turner painted 12 oil sketches of subjects tonnected with the River Thames and the Wey. All of them wenpainted on thin veneer boards and are among the earliest examples cf outdoor painting In oils. Swift Ukd summary in their treatment DOtM of rapidly changing effects of light and shade which foreshadow the oil ikah John Constable some years later. As early as 1708 Turner's interest in light led htm to study Claude Gellee whose work mudc him fed both excited and unhappy becau**he felt it was inimitable. The influence of Claude lasted out Turner's life, more especially in his classical and mythological subjects, but by 1814 Crossing the Broek shows him B0Bt] idiom of Claude to the English landscape both in design and In the rendering of light by ub.. %  %  So MM (r*. UM thill of Pwnail T-.tx><-. Mar* ssasl keaaas w %  i •pplyiR. HUM ibe .amous Bennett College can help your career through personal POSTAL TUITION I r nsn ran ibat wo Bit eiaasa wtia;h will u.iia!il> uads as protnsHti, if you %  in your oareer h> mmr. > II HlCM ff fMUl Ull TOM TWt> OLYMEg DKsUDIKQ FOLYPHEhtVtV—Pain tad by J (by Courtesy "' n ' Truslcci of the Vatkmal Gnller W. Turner Enoiendi Birth all .I'.ri, •rrlSWa |„ ,.,.„-„i| N.. %  %  %  i ni ttiii.ii i. %  %  %  Whea you anrot with The Urnitrii < oTegc you will be coached unnl %  >. >.l \l ir i. the College who h*iu.ih m ba) *)tc*i. of PTSSBSB Tatar training b> ; -ea lam %  at sssr aacst 1 ^*> esaras are .-harged AD buats ass few K studana. Yossr asm Twasr wall harp saaj, *,u bnog OSB tas cassa iuu a as you. Kiul there n twlaa more flsan -nu %  nagrn* You will tjualrfyl Aad rendered in pure colour T 1 "" ,lim he (xjntraatl |h> .p to Rome with the large painting 'he white ground is stained in Wfllng 'hip of the past with ih Kl.hsnond Hill on thr Trisiee I Ukg ITgaW UfluUI, in otli.-i I Di* '' W %  fepTI K '' Regent's Itirthda*. The Iniluence* Ihuily scumbled. the tug The GO) U W I f if tbe various European masters In Il)r. deriding rolypheanus l*mpid % %  • whom he had emulated were painted In 1B29 he esUUiihoa a fWaTT ll palsitgd with all cumulative and cannot be neatly cwmplctely new Iwrmorry. All is t*tcrj' which Tun.. separated one from another: light and colour, from the flanwig v ' '"* r 1 with water. throughout the remainder of his design of the morning cloudii From 1040 onwardi l life It is possible to detect the the transparent veils of blue m I effect of all of them In a single the shadows. This picture is pro attention HU ta isl trash be.-oinpo*ijion Steadily his own bably the gTeatesl hlstorie.d paint loogei and the fftlltl : Hi very personal vision unfolds Itself. i"g produced by the Romantic aten are luggi t> .i rather thi reinforced by an acute visual Movement In England. At about deocribtd TM. LOQinemoiy. and as early as lglS h the same period Turner painteel I u-overstal ptctufw Ol EtU career, had pro-luccd on astonishingly number Of line pktures at Petstain, Siesta sad Speed. modem landscape In Frosty Morn <-ilh Park, in the English county I am ted in 18*4 Here (he kMh nts' Ing. a picture which strangely or Sussex, which are all studies of aW n. lam Bn£ enougli achieved instant popuver'ouseflect.. of light. In Interior spe-d of the r.. 11 A ,,S ruataingj larlty. Archdeacon Fisher, who twnfc everything in the ro>-m across the viaduct and by the was a staunch friend of Constable, has been transmuted by a burst of iinvnig ram whuh u..ninuiothe described it as "a picture ~' plclurcs. %  Turner paints a picture of a frosty morning country with the calmn' Words wort n. It is u detocheel deeply felt interpretation of mat !" <-ru wnicn leads -he eye In! abstrnct Hi.ingpi moment when the winter sun nseh 'he picture in a manner that be now from the idea lying behind rnd slowly thaws the frosty land comes typical of the last 20 ycr i ,s subject rather than frot An important feature of Turner's "' nx life. In the Ftte/Oriri outward appi career was his practice of spending nctures are als.> loma simple and I\irner's importance lies very several months each year travel!fcl' 1 "2 l 1 ""*'" %  •• The Old Chain hugely in the way in which he ing in search of material for his I**** Brighten nuticipatcd Ihe d'cveloptneni ol pictures. Owing to the unsettled Jn* following deo-de of Turner's i.ci^cape painting in the IBth state of Europe, his visit to France hie is characterized by work in century. Long before ho duti Ihe ml Switzerland in 1802 was the which the ground is often laid In canvas primed with whit* and iho only occasion on which he left this w^hniasses of blue, yellow or red. l, K ht scale of colour which he country until 1817. Thereafter his ^orhaai Castle is a vision of im>; i s, i had been v visits to the Rhine. Switzerland and sunrise carried out In primTinworks of the %  1*SJ r us g i B : i of sunshine into a caacad* of Jewellight into .. ta simple liKe colour: Through this not of imM. During the It BwTfl t In the colour the strueturo of the room if his life l %  { ] lie** of eon be dimly made out. Colour effevt of hghi and darknees ..ndl! S2&S Jr.." !" Mdyei ."id light are swept into a spiral l is rompoiltiona bstfome more' of that patierri which leads 'he eye Into abstract. Hi* ingpiraVri comer; } *••"-•<-•"— DP -MORSE'S y& PILLS >nd IUly became more frequent ary red, blue and y of low until he was 70 years old ond worked into a white ground railing he-tlth curtailed his travels, "foreshadowing of French His first visit to Rome in 1819 *m century Impressionism In brought about a marked chango its colour The decade closes m his work. Like Poussin.. Claude with The Fighting Tenterand Richard Wilson before him he *>** in which the painter returnfound lasting inspiration In the ""^e more to a historical subj. scenerv around Rome, Trivoll and Naples. On his return to London. Turner's colour became brilliant In 1813 he had already begun priming his canvas with white In order to obtain greater light in all parts of the picture. The lln.1 Italian visit clarified his Ideas and from now on colour and light became indivisible. The first results of this visit to Italy dis appointed his admirers, but In 1823 he produced The Bay f Bslse, a much idealized rendering rf the subject In which dazzlmg clo boot! fi tein.nneii until the present cenluiA whan wu realised that Turnei %  creams were nearer to the truth Ihan had bean lutpoctod O table these islands he was unapt during ms lUetime except uid the United Stat mm lESSON "MAGI" HEALING OIL I value. Use it for cooghg, ooldo, i-olic and dlarrluica. and externally for cuts %  ltd liruises. sprains and strains. Good for your stock und poultry too. TRIFLE VALUE IN ONE BOTTLE THATS "MAGI" HEALING OIL What You Should Know About Your English Wky So Many StudenU Recogamend 4 RE you content with the way you speak and write? Are you sure that you are not m ak in g mistakes that cause people to underrate your Never has the importance of good English been more widely recognised than to-day. "you can express yourself persuasively and forcefully you have an immense advantage Id your business or professional work as well as in social life. Does your English enable you t o egohar %  TOUT be't on nil occasions • Can you express your ideas fluently — end correctly 7 Are you sure or your pronunciation and spdllne T Why You Ar e Judgd by the Wy You Sp—h — i Write You m )udJ by Your English reveal* you. the w> you expres, yourMl' Ii It not • (c\ that you )udn ouwrt br UMjr '.geeeh and wrtUnj ? Juit as you are favourably impresied by the man who haa a ready command at correct, polished and effective speech, so you receive an unflatteringImpression of the man WHO fumbles for word! and is obviously uneaay about his English. No matter what ability you may poaseaa In other directions, you are gravely'• %  MSWfJ* your English u deiectlv. Every W IT minute-you run the rlak of being unfavourably assessed. How You Cam IMPROVE Your ENGLISH in %  FQYW Hourg Uany ambiUous people are worried ^ff,'" 8 they cannot depend upon their EnfUsh not letUng them down It was to meet their need that the Regent Institute planned the now orid -'* ni S u r '.^ ou ," e tn Effective English and Personal Efficiency rpl HID) Palace Oate, London. W.t. EagUad. without ." oblitauon


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SUNDAY. MAKt II 2. IU.-.J -I \ll\Y lliliK \ll PAO.l. IHRl.l. AT THI: rrvKMA On Moonlight Bay US <• .11. Gardening Hints For Amateurs Annuals in (icneral With the ukal weather that we have had K> far thi* voar annual* should have made a good start. LAST niRht was ttie gala upemng ol the new Plmza Once a garden can be adequately Theatre in Barbareei. Road-the third theatre under the watered, thto u justthe wuether mna ? ern.-nt of Caribbean Theatre. Ltd. to be opened in ^S^SSSC^S^S .U £ the island Tu mark this important occasion, the manageother annuals love. Some people'! merit have selected ON MOONLIGHT BAY as their feature Snapdragon plant* are already a film and It would be difficult to find mare refreshing and * o1 ,f ilh j^JJf 11* aMU u •'* appealing: entertainment. Dora Day and Gordon Macrae ^AJthouaihlkrww that ia*t well Warner Bros, popular song and romance team are starred when eui must take first BUW in in this amusing and lighthearted adaption of Booth Tarkvalue, yot thare are other* *tuch. Ington. famous "Pandro" stories, .ha. is a gay family tSStSfSSSftS E £ FARM A1W GARDE\ THECWUH M 1 |H> Af.llltOLA) Follnu II I local cottage indu not nenpanlj (;.! Kil ... II i' W think H wil mit.ed that then* are exposed hillsides and i. ai. nal lands In .he hands of peasant propiwter* as mil .i U iMd ploti. in seme of Ihe dry. a m afafc it village areawinch couli 1 v turned to account if pla: I ly trer 1 I.ik.l n-M,.,!!,, !" ^ il U.. B.B.(. KADIO NOUS iaa conaidarjhld value mmmrr U — — %  —. "h in iVmaud. TTv ir.<1 Broad, ast & torncomedy, with music. The beauty of a film like 0* is that the enjoyment of it knowi no age limii and Ita youthful verve In delightful to all. With a •background of n small town in Indiana in 19)7, the story concerns a young tomboy mlu who Is much more tn baseball than romancinc under the Indiana moon—that -i, until a young collage senior mnkm his appearance and changes her Ideas. Romance follow* Q tally no time at nil. but iu path alas more thorns than rowea, what with our hero believing in Frvo Love and his kv/eethe. batig dead against hb suit either Free or otherwise! Huweve.. graduation day reveals the f-wt that all the senior men have anlisted to go overseas, including our hero, and possibly due to this fact, hli Ideas of matrimony undergo a rapid about-face. Parental blessing is finally given, and everyone is happy. The plot includes many hitanous episodes, mainly contributed by the eleven-year-old hrother whose propensities for Retting inhim to difficulties are only equalled From by his ingenuity for disentanglin? mem, that garden for their beauty alone. Queen Ann's Lace Queen Ann's lace %  those, and although It la only %  juic. %  %  into pre i ive seen the "an UM of HI th< Uah Guti %  thick, but a. Durin| %  o %  %  Con I >n I urn re' qualm %  i> led, h %  The follow large!) M lnforl nation .hi ..ted in Ih. Institute ell kit uu.t very .. %  (. ; "< .I-.I. re.i IIH rr is used exCarl) iration. some ,,,.„„, r ,„ m KuaUl . d ii! titf Uuwcr v. L i .. ... ..... sv....... *" '"'' "it nulrittvi ,1 ii > i't'rn P, IMiKIs 11A1 ment:,r% March 4. is lludgt-L ia> in Britain rears the imr <;M ..I Overseas the Budget peaches lor <•! the •elf. and hi unsuriiaaacd in uainiv '" '" H loneliness The plants r,>w I„ .bout four fed in ML*' and I loiters are pure white, and. as '"• M . ft ? '"" Ihe name implies are fir .1 light '1 lH ""' *"bj.vt el It looks lovrl, STown in a border with other menury on Thursday lit 9.4.% pin. iowen. or In a bed by Hat 11 In .i*te of the fact that Queen •|.mcri;ellc> III Millava Aaa'i Vaee does not lasl very loan o.-ifin... neail %  •••• %  %  thu Oowcr is used ex-carlck.': GFatnc who uiumed leiuively for de.^,ration. .on.. m Kul|Ul ,.„„„,„,. a'l even tinting the flower ..,„.,,. ,„. .„ , ,,. ,,. ,,„. E „„ r %  heads pink „ r blue. „ %  • Single Balsam OaMTul Brlggs wUl dWciis, Com, Single Baliam i anothar plant '"unlsm ui Malaya in hta talk^On li,„„„,.. tliul unol of much value for pick''•"ng %  ' "'.u: rn the M-iie. 1 nig but which brighicus up the ll '' !l1 -' Prograromj I he. 1 insny parts of .hauy spou in a garden. So muct> Pgd world, that*, aaainl 1 has already been written about : "' IVrtugur„ trnveller. this plant that ne special des.-i r I ,N tion i:i necessary here, and this is I 1 only a reminder to include a few Col of Ulese gay little plants here and H that the Comcum In Uv -ignrntnt up country, there. There Is a great variety uiunl.t anny in M -ijmnln : aruval in the aattleIn the colour of these flowers, and ..1-n.l l.''i' with pisIVikuiu... Ian kirv of Ooa, sv.. i s aghast at the killing ofton a new shade can be 20t from l u ls rifle .,1 a few "' %  large scale factories have himself. However, one • of the of small firl. and the antnnco a friend's garden. Brens a lo m 1,11been established for Ike preparafunnlcst sequence, occurs durma of Miss Lupluo. the whole aln.e.These plants gro*r from seed or Srmund orianlsau. 1 "' *" nuts lor eatporl the OlM datebeueean he young phcr, become, charged, and Ih. cu.llng, and like a moist shady ,5 OM ,r In who pr..v, „ ,, sweethearts. I'll call It the "powaction never lels up, sool ,\? — .1-..1..1.. 1 nothei hundred „f Hie kidneyMacrae, the two of them sing the compelling, and her belief that dd „eatlv to the ."lour of the For ""' ordinary i.,,.,-iuiiur ai. 1 ,i,.,. .1 „ui. in.siulk 01 peduncle who hales is g nr den These flowers with their Chinese in Malaya the Common t ,, .,, t, nu | gradually MV changing the graoafui spikes are also in spite l'arty is bill the lau-.l and 1111 ... nines a Iksdty. turgid appeariblltercd policeu j oa.,1,. short ufp V|;ry ~ pulHr M lulbless of %  long line of seorat %  ce Mtnewhal reaembling an ap'" in addition 10 boliuucts and Ixmir ocietles lo which ihey paid thasr la ri„ ..ppl. %  • %  n .line l„ 1. They grow easily from seed or contributions under thicat of bnghl red or yellow colour and tuning, flourish under ordinary mutilation or death. The broadcast, .re ornamonu hangingiai garden conditions, and will do lasting f..i iweiity n.iiiutca wlU be sreen l.glage. In thi dually well In dry or wcl weather, given twite ou Filday. 7lh. Much .mioned, a mature 11 ee .1 Salvias moke a lovely border .,, 4 15 and again at 10.30 pin '<•" HIV-rtSJH %  "'., „'"ii'' to a he.1 Hie reH ,,a,l, ecra-Molle I %  KM lo 150 lb of apples tlllllUlills Penrbd" roV. while Mary Wickes. winter snow, logether with well ZMST .^LSZ u ia V, of ca liur Hriii.1. In lualllan Knir '' "> whl 1 %  ll ,ul •" "' "' "' Stella, the cock says her say done dialogue and good acting. ^?garden 5pl0 *'"" """"' T Br i, !" r h 'ESS? Falf^.5' imhuiked nuls are obtain this :.ii inlerestlng nd 'n the larden. The British Industries 1Fair. 1 b. ^ in>s m| „ ,„ Little Yellow Daisy ul .?• hc '", kTl?l.„, r r.ilrt "'lagers, U ntira nuU are first UUle Yellow Daisy "thiHigh Sl"" 1 ^ !" ,"'^! o a ,, d ?,,, le '''' lr hmn !" " uuite uaeleiai for olekinu s.-t "lymnla. Uondon and loan. ,,,.,„,, „, lh( K,e to permit the proldde, a have" bfi of' t, lg„ "rouiis,..,. lliriniiiUlto... wei. „, ,„„ „„„,,„„. Ktaj-J.' iieaa in the garden This UUle •'" %  Industries will IK %  di.|.l..>cd i .eleased from the outer huaka plant grows In sizable bunches BIT. PiMj.' . !" ;P < "u „, ,,„„„, ,reatm-il if dainty greenery which ha. a programmes starling In the cunung rheso pot. hold about one and a delicious aromatic scent and week will outline plans for Ihe ,.. lr 1O [,.,, pouMI of nuts and when In bloom Is covered in Fair which Is expected to beon „re balanced oil threestone, over hundreds of tiny golden dally the same scale as last yeafa Fesi low burning I'.IC While heating. BOSTON Mass Feb 29 %  "" dowers. U makes .. splenllval of Britain ll.l.F. Emohwns ihenuU in illrrei with wooden A tin? nl.-tic ban inside the iM "^ 'dcn or border plant, thi. yea, Is laigely on new ItHal. ladle, and the cxp. II.-d oil cnljaO. K...M TSI '.,J£ M.J U.rl ""ce eslablished Yellow Daisv |„.I d.-lgns anm Improved f ' " "<*> "Pn !" -Ar,,r """" heart of ->'••'- Mr> r Mary u llm ^ ^ dj^peara ^ wh J. h wlU pnaoou, U,e exlen ..iiiiute. n^lioil In. ...... ... !" JTo „ ,a.,r „ au, u J the rainy wealkerTbut as p„rt trade and otercoow Ihe diread) fi unique operation perfoim,..„.•,•„ ou.nlhs come around ,, n Ui.... ,.r omterlal. lo ivarm.iPi* innkl.sl a, PI,ra"''B""i".r.o;,r."bng'ld. ed 11 Pcle. Itcnt llnghn, honpi.al. !" i t ^^again^n ^iTuTe „2ttlS I IrS oioid.^l wllUe Wltl wood a*e, ,,.!.. Lupnlo back to the screen after A Uiclle ball I, ajcuredI near a elpected, lUld In a lot of unog.Thursday next, 6lh. March at a-O dhcring oil. wllh .U bl her""mourn in the Held of directheart valve -which had been Inpec W d place.. It dor* not stand u ,, „„ p . ing ad producing, and presents lured in a childhood attack of transplanting well, and to get It "" 5 P M T> I her in the type of dramatic role rheumatic fever established it is bdlor to collect %  '" I % %  < U" kernel, extracte.1 Us. Robert a quantity of dried flower heads ale, not used for bouquets „i .leti ,„i rheie Is a ..,„, „ Uv oonosltc her, and beThe ball slips in place during m i planl lh ^. ^ ho p C hc oration very often I'eluiiias love ih, .oghou. Ihe W.-.I indlea tor neili. ih. tw-o of them, thoy each heart beat to prevent the W 1U spring Ihe folluwuig year, dry sunny weather, and Uley conhot e greavn cashew nuts prepare.! sfe -;— b rer:ry no ::it:rpied §^3^5 *&=* rzsjz Doctors Pravo AloveUofCaeplexioninHDays /7]R %  %  untie Kraschan. I alwaM usad to wake In tho i %  .int. very tired. Now | t t %\\ (li*.I lii.ln*M -::J f "Mng full of enorixy iin-i in my sbuuldurs fltlnuB roui.1 my aaki"^tafss&^ti^ thta pftins sill owrUlhea. I — Kruschao Halu i.-enfarly n.l cannot apaak U i Ltghly olitr KiuschOD ka 1 voo young botntiso it tona (> tba Uv-ir. hidnoya and ito-t-ls nd ko^p* tli*m alt working smuataty mil •m it-ntly Tke reward of this Internal cleanllneaataafreabonfid and Inviaoratedbody. Folaonou; wuli materials ar<>ipolled and the pains nr rhoumalisrp^oaaaa. And M yo'i continue with Kru •-.ben, vour whole body reapooda %o I K Iheuiloia and Storaa. FW I lri|Mf, flMwtf ComBliiion, usi Pelmohvi SM U D&C.OIS Adtiit. Veadtag ikla ieeiw.lUlt eravad ihet i H .. •alw.el.ve Wap a. iei r eva am^~* aronent in aaaay we. 0i "'• %  I** 1 (Ml eHw-weH. *eh atn wandart-lly knthta. Caa.a-laoh.nt lain flnf'. ..—..., K i-v^. 1 old nostalgic papular songs ol hate destruvs another era. On Moonlight Bay. instrumental Cuddle Up A Little Clnaer. Till outlook of the Wc Meet Again. Tell Me and rm man Robert Ryan gives slat Forever Blowing Bubbles are just to the role Q f the lonely offlc n few of the good old tunes it is dn d his change of character pleasant to remember credible and natural. Young Billy Cray, an engaging and amusing voung new star obThe swiftly paced chase acen viously enjoys himself in the against a background of blc Tiny lUill Keep* Woman Alive with delightfully astringent humake mour different film, though it must be A real old-time movie Is shown admitted that some of the situaln the picture, with the lurid title tions are heavily weighted with of "The Cunra of Prink." Insensational elements, ckdentally, this one-reeler has a decided Influence on the voung brother, who Imagines his father in the leading role—with disastrous results' Good script, direction and acting make this a lively, happy picture and there are some excellent touches in costuming and stage ON DANGEROUS GROUND Jg""-" ON DANGEROUS G^UNn^ ~ |ft W Urlgh le ball it secu; alve which had In," ^producing."' and "present, lured in a childhood ch Aa g for weeks on end In giving no trouble. If. conditions pi, -ml them They make one of the BJK leeultg in the 'blew beds of ur lovely jn u ken I ll^ •: Petunias seed them,,( ,, pang Of perforated rotary Petunia selves and once grown, seedlings drnv fnu peri <>f th< i Perhaps it may be inaccurate spring up the following year all b n I some R.000 H> of ..hie-i. h1* an to class the Petunia among about the garden. If no seedlings ro *tcd In tedl pea dallj The operation was performed on y^,. pItBU whosc flowers are arc available, the imported seeds \y ftve lbs .-f unhuaked nut^ yield bcr 20 by a surgeon who onl y decorative In the garden, grow v,, r> easily Icattei M iIQH of k' "Tf m ^^e,L*li ,wI 1 .? y,l who* Is "on described by surgeons fdr the enSlleS?and^n'aTd'ened by^the nrs, „me yesterday. rounded in hi* dally work, and consequence. a lonely man iiked that his name be withheld. Rn d of little r^'Uner STdSBC ^Sil S ill Petunias do last reasonably suspects 1o m ^ch'' a Tc'g^e thai nt home and dOJe eajd *• when picked, but. a* a rule the, in decides to the?erlna*. lie. . It %  • .. %  %  'I pears ahnt a few cahcw tt.t> %  round ihe oottags * tkrir |wf Ulitklhil Gwasu /'-! %  1 1 1 *7 < ">II fv 'fr-anHllat, I'llld ij JIU.-I. /o'joWr.li" nAJpvmii UM down iu your pores. Ibou "iinao' -nli r. Pood's Cold Qseaai %  %  aihaveawsssssw, rsmeaAgwIafj, l len initriiiin:. protect your dim .Mil. tu. 1.U11.4 PoB^'-Vsnishuw l 'tain, tinui'ii nn-i* 1 l>>un Lit MI ,illh..l.U. 1 „r | i 1 ~,l.,r, ll | t |,„b,Hir,. Fallow ilii* SMJ t.-uiiulalihlull) >..m ill.>!•.. letaaegeal yoeiegfe 1 |i|e\i"Ti mil pewn i" >"H by so many lever] wMlt] eegaasj jie an iliu-ij-tn uson


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n'.i roTH si \ii\v ADvnrATE SCMMT. MVKf" !" 3 CLYDE \\ V I.COTT SCORES LONE W.I. THOUSAND Kmpir<> Lead In First Division in 11 ^ ONLY l •#•' The Mati.-utfan* arm) no doubt nuke H ever record* Uiey haw %  is the only player on the V\ i dies team to have scored more tbaa one ihuu>;.iide haa scored 1.01* 23 Innings, (once nol tiuci Un **> nverage of 49 90 He also put ay the highest store In lb I matches of 116 Frank v. d on batting list, frank,, runs in 22 innings (four times ux out) with an average of 48.44 runs imd with his htgh<-st scon' 160 no! arc interesting AUi. li*. %  njm Kuy Uarsnall 32.76 an.. Ji mcyer 11.17. — :u i rt aD ait'iagc id • 1.1 111 It All 111 | B iiOVVL iw OVfcKS 'I -wlcd more th-n ran man ihngu OUM %  RACING RESULTS \i QlMsslW Ml V^N Wl. M \„< 11 1 .MOTHER I 14 Race; GARRISON STAKls-t la— B and LMW-fUM <**. SMS. MM': tli>. I MED CHEEKS •2 FIBELADY 118 lbs s A Rial Jock*) 3 FL\ DRAGON io. 3 |1M TIME 1 34 I'AHI-MUTUEL FORECAST: $10.20 ALSO RAN: Belle Surprise ( (123 lbs., P Fletcher) START: Good FINISH Close Ne l k. 1 length. 4-yr -old b f Link later-Golden Carp. IRA1NER Mr. J. T. Fletcher Mr. S. A Walrott. J.. k< i Wihler W.n $5 32; Place *1 lit. II M 5 lbs.. Lutehman< Ftssi llitdg-t THE FLYING YASMEEN Dunqmwqm* W ins the Guineas Vatontte 's Impressive Victory in iitmhii TNI lif. IN BflsM things which stack "n the th.in others W*itit •auaes them e* according to the circumstances. Usually the element of surprise has quite k lot to do with it. But when you are expo-ting something to happen and it cornea off, yet still, ;. of that, you stand amazed at the way it happen.H. then you can be almoet dead certain %  trie memory. the performance of Mr. Tommy Edwards' -'iid Race: MABfOI HTAKEft—Ctaaa C as* C2 Mai4e.i—ftM. i %  .i.i Mi .,... a i acta but tins i ha upunmi/ lajMst. bui heuiu with a %  %  %  rttU M/LNa R I H •*•* and have scored t-.e *-* "* i-""i* '"r thna i I HAM u,c anon upeoasl. n f a m lllss rl j known—defeated Carlloi'A. I IM g.ui,o was a IM one lor UM "*"*' .• .n io.ii luuwiiJig eiiuria, %  •.op*. l a tueory of pi-ymg Uie bull in ,: %  • agauist the smai'cr Cariton mat the eium Caxili/n '. %  Umi iiieOiuni beiglr. anil tilt' Empire players numberuig amontl their ranks people like Charles Alleyne, Algj S.1..1... :., SnuUi, and company musl at ui.ee establiMi a uignt euge a ,,i uniivantagR even if w Igliuie ail on.. (o| ... Li. bvil.g. -\oi MU< II IO Ci/UUbk TNlkliE was nut n.mii to chMM ba l wssa ti tnc Mum f... tht greater Ull ojUtalldlllg rdayai tot • .<. BBSM lorawd and half • nut laying tii.it he was i '.pressed > had U 'Ken the %  1 hai best i morrow ano i'" Can Ran win ba Rtuch SPAKTAN DEFKA n n E MI IKK %  -mplclelv | ,.r uW w.vk to ICON their i > Ion Ihll season. It is true .... %  %  %  %  parfonn%  i ved to win. %  %  %  %  %  %  | %  I I .. %  emlnantl log nidaf Bald iployad bj tha Bank 1*11 U';ili landing. He was m* good by all looal Mandardb Rood. AM IUMH 'lid T r i > .i tlie> I'oulcl li IIKKOKS S KI i*i 1 Olttana workwi haroaealb tht hall .. % %  .:., fact .:. licvci thought of lobbing the ball ml pponanl area or trj mg a shot &f%  theory of ung. College dafaatad Bverton rgsn of two goals t. nil :n their BXtUBl %  lle •*> Br ihis aaaaon c o mman dHt-OrdloaUon • Harrison CoUaaja Iku 108000 toi aoaoa Ufa aetmoL LAWN HAMS, PLANS T'HE Council Oi tiie (S.nL LOWS lenii, ASBOCtaUOD decide.! r* 1*> ; '' be held In Jamaica in April Of this year. Tin is a If >ld bid -n the | talnly COnaUt4lta aandal undertaking ain<"? the formati"!: Iatlon. Jamaica 1* .. ""'* other British ColonMa In I %  "" *" boarding costs an elation Is quite justified in the elluit to place Barbados Association Lawn Tennis on the map < ( The Council of the A&auciatlun has also acceiXed the offer or Mr. Neville ( Innd at the Pine Estate and the Axaoeiatlon plan I I Uon therp and to prepare two or possibly three courts. Obviously the Ass." funds to 1 projects and it is hoped that all sportsmen will give the venture their full support. Jrd Race: CHELSEA STAKE-*—Claaa and Lewer-Waa. . Mr. F. E. C. Bvtheil. Jockay Yvonct HML. 1 ov FA1U-MI Ull. Win: J9.30 Place |g.0a I.T3 FORECAST. $34.3:. ALSO KAN. Water bell (125 lbs., Crusslvy;, Jolly Miller < 130 lbs.. Johni, Sunbeam (121 Ibe., Wilden. Capm, ilt>2 J .. . BOsiO); I lamanlfna (IM lbs., nurkell). Rambler Rose (1U2 ,. i lbs., joaaDii). BTAR1 i.ood. FINISH; Close, neck. 1 length. 3-yr.-old b.g O.T.C.-tlak. TRAINER Mr. F. E. C Bethell. III. KAvr : BARBADOS GlINKAS 1952—Nominated—S0.M iflOO.ao. 9200.00. JIOO.OO)—:•.. Furlonm 1. DUNQUERQUC 114 Ibe. Hon. J. D. Chandler. Jockey Croasley. 2. CARDINAL 117 lbs. Mr. J. W. Chandler, Jockey Yvonet. 3. CAVALIER 117 lbs. Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder. TIME 1341. I'AHI-MUTUEL : Win : J2.64. Place $1.00, J1.0H. 1.04 FORECAST : $9.72. ALSO RAN Seedling (117 lbs., Lulchmunj, May Da> (117 lbs., Thukell), Apromiak (117 Iba.. Fletcher). Columbus (117 lba., Wilder). START : Good. FINISH : Clo-e. Neck, 3 lengths WINNER b.f. O.T.C.-Belledune. TRAINED Mr. J. W. Chandler. %  ma at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon. I „. ..t i.i uy that I knew it waa going to happen, but rather thai 1 know it ii.ight h.ippen or ...uld happen. I knew all along of clan*. This goes right back to the nrst time I look al her breeding and form. By Wattling Street out of %  > Sir Perry Loralne and is a sister to such i — DJ -JibiMhadneu.. and the Gulden Rood both of which ng the highest class in England. Her dam. Yaana, is. in ted At a most .outstanding brood mare Yasmeen. of course. i in Hie same light as her baothers but neverthclea* •ted that, for the West Indie*, something above ihe M-rted. I the hJTl that would impirs*. I %  rf tlioroughbreds as something out of ahe i v.-ii the most inexpei u-tu-ed nowiee , .-,. bj l.i action In Tnnldad, when she In lba Wen Indies, it was apparent U peed She onlj wanted a little more tuna . | ; .ix furlongs. ,, wen a S k. did i came to lav i.„ ana-war that few honaa oi tins caabre A iinle-s something is amiss wll ag with Yasmeen was very clearly la I usplayed at exercise, nutbarmoi I %  bar last gallop it was more noficanl are two reasons la thaan from my tips. 5th Rare J B.T.C. STAKES—Claaaea A *b B Italy—tl.ioo 00 (HgS.OO. 11115.00. *00.09>— 9 turlonaa I NOTONITE 116 lbs. Mr. C, A. Pi. i r. leokajS P rTelcher, 1 F1RELADY 108 lbs. Mr. S. A. Ulanchcttc. Jockey Lulclunau. 3 REBATE 127 lbs. Mi. M. E. R. Bourne. Jockey Quest* J TIM! I-Uft. PARI-MUTUEL ; Win : $2.90. Place : SI.2B, $1.78. $1.48 J'OKECAST : $10.44. ALSO RAN Landmark (117 lbs. O'Neill. Slainte (120 lbs., Thukell), Gun Site, (130 lbs., Croasley), bnbers (108 lbs. lit-II. I START: Good FINISH EMS', 3 lengths, 1 length. WINNER bi.e. Fiiiifax-Einprc** Josephine. TRAINER Mr. J. T. Fletcher. th Rare | SPRIMi STAKES—Claw. and Lower—108.00 ($390.00, $150.00, $50.00)—7'^ Furlong* i IJOLDRUM 2 SWEET ROCKET LUNWAYS 121 lbs. Mi M. M Innlm JocfcOJ liolmi 128 lbs. Mi R.f OIU Jockey Lutehman. 128 Rts. MI K. D Edwards. Jockey Yvonet 341. PARI-MUTUEL : Win ; $4.76. Place $170. 5J I • IREJ AST : $18.24. ALSO KAN : Water Cress (12* lbs., Croasle; Lady 010 lba., O'Nell). Dashing Princess (126 lbs., Jo. 1130 lbs.. Wiloeri, Arunda (121 lbs guested), Topsy (126 Its, Newman*. START Oood rOriSa I lengUi WINNER ch.f. WyndJi-n.-ScreiuO IRAi.NLl; HOB • 71k Rare CREOLE STAKES Claaa G *.nd l*tr-4M *'•*, $100. $mj H t Furlengs. 1 HOSETTE 114 lbs. Mr C Barnard I. BETSAM 1 35 lbs. Mr. J. D. Hill Jockay Quanta*. 3 TWINKLE .102 2 lbs. Mr L J. Sealy. Jockey Bella. TIME: 1.091. PARI-MUTUEL Win si.30. place: gljg. a] n 4UCAET $:.2. ALSO RAN Gavotte (1S2 lbs.. Crosslex; Blue Dlagaoad < 115 lbs. Lutchmanj, Joan's SUr (118 lba., Yvonet). PnltngR 11 U|; Diadem I 130 lba., Joseph), Vonwise < 1*0 R, FletcneD. Billy Boy (133 lbs, John). START Good. FINISH: Easy. 4 lengths. 1 length. WINNER: 3->r.-old lib. ch '.. Burning B>iw-Roaainnnd. TRAINER lion V C Gale g> On yace 5 i KM above in mind 1 still stood in the Stnd at the ruiy and marvelled at the way she went about her tha <<:*-' '"> the jump and Wilder loot no time %  I :-hc had. Harroween was also well oil ami the two of thom mey held on to Yasmeen for the first furlong. It %  early pace such as I have seldom seen exiept b> .. raoa of the past. But at the half mile both Demur' .in i Ham II ad enough and Yasmeen careered off in (roni length with almost every stride. B% two luilonn pole "i)d turned for home she had li\i i Dgtha <>n the rest of the held and at this stage I '< %  _,n to slow up. But. nollunn ol : nils time, and presently Newman waa casing her up en the post a winner by what tha Judge conservatively estimated to be three length* She Iwithout doubt the fastest filly I have ever seen In the %  lii9t 1 J JlAl bnak the record. She was only 2/5 above it. i| any Horse runs the 5W furlongs at the Garrison in !esa than 1 'HI. they can ship it back to England, as far as I am i nrerafM, The uexi moat outstanding performance for the day 1 thought victory in the Barbados Turf Club Stake*. A colt rnodoat beginning he has developed Into a big horse with " lie might have been better at an earlier M for an unfortunate tendency towards the proverb!.,I djTj coal whi.h he developed on his visit In Trinidad last 1 %  loaa Trinidad had a laatc of his brilliance when in anlta ..f u-mg *ick he defeated the great Lupinus over six furhm-gs. he was in receipt of much weight. i a was not seen to best advantage laat November and very wlaafo he waa ki'pt at home while the Christmas meeting With Ihe cooler months upon us he has now benefited as nd usually do and at this meeting he has really bloaaomed .Kit Into Iman, lie won his race yoaterdny with a in tha Hood tune 1.551 'or the 9 furlooKand U i Flatchaa |av Un Ids head and passed i around the four furlongs pole it was, more or less, a walk home for him. I cannot aco him being aaatly beaten attain lux the meeting. In ihis race both Fire Laojy and Rabat* ran well but while the former had already raced over 7'j furlongs on the same afternoon. the latter looked as If *he night have felt Ihe going. The Jamaican Derby winner Embers, who ran fourth, displayed some mi which waa not expected by most of la*, but she is obviously'a bit outclassed in this company. • iuincas was not the two-horse-race 1 expected it to be. I thought had a particularly good ride and was preseiiu-d ^"'h 0*i for winning the classic. But ha failed at arhon antatlni U*a Iroteh and Dunqueruue. in tha best tradiUona of the O.T.C. get, ran on stoutly to win from nal by a neck. I was pleasantly surprised *l " %  s.^ %  -. %  .. flutter. BtlttUndi • i jockey did a One job indeed lo get way with lioth his life and :e nilyi. Surely this sort of thing cannot COM Looking arooml for something lo imish off with, what could be i>erformance of the half bred Rosette. Not t gnat Andy ever impressed me more. She made si>l her opponp-.f. and it was not surprising that she c/ m MI. v. iii\ i ; /.u ;;/ US "' nri:\l\c I HOSE KOLI UNO KITS S—All Models ... Models i J \ "SAVE TINS, DUI I > YOVt tEQUI |(\ I SVHI.IA //lit If %  t K*TI:I.\ Dial 1^69 j SI II41S. Bay Street j -..-. %  %  %  %  %  .: %  GENTS FELT HATS fan •''. _' WU '-' ~ -*v i 'WHK f The Sportsman / ^*V WHITE FELT at S4.04 Other Popular Shades at $2.80, $3.72, $3.81, $3.97 LASHLEY'S LIMITED. Swan fit Prince Wm. Henry Sla. '.mg ^^K*^ #Pt#F" ******* OBTAIHABLf FROM All IEA0INC STORES 10CAI AOtNTS J. POTTER mflDE BY V£R(UEVERITT LTO! ATHERSTOnE.En&LRnO UNIVERSAL Dip o> bruth (or pont..r protection ijii-iit White A-^tt Borri Roi ind Fwn,. Pj,n| or peti*h o*tr (rcatcd wood. NB odooi NeOra-rhau ECONOMKAL — Highly conf.entrited.^liv cirnife when diluted tor u.e — goei further >r>d coin len. PERMANENT --Cannot without or aviporate. Combines with the fibrei. toughens the tcntitr and makes it f.re-reiim*iL For permanent protection '^ t *lli *>•.. f-tth Kt„t t.va Co. (r*\, m ^e^-rOetOiJi noiloUt from H. JAiON JONES g CO. LTD, P.O. Box Ml, Ba-bidw. ?^^t^^^?^jj RSADC T THi HONKJ OP gdCKfAST Mlfl •auteipi f you feel worn out. dec %  ti, oeanenlir run down s flan or <-.< guchfssi Tontc Wine will ssstcUy '*. energy and tone up the *rtoie ne-.r Going new vitality it fornfici r Ow ->i and whiumon and remember, gat Wine is atpeoaJlY valuable alier illm BVCKFAS1T TOXM 'WIX' SB^t-• -_MI*J<. BRYLCREIM keeps your hair right in the picture ' %  ** lu,, ,u • "'" %  U K •^ Hrykri-cm I*or handaome, healthy hair ut Brykrcvm I Brykrvcm nukes your jpi.'jrjncc a smart onwherever you go, whatever you do. Masugc your u.ilp with Brylcreem every d*y and we how its pure oil* and tonii: ingrcdicots give your half that vital, healthy look, ggjsssssst Brylcreem controls ihe hjir withoui txctmvi uilincs-, ^^^^^ txrjiusc the oils in DrfltiMB arc tmulnfiid. That means cltm grooming. That ""-am laning hair health. Ak lor I'-.la the perfect hairJrcssing. FOR OAV.LONC SMARTNtSS A.4D LASTING i { HAIR HEALTH BRYLCREEM YOUR HAIR PHOSFERINE for a quick convalescence; When ttag body's reserves tre brought low by influenzs or other debilitating illnciSi und convalescence ihreatci ro be %  slow buaineaa, PHOSnUMB can do much to replace energy and (trength. PHOSFERINE its hne tonic powers by coaxing the appetite, providing the gentle stimulus to get things going again. So icspoosrrc ia the body to the help of PHOSFERINE that improvement may be looked for almost immediately— and every day will biing signs of returning strtngrh. In liquid or tablet form. 11 drops of PHOSFERINli equal : tablet*. THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS (W Depression, Debility. fndigaiUon, offer 'n/Wiio






ESTABLISHED 1895





Big Upset In)

Maiden Stakes

JOCKEY SONNY HOLDER straddled four win-'

ners as the B.T.C. three-day Spring Meeting
got underway at the Garrison Savannah yesterday

afternoon in fine weather. Hon. V.‘C. Gale was! “over®
the most successful trainer with three wins.

Although no records were broken the fair crowd |

who attended witnessed
the hard track and some

Biggest upset for the day was in the Maiden | Mr. E
Stakes when Mr. J. R. Edwards’ Castle In The Air |:

a day of keen racing on
good times were returned.



and Mr. M. E. R. Bourne’s Magic Gaye gave the!

lucky punters $59.16.

The Field Sweep reached the $500.00 mark on one |
oceasion and the $400.00 mark on five occasions while the |
Pari Mutuel paid its highest dividend of $9.36 on First}

Admiral in the Chelsea

takes.

The Police Band under Sgt. Archer was in attendance
and rendered some lively airs including the-latest Calyp-

soes during the afternoon.

The Meeting continues on Thursday.

FIRST RACE

Garrison Stakes

A small crowd was present to
see the Meet off to a good start
with six horses of the original ten
entries facing the starter.

Belle Surprise, Lutchman up,
and Flying Dragon, Wilder up,
carried 5 and 3 lbs. overweight
respectively, The race was off to a
fairly good start, and as they
passed the Stand for the first time
it was Flying Dragon, Wilder up,
strongly challenged by Fuss}
Budget with Pat Fletcher in the |
saddle. ,

Fuss Budget, after taking over |
as they rounded the first bend, set |
the pace all the way to the third
furlong where the others made
their effort.

Flying Dragon closed the gap
with Firelady and Red Cheeks in
hot pursuit, and as they turned
into the home stretch, O’Neil
pushed Mr. “Teddy” Jones’ Red
Cheeks into first position on the
rails, and rode her home the win-
ner by a mere neck ahead of Fire-
lady, Joseph up, who made a very
strong bid to come second. Flying
Dragon finished third, a length
behind.

SECOND RACE




starter for the secon
Maiden. Stakes, Class “C” aid
“C2” over 5% furlongs. As the
gate flew, Test Match was caught
up, and although escaping with-
out throwing its jockey, the race
had to be recalled. |
They got off to a better start on
the second try, bunching up to-
gether except for Mabouya, Wilder
up, who got a late jump and was
trailing. When they passed the 3-
furlong pole, they began to spread
out a bit, and ‘Castle In The Air’,
Holder up, took over and came
up the home stretch with a fine
sprint to beat Magic Gaye, Belle
up, by two lengths. “Aim Low”
finished a close third, half @
length behind the second horse.

THIRD RACE
Chelsea Stakes

Sunina and April Flowers were
scratched. Of the remaining nine
entrants Caprice, First Admiral
and April Fldwers each carried
2, 4 and 7 lbs. overweight respec-
tively.





@ On page 16

AN APOLOGY

The “Advocate” wishes to
apologise to Mr. A. H.

Hamilton-Hill for publica-
tion of an article entitled
“New King of Guana Island”
which appeared in this
newspaper from one of our

correspondents.

This article, it has since
been discovered, contained
many inaccurate and mis-
leading statements.

We regret any inconveni-
ence caused to Mr. Hamil-
ton-Hill.



DUNQUERQUE

| little part

J’ca., All Stars

Draw Series

(From Our

JAMAICA, March 1.

The football series in ne jcussion which is expected to be-
| Jamaica beat Caribbean All Stars |
one-nil in a tame game. None of |

ended in a 2—2 draw to-day

the members of the teams showed |
brilliance as in the three former |
games, excepting such outstanding
players as Kruin of Surinam, the
star forward, Gonsalves the Trini-
dad goal keeper, Lester Allcock,
the Jamaica star inside left and
Eplarge, Jamaica’s left half.

Jellie Heron, the Glasgow Celtic
professional, turned out for
Jamaica, but was still suffering
injury to his right knee and took
in the game. New-
comer Greene who occupied inside
right position in this match, scored”
the lone goal after beautiful
passing by Allcock.





THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of obtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, the
Advocate have arranged for
a practising Doctor to answer
reader’s medical queries.

The Family Doctor will be
unable to see any readers
personally, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and












letters will be treated in i
confidence. To make abso }
lutely sure you are asked

not to sign your real name |
to your query but to write
under a pen name. The
answer to the question will
appear under the pen name.

Letters should be addressed |!
to The Family Doctor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week.

The first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate,

Jap Trade Team
Off To Brazil —

|



TOKYO, March 1. ;

Four trade and finance officials}
left by air for Brazil] to partici-!
pate in Japanese trade talks with!
Brazil, They were accompanied)
by Koichi Takani, newly ap-
pointed head of the Japanese
office in Buenos Aires. |
UP

|
Own Correspandent)
i

, treated

-

q -Man Com.
Will Interview
Governor

4



At the meeting of Barbados
faxi Cab Owners Association
held ai the Progressive League,
Fairchild Street, St. Michael on
Friday night : vas decided to

appoint a ‘ven man delegation
to interview His Excellency the
concerning the griev-

ances of the

Island

A ten man Committee was also
appointed to prepare the mem-
indum for presentation. Two
Auditors were appointed and
these are Mr, Edward Bohne and
Cameron Hewitt. They
proposed by Mr. Belgrave

nd Mr. Carl Collins.
Among those present were Mr
J. E, T. Brancker, M.C.P., Presi-
dent in the chair, Mr. C. E.
Talma, M.C.P. Secretary, Mr. C
>. St. Hill, Treasurer, Mr. K
Forde, ‘Vice President, Mr. L.
Codrington, Mr. C. Cobham, Mr,
A. Gittens, Mr. S. Crick, Mr. C.
Green, Mr, M. Barrow, - L.
Mr, W.

Williams M.C.P
Hinds.
Messrs. Belgrave, L. Codring-
ton and James Tudor, M.A. were
appointed the three Trustees.

Taxi Owners of the

were



Estimates To Be
Discussed Tuesday

People who follow politics here
are looking forward to the dis-

gin on Tuesday over
mates,

Subjects of discussion during the
last political campaigning fer the
Elections were Housing, Education
and Emigration and the people
are looking forward to see what
plans are being made for Hous-
ing and Education, |

At present the Housing Loans}
Department is making loans to!
many workers of the Sugar In- |
dustry and the House building
programme at the Government
Housing schemes are being con-
tinued.

A keen follower of the debates
in the House anticipates that the
House will be packed with mem-

the Esti-

to hear the discussion on the Esti-
mates,

The House may sit every day
for a few days to get the Esti-

mates finished.



MAN SHOT:

r Oo Cofrespondent)
ANTIGUA, March 1. |
At five o’clock this morning it
was reported that Clarence |
Clarke, a baer was shot by}
Basil Davis a clerk in) a rum}



shop owned -by Lawrence Gon-
salves in the Bridge area. |
It is said that six men were!
playing with an automatic pistol
and the weapon discharged,
Clarke was hospitalized in aj

critical condition with a punctur- |
ed stomach wound. |



|
Cyclist Injured

Everton Young, a

labourer of
Passage Road,

St. Michael, was
and discharged at the |
General Hospital yesterday at
about 7 p.m. for injuries on his

jface and neck after he fell from

his bicycle which he was riding
along Bank Hall Road,
The bicycle was not damaged.



LARGE CROWD
AWAIT FISH

A large crowd waited in the
Public Market for fish from about
2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The
first quantity of fish was brought
in shortly after three o’clock. This
catch consisted of a large Blue
Peter shark, about six feet long,
and a dolphin.

The dolphin was quickly sold
but only a few people appeared
to be interested in the shark. They
were waiting to see i* the late
boats would bring flying fish.

WINS



DUNQUERQUE, Crossley up, winning the fourth race which was about seven and a half furlongs
in yesterday’s racing at the Garrison Savannah. Cardinal, ridden by Yvonet, was second.



bers of the community who Et
{
|

|
|
{ past

MARCH 2, 1952

os

BARBADOS,



START

7
>, FINE

THE START of the Sixth Race which was Seven and a Half
and Mr. N. M. inniss’s Doldrum ridden by Holder was the winner,

F oreigi Minister To
Diseuss Arab Pact

By WALTER COLLINS

CAIRO, March 1,

Arab circles believe that the Spanish Foreign Minister

Alberto Martin Artajo will discuss the possibilities oi

creating a Mediterranean community pact with Arab states

va he makes his six-nation swing through the Mideast
in April,

ut of the six Arab nations Artajo is scheduled to visit,

three have Mediterranean shorelines, three others are

woven into a Mediterranean pattern by their relations with

their neighbours and an overall defence blueprint for the
eastern Mediterranean y
-——— 2 ~~ ——~ Egypt, Lebanon and Syria are
definitely Mediterranean countries,
while Jordan and Iraq use the

Results A Lt peri sa ihe as ow
A Glance

Tripoli.
Saudi Arabia's oil flows through
FIRST DAY
1, RED CHEEKS (O'Neil)

the Persian Gulf to the Red Sea,

thence to the Mediterranean while

: FIRE LADY (Joseph) ay ipeline also links Arabian oi] to

3. FLYING DRAGON (Wilder) a terminal in Lebanon

L GAstLE fe cae ee ‘ All these countries are united
2; MAGIC GAYE (Belle) by the Arab League Charter.

%. AIM LOW (Crossley) At this time when Egypt in par-

_. THIRD RACE ticular and other Arab states ar¢

J ance Warne eee, generally going through a difficult

%. MISS FRIENDSHIP (Â¥vonew) stage wherein their interest some-

FOURTH RACE times conflict with their suspicions

1, DUNQUERQUE (Crossley)
*. CARDINAL (Â¥vonet)

Se







4 CAVALIER (Holder) | powers a Mediterranean Commu-

; NoroNse te i nity Pact along the lines of the

+2 » (FP, er er) “1 j

2. FIRELADY (Lutehman) | European community Pact is. re-

4. REBATE (Quested) ceiving considerable support
SIXTH CE among the Arabs

1. DOLDRUM (Holde — ” UP

, SWEET ROCKET (Lutenman) en

| LUNWAYS (Â¥vonet) e e
SEVENTH RACE

1, ROSETTE (Holder) Min R t

¢. BETSAM (Quested) ers e ec

%. TWINKLE (Belle)
EIGHT RACE

Compromise

SANTIAGO, Chile, March 1.
Six hundred striking miners

1. USHER (Quested)

2, MARY ANN (Â¥vonet)

', CROSS BOW (Holder)
NINTH RACE

1. YASMEEN (Newman)

2, HARROWEEN (Joseph)

&. PEPPER WINE (Crossley)



Meria Elena and Pedro Valdivia

Antofagasta province rejected
|



a compromise formula presented
by the Labour Minister to solve
the economic
n.anagement.
Then the Minister flew to Iquige
where 2,000 Communist con-
trolled nitrate miners were idle
in support of the petition. The
workers refused direct talks with
the managerhent Yesterday po-
lice arrested four striking leaders
after throwing tear gas bombs at
a workers’ meeting.

A Communist spokesman
that
police

Coalition Govt.
To Be Discussed

PARIS, March 1

General Charles De Gaulle,
French People’s Rally leader, an-
nounced after a Party caucus that
he is willing “to discuss with Pre-
mier Designate Paul Reynaud his
proposed programme of National
Unity Government.”

dispute with the

cir-
some people
intervention

culated
died

word
during
It was the first indication since
1946 that De Gaulle’s group which
now is the strongest pues Party
in the National Assembly was
willing to discuss participation
in a Coalition Government and
greatly increased the chances of
veteran Conservative Reynaud
forming a government to stave off
national bankruptcy.

ties
pr

and the Governor of Tarapaca
—U.P



vince,



Graham Greene
Talks Of Freedom



—U.P. WASHINGTON
British author Graham Gre«
arrives in New York, after
American visa had been tempor
EDITOR DIES arily held up in Iindo-Chi:
— cause he once, “as qa youthfu

NEW YORK, March | prank,” belonged to the Cor
Keith Keat Speed 72 Executive} nist Party, and immediately
Editor of the New York Sun from] vo with some shrewd anc
i943 until it merged with the{ ageous remarks about the U.S
New York World Telegram, died “T like America “ the Amer-
here to-day.—U.P. cans,” he said.

VIENNA, Marth 1 ($5;400,000).”, It added that

|
|
|
|

Slip shod production in the “further losses occurred
Prague branch of Czechoslova- the. insufficient use of r n-
kia's giant Skoda Armament| ery and high absentecism It
Combine delayed shipment of] said that the plant failed

material to Russia, the newspae
per Mlada Fronta admits.

The newspaper said that at the
branch factory in Prague “in the
year the bad and faulty
production cost our economy,
twenty seven million

reach 98 per cent. of it
tion quota for 1951

pro
}

AH branches of Skoda Cor
bine are believed to be pro-
ducing armaments for the Rus-
crows |sian war machine. Mlada Fronta



lof so-called imperialistic Western ,

who closed the big nitrate plants'the servants to turn away

This was denied by the authori-}



Furlongs. Nine horses entered

Scouts Leave
| Tomorraw

Barbados Contingent for the first
Caribbean Jamboree which takes
place in Jamaica will leave Seawel|
Airport at 3.20 pm Monday
Scouts are asked to be at the
airport by 2.15 p.m

The party leaving comprise,
Major J. E. Griffith, V. E. Ma
thews, K. C. Pile, H, Blackman,

E, Thompson, Capt, R, A. Sealy,
T. Carter, M, Husbands, E. Inniss,
H, Lewis, N. Quarless, L. Quin-
tyne, G, Rudder, O. Springer,
D. Trotman, R, Turton, A, Brath-

waite and Cecil Walkes, These|ritish occupation,

scouts will travel to Jamaica via
Grenada,

At 7.30 p.m. the same day Rev,
L, C. Mallalieu who is attached to
the Contingent will leave Seawell
for Jamaica via Trinidad.

The other three members of ti
party FE. Scantlebury, L. A
Springer and S. Bushelle—are
standing by for the first oppor-
tunity to Jamaica

AGA KHAN IS
(SOLATED

NICE FRANCE, Mareh 1,

The fabulously wealthy Aga
Khan lay alone in his sumptuous
}bedroom at Villa ‘“Yakimour
jnear Cannes cut off from his

friends by doctors who feared
jhis heart might stop

The 74-year-old Moslem leader
ealled in Pierre Duchossal, Gen-
eva heart specialist within a few
minutes of his arrival yesterday
by special chartered plane from
New Delhi,

Members of the Aga’s household
said his state of health gave “no
cause for anxiety” but Duchossal
ordered complete rest and told
all
callers, —U.P.





| Truman Will Talk
On Security Plan

WASHINGTON, March 1
President Truman will address
the nation on the mufmal security
programme next Thursday night.
The White House announced the
broadcast and television plans to-
day on the heels of reports that
the administration decided to
fight any cut in its proposed $7,900
million new foreign aid pro-
| gramme. The President will speal

| from 10.30 to 11.00 p.m. E.S.'I
over all major radio and television
networks.

Joseph Short, Presidential Pree
Secretary said that the President
will send Congress his request for

Vee secs

|

‘



and economic aid fund
at about the same time as. his
speec! UP.

REPORT DENIED
CAIRO, March 1
Premier Aly Maher Pasha ce
j nied Egyptian Pre reports tha
| Britain has agreed to the imme
diate evacuation of the Suez Cana!
Zone and recognition of Farouk :
King of Egypt and the Sudan
—U-P.

{
{



Arms Production Drops



| stressed that the Prague ant
one of the most ir t
Prague factorie i it
ducing hines -for the So

Union”

Recently the Czech Gever
ment placed heavy new dem
on the entire Skoda Con
output demanding that 38
cent. more goods be produc
1952 than in 1951.—-U.P.






Jockey Holder Straddles 4 Win

U.N. Raiders
Batter Reds
By Land, Air

Hon, Robert Kirkwood has a
‘motion before the Legislative
;Council asking Government to
|make urgent representations to;
the British Government to the!
effect that British Company taxes
j Should not be charged on the
profits of British concerns in
respect of profits earned from

8TH ARMY HEADQL
Allied tank and infantry
territory inside the “Iron T

while U.N. fighter planes cd:

tanks in. the same sector.

United Nations raider:
and a half threw st
Communist bunkers south

hour

city of the “Iron Triangle.”

fire forced the U.N. raiding
Bomb laden F.51 Mustan
ed a group of Communist
Pyongyang destroying thre«
munist armoured vehicles

Kirkwood Raises
Question Of Taxes
KINGSTON, Feb 29

operations in Jamaica and other

british colonies provided
| such, Profits are retained in
territories in which they are earn.

that
the

fed for the development and ex-
The main body of scouts of tine | paneton of agriculture and indus-

and

—C.P.
LL

Germans Jubilant

URG, March 1.

HAMB
Jubilant Germans set pontires |
on the fortress isle of Heligoland |
celebrating

its return to them
years of demolitions
\ practice bombing on the
former submarine base. The
island 28 miles off the mainland
covers only 130 acres.
fieations were

after seven

blown up under
British and

United States bombers used it for |

tne: Vie

— target.—U.P.



ON OTHER PAGES

. Carib Calling.
Cinema, Gardening
Hints, Farm and Gar
den, B.B.C, Notes,

4. Bookie, O.8.C., Races
5. Flying Club, Chats o»
Swimming,

6. Sewing Circle;
Fashion

7. Women,
8. Editorials,
9

2
3



Tops in

I Saw Naples. And
Lived!
10. Book Review: Local
News

11. Art (Turner),
12. Children,

13. Comic Strips.
16. Shooting Races.





After forti- |



JARTERS, Korea, March
raiders thrust inte
riangle” on the

stroyed

Communist
Front

ine Red



Central

amag



or ed Y
at dawn and for
ims of 90 millimetre fire

of Pyongyang,

jumped off an
into
northernmost
Heavy Communist Mortar
team to return
igs and Marine Corsairs pound
tanks east of Sepori, north of
and damaging six of the Com-
Sore | ere picked
ind returned to f tly lines,
airforce
number stil issing

\k ecuri
withheld th

eas

Ground action ts
he Eighth Army
announced that three teams of
tanks striking on the Western an
Central Fronts limped back to
the U.N. “limes yesterday after
jheavy Comrlinist fire destroyed
one armour Clad vehicle and
‘damaged others These
armour losses believed to be
ithe most four months
Three Sherman tanks
were back to allied lines
retriever is dam-
aged in the attempted rescue

pped u some

Headquarters

nine
ire
severe in

disabled
towed
it but one tank

Raiding units struck
Chorwon in the “iron
sector and southeast and south of
Kumsong Communists ghost
town” which once dominated the
eae Front. Tanks destroyed at
least 48 Communist bunkers and
a concrete tunnel,

On the Eastern
munist infantrymen ambushed an
Allied patrol east of the Mun-
dung Ni valley last night but were
beaten off after a five-minute
mall arms fight,

Reds Repulsed

Another group of 20 Commun-
ist soldiers was repulsed by small
arms fire as they attempted to
probe an Allied position in the
same area, One hundred rounds
of Communist mortar and artillery
fire were received in U.N. posi-
tions in the “Heartbreak Ridge”
ector during the night,

west of
triangle”

Front Com-



tl iir war, fighter-bombers
lestroyed six tanks and damaged
nine others while knocking out
more than 110 gun positions and
inflicting 54) casualtic
; Allied planes cut Red railroad
icks in 2,472 plac troyed
25. locomotive ind 346 box cars
and damaged 50 locomotives 1
ty urs
N, planes coneentrating on
road traffic, destroyed 2,367 ve
hicles and cratered highwa in
108 places, Other claims for Feb-
lary included 30 tunnels, 92
supply carts, 78 bridges and mor



than 1,850 buildings

Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Wedding, or for

your own quiet enjoyment at home—

K. W. V.

can add to that enjoyment, as
K.W.V. WINES are QUALITY WINES,
Popular throughout Great Britain, Canada

tries of the world, incliding the British West

Indies.

And in these burdensome days of High Cost

of Living, K.W.V. comes to your rescue also.

K.W.V. WINES COST MUCH LESS
than Foreign Wines of France, Spain,
and Poftugal, because K.W.V. WINES

are admitted into the Colony under the

British Preferential Tariff.

LLL ESN TDN ORY me



7 A

K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V. Cornation ‘Wine.
K.W.V. Sweet Verraouth, K.W.V. Dry Vermouth,

K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE

WINE,

K.W.V.. SHERRIES.



New Zealand, Sweden and many other coun-




PAGE TWO

SFL PRCE LPP POOP OSE CLEP LCSD

“ROODAL THEATRES |









H.M. KING GEORGE VI LAID TO REST
You have seen the first part of the so temn ceremonies that fol-
lowed His s Majesty’ awa Roodal s now invite you
to see the rest of the moving scenes which e! the gun carriage
is pulled through Windsor and comes to rest at St. George’s Chapel
vhere the body of the dead Monarc} ill remain in everlasting sleep.
Join the millions in London w vatched the mile-long cortege
leaving Westminster See, even be ter than they did the Queen and
Royal family, foreign royalty and representatives in funeral proces-|}
sion. All is unique in spectacle and solemn splendour .
SEE IT ALi, AT the EMPIRE, ROXY & ROYAL THEATRES
it all shows from today ar continuing to Thursda
Come early if you want to avoid the rush
. s
EMPIRE
TODAY to TUESDAY 145 & 815 P.M.

TNE PROWLER

00k what he wanted...
\ove, Loot = anything!





VAN HEFLIN and
EVELYN KEYES

with JOHN MAXWELL
KATHERINE WARREN
EMERSON TREACY

Soroenpiey by Hugo aitier
From an original story b
Robert Thoeren and Hans Wit velm

leased thru United Artists
An &. P. EAGLE PRODUCTION
tae

Ex'tra:—Latest Newsreel

OL YMPIC

TO-DAY TO TUES

430 & &15

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the old West's |
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BES 7 oF THE
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STARRING:— CHARLES BOYER IRENE DUNN

2
THUR. OTH at 140 (Cheap Prices} MID-NITE SATURDAY 8TH

Whole Serial - -

“ THE
IRON CLAW”’

Charles Starrett Double - -
“TWO FISTED STRANGER’
and

“HORSEMAN OF THE es

R OVAL

& “Bas pm.





BIG DOUBLE
FIGHTING,
[LAUGHINGYiOVING |

FOR® HEARTBREAKS
»+-OR GLORY!

‘Sopay:

ghosts that
fired to

A CARL KRUEGER Production
AN EAGLE, LION FILMS RELEASE



MON. & TUES, 4.30 & 8.15

‘HE MARK BROTHERS in

“LOVE HAPPY” and
“COPAC prateat iN a”

Thy ar ath,



“1.20 “Whole Serial
“Prince of
the Plains” “e IRON
and x
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cae ’ CLAW
Navajo Trail
= . Sat 8th, 9.30
R. Aidens
(Cheap Prices) (Cheap Prices)
ROX
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TO-DAY TO TUES. 445 & 8.15
HERBERT J. YATES PRESENTS
ERROL FLYNN Mi ELINB PRE LLB in
‘
, ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN’ FABIAN”
"AURSDAY 6TH AT 1.30 P.M MID-NITE SATURDAY 86TH
“STRAY
“Sen PROM PONOA CITY”: | Whole Serial - -
FI
seesoee cINS XRONTIERMAN’ FEDERAL OPERATOR
cee ae eee Ot POO SSP OCG HOO S9SE

SUNDAY
COLLSLSGOP OOOO LILIES

4
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| YOUR GUIDES 10 BETI£€R MOVIES

TONITE 8.30 PM LAST SHOWS

“THE MAN WITH A CLOAK~

Joseph COTTEN Barbara STANWYCK

t set for two Days of Fun
TOMORROW AND TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

— A Double loaded with Fun and Action —
A NEW FILS

re ae
ere TO THE Top.

~) LOVE and









STARRING

VAN JOHNSON.
e HEROES ®% 442nd
rece COMBAT



Coming! Coming!
The Desert Fox

James Mason
Jessica Tandy

with BEVERLY

TYLER
fa
TAY GARNETT

A THOR PRODUCTION
Rohmaned Oy LOD Camteny foe

1)

By Special and | Namerous Request |

| GLOBE PRESENTS ON WEDNESDAY Sth,
rn 8 ANZA

THE GREAT CARUSO

SOE ALS OPCS




POS

3



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Buy Nowy
and Save !
GLASSWARE





«)'
I
|

BUTTER DISHES ............ 45c. each
HEAVY PINT TUMBLERS 36c. 5,
SNAP GLASSES (3 gill) 120. ,,
CHEESE DISHES ............ ee. ss
NUT OR CANDY DISHES 2ic. yy
LEMONADE SETS ............ 165 set
e

KITCHENWARE
FINE TEA STRANERS ....... 20c. each
STAINLESS KNIVES ........ 30c. ,,
SOUP PLATES.............. 44c. _,,
DINNER PLATES ...... ec. >
NO. 2 LAMP BURNERS ...... 38.»
FLY SWATTERS ............ 26c. ,,
SCRUB BRUSHES ............ 20c. ,,

©
G. W. HUTCHINSON
& CO.. LTD.

DIAL : 4222 —! Broad Street.





———_—— oe







ADVOCATE

SUNDAY,



VPLS SLES

Bâ„¢asnun and Mrs. J. B
Young from Hamilton, On-
rio, were among the passengers

here

riving





1g also of Hamilton.

Other passengers arriving by

the same opportunity from Can-

ada for a holiday were Mr. and
Mrs. John McHale of London,
Ontario, Mr. and Mrs. Norman
Jarvis and Mrs. Stanley Con-
yers of Toronto. They are all
staying at the Marine Hotel.
Canadian Medics
Dd" and Mrs. A. J. Gilchrist
f Toronto, Canada whe
left Barbados and flew over to
Trinidad for two days to see the

island, returned on Friday morn-

ing by T.C.A. They are staying
at the Hotl P Beaeh Club.
Hotel P vogrtotors

R. AND SHERWOOD

who are the owners of a

hotel in Bermuda, are now in

Barbados for a sort holiday

staying at Paradise Beach Club.

They passed through here on the
RMS. Lady Redney on Monday

and went down to Trinidad
They returned by T.C.A, on Fri-
\day morning and will be remain-
fing until Mereh. 5,

U.K. Businessman

R. GEORGE M. CLARKE, 4

businessman from Ireland,
arrived here on Thursday by
B.W.LA. from Trinidad on a
short visit and is staying at the

Marine Hotel, 3
Holiday

MONG the guests staying at
the Aquatic Club are Mr.

land Mrs. John Marugg of Vene-
| 2uela, Mr. Marugg is from the
Industrial Relations
lof the Phillips Petroleum
poration.

Legislator’ s Wife
FTER spending three enjoy-

able weeks’ holiday’ in
Barbados staying at Indrame:
Guest House, Worthing, Mrs.
yr Jagan returned to British

Juiana on Friday by B.W.I.A.

Wife of the Hon'ble Dr. Cheddi
Jagan, B.G. Legislator, Mrs.
Jagan is a Councillor the
Georgetown Council and Gen-
eral Secretary of the Peoples
| Progressive Party.

On Inspection Tour
DD" H. FORGAN and Mr
Chris Duncan who are both ,
seeemnesnanivee of the Max Baer



Cor-

4

of

roducts of the U.K. left the
Hites on Friday by B.W.LA, fo:
British Guiana after paying a

short visit here. They were stay-
at the Marine Hotel.

Forgan is on an_ inspec-
tour throughout the West
Indies, while Mr. Duncan whose
juarters are in Jamaica, is
a business visit to some of
islands in the area, From
a he expects to go

Back Again

R, AND MRS. W. M. WHITA-

KER from Columbus, Ohio
who spent part of the winter in
Barbados last year, are now back
again for five weeks’ holiday.
They arrived on Friday morning
by 'T.C.A. accompanied by their
daughter and are staying at Para-
dise Beach Club.

With The Canadian
After Six Weeks

Dr.

tion

read







RS. BRYDON, a Canadian

who had been holidaying
jhere for the past six weeks stay-
jing at the Marine Hotel, return-
led” home by 'T.C.A. on Friday.

Leaving To-day
UE to leave to-day (Sunday)

D

by the Colombie for England
}are Mr. and Mrs. A, K. “Tony”
| Corrigan and their four-month-old
daughter Mr. Corrigan, who is
on the mobile staff of Messrs.

Cable and Wireless has been sta-
tioned here for approximately
three years, during which time he
has been to several of the other
islands on short transfers, His
home in England is Durham, Mr
Corrigan is returning to England
on long leave.

Mrs, Corrigan is the former
Ramona Portillo, daughter of Mr
Ramon Portillo of Venezuela and
| Mrs. Portillo of Bay Street.

Attended Carnival

R. AND MRS. J. M. Sharpe
of Saskatchewan and Dr. and
Mrs, McPhail of Toronto, Canada
| who came out to Barbados early
in January for the winter, paid a
visit to Trinidad for Carnival and
returned on Friday morning by
T.C.A. to complete their holiday.
They are staying at the Paradise
Beach Club.



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Wild Bill ELLIOTT as Red Rider &

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SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES



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“PLAZA “CIN

B’BAREES

DORIS DAY
Also The Colorful Cartoon
OPENING

SOON! RKO'S

2» Friday morn-
y T.C.A. from Canada for a

They were accompan-
their son and daughter-
Mr. and Mrs. W. H.

Department (4.



1952

MARCH 2,



JUST before leaving for Antigua on Priday are Mrs.Harvie, Col. Eric Harvie, Mrs. Ross and Mr. Ken-

neth Ross.

They left by the “Maria Catharina” which is taking part in the Caribbean Yacht Cruise.
arina” is chartered by Gol. Harvie.

Cancer Specialist
D* and Mrs, Alejandro Calvo

Lairet who were recently
married in Venezuela, are now
in Barbados on their honeymoon
which they are spending at the
Aquatic Club,

Dr. Calvo is a Cancer Special-
ist from Centro Medico in —
Pas. ia. al
Venezuelan Auditor Leaves
Amon the passengers return-

ing to Venezuela on Friday
by L.A.V. was Mr. Miguel Schon,
Auditor of the Banco Mercantil
in Caracas. He had been spend-
ing a holiday here staying at the
Aquatie Club.

On W.L. Tour

AYING a visit to the West In-
dies in the interest of his firm
is Mr. Ronald Carey, Partner of
Woodhouse, Carey and Browne,
Produce Brokers of London, He
arrived hére on Thursday night by
B.W.LA, from British Guiana and

is staying at the Marine Hotel,
Mr. Carey who has also visited
Trinidad, leaves Barbados later in
the week by B.W.LA. for Jamaica
before returning home via New

York about the end of March.

Second Visit In 45 Years

FTER spending two and a half
months’ holiday in Barba-
dos staying with his relatives Miss
Louisa Green and Mfs, Lilian Gay,
Mr. James Green of Brooklyn, re-
turned to the U.S.A, on Thursday
by the S.S. Fort Townshend.

Mr. Green is a Barbadian who
had been living in the U.S.A. for
the past 45 years. This was his
second visit to the colony during
that period,

He begs to say goodbye to all
those whom he was unable to con-
tact before leaving.

Official Starter
M*. O. P. BENNETT, Official
Starter of Races, arrived
by B.W.LA. on Thursday and is
staying at the Hotel Royal.
For The Races
R. N. TAWIL, Director of
Faulkner Trading Co., and
Mrs. Tawil, arrived on Thursday
by B.W.1LA. to attend the Races.
They are staying at the Ocean
View Hotel.



“set in.

“Maria Cath-

The party will be returning to Barbados after the cruise,

Carnival In Barbados
N the night of the Mauretania’s
visit to Barbados, which
coineided with the Trinidad Car-
nival, passengers on the ship were
able to - a general view of what
Carnival looked like when they
dropped in at Chez Jean Pierre,
the French Restaurant in Hastings.

The Management of the Res-
taurant staged a Carnival corre-
sponding with that in Trinidad and
it was deemed a great success. A
steel band was engaged to supply
the music and many Barbadians
took part.

The thrill and climax was
reached at midnight when Lent
So well did everyone en-
joy themselves that it is hoped to
make the festival an annual one.

bassy

T PRESENT holidaying here ,

is Miss Francoise' Vary and
Miss Denise Gaudette of Venezue-
la. They both work at the Cana-
dian Embassy in Caracas,
Still Holidaying Here
HAROLD BEATTY, until
recently General Manager of
the Montreal Board of Trade and
Mrs. Beatty are still holidaying in
Barbados staying at the Windsor
Hotel where they have been for
the past two weeks. They expect
to return to Canada later in the
montn,

Co-operative Bank

Manager
RRIVING yesterday morning
by B.W.LA. from Trinidad
were Mr. and Mrs, Perey Philip
who have come over for a month’s
holiday. They are staying at
Indramer Flats, Worthing.

Mr, Philip, a druggist of Port-
of-Spain, is also President and
Managing Director of the Trini-
dad Co-operative Bank.

St. Kitts Barrister
q® Barbados chiefly for the Races
are Mr. G. P. Boon, Barrister-
at-Law, St. Kitts, his daughter
Mrs. C. G. Rigley and his daugh-
ter-in-law Mrs. G. R, Boon, They
arrived on Friday by B.W.1.A. and
will be remaining for two wecks

staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mrs. Rigley is the owner

Columbus which raced at

Garrison Savannah yesterday.

ol
the

Brothers
R.. STEWART SARJEANT
Barbadian now resident in
the U.S.A. left the island on Wea-
nesday by B.W.IA. for Puerto
Rico where he took Pan Ameri-
can Airways back to the State
He was accompanied by his wif
and son Stewart Jnr. They h
spent a month’s holiday here
Mr. Stewart who has paid h
first visit back here in 33 ye
is a brother of Mr. “Bill” Sar
jeant of the Hastings Hotel with

whom he stayed: hey had ;
seen each other for over thr«
decades,

Mr, Sarjeant who left here at

the age of 16 is now well estab-
lished in the Real Estate Busin«
in New York,

While here he has made a tour
of the island and saw places he
had not visited when a boy. H
was very impressed by the vast
improvements the island ha
made and was overwhelmed
the hospitality of the people. H:
expects to return next year.

Business And Pleaure

N BARBADOS for two weeks on
business coupled with pleas-
ure is Mr. A. S. Graydon, Export
Manager of John Labatt Ltd., on
of the oldest brewers in Canada
He arrived on Wednesday by
T.C.A, aceompanied by his wife
and is staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Graydon has been to the
Caribbean before . but this is
his first visit to Barbados. He
said that he was glad to be here
in this climate because when he
left Montreal it was very cold
with lots of snow.

Scout Raffle
ONGRATULATIONS to Miss
Joan Weekes of “Briggs
Cottage”, Gun Hill, St. Michael,
who won the Boy Scout raffle. The
prize was a Phillips Sports model
bicycle and the Winging number
was 4

_— Carnival
RS. I. V. SPRINGER of
“Beunice’, River Road re-
turned from Trinidad on Friday
morning by B.W.1.A. She went
over to see Carnival there,



The Barbados Maternity Hospital

THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL is situated at Bank
Hill, and was re-converted from a building which was

formerly a private residence.

The grant by Colonial Develop-

; ment and Welfare Organisation of

£24,000 in 1944 for the establisn-
ment of the Barbados Maternity
Hospital and ‘' e subccg ert icing
over by the Government in "1947,
was the answer to public criticism
over the lack of proper training
facilities for midwives in the
Colony.

The Maternity Hospital is under
the direct control of the Director of
Medical Services and is supervised
by a Matron and Visiting Obstetri-
cian, assisted by a staff of trained
midwives,

The Hospital has ‘accommoda-
tion for twenty mothers and their
babies.

Twenty pupils are undergoing
training constantly. Of these, ten
trained nurses undergo a 12-
month period of training prior to
sitting an examination for quali-
fying as midwives, while ten
untrained pupils undergo eighteen
months’ training. Examinations
are held every year.

Clinics are held
Ante-natal Clinic is
weekly,

Patients are interviewed by the
Matron and are given a comple
physical examination by the Visii-
ing Obstetrician and all details are
recorded. Treatment is also given
to patients.

On Clinic days, besides the
routine check-up, patients are in-
structed in all the essential
factors which make for good
health during pregnancy, The im-
portance of an adequate diet is
stressed with its important ele-
ments of meat, fish, dairy produce,
fruit and green leafy vegetablest

Patients are encouraged to seek
the services offered at the Clinic
in the third month of pregnancy
and certainly not later than the
sixth month, Dental services are
also available.

There is a Theatre for the
delivery of the babies; a nursery
for normal babies and a nursery
for premature babies,

weekly, The
held twice

GENTS’ SHOES



TAN & BLACK KID OXFORDS.

After delivery, mothers are en-
couraged to attend the post-natal
clinies where advice is given or
the care and feeding of the infant.

There were 420 deliveries cur-
ing the year 1951, There were also
2,874 ante-natal attendances and
300 post-natal attendances.

Although every patient who
attends the ante-natal c’inic cannot
have her baby in the Hospital due
to the limited ‘accommodation, \
number seeking the servi
offered free at the Maternity
Hospital have increased greatly.

On a visit to the Maternity
Hospital recently the Advocate
was particularly impressed by the
spotlessly clean appearance of the
Hospital, both inside and outside;
the efficiency of the staff and the
cheerful, happy and restful atmos-
where prevailing,

Not only do the patients receive
every care and attention at the
Maternity Hospital but the Colony
ean be justly proud of the up-to-
date training facilities offered to
young women who are interested
in making midwifery their
vocation,

. $10.64 & $11.59

TAN & BLACK CALF SEMI BROGUE OXFORDS .............60000+ 11.19
TAN & BLACK BROGUES ................. a 11.99
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DIAL 5170
TODAY and Continuing DAILY at 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

WARNER'S HAPPY TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL | |

ON MOONLIGHT BAY

GORDON MacRAE — JACK SMITH

7

RE-RELEAGE |!

REAL GLORY

Gary COOPER

SSS =

David NIVEN

Andrea L DS

PROJECTION
SYSTEM
OISTIN >

ey & Tomerrow—445 & 4.80 p.m.

VE IT TO HENRY

His Walburn, Walter Catlett &
SIERRA PASSAGE
Wayne MORRIS
‘deaepeiiiaititiighelpannteainn sania
Tues, (only) — 445 & 8.30 p.m

LUCKY LOSERS

Leo Gotcey & The Bowery Boys &

THE PIONEERS

Tex RITTER





DIAL 8404

Dial 4220
“GAIETY |

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
AT. TODAY — 430 P.M.

VOICE OF THE TURTLE

Ronaki Reagan, Eleanor Parker &

,LOOK For THE SILVER LINING

(Color by Technicolor)
Gordon MacRae & June Haver

TUESDAY (o (only) 8.30 30 PM.

THE GOLDEN MADONNA
Michael Rennie &

HOMICIDE
Robert Douglas








SUNDAY, MARCH

9

195

52

ee a a ee ee ee ee ee



AT THE C1

—



VEMA



On Moonlight Bay

Hy GH,

LAST night was the
Theatre in Barbarees Roa

a opening of the new Plaza
the third theatre under the

management of Caribbean Theatres Ltd. to be opened in

the island. To mark this im

portant occasion, the manage-

ment have selected ON MOONLIGHT BAY as their feature
film and it would be difficult to find more refreshing and
pealing entertainment. Doris Day and Gordon Macrae

Warner Bros. popular song

in this amusing and lightheart
ington’s famous ““Pandro” stories, that is a gay family

comedy, with music.

_ The beauty of a film like this
is that the enjoyment of it knows
no age limit and its youthful verve
is delightful to all.

With a‘background of a small
town in Indiana in 1917, the story
concerns a young tomboy miss
who is much more interested in
playing baseball than romancing
under the. Indiana moon—that is,
until a young college senior makes
his appearance and changes her
ides. Romance follows in practi-
cally no time at all, but its path
thas more thorns than roses, what
with our hero beliaving in Free
Love and his sweetheart’s father
being dead against his suit either
Free or otherwise! However,
graduation day reveals the fact
that all the senior men have en-
listed to go overseas, including our
hero, and possibly due to this fact,
his ideas of matrimony undergo
a rapid about-face. Parental
blessing is finally given, and
everyone is happy.

The plot includes many hilari-
ous episodes, mainly contributed
by the eleven-year-old brother
whose propensities for getting in-
to difficulties are only equalled
by his ingenuity for disentangling
himself. However, one « of the
funniest sequences occurs during
the first date between the young
sweethearts. I'll call it the “pow-
der puff” episode, and if it doesn’t
make you laugh, nothing will.

Doris Day sparkles in her role
of boyish tomboy into grown-up
young lady and with Gordon
Macrae, the two of them sing the
old nostalgic popular songs of
another era. On Moonlight Bay,
Cuddle Up A Little Closer, Till
We Meet Again, Tell Me and I’m
Forever Blowing Bubbles are just
a few of the good old tunes it is
pleasant to remember )

Young Billy Gray, an engaging
and amusing young new star ob-
viously enjoys himself in the
“Penrod” role, while Mary Wickes,
as Stella, the cock says her say
with delightfully astringent hu-
mour,

A real old-time movie is shown
in the picture, with the lurid title
of “The Curse of Drink.” In-
cidentally, this one-reeler has a
decided influence on the young
brother, who imagines his father
in the leading role—with disas-
trous results! :

Good script, direction and act-
ing make this a lively, happy pic-
ture and there are some excellent
touches in costuming and stage

sets.
ON DANGEROUS GROUND
ON DANGEROUS GROUND at
the Plaza, Bridgetown , brings Ida
Lupino back to the screen after
her sojourn in the field of direct-
ing and producing, and presents
her in the type of dramatic role
in which she excells. Robert
Ryan plays opposite her, and be-
tween the two of them, they
manage to put over some drama-
tic entertainment. d
The picture starts off in a
rather hum-drum cops-and rob-
bers manner with Mr. Ryan as a
plain clothes policeman, who is
embittered and hardened by the
sordidness with which he is sur-
rounded in his daily work, and in
consequence, a lonely man.
Brutality gains the upper hand
in his manner of dealing with
suspects to such a degree that
his captain decides to send him
out of town for awhile, and gives



NOT

A









°





In order to meet the demand for serving the
public better in our DRUG STORE we have
closed our SODA FOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT
and will be utilizing this space for expanding
our DRUG DEPARTMENT.

COLLINS” LTD.

and romance team are starred
adaption of Booth Tark-



DORIS DAY

him an assignment up country.
Fro; his arrival in the settle-
ment, that is aghast at the killing
of a small girl, and the entrance
of Miss Lupino, the whole atmos-
phere becomes charged, and the
ection never lets up.

As a blind gitl, whose men-
tally defective younger brother
has committed the murder, Miss
Lupino is completely convincing.
Her performance is sensitive and
compelling, and her belief that
hate destroys him who hates is
instrumental in changing the
outlook of the embittered police-
man. Robert Ryan gives stature
to the role of the lonely officer,
and his change of character is
credible and natural.

The swiftly paced chase scenes,
against a background of bleak
winter snow, together with well
done dialogue and good acting,
make this an _ interesting and
different film, though it must be
admitted that some of the situa-
tions are heavily weighted with
sensational elements.

Tiny Ball Keeps

Woman Alive

BOSTON, Mass. Feb, 29.

A tiny plastic ball inside the
heart of 37-year-old Mrs, Mary
Dansereau is keeping her alive
after a unique operation perform-
ed at Peter Bent Brighm hospital,
A Lucite ball is secured near a
heart valve which had been in-
jured in a childhood attack of
rheumatic fever.



The, ball slips in place during
each heart beat to prevent the
blood from flowing backward.

The injury would have proved
fatal to the mother of two children
had she not undergone the opera-
tion described by surgeons for the
first time yesterday.

The operation was performed on
December 20 by a surgeon who
asked that his name be withheld.
A month later Mrs. Dansereau was
sent home and doctors said she
is recovering rapidly thougn not
completely cured.—U.P.












ICE,




IN THE

DESERT
-~OF DESSERTS—



ONLY

11¢

eee ee ne

Beat today’s High Cost
of Living and ENJOY

‘tensively for decoration,

Raspberry, Lemon,

SUNDAY

ADVOCATI



Gardening Hints
For Amateurs

Annuals in General

With the ideal weather that we
have had so far this year annuals
should have made a good start.
Once a garden can be adequately
watered, this is just the weather
that Snapdragon, Petunias, Ver-
bena, Candytuft, Phlox, and all the
other annuals love. Some people’s
Snapdragon plants are already a
foot high, and other anauals are
equally advanced.

Although flowers that last well
when cut must take first place in
value, yet there are others which,
although not so satisfactory as cut
Saeeeaay ek deserve a place In the
garden their beauty alone.

Queen Ann's Lace

Queen Ann's lace is one of
these, and although it is only a
wild flower (called “Cow Parsley”
in. En id), it is none the less
beautif for that. This plant
grows easily from seed, seeds it-
self, and is unsurpassed in dainty
loveliness. The plants grow to
about four feet in height and the
flowers are pure white, and, as
the name implies are 6f a light
lacy appearance. It looks lovely
grown in a border with other
flowers, or in a bed by itself.

Tn spite of the fact that Queen
Ann's lace does not last very long
when cut, this flower is used ex-
some
Florjsts even tinting the flower
heads pink or blue,

‘ Single Balsam

Single Balsam is another plant
that is not of much value for pick-
ing but which brightens up the
shady spots in a garden. So much
has already been written about
this plant that ne special descrip-
tion is necessary here, and this is
only a reminder to include a few
of these gay little plants here and
there. ere is a great variety
in the colour of these flowers, and
often a new shade can be got from
a friend’s garden.

These plants grow from seed or
——h and like a moist shady
spot.

Red and Blue Salvia

Salvias are also among the
plants whose flowers do not last
well when picked, and yet which
add greatly to the colour of the
garden. These flowers with their
graceful spikes are also, in spite
of their short life, very popular as
an addition to bouquets and bowls.
They grow easily from seed or
cutting, flourish under ordinary
garden conditions, and will do
equally well in dry or wet weather.

Salvias moke a lovely border
to a bed, the red salvia especially
making a bright splash of colour
in the garden.

Little Yellow Daisy

Little Yellow Daisy, although
quite useless for picking, yet
provides a lovely bit of bright-
ness in the garden. This little
plant grows in sizable bunches
of dainty greenery which has a
delicious aromatic scent, and
when in bloom ‘is covered in
hundreds of tiny golden daisy
like flowers. It makes a splen-
did Rock garden or border plant.

Once established Yellow Daisy
is there for ever. It disappears
during the rainy weather, but as
these dry months come around,
up it comes again in all the
expected, and in a lot of unex-
pected places. It does not stand
transplanting well, and to get it
established it is better to collect
a queasy of dried flower heads
and plant those and hope they
will spring the following year.
Yellow Daisy prefers a poor soil,
and will root and grow on a

vel path if the gravel is at all
oose enough for it to gain a hold.

Petunia
Perhaps it may be inaccurate
to class the Petunia among

those plants whose flowers are
only decorative in the garden,
and of little use for picking.
Petunias do last reasonably well
when picked, but, as a rule they
grow so massed in the bed, that
picking is difficult, and so they

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PAG! THREE



FARM AND GARDEN

THE CASHEW NUT (By AGRICOLA)

Following the note on ft
pose a question: are we on
local cottage industries, one
not necessarily good soil at

mitted that there are exposed hillsides and marginal lands
in the hands of peasant proprietors as well as unused plots

1ardiness last week, to-day
the lookout for an addition t
issociated with the soil and

that? We think it will be ad

in seme of the dry, water-short village areas which could

be profitably turned to account if planted to a |

such as the cashew

BB.C. RADIO NOTES

Direct Broadcast & Com-
mentary
Tuesday, March 4,

Budget
Day in Britain, As in

previous

is

years the BBC’s General Overseas '

Service will broadcast the Budget
speeches by the Chancellor of the

Exchequer, the Rt. Hon. R. A.
Butler, on Tuesday at 5435 p.m.
repeated at 9.00 p.m. and by a

Member of Her Majesty’s Oppos-
ition in the House of Commons
on Wednesday at 5.15 p.m, re-
peated at 9.00 p.m. The Chancel-
lor’s Budget proposals for 1952
will be the subject of Andrew
Shonfield’s weekly economic com-
mentary on Thursday at 9.45 p.m.

‘Emergency’ in Malaya

On Friday next, March 7, Hugh
Carleton Greene who returned
recently from Kuala Lumpur

where he was head of the Emer-
gency Information Services, under
General Briggs, will discuss Com-
munism in Malaya in his talk ‘On
Being a Bandit’ in the series ‘From
the Third Programme.’ This is of
particular interest to iisteners in
this area on account of the recent
transfer to Malaya of the Hon
Donald C, McGillivray, former
Colonial Secretary of Jamaica. Mr.
Greene points out that the Com-
munist.army in Malaya consists of
about 4,000 men, armed with pis-
tols, rifles, Sten guns and a few
Brens and is supported by an un-
Cerground organisation of some
15,000 men who provide it with
supplies, particularly food, re-
cruits and intelligence, and can
themselves rely on the regular as-
sistance, willing or unwilling, of
(it’s anybody’s guess but let us
say) another hundred thousand.
For the ordinary non-Communist
Chinese in Malaya the Communist
Party is but the latest and most
ruthless of a long line of secret
societies to which they paid their
contributions under threat of
mutilation or death. The broadcast,
lasting for twenty minutes will be
given twice on Friday, 7th, March
at 4.15 and again at 10.30 p.m.

British Industries Fair

The British Industries Fair, 1952,
will be held from May 5 to 16
simultaneously in Earls Court and
Olympia, London, and Castle
Bromwich, Birmingham, where
heavy industries will be displayed,
‘B.LF. Preview,’ a group of four
programmes starting in the coming
week will outline plans for the
Fairy which is expected to be on
the same scale as last year’s Fes-
tival of Britain B.LF. Soe
this year is largely on new ideas,
frest designs anm improved pro-
cesses which will promote the ex-
port trade and overcome the di-
version of materials to rearma-
ment. The first broadcast will be
on Thursday next, 6th, March at
10.15 p.m,





are not used for bouquets or dec-
oration very often. Petunias love
dry sunny weather, and they con~
tinue flowering for weeks on end
giving no trouble, if, conditions
suit them, They make one of the
loveliest beds of our lovely
annuals. Petunias seed them-
selves and once grown, seedlings
spring up the following year all
about the garden. If no seedlings
are available, the imported seeds
grow very easily. catter them
well in the seed box, and cover
with a very thin layer of sifted
mould. Petunias take twelve
weeks from seed sowing to flow-
ering.

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hardy tree

Like its near reiation the mango

it thrives well in the vicinity o

pe sea and may be a help too ix

ting erosion. The cashew nu

has considerable value commer

cially and is much in demand. Th

Jruit or so-called ‘apple’, althoug!
Welding an astringent juice, can |

be eaten raw or made into a pre

serve; cashew wine is also men
ned We have seen the ‘ap

ples’ made excellent use of in the

Rupununi district of British Gui |
i where the tree often occur

in fairly
ds in

thick, but scattered, |
the savannahs. During
the fruiting season, the Ameridian

tur: their pigs in to consume the |
fruits, which they do with relish
producing pork of good quality

at the same fime, the nuts are col
lected, roasted, shelled and mark-
ected locally The following brief
eview is based largely on infor-
mation which has appeared in the
Bulletin of the Imperial Institute

As is well known, cashew nut
are a prized ingredient of cake
and sweetmeats and as ‘salted

ts’ are very popular in the Unit

States. In flavour and nutritive
malue they approximate almond

r which thev often figure as a
sitbstitute. The tree, originall
a ‘naive of South America, is/}
now to be found in many parts of

the tropical world, thanks mainly
to intrepid Portuguese travellers
in America, from Mexico to Bra-



ril and the West Indies; in Africa
both East and West; and in Asiati
countries. In the Bombay Presi-
dency of India and the adjoinin
Portuguese territory of Goa, sev-|
eral large sceale factories have
been established for the prepara-



tion of cashew nuts for export
markets. :
Under favourable conditions,

the tree may reach a considerable
size and commences to bear at!
the end of the third year. There
is an interesting feature connect-
ed with fruiting: after the forma-
tion and ripening of the kidney-
shaped nut, the stalk or peduncle
of each nut gradually swells and
assumes a fleshy, turgid appear-
ance somewhat resembling an ap-
ple. These ‘apples’ mature to a
bright red or yellow colour and
are ornamental hanging amid the
green foliage. In the part af India
mentioned, a mature tree of eight
to ten years is said to yield from
100 to 150 1b of ‘apples’ annually
from which about 20 to 25 Ib, of
unhusked nuts are obtained. When
the roasting is carried out by the}
villagers, the entire nuts are first)
placed in earthenware pots per-
forated at the base to permit the)
escape of the pungent, astringent
oil released from the outer husks
during the roasting
These pots hold about one and a
half to two pounds of nuts and
are balanced on three stones over

a low burning fire. While heating, |

the nuts are stirred with wooden
ladles and the expelled oil collect-
ed in an iron spoon, After about
ten minutes roasting, the nuts are
ready for separation; they are
placed in a basket and sprinkled
with wood ashes so as to prevent
any adhering oil, with its blistering
properties, from burning the hands.
The husks are cracked between
stones and the kernels extracted
by hand, There is a good demand.
throughout the West Indies for

home grown cashew nuts prepared |
in this simple way. The factory |

process is, of course, more efficient
and results in the ‘blanched ca-
shew kernels of commerce.’ Large
open pans or perforated rotary |
drums form part of the equipment
and some 8,000 lb of nuts are
roasted in each pan daily. Twen-
ty five lbs of unhusked nuts yield
from six to eight pounds of ker-
nels. :

Thus, at existing prices, it ap-
pears that a few cashew trees
around the cottage door would not
be a bad investment.





|

treatment. |









USED
TO WAKE

FEELING
TIRED

Now rises
full of

| energy ,

What o bad start for a
work if you wake
teeling ‘t and

ii s, instead of being
brisk and full of energy.
One woman who can
ippreciate the difference from
her own experience, writes to

us |
“Refore taking Kruschen, I |
always used to wake in the
morning feeling very tired, Now
(have lost all t gt Hrednene and |
I wake feeling full of energy.
Kruschen has made me feel years
younger I also guifered with
rheumatic pains in my shoulders
and swellings round my ankles
I am now completely ¢ of
these pains and swell et take
Kruschen Salts regularly, and
cannot speak too bighly i

Kruschen keeps you young
because it tones up the liver,
kidneys and bowels and keeps
them all working smoothly and

efficiently. The rew of this
interna] cleanliness is a ened
| and invigorated body. Polsono

Baste canteciels are eae ed an
@ pains of rheumatis i.
ina en you continue with Kr -
somes your t wack body responds
8 pur oree.
Kruschen is obtainable from all
Yomista and Stores.

2m,





2

Too MayWi
4 ae 4




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PAGE FOUR









/
: ‘OTT 7 RACING RESULTS THE FLYING YASMEEN |
CLYDE WALCOTT SCORES ACL ESULT *{ FL
tir r rey T os a ; + ual a ‘ |
A GARRISO? AVANN: M : 952 r ,
LONE W.1. THOUSAND —ene.* nen 5. oe Dunquerque Wins the Guineas |
WEATHER Fine TRACK Firn ” ° }
’ ° ve a . . . |
Empire Lead In First Division Netonite’s Impressive Victory
. ‘ Ist Race: GARRISON STAKES—Class B and Lower—$1,000 ($335, *
S > reg
oe eee $165, $55)—7% Furlongs. BY BOOKIE
WEST INDIES tour of New Zealand has t ischaemia ie
nd this too marks the end of 1. RED CHEEKS 23 Ibs Mr. E. C. Jones Jockey O'Neil, . al . ‘os ete in the
\ustralia and New Zealand. 2. FIRELADY 118 lbs Mr. S. A. Blanchette ae a : oy en: a an. Par
i Phe justifiable measure of satisfac- Jockey Joseph i tat ane aria need to the circum-
7 tion fel adents of West Indian cricket his- 3. FLYING $0. 60: 30 usually Var SCC ;
o t t this is the first occasion on DRAGON 106 + 3 lbs. Mr.S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilde?, mances, Usually the element of surprise nee =
We team has opposed a New Zea- TIME: 1.34. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $5.32; Place: $1.88; $1.38. & lot to do with it. But when you on e a ati
a on their own territory in official fixtures FORECAST: $16.20. something to happen and it comes as it
‘ hav efeated them convincingly 5 a le ' . 4 leak «SMa on top of that, you stand amazed at way }
and hi 1efeale : 6 ALSO RAN: Belle Surprise (98 5 lbs., Lutchman); Fuss Budget happens; then you ean be almost dead certain
WALCOTT SCORED ONLY 1,000 : (123 Ibs., P. Fletcher). that such will never fade from the memory.
The statisticians among us will Bs START: Good FINISH: Close. Neck; 1 length. ~ Sueh an «vent was the performance of Mr. Tommy Edwards’
no doubt re pe it "' point in what-#7 a4. WINNER: 4-yr.-old b.f, Linklater-Golden Carp. filly Yasmeen at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon.
ever records they have kept con- a . - Watnhar
cerning this tour, that Clyde Walcott TRAINER: Mr. J. T, Fletcher.

is the only player on the West In-
dies team to have scored more than
one thousand runs and has topped
the first class batting averages
Clyde has scored 1,098 runs in

23 innings, (once not out) for an
average of 49.90. He also put up
the highest score in first class
matches of 186

Frank Worrell is next on the
batting list. Frankie scored 872
runs in 22 innings (four times not

out) with an average of 48.44 runs
and with his highest score 160 not
out,

The figures of the other players
are interesting. Alan Rae’s figures
were 33.27, Robert Christiani 33.13,
Roy Marshall 32.78 and Jeff Stoll-

meyer 31.17,

iG
Everton Weekes, the other Ww",
Was seventh with an average of -
27.85 in 2U innings with lop score
‘a

ee CLYDE WALCOTT
WINS BOWL 500 OVERS



“i ‘t a’? { t »
2 His “twins” Aif Valentine and Sonny Ramadhin bowled more than
200 overs and this y more than 300 overs more than any other
member of the West 1 team
Vaientine took 6] ce at



of 23.85 runs each but this

bowling averages and Ramadhin
next in order,

rey Stoilmeyer, the number one opening

toppea lhe bowling averages, but he did with 8
et Of 10.49 FuUNS each in SY Overs.

mez ran to a jusuiiable second place with 236.7 overs
at a cost of 19./6 runs each,

‘ 2WO WANS

kK MPIRE won fixtures last week and have scored the
maximum points Of six points for three games played since the

ivo2 season opened, f

4ne Diues
ecoring only goal «
most part but poh te

only gained him s
Wilton 40 al

It is ironical
batsman s
WiCKels at

venth piace

a Cost Of 2/,.0/ runs ¢



Wial well
hould have
a c

Gerry G
for 3U wicket

both toeir

are familiarly known—defeated Carlton "by
tne maich. ‘Ine game was a fast one for the
ms were laulty in their finishing efforts,

Linpire Wis season have deveioped a theory of playing the ball in
the air and this proved an advantage against the smaiter Cariton
players, When it is taken into considerauon the fact tnat the entire
Cariton team are under more than medium height and the Empire
Piayers numbering among their ranks people like Charles Alleyne,
Algy Symmonds, iv Smith, and company must at once establish





@ sught edge on the game because of this uvantage even if we
ignore all other siderations for the time being.
NUL MUCH TO CHOOSL

FINUHERE was not much to choose between the teams for the greater

part of the Freddy Hutcoinson was the outstanding
player for Carlton. He played at fullback, inside forward and halt
back at diflerent stages of the game, 1 am not saying that he was

game,

actually assigned to all these positions but he nevertheless impressed
me al one stage or another of the game that he had undertdken the
responsibility of playing in these positions,

Although his ali round play was useful yet I think that his best
posilion is a Wing half. However, he is leaving for England tomorrow
and football fans will wish him the best of luck. Carlton will be
much the poorer for his absence,

SPARTAN DEFEATED
MPIRE completely outplayed Spart: iis week to score their
third consecutive win in the first Livision this season. It is true
that Empire scored the.only goal of.ihe match by the vexatious pen-
alty route. However, in my opinion Empire gave the better perform-
ance and deserved to win.

They adopted their ball in the air policy again and Spartan with
a nonsensical short passing game eminently unsuitable to the wider
field could find no answer to the tactics employed by the Bank Hall
team.

Frank Taylor at inside left for Empire was outstanding. He was
swift in the attack, his ball control was good by all local standards
and his distribution was also good,

The Spartan wingers were quick enough neither did they
receive the type of crossfield pass from which they could have made
the most use,



not

HEROES
KIPPER CADOGAN and Gittens worked heroically in the half
back line but their greatest sia was the fact that they never
thought of lobbing the ball into their opponents area or trying a shot

themselves. They content«
intercepting and clearing.
College defeated Everton by a clear margin of two goals to nil
in their fixture yesterday. Everton is completely out of stride so far
this season and on the other hand I have never such commend-
able team spirit and co-ordination of effort displayed by Harrison
College this season for some year the history of the school.

LAWN TENNIS, PLANS
7JRHE Council of the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Association
decided recently to enter a team Br Trophy to
be held in Jamaica in April of this year.

This is a bold bid on the part of the Association and will cer-
financial undertaking since

d themselve

with the negative theory of

in

th
the I

tainly constitute their most ambitious
the formation of the Association.

Jamaica is a considerable di away from most of the other
British Colonies in the Caribbean and transportation and boarding
costs are comparatively high. Nevertheless I think that the Assc-
ciation is quite justified in the effort to place Barbados Association
Lawn Tennis on the map of Caribbe anised rt

The Council of the Association has also accepted the offer of
Mr, Neville Carter of a portion of land at the.Pine Estate and
the Association plan to erect a pavilion there and to prepare two
or possibly three courts.

Obviously the Association w

tance

n «
i

ill be faced







5

“

1952

SUNDAY, MARCH

SUNDAY ADVOCATE







" ss eee sie ‘ I would not say that I knew it was going to happen, but rather
2nd Race; MAIDEN STAKES—Class © and C2 (Maidens)—8900,

that I know it might happen or could happen, I knew all along

















hat e wa f class. This goes right back to the first time
($300, $150, $50)—5% Furlongs. I had 4 look at ne ‘beoedine bua texts. 5 Wattling Street out at ¥ /

—_—____ — ——-—— - ~~ —= Yasna she red by Sir Perey Loraine and is a sister to suc a
1. CASTLEIN THEAIR 112lbs. Mr. J. R. Edwards, Jockey Holder, od horses Nebuchadnezza 2 the Golden Road both of which TS: JW. ER
2. MAGIC GAYE .... 109 lbs. Mr. M. E.R. Bourne. Jockey Belle. ahiciy are a Silas eee, ar england. Her dam, Yasna, is, in| OBTAINABLE FROM ALL LEADING STORES. LOCAL AGENTS POTT
3. AIM LOW ........ 125 lbs. Dr. H. M. Weaver, Jockey Crossley ‘ dasar andi P are. Yasmeen, of course,
TIME: 1.083. PARI-MUTUEL; Win: $6.70; Place: $1.96, $4.14, bidee regen , sat ta cane Wate ea hac socllare but nevertheless | MUI[ iTS DAM aa te aaa iee ae ATHERSTONE, ENGLAND

$4.52. er for uggested that, for the West Indies, something above the 7

; ; yedinary could be expected. *
ALSO RAN: Devil's Symphony (109 lbs., James); The Thing (109 ee ee MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY
\ ‘ 1 ‘ie — ; ) xoks Yasmeen is the sort that would impress both the experi = fee

See, Cepeenes); Manees (eae OM.. coneGi) 5 DEE var et98 Pe th a that think of thoroughbreds as something out of the >

lbs., P. Fletcher); Test Match (112 4 lbs., M. Browne); Abu- si Night At exercise even the most inexperienced ae

Ali (112 + 2 lbs., Yvonet); Mabouya (125 lbs., Wilder); Blue u be impressed by her a. In Trinidad, er ss

Nelly (109 lbs,, Quested); Darham Jane (109 + 6 lbs., O'Neil). for the first time in the West Indies, it was apparen ae tin a

French Flutter (109 Ibs., Thirkell); Fille D'Iran (109 lbs., Lutch- ed a fine ‘urn ot speed. She only _wanted a little more time’

man) ratron for her to get six furlongs. , ;

, -INTS . . { then one ay well ask, did I come to leave her out ot

SEART: Fal. SINISE Somer. = Tenens, $ lene ‘ e uae "The answer is that few horses of this caiibre
WINNER: 3-yr.-old b.c. Windsor Clipper-Aerocomet. ‘ the West Indies unless something is amiss with them,
TRAINER: Hon, V. C. Gale.

wrong with Yasmeen was very clearly indicated
h she displayed at exercise, Furthermore I got the
after her last gallop it was more noticeable than
1d the fact that a horse is « bad starter, are two reasons
preclude them from my tips.

3rd Race: CHELSEA STAKES—Class F and Lower—$800, ($265,
$135, $40)—5% Furlongs,
1, FIRST ADMIRAL 105 + 4 Ibs. Mrs, F. E. C

If you feel worn out, depressed, or
generally run down a glass or two a doy of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restc
energy and tone up the whole nervou:
Giving new vitality it fortifies ou against fever



e los

Bethea.
Jockey Holder.

ich always



i ill s 3 . and exhaustion and remember, Duc be
2. MARCH WINDS 105 lbs. Mr. U, J. Parravicino, But with all the above in mind I still stood in the Stand at the ;
Jockey Lutchman. sarrison yesterday and marvelled at the way she went abcut her Wine is especially valuable after i!iness.
3. MISS FRIENDSHIP . 132 lbs. Mr. F. E. C, Bethell, k

Demure had the edge on the jump and Wilder lost no time
giving her af she had. Harroween was also well off and between
two of them they held on to Yasmeen for the first furlong. It
a display of early pace such as I have seldom seen except by a
few outstanding horses of the past. But at the half mile both Demure
and Harroween had had enough and Yasmeen careered off in front.

Jockey Yvonet.

Place; $2.02, $1.72, $2.58. 4),

the

TIME: 1.09 PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $9.36.

FORECAST: $34.32.

ALSO RAN: Waterbell (125 lbs., Crossley); Jolly Miller (130 Ibs.,
John); Sunbeam (121 lbs., Wilder); Caprice (102 {-2 ibs., Beiie);

Take home a



bottle today

|






oF;
,

> , establishing a lead of a length with almost every stride. By the time ‘ & x i
Clementina (125 lbs., Thirkell); Rambler Rose (102 + 1 ibs., he reached the two furlong pole and turned for home she had five i \ l if
Joseph). or six lengths on the rest of the field and at this stage 1 begun to 1a 39
START: Good. FINISH: Close, neck, 1 length.

wender if she would begin to slow up. But, nothing of the sort, she did
not fade this time, and presently Newman was easing her up cn the
post a winner by what the judge conservatively estimated to be three
lengths, She is without doubt the fastest filly I have ever seen in the
West Indies. «f) JSignl

WINNER;, 3-yr.-old b.g. O.T.C.-Flak.
TRAINER: Mr. F, E. C. Bethell.

TONIC Wit

~~ 4th Race : BARBADOS GUINEAS 1952—Nominated—$900.00
($300.00, $200.00, $100.00) —74 Furlongs

a

. l'rue she did not break the record. She was only 2/5 above it.
1. DUNQUERQUE .... 114 lbs. Hon, J. D. oe tuaat But the day that any horse runs the 5% furlongs at the Garrison
2. CARDINAL 117 ibs. . Mr. J.W, Chandler, ey Crossley. i; less than 1,06, they can ship it back to England, as far as I am
. CARDINAL ........+ . I. W. ; oncertae.
Jockey Yvonet, ©°PCerne :
- " bide ail . : The next most outstanding performance for the day I thought
ime ie id Shhh 117 lbs. Mr. C..Barnard. Jockey Holder. was Notonite’s victory

PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $2.64. Place : $1.06, $1.08, $1.04

FORECAST : $9.72,

ALSO RAN : Seedling (117 lbs., Lutchman), May Day (117 Ibs,
Thirkell), Apronusk (117 lbs., Fletcher), Columbus (117 Ibs.,
Wilder),

START : Good.

WINNER : b.f. O.T.C.-Belledune,

TRAINER: Mr. J. W. Chandler.

"5th Race ; B.T.C, STAKES—Classes A & B Only—$1,100.00
($365.00, $185.00, $60.00) —9 Furlongs

in the Barbados Turf Club Stakes. A colt
wiho had a very modest beginning he has developed into a big,horse
with great possibilities. He might have been better at an earlier
stage of his career but for an unfortunate tendency towards the
proverbial dry coat which he developed on his visit in Trinidad last
June. Nevertheless Trinidad had a taste of his brilliance when in
spite of being sick he defeated the great Lupinus over six furlongs,
although it must be said, he was in receipt of much weight.

After that he was not seen to best advantage last November
and very wisely he was kept at home while the Christmas meeting
went on. With the cooler months upon us he has now benefited as
most of this kind usually do and at this meeting he has really blos-

FINISH : Close, Neck, 3 lengths

, somed out into a fine specimen. He won his race yesterday with

1 PROTON Te ii'essc ds 116 lbs. Mr. C, A, Pierce, consummate ease in the good time 1.554 for the. 9 furlongs and 14

: Jockey P, Fletcher, yards. In fact after Pat Fletcher gave him his head and passed

2. FIRBLADY ..:..... 108 lbs. Mr. S. A, mame £ sa them all around the four furlongs pole it was, more or less, a walk
ockey Lutchman, home for him. I cannot see him being easily beaten agai

3. REBATE .......... 127 lbs. Mr, M, E. R. Bourne. . a ee eee

meeting.

In this race both Fire Lady and Rebate ran well but while the
former had already raced over 74 furlongs on the same afternoon,
the latter looked as if she night have felt the going. The Jamaican
Derby winner Embers, who ran fourth, displayed some early pace
which was not expected by most of us, but she is obviously’ a bit
outclassed in this company.

Jockey Quested.
TIME : 1.654. PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $2.96. Place : $1.28, $1.78, $1,46
FORECAST : $16.44.
ALSO RAN : Landmark (117 Ibs. O’Neil), Slainte (120 lbs., Thirk-
ell), Gun Site, (130 lbs., Crossley), Embers (108 lbs. Belle).
START: Good. FINISH: Easy, 3 lengths, 1 length.
WINNER : br.c. Fairfax-Empress Josephine. The G die ig aah ‘ s eH
A ‘ cir 1e¢ Guineas was not the two-horse-race expected it to r
TRAINER : Mr, J. T. Fletcher. Cavalier I thought had a particularly good ride and was presented
with every opportuinty for winning the classic. But he failed at
‘he crucial moment when entering the stretch and Dunquerque, in |
he best traditions of the O.T.C. get, ran on stoutly to win from

: SPRING STAKES—Class © and Lower—s900.00
($300.00, $150.00, $50.00) —744 Furlongs

6th Race

her stable mate Cardinal by a neck. I was pleasantly surprised

1. DOLDRUM ..... 121 lbs. Mr. N. M, Inniss. Jockey Holder. with the way Cardinal ran while Seedling, who came fourth, also
2. SWEET ROCKET 126 lbs.. Mr. R. C, Gill. . Jockey Lutchmah. turned in a good performance for five furlongs.

LIN WARE i evice ty 126 bbs. Mr. K. D, Edwards.

Jockey Yvonet I do not believe that Dunquerque was one hundred per cent iit.

TIME : 1.34§. PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $4.76. Place : $1.70, $2.02, $2.04 But she won more or less how I thought she would and that was du

FORECAST : $18.24. to supe ce S She is pore a very a addition to the rank:

ATS er a re on ‘+ Noraimacar.5 ea y (120 of our ereoles and so far I give her a very high rating when com area

ALSO RAN : Water Cress (126 lbs., C1 a , ‘Tiberis Lad “" with her predecessors. With the Jamaican tide recsding we ve do

lbs., O'Neil), Dashing Princess (126 Ibs., Joseph Pieuxce with every bit of class in our classics,

Great pity of pities is it there
fore that I learn that Dunquerque is not entered for any of the Trini-
dad classics. We might have to wait until both are four years old

(130 lbs., Wilder), Arunda (121 lbs., Quested), Topsy (126
Newman).

keeps your hair right in

START : Good. FINISH ; Easy, 2 lengths, 1 length ?¢fore we see herself and Bright Light meeting again.
INER Vv. C Gal s : ;
WINNER : ch.f, Wyndham-Serenity. PRAINER : Hon, V. C, Gale { sincerely hope that after seeing fourteen horses start in ihe the picture FOU Spee, lustegua_ hale, use

7th Race: CREOLE STAKES—Class G and Lower—$600 ($200, _
$100, $40,)—5'. Furlongs.

iaiden Stakes that every single one of us is convinced that it is

Brylcreem !
the most unfair kind of horse-race that could be seen in any part of

For handsome,
healthy hair use Brylereem !





Brylereem makes your appearance
the rere I suggest that . member of the Turf Club be given a smart one wherever you go, whatever you do. Massage your
1. ROSETTE ....%... 114 Ibs. Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder, 4 pair of shoes two sizes too small for them and they will soon realise 4 : As - ; .
2s TRAE 0 4s calvean 135 lbs. Mr. J. D. Ifill. Jockey Quested, what a tight fit it is. I was most distressed, but not surprised, to see scalp with Brylereem wrere day and er how its pure oils and
3. TWINKLE .... 102 + 2 lbs. Mr. L. J. Sealy. Jockey Belle. a horse making off in the direction of Dayrell’s Road, which I after- tonic ingredients give your hair that vital, healthy look.
TIME: 1.094. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.30. Place: $1.26, $2.02, $2.50. wards learned was French Flutter. But.under the circumstances I Brylcreem controls the hair without excessive oiliness,
FORECAST: $7.92. > ie ve va a fine job ar be ped wey With both his life and because the oils in Brylercem are emulsified.
ALSO RAN: Gavotte (132 lbs., Crossley); Blue Diamond (135 Ib: he AMY urely this sort of thing cannot continue. That means clean grooming. ‘That means
Lutchman); Joan's Star (118 lbs., Yvonet); Cottage $105 9 Ib Looking around for something to finish off with, what could be} lasting hair health. Ask for Prylcreem,
O'Neil); Diadem (130 Ibs., Joseph); Vonwise (130 it Fletcher); more fitting than the performance of the half-bred Rosette.

Not
She made short shrift
and it was not surprising that she equalled the
class Over this distance. In fact her time was a 1/10

Billy Boy (133 lbs., John).
START: Good.
WINNER: 3-yr.-old h.b.

; the perfect hairdressing.
even the great Andy ever impressed me more.
yf her opponents

record for her

FINISH: Easy, 4 lengths, 1 length

FOR DAY-LONG SMARTNESS AND LASTING
ch.f. Burning Bow-Rosamond.





















with need for funds to NER ess but as the notice board deals in fifths of a second only I could HAIR HEALTH BRYLCREEM your HAIR
i A) iene wi ive TRAI > Hon. V. C. Gale. not have thi ut up. She is another who will be very hard to beat kine’
carry out these projects and it is hoped that all sportsmen will give the ze i. Tit dies vent, a By Be x u ¢ J SeTNT
3 , the rest of the e . one
venture their full support, fy nm pag i . g
Saas
SOOO PPDS OOF FPSO OPOF PO SSF2 POPPE VOPP PS PPF SPITE ‘ te aa taa C
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SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952



B.L.A.C. Hangar Going Up At Seawell

(By Our Flying Correspondent)

The Barbados Light Aeroplane
Club is making rapid ‘strides. It
was only on August 10 last year
when a group of local flying en-
thusiasts met at Goddard’s Res-
taurant and forméd the Club.
These can truly be called “The
Pioneers.”

Ay that time these pioneers
knew not from whence the funds
would come. But they had ¢our-
age; they: were determined; they
did not overlook the smallest
problem and last but not least,
they anticlpated success,

Today we have the B.L.A.C.
constructing a hangar at Seawell.
Probably, tomorrow we may see
the arrival of an Auster Autocrat,
the type of plane which the Club
is expecting to use in the island.

To fail to mention the pioneers
would be an injustice They
were: Messrs. R. A. Beard, D.
Edghill, Jackie Marson Jnr., M.
Reingold, Stanton Toppin, R.
Inniss, R. Peterkin, C. i

Peterkin,
L. Chase, D. Malone, F. E. Miller, th

I. Corbin, S. E. L. Johnson, T. A.
L. Roberts, E. “Dipper” Barrow,
A. Jemmott, P. C. S, Maffei, E. A.
Reece, G. Butcher and Squadron
Leader Henderson.

Every Club, regardless of size,
encounters its difficulties in its
infancy and the B.L.A.C. was no
exception.

When the House of Assembly, a
little over a month ago, were con-
sidering a Bill to amend the Cus-
toms Tariff Act so as to exempt
among other items, aircraft and
aireraft Spare parts from the pay-
ment of customs duty, Mr. O. T.
Allder, Senior Member of St.
John, said: “The Flying Club is
a club that should not be assisted.
It is a club which exist to pro-
duce a little sport for a few.”

In my opinion Mr. Allder knew
nothing about the Club.

Fortunately Mr. E. W. Barrow
and Mr, F. E. Miller, two pioneers
of the Club, were present and
were able to deny these mislead-
ing allegations. They knew that
the Club was opened to anyone
who wanted to join, flying or non-

flying member. The Bill was
eventually passed.

Meeting
« Lhe inaugural meeting of the
Club was held at 8.0U p.m. on
Wednesday, January 16 at the

Chamber of Commerce when the
Memorandum of Association and
the Articles of Association were
approved.

Mr. A. R. Toppin, a prominent
businessman in the City, , was
elected first President of the Club
with Mr, Robert Peterkin as Sec-
retary. The Committee of Man-
agement comprises of Mr. Wood
Goddard, Chairman, Mes:rs,
‘Robert Peterkin, Jackie Marson,
Stanton Toppin, Lance Jordan,
Freddie Miller, “Dipper” Barrow,
Denis Malone and Morton Rein-
gold.

Two sub-committees within the
Committee of Management were
also formed, one for the purpose
of investigating the cost and im-
mediate erection of a hangar at
Seawell, and the other to deliver
a series of Lectures to other mem-
bers of the Club on such subjects
as the “Theory of Flight” and
other related subjects. The lec-
turers in this series are: Stanton
Toppin, Denis Malone, ‘Dipper’
Barrow, Squadron Leader Hen-
derson and Wood Goddard.

The process of having the com-
pany registered in accordance
with the requirements of the Com-
panies Act, 1910, is being looked
after by Messrs. Barrow and
Malone and it is hoped that this
will be completed in the near

future,
Drop Ltd.

Application has been made to
His Excellency the Governor-in-
Executive Committee for permis-
sion to drop the word “ ited”
in the name of the Club. The
Company is limited by personal
guarantee not exceeding $48 in the
case of flying members and one
shilling in the case of non-flying
members,

The job of preparing plans and
estimates of the cost of erecting
the hangar fell to Messrs. John-
son, Miller and C. G. Peterkin and
Mr. Johnson undertook to con-
struct a scale model of the pro-
posed hangar.

Mr. C. H. Roberts of the firm of
Cole & Co. gave the Club two
steel sections for the roof and
the track for the sliding doors; in
addition he has volunteered to
make the necessary changes to the

steel sections to provide a 45-foot {n furthering this venture.”

“If you're

And can't





THIS is the type of ‘plane which is expected to arrive from England

for the Barbados Light Aeroplane Club.

Span nich will be the width of
e

Mr... Peterkin placed his know-
ledge of land surveying at the dis-
posal of the Committee in laying
out the site for the h , pre-
paring plans and supervising the
work of erecting the wallaba

poles.
Site

The site of the hangar was
agreed upon in collaboration with
Mr. Henderson, Airport Manager,
acting on behalf of Government.
Mr. Henderson also offered sug-
gestions. It was estimated that the
cost of the hangar would be in
the vicinity of $1,900 and $2,000.

At a meeting on January 16 it
was agreed to accept the offer re-
ceived by cable from the Auster
Company of a used “Autocrat”
three seater aircraft, similar to
the one which was recently flown
up to the island by two members
of the Trinidad Flying Club. The
cost of this aircraft is £610 and the
Club immediately cabled its ac-
ceptance.

Shortly afterwards the Club re-
ceived a cable informing them
that the shipping charges had been
increased by £90 to £380, and ask-
ing that a letter of credit be open-
ed in London for £1,000, This was
done. Since then the Club has
received another letter stating
that the plane will soon be ship-

d.
Peat present the membership of
the Club stands at 33 flying and
17 non-flying but there are many
others who have stated their
intentions to join. .

At the invitation of the Commit-
tee of Management Mr. J..A. Skin-
ner consented to accept the Hon-
orary position .of Vice-President.
Mr. Skinner’s contribution in the
field of aviation in Barbados is
well known. He was the first per-
son to construct an aeroplane lo-
cally. The comments of experi-
enced aviators who saw this plane
were favourable.

Invaluable

Of Mr, A. R. Toppin, the Club
will derive inyaluable _ benefit
from his ability and experience in
business circles, He will advise
the Club on matters of a commer-
cial nature.

The unsolved problem of fin-
ance still faces the Club. Up to the
present, the receipts from sub-
scriptions, donations and the danct
amounted to $4,830 of which
$4,800 was used to open the letter
of credit in London. There is now
needed to meet expenses in build-
ing the hangar, insurance and
other incidental items required to
put the aircraft in the air, ap-
proximately $3,000.

To meet this expense members
feel that the membership should
be substantially increased and
hope to find many more public-
spirited persons who are willing
to follow the excellent example
set by Mr. berts.

The Barbados Light Aeroplane
Club provides young men and
women with a flair for flying, an
opportunity to indulge in a healthy
form of recreation and at the same
time improve their knowledge.
Then they are thase who may
wish to make flying a profession.
To them the ery is afford-
ed to stud e elementary prin-
ciples of Aviation at a compara-
tively low cost, and in times of
emergency there are many uses to
which an aeroplane can be put.

“The Committee of Management
appeals to all those who can to
assist in any way they think fit,

on your back

get a nap

Through a pain in the back,
Use FIERY JACK,

It'll never come back.”

On Sale at all leading Chemists

— Frank 8. Armstrong

lid., Agents





cal power in this cipprery: w
rich, pa. blood and Iiterally nee

Sports Window

HARRISON COLLEGE who
defeated Everton two-nil on
Friday afternoon at their
school grounds will be meet-
ing Notre Dame at Kensing-
ton Oval to-morrow after-
noon in a First Division
football match. This game
should be Sonpresng.
Other First ivision
matches for the week are
Tuesday, March 4—Everton
vs. Carlton. \
Referee L. F_ Harris,
Linesmen O. Robinson
and W. Hoyos.
Friday, March 7 — Spartan
vs. Harrison College.
Referee G. Amory, Lines-
men D. Archer and A.
Parris.
Division Two
Tuesday, March 4.
vs. Notre Dame
Referee D. Archer
Wednesday, March 5. Spar-
tan ys. Carlton
Referee O. Graham.
Friday, March 7. Empire ys
Everto’

m
Referee K. Walcott.
Division Three
Tuesday, March 4. College
vs. Pickwick Rovers at
College.
Referee L. King
e vs. Foundation Old



Empire

L
Boys at Lodge.
eferee H. King.
Regiment vs, Everton at
rison.

eferee D. Wilson.
Wanderers vs. Y.M.C.A. at

the Bay.
Reterce F. Edwards
Wednesday, March 6.
Foundation vs, Carlton
* at Foundation.
Referee H. King.
Combermere Old Boys vs.
Rangers at Combermere.
Referee O. Robinson.
Cable & Wireless vs. Com-
bermere at Boarded
Hall.
Referee R. Parris.
Notre Dame vs. Police at
the Bay.
Referee C. Roachford.
Friday, March 7. Lodge vs.
College at Lodge.
Referee A, omas.
Regiment vs. Foundation
Old Boys at Garrison
Referee R,. Hutchinson.





Racing Resu

SUNDAY

Results Of 2/-
Field Sweep



ADVOCATE



Chats on Swimming:

The Crawl:

Leg Movement
Bly IAN GALE

let



As usual,













PAGE FIVE



| MAR, 2 NO. 213 Nice to be

| The Topic
| of in his shoes |

| Last W

eek




















ig start on land |
Lie on you omach on a bed or
Prise FEE BAGS Amount |& padded stool, gripping with your
Pirst 1785 $is459|hands to prevent over balancing. |
Second pve = 8 The legs simply flail up and
a, | 26.37 |} GOWN, passing and repassing each
Fitth 1188 meiother, the knees being kept
th 1762 no! leh } ~ 9 “> Pac .
"55.00 each to holders of Tickets > ny yy a - ee
1784, 1786. 0077, Q078, 1723, 1785, | mm Grape é oe
1019. and then rises again, as its fellow
SECOND RACE descends
Rie oe After you have become more}
Shcond Tes }.| proficient, the details of the move- |
Third 84 ment may be adjusted. First the
Fourth . feet t be turned inward, so
ak too} that wk the toes tend to brush
Seventh 10 agaimst each other, the heels are |
Bighth 10 everal inches apart. Also, the feet) 35... Goss:
oe 10 must be kept pointed all the time, | joo nails Notre tf
Eleventh is if you were walking on tiptoe. | Those chaps that eat ched Bread
Twelfth 10 \ slight suppleness of the, Knees | Sandwiched with Goc 's hant
Thirteenth 10 . a ’ radually f- iy :
Fourteenth 2326 106 ee may. be gi ih. a3 |W fe ON eS ee ee
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets N ‘ Np oth ow aie '
1791, 1798, 2408, 2410, 0488, 0490, 1 j bast year we praised the “bay bx
1729. | ae icked it into fame
THIR ce
Prize Heat Amon.) - boys don't be offended
First 6: 3} | We t
Second 1454 269 ‘ We x é t tit
Third og 131 | We ed
Fourth 1582 6
Fifth 214 ul | rr t
Sixth 3395 10 | Te
Seventh 2877 War} ) We jaht dow tt ‘ \
Eighth 0256 10.00 | tA ost left t « b frig?
Ninth 15% 10.06 |
$6.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos. | | 7 pour tall mt Sparta
2679, 2681, 1453, 1455, 0118, 0120, 158! Claimed a tiants bold
1583 You're lowered to-day by thre pe
FOUR ce For Empire scored the goal
Prize oa Amoun! } °
First 0056 $470. i The dressed-up rouge-up damse
Second 3268 268 | Were disappointed; ves
Third 3202 is44 To blame the full-back Bowe
Fourth 0702 Gr.2 Fo jng ha me
Fifth 2464 10.00 |
Sixth 2633 10.06 1 The tried ¢ blame the referec
Seventh 2446 10.00 be ‘ Bt nid thes tallad to sae
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets No It is important to preserve & Pint itue vet aaron nee
0035, 0057, 3267, 3269, 3201, 3203, O70: | Strong sense of rhythm, so that the! poh) love Robie
0703 ae aes thrash is even and of unvaried .
F E speed 1A winger played a sal
A ; | a
Erise Thess jae72| Now, into the water. But do| Corer UE ik’ don tbaniaet
Second 0351 28.1 {not forget to take a surf board or}. sy fans loee one. all
ae Ho ON some other float to hold on to.
Fitth oats too {ASsume a horizontal position anc} Another centre forward
Sixth 1509 10.00 |Start to kick. Let the legs thrash | Befor
Seventn eck a’ asia i uhies 40.00 smeothly up and down, no more | We. eee iM
: each to holgers 0: gkets Nos-\than the heels breaking the gur-|° +
1 3, 0350, 0352, 1827, 1829, 209% aking 8 | F
2002: = ™ i =F face, As before, feet pointed and ‘hovie danced “mabe jamba Leek for this green lobe!
aIEEy RACE turned inward, ankles and knees eo through the. pecond ball Your Guarantee of
Prize icket Amount i 4 Ar . . i au erted look Spartan noodles
First 0400 $449.43 sue at bas but a ny supple And kill herself with laugh satiefoction
Second 0591 igo (ater on. Now, with the wate) :
Third sat 192.61 | resistance you will find that kick | A preacher with a blue flag
a Bd a ing is a far different matter from | And wiih 4 sig voice :
t 00 “, ny} cri play up '’EBmpire play up
Sixth 2510 tooo the land practice. The legs will | rn Py ejoiee
Seventh 0836 10.00 Ot only keep the body in a hari- ° ;
Eighth 0818 10.00 zent4l, positign but will also push | ‘rnen giants turned to weaklings
Ninth 0837 100] you slowly along. Put plenty of | And this Lou wisely said
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos Vigour into the kick th ha} Robert these young footballers
0399, 0401. 0590, 0592, 0536, 0538, 1207,)¥/gour into the Kick, so that tha) Mi Ve i rtched Bread ‘ >
1209 wares swirls strongly about your |!*°ket,!) & Bs Enriched Brand JOVYANCE
SEVENTH RACE ect. Well Friday in the College
First “—— eect At first you will find this ex- ! Schoo! boys and oid men pny
> . ‘cis very tir i4 |} The College toyed with Everton | i aa
Second ts... 2e7..u }ereise yery tiring. But keep it} The py ad | loyance' is probably the most
Third 1hr9 143.69 (up, and make it a rule in futurg| 4°4 "ad things their own way Joya p y
Fourth 0757 71.34/to do five minutes of kicking] another Herman Griffith | famous children's sandal in the world
sixth teas iD ct every time you go to the sea be<]} Appears now in this land } .
Seventh 0922 10.00 | fore actually doing any swimming. Gee mip = ar Lg sacea } today. It is sim and sturdily made from
Eighth 07 10.00 | After a while you will be able nen he grows up 4 an
y ) ij | strong, supple leather 1 thick plantation crepe-
nae, 1194 0 « to discard the float, and breathe! syyiii is » rising goalie | 8 PP ’ P P P
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets No» | by giving a strong downward pull] Joe satd; tm this decade | rubber. Its design a hape was the result of a
0249, 0251, 1872, 1874, 1378, 1980, 0750, | With the arm on the side on which | You'll see him next few seasons | a , :
0758; oe you have chosen to breathe, turn~ | Put Cover th the shade scientific survey of hundreds of children’s feet. It's a
. BIGUTH RACE ing the head at the same time. | young boys will eat Enriched Bread aaa
‘rize Ticket Amount : iy pt : f lovely sandal.
First 0904 $480 27 These are the common faults in| To be bright football stars
Second 0045, 274 44|the leg movement, First; frequent. | The old Mi ge a plying .
need 4 wrt tiy the legs are too much bent at} 4"? swoy 2
é
ritth 3222 7 1009 |}the knees and at the ankles. In sponsored by |
Sixth 1306 iond}such a case tihe thigh, pulled up
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos.|/under the body, or the calf of the R BAKERIES |
; o Pi | :
Sp Se eo. Se: 0179, 0181, 149, leg as it is bent back, and the J&
- NINTH RACE reais feet furnish retarding sur~ makers of |
Prize ket Amount | faces. $ Rey D A L $
Fm ci 1227 = '8) Second; Often the feet ave lift- ENRICHED BREAD A
Secon . - . 7
Third 2 142 53 }e Out of the water with consid~-
Fourth 2812 71.26 | erable splash, They should come and the blenders of |
Fifth 0059 1000} just to the surface of the water, STREET a T. ENGLANI
$5.00 each to holders of Tickets Nos, rf ti tside tk ater J & R RUM MADE BY C, & J. CLARK LIMIT 9, 5 1 ®
1226, 1298, 2889, 2801. 2862, 2004, gait, |10" foot motion outside the water
2813. ‘ee ae , ‘lis completely wasted as far ag the |} ¥ LOCAL AGENTS: A\!

lis From Page 4

CASTLE GRANT STAKES—Class D and Lower—$900,

($300, $150, $50)—714 Furlongs.

8th Race:

1. USHER 111 lbs
2. MARY ANN ...... 127 Ibs.
3. CROSS BOW ...... 130 Ibs.
TIME: 1.35}.

FORECAST: $8.04.

Mr. M. E. R, Bourne.
Jockey Quested
Mr, F. E. C. Bethell.

Jockey Yvonet
Mr. C. Barnard.

ALSO RAN: Colleton (115 lbs., Crossley); Oatcake (130 Ibs., O’Neil)

Apollo (115 lbs., Fletcher).
START: Good.

FINISH: Close, % length, 1 length.

WINNER: b.g. Dunusk-Maid of Honour.

TRAINER: Owner.

9th Race: DALKEITH STAKES—Classes A & B Only—$1,100,
($365, $185, $60)—515 Furlongs,

1. YASMEEN ........ 118 lbs.

2. HARROWEEN ...'. 183 lbs.
3. PEPPER WINE .... 120 lbs.
TIME: 1.06. PARI-MUTUEL:

FORECAST: $14.76.

ALSO RAN: Belle Surprise (102 1
Wilder).
START: Good.
WINNER: b.f. Watling Street-Yasn

TRAINER: Owner.



t

American Doctor’s Discovery
Strengthens Blood, Nerves,
Body, Memory, Brain, Mus-
cles, and Endurance—Better
Than Gland Operations.

Thanks to the discovery of an Americo
Dortor, it is now possibl if those why
{eel prematurely old, un-down an:
Worn-ovt, to experience again the thrill o!
Youthful Vigour, Ambition, and Vitality
This great discovery, which is a simple
home treatment and can be used secret!
by anyone, quickiv brings « sutplus of vi-

Sass

of Mle.

No longer is it necessary for you to suffer
from Loss of Vigour and Man . Wea
Memory and Body, Nervottsness, ite
| Blood, Bickly Skin, Depression: ant ir
Sleep, Instead you spares Cane this simple

home treatment # few days a: ‘ou will
find that your vigour, is t-
ter what ise age, you

gland activity and nerve force is incre:
snd restored. You will find youth i-
hieh as,
ir

body tingle with new energy ahd
This simple home trestasent is io pleasant

an

rasy-ta-take tablet in id fer bere
it is Tar bet!

ho have used It sa:
than any other me
Works in 24 Hours

This new medical discovery, knoWn as
Vi-Tebs, has been tested usands io
America and has ach results that
seem almost miraculous has ton:
obstinate cases that had id alt other
treatment, It has rescued tl ang trom
premature old age and debility It has
made older mn as $334 new. It has
brought happiness be. prite totheu-
sands who believed that y Were Old.

worn-out, and finished with the joys of
life And the beauty of this re-
markable distovery ts that

is brings results so
quickly
you can

1a 24 hours

Se and feel

@ tremendous im-
4 provement and within
one week it will literal-

Vi-Tabs

Doctors Praise

@ Doctors in America and |
in wieny other countries






tality and an ability to enjoy the pleasures |

festored. No mal

Taecse ta tomate |

fal physi- |
Rul

Mr. K. D, Edwards.

Jockey Newman
Mr. D. V. Scott. Jockey Joseph.
Hon. J. D, Chandler.

Jockey Crossley.

Win: $2.18. Place: $1.64, $2.34.

bs., Lutchman); Demure (123 lbs.,

FINISH: Easy, 3 lengths, % length.

a,

_ Glands Made Adive and Youthful
Vigour Restored in 24 Hours

} too gay that the Vi-Tebs
formula is marvelous
for those who are old
belore their time, Run-
$74. AL Brat
‘or instance, Dr T A
Bilis, of

“Not on!

rently wrote
does this formula en
| tich the blood supply of
ikewise activates the
inne System This is
ed by renewed en-
efgy and ambition. par-
tieulatly gratifyi: t




'
t
wrote. “Tired-

ies sorely need
cueet,2 uence
works ils splendia
is neives and

ite, rings greater
nhetvous, rn-down

upken
@ ¢stablished system
tis formula, “hich
is upon the bicod,
improves
strength to Weak,
people”

Guaranteed To Work

Vi-Tebs are not an S=periment This
tiple home treatment, which can be used
with absolute secrecy. is the prescription
f ap American doctor It is amazingly
Oe end ts giving new youth, vital-
ity, and energy to millions in America Be-
cause of its remarkable sucetrs, Vi-Teos
are Dow distributed by chemists here un-
der & guarantee of complete satisfaction
For this reason you sho net experiment
with Questionable drugs which may be
drastic and pilav AY the delicate gland
and nervous system. Vi-Tebs not only have
proved their sterling worth by hely
millions of sufferers, but are guaranteed !n
your own particular case Put Vi-T,
the test. See for yourself how much
er, stronger, NG more vigourous y
feel with this doctor's prescriptior
Tebs must bring y
rey. atid vitality,
Lory of You sim
age an

vi-
ou @ new feeling of #1
and be entirely satistar
y return the empty pack
it costs nothing under the guar-
You are the sole judge of your own

A_®




d lasts
eight deys. As the guarantee fully protects
you, you should grt your treatment imme-
diately s0 that you foo wll know wh.

Vi-Tabs .2):':

years younger
Restores Manhood



is
7

and full of vigour
and vitality

and Vitality

swimming process is concerned,
and naturally makes the other
foot go deeper and therefore re-
ist more water, in order to have
hody balance,

And lastly, too wide a kick re-
tards the forward movement of the
hody. To make sure that you are
not kicking too wide, make it a
practice at first to let your big
toes brush lightly as they pass
each other,

Jockey Holder. |
PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $1.78. Place: $1.40, $1.94. |

°

COMMONWEALTH
MEETS MERLYN

| .The Commonwealth Sports
{Club will juay a friendly fix-
‘ture against Merlyn to-day
jat Merlyn grounds, St. James.
The truck will
|Road at 12 noon and players are
asked to be on time,
start at 1 p.m. punetually.
The teams are as follows: —
Commonwealth Sports Club
Graham

{

5, E. W. Barrow,
M.C.P., J . Tudor, Jnr.,
Brereton, B, K. Bowen, J, Lorde,
|E. Eleock, C. Perkins, C. Clarke.
St. C. Blackman, C, Sandiford
| D. Agard, (12th man).

} io L, Best (capt.),
Byer, H, Cumberbatch, V.
L, Reid, T. Taitt, A, Richards, E
Greaves, L.
A. Walcott,

J

Flying Ducks !

Blue Birds

All Wall

POOLE

A

0

Bolton Laae

Phone 3909

and









leave Tweedside |

Play will}

J."
E.'

Todd, |

Hope, G. Bridgeman

Seagulls !

Select Your Favourite Set Early

Louis L.




' Getting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

f up night



ourning sensa |
Whitish discharge, |
wh \t base of spine, g«
, Dervousne
of manly vi
vdinoase oF the
Gland Ca most
in men)
n a4

aul



and w

our are

‘rostate

important sex gland

Co Overcome these troubles

hours and quickly restore
sour and healtt
lentific disedvery

o matter how tong

« Rogeng guare

h Clnvigorate

Hand and make

20 r unger oft

flog Hemist

and

| ane,



tuke the new

ealled Rogena.
mu have suf
nteed to
your Vros
you feel 10 to
oney back. Get
The

|
|
|




@ Baby revels inthe
saet ie echt of
Soap It comb;
emollient ang medicioa
which kee:

| Meader akin healthy end )
free from blemishes, ex-
quisitely softand velvety.




4 before you bath -
before you dress -

ANDREWS

tor Inner Cleanliness!







! Do you wake up in the morning
feeling fitand cheerful, or are you
dull and irritable? It all depend
on Inner Cleanliness !

A morning glass of sparkling
Andrews ensures this /imer Clean
by
and tongue, settling the stomach, |
toning up the and
clearing away food wastes

in

POTTERY

Plaques liness freshening the mouth

liver zently
A teaspoonful in a glass of water
makes a grand “ refresher ”, too.

DO YOU KNOW that your digestrve juices are extremely
| acid and may be over-stimulated by highly seasoned food ?
i Unless your diet contains sufficient alkali to neutralise this

;

i) excess acid you then develop heartburn and indigestion, At
T }| such times the antacid qualities of Andrews are invaluable
if Sparkling Andrews corrects digestive disorders and ensures
B Hi Inner Cleanliness
ayl i
yley |
f 4
i
Aquatic Club Gift Shop
—- Phone 4897
\
Y}
ny
(
_





SS

(
\




ee

SEWING

By PENNY NOLAN

New Slips From Old
This year’s full skirted styles
ill for still full petticoats and
slips. These, of course, you can
make from scratch but consider-
able saving can be effected by re-
naking some of your old straight
ingerie

If you have a slim slip which
is still good you can quickly make
it into a full flounced skirt by add-
ing gathered tiers of some stiff
fabric. If your slip is nylon the
ideal material is matching nylon
net if it is available. However,
any crisp lightweight cloth will do.

You will need two strips about
hree yards long and twelve to fif-
een inches wide, These, of course,



maybe pieced ag necessary. The
width of the material will govern
the quantity required. Remove
ce or trim from bottom of slip
nd roll hem

Measure the width of your slip
| eight inches up from the hemline
| and gather one strip to fit this
|measure, Sew this flounce on to
| the using narrow satin ribbon to
| cover the gathered raw edges.

Next measure width of slip ten



inches above first flounce and
gather second flounce to fit this
measure. Finish gathered edge

| with satin ribbon like the first.
Coshmere Bouquet’s gentle A slim taffeta slip can be trans-
taihet hasbeen proved out- ‘ formed into a bell silhouette of
standingly mild for oll types CG : | three gathered ters with a yard
, i 1 : | of inexpensive taffeta and about
} of skin! fout and a half yards of cording.
|A black, navy or dark coloured
taffeta slip can be made very at-
| tractive by using a plaid taffeta

for the bottom and top tiers.

Cut the slip at the hipline being
Wr) Tae iey ele careful to make an even cut, It
ok is best to chalk this line on the
slip when you have it on, as bias
slips hang so differently on the
body. Use a yard stick measuring
from the floor up as for a hem,
The material cut off from the bot-

a 7"

Adarns yoy





eae ea A At











5 tom of the slip will make the
jmiddle tier, Cut it in strips eight
| or nine inches deep.

The yard of new taffeta will
e a7 a make the top and bottom tier.

| What’s Cooking

This week I am going to give
you recipes on how to make cus-
| tards.
Custard For Filling
| Sugar, 3 tablespoonsful.
| Egg Yolks, 3.
| Flour, 3 tablespoonsful,
| Lemon rind or vanilla essence.
Butter, 1 teaspoonful,
| Milk, 1 pint.

Put the egg yolk anl the —
in a saucepan, mix with a wooden
spoon then add the flour (the flour

| should be the best cake flour) and

EAU-DE-COLOGNE
Cool, Fragrant, Refreshing

the lemon rind or 4 teaspoonful
of vanilla essence. Put the milk
in another saucepan and put it
| on the fire, when it is almost boil-
| ing, pour it over the eggs, sugar
iand flour a little at a_ time,
mix it slowly with an egg
beater or a whip. When you have
| poured all the milk, put the sauce-
{pan on the fire and stir all the
{time until the custard is thick,
{When the custard starts to boil
‘let it boil for about 3 or 4 minutes
so that you won't taste the flour
when it is finished. Pour it in a
pyrex bowl or any other kind of
}bowl and add the teaspoonful of
butter. Stir it from time to time
so that it will not have a skin qn
the top, This custard is too thick
for anything but filling.

| 1. If you want a custard allo
COLD CREAM Zabaione, make the same custard
HAIR CREAM as above and when you pour it

-BROADCLOTH FA -
\

uy 4
e / ; 7

A N\

-By BOURJOIS

FACE PUWDL» ~§ LIOUGE PEX FUME LIPSTICK
TALC * VANISHING CREAM - SOAP * BRILLIANTINE



by

\






EASY TO SEW

{ AT SUCH LOW COST, TOO!
iio X



Watch the excitit.g stripes and
comfortable. cool wear of ‘’Tex-made"’
Raleigh Print Broadcloth please the men
and boys in your family' You’l) like the
easy sewing and washing Raleigh is

_ amooth in texture and unusually durable
* |». ideal for shirts. and blouses. in
addition to pyjamas. The low cost will surprise you!

{Try Broadcloth by ‘“Tex-made” today Women everywhere are buying it. Be
gure to ask for the identification bands and tag—your assurance of genuine
tub-fast “’Tex-made”’ Broadcloth.

¢

oe
»

FABRIC

DOMINION TEXTILE CO. LIMITED
. MONTREAL ~ CANADA






‘*TEX-MADE”’
iS WELL MADE

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



IRCLE Whe ‘Taming’

Make the top tier about eight
inches deep and the bottom tier
about nine inches deep, To achieve
graduated fullness each strip must
be cut fifteen inches longer than
the preceding one.

Gather the tiers and join them
together inserting cording in each
tier to make it stand out. Then
join the tiers to the slip top using
cording here also. Hem the bot-
tom tier.

If the top of the slip is worn
you may cut it off at the waist
and add an elastic band to make
it into a full petticoat.

An old cotton night gown with
a straight skirt can be made into
a crinolined petticoat. Cut the
skirt part of the night gown into
four gores. Make the top of each
‘gore one fourth of your waist
measure plus seam allowances.
Make the bottom of each gore two
and one half times the width of
the top of the gore. Cut four
crinoline bands eight inches deep
to the shape of the bottom of the
gores allowing one fourth inch for
seams. In shaping the crinoline
gores allow for a hem on the petti-
coat gores to be turned under and
hemmed to the underside of the
crinoline, This hem will cover the
raw lower edge of the crinoline
Join the crinoline gore seams flat
and cover the joins with bias tape.

You will need a six inch deep

ruffle edge with two and a. half
inch eyelet trim to sew under the
crinoline to prevent scratching
You may be able to piece this
ruffle out of the left overs of the
gown or you may have to buy new
material.
' Stitch the top edges of the
crinoline and ruffle to the under
side of the slip with the crinolin®
in the middle. Use bias tape to
cover the raw edges. Hem the
_— of the slip over the crino-
ne,

Always look twice before you

discard a garment because the
styles have changed. If the mate-
rial is still good with a little

imagination you may be able to
make something very attractive
and useful from it.

In The Kitchen

out into the pyrex bowl add 1
liquer glass of sweet vermouth or
rum, '

2. If you want a chocolate cus-
tard filling, melt two tablespoons-
ful of grated chocolate( not milk
chocolate) thus: Put the chocolate
in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon-
ful of water or milk, keep the
saucepan near the fire until the
chocolate is melted. When you
have made q_custard as above be-
fore taking the saucepan off the
fire add the melted chocolate, stir
it in the custard and pour into a
pyrex bowl. Put always the
vanilla essence and NOT the
lemon rind when you want a cho-
colate custard.

. English Custard

Ege yolks, 5.

; as Sugar 5 tablespoons-
ul.

Milk, 1 pint.

Orange or Lemon rind or vanilla
essence, (You can put 1 oz. of
cornflour; and 4 glass of cream
that you can add with the other
milk instead of 4 glass of milk.)

This custard is without any

flour and is especially good for
children, as it is very light and
nourishing,
_ Put the egg yolks and the sugar
in saucepan and mix with a
wooden spoon until they are light
anifrothy. Put the milk in an-
other saucepan and put it on the
fire. When the milk is almost
boiling, pour it a little at a time
on the eggs and sugar and work
the mixture with the spoon, Put
the saucepan with the custard on
the fire and stir it all the time. Be
very careful that it does not boil,
when you see that it has started to
thicken, take the saucepan off the
fire, add the vanilla essence or the
lemon rind and let it cool. If you
want to add the cream you have
to add it when you take the sauce-
pan off the fire. In that case you
put } glass of milk less at first and
then add the } glass of cream.

I find it better to add 1 oz
(about 1 level desertspoonful) of
cornflour to the eggs and the sugar
will not fail.



a’

PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel

Of The
Jungle Girl

WHO WED AT 13

ual
By ROBERT GLENTON
BERGEN-OP-ZOOM (Holland).

THE little Mother Superior with
the apple-wrimkled face put a
finger to her lips and opened a
door on the first floor of the con-
vent of St. Francis in the Dutch
market town of Bergen-Op-Zoom.

There in the front row of a class
of 40 girls a child was sewing a
seam in her father’s pyjama
jacket.

She looked about ten. Yet little
more than a year ago the world’s
headlines were calling her a jungle
bride and pictures of her, sultry
in a sarong, with hair about her

shoulders, were in every news-
paper.

You remember her? Bertha
Maria Hertogh was married

when she was thirteen to a twenty—
three-year-old Malay school
teacher. She had been handed
over as a child to the care of a
Malay nurse, Che Aminah, in 1942
when her Dutch parents were
fleeing from the Japanese.

She was baptised a Cxtholic,
but was brought up in a jungle
village as a Moslem. Seventeen
people died in the Singapore riots
when the court decided she should
return to her parents in Holland.

How Could She Settle?

Bertha came back to her
parents’ council house in Bergen-
op-Zoom and psychiatrists shook
their heads, A girl with such 4
background would find it impos-
sible to settle in peaceful, quietly
civilised Holland.

One who offered six to four
against successful rehabilitation
of Bertha Hertogh was Mayo Win-
gate, the psychologist who, writ-
ing in the Sunday Express,
pointed out his hospitality of a girl
—torn from the arms of her foster
mother—to the parents she had
not seen for ten years .. . lan-
guage troubles ... the fact that
she was a married woman who
had once more to become a little
girl.

This is a progress report on
the way Mrs. Adeline Hertogh
faced her problem daughter.

I talked to Mrs. Hertogh in the
kitchen of her home. “There are
no more worries about Bertha”,
she said. ‘She’s a good girl and
we are all happy together. But I
will say that it has been very
hard work.”

Ignored Her Father

When Bertha arrived at Bergen
she would speak to no one but
her mother.

She glared at her brothers and
sisters. She ignored her father.

She complained about the food,
potatoes, meat, bread, sausages,
and cheese her family live on, de-
manding rice with every meal.
Mrs. Hertogh gave in,

Then Bertha started talking to
her slyly behind her hand, and
always in Malay, which Mrs. Her-
togh understands. But she never
disclosed her innermost thoughts.

There were many questions,
particularly about her “marriage”,
to which Mr. and Mrs. Hertogh

wanted an answer.

One day the answers came—
like this,

3ertha sleeps in the same bed
as her sisters, Wiesje, aged 17,
and Corry, 16.

And at night she would tell
them about life in Malaya: “IL
never really lived the life of a
married woman,” she said. “I

just got married and then was
taken back to Aminah’s house.”

So began Bertha’s rehabilita-
tion,

Last March on her birthday her
parents gave her a piece of pat-
terned fabric and some skeins of
gay embroidery silk.

Bertha was so happy. She
clutched the silks, and kissed her
mother. But still she ignored her
father,

One month later Police Chief
Van T. Hof was in the house

F @ on page?







By Dorothy Barkley

LONDON.

Fashion’s latest epidemic, which
broke out this week at the collec-
tion of a leading designer, and is
rapidly infecting everyone, is the
tartan evening jacket,

Its style is perfectly simple: it
has upstanding collar, long sleeves,
collar and cuffs trimmed with
black braid, and it buttons down
as far as the miniature basque. It
was most effective in “Black
Watch” tartan taffeta, (note for
Sassenachs: a black and green
plaid), worn over a white evening
gown, cuffed round the decollet-
age with matching tartan. The
dress skirt fell in four tiers, each
edged with a crinkling of white
lace.

This type of jacket is useful on
a hundred and one occasions.
Wear it by day over a beach dress,
at night over an evening dress.
Tartan is just one suggestion for
material. In gossamer fine silk
surahs or shantungs, it is ideal for
warm climates, In wool ‘or quilt-
ed satin, it is perfect for cold
climates. Another version of the
evening jacket in coffee coloured
satin, embedded with sequins,
was worn with an evening dress
in coffee ne. over dusky pink
taffeta. This little evening jacket
is a welcome change from the
stole which has been the univer-
sal evening wrap in the past few
years,

A second fashionable top is this
season’s version of the cocktail
blouse, for wear with suit or skirt.
It has low shoulder line, plung-
ing neck and three-quarter length
sleeves. With a grey or black
suit the fashionable colour ta
choose is dusky pink, and the ma-
terial is shantung. The blouse is
draped and fastens unusually on
the side seam with a row of
penny-size buttons.

Reflecting the current vogue for
fullness, skirts in this collection
by. Cavanagh, (who formerly
worked with Molyneux), were
gathered, crinolined or pleated.
Pleats were everywhere — half-
inch box pleats on skirts, on dress
bodices to match skirts, and in
groups placed at four-inch inter-
vals round the skirt. Yellow, grey
and navy, trimmed with white,
were the colours featured in the
collection. Illustrated is a typical
dress in lemon yellow shantung:
it has unusual neck with roll col-
lar dipping down to a V-line
pleated yoke to match the pleated
skirt, which billows out over a
stiffened petticoat.

Colourful prints dominated the

@ On Page 15








oe

LEFT: Cocktail blouse in dusky
shoulder line.

with black braid trimming on



| tightness and pain behind the eyes. They
| bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy,
congested feelings, at the same time soothing
the nerves and counteracting depression.
The aches and pains of ’Flu disappear in
no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly
and safely. They neither harm the heart
| nor upset the stomach. Keep a supply of
PHENSIC tablets by you always.

BRING QUICK

Phensic *=

FOR ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS,
LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA




ve ‘
that
eUMAT! ty
gion inputs





TWO TABLETS





4



MARCH 2, 1952



collar and cuffs,

BELOW: Lemon yellow shantung
dress with pleating on yoke to
match pleating on crinoline
skirt.

shantung, with low

Tartan evening jacket





Mile. Bettina, beautiful
Paris model and cover giri,

loves Lip Line .. . it makes
chonging from one refill
edlour to another so simple
«++ 80 quick... so clean



Gala's fashion-right colours are the newest rave among models

in the great Paris and London dress houses ... for Gala colours

are perfectly keyed to the latest dress shades .. . and Lip Line
allows lip colours to be changed quickly and cleanly, as each re-

fill, contained in its own metal shell, is inter-





LIP LINE
changeable in the same case.

NAIL ¢ COLOUR

And there’s a glistening Nail Colour to
match every Lip Colour

GALA OF LONDON ,

Sole Agent and Distributor : ff

F.S. NICHOLLS, P.O, BOX 263 Alsoobsainable fromall the leading Scores
SUNDAY, MARCH, 2, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATI

“Wasp-Waisted Country Clothes” = Man About Town

PAGE SEVEN...



























. eile | All the rich atmosphere of the! even tell you of the specic ;
a , ‘ a ’ | ‘Tro: o ‘ jal prob-
(By MURIEL SNOW) QUEEN WASHES UP Tropics under one — roof—that’s| lem classes to smooth ae ain: ance
LONDON. teat you'll find at the Dominica) â„¢@kKiag wrinkles. Why not phone?
As alway e new suits fror oe aft Co. and Fruit Market,| The selective stock and fine
Lact ‘ nevitably herald the Newly redesigned and opened—| Quality of it—when you sense thi:
Spri n London and Spring it | the gay colourings of Raffia work jyou know you're in C. B Rice &
he Fast world like New carpets, Baskets, Bags, Calabash | Co.’s Showroom of Men’s wear on!
Year’s Eve — full of promise, of | Rattles, Pandanus Plants and | Bolton Lane ‘known through-: |
anti tion of the unknown, of Palms—and the fascination of OUt the Caribbean and beyond
th futume % h d a | the luscious fruits invite you to | Beautiful Sportswear is shown in
The promise is fulfilled first in jeome in and enjoy them all! And|the new Consulate ‘FREANEZE’ |
the r Edwardian “Masher" line Dri ember the cool fresh Fruit | Shirts in pastels, as well as in the
bu g wit nall rev- pOrinks of Lime Squash, Grape-| original superfine ‘Jacket/Shirts
gene trie. thas hie te | *rult.and: Orange in surroundings ;Fine Neckwear is featured in Wor- |
ine tapering from shoulder of Tropical enchantment. \Wool/Raven with clastic tea” of
n Secondly r . -e50 bs ) ‘ j
t anita of Border | B ‘s’ Khaki Shirts, ideal for °
oo West a a pe and of excellent quality; Another new product from this
j 1) with th seandianidl h Stand lots of wear and tear— |rapidly expanding firm of distri- |
pped-in wv drop} .dded on eat R. H. Edwards Ltd. on butors, K, J. Hamel-Smith Ltd
emia the ae . : ear Street. Value ig tops at| It’s the McCaul Bicycle newly ar-
guider h orter, slightly $3.48. A. new shipment of Khaki | rived on the island together with |
cull > Stockings, fast colours from |the MeCaul Stoves (collapsible and
¢ A d M $1.08 as well as Men's Khaki ideal for limited space—full parts
. Shirts with semi-stiff collars also S¢TVice_available). The bike is a
e d : re of h c |proyide exeellent value. You'll Man's Tourer Model with inflator.
fs r flapped jlike the brightly patterned Men’s | tool kit, oiler and combination |
i /Atlas Sports Shirts and when Spanner in leather bag—all inclu- |
T! he few design- }you’re in, ask to see the range ®ve in the attractive price. Phone
ers Vv a country of Socks from 51 cts. up. Phone | 4748
ot tight that it would prove i Here ¥. : WITH CASHMERE BOUQUET FACE P
not s¢ it would prove “ ere you are for everything in
to be a Cé in’ the first ee Glassware—Cocktail, Dinner and, i OWDER
or a field. Equally me of S > many have found this to be |Champagne and Iced Drinks glass- * Soft textured
resses a such a pleasant drug store with |€5. too, with colourful designs in | * Del | f
ence of distinction for the country. | quick, efficient service. It’s P, A,| Sets of six or individually, They're | icately perfumed
Witness the one of navy blue; | Clare’s Drug Store just off Broad &t the Central Emporium on Broad *% Coshmere Bouquet Face Powder
ul ely pleated skit : as Street, on Prince Wm. Henry St. So are the new Sweet and | gives a satin smooth finish
hoe neckline outlined with big Street. The stock is refreshingly | Butter Dishes for the refrigerator *® Clings light! ly, t
bone buttons and wide pique col- ;new with lots of Baby Gift Sete | phere’ & Hew Kitchen Sani-Can oe eee
lar or the grey, with seams across as well as gifts for Mother (Dad, |for only $2.74 and very large lasting loveliness

the waist at the back, releasing tu too, “with the very new Krank’s | Glass Containers for flour, sugar, |






a fall of material at the side Brushless Shave Kreemer). Of |e. The values are excellent and | FACE POWDER BY

: T Ata sii taimamal ane 14 | course, there’s a full range of the |5° '5 the variety }

aoe aod * eee “ mn e = very best proprietary drugs and) 7) he - - |

cately tailored lace over taffeta ——————— TT = la most efficient dispensing dept ney 'Ll coming——like the six |
seen this season in a new in- fe. 2... esas esses OCS Her snare of ime wash-up aiter an outdoor meal she helped to You'l a pe | hite’ horses © ”

‘ siahaaieamaal a : N= cook when she and Princess Margaret visited a Girl Guides’ camp in Britain. This pict | You'll like the Candy Counter— |W '6 horses—excepting they're |

terprelation coat of bate Angart 1944 “a pore iaaaee TS” |p weet serwertul Sean 29,90 cot, Ses

2 é avy - ° . . , a y |

ta with a ae a . Erne ball dresses — the rustling of tremendous collar folding almost skirts. The whispering, many|, You'd like a deep freeze? jgoming to Chelsea Garage in mid- |

é pe ; te aru aS ress Of their great, sweeping skirts still into a shawl. layered grey chiffon dress. Its} Wouldn't we all and I’m going to March. The 1952 Vanguards have |

brighter hue. Tt is an 4 scot en- echo in the ear. : exquisite bolero embroidered in show you how—now. The new many refinements, the chassis is

semble of considerable elegance. Worth focuses attention on the COLOURS: By day dark greys silver with a big plain bow unty- | Sternette ‘JACK’ zero cabinet has rather larger and the door handles

It can be said that throughout
there the indefinable, subtle
colouring —
Further

is

greys yellows, pinks.
no

that while there is
startling change in outline,
the feminine is further stresse«
this year; expressing the unspoNen
need for practical yet supremely
distinguished clothes.



As these last two years there
has been this trend towards the
rounded line, it seems reasonable

to assume that it will continue
but not to extremes as far as
country clothes are concerned

because it would defeat their ob-
ject. As yet the difference be-
tween this year and last year
is not so pronounced as to neces~
sitate wholesale disearding of
wardrobes except among the
dwindling numbers of those who
must follow fashion closely. On
the otKer hand it does make
clothes of two or three years ago
look rather old fashioned. From
this point of view it is likely to
bring a fair number of orders to
the trade. Being more waisted is
likely to appeal very much to the
Latin American market and even
to North America, where hither-
to it was considered that the typi-
cally English country clothes
were too severe although the
tailoring itself was always highly
esteemed. In South America, in
particular, it tends to reconcile
two conflicting inclinations, that
of wanting to appear very Eng-
lish and at the same time satis-
fying the natural Latin desire
for pronounced waistlines.

this point of view it
augurs well for British export
prospects. The present fashion
is not too elaborate to be copied
to meet the capacity of the slend-
er purse; so narrow waists and
rounded hips will not be the
privilege of the rich but in due
course will come into general
wear.

From

Rustle of Spring

Worth heralded spring in Lon-
don in a way that was noticeably
different from Michael of Lac-
hasse. For at Worth, in contrast
with Lachasse’s Edwardian
“Masher” jackets, and wasp-
waisted country clothes, there
were magnificent evening and



When You Feel

WORN OUT
aud “fired

and drag around each
day, unable to work
took to the cause of
your trouble. Chances
are your kidneys are E {
out of order. Healthy; Fas
active kidneys filter
poisonous wastes and
excess acids from
the blood. When they fail, the system
becomes clogged with pom and you
feel thean and miserable. Then is the
time to take Dodd’s Kidney Pills, Within



tight bodices and feminine skirts
for silk dresses but emphasises a
shade, the front fullness—a diffi-
cult line to wear save by the
young and lean. Doubtless be-
cause of this, there is the alterna-
tive line. Svelte from the
draped, low bodices to the
swathed skirt, often two loose
panels springing from a knot at
the bosom, Sleeves are mostly
short and softly full caught into
a narrow band, In the coats
they are ballooning. The dia-
phragm in most of the day and
evening dresses emphasised by
tight, fine draping. Cuffed bod-
ices are much used for designs
with short, rounded boleros,
FABRICS for day are uncrush-
able surahs, shantungs, organzas
and a glazed gauze—all with an
appearance of fragility but in fact
of remarkable suppleness and
quite firm. Most of the silks are
printed in small, geometrical de-
signs.
‘A new coat fabric was introduc-
which has the appearance of
silk tweed. In silver grey it
sed for a loose coat with

ed
stiff





‘used for a Hoe cont with pepium pling over spreatng
The ‘Taming’ Of The Jungle Girl

predominate and a very lovely
Shallow-sea blue is seen in surah.
For evening palest pink and grey
are the two which are to the fore
but the startling Prussian blue,
now called Cerulean blue, was in-
troduced and was quite electrify-
ing in its suddenness.

SPOTLIGHTED: A neat little
eaped, sleeveless coat of the new
stiff, grey fabric, a jutting skirt
and altogether very pert looking.
Fitted shantung coats; one of
brilliant plum colour.

Jet embroidered waist band to a
black suit.

The piece de resistance — a
ravishing black faille demi-
evening dress: swathed bodice
beneath a minute velvet-banded
bolero, the long hip line tight,
then joined to a deep, wide
fiounce; a half overskirt flung
over to one side making an un~
even hem which was emphasised
by a two-inch band of black vel-
vet passementerie. The thick,
light navy blue grosgrain suit, its
little early Victorian jacket with
peplum hipline over spreading

Who Weds At 13

@ from page 6

talking to Mr. Hertogh
Bertha came in.

She flung her arms around her
father, kissed him and ran out of

when

the room.

The astonished man _ could
searcely speak for emotion, and
the portly Van T. Hof smiled and
left the house
Went Into The Sixth Form

Now Bertha was coming back
into the family. She knew no word
of the language, but a nun came
daily to teach her Dutch and the
other subject a child should
know.

Thereafter
Bertha had

everyone thought
better go to school
sixth form with
Her last
“very good”

She went into the
girls of own ge
report shows “good,”
in every subject.





|B

Dream Girl...

Lustre-

way loveliness
Fragrantly clean
Glisténing with sheen
e Soft, easy to manage

Now she has finished general
education and is learning profes-
sional dressmaking. She is skilled
with her fingers.

Bertha still like playing with
ten-year-olds at “mothers and
fathers.” She can be a little tyrant
at times.

She told me; “I love my mother.

I will never go back to the
Malays.”

That she might be kicnapped
and taken back is a thought

always in the minds of the police.
‘Strangers From The Orient’

When Bertha first arrived she
had an escort. Then it was taken
away. Now there is a plain clothes
man,

Police had reports of Oriental
strangers in the town. Men have
been questioned, But that is
seers Bertha knows nothing
about.

Creme Shampoo gives
your hair soft, glamorous three-

Lustre-Creme’s billowy lather
is a blend of secret ingredients

ing beneath the chin to reveal a
halter
pletely covered
silver beads,

THE GRANDE TOILETTE; |
Magnificent satins and failles are
lavishly used for these, reminis-
cent of a more
graceful mode of living. Chiftons,
muslins,
enter the picture.

Delicate embroidery
used to enhance the
the fabrics, '

To particularise
nile
faille with
panel encrusted
pearl embroidery.
heavy grosgrain
reminiscent of the late 18th cen-
tury in its splendour and lavish-
ness,
tight bodice cut out exposing the
bosom of the black dress beneath.
The
its little cuffed tight bodice a mass
of clustered pearl drops—a de-
sign of the utmost delicacy,

a

She is making a good job of
being a typical little Dutch girl.
watched her take off her
white starched apron and set off
from school for home, She wore
green
with the medallion of the Virgin
Mary round her neck.

Over it all she put a thick coat
and off she went, laughing.

midrif
with the

neck, and com-

same | ¢lusive
Son,

leisurely age and

organzas and tulle also
is much

richness of

— the
and parchment
bodice and centre
with gold and
A palest pink
evening coat—

eau de
coloured

The upstanding collar and

full-skirted white satin —

Do



fe



do

jumper tartan skirt,

to



@ capacity

Ltd
There's

sronchitis
and gasp for breath and can't sleep?

tasteles
attacks seem to vanish like magi
i piautee MENIDACO starts work-
ing th

phiegm, promot
and bring sounc

heated

Price?

the larger

4

(top








pes,
r, All you do



é of 3.9 eu, ft. and it’s |"re flush
just perfect for the home—the ex- |
insulation ensures |
complete freedom from moisture. jclass) and the chance to get one
The distributors are S, P. Musson )/S yours by phoning 4949.

— about $400 “* 7 n
‘EMPRESS’ |
model with a whacking great ca-
pacity of 9.6 cu, ft. and if that’s
what you want, well—here it is!

So you don’t know how and you
want to know and you wish you
could—-let me help by telling you
to phone 4927, That's the Singer
Sewing Academy

‘James Lynch & Co. Lid. Building).
Mrs, Mildred Watkins will tell you
how to enroll (nothing to it, real-
ly): detail much of what you'll
jearn—and how you'll learn! and

coughing,- st
ronchifis Curbed in 3

Do you have attacks © y
so bad that you choke | ing

of the

rangling Asthma,

you cough so hard you feel like
you were be ruptured? Do you
‘| weak, unable to work, and have

! eareful not to take cold and
can't eat certain foods?

No matter how long you have suf-
tered or What you have tried, there
is new hope for you In a Doctor's
prescription called MIENDACO, No
no smokes, ho injections, no
is take two
s tablets at meals and your

In

ugh your blood Aiding nature
dissolve and remove strangling

No Asthma in 2 Yeors



e free easy breathing
i sleep the first night
go that you soon feel yeara younger
ar stronger.





tting. Choice of colours |
(no choice of performance, Van-
guard offers only the best in its

Two and one half pounds for
sixty cents—hi! hold on, where are

we and what am I talking about.
Mil tell you, I’m talking about the
mewly marketed Pearl Brand |
Demerara Whole Grain Rice

Packet which is—you've guessed
it, 24% Ibs. and 60c. per pkt. It’s |
at all the Groceries, it's easily
handled, it’s a ‘must’ for every
larder and remember there's NO|
yicking. Distributed by » Geddes |
Grant Ltd, Pearl Brand is a pro- |
duct of the B.G. Rice Marketing |
Board,



, Th. bad fost 40 Ibs., suffered coug
choking and strangling ¢

nt, coulkin't sleep, expected to dic
INDACO stopped Asthma spasm
liret might and he has had none since
In over two years

Money Back Guaranteo

The very first dose of MENDACO
goes right to w rk @eirculating
through your blooe id helping na
ture rid you of the ef sof Ast hom
In no time at all {DACO may
easily make y f yours youngor
and stronger, Try INDACO under
an tron-clad money back gnarantec
You be the judge. If you don't fee
entirely well, like a new person, and
fully satisfied after tas
DACO just retu D
age and the ff » price
be refunded, G MID ACO from
your Chemist today and see how
well you sleep tonight and how much
better you will feel tomorrow, The



Minutes



u



Book now for a rejuvena 2 Tr



with helpful advice on individual skin-care and makerUp—mee

amy





it's an experience you'll enjoy.







KNIGHT'S LIMITED,
33, BROAD STREET.



|
|



MENDACO not only brings almost guarantee
: A“ . ee ae “s
‘Sometimes, I Wonder’ tmmodiate comfort one tom to ward Mendaco:''': v5 .
olf future attacks, For instance, Mr. | Ends Asthma * Bronchitis w Hay Fe

Is she really just like any other ve li ———-— ——we — oactntinsinnnieectsiominiciait jermpen sichiieancdivesiiagjisincinibdaaiaiiaiati a iil.
Dutch girl? “Sometimes I won- '
der,” said her father. “She can be ; fr |
very Oriental if she wishes to.” Lucky Discovery f="

Occasionally her brown eyes i a
darken and all expression van- Har 0 ear ng \
ishes from her face. It is a legacy Thousands of men and worn mo
of the East. who could not hear well and were ‘

almost deaf because of oar c ara rls + “ " A
But Mrs. Hertogh has no such| are now making the tunity fe I | |
"1 ANTEX, Many now say , fp
worries. She grabbed her daugh- entry taar a ¢ lock. th k 80 feet a m 1 y Cc 101 ce ee Die.
ter, swung her round, and said; away, Get SPANDEX ow inst. tt \\
“Just look how much weight she arne eee Xcecner hearing \
has put on.” .
—L.E.S.
e
More beautiful?
e -

Of course! No other nail polish, at any price,
lends such beauty to your nails as CUTEX,
Cutex contains an exclusive new ingredi-
ent, Enamelon, Your nails will retain their
Justre for days. Cutex does not crack,

off or fade. Choose {rom the many mo:
fashion shades,









Try Cuter Lipstick =
jor true lip-appeal.
View, long:
lusting Cutex comesio

smooth,

1 hour Dodd’s start to help the kidneys
drain away these harmful wastes. Soon

: hades that harmonize
vour ‘all-in’ feeling is replaced by clear- oe

with your favorite nail
polish.

plus gentle lanolin. a |




Roy.

-

headed energy and pep. be sure to hf 4
get the genuine Dodd's Kidney Pills—3 - i i sete ae 4 t
for large bottle at all drug stores, 423 | I we he | Br;
|
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‘
PAGE EIGHT

MARCH 2, 1952

a=

| PAPER SERVIETTES

in Pastel Shades
BO0c, per 100.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

SUNDAY,










people. In Jamaica the Weifare-Commis-
the departments — of: education,
agriculture and health work together to
produce better nutrition and better vil-
lages.

These are by no means a list of all the
achievements of welfare in the British
Caribbean from the time that welfare has
been recognised as an agency for assisting
the good life. But enough instances have
been quoted to show that without a wel-
fare department many of the social im-
provements that are visible in the region

1 ana



Sunday, March 2, 1952

—— eee

WELFARE

THIS month Barbados will be the meg¢t-
ing place of Welfare Officers from all parts
of the British Caribbean, when a confer-












EUROPEAN
ARMY

(EUROPEAN |



ence will be held under the chairman-
ship of Mr. Chinn Adviser on Welfare to
the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

Welfare is a subject upon which West
Indians have mixed ideas. Most people
will honestly admit that they know very
little about welfare and are not particu-
larly enthusiastic about finding out. Here
in Barbados, Welfare as a department of
government is in its infancy and Barbados
lags behind other West Indian islands in
appreciating what are the advantages to
be derived from an active and efficient wel-
fare organisation.

The need for welfare is so apparent that
the word remains inscribed in the title of
that Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion, the activities of which are almost
solely responsible for the large strides
which have been taken during the last
decade by the West Indies in social, econo-
mic and political progress.

There was criticism at first that the or-
ganisation was behaving too much like a
fairy godmother doling out largesse and
welfare grants indiscriminately and fail-
ing to stress the fact that true welfare
could only result from economic develop-
ment in which the peoples of the area
themselves played a great part.

If Welfare has suffered because of this
over-priming of the development pump—
and it would be foolish to say that it has
not suffered in Barbados—to-day there is
no less a danger of our forgettirfy that the
whole purpose of development is the pro-
duction of welfare. Emphasis on develop-
ment in recent years although originating
from the laudable intention to persuade
people that material improvement de-
pended primarily on individual efforts has
given rise to a new fallacy that all that
matters is economic development, and that
where there is economic development,
welfare will automatically take care of
itself.

This pre-occupation with development is
itself a sign of failure of the peoples of the
area to understand what welfare is, what
it hopes to achieve and what it has already
achieved in the British Caribbean.

Welfare is essentially the application of
a social science which specialises in the
organisation and assistance of admirable
social principles such as self-help and a
readiness to take responsibility and to
serve others. ,

Welfare teaches that the standard of liv-
ing is not material (as is believed by per-
haps ninety-nine per cent. of the people liv-
ing in the British Caribbean) but is some-
thing in people’s minds. It maintains that
there is no advantage in giving people
money if they have no idea of spending it
on the things that last, such as good homes:
good equipment in field and kitchen: books
and education.

Those who regard welfare as something
opposed to or extraneous to economic de-
velopment display only the shallowness of
their thinking. There is no antagonism be-
tween the two. But since the ultimate aim
of prosperity is a good life for human
beings, Welfare as a social science is de-
signed to give them the concept of a good
life.

Mr. McGillivray, late Colonial Secretary
of Jamaica not long ago told the staff of a
3-F movement—Food for Family Fitness—
that their work was as important a con-
tribution to development as the erection of
factories. This tribute is rooted in the
fundamental economic precept that the
true wealth of a country is its people.
People who eat correctly in proper homes
become more self-reliant, punctual, duti-
ful and co-operative. These are qualities
much sought after in labour forces
throughout the world today and they are
necessary to the healthy and productive
economy of Barbados. Besides the success-
es achieved over 12 years by.Jamaica Wel-
fare Ltd., (now known as the Social Wel-
fare Commission) with a “Better Villages”
campaign, Welfare has helped govern-
ments to think socially in many ways. Its
work in prisons where farms and agricul-
tural schemes have been inaugurated and
with probation is perhaps best known, and
Welfare has begun to persuade authorities
to board out deprived children in carefully
chosen family homes instead of consigning
them expensively and often unhappily to
institutions. In many places it has greatly
improved the administration of Poor Relief
by making it so far as possible a family
eare-work and_ rehabilitation service
‘rather than a mere payment of doles. It
has done much for youth either directly or
through helping voluntary bodies.

\ Welfare although in some respects its
“xk in this region resembles the activities
of the Mome Office and although it is a
depar tment of Government is considered
as a bridge between government and the

would not have been made.

terms of dollars or cents.

ties like Barbados where there exist so
many other voluntary social services with
years of tradition and experience and
where the rugged individualism of every
Barbadian makes the taking of advice more
difficult than the swallowing of castor oil
by a naughty child the work of a welfare
department will inevitably be obstructed
by obstacles.

But Barbados no less than Jamaica’needs
a welfare department and government de-
partments, local government and the pub-
lic Ought to be benefitting from advice and
assistance on welfare, which ought to be
freely available from the Social Welfare
Office.

That this advice and assistance is not
sought by all who should seek it is evi-
dent from the intermittent criticisms
which are made in public and in private
about welfare. The advantages of welfare
are so obvious that failure to utilize its
services because of a misunderstanding of
its function is more than regrettable.



AGRICULTURE

THE aim for the future development of
agriculture everywhere in the West Indies
should be a steady transition to. mixed
farming, according to the authors of the
West India Royal Commission Report
(Cmd. 6607),

This mixed farming involves permanent
as opposed to shifting cultivation and the
complementary use of stack and crops, and
should result in much higher productivity
of the land.

The Development and Welfare Organisa-
tion which came into being directly as a
result of that report has always placed
agriculture at the top of its list of prior-
ities and Barbados has benefitted consider-
ably as a result. Among these benefits was
the establishment of six agricultural sta-
tions where experiments in mixed farming
are presently being conducted

The agricultural stations vary in size and
experiments now being conducted will
give accurate information about various

sizes of peasant allotments and will prove

what sizes are economic, if any. While this
information is being compiled the stations

are acting as advertisements for better agri-
cultural methods and the services of first

class.livestock are gradually improving the
strains of local cattle. All this is excellent
and the news that the taxpayers of Bar-
bados have been asked to foot the bill for
these stations in the new estimates for
1952-53 will be-received with equanimity
in an island where the primacy of agricul-
ture is acknowledged and unchallenged by
the majority of people.

It would however be letting slip an op-
portunity—and no opportunity must be let
slip--if the government of Barbados were
not reminded that financial assistance for
these stations until they can pay for them-
selves is not enough.

The Government of Barbados has shown
a strange reluctance to understand what
are the impediments to a successful agri-
cultural policy for this island.

They realise now, when it is too late,
what a loss was sustained when for chéese-
paring and narrow financial reasons they
permitted the Deputy Director of Agricul-
ture to leave an island where he had done
such valuable work. They have shown no
great alacrity to attract a successor,

That is failure number one.

Despite increasing complaints from
“peasant” agriculturalists, despite the evi-
dence of figures compiled on these same
agricultural stations, the government of
Barbados continues unintelligently and to
the detriment of local agriculturalists to
control meat at prices which must discour-
age cattle raisers from improving the
strains of their livestock.

That is failure number two.

Equally depressing is the invitation ad-
dressed to all Barbadians to grow more
food when every grower of food knows
that even on government-owned agricul-
tural stations at certain periods of the year
loeally grown vegetables and ground pro-
visions have to be destroyed, because of in-
adequate marketing arrangements. There
is no need to go further than failure num-
ber three to realise how slowly the govern-
ment of Barbados takes action to set right
what is glaringly wrong with its agricul-
tural policy.

The necessity
for welfare is increasingly being recog-
nised by more and more people as its
activities become known and understoods ee
But .its utility cannot be measured in
Nor are its ser-
vices always invited. In small communi-



iT SEEMS THEY NEED A KEYSTONE

This Thing Called Gatt



| The word Gatt when spoken
;makes an ugly brutal noise and it
is not surprising that in the lan-
guage of Hollywood it means a
gun.

In international trade circles
however these four initial letters
stand for a Geneva Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade, made in
October 1947. This agreement
was the greatest practical step
taken towards the formation of
jan International Trade Organis-
jation which was outlined in the
Havana Charter of 1948. Failure
|to ratify the Havana Charter was
inevitable in view of the circum-
stances which existed at the time
jand which continue to exist. But
its failure has been a great set-
back for the forces which are
active to promote unity and un-
derstanding between the peoples
of the world.

The Charter was intended “to
assure a large and steadily grow-
ing volume of real income and
effective demand, to increase the
production, consumption, and ex-
change of goods, and thus to con-
tribute to a balanced and ex-
panding world economy.”

The Havana Charter did not
suddenly emerge out of the blue
as a solution to all post-war
problems. The American loan to
the United Kingdom of £938,-
000,000 was made subject to cer-
tain conditions expressed in the
Bretton Woods Trade Agreement
and the United States is still pur-
}suing a policy which is designed
to promote multilateral trade and
to abolish imperial Preference
and other restrictions on Free-
dom of trade.

The ideals of multilateral trade
which are continually being
championed by the United States
at international conferences are
so attractive that they meet with
ready acceptance from members
of the United Nations. Yet the
countries who pay lip service to
these ideals have found it impos-
sible to put them in practice and
so far multilateralism has not
triumphed.

The countries of Western
Europe today are so concerned
with the immediate objectives of
increasing exports and reducing
imports in an effort t6 achieve a
balance of trade that the Havana
Charter seems farther away than
ever.

Great Britain provided an ex-
ample of the obstacles which im-
pede progress to multilateralism
when in aceordance with a con-
dition of the United States loan
it attempted to make sterling
convertible.

By GEORGE HUNTE

tariff system, if the United King-
dom abolishes imperial prefer-
ence. Unfortunately it is equally
no exaggeration to point out that
if the United ‘Kingdom abolished
imperial preference before its
present trading position is bal-
anced, both the United States and
the British Commonwealth coun-
jries which are in the British
preferential system would suffer.

The United States apparently is
aware of this paradox but there
can be no mistuke about its ulti-
mate objectives.

How are the British territories
in the Caribbean affected by these
international efforts at trade or-
RBanisation and have they bene.
fitter or suffered from the ar-
rangements made at Geneva?

In recent months some expo-
nents of a West Indian Customs
Union have been using the alleg-
ed. disadvantages of GATT to
support their arguments. It is
said that a West Indian Customs
Union could participate, in its
own right, instead of through the
United Kingdom Government, in
arrangements made in accordance
with the articles of GATT.

But it is not at all easy to see
what advantages would be gained
from this suggested improvement
in status, in view of the British
West Indies’ special dependence
on the United Kingdom,

There is everywhere in the
British Caribbean today a reluc.
tance to face issues squarely. And
the subject of Customs Union is
in danger of being considered a
substitute for political federation
without full ‘realisation of the
fact that the formation of a Cus-
toms Union would inevitably les-
sen the responsibility of the
United Kingdom with regard to
the p.vovision of guaranteed mar-
kets for British Caribbean pro-
duce.

The British Caribbean territo-
ries could not expect the United
Kingdom to relax exercise of ex-
isting trading controls against
possi the interests of the Uni-
ted Kingdom
same time to remain a sitting
target for a Caribbean’ Customs
Union which found itself less
adept at international bargaining
than is sometimes suggested. It
is possible to compile a list of
Gar uaotee that the West In-

ies now experience as a r t
of GATT, iy

Trinidad has complained loudly
in recent months of an obstacle
which has arisen with regard to

; “clock-making” indus’ be-
Explaining its failure in a mem- a A

orandum (Cmd. 7572) the British Ge"an impediven ens CATT

government said that “the impos- West Indian limitations with

sibility of maintaining the con- regard to si a tecti
vertibility of sterling which was Suaouieh in ute i inna. ieee
attempted in 1947 made it neces- tries like oils and fats: GATT’S
sary to embark upon a system of\ cramping effect on tariff changes
bilateral agreements in order and preferential margins: and
secure the continuance of as large losses which the West Indies have
a volume of international trade experienced because of reductions
as possible.” The United States of preference in Canada for rum
meanwhile continues to cham. are also cited. ,

pion multilateralism and at the But the disadvantages which
Torquay conference a full scale are experienced under GATT do
attack was launched against Im- not appear irremovable even
perial preference, It would in fact within the present arrangement
be no exaggeration to say that by which the United Kingdom
the United States will only con- represents the British Caribbean
sider any great reduction of her at international trade meetings



By BUTE HEWES Producers’ Organisation, repre-
senting primary producers in the
LONDON. Commonwealth,

When Mr, R. A, Butler, Britain’s, This memorandum to Mr. But-
Chancellor of the Exchequer, in- ler is entirely concerned with the
troduces his Budget on March 4, serious effects which existing high
his proposals will be anxiously U.K. rates of duty are having on
awaited not only in Britain but wines, spirits and cigars from the
throughout the Colonies and the Empire, including rum and cigars
Dominions as well, the West Indies,

For the measures he will pro- The Organisation has made
pose may have a vital influence similar Budget appeals every year
upon the prosperity of many Em- for the past three years, but this
|pire producers who contribute year hopes are particularly high
| large sums every year, in the that it may have some success.
form of duties and taxes, to Bri- For one thing, Britain’s Govern-
tain’s revenue, ‘,ment has changed since the last

In the West Indies, for example, Budget and Mr. Butler will at
| people who depend for the liveli- least be examining the problem
j}hood upon exports of rum and from a new angle,
|cigars to Britain will hopefully .
lawait a reduction in the almost _ Since the last Budget, too, the
[prohibitive British duties levieq Jamaica cigar industry has spoken
jon these things that put them out out with an ex ly loud and
lof reach of the mass British mare angry voice agail the Anglo-
ket. * Cuban Trade Agreement, which

In all Colonies which offer a will allow-Cuban cigars into Bri-
“tax holiday” to induce the in- tain for the first time since before
| vestment of capital from overseas, the war, Last summer, Jamaica
|there will be the hope that Mr, submitted a full scheme to the
| Butler will adjust the present sys+ British Government whereby a
|tem which makes tax payable at cut in excise duties on cigars would
}the full British rates and thus inerease net consumption in Bri-
| nullifies the sacrifice of taxes that tain, with the result that revenues



\the Colonies themselves have would be higher than ever while
| made, the Jamaican market was allowed
During the few weeks before to expand.

| Budget Day, Mr, Butler will have The British Empire Producers’
received scores of representations Organisation refers to the Anglo-
from various organisations asking Cuban agreement in its memoran-
for cuts in many taxes and duties, dum to Mr, Butler and declares:
One such appeal has already been “As imports of Cuban cigars on
presented by the British Empire an important scale will again be-

itself, and at the GATT



W.I. Hopes Of British Budget




























Ph. 4472

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Article XVIII of the Geneva
agreement “recognises the prin-
ciple that under-developed terri-
tories may have ‘to impose pre-
tective measures which would
be contrary to other articles of
the agreement in order to build
up their own economies.”

If Great Britain was forced to
aotify the organisation for Euro-
pean Economic Co-operation in
1947. of that country’s: necessity
to “embark upon a system of bi-
Jateral agreements in order to
secure the continuance of as
large a volume of international
trade as_ possible’, how much
the more likely will the dependent
British Caribbean territories be
able to escape from the provis-
ions of an agreement which was
specifically introduced to assist the
freeing of trade between inde-
pendent trading units.

Unless some other advantages of
Customs Union are clearly fore-
seen the British Caribbean terri-
tories can continue to face GATT







are made from

MOYGASHEL
LINENS

with equanimity so far as’ disad-

vantages are concerned. ° BENBURG
There are enough precedents on

the plea of dire necessity for fail- ° BALMORAL

ure to fulfil obligations invoked
under international trade agree-
ments: and the interest which the
United Nations display with re-
gard to dependent territories of
metropolitan powers makes it al-
most impossible for anyone to in-
voke GATT in such a way that it
would cause real hardship to the
British West Indies. There might
of course be reluctance on the part
of the United Kingdom or of the
British territories to seek such re-
dress but neither the United
States nor Canada would want to
be aceused of unfriendly or dis-
criminating action against depend-
ent territories in the Caribbean.

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

in Popular Shades
& Lightweights

It would certainly be unwise for
the British Caribbean territories
to disdain GATT and the bene(its
to be derived from a freeing of
world trade. But the British Car-
ibbean is too dependent on ihe
United Kingdom to enter lightly
into a Customs Union on the
grounds that it would remove the
disadvantages resulting from

Even within a Customs Union
the dependence of the British
Caribbean on the United Kingdom
as a market for its produce seems
inevitable. The best trade policy
for the British Caribbean would
appear to be a flexible policy by
which the area is allowed to ex-
ploit its commercial ability within
definite margins determined by its
earnings and yet is protected from
fierce world competitions by its
membership of the British trading
preferential area. -

The Regional Economic Com-
mittee which will, it is hoped, soon
be functioning properly, will pro-
vide adequate machinery for deal-
ing with things like GATT. Before

lunging into a Customs Union
British West Indian governments
might like to satisfy themselves
that Customs Union will bring ad-
vantages not obtainable through
the Committee,

Not all the British territories can
see the advantages to be gained
from Customs Union as clearly as
British Guiana which has decided
against political federation but
which hopes to earn another
$3,000,000 annually as a result of
Customs Union.



HARTLEY’S

jam

the greatest name in jam-making



gin to enter the United Kingdom
in April next, it is a matter of
urgency that some action shouid
be taken to prevent a further set-
back to the Jamaica cigar indus-

“A substantial reduction in the
duty on cigars which would place
them within the reach of people
with moderate incomes would
seem to be the most effective wa:
of restoring the position and theie
is good reasou for thinking that
it could be done without ap-
preciable loss of revenue.”

This was the policy advocated
by Col. Michael de Cordova, when
he visited London last summer
to make representations on behalf
of the Jamaica cigar industry
against the Anglo-Cuban agree-
ment. He asked that, in order to
increase the market, duty on
cigars should be reduced back to
the 1939 rate of 14s. 2%4d. This,
he said, would
cigar

save Jamaica's |
industry from extinction,
within the

bri cigars
reach of - in Britain
and would possibly increase the
overall revenue to the U.K.
Treasury.

No indications were given at
that time of Government reaction
towards this proposal. But Col, de
Cordova’s full statement is still)
in the hands of the Treasury and |
will no doubt be taken into full)
consideration in the preparation of |
the coming Budget.

One ray of hope is seen in Mr. IW
Butler’s recent announcement that, )))

@ on page 9 p

Enjoy GODDARD'S GOLD
BRAID RUM s# Straight or
Blended a The Goodness all

the same.
SUNDAY, MARCH 2,

1952



I Saw Naples..

. And

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Lived!

A Gun, A Girl And Shots In The Night

@ A revolver shot killed Harry
lume. He died in a _ sewer
beneath Vienna, ag those of you
know who saw the movie, “The
Taird Man.” Yes, that was the
eid of Harry Lime.

@ But he had many lives, and I
can receunt all of them. How do
i know’ Because my name is
hiarry Lime...

THERE was once an exquisite,
huge emerald locket which spent
most of its time looking out at
the world from the rather fleshy
neck of Mrs, Donaldson as she
waddled like a golden duck
across the international social
horizon.

I had rather a strong desire
to change the habitat of this
locket from her cool neck to my
itching palm. That was in Naples,
in 1937.

My plan was complete to the
last detail. But first I had to get
rid of Rubio.

Rubio was a Spaniard, around
35 years of age. He was good-
looking in a nauseous kind of
way and his voice was soft. But
he’d picked up his English from
reading books, not speaking it.

When I went to see him in
his swagger hotel apartment, he
didn’t look happy. He said: “You
kept me impatient for an hour,
Mr. Lime.”

I said: “I’m sorry, Senor Rubio.
I just flew in from London. For-
got to move my watch ahead.”

He smileq sceptically. “It is my
knowledge that you have been
in Naples for three days now.
But it does not matter. I am a
man with a skill for waiting.”

“Well,” I said,
be very brief. I won’t waste any
more of your time.”

“Bueno! But first I must tell
you that ] have made all the ar-
rangements to dispose of the
Donaldson emerald—as soon as
we—ah—possess it, of course.”

I looked at him remorsefully,
“There’s a small item of which
I forgot to inform you, Senor
Rubio. I have decided to include
you out.”

“T do not think I understand,”
“To be brief and simple—I
have decided to dissolve our
partnership.”

“You—you are disposing &
me?”

A gun... buat I
laughed

IL NODDED. “Perhaps
a nicer way of saying it.”

There was a pause. Then Ru-
bio said slowly: “I do not prefer
to be disposed.”

“Naturally not,” I agreed. But
sometimes we get disposed
whether we like it or not,” I
picked up my hat and turned
towards the door.

A black automatic pistol ap-
peared like lightning from un-
der his armpit. He said; “If you

that’s

take one more step towards
the door, I will fire.”
I laughed in his face, “Don't

~ be a complete fool. If they found
a dead man in your room they
would hang you. Rubio, I’m on
my way out. If you fire, the
police and all the hotel detectives
will be here before you can leave
the floor, Buon giorno.’

Ag I opened the door, he said
harshly: “There’s a saying in this
city. ‘See Naples and die!’”

I shook my head. “It only
proves that life is very shért and
uncertain—for us all.”

Believe me, I am not a‘ pro-
fessional hero, but I was not at
all concerned about Senor Rubio
putting a bullet in me—not in
his hotel room. ; hurried to the
pier where the Arcturus was
about to dock, She wags carrying
precious freight—Mrs. Donald-
‘son. IT had already made ar-
rangements for one of the Cus-
toms officials to hold her up on

“I’m going tc’



the pretext of going through her
baggage. A 5.000-lira note did
the trick.

Mrs. Donaldson's high-pitch-
ed outraged voice guided me to
her wi.nout troubie. She was
fiftyish, voluble, gullible and
somewhat foolish. Her fat cheeks
were quivering with rage as she
bawled the Customs man out.
Beside her, looking helpless,
stood a slim and lovely girl.

After a second or two I pushed
between the grinning spectators.
“What seems to be the trouble?”
I asked. As if I didn’t know.

I spoke sharply in Italian to
the Customs man, while they
looked on admiringly. He bowed
with great respect.

Harry Lime, as Orson Welles
Portrayed him in the film
“The Third Man.”

A few minutes later, loveliness
was gracing my car. Loveliness
in the form of the emerald locket
around Mrs. Donaldson’s neck.
And Aimee Colins. She was Mrs.
Donaldson’s hired companion.
She had auburn hair and eyes to
match the emerald. She was as
sensitive and shy as Mrs. Don-
aldson was garrulous and gush-
ing. And she liked me. Every so
often I would catch her eye.
Then she would hastily turn
away as if she were guilty of
something.

After a while Mrs. Donaldson
said: “If it weren’t for you I
don’t know what would have
happened. I wish we could re-
pay you for your kindness.”

I said: “Well, I think perhaps
you can. I’ve got to buy my sis-
ter a gift. I don’t know too much
about jewellery—so I wonder if
either of you could come along
and help me shop.”

“Of course we can.” she gushed
“Aimée does most of my shop-
ping for me. I’m sure she would
be delighted to help you. You go
ahead. Just drop me at the
hotel,”

“Good. That’s a relief. Now
I'd like both of you to be my
guests at dinner to-night.”

Call me Harry.
I said

WE deposited fat Mrs. Donald-
son in her room, and then Aimee
and I went shopping. I took her
along to Corso Vittorio Eman-
uele, one of Naples’ better
thoroughfares.

She said: “What are you look-
ing for, Mr, Lime?”

“Please call me Harry.”

“All right.”

May I call you Aimee?”

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want to buy for your sister?”
“Some nice jewellery. Mrs.
Donaldson was wearing some-
thing pretty. Something like
that.”

She laughed. “You don’t know

much about jewellery, do you”?

I know -what 7 like, But most
of the time the Giings I like you
can find in a dime store”.

“You won't fing Mrs, Donald-
‘son's locket in a dime store,’
Aimee “It cost about
20,000 dollars. That’s a _ real
in the

Did I sound surprised? I said:
“She must be crazy travelling
round with that flashing on her
neck.”

She nodded. “It’s not exactly
wise—but she’s very sentimental
about it. Her husband gave it to
her just before he died. She
swore to wear it every day of her
life.”

Suddenly=that

voice again

WE stopped in front
jeweller’s window, As we were
examming the stock, a ~ voice
broke in on us. A too familiar
voice,

“I am begging your pardon. I
heard you conversing English.”

1 whipped round. Sure enough,
it was Rubio.

I said rudely: “We were talk-
ing Amer.can—a totally different
language.”

Ignoring it, he said; “I—I am
trying to reach Via Salvator
Rosa. Could you inform me how
to go there?’

“Sure, Turn right at the next
corner and go straight for three
squares.”

Rubio still hung around, mak-
ing conversation. When we final-
ly got rid of him, Aimee said:
“He seemed most reluctant to
leave, He acted as if he knew
you.”

I said: “Well, I didn’t care to
know him. Shall we go in now?”

“Yes, of course There’s
just one thing I’d like to ask you.
What do you—for a living?”

ol a

“Oh, I'm a dealer in objets
dart. I wander through the
world, collecting the best
things.”

“It sounds very interesting.”

“It is. Often quite exciting.
Now let’s go in.’

I bought a filligree pin for
2,500 lire. On the way back to
Aimee’s hotel, she was pensive.
I took her by the hand. She did
not object, nor did she react to
the touch. She let me hold her
hand, nothing more. I suspected
Senor Rubio had made too strong
an impression, It was essential
now that I work fast.

Strangely enough, it was Amiee
that bothered me, not Rubio. I
was beginning to be extraor-
dinarily fond of her, and that was
bad. I make it a point not to be
fond of anyone in this world.

At dinner I made sure that
there was plenty of spumanti,
the Italian version of aham-
pagne. Mrs, Donaldson was soon
becoming thoroughly _ relaxed.
Spumanti is a fine relaxer, I
stirred it with a wooden swizzle-
stick, the bottom of which was
well laced with phenobarbitol.
My keynote for the evening was
relaxation. Before the evening
was over, my emeralded guest
was going to be the most relaxed
woman in all Italy,

I lifted my glass. “A toast to
us. May we always be as happy

as we are now.”

Mrs. Donaldson giggled. “A
toast to you, Mr. Lime, You
wonderful, wonderful man!”

I patted her neck. I wanted her
to get used to the touch of my
hand against it. She withdrew a
little. Her neck had become
supersensitive because of the
locket.

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As we drank, I studied the
clasp on the locket. It was a
simple device, You turned a tiny
wheel and it released the catch
Just a twist of the wrist

As a special treat for Mrs.
Donaldson I called the musicians
over and had them play Neapoli-
tan tunes for her alone, She
loved it. So did Aimee. She stole

her hand into mine as_ they
played.

When the music ended; Mrs,
Donaldson = sighed “That was
just beautiful They played
divinely.”

I sat up. “Now | have a won-
derful idea. How would you all

like to go for a drive to Pompeii?
T’s only ten o'clock. There’s a
full moon. It will be quite a
thrill.”

Mrs. Donaldson clasped her
pudgy hands. “I'd adore to go
A fascinating place.”

T called ‘he waitersand bent to
sign the check. When I looked
up, Rubio was bowing = § and
smiling at the ladies,

“A coincidence,” he murmured
“Il happen to be dining in the
similar restaurant ... 1 was sin-

cerely wishing you would all join
me ina bottle of Lacrima
Christi.”

“Some other time,” I snapped.
“We're in a hurry.” &

“The coincidence of another
meeting, I fear, would not be
excellent. Permit me to introduce
myself. I am Alfonso Rubio.”

“Nice to meet you, Mr, Rubio,
And good-bye!”

I ignored Rubio's
threats

I HUSTLED my party out of
the restaurant, leaving him
standing there and breathing
hreats.

Mrs. Donaldson exclaimed:
“What an odd iman!” And Aimee
asked: “Are you sure you don’t
know him, Harry?”

“IT know him now,” I said,
“His name is Alfonso Rubio, and
I'm ‘genuinely sorry he didn’t
follow my directions this after-
noon and walk into the Bay of
Naples.” ’

It was less than an hour's ride
to the ancient, extinct city of
Pompeii, lying like a corpse at
the foot of its killer, Versuvius.
We entered through the garden
of an ancient home. The moon
shone down, hard and white.

Aimee gasped with fright as a
lizard ran over her foot. There
are more lizards in Pompeii than
there used to be people. But
they’re harmless.

We walked slowly towards the
Forum, past the ancient mansions
of rich Romans, with signs still
visible on the walls, ordering
“Stick No Bills’—in Latin, of
course. F

Suddenly, Mrs. Donaldsofi said:
“It’s all beginning to make me
feel faint.”

I asked solicitously; “Don’t you
feel well?”

“I feel fine—just sleepy. T
don’t know why I should feel
sleepy when I’m so excited.”

Quickly I seized

the locket

AIMEE was worried. She said:
“I think we bad better go back.”

“We will,” I soothed her.
“But first we'll let Mrs. Donald-
son catch a few minutes’ rest.
There’s a marble bench in the
atrium of the Casa de Ceriale. . .

Here we are. Now you sit down,
Mrs, Donaldson, and rest your
shoulder against mine.”

She murmured sleepily, com-

fortably: “You're a darling, Mr.
Lime.”
I said: “Aimee, if you walk

into the other room to your right,
you will see some excellent
frescoes, beautifully preserved.
Here—take the torch.”

10,



SSCS CSOT LEE LLLLLL LELOLLPLEL LL LALOP LA Ce

- SOPIOOSOOOS,



Mr

Donaldson was sleeping
softly I pressed my fingers
against her neck. There was no
reaction, I quickly unloosed the
catch and with slow care picked
the locket gently off her neck.
It was done quickly. And now IL
was ready to make my silent
departure.

But then I heard a sound ‘that
froze me. Footsteps. And they
weren't Aimee's! There was only
one thing to do, Run!

At Strade Stabione I tutmed
the corner and ran into one of
the old Roman baths. I made for
one of the rooms, expecting it
to have another exit. It was dark,
and I fumbled around, I had a
very unpleasant feeling when I
became aware that the only way
out was the way I came in, I
ran back, but it was too late. My
Pursuer was standing at the
entrance with a. flashlight in one

hand and a gun in the other. It
was Rubio!
I’m not usually a_ reckless

fellow, but this time I did a very
rash thing. I rushed him, He
fired, and the bullet grazed my
shoulder,

We fell on the marble floor, He
Was wiry and very strong. In
a few seconds it was clear that
he was in far better shape than
I was. Then he hit me a very
rude blow on the head with the
gun, and I gave up the fight, I
just lay there, thinking what a
very evil moment of my life this
was.

Rubio panted: “The locket. . .
Thank you!. . . And now I think
I will dipsose of you for having
caused me all this trouble.” He
raised his hand to shoot,

Suddenly the old baths echoed
with shouts and general hubbub,
The voice of a guard came
sharply. “Drop the gun, signor,
or lll fire!”

There
armed
Rubio

several other

the doorway.
his gun, Poor
Rubio! Caught red-handed—with
my goods! I lay there on the
ancient marble floor and laughed.
Then I went out to face Mrs.
Donaldson and Aimee,

Mrs. Donaldson was alrnost
hysterical with admiration for
my courage in chasing the wicked

were
guards
dropped

in

robber. But Aimee said nothing
at all, ‘

I blamed myself for taking
them to Pompeii and_ into
danger But Mrs. Donaldson
cried: “That terrible man would
have tried to snatch the locket
wherever I was. I'm going
to give you a gift. A hundred-

pound note. You must take it.”

im sorry. said

Aimee
I SAID gracefully: “If it
means so much to you, Vl

give it to my favourite charity.”
She wasn’t to know that’s Harry
Lime,

We got back to the car and
drove to her hotel. She went up
to bed, leaving me alone with
Aimee. For a while we stood
silently together. Then I said:
“I’m sorry about this evening,
Let's meet for lunch to-morrow.”

“No, Harry.”

“Why not?”

“Ie never saw the
didn't find them and I walked
all the way around I saw
you from the front entrance.”
Then, after a long pause:
“Besides, a man who deals in fine

frescoes, I

arts would know an_ emerald
necklace from aé_ dime store
trinket.” I should have thought
of that.

As I walked back to my hotel
] thought about Vaffaire emerald.
It had cost me about 100 dollars
to bribe the customs official, and
buy the champagne and the fili-
gree pin. The reward left me
with a profit of 270-odd dollars,
plus a bump on my thead and a
hole in my suit, I had lost the
lovely green emerald and the
lovely green eyes of Aimee

The emerald didn't
much. But Aimee, you nearly
interferred with the great
romance of my life—my love for
Harry Lime,

bother me

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W.I. Hopes
Of British
Budget

from x
Britain® Gpuieee apart
stocks are to be re-arranged tivis
year tO save some £22,000,000
part of the renewed drive to «
dollar spending, If Empire toba
is to be encouraged in Britain,
seems apparent, the West Ind.
must surely benefit to some e::-
tent.

On the question of rum, ho\
ever, the position is not so cler
eut, The present rate of di
levied on rum imports into B
tain is £10 11s, 3d. per proof gi -
lon and while this continues, co
sumption of rum must contin
at a low level. In spite of
vigorous advertising campai..
conducted throughout Britain
West Indian rum companies, ¢>:-

sumption remains distressin |
low.
Britain's rum imports in ‘>

twelve months ending Septem!
30, 1951, totalled 9,200,000 gallo
maintaining the satisfactory ley |i
of imports and even exceedir |
the previous year’s figure, Bs
the tigures for withdrawals of th:
rum from bonded warehous
show a very different picture,

In that same twelve-mon' 1
period, only 1,800,000 gallons of
rum were withdrawn from bond |
for consumption,’ As a_resul,|
stocks in the bonded warehous:
at the end of the year totalled |
14,900,000 gallons, Obviously, ru
importers cannot continue to buy |
West Indian rum if it is merely |
to lie idle in warehouses, tying |
up huge sums of capital. |

The position is, therefore,
that these 14,900,000 gallons |
of warehoused rum have to
be disposed of. This cannot
be done unless consumption
increases considerably; and
this will not take place un-
less the duty and thus the
price comes down,

Whatever Mr. Butler’s de-
cision on rum duties, it seems
plain that Britain's rum im-
porters are considerably over-
stocked and must. shortly re-
duce th@ rate of import
until some of these stock:
have been worked off,

The unsatisfactory income ta
position affecting investment in
the Colonies is more likely to flix
a favourable solution in Mr. But-
ler’s Budget, for many Consery #-
tive spokesmen have deplored
situation under which sacrifices
made by Colonial territorie
sometimes at great cost to them-

selves, accrue to the benefit of |
Britain,
The Institute of Taxation ha

made this recommendation to Mr
Butler: “We submit that the new |
excess profits tax should be ie-|
stricted to profits made in th
United Kingdom and that profit
from trading overseas should («
specifically exempted. If the}
foregoing recommendation to ex-)
empt all overseas profits is no}
accepted, we would urge that t+ |
profits of all companies con-|
trolled abroad should be ex-
empted, even though these com-
panies may be subsidiaries of
companies managed and controll.
ed in the United Kingdom whic! |
are therefore themselves Hable t
excess profit tax.

It has long been a complaint of
British investors in Colonial terri-
tories that the “tax holiday” ar
rangements instituted in these |
territories have little value as |
means of attracting capital while
Britain still levies income tax at
the full rate, This was among the
first of the West Indian problems |
to be studied by the U.K, Govern
ment when it came into power
last autumn, but there has been |
no opportunity to adjust the
enomaly before the presentation of
the Budget.—B.U.P.





















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PAGE..TEN



BARATIA GETS

seen

A HIGHWAY

Ry IAN GALE

A BRIGHTER SUN by Samuel Selvon (Wingate 11/6).

saan

Thijs :is another novel about Trinidad, but unlike Edgar

Mittleltolzgr’s
the complications, of middle



Morning in the Office it does not deal with

class life in Port-of-Spain, but

centres, around thé life of peasants of many races living in

an outlying village.



The story : a:"a Wil

called Chaguat wuoer

mtroduced! to Tiger,

year-old Indian

Ch ay’ the

t € ao]

“ t

- r

up for ra 6

fe when ft

ried wag big &. ple

and drink, plenty ceremony,’
Tiger marri Urmilla, . an

an
they

Indian girl of#bout his age,

modved to 4 village calicd Baratia,
where they hf! body i. mud
hut ar e 1
Ind Chinese reerce
together. Inthe. back streets ths
Indians lived sunpkey»ekserving
their custems ang, tending thei:
fields, selliigâ„¢ the produce in th
vilage_ oy dnemearby San: Juan.
The negroés were never farmers,
and most of them did d jobs
around: the vill worked in
the city, The Ciinece were either
laundeters or shop keepers.
The*War d 3
much. Tige like her In#
dians ‘tended |} rden ind
Urmilla w with child.
Their neighbour re negroes,
and throughout the novel the au
th shows how different

races in Trinidad can get on Well
together if they forget ‘their ori
gims afd remember only that they

are all Trinidadian: But then
the Americans came to build a
road, gnd the rythm of life in
the village w broken. Tiger -and



many Gthers | their gardens and

were ‘hired by the Americans to
help build the road
Tiger became restless and djs-

contented. He had learned to read
and he could not make up his
mind about what he would do
when the Americans left..“What
was he going to do with all the
money he would make working for
the Americans. He would go away
and study. No, he would Stay. anid
build big house. Nar man. Buy
plenty; land and have big garden.
Nar. Send children to Port-of-
Spain-to get big cducation, come
doetor and lawyer. Open up a shop

qd thake moxz mercy Send
Urmilla and the chilaren co Chague
Ss and go awey to another land

with oygie. See America. Go
England”? ---»- eR

Atier ae Lanouga an emo-
tional om ‘Tiger inairages te
arrive:@t a soluiion to his prob-

iccas, Bia we leave him standing
on tagpnew highway wide Geass
Whizthg by chewing a blaieyof,
Brass. 27 het

A Brighter Sun is an interest-"
ing liffle novel and snows ‘great
promise Samwel Selvon, a, Trin-
idadiag-Indiin, has managed by
skilful combination of fact’ and
fictionto tell the story of the effect
of theowar on Trinidad in général
on ong)small community in- pare
ticulare The frequent use of-¢mude
expressions may shock some
readers; and the fact that most of
the beef is written in distemeeaiee
ciseourgv@e others, but there #§ no
doubt ‘that this is one of the best
novels..to be written by a West
Indian; ;

THE MONDAY STORY by James
Leasor (0.U.P. 7/6)

Thig%s not much of a novel, but
it is areexcellent educational book
‘wrapped up in novel form.

Designed for young people it
gives an accurate account of the
aifficulties and rewards of journ-
alism ‘as a career as well as

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nd spends his time hoping that
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amount of

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eareer,

— et SCHOONERS
y asil Greenhill (Percival
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This book will be of interest to
all those who make a study of
iautical history. It deals with the
schooners, which developed with
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big steel ships, and sem
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They began as carriers of ripen-

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their perishable Later
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Then the business of carr.
cargoes of salted Newfoundlan:
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Europe expanded at the end of the
19th century, and the schooners
sailed backwards and forwards
with this cargo, in one of the
hardest and most romantic trades
ef all time. In 1930 these little
chips ceased to sail the Atlantic,
end then the last of them took ‘to

-he home trade about the British
isles.

No history of these ships has
ver been written, and this book,
with its text and plans and photo-
eraphs, rescues from permanent
obscurity one of the less known
but most enthralling aspects of
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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



Students Find It Harder
To Get Jobs

THIS is the month when pru-
dent students of London Univer-
sity in the final year call on the
University’s Appointments Board
to discuss their prospects of get-
tiig jobs after they have taken

their examinations in the sum-
mer.
What are those prospects? I

have been talking to the board's
secretary, Mr. H. R. Walters, and

deputy secretary Miss M. C.
Robertson, They both say the
“market” for graduates is hard-
ening.

There is usually a slump in

demand at the time of a General »:

Election; after the election the de-
mand as a rule picks up agaia.
This time it has not done so.

This hardening process made
itself felt first upon the market
for women graduates; it has now
extended to men. The reasons fox
it are twofold. Business firms
and industrial enterprises have
complete the task of making good
wartime staff shortages; and the
number of students at universi-
ties today is much larger than it
was before the war (at London it
is more than double; the 1939-40
figure—11,000, in 1951-52 23,000)

It Takes Longer

“WE see from two to three
thousand people a year,” said Mr.
Walters, “about a third of them
arts students. The average com-

ent person coming to see us in

ebruary would in the past, have
probably been fixed up with a job
by September, With the harden-
ing of the market the interval
between their leaving the uni-
versity and our being able to
place them is likely to be rather
longer.”

The board does not cover the
specialised fields of medicine, the
Church, or the Bar; but it
directs the inquiries of many
hundred students to professional
organisations which have their
own equivalent to an appoint-
Te pan painie fern. thb.orell

“We see people from the cradle
tothe grave,” said Mr, Walters,
a large, friendly man, himself a
B.Sc, of London, and holder of
the Military Cross. “Many
parents bring boys and girls to
see us before they have entered
the university.” At the other end
of the scale, a man of 74 recently
asked help, as a _ graduate, in
finding a Pop,

Registration with the board
costs 2s. 6d. for every six months
of registration. Those registered
receive a weekly bulletin contain-
ing a collation of jobs publicly ad-
vertised and others known to the
board and not yet filled. 3

“Quite frequently,” said Miss
Robertson (a B.A. of Oxford, M.A.
of Glasgow), “we get applications
from graduates of Oxford, Cam-
bridge, the Scottish Universities
who say ‘We've heard you're so
good,’ ”

Does the quality of the degree
taken count in getting a job?

For scientists it matters a lot
whether they get a good degree.
In arts, the larger ine like a
first or second-glass honours,
though they are not, very often,
concerned about what subjects
have been read.

In engineering it does not seem
to matter about the quality of
the degree so long as_ students
have gone through the syllabus
and passed their examination.

What of the pay that young men
and women can expect to receive
when they enter ustry or com-
merce with a university degree
after their names?

For men, the figure is about
£475 at the age of, say, 24,
though this may vary £50 either
way. The average figure has gone
up by some £75 in the past two
years,

Before the war a young man
going into business from _ the
university would expect £250—
equivalent, says the board, to
£500 to-day.

The best appointment
through the board in the

made
last



year was for a man who .got a
second in science. He had no
previous experience in business,



but had served through the war.
His starting salary was £800

Women Score

Women, untroubled by National
Service which, said Mr. Walters,
“has bedevilled the pattern of
recruitment for men,” start
younger and will receive £300—
£350 as a rule. Those who teach

or enter the civil service will
probably receive more.
The views of industry and busi-

upon the value of a univer-

sity training? Big firms have for
a long time set a store upon the
training a degree implies. Not

all smaller firms yet realise how
much of the best materials pro-
duced in the schools is going on
nowadays to the universities.
“They are not as enlightened
we should like,” said Mr.
Walters “but there are signs of an
improvement since the war.”

—LES.

as



Decision On
Stabbing
Confirmed

In the Assistant Court of
Appeal Their Honours Mr, H, A.
Vaughan and Mr. A, J. H. Hane

schell yesterday confirmed the
decision of His Worship Mr. C.
L. Walwyn who sentenced 27-
year-old hawker Undine Hink-|

son of Richmond Gap, St. Michael |
to one month’s imprisonment |
with hard labour for wounding |
Helena Gittens on her
shoulder with a knife.

Gittens appealed against Mr.
Walwynis decision and was also}
ordered “to pay the cost of a peal |
which amounted to 10/4. Gittens |
said that on February 28 about:
12.12 pm. she was on Swan
Street and went up to the tray of
the defendant. While there an
argument arose and the defend-
ant took up a knife from her tray
and cut her on the left shoulder.

Island Constable Theophilus
Holder arrested the defendant.
Sgt. Murrell prosecuted for the
Police from information received.



21 Candidates For
Entry To U.C.W.L.

They are 21 candidates for
entry to U.C,W.I, Two are taking
the entrance examination; 18 are
taking the Barbados Government
Exhibition, These 18 candidates
with an additional one, are taking
the U.C.W.1. Scholarship examina-
tion. The examination started
Monday, Feb, 25 and ended Fri-
day, Feb. 29.

University College Of The West
Indies

Candidates for Entrance Exam-

ination in Arts:—Alma I, Lloyd,
Alvin F, E, Barnett.

Candidates for both U.C.W.I.

Scholarship Examination and
Barbados Government Exhibi-
tion
NATURAL SCIENCE
Geoffrey Rudder, Erskine &,
Ward.
ARTS

Courtney N, McL. Blackman,
Mary ©. Brathwaite, Ernest A.

Cadogan, Shirley I, Clarke; Colin
Cc. Deane, Henry De B. Forde,
Alwin J. Harding; Mitchinson pb.
S. Hewitt, Sheila D. King, Colin
F. Kirton; Marion E. P, Newton,
Peter A, Sobers, Charles H. T.
Thorpe; David Williams, Grace
M. E. Yard; Sylvia E, Yard.

Candidate for U.C.W.I, scholar-
ship only: Arts—Clement A, §S,
Hopkinson,



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One Month
For Stabbing



“This kind of wounding is be-
comin. very prevelant in the
island and I have to make an
example of you. This offence

+

was committed in the middle of
the town and in the middle of the
day," His Worship Mr. C. L.
Walwyn, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”, told 27-year-old
hawker Undine Hinkson of Rich-
mond Gap, St. Michael, yesterday
whee he sentenced her to one
month’s imprisonment with hard
labour for wounding Helena Git-
tens on her left shoulder with a
knife on February 28

Hinkson pleaded guilty to the
charge, but appealed against Mr.
Walwyn’s decision, Helena Git-
tens told the court that about 12.12
p.m, on February 28 she was in
Swan Street and went to the de-
fendant’s tray. While there both
of them got in an argument and
the defendant pulled a knife
fromthe tray and made several
stabs at her with it. One of the
stabs “caught” her on the left
shoulder and one of her fingers
was also cut.

- “Murder”

Island Constable Theophilis
Holder said that on February 28
about 12.12 p.m, he was on Swan
Street when he heard shouts of
“murder’. On going to the bot-
tcm of Swan Street he saw the
defendant and complainant fight-
ing, The defendant was making
several attempts to stab the com-
plainant and eventually the com-
plaimant was cut on her left
shoulder. He held the defendant
and another woman managed to
take away the knife.

Asked by Mr. Walwyn what she
had to say, Hinkson said that the
complainant came up to her and



Harbour News
“Lady Patricia”
On Dry Dock

The M.V. Lady Patricia which
arrived here on Monday from St.
Vincent is now in the dock-
yard of the Central Foundry
Limited. It is understood that
the opportunity is being taken of
repainting and doing minor re-
pairs to her.

. & ca

Also undergoing repairs is the
Schooner United Pilgrim. She
arrived here from St. Lucia on
20th February with a leak in her
stem and consequently had to be
towed into the harbour, She is
now leaned to one side in the
inner basin of the careenage.
Repairs are now almost com-
pleted and the United Pilgrim
will be accepting cargo during
the week. :

For the past three days there
has been a great stir of business

on the lower side of the outer
basin of the careenage. Mans
lighters lined the wharf anc

were being laden with cargo for
the S.S. Crofter.

Included among her cargo are
1600 bags of sugar, 500 bags o!

refined sugar, 200 drums ot
syrup, 550 drums of fancy
molasses, and 200 drums of
vacuum-pan molasses. ae

Crofter will be leaving for Lon-
don today,
+ me *

Also unloading her cargo from
the United Kingdom has been the
S.S. Philosopher.. Both the Phil-
osopher and the Crofter are con~-
signed to Messrs. Da Costa & Co.,

Ltd.

aD

started to abuse her. After the
argument the complainant cuffed
her in the face and while they
were fighting she noticed that
the complainant was cut,











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a a



(By CHARLES CLARKE)

Registrar of the Courtauld Institute of
Ait London University

J. M, W. Turner exhibited his

first oil painting in the annual

Roya! Academy exhibition in 1797,
ar the age of 22. By this time he
was already an accomplished
water—colourist and his drawings
had been accepted by the Academy
as early as 1790. His early tuition
in the oil medium is obscure
although tradition has it that he
copied at the studio of Sir Joshua
Reynolds, who died in 1792.
Turner entered the Royal Academy
Schools in 1789 and it seems
reasonable to suppose that he
learnt the elements of his craft
curing this period. His first works
are dark and almost monochro-
matic and betray a lack of
experience in his medium. His
increasing skill and confidence are
reflected in the growing volume
of his work during the next few
years, in which he established a
Feputation as a marine painter.
is aspect of his work reachpd
its full maturity in The sun rising
in a Mist (painted in 1807) where
he outmatched William van der
Velde and Aelbert Cuyp.
Like many another English
inter his early work was often
a@sed upon Dutch 17th century
Models and in addition to marine
painting, landscapes and genre
Subjects were handled with in-
freasing virtuosity. The sea and
everything connected with the sea
fascinated Turner throughout his



life and provided him with endless

subjects both calm and stormy.
Ris interest in fisherfolk is vivialy
reflected in the bustling stormy,
atmosphere of Calais Pier painted
in 1803. As early as 1800 the
calm radiance of Richard Wilson,
the great 18th century English
landscape painter, appeared in
Turner's mythological subject
Aeneas with the Sibyl This
picture was the first of a long line
of paintings in which Greek
mythology and Roman_ history
were later made the vehicles of
dazzling effects of light and colour.
In 1802 the Treaty of Amiens
opened up Europe again for a brief
period to travellers from Britain:
Turner hurried over to France and
Switzerland by way of Calais, and
visited the Louvre, where he made
a number of notes on the pictures.
He was enthusiastic about Titian’s
use of colour and the balanced
light and shade of Nicolas Poussin;
Ruysdael he also admired, but he
disliked Rubens’ system of double
lighting though he thought the
Flemish painter’s technique was
brilliant.

The effect of Poussin’s work
upon Turner is clearly noticeable
in the pictures painted immedi-
ately after this visit to France.
Always a first rate draughtsman,
his painting becomes firmer and
the pattern of light and shade
more decisive. The influence of
Poussin culminates in The Goddess
of Discord choosing the Apple of
Cantention in the Garden of the
Hesperides exhibited in 1806 abt
the British Institution. The in-
fluence of Titian makes itself felt
in the bolder colours which Turner
began to use in 1803 as well as in
subject matter and the echo of
Ruysdael can fbe detected in
Turner’s landscapes for the next







What You Should Know
About Your English

Why So Many Students Recommend
the Effective English Course

A RE you content with the way you speak and
write? Are you sure that you are not
mistakes that cause people to underrate you

Never has the importance of good English

been more widely recognised than to-day. If you

persuasively and forcefully

you have an immense advantage in your business
or professional work as well as in social life.

Does your English enable you to appear at
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id fluently — and c you

eas y prediing t

can express yourself

your best on all

your pronunciation and



20 years. In 1807 there appeared
a brilliant essay in the manner of
Dutch 17th century genre painting
entitled The Blacksmith’s Shop.
Here we find bright touches of
local colour and an accomplished
treatment of light. This was fol-
lowed in 1808 by The Death of
Nelson in which Tyrner estab-
lished himself as England's
greatest historical painter.
During the first period of Turn-
er’s career as a painter in oils his
earlier topographical drawings had
served as models which were soon
transformed into highly original
compositions. As his confidence
increased the range of his work
became wider and his technique
expanded rapidly. By 1808 his
earlier chiaroscuro, which was
iather like that of Rembrandt,
became charged with an atmos-
phere that was bright and
luminous even in the shadows, and
the whole key of his colour
sightened appreciably. The earlier
works such as Calais Pier were
possessed of a Byronic fury which
gave way during the next four
years to quietness and meditation.
In spite of much ill-considered
criticism a number of influential
patrons and critics supported him;
during the second half of his life
wealthy manufacturers began to
buy his paintings. Throughout his
life Turner enjoyed loyal support
from the majority of his fellow
Academicians, especially the
younger men, and on. at least
one occasion the Academy was
severely criticised for its modern—
ist tendencies in countenancing
his work, Turner did not, how-
ever, rely solely upon the annual
exhibitions at the Royal Academy
to sell his paintifgs. In 1808 he
built his own gallery in Queen
Anne Street West and for some
years held annual exhibitions of
his work. After these exhibitions
were discontinued he kept a num—
ber of his pictures on permanent
show; some of them were sold,
but several others which he called
his “darlings” he refused to part
with and they were eventually
bequeathed to the nation.

Between 1806 and 1810 Turner
painted 12 oil sketches of subjects
connected with the River Thames
and the Wey. All of them were
painted on thin veneer boards and
are among the earliest examples
ef outdoor painting in oils. Swift
and summary in their treatment
they are notes of rapidly changing
effects of light and shade which
foreshadow the oil sketches of
John Constable some years later.
As early as 1709 Turner’s interest
in light led him to study Claude
Gellee whose work made him feel
both excited and unhappy because
he felt it was inimitable. The
influence of Claude lasted through
out Turner's life, more especially
in his classical and mythological
subjects, but by 1814 Crossing the
Brook shows him applying the
idiom of Claude to the English
landscape both in design and in
the rendering of light by subtle
gradations of tone. In Dido build-
ing Carthage, painted in the same
year, the method of the French
master appears just as fully de—
veloped in a classical subject.

This clearly distinguishable
phase of Claudian influence in
which Turner renders light mainly
by subtle gradations of tone ends

ever made, It
numerous

Regent pupils.





Many students say that the moderate fee charged
for the Course is the best investment they have

ve enrol on the recommendation of
S

You will enjoy taking this famous Course.
will find that the lessons are so fascinatingly written



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Oil Paintings of J. M. W. Turner

ASupreme Colourist



———

|



|

ULYSSES DERIDING POLYPHEMUS—Painted by J. W. Turner.

(by Courtesy of the Trustees of the National Gallery, England)
° -~: °

in 1819, the year of his first visit
to Rome with the large painting
of Richmond Hill on the Prince
Regent's Birthday. The influences
of the various European masters
whom he had emulated were
cumulative and cannot be neatly
separated one from _ another:
throughout the remainder of his
life it is possible to detect the
effect of all of them in a single
ecomposijion. Steadily his own
very personal vision unfolds itself,
reinforced by an acute visual
memory, and as early as 1813 he
had produced an astonishingly
modern landscape in Frosty Morn.

ing, a picture which strangely
enough achieved imstant popu-
larity, Archdeacon Fisher, who

was a staunch friend of Constable,
described it as “a picture of
pictures.” Turner paints a simple
picture of a frosty morning in the
country with the calmness of
Wordsworth. It is a detached yet
deeply felt interpretation of that
moment when the winter sun rises
end slowly thaws the frosty land.

An important feature of Turner's
career was his practice of spending
several months each year travell-
ing in search of material for his
pictures. Owing to the unsettled
state of Europe, his visit to France
and Switzerland in 1802 was the
only occasion on which he left this
country until 1817. Thereafter his
visits to the Rhine, Switzerland
and Italy became more frequent
until he was 70 years old ond
failing health curtailed his travels.
His first visit to Rome in 1819
brought about a marked change
in his work, Like Poussin,, Claude
and Richard Wilson before him he
tound lasting inspiration in the
scenery around Rome, Trivoli and
Naples. On his return to London,
Turner’s colour became brilliant
In 1813 he had already begun
priming his canvas with white in
order to obtain greater light in all
parts of the picture. The first
Italian visit clarified his ideas and
from now on colour and light
became indivisible. The first re-
sults of this visit to Italy dis
appointed his admirers, but in
1823 he produced The Bay of
Baiae, a much idealized rendering
ef the subject in which dazzling

—





is not surprising therefore that

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THE REGENT INSTITUTE
(Dept. 501D) ’
Palace Gate, London, W.8, England.

Please send me a free copy of your prospec-
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without any obligation.

RR DS Pear
(BLOCK LETTERS)

ADDRESS

a a i



light is rendered in pure colour;
the white ground is stained in
parts like water—colour, in others
Shinly stuinbled.
n Ulysses deriding Po!
painted in 1829™he ‘ostabt eas"
completely. new harmony. All is
light and colour, from the flaming
design of the morning clouds to
the transparent veils of blue in
the shadows. This picture is pro-
bably the greatest historical paint-
ing produced by the’ Romantic
Movement in England. At about
the same period Turner painted a
number of fine pictures at Pet-
worth Park, in the English county
ot Guctas Oph wo Studies of
various effects of light. In Interior
Baa beck eee the room
ransmu a burst of
sunshine into a cascade of jewel
like colour: Through this riot of
colour the structure of the room
can be dimly made out, Colour
and light are swept into a spiral
pattern which leads the eye into
the picture in a manner that be
comes typical of the last 20 year
of his life. In the Petworth
eae are ay some simple and
r pieces li‘:e Th
Pior Brighton. A tole ag
The following decade of Turner's
life is characterized by work in
— the wand is often laid in
v masses of blue, yellow or red.
Norham Castle is a vision of mist
and: sunrise carried out in prim-
ary red, blue and yoltow
worked into a white ground
French

a_ foreshadowing of
Impressionism in

19th century
its colour. The decade closes
with The Fighttng Temer-
aire in which the painter returns

once more to a historical subject.

|

This time he contrasts the graceful)
sailing ship of the past with the
new age of steam represented by
the tug. The colour is nearly a:
limpid as water colour, and the
fiver is painted with all thai
mastery which Turner possessed
when he dealt with water.
From 1840 onwards storms, fires
and elemental forces occupied his
attention. His brushwork becomeag

]





looser and the structure of thing
seen are suggested rather than)
described. The last great con
troversial picture of his career,
Rain, Steam and Speed, w

painted in 1844. Here the elements
are represented by the steam and
speed of the railway train rushin
across the viaduct and by the
driving rain which transmutes the
light into a shimmering opalescent
mist. During the last ten years
of his life ‘Turner exploits every
effect of light and darkness and
his compositions become more
abstract, His inspiration comes
now from the idea lying behind
jus subject rather than from the
outward appearance.
lurner’s importance
largely in the way
anticipated the

lies very
in which he
development of

ndscape painting in the 19th
century. Long before he died the
canvas primed with white and the
light scale of colours which he
used had been widely adopted
The works of the last decade of
his life remained a closed book
until the present century, when
it was realized that Turner's
dreams were nearer to the truth

than had been suspected, Outside
these istands he was unappreciated
during nis lifetime except in Italy

and the United States. ’



| Postage

|

The Truth in
Your

Would ou like to







w

Horoscope

Stars indicate for you id 1
to test free the skill of Pundit Tabo
India’s most famous Astrologer, wh

applying the
ancient science to
useful purpose
has built up
enviable reputa-

Tabore

tion? The
cura t
predictions and
the sound practi-
Cai advice cus
tained in his
Horoscope on
Business. Speev
lation, Finance
Love affairs,
Friends, Enemies
Lotteries ete
have astounced
educated
the world
Georte Mackey
of New York
lleves that Tabore must possess some
econd-sight
To popularise his system
send 4 FREE your Astral

tie if rn
Mr

Mr or Miss), addre

money wanted
ete.,
Postal Order
and othe t
be amazed 4
of his stateme
Write n
be ade agair
TAPORE, (Dept
Street, Bombay 2€
4 cent

for Astro!
send 1
tationery
z literat

















affairs





is. This dependat
» ite special veg
clears away. linpurities
pm right auc regular
r you feel tomorrow








Lm

forward him your

remarkab

‘To fee! bright, clear eyed
and energy—-you must have ele
Food digestion, regularity. 1

f



will
interpreta

un

und date of

mical
in
tes
re

@
» OLD FAVOURITE MEDICINE
RELIEVES CONSTIPATION

| birth all clearly written by yourself

N
Work

Britis!

tiny
You

always full of pep

jan Root Pills supply the help N

Hee how much

-RMORSES
er PILL

will

cy
A
TRUSTED REMEDY
ee FOR OVER
9 50 years

! COMSTOCK'S WORM PELLETS




made by the makers of Dr. Morse's Pills
*« protection for your family
no child or adult is immune

BWL24y.

|
|




IT MUST SERVE DADDY AND HiS GREAT-GRANDS



PAGE ELEVEN



Hivuw vue iamous

Bennett College can help your:

career through personal
POSTAL TUITION

? YOU Fem that you cannot pass the
exams which will qualify you in your

trade or profession, if you are handicapped
in your career by missed ciucational

Guaranteed tuition until successtul . . .

When you enrol with The Bennett Coftege
will be coached until you QUALIFY.
ane assurance is given by the Governor of

' by post. This

who has faith in his system of
way you have the nefx; of College

i

train. -

tuition, but you work i your own time —
at yoer pace! No extras are charged. All
books age frees to students. ene

Your latent cleverness . . _ Se lane
Your own Twtor will help you, will bring (Pitemnan’s
Out the cleverness in you. And there is oan” wrides
often more than you imagine You will Teletomménications
Qualify! And Qualification means personal
betterment. First choose your subject — fom 7
then sand t obligation) for The
Bemnett book on your subject.

AND MANY OTWERS

ROW TEAR OUT THE COUPON






“MAGI”
HEALING OIL

is good value. Use it for
coughs, colds, colic and diarr-
hoea, and externally for cuts
and bruises, sprains and
strains. Good for your stock
and poultry too.

TRIPLE VALUE IN
BOTTLE

ONE
THAT'S

“MAGI”
HEALING OIL

SSS STONES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS
—
SPOPBoOGOE~

It must stand up to all weather conditions, the bleaching of the
Sun, the dampness caused by soaking rains, the dirty signs of
mildew. How long it will last in the elements depends on the
treatment you afford the wall surfaces inside and outside —
that’s why you should apply — —

SNOWCEM

SNOWCEM protects the outside of your building
from rain and moisture and iniproves its appearance.
Its clean finish on inside walls and ceilings increases
light reflection value by at least 20 per cent.
SNOWCEM is hygienic since its valuable surface
promotes maximum cleanliness and prevents the
harbouring of germs.

~~
BEEFSSSSAIFWYGLAOGAA GIO FS

CEMENT WATERPROOF COATING

Supplied in the following
popular Shades :
White, Cream, Pink,
Silver-Grey, Green,
Blue, Yellow and

Terra-Cotta.
A,

On Sale at all Lumber
and Hardware Stores.



IN WHICH OF [HESE
LIES YOUR FUTUZE >

Enam:.
© Wires)







PAGE TWELVE





















SUNDAÂ¥ ADVOCATE SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952
1
Cold Figuees Falling Hair?

ir is a def re starved of vital
Organic sub ee e vali plied by the body. That's why you
need Silvikrin, urgently. For Silvikrin contains, in concentrated forn
the fourteen essential hair-forming substances. Massaged int
scalp, Silvikrin richly nourishes the haic raots—and soon hair grow
again with healthy, handsome vigour. Pure Silvikrin will set your hair

. . . growing and thriving again and keep it healthy. jâ„¢ .
Money In Circulation 60-Second Quiz Ue lin irs eh a: ed 7

and thinning hair As a daily dressing use
Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion or, for dry heads,
the new Silvikrin Lotion with O

LACE any four coins—quarter, dime, nickel, pen- ACH of these brainteasers is
ny Will do—in a pile with the largest-sized coin supposed to be answered
the bottom and the others in order. Consider Within one minute Have som

me time you while you writ¢

down your answers. When you

are finished, time the other p

son. Ready, go
i. A farmer ate two eggs every



ut the pile is on spot A, and that there are spots
C beside it. The problem is to move the coins
at a time to spot C according to these rules
(1) A coin may be moved only to an empty spot or
(2) to a spot with a larger coin upon it; (3) com-



















js P cfo . ’
plete the transfer, with’ the coins on C in tae same ™Prning hl . were mi
order in which they started on A, in 13 moves had po chickens; nobody eve ft
>) oy, BANE him any eggs, and he cever
% ’ " ; o bought, borrowed, begged or stol
ood 2% Y EF. 99% F BOWE }
Loe i doy Fe pees Neppieg SAF ues Where ae be ae FAI IIA IIA II IIIA I IDA ISI I IAAI IS ISIS ISS ISIS SISA AS
m oo; doy @ ae suo, ~~
) ‘uo Om pUe Tt Uy + th 1 eggs? MAKE the 8 equations in this - St wad wane Gh; Maem clock
2. Brown carried a bag of Gour l puzzle total “32,” both across be i t if y 2 ee i Mowe sivek
Jones carried three bags the size and down. However, the first two } i | 2 Oo 1) Gat zee oan ghenye trust
of Brown's. But Brown's toad VERTICAL columns must use b :
was heavier. Why? only ODD numbers under 20, 2 | Time? Be Roney Se mur
$4 farmer Had &-8/7 has while the third column must have e choose a i
stacks in one field and 5-4/9 ha '! EVEN numbers under 23. ,
RAW a continuous line that does not cross itself, Jsaeks in another fie A He put = —— , cr | VICTORY 30-hour alarm | NEW DAWN 30-hour alarm seems
; | lock ~ blue or | clockinbandsomecream, 2"
but ercsses; once, all the lines in the figure be- (yom all together, How many did orf ‘ft aI T we "2 Lt oe oye | , clock in cream, or bhue or green case with é T
low, and find a weapon George Washington used ».. faye then? 80198 doje Pujuusog sseAeuy \ green case with plated



long before he became a General. 4. Each of the Hubba brother i
has as many sisters as he ha
brothers, but each of the Hubbo ;
sisters has twice as many broth-
ers as she has sisters. How oian)
brothers and sisters in the Hubba
family ?

5. Nugget Nate’s mouphait

SAW Gittings, +inch diat | Plated fittings, 4-inch
, dial with full lumin-

f) with luminous spots.
| , ous numerals, Also

Also available non available nondumk
luminous. A precision nous. A superbly
toade alarm clock, com- made alarm clock
f pictely reliable that you can always trust.

















shack is almost buried in snow, 3 JO: S IE : Z Sota ;
and the temperature is 20 below : English Clocks Lid.
zero when he enters. His eyes By T. O. HARE j
move from the single match he eit: bia te“ aaub count Obtainable from all Leading Jewellers
has to a candle, oil lamp and fire I Josie?" said Mrs Wayz 3
ready to be lit. Which does hy | Brice oe her husband the 3 7
light first? h sala Wazygouse
qowur ou, * s18 904K | | “Le dike 8s, tt 3@, things ¢
{ ‘as ; att | kept ret ut give you ?
sg JOR Foe tO a Clue Wint fred” ft : 4
idiua e4oas Bateg nS rig & rapid mental calculatt :
1 DIB] S10M Baqe SUL TF 18504 if you multiply the squi §
} oF Josie’ sae (in year by :
2 f he. a e cube of her age tm years
rout O} O; Hey you get a number of seven : ANDO you CANT
7 gits’ :
“ACH of the following nun } *Do you indeed, said §
” “ Winifred sarcasticall "So ¢§ J
‘ ~ appears in iL ( ‘ aby, We know all a 1 iy Ga WRONG
n systematic | ; 0 nid toose §
ing to a systematic pla | j * We need one further datum : The regular use of
studying them, you ar ) | i ghe igs st of the seven digits § Lanalal ir Fi
ly what should be t ' oS 2a : 4 Hair | Food
ce ean | How old Is Josie? : will, by its action on
- 73, aesescnnsessssresescencsreseoenseusesassene the roots and scalp,

For example, give)

Can You Figure This? vw» 4.5

nourish every hair









a eojn.9g tsesdtTy uopUuo? gland and encourage
indicate the nex mber a: ‘tz 3) ie richer growth. It
: ; ‘canned sa ae 2 @ ‘sataip : a 1
j NSERTING a minus sign, multiplication sign A. 1, 3, 6, 8, 11, 13, 16, 18, geass jo saquina © 9} Se 20q provides nourishment
1 a division sign where setessary, complete B. 3, 10, 4, 11, 5, 12, 6, 1% 7, jo samod (jy eqn souls puy to the scalp and hair
7 : ¢ ¢ ee 410 'fZ 10 SL St es os

lowing sqenticn: ae ©. & 18, 20 % 2 20, me me Hor 3eq roots and corrects
$= 75 . 25, 2 : unt! aga fo 7B St Jaq }
é a sae aa ace Soe : yaMOd CIT AU) JO BEBIp feUy eal such troubles as |

a xj@ AQ POplAlp X1s-Aj Xue pampany x1Q nent no S 4H edM-AlUOME OY TSUOR NOS ' WOILATOS 183 JONFDITIFLNI

DANDRUFF Milter



; eis ‘ 7 1 | cea om ia
, ’ PARTIAL BALDNESS =
VORB Db | | mise oil
¥ | Ruane and the New Bonnet—2 THIN & FALLING HAIR rub THERMOGENE
ALL -SATUR DAY PUZ2L | The daily application of this Hair

Food results unfailingly in a really eae Rub all over
E | beautiful glossy head of hair. | your chest, throat, and back.
LANALOL No. | With oil (Yellow It does you good in two Its healing warmth relieves
5.8 | ALOL No. 2 Without oll (Green ways — you rub it on congestion, and breathing the

Label) for hair a is . rey, oily —

the
hem a







aay leasant medicinal
{rom | hee nt and cooli and you breathe it in! ae pe . YAPQUE: If gives
ue vard | LOL CREAt (Blue Label). A ee ears nose, throat, and lungs.
o SQUTRM

eas hair d
ANA lL SOLIDIFIED (Bakelite |
EANAL OL "sobipiriED | DOUBLE- ACTION

LANALOL SOAP SHAMPOO (Red

7 SS steer THERMOGENE

r go h work etches a basket and a cloth to | Local Distributors: }
h a ava = Wil 03 frum? w Mise Laven a GENERAL AGENCY CO., Lanalo wan MEDICATED RUB
© instead fetch a new bonnet M good time to catch the ”

Bhat Miss Lavender has been she'says as she gives nhs ‘ (Barbados) Ltd. ft TeoweLs In big glass Jars and handy dandy Tins
|

word)

You have to urrange
il 50 words in suc
in order that the
relationship between
any word and that
next to it is governed
by one of six ruleg.

RULES

i. The word may be
an anagram of
word mh a ae ‘



Rupert finds that his mojher
wants him | oO go on quite



be very, very a
1 '
a long delighted to be







2 1t
synonym of “he we word that pre A typical succession of words
cedes it. * aise k e. Bie ‘ain — Storm
3. It rl ‘orn reen

adiine 08 oarleiter to, aubktaeti

one letter from, or nging one at

letter in, the preceding word. sia tt Wh oe ordi iit
aI aspoala, an—Roman — Manor—Mayor—

the Seine oe in re Co pranien — Patinch — _punes

simile, metaphor. or association Dri ;

of ideas. I
5. It may form with the genue —

preceding word a name of a wy Ba oh gel a Waite

well-known person, place, or: Steak—Steam

thing in fact or fiction, TY im e— Table—Stabie

P.O. Box 27 | = TRSI/! “SS















Kidneys



rid
Firm

6. It may be associated with Film—FUl—C harge—-Onse'! |
the preceding word in title or action of a book. play, or other W'!the-SQUIRM
composition London Express Service



Fly by Constellation to





The Lightning Pick-me
The Safe and Wong



TABLETS
THE LIGHTNING PICK-ME.UP



And Save iis On “Off Peak’ Fares

Your flight by p: ivized Constellation Speedttrd
saves you days of travelling time — extra time
© do and see more on business or pleasure,





| You relax in deep-seated comfort, enjoy complimen:ary
| reals and mealtime qarinks in flight high above the weat! “ YEAST-VITE ” Tabiets give you fast relief from pain and follow it up by
N . a on er helping you to feel better and brighter afterwards. Each ““YEAST-VITE”
pele Sacha pay not eve n a tir Tablet is a scientific combination of analgesic — or pain-relieving ingredients
attentive B.O.A.C, service. —together with the important stimulant, Caffeine and the valuable tonic
B OA C E Vitamin B:, Test the effect with the next pain or cold that attacks you! As the
IN 1908 Prof. C. V. Boys made the following | WATE, takes good care of vou unpleasant symptoms fade and you begin to feel your old self again you will
remarks in his Presidential address to the | , be one more added to the countless thousands of people who have proved the
Physical Society in London : Piaeegitete aes po great benefit of * YEAST-VITE” ‘ Pick-Me-Up’ Tablets! Get a bottle TO-DAY!
BAKBADOS Non “ BH F
“The Lubricating property of oil depends | RET er a as . Qu e Relsoves
on something which is at present un- | | FA FARE | ,
known..... no-one knows what oiliness | | od
is” od LONDON -- 1,560.10 1,301.60
oe Ly | a Paya
This blissful state of ignorance continued until Fed NEW YORK _.. 518.10 st } . ;
is bli ig , 2 icy
March 1920 when Wells and Southcombe pub- ge PARIS +h 1,560.10 1,301.80 i] a U 4 y.. L ¢ | A
lished a paper showing conclusively that the | MIAMI 406.50
“oiliness” of a mineral oil could be substan- ie et ~ 4 ¢) ES é iis
tially improved by additives. Oils made on | Consult {
the Wells Southcombe process became market- | Atrwaye’ Lowes boa or ge West Indian | 4 3 VE R i} H iE ESS
ed throughout the World as a. — bados. Telephone reet dgetown—Bar- | ee

NERVE anv
RHEUMATIC
ails

GERM OIL y
Pag tn uh a. #~ ! Y . Q. 0): A. [
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LID. |

SRITISH OVERSEAS AIR W



AY CORPORATION mde
Pe me weal iS Sereerstenererens i _ st












ee ee Oe

i SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN



HENRY





BY CARL ANDERSON

We never

a let go!

/ Vigilance over the high quality of

e “Black & White” is never relaxed. Bicnded in
= the special “‘ Black & White ” way this truly

eutstanding Scotch is in a class al! its own.

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY

Ine Seer th in the Blending

Scotch Whisky Distillers






FOR IT!.. /|

en

> io
HE'S FALLING }|



By Appoir tment te:

to HM. King oge Vi James Buchanan & Co. Led,



JAMES BUCHANAN & CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND









177 DADDY, AREN'T 4"
| (yOu COMING UP
‘7 AND KISS ME P



MC WAS iT you)

I KISSED








DADDY, AREN'T YOU
COMING UP AND KISS
ME GOODNIGHT ?

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

Lh
y



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only





























G SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Brancnes “"Tweedside,
Speighistown and Swan Sirees
Usually Now Usually Now
Tins Brisket-Beef (4-Ib) 4.20 4.00 Tins Anchor Powd. Milk a nie
Tins Aylmer’s Fruit Salad 85 80 Tins Smedleys Peas 49 45
, Pkgs. Shredded Wheat 48 12 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 23 19
IT LOOKS LIKE WE'LL «HE HAS ENOUGH HOSTAGES
HAVE TO PLAY ALONG, --DALE... THE CREW... THE BRAINGOYS! THIS
FLASH {iG MOE KNOWS GUARDS ! NO...ALL WE STIFF WAS SPOILIN'
THE FUEL CAN BE Cua CAN DO IS STALL FOR





MANURACTURED IN THE
PRISON LAB! AND IF

E TRY ANY TRICKS... |

AE... AND PRAY!






THE COLONNADE GROCERIES








, w= OF THIS RING / SHE'LL
Iv LOOK IN THAT POOR, BANDAGED | | BE HAPPY TO GET IT BACK,
GIRL'S EYES/ LUCKY WEE WHATEVER HER NAME 5...








mone Enyoyable by

AUSTIN.



4 OMe pam-[e

~at ee ORNL AE EO Rae SRE TE 84
‘





LOOK AT You! YoU USED
TO DRESS LIP - LOOKED
DAPPER -NOW LOOK AT
YOU / CARELESS -LNTIDY-
LOTHES

THAT I WILL. OO-AND
THERE'S NO TIME LIKE
THE PRESENT-





STRANGE - I'M
WEARIN' THE
GAME SUIT-





| i We have been advised by The Austin Motor








Co,, Ltd. that cars are readily available under
the Overseas Delivery Scheme for visitors
to England,

AUSTIN=You can fiepens on it!

CALL IN EARLY TO ASSURE DELIVERY
70 SUIT YOUR ARRIVAL IN THE U. k.

(I'M. SORRY... SO. SORRY THINGS
. HAD TO TURN OUT THIS
_ WAY?

<.

~ —SsECKSSTEIIN
=. ./ BROS.




YI DONT KNOW? THERES A LOT | DONT
NOW ABOUT YOU. YOUR NAME, YOUR
FACE..WHY YOU DRESS LIKE THAT**IN
THE JUNGLE - re






LEGEND! YOU'RE MY GUIDE. IF YOU DON'T

= oe
DOK Hi! 4
OOK HEDGE GET RESULTS, I'LL FIREYOU++ OH!

GOING IN CIRCLES FOR DAYS!| 1 00
ARE YOU TRYING IO KEEP ME) THAT?
AWAY FROM NATIVE .

BAY STREET










A40 Somerset



A RTL EEE A NET NRRL OND AT NR SONNET ATE TR










PAGE FOURTEE

———L

N







CLASSIFIED ADS.






































SUNDAY ADVOCATE



| PUBLIC NOTICES

TELEPHONE | 2508. NOTICE
grap wnwtibten anus i nile a a tla THE PARISH OF ST. JOHN
All persons or firms de wit
r Parish are kindly asked end the
THANKS FOR SALE sccounts to the undersigned not later than
inniahesscenisttdainieiiinaiaie the 15th inst
aaa RS. FRASER,
CUMBERBATCH The Cumberbatch AUTOMOTIVE Dee id
family beg through this medium to —_-—— — 2.2.52—2r
return thanks to all those kind friends EE
who sent wreaths, letters of condolence T. S. Kinch. Di BARBADOS CLERKS’ UNION
or in any way expressed their sympat! 7 28.50 The Annual General Meeting of the
in our .recent bereavement Good conditior above Union will be held at the ¥.M.C.A
ss Telephone 207. | (Naval Hall) on MONDAY 10th March
aaa. Pa —" ** 1 1952 at 5 por
LEWIS me tie _undersignes sAR—1 oo Notices of ind/or question:
thanks through this med oe i Teng Car. | tor discussion be sent in writing
who sent wreaths, letters, c App schar illaby, St. | 5, a in a yith
other expressions of sympathy Andrew, 2.2.52—1n ices Ee a n accordance wit!
who also attended the funeral of ou . i th at " te eten
beloyed husband and father Charles] | CAR—1995 Ford Engine Gear Box and ot ue ciated tines tome omen |
Mitchell DaCosta Lewis ae fae — ae | ¥ | Sra between the hours of |
Ursula Lewis (Wife), Colvir St. Andrew 2.3.52—1n March 1952,

Da



Sheila: and Keitha





4 p.m and 6 p.m. any evening.

CHRISTIE SMITH,
















































; ae CAR—Austin 10 H.P. Engine, recently zn cho
(Brother). Gladstone : rebored. Price $390.00. Phone 5128. General 7.
ee 2.3.52—1n 7

. CAR: Morris Minor Car, Saloon 12,00} HARRISON COLLEGE SPORTS.

IN MEMORIAM miles. Excellent condition. Ring 8504 | TUESDAY, 11TH MARCH, 195%

1.3.52 ~2n | The School Sports will be he «
1.30 to 5.30 5 on
ARMSTRONG: In joving ry of our CAR: 1950 Hillman Minx condition | March All Old Ha s are
dear beloved wife and Ethe-Jas new. Apply: W. S. L. Tryhane, | cordially invited. Ther
line Eudora Armstrong Shop-] Maxwell, or Phone 8558, 3339. Boys’ Race towards
keeper of Eagle Hall, who was called 1.3.52—~2n | afternoon
to rest on 2nd March 1948 _ % nae
May glory be her resting place, CAR—1 Morris Car. 8 K.p., mileage J
Now absent from our seeing 24,000. For further particulars, apply NOTICE ;
A long provided place is there, H. A. Cuke, (Junior), c/o Bovell & THE PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
When Father calls His own. Skeete, Phone 4231 29.2.52—t.f.n ALL OWNERS OF DOGS
Ever remembered by the Armstrong] ——— —— .. __. | Who have not yet done So are rer
family. 2.3.52—In CAR: 1950 Wolseley 6/80 10,000 miles. | that their license ex d on the
—- Excellent condit'on 1951 Morris Minor | J@nuary 1952, a 5 be re
FOSTER—jn loving memory of my )11,000 miles. A-1 condition Fort Royal | Without any further delay
beloved husband Darry Alfield Foster [Garage Lid. Telephone 4504. WOOD GODDAR D,
who fell asleep on March 2nd 1951. 2.2.52—4n Parochial Treasure
Blossoms may wither 2.3.52—3
Flowers may die —— ——
Friends may forget you ELECTRICAL
But never will I
Bver to be remembered by his loving wife | PU LIC SALES
Elizabeth A. Foster, The Foster family! ELECTRIC Irons, toasters, mincers,

2.3.62—Iin,

and grandchildren,







GITTENS—In loving memory of my dear









| kettles etc. all reasonable prices.
Electric cooking ranges. At our new
showroom, dial 5136,















Also
K. R. Hunte & Co.,





































REAL ESTATE





















soumay, MARCH 2,





























oe
FOU RENT } WANTED
HOUSES ;
a j HELP
At RALPH I {D's Lower Bay St
Lock pet s s available for CAPABLE NURSE — Must sleep in
and be willing to do housework Apply j
Sine 47 having 2 large|to Mrs. J. A, Millington, “Jamdor,” |
tc | Maxwells Road, Ch. Ch. 2.3.52—2n |
Sho x svir Ls ——$—$—$—
Show Window self to’ oilet and} CLERK—A Lady Clerk for office work |
Wash Basir with a knowledge of shorthand and
No Shop 2 x ving 2 . | tybewntting: and general office work.
b ha Totlet Apply by le stating previous experi-
airs 6000 sq. ft. of ome ence, and lity to x A.B. C/o!
€ tior sving Tollet and Wash] Advocate Company. 1.3.82—3n
Basir Aght and delight! cool
Ali the above i 2 year SALESMAN—For Commission y
ease business. Opportunity to travel fslands
Apply Ralph Be Phone 5010 after} with Ta promotion for right man
hours 8657 2.3.52--3n | Salary tmhonthly. Subr Photo- |
roeugenereseeeereereeenomnrenfenreatin era Bes (confidential) |
BAS RA, Bathsheba, $t, Joseph. Apply Box H. J. K. Barbados Advocate. |
R. Pickering. Windy Wold, Hindsbur 2.3.52—3n |
Road, St. Michael. 2.3.52—2n i
—-—— —-———— -- MANAGER Rockley Golf |
BERESFORD — Maxwell Road. Fully = beaters In t over Club |
furnished, from the Ist March, 3 Hed- bedrooms, living: |
rooms and all modern conveniencés oe sconce oentan ete. also free
Apply: Nurse Pilgrim. Phone 8101. | ight. water and Taxes. Know je of
1.3. 62—2n | Gott an advantage, canvassing will dis-
| quality. Apply by letter to Secretary
BUNGALOW Fully furnished on St. | from whom further particulars can be!
James Coast (7 miles from town), 3 bed- | obtained. 1.3.52—t.f.n
rooms, 2 toilets and? baths. All modern
veniences. Dial John Lamming, 2072 ‘ELLAN
29.2.52—3n | MISC EOUS

le
FLAT Avalon”, Collymore Rock, for |

4 months from Ist March. Dial 3696,

BOARDERS: Male,



Local or Foreign,
| quiet respectable district—near to town—



1.3.52—t.f.n | Bus stop at door. Phone r. .
t ISHE| 9OMS, with y
' ae oD pee Manliness mimic | Person interested in running small ex-
2.3.52—1n |clusive Chub catering to tourist trade
» | which will also carry items for sale

on the

FFREK"—House éalled “Ferek" to this type clientele. Attractive prem-
sea at Worthing. Fully furnished, sn- | ‘ses located mie Apply
ding refrigerator. It has 4 bedrooms | (Confidential) x, rbados
Apply at Cnystal’s Guest House Advocate. .2.52—3n

1.8.52—2n

—_—$__——$$—$$—— TT

(NT
REQUIRED TO RENT: Furnished

MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with House, 4 bedrooms St. John district or
Since and Linen, Good Sea-bathing. | "ear for 2/3 years. Full particulars to
For further particulars. Apply to Alma Box.G. H. Advocate Co. aniioe:

6 Coral Sands, Worthing.
2.2.52—t.i.n.

Lashley No,

TWO INJURED










































pos

i lich Cause

Fool if
ilied in 4 pay

a and Itching
Stopped in
7 Minutes




po you
































badly “that nearly
« oie you “y woe?
x skin on feet crack and
peel? At blisters between
your toes the s of your
feet? Do the Wisters break and
rub apd cause morg blisters of
form? Do you 1 get 80 ‘Sore &
es that the tually bleed? If zy .
yon suller tr foot troubles, | | Get m from your ohemlat
you should hat the real}today. Al it tonight and yo ;
cause | ' ungus and that| notice @ renee aus impre nt
you ca Ke { yaur trouble | 14 the morning, - in : oe
lyo t is or parasites derm will have kill the germs,
Wipoka ho. trouble parasites, and fungus respopelbie
. F ; or your trouble,
icILLS THE CAUSE for yourself that your skin sapialy
Ordinary ointments and liquids is becoming soft, clean, smooth, and
ean not do much good because they | healthy, but continue it ina the 3 days
do not f or kill the underlying | longer to e sure tha’ results
cause of your tre uble Fortunately | are coneeay tory, and at
it at last is possible to overcome | the end of this . eer feet are
these foot troubles and also even| not completely e itching,
the most stubborn ringworm infec- | cracking, peeling, 6,9

Nixoderm w

doctor's prescription
this guarantee

tion with the
preacrip-

Nixoderm—based on the





tion of a famous English skin s to put Ni mm
clalist and now imported by leading | days and t if one
chemists. Nixoderm is pogitively | istied in eve
guarantced to end your foot trou- the emp!

ble, and has these 3 detinite actions: | will be

1. Tt kills the germs, parasites, and | from your ¢!

fungus responsible for these foot" antee pro



——= a

SHIPPING NOTICES





































1952

REAL ESTATE

JOHN
ha.
BLADON

@ ce.

A.F.8., F.V.A.

Bes ALwAES ‘avai

FOR SALE
































“LYNCHBURG”, Sth Ave. Belle-
ville — An attractive and well
proportioned 2 storay house situat-
ed on a corner site of 12,500 sq.
ft. Contains 3 galleries (1 enclosed),
large See Pon study, modern
kitchen, Bedrooms, garage e'
accepted for quick

Low
sale, gwner going abroad.



“BYWAYS”, New Rd.—
A pleasant, * -war stone
bungalow of c construc-

it.
ith wash!



; OURT ‘ .
See eras sprees” fell asleep | Ltd. 29.2. 52—3n HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | gpe y seein — Souler residential ‘ “e vie, Bel taller
ol e288: CO aeen, Sey TTERIES house, all conveniences, with party-| » _arge Ground Floor Flat avail- storey house z
de edhe cor g gig wholesale wa ave ciry GARAGE | *!zed living room, open verandah, kitchen able Ma Ae Uioderate inclusive Sabb. GENOA, March 1. ROYAL NETHERLANDS and dining
Ser oe Bed thks t ny rest CO., 4671 21.2.52-+ f.n.|and edly a Garage, laundry. 2| Redecoration and agreement for approved Two Brazilian women were se- STEAMSHIP co offen” ¥ sig kitenen, nt Al A storerooms:
But Jesus love thee best SOA Uke bie cea Saale Sie wiittide cite, Hockley New | erent Apply F 3. North, Liste {sen |riously injured today in a collision , - Passengers £08 ae tue garage and large wr Getdtens
: seme szo? Be ast eat »y orothy, | Receiver (without Cabinet) Feet | Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476. | CUS’ NN 2-523" lbetween two automobiles, Hos-|arcg pow eing 2tom OES Vincent, wrens and i Ane, Toente sre about % of an agre
nek, stems (wile), Dapuane ROSY» I 3 . 13.2.52—t.{.n YNS TC, a . NAIRE, 22nd February, . sling ednesday 27th inst. w fruit trees and pasture, a
Nellie, Mrs. Viola’ Tudor (children), |*i"s, Opp. George street, Reine Rd =o via ae | eae a mn Wor, Sone pital officials gave their names as| Ms. HERSILIA, Ist March, (1952. contains good building plot on
Cardon Tudor {son-in-law) si niesas = LAND—A small parcel of land situated | 2°74 December 1952. Apply: Mrs, W. T Gotero Boasdas and Nagra Gon ae. FES TUNGSBORG, 13th Marah, 1952, The Mi. jand, Pasgnccrs will ac- corner site.
»3.52—In. DIOGRAM _19 ; — lin Road View, St. Peter the property of | G7 : no . W. 7! but there were not able to reveal | 5:5, COTTICA, list Match, Q cept Cargo for
——. Cee e et a ed ekentiant | Stanley King. Situated on the north by OE EERE Pent Sal their hamnen in Brasil —UP, SAILING ITO PLYMOUTH AND Dominica, rrat, “HOMEMEDE”, Garrison— This
SMALL—In loving memory of our dear} -ONt 0! 00. May be seen|Albert Forde on the south by Rupert ene a ae Aik ee ee a. AMSTERDAM Nevis and St. Sea Friday Drogerty is ideally situated for
friend and God-mother Mrs, Hilda) aocta Ring Pie. ‘Timpson Lodge | Holder butting and bounding to Public ee i M.S. WL EMSA aren wouruarst, 1858, 7th March 195 most people in this ever popular
Small who has departed on March | coool 95.933 M7 2.92--an | Road. Size 100 x 90, Apply to Stanley PART ONE ORDERS SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND i" ", whilst not
1, es ae ee ns s : ; King. Shermans, St. Peter 2.3.52—1n pu hele white sade eins baa cae My. “CLARA” will pooemt . s ce foe, te its
= Me thet stands as all true lives | ee mn : 4 _= * ruary, b. argo an verandah cannot overlooked, a
Rave stood _ WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGERATOR: |7|T.Np NEAR ROCKLEY GOLF CLUB LI£UT.-COL, J. CONNELL, O.BE,ED, *» |S.S. BLATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952, and Sepenes. a so common with modern
Firm-reoted in the faith, that God is} Cubic feet, Ring 8504. 1.3.62—2n | FS eelient building site for sale, good Commanding, SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBU be notified. This bungalow was erect-
TS . :
WESTINGHOUSE REFRIGHRATOR 4.6. | tesidential section, adjoining north side} j..u. wo. 9 THE BARBADOS REGIMENT wiore, lies soo ie out 1939 & {x constructed of
Ever to be remembered by—Ruth Smith | ic feet in Saptaah Badulititen tor OR #5-| of Golf Course,‘ moderate price. For | issue No 2 oe ie .S| BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952. ith a shingle roof. There
and family 2.3.52—1n | tormation dial 2115 or 4972 details see JOHN M. BLADON & Gl i PARADES — TRAINING 2 o< Cea Tah att i \ i 8 Bove Werpodan. living soait, 4
carne ‘ ’ “hi 4640. 8. 51—t.f, i LIN RIN AND CURACAQ bedrooms, , ‘servants’
SMALLIn loving memory of my dear 1.3.52—2n | Fhone 5.8.51- wife Hilda Small, who was called to HQ Coy.—Interior Economy—Checking kit—(All ranks are required to bring 8. P, MUSSON, SON & CO, about 7,400 sq. ft.
higher service on March Ist 1951. FURNITURE AUCTION ae erate s of sigthing and ecuipmant ispuedy. +i rie wai cape ak Agente 5 5 = =
I long for, household voices gone peipiaiiongein oy is on the open and miniature anges; ose not firing w: o . = = . = i,
For vanished hope * long CABINETS: 2 Kitchen Cabinets in Ta CAR—Ford Prefect Saloon 1950 Model ace “B" Coy will do riot ‘drill, —s BRP iene built bangslow
But God has leg my dear one condition “Diat 8545. S. Weatherhead, | damaged in accident. We are instructed |) 7ynnM oe Ca di N\ ti shingle roof, very well front
i. ‘ - , | The Signal's Platoo Cc is fi e des w
weer Tuan” meee Yaatos p's rnin | de, thi went forsale by, sucttin | Sn‘ uondays and Wedngigia. ress ns “PeeP TH NO SRD Pee nadian ‘Navona teams jipe A A Pg
Brereton. "2.3,52—In. LIVESTOCK at 2p.m. John M. Bladon & Company,| Band Practices. ve held on Mon. 3, Tues. 4, and Wed. 5 Mar. 82 nn kh errr || ge ait fe EY jgapde and gine
uctioneers, 2.3.52—4n " | EE kitchen ne Yoom,
Recruits
WEEKES: In loving memory of our dear 7 SOUTHBOUND
husband and father Robert Evans ‘ COW: One Graded Guernsey Cow giv- I will set up for Sale at Chimborazo, |, et ls Mgr training om Monday 3 March 1952. ak 1 AS, ae, pagty, 9 serene poms A of
Weekes who departed this life on|ing twelve pints milk daily, third Calf. | St. Joseph one board and shingled House | ~ Pan . ; a ” closed and there is direct
March 2, 1948. A. W. Williams. Ae db nds | te x 10 and thedrost 80 Mongey March | “She Skidot Wétween the Oppoers and Ws & Santeants for, the, Boris “wcores | | HORM Siiat Cnuimme oe) Tye Re ae eee: : ee ee Recess to Whe yea with good bath-
Till memory fades and life departs, |} ————_—_—_—_—_____________ | 3, 1962 at 12 o'clock noon WOs & th a - Offwern 008 iy, Wee won ne . Serjeants. Se ‘ * + 14 rh, March 24 March ee
You'll live forever in our hearts.| GOAT: One Alpine Goat, fresh in Milk, | Terms Cash, 3. ORDERLY OFFICE . + es :=NDIN:
Remembered by—The Weekes Family,| First Litter. Apply: E. Rayside, White R. A. LER, | ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDE — SERJEANTS FOR WEEK ENDING eiartias dvi iie Hin 'vely
Henry's Lane 2.3.52—I1n | ha oa St. Michael 2.3.52—1n Hoyeninet Auctioneer, | Orderly Officer Lieut. E. R. Goddard NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arriy Arrives well constructed modern home
_ : Lat a oe ist. “F | __ Orderly Serjeant 234 Sit. Williams, E. D, | Barbados Barbados Boston St John Halifax cleverly designed for easy running
mith gous weded atta ee, wow | — Nex orderly Office Li “LADY RODNEY" .._». 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March Rae eee ea: oem
yg Sg A Anni? ee ; Ouderiy Cicer Yiieut, we. iti “LADY NELSON” |. ..22 March 24 March 3 April. 4 April? April Pee eee, etie to eae
INTERESTING TO Gibbs, Hindsbury Road, St. ofientel UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER S " 'eg.COX, Maior, — CRUISER +a. @ April TApa = — 14 April 17 April tiled bathroom with separate
hs "| By instructions received from the Th ee & notes For further particulars, apply to— pws , tiled kitchen, laundry,
VISIT: MECHANICAL ean Co. I will sell on Friday, PART JI ORDERS " oe j with st apartets Say Meee Cae?
‘are h at Messrs. Chelsea Garage HE B: AD GIMEN L NO. o iccess
You can now get Pinfold Street (1) 1949 Standard 7 ee ane OFRtAe NO: ¢ f of stone with
Office ecuinpmernt of all kind= Steel] Vanguard. (Damaged in accident) Term rr STRE NGTH DECREASE — Resigna’

Your usual WARM WATER BATH
IF THER

E iS GAS IN HOUSE



Safes, Skandex Visible Records,














cash, Sale at 2 p.m.







|

and and Standard Typewriters, Adding and VINCENT GRIFFITH |
oe at 29ur Gae Shommite Porce: Calculating Machines, Duplicating Auctioneer
lnin Bama Gas Geysers ... Machines. Bradshaw & Company. 2.3.52—4n. |
® minutes you can have warm bath 28 .2.52—t.f.n. a }
SC US UNDER THE SILVER
MISCELLANEO HAMMER
ANTI ON WEDNESDAY 5th by order of Mrs
Gliss, Waa aa Jewels, fre ehiver | ly G. Chase we will sell at “San Souci”
Watercolours, | Early books, Maps, Auto- | %¢nsinuton New Road her Furniture
All_ who are members of grephs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop yn which ineluges
A.M.O.R.C. and other inter- adjoining Royal Yacht Club. i Tip-Top ee Table, Upright |
s ora 2. “hairs, very good erbice Chair, Settee
ested persons are invited to 3.2.53—tEn. | via.” Sideboard, Ornament Tables, |
attend a BO) SPUN—A Uphols Arm C r, Rockers, TFiant |
lovely un from Italy in ¢ Stands all in Mahogany: Glass and China, |
SERIES OF . Thirty Beigns and louts, usually | Single Iron Bedsteads and Beds, Mahog. |
$1.86 reduced for one w to $1.73 yard. | Pressing Table, B.W. Chairs, Larder, |
Visit KIRPALANI an 273 7 Three Burner Oil Stove, Good Coffee |
'2.3.62—1n, | Mill, Kitchen Utensils, Glass Doors,

MEETINGS

ul



BOX CART: One Low Mule drawn



ars, Dial 2622 or Burton,

Pine Road







Windows
items,

and Shutters, Ferns and ot

her |



a Box Cart with spare wheel, built t Sale 11,30 o'clock, Terms cash.
2 my ne yest, Breage carny a cow. Apply: Mrs. J. Hi. Wil.| BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
’ kinson, Erin Hall, St. Michael. Auctioneers, |
ae every Tuesday Night ' 2.3.52—3n 2,3.52—2n. |
a 2.3.52—1n COCOANUT PLANTS: True Dwarf
iE 2 Type, large, healthy Plants. For partic- LOST «& |



et

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

EASTER CARDS '
MOTHER’S DAY
CARDS

Spanish—English, English—Spanish
Dictionary ar
Everything Shakespeare ever
wrote. Rudyard Kipling’s verse
(over 800 pages).
GLASS — $1.50 1
a
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE















sir

ju




ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

st

Py

De

oo

Just Received .

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply

>

G. W. Hutchinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street





NOTICE

not be Modernised.
Whether you are furnishing

a Home or an Office the
Modern Furniture Co-opera-
tion can do the job to suit

Why

ur taste and your pocket.

. why not stop in and give
us your order, whether it’s
omueeey, Birch, Pine, Fir
or Deal. Your orders are
promptly dealth with, so re-
member the place...

THE MODERN
FURNITURE
CO-OPERATION
DEPOT

: }
Opp. Sobers Lane
8 .
Â¥ 99699999950 0965555 5

Tudor Street
FPF LIE EEE EEE ELLIS SSD

500%
‘ :
2 seibiediledneliaeccosesoosoncqesesanee

Shirts with



co.,, LTD., Dustribuicre. Phone:



No

Sailing

nearest.

2.3.52—1n













for a aay coe shirt? ys yave in-
numerable s' designs and qualitieg.
ne ee colourful scenery

THANI BROS,
29.2.82—t.f.n

MENIER’S Breakfast Cocoa in “% Ib, &

1d map a specialty.



ib. tins, At all leading Grocers,

1,3.52—2n



MOSQUITO NETS: Two double,
ygle and oddments. Ring 8504

MENIER’S Brgoktont Cocoa. Shipment
HAMEL-SMITH

st received, K.



LK SCARVES:

Wm. Hy. Street

29,2.52--t

——$—$————————— es

STRAW MATS. Fancy and colourful,
ec Bedrooms and Dining room, also
up. Can you beat it?

por front 88c.



THANI Bros. Dial 3466
29.2,52—t.f.n
TRY a cup of delightful MENIER'S
Breakfast Cocoa TODAY, Take no sub-
stitute ! 3.52—2n



TORNADO—International K.41. ares
«

a ey oe equipment,

Cost $700.00 now
ers. ser Fviews. Telephone L

18.11, 51—t.f.n



“Two SAILING “BOATS— Mallard 21 ft.
Marine
Engine and complete equipment $1,700
Also International Tornado well

Craft, with Auxiliary

AT

He
WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

ROBERT i MacLEOD
AND

PENCIL $ WATER

CQLOUR
FIGURE DRAWINGS

of West Indian Subjects
BY
HAROI.D CONNELL
—

—O-

10 asm, — 6 p.m.

1.3.52—2n



4748.
1.3,52—2n

Barbados View, Pure
Silk Scarves with colorful Sceneries and
Map of the Island $3,968 each, THANI,



BARBADOS MUSEUM

Open February 9—March 8





































POSSS POD PODOSSSIOTGN

NOTICE

Will the friend to whom I
loaned my special Harrison College

Prize Book awarded in 1897 please
return same to Mayers C/o
one Advocate Advertising Dept, This

is very valuable to me.

V. PARRAVICINO.

&

FOR SALE

“OLIVE BOUGH”
(Seaside)

At Hastings. Dial 3111
D. F. DeABREU

The Usual Asking or
Putting On Price. Applies So As
To. get the Upset Price, The House
has 4 Bedrooms, all modern Con
veniences, Very Good Condition,
Enough Land to Erect 3 Bun

galows Inspection Only to Ap-
Seoved Buyers and By Appoint-
ment The Olive being Onk’ of

fn.

for

Native Species certain other
neal Species cannot Thrive unless with
Withered Boughs but the Native
Species Thriv e Luxuriant\y Else-
where; the Seedlings of a Very
Subtile and Enviable Species

Ord built with good racing record, known as Adamites and the lesser
To-day Bi Secretary, Rare Species known as Gomites
, . aici taieicl BP ecie. and Bustamites may be and should

be planted in Clear Soils. Libra
being the seventh and only Zodiac
Sign made of Metal under which
& was Born permits Me to Offer
one and all Real Estate Bargains
even if I am left to Freeze and
tpso Facto I Must Continue as
hitherto to be Honest and will
Never wnlike a Good and Ardent
General resort to Strategy, Pivots
and Balls. Truth and Right must
Prevail! Evil vs Itself! Con-
ecience lent and Exor-

able ak a Yeaduhun swings on
BRIGHTON,

Retribution! AT Sea-
side :— Almost



New Congrats
3 Bedroom American Design Bun-

ere: Modem Conventences,
about 10" . Gotng Under
2,700. iG NAVY GAR-

-_ahaee New 3 Bedroom 12
inch Stone Bungalow, all Modern
eae os about om *~

nder = £31 1

Son exr® By The Bus Co.,

2-Storey Stone Business Premises
and Residence, Conveniences,
Good Condition, Ideal for any
Business. Going Under £2,300. IN
ST.—Large 2-Storey Stone
Business Premises & Residence
with a Large Garage or Workshop,
all Conventences, A-1 Condition,





Teal for any Business, Vacant,
Can Yield $120.00 p.m. Under
£3,000 Can Buy It—-UPPER NEL-
SON ST..--3 Bedroom Residence,
Conveniences Good Condition,
about 3,500 sq. ft. Going Below
£800. Contact Me Almost
Anything in Real Estate uit
Can't-—Who Will’ ¢ Olive
Bough”, Hastings

%56999999996544000649000" S







DOMO SEPERATOR: One Domo Sep- LO
erator and Churn (Large) in good condi- ST
ion, PI b 3.52—
Hon. Ppone bap0, 1.3.52—2n | “CAMERA: One Camera (Kodak Ban- |
HERCULES BICYCLE: Raffle tickets|‘:™) In Leather Case, by | Passen
rt snle 1/- each (for charity}, Call at ady Rodney’ presumably left in taxi
A. -. Taylor's Store 1.3.52—2r between Aquatic Club = and Baggacg
eal rie an Warehouse, Reward offered for returt
L. to Gardiner Austin & Co., Lid. Passer
HO ‘DAY SHIRTS: Are you looking ger Dept. 2.3.52

In}
|

ns
506 Pte. Gibbs, R. A “B" Coy Permitted to resign from
ment ‘wef 1 Feb. 52.

2 LEAVE — Privilege

make an effort to attend.

Elimination Matches to select 4 players to re;
coming inter club tabf tennis tournament
take place on Monday, 3 Mar., 52 at 1 hours in the Drill Hall.

bers are asked to attend.
The Annual General Meeting of the R Sports Club will be held
Tuesday 4 Mar., 52, at 1700 hours in tip Delt Hall Members are asked
attend, especially those recently enlisted/

Will all those in possession of Regimental “tais

kindly return same to
Sports Officer on Wednesday 5 Mar., 52, at












WE ARE INSTRUCTED» te undertake a complete

CLEARANCE SALE at
RALPH DEARD’S SHOWROOMS
BAY STREET

on Monday and Tuesday the ara and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if ‘not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.



JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS

"Phone 4640 Plantations Building







. ¢ < ++ OA F 446
SPCEEEEAA LAE AP APPPDDODAPP D\Ny BEE

FOR PERFECT COOKING
SELECT THE

FLORENCE

STOVE



: AND
OVEN
tA
Beauty
and
Quality
Combined
: THE CITY GARAGE TRADING
‘ os LTD.

the Regi-

resent the Regiment in the forth-
be held at the Y.M.C.A. will
All mem-



on
to



the

AAS

|



&
PLPLPVPEE












Captain J, Redhead Granted 5 months P/Leave wef 1 Mar. AT CENTRAL EMPORIUM
os ae permission to leave the Co
0) . rm treets
| 407 Sit. Quintyne, L, G. “BY” Coy On 4 months’ P/Leave is granted per- ( er Broad & Tudor S )
to leave the Colony . ’
| 448 Cpl. Rudder, G. M. “A” Coy Granted 4 weeks’ P/Leave wef 25 Feb. You will find a fine assortment of
| Soto permission to leave the
7 jv
| 695 Pte. Quarless, N. Granted: 3 weeks’ P/Leave wef 3 Feb. e ‘ARPENTERS’ TOOLS .
62, with permission to leave the 5
Colony. a
556 Pte. Chase, P. D, E. “BY Coy Granted 2 weeks’ P/Leave wef 28 Feb. 1% Buy TO-DAY or pay more TO-MORROW !
52. ¥
M1. D. emurecor mc” | Zeosnennenees
The Barbados Regiment. SOOPIOSS woot 65%
T 1 w ants Mess ‘aie Saturda: Mar. 52. Th
here will be no WOs & Serjeants Mess on turday 8 Mar. e e
next Mess Meeting will be held on Sat. 22, . 52. Members are asked to Now Available

PASSE PARTOUT—In all Colours
BUTTERFLY TRANSPARENT TAPE—In 2 Widths
ART CORNERS—In Black & Grey

Also
An Assortment of
BOOKS ON PHOTOGRAPHY

Y MARCH WINDS DOTH BLow!
WHAT DO YOU KNOW ?
IT IS TIME FOR

TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
REMEMBER—
SIP it

—- TO ENgeY IT.
BLENDERS

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SQNS, Lid.

1

foe

TRY IT!

‘MENIER'S
BREAKFAST COCOA





Besides being nutritious you'll

ve no trouble
getting the children to drink it, They

love it!
GET YOURS TO-DAY!
“SA,

On Sale at all leading Grocers.

|| K. J. HAMEL-SMITH & CO. LED,

‘Phone 4748





-O-

Bridge Street













bungalow in ‘lewaant re

ts is over
i ghd there are

near USE”, IN!

Low: BE imber Te
living room, verandah, 3 bedrooms,
bath and toilet, kitchen, garage and
out-buildings. Good arable land
over one acre, all enclosed with

wall and fenci: very suitable
market yor chicken farm
Low figure

WDE, WELOWS, James
ee ae

ia st eee ve

eo evens ooo core

basement.
HOUSE,
Bae

is fe acreage in-
cluding a long streten of the
Crane beach, large coconut grove,
gardens planted with flowering





shrubs and shade trees. The coast-
al views vin id dly be excelled
and the is excellent.
Further tion may be ob-

FA os
tained from the sole agents of
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy.



great
care by the present owner. The
house has 2 wide roomy verandahs
at front and side, large

room, separate

bedrooms
kitehen, la

drawing
dining 3 good
(with vane beetes!,

“MALTA”,

St. Peter—Modern
coral house of exceptionally sound
construction

are well laid out and fenced.
and well water. A most desiral
and highly recommended property.

RENTALS

“NEWTON LODGE” — Maxwell
Coast. Fully furnished house
available long lease. Immediate
possession.

RESIDENCE — Beautifully furn-
ished with swimming pool, close
to town with excellent staff.

Available on lease to ap-
proved tenants fr May ist.
Phone 4640

Plantations Building






SUNDAY, . MARCH.,..2,--1952

CHURCH BBC. Radio vews In Brief
SERVICES Programmes |Cooking Class For Girls’ Club



















SUNDAY ADVOCATE









SSS SSS PEO FO

S Barbados Inter-School ATTENTION



PALE KL O








7 rEg.
ee ee 5 Athletic Uni MOTORISTS !!
PAUL'S—i.00 aim. Holy Com- SUNDAY, MARCH ¢ A six-weeks course in Cooking |and overturned. Foster, who wa" | ¢ AueHe nion
H 2 1902 - 1
od, 0.18 aan. Bitene th Precensias and Table Laying was recently on the platform, was injured and | ¥ ? - a. L NOTICE
Zolcmn ass and Sermon. 11.15. a.m. Tnternational Communism,|started at the Bay Street Girls'|the truck extensively damaged.| ATHLETIC SPORTS I
“~~ 4 < eu 2 eee i a m a 4 a
Sunday’ Sehool and Saptians, fine am, Ray's a Laugh, 12 (noon! The/Clyb. This Class if attendéd by M—1065 was slightly damaged i
. 8 Ss, 1220 p.m. News Analysis. - .} 1p. oe
‘ pI. RversiNg and sermon, , rivetner” @B—7.15 p.m % 20 members of the Club_ It is . at
Conant ees P 19 76M %6 58M #1 eM : ae - a ei on eo os
et . : : 08 SOS Set > ’ QIN
eres ae Bsh. jena Rervign at “pe te gee eee a armen caperenes by Miss Harper « CLLLPLPLLEOECLEET OOD 3| KENSINGTON OVAL As trom the 3rd of March,
ane * 449" p.m. “For the Common Good, 4.30) 0S Industrial Union. I offer, as, if and when Q| 1952...
sday: 7.20 p Mission Service pm Sunday Half Hour, § p.m. Music x) Friday, 21st March "wo y
ci a sts Open Ate Okabe sian, 6 p.m. BBC Symphony Orchestra, A parcel of books was presented issued— x CR (i 5 (i
a 7. » Open / vice 6.45 p.m. What's Cooking, 6.55 p.m./to the Boys’ a irls’ C x}
Chesed Road , Programme Parade and imterlude, 7 p.m. | yy 5 h ae nd Gis a 4 ciTy OF ¥ at ‘ 4
2 Boss Stations of the Cross The News, 70 pan. Mews Analvais, 7.15 | MF. - n ee — ile a x 12.30 p.m. will be at the promises ad-
E f p.m. C&ribbean Voices, 7.30 p.m uis Lynch o e. Modern High x . Stoute’s Dru tore,
Ddubje My Baptis Se: vr 2 joining ute’s & .
yee y Baptism Vow Semprini. aI lh School offered a set of boxing MON TREAL RY Kensington Stand: at the corner of Country ~
MELHOUIST ; ; suicsenaetiariatees gloves. 3 ADULTS: :«: 6 a ck Street e
: 2 ~ | I« / .
Sunday, March ind 1982 | 7.45 p.m. Donald Peers, 815 p.m.| Ten acres of third crop ripe 4% Bonds, payable Can- \| CHILDREN: > St 1 9d. i} shall continue to offer our
i, HY, 2 POUWOOIS Seti Tne: 32h Pm. Beigous! canes were burnt when a fire: oc- ada or New York ; % 3 ee ) customers the usual efficient
J. >. BoUKon, nOIyY Com- 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m Hom a |curred at Apes Hill Plantation, St. | Price> approx. 99 net, New \ | ¢ G Challen service im more 3
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. London Forum, | James at about 3.00 p.m. om Thurs- York funds. — The anege i surroundings.
«AxKe® BAY—9.0 a.m. Rev a 10.45 ‘p.m, Singing is so good a Thing.|day. They are the property of Suitable for Trust funds ne s x Pavilion: :-: 64d. — 4553
MOGUUKet, Oy Collniunon, 4 ~.M. BOSTON - : 2 . restment of proceeds .
Me eee kasi, WRUL 15.29Mc WRUW 11.73Me wRux |S. A. Wallcott of the same p'anta- ey the called Commons < | %
WHITEHALL—9.30 am. Mr. M Blunt, |7.75Mc tion and were insured. from the « yo kan so
o weed - ae Beets sa ‘etnias wealtr ot ustrala we
Coase MONDAY, MARCH 3, 19% George Foster of Bank Hall, St. | 1952/55 * =
‘ a 11.15 a.m, Personal Portrait, 11.30 a.m. i re @ ian Sin
sah ee Variety Fanfare, 12 (noon) The News. ee wie ae. the Gen. | x |
12.10 p.m. News Analysis. eral Hospital on,Friday afternooi Government of ae
Seal = cg am, Me D. Seo, 4607.15 p.m. 19 76M 25.53M 31.8M/in dn unconscious condition an er iS - ~ |
i wis & Joun ; 7 acca : :
4am. The News, 4,10 p.m. The Daily detained. Foster was a passen SOUT HERN .

BANK HALL—¥#.30 a.m. Mr. F. Moore,
Me. ad 2. Areadie
mm hiGas a.m. Mr G



Vie tate Lar reMes
noly Commurnen

Bhi AKL M. A. E
PNoiies, 4 pi. ee. B. Cros. Saera-
ment of we Loris Supper at exca
bes vice

DAAKLsivi-9 a.m. Rev. M. A. E



S, SuCKaNent OF Lue Bord s Supper





C, praiwascte
i, am GU. Brewster,
‘pom a A a inomas pacra-
ment of tne Lomas Supper
auvuin vsoatawe vam hvev bb
Cresvy. Sécrainent of ine Lord's Dupper,
(pom. Mr. &. harris
PROViet NCE —ii Bun, Rev. B. Crosby,
4 piu ovad wv Liarae
VAUXnALL—1li a.m, Mr, C. Jones,
7 p.m. mer i. Blackman
MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK Siniidi—i. aan. “Mornin
Service yweu ft hoy Commus.on
rreacner bb. be New, pan.
aVveling Service, t’reacner: nev, Bb.

dvew
GaACS HILL—11 a.m. Mor







Preaener
service y
2 kay ba orning service,
Preache ne 7 m. bwenmMs
bervice, Freacner:; Mr. O. K, Lewis,
MUN. GyM—LnY — ) p.m hvening
Servieé, rr€acner: Mr Keid
DUNSCUMBE A vening Service
Preacher War Ww s
snGr Hata por ening Serv-ce,



Preacner; mc. ft G. Smuw
EGULF BAPTIST CHURCH

TODOK STReaf—Sunday School 9.30
em Morning 10.0 a.m
LiatBeusinc Serve dle p.m Henoes
ot heaven under the auspices of the
bados jis over Rediffusion every Tuédday
und dPursdsv at ¥ p.m.

Worsmip



COLLYMORE ROCK a.M.t. CHURCH
11 am. Divine Worship; 3.30 pm
Sunday School; 7.15 p.m. Holy Com-
munion.

Monday at 7.15 pm the ACE
League will meet,

Minister:— Rev. E. A. Gilkes

8T. LEONARD'S CHURCH

Sunday, March 2nd — Lent 1

8 am Hoiy Communion; 9 am
Choral Eucharist; 10 30 am Holy Bap-
tisms; 11 am. Matins & Sermon; 3
pm ‘Sunday School; 7 pm. Evensong
& Sermon,
Holy Communion’ Celebrated — daily
throughout Lent.
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays &
Saturdays 7.30 a.m., Thursdays with

Hymns at 5 a.m; Fridays at 6 a.m
BAPTIST

ist Sunday in Lent
The ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11 a.m, Matins and Sermon, 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon, preacher at both
services the Rev. J. B. Grant, L.Th.,
Minister in chagre,

430 pm Monday, Wednesday, Fri-
day — training for youths, this will be
conducted by the Rey, L. Bruee-Clarke,
Assistant Pastor, assisted by Mrs, Olaa
Browne,

ST. MARY'S CHURCH — Lent 2
Matins and Litany; 8 00
Mass; 9 00 am Solemn Mass

330 pm Sunday €chool;
Children’s Vespers; 4 15 p.m.
700 p.m Solemn Evensong

preacher: Father F. Layne

WEDNESDAY STH
730 pm Solemn Evensong and Ser-
mon, Preacher: Father Frederick.
FRIDAY 7TH

& Sermon;
400 pm
Baptisms,
& Sermon,

, that

Service, 4.15 p.m, Melody from the Stars
{65 p.m. Interlude. 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Nights at the
Opera, 6 p.m. Listeners’ Digest, 6.30
pm Dance Music, 645 pm. _ Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade,
I pm The News, 7.10 p.m. News
Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Play Reading
745—10.30 p.m 25.53M 31 32M 49.42M
—
7.45 p.m Forty Tons of Cherub.
8 p.m. Think on these Things, 8.15 p.m
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m African
Survey, 845 p.m Composer of the
Week, 9 p.m. From ‘the Third Pro-
The News, 10.10 p.m
10.15 p.m. Science
Tip Top Tunes

gramme, 10 p.m
From the Editorials,
Review, 10.30 p.m



Tops In Fashion

from page 6
afternoon scene: cerise feather
patterns on dolphin green back-
ground; black butterflies on mid-

» night Blue ground, and an unusual

brown and white scroll pattern on
a-black ground.

The star of the collection was a
proofed tent coat — in pure white
grosgrain. This is the first time
white grosgrain has been
used as a raincoat material, Its
fashion points: round neckline
with. no-colar, round shoulder
line, and the fullness at the back
gathered into a yoke placed mid-
way between shoulder and waist.
The answer to those who doubted
whether this was practical, was
that the coat had already been
dry-cleaned, and had stood up to
the’ test.

Significant touches from the col-
lection: rosebuds rambling every-
where, buried. amongst the straw
ef a hat, placed at hip level on
the hem of a jacket black hats
trirnmed with white Life Guards’
plumes; and a tartan outfit — tar-
tan boater tartan collar on dress,
both matching the crinoline pet-
ticoat which showed a fraction of
an inch below the dres? hem.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street.
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

Healing.

SUNDAY, MARC?TT 2, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: CHRIST
JESUS,

Golden Text: Isaiah 11:1. There shall
come forth a tod out of the stem of
Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of
his roots,
rhe following Citations are ineluded
in the Lesson-Sermon:

The Bible: Then said Jesus.....u@ ye
continue in my word,.,..ye shall know
the truth, and the truth shall make you
free. John 8:31, 32.

Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy.

The divine image, idea or Christ was,

1130 am Breakfast-time Service, ig, and ever will be inseparable from
Canon Barlee,; 7.30 pm. Stations of the divine Principle, God. y
the Cross. Page 338.
———————





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and BUILDERS

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the following :—

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Phone 2107, 4406 or 3534

x
x
%
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>

4x

oo

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|

ger cna lorry which was involve
in an accident.
The accident occurred at

EUEECRDESEA

ibou

|
2.30 p.m. on Bennets Road, St | 414% Registered Stock due
Thomas, between motor lorry | 1977/82
M—1195, owned by Michael Hunt: | Price: 100 net London,

of Bank Hall and driven by Ken-
neth Scott of Quarry Road, Bank
Hall, and motor lorry M—1065
driven by Samuel Grimes of
Wavell Avenue, St. Michae), |

M—1195 struck an embankment

and/or

Government of

UGANDA





| 342% Registered Stock due
|X 1969.
FRIENDLY CRICKET | Price: 90 net London--
1.33% 5
Yorkshire C.C. will play the Both are full Trustee in-
Veterans C.C. a two-day cricket vestments interest payable
fixture at Friendship Playing} tax-free to residents outside
Field. The match begins to-day the U.K.
and continues the following Sun- 1 WERE
day. Play starts at noon, Lay J
Yorkshire C.C. will be repre- A MM. <
sented by:— Stockbroker.

T. Maynard (Capt.), O. Barrow,
C. Clarke, L. Blackett, C. Clement,
H Harewood, L. Mottley, R. Cum-
mings, A. Carter, K. Payne and
D Haynes.

Dial 4796 Hours 9—3
33 Broad Street, Bridgetown,
Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy

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Announcing the arrival of:—

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in 5 colours

For Verandahs and Floors

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Magazine Lane,







Thani Bros Lucky Cash Prize Drawing

$50.00 Cash Price goes to the lucky No. 16 bill dated
11/2/52.

Clerk’s initial M.C. also the amount spent which
is $3.57.

Any one holding the bill with above description
may please bring in this bill on Thursday the 6th
March at THANI BROS. STORE and get $50.00 Cash |
Price. To avoid complications it is necessary that.the
bill should have the same item as the one on the

|| FORD



duplicate which is in our possession. .

If the above is not produced within two weeks

time this f $ v n go to deserving _ || . Ltd
A oe eee ee ae oe earns | Charles Mc Enearney & Co., Ld.

Radio later.








\ , yo

CCAS =

Profil

FIGURE IT OUT FOR YOURSELF!

For example, let us see the Dollar and Cents difference in net
profit between the use of Cheap and “Pillsbury’s Best’’ Chick Starting

Feed.

PILLSBURY’S BEST CHEAP FEED
$13.60 per bag $12.60 per bag
or 15c. per Ib. or 14c. per Ib.
2 lb. cost 30c. 2 Ib. cost 28c.




a
bigger

SON Se ES
SAAR. GS




Versus

—15c.
—14c.
2c, more
PILLSBURY’S BEST Chick Starter only 2c. more per chick four to six
weeks of age. ss
PILLSBURY’S BEST~ fed chicks average five to six ounces “Heavier” at
six weeks. ¥

FIGURE POULTRY MEAT WORTH 48c. PER LB.

1 oz. = 2c. x 5 oz. — 10c. more value per chick.

10c.—2c. (Extra Feed Cost) = 8c.
8c, more profit per chick
500 Chicks $40.00 more Net Profit to YOU the Feeder, and a

better flock.
T'S SO SIMPLE TO GET BEST



4

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Results. and Bigger Returns feed the Best — PILLSBURY’S BEST
New stocks Starter, Grower and Layer just arrived - - -



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PHONE :—:

2229.






pa
SaaS



1

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|

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|



PAGE FIFTEEN





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LINEN NAPKINS .. $1.38 and $2.20 each
LINEN EMB. LUNCHEON SETS —

13 pieces $7.20 to $8.85 Set
LINEN LUNCHEON SETS--HAND PAINT-

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LINEN GLASS CLOTHS $1.24 each
LINEN GUEST TOWELS $1.80 each
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TAILORS AND CLOTHIERS
OF DISTINCTION






PAGE SIXTEEN



SUNDAY





ADVOCATE



SERGEANTS DEFEAT OFFICERS

In Shoot For Royal
Leicestershire Cup







The | isome silver cup pre-
sented to the Barbados Regimen
by the Royal Leicestershire Regi
ment in 1949, was competed for
on the 3! occasion at ine Gov
ernment Rifle Range on S
the 23rd February, 1952

The conditions are as foll«

Teams of 12, firing at 100 yar

nding, and lying at 200 1 30(
vards at 4-foot target

At 100 yd each men

hter ind 7 rds to al
tanding no rest Ai 2uuU ye
each member fires 2
7 rds. to cou

300 ach mem c
r I n at
( yu ng 4
3, fol Rap e
‘ ( d ll w
r ¢

Th
\' ‘ V ir vou f
Office t ’
accurate ci t +1
200 yards Reaching the 300
firing point ith what might V
been considered a comfortable
lead the Officers encountered diffi-

ulty mainly in the snapshooting
resulting in the loss of 69 points



The Sergeants and Warrant Offi-
s by steady rather than spec
tacular shooting gradually out-
listanced their seniors by
deserving 1 of 28 point

Throughout the event which be
gan in blazing sunshine at 2 p.m.
there existed a truly keen and
competitive spirit, and the after-
noon was concluded in the Ante-
Room of the Officers Mess wher
the Warrant Officers and Ser-
geants, guests, responded to
toasts.

as

The outstanding performers
this match were,
who se red 98 out of a possible 114
for the W.Os and Sgts., and Major
Walcott for the Officers, who is
also to be congratulated on secur-
ing 2 possibles at 100 and 200
yards in his excellent score of 108
out of a possible 114,

The following are the scores

in

RSM Marshall ,

WINNERS



MEMBERS of the victorious Sergeants’ team which defeated the Officers to win the Royal Leicestershire

Cup.

Big Upset In
Maiden Stakes

Arunda displaceqd Water Crest
The Field was off to a good between the 4th and 3rd furlong,
start with Caprice piloted by and Doldrum improved her posi-
Johnny Belle in the lead followed tion
closely by First Admiral, Water- As they came into the home
bell ‘and March Winds. They stretch Holder slipped Doldrum
raced in this position until they through on the rails and running
ached the three-furlong pole on strongly she passed Sweet
hen First Admiral (Holder up) Rocket and increased her lead to
took over the premier position. two lengths to win going away.
Coming around the bend places Sweet Rocket, Lutchman up, and
changed quickly but Holder still Lunways, Yvonet up, battled it
kept First Admiral to the fore to out for second place for which
race up the home stretch win- they ultimately dead-heated.
ner by a neck from March Winds —_——— -

who was second a head in front SEVENTH RACE

from page 1

of Miss Friendship.

HFS, PF Mo —
SERGEANTS ee : Creole Stakes
RSM M ! ‘ FOURTH RACE The field of ten got off to a
Ss arshall, H 3. G 96 f - « , rj j € >
8 Pe ‘ fair start with Twinkle, Cottage
Sue ion ot Barbados Guineas and Vonwise each carrying 2, %
CSM. Carter, G. A 89 Seven horses faced the Starter and 8 Ibs. overweight respec-
Set Goodman, R. C. 8 in this event the second 7% for tively.
oa ene re . po the afternoon. Getting off to a yYvyonet got off first with Joan
Set Reid, NE 69 good start, Holder pushed Cav- Star but was quickly overtaken
C QMS Quintyne, K 67 alier to the front and was lead- py Rosette piloted by Holder, by
Py any ane - ing when the field passed the the four furlong pole, They
tat oman, V » Ste ° ° tre ; s tak ‘
CQMS Hail, F. B 5g Stands for the first time. Dun= raceq in this position until they
querque ridden by Crossley was were well past the three furlong
937 running in the second position > ;
, : . t pole.
HLP.S. Per Man — 114 with Seedling third. Twinkle who had not got off
OFFICERS On reaching the four furlong 4 well now started to recover
ol i pole, Seedling challenged and jost ground and was now lying
eanios mcott g : c a! took over the second position jn the third position with Blue
Lieut, Gooding, H. B 2 from Dunquerque, keeping this piamond fourth. *
Lem, mouaatd, E.R a1 Place until the two furlong pole “Tn the meantime Holder keptt
th Gok Connell 7 78 we seat te. ’ ., Rosette well to the fore and com-
Capt, Neblett, C,'E. DunQuerque then made a bid ing around the bend Betsam who
Capt. Jordan, J’ R 77 and soon overtook Seedling. Car- },4q also moved up made a strong
Capt Hunte, GB 66 dinal also came into the picture bid for a place and eventually
Lieut, Peterkin, PoC $b nc ~ Be are up the fgnished second behind Rosette
Capt, Daniel, HR 37 home stretch there was a ding who-had raced up the straight to
. dong tussle for the premier pos : ‘ . > four lengths
i win comfortably by four lengths.
go9 tion and Dunquerque managed



12]- For ‘Bad’ Ese" "

Language

T h e i r Honours Mr, H, A.

Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell, Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday con-
firmed the decision of His Wor-

ship Mr. S. H. Nurse Police Mag-
istrate of District “E”’, who im-
posed a fine of 12/- and 3/- costs
to be paid in seven days or in
default 14 days’ imprisOnment
with hard labour on Helena
Bishop of Waterman’s Village, St
James, for using indecent lan
fuage on Thorpe’s Road on No-
vember 30, 1951.

Rishop appealed against Mr
Nurse’s decision and was yester-
day ordered to pay the cost of
appeal which amounted to 9/8

The evidence of the prosecution
was that while walking along
Thorpe’s Road on November 30,
1951 Bishop saw Julian Carmi-
chael who told her not to walk
over his land on which canes were
growing

Bishop took
Carmichael
abuse him, Two
Ethelbert Boyce a
Boyce—overheard
said to Carmichael.

objection
said and

to what
began to
children—
nd David
what Bishop

In confirming
Their Honours said
not proved the
the evidence of the two children
was manufactured or forced
therefore they had no reason fo:
disturbing the the
Police Magistrate

the decision
that it was

by defence that

decision of

’
| They'll
(I WOULDN'T MIND IF ¥
Y SHE COULD KEEP THE
| TPS, HERSELFBUT ALL
| THESE HAT-CHECK GIRLS
ARE ON SALARY THE
BOSS GETS ALL THE
owe DOUGH» oe

a

ss

I READ
THE Ci




Do At Every

cE
iS PLENTY

\T-OOM

CONCESSION IN A
JOINT LIKE THIS
MAKES A GRAND



iv Twinkle was
behind.

third one length

catch the Judge’s eye first by
neck ahead of Cardinal who was
front of

EIGHTH RACE

"i RACT Castle Grant Stakes
FIFTH RACE Vanguard was the only horse
, @ 7 scratched and the remaining six
B.T.C. Stakes got off to a good start. Passing

Gun Site carried top weight of the stands for the first time, the

Ake earn 4 1 ae a . eee order was Usher with Apollo and
ders ieee” Sprite, Fiving sae Mary Ann lying in the second
gon. and “Harroween : being and third prota respectively.
: ? reac 7 > five rur ug
scratched. The distance was over sy Creme ‘now t egan ; to eee
nine furlongs, the longest for the pole ross vegan t x

up from the outside, but Quested
in the meantime kept Usher well
— to the fore, making every pole a
Embers, J. Belle up, and Re- Wining one,
bate, Quested up, led the field as It was then left to Cross Bow
the horses went past the judges and Mary Ann to fight it out for
for the ‘first time, Landmark the second and third positions and
with O’Neil in the saddle wa
pulled up at this stage of the home stretch.
race due to a burst stirrup leath- Eventually Mary Ann got home
er. second, half a length behind
Between the five and four fur- Usher to beat Cross Bow who wa
long poles, it was still Embers third by a length.

and Rebate with Notonite a close —_——_
NINTH RACE

third, and Fire Lady hot on their
heels,
Dalkeith Stakes
Fuss Budget and Rebate

day,
were

and entrants for
classified

this event
class “A” and

Embers soon gave place to Re-

bate who was quickly caught being

‘ Piodag'h he ; en
oy ee a Fire scratched, the remaining tiv
coer, vere | ee er me 1M horses were off to a good start.

that order. Notonite went on to Y: so Z Seen t
wih an easy race by three clear asmeen, Newman up, went in-
lengths and Fire Lady beat Re- the lead early and sprinting
tate by a length : well moved away from the rest of
sciiiesiibinaeins the field as they went past the sec-

SIXTH RACE ond furlong. Demure who wa
second up to then, weakened
Spring Stakes comewhat, and Joseph pushed
Nine horses faced the starter Harroween into this position. Pep-
in this event with Flieuxce Car- per Wine also displaced Demure
rying top weight of 130 lbs and made a bold but futile ¢ j-
The race was over 74 furlongs, lenge for the position while ? -

and going past the judges for the man kept Yasmeen well
first time, it was Sweet Rocket and rode her home the winner by
followed by Water Cress, Arunda, three lengths, Harroween finishex

in froa





Doldrum and Dashing Princess half a length ahead of P
all the way to the fourth Wine. ‘.
Time sadn Pot Oe By Jimmy Hatlo

Zf_ USTEN TO THE
{ TWO HIGH BRACKETS
\ FEELING SORRY FOR
GERTIE“THEY THINK
THEY SHOULD ONLY,

THE FAT GUY WRAPPED UP
HIS ROAST BEEF BONE TO
TAKE HOME TO HIS
DOG:s HE SAID!















ENTS











WHERE








4 YOU SHOULDA
HEARD ’EM TALKING
ABOUT HOW THEY'RE
GONNA PUMP UP
THE OL’ SWINOLE








HiS HAND
AND THEY



COUPLE OF SELF-MADE
AUTHORITIES:

THANX To JEROLD GROSS,
~ LANA LANE
> BEVERLY HiiS,CALIF. |



this they did while coming up the

2.700 Make
Housing Loans

Since the Housing Loans fund
was started in June 1950 approxi-
mately $800,000 have been lent to!
2,700 people. The number which
applied for loans, however, is ap-
proximately 6,000 who wish
$2,000,000

It is an all day job at the Hous-
ing Loans Department where peo-
ple are always taking applications
for loans and on some days inter-
viewed . by the Manager Mr.
D. A, M. Haynes |

Long queues are always seen at |

Housing Departments. Besides |
these Housing Loans which are
for those engaged in the sugar

industry, there are always long
queues on those days when the
Housing Department at the Garri-
son are interviewing applicants
who seek Government houses at
rent, These are two separate de-
partments

Since the Housing Loans fund
tarted,” Mr. Haynes said yester-
day, “the people have been very
\ppreciative of the loans and make
very effort to repay them.”

Mr. Haynes observed that one
ould readily realise what change
as taken place in housing over
he country districts. The loans
ave been concentrated in par-
hes like St. Andrew, St. Thomas,
nd St, John where housing con-
itions were worse.

Mr, Haynes said that the plant-
rs co-operated well with the de-
artment,



Red China Wants
‘to Free Formosa

TOKYO, Feb. 28
Communist Peiping Radio heard
ere said that Red China is
idamantly determined to liber-
te Formosa by any means” and
; “fully capable of actually lib-

crating Formosa.” The broadcast

as made in the Japanese lan-
uage and +: was translated in
‘okyo.

The Red radio said: “The Chi-
nese people under Communist
ile are not only adamantly de-
rmined to liberate Formosa by
iy means but are fully capable
actually liberating Formosa.”
The programme was made in
celebration of the Fifth Anniver-

ry of the Formosan rebellion on
February 28,

1947.—U.P.



GUARANTEED
SERVICE

Remember any Watch and
Clock Repairs will be deliv-
ered within a week with a
guaranteed note







At J. BALDINI & CO.,
Office. at Lashley’s Ltd.
Prince William Henry Street
|
} ” ’ y
fish BRITISH COUNCIL

Wakefield, White Park

Violin: Recital
by
WILLIAM CLAIRMONTE

'
}
|
(Accompanist: WINSTON
HACKETT)

yn Wednesday, Sth March

at 8.30 p.m



Prograinme includes:

in ‘

Handel—Sonata No, 4
D Major.
Mendelssohn Andante
from Concerto in E
Minor.
} ?
| Beethoven — Romance in
| G Major.
| Elgar — Gavolle.
| Admission $1.00 or 60
All seats reserved
2.3.52.—11

i —

SUNDAY, MARCH 2





















If you have eaten unwisely, or too well, take a dash of ENO’s
“Fruit Sait”. This will set your digestive juices flowing, belp
you: stomach deal with its burden, remove the feeling of discon:-
fort and congestion. And thanks to its wonderful effervescence,
how freshening ENO’S is to the mouth! ENO’S contains no
Glauber’s Salt and no Epsom Salts. Yet, by a gentile laxative
action, ENO’S encourages perfect regularity. Most of us need
our “ Fruit Salt” first thing in the morning. }

Eno’s
‘Fruit Salt’

SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED

for IRREGULAR ACTION,
SICK HEADACHE, LIVERISHNESS,
BILIOUSNESS, HEARTBURN, etc

Sold in bottles for
lasting freshness.

The words “ sNo" and“ wnutt saut” are registered Trade Marks

Plunge into fun... hall :
>

There's a wonderful sense of freedom about this



st/24

year's Jantzens. They're designed to make you
slimmer, trimmer, seal-smooth and sleek. For
women we've dreamed up figure-shaping ;
one or two-piece suits with straps that
do all kinds of clever disappearing tricks
for smoother swimming and sunning

For men, brief trunks with comfy
nside supperters., All are in figure-
flactering materials and the prices
are so reasonable you'll never
believe your good fortune !
Take the plunge and get
yours now.

.

———



pewter
Attracticn in Action













DURABLE
CROCKERY

@We have just received a
new shipment of crockery in
flowered designs and plain
in sets or in individual pieces.

Undoubtedly Values i Quality.



CAVE

SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD.
10-13 Broad Street

colours. They can be bought

Why

are people
becoming so
excited about

â„¢ SALE?

WiHlY: The BIGGEST CUT PRICES
You'll ever get in Bridgetown

SHOES $1.00
Size 3 to 34 Per Pair 3

LADIES

HATS cach $1.00 & $2.00
_HRAIDS & EDGES per yd. Ze.

MODEL STORE SALE

from Ist. March
See Our Handbills .











1952







Wherever the Need

aReD Hanp Paints

PROVIDE RELIABLE PROTECTION FOR
EXTERIORS

HIGH-CLASS DECORATION FOR
INTERIORS
We have received New Stocks of ...

SPECIAL HOUSE PAINTS
Grey, Dark Grey, Oak Brown,







AND






tamraacn Kwittine mires Urn skentionme hig Barbados Light and Dark Stone.
RR i ae ae ‘Ss’ ENAMEL-FINISH PAINTS
i ee x ME CPPOE Acinic Cream, Tulip Green, White.
DAN SPRINGER % G.F.S, % MATINTO FLAT PAINTS
MLS \ 1 1 % Cream & Green. .
PURrALL NO. 1 & THE ANNUAL SALE ¥ CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS
BLIC MARKET x 4 ? The Sign of Bright Red, Grey, Mid. Green.
Custowess We" have’ _aoed {| THE GIRLS’ N Quality HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN
Fupply of Prime Local staak 3 |% FRIENDLY SOCIETY 3 Se ee te
end Reeth e ese buying & will be held at PAINT REMOVER ;
stock at attractive prices. & THE HOSTEL s for the easy removal of old paint. ‘
s on ’
Dial 2005 ig, aay to 2 pam % SATURDAY, APRIL 26th % Phone 4267, 4456
Dial 3620. after 2 p.m. % from 3—6 p.m, % 1
a betas tater” 8 WIEKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.
$6415995045050500060000." ’





WE GIVE

WE GIVE QUALITY
we GIVE SERVICE

See Us When You

. Want The Three
Combined

EVERY SUIT

MADE BY US

IS “THE BEST”

| SUIT MADE RY
US



P. Cc. S, MAFFEI
& Co. Lid.

Top Scorers m tailoring
Prince Wm. Henry ‘treet

——— SSS SS























COOL SPRING in the
North!— will demand a re-
turn to warmer clothing at
vacation end.

We have a s2lection of the
finest Wo s loomed in
Englanc, well as glorious

Cashmere Pullovers from
Scotland, light weight
Tweeds and crisp Worsted

Suitings for both Ladies and
Men.

The quality of this branded
stock is unquestioned and it
is our Sales Policy to com-
bine this high quality with
excellent value





Merchant Tailors
of Holton Lane



























ee




PAGE 1

r\mv. MVHCH l i: STVDAT ADVOCATT p^.r Tirnmrv HENRV BY CARL ANDERSON C UNT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES BLONLMF BY CHIC YOUNG We never lei go! Vigilance over Ihe high qualuy of "Black & While" is never relaxed B nded in the special Black & White "' v iv this truly 4.20 4.00 Tins Anchor Powd. Milk (2*J UrtlNGlN^ UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS ioorr K>JCWA*4AT TO DO ABOUT yCAJB FATt-CC ME ift SO CAffELESS ABOUT TVfi •/ KCWESSGS' m A6HAMEO OF THAT I WLLOO'AMP TH6UIT& 'O T* UXC L__ TMB POGSBNTLOOV AT NQU.'*OJ useo TO DPE^G UP LOOKBP OAPca? -fciow uxx AT *U /CAlLS9S-l>4TOy%  %  • ftuf AM AN rw AWN MAT I BY ALEX RAYMOND HRHY THF PHAN1 < BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES '. • . ...... MM 680UT WU.*UftN*ME.*Xje M*E .WUV \CU MESS LIVE TUW-IN :wt JUNGLE.? v*&S! ••' lCAM£T3DefiBW*CMONTHE(W41!>t\MEaE ARE *XJtlT LE6END? TOIJW : MV'R1IPE.IF ^)IJC">.' ST l|'/*l| it rjJ "'Q*?^ J^E3EABCH"S. y, i rr. -.a Tins Aylmer's Fruit Salad 85 Pkgs. Shredded Wheat 48 80 Tins Smedleys Peas 12 Pkgs. Jello Puddings 2.35 49 23 2.12 46 19 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I II I C O I. O N > A II I < %  II o I i: II I I s dloliday in iA. Jl. Jnjcuk a 70 XoAjifrid AUSTIN • •— • £*&*£.£ We have been advised by The Austin Motor Co.. Ltd. that cars are readily available under the Overseas Delivery Scheme for visitors to England. XI SI l> — Yon ran III-IM'IMI on it! i CALL IX BMULV TO \ssi ill: OKUVEHY TO si ir YOI it i mm iii.x TMB i K. %  / TCBC ECKSTEIN BROS. BAY STREET 1 titfO SomiAitl



PAGE 1

p\r.r roiRins ,s ADVOCATE SUNDAY. MARCH 1 ISM CLASSIFIED ADS. IM III U \OII4 I \ ion nE\T TELEPHONE 250S. THANKS (IVMIWH1 The CuraWitairti >-eg l*rOuU> U* ut>ii< tav ..-,.. t.11 i-e kmsT (run* ••heseeit wreath. mn 8 MiiMIHW. or in any wav p' wd iwti % %  %  tn PI .jwmnt ktii ses m ell t UJi In sssfan II *l* We IM than. •iw HIII wraaH MMf f> rww of O*-IM*JI. and -ho etoe attended the funeral M %  HW^fO husband mid father CTiarles Vltcbe.l DaC-st. Lewi* l %  .fir.***-! 04 f—pi tn 11 -!• IN MEMOEIAM iiinoMi %  line luMti ABMlri( late SBiap keeps-r of Bag* !: IINUMlid H.i.' MM Ma> glorv be her r*,Ung pier*. No* absent from oar NtIM A ton* provided piece to them. Wtwr rth*r ell. Hi, • re*r*mbered • I I I lusri h in loving mm beloved husband Drr> Who fall asleep M Man h and Il Bloaaorne may wither rtower* m> die rwi* M) forget vou Ever to be raenenbered by hi EU'abetn A Foster Th* Footi and graradchUdren. 1 l.,.i i Ml (.ItTt.V* In hiving imaum of my hij*ha*.d Ernest Oinatu. who 1*11 asleep "' Cod i -.mbeted r.v-|| u ih Smith H I -in • MALI, In k-ving mamoiy of *%' Oar wifeHilda Small, wlui v. a. called t higher eeevlc* on March IM 1BSI. I lorn for. household voices con* ror .-ntohed hope i lng Bui Owd has IH ID dear "• And he Ma U< I % %  wrong Wilfred Small -husbandr. ""bar RrerHon* SB—In "imri In loving nwmory of our d h.abend and lather Robert E-v. Waehs-s who departed Ihi. life March 1, 1MB Till memory fades and life departa. You'll live forever in our heaiH Remembered h> • Th* Work*. ?""•• %  Henry's Lame * **' INTERESTING TO VISITORS Your ""'"i WARM WATEI IT THERE CAS IK CU tl >oi *-• Showr.It* Ihr Bcaulllul WhU Uln Knamal O. Ooy %  mlnalx >•. • % %  i... wi rtlcr oim m M -r niMN ._ pnraono or Ittma dvaimr wuh I*M P-nMi or* kindly —kl i %  inn no>r.inod t,.( :t#-i la." U,* IMw IIM L H I Par* %  .,. AT IWI nwMM MtkMO* **i •• Appl^ T S KMM* Dul rr^ H BM ljn--iIII! TMrl wwrli Trtopkwnr mm. CAK it* VtnuhoJJ tApl KKhard IK'• MuUfcy. S CAJI IM> Port Cnntn. PaiU A#p. %  Mhnrtt Ardlf* r Boa aid CAB—I fcorria Car h p mihui M.oOt Por furWier p-rUeuUi appl A Cuke 'Junior. Co lkn*n • to Ptwir 4BI 1 B>-t In CAK: ino Molaatoy • 10 10.WO mUr Ek.vlWnl condlton IM1 M-TUB Mm0 n.ito*. A-l condition Port Royal ifr Ud T>;*B>h-r.r 4504 17 1 B—m KLKCTRK-AL ua K ii •howrooan. dlilllBI R R iBinUA Cc Die ruAHHLiuin BAi-nrjUBRWhotoaaW and PoUll CITY r.ARAll" O.. H U I I I n MCA AH IH' Comov RrcMv-r iwilhout Cabinet %  A QfOff* Mirrt. BeliTiont ltd Bi rTADIOGRAM IBM QPC Radlocram Ito4k Conanto. Pully r*vlrrd. nrallont lltlo-i CDDM May br aaon DaCoata. lUnt or wnliTimpaon Lodgi i H.au h I^TINUHOLSr. RFPRIGftm Ubli fftt In pnfl condllk-n I iifntmatioii dial Hl5 or 4T1 FUKNITIKK .... In aood lUMrMM I 3 %  In LIVESTOCK rOW: Ono Oradfd Ourcnacy Cow lvii.I twvlvr ntiiti milk daily, third Call - Willi..n l)U-In aovkea : at s i i"i i torar V*\M>B HELP CAPABUl d .... ] m£ n\RBMHlCLCBKK' I Mii\ Tbo Annual Ooi.ai-1 Mt BbOOO UlUOB will bo had -t the Y M C Naval N-U on MONDAY HM* March %  N at 1 V n, Notan vt B*Mlotia aini of qunuoi Or dtoiuaai'o tiw Bnrrtnry in ai xi nd liLn —A L-4Y Cfcrt l<-r offato knowionfo ol nh'-nhnnd inr. and av-nal * w Fooi lich Cause Killed in 4 Days MMM I lwc,l

ati"ff. *I %  •r^fOl or W T tn U! Apr b> uanr MotW f'--'"^*.*5*'%  jtH • %  ft of inn.rfr wxl rapwbiiit to Boi ABC C O lain r*.*My dJH> tot ocommodlatto-i. >.M*ing Tcltot anal Wa lawn LAHM and .l..i. t< cool n aton l i 1 >oi -aUCWwinon' AS HA. BaUuhvba bafeoba. SL Jowl-. Awt' Vtadi WoM. ii.-iitouMLnWBTftW Por r*twr.'ioii Af** 0| i H WiMI Uy to trartl OEandi promiitHH, fcr i llhL IMII %  ponrhKSubmit pholo population icextUmtUI ib>H 1 K BarbbdoB Ad\nill be an OKI Knit' R-. toward* Uur md o* tiar ,fUnoon S > SBin IHRUroKD U-.-t.l Ri>(_miar*d. from II. lit Mant. roaSM and all n>--ain coiniTilrina. ppl\ S.it*.r*iiifrin. FVn. 1101 let! ant bath" NOTICE %  HMBRI I I ii—a SRCmXTART VAtAHU ItocHlry Roll <-i-b Pnro nuon-rt In PiaMouor. rrMiMBu.^ 1 bcdmoni-. llvAn*ijonv, .lonpS Vrnndin ate aiao iTtr liftii. alar and T. RJMWIB4R <1 OMY >n an>nntodw. canva**to.g will *-mmmt Apply b> lui to Bia mprY fi.nn whom luithar eariiou^ti ••" UMlSCfcLLANEOUS Iit-i Jnw. i a a— 11 %  top ol door Ptioi I It IdVnUS lth "t wRh IMS MnMli .DUtrtrt I I SJ 1" Paroori lntreatod nd rfn.uld bo rmrwrd d>la> IVOOO OOODARD a.tod "I''%  'ully tun • It has bofliuomo •I %  Ci.*.! H. mp H-Bn rimii s\%.A REAL I MAI I IIUUSl biand now. an pir I bodroo luao. all con-mla-cr.. lad llinf room, onan v*raiiJ.h. kil.hi id utilit/ room J a ra B a :ar,rfr. i flgl(ll •oivant rooms and itoraa* i.iom imdor . On attraiiivo hllliioa ttlr. Itoektoy N lli..d A Barnn A Co., Ud Dial UTS 11 1 U II n Bt. Btoior tho proworty ol UODERM rURN-BMBD Pl^T-wilb Bllrar ond Unrn. Oocd Ss-bothln for further pnrOc.l.ri. Applw Abu 1 ,ttJMi No. f Cmal SandB. Winlhlnj. S 1 *1I |n r-HLN I 01 n> dp* Miinc) in thia popular rf* Gmuitd rioor .tut Moderate ine] i nd an Church. I.ii ^pprotnl I %  K ? WkNSLOW tattle Wash. Tnr Mirrh. MaJune. Julv %  if-r ISU. Apelv noodlnr •HToncri'"ps> Pini Albert Ford* ori Holder bi.ttl-.i and bo-.nli. I Site ion x . Appl %  •. | lo Fubi* in lUnH LANI NFAR ROTRLSY OOI.P CLfR berllont b-.nidind alto for sole, good rosidanttol ssrUO-L adjoining north *lde Oolf Couroa. moderate pnc*. Por detail! BOO JOHN M. BLADON A CU. Iron* s**0. Sfl.ll—1.f.n •. W. T It fltt-*i -.hi.h will %  tn tnit typo %  Inrotod %  %  SBHRsfBRl nlnf small >tourist trod* lama lor -le irucllvo pew-ienrry Advocate SMS*3r< UFA)! IRXP 1.1 KI:M rarnlahe. louar. • %  nan St John district or .ear for r 1 PUll pi '.. .1 .T* %  '.. G 1 11SS—fln KIUS THE CAUSf %  KT, M well aa BUttSS-'ml : •tPBf W lli,, %*4 •oolhea ajiJ 2nLib<> T r ,n *' '..5 %  l -ih aof> oltnr. Bud %  tnooth .,.90l!!^..Tfl-.ptY ii t-tiigkt and yon •'" not we n tronmonssi.ua iiUUVi|aM - IMiUi. Pmaini.fi. derm -as .11 have hilled th* grriii.. paraalUa. and lungua reanonalul* for your trouble. %  y" *•" ,•* -. if that your akin rapidl. In pocorolnf noft. rtomn. anw->in. and heallai. hVt caoUnue It nut 1 dx I.HH>ri.Mk* aura that th* result. aro completely aatla'actory. nnd at thr end of this time If yonr laeJ.-J" . id of the Itohlhg. -tie-l in i'Vr> ~ai. msiif iii 10* etupiy uaikAge anil your m^i i-.nl ha rrfundod. Get •"' %  ••• i i.cmlat today, rhr ui uilea prolocU rou. SHIPPING NOTICES TWO LSJIHEU GENOA, March 1 Two Brazilian women were seriously injured today In a collision between two automobiles Hospital ofnciali gave their names at GotcTO Boasdaa and Uanda Goes but thern, ware not able to reveal their homes in Bra-ril— V.P. I PART ONE ORDERS B D I 1 -( Ol I I (INNLLL. O Comma ndlnf. IHI NAIKDOH Rrr.lMfNT n f*b AUCTION damag*d in niter this '.:. I'.....i pm J. Aii.ti.iT.reiileln for sal* by auclloii i Garage on Friday iiii M Bladoti A 4.<>ropai. TARADBS — TRAININO ft* will pai-'r at Heat IIQ at I'rO no i ii %  i-king kii all article* ol clnthlne and tqin P irni IHjto—.. %  A" Coy on th* opan snd miniature rannaa; IflOM not l.noa will carry out weapon training "B Coy will do n t drill mm It RrUBfKd and thare will br no further paind* •dnanOUv ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Ml IM, I HUM tlKOPK I let March, 10a*\ IIHAl-r!M,>ll'.|Mi. ism March, 199i COTTR.A. jlrt March, ISU. %  AnjKO it* ri.iNut-tN AM* ta mil l-M QtTANA I B. fT aOrr OB. Stth February. ItSS. S RI^TTLNGSBuaUi rth M.irch. !11 •Milu. IO IIIMIUli FAnAtoARIBHi AND RRlri.tH (H'ltS \ M 9 BONA1BX. loth Marrh, lSSt, S B COTTTCA. Tth April. ISU. *ATUMU TO ISISIIIAD AND CI'BArAQ M i. IIIJISIIJA. nut March, IBM B. P. MLSSON, BON A CO.. The M/V CACIQUX P-t CAitlBE" will accept Carlo %  PBtasfigora for SI. Lucia. Vincent, Grenada and Aruba. i Ba ling Wrslnesday ITth Inal The M V ' MONEKA" will accept Carlo and Patnrngrn for IXamlnlcn. Ahthrua, a-twrtoerrBt, Nevl ami SI Klttf Sailing Friday 7th March IBM II accept < hold i M.,, GOATX-Flv* l|i Banaen and Alpine mk'h amu gr.olnl alt In hid. two {%,' n IbMr Srst Utlar Apply to Dudle, l.l-os. Hlndaburv Road, St. Michael. 13*S-In MECHANICAL ther inter invited to ;i| %  •.'.-,',-%  -•----*'*- All who at A.MORC nr Bated persons atU-nd A SI llll S OF %  umirnn add at the West Evangelist Tabernacle. Keniington New Road, overy Tuesday Night *< at 9 pm. \* 2.3.52— In. g .oorB, 4IVJ Bll OumtMie. 1. C. 'n" Coy 441 Cpl Rudder. G M "A" Coy 4a* Pte Ouarlaa*. N. Km Pie Chase. P D. t Granted 5 month" P Leave wef I Mar SI with permission tu leave the Cokmy. On 4 moo in. P Leave I* granted peril. IBSHMI to le.>v* the Colony Granted 4 week.* P Leave wef 15 eb 0. with permiatkni to toava th* Thare will be no WOa A Serjeant be held • make an eltnrt tn attend e. CO. I %  Sj IIISI A HM Ml The Annual General Meeting T..esdav 4 Ma I a. . O-anted a weeks' P/Laava wwf 1 Feb 9t, With prrmlaaton to leave the Colony _... ) tirantad 1 weak.' P,Laavc wef IB Fcb St M L D. CKXWER-COX, Ittajor. ton A Adlutant. Tba alaibatkx H.. %  !-• lliallllB on Saturday I Mar. U. Tho Rai a. Mar. SL Members are naked to i^ n hou*r. In "the Drill RaU. Al 1 SporU Club LTD.-AfenU. /eorU Club wiU -. ho.,, in the Dr| IU1I Member, a I W> ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS %  ILIS. CURIoa. AST. VSVDBHOB. BKDAH. JOTBB1A1 r SST18TICAB CUSIOIIDADES. IRA1DOB DE LA INDIA CHINA anno THANI'S Tt. Km. M., •,!.. DU1 MM Jusi Received ... VALOR STOVF PARTS Liimtvd Supply Order Today al G. Y. Iluu-hiihoii & CO,. LTD. Dial m Broad Slrerl iv SHIRTS Are you loohihtf %  •tourhil sliirt* We have In -trlaa. deaigna i.nd gu..lita>f. ih Barb-, i ,oi.irfUl Bcanarv ,t BprcUiM' TMAMI BKO BIN tin CAMEliA One 1 iK i-dv H.>dneiptr hi) %  Msrrii Aq.mtic Club and BagaaSB Warehouta Hew-rd •yfland to Gardlnei An.tm A Co Ud Pusaeit tier Drpt Mil l'>. MMIH: MinKjUITO NSTTS: Two double, mi. n.lie and oddments lung BW1 i a u—i. MENIEK'S Break fa it Cocoa Bhlpmanl -i leceurd K J HAMEI-MMlTtl (V . LTD. Dtolrlb.no !" Phono 4T4S llll Sti Itarhadoa Vies-. Pure I colorful Scrne.lei and ,d BJeS each TIIANIY-. fHA MATS Paia Hedro rflB and Dining room, also for sou beal If TMAN1 Bn Pl-l *• as 1U t f n TRY a cup of delighU.il \l Bteakfaxt tVx-.m TODAY Take TORNADO--lnternattonal K 41 il condition. eserUetn equlpm. Coal FKBOB :"xr* Tetopimne 'MBV IB II II t f n N v ,'".'„';".' .": :' .;.";';'",":. ; ; I ,i Thl. N V M vary valuable to me 0 V PARBAVRINO \ Also bitrmallonal Tornado with good rarlns; iwt Ani.lv Revrelary Yacht' Club 3 a U -in FOR SALE "OLIVE BOUGH" (Seaside) At Hastings. Dial 3111 D. F. DeABREt' FURNITURE AUCTION WE AKi: IN'STRl'CTED U undrrUhr a rotnplelr CLEARANCE HALE at u %i I'II m:\iurs MIOWIHMMIS BAY STREET mi Monday and fursd.iv ihr ;irl *nd tth of Marrh and to continue on Wrdrtcaday U 'not eompleted. Sale from 11 a.m. tn 4 i' m uih. JOHN >lBLADOA *%> t'O. AVCTIONEERS AT CENTRAL EMPORIUM (Corner Broad A I utl.it Streets) You will Hod a line assortment of fAIIPEXTEHS' TOOLS r Bui TO-DAY or i>> more TO-MOREOW I k-MOveowoeoooeoeeoeoeos) loir V.„,l„hh I'ASSE PAKTODT—In all Colours lU'TrKKFLV TRANSI'AKBNT TAPS— ID 2 Widths AKT CORNEliS lu Buck Gry Also An Aisorlment 0 | BOOKS ON PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERTS & Co. Dial 3301 ^^^^^^^^v/////.^v.^v//////,y// J y/ ^^y /, %  Plantation* BaUdtnr. To get i v,v,y/,v///.'. MIIKI Why njyt be ModcrDised Whether you are furnishinc a Home or an OltU-r the MfroVrn Furnlfunr Co-our>m> tkm can dn the Job to suit your taste and yuur pocki-t Su why not stop in and givi us your order, whether It's Mnhosjany, Birch. Plm. Fn or Deal. Your ordea promptly doallh with, so remember the place . THE MODERN FURNITURE J CO-OPERATION DEPOT 1 'M' I ".. Tudor MF.H EXHIBITION BARBADOS MUSEUM I :* < -OWEST INDIAN PAINTINGS BY ROBERT J. I4ACLEOD AND PENCIL A WATER (ri in i; FIGURE DRAWINGS ol West Indian Subjects BY HAROLD CONNELL Open Irbruary —March H 10 A.m. — 6 p.m. Usual Ashing or i Jne* Applies An Anonu. all n— L vrntonras. Very Onod Fi....fli L" to Er.-i i"'nBhnei ftssptel ott pttyrwd BUSM .'-i I %  item The OU.e M N-tive Specie. -i Rpactoa cannot Thrive •jnaSSf r?Oi Withered B.-vih. BI II Rare Specie, known aa ^Oonslte* lt nd Rurtamnaa ma be -nd nhould 0 planted In Clear Solla Ubra being the seventh and onlv aVidla.' Suril made o( Metal under which I ... nor., parmttl Me to ORrr one and nil Real Estate Bargain. even 11 I am heft to Creole -nd Ipeo Parto I Must ConUnua a. hitherto to be Honert and will Ne\n vinllka a Good and Ardent Qenrral resort to Bbatagy. PIVPIB and Balls Truth and Right mual Pmalt: Evil r*eaejv'. Itself Ton acience though Silent and Ex-'i able like a IVndulum BtoUupj on BAinbuUon' AT BRIGHTON % % %  %  Ida Aln.ort N< i 1 RediooiTi Ameiuan Desug" Bu.igalow. all M.sl*ri V Convenlen.'. •. about u.ooo *q n G<>nui Uhdei £1.100 PACBSU NUT GARDENS.Almost New 1 nedioom 11 inch Stone Hungalow .11 Mod.it Conveniences about 1X000 -sj tt Qofng Vtvdci 11.100 V rOBLeXW BTBy The *IB CO 1 Stvrev Btacia Bualnea. r*rsawlari and Realdencc C Oor-J Condition Ideal lor ar Buslnesa. 0*4ng Ui>der EUBJ 11 TI'Don ST l-i gr 1 Storey Son B.iMneea prerntBes A R aa nl en. %  •Ith B l^rfr Oarage or Workshop. Ideal tor on, Business. Vacant. Can Yield II* C1.0S0 Can Bnv It UPPER XSX I Bcdn %  I'Ott I'l.lllit I COOKiXG sii.it I THE FLORENCE Contact Me .. ,gl, lU.tl:n Beauty and Quality Combined THE CITY (iARAGE TRADING (0„ LTD. M illl il II I Ml*, 1141 IM Hl.llit HUM IIII rot" j, MMI :IT IS TIME FOR TAYLORS SPECIAL BLENDED RUM (With the Distinctive Flavour) REMEMBER— SIP II TB ISHIl IT. BLENDERS /##\ IK T.WLOH A StUm, It,I. TRY IT!! ^ %  %  "^0 MENIER'S \ -~S BREAKFAST COCOA %  .-n> 2-Ih 25f tSf • Bfsidvs bciim nutritious \ou'll hare ao OsukU ellin the rhildrrn lo drink il. They'll low B! GET VOl'RS TO-DAV! .„ %  •*? : a On Sale al ull leading Orocen. K. J. HAMEL-SMITH & CO. LTD. Ilislrilllilors srssCdSO I? IR oBridge Mrnl REAL ESTATE JOHN N. BI APON *> *•• a.r.a. r v a. limriuiiivstH LUT1NGS AlWArfs aTAlLABBE. FOR SALE I-1N< RBl'HO". Slh Ave IWUevilla An attrarUva and weU prnportloned 1 Btor' Itouse aituatII Contalna a gallertoB . modern llltc^,cn 1 atodrouina. garage etc l*w Bgura acxepted Sar Quick sal*, owner going abroad. "BYWAYS". Rocktoy Hew Rd— A pleasant, rootna/. Bra-wfr .Ion* tilings:..* oi flirt clau toimrurUoa throuSri^* The, % bad-oom. are provided with waabbaBtri and all have a oool ajcpOOUla Them Is a large lounge. '11-lng %  "" front verandah and < tohen In the baaeo^nt ire extan.i" looma and garaaje atrvanU' Quartei. .re drtac^ed A-eof lsi.il l. siver BLOBO q ft A -"• otHiructed Mew i ire -t Bcoea rh# golf eourst A popular SPd select djatrlet uEANViur nut HaURoomi I fltorsv house with gallerlea, living and dluing roorna. kitchen, pantry and %  toierooma enrtoaod yard with etoek pen*. garage and large out-bulldlnia Grounds am about >. wf an acre with fruit trees and pa.ture. alao contains good building plot on .vince nu "BOMRMEDB". Garrison— Tola properiv la Ideally .Hunted lor mod people in lhl ever popular diitrkrt 'Botnamede'. whilst not Isolated, is mine private and Its verandah cannot be. overlooked, a fault BO common wllh modem AQuars. Thi bungalow' was erectJ about isas fa ponstturted of BtuBO with a thing!* roof. Thors la a good verandah, living room. 1 hedroomi. kltetien. wrvanta' quaitrrs, double garage ftCUnd about T.sOq adft. •'fUMUsUTOE". St. l*s,rciicSparlona itona built bungalow wrth shingle roof, very well planned with wide verandah! at front and able. 1 enclosed galleries. largo airy lounge nd dining room. 1 double bwdroornt. kitchen and ieotny. > BervanU' reomi. SBIB aid outhooae* The land l eowtplateiy ervcloaed and there Is direct acceea to that lea with good bathing. niNt.At.ow. j"ii <• Hill.— Very well corsair ur ted modern home els-verly doelgned for eaay running Hh minimum labour. Contalna wide verandah*, good living room. Itbedrooma with built in closet.. tiled bathroom With separate toilet, tiled kitchen. laundry. servant'a uunrtcrB and largo garage wtut direct accaea U bouae. Conatructed of tune with polished K l aoorlng throughout Cool and raaamgly pepular realdentlal dntriet. "BL'SJUH''. Worthing. Modern ona btingaiow in plaaaaot real%  Initial urea. Accornniodatloo consniIan lounge, dining-r! %  •>( %  Uiree Lardroorni with running water, bath wtth hot water and modern kneh•nette Land U over 'i acra all (•need and there BIB many frutt traeLOW— New timber houM living room, verandah. 1 bedrooms, baih and toilet, kitchen, garage and out-buildingsGood arabla land over one acre, all enclosed with wall and fencing, vary suitable market gardening or chicken fane Loto :.-:-' Sjastssl. WKBI WILLOWS, St. Jaraee— Delightful bungalow houae will. open vemodah ecdtutuuufag inagrUBcsat via* of aea and atraichea of beach Large lounge. 3 bedroonw. vwrandahB. kitchen, panuy and BarvanU' mom-. Store room* bt internet;! Oflora touatderad (TLAMB hoi -i %  *, PblUp— CB>e f the most charmingly *HuaUM proper*.ie-. of tbl* nature tn the Uland. The houie contain'-vt Urge bedruoma iuh hot a old weted. rpaclou* I'lingee, din uigiootn largo oockuui bar •rtih b*mb0o dectir, wide trtedy g>\D*rin. garage aidreroont. batbmg ch.ileL Mavj dieicl lighting plant 1 th* ameimaa u.u-1 wiUi tbi> a iilfH.ve acraaga knof the M-sirCarrinj tha aole agents of i A Scaly I The nut [ %  etoldr-f." r whlth has •' %  OLOSftB Bums gt. Jamea —An tatata tio..*e built of eUne with pin* Boon and rhlngte rocf 3 recwption. 9 tiaairoomi, veraadah* etc. also gang* si>d usual otrtbiiiidinga The house stands on appmx 4 acrea of wall timbered land imahega.iy) approachad by a tang driveway flanked wtoh rloaaly (Banted Mahoganv trees ~ standing atiraction of ii the very lovely silo 1 UM advantage of being Well elevated -rvd cool vrtth fine views op all iMIe*. Coast li lea* than a irola away and town g milea. -W^eTnOTlBB". St PeterA solid one "loray stone rcaldeacr wtth shingled root, l*tetjr e. tensively i *-model led with great care by the present owner The house haa 1 wide roomy verandah* at front and aid*, large drawing room, separate dining n bedrooms (wllh wash _. kitchen. laundry, servants' tera and gar as* Ground* over '. scree with produtttva orchard. OoweT and vegetable garden*, driveway and large parking spar* for can. ''Wyndovar' U wall e'.ev.ted on Us rldgto. always Benefits from a brrsjge and commands perfect vtewa of th* coaatlbae. SALTA si PeterModern coral hatue of aaceptlonally sound OuaaUiaittoaB — esttenalva modal ling and re-decors lion Just bean completed Tho kmnga, of ample dUnenatona. opens orres wide varandahs With most attiactJva seaarapo vlawa The three beati-asMna am Sited with i-^ilt-in wsgoTBej ii and aloe waahbaaini. and tke two bathroom, have II. C water. Kitchen and pantry are well Stead out and am supplied with H/O water. Oround Boor contains 1 garages, large %  torerooms and eervar.ts quarters. grounds of about '. of an sere are well Laid out and ler.red. Main* and wtll staler A inost dealrable and highly reccerwrMfided property. RENTALS -KBWT-ON LOPOS" — Maxwell Coast Fully furnished house available long lease Immediate UBIDI.M g — Beautifully fan uned with swimming pool, cloa to town with. Phone 44540 PlRDtaliont Buildlnc



PAGE 1

PACE IIGBT SUNDAY ADVOCATE SI HDAY, W.ltCM t l52 |}\Kfi\IK)S^Al)\lMll, t T--— — f-___ -.} Sunday. Match 2. 1*52 WELFARE THIS month Barbados will be the meeting place of Welfare Officer* from all parts of the British Caribbean, when a conference will be held under the chairmanship of Mr. Chinn Adviser on Welfare 1o the Secretary of State for the Colonies. Welfare u. a subject upon which West Indians have mixed ideas. Most people will honestly admit that they know very little about welfare and are not particularly enthusiastic about finding out. Here in Barbados. Welfare as a department of i men i is in its infancy and Barbados lags behind other West Indian islands in appreciating what are the advantages to be derived from an active and efficient welfare organisation. The need for welfare is so apparent that the word remains inscribed in the title of that Development and Welfare Organisation, the activities of which are almost i\ responsible for the large stride-which have been taken during the LesJ decade by tin* West Indies in social, economic and political progress. There was criticism at lirst that the organisation was behaving too much like a fairy godmother doling out largesse and welfare grants indiscriminately and failing to stress the fact that true welfare could only result from economic development in which the peoples of the area themselves played a great part. If Welfare has suffered because of this over-priming of the development pump— and it would be foolish to say that it has not suffered in Barbados—to-day there is no less a danger of our forgetting thnt the whole purpose of development is the production of welfare" Emphasis on development in recent years although originatini; from the laudable intention to persuade people that material improvement depended primarily on individual efforts has given rise to a new fallacy that all that matters is economic development, and that whore there is economic development, welfare will automatically take care of itself. This pre-occupation with development is itself a sign of failure of the peoples ot tbf area to understand what welfare is, what it hopes to achieve and what it has already achieved in the British Caribbean. Welfare is essentially the application of a social science which specialises in the organisation and assistance of admirable social principles such as self-help and a readiness to take responsibility and to serve others. Welfare teaches that the standard of living is not material (as is believed by perhaps ninety-nine per cent, of the people living in the British Caribbean) but is some thing in people's minds. It maintains that there is no advantage in giving people money if they have no idea of spending it on the things that last, such as good homes: good equipment in field and kitchen: books and education. Those who regard welfare as something opposed to or extraneous to economic development display only the shallowness of their thinking. There is no antagonism between the two. But since the ultimate aim of prosperity is a good life for human beings, Welfare as a social science is designed to give them the concept of a good life. Mr. McGillivray, late Colonial Secretary of Jamaica not long ago told the staff of a 3-F movement—Food for Family Fitness— that their work was as important a contribution to development as the erection of factories. This tribute is rooted in the fundamental economic precept that the true wealth of a country is its people. People who eat correctly in proper homes become more self-reliant, punctual, dutiful and co-operative. These are qualities much sought after in labour forces throughout the world today and they are necessary to the healthy and productive economy of Barbados Besides the successes achieved over 12 years by Jamaica Welfare Ltd., (now known as the Social Welfare Commission) with a "Better Villages" campaign, Welfare has helped governments to think socially in many ways. Its work in prisons where farms and agricultural schemes have been inaugurated and with probation is perhaps best known, and Welfare has begun to persuade authorities to board out deprived children in carefully chosen family homes instead of consigning them expensively and often unhappily to institutions. In many places it has greatly improved the administration of Poor Relief by making it so far as possible a family care-work and rehabilitation service father than a mere payment of doles. It has done much for youth either directly or through helping voluntary bodies. Welfare although in some respects its **"* in this region resembles the activities * th* Mum,, office and although it is a departmenv lf Government is considered as a bridge bevw^n government and the people. In Jamaica the Welfare Commis,!ic depai tmer.ts of cduciTion, agriculture and health work together to produce bettej nutrition and better villasjH These are by no means a list of all the :iehie\ements of welfare in the British Caribbean irum the time that welfare has been recognised as an agency fur assisting the good life But enough instances have been quoted to show that without a welfare department many o' the social improvements that are visible in the region would not have been made. The necessity for welfare is increasingly being recognised by more and more people as its activities become known and understood/ But.Us utility cannot be measured in terms of dollars or cents. Nor are Its services always invited. In small communities like Barbados where there exist so many other voluntary social services with years of tradition and experience and where the rugged individualism of every Barbadian makes the taking of advice more difficult than the swallowing of castor oil by a naughty child the work of a welfare depaitment will inevitably be obstructed by obstacles. But Barbados no less than Jamaica needs a welfare department and government dep.otioenis. local government and the pub1 irought to be benefit ting from advice and assistance on welfare, which ought to be fi %  %  !% available from the Social Welfare Office. That this advice and assistance \a not %  ought hy all who should seek it is evident from the intermittent criticisms which are made in public and in private about welfare. The advantages of welfare are so obvious that failure to utilize its services because of a misunderstanding of its lunction is more than regrettable. PAPER SERVIETTES in Pastel Shades HUr. |..r IOO. ADVOCATE STATIONERY This Thing Called Gat. The word Gatl when spoki makes in ugly brutal noise and U is no. surprising that in the lan%  USSNI "' Hollywood It means a B* OKOf'.E HUNTF. Aitule XVII! of the Gene ff .JJJSJ .„o un r K r S5T5S? ZSSX&Si tT" %  S\^L ,mp nal P" f term By bava tq impose pre. sun. ence. Unfortunau-ly ,t is equally tMtlVC measure* which would In international trade circlet DO vxaSMrauon io point out that be contrary to other articles however ihea.i-.ur initial letters ,f the I'nlted Kingdom abolished u M greement in order to build .?. %  -^T^H. StaT*? 1 imper,al P'""""<* before it. u p their own economies." "Zl* %  m d ,n present trading position Is balif Great Britain was forced g r 1* m 1 " n ced> both 0* United States and .lotify the organisation for Eu wealth counpoan Economic Co-operation October 1M7. This the greatest piactical Ph. 1171 C. S. PITCHER & CO. t*P the British Co M.IIH I I II III THE aim for the future development of agriculture everywhere in the West Indies should be a steady transition to mixed farming, according to the authors of the West India Royal Commission Report (Cmd. 6607). This mixed farming involves permanent as opposed to shifting cultivation and the .tries which arc in the British 1947 of that country*. nScest.— prefer, itial system would suffer, to "embark upon a system of blThe United Stales apparently is lateral agreements in order to aware of this paradox but there secure the continuance of M can be no mi*r ike about Its ullilarge a volume of inteniation.il mate objective* trade as possible', how much How are the British territories <[>* "-ore likely will the depend.-it in the driblet, affected by these BrlUsh Caribbean territories be ttorti at trade orBble ' **C"P* from the provi*I have they bene%  > %  f an agreement which was specifically introduced to assist th effective demand, to production, consumption change ol goods, and lhu_ tribute to a balanced and exU: panding world economy." taken towards the formation an International Trade Organisation which was outlined in the Havana Chatter or IMS. Failure to ratify the Havana Chartei was ine-'iUble in view of the on (instances which existed at the tim %  and which continue to exist. But its failure ha. been a great -t back for lho force, which ere international active to promote unity end unKsnisation a derstandlng between the peop'ec f,iler or urTc.i\i from the „.^ of the world renfemenls made at Geneva? freeing of trade between Inde-SJ Charter was intended -to In recent m .nth. some expo"SSS^Sit har^dvant..*, assure a large and .tcadlly glownerrts of a Weal Indian Customs r ,!2tnn\i &5£ ? Z Z ?i."TV mg volume of real incom? and Un.on have b,. „ using the allefSiJ 0 ^. R" ,T h "r' H £2" ...•, thud disadvant. n f RSTT t.. >rrn ,ne ** r isn Caribbean tcmas a solut.on to all post-war *ijh the article of ( GATT. ments: and the interest which thproblems. The American loan to "ut it is not at all easy to §ee United Nations display with J complementary use of stock and crops, and the United Kingdom of £988.*"> advantages would be gained ( ard to dependent territories of 'UOO.OOQ was made subject to cerfrom this suggested Improvement metropolitan powers makev H :.!tain conditions expressed in the m status, in view of the British moil impossible for anyone to inHrelton Woods Trade Agreement West Indies' special dependence voke GATT In such a way that i( and the United Stale* is Mill puron the United Kingdom. would cauw real hardship to the suing a policy which is designed There is everywhere In the British West Indies. There mii'li' to promote multilateral trade and British Caribbean today a retur. of course be reluctance on the p irt to abolish imperial Preference tance to face issues squarely. And ' tr, e United Kingdom or of ;hr and other restrictions on Freethe sub)ect of Customs Union i. British territories to seek such redom of trade. in danger of hemr considered a <,r M Dul neither the United substitute for ooHiifil f<.•-..'(..,. States nor Canada would want lo The Ideals ot multilateral trade wlSilui fill £.11? at international conierenc are ^ m8 !" B w uld ""-vitably 1shuuld result in much higher productivity Of the land. The Development and Welfare Organisation which came into being directly as a result of that report has always placed agriculture at the top of its list of priorities and Barbados has benefltted considerably as a result. Among these benefits was the establishment of six agricultural stations where experiments in mixed farming in presently being conducted be accused of unfriendly or discriminating action against depen ent territories In the Caribbean The agricultural stations vary in size and experiments now being conducted will give accurate information about various sizes of peasant allotments and will prove Europe today are what sizes are economic, if any. While this information is being compiled the stations are acting as advertisements for better agricultural methods and the services of first class livestock are gradually improving the strains of local cattle. All this is excellent and the news that the taxpayers of Barbados have been asked to foot the bill for these stations in the new estimates for 1952-53 will be received with equanimity in an Island where the primacy of agriculture is acknowledged and unchallenged by the majority of people. It would however be letting slip an opportunity—and no opportunity must be let slip—if the government of Barbados were not reminded that financial assistance for these stations until they can pay for themselves is not enough. _, attractive that they meet with HEWJ"*! r !" Km ib y ' " would certainly be unwis. ready acceptance from members """* Kingdom with regard to the British Caribbean ten-it of the United Nations. Yet the *' P-" v ""' Of uuarnntcod marto disdain GATT and the ber i-oui.tu, who uay liu service to *"''•'' r r "t^h Caribbean pro• be derived from a freetn.. these ideal, have found it .mpos•"'•£ *wW trade But the British Car. sible to put them in practice and Tb* Brliwh Caribbean terrlto. bbean is too dependent on U so far multilateralism has not "* %  *'u ds lhat w u ^ !" ve J 1 icerned P'-M'W the interests of the Uni^ l^ an a p! resulting fro u *#c0t^xZ' tiff made Irunt >IOV The Caovernment of Barbados has shown a strange reluctance to understand what are the impediments to a successful agrieultural policy for this island. They realise now. when it is too late, what a loss was sustained when for cheeseparing and narrow financial reasons they permitted the Deputy Director of Agriculture to leave an island where he had done such valuable work. They have shown no great alacrity to attract a successor. That is failure number one. Despite increasing complaints from "peasant" agriculturalists, despite the evidence of figures compiled on these same agricultural stations, the government of Barbados continues unintelligently and to the detriment of local agriculturalists to conlrtil meat at prices which must discourage cattle raisers from improving the "f their livestock. That is failure number two. Kqually depressing is the invitation addressed to all Barbadians to grow more food when every grower of food knows that even on government-owned agricultural stations at certain periods of the year locally grown vegetables and ground provisions have to be destroyed, because of inadequate marketing arrangements. There is no need to go further than failure number three to realise how slowly the government of Barbados takes action to set right what is glaringly wrong with its agricultural policy. Great Britain provided an example of the obstacles which imj pede progress to multilateralism ot GATT asia ^^s^ f n m ^^ l r^!zii2& convcrTbiT ' "* **"" T^^t^^^ Explaining IU failure in a mem^J Australia ."ten reted^ATT t ^S^SS^S^-m n orandum (Cmd. 7572) th,British 5 unnedlment^^ Thp RcB i ona n. Econ mlc Co ^government said that "the .mpos"wei IrS u UmiUtion. with ^'ee which will, itis hoped ,.^ vertibil.ty of sterling which was measure, in f.%-our of local Induslng wlth things like GATT. Befo., attempted In 194, made .1 nece.trie, like oils and faU: GATT3 plunging into a Customs Union aery to embark upon a synem of # cramping cITecl on latin* changes British West Indian goven.me.itbilateral agreement, in order to^and preferenli.il margins: and might like to satisfy themselves secure the continuance of a. large losses which the West Indies have that Customs Union will bring nda volume of international trade experienced because of reductions vantage, not obtainable thmi;i>h as possible." The United States of preference in Canada for nun lnc Committee meanwhile continues to cham. are also cited. Not ill the British territories Ml pion multilateralism and at the But the disadvantages which see the advantages to be gained Torquay conference a full scale are experienced under GATT do from Customs Union a. clearly as %  Hack was launched against Imnot appear Irremovable eren British Guiana which basdeekted penal preference. It w*uld In fact within the present arrangement against poliUc.il federation but be no exaggeration to sav that by which the United Kingdom which hope, to earn anothci the United States will only conrepresent* the llntish Caribbean $3,000,000 annually as a result of slder any great reduction of her at international trade meeting* Customs Union People who KNOW —always ask for HARTLEYS jam the grcoUit name in jam-making W.I. Hopes Of British lluuVi By BfTF 1IF.WFK LONDON When Mr. R. A. Butler, Britain'* Chancellor of the Exchequer. |&. troduce. his Budget on March *. his propoaals will be aru.iou.lv Producers' Oru.inlsatlon. repregin to enter the United Kmgd. m senUng primary producers in the In April next, it is a matter -( Commonwealth. urgency that •ome action hou..l Thl memorandum to Mr. Butbe taken to prevent a further letHe Is entirely concerned with the back to thp Jamaica cigar indu-serlous effects which existing high try." U.K. rates of duty are having on "A subatanUal reduction in th-* ..wailed not only in Britain but wines, spirit, and cigars from the duty on cigar, which would place i throughout the Colonies and the Empire, including rum arid cigars Uiem within the reach of people Donunion. as well. from the We* Indies. with moderate incomes WOUKI I For the measures he will praThe Organisation has made seem to be the most effective wa • l>oe may have a vital Influence similar Budget appeal, every year or restoring the poution and the.*.upon the prosperity of many Kmfor the past three year., but this is good reason for thinking th i* pire producers who contribute year hopes are particularly high it could be done without % %  .>. large sums every yaar. fan the that it may have some success, preclable loas of revenue." form of duties and taxes, to Br;For one thing. Britain's GovernThis was the policy ad' tain's revenue .mant has changed since the last by Col Michael de Cordo\; ( when In tiie West Indies, for example, Budget and Mr. Butler will at lie visited London last >uuunei iH'opic who depend for the liel.least be examining the problem to make represenlaiiom ( >n boh a hood upon export* of rum ant from a new angle of the Jamaica cigar industiy cigar, to Britain will hopelullv agairurt the Anglo-Cuban agrewawait a reduction in the almo Since the last Budget, loo, the mem. He asked that, in order to prohibitive British duties levle<| Jamaica cigar Industry has spoken increase the market, duly on ,on these things that put them out out with an extremely loud and d^Br, should be reduced back u (of reach of the mas. British maran*T>voice again* the Anglou^ i3 rate of 14. 2'%d. Thu. het. Cuban Trade Agreement, which no Ml <| i would save Jamaica's In all Colonies which offer -i W 'U allow Cuban cigars into Bricigar industry from extinction, ."tax holiday" to induce the intain for the first time since before would bring cigar, within the vestment of'capital from overseas "'e war. LM wmmor, jiniiln md, of everybody In Brlta... > there will be the hope that Mr. submitted a full scheme to the and would posirtbly Increase the 1 Butler will adjust the present aysBritish Government whereby a overall revenue to the U.K. tern which make* tax payable at cut In excise duties on cigars would Treasury. the full BriUsh rate, and thus Increase net consumption in BriJJ 0 indications were glvea aj %  nullifies the sacrifice of taxe*. that lain, with the result that revenues that time of Government reaction : the Colonies thvmw!%• %  h %  %  '.""lid be higher than ever while towards this proposal. But CoL de made. the Jamaican market was allowed Cordova's full statement is stilt During the few week, before to expand. in the hands of the Treasury an.l Budget Day. Mr. Butler will have The British Empire Producers wi|j no doubt be taken Into full lecelved scores of n'praeentaUons OrganlsaU.n refer, to the Angloconsideration in the preparation of from various organisations aakdng Cuban agreement In Its memoranthe coming Budget. for cuts in manv taxe and duties dum to Mr. Butler end declares: One ray of hope Is seen In Mr. ,On* such appeal has already been "As import, of Cuban cigars on Butler*, recent announcement that, presented by the British Empire an important scale will again be# OD page t Acu)t£ to ay It it I ilt Sit M m Straight or Itlfinli'il m i Intptnnliii'ss ail tht* s/iiii''



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I'.W.F *1\TFEN -\i.\v \nvor.\TT rm.\T M\ROI IM1 SERGEANTS DEFEAT OFFICERS WIWIHS III Shoot For Royal Leicestershire Cup Lados Kegimrm hv ihp R I %  %  rc*m.s • At lie %  I %  %  P %  %  I %  %  nh in the snap it iiiMinK in the lot" of N iii Warrant OfB%  seniors by a Throughout the event whlrh he1 Liu at 2 p.m.. a*ria*ad %  truly keen and / Faf CX C CX t^ aT 4/ ^-J 1%JI %rK5& Sl ' ,h ' H"t"l! Loans fund CU B MWUU T* -'int. end the 'tor tarlcd In Jimr 1950 approxinoon M loncludcd In the A „„, ,, ,„..„ W l< ly $800 000 have been lent to Root*! • off V < %  n th. 4.h and Jrd I...long. !" J"2g*. Tlu """>bcr which the Warrant Officer B JKXS.SV !" ?W^KW'K '" Johnny Boll,,„ th d lion STSnoOD f.v rinl Ain IbV came into th,home *.ww.wu tod M.ti-fi Wind. They rtretcb Hold.-r -dipped Doldrum |( |* g n a i| day lo at the Housposition until they through on the tails in^mniimg |tl(( i^ am Department where paoof tbs victorious %  •igpanU 1 teas* which %  afaaita' th' Officer' to win Uta Royal Lfica*Urshlr Big Upset In Maiden Stakes 2.700 Make Housing Loans If yeni hive HUB unwisely, or too well, take a dash of ENO .> Fruit Sill ". Liwill set your digestive imco flowing, help you. M(im -Trongly she pasted Sw| whoac red 98 out of I ; ,., Admiral (Holder up) Rocket and increased her lend to for th W.Of and Sgts.. and H the premier position. two lengths to win going away. Walcott for the Officers, who i* Coming around the l*nd places Sweet Rocket. Lutchman up. and also to be congratulated on ecurchanged quickly but Holder still Lunways. Yvonet up. battled it Ing 2 possible* at 100 and 200 kin ml to the fore to out for second place for which dead-heated. yardt n his excellent score of I nut of a pouib'e 114. The following are the scores -mm S\TH S M bfankan. H n ; -!i r.. IT C >H •**\ (;.. !" i-., i< < sai 1. o C S M unntMi. A. r % %  *i le. i.i N r C Q M a Quinlvn*. K io M m... CaaVaaan. i: w <: Q M II r i r-r Man — III OIIKtRa. Mit|.f o r • i ..., T A 0.-ii<* ii n i: n Mali* .V LI 1 .. II. J NrM..-< C. X Cam %  H 1 %  %  1 1. 1 1 i-pi 1. SKVKNTH RACK race up the home itnl I by a neck from March Wind: 0 waa second a head In front tit hip. Creole Stake* FOI'RTII RACK The held of ten got off to I Ian start with Twinkle, Cottag,l'...i i. .-I-. Cituneas an d Vonwiie each carrying 2, b m Seven horses faced the Starter U1U | s lbs. overweight respects in thlt event the second 7V for tively. •J the afti i Pitting off to a Yvonet got oft* first with Joan ga good start. Holder pushed Cav$ tai but was quickly overtaken a* allaT to the front and was leadDv Rosette piloted by Holder, bj M |Bg when the Held p;i~s-oie. SMdUng chaltangad and | 0|; aroU nd and was m %  cond pmition n lh( lr ,irpe;il. yesterday eonthe decision of His Woracratched •j) to UM for* and com-l .1 th.bind ets ; ,m wbO i up mail" i rtrong plate and eventually . | lehmil Rotsrtto home Itnttj iA. ding ,,„ „,„, |i „. l i ull thr % %  done lusale for the premier insar „ m four lengths. tot lion an't llunqiierqiie managed fo T — catch ihaj Judge's eye first by neck ahead of Cardinal who waa second three lengths In fiont ol ""avaller. Castle (iranl Stak.-s Vanguard i nl) hor* u-rtv. i_ atenwa and th* remaining six D.l.L. stakes -„, off lo a -yod slurlPasting sue carried top •ratgnt ..f K, |tfJldtll> lh( „, ., ,.„„. t (lt .. in the Held of seven iniW( WM Usher with A| huh ..une un.i. %  .. hrtag m the second ve. Spnte. Flying DM^ ., 1|ld po^nons respeollvely and Harroween. being )n r^hlng th.D. iuru..ui [! % %  are always taking appln allon for loan* nnd -n some days Interviewed bv the Manager Mr I) A M Haviies Long queues are always sawn at Housing Departments. Besidethese Housing Loans which are for those engaged In the sugar industry, there are always long queues on those dayi when the Housing Department at th* Garrison arc interviewing applicants who seek Government houses at rent. These are two separate dapartnu i the Housing Loans fund Mr. Haynes said yesier• lay "the people have been very ippi-eclative of the loans and make, very effort to repay them.' Mr Haynes observed that • % %  %  quid readily realise what change a, taken place in housing over ,o country dlstti.t I he loans nve been concentrated in parSi Andrew. St Thomas, John where housing; eoitkUons were worse Mr. Haynes said that the plaftn co-operated well with the deartment WHY: KKlllTH RACK Red (Jliinu Quills lo Free FiornioM KIITII RACK ship Mr, S H. Nurse Police Magistrate of District "E", who im,] U posed a tine of I] and S/costs to be paid in seven days or in default H days* imprisonment with hard labour DO Htfa IU Bishop of Waterman's Village. SI ing indecent lan:i ganea furlongs, the longest for the ........... | %  ,. ,-,,-,,< *Hlrd class "A" and %  %  vomber 30. 1951. liishop apjHMlcd %  gglu M Nurse's decision and was yesternppeai which fanwuntad The L\ dene* -1 UM prosecution was that while walking along %  ntbtr 10 nisi Bishop taw Julian Ca ho told bar not tt> sralk j^ v in conilnning UU d* Tiieu H that II •! % %  %  %  Thcyll Do It Every Time Why are people becoming so excited about SALE? The BIGGEST CUT PRICES You'll ever get in Bridgetown SHOES $1.00 Size 3 to 31 Per Pair HlfiS~* M.C*dt SVJ.OO IIIIAIUS A V.MitLS per .a. 2c. MODEL STORE SALE from 1st. March See Our Handbills n ttaeiaatw '*• Thtm RED HAND PAINTS l J llelle up. .n>it H< bate, Quested up. led tl the horse-, went piist (he judgi (ttr the Ilisl time. Landmark with O'Neil in the saddle w.i pulled UP al this stage or the due to a burst sllrr0| P .hCrosfl ii-. %  began •• m vt UP from v in the meantime kept Usual well to the fon winning one. then left 10 I and Mary Ann to fight it oul f"i Bd and third DO this they did while coming up the .me ttretch. Eventually Mary Ann got home half a length %  third by a length. second Between the live and four furL'sher over his lend on w*lch i ... ,. ( wi nt • # Lady U bSt1a t and begaa i \eut\h abuse him. Two children— Ethelbert Boyce a n d Davit! I Bishop C imiehael. i up. to th load earlj end ell moved aw..;. the held as they went past the tecund furlong. r> BBun ccond Up tti then .:I.I-MII.'1 and Joseph pushed Harroween into tl Wll B I %  II. id made a bold hut : %  i ell Bareel Rocket and rode bar borne On utawrori f< i ,ii..v.e.i i. Water Cret \i nde three lengths Hai ilv DoMrum and rtaanlng rMncaai haif %  length gh Police Maniat lo the Wine SIXTH BACK Spriavj Stuke-s tl Ith FUeuxce Cai hi at IM ihtwo chndi [ PROVIDE ItFI.IARLF PROTECTION FOR EXTFRIORS | ANP HIGH-CLASH DECORATION FOR IVTFRIORH We have received Wew Sfocrs ol . SPECIAL HOUSK PAINTS Ore*. Dark Grey Oak Brown. Barbados Light and Dark Stone S* KN A MEL-FINISH PAINTS Cream. Tulip Green, White. MATINTO FLAT PAINTS Cream & Green. CONCRETE FLOOR PAINTS or Bright Bed. Grey. Mid. Green. HARD GLOSS PERMANENT GREEN with Grey underrating. PAINT REMOVER for the easy removal of old paint%  Phone 4267. 4436 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. COOL SPRING in the North!— will demand a return to warmer clothing at vacation end. We have :. ictton of the linest Wo i loomed in Englan.: I well as glorious Cashmere 1'ulloveis from Scotland, light e | h I "i... %  ..i ind cusp WoMad Suitlni l l|11 bottl Ladies and Men. The quulitv of this branded stock is unquestioned and it is our Sales Policy to combine Ihii high quality with cxivllent value C.B.RicefcCo. tat, A .Mrrrhunl Tnilurs <>t Unll.in 1 .mi



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SLNDAX, M.UM U *,. HB2 M M>.\ ii(K\n: fAt.F HFTr.LN CHURCH SERVICES AN OUT AN %  % %  <•! %  SMMOI and MMWI. Programmes m mi M*m H I. %  II IS %  lit tnlrtThMkital CIDHMM MI i*> Ray'* %  I-- lUiMm Vow it MM %  . ... • .HI M -v n WnTTTHAlX—* *ra SW M .-... • %  p hAMK MALI. %  Bj S.M Mr r Moonr. 4 p m TW Keiva. 4 IO p Inwtl^ar. IS p m For th* CMnina Oooa. 1* w n. Kuodav Hair Haur, p %  MtBStC BBC SfrDtari OirBa M ra. • 4.1 p m WTiat %  l'<—k n| I p rn PBMTamntr I'ai^a ana intnludr 1 pn rne Maw*, 1U0 paa. Hfwa AjialyMa. 7 II l> T-. Caribbean Vnlna. 7 30 0 m •i .„piini as MM ii .1-* m atM R*M*> Ifntti tha man %  rs P m I. wUirta. IM fompawi • •t Thr Wi* Dpi %  a ;. DtSMft. p m Dane* Mill, • 45 p m Span* Koiutd Up and PfOITi ; p ... i> ; N.--I I IS p I C J*ina 1IA-I .m P M JJ UM SI MM IP MM 7 > p n. Think on tt>a Thin*. 1 pi" Radio 1 4ft p ir. tati.pw* .* U w !" > p >., n—n 4h# Thtta PT r. 10 p m Tha N.w. IO IP p %  rVvlr* 10 10 p m Tip Top Tunaa %  tx-wc*lu -nurse i: I and Table Laym*; waptarlrt at the Bay Street .. Club. Thi* Class %  .lUTKlert b> 20 members of the Cl. supenri'ed by Mis* HarpGirlIn(ta*li.jl I A parcel of books Watt pr%?sr*iud to thBoy*' and Girll Mr. John Shannon while Mr. Louis Lynch of thr M>dTn High School offered a *et of boxmi: •ML en aerea of third crop ripr cane< -ere burnt I %  curred at Ape They are the pi S A. Wallcott of Ihf Mf* lion and were Injured. eercr Fealer ol Bank Hall, SI Michael, WJJ taken to ral Hoapital on.Fnda;. in .in unconacioun cimdilmn Bjl detained. Foster was a paasen ger "n a lorry WDl an accident. The accident oe u 2.30 pin. on Bcnnels B TTiomas between motor li>rr> M—1195. owned by Michael Hunt of Bank HaU and drive Tieth Scott of Quarry MM HalL and motor lorry M—1085 driven by Samuel i.i Wavell Avanue. St. Michael M—1105 strucK an emi Tops In Fashion + f r..m pace feather i backii mi . Msrrk 1*4 — Laat I %  am H*H> Cuinrr union, tarn t'tipial Eucnanil. 10 M a m Holy Bap* m Mallnn Sa-mon. i -v School' 7pm Eitfitoix & jprwon, Hi. i .1. oirbialnl rlailv l!iro.jiioji Lanl. Mondaji. TurMiM Wadnawlay> A Saiuraa>> 7 a m. Thuradayi wiih llvmni %  • 1 ati. todayIt I ii" %  A mar Id BBadae la L*nt The ST. JAMS NATIONAL BAPTIST II am. Mattni and Sarmuti, 7 m Cvf>n*ona and Sarmon. prtwcltar al ooth 'ar\*ica tna Brv J H (Irani. L Th Mmi-irr la rhaare. ID pm Monday. Wcdnaiday. Fni'.y iMdratM] uir >...iii... IHM will b* afternoon SCODC cerise 0D dolphin free ground; bUck buttcrlln.^ night blue ground, and an brown and white scroll pattern a black ground The star of the collection was a proofed tent coat — In pure white KTosgraln. This is the Hrst him that white troaipaln has beer used as a raincoit material. ID fashion points: round neckline with no colar. round shouldci Iin*| .ml the fullness (it the back gathered Into a yoke placed midway between shoulder and waist ver to those who dnubted whether this was practical, was thai the io.it had already bee dr"-clcaiied. and had stood up t th*' test. Significant uuches from the collection: roebuds ramblinp; everywhere, buried amongat the straw of a hat. placed at hip level on the hem of a incket black I trimmed with white Life Guards F luir>ti. and a tartan outfit — tartan ruatei tartan collai P Loth matching the crinoline pt> ncoat which showed a fraction of an inch below the dresc bem. < HtUHIlA*. atlKNf'K ... c-t.i. -i vum "'i-'"" %  rldcrta*" IPP" %  • '•••. Sunday* II a.aw and T pjn. Wrdna-lay. %  p.m A sjerrtce whlc Ir-IudM Ta-umo.ila ol Chrlftl"" Scienr iiiLiin-iad by ih.sn-v. ar. MARVH %  in ai n i %  ,.i 7 30 a m Malm, -n.i I.IMn>; SM a m Low Maw; S on a m a, Snmo'i I SO p m Sunday *cnool. 4 00 p m c-hlMrm'* VnptK III p m Rdpilimu. 7 00 p.m Mlann Eva-uona , Satinan. ^raachar F.thaf F !**(.' WKIINPSIMY Mil SUNDAY MARCTt Kabfrrt al !*•••-"' %  JKSU* l.aldaa fwaM liaiah II 1 PSIM forth a rod out % %  JPMC. and a Branch BMll .*— Th* lollawlni CBMMMI K—I la Ut* Laaaap-Sarmaa Tba Bibla: Thru aald J< cpptlnur in mv worn •*• TTMl" and Ihf inilh -h lima Sarvlcr. BBBMBI W r nail know %  II. .,,-,.•' "** Tha divma imaaM. %  •> %  r miirt --. Ir. and rm wlU ba inaaparabU from the dluw PYlnripla. Ood PMkj In Hrivf Cooking Classl"or (,irls' Clul s ,,, v 1 liarsMVt IMIIT Vli.iol •: 1 on the platform, was injured an v.ivrlv damagan* %  .rnaged iMrawis ti KtMOVALNOTItE FRIENDLY CRICKET \\,ik,.h:rc CX. will play the Veterans C.C. a two-day cricket fixture at Frieiid-.nip Fl... u.* Field The match begins to-day id continue* the following Sunday. Play starts at noon Yorkshire C-C. will be repre%  BDtdjd by: — T. Maynard tCapt.). O. Barrow. C Clarke. L. Blaeketi. c Clnnenl H Hartrwood, i. Motttty, R. Cumngs, A. Carter. K PtyiW lad PHO.XE us! CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS Wp are in a position to execute your Order, [or the followini: :— PAINTS—from the best Manufacturers GALVANISED CORRL'dATKD SHKKTS—21 ^nuKe NAILS I'll'l in all sizes PIPK FITTINGS EXPANDED METAL RLINKOIMINC. RODS CEMENT Sec Us early for Your Requirements BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. No. 10 Swan SI. Phone 2107. 4406 or 3M4 //A'yV/////Ay//A'//// O-CEDAR POLISH ;J THE POLISH FOR I BRIGHTER HOME J OCEDAR POLISH 4-c. tins (i 'XU 12-ur. tin. 'a Me .'-pi. tin. I %\3t I cln. tins a $4.00 OCEDAR MOPS—S2.9S ear WET MOPS — i< S4( and SI.52 each I.et us snpply your requirements. I L_ PLANTATIONS LTD. Announcing the arrival of:— WHY WAIT? Sasftan .VOir TO noHl.n PAJU0D8 VEEDOL MOTOR OiL at all leading Garages & Service Stations. •FOI'ND WllfKfVm m (ARS TRAVEL iiomi HI IIIIMI ifsj gj lt m DIAL 2229. (Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS in 5 colours Fur Verandahs and Floor.* in it in: it T Magaxine Lane, Thani Bros Lucky (ash Prize Drawing $50.00 Cash Price goes t<> ttta lucky Mo !•• bill datcJ 11/2 52. Clerk's initial M.C also the nminmt spent which is $3.57. Any one huldini; the hill with ..l>. may please bring In tins bill on Thuisdav ihe 6th March al THANI BROS STORK md rl f %  C I'ncr. To avoid complicatloni it li ncincimirji that lac hill should havr (hr sa.ir m-i .ri tiir duplicate which is in our possession. If the above is not produced within It* time this amount of $|000 will then t!<. to di charities whk h a 111 bt %  nnoui ced li he Pn rw Radio later. Right feeds* i H.i HI: IT OI T TOR rmmSELFl For example, let us see the Dollar and Cents difference in net profit between the use of Cheap and "Pillsbury's Best" Chick Starting PILLSBURY'S BEST S13 60 per bag or 16c. per lb. 2 lb. cost 30c. Versus CHEAP FEED $12 60 per bag -18cor 14c. per lb. —14c. 2 lb. cost 28c. 2c. more PILLSBURY'S BEST Chick Starter only 2c. more per chick four to six weeks of age. PILLSBURY'S BEST fed chicka a-reraje five to six ounces "Heavier'' at ux weeks. FIGURE POULTRY MEAT WORTH 48c PER LB. 1 oz. 2c. z 5 oz. 10c. more value per chick. 10c—3c. (Extra Feed Cost) 8c. 8c. more profit per chick 500 Chicks $40 00 more het Profit to YOU the Feeder, and a better flock. irs so SIMI'I.I: TO UKT MUST Results and Bigger Returns feed the Best PILLSBURY'S BEST New stocks Starter. Grower and Layer just arrived • %  Hont:nr THOU h TD-A4WVT9. PHONE : 2229 THE IRISH LINEN HOUSE The Things You Need At Bargain Prices ONCE MORE FOOARTY'S OFFER DISCRIMINATING HOUSEWIVES A MAGNIFICENT CHANCE OF LAYING IN SOME REALLY GOOD HOUSE HOLD LINENS AT ASTONISHINGLY LOW PRICES . 36" LINEN SHEETING $2.70 per yd. 72" .. ., 0.33 ., 90" „ „ 5.99 „ 72 x 108" LINEN SHEETS 15.00 each 90x108" ,. 20.00 LINEN PILLOW CASES 18 x 28 $2.75 to $3.67 each '.2" LINEN DAMASK $7.50 per yd. LINEN DAMASK TABLE CLOTH 72 x 90 ... $25.39 each LINEN NAPKINS $1.38 and $2.20 each LINEN EMB. LUNCHEON SETS — 13 pieces $7.20 to $8.85 Set LINEN LUNCHEON SETS HAND PAINT ED 9 pieces $14.00 Set LINEN GLASS CLOTHS $1.24 each LINEN GUEST TOWELS $1.80 each IRISH LINEN is such a gay luxurious set ting, it brings out the rich ness of fine silver, China U Crystal Attention I.mii-s I! ARE YOU CONTEMPLATING GOING ABROAD SHORTLY 7 THEN HAVE YOUR SPRING COAT MADE TO MEASURE AT — FiHiAHVY'S TAILORING DEPARTMENT WE HAVE A WIDE VARIETY OF RICH LOOKING COLOURS AMONG OUR WEST OF ENGLAND DOE SKINS PLEASE ENQUIRE AT Win. Fogarty if to) Ltd. TAILORS AND CLOTHIERS OF DISTINCTION



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tutfcitt j^lnreate ESTABLISHED 1695 BARBADOS. .'. AKCil 2 1>2 Jockey Holder Straddles 4 Win (mi. Big Upset In !" f <** t7 A W ill lntervi Maiden Stakes Gwenor JOCKEY SONNY HOLDER straddled four win ners as the B.T.C. three day Spring Meeting got underway at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon in fine weather. Hon. V. C. Gale was the most successful trainer with three wins. Although no records were broken the fair crowd who attended witnessed a day of keen racing on the hard track and some good times were returned. Biggest upset for the day was in the Maiden Stakes when Mr. J. R. Edwards' Castle In The Air and Mr. M. E. R. Bourne's Magic Gaye gave the lucky punters $69.16. The Field Sweep reached the $500.00 mark on MM n and the $400.00 mark on five occasions while the Pan Mutuel paid its highest dividend 4 WJfl on Fust! Admiral in the Chelsea Stakes The Police Band under Sgt. Archer was in attendance and rendered some lively airs including the-latest CalvpTOOS during the afternoon The Meeting continues on Thursday. FIRST RACE Garrison Stakes A small cruwd was present to >.' the Meet utl to a good start with six horses of tne origni.il ten entries tmOng tin tfartai IWUe Surprise, Lutchman up. •it,a Flying Dragon, Wilder up. corned 5 and 3 lbs. mvrwiigni rg ; <. nvcly. The race was off to a fairly good start, and a* they jassed the Stand lor the flrtt time it was Flying Dragon, Wildei up, strongly challenged by Fuss Budget with Pat Fletcher in the .saddle Fuss Budget, after taking over ag they rounded the llrsl bend, set the pace all the way to the third furlong where the others made their effort. Flying Dragon closed the guv with Firolady and Red < I hot pursuit, and as they turned into the home stretch, O'Neil pushed Mr. "Teddy" Jones' Bed Cheeks into first position on the rails, and rude her home the winner by a ere neck ahead of Fircludy, Joseph up. who made a very strong bid to come second. Flying Dragon finished third, a length tMh&ML SECOND RACE Maiden Slake* Fourteen noraes t a 11 4 tho Marter for the wonrTg— the Maiden Slakes, class "ctad -C2" over 5Vi furlongs. As the gale (lew, Test Match was taught up. and although escaping williout (browing 11 loclcay, the race tad lo be reeulled. They got off to a better start t>n the second try. lunching up togtthcr except for Mabouya, Wilder up, who got a late jump and was trailing when they passed ihe 3furlong pole, they began to spread out a bit. and 'Castle In The Air*. Ilnldrr up. took over and came up the home stretch with a fine sprint to beat Magic Gaye. Belle up, by two lengths. "Aim Low" finished B close third, half a length behind the second horse. THIRD RACE Chelsea Slakes Sunlna and April Flowers were scratched. Of the remaining nine entrants Caprice, First Admiral fl nd April Flrfwers each carried 2. and 7 lbs. overweight respectively. g> On page IS of Barbados %  %  %  h.l.i „, Fairrhitd I | delegation ... 1 %  the gritv. A ion i wat also ippoinied i %  senlatlon. Two Auditors van .;,pointed and I Mi E Csuneroa Hawltt They were proposed by Mr tMgrave Ilin*. %  J E. T. Brancker. MX P P % % %  dent In the chair Ml (' F. Talma. M.C.P Secretarv Mr. C E. St. Hill. Treasurer Mr K Mi' I. %  '. Mr. C. Cobham. Mr. A QlUtfia, Mr S Crick. Mr C. Green. Mr. M Barrow. Mr. I-\ Will. II I P Mr. W. ve i. Codrtngton and James Tudor. MA. Wore (he thr* rruataag, J'ca., All Stars Draw Series JAMAICA. March 1 The football series in Jama KM ended in a 2—2 draw lo-day as Jamaica beat Caribbean All Stars one-nil in a tame game. None of the members of the teams showed I .is in the three form i • COBpttttg such outstanding I players as Kruin of Sunn,mi. the '..T iuiward ("..in.,dves the Trinidad goal keeper, Lester Allcoek, the Jamaica it u Eplurse. Jamaica's left half. JelluHeron, the Glasgow Celtie i TI>I' -simi.ii. tuned out fui jamakH %  suffering injury to his right knee and took little pait in the game. Newcomer (iieene who occupied inside right position In this mate ihe lone goal after beautiful passing by Allcoek. AN APOLOGY The 'Advocate" wishe* lo apolotuc I o Mr. A. II lla,ralllon-lltll for publication af an article entitled "New King uf Guana Island' which appeared In this newspaper Irom one of our i ormpondsstta. This article, u haa since been discovered, contalacd many Inaccurate and mtleadlnc statements. We regret any inconvenience caused lo Mr. Hamilton-Hill. THE FAMILY DOCTOR In keeping with our policy of obtaining for our readers the best possible advice on subjects of importance, the Advocate h.v < %  tiling Doctor to -Imedical gurries. The Family Isoctor will Inunable to see any ;, personally, but you can send Bin roar questions and II.i' .ii %  w.t will appear every week in the Evening Advaeate. There will he no charge medical adv.1 loiters will be treated In confidence. To make abso lulely sure you are not to sign your real name to your query but lo writeunder a pen name. The answer to the question will appear under the pen name. Letters should be addressed to The Family Doctor, e/o The t.dllor Ad, ecatc. gsrlgge. tuwti. gad musi reach Urn office by Wednesday god) week. The first series of rcplivto medical questions will appear In next Monday'* arming Advocate. i • %  im;i|.'To lit' Discussed Tuesday People who follow poUl HI looking forward to the discussion which is expected to begin on Tuesday over the Estimates. Subjects of discussion during the latt pol itic al campaigning far the I tenOU wenll %  .! %  IIIJ;, E lucilion and Emigration and the people arc looking forward to see whit plans are being made for Housing and Education At present the Housing Loans Department is making loans to %  .i.. worttan of tin Sugar in duslry and the House, building programme at ihe Government Housing schemes ;ire being continued. A •< i rosftowar of tbg debates in the House anticipates lhal the Hoaae will be packed with member! af the community who wish i<> hear the discussion on the Estimntea. The House may sit every dav for i few days to get the Betlmale* fitu U.N. Raiders Batter Reds By Land, Air HTII ARMY HEADQl \HTK1: ,,h I AHM tank al '. rrttorj inside Ihi *' hl u N "* pluiei iHnkl in tile Mtnur fceclnr. United Natl ns ral lei imp • 1 !! inilllrr J"" 1 """*' """'" %  '.'• 0UI i Ihe "Iron Trlangl, Real • Communilt Mnrtir firo forced ihe UN raldir team to return Bnmb laden Ml Mu %  Comin poundVULEZ2 ''' ''"' k, %  ""'"' ^p-"1 ""'•'" < %  i yonnrang doMroyteg three and dam-: irmoured vel %  Kirkwood Bsdaat Question Of Tgxet Hun KIM1STOH Fell 2 liuU-,1 Kl.kw,Kl Ba, Till STABT ol thr Mhllh % %  %  whh* u Heven ind • H.ll TtulwrL aMl Mr. N. M Imab*'*. IMdri rlddrn by Heleffr WM lh# wlnwr Nine horw. nu i.-l Foreign Minister To Discuss Arab Fact By WALTKK COLLINS CAIRO, March 1. Arab circles believe thai the Spanish Foreign Minister Alberto Martin Artajo will discuss the possibihtirs creeling a Mediterranean community pact with Arab statL.. when he makes his six-nan m swing through the Mideast in AprU. Out of the six Arab nation! Artajo is scheduled to visit, three have Mediterranean shorelines, three othera are woven into a Mediterranean pattern by their nlationa wilh their neighbnura and an overall Jefence blueprint for ihe eastern Medilerranu MAN SHOT ANTIGUA. March I. Al five o'clock this mornine it portod thai Clarke, a Kirth*r was shot by ;i clerk "> a rum %  d by Lawrence Gon%  t| %  B %  It is sail! that six Iplaying with u automi a .iid m weapon discharged. Clarke was hospitalized In a critical condition with a punctured stomach wound. Cyclist Injured B* HI Young, a labourer of Passage Road, St. Michael, was treated and discharged at the Hospital yesterday at about 7 p.m. for injuries on hi* face and neck after he fell from his bicycle which he was rldmg along Dank Hall Road. The bicycle was not damaged. Jap Trade Team Off To lirazil TOKYO. March 1. Four trade anil HILIIKU nillci.il:. left by air for Bran) lo participate in Japanese trade ulk-s v.ilh braziL They wereaccompanied by Koichi Takani, m led head office I Boen LARGE CROWD AWAIT FISH n.^„ la £? e crow 1 wiitad in the Public Market for fish from about 2 o clock yesterday afternoon. The Ufa was brought in shortly nfter three o'clock. This nested of a large Hlue Peter shark, about six feet long, and a dolphin. The dolphin was quickly sold but only a few people appeared to be interested in the shark. They %  were waitL. DJ* boats would ;lng to j Id bring see •' the lata flying Ash. Ill MM I HOI I wins Results At A Glance I IN Hall,. Ml*. li linilni i man .\r,. >T AltMINtl .H.ld... "IND. .1.....-.,, ll>M-lllr ,|.. n >i mi am i %  i. i ni \t,i i rqi i it %  ...!.,, t MllilVtl il>>w|r I II Mill. II,., I.. tii.ii axis %  -'IIIINIII r ii.ui,. • '•i i taw --—-mini MLHAtr i U ..N. (l -I\IH IAII I'OIJiai M -ll.lder. "*l %  <" KIT I .1. h.... i IIMII a\i i •:n-I ll lla|,.i IVI i. AM tfn.a,*. I TMI.SKl.t. iH.li.1 %  II1HI RAIT i SIII; a ,qiM>i> MARt ANN .1. % %  >.., it...mm II i.. NIMH RAC* I "Ml I N N .-.,. I"I!K.,.IIS !....., rrrrra WINS .. Egypt, I*banon and Syria arc detituieiy Haditarraiic m ..ui,u„ -. while Jordan and Iraq us* the Lai^nese capital Beirut as their por' luqui oil How. to lirnnM.Ill Tripoli. 6 udi Arabia's oil flows through ihi Persian Gulf to the ll. i B) tin ,. %  to the lledlterTeMan nhili M . the Arab League Lli-iNi At this time when Egypt in pai tirjlar and other Arab K'llng through •t.,ge whrrvin their interest sometimes conflict wilh their suspicion* of so-cdled imperialist, powers a Meditei | nrty Pact along the lines of the European community pact Ire""'"'Ing considerable support >n the Arabs. —FJP. Scouts Leave Tomorrow rin mala body of scout* of the Barbados Contingent for the iir-i CariblH'iin Jambwei which takes lil.ue iii Jamaica will UviveSaawvll Alrpotl .it IM pjn sfefiday Si.nits jre ggkad to lie at the U.l'i I'll The party lag Ma)..r J E Grlfflth. V E MJ Ihewa, K < %  iM... H D .i E Thompson, Cnpt. R A S. i T. Carter, M Husbands, V lin,i H. Lewis, N. Quarlean. L Quintyno. 0. Ruddnr, O. Bptingei D. Trotman. H. Turton. A DTatl waite and Cecil Walkes. Thew scouts will travel to Jamaica v) Grenada. Al 7.30 p in Mi.BBUM day Re* 1. iMnllalieu who is attached u UM Conungenl will laavo Seai' for Jamaica via Trinidad party i u A %  tasMlini b> for Ihe ttiet oepor II,., up some luartars — ..wo*, n ; nu of %  '' %  %  "UM Lagliiauv ,''." '"' : u '"" >" •OU.HII artlng Govermiin. "take urgenl r.-p„^ntatlon, %  „ ' *•" Ihe British Government la tb t %  •strove**' ,-ffect that lirilixh Comounv ia.i.1' '" " ''" "'' should not be cnargST on The Proflu „f Briush eonretru 11.?."""" SJ ,rv %  ^ ^ be 'espen u' protlU earniri mini ."' """ "'V'"' "' f u monnV "Parations m J„uui „!, ... %  rtUsh colonies, provided t, L U,rk u %  uch protiu are retained in ttu tcrritorie* in which they n ,. ari tr ihe deve^opmeiit ami •1 ..gneulture and nidi. I 1 pared' liy. (soriiiuiiH Jubiluiil HAMBUIU;. March I. JubUant Germans set bonuro an tho fortreas isle uf ilcligoi-,. 1 %  •letjraring its return t> the,., .fter seven years of ,] %  ane practice bombing un I'. former submarine base. Tintlaoa 2 pailgg .,ti ti„. Bjuunlatid overs only 181) m re*. Aft-i tori iications ware blown up und. 1 %  llritish occupation, HritUh and ,. 1 uilod Slaloa boiiilwrs tkted 11 for I practice Urgcl. l r CottliUoQ Govt. To Be DitHnisseJ PARIS, Mann General Charles De Oaulie French People's Rally leader, announced after a Party caucus IhJt he u wilting "to discuss with Pi mier Designate Paul Reynaud his proposed programme of Rational Ul t% Givernmi-nt ' %  ll the first indication si iB4j that De Oaefla*i group which now |i the strongest singh PartJ Nations) Assembly was willing to discuss participation in a Coalition Government unsl ll Tensed the chances of •eteran Conservative Reynaud forming a government to stave on national bankruptcy. -UP EDITOR DIES N1 M v EtK %  Keith Kcat Spceil T2 Execut Editor of the New York iun I | i43 until a BHTged with the New Yark World Telrgrnm. 1 -d IT. Miners Rejectt Compromise SANTIAGO. Chile March I Six hundred striking miner who rinsed the big nltr..'.pl.mt, Marlg Bant ,,, 1 pg i,., vaidivia in Antofagasta province rejected a compromise formula presenterl by the Labour Minuter t,, .,)<., %  in. ecmonuc dispute with the entent Then the Minurtei flew to Iquiqe where 2,000 Communist eon1 Itrate miners wegg kcUV in support of the petition. The woikers refused direct talks with the management Yesterday poliee arTssrted four striking leaders eftar throwing tear gas bombs at ,. workeri' meeting. A Communist spokesman rlrrulated word that sotw died during police intervention Thi* wgg denied I ties and the Oov — v.r AGA KHAN IS ISJOLATED NICK PRANCB, M The fabulously wealthy Aga Khan la] mnptuou" bedroom al Villa Yaklmom n-ar C'anne* cut off from hU friands by doctors who feard he, heart mivht stop. The 74-yi-.i-uld rfftlfl Odled 111 Pierre Duchossal, Geneva heart specialist within a few minutes of his arrival yesterday by special chartered plane from NVw Delhi. Mentliers of the Aga's bOUaanOllI said his state of health gave "no .lllxlelv' %  but Dtiehoi ordered complete rest tM %  • 1 the servanta to lurn away all alter* — IT.r. — ON OTHER l-Al.l | 1 Carib Callinc 3 € 1 a e sa a, Ciardeeliis 11,in.. Feim 4nd i.it den. nil( Notes. 4 It....1.,. 11 s 1 1; 1 MM... < hii. ( kali I ^Miminiiut. | Blwsng t'lrrle; Tups in lash Ion 7 — %  %  II, 1 I.IIII.IUU • I Saw Naples \,„ lived ie %  took Review; 1 News 11 Art l Tamer 1 It OaMiaa. IS Comic Slrlp*. ta Shmrtliis Raee%. %  -truck west of i!.puUed by small Jirma fire as they a'tempted to probe an Allied position In the name area. One hundred rounds .if Communist mortar and artillery d in I'.N. positions In the "Heartbreak Ridge" 1 in Hie nigh'. 1 Sghtei %  txannati %  %  ; while knocking out 'urns and inflicting M traeki in I 1 %  and damaged 30 lo %  '.inn on %  hides ind astcrdaf'i racing at the Girrlson Savannah. Cardinal, ridden by Yvanet, was VIFNNA. Mnrf Slip shod production in Ihe Prague branch of Can I kla's giant Skoda Armament %  patent of material to Russia, the newspam Mlada FraaU admits The newspaper said that at tho branch factory in Prague "in the* past year the bad and faulty 11 C0*t our economy twenty seven million crowns (IJJOO.OOO).It added I iosse occurred -the insufficient use o( ery and htgn absentr said that the plant I reach N "ta for 1851 Al beanchoi of Skbine are i>elieved to duclng arm %  merits for the Russian war %  Union''. lUeeotly the ment pl-i 1 on the output deniaiiil.:.^ tii.it SS per cent sjMgi 12 than m |ffg| rp. U)hanswsJi Ijau (bihanqsi G flardy Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Weddinq. or lor your own quiet enioymenl at home— K. W. V. can add to that enjoyment, as K.W.V. WINES are QUALITY WINES. Popular throughout Great Britain, Canada New Zealand, Sweden and many other countries oi the world, including the British West Indies. And in these burdensome days oi Hiqli Cost ol Livinq. K.W V. comes to your rescue also. K.W V. WINES COST MUCH LESS than Foreign Wines ol France, Spain, and Portugal, because K.W.V. WINES are admittod into tho Colonv under the British Preferential TariH. K.W.V. Paarl Tawny. K.W.V. Cornalion Wine. K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Vermouth. K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE. KW.V. SHERRIES. J



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PACE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE -i NDAI MARIII 2. i* BARATIA GETS A HIGHWAY Hy IAN GA1JE A BKU.Miri! MN If s.timirl Vlu„i (Winijate 11 6). This.1*an"t!wr novel .ib-.ui TrlnltUd, but unlika Ednar Murr.inc in the OflsCa it does not deal with the coftplicationa of middle clan Ufa in Port-of-Spain, but centres around the life i f peasants of many races living In an outlying village. %  • . "In -' Students Find It Harder To Get Jobs THIS is the month when pruyear * for a mat. who .got i dent students of London Unlversecond In sclrnee. Hr had & the final year call on Ihe previoi.* rxpertenorin business I'mversiiy** Appointment* Board but had M rvad through the wai to discus* ihair proapecu of getHi* starting salary was JE800 1I..K John after they have taken (heir examination* in the sumOne Month For Stabbing Ihirlniur Yi'ir* "Lady Patricia" (In i)rv l). k lTttiiien Nrore nwi What Tiger tad an .11 fc ibout hU age. inj then ~*htprod • San Juan. '.irmers. %  ran or ahop keepers. th— %  %  -Mfi.T i Women, untroubled by N .tion.l n-v own lalkUig to the board* ..,. b #0 v m*d the pattern of secretaryMr. H. R. Walters, an I recruitment for men" start deputy secretary Mis* M t ., m gor and will receive £100— Bobertaoo. They both say the nsoasarulc Those who teach for graduate* is huiJ,„ %  v service will cning. %  -.n.ly icceive more. There ia usually a slump IB Tl* vi. w of Industry and busl•uneJ'ig la brj t10 JJ v i^uiu ,• .revelant in th ..rrrvfi here ap Monday fiom Si island and I have to make an Vincent i, now in the dockaaaaapaf of >""• Thai easBB .:iu-l Foundry WM lommitted in the middle of UndtgdL It b understood that lb* U,*n -nd tn the middle of the theopportunity Is being, taken <•* day." Hit Worship Mr C irapaaafiag and doing Walwyn. Acting Police Magistrate p-lm to her • >f ptstiut "A told 27-year-old I whei l'n.nne Hinluon of RichAtoo undergoing repair* % %  to* nujul flap St Mid vewrrl*y Schooner CaUed PUurtm. She what, he sentenced her to on,arrtvert hen Bram St Lucia moath's unpriwnment with hard ^Olh retoruuiy with U-k in her :..liour for wounding Helena Oil**<•"> *"<* co ?*T' i^L.^ a ^ ten. on her left shoulder with a ".wed into the harbour^ She n pleaded guilty ,o the *2&J*S? , % It ST^ United rx.jnr 11 be accepting cargo during ned to uaain of hatae. bo: appealed agam*t Mr K'Sf'.J"' ^ %  m !" „ im .„ —^ ~%  S^^h^2^uJ?5SS ITS wmba r%  tha time of a Gene| UM value of a univer%  "" %  '" !,, 'J^ 0 "" ,h ? 1 bout 12 the gajalL Big nrnu have for P-m. !" "-p' . kn ** .*!;*" u.jnd a* a rule pick* up aa;.i. a Urw time et a store upon the ;*n M %  " and want to W r„ r the past thu* day* there U ha* not d*ne Hhgraa implle* Not f-ndit fay. Whilo thera both „ ua ^.^ t ((^.t .or „ f busines This haidening procass made all smaller Arm* yet realise h<*. a an argument and on u, c lower side of the outei Itself felt flitt upon the market much of the heat materials prothe defendant pulled a knlle basin of the careenage. has now aueed in the schools is going on 'need The raaaontfoi ItuaineM flniui 1 pnlightrnwi nd industrial enterpitte. have *• bo"W ." *W M i rtaodi I it are twofold and uaauauiu anwrpiues nave % %  -' !" %  %  •—• — ~ —• "* %  .on-pl*. .K._UH ot m-U.. r*,. ^ ->'; ;'-; .'e jr. BJ .n v, M *\M -I l.\(IN irtlme ttaff shortage*., and uw lumber of studen's at universities today 1* much larger than it was before the war (at London It is me than double; the 1939-411 flgure-n.OOO. in It51-S2 23.000, improvement since 'he w:ir Tha :--.. .* a cei .-nluable Instruct Th. amount %  iiithor tell, the story Decision On Stabbing Confirmed defendant pulled a knife ba9 | n f nV careenage. Man> Hay and made several lighten lined the wharf anc stab* >>' %  tier with It. One of the WPr e being laden with cargo foi tughi" her on th* left the S.S Troft.-r. .'houli'iT and on* of her lingers Included among her cargo an aU>o rut. leOO ba*t< of lUgar. 500 bag* of "Murder" ^ned „^" 2 (,n l.lai,. CvnsWble Thcophius •V'J'P* II,*kr laid that on February ^^^ ; tout 12.12 p.m. he was on Swan S'.raat When he heard shout* of under" On ruing to the bolMR. FISHERMAN WE HAM. GALV. WIRE NETTING in r mi i Hat at prices which cannot be beaten. .V. It. now ELL Bay Street. Lumber & Hardware DIAL 33M i>aaa*aaoa*>aaaaaaaaaa>aa in Th. It Takes Longer 1 WE see from two to thrae thousand people a year," said Mr. -'' Walter*, "about a third of them dree boys who spend tneir first art, student*. The average comKtavtag school in search j^tpnt person coming to *ee u* In f u >ounialiitic career. One gets February would in the patl. have nil job lii fleet Street, probably been fixed up with a )ob %  i Kndi his time hoping that by September. With the harden6 rjr a reporter will be lick ing of the market the interval Mil gat,a chance to show between their fatitaf *e 'uniV( ., r o|(| hawker Un dlne Hink%  ,omplalna"nt came up to her of Richmond Gap. St. Michael l drum* of Mies 200 drum., "f .uciium-pan mutate**. The .ill be leaving tor London today. .JL'T AI*o unloading her cargo from il.frndant and complainant nghllhv i; m ,cd Kingdom ha* been the ii g. Trie defendant was making s5 philosopher Both the Phil several attempt* to *tab the com0(0 n)ier and the Crofter are conplainant and eventuaUy the comc lt[ ned to Messro. Da Costa *> Co.. o/ nlainuit wt cut on her left i_ui # *houlder. He held the defendant UBQ ..f Swan Sticct he the AasnUnt C Appeal Their Honour* Mr M. <\. wiuu %  %  %  • %  = !" • %  • ——~— #,-, the V,ughan and Mr. A. J H. Hanand .mother woman managed to sta.tecl to ab UBB bar. atfMr Jf$ s.he)l v.-t.n-.ia. connnnad the t-ke away the knife. argument the .-omplamam *g* at Hit Worship Mr. C Asked by Mr. Walwyn what .he her In the face and while Ui l. Walwyn who sentenced 27had to say, Hlnkaon said that the were nghtinn %  he can do. Another tl i *h" races in I toge'her if they forget their th it they ore all T But then Id build a i i of life tn token Tiger-and their gardciftand i clancing, and finding it tedlou: novel the BU ifter .. time decides to beeome :rnrr inttead.. The third I a well i*>iit tt the right way and Join: venuty and our being place them Is likely to -.llced ind the complainant was cut. that ba tail • specli Chur %  liaed field* of medicine, t one month's imprisonment | ith hard labour for wounding ; L !" Helen an her left hiulder with a knife. ,in-r. planning KraduaUy lo work direct* the Inquiries of many Otteeni appealed against Mr. in way up and then try for a job hundred student* to proteaa*onai Walwyn_t decision and wa* also • London dady itrgamaationa which have thetr „rdered^ti pay the coat of appeal own equivalent to an appointwhich amounted to 10/4. Gitteru i rce boy* started believing inenU board. said that on February 20 about r gardcnwaiid the glamorous Hollywood ver"Wa aea people from the cradle )2 | 2 p.m. the wa* on Swen mi. American? to *ion of a newspapennan'* life, to to the grove." said Mr Walters, strct and went up (o the tray of h-lp bull out only loo that there Is l" r a, friendly man. himself a the defendant. While there an very little glameur and a lot of B-Sc. ol London, and holder of iir i(ument anise and the defend-ud a#> hard work involved 'he Military Croaa. "Many ant t^k up a knife from her tray contented. It.had learned to read parent* bring boy* and girls to .,„<( ,. ul her on the left shoulder, and he could not mak* up his I strongly recoouneud thu book aee ua before they have entered inland Constable Theophilua mind about what he would do toany school boy* and school the university." At the other end Holder arrested %he defendnnt. when the Americana left -What furlg who are conteenplatinR going "f the scale, a man of 74 recently Sl ,, Murrell prosecuted for the wax he smti; lo w i-r lasid tu. bland." IW Ml.WIIANT SCUOONKRS by id..i i .n.i,i, MI (parclval Mart*i*U 3* > rhls book Will be those whu make %  H u u% laava tum Utu:rr :• Tt %  %  %  ia n gajtee others, hut there gt no Mi .t (In. L. ..re yf th* best novels lo be written bv : Vest In 41.1 n. till MONttW STORY bv Jsmr> Le-a*r (O.l 1 P. 7/> Thu] i> i ol tnui M o! .. novel, bul Bare itlonal book wrapped up in novel form. livople It give* an oimculue ullam "n u caroer as well as receive a weekly bullet ing a collation of jobs publicly ad-" |__. *," / T a" IT / vertlted and other* known to ihe Mltry M U O.fv. ff .M. ^.^frequeSu^'^id Mh. They -re 21 .andldate. for Itobertson (a BA. of Oxford. MA. entry to U.C.W I Two are taking of Glasgow), "we get applications Ihe entrance .wtmlnalion; 18 an* from vaduates of Oxford. Camtaking the Barbados Government Merest to bridge, the Scottish Univer slue* F xhibltion. These 18 candidate. duo.} of who say 'We've heard you're .u with an additional one. are taking -uiieal history. It deal* with the good." the U.C.W.I. Scholarship examuui.lv.a E. Yard bacurity one of the lest known £?00 to-day. CMaJdate for U.C.W.I. scholar•" throTgh^S g^Bf^^'^S ,1;:;;,;;;:,^ **-c* A Brighter Sun is ing liffil promiggt s m %  I S" Iv ' -d t... or cargoes too smVlifoT the'big %  ''"' aldp* of the time. affect < ii.< aval on 1 : HI general Then the business of carrying ; small community in, parrargoe* of salted Newfoundland %  r ut erud* ;xid fiaii across the Atlantic to .ions ma> shock ion ( Kuropc expanded at the end of the nd the fact thnt rn0*l ot ISth century, and the schooners .led backward* and forward; vith this cargo, in one of the i-irdest and moat romantic trades f all time In 1930 these little hip* ceased to sail the Atlantic, ml then the last of them took to N,, giatOf] ot these hips has '" baan written, and this book. vith its text and plans and photouniversity nacuea from permanent ^. lu 'J,"V'"V modern British nautical history !" lotMl N-I0 h NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring'and Summer Catalog offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY —at the lowest prices anywhere for m) lovely teeth The spenui (.Team n-odiir* a co laMilil Join The millions who %  .hop byaBsil fhrecdy from the ...lo. filled National fJcllat tlrss CMaloe. Select from il.oOiSndsof the neweitsi>lci id finest borne items all priced at America's girsiot "BjJRfg, I Mem ii euirsnteed tn s pit'u.td snd de\ which .lwu in rviu*n | yourueui ra*i'* i bar* daoay &" en auuta roar t*Ui are whltarsnJ I Hiabtw anar raeuUu | cleanlDi erlUt Xoiraoa t a -'^Ui* H" liiiall?Las. CSV 9. Me. /•. Sis eeu. MaOMaf JJ*0 : -'i CMldran lote UM rerreeairw I mlaiy Ulte Sf|lv-l"t,r j tMia a *ood itart-hslft I to keep them haali hy *nj white with Kul > aue NATOAL anus HESS TLTSKSS*. \ Only hair aa inch on roar toothbrush inofuujAiii clean and polishes your teeth No other deittifrlce does morr than KOLYNOS to fight tooth oecav see f' m:\trtvvi. VATTettXS OF CONGOLEUM in Squares and by the Yard Shmp rnrcni>'n>/i/ til . fkofrte cine SaW*% THE BARGAIN HOUSE %  j SPECIAL LINES FOR LADIES!! ART SILK in White. Pink and Blu XOW T2r. yd. SPUNS — While. Pink. Blue. Beige, Brown MIH 8Ur. yd. CREPES. TAFFETAS. SILKS and other Quality Silks NOW SI.OO yd. COTTON VESTS NOW 2 tor SI.OO CRINOLINE HATS Pink. Blue. White. Gold NOW SI. I I IAN.-l>roprirlor.



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-I Ml AY. MARCH 2. 1M2 SUNDAY ADYOt \ I I'M.I MM B.L.A.C. Hangar Going Up At Seawell > thu Flying Cmap4ai> The Barbados Lignt Aeruplane Club is making rapid M aYUguat It I--: yaw athan a tiwup ! lot... G laurant ana formed the Club a irui> be col Pioneers." A; that lunc these pioneers ; from whnc I | %  %  and ln but nut Least, they duitctpjud MM Today whave the U.LA.C. conabticUa %  HaawtlL I'lulMbl.. tuinwiIOtt il Iva) uf ..ii Auslei the type of plane which the Club ;i:tf island. To Call in man t lon the piuneer* would be an injustice. They ware: Messrs. R. AIcard. D. EdihlU, Jackie Marion Jnr.. M. Relngold. Slanton Toppin, R. Ir,na, R. Peterkin, C. Pcterlun, span whicn will be tbe width ol L. Chase. D. Malonc. F E. Miller, the building. I. Corbin. S £ L Johnson. T. A. Mr Peterkin piacco his knowl. Robert;. E "Dipper*' Barrow. ledge of land nuvtyloi at the dav A. Jemmott. P. C. S. Mallei. E. Aposal ol the Committee in laying I Butcher and Squ dron out the site lor itae hangar, preLeadcr Henderson, ring plans and supervising the Every Club, regardless of list, ork ol erecting the waltabi rneounii-r, a urged upon in cuUaboraliuw * little over a month ago, were conMl Henderson, Airport Manager, sldering a Bill to amend the Cusacting on behalf of Cover.unenv toms Tariff Act so as to exempt Mr Henderson also oiT.i dinong other items, aircraft and „ cs t loni u was estimated that lh .iretail spare parts tram the paycus t „( ; %  .iiu be i i ustoms duty, Mr. O T. hc vicinity of $l.t*Ou and S2.0#. Allder. Senior Member • 11 l MAR. 2 NO. 213 The Topic of Last Week Nice to be in his shoes! ir.-i u H 1TBS %  14. itsg "T: THIS is Uio type of plane which u expected ta arrive [rom England for tlio Batbido. Light Aeroplane Club due* a little sport lor %  few." In my opinion Mr. Allder km nothing about the Club. Club immediately cabled its of the Club, were present and were able to deny these misleadm nig ^legations. They knew that <*i anc *the Club was opened to anyone Shortly alu.-iw.nds the Club rewho wanted to loin, flying or'nonceived a cable informing them %  lying member The Bill was ihat the ahipping charges had been eventually passedincreased by £90 to £3t0, and askSliiJii *•"-'•""•" •*• h0 club lUndl .,.33 n„n C !" H busineaamaii HI uie City, was r, , %  "IP! "" Pr ^sS 11 ? ^ y UU AT the Invitation of the Commit'>•*tee of Management Mr. J A. Skmlnc Committee of Man^^^t, to aWut lhe „ on agemcni con.pn.es of Mr Wood nrfl (Uon of vice-Prendrn. Uiairman, Mc r.. Mr / Sk)nne r's contribution In the Ruben P-terkli^ Jack.e Marson, fle d of avlol i on ln Barb ado, is ropnto, l-Bnce Jordan, „ ^Q^. H e was thr flr-t pcr—-, ll1 WK! %  "S"' • SpStnZ AMOBliMlODsoJl alglOM ..nd Morton Reinca||y The commen „ of exp eTi•"!? %  Ufc enced aviators who saw thin plane Two sub-committees WIUKII the Cuiiiiuuitt uf Management were also formed, one lor the purpose ol investigating the cost and Immediate •nctiOD of a hangar al Seawell. and the other to deliver A-erc favourable. Invaluable Of Mr. A. R. Toppin. the Club „ will darlva invaluable benefit .i sariaa'of I^tlurei. to olher IUUII(rom hi* iibillly and experience In hers of ih Club on such subjects business circles. He wlU advise aj the %  Theory of Flight" and the Club on mailers of a commeraUtat related subjects. The lecclal nature. lurers in this series are: Stanlon The unsolved problem of llrToppln. Denis Malone, 'Dipper" .nee %  till laces the Club. Up to th.Harrow, Squadron Leader Henpresent, the receipts from subderson and Wood Qoddard. scriptions. donations and the dancr Tho process of having tho comamounted to $4,830 of which pany registered in accordance M.800 was used to open the? letter With Uie requirements ol the Comof credit in London There is now panics Aet, 1910, is being lOOfcad needed to meet expenses In buildifu-r by Messrs. Barrow and ine the hangar, insurance and Malone and il 14 hoped that this other incidental items required t<> will bo completed in tho near put the aircraft In the air, ap(uture. proxlmately 13.0O0. Drop Ltd. To meet this expense member.* Application has been made to [eg) Lbnt Itag mcmbeislup should His Excellency the Governor-inbe substantially Executiv %  Jon to in the name of the Club. The io follow the excellent Company Is limited by personal set by Mr. Roberts. guarantee not exceeding $48 in the The Barbados Light Aeroplan. J of flying members and one Club provides young men and TRAINER Sporis Window HMtKISuN* COLLIOI defeated Ev.uon two-nil on then school ground* will be meeting Notre Daunt it Kensington Oval to-in>.rrow afternoon In a First Division itx.U .11 match. This game should be interesting. Other First Division matches for the week are Tuesday, March 4Fv. va Carlton Referee I. F llnrriLinesmen O. Robinson II .1 w Hoyoi Friday. March 7 — Spart.m vs. Harrison College. Referee G Amory. Linesmen D. Archer and A 1 anii IMvUUn I'vu Tuesday. March 4 Empire v. Notre Dame Referee D. Archer Wednesday, March 5 Spartan vs. Carlton Referee O Graham Friday, March 7 Empire vs Everton Referee K Walcott. in. 1Three Tuesday. March 4 College vs Pickwick Rovers at College. Referee L. King Lodge vs. Foundation Old Boys at Lodge. Referee II King Regime 1. L v k'vertun at Garrison. Referee It Wilson. Wandgnra vi Y.M.CA at the Bay. Referee F Edwards Wednesday. March J Foundation vs Carlton at Foundation Referev It King Combermere Old B<-> 1 Rangers at Cnmbenneic Referee O Robinson Cble ft Wireless vs Combermere at Boarded Hall. Referee R Parris Notre Dame vs. Police at the Bay Referee (' Honchford Friday. March 7. Lodge VI Cullege at Lodge. id rerta A Thomn.i Regiment v Foimdatlmi Ohl llo Referee 11 Rutehloaon %  n OWP 1 II.W n %  1 <>..' %  I *r**n\h ,... %  •tea naj %  • %  MU %  B ri *ti h..ld*r. 1T1 I7a im J4W I U4KI -r tM11| s padded Stool, flipping IUI youi iM'.slh:n Balancing. .<**> ,II, I "iST" im Tl SSr 1 >P .ibout aighi "" im "* IU idim S" del I First the let lurW %  ,1 %  on Uncoa %  nd anklaa w-y be gradually p.-rmitted .*w aa' '7...V %  J,., • i! M h..ki. i4si iu. am aiso MM %  J.^.v" u n !" BM %  | 1MB Ttllr.l m fault*->-!"" %  w SUOl aau Ha 1 .. %  aw H r.Tur nm ISIII flirt tTM 1 IFTM B*t 1 T.,ll-t t> Miflri IStl 1 S...I. %  sat Thirt IBM I "?„:, UK' PM Stod Tfat4 > %  %  ,r' r.fih %  ojMj. ytoi atea. aw, < *5 Tl.ifil ruth i1h %  t mnii ntii TVnlh S..UU gjagj fourUi i..irtfn o Twktu ir*. ins. iMo. 1 icu MM rhin C011 tt 11 Fifili UU MM laal las* law 11 in iioidrr> uf t 00*4 mm. tin. 1ST ..1 TMkrt* nan. mi. aa uu. Racing Results AW>I HUM / Mil. Ksrr: t'ASTLE GKANT STAKES—I lavs l> and lourr |H, drop the word ^Limited" spirited persons who are willing Apollo < 115 lbs., Fletcherj xainple START: Good. FINISH: Cle, S s length, I i WINNER: b.g. Dunusk-Maid of Honour Owner. %  t thai IBM aj %  % %  .. .:,: Rut ih' r i~>aid o< I i D Itkan and lit til kll : \'-\ UN ll'i I .%  ill' up and down, no more ".li" haa i l tMe.ikuig the ir1 I before, feet pointwi am turned Inward, aAaJea and km-os .HIT at Oral but slightly supple later on. Now, iUi IsM w*> rt Istara t you will find • ig U a far difleieiu matin fi>n the l-nd prgrtkt Tag V nor oiiK keep Uu body In a liunI 1 iliou but will alsu pu-h you slowly along. Put plenty %  vigour Into the kuK. BO Ihal t % %  .-.it. ,1: itrongU .d-iui v,.ii (Mj At in si you will hod this cx• 1 i j Urtn| Uut ki-rp it up, and make it a iule in tutu i< ( 'lo live minutes nf kioki-ig every lime vwu go U. the sea be'. itoing any .-wimmiii.' After a Mhila you will be ahli to discard I ho float, and brcoll.o by giving .1 strong downward p.'11 with the nmi <>n the id' on v. I %  h iva eboaan to breathe, turning the h<-;id at the same turn Thew are the common [..nil H-ili-g iiH.M-tiitiii r'n 1 fn--nii h tho legs arc too much hem IL. Run Bod .1 tklaa .. 1. .1 BBJ loa uugh, puHa d im lag Uw DOdV, "i 't ..iif of n % %  leg as it Is bent back, and tho "flat" feet furnish retarding iurQftan Uuli-et aiv liltr i out of the watei with ...ti-i. t 1 ihle "fllath They should BOO .t to Uu Burisu.of UM wafa t r fot)l inoliiai oiilside the iv.it1 iin.|.letely waited as far a she %  .vimming process Is cone*11Md itid natural^ maloM tha othei fiot go deepi'!and therefore TO,it more water, in order to have u kta n ..k.1 • isniotloa at Aral to l^t uos brusii lightu ..'hi-v pagf %  1 %  %  1..1. >..idl> V He's got Nugget smartness'. MUGG T 6 SHOE POL:J;H %  .1 %  %  IM IH %  IM .'I. %  I I %  .1 I I 1 B I sponaored by J & k BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM .. 1 ,:!,. Gelling Up Nighh Makes Men Old famous thi toda/ h strong. -,uppt rubber. It. di scientific %  irv| oi hurw idajL £JXXAAMCE' e ii probably the most .* %  daj 1 • ii d sturdily made from 1 I thick plantation crepe: hape was thr rfl l. of children's leci. Its a <5 SANDALS MAOt Rr C. J. CLARK LIMI1 >. KSLANO %  -I -...I.' 4th Race: DALKEITH STAKKH—Classes A A B Onl>— ll.IB (fSU, Slaa. uoir.' itirlMijE* YASMJttN 2 HARROWEEN 3 PEPPER WINE 133 Ji. 120 lb shilling in the case of non-flying women with a flair for flying, members opportunity to indulge In a healthy The job of preparing plans and form of recreation and at the same u-timoten ol the cost ol erecting lime improve Ihelr knowledge the hangar fell to Messrs. JohnThen they are those who may *on. Miller and C, G. Peterkin and wish to make flying a profession Mr. Johnson undertook to conTo them the opportunity is affordstruct a scale model of the proed to study the elementary prin„, ,-o-ed hangar. c.ple. ol Aviation at a comparaTIME: 1.06,. PARI-MUTITl Mr. C. H. Roberts ol the firm ol lively low cost, and in times ol FORECAST $14.70. Cole & Co. gave the Club two emergency there arc many uses to ALSO RAN Belle SuraraM 1 iti lbs Dutchman >. Demure (123 : 'r< 1 sections tor the roof and which an aeroplane can be put. Wilder) the track for the sliding doors; in Th t Committee of Management STA RT addition he has volunteered to appeals to all those who can l~ %  n.ike. tln> necessary changes to the assist in any way they think tl iteal sections to provide a 45-foot In furthering this venture." Mr K D Edwards Jockey Newman Mr V V Sent! Jf>rfce> Joseph Hon. I. D Chandler. Jockey Crossley. %  W.n$2 18 PaesV SI 64, Y7 34 lbs Good. FINISH: WINNER, b.f. Watling Street-Y.. TRAINER: Owner. Ea*J 3 lengths > T length COMMONWEALTH MEETS MERLYN :! %  ( oganwmwaatltai Sp.ut.,. I lull Will BMgJ .i (|i. 'uuUK-in-sl Meilyn to-d..> at M-rlvn grounds, Hi. J.inn iii laava rweedstde Road at 12 noon and player* RM jBki-d