Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




—_—_
FRIDAY, ESBRUARY 29, 1952

RET PACT WITH USS.

Tension Mounts As
General Strike Nears

} oi TUNIS, Feb. 28.
WITH A NATIONWIDE twenty-four hour general
New Plans For strike scheduled to start Friday, tension mounted in









ESTABLISHED 1895

ATTLEE ADMITS SE

Facts Disclosed To | oo". ans
Prevent Labour Split

: LONDON, Feb. 28. ~~;
CLEMENT ATTLEE admitted that his Labour Gov-| /70m Al Quarters:

















































ernment had_made a secret Pact with the United States |~~ Tunisia as numerous sabotage actions were reported.
to strike at Communist air bases on the “far side of the J KE | P; t Witl The strike appeal was issued Wednesday night by
Yalu River” in the event of heavy air attacks on U.N. | ap xport | ac wn workers and the Merchants Union in § ort of cafe own-
forces in Korea. The former Prime Minister insisted, ‘ + ers who pulled down shutters yesterday protesting against
however, this meant “no departure from the general policy 7 arget } Austria French measures taken to shut six bars in Tunis.
of confining operations to the Korean Theatre of War.” A ritie aid on Thursday
i sale i. Se cle e j i . > the ceived reports of sabotage
Attlee’s statement issued’ to | Disclosed ’ im foe ae Feb. 28 Joris nvi es Makar A Kessera in the west
newsmen was seen as a move to| |. } 1e United States, Britain and t : er gion of Tun here 16
prevent an open split in Labour THE FAMILY | France, served notice on Moscow telegraph poles were felled during
Party ranks after Prime Min ster } Tokyo — The Ministry of In- that they are drafting new propo the night by sitator
Churchill’s disclosure of the! DOCTOR ternational Trade and Industry }als for an Austrian peace treaty ttae Railway workers near Ferry-
agreement in the House of Com- will set the nation’s export target ‘designed to end Austria’s eight lle discovered this morning 17
mons on Tuesday In keeping with our policy for the 195 3 year at $1,570,- year status as an occupied nation PARIS. Feb. 28 |+ or lway tracks burned
yt z of obtaining for our readers 000,000.—, according to sources The three powers expressed ne\ Ihe city of light twice occupied] .A metal box packed with high
Cc hurchill’s revelation — in an-| the best possible advice on close to the MITT. determination to end the Soviet} in modern war but never seri-| explosive vas found early this
| owe to “warmongering” charges | subjects of importance, the al Union's blockade against thejously damaged, tinds it broad} morning in front of the home of
| against him caught some of the Advocate have arranged for The sources said that the ex- Austrian treaty in a statement re-} boulevards the most attractive;the French Commander of troop:
Labourites by surprise — espec- a practising Doctor to answer port pr ogram is being finalised by leased in Washington, London]atomic target in Western Europe | in Tuni
ially the faction led by left] reader's medical queries. the MITI at the request of the | Paris. and probably the easiest ma \ Tur e tadiitin a
winger Aneurin Bevan. : The Family Doctor will be Economic Stabilization Board. The Big Three did not discldse] City to bomb. taxi by police last night because
a ; ‘ { n > 2s nthe 4 2 7 Best check point in Europe,”|he was carry 1 revolver with
The Prime Minister who took|| Unable to see any readers The. curr bs the next move. But diplomatic '
{ sonally en ? ares , W J > } 2 i i }one vent yun 2 the elip
over when the Conservatives un-,| Persenally, but you can send with ‘$1 468 000,000". co ho aton | quarters indicated that Western] “#5 & United State ' gl an Sjone sy round in the clip.
seated the Labour Government,} him. your questions and ||, MITT in its deat eae by nations shortly will propose — to} Comment _ Russian pilot cout | “we
four months ago, said that Att-'| “e answers will appear gram’ completed SS eee wee Moscow in diplomatic notes aa{SPo! |! sid "Elser a ae 'He | a a ten Oe oc
len’s) agreement. ‘wes dnada last every weex in the Evening ‘ . pleted some time ago. “abbreviated treat’ to remove Genera sen lowe! s ea | Be b d S rt
May. 1 Advocate. . te present program included the United States, British, French and RRIRENGTS Shar: OOF 2 BBG a troados Scouts
Here is the text of Attlee’s{| | There will be no charge |}©XPt of 1,200,000,000 square Soviet occupation forces from) 2!0"8 the broad landed highwa; | °
statement: “As there is some,! for this medical advice, and yards of cotton cloth and 1,500,- Australia, ee a 2S Eee ot ares Us For Jamaica
misapprehension as to the atti-j letters will be treated in 000 tons of iron and steel pro- Diplomats said the new approach ao headquarters of “iy ;
tude of the Labour Government confidence, To make abso ducts, would recognize that Soviets were a lie a coarey Manes tegt 7 His Excellency the Governor
: tiated’ Piva ; ely sur hn eel ; ' supplies to rearm Eure gion
in regard to the Korean war, lutely sure you are asked Stockholm — A novel type of unwilling to resume roundtabie] ‘phe Branch of the aro wweney | Will inspect the Barbados con-
owing to the disclosure by the net to sign your real name om 5 D i 3 A . oo ea ’ linuent of scouts for the Carib-
; X-ray table, said to be the first talks on Austria, Deputies of th@ychannelling the same supplies t , . r the Carib
Prime Minister of the substance to your query but to write tea Led 2 e or ave %t sincelm. ; rm PI bean Jamboree at _ Governme
: i , : of its kind in the world and four powers have not met since} pPyrance ment
of one of a series of confidential under a pen name. The || Ditting three « di en 1950, when after 258 meetings the And sticking out like the | House this afternoon
communications on military op- answer to the question will an i ree ~ dimensional photo- failed to reach agreement ‘on an a bial “ abt it Af Fines The contingent unde Major
erations in Korea exchanged be- ppear under the pen name graphing of the heart, has been Austrian pact. When they quit SMS hes we Sump Wie Dron ys 8. "Gritith Islan ommis
tween the Governments of the Letters should be addressed designed by Dr, Oliver Axen of 48 articles of the 58 article treaty ote i ee Lisbon ‘Anant! | sioner will leave for Jamaica early
United Kingdom and the United to The Family Doctor, c/o || the Malmo General Hospital, in had been agreed ‘upon { States, I am setting out the, facts. te Editor Advocate, Bridge- oe with two Swedish The three power statement said. | Pact functioning " : ne | With only a few more days to
own, ¢ reac’ 5 engineers 4 . y ; . q * . ance the
' There had been pressure in nae a aoa ao me ‘Austrians desire to see terminut-| Just a little further down the| 8° po Ma ma eee the tour
certain American quarters for ex- Weak, eGnesday eacn The new table, which will great- ed the state of affairs which should}line a Red pilot could spot tha Dasteitas's inettint: dd 7.
tension of the war,in the Far he first series of replies ly a eg the diagnosis for 4, . , sg Seca see
“East by various operations in- to medical | 5 ‘ operating on serious cases of con- .
: o al questio : r : is § t . ort
cluding a naval blockade of the scoeay 4h eee genital diseases of the heart, this aspiration. They are therefore] land abd air forces set aside t eat ae ee soPHor ee for
mainland, military operations Canine Advocates. y’s makes it possible to photograph urgently examining new propos-|defend the land mass of Europe! “gen YOURS TODAY
against China and bombing of . from two directions at right angles - = als so that the four powers may be] > like sitting ducks at Fontaine- 11. the Royal Bank of Canada or
* Lae nie > F as ‘ ‘ a ‘ 9 j ladua “i . es E een
Manchurian cities. The two Gov- to one another. Up to five pic-| Simuman Ciaiminema the Mrgest of the Yachts going on the Carib. |@Mabled to fulfill their pledge} bleau—t Pe to Mr. N. D. Osborne (treasurer
. be opposed to such; i st B . + tures can be taken per second. bean cruise, leaves Barbados to-day. made in the 1943 Moscow declara- “ of the Fund) at the Income Tax
a policy. rom time to time arrier oO . ; —s o - - tion to restore to AuStria full Me Department, Bridge Street
questions arose as to the conduct | Gothenburg — A giant floating freedom and independence, WEO8SCOW Expected went saevin Iy one

—UP.

edged $394 00

To Undermine | "3.8% i.

Evans & Co 10 00

~ ‘ . . ae Wm. Fogarty’s Ltd 20 00
COAST, GUARD | Lisbon Decisions , * 6°
Anon

BR . RYS! Mr. 1... A. ipneisor
y W. A. RYSER Col, A. H. Campbell



the subject of correspondence, tons has been ordered by a

P ry
“Among them was the ques- Of Jap Creaty Gone Gothenburg shipyard. The new

Y jock will be the largest in Scans e A ae
tion of what action should bal WASHINGTON, F ‘ ; ; ‘
ner: , 4 aha \ , Feb, 28. |dinavia and the fifth in size in =
taken "in the event at Reavy lt! ipiomatic and oma guarters| Europe: aad wail “Be capa | Se can Uruise
the forces of the United Nations here believe that the last barrier|accommodating the tankers of

f erations i the Korean ‘ > acge * dock with a length of 714 ft. and .
Theatre of War aid these a Early Ratification with a lifting capacity. of 28,000 ) achts | .eecave 1] o-day

s

PLANES SEEK

SeStua
S8esesse



5 i . ; ‘ ‘ YW s . LONDON, Feb. 28. B'dos Youth Movement
by aircraft from bases on the fe early Senate ratification of the|34,000-ton d.w. now being built TO-DAY, TWO YACHTS which have been lying mn LWO SHIPS A blast from Moscow to coun- Mi. “& Sirs a ao BS
far side of the Yalu River. It|J@P@nese peace treaty has been|in Sweden. The lifting machinery] Carlisle Bay are expected to weigh anchor and start on 5 ; teract the Lisbon NATO decisions} Mr & Mrs 8. H. Dasliesh 5
was represented that where eee ~ signing in Tokyo | will provide for complete emer- the Caribbean Yacht Cruise. The cruise is arranged by Gained de ee ee ralghs be eapeced a any moment r C. J. Dunean 10 00
} attacks of this kind took place,! ouing? O° 4 a Pee imple-'sion of the dock, fully loaded, in the Society of Friends of English Harbour, sponsored by | search planes took off a Ante tn con's hmaas ee en 5H Total $501.00
it was unreasonable that the g a Japanese-American| two hours the Royal Cruising Club of the United Kingdom, and those |: cutt rehii bon Scesartint Rae. ints

bs : a bilateral securit ac
General Officer Commanding F curity pact. tag J
should be precluded. from attack-; General Omar Brad] ; . auat pane sailing from here are Maria Catharina and Mollihawk.
ing these airfields. The Labour! pan Aa hile Noted Chiet. pane * Germans Will Cake Origon will sail tomorrow. ‘

Government agreed with this @xpressed the opinion hat at ie Starting from Barbados, the
point of view and the Govern- P

. ye : :
sreeme » » cruise is expected to climax about
ment of the United States was agreement must be signed before! Ove r Heligoland 4 000 Strike Mareh 18 in English Harbour,
9 /

aid two cutters in searching for|bon would necessarily take into
a disabled shrimp boat in the/ account the propaganda aspect of
Gulf of Mexico and a Honduran|the situation as well as its possi-

»
Plane Abandoned
vessel in distress off the western | bility of undermining the Lisbon |
tip of Cuba, The Penny Single-| decisions by influencing the alti-| SYDNEY, NOVA SCOTIA, Feb. 28
















le tn have ended long ago. The} headquarters of Bisenhower’ dene : 7
| Governments fully share] central front—the bosses of al!| Siderably to the total but there
|
|









China, three months after their| ss gether with about 1,000 German tion picture houses while Com-
trial by mob in the “People’s Basu GUAM, Feb, 28.
Tribunal” in Canton, They are}, ea iy found wreckage which | guns and ran a U-boat base during|key squares against the opening
sisters of St. Gerian (Imelda La-|°" y think may be part of a B.29 World War If were evacuated/this afternoon of the Hollywood
pierre), St. Victor (Germaine|Which exploded in flight and



soldiers who manned anti-aircraft|munists began demonstrating in

Mand Maclaren and her DUS) Canada Will Not
ante As Homans in 1930, Maria Ask U.S. For Aid



maker of history

from the island after the German|film: “Rommel the Desert Fox’

the t : pa ‘ shrimp boat out of Tampa,/tude - a West meen and Eighteen men parachuted from
: iain ; sse circum-| Ue teaty became effective, Other ri Antigua, and other ports of call|Fiorida, was reported drifting | French arliaments. They said | United States air force trans-
aaouer Fin sceutitanien: tin wise he pointed out, American | island l'o-miorrow iwi include St. Vincent, Gren-|helplessly about 150 miles west{the Russians might do any of the | port in a snowstorm last night
His Majesty’s Government or, if {97S remaining in Japan to] Fe ROME, Feb. 28. / ada, Carriacou and Bequia in the of Key West, Florida. following three things ., | Captain Robert J. Hesler told
time did not allow, with British '@UÂ¥@rd the defenceless country FRANKFURT, Feb. 28. Italian Carabinieri and riot |Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, The 157-foot Honduran moto 1. Walk out of the United Na , hewamen it turned out well, as he
Liaison Officers on the spot, the #fter the treaty became effective,; German authorities will take/squads were called out in force, Martinique and Gaudeloupe. In| Vessel Taboga was reported injtions. : . p ANE CAV om the gasoline short
General Officer Commanding would be in a shaky position, The|over bomb torn Helipoland IslandJwhen 4,000 insurance company |Antigua a three-day programme trouble about 200 miles to the} 2. Call iff i e ae ane, ¥ ted in a Sydney hotel
I should be permitted to attack Provision of the agreement which|on Saturday under promises never]eMployees staged mass demonstra- j of entertainment, which includ- Southwest of the Singleton nea fae and of is y Pee alm - é 18 re picked up, by police
i those airfields from which the blankets all American forces in|to turn it into a sea bulwark] tions for escalator wage con-'¢d a fancy-dress ball at Clarence Cane San. Antonio, Cubs, | 3. Pro nae tnthaution 6nd oe | a i fone aa ene weet.
} attacks were being launched. It Korea under the general category |@gainst Britain again. The rocky] ‘acts geared to the cost of living House, had been arranged to rhe coast guard rescue centre t lization of terme ee lover Ficl i'M ar te t ee
} was obvious there was here no,0f U.S. security forces for Japan,| island for almost seven years has]. Two rows of carabinieri carry-}ark the occasion, but owing to here expected the cutter Ariadne Pty the ‘ sak measure ia likely | Tot es ; vie te A, ee te aren
I departure from the general policy also did much to quiet misgivings | been a practice target for Britishl ing side arms stood in front of the,| court mourning for His Late Ma- to reach the area where th *lto- bring iny “real ‘chanas in the thea nt ins ; a Sian "Tea ‘ ie
f of confining operations to the|of numerous legislators. and American bombers, The last /!eading insurance firm on bustling|Jesty King George VI, alterna- Singleton was drifting early to | iitite tian . ” P eet P ta Bes Ads ts UP ta tn
} Korean theatre of war.” live bombs to shake the pile sf |Piazza San Silvestro while work- tive arrangements have’ had to |day The Taboga, converted in. | 5!Ua . porte: eee y eV .
—(UP.)| A record of the Senate Foreign} rubble and splintered rocks which |&?S,Shouted demands be made fantry landing craft, radioed the| — Sibi seelidlliieipsnbiincndngi aidhanail ‘ ‘cau
{ ' Relations Committee’s hearings on| covers the {eta nice: aa} The demonstration was orderly Largest coast guard yesterday that five = 5 “
' | the treaty reveals a number of' dropped by ‘Royal he Force | however and no incidents were Of the entrants the 90 ft. ketch of its six engines “were disabled ~ yy =
t 7: j Congressmen are concerned over| bombers on February 21 reported. : M@ria Catharina is the. largest.| p, ae cutter. Nemaele eee \ Sebel /g-
} Nuns Arrive what would happen if the peace ' , ln Punller demonstrations “are She is owned by Comdr.. V. E. cee. Sean was sent to © ey So Erste .
' F treaty came into effect before the A group of 18 bored German aaiie sbtaetnne oil mle .. aaa B. Nicholson and is under char- |* High inde ahd heavy seas that ©
i In Hong Kong ee a a ee UP cscs: a veal ae oe of the crowd were supplied with | eet acor, Be Fry os hindered rescue operations las HH. walio
HONGKONG, Feb. 28 : : 4 Kale teasitiare ane eaakiae ta small whistles Carabinieri quick- Canada. Col aa Ta Warvia night were subsiding and the )
r i, ob. 28. ‘ Slo I! t ar > wy. » a . @ mete. « "aT ‘ * arta — + -
Three tired Canadian nuns their former homes before the eee en ee es will have as their guests Mr, and cere rece a 7 : erence V I SCO u N T N E LSO N
j arrive 5 g r tre | oF 7 sla ; he 1d back to Germany Fon seeal : _jc!Mrs. Kenneth Ross of Sault, Ste, }'°°*" ships without diff- | 4
arrived in Hongkong s by train | W reckage Found island i handed J Gerr ) Meanwhile heavy police guards Marie, Canada, and will be join culty —(U.P.) . | re y
| this afternoon from Communist} on March 1. The islanders to-|were put around two Rome mo- od Tat Saslinicti Sy thaty daunted ( peatonot naval ivelebiicn:
; |
| |
|



has an auxili-



























i a Bee os eee oc {crashed 150 miles northwest of]. 0 > f sche > mn si ane i
aunuey? ee Oe teen | Catt Tuesday urrender in May 1945, as ee ee Both theatres '@"Â¥, aoe, a sory gene WASHINGTON, Feb. 28
| x s ; 3 —U.P. é , 8. ; erated on board by an as Im- . 7 » £eD. «
| faced a screaming mob who! Four of the ten men who were are being searched for a perial Generator, is a very com-] , !t has been learned that Cana
i ema ami oa Sate man~ | aboard the giant craft were picked bambs ~"" | fortable yacht, Her kitchen is fs ae ne plan to ask th
i slaughter ° thousands up after clinging to a life raft for equipped with a deep-freeze and|V"'ted States for any aid in com-|
| Soe in oe an Infant Or-| g night. The fate of the other six RUSSELL IS CANDIDATE in a large refrigerator and the|bating the outbreak of foot an
hanage in Canton. cre . as , cr 3 s ‘ » is beauti she mouth disease rattle herds of}
Dain thee tastady: Werk gen-} ere we te Known wasnincTon, Feb. 28. | Dutke Of Windsor |\nunge is beautifully furnished, | mouth disease in cattle herds. 0 |
tenced to be deported. Where | One flyer said \he parachuted} Senator Richard tussell of crew of six weighs 72 tons net,jat the Canadian Embassy here saix
j they have been since they were} with one of the missing men but}Georgia announced Thursday that Returns Home has a beam of 19.6 ft. and draws]|their Government feels it is able
} sentenced was not immediately | the other five are believed to have}he is a candidate for Democratte lift. of water. to handle the outbreak effectivels
made known. been trapped in the burning plane.}P:esidential Nomination LONDON, Feb, 28. Search, a 55ft. motor sailer|without direct financial nid from
—(U.P.) —UP. —UP. The Duke of Windsor ended his}owned by Mr / Dave Chapman ]the United States,
in —_——- — ' : sad journey to this land he once|of Chicago, Which was expected They pointed out that Canad
ri 4 y fume tan ‘ ruled and boarded ship for thejto start the eruise from Barba-]jc peiter e sd’ the oe
IME WINNING GOAL lonely ‘voyage “home” to the|dos will now Join the feet taj. better equipped than Mexico
United States. He had come here|Grenada, Leaving here tomor-|ujpi. | Pr
—unheralded and without his wife|Tow will be the 32ft cutter Canada has sicnade teen |
|—eight days ago for the funeral of ae a ia owned by Mr. liiiing infected animals Un ited
Po other King George|Hal Cole r, Cole will be ac-}o. 3° a ae eee
i young brother B core® companied by Mr, George Stoute oan 1 ee tcagalewne ye
; \ re , = as skipper, Mr Leonard Archer J Clais Said we anadia eradi-
fy, oy oa a “se foe oa as navigator and Mr Gerald |C@Uon programme will be con
| circumstances. is eel 4..!Nichols. Origon, which is 10.8]4uc‘ed along the same linc t
| his family and his ta me lov. |ton (Thames Register) and is|that carried on by the joint U
jcle of old friends had en v= | equipped with wireless, will join}]Mexican Commission during ;
jing one but the British a a jthe fleet in St. Vincent, She has}pas) five years. During that time|
' public largely ignored the Gras ria crew of one. the U.S, has spent about $122,000,-
man now fifty-seven who 15 Meritt Shepherding the fleet is Molli-]000 and helped slaughter abo
ago was their King Edward Sg hore ee by Mr, Desmond ]1,00).000 animals —UP
| —U-P. e m Page 3
U.N. PLANES CUT BRIDGE, 8&4 EMovep
eo ~ , he FROM EAR
: EIGHTH ARMY H’QRS’ Feb. 28 CONNECTICUT, Feb. 28
' | UNITED NATIONS fighter-bombers making “every | Richard Christensen, nine-yea
bomb count” knocked out a 250-foot bridge in North | id cub oor showed no ill effect
Central Korea and damaged two other Communist sup- jjys ney tee he, at had indeed
_m . 5 I i bean that hi: odg
PY ae hike patrolled “MEG. Ailay” cre eee hee ak beds
| | -008 jets pa le MALG, ey {nearly grown lf an incl
| A band of Communist troops attacked South of Pan- Dick’s mother said he i |
| munjom under cover of darkness early to-day but United | ins ” bean bags at school when
| Nations infantrymen beat them off after a thirty-minute | ?¢0! the bags broke. His chur
Se 2ed plz . od h hand grenades anc aoe a at Dick and one
fight. A Red platoon armed with hand grenades and popped into his ear. His mothe
small arms hit a United Nations held hill South of the ‘'said they thought he had shaker
ceasefire village at 2.10 a.m. , Allied artillery was called bg ra pick ese me cS
|. in soon after the fight began. Ae oe pe sinf : ; SENIOR seni 4 ’ 5



A WELL PLACED SHOT by Drayton, Empire inside forward gives his team the only goal of the } There was no significant activity along the rest of { ahe ae . ~
match against Spartan yesterday afternoon—the kick was from a penalty award. i ‘the front.—U.P. —OP. ' si











PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

R. MIKE
Public

HILDRED,
Relations Officer
Montreal, for the Atlantic Region
who arrived from Bermuda on
Wednesday by T.C.A. is due to
leave for Trinidad this morning.

T.C.A.’s

Yesterday accompanied by mer
bers of the local press and radio
he went on a short tour of the
island, Also in the party were a
T.C.A pilot, Captain J. K. Lewis
and his 9-year-old son “Bobby.”

Mr. Hildred armed with a
camera and tri-pod, took several
pictures. Captain Lewis and his
s0n who will be remaining here
until Wednesday are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel

For Cpening’ of New

Cinema

EMBERS of the imotion pic-
i ture industry in the W.1,
have been arriving i Barbados
daily to attend the Cocktail Party
this evening at the Plaza, Bar-
harees, which will mark the open-
whg of this new theatre, which is

owned and operated by Caribbean
Theatres Limited.

Recent arrivals include Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Tee Ksingh who
arrived from Trinidad on Wednes-
Mr. Teelucksingh who is
Menaging Director of Teelucksingh
Theatres Limited, is alsc a d
tor of Caribbean Theatres
Mr. and Mrs. Teelucksingh
staying at the Hastings Hotel.









rere
Lid.
are

Mr. Richard Spierman, wife of
Warner Brothers Representative
in the W.1L., arrived on Monday
and is a guest at the Hotel Royal
Vir, Spierman is due today.

N Oo. J. Forest, Caribbean

Representative of Westrex Com-
pany, Caribbean, is also here for
the opening and is a guest at the

Aquatic Club. Also staying there
are Mr. and Mrs. George Schweig
who arrived on Sunday. Mr,
Schweig is Columbia Pictures
representative in the W.1.

Expected to arrive today are
Mr, Cecil Marks, representative
Universal and J. Arthur Rank
pictures in the W.I. and Mrs.
Marks. They will be staying at the
Marine Hotel

Cables of congratulations and
best wishes have been received
by Caribbean Theatres Limited
from the following film. stars,
Doris Day, Errol ynn, Patrice
Wymore, Virginia Mayo and Gene
Nelson.

Other luck cables
been received from Mr, Peter
Colli, Warner’ Brothers, Latin
American Supervisor, Mr. Michael
Havas, R.K.QO. Latin American
Supervisor and Mr, Albert Steind-
hardt, United Artists representa-
tive at present in San Juan and
until recently their W.I. repre-
sentative stationed in Trinidad,

good have



Saal

MR. MIKE HILDRED, T.C.A.'s
and party visited St. John’s Chur



7

Regional Put

ch yesterday

lic Relations Officer




They pause at the Sun-dial overlooking the Cliff for Mr. Hildred

to take a picture while Mr. Ian Clarke of Rediffusion points out

a
familiar landmark.
Left to right are Capt. Lewis, T.C.A. Pilot, Mr. Hildred,
Mr Clarke and “Bobby” Lewis, Capt. Lewis’ 9-year-old son.

To-morrow Night





ISITORS to Club Morgan
morrow night are in for

treat when they will hear
Earl Wilkins at the piano
Wilkins is the former Gwen Mack
versatile itertuiner o r
hotel and club wor Mr. Wilkins
is also known in the entertainment
world and he will act as Maste
of Ceremonies

This type of entertainment
very popular in the U.S., but

mething we rarely see here

Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins e here
for a short holiday from Vene-
zuela

Week-end Visit

ATRICK ELLAM, owner of the
19 foot yacht Sopranino
which arrived in Barbados re-
cently after crossing the Atlantic
in 2814 days and his friend Colin
Mudie plan to take the Sopranino
down the Leeward coast to spend
the week-end off Heron Bay on
the St. James Coast,

Patrick went to the same schoo!
in Buckinghamshire Stowe
School—as film star David Niven
who is present in Barbados
with his wife spending a_ short
holiday as guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald Tree of “Heron Bay,”
St. James.





Talk On Building













PRYHROUGH the courtesy of

{ British Council there
t t < tonight t 8.30 or
‘What the Building Society can

for Housir } mun-

ity.” The lecture be Mr.
William Cash, M.A A and
the meetir hich be held
at Wakefiel Whitepark, will
be under the nairmanship of
Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G

A pecial ivitation has been
extended to member of the
H in Board, byt the public
are welcome Many prominent
members of the ymmunity, who
ie interested building have
pre to attend,

viheabaden Holiday

T° resent holidaying in Bar-



barlos is Mrs, BH, B. Vaughan
> of a former President of
.N.S) and C.N.R., who is eccom-
panied by her on Dr, Peter
Vaughan.
Mrs. Vaughan and Dr. Vaughan
are guest it the Hastings Hotel.
Satisfactory Progress

is pleased to report that

eo
Mr,

Jack Thorne of Sandy
Lane, St. James, who was seriously
injured in an aeeident at the

factory recently, is making satis-

factory progress. He is at present) T

a patient at the Hospital,

BY THE WAY e « « By Beachcomber

f OW about a holiday abroad
next year?

Sixteen Hours In Lovely Peru.
gia, including one. one-course
meal, without wine, feat or cof-
fee, and use of hotel bedroom for
sleeping.





CROSSWORD



Across





1 Uhura t get trom the Mower. (6)
G Lo this age it's worship. (3)
® Rum piacy to get bread, (5) ’
6. The {de lady has it. (4)

s ro up and down it. (7)

@ maybe? (6)

t around over there. (4)
i rker has it, (4)
5 ded Dora to her box. (3)

(a4)

from birth for camou-
(5)
+t aay

Â¥ Movable shelter
Striped
floge







where it will neces:

A tine at. (6)
in} 13. (3)
km of yeateryears, (4)
Poe a favour would ingra-
Tinte qa)
Down

n threefold waters, (4)
ee in one or maby
(7)
ve vernacular. (u)
6 Weaken. (6) '
Macedam pernaps (B)

) Never more he said, (5)
1% Sort ul bioke to 15 (6)
14. A rocky isle. (6)

16 Unfolds. (5)
20 Undeistanding of a 7



(3)





The traveller is allowed to take
eight cigarettes out of England,
and one box of matehes for his
personal use. The allowance per
traveller of £2. 14s. 8d. does not
include cost of journey. £10 will
be added to the cost of the ticket,
as a contribution to a special fund

for the importation of more
American films.
The Gamma-bomb \ VII

R, KARPAM KOOLRUK was
about. to follow the pretty
air-hostess (whom the astute
reader will have recognised as
Dingi-Poos) on to the plane, Sud-

denly a playful gust of wind
whisked off his wig, blew his
false nose away and buckled up
his left (cardboard) ear. A roar
went up from 10,000 detectives,
and before you could say bottle,
the spy had been arrested and
dragged away. The pilot, with

dainty silver revolver dinting the
back of his neck, obeyed the com-
mand to take off, Nobody both.
ered with the beautiful beast who
thought the paper she had stuf-
fed into her corsage contained tne
genuine formula. Egham, quickly





Rupert, rer ne thar Ci

Solution of vesterdav's purzi¢ Across , Pp re e ing that Guy

i [rruptio: ? Neighbour Fawkes' Day is not far of, has
t been co 1 fireworks
box sm he

Nise } afford, and
Out: 8 : ‘
Ambletsides) 15 adds
Krror: 19 Omit . Chinese

OF Pe tre



SR A AT ORATOR LENS Ares

NEW . ARRIVALS

PILLOW CASES
SHEETS 70 x 90

90 x

”

DIAPER CLOTH

20) x 30

a

a

{a

24” @

108

WASH CLOTHS (White) @

DOMESTIC 24” @
CRETONNE 27” @
PLAID TABLING 48” @







released, waved to her
was puzzled, never
her despised ewain
her, “Good, work,”

ind

ad outwitted
said



, in God is my, trust,

|



she |
repens that | â„¢

Sir |
Hawkesleigh. Muffet. One feels a/
cad, doing this to a woman,” said | g,

Egham, the wound of his hopeless |

love still unhealed. Muffet gave
him a look of contempt, and that
children,

4 certain experiment in the Zakan | p.m
thought to] P-â„¢. Interlude
in al ; de

desert with what was
be the Gamma-bomb. ended
flasco, as you shall see.

Compast mentis
I F we did not allow our fruit
to rot on the trees we should

not be able to export
tin, and if other countrie
their fruit rot, they would
want the tin, and we should
t thely tinned A

not
not
uni-

fruit,

is the inner story of why | 10.15 p.m

pom Kentner, 10.00 p.m. The
| News, 10,10 pam. From the Editorials
The Debate Continues, 10.30

From the Third Programme, 10.50

much }
let |

versal plan for letting the world’s |

fruit rot would release
quantities of tin, which we could
export, and then import in

large |

the |

shape of empty tins, in which we ,

could export the rotten fruit

as

compost, getting in return an al- |

location ‘of ‘tinned compost.

Rupert and the New Bonnet—1 |



> is looking through them
ning them and im 1g

his friends are

wher
name called
he }



then
ries

wants with

SR emt eee re mn NN ee A REE

$ .98 each

387
2.04

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4990



SOON BURT LANCASTER'S Greatest
“MAN of BRONZE”

Dal
tao

B’TOWN

RKO - Radio Action-Packed Drama !
ida Robert

LUPINO RYAN in
Also the LEON ERROL Short om



SATURDAY Special 9.390 a.m, & 1.39 p

THE ANKANSAS SWIN



at BTOWN

TODAY

and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.90 p.m

“ON DANGEROUS GROUND”

YOUR SHOE STORES
eae





P

2.30. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m



3 Shows

“CACTUS CAT-UP”

Midnite Sat Ist

m

G

> New Action We

“OUTLAW GOLD"

with The Hoosier Hotshots « Johnny Mack BROWN &
f “BONANZA TOWN” |” ARIZONA TERRITORY
Charles STARRETT BURNETT Whit LS And PDE








ROOK



NOW



~ CINEMAS



| : Dit :
PLATZ Aq BARB
GALA OPENING :

re.

BARBADO



S ADVOCATE

A Challenge | The Mole’s House Was Dark

—With No Light, He Could See His Guests—

To The New

Elizabethans |

BY THE ARCHBISHOP
OF CANTERBURY

THE
by he:
goodness
diness
sincerity

Is that
gCod citizens to

QUEEN
clear

by
for
and
not

captures us

shining grace
her youth

service,

all}
and
and

by



tion
challenge
be



to al
more activel
their service
nd to all indifferent citizens
4 aside their indifference}
lack of conviction and lack
spiritual effort?
And the bad spouses and bad
rents to become faithful spouses
id dutiful parents
And to all the self-seekers and
piritual parasites to becOme
tkers for the common good
contributors to the common
tock of spiritual power and cbe-
ence to truth?



Does not everything call to us
ur memory of a good King,
* devotion to a young Queen,

nation's
ed?

greatness and its

Will not the Press and all the
of publicity, so powerful
these days, will not public
‘pinion as it passes from mind
mind end mouth to mouth,
us in this reformation—ex-
ling the drab and the dreary,
sordid and the salacious, the
distic and the sexy, the trivial
and the trumpery, and the
umption that everyone’s main
end in life is tor more money,
clothes, and amusement?
challenge like this could not
made without a Yeturn to
ligion and Church.
Here, too, let there be a re-
formation as eager, as Scriptural, !
comprehensive, as creative as

gans

a



the Reformation under the first)
Elizabeth, |

1 believe there is g movement!

vord> it, and a reaching out!
for it. But at the present it is a}
little shamefaced and hesitant,

2 « *

We shall best honour our|
King, we shall best uplift our |
Queen, we shall best serve our|
netion if we make a new act Of

faith, of obedience, of discipline,
of discipleship to God,

Here for the nation is the
watchword, as it was for the |
King:—

In God is my health and mail
jlory; the rock of my might: and}



—L.E.S.

ee



|

«B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

FRIDAY, REBRUARY 2%, 152.
|
|




5 a.m. New Records, 12.00 (noon)

, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis.
4.04












p.m, 19. 76M 31 22M &5 5aM
1.00 pr The Nev 410 pa Dail
Service, 4.15 p.m From the Third Pro-
gram 4.35 p.m. Interlude, 4.45 p.m
Music Magazine »00 pom, Piano Plajy- |
ime, 5.15 pm, Listeners’ Choice, 6.00 |
pm. Merehant N Ivouramme, 6.15
pom A Go, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round
Up Programme Parade, 7 >) p.m
7.10 pom ws Analysis, |
18 p.m. West Indian Diary
7.45—16,00 pom %53M 31M 49.49M

745 p.m, Get Out Those Old Records,
15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
World Affeirs, 6.45 p.m Composer of the |
Week, 9.00 p.m. English Magazine, 9.30
Louis



TO-MORROW
NIGHT

VARIETY
FLOOR
SHOW

At }

CLUB |
1 MORGAN

GWEN MACK Popular

American Radio and

Club) Entertainer with

Earl Wilkins as Mister

of Ceremonies; also a

Try out of the South

American — Entertainers

For Dinner

or Table

Dial 4009

Nees

Reservations



10 fer Reservation

AREES

(

Sat. March Ist. at 8.435 p.m. :

& continuing Daily at

CARIBBEAN

OG MOONLIGHT BAY
rt Te

” { AY ci

|



145 & 8.30 PM
PREMIERE

with The

s

=

T

By MAX TRELL

KNARF and Hanid, the S
went behind the



‘¥d Apple Tree un-

til they came to the fallen stump. |

Then they it

Blinky Mole stuck

rapped on several

imes. Finally
A nose out through a hole at the

bettom of the stump, then rubbed
his eyes and looked around without
seeming to see anything.

“Who knocked on my door?” he
said. “Is anybody here?”

“We're here, Blinky!” said Knarf.
“Hanid and I.”

“Oh!” said Blinky. Then he
rubbed his eyes again. “I hear your
voices, but I can’t see you. Come in,
please. It’s that bright sunlight,”
he said the next moment after
Knarf and Hanid had squeezed
themselves into the hele in the
stump and were following Blinky
down the narrow stairs into his par-
lor. “I can’t see a thing in bright
sunlight. Ah, now I see you!” he
exclaimed as soon as they reached
the parlor.

Dark as Night

It was almost dark as night in
Blinky’s parlor. Except for a tiny
glow-worm on a table, there was
no light at all,

“But now we can’t see you!” said |

Hanid.

Blinky uttered a deep sigh. “I'm
terribly, terribly sorry. It’s my
fault. Everyone else seems to be
able to enjoy the sunshine—except
cats and owls and mice. I’m sure
I'd enjoy it, too, But I just can’t see
anything. And it’s no use trying to
walk around and pretend you’re
seeing the birds and flowers and”al!
the pretty colors, when you have to
keep your eyes tight shut. No,
there's no use pretending you can
when you can’t,”

Blinky sat down in a chair and
sighed again.

“You ought to have glasses,” said
Knarf.

“Dark glasses,” said Hanid.

Blinky looked puzzled. “Dar!
glasses? | never heard of them. Do
they keep the sunlight out?”

“That's just what they do,”
Hanid,

“Well.” said Blinky, “they sound
mighty tine. And I'll have to get a

said

HELLO-O-O!!

TO WEAR ?

Elite - Photo - Print @

Be-Bop Caps — in various

Men’s Feit Hais @
Men's Socks @

Se Don’t Forget ! !



4

A Memorable Cast
Dramatic Mvstery Of

"BAREES) Re-Relcase RKO
REA GLORY” Gary COOPER
David NIVEN



ISTIN DIAL 8404

eday & Tomorrow 4.45 & 4.30 p.m
» GORCEY & The Bowery Roys
“IN FAST COMPANY” &

mes Oliver CURWOOD’'S

“¥UKON MANHUNT’

Kirby GRANT & “CHINOOK”

T. 1.30 Midnite SAT.





p.m.

IDDEN CITY Roy Rogers’
omba the Doubie!
Jungle “‘Slelderade” &
RANE “Man Frem

Mus'c Meuntain’

ee

lows, |

Reliance Shawl Shirts @ ..
Other Colourful Designs @

John White Shoes (Two-Tone) @
Willow Oxford Shoes (Brown) @

To Save Valuable $ $ $
me SHOP AT ~SeG

GEORGE SAHELY & (0.—19 SWAN STREET

For BEST VALUES and EFFICIENT SERVICE

N.B.—This Store will be closed on Saturday 1st
and 8th March (Race Days) at 12.30 p.m.



}



Blinky Mole at the front door of
his house.

pair. By the way, where can I get
;a pair?” he suddenly asked. “I can’t
| very well go to town in the daytime,
you know, for I’d never be able to
see my way around. And if I wait
until it’s night, none of the stores
will be open.”

But Knarf and Hanid said they
| would make Blinky a pair of dark
| glasses, So they got some pieces of
| colored glass and put them in a pair
of old spectacles that Blinky said he
jsometimes used for reading, and
|when Blinky put them on and went
out into the sunlight with them, he
|exclaimed in delight: “They’re won-
| derful! It’s just like walking around
jin the middle of the night!”

{ Long Walk

They all took a long walk across
the meadow, and around the hilt
and up to the edge of the pond, Anu
every now and then, when Knarf
or Hanid spied a particularly pretty
biuebell or daisy, Blinky would push
the glasses down to the end of his
nose and take a quick peek over
them at the flowers.

“Benutiful!” he Then he
pushed the glasses hurriedly back



said,



in front of his eyes again, “Ll oug't

tell Owl about these.” he seid
houghtfully. “1d don’t think hes
ever sven the work! in the das
vither.”





FELLAS
ARE YOU GOING TO THE RACES?

WORRIED ABOUT WHAT YOU ARE GOING
LET US HELP YOU!

wth SPORT SHIRTS-wa

Two-Tone @ $3.85 — Plain Colours @ $3.90

1.94
4.25

ab $2.50 —
Colours @ ooo... co.

$3.00 —
$1.43 &

9.60

. per pair 53














In The
The Year

‘GAEET

The Garden—St. James
Teday & Tomorrow 8.20 p.m.

“THE BIG PUNCH”
Gordon MacRAE -- Wayne MORRIS
“THE BRIGHT LEAF”
Geary COORER — Patricia NEAL

MIDNITE. SAT: 18T
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE”
Wid Bil OTT as Red Rider &
“ALIAS BILLY the KID”
Sunset CARSON.

Sun. & Mon.









8.30 p.m. & Mat. Sun
S p.m.

“VOICE of the TURTLE” &
“LOOK fer the SELVER LINING”





| POP SRIOSESSISS SISOSP PS SOPOT GS SPSS OPPO VOSOOOS

See Cy,

. yo GLOBE Tye
* , O»- :
; DELUXE ENTERTAINERS °F §
5 (acelin ns nner a enetaennteicisiecnistinniinlcenen o
x To-day 5.00 and 8.30 p.m. to Sunday .

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952







EMPIRE
Opening TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and continuing
Daily 4.45 & 8.30

WHE PROWLER

soo Whot he wanted...
\ove, \ookt — anytning|






EVELYN KEYES

with JOHN MAXWELL
KATHERINE WARREN
EMERSON TREACY

Screenplay by Hugo Butier
From an original story by

Robert Thoeren and Hans Wilheim

Directed by

S.'P- EAGLE + JOSEPH LOSEY
Released thru United Artists
An S, P. EAGLE PRODUCTION

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY TO TUES. 4.30 & 8.15

R.K.0's GIANT SIZE DOUBLE

ye they co” el

the old West's _
most dangerous Badmen... .
Sin Town's most tempting
woman!

BES T oF Le
PAV ad

TECHNICOLOR






STARRING

ROBERT RYAN.

REVOR
CLAIRE TEL

eat PRESTON





AND

“LOVE AFFAIR”

STARRING :— IRENE DUNN

MIDNITE SAT.
WHOLE SERIAL

ROYAL

TODAY (only) 5
“DESTINATION }

CHARLES BOYER



St BRUCE GENTRY
ROX Y

TO-DAY TO TUES

SPECIAL



4.45 & 8.15

Errol FLYNN Michelene MRELLE





SAT. & SUN.
James DUNN in
“GOLDEN GLOVE STORY”

4.90 & 8.15

in

“ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN FABIAN’

and
“HIGH LONESOME” od ree
with ~-
JOHN BARRYMORE Jr SPECIAL MID-NITE SAT. 18T
SPECTAL 9.30 A.M. SAT. Republic whole Serial !

(Cheap Prices)

JOHNNY WIESSMULLER as
JUNGLE JIM and
RETURN of OCTOBER”

“MANHUNT OF MYSTERY ISLAND

It's Action at Mid-nite













Opening Tomorrow Sat. Ist 8.15 p.m.
BARBAREES

PLAZA

ANOTHER SCENIC
WONDER IN THE
CARIBBEAN !

(DIAL 5170)
WITH






bunny-huggin’
happiness of those

grand days!
Here’s the gayest
new Warner Bros.





/

musical of
our day!



+ ech TES

PLAZA ous
' DIAL 5170

FROM
WARNER
BROS.





i

_ Abreu’s case whether

ee OE ae ee? ee eS ew ee eee

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29,

Commission Agent
Lose £720 Claim

MAY APPEAL TO W.I. COURT

AFTER HEARING the Acting Puisne Judge, His
Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor’s directions that it was
only an honest agent who was entitled to any commission,
and if they felt there had been a contract they would have
to ask themselves whether Damian De Abreu, real estate
agent, was dishonest, it took a special jury two and a half
hours to return a judgment in favour of Estwick E. Deane
from whom De Abreu was claiming £720 as unpaid
commission.

De Abreu counsel, Mr. G. H.
Adams applied for a stay of exe-
cution pending an appeal to the the
West Indian Court of Appeal. Mr. themselves



House Pass Address
To Governor On

said that he had not said
,000, but if it were material,
. the jury, would have to ask
lot of things. One








Adams was associated with Mr. of » things would be that after . r

D. H. L. Ward, instructed by ‘he conversation, he went to his Econoniic Notes
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy, Soli- “ephew who was his solicitor.

citors. Deane’s counsel were Mr. 'i®en there was the statement The House of Assembly Tues-

E. K. Walcott, Q.C. and Mr. J. S. Carrington & Sealy and day night passed an Address



in
B. Dear, instructed by Messrs. nmoning of him as a wit- Reply to a Message from Hi
Cottle, Catford, Solicitors. his being unwilling to Excellency the Governor, concur -



De Abreu claimed that Deane Come. ring in the extension to Barbados





and he had agreed to a contract the end of Mr. Adams’ of the provisions of new economi
that if he introduced Deane to.an ° Mr. Walcott claimed the notes between the Governments of
owner of a plantation who was ! to reply and Mr. Adams the United Kingdom and _ the
willing to sell and a sale objected, At this stage the lunch- United States,

resulted,
he would pay him 3% commission.
He claimed that he introduced
Deane to the owner of a planta-
tion which he eventually bought
for £24,000 and Deane owed him
£720 as unpaid commission.

Evidence for Deane, however,
was that De Abreu had told him
that £26,000 was the price asked
when in truth it was £24,000, and
this was held by his counsel to
be dishonesty, as De Abreu would
have got more commission if that
price had been paid.

After nearly two and a half
hours deliberation, the jury re-
turned to the court and enquired

eon adjournment was taken and
on the resumption, Mr. Walcott
Cid not reply. His Lordship then
began his-sum up.

His Lordship first referred
De Abreu’s claim— £720,
commission on £24,000.

He told the jury that they had
to be satisfied that the contract
was entered into between De
Abreu and Dearie in which Deane
agreed to pay him 3% if as the
result of an introduction of an
owner of a plantation by De
Abreu, Deane made a purchase of
the plantation.

Of course, he said, if they found
that there was no such contract,

The Address reads as follows:
“The House of Assembly have
the honour to acknowledge receipt
of Your Excellency’s Message No.
3/1952 dated 8th January, 1952
relating to the new exchange of
notes between the United Kingdom
and the United States of America,
The House concur in the ex-
tension of the provisions of the
new notes to Barbados
Debaxe on the Address was con-
tinued Tuesday night after having
been postponed for some weeks,
and leading off Tuesday night’s
discussion, Mr. R.«G. Mapp said
that in view of the fact that, during

to
3%





whether the statement of the price then they would merely say, the debate on the Address in con-
by De Abreu was in accordance judgment for the defendant, nection with the discriminatory
with his duty in carrying out the Deane. policy of the Senator McCarran

contract. His Lordship told them,
“Directly that was not part of his
duty. But my instruction to you
fs, if he gave what he knew to be
a wrong price, he would be guilty

Before they could say there was
a contract, they had to be satis-
fied that the minds of De Abreu
and Deane were clear and .satis-
fied as to the terms.

Bill, members had expressed thei:
willingness for goodwill between
Barbados and the United States,
he would not oppose the peaere

r It Mig not of the Address. He hoped that the
of dishonesty. be a good contract if De eu extension of the rail wohiha have
Yesterday was the fourth day of was interpreting what was said }

the effect of getting the Americans
on Barbados’
against the
Bill.

Mr. C.

hearing. De Abreu’s counsel, Mr.
Adams had urged that Deane and
his main witness Roy Gill from
whom he bought the plantation If they agreed that there
had told lies and De Abreu was & contract, the question of
speaking the truth when he told alleged misconduct then arose.
them that Gill had all along men— they found that De Abreu was
tioned £26,000 as the price of the guilty of such misconduct as
plantation. He showed, too, that Would disentitle him of his com-
De Abreu had nothing to do with Mission, they would have to give
the price of the plantation as Judgment for Deane,

Deane emphatically said that he ,, 1» evidence Gill had told them
was seeing after the price himself, that it was De Abreu who put
Though De Abreu did not lie, even the idea of selling Oxnards and
jf he had lied until his face wa: Husbands int6 his head. It had
blue, he would not have strayed OMe SO much as a surprise to
from the terms of the contract him that he talked of seeing par-

Continuing his address yester- ~*~ first.
day from the previous day, Mr. e told them that where there

in one way and Deane in another,
The terms in their minds had to
be exact and identical,

side in the fight
Senator McCarran

was
the
It

E. Talma felt
Address of the sort
hope for the future, in that a
great continent like the United
States was seeking goodwill and
co-operation with Barbados, In
times of war this island had to
look for protection from the
United States, and he was hoping
that not only should they ask fon
goodwill with Barbados, but that
that goodwill would be extended
in some tangible form to Barba
dos by America. He took it that
the Address was not only impor-

that an
gave some



Adams reminded the jury that the were not many witnesses and tant but urgent in view of present

contract was, if as the result of Where the chief witnesses were world conditions and Barbados’

De Abreu's introducing Dean to cee and defendant, they geographical position.

someone with a plantation to sell, 78° | i. examine the evidence *

a sale resulted, 3% commission ne ‘i and ‘see what credit’ ‘The House of Assembly Tues-

would be his remuneration. te a3 the plaintiff or the de- gay night accepted the amendments
He said that a defence of fraua 7emdant was entitled to. They jeferred to them by the Legisla-

had to decide whether they be-
lieved the truth or falsehood of
either party. They had to look at
the evidence of the other wit-
nesses and see whether that helped
them in deciding the truth or
otherwise of either party.

He first dealt with E. D. Mott-
ley’s evidence. He said that his
was expert evidence and merely
showed that 3 per cent. commis—
sion was the normal commission
under circumstances such as
those and if there was a claim of

was one in which the other side
could hold that his agent defraud-—
ed him, acted in his own interest
took secret bribe, colluded with
the other party or such like. They
had to prove that as a result of
the alleged lie, Deane suffered loss
But Deane had not suffered loss.

“IT submit,” he said, “that if the
jury agree that the agency is
proved, that this was a specific
contract merely to bring the par-
ties together and not to go through
all the stages of the contract,

tive Council in respect of the
Pioneer Industries Bill. The
amendments were only typograph-
ical, and were accepted without
tomment.

He therefore begged te endorse
the terms of the Address.

The Address was then passed,

ON PROBATION

FOR STEALING
His Worship Mr. C, L, Walwyn,



3% it would not ' oxtraor- Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
they would have to find for the qjnary See % be an extraor trict “A”, yesterday placed Clevi
plainti® He said that De Abreu had said Gill of Conchs Alley, City, on pro~

He recafled that counsel for the
other side had been unable to find
a case of a person being employed
to find a prospective vendor and
he quoted a case to bear out his
submission that that wi@ not un-
usual,

He said that even if another
agent came along afterwards—or
as in that case a solicitor—and
finished the contract, De Abreu
would have done what he had set
out to do, introduce the parties.
And as soon as there was the sale,
he would be entitled to his com-
mission. .

So strong was the authority, he
said, that it was shown that even
after dismissal, the agent could
collect his commission. Deane’s
evidence was in effect that De
Abreu was his agent and he had
fired him, but his holding that
there had been fraud when he
had not suffered loss, did not
excuse him from paying commis-
sion. It was essential that the
means used should successfully
deceive.

They would remember the let-
ter De Abreu wrote Deane, he

bation for a period of 12 months
to keep the peace and be of good
behaviour in the sum of £5 for
stealing cloth, the property of
Mortimer Skeete, sometime be-
tween February 16 and February
19.

Skeete told the court that he
left the cloth in his house some-
time between February 16. and
February 19 and when he wanted
it he found that it was missing.
The defendant used to live in the
same house with him,

Gill said that sometime ago
Skeete gave him the cloth and
during the month of February he
carried it to his tailor.

Boys’ Clubs Get
Advisory Committee

An Advisory, Committee _ for
he Committee of Management of
he Barbados’ Boys’ and Girls’
Clubs has been formed.. This
Committee will hold its first meet-
ing at the office of the Com
missiéner of Police Central
Station, this morning.

he had telephoned Deane on July
24 about a dairy business, Deane
had denied that it was about
dairy business, but admitted that
there had been this telephone
call. Then, Deane told him he
was interested in a_ plantation.
They both agreed that there were
subsequent conversations.

De Abreu said that in the first
conversation over the telephone
he asked Deane if he introduced
him to a person with a plantation
to sell and a sale resulted, if he
would pay him, and he said he
would. De Abreu had sought’ to
confirm the alleged arrange-
ments by referring to Lodge
which he had mentioned and
which Deane enquired after,
though in that case he would
have got commission from the
owner.

All





that Deane, however, de-
nied, De Abreu said that Deane
had told him he had offered
£18,000 for Lodge and Deane
denied making the offer. Farmer
of Lodge confirmed that evidence.
Then came the question of credit.
If they believed Farmer and be-



said. They would remember he lieved that De Abreu was not ———__—_—_—-—_-. -—--
told him he could inquire from speaking the truth, they would that of its owner,
Gill if he doubted him. Would have eause to look at the rest Deane had given a quite differ-

he have told him to enquire from
Gill if Gill had not in fact told
him £26,000? Was he a lunatic?

of his evidence very carefully
At a meeting between them on
August 6, De Abreu called Roy
It was not material to De Gill’s name, mentioned a price and
Roy Gill other particulars about a planta-
was speal{ng the truth, Gill hav- tion, but did not call its name or

ent version of the meeting. He
said he told De Abreu that before
he could do anything, he had to
know that the person was working
for a commission for the vendo:

@ On page 8



p

IM MAKING A CLEAN SWEEP
OF MY TROUBLES—

ALL





’'VE BANISHED THE BLUES AND

MY NERVE MISERIES WIiH

NUTROPHOS

Why feel depressed, irritable and generally
out of sorts when you can get relief with
NUTROPHOS—it’s marvellous for all nerve

troubles





ge You Eat Well, Sleep Well, Feel Well
When You Take NUTROPHOS.



SS STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—Agents









| color filled Nauional Bellas



| you are not pleased

i i i a i ed i ee



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





Yachts Leave
Today

Christian
Science:

= ° f @ from page 1
Its Reinstatement Of Nicholson and under charter to
ik i ae ‘ Mr. John Wright of the United
Primitive Christianity — Stries. She will be in daily
reless communication with the



e in
sible

And Spiritual Healing — Cruise Comn
RALPH CASTLE C.S. of San
Francisco, California :
Member Board of Lecture- ! m
ship the Mother Church,
The First Church of As
Christ Scientist, in
Boston, Massa-
ee chuset
At no time in history have men
and women been in greater need
of compassion than they are to-
day, Ralph Castle, Christian Sci-
ence lecturer, told an audience in
the First Church of Christ
Scientist, Garrison Hill, Bridge-
town, last night.
“Compassion, as Christ
displayed it,” he said

Antigua and
for supplying
mation to yachts participat-
the cruise,

Others to Jom
the cruise moves on through
the various West Indian ports
ofher yacht ire expected = to
join it. One is the motor yacht
Vesta owned by Mr. Luis Sean-
della of Puerto Rico, She will
have on board a party of seven
including former Governor Jesus
T. Pinero of Puerto Rico,

There two other yachts
entered Puerto Rico—the
motor yaohts Phoenix and Malala
owned by Mr. German Fernan-
ae and My Vincente Balbos
ineffable tenderness It is more Pena, respectively. The 38 ft
than ordinary pity, kindliness, or ketch Grail under charter to Mr
merey It is a deep desire to do C. S. Hamilton and a party of
good to others, a feeling which three will join the cruise
preceded the actual physical heal- at Grenada.
ings. To-day,’ said Mr. Castle, When the
“this same sense of compassion to- lish Harbour
ward our fellow beings is requi- March, it
site to Christian Science healing, H.M.S Sparrow, and a Police
On page 367 of her textbook, boat will be in the Harbour to
‘Science and Health with Key to direct yachts to their moorings
the Scriptures,’ Mary Baker Eddy, and to carry out simple immi-
the Discoverer, Founder, and gration and entry formalities.
eader of Christian Science, writes, If we are to judge the senti-
‘The tender word and Christian ments of all those who are going

By

be re¢

f the



are
from

Jesus
“conveys

also

fleet
on
will be

sails into Eng
Tuesday, 18th
greeted by



encouragement of an invalid, piti- on the Caribbean Cruise by the
ful patience with his fears and the epinions expressed by those who
removal of them, are better than gre sailing from Barbados, we
heeatombs of gushing theories, can be sure that, provided every-
stereotyped borrowed speeches, thing goes according to plan, the
and the doling of arguments, cruise will be a most enjoyable
which are but so many parodies onc F

on legitimate Christian Science,

aflame with divine Love.’ And on
page 365 she states, ‘if the Scient-
ist reaches his patient through
livine Love, the healing work
will be accomplished at one visit,
and the disease will vanish into
its native nothingness like dew
before the morning sunshine.’ ”

The theme of the lecture is de-
finitely conveyed in its “title,
“Christian Science: Its Reinstate-
ment of Primitive Christianity and
Spiritual Healing,” for Mr. Castle
contended that the application of
the teachings of Jesus in our daily
lives is the sole purpose of Chris-
tian Science, and tius, me saia, ot
course includes healing the sick
by spiritual means, or by prayer,
and regenerating the sinful,

The lecturer said he wished to
devote the time at his disposal to
discussing two of the Christly
characteristics, or qualities of
Jesus, in connection with his sub-
ject, mamely, compassion, and
Christ Jesus’ realization of insep-
arabilitv from God,

CANE FIRE PUT OUT

{Residents of "he Salt Pond,
laxwell district, a ted in put-
ting out a cane fire whiah start-
ed there yesterday evening about
5 o'clock. The fire burnt a quar-
ter of arm acre of second crop ripe
canes, the property of Fitz Ince
of the same district.

|




the dead, regenerating sinners,
even bringing his own body back
from the tomb—through the know-
ledge of man’s at-one-ment with
the Father, the divine Spirit, with
which he was endowed without
measure. On page 482 of “Sci-
ence and Health with Key to the
Scriptures,’ Mrs, Eddy _ writes:
‘Jesus was the highest human con-
-ept of the perfect man. He was
inseparable from Christ, the Mes-
siah,—--the divine idea of God out- |
side the flesh,’ Jesus was insepa-
table from Christ, because he
knew through spiritual perception
that he inseparable, And
herein lies an important factor in
he teachings of Christi }
und in its healing effic ]
1

Wa

“In Christian Science,” Mr, Cas-
tle explained, “the original dis-
tinction is retained which existed

ian Science
acy.



between the name Jesus and the “As human beings, we are apt
word Christ. Jesus was a man’s to think we are definitely separ-
hame and is still used in some ated from the Christ, that is,
countries. Christ was a_ title from the true idea of God as de-
meaning the Anointed, or the monstrated by Jesus, or we en-
Messiah. Originally, the Master tertain serious doubts as to our |
was referred to as Jesus, the inseparability from it. The great ¢
Christ, but gradually the article discovery which our Leader, Mary

was dropped until he became com-
monly spoken of as Jesus Christ
or Christ Jesus

Baker Eddy, made, through divine
revelation and her consecrated
study of the Scriptures—espevial-

“Jesus was actually God's repre- ly the teachings of Jesus—is that
sentative on earth, doing nothing, you and I, in reality, enjoy the
as he said, in his own power or game inseparability from Christ,
strength, but accomplishing all Truth, as was realized by the
things—-healing the sick, raising Master.”



HATIONAL
[BELLAS hess

Latest New York Styles—Typico! of our catalog >

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring and Summer Catalog
offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY
—at the lowest prices anywhere

Join the millions who
shop by mail directly from the




" Cee a)
Joday!



TMM Clty





“* TIONAL BELLAS HESS

Hess Catalog. Select fror
atalog. Select from. } aa’, “Rillss Hosp Ballding, Kenses Clay. 9, Mo,

thousands of the newest styles

and finest home items all ca



free, the new National Bellas

| . , i {oney-Saving Catalog.
| priced®at America’s greatest - .
| savings Name
Every item is guaranteed to Address
| be exactly as pictured and de ;
scnpen, rour money ack it {i «| e;-;:ttti ‘(a st;‘(S CS:

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS

66-2 _dellas Hess Building
Kansas City 9, Missouri,

PA‘ THREE



|

|
|

THE COLONIAL |
STUDENT. IN |
HAMPSTEAD |

LONDON, Feb. 20. |

Spurred by their desire to help}
young Colonial students, volun |
‘ary organisations concerned |
with their welfare in London’s|
Hampstead area has decided to
set up a working party to ex-
pand and co-ordinate their activ-
ities.

This decision was reached at a
meeting at Hampstead Town
Hall under the chairmanship of |
the Mayor of Hampstead, Coun-
cillor Harold Judd. It was sup-
ported by Mr. Henry Brooke,
MP. for Hampstead, ang some
40 local representatives of the
churches and other interested
bodies,

The meeting was address€¢d by
Sir Ronald Adam, chairman of
the British Council and of the
Conference of Voluntary Socie-
tics on the welfare of Colonial
Students in London, and Miss
Mory Trevelyan, Advisor to
Overseas Students in London
University and chairman of the
Standing Committee of the Con-
ference,

Both speakers stressed the need
for bringing the overseas student
into contact with the people of
Britain, What was wanted, they
said, was that residents should do
everything possible to make them
feel at home.

The British Council, Sir Ronald
added, needed all the co-operation
and help it could get in the work
that it had undertaken for over-
eas students.

Dies Suddenly

Joseph Blackman, a labourer
of Checker Hall, St, Lucy, died
while being taken to the Gen-



eral Hospital yesterday by the
police van, It was learnt that

Blackman had visited some peo-
ple in Goodland and was wait-
ing for the bus to take him home
wihen he fell ill.

His body was taken to the pubs

lie mortuary,




ARE
*'NERVES”’ A SIGN
YOU'RE GROWING

OLD?

Often as a woman es
middle life, her nerves get , and
she accepts this as a sign of age.
But why let you become ’
run-down—or 80 nervous you ox
without cause—at any time in life

For nearly fifty years wise
women have been meeting this
situation happily — by, getting

lenty of rest, fresh air, x
ood and by taking Dr. Chase's
Nerve Food . te them up. For
the Vitamin By, iron a
needed minerals in this time-tested
tonic help build up your vitality
and aid in toning up the entire
system—so you can face thefuture
with confidence,

Give Dr, Chase’s Nerve Food a
chance to help banish nervous
fears and doubts. It beige you rest
better, and feel better, The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance, 10

KEEP







AS CLEAN AS ; %
“D)
a

WHISTLE ALUMINIUM CLEANER
,, CARPET, UPHOLSTERY CLEANER
» FURNITURE CREAM
» HAND SOAP
, LAVATORY CLEANER
. RED TILE POLISH
» SUGAR SOAP

Hi




















| MANNING & CO.. LTD sen

CONQUER PAIN
SCIENTIFIC)

Caffeine, Acetylsalicyiic Acid—and QUININE. These four

medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that is why
they relieve pain fast, restore your sense of well-being !

Is welcomed by Doctors! Over 12,000 doctors and dentists

in Great Britain alone use It in thelr surgeries | Fevers,
colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, neuraigia—this wonderful
new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from ail of them !

costs little. You can buy it

In two-tablet envelopes—
enough to bring quick relief from a
bout of pain. Or in handy 20-tablet
boxes. Or in 50-tablet botties—keep
one of these in your house.

ARM YOURSELF
AGAINST PAIN
GET ‘ANACIN’ TODAY!

*‘amAgul’ be on in Great’ Britain and South Africa under the name ‘ANADIN

On
children’s
cuts, scratches
and abrasions







use

OETTOER

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC
Sarn-Non Potsonous
Dorsn't Pain
Dorsn’t Strain





“If you're on your back
And can't get a nap
Through a pain in the back,
Use FIERY JACK,

It'll never come back.”

On Sale at all leading Chemists

— Frank B. Ltd,

YOUR HOME

Armstrong Agents. ~







(-

~
6

WAX POLISH
WINDOW CLEANER









PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS a apvoetTE CC”

Gace f=) = 5S Fae

Friday, February 29, 1952

FEDERATION

MR. LYTTELTON’S despatch to the
Governors of British Caribbean Colonies
will little interest has been
shown in these territories whenever feder-
ation has been publicly discussed. But the
despatch is not intended to revive talk
about federation. If that was his intention,
the Secretary of State for the Colonies
would have been much more receptive of
the suggestion that a conference should be
held in London in June.

revive what

He is not opposed to the holding of such
a conference, but he makes it clear that a
conference in June must come fully briefed
and prepared to reach agreement on a fed-
eral scheme in sufficient detail to enable
a start to be made with the complex and
lengthy process of drafting the necessary
constitutional instruments.

But the conditions proposed by Mr.
Lyttelton for holding the conference in
June, namely that preliminary work
should be completed by the end of March,
means, so far as Barbados is concerned,
that there will be no conference in June.

The House of Assembly has only this
week been presented with the Estimates
1952-53 and clearly it would be impossible
for that House to divert its attention from
consideration of these estimates to a study
of the subjects proposed by Mr. Lyttelton
necessary before a London meeting can
be arranged.

as

These subjects which include study of
the financial and other implications of the
Rance report and a detailed examination
of the proposals made in the MacLagan
Report are not the only obstacles in tle
way of a June meeting. Each government
in the area will have to make up its mind
on these subjects and will have to circulate
their decisions to other governments par-
ticipating. in the conference in London.
Even #® Barbados could make up its mind
by the end of March (which is impossible)
there would still be delay while this gov-
ernment was studying the decisions of
other West Indian governments. For these
reasons it can be stated that there will be
no conference in London in June to discuss
federation. But Mr, Lyttelton’s despatch
will have the salutary effect of bringing
to the attention of the West Indian govern-
ments what had been stressed in the Rence
report, that much further work would be
necessary before the practical effects of
their recommendations could be fully
assessed

The use of West Indian instead of Car-
ibbean in connection with federation is
once again permissible because the legisla-
ture of British Guiana has formally re-
jected the Rance report and the Legislature
of British Honduras will most certainly
reject it when it is debated in that colony.

West Indian federation if it comes about
will therefore mean federation of the
British islands which extend from Jamaica
through the Leewards and Windwards to
Barbados and Trinidad. “his new situa-
tion has got to be facea and so far it has
not yet been faced.

; Mr. Lyttelton’s despatch will force West
Indian governments to begin their detailed
study of Customs Union and financial ar-
rangements for the upkeep of a federal
state with the knowledge that neither
British Guiana nor British Honduras will
be paying one penny towards its cost. This
will have some bearing on a federation,
the income of which is to be derived prin-
cipally from customs revenue.

Jamaica’s proposal that a conference in
London would undertake “close consider-
ation of the financial aspects of federation”
is therefore wisely widened by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies. The dele-
gates who go to London, whenever the
conference is held, must go prepared to
reach agreement on a federal scheme, or to
reject federation entirely should agree-
ment not be reached. But whatever agree-
ment is reached by West Indian govern-
ments can only be reached after the most
exhaustive and detailed study of the costs

of federation to each territory and the
advantages or disadvantages that would
result to each territory from a Customs

Union, That study will be aided by in-
formed opinion and since Barbados will
have to decide for federation
this year all those with special knowledge
sf trade and finance must priority to
the MacLagan Report on Customs Union
and the financial contribution that Barba-
dos will have to make towards a Federal
Government if this island decides that it
wants to participate in a federation of the
West Indies. There is certainly no obliga-
tion for it to do so, but it has to decide

or against

give

for

or against. And that decision must be
based on knowledge and facts, not on
sentiment or wishful thinking



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Problems

By a London Correspondent

LONDON, Feb. 21.
Views differ sharply on what
an and should be done to pro-
mote the economic development
of the Commonwealth. One
school of thought holds that
everything possible should be
done to accelerate the pace of
development as a means of
strengthening the sterling area’s
economic defences, while another

section of opinion advocates a
more cautious approach to the
whole problem.

To argue in favour of all-out
economic development is not the
same, however, as indicating
how this desirable end can be

achieved within the limits of our
present resources. Most Com-
monwealth countries naturally
look to Britain, as they have
done in the past, to provide the
bulk of the capital needed for
development purposes. What they
sometimes tall to realise is that
overseas investment is only one
among many heavy competing
demands on the national product
of post-war Britain.

As Irene M. Spray points out

in the current issue of New
Commonwealth, the first neces-
sity is to provide a_ sufficient
outflow of goods and _ services

from Britain to pay for the im-
ports of raw materials and food-
stuffs essential to sustain her
industry and provide a standard
of life which seems tolerable to
her people. Extensive capital
investment is moreover, needed
at home to make good the losses
of two world wars and to main-
tain and modernise her produc-
tive equipment. The question of
whether we can spare additional
resources for overseas develop-
ment must take into account
these two essential requirements.

At the moment, it is by no
means certain that Britain can
export enough .o pay her way
in the world and, at the same
time, free resources for even the
minimum amount of home in-
vestment. The British Chen-
cellor of the Exchequer has
already made sweeping cuts in
our import programme in an
effort to balance our overseas
trade, and these cuts will shor ly
have to be matched with a
similiar reduction in home con-
sumption. Home investment has
also been substantially curtailed
in order to free materials for the
export drive. But the overrid-

Mr. Republican Accepts Truman's

AMERICA’S presidential elec-
tion campaign swings into high
gear although voting is not till
November, Senator Robert Taft
~— Mr. Republican, and strong
man of the Opposition — stumps
the Far West and reveals the for-
eign policy he will shape if re-
turned to the White House,

WASHINGTON.

Tic truce on foreign policy
between President Truman and
the Republicans has been thrown
out by Senator Taft.

Taft, biggest danger to the
President in this year’s election,
issued his challenge when he
arrived in Denver, Colorado,
yesterday,

Reporters said to him: “Presi-
dent Truman has dared you to
oppose him on foreign policy.
‘Do you accept the dare ?”

Smiling and raising his voice,
Taft replied: “I certainly do!”

He repeated his statement for

newsreel men, and, for good
measure, added that Truman’s
foreign policy “could not have
been worse, and his concessions
to the Communists have led
America into an unnecessary
war.”

Truman has_ pleaded that

foreign policy should be kept out
of election controversy to pro-
tect national security.

But Taft talked of little else
all that week, In a_ series of
speeches he repeatedly called for
the “wraps to be taken off”
Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist
forecs on Formosa, so that they
can attack the Communists on
the mainland,

Britain and France could or
would do nothing effective, he
said. But the Chinese Nation-
alists “could and would act.”
Here Taft carefully announced
that if he could’ prevent it
America would not send ground

forces to Indo-China, where the
French face . mounting Red
assaults,

A new policy

What changes can be expected
if Taft becomes President? He
has said he will sack™America’s
joint chiefs of staff, including
General Bradley, and bring Gen-
eral MacArthur pack to an
important post.

Our Readers Say :
Unsatisfactory

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—I read with considerable
interest but unfortunately with
little or no satisfaction the re-
port in your last Sunday’s issue
of the interview with the Resi-
dent Manager of T.C.A., relative
to the statement by the senior
member for St. George that the
proposed new T.C.A,,_ aircraft
will leave Barbados out of their
route.

Mr. Barrow’s statement was
as clear as a pikestaff, and more
fully it was to the effect that in
about eithteen months time the
T.C.A. planes will be re-equip-
ped with turbo jets and they
would not be able to land on our
Wilson-supervised runway at
Seawell, even after the man-
power re-construction for which
a vote of $60,000. was then being
considered by the House of
Assembly.

Mr. Baxter says that in their
scheme of things T.C.A. will
have “new and larger equipment”
by 1954 and “that traffic in all
probability will be increased
many times.” In his alleged re-
futation of Mr. Barrow’s definite
statement about the type of air-
craft and leaving Barbados out,
Mr. Baxter is reported as saying
that “this statement was com-
pletely inaccurate and ‘without
foundation.”

f a layman



/ particularly in-
tere

sted in getting at the truth
of the matter .and knowing
something about the surrounding
circumstances, I find Mr. Baxter’s
“refutation” much too sweeping

for any use, especially after he



ing consideration in this, as in vate the long-term problem,
all current economic problems, while unnecessary delay in pre-
is the heavy and growing burden paring the ground for develop-
of rearmament. ment projects might have even
It is difficult therefore to escape more disastrous consequences.
Mrs. Spry’s conclusion that, Mrs. Spry looks even further
notwithstanding measures of re- ahead than this. Some of ihe
trenchmen. at home, there is more undeveloped countries neea
unlikely to be a surplus of not only “conerete capital” but
capital development goods for “social capital” too, if the full
export on a scale adequate to productive powers of both their

the needs of the countries of the
Commonwealth,

The Commonwealth
Ministers recognised
when they said in theif com-
munique after the recent sterl-
ing area finance talks that out-
side investment would be wel-
vomed. Meanwhile an investiga-
tion into the opportunities for
ihe most economic utilisation of

Finance
this fact

such internal resources as can
be applied to Commonwealth
development is under way and
the officials concerned in_ this

study have just completed their
first series of talks.

Their discussions have presum-
ably covered not only the prob-
lem of finding the resources for
development, but also the ques-
tion of how far and how fast we
should proceed,

It should be realised that
economic development is essen-
tially a long-term policy. Quick
results cannot, and should not,
be expected. In Mrs. Spray’s
words: “The urgency of immed-
iate results, of a quick increase
in the output of vital raw mater-
ials and foodstuffs, and of
economies in dollar imports by
means of new domestic produc-
tion, must not obscure the
importance of longer run and
less tangible considerations.”

Expedience which promise
speedy current relief from the
pressure of shortages, either of
dollars, or materials and food-
stuffs or of manufac-ures of
capital or consumer goods, may,
she says, conflict with longer
run measures which, in a more
remote future, would yield rich
returns of increased productive
power.

This is the essence of the Com-
monwealth development problem

The difficulty, however, is to
decide which is more essential—
quick returns or the long-run

capi.al projects.

Measures which may bring
speedy relief from the current
economic perils besetting the

sterling area may merely aggra-

Dare

This would mean reversal of
America’s foreign policy, as far
as Asia is concerned,

Although Taft has proclaimed
that he favours a European
army, there is no doubt that
America’s policy in Europe will
also undergo profound changes
if he wins the election.

Not all Republieans take the
Taft line. In open disagreement
with him is Governor’ Earl
Warren, of California, who also
hopes to run for the presidency.

Says Warren: “I believe that
if the U.S. were to aid Chiang,
this action would be dissociated
from U.N.O. and therefore our
war alone.”

Senator Wayne
Oregon, one of the most
of the Republicans, gives
warning: “If the Republicans
are manoeuvred into a_ position
that justifies a war party label,
we will be defeated in the
election, as we should.

“Our allies have indicated that
they are not going to ‘buy’ pro-

Morse, of
Liberal

posals for an all-out war in
Asia.”

Freer hand
General George Stratemeyer,

until recently commander of all
U.N.O, air forces in Korea, takes

the view of Taft and other ex-
treme Republicans — that if
MacArthur’s advice had _ been

followed last spring the Chinese
Reds would have been defeated
by now.

This extreme viewpoint is
causing Truman’s State Depart-
ment to make some concessions
to meet it, according to a
Washington report front-paged
in the New York Times.

The report says that the
following actions are under active
consideration by the State

Department :—

1, Giving the UiS. Seventh
Fleet on guard in Formosan
waters—a freer hand in dealing
with any Communist moves
against the island. At present
the fleet is only supposed to deal
with attacks “by sea or air,” so
presumably a freer hand would
mean



confirms Mr. Barrow in respect
of new and larger equipment to
come. Mr. Barrow’s contention
as I understood it was that if the
present TCA, aircraft are
damaging the runway their larger
ones will ruin it if indeed they
can land and take off on it at all;

the (b) method of repairing it
notwithstanding,
To the ordinary person Mr.

Barrow's contention seems most
reasonable, and if only Mr.
Baxter had stated definitely in
his interview that T.C.A., were
not contemplating the use of
turbo jets and that they were
confidently expecting our run-
way both in its length and its
strength to take their 1954 air-
craft without danger or damagé
to either, he sure would have
been very convincing. Is it too
much to hope that he will make
this statement now?
With thanks for space,

Yours sincerely,

A. E. S. LEWIS.
Bridgetown, 26.2.52,

Te Southern Cross

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—Since coming to your
Island several months ago I have
been a regular Subscriber to
your most interesting and inform-
ative publication.

As the _ constellation
Southern Cross” is not
in any part of Canada,
greatly appreciate if
advise me as to where and at
what time it now can be seen
Kindly print this information in
your morning paper,

Sincerely,

A CANADIAN VISITOR.

Skeete

“The
visable
I would
you could

mre Sy Director of

this ».,

bombarding Red _ troop

peoples and natural resources are

to be brought into play. “Not
only is future productive power
at stake,”’ she says, “but, perhaps,
also future friendship between
the white and the coloured
peoples, between the East and
the Wesi.”

Nor does the problem end
there, for when the world has

solved the present problem of in-
flation, it will have to face the
even more difficult problem of
correcting the fundamental un-
balance between the economies of
the under-developed countries,
which are the main sources of
raw material supplies, and those

of the more advanced countries
which need new markets and an
ever increasing flow of raw
materials to sustain and expand
their manufacturing industries.
The task of deciding how

’



“essential, comparatively, are
the rival claims ou limited capi-
tul resources as Mrs. Spry
points out, one calling for rare
econoinic wisdom and_ political
delicucy. The days are . gone
when such questions weré sei-
tled by individual investors. We
ate faced with a problem of
creating new mechanisms, such
the International Bank for
Reconstruction and Development,
for promoting, directing and con-
trolling investment within the
Commonwealth and between
Commonwealth countries and
other countries.
“We are faced,
“with the fact
ment must

1S,



us

too,” she says.

that future inves:-
depend on_ political
decisions; on the readiness of
electorates to accept, as of Gov-
ernments to adopt, policies which
impose sufficien.. limitations 6n
consumption to free resources
for capital purposes and which
call for strenuous exertions to
increase natiorfal production.”
FOOTNOTE:

Mrs. Spry, formerly of the
Depertment of Economics Uni-
versity of Toronto, is the wife of
Mr. Graham Spry, Agent-General
tor Saskatchewan in London,

concentrations ashore;

2. Cancelling the fleet’s orders
to prevent an attack by Chiang’s
Nationalists against the Red-
held mainland;

3. Telling Mao Tse-tung, Red
China’s boss, that Formosa will
remain fully protected by the
U.S., even if a Korean armistice
is signed.

All that especially clause
two is going to be received
with considerable dismay by
anti-Taft and’ anti-MacArthur
citizens,

‘Don’t retreat’

It follows very ciosely the line
laid down by respected Republi-
can John Dulles in a speech he
made to a_ private group in
Washington the other day.

And in Des Moines, lowa —
the heart of America’s mid-West
Dulles tells an_ influential
farmers’ audience that “to retreat
into our own shell by abandoning

our allies of the free world
would be to co-operate 100 per
cent, with the Kremlin’s encir-

clement policy.

“America should combat the
indirect aggression of the Soviet
Politburo by a political offensive
against the despots themselves.”

Stressing that he was voicing
his personal views and not those
of Truman, whose special adviser
on foreign affairs he is. Dulles
added that he doubts if the
Soviet leaders will ever venture
“on open military conquest.”

As for Taft, his mind is made
up and he will keep on with his
present line to the bitter end.
He is convinced that the series
of Republican presidential routs
Willkie and twice Dewey —
have been because they were
weak “me too-ers,” simply echo-
ing the Democrat line.

And Taft is certainly no little

Sir Echo.

Chicago cable: President
Truman recently denounced
“the chorus ot alarmists” who
said America should abandon
her allies and pull out of Europe
and Korea.

“We must

beat back these
threats to the United Nations,”
said Mr. Truman in a message
to a UNO association meeting.
—L.ESS. |

Science and Agriculture, told the
Advocate yesterday t h a t “The
Southern Cross” can be seen in
the southern sky between one and
three o’clock in the morning at
this time of the year.

He could not say precisely at
what hour it would be standing
erect.

If the sky is
visitor gets out
“The Southern
seen.

clear and our
of bed on time
Cross” will be

Thanks
To The Editor, The Advocate,—
SIR,—I have recently received
five copies of the Barbados
Advocate from Rev.
Clarke on behalf of the Barbados
Youth Movement. I am_ very
grateful to them for sending me
these papers and at the same
time enabling me to hear or
know something about the people
of the West Indies,
I was hoping to find a@ letter
enclosed in the papers but I am

sorry there was none so that I
may write to thank them
sincerely.

So I shall be very grateful if
you will publish this my letter of
thanks to the Barbados Youth
Movement for their kindness in
sending me the papers.

T hope when they read of this
they will endeavour to send me
their address to enable me to send
Gold Coast newspapers to them.
IT hope also they will not discon-

tinue sending me copies of the
Barbados Advocate as I like to!
read them very much.
WILLIE W. ADAMS.
P.O. Box 28
KUMASI
Gold Coast {
B.W.A ‘ZOU SI














L. Bruce!



wealth Development (j( Millions Now In! paper SER

The Empire, And 7 Out
OF 8 Are Coloured

By DON TAYLOR

FORTY MILLION “missing” people of
the Empire, almost as many as live in Eng-
land, have been discovered.

Instead of being head of about 570 million,
as was widely accepted, Queen Elizabeth II
8 actually the head of around 610 million.

This is more than a quarter of the esti-
mated world population.

Post-war census figures and more efficient
estimating are responsible fdr the higher
figure.

NUMBERS QUADRUPLED IN
HONGKONG

Previous estimates were off the
because :—

1. Some countries never had a real cen-
sus—some still await one.

2. Chaos of war led to confusion in many

target

lands.

3. There was difficulty in assessing
nomad and-isolated peoples.
4. Unofficial migration: In Hongkong,

for example, the population quadrupled in
seven years, many of the newcomers being
refugees from China. :

4,000,000 MORE EVERY YEAR

Here are some facts about Empire popula-
tions to-day :—

INDIA: Census figures show about 357
million,

Yet, until recently, our own official Com-
monwealth Relations Office List gave an
estimate of 295,549,404.

India’s population, under British rule,
trebled itself in 60 years. It is believed to
be increasing by four million every year.

In KENYA a million more Africans were
counted—the estimate being wrong by 20
per cent.

MALAYA, too, has 100,000 more than an-
ticipated.

NIGERIA, our largest Colonial territory,
provides a remarkable example of mislead-
ing estimates. In 1943 it was thought to
have about 21 million inhabitants; in 1948,
25 million. Now it is being spoken of as 28
million.

CEYLON’S population is increasing by
nearly three per cent. each year.

And the population of East Africa is re-
ported to have increased by 115 per cent.
in 17 years.

SOUTHERN RHODESIA’S has
trebled itself in 40 years.

BRITAIN IS THE MOST CROWDED

Can these figures be claimed as evidence
of the benefits of British rule?

It looks like it. For, in China, there has
been little to show the population has in-
creased on anything like the same scale.

Is INDIA, with her hundreds of millions,
the most crowded of the major Empire
countries?

No. It is Britain.

There are 531 people to the square mile
here; 313 in India.

Yet, in AUSTRALIA, there are only 2.8
people to the square mile: and 3.3 in Canada.

In one area of the Empire—the Antarctic
Dependencies—covering 2,647,000 square
miles, there are no permanent human in-
habitants.

NO GREAT LOSS BY MIGRATION

Our population in Britain has increased
by about 4,000,000 in 20 years, roughly nine
per cent,

We have not lost any great number
migration.

For the white population of the Empire
as a whole has increased from the 70,000,000
in 1940 only to about 77,500,000—just over
ten per cent. in 12 years.

That means that almost seven out of
every eight Empire folk are black, brown or
yellow.

During the 84 years of Queen Mary’s life
the Empire peoples have more than doubled.

Look at these figures :—

1861 — 259 million.
1871 — 283 million.
1881 — 310 million.
1891 -— 381 million.
1901 — 400 million.

By 1926, there were around 475 million,
and just before the last war the figure was
thought to be about 510 million.

COUNTRIES LOST AFTER THE WAR

In 1945, the figure of 550 million was
being used.

Then we lost Burma, Eire, Transjordan
and Palestine from the family—and with
them about 23 million people.

Yet, here we are now with 610 million !

Queen Elizabeth the First, in whose reign;
the Empire really began, ruled over a mere}
four millions.

One last point. The Empire is not “a
quarter of the earth’s surface” as is so often |
| declaimed.

It is really not far short of a third.
But that is counting the huge area of the|
|Antarctic Dependencies.

And whether our claim to these will ever
|be universally recognised is another story.
—L.ES.

almost

by





MY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952â„¢

(eae ntneema












RVIETTES

In Plain White
$1.00 per hundred

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

VALOR
DOUBLE
OVENS





VALOR
2 — 3 BURNER
OIL STOVES

Also Single Burner Stoves |
and Spare Parts for all makes. |

|. i

C. S. PITCHER & CO.



‘are made from

MOYGASHEL
LINENS

BENBURG

BALMORAL

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

im Popular Shades
& Lightweights

°
°

se





_————eeeeaee





DOMINICA
GIGARR "|

Or






Sale at Your Druggist

DACOSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents

Fillet Steaks
Calves Liver
Minced Steak
Hams in tins
Beef in tins
Tongués in tins
Sardines
Anchovies
Antiplasto
Macaroni

Fruit Salad
Mango Chutney
Red Cheese
Kraft Cheese
Carr’s Crackers
Anchor Butter

fime Beverages

Bass’s Ale
Worthington Ale
Guinness Stout
Tuborg Beer
Gold Braid Rum

Phone GODDARDS For Service |



’

SSS







‘



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY

29

, BB2





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

—— ee

Butchers’ Methods In Country Districts

DISCUSSED BY HEALTH
COMMISSIONERS

THE

COMMISSIONERS

of Health of St. Michael

yesterday discussed a letter from the Colonial Secretary
in which he points out that the Commissioners of Health
of St. John have drawn the attention of Government to
the fact that “licences are issued to butchers in the country
districts without the knowledge or consent of the Com-
missioners who are of the opinion that this practice is det-
rimental to the health of the community.”

The Commissioners after dis-
cussing the matter, decided on
the motion of Mr. E. D. Mottley
that, because the question of
economics was closely, bound up
in the matter, there should be a
joint meeting of the various
Commissioners of Health, the
Director of Medical Services and
the Inspector of Butchers’ Meat,
to discuss the matter before tak-
ing steps against the butchers.

The Clerk of the Meeting was
accordingly instructed to reply to
the Colonial Secretary, and em-
body the suggestion of the Com-



missioners in the letter.
Amendment
Leading off the discussion on
the, matter, Mr. E. D. Mottley
said that it did not directly af-
fect the parish of St. Michael,
but the suggestion put forward

by the Commissioners of St. John
would necessitate an amendment
to the Market and Butchers Act.

In view of the fact that the
suggestion came from the Com-
missioners of Health, he wonder-
ed whether it was not a matter
which should be considered by
the General Board of Health, with
whom would rest the ultimate
responsibility.

They had to bear in mind the



meat situation in the colony as
well as the economic position of
the people who butchered meat
in the ountr Many matters,
such ne sugeested by the
Ce is of St Tohn had
been discu d when the Public
Healt Bil up

He suggested that they should
rep to. ti Colonial Secretary
stating h he matter was of
such importance, and was. so
closely bound up with the eco-
nomics of the people concerned,
that the Commissioners could not
immediately express ahy par-
ticular view on the matter, but
would welcome a joint meeting
of the various Commissioners of
the several parishes, the Direc-
tor of Medical Services and the
Inspector of Butchers’ Meat, at
which the matter would be

fully discussed,
Good Recommendations

Hon, V. C. Gale said that the
recommendations of the Commis-
sioners of St. John was a good
and sound one from the point of
view of health, and had always
seemed to be an anomaly in re-
spect to that matter. He drew
attention to the fact that butch-
ers within the city limits had to
do their slaughtering in the mar-

ket where their meat was in-
spected, but those outside the
limits could do their slaughter-

ing at home, so long as they ob-
tained a licence from the Col-



onial Treasury,

Hon. Mr. Gale also pointed out
that labourers at plantations
benefited when slaughtering was
done on the plantations on Sat-
urday mornings, in as much as

they did not have to pay to travel
to the market in the city, and
in some cases, were charged at a
lesser rate than what obtains in
the city.

He was in favour of Mr, Mot-
tley’s suggestion, and seconded
the motion that the view of the
Cammissioners should be made
known to the Colonial Secretary
in their reply.

News In Brief:

A. WA. Obtain
Revolving
Barbell Set

There is another revolving Bar-
bell set in the islana, apart from



the one recently purchased by
the Palm Springs Barbell Club.
This set was bought by G.

Hinkson of Leeward Barbell Club
and has previously been placed
at the disposal of the Amateur
Weightlifting Association of Bar-
bados.

A visitor to the island, who is a
keen physical culturist, told the
Advocate that all the Weightlifting
Clubs in the island should try to
import the modern revolving sets.

- * .

Gordon Searles of Westbury
Road, St. Michael, reported that
his nickel watch was stolen from
his residence between 5.00 and
3.00 p.m. on Wednesday.

. . *

A silver bangle and a gold chain
were stolen from the home of
Gertrude Shepherd at Reed Street,
Bridgetown, between 8.00 and
8.45 p.m, on Wednesday.

* - =

Five motorists were reported
for exceeding the speed limit on

WednéSday. Of the 22 traffic
offences on the Police Reports
yesterday, two motorists ‘were



reported for not drawing up close
enough, to.the side of the road,
and two for not conforming with
road signs.

e * -

A vortion of a boarded and
shingled house at Mason Hall St.,
St. Michael, was burnt when a
fire broke out at about 9.15 p.m.
on Wednesday. The house is the
property of Stanford Small of
Tweedside Road, St. Michael and
was insured.

+ . .

Torrence Smith of Dr. Clarke’s
Gap, Bank Hall, St. Michael, re-
ported that $27 in cash was stolen
from his shirt pocket at his home
between 8.30 a.m. and 8.15 p.m.
on Wednesday.

Woman Placed On
Boud For Wounding

Hazel Howell of Lakes Folly,
St. Michael, was yesterday placed
on a bond for six months in the



sum of £5 by His Worship Mr.

G. B. Griffith, Acting Police Mag-
istrate of District “A”, for wound-
ing Gloria Thomas on her neck
on February 15,

Police Woman 12 Wilkinson
arrested Howell who was after-
wards charged with wounding.
Gloria Thomas of Chapman Lane,
St. Michael told the court that
while she was on her way on
February 15 at about 8 p.m. the
defendant and her sister ambushed
her and gave her a sound beat-
ing. The defendant hit her behind
her neck and she went to the
General Hospital where she was
treated,















‘PAGE FIVE













oo
e . - 7.
Who Will Pay Inspector Dismissed After ‘olume Two Of
- +
F ‘of bordi 4 ° ee Police Magazine
or Water nsu nation
ls Now On Sale
In Schools? THE COMMISSIONERS of Health of St. Michael, rhe first issue of Volume 2 oi|
: after going into certain adverse reports against Sub- the Barbados Police Magazine was |
The Commissioners of Inspector Jonothan Small, dismissed him from their on sale from yestera ins |
Health of St. Michael vester- services as from the 22nd of February on one month’s pay volume was also edited by Cap
day decided on the motion of in lieu of notice tain W A. R, Armstro |
Hon. V. C. Gale, seconded by Small, who was an Inspector for the past five years, ao eee ae vee Farmer 0
Mr. A. R. Toppin, that they was brought before the Commissioners on a charge of “"ho: Police. Mavazines wert
would reply to a query from “gross insubordination” to the Chief Sanitary Inspector, publisned last year. Three were |
the Commissioners of St. Mr. W. W. Merrit, whose instructions regarding the de- caiea by Captain Farmer and|
John to the effect that they livery of a notice to a householder in connection with a vne by Captain Armstrong. Cap-|
‘ : e115 ¥ . a ° var og . » editor-|
are quite willing to sign the sanitary nuisance, he “bluntly” refused to carry out. tain Farmer gave up the editor-|
petition whereby Govern- Ss alla eae ; chip eg ae had to leave foi
m i j he lief Sanitary Inspector England to take a cours¢
ons be responsible for the CARPE. | reporting to the Commission- The current magazine has an}
nayment of all water used in NTER | ers, pointed out that it has been attractive cover which shows two]
Elementary Schools,” IMPROVING | stomary for the past 30 years Harbour Policemen rowing their]
Th c oie Thirty an Inspector in one district poat into the Careenage Their |
Bem ecwnen oe. Hipalh Seen ty teens, One een ' request another Inspector in faces are stern and reflect the}
of St. John had written to the penter James Small of Fair- inother district to serve notices yough life of the sea. The photo- |
St. Michael Commissioners point- field, St. Michael who was persons whose rent houses in . . t Sa has Charles All-
ing out that since the drawing admitted to the General nother district have become a ®'4@P" Was abl sh “1 hire gt “the | Wr
up and signalling of the petition | Hospital on February 20 nitary nulaance. mon and published through the| LU
whereby Government be respon- suffering from stab wounds When a similar request was courtesy of whe’) Barbados Ful 2 .
sible for the payment of all wa- on various parts of his body made to sub-Inspector Small, he licity Committee 0 5
ter used in the Elementary is still reported by the Police tused the other Inspector, and Phot hs
Schools, an amendment had been to be making good progress m being summoned by the Chief omg ape e
passed to the Public Health Act, and gaining strength every Sanitary Inspector, and given Many more of Allmon's photo 3
making it compulsory for the aay direct instructions, he twice re- graphs appear in the magazine
Commissioners of Health of the The wound on the throat fused in the presence of the Captain Armstrong, in_ his 4ale at the
various parishes to pay one half | ‘s virtually healed and yes- reat majority of the staff editorial, pays tribute 10 the new | on
« ae of the water rates ree With the help two : Inspector - General of Colonial
charg n respect of the respec- policemen ho are always « »rly samel?? aa pt ins 51.
tive schools. ety by his bedside he was seen mproperly Dressed Police. He writes; “In July 1951,/

Entire Cost

The St. John Commissioners
re-affirmed that they are still
of the opinion that the Govern-
ment should bear the entire cost,
and they therefore wanted to
know if the Commissioners of St.
Michael and the other parishes
were willing to proceed with the
said petition.

Discussing the matter, the
Commissioners of St, Michael
pointed cut ‘hat they had al-
Ways cxpreassd the view that
the cost of supplying water in
the elementary schools should
be the sole responsibility of the
Central Government. My. E.
D. Mottley, however was of
opinion that in as much as they
had already discussed the mat-
ter, and Government had only
seen fit to pay half, and had
accordingly amended tke Act
that the matter should be left
over for a while, pending fur-
ther discussion on the new
Public Health Act.

Mr. A. R, Toppin expressed
the view that the minute Gov-
ernment decided to pay half the
rates they showed a sign of weak-
ness, and he would suggest that
St. Michael join with the other
parishes in signing the petition.

Mr. J. M. Kidney, Chairman
of the Commissioners said that
Government should bear the en-
tire responsibility, as it was no
part of the Commissioners of
Health expenses.

Government’s Concern

Hon, V. C, Gale said that the
elementary schools were tihe con-
cern of the Government, and re-
called that at one time these
schools were run by the Church-
es, and only received a grant.
There was at that time no Edu-
cation Department, but what was
known as the Education Board,
but now that there was an Edu-
cation Department, the matter
of supplying water to tihe schools
should be looked after by Gov-
ernment.

He later_moved, seconded by
Mr. A. R. Toppin, that the Com-
missioners of St. Michael should
reply to the St. John Commis-
sioners to the effect that hey
were quite willing to sign the
petition, The meeting agreed.



U.K. Missionary Tells Of
Experiences In China

MR. A. G. CLARKE, a U.K. Missionary who has lived

in China for over 30 years,

of some of his experiences

told the Advocate yesterday
in that country, particularly

during the Second World War.

Mr. Clarke who now resides in Bermuda for health
reasons, is on a four months’ visit to the British West
Indies conducting a series of Bible Services in the various

centres.

He arrived on Sunday by
B.W.LA., from Antigua and is
staying with Mr. and Mrs, Fred
Ashby at “Henderson Lodge,”
Clapham.

He said that when the war broke
out in December 1941, he was in
Weihai in North China and was
immediately arrested by the
Japanese gendarmes. He was
taken their headquarters
where he remained for
a week undergoing severe
questioning. He was then sent
to solitary confinement which
lasted for three months, He was
released on condition of “house
arrest” for five months after
which he was sent to Lunghwa
Camp in Shanghi with his wife
and younger son for internment
with nearly 2,000 internees,
chicfly of British nationality.

Great Service

These internees included many
Missionaries belonging to séveral
societies as well as doctors and
nurses who rendered magnificent
service in the camp with a min-
imum of equipment. They re-
mained in the camp for three
years until the war ended,

to



TREASURE TROVE

Treasure Trove (or treas-

ure found) is where any
gold is found or silver in
coin, plate or bullion, is
found hidden in a house or
in the earth or other private
place.

If the owner is unknown
the treasure belongs to the
Crown. The finding should
be reported to the Coroner,
who may hold an inquest to
determine whether articles
of gold or silver so found
are treasure trove or not.



Mr. Clarke said that the camp,
a college campas before the war,
was in a ruinous state and had
to be made habitable by the early
internees by way of cleaning the
rubbish, making roads and clean-
ing the buildings etc.

The camp was in a malaria
district and 75% of the internees
were infected. Many of them
suffered from vitamin deficiency
diseases,

A number of the _ internees
escaped from the camp and as a
result, the remainder were pun-
ished by reducing the already
megre rations by 50% in addition
to confinement to billets for
several weeks.

In charge of the camp were a
Japanese Commandant and 24
consular police. The internees
were however allowed to organ-
ise for the well-being of the
camp and this made things rather
better for them than would have
otherwise been the case.

Horrors of Camps

As far as treatment was con-
cerned, he said that there were
many unpleasant incidents, but
nothing comparable with the hor-
rors of the camps in Malaya and
elsewhere.

“We had over 300 children in
the camp, but they did not lack
education because they had a
number of trained teachers in-
cluding university graduates
amongst the internees who drew
up a full curriculum up to School
Certificate standard for the bene-
fit of the children.”

He said that the internees also
organised a series of lectures for
peovle who were keen on getting
a liberal education. Men who had
experience along certain lines
like architecture and engineering
gave lectures on the various sub-
jects

There were also some lectures
on travel and Others’ which
covered all branches of know-
ledge, Mr. Clarke himself teaching
decorative design and the Chi-
nese language in addition to
being quartermaster of the
camp. There was also a Com-
nuttee for organised entertain-
ments and other activities.

He said that owing to his
onerous duties of quartermaster
hiy health broke down, and he
was sent back to England with
others in a hospital ship.

Speaking of his early pioneer-
ings days in China when he
went out as a missionary to
spread the gospel among the
people in 1914, Mr, Clarke said
that he was faced with cOnsid-
erable difficulties and dangers
in connection with his work, and
had a number of incidents with
Chinese bandits.

He however thought that the
Chinese peasants were really a
lovable and_interesting people of
simple thrifty habits.

“Although I am not able to go
back to China owing to the polit-
ical situation, yet I have the satis-
faction of knowing that there are
many gifted men there to carry
out the christian work” he said.

Mr. Clarke, a Bible Teacher and
Author, has also written books,
one of which is “The Analytical
Studies in the Psalms”, the notes
for which were prepared while
he wag interned in China.

Excellent Meeting

WASHINGTON, Feb. 28

President Truman described the
Lisbon conference of the North
Atlantic Pact nations at a press
conference on Thursday as being
an excellent meeting and very
successful.

Truman said he is still working
on the selection of an Ambassador
to the Vatican byt has made no
progress. He promised correspon~
dents to let them know promptly
when he found
position.—U.P





a man to take tl “i

walking in the ward. It is
expected that he will be dis-




Stat¢

The matter was brought to the Office that the Secretary of

charged ‘early next week Oot eaten Finance oe tor the Colonies had appointed
The Police are holding oned rae ‘gig ht i ihe Colonel W. A. Muller, C,M.G,, to
Small in corinection with the charge ma m9 death of 36-year-old domes- xplain his : Ray re Smali on i a pector-General ef the Colonia
tic servant Gwendolyn enasien appeared: velanet the Police and Adviser on Colonia
Clarke of New Orlean Committee. “improperty dseeesa’" Police matters to the Secretar)
ee Ros St Michael {1 when asked why he had re- Of State for the Colonies.
Gdserel Hoonital about eno fused, replied that he had been “Colonel Muller who | vy



p.m, on February 20, bu
died shortly after she wa
admitted



1.D.0. Mey Share tn
B.G. Rice Industry
(By JAY R. SINGH)

LONDON,

The Cole nial Development Cor

poration may shortly take a finan-
cial interest in development and
expansion of the Pr'tish Guiana
Rice Industry, This interest wil
be on a partnership basis with
the British Guiana Government.

Negotiations are already under
way between the Corporation’
headquarters in London and the

Colony government for the taking
over of the 4,300-acre Mahaicony

Abary Rice Development and
Expansion Stheme, the only one
of its kind in the Empire. So fai
though it has proved to be an
uneconomic proposition to the
Colony although serving to pro-
vide the necessary data for me-
chanising the Industry.

Negotiations

The negotiations are an outcome
of recommendations of the Rice
Mission sent out by the Colonial
Development Corporation in 1951
to investigate the possibility of
expanding rice production § in
British Guiana, which is the most
important rice producer of the
British Western Hemisphere ter-
ritories.

The first task of the Corpora-
tion would be to push ahead with
the Mahaicony-Abary Scheme.

The money involved is said
be around £1) million.

The British Guiana Government
and the Colonial Development
Corporation however, have not yet
decided how much each will ad-
vance,

Meantime, the Colonial Devel-
opment Corporation may _ still
eventually embark on a Colony~
wide race development and ex-
pansion project. This would cost
around £3 million and bring
200,000 additional acres of rice
under cultivation. At present
British Guiana has 88,000 acre
yielding an average of 56,000 ton:
ennually. A percentage of this i
exported to the British Caribbean
territories.

Eventually it is
British Guiana will
the B.W.I, territories

The Colonial Development Cor-
poration’s decision to embark on
the major £3 million scheme will
depend on their success in aeccel-
erating economically the produc-
tion envisaged by the Mahaicony-
Abary project.

that
all

hoped
supply



(Of the 4,300 = acre the
Mahaicony-Abary Scheme the
Corporation expects to put 3,800
acres under cultivation, The re-
maining 700 acres will be left for



cattle grazing and the growing
grass).
—Expres

RATES OF EXCHANGE

PEGRUARY 28, 1952
CANADA
734/10 Cheques on Banke 117/10
Demand Dratt !
Sight Drafts 714/10
734/10 Cable
719/10 Currency 70 0
Coupons 9
50% Silver 20°



Ah!
LUNCH

meat, cooked
and soft foods.

vegetables

Lunch Wrap keeps Flav
in because it is moist
and the price per

only babe.
ee

prc

roll

7

to ®



Use Lunch Wrap for sandwiches,



joined the Colgnial Police Set
vice in Ceylon in 1920 and serve:
there until 1988 when he was ap

employed as an Inspectar and not
a messenger

aoenes a poe, wer heard pointed Commissioner of Po! )
efore he ommissioners at -piinidad and Tobago. In 1948 he}
their meeting yesterday, Small

was transferred on promotio

was asked if he would apologise Police

Commissioner of





to the Chief Sanitary Inspector, ~ > : 5 n rang ;
and he replied, “if that was the Y!ka, Bast Africa, Th
wish of the Board.” ment he ,held until h i
Members of the Board viewed Inspector-General of Colo
the matter very seriously, and Police Forces on Novembe
it was felt that such conduct, !95!
if condoned, might lead to tie Ik with considerable |
spread of an epidemic which sure that we welcome Colo
might bave heen checked if the Muller to his new office. His ex
particular Inspector had’ served perience in Colonie! Police Affa
a notice given him. i unquestionable and with h
a . nersonal knowledge ‘ W
Mr. Mottley, in view of cer- Indian problems, the Police Fore
un information, appealed to the of these Colonies houla benef
Board to consider severe discip- ‘ ae c ,
nary measures against Small, considerably upder hi =
rather than dismissal, and sug- ®4vice
ted that he be suspended for Improvement
three months without pay, in ad- ‘We look forward to ar
dition to an open apology to the visit from the new Insp¢
Chief Sanitary Inspector. General, and as one who ha
The* Board however felt that, the privilege and honour to hay
from other reports on the In- se:ved under him for four yea
spector’s general conduct and in Trinidad and Tobago ar
ibility, there would be repeti- knows fully his capabilities ar
tions of such behaviour, and that above all his interest in We
therefore he hould be dismissed Indian Police Affairs, we can in
from the 22nd of February, deed look forward to his makin
and given one month's salary in recommendations for general im
lieu of notice, provement and efficiency in th
Police Forces in these Colonie
“We again offer our best wishe
P li % S . i nd congratulations to him on t
oO 1¢e ecenes new appointment
In the Editorial, Captain A
T B Film d trong also makes reference
oO e e various improvements made to tl
local Force He write h
Mr. I, Carmichael will use the the new grocery section of
mainder of the film which was Police Canteen at Police Head
en to the Barbados Police to quarters which was opened by
ke scenes of the Central Police Hon, R,. N, Turner, Colonia) Secre
tion and St, Cecilia Barracks. tary and states that this was an
These scenes will be taken this other step forward made in the
morning. welfare of the Force.
of St Cecilia Barrack he
The 200 feet of coloured film writes: “The new barracks wer¢
w given to the local Force by purchased early in 1951 by Gov
the Commissioner of Police 1m gpnment in order to provide our
Montreal in appreciation of the pycellent Police Band with proper
hospitality shown him when he living, working and recreation
was in the island, accommodation, where the entir¢
Already Mr. Carmichael has Band is now housed with far
ésken scenes from the Musical more satisfactory results thar
Ride, Drill Display and Beatine previously experienced at Central
of the Retreat which took place Police Station where their Qua

1, the Police Show at District “A’
station on Tuesday.

were not only inadeounte b

@ On Page 6

ters





SERVANT’S INQUIRY AIDMOURNED

IS WORSHIP Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Coroner of District

“A", yesterday adjourned die the inquiry into the
circumstances surrounding the death of 36-year-old domestic
servant Gwendolyn Clarke of New Orleans, St. Michael,

Gwendolyn Clarke was admitted to the General Hospital on
February 20 at about 6.30 p.m., suffering from stab wounds on
her body, but died a few minutes after she was admitted to
the Casualty.

On the first hearing in the inquiry Dr. A. 5. ¢
formed the post mortem examination on the body of the deceased
February 21, told the of his findings. Next
1s Daisy Clarke who said that the deceased used to live
home at New Orleans, Westbury Road, St. Michael. At one time
Small also used to live at her house but sometime
staying at her place owing

sine

ato who pe

on court vitness

it her



Jame ago

she prevented Small from to hi
behaviour.

About 6.15 p.m. on February 20 she was told something and
going to Westbury Road saw the deceased lying in a pool of
blood. The deceased was taken to the General Hospital, On
February 21 she identified the body to Dr. A. S. Cato in the

Mortuary of the General Hospital,
The deceased was the mother of seven children.
= a A SN,
vavapeenats a ——








WRAP

cheese



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



was announced by the Colonia |



THE WORLD'S MOST POPULAR
SEWING MACHINE

«an

Will do every description of Sewing and makes a perfect

Lock-stitech on all thick

SS

miateriais, or thin,

a

«»

ava “J@QoNKS”

IT WILL LAST A LIFE-TIME

Complete with Wood Cover





Hardware Store
Tel.

HARRISON'S

2364.

|
| ‘we ONLY $99.16 EACH








} SSS SS SS

Come in To-day
and

Knujoy Our

ICE CREAM



SPECIAL

Row Ube delighted







vnights Phoenix |
Soda Fountain |





|
'
\\
|
|
|
|





: a 3 “i
uv
| Select These Food Savings i
ne {
i) Originally For this i
Kf Week
i ROBERTSONS JAMS {{
u \PRICOT, REDCUR : ea (K

BLACKCURRA } ‘ 50
i OBERTSONS MARMALADE i}
{ GOLDEN SHRED, SILVER SH D (
Hf SCOTCH ORAN 45 i
}} ROBERTSONS GING! DI ae
i} rsONS S$ 4 W BE JAM ; 57 \
\ = OM
i oul i}
i 90 i
i HA . i ’
qi I I SKE I 4 1 {
H} f NHA f ;
i ri I 77 ‘
i INC ; ai
i k ; E 4.50 (
v
ii} . COCKADE FINE RUM |
i} ° i
STANSFELD., SCOTT & CO. LTD. i
{ 4



PAGE SIX

CLASSIF











DIED
WAITTHE On February 28 1952, at
the General Hosp 1, Dudley Wait
late. Superintendent, Christ Chur
Highways. Funera! will leave hi
late residence, Enterprise, at 4.30
p.m. today for the Christ Church
Cemetery
Leotta Lashiey, Joseph Lashley.
29.2.52
IN MEMORIAM
BROME: In loving memory of our dear
Edmund Brome who died on Feb

22, 1952.
Walk on beloved,
ful garden
Where pain and sorrow never come,
Soon our earthly course we'll finish,

in God's beauti-












TELEPHONE 2508.

IED ADS.

FOR SALE





1950 Model 8,000

CAR: Morris 8 h.p
mileage App S. Bhikha, King Street,
Phone 4814 29.2.52--3n
Spelt ppetniceesieeereeeetininaen rca cicae
CAR: One Prefect Ford Not an old
Model but with four new tyres. Dial
2969 and ask for Mrs. Outram
29.2.52—I1n

-

CAR 1938 Morris, 8 h.p. Sedan.
Recently overhauled and rebored, Good
battery Tyres fair $525.00 Apply:
E. H. Webster, Applewhaites

28.2.52—in
ee

















CAR—1 Morris Car. 8 h.p., mileage
And sing, with thee, sweet #0n8*! 24,000. For further particulars, apply
Ribera ee Cariisie (Son), Ancla] #: A. Cuke, (Junior), c/o Bovell &
a ‘ lisie : > 423 29.2 52
(Daughter-in-law), Verbena Green and Rhovte, Phone 4351 oe oS A
Emerald Clarke (Daughters), Renriex an@] CAR—One 1951 Hillman Minx. Excel-
LeNer.. and family owner driven. Dial Williams at 3006 or
I © thenete Gian
SPRINGER: in loving memory of our after working hours 95251 93.2. 52—t.f.n
dear beloved father Clifford St. Clatr ei a ee ee
wate at ‘000 See cere: CAR: 1950 Hillman Minx, condition
1a y ’ p' , a
Two years have passed since that M. aie a eee L., Tnyhane,
ae ae axwell, or Phone 8558, 3339 ws
When the one we loved was taken oF 5.0
sya : p v bseahi CAR—One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon
The was hard the shoe in excellent condition. Contact ¢C. J.
severe, P Rameharan, Phone 3122, or Cole & Co.,
We never thought that death was 50}; 4q. Phone 4316 26.2.52—4n,
near
Mirlam, Barrie, Gordon, Edgar (Child- “
fen), and seven grand children ELECTRICAL
29.2.52—1n
oN a cicsiesiicnriomiininn —seeeees BLECTRIC Irons, toasters, mincers,
M oO TA kettles ete. all reasonable prices Also
1 P R a Electric cooking ranges. At our new
BARBADOS ELEMENTARY TEACHERS’ | showroom, dial 5196. K. R. Htnte & Co.
ASSOCIATION lad 29,.2,52—an

All HEAP TEACHERS are invited to 4
Special meeting at the Chureh House on
Saturday Ist March at 10 a.m

F. H. BARKER,
Hon. Secty,
B.E.S.T.A
28.2.52—2n

—_—————

PERSONAL



This serves to notify the public that
I do not hold myself responsible for
any debt or debts contracted in my

name unless fy a written order signed
by me.
LESLIE MURPHY
Dayrells Road,
Christ Church
28.2.52—2n

WANTED

MiSCELLANEOUS

BOARDERS: Male,
quiet respectable district
Bus stop at door. Phone







Local or Foreign,
par to town—
3943





3.
29.2.52—3n



YOUNG Business lady (white) requires
permanent “board” accommodation, All
meala or breakfast only would suit
Reply — Box R. C/o Advocate Co,

27.2.52—2n

ENGLISH SHORTHAND TYPIST re-
qu'res permanent position, Several years
experience. Good speeds. Reply Box
Z. C/o Advocate Co 27,2,52—2n





Person interested in running small ex-

clusive Club catering to tourist trade
which will also carry items for sale
to this type clientele. Attractive prem-
ises located in Bridgetown Apply
(Confidential) Box Z Y X, Barbados
Advocate. 29.2.52—n



GOVERNMEN: NOTICE

TENDERS FOR UNIFORMS

Separate tenders are invited for
the making of Uniforms for the
Police, Harbour Police and Fire
Brigade for the year 1952-53. Fur-
ther particulars can be obtained
from the office of the Commission-
er of Police.

Tenders, in duplicate, should be
forwarded in sealed envelopes
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by
name) so as to reach the Colonial
Secretary’s Office not later than
the 17th March, 1952,

Envelopes should be clearly
marked “Tender for Police Uni-
forms”, “Tender for Harbour
Police Uniforms”, or “Tender for
Fire Brigade Uniforms”, as the

may be.
ee c 23.2.52—3n.







The First Lecture in the Lenten
Series, “Christ on Passover", will
be given tonight at Lemon Grove at
7.30 pam.

Subject “The Prophets and the

Promise"

Mr, Cameron Tudor
invited
29,2.52-

OCLSP ELEY STP IOVPIIOST
10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
MOTHER’S DAY

Speaker:
You are cordially
In



EASTER CARDS
CARDS

Spanish—English, English—Spantsh
Dictionary
Everything Shakespeare
Rudyard Kipling’s
(over 800 pages)
GLASS JARS $1.50

= at —
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ever

wrote. verse

ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

BJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466





AT
BARBADOS MUSEUM
iQ

WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

ROBERT J. MacLEOD
AND
PENCIL & WATER
COLOUR
FIGURE DRAWINGS

of West Indian Subjects

BY
HAROLD CONNELL
~O.
Open February 9—March 8

10 a.m. — 6 p.m.





'D. Walker, c/o Mrs





GEC. FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES—
Wholesale and Retail. CITY GARAGE





co., 4671. 21.2,52—t.f.n.
LIVESTOCK
cow Guernsey-Ayrshire Cow giving

16 pints milk daily, first Calf, Contact:
R. Trent, Nr. Four

29,2.52—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

AQUARIUMS-—-Large
giass. Empty or stocked with Fish and
plants, Also some young Siamese Fight-
ing Fish and other Tropical Fish. Archie
Clarke, Dial 5148

Roads, St. John





and small, all

24.2.52—5n

EMBROIDERED SP A heavy Spun
Sitk with .coloured embroidery, loveby
quality 36” wide $1.65 yard at KIRPAL-
ANI, 52 Swan Street 29,.2.53—in









HOLIDAY SHIRTS: Are you looking
for a gay colourful shirt? We have in-
numerable styles, designs and qualitis¢.
Shirts with Barbados colourful scenery
and map a speciality, THANI BROS

29.2.52—t.f.n

STLK SCARVES: Barbados View, Pure
Silk Scarves with colorful Sceneries and
Map of the Island $3.98 each. THANI™®,
Pr. Wm. Hy Street

2.2.52—t.f.n.





STRAW MATS Fancy and colourful,
for Bedrooms and Dining room, also for
Door front 8c. up. Can you beat it?
THANI Bros Dial 3466,

29.2.52-—t.f.n

FOHK RENT





HOUSES

SS
BUNGALOW: Fully furnished on St.
James Coast (7 miles from town), 3 bed-
rooms, 2 toilets and baths. All modern
conveniences. Dial John Lamming, 2472.
29.2.52—3n
oe
HOUSE—Two Storey House near
Aquatic Club, fully furnished including
Fridge, and Gas Stove. Telephone and
Radio installed, available from the Ist.
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-
letting would like agreement settled as
he is leaving the Island shortly, For
viewing; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay
Street. Phone 5010. 26.2.52—3n

—_—

MAYVILLE, Jackson, 2 bedrooms, Din-
ing and Drawing. Dial 2550 for particu-
lars. 29.2.52—In



MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
Siiver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
For further particulars. Apply to Alma
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.

23.2.52—t.f.n.



PAVILION COURT
One va cy in this popular residential
estate ge Ground Floor Flat avail-
able Mareh 3ist. Moderate inclusive rent
teclecoration and agreement for approved
tenant. Apply FP. J. North, Little Kent,
“hrist Chureh 29.2.52-—-3n

PUBLIC NOTICES

OF ST. MICHAEL

NOTICE
All persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish of
Saint Michael are asked to send in their
Vouchers (in Duplicate) to the respective
Departments without delay so that pay-
nent can be made before the end of the

Parochial Year,
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churchwarden’s Clerk.
22.2.52—4n,












PARISH



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Owners of Dogs are reminded that
heir Dog License expired on January
‘ist, 1952 and should be renewed imme-
Gintely
WOOD GODDARD,
Parochial Treasurer



29 52—2n





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The epplication of Fitz H. Hunte, Shop-
eeper of Black Rock, St, Michael, holder
f Liquor License No. 1056 of 1952 granted
to F. F. Elias in respect of a board and
lingle shop at Welbeck, Black Rock, St
Michael for permission to use said Liquor
License &c,, at a 2-roofed board and
hingle building at Seciusion Road, Black
Rock, St. Michael

Dated this 27th day of February, 1952

re EB. A. McLBOD, Esq
| Melice Magistrate, Dist. “A”
FITZ H. HUNTE,
Applicant

‘.B.—This application will be consid-
t a Licensing Court to be held at
Court, Dist. “A* on Monday the

day of Mareh 1952 at 11 o'clock,






Oth

FE. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’

29.2.52—1n



DAN SPRINGER

STALL NO. 1
PUBLIC MARKET

| aR

To my and
Customers
supply of
Roast, Stew,
and ste
stock at

friends
have a good
Local Steak,
young heifers
buying

Planter

We
Prime
from
We are still
attractive prices




Dial 05 from *® am.
and
3630 after 2

Dial

Just Received...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply
Order To-day at
«»

(i. W. Hutehinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street





PUMLIC SALES







REAL ESTATE
HOUS Brand new, ampik edroor
house, all convenience with part



sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room Garage, laundr 2
servant rooms and storage room
On, attractive hillside site, Rockley New
Road, A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476

13,2.52—t.f.n

BUNGALOW —Modern 4

Bungalow, situated at Top Rock, Ch, Ch





on % acre of land, Having 2 fully tiled
Toilets and Baths, built-in Cupboards,
Outside 2 Garages, Servants’ rooms and
Playroom, Garden well iad out with
Dual entrance. Best offer £4,000 accepted.
Possession 3ist March Further particu



lars; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Ba3
Phone 5010, 27.2

27.252











The undersigned will offer for
at public competition at their office
17, High Street, Bridgetown, on Frida)
the 2th February, 1952, at 2 p.m
CLEVELAND a conveniently situated

house, in the 2nd Avenue,
standing on 11,273 square feet of land
and containing Drawing and Dining
Room on the Ist floor, 3 Bedrooms up-
stairs, and usual conveniences
For Inspection, telephone Miss Hutson
No, 2017
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO

20.2.52—6n





PUBLIC NOTICES



BARBADOS
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS
IN THE MATTER OF CENTRAL |
FOUNDRY
~and

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
ACT 1910

NOTICE 4% hereby given that a Petition
was on the 26th day of February 1952,
presented to His Lordship the Chief Judge
of the Court of Common Pleas by the
abovenamed Company to confirm an
alteration of the said Company's objects
proposed to be effected ty; a Special Res
olution of the Company unanimously
passed at an Extrad@dinany General Meet-

ing of the said Company held on the
30th day of ‘ovember 1951, and subse-
quently unanimously confirmed at an
Extraordinary General Meeting of the

said Company held on the Mth day of
December 1951, and which Resolution
runs as follows

“That the provisions of the Memoran
dum of Association of the Company wit!

respect to the Company's objects be
altered by adding a paragraph to be
numbered (rl) to Clause 3 of suct
Memorandum of Association the word

following that is to say:
(rl) To maintain and support or
in the establishment and support of as-

aid



sociations, institutions, funds, trusts, and
conveniences calculated to benefit er
ployees, or ex-employees of the Com-
pany or the dependents or connections

of such persons and to grant pensions
and allowances, and to make payments
towards insurance and to enter into Any
scheme calculated to benefit employees

or ex-employees of the Company or the
dependents or connection. of such
persons.”

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN
that the said Petition is directed to be
heard before His Lordship the Chief

lea

Judge of the Court of Common
on Friday the 21st day of March, 1!
10,30 o'clock in the forenoon, and
person interested in the said Company,
whether as creditor, or otherwise, de
sirous to oppose the making of an orde:
for the confirmation of the said alteratiot
urder the above Act, should appear 4
the time of hearing, by himself or his
counsel, for the purpose, and a copy of
the said Petition will be furnished to
any such person requiring the by
the Comparmy’s Solicitors, Messrs, Cottle,
Catford & Co., No. 17, High Street
etown, on payment of the regulated
for the same.








d this 27th day of February, 1952
COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,,
Solicitors for the

Company.

28.2. 52—3n



INTERESTING TO
VISITORS

You can now get
Your usual WARM WATER BATH
IF THERE iS GAS IN HOUSE
Gas Showrooms and
White Porce-

Call at your
See
lain Enamel Gas Geysers

% minutes you can have warm bath
Price

the Beautiful

- only $82.00



Belleville, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Police Mag.—from 5



}
| fetrimental to their musica,
ut ;
€ ute that he had, on more
ne occasion, suggested both
ere and during his service in
iad and Tobago, that to

Wwe
doubt, was

spirit of goodwill, which
an essential to
Federation of the Colonies in the
| West Indies, an interchange of
| Police and Militia Bands between
these islands on Concert-tours
|! would be ideal and welcomed by
}the Public of the Colonies.
Captain Armstrong also writes
about improvement and dAnnova-
tions at Police Headquarters and
New Recruits, but the most of his
space is allotted to the Barbados
Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs.
He writes: “Through the initia-

no

tive of Colonel R. T, Michelin,
this Colony can now boast of
no less than 14 such Boys’
and Girls’ Clubs scattered
throughout the Island and per-
forming excellent work in help-

ing to train the youth of this
Colony along social and demo-
cratic lines, providing games,

‘both indoor and outdoor, carpen-

| try, shoe-making, gardening and
!'many other items of interest and
instruction to the adolescent
,mind, keeping youth who are|
not so fortunate in having these
‘facilities in their homes, out of |
mischief, off the streets, away





from

all

rum-shops, ete., and above
| endeavouring to direct them
} from a life of crime—which is
[une of our principal duties—Pre-
vention,

He states that the adolescent
mind is quick to recognise fair-
play and the youth is anxious to
feel what he does is important
to somebody. “Too often, juvenile
crime begins by the lack of re-
cognition in the home, the school,
| o1 the playground, and when the
policeman can stir a feeling of
eres in the child and teach



him that he can help others in
a way which will bring him ap-
probation and __ self-satisfaction,
the scale thas been tipped in fav-
our of constructive outlets for
the inadequate child.”

There are other interesting
articles in this magazine as well
a large number of attractive
illustrations,

as



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay







Sch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch.Sunshine
R., Seh. Wonderful Counsellor, Sch.
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Emeline, Sch.
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Burma D., Sch.
Emanuel C, Gordon, Sch.-Cyril E. Smith,
Sch, Franklyn D. R., Sch. United Pilgrim,
Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. DOrtac, M.V
Lady Patrici Sch. Frances .W. Smith,
ss Car « Yacht Maria Catharina,
S.S. Crofter, S.S. Rogenes, Yacht Molli-
hawk

ARRIVALS

SS. Fort Townshend, 1944 tons net,
Capt. J. Henrikson, rom Grenada,

S.S. Stentor, 1,083 tons net, Capt. R.
Rugg, from Rotterdam

S.S. Philosopher, 4,998 tons, net, Capt.
T. Winstanley, from London

Ser A. H. Van Sluytman, 76 tons

Capt. Stoll, from Br. Guiana
DEPARTURES

M.V Cacique Del Caribe, 142 tons

net, Capt. N, Mulzac, for St. Vincent.
MAIL NOTICE

Mail for Martinique, Guadeloupe,
United Kingdom and France by the S$.S,





Colombie will be closed et the General ;
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 2 p.m. on the 29th
February, 1952; Registered Mail at 8.30

a.m., Ordinary Mail at 9,30 a.m
lst March, 1952.

Yroser LP PPPS OEF POSSI

‘s

» vr

% NOTICE

° Will the friend to whom I
& loaned my special Harrison College
@ Prize Book awarded in 1897 please
return same to Mayers C/o
$ Advocate Advertising Dept. This
xR very valuable to me

8 V. PARRAVICINO.
SCO SCCPL POLLEN

SPECIAL LINES FOR
LADIES!!

ART SILK in Wh
SPUNS — White,

ite, Pink and Blue
NOW 72e. yd.
Pink, Blue,

Beige, Brown

WOW SOc. yd.

CREPES, TAFFETAS, SILKS
and other Quality Silks

NOW $1.00 yd.

COTTON VESTS

IOW 2 for $1.00



CRINOLINE HATS
Pink, Blue, White, Gold

JERSEY PETTIC
SILK PANTIES
NIGHTIES (Sligh
FUGI

GIRLS’ VESTS &
NX
TOWELS

30 SWAN STRE

NOW
OATS

NOW S144 each

$1.44 each

NOW 2 for $1.44

tly damaged)

NOW $2.16 each
NOW j54e. yd.

NOW 24e.
PANTIES
Ow 3 for

NOW Sle.

INFANTS’ VESTS

$1.20
a& 6S



DIAL





| Bill Me@ :— 23rd October, 1951

on the |



2702.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tenders for the Supply of Fresh Cow’s Milk to the
Public Elementary Schools

Tenders are invited for the supply of Fresh Cow's Milk to the
Public Elementary Schools throughout the island during the follow-
ing school terms: —



Z, 5th May to ist August 1952
2. 15th September to 12th December 1952.
3. 12th January to 10th April 1953,

Particulars of the conditions and requirements of supplying the
Milk are embodied in the Contract, copies of which are available for
reference at the Colonial-Secretary’s Office.

Persons tendering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for
the due performance of the Contract.

The tenders marked “Tender for the supply of Fresh Cow’s Milk
to the Public Elementary Schools” must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock noon on Saturday, the 15th of March,
1952.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any
tender.
19th February, 1952,

23.2.52—3n.



OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

BARBADOS.

IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or incumbrance
in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant)
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witr documents and
Vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday bety » the hours of 12
noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Of Public Buildings,
Bridgetown before the 25th day of March, 1952, in order that such claims may
be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively,
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

Plaintiff: ERROL MALCOLM STEELE





Defendant: HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein
by GARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her
constituted attorney on record in this Island.

PROPERTY:

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-
terprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise in the parish of Christ Church in this
Island containing by admeasurement 7 acres (inclusive of a portion of a road
twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Public
Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and_bounding on lands of the
estate of Miss Mufcy E, Lucas deceased, on lands of James A. Tudor, on lands
of the Honourable J. D. Chandler, on lands formerly of the estate of T. C, Lucas
but now of Miss Haze] M. Bynoe on the remainder of the said road twenty feet
wide, on lands of Mr. E. C. Jackman, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the
Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all other

ti thereon erected and built standing and being.
buildings and erections aia see

Registrar-in-Chancery.

\

Z

‘BOILERS <2

WITH

Dated 22nd January, 1952.



















PREVENT
INCRUSTATIO
IN

\












YOU CAN
GET YOUR
REQUIREMENTS FROM

PLANTATIONS LTD



”



FOR MEN!!
1,000 SPORT SHIRTS

5 Shades

Now 2 for $4.50

RIBBED VESTS
3 for $2.00





POLO SHIRTS<841c. & $1.44
OCKS = 2 pairs for $1.00



S. ALTMAN.=Proprietor.



[ROYAL NETHERLANDS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952













STEAMSHIP CO, The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
CARIBE” will a % a =
SAILING FROM EUROPE Passengers for ;
TRE, ruary Vincent, Grenada and Aruba,

es — nn been oo Sa'ling Wednesday 27th inst.

HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952.
S.S. BRATTINGSBORG, 13th March, 1952.

S.S. COTTICA, 2st March, 1962. | ““MONEKA" will ac-

cept poe =
Dominica, Antigua, nitserra’
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
Tth March 1962.

The M/V. “CLARA” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Nassau
and Bahamas. Date of sailing to
be notified.

The M/V
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
M.S. WILLEMSTAD, ath ‘ebruary, 1952
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND

BRITISH GUIANA

M.S. STENTOR, 28th February, 1952.
SS. B).ATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, P.

AND BRITISH GUIANA
M.S BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952.
SS COTTICA, 7th April, 1952. '
SAYLING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO | {J
M.3. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952. |

SCHOONER OWNERS
(INC.)

B.W.I.









8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,
Agents. ’ —~— —~
* i s es
Canadian National Steamshi
SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Balifax Boston Barbades Barbados
“LADY NELSON” ae oe oe + 27 Feby. 2 Feby. © March 10 March
“CANADIAN CRUISER” é ° «.» 14 March. — 23 March 2% March
NORTHBOUND Arrives Satis Arrives Arrives Arrives

Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax

+21 Feby. 24 Feby. _ 2 March

+» 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 2% March
“LADY NELSON” ee +-22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. CRUISER” +» 4 April 7 April -~ 14 April 17 April

For further particulars, apply to—

“CAN. CRUISER”
“LADY RODNEY" .



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
ee



CG" TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
_“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952 .... 31st March, 1952
*““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 .... 6th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” ,,.. 8th May, 1952... ... 2ist May, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

ou, (OLOMBIE” «» 11th April, 1952... ... 28rd April, 1952
DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ..... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952
"Sailing direct to Southampton
































The T. S. S$. GOLFITO

will be arriving from
Southampton on Sunday, 2nd March at 3 p.m,
and will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same after-
noon for Trinidad. There is ample 1st Class

Accommodation available for Trinidad.

Apply...

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO0., LID.

FISHY BUSINESS
You can obtain best quality ...

FISHING LINES & FISHING HOOKS

From...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD & BROAD STREET

WE ARE INSTRUCTED to undertake a complete
CLEARANCE SALE at
RALPH WEARD’S SHOWROOMS
BAY STREET

on Monday and Tuesday the 3rd and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS



"Phone 4640

WHEN “COGNAC” 1s
MENTIONED

THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS
TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HEN-
NESSYS IS THE BRANDY THAT
MADE COGNAC FAMOUS.

HENNESSYS

¢ THREE STAR -
* V.S. O.P. (over 20 years)

* X.O. LIQUEUR

(over 40 years)



PPPS FO? "

SOSSOSPP PPPS PS FOSS

a

STOKES & BYNOE LTD~AGENTS.

PLPLISSO
79S

|







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN








































woe LE TT 3695 4 995655", FFE tt 2"

BY CARL ANDERSON . %

HENRY & STUART & SAMPSON'S &
aa 7 — i 8 EXPERT BLENDING §

alas ‘T| i | Te eet FoRTuNE S z
= g TRB a ete!

J onan ? > .

py ae , a aa sa ? nee § FLAVOUR OF %
— aT] TOOTH PASTE TO § %

| | | HELP S S. & S. RUM ‘

| | AVOID Py :

a: '$ STUART & SAMPSON <
Me , 10 Te 3 (i938) LID. %

pat Neadquarters for Best Rum. .

SLINT OF THE FLYING :

g ¥
2OOCEGS: ILLIA ALLL AA A A

, DECA AY i : ale wueevel ;

fi. oe eee AND
sai it bneat'', (00; | SELECT THESE





PLES OSS.

YOU L/TTLE FOOL!
47OLOD VOU -



USTERINE Tooth Paste helps stop tooth decay 4





1, LISTERINE Tooth Paste actually helps rex
destructive bacteria N O W
} 2. It attacks dull film which holds bacteria oj ainse
la tooth surfaces.
/ 3. It even helps to remove mouth acids! :
Hutry now and buy ListeRINE Tooth Paste... brus! revery I-Ib & 2-Ib
meal and fight tooth decay...clean teeth brighter...c05? DREATI Tins Mortons Oatmeal
FRESH FOR HOURS AND HOURS! Tins Corned Mutton
3 You'll Uke Tins Breakfast Roll
its refreshing Tins Lamb Tongue
mint flevor, too i Tins Veal Coat

(Imperial Vienna Sausages)
Large & Small
Tins Hamberger Steak
Gelatine in Packs
Tins Fruit Cocktail
Tins Fruit Salad

~ (THE NN, WHEN YO
FINISH IN THE
ON ATTIC. 1 WANT
ea ayy TO DO THE
SAME THING
=f IN THE CELLAR

INCE & CO.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST

"GOS 9955965656559 0 59509 GS SSS OOS BOBO S OSE OE OOOO





ie,





IT PAYS YOU ‘TO DEAL HERE







FLASH: GORDON









ar) = Tse TTPO eee SPECIAL alters to. all C to all Cash and Credit ¢ Customers v0 for Thursday to Saturday sy only

| warr S CELEBR: NNA HATE TO
THERE'S A FINE STORE









¢ AN? c { Les THIS JOINTS, a ~ Se ————oIISSSSSESSESEoaESSeeeoeoeToeeo SS
QuARTERS! IT'S ALL Sccagion. A peasmiut, ) “a er re SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our ranches Tweedside,
“eo ith “fd ered Speightstown and Swan Street
AG Usually Nov Usually NOW
es ve ma peor Tins Klim (5 Ib) ee oe
f Tins Black Magic Choco _ : . Tins Oxford Sausages
a —(Walls) 69 64
Pkgs. Tapioca Flakes 24 21 Bottles Carlings Beer ae 26 21
Ourrants (per Ib) id ie Boneless Beef 3 bY 58 48








LIGHT O' M’ LIFE, LAURIE,| | WE CAN ALSO PICK Eat ‘. Deg “ON YER TINY HAND
LOVE... WE CAN'T WED

TODAY, BUT...WE CAN GET
TH’ LICENGE / LET'S GAE /

eS WHATEVER YOU say, RING 2 Vy, LAURIE, FE ” a : ; f % oe a a
© ssaidasint Gna rons peaRest/ ano PARLIN. ARE YE J , THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

OUT...A WEPDING o> ee ‘ B | WHEN WE PAR-RTEP :
3S ; FIVE YEARS AGO @ |











YOUR
DOG

By










AH-NOW THAT THEY
HAVE GONE - THIS
16 THE FIRST REAL
OPPORTUNITY TO
TELL THE PUBLIC
WHAT I WANTED
TO SAY -







FINE / WELL = FC 92 FIVE |
DAYS |'VE WANTED TO |
TELL YOU-- J

ge go
Z




[ze ARE YOU LISTENIN’ ? |















| ROBERT LEIGHTON

NOW ON SALE UP



ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BROAD STREET & GREYSTONE, HASTINGS

GOOD WINES)

GO WITH

GOOD FOODS

WHITE TATTLE WINES

‘GRAVES’— L. Danglade & Fils 1939 Vintage
‘ pe ai ae “GRAVES”—Sichel & Fils 1945 Vintage
C = “BARSAC”—L, Danglade & Fils 1939 Vintage
RED TABLE WINES The Best| “LIEBFRAUMILCH"— E. Hassemer — Germany

RIP . KIRBY













- Seg So SE On ee Ce ee



t —1947 Vintage
a mm ; sieneeoaeraeeey C CEV CAN DNT OID ME | “BEAUJOLAIS”—Poulet Pere & Fils 1949 of them ‘WEMMERSHOEK"—No. 1 K.W.V. South Africa
COT THB ELD B pa INTO i NTH AN JAI eee i Vintage Ll “FRANSCHHOEK”—No. 2 K.W.V. South Africa
Zo oa tly | “CHAMBERTIN”— Poulet Pere & Fils 1913 | @ _
=“ I 23 | Vintage | levine ._n :
—rG “CHARMES. CHAMBERTIN”—Poulet Pere & Fil Ml LIQUEURS
‘ / 946 aul §
¥- y “CHATEAUNEUF DU PAPE” —Brotte ean a Arti - “BOLS” — Holland — Cherry, Peach,
mot ; nier 1943 Vintage SPEC TAL. Maraschino, Apricot, Kummel,
egies “MONTOIRE ROSE” —Louis Renard RUM Curacao Triple Sec., Creme de
' = “SAINT JULIEN” Claret—Louis Eschenaue: Menthe
-| “ST. EMILION” Claret—Danglade & Fils
/ ‘ y Y r
| ALLEYNE ART HU R & CO... LTD.

“YOUR GROCERS HIGH STREET

REE TA ST TE ETE

Rae IOS.







ECC ee eee



PAGE BIGHT



EMPIRE WON their

noon. The
first half hour.

witness the revival of year

two teams

Empire touched off kicking to-
wards the goal to the pavilion end
Immediately Spartan took over,
but Chase on the right wing who
had cut in was adjudged cff side

The Empire front tine scon g







going with Taylcr dire th
game. He passed to the i
right Douglas who kicked danger
ously across the Spartan goal, the





ball going cut of play.

Play was then transferred t
he Empire goal and Boyce on
the left wing after receiving a
pass from Tony Haynes centred

across, the Empire goal, but Chase






bungled
Empire Attack

The Empire forward again
launched an attack on the Spartan
goal and were almost successful
when the Spartan “keeper” Wood
moved cut and vas beaten
Bowen, the Spartan r full
attempting to clear, si i the ball
to give Empire the first corne:

vhich Douglas took from the right



side but hout result
Another try made by Robinson,
the Empire left winger from out

area was negatived when
Wood collected and

side the
Custodian
saved.

The game in these
had developed into a keen tussle
and in the excitement, both feams
missed gocd opportunities for de
veloping constructive play.

Empire kept Spar

stages

early

tan on the @

fence for some time during whieh

both Taylor snd Dougl failed

to make use of theu ivantage:
Foul Play

It was not long after this that

Bowen, the Spartan right full,

was penalized for foul tpay in

the area. Drayton took the kick
and made no mistake to put his
team one up

It was only a matter of seconds
later when Gittens, the Spartan
right half miskicked, Douglas got
possession and passed to Hope who
was now playing on the right wing,
but the latter sent in a hard one

which missed. the upright by
inches, ;
Spartan made a bid for the

equalizer but the Empire defence
got in their way and had the ball
back in the Spartan goal area
After some minutes of struggle
during which Empire on the one
hand tried to increase their lead
and Spartan on the other fought
for the equalizer, the interval was
foken with the score unchanged.

After Half Time

On the resumption Spartan were
immediately on the offensive and
their front line led by samuel
Griffith initiated a good movement
for Chase on the right wing to
send across one which went’out of

play.
Shortly after this Empire took
over and Hope, their centre

forward, sent in a grounder which
goalkeeper Wood had no difficulty
in saving.

Fighting desperately for a goal,
the Spartan forwards took the
ball well within the Empire goal
area, but their efforts were in
vain.

Play was now transferred to
the Spartan area and they were
forced to concede a corner, but
nothing resulted,

Spartan were socn given a free
kick just outside the area, Haynes
kicked to Griffith who passed back
to Haynes who kicked wide.

Good Try

Empire made a good effort to
put themselves further in the lead





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Ordinary: 10.00
a.m.
Football: Division 1 —Har-

rison College vs. Everton
at Har. College : 5.00 p.m,
Division Ii — Carlton vs.
P.- Rovers at Queen's
Park; 5,00 p.m.
Division U--Wanderers ys.

Y.MP.C. “A” at the Bay:
5.00 p.m,
Foundation vs, Comber-
mere at Combermere :
5.00 p.m,
Y.M.P.C. “B"” ys, Comber-

mere Old Boys at Beckles
Road: 5.00 p.m.

Mr. A. G. Clarke, U.K, Mis-
sionary, speaks on his ex-
periences of war - time
China at Dayrells Road
Gospel Hall: 7.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Has-
tings Rocks: 8.00 p.m.

Mr. Witham Cash lectures
on
British Council :

“House Designing”
8.30 p.m.

third
they defeated Spartan by the only ¢
the two teams clashed at Ke nsington Oval yesterday after-
goal was the result of a penalty during the
Drayton did the

For more than three quarters of an hour before the
beginning of the game the crowd which numbered about
3,000 formed long queues as they

in

game succession whoen
goal of the match when

trick



waited for entrance to

s’ old rivalry between these

vhen Robinson on the left wing

vi had ¢ ent | gro r

but Wood be ween pr ts
a and cleared

No ‘oon tha Spartan had

the ball in the Empire ares thin

it was back in (tseirs. On «ne



after beating
his way down the wing, kicked
roalwards with Wood the
“kesper” out cf the geol Full

asion Robins



back Gibbons however came to
the rescue and cleared.



Empire kept on pressing id
Drayton sent in a hard cr m
outside the area, but goz
Wood saved

Spartan during the clo

triec hei

stages of the game

t to draw level 1 they kep
the ball in thei oppone nts’ area,
hut just failed to score

The game end th Er re

winners by one goal to love

The Teams





e teams were:-—

Empire: Symmonds, smith,
Grani, Alleyre, Maynard. Rudder,
Douglas, Taylor, Hope, Dray:
Robinson.

SPartan: Wood, Bowen, Giobon
Gittens, Cadogan, Weekes, boy«
Haynes, C. Wood, Griffith, Chuse

Referee: Mi Ben” Hoyos

ikoys’ Club F sot: ull

St Cecilia Senior euved
Worthings Seniors $6—-1 in tie ai
return match of the Ko Club

City Division football.

The Seniors game was keen,
contested. St. Cecilia drew
blood, when H. Norville scorea
a penalty, Half time found the

lirst





score 8—0 in St. Cecilia's favour

The second half found Worth-
ings pressing the game to open
their account, success came when
Hinds beat goalkeeper Jordan
with a first time shot. The score
was now 3—1,

St. Cecilia began to combine
well and H. Norvile scored hi
third goal of the match

About 8 minutes before the

final blast of the whirtle O. Git-
tens scored the fifth goal.

M. Irish was the Referee.

The teams were,

St. Cecilia; Jordan Downes,
T. Fitt, N. Phillips, C. Haynes,
P, Sealy, B. Banfield, O. Gittens,
I, TAU, C. Griffith (Cant.) and
H. Norville.

Worthings; Robinson,
Mosley, Clarke, Springer,
Lewis, Lashley, Cummings,
and Niles,

Hal}
Pilgrim
Hinds



Alleyrre Arthur
Defeat “Recorder”

In a very fast football match
yesterday afternoon, Alleyne
Arthur defeated a Recorder team
by five goals to two. About two
minutes after the game started the
Recorder scored the first goal of
the match and within about 20
minutes Alleyne Arthur scored
two, At the end of the first half
the score was 2—2.

Play was very fast and the
Alleyne Arthur forwards outplay-
ed the Recorder defence. Alleyne
Arthur’s forwards Norville ani
Squires scored one goa! each and
Greene scored a penalty.

Mr, I, Graham was referee.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
from Codrington :
Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
Date ; .07 in,
Highest Temperature :
85.5°F
Temperature :
70.0°F
9 miles per

Rainfall

Lowest

Wind Velocity :
hour

Barometer : (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.935

tO-DAY
6.21 a.m.

29.997

Sunrise :
Sunset: 6.07 p.m.
Moon; New, February
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 6.31 a.m.,

25

7.410



p.m,
Low Tide; 12.14 a.m., 12.49

pm,
ue gneve
















GOT INSURANCE -:.
BUT I JUST WANT
TO DO YOU A FAVOR,

AND LOOK OVER YOUR





RIGHT



c ‘fechas BULBERRY

—f QUIT HIS JOB HERE LAST
WEEK / WHAT'S HE
DOING BACK HERE

ee
‘pean

BUT I’M
AWFUL BUSY
NOW,

EMPIRE DEF, EAT ' SPAR TAN

3.000 Watch Exciting Game

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



iKnow Your Football

LAWS 2 & 3
By O. 8. COPPIN
TO DAY q SHALL DEAL with Laws II and IIt of the
game th govern first the ball and seco idly the number

of players.
THE BALL
be of leather,

tion which might prove dangerous to players.

shall be spherical;
and no material shall be used in its construc-

the outer casing shall

The cir-

cumference of the ball shall not be more than 28 inches







nor less than 27 inches. The weight of the ball at the
start of the game shaljJ not be more than 16 ounces nor
Jess than 14 ounc
{ have never heard of ju- went being agreed upon by both
tances of this lew being oroken teams before the start of a match.
as the manufacturers of .o>tballs nis rule is important especi-
obviously in their own iterests ally with regard to the changing
iform to the rule ana ) 1 of a goal-keepe: l, have seen
lefi for infringements by club. ome instances of this with very
who purchase them painful resulis to the offending
bacre are only two points that team.
must be remembered about balls If without noufying the referee
and that is their inflation and the a player changes to goal-keeper
lacing of them. If a ball is not dufing the game, and then handles

sufficiently inflated it will be re-
the simple reason that the bounce
and carry of the ball will vary
from that of one which has been
properly inflated. In addition to
that it would be definitely dan-
gerous ond uncomfortable at the
least to play it with the head,

Conversely some balls can be
ver-inflated with similar hinder-
i ffects,




1e other point is that of lacing.
Care should be taken to see that
the laced part of the ball is flat
with the surrounding surface and





that there are no protruding ends.
Leather laces can be very un-
comfortable if care is not taken
with the lacing. I agree with the
advice that wherever possible
tape should be used as laces and
here is a diagram showing one of
the best methods of laci
pile acts th
(* ?
® .
\ ee ee
Pe / a Ok
——a-
Ss
—_ %
up
- -
YY A * Ae
\
evr
(1) Make a small cut in one end
of the tape, Insert through hole
No. 1 as shown,
(2) Draw long end of tape
vhrough hole opposite 1, through
cit in. short end of lace and

inrough hole No, 2.
(3) Continue lacing across un-

til last holes are reached, Make
double loop as shown, and bring
end of lace out through hole oppo-
site No, 5.

(4) Insert lacer through ‘hol
opposite No. 2 and down the chan- |
nel Lelween the layers of leather
until it reaches the hole opposite

No. 5, Draw end of lace through
this channel,

(5) End of lace comes out of
hole opposite No. 2. Draw up lace
tightly and cut off end close t
hole,

Number of players. The game












shall be played by two ns,
each consisting of not more thar

eleven players, one of whom shall]
be the goal-keeper. One of the
other players may change places
with the goal-keeper during the

match provided notice be given
the referee before such ch

made, Except in a match played
under Rules of a competition, sub-
titutes may be allowed to replace
players receiving injuries during
a game, subject to this arrange-

‘e By Jimmy ae







HE QUIT TO BE











HIS GOOD-BYE KISS IS
| ( STILL WET AND HE'S

| BACK TRYING TO
SIGN US ALL Ue= )



HAD A GOOD WORD FOR
ANYBODY “NOW WE'RE
ALL DEAR FRIENDS AND

A BIG INSURANCE MAN»



















HE'S AROUND
HERE MORE NOW
THEN WHEN HE
WORKED HERE +>
I'M GONNA HIDE
IN THE STOCK-
ROOM».










"We MAN WHO
CAME BACK» THEY’L
DO iT EVER
TIME ---



‘ sale
THANX TO“E.F.G.;
c i TEXAS



the
flected in the standard of play for a

during the

(except
out the consent of the Referee is

is awarded.

ball within the penalty area,
penalty kick shall be awarded,
Any player leaving the field
progress of the game
through accident) with-





deemed guilty of ungentlemanly
conduct and an indirect free kick



Of course the decis

ion in this case is left with tl
referee who must judge the case
on its merits,

Next—Law [V—Players’ Equip-
ment.

Jamaica Lose
Al Soccer Again

KINGSTON, J’ca. Feb. 27.

Jamaica, despite several scoring
opportunities lost the third Inter-
national soccer game to the Carib-
bean Al. Stars 1--0 at Sabina
Park this evening,

Twenty-two thousand fans saw
Surinam’s Michel Kruin score in
the fiftieth minute, Gillie Heron,
professional from Glasgow Celtic
did not play for Jamaica owing io
in injured knee.



I—NIL

Agent Loses Action

@ From Page 3
sane said that be Abreu did neo
se the name of the plantation
fternoon and he said he told
en he lad something con-

‘rete, he would listen to him.
Gill had said that he had put
~wen'h so the 1l3.:st it could have

his cards on the table before the
is the si Knowing that
De Abreu met Deane on the sixth

“vy would have to decide whether
Se Abreu did not know the name
vf the plantation and the owner
when he me¢t him
Gill had said that he neve-
for £26,000. If they believed Gill

d eane, the ques:ion arose,
“What reason had the piaintiff for
withholding it on the sixth. Was
t because he was trying to induce
(he defendant to offer him a com-
mission?” Was it because no com-
Mission had been previously
agreed to? Was De Abreu saying,
‘IT have a plantation going and

1 Want one,

Give me a commission.”

Mr. Walcott said he queried the
motive of adding the £2,000, His
Lordship said. Was it that De
Abreu would then have gone to
vill and say, “I have got so much
more, you give me something

asked



* Waleott had asked them to
Deane because De Abreu
proved to be a liar in several
instances An instance was that
he had said he had telephoned
Gill at 3 p.m. on the seventh and
Gill said he had been at the races.

His Lordship then reminded
them that Mr. Adams had said
that the first part of the defence
contradicted the other part. But
Deane was saying in the first place
there was no contract and then,
f it should be found that there was.
one, then, ,dishonesty disentitled
Deane from getting his commis-
ion.

Mr, Adams had argued that it
was quite clear that De Abreu had
veen promised commission, other-
wise he would
Gill some.
ter for them. In all the evidence
they had to take their own inter-
pretation,

He said that De Abreu had also
claimed that it was not ‘before
Deane saw Rex Gill at the races:
That,



that he changed his mind.
‘oo, was for them to decide.

Though Mr, Adams had ques-
tioned Deane’s not replying to De
\breu's letter concerning the con-

act, they might well think that
it was felt there was no cause for
a reply.

Mr. Adams had also drawn
their attention to Gill having still
sold for £24,000 despite his hav-
ing said that he was not moving
from £24,900 and was because of
that saying that Gill could be
doubted when he said he never
said £26,000. They might feel that
that was added on to make the
offer,

If they concluded that before
the seventh, De Abreu was in
possession of the facts and did not
divulge them to Deane, they might
conclude that De Abreu was de-
liberately trying to mislead Deane
in order to get him to pay a
higher price for the plantation,

He said that Mr. Adams had
said that even if De Abreu was
dishonest, that had nothing to do
with the case. “But I am telling
you that it has a lot to do with

All Stars team: Lacussade tt” he said. :
(Haiti) in goal; Gerry Parsons Mr. Adams rose at this stage
(Trinidad; Andre Dieudonne to make an objection to his being
(Haiti); Delbert Charleau (Trini- misquoted. He : at what he
dad); Allan Joseph (Trinidad); 2&4 said was tha Dr A’ rev could
Humphrey Mynals (Surin: m): lie until he Was Dus int Lace
Paul Desrosiers (Haiti): Charles with matters not. connected with
Panguillot (Guadeloupe); Michel the contract. :
Kruin (Surinam); Rudie Kam- Mr. Taylor conceded _ this, bu
pervun (Surinam) and Andre continued to say that if Gill’s price
Vreux (Haiti).—(CP) was £24,000 and De Abreu had

’ said £26,000, that would be dis-
idee honesty and Deane would be
WATE entitled to say, “You are dis-
missed,”

R POLO He said that Mr. Adams hac

MEETING TO-NIGHT held that the falsehood had to

Geceive and if there had beer

There will be a specie] Council falsehood in the case, it had no

Meeting of the Barbados Amateur deceived. They knew Dean®

Water Pole and Swimming Associ
ation tonight at the Barbados
Aquatic Club.

The meeting starts at
representative
cluding the

830 A
of each club in-
Ladies’ teams are

sasked to attend,





Colours the Hair instantly.
It Is absolutely what Is professed

A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING

Available in 4 handy sizes
Obtainable frem

BOOKER’S (Barbados

DRUG.STORES LT
BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN
Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stanmore, Middlesex, Eng.

ed







SEC LAA AES EP EPPS EO SOS



MILK

suffered loss.

He added, “It is only an honest
agent who is entitled to any com-
mission,”

“T am instructing you,” he said,
“that if you come to the conclusion
that the plaintiff was told by Mr



NO.MORE GREY HAIR

AFRICAN MIXTURE

Also try
FLEUROIL
BRILLIANTINE

of it:

Makes the hair
soft and glossy

Sold in 2 Sizes





POOCPPOP PPPS PSS FOOD

thE

-Murrays

Sioe.: |

MANNING & (CO., LTD.

AGE

(6 AM OCC
“o , PESO

44
+ ia PROCESS ,

NTS.

“<
SORE SOCSSOCSOODC SOS

not have offered
However it was a mat-

Gill
price

that

“The question is,
coniract
If

id he

e

When
umming up,
wot
ing
for

ne euumemmmenael





Pk




£24,900 and he advanced the
to £26,000 and named that
Mr. Deane, the moment he did
ne
ee bis normal interest.”
was there a
His Lordship ended.
there was a contract, was
e dishonesty by the plaintiff’
advance the price so thi
would get some commission?”
His Lordship _ finished
the jury deliberated
nda half hours before arriy
their verdict of, judgment
defendant, Deane.”

OM

at

the



2 Now you can *
afterd thet trip
to Eurepe



Leave now—return after No-
vember 3Cth, ‘‘Thiift-Season”
Clipper fares saye you up to
25% round-trip to wt! Europe.

PARIS

Gayer than ever dur-
ing its 2000th Anni-
versary—and now only
hours from New York
_by direct ‘Strato’
Chpper* tights.

Fly one way via Paris
— one way vie the
Azores, Portugal, Spain
and the French Riviera.




Se erey
aI -
2 a wine
vine

2% GTHER CITIES



Krom New York, luxurious PAA
Clippers provide frequent, regular
service to the leading cities of



Europe ™..offer « choice of three
trans-Atlantic routes, You can also
enjoy stopovers in England and
Treiand at no extra cust.



2

Fer reservations, see your
‘yavel Azent or




WORLD'S
i XPERIENCED
ALALINE

Pin? AMERICAN

HGRLD ALWAYS
ca ¢ ac itd.

MmOas
















DANCE

at

ite BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
SATURDAY

March Ist, 9 P.M.

For Local and Visiting

MEMBERS

Music by Mr. ©. Curwen’s
Orchestra

(No Admission Charge to

Ballroom)
28,2.52,—3n.





ERNIE’S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB
—o—

There will be a Special
MEETING
To-morrow (Friday)
February 29th
to discuss the problems
of the First Day’s Rac-
ing oh March Ist.

vitae ot

There will be
over on each race,
Each horse will have
a price.
aoe

Dinner will be
at 8 o'clock

—O—

Special Lobster Cocktails
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C, Snow,
Proprietor Edgewater
Hotel,
where he prides himself
on Lobster Salads and
Lobster American at all
hours.

a Call-

served

—_—0—

Go and try them and
let me know the results

——Qane

OUR MENU:
Hors d’Oeuvre
Stuffed Eggs, Anchovies
Patties, Etc.
Turkey Pelau |
Poire & Peche Me

Purity Mince





was then acquiring inter- |,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952

Police Band Concert To-night

The Barbados Police Force Band Con-

dies cia













cert at Hastings Rocks tonight starts at
8 o'clock. The conductor will be Capt
c. E. Raison, MBE ARCM z
PROGRAMME the produce
MILITARY MARCH MEDLEY
The Home Guard On Parade pe Concerte Tr
—Duthoit t (La Mover Haydn
[ONCERT OVERTURE Soloist Band Lovell
Zampa--Herold 3 electio MERRY ENGLAND
SPANISH VALSE By Recuest) —dward German
Estudiantina—Waldteufel (7) Entracte for Beils—-CHIMES OF JOY
4) HUMORESQUE —Ord Hume
Tangled Tunes—Alford Soloist cr Best
How - rarely we hear an air 8) Film Mu AI’ GET YOUR
whieh is not in some war rem- G Irving Berlin
iniseent of another; an amus- 9) Two Calyso fOrPvONE
ing illustration of the similarity Mur-ell
occasionally found twixt melo- GOD & ET qUSEN







i

| Calling all

| bicycle owners

We offer you
| tire hi class

INSURANCE ff
\ yf
COMPANY



MERGED IN THE

ROYAL INSURANCE COMPANY LTD

| BICYCLE INSURANCE POLICIES

theft,

for

ainst fire
and property

accident,
damage

this policy covers you age
injury to third partie

personal
yremium



less than half the cost of your dni:y newspaper.

Do not delay, come in and let us issue you on: of these
policies to-day.

One accident may cost you more than one hundred years
insurance premium would cost

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET



aly











é Aanniiee the gerereenes specie “t
(lerram) MARBLE. CHIPS |
\ in 5 colours )
i For Verandahs and Floors
} TT. HERBERT LTD.
tL Magazine Lane, t-: Dial; 4367



Guarantee A Perfect FIT
every SHAPE.



to

C. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD.

Top Scorers in Tailoring
Prince William Henry Street







SS eae
—







CooL
North! will demand a re-
turn to warmer clothing at
vacation end.

SPRING in the

We have a ction of the
finest Woc..ens loomed in
Enghana, as well as glorious
Cashmere Pullovers from
*Scotland, light weight
Tweeds and crisp Worsted
Suitings for both Ladies and
Men.

The quality of this branded
stock is unquestioned.and it
is our Sales Policy to com-
bine this high quality
excellent value.

y.

C.B. Rice & Co.

Merchant Tailor:
of Holtom Lane



Full Text

PAGE 1

BARB AIM iunOCATS .I'll. I I M Butchers' Methods In Country Districts bISVmSED BY HEALTH Who Will Pay Inspector Dismissed After mmussio\ERs Tb For Water In Schools? Commissioners .-I COMMISSIONERS of Health of St MicbMl i tttr (mm the Colonial Secretary | i nts out IhM llie Commissioners of Health J hr: luve drawn the attention of Government to the tod thai "licences are issued to butchers in the country j j fi ?* %  Mlcha \esterdittricU without the knowledge or consent of the Comgf.v decided on the motion ol 1 an i i the opinion that this practice is det!" on C. Gale, seconded b\ tal to the health of the community Ml %  "• Toppin. that they Tba riaiim|ajliani. after dis-~ %  — would reply to a query from cuulnn the matter, tleei.lod on \.„.,.. |„ R m :.,f t ne Commissioners of St ., ,i,„,i,> ""' "• Btw > John to the effect that Dm -'' 4 *Tf A At* J> ''are quite y. i ,llin „, ji.n the ra should be i A XV A (hnfonn; l*' ,ll,on whereby Govern .-. fV tV.XJtlMMWt mcnI b( responsible for the nayment of all water used In i/nsii iMH'tlinttlion THK COMMISSIONBAS ol Hi %  Sul %  Inoaiv on OM montl \ olitillf '/ WO Of Holiee MbMSHne Is \uw On Sale %  W H It. Arms.* l/!hi4 ..t inn, IM "tilt. iv out, joint aMOttng of 'he various i Heal Services and the Impacter %  •' tMehnt Ment. to discu.i-cfore tak.I'rhers. [ealliig m %  1 f, and emtMHly UM I the Commissioners In tin Revolving Barbell Set Klemenlary Schools IntaMn ..f Health Of Si MhB had written to the St. Michael Commissioner* pointtliiw ,, „,,nih. MeMM u.rin oul ,nHl Wncc lhc drawim: Spring* Barbell flub. V*' 'L, ,, '* ,L F ,1" i?#i.S ), ^,2; ** %  " %  " amendment had hrei. Amendment %  HiiiKson or Let-ward Barbell Club on "I" 1 J" i I) M.*lley SJSf.i if" !" */ LV A !" ,ur Comrnlanoner. of Health Ml il did not dlractSy alX2£" l '" n, *"clation of Barvariou pariahs to w or of the amount of the wate charged In respect of the i i.spasal u: the Amateur ^S^JT^uIw^ X! UM I ill % %  pi -— ' %  '"I %  "• 'ill"lll in, .— fcrt the parish of St. Michael, ha !" but the suggestion put forward A visitor to the ulsjid. who .„.,„„, nmiwioners of St. John l^fJLi*. y f. .S u .'i Ur S2* V W **• *ooto. would necessitate i nt ^vacate that a 1 the Weightlifling to the Market and Butchers Ad. tluba in the island should try to Entire Cost ta 4 MM ',.' that the im Pr> Ihe modern revolving sets. r came from the Com... The St John i Health, he wonder,,*',"" ,, ,, or w ** tb yrv re-aflUmcd that they are still %  | .,: a matter !?,^' d -, fc 2l; " %  • reported that of the opinion that the Qoven.whuh h'.ulfl : Hi his nickel n % %  % %  !• %  IM : ChaH Mi W. W. Utrrit i Uon with .i rlrmatronaj. ap I %  tup rani nuujailna lh.it it haii !••' %  Icenx ii li tpeetoi in an liini %  othei lns l *ct,,i in i., tV .„, sxvii, i %  ^raonawrfiw rent house. '" hMX,n,e a moA ana %  %  %  nlllii CARPRNTF.R IMPROVING Tim--. M carpeniei J MM. > %  tw was admittxl to the i. i-till report) irogreat Jed and yesterday uith tht help ,rf hra %  It It : %  %  Small in connection w death ol tic %  %  i v ,i n i <>MendoiM. Clarke <>( :,. U. arbo %  ; o-m. on Ven Led adiniUed Small he %  %  b) the Thief Inspector, and direct Inatrur'lona. he twice r. .i ,. i .i f the "tufT "Iniprtiperh I.. -. ,1 I'll,.)..i.i|-h lore Of AUl %  MOT l" tile Mi.iK'1'" Arnutronu, alch was stolen from mrnt .hould bear the entire coat, between 5.0O and a „d tfaaj USerOfore wanted to pan. ori Wednesday. know il the Commi %  % %  -_ . , Michael and trie oilier bear la mind the %  "• eaaale and a Robl chain were willing to proceed with the olpn* aa r, f i 101 !" !" n " of said petition J iif Gertrude Shepherd at Reed Street. t moat '''•"'f''"*". J^tween 8.00 and ..,., B.48 p.m. on Wednesday. rib; 'he „. live mourn*, were reporte.l exeeeding the speed limit on iTednOdaj or 5m 22 traffic a the police Reports two motorists were |>( reported tor not drawing up close auch importance, and was no r in l, n i"-the side of the road, rloaply bound -h the eeoand lwo '' I,ot conforming with nnnitca of the people conce-nad. r ,r "' ,IRn -*that 11.' not . ," Immediately expreas gb par.* .•f r ton of a boardetl and bid t "'.. ho U8 al MMon HaU Sl %  would %  MUnl „' Micmiel. was burnt when a of ihe %  of fir<\';rokc out at about fl.15 p.m. trie sew: the Din Wediiegday. Tie house is the ropertr of Stanford Small of Butchers' Mil al TV-^side I'-ad St Michael and Mr. A. R Toypui expreaaed ,. wai insured. the view that the minute Gov• • • eminent decided to pay half tinnee Smith of Dr. Clarke's rates they showed a sign of weakColon) government foi U.*.*tn| the riattei. the Coniini-sioners of SV Michael it hat th< v had althe cost of supplying water in *'*"• TOT) IKirc fi\ the element.iry schools shotild ba the tola n-.|e,itiMhility of the Central Qovarnoiant. M> F "lev. however was of opinion that in as much a thev had already discussed the matter, and Government had only %  tan lit to pay half and had accordingly amended tpe Act lhat the matter should IK 1 left Over ftr a while, pending fuiIher discussion on the new Public Health Act. Polio ih an lea; "In J t wai annoui* <-.i by the i %  • %  wi broui %  l*o %  .. \ \; ,„. .1,. Ninall to .111 %  fuaed. re] %  had i-een Colonel Muih 1 vice in Ceylon in l-i' than until IDM when h diaiA §Oh ttVBAif occasion %  a on sals at ihe loading AtohsA HARRISON'S B^d n. . \\\\. Rice lne on %  NagotlaUt na an betwe< Uie m*t*er u heard the 1 ommisalonen al friiu 1 k| paaaaaiMy. aaaall <>k. .1 ii li. ..uuld a|Milu I Oment Bon V C Oala said that the from his shirt pocket at his home P-rtshe. in signing the petition. Bnau ,ly one Lj |1|||J .„ ... UM prlelb ree C ommisoneYs said that !" „,' hB '"".V, t n %  "'-", £,"£ ' Government should bear the enc , '" „.„ '^' .,.'. „ tmn full) hi. Vieof health, and had always JMsBai tire responsibility, as it was no !"!" {L "0,4^^^ for m ""' " ll.Mn;"ne^lu y st. l U "* "* 'W " !" *- "" ,,a """*' Affu ~ Woman PJaced On part of the Commissioners Health xpenses I to ba an .m.imal • to that matter. He drew attention %  •> the fact that butch%  ri wmr* era within the ,,t y i, m .ts had to l> atlbUity ol tnined a licen- from t#w ColO. B. Griffith, Acting Police Magschools were run by the Churchexpand 11 rtCt (.111.1 rraaaurx %  .. ..f Dlstrtrt "A", for woundes. and only received a grant British Gttlfl Mr. Gale Mfo pointed out ing Gloria Thomas on her neck There was at lhat lime no Eduimportaint rice 1 t>ourers at plantations on February 15. cation Department, but what was British \v. when slauuhteiing was PoUce Woman 12 Wilkinson known as the Education Hoard. „torles. ft load tool • makin ti aalary in lajeommendati i>f notice. K n ..1 Police Scenes To Uv Filmed M ia*k ..f tit.Corpora. Mi 1 Carmlchad •• Mm which OB "Satarroncd Howall who waVaVieT" Slit now lhal there was an Eclu!E > ..T! r ^I*'' '." ** m ", "'"'' oliarged wllh wounding, "lion Department, Ihe mutter larbl PoUce • 1,. mval (i| „ nn Th „„„ „, chapman Ln", -I "uppljin, water lo UM achootl ni M „ n „' l( „ r .. %  Central Pohc. to the mark*! In the city, anil s Mlr (1| ,„,,, thl eourt that ho"l"l e looked alter by OovT..,. ' I, t fS ru : 1 „ while.he „„ J her^... o„ "nmonl J.' e taken till. while she February 15 at her way on 1 bout 8 p.r the be II. later moved, seconded b> Tho Uritn.li ('.... U He favour of Ml Mot^'endant and her sister ambushed MrrA'T^opplnTuHat ^he~Comand the Colonial %  ion. ind seconded ner and ave her %  wund o* 91 missionei). of St Michael should Corporation I view of iho '"* %  The defendant hit her behind reply to the SL John Commi*decided Imw muofa path will adt %  %  thould Ixmade he f neck and she went to the sioners to the effect that \icy vance. mlal Secretar%General Hospital where she was were quite willing to sign the Meantime, the Colonial Develln Hit treated. petition. The meeting agreed U.K. Missionary Tells Of Experiences In China provatnenl and 1 p h< ien< 1 In th 1 I %  ntmenl 1 1 irong .i %  maka 1 I \ .11 IQUI unprovami 1 1 la write'I P 1 Mm it N t.u v and rial* thai th ..... -tlf-iii of 1 I If St %  1 U Tinin"%  %  i crnnii'iit ii i 1. %  Ol ... of the ') shown him when he MR. A ti CLARKE, a U.K. Missionary who has lived 111 China for over 30 years, told the Advocate yesterday Tin will ,|,]>ly 1 alaa aona k. .. travel ind iither-* which British Owai ome of hta "P^nc*l in that country, particularly JS2^rciS n ffiaW^ailffi I %  %  %  '' ounnc tho Second World War. dacoratlva daalgn and Uta Chipn-al ah ad Mr. Clarke who now resides in Bermuda for health naaa hviguaaa in addition to the reasons, is on a four months' visit to ihe British West b e I n g quartermaster t UN genie on lhal Indies conducting a series of Bible Services in the various -* ^ — ^r,.^^. SS^SSSte^-M ,, Sunday h, Mr. Cbrk. ..Id that th. camp, ,r ,, """ -""' "*** H.WIA from Antigua and 1* a college campas before the war. |i c ail ; n ,| lu; owing to Im M-I Ittd Mrs. Tred was in a ruinous state and had onerous duties of liu arlermasler r ol ai '-Henderson Lodge, tbmade habitable by the eariy hi. he^itn broka down, and he arr ^, m de mill itlo I . ,n f*. rn *** "y *•> ' cleaning the WftS „,,( Mck ^ England with m i,uDg '><• "" tor He said that when the war broke nibblsh. making roads and deanothers In a hospital ship. ,-Mlc -.^ing m^t th>i>nicnt and expansion project 1 around 13 million and brina 200.000 addl'ional acres of rice under eulUv.di..u B .11 h Oufana I 1 B8.000 am yielding un aeanaja %  f M.000 ton annually A IK^anl EXSm. SERVANT'S MQUERY AnjQUTtl\EI> Eventuiill.v it is hoped THE WORLD'S MOST POPULAR SEWING MACHINE win ia aaari gaaarfaM "i lanlai Mi aaakai 1 paifaat l.k stit.li ,in >ll milerUU Ihl.fc or lliin. m v A JOM'S 11 \\\\ 1 1 \si \ 111 1 .TIME 1 amateta arttt tVaad Otaaf •aONLY S99.16 EACH HARRISONS Hardware Store Tel. 2364. thai ii is vra Weihai In Korth China and immediately arrested by __ Speaking of his early pioneerJapaneM aendarme.. He was """'" "" •• ' !" !5 !" 5*II !" oul %  mlailonary tu ..En .0 Oieir headquarler, ^J^<^ „ £%£ £J!ZZ P'" %  '^> !" ! ** where he remained for 11 week undergoing severe grow) • :ufTered from vitamin deflclancy ^^ in ] ftl4 Mr. Clarke that he was faced with considnber of the interne*^ able difficulties and dangers ff^aeSK lontoinUt^frBch ^r" t !" m lh T S amp and a8 " connection with his work, and ..t^U th^mon^T'He was fig^ SS^X^iSS; S? "T*?* 1 '"* BS "** I o n condition of -house ^ ?i |onE d £ m 5 JV Z addSon ChinW b ndlU T ?*l . -. TI m .Tt!m.hwI tn <-nnnement to billets for He however thought that the, which he wa% sent to <""*! several weeks Chinese peasants were really a anger son for interni .enl j,,,.^^ Command nl nd 24 lr thrit%y hmblU with nearlv 2.000 jot*TT*ees. confU ,, r ^^ -r^ irt emees chiefly of Bnuan llllluni, J were however allowed to organ"Although I am not able to g" tirrat iserviee IMfor Ihe well-being of the hack to China owing to the polilThese int'-mees included many "amp and this made things rather leal situation, yet 1 have the satist to several better for them tbsn would have laclion ol kaowing that there are 1.actors and otherwise been the ease. many gifted men there to carry nuni es 1 magnificent ut the Christian work" he said. %  with a minHorrors of Camps .. They re4 Mr Clarke. • Bibk^eaclairand mjin c! for three As fa r as treatment was conAuthor, ha* a so wrtlttn books years until the war ended. ccmed. he said that there were one of which Is 'The -^alrUoal many unpleasant incidents, but Studies in the Psalms the note!, nothing comparable with the horr r which were prepared whde rors of the camps in Malaya and he was interned in China. elsewhere %  We had over S00 children in the camp, hut they did not lark sg f. aa A \f,**ttlntr education because they had 1 GXCBilSM WBBttng number of (rained teachers In1 l 11 d 1 n g university graduates WASHINGTON. Feb. 2 .imongst the internees who drew President Truman described the .i[> 1 full curriculum up to School Lisbon conference of the North te standard for the beneAtlantic Pact nations at a pren fl* of the children conference on Thursday as being an escellent meeting and He said that the Internees also successful. ors<>nUed a series of lectures for Truman said he is still peonle who were keen on getting cm the selection of an Ambassador a liberal education. Men who hsd to the Vatican but has made no experience along certain lines progress He promised corresponMtecture and engineering denls to let them know j gave lectures en the various subwhen he found a mon to take the j (c ij aaajtlea —l*T rn rheq u caa*. t. r press. RA • : Of 1 \t II \ \>.i IS" %  VMI t %  %  II* \ol;*llir Mr 0 It (irin.tli. \H|IIS Coroner \ lisiini %  WBjBjaaDj J'li.nirned ga< 0> Ihe Iniiulrt into the rlrrunisLinos ".iirrimiidiiu: Ihe drill, of :il(-*rir-old d-niirsln vervinl l.umdoUii t l.irkr of Nrw Url. in>t >li.h..l OanBgfllffSJ I lirkr B/ga .tdmilled t the l.rnrr.il BaapHal "" IVIin.r* 20 al .ihoul fild p 111 aaaTartajg frwm -.Uh woundii bat l.'Hl.. but died A Irv. minutes iflaf -hr iidmitlrd t %  he OaaaaJU. %  %  %  on Nbruary 21. told the court ->r ins and was Dal darka afho laid that 1 %  j, .-. Vaatbur) R BLMa %  .11 ^iso used to live al bat houag but ematln %  %  .' •nil. Ai-.ut u.r. pjn-on 1 m the deceased lying in a pool f .leceased was taken to the General KoapitoJ, On 1 -1 nary 21 she Idai to Df a. 8. lha General H0f| deceased was the awtl aUd unit t it f40 if 00a 1 • frSS^as ICK CREAM W SPECIAL > cm "// hf livtitfhti'ii TREASURF TetOVE Trei.urc Trove (r Irra* ure found) Is where an> cold is lound nr s|l\rr In twin, pi Ale or hullieii is found hidden in a ba—r or IffOk or riiher privale plare. If the iiwuer i unknown the treasure belonrs to the frown The flndlni sooulrt ba r--i .11 i.e. ia baa > held an innu's |g Baa, irii. an of said found are trejsure tro\ r or not. ,.nights iliwnix Soda liiniiiaiii CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STRKT Sftfcl f ##*.v#* i i: I rsoi M 45 a 3 M I IT .4tt .M .47 a &f siivs/ifw. #€OTT* 000. rm. 1



PAGE 1

I UDM I Mtl \K\ a HAKIl MIU> \iivoi All I' K.I M\TS HENRV BY CARL ANDERSON C LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS 6 GEORGE DAVIES BLJNUIt ZHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY I RY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS •'.--'. '.V ~-2 .•..,< %  ._ AH-MO*/TMAT Tk<-v ., M. : ter n i OPCOffTLHTV TO 'ELL. -^e PUBLIC WHAT I W*J"EO PINS WELL roa civc PV- vB WAMTE0 TO .TELL VOU" IT' *-A.X** <*XJ RIP KIRPV BY ALEX RAYMOND THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES NO FINER TOOTH P.STE TO Hf(P AVOID TOOTH DEC Y I. USTUINI To**h IM. i i tie-fnullwr hartrria s. it ubtfci a>n UM ..) %  .. I, %  %  out* nriMcr*. 3. li e*w) br-.pt %  icmovc m.iuil, *, |fc| Hmry Nin4bii) iiM-tusi i. A ItUtM %  IHtl U AND Ml HV YWlt H Inl fir v Made by Ihi moWr, .1 lim.,, UJTiOIN I SDMI I UMPWfS I 1 \i" %  THE FLAVOIP OF S. & S. RUM .* Ml.lil S SAMPSON ,: (1938) LID. I R*M Run. X '.*--.'.-.•-•-•A-,*,'.*.'-'-'-*-'.*.-.**.-„ %  • HURRY'HURRY! I AND SELECT THESE NOW in. x •. Tim. Morton* Oatmeal Tina i ...-11. .1 Million Tin* Itr^jhf... 1 Roll Tin* lamb Toiicur Tin* Vnl '.oaf (Imperial Vienna SaitU|rl tarn small tin. Hanibrrct-r Sleak (MiN m Parks I in* Irwl. Cocktail KIM Fruit Salad INCEA CO. KOrRI IK **T IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers lo all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only III I I US urr now uallblr < our Brrnirhm hMMHi SIM iitlillo % %  unil Swan HBMM Usually N" Tins Khm (5 lb) „ Tins Oxford Sau: age 1 '•' M (Walls) .03 .04 Pkgs. Tapioca Flakes .24 HI Bottles Cartings Beer .26 .21 srii i\i Tins Black Main Cli> '.lb Usually NOW 0.14 5.50 Currants (per Hi) .45 %  ',' %  Boneless Beef .58 .48 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i 11 1: I o 1. o \ \ .1 u 1: 1; 11 o C 1: 1111 s Y O I It II Ou By ROBERT LEIGHTON von o.v s 1// 11 A II V (MA I I S I A I I O X i; II V ("STONE, HASH'.'. GOOD WINES I.O WITH 111 %  • I.IHI.I: tvixis I'.l M IIII.AIS'—1-oul.l Til, r. Fib MM \ bat < IIXMIIIKTIN %  •— I'.uilii Pi ,, ... I Vial < II IKMI ( II \MIII KTIN l-i.ulc %  %  ft I II I'Hi. \ IIHTI.MMII III l"\l'l -limn. 11 1 Inn* n,,, I'.l I MONTOIBE BOSE"—l.mii, K.M.I.I %  SAINT .111.11 :s (I.Mi I EtekfUHi ST I MM.HIV I'lnrrl—lluiuiliiuV A I lb GOOD FOODS Will II I All II IVI MS "OBAVW— 1.. Du|Ui nu im vt.ua (IKAVFS —Mend & Fib IMI VtoUn BAftSAC-1. DwttbUt & Fib ItM VlaUujt 1 11 111 KM MILCH"— 1: ItMMi — Otmuiy — BIT. Vinlai-iWEMMI iisin.i K -No. I K.W.V South \',„, FRANSCHIIOF.K"—No 2 K.W.V Soulh M,,, Thf Best -/ ' n: all \i\Wt SPECIAL KIM I M>l II IIS Kill s llolLmd — OwiIJi PaMh, ii.,r.,., hut,.. April-,,1 KummeL I ,,.,, .,,. Triple %  *.. ( rcnu ,1


PAGE 1

I'M.I MM It BARBADOS ADVOCATE HilH \\ I I Bill MIV -"I IS.".!" I5AKBAD0S AUYOGttE PvMaj l-rltruar> 2f. IKS IIIM ir\no\ a dopatd ': Itisl. ( '..l M will ieviw what htllc interest has been shown in theae territories whenevi Bttou hM been publicly discussed. But the despatch is no to ie\iw ':i'k II If lht Wl the Secrtt.iiy %  %  Slat.for the Co lon!— would have been much more receptive of the suggestion that a conference should be held in I.ondon in June. il. |g neH %  j'jjosed to the holding of such a conference, bill hi* makes it clear that a MBA NDN in June must COOWfull] and prepared to roach agreement on a federal scheme In sufru-ient detail to enable a start to be made with the complex and lengthy process "f drafting the necessary constitutional UMtruj Hui tn*conditions proposed by Mr. LytU'l'im lot t %  conference in June n.im.'ly dial praUmliiarj work should I %  by the end of March, as B.nbados is concerned. that there will be no conference In June. • mbly has only this week been prcaantrd with the Estimates IMS-A8 and clearly it would be impossible for thai I!' DM 'in; otton from consideration of these estimates to a study of the subjects proposed by Mr. Lyttelton I London meeting can be arranged. These subjects which include study of the (in-mcial and other Implication! "I the 1 letailed examination ol tin proposal] made In the Macl^agan niy obttaele way of a June n.. K.,i h %  vii tuni-.i in the %  '. I AIII hSVfl to make up its mind i eulata (haii daeanVwai *< % oth i i :>is parUcipatimin the confarH Evdi rf Barbados could make up Us Bind by the end of March (which is impossible) there a/ouM still be delay while tl arnnv il was itudylng the dadaloni ol kdian governments. Foi theaa Ite I that there will be London m June to discuss Bul Ml I.\ Helton's despatch .i i arj aflect of bringing to the attention or the We ments what had bOW I report, that much furtlier work would be f tin' prac'iral effects of tlieir M ittom could he iuiiy %  The u-o Wi i Indian instead of Caribbean In connection with federation M i aO i' ,' %  ''' becauae tho legislature of British Guiana baa formally rejected the Ranee report and the Legislature of British Hondurai will most cartainlj reject it when it is debated in that colony. West Indian (adoration U II • -rues about will tharafora maon todaraUon of the British islands which extend from Jamaica through the Leewards and Windwards to Barbados and Trinidad. 11ns new situation has !ot !-i I %  •Liieii and so far M has not yot bean faced. Mr. Lyttelton'.s despatch will ton Indian governments to bagtn their detailed study of Customs Union and financial arrangementi tor the upkeep of %  federal state with the knowledge that neither British Guiana nor ltnti-.li Honduras will be paying one penny towards its coat Tins will have MMM boarinj on I federation. the income of which is to he derived principally from cuatornj revenue. Jamaica's proposal that a conference in London would undertake "doaa rnnakkr lapaeti of fodaratfan* 1 la therefore wlaely widened by the Secretary of State for the Colonies The delegates who gO ti< London, wlienever the conference is held, must no prepared to taachagreet %  I lederal scheme, or to reject federatl Uraly .-hould agreement not be reached. But whatever agreement is reached by Weal Indian merits can i ol) be r" ; he most exhaustive and detailed study of the costs of federation tnd the advantaj %  | would result to i I'ustoms Union. That atudy will b< iided by informed opinion and idos will have to decide for -• deration this year all those %  • lal tmowladga %  %  %  the afat I ta Union and th make good H df two world wars and to maintain and modernise her productive equipment. The question of irbettwr %  %  can apara additional resources for overseas development musl lafca into account these two ewnlial rOQU At the moment. II is by no rtatal thai Britain can export enough ,o pay her way m llie world and. at | lime, freii %  minimum .'mount of voctment Tn Bi i %  QIMB* has sjnady made swaapina cuts In <>ur import proaramrraB In an cfTort to balance our I Ihaaa cuts will shor lv bare le imatched wtth n reduction iti i. %  ii ,. also been substantially curtaile.1 In order to free material* for the export drive. But the overrldin this, as In %  • t buraan te escape %  HI tlul. il* of IVthere is lo be a surplus of capital development goods for cxi oil on a scale adequate tc Finance IhU fact %  HBlHBal l *terlwould be welcomed. Meanwhile an investigation into ihe opp.rtU'. ihe moat economic utilisation of tarnal rceources as can be applied to Common wealth %  nt is under way and Ihe official, concerned m this study have just completed their first series of talks Their discussions hai< red not only the probndau 'he pgao development, but also II boa of how far and how fast we hould proceed. It Should be rcliM-d thai economic development Is essentially a long-term pel. tesults cannot, and should not. Spray's words: "The UHBI late results, of a quick increase tpul of vital raw materials and foodstuffs, and of %  in dollar in ; msarn M new domestic produelion. mul not obscure the %  >f longer run and H DCS which prORilM rrora lha pressure of shortages, either of dollars, or materials and foodstuff* or of mamifac tires o( consumer gOO she say*, eanfllel irMIl loner run measure* which. In i mot remote future, would yield rich returns of increased productive power. This is the essence of ihi Commonwealth development problem Ulty, however. 1to aseids Aioiii iawn essential— quick returns or the long-run %  p| .il prtHocti. %  %  Uef froirj ih< besetting the sterling area may merely %  flgra%  ... %  %  %  %  j>cts might bl %  aarooa mancan naa fuitfic Son,. of die %  . '. loo, it the full Dd natural raspy %  %  %  the in' lbs coloured people I %  M th* pro! %  %  solved the present prohli I face I hi iblem ol correcting the biil'iice Ii lav uncV %  vrlllctl are the n %  Of :hc more .il 1 %  %  •vii Lnrroasaaa floe %  r i ..nil exp.i tl.eir marulactuim k n The task Ol deciding how i .Ii i ; %  %  Mm. Spr\ .for rare I ID god |Ki|itic;il The days are fOM i %  I are Faced van %  protasi i of i %  Intaraattoaal Bank for Dovalopment, for promotinjf. oireeling and con imlliiiK mvostmenl within th Common i be t W tW l I omnonwi ..ith other countries. We are fac> %  too," she s %  VMMI the fact ihsl fUb i ment mupolitical decisions; on %  i %  %  %  ifnelen limitations On frM resource* %  it purposes and which call for atreni ous em 11 %  • i mu NOR: Qpry, firmertv of the Unlventry o* Toroaio, is the wtfo of Mr uraham Bpry, Auent-Gener.il m Ixindnn Mr. Ilepulilifan AiTe|ils irumaii's 11;i re %  .'',;';.';;;"•• AMERICA'S presidential glaci-aipii swinas tnto hioh S i>ar (iltfiouph rollny ta not III! '. .s'eiinfor Hobert Ta/t -Mr Rrpubliran. and strong ntfl'i ' rou %  eeapl the dare "• ig and raising his voice, Tall replied "1 certainly do!" Ih' lepeated his statement for IIKII. .did, for good BddBd thai Truman's pOlles "could not have bean worse, and his concessions to the Communists have led %  i Into JII unnecessary Truman has pleaded that foreign policy should be kept out ii controversy to protect national security. lid Toft talked of little else all that week, In a series of ;• in lie iepe;lc-dly called for IBg to lx> taken off" Chlonj Kai-shek's Nationalist %  a, M thai they .an attack the Communists on i mainland. hritain and France could or would do nothing effective, he %  aid But the Chinese Nation'tultl and would act." Here tafl carefully announced that If he could prevent il AntOrtco would not send ground forces to Indo-Chinn, where the French face mounting Red %  A new poliry Whnt change* can be expected if Tafl becomes President? He has said he will sack—America's S ObJefl of staff, including Icncral Bradley, and bring General MacArthur pack to an Important post. This would mean reversal of America's foreign policy, as far as Asia is concerned. Although Taft haa prOCUbnstd that he favours a KUfUpaait %  my, there is no doubt thai pollej in Buropg arlll also undergo profound changes II he wins tile election. n Kepublleans take ihu Taft line. In open disagreement with him is Governor Karl W.OTCTI. i.f California, who ill hopes lo run for UM preMdcn y. Says Warren: "1 l-in if ihe U.S. were to aid Chiang, this action would be dissociated from U.N.O and th. r. f. i. %  U war alom Wayne Morse, of oa of lha moot i of ihe Republican'., i: warning: "If ihe Republicans arc manoeuvred into a postttoi that iiishlles a we will ba defeated in the is we should. ..I indicated thai they are not going to 'buy' proposals fur an all-out B %  •• ta Asia Freer hand CJenaraJ George Btratanttrei until recently commandii of ill u.N.o. air forces m Korea, taaag Of Taft and I tli .t If MacArthur ..i boon folloired latl ^prmtf uie CMaati Reds would have been defeated by now. This eatreuM vk wi>oint i* causing Truman's State Dep^jt. mcni t.i ni.ikc %  oma 0 I to meet |l accocdlngj to %  Washington report front-paged in the New York Times. The report says following actions are under active consideration by the State Department :— I. Giving the U-.S Fleet — on guard in Formosan waters—a freer hand In ioalMIC. vith ins Communist moves against the Island. At present the Meet is only supposed to deal with arb> ka presumably A freer hand would mean bombarding Red troop a CHH'I Ihi : %  Heel's orden %  .n itiek by Chiang's NaUonaltsU sgamst the Red> nland: 1 r. Ilmg Mao Tse-tung. Red China's boss, that Formosa will rSRUUri tully protected by Ihe t'S even if a Korean armistice || %  iiMieil All that — especially clause || going to be received %  itta considerable dismay hy anti-Tan. and anli-MacArthur 'Don't retreat' OWI very closely the 1 % %  b) icspeetcd Republican John Dalles in a speech he .i pnv.de group in Washington the other day. And in lies Mmm"-. 1..,-. the baart of Ana Duiic.s teiis ,oi Influential ,'t I.IIS' .luuLence thai "lo ret tea into our own shell by abancksoini oi.i .illies of ihe f i %  • would be lo co-operale \'"i per cent, with the Kremlin' 11. meal pouey. Amnica should conibal ihe Indirect aggression of the Soviet POIIUMITO by a political oflecativi %  la despots themselves." Dg that he was voicing his personal views and not those ot Truman, whose special advi on foreign affairs he is Dulles that he doubts if ihe Soviet Isadora %  rill ever veaturr "on open military conquest." raft his mind la made i will keep on with his iinv to the bitter end. that the series Of Hepubli.an presidential routs — Willkie and twice Dewey — have been because they were weak ,, me tno-i-rs." simply echoing the IXiiioei it line. An Taft is icrtainlv no little Sir Rcho. Cnicopo cablePresident Truman recently denounced "the chorus or alarmists" who -.oi America should abandon ! As the constellation "Tha Southern Cross" Is not visible In any part of Canada. I would I u could advise me as to wtaara what time II i 1 Kindly print this laforil your morning pap^r. Blncorau. A CANADIAN VISITOR. Mr C C Ikeete, Director uf 9 %  t nd Agriculture, told the Advocate yesterday that "Tba Southern Cross" can be seen in lha aauaaera sky between one and three o'clock in the morning at tins lime of tie rear. He have about 21 million inhabitants; in 1948, 25 million. Now it is being spoken of as 28 million. CEYLON'S population is increasing by nearly three per cent, each year. And the population of East Africa is reported to have increased by 115 per cent in 17 years. SOUTHERN RHODESIA'S has almost trebled itself in 40 years. BRITAIN IS THE MOST CROWDED Can these tigures be claimed as evidence of the benefits of British rule? It looks like it. For, in China, there has been little to show the population has increased on anything like the same scale. Is INDIA, with her hundreds of millions, the most crowded of the major Empire countries? No. It is Britain. There are 531 people to the square mil? here; 313 in India. Yet, in AUSTRALIA, there are only 2.8 people to the square mile: and 3.3 in Canada. In one area of the Empire—the Antarctic Dependencie-i—covering 2,647,000 square miles, there are no permanent human inhabitants. NO GREAT LOSS BY MIGRATION Our population in Britain has increased by about 4.000.000 in 20 years, roughly nine per cent. We have not lost any great number by migration. For the white population of the Empire as a whole has increased from the 70.000,000 In 1940 only to about 77.500,000—just over ten per cent, in 12 years. That means that almost seven out of every eight Empire folk are black, brown or yellow. During the 84 years of Queen Mary's lifi the Empire peoples have more than doubled. Look at these figures :— 1861 — 259 million 1871 — 283 million. 1881 — 310 million. 1891 381 million. 1901 — 400 million. By 1926. there were around 475 million and just before th e last war the figure onu thought to be about 510 million. COUNTRIES LOST AFTER THE WAR In 1945. the ligure of 550 million was being used. Then we lost Burma, Eire. Transjordan and Palestine from the family—and with them about 23 million people. Yet. here we are now with 610 million Queen Elizabeth the First, in whose reign the Empire really began, ruled over a mere four millions. One last point. The Empire is not "a quarter o( the earth's surface" as is so often declaimed. It is really not far short of a third Hut that is counting the huge area of the Antarctic Dependencies. And whether our claim to these will ever; :versally recognised is another story | ff VALOR 2 3 BURNER OIL STOVES Also Single Burner Stoves and Spare Parts for all makes. C S. PITCHER & CO. >a#t^^tcZ* art' imiilifrom >IOY4.\MI*KL IIMVS &f III Mil IH, m/i/HHw A ALL \VMM . A All IM MS ill I*O|MII;II Sh.iiL s A I Jfjbtwelgbaal DA COSTA & CO. LTD. Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR Or Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co.. Ltd.—Agents % LUNCHEON SPECIALS FIIIM Slrak Calve* Liver Mlnrrd Steak Harm in tins Be*f In imTonxue* in tinSardine* Anchovies Ai.Iiplaalo .M.i. jr..in I run Salad Manna < liuliin Red cheese Krart Cheese Carr-a Craeker* Anchor Batter I -slO-Bass's Ale Horlhincton Ale tiuhine^v Mont Toborc Beer Cold Braid Rum i*h<>t$<> i.oni* a itns § r s,., r .>#'



PAGE 1

ATTLEE ADMITS SECRET PACT WITH U.S. Facts Disclosed To Prevent Labour Split HAMIA I Vlll \lll\ % LONDON. Feb. 28. CLKMENT ATTU thai his Labour Oovernimnt hail nmil. | pact with Ihe United tu strike ;it Cornmuntgt air baaoi on ihi "far tide "i the %  %  i ur attacks The t.-rmer Prime Minister %  tcpartur.from the general poUc) ol confining the Korean Theatre of Weir." Attl**v statement issued to S reveni MI open Battl arty ranks at Churchill's disclosure ot the % %  mon* mi Tuesday. ChurehUTl revelation in anwarmonger im: ii i of the I Labourites by surprise — especlally ih lection led 11 Ml j winger Ancumi Be van. Tae 0V| when ihe Conservatives unseated the Lab.-.. four months ago. said th.n Alt: ataj Mtlee'sl then i '.mm-, misapprehension UP to tho atti-1 tude of the Labour C in regard to II | Kfl owing to th %  1 the substance of one of a series ot confidential communications on milll | i ween the Governments "( Bee 'nitcd Kingdom sli I Us ; .tm setting out Thenhad i t-i tain Ann lean quai tes %  • >.tenaton ol the I hi East by vaiious opg|*Ak)M including a naval blockade of the mainland. military operations against China and bombing of Manchurlan cities. The two Governments were oppn?t a policy. From time lo time! questions arose as to the conduct] of operation.-, in the Korean | Theatre of War and these ware the subject of correspondence. %  .-. then wag the ques-. tion of what action should be taken in the event of heavy :iii attacks being launched against the forces of tin T ..ft from bases on the far side of the Yalu Itiver. It was represented that where M this kind took place, 1 was unreason, i bl r ili.it me General should be precluded from atlack. InLabour Government agreed with this point ol Government of the United States was Informed thai in th es e elrcuaaition with His Mil). reran ant or, if DOt all"*. ith EsrlUah Liaison Officers on the spot, the General Officer Commanding should be permitted to attack those airfields from which the altacks were being launched. It was obvious there was henBO departure from the general policy of confining operationa to the K HI theatre of war." —(UP.) THE FAMILY DOCTOR In keeping with Otn | lining |or our n ble advice on subjects of importance, the \<(\o. ilt i; ed f or sum Doctor to answer iM'dical <|nrrirs. Tie Family l).,Mr will be to see any readers 'My, but you can send roar questions and mssNH will appear %  van *K In the Evening Mveeeea. re will be no charge for this medical adMce, and letters will In.treated m fee. To make abso %  re* %  out real name a Query but to write %  I. n will under Ihe pen LeIU'i .s should be addl .oe Family Dieter, e/o I hr Id \4y **•., Bridge low". ..lit: must l... niiu-c by VTedneadai weak. tr i es of replies I i medical questions arlll %  Evening Advocate. ISuns Arrive In Hong hong HONGKONG. Feb. 28. Three tired Canadian nun arrived in Hongkong by train this afternoon from Communist China, three in"" iltei then tnnl by mob in the '•People'* In Canton. They are t St. Genan 11 oterre), st Victor Tanguay) and St. Pol ( Elizabeth Rimers ILa.-t December 2, they faced a screaming mob who "convicted*' them of the manslaughter of thousands of children In the Rot) Infant Orphanage in Canton The three sister* were sentenced to be deported. Where they have been sii*ce they were sentenced ami not immediately made known. -(I'M La.*t BarriYr To Earl) Ratification Of Jai/IWal) CTOIMWASHINGTON, Feb. 20, Diplomatic and official quarters bare believe that the last barrier lo early Senate ratification of the Japanese pi has bee,, igning in Tokyo Thursday of an agreement imple-i menting a Japanese-Amencnnl pad Oaneral Omai man ,,f ;. %  .. pinion that tin must be sum the treaty tve. Otherpointed out, American remaining in Japan to Biiurd the dcforaCalOBI counto] after the treaty became i baki poaltioa The provision of the agrees blanket* aU Americ an : lor the gjeoori '-eurlly force* fl also did much to of numerous leg^alato* t, A record of the Senate Foreign Relations Coounltu the treaty reveals a number of a i %  %  what would happen if the peace treaty came into ,%  • %  war In Korea ended. I'.P. Fmm Ml IJuurlvr*; Jap Export Target Disclosed Tk>. — The Ministry of InTrade and Industry will set the nation'* export target POT the 1952-53 year at $1,570,900,000.—. according to sources %  e Mm. ureei said that the export program Is being finalised by Mm .,1 %  ),request of the Hoard. irretM agave compares with SI.4Sg.O00.O00. compile,! b> MJ PI in il* first draft program completed wimc time ago. ant program included the 12iKi.ono.l>no square loth and 1.500.000 Ions of iron and steel products. Stockholm A novel type of X-ray table, said to be the first of Its kind in the world and permitting three dimensional photographing of the heart has been designed by Dr. Oliver Axen of the fcflalfiM Qsnare! Hospital, to UOB with two Swedish %  %  .. tabsa, which will greatly faellitata the diagnosis lor oneraUng on serious cases ol congenital diseases of the heart, nee it possible to photograph from two direction* at right angles one another. Up to five picres can be taken per second tiothcHburf — A giant floating deck Wtth a length of 714 ft. and t|i a lifting capacity of '8.000 lon. has been ordei. Got h enburg; shipyard. The hew dock will be the largest in Scan* dinavli and the fifth in size in Europe, and will be capable of accommodating the tankers of 34.000-ton d.w. uow being built in Sweden. The lifting maobJncrj will provide for complete emersion of the dock, fully loaded in two h.Hirs. Wreehagm found GUAM, Feb. 28 Searchers found wreckage whiob they thmk may be part of .. li IV which exploded In flight and crashed 150 milenorthwest of r.uam Tuesday. Four of the ten men who were aboard the gunl nap Aero picked up after clinging to a life raft foi a night The fate of the other six crewmen was BOl knawq One flyer .add he peo with one of the missing men bu: the other five are believed to have been trapped in the burning plane — v.r <;-r.iians Will Take (her IfvligoluiHl Island To-titoi-rov. FIIANKFUKT. Fcl, 28 will Ukc over bond i • u .. ind Island day under promise* never to tui*n It into a sea bulwark ugainst Britain again. The rocky island for almost seven years has %  and American bombers. The las', live bombe t" shake the idle if rubble and spUidared rocks which the Island now, were by Royal Air Force bombers on Fehruary 21. A group of IR bor< t be b Ian I February 22 to prevent 2.500 : %  mi returning 1u %  i bomes before the handed intrk u. Qemsany I. The islanders together with about 1.000 German bo manned gnl I ; i an a U-boat base during World War 11 were evacuated n the island after the German v 1*45. —fJ.P. Tension Mounts As General Strike Nears f Be Tsrgatil of Uio Yachts going on th* Caribbean cruise, leavu atarbsdos to-day. Yachts Leave To-day On Caribbean Cruise TO-DAY, TWO YACHTS which have been lying in Carlisle Bay are expected to weigh anchor and start on Ihe Caribbean Yacht Cruise. The cruise is arranged by the Society of Friends of English Harbour, sponsored bv the RoyaJ Cruising Club of the United Kingdom and those sailing from here ..n M..: .1 Catheuina and Mollihawk. On:,,n will sail tomorrow. 4,000 Strike New Plans For Pact With Auslriu WASHINl N I I'lie t Dib Fian.v. sei ,ea iioli.i< %  : M, that the> are drafUng m sis for an Alggg oeslgne.1 u. end Aual >ear Status as j|, ,.e. u| .. Ttu-tlii.. detcnmnaiion u> end tin BoVtre union s nlocaade .0un Auatiian treaty in %  itatefnent rt leased m waahlngton, London Pana The UIK line.Bad not dsa aaM the 11.-1 Daava But dl| ocnath quartern indiciteii thai Wi nations slim tly will pn Muaeow in dflg4omaUi "abbreviated tree) <-in United BuraM B U 1 I rent i> ... ri BovkN < oupeUon [ttrc I ai Australia. Diploinau aald the new ippteai b would recognise thai Bovtete ware unwilbng io resunti 1 .Ik MI, .\u ;. .., it. pi. : ,., four poweik have 1M0. when nftei Ml mtlngs thoj t.lled to reach agrerrnenl cn .> i Austrian pad When Lite, q ,r I" aiticl.-, %  :. _, ., had been agretil upon Tho Ihrci I 'Austrlaiib desire to see If ed theatate or jffalnt which alioiil i rightly have ended loni: ag The three nwiliiaml fut:. bare thu aspiration. TaV M Uigently e\nniiini n IMN als so lhal the fmn powers may be enabled t • >-.\-\\ gaa 1 boulevards the most %  i protaanh bt 1 l %  boaw ii, 1.. k point In I .1 Ul 1 nt A Ruaetan ptlo) 11 few linmlti 1 1 ight i"it HI "1 %  %  landed (minting ul il Ukl II 1 idquarti n ol lltarj %  < The Bi itch of th* hannelllni Ihe 1 0 Sticking out like Hit re Ibuml 1 Iquarbn fm Mi Dft Atl.inti. to keep Ihi TO 1 Uonitig Just .1 Htlie further '1 Red pilot eeuld not the otntral Front thi* tmase* of ill md nhd jir force* set sside I lefend ti>,. land mass of Buropi hk employees staged mass demonstrations for encatetoi wage coniracu geared lo the coel of living Two rows of r,y-trnarn Ing side arms stood In front of U leailing insurann llrm on bustling ii ral > Piazza San Silvcstro while work*•• er fihnuted demands The demonstration was orderlv .md no Inclde' %  reported. Siiml.ii demonstrations were held at Milan in the north Tlic demonstration snM noisy as most at the crowd *r*n supplied with imall whistles CarabinUn quickly arrived but there were no ,ii-M.l.-I Meanwhile hesvy police guards were put around two Rome notion pl'ture houses while Communists began demonstrating RUSSELL IS CANDIDATE WASHINGTON Feb 28. Russell of Georgia announiivi Thursday that %  uiididate for !)• %  i Nomimillon. — v.r. Till': UIWIH <.o\i munists began demomtr.i'tng in ."* rf kev squares jgainst the opening m a room < %  she Hollywood Q||) |, film llommel the l>evrt f'ox"|(' ai t inri scheduled to open slmult-ncou> ., theenrei, Both theatres ,.,. from Itai'lwdon, the expected lo climax about Maud 18 In Kngli* Harbour, Antigua, anil othi-i polls of i.ill l st Vincent QrenII, IL, Dominica, i ihree-day pro ninient. which ineluil•-dress bail nt Clarence House, had been arranged to mark the occasion, but owing to court mourning fa s %  %  i King Oeorge VT slternarrange i %  iiad to be made Uaajaaj %  die w ft. keteh Mann fotlinrl.ia n ihe l.riiei, v %  if nod by Cosnd '. i Il Nicholson ami is under chai%  ',< .ml Mrs. Hnrvie f Celgary, AiiM-rta. I'ol. and Mm Haiv.e "il have .s their guests Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Roas ol Reull Bte Marie, Canada, and will IH|alnd at Martinique b) their daughter Mi Mul i| are \rtnt bombs *.„ bed for t-ssibi< —I'.P. Hollaml in 1B30. Morui which has an auxiliind electricity genbourd by an AU .-. ImIhihv Of Windsor Rot urn* Ifonw perlnl (lener.itor, Is a vert c i Her knenen e.|ul|>p.-r| wltli a deep I ii large refrigerator and the lounge i* bseutlfulb furnished Maria CatUarina wUch cvrrtea i rew of six weighs 72 tons net. %  i.i* a lieam of 19.6 ft and draw lift, of Wider. Search, %  fifSft motor sailr owned by Mr Dave Chapman 4 I %  •>. wdilch was expected lo start the rrui-e from Hsrltados will BOW i"ii the nest In Grenada, leaving here tomorrow will btthe 32ft cutter Ortffon which is owned by Mr Hai Coie Mi Cole win be aecompanled by Mr Oeorge Stoute aIdpper, Mr I/fHiard Archei as navlgatoi anil Mr Ceiald NichoK Orioom, which Is 10 § ton (Thames Register) and i will join She flei in St Vincent. She has A WELL PLACED SHOT by Disyion. Gnptre In-id* forward girti tin Uasa Ul* only goal of the match agalast Bpsrtan yesterday afUmoon—ths kick w> from a penalty award. LONDON, Feb. 2* The Duke of Wlndsoi i sad journey to thin land he once ruled and boarded ship for the lyggbj 'home" to the United Pastes He bad come here unheralded und without his wife %  ij^ht daya ago for the funeral uf hiyoung brother King George VI Re left lo dt] under Ihe same incumstanecs. His reception from |y and his immediate cifete of old friends had been a lovbut the Bntish prase d public larawti l| r „ crrw o( ^ man now llfly-wven who 18 y-.. Sher>herflin* the flee' | ago • thr King Edward VI!'. haul, 'kippered l>v Mr I —*' r • '>" Page 1 U.N. PLANES CUT BRIDGE KK.HTH ARMY H QH> feb. W UNITED NATIONS flghter-bombera maklna "i tximb count" knocked out a 250-foot bridge Ua North CentraJ Korea and damaged two othei Conununial supplv rout F.HfJ jets patrolled "M I.C Alley" A band of Communist troops attackcl South munjom under cover of'in km iv but United nul lnf.intrvmen be;it them off after a thir*.v-nuiiut<' filjht A Red i)lat*on ;irmr*d with r and small arms hit a United Nations held lull South of the it 2 10 u m. .Allied artillery was called %  Rght !x*:ian. was no significant aetivil Hhe front —U.P. COAST. GUARD I'LANEg SEKK TVO JHIPSS MIAMI. Florida. Fvb 28. United States Coast Guard 'arch planes look off at dawn t<> id Iwo cullers in searching (Ol i shi miji boal in the ill of leosdco and %  Honduran iviel in disiresa off the wealcrn 0l Cuba. The renny Hlnglr %  i ..i ool 1.1 T.iniu.i reported drirUng heipii'ssly eboul IM mil.nhn %  i K. West. Honda. ihe ; 57-frr-t Hoadurai i4rM>a eras reported bi trouble about 300 miles to the ..I Ihe SlnflefaM net. Cage :^..ii Antonio, Cuba. kutllll ICIIII leliti I i ullei AflaaaM u sree srbere tn siniirUn srei drifting sort} t i raboga %  %  %  ii thai llvof its *ix engines "were disabled The toiler Neeseaas out of St. Petersburg. Florida, win sent h Md the Tabwxa High sdad and hear} seas tha* hindered n cue operations ia niKhl were subsiding uiwi MH coast guanl said teach the iwo ships without difflrulty — tn.p.) Canada Witt iSot Aak U.S. tor Aid WASiii.Miiu:, r*b 2H It has been learned lhat Can.* to k th Btatee for any aid In 00B1 ii>K Die outbreak of foot anuth d i sease In cattle hi k.iti hewai provtni i %  %  %  direct ilnanelal %  [I to wage war on tin Ii virus. h.i. alrt-tolkilling Ii %  United Igrlcuttural i krlals said the Cai Uon {iroKi-mme will i Ol. ••< that cairti'd on I" tin ilcan Con ml kn rears Uui.nit pent ibo i* $i82.ntai : helped llaughtl —I'.P. BEAN REMOVED FROM EAR CONNECTiri'T Feb 28. %  d cub scout sh hts e. r ot a bean lhat had lo.ig.-l II bool when Ml* chums i i oped h I thougl i he ha%  %  %  I ii with a p:n ache Moscow KxfH*ctvd To Undvrminv I tshi.n Docittions Mi W. A. EVBKR MNDON. Teb 28 A hla.-t from Moscow to counteract the IjitlMin NATO "dghl be eapected at any moment Uiploni.t ,„i \I i ..Kfc inuoe.liale reaction lo i.i 1 uM aeeaataril] I account the propaganda aspect ol Iba stta limn .i. .".ill si [ai po inlily ol linden gg It. decisions by influ VlllKS TOI1AV 10 the Royal B.ink of i .inada or < %  Hi N r> Oaborni %  of the Fund] it the I Department, Hi kdge ttreel ..i...i %  I lv..u A C. ruiiiv. I.M •I A II |-|,,.ll,,, I.KI Ui a Un I. A LrMch M. M. il i I" II US Pkuie vii.iiiiii.nr.! SYDNEY. NOVA SCI HI.V Feb M %  i %  d BUb roi he Kusslans might do io t u* port In a anowstorm last night InviiiiK Ihrei things i JTaU oul of %  2 call H meellng ol Comln forn ind ofllctallj proclaim Eas 1 %  %  3 Propose unillcatmn and IIMI%  <;. man] Onb the last measure ts llkei. J change in tintuataoa — v.r. i i i Heater lotd %  i out well, as be .; %  : by poUce %  site from Wet%  • i ii i f SENIOR. SERVICE m


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EW5LX91HF_TS223S INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T16:44:23Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02822
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

I'Al.l IK ll'l ll\KH-UM>S ADVOCATE I UDA1 I I BSI \u\ H, Ml EMPIRE DEFEAT SPARTAN 1-NIL Police Bund Gonceii To-nigh I 3,000 Watch Exciting Game : WON ttu : %  ,il of the match when the two teams clashed al noon H .is the raw %  %  %  it houi Drayton did the trick K n nor* than three quartan <>f an hour b hciiinntni: f 'he Rama the crowd which numbered about queues as thi run 1 old i teams. %  %  the right arena who h id CUT : T going will right r>< >. %  I ptaj %  %  %  .itgoal and B Hie left pas* fr across, the Empire goal. bu1 Cb %  Kmpire Attack :.%  : %  launched im attB) %  %  %  full j? -5^-— • msm Agent Loses Action %  %  ion • UVt %  NUf MCI asu atca KM 4 la bv %  uxht lull. I toil took the kick .i.11 in nie no mkrtake to put hi* IM Up only %  matter of seconds ttena, the Spartan right Mil mitkleked, Douglas got Hope %  arbich miaaed the upright by in h ..-. mode a bid loi the %  but the Empire defence ..nd had the ball Aflcr during which Empire on UM on Mien lead i tougl tut (he equalize) ihi interval was mchanged After Half Time On the resu m p t ion Spartan wan tl. Ban Lei ia %  Uun fro. line lad by samuol Griffith In) d movement Referee: Mr I-.., HO Boy*' lAuh Football BJ Cacil Wot hlnga Benl return match Ol lha Ho City Division football. leaaors game wa lonteatod. St. O • Icon Page 3 %  r thi plantation he said he lold thing ron%  I HMi thai he had put mild have •ua cards on the tab*) beseri thi Knowing that De Abstu ii lhe -ixir, 1 %  \breu did n lballs. Dtanc from getting 1 ly with regard b thi Mr. Adams hud argued that BjUlta clear that De Abreu had %  ' nnuaeton, other%  %  to Pt.000 and earned thai ( Mi 1". MU he din il oi R inter %  The question is, was there a lon.ract?" His Lordship ended. brant, am* %  %  • would t'.ot son %  m • %  I!.Irdhip flnishe.l unming up, the jury del na I I 1 .1 venlic t of ludgmenl %  I TKV Bar*rdo* Pulie* rote* Band Can1 11 *l M-' 1 a clock Th cundurliM ni nr cp> r 1bakM, Mar A a c M p—oaamii i m r\ The Hn-n* Guard On p..,..!. %  I tnMm-i Ti-l 110m inw The . %  .. • I' fiMtunsnt UM pradurv 1 %  %  I —Ora 1:— HM . I...., ->,„. a.. -11 LAWS 2 3 By <*. 8. f:in>l'l\ 1 \v 1 SHAI I D^AL witfi Lewi II and II %  of players. THE MALI, ihall be spherical; the outai eiainn shall %  nd no roatafiaj ghall bi used bn UsoonatruC' which mighl i 1 >v darujpKOua to players Tho cirihall not be more than '2S inches nor h The weight of the ball at the me --hiill not b> more than 16 ounces nor 1 1 w 1 as the manufacturer* ol 1 .. thoti own %  ,( ho pun haaa that lv IW0 1 II ... %  ': %  l| tlH 11 latloi md the a 1 not during the %  1 %  % %  .11. kick .i i. awa %  blood, when HN '..lined that it waj DOl baforS .1 penalty H I I UP lound I vary during the pro ,w Rex ('.ill at the red 3—0 In O (except ulrousl rtththat h* changed hLs mind. That. he would not have offered %  ill siime. However it was a mat"1 (or them In all the evidence •hey had to take their own inler%  %  lion He said that De Abreu had alsi iocs beat goalkeepai % %  ., now I ; The second hulf found Worthn to "" lh e conaeni o( the Relei Ingi pre sum lha pme b ho their account imlin.t frfr Kiel' . th the be km in tins caaa Ii lefl th similar hinderrefi 1 %  effects. N.xt Law rv Ptayars 1 i:.mi|. %  menl. %  %  %  Mb 11 ; ; thai ti.' 11 are no pr> ix-.ither utcaa ran h : Will tin I H I ng one ..: %  si Cad] ,11,1 n .. %  third goal of (he match. tbOUl ;, %  %  %  Bi ..1 bum ol 'h,whi n 1 1 1 the Bfth goal \' [1 %  '.he Tile team St. Cecil la: Ji d T Km. ft. PhUllpi. t Hayna %  '. Ranneld 0 1 ii GrimtJ %  '' %  %  n 11 NorvUkS Worthing..: Itohimon Hal I wmg to M*l"y. Clarke. Sp I t'outeJ v l 1 ^ 1 "" r '" %  nd Ndes. Jamaica Lose .t/ Soever Again tend ocroej pan pire took 1 centroi-ni In i. grounder which i Wood h id no iifflcuU.v %  %  %  look the ball well within lha En 1 wars %  %  iin pku wai now Iran ... Bp % %  %  Bw wsei coo nothing n % % %  en .1 ire Hayni kicked to tintlith arbo pe who Wclu 'i %  WHAT'S ON TODAY (emI id Ordinary 1000 ajn. reesballi Dtvhaea i — H'ri...u I'ellege vi. Overtoil at liar. ( ollege ; 5.00 p.m DIVIMOU II — t'arllvn vn. p it o e r %  at avasSaVS Park 5.00 p.m. Division in Wssataraffi n V.Mf.C. A" at the Bay : 5.00 p.m. Foundation \s. (Umber in. re ia I Comhcrmcrr ...no pm. V.M.I'.r. 'H' v> il.i i mere Old llo Jl Beekles Koad : 5.U0 p.m Mr. A. Q. (larke. t K. Mi%  ionar>. apenks on In%  •* petleiiees o f war lime nun. ai Derralai %  ><< Cospi I H.ll ; ; no p m I i Hind ( oiuert. llaUn Koeka : S.OO p.m. Mr. miham Ca-ili lecture* On 'House lI'Mim, HrllNh tooneil %  %  11 the Recorder defence Alleviii nyrwerde Hoi rUk Squires %  cored one goal each an ired .i penalty. Mi. i Qrahara wai refi rei (l)M ike .i -in .1 eUl i %  feat and tin" %  '•" 'ape In* rarda cutpUo %  s >>owi WEATHER REPORT VI.STI:RI>AV l(.iinl.ill from tlKtrlnxUm : NU FetBl i. IM.I in for Month lo Date : .07 in. BUgkeal Fassfsaassee i h. i i % %  > %  % %  Temperature : 7s.s*r Wind \'eloeit> 'l miles per hour It.irnmrler : (H a.m.) :0.997 II p.m. i SS.9S5 CO-DAT sunrise : 6.21 a m. BeaeM .07 p.m. afoae New, rsaraarj II I i .Mm : 6.30 p.m. Illch Tide 6.31 a m 1.10 l Tide i II 14 (2) Draw long end ol tapi ihrough hoh oppoatte i. through %  nd. ol i boll No. I ontlnue lacing m til li,vl n,,!,an 1 %  double loop as shown, arid bring e oul through hnle OppoMte No '. i i.uer through hoi a %  •! Isalbei' Dp No. 5. Draw and %  I a | II i %  NBBabef ul plat-r--. played by twi .ach conaiaUng ol not %  •J-keepei On other playi imaj ruu vi nh the goal-keepei during the ui di i Hul lltUtei i:. Owed lO replace | for them to decide Though Mr. Adams had nuae i replying to Do letter concerning th. % %  might well think that II there was no cause for reply Mr. Adams had ..I tlon io GUI b .old for 1:24.000 deaplh nig said that he was not moving from £24.000 and was beeaUSS of ing that Gill could be loubted when l.i %  aid £26.000. They might fi-el that that was added on to make the ft : If they concluded thai before th seventh. De Ai-reu was in ii dui not Uvulae them to Deane Ighl lonclude thai De Abreu was deliberately trying to mislead Deane I to get him to pay a higher price for the plantation, He S.LI, I lh.it Mi vi haid that even if Do Abreu was g to do telling you 'hal it has i lot to do With Mi*. Adam> rOSS Bt tl lo mi %  .i (Tnni: dad*. Allan Joaeph I 11 I Paul i)i-i i< i. II iitl i Charles %  (Guadeloupe M i n. i Kruln (8u pervun Andre %  rp. WATER POLO MEETING TO-NIGHT %  i.i'i i %  They'll Do It Every Time ** ^T^! By Jimmy Hado | NO.MORE GREY HAIR AFRICAN MIXTURE Colours the Hur Iniuntljr. k ii . Eng. Eatd .'.-.-.'.'.'.-.-.'.-.^•.---.--•,-.'.','.','^.'.',-,','',',--',',',',-,*,','*'*',','.'.-,-,', AIM try FLEUR0IL BRIUIANTINE Mokei the fiolr soft anti gloss? Sold In 2 SUM •MILK STOV3TMANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS. VV//*VWV/W'V.WrVtW.'.'.V.V,V.



PAGE 1

lu.r six IIAKBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1*52 CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLfmoNi ?soa. DBD pm today I'" PuShl i will km IN MEMOKIAM A..d aBBg, ef home Vfriim. On fwi'i'i Cast*nevirhter... [..\. ; I. I. If" "" % %  ~ '• I • ^_ imiM.i 'y "i • dNi brl-wed falhei t'liftord St CUM Springer wriu departed tkl* "'• February a*. UP* Two year, have paar-i Md day .Mart IK* ow -e loied •*• "Bkrr. nran. The bin* srsa i itn Ih. .nock •evere. We MT*I IhouaM ih-t death a. to near M.ii..an. Uariie. Gordon **,., CBI Bler... and •< % %  H B.M %  %  ion SALE AUTOMOTIVE CAR nm n.len s t *•' •hone MM one Prelect Ford ita Morn Sedan uled ed O 4 T*MUS Apply Webat. **h"* ii 3 u an 1 M.. CM ihp %  • Far f> M. apply rV-rll Cufc..d al KIHI'AI, an Blreel St 1 U In HOUOAY ^IIIKTS •r a gay eotourlu MiiieraDle nylea. deaign. and Ojualliia* hlrta vlth RarVadna colourful acei.n d map %  apeclally THANI BROS PtHLH SALKS I *-* %  Mu.-from 5 RE \l. I STATI their IILI.MC.I m. oeen v.randah. kitchen Hia Garade. laundry. I .,i .1 Bakran r**ai k*Hi WUaade atte. Rwkl-. Hew CO, Lid thai tew II I H—t f n Mvd.r ToUeta QanaiaB. Naanow Dual CM PwpwPMPn 31.1 Ian AM H-.iii . m m < id Balha. bull'.-in Cupboaid' Oaragra. kervanU' room, anfl Garden -ell lad out wltk I oAVr C4.0BD •i.epti'd %  %  ^ l^ranyi | r) M Ima pwaaaj %  l al pablar eaeruartiti...; H. Hiah Streel Nndgem-a-n the Bl> BVto itter lor •* h n i rM te .-..I..] hauat. la the Ind Aeenw atondjag on I1J7I aquaie leat of land .nd containing Drawing and Dining Roam en the lit Boor. 3 Bedroom, up. il.iin ...I n.ual run i-ileri iFor pjagartlaw, lalf ri a ne MUa Hutaon. No. HIT CtrTTl-E. CATTOHD a C> I'I III II XOTIIIS %  l IHI I IN Till. -WHS III U %  i 1.11 more than one occasion, >ug.ested both %  i ouagn, that to 1 gOOdWlU, WaUCtl no doubt, was an eaoctitial to i i of the Colonies In the Wcgt Indies, an interchange of Militu BanQi between these iftlands on Concert-tours lid ba ideal imd welcomed by '* d lthe Public of the Colonu Captain Arnutrong alao write* i-iovernent and -lnnovaBl .mqunrter* -nd Raaj IIII i uJtB) I"'' the mnat of h llaOtwkd i" ihe liarbadc PDOM Boy*' and Girls' Club*. raofjb thr mitiaBl R T. Michel In this Colony can now boast of than 14 such Boys' Clubs scattered Ihrougliout the Island and performing excellent work in helping to train the youth of this Colony along social and democratic IIM'-. pravtwang game*. or and outdoor, rarpen• -making, gardening and of interest and to the adoleacen' %  %  pint ^ f uih who are in staving these .i honies. out of Bwef, away n .; etc and above outing to direct them HA of crime—which i* .! %  .1 oui principal dutie*—Pre%  GOVERNMENT NOTICE DEPARTMENT Or EDUCATION Tenders for the Supply of Fresh Cow's Milk to the Public Elementary Schools Tenders are invited for the supply of Frevi Cows Milk to tha Public Elementary Schools throughout the island duriag the following school terms — 1. 5th May to lit August 1B52 2. 1Mb September to 12th December 1952. 3 12th January to 10th April 1B5S. Particulars of the conditions and requirements of supplying the Milk are embodied In the Contract, copies of which are available for reference at tha Colonial Secretary's Office Persans tendering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for the due performance of the Contract. The tenders marked Ted>r for the nippiu of Fresh Cow's Afilk fo the Public Elementary Schools" must reach the Colonial Secretary"i Office not later than 12 o'clock noon on Saturday, the 15th of March. 1B52 The Government does not bind Itself to accept the lowest or any tender. lath February. 1952. 23 2.52—3n. ROYAL NF.1MERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SAlUhu HUM mnri MS HOMADK Und wbruan>. 1BSI HEReULLA. let asarch. lBBt. iHATTINokWHUJ. isth March, ISU "TWA. llet March. IBM. -MUM. TO II IMOI IH AJtB) raB.ruarv. 11*1 rtlAMABIBO *M> I" l M-K (.11*** I S PT EWT oa. SBUt rwaruarv. IBM. •< H v ITI.N csautui. iTut 'inn, IBSS. .11 I i. TO I"IMI'Mi rMOIMIII. AXO BaiTIHH OLIAMA S MONA1IU1 Ikul March, 1BS1. I I "TTH-A Ilh AprlU ISBB. • V'LINO TO TRaHIDAD AJnS f 11A( tu VI i Iir.H.Sll,lA 1SUV March, IBM. s r msBOM. son a co. Taw M V. -CACIOtX Ml CArUlU ia r a f t Carg> and 1. LurtSt and Arubo. SM Uiul Wadiwedai ITU. in.1 The M V MGNKKA .1 M cap* Cargo and Paeaenger. tar QaaniAwa, AaUgua. a*oi*ariBi. Nevia and S Kill* SaUlng rnda, Tth March IBM The M V. -CLAMA" wul aceept Cargo and P a-a ngi w lor Naaaau and Baham-. Date St wiling to Eg aagHkp] Canadian National Steamships I l.land S9M each THANI %  JTTRAW MAT* rarvo>< and color for Redroonu and tMnlng room. al... Door front Bar up Can rau be>t THANI Bra* Dial IBM ci the Court of Common Flea, by eke hpaeana—ed Cnmpany to conArm an allarallaa of the aald Conipam'* object. propaeed lo he tfle> ted 1. Special Re.oiutnn of ihe Company uaanUnously I .....a H as lassjBSpssi sv aaBsasi ..!.-Id Company held on UM jriih <1*> pi rTovembei ISSI. and anbaeQuentK unaiiin.oii.lv confirmed at an Kmraordlii.iv Cicneral Meeting of lha •ain Conipanv hrid on Die 14th U.i of Decefnber IBS1. and whW runa at lollnv. T>ial Hie pt'iviuona of Ihe Memofan dumol Aa^reapecl lo Ihe Company's obleeii m ..Itered h\ adding a paragraph to he iiumbeied irli to Clauar 3 of turh Memorandum of Aaaoriatum %  oUowing thai II Id Bay: Ml To in ..inlaid and aiipport or aid In Ihe eatabliahment and lupporl M o.%  oclationa. inatlluUoiia. ImidI M cak-Lilaled In benefit rmi-x-emplhoui .uch peraon requlrlns the -ame by . ft.llcit.ir.. Meaara. Coflle. Cat ford Co, No IT High Sweet. Ri Mgataara, on paymenl of tha regulated %  nar|e lor Ihe same run day of rapruary. IBU. ,-< iTTlf. C %  ATFtHUl Si CO Solicitor, fnr Ihe Company. th.it the aato to w tan t lick to recognise fair— ihe youth is anxious to .1 he does Is important to somebody "Too often, juvenile enme begins by the lack of re— MgtnlAiOjl in she home, the school. .\griiund and when the gal a feeling of %  %  in the child and teach him that lie Stan help others in WSJ which will bring him ap, atf. %  tfcptgsetloai J,JB lieen tipped in fav-| i.Ntructive outlets for • %  ni.-ito child." Time in Otlstr interesting i, this magaslne as well I .ittrsetlve %  ions. OFFICIAL NOTICE I'M ltA!>^ IN mi DM St OF t Bjaju I .,, Uf PtrifRVANCF. of uM KSJI, I dn heeebaeiwna havms or rLnming BB) etliiiirlgM BT iniei. -I nr anv lien Or lnc-.iMthr.aice an or arleeling live p.iperl> herenuilt.. ., i.lmiied 'the prwperly cf the dl f SBSB f I to brt.tg before me an account ef iheir cl..mui *uh iheir witneaaeo, dovumeMs and ieber. to be examined by me an an* T.ieMav or PI noon and > ocmek in ihe StaSrMPB Bl Ru ffafMraUon OfBce. Public Building.. Biidgotowr. before the Ifrth day of H %  *, ISM. m order th.H un claim, may and ranked according to Ihe nature and pen-riiY iberaoi re-pecuvelv. 'Wo auik pereort. will be prerlvided from Ihe benefit' ef any decree and be) geprteed of all claim, on or against tha natd propcm PkUnlig ntltOI. MAIXOIJW -rtTJU. aefeadaal: HE1.KN EVELYN CiKKtiLEY Kind horeln by aARFnuj> DeVii.TON iioixnm her coniUtufed attorney on record in Ihia taland. PHOPZHTY AU. THAT certain piece or parcel of hind ifUrmeilv p.m nf Ihe lands of SntrrpttM PlaalaUor,. altuate al tnl-rpri*In the parUh of ChrWt Ch. %  IsUnd containing by admeasurement t acras ilnclu.iva of a parlian of a road Ta-enW feet wlda whuh interned, the aald parcel of Lmd and run* from the l^o Road in a northarlv to southerly directioni Bulling -nd bounding on land. Of too •aiala of Ml*. Mufcy T Lucas de.eo.ed. on Und. of Jame. A Tudor, on landa of the Honourable J D. Chandler. o„ landa foimeiiv of tha e.late o* T bv.1 now of MUHaul M Bynoe on Ihe reniaiidcr of the Mid road t %  rie an laada of Mr EC la. Bn.au on lands of Mr W A Yearwood. Public Head, together wlU. lha maeauagr or dwellingh..-iae thereon and all OUVtr md buin sianding and *r— bmldiBgs and erecii %  therenaafa i Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay Mary K < V. VhSuni i, Wuiil.i' %  I.. *a as i, .,, r ii nBBM M UlllVAIrrl Tt.wi.ehend. IBM tons net. it.-it.ikMi... ra llentor. I .OBJ U • 'ajg i.-n. pat, Capt %  .i Orenai i mi T A II V.l s,r %  III rvitn HI > I H Dal .illla M %  >.... f-r W Vin. MAIL NOTICE Martin.gue. Ouad ... ai-l France by tl Colotnbie .11 be rloaed at Ihe C Poet Office a. under:— Parcel Mali at I p.., on U> i ... %  i -. ..i -i B.3B am Ul Marrh. IBU. \tTif i: 1 H-k awarded ggg BfeBBM tl,ir.C B Dept Thia PREVENT INCRUSTATION ^^ IN BOILERS WITH you CAN GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS FROM PLANTATIONS LTD THE BARGAIN HOUSE SPECIAL LINES LADIES!! FOR ART SILK in White. Pink and Blue \OW Tit. yd. SPUNS — While. Pink. Blue. Beige. Brown \ll\t UOr. vd. CHEPES. TAFFETAS. SILKS and other Quality Silks \OW HI. IHI d. COTTON VESTS .\OW 1 for SI. IHI CRINOUNE HATS Pink. Blue. White. Gold \OW Ml. I I JERSEY PETTICOATS \(IU SI. 11 each SILK PANTIES NW 2 for Sl.ll NIGHTIES (Slightly damaged) \W S2.H1 FUGI \OW Mr. INFANTS' VESTS NfMH. -J| r GIRLS' VESTS 5, PANTIES \fl\V :i for HI. ill TOWELS NOW :ilr. A !lr. 1'iieli % %  iirli Ml. FOR MEiXll 1,000 SPORT SHIRTS . siiiififs Now 2 for S I...O RIBBED VESTS :i fr s-j.oo POI.O SHIKI'S-air. A SI. 11 MH hS -• pairs for 1.1111 :io SWAN srni:i:r. Ill Al. '2702. S. .!.TM.I\.Proprietor. BOITHStOfnTD Arrlees CAM CRClSgRi^ny RODNCT" •1-ADV NtXSXlN" CAN. CRt'ISKR" -•" %  Arrteaa Arrises Arrives BarbadM aW.t.a Si. Jeka Balkfaa ,. t\ Febv M Fwby — S alarch ,. S March March 3B March II March U Marrh ..St March 34 March 1 AvrU 4 AprU T April .. I April 1 AprU — Il April IT April For further partSmlava, apply to— GARDINER LTD.—AfenU. UV& C IC G"TRANSATLANTIQUE SBIIIOIS from Southampton to Gu.drlnupe. Martinique. Barbados. Trinidad, La Oualra, Ctiraeao Ji Jamaica Prom Southampton Arrives Barbados COLOMBIE. 18th March. 1M2 31at March, 1932 .'K GRASSE" ..24th April, 1952 8th May. 1932 "COLOMBIE" ... 8th May. 1952 .. .... 21st May, 1952 'Not calling nt Guadeloupe "MUM. FROM BARBADOS TO El'ROPE rtom Barhadaa. Arrives Hautluunpton %  COLOMBIE" .... 11th April. 1952 ... 23rd April, 1952 "DE (IRASSE19th May, 1952 29th May, 1952 "COLOMBIE" .... 1st June, 1952 13th June. 1952 'Sailing direct to Southampton H. M. JONES A fO.. LIU. Agents. FYFFES LINE The T. S. S. GOLFITO will be arriving from Soutiutmplon on Sunday, 2nd March at 3 p.m. und will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same afternoon for Trinidad. There Is ample 1st Claw Accommodation available for Trinidad. Apply WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. FISHY BUSINESS You can obtain best quality . FISHING LINES <* FISHING HOOKS From CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. PIER HEAD & BROAD STREET ^•*.*.y.w.*. *^.^'>>o**>oa' >t *p p o i i s i e e i iM i i i ^^ *. > FURNITURE AUCTION WE ARE INSTRUCTED to undertake s romplete CLEARANCE SALE at %  Ml I'll BEARD S SHOWROOMS BAT STREET on Monday and Tuesday the 3rd asul tth of March sad to continue tan Wednesday U not completed. Sale tram 11 s.rw. tn 4 p.m. dslly. JOHN M. HLA1ION A CO. AI/CnONKZBS nutation BalUUu WHEN "COGNAC K MENTIONED THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HENNESSYS IS THE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS. HENNESSYS • THREE STAR &f V. S. O. P. (over 20 years) • X. O. LIQUEUR (over 40 years) STOUCS • 1YN0C LTD-4SOITS.



PAGE 1

PAC.I TWO IIAKII.UHIS ADVOCATE FRIKAV. KI.BKl WRY 29, IS52 QaJub Qcdlinq M R MIKF. HILDMBD, Tf.A %  Public Relation-" Officer. Haatfi who arrived from Bermuda on Wrdresday by TWA. it A leave for Trinidad this morning %  by mm %  Ml of lb* li>cal pint .ind I.IIIO ia anal on .1 marl loui "f the V In the pinty T.c.A pilot. Contain J K i mul hi* a-year-old son "Bobby." Mr. Mildred urmcd with n camera and 'ri-poi. took efajaiaJ picture*. Captain l*wis and hi* ton who will be remaining here until Woiines Caribbean Theitre* Limited. i utiluUc Mr. ano Mi a H . Mo arrivi %  on Wrdne*riu Mi TVvlurkalnih who la ninth Theatre* Limited. U *dav I rntMirM Ltd. Mr. an ill TV i tin I Ingh are Hotel Mr %  Otfgs, wife of Warner Brothers Represent-itivr in ine w.i arrived i n and i> a Ktiesi at the Howl Royal la Cue today. Mr. O J ronat, Onbbean [ Weatrea Com%  tao ban ror IIK "in! ii .i iiimi at the AquaU.^ Club. Also ai.i. are Mr. und Mrs, George Schwcig, who arrtk'ed on Sun.i Pictures in thr W.I. : t. arrlv* today ar.Mr. Cecil Mi.rks, repreniiativc and i Aril e ictures m the* W.I. and bin. %  rv lll be staying nl the Hotel Cables of congratulation* and betf arWwa have bam paeetvad to Caribbean Theatres Limited from the following film stars. Dorm Day, Errol Flynn. Patrice Wymore. Virginia Mav and Gem* Nel 'itii.r food hick cables have been received Bran aft ivt. r Coili. Warner ttrothers. Latin American Supervisor. Mr. Michael Havaa. R.KU. Latin American Supervisor and Mr. Albert Stelndhardi. United Artists reprcsentuUve at present in San Juan and \ Cliallrnge To The New Kli/abrlhans it) ill/. \UUIMSIHH> HIKE HII.DRU* TCA • B oficci and party viaitad it. JoanCLuirh yterd.iy Thy p*u~ at the Biui dm ovartaalong "" cntr for v to take a picture while Mr Iin duke of R-. raadUar Ixidroare Left to right ut Capt Lewi.. T V A Pilot. Mr Hildred. tta und "Bobby Lavta, Cap! L*wi* 9 y-ar old wt. their W.I. reprewnl.itive stationed In Trinidad. To-morrow Night V LSITORI to eras M .'' tut %  %  K-il WOW .... %  lub work. Mi la also l world and man) la Q S.. but \ir and Mi I Wwk-end Vi.it P ATRICK KU.AM, QWIUB "f Hal 19 toot %  aaraaaaB which arrived In niirhudo* re%  Allaiillc d hu friend Colin Muiiiiplan lo take tinSoprjnino down 1*1. I.n ..r, iin*eek-nul ofi Heron tht Bl Ian* Ooeal I'aliiik went In Ihi i In Itucktnahamshlre -Slowi School—as Iklm BtW Da.ul Niven who u it Drawmt in with (us Wife IPandllH %  •• gucrilB of Mr. ami Mrs. Ronald Tr< < ol Munn Ehiy," %  -. %  i Talk On Building be a talk tonight Bl bMO on %  U >* Mr. William Caan. MA. FCA and %  %  %  of the I but the public Bl %  %  i i.g have %  Barbados Holiday A T (fre^i m RirViiighan. • :%  I .t-Klenl ot bo b on l>i l*eter i Mi Vat % %  Vaochan Satlafuctory Progri sa C AJUB la pleased to \ i Sondj i. ... .it the t< % % %  !> %  %  • %  %  %  %  niK Qi res us all %  % %  ;,: grac l.y hr youth re* "i %  •* for gallant Mmd d> • not a liajlenge to 'l n then %  Bi %  % %  thg %  ......ffereiKC • a lack nf eonvietton and lack %  affoii' : %  itecotne faithful Kpouset The Mole's House Was Dark — With N Light, He Could See His Guest* Bg MAI 1 J:U l 'he K\ VIM' 11 llimd theSha.loi %  md th^ Vl A; • th* (alien nun Then they rapped on It arrei finally Blink) Mole -tuck >e out through a hole at the up. then rubbed Ms eyas and looked around without see anything. "Who knocked urn iny door' said, "la anybody barer W.M.. harv. BlinkyraaidKn. "Hanidand I." "Oh!" .aid Blinky Then nibbed his eyes again. "I hear your voices, but 1 can't aea you. Come in. please. It's that bright sunlight," he said the nest moment after knarf and Han id had smteeeed B inl(y MoU ., tB# front go*, rf tnemseh*es into the hale ia the ky huW€ -lump an^ were following Blinky down the narrow stain Into hit par. W "I cant aee a thing in bright 'P 3 ''B '"• ay. wbaea can I get ainlight. Ah. now I tee you!" he , Plr?" he suddenly aaked. I can l exclaimed as soon as they reached *erjr sr.ll go to tnwa in the daytime. the parlor. |>ou know, for I'd never be able to Bass* M BstaBa Uea my way arcund. And if I wait \ ,. until if. nllrtil. none .f th. .wrn m&Sf "T" ^* *'. "'* "'" 1 open." E2lir^r'.*3S! fS~ i".V ""' Knn.f end ll.nld ld .he, Bui nm ire r.n't — m ,'" M ;." %  •" %  • "" ' '" !" P 1 "" But now . can I m you eald co|orcJ ,,• „,,.„ n p ir I. >l l I u I Opening TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 >OOV,>NVVOA \\e Narc;ed.... \oNe. \oo\-at\H\Vi\t\Oj\ IHM KIWI! VAN HEFLIN wi EVUYN KEYES *.in JOHN MAXWELL KATMCRINE WARREN EMERSON TREACY lerMnplav by Huco B-i" fnjm an oogKsat story b Rebaii Thowae and Hans Wiinsim S/PTEAGLE • JOSEPH*LO r LReisasad 0u United Ar:ist An 9 P. EAGLE eKOOUCTION Hanid. Uhiiky uttered a deep gla-. f old spectacles that Ullnky %  "! be ini.> used for rtadinir, and Blinky put them on and went out into the sunlight with them, he ...aimed In delight "The^ie am dei (nl' It's jut like walking around in the middle of the night!" O I. V SI l I :h. "I'm hly, terribly sorry. It's my fault. Ereryone else seems to be i shle to enjoy the sunshine—exoept rats and owls and mice. I'm su too. But 1 Just can't i anything And it's no use trying to walk aiound and pretend you're Xxmt. Walk seeing the btrda and flowers and all _, _.. ^_ the pretty aaaatt. when you have t L They all touk a long walk -en u keep your eyes tight shut Mo, *• ">sdow. and around the Ml there', no use pretending you ear %  • P the edge*tkepaad. tfly when you cant" "J" %  "i' 1 ""' n 'SS K Uhnky sat down In a chair and "' H"id -pied a particularly^..etty %  Igbed again '.Inebell or daisy. Blinky would push %  Kht to hav. glasses." Mid •** I**" • low lo f h '' ""'. nf %  Kn^rf. and take a quick peek over "Dart iliaJli.'aaid Hanid. %  ibim at the flowers. Blinky looked puaiied. "Dar. "Rmutilul!" he -aid. Tb-n ke ulasaM? I never heard of them. Dpn In I %  < %  "1---in" i" %  < % %  they keep the Kunlight out?" %  f 1 •Thahe -abl Hanid. "I dottl Ibll at • "Well -aid Blin';y, "ihev arun might)' line. And 111 have to iret n either." fere tlOIBU the old West* *^nW most dangerous ftodmen... Sin Town's most templing , BEST Of TH£ BADMEN TECHNICOLOR "^rr5Fvsa aatflT lisS. LOVE AFFAIR' BY THE WAY . By Bkcomb., TJOW .ibout a holiiksy nlo>a-1 ytX noxl year In Lovely Perugia, including one one-course meal without wine. a>< i -r toffee, and use of hotel bedroom for sleeping. CROSSWORD i > J 1 't_' IO J u T n 1 .--. I • .:..p. i net bread, l&i (41 It TrainH >ip tl i"n It. ill (%  %  Ittl *.. tMnaar iixunu %  • mate m a itr n> u iti B I'rreeUM Uuis lo hri U>i ill i i fiom blrtd for cimoU The traveller K allowed to lake algbl clgarattea out ni England and one ho* nf mntehes fa hu personal use. The allou ti.ivcllei of C2. 14s 8d d Include coal nf |ou i Elfl vn %  Hided to Ihe cost of the UdteC as n contribution to a speel il fund for the importation of more ..,! hi '/'hi' t.ninniii h>,uili Will D H. KAHPAM KOOLH about to follow thg .iir-hustesa (whom ihe salute reader will have recognised as Dingi-Poosi on iu DM I 1 I of wind Witasfcad on his wig. blew his < kled up his left ( i roaj went Up fmtii KMUhi deted %  ire you could -.^ botl i luit been arresied and iway, The pUol with dainty allvei revoivei dinting the hack of his nock, obeyed the comi take on. itoboi ered nith the bc.uitifui baaat %  ill ugbl the pep fed into her corsage conta ganuine formulii. Knhum. qtUCfcl) , 1 is *ald i • t 15 ill i A rueai it i*i ii •tandini .il s I i PLAiT4 ""'""> wuiMH 01*1 5170 BRO%.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. FlltKlARY 29. 1932 UARBAllt U.WKAII PA Commission Agent Lose £720 Claim MAY APPEAL TO W.I. COURT AFTER HEARING the Actinic Puisne Judge. His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor'i directlagta thai it was only an honest agent who was entitled to any comm and if they fell then, iiad been a contract they would have to ask themselves whether Damian De Abreu. real estate agent, was dishonest, it took a special jury two and a half hours to return a judgment in favour ol Estwick E. Deane from whom De Abreu was claiming £720 as unpaid T MEr CONQUER PAIN SCIENTIFICALLY it f louse Pass Vddress commission. De Abreu counsel. Mr. G. H. i:-£ Hti thai he had not Adams applied fur a hUy of o\, bul II aar mater—. cution pending an appeal 10 '. eitors. Dearie's counsel were Mi t K. Waleott. QC. and Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed I Coltle. Catfoi-'i B De Abreu ell and he had agreed In that if he introd awnai or %  nlantailon who was Willing to sell and a sale resulted. he would pa> bin He cl al m ad th;.: h inen tho honour lo acluv ; Mini Up. 1 %  owlad .. CUMD relating to the new exchange ol the ,ur> K they had ^Jf"" between %  K told lo be satii tlon which he eventually bought for £24.000 and Deane owed him TOO m unpaid roramlki WM held by his counsel to a(nwd !o nlm ^ jf ^ nfl new,. ,1. %  lo garb be dishonesty, as De Abreu would n su | t n( ,,„ introdveUon of an Dow on the Address was conhaye got more commission if that owner of a plantation by De turned Tuesday night aft-1 price had been paid. Abreu. Deane made a purchase f ''*' portioned tor KM After nearly two and a half |he plantation. I leading off T. hours dt'iihcn.im:i, ln |urj reOf course, he said, if they found discussion, Mr. B \i turned to the court aj that there was no such contract, that In view of th* fact thai whether tte statement of the pr..e than tiny *ould DM debate on the Add:ess in mby De Abreu was in accordance judgment for the defendant, ruction with the dUcrlml with his duty in carrying out the Deane. contract. His Lordship toid them Before they could say ther,. ares Bill, members had prsed their Directly that WU Dot part of hll %  eontraet. Qiey had to be satiswillingness for £ %  > %  • duty. But my instruction to y,„ gad thai Uig minds of De Abreu Barbados and the Unite I Is if he gave what he k.ie U> be ahd Deane wen clear and t,she would not oppose the passing would be guilty fled asito the terms liOfuM n..„, lhe Address HVhoiied that lh5 -it.act if D A*, ..xiensi.m of the !.!•< would have *as interpreting whnt ,.„,.,, .„ ^xuu* the A cr on BarbaUofc' aldv in UM against the SemtOi Bill. M 1 i: rahaa Ml thai n Adiiii". of the sort gave some then, that Gill had all alon K menthey found That IV A(„.. u £L? I SL W J 1 ?ffi^ tioned C26.O00 as the price of tne guilry of such misconduct .. f"' jl '" %  ''' ,l,u plantation. He showed, too, that would cliscntitlo hm. of his comBu "*" Wi,s "'g 1 -";;'" "'" De Abreu had nothing to n ,.s Judgment for Deane. "me* of war thli 1 . Deane emphal.e.iiU MUd Ipal th ta avldatice QUl had told them lwk f"r protection fium the was seeing after the price himself ,hr,f %  ' %  • % %  (Uirau who put Unttad Btataa, and be wi Though De Abreu did n ""' %  ' wiling Oxn.nds gnd thai not only should they ask foft if he had lied until his (act wa Hlls bnds intd his head. It had goodwill with Barbados, blue he would not have. stravei c *" np so much as a surprise to that I;IKK1WI11 would be 1 1 from* the terms of lhe contract hlni hi t h* 1 talked of seeing parIn some tangible form to Barba 4) from pJtc I r to LONDON, reb 20 Spurred bj th-ir desire to help uiig Colonial students, voluftn with the .. r y orgardaattoM concerned nth their welfare m Lundoii's VUlg H.mmslead aiT.i has decided to ip .. v.niKrig party •• ex1 .nid and .o-t-rdinale their activOUaan to iuin .ties. %  move* on through T,us '••clsi'Hi was loachad at a sung ..t m aiiitii d Town gpoctad le H..ll_under tho rhainmanshlp 01 jin'i IV Ol % %  he BMtor yacht a wrong price, he Of dishonesty Yesterday was the fourth d.i hearing. De Abreu's counsel. Mr. n Deal Adams had urged that Deane an 1 Trie terms in their minds had to his main witness Roy Gill from bsj 1 lantlcaL whom he bought the DbntaUoi thaj BfTeed thai Ua had load Uai and De Abreu w*as contract, the question Of 1) 1 speaking the truth when he told alleacd misconduct then And Spiritual Healing tl\ K Al III \>u 1 > 11.11.,-... \ ... Mesabet %  1 %  Christ flostofi. Afossa%  " lain tl M"i., of nampstead. CounAt no time |n i :|IS Scan""or Harold .ludd It was sup%  nd WOl n,,,. she will I'orted by Mr Henry Hr'oke. of compassion than .,,. M P. for Hampstead, aim some former Oovernor Jaaui W local representative* of IM In T I lo Mco luirche-, and other Interested the First Chm BD vacht-. bodies. Uiro—*he The meeting was addressed by I uiglit. ..ml MalalSir Itonuld Adam, chairman of "Com] 11 fernaiilhe British Council and of the MV. Vincent*. Balbo 1 o nf e r anea of Voluntary SocieI'lie M ft ins on the welfare of Colonial than ordinary pity. Ml Buadanai in London, and Miss HII 1 s Hamilton and a party of M, rj Tsevelysn. Advisor u> BOOd 1 will %  raiaa MUllanbj in London preceded* (iivnada. ersity and chairman of the logs 1 Kid Mr. Castle, Whan lb* it'-: ail* int.. F.ng standing Committee of the Con"Hussar rboui %  "! Tuesday. IStti ivn ncc. NM iv it, t|, speakers stressed the need >iie to Chrtrb ling, HMS Sparrou, and in-mging the overseas student On page 867 of her Uxtlx-ik. boat w.ll be ui the HarboUI % %  into iimtact with the people Of Britain, What was wanted, they id. was that resident* should do my. n.iii to carry out draple ImmlI I 1 Christian menta of all sho %  who an encouragement of an 11.. | rlbbean Cruise i>* the 1 gpcMraad i u .. removal %  ( tin %  from Barbadw. we hecatombs of gushing theorl .• thai, provided even-llng to plan, the %  %  will U> .. %  • which are perocbei an Ull let'' .1 Siienee. , d on CANE FIRE PUT OUT ei % thing possible lo make Ihei feel .11 honaa The British Council, Sir Ronald ...led all the u B Opa ig Bo n and help it could gel in the WW* lhal ,had undertaken for BW> H)sa students. aage 365 she rtah -. if (he S ( lent. I)i*>8 Suddenly %  Contii II .. his address palterl „ V day from the pnvlOUl day. Mr, Adams reminded the |ury that tho contract wa-. if De Abreus introducing Dean someone with a plantati< %  a sale resulted, 3% commission [ would be his remuneration. dos by Amern. Ha t<],i them lhal whenthara the Add He look it that 1 not only imp<>: l i* evening about %  t a quar%  [i %  I!cane*, the pnport] .if Kit/ luce of tho itiime district. lal'Un nd Wer ac ^ ,U,t " U : deidi n g the truth or coniment. .. 1 p.,rt%. "'' '.I"'..-.'. II' iirsl dealt ith E I) Mottthe term, of lhe Add id that his and merely nt. commis— j conunlialon The Addn look ecrel bribe, coll the other party Of suth like Tb* had to prove that as a result ol the alleged IK. 1But Deane had not suffered loss. ( ,. v tvUmtm Ho -I rubrnhThe add that II th %£ aSett^il£ jury agree that Ibe agaocj ., lilX s „ proved, that this was a specific flio|1 W K hp nor contract merely to bring the parunder clreumsUince8 ^^ ties together and not to 80 through h(11<1 ;in „ f hpr| , all the stages of the contract. „ „ (VIHl|(| ^ ^ ihey would have lo Hud for ti Here a hfld'Vel^'honr\i'i>'a\le*r,' n 'JuK* baUon hvi d II other side had been unable to iinri 2 4 gbout a dairy business Deane *o keep the pence and be of good a case of a person being employed hnfl livnirtl th;il lt „..^ aboul behaviour in tho sum of £5 for to find a prospective vandof and (( irv buatneaa, but admitted that stealing doth, the proper! ON PROBATION FOR STEALING His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwvn. .1 -i pi H le of Dlstiict A", yaatarda] plaoed Chnd • De Abreu bad MM (; ") Conrhs Alley, Cil> 00 BffOextrnor; ill In.1. I one visit. \ ill vanish Into Ms native nothingness I 1 %  %  %  '. tun 1de(iniU'K conveyed In Its u"c. tola" ment of Prunltlvi anaratlni ilnnan Spiritual Healh for M rig I own Body baeh xmtendad that 1 of from the tomb through the knowour dally £"•! "' M '*" 1 %  tHaia-mant with Ktras tha ol> purpose of ciu plrit wlU II^II Manea and ni 11a 01 '' %  %  '' ""ai endowed withoul ol "$d hv spiritual m< in or by I 1 > to the Lng the sinful. ygnpturi H Udj wrttf TM %  hi %  %  lh highest human con* %  I the nerfecl man He wai discussing two of Uu 1st, tha Mi I UM divine 1. %  I I III!. || ktet, nan els. comps % % %  .use he rji ipirttual pi from (ion • rable. And Ifc mi % %  %  ., • "In Chi %  ''is, imca i. !. und In Its healing efficacy. %  inga, we are apl hlnl 1 |w niti I name anil 1 still used in Bonn Chrl I that m I Skeete. sometime beI. 1 February 11 ind I 19. Skcete told the court that ho left the cloth in Mi hOUSO sometime betv>'> n !' %  %  %  H %  %  l| February 19 and when he wanted iZL£r,£. rtleV !"" atkr 1 Dei,nr lf h0 "produced „ nP rminrt ,hat it WI t il \\ "uSS i the I le m V,' l T noa ?' lh -," 1 r ,a li, ,n The defendant .. l i as there was the saie. ,„ ^ am B Slll n u i u (l l( nc h.iP with him *.-inU.,l to Ins com,i...,i-i .^-.. t i~ ...i L _^ ; .. L same nouse wiin ruin. he quoted a case to bear "id hll (),.„. had bean this telephi submission that that v. $ not unca |j Thl p> ,,;,, h| _,. usual. was interested ID a plantati He said that even if another x,,,., ^th agreed lhal agent came along afterwards—or juuscqucn' conversation.s. as in that case a solicitor— and ,,,. Abreu s ,d |hll in Hie I finished the contract. De Abreu conversation over the teleph would ban dona what b ... he mtroduced „ out to do, introduce And as soon as there he would be entitled to Ins comWould pny him in() h( ^ id np mission. would. De Abrru had sought to So strong was the authority. M ,,,nihni the alleged arrangesaid, that it was shown that m „.,-,,;,, ,„ U) ^ c dunni the mwth of February ha after dismissal, lhe agent could A lirn K liad mC nti-,ed ami !" med It t" hi. < collect his commission. Deane s w hi c h Deane enquii-d aHer. evidence was ir. clTecl that De thougli in that saw nc would Abreu was his agent and he had hilvo ,,„, commission from the fired him. but his holding I there had been fraud when he A1I t i, nl none, how had not suffered loss, did not ^pd. u. Abreu said that Deane excuse him from paying commisn<1( | told him he had olfered sion. It was essential that the £ 18,000 for Lodge gnd DagfM means used should successfully denied making the off.deceive. m of Ixxlgi* confirmed thai meaning tl led. or the Messiah. Originally, tl was referred to as Jesus, the Christ, but %  1 j1. doing nothing %  filing all %  sling the sii i %  a 1 ...., Bar; ough dlvln. 1 .1 .:iii'. from it %  %  1 1.1 •tudy of 1 -is that you and I. in • r.i : ih. I %  Joseph Blackman. ,,f Checker Hall. St while iieing taken to the C.en•ral Hospital yesterday by the S ilica van It was leai acknian had visited pie in 11.--Hand and was wait,ug for the bus to t..ke him home mm he fell ill. Hii body was taken la the public mortuary. ARE "NERVES" A SIGN YOU'RE GROWING OLD? %  approacBN %  Lf I %  "' Mga ol age it banana laT. ,.-f vi.m y cry %  R/,— ill 111'.' Gill said that sometime ago Rkeete gave hiin the cloth and Boys' Cluba Get Advisory Committee An Advisory Committee f the Committee o' Management the Barbados I Clubs has been formed Tl Committee will I ing at the office of Cent 1 or ixJdgc eonnrmed that evidence. ".,-,, „ vnu^ ?Then eomethe mie.i, %  4 1 • iV ^ hl /^JT'i he if they believed rTrmer and be. Station, this morning. Oftrn as a womaa artrtnssBaaarn %  lie accept • thi* Hut why kt yon 11 11 iln*D —or so mt wiihirtit omunr-alaa. For nearly hfiy yaars %  * %  wmir-n have l-*n mrHiag lam %  -.M...-. aappsiy by acrJag plenty d HS f fresh Bfej wtioirsosaB {.1 and t>y taloag Dr. Chase I N^rV'1'.-irlIolHiil.flliemup. Kor rii. %  ,,., hi, taai %  •J OWW r.r^.lo.1 HHH-ILIin thtusw-*ss*ad tm.c help baud op y>ur vMsaiy and -id tti tuning op the enUr%  y^leni w.youianUcthelutare wilhrunhdrncr. i.iv. Dr. t %  Haas's Nome rood a thajice to help I-11W1 nervous fears and rloubti ll helpyou ns "Ur t'tMae" •rlbr „ yvui JH ai 'i BHW; r CMO %  PhanacMln, Cafairw. Acatyluilcytk Add—v>d QOININI. Thaaa (oar adsaoncsllr balsnosd. work r/rargi0ally—(hat a why n pain (an. rattora your ana of wall-hatng I IbwaloxnadbyDocton! Orsr 12.000 doctors ana dentists r in Gran Britain alona use It (n thalr largarles Frrars, csMda. haaOachai. toothacha, rhaumatlim. nauralgU—^hls woadarad aaw saacHk hrlnp you smailngty qukk rallaf from ail of thorn I Bna "" %  • Too can buy it 155^57 Ir. two-tablet an.aiapai•nou|h to bring ipiKli rslial from a bout of pain Or In handy lO-tabU* 1 boxat. Or In SO-tsblet bottles—*••• ana of thcte m j-our houta. ARM roiiRseiF ACAIHST PAH BET %  AMACIH' TODAY! MM H *MI t*if trt W.i UTM. --'-' L On children's cuts, scratches and abrasions use 'DETTOL' IHI MODIIN ANTI5IPIIC S.i \ D I'MV DOI "If you're on your back And can't get a nap Through a pain in the back, Use FIERY JACK, It'll never come back." On Salt at alt leading Chemists They would remember the let. ter De Abreu wrote Deane, he said. They would remember he Uavad that De Abreu was not told him he could Inqulri from speaking the truth, thr-v would (hat of Hj owner. ''.ill if he doubted him. Would have eause to look al the rr-rt Deane had given n nuft *iifTer he hove told him to cimuire from of his evMance rerj carefull) ent version .f the meetiBf. H 'lill if Gill had not in f;ict told At | meeting between them on said he told De Abreu th him £28.000'' Was he a lunatic? August 6\ De Abreu called Roy he could do anything, he had t It was not material to De Gill's name, mentioned %  price and know that the person was workln Abreu's case whether Roy Gill other particulars about a plant afor a commission for thi via spealfng the truth. Gill havUon. but did not call it* name or #> On page II I'M MAKING A CLEAN SWEEP OF MY TROUBLESI'VK BANISHED THE BI.L'ES AND AI.I MY NEKVE MISERIES Wllll NUTR0PH0S Why (eel depressed, irritable and generally oul of sorts when you ran gel relief with NITROPIIOS—it's marvellous for all nerve troubles Vou Eat Well. Sleep Well. Feel Well When You Take KUTROPHOS. J STOKES a BYNOt ITO -*"•"*<-* NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring and Summer Catalog offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY —at the lowest prices anywhere Join the aaaUioi hop bvmjil dm,*I olor filled National HCIIJI leas Catalog. Select from %  lit style* r.J hnev home item* . all %  .c< t aA vingi Ever)-1 beex**r.Iy** pictured and described. • you ace not pleajcd NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Sm lim.l Sovt MMeyl ""J^" I • %  I ION >l III I HI %  *' .!!.. M... B„,W.-, B K.im art 9. Mo. • lira* rTrtTir I'm M**ryl4i.*r to'if. KEEP YOUR HOME AS CLEA %  I JHIO. He Building Kantat Oly 9, Mil.ourlWITH WHISTLE PRODUCTS WHISTLE AI.IMINHM (I.I.1MK .. CARPET, UPHOl.sTEltv t LSANBB ., FURNITURE CBBA* .. HAND SOAP LAVATORY (I.I AM II .. RED TILE POLISH ., SUGAR SOAP „ WAX POLISH .. WINDOW CLEANER MANNING & CO.. LTIi.—^ne. %  !!






—_—_
FRIDAY, ESBRUARY 29, 1952

RET PACT WITH USS.

Tension Mounts As
General Strike Nears

} oi TUNIS, Feb. 28.
WITH A NATIONWIDE twenty-four hour general
New Plans For strike scheduled to start Friday, tension mounted in









ESTABLISHED 1895

ATTLEE ADMITS SE

Facts Disclosed To | oo". ans
Prevent Labour Split

: LONDON, Feb. 28. ~~;
CLEMENT ATTLEE admitted that his Labour Gov-| /70m Al Quarters:

















































ernment had_made a secret Pact with the United States |~~ Tunisia as numerous sabotage actions were reported.
to strike at Communist air bases on the “far side of the J KE | P; t Witl The strike appeal was issued Wednesday night by
Yalu River” in the event of heavy air attacks on U.N. | ap xport | ac wn workers and the Merchants Union in § ort of cafe own-
forces in Korea. The former Prime Minister insisted, ‘ + ers who pulled down shutters yesterday protesting against
however, this meant “no departure from the general policy 7 arget } Austria French measures taken to shut six bars in Tunis.
of confining operations to the Korean Theatre of War.” A ritie aid on Thursday
i sale i. Se cle e j i . > the ceived reports of sabotage
Attlee’s statement issued’ to | Disclosed ’ im foe ae Feb. 28 Joris nvi es Makar A Kessera in the west
newsmen was seen as a move to| |. } 1e United States, Britain and t : er gion of Tun here 16
prevent an open split in Labour THE FAMILY | France, served notice on Moscow telegraph poles were felled during
Party ranks after Prime Min ster } Tokyo — The Ministry of In- that they are drafting new propo the night by sitator
Churchill’s disclosure of the! DOCTOR ternational Trade and Industry }als for an Austrian peace treaty ttae Railway workers near Ferry-
agreement in the House of Com- will set the nation’s export target ‘designed to end Austria’s eight lle discovered this morning 17
mons on Tuesday In keeping with our policy for the 195 3 year at $1,570,- year status as an occupied nation PARIS. Feb. 28 |+ or lway tracks burned
yt z of obtaining for our readers 000,000.—, according to sources The three powers expressed ne\ Ihe city of light twice occupied] .A metal box packed with high
Cc hurchill’s revelation — in an-| the best possible advice on close to the MITT. determination to end the Soviet} in modern war but never seri-| explosive vas found early this
| owe to “warmongering” charges | subjects of importance, the al Union's blockade against thejously damaged, tinds it broad} morning in front of the home of
| against him caught some of the Advocate have arranged for The sources said that the ex- Austrian treaty in a statement re-} boulevards the most attractive;the French Commander of troop:
Labourites by surprise — espec- a practising Doctor to answer port pr ogram is being finalised by leased in Washington, London]atomic target in Western Europe | in Tuni
ially the faction led by left] reader's medical queries. the MITI at the request of the | Paris. and probably the easiest ma \ Tur e tadiitin a
winger Aneurin Bevan. : The Family Doctor will be Economic Stabilization Board. The Big Three did not discldse] City to bomb. taxi by police last night because
a ; ‘ { n > 2s nthe 4 2 7 Best check point in Europe,”|he was carry 1 revolver with
The Prime Minister who took|| Unable to see any readers The. curr bs the next move. But diplomatic '
{ sonally en ? ares , W J > } 2 i i }one vent yun 2 the elip
over when the Conservatives un-,| Persenally, but you can send with ‘$1 468 000,000". co ho aton | quarters indicated that Western] “#5 & United State ' gl an Sjone sy round in the clip.
seated the Labour Government,} him. your questions and ||, MITT in its deat eae by nations shortly will propose — to} Comment _ Russian pilot cout | “we
four months ago, said that Att-'| “e answers will appear gram’ completed SS eee wee Moscow in diplomatic notes aa{SPo! |! sid "Elser a ae 'He | a a ten Oe oc
len’s) agreement. ‘wes dnada last every weex in the Evening ‘ . pleted some time ago. “abbreviated treat’ to remove Genera sen lowe! s ea | Be b d S rt
May. 1 Advocate. . te present program included the United States, British, French and RRIRENGTS Shar: OOF 2 BBG a troados Scouts
Here is the text of Attlee’s{| | There will be no charge |}©XPt of 1,200,000,000 square Soviet occupation forces from) 2!0"8 the broad landed highwa; | °
statement: “As there is some,! for this medical advice, and yards of cotton cloth and 1,500,- Australia, ee a 2S Eee ot ares Us For Jamaica
misapprehension as to the atti-j letters will be treated in 000 tons of iron and steel pro- Diplomats said the new approach ao headquarters of “iy ;
tude of the Labour Government confidence, To make abso ducts, would recognize that Soviets were a lie a coarey Manes tegt 7 His Excellency the Governor
: tiated’ Piva ; ely sur hn eel ; ' supplies to rearm Eure gion
in regard to the Korean war, lutely sure you are asked Stockholm — A novel type of unwilling to resume roundtabie] ‘phe Branch of the aro wweney | Will inspect the Barbados con-
owing to the disclosure by the net to sign your real name om 5 D i 3 A . oo ea ’ linuent of scouts for the Carib-
; X-ray table, said to be the first talks on Austria, Deputies of th@ychannelling the same supplies t , . r the Carib
Prime Minister of the substance to your query but to write tea Led 2 e or ave %t sincelm. ; rm PI bean Jamboree at _ Governme
: i , : of its kind in the world and four powers have not met since} pPyrance ment
of one of a series of confidential under a pen name. The || Ditting three « di en 1950, when after 258 meetings the And sticking out like the | House this afternoon
communications on military op- answer to the question will an i ree ~ dimensional photo- failed to reach agreement ‘on an a bial “ abt it Af Fines The contingent unde Major
erations in Korea exchanged be- ppear under the pen name graphing of the heart, has been Austrian pact. When they quit SMS hes we Sump Wie Dron ys 8. "Gritith Islan ommis
tween the Governments of the Letters should be addressed designed by Dr, Oliver Axen of 48 articles of the 58 article treaty ote i ee Lisbon ‘Anant! | sioner will leave for Jamaica early
United Kingdom and the United to The Family Doctor, c/o || the Malmo General Hospital, in had been agreed ‘upon { States, I am setting out the, facts. te Editor Advocate, Bridge- oe with two Swedish The three power statement said. | Pact functioning " : ne | With only a few more days to
own, ¢ reac’ 5 engineers 4 . y ; . q * . ance the
' There had been pressure in nae a aoa ao me ‘Austrians desire to see terminut-| Just a little further down the| 8° po Ma ma eee the tour
certain American quarters for ex- Weak, eGnesday eacn The new table, which will great- ed the state of affairs which should}line a Red pilot could spot tha Dasteitas's inettint: dd 7.
tension of the war,in the Far he first series of replies ly a eg the diagnosis for 4, . , sg Seca see
“East by various operations in- to medical | 5 ‘ operating on serious cases of con- .
: o al questio : r : is § t . ort
cluding a naval blockade of the scoeay 4h eee genital diseases of the heart, this aspiration. They are therefore] land abd air forces set aside t eat ae ee soPHor ee for
mainland, military operations Canine Advocates. y’s makes it possible to photograph urgently examining new propos-|defend the land mass of Europe! “gen YOURS TODAY
against China and bombing of . from two directions at right angles - = als so that the four powers may be] > like sitting ducks at Fontaine- 11. the Royal Bank of Canada or
* Lae nie > F as ‘ ‘ a ‘ 9 j ladua “i . es E een
Manchurian cities. The two Gov- to one another. Up to five pic-| Simuman Ciaiminema the Mrgest of the Yachts going on the Carib. |@Mabled to fulfill their pledge} bleau—t Pe to Mr. N. D. Osborne (treasurer
. be opposed to such; i st B . + tures can be taken per second. bean cruise, leaves Barbados to-day. made in the 1943 Moscow declara- “ of the Fund) at the Income Tax
a policy. rom time to time arrier oO . ; —s o - - tion to restore to AuStria full Me Department, Bridge Street
questions arose as to the conduct | Gothenburg — A giant floating freedom and independence, WEO8SCOW Expected went saevin Iy one

—UP.

edged $394 00

To Undermine | "3.8% i.

Evans & Co 10 00

~ ‘ . . ae Wm. Fogarty’s Ltd 20 00
COAST, GUARD | Lisbon Decisions , * 6°
Anon

BR . RYS! Mr. 1... A. ipneisor
y W. A. RYSER Col, A. H. Campbell



the subject of correspondence, tons has been ordered by a

P ry
“Among them was the ques- Of Jap Creaty Gone Gothenburg shipyard. The new

Y jock will be the largest in Scans e A ae
tion of what action should bal WASHINGTON, F ‘ ; ; ‘
ner: , 4 aha \ , Feb, 28. |dinavia and the fifth in size in =
taken "in the event at Reavy lt! ipiomatic and oma guarters| Europe: aad wail “Be capa | Se can Uruise
the forces of the United Nations here believe that the last barrier|accommodating the tankers of

f erations i the Korean ‘ > acge * dock with a length of 714 ft. and .
Theatre of War aid these a Early Ratification with a lifting capacity. of 28,000 ) achts | .eecave 1] o-day

s

PLANES SEEK

SeStua
S8esesse



5 i . ; ‘ ‘ YW s . LONDON, Feb. 28. B'dos Youth Movement
by aircraft from bases on the fe early Senate ratification of the|34,000-ton d.w. now being built TO-DAY, TWO YACHTS which have been lying mn LWO SHIPS A blast from Moscow to coun- Mi. “& Sirs a ao BS
far side of the Yalu River. It|J@P@nese peace treaty has been|in Sweden. The lifting machinery] Carlisle Bay are expected to weigh anchor and start on 5 ; teract the Lisbon NATO decisions} Mr & Mrs 8. H. Dasliesh 5
was represented that where eee ~ signing in Tokyo | will provide for complete emer- the Caribbean Yacht Cruise. The cruise is arranged by Gained de ee ee ralghs be eapeced a any moment r C. J. Dunean 10 00
} attacks of this kind took place,! ouing? O° 4 a Pee imple-'sion of the dock, fully loaded, in the Society of Friends of English Harbour, sponsored by | search planes took off a Ante tn con's hmaas ee en 5H Total $501.00
it was unreasonable that the g a Japanese-American| two hours the Royal Cruising Club of the United Kingdom, and those |: cutt rehii bon Scesartint Rae. ints

bs : a bilateral securit ac
General Officer Commanding F curity pact. tag J
should be precluded. from attack-; General Omar Brad] ; . auat pane sailing from here are Maria Catharina and Mollihawk.
ing these airfields. The Labour! pan Aa hile Noted Chiet. pane * Germans Will Cake Origon will sail tomorrow. ‘

Government agreed with this @xpressed the opinion hat at ie Starting from Barbados, the
point of view and the Govern- P

. ye : :
sreeme » » cruise is expected to climax about
ment of the United States was agreement must be signed before! Ove r Heligoland 4 000 Strike Mareh 18 in English Harbour,
9 /

aid two cutters in searching for|bon would necessarily take into
a disabled shrimp boat in the/ account the propaganda aspect of
Gulf of Mexico and a Honduran|the situation as well as its possi-

»
Plane Abandoned
vessel in distress off the western | bility of undermining the Lisbon |
tip of Cuba, The Penny Single-| decisions by influencing the alti-| SYDNEY, NOVA SCOTIA, Feb. 28
















le tn have ended long ago. The} headquarters of Bisenhower’ dene : 7
| Governments fully share] central front—the bosses of al!| Siderably to the total but there
|
|









China, three months after their| ss gether with about 1,000 German tion picture houses while Com-
trial by mob in the “People’s Basu GUAM, Feb, 28.
Tribunal” in Canton, They are}, ea iy found wreckage which | guns and ran a U-boat base during|key squares against the opening
sisters of St. Gerian (Imelda La-|°" y think may be part of a B.29 World War If were evacuated/this afternoon of the Hollywood
pierre), St. Victor (Germaine|Which exploded in flight and



soldiers who manned anti-aircraft|munists began demonstrating in

Mand Maclaren and her DUS) Canada Will Not
ante As Homans in 1930, Maria Ask U.S. For Aid



maker of history

from the island after the German|film: “Rommel the Desert Fox’

the t : pa ‘ shrimp boat out of Tampa,/tude - a West meen and Eighteen men parachuted from
: iain ; sse circum-| Ue teaty became effective, Other ri Antigua, and other ports of call|Fiorida, was reported drifting | French arliaments. They said | United States air force trans-
aaouer Fin sceutitanien: tin wise he pointed out, American | island l'o-miorrow iwi include St. Vincent, Gren-|helplessly about 150 miles west{the Russians might do any of the | port in a snowstorm last night
His Majesty’s Government or, if {97S remaining in Japan to] Fe ROME, Feb. 28. / ada, Carriacou and Bequia in the of Key West, Florida. following three things ., | Captain Robert J. Hesler told
time did not allow, with British '@UÂ¥@rd the defenceless country FRANKFURT, Feb. 28. Italian Carabinieri and riot |Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, The 157-foot Honduran moto 1. Walk out of the United Na , hewamen it turned out well, as he
Liaison Officers on the spot, the #fter the treaty became effective,; German authorities will take/squads were called out in force, Martinique and Gaudeloupe. In| Vessel Taboga was reported injtions. : . p ANE CAV om the gasoline short
General Officer Commanding would be in a shaky position, The|over bomb torn Helipoland IslandJwhen 4,000 insurance company |Antigua a three-day programme trouble about 200 miles to the} 2. Call iff i e ae ane, ¥ ted in a Sydney hotel
I should be permitted to attack Provision of the agreement which|on Saturday under promises never]eMployees staged mass demonstra- j of entertainment, which includ- Southwest of the Singleton nea fae and of is y Pee alm - é 18 re picked up, by police
i those airfields from which the blankets all American forces in|to turn it into a sea bulwark] tions for escalator wage con-'¢d a fancy-dress ball at Clarence Cane San. Antonio, Cubs, | 3. Pro nae tnthaution 6nd oe | a i fone aa ene weet.
} attacks were being launched. It Korea under the general category |@gainst Britain again. The rocky] ‘acts geared to the cost of living House, had been arranged to rhe coast guard rescue centre t lization of terme ee lover Ficl i'M ar te t ee
} was obvious there was here no,0f U.S. security forces for Japan,| island for almost seven years has]. Two rows of carabinieri carry-}ark the occasion, but owing to here expected the cutter Ariadne Pty the ‘ sak measure ia likely | Tot es ; vie te A, ee te aren
I departure from the general policy also did much to quiet misgivings | been a practice target for Britishl ing side arms stood in front of the,| court mourning for His Late Ma- to reach the area where th *lto- bring iny “real ‘chanas in the thea nt ins ; a Sian "Tea ‘ ie
f of confining operations to the|of numerous legislators. and American bombers, The last /!eading insurance firm on bustling|Jesty King George VI, alterna- Singleton was drifting early to | iitite tian . ” P eet P ta Bes Ads ts UP ta tn
} Korean theatre of war.” live bombs to shake the pile sf |Piazza San Silvestro while work- tive arrangements have’ had to |day The Taboga, converted in. | 5!Ua . porte: eee y eV .
—(UP.)| A record of the Senate Foreign} rubble and splintered rocks which |&?S,Shouted demands be made fantry landing craft, radioed the| — Sibi seelidlliieipsnbiincndngi aidhanail ‘ ‘cau
{ ' Relations Committee’s hearings on| covers the {eta nice: aa} The demonstration was orderly Largest coast guard yesterday that five = 5 “
' | the treaty reveals a number of' dropped by ‘Royal he Force | however and no incidents were Of the entrants the 90 ft. ketch of its six engines “were disabled ~ yy =
t 7: j Congressmen are concerned over| bombers on February 21 reported. : M@ria Catharina is the. largest.| p, ae cutter. Nemaele eee \ Sebel /g-
} Nuns Arrive what would happen if the peace ' , ln Punller demonstrations “are She is owned by Comdr.. V. E. cee. Sean was sent to © ey So Erste .
' F treaty came into effect before the A group of 18 bored German aaiie sbtaetnne oil mle .. aaa B. Nicholson and is under char- |* High inde ahd heavy seas that ©
i In Hong Kong ee a a ee UP cscs: a veal ae oe of the crowd were supplied with | eet acor, Be Fry os hindered rescue operations las HH. walio
HONGKONG, Feb. 28 : : 4 Kale teasitiare ane eaakiae ta small whistles Carabinieri quick- Canada. Col aa Ta Warvia night were subsiding and the )
r i, ob. 28. ‘ Slo I! t ar > wy. » a . @ mete. « "aT ‘ * arta — + -
Three tired Canadian nuns their former homes before the eee en ee es will have as their guests Mr, and cere rece a 7 : erence V I SCO u N T N E LSO N
j arrive 5 g r tre | oF 7 sla ; he 1d back to Germany Fon seeal : _jc!Mrs. Kenneth Ross of Sault, Ste, }'°°*" ships without diff- | 4
arrived in Hongkong s by train | W reckage Found island i handed J Gerr ) Meanwhile heavy police guards Marie, Canada, and will be join culty —(U.P.) . | re y
| this afternoon from Communist} on March 1. The islanders to-|were put around two Rome mo- od Tat Saslinicti Sy thaty daunted ( peatonot naval ivelebiicn:
; |
| |
|



has an auxili-



























i a Bee os eee oc {crashed 150 miles northwest of]. 0 > f sche > mn si ane i
aunuey? ee Oe teen | Catt Tuesday urrender in May 1945, as ee ee Both theatres '@"Â¥, aoe, a sory gene WASHINGTON, Feb. 28
| x s ; 3 —U.P. é , 8. ; erated on board by an as Im- . 7 » £eD. «
| faced a screaming mob who! Four of the ten men who were are being searched for a perial Generator, is a very com-] , !t has been learned that Cana
i ema ami oa Sate man~ | aboard the giant craft were picked bambs ~"" | fortable yacht, Her kitchen is fs ae ne plan to ask th
i slaughter ° thousands up after clinging to a life raft for equipped with a deep-freeze and|V"'ted States for any aid in com-|
| Soe in oe an Infant Or-| g night. The fate of the other six RUSSELL IS CANDIDATE in a large refrigerator and the|bating the outbreak of foot an
hanage in Canton. cre . as , cr 3 s ‘ » is beauti she mouth disease rattle herds of}
Dain thee tastady: Werk gen-} ere we te Known wasnincTon, Feb. 28. | Dutke Of Windsor |\nunge is beautifully furnished, | mouth disease in cattle herds. 0 |
tenced to be deported. Where | One flyer said \he parachuted} Senator Richard tussell of crew of six weighs 72 tons net,jat the Canadian Embassy here saix
j they have been since they were} with one of the missing men but}Georgia announced Thursday that Returns Home has a beam of 19.6 ft. and draws]|their Government feels it is able
} sentenced was not immediately | the other five are believed to have}he is a candidate for Democratte lift. of water. to handle the outbreak effectivels
made known. been trapped in the burning plane.}P:esidential Nomination LONDON, Feb, 28. Search, a 55ft. motor sailer|without direct financial nid from
—(U.P.) —UP. —UP. The Duke of Windsor ended his}owned by Mr / Dave Chapman ]the United States,
in —_——- — ' : sad journey to this land he once|of Chicago, Which was expected They pointed out that Canad
ri 4 y fume tan ‘ ruled and boarded ship for thejto start the eruise from Barba-]jc peiter e sd’ the oe
IME WINNING GOAL lonely ‘voyage “home” to the|dos will now Join the feet taj. better equipped than Mexico
United States. He had come here|Grenada, Leaving here tomor-|ujpi. | Pr
—unheralded and without his wife|Tow will be the 32ft cutter Canada has sicnade teen |
|—eight days ago for the funeral of ae a ia owned by Mr. liiiing infected animals Un ited
Po other King George|Hal Cole r, Cole will be ac-}o. 3° a ae eee
i young brother B core® companied by Mr, George Stoute oan 1 ee tcagalewne ye
; \ re , = as skipper, Mr Leonard Archer J Clais Said we anadia eradi-
fy, oy oa a “se foe oa as navigator and Mr Gerald |C@Uon programme will be con
| circumstances. is eel 4..!Nichols. Origon, which is 10.8]4uc‘ed along the same linc t
| his family and his ta me lov. |ton (Thames Register) and is|that carried on by the joint U
jcle of old friends had en v= | equipped with wireless, will join}]Mexican Commission during ;
jing one but the British a a jthe fleet in St. Vincent, She has}pas) five years. During that time|
' public largely ignored the Gras ria crew of one. the U.S, has spent about $122,000,-
man now fifty-seven who 15 Meritt Shepherding the fleet is Molli-]000 and helped slaughter abo
ago was their King Edward Sg hore ee by Mr, Desmond ]1,00).000 animals —UP
| —U-P. e m Page 3
U.N. PLANES CUT BRIDGE, 8&4 EMovep
eo ~ , he FROM EAR
: EIGHTH ARMY H’QRS’ Feb. 28 CONNECTICUT, Feb. 28
' | UNITED NATIONS fighter-bombers making “every | Richard Christensen, nine-yea
bomb count” knocked out a 250-foot bridge in North | id cub oor showed no ill effect
Central Korea and damaged two other Communist sup- jjys ney tee he, at had indeed
_m . 5 I i bean that hi: odg
PY ae hike patrolled “MEG. Ailay” cre eee hee ak beds
| | -008 jets pa le MALG, ey {nearly grown lf an incl
| A band of Communist troops attacked South of Pan- Dick’s mother said he i |
| munjom under cover of darkness early to-day but United | ins ” bean bags at school when
| Nations infantrymen beat them off after a thirty-minute | ?¢0! the bags broke. His chur
Se 2ed plz . od h hand grenades anc aoe a at Dick and one
fight. A Red platoon armed with hand grenades and popped into his ear. His mothe
small arms hit a United Nations held hill South of the ‘'said they thought he had shaker
ceasefire village at 2.10 a.m. , Allied artillery was called bg ra pick ese me cS
|. in soon after the fight began. Ae oe pe sinf : ; SENIOR seni 4 ’ 5



A WELL PLACED SHOT by Drayton, Empire inside forward gives his team the only goal of the } There was no significant activity along the rest of { ahe ae . ~
match against Spartan yesterday afternoon—the kick was from a penalty award. i ‘the front.—U.P. —OP. ' si








PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

R. MIKE
Public

HILDRED,
Relations Officer
Montreal, for the Atlantic Region
who arrived from Bermuda on
Wednesday by T.C.A. is due to
leave for Trinidad this morning.

T.C.A.’s

Yesterday accompanied by mer
bers of the local press and radio
he went on a short tour of the
island, Also in the party were a
T.C.A pilot, Captain J. K. Lewis
and his 9-year-old son “Bobby.”

Mr. Hildred armed with a
camera and tri-pod, took several
pictures. Captain Lewis and his
s0n who will be remaining here
until Wednesday are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel

For Cpening’ of New

Cinema

EMBERS of the imotion pic-
i ture industry in the W.1,
have been arriving i Barbados
daily to attend the Cocktail Party
this evening at the Plaza, Bar-
harees, which will mark the open-
whg of this new theatre, which is

owned and operated by Caribbean
Theatres Limited.

Recent arrivals include Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Tee Ksingh who
arrived from Trinidad on Wednes-
Mr. Teelucksingh who is
Menaging Director of Teelucksingh
Theatres Limited, is alsc a d
tor of Caribbean Theatres
Mr. and Mrs. Teelucksingh
staying at the Hastings Hotel.









rere
Lid.
are

Mr. Richard Spierman, wife of
Warner Brothers Representative
in the W.1L., arrived on Monday
and is a guest at the Hotel Royal
Vir, Spierman is due today.

N Oo. J. Forest, Caribbean

Representative of Westrex Com-
pany, Caribbean, is also here for
the opening and is a guest at the

Aquatic Club. Also staying there
are Mr. and Mrs. George Schweig
who arrived on Sunday. Mr,
Schweig is Columbia Pictures
representative in the W.1.

Expected to arrive today are
Mr, Cecil Marks, representative
Universal and J. Arthur Rank
pictures in the W.I. and Mrs.
Marks. They will be staying at the
Marine Hotel

Cables of congratulations and
best wishes have been received
by Caribbean Theatres Limited
from the following film. stars,
Doris Day, Errol ynn, Patrice
Wymore, Virginia Mayo and Gene
Nelson.

Other luck cables
been received from Mr, Peter
Colli, Warner’ Brothers, Latin
American Supervisor, Mr. Michael
Havas, R.K.QO. Latin American
Supervisor and Mr, Albert Steind-
hardt, United Artists representa-
tive at present in San Juan and
until recently their W.I. repre-
sentative stationed in Trinidad,

good have



Saal

MR. MIKE HILDRED, T.C.A.'s
and party visited St. John’s Chur



7

Regional Put

ch yesterday

lic Relations Officer




They pause at the Sun-dial overlooking the Cliff for Mr. Hildred

to take a picture while Mr. Ian Clarke of Rediffusion points out

a
familiar landmark.
Left to right are Capt. Lewis, T.C.A. Pilot, Mr. Hildred,
Mr Clarke and “Bobby” Lewis, Capt. Lewis’ 9-year-old son.

To-morrow Night





ISITORS to Club Morgan
morrow night are in for

treat when they will hear
Earl Wilkins at the piano
Wilkins is the former Gwen Mack
versatile itertuiner o r
hotel and club wor Mr. Wilkins
is also known in the entertainment
world and he will act as Maste
of Ceremonies

This type of entertainment
very popular in the U.S., but

mething we rarely see here

Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins e here
for a short holiday from Vene-
zuela

Week-end Visit

ATRICK ELLAM, owner of the
19 foot yacht Sopranino
which arrived in Barbados re-
cently after crossing the Atlantic
in 2814 days and his friend Colin
Mudie plan to take the Sopranino
down the Leeward coast to spend
the week-end off Heron Bay on
the St. James Coast,

Patrick went to the same schoo!
in Buckinghamshire Stowe
School—as film star David Niven
who is present in Barbados
with his wife spending a_ short
holiday as guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald Tree of “Heron Bay,”
St. James.





Talk On Building













PRYHROUGH the courtesy of

{ British Council there
t t < tonight t 8.30 or
‘What the Building Society can

for Housir } mun-

ity.” The lecture be Mr.
William Cash, M.A A and
the meetir hich be held
at Wakefiel Whitepark, will
be under the nairmanship of
Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G

A pecial ivitation has been
extended to member of the
H in Board, byt the public
are welcome Many prominent
members of the ymmunity, who
ie interested building have
pre to attend,

viheabaden Holiday

T° resent holidaying in Bar-



barlos is Mrs, BH, B. Vaughan
> of a former President of
.N.S) and C.N.R., who is eccom-
panied by her on Dr, Peter
Vaughan.
Mrs. Vaughan and Dr. Vaughan
are guest it the Hastings Hotel.
Satisfactory Progress

is pleased to report that

eo
Mr,

Jack Thorne of Sandy
Lane, St. James, who was seriously
injured in an aeeident at the

factory recently, is making satis-

factory progress. He is at present) T

a patient at the Hospital,

BY THE WAY e « « By Beachcomber

f OW about a holiday abroad
next year?

Sixteen Hours In Lovely Peru.
gia, including one. one-course
meal, without wine, feat or cof-
fee, and use of hotel bedroom for
sleeping.





CROSSWORD



Across





1 Uhura t get trom the Mower. (6)
G Lo this age it's worship. (3)
® Rum piacy to get bread, (5) ’
6. The {de lady has it. (4)

s ro up and down it. (7)

@ maybe? (6)

t around over there. (4)
i rker has it, (4)
5 ded Dora to her box. (3)

(a4)

from birth for camou-
(5)
+t aay

Â¥ Movable shelter
Striped
floge







where it will neces:

A tine at. (6)
in} 13. (3)
km of yeateryears, (4)
Poe a favour would ingra-
Tinte qa)
Down

n threefold waters, (4)
ee in one or maby
(7)
ve vernacular. (u)
6 Weaken. (6) '
Macedam pernaps (B)

) Never more he said, (5)
1% Sort ul bioke to 15 (6)
14. A rocky isle. (6)

16 Unfolds. (5)
20 Undeistanding of a 7



(3)





The traveller is allowed to take
eight cigarettes out of England,
and one box of matehes for his
personal use. The allowance per
traveller of £2. 14s. 8d. does not
include cost of journey. £10 will
be added to the cost of the ticket,
as a contribution to a special fund

for the importation of more
American films.
The Gamma-bomb \ VII

R, KARPAM KOOLRUK was
about. to follow the pretty
air-hostess (whom the astute
reader will have recognised as
Dingi-Poos) on to the plane, Sud-

denly a playful gust of wind
whisked off his wig, blew his
false nose away and buckled up
his left (cardboard) ear. A roar
went up from 10,000 detectives,
and before you could say bottle,
the spy had been arrested and
dragged away. The pilot, with

dainty silver revolver dinting the
back of his neck, obeyed the com-
mand to take off, Nobody both.
ered with the beautiful beast who
thought the paper she had stuf-
fed into her corsage contained tne
genuine formula. Egham, quickly





Rupert, rer ne thar Ci

Solution of vesterdav's purzi¢ Across , Pp re e ing that Guy

i [rruptio: ? Neighbour Fawkes' Day is not far of, has
t been co 1 fireworks
box sm he

Nise } afford, and
Out: 8 : ‘
Ambletsides) 15 adds
Krror: 19 Omit . Chinese

OF Pe tre



SR A AT ORATOR LENS Ares

NEW . ARRIVALS

PILLOW CASES
SHEETS 70 x 90

90 x

”

DIAPER CLOTH

20) x 30

a

a

{a

24” @

108

WASH CLOTHS (White) @

DOMESTIC 24” @
CRETONNE 27” @
PLAID TABLING 48” @







released, waved to her
was puzzled, never
her despised ewain
her, “Good, work,”

ind

ad outwitted
said



, in God is my, trust,

|



she |
repens that | â„¢

Sir |
Hawkesleigh. Muffet. One feels a/
cad, doing this to a woman,” said | g,

Egham, the wound of his hopeless |

love still unhealed. Muffet gave
him a look of contempt, and that
children,

4 certain experiment in the Zakan | p.m
thought to] P-â„¢. Interlude
in al ; de

desert with what was
be the Gamma-bomb. ended
flasco, as you shall see.

Compast mentis
I F we did not allow our fruit
to rot on the trees we should

not be able to export
tin, and if other countrie
their fruit rot, they would
want the tin, and we should
t thely tinned A

not
not
uni-

fruit,

is the inner story of why | 10.15 p.m

pom Kentner, 10.00 p.m. The
| News, 10,10 pam. From the Editorials
The Debate Continues, 10.30

From the Third Programme, 10.50

much }
let |

versal plan for letting the world’s |

fruit rot would release
quantities of tin, which we could
export, and then import in

large |

the |

shape of empty tins, in which we ,

could export the rotten fruit

as

compost, getting in return an al- |

location ‘of ‘tinned compost.

Rupert and the New Bonnet—1 |



> is looking through them
ning them and im 1g

his friends are

wher
name called
he }



then
ries

wants with

SR emt eee re mn NN ee A REE

$ .98 each

387
2.04

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4990



SOON BURT LANCASTER'S Greatest
“MAN of BRONZE”

Dal
tao

B’TOWN

RKO - Radio Action-Packed Drama !
ida Robert

LUPINO RYAN in
Also the LEON ERROL Short om



SATURDAY Special 9.390 a.m, & 1.39 p

THE ANKANSAS SWIN



at BTOWN

TODAY

and Continuing Daily at 4.45 & 8.90 p.m

“ON DANGEROUS GROUND”

YOUR SHOE STORES
eae





P

2.30. 4.45 & 8.30 p.m



3 Shows

“CACTUS CAT-UP”

Midnite Sat Ist

m

G

> New Action We

“OUTLAW GOLD"

with The Hoosier Hotshots « Johnny Mack BROWN &
f “BONANZA TOWN” |” ARIZONA TERRITORY
Charles STARRETT BURNETT Whit LS And PDE








ROOK



NOW



~ CINEMAS



| : Dit :
PLATZ Aq BARB
GALA OPENING :

re.

BARBADO



S ADVOCATE

A Challenge | The Mole’s House Was Dark

—With No Light, He Could See His Guests—

To The New

Elizabethans |

BY THE ARCHBISHOP
OF CANTERBURY

THE
by he:
goodness
diness
sincerity

Is that
gCod citizens to

QUEEN
clear

by
for
and
not

captures us

shining grace
her youth

service,

all}
and
and

by



tion
challenge
be



to al
more activel
their service
nd to all indifferent citizens
4 aside their indifference}
lack of conviction and lack
spiritual effort?
And the bad spouses and bad
rents to become faithful spouses
id dutiful parents
And to all the self-seekers and
piritual parasites to becOme
tkers for the common good
contributors to the common
tock of spiritual power and cbe-
ence to truth?



Does not everything call to us
ur memory of a good King,
* devotion to a young Queen,

nation's
ed?

greatness and its

Will not the Press and all the
of publicity, so powerful
these days, will not public
‘pinion as it passes from mind
mind end mouth to mouth,
us in this reformation—ex-
ling the drab and the dreary,
sordid and the salacious, the
distic and the sexy, the trivial
and the trumpery, and the
umption that everyone’s main
end in life is tor more money,
clothes, and amusement?
challenge like this could not
made without a Yeturn to
ligion and Church.
Here, too, let there be a re-
formation as eager, as Scriptural, !
comprehensive, as creative as

gans

a



the Reformation under the first)
Elizabeth, |

1 believe there is g movement!

vord> it, and a reaching out!
for it. But at the present it is a}
little shamefaced and hesitant,

2 « *

We shall best honour our|
King, we shall best uplift our |
Queen, we shall best serve our|
netion if we make a new act Of

faith, of obedience, of discipline,
of discipleship to God,

Here for the nation is the
watchword, as it was for the |
King:—

In God is my health and mail
jlory; the rock of my might: and}



—L.E.S.

ee



|

«B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

FRIDAY, REBRUARY 2%, 152.
|
|




5 a.m. New Records, 12.00 (noon)

, 12.10 p.m, News Analysis.
4.04












p.m, 19. 76M 31 22M &5 5aM
1.00 pr The Nev 410 pa Dail
Service, 4.15 p.m From the Third Pro-
gram 4.35 p.m. Interlude, 4.45 p.m
Music Magazine »00 pom, Piano Plajy- |
ime, 5.15 pm, Listeners’ Choice, 6.00 |
pm. Merehant N Ivouramme, 6.15
pom A Go, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round
Up Programme Parade, 7 >) p.m
7.10 pom ws Analysis, |
18 p.m. West Indian Diary
7.45—16,00 pom %53M 31M 49.49M

745 p.m, Get Out Those Old Records,
15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
World Affeirs, 6.45 p.m Composer of the |
Week, 9.00 p.m. English Magazine, 9.30
Louis



TO-MORROW
NIGHT

VARIETY
FLOOR
SHOW

At }

CLUB |
1 MORGAN

GWEN MACK Popular

American Radio and

Club) Entertainer with

Earl Wilkins as Mister

of Ceremonies; also a

Try out of the South

American — Entertainers

For Dinner

or Table

Dial 4009

Nees

Reservations



10 fer Reservation

AREES

(

Sat. March Ist. at 8.435 p.m. :

& continuing Daily at

CARIBBEAN

OG MOONLIGHT BAY
rt Te

” { AY ci

|



145 & 8.30 PM
PREMIERE

with The

s

=

T

By MAX TRELL

KNARF and Hanid, the S
went behind the



‘¥d Apple Tree un-

til they came to the fallen stump. |

Then they it

Blinky Mole stuck

rapped on several

imes. Finally
A nose out through a hole at the

bettom of the stump, then rubbed
his eyes and looked around without
seeming to see anything.

“Who knocked on my door?” he
said. “Is anybody here?”

“We're here, Blinky!” said Knarf.
“Hanid and I.”

“Oh!” said Blinky. Then he
rubbed his eyes again. “I hear your
voices, but I can’t see you. Come in,
please. It’s that bright sunlight,”
he said the next moment after
Knarf and Hanid had squeezed
themselves into the hele in the
stump and were following Blinky
down the narrow stairs into his par-
lor. “I can’t see a thing in bright
sunlight. Ah, now I see you!” he
exclaimed as soon as they reached
the parlor.

Dark as Night

It was almost dark as night in
Blinky’s parlor. Except for a tiny
glow-worm on a table, there was
no light at all,

“But now we can’t see you!” said |

Hanid.

Blinky uttered a deep sigh. “I'm
terribly, terribly sorry. It’s my
fault. Everyone else seems to be
able to enjoy the sunshine—except
cats and owls and mice. I’m sure
I'd enjoy it, too, But I just can’t see
anything. And it’s no use trying to
walk around and pretend you’re
seeing the birds and flowers and”al!
the pretty colors, when you have to
keep your eyes tight shut. No,
there's no use pretending you can
when you can’t,”

Blinky sat down in a chair and
sighed again.

“You ought to have glasses,” said
Knarf.

“Dark glasses,” said Hanid.

Blinky looked puzzled. “Dar!
glasses? | never heard of them. Do
they keep the sunlight out?”

“That's just what they do,”
Hanid,

“Well.” said Blinky, “they sound
mighty tine. And I'll have to get a

said

HELLO-O-O!!

TO WEAR ?

Elite - Photo - Print @

Be-Bop Caps — in various

Men’s Feit Hais @
Men's Socks @

Se Don’t Forget ! !



4

A Memorable Cast
Dramatic Mvstery Of

"BAREES) Re-Relcase RKO
REA GLORY” Gary COOPER
David NIVEN



ISTIN DIAL 8404

eday & Tomorrow 4.45 & 4.30 p.m
» GORCEY & The Bowery Roys
“IN FAST COMPANY” &

mes Oliver CURWOOD’'S

“¥UKON MANHUNT’

Kirby GRANT & “CHINOOK”

T. 1.30 Midnite SAT.





p.m.

IDDEN CITY Roy Rogers’
omba the Doubie!
Jungle “‘Slelderade” &
RANE “Man Frem

Mus'c Meuntain’

ee

lows, |

Reliance Shawl Shirts @ ..
Other Colourful Designs @

John White Shoes (Two-Tone) @
Willow Oxford Shoes (Brown) @

To Save Valuable $ $ $
me SHOP AT ~SeG

GEORGE SAHELY & (0.—19 SWAN STREET

For BEST VALUES and EFFICIENT SERVICE

N.B.—This Store will be closed on Saturday 1st
and 8th March (Race Days) at 12.30 p.m.



}



Blinky Mole at the front door of
his house.

pair. By the way, where can I get
;a pair?” he suddenly asked. “I can’t
| very well go to town in the daytime,
you know, for I’d never be able to
see my way around. And if I wait
until it’s night, none of the stores
will be open.”

But Knarf and Hanid said they
| would make Blinky a pair of dark
| glasses, So they got some pieces of
| colored glass and put them in a pair
of old spectacles that Blinky said he
jsometimes used for reading, and
|when Blinky put them on and went
out into the sunlight with them, he
|exclaimed in delight: “They’re won-
| derful! It’s just like walking around
jin the middle of the night!”

{ Long Walk

They all took a long walk across
the meadow, and around the hilt
and up to the edge of the pond, Anu
every now and then, when Knarf
or Hanid spied a particularly pretty
biuebell or daisy, Blinky would push
the glasses down to the end of his
nose and take a quick peek over
them at the flowers.

“Benutiful!” he Then he
pushed the glasses hurriedly back



said,



in front of his eyes again, “Ll oug't

tell Owl about these.” he seid
houghtfully. “1d don’t think hes
ever sven the work! in the das
vither.”





FELLAS
ARE YOU GOING TO THE RACES?

WORRIED ABOUT WHAT YOU ARE GOING
LET US HELP YOU!

wth SPORT SHIRTS-wa

Two-Tone @ $3.85 — Plain Colours @ $3.90

1.94
4.25

ab $2.50 —
Colours @ ooo... co.

$3.00 —
$1.43 &

9.60

. per pair 53














In The
The Year

‘GAEET

The Garden—St. James
Teday & Tomorrow 8.20 p.m.

“THE BIG PUNCH”
Gordon MacRAE -- Wayne MORRIS
“THE BRIGHT LEAF”
Geary COORER — Patricia NEAL

MIDNITE. SAT: 18T
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE”
Wid Bil OTT as Red Rider &
“ALIAS BILLY the KID”
Sunset CARSON.

Sun. & Mon.









8.30 p.m. & Mat. Sun
S p.m.

“VOICE of the TURTLE” &
“LOOK fer the SELVER LINING”





| POP SRIOSESSISS SISOSP PS SOPOT GS SPSS OPPO VOSOOOS

See Cy,

. yo GLOBE Tye
* , O»- :
; DELUXE ENTERTAINERS °F §
5 (acelin ns nner a enetaennteicisiecnistinniinlcenen o
x To-day 5.00 and 8.30 p.m. to Sunday .

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952







EMPIRE
Opening TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and continuing
Daily 4.45 & 8.30

WHE PROWLER

soo Whot he wanted...
\ove, \ookt — anytning|






EVELYN KEYES

with JOHN MAXWELL
KATHERINE WARREN
EMERSON TREACY

Screenplay by Hugo Butier
From an original story by

Robert Thoeren and Hans Wilheim

Directed by

S.'P- EAGLE + JOSEPH LOSEY
Released thru United Artists
An S, P. EAGLE PRODUCTION

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY TO TUES. 4.30 & 8.15

R.K.0's GIANT SIZE DOUBLE

ye they co” el

the old West's _
most dangerous Badmen... .
Sin Town's most tempting
woman!

BES T oF Le
PAV ad

TECHNICOLOR






STARRING

ROBERT RYAN.

REVOR
CLAIRE TEL

eat PRESTON





AND

“LOVE AFFAIR”

STARRING :— IRENE DUNN

MIDNITE SAT.
WHOLE SERIAL

ROYAL

TODAY (only) 5
“DESTINATION }

CHARLES BOYER



St BRUCE GENTRY
ROX Y

TO-DAY TO TUES

SPECIAL



4.45 & 8.15

Errol FLYNN Michelene MRELLE





SAT. & SUN.
James DUNN in
“GOLDEN GLOVE STORY”

4.90 & 8.15

in

“ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN FABIAN’

and
“HIGH LONESOME” od ree
with ~-
JOHN BARRYMORE Jr SPECIAL MID-NITE SAT. 18T
SPECTAL 9.30 A.M. SAT. Republic whole Serial !

(Cheap Prices)

JOHNNY WIESSMULLER as
JUNGLE JIM and
RETURN of OCTOBER”

“MANHUNT OF MYSTERY ISLAND

It's Action at Mid-nite













Opening Tomorrow Sat. Ist 8.15 p.m.
BARBAREES

PLAZA

ANOTHER SCENIC
WONDER IN THE
CARIBBEAN !

(DIAL 5170)
WITH






bunny-huggin’
happiness of those

grand days!
Here’s the gayest
new Warner Bros.





/

musical of
our day!



+ ech TES

PLAZA ous
' DIAL 5170

FROM
WARNER
BROS.


i

_ Abreu’s case whether

ee OE ae ee? ee eS ew ee eee

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29,

Commission Agent
Lose £720 Claim

MAY APPEAL TO W.I. COURT

AFTER HEARING the Acting Puisne Judge, His
Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor’s directions that it was
only an honest agent who was entitled to any commission,
and if they felt there had been a contract they would have
to ask themselves whether Damian De Abreu, real estate
agent, was dishonest, it took a special jury two and a half
hours to return a judgment in favour of Estwick E. Deane
from whom De Abreu was claiming £720 as unpaid
commission.

De Abreu counsel, Mr. G. H.
Adams applied for a stay of exe-
cution pending an appeal to the the
West Indian Court of Appeal. Mr. themselves



House Pass Address
To Governor On

said that he had not said
,000, but if it were material,
. the jury, would have to ask
lot of things. One








Adams was associated with Mr. of » things would be that after . r

D. H. L. Ward, instructed by ‘he conversation, he went to his Econoniic Notes
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy, Soli- “ephew who was his solicitor.

citors. Deane’s counsel were Mr. 'i®en there was the statement The House of Assembly Tues-

E. K. Walcott, Q.C. and Mr. J. S. Carrington & Sealy and day night passed an Address



in
B. Dear, instructed by Messrs. nmoning of him as a wit- Reply to a Message from Hi
Cottle, Catford, Solicitors. his being unwilling to Excellency the Governor, concur -



De Abreu claimed that Deane Come. ring in the extension to Barbados





and he had agreed to a contract the end of Mr. Adams’ of the provisions of new economi
that if he introduced Deane to.an ° Mr. Walcott claimed the notes between the Governments of
owner of a plantation who was ! to reply and Mr. Adams the United Kingdom and _ the
willing to sell and a sale objected, At this stage the lunch- United States,

resulted,
he would pay him 3% commission.
He claimed that he introduced
Deane to the owner of a planta-
tion which he eventually bought
for £24,000 and Deane owed him
£720 as unpaid commission.

Evidence for Deane, however,
was that De Abreu had told him
that £26,000 was the price asked
when in truth it was £24,000, and
this was held by his counsel to
be dishonesty, as De Abreu would
have got more commission if that
price had been paid.

After nearly two and a half
hours deliberation, the jury re-
turned to the court and enquired

eon adjournment was taken and
on the resumption, Mr. Walcott
Cid not reply. His Lordship then
began his-sum up.

His Lordship first referred
De Abreu’s claim— £720,
commission on £24,000.

He told the jury that they had
to be satisfied that the contract
was entered into between De
Abreu and Dearie in which Deane
agreed to pay him 3% if as the
result of an introduction of an
owner of a plantation by De
Abreu, Deane made a purchase of
the plantation.

Of course, he said, if they found
that there was no such contract,

The Address reads as follows:
“The House of Assembly have
the honour to acknowledge receipt
of Your Excellency’s Message No.
3/1952 dated 8th January, 1952
relating to the new exchange of
notes between the United Kingdom
and the United States of America,
The House concur in the ex-
tension of the provisions of the
new notes to Barbados
Debaxe on the Address was con-
tinued Tuesday night after having
been postponed for some weeks,
and leading off Tuesday night’s
discussion, Mr. R.«G. Mapp said
that in view of the fact that, during

to
3%





whether the statement of the price then they would merely say, the debate on the Address in con-
by De Abreu was in accordance judgment for the defendant, nection with the discriminatory
with his duty in carrying out the Deane. policy of the Senator McCarran

contract. His Lordship told them,
“Directly that was not part of his
duty. But my instruction to you
fs, if he gave what he knew to be
a wrong price, he would be guilty

Before they could say there was
a contract, they had to be satis-
fied that the minds of De Abreu
and Deane were clear and .satis-
fied as to the terms.

Bill, members had expressed thei:
willingness for goodwill between
Barbados and the United States,
he would not oppose the peaere

r It Mig not of the Address. He hoped that the
of dishonesty. be a good contract if De eu extension of the rail wohiha have
Yesterday was the fourth day of was interpreting what was said }

the effect of getting the Americans
on Barbados’
against the
Bill.

Mr. C.

hearing. De Abreu’s counsel, Mr.
Adams had urged that Deane and
his main witness Roy Gill from
whom he bought the plantation If they agreed that there
had told lies and De Abreu was & contract, the question of
speaking the truth when he told alleged misconduct then arose.
them that Gill had all along men— they found that De Abreu was
tioned £26,000 as the price of the guilty of such misconduct as
plantation. He showed, too, that Would disentitle him of his com-
De Abreu had nothing to do with Mission, they would have to give
the price of the plantation as Judgment for Deane,

Deane emphatically said that he ,, 1» evidence Gill had told them
was seeing after the price himself, that it was De Abreu who put
Though De Abreu did not lie, even the idea of selling Oxnards and
jf he had lied until his face wa: Husbands int6 his head. It had
blue, he would not have strayed OMe SO much as a surprise to
from the terms of the contract him that he talked of seeing par-

Continuing his address yester- ~*~ first.
day from the previous day, Mr. e told them that where there

in one way and Deane in another,
The terms in their minds had to
be exact and identical,

side in the fight
Senator McCarran

was
the
It

E. Talma felt
Address of the sort
hope for the future, in that a
great continent like the United
States was seeking goodwill and
co-operation with Barbados, In
times of war this island had to
look for protection from the
United States, and he was hoping
that not only should they ask fon
goodwill with Barbados, but that
that goodwill would be extended
in some tangible form to Barba
dos by America. He took it that
the Address was not only impor-

that an
gave some



Adams reminded the jury that the were not many witnesses and tant but urgent in view of present

contract was, if as the result of Where the chief witnesses were world conditions and Barbados’

De Abreu's introducing Dean to cee and defendant, they geographical position.

someone with a plantation to sell, 78° | i. examine the evidence *

a sale resulted, 3% commission ne ‘i and ‘see what credit’ ‘The House of Assembly Tues-

would be his remuneration. te a3 the plaintiff or the de- gay night accepted the amendments
He said that a defence of fraua 7emdant was entitled to. They jeferred to them by the Legisla-

had to decide whether they be-
lieved the truth or falsehood of
either party. They had to look at
the evidence of the other wit-
nesses and see whether that helped
them in deciding the truth or
otherwise of either party.

He first dealt with E. D. Mott-
ley’s evidence. He said that his
was expert evidence and merely
showed that 3 per cent. commis—
sion was the normal commission
under circumstances such as
those and if there was a claim of

was one in which the other side
could hold that his agent defraud-—
ed him, acted in his own interest
took secret bribe, colluded with
the other party or such like. They
had to prove that as a result of
the alleged lie, Deane suffered loss
But Deane had not suffered loss.

“IT submit,” he said, “that if the
jury agree that the agency is
proved, that this was a specific
contract merely to bring the par-
ties together and not to go through
all the stages of the contract,

tive Council in respect of the
Pioneer Industries Bill. The
amendments were only typograph-
ical, and were accepted without
tomment.

He therefore begged te endorse
the terms of the Address.

The Address was then passed,

ON PROBATION

FOR STEALING
His Worship Mr. C, L, Walwyn,



3% it would not ' oxtraor- Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
they would have to find for the qjnary See % be an extraor trict “A”, yesterday placed Clevi
plainti® He said that De Abreu had said Gill of Conchs Alley, City, on pro~

He recafled that counsel for the
other side had been unable to find
a case of a person being employed
to find a prospective vendor and
he quoted a case to bear out his
submission that that wi@ not un-
usual,

He said that even if another
agent came along afterwards—or
as in that case a solicitor—and
finished the contract, De Abreu
would have done what he had set
out to do, introduce the parties.
And as soon as there was the sale,
he would be entitled to his com-
mission. .

So strong was the authority, he
said, that it was shown that even
after dismissal, the agent could
collect his commission. Deane’s
evidence was in effect that De
Abreu was his agent and he had
fired him, but his holding that
there had been fraud when he
had not suffered loss, did not
excuse him from paying commis-
sion. It was essential that the
means used should successfully
deceive.

They would remember the let-
ter De Abreu wrote Deane, he

bation for a period of 12 months
to keep the peace and be of good
behaviour in the sum of £5 for
stealing cloth, the property of
Mortimer Skeete, sometime be-
tween February 16 and February
19.

Skeete told the court that he
left the cloth in his house some-
time between February 16. and
February 19 and when he wanted
it he found that it was missing.
The defendant used to live in the
same house with him,

Gill said that sometime ago
Skeete gave him the cloth and
during the month of February he
carried it to his tailor.

Boys’ Clubs Get
Advisory Committee

An Advisory, Committee _ for
he Committee of Management of
he Barbados’ Boys’ and Girls’
Clubs has been formed.. This
Committee will hold its first meet-
ing at the office of the Com
missiéner of Police Central
Station, this morning.

he had telephoned Deane on July
24 about a dairy business, Deane
had denied that it was about
dairy business, but admitted that
there had been this telephone
call. Then, Deane told him he
was interested in a_ plantation.
They both agreed that there were
subsequent conversations.

De Abreu said that in the first
conversation over the telephone
he asked Deane if he introduced
him to a person with a plantation
to sell and a sale resulted, if he
would pay him, and he said he
would. De Abreu had sought’ to
confirm the alleged arrange-
ments by referring to Lodge
which he had mentioned and
which Deane enquired after,
though in that case he would
have got commission from the
owner.

All





that Deane, however, de-
nied, De Abreu said that Deane
had told him he had offered
£18,000 for Lodge and Deane
denied making the offer. Farmer
of Lodge confirmed that evidence.
Then came the question of credit.
If they believed Farmer and be-



said. They would remember he lieved that De Abreu was not ———__—_—_—-—_-. -—--
told him he could inquire from speaking the truth, they would that of its owner,
Gill if he doubted him. Would have eause to look at the rest Deane had given a quite differ-

he have told him to enquire from
Gill if Gill had not in fact told
him £26,000? Was he a lunatic?

of his evidence very carefully
At a meeting between them on
August 6, De Abreu called Roy
It was not material to De Gill’s name, mentioned a price and
Roy Gill other particulars about a planta-
was speal{ng the truth, Gill hav- tion, but did not call its name or

ent version of the meeting. He
said he told De Abreu that before
he could do anything, he had to
know that the person was working
for a commission for the vendo:

@ On page 8



p

IM MAKING A CLEAN SWEEP
OF MY TROUBLES—

ALL





’'VE BANISHED THE BLUES AND

MY NERVE MISERIES WIiH

NUTROPHOS

Why feel depressed, irritable and generally
out of sorts when you can get relief with
NUTROPHOS—it’s marvellous for all nerve

troubles





ge You Eat Well, Sleep Well, Feel Well
When You Take NUTROPHOS.



SS STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—Agents









| color filled Nauional Bellas



| you are not pleased

i i i a i ed i ee



BARBADOS

ADVOCATE





Yachts Leave
Today

Christian
Science:

= ° f @ from page 1
Its Reinstatement Of Nicholson and under charter to
ik i ae ‘ Mr. John Wright of the United
Primitive Christianity — Stries. She will be in daily
reless communication with the



e in
sible

And Spiritual Healing — Cruise Comn
RALPH CASTLE C.S. of San
Francisco, California :
Member Board of Lecture- ! m
ship the Mother Church,
The First Church of As
Christ Scientist, in
Boston, Massa-
ee chuset
At no time in history have men
and women been in greater need
of compassion than they are to-
day, Ralph Castle, Christian Sci-
ence lecturer, told an audience in
the First Church of Christ
Scientist, Garrison Hill, Bridge-
town, last night.
“Compassion, as Christ
displayed it,” he said

Antigua and
for supplying
mation to yachts participat-
the cruise,

Others to Jom
the cruise moves on through
the various West Indian ports
ofher yacht ire expected = to
join it. One is the motor yacht
Vesta owned by Mr. Luis Sean-
della of Puerto Rico, She will
have on board a party of seven
including former Governor Jesus
T. Pinero of Puerto Rico,

There two other yachts
entered Puerto Rico—the
motor yaohts Phoenix and Malala
owned by Mr. German Fernan-
ae and My Vincente Balbos
ineffable tenderness It is more Pena, respectively. The 38 ft
than ordinary pity, kindliness, or ketch Grail under charter to Mr
merey It is a deep desire to do C. S. Hamilton and a party of
good to others, a feeling which three will join the cruise
preceded the actual physical heal- at Grenada.
ings. To-day,’ said Mr. Castle, When the
“this same sense of compassion to- lish Harbour
ward our fellow beings is requi- March, it
site to Christian Science healing, H.M.S Sparrow, and a Police
On page 367 of her textbook, boat will be in the Harbour to
‘Science and Health with Key to direct yachts to their moorings
the Scriptures,’ Mary Baker Eddy, and to carry out simple immi-
the Discoverer, Founder, and gration and entry formalities.
eader of Christian Science, writes, If we are to judge the senti-
‘The tender word and Christian ments of all those who are going

By

be re¢

f the



are
from

Jesus
“conveys

also

fleet
on
will be

sails into Eng
Tuesday, 18th
greeted by



encouragement of an invalid, piti- on the Caribbean Cruise by the
ful patience with his fears and the epinions expressed by those who
removal of them, are better than gre sailing from Barbados, we
heeatombs of gushing theories, can be sure that, provided every-
stereotyped borrowed speeches, thing goes according to plan, the
and the doling of arguments, cruise will be a most enjoyable
which are but so many parodies onc F

on legitimate Christian Science,

aflame with divine Love.’ And on
page 365 she states, ‘if the Scient-
ist reaches his patient through
livine Love, the healing work
will be accomplished at one visit,
and the disease will vanish into
its native nothingness like dew
before the morning sunshine.’ ”

The theme of the lecture is de-
finitely conveyed in its “title,
“Christian Science: Its Reinstate-
ment of Primitive Christianity and
Spiritual Healing,” for Mr. Castle
contended that the application of
the teachings of Jesus in our daily
lives is the sole purpose of Chris-
tian Science, and tius, me saia, ot
course includes healing the sick
by spiritual means, or by prayer,
and regenerating the sinful,

The lecturer said he wished to
devote the time at his disposal to
discussing two of the Christly
characteristics, or qualities of
Jesus, in connection with his sub-
ject, mamely, compassion, and
Christ Jesus’ realization of insep-
arabilitv from God,

CANE FIRE PUT OUT

{Residents of "he Salt Pond,
laxwell district, a ted in put-
ting out a cane fire whiah start-
ed there yesterday evening about
5 o'clock. The fire burnt a quar-
ter of arm acre of second crop ripe
canes, the property of Fitz Ince
of the same district.

|




the dead, regenerating sinners,
even bringing his own body back
from the tomb—through the know-
ledge of man’s at-one-ment with
the Father, the divine Spirit, with
which he was endowed without
measure. On page 482 of “Sci-
ence and Health with Key to the
Scriptures,’ Mrs, Eddy _ writes:
‘Jesus was the highest human con-
-ept of the perfect man. He was
inseparable from Christ, the Mes-
siah,—--the divine idea of God out- |
side the flesh,’ Jesus was insepa-
table from Christ, because he
knew through spiritual perception
that he inseparable, And
herein lies an important factor in
he teachings of Christi }
und in its healing effic ]
1

Wa

“In Christian Science,” Mr, Cas-
tle explained, “the original dis-
tinction is retained which existed

ian Science
acy.



between the name Jesus and the “As human beings, we are apt
word Christ. Jesus was a man’s to think we are definitely separ-
hame and is still used in some ated from the Christ, that is,
countries. Christ was a_ title from the true idea of God as de-
meaning the Anointed, or the monstrated by Jesus, or we en-
Messiah. Originally, the Master tertain serious doubts as to our |
was referred to as Jesus, the inseparability from it. The great ¢
Christ, but gradually the article discovery which our Leader, Mary

was dropped until he became com-
monly spoken of as Jesus Christ
or Christ Jesus

Baker Eddy, made, through divine
revelation and her consecrated
study of the Scriptures—espevial-

“Jesus was actually God's repre- ly the teachings of Jesus—is that
sentative on earth, doing nothing, you and I, in reality, enjoy the
as he said, in his own power or game inseparability from Christ,
strength, but accomplishing all Truth, as was realized by the
things—-healing the sick, raising Master.”



HATIONAL
[BELLAS hess

Latest New York Styles—Typico! of our catalog >

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring and Summer Catalog
offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY
—at the lowest prices anywhere

Join the millions who
shop by mail directly from the




" Cee a)
Joday!



TMM Clty





“* TIONAL BELLAS HESS

Hess Catalog. Select fror
atalog. Select from. } aa’, “Rillss Hosp Ballding, Kenses Clay. 9, Mo,

thousands of the newest styles

and finest home items all ca



free, the new National Bellas

| . , i {oney-Saving Catalog.
| priced®at America’s greatest - .
| savings Name
Every item is guaranteed to Address
| be exactly as pictured and de ;
scnpen, rour money ack it {i «| e;-;:ttti ‘(a st;‘(S CS:

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS

66-2 _dellas Hess Building
Kansas City 9, Missouri,

PA‘ THREE



|

|
|

THE COLONIAL |
STUDENT. IN |
HAMPSTEAD |

LONDON, Feb. 20. |

Spurred by their desire to help}
young Colonial students, volun |
‘ary organisations concerned |
with their welfare in London’s|
Hampstead area has decided to
set up a working party to ex-
pand and co-ordinate their activ-
ities.

This decision was reached at a
meeting at Hampstead Town
Hall under the chairmanship of |
the Mayor of Hampstead, Coun-
cillor Harold Judd. It was sup-
ported by Mr. Henry Brooke,
MP. for Hampstead, ang some
40 local representatives of the
churches and other interested
bodies,

The meeting was address€¢d by
Sir Ronald Adam, chairman of
the British Council and of the
Conference of Voluntary Socie-
tics on the welfare of Colonial
Students in London, and Miss
Mory Trevelyan, Advisor to
Overseas Students in London
University and chairman of the
Standing Committee of the Con-
ference,

Both speakers stressed the need
for bringing the overseas student
into contact with the people of
Britain, What was wanted, they
said, was that residents should do
everything possible to make them
feel at home.

The British Council, Sir Ronald
added, needed all the co-operation
and help it could get in the work
that it had undertaken for over-
eas students.

Dies Suddenly

Joseph Blackman, a labourer
of Checker Hall, St, Lucy, died
while being taken to the Gen-



eral Hospital yesterday by the
police van, It was learnt that

Blackman had visited some peo-
ple in Goodland and was wait-
ing for the bus to take him home
wihen he fell ill.

His body was taken to the pubs

lie mortuary,




ARE
*'NERVES”’ A SIGN
YOU'RE GROWING

OLD?

Often as a woman es
middle life, her nerves get , and
she accepts this as a sign of age.
But why let you become ’
run-down—or 80 nervous you ox
without cause—at any time in life

For nearly fifty years wise
women have been meeting this
situation happily — by, getting

lenty of rest, fresh air, x
ood and by taking Dr. Chase's
Nerve Food . te them up. For
the Vitamin By, iron a
needed minerals in this time-tested
tonic help build up your vitality
and aid in toning up the entire
system—so you can face thefuture
with confidence,

Give Dr, Chase’s Nerve Food a
chance to help banish nervous
fears and doubts. It beige you rest
better, and feel better, The name
“Dr. Chase” is your assurance, 10

KEEP







AS CLEAN AS ; %
“D)
a

WHISTLE ALUMINIUM CLEANER
,, CARPET, UPHOLSTERY CLEANER
» FURNITURE CREAM
» HAND SOAP
, LAVATORY CLEANER
. RED TILE POLISH
» SUGAR SOAP

Hi




















| MANNING & CO.. LTD sen

CONQUER PAIN
SCIENTIFIC)

Caffeine, Acetylsalicyiic Acid—and QUININE. These four

medicines, scientifically balanced, work synergistically—that is why
they relieve pain fast, restore your sense of well-being !

Is welcomed by Doctors! Over 12,000 doctors and dentists

in Great Britain alone use It in thelr surgeries | Fevers,
colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, neuraigia—this wonderful
new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from ail of them !

costs little. You can buy it

In two-tablet envelopes—
enough to bring quick relief from a
bout of pain. Or in handy 20-tablet
boxes. Or in 50-tablet botties—keep
one of these in your house.

ARM YOURSELF
AGAINST PAIN
GET ‘ANACIN’ TODAY!

*‘amAgul’ be on in Great’ Britain and South Africa under the name ‘ANADIN

On
children’s
cuts, scratches
and abrasions







use

OETTOER

THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC
Sarn-Non Potsonous
Dorsn't Pain
Dorsn’t Strain





“If you're on your back
And can't get a nap
Through a pain in the back,
Use FIERY JACK,

It'll never come back.”

On Sale at all leading Chemists

— Frank B. Ltd,

YOUR HOME

Armstrong Agents. ~







(-

~
6

WAX POLISH
WINDOW CLEANER






PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS a apvoetTE CC”

Gace f=) = 5S Fae

Friday, February 29, 1952

FEDERATION

MR. LYTTELTON’S despatch to the
Governors of British Caribbean Colonies
will little interest has been
shown in these territories whenever feder-
ation has been publicly discussed. But the
despatch is not intended to revive talk
about federation. If that was his intention,
the Secretary of State for the Colonies
would have been much more receptive of
the suggestion that a conference should be
held in London in June.

revive what

He is not opposed to the holding of such
a conference, but he makes it clear that a
conference in June must come fully briefed
and prepared to reach agreement on a fed-
eral scheme in sufficient detail to enable
a start to be made with the complex and
lengthy process of drafting the necessary
constitutional instruments.

But the conditions proposed by Mr.
Lyttelton for holding the conference in
June, namely that preliminary work
should be completed by the end of March,
means, so far as Barbados is concerned,
that there will be no conference in June.

The House of Assembly has only this
week been presented with the Estimates
1952-53 and clearly it would be impossible
for that House to divert its attention from
consideration of these estimates to a study
of the subjects proposed by Mr. Lyttelton
necessary before a London meeting can
be arranged.

as

These subjects which include study of
the financial and other implications of the
Rance report and a detailed examination
of the proposals made in the MacLagan
Report are not the only obstacles in tle
way of a June meeting. Each government
in the area will have to make up its mind
on these subjects and will have to circulate
their decisions to other governments par-
ticipating. in the conference in London.
Even #® Barbados could make up its mind
by the end of March (which is impossible)
there would still be delay while this gov-
ernment was studying the decisions of
other West Indian governments. For these
reasons it can be stated that there will be
no conference in London in June to discuss
federation. But Mr, Lyttelton’s despatch
will have the salutary effect of bringing
to the attention of the West Indian govern-
ments what had been stressed in the Rence
report, that much further work would be
necessary before the practical effects of
their recommendations could be fully
assessed

The use of West Indian instead of Car-
ibbean in connection with federation is
once again permissible because the legisla-
ture of British Guiana has formally re-
jected the Rance report and the Legislature
of British Honduras will most certainly
reject it when it is debated in that colony.

West Indian federation if it comes about
will therefore mean federation of the
British islands which extend from Jamaica
through the Leewards and Windwards to
Barbados and Trinidad. “his new situa-
tion has got to be facea and so far it has
not yet been faced.

; Mr. Lyttelton’s despatch will force West
Indian governments to begin their detailed
study of Customs Union and financial ar-
rangements for the upkeep of a federal
state with the knowledge that neither
British Guiana nor British Honduras will
be paying one penny towards its cost. This
will have some bearing on a federation,
the income of which is to be derived prin-
cipally from customs revenue.

Jamaica’s proposal that a conference in
London would undertake “close consider-
ation of the financial aspects of federation”
is therefore wisely widened by the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies. The dele-
gates who go to London, whenever the
conference is held, must go prepared to
reach agreement on a federal scheme, or to
reject federation entirely should agree-
ment not be reached. But whatever agree-
ment is reached by West Indian govern-
ments can only be reached after the most
exhaustive and detailed study of the costs

of federation to each territory and the
advantages or disadvantages that would
result to each territory from a Customs

Union, That study will be aided by in-
formed opinion and since Barbados will
have to decide for federation
this year all those with special knowledge
sf trade and finance must priority to
the MacLagan Report on Customs Union
and the financial contribution that Barba-
dos will have to make towards a Federal
Government if this island decides that it
wants to participate in a federation of the
West Indies. There is certainly no obliga-
tion for it to do so, but it has to decide

or against

give

for

or against. And that decision must be
based on knowledge and facts, not on
sentiment or wishful thinking



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Problems

By a London Correspondent

LONDON, Feb. 21.
Views differ sharply on what
an and should be done to pro-
mote the economic development
of the Commonwealth. One
school of thought holds that
everything possible should be
done to accelerate the pace of
development as a means of
strengthening the sterling area’s
economic defences, while another

section of opinion advocates a
more cautious approach to the
whole problem.

To argue in favour of all-out
economic development is not the
same, however, as indicating
how this desirable end can be

achieved within the limits of our
present resources. Most Com-
monwealth countries naturally
look to Britain, as they have
done in the past, to provide the
bulk of the capital needed for
development purposes. What they
sometimes tall to realise is that
overseas investment is only one
among many heavy competing
demands on the national product
of post-war Britain.

As Irene M. Spray points out

in the current issue of New
Commonwealth, the first neces-
sity is to provide a_ sufficient
outflow of goods and _ services

from Britain to pay for the im-
ports of raw materials and food-
stuffs essential to sustain her
industry and provide a standard
of life which seems tolerable to
her people. Extensive capital
investment is moreover, needed
at home to make good the losses
of two world wars and to main-
tain and modernise her produc-
tive equipment. The question of
whether we can spare additional
resources for overseas develop-
ment must take into account
these two essential requirements.

At the moment, it is by no
means certain that Britain can
export enough .o pay her way
in the world and, at the same
time, free resources for even the
minimum amount of home in-
vestment. The British Chen-
cellor of the Exchequer has
already made sweeping cuts in
our import programme in an
effort to balance our overseas
trade, and these cuts will shor ly
have to be matched with a
similiar reduction in home con-
sumption. Home investment has
also been substantially curtailed
in order to free materials for the
export drive. But the overrid-

Mr. Republican Accepts Truman's

AMERICA’S presidential elec-
tion campaign swings into high
gear although voting is not till
November, Senator Robert Taft
~— Mr. Republican, and strong
man of the Opposition — stumps
the Far West and reveals the for-
eign policy he will shape if re-
turned to the White House,

WASHINGTON.

Tic truce on foreign policy
between President Truman and
the Republicans has been thrown
out by Senator Taft.

Taft, biggest danger to the
President in this year’s election,
issued his challenge when he
arrived in Denver, Colorado,
yesterday,

Reporters said to him: “Presi-
dent Truman has dared you to
oppose him on foreign policy.
‘Do you accept the dare ?”

Smiling and raising his voice,
Taft replied: “I certainly do!”

He repeated his statement for

newsreel men, and, for good
measure, added that Truman’s
foreign policy “could not have
been worse, and his concessions
to the Communists have led
America into an unnecessary
war.”

Truman has_ pleaded that

foreign policy should be kept out
of election controversy to pro-
tect national security.

But Taft talked of little else
all that week, In a_ series of
speeches he repeatedly called for
the “wraps to be taken off”
Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist
forecs on Formosa, so that they
can attack the Communists on
the mainland,

Britain and France could or
would do nothing effective, he
said. But the Chinese Nation-
alists “could and would act.”
Here Taft carefully announced
that if he could’ prevent it
America would not send ground

forces to Indo-China, where the
French face . mounting Red
assaults,

A new policy

What changes can be expected
if Taft becomes President? He
has said he will sack™America’s
joint chiefs of staff, including
General Bradley, and bring Gen-
eral MacArthur pack to an
important post.

Our Readers Say :
Unsatisfactory

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—I read with considerable
interest but unfortunately with
little or no satisfaction the re-
port in your last Sunday’s issue
of the interview with the Resi-
dent Manager of T.C.A., relative
to the statement by the senior
member for St. George that the
proposed new T.C.A,,_ aircraft
will leave Barbados out of their
route.

Mr. Barrow’s statement was
as clear as a pikestaff, and more
fully it was to the effect that in
about eithteen months time the
T.C.A. planes will be re-equip-
ped with turbo jets and they
would not be able to land on our
Wilson-supervised runway at
Seawell, even after the man-
power re-construction for which
a vote of $60,000. was then being
considered by the House of
Assembly.

Mr. Baxter says that in their
scheme of things T.C.A. will
have “new and larger equipment”
by 1954 and “that traffic in all
probability will be increased
many times.” In his alleged re-
futation of Mr. Barrow’s definite
statement about the type of air-
craft and leaving Barbados out,
Mr. Baxter is reported as saying
that “this statement was com-
pletely inaccurate and ‘without
foundation.”

f a layman



/ particularly in-
tere

sted in getting at the truth
of the matter .and knowing
something about the surrounding
circumstances, I find Mr. Baxter’s
“refutation” much too sweeping

for any use, especially after he



ing consideration in this, as in vate the long-term problem,
all current economic problems, while unnecessary delay in pre-
is the heavy and growing burden paring the ground for develop-
of rearmament. ment projects might have even
It is difficult therefore to escape more disastrous consequences.
Mrs. Spry’s conclusion that, Mrs. Spry looks even further
notwithstanding measures of re- ahead than this. Some of ihe
trenchmen. at home, there is more undeveloped countries neea
unlikely to be a surplus of not only “conerete capital” but
capital development goods for “social capital” too, if the full
export on a scale adequate to productive powers of both their

the needs of the countries of the
Commonwealth,

The Commonwealth
Ministers recognised
when they said in theif com-
munique after the recent sterl-
ing area finance talks that out-
side investment would be wel-
vomed. Meanwhile an investiga-
tion into the opportunities for
ihe most economic utilisation of

Finance
this fact

such internal resources as can
be applied to Commonwealth
development is under way and
the officials concerned in_ this

study have just completed their
first series of talks.

Their discussions have presum-
ably covered not only the prob-
lem of finding the resources for
development, but also the ques-
tion of how far and how fast we
should proceed,

It should be realised that
economic development is essen-
tially a long-term policy. Quick
results cannot, and should not,
be expected. In Mrs. Spray’s
words: “The urgency of immed-
iate results, of a quick increase
in the output of vital raw mater-
ials and foodstuffs, and of
economies in dollar imports by
means of new domestic produc-
tion, must not obscure the
importance of longer run and
less tangible considerations.”

Expedience which promise
speedy current relief from the
pressure of shortages, either of
dollars, or materials and food-
stuffs or of manufac-ures of
capital or consumer goods, may,
she says, conflict with longer
run measures which, in a more
remote future, would yield rich
returns of increased productive
power.

This is the essence of the Com-
monwealth development problem

The difficulty, however, is to
decide which is more essential—
quick returns or the long-run

capi.al projects.

Measures which may bring
speedy relief from the current
economic perils besetting the

sterling area may merely aggra-

Dare

This would mean reversal of
America’s foreign policy, as far
as Asia is concerned,

Although Taft has proclaimed
that he favours a European
army, there is no doubt that
America’s policy in Europe will
also undergo profound changes
if he wins the election.

Not all Republieans take the
Taft line. In open disagreement
with him is Governor’ Earl
Warren, of California, who also
hopes to run for the presidency.

Says Warren: “I believe that
if the U.S. were to aid Chiang,
this action would be dissociated
from U.N.O. and therefore our
war alone.”

Senator Wayne
Oregon, one of the most
of the Republicans, gives
warning: “If the Republicans
are manoeuvred into a_ position
that justifies a war party label,
we will be defeated in the
election, as we should.

“Our allies have indicated that
they are not going to ‘buy’ pro-

Morse, of
Liberal

posals for an all-out war in
Asia.”

Freer hand
General George Stratemeyer,

until recently commander of all
U.N.O, air forces in Korea, takes

the view of Taft and other ex-
treme Republicans — that if
MacArthur’s advice had _ been

followed last spring the Chinese
Reds would have been defeated
by now.

This extreme viewpoint is
causing Truman’s State Depart-
ment to make some concessions
to meet it, according to a
Washington report front-paged
in the New York Times.

The report says that the
following actions are under active
consideration by the State

Department :—

1, Giving the UiS. Seventh
Fleet on guard in Formosan
waters—a freer hand in dealing
with any Communist moves
against the island. At present
the fleet is only supposed to deal
with attacks “by sea or air,” so
presumably a freer hand would
mean



confirms Mr. Barrow in respect
of new and larger equipment to
come. Mr. Barrow’s contention
as I understood it was that if the
present TCA, aircraft are
damaging the runway their larger
ones will ruin it if indeed they
can land and take off on it at all;

the (b) method of repairing it
notwithstanding,
To the ordinary person Mr.

Barrow's contention seems most
reasonable, and if only Mr.
Baxter had stated definitely in
his interview that T.C.A., were
not contemplating the use of
turbo jets and that they were
confidently expecting our run-
way both in its length and its
strength to take their 1954 air-
craft without danger or damagé
to either, he sure would have
been very convincing. Is it too
much to hope that he will make
this statement now?
With thanks for space,

Yours sincerely,

A. E. S. LEWIS.
Bridgetown, 26.2.52,

Te Southern Cross

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—Since coming to your
Island several months ago I have
been a regular Subscriber to
your most interesting and inform-
ative publication.

As the _ constellation
Southern Cross” is not
in any part of Canada,
greatly appreciate if
advise me as to where and at
what time it now can be seen
Kindly print this information in
your morning paper,

Sincerely,

A CANADIAN VISITOR.

Skeete

“The
visable
I would
you could

mre Sy Director of

this ».,

bombarding Red _ troop

peoples and natural resources are

to be brought into play. “Not
only is future productive power
at stake,”’ she says, “but, perhaps,
also future friendship between
the white and the coloured
peoples, between the East and
the Wesi.”

Nor does the problem end
there, for when the world has

solved the present problem of in-
flation, it will have to face the
even more difficult problem of
correcting the fundamental un-
balance between the economies of
the under-developed countries,
which are the main sources of
raw material supplies, and those

of the more advanced countries
which need new markets and an
ever increasing flow of raw
materials to sustain and expand
their manufacturing industries.
The task of deciding how

’



“essential, comparatively, are
the rival claims ou limited capi-
tul resources as Mrs. Spry
points out, one calling for rare
econoinic wisdom and_ political
delicucy. The days are . gone
when such questions weré sei-
tled by individual investors. We
ate faced with a problem of
creating new mechanisms, such
the International Bank for
Reconstruction and Development,
for promoting, directing and con-
trolling investment within the
Commonwealth and between
Commonwealth countries and
other countries.
“We are faced,
“with the fact
ment must

1S,



us

too,” she says.

that future inves:-
depend on_ political
decisions; on the readiness of
electorates to accept, as of Gov-
ernments to adopt, policies which
impose sufficien.. limitations 6n
consumption to free resources
for capital purposes and which
call for strenuous exertions to
increase natiorfal production.”
FOOTNOTE:

Mrs. Spry, formerly of the
Depertment of Economics Uni-
versity of Toronto, is the wife of
Mr. Graham Spry, Agent-General
tor Saskatchewan in London,

concentrations ashore;

2. Cancelling the fleet’s orders
to prevent an attack by Chiang’s
Nationalists against the Red-
held mainland;

3. Telling Mao Tse-tung, Red
China’s boss, that Formosa will
remain fully protected by the
U.S., even if a Korean armistice
is signed.

All that especially clause
two is going to be received
with considerable dismay by
anti-Taft and’ anti-MacArthur
citizens,

‘Don’t retreat’

It follows very ciosely the line
laid down by respected Republi-
can John Dulles in a speech he
made to a_ private group in
Washington the other day.

And in Des Moines, lowa —
the heart of America’s mid-West
Dulles tells an_ influential
farmers’ audience that “to retreat
into our own shell by abandoning

our allies of the free world
would be to co-operate 100 per
cent, with the Kremlin’s encir-

clement policy.

“America should combat the
indirect aggression of the Soviet
Politburo by a political offensive
against the despots themselves.”

Stressing that he was voicing
his personal views and not those
of Truman, whose special adviser
on foreign affairs he is. Dulles
added that he doubts if the
Soviet leaders will ever venture
“on open military conquest.”

As for Taft, his mind is made
up and he will keep on with his
present line to the bitter end.
He is convinced that the series
of Republican presidential routs
Willkie and twice Dewey —
have been because they were
weak “me too-ers,” simply echo-
ing the Democrat line.

And Taft is certainly no little

Sir Echo.

Chicago cable: President
Truman recently denounced
“the chorus ot alarmists” who
said America should abandon
her allies and pull out of Europe
and Korea.

“We must

beat back these
threats to the United Nations,”
said Mr. Truman in a message
to a UNO association meeting.
—L.ESS. |

Science and Agriculture, told the
Advocate yesterday t h a t “The
Southern Cross” can be seen in
the southern sky between one and
three o’clock in the morning at
this time of the year.

He could not say precisely at
what hour it would be standing
erect.

If the sky is
visitor gets out
“The Southern
seen.

clear and our
of bed on time
Cross” will be

Thanks
To The Editor, The Advocate,—
SIR,—I have recently received
five copies of the Barbados
Advocate from Rev.
Clarke on behalf of the Barbados
Youth Movement. I am_ very
grateful to them for sending me
these papers and at the same
time enabling me to hear or
know something about the people
of the West Indies,
I was hoping to find a@ letter
enclosed in the papers but I am

sorry there was none so that I
may write to thank them
sincerely.

So I shall be very grateful if
you will publish this my letter of
thanks to the Barbados Youth
Movement for their kindness in
sending me the papers.

T hope when they read of this
they will endeavour to send me
their address to enable me to send
Gold Coast newspapers to them.
IT hope also they will not discon-

tinue sending me copies of the
Barbados Advocate as I like to!
read them very much.
WILLIE W. ADAMS.
P.O. Box 28
KUMASI
Gold Coast {
B.W.A ‘ZOU SI














L. Bruce!



wealth Development (j( Millions Now In! paper SER

The Empire, And 7 Out
OF 8 Are Coloured

By DON TAYLOR

FORTY MILLION “missing” people of
the Empire, almost as many as live in Eng-
land, have been discovered.

Instead of being head of about 570 million,
as was widely accepted, Queen Elizabeth II
8 actually the head of around 610 million.

This is more than a quarter of the esti-
mated world population.

Post-war census figures and more efficient
estimating are responsible fdr the higher
figure.

NUMBERS QUADRUPLED IN
HONGKONG

Previous estimates were off the
because :—

1. Some countries never had a real cen-
sus—some still await one.

2. Chaos of war led to confusion in many

target

lands.

3. There was difficulty in assessing
nomad and-isolated peoples.
4. Unofficial migration: In Hongkong,

for example, the population quadrupled in
seven years, many of the newcomers being
refugees from China. :

4,000,000 MORE EVERY YEAR

Here are some facts about Empire popula-
tions to-day :—

INDIA: Census figures show about 357
million,

Yet, until recently, our own official Com-
monwealth Relations Office List gave an
estimate of 295,549,404.

India’s population, under British rule,
trebled itself in 60 years. It is believed to
be increasing by four million every year.

In KENYA a million more Africans were
counted—the estimate being wrong by 20
per cent.

MALAYA, too, has 100,000 more than an-
ticipated.

NIGERIA, our largest Colonial territory,
provides a remarkable example of mislead-
ing estimates. In 1943 it was thought to
have about 21 million inhabitants; in 1948,
25 million. Now it is being spoken of as 28
million.

CEYLON’S population is increasing by
nearly three per cent. each year.

And the population of East Africa is re-
ported to have increased by 115 per cent.
in 17 years.

SOUTHERN RHODESIA’S has
trebled itself in 40 years.

BRITAIN IS THE MOST CROWDED

Can these figures be claimed as evidence
of the benefits of British rule?

It looks like it. For, in China, there has
been little to show the population has in-
creased on anything like the same scale.

Is INDIA, with her hundreds of millions,
the most crowded of the major Empire
countries?

No. It is Britain.

There are 531 people to the square mile
here; 313 in India.

Yet, in AUSTRALIA, there are only 2.8
people to the square mile: and 3.3 in Canada.

In one area of the Empire—the Antarctic
Dependencies—covering 2,647,000 square
miles, there are no permanent human in-
habitants.

NO GREAT LOSS BY MIGRATION

Our population in Britain has increased
by about 4,000,000 in 20 years, roughly nine
per cent,

We have not lost any great number
migration.

For the white population of the Empire
as a whole has increased from the 70,000,000
in 1940 only to about 77,500,000—just over
ten per cent. in 12 years.

That means that almost seven out of
every eight Empire folk are black, brown or
yellow.

During the 84 years of Queen Mary’s life
the Empire peoples have more than doubled.

Look at these figures :—

1861 — 259 million.
1871 — 283 million.
1881 — 310 million.
1891 -— 381 million.
1901 — 400 million.

By 1926, there were around 475 million,
and just before the last war the figure was
thought to be about 510 million.

COUNTRIES LOST AFTER THE WAR

In 1945, the figure of 550 million was
being used.

Then we lost Burma, Eire, Transjordan
and Palestine from the family—and with
them about 23 million people.

Yet, here we are now with 610 million !

Queen Elizabeth the First, in whose reign;
the Empire really began, ruled over a mere}
four millions.

One last point. The Empire is not “a
quarter of the earth’s surface” as is so often |
| declaimed.

It is really not far short of a third.
But that is counting the huge area of the|
|Antarctic Dependencies.

And whether our claim to these will ever
|be universally recognised is another story.
—L.ES.

almost

by





MY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952â„¢

(eae ntneema












RVIETTES

In Plain White
$1.00 per hundred

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

VALOR
DOUBLE
OVENS





VALOR
2 — 3 BURNER
OIL STOVES

Also Single Burner Stoves |
and Spare Parts for all makes. |

|. i

C. S. PITCHER & CO.



‘are made from

MOYGASHEL
LINENS

BENBURG

BALMORAL

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

im Popular Shades
& Lightweights

°
°

se





_————eeeeaee





DOMINICA
GIGARR "|

Or






Sale at Your Druggist

DACOSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents

Fillet Steaks
Calves Liver
Minced Steak
Hams in tins
Beef in tins
Tongués in tins
Sardines
Anchovies
Antiplasto
Macaroni

Fruit Salad
Mango Chutney
Red Cheese
Kraft Cheese
Carr’s Crackers
Anchor Butter

fime Beverages

Bass’s Ale
Worthington Ale
Guinness Stout
Tuborg Beer
Gold Braid Rum

Phone GODDARDS For Service |



’

SSS







‘
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY

29

, BB2





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

—— ee

Butchers’ Methods In Country Districts

DISCUSSED BY HEALTH
COMMISSIONERS

THE

COMMISSIONERS

of Health of St. Michael

yesterday discussed a letter from the Colonial Secretary
in which he points out that the Commissioners of Health
of St. John have drawn the attention of Government to
the fact that “licences are issued to butchers in the country
districts without the knowledge or consent of the Com-
missioners who are of the opinion that this practice is det-
rimental to the health of the community.”

The Commissioners after dis-
cussing the matter, decided on
the motion of Mr. E. D. Mottley
that, because the question of
economics was closely, bound up
in the matter, there should be a
joint meeting of the various
Commissioners of Health, the
Director of Medical Services and
the Inspector of Butchers’ Meat,
to discuss the matter before tak-
ing steps against the butchers.

The Clerk of the Meeting was
accordingly instructed to reply to
the Colonial Secretary, and em-
body the suggestion of the Com-



missioners in the letter.
Amendment
Leading off the discussion on
the, matter, Mr. E. D. Mottley
said that it did not directly af-
fect the parish of St. Michael,
but the suggestion put forward

by the Commissioners of St. John
would necessitate an amendment
to the Market and Butchers Act.

In view of the fact that the
suggestion came from the Com-
missioners of Health, he wonder-
ed whether it was not a matter
which should be considered by
the General Board of Health, with
whom would rest the ultimate
responsibility.

They had to bear in mind the



meat situation in the colony as
well as the economic position of
the people who butchered meat
in the ountr Many matters,
such ne sugeested by the
Ce is of St Tohn had
been discu d when the Public
Healt Bil up

He suggested that they should
rep to. ti Colonial Secretary
stating h he matter was of
such importance, and was. so
closely bound up with the eco-
nomics of the people concerned,
that the Commissioners could not
immediately express ahy par-
ticular view on the matter, but
would welcome a joint meeting
of the various Commissioners of
the several parishes, the Direc-
tor of Medical Services and the
Inspector of Butchers’ Meat, at
which the matter would be

fully discussed,
Good Recommendations

Hon, V. C. Gale said that the
recommendations of the Commis-
sioners of St. John was a good
and sound one from the point of
view of health, and had always
seemed to be an anomaly in re-
spect to that matter. He drew
attention to the fact that butch-
ers within the city limits had to
do their slaughtering in the mar-

ket where their meat was in-
spected, but those outside the
limits could do their slaughter-

ing at home, so long as they ob-
tained a licence from the Col-



onial Treasury,

Hon. Mr. Gale also pointed out
that labourers at plantations
benefited when slaughtering was
done on the plantations on Sat-
urday mornings, in as much as

they did not have to pay to travel
to the market in the city, and
in some cases, were charged at a
lesser rate than what obtains in
the city.

He was in favour of Mr, Mot-
tley’s suggestion, and seconded
the motion that the view of the
Cammissioners should be made
known to the Colonial Secretary
in their reply.

News In Brief:

A. WA. Obtain
Revolving
Barbell Set

There is another revolving Bar-
bell set in the islana, apart from



the one recently purchased by
the Palm Springs Barbell Club.
This set was bought by G.

Hinkson of Leeward Barbell Club
and has previously been placed
at the disposal of the Amateur
Weightlifting Association of Bar-
bados.

A visitor to the island, who is a
keen physical culturist, told the
Advocate that all the Weightlifting
Clubs in the island should try to
import the modern revolving sets.

- * .

Gordon Searles of Westbury
Road, St. Michael, reported that
his nickel watch was stolen from
his residence between 5.00 and
3.00 p.m. on Wednesday.

. . *

A silver bangle and a gold chain
were stolen from the home of
Gertrude Shepherd at Reed Street,
Bridgetown, between 8.00 and
8.45 p.m, on Wednesday.

* - =

Five motorists were reported
for exceeding the speed limit on

WednéSday. Of the 22 traffic
offences on the Police Reports
yesterday, two motorists ‘were



reported for not drawing up close
enough, to.the side of the road,
and two for not conforming with
road signs.

e * -

A vortion of a boarded and
shingled house at Mason Hall St.,
St. Michael, was burnt when a
fire broke out at about 9.15 p.m.
on Wednesday. The house is the
property of Stanford Small of
Tweedside Road, St. Michael and
was insured.

+ . .

Torrence Smith of Dr. Clarke’s
Gap, Bank Hall, St. Michael, re-
ported that $27 in cash was stolen
from his shirt pocket at his home
between 8.30 a.m. and 8.15 p.m.
on Wednesday.

Woman Placed On
Boud For Wounding

Hazel Howell of Lakes Folly,
St. Michael, was yesterday placed
on a bond for six months in the



sum of £5 by His Worship Mr.

G. B. Griffith, Acting Police Mag-
istrate of District “A”, for wound-
ing Gloria Thomas on her neck
on February 15,

Police Woman 12 Wilkinson
arrested Howell who was after-
wards charged with wounding.
Gloria Thomas of Chapman Lane,
St. Michael told the court that
while she was on her way on
February 15 at about 8 p.m. the
defendant and her sister ambushed
her and gave her a sound beat-
ing. The defendant hit her behind
her neck and she went to the
General Hospital where she was
treated,















‘PAGE FIVE













oo
e . - 7.
Who Will Pay Inspector Dismissed After ‘olume Two Of
- +
F ‘of bordi 4 ° ee Police Magazine
or Water nsu nation
ls Now On Sale
In Schools? THE COMMISSIONERS of Health of St. Michael, rhe first issue of Volume 2 oi|
: after going into certain adverse reports against Sub- the Barbados Police Magazine was |
The Commissioners of Inspector Jonothan Small, dismissed him from their on sale from yestera ins |
Health of St. Michael vester- services as from the 22nd of February on one month’s pay volume was also edited by Cap
day decided on the motion of in lieu of notice tain W A. R, Armstro |
Hon. V. C. Gale, seconded by Small, who was an Inspector for the past five years, ao eee ae vee Farmer 0
Mr. A. R. Toppin, that they was brought before the Commissioners on a charge of “"ho: Police. Mavazines wert
would reply to a query from “gross insubordination” to the Chief Sanitary Inspector, publisned last year. Three were |
the Commissioners of St. Mr. W. W. Merrit, whose instructions regarding the de- caiea by Captain Farmer and|
John to the effect that they livery of a notice to a householder in connection with a vne by Captain Armstrong. Cap-|
‘ : e115 ¥ . a ° var og . » editor-|
are quite willing to sign the sanitary nuisance, he “bluntly” refused to carry out. tain Farmer gave up the editor-|
petition whereby Govern- Ss alla eae ; chip eg ae had to leave foi
m i j he lief Sanitary Inspector England to take a cours¢
ons be responsible for the CARPE. | reporting to the Commission- The current magazine has an}
nayment of all water used in NTER | ers, pointed out that it has been attractive cover which shows two]
Elementary Schools,” IMPROVING | stomary for the past 30 years Harbour Policemen rowing their]
Th c oie Thirty an Inspector in one district poat into the Careenage Their |
Bem ecwnen oe. Hipalh Seen ty teens, One een ' request another Inspector in faces are stern and reflect the}
of St. John had written to the penter James Small of Fair- inother district to serve notices yough life of the sea. The photo- |
St. Michael Commissioners point- field, St. Michael who was persons whose rent houses in . . t Sa has Charles All-
ing out that since the drawing admitted to the General nother district have become a ®'4@P" Was abl sh “1 hire gt “the | Wr
up and signalling of the petition | Hospital on February 20 nitary nulaance. mon and published through the| LU
whereby Government be respon- suffering from stab wounds When a similar request was courtesy of whe’) Barbados Ful 2 .
sible for the payment of all wa- on various parts of his body made to sub-Inspector Small, he licity Committee 0 5
ter used in the Elementary is still reported by the Police tused the other Inspector, and Phot hs
Schools, an amendment had been to be making good progress m being summoned by the Chief omg ape e
passed to the Public Health Act, and gaining strength every Sanitary Inspector, and given Many more of Allmon's photo 3
making it compulsory for the aay direct instructions, he twice re- graphs appear in the magazine
Commissioners of Health of the The wound on the throat fused in the presence of the Captain Armstrong, in_ his 4ale at the
various parishes to pay one half | ‘s virtually healed and yes- reat majority of the staff editorial, pays tribute 10 the new | on
« ae of the water rates ree With the help two : Inspector - General of Colonial
charg n respect of the respec- policemen ho are always « »rly samel?? aa pt ins 51.
tive schools. ety by his bedside he was seen mproperly Dressed Police. He writes; “In July 1951,/

Entire Cost

The St. John Commissioners
re-affirmed that they are still
of the opinion that the Govern-
ment should bear the entire cost,
and they therefore wanted to
know if the Commissioners of St.
Michael and the other parishes
were willing to proceed with the
said petition.

Discussing the matter, the
Commissioners of St, Michael
pointed cut ‘hat they had al-
Ways cxpreassd the view that
the cost of supplying water in
the elementary schools should
be the sole responsibility of the
Central Government. My. E.
D. Mottley, however was of
opinion that in as much as they
had already discussed the mat-
ter, and Government had only
seen fit to pay half, and had
accordingly amended tke Act
that the matter should be left
over for a while, pending fur-
ther discussion on the new
Public Health Act.

Mr. A. R, Toppin expressed
the view that the minute Gov-
ernment decided to pay half the
rates they showed a sign of weak-
ness, and he would suggest that
St. Michael join with the other
parishes in signing the petition.

Mr. J. M. Kidney, Chairman
of the Commissioners said that
Government should bear the en-
tire responsibility, as it was no
part of the Commissioners of
Health expenses.

Government’s Concern

Hon, V. C, Gale said that the
elementary schools were tihe con-
cern of the Government, and re-
called that at one time these
schools were run by the Church-
es, and only received a grant.
There was at that time no Edu-
cation Department, but what was
known as the Education Board,
but now that there was an Edu-
cation Department, the matter
of supplying water to tihe schools
should be looked after by Gov-
ernment.

He later_moved, seconded by
Mr. A. R. Toppin, that the Com-
missioners of St. Michael should
reply to the St. John Commis-
sioners to the effect that hey
were quite willing to sign the
petition, The meeting agreed.



U.K. Missionary Tells Of
Experiences In China

MR. A. G. CLARKE, a U.K. Missionary who has lived

in China for over 30 years,

of some of his experiences

told the Advocate yesterday
in that country, particularly

during the Second World War.

Mr. Clarke who now resides in Bermuda for health
reasons, is on a four months’ visit to the British West
Indies conducting a series of Bible Services in the various

centres.

He arrived on Sunday by
B.W.LA., from Antigua and is
staying with Mr. and Mrs, Fred
Ashby at “Henderson Lodge,”
Clapham.

He said that when the war broke
out in December 1941, he was in
Weihai in North China and was
immediately arrested by the
Japanese gendarmes. He was
taken their headquarters
where he remained for
a week undergoing severe
questioning. He was then sent
to solitary confinement which
lasted for three months, He was
released on condition of “house
arrest” for five months after
which he was sent to Lunghwa
Camp in Shanghi with his wife
and younger son for internment
with nearly 2,000 internees,
chicfly of British nationality.

Great Service

These internees included many
Missionaries belonging to séveral
societies as well as doctors and
nurses who rendered magnificent
service in the camp with a min-
imum of equipment. They re-
mained in the camp for three
years until the war ended,

to



TREASURE TROVE

Treasure Trove (or treas-

ure found) is where any
gold is found or silver in
coin, plate or bullion, is
found hidden in a house or
in the earth or other private
place.

If the owner is unknown
the treasure belongs to the
Crown. The finding should
be reported to the Coroner,
who may hold an inquest to
determine whether articles
of gold or silver so found
are treasure trove or not.



Mr. Clarke said that the camp,
a college campas before the war,
was in a ruinous state and had
to be made habitable by the early
internees by way of cleaning the
rubbish, making roads and clean-
ing the buildings etc.

The camp was in a malaria
district and 75% of the internees
were infected. Many of them
suffered from vitamin deficiency
diseases,

A number of the _ internees
escaped from the camp and as a
result, the remainder were pun-
ished by reducing the already
megre rations by 50% in addition
to confinement to billets for
several weeks.

In charge of the camp were a
Japanese Commandant and 24
consular police. The internees
were however allowed to organ-
ise for the well-being of the
camp and this made things rather
better for them than would have
otherwise been the case.

Horrors of Camps

As far as treatment was con-
cerned, he said that there were
many unpleasant incidents, but
nothing comparable with the hor-
rors of the camps in Malaya and
elsewhere.

“We had over 300 children in
the camp, but they did not lack
education because they had a
number of trained teachers in-
cluding university graduates
amongst the internees who drew
up a full curriculum up to School
Certificate standard for the bene-
fit of the children.”

He said that the internees also
organised a series of lectures for
peovle who were keen on getting
a liberal education. Men who had
experience along certain lines
like architecture and engineering
gave lectures on the various sub-
jects

There were also some lectures
on travel and Others’ which
covered all branches of know-
ledge, Mr. Clarke himself teaching
decorative design and the Chi-
nese language in addition to
being quartermaster of the
camp. There was also a Com-
nuttee for organised entertain-
ments and other activities.

He said that owing to his
onerous duties of quartermaster
hiy health broke down, and he
was sent back to England with
others in a hospital ship.

Speaking of his early pioneer-
ings days in China when he
went out as a missionary to
spread the gospel among the
people in 1914, Mr, Clarke said
that he was faced with cOnsid-
erable difficulties and dangers
in connection with his work, and
had a number of incidents with
Chinese bandits.

He however thought that the
Chinese peasants were really a
lovable and_interesting people of
simple thrifty habits.

“Although I am not able to go
back to China owing to the polit-
ical situation, yet I have the satis-
faction of knowing that there are
many gifted men there to carry
out the christian work” he said.

Mr. Clarke, a Bible Teacher and
Author, has also written books,
one of which is “The Analytical
Studies in the Psalms”, the notes
for which were prepared while
he wag interned in China.

Excellent Meeting

WASHINGTON, Feb. 28

President Truman described the
Lisbon conference of the North
Atlantic Pact nations at a press
conference on Thursday as being
an excellent meeting and very
successful.

Truman said he is still working
on the selection of an Ambassador
to the Vatican byt has made no
progress. He promised correspon~
dents to let them know promptly
when he found
position.—U.P





a man to take tl “i

walking in the ward. It is
expected that he will be dis-




Stat¢

The matter was brought to the Office that the Secretary of

charged ‘early next week Oot eaten Finance oe tor the Colonies had appointed
The Police are holding oned rae ‘gig ht i ihe Colonel W. A. Muller, C,M.G,, to
Small in corinection with the charge ma m9 death of 36-year-old domes- xplain his : Ray re Smali on i a pector-General ef the Colonia
tic servant Gwendolyn enasien appeared: velanet the Police and Adviser on Colonia
Clarke of New Orlean Committee. “improperty dseeesa’" Police matters to the Secretar)
ee Ros St Michael {1 when asked why he had re- Of State for the Colonies.
Gdserel Hoonital about eno fused, replied that he had been “Colonel Muller who | vy



p.m, on February 20, bu
died shortly after she wa
admitted



1.D.0. Mey Share tn
B.G. Rice Industry
(By JAY R. SINGH)

LONDON,

The Cole nial Development Cor

poration may shortly take a finan-
cial interest in development and
expansion of the Pr'tish Guiana
Rice Industry, This interest wil
be on a partnership basis with
the British Guiana Government.

Negotiations are already under
way between the Corporation’
headquarters in London and the

Colony government for the taking
over of the 4,300-acre Mahaicony

Abary Rice Development and
Expansion Stheme, the only one
of its kind in the Empire. So fai
though it has proved to be an
uneconomic proposition to the
Colony although serving to pro-
vide the necessary data for me-
chanising the Industry.

Negotiations

The negotiations are an outcome
of recommendations of the Rice
Mission sent out by the Colonial
Development Corporation in 1951
to investigate the possibility of
expanding rice production § in
British Guiana, which is the most
important rice producer of the
British Western Hemisphere ter-
ritories.

The first task of the Corpora-
tion would be to push ahead with
the Mahaicony-Abary Scheme.

The money involved is said
be around £1) million.

The British Guiana Government
and the Colonial Development
Corporation however, have not yet
decided how much each will ad-
vance,

Meantime, the Colonial Devel-
opment Corporation may _ still
eventually embark on a Colony~
wide race development and ex-
pansion project. This would cost
around £3 million and bring
200,000 additional acres of rice
under cultivation. At present
British Guiana has 88,000 acre
yielding an average of 56,000 ton:
ennually. A percentage of this i
exported to the British Caribbean
territories.

Eventually it is
British Guiana will
the B.W.I, territories

The Colonial Development Cor-
poration’s decision to embark on
the major £3 million scheme will
depend on their success in aeccel-
erating economically the produc-
tion envisaged by the Mahaicony-
Abary project.

that
all

hoped
supply



(Of the 4,300 = acre the
Mahaicony-Abary Scheme the
Corporation expects to put 3,800
acres under cultivation, The re-
maining 700 acres will be left for



cattle grazing and the growing
grass).
—Expres

RATES OF EXCHANGE

PEGRUARY 28, 1952
CANADA
734/10 Cheques on Banke 117/10
Demand Dratt !
Sight Drafts 714/10
734/10 Cable
719/10 Currency 70 0
Coupons 9
50% Silver 20°



Ah!
LUNCH

meat, cooked
and soft foods.

vegetables

Lunch Wrap keeps Flav
in because it is moist
and the price per

only babe.
ee

prc

roll

7

to ®



Use Lunch Wrap for sandwiches,



joined the Colgnial Police Set
vice in Ceylon in 1920 and serve:
there until 1988 when he was ap

employed as an Inspectar and not
a messenger

aoenes a poe, wer heard pointed Commissioner of Po! )
efore he ommissioners at -piinidad and Tobago. In 1948 he}
their meeting yesterday, Small

was transferred on promotio

was asked if he would apologise Police

Commissioner of





to the Chief Sanitary Inspector, ~ > : 5 n rang ;
and he replied, “if that was the Y!ka, Bast Africa, Th
wish of the Board.” ment he ,held until h i
Members of the Board viewed Inspector-General of Colo
the matter very seriously, and Police Forces on Novembe
it was felt that such conduct, !95!
if condoned, might lead to tie Ik with considerable |
spread of an epidemic which sure that we welcome Colo
might bave heen checked if the Muller to his new office. His ex
particular Inspector had’ served perience in Colonie! Police Affa
a notice given him. i unquestionable and with h
a . nersonal knowledge ‘ W
Mr. Mottley, in view of cer- Indian problems, the Police Fore
un information, appealed to the of these Colonies houla benef
Board to consider severe discip- ‘ ae c ,
nary measures against Small, considerably upder hi =
rather than dismissal, and sug- ®4vice
ted that he be suspended for Improvement
three months without pay, in ad- ‘We look forward to ar
dition to an open apology to the visit from the new Insp¢
Chief Sanitary Inspector. General, and as one who ha
The* Board however felt that, the privilege and honour to hay
from other reports on the In- se:ved under him for four yea
spector’s general conduct and in Trinidad and Tobago ar
ibility, there would be repeti- knows fully his capabilities ar
tions of such behaviour, and that above all his interest in We
therefore he hould be dismissed Indian Police Affairs, we can in
from the 22nd of February, deed look forward to his makin
and given one month's salary in recommendations for general im
lieu of notice, provement and efficiency in th
Police Forces in these Colonie
“We again offer our best wishe
P li % S . i nd congratulations to him on t
oO 1¢e ecenes new appointment
In the Editorial, Captain A
T B Film d trong also makes reference
oO e e various improvements made to tl
local Force He write h
Mr. I, Carmichael will use the the new grocery section of
mainder of the film which was Police Canteen at Police Head
en to the Barbados Police to quarters which was opened by
ke scenes of the Central Police Hon, R,. N, Turner, Colonia) Secre
tion and St, Cecilia Barracks. tary and states that this was an
These scenes will be taken this other step forward made in the
morning. welfare of the Force.
of St Cecilia Barrack he
The 200 feet of coloured film writes: “The new barracks wer¢
w given to the local Force by purchased early in 1951 by Gov
the Commissioner of Police 1m gpnment in order to provide our
Montreal in appreciation of the pycellent Police Band with proper
hospitality shown him when he living, working and recreation
was in the island, accommodation, where the entir¢
Already Mr. Carmichael has Band is now housed with far
ésken scenes from the Musical more satisfactory results thar
Ride, Drill Display and Beatine previously experienced at Central
of the Retreat which took place Police Station where their Qua

1, the Police Show at District “A’
station on Tuesday.

were not only inadeounte b

@ On Page 6

ters





SERVANT’S INQUIRY AIDMOURNED

IS WORSHIP Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Coroner of District

“A", yesterday adjourned die the inquiry into the
circumstances surrounding the death of 36-year-old domestic
servant Gwendolyn Clarke of New Orleans, St. Michael,

Gwendolyn Clarke was admitted to the General Hospital on
February 20 at about 6.30 p.m., suffering from stab wounds on
her body, but died a few minutes after she was admitted to
the Casualty.

On the first hearing in the inquiry Dr. A. 5. ¢
formed the post mortem examination on the body of the deceased
February 21, told the of his findings. Next
1s Daisy Clarke who said that the deceased used to live
home at New Orleans, Westbury Road, St. Michael. At one time
Small also used to live at her house but sometime
staying at her place owing

sine

ato who pe

on court vitness

it her



Jame ago

she prevented Small from to hi
behaviour.

About 6.15 p.m. on February 20 she was told something and
going to Westbury Road saw the deceased lying in a pool of
blood. The deceased was taken to the General Hospital, On
February 21 she identified the body to Dr. A. S. Cato in the

Mortuary of the General Hospital,
The deceased was the mother of seven children.
= a A SN,
vavapeenats a ——








WRAP

cheese



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET



was announced by the Colonia |



THE WORLD'S MOST POPULAR
SEWING MACHINE

«an

Will do every description of Sewing and makes a perfect

Lock-stitech on all thick

SS

miateriais, or thin,

a

«»

ava “J@QoNKS”

IT WILL LAST A LIFE-TIME

Complete with Wood Cover





Hardware Store
Tel.

HARRISON'S

2364.

|
| ‘we ONLY $99.16 EACH








} SSS SS SS

Come in To-day
and

Knujoy Our

ICE CREAM



SPECIAL

Row Ube delighted







vnights Phoenix |
Soda Fountain |





|
'
\\
|
|
|
|





: a 3 “i
uv
| Select These Food Savings i
ne {
i) Originally For this i
Kf Week
i ROBERTSONS JAMS {{
u \PRICOT, REDCUR : ea (K

BLACKCURRA } ‘ 50
i OBERTSONS MARMALADE i}
{ GOLDEN SHRED, SILVER SH D (
Hf SCOTCH ORAN 45 i
}} ROBERTSONS GING! DI ae
i} rsONS S$ 4 W BE JAM ; 57 \
\ = OM
i oul i}
i 90 i
i HA . i ’
qi I I SKE I 4 1 {
H} f NHA f ;
i ri I 77 ‘
i INC ; ai
i k ; E 4.50 (
v
ii} . COCKADE FINE RUM |
i} ° i
STANSFELD., SCOTT & CO. LTD. i
{ 4
PAGE SIX

CLASSIF











DIED
WAITTHE On February 28 1952, at
the General Hosp 1, Dudley Wait
late. Superintendent, Christ Chur
Highways. Funera! will leave hi
late residence, Enterprise, at 4.30
p.m. today for the Christ Church
Cemetery
Leotta Lashiey, Joseph Lashley.
29.2.52
IN MEMORIAM
BROME: In loving memory of our dear
Edmund Brome who died on Feb

22, 1952.
Walk on beloved,
ful garden
Where pain and sorrow never come,
Soon our earthly course we'll finish,

in God's beauti-












TELEPHONE 2508.

IED ADS.

FOR SALE





1950 Model 8,000

CAR: Morris 8 h.p
mileage App S. Bhikha, King Street,
Phone 4814 29.2.52--3n
Spelt ppetniceesieeereeeetininaen rca cicae
CAR: One Prefect Ford Not an old
Model but with four new tyres. Dial
2969 and ask for Mrs. Outram
29.2.52—I1n

-

CAR 1938 Morris, 8 h.p. Sedan.
Recently overhauled and rebored, Good
battery Tyres fair $525.00 Apply:
E. H. Webster, Applewhaites

28.2.52—in
ee

















CAR—1 Morris Car. 8 h.p., mileage
And sing, with thee, sweet #0n8*! 24,000. For further particulars, apply
Ribera ee Cariisie (Son), Ancla] #: A. Cuke, (Junior), c/o Bovell &
a ‘ lisie : > 423 29.2 52
(Daughter-in-law), Verbena Green and Rhovte, Phone 4351 oe oS A
Emerald Clarke (Daughters), Renriex an@] CAR—One 1951 Hillman Minx. Excel-
LeNer.. and family owner driven. Dial Williams at 3006 or
I © thenete Gian
SPRINGER: in loving memory of our after working hours 95251 93.2. 52—t.f.n
dear beloved father Clifford St. Clatr ei a ee ee
wate at ‘000 See cere: CAR: 1950 Hillman Minx, condition
1a y ’ p' , a
Two years have passed since that M. aie a eee L., Tnyhane,
ae ae axwell, or Phone 8558, 3339 ws
When the one we loved was taken oF 5.0
sya : p v bseahi CAR—One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon
The was hard the shoe in excellent condition. Contact ¢C. J.
severe, P Rameharan, Phone 3122, or Cole & Co.,
We never thought that death was 50}; 4q. Phone 4316 26.2.52—4n,
near
Mirlam, Barrie, Gordon, Edgar (Child- “
fen), and seven grand children ELECTRICAL
29.2.52—1n
oN a cicsiesiicnriomiininn —seeeees BLECTRIC Irons, toasters, mincers,
M oO TA kettles ete. all reasonable prices Also
1 P R a Electric cooking ranges. At our new
BARBADOS ELEMENTARY TEACHERS’ | showroom, dial 5196. K. R. Htnte & Co.
ASSOCIATION lad 29,.2,52—an

All HEAP TEACHERS are invited to 4
Special meeting at the Chureh House on
Saturday Ist March at 10 a.m

F. H. BARKER,
Hon. Secty,
B.E.S.T.A
28.2.52—2n

—_—————

PERSONAL



This serves to notify the public that
I do not hold myself responsible for
any debt or debts contracted in my

name unless fy a written order signed
by me.
LESLIE MURPHY
Dayrells Road,
Christ Church
28.2.52—2n

WANTED

MiSCELLANEOUS

BOARDERS: Male,
quiet respectable district
Bus stop at door. Phone







Local or Foreign,
par to town—
3943





3.
29.2.52—3n



YOUNG Business lady (white) requires
permanent “board” accommodation, All
meala or breakfast only would suit
Reply — Box R. C/o Advocate Co,

27.2.52—2n

ENGLISH SHORTHAND TYPIST re-
qu'res permanent position, Several years
experience. Good speeds. Reply Box
Z. C/o Advocate Co 27,2,52—2n





Person interested in running small ex-

clusive Club catering to tourist trade
which will also carry items for sale
to this type clientele. Attractive prem-
ises located in Bridgetown Apply
(Confidential) Box Z Y X, Barbados
Advocate. 29.2.52—n



GOVERNMEN: NOTICE

TENDERS FOR UNIFORMS

Separate tenders are invited for
the making of Uniforms for the
Police, Harbour Police and Fire
Brigade for the year 1952-53. Fur-
ther particulars can be obtained
from the office of the Commission-
er of Police.

Tenders, in duplicate, should be
forwarded in sealed envelopes
addressed to the Colonial Secre-
tary (and not to any officer by
name) so as to reach the Colonial
Secretary’s Office not later than
the 17th March, 1952,

Envelopes should be clearly
marked “Tender for Police Uni-
forms”, “Tender for Harbour
Police Uniforms”, or “Tender for
Fire Brigade Uniforms”, as the

may be.
ee c 23.2.52—3n.







The First Lecture in the Lenten
Series, “Christ on Passover", will
be given tonight at Lemon Grove at
7.30 pam.

Subject “The Prophets and the

Promise"

Mr, Cameron Tudor
invited
29,2.52-

OCLSP ELEY STP IOVPIIOST
10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH
MOTHER’S DAY

Speaker:
You are cordially
In



EASTER CARDS
CARDS

Spanish—English, English—Spantsh
Dictionary
Everything Shakespeare
Rudyard Kipling’s
(over 800 pages)
GLASS JARS $1.50

= at —
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ever

wrote. verse

ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

BJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466





AT
BARBADOS MUSEUM
iQ

WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

ROBERT J. MacLEOD
AND
PENCIL & WATER
COLOUR
FIGURE DRAWINGS

of West Indian Subjects

BY
HAROLD CONNELL
~O.
Open February 9—March 8

10 a.m. — 6 p.m.





'D. Walker, c/o Mrs





GEC. FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES—
Wholesale and Retail. CITY GARAGE





co., 4671. 21.2,52—t.f.n.
LIVESTOCK
cow Guernsey-Ayrshire Cow giving

16 pints milk daily, first Calf, Contact:
R. Trent, Nr. Four

29,2.52—2n

MISCELLANEOUS

AQUARIUMS-—-Large
giass. Empty or stocked with Fish and
plants, Also some young Siamese Fight-
ing Fish and other Tropical Fish. Archie
Clarke, Dial 5148

Roads, St. John





and small, all

24.2.52—5n

EMBROIDERED SP A heavy Spun
Sitk with .coloured embroidery, loveby
quality 36” wide $1.65 yard at KIRPAL-
ANI, 52 Swan Street 29,.2.53—in









HOLIDAY SHIRTS: Are you looking
for a gay colourful shirt? We have in-
numerable styles, designs and qualitis¢.
Shirts with Barbados colourful scenery
and map a speciality, THANI BROS

29.2.52—t.f.n

STLK SCARVES: Barbados View, Pure
Silk Scarves with colorful Sceneries and
Map of the Island $3.98 each. THANI™®,
Pr. Wm. Hy Street

2.2.52—t.f.n.





STRAW MATS Fancy and colourful,
for Bedrooms and Dining room, also for
Door front 8c. up. Can you beat it?
THANI Bros Dial 3466,

29.2.52-—t.f.n

FOHK RENT





HOUSES

SS
BUNGALOW: Fully furnished on St.
James Coast (7 miles from town), 3 bed-
rooms, 2 toilets and baths. All modern
conveniences. Dial John Lamming, 2472.
29.2.52—3n
oe
HOUSE—Two Storey House near
Aquatic Club, fully furnished including
Fridge, and Gas Stove. Telephone and
Radio installed, available from the Ist.
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-
letting would like agreement settled as
he is leaving the Island shortly, For
viewing; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay
Street. Phone 5010. 26.2.52—3n

—_—

MAYVILLE, Jackson, 2 bedrooms, Din-
ing and Drawing. Dial 2550 for particu-
lars. 29.2.52—In



MODERN FURNISHED FLAT—with
Siiver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.
For further particulars. Apply to Alma
Lashley No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.

23.2.52—t.f.n.



PAVILION COURT
One va cy in this popular residential
estate ge Ground Floor Flat avail-
able Mareh 3ist. Moderate inclusive rent
teclecoration and agreement for approved
tenant. Apply FP. J. North, Little Kent,
“hrist Chureh 29.2.52-—-3n

PUBLIC NOTICES

OF ST. MICHAEL

NOTICE
All persons, Firms and Corporations
having Accounts against the Parish of
Saint Michael are asked to send in their
Vouchers (in Duplicate) to the respective
Departments without delay so that pay-
nent can be made before the end of the

Parochial Year,
FRED J. ASHBY,
Churchwarden’s Clerk.
22.2.52—4n,












PARISH



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
Owners of Dogs are reminded that
heir Dog License expired on January
‘ist, 1952 and should be renewed imme-
Gintely
WOOD GODDARD,
Parochial Treasurer



29 52—2n





LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The epplication of Fitz H. Hunte, Shop-
eeper of Black Rock, St, Michael, holder
f Liquor License No. 1056 of 1952 granted
to F. F. Elias in respect of a board and
lingle shop at Welbeck, Black Rock, St
Michael for permission to use said Liquor
License &c,, at a 2-roofed board and
hingle building at Seciusion Road, Black
Rock, St. Michael

Dated this 27th day of February, 1952

re EB. A. McLBOD, Esq
| Melice Magistrate, Dist. “A”
FITZ H. HUNTE,
Applicant

‘.B.—This application will be consid-
t a Licensing Court to be held at
Court, Dist. “A* on Monday the

day of Mareh 1952 at 11 o'clock,






Oth

FE. A. McLEOD,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “A’

29.2.52—1n



DAN SPRINGER

STALL NO. 1
PUBLIC MARKET

| aR

To my and
Customers
supply of
Roast, Stew,
and ste
stock at

friends
have a good
Local Steak,
young heifers
buying

Planter

We
Prime
from
We are still
attractive prices




Dial 05 from *® am.
and
3630 after 2

Dial

Just Received...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply
Order To-day at
«»

(i. W. Hutehinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street





PUMLIC SALES







REAL ESTATE
HOUS Brand new, ampik edroor
house, all convenience with part



sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room Garage, laundr 2
servant rooms and storage room
On, attractive hillside site, Rockley New
Road, A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476

13,2.52—t.f.n

BUNGALOW —Modern 4

Bungalow, situated at Top Rock, Ch, Ch





on % acre of land, Having 2 fully tiled
Toilets and Baths, built-in Cupboards,
Outside 2 Garages, Servants’ rooms and
Playroom, Garden well iad out with
Dual entrance. Best offer £4,000 accepted.
Possession 3ist March Further particu



lars; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Ba3
Phone 5010, 27.2

27.252











The undersigned will offer for
at public competition at their office
17, High Street, Bridgetown, on Frida)
the 2th February, 1952, at 2 p.m
CLEVELAND a conveniently situated

house, in the 2nd Avenue,
standing on 11,273 square feet of land
and containing Drawing and Dining
Room on the Ist floor, 3 Bedrooms up-
stairs, and usual conveniences
For Inspection, telephone Miss Hutson
No, 2017
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO

20.2.52—6n





PUBLIC NOTICES



BARBADOS
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS
IN THE MATTER OF CENTRAL |
FOUNDRY
~and

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
ACT 1910

NOTICE 4% hereby given that a Petition
was on the 26th day of February 1952,
presented to His Lordship the Chief Judge
of the Court of Common Pleas by the
abovenamed Company to confirm an
alteration of the said Company's objects
proposed to be effected ty; a Special Res
olution of the Company unanimously
passed at an Extrad@dinany General Meet-

ing of the said Company held on the
30th day of ‘ovember 1951, and subse-
quently unanimously confirmed at an
Extraordinary General Meeting of the

said Company held on the Mth day of
December 1951, and which Resolution
runs as follows

“That the provisions of the Memoran
dum of Association of the Company wit!

respect to the Company's objects be
altered by adding a paragraph to be
numbered (rl) to Clause 3 of suct
Memorandum of Association the word

following that is to say:
(rl) To maintain and support or
in the establishment and support of as-

aid



sociations, institutions, funds, trusts, and
conveniences calculated to benefit er
ployees, or ex-employees of the Com-
pany or the dependents or connections

of such persons and to grant pensions
and allowances, and to make payments
towards insurance and to enter into Any
scheme calculated to benefit employees

or ex-employees of the Company or the
dependents or connection. of such
persons.”

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN
that the said Petition is directed to be
heard before His Lordship the Chief

lea

Judge of the Court of Common
on Friday the 21st day of March, 1!
10,30 o'clock in the forenoon, and
person interested in the said Company,
whether as creditor, or otherwise, de
sirous to oppose the making of an orde:
for the confirmation of the said alteratiot
urder the above Act, should appear 4
the time of hearing, by himself or his
counsel, for the purpose, and a copy of
the said Petition will be furnished to
any such person requiring the by
the Comparmy’s Solicitors, Messrs, Cottle,
Catford & Co., No. 17, High Street
etown, on payment of the regulated
for the same.








d this 27th day of February, 1952
COTTLE CATFORD & CO.,,
Solicitors for the

Company.

28.2. 52—3n



INTERESTING TO
VISITORS

You can now get
Your usual WARM WATER BATH
IF THERE iS GAS IN HOUSE
Gas Showrooms and
White Porce-

Call at your
See
lain Enamel Gas Geysers

% minutes you can have warm bath
Price

the Beautiful

- only $82.00



Belleville, |

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Police Mag.—from 5



}
| fetrimental to their musica,
ut ;
€ ute that he had, on more
ne occasion, suggested both
ere and during his service in
iad and Tobago, that to

Wwe
doubt, was

spirit of goodwill, which
an essential to
Federation of the Colonies in the
| West Indies, an interchange of
| Police and Militia Bands between
these islands on Concert-tours
|! would be ideal and welcomed by
}the Public of the Colonies.
Captain Armstrong also writes
about improvement and dAnnova-
tions at Police Headquarters and
New Recruits, but the most of his
space is allotted to the Barbados
Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs.
He writes: “Through the initia-

no

tive of Colonel R. T, Michelin,
this Colony can now boast of
no less than 14 such Boys’
and Girls’ Clubs scattered
throughout the Island and per-
forming excellent work in help-

ing to train the youth of this
Colony along social and demo-
cratic lines, providing games,

‘both indoor and outdoor, carpen-

| try, shoe-making, gardening and
!'many other items of interest and
instruction to the adolescent
,mind, keeping youth who are|
not so fortunate in having these
‘facilities in their homes, out of |
mischief, off the streets, away





from

all

rum-shops, ete., and above
| endeavouring to direct them
} from a life of crime—which is
[une of our principal duties—Pre-
vention,

He states that the adolescent
mind is quick to recognise fair-
play and the youth is anxious to
feel what he does is important
to somebody. “Too often, juvenile
crime begins by the lack of re-
cognition in the home, the school,
| o1 the playground, and when the
policeman can stir a feeling of
eres in the child and teach



him that he can help others in
a way which will bring him ap-
probation and __ self-satisfaction,
the scale thas been tipped in fav-
our of constructive outlets for
the inadequate child.”

There are other interesting
articles in this magazine as well
a large number of attractive
illustrations,

as



Harbour Log
In Carlisle Bay







Sch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch.Sunshine
R., Seh. Wonderful Counsellor, Sch.
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Emeline, Sch.
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Burma D., Sch.
Emanuel C, Gordon, Sch.-Cyril E. Smith,
Sch, Franklyn D. R., Sch. United Pilgrim,
Sch. Rainbow M., Sch. DOrtac, M.V
Lady Patrici Sch. Frances .W. Smith,
ss Car « Yacht Maria Catharina,
S.S. Crofter, S.S. Rogenes, Yacht Molli-
hawk

ARRIVALS

SS. Fort Townshend, 1944 tons net,
Capt. J. Henrikson, rom Grenada,

S.S. Stentor, 1,083 tons net, Capt. R.
Rugg, from Rotterdam

S.S. Philosopher, 4,998 tons, net, Capt.
T. Winstanley, from London

Ser A. H. Van Sluytman, 76 tons

Capt. Stoll, from Br. Guiana
DEPARTURES

M.V Cacique Del Caribe, 142 tons

net, Capt. N, Mulzac, for St. Vincent.
MAIL NOTICE

Mail for Martinique, Guadeloupe,
United Kingdom and France by the S$.S,





Colombie will be closed et the General ;
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 2 p.m. on the 29th
February, 1952; Registered Mail at 8.30

a.m., Ordinary Mail at 9,30 a.m
lst March, 1952.

Yroser LP PPPS OEF POSSI

‘s

» vr

% NOTICE

° Will the friend to whom I
& loaned my special Harrison College
@ Prize Book awarded in 1897 please
return same to Mayers C/o
$ Advocate Advertising Dept. This
xR very valuable to me

8 V. PARRAVICINO.
SCO SCCPL POLLEN

SPECIAL LINES FOR
LADIES!!

ART SILK in Wh
SPUNS — White,

ite, Pink and Blue
NOW 72e. yd.
Pink, Blue,

Beige, Brown

WOW SOc. yd.

CREPES, TAFFETAS, SILKS
and other Quality Silks

NOW $1.00 yd.

COTTON VESTS

IOW 2 for $1.00



CRINOLINE HATS
Pink, Blue, White, Gold

JERSEY PETTIC
SILK PANTIES
NIGHTIES (Sligh
FUGI

GIRLS’ VESTS &
NX
TOWELS

30 SWAN STRE

NOW
OATS

NOW S144 each

$1.44 each

NOW 2 for $1.44

tly damaged)

NOW $2.16 each
NOW j54e. yd.

NOW 24e.
PANTIES
Ow 3 for

NOW Sle.

INFANTS’ VESTS

$1.20
a& 6S



DIAL





| Bill Me@ :— 23rd October, 1951

on the |



2702.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tenders for the Supply of Fresh Cow’s Milk to the
Public Elementary Schools

Tenders are invited for the supply of Fresh Cow's Milk to the
Public Elementary Schools throughout the island during the follow-
ing school terms: —



Z, 5th May to ist August 1952
2. 15th September to 12th December 1952.
3. 12th January to 10th April 1953,

Particulars of the conditions and requirements of supplying the
Milk are embodied in the Contract, copies of which are available for
reference at the Colonial-Secretary’s Office.

Persons tendering must be prepared to furnish two sureties for
the due performance of the Contract.

The tenders marked “Tender for the supply of Fresh Cow’s Milk
to the Public Elementary Schools” must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock noon on Saturday, the 15th of March,
1952.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any
tender.
19th February, 1952,

23.2.52—3n.



OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

BARBADOS.

IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or incumbrance
in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant)
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witr documents and
Vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday bety » the hours of 12
noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Of Public Buildings,
Bridgetown before the 25th day of March, 1952, in order that such claims may
be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively,
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

Plaintiff: ERROL MALCOLM STEELE





Defendant: HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein
by GARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her
constituted attorney on record in this Island.

PROPERTY:

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-
terprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise in the parish of Christ Church in this
Island containing by admeasurement 7 acres (inclusive of a portion of a road
twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Public
Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and_bounding on lands of the
estate of Miss Mufcy E, Lucas deceased, on lands of James A. Tudor, on lands
of the Honourable J. D. Chandler, on lands formerly of the estate of T. C, Lucas
but now of Miss Haze] M. Bynoe on the remainder of the said road twenty feet
wide, on lands of Mr. E. C. Jackman, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the
Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all other

ti thereon erected and built standing and being.
buildings and erections aia see

Registrar-in-Chancery.

\

Z

‘BOILERS <2

WITH

Dated 22nd January, 1952.



















PREVENT
INCRUSTATIO
IN

\












YOU CAN
GET YOUR
REQUIREMENTS FROM

PLANTATIONS LTD



”



FOR MEN!!
1,000 SPORT SHIRTS

5 Shades

Now 2 for $4.50

RIBBED VESTS
3 for $2.00





POLO SHIRTS<841c. & $1.44
OCKS = 2 pairs for $1.00



S. ALTMAN.=Proprietor.



[ROYAL NETHERLANDS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952













STEAMSHIP CO, The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
CARIBE” will a % a =
SAILING FROM EUROPE Passengers for ;
TRE, ruary Vincent, Grenada and Aruba,

es — nn been oo Sa'ling Wednesday 27th inst.

HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952.
S.S. BRATTINGSBORG, 13th March, 1952.

S.S. COTTICA, 2st March, 1962. | ““MONEKA" will ac-

cept poe =
Dominica, Antigua, nitserra’
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
Tth March 1962.

The M/V. “CLARA” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Nassau
and Bahamas. Date of sailing to
be notified.

The M/V
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
M.S. WILLEMSTAD, ath ‘ebruary, 1952
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND

BRITISH GUIANA

M.S. STENTOR, 28th February, 1952.
SS. B).ATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, P.

AND BRITISH GUIANA
M.S BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952.
SS COTTICA, 7th April, 1952. '
SAYLING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO | {J
M.3. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952. |

SCHOONER OWNERS
(INC.)

B.W.I.









8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,
Agents. ’ —~— —~
* i s es
Canadian National Steamshi
SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Balifax Boston Barbades Barbados
“LADY NELSON” ae oe oe + 27 Feby. 2 Feby. © March 10 March
“CANADIAN CRUISER” é ° «.» 14 March. — 23 March 2% March
NORTHBOUND Arrives Satis Arrives Arrives Arrives

Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax

+21 Feby. 24 Feby. _ 2 March

+» 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 2% March
“LADY NELSON” ee +-22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. CRUISER” +» 4 April 7 April -~ 14 April 17 April

For further particulars, apply to—

“CAN. CRUISER”
“LADY RODNEY" .



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
ee



CG" TRANSATLANTIQUE

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

From Southampton Arrives Barbados
_“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1952 .... 31st March, 1952
*““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 .... 6th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” ,,.. 8th May, 1952... ... 2ist May, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

ou, (OLOMBIE” «» 11th April, 1952... ... 28rd April, 1952
DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952 .... ..... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .... Ist June, 1952... .... 13th June, 1952
"Sailing direct to Southampton
































The T. S. S$. GOLFITO

will be arriving from
Southampton on Sunday, 2nd March at 3 p.m,
and will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same after-
noon for Trinidad. There is ample 1st Class

Accommodation available for Trinidad.

Apply...

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO0., LID.

FISHY BUSINESS
You can obtain best quality ...

FISHING LINES & FISHING HOOKS

From...

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD & BROAD STREET

WE ARE INSTRUCTED to undertake a complete
CLEARANCE SALE at
RALPH WEARD’S SHOWROOMS
BAY STREET

on Monday and Tuesday the 3rd and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS



"Phone 4640

WHEN “COGNAC” 1s
MENTIONED

THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS
TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HEN-
NESSYS IS THE BRANDY THAT
MADE COGNAC FAMOUS.

HENNESSYS

¢ THREE STAR -
* V.S. O.P. (over 20 years)

* X.O. LIQUEUR

(over 40 years)



PPPS FO? "

SOSSOSPP PPPS PS FOSS

a

STOKES & BYNOE LTD~AGENTS.

PLPLISSO
79S

|




FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN








































woe LE TT 3695 4 995655", FFE tt 2"

BY CARL ANDERSON . %

HENRY & STUART & SAMPSON'S &
aa 7 — i 8 EXPERT BLENDING §

alas ‘T| i | Te eet FoRTuNE S z
= g TRB a ete!

J onan ? > .

py ae , a aa sa ? nee § FLAVOUR OF %
— aT] TOOTH PASTE TO § %

| | | HELP S S. & S. RUM ‘

| | AVOID Py :

a: '$ STUART & SAMPSON <
Me , 10 Te 3 (i938) LID. %

pat Neadquarters for Best Rum. .

SLINT OF THE FLYING :

g ¥
2OOCEGS: ILLIA ALLL AA A A

, DECA AY i : ale wueevel ;

fi. oe eee AND
sai it bneat'', (00; | SELECT THESE





PLES OSS.

YOU L/TTLE FOOL!
47OLOD VOU -



USTERINE Tooth Paste helps stop tooth decay 4





1, LISTERINE Tooth Paste actually helps rex
destructive bacteria N O W
} 2. It attacks dull film which holds bacteria oj ainse
la tooth surfaces.
/ 3. It even helps to remove mouth acids! :
Hutry now and buy ListeRINE Tooth Paste... brus! revery I-Ib & 2-Ib
meal and fight tooth decay...clean teeth brighter...c05? DREATI Tins Mortons Oatmeal
FRESH FOR HOURS AND HOURS! Tins Corned Mutton
3 You'll Uke Tins Breakfast Roll
its refreshing Tins Lamb Tongue
mint flevor, too i Tins Veal Coat

(Imperial Vienna Sausages)
Large & Small
Tins Hamberger Steak
Gelatine in Packs
Tins Fruit Cocktail
Tins Fruit Salad

~ (THE NN, WHEN YO
FINISH IN THE
ON ATTIC. 1 WANT
ea ayy TO DO THE
SAME THING
=f IN THE CELLAR

INCE & CO.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST

"GOS 9955965656559 0 59509 GS SSS OOS BOBO S OSE OE OOOO





ie,





IT PAYS YOU ‘TO DEAL HERE







FLASH: GORDON









ar) = Tse TTPO eee SPECIAL alters to. all C to all Cash and Credit ¢ Customers v0 for Thursday to Saturday sy only

| warr S CELEBR: NNA HATE TO
THERE'S A FINE STORE









¢ AN? c { Les THIS JOINTS, a ~ Se ————oIISSSSSESSESEoaESSeeeoeoeToeeo SS
QuARTERS! IT'S ALL Sccagion. A peasmiut, ) “a er re SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our ranches Tweedside,
“eo ith “fd ered Speightstown and Swan Street
AG Usually Nov Usually NOW
es ve ma peor Tins Klim (5 Ib) ee oe
f Tins Black Magic Choco _ : . Tins Oxford Sausages
a —(Walls) 69 64
Pkgs. Tapioca Flakes 24 21 Bottles Carlings Beer ae 26 21
Ourrants (per Ib) id ie Boneless Beef 3 bY 58 48








LIGHT O' M’ LIFE, LAURIE,| | WE CAN ALSO PICK Eat ‘. Deg “ON YER TINY HAND
LOVE... WE CAN'T WED

TODAY, BUT...WE CAN GET
TH’ LICENGE / LET'S GAE /

eS WHATEVER YOU say, RING 2 Vy, LAURIE, FE ” a : ; f % oe a a
© ssaidasint Gna rons peaRest/ ano PARLIN. ARE YE J , THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

OUT...A WEPDING o> ee ‘ B | WHEN WE PAR-RTEP :
3S ; FIVE YEARS AGO @ |











YOUR
DOG

By










AH-NOW THAT THEY
HAVE GONE - THIS
16 THE FIRST REAL
OPPORTUNITY TO
TELL THE PUBLIC
WHAT I WANTED
TO SAY -







FINE / WELL = FC 92 FIVE |
DAYS |'VE WANTED TO |
TELL YOU-- J

ge go
Z




[ze ARE YOU LISTENIN’ ? |















| ROBERT LEIGHTON

NOW ON SALE UP



ADVOCATE STATIONERY

BROAD STREET & GREYSTONE, HASTINGS

GOOD WINES)

GO WITH

GOOD FOODS

WHITE TATTLE WINES

‘GRAVES’— L. Danglade & Fils 1939 Vintage
‘ pe ai ae “GRAVES”—Sichel & Fils 1945 Vintage
C = “BARSAC”—L, Danglade & Fils 1939 Vintage
RED TABLE WINES The Best| “LIEBFRAUMILCH"— E. Hassemer — Germany

RIP . KIRBY













- Seg So SE On ee Ce ee



t —1947 Vintage
a mm ; sieneeoaeraeeey C CEV CAN DNT OID ME | “BEAUJOLAIS”—Poulet Pere & Fils 1949 of them ‘WEMMERSHOEK"—No. 1 K.W.V. South Africa
COT THB ELD B pa INTO i NTH AN JAI eee i Vintage Ll “FRANSCHHOEK”—No. 2 K.W.V. South Africa
Zo oa tly | “CHAMBERTIN”— Poulet Pere & Fils 1913 | @ _
=“ I 23 | Vintage | levine ._n :
—rG “CHARMES. CHAMBERTIN”—Poulet Pere & Fil Ml LIQUEURS
‘ / 946 aul §
¥- y “CHATEAUNEUF DU PAPE” —Brotte ean a Arti - “BOLS” — Holland — Cherry, Peach,
mot ; nier 1943 Vintage SPEC TAL. Maraschino, Apricot, Kummel,
egies “MONTOIRE ROSE” —Louis Renard RUM Curacao Triple Sec., Creme de
' = “SAINT JULIEN” Claret—Louis Eschenaue: Menthe
-| “ST. EMILION” Claret—Danglade & Fils
/ ‘ y Y r
| ALLEYNE ART HU R & CO... LTD.

“YOUR GROCERS HIGH STREET

REE TA ST TE ETE

Rae IOS.




ECC ee eee



PAGE BIGHT



EMPIRE WON their

noon. The
first half hour.

witness the revival of year

two teams

Empire touched off kicking to-
wards the goal to the pavilion end
Immediately Spartan took over,
but Chase on the right wing who
had cut in was adjudged cff side

The Empire front tine scon g







going with Taylcr dire th
game. He passed to the i
right Douglas who kicked danger
ously across the Spartan goal, the





ball going cut of play.

Play was then transferred t
he Empire goal and Boyce on
the left wing after receiving a
pass from Tony Haynes centred

across, the Empire goal, but Chase






bungled
Empire Attack

The Empire forward again
launched an attack on the Spartan
goal and were almost successful
when the Spartan “keeper” Wood
moved cut and vas beaten
Bowen, the Spartan r full
attempting to clear, si i the ball
to give Empire the first corne:

vhich Douglas took from the right



side but hout result
Another try made by Robinson,
the Empire left winger from out

area was negatived when
Wood collected and

side the
Custodian
saved.

The game in these
had developed into a keen tussle
and in the excitement, both feams
missed gocd opportunities for de
veloping constructive play.

Empire kept Spar

stages

early

tan on the @

fence for some time during whieh

both Taylor snd Dougl failed

to make use of theu ivantage:
Foul Play

It was not long after this that

Bowen, the Spartan right full,

was penalized for foul tpay in

the area. Drayton took the kick
and made no mistake to put his
team one up

It was only a matter of seconds
later when Gittens, the Spartan
right half miskicked, Douglas got
possession and passed to Hope who
was now playing on the right wing,
but the latter sent in a hard one

which missed. the upright by
inches, ;
Spartan made a bid for the

equalizer but the Empire defence
got in their way and had the ball
back in the Spartan goal area
After some minutes of struggle
during which Empire on the one
hand tried to increase their lead
and Spartan on the other fought
for the equalizer, the interval was
foken with the score unchanged.

After Half Time

On the resumption Spartan were
immediately on the offensive and
their front line led by samuel
Griffith initiated a good movement
for Chase on the right wing to
send across one which went’out of

play.
Shortly after this Empire took
over and Hope, their centre

forward, sent in a grounder which
goalkeeper Wood had no difficulty
in saving.

Fighting desperately for a goal,
the Spartan forwards took the
ball well within the Empire goal
area, but their efforts were in
vain.

Play was now transferred to
the Spartan area and they were
forced to concede a corner, but
nothing resulted,

Spartan were socn given a free
kick just outside the area, Haynes
kicked to Griffith who passed back
to Haynes who kicked wide.

Good Try

Empire made a good effort to
put themselves further in the lead





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Ordinary: 10.00
a.m.
Football: Division 1 —Har-

rison College vs. Everton
at Har. College : 5.00 p.m,
Division Ii — Carlton vs.
P.- Rovers at Queen's
Park; 5,00 p.m.
Division U--Wanderers ys.

Y.MP.C. “A” at the Bay:
5.00 p.m,
Foundation vs, Comber-
mere at Combermere :
5.00 p.m,
Y.M.P.C. “B"” ys, Comber-

mere Old Boys at Beckles
Road: 5.00 p.m.

Mr. A. G. Clarke, U.K, Mis-
sionary, speaks on his ex-
periences of war - time
China at Dayrells Road
Gospel Hall: 7.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert, Has-
tings Rocks: 8.00 p.m.

Mr. Witham Cash lectures
on
British Council :

“House Designing”
8.30 p.m.

third
they defeated Spartan by the only ¢
the two teams clashed at Ke nsington Oval yesterday after-
goal was the result of a penalty during the
Drayton did the

For more than three quarters of an hour before the
beginning of the game the crowd which numbered about
3,000 formed long queues as they

in

game succession whoen
goal of the match when

trick



waited for entrance to

s’ old rivalry between these

vhen Robinson on the left wing

vi had ¢ ent | gro r

but Wood be ween pr ts
a and cleared

No ‘oon tha Spartan had

the ball in the Empire ares thin

it was back in (tseirs. On «ne



after beating
his way down the wing, kicked
roalwards with Wood the
“kesper” out cf the geol Full

asion Robins



back Gibbons however came to
the rescue and cleared.



Empire kept on pressing id
Drayton sent in a hard cr m
outside the area, but goz
Wood saved

Spartan during the clo

triec hei

stages of the game

t to draw level 1 they kep
the ball in thei oppone nts’ area,
hut just failed to score

The game end th Er re

winners by one goal to love

The Teams





e teams were:-—

Empire: Symmonds, smith,
Grani, Alleyre, Maynard. Rudder,
Douglas, Taylor, Hope, Dray:
Robinson.

SPartan: Wood, Bowen, Giobon
Gittens, Cadogan, Weekes, boy«
Haynes, C. Wood, Griffith, Chuse

Referee: Mi Ben” Hoyos

ikoys’ Club F sot: ull

St Cecilia Senior euved
Worthings Seniors $6—-1 in tie ai
return match of the Ko Club

City Division football.

The Seniors game was keen,
contested. St. Cecilia drew
blood, when H. Norville scorea
a penalty, Half time found the

lirst





score 8—0 in St. Cecilia's favour

The second half found Worth-
ings pressing the game to open
their account, success came when
Hinds beat goalkeeper Jordan
with a first time shot. The score
was now 3—1,

St. Cecilia began to combine
well and H. Norvile scored hi
third goal of the match

About 8 minutes before the

final blast of the whirtle O. Git-
tens scored the fifth goal.

M. Irish was the Referee.

The teams were,

St. Cecilia; Jordan Downes,
T. Fitt, N. Phillips, C. Haynes,
P, Sealy, B. Banfield, O. Gittens,
I, TAU, C. Griffith (Cant.) and
H. Norville.

Worthings; Robinson,
Mosley, Clarke, Springer,
Lewis, Lashley, Cummings,
and Niles,

Hal}
Pilgrim
Hinds



Alleyrre Arthur
Defeat “Recorder”

In a very fast football match
yesterday afternoon, Alleyne
Arthur defeated a Recorder team
by five goals to two. About two
minutes after the game started the
Recorder scored the first goal of
the match and within about 20
minutes Alleyne Arthur scored
two, At the end of the first half
the score was 2—2.

Play was very fast and the
Alleyne Arthur forwards outplay-
ed the Recorder defence. Alleyne
Arthur’s forwards Norville ani
Squires scored one goa! each and
Greene scored a penalty.

Mr, I, Graham was referee.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
from Codrington :
Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
Date ; .07 in,
Highest Temperature :
85.5°F
Temperature :
70.0°F
9 miles per

Rainfall

Lowest

Wind Velocity :
hour

Barometer : (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.935

tO-DAY
6.21 a.m.

29.997

Sunrise :
Sunset: 6.07 p.m.
Moon; New, February
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 6.31 a.m.,

25

7.410



p.m,
Low Tide; 12.14 a.m., 12.49

pm,
ue gneve
















GOT INSURANCE -:.
BUT I JUST WANT
TO DO YOU A FAVOR,

AND LOOK OVER YOUR





RIGHT



c ‘fechas BULBERRY

—f QUIT HIS JOB HERE LAST
WEEK / WHAT'S HE
DOING BACK HERE

ee
‘pean

BUT I’M
AWFUL BUSY
NOW,

EMPIRE DEF, EAT ' SPAR TAN

3.000 Watch Exciting Game

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



iKnow Your Football

LAWS 2 & 3
By O. 8. COPPIN
TO DAY q SHALL DEAL with Laws II and IIt of the
game th govern first the ball and seco idly the number

of players.
THE BALL
be of leather,

tion which might prove dangerous to players.

shall be spherical;
and no material shall be used in its construc-

the outer casing shall

The cir-

cumference of the ball shall not be more than 28 inches







nor less than 27 inches. The weight of the ball at the
start of the game shaljJ not be more than 16 ounces nor
Jess than 14 ounc
{ have never heard of ju- went being agreed upon by both
tances of this lew being oroken teams before the start of a match.
as the manufacturers of .o>tballs nis rule is important especi-
obviously in their own iterests ally with regard to the changing
iform to the rule ana ) 1 of a goal-keepe: l, have seen
lefi for infringements by club. ome instances of this with very
who purchase them painful resulis to the offending
bacre are only two points that team.
must be remembered about balls If without noufying the referee
and that is their inflation and the a player changes to goal-keeper
lacing of them. If a ball is not dufing the game, and then handles

sufficiently inflated it will be re-
the simple reason that the bounce
and carry of the ball will vary
from that of one which has been
properly inflated. In addition to
that it would be definitely dan-
gerous ond uncomfortable at the
least to play it with the head,

Conversely some balls can be
ver-inflated with similar hinder-
i ffects,




1e other point is that of lacing.
Care should be taken to see that
the laced part of the ball is flat
with the surrounding surface and





that there are no protruding ends.
Leather laces can be very un-
comfortable if care is not taken
with the lacing. I agree with the
advice that wherever possible
tape should be used as laces and
here is a diagram showing one of
the best methods of laci
pile acts th
(* ?
® .
\ ee ee
Pe / a Ok
——a-
Ss
—_ %
up
- -
YY A * Ae
\
evr
(1) Make a small cut in one end
of the tape, Insert through hole
No. 1 as shown,
(2) Draw long end of tape
vhrough hole opposite 1, through
cit in. short end of lace and

inrough hole No, 2.
(3) Continue lacing across un-

til last holes are reached, Make
double loop as shown, and bring
end of lace out through hole oppo-
site No, 5.

(4) Insert lacer through ‘hol
opposite No. 2 and down the chan- |
nel Lelween the layers of leather
until it reaches the hole opposite

No. 5, Draw end of lace through
this channel,

(5) End of lace comes out of
hole opposite No. 2. Draw up lace
tightly and cut off end close t
hole,

Number of players. The game












shall be played by two ns,
each consisting of not more thar

eleven players, one of whom shall]
be the goal-keeper. One of the
other players may change places
with the goal-keeper during the

match provided notice be given
the referee before such ch

made, Except in a match played
under Rules of a competition, sub-
titutes may be allowed to replace
players receiving injuries during
a game, subject to this arrange-

‘e By Jimmy ae







HE QUIT TO BE











HIS GOOD-BYE KISS IS
| ( STILL WET AND HE'S

| BACK TRYING TO
SIGN US ALL Ue= )



HAD A GOOD WORD FOR
ANYBODY “NOW WE'RE
ALL DEAR FRIENDS AND

A BIG INSURANCE MAN»



















HE'S AROUND
HERE MORE NOW
THEN WHEN HE
WORKED HERE +>
I'M GONNA HIDE
IN THE STOCK-
ROOM».










"We MAN WHO
CAME BACK» THEY’L
DO iT EVER
TIME ---



‘ sale
THANX TO“E.F.G.;
c i TEXAS



the
flected in the standard of play for a

during the

(except
out the consent of the Referee is

is awarded.

ball within the penalty area,
penalty kick shall be awarded,
Any player leaving the field
progress of the game
through accident) with-





deemed guilty of ungentlemanly
conduct and an indirect free kick



Of course the decis

ion in this case is left with tl
referee who must judge the case
on its merits,

Next—Law [V—Players’ Equip-
ment.

Jamaica Lose
Al Soccer Again

KINGSTON, J’ca. Feb. 27.

Jamaica, despite several scoring
opportunities lost the third Inter-
national soccer game to the Carib-
bean Al. Stars 1--0 at Sabina
Park this evening,

Twenty-two thousand fans saw
Surinam’s Michel Kruin score in
the fiftieth minute, Gillie Heron,
professional from Glasgow Celtic
did not play for Jamaica owing io
in injured knee.



I—NIL

Agent Loses Action

@ From Page 3
sane said that be Abreu did neo
se the name of the plantation
fternoon and he said he told
en he lad something con-

‘rete, he would listen to him.
Gill had said that he had put
~wen'h so the 1l3.:st it could have

his cards on the table before the
is the si Knowing that
De Abreu met Deane on the sixth

“vy would have to decide whether
Se Abreu did not know the name
vf the plantation and the owner
when he me¢t him
Gill had said that he neve-
for £26,000. If they believed Gill

d eane, the ques:ion arose,
“What reason had the piaintiff for
withholding it on the sixth. Was
t because he was trying to induce
(he defendant to offer him a com-
mission?” Was it because no com-
Mission had been previously
agreed to? Was De Abreu saying,
‘IT have a plantation going and

1 Want one,

Give me a commission.”

Mr. Walcott said he queried the
motive of adding the £2,000, His
Lordship said. Was it that De
Abreu would then have gone to
vill and say, “I have got so much
more, you give me something

asked



* Waleott had asked them to
Deane because De Abreu
proved to be a liar in several
instances An instance was that
he had said he had telephoned
Gill at 3 p.m. on the seventh and
Gill said he had been at the races.

His Lordship then reminded
them that Mr. Adams had said
that the first part of the defence
contradicted the other part. But
Deane was saying in the first place
there was no contract and then,
f it should be found that there was.
one, then, ,dishonesty disentitled
Deane from getting his commis-
ion.

Mr, Adams had argued that it
was quite clear that De Abreu had
veen promised commission, other-
wise he would
Gill some.
ter for them. In all the evidence
they had to take their own inter-
pretation,

He said that De Abreu had also
claimed that it was not ‘before
Deane saw Rex Gill at the races:
That,



that he changed his mind.
‘oo, was for them to decide.

Though Mr, Adams had ques-
tioned Deane’s not replying to De
\breu's letter concerning the con-

act, they might well think that
it was felt there was no cause for
a reply.

Mr. Adams had also drawn
their attention to Gill having still
sold for £24,000 despite his hav-
ing said that he was not moving
from £24,900 and was because of
that saying that Gill could be
doubted when he said he never
said £26,000. They might feel that
that was added on to make the
offer,

If they concluded that before
the seventh, De Abreu was in
possession of the facts and did not
divulge them to Deane, they might
conclude that De Abreu was de-
liberately trying to mislead Deane
in order to get him to pay a
higher price for the plantation,

He said that Mr. Adams had
said that even if De Abreu was
dishonest, that had nothing to do
with the case. “But I am telling
you that it has a lot to do with

All Stars team: Lacussade tt” he said. :
(Haiti) in goal; Gerry Parsons Mr. Adams rose at this stage
(Trinidad; Andre Dieudonne to make an objection to his being
(Haiti); Delbert Charleau (Trini- misquoted. He : at what he
dad); Allan Joseph (Trinidad); 2&4 said was tha Dr A’ rev could
Humphrey Mynals (Surin: m): lie until he Was Dus int Lace
Paul Desrosiers (Haiti): Charles with matters not. connected with
Panguillot (Guadeloupe); Michel the contract. :
Kruin (Surinam); Rudie Kam- Mr. Taylor conceded _ this, bu
pervun (Surinam) and Andre continued to say that if Gill’s price
Vreux (Haiti).—(CP) was £24,000 and De Abreu had

’ said £26,000, that would be dis-
idee honesty and Deane would be
WATE entitled to say, “You are dis-
missed,”

R POLO He said that Mr. Adams hac

MEETING TO-NIGHT held that the falsehood had to

Geceive and if there had beer

There will be a specie] Council falsehood in the case, it had no

Meeting of the Barbados Amateur deceived. They knew Dean®

Water Pole and Swimming Associ
ation tonight at the Barbados
Aquatic Club.

The meeting starts at
representative
cluding the

830 A
of each club in-
Ladies’ teams are

sasked to attend,





Colours the Hair instantly.
It Is absolutely what Is professed

A GENUINE HAIR COLOURING

Available in 4 handy sizes
Obtainable frem

BOOKER’S (Barbados

DRUG.STORES LT
BROAD STREET, BRIDGETOWN
Manufactured by E. FLOUTIER LTD., Stanmore, Middlesex, Eng.

ed







SEC LAA AES EP EPPS EO SOS



MILK

suffered loss.

He added, “It is only an honest
agent who is entitled to any com-
mission,”

“T am instructing you,” he said,
“that if you come to the conclusion
that the plaintiff was told by Mr



NO.MORE GREY HAIR

AFRICAN MIXTURE

Also try
FLEUROIL
BRILLIANTINE

of it:

Makes the hair
soft and glossy

Sold in 2 Sizes





POOCPPOP PPPS PSS FOOD

thE

-Murrays

Sioe.: |

MANNING & (CO., LTD.

AGE

(6 AM OCC
“o , PESO

44
+ ia PROCESS ,

NTS.

“<
SORE SOCSSOCSOODC SOS

not have offered
However it was a mat-

Gill
price

that

“The question is,
coniract
If

id he

e

When
umming up,
wot
ing
for

ne euumemmmenael





Pk




£24,900 and he advanced the
to £26,000 and named that
Mr. Deane, the moment he did
ne
ee bis normal interest.”
was there a
His Lordship ended.
there was a contract, was
e dishonesty by the plaintiff’
advance the price so thi
would get some commission?”
His Lordship _ finished
the jury deliberated
nda half hours before arriy
their verdict of, judgment
defendant, Deane.”

OM

at

the



2 Now you can *
afterd thet trip
to Eurepe



Leave now—return after No-
vember 3Cth, ‘‘Thiift-Season”
Clipper fares saye you up to
25% round-trip to wt! Europe.

PARIS

Gayer than ever dur-
ing its 2000th Anni-
versary—and now only
hours from New York
_by direct ‘Strato’
Chpper* tights.

Fly one way via Paris
— one way vie the
Azores, Portugal, Spain
and the French Riviera.




Se erey
aI -
2 a wine
vine

2% GTHER CITIES



Krom New York, luxurious PAA
Clippers provide frequent, regular
service to the leading cities of



Europe ™..offer « choice of three
trans-Atlantic routes, You can also
enjoy stopovers in England and
Treiand at no extra cust.



2

Fer reservations, see your
‘yavel Azent or




WORLD'S
i XPERIENCED
ALALINE

Pin? AMERICAN

HGRLD ALWAYS
ca ¢ ac itd.

MmOas
















DANCE

at

ite BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB
SATURDAY

March Ist, 9 P.M.

For Local and Visiting

MEMBERS

Music by Mr. ©. Curwen’s
Orchestra

(No Admission Charge to

Ballroom)
28,2.52,—3n.





ERNIE’S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB
—o—

There will be a Special
MEETING
To-morrow (Friday)
February 29th
to discuss the problems
of the First Day’s Rac-
ing oh March Ist.

vitae ot

There will be
over on each race,
Each horse will have
a price.
aoe

Dinner will be
at 8 o'clock

—O—

Special Lobster Cocktails
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C, Snow,
Proprietor Edgewater
Hotel,
where he prides himself
on Lobster Salads and
Lobster American at all
hours.

a Call-

served

—_—0—

Go and try them and
let me know the results

——Qane

OUR MENU:
Hors d’Oeuvre
Stuffed Eggs, Anchovies
Patties, Etc.
Turkey Pelau |
Poire & Peche Me

Purity Mince





was then acquiring inter- |,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1952

Police Band Concert To-night

The Barbados Police Force Band Con-

dies cia













cert at Hastings Rocks tonight starts at
8 o'clock. The conductor will be Capt
c. E. Raison, MBE ARCM z
PROGRAMME the produce
MILITARY MARCH MEDLEY
The Home Guard On Parade pe Concerte Tr
—Duthoit t (La Mover Haydn
[ONCERT OVERTURE Soloist Band Lovell
Zampa--Herold 3 electio MERRY ENGLAND
SPANISH VALSE By Recuest) —dward German
Estudiantina—Waldteufel (7) Entracte for Beils—-CHIMES OF JOY
4) HUMORESQUE —Ord Hume
Tangled Tunes—Alford Soloist cr Best
How - rarely we hear an air 8) Film Mu AI’ GET YOUR
whieh is not in some war rem- G Irving Berlin
iniseent of another; an amus- 9) Two Calyso fOrPvONE
ing illustration of the similarity Mur-ell
occasionally found twixt melo- GOD & ET qUSEN







i

| Calling all

| bicycle owners

We offer you
| tire hi class

INSURANCE ff
\ yf
COMPANY



MERGED IN THE

ROYAL INSURANCE COMPANY LTD

| BICYCLE INSURANCE POLICIES

theft,

for

ainst fire
and property

accident,
damage

this policy covers you age
injury to third partie

personal
yremium



less than half the cost of your dni:y newspaper.

Do not delay, come in and let us issue you on: of these
policies to-day.

One accident may cost you more than one hundred years
insurance premium would cost

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET



aly











é Aanniiee the gerereenes specie “t
(lerram) MARBLE. CHIPS |
\ in 5 colours )
i For Verandahs and Floors
} TT. HERBERT LTD.
tL Magazine Lane, t-: Dial; 4367



Guarantee A Perfect FIT
every SHAPE.



to

C. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD.

Top Scorers in Tailoring
Prince William Henry Street







SS eae
—







CooL
North! will demand a re-
turn to warmer clothing at
vacation end.

SPRING in the

We have a ction of the
finest Woc..ens loomed in
Enghana, as well as glorious
Cashmere Pullovers from
*Scotland, light weight
Tweeds and crisp Worsted
Suitings for both Ladies and
Men.

The quality of this branded
stock is unquestioned.and it
is our Sales Policy to com-
bine this high quality
excellent value.

y.

C.B. Rice & Co.

Merchant Tailor:
of Holtom Lane