Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Toba ae



iI seem



2 eT nnn

ESTABLISHED 1895







THURSDAY, FEBRU

ARY 28, 1952

Adworat











PRICE : FIVE CENTS



W.L FEDERATION FOR TALKS IN LONDON

After Colonies Have Given
Final Study To Report |

THE FOLLOWING despatch has been received from~
the Secretary of State for the Colonies :—

Sir,

You will recall that, in September last, my predeces-|
sor sent a message to the Governor of Jamaica in which |

he welcomed the proposal ‘contained in resolutions, lately
passed by the Jamaica Legislative Council and House of
Representatives, that a conference on West Indian federa-
tion should be held in London as soon as this could con-

veniently be arranged.

2. It appears, from subsequent
informal consultations that this
proposal is acceptable to the
Governments of those Colonies
whose Legislatures have accepted
federation in principle as the
result of their consideration of
the recommendations made in the
report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee. That re-
port has now been discussed by
the Legislatures concerned, with
the exception of those of British
Honduras and of, Barbados, where
it has been accepted in principle
by the House of Assembly, but
has yet to come before the Legis-
lative Council. In British Guiana,
the Legislative Council voted by
a majority against acceptance of
the Committee’s proposals; and it

may accordingly be necessary for,

further consideration to proceed
on the supposition that any
federal arrangements would not
include that territory, at all events
at the outset. On the assumption,
however, that the Legislative
Council in Barbados will endorse
the views of the House of Assem-
bly, I take it that it will be gen-
erally desired that I should now
proceed with making the arronge-
ments for a Conference in Lon-
don at the earliest convenient
date. The position of British
Honduras must be determined in
the light of whatever decision is

reached by the Legislative Coun-'!

cil of that Colony. when the
report is debated. I hope that

it will be possible for this step,

Stabbed Woman’s

to be taken in the near future.

3. I understand that it would
not in any event be practicable
to convene a fully representative
gathering before June next, since
many of those concerned will be
occupied until then with busdget-
ary and other urgent business in
their own Legistetures. “ft there
is a general wish to hold the
Conference ,in June, I shall be
very glad to make the necessary
arrangements. Before, however,
a date is finally settled, there are
certain points which seem to call
for some further consideration.
It is the common experience that
the success of any conference
depends very largely on the
extent to which the ground has
been prepared in advance, and
I think that this consideration is
likely to prove particularly rele-
vant to a conference concerned
with the highly intricate and
far-reaching problems raised by
the project for West Indian
federation. I recognise, of course.
that the Conference will be for-
tunate in having before them the
broad outlines of a federal plan

@ On Page 4



THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of cbtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, “the
Advocate have arranged fo1
a practising Doctor to answer
reader's médical queries.

The Fam!'ly Doctor will be
uneble to see any readers
personolly, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and
letters will be treated ing
confidence. To make abso~/
lutely sure you are asked ¥
not to siga your real name
to your query but to write
under a pen name, The
answer to the question will
“ppear under the pen name.

Letters should be addressed
to The Family Doetor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week,

‘rhe first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate,

/



Inquest Continues

Further hearing in the inquest
concerning the death of 36-year-
old Gwendolyn Clarke of New
Orleans, St. Michael, will be taken
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Coroner of District “A’’ to-
day at 2 p.m.

Clarke was admitted to the
General Hospital on February 20
about 6.30 p.m, suffering from
stab wounds, but died a few min-
utes after she was admitted

On the last hearing Dr. A. S,
Gata, who performed the post
mortem examination on the de-
ceased, told the Court of his find-
ings.

Daisy Clarke also gave evi-
dence and said that the defendant
used to live at her house at West-
bury Road, St. Michael. About
6.15 p.m. on February 20 she saw
the deceased lying unconscious in
a pool of blood.

The next day she identified the
body of the deceased to Dr. A. S.
Cato. The deceased was the
mother of seven children.



World Sugar | General Strike

Production
Goes Up

(From Our Own Correspondent)
‘ LONDON, Feb. 27.

The world sugar production for
the current year will be one mil-
lion tons higher than in the pre-
vious 12 months, estimate E. D.
= F. Man in their latest circu-
ar.

This increase to 36,915,000 tons
is mainly accounted for by a rise
pf 700,000 tons in Indian and
Pakistan production. But even
though these countries are expect-
ed to produce 5,200,000 tons this
year they will still remain net im-

porters owing to tremendous home

consumption.
E. D. and F. Man say heavy

Cuban _production—approxitnate- | cars jumped the tracks complete-|
ly 6,300,000 tons, is casting a | ly blocking the line for almost one





May Break Out

TUNIS, Feb. 27,

Cafes in this capital closed down
for a three-day strike as rumours
spread that a 24-hour general
strike might break out in support
of bar owners.

Cafes throughout the capital
pulled down their shutters for
three days in protest against the
French authorities’ clamp-down
on six Tunisian bars in the
suburbs. At the same time it was
rumoured but not officially con-
firmed that a 24-hour general

strike might be called for Friday, |

February 29, in solidarity with
Tunisian cafe proprietors
Meanwhile authorities reported
that a goods train had been de-
railed during the night near Ma-
hares, on the line between Sfax
and Gabes.- They said 30 freight

shadow over the world market | mile. However. they said that an

and it is problematic from which

investiggion conducted immedi-

quarter could come sufficient sup- | ately after the accident revealed
port to maintain or improve the’ that aderaiinen’ was caused by

present oprices Unless United
States aid to Japan and Germany
is repeated, it looks possible that
Cuba may have difficulty in dis-
posing of this year’s output



Turkish Forces
Ready For N.A.T.O.

By K. C. THALER
LISBON, Feb. 27

faulty equipment and not by |

sabotage. — 2 ie —U
. Hoabinh Left

In Flames
! HONG KONG, Feb. 27



Peiping Communist radio heard
here said parts of Hoabinh, Indo-
nesian city evacuated by French
‘forces last Friday were still in
flames. The broadcast said the
Turkish Foreign Minister Fuad city was littered with vehicles and
Koprulu said Turkey is ready to war materials left behind by
make a bigger immediate contri-
bution to Western defence than
any other European nation and
urged Eisenhower to take imme- raging along route number six be-

French in their “hasty retreat.”

It said the communique also re-,
ported that fierce fighting was

diate steps to include this power- tween Hoabinh and Hanoi.

ful force in his command.

“Tt is essential that this integra-
tion take place without delay.”
Koprulu said in urging that a
Southeastern link be welded to
the Western defence chain against

Soviet aggression.

i
Koprulu said: “Turkey's imme-
diate military potential is at least
as much as that of the European
NATO state with the largest ac-
tual contribution to the North At-

lantic treaty area.”

He said that with Greece and
Turkey now in the NATO the in-
tegration of Yugoslavia (which
has 36 divisions) into the West-
ern defence would increase her
own security as well as that of

NATO.” —U-P.



Franks Turns

Down N.A.T.O. Job

LONDON, Feb. 27.
Foreign Secretary Anthony

Eden disclesed Wednesday night

that Sir Oliver Franks, Britisn

Ambassador to Washington turned
down the newly created post of ,,
A.T.O. The
vertently
when Ejeo arrived “at London
airport from N.A.T.O. Council



Secretary General of N
disclcsure was made inz





The 6 e
Conference at Lisbon which cre-|sommon ground exist
ated the post and offered the job for negotiation. If 4
{to Frasiks. —U.P. repeat only their prev





From All Quarters.

Charity The

Big Way |

LONDON.

Malden, Massachusetts : An!
act of charity staggering in scop®
--even for America~is revealed |
in Maiden where, on his death-
bed 30 years ago, George White. ;
presidént- of the Cuticura Cor-
poration, ordained that from then
on, two out of every three dol-
lars earned by his huge soap and
ointment concern should be
devoted to a “humanitarian ;

fund” So far a_ total of

$30,000,000 has been secretly
given away to worthy recipients.
New York: Once Willy Sut-!

ton, dramatically arrested in

|New York the other day for a big

bank robbery, was asked by an

;earnest social reformer: ‘Tell!
Ime, Willy, -why do you rob |
|banks?” Rejoined Willy: “Be-|
, cause that’s where the money is,

sister.”

Mahe (Seychelles) : Airmail
letters posted in London on
December 13th reached the Sey-
chelles on February 20 taking!

longer than sailing ships before
the Suez Canal was opened.
Amsterdam: The Dutch Soci-

ety of Non-Smokers has sent a}
letter to Queen Elizabeth on the}

oecasion of her ascending the
Throne, paying homage to her
and Prince Philip because they
are both non-smokers. The let-

ter expresses the wish that the}

whole world may follow this
royal example so that “it may be
delivered from the increasing
slavery to tobacco.”

Indianapolis: Jay York was
arrested for speeding, the first
man caught in a recently installed
police radar trap. He pleaded
Not Guilty “because I wanted to
see how the thing operated, my-
self.” (Fined 26 dollars 75 cents.)

Rome: Traces of gold have
been found in drinking water at
Como, North Italy, when the
water was tested by health au-
thorities. Today people there are
drawing bucketsful hoping te
find gold.

Rome: A _ pickpocket lying in
hospital and guarded by police
filched £50 from one of them.
The money was found stuffed in-
side his pillow.

Sydney: Liberal Party election
organiser Douglas Date was
awarded £75 this week in a
Workmen's Compensation Court
His injury? A broken little
finger, sustained while shaking
hands during the last election.

New York: The Wall Street
Journal produced this headline
this week: “Retailers mourn ris-
ing customer reluctance to part
with money.” f

ere ee ono

| POCKET CARTOO
by OSBERT LANCASTER



“By Jove, Sir, it’s jolly
lucky these fellows didn't
get hold of something tha:'s
actually on the Medd

——_—

list.”



DEFECTIVE ENGINE
FORCES PLANE DOWN

CHICAGO, Feb. 27

An American Airlines DC-6
with one engine dead circled the
city for nearly three hours to-day



'

DR. ADENAUEBR, the German Federal Chancellor, leaves the Foreign Office in London with M

Schuman, French Foreign Minister, after meeting to continue their discussions on the European Army
question.

| Barbados Budgets For
12-Million-Dollar Revenue

TRUMAN *

WELCOMES
MINISTERS

WASHINGTON, Feb. 27.

Secretary of State Dean Acheson
returned from North Atlantle
Treaty meetings and received
warm congratulations from Presi-
dent Truman on his “most success-
ful conference,” Truman ‘con-
gratulated both Acheson an] See-
retary of the Treasury John Sny-
der at the National Airport when
they arrived from Lisbon.

The Président told the Cabinet
officers that the meetings in Lons«
don and Lisbon had accomplished
“things we have been working for
these last three or four years, It
is a high privilege of mine to con-
gratulate the Secretary of State
and the Secretary of the Treasury
on the job they have accom-
plished.”

Acheson, thanked the Presiaent
for coming to greet them and ex-
pressed pleasure at the President's
“encouraging words,”

He said: “We return tired, but
happy in the belief that we have
accomplished what you sent us to
accomplish.” UP.





U.N., Reds Abandon
Attempt To Break
Deadlock

PANMUNJON, Korea, Feb, 27

_ United Nations and Communist
Staff Officers abandoned their
attempt to break the deadlock
over the repatriation of war pris-

oners. They decided to toss the)' .
issue back ‘to Generals and Ad-|tife of his five week old Cabinet
on a series of confidence votes on
his budget including a 15 per cent |
tax increase. i

The votes of confidence in the

mirals of the main armistice dele-
gation after 21 days of futile de-

| bate :

The step followed the United |
Nations warning that the Allies | National Assembly probably will
never will agree to force Commun- | be taken on Friday.
ist prisoners to return to North |
}Korea against their will, The

all prisoners by force if necessary

tle two other deadlocked issues
Russia’s eligibility for the neutral

fields during the armistice
—UP.



|” Basins Ad

Scouts

Mr. H. A. Vaughan will give

brief Historical sketch of Barba-
dos for the benefit of the Seout
contingent which will visit
to use up its gasoline supply be-| Jamaica for the first Caribbean

fore making a safe emergency , Jamboree early next month,

landing.

The plane landed at the Inter-
national Airport at 9.20 a.m. with
a load of 23 passengers, four
crewmen and four other airline}

employees

The plane had been held afloat)

since 3.50 a.m

The. plane took off at 3.15 a.m.|
on a flight to Los Angeles and was|thony Eden left by air for Lon-

' This talk will take plate today
,at 4.30 p.m. at Harrison College



EDEN FLIES HOME

LISBON, Feb. 27.
ir

itish Foreign Secretary An-

flying between Davenport and|don at 11.30 G.M.T.

Des Moifies’ when the pilot dis-|
covered an oil leak in number one
engine and flew back here on|bon

three engines for the landing
U.

LONDON, Feb. 27

sritish officials confirmed for |

He told pressmen at the airport
“Iam sure the results of the Lis-

—U.P. one child survived.



| mands there will be no negoti-
| ation.” |
Officials said that according to}

the first time that talks between |jadvice from Cairo, it was hoped



One official said:







the British and Egyptian Govern-
r vould start in Cairo on
They said talks would
xploratory and not actual



that the Egyptian policy while
still seeking to satisfy Egyptiar
Nationalist demands would take
account in a pra al way of the



present world situation and the

necessity for an effectual Middle



EUR@PEAN ARMY TALKS



aide ‘

bitter opposition from the Social

Democrats the second largest ‘ . i
party in dhe West Genhen Fore: | Labour Censure Motion

ment, Adenauer is convinced he
l zabour censure t ac

can get rearmament ratified by a rears ‘hill : of a siete ache eae

comfortable majority of the Bun- | \"UF = ; mane 4

destag (Lower House)

THE ESTIMATES of Revenue and Expenditure
the year 1952-53 have been sent down to the legislature
to be discussed and passed before the end of the financial
e House of Assembly and the Legis-
lative Council will have four weeks during which to exam-
ine the figures.

Estimated Revenue is set out at $12,390,194 with Esti-
mated Expenditure fixed at $12,052,094,

year, 3lst March.

: underway,
This allows

confidence is based on two major| badly bl
considerations | Chinese

Scanner natin

Quick Action On
MeCarran Bill
Urged In Jamaica |

KINGSTON, Feb, 26.

usand Jamatoans are
on the waiting list of the Ameri- |
ean Consul here to go to U.S.A
to live, Jamaica's quota is 1,500 ;

provided an estimated
j revenue of

revised figures of $12,597,802 and
$11,253,115 lett a gross surplus of

Memorandum Explains

The Memorandum on the Estini-
Which was sinned
Colonial Secretary until the estab.
‘| lishment of the post of Financial
Secretary is not signed this year.

It says inter alia, however, that

Senator , i
tor McCarran’s Bill would was the intention of the Gov-

practically stop Jamaicans enter-
ing America tq reside
In the House of



Victoria Cross, Britain's highest
military award on the chest of a
nervous Korean war hero in her
irst semi-official ‘act since her
ather died three weeks ago to
day

epresenta- | Proposed fiscal survey, to present
tives to-day F. A, Glasspole, Peo-|the fullest background available
ple's National Party member gave Of
the Celony and to determine its future
House to request Government to, financial and economic policy
make the most urgent and strong-|the next five years, A memoran-
est representations to the Secre- dur)
tary of State with a view to the'dra’t estimate
British Government making T€-|pleied, when the Fiscal Survey
presentations
Government
protection so as to preserve the! |
privigege now enjoyed by British!
entering America
Jamaica's present quota is 1,500 a}

sh rh een pet cee a 4 defeated Nationalist’s leader, Chi-

five new Knights of he realm | 41 Kaishek on a new mainland
vith a gleaming sword at her flr
American ! of

cocument of

se circumstances, Govern-
has decided
(a) to proceed with the normal
budget limiting
far as possible to the actual
commitments of Government



provision as

Faure. Risks |
Cabinet

PARIS, Feb, 27.
Premier Edgar Faure staked the!

rent) which will be present-

programme
capital expenditure

1951-52 Revenue

The substantial

Especially difficult obstacles ar¢
a super tax on hard liquor and}
Reds have demanded the return of | economies in nationalized railways |
| which threaten dismissal for many
Staff Officers also seemed on the | employees, among them many So- |} ae

i ' ; very substantial
verge of confessing failure to set- !cialists reases , ; .
,imereases in receipts from Customs

($1,040,000)

Railways are now oper-
-jating on a deficit.

economics | @nd
Truce Supervision Comniission| brought down “Faure’s predeces-
and the right of Reds to build air- | sor,

Income Tax
memorandum
52 Estimates,
that only a modest increase
toms and excise had been adopted
it became appar

Premier Rene
{$10,300 million
(about $4.000,000,000 for military
The Cabinet authorized ,
Faure to seek no less than 33 votes
lof confidence on financial propos-
| The biggest pill for the As-
sernblymen to swallow is the pro-
posal to increase most taxes by 15
»per cent instead of ten per cent
‘originally pianned, because of ob-












includes , 1951

During the year
was to be expected in 1952 whicn
unanticipated

threats, A substantial rise in price
; i 7 levels during
talks of the Atlantic Allies.--U.P. aneountin tox’ the

extraordinary increase in Customs



FIRE KILLS FIVE
VILLE SAINT PIERRE,
QUEBEC, Feb. 27
one family
were killed to-day when fire razed
their home while the

The income Tax received in the |
current year,
paid to be related to the 1950 crop
year of 158,183 tons which refiect- |
ed an increase in the value of the!
crop over the previous



Those dead included the mother,
40, two children aged 13 and eight ‘
years and their elderly grand- sufficient experience of peak crops
parents who lived with them in a ,@nd high prices.
in this tiny commun-/
N.A.T.O, meeting will be de-Jity West of Montreal on the road ,
{ cisive for world peace.”

rouchly $800,000 was due to in-
The revised estimate of expend-

excess of $800,000 over the original |
@ On page 3

Egypt and Britain to Hold Con ference



, Defence Organisations :
considered to be best: but officials | comment but it was apparent tha
said there is no intention to stand
rigidly by this
only solution

was prepared

understandir
Egypt without undue

Officials said
to consider any alternative Egypt
ing promises to
ence position of the
1e British side the Four mair
Power proposals for Middle East;

an equal parl-

' Churchill Wins

Confidence Vote

Feb. 27
PRIME MINISTER Churchill won a House of Con
mons confidence vote on his foreign policy Tuesday night
after asserting his pledge of ‘prompt, resolute and effec-
tive” action in Korea and that he only continued policies
set last May by the former Labour Government
He disclosed algo that the Labour regime of Prime
Minister Atti@e secretly set up a plant for regular pro
duction of atomic bombs and had produced an atom bomb

Churchill * » the confidence

Adenauer (in ii itis 20% bochane

to swell his nominal Conserva-

e tive edge of 14 votes
His revelations on Korean
Confident policy and the atom bomb, came
Churchill said—, from Cabinet
By JOSEPH W. GRIGG documents Which he had no
BONN. Feb. 27 chance to see until his Conserve-

West German Chancellor, Konrad tive Party /ousteq Labourites in

\denauer is completely confidenti last October's general election
of his ability te reise 12 more Di-| His disclosures brought eonfusion
visions for Western Defence as|and anger among labour mem-
socn @s a European Army Treaty | bers This may sharpen the

ratified, according to his close divisian betwedn such moderate

leaders as Attlee and Morrison
It is said that despite continue i} and the Left Wing factton led by
Aneurin-Bevan

} The confidence vote came on a

j tary pledges to President Truman.
He also believes there is no dan-| #bour critics charged that these

ger of his being ousted from office | Pledses were hinted when
between now and August 1953] Churc hill promised in a speech to
(when the next Parliamentary |©onsr sn Washington last

general elections are scheduled) }month that Britain would take

In the 18 months still left before ,Prampt, resolute and _ effective

the elections he is confident that, action if a Korea truce were
West Germany will have re-;reached then broken by Com-
covered almost complete in ; Munists

lependence under interim peace | Churehill denied making any
agreements now being negotiated | Secret agreement with Truman.
with the Western Allies and wili]He said Attlee’s Government
already have formation of her|reached a secret military under-
European Army diyision fia Me with the United State

last May to take joint action out-
side Korea if Communist planes
ed U.N. forces from
ases,

1, The 48 vote majority he won Churchill said Attlee was jus-

The ‘76-year-old Chancellor






in the Bundestag in the prelimin- /tifed in making such arrange-
ory rearmament debate on Febru-|ments and added: “We conform-
ary 8 ed in principle to the policy of

2. The West German convic-|our predecessors and indeed in

tion which makes ousting of the |some respects it might be said
Government almost impossible ex-]that we diq not commit ourselves

cept in quite extraordinary cir-jeven as far as they had done.”
cumstances UP.



Cowardly Disclosures

rg Bevan denounced Churenit “for
Queen Awards V.C. what he called cowardly disclos-

: ; ures of Cabinet secrets and de-

: LONDON, Feb, 27 manded without success that

Queen Elizabeth II pinned the/Churchill produce actual docu-
ments to prove his statements.

The Prime Minister said he

still is convAyced the U.N. would

make a mistake to start a war

with Communist China and “few

adventures could be less useful

rhe slim, young Queen dressed of. fruitfal” than. to launch

war against Reds.

investiture conducted in the or-|. 4 furious uproar broke out on
nate gold and white State ball-|Labour benches at Churchill's
oom of Buckingham Palace ‘disclosure that the Labour Gov-
I U.p, lernment established a plant for

erweereereenmpeemene | regular production of atomic

JET DESTROYED bombs and produced a bomb

‘which is to be tested this year.

FIFTH AIR FORCE 4.Q,, ' Churehill accused the Labour

KOREA, Feb. 27 {Party of keeping the secret of the
One Communist MIG 15 was | atomic bomb plant with “Machi-

lestroyed and one damaged to javellian art” so it could accuse
tay when 27 F-86 jets fought an |Conservative of warmongering
estimated 60 Red jets near Sinanju ly

ig the election campaign.

in “MIG alley,” —U.P. - @ On Page 5



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PAGE TWO



I ORD ROWALLAN, Chief Se

- of the British Empire and
Commonwealth will be intransit
through Barbados this evening by

air. He is expected to arrive at
Seawell from Atkinson Field
British Guiana at 7.40 p.m. by
B.W.1.A., and leaves 50 minute
later for Trinidad. He will be
rccompanied by his A.D.C., Lt
Comdr. E. P, Mallinson
Canadian General
NENERAL and Mrs. Charles

MacLaren arrived from Ber-
muda yesterday morning by T.C.A
to spend a holiday in Barbado:
staying at the Marine Hotel

General MacLaren was born in
Wakefield, Quebec in 1878. He was
educated it Public Schools:
Queen’s University (B.A., 1902)
Toronto University (LL.B., 1905)
Osgoode Hall.

He served in England and
France during the first ‘World
War, was twice mentioned in des-
patches, and awarded the D.S.O

In Detember 1916 he w
swarded the C.M.G, His wife
Derothy is the daughter of the
late Lt. Col. Fred White. Their
home is in Ottawa

Back To Canada

IR VICE-MARSHAL and Mrs

as

Arthur T. Cowley who had
been holidaying in Barbados, re-
turned to Canada yesterday by
T.C.A.

Air Vice-Marshal, Cowley is
Director of Air Services, Depart-
ment of Transport, Ottawa. They
arrived here early this month and
were guests at Cacrabank.

St. Vincent Beauticulturist

RS. JULIAN BAYNES, whose

husband is a Member of the
Legislative Council in St. Vincent
and a partner of Baynes Brothers,
dry goods merchants of Kings-
town, is now in Barbedos for a
month’s holiday.

She arrived over the last week-
end and is a guest of Mrs. Stella
Zephirin of The Savoy, Bay Street.

Mrs. Baynes, the leading beau-
ticulturist in St.

Vincent, is a
regular visitor to this island. She
was last here in 1950 when she
spent a month,

U.S. Specialist
[>*. RAYMOND TOMASSENE,
Ear, Nose and Throat Spec-
ialist of Wheeling, West Virginia,

who has been visiting Barbados
for several years is now back
again. He arrived yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. via Trinidad
for about a month's holiday and
is staying at the Marine Hote!.
He was accompanied by Mrs.

Tomassene,

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

EE ee.





< —wwwrewe

‘it's this Olympic Games
kating championship,”’

nem LOL a Oey ag ly

Here Again

M* AND MRS. R. LAFFAN
are back in Barbados after
in absence of several months.
They arrived from Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.LA,
Canadians
MONG the passengers arriv-
ing tn Barbados yesterday

T.C.A.
Mrs

morning
for a holiday

from Canada by
were Mr. and
Alex Paterson of Montreal, Mr
and Mrs. 1, Perley-Roberts of
Ottawa who will be remaining for
about a month and Mr. and Mrs,
C, H. Gordon. They are all stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.

To Be Married To-morrow
ISS LUCY COREY of Mon-
treal was among the passen-

gers arriving from Canada _ yes-
terday morning by T.C.A_ She i
to be married tomorrow to Mr

Glyne Moore, son of Mrs. Winifred
Moore of 8th Avenue, Belleville
and the late Mr. G..R. S. Moore.

Miss Corey who is the daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Corey of
Hatley, Montrealy is a former
T.C.A, Stewardess. At one time

she used to fly on T.C.A.’s Domes-
tic routes but recently had been
flying on the Montreal-London
run.

Two Changes

WO changes in forthcoming
sailings of the S.S. Golfito
from Barbados have been an-

nounced, Golfito is now scheduled
to leave Barbados for Southamp-
ton on Ist May instead of 24th
April and 12th June instead of
5th June, 1952.

Her next call at Barbados
be Sunday, March 2nd
Southampton.

will
from

Carub Calling

Two Weeks

FTER spending about twe
eeks’ holiday here, Mr. Noe?
Baynes, merchant of Kingstown,

returned home on Monday night
by the R.M.S. Lady Rodney.

Visited Parents and Sister
ETURNING to Canada yester-
day by T.C.A. after spend-
‘ng a short holiday with his
parents Prof. J. S. Dash, O.B.E.,
and Mrs. Dash and his sister Mrs.

M. P. Merrick, was Mr. Philip
Dash. He was accompanied by his
wo young sons Michael an@
Stephen.

Mr. Dash is attached to Head
Office, Bank of Montreal.

Four T.C.A. Officials

OUR T.C.A. Officials flew in

by T.C.A. yesterday on a short
visit. They are, Mr. Mike Hildred,
T.C.A.’s Regional Public Relations
Officer, Montreal, who came in
from Bermuda; Mr. A. Lake,
Communications Supervisor,
T.C.A.’s Aélantic Region who ar-
rived from Montreal; Mr. Jack
Scotj, T.C.A. Stores Inspector and
Mr. Casey Vanderlinden, Super-
visor of Maintenance, T.C.A.’s

Atlantic Region,

Mr. Loke, Mr. Scott and Mr.
Vanderlinden are guests at the
Marine Hotel, Mr. Seott and Mr,
Vanderlinden who are on an in-

pection tour arrived from ‘Ber-

nuda
Talking Point

The best liar is he who makes
the smallest amount of lying go
the longest way-—Samuel Butler.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952
1115 a.m James Verity, 11 30 a.m
Crazy People, 1260 noon The News,
1210 pm News Anclysis
4.00—7.15 pm, — 19 76m, 25 53m ,
31 32m

400 pm
Daily

The News, 410 pm. The





Service, 415 pm Rhythm is
Their Business, 445 pm Sporting
Record, 5.00 pm Composer of the
We 515 pm Tew Records, 6 00
pm Colonial Commentary, 6 15 p im
Scottish Magazine, 6 45. pm Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
pm The News 7.10 pm News
Analysis, 715 pm We See Britain
745—10.40 pm — U.53m., 31 3tm ,
49.4%m
74 pm Crazy People, 815 pm

Radio Newsreel
patch, 8 45 p m

830 pm _ Special Dis-
Composer of the Week

9.00 pm. Ring Up The Curtain, 10 00
pm The News, 1010 pm From The
Editorials, 1015 pm A Good Job
10 30 pm. The Last Chronicle of Bar

et

BY THE WAY... . By Beachcomber

MAN who tethered his coat
& ina field and tried to milk
it said he thought there was a
*g” in the month, “You are think-
ing of oysters”, replied the official,

“Why on earth should I be
thinking of oysters?” asked the
man. “Well, you thought your coat
was a goat, I suppose,” said the
official. “Go on! Go on!” shouted
the man, “Now tell me ‘that if
there is a ‘g’ in the coat I ean
eat goats in February.” “We are

evidently talking at ¢ross-pur-
poses,” vouchsafed the official.

‘Evidently,” said the man, “Haye
some coatsmilk cheese?”

Prodnose; You don’t expect us
to believe this!
Myself: Not literally, of course

Sorg F052—1952. Floreat!
NE of the omissions I noticed
from a recent list of centen-
aries occurring this year was the
restaurant Sorg in the Place du
Vieux Marche aux Vins in Stras-
bourg. The moment you enter the
unpretentious room you breathe
an air of established contentment,
There is no loud babble of voices,
but only an occasional exchange
of comments on the excellence of
the food and the ‘wine. The wait-
ers move quietly about their ben-
eficent ‘task. There is no radio to
bring a heathen atmosphert into
the enjoyment of the fare, Every-
thing is serene, unhurried, and the
soul as well as the body is nour-
ished, And the crown of the feast
should be crepes au kirsch, If
English people are still allowed to
go abroad, I hope to return to
Sorg some day.
Wide experience
BUSINESS man_ has been
advising applicants for jobs
not to be shy and humdrum, but

to try to startle the man who is
interviewing them by enterprise
and self-confidence. I knew a

young man who, when asked for
his previous experience, replied
loudly and rapidly: “Wickminder
in a Khartoum lamp-factory,
greenhouse overseer at Codgett
and Rivers, consulting architect
Clermont-Ferrand gasworks, se¢n-



jor partner in a steam carpet beat-
ing warehouse at Cadiz, braceplug
setter and internal wirer at Har-
wich, publicity manager for
Bloodstoneés Dog Foods.” The
executive was so impressed that
the applicant got the job—head
of the pressing department in a
firm of button-moulders,

The hunt is up

A TELEVISION Detector Van
Detector Van, sent out to

warn illicit gapers of the approach
of the Detector Van. it putting so
many illicit electric irons out of
order that an Electric Iron Detec-
tor Van, with repairing equipment,
is to be sent out at once.

Marginal note

a you want to qualify as a
passer-by you must never stop
walking. A man’s jacket was

ripped the other day by a motor-

car. The case was dismissed when
the man--admitted that he was
standing still at the time. If a

car backs suddenly on to the pave-
ment and knocks you through a
shop-window, it is no good saying

you tried to get out of the way, The head-line was not in this
and were therefore a passer-by, column,



i

gt



For a time Gaffer Jarge stares at
Rupert, Then, quite unable
speak, he turns and moves away
shaking his head in bewilderment.

to

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The answer is that you would
have been standing still if the car
had not backed at you, and there-

fore you are not a passer-by.
4 UITE rightly a critic praised
the “well-balanced cast” of
a ballet. Balance is everything,
as the ballerina found out to her
cost when the man at whom she
was thrown fumbled the catch, so
that she banged herself against a
eardboard tree in the woodland
glade, Without balance the whole
thing becomes a sort of Rugby
serum.

Hup!

Barber’s cat chews
umbrella
FRIEND of mine, and any
friend of mine is a friend of
mine, as the lonely drinker said
to himself—a friend of mine had
a nasty experience the other day.
On awakening he took a hasty
glance at his paper, and the fol-

lowing headline made him reel
back on to the pillow. Colonel
Inherits £200 From A _ Lizard.




oe ere

Pedi he ee



Properly and see that ev
tree shall have

ery kind of
its proper place.

ut for you, little bear, pine woods
would have conquered the land and

never will!'* Then he

: tlow they
But the first elf has spotred the vanishes and Rupert scampers
group and he leaps towards them. happily home again.
“We've won, we've won!" he THE END
cries, ‘* Nutwood forest shall not ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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VA

[0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH %

EASTER CARDS
MOTHER’S DAY
CARDS

Spanish—English, English—Spanish





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Everything Shakespeare ever
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By




f

Teddy sat in the
, think

Bears Can't Attend School
TEDDY, ‘the Stuffed Bear said:
How can I learn to read and write |
shook his head and said that there
said General Tin the tin soldier.
the rag-doll. |
crickets. Or for lions or tigers or
beene-ssnpnteesitsnss
“Or for plants and flowers,

—Neither Can Cows, Goats or Birds—
By MAX TRELL
I've never been to school. Aren’t
there any schools for me to go to?
if I don’t go to school?”
But everyone Teddy spoke to!
were no echools for Teddy Bears.
“Schools are only for people,” |
“There aren’t any schools for cats |
and dogs, @ither,” said Mary-Janeé |
“Nor,” added Mr. Punch, “for }
cows or goats or grasshoppers or!
elephants.”
“Or for birds,” said the C
r layroom corner,
the Geranium, waving her | fe.
“Something.” said Teddy final

“ought’to be done. I'd better think though he had been thinking for
about what ought to be done.” ar pe, ek “Who will be the
in His Corner teacher, Teddy?
| “Us!” said Teddy. “All of us!”
So Teddy sat very still in hie, 4 y.
corner of the playroom, thinking | Mendes ae od Soll engtews
about what ought to be done. Sud- ls Rid os rar . write!” said
denly he said: “I know!” Me Pu x ae eens a
By this time everyone alse fini en
the playroom had forgotten whai
Teddy was pixies about, so he
had to explain all, over apain.

j
|

Kept Smiling
But Teddy kept smiling and said:
‘Why do we have to read and write
“And I know just what to do, Let’s Whe way people do? We'll read and
start onr own sehvol!” , write in our own way, We'll make
Everyone agreed it wax a won- ‘up our own way to read and write
derful idea only they ait shook and that’s what we'll teach our-

their heads again. ' selves in our own school.”

“Why, wihat’s the mutter?” | Then everyone else wondered if
asked at perhaps Teddy’s idea wasn’t good,
“Who'll the teacher?” said “Maybe,” said Teddy, “that’s how

General Tin. “What good is a people learned to read and write,
school without a teacher?”

too. | mean, long, lon ‘0, when
“T don’t know,” said Teddy, try. | people first ntarted to ete school.
ing his best to sound eheerful. “I') | We'll get pencils and make marks
have to think some more.” | for every different work we know.

So he sat quietly in his eorner,! And then we'll study the marks
thinking and thinking, until at last,'. . . and that’s how we'll all teach
after a very long tine, he an. ourselves, and that’s how we'll all

nounced: “I know!” \ learn,”

“Who?” said everyone, For this And Teddy, the Stuffed Bear,
time they hadn't forgotten what smiled, because he did so want to
Teddi +98 thinking about, even | zo to school,



World Players
For Tennis In J’ca
NEW YORK, Feb. 27.

West Indian
Table Talk

Headed by Dick Savitt, an in-
ternational field will leave this ay teoeaae
week for Jamaica for two grass LONDON, Feb. 21.
court tennis tournaments. Leaving this week for a business

An. Visit to the major British West
antes Indian tertitories is Mr. Colin
Sere ee ater ~ Turner, whose firm in Londomtep-
ace “en Cham- yesents’ several prominent West
DISnsni pa.” e st. Andrew in- tndian newspapers. Purpose of
vitation will be held at Kingston, Mr. Turner's visii, I understand,

March 1. The Caribbean will be is
played at Fairfield Country Club sewebaaet th Tine Lh bee
at Montego Bay, Jamaica, March ’

Tournaments are the St.
drew invitation and third

5 to 9 pany. He will travel to the West
7 a Indies by sea, but will fly between

Players making the trip will the various territories. He returns
include Budge Patty, Canadian Via New York in April.

Davis Cuppers, Brendan Macken
of Montreal and Lorne Main of
Vancouver, David Lurie, South
African and two British Wight-
man Cup players, Helen Pletcher
and Pat Ward.

BACK TO B.H.

Rawle Farley, former WISU
President, returns to the West
Indies in March. He will take up
employment in British Honduras.
awile, who comes from British
Guiana, lived in B.H, before com-
ing to England. .

—(C.P).

TULIPS FOR WOMAN

WITH 2 WEEKS TO LIVE INFANTRY BATTALION

LONDON, Feb. 26. An infantry battalion may be
An armful of purple tulips left ‘ised in Eastern Caribbean ter-
London on Tuesday by air as a “itories if the suggestion Conserv-
gift for a woman in Perth who @tive M.P. Major Tufton Beam-
nas only two weeks to live. ish, is adopted, The proposal will
rs. P. J. Hore of Bedford ar- be put forward in Parliament on
rived at London this afternoon March 19th, Major Beamish wi!l
with the flowers—a breath of tell Mr. Oliver Lyttelton that
Englidh spring’—ipoking for a formation of a battalion would
passenger to take them to her be followed by a ready response
friend Mrs. Doris Jones who emi- {yom voluntary recruits.

grated to Australia last year and |
is now critically ill. i STUDENT TABLE
TENNIS

Students of seven different na-
tionalities took part in the Londen
| University table-tennis champions
|week. About 200 men in the sin-
gles played on seven tables for
more than six hours to decide tue
first round results. Among those
knocked out was Walter Jones, a
West Indian mathematics student.
He said afterwards, “Next to crick-
et the West Indians prefer table
tennis. I’m afraid I’ve let my
country down sadly.” Favourite
for the singles is 26 year old
Vietnamese, Luu-Thahh-Dakh.



The flowers were taken aboard
but Mrs. Jones may never enjoy
them. It takes four days to fly
to Perth.

—U.P.









~ ROODAL
EMPIRE

TODAY: Last 3 Shows 1 30 p.m,

Across
Ll Fort iruin by sudden invasion|

7, Next. door tht : Sets AT DAWN
+ Ne 0) is 18 in Close “THE SUN SETS AT D ”
proximity, (0) Introdue'ng
9. This crow is hooded. (5) Sally PARR — Philip SHAWN
ia oneaeaee Of sorts, (4) EXTRA:
} luter cover (4) SRR! SHOWING THE
13. Needed for a latent change. (6) vuM .

FUNERAL OF THE LATE KING
OPENING FRI. 20TH

The Iittle fel)
Makes ears

ow is no gem, |
+ Intention |

burn surely, (4)
show in the morn





ing. (3) Digi: 5 /\ faa
ing:
22. Exist on a vague ition of EFLIN — Ev KEYES
i wie aabiual yas (4) ven ane
24. e; aken is not a
o5 punishable omence, v4) 0° COE TIES cave wor
2 parting ways, (4) .
26. Forty days in summer sully. David Niven's Latest Film
know these winds. (7)
cati LYMPIC
A. Incite by seating it, ()
2. Actnowiedse validity of this
. 30 8.15
- Cheerful tn tne train. (5) Hedy LAM on tne . '
Unprepossessing. (4) STRANGE WOMAN

Nothing stops mé going to dine.
hy often said that truth will.
Break o northern handicap, (4)

Such poten Prepares for publi-
cation. (3)

AND
CHARLIE CHAPLIN in
MONSTEUR VERDOUX

TODAY SPECIAL at 1.30
Roy Rogers in “IDARO”

oe mo ee





(4. This side for piame? (5 and “SIOUX CITY SUE”

!S Keeis may transport them. (5) With Gene AUTRY

16 Bant enmt ® small lake. (4) (Cheap Prices) ®
) ft Fouswe ® famous oraer, (4)

and 23. Gown ana meal provide Qavaing, Peiday Wh 0.90 & 8.15







a broken air seat. (4, 3) cee ae in . act
Solution of vesterdae’s nugric Avrovs: «a .
i Journey; 8 Amused: 11. Gar: 32 and “LOVE AFFAIR’
it: 15. ite! 14, Tram: 15, Startie a ce “oe
Noun: 17, Novel: 19 foe! 2) Snine SPECIAL MIDNITE SAT. ist
oe ae 25. Hand: 24 Add: {5 Reveal Whole Serial—
Own: Jasmine: 2. Om 5 ie ; , o
Faition Vearn: 6 Demat? BRUCE GENTRY
rum ad s Onit 10 Stranger
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Johnny Mack BROWN & Doris DAY — Gordon Mar RAE with the New
ARIZONA TERRITORY" Singing Sensation Jack SMITH
TT Whip WILSON Andy CLYDE A WARNER BROS,
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Diat 2310

PLATZ AweBARBAREES
GALA OPENING
Sat. March Ist. at 6.43

& centinaing Dally at 445 & ae The
OM MOONLIGHT BAY

THURSD



THE WINDSOR INCOME
Duke Seeks A New Settlement

By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE

HE Duke of Windor’s income

is being discussed among

politicians of both parties, unoffi-
cially cf course, as yet.

King George VI made him an
allowance of £25,000, which
ceases with his death.

It is possible that Queen Eliza-
beth will continue this as a purely
family affair, but it is believed
that the Duke is anxious for a
more stable arrangement,

It is thought that such an ar-
rangement was one of the mat-
ters talked about when he visited
the Prime Minister at 10, Down-
ing-street two weeks ago.

The cbvious course is to incor-
porate ‘the payment in the Bill
dealing with Royal Family fin-
ances which will shortly be pre-
sented to Parliament.

A Men’s Affair

ERE is comment on the

absence of women—other

than reyal mourners—from the
funeral procession.

Countess of Erroll, who as

hereditary Lord High Constable

of Scotland ranks first after the

Royal Family in Scotland; was
not invited.
Not one of the women’s ‘ser-

vices or social organisations. was
represented,

Lady Reading, founder of the
Women’s Voluntary Service, said
to me; “I was told they had | de-
cided not to include women and 1
agreed. Funerals belong to men
and the nearest women relatives.”

School for Charles ?

LD sare sing previous heirs, who

were educated privately in
their early years, Prince Charles
may go to school.

His father has always wanted
Charles to go to his old sehvooi,
Gordonstoun, near Elgin.

And Queen Elizabeth was in-
clined to agree.

Ba

* ®

Other members of the family,,

including the Queen Mother, pre-
ferred Eton or Hafrow, if any
school at all.

Now Prince Charles is first in
line of suceession his schooling
must tend to become a State con-
cern rather than a purely domes-
tie affair.

Against the views of those who
favour private education, there
is a strong argument for some

school association with his future
subjects,

Kings ‘At Home’

Ov by one the royal mourners
are departing this week-end
from Claridge’s.

Never before have so many
royal heads been gathered in one
hotel, At times the fawn-car+
peted foyer became a cosmopolitan
Court.

te

th *

There, beneath the huge crystal
chandelier, Lady Lucas curtsied
low to King Gustav and reminded
him that she entertained his
father when he visited Britain.

* * *

There, also, Don Juan, the
Spanish Pretender, twice kissed
the hands of girls presented to
him, and King Paul of Greece
shook hands with members of the
staff.

Sweden's King Gustav escorted
Norway’s King Haakon and Earl
Mountbatten to the entrance,
after Vaey had called on hit.

He relaxes after lunch with o

game of canasta.

* *

On the plane to London two
seats were reversed so he could
have a canasta foursome.

Wrong Monarch

HEN Denmark’s King Fred-
cril: and Quecn In rid wore
expected everyone in the foyer
from manager to page boy was on
the alert.
A bell rang, signalling the
arrival of a V.LP., ahd a Danish
equerry hurried

THEATRES
ROXY

Today Last ? Shows 4.30 @ 8.15
Googie Withers — Grifnth Jones
in “ONCE UPON A DREAM”
and “MY BROTHER's KEEPER”

with
— Jane Hilton

NEWSREEL SHOWING
OF THE LATS KING.

TODAY SPECIAL at 1.30 p.m
“PRINCE a PLAINS”

“NAVAJO RAIDERS"
(Cheap )

SAT. Special Mid-nite Show
WHOLE

SERIAL
“MANGUNS of M¥etERy

ROYAL

Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 @ 8.15

Jack Warner





EE
with
NEWSREEL a

OF THE LA’

eee
TODAY SPECEAL at 1.99 pcm.

See Pes eae.



for Reservation



ak
“RBA!



But instead of King Frederik,
Ex-King Peter and Queen came
through the revolving doors.

They were taken up in the lift
and, as the bell rang again, the
manager signalled for the lift to
hurry down. It returned just in
time for the Danish couple.

Top Hat Wanted

the funeral Queen AlexSn-
dra “wore a Paris-made black
woollen dress under a Persian
lamb toat.
She hada three rows of pearls
and péar) earrings.
a *

Over the black uniform of an
admiral of the Yugoslay Navy,
King Peter wore a greatcoat which
arrived from New York by plane
and was pressed by a Savile-row
tailor.

From him King Peter ordered
a morning coat and top hat.

Holland’s Bloom

UEEN JULIANA hurried from

her car to her sulte, but re-

eppeared a few minutes later to
drive to Buckingham Palace.

The queen brought her own





GRAND OPENING
BARBAREES

PLAZA



(DIAL 5170)

AY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952

Ex-Queen
of Dutch

from
up

one
made

wreath and
Wilhelmina,
bloom

Her mourning clothes were
made in Holland, for she believes
in encouraging national trade.

Forgotten Sword

ENMARK'’S royal couple ars
due to visit London again in

May, when King Frederik will
dedicate a Danish church.
Then he Will sail in his yacht

Dannebrog to Greenland.

His eousin, Prince Axel, left his
ceremonial sword in the plane
It was sent on to the hotel.

Film Festival

CANNES, Feb. 26
The Fifth International Film
festival will be held here from

April 23 to May 10 with 18 coun-
tries participating the organisation
announced Tuesday

Countries taking part will be
Argentina, Canada, Germany,
Britain, France, Greece, India,

Italy, Luxembourg, Cuba, Mexico,
Norway, Poland, Saar, Spain,
Switzerland, Union of South Afri-
ca and Yugoslavia. Israel and
Japan are also expected later but
has not yet given an official reply.
—U-P.



MARCH Ist 8.435 p.m.

ANOTHER SCENIC
WONDER IN THE
CARIBBEAN !

WITH

THE






A

\



Bay-eautiful babes! Bay-eautiful

WARNER’ BROS.

AU PL AZ A BARBAREES

L 5170

DIA

MUSICAL IN Many
‘OQra\:
On.

(Moo

DORIS DAY GORDON MARAE!

LoviIN'EST




Moon / ~




tunes!’

in cotoe by TE CHINICOLOR

FROM

WARRKER
BROS.















A Memorable Cast
Dramatic Ivstery Of

The MA








NG TO-DA

and Continuing DAI

A

.
.? love...

with
WARD BOND
CHARLES KEMPER







David



DIAL 8404
TODAY (Only) 445 & 8.30 P.M.
a QUEST of CHEYENNE”
Wild Bilt ae &
“ALAS BILL - =
CARSON

PRIDAY @ SAT. 44s @ &.0 PM
Leo GORCEY & Bowery Boys
“IN FAST COMPANY”
James Ron CURWOOD’S
” .ON MANHUNT”
&














COTTEN-STANWYCh,
Fein WITH

A CLOAK’

LOUIS CALHER
\ LESLIE CARON

IN ONE STRANGE NIGHT

IDA ) TGS

ROBE RT RYA all
ON DANGERO”-
OUND ‘



POODPRS SSSI ¢
Â¥,

ee

%o : %

Your Tickets for the Best Shows :
To-day 5.00 and 8.30 p.m. to Sunday x











In The
The Year










“starring

N








Y 1.45 & 8.30 p.m.

FRIDAY 2.30—4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

LY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.








e met both
cnd MURDER!





c



B*TOWSN
Diat 2310

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) &.20 P.M
“BEWARE of PITY”

Lilli PALMER &
“HOUSE of FRANKENSTEIN
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY









FRIDAY & SATURDAY 48% PM
“THE BIG PUNCH
Gordon MacRAE Wayne MORRIS

“THE BRIGHT LEAF"
Gary COOPER
MIDNITE SAT: IST
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE
Wild Bill BLLIOTT &
“ALIAS BI ¥ the KID
Sunset CARSON






THURSDAY, FEBRU. ARY 28, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







The Labour Welfare THE GAN BOLS oe 5 ahiig Appeal —— etn Pearle po a ae

ante. C lems of this subsidiary compar r4 pproximately 2 n

eh RS ee
GEORGE, THE SUITES COME
















(VE PUT THE Mr, Carl eslie 1¢ of the Seawell Air I is
F © jeack PROM THE UPHOLSTERERS 2S SACK ON If vented au of ILA.(C)L. Sea- designed to inciples of
4 | A | C t ry 4—1T LOOKS LOVELY vell wees ae eee 5 ‘
f v , proceeded on 3 weeks’ Vv n i Airp tration,
une * ni ommuntl y by K vt tion leave during the month He Civil Aviation on, Ait
: resumes duty on 15th Februar Traffic Control Meteorology,
} . Telecomnrunication and other
D | t Directorate General of related subject
eve opmen Civil Aviation : Mr, DeGazon infor us that
W/Cmdr. L. A. Egglesiie) there i 1 proposal » extend
THERE ARE NOW 3 Community Halls provided from Pupetos Generel Of Sty!) Avin- Visio Alsport by te ae te
Mind ana & 44 tion British Caribbean Are a tak strip crossing the exist-
Fund and functioning. They are : Belleplaine Com- '



left the Colony for British Guiana, ing runway at an angle of about
where a conference was held with 16 North Beane Field, which
members of the British Guian ito be the U.S. Army Air



Hali, in St. Andrew; Princess Alice Playing Fie‘d,
lichael and K.G.V.M.P. in St. Philip. Two other











halls are completed but the formal openings have not yet Government, Mr. W. Grinsted ce base, has recer been
taken place : one at Sarjeant’s Village, Christ Church and Director of the Caribbean Meteor- acquired by the St. Lue Gov-
} . Rearwices - frown » m : } mee under My
the other at Ellert St St ological Services, and Mr. Frown, ernment and also comes un ler Mr.
Bath a} a e arcane. bag bnotirs Another for St. Joseph, Air Registration Board Surveyor DeGazon’s administration
eee >a, Is In course of erection NOW. on the recommendations of the

; Tt existence of these Halls chased and despatched to Anti- Meteorological Sub-committee of

rovide 1 great opportunity for gu where the Social Welfare the Regional Air Navigation Cor



the District Welfare Officers at- Office has been able to contact Consideration Of ference recently concluded at Gernkin Divisions

iched he Social Welfare Of- a buye Most of the original } : Re nore On Sea we li eld returned 10. the, Colony on vi 29
to bui p and assist in de- order r 250 baskets has now field returned to the Colony on » I e dy 19 >»
velopin t p movements par- | n completed, Bill Postponed 22nd P ; V ill Be t ‘a - =




January from British Gui-
rural areas where ana, and left the next day on a BONN, Germany Feb, 26






































































z et . The House 3s y Tuesdays ; .
i hitherto been impossible aining for Group Work — yiont postp a oe ‘a ueeday visit to St. Kitts, Antigua, Jamai- Allied officials said Tuesday
t uch beeause of the lack With only 4 District Welfare iI] hick aaaee pag re oars Four soft spots on the runway Plantation, St. Miehael, recently Military ca and British Honduras that the Atlantic Army will
of a meeti place Officers available to cover the lic Em V tives 1 an eopent She ae were re-instated by the Depart4 returned from Canada and .1s A USAF (MATS) Amphibian Seawell Aerodrome Control: D@ve to, wait at least until 1955
Wher hall él Wéitee e island for fleld work—and “ y par a SEONG ay ned ee ment of Highways & Transport, working with T.C.A, at Seawell §-10 aircraft arrived from Ram- The number. of aircraft move- for. 12 German divisions it counts
est all is ready the Vestry much of the time of the chief offi- oo ants Sa cae pangs an sov~ during the month of. January. Airport. As stenotypist, she re- sey Air Force Base in Puerto ments handled by Seawell Aero- 0% to help defend the west _des-
in Maids Conte Cex USS OS necessity be given to — lati oH pose ‘2 adopt new These soft spots measured 20ft. x lieves Miss Isabel Bezanson who on Friday, 11th January, drome Control for the month was pite the green light given Euro-
, rts elds Com~ administrative duties--the policy te "ean seattest ang submitted 20ft.; 18ft, x 34ft.; 32 ft. x 12ft. is now at T.C.A, in their Bridge ( the command of .Lt. H. 943, composed of 122 landings and pean Army by Atlantic Allies at
t ijority of mem- js to concentrate on the training by a Committee appointed by the and 24ft. x l7ft. respectively, and, 4 x fufill : ssign- W rf rg 4 flight. jo)’ c cea re of melt: Lisbon’ conference
be! ( ng the Vestrymen) cf th ‘ ae ana a rer . ‘oo Se te ’ ¥, 4nd. town office fufilling her assign Wallendorf, on a training flight. 12) take-offs, The number of
} matside Se ee ate c the leaders: thus es week. Sore io SETUP into. the Reg- were located between stations’ ment in Barbados for the Tourist This aireraft is attached to the operative hours for the month Vinee oficiales’ al thint cube
C opt fy es local eines * -. Pre Welfare “Officers lettuxe + pas governing the leave of 1600ft. and 2000ft. reading west to Season. Air/Sea Rescue Squadron at were 477, the Control Tower and » ies, 7 vMacwed sal ta an be ily
\ kr the ‘i { met ana ny SHAD OR: Re one eet ee ¥ Government Officers east of the runway. Work on these Messrs, Gardiner Austin & Co Borringquin, Puerta Rico, The @ sential Government Service eae i. Hy et | “the, a
V now the district ani Yentre v girls in the slass an mployees. — ateme ’ ~— mn . . Ss a 2 . ces j France have t back : a
vill in the running. are all p Sod incisor aa ee ts ‘ re-instatements ‘was usually one itd, Local Agents. for Trans- Pilot and flight crew of 9 remained peing manned for an average of vious timetable calling for com-
; c &- ave all picked leaders of group: Dr. G. H. Cummins, .(.) who on Tuesdays and finished in the ~ 1 for .2 days. I 8 : & . : 6
t he > time to assist in or clubs in the area from which introduced the Bill, accepted .a. early hours of Wednesday morns Canada Air Lines moved into w ear at poe 3 a 2 days. = 15.4 hours daily. bat ready German troops by
Halt ng B Ling Broupe using the they come, and it is hoped when suggestion by Mr, A, E. S. Lewis ings. Seal-coating of shrinkage their new and spacious offices a thupeasddaets eanec 0 Get US Seawell Traffic : 1954. Sources ‘here explain the
fal e District Welfare Officer they have finished their course (L) that consideration should be cracks on the runway cOntinues. the corner of Broad and Cowell sincere appreciation 0 the hos- The passenger, cargo and mail situation thus: * Germans will
for the areas concerned concen~ jn Bridgetown they * will retuTn, postponed ir view f tk of ig t Work cas “the new ’ ; Streets on 8th January, 1952. pitality extended to himself and ¢rame for the month is as detailed need two full years fram the
trates worl round the district +9 their areas firmly grounded in’ copies of the ely waanitations saa aback of the natin | ea fae Mr. F. Maurice McGregor, crew during their stay, and hereunder: — ‘ starting peint to call up, arm and
f a time helping the groups the principles of -xtmninga group, jot yet been nina, near iiS tn reom continued, and with the oe Operations Manager, T.C.A’s At- thought that when he returned to 3 959 passengers 36 283-Ib, ale pe gg to ane ue to
1 the clut nd organizing bo y > Co Pe . ‘ . ‘ . . 2ag ive 3S | » would endeavour aT as : wes serve th the six ns puro=
5 ie ee eee eB = the eee and the | members as was proposed in the gress made by the Department of lantic Region arrived in the his po apg Or yr endeavour freight and cargo and 5,496-Ib = ae ve i ation
ciple ch the D.W.O, works iF ecient cla at: the Objects and Reasons of the Bill, Public Works in completing the colony on 9th January for a to arrange Lips all the remainder mail, i ’
gto lotal groups $0 Buln’ YW GA _ just feck a The Regulations which were NeW garages, the removal of all, week's vacation, vit : of the a be permitted to Personnel The outlook now is that nota
iam enluen for girls. It in nak open to any Grafted by the Committee, and raeaes the ae goreaes ae a Ne aT tex ae ao Gath erUREee Mr. F. H. DeGazon, Supervisor, anes en oldie get ee
t. A “ an example of , 1 Y' accepted by the Civil Service Asso- ‘he generating plants has been [igh 502 /60¢ rough = Barba- . i " i Vigie Airport, Castries. St. Lucia, drafted before early 1Yoo.--U.R,
how unity hall ¢ Pie ofp one but ta young women who istic i ; ;, completed, thus clearing the way dos during the ‘month commenc International Aeradic gle port, , A
i inity hall can help know something about’ stitdhery ciation, will apply to all public » . . y > 7, (Caribbean) Ltd:
teal community. Some activity cite’ ecdreme Meainee om learn Officers and whole time employees for the sub-surfac ing of the Car ing on Friday 18th January Phi - ag erer dc ‘ak Saas
goes on in the Belleplaine Cen- more so that they can become Of Government, thus enabling Park, This new car park is increased their number of flights ‘Mr. Gears Solan O er
e every day of the week ex- teachers in their own groups uniformity of leave provisions in approximately 200ft. x 110ft. and to 14 as compared with 9 in Jan thet Mr. George Cartet—earn.
cept Sunday. They include a Baby = the Civil Establishme ¢ . will be capable of accommodating uary 1951, and transported a tota tor-in-Charge, LA(C)L., Barba-
Welf cl B f th Plavi Field Nethall " Establishment of thé ¢ vrivate cars parked herring 866 J 1952 dos, has tendered his resignation
We e Clini 1 Brancn © e aving Fields — Nethba islz 4s ate et > : “= of 366 passengers in nuary 52 Se, es < b
Publi Library; Police Boys Wand. hinted by Mr. M. E. Cox bone fashion.The taxi rank w ilk as ‘cuaanarad with 984 di wet . the to Head Office, Port-of-Spain, to
Club and a series of Committees For years organised team (7) Satins seconded the mention t : be separate and distinct from the corresponding period in 1951. become effective 15th February
run i 1 le bu ‘sanis- games (e.g. cricket and football) a se oe 1, private car park and will be so , 1952. Mr. Carter will be greatly
ed the D.W.O.’s. which in- have been played by boys,, but the second reading of the Bill, delineated. British Guiana Airways Ltd: nissed by all with whom he work-
clude there has been no similar activ- ‘hat the new Regulations provid- The Department of Public This airline, the local Agent i at Seawell Airport, from the
" _. ity for girls. To meet this de- ed for the granting of leave to works have now completed the f° which are B.WIA. Ltd cage when the Radio Call sign
(a) A sewi roup for girls §cienc nic se. all public employees on the same ~ my transported a total of 116 passen- ea? r =
é TOUY ficiency the Social Welfare oe as q tan ne two buildings designed to house i ; was “22 up until now. Mr, Car-
fice a week; aN _ fice is encouraging and stimfat- asis as does the Holidays with the garages for the Airport vehi- S&S during the month in 16 tax’ pectsitic: lode Vie auntie Mir
a \ P Reading group for ing netball among the d Pay Act provide for employees cles, Storeroom and Workshop. “ights This airline continues te P. Carter of Messrs, Carter & Co
dul on. Tuesday eve- Scholars’ Associations of the in private businesses, Foundations for 8 other garages Operate its bi-weekly schedule on 5) idgetown who died on &th
i rhe grou. 3 at primary schools in the island, to be rented to Airline operators Mondays and Thursdays between yo nuary. It is on sokeunt ta his
ri readin Julius and | among other girls groups, BUDGET to house their vehicles have been St, Vincent Barbados—Dominica yt cle’ a th nat Wir. Gedirae
eeeser 2 oii ‘ particularly those that are being --from 1. laid and the building will be com“ Barbados—-St. Vincent Carter . Director. yf the jan e
ur ub or formed at the Community Cen- yleted during February rs < > °
x q pleted during February K .t toe nae :
f t Ball and tres." The task has been @ slow estimates and covers in the main The extension tc the Termiral Ae operated 4. charter jag an hide ens at the
Po >an one, ‘but long a some\ pro- the new cost of living allowances Building, the dimensions of which fights during the month betwee! ae a eee ee part in the
, : - gress can be recordec rer! sec 4 is are 8 cf s res » Nev a : juUSsINess O > rm.
1 salsed alin SSR GREL TEENIER “Déviods Axe to Government employees and is are 83ft. x 33ft. has now reached Curacac Zarbados (via St
4 . ganis Be I ods é a reflection also of increased prices roof level, and the building of the [uc Cc ; Tr | led 16 M H ld Rose, Radi iy
he purchase not a regular feature of life-in of Government purchases extension for the Control Tower ucla) uracao rey landed 10 Mr, Harold Rose, Radio En-
! uipment. The g primary school. The first obsta- , Pp ases. : on f he tr * passengers, taking out 21, with 15 gineer for LA.(C)L,.. Barbarios
; , , ; ee r oon In fact the supplementary estim- proceeds. The Control Tower will , : . tt [ ; : ’
try. Plavir Fields cle, therefore, to be overcome 4 ; ; intransit This airline had a de ined from St. Lucia on New
a4 + : ’ ’ . ates during the year amounted to be a more spacious room having , cea q ’ . ' 7
i } sted by was the reluctance of the girls ~ $1,500,000; al Wi’ a-length of 30ft. and a depth of lay of approximately 30 hour , Year's day where he had spent
king up the small bal- themselves in participating in an over 3 400,000 and although 10M "Phe room haat oat be. Barbados due to an engine chans bout 3 months _ transferring
ne cd. The group activity which involved running, there will be an under expenditure low- the. Control ‘ Sacear aall Z. on one of their aircraft, A relief [.A.L.’s Equipment from Vigie
chosen two if its best jumping, and co-ordination of pf $230,000 in respect of emigra~ itil " ‘i aa briefi 7 an plane was flown from Curaca \irport to Castries. Since Mr.
and > the young brain and body. The next task ton, a considerable amount. will Bo (sec AF LCRA | TOR tO incing a splet tn jeorge Carter's resignation from
an @ @ up once a week at F aa someone wail ing and fall to be revoted in the 1952—53 Pilots and flight crews rINging é ou plete engin ' svi rAL” Wir Ross hes usniinl
os * was to fi some > 1 anc . = f Ww ble , ren for changing and installing warns . se =
i with other bas- satneckeaiaal ua : ate eee tar i 8 Pwo new double-throw loud Bing fen: on ontoreimceGharde
Harrison College Gani Mas so st Comb Jae New Taxation system ‘were installed dur ing the do "the job. After a test flight cna tk Barbados : Nope Bt rate of egg production,
(e) Netball for girls School, « terdebogie) a oncca ar month, one in the Terminal Build- both aircraft departed for Cura- “yy, & W.. Hall, Secretary) and maintain them in good
(f) One afternoon a week the training, and- during 1949 and , The substdntial actual and po- ing and the other in the waiting cao, ‘Secountahit, and Mr, Frank JJ.} physical condition. The
Hall is open for indoor 1950 instructed leaders. fr , tential increases in the recurrent room. ’ j ’ “a Signals Officer — .
: rom the 2 Jinea Aer ale Nnezo- ivdine, Area Signals Officer
nes such as table tennis, following Old Scholars’ re ae expenditure of Gove nment wil! Mr. Bertie Rogers—until re- Hanae men ile Venezo LAL. paid @ short routine. visit oatmeal! in Ful-O-Pep
Chinese checkers, draughts, ¢{jons: St. Paul’s, St, Matthias, Tequire to be covered as soon as cently attached to the Port.of- ams she ) : 5 ; to Seawell during the month Feeds and Mashes for
ete, Grace Hill, Christ. Church, St, possible by increased and new Spain office, B.W.LA. has been ; ‘er 1 paper 8 fights urine Phey returned to their headquar- For Starting, Growing starting, growing and egg
Shady . most encouraging Albans, and Edghill Memorial. taxation, While it is a fact that transferred to Seawell as Traffic the month bringing in 06 passen= ‘ors’ in Trinidad on 23rd January. and fgg Production dacti ib
ign that the tendency t ee The fees for instruction and mo- the present average of annuai Clerk, He arrived early in Jan- Bers and taking out 113, The new It is learned that Mr, Bill Lawes production contributes
tn Ne sce fox wetnbling HCY, for equipment were raised crops, viz., probably 170,000 tons Uary schedule is as follows Fridays Assistant Operations Manager, For information and orders, contacts toward nore profitable
vhi “ia chen hen i wen. Dome Old_ Scholars themselves between 1949 and 1952 inclusive, B.W.LA. recruited three new Maturin Barbados Mat | AL, recently returned to U.K R. M, JONES & CO., L results.
f ovtneaie ; 25. has ea AS mugh a oan which was held provides adequate revenue for our Hostenees during ne month. They urin, arriving at Barbado at from Buenos Aires where he was a . oy Lid.
tive) : : : during 1949. any of these girls ediate ments, the re- are the Misses Pauline Fitzgerald, 12.30 p.m, and leaving at Lat ; I ‘
tirely died out. All teachers and GUZM8 3 immediate requiremen ie 1 ‘ : delegate with the U.K. M.C.A P. ©. Box 241
Sey. Sind tae enn a had never before even seen net= dyction in annual crops which Barbara Hart, and Mrs. Carlton p.m. Sundays—Maiquetia—Bar- (United Kingdom, Ministry of : Made by
service. There is no wi blared mast a almost inevitable would result in Goddard. Mise dig ax i. the oor — Maiquetia, arriving at (Gjyj) Aviation) delegation to the Bridgetown The Quaker Qats Company
ble for paying them Ree eet a eae is 4 series of deficits against which’ Younger daughter of Mr, Thos: Barbados at noon and departiny) South American and South Atlan e
nim of the District Wel- therefore with a certain. amount there are presently no adequate Fitzgerald of Messrs Gardiner at 1.00 p.m



z sride in achieve: a q tic Regional I1.C.A.O. meeting
e Officers is not only to get of pride in achievement that we


























f “eServes. Austin & Co., Ltd., local Agents Mr. Vernon Knight, Hon, Vice re 8 re “y Ask -O- i —it’
new a tis ol but to build record sna cr * me above- fet tas been indicated earlier im for Trans-Canada Air Lines, and Consul for Tonmatiatd in Barbado held theter: Pn hie terurn journey oh fos Pul-9 Pep Rowliey Paoding Guide—it's Freel
up ana develop . any existing menSoned . strane were accepted this memorandum, this aspect ahd 4 sister of Miss Dorothy Fitzger- accompanied by Mrs, Knight, left |
groups. Much time is therefore OF ae Meat’ deta 8 ‘aaa. that of future capital expenditure ald, Trans-Canada’s Receptionist for Trinidad on 14th January to ; See eR —- $$$ —____— neers acememnims
ven to these on the Committee yy, tball League c 7 will be considered when the Fiscal at Seawell, Miss Hart is of Cana- attend a victory party given by ;® \
ie 1 every tance is giv- © Z Survey is presented to the Legis- dian birth and now resident in the Trinidad office of Pan Ameri-
ing 4 : d di Retina’ uberis The next hurdle, that of ob- lature. a ope rene - vie can Airways, which had emerged | | —_—__oooOo
ae q ate oonthiee ros taining equipment was met by _ ti 4 4t-Commander arlton winners in an area sales contest |
emiacba oY ete ter Cast against the individual associations. This ~ 10d dar x ‘ i initiated by P.A.A.—Latin Ameri-
odds which were fairly formid- meant that the various groups (i) the Savannah Committee Trans-Canada Air Lines: can Division. Mr. Vernon Knight
ble beginning and are still had to work. for and organis® for the use of space at the Dr. Neil Stewart —~T.C.A’s med~ is Manager of Messrs. Da Costa é |
to be reckoned there is being indoor Games ~ Svenings; social Garrison “Tor the St. Matthias ical officer stationed at Vancouver, Co., Ltd., (Sales Department) |
lowly built up in St. Andrew a hops; concerts and ‘fairs in order and St, Paul’s Netball Teams; was on vacation in Barbados dur- local representatives of P.A.A.| to |
real community movement to raise the $48 that was neces- (ii) the Vestry of St. Mi- jing the month. He was accom- His wife, however,,is the Mana- |
. sary to purchase Tings, pe chael for the use of Queen's panied by his wife and daughter.. geress. of “Airlines & Gen ai
The Centre at Belleplaine is ball and bands. It will not F Park and the grounds of the Miss Phyllis Farmer. daughter Agencies Ltd,” Local Agents for |
® not however the only activity realised, except by those who Nightengale Memorial Home; of mr, H.R farmer ‘of Lodge L.A.V As |
taking 1 Recently the new have worked with poor groups (iii) Mr. and’ Mrs. Grantley or Mr. - i, n y wdge LA.V.
hool ir Mount has been the amount of effort needed. The Adams for the use of grounds
ope i Parent. Teachers Social Welfare Office stresses the at their home for the Grace



ich has been set need for self-help in obtaining the Hill Netbail Team;
the Education De- things that the group desires, and and











Stair
and

|
| |
| i) ,-
|
|
|

| the Social Welfare this $48 had to be raised in addi- (iv) to the Vestries of—
I Organisation is still tion to whatever other funds were St. Michael, St. Philip and
a very new born babe but asmall-ordinarijy required for normal Christ Chureh who have pro-
beginni has been made, and club needs vided or expressed their will-
hoir practices and a_ class in One of the pre-requisites for © ingness to provide grounds and
neediecraft for girls are already membership to the Barbados ‘equipment .at.. their Playing |
taking place. On Sunday after- Netball League is that each team Fields.
noo! 1 hall of the school is should have a “home” ground This is the beginning, and wita|
open for parents and teachers to This was not easy for,snerO.S.A.’s the add@ed stimulus which the!
meet in a friendly atmosphere. to obtain; “Through the Social Barbados Netball League will
There is also a small basketry Welfare Office the following give to the’ game, the day is
me ‘sn operation based on teams have now. acquired. a looked. forward to confidently
der School. Well-made bas- “home” ground, and the thanks? when Netball for girls will be;
made by the boys are pur- of the office go to— as popular-as cricket for boys. |
!

Your flight by pressurized Constellation Speedtrd
saves you days of travelling time — extra time
fo do and see more on business or pleadure.
You relax im deep-seated comfort, enjoy complimentary
meals and mealtime drinks in flight high above the weather
No extras to pay — not even a tip —
for attentive B.O.A.C. service.

BOAC. takes good care of you

Passage
Carpeting

MORE space
MORE crace
LESS) Waste




Carpet
Strips

|
|
|
|
..And Save asigts On “Off Peak’
|



. : BAKBADOS NORMAL | “OFF SEASON*
| in varied RETURN RETURN |
i . “ j
: Widths : LONDON . 1,560.10 1,301.60
WITH THE NEW = |] 3 NEW YORK .. 518.10 a .
| & all sizes of | PARIS . 1,560.10 1,301.60
FIB RE M AT S } MIAMI fi 406.50 on



Consult your Travel Agent or British West Indian |
Airways. Lower Brond Street, Bridgetown—Bar-



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 4) |p appapos |

“We also stock



bados. Telephone 4585.

Seo the New Medels now on Show at CO-OP. _ ee | ey Vy |
with Cane Seats

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. COTTON and Weed Seats” BY I» BQ:
VICTORIA STREET FACTORY LTD. |

BRITISH Fee ah AIRWAYS vd eon a eeee |

320











pacecarsonsin









PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS S49 ADVOCATE |



roe a Tk ey

ef
Thursday, February 28, 1952



NO OPP

IN a party political broadcast last Satur-
day Mr. Attlee, Leader of Her Majesty’s
opposition in the House of Commons said
that “an active opposition is an essential
part of our system.”

In Barbados where the Bushe experi-
ment operates on a so-called party basis
an active opposition is impossible because
ot the overwhelming majority of one party
and the fragmentation of what is called
the opposition into four electors, two In-
dependents and two Congress. The Bushe
experiment has ended, as was earlier pre-
dicted, in the destruction of the party sys-
tem.

Our parliamentary system which is
based on the English parliamentary system
lacks the one thing needful that makes
the English system work—an active oppo-
sition.

The House of Assembly met on Tuesday
for the eleventh time since the new session
began on December 18th, 1951. During
these meetings nothing has been said or
done'by any of the eight “opposition” mem-
bers which could be interpreted as evi-
dence of a policy. There has been in the
new Assembly opposition in the sense that
speakers from all parties have criticised
members of the Executive Committee and
have attacked in debate — proposals and
resolutions introduced by them.

Mr, A. E. S. Lewis, especially and on
occasions Mr. Barrow and Mr. Talma have
contributed to debate certain statements
which could not be interpreted as favour-
able to the arguments put forward by
protagonists of the government.

On one occasion Mr. Lewis showed his
independence of the party by voting with
the “opposition.” This week Mr. Talma
voted against his party.

On most occasions however, labour mem-
bers who disagree with measures cham-
pioned by members of the Executive Com-
mittee refrain from carrying their dislike
to the extreme of voting against their own
party. But this has happened in this session
more than once.

On the other hand, all members of the
Electors’ Association do not always vote in
the same way and Mr. Haynes recently
voted independently of his party when
the report on the runway at Seawell was
under discussion by the House. It is true
that during the present session the “oppo-
sition” has more often than not voted en
bloe against the Labour Party but quite
apart from the fact that not all eight oppos-
ing members seem to be present when the
counts are made, voting against the gov-
ernment cannot be said to be the same as
actively opposing the government. And
as Mr. Attlee truly said an active opposi-
tion is an essential part of the British
parliamentary system. Unfortunately the
Barbados parliamentary system has pre-
served the shadow of the British system
‘but has lost its substance. Nothing could
have been less desirable: nothing could
have been further from the intention of
Sir Grattan Bushe.

In his party political broadcast Mr.
Attlee made another statement which does
more than underline the gravity of Bar-
bados’ lack of an active and effective oppo-
sition. He made the statement that “we
recognise that any government would have
had to introduce unpopular measures.”
This sentence will repay study and analys-
is because it is so far removed in meaning
from the political system of this, island.

It may fairly be said that the last thing
that any political party wants to do here is
to introduce any measure that is unpopu-
lar. The political platforms which were
adopted by the two major parties during
the electioneering campaign of 1951 seem-
ed to rival one another in the wonderful
promises made to the people. The out-
standing knowledge possessed by Mr. J. H.
Wilkinson in all matters affecting Barba-
dos’ economy was completely overlooked
and ignored by electors who bluntly and
recklessly displayed what little interest
they have in matters which so vitally con-
cern their present and future standards of
living.

In Great Britain on the other hand not
only does Mr. Attlee as leader of Her
Majesty’s opposition recognise “that any
government would have had to introduce
unpopular measures” but ex-Labour Min-
isters like Mr. James Griffith, former
Secretary of State for the Colonies, and
Mr. Robens have been recently warning
workers in South Wales and elsewhere in
England that industrial disputes fomented
for political reasons sabotage the Trade
Union movement, play into the hands of
the Russian imperialists and endanger their
own standards of living.

In Barbados, on the other hand, visitors
to the House of Assembly cannot fail to
conclude when they listen to speakers of
the so-called “opposition,” that their real
objection to the party in power is not that
they turn a blind eye to evils which must
be remedied but that they do not go fast
enough down the road which leads to
Utopia. If they continue like this parlia-
mentary government in Barbados will be-
come o more than “rubber stamping” in-
terrupted by gusts of hot ail

no

OSITION |





West Indian Federation Cuba’s Sugar

@ From Page 1

by a Committee voniposed of
representatives of all the Colon-
ies concerned. But the Stand-
ing Closer Association Committee
themselves recognised that much
further work would be necessary
before the practical effects of
their recommendations could be
fully assessed, Some Governments
have already started a detailed
examination of the Committee’s
proposals and I presume that the
remaining Governments will wish
to undertake similar studies in
advance of the Conference
Secondly, it is already clear that
proposals will be put forward for
modification of some of the Com-
mittee’s- recommendations, and it
is desirable that all the Govern-
ments concerned should have
adequate time to study such pro-
posals in advante of the Confer-
ence. Thirdly, I note that little
progress has so far been made by
Governments in considering the
report of the MacLagan Commis-
sion. A Customs Union seems
to be an essential corollary of
political federation, and for this
reason I should doubt the wisdom
of holding a general conference
on federation unless Governments
had already studied the report of
the MacLagan Commission and
had reached broad conclusions.

4. My present view, therefore,
is that it would not be advisable
to hold the London Conference
until Governments had been
able:

(i) to complete their study
of the financial and other
implications of the Rance
Report;
to undertake a detailed
examination of the pro-
posals made in the Mac
Lagan Report with a view
to determining what tech-
nical difficulties may call
for some adaption of the

(i)

proposals to: meet the
conditions of individual
territories and what par-
ticular fiscal problems
would arise from _ the
application of the tariff
schedules incorporated in

the report; and



DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS
LONDON,

The best news of the week is
the end of Identity Cards. I sup-
pose they were not particularly
obnoxious pieces of pasteboard,
but it was what they stood for
that seemed irksome. And they
were a little absurd. The state
gave every baby the present of a
card inscribed with name and
birthday—in case it should forget.
Changes of address had to be re-
corded, The cards were introduced
in the hurried legislation of 1939
with the idea that they would last
for wartime only. By the time the
war ended the bureaucrat had
tagged so many burdens on the
grey cards that they would not
let the cards go, Health services
land Post Office clerks asked for
the cards; the police found them
convenient. They could always
ask every motorist parking in the
wrong place to show his card. The
theory was that identity cards
make bigamy difficult, But actu-
ally the rates for bigamous mar-
riage have risen since the war—
as one of our nationalist humorists
cays, nothing will keep a British
bigamist back.

Accidents Wilf Happen

I have been reading a report—
a very solid official document—
by His Majesty’s Inspector of
Factories—and I have found it
fascinating. It discusses the vari-
ous kinds of accidents that hap-
pen in Britain's factories—and
all kinds of other matters con-
nected with life in industry. For
people who work in offices, the
life of the factory is like studying
a foreign country. Here are some
of the aspects of the everyday
life of the British industrial work-
er that most struck me:

When asked about evening
work, on the shift system, many
workers said “It is as good as
going to the pictures.” They liked
the evening shift because they
could be about the house all the
day, aad look after their gardens
before coming in to work in the
evening, Their wives reported that
they did not like it,

The British industrial worker
hates wearing goggles to protect

By

OUR

A Clerk Replies

To The Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—I read what “Shopper”
had to say about clerks, in Fri-
day’s Advocate and as I am a
Clerk I felt that I should answer.

I agree with “Shopper” that
some clerks are very slow and
are not interested in their work
but that does not mean that all
clerks should be thought of as
one, it is true that in some lead-
ing stores when you go to pur-
chase anything the clerks do not
come forward to you to see what
you require, if you never ask for
what you want I doubt if they
will ask you.

But, for all tha , a clerk has to
eat the same as the shopper,. and
she has to dress smartly since
when you are a clerk, you can-
not go to work anyhow, say for
instance, a clerk has six dresses
—who knows that with the smail
salary she gets she carinot afford
to buy too many so she buys six
good dresses us she knows she
has to look her best in that kind
of work. The Shopper has 12
dresses say, (twice as many as
the clerk) but what kind = of
dresses? Cheap maybe; when
the shopper dresses to go to town
in one of her twelve which are,
maybe her best naturally the
clerks look better dressed than
she does. Why not take a hint
from the well-dressed clerks and
buy good dresses instead of a
quantity that are of no account,
in that way there will be no hard

feelings.

The clerks cannot go to the
grocery and get their groceries
any cheaper than the shopper,
they have to pay the same price
we clerks cannot say when we
give better service in our work
we will pay you your price for
the groceries, we have to pay thé

!

‘From.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(iii) to circulate
ions under

their conclus-

(i) and (ii),
together with any propos-
als for amendments and
nodifications, for study by
other Governments con-
cerned.

If the London Conference is to
be held in June, I consider that
it is essential that preliminary
work on the above lines should
be completed by the end of
March, If it appears thet this
preliminary work cannot satis-
factorily be completed in time, it
may be advisable to postpone this

meeting until later in the «um-
mer. .
5. It will be no easy task to

sift, collate and present the views
of so many Governments on the
diverse and _ technical subjects
covered by these two reports. I
suggest that it would be to the
general convenience of West
Indian Governments to make use
for this purpose of the facilities
for re gional co-ordination
afforded by the Development and
Welfare Organisation; if desired,
the Comptroiler of Development
and Welfare could be invited to
preside Over a committee of offi-
clals nominated by all the Gov-
ernments concerned. It would
seem very desirable that wherever
possible the Financial Secretaries,
or corresponding officers, should
take part in this committee. This
committee would be expected to
present to their Governments
and the Colonial. Office, at least
one month in advance of the date

fixed for the opening of the
London Conference, a compre-
hensive statement of the views

and recommendations of Govern-
ments on both reports. I should
emphasise that I do not propose
that this official committee should
deal with any questions of policy:
its function would be to collate
the comments and proposals of
the various Governments so as
to facilitate the work of the Con4
ference

6. I should be grateful if you
would inform me, by telegram if
possible, of the views of your

his eyes—and so accidents to eyes
were higher than they should be.

Workers were inclined to exag-
gerate the irritation of wearing
goggles.

More accidents in factories hap-
pen toward the end of the morn-
ing, and again late in the after-
noon—the peak accident time is
between four and five in the eve-
ning. The worst accidents happen
then due to carelessness—and one
of the most dangerous jobs is that
often allotted to girls and youths
who have to clean moving
machinery.

Atomic energy has added a new
chapter ‘to safety regulations.
Many firms in Britain now use
atomic bye-products regularly to
carry out X-Ray examinations of
metal parts. The main precaution
is not to keep the same workers
always on the job exposed con-
tinually to small doses of gamma.
radiation—jhe same_as the radia-
tion from atomic bomb blasts.

®

With the departure of the last
Royalty and the last special re-
presentative the "department of
the Foreign Office that looks after
ceremonial is breathing a sigh of
relief. Many people asked how
it was decided which order the
foreign Kings and Statesmen
should march in. I have the pro-
gramme in front of me, and I have
been. asking questions. There do
mot seem to be many rules. Heads
of States were arranged with the
Kings first and the Presidents
afterwards. But there were ex-
ceptions to this. The elderly
President Vincent Auriol of
France (who must have found the
two-and-a-half mile walk a
strain) was before the young King
of Iraq. Prime Ministers, and other
special diplomatic representatives
were placed in order in accord-
ance with the seniority of their
Ambassador in London, That is
why Mr. Dean Acheson was al-
most at the back—his Ambassador,
Mr. Giffard, is g comparative new-
comer to London. But there were
no quarrels. Three centuries ago
there used to be fights. In 1661 the
French and Spanish Ambassadors
went to a procession armoured for
the fray.

READERS SAY:

same as you. A clerk’s job is
hard,—standing from 8 a.m, un-
til 4 p.m. with the exception of
breakfast hour, Don't you
think it is hard on us and we de-

serve better wages? We know
that the King was loved for his
great service to the Nation and
we also know that he was a just
and fair King and he was. not
selfish like this particulary shop-
per. Without the dollars what
would we all do including you
“Shopper.” Let me tell you

Shopper “The mills of God grind
slow but sure.”
DISGUSTED CLERK.

Boys’ Club for Dayrells Rd.

To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please permit me space
in your journal, to wholehearted-
ly support the plea by a corres-
pondent “Resident” for the
urgent need of a Boys’ Club for

Dayrells Road o, St. Matthias
Gap. t
Every evening religiously be-
tween the hours of 5 to around
10 o'clock, a gang of young men,
boys, young women and even
small children gather about the
road and do make use of every

conceivable annoyance; especially
so at Upper Dayrells Road where
a stand pipe is erected. Many of
them do not even belong to the
immediate vicinity. They use the







most filthy expressions to the
entire disgust of residents and
passersby, also the perching on top
of the pipe which enclosure pro-
vides not only sitting accommoda-
tion. but they even lie down on
same,

At tt point is surely the nar-
rowest part of the road with a
curve hindering the sight of traffic
approaching from either end. Wit!
the contin fi f I wit
the regular buses } to p

pedestria barel) jueezi

Britain

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952
el

——————



OOOO

PAPER SERVIETTES

In Plain White
$1.00 per handred

Government on these suggestions.

7. The resolution passed by
the Jamaica House of Represen-
tatives on 14th August last implied
that the purpose of the proposed
Conference in London would be
to untlertake “close consideration
of the financial aspects of fed-~
eration.” In my view, the objec-|
tive of the Conference should in|
fact be much wider; I suggest)
that it should seek to reach
agreement on a federal scheme,
in sufficient detail to enable a!
start to be made with the complex
and lengthy process of drafting}
the nec@€ssary constitutional in-|

Offer To
Egypt

CAIRO,
Cuba has offered to sell Egypt 50,000 tons
of refined sugar to help relieve Egypt's short-

ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

)
tf





}
















struments. As I said above, the| age. The offer was made by the Cuban VALOR
task of the Conference will be) ; ‘ ip ‘
craaisy tucllideiek ty the vewurt! Minister in Cairo, Sr. Louis Dalmagro, to the

DOUBLE
OVENS

of the Standing Committee on| Egyptian Premier, Ali Maher Pasha, who
Closer Association; | assume that) cajq he would consider it
it will be generally agreed that) : eo :

A Cuban Legation official said that the

the purpose of the Conference is)
to work out a detailed plan on | price Cuba suggested was about £53 11s. per



the basis of the Committee's F :

report and not to re-examine 'on, c.i.f., Alexandria. Payment would be as
afresh the various alternative jn dollars. The Cuban offer confirms with
forms of federal government

whose merits and demerits in| Maher Pasha’s previously-announced policy
relation to the West Indies the) of dealing directly with foreign governments
Committee may be presumed to ¢ t ’ ith :
have exhaustively’ studied. Po Ree Egypt’s needs without the services

‘ea ; Z of intermediaries.

& oractica reasOns, 10) .
woula nha desirable thet the) Egypt has also signed a barter agreement
number of delegates to the Con- with Czechoslovakia which provides for the
ference should be kept as low as} _ 1

sale to Egypt of 20,000 tons of Czechoslovak

representation of opinion in the| sugar in exchange for Egyptian cotton. The

VALOR
2-— 3 BURNER
OIL STOVES

Also Single Burner Stoves



possible consistent with adequate)

varios | pea howl epiniba| sugar will be sold at £64 per ton, while the and Spare Parts for all makes.
whether Seeeereation at _ file cotton will be sold at the prices ruling on

basis as for the Standing the free market. _ S. PITCHER & co.
Whether you eoueider that ...THRRE DIE IN GUADELOUPE RIOTS
Matable it wit ne aoubt bel POINTE-A-PITRA, Guadeloupe,

desired in some cases that dele-| Three people were killed and nine serious-
gations should be accompanied by |

Aslakee. _ly injured in two days of rioting in Guade-
9. I hope that the Government} loupe by striking workers affiliated with
British Guiana, whose Legis- Communist unions. The three were killed

lature has not felt able to accept .
the S.C.A.C. Report in principle,| when police fired on an angry mob storming
a sugar mill in Moule.

will nevertheless be willing to
£138,000 JAMAICA HURRICANE FUND

be represented at the London
Conference by an Observer.
OLIVER LYTTELTON.” |
LONDON,
| Donations received by the Jamaica Hur-
/ricane Relief Fund now total £138,000 and
/more contributions are still pouring in. In
addition, many thousands of pounds have
been sent direct to the Governor of Jamaica

ot
i

are made from

MOYGASHEL

. . . |
Voice Of Britain }
All over the world they listen}

to the B.B.C. If it is true, then










































ell the world should be inter-| by firms and individuals in the United King-

ested in the cuts to the B.B.C.| dom . LINENS
Overseas Broadcasting that are 7 }

now in progress. Since the war

AIR FLIGHTS, TO FRENCH WEST INDIES

the B 5 C. has cOvered the world. ° BENBURG *

As well as oe General nen LONDON ° oe,
Service, which is intended for , =
the British Commonwealth, there BALMORAL E ‘

Non-scheduled flights by United Kingdom
and Colonial registered civil aircraft to most
places in overseas territories are subject ta
various special requirements and the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation, in London, has issued
a reminder on the requirements of the

French authorities in Guadeloupe and Mar-
tinique.

have been regular programmes
in Chinese and Siamese; in Per-
sian and Indonesian, in Portu-
guese and Spanish—as well as in
the more familiar European
languages. Last year, as a result
of the budget ecOnomies, the
B.B.C, was held down to a slightly
restricted expenditure for its
overseas and European offerings.
The result is that whole services

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

are now ak Nobody has Aircraft registered in the British ‘West in Popular Shades
ever quite estimated how many| Jnqdj
listen. The B.B.C, has sometimes Indies may make stops for non-traffic pur-

tried to obtain figures. Occasion-
ally write -in competitions have
revealed remarkably big addi-
ences particularly behind the Iron
Curtain, I remember having lunch
with a friend in Prague, in a block
of flats in the middle of the city
a year after the Communists took
over there. In the middle of the
day the B.B.C.’s Bulletin’s—even
in English—could actually be
heard from several windows.
Curiously, nobody seemed to care
—as everyone listened to the
B.B.C. In other countries—friend-
ly countries like Italy with their
own free news services—it was
more difficult to prove many
listeners turned to the B.B.C.
The Organization of Listeners
Research tried to get an Italian

poses in the French Caribbean islands with- a Lightweights
out prior notification or authorisation. In all
cases of traffic flights however, prior author-
isation should be obtained,

Applications should be addressed to the
Governors of the individual French islands
and should specify the type and marking of
the aircraft, the name and address of the
company, the number of people in the crew,
the proposed itinerary and points of call in
French territory, and the purpose of the
flight (passenger or freight with an indica-
tion of the number of passengers and ton-
nage.)

DOMINICA
CIGAR

Or Sale at Your Druggist

market research inquiry firm to MORE SCOUT JAMBOREES
test the Italian listening public.
But I suspect the Italians, with LONDON,

their usual amiable feelings, put
a rather friendly figure to the
B.B.C.

Now the Voice of Britain will
be cut down while another Voice
goes on shouting—and Moscow
Radio beams its takes widely.

* * *
A victory for Gown over Town.

Following upon the First Caribbean Boy
Scout Jamboree, more jamborees are already
being planned in Australia and Britain. The
Australian jamboree, for Scouts in the Pacific
area, will be held at the end of December
this year near Sydney, New South Wales,

A World Jamboree is proposed for Britain




Ouiord uacworks will not be ex| 2 1957, to honour the anniversary of the i
panded to ruin the view of the] birth of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the e }
famous dreaming spires. Boy Scout movement on February 22, 1857. i
~~ | The jamboree would also commemorate the i
golden jubilee of the movement, which ‘wag 1
started in 1907,

to the walls to avoid accidents, it

COMMONWEALTH FINANCE MEETINGS















can better be imagined than ex-
plained. This district is in close CONCLUDED
proximity to the Hastings main], INDO:
road within easy reach to the T «“ . lie, LO N,
island's most up-to-date oe f Wo “Working Parties” set up by the Con-
and Guest-houses; many residen e ‘
BN Bere than aces ame] erence of Commonwealth Finance Ministers.
this road either walking or driv-]4" London in January have now completed.
{ng. This road also leads to the} a first series of meetin dh
mly Golf Club. What impressions]. Ps mi gs an ave summitted
an = ee to us island have | interim reports for the consideration of Com-
of such @ state of affairs? ‘
The residents in this area are at ae Governments, It is expected that
property owners in a small or|each party will resume its Meetings in a few
large degree; can they be asked to > tim
ae such for the sake of a at e.
few, who, if and when spoken to © group, ui der chairmanship
are the first _ get highly annoyed, Stiaiee 7 aes so of the
beside retaliating with abuse Economic Affairs, has
Some one may suggest placing | been co: idering estion. he
them in Court, but they are many ity of ~— the au of convertibil
who have never and may never oo sterling and related problems. The
even if it meant their death, will} other. chairmanshi
be seen or heard in the Courts, m ta under the P of the Parlia-
That's where the advantage is a ary Under-Secretary for Commonwealth
aken. ink the idea of “Rest- i ii
dent” a splendid one, especially ene has been considering the question
waeg saan’ this ee ae 9 evelopment. — = or sine Carr's Cream Crack-
ner Headmaster o} . Matthias —per Ib ..... A * ers —per tin...... $1.68
Boys’ lives, also the present EETS RA 41 tin Danish Hams $7.00 J & R Sandwich Bread
Headmasters of St. Matthias and Sw TION CUT IN UK. 16, .20, 36
St. iertice and oem members LONDON, a: tin P epee. 7008 EXTRA SPECIALS
of their sta ’ ternativel i anish
could give a, peep in or may be Cuts in sugar allocations to U.K. manu~ 2 I tin D Hams $4.30 30 oz. Magnet Peas.... .36
ce = pe ‘ pers, pantie, who facturers and reductions in their private im- | x F . Tae Tupehpon $4.98 Tea-time Paste ...... AS
- B 8 ys, may be}ports of unrationed sweetening materiale |) oo ’ Cook's Paste ......... .06
given an opportunity to develop were of unrationed sweetening materials |{} |. tin Ham Roll 90 | Baby's Strained’ Foods 16
into eee diarriney a a result in a drop in the sweets Danish 16 oz, Cocktail eo teh Vale .. a
‘NT. {ration shortly, according to the Ministry of Seusagee -...... #106 I eet
il ii le Crush ...... 24
Health Centres Food, in London, ee Genawich Relish ||... 38
; Ma i OOS. NS i ae ee Cn, oes ote tS . 2 % tin Purple Grapes .54
ee et nt Enea Output of chocolate and sugar confection- |}}} Macaroni—16 oz Pke. 39: | _—_Italian Tomato Paste .27 60
SIR,—May I remind the De- i ; Carr’s Sweet Biscuits Embassy Cigs, of 25 .. .48
partment of Medical Services gf oy. - already being cut, but these cuts have per \% ID Phkg..... 48 Sling in tins ......... “42
its 1 comise made last year con-| "Ot yet taken full effect on supplies and the
eee a a dia ; - .
coon Gone See tishment ration will be maintained at its present level }
~Time marches on and these | for the time being. Before long, however, Phone CODDARDS = We Deliver
wee ‘ ently required. » is li ‘ {
aneeRO BOW tly require t ere is likely to be a 25 per cent. cut in the i
26,2 ration —B.U.P,

i

‘



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

PLAZA, BARBAREES

THE PLAZA CINEMA,
built by Messrs. Clarke & Tucker,
designers and builders of the Plaza Cinemas at Bridgetown

and Oistin.

The exterior of the building is in a straightforward
modern style and is finished in salmon-pink stipplecrete
with red accentuating the architectural features.



Oils And Fats
Talks In April

A FULL MEETING of
the Oils and Fats Confer-
ence will meet probably in
April to decide on the terms
of an Oils and Fats agree-
ment which will be recom-
mended to Governments to
supersede the existing
agreement which will come
to an end in September,
Professor C. G. Beasley,
Economic Adviser to the
Comptroller for Develop-
ment and Welfare and
Chairman of the Conference
told the Advocate yester-
day.

The preliminary work on
the terms which should be
included in such a new
agreement, was carried out

by a specisl committee
which met at Hastings
House in December last.
The recommendations of

this committee are now be-
ing considered by individ-
ual Governments.

inward slope to the entrance doors
to which the lines of fluorescent

terrazzo ficoring below, which
also slopes,

trend of designing, the wide lobby
has been located right down at
road
lighting, attractively coloured ter-
razzo wainscot and floor and well
positioned ticket offices on each
side set a bright theatrica! mood
which
passerby.

one enters the stair foyer where
the mood changes
ay testivity to pastel shades and
subdued indirect lighting, creating
a quiet and relaxed feeling well
adapted to ultimate show enjoys
ment.

left and the ladies powder room
and men’s room on the right two
flights of cantilevered reinforced
concrete stairs lead to a miezzan-

28, 1952 ae

PE




Barbarees, was designed and
who were also the

The facade which is floodlit at
night is dominated by a wide
protective canopy in red, black
and silver whose soffit joins the
ceiling of the lobby in a sweeping

ceiling lighting and the patterned
point the way for

patrons.
In keeping with the modern

level where its brilliant



invites entry of every

The Stair Foyer
Passing through the main doors

from bright
Flies’’.

With the candy counter on the

was interested in becoming
“Why An Aeroplane Flies” was
made through the co-operation of

Professor Beas said: ine lounge for balcony patrons the Empire Flying School, Royal
“There is a eineeal ieotas where the decorative scheme, Air force. The first section showed
in the West Indian territor- colourful resilient asphalt -tile was Lift. This explained the part

ies that the oils and fats
industry is particularly well
suited io the conditions
and that the Governments
are justified in taking such
measures as wil! give the
industry a reasonable de-
gree of protection.”





Crowd Attend

Police Display

The Police Show at District
“A” Police Station on Tuesday
evening attracted a large crowd.
Many tourists from the R.M.S.
Mauretania, which was anchored

in Carlisle Bay, attended the
show.

The Show opened with the
Musical Ride. Major R. A.
Stoute, Deputy Commissioner of
Police, who acted as Master of

Ceremonies, announced the names

floor, furniture and cheerful soft
lighting all combine to promote a
hospitable and restful atmosphere
of g home rather than that usually
associated
terprises.

played by the wind above and
below the wings of the plane.



with commercial en-

News In Brief:

BICYCLE



Warmth and intimacy with
dignity is a common distin-
guishing feature of all Plaza
auditoriums, as it is their
and blue colour scheme which
has been maintained heres

Nevertheless, each has an indi- STOLEN

viduality of its own. In this Kenneth Wortell of Villa Road,
auditorium accoustical qualities Brittons Hill, reported that his
have been built-in by the use bicycle, valued $45, was stolen
of curves and planes in the from outside Harris’ shop at Nel-
walls; for example, each side son Street between 5.30 p.m. on
wall is broken up into a series Friday and 5,00 p.m. on Saturday.
of splayed panels to avoid * 7 *

parallelism in sound. Lighting, A quantity of bread, a basket
which is soft end soothing, is by 2d a bowl were stolen from a
means of coloured side strip bread cart while it was parked at
coves, 2s well as by downlights Probyn Street, City, between 11.30
recessed behind grills in the P:-â„¢. On Monday and 7.30 a.m, on
ceiling. Tuesday. The items are the prop-
erty of the Purity Bakery. The
incident was reported by Living-
stone King of Culloden Road, St.

Focal Point

: sai 4 ra The focal point to which the Michael.
oor of the horses and their eyes are drawn, naturally, is the * * *
: stage and screen. Here we have Six and a half acres of ripe
As usual, both horses and rid- an innovation — no proscenium canes . were burnt when a fire

ers were applauded for a grand arch or curtains — just a “float- Occurred at Apes Hill Plantation,

display
ment,

of precision

and judg- ing” screen which provides pro-

St. James, at about 11.45 p.m. on

jection of q previously undreamed Tuesday,
This was followed by the Drill of

quality and maintains The fire extended to Spring

the

Display by recruits who are at Plaza tradition for pace setting Plantation where 22% acres of

present, Training at Dist. “A” and in the Cinema business of Bar- Tipe ¢anes,
some members of the Constabu- bados. Coloured light spills out Walcott, were burnt.
lary. The drill squad gave a good from behind the top and sideg insured.

4 of this screen
of the display was that no orders concave

performance. A_ special feature

were given.

The show ended with the Beat-
ing of the Retreat by the Police
Band and Drummers, The Drill
Squad, which was dressed in
regular dress for the Drill Dis-

tunic with white
and gloves.
To climax

helmet,

the evening’s en-

erica, Great Britain and Canada.



the usual standards.

Further Evidence
In Larceny Cage

Further evidence was taken
yesterday by His Worship Mr.
&. A. McLeod, Police Magistrate
of District “A”, in the case in
which Frank Frybrace (35) of
Pine Land, St. Michael, is charged
by the Police with the larceny of
eight tins of paint valued at £16,
4s. 8d., the property of General
Hardware Supplies.

The charge states that —
offence was committed sometime

painted in a pleasing combination
of pastel shades.

belt building every seven minutes.

fully
tertainment tihe Police Band play- vision from every seat, while the
ed the National Anthems of Am~= pack to back spacing of seat rows
has also

vf solid permanence which has
been developed with the idea of
maximum pleasure, comfort and
convenience for the patrons.

Assistant School Teachers met at
the Queen's
morning as a prelude to the An-

property of S, A.
They were

* * *

Whitfield Daniel is detained at
the General Hospital suffering
from burns on his right leg.
Daniel was assisting Lionel rie
Another new feature is the in- 8tim with putting gas into a lorry

on to the fluted
back wall which is

stallation of a ventilation system When an explosion occurred.
under :

4 drive,
play, now wore the entire blue Stately

which large electrically
exhaust fans will com-

A_ fire at) Gibbons Plantation,
change the air in the

Christ Church, at about 4.30 a.m.
on ents burnt four and three
The floor slope has been care= Quarter acres of first crop ripe
7 canes, the property of F. B. Good-
designed to afford perfect ing, ‘hey were insured.

It extended tg Parris Land and
burnt half an acre of first crop,
an acre of second crop and half an
acre of fourth crop ripe canes,
the property of Charles Yearwood.
The ,canes were not insured.

*

been increaséd beyond

The entire project is an example

a

The equipment at the building
of the Knitting Mills at Coleridge
Street is at present being dis-
mantled. It is being removed to

the building at Spry Street which
the Mills now occupy,

This building formerly housed
the old Biscuit Factory.

Bottles Going
Out Again



Teachers Discuss
Grievances
About 500 or more Elementary



Patk last Saturday

om! . ‘uary nual General. Meeting of the With most of the leading aerat-
beware Pea at ait or ene Barbados Civil Service Associa- €d factories using their own trade
enusd at mid-day today. Fry- tion, and decided to join the marked bottles, “Barbados is re-

brace is on a bail of £75,

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker is appear- Civil Service Association.

ing on behalf of Frybrace while

Set. E. King is prosecuting for the with a view

Police.

£5 For Bodily Harm



School Teachers’ Division of the €xporting empty three-gill bot-

tles oie islands.
The meeting was summoned _ Applications were made _ by
fo awakening the individuals to the Control Office

interest of Assistant Teachers in for permission to export these
their own welfare, since only a bottles, and accordingly, the Con-
very small minority of them were troller of Supplies
members of the Teachers’ Divi- notice informing interested per-
sion of the Civil Service

has issued a

Asso- sons that he would consider issu-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE BARBAREES PLAZA which opens next Saturday night.

Why An Aeroplane Flies

THE FIRST of a series of lectures on “Theory of
Flight” to be given to members of the Barbados Light
Aeroplane Club and the public was held at the British
Council, “Wakefield”, on Tuesday night. This lecture was
‘illustrated by a Film Show. .~

The Show was the first part of “Why An Acroplane
This was divided into three sections : Lift, Drag,
and Thrust. A large number of members and people who
are anticipating becoming members, attended. There were
a few of the ladies and one especially expressed that she

a non-flying member.

The audience was also able to
see at what angle the plane would
reach stalling speed. Mr. Wood
Goddard, Chairman of the Com-
mittee of management, who an-
swered queries, explained stall-
ing speed for the benefit of mem-
bers,

This section showed quite
clearly how the plane should
be flown to get the best landine
results. At one stage the plane
was stopped in. the motion of
landing so that the audience
could see the angle of the wing
which was responsible for giv-
ing the plane lift before its
wheels touched the ground.

By use of particles in water
this section showed the rush of
wind over the wing at various
angles, identifying the low press-
ure above the wing and the high
pressure below.

The next section dealt with
Drag which was divided into three
parts Parasite Drag, Induced
Drag and Skin Friction, The fina]
section was Thrust.

Stability

The other three parts of the
“Why An Aeroplane Flies”, which
will be shown next Tuesday night,
are: Forces in Balance, Stability
and Defective Control,

After the show Mr. Goddard
answered questions while some
of the members discussed various
points. between themselves, In
moving a vote of thanks, Mr.
Goddard said that he was glad to
see the number present, but he
hoped on the next occasion the
attendance would be greater. He
pointed out quite clearly that the
lectures were open to the public
Even those who had no intentions
of joining the Club could attend

As soon as the hall was cleared,
the Committee of Management of
the Club held a meeting to dis-
cuss insurance of planes and
members

Through the courtesy of the
British Council, booklets entitled
“Aviation Training in Great Brit-
ain’’ were distributed to
who were interested.

Sound Training

The foreword to “Aviation
Training in Great Britain” is
written by Minister of Civil Avia-
tion, Lord Pakenham, who states
“Sound training is the founda-
tion-stone of success in any walk
of life. This is true above all in
air transport, where development
is so rapid that new problems
confront us almost every day and
the search for their solution com
pels change of method and tech-
nique. Those who choose aviation
as a careey must indeed be flex-
ible in mind and adventurous in
spirit.” :



The booklet has many illustra,
tions. One picture shows the plane
which was used in the first Lon«
don-Paris air service in 1919 and
another shows the first plane to
make a_ direct non-stop trans-
atlantic Flight in 1919, The flight
was made by two British, airmen

Anotker group of photograph:
shows some of the British train-
ing in aircraft nnd some of thie

civil aireraft.

It deals with licenses that can

be obtained in Great Britain and
the training establishmer
qegepclneapeeincenaernirenetminbeemiomomsetnre



those *

In Damages Suit

DEFENCE COUNSEL in the Court of Common Pleas

Suit Damian De Abreu vs. E. E. Deane in which De Abreu
is claiming £720 unpaid commission, Mr. E. K. Walcott
Q.C., in his address to the jury yesterday held that there
had been no contract between the parties; besides De
Abreu did not introduce Deane to a seller as had been a

term of the alleged contract.

He argued, too, that if there

even was a contract, De Abreu had misconducted himself
and Deane would have been justified in dismissing him.

The case is being tried by a
Special jury before the Acting
Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr.
Justice G. L. Taylor,

Mr. G. H. Adams and Mr. D.
H L. Ward, instructed by
Messrs. Carrington and_ Sealy,
Solicitors are De Abreu’s coun-
sel. Mr, E. K. Walcott, Q.C., and
Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed by
Cottle Catford, Solicitors are
appearing for Deane. ;

De Abreu’s case is that Deane

agreed to pay him 3% commis-
sion if he introduced him to any-
one who was willing to sell a
plantation and the plantation was
eventually sold. One of the
plantations which he introduced
him to, and which was eventually
bought for £24,000 was Hus-
bands and Oxnards, St. James,
an@ De Abreu claims that he has
not been paid his commission.

A Contract

In His address to the Court,
Mr. Adams said that in Deane’s
own attempt in jis defence to
show that there had been fraud,
it was evident that there was a
contract. He argued that Deane
only knew of the plantation

through De Abreu and that even
if De Abreu did lie as the other
side was holding, it would not
have interfered with the contract.

Today when the case contin-
ues, he will address the Court on
the point of law that there could
be no defence of misrepresenta-
tion or fraud unless the alleged
misrepresentation induced the de-
fendant Deane to enter a contract

nd he suffered loss in conse-

ence,

Mr. E. D. Mottley, who was
called to give expert evidence,
said he had extensive experience
n real estate business and was
he oldest real estate agent in

experience in Barbados.

He said that the general prac-
tice was to act on behalf of the
vendor but it’ was not unusual to
ict on behalf of the purchaser.
The person on whose behalf one
acted paid one, it being understood
thal you were not being paid from
both sides.

In cases in which properties
were rare, like Broad Street, one
sometimes got another asking one
to secure a property for him and
he would pay for getting it.

Maximum Price
in buying plantations, the max-

imum price was 5 per cent. de-
pending on the price. For any-
thing over £10,000 commission
varied from between 3% to 3%.

It was seldom below 21%.

To Mr. E. K. Walcott, under
cross-@xamination, he said that of
course if one was searching for a
» and a vendor had one to sell
£24,900, an agent would not
tell his client £26,000, If he did
that he would consider he was not
working for him.s

He said that when he made an
introduction, his job was finished.
He left the price to the vendor
and the purchaser. When a pros-
pective purchaser said he wanted



a plentation the main point was to
get someone who had one to sell.

te-examined by Mr. Adams, he
said that the agent might be em-
ployed merely to find somebody
vho would do the purchasing, He
could be engaged too, in doing the
whole transaction.

Addressing the Court, Mr. E. K,
Walcott said that counsel for the
other side had realised from the
evidence given the previous day
by Mr. Roy Gill, the disaster that
hed befallen his case; hence the
introduction of additional—not
rebuttal evidence,

As regards what was a reason-
able price, it was his submission
that in any specific contract what
vas reasonable or unreasonable
did not take any effect. There
was plenty of case law to that and
he would be willing to reply to

argument if necessary. There
vas no question of what Mr.
Mottley thought or what was not
reasonable.
Specific Contract

If one were claiming a specific

contract, one failed or succeeded

| the contract agreeing to the
tcrms. Supposing one had gaid
10%, the other side could not

‘argue that that was unreasonable
because the agreement was that

it would have to be paid. There-



fore the evidence about its being
reasonable was nothing.

He held that it was not merely
a question of saying that “A” hac
something to sell and “B” wanted
something to buy. The price ha\
to be mentioned, and the righ:
price. Mr. Mottley had said that
that was part of his duty.

Here Mr. Adams rose to object
that Mr. Mottley had not said
that. He had said he would get
them together and his job was
finished there, but if he mentioned

the price, it was not because it
was his duty,
Continuing, Mr. Walcott said

that they, the jury, had heard Mr.
Mottley and they were the judges
of the facts.

He said that if Qey were satis-
fied that there was misconduct,
they would give judgment for the
defendant, Deane.

Every time he telephoned, he
worked, but the question was, was
the work honest or dishonest
work?

Price, Important

If the price was not a materia!
part of ea duty of the plaintiff,
Mr. Walcott asked, why did coun-
sel for the other side even in his
opening tell them that as a result
of certain things, a price was
arrived at. Nobody went to buy
anything unless they knew what
the price was likely to be. And if
an agent stated a price and put
on £2,000, that was very wrong

He said that whenever they got
evidence of contradiction between
De Abreu and Deane, it was for
them to say what they believed
In that case where there was Roy
Gill as a third party outside De
Abreu and Deane, De Abreu was
found to be a liar. When as a
result of Roy Gill's evidence they
found that De Abreu was a liar
they could not believe his evi-
dence as against Deane even if
they wanted to do so,

The burden of proving the con-
trect, he said, was on the plaintiff
and also the burden of proving
what the contract was, but the
burden of proving the misconduct
was on the defendant

De Abreu, he argued, had start-
ed off by forgetting what had been
put in the pleadings. In his own
words he was to get commission
if he found a place and yet be-
gan by introducing the plantations
Strong Hope and Lodee, places
with the sale of which the owners
were to pav him.

Full Details

De Abreu was saying that on
the 7th, Roy Gill was to be told
what the client thought of the
price and the plantation, They
had heard him give evidence on
that point, that he had previously
given him full particulars and on
the 7th, he had gone to the races.

So in truth and fact, De Abreu
was at his effice talking with
Deane pretending not to know
which plantation it could be and
trying to figure it oul, despite Roy
Gill the owner putting all the
cards on the table,

From the inception of his duties,
De Abreu wag stating the figure
which was not only inaccurate,
but known to be inaccurate and
incorrect. Thus he was dishonest
and misconducting himself,

You could not say you intro-
duced a planter unless you named |
a prospective vendor and pur-
chaser.

De Abreu’s saying that Deane
said he would send around some—
che to inspect the plantation
could only be a lie, Of course
Deane would not have had to go
to the secrecy of inspecting the
plantation without the vendor's
knowledge. It would have been
quite natural for an inspection
before a sale was contracted,

The fact was that Deane dic
not agree to pay him any com
mission, So it was very simple.
If De Abreu knew that neither
the vendor nor the purchaser in-
fended paying him, he would
necessarily try to jack up the price
so that he would get something
That was why he told Roy Gill
about the extra,

Jacking Up Price



De Abreu had gaid that the
commission was 3% and he would
put if to the jury that by the

jacking up of the price De Abreu
would have been hoping to get
more commission and that was
misconduct,



PAGE FIVE



He said the De Abreu’s letter
to Deane was nothing more than
an apology. All he was more or
ies saying was that other real
estate agents did that sort of thing

jJackee, up prices—and therefore
he should not go to the extreme
of giving him no commission

“My submission to you" is that
you have to find what is the con-
tract,” he said, “If you want to
prove this contract, it must be
clear and unequivocal, The con-
tract was supposed to be a verbal
cne, although in the pleadings
it dealt with introducing a. pros-
pective buyer.

He said that when one was nét
cross-examine on a certain point
he might safely assume that that
point was conceded. And Mr.
Gill was not cross-examined by
the other side on the point as to
whether he told him that the
price he wanted was £24,000.
Maybe it was felt that it was not
needed. That possibly explained
the terms of the plaintiff's state-
ment of claims which was with
the hope of evading the neces-
sity of having to deal with a bit
ot evidence such as that. That did
not hold at all, because De Abreu
had not introduced him in any
sense of the word,

He had not used
prospective vendor in the letter
nor in the evidence until he was
cross-examined,

the word

Ife held that the contract would
have to be stated, whether verb-
ally or in writing, in clear, pre-
cise terms. It could not be stated
in a way that one could under-
stand one thing and another, an-
other

Roy Gill had said that De
Abreu had told him fhat he was
going to get a commission from

___, Defence Counsel C laims No Contract

his agent and asked him how
much he was going to get from
his: but that did not prove that
there was an agreement for a
commission, That was De Abreu’s
word and his alone and he had
been proved to be a liar.

Human Greed

In his address, Mr. G. H
Adams said that it was a simplk
matter and they as jurymen were
entitled to use their knowledge
of the world as to whether they
believed. the statement of the
witness or not. It was quite
usual matter for either a vendor
or purchaser to pay a commis-
sion. It was usual for a person
to ask an agent to get a radio,
a house or some such item and
they would be paid a commission.
But sometimes, as was the case
before them, human greed came

into the affair and the commis-
sion was not paid,
Certain contracts need not be

written but could be made verb-
ally, and the type of contract
they were dealing with was such
a one. But that was not in dis-
pute.

They were not saying that all
De Abreu had to do was to intro-
duce a man, They were saying
that if as a result of an introduc-
tion they got together and a sale
was made, the commission was
due.

As to the question of unequi-
vocal language in a contract, he
said that there were instances
when it could be argued that
despite a sale not coming off,
commission should be paid for
the bringing together of the
parties. In the escaping of such,
the language should be clear and
unequivocal.

@ On page 6

SPECIFY |

“EVERITE

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

~TURNALL’

ASBESTOS

lrresh



Supplies

J. & J. Baby Oil
Vitalis Hair Tonic
Saccharin Tabs. 1000's
Medilax Laxative Tabs.
Nervitone Tonic Wine

Riddobron Inhalant

Arrived

(Cashew Nuts (tins)
Barney Tobacco
Betuli Oil
Absorbine Jnr.
Vapex Pastilles

Kropps Razors & Strops



KNIGHTS LTD.





SSeS [2 Pe Pe ee ee
; “ ah cal 3 ciation. ing licences for their export during We x 44 i es ry a
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, , s. ra wes the period February 28 to April "
Acting Police Magistrate oe aie an te te pgothes: 23, 1952
trict “A”, yesterday ordere port) = ,
George Austin, a labourer of tain grievances, and it was t- A check with the Control Office

Thomas Gap, Westbury Road, St. ed out that although head teach- coer L that pameedy parsons ne
Michael, to pay a fine of £5 in 14 ers and assistants were both fac- ‘oa ea meee eek
days or two months’ imprison- tors in t&e common wheel of bie ; . Ve a y
ment with hard labour when he education, the requisite respect een issued.
found him guilty of inflicting was not given to assistants’ by
bodily harm on Myrtle Bowen. some of the heads. |
. Another irregularity which was

The offence wes committed on brought to the notice of the meet- IN PREPARATION
Februsry 9. Mr. D. Malone 4p- ing was that in some schools, as-
peared in the case on behalf of sistants were promised prefer- Mr, S, A. Hammond of the De-
Austin. Bowen told the Court ence if they sacrificed their re- velopment and Welfare Organisa-
that at about 7.30 p.m. on Feb- cess period at mid-day or their tion who paid a visit to the Lee-
ruary 9 the defendant after abus- after-school hours, ward. Islands: for the pur a

j < r several times
ing her, kicked her severa 3 re Wad wesie: Seat Siacvtew ee making an investigation of the

and threw her to the ground. The : n oreanisation..of the salédles of
incident happened at the corner thé adverse criticism levelled at civil

- sport Shirts

and other items for men



HAMMOND REPORT



_ CONSULATE WHITE SPORT SHIRTS

Short Sleeves, sizes 14} to 17 ins. |

Each $8.03



A em een as meee nem ne





/ “ENOWN DE LUXE SPORT SHIRTS









.# n"

' 4 servants in that area is 2 ‘77

i ick Gap, St. Michael. teachers in respect of the “thir- i * Short Sleeves in Shades of White, Blue, Grey, Cream ie an:
ett, tecn-plus tests”, teachers should Pov ntation to the Government, ¢ salir JUST ARRIVED

Mr. Malone said that the poe make every effort to La . ; J Sizes — Small, Medium and Large
tant thing in the case was what themselves into a body, y join- oe IRINA Startena ‘
started the fight. The witnesses jing the Teachers’ Division of the BREAKFAST TIME RRR EE eae fete: Bet Be a 1.85 PURILN: we:
of the complainant did not give Civil Service Association where SERVICES Sat etemimersmisemam -- PURINA... Growena GH
the same story as the complainant they might air their grievances, ; OTIS VESTS athiet iia dadibeve's sam f Di aye
herself. If the Court accepted the and discuss their mutual prob-. During Lent Canon Barlee will atvia.. inc seston. vibb< IS .COTTON . BRIEFS BOYS 4% LENGTH SOCKS PURINA Layena
story of the defendant then there lems with a view to finding ways;conduct the breakfast time sery- and plain, Sizes 36 to 46 Sizes, 30 to 44 Sizes 84 to 10 ins. ’
was no case. and means of over-coming them. ices on Fridays from 11.30 a.m. ’ : a ‘Ke well as
‘oats pews ot At. Masys Clase, MESO. Heir. $1.56 Pair. $1.05

The subject will be—The occa-
sional services of the Prayer book,

$1.32

OPEN END SCHOOL TIES

7
Canadian Farmer Here On Holiday PURI NA

RENOWN SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS, with piped













contrasting Collars. Shades of Grey, Blue, Cream. Y pe i : Calf Startena
Mr. Getty Greene, a Canadian Station at the Pine and saw the CHURCHILL - from 1. in dae, boys of Harri- Sizes 36 to 44 ins. ys Pigeon Chow or
who donatéd a “el n bull to bull Remus which he had donated Attlee denied this. He said be . - , Suit $16.37 Dh an choi D. & F. Chow
the Barbados Government some to the Government. He said that had been ready any time to talk aR A SLs ag a J O.. ;
years ago for the purpose of im- he was glad to know that it had with Churchill and believed Lord ee 4 Rebbit Chow Milk Chow
proving the dairy strain now a number of its offspring in vari- Cherwell, Churchill's _ scientific nomen
back in the vl ous parts of the island and hoped advisor who now heads the Brit- ial ds fost Chow
Mr. Greene is a farmer from that its daughters might increase ish atomic programme, had been















}
WH
WA
|
: A
Ontario where they breed pure the milk production of their dams. kept fully inforrned. 1 | Hen Chow (Scratch Grain)
bred Frejsian cattle, Hevarrived There had been no official an- \ } ; 4 y
aie the low end by BWIA He thought that with the good nouncement that Britain was pro- oe Ss & CO.. LIMITED
ae m 1 at the Pine, it would ducing atomie weapons until 11 j i, H. JASON Pia &
oo oa ke? } t be ow before the whole days ago when Government said \ i “remGe | "ys Distributors
os . 1 H ! t production of the tests would be made this year at I 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street. Y ae a : sine _—.
He told tte yester ntir land through artificial in- Woomera desert range in Aus- Bh | fe S : a Ss 4 i. SY S] ,
that n he paid a semination should give < big boost tralia. | Sep ;
visit to the Livestock to the colony's milk production. —(C.P). = = -

"4 , \ ——————— rh as j



.%

en



PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADs.

TELEPHONE 2508.

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE











































charge is $3.00 for any number of words












up to pad 9 cents per yord fr ‘oe
a oe 4 oe he CAR—Consul: 2 months old, Mileage
N only after tf -4 under 1,500; condition as new. Apply



Ralph Beard, Lower Bay Street, Phone:
5010. 26.2.52-—3n

IN MEMORIAM TAR—One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon
in excelent condition Contact C. J

TO —In loving memory of our dear} Ramcharan. Phone 3122, or Cole & Co.,
beloved Sister and Aunt, Albertha Ltd. Phone 4316 26,2.52—4n.



CAR 1950 Hillman Minx, condition
as new Apply: W. S. L. Tnyhane,
Maxwell, or Phone 8558, 3339
27 .2.52—3n

who was called to rest on the 28th
February, 1950.
Sad memories live with us,
Today and the day sh®
away—
God took her home it was His wil

passed





But in our hearts she liveth still. CAR: 1947 Morris 8 Fawn Sedan. Easy

Annie {Sister}, Edwin (Nephew), Car- to drive. Strong Hill climber. Good tyres

men, Melda, Sheila, Anthonette (Nieces) Apply: Tel. 8288 27.2.52—3n
28.2.52—1n

CAR 1947 Chevrolet Stylemaster in

excellent condition. Apply: V Williams,
Williams Court, Christ Church, Opposite
Sayes Court Government Farm

28.2. 52—In

Leanne EEE E EEE EEEEERRnnneeel

PERSONAL



Morris



SS CAR--1 Car. 8 h.p., mileage
The public are hereby warned agains! 24,000 For further particulars, apply
giving credit to tny wife CELESTINE | H. A. Cuke (junior!. Phone 4231

DOREEN REDMAN (nee DORSON) of

Bush ‘Hall, St. Michael as I do not holc

myself respons ble for her or anyone

elge contracting any debt or debts in

my name unless by a written orde!
signed by me.

SAMUEL PETER REDMAN,
C.5.M. Curacao,
N.W.1. (16.2.52) |

28,2.52—t.f.n

CAR—One 1951 Hillman Minx, Exe
Jent condition, going very reasoni
swner driven. Dial Williams at 3006 or
vfter working hours 95251





23,2.52
CAR: 1938 Morris, 8 h.p
27,2.52—2n Recently overhauled and rebored
ee battery. Tyres fair $525 00
This serves to notify the public that; E. H. Webster, Applewhaites
I do not hold myself responsible for 28.2.52—3n
any debt or debts contracted in ms |
name unless ty a written order signed VAN: Foursome Van

ton





Apply





1949 model,

; Dark Gi (A-2) Good condition. r ; :
vy oy LESLIE MURPHY, | Apply to G. Newton, Dotleplaine St. | at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Inspection |contract, Misconduct meant mis-}and courses will be offered up to the Higher School Certificate ex-
; Dayrells Road, , Andrew. M2 2.82—4n | any day on application to the occupier. | conduct scone of the con-{amination of ‘Cambridge University.
Chriss asa Me lleite . ten ate . tract. So supposing he were dis- 2. Qualifications. Applicants for the post should hold a Uni-
alae ELECTRICAL Solicitors, 12 High Sy'sa-én, {honest in a particular tiversity degree and be qualified to teach (1) English, History and
TT os t
FLA _——— lwhiech was not connected wit! his Latin, and (2) Mathematics. ; °
Lost A FOUND geen. et ony TERIDCE |, HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | duty, it would have had nothing 3. Salary. The post is pensionable. The salary scale is $1,920

CO,, 4671

CS

RADIOGRAM—1950 G.E.C. Radiogram
* Desk Console, Fuily repaired, excellent
condition $220.00. May be seen
DaCosta
Sehool 95-233.

21.2.52-—t+.f.n

i
ERE SEs
COAT: Short Yellow Flannel Coat.

Finder will be senerousiy rewarded 9p
réturning same to Hotel Windsor to Mrs.







27.2.52—3n








Agcock 28.2.52—2r FURNITURE
BWERPSTAKE TICKET—Series D. 064] —TepAL TABLES AND CHAIRS: Col-

Gordon
Thomas
%8.2.52—I1n

return same to

Hall, St round

and square tables with
Ideal for bridge tables

ndah furniture. Come ih and see

Finder please
Skinner, Rock









" = i. a sw show room or dial
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series DD mn ee ee oe
7437. Finder please return same to Estelle 5136. K. R. Hunte & Co., ews ‘
Gant of White Hall, St. Michael : m
’ 28.2. 52—In =
——$—$—<—<—<————————————_ MISCELLANEOUS
FORK RENT AQUARIUMS—Large and small, all
glass. Empty or stocked with Fish and

Plants. Also some young Siamese Fight-
ing Fish and other Tropical Fish
Clarke, Dial 5148































ALOW: st ted | ———_—__—_—___—_____-———— . 6 7" ini ines " . i rj
Bao We reais at SSiters, BEDSIDE STRAW MA With Ani- AUCTION lthey believe that De Abreu would and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1952, No. 2. which will be
les Rowe Road, St. George. All} mals, | | and Tajmahal Designs, |$ ————_——_——_ - |have offered to pay Gill if Deane published in the Official Gazette of Monday 25th February, 1962.
ern conveniences ingtalted Apply ges 1.33 egeh at KIRPAL T will set up for Sale at Chimborazo.|paq not agreed to pay him a ® Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of
HUTCHINSON 6 BA 1ELD . 4 = 28,2.52 “in Bt Joseph ‘one: bean, na shingled soles céanraisaions “Glauber Salts”, “Virol” and “B.F.I. Powder” are as follows :-—
: 24,.2.52—8n}. PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none/3, 1952 at 12 o'clock Hoon | Jt was said that Deane found 7 = ———_——
better — 10-Ib, lots and upwards @ 19¢.| Terms Cash lout that De Abreu was. telling MAXIMUM
“Maxwell Road. Fully} Per Ib. Phone 2547. 8.2.52—t.f.n R. A. LEE, |him a wrong price. It was not ITEM UNIT OF SALE “eta
ished, from the Ist March, 3 Bed- — Gover nt Auctioneer, | Te < - : 7 r PRICE
and all modern conveniences. PUI am OTICE ‘\ I I suggested that he met Ro. Gill 5 $ Seve yal 3s iatee, Ce
ly Nurse Pilgrim, Phone #101 Ms Be 28 pn at the a and tar a ie Glauber Salts ode 01
MA eae —_——___—---~ —- {Solicitor did not e m e es tig ¢ ee .* :
NOT sell on Thursday 26th at 1 pm.| price, so he could not have had 1-lb. Aig! ee os .12
"MORE. Pine Hill, Saint Michael.{ Applications from ICE Registered [Bt BATE Vee core enon g Frou a f ” Pe net De Rare
Drawing and Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms] Medical Practittoners for the post of toad to Cable & Wireless Station) a grounds for saying the ; Virol “ .. Medium sized bottle ine 86
Digweit modern conventences including] PAROCHIAL MEDICAL ce cROst (Of |fouble roofed “house covered with had told him a wrong price. It Large $1.94
hot and cold water rae Garage and] the parish of Saint Michael, will mK for | Bhingles, and a small gallery. Size: |was only after Deane had met ” ” oe $l.
seryants room. Apply ceived by me ti 2 o'cloc § x 10 x 8, TERMS CASH R. Archer ay : , old him certain 3
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD eta wenttes wih ie ii ensia ‘Adctloneer. 26.2,52—-3n ese soi trae ge ied not to| B-P.I. Powder ++ Small sized tin es .38
siaael The Salary attach : ne AM ; ; arge ,, ; a 94
94.20.89} to emt eee FP ene, ont “hice || CARS—Morris Minor Saloon 1951 Model | PAY De Abreu his commission, | 8 ,






‘(OUSE—Two Storey House near






Ring or write Timpson Lodge

Archie

24.2.52—-5n

hundred and twenty dollars (84,320) per
annum, payable in monthly instalments

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





‘Damages Suit



In Carlisle Bay

: RATES OF EXCHANGE |

WANTED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY %%. (95
CANADA
ch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch. Sun- NEW YORK |
a = from page 5 ghine R, Sch Wonderful Counsellor, | 73.4% pr Cheques or }
HELP If they accepted the contract,|/Sen. Marea Henrietta, Seh Emeline, Bankers 71.7% pr
| they would come to the examin-|Sch are Bette Waite a, meee | Sight or demand
| e oO » ov _ ; ; D Sch. manuel c ordon, ic Draft 71.5% pr
FEMALE BUTLER & COOK—Apply: |S f the evidence. Their claim |¢.+) g. smith, Sch. Franklyn D. | 73.49 pr one
Mrs. Simpson, Veretun, St. Johr was that they were employed to|s-, United Pilgrim, M V. Cacique Del) 71.9% pr. Currency 70 2% pr
2 52—an |find a man who had a plantation) Caribe, Sch Rainbow M , Sch. D’Ortac, . Coupons 69.5% pr







i1IOR SALESMAN





mentioned and not

Dual entrance. Best offer £4,000 accepted

stairs, and usual convenience

telephone Miss Hutson, |of price was nothing to

De Abreu

For Inspection
No, 2017
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20,2.52—6
ee
“EBENEZER”, that desirable dwelling-|tation of a ¢ rtain size and
house overlooking the sea situate at | certain parishes to sell.

Enterprise Road, Christ Chureh and built - aes - ‘
ert inch stone standing on 2 Roode plantation would obviously










at the office of the /

2ath February [out his duty under



up for s

the terms

undersigned on Thursday






house, all conveniences, with party-
sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room sjarage, laundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under
On attractive hillsiae site, Rockley New
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476
13,2.52—t.f.n
chattel dwellinghouse
lands of Saint ‘s |
KING
The house, whch is near |a

mission. The Contract
that he should introduce him

and a sale resulted,
Defence of Fraud



standing on



Chureh, situate at

Bridgetown. contract, In

Water and electric services | UP that defence, he was
Inspection on application to
Mrs, Eustace Gooding,

Sunday) from

veniences.

installed

the Tenant,

day, (except

p.m

The house will be set up for

publie competition at our office,

Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday

instant at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

Sokc tors
22.2.52

|
5 |
noon to 5 |helieve Deane.

sale by | Roy Gill had
|De Abreu

told them

James



how much
he thought
4n jacting aS an
even offered to

that Gill
agent. De
pay Gill.









5
9,000 miles. Austin A 70 aloon 1951 It
shightls

Mode! 6,000 miles, Both damaged

that on the





to sell and report him to Deane.

“IU required chiefly |r. . _— . Smith, & S. Campero, Yacht Maria (including Newfoundland)
for Hardware Lines. Apply in writing The remuneration would be 3%.| Catharina. 23.3% pr. Cheques on
to P.O. Box 280." 24.252-t4.n.| Mr. Mottley was put in ¢ prove ARRIVALS Bankers 71.6% pr
the usual, commission. € was|s 8. Crofton, — Kn net, Capt. S. Sight or demand po
r » oy iamond, % . Drafts 71.45% pr
PU « . . an expert, no one questioned |""S"5” Rogenes, 4,389 tons net, Capt. mend Drafts 71 45% pr
HL ; SALES that. He was put in in case there},. Vatnaland, from Glasgow. 73.3% pr. Cable
was any doubt as to the normal] Yacht Mollihawk, 31 tons net, Capt.) gc. 5, Currency 90.1% pr
z= — : commission. Dp. Nicholson, from ges Coupons 69.4% pr
REAL ESTATE Did 287 believe Deste wae Sen Mary M Lewis, 6 tons net, MAIL NOTICES
a F ne tok em a y i} Capt, 1 , for ir. ulana. “ ~
BUNGALOW ~Mode rn 4 Bedroom ploy De Abreu but in the course| MV Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt. Mails for Br, Guiana by the Schaones
Bungalow, situated at Top Rock, Ch. Ch : Gumbs, for St. Lucia. Marion Belle Wolfe will be closed at the
sn‘, acre of land. Having 2 fully tiled |}Of conversation the question of Sunrover. 3 tons net, Capt, |General Post Office as under :—
Toilets and Baths, built-in Cupboards,|Lodge arose and he enquired!, Mev: foy Trinidad. Parcel Mail and | Hesisteres Bail *
Outside 2 Garages, Servants’ rooms and |; ° ers jretania, 19,691 tons net, |10 a.m., Ordinary at 12.15 p oi
Playroom, Garden well lad out with after Lodge? Were all the oth ss Tears a” the 29th February, 1952.

Husbands and |©4Pt.

io with
All he had to do was)and fuel tanks,

sn (to hunt about Barbados and dis-|ton Pumping Station, St. John.
}cover somebody who had a plan-

The
have
been bought in a Solicitor’s office.

15 Perches of land containing open mn - -
verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 2|Even if De Abreu lied until he
ams tg space for a third) | was blue in the face, it had noth-
nm, pan serv s room, ; 7 , -ag
PY Neve will be | ing to do with the case.

All he had to do was to carry

\to do with his getting his com-
was

someone with a plantation to sell
Deane had put up a defence

of fraud after denying there was
order that there

Seventh Day Adventist ‘Church, contains | might be fraua there had to be
closed gallery, drawing and dining |, aga 3
rooms, 2 bedrooms. kitchen, usual con- an agent So when Deane put

in the}
face of giving himself the lie.
any |So they had every right to dis-

that
had said that he was}
28th | getting commission and enquired
he was getting whefl
was only
Abreu
Did

was held, he pointed out,

MV. Lady Patricia, Sch Frances Ww OANADA

P. W. Sorrell, for St. Vincent.



Possession 3ist March, Further particu- | Oxnards, the plantation which as . . CES
lars; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay St. | was eventually bought?
Phone 5010. 27.2.52—-3n He said that there was no GOVERNMENT NOTI
CLEVELAND a conveniently situated | 28reement that they had to 1CERS FOR ©.
house, in the 2nd Avenue, Belleville, |negotiate a_ price. Over and BO SALE
standing on 11,273 square feet of land }over again Deane had told them 2 shell type CORNISH fire tube boilers 5 feet in diameter and
and containing Drawing and Dining he was seeing after the price : , 0 Ib: squar inch
Room on the Ist floor, 3 Bedrooms Up- | Himself ‘Therefore the question fourteen feet long, working pressure up to 250 lbs. per square .

Boilers are complete with all boiler mountings, fuel oil burners
also superheater, if required. Can be seen at Ever-
Will be sold singly.

Tenders to be submitted to the Honourable Colonial Secretary

c on or before Friday 29th February, 1952. —21.2.52.—3n.



VACANCY FOR POST OF SENIOR MASTER,
GRAMMAR SCHOOL, DOMINICA

Applications are invited
of} Dominica Grammar School.

for

by $120 to $2,400. A cost of living
salary is also payable.
to|suitable applicants at
qualification and experience.
4. Quarters. Quarters are not provided.
5. Leave.

6. Passage om first appointment.
appointment will be paid, as well as that of his wife
of school age, not exceeding four, if
him within twelve months from the date of his first appointment.

7. Conditions of Service. The officer
Regulations and local General Orders.

Applications stating the applicant's
as one, ld be addressed to the A t D
assume duty, shou e addressed to the inistrator, inica.
: J SHAMILTON MAURICE,

Education Officer.



Attention is drawn to









sixth when De Abreu

tie Club, fully furnished including} of Three hund and sixty 1 ag) | in accidents ara
J and Gas Stove, Telephone and] A Ce ee ee eee dotvent rates |, We are instructed to offer these vehicles {met Deane, he had known i
Ragio installed, available from the Ist.) is also payable. ov “alia ‘by aucton at the Courtesy |estate and had not. divul ft.
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-]| The successful applicant will not be Birage on Friday 29th at 2 p.m }But though Roy Gill had said
i Ee incving the avg ay. wor bahay to act in, or hold another JOHN M. BLADON & CO., that he had told him the name
e is leaving e dslan hortly, O} arochial or Government appointmen Auctioneers | , Se hatt on ine
vi *Apphy Ralph Beard, Lower Bay] and will be reauired oy tek cue el 428224n {of the plantation before the 8
8 Phone 5010. 26.2.52—3n | duties as from the 25th March 1952, but | > 43.024" | onth, it was not said up to whe
f if already holding such appointment, before, so there was every pos-~
DERN FURNISHED FLAT—with | will be given a reasonable time to re- IMPORT ANT | ibility that De Abreu did not
Si and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.] linquish same after assuming duty. “— Fie ” Besides, if he had known,
For further particulars. Apphy to Alma] Further particulars in connection with \know. Besides,



6 Coral Sands, Worthing,

the duties of thi Pa rn
23.2.52—t.f.n, of this post can be obtained

from the undersigned.
By Order,
mr. C, REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.

















- 14,2.52—8n

Cee en eee ee

“Christ Our Passover

”

A Series of Six Lectures will be |
ven by Mr, CAMERON TUDOR

t LEMON GROVE every Friday IN

BARBADOS.

ALL ARE WELCOME NOTICE iS hereby given that a Petition

f the Court of Common

Pleas by
sbovenamed Company to

confirm an

Just Received ...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

olution of the Company

a ing of the said Company held on the
Limited Supply %th day of November 1951, and subse-
Order To-day at quently unanimously confirmed at an

Extraordinary General Meeting of the
said Company held on the lth day of
December 1961, and which Resolution
runs as follows :—

“That the provisions of the Memoran-
jum of Association of the Company with
respect to the Company’ be
altered by adding a para
1umbered irl) to Clause
Memorandum of Association the
ollowing that is to say:

irl) To maintain and support or
n the establishment and support of as-
ociations, institutions, funds, trusts, and
conveniences calculated to benefit em-
sloyees, or ex-employees of the Com-
any or the dependents or ‘connections
~ such persons and to grant pensions
ind allowances, and to make payments
owards insurance and to enter into any
cheme calculated to benefit employees,
or ex-employees of the Company or the
tependents or connections of such
versons

AND NOTICE



q. W. Hutchinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street



aid

Bay Street Girls’ Club ad-
joining Esplanade.





Come



and see for yourself, and Is FURTHER GIVEN














10.30 o'clock in the forenoon,
»erson interested in the
whether as creditor, @
irous to oppose the

or the confirmation ©: gald alteration
inder the above Act, should appear @

RUARY, 1951.4 to 6 p.m.

ounsel, for the pufpese, and a copy o
he said

RACES! RACES!

JOCKEYS’ RACING
WHIPS

Call in to-day and
yours.

Catford & Co., No. MW, High

harge for the same,



OTTLE CATFORD & CO.,

s c
select Solicitors for the Company,

«— Also just received —
DOG COLLARS, LEADS.
HARNESS re CHAINS,
CHOKERS

NEWSAM & CO.

HUE

Seawell

TUBSDAY — BY PT.C.A.
Arrivals from BERMUDA:
Dorothy Maclaren,
son, Irvine Perley-Robertson,
Weatherby, Michael Hildred, John
Casey Vanderlinden
Afrivals from MONTREAL

J, Clark, J. Clermont, A.
Dumais, C, Dumais, M
Gordon, ©. Griydon, A
Mackay, A. Patterson
Ross, A. Seatcherd,
Woke, L. Corey, L. }

WEDN AY — BY TCLA
Departures fo

Clermont















Stools. Cheval and other framed dolen Ellis Stuart King, Helen King
irrors, $1 up, Bedsteads, Beds, TUESDAY — BY B.W.LA
, Washstands $8 up-—China,
m and Kitchen Cabinets,

Arrivals from TRINIDAD:








Elona Vandevys.
tonie
Galey
Bi

Charles Vandevy A
Picardi, Eulalia Pieardi,

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069
Epigama Billi



{

IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS

THE MATTER OF CENTRAI
ight during Lent, The first will . C AL
given Tomorrow Night at 7.30 bh
: The Prophets and . —
Bree, Bublect: oe premise. IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
. o

wes on the 26th day of February 1952,
presented to His Lordship the Chief Judge
the

alteration of the said Company's objects
proposed to be effected tiy a Special Kes-
unanimously
passed at an Extraddinany General Meet-

bat the said Petition is directed to be

and any

id Com .
Drerw ise,

mg of an ovdar

he time of hearing, by himself or bis

Petition will be furnished to
ny such person requiring the same by
he Company's Solicitors, Messrs Cottle,
Street,
jridgetown, on payment of the regulated

Dated “ ith day of February, 1052.



Sylvia Boss, General Charles Maclaren,
Ethel Perley-Robert-

Una
Scott

J

Gordon, H.
Graydon, L.



-LEMENTARY TEACHERS’ | would he have telephoned
SOCIATION

ACHERS are

BARBADOS





All HEA®



invited ee |1y to find
When
Mr.

address

gpecial meeting at the Chureh House
acm

BARKER

the case

Saturday
Adams

Ist March at 10 )
F. H | day will

; his
a {and

jup to the Jury.















The Refrigerator which ten

years

ago caused the Bajan

Cook to exclaim

* ‘ 7, 1eard before His Lordship the Chief “ - . "
buy just that item you Judge of the Court of Common Pleas Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
want. FRIDAY 29th FEB- ym Friday the 2ist day of March, 1992 at

mek ice!”

n
t

is here again... :

; in full force just in time to meet the

needs of those who cannot avail vhemselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.

These machines are for cperation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41% cub.

ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

———

BOOk YOURS NOW
e

THE EMTAGE ELEC, CO.

Plantations Building





Arthur Cowley, Marion Cewley, Philip
Dash, Michael Dash phen Dash, Daisy = : SS
MONEY SAVING STORE Fleming, Barbi enidge, Catherine = ee ————
: Merrick, Lat Scott, Vivian §Seott
Herold Taitt, Miss Budspeh
Mone. ving NEW and Renewed Departures for BERMUDA;
Ward $s, Dresser-robes, Vanities, Octavia Burke, Frederick Ellis, Gwen-



L. Carew, S, Webster, M. Taillieur, R

for Dining, Kitchen, Radio Taillieur, F. McKenzie, R. Barbour, C

and Decoraton. Barbour, P. Watson, G. Shillington, E

2 nos, Gramaphone, Type- ee eee R. Troconis, B
” , i sy Linden, G ilkins, E. Wilkins, L ray

writer, Banjos, Ice boxes Cortejoso, B. Brodie, M. Laffan, R. Laffan ANOTHER

emer Departures for TRINIDAD or : -

= Irving Daly, Leon Daly, Rose Walker

John Lee, Eldier Scotland, Fanny Hum-

L. S. WILSO phrey, Mavis Turpin, Charles Vandevys,

n

Homer
Maria Billi, Franca





r.
|Wilkinson and others subsequent-
out whfch it could be.
continues to-
continue
on a point of law
then His Lordship will sum

gives you
the Extra Vitality

to resist

INFLUENZA



5 — See

“FOR SALE

RALPH. BEARD'S
SHOWROOMS

Standing on 6,800 sq. ft.,
Space of 6,000 sq. ft. upstairs and downstairs.
Four Show Windows. Frontage 72 ft.

| EASILY CONVERTED

into six Offices Ist Floor, 3 large Shops Downstairs





having a Covered Floor

LIGHT, COOL and CENTRAL
THREE TOILETS ARE INSTALLED
also LIGHT and POWER FITTINGS

THE AROVE PROPERTY IS
AVAILABLE WITH POSSESSION
MARCH Sise 1952

Best Offer Over £12,000 accepted

iI

\ Further Particulars, Apply RALPH BEARD
\ ower Bay Street
"PHONE 5010













one vacant post of Senior Master,
The school roll at present numbers 150,

allowance of ten per cent. of
Consideration would be given to appointing
points in the scale commensurate with their

Leave is earned in accordance with local regulations
and provision is made for assistance towards overseas leave passages.
The offieer’s passage on first
and children
they accompany him or follow





will be subject to Colonial

age, qualifications and teach-
and indicating the earliest date on which he could

28,2.52—3n.

the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent |)

SSeS —eeeeeeeeeaeaeooom





In addition to general cargo this vessel

Lading for
British Guiana,



F

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952











———— =
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. The M/V CACIQUE DEI
(M.A.N.Z. LINE) | CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
| Passengers for St. Luci Sst
SS. “TEKOA” is scheduled to sail Vincent, Grenada and Aruba
from Adelaide February 15th, Melbourne Sa ling Wednesday 27th inst
February 26th, Sydney March 4th, Bris-
bane March 15th, arriving at Trinidad The M/V. ““MONEKA”™ will ac-
about April 15th and Barbados about cept Cargo and Passengers for
April 18th. Deminica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday

has ample space for chilled and 7th March 1952 ;
frozen cargo.
Cargo accepted on through Bills 2 The M/V. “CLARA” will accept

Cargo and Passengers for Nassau

Leeward and Windward and Bahamas.

Date of sailing to

Islands. be notified.
For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
TRINIDAD. ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignee. Tele. No. 4047

and
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
BARBADOS, B.W.1.







NEW YORK SERVICE

“GENERAL ARTIGAS" sailed 21st February -- arrives B'dos 4th March, 1952.



A STEAMER sails 8th March — arrives P’dos 19th March, 1952.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

S.S. “LIBREVILLE” sailed 13th February —arrives B’dos Ist March, 1952.

A STEAMER sails 27th February — arrives Barbados



nm
















16th March, 1952.

eee

CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship



Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados

s. “ALCOA PLANTER” .. 12th Februany 2ist February
s. “ALCOA PEGASUS” .. .- 26th February 7th March
.s. “ALCOA PILGRIM” .. + 14th March 24th March

A STEAMER es e* . 23rd March 2nd April

A STEAMER + + a4 =/s 13th April 23rd April

A STEAMER... oe pe ee ist May llth May

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & ©O., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE













§G* TRANSATLANTIGU E |
c TLANTIQUE |
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1982 ....
““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952 ...
*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados, Arrives Southampton

Arrives Barbados
83lst March, 1952
6th May, 1952
2ist May, 1952





; “COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 .... 23rd April, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIR” ist June, 1952 .... 18th June, 1952



ailing direct to Southampton



HK. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

FYFFES LINE

The T.S.S, GOLFITO

will be arriving from
Southamptan on Sunday, 2nd March and will
be sailing the same afternoon for Trinidad.
There is ample Ist Class Accommodation

available for Trinidad.

Apply ...

WILKINSON & HAYNE



FISHY BUSINESS



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
RS RE -_-—~

s IS BACKACHE
|
|





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?

May people suffer an aching batk
v—believing you must expect
a few aches and pains when you're
“getting on” in years!
But backache is often caused by che
faulty action of kidneys and liver.
con much better you feel afrer

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liver Try Dr, Chase's Kidney-Liver

Pills tonight. At all drug counters 16




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i

KING GEORGE VI.

A FAMILY ALBUM
. OF HIS GREAT LIFE

°










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4 a ° Presenting a magnificent
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NOW - THEN -NOW ouveniy record of the eventful
* N-













TT GIVE IT | LIKE An life ane se » late
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â„¢ PAGE BIGHT

“Pepper W ine’

Harroween Meets
With Mishap

THE FINAL GALLOPS went off yesterday morning

in the presence of a fairly

large gathering of spectators

The track still remains in a very hard condition and with
the races beginning the day after tomorrow it would take
a cloud burst or more to make it anything like soft

Best time for the morning was returned by Hon. J. D
Chandler’s Pepper Wine, who did a smart five in 1.02"s.
This aged mare is staging a comeback after retiring for a

year or more.

The most unfortunate happening so far has been the

accident which Mr. D. V
Tuesday morning. After
pitched her rider, Worrell.

Scott’s Harroween met with on

pulling up she stumbled and
She then ran off, and, jumping

the rails, made for the paddock where she fell before end-

ing up in front of her stall.

She was oui yesterday but was
a bit stiff. Harroween would have
been a favourite for either of the
two races she chese to start in on
Saturday and this is a rotten piece
of luck indeed for her stable.

The gallops were as follows

3etsam was out first as usual.
He did five in 1.07%.

Flying Dragon looked cross
about something as he finished a
five in 1.04

Rectan did a box to box in 1.23}
and the last five in 1.082 He

Jooked fairly easy.
Harroween was next going from
the box, She did five in
1.06%. 1 did not notice her at the
finish but I am told that she was
not as comfortable as usual. This
was to be expected after such a
nasty fall.
The Thing has improved of late
She did five in 1.04%.
Rosette is more or less on ice
She did a slow 7 furlong gallop.
Dim View looked alright to me
over a five in 1.05. She played
about a bit but otherwise !
thought the gallop a good one.
Pepper Wine did a five in 1.024.
Mabotya seems to be going
backwards. She did five in 1.08%,
not finishing very strong,
Demure did four in 52%

quite
easily.

Rebate looked exceptionally full
of life as she did about seven
furlongs. She did the box to box
in 1.24 and the last five in 1.07.

Darham Jane did four in 55},
She is one of those which I think
will be well up in the Maiden.

Doldrum had to step fast to be
with Castle In The Air over the
first part of a 54% furlong gallop.
They did five in 1.048.

Dashing Princess and Belle
Surprise went well together doing
the box to box ‘in 1.24.

Lunways jumped off from the
5% gate doing this distance in 1.09
and four in 524.

French Flutter did a good five

1.03%,

Dunquerque did a box to box
in 1.25¢ and the last five in 1.08.

Embers did a box to box in 1.27

Cross Bow and Cavalier did five
in 1.05 with the latter looking
the better of the two.

Flieuxce did a box to box in 1.25
and the last five in 1.07%.

Colleton did the box to box in
1.263.

Yasmeen did
1.06.

March Winds and Diadem did
five in 1.08, the former much the
easier of the two.

River Sprite did five in 1.103.

Fuss Budget and Notonite were
companions over a box in 1.24%
and the last five in 1.04%. After
Harroween’s mishap Notonite
now my definite choice for
B.T.C, Stakes.

Blue Nelly did a slow five with

in

an easy five in

is

the

Usher in 1,11. The latter I think
will win the first D class race
over 742 furlongs. The forme)

has her supporters for the Maiden
Stakes.

Sweet Rocket
when she did a
1.204.

Gun Site enjoyed himself at half
speed, doing a box to box in 1.294

Topsy managed to do something
more than a three-quarter
pace gallop and actually did a box
to box in the fairly good time of
1.23. The last five she did in
1.064.

Cardinal did five in 1.062 easily,

Tiberian Lady made a_ great
effort to do five in 1.068.

Red Cheeks did five in 1.04,

Devil's Symphony did an easy
five in 1.04%. She improving
all the time.

Waterbelle did five in 1.073

was
box

impressive
to box in

is

Seedling did a comfortable box
to box in 1.24 and the five in.
1.064.

Magic Gaye looked easier than

Arunda over box to box in
1.25%.
Watercress worked after I left

but my colleague informs me she
did five in 1.083
Fille D’'Iran did a five with half-
bred Blue Diamond in 1.074.
Firelady did a box to box
1.284 and the last five in 1.09!
Caprice did a box to box
1.30}.

in

in



oe
i Ne
HERE'S THE
NEVER FORGETS / vicel I KNEW
WE HAD A FILE
ON HIMâ„¢I REMEMBER
LOOKING AT
PICTURE

A FACE OR
A PICTURE +=»

gon F Alo,



| They'll Do It Every

Aim Low I hear was not im
pressive although she did not do
much. Her five was done in 1.10

The usval trio, Vonwise, Colum-
bus and Cottage did five in 1.13?

Apronusk and Apollo were the
last my friend saw. They did <
box to box in 1.281

Spartan Defeat
“verton 2—1

Spartan defeated Everton two
one in their Second Division foot-
ball fixture at Queen's Park yes-

terday afternoon The game wa
fairly fast but the forwards of
both teams missed many oppor
tunities to score

The goals for. the Park team
were scored by skipper Ainsley
Gittens and Phillips, Collymore
at centre forward for Everton

scored for his team

Spartan took the touch off with
Everton defending the goal at the
Weymouth end. The ball was car-
ried from goal to geal. When the
game was ahout 25 minutes old C.
Archer, the Everton left back,
kicked the ball outside to give the
Park team a corner kick

Jemmott kicked a _ beautiful
corner and Ainsley Gittens turn-
ed the ball into the nets put
Spartan one up,

Spartan nearly increased
lead when Phillips, their right
wineer, took an excellent shot
which nearly beat goalie Colly-
more

to

their

Saved
The Everton
attempt to

forwards,
equalise the
bored down. Seale the
right, ran down the right
aud centred. Cellymore toox a
shot which goalie Wood savea.

A little later Seaie repeated this
performance. He again cencred
from the right wing and _ this
time Collymore made no mistake
He beat goalie Wood with a well
placed shot. Half time found the
score unchanged.

Spartan regained the lead short-
ly after the second half begen.
Phillips, who was now playing at
centre forward in place of Git-
tens, received a long pass. He
hurried towards the goal and beat
Collymore with a hard shot,

Spartan was later awarded a
penalty kick when Referee Hoyos

in an
game,
inside
wing

penalised one of the Everton
backs Ainsley Gittens took the
shot but sent the ball straight to

goalie Collymore who saved easily
and cleared after avoiding an on-
iush by Gittens.

The last minutes
Spertan forwards
Everton goal in
their lead

found the
attacking the
an effort to in-
creas

The teams were as follows:—
Spartan: P. Wood, T_ Banfield,
Morrison, Weekes. Wilson, Morris,
Phillips, Grant, Gittens, R. Gibb
and Jemmott,
Fverton
V. Harewood,

Collymore, Connell,
Fowler C. Archer,
Danie}, C, Collymore, Sealy, Seale,
Edey and N. Harewood,

Referee; Mr, “Ben"’ Hoyos



CRICKET AT FRIENDSHIP

There will be a cricket mateh
con Saturday, Ist March at Friend-
ship Playing Field
team from the Water
Yorkshire Cricket Club

Following are the teams

between a
Works and

Water Works: N. A. Barrow
(Capt.), .F. Alleyne, C. Ashby,
E. R. Barrow, S. Cadogan, C
Clement, O. Forde, D. Jores, 1

Kirton, Mr. Ward and E. Springer

Yorkshire ©. CT.
apt.). C. Clarke, L.
R. Cummings, K. Payne, A. Carter,
c Clement H Harewood, D
Haynes, L. Mottley, and J. Morris

Maynard,

(€ Blackett,



‘Time

Repiwered Ub Patent Other

Ss
iS

BUREAU ie,
GREAT

WORK,
CAMERA-

EYE!

9

“MINIMUM OF 3
[ anp spectator

orgs



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





YDS, ADVISED
ENCLOPURE?*
et na

eS

BETWEEN

Pee.

'

po

arma

Best For Morning

4

Know Your Football—uw :

By O. S.

COPPILN

SO GREAT AN ENTHUSIASM has been shown for
local football already this season and’ so many requests
have been received at my desk at the Advocate with re-
gard to the general fundamentals of the game, that Ii have
persuaded myself that the best way to answer most quer-
ies is to run a short series of discussions and explanations

on the Laws of the game.

This series is not intended tobe charged fairly when in posses-

dogmatise on tactics nor does it sion—(2)

seek to coach people on the finer
points of the game I am aiming
at explaining to the football pub-
lic who would need me do so, what
happens when a game is started,
what governs the play and why.

There are two main objects of
the seventeen laws governing
football—THE CONTROL of the
game and the PROTECTION of
the players. These seventeen laws
have evolved gradually as the
outcome of more than _ eighty
years of playing experience,

The character of the game de-
pends to a great extent on those
who play it complying with the
laws and accepting the decisions
of the referee and if those who
watch it are conversant as well,
au good deal of the booing and
hard feelings harboured against
officials doing a thankless job
will be obviated.

Law L—The i ieid wt Play

The tield of play shall be rec-
tangular, its leng:h .being not
more than 130 yards nor less than
100 yards and its breadth not
more than 100 yards nor less than
50 yards,

It is recommended that clubs
should try to obtain a field to the
average dimensions to Interna-
tional matches that is, 110 to 120
yards by 70 to 80 yards,

In the picture of the field above
{ have tried to indicate where you
see on the field of play several
white lines marking off certain
eas and Law 1, after setting out
the size of the field prescribes
these areas,

Let us take them briefly as we
have got to know the term. If we
took the field at Kensington for
instance, it is a rectangle that
is roughly 100 x 75 yards, And
if we began from one of the nar-
rower sides of the rectangle and
iooked up the field away from
the Pickwick and George Chai-
lenor Stands towards the sight-
screen at the far end of the
ground,

We
order;

Touchlines—The field of play is
marked out with distinctive lines
not more than five inches’ in
width, the longer boundary lines
nre called touchlines.

Goal Lines—These are marked
at each end ot the field of pley
and at right angles to the tovch
lines.

Goal Area—At each end of the
field two lines are drawn at righ’
angles to the goal line, 6 yards
from each goal post. These extend
into the field of play for a dis-
tance of 6 yards and are joined by
a line drawn parallel with the
goal line, Each of the spaces on-
closed by these lines and the
line are called the goal area.

I might explain here, although
I shall come to it later on in the
rules that the goal area has two
purposes—(1) to indicate the on!y
area in which the goal-keeper cay

will find these lines in

ie Jimmy Hatlo

CANT REMEMBER HE

SAW THE SAME SHOW BEFORE
TILL IT'S HALF OVER*=-

WELL, I DION’T
SEE [Ts
SO YOU'LL
JUST HAVE TO
SIT THROUGH
, IT AGAIN=:



to limit the area
which the ball is placed for
goal kick,

Penalty Area—At each end of
the field of play two lines are
drawn at right angles to the goal
line, 18 yards from each goal post.
These extend into the field of
play for a distance of 18 yards and
is joined by a line drawn paral-
lel with the. goal line. Each of
the spaces enclosed by these lines
is called the penalty—area.

A mark is made twelve yards
away from the midpoint of the
coal line, within the penalty area
and this is the “spot” from which
penalty kicks are taken,

From each penalty kick mark
en are of a circle, having a radius
of 10 yards is drawn outside the
renalty area and all players ex-
cept the goal-keeper and the
player taking the penalty kick
must remain outside this arc until
9 penalty kick has been taken.

Corner Area—From each corn-
ev-flag post a quarter circle, hav-

in
a

Notre Dame Beat
7 s
Everton In Third

>, ° @ f
Division Match

Notre Dame defeated Everton
one nu in a ‘third Division foot-
tail mateh at the Bay yesterday
atternoon. ‘Tine lone goal of the
match was netted when the sec-
ond half of play was about five
minutes old,

soth teams started off the
game slowly, but Notre Dame
were seen doing most of the press-
ing and quite a few chances they
failed to take advantage of. When
thé whistle was blown for half-
time, both teams had failed to
seore,.

In the second half, Notre Dame
after putting in the first and only
goal, relaxed and again they never
took their chances.

At Carlton Police and Carlton
played to a l—1 draw, but Carl-
ton did most of the pressing in
this match. Both teams tried to
get the edge on each other, but
Police had the most chances for
winning this match.

* o *

In the Netball match on Tues-
day at Girls’ Foundation School,
the ‘“omesters won .the match
played against an Ursuline Con-
vent team by 14 goals to 13, The
Umpires were Mrs. N. Ward and
Mrs. G,., King.

The match which was scheduled
to teke place last Friday between
Queen's College Old Girls and the
Ursuline Convent at the Convent

wi" be played on Tuesday, Mareh
4. and the mateh ‘scheduled to
take place today between ‘St.

Michael's Girls and Queen's Col-
lege Old Girls at St. Michael's
Girls, School will take place on
Wetlnesday, Mareb 5. at 4.45 p.m

Rangers Win

In the Third Division match
Setween Rangers and Y.M.C.A.
at Shell, Rangers beat Y/M.C_A,
et

ing a radius of 1 yara is drawn
inside the field of play.

The corner flag post must not
be less than five feet high with a
non-pointed top. They mark the
corners and they assist the referee
and linesmen in deciding whether
the ball has gone over the touch
line or the goal line.

Some grounds carry a halfway
flag’ post. This is not essential but
if does mark the centre of the
field.’ If used it must be opposite
the halfway line and not less
than 1 yard OUTSIDE the touch-
‘jne,

The Goals—The goals are placed
in the centre of each goal line and
consist of two upright posts equid-
istant from the corner flags and
eight yards apart (inside measure-
tment) joified by a horizontal
crossbar, the lower edge of which
is eight feet from the ground, '

The width and depth of the

oal posts and the width and

epth of the crossbars are not
allowed to. exceed five inches,

Nets are attached to the posts,
t_ossbars and ground behind the
goals, They must be appropriately
sSuytported and so placed as to
ilicw the goalkeeper ample room

And so I leave my readers with
Law I and a few points, Next
article—Law II—'The Ball”—and
Law IlI—“Number of Players.”

——-



PERSPIRATIO
ODOR
INSTANTLY

WITH A FINE SPRAY OF
0DO-RO-NO

Just Squeeze the Bottle...

and a fine, mist-like spray quickly
banishes perspiration and its odor.
Safeguards your natural freshness

Effective. Odorono Spray effec-
tively checks perspiration and odor

Economical, Hundreds of sprays
in every bottle. Use less — lasts
longer.

Safe. Odorono Spray cannot irri-
tate normal skin. Will not rot
fabrics.

Handy. Pliable plastic bottle sprays
pertectly~always.



SERVE YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX
J & KR ENRICHED BREAD





; John Goddard's



THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 28, 1952





TEAM TO MEET
GODDARD’S ELEVEN

Mr. W. Lewis of Collymore}
Rock has selected a team to meet |
World XI an-|
nounced on this page a week ago. |

How does this figure with the
other amateur selectors?—F. R. |
Brown (captain), R. Simpson, B.}

» Sutcliffe, V. Hazare, C. L. Walcott,

D. S. Compton, G. E. Gomez, R.}
Lindwall, D, Phadkar, Ian John- |
son, T. Burtt,. V.-Mankad, J. |
Stollmeyer. |



Sports Window

SPARTAN, cup. winners
for three consecutive sea-
sons, meet Empire at Ken-
sington this afternoon ‘in a
First Division fixture.

These are two popular
teams and the game is
bound to excite considerable
interest.

Empire, after
absence have come back
this season and have won
both their fixtures this sea-
gon, defeating College, and
Carlton,

a season's

Spartan in their two fix-
tures have dropped a single
point, having defeated
Carlton but were held to a
draw by the keen young
team Notre Dame.

This evening these teams
go into action with Empire
having scored a_ possible
four points and Spartan
three points out of a possi-
ble four.

ee



Empire will field : Sym-
monds (goal); Grant and
Smith; Maynard, Alleyne,
and Rudder; «Robinson,
Drayton, Hope, Taylor, and
Douglas.

Spartan will field : Wood
(goal); Bowen and Gibbons;
Haynes, Cadogan, and Git-
tens; Chase, Griffith, Wood,
Van Genderen, Boyce.



DANCE

at

| THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

on

SATURDAY

March Ist, 9 P.M.

For Local and Visiting
MEMBERS

Music by Mr. C, Curwen's

Orchestra
(No Admission Charge to
Ballroom)
28.2.52.—3n,

ERNIE'S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB

—o1—

There will be a Special
MEFTING ©
To-morrow (Friday)
February 29th
to discuss the problems
of the First Dnay’s Rac-
ing on March Ist.

—I—

There
over
Each

wiil be
en each race.
horse will have
a price.

a Call-

—0—

Dinner will be
at 8 o'clock

served

—

Special Lobster Cockt?ils
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C. Snow,
Proprietor Edgewater
Hotel,
where he prides himself

on Lobster Salads and
Lobster American @t all
hours.
a,

Go and try them and
let me know the results

p(n
OUR MENU:
Hors d’Oeuvre

Stuffed Eggs, Anchovies

Patties, Etc.
Turkey Pelau
Poire & Peche Melba
Purity Mince Pies

SLICES OF

aes



SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 27

Cesar Brion, Argentine heavy-
weight star will be gunning for
his fifth victory since returning
from a visit to his homeland when
he goes against Bob Dunlap on



WHAT’S ON TODAY
Court of Common
Pleas at ...........10.00
Police Courts... 10,00
Mrs. De Kuh’s Art
Exhibition at “The
Pavilion”, Hastings :
warqphtichechonssesis ‘
4 Meetintg of ——
Commissioners,

Michael ............ 1.00
Talk on Barbados for
Scout Contingent at
Harrison College
by Judge Vaughn
4.30

| Netball : St. Michael’s
Gitls’ vs. Queen's
College Old Girls
at St ael’s
Girls’ School ... 4.45
Football at Kensing-
tom : Spartan vs
Empire 5.00 p.m.

ss
Et

a.m.
a.m.

p.m.

P.m.



e

‘



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56-9



FLOWERED
96" wide per yard 96. & 87c.










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| CESAR BRION TO MEET. BOB DUNLAP

Monday

Brion, now in tri~ming, will
have a ten-pound weight advan-
tage. He expects to weigh about
196 pounds compared with 186
for Dunlap —U.P



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
ve from Codrington
nil.
Total rainfall for month te
date: .07 in,
Highest Tensperature
86.5° F.
Lowest Temperature
70° F.
Wind Velocity
per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) :
(3 p.m.) : 29.845

TO-DAY
Sunrise : 621 a.m,
Sunset : 6.07 p.m.
Moon : New, February
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
High Tide : 5.53 a.m., 6.25
p.m,
Low Tide :

11 miles

29.949

25

12.04 p.m.





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36’ wide per yard

88c.







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lovingly blended,
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ARMSTRONG LTD.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS, HVMII' TELEPHONC not. IIH.Ifa* Sirta*. Marnaaa ot bMN*< MKMBTWMBU LI. C..,b OU1M •*• %  M and • p a> I v.*u* onkr attar • • m i on s\i i: ^AUTOMOTIVE IAK C—M l M....I'! uiwter IJM .maaitiaa %  Mali* Baard. Lower Bay aOlO IN MEMOKIAM b*W>vt W-in ..i %  Allrtha |*. • < '" %  %  %  Fab-mart IMS 1...J M x %  M V l, Edwin >**Ph< •MilAmbon*. ihri. Car PERSONAL fkt .111.1 if i ,.,..., ri-n m MM ... %  : *• .-i %  %  iitfsalf MVOMU* **" "** rla. €*>nUClli>S any dabl i HuniMr Haa.k toloori I mditM Cools* „ c PIMM* >1. or Coir A Co.. %  Il.,dwar UMa Apply in wr.Ua* ,ru rva*** Damages Suit rr 1 tfJM HI II SALES REAL ESTATE 1S4T Cheviot*! * %  %  I %  *1U II i LEVELAHD i i MUM. IK %  Roam ...i I hiI.r II--M1 b--i .lair* -nd """"l eom*i I . Nil -at,... oidi tn I loi ci.i.rliliiK' m*d b AMUin prrR MDMAM. C H M Curacao. K W 1 ilfl 1 Ml TWO rftiI IKI m" MM % %  •• %  any d.U oi dabla > < All Mac.nl H I h p **lai. •hauled ..r.d n-bo.l Oond %  an Appl Mff Apiilra. halloa I.OVT A N01O FlOO** %  •lurnl. Ad !" LOOT ,..• M *MiNo~... DO T*fl FlBdrr pi-.-rftu.-<' -ma •" •*•"< Op-m P< WhH, HAIL H M^^ lr HAPHK.IUM ||M <;' %  Kadlrai rrpolrrd. .X.IU-nl 4fc'h ll lr brlds* tabl<- • %  aodab futnlliitr Com. in and %  *•• -"-'"' %  %_ %  >*• FOH REKT HOUSES HOALOW brdroom >• Roo MM I .'TICM HUTC1Uft*W A PA ;iW l Sail*-". CIrn-IrXl) til i'| iKHCHroBI* M. t Mai'h Fhour I ijit:./'J hou* • %  li.'.-nn.-. Mod i i 1 II Pr.it '•rand-h. draolnf and dn fontract. , rfn* in *ie exaral'i. ,Thir ridim ... i. fopioyed to Ami a man Who had a plantation • him tu Dranc. %  ri.it.on Mould be 3*. Mr. MolUcy was put in to prove usual. commUaion H %  *' %  •xntrt. no one questioned He wa put in in caat Uatre IMIW a> '" '"e normal won. hclicvr Deane when hitold them that he did not employ De Abreu but m the course of conversation Uquestion of Uodsv aruac and he enquired after Lodge" Were all the others ,,r.d not Husbands and Oxnards. the plantation which I -<-ught ? ltd that there was no I that they had io puce. Over and hWl I"'"' ttivm . | ..Itc. the Dtitl rtw r efon UM .,f pdCd araa nothing to do with Do Abrcu. All he had to do WM to hunt about Barbados and du;I ,-ii.Miv who had a plani ceilain iae and In rtrtjii' uaiishe.i to sell. The i, wuuld obviously have -. been i*ughi In %  Soluiiors oirice. naniaVa Even if LV Abreu lied until he %  0 [AUS blue in the (ace. it had "otb%  itiK t<' •>•> with the case. All I..had to do was lo carry mity under the terms .•ulrarl. Misconduct meant mi'ii... ... In Carliile Hty M.roa llrnrlo'U %C, M..,on a-lh. Wolf. *v Bmanu.1 ( Ool ?.M-. aVh aa.W -t.tVhfl OTU-. u v Lad* Faancia. rh Praao?_ w i I. OS*. ML CaH ',.%  DBM Jtirw or KxCHAyei I I.I kBl MM HIBk i ahan Sl#M IT I I.. .11. r.i, ^ Co U | SHIPPING THURSDAY. FEBSVABV ^ 1932 NOTICES -I V. pi 71 %  • Pi at sr. p pionvond. from oi L a a Ho.ne. Ja* ,v VatmUnd. !" %  "> Clo*d<" Yachl Mulllna**. W "• 1 M la I loo r.lau. K" oir*a Uai> al L.. aUtaoali I !" *< u V .-...bber ID* u.1 q u a>U-. ior Si Lucia || s.,;..-.. %  un %  P| Triiurfad S g M.uliUm It-** lyt I) W ao..U (o( I net. Cap) Capt t UCAPA asaaaW H Mewfeaa. Banara tEarai Demand D-af CaMa CaMBi %  MAIL NOTICES i|.7? oTlnair M.U •' '• %  " %  ZBALAND UNI UMITKI. .11.1 uwi M TEKOA "S:'*1JLB5S Mb BB4 a*rtadoabout .iKfllknaGOVERNMENT NOTICES BOILERS Mi ": 2 M l HB. CORNISH llnlutHtoUr. 5 hl m dlm.Ur and „„,1 luel Unk,. .UO .pc.h..tr. ,< ,u.rc.. CM b. n .1 EvBTender! lo bo mbmilWd lo the llun".....M. on or b.lor. r.Wy u. Trbrunry. 1S2 ^Mcoa.^^'Co%  bova -.11 %  M -. OU-F. all .. In anracll' paily%  m. opan vvratda>< I iraa, lauitdn. i and alotaao loom Uitdm hilliimBam.A Co. Lid Dial M' OIJVHSA tfeaHal d*.IUnshouat fTrAtSS llrldCrlown. Tti. h" Sivanth D'' %  "' u n, d Kallciy. drawing and dlnlruj una1 brdfoomi ailihrn. mual conr.Hncn. Walrr in .talli-d lnapctli"i '• -PI" iho Trnonl. Mr.. I I day. .M.ept Rundav. from noon >o 4 MISC'KLLANKOL'S Aql'AWl'MI L*fo and amall. -II UM Empty of ilorMrd. ilh nan anfl ...i'. Ai"> aoano young BUnvra. I*lah> In. nh and olhrr Troplcat Fwh ArehH (IDC STRAW MATS Wllh A.n| a •*lor II M sack a KIM IMIRGHAIN Piaran Fawl — non 1*11.. 10 lb. lou and upaiMi l-r por lb. Phono IMT %  : 1 t B I'l 111 II \OTHIS dOOl MOHf luir I iu ro.m Apply Htm H;NHON r Hobrll. BJ .nd HAMii in Mill 3n tJOUBI—Two Wot. Mi.. gars r-r.'"^^^^:'; NOTUE %  %  el. will b# i .-rlocb noon n.iiiJi.d and iwrnl* dollar* .14 130. tiimim. pHM.Iil. in inonlhly .nilnlin of Thrar hut.rtrad and .!> dollar. i| A C aat ot-LiVlnd Womi* al IM yACA OI.4MNAR SCHOOL. DOMIMf X M VS1U1. NEW YORK SERVICE I. ARTIQAS" Mlled Hat F.bruarT .mw Bdoa .all. Sth March — IIT" E'doa llh March. 1BSI M.irch. l*U. NEW ORLTANS SERVICE Latin, and (2) Mathematics. ia i Bru u-oli. is SI 920 S HalATTThe post is pensionable. The salary scale is %  '. ., *i?olol2 400 A cost ofliving allowance of ten per saCvui^i Payable. Consideration would be given lo appointing Suable ?$5lS£ -t point, in the scale commensurate w.th their qualification and experience. J t5S~Ur&?-^rJSSS^ b .oc.1 ro.uU.lon. and p'roXon M mad. tor alnce low.rd. ovr "• v >"•"; hum on Hrrt appolilmrnl. Th omen-s paawto OP. fall appoint'JSTdl t. p..,.. a-. U Z lh.1 "I fa ..lo-' of Khool age. nol exceeding lour, .f Itiry accompaj him or loll h m wrSin'tielve month, from the date o. hi, Br.I ppni.mon 7 C.ndlttoni. of Service. The ofhe^r will be subject to I olor was in Ihe „„,„„„, n< | |oc 0 l General Orders. Applications statin, the .pplleM|-. am qiuhricaliqiii and !...;nut experience and indicating the earliest dale i.n which hi ussume'dut,, shoui.l b. addreed ,0 ^^K^xSllct"' Education Officer. 28.2.52—3n. CANADIAN SOtJTBMl'KD Ka-a af Bb

m. l Bl UK 41>S-4ii BalU Balifai Itlh Fabruanr Up l.l,r.i.r Uth Uarch J3rd Starch !' %  | Ai-ril Arrl... RarbaSai Hal Frbruarj 1th March Mm Marrh and April UM Mai ALCOA PLAKTsat" .. ALCOA PCCASC9' %  AI>COA PILaRIM• A TTAMCR A a-TtAMFR A BTXAUER Th.a v->aa.ta b*v llmitad paaMngcr accommodauoo. ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW TORE AND .l II cEBVTCE Al'l'l --H A OOSTA CO.. LTD-CANADIAN MBV1CE Did %  !HAbreu would M) GUI II Deane .igreed t pay him a agld that Deane found IV Abrcu was lalling vroni pike t waa not that he met 1U.V C.ill | Rex (..n toe did IUA lell him the -,, he could not have nail %  I living that l>e Abreihim .. wrong pries. It ( gftsr Deane had met A ho mill him certain things that Deane decided not to nav De Abreu his cvmnuailon. be pointed out. ,|xth "hen De Abreu | had known Ihe :..,' %  iivulgeti H Bu) -i u-l Roa %  "' thai he had told him Mte ,,i the plantation Mtfors thetith it w*i W* s 1 1 k, o* lu wh n that l* Abrei %  UM I iSn, S lr Then Hi* UTd'WP • '""' Attention is drawn 10 the Defence (Control pf Diog an.l I '..tent and Prop",etary Medicine Trices, Oidc, I9M No 1 ^" "ill b. ublished in the Ofllcial Gazelle of Monday 25th February, 1952 l Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of Glauber Salts'. "Virol" and B.F.I Powder" pro as follow.— UNIT OF SALE MAXIMUM P.ETAII PRICE Glauber Sail. IVF.l. Powder .. l-or. I. lb. Mtdiur. Largo Inull I^uge 01 .12 C IE 6 u TRANSllLMiiTIQUE Sailing* iitiiu Soutliamptwii to tiuadrloupe. Barbados. Trinidad, La Guaira. Curacao Martinique. JamakJ From Soulhaaaplon "COI.OMBIE" 18th March. 1952 DE ORASSE" 24th April. IMS2 LOLOMBIE" 8th May. Arrives Barbados 31st March, 1952 6th Mav. 1952 21st May. 1952 art mid the ItOYBCIi 'Not cjlhng at Gundcloupo SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EIROI'F From Barbados. Arrives Southampton COLOMBIE" Uth April. 1952 . 23rd April. 1932 DE GRASSE'' .... Ifth May. 1952 29th tfg • COLOMBIE" 1st June, 1952 13th June, 1952 'Sailing direct to Southampton FYFFES LINE T. S. S. GOLFITO will be arriving from Snuthampliii m Sunday. 2nd March and will be sailing Ihe same afternoon for Trinidad. There is ample M Class Accommodation available for Trinidad. WILKINSON & HAYNES (().. LID. K.W/A'//.'. VAV. FISHY BUSINESS You can obtain besf qualltv • • %  FISHING LINES A FISHING HOOKS CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. PIER HEAD BROAD STREET JUST TO \lt\TIU\A FEW ITEMS .\OWOPEM\G FENDER TAPE CELLULOID SHEETS CORK SHEETS FLEXIBLE RADIATOR HOSE GREASE GUNS OIL CANS REAR VIEW MIRRORS BATTERY CABLES BATTEBY HYDROMETERS BATTERY CHARGER BULBS HIGH PRESSURE AIR HOSE U HOT PATCHES AND VULCANIZING KITS SUCTION VALVE GRINDERS ENGINE VALVES—All Model. DECARBONIZING GASKETS SETS-All Model. GENERATOR ARMATURES—All Model. LODGE SPARK PLUGS VALVE GRINDING COMPOUND GASKET GOO fur Scaling JoiBll HOLTS AQUA-TECT for water proofing jnition Wire. RUBBING COMPOUND SIMONI7. KLEErtER AND WAX HOLTS WONDAR WAX mm CHAMOIS AND POLISHING CLOTHS LICENSE DIGITS AND PLATES ALL TYPES MECHANICS' TOOLS SAVE TIME. DIAL 426V FOR YOVR REOLIRt, MF.NTS, WE'LL SURELY HAVE IT" ECKSTEIN Dial 4269 — BROS. Bay Street ^V/.'-t-.'/.'.'.'.'..



PAGE 1

PACK TfcO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. FF.BRl ARYM_l32 CaJtib CaUinq I ORD ROW ALLAN. Cha %  and through Marl^nl..,ru evening by air H -II from AtkmM.ti F.i Id n. b% B.W.I.A., and Invfi later for Trinidad. He nputMd by im A D.< U COOsir. E p Mallinson Canadian General G ENERAL and Mi* Chart* mud.i %  ..... B) T<' \ lo spend a bollda) in ILutiados. at thr Mann%  Wakci* q .. bee n IHTH H, • dm MM %  Publii ^. boot yurev | ,. f, T.I. i' 1905 V Osgoodr H..II. lir•ervoo in Encland and World Uonad. in despatch) 11 lha i> s 11 In rwardi.i •' %  r \l r, ||i> %  daughter of ttia late 1 %  Col Fret White Thetr in Ottawa Back To Canada A m VIl U UtSHAJ IrtJ ii r Cowlay who had .11 Hi.rbadM, re%  % %  i hal Covrlaj IN m. Depart. %  %  %  this month and %  honk. St. Vincent Benuticulturiat M RS. JULIAN BAYNI> husband Is a Member of DM .1 in ST Vincent Hri.lher*. M Kbip i .. %  M ttu last week%  %  M> Bayw the lending beaunrulluriht in St. Vincent. Is a %  was lav; herr in I95n | spent l month. U.S. Special.* B it. RAYMOND TOMASSENK. Ear. Nose and Throat SpecaUat ..f Wheeling. West Virginia, i %  %  %  %  : %  .-II l,.IW I.., K vi-dcrday Trinidad %  %  %  monthl h. I Js ttayiiLL M Hot.: He WBF arenmpanied bv Mr* Tomassene. It's rhii Otjmp* (,< %  "< %  %  lua." Here Again M R AND MRS H I %  month* .'.idad on i) H W.I A Canadians A MONG (he pageant Bar! • : | i V V.' i' : %  Ottawa who will be ramaming tor about a month .. %  < ii Gordon Thai are all atav%  . Hotel To Be Married To-morrow M iss LI t v COBBY .,• Man •at among the passmSti arrtvUJ from Canada yesI.MI.I.. nMrnni by T.C she i to be man i iu Mr Glyne Moore, son „i Mi Hth Aieriie. Ballvll|e and the late Mr (I. R. S Moore. 1 %  > %  daughter f Mr. and Mrs. If. U Cure, of H.tll.-y. Moiltraall U %  former TCA BstwaTdasa. At one tim. she use-i to fly on Tr.\ tic routes but recently had been flying on the Montreal-l-oiuloti Two Changes T WO chansein fort] nlhnsji nf the s.s <;itiu> Irom Harbados have I i notmcad c^ihu i* now scheduled km on lat d of Mui April :.iul I2lh June Instead of Ml June. 1952. III! I,.'-' %  Sunday, March tod Iron Southampton. Two Weeks A -pending .ibout two I] here. Mi. Noet h ham of KiriL Mondaj night 1 ad> Rodne* Visited Parents and Sister R MNG lo Canada vesterda> by T.C.A. after spending a short holiday with hi" Prof. J. S. Dash. O 1)1. and Mrs. Dash and hi* si b i Mi M P. Mrrrick. was Mr. Philip c-mpanied by his I Michael and Stephen. Ii attached to Head Hank of Montreal. Four T.C.A. OfficM. F OUR T.C.A. Officials flew In by T.C.A. yesterday on a short visit They are. Mr Mike Mildred. Regional Puhllr Relstioni Montreal, who came in 111.tn Bermuda, Mr. A Loke. ('ommiinlr-f -r>* Supervisor. T-OA.*! Allantic Region who ar•i Montreal; Mr. Jack Scotf, T.c A Korea itupe-ior and Vanderlinden. Supeir of Matntenanee. T.C.A.'s Ragtnri. Mi Lake, Mr Scott and Mr. vanderlinden are guevts at the MarhM lintel Mr Scott and Mr. VanaerUndmn who are on an iniived from Rer%  nuda. Talking Point The hesi Imr l< h-* sffsO 'nakei I'll nna l s t ll amouni of li/tnp BO M n-au—Samuel Butler. Bears Can't Attend School —Nrither Can Cow*. Coats or Birds— li> MAl HOI Tl D01 UM Kadnsd Bear aaMl i 1-e.n to whooI Aren't to go to' i! m can 1 l*arn la r#ad and write gotosehatir* Bat iviriaaa TeH.iy spoka to si aofe Sis heud sad -i.id that there Bhaoks for Teddy Bear.. I '•ScK.sr.li are „ n lt fsr psspie." i ral T.n ih* tin MII)*I th t.. ( -ehosln far eflU •aid Mary-Jane ; Tln-ie artn'i %  raa>dall N'or." added Mr. Punch. ••; J or goatn or xinHhoppers tar honi or liters t-phants." Or for birds." said the Cw Or for alanu and flower.,* %  Oranium, waving her I**)., "Something.'' >nid Teddy Inall THE WINDSOR INCOME Duke Seeks A Sew Settlement LT.Wy m\ I, Ik. ,k„oMi imr, Hilntlai. .I,-J!"J.".!*''T'. l '' l .'*'f*". h '"' uth *• *•* b n Uil'Uni f. 101 MM .ihl M h. Ho !" %  ,(, „ ] 0n „„,. ••,,„ ,,„ ^ lh In HI. CM— Ho TMldjr Ml vriy .|||t in Mh.i,Trtdyr%  U Thirty. -All o( Ml" %  >...r „t Ih. ,,|.j ,.„„,. iMKMM ,, "", """'' • !" %  *• %  !!— i.l %  Inily h. M I klio.'' A '"' %  "• •' • '•" ""••" ld B, tkl. ii.., ...ryon. ,1M |„ '• P ""'" IM playroom had fourolt.r, Hha.t Kanl Mnlllnc *'*..' I IL££ M 1 b "'" h '' 'TnMxlnpl.niilliir •<•. T> all, OT.I araui U'Wky do .. har. to M-a.l and wril. ay popl do' Wo'll read and in oor own way. W.11 nab. had "And I know J-.tl wha In \ rr'. fci.' "tan our own ach.iot I" Kwyon* arn-rd It wo. a won d-rtul Idra onl. Ih., all ,h.„l ilic-ii hMidi again -Why. wiiar. ih. m.ii,,!ii.l.d TVd.lv. "Who'll U th. laachvir Otaml Tin. "Whal nod arhaal without a l.arh-l f" I dnn'l know." %  ... op our own way lo road and write and thai', what w."ll teach our-elrfa In our own achool." Thrn rv.ryone ela. wond.r.d II pcrhap. lldy'. Ida waan't food "Maybe," .aid Teddy, "that', how p-'ople learned to rend and write. !•-' I mean, lone, long ago. when !" ", I'le llr.l Marled to ,o t„ Khool. UM In .mind cheeifnl -|'|| 1V .'|| „, „„ c |,, ,„ d .i.i B.B.CL Radio Programme OAV. rFMKI-MlY a. ISU 11 JO a m Cr/% The Mr*.. I M IS Ml — i* .'-. Ti .Cm 11 Mat 4 M Ii m Th no.ii SMVl... i p m %  i h. i Buainatu 1 41 p vi-..'.m. Hrcnl. :> •> %  p r 1% p n. %  •rhyiiMi, • %  %  td • Mam it* %  I'l> and P rarstti -'* %  The N*w 7 IB P m Nw Anal kH Billaln 1 U t< l-T' to think some more." So he uit quietly In hit corner, thinking and thinking, until st ini. after a ery |..ng tlnie. as an noaneed: "I hnow'" •Whonid everyone. Par th> time they hadn't fiii)-oitrn whal *•* %  i ting sboat, rrea gel pencili and mske mark* erery different work we know. And then wril study the marks . and that'* how well all teach aaraatvaa, and thst'n how well all learn." And Ted.ly. the Stuffed Bear, eeoas he did ao wsnt to L i assets, in M RMIO N-.irrl. I N p HI Rf. pa'-h I 41 p in Compoaer of the Week • a pn Ruin I'p The Curia in. 10 M p m The Nrv... 10 In p n I l i Ediionaia. ID II p m A QOOB Jok 10 SS pm The l^>l Ciin.nir-r "I Har BY THE WAY ... a, B chco m b e r A MAN in g field .mil iricd t„ mjlk it said he though' thj llw official. "Why on eoilh -Jioulu I „ thinking ..f .>y-^wn %  • asked Human. "Well, ymi Ihnn.lit fOUl CMt snid the tflici.ii ''*•'> onl t... ot %¡ M in in NOW T. -11 pjg ih;it if there Is a g' in the > oat I can eat goats in Fcbruni\ u, ,], -vifietiiiy talking .it crosB-puinoses," vouchsafed the ..rtlci.it %  I • rradiiooe: \... .i t expect us to beH* M'M-lf: NO. htri.ilK Q| SM m$*—l9S2. FlormUf ^VNK uf the ninh'i'Kb | noticed Vy fimn n iiwil | t -t of ivnlin arics occuning this yea. rai the restaurant Sorg in the Place d i Vloux M. ,n Btrai %  bourg. The moownl rou etiti-i UM Uous room you breathe rn air of established conlentin.n-. Thorp In n. loud tabbls "' vnii-e .. .. tilon ihe e-.. the fo.xi and the wino I en movu quleU) about then ben%  Bcenl taak, Ttiars Ii n sbnoaphert Into nant "t trntar*, Bvan 'inhurried, and the U.e boa> is nourtown of the (aM should be ersptg an llrprl. if English people em MUI allowed to d, I liopitn return U' I Sorg some . U M> i-x/H'rii-nriA BUSINESS man has l>eei. %  .. nti tin ti'i" I %  Ay and huntdinun, but j tn tt> in BtartW the man who i> Ing then by %  ..iid M'lf-.-.inlidence I ImM young man who. when asked for repUe s %  i il>. "Wickinin.i r In a Kli;nii um I,, i up-factory. greanhou i %  %  at Codntt and RIM I archrteet Clcrniont-aVrr,in(l %  I l(-lt I"'.,'In ami'enouM JI Cadla, f-ettor and Internal srtrer ai Har%  nti. pubUetty managei tm Bloodstone i Dog FiKKta." The executive wns so imprcs*ed saying you tne.1 to get out of the way. Rod '..i re therefore a paaer-b] The amrwer is thai >' Bat in Rupert and the Pine OgreVox mm Gill*. |arpi *ete Kupen. Thaa, qmt urublr %  psah, he lumi .ind BMW %  nahSBg hi. he.,i bewlldrrnttiu. tut ihr firti || hu (potifd thr and h* Irapt (0Jt.l, |h. % %  ,. Nutwood lo 1.1 s... , i dial \ l>e i 'I V .in Caribbean territories if the !. .I mi seven tables foi more th.iti six hmit tn decide Ine hrst round results. Among tho:e hniH-koi out anu v.iit'r Jones, a West Indian mmhematit" -.tuden' He snld nftfrwards. 'Next to cricktl the West Indians prefer tabl? tennis. I'm afraid I've let my cnuntiy down sadly." Favouritr fr the singles is 26 year old Vietnamese. Luu-Thahh-Dukh. BT EPHHAIM llll'K \-III T HE Duke of Winder's income is being discussed among poli t i ci ans "f both parMaa, unofllclaliy rf course, as yet. King George VI made him an allowance of £25.000 which cease* with his death. It is possible that Queen Klmbeth will continue this as a purely tr.miK ifTair, hot It is believed that the Duke is anxleu* for a more 'table arrangement It n thought that such an ar..mgement was one of the matter' talked about when he visited the Prime Minuter at 10. Downing-* treet two weeks ago. The obvious course is to Incorporate the payment in the Bill dealing with Royal Family finances which • %  .•ill shortly be pre•ented to Parliament. A Men's Affair *T*HKHE n comment on the %  absence of women—othci than loyal mourners—from the funeral procession. Countess of Erroll. who m hereditary Lord High Cosislablt* of Scotland ranks first after the Royal Family In Scotland, w..not Invited. Not one of the women's services or social organisations was represented. laady Reading, founder of the Women's Voluntary Service, said to me: "I was told they had decided not to include women and 1 agreed. Funerals belong to men and the nearest women relatives." School for Charles ? | TNl.IKK previous heirs, who *-* were educated privately in their early years, Prince Chirles %  nay go to school. His father has alwa*.< Charles to go to his old '.', rdonstoun. near Elgin. And Queen Elizabeth lined to agree. Other members of the family.! including Ihe Queen Mother, preferred Eton or Harrow, If any .chool at all. Now Prince Charles is first in line of succession his schoo.in,' must tend to become a State ccn[ cern rather than a purely domestic affair. Against the viosvs of those who favour private education, there is a strong argument for some school association with his future, subjects. Kings 'At HontsV /"\NK by one the royal mourners *-* are departing this week-end from Claridge's. Never before have so many royal heads been gathered In one hotel. At times the fawn-earpeted foyer became a cosmopolitan Court. Thera, beneath the huge crystal chandelier. Lady Lucas curtsied tow to King Gustav and reminded him that she entertained his father when he visited Britain. There, also. Don Juan, the .Spanish Pretender, twice kissed the hands of girls presented to him, and King Paul of Greece shook hands with members of the staff. Sweden's King Gustnv escorted Norway's King Haakon and Earl Mountbatten to the enfrinr.* .tfter fiey had called on hUn. He relaxes after lunch with n kJiti* of canstla. On the plane to London two wots were reversed so he could have a canasta foursome. Wronu Monarch W HEN Denmark's King Fredi rll and Queen I. re expected everyone In the foyer from manager to page boy was on the alert. A bell rang. atgMOIing the arrival of a VXP, akd a Danlah equerry hurrlrd fvrarard. But instead of King Freder.K Ex-King Peter ind Queen came through the revolving doors They were 'aken up in the lift and, as the bell rang again. MM manager -ignalled for the lift t" hurry down. It rammed just in time for the Danish couple Top Hat Wanted P*OB the funeral Queen Alexsti%  T dra"wore a Paris-made black woollen drew under n l>ie,i lamb eoat. She had three row. nf pearls and pearl earrings Over the black uniform of an admiral of the Yugoslav Navy, King Peter wore a greatcoat which arrived from New York by plane and was pressed by a Savile-row tailor. From him King Peter ordered > morning coat and top hat Holland's Bloom O UKEN JULIANA hurried from her car to her suite, but reappeared a few minutes later to drive to Buckingham Palace. The queen brought her own wreath and or.e from Ex-Queen Wilbelmina. made up of Dutch Uoom* Her mourning cloth' ,r.-de to Holland, lor she believe. Jn encouraging national trade. Forgotten Sword D FNMAHK S royal couple art due to visit London again in s Fredenk e/ill %  a Danish church. Then he will sail In his yacht Dannebrcg to Greenland His catisin. Prince Axel, left hi' ceremonial sword in the plane *nt on to the hotel. fttm Festival CANNES. Feb M The Fifth international lUm festival will he held here from April 23 to May 10 with 18 countries participating the organisation. announced Tuesday Countries taking part will be Argentina. Canada, Germany. Britain. France. Greece, India, Italy. Luxembourg. Cuba, Mexico. Norway. Poland. Sanr Switzerland, Union of South Afr>~a and Yugosla\ia. IM Japan are also expected later but has not yet given an official replv. — v.r. &f * 1 XI* OMX 1X0. I# f It 1 II 1st c?„ /-J ., BVKHtHll S PI 4/4 ANOTHER HBOC IlllAL SITO) WONDER IN Till: CARIBBEAN 1 WITH DORIS DAY GORDON MRAE' My-eaut.ru! DOhea 1 Bay-esa-utitui WARMER BROS. ...%  ,..TECHNICOLOR IROM AI PLAZA -"*— WABNrn L "" HKOV m^m^mmmJ^^^^^m^nn^^^r^'^ r '^'.-.'.'.^'^\' r ^' f ','.',',',-.-. tfP GLOBE ^W** mm ' %  * a.r Ifc e Ba-%1 %•>•..* ISstv 5.110 and 8.30 p.m. M Sunday R00DAL THEATRES EiMPIRE TOOAl l—l • SB.*. I W ••> i t • a B.M •TBS Bt'K atTS AT DA.WNlMrodue n* Bally PAIW Philip SI1AWS EXTRA KISIUII. 'NOSINU TUB SI NBBAI. or 1IIS I.All' KINI. oi'KMNd rm *ni TNI riottiii van HErtJs brsttnM KIMcoacora snomi Y nn i MH %  v. NO" I>.ivlil Niv.n. 1 ,l..l Film OLYMPIC TODAt '"-I., la. B IK IteSy LAMAJOI maraAMaa WOMAN ANI) 'MA HI IV CHAI1.I-. In MONSITt'B VBBDOI'X Dial 4220 ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS BIUKH CURIOS ATi 7ENDIMOH. 8EDAB. JOYFRIAB V ABTIBTIOAB OURIOSIDADnS. TRA rPOB DB I>A INDIA CHINA • EJIPTO THANI'S Pr. Wn. Hry. St., Dial S44M YOUR SHOE STORES IQ-DATS NEWS FLASH FASTER CARDS MOTHERS DAY CARDS ......i. I.,),.. E .,ii,h -s...i.h '.v,w,vvV/ BOXY i4.i UM s BOa—i as k S.W 'i.-.as.a. Withm Cttitith Jtmifi in %  'OMlf I'PON A DBEAJS" -nd "ail NNOlltrB-H HIII-II with Jack Win* Jane HUlow BXTHA M H-KIM .HIIWI,,,, rvNBBAL Or IHB I.ATB KIN). Tooar aractAL a i m EZ easTC OP THB P*.AIXsSAT. Bs*lal MU-.IW SB** UIIOIJ; KSJIIAI. "MANBt'NT •* MtBTVar auuiBROYAL I-.T I— %  s... 4.SB I li Oa-onw BANDKn In %  xrtmgDatui rrasAW avilh %  StANOSOT TONE A Memorable Cast In The Dramatic f'vstery Of The Year AmmtMl Savtata COTTEN STANWYCK A CLOAK LOUIS CALHERN LESLIE CARON Ul'l \l\l. TO-IHY 1.1.7 A Jl.iu ,,.. FRIDAY 2.30 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. and Continuing DAILY 4.45 c 8.10 p.m. *N ONE STRANGE NIGHT . she met both love...end MURDER! IDA LUPINO ROBERT RYAN OHDAHGlkM GROW 1*1 4 # 4 .novas, a~ %  -/maT_/m —Ui ..,, t tl[ I



PAGE 1

r.u.i K.I u BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. FEBRfARY BARBADOS *.—_i— AmjM&TE West Indian Federation Cuba 9 s Sugar Thur*da>. February 28, 1952 \o iirniM i io\ IN a parly political broadcast last Saturday Mr Attlee. Lnckr of Her Majesty* opposition m the House of Commons said that "an active opposition is an essential part of our system." In Barbados where the Bushe experiment operates on a so-called party basis an active opposition is impossible because ol the overwhelming majority of one party and the fragmentation of what is called the opposition into four electors, two Independents and two Congress. The Bushe experiment has ended, as was earlier predicted, in the destruction of the party system. Our parliamentary system which is based on the English parliamentary system lacks the one tfttrjg needful that makes the BlgUafa system work—an active opposition The House of Assembly met on Tuesday for the eleventh time since the new session n Dacaanber lath. IML During than meetings nothing has been said or done by any of the eight "opposition" members which could be interpreted as evi! a polity There has been in the I mbly opposition in the sense that %  peakera fr?m all parties have criticised members of the Executive Committee and have attacked in debate proposals and resolutions introduced by them. Mr. A. F,. S. Lewis, especially and on occasions Mr Barrow and Mr. Talma have contributed to debate certain statements which could not be interpreted as favourable to the arguments put forward by protagonists of the government. On one occasion Mr. Lewis showed his independr, (.• of the party by voting with R avail Mr. Talma VOwd %  "st his party. On moat occasions however, labour members who disat'ree with measures championed by motnbe i B of the Executive Committea refrain from carrying their dislike to the extreme of voting against their own party. But this has happened in this session more than once, On the other hand, all members of the Electors 1 Association landing knowledge possessed by Mr. J. H. I Wilkinson in all matters affecting Barbados' economy was completely overlooked and ignored by electors who bluntly and recklessly displayed what little interest they have in matters which so vitally concern their present and future standards of living. in Greet Britain on the other hand not only does Mr. Attlee as leader of Her Majesty's apportion recognise "that any government would have had to introduce unpopular nuasures" but ex-Labour Ministers like |fr James Griffith, form* Seen it* for the Colonies, and Mr. Robeni have been recently warning worker.^ in Soutl • i>ewhere in England that industrial disputes fomented for political reeaotU sabotage the Trade Union movement, play into the hands of the Hi:Ian impel i ..lists and endanger their own standards of living. In Barbados, on the other hand, visitors to the House of Assembly cannot fail to Conclude When they* listen to speakers of the so-called "opposition." that their real objection to the party in |*>wer is not that they turn a blind eve to evils which must be remedied bui thai they do not go fast enough down the rued which leads to Utopia H they continue like this parliamentary government in Barbados will become no more than "rubber stamping" interrupted by firsts 0 f hot air. 0) From Par I by a Commuter i-ompoacd of representaUve* ,( all •• %  les concerned. But tfc* ins Closer Asao) themselves recognised that much further work ... baOBN UM practical effect* of their recommiavtationi aould >•" fully %  —cw d. Some Government'have already started a detailed examination of theCommittee's proposals and I presume that the remainingGovernment* will wish lo undertake similar studies in advance of the Conference Secondly, it is already dear that proposals will be put forward for modification of -nmr of mittee's recommendations, and it Is desirable thai all the Governments concerned should have. adequate time t study such proposals in advance of the Conference. Thirdly. I not,that little progress has so far been made by Governments in considering the report of the M:icLagan Commission. A Customs Union seems to be an essential oovcOerj '' political fedrrnt on, and |Qff ihi reason I should doubt the wisdom of holding a general conference on federation unless Government* had already studied the report of the Mac Lagan Commission and had reached broad conclusions 4. My present vie*, therefore. . th..t it would not lie advisable to hold the London Conference until Governments had been able(i) to complete their study of the financial and other implications of the Ranee Report, ift. collate and present the view* of c many Governments on the diverse and technical subjects eovend by these two reports. I fuggeit that it would be to the general convenience of West Indian Governments to make use for this purpose of the facilities lor regional co-ordination (iffcrded ij> \i„. rjavatoi irganisalion: ;i and Welfare could be invited to preside over a committee of offli lall nominated by all the QOV' %  would '. em vtr* ttoslrahle that wherever lim Financial Secretaries. or corresponding officer*, -hmild HI Hits committee This MOunlttM would be expected to present to their Governments .ind the Colonial Office, at least one ninnth in advance or • %  fixed for the opening .,f the I '(inference, a comprehensive statement of the views mmanisiHom of Ooratv i i nt;; mi tMfth reports. I should emphasise that I do run propose thai this official committee should deal with any questions of poUej Its tUDtUO |o collate the eOBsl %  i nasals of the variou. Governments so as •< %  the wor* of %  fcrence 8. I should be grateful if you would inform m possible, of it., MOWS of your nt on the*,Miggntn>ns T The resolution (wased by thg Jamaica House of Representatives on 14th Auguv. last implied Uiat the purpose of 'he proposed m London would be lo undertake "close consideration i.ancial jNfvts gf fedIn my v'v, the objectne of the Conference should in fact be much wider. I suggest that it should seek to reach in a federal scheme, tgfl • onaMr A Mart lo be made with the complex draft inn the nawossary constitutional in%  druments. As 1 said above, the task of the Conference will be gTMU} l.uilitared by the report of the Standing (ommlttee on Cloaar Aaaociatlead loounw that it will le general! agreed that .of the %  '•nference Is to work out II detailed plan on the basis of the Committee's report and not t. re-examine afresh the varioualternative vernrnent whose merits and dements in ... the Wet Indies the *.may be pr> have exhaustively fet lied 8. For practical reasons. It would gel number of delegates to the Conference should be kept as low as possible conatstamt with adequate representation of opinion in the various territories 1 should welcome your early opinion whether representation on this %  cession should be n the sam* basis as for th at the London ferrnre by an Ohserver .1 \'\vs I i-oiii llrifaiiii it% ii.win TI:MI'LF ROBIKI' I A >N1X>N. The besl news of the wnk M the end of Identity Cards. I wppose they were not PfUcuUirtj i l noxious pieces of pasteboard, but It was what ihe> stood n.i that *eemed irksome. And they were a little absurd. The stale gave every baby the present of a card inscribed with name and birthday—In case it should forget. t h;,r H : to be recorded The i-udwen introduced in the hurtiod legislaticn of 11139 with the idea that they would Lall for wartime only i> MM tuna UM War i i.ne-l the hureiucr.it had tagged so many burdens on the grey i.mls that they would nut let the cards go. Health services Ond Post Ofllce clerks asked for Iho cards: Ihe police found them convenient. They could always i k evarj motorist perfcina In the wiong place to show his card. The theory was that Identity cards mnk" Ineamy difflcul'. But actually loe rates for bigamous marriage have risen since the war— as one of our nationalist humurist* \.v nothing will keep a British bigamist back. Accidents Will Happen I have been reading a report— a verv solid official document— by Mis Majesty's Inspector of Factories—-and I have found It fvicinaling. It discusses the various kinds of accidents that happen in Britain's fietortes—and all kinds of other matters ron%  with life in industry. For people who work In offices, the hf. : UM f.ntmv is like studying a foreign country. Here are some of the aspects of the everyday life of the British industrial worker thai most struck me Win A asked iibout evening work, on the shift system, many said "It Is as good as going to the pictures." They liked ;he crning shift because they could be about Ihe bouse all Ihe day, gad look slier their gardens before coming in to work In the i veiling Their wives reported that they did not like it. The British industrial worker oartni goggles to protect %  %  were higher than the> should be. Workers %  ;-. exaggerate the irritation of Mi r..n idenbj In factories happen toward the end of the morning, and tfaun l.de in U noon—lh. | lime is between tour and live m uie oveDiBtfThe worst accidents happen then duO %  and MM of the na "i>s Is thni ofton aUottad lo atria ond JPOUUM who have to clean moving %  Atomic energy has added a new chapter to safety ragBlolloni Many lirms In Britain now use %  toriuc bTO-produeu racuuui) bo carry out X-Ray examinations of motel p.ots. Th* mam procouUorj is not to keep the same workers always on the )ob exposed eonUnuall i > small doses of gammaihe same as u lion from atomic bom!' I i With the doparturo of ihe last .nid the lost special rcUva DM dapartmook of •h< f'oM-iwn Ofllce that looks after earamonial bi breathing a sigh of iclief. Many people %  akcd howIt was decided which order the foreign Kings and Statesmen sluiuld n.mh in 1 hive the programme in front of me. nnd I have UsUJ questions. There do not seem lo be many rtl %  %  r Sl ill were arrungetl with the Kings first and the P afterwards. But there were cxeaptlons to this. The •ktorl] President Vinei-nl Auriol of France (who must have found the two-and-a-half BUM walk a U before the young King of Ir.iq. Rilme Ministers, ond other %  podal diplomatic representalives were ptaoad bn order bn accordoeeo wtth the Mnlorrtj of ttMtr Ambassador In London. That is why Mi Doan Achesyn was alinovl at the hack -his Ambassador. Mr Glftard. is ;1 comparative newcomer lo London. Bu' there were in flMfTato. Three centuries ggO there used lo be lights. In 1881 the French and Spanish Ambassadors went to a procession armoured for uu Irmj Voice Of i; %  r the world they baMB lo the B.B.C. If it is true, then ell the world should be interistcil m Iho cum to ihe BBC. Broadcasting that are %  Kress. Since the war has covered Ihe world Al well M the General Overseas whsOB is intended for :, Commonwealth, thenregular programmes rod Si.i* %  i n Persian ind Indonesian, m Portut Spanish—as well as in the more familiar European Last year, as a result of the budget economies, the M B C -as held down to a slightly oxpendlturo for n. overse a s and European offerings. nil is that whole services %  closing. Nobody has ever quite estimated how many listen Th,. Hlic i is sometimes Main figures. Occasionally write -in I lUlMMllllhw h-ne revealed remarkably big nddlODeM i-iituiilarly behind the iron Curtain. I remember having lunch with %  friend in Prague, in a block of flats i n ihe middle of the city I rear after the Communists took i-ver there In the middle of tho daj Iho BBC's Bulletin's—even in English—could actually he heard from several windows. I] nobody seemed to care • as everyone listened to the BBC. In other countries—friendly countries like Italy with their own free news services—It more difficult to prove many listeners turned to the B.B.C The Organization of Listeners Research tried to gel an Italian market research inquiry Arm to lest the Italian listening public But I suspect the Ilaltatis. with their usual amiable feelings, putt I rather friendly figure to tho BBC. Now the Voice of Britain will be cut down while another Voice goes on shouting—end Moscow Radio beams its takes widely. A victory 'or Gown over Town The University has won. Tha %  8 win not be exMBdod l" nun tt.. new of the famous dreaming spires. Ol It III AIM IIS SAY: ,1 Clvrk Rrplivs To The Editor. The Advocate.— SIR.—I read what "Shopper" had to say about clerks, in Friday's Atvecaie and U 1 Ml •< clerk I fell thai I should answer. I agree with "Shopper" that some clerks al • very slow* and are not llataraouM in their trork but that does not mean that all clerks should !* %  thought of as nne, it is true that in some leading stores when vou go to purchase anything the clerk* do not come forward lo you to MO OhHal you require, if you never ask for what you want I doubt if they will ask vou But, for all tha a clerk has to eat the same u the shopper, and she has to drest NnagUy since waste you .••>< %  nark not go to work ajiyhoff, say for instance, a he <,inuot afford to buy too many in she buys six good dresses u he kBOWt Baa has to look her best in that kind of work. The Itirpper has 12 dresses say. (twke as many as the clerk) but 0 had Kind .if dresses? Cheap muyli. when the shopper dresses to go i | UMrB in one or haw bvolve i I I maybe her l>est naturally the clerks look hetler dressed than she does. Why root take | hint from the well-dressed clerks and buy good drosses Instead of %  quantity that .ire of no account, in that way there will 1* no hard feelings. The clerks any cheaper than the Utey have lo pay the same price. we i i.-ik i annol my arhen wa %  .. we will pay you your price for UM gruc'ri**. we have to pay the same as you. A clerk's job is hard.—standing I run 8 III 4 p.m. with the exception of breakfast horn. Docn think it U hard on u and we dev. Ihsl the King was lo\-ed for his great sei' we also know thai he we Kmg aad he selfish like Ihu i iH". Without the doluu %  •'Shopper.' l^rt BM lb of God grind i DISGUSTED CLUX // %  .-' Ctofj fur Dmynih Hi: UM i %  ponuentd" -pi'-ideiu" for Ihe urgent need of I Boys' Club tor Dayr H %  Sl Oajh fvarj i B| leliglously beof 5 to around 10 O'clock .Ming men. i mil even smalt children lather Bbout the road and do nuke UM conei ivable annoyance. r them do BOt tv> vicinity. Inmost A 1th) expr* ilons to the -ig on top of the pipe which encl %  mmoda' %  %  Offer To Egypt CAIRO, Cuba has offered to sell Egypt 50.000 tons of refined sugar to help relieve Egypt's shortafii. The offer was made by the Cuban Minister in Cairo, Sr. Louis Dalmagro, to the i Egyptian Premier. Ah Maher P.isha. who sai'l he would consider it. A Cuban Legation official said that the price Cuba suggested was about £ 53 Us. per ten. c.i.f, Alexandria. Payment would be as in dollars. The Cuban offer confirms with Maher Pasha's previously-announced policy • ;ht (passenger or freight with an indica Una of the number of passengers and Ion nage.) MURE SCOUT JAMBOREES LONDON, Following upon the First Caribbean Boy Scout Jamboree, more jamborees arealready being planned in Australia and Britain. The j Australian jamboree, for Scouls in the Pacific area, will be held at the end of December this year near Sydney, New South Wales. A World Jamboree is proposed for Britain %  n 1957, to honour Ihe anniversary of the birth of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout movement on February 22, 1857. The jamboree would also commemorate tha golden jubilee of Ihe movement, which was; started in 1907. COMMONWEALTH FINANCE MEETINGS CONCLUDED LONDON, Two "Working Parties" set up by tha Conference of Commonwealth Finance Ministers in London in January have now completed first series of meetings and have summitted interim reports for Ihe consideration ol Commonwealth Governments. It is expected thst each party will resume its meetings in a few months' time. One group, under the chairmanship of the Minister of State for Economio Affairs, has ban considering the question of convertibility of sterling and related problems. Tho other, under Ihe chairmanship of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Commonwealth Relations, has been considering ihe question nf development SWEETS RATION CUT IN UK. LONDON, Cuts in sugar allocations to U.K. manufacturara and reductions in their private imports of unrationed sweetening materials %  HI inevitably result in a drop in the sweets ration shortly, according to the Ministry of Food, in London. Output of chocolate and sugar confectionery is already being cut, but these cuta have i ken full effect on supplies and the mtion will be maintained at its pr esen t level he the time being. Before long, however, there is likely to be a 25 per cent cut in the ration.-B.CP. u tn the walls to avoid nri'.dcnts. it ean better l* mii.inncd than explained. Tho. district U m clone to the HBeUtnas main %  hin easy reach to the BUM. lip-t .-dale Hotels : : %  %  i-iaces past %  %  k B| in dnvIna. This ruwd also lead* lo tha i j Oolf dub What impression* ..flairs? in this area are %  i.iii or large degree; cm ihey be asked to lolcrntc such for the sake of a lew. who. If ind lien are thp first to get h fhh i-esi.ir retJ Until sriU sugjte-i placing irp many who hav.e naver and may never Bean if it meant utdr detth, will be aetn or I i K(-. till it-e is taken. 1 think the !*•;, | Ue-it. ma |hn district a forteaiti r of St. Matthias o the present -•"•: %  Sl I.;iwrcnre and oCirr member* Of their staft who altem.itlvelv could give a peep i n or may be ii!.' <.f their paat pupil*, who although not still hoys, may be Btven an opportunity to develop into better dtlttna, ANOTHRK RF-RIDRNT tffalth Ckmtm To ihe Edttvr. The Advocate; 'MX vear conand these Centres are urgently required. pflattiCO VALOR 2 3 BURNER OIL STOVES Also Single Burner Stoves and Spare Parts for all makes. C S. PITCHER & CO. tttft^^a&J art' itttuhfrom MOM. VMM I l.l.\E.\S III Mil III. • ii \imm ii & ALL WOOL t.XHAltlllMS in Popular Slnul.s DA COSIA & CO. LTD. Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR Qr Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents SELECT NOW Leg Hams (Whole or cut. !>. % %  rb I th tin Danish Ham* 4 lb tin I'reward Ham* 3 lb (in Danish Hants 6 lh tin I inn til-mi 1 fb Un Ham Roll Danish 16 CM. Cocktail HatuMea Danish B oi. f'orkUII Saoaaga Macaroni—Ifi as Pfcg. Carr'a Sweet BlsculU per i fb rkg S1.25 S7.O0 S3-KH $4.30 S4.aa ,?o S105 4* .S9 .44 FOR THE RACES Carr's Cream Craa> • era —per Un $1.61 JAR Sandwich Bread .la. ta. M EXTRA HPECIAL8 :: . Magnet Pema. . I..i innPaste Cook a Paste Baby's KU*atnrd Foods 30 os. Un Green Vale .. 2 lb Un Pig Jam 54 Pineapple ru.li 14 Nandwlrh Relish . .U 2 lb Un Purple Grapaa l-alian Tomato Paste . Eanbaaay Ciga. of .48 Slln In tins .41 %  •hone GODDARDS w. Ilrlivrr I




Toba ae



iI seem



2 eT nnn

ESTABLISHED 1895







THURSDAY, FEBRU

ARY 28, 1952

Adworat











PRICE : FIVE CENTS



W.L FEDERATION FOR TALKS IN LONDON

After Colonies Have Given
Final Study To Report |

THE FOLLOWING despatch has been received from~
the Secretary of State for the Colonies :—

Sir,

You will recall that, in September last, my predeces-|
sor sent a message to the Governor of Jamaica in which |

he welcomed the proposal ‘contained in resolutions, lately
passed by the Jamaica Legislative Council and House of
Representatives, that a conference on West Indian federa-
tion should be held in London as soon as this could con-

veniently be arranged.

2. It appears, from subsequent
informal consultations that this
proposal is acceptable to the
Governments of those Colonies
whose Legislatures have accepted
federation in principle as the
result of their consideration of
the recommendations made in the
report of the Standing Closer
Association Committee. That re-
port has now been discussed by
the Legislatures concerned, with
the exception of those of British
Honduras and of, Barbados, where
it has been accepted in principle
by the House of Assembly, but
has yet to come before the Legis-
lative Council. In British Guiana,
the Legislative Council voted by
a majority against acceptance of
the Committee’s proposals; and it

may accordingly be necessary for,

further consideration to proceed
on the supposition that any
federal arrangements would not
include that territory, at all events
at the outset. On the assumption,
however, that the Legislative
Council in Barbados will endorse
the views of the House of Assem-
bly, I take it that it will be gen-
erally desired that I should now
proceed with making the arronge-
ments for a Conference in Lon-
don at the earliest convenient
date. The position of British
Honduras must be determined in
the light of whatever decision is

reached by the Legislative Coun-'!

cil of that Colony. when the
report is debated. I hope that

it will be possible for this step,

Stabbed Woman’s

to be taken in the near future.

3. I understand that it would
not in any event be practicable
to convene a fully representative
gathering before June next, since
many of those concerned will be
occupied until then with busdget-
ary and other urgent business in
their own Legistetures. “ft there
is a general wish to hold the
Conference ,in June, I shall be
very glad to make the necessary
arrangements. Before, however,
a date is finally settled, there are
certain points which seem to call
for some further consideration.
It is the common experience that
the success of any conference
depends very largely on the
extent to which the ground has
been prepared in advance, and
I think that this consideration is
likely to prove particularly rele-
vant to a conference concerned
with the highly intricate and
far-reaching problems raised by
the project for West Indian
federation. I recognise, of course.
that the Conference will be for-
tunate in having before them the
broad outlines of a federal plan

@ On Page 4



THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of cbtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, “the
Advocate have arranged fo1
a practising Doctor to answer
reader's médical queries.

The Fam!'ly Doctor will be
uneble to see any readers
personolly, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and
letters will be treated ing
confidence. To make abso~/
lutely sure you are asked ¥
not to siga your real name
to your query but to write
under a pen name, The
answer to the question will
“ppear under the pen name.

Letters should be addressed
to The Family Doetor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week,

‘rhe first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate,

/



Inquest Continues

Further hearing in the inquest
concerning the death of 36-year-
old Gwendolyn Clarke of New
Orleans, St. Michael, will be taken
by His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith,
Acting Coroner of District “A’’ to-
day at 2 p.m.

Clarke was admitted to the
General Hospital on February 20
about 6.30 p.m, suffering from
stab wounds, but died a few min-
utes after she was admitted

On the last hearing Dr. A. S,
Gata, who performed the post
mortem examination on the de-
ceased, told the Court of his find-
ings.

Daisy Clarke also gave evi-
dence and said that the defendant
used to live at her house at West-
bury Road, St. Michael. About
6.15 p.m. on February 20 she saw
the deceased lying unconscious in
a pool of blood.

The next day she identified the
body of the deceased to Dr. A. S.
Cato. The deceased was the
mother of seven children.



World Sugar | General Strike

Production
Goes Up

(From Our Own Correspondent)
‘ LONDON, Feb. 27.

The world sugar production for
the current year will be one mil-
lion tons higher than in the pre-
vious 12 months, estimate E. D.
= F. Man in their latest circu-
ar.

This increase to 36,915,000 tons
is mainly accounted for by a rise
pf 700,000 tons in Indian and
Pakistan production. But even
though these countries are expect-
ed to produce 5,200,000 tons this
year they will still remain net im-

porters owing to tremendous home

consumption.
E. D. and F. Man say heavy

Cuban _production—approxitnate- | cars jumped the tracks complete-|
ly 6,300,000 tons, is casting a | ly blocking the line for almost one





May Break Out

TUNIS, Feb. 27,

Cafes in this capital closed down
for a three-day strike as rumours
spread that a 24-hour general
strike might break out in support
of bar owners.

Cafes throughout the capital
pulled down their shutters for
three days in protest against the
French authorities’ clamp-down
on six Tunisian bars in the
suburbs. At the same time it was
rumoured but not officially con-
firmed that a 24-hour general

strike might be called for Friday, |

February 29, in solidarity with
Tunisian cafe proprietors
Meanwhile authorities reported
that a goods train had been de-
railed during the night near Ma-
hares, on the line between Sfax
and Gabes.- They said 30 freight

shadow over the world market | mile. However. they said that an

and it is problematic from which

investiggion conducted immedi-

quarter could come sufficient sup- | ately after the accident revealed
port to maintain or improve the’ that aderaiinen’ was caused by

present oprices Unless United
States aid to Japan and Germany
is repeated, it looks possible that
Cuba may have difficulty in dis-
posing of this year’s output



Turkish Forces
Ready For N.A.T.O.

By K. C. THALER
LISBON, Feb. 27

faulty equipment and not by |

sabotage. — 2 ie —U
. Hoabinh Left

In Flames
! HONG KONG, Feb. 27



Peiping Communist radio heard
here said parts of Hoabinh, Indo-
nesian city evacuated by French
‘forces last Friday were still in
flames. The broadcast said the
Turkish Foreign Minister Fuad city was littered with vehicles and
Koprulu said Turkey is ready to war materials left behind by
make a bigger immediate contri-
bution to Western defence than
any other European nation and
urged Eisenhower to take imme- raging along route number six be-

French in their “hasty retreat.”

It said the communique also re-,
ported that fierce fighting was

diate steps to include this power- tween Hoabinh and Hanoi.

ful force in his command.

“Tt is essential that this integra-
tion take place without delay.”
Koprulu said in urging that a
Southeastern link be welded to
the Western defence chain against

Soviet aggression.

i
Koprulu said: “Turkey's imme-
diate military potential is at least
as much as that of the European
NATO state with the largest ac-
tual contribution to the North At-

lantic treaty area.”

He said that with Greece and
Turkey now in the NATO the in-
tegration of Yugoslavia (which
has 36 divisions) into the West-
ern defence would increase her
own security as well as that of

NATO.” —U-P.



Franks Turns

Down N.A.T.O. Job

LONDON, Feb. 27.
Foreign Secretary Anthony

Eden disclesed Wednesday night

that Sir Oliver Franks, Britisn

Ambassador to Washington turned
down the newly created post of ,,
A.T.O. The
vertently
when Ejeo arrived “at London
airport from N.A.T.O. Council



Secretary General of N
disclcsure was made inz





The 6 e
Conference at Lisbon which cre-|sommon ground exist
ated the post and offered the job for negotiation. If 4
{to Frasiks. —U.P. repeat only their prev





From All Quarters.

Charity The

Big Way |

LONDON.

Malden, Massachusetts : An!
act of charity staggering in scop®
--even for America~is revealed |
in Maiden where, on his death-
bed 30 years ago, George White. ;
presidént- of the Cuticura Cor-
poration, ordained that from then
on, two out of every three dol-
lars earned by his huge soap and
ointment concern should be
devoted to a “humanitarian ;

fund” So far a_ total of

$30,000,000 has been secretly
given away to worthy recipients.
New York: Once Willy Sut-!

ton, dramatically arrested in

|New York the other day for a big

bank robbery, was asked by an

;earnest social reformer: ‘Tell!
Ime, Willy, -why do you rob |
|banks?” Rejoined Willy: “Be-|
, cause that’s where the money is,

sister.”

Mahe (Seychelles) : Airmail
letters posted in London on
December 13th reached the Sey-
chelles on February 20 taking!

longer than sailing ships before
the Suez Canal was opened.
Amsterdam: The Dutch Soci-

ety of Non-Smokers has sent a}
letter to Queen Elizabeth on the}

oecasion of her ascending the
Throne, paying homage to her
and Prince Philip because they
are both non-smokers. The let-

ter expresses the wish that the}

whole world may follow this
royal example so that “it may be
delivered from the increasing
slavery to tobacco.”

Indianapolis: Jay York was
arrested for speeding, the first
man caught in a recently installed
police radar trap. He pleaded
Not Guilty “because I wanted to
see how the thing operated, my-
self.” (Fined 26 dollars 75 cents.)

Rome: Traces of gold have
been found in drinking water at
Como, North Italy, when the
water was tested by health au-
thorities. Today people there are
drawing bucketsful hoping te
find gold.

Rome: A _ pickpocket lying in
hospital and guarded by police
filched £50 from one of them.
The money was found stuffed in-
side his pillow.

Sydney: Liberal Party election
organiser Douglas Date was
awarded £75 this week in a
Workmen's Compensation Court
His injury? A broken little
finger, sustained while shaking
hands during the last election.

New York: The Wall Street
Journal produced this headline
this week: “Retailers mourn ris-
ing customer reluctance to part
with money.” f

ere ee ono

| POCKET CARTOO
by OSBERT LANCASTER



“By Jove, Sir, it’s jolly
lucky these fellows didn't
get hold of something tha:'s
actually on the Medd

——_—

list.”



DEFECTIVE ENGINE
FORCES PLANE DOWN

CHICAGO, Feb. 27

An American Airlines DC-6
with one engine dead circled the
city for nearly three hours to-day



'

DR. ADENAUEBR, the German Federal Chancellor, leaves the Foreign Office in London with M

Schuman, French Foreign Minister, after meeting to continue their discussions on the European Army
question.

| Barbados Budgets For
12-Million-Dollar Revenue

TRUMAN *

WELCOMES
MINISTERS

WASHINGTON, Feb. 27.

Secretary of State Dean Acheson
returned from North Atlantle
Treaty meetings and received
warm congratulations from Presi-
dent Truman on his “most success-
ful conference,” Truman ‘con-
gratulated both Acheson an] See-
retary of the Treasury John Sny-
der at the National Airport when
they arrived from Lisbon.

The Président told the Cabinet
officers that the meetings in Lons«
don and Lisbon had accomplished
“things we have been working for
these last three or four years, It
is a high privilege of mine to con-
gratulate the Secretary of State
and the Secretary of the Treasury
on the job they have accom-
plished.”

Acheson, thanked the Presiaent
for coming to greet them and ex-
pressed pleasure at the President's
“encouraging words,”

He said: “We return tired, but
happy in the belief that we have
accomplished what you sent us to
accomplish.” UP.





U.N., Reds Abandon
Attempt To Break
Deadlock

PANMUNJON, Korea, Feb, 27

_ United Nations and Communist
Staff Officers abandoned their
attempt to break the deadlock
over the repatriation of war pris-

oners. They decided to toss the)' .
issue back ‘to Generals and Ad-|tife of his five week old Cabinet
on a series of confidence votes on
his budget including a 15 per cent |
tax increase. i

The votes of confidence in the

mirals of the main armistice dele-
gation after 21 days of futile de-

| bate :

The step followed the United |
Nations warning that the Allies | National Assembly probably will
never will agree to force Commun- | be taken on Friday.
ist prisoners to return to North |
}Korea against their will, The

all prisoners by force if necessary

tle two other deadlocked issues
Russia’s eligibility for the neutral

fields during the armistice
—UP.



|” Basins Ad

Scouts

Mr. H. A. Vaughan will give

brief Historical sketch of Barba-
dos for the benefit of the Seout
contingent which will visit
to use up its gasoline supply be-| Jamaica for the first Caribbean

fore making a safe emergency , Jamboree early next month,

landing.

The plane landed at the Inter-
national Airport at 9.20 a.m. with
a load of 23 passengers, four
crewmen and four other airline}

employees

The plane had been held afloat)

since 3.50 a.m

The. plane took off at 3.15 a.m.|
on a flight to Los Angeles and was|thony Eden left by air for Lon-

' This talk will take plate today
,at 4.30 p.m. at Harrison College



EDEN FLIES HOME

LISBON, Feb. 27.
ir

itish Foreign Secretary An-

flying between Davenport and|don at 11.30 G.M.T.

Des Moifies’ when the pilot dis-|
covered an oil leak in number one
engine and flew back here on|bon

three engines for the landing
U.

LONDON, Feb. 27

sritish officials confirmed for |

He told pressmen at the airport
“Iam sure the results of the Lis-

—U.P. one child survived.



| mands there will be no negoti-
| ation.” |
Officials said that according to}

the first time that talks between |jadvice from Cairo, it was hoped



One official said:







the British and Egyptian Govern-
r vould start in Cairo on
They said talks would
xploratory and not actual



that the Egyptian policy while
still seeking to satisfy Egyptiar
Nationalist demands would take
account in a pra al way of the



present world situation and the

necessity for an effectual Middle



EUR@PEAN ARMY TALKS



aide ‘

bitter opposition from the Social

Democrats the second largest ‘ . i
party in dhe West Genhen Fore: | Labour Censure Motion

ment, Adenauer is convinced he
l zabour censure t ac

can get rearmament ratified by a rears ‘hill : of a siete ache eae

comfortable majority of the Bun- | \"UF = ; mane 4

destag (Lower House)

THE ESTIMATES of Revenue and Expenditure
the year 1952-53 have been sent down to the legislature
to be discussed and passed before the end of the financial
e House of Assembly and the Legis-
lative Council will have four weeks during which to exam-
ine the figures.

Estimated Revenue is set out at $12,390,194 with Esti-
mated Expenditure fixed at $12,052,094,

year, 3lst March.

: underway,
This allows

confidence is based on two major| badly bl
considerations | Chinese

Scanner natin

Quick Action On
MeCarran Bill
Urged In Jamaica |

KINGSTON, Feb, 26.

usand Jamatoans are
on the waiting list of the Ameri- |
ean Consul here to go to U.S.A
to live, Jamaica's quota is 1,500 ;

provided an estimated
j revenue of

revised figures of $12,597,802 and
$11,253,115 lett a gross surplus of

Memorandum Explains

The Memorandum on the Estini-
Which was sinned
Colonial Secretary until the estab.
‘| lishment of the post of Financial
Secretary is not signed this year.

It says inter alia, however, that

Senator , i
tor McCarran’s Bill would was the intention of the Gov-

practically stop Jamaicans enter-
ing America tq reside
In the House of



Victoria Cross, Britain's highest
military award on the chest of a
nervous Korean war hero in her
irst semi-official ‘act since her
ather died three weeks ago to
day

epresenta- | Proposed fiscal survey, to present
tives to-day F. A, Glasspole, Peo-|the fullest background available
ple's National Party member gave Of
the Celony and to determine its future
House to request Government to, financial and economic policy
make the most urgent and strong-|the next five years, A memoran-
est representations to the Secre- dur)
tary of State with a view to the'dra’t estimate
British Government making T€-|pleied, when the Fiscal Survey
presentations
Government
protection so as to preserve the! |
privigege now enjoyed by British!
entering America
Jamaica's present quota is 1,500 a}

sh rh een pet cee a 4 defeated Nationalist’s leader, Chi-

five new Knights of he realm | 41 Kaishek on a new mainland
vith a gleaming sword at her flr
American ! of

cocument of

se circumstances, Govern-
has decided
(a) to proceed with the normal
budget limiting
far as possible to the actual
commitments of Government



provision as

Faure. Risks |
Cabinet

PARIS, Feb, 27.
Premier Edgar Faure staked the!

rent) which will be present-

programme
capital expenditure

1951-52 Revenue

The substantial

Especially difficult obstacles ar¢
a super tax on hard liquor and}
Reds have demanded the return of | economies in nationalized railways |
| which threaten dismissal for many
Staff Officers also seemed on the | employees, among them many So- |} ae

i ' ; very substantial
verge of confessing failure to set- !cialists reases , ; .
,imereases in receipts from Customs

($1,040,000)

Railways are now oper-
-jating on a deficit.

economics | @nd
Truce Supervision Comniission| brought down “Faure’s predeces-
and the right of Reds to build air- | sor,

Income Tax
memorandum
52 Estimates,
that only a modest increase
toms and excise had been adopted
it became appar

Premier Rene
{$10,300 million
(about $4.000,000,000 for military
The Cabinet authorized ,
Faure to seek no less than 33 votes
lof confidence on financial propos-
| The biggest pill for the As-
sernblymen to swallow is the pro-
posal to increase most taxes by 15
»per cent instead of ten per cent
‘originally pianned, because of ob-












includes , 1951

During the year
was to be expected in 1952 whicn
unanticipated

threats, A substantial rise in price
; i 7 levels during
talks of the Atlantic Allies.--U.P. aneountin tox’ the

extraordinary increase in Customs



FIRE KILLS FIVE
VILLE SAINT PIERRE,
QUEBEC, Feb. 27
one family
were killed to-day when fire razed
their home while the

The income Tax received in the |
current year,
paid to be related to the 1950 crop
year of 158,183 tons which refiect- |
ed an increase in the value of the!
crop over the previous



Those dead included the mother,
40, two children aged 13 and eight ‘
years and their elderly grand- sufficient experience of peak crops
parents who lived with them in a ,@nd high prices.
in this tiny commun-/
N.A.T.O, meeting will be de-Jity West of Montreal on the road ,
{ cisive for world peace.”

rouchly $800,000 was due to in-
The revised estimate of expend-

excess of $800,000 over the original |
@ On page 3

Egypt and Britain to Hold Con ference



, Defence Organisations :
considered to be best: but officials | comment but it was apparent tha
said there is no intention to stand
rigidly by this
only solution

was prepared

understandir
Egypt without undue

Officials said
to consider any alternative Egypt
ing promises to
ence position of the
1e British side the Four mair
Power proposals for Middle East;

an equal parl-

' Churchill Wins

Confidence Vote

Feb. 27
PRIME MINISTER Churchill won a House of Con
mons confidence vote on his foreign policy Tuesday night
after asserting his pledge of ‘prompt, resolute and effec-
tive” action in Korea and that he only continued policies
set last May by the former Labour Government
He disclosed algo that the Labour regime of Prime
Minister Atti@e secretly set up a plant for regular pro
duction of atomic bombs and had produced an atom bomb

Churchill * » the confidence

Adenauer (in ii itis 20% bochane

to swell his nominal Conserva-

e tive edge of 14 votes
His revelations on Korean
Confident policy and the atom bomb, came
Churchill said—, from Cabinet
By JOSEPH W. GRIGG documents Which he had no
BONN. Feb. 27 chance to see until his Conserve-

West German Chancellor, Konrad tive Party /ousteq Labourites in

\denauer is completely confidenti last October's general election
of his ability te reise 12 more Di-| His disclosures brought eonfusion
visions for Western Defence as|and anger among labour mem-
socn @s a European Army Treaty | bers This may sharpen the

ratified, according to his close divisian betwedn such moderate

leaders as Attlee and Morrison
It is said that despite continue i} and the Left Wing factton led by
Aneurin-Bevan

} The confidence vote came on a

j tary pledges to President Truman.
He also believes there is no dan-| #bour critics charged that these

ger of his being ousted from office | Pledses were hinted when
between now and August 1953] Churc hill promised in a speech to
(when the next Parliamentary |©onsr sn Washington last

general elections are scheduled) }month that Britain would take

In the 18 months still left before ,Prampt, resolute and _ effective

the elections he is confident that, action if a Korea truce were
West Germany will have re-;reached then broken by Com-
covered almost complete in ; Munists

lependence under interim peace | Churehill denied making any
agreements now being negotiated | Secret agreement with Truman.
with the Western Allies and wili]He said Attlee’s Government
already have formation of her|reached a secret military under-
European Army diyision fia Me with the United State

last May to take joint action out-
side Korea if Communist planes
ed U.N. forces from
ases,

1, The 48 vote majority he won Churchill said Attlee was jus-

The ‘76-year-old Chancellor






in the Bundestag in the prelimin- /tifed in making such arrange-
ory rearmament debate on Febru-|ments and added: “We conform-
ary 8 ed in principle to the policy of

2. The West German convic-|our predecessors and indeed in

tion which makes ousting of the |some respects it might be said
Government almost impossible ex-]that we diq not commit ourselves

cept in quite extraordinary cir-jeven as far as they had done.”
cumstances UP.



Cowardly Disclosures

rg Bevan denounced Churenit “for
Queen Awards V.C. what he called cowardly disclos-

: ; ures of Cabinet secrets and de-

: LONDON, Feb, 27 manded without success that

Queen Elizabeth II pinned the/Churchill produce actual docu-
ments to prove his statements.

The Prime Minister said he

still is convAyced the U.N. would

make a mistake to start a war

with Communist China and “few

adventures could be less useful

rhe slim, young Queen dressed of. fruitfal” than. to launch

war against Reds.

investiture conducted in the or-|. 4 furious uproar broke out on
nate gold and white State ball-|Labour benches at Churchill's
oom of Buckingham Palace ‘disclosure that the Labour Gov-
I U.p, lernment established a plant for

erweereereenmpeemene | regular production of atomic

JET DESTROYED bombs and produced a bomb

‘which is to be tested this year.

FIFTH AIR FORCE 4.Q,, ' Churehill accused the Labour

KOREA, Feb. 27 {Party of keeping the secret of the
One Communist MIG 15 was | atomic bomb plant with “Machi-

lestroyed and one damaged to javellian art” so it could accuse
tay when 27 F-86 jets fought an |Conservative of warmongering
estimated 60 Red jets near Sinanju ly

ig the election campaign.

in “MIG alley,” —U.P. - @ On Page 5



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PAGE TWO



I ORD ROWALLAN, Chief Se

- of the British Empire and
Commonwealth will be intransit
through Barbados this evening by

air. He is expected to arrive at
Seawell from Atkinson Field
British Guiana at 7.40 p.m. by
B.W.1.A., and leaves 50 minute
later for Trinidad. He will be
rccompanied by his A.D.C., Lt
Comdr. E. P, Mallinson
Canadian General
NENERAL and Mrs. Charles

MacLaren arrived from Ber-
muda yesterday morning by T.C.A
to spend a holiday in Barbado:
staying at the Marine Hotel

General MacLaren was born in
Wakefield, Quebec in 1878. He was
educated it Public Schools:
Queen’s University (B.A., 1902)
Toronto University (LL.B., 1905)
Osgoode Hall.

He served in England and
France during the first ‘World
War, was twice mentioned in des-
patches, and awarded the D.S.O

In Detember 1916 he w
swarded the C.M.G, His wife
Derothy is the daughter of the
late Lt. Col. Fred White. Their
home is in Ottawa

Back To Canada

IR VICE-MARSHAL and Mrs

as

Arthur T. Cowley who had
been holidaying in Barbados, re-
turned to Canada yesterday by
T.C.A.

Air Vice-Marshal, Cowley is
Director of Air Services, Depart-
ment of Transport, Ottawa. They
arrived here early this month and
were guests at Cacrabank.

St. Vincent Beauticulturist

RS. JULIAN BAYNES, whose

husband is a Member of the
Legislative Council in St. Vincent
and a partner of Baynes Brothers,
dry goods merchants of Kings-
town, is now in Barbedos for a
month’s holiday.

She arrived over the last week-
end and is a guest of Mrs. Stella
Zephirin of The Savoy, Bay Street.

Mrs. Baynes, the leading beau-
ticulturist in St.

Vincent, is a
regular visitor to this island. She
was last here in 1950 when she
spent a month,

U.S. Specialist
[>*. RAYMOND TOMASSENE,
Ear, Nose and Throat Spec-
ialist of Wheeling, West Virginia,

who has been visiting Barbados
for several years is now back
again. He arrived yesterday
morning by B.W.1.A. via Trinidad
for about a month's holiday and
is staying at the Marine Hote!.
He was accompanied by Mrs.

Tomassene,

ARTIE’S HEADLINE

EE ee.





< —wwwrewe

‘it's this Olympic Games
kating championship,”’

nem LOL a Oey ag ly

Here Again

M* AND MRS. R. LAFFAN
are back in Barbados after
in absence of several months.
They arrived from Trinidad on
Tuesday by B.W.LA,
Canadians
MONG the passengers arriv-
ing tn Barbados yesterday

T.C.A.
Mrs

morning
for a holiday

from Canada by
were Mr. and
Alex Paterson of Montreal, Mr
and Mrs. 1, Perley-Roberts of
Ottawa who will be remaining for
about a month and Mr. and Mrs,
C, H. Gordon. They are all stay-
ing at the Marine Hotel.

To Be Married To-morrow
ISS LUCY COREY of Mon-
treal was among the passen-

gers arriving from Canada _ yes-
terday morning by T.C.A_ She i
to be married tomorrow to Mr

Glyne Moore, son of Mrs. Winifred
Moore of 8th Avenue, Belleville
and the late Mr. G..R. S. Moore.

Miss Corey who is the daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Corey of
Hatley, Montrealy is a former
T.C.A, Stewardess. At one time

she used to fly on T.C.A.’s Domes-
tic routes but recently had been
flying on the Montreal-London
run.

Two Changes

WO changes in forthcoming
sailings of the S.S. Golfito
from Barbados have been an-

nounced, Golfito is now scheduled
to leave Barbados for Southamp-
ton on Ist May instead of 24th
April and 12th June instead of
5th June, 1952.

Her next call at Barbados
be Sunday, March 2nd
Southampton.

will
from

Carub Calling

Two Weeks

FTER spending about twe
eeks’ holiday here, Mr. Noe?
Baynes, merchant of Kingstown,

returned home on Monday night
by the R.M.S. Lady Rodney.

Visited Parents and Sister
ETURNING to Canada yester-
day by T.C.A. after spend-
‘ng a short holiday with his
parents Prof. J. S. Dash, O.B.E.,
and Mrs. Dash and his sister Mrs.

M. P. Merrick, was Mr. Philip
Dash. He was accompanied by his
wo young sons Michael an@
Stephen.

Mr. Dash is attached to Head
Office, Bank of Montreal.

Four T.C.A. Officials

OUR T.C.A. Officials flew in

by T.C.A. yesterday on a short
visit. They are, Mr. Mike Hildred,
T.C.A.’s Regional Public Relations
Officer, Montreal, who came in
from Bermuda; Mr. A. Lake,
Communications Supervisor,
T.C.A.’s Aélantic Region who ar-
rived from Montreal; Mr. Jack
Scotj, T.C.A. Stores Inspector and
Mr. Casey Vanderlinden, Super-
visor of Maintenance, T.C.A.’s

Atlantic Region,

Mr. Loke, Mr. Scott and Mr.
Vanderlinden are guests at the
Marine Hotel, Mr. Seott and Mr,
Vanderlinden who are on an in-

pection tour arrived from ‘Ber-

nuda
Talking Point

The best liar is he who makes
the smallest amount of lying go
the longest way-—Samuel Butler.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952
1115 a.m James Verity, 11 30 a.m
Crazy People, 1260 noon The News,
1210 pm News Anclysis
4.00—7.15 pm, — 19 76m, 25 53m ,
31 32m

400 pm
Daily

The News, 410 pm. The





Service, 415 pm Rhythm is
Their Business, 445 pm Sporting
Record, 5.00 pm Composer of the
We 515 pm Tew Records, 6 00
pm Colonial Commentary, 6 15 p im
Scottish Magazine, 6 45. pm Sports
Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00
pm The News 7.10 pm News
Analysis, 715 pm We See Britain
745—10.40 pm — U.53m., 31 3tm ,
49.4%m
74 pm Crazy People, 815 pm

Radio Newsreel
patch, 8 45 p m

830 pm _ Special Dis-
Composer of the Week

9.00 pm. Ring Up The Curtain, 10 00
pm The News, 1010 pm From The
Editorials, 1015 pm A Good Job
10 30 pm. The Last Chronicle of Bar

et

BY THE WAY... . By Beachcomber

MAN who tethered his coat
& ina field and tried to milk
it said he thought there was a
*g” in the month, “You are think-
ing of oysters”, replied the official,

“Why on earth should I be
thinking of oysters?” asked the
man. “Well, you thought your coat
was a goat, I suppose,” said the
official. “Go on! Go on!” shouted
the man, “Now tell me ‘that if
there is a ‘g’ in the coat I ean
eat goats in February.” “We are

evidently talking at ¢ross-pur-
poses,” vouchsafed the official.

‘Evidently,” said the man, “Haye
some coatsmilk cheese?”

Prodnose; You don’t expect us
to believe this!
Myself: Not literally, of course

Sorg F052—1952. Floreat!
NE of the omissions I noticed
from a recent list of centen-
aries occurring this year was the
restaurant Sorg in the Place du
Vieux Marche aux Vins in Stras-
bourg. The moment you enter the
unpretentious room you breathe
an air of established contentment,
There is no loud babble of voices,
but only an occasional exchange
of comments on the excellence of
the food and the ‘wine. The wait-
ers move quietly about their ben-
eficent ‘task. There is no radio to
bring a heathen atmosphert into
the enjoyment of the fare, Every-
thing is serene, unhurried, and the
soul as well as the body is nour-
ished, And the crown of the feast
should be crepes au kirsch, If
English people are still allowed to
go abroad, I hope to return to
Sorg some day.
Wide experience
BUSINESS man_ has been
advising applicants for jobs
not to be shy and humdrum, but

to try to startle the man who is
interviewing them by enterprise
and self-confidence. I knew a

young man who, when asked for
his previous experience, replied
loudly and rapidly: “Wickminder
in a Khartoum lamp-factory,
greenhouse overseer at Codgett
and Rivers, consulting architect
Clermont-Ferrand gasworks, se¢n-



jor partner in a steam carpet beat-
ing warehouse at Cadiz, braceplug
setter and internal wirer at Har-
wich, publicity manager for
Bloodstoneés Dog Foods.” The
executive was so impressed that
the applicant got the job—head
of the pressing department in a
firm of button-moulders,

The hunt is up

A TELEVISION Detector Van
Detector Van, sent out to

warn illicit gapers of the approach
of the Detector Van. it putting so
many illicit electric irons out of
order that an Electric Iron Detec-
tor Van, with repairing equipment,
is to be sent out at once.

Marginal note

a you want to qualify as a
passer-by you must never stop
walking. A man’s jacket was

ripped the other day by a motor-

car. The case was dismissed when
the man--admitted that he was
standing still at the time. If a

car backs suddenly on to the pave-
ment and knocks you through a
shop-window, it is no good saying

you tried to get out of the way, The head-line was not in this
and were therefore a passer-by, column,



i

gt



For a time Gaffer Jarge stares at
Rupert, Then, quite unable
speak, he turns and moves away
shaking his head in bewilderment.

to

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The answer is that you would
have been standing still if the car
had not backed at you, and there-

fore you are not a passer-by.
4 UITE rightly a critic praised
the “well-balanced cast” of
a ballet. Balance is everything,
as the ballerina found out to her
cost when the man at whom she
was thrown fumbled the catch, so
that she banged herself against a
eardboard tree in the woodland
glade, Without balance the whole
thing becomes a sort of Rugby
serum.

Hup!

Barber’s cat chews
umbrella
FRIEND of mine, and any
friend of mine is a friend of
mine, as the lonely drinker said
to himself—a friend of mine had
a nasty experience the other day.
On awakening he took a hasty
glance at his paper, and the fol-

lowing headline made him reel
back on to the pillow. Colonel
Inherits £200 From A _ Lizard.




oe ere

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Properly and see that ev
tree shall have

ery kind of
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ut for you, little bear, pine woods
would have conquered the land and

never will!'* Then he

: tlow they
But the first elf has spotred the vanishes and Rupert scampers
group and he leaps towards them. happily home again.
“We've won, we've won!" he THE END
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By




f

Teddy sat in the
, think

Bears Can't Attend School
TEDDY, ‘the Stuffed Bear said:
How can I learn to read and write |
shook his head and said that there
said General Tin the tin soldier.
the rag-doll. |
crickets. Or for lions or tigers or
beene-ssnpnteesitsnss
“Or for plants and flowers,

—Neither Can Cows, Goats or Birds—
By MAX TRELL
I've never been to school. Aren’t
there any schools for me to go to?
if I don’t go to school?”
But everyone Teddy spoke to!
were no echools for Teddy Bears.
“Schools are only for people,” |
“There aren’t any schools for cats |
and dogs, @ither,” said Mary-Janeé |
“Nor,” added Mr. Punch, “for }
cows or goats or grasshoppers or!
elephants.”
“Or for birds,” said the C
r layroom corner,
the Geranium, waving her | fe.
“Something.” said Teddy final

“ought’to be done. I'd better think though he had been thinking for
about what ought to be done.” ar pe, ek “Who will be the
in His Corner teacher, Teddy?
| “Us!” said Teddy. “All of us!”
So Teddy sat very still in hie, 4 y.
corner of the playroom, thinking | Mendes ae od Soll engtews
about what ought to be done. Sud- ls Rid os rar . write!” said
denly he said: “I know!” Me Pu x ae eens a
By this time everyone alse fini en
the playroom had forgotten whai
Teddy was pixies about, so he
had to explain all, over apain.

j
|

Kept Smiling
But Teddy kept smiling and said:
‘Why do we have to read and write
“And I know just what to do, Let’s Whe way people do? We'll read and
start onr own sehvol!” , write in our own way, We'll make
Everyone agreed it wax a won- ‘up our own way to read and write
derful idea only they ait shook and that’s what we'll teach our-

their heads again. ' selves in our own school.”

“Why, wihat’s the mutter?” | Then everyone else wondered if
asked at perhaps Teddy’s idea wasn’t good,
“Who'll the teacher?” said “Maybe,” said Teddy, “that’s how

General Tin. “What good is a people learned to read and write,
school without a teacher?”

too. | mean, long, lon ‘0, when
“T don’t know,” said Teddy, try. | people first ntarted to ete school.
ing his best to sound eheerful. “I') | We'll get pencils and make marks
have to think some more.” | for every different work we know.

So he sat quietly in his eorner,! And then we'll study the marks
thinking and thinking, until at last,'. . . and that’s how we'll all teach
after a very long tine, he an. ourselves, and that’s how we'll all

nounced: “I know!” \ learn,”

“Who?” said everyone, For this And Teddy, the Stuffed Bear,
time they hadn't forgotten what smiled, because he did so want to
Teddi +98 thinking about, even | zo to school,



World Players
For Tennis In J’ca
NEW YORK, Feb. 27.

West Indian
Table Talk

Headed by Dick Savitt, an in-
ternational field will leave this ay teoeaae
week for Jamaica for two grass LONDON, Feb. 21.
court tennis tournaments. Leaving this week for a business

An. Visit to the major British West
antes Indian tertitories is Mr. Colin
Sere ee ater ~ Turner, whose firm in Londomtep-
ace “en Cham- yesents’ several prominent West
DISnsni pa.” e st. Andrew in- tndian newspapers. Purpose of
vitation will be held at Kingston, Mr. Turner's visii, I understand,

March 1. The Caribbean will be is
played at Fairfield Country Club sewebaaet th Tine Lh bee
at Montego Bay, Jamaica, March ’

Tournaments are the St.
drew invitation and third

5 to 9 pany. He will travel to the West
7 a Indies by sea, but will fly between

Players making the trip will the various territories. He returns
include Budge Patty, Canadian Via New York in April.

Davis Cuppers, Brendan Macken
of Montreal and Lorne Main of
Vancouver, David Lurie, South
African and two British Wight-
man Cup players, Helen Pletcher
and Pat Ward.

BACK TO B.H.

Rawle Farley, former WISU
President, returns to the West
Indies in March. He will take up
employment in British Honduras.
awile, who comes from British
Guiana, lived in B.H, before com-
ing to England. .

—(C.P).

TULIPS FOR WOMAN

WITH 2 WEEKS TO LIVE INFANTRY BATTALION

LONDON, Feb. 26. An infantry battalion may be
An armful of purple tulips left ‘ised in Eastern Caribbean ter-
London on Tuesday by air as a “itories if the suggestion Conserv-
gift for a woman in Perth who @tive M.P. Major Tufton Beam-
nas only two weeks to live. ish, is adopted, The proposal will
rs. P. J. Hore of Bedford ar- be put forward in Parliament on
rived at London this afternoon March 19th, Major Beamish wi!l
with the flowers—a breath of tell Mr. Oliver Lyttelton that
Englidh spring’—ipoking for a formation of a battalion would
passenger to take them to her be followed by a ready response
friend Mrs. Doris Jones who emi- {yom voluntary recruits.

grated to Australia last year and |
is now critically ill. i STUDENT TABLE
TENNIS

Students of seven different na-
tionalities took part in the Londen
| University table-tennis champions
|week. About 200 men in the sin-
gles played on seven tables for
more than six hours to decide tue
first round results. Among those
knocked out was Walter Jones, a
West Indian mathematics student.
He said afterwards, “Next to crick-
et the West Indians prefer table
tennis. I’m afraid I’ve let my
country down sadly.” Favourite
for the singles is 26 year old
Vietnamese, Luu-Thahh-Dakh.



The flowers were taken aboard
but Mrs. Jones may never enjoy
them. It takes four days to fly
to Perth.

—U.P.









~ ROODAL
EMPIRE

TODAY: Last 3 Shows 1 30 p.m,

Across
Ll Fort iruin by sudden invasion|

7, Next. door tht : Sets AT DAWN
+ Ne 0) is 18 in Close “THE SUN SETS AT D ”
proximity, (0) Introdue'ng
9. This crow is hooded. (5) Sally PARR — Philip SHAWN
ia oneaeaee Of sorts, (4) EXTRA:
} luter cover (4) SRR! SHOWING THE
13. Needed for a latent change. (6) vuM .

FUNERAL OF THE LATE KING
OPENING FRI. 20TH

The Iittle fel)
Makes ears

ow is no gem, |
+ Intention |

burn surely, (4)
show in the morn





ing. (3) Digi: 5 /\ faa
ing:
22. Exist on a vague ition of EFLIN — Ev KEYES
i wie aabiual yas (4) ven ane
24. e; aken is not a
o5 punishable omence, v4) 0° COE TIES cave wor
2 parting ways, (4) .
26. Forty days in summer sully. David Niven's Latest Film
know these winds. (7)
cati LYMPIC
A. Incite by seating it, ()
2. Actnowiedse validity of this
. 30 8.15
- Cheerful tn tne train. (5) Hedy LAM on tne . '
Unprepossessing. (4) STRANGE WOMAN

Nothing stops mé going to dine.
hy often said that truth will.
Break o northern handicap, (4)

Such poten Prepares for publi-
cation. (3)

AND
CHARLIE CHAPLIN in
MONSTEUR VERDOUX

TODAY SPECIAL at 1.30
Roy Rogers in “IDARO”

oe mo ee





(4. This side for piame? (5 and “SIOUX CITY SUE”

!S Keeis may transport them. (5) With Gene AUTRY

16 Bant enmt ® small lake. (4) (Cheap Prices) ®
) ft Fouswe ® famous oraer, (4)

and 23. Gown ana meal provide Qavaing, Peiday Wh 0.90 & 8.15







a broken air seat. (4, 3) cee ae in . act
Solution of vesterdae’s nugric Avrovs: «a .
i Journey; 8 Amused: 11. Gar: 32 and “LOVE AFFAIR’
it: 15. ite! 14, Tram: 15, Startie a ce “oe
Noun: 17, Novel: 19 foe! 2) Snine SPECIAL MIDNITE SAT. ist
oe ae 25. Hand: 24 Add: {5 Reveal Whole Serial—
Own: Jasmine: 2. Om 5 ie ; , o
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Johnny Mack BROWN & Doris DAY — Gordon Mar RAE with the New
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TT Whip WILSON Andy CLYDE A WARNER BROS,
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Diat 2310

PLATZ AweBARBAREES
GALA OPENING
Sat. March Ist. at 6.43

& centinaing Dally at 445 & ae The
OM MOONLIGHT BAY

THURSD



THE WINDSOR INCOME
Duke Seeks A New Settlement

By EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE

HE Duke of Windor’s income

is being discussed among

politicians of both parties, unoffi-
cially cf course, as yet.

King George VI made him an
allowance of £25,000, which
ceases with his death.

It is possible that Queen Eliza-
beth will continue this as a purely
family affair, but it is believed
that the Duke is anxious for a
more stable arrangement,

It is thought that such an ar-
rangement was one of the mat-
ters talked about when he visited
the Prime Minister at 10, Down-
ing-street two weeks ago.

The cbvious course is to incor-
porate ‘the payment in the Bill
dealing with Royal Family fin-
ances which will shortly be pre-
sented to Parliament.

A Men’s Affair

ERE is comment on the

absence of women—other

than reyal mourners—from the
funeral procession.

Countess of Erroll, who as

hereditary Lord High Constable

of Scotland ranks first after the

Royal Family in Scotland; was
not invited.
Not one of the women’s ‘ser-

vices or social organisations. was
represented,

Lady Reading, founder of the
Women’s Voluntary Service, said
to me; “I was told they had | de-
cided not to include women and 1
agreed. Funerals belong to men
and the nearest women relatives.”

School for Charles ?

LD sare sing previous heirs, who

were educated privately in
their early years, Prince Charles
may go to school.

His father has always wanted
Charles to go to his old sehvooi,
Gordonstoun, near Elgin.

And Queen Elizabeth was in-
clined to agree.

Ba

* ®

Other members of the family,,

including the Queen Mother, pre-
ferred Eton or Hafrow, if any
school at all.

Now Prince Charles is first in
line of suceession his schooling
must tend to become a State con-
cern rather than a purely domes-
tie affair.

Against the views of those who
favour private education, there
is a strong argument for some

school association with his future
subjects,

Kings ‘At Home’

Ov by one the royal mourners
are departing this week-end
from Claridge’s.

Never before have so many
royal heads been gathered in one
hotel, At times the fawn-car+
peted foyer became a cosmopolitan
Court.

te

th *

There, beneath the huge crystal
chandelier, Lady Lucas curtsied
low to King Gustav and reminded
him that she entertained his
father when he visited Britain.

* * *

There, also, Don Juan, the
Spanish Pretender, twice kissed
the hands of girls presented to
him, and King Paul of Greece
shook hands with members of the
staff.

Sweden's King Gustav escorted
Norway’s King Haakon and Earl
Mountbatten to the entrance,
after Vaey had called on hit.

He relaxes after lunch with o

game of canasta.

* *

On the plane to London two
seats were reversed so he could
have a canasta foursome.

Wrong Monarch

HEN Denmark’s King Fred-
cril: and Quecn In rid wore
expected everyone in the foyer
from manager to page boy was on
the alert.
A bell rang, signalling the
arrival of a V.LP., ahd a Danish
equerry hurried

THEATRES
ROXY

Today Last ? Shows 4.30 @ 8.15
Googie Withers — Grifnth Jones
in “ONCE UPON A DREAM”
and “MY BROTHER's KEEPER”

with
— Jane Hilton

NEWSREEL SHOWING
OF THE LATS KING.

TODAY SPECIAL at 1.30 p.m
“PRINCE a PLAINS”

“NAVAJO RAIDERS"
(Cheap )

SAT. Special Mid-nite Show
WHOLE

SERIAL
“MANGUNS of M¥etERy

ROYAL

Today Last 2 Shows 4.30 @ 8.15

Jack Warner





EE
with
NEWSREEL a

OF THE LA’

eee
TODAY SPECEAL at 1.99 pcm.

See Pes eae.



for Reservation



ak
“RBA!



But instead of King Frederik,
Ex-King Peter and Queen came
through the revolving doors.

They were taken up in the lift
and, as the bell rang again, the
manager signalled for the lift to
hurry down. It returned just in
time for the Danish couple.

Top Hat Wanted

the funeral Queen AlexSn-
dra “wore a Paris-made black
woollen dress under a Persian
lamb toat.
She hada three rows of pearls
and péar) earrings.
a *

Over the black uniform of an
admiral of the Yugoslay Navy,
King Peter wore a greatcoat which
arrived from New York by plane
and was pressed by a Savile-row
tailor.

From him King Peter ordered
a morning coat and top hat.

Holland’s Bloom

UEEN JULIANA hurried from

her car to her sulte, but re-

eppeared a few minutes later to
drive to Buckingham Palace.

The queen brought her own





GRAND OPENING
BARBAREES

PLAZA



(DIAL 5170)

AY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952

Ex-Queen
of Dutch

from
up

one
made

wreath and
Wilhelmina,
bloom

Her mourning clothes were
made in Holland, for she believes
in encouraging national trade.

Forgotten Sword

ENMARK'’S royal couple ars
due to visit London again in

May, when King Frederik will
dedicate a Danish church.
Then he Will sail in his yacht

Dannebrog to Greenland.

His eousin, Prince Axel, left his
ceremonial sword in the plane
It was sent on to the hotel.

Film Festival

CANNES, Feb. 26
The Fifth International Film
festival will be held here from

April 23 to May 10 with 18 coun-
tries participating the organisation
announced Tuesday

Countries taking part will be
Argentina, Canada, Germany,
Britain, France, Greece, India,

Italy, Luxembourg, Cuba, Mexico,
Norway, Poland, Saar, Spain,
Switzerland, Union of South Afri-
ca and Yugoslavia. Israel and
Japan are also expected later but
has not yet given an official reply.
—U-P.



MARCH Ist 8.435 p.m.

ANOTHER SCENIC
WONDER IN THE
CARIBBEAN !

WITH

THE






A

\



Bay-eautiful babes! Bay-eautiful

WARNER’ BROS.

AU PL AZ A BARBAREES

L 5170

DIA

MUSICAL IN Many
‘OQra\:
On.

(Moo

DORIS DAY GORDON MARAE!

LoviIN'EST




Moon / ~




tunes!’

in cotoe by TE CHINICOLOR

FROM

WARRKER
BROS.















A Memorable Cast
Dramatic Ivstery Of

The MA








NG TO-DA

and Continuing DAI

A

.
.? love...

with
WARD BOND
CHARLES KEMPER







David



DIAL 8404
TODAY (Only) 445 & 8.30 P.M.
a QUEST of CHEYENNE”
Wild Bilt ae &
“ALAS BILL - =
CARSON

PRIDAY @ SAT. 44s @ &.0 PM
Leo GORCEY & Bowery Boys
“IN FAST COMPANY”
James Ron CURWOOD’S
” .ON MANHUNT”
&














COTTEN-STANWYCh,
Fein WITH

A CLOAK’

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\ LESLIE CARON

IN ONE STRANGE NIGHT

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ROBE RT RYA all
ON DANGERO”-
OUND ‘



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e met both
cnd MURDER!





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Diat 2310

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) &.20 P.M
“BEWARE of PITY”

Lilli PALMER &
“HOUSE of FRANKENSTEIN
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY









FRIDAY & SATURDAY 48% PM
“THE BIG PUNCH
Gordon MacRAE Wayne MORRIS

“THE BRIGHT LEAF"
Gary COOPER
MIDNITE SAT: IST
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE
Wild Bill BLLIOTT &
“ALIAS BI ¥ the KID
Sunset CARSON



THURSDAY, FEBRU. ARY 28, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







The Labour Welfare THE GAN BOLS oe 5 ahiig Appeal —— etn Pearle po a ae

ante. C lems of this subsidiary compar r4 pproximately 2 n

eh RS ee
GEORGE, THE SUITES COME
















(VE PUT THE Mr, Carl eslie 1¢ of the Seawell Air I is
F © jeack PROM THE UPHOLSTERERS 2S SACK ON If vented au of ILA.(C)L. Sea- designed to inciples of
4 | A | C t ry 4—1T LOOKS LOVELY vell wees ae eee 5 ‘
f v , proceeded on 3 weeks’ Vv n i Airp tration,
une * ni ommuntl y by K vt tion leave during the month He Civil Aviation on, Ait
: resumes duty on 15th Februar Traffic Control Meteorology,
} . Telecomnrunication and other
D | t Directorate General of related subject
eve opmen Civil Aviation : Mr, DeGazon infor us that
W/Cmdr. L. A. Egglesiie) there i 1 proposal » extend
THERE ARE NOW 3 Community Halls provided from Pupetos Generel Of Sty!) Avin- Visio Alsport by te ae te
Mind ana & 44 tion British Caribbean Are a tak strip crossing the exist-
Fund and functioning. They are : Belleplaine Com- '



left the Colony for British Guiana, ing runway at an angle of about
where a conference was held with 16 North Beane Field, which
members of the British Guian ito be the U.S. Army Air



Hali, in St. Andrew; Princess Alice Playing Fie‘d,
lichael and K.G.V.M.P. in St. Philip. Two other











halls are completed but the formal openings have not yet Government, Mr. W. Grinsted ce base, has recer been
taken place : one at Sarjeant’s Village, Christ Church and Director of the Caribbean Meteor- acquired by the St. Lue Gov-
} . Rearwices - frown » m : } mee under My
the other at Ellert St St ological Services, and Mr. Frown, ernment and also comes un ler Mr.
Bath a} a e arcane. bag bnotirs Another for St. Joseph, Air Registration Board Surveyor DeGazon’s administration
eee >a, Is In course of erection NOW. on the recommendations of the

; Tt existence of these Halls chased and despatched to Anti- Meteorological Sub-committee of

rovide 1 great opportunity for gu where the Social Welfare the Regional Air Navigation Cor



the District Welfare Officers at- Office has been able to contact Consideration Of ference recently concluded at Gernkin Divisions

iched he Social Welfare Of- a buye Most of the original } : Re nore On Sea we li eld returned 10. the, Colony on vi 29
to bui p and assist in de- order r 250 baskets has now field returned to the Colony on » I e dy 19 >»
velopin t p movements par- | n completed, Bill Postponed 22nd P ; V ill Be t ‘a - =




January from British Gui-
rural areas where ana, and left the next day on a BONN, Germany Feb, 26






































































z et . The House 3s y Tuesdays ; .
i hitherto been impossible aining for Group Work — yiont postp a oe ‘a ueeday visit to St. Kitts, Antigua, Jamai- Allied officials said Tuesday
t uch beeause of the lack With only 4 District Welfare iI] hick aaaee pag re oars Four soft spots on the runway Plantation, St. Miehael, recently Military ca and British Honduras that the Atlantic Army will
of a meeti place Officers available to cover the lic Em V tives 1 an eopent She ae were re-instated by the Depart4 returned from Canada and .1s A USAF (MATS) Amphibian Seawell Aerodrome Control: D@ve to, wait at least until 1955
Wher hall él Wéitee e island for fleld work—and “ y par a SEONG ay ned ee ment of Highways & Transport, working with T.C.A, at Seawell §-10 aircraft arrived from Ram- The number. of aircraft move- for. 12 German divisions it counts
est all is ready the Vestry much of the time of the chief offi- oo ants Sa cae pangs an sov~ during the month of. January. Airport. As stenotypist, she re- sey Air Force Base in Puerto ments handled by Seawell Aero- 0% to help defend the west _des-
in Maids Conte Cex USS OS necessity be given to — lati oH pose ‘2 adopt new These soft spots measured 20ft. x lieves Miss Isabel Bezanson who on Friday, 11th January, drome Control for the month was pite the green light given Euro-
, rts elds Com~ administrative duties--the policy te "ean seattest ang submitted 20ft.; 18ft, x 34ft.; 32 ft. x 12ft. is now at T.C.A, in their Bridge ( the command of .Lt. H. 943, composed of 122 landings and pean Army by Atlantic Allies at
t ijority of mem- js to concentrate on the training by a Committee appointed by the and 24ft. x l7ft. respectively, and, 4 x fufill : ssign- W rf rg 4 flight. jo)’ c cea re of melt: Lisbon’ conference
be! ( ng the Vestrymen) cf th ‘ ae ana a rer . ‘oo Se te ’ ¥, 4nd. town office fufilling her assign Wallendorf, on a training flight. 12) take-offs, The number of
} matside Se ee ate c the leaders: thus es week. Sore io SETUP into. the Reg- were located between stations’ ment in Barbados for the Tourist This aireraft is attached to the operative hours for the month Vinee oficiales’ al thint cube
C opt fy es local eines * -. Pre Welfare “Officers lettuxe + pas governing the leave of 1600ft. and 2000ft. reading west to Season. Air/Sea Rescue Squadron at were 477, the Control Tower and » ies, 7 vMacwed sal ta an be ily
\ kr the ‘i { met ana ny SHAD OR: Re one eet ee ¥ Government Officers east of the runway. Work on these Messrs, Gardiner Austin & Co Borringquin, Puerta Rico, The @ sential Government Service eae i. Hy et | “the, a
V now the district ani Yentre v girls in the slass an mployees. — ateme ’ ~— mn . . Ss a 2 . ces j France have t back : a
vill in the running. are all p Sod incisor aa ee ts ‘ re-instatements ‘was usually one itd, Local Agents. for Trans- Pilot and flight crew of 9 remained peing manned for an average of vious timetable calling for com-
; c &- ave all picked leaders of group: Dr. G. H. Cummins, .(.) who on Tuesdays and finished in the ~ 1 for .2 days. I 8 : & . : 6
t he > time to assist in or clubs in the area from which introduced the Bill, accepted .a. early hours of Wednesday morns Canada Air Lines moved into w ear at poe 3 a 2 days. = 15.4 hours daily. bat ready German troops by
Halt ng B Ling Broupe using the they come, and it is hoped when suggestion by Mr, A, E. S. Lewis ings. Seal-coating of shrinkage their new and spacious offices a thupeasddaets eanec 0 Get US Seawell Traffic : 1954. Sources ‘here explain the
fal e District Welfare Officer they have finished their course (L) that consideration should be cracks on the runway cOntinues. the corner of Broad and Cowell sincere appreciation 0 the hos- The passenger, cargo and mail situation thus: * Germans will
for the areas concerned concen~ jn Bridgetown they * will retuTn, postponed ir view f tk of ig t Work cas “the new ’ ; Streets on 8th January, 1952. pitality extended to himself and ¢rame for the month is as detailed need two full years fram the
trates worl round the district +9 their areas firmly grounded in’ copies of the ely waanitations saa aback of the natin | ea fae Mr. F. Maurice McGregor, crew during their stay, and hereunder: — ‘ starting peint to call up, arm and
f a time helping the groups the principles of -xtmninga group, jot yet been nina, near iiS tn reom continued, and with the oe Operations Manager, T.C.A’s At- thought that when he returned to 3 959 passengers 36 283-Ib, ale pe gg to ane ue to
1 the clut nd organizing bo y > Co Pe . ‘ . ‘ . . 2ag ive 3S | » would endeavour aT as : wes serve th the six ns puro=
5 ie ee eee eB = the eee and the | members as was proposed in the gress made by the Department of lantic Region arrived in the his po apg Or yr endeavour freight and cargo and 5,496-Ib = ae ve i ation
ciple ch the D.W.O, works iF ecient cla at: the Objects and Reasons of the Bill, Public Works in completing the colony on 9th January for a to arrange Lips all the remainder mail, i ’
gto lotal groups $0 Buln’ YW GA _ just feck a The Regulations which were NeW garages, the removal of all, week's vacation, vit : of the a be permitted to Personnel The outlook now is that nota
iam enluen for girls. It in nak open to any Grafted by the Committee, and raeaes the ae goreaes ae a Ne aT tex ae ao Gath erUREee Mr. F. H. DeGazon, Supervisor, anes en oldie get ee
t. A “ an example of , 1 Y' accepted by the Civil Service Asso- ‘he generating plants has been [igh 502 /60¢ rough = Barba- . i " i Vigie Airport, Castries. St. Lucia, drafted before early 1Yoo.--U.R,
how unity hall ¢ Pie ofp one but ta young women who istic i ; ;, completed, thus clearing the way dos during the ‘month commenc International Aeradic gle port, , A
i inity hall can help know something about’ stitdhery ciation, will apply to all public » . . y > 7, (Caribbean) Ltd:
teal community. Some activity cite’ ecdreme Meainee om learn Officers and whole time employees for the sub-surfac ing of the Car ing on Friday 18th January Phi - ag erer dc ‘ak Saas
goes on in the Belleplaine Cen- more so that they can become Of Government, thus enabling Park, This new car park is increased their number of flights ‘Mr. Gears Solan O er
e every day of the week ex- teachers in their own groups uniformity of leave provisions in approximately 200ft. x 110ft. and to 14 as compared with 9 in Jan thet Mr. George Cartet—earn.
cept Sunday. They include a Baby = the Civil Establishme ¢ . will be capable of accommodating uary 1951, and transported a tota tor-in-Charge, LA(C)L., Barba-
Welf cl B f th Plavi Field Nethall " Establishment of thé ¢ vrivate cars parked herring 866 J 1952 dos, has tendered his resignation
We e Clini 1 Brancn © e aving Fields — Nethba islz 4s ate et > : “= of 366 passengers in nuary 52 Se, es < b
Publi Library; Police Boys Wand. hinted by Mr. M. E. Cox bone fashion.The taxi rank w ilk as ‘cuaanarad with 984 di wet . the to Head Office, Port-of-Spain, to
Club and a series of Committees For years organised team (7) Satins seconded the mention t : be separate and distinct from the corresponding period in 1951. become effective 15th February
run i 1 le bu ‘sanis- games (e.g. cricket and football) a se oe 1, private car park and will be so , 1952. Mr. Carter will be greatly
ed the D.W.O.’s. which in- have been played by boys,, but the second reading of the Bill, delineated. British Guiana Airways Ltd: nissed by all with whom he work-
clude there has been no similar activ- ‘hat the new Regulations provid- The Department of Public This airline, the local Agent i at Seawell Airport, from the
" _. ity for girls. To meet this de- ed for the granting of leave to works have now completed the f° which are B.WIA. Ltd cage when the Radio Call sign
(a) A sewi roup for girls §cienc nic se. all public employees on the same ~ my transported a total of 116 passen- ea? r =
é TOUY ficiency the Social Welfare oe as q tan ne two buildings designed to house i ; was “22 up until now. Mr, Car-
fice a week; aN _ fice is encouraging and stimfat- asis as does the Holidays with the garages for the Airport vehi- S&S during the month in 16 tax’ pectsitic: lode Vie auntie Mir
a \ P Reading group for ing netball among the d Pay Act provide for employees cles, Storeroom and Workshop. “ights This airline continues te P. Carter of Messrs, Carter & Co
dul on. Tuesday eve- Scholars’ Associations of the in private businesses, Foundations for 8 other garages Operate its bi-weekly schedule on 5) idgetown who died on &th
i rhe grou. 3 at primary schools in the island, to be rented to Airline operators Mondays and Thursdays between yo nuary. It is on sokeunt ta his
ri readin Julius and | among other girls groups, BUDGET to house their vehicles have been St, Vincent Barbados—Dominica yt cle’ a th nat Wir. Gedirae
eeeser 2 oii ‘ particularly those that are being --from 1. laid and the building will be com“ Barbados—-St. Vincent Carter . Director. yf the jan e
ur ub or formed at the Community Cen- yleted during February rs < > °
x q pleted during February K .t toe nae :
f t Ball and tres." The task has been @ slow estimates and covers in the main The extension tc the Termiral Ae operated 4. charter jag an hide ens at the
Po >an one, ‘but long a some\ pro- the new cost of living allowances Building, the dimensions of which fights during the month betwee! ae a eee ee part in the
, : - gress can be recordec rer! sec 4 is are 8 cf s res » Nev a : juUSsINess O > rm.
1 salsed alin SSR GREL TEENIER “Déviods Axe to Government employees and is are 83ft. x 33ft. has now reached Curacac Zarbados (via St
4 . ganis Be I ods é a reflection also of increased prices roof level, and the building of the [uc Cc ; Tr | led 16 M H ld Rose, Radi iy
he purchase not a regular feature of life-in of Government purchases extension for the Control Tower ucla) uracao rey landed 10 Mr, Harold Rose, Radio En-
! uipment. The g primary school. The first obsta- , Pp ases. : on f he tr * passengers, taking out 21, with 15 gineer for LA.(C)L,.. Barbarios
; , , ; ee r oon In fact the supplementary estim- proceeds. The Control Tower will , : . tt [ ; : ’
try. Plavir Fields cle, therefore, to be overcome 4 ; ; intransit This airline had a de ined from St. Lucia on New
a4 + : ’ ’ . ates during the year amounted to be a more spacious room having , cea q ’ . ' 7
i } sted by was the reluctance of the girls ~ $1,500,000; al Wi’ a-length of 30ft. and a depth of lay of approximately 30 hour , Year's day where he had spent
king up the small bal- themselves in participating in an over 3 400,000 and although 10M "Phe room haat oat be. Barbados due to an engine chans bout 3 months _ transferring
ne cd. The group activity which involved running, there will be an under expenditure low- the. Control ‘ Sacear aall Z. on one of their aircraft, A relief [.A.L.’s Equipment from Vigie
chosen two if its best jumping, and co-ordination of pf $230,000 in respect of emigra~ itil " ‘i aa briefi 7 an plane was flown from Curaca \irport to Castries. Since Mr.
and > the young brain and body. The next task ton, a considerable amount. will Bo (sec AF LCRA | TOR tO incing a splet tn jeorge Carter's resignation from
an @ @ up once a week at F aa someone wail ing and fall to be revoted in the 1952—53 Pilots and flight crews rINging é ou plete engin ' svi rAL” Wir Ross hes usniinl
os * was to fi some > 1 anc . = f Ww ble , ren for changing and installing warns . se =
i with other bas- satneckeaiaal ua : ate eee tar i 8 Pwo new double-throw loud Bing fen: on ontoreimceGharde
Harrison College Gani Mas so st Comb Jae New Taxation system ‘were installed dur ing the do "the job. After a test flight cna tk Barbados : Nope Bt rate of egg production,
(e) Netball for girls School, « terdebogie) a oncca ar month, one in the Terminal Build- both aircraft departed for Cura- “yy, & W.. Hall, Secretary) and maintain them in good
(f) One afternoon a week the training, and- during 1949 and , The substdntial actual and po- ing and the other in the waiting cao, ‘Secountahit, and Mr, Frank JJ.} physical condition. The
Hall is open for indoor 1950 instructed leaders. fr , tential increases in the recurrent room. ’ j ’ “a Signals Officer — .
: rom the 2 Jinea Aer ale Nnezo- ivdine, Area Signals Officer
nes such as table tennis, following Old Scholars’ re ae expenditure of Gove nment wil! Mr. Bertie Rogers—until re- Hanae men ile Venezo LAL. paid @ short routine. visit oatmeal! in Ful-O-Pep
Chinese checkers, draughts, ¢{jons: St. Paul’s, St, Matthias, Tequire to be covered as soon as cently attached to the Port.of- ams she ) : 5 ; to Seawell during the month Feeds and Mashes for
ete, Grace Hill, Christ. Church, St, possible by increased and new Spain office, B.W.LA. has been ; ‘er 1 paper 8 fights urine Phey returned to their headquar- For Starting, Growing starting, growing and egg
Shady . most encouraging Albans, and Edghill Memorial. taxation, While it is a fact that transferred to Seawell as Traffic the month bringing in 06 passen= ‘ors’ in Trinidad on 23rd January. and fgg Production dacti ib
ign that the tendency t ee The fees for instruction and mo- the present average of annuai Clerk, He arrived early in Jan- Bers and taking out 113, The new It is learned that Mr, Bill Lawes production contributes
tn Ne sce fox wetnbling HCY, for equipment were raised crops, viz., probably 170,000 tons Uary schedule is as follows Fridays Assistant Operations Manager, For information and orders, contacts toward nore profitable
vhi “ia chen hen i wen. Dome Old_ Scholars themselves between 1949 and 1952 inclusive, B.W.LA. recruited three new Maturin Barbados Mat | AL, recently returned to U.K R. M, JONES & CO., L results.
f ovtneaie ; 25. has ea AS mugh a oan which was held provides adequate revenue for our Hostenees during ne month. They urin, arriving at Barbado at from Buenos Aires where he was a . oy Lid.
tive) : : : during 1949. any of these girls ediate ments, the re- are the Misses Pauline Fitzgerald, 12.30 p.m, and leaving at Lat ; I ‘
tirely died out. All teachers and GUZM8 3 immediate requiremen ie 1 ‘ : delegate with the U.K. M.C.A P. ©. Box 241
Sey. Sind tae enn a had never before even seen net= dyction in annual crops which Barbara Hart, and Mrs. Carlton p.m. Sundays—Maiquetia—Bar- (United Kingdom, Ministry of : Made by
service. There is no wi blared mast a almost inevitable would result in Goddard. Mise dig ax i. the oor — Maiquetia, arriving at (Gjyj) Aviation) delegation to the Bridgetown The Quaker Qats Company
ble for paying them Ree eet a eae is 4 series of deficits against which’ Younger daughter of Mr, Thos: Barbados at noon and departiny) South American and South Atlan e
nim of the District Wel- therefore with a certain. amount there are presently no adequate Fitzgerald of Messrs Gardiner at 1.00 p.m



z sride in achieve: a q tic Regional I1.C.A.O. meeting
e Officers is not only to get of pride in achievement that we


























f “eServes. Austin & Co., Ltd., local Agents Mr. Vernon Knight, Hon, Vice re 8 re “y Ask -O- i —it’
new a tis ol but to build record sna cr * me above- fet tas been indicated earlier im for Trans-Canada Air Lines, and Consul for Tonmatiatd in Barbado held theter: Pn hie terurn journey oh fos Pul-9 Pep Rowliey Paoding Guide—it's Freel
up ana develop . any existing menSoned . strane were accepted this memorandum, this aspect ahd 4 sister of Miss Dorothy Fitzger- accompanied by Mrs, Knight, left |
groups. Much time is therefore OF ae Meat’ deta 8 ‘aaa. that of future capital expenditure ald, Trans-Canada’s Receptionist for Trinidad on 14th January to ; See eR —- $$$ —____— neers acememnims
ven to these on the Committee yy, tball League c 7 will be considered when the Fiscal at Seawell, Miss Hart is of Cana- attend a victory party given by ;® \
ie 1 every tance is giv- © Z Survey is presented to the Legis- dian birth and now resident in the Trinidad office of Pan Ameri-
ing 4 : d di Retina’ uberis The next hurdle, that of ob- lature. a ope rene - vie can Airways, which had emerged | | —_—__oooOo
ae q ate oonthiee ros taining equipment was met by _ ti 4 4t-Commander arlton winners in an area sales contest |
emiacba oY ete ter Cast against the individual associations. This ~ 10d dar x ‘ i initiated by P.A.A.—Latin Ameri-
odds which were fairly formid- meant that the various groups (i) the Savannah Committee Trans-Canada Air Lines: can Division. Mr. Vernon Knight
ble beginning and are still had to work. for and organis® for the use of space at the Dr. Neil Stewart —~T.C.A’s med~ is Manager of Messrs. Da Costa é |
to be reckoned there is being indoor Games ~ Svenings; social Garrison “Tor the St. Matthias ical officer stationed at Vancouver, Co., Ltd., (Sales Department) |
lowly built up in St. Andrew a hops; concerts and ‘fairs in order and St, Paul’s Netball Teams; was on vacation in Barbados dur- local representatives of P.A.A.| to |
real community movement to raise the $48 that was neces- (ii) the Vestry of St. Mi- jing the month. He was accom- His wife, however,,is the Mana- |
. sary to purchase Tings, pe chael for the use of Queen's panied by his wife and daughter.. geress. of “Airlines & Gen ai
The Centre at Belleplaine is ball and bands. It will not F Park and the grounds of the Miss Phyllis Farmer. daughter Agencies Ltd,” Local Agents for |
® not however the only activity realised, except by those who Nightengale Memorial Home; of mr, H.R farmer ‘of Lodge L.A.V As |
taking 1 Recently the new have worked with poor groups (iii) Mr. and’ Mrs. Grantley or Mr. - i, n y wdge LA.V.
hool ir Mount has been the amount of effort needed. The Adams for the use of grounds
ope i Parent. Teachers Social Welfare Office stresses the at their home for the Grace



ich has been set need for self-help in obtaining the Hill Netbail Team;
the Education De- things that the group desires, and and











Stair
and

|
| |
| i) ,-
|
|
|

| the Social Welfare this $48 had to be raised in addi- (iv) to the Vestries of—
I Organisation is still tion to whatever other funds were St. Michael, St. Philip and
a very new born babe but asmall-ordinarijy required for normal Christ Chureh who have pro-
beginni has been made, and club needs vided or expressed their will-
hoir practices and a_ class in One of the pre-requisites for © ingness to provide grounds and
neediecraft for girls are already membership to the Barbados ‘equipment .at.. their Playing |
taking place. On Sunday after- Netball League is that each team Fields.
noo! 1 hall of the school is should have a “home” ground This is the beginning, and wita|
open for parents and teachers to This was not easy for,snerO.S.A.’s the add@ed stimulus which the!
meet in a friendly atmosphere. to obtain; “Through the Social Barbados Netball League will
There is also a small basketry Welfare Office the following give to the’ game, the day is
me ‘sn operation based on teams have now. acquired. a looked. forward to confidently
der School. Well-made bas- “home” ground, and the thanks? when Netball for girls will be;
made by the boys are pur- of the office go to— as popular-as cricket for boys. |
!

Your flight by pressurized Constellation Speedtrd
saves you days of travelling time — extra time
fo do and see more on business or pleadure.
You relax im deep-seated comfort, enjoy complimentary
meals and mealtime drinks in flight high above the weather
No extras to pay — not even a tip —
for attentive B.O.A.C. service.

BOAC. takes good care of you

Passage
Carpeting

MORE space
MORE crace
LESS) Waste




Carpet
Strips

|
|
|
|
..And Save asigts On “Off Peak’
|



. : BAKBADOS NORMAL | “OFF SEASON*
| in varied RETURN RETURN |
i . “ j
: Widths : LONDON . 1,560.10 1,301.60
WITH THE NEW = |] 3 NEW YORK .. 518.10 a .
| & all sizes of | PARIS . 1,560.10 1,301.60
FIB RE M AT S } MIAMI fi 406.50 on



Consult your Travel Agent or British West Indian |
Airways. Lower Brond Street, Bridgetown—Bar-



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 4) |p appapos |

“We also stock



bados. Telephone 4585.

Seo the New Medels now on Show at CO-OP. _ ee | ey Vy |
with Cane Seats

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. COTTON and Weed Seats” BY I» BQ:
VICTORIA STREET FACTORY LTD. |

BRITISH Fee ah AIRWAYS vd eon a eeee |

320











pacecarsonsin






PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS S49 ADVOCATE |



roe a Tk ey

ef
Thursday, February 28, 1952



NO OPP

IN a party political broadcast last Satur-
day Mr. Attlee, Leader of Her Majesty’s
opposition in the House of Commons said
that “an active opposition is an essential
part of our system.”

In Barbados where the Bushe experi-
ment operates on a so-called party basis
an active opposition is impossible because
ot the overwhelming majority of one party
and the fragmentation of what is called
the opposition into four electors, two In-
dependents and two Congress. The Bushe
experiment has ended, as was earlier pre-
dicted, in the destruction of the party sys-
tem.

Our parliamentary system which is
based on the English parliamentary system
lacks the one thing needful that makes
the English system work—an active oppo-
sition.

The House of Assembly met on Tuesday
for the eleventh time since the new session
began on December 18th, 1951. During
these meetings nothing has been said or
done'by any of the eight “opposition” mem-
bers which could be interpreted as evi-
dence of a policy. There has been in the
new Assembly opposition in the sense that
speakers from all parties have criticised
members of the Executive Committee and
have attacked in debate — proposals and
resolutions introduced by them.

Mr, A. E. S. Lewis, especially and on
occasions Mr. Barrow and Mr. Talma have
contributed to debate certain statements
which could not be interpreted as favour-
able to the arguments put forward by
protagonists of the government.

On one occasion Mr. Lewis showed his
independence of the party by voting with
the “opposition.” This week Mr. Talma
voted against his party.

On most occasions however, labour mem-
bers who disagree with measures cham-
pioned by members of the Executive Com-
mittee refrain from carrying their dislike
to the extreme of voting against their own
party. But this has happened in this session
more than once.

On the other hand, all members of the
Electors’ Association do not always vote in
the same way and Mr. Haynes recently
voted independently of his party when
the report on the runway at Seawell was
under discussion by the House. It is true
that during the present session the “oppo-
sition” has more often than not voted en
bloe against the Labour Party but quite
apart from the fact that not all eight oppos-
ing members seem to be present when the
counts are made, voting against the gov-
ernment cannot be said to be the same as
actively opposing the government. And
as Mr. Attlee truly said an active opposi-
tion is an essential part of the British
parliamentary system. Unfortunately the
Barbados parliamentary system has pre-
served the shadow of the British system
‘but has lost its substance. Nothing could
have been less desirable: nothing could
have been further from the intention of
Sir Grattan Bushe.

In his party political broadcast Mr.
Attlee made another statement which does
more than underline the gravity of Bar-
bados’ lack of an active and effective oppo-
sition. He made the statement that “we
recognise that any government would have
had to introduce unpopular measures.”
This sentence will repay study and analys-
is because it is so far removed in meaning
from the political system of this, island.

It may fairly be said that the last thing
that any political party wants to do here is
to introduce any measure that is unpopu-
lar. The political platforms which were
adopted by the two major parties during
the electioneering campaign of 1951 seem-
ed to rival one another in the wonderful
promises made to the people. The out-
standing knowledge possessed by Mr. J. H.
Wilkinson in all matters affecting Barba-
dos’ economy was completely overlooked
and ignored by electors who bluntly and
recklessly displayed what little interest
they have in matters which so vitally con-
cern their present and future standards of
living.

In Great Britain on the other hand not
only does Mr. Attlee as leader of Her
Majesty’s opposition recognise “that any
government would have had to introduce
unpopular measures” but ex-Labour Min-
isters like Mr. James Griffith, former
Secretary of State for the Colonies, and
Mr. Robens have been recently warning
workers in South Wales and elsewhere in
England that industrial disputes fomented
for political reasons sabotage the Trade
Union movement, play into the hands of
the Russian imperialists and endanger their
own standards of living.

In Barbados, on the other hand, visitors
to the House of Assembly cannot fail to
conclude when they listen to speakers of
the so-called “opposition,” that their real
objection to the party in power is not that
they turn a blind eye to evils which must
be remedied but that they do not go fast
enough down the road which leads to
Utopia. If they continue like this parlia-
mentary government in Barbados will be-
come o more than “rubber stamping” in-
terrupted by gusts of hot ail

no

OSITION |





West Indian Federation Cuba’s Sugar

@ From Page 1

by a Committee voniposed of
representatives of all the Colon-
ies concerned. But the Stand-
ing Closer Association Committee
themselves recognised that much
further work would be necessary
before the practical effects of
their recommendations could be
fully assessed, Some Governments
have already started a detailed
examination of the Committee’s
proposals and I presume that the
remaining Governments will wish
to undertake similar studies in
advance of the Conference
Secondly, it is already clear that
proposals will be put forward for
modification of some of the Com-
mittee’s- recommendations, and it
is desirable that all the Govern-
ments concerned should have
adequate time to study such pro-
posals in advante of the Confer-
ence. Thirdly, I note that little
progress has so far been made by
Governments in considering the
report of the MacLagan Commis-
sion. A Customs Union seems
to be an essential corollary of
political federation, and for this
reason I should doubt the wisdom
of holding a general conference
on federation unless Governments
had already studied the report of
the MacLagan Commission and
had reached broad conclusions.

4. My present view, therefore,
is that it would not be advisable
to hold the London Conference
until Governments had been
able:

(i) to complete their study
of the financial and other
implications of the Rance
Report;
to undertake a detailed
examination of the pro-
posals made in the Mac
Lagan Report with a view
to determining what tech-
nical difficulties may call
for some adaption of the

(i)

proposals to: meet the
conditions of individual
territories and what par-
ticular fiscal problems
would arise from _ the
application of the tariff
schedules incorporated in

the report; and



DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS
LONDON,

The best news of the week is
the end of Identity Cards. I sup-
pose they were not particularly
obnoxious pieces of pasteboard,
but it was what they stood for
that seemed irksome. And they
were a little absurd. The state
gave every baby the present of a
card inscribed with name and
birthday—in case it should forget.
Changes of address had to be re-
corded, The cards were introduced
in the hurried legislation of 1939
with the idea that they would last
for wartime only. By the time the
war ended the bureaucrat had
tagged so many burdens on the
grey cards that they would not
let the cards go, Health services
land Post Office clerks asked for
the cards; the police found them
convenient. They could always
ask every motorist parking in the
wrong place to show his card. The
theory was that identity cards
make bigamy difficult, But actu-
ally the rates for bigamous mar-
riage have risen since the war—
as one of our nationalist humorists
cays, nothing will keep a British
bigamist back.

Accidents Wilf Happen

I have been reading a report—
a very solid official document—
by His Majesty’s Inspector of
Factories—and I have found it
fascinating. It discusses the vari-
ous kinds of accidents that hap-
pen in Britain's factories—and
all kinds of other matters con-
nected with life in industry. For
people who work in offices, the
life of the factory is like studying
a foreign country. Here are some
of the aspects of the everyday
life of the British industrial work-
er that most struck me:

When asked about evening
work, on the shift system, many
workers said “It is as good as
going to the pictures.” They liked
the evening shift because they
could be about the house all the
day, aad look after their gardens
before coming in to work in the
evening, Their wives reported that
they did not like it,

The British industrial worker
hates wearing goggles to protect

By

OUR

A Clerk Replies

To The Editor, The Advocate,—

SIR,—I read what “Shopper”
had to say about clerks, in Fri-
day’s Advocate and as I am a
Clerk I felt that I should answer.

I agree with “Shopper” that
some clerks are very slow and
are not interested in their work
but that does not mean that all
clerks should be thought of as
one, it is true that in some lead-
ing stores when you go to pur-
chase anything the clerks do not
come forward to you to see what
you require, if you never ask for
what you want I doubt if they
will ask you.

But, for all tha , a clerk has to
eat the same as the shopper,. and
she has to dress smartly since
when you are a clerk, you can-
not go to work anyhow, say for
instance, a clerk has six dresses
—who knows that with the smail
salary she gets she carinot afford
to buy too many so she buys six
good dresses us she knows she
has to look her best in that kind
of work. The Shopper has 12
dresses say, (twice as many as
the clerk) but what kind = of
dresses? Cheap maybe; when
the shopper dresses to go to town
in one of her twelve which are,
maybe her best naturally the
clerks look better dressed than
she does. Why not take a hint
from the well-dressed clerks and
buy good dresses instead of a
quantity that are of no account,
in that way there will be no hard

feelings.

The clerks cannot go to the
grocery and get their groceries
any cheaper than the shopper,
they have to pay the same price
we clerks cannot say when we
give better service in our work
we will pay you your price for
the groceries, we have to pay thé

!

‘From.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

(iii) to circulate
ions under

their conclus-

(i) and (ii),
together with any propos-
als for amendments and
nodifications, for study by
other Governments con-
cerned.

If the London Conference is to
be held in June, I consider that
it is essential that preliminary
work on the above lines should
be completed by the end of
March, If it appears thet this
preliminary work cannot satis-
factorily be completed in time, it
may be advisable to postpone this

meeting until later in the «um-
mer. .
5. It will be no easy task to

sift, collate and present the views
of so many Governments on the
diverse and _ technical subjects
covered by these two reports. I
suggest that it would be to the
general convenience of West
Indian Governments to make use
for this purpose of the facilities
for re gional co-ordination
afforded by the Development and
Welfare Organisation; if desired,
the Comptroiler of Development
and Welfare could be invited to
preside Over a committee of offi-
clals nominated by all the Gov-
ernments concerned. It would
seem very desirable that wherever
possible the Financial Secretaries,
or corresponding officers, should
take part in this committee. This
committee would be expected to
present to their Governments
and the Colonial. Office, at least
one month in advance of the date

fixed for the opening of the
London Conference, a compre-
hensive statement of the views

and recommendations of Govern-
ments on both reports. I should
emphasise that I do not propose
that this official committee should
deal with any questions of policy:
its function would be to collate
the comments and proposals of
the various Governments so as
to facilitate the work of the Con4
ference

6. I should be grateful if you
would inform me, by telegram if
possible, of the views of your

his eyes—and so accidents to eyes
were higher than they should be.

Workers were inclined to exag-
gerate the irritation of wearing
goggles.

More accidents in factories hap-
pen toward the end of the morn-
ing, and again late in the after-
noon—the peak accident time is
between four and five in the eve-
ning. The worst accidents happen
then due to carelessness—and one
of the most dangerous jobs is that
often allotted to girls and youths
who have to clean moving
machinery.

Atomic energy has added a new
chapter ‘to safety regulations.
Many firms in Britain now use
atomic bye-products regularly to
carry out X-Ray examinations of
metal parts. The main precaution
is not to keep the same workers
always on the job exposed con-
tinually to small doses of gamma.
radiation—jhe same_as the radia-
tion from atomic bomb blasts.

®

With the departure of the last
Royalty and the last special re-
presentative the "department of
the Foreign Office that looks after
ceremonial is breathing a sigh of
relief. Many people asked how
it was decided which order the
foreign Kings and Statesmen
should march in. I have the pro-
gramme in front of me, and I have
been. asking questions. There do
mot seem to be many rules. Heads
of States were arranged with the
Kings first and the Presidents
afterwards. But there were ex-
ceptions to this. The elderly
President Vincent Auriol of
France (who must have found the
two-and-a-half mile walk a
strain) was before the young King
of Iraq. Prime Ministers, and other
special diplomatic representatives
were placed in order in accord-
ance with the seniority of their
Ambassador in London, That is
why Mr. Dean Acheson was al-
most at the back—his Ambassador,
Mr. Giffard, is g comparative new-
comer to London. But there were
no quarrels. Three centuries ago
there used to be fights. In 1661 the
French and Spanish Ambassadors
went to a procession armoured for
the fray.

READERS SAY:

same as you. A clerk’s job is
hard,—standing from 8 a.m, un-
til 4 p.m. with the exception of
breakfast hour, Don't you
think it is hard on us and we de-

serve better wages? We know
that the King was loved for his
great service to the Nation and
we also know that he was a just
and fair King and he was. not
selfish like this particulary shop-
per. Without the dollars what
would we all do including you
“Shopper.” Let me tell you

Shopper “The mills of God grind
slow but sure.”
DISGUSTED CLERK.

Boys’ Club for Dayrells Rd.

To the Editor, the Advocate
SIR,—Please permit me space
in your journal, to wholehearted-
ly support the plea by a corres-
pondent “Resident” for the
urgent need of a Boys’ Club for

Dayrells Road o, St. Matthias
Gap. t
Every evening religiously be-
tween the hours of 5 to around
10 o'clock, a gang of young men,
boys, young women and even
small children gather about the
road and do make use of every

conceivable annoyance; especially
so at Upper Dayrells Road where
a stand pipe is erected. Many of
them do not even belong to the
immediate vicinity. They use the







most filthy expressions to the
entire disgust of residents and
passersby, also the perching on top
of the pipe which enclosure pro-
vides not only sitting accommoda-
tion. but they even lie down on
same,

At tt point is surely the nar-
rowest part of the road with a
curve hindering the sight of traffic
approaching from either end. Wit!
the contin fi f I wit
the regular buses } to p

pedestria barel) jueezi

Britain

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952
el

——————



OOOO

PAPER SERVIETTES

In Plain White
$1.00 per handred

Government on these suggestions.

7. The resolution passed by
the Jamaica House of Represen-
tatives on 14th August last implied
that the purpose of the proposed
Conference in London would be
to untlertake “close consideration
of the financial aspects of fed-~
eration.” In my view, the objec-|
tive of the Conference should in|
fact be much wider; I suggest)
that it should seek to reach
agreement on a federal scheme,
in sufficient detail to enable a!
start to be made with the complex
and lengthy process of drafting}
the nec@€ssary constitutional in-|

Offer To
Egypt

CAIRO,
Cuba has offered to sell Egypt 50,000 tons
of refined sugar to help relieve Egypt's short-

ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

)
tf





}
















struments. As I said above, the| age. The offer was made by the Cuban VALOR
task of the Conference will be) ; ‘ ip ‘
craaisy tucllideiek ty the vewurt! Minister in Cairo, Sr. Louis Dalmagro, to the

DOUBLE
OVENS

of the Standing Committee on| Egyptian Premier, Ali Maher Pasha, who
Closer Association; | assume that) cajq he would consider it
it will be generally agreed that) : eo :

A Cuban Legation official said that the

the purpose of the Conference is)
to work out a detailed plan on | price Cuba suggested was about £53 11s. per



the basis of the Committee's F :

report and not to re-examine 'on, c.i.f., Alexandria. Payment would be as
afresh the various alternative jn dollars. The Cuban offer confirms with
forms of federal government

whose merits and demerits in| Maher Pasha’s previously-announced policy
relation to the West Indies the) of dealing directly with foreign governments
Committee may be presumed to ¢ t ’ ith :
have exhaustively’ studied. Po Ree Egypt’s needs without the services

‘ea ; Z of intermediaries.

& oractica reasOns, 10) .
woula nha desirable thet the) Egypt has also signed a barter agreement
number of delegates to the Con- with Czechoslovakia which provides for the
ference should be kept as low as} _ 1

sale to Egypt of 20,000 tons of Czechoslovak

representation of opinion in the| sugar in exchange for Egyptian cotton. The

VALOR
2-— 3 BURNER
OIL STOVES

Also Single Burner Stoves



possible consistent with adequate)

varios | pea howl epiniba| sugar will be sold at £64 per ton, while the and Spare Parts for all makes.
whether Seeeereation at _ file cotton will be sold at the prices ruling on

basis as for the Standing the free market. _ S. PITCHER & co.
Whether you eoueider that ...THRRE DIE IN GUADELOUPE RIOTS
Matable it wit ne aoubt bel POINTE-A-PITRA, Guadeloupe,

desired in some cases that dele-| Three people were killed and nine serious-
gations should be accompanied by |

Aslakee. _ly injured in two days of rioting in Guade-
9. I hope that the Government} loupe by striking workers affiliated with
British Guiana, whose Legis- Communist unions. The three were killed

lature has not felt able to accept .
the S.C.A.C. Report in principle,| when police fired on an angry mob storming
a sugar mill in Moule.

will nevertheless be willing to
£138,000 JAMAICA HURRICANE FUND

be represented at the London
Conference by an Observer.
OLIVER LYTTELTON.” |
LONDON,
| Donations received by the Jamaica Hur-
/ricane Relief Fund now total £138,000 and
/more contributions are still pouring in. In
addition, many thousands of pounds have
been sent direct to the Governor of Jamaica

ot
i

are made from

MOYGASHEL

. . . |
Voice Of Britain }
All over the world they listen}

to the B.B.C. If it is true, then










































ell the world should be inter-| by firms and individuals in the United King-

ested in the cuts to the B.B.C.| dom . LINENS
Overseas Broadcasting that are 7 }

now in progress. Since the war

AIR FLIGHTS, TO FRENCH WEST INDIES

the B 5 C. has cOvered the world. ° BENBURG *

As well as oe General nen LONDON ° oe,
Service, which is intended for , =
the British Commonwealth, there BALMORAL E ‘

Non-scheduled flights by United Kingdom
and Colonial registered civil aircraft to most
places in overseas territories are subject ta
various special requirements and the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation, in London, has issued
a reminder on the requirements of the

French authorities in Guadeloupe and Mar-
tinique.

have been regular programmes
in Chinese and Siamese; in Per-
sian and Indonesian, in Portu-
guese and Spanish—as well as in
the more familiar European
languages. Last year, as a result
of the budget ecOnomies, the
B.B.C, was held down to a slightly
restricted expenditure for its
overseas and European offerings.
The result is that whole services

&

ALL WOOL
GABARDINES

are now ak Nobody has Aircraft registered in the British ‘West in Popular Shades
ever quite estimated how many| Jnqdj
listen. The B.B.C, has sometimes Indies may make stops for non-traffic pur-

tried to obtain figures. Occasion-
ally write -in competitions have
revealed remarkably big addi-
ences particularly behind the Iron
Curtain, I remember having lunch
with a friend in Prague, in a block
of flats in the middle of the city
a year after the Communists took
over there. In the middle of the
day the B.B.C.’s Bulletin’s—even
in English—could actually be
heard from several windows.
Curiously, nobody seemed to care
—as everyone listened to the
B.B.C. In other countries—friend-
ly countries like Italy with their
own free news services—it was
more difficult to prove many
listeners turned to the B.B.C.
The Organization of Listeners
Research tried to get an Italian

poses in the French Caribbean islands with- a Lightweights
out prior notification or authorisation. In all
cases of traffic flights however, prior author-
isation should be obtained,

Applications should be addressed to the
Governors of the individual French islands
and should specify the type and marking of
the aircraft, the name and address of the
company, the number of people in the crew,
the proposed itinerary and points of call in
French territory, and the purpose of the
flight (passenger or freight with an indica-
tion of the number of passengers and ton-
nage.)

DOMINICA
CIGAR

Or Sale at Your Druggist

market research inquiry firm to MORE SCOUT JAMBOREES
test the Italian listening public.
But I suspect the Italians, with LONDON,

their usual amiable feelings, put
a rather friendly figure to the
B.B.C.

Now the Voice of Britain will
be cut down while another Voice
goes on shouting—and Moscow
Radio beams its takes widely.

* * *
A victory for Gown over Town.

Following upon the First Caribbean Boy
Scout Jamboree, more jamborees are already
being planned in Australia and Britain. The
Australian jamboree, for Scouts in the Pacific
area, will be held at the end of December
this year near Sydney, New South Wales,

A World Jamboree is proposed for Britain




Ouiord uacworks will not be ex| 2 1957, to honour the anniversary of the i
panded to ruin the view of the] birth of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the e }
famous dreaming spires. Boy Scout movement on February 22, 1857. i
~~ | The jamboree would also commemorate the i
golden jubilee of the movement, which ‘wag 1
started in 1907,

to the walls to avoid accidents, it

COMMONWEALTH FINANCE MEETINGS















can better be imagined than ex-
plained. This district is in close CONCLUDED
proximity to the Hastings main], INDO:
road within easy reach to the T «“ . lie, LO N,
island's most up-to-date oe f Wo “Working Parties” set up by the Con-
and Guest-houses; many residen e ‘
BN Bere than aces ame] erence of Commonwealth Finance Ministers.
this road either walking or driv-]4" London in January have now completed.
{ng. This road also leads to the} a first series of meetin dh
mly Golf Club. What impressions]. Ps mi gs an ave summitted
an = ee to us island have | interim reports for the consideration of Com-
of such @ state of affairs? ‘
The residents in this area are at ae Governments, It is expected that
property owners in a small or|each party will resume its Meetings in a few
large degree; can they be asked to > tim
ae such for the sake of a at e.
few, who, if and when spoken to © group, ui der chairmanship
are the first _ get highly annoyed, Stiaiee 7 aes so of the
beside retaliating with abuse Economic Affairs, has
Some one may suggest placing | been co: idering estion. he
them in Court, but they are many ity of ~— the au of convertibil
who have never and may never oo sterling and related problems. The
even if it meant their death, will} other. chairmanshi
be seen or heard in the Courts, m ta under the P of the Parlia-
That's where the advantage is a ary Under-Secretary for Commonwealth
aken. ink the idea of “Rest- i ii
dent” a splendid one, especially ene has been considering the question
waeg saan’ this ee ae 9 evelopment. — = or sine Carr's Cream Crack-
ner Headmaster o} . Matthias —per Ib ..... A * ers —per tin...... $1.68
Boys’ lives, also the present EETS RA 41 tin Danish Hams $7.00 J & R Sandwich Bread
Headmasters of St. Matthias and Sw TION CUT IN UK. 16, .20, 36
St. iertice and oem members LONDON, a: tin P epee. 7008 EXTRA SPECIALS
of their sta ’ ternativel i anish
could give a, peep in or may be Cuts in sugar allocations to U.K. manu~ 2 I tin D Hams $4.30 30 oz. Magnet Peas.... .36
ce = pe ‘ pers, pantie, who facturers and reductions in their private im- | x F . Tae Tupehpon $4.98 Tea-time Paste ...... AS
- B 8 ys, may be}ports of unrationed sweetening materiale |) oo ’ Cook's Paste ......... .06
given an opportunity to develop were of unrationed sweetening materials |{} |. tin Ham Roll 90 | Baby's Strained’ Foods 16
into eee diarriney a a result in a drop in the sweets Danish 16 oz, Cocktail eo teh Vale .. a
‘NT. {ration shortly, according to the Ministry of Seusagee -...... #106 I eet
il ii le Crush ...... 24
Health Centres Food, in London, ee Genawich Relish ||... 38
; Ma i OOS. NS i ae ee Cn, oes ote tS . 2 % tin Purple Grapes .54
ee et nt Enea Output of chocolate and sugar confection- |}}} Macaroni—16 oz Pke. 39: | _—_Italian Tomato Paste .27 60
SIR,—May I remind the De- i ; Carr’s Sweet Biscuits Embassy Cigs, of 25 .. .48
partment of Medical Services gf oy. - already being cut, but these cuts have per \% ID Phkg..... 48 Sling in tins ......... “42
its 1 comise made last year con-| "Ot yet taken full effect on supplies and the
eee a a dia ; - .
coon Gone See tishment ration will be maintained at its present level }
~Time marches on and these | for the time being. Before long, however, Phone CODDARDS = We Deliver
wee ‘ ently required. » is li ‘ {
aneeRO BOW tly require t ere is likely to be a 25 per cent. cut in the i
26,2 ration —B.U.P,

i

‘
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

PLAZA, BARBAREES

THE PLAZA CINEMA,
built by Messrs. Clarke & Tucker,
designers and builders of the Plaza Cinemas at Bridgetown

and Oistin.

The exterior of the building is in a straightforward
modern style and is finished in salmon-pink stipplecrete
with red accentuating the architectural features.



Oils And Fats
Talks In April

A FULL MEETING of
the Oils and Fats Confer-
ence will meet probably in
April to decide on the terms
of an Oils and Fats agree-
ment which will be recom-
mended to Governments to
supersede the existing
agreement which will come
to an end in September,
Professor C. G. Beasley,
Economic Adviser to the
Comptroller for Develop-
ment and Welfare and
Chairman of the Conference
told the Advocate yester-
day.

The preliminary work on
the terms which should be
included in such a new
agreement, was carried out

by a specisl committee
which met at Hastings
House in December last.
The recommendations of

this committee are now be-
ing considered by individ-
ual Governments.

inward slope to the entrance doors
to which the lines of fluorescent

terrazzo ficoring below, which
also slopes,

trend of designing, the wide lobby
has been located right down at
road
lighting, attractively coloured ter-
razzo wainscot and floor and well
positioned ticket offices on each
side set a bright theatrica! mood
which
passerby.

one enters the stair foyer where
the mood changes
ay testivity to pastel shades and
subdued indirect lighting, creating
a quiet and relaxed feeling well
adapted to ultimate show enjoys
ment.

left and the ladies powder room
and men’s room on the right two
flights of cantilevered reinforced
concrete stairs lead to a miezzan-

28, 1952 ae

PE




Barbarees, was designed and
who were also the

The facade which is floodlit at
night is dominated by a wide
protective canopy in red, black
and silver whose soffit joins the
ceiling of the lobby in a sweeping

ceiling lighting and the patterned
point the way for

patrons.
In keeping with the modern

level where its brilliant



invites entry of every

The Stair Foyer
Passing through the main doors

from bright
Flies’’.

With the candy counter on the

was interested in becoming
“Why An Aeroplane Flies” was
made through the co-operation of

Professor Beas said: ine lounge for balcony patrons the Empire Flying School, Royal
“There is a eineeal ieotas where the decorative scheme, Air force. The first section showed
in the West Indian territor- colourful resilient asphalt -tile was Lift. This explained the part

ies that the oils and fats
industry is particularly well
suited io the conditions
and that the Governments
are justified in taking such
measures as wil! give the
industry a reasonable de-
gree of protection.”





Crowd Attend

Police Display

The Police Show at District
“A” Police Station on Tuesday
evening attracted a large crowd.
Many tourists from the R.M.S.
Mauretania, which was anchored

in Carlisle Bay, attended the
show.

The Show opened with the
Musical Ride. Major R. A.
Stoute, Deputy Commissioner of
Police, who acted as Master of

Ceremonies, announced the names

floor, furniture and cheerful soft
lighting all combine to promote a
hospitable and restful atmosphere
of g home rather than that usually
associated
terprises.

played by the wind above and
below the wings of the plane.



with commercial en-

News In Brief:

BICYCLE



Warmth and intimacy with
dignity is a common distin-
guishing feature of all Plaza
auditoriums, as it is their
and blue colour scheme which
has been maintained heres

Nevertheless, each has an indi- STOLEN

viduality of its own. In this Kenneth Wortell of Villa Road,
auditorium accoustical qualities Brittons Hill, reported that his
have been built-in by the use bicycle, valued $45, was stolen
of curves and planes in the from outside Harris’ shop at Nel-
walls; for example, each side son Street between 5.30 p.m. on
wall is broken up into a series Friday and 5,00 p.m. on Saturday.
of splayed panels to avoid * 7 *

parallelism in sound. Lighting, A quantity of bread, a basket
which is soft end soothing, is by 2d a bowl were stolen from a
means of coloured side strip bread cart while it was parked at
coves, 2s well as by downlights Probyn Street, City, between 11.30
recessed behind grills in the P:-â„¢. On Monday and 7.30 a.m, on
ceiling. Tuesday. The items are the prop-
erty of the Purity Bakery. The
incident was reported by Living-
stone King of Culloden Road, St.

Focal Point

: sai 4 ra The focal point to which the Michael.
oor of the horses and their eyes are drawn, naturally, is the * * *
: stage and screen. Here we have Six and a half acres of ripe
As usual, both horses and rid- an innovation — no proscenium canes . were burnt when a fire

ers were applauded for a grand arch or curtains — just a “float- Occurred at Apes Hill Plantation,

display
ment,

of precision

and judg- ing” screen which provides pro-

St. James, at about 11.45 p.m. on

jection of q previously undreamed Tuesday,
This was followed by the Drill of

quality and maintains The fire extended to Spring

the

Display by recruits who are at Plaza tradition for pace setting Plantation where 22% acres of

present, Training at Dist. “A” and in the Cinema business of Bar- Tipe ¢anes,
some members of the Constabu- bados. Coloured light spills out Walcott, were burnt.
lary. The drill squad gave a good from behind the top and sideg insured.

4 of this screen
of the display was that no orders concave

performance. A_ special feature

were given.

The show ended with the Beat-
ing of the Retreat by the Police
Band and Drummers, The Drill
Squad, which was dressed in
regular dress for the Drill Dis-

tunic with white
and gloves.
To climax

helmet,

the evening’s en-

erica, Great Britain and Canada.



the usual standards.

Further Evidence
In Larceny Cage

Further evidence was taken
yesterday by His Worship Mr.
&. A. McLeod, Police Magistrate
of District “A”, in the case in
which Frank Frybrace (35) of
Pine Land, St. Michael, is charged
by the Police with the larceny of
eight tins of paint valued at £16,
4s. 8d., the property of General
Hardware Supplies.

The charge states that —
offence was committed sometime

painted in a pleasing combination
of pastel shades.

belt building every seven minutes.

fully
tertainment tihe Police Band play- vision from every seat, while the
ed the National Anthems of Am~= pack to back spacing of seat rows
has also

vf solid permanence which has
been developed with the idea of
maximum pleasure, comfort and
convenience for the patrons.

Assistant School Teachers met at
the Queen's
morning as a prelude to the An-

property of S, A.
They were

* * *

Whitfield Daniel is detained at
the General Hospital suffering
from burns on his right leg.
Daniel was assisting Lionel rie
Another new feature is the in- 8tim with putting gas into a lorry

on to the fluted
back wall which is

stallation of a ventilation system When an explosion occurred.
under :

4 drive,
play, now wore the entire blue Stately

which large electrically
exhaust fans will com-

A_ fire at) Gibbons Plantation,
change the air in the

Christ Church, at about 4.30 a.m.
on ents burnt four and three
The floor slope has been care= Quarter acres of first crop ripe
7 canes, the property of F. B. Good-
designed to afford perfect ing, ‘hey were insured.

It extended tg Parris Land and
burnt half an acre of first crop,
an acre of second crop and half an
acre of fourth crop ripe canes,
the property of Charles Yearwood.
The ,canes were not insured.

*

been increaséd beyond

The entire project is an example

a

The equipment at the building
of the Knitting Mills at Coleridge
Street is at present being dis-
mantled. It is being removed to

the building at Spry Street which
the Mills now occupy,

This building formerly housed
the old Biscuit Factory.

Bottles Going
Out Again



Teachers Discuss
Grievances
About 500 or more Elementary



Patk last Saturday

om! . ‘uary nual General. Meeting of the With most of the leading aerat-
beware Pea at ait or ene Barbados Civil Service Associa- €d factories using their own trade
enusd at mid-day today. Fry- tion, and decided to join the marked bottles, “Barbados is re-

brace is on a bail of £75,

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker is appear- Civil Service Association.

ing on behalf of Frybrace while

Set. E. King is prosecuting for the with a view

Police.

£5 For Bodily Harm



School Teachers’ Division of the €xporting empty three-gill bot-

tles oie islands.
The meeting was summoned _ Applications were made _ by
fo awakening the individuals to the Control Office

interest of Assistant Teachers in for permission to export these
their own welfare, since only a bottles, and accordingly, the Con-
very small minority of them were troller of Supplies
members of the Teachers’ Divi- notice informing interested per-
sion of the Civil Service

has issued a

Asso- sons that he would consider issu-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THE BARBAREES PLAZA which opens next Saturday night.

Why An Aeroplane Flies

THE FIRST of a series of lectures on “Theory of
Flight” to be given to members of the Barbados Light
Aeroplane Club and the public was held at the British
Council, “Wakefield”, on Tuesday night. This lecture was
‘illustrated by a Film Show. .~

The Show was the first part of “Why An Acroplane
This was divided into three sections : Lift, Drag,
and Thrust. A large number of members and people who
are anticipating becoming members, attended. There were
a few of the ladies and one especially expressed that she

a non-flying member.

The audience was also able to
see at what angle the plane would
reach stalling speed. Mr. Wood
Goddard, Chairman of the Com-
mittee of management, who an-
swered queries, explained stall-
ing speed for the benefit of mem-
bers,

This section showed quite
clearly how the plane should
be flown to get the best landine
results. At one stage the plane
was stopped in. the motion of
landing so that the audience
could see the angle of the wing
which was responsible for giv-
ing the plane lift before its
wheels touched the ground.

By use of particles in water
this section showed the rush of
wind over the wing at various
angles, identifying the low press-
ure above the wing and the high
pressure below.

The next section dealt with
Drag which was divided into three
parts Parasite Drag, Induced
Drag and Skin Friction, The fina]
section was Thrust.

Stability

The other three parts of the
“Why An Aeroplane Flies”, which
will be shown next Tuesday night,
are: Forces in Balance, Stability
and Defective Control,

After the show Mr. Goddard
answered questions while some
of the members discussed various
points. between themselves, In
moving a vote of thanks, Mr.
Goddard said that he was glad to
see the number present, but he
hoped on the next occasion the
attendance would be greater. He
pointed out quite clearly that the
lectures were open to the public
Even those who had no intentions
of joining the Club could attend

As soon as the hall was cleared,
the Committee of Management of
the Club held a meeting to dis-
cuss insurance of planes and
members

Through the courtesy of the
British Council, booklets entitled
“Aviation Training in Great Brit-
ain’’ were distributed to
who were interested.

Sound Training

The foreword to “Aviation
Training in Great Britain” is
written by Minister of Civil Avia-
tion, Lord Pakenham, who states
“Sound training is the founda-
tion-stone of success in any walk
of life. This is true above all in
air transport, where development
is so rapid that new problems
confront us almost every day and
the search for their solution com
pels change of method and tech-
nique. Those who choose aviation
as a careey must indeed be flex-
ible in mind and adventurous in
spirit.” :



The booklet has many illustra,
tions. One picture shows the plane
which was used in the first Lon«
don-Paris air service in 1919 and
another shows the first plane to
make a_ direct non-stop trans-
atlantic Flight in 1919, The flight
was made by two British, airmen

Anotker group of photograph:
shows some of the British train-
ing in aircraft nnd some of thie

civil aireraft.

It deals with licenses that can

be obtained in Great Britain and
the training establishmer
qegepclneapeeincenaernirenetminbeemiomomsetnre



those *

In Damages Suit

DEFENCE COUNSEL in the Court of Common Pleas

Suit Damian De Abreu vs. E. E. Deane in which De Abreu
is claiming £720 unpaid commission, Mr. E. K. Walcott
Q.C., in his address to the jury yesterday held that there
had been no contract between the parties; besides De
Abreu did not introduce Deane to a seller as had been a

term of the alleged contract.

He argued, too, that if there

even was a contract, De Abreu had misconducted himself
and Deane would have been justified in dismissing him.

The case is being tried by a
Special jury before the Acting
Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr.
Justice G. L. Taylor,

Mr. G. H. Adams and Mr. D.
H L. Ward, instructed by
Messrs. Carrington and_ Sealy,
Solicitors are De Abreu’s coun-
sel. Mr, E. K. Walcott, Q.C., and
Mr. J. S. B. Dear, instructed by
Cottle Catford, Solicitors are
appearing for Deane. ;

De Abreu’s case is that Deane

agreed to pay him 3% commis-
sion if he introduced him to any-
one who was willing to sell a
plantation and the plantation was
eventually sold. One of the
plantations which he introduced
him to, and which was eventually
bought for £24,000 was Hus-
bands and Oxnards, St. James,
an@ De Abreu claims that he has
not been paid his commission.

A Contract

In His address to the Court,
Mr. Adams said that in Deane’s
own attempt in jis defence to
show that there had been fraud,
it was evident that there was a
contract. He argued that Deane
only knew of the plantation

through De Abreu and that even
if De Abreu did lie as the other
side was holding, it would not
have interfered with the contract.

Today when the case contin-
ues, he will address the Court on
the point of law that there could
be no defence of misrepresenta-
tion or fraud unless the alleged
misrepresentation induced the de-
fendant Deane to enter a contract

nd he suffered loss in conse-

ence,

Mr. E. D. Mottley, who was
called to give expert evidence,
said he had extensive experience
n real estate business and was
he oldest real estate agent in

experience in Barbados.

He said that the general prac-
tice was to act on behalf of the
vendor but it’ was not unusual to
ict on behalf of the purchaser.
The person on whose behalf one
acted paid one, it being understood
thal you were not being paid from
both sides.

In cases in which properties
were rare, like Broad Street, one
sometimes got another asking one
to secure a property for him and
he would pay for getting it.

Maximum Price
in buying plantations, the max-

imum price was 5 per cent. de-
pending on the price. For any-
thing over £10,000 commission
varied from between 3% to 3%.

It was seldom below 21%.

To Mr. E. K. Walcott, under
cross-@xamination, he said that of
course if one was searching for a
» and a vendor had one to sell
£24,900, an agent would not
tell his client £26,000, If he did
that he would consider he was not
working for him.s

He said that when he made an
introduction, his job was finished.
He left the price to the vendor
and the purchaser. When a pros-
pective purchaser said he wanted



a plentation the main point was to
get someone who had one to sell.

te-examined by Mr. Adams, he
said that the agent might be em-
ployed merely to find somebody
vho would do the purchasing, He
could be engaged too, in doing the
whole transaction.

Addressing the Court, Mr. E. K,
Walcott said that counsel for the
other side had realised from the
evidence given the previous day
by Mr. Roy Gill, the disaster that
hed befallen his case; hence the
introduction of additional—not
rebuttal evidence,

As regards what was a reason-
able price, it was his submission
that in any specific contract what
vas reasonable or unreasonable
did not take any effect. There
was plenty of case law to that and
he would be willing to reply to

argument if necessary. There
vas no question of what Mr.
Mottley thought or what was not
reasonable.
Specific Contract

If one were claiming a specific

contract, one failed or succeeded

| the contract agreeing to the
tcrms. Supposing one had gaid
10%, the other side could not

‘argue that that was unreasonable
because the agreement was that

it would have to be paid. There-



fore the evidence about its being
reasonable was nothing.

He held that it was not merely
a question of saying that “A” hac
something to sell and “B” wanted
something to buy. The price ha\
to be mentioned, and the righ:
price. Mr. Mottley had said that
that was part of his duty.

Here Mr. Adams rose to object
that Mr. Mottley had not said
that. He had said he would get
them together and his job was
finished there, but if he mentioned

the price, it was not because it
was his duty,
Continuing, Mr. Walcott said

that they, the jury, had heard Mr.
Mottley and they were the judges
of the facts.

He said that if Qey were satis-
fied that there was misconduct,
they would give judgment for the
defendant, Deane.

Every time he telephoned, he
worked, but the question was, was
the work honest or dishonest
work?

Price, Important

If the price was not a materia!
part of ea duty of the plaintiff,
Mr. Walcott asked, why did coun-
sel for the other side even in his
opening tell them that as a result
of certain things, a price was
arrived at. Nobody went to buy
anything unless they knew what
the price was likely to be. And if
an agent stated a price and put
on £2,000, that was very wrong

He said that whenever they got
evidence of contradiction between
De Abreu and Deane, it was for
them to say what they believed
In that case where there was Roy
Gill as a third party outside De
Abreu and Deane, De Abreu was
found to be a liar. When as a
result of Roy Gill's evidence they
found that De Abreu was a liar
they could not believe his evi-
dence as against Deane even if
they wanted to do so,

The burden of proving the con-
trect, he said, was on the plaintiff
and also the burden of proving
what the contract was, but the
burden of proving the misconduct
was on the defendant

De Abreu, he argued, had start-
ed off by forgetting what had been
put in the pleadings. In his own
words he was to get commission
if he found a place and yet be-
gan by introducing the plantations
Strong Hope and Lodee, places
with the sale of which the owners
were to pav him.

Full Details

De Abreu was saying that on
the 7th, Roy Gill was to be told
what the client thought of the
price and the plantation, They
had heard him give evidence on
that point, that he had previously
given him full particulars and on
the 7th, he had gone to the races.

So in truth and fact, De Abreu
was at his effice talking with
Deane pretending not to know
which plantation it could be and
trying to figure it oul, despite Roy
Gill the owner putting all the
cards on the table,

From the inception of his duties,
De Abreu wag stating the figure
which was not only inaccurate,
but known to be inaccurate and
incorrect. Thus he was dishonest
and misconducting himself,

You could not say you intro-
duced a planter unless you named |
a prospective vendor and pur-
chaser.

De Abreu’s saying that Deane
said he would send around some—
che to inspect the plantation
could only be a lie, Of course
Deane would not have had to go
to the secrecy of inspecting the
plantation without the vendor's
knowledge. It would have been
quite natural for an inspection
before a sale was contracted,

The fact was that Deane dic
not agree to pay him any com
mission, So it was very simple.
If De Abreu knew that neither
the vendor nor the purchaser in-
fended paying him, he would
necessarily try to jack up the price
so that he would get something
That was why he told Roy Gill
about the extra,

Jacking Up Price



De Abreu had gaid that the
commission was 3% and he would
put if to the jury that by the

jacking up of the price De Abreu
would have been hoping to get
more commission and that was
misconduct,



PAGE FIVE



He said the De Abreu’s letter
to Deane was nothing more than
an apology. All he was more or
ies saying was that other real
estate agents did that sort of thing

jJackee, up prices—and therefore
he should not go to the extreme
of giving him no commission

“My submission to you" is that
you have to find what is the con-
tract,” he said, “If you want to
prove this contract, it must be
clear and unequivocal, The con-
tract was supposed to be a verbal
cne, although in the pleadings
it dealt with introducing a. pros-
pective buyer.

He said that when one was nét
cross-examine on a certain point
he might safely assume that that
point was conceded. And Mr.
Gill was not cross-examined by
the other side on the point as to
whether he told him that the
price he wanted was £24,000.
Maybe it was felt that it was not
needed. That possibly explained
the terms of the plaintiff's state-
ment of claims which was with
the hope of evading the neces-
sity of having to deal with a bit
ot evidence such as that. That did
not hold at all, because De Abreu
had not introduced him in any
sense of the word,

He had not used
prospective vendor in the letter
nor in the evidence until he was
cross-examined,

the word

Ife held that the contract would
have to be stated, whether verb-
ally or in writing, in clear, pre-
cise terms. It could not be stated
in a way that one could under-
stand one thing and another, an-
other

Roy Gill had said that De
Abreu had told him fhat he was
going to get a commission from

___, Defence Counsel C laims No Contract

his agent and asked him how
much he was going to get from
his: but that did not prove that
there was an agreement for a
commission, That was De Abreu’s
word and his alone and he had
been proved to be a liar.

Human Greed

In his address, Mr. G. H
Adams said that it was a simplk
matter and they as jurymen were
entitled to use their knowledge
of the world as to whether they
believed. the statement of the
witness or not. It was quite
usual matter for either a vendor
or purchaser to pay a commis-
sion. It was usual for a person
to ask an agent to get a radio,
a house or some such item and
they would be paid a commission.
But sometimes, as was the case
before them, human greed came

into the affair and the commis-
sion was not paid,
Certain contracts need not be

written but could be made verb-
ally, and the type of contract
they were dealing with was such
a one. But that was not in dis-
pute.

They were not saying that all
De Abreu had to do was to intro-
duce a man, They were saying
that if as a result of an introduc-
tion they got together and a sale
was made, the commission was
due.

As to the question of unequi-
vocal language in a contract, he
said that there were instances
when it could be argued that
despite a sale not coming off,
commission should be paid for
the bringing together of the
parties. In the escaping of such,
the language should be clear and
unequivocal.

@ On page 6

SPECIFY |

“EVERITE

ASBESTOS-CEMENT
CORRUGATED SHEETS

AND

~TURNALL’

ASBESTOS

lrresh



Supplies

J. & J. Baby Oil
Vitalis Hair Tonic
Saccharin Tabs. 1000's
Medilax Laxative Tabs.
Nervitone Tonic Wine

Riddobron Inhalant

Arrived

(Cashew Nuts (tins)
Barney Tobacco
Betuli Oil
Absorbine Jnr.
Vapex Pastilles

Kropps Razors & Strops



KNIGHTS LTD.





SSeS [2 Pe Pe ee ee
; “ ah cal 3 ciation. ing licences for their export during We x 44 i es ry a
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, , s. ra wes the period February 28 to April "
Acting Police Magistrate oe aie an te te pgothes: 23, 1952
trict “A”, yesterday ordere port) = ,
George Austin, a labourer of tain grievances, and it was t- A check with the Control Office

Thomas Gap, Westbury Road, St. ed out that although head teach- coer L that pameedy parsons ne
Michael, to pay a fine of £5 in 14 ers and assistants were both fac- ‘oa ea meee eek
days or two months’ imprison- tors in t&e common wheel of bie ; . Ve a y
ment with hard labour when he education, the requisite respect een issued.
found him guilty of inflicting was not given to assistants’ by
bodily harm on Myrtle Bowen. some of the heads. |
. Another irregularity which was

The offence wes committed on brought to the notice of the meet- IN PREPARATION
Februsry 9. Mr. D. Malone 4p- ing was that in some schools, as-
peared in the case on behalf of sistants were promised prefer- Mr, S, A. Hammond of the De-
Austin. Bowen told the Court ence if they sacrificed their re- velopment and Welfare Organisa-
that at about 7.30 p.m. on Feb- cess period at mid-day or their tion who paid a visit to the Lee-
ruary 9 the defendant after abus- after-school hours, ward. Islands: for the pur a

j < r several times
ing her, kicked her severa 3 re Wad wesie: Seat Siacvtew ee making an investigation of the

and threw her to the ground. The : n oreanisation..of the salédles of
incident happened at the corner thé adverse criticism levelled at civil

- sport Shirts

and other items for men



HAMMOND REPORT



_ CONSULATE WHITE SPORT SHIRTS

Short Sleeves, sizes 14} to 17 ins. |

Each $8.03



A em een as meee nem ne





/ “ENOWN DE LUXE SPORT SHIRTS









.# n"

' 4 servants in that area is 2 ‘77

i ick Gap, St. Michael. teachers in respect of the “thir- i * Short Sleeves in Shades of White, Blue, Grey, Cream ie an:
ett, tecn-plus tests”, teachers should Pov ntation to the Government, ¢ salir JUST ARRIVED

Mr. Malone said that the poe make every effort to La . ; J Sizes — Small, Medium and Large
tant thing in the case was what themselves into a body, y join- oe IRINA Startena ‘
started the fight. The witnesses jing the Teachers’ Division of the BREAKFAST TIME RRR EE eae fete: Bet Be a 1.85 PURILN: we:
of the complainant did not give Civil Service Association where SERVICES Sat etemimersmisemam -- PURINA... Growena GH
the same story as the complainant they might air their grievances, ; OTIS VESTS athiet iia dadibeve's sam f Di aye
herself. If the Court accepted the and discuss their mutual prob-. During Lent Canon Barlee will atvia.. inc seston. vibb< IS .COTTON . BRIEFS BOYS 4% LENGTH SOCKS PURINA Layena
story of the defendant then there lems with a view to finding ways;conduct the breakfast time sery- and plain, Sizes 36 to 46 Sizes, 30 to 44 Sizes 84 to 10 ins. ’
was no case. and means of over-coming them. ices on Fridays from 11.30 a.m. ’ : a ‘Ke well as
‘oats pews ot At. Masys Clase, MESO. Heir. $1.56 Pair. $1.05

The subject will be—The occa-
sional services of the Prayer book,

$1.32

OPEN END SCHOOL TIES

7
Canadian Farmer Here On Holiday PURI NA

RENOWN SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS, with piped













contrasting Collars. Shades of Grey, Blue, Cream. Y pe i : Calf Startena
Mr. Getty Greene, a Canadian Station at the Pine and saw the CHURCHILL - from 1. in dae, boys of Harri- Sizes 36 to 44 ins. ys Pigeon Chow or
who donatéd a “el n bull to bull Remus which he had donated Attlee denied this. He said be . - , Suit $16.37 Dh an choi D. & F. Chow
the Barbados Government some to the Government. He said that had been ready any time to talk aR A SLs ag a J O.. ;
years ago for the purpose of im- he was glad to know that it had with Churchill and believed Lord ee 4 Rebbit Chow Milk Chow
proving the dairy strain now a number of its offspring in vari- Cherwell, Churchill's _ scientific nomen
back in the vl ous parts of the island and hoped advisor who now heads the Brit- ial ds fost Chow
Mr. Greene is a farmer from that its daughters might increase ish atomic programme, had been















}
WH
WA
|
: A
Ontario where they breed pure the milk production of their dams. kept fully inforrned. 1 | Hen Chow (Scratch Grain)
bred Frejsian cattle, Hevarrived There had been no official an- \ } ; 4 y
aie the low end by BWIA He thought that with the good nouncement that Britain was pro- oe Ss & CO.. LIMITED
ae m 1 at the Pine, it would ducing atomie weapons until 11 j i, H. JASON Pia &
oo oa ke? } t be ow before the whole days ago when Government said \ i “remGe | "ys Distributors
os . 1 H ! t production of the tests would be made this year at I 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street. Y ae a : sine _—.
He told tte yester ntir land through artificial in- Woomera desert range in Aus- Bh | fe S : a Ss 4 i. SY S] ,
that n he paid a semination should give < big boost tralia. | Sep ;
visit to the Livestock to the colony's milk production. —(C.P). = = -

"4 , \ ——————— rh as j
.%

en



PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADs.

TELEPHONE 2508.

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE











































charge is $3.00 for any number of words












up to pad 9 cents per yord fr ‘oe
a oe 4 oe he CAR—Consul: 2 months old, Mileage
N only after tf -4 under 1,500; condition as new. Apply



Ralph Beard, Lower Bay Street, Phone:
5010. 26.2.52-—3n

IN MEMORIAM TAR—One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon
in excelent condition Contact C. J

TO —In loving memory of our dear} Ramcharan. Phone 3122, or Cole & Co.,
beloved Sister and Aunt, Albertha Ltd. Phone 4316 26,2.52—4n.



CAR 1950 Hillman Minx, condition
as new Apply: W. S. L. Tnyhane,
Maxwell, or Phone 8558, 3339
27 .2.52—3n

who was called to rest on the 28th
February, 1950.
Sad memories live with us,
Today and the day sh®
away—
God took her home it was His wil

passed





But in our hearts she liveth still. CAR: 1947 Morris 8 Fawn Sedan. Easy

Annie {Sister}, Edwin (Nephew), Car- to drive. Strong Hill climber. Good tyres

men, Melda, Sheila, Anthonette (Nieces) Apply: Tel. 8288 27.2.52—3n
28.2.52—1n

CAR 1947 Chevrolet Stylemaster in

excellent condition. Apply: V Williams,
Williams Court, Christ Church, Opposite
Sayes Court Government Farm

28.2. 52—In

Leanne EEE E EEE EEEEERRnnneeel

PERSONAL



Morris



SS CAR--1 Car. 8 h.p., mileage
The public are hereby warned agains! 24,000 For further particulars, apply
giving credit to tny wife CELESTINE | H. A. Cuke (junior!. Phone 4231

DOREEN REDMAN (nee DORSON) of

Bush ‘Hall, St. Michael as I do not holc

myself respons ble for her or anyone

elge contracting any debt or debts in

my name unless by a written orde!
signed by me.

SAMUEL PETER REDMAN,
C.5.M. Curacao,
N.W.1. (16.2.52) |

28,2.52—t.f.n

CAR—One 1951 Hillman Minx, Exe
Jent condition, going very reasoni
swner driven. Dial Williams at 3006 or
vfter working hours 95251





23,2.52
CAR: 1938 Morris, 8 h.p
27,2.52—2n Recently overhauled and rebored
ee battery. Tyres fair $525 00
This serves to notify the public that; E. H. Webster, Applewhaites
I do not hold myself responsible for 28.2.52—3n
any debt or debts contracted in ms |
name unless ty a written order signed VAN: Foursome Van

ton





Apply





1949 model,

; Dark Gi (A-2) Good condition. r ; :
vy oy LESLIE MURPHY, | Apply to G. Newton, Dotleplaine St. | at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Inspection |contract, Misconduct meant mis-}and courses will be offered up to the Higher School Certificate ex-
; Dayrells Road, , Andrew. M2 2.82—4n | any day on application to the occupier. | conduct scone of the con-{amination of ‘Cambridge University.
Chriss asa Me lleite . ten ate . tract. So supposing he were dis- 2. Qualifications. Applicants for the post should hold a Uni-
alae ELECTRICAL Solicitors, 12 High Sy'sa-én, {honest in a particular tiversity degree and be qualified to teach (1) English, History and
TT os t
FLA _——— lwhiech was not connected wit! his Latin, and (2) Mathematics. ; °
Lost A FOUND geen. et ony TERIDCE |, HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom | duty, it would have had nothing 3. Salary. The post is pensionable. The salary scale is $1,920

CO,, 4671

CS

RADIOGRAM—1950 G.E.C. Radiogram
* Desk Console, Fuily repaired, excellent
condition $220.00. May be seen
DaCosta
Sehool 95-233.

21.2.52-—t+.f.n

i
ERE SEs
COAT: Short Yellow Flannel Coat.

Finder will be senerousiy rewarded 9p
réturning same to Hotel Windsor to Mrs.







27.2.52—3n








Agcock 28.2.52—2r FURNITURE
BWERPSTAKE TICKET—Series D. 064] —TepAL TABLES AND CHAIRS: Col-

Gordon
Thomas
%8.2.52—I1n

return same to

Hall, St round

and square tables with
Ideal for bridge tables

ndah furniture. Come ih and see

Finder please
Skinner, Rock









" = i. a sw show room or dial
SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series DD mn ee ee oe
7437. Finder please return same to Estelle 5136. K. R. Hunte & Co., ews ‘
Gant of White Hall, St. Michael : m
’ 28.2. 52—In =
——$—$—<—<—<————————————_ MISCELLANEOUS
FORK RENT AQUARIUMS—Large and small, all
glass. Empty or stocked with Fish and

Plants. Also some young Siamese Fight-
ing Fish and other Tropical Fish
Clarke, Dial 5148































ALOW: st ted | ———_—__—_—___—_____-———— . 6 7" ini ines " . i rj
Bao We reais at SSiters, BEDSIDE STRAW MA With Ani- AUCTION lthey believe that De Abreu would and Proprietary Medicine Prices) Order, 1952, No. 2. which will be
les Rowe Road, St. George. All} mals, | | and Tajmahal Designs, |$ ————_——_——_ - |have offered to pay Gill if Deane published in the Official Gazette of Monday 25th February, 1962.
ern conveniences ingtalted Apply ges 1.33 egeh at KIRPAL T will set up for Sale at Chimborazo.|paq not agreed to pay him a ® Under this Order the maximum retail selling prices of
HUTCHINSON 6 BA 1ELD . 4 = 28,2.52 “in Bt Joseph ‘one: bean, na shingled soles céanraisaions “Glauber Salts”, “Virol” and “B.F.I. Powder” are as follows :-—
: 24,.2.52—8n}. PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none/3, 1952 at 12 o'clock Hoon | Jt was said that Deane found 7 = ———_——
better — 10-Ib, lots and upwards @ 19¢.| Terms Cash lout that De Abreu was. telling MAXIMUM
“Maxwell Road. Fully} Per Ib. Phone 2547. 8.2.52—t.f.n R. A. LEE, |him a wrong price. It was not ITEM UNIT OF SALE “eta
ished, from the Ist March, 3 Bed- — Gover nt Auctioneer, | Te < - : 7 r PRICE
and all modern conveniences. PUI am OTICE ‘\ I I suggested that he met Ro. Gill 5 $ Seve yal 3s iatee, Ce
ly Nurse Pilgrim, Phone #101 Ms Be 28 pn at the a and tar a ie Glauber Salts ode 01
MA eae —_——___—---~ —- {Solicitor did not e m e es tig ¢ ee .* :
NOT sell on Thursday 26th at 1 pm.| price, so he could not have had 1-lb. Aig! ee os .12
"MORE. Pine Hill, Saint Michael.{ Applications from ICE Registered [Bt BATE Vee core enon g Frou a f ” Pe net De Rare
Drawing and Dining rooms, 2 bedrooms] Medical Practittoners for the post of toad to Cable & Wireless Station) a grounds for saying the ; Virol “ .. Medium sized bottle ine 86
Digweit modern conventences including] PAROCHIAL MEDICAL ce cROst (Of |fouble roofed “house covered with had told him a wrong price. It Large $1.94
hot and cold water rae Garage and] the parish of Saint Michael, will mK for | Bhingles, and a small gallery. Size: |was only after Deane had met ” ” oe $l.
seryants room. Apply ceived by me ti 2 o'cloc § x 10 x 8, TERMS CASH R. Archer ay : , old him certain 3
HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD eta wenttes wih ie ii ensia ‘Adctloneer. 26.2,52—-3n ese soi trae ge ied not to| B-P.I. Powder ++ Small sized tin es .38
siaael The Salary attach : ne AM ; ; arge ,, ; a 94
94.20.89} to emt eee FP ene, ont “hice || CARS—Morris Minor Saloon 1951 Model | PAY De Abreu his commission, | 8 ,






‘(OUSE—Two Storey House near






Ring or write Timpson Lodge

Archie

24.2.52—-5n

hundred and twenty dollars (84,320) per
annum, payable in monthly instalments

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





‘Damages Suit



In Carlisle Bay

: RATES OF EXCHANGE |

WANTED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY %%. (95
CANADA
ch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch. Sun- NEW YORK |
a = from page 5 ghine R, Sch Wonderful Counsellor, | 73.4% pr Cheques or }
HELP If they accepted the contract,|/Sen. Marea Henrietta, Seh Emeline, Bankers 71.7% pr
| they would come to the examin-|Sch are Bette Waite a, meee | Sight or demand
| e oO » ov _ ; ; D Sch. manuel c ordon, ic Draft 71.5% pr
FEMALE BUTLER & COOK—Apply: |S f the evidence. Their claim |¢.+) g. smith, Sch. Franklyn D. | 73.49 pr one
Mrs. Simpson, Veretun, St. Johr was that they were employed to|s-, United Pilgrim, M V. Cacique Del) 71.9% pr. Currency 70 2% pr
2 52—an |find a man who had a plantation) Caribe, Sch Rainbow M , Sch. D’Ortac, . Coupons 69.5% pr







i1IOR SALESMAN





mentioned and not

Dual entrance. Best offer £4,000 accepted

stairs, and usual convenience

telephone Miss Hutson, |of price was nothing to

De Abreu

For Inspection
No, 2017
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO
20,2.52—6
ee
“EBENEZER”, that desirable dwelling-|tation of a ¢ rtain size and
house overlooking the sea situate at | certain parishes to sell.

Enterprise Road, Christ Chureh and built - aes - ‘
ert inch stone standing on 2 Roode plantation would obviously










at the office of the /

2ath February [out his duty under



up for s

the terms

undersigned on Thursday






house, all conveniences, with party-
sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
and utility room sjarage, laundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under
On attractive hillsiae site, Rockley New
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476
13,2.52—t.f.n
chattel dwellinghouse
lands of Saint ‘s |
KING
The house, whch is near |a

mission. The Contract
that he should introduce him

and a sale resulted,
Defence of Fraud



standing on



Chureh, situate at

Bridgetown. contract, In

Water and electric services | UP that defence, he was
Inspection on application to
Mrs, Eustace Gooding,

Sunday) from

veniences.

installed

the Tenant,

day, (except

p.m

The house will be set up for

publie competition at our office,

Street, Bridgetown, on Thursday

instant at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,

Sokc tors
22.2.52

|
5 |
noon to 5 |helieve Deane.

sale by | Roy Gill had
|De Abreu

told them

James



how much
he thought
4n jacting aS an
even offered to

that Gill
agent. De
pay Gill.









5
9,000 miles. Austin A 70 aloon 1951 It
shightls

Mode! 6,000 miles, Both damaged

that on the





to sell and report him to Deane.

“IU required chiefly |r. . _— . Smith, & S. Campero, Yacht Maria (including Newfoundland)
for Hardware Lines. Apply in writing The remuneration would be 3%.| Catharina. 23.3% pr. Cheques on
to P.O. Box 280." 24.252-t4.n.| Mr. Mottley was put in ¢ prove ARRIVALS Bankers 71.6% pr
the usual, commission. € was|s 8. Crofton, — Kn net, Capt. S. Sight or demand po
r » oy iamond, % . Drafts 71.45% pr
PU « . . an expert, no one questioned |""S"5” Rogenes, 4,389 tons net, Capt. mend Drafts 71 45% pr
HL ; SALES that. He was put in in case there},. Vatnaland, from Glasgow. 73.3% pr. Cable
was any doubt as to the normal] Yacht Mollihawk, 31 tons net, Capt.) gc. 5, Currency 90.1% pr
z= — : commission. Dp. Nicholson, from ges Coupons 69.4% pr
REAL ESTATE Did 287 believe Deste wae Sen Mary M Lewis, 6 tons net, MAIL NOTICES
a F ne tok em a y i} Capt, 1 , for ir. ulana. “ ~
BUNGALOW ~Mode rn 4 Bedroom ploy De Abreu but in the course| MV Caribbee, 100 tons net, Capt. Mails for Br, Guiana by the Schaones
Bungalow, situated at Top Rock, Ch. Ch : Gumbs, for St. Lucia. Marion Belle Wolfe will be closed at the
sn‘, acre of land. Having 2 fully tiled |}Of conversation the question of Sunrover. 3 tons net, Capt, |General Post Office as under :—
Toilets and Baths, built-in Cupboards,|Lodge arose and he enquired!, Mev: foy Trinidad. Parcel Mail and | Hesisteres Bail *
Outside 2 Garages, Servants’ rooms and |; ° ers jretania, 19,691 tons net, |10 a.m., Ordinary at 12.15 p oi
Playroom, Garden well lad out with after Lodge? Were all the oth ss Tears a” the 29th February, 1952.

Husbands and |©4Pt.

io with
All he had to do was)and fuel tanks,

sn (to hunt about Barbados and dis-|ton Pumping Station, St. John.
}cover somebody who had a plan-

The
have
been bought in a Solicitor’s office.

15 Perches of land containing open mn - -
verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 2|Even if De Abreu lied until he
ams tg space for a third) | was blue in the face, it had noth-
nm, pan serv s room, ; 7 , -ag
PY Neve will be | ing to do with the case.

All he had to do was to carry

\to do with his getting his com-
was

someone with a plantation to sell
Deane had put up a defence

of fraud after denying there was
order that there

Seventh Day Adventist ‘Church, contains | might be fraua there had to be
closed gallery, drawing and dining |, aga 3
rooms, 2 bedrooms. kitchen, usual con- an agent So when Deane put

in the}
face of giving himself the lie.
any |So they had every right to dis-

that
had said that he was}
28th | getting commission and enquired
he was getting whefl
was only
Abreu
Did

was held, he pointed out,

MV. Lady Patricia, Sch Frances Ww OANADA

P. W. Sorrell, for St. Vincent.



Possession 3ist March, Further particu- | Oxnards, the plantation which as . . CES
lars; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay St. | was eventually bought?
Phone 5010. 27.2.52—-3n He said that there was no GOVERNMENT NOTI
CLEVELAND a conveniently situated | 28reement that they had to 1CERS FOR ©.
house, in the 2nd Avenue, Belleville, |negotiate a_ price. Over and BO SALE
standing on 11,273 square feet of land }over again Deane had told them 2 shell type CORNISH fire tube boilers 5 feet in diameter and
and containing Drawing and Dining he was seeing after the price : , 0 Ib: squar inch
Room on the Ist floor, 3 Bedrooms Up- | Himself ‘Therefore the question fourteen feet long, working pressure up to 250 lbs. per square .

Boilers are complete with all boiler mountings, fuel oil burners
also superheater, if required. Can be seen at Ever-
Will be sold singly.

Tenders to be submitted to the Honourable Colonial Secretary

c on or before Friday 29th February, 1952. —21.2.52.—3n.



VACANCY FOR POST OF SENIOR MASTER,
GRAMMAR SCHOOL, DOMINICA

Applications are invited
of} Dominica Grammar School.

for

by $120 to $2,400. A cost of living
salary is also payable.
to|suitable applicants at
qualification and experience.
4. Quarters. Quarters are not provided.
5. Leave.

6. Passage om first appointment.
appointment will be paid, as well as that of his wife
of school age, not exceeding four, if
him within twelve months from the date of his first appointment.

7. Conditions of Service. The officer
Regulations and local General Orders.

Applications stating the applicant's
as one, ld be addressed to the A t D
assume duty, shou e addressed to the inistrator, inica.
: J SHAMILTON MAURICE,

Education Officer.



Attention is drawn to









sixth when De Abreu

tie Club, fully furnished including} of Three hund and sixty 1 ag) | in accidents ara
J and Gas Stove, Telephone and] A Ce ee ee eee dotvent rates |, We are instructed to offer these vehicles {met Deane, he had known i
Ragio installed, available from the Ist.) is also payable. ov “alia ‘by aucton at the Courtesy |estate and had not. divul ft.
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-]| The successful applicant will not be Birage on Friday 29th at 2 p.m }But though Roy Gill had said
i Ee incving the avg ay. wor bahay to act in, or hold another JOHN M. BLADON & CO., that he had told him the name
e is leaving e dslan hortly, O} arochial or Government appointmen Auctioneers | , Se hatt on ine
vi *Apphy Ralph Beard, Lower Bay] and will be reauired oy tek cue el 428224n {of the plantation before the 8
8 Phone 5010. 26.2.52—3n | duties as from the 25th March 1952, but | > 43.024" | onth, it was not said up to whe
f if already holding such appointment, before, so there was every pos-~
DERN FURNISHED FLAT—with | will be given a reasonable time to re- IMPORT ANT | ibility that De Abreu did not
Si and Linen. Good Sea-bathing.] linquish same after assuming duty. “— Fie ” Besides, if he had known,
For further particulars. Apphy to Alma] Further particulars in connection with \know. Besides,



6 Coral Sands, Worthing,

the duties of thi Pa rn
23.2.52—t.f.n, of this post can be obtained

from the undersigned.
By Order,
mr. C, REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry.

















- 14,2.52—8n

Cee en eee ee

“Christ Our Passover

”

A Series of Six Lectures will be |
ven by Mr, CAMERON TUDOR

t LEMON GROVE every Friday IN

BARBADOS.

ALL ARE WELCOME NOTICE iS hereby given that a Petition

f the Court of Common

Pleas by
sbovenamed Company to

confirm an

Just Received ...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

olution of the Company

a ing of the said Company held on the
Limited Supply %th day of November 1951, and subse-
Order To-day at quently unanimously confirmed at an

Extraordinary General Meeting of the
said Company held on the lth day of
December 1961, and which Resolution
runs as follows :—

“That the provisions of the Memoran-
jum of Association of the Company with
respect to the Company’ be
altered by adding a para
1umbered irl) to Clause
Memorandum of Association the
ollowing that is to say:

irl) To maintain and support or
n the establishment and support of as-
ociations, institutions, funds, trusts, and
conveniences calculated to benefit em-
sloyees, or ex-employees of the Com-
any or the dependents or ‘connections
~ such persons and to grant pensions
ind allowances, and to make payments
owards insurance and to enter into any
cheme calculated to benefit employees,
or ex-employees of the Company or the
tependents or connections of such
versons

AND NOTICE



q. W. Hutchinson

& CO, LTD.
Dial 4222 Broad Street



aid

Bay Street Girls’ Club ad-
joining Esplanade.





Come



and see for yourself, and Is FURTHER GIVEN














10.30 o'clock in the forenoon,
»erson interested in the
whether as creditor, @
irous to oppose the

or the confirmation ©: gald alteration
inder the above Act, should appear @

RUARY, 1951.4 to 6 p.m.

ounsel, for the pufpese, and a copy o
he said

RACES! RACES!

JOCKEYS’ RACING
WHIPS

Call in to-day and
yours.

Catford & Co., No. MW, High

harge for the same,



OTTLE CATFORD & CO.,

s c
select Solicitors for the Company,

«— Also just received —
DOG COLLARS, LEADS.
HARNESS re CHAINS,
CHOKERS

NEWSAM & CO.

HUE

Seawell

TUBSDAY — BY PT.C.A.
Arrivals from BERMUDA:
Dorothy Maclaren,
son, Irvine Perley-Robertson,
Weatherby, Michael Hildred, John
Casey Vanderlinden
Afrivals from MONTREAL

J, Clark, J. Clermont, A.
Dumais, C, Dumais, M
Gordon, ©. Griydon, A
Mackay, A. Patterson
Ross, A. Seatcherd,
Woke, L. Corey, L. }

WEDN AY — BY TCLA
Departures fo

Clermont















Stools. Cheval and other framed dolen Ellis Stuart King, Helen King
irrors, $1 up, Bedsteads, Beds, TUESDAY — BY B.W.LA
, Washstands $8 up-—China,
m and Kitchen Cabinets,

Arrivals from TRINIDAD:








Elona Vandevys.
tonie
Galey
Bi

Charles Vandevy A
Picardi, Eulalia Pieardi,

SPRY STREET. DIAL 4069
Epigama Billi



{

IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS

THE MATTER OF CENTRAI
ight during Lent, The first will . C AL
given Tomorrow Night at 7.30 bh
: The Prophets and . —
Bree, Bublect: oe premise. IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
. o

wes on the 26th day of February 1952,
presented to His Lordship the Chief Judge
the

alteration of the said Company's objects
proposed to be effected tiy a Special Kes-
unanimously
passed at an Extraddinany General Meet-

bat the said Petition is directed to be

and any

id Com .
Drerw ise,

mg of an ovdar

he time of hearing, by himself or bis

Petition will be furnished to
ny such person requiring the same by
he Company's Solicitors, Messrs Cottle,
Street,
jridgetown, on payment of the regulated

Dated “ ith day of February, 1052.



Sylvia Boss, General Charles Maclaren,
Ethel Perley-Robert-

Una
Scott

J

Gordon, H.
Graydon, L.



-LEMENTARY TEACHERS’ | would he have telephoned
SOCIATION

ACHERS are

BARBADOS





All HEA®



invited ee |1y to find
When
Mr.

address

gpecial meeting at the Chureh House
acm

BARKER

the case

Saturday
Adams

Ist March at 10 )
F. H | day will

; his
a {and

jup to the Jury.















The Refrigerator which ten

years

ago caused the Bajan

Cook to exclaim

* ‘ 7, 1eard before His Lordship the Chief “ - . "
buy just that item you Judge of the Court of Common Pleas Hey! Hey! Looka Fia
want. FRIDAY 29th FEB- ym Friday the 2ist day of March, 1992 at

mek ice!”

n
t

is here again... :

; in full force just in time to meet the

needs of those who cannot avail vhemselves of the
electricity supply in the near future.

These machines are for cperation on kerosene oil,
natural gas or electricity, and are available in 41% cub.

ft. and 7 cub. ft. models.

———

BOOk YOURS NOW
e

THE EMTAGE ELEC, CO.

Plantations Building





Arthur Cowley, Marion Cewley, Philip
Dash, Michael Dash phen Dash, Daisy = : SS
MONEY SAVING STORE Fleming, Barbi enidge, Catherine = ee ————
: Merrick, Lat Scott, Vivian §Seott
Herold Taitt, Miss Budspeh
Mone. ving NEW and Renewed Departures for BERMUDA;
Ward $s, Dresser-robes, Vanities, Octavia Burke, Frederick Ellis, Gwen-



L. Carew, S, Webster, M. Taillieur, R

for Dining, Kitchen, Radio Taillieur, F. McKenzie, R. Barbour, C

and Decoraton. Barbour, P. Watson, G. Shillington, E

2 nos, Gramaphone, Type- ee eee R. Troconis, B
” , i sy Linden, G ilkins, E. Wilkins, L ray

writer, Banjos, Ice boxes Cortejoso, B. Brodie, M. Laffan, R. Laffan ANOTHER

emer Departures for TRINIDAD or : -

= Irving Daly, Leon Daly, Rose Walker

John Lee, Eldier Scotland, Fanny Hum-

L. S. WILSO phrey, Mavis Turpin, Charles Vandevys,

n

Homer
Maria Billi, Franca





r.
|Wilkinson and others subsequent-
out whfch it could be.
continues to-
continue
on a point of law
then His Lordship will sum

gives you
the Extra Vitality

to resist

INFLUENZA



5 — See

“FOR SALE

RALPH. BEARD'S
SHOWROOMS

Standing on 6,800 sq. ft.,
Space of 6,000 sq. ft. upstairs and downstairs.
Four Show Windows. Frontage 72 ft.

| EASILY CONVERTED

into six Offices Ist Floor, 3 large Shops Downstairs





having a Covered Floor

LIGHT, COOL and CENTRAL
THREE TOILETS ARE INSTALLED
also LIGHT and POWER FITTINGS

THE AROVE PROPERTY IS
AVAILABLE WITH POSSESSION
MARCH Sise 1952

Best Offer Over £12,000 accepted

iI

\ Further Particulars, Apply RALPH BEARD
\ ower Bay Street
"PHONE 5010













one vacant post of Senior Master,
The school roll at present numbers 150,

allowance of ten per cent. of
Consideration would be given to appointing
points in the scale commensurate with their

Leave is earned in accordance with local regulations
and provision is made for assistance towards overseas leave passages.
The offieer’s passage on first
and children
they accompany him or follow





will be subject to Colonial

age, qualifications and teach-
and indicating the earliest date on which he could

28,2.52—3n.

the Defence (Control of Drug and Patent |)

SSeS —eeeeeeeeeaeaeooom





In addition to general cargo this vessel

Lading for
British Guiana,



F

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952











———— =
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED. The M/V CACIQUE DEI
(M.A.N.Z. LINE) | CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
| Passengers for St. Luci Sst
SS. “TEKOA” is scheduled to sail Vincent, Grenada and Aruba
from Adelaide February 15th, Melbourne Sa ling Wednesday 27th inst
February 26th, Sydney March 4th, Bris-
bane March 15th, arriving at Trinidad The M/V. ““MONEKA”™ will ac-
about April 15th and Barbados about cept Cargo and Passengers for
April 18th. Deminica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday

has ample space for chilled and 7th March 1952 ;
frozen cargo.
Cargo accepted on through Bills 2 The M/V. “CLARA” will accept

Cargo and Passengers for Nassau

Leeward and Windward and Bahamas.

Date of sailing to

Islands. be notified.
For further particulars apply —
FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS
TRINIDAD. ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignee. Tele. No. 4047

and
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
BARBADOS, B.W.1.







NEW YORK SERVICE

“GENERAL ARTIGAS" sailed 21st February -- arrives B'dos 4th March, 1952.



A STEAMER sails 8th March — arrives P’dos 19th March, 1952.

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

S.S. “LIBREVILLE” sailed 13th February —arrives B’dos Ist March, 1952.

A STEAMER sails 27th February — arrives Barbados



nm
















16th March, 1952.

eee

CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Name of Ship



Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados

s. “ALCOA PLANTER” .. 12th Februany 2ist February
s. “ALCOA PEGASUS” .. .- 26th February 7th March
.s. “ALCOA PILGRIM” .. + 14th March 24th March

A STEAMER es e* . 23rd March 2nd April

A STEAMER + + a4 =/s 13th April 23rd April

A STEAMER... oe pe ee ist May llth May

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & ©O., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE













§G* TRANSATLANTIGU E |
c TLANTIQUE |
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
“COLOMBIE” .... 18th March, 1982 ....
““DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” .... 8th May, 1952 ...
*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados, Arrives Southampton

Arrives Barbados
83lst March, 1952
6th May, 1952
2ist May, 1952





; “COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 .... 23rd April, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” .... 19th May, 1952... 29th May, 1952
“COLOMBIR” ist June, 1952 .... 18th June, 1952



ailing direct to Southampton



HK. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.

FYFFES LINE

The T.S.S, GOLFITO

will be arriving from
Southamptan on Sunday, 2nd March and will
be sailing the same afternoon for Trinidad.
There is ample Ist Class Accommodation

available for Trinidad.

Apply ...

WILKINSON & HAYNE



FISHY BUSINESS



You can obtain best quality ..
FISHING LINES & FISHING HOOKS
From... .
CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

PIER HEAD & BROAD STREET 8

JUST TO MENTION A FEW ITEMS NOW OPENING

FENDER TAPE
CELLULOID SHEETS

CORK SHEETS
FLEXIBLE RADIATOR HOSE
GREASE GUNS ’
OIL CANS :
VIEW MIRRORS
ABLES

HOT Rar AND

SUCTION VALVE GRINDERS

eee tae VALVES—All Models

DECARBONIZING GASKETS SETS—All Models
GENERATOR ARMATURES—All Models

LODGE SPARK PLUGS

VALVE GRINDING COMPOUND

GASKET GOO for Sealing Joints f
HOLTS AQUA-TECT for water proofing ‘nition Wires
RUBBING COMPOUND

SIMONIZ KLEENER AND WAX

HOLTS WONDAR WAX

CHAMOIS AND POLISHING CLOTHS

LICENSE DIGITS AND PLATES

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
RS RE -_-—~

s IS BACKACHE
|
|





HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?

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â„¢ PAGE BIGHT

“Pepper W ine’

Harroween Meets
With Mishap

THE FINAL GALLOPS went off yesterday morning

in the presence of a fairly

large gathering of spectators

The track still remains in a very hard condition and with
the races beginning the day after tomorrow it would take
a cloud burst or more to make it anything like soft

Best time for the morning was returned by Hon. J. D
Chandler’s Pepper Wine, who did a smart five in 1.02"s.
This aged mare is staging a comeback after retiring for a

year or more.

The most unfortunate happening so far has been the

accident which Mr. D. V
Tuesday morning. After
pitched her rider, Worrell.

Scott’s Harroween met with on

pulling up she stumbled and
She then ran off, and, jumping

the rails, made for the paddock where she fell before end-

ing up in front of her stall.

She was oui yesterday but was
a bit stiff. Harroween would have
been a favourite for either of the
two races she chese to start in on
Saturday and this is a rotten piece
of luck indeed for her stable.

The gallops were as follows

3etsam was out first as usual.
He did five in 1.07%.

Flying Dragon looked cross
about something as he finished a
five in 1.04

Rectan did a box to box in 1.23}
and the last five in 1.082 He

Jooked fairly easy.
Harroween was next going from
the box, She did five in
1.06%. 1 did not notice her at the
finish but I am told that she was
not as comfortable as usual. This
was to be expected after such a
nasty fall.
The Thing has improved of late
She did five in 1.04%.
Rosette is more or less on ice
She did a slow 7 furlong gallop.
Dim View looked alright to me
over a five in 1.05. She played
about a bit but otherwise !
thought the gallop a good one.
Pepper Wine did a five in 1.024.
Mabotya seems to be going
backwards. She did five in 1.08%,
not finishing very strong,
Demure did four in 52%

quite
easily.

Rebate looked exceptionally full
of life as she did about seven
furlongs. She did the box to box
in 1.24 and the last five in 1.07.

Darham Jane did four in 55},
She is one of those which I think
will be well up in the Maiden.

Doldrum had to step fast to be
with Castle In The Air over the
first part of a 54% furlong gallop.
They did five in 1.048.

Dashing Princess and Belle
Surprise went well together doing
the box to box ‘in 1.24.

Lunways jumped off from the
5% gate doing this distance in 1.09
and four in 524.

French Flutter did a good five

1.03%,

Dunquerque did a box to box
in 1.25¢ and the last five in 1.08.

Embers did a box to box in 1.27

Cross Bow and Cavalier did five
in 1.05 with the latter looking
the better of the two.

Flieuxce did a box to box in 1.25
and the last five in 1.07%.

Colleton did the box to box in
1.263.

Yasmeen did
1.06.

March Winds and Diadem did
five in 1.08, the former much the
easier of the two.

River Sprite did five in 1.103.

Fuss Budget and Notonite were
companions over a box in 1.24%
and the last five in 1.04%. After
Harroween’s mishap Notonite
now my definite choice for
B.T.C, Stakes.

Blue Nelly did a slow five with

in

an easy five in

is

the

Usher in 1,11. The latter I think
will win the first D class race
over 742 furlongs. The forme)

has her supporters for the Maiden
Stakes.

Sweet Rocket
when she did a
1.204.

Gun Site enjoyed himself at half
speed, doing a box to box in 1.294

Topsy managed to do something
more than a three-quarter
pace gallop and actually did a box
to box in the fairly good time of
1.23. The last five she did in
1.064.

Cardinal did five in 1.062 easily,

Tiberian Lady made a_ great
effort to do five in 1.068.

Red Cheeks did five in 1.04,

Devil's Symphony did an easy
five in 1.04%. She improving
all the time.

Waterbelle did five in 1.073

was
box

impressive
to box in

is

Seedling did a comfortable box
to box in 1.24 and the five in.
1.064.

Magic Gaye looked easier than

Arunda over box to box in
1.25%.
Watercress worked after I left

but my colleague informs me she
did five in 1.083
Fille D’'Iran did a five with half-
bred Blue Diamond in 1.074.
Firelady did a box to box
1.284 and the last five in 1.09!
Caprice did a box to box
1.30}.

in

in



oe
i Ne
HERE'S THE
NEVER FORGETS / vicel I KNEW
WE HAD A FILE
ON HIMâ„¢I REMEMBER
LOOKING AT
PICTURE

A FACE OR
A PICTURE +=»

gon F Alo,



| They'll Do It Every

Aim Low I hear was not im
pressive although she did not do
much. Her five was done in 1.10

The usval trio, Vonwise, Colum-
bus and Cottage did five in 1.13?

Apronusk and Apollo were the
last my friend saw. They did <
box to box in 1.281

Spartan Defeat
“verton 2—1

Spartan defeated Everton two
one in their Second Division foot-
ball fixture at Queen's Park yes-

terday afternoon The game wa
fairly fast but the forwards of
both teams missed many oppor
tunities to score

The goals for. the Park team
were scored by skipper Ainsley
Gittens and Phillips, Collymore
at centre forward for Everton

scored for his team

Spartan took the touch off with
Everton defending the goal at the
Weymouth end. The ball was car-
ried from goal to geal. When the
game was ahout 25 minutes old C.
Archer, the Everton left back,
kicked the ball outside to give the
Park team a corner kick

Jemmott kicked a _ beautiful
corner and Ainsley Gittens turn-
ed the ball into the nets put
Spartan one up,

Spartan nearly increased
lead when Phillips, their right
wineer, took an excellent shot
which nearly beat goalie Colly-
more

to

their

Saved
The Everton
attempt to

forwards,
equalise the
bored down. Seale the
right, ran down the right
aud centred. Cellymore toox a
shot which goalie Wood savea.

A little later Seaie repeated this
performance. He again cencred
from the right wing and _ this
time Collymore made no mistake
He beat goalie Wood with a well
placed shot. Half time found the
score unchanged.

Spartan regained the lead short-
ly after the second half begen.
Phillips, who was now playing at
centre forward in place of Git-
tens, received a long pass. He
hurried towards the goal and beat
Collymore with a hard shot,

Spartan was later awarded a
penalty kick when Referee Hoyos

in an
game,
inside
wing

penalised one of the Everton
backs Ainsley Gittens took the
shot but sent the ball straight to

goalie Collymore who saved easily
and cleared after avoiding an on-
iush by Gittens.

The last minutes
Spertan forwards
Everton goal in
their lead

found the
attacking the
an effort to in-
creas

The teams were as follows:—
Spartan: P. Wood, T_ Banfield,
Morrison, Weekes. Wilson, Morris,
Phillips, Grant, Gittens, R. Gibb
and Jemmott,
Fverton
V. Harewood,

Collymore, Connell,
Fowler C. Archer,
Danie}, C, Collymore, Sealy, Seale,
Edey and N. Harewood,

Referee; Mr, “Ben"’ Hoyos



CRICKET AT FRIENDSHIP

There will be a cricket mateh
con Saturday, Ist March at Friend-
ship Playing Field
team from the Water
Yorkshire Cricket Club

Following are the teams

between a
Works and

Water Works: N. A. Barrow
(Capt.), .F. Alleyne, C. Ashby,
E. R. Barrow, S. Cadogan, C
Clement, O. Forde, D. Jores, 1

Kirton, Mr. Ward and E. Springer

Yorkshire ©. CT.
apt.). C. Clarke, L.
R. Cummings, K. Payne, A. Carter,
c Clement H Harewood, D
Haynes, L. Mottley, and J. Morris

Maynard,

(€ Blackett,



‘Time

Repiwered Ub Patent Other

Ss
iS

BUREAU ie,
GREAT

WORK,
CAMERA-

EYE!

9

“MINIMUM OF 3
[ anp spectator

orgs



BARBADOS ADVOCATE





YDS, ADVISED
ENCLOPURE?*
et na

eS

BETWEEN

Pee.

'

po

arma

Best For Morning

4

Know Your Football—uw :

By O. S.

COPPILN

SO GREAT AN ENTHUSIASM has been shown for
local football already this season and’ so many requests
have been received at my desk at the Advocate with re-
gard to the general fundamentals of the game, that Ii have
persuaded myself that the best way to answer most quer-
ies is to run a short series of discussions and explanations

on the Laws of the game.

This series is not intended tobe charged fairly when in posses-

dogmatise on tactics nor does it sion—(2)

seek to coach people on the finer
points of the game I am aiming
at explaining to the football pub-
lic who would need me do so, what
happens when a game is started,
what governs the play and why.

There are two main objects of
the seventeen laws governing
football—THE CONTROL of the
game and the PROTECTION of
the players. These seventeen laws
have evolved gradually as the
outcome of more than _ eighty
years of playing experience,

The character of the game de-
pends to a great extent on those
who play it complying with the
laws and accepting the decisions
of the referee and if those who
watch it are conversant as well,
au good deal of the booing and
hard feelings harboured against
officials doing a thankless job
will be obviated.

Law L—The i ieid wt Play

The tield of play shall be rec-
tangular, its leng:h .being not
more than 130 yards nor less than
100 yards and its breadth not
more than 100 yards nor less than
50 yards,

It is recommended that clubs
should try to obtain a field to the
average dimensions to Interna-
tional matches that is, 110 to 120
yards by 70 to 80 yards,

In the picture of the field above
{ have tried to indicate where you
see on the field of play several
white lines marking off certain
eas and Law 1, after setting out
the size of the field prescribes
these areas,

Let us take them briefly as we
have got to know the term. If we
took the field at Kensington for
instance, it is a rectangle that
is roughly 100 x 75 yards, And
if we began from one of the nar-
rower sides of the rectangle and
iooked up the field away from
the Pickwick and George Chai-
lenor Stands towards the sight-
screen at the far end of the
ground,

We
order;

Touchlines—The field of play is
marked out with distinctive lines
not more than five inches’ in
width, the longer boundary lines
nre called touchlines.

Goal Lines—These are marked
at each end ot the field of pley
and at right angles to the tovch
lines.

Goal Area—At each end of the
field two lines are drawn at righ’
angles to the goal line, 6 yards
from each goal post. These extend
into the field of play for a dis-
tance of 6 yards and are joined by
a line drawn parallel with the
goal line, Each of the spaces on-
closed by these lines and the
line are called the goal area.

I might explain here, although
I shall come to it later on in the
rules that the goal area has two
purposes—(1) to indicate the on!y
area in which the goal-keeper cay

will find these lines in

ie Jimmy Hatlo

CANT REMEMBER HE

SAW THE SAME SHOW BEFORE
TILL IT'S HALF OVER*=-

WELL, I DION’T
SEE [Ts
SO YOU'LL
JUST HAVE TO
SIT THROUGH
, IT AGAIN=:



to limit the area
which the ball is placed for
goal kick,

Penalty Area—At each end of
the field of play two lines are
drawn at right angles to the goal
line, 18 yards from each goal post.
These extend into the field of
play for a distance of 18 yards and
is joined by a line drawn paral-
lel with the. goal line. Each of
the spaces enclosed by these lines
is called the penalty—area.

A mark is made twelve yards
away from the midpoint of the
coal line, within the penalty area
and this is the “spot” from which
penalty kicks are taken,

From each penalty kick mark
en are of a circle, having a radius
of 10 yards is drawn outside the
renalty area and all players ex-
cept the goal-keeper and the
player taking the penalty kick
must remain outside this arc until
9 penalty kick has been taken.

Corner Area—From each corn-
ev-flag post a quarter circle, hav-

in
a

Notre Dame Beat
7 s
Everton In Third

>, ° @ f
Division Match

Notre Dame defeated Everton
one nu in a ‘third Division foot-
tail mateh at the Bay yesterday
atternoon. ‘Tine lone goal of the
match was netted when the sec-
ond half of play was about five
minutes old,

soth teams started off the
game slowly, but Notre Dame
were seen doing most of the press-
ing and quite a few chances they
failed to take advantage of. When
thé whistle was blown for half-
time, both teams had failed to
seore,.

In the second half, Notre Dame
after putting in the first and only
goal, relaxed and again they never
took their chances.

At Carlton Police and Carlton
played to a l—1 draw, but Carl-
ton did most of the pressing in
this match. Both teams tried to
get the edge on each other, but
Police had the most chances for
winning this match.

* o *

In the Netball match on Tues-
day at Girls’ Foundation School,
the ‘“omesters won .the match
played against an Ursuline Con-
vent team by 14 goals to 13, The
Umpires were Mrs. N. Ward and
Mrs. G,., King.

The match which was scheduled
to teke place last Friday between
Queen's College Old Girls and the
Ursuline Convent at the Convent

wi" be played on Tuesday, Mareh
4. and the mateh ‘scheduled to
take place today between ‘St.

Michael's Girls and Queen's Col-
lege Old Girls at St. Michael's
Girls, School will take place on
Wetlnesday, Mareb 5. at 4.45 p.m

Rangers Win

In the Third Division match
Setween Rangers and Y.M.C.A.
at Shell, Rangers beat Y/M.C_A,
et

ing a radius of 1 yara is drawn
inside the field of play.

The corner flag post must not
be less than five feet high with a
non-pointed top. They mark the
corners and they assist the referee
and linesmen in deciding whether
the ball has gone over the touch
line or the goal line.

Some grounds carry a halfway
flag’ post. This is not essential but
if does mark the centre of the
field.’ If used it must be opposite
the halfway line and not less
than 1 yard OUTSIDE the touch-
‘jne,

The Goals—The goals are placed
in the centre of each goal line and
consist of two upright posts equid-
istant from the corner flags and
eight yards apart (inside measure-
tment) joified by a horizontal
crossbar, the lower edge of which
is eight feet from the ground, '

The width and depth of the

oal posts and the width and

epth of the crossbars are not
allowed to. exceed five inches,

Nets are attached to the posts,
t_ossbars and ground behind the
goals, They must be appropriately
sSuytported and so placed as to
ilicw the goalkeeper ample room

And so I leave my readers with
Law I and a few points, Next
article—Law II—'The Ball”—and
Law IlI—“Number of Players.”

——-



PERSPIRATIO
ODOR
INSTANTLY

WITH A FINE SPRAY OF
0DO-RO-NO

Just Squeeze the Bottle...

and a fine, mist-like spray quickly
banishes perspiration and its odor.
Safeguards your natural freshness

Effective. Odorono Spray effec-
tively checks perspiration and odor

Economical, Hundreds of sprays
in every bottle. Use less — lasts
longer.

Safe. Odorono Spray cannot irri-
tate normal skin. Will not rot
fabrics.

Handy. Pliable plastic bottle sprays
pertectly~always.



SERVE YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX
J & KR ENRICHED BREAD





; John Goddard's



THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 28, 1952





TEAM TO MEET
GODDARD’S ELEVEN

Mr. W. Lewis of Collymore}
Rock has selected a team to meet |
World XI an-|
nounced on this page a week ago. |

How does this figure with the
other amateur selectors?—F. R. |
Brown (captain), R. Simpson, B.}

» Sutcliffe, V. Hazare, C. L. Walcott,

D. S. Compton, G. E. Gomez, R.}
Lindwall, D, Phadkar, Ian John- |
son, T. Burtt,. V.-Mankad, J. |
Stollmeyer. |



Sports Window

SPARTAN, cup. winners
for three consecutive sea-
sons, meet Empire at Ken-
sington this afternoon ‘in a
First Division fixture.

These are two popular
teams and the game is
bound to excite considerable
interest.

Empire, after
absence have come back
this season and have won
both their fixtures this sea-
gon, defeating College, and
Carlton,

a season's

Spartan in their two fix-
tures have dropped a single
point, having defeated
Carlton but were held to a
draw by the keen young
team Notre Dame.

This evening these teams
go into action with Empire
having scored a_ possible
four points and Spartan
three points out of a possi-
ble four.

ee



Empire will field : Sym-
monds (goal); Grant and
Smith; Maynard, Alleyne,
and Rudder; «Robinson,
Drayton, Hope, Taylor, and
Douglas.

Spartan will field : Wood
(goal); Bowen and Gibbons;
Haynes, Cadogan, and Git-
tens; Chase, Griffith, Wood,
Van Genderen, Boyce.



DANCE

at

| THE BARBADOS
AQUATIC CLUB

on

SATURDAY

March Ist, 9 P.M.

For Local and Visiting
MEMBERS

Music by Mr. C, Curwen's

Orchestra
(No Admission Charge to
Ballroom)
28.2.52.—3n,

ERNIE'S

DEMOCRATIC CLUB

—o1—

There will be a Special
MEFTING ©
To-morrow (Friday)
February 29th
to discuss the problems
of the First Dnay’s Rac-
ing on March Ist.

—I—

There
over
Each

wiil be
en each race.
horse will have
a price.

a Call-

—0—

Dinner will be
at 8 o'clock

served

—

Special Lobster Cockt?ils
supplied by Squadron
Leader A. C. Snow,
Proprietor Edgewater
Hotel,
where he prides himself

on Lobster Salads and
Lobster American @t all
hours.
a,

Go and try them and
let me know the results

p(n
OUR MENU:
Hors d’Oeuvre

Stuffed Eggs, Anchovies

Patties, Etc.
Turkey Pelau
Poire & Peche Melba
Purity Mince Pies

SLICES OF

aes



SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 27

Cesar Brion, Argentine heavy-
weight star will be gunning for
his fifth victory since returning
from a visit to his homeland when
he goes against Bob Dunlap on



WHAT’S ON TODAY
Court of Common
Pleas at ...........10.00
Police Courts... 10,00
Mrs. De Kuh’s Art
Exhibition at “The
Pavilion”, Hastings :
warqphtichechonssesis ‘
4 Meetintg of ——
Commissioners,

Michael ............ 1.00
Talk on Barbados for
Scout Contingent at
Harrison College
by Judge Vaughn
4.30

| Netball : St. Michael’s
Gitls’ vs. Queen's
College Old Girls
at St ael’s
Girls’ School ... 4.45
Football at Kensing-
tom : Spartan vs
Empire 5.00 p.m.

ss
Et

a.m.
a.m.

p.m.

P.m.



e

‘



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| CESAR BRION TO MEET. BOB DUNLAP

Monday

Brion, now in tri~ming, will
have a ten-pound weight advan-
tage. He expects to weigh about
196 pounds compared with 186
for Dunlap —U.P



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
ve from Codrington
nil.
Total rainfall for month te
date: .07 in,
Highest Tensperature
86.5° F.
Lowest Temperature
70° F.
Wind Velocity
per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) :
(3 p.m.) : 29.845

TO-DAY
Sunrise : 621 a.m,
Sunset : 6.07 p.m.
Moon : New, February
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
High Tide : 5.53 a.m., 6.25
p.m,
Low Tide :

11 miles

29.949

25

12.04 p.m.





EE








of our catalog >

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring and Summer Catalog

offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY
—at the lowest prices anywhere





1 Mail this Goupon
, ser eN







BELLAS HESS

Bellas Hess Building, Kansas City 9, Mo,

Name...

56-2 . sellas Hess Building
Kansas City 9, Missouri,

NATIONAL BELLAS HESS



Such values
make you
think...

SPUN

- PLAIN SPUN
36’ wide per yard

88c.







CAVE SHEPHERD & (0. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET



without words.

lovingly blended,
until it is as noble a Scotch
as €ver came out of
| Scotland,

Sole Distributors :
| FRANK B.
ARMSTRONG LTD.

WHITE HORSE
Scotch Whisky

The purpose of signs is to tell
Here is a sym-
bol that tells, plainer than any
words, of ‘whisky at its finest...

long natured,

ial












PAGE 1

PAC.f eim BAUMXM VDVOTATE Tiiin-im i i SRI UU i;2 • Pepper Wine" Best For Morning CESAR BKION TO MEET BOB DIM. VI' SAN FHASt'lSAO Y<\> 2~ Monday Cesar IJr.on. Argentine heavyBrJOjB, BOW |g tl ning wrl uiighl star will be lunnmic %  i -pound weight advanvktoO] since returning lag* He rxpeii. lo weigh aboi! % %  It to hi* homeland when 1M pound* compared I Harroween Meets With Mishap IIB FINAL GALLOPS m i lie presence <>l a fairly largi The truck ttiU remains In a ind with the races beginning 'he day aflar tomomra \\ would t.ike .1 i odd burst or more to make it anything like soft ma few trie morning m returned by Hoi) -1 I> I'l-pper Wine, who r thi' paddock whara afal fall bafoia ending up m front of her stall. Aim Lnw I hear w. %  much Her The UN II V 11' Apromi last m\ friend • %  rhi i 28' go** again** Bob Dunlai. "*i for Dunlap i +--\t m." K t jf m MINIMUM o> i IDV Aoviua MTWCM touaa.Rin of FIELD {" MO SPCCTMOR fRUOfUM raaot MM %  i %  &hc chase to start in on rattan piece jf lurk in % %  %  i' i bat Mania llapi were ei Fbl I ..s usual. Flying ; no* to r*x in U*l : 06J. He looked % %  Harmwecn was next gmng from x She did five in 1.06|. I dl finish hoi I .'>m mid that she wu I,. a usual This wait to he > \pertcd after such a nasty full. The Th nj h* improvod of late ilv. in I.M1. HUM'U' I %  Fii.ii She did a tlu 7 furlong aallop Dim View looked nlnghi In Bta %  I si-..playM about a l>lt I ul Othi thought the Kiillnp a |tood one. Pepper Wmc did %  five > %  > 1.021.. MabutjyJ seems to be 0OUUJ rds, si did live in i.08|. not finishing VOT; strong. Demure did rour In 521 qulta easily. Spartan Defeat Overtoil 2—I %  Bsi -I .< i>.\ Won foot.ii Bxtun t t m "SF • m. I 3 ornow lu&tim TEAM TO MEET GODDARD'S ELEVEN Mr W U-wis '.l Rock ha* selected .. team to meel John Goddard's World XI ani Ho w does this figure with th. other amticur M l OStor i t B Brown (captain I R Simpson B Sutcllfte. V. Hazare. C U Walcott. I> S. Compton. G. E Gme*. R Undwi.ll. D. Ptiadkar Ion Johnson. T Bunt. V Mankad J Stollmeyer *Mf>nTfi Know Your Football— LAW I The game AM %  %  I art learn %  klpoet AlnsH ) M rda) ifternoon a l but %  .mis nisi •,, eora lOabj for Dtpad by ind Phillipc.iii., %  I centra forward for Bvartoi %  inii .HI 10 took the touch Ofl %  Itl . Weymouth end. The ball was car %  ii.i iMm |oaJ to |oal Whan ih aame was ah/iut 2i mtnute Did C Ik wh,. would naad BM d anally full Sgf^Jj; ^fiSSJiS '^ ^ ^ffi*" "*• %  %  %  " %  > i ,.,..,.. .„.„., I-" 1 '' k'ek. what m it 111) .is she did al furlong!. Shi iii.i ihe bo* to 1M>: in 1.34 and tha last BTS m l 07. D>irhan' lartC did four in 35'.. She la on hleh i think Spartan ana up. will ba wed up in id. M.n.i.-ii Doldnaaj had <<• itop I arban Phillips. tie In Hie Air OV*l Ihi llrst part of .i fi 1 .. furloiia nallop. Thej din Bvc In 1.041. %  g iTinccss and Balf< Surprise went well together doing the box to box^n 1.24. Lunwayi jumped off from the 5V* gate doing this distance in I Op unit four In 521Flutter did a gno.1 live ,n 1.03(. Dunquerque did a box to box in 1.2Sj and the last live m l "H Embers did a ixix to bux % %  > 1J1 Cross Boa si d vaUtr did fl' in l N with the latta tin* better of the two. itt kicked .. beautiful id Ainslev Qlltani tin nd the ball inlo lha i.,.-.. %  'in n mht '. %  in. h mure heal Saved The Kveit.ii, [Ofl uttempt to equalise By o. 8. com* SO tlREAT AN ENTHUSIASM has been shown for local football already this season and so many requests have been received at my desk, a! the Advocate with regard to the general fundamentals of the game, that I have pemundcHi myself that the best way to answer most querns is to run H short series of discussions and explanations on lhe IJIU* of the game. Thin atrhM is not intended to be rhiirgctf fairly when in posscse .n tactics no, doaa i: Hon. (2) to limit the area in play %  W* .11 i. I .'. eorapi) lag rcepting the itl i th. (kx bloni down. Scale i ight. ran down lh< I %  II h goalie Wood HVM A liti'i. pai tovrnaaoa, Ha aa*w can n irom the right wing end th looldn| time CoUyrnora made no ml t k He beat goalie Wo.>d game, of the leferev and if those who inside watch it are eonver.-am ag M n i nod deal of the booing and %  JA J *' aro 'petlngn haiboured agalnn ca tin i..Idoing a ihankleas Job ill le obviated. Flieuxee did a box to box in 1.2.1 placed shol Half tune (nun nnd the last Ave in 1.07|. unchanged. Colleton did tha box to box In Spartan regained the lea ', ;' |T '^'" l0ft v "" , Jy after the second half bag I easv five in Phillip*, who an*, now playing at %  entre forward In | I pats. He rlad towards UM rjool and wal i lolls mtora % %  > ith i nard shot s rUi companions over a box In IM "'"'" ""''"" nnd the lai ihe m 1.041. Altai %  ' m ,,( 1 *' rwarton Harroween's misliap Nou.nite back Ain-le. Qlltani took thi now my dellnite choke for th.bof but sent the hall straight to i.. oUyrnora who saved aaally Blue NHh did i akm Bvi adlli ud ckarad ..ftcr avoiding an onUsher in l.l) The latter i think %  Th.li-t nuniiKv round the '{^ ^ fleld ut Keiwngl. Sp rtan forw a rds attacUni 'he instance ii is a rectangl. 1.28(. Vatmeei) did 1.08. Maren Winds nnd Diadem did Bva ir 108. tha t-Tmer much the ... il i nf tintwo. Sprite did tlve in 1.I0|. Fusiiudk.'t gnd Notonlta ware 1JI\V 1.—The ie.d -I Pi iv i of play shall be rectangular, its leng.h .being not more than ISO yards not l**s* than 100 yardsand its breadth nut less lha (J ...id It ir.'commendcd thai clubs should try to obtain a Bald to lha rii ii, International matches thai is. 110 to ISO yards by 70 to Hi yard In the picture of the ticld above 1 have tried to ladkata where you ii 1 on the Aeld of play several ialty kicks are taken. From each penalty kick mark ,n arc of a cirrk, having a radius ol 10 yards Is drawn eutsMa wM psknalty ana and all pi up: the gnalkeeper and the player taking the penalty kick must remain outside this arc until iwaalty kick has been taken 1'erner Area—From each corn"i-flag prst a quarter circle, hav;Vo/r Dame tivat Ever ton In Third division Match NOW Dnme defeated Rverlon m. II.I in ;i iinrd Dtvrislon fool^uil match at ihe Bay yesterday am i noon. Tne lone goal of the ing a radius uf I yaru ih drawn uvidc the ticld of play. The corner Bag post must nut be less than live feet high with n non-pointed top. They mark the comers and they assist the referee and linesmen in deciding whethc. lheth is Favlttsw". Hastings di>: . in. MM Iliihest t. imi.r uuii '.i-.iim of Saaltsr* gg.3 F t ununiMUmers. 8S. Michael 1.00 p.m la F. Talk en lUrisado* for Wind Vfierity 11 miles Seoul Conlinirnl -1 Harrison (allesr Hiromrier i a.m.) : X9.M9 by Jodie Vaughn (3 p.m.) | 3U.844 4.30 p.m. Nrtball : St. Michael's TO-DAY (.i"l. vs. Queen's Sunrise : SSI am. College Old Girts Sunset : h.07 p.m. at 8L Msehael's Moon New. Februsrv 33 Gu-is' s.h.i it: p.m 1 I.i.lil".i. : S.30 p.m Feelball st Ken-lagHigh Tide 3 33 a.m.. 0.23 tagt : Spartan %**. p m Empire 3.00 p.m 1 I.tiw Tide : 12.01 p.m. DANCE THE BAKRAIHIS AQUATir CUIB SAilHOA. March 1st, 9 P.M. For Local and Visiting MEMBERS Music by Mr. 6 Cka y aa a Orchestra (No Admission Charge lo Ballroom) 28.2.52.—In. NATIONAL BELLAS HESS Spring and Summer Catalog offers the newest styles for YOU and YOUR FAMILY —at the lowest prices anywhere Join the millions wtst .ihop by m*il directly froin the color filled Nanonal Bellas HctsCaislov. Select from rhouisndtof the newest ityley and finest Itomc iiems all priced sr America greatest Mvines. Every item is guaranteed tO he exactly as pictured and de oenbed. Vour money bsck .1 you are not plesseJ ^.J.! m %  -%  auiiiio**n. me lone aw". i *" %  hite lines marking otT certain mBtph wag neHM when Ihe ^. %  • ii. ii load will win the (ust D class rac OVar Ti furlongs. Th<> lo baa her MI; i orto ihe M Btakai Swcei Rockn waa In when she did ,i box to box in The teams were as follow* — >-2l. Sp.rlan: I' %  food, T BanlleUI Gun Site iiij.v.,i himself at hall \i.., w..-. W UorrU %  peed dumr. a ix to Nix In lJpl Topsy managed lo do something .,,, %  ..,„„..,,, mori than % %  three-quarter -££? pace gallop ami actuall) HI.I .i box to bOS in Ihe f.nrly gg> i I.2S. The last live MM did In %  Cardinal did five in I.d04 easily. l-i.. made Bve in l.ufift. n 1.04 De. r Byinpl a is did on %  ISJ Avo in '.<*i' Sh. n ..ii th. w..t,-ii ilk Avo in 1.071 .. i %  lo box 1.061. Magu I i-icr than Atunda over in\ 10 bog II 1.25 4 nd Law 1, after setting oul Ihe sire of Ihe ileld prescribe, iheae areas. Let us lake them bricfls ..v ,e got t and N ifarewood. Mi B> %  Hoi i CRICKET AT FRIENDSHIP diCapi '. r. AH Watereres* worked after I let' | R i>ut mi Fiiie Dfrai did a Ave *ith halfln i.07(. i. did r> bog to ix.x In I ii 11. %  ., h..x in 130 L t wag fi* end ,.f 0 We will find these lines in %  dei Tauebllnes The Held of play i%  narked oul with distincliv, UraH not more than five inches Ul width, the longer boumlai ItoMN %  ro called touihiim(twal Lines The-, are in..iked at ago* end M ihe Held of p) and at right angloi lo th* i< I %  IIGsal Ares At aOCTI gnd Ol Ull %  i.Id Iv... hues ;ire ilriwn ul rlgtl .ngles tO the goal line. 8 yardfiom each goal post The-r ggtC into the Aeld or play hM %  db : .1.. of I yards and are joined b) A line drawn parallel %  **%  11 > the coal line Ifeg | %  • % %  %  . thaaa Unas and tha %  i! lint' .Hi..died the goa Veeksktoa c t .a, nard. i might explain hare i CUrka i. Btackett l ahaU come t.> n later on in the n r mtt K \ i that UM al area has i< H. Harewoo I uidkah i. Mottle) and .1 Mon ., ,„ histle was blown for halfhoth team* had failed to he second half. KotTl DUM putting in th< first and only elaxcd and ag lb) they neveri :.-k.n n en Satui .i M hip Playfiia F.vi.i %  Watei W"'Kv • %  Club Foil.mini: are the Nkstar ( M-k% N Hayn Mi W ird I n Joi at, I Thc\'*ll !><> It Every rime .^-— By Jimrny Hatlo rlER-A-EYE, PETECTIVE. NEVER PORGETS A FACE OR / A PICTUREtook their chanci Al CasifeM Police and Carlton .i I — 1 draw, but Carlton .(id most of the pressing in Ink match. Both teams tried to get the edge on each other, bill Police had the most ehunee* for winning thi* match. In the Netball match on Tuesday it Girls Foundation School. %  BOMaten won tin* match played agaiust an Ursulme Conl>> 14 goals lo 13 The wwro Mrs N. Ward and Mrs. G.King Tne match which was lehOnUred lo tekO place last F*riday between Oueen Oatlea), old Ohk and the Coneont at the Convent be played op Tuoaday. Mure 1 I and the inalch 'scheduled to lak* Place today between St. Girls and Queen's ColGuls at St. Michael'" ntrk BehOOl will t.ike place "i .Mneh b at • •> p.m ikasjen W in UM Thud Division match ecu Hangers and Y MCA. Ihell R .ngers beat Y\f('4 HE C4MT REMEMBER HE SAW TUE SAME SMOVV BEFORE TILL ITS HALF OVER — Save Tim! Sayt Money! ""'ft^*" IIONAL BIN U lir vs. Jlflbt Hi, Bmldins. Kmni Or* 9. Me fJnm it** -t. /f it Vsrxsw* frlbt Ihi ll.r.c Wig. Kssw A*lfw. C", „ .,.,,.„ NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 'ZJXXS& Such values make you think .... FLOWERED SPUN -4>6" wide per yard 96c & 87c. PLAIN SPUN 36' wide per yard 88c. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10. II. I? s 13. BROAD jlRKI IMPROVE YOUR DIET KEEP FIT KEEP STRONG HERE'S THE WAY SERVE YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX SLICES OF I A II I Mill III II ItIII VII THE LOAF OF QUALITY WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky The purpose of signs i without words. Here is a symbol that tells, plainer than anv words, of whisky at its finest . lovingly blended, long n;..tureJ, until it is as noble a Scotch as ever came out of Scotland.



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED IMS THURSDAY. t-EMU'AKY 2a. 6J I'Kll'K. FIVE CKNTS W.I. FEDERATION FOR TALKS IN LONDON After Colonies Have Given Final Study To Report llttOIt%\ AlltflY TIIKS THfc FOLLOWING despatch has been received fn.m Ihe Secretarv of Stautor the Colonies ;— Sir. You will recall that, fn September last, my predecessor sent a message to tin | he welcomed the proposal 'contained S ussed by the Jamaica t.euislatiw Council iind "ft< epresentalives, that a conference on Wast Fndian tion should be held In lndnn as toofl ltd conveniently be arranged. 2. It appear*, from subsequent informal consultations that this proposal 11 acceptable lo (he Government* of those whose Legislatures have accepted federation in principle a> le ie*uli of their consideration of the recommendations maoe in the report of Ihv Standing Closer Association Committee. Thai report has now been discussed by the Legislatures concerned, wilh the exception of those of British Honduras and of Barbados, where it has been accepted in principle by the House of Assembly, but has yet to come before the Legislative Council. In British Cui. n.i. the Legislative Council voted by a majority against acceptance of the Committee's proposals; and It may accordingly be necessary for further consideration to proceed on the supposition that any federal arrangements would not include that territory, at nil events at the outset On the assumption, however, that the Legislative Council in Barbados will endorse the views of the House of Assembly, I take it that it will be generally desired that 1 should now proceed with making UM rr.enl* for n Conference in London at the earliest convenient date. The position of British Honduvaa must be determined in the light Of whatever dec is on is reached by the Legtsl,i': ell of that Colony, when ihe report is debated. 1 hone that it will be possible for this step to be taken tn the near future. I 3. I understand that \\ would not in any event be praetlcabl to convene a fully representative gathering before June next, since many ol those concerned will \r occupied until then with budgetary and other urgent business in their own Legislatures. -5i there Is a general wish to hold the Conference in June, I shall very glad to make the necessary arrangements. Before, however. a date is Anally settled, there are certain points which seem to call for some further consideration. It is the common experience thai the success of uny conference depends very largely on the rxtent to which the ground has been prepared In advame. and 1 think that this consideration is likely to prove particularly relevant to a conference concerned With the highly intricate and far-reaching problems raised bv the project for West Indian federation. I recognise, of course that the Conference will he fortunate In having before them the broad outlines of a federal plan THE FAMILY DOCTOR lii kecpng with out cf cbtaimng fOI 01 [ readers the best possible advice on subjec's of imporfiince. 'he Advocati ,w msed foi D i tor tn answer raader'l mfdlcal queries. The I'am'ly Dorlor will be unrble to* sec person." 11) but you can send him your que^tons and tail .11 appear < \. M week In the Evening Ad vacs le There will be no charge for this medical advice, and letta i win bi trMted confidence. To mi if you .ire nut la slg.i your real name to your query but to write raw i .i paa asm* n i to the yut-iion will ppear uncu; ihi Lattert thouM I :., The Family I>oetor, c/o Ihc linn Advaeate. Bridgetown, an.i must tench thi ba Wadneadag week. • ti us ..t nnliss to Bwdkal nut atio ns will %  ppe a i in nail Mondays Evening Advocate. as # OH Page Stabbetl Woman *s Inquest Continues Further hearing in the inquest aotwanung the death of 36-yearold Gwendolyn Clarke of New St Michael, will l>e Mk by HJ< Worship Mr. G. It. Griffith. Acting Coroner of District "A" day at 2 p.m. Clarke was admitted to ths Genera! Hospital on February M bout 6-10 p.m. suffering 'rom stab wounrls, but died a few mlnflcr she was admitted the lail healing Dr. A. 3. i performed the a-i-i mortem • xamlnation on the -tts : An' act of chanty stnggenng in scop" 'Vr.ilr : %  •: where, on his deathi-st 3c ytn ag< %  r < **je White,. Ol thi t uticura Coi-' potation, ordained that from then I DU| of every tli lars earned by his huge soap and concern should be. to ., hun ton B fai %  i-itai ot no.oOO.OOO has been secretly given away to u Ne Yarfe : Once Wills Su'ton. dramatically arrested i New York the othei day for a big. Umk ; %  !.: • earnest social reformer "Tell me. Will*, why do you robi banks-" Rejoined Willy "Be-! ,-ause that's where the mnney it. 1 inter Make isrMhellM): Airmail letters pOStad in London on Decembei ISth reached the S.-.chellet on February 20 taking' longer than sailing ships before the Suez Canal wasj OMM Amsterdam: The Ihilch So.,ety of Non-Smokers hi letter to Queen Hiubtth on thai occasion of her ascending ihr Throne, paying homage to hei .mil Prince Philis bacsusa the. in bain nan srnoaari The letter expresses 'he wish that the whole world may follow Ihi royal example so that "it may be delivered from the ll to tobacco." %  aaffaaaaaan I .lay York was arrested for speeding, the liri own eaughl In %  reeeoUj uutalW poUca radar trap. He pleaded Not Guilty "because I wanted M see how the thing operated, myself." (Fined 26 rtnllnis T.*> cents.] Rosae : Traces OSBERI I.ANLAStl I' t)R ADENAUER, the Oersnao FVderal Chancellor. I.TO. tka Foroign Ofllcr fr?i:ih rorriin Minister, after neatiag to .-ontlnue thni atesaasBjasu asaaataa. 1 Europt'itii Amiy %  Barbados Budgets For 12-Mi I lion-Dollar Revenue World Sugar Production Goes Up "' %  '" *> %  o QsttsssssaaaaU LONDON. Feb 27 The world sugar production lor the current year will be one million tons higher than In the previous 12 months, estimate E. D and F Man in their latest circular. This increase to .16,915.000 tons Is mainly accounted for bv a rise bf 7O0.000 tons in Indian and Pakistan production But even though these countries are expect-. Tunisian cafe proprietors ed to produce 5.200.000 tons this Meanwhile authmitiryenr they will -till remain net Imj that a good* turn had been deGeneral Strike May Break Out TUNIS. Feb 27 Cafes in thi* capital closed down for a three-dnv strike as rumours spread that a 24-hour general strike might break nut in support of bar owners Cafes throughout the capital pulled down their shutters EhrSO clay in protest against the r'rench authorities' clamp-down on six Tunisian bars In the suburbs. At the same time It rumoured but not official!; I firmed that a M-hOW strike might l>e railed for Friday, February 29. in snlidarit. with TRUMAN WELCOMES MINISTERS WASHINGTON Pah. 21. Secretary of State Dean Acheaon returned tram North Atlantic [teal and ... tlvad Warm congnitulatl^ns from President Truman on his "most fail conference," Truman con* grululated both Aeheson anl Sce%  John Snyrtal Airport whea The President (old Ihe Cabinet officers thst iimaauni 'ton and Lisbon had sccompUthed "'hint's we have been worhini' foi '• '. t last three Ol four years. II is a high pi Ivlleae of mine to congratulate the Secretary ol Btsfa md the (secretary of the 'HI th" |oh the) h". plished Pu thanked thi I %  %  and sat* I plaasui Lbs PTaatdent's | T | w. return tired, but the belief that >' %  • havi armmpllshed wd • %  ccompUsh t' f I .\.. Rods MMIKIOI. tttattpfl To Break DoaU(N-k THE ESTIMATES ol Revenue and Expenditun f the year 1932-53 have been aent down to the I to be discussed and passed before the end < %  tha nnandal year. Slat March The Uuusa • pendituie ll'l.tOll IH-4 hut tli' H1.2M.MS ten ,. gross lu ol H .344,687 M i .I'ni'iM i:\piunis | The Msntorandum on Ihe K-tm Ctecnty Utouaaud Jamaicans nt, 1 M „. wh(ch „ %  m the waiting li-t <,r u,,. A-nari Colonial Sacnrta.,uni S? LT-TO*' "srunant of the post at 11 Churchill Wins Confidence Vote d b PRIMS MINISTER Churchill ,, nlhl .t 'pr.impl. rwolule and dkcIhal ha onl) i-onunucd i i.nl %  %  %  -..•<• MCratlj ->-l ,.|) .. |)lal in ii •tomlc bomli. .in.l li.il produi-Ml an atom bomb Adenauer ConfidtMil inrldenre rets us Ailh Lila-ral Cartv harlting ell hi' Cot %  nf 14 votes II :....!. %  • .. Korean policy Ulld Ihr Churrhlll said—, from Cabinet MMKPH w OMOG Which he I i i laneeUoi Konrad live Parts ousted Labourites in . I ,ihi eonfusion hM Western Dafenes BI ind angar among hibour mem1 .i Thm may nharpen the rMn between lush moderate i leaders as Attlee an.t Mot %  • % % %  Ii Hi H „„! ti„. Lefl Wins f•• n led h) ipposlllon fi'.m the Be \,,,. . ; iievan Quick Action On MoCarran Bill Urged In Jamaicxi KINGSTON. F*i> 2e Ii : %  %  %  . '• P ants tdsnauei l majortt.i >.( i destau (Lowei II %  %  Hi il i bellevi irv el ger ot his being ousted froi I t Alien Ihs 'i' •.Porl In Ihe II ... i 1 will have re %  i slrno t i i.mpietiin lapendei 11 . %  with the Western Alltel ol he\ n %  i iu To-yeai -old Chsi rontldence La b I. The 411 M.'I mSjorit) lir *•<• I the. Bundestag in tin i rellm n i. m to live Jar ul ; I Mi porters owing to tremendous horn, consumption. E D and F. Man say heavy Cuhnn production—a pproHlrnateS g.aoo.OOA tons, icasting n adow over the world market nnd 11 H ptOTahWnatlC from which quarter eould rome sumclent sup. port to maintain or improve the thai present orices Unless United (aulty Statr< Bid 'o Jnpan and Germapv -ahot.i Is repeated, it looks possible thai Cuba may have difficulty in disposing of this year's output %  lied during the night near Mihares, on lbs Uft> and Gab*vt#v said M cars Jumped the trackcompletely blocking the line for almost one mile Ko*a %  Sid that an inves'ti'S* Ir* foodueted irnme dssta'l %tt hold of onirihiaf ih.r: actHdlly on fh* o-xrunona list." DEFECTIVE ENGINE FORCES PLANE DOWN quota m i.ow a, Seeretary i, not signed this y. Senator McCarrnn 1 Bill ou\d\., l },'* y ?J H "'', "["• h "?''*''*• ,. lhl practically .top JamaU.m enterU w h '"U-i.tio,, ..I Owing An.erlrn i 0 reside nemi..nen'" b In the Mouse of Represent a-1 l""1-s---i nacal sui to-day F. A Glasspole, Peo*"• full***** l-a.kgn.uii.l %  vailabis '. Uonal Part* member gjve "' ""' wieral p ition of tl' notice of ,i motion asking the < %  erirnne it* futu House tn request Government to flnsn lal and seooonale policy '"' n.iKi thi most urgent und itrong-luM next nvs rsars A marnoran lens to the Seen dtl I' id i .r\ of State with a view to Ihe ,| r u I UttniSTS n 0 %  I IttSh (eivernrnent making repte.ed. wh< the fiscal Bums pirsentatlons to the Ainericaii „, :,..., . .., |. Cownmrnt for their help and ., ,„„.„, B^-SStltfggAls-S ;,!•:;'! colonials of entomiK AmST.CS ' %  "" ,nl %  "' Jamaica's prt>nt quota Is 1,300 g •"* "'!"' vfnr ii Ihi aces Oovern_C.|i. mei i hai a> .__^_. (>i to procagd aith tha nurraal bmigei hi'utin pre fm as |>o*slhle lo the m-tual i omn lunents of Go i rent i i\ in h win be fjeasentad la ths I i Ma: eh, IH to pn rani tha flsi >i Bui vey of llarhii'. iaaa. .. -c. i of the proposed Una and taaation linllry ai live yen proaranun-i .-aplUI (xneudituie Faure. Risks (labiml 1'ANMHN.ION Korea, reb. n United Nations and CommunU' Staff Officers abandoned then attempt tn break the deodlu k ver the repatriation of war prh_ f'AKIS, Teb 27. oners Thav decided to toss the, Premier Edgar ri.ure st..kr.i the issue back to Generals and Ad! |f e of his five week old Cabinet j mlrals of tl "> a series of confidence votes on ft" r 21 duv* of futile rt<'" budget inrludmg a 13 per cen: jbau tax iDcrease Tlu step Minted the Hnlte.l The votes of confidence in the %  ...iming that the Allies' Nnnonal Assembly probabh Hill never will an.-.Tn force Communbe taken on Friday l*t prisoners to return to North ; Especially difficult obatacll Korea SSalnSt their will Tl .a super tax on hard lu.uoi Red. have demanded th. return %  I poornli in n.itionallaed railways ; rsUm)( eri 10f murah neeesaan which threaten dismissal for man' ., tiMiiia ut v cr. also seemed on th. employees, among then, many Be' I'I. !,„!£,;J %  faUur. to set--claim. Railway, arc new OBST-I "j !" .S.il?7nraf^mr! Propmed railway seoSkOOUi I %  "" %  '^^ .*:,,, Bupei %  "" broughi down_"Faure's predecrit( ,IM '" vie The WBgg 0 thill which makeMisting of thi tn quite -'< i ssroinsi i < i< %  t r QttMO Anunls \.(J. LONDON. I %  I ijiiei-. Elizabeth II pinned the \ loris iCrossi Brltein'i highest H %  .%  .mi .... the %  %  rout K %v.ir ben In hei in. ul act since hT %  %  %  ltd The iliii. .. rhapily-cul i lach di % %  I r Knlghl ol hi i %  alt mini sword .tt I %  %  %  ol UuikliiKh.im pala i r JET DESTROYED FIFTH Aiit FOBCKel.% KOIlKA. Feb *T One < ornmignU I MIO Sd and one dan lu when II F M ... It, MM. lUay — V.r. Labour ( ensure Motion The conndenee vote came on a %  eeushig Churchill "' making escrel raltttarv alattejM %  > PraaTdanl Truman. iresd thai these Unted when Churchill raror nias d in > %  u, month that Mm prompt, raaoluta .out etfe<'iive action if .i K.> i tearhed then broken I muaists ChugsMfl lanted n iking any secret gatreomenl wfth Truman ill ,. %  .id the Units Lut M to lake teanl seUon out. < plaoei badly blgte< N BSI bTOnl . • ChurcrQU uld Attic, was |uslilleri In making Mich .uninge. %  • %  I in principle to the i i ptedgOggfOM Snd indeed In some respects it might tli.il we ill. even as far as they had done" Cowardly Drwloasirea Itevjn :. vhal bs i died %  H.IMIU dis i.%  '.ibinal secrets and deated wiihi.iit ruscisa 'hat i i. u.-hiii produce setual documents to piove I The Prnno Ml I still is con\\ M "I DM U N wouM rnaita %  mistake I tari raj .nd "few i mil.I I. I. i, rh.l oi fruitful" thiin to launch denmtad Nationalists leader, Chiang Kaishek on ,i new %  \ furtoUl Uproar hrnke out on bsnehea it '•hurchill's that the Labour Oovemment established a plant for regular production >t jtorme b) ml* Id pi ."lined I 'i wtlMh is to l tested this year. Partj of k.-eping the asjoret Of the nib |.i,ini a Ith •'Machi,t could accuse i ...mgerlng Hioi'ig the el. lion campaign. • { that only ^ esuenses The t'abinet mitborltS I toms end eai I w hi equipment and ed b* not bj —U*. An Turkish Forc'a8 Readv ForN.A.T.O. Hoabinh Left In Flames HONG KONG Feb 2 CHICAGO, Feb 27 XI H A Vaughan will glva American Airlines DC-6J 1 ""' Historical -keto 'H' benefit of th. B kt> for rteanj three i onl meant which win ,. to use up iU gasoline supply be-1 Jamu.c. for the first Carfhbs lOta making a safe etnergenc> Jamboree early next month la ^'l"' R J Tnl u,]k %  ,,l f kr l 11 """ l '"' ihe plam landed rl the Inter-; u j 130 p.m at Harrison Collet national Airport at 8 20 a.m with load of 2.1 passenger-. %  ipina Con %  skd 1 nunist ,: Ho '.idio hi.ri ior^ nesiart led b] Trench afaati EDEN FLIES HOME KDd flev, bark here 00 boi Ff.A.T.O meeting will be de. r %  —U.P. The plane had been held -, K. 0 THALIR forces last Frlda> were still in dnce 3 JO a nv | Ji LISBON. Feb 27 LISBON. Feb 27 flam^ The broadcast said the The plane look off at 3 li am ,r "' h '""'K'^^"y AnTurk.sh Fo-eign MinLter Fu ' /•• *"1>< %  *• Aogetes and was H-:. hlen '^ '- '!*<• Koprulu said Turkey %  ., *n at 1 IOC make 0 bigger nnmeduiU COOtrlFffll bution to Western defence than It a t d the communique also recovered an oil leak in number one) T T. "tr_ lh< '" u 't of_the L. any other European nation and ported that flerre fighting wu engine urged llasnnowsr to take imm gag tha' .inothci ..bnormal crop was to be esf 1 attracted ,i h e. imp rti In uddilion to the unantu 1 paled heai toying following Korean w threat*. A subsUmli-. rlat Ul i>'i nig tout year was 1 l irtke I for the fJAi-aordp bl easterns The incomr In receiveil In the rurrssBt year. 1S5I—St may he mid U> be related lo the f %  •>• v year af I5S.IS3 tons which refractad an Invreaae in the value nf ihi rrop over the pres'lou* ve r el nearly S3 aeo.SOti The undrr '.Hose dead ....luded the mother. i~ Um i lto -a J a. ta, 'a'""." '" 40. tworh w : aged 13 and eight 'roucbiy Mta.oos * %  du. years and their elderly grandauflirirnt esperlenee ..f peak er,.i parent* who lived with them in a and high erlee%. r,.,mr basn mthMUnyeonuaun-l 1 e revraad sstlmat 11% West or Montreal on the road Iture im 1MI—52 ..presents i to I-achine. Quebec police said < xess of tSOO.000 over the -omn on ground exists as a pa _, ids the Fc viou* equal par,snimenl remalnei





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T IUKSDAV, FEBRUARY io. l*ii Thr Labour Welfare Fund And Community Development BAMVDOS AOYOtATr. %  ? &S,^ SOLS 'I 1 Community Halls provided from '[' i: ri Belleplainp ComrU*a Playing field, ITI SI. Philip Two other pleUd fa ,: lha formal optningi havt : \ Cfal m Church and M Another tor St. Joseph. .nurse of erection now. Halls chased and despatched I :r the Social .. been ..Die to U.K. h %  ng I A t imslilrrutiun Of Hill Fbiipamml ItM Hour of Assembly Ti. %  UM pflatpomd eon>i %  % %  % %  •' BUI i i Training (or Qnmp Work %  '-' A 'JSfiPi in',"*' f offiA<1 ' '•"• !" nl'"" icnl %  |irovu.al u> .>.> British C.ulHiia, and lift the ramaga 1',.,'it.i'.:.. BI Ha* i Mllltan M \ rsAK i MATSI Amphibian SfiMvll Aerodrome Control: %  rorklni with Tinnumber of IM*01 itw: con—q ufnt UJ nonth of Jmnuan \ m. handled by Scwrll An m These soft spots measured MB v 'I'd J.imui > drome ConttOl lor UM month v. iHn x 34(i., SI it i IM I omnMnd a. U H IS, eompoMd of I !! %  -f men ,,m.ee lufullng ,L| HI lnhe-*ga. Th. number 1 led between bag lo the oparst t T hOM moolh These officials aal • %  <: i. Saagon. inadron at U i,, ... g> COUtrol i %  >' % %  i paclallj li the Housci casl ol the nmw.iv Work .., these nnei Austin .v Puerto RlCO. I -tie unU in ]< %  -!.%  -' %  : %  • i. ew Of %  rwMIMll boM| manned f.u %  H I ii the) ,' WW H„ Air UlkM %  f r 2 dyI j Itil* in bhe area from which Introducod the Bf WedUWdU morn, XDBC10U|! ank-e> I '" ewivey his Srawell Truffle toped when wiweatloii by \L A ( %  s i.. [ng BiKotMtlni of Bhr.nka H ,',,*„ ,„,, >,i i %  %  "" "' >e hoi-rn.!; ".,!,,„, -.„ 111( „ ,M dtflown they dUIrjfim portponed In vl • M, K lurtn. the.. %  I V.TundVL^LXSS JKS.fi?HD? P'of • "^' KCKulation, had -back of_ UV lin w,imi 1 ^ 1 ;. i luu V ^^ T | 1 ,, Wtt^ to "J ^ ,„*„* %  11 '"'it lMlllin antl „„.,. p Uln .l.inu-i, u.i %  W wmnfla "al 111 the remainder ni-(1 of UM •qtwdran be penaltted to p crvm „,.| it iiarhadm M| K „ ,„,, ,. .'.26 %  %  '• Atlantic Am i %  I %  .rm> %  • %  %  .... ... TSViS. -•" %  Us cl# ... l.0 *" %  TTi %  help Y.W C.A ha I for g.rU. II u not open lo any *221l K.?V.STE %  "' one but to young won.cn who ccerrt* bjrthe Civil Service AJ I •omethlni about ftitohcr-. kv.idy and are wiilins lo le-n on* ao 'hat they cm beeorn.dU Of Ihe week e\teOehen in their own p-rmo %  by as ..... I UM PlavinL' i-trleH— Nelhull %  • amei (e.g. ctlcki l i i i which Inhave been pUyed by boy* I %  has lieen no aimllar activIty t..t nirU. To meet thia for giru (lclcncj ihe Social Welfare i. i-!u ntimgiiig and ill: %  %  : f loo n<-u>..ll among the I :n'U M Kfjl, tare* "Asaoclationa of thl" 1'iiva te bualneMO*. DOOjl in the Island. <-ther girls fro. elation, will apply to all pubii? officers and whOM enabling unifoiinity nf li-.,.. . i %  (i>> who %  aoondod ih"' notion i Dd n>ading of lh< Bill, rfel.Regulations | . ;.,.. %  ., ( Pubhe 1 ' ...ve now compll all public employees <•• %  .., bulldUiti deaigned lo boo* baata. u d)oM ti.iHoUdayi witl UM BaraMi to. iba Alfporl vel Pay Act provide for employees cw S :, I.I nd Worlwt. Deparlnieiit of oiniiU'ting the) i ixcepi the two Karo#aa housing T.C^ InouauraU has bee* mhl ttiu. B clearing UM way do* during the fnonth i for th sub-*iui.iug of th* CM i laj inih Janui i I'ark. Thi new ear park ia inereaseU their munlxr of (I H tfl \ \'.oi\ .mil to U will l>t .i V 1 •i'gol 3$n uaamujiri in Jan I be sepai. ew park and will be aa British Guiana Atrwayi l.t.l Inler.iiiliiinul Aei.uli 11 II ihlieun) l.ld : ,. %  thai ara M in .—OperaVigie Ait[. Supcrvi | St. I.o trooaa by 1 full yaara I %  I t men to ...ii European Annv. %  rjeniiii bo %  %  %  transport* lb in \*> ilmhu Thu an' HI IHJEI 'from 1. rrbundaUoni for othei t„ bt ranted to Airline operators Monday and Thu to house then VOl I the bullduig will be coi %  leled during FK. I.. M. : ..-, has tendered but resignation Haad OCka, r\>ct--oi-8paui, to i.iui raantaf] 1!J2. Mr. C.irln will Ugimlv ,. .,1 i.\ .,11 with whom he work%  eawall Airporl. from the |ha Radio Call sign p until now M. Cat %  hii inv la Mi F i irtar A CO Brldgatinrn. who dagfl op "tu It la on uecounl • f hi* Mr. George Director of UM Bna re i >.ui I AI ilnoa he %  (< I :.ed at the Communit-. < has been a alow estimates and cove n the ouln i th.Tarmii l K.I.M m active part In th^ one, bui at long la I im< new cost of living l of wiu.i. flights during Ihi p the Hun ran grese can be recorded t„ fniveniment emplovee* and Is glf BMI hd ., r (via SI ii.gaiused gardes periods "— i lonoclloii ilno of l.iLioMBflpilf i 1 1 ,. II i Id Roat RadJ I .. regular raaturc of Life i extension I "v Control r .., I.A n'il. Barbados: um. The nrs t obata in fart tt* fupplei i nad from 81 Lu i Nan overcun..._,„ )l|rjll room having ( whara tu had spent rbe ... %  . task ; i T, ',^ 1 V ; 7^7 '' P'tots and (tight i ible enough lo m in., : fctiiiu.lea p respect of utlier item* ( t|ii p uhll( AddrO ' "' onr aml "' m ): s '' %  ll "' Va... Ta % % %  % % %  Coatbanngra School, undeiti-* a tours* of .in.I during 1949 :iiul %  .1 leaders Ironi : ,1H T.!" "'" m ur '. P ^ u. BaaalU .*.,....im.U -. I.mctt Aernp.n.t;.le \.•.. %  /.. The \eu Tavation ...',,, V|„. T.inii^lliuihl both nvbsuntlal actual an ID ' ""r: %  n ,.,lana d \.v.i Vigie i -., %  b N Bli %  Mi n from \ i \ii Ro < %  HI assumed i >(„ i i. %  •ln-Chargt Barbodo i W Mall. Becretair .hi, and Mi rranh .i i rdlne, Art nab Offwai .1 rauUna raW the iiiontli urit6> •MB It. v\ I Beawel during th* month '" '''' JJ, ?? MUlwm m rsS lPs v.I.. Iv 170.000 Ion I %  %  : % %  <•" > ...,.; %  ;, .... : %  unMiides ..leou-ie revenue lor oui ,ni ''"' """u ivl "e am Buenos Aires where hi i . liUv I these Jlri. C, il.0 p.n MM net„7,u,,' i„ S i %  led King* Mil u .1, so that moat of ihctn ,< mml inevltabk would result ... I II Aviation) delemlan to ihe \ n..l 1 < A i I in. ; ^ ei piiu.HI ui.m-n-i.iv.il .ii-. !" K i monies "..^i %  • [ .-"_.. *%t "" >. %  held Uten. On his re* ins. from ncnitch. II Is a "*.'c, I %  .VV,",, W..I therefore w,th a certain amoi ,,,,,,.lv „ ,.,,„.. IM fM Wcl_ of prtde in achievement that we JJ^,^' %  "*" %  AurUl %  i. HOT, Vice has lit^n lodleoted lorUec in ll,: [l Aft 1 ...I'.., Ccvii-O'-' >1* .115 s I IriUinillon aa* or-.rs lonijifi t. M. JONU a CO., Ltd. P.O. Baa 141 Bel.)....-. K eep your hens at a high rale of egg ptoductioo. and maintain thm in good physical condition. Tha oatmasl ID Ful-0-Pap Feeds and Mashes lor starting, growing and agg production contributes toward more profitable results. Made ay Tha Quaker Oeti Company Ask lor ful-O P.p Poultry Feedlns Oulda — It's (reel • %  S i IE,. kU SurvtO UM Ll %  i next hgrdle, that of nolalure. %  8 "i 1 ai net n %  "" UM Lndividisal as ociatroi This groups %  *: bad to row tv and orgarins) '" *J5 "idoor gs social .nd fairs in order t48 that wa • MOt 0,-di,,. %  S ^""^ \v" not .V i JTrE led. The raocl ,., ,., *d for nlf-hl .,. in obtaining the %  %  % %  I i mill. ni on 11th Jai stten'l .i iii.ui birth and Ace of ] Tiinni.ui Mrs. Ooddai U-Commi i i % %  Goddara. Ul the S;vannnh Cfnn,itt.--rran^-Caniidll Air Line* tan for Usa use of space M Itag Ml Ntll B* iftlrtr ststlnnrt af Vsnrmn Ll ,n.i st f.-.A' Netbsll ran was .... \ icauon In awtbadoi %  P.A.A mi the Vesli-y whatever %  but • small ordlnaril> retiulrad for norm a 1 h-i* been mode, and rlul class In One of aha pt % llarbodo* %  M*ll League 1 of the ^ehool is should have s **homi un I (. %  t^r-a-rs s A Park and U ground* "' UM %  fill) Mr. and Mra, OranU" %  Adams foe the u*.of grounds home for Ihi Hill Netball Teem; Mb .f Mr. Parmai 11 if 1 daughu r Agencli I I. A V I fiv) to Hie Vestries of— St. Michael. . Philip acsl in 1.. ciiuivb who have provuled or expi, I Ingnrrr to provide grounds and 1 FfVl.l-. This is the beginning, and with th.willed aimrdto. u-hgrh the So, il Haibados Natball Leagu.veili Is also a small basketry Welfare Off.. the* game, the day iD teams have now .„. .nivd a t looked f-'rward Lo IVeU-rnade baa"home' 1 ground, and 1 ''.• '• NeUasll lor gin .1. purof the ofhr.. as p.-pular as rrieKet for DO MORE SPACE MORE GRACE LESS WASTE WITH "• XEW i '.6.C. ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR .• %  • thv \t'ir #f'/s imunn Shntr ai I UK CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. VICTORIA STREET RUGS AND 'CARPETIMG fly by Qmste&ation l0 Carpet Strips in varied Widths sizes of FIBRE MATS BARBADOS CO-OP. COTTON FACTORY LTD. "We a/so Hock Bentwood Chain with Cane Seals and Wood Seals' ...And Save $258.50 On "OH Peak Your flight by pressurised ConMellalmn Bpi %  sves you days of travelling lime — eatia time • do and tee more on business or ple.i*uic. You ralax sa deep-sealed comfort, enjoy 1 m.sls and maaltlma drinks In flight high gbovg No aatras to pay — not even a tip — sar attantlve BO A C. service B.O.A.C. takes good tan of you BAHSADOS l.tlMMIN NKW YORK PARIS MIAMI NORMAL 111 TIIIV FARE I 560 10 nut 1,560.111 406.50 OFFSFASON* RITIRN FARE 1 noiso fiinsull your Travel Acenl er Rrl'l-h We.l Indian Airways. Lower BroTd Street. Rriilceln,vn—Barbados. Telephone I5R5. II 11 I T I I H OVERSEAS A 1 R W A HPORATiuM



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THVRsriAY. FfBRl \RY M. 1M2 O:\nn.\nos \nvor.\tr PACE rnr. PLAZA. BARBAREES THE PLAZA CINEMA. Barbarces. was downed and built b\ MlWll Clarke & Tucker, who were also the n.l builders of Ihe Plaza Cinemas at Bridgetown and 0 Tl '''•' tha MI .:, .11 %  si raigh; forward i" md is flnishi'ti In talinon-plnk stipplecrele with ret] accentuating the arrhiteciural features iloodlit at night is dominated by a wide protective canopy In red. Mack whose soffit Join* the. retltna %  •' the lobby In a weeping inward slope to the entrance doors lo "Inch the lines of fluorescent cetluafl Hhting and the patterned nV ; ring below, whuh also slope*, point !h* way for patrons. in keeping with the modern, trend of designing, th,. wide lobby located right down at %  l where it* brilliant I fhUDg, attractively coloured terncoi and floor and well I ticket offices on each bright theatrical mood which invites entry of ever> XEW I III % Mil Oils Ami Fats Talks In April \ I ILL MilTINt. al the OIK and Fab (Onfrrener will meet probably in April to di-rldr on lllr trim* •f an oil* and Fat* agreement Mill, I. Will I.rr.,.1,1mendrd o Ouvernroente In suprrvde ihe existing screcm-nt ul i.li w\}\ tOBM lo an end in %  epOBBlBBr, Prolrwo. ( <,. H>a. lo the for DevelopWelfare and I'lc I Mud ..in p >. All he wai more or hisbut that did not prove tha' Js saying was that %  < %  was an agreement „_ aa ta jta ..sent* did that sort of thin* commission. That w.i \ DKFEHCI CO* NSEI In the Court ol Commoti P i ap prices—and i 'and his atom SuU I'.IM.:.," Da fVbrau I K. Deane in which Da rum M sin mid not go to the nruntaakm, Mr. E. K. Walcott of in Human Qnaal ot in his address to the jury yesterday held that thi-i. '•"; in hU address, Mr. 0. H had baa < ntnei between the parties, i,osi...>s D LE* "it* !" "* *"* Abreu did not Introduce Daeute to seller . had bean TZZSg U mi i UH %  llaflid contract He argued. to>. thai il thara ,[ lr v ,,„| ( | ;( I,, W hrihcr the. wen arai a contract Da Abrati had miaconducted hinuell ,! I %  • wuuld have bean lustiflcd in rtlamWaini him wiinns or noi. n wu nmt. Ih Intradudna r,„ ri ii„., ... %  ""••* '-;," v "' m ',' ,M 1 !" "" %  •" %  .m< <•'-.! A' I. I anenl lo srl n n , ,. ., fliethlna t" MU and H wantait • 'IMHIII s:iit-i % iiin w rh.it thai ho %  Ian mi , ., ;..,.;" i„ >.m-lliiiii l" bu> In. |.n., na\ MM a> coomdm. And Mr lhr v would be paid cr.mmiaiu.11 (hi i.ill ii nol rroea-eaaimntd by B"' omelllIieii, as Wat Iho ea<. I >ald lhal lluother >id.or. II bcl.ire them, human >reed eaino s.lioitoni urv ue Abrvu N i-ounIhat wB5 p,,,, of hlt du!v whelhal ba told bin that lb."" ,n -' affair and the roemn. K w'U.nt. I/I .and Hat* Mr Adatna roae li objact PH.* he wanted waa £2toon. sum wa< not paid, a: .1 s B Dear, itu.tru.l.'d l ,|, llt \|, M..UI,., h.,,1 ,,,,( .... M...I. k| araa felt thai it was not uatf II. had ftal.l ha would ajal naadad Thai iNuuiblv aaplajnad ,;r l 1 red ii I.a Ih-an. Ihcni ti is job waIhe terma of the pllaintifTs stair*J'i l,en but could he made verbis' Abr.-u > case is that Deane Bnlahed there, but if h* rnsnttoraM nent ^i clainai which was with % %  nd """, l >bt' ol eoniract %  ed to iy him St commUth.pries it em not because it the Hope of cvadmj the neces•*• ""!', *'?'"" *•'" '• "Jeh II if h. ii in I'II lo n."ahis duty. havlnf to deal with a hit on *' "'" hJ %  •* ""' "' ha' ,h, H "'" %  Idiaai to UM Court, wanri i In anitnc in dafr, pn*'"" could be argm-d th.u r. Adams Mid that in Daanat Meat bnattaa.) tanaa. it •.--• %  1 %  d. po( HI Jiiv clt-ii'iH-e to |f ih P price was nol .1 maternal "' w *> n "' OB* could underto that there had l>eeit Itaud, 1 tit of (ha duty Of Kir pliuntilT u >,t on,1 ,h n a and nnothe THE BARBAREES PLAZA which open* next Sattudsy night l Why An Aeroplane Flies J Flies". This was divided into three MCttoni Lift, Draff. and Thrust. A lar^e number of naaman and paopli who ore anticipating becoming membtis. attend) I. are wen a few of the ladies and one especii.llv expraaacd that aha was interested in becoming a non-ilyiiii: nu 'Why An Aeroplane nies" was The iudi.-n.,. concrete stairs lead lo a vrfeuanmade through the co-operation of M th* plai • would ine lounge for balcony patrons the Empire Plying School, Royal Mad Wood where the decorative scheme. Air force The first section showed Cioddard. Chairman ol Uiv Coincolourfu. resilient asphalt tile was Lift. This explained the part mittee of maniiRcmeni, who anfurniture and cheerful soft played Uy the wind above and swered queries, i-xpiained stallCrowd Attend Police Display lighting al) combine 10 promoti and restful atmosphere • 1-01 her than that usually wah commercial en%  % %  \ .i.nih and Intimacy with !" dianity U a common dlstin. ii-hm, feature of all Plaaa ..u.iiii.riiiiiis. aa It to their cream and blur colour scheme which h k been maintained hersw NrverthcWs. ,-.,.], has an mill (iduallly of IU own. | n this j .ludilorium aecousUeal qualillea Bnttoi below the wingt of the plane .Vim In Brief; BICYCLE STOLEN The Police MWW i.i Duatrlrt "A"' Police Station on Tuesday evening attracted ;. lari;.crowd Many tourista from the H M s Alauri-tania, Which m ..nchore.1 in Carlisle Bay. attended the show. The Show opened wiili the Musical Ride. Major R. A. Stoutc, Deputy I PWlce, who acted Conmonles, firinouneed ihe names of some ind their riders ing speed for the benefit of niemtiers Thin secllon showed qailc 1 Icurll h" lllrpi ..11, -.It..tilt 1 be flown to gel the he-.! landlitr resulta, Al one stasr tinpUnr was stopped In thr motion .1 landing so that the audlencr could see the angle of the wins which was respon*ihlc lor si. ing the plane lift Mara wheels touched the (round By uso of partla lei in watci this section chow %  %  mil fiver Iba wtnf nlenhfymg 1 lie I ihe wta| and ihe high 'vulfi r contradiction between Bllaaad £ Al ; ( "" and P**"? ((( Hnen t ed th Horrell of Villa Road Hill, reported that hh seen nuilt-fn by the use bicycle, valued Ss3. was stolen A ngl or curves and planes In the from outside Harris' shop at Nel„ r ,, i,bove walls: for example, each side son Street between 5.30 p.m. on pressure below, wall is broken up Into a series Friday and 5.00 p.m. on Saturday. The next section dealt wilh of splayed panels to avaU Drag which was divided into three. parallelism in sound. IJghUng. A quantity of bread, a basket parts — Parasite Draft llt^Ufltd rich is soft IMH! soothing, fat by an %  half "I Iha purchaser, parked at serf ion was Thrust Tin person on whose behalf MM by dow-nllghta Pfbyn Street. City, between 11.30 I batng undaratood ree-ssed behind Bi-ills in the 1"" "" Monday and 7-30 a.mon Slabilily Ihn celling. Tuesday. The items are the propThe other thre,. ports oi iho "' erty of the Purity Bakery. The %  Wh. An AarOfliaiM -FUSS", whldl incident was repotted by Livingwill be ihown DOM TUCSda) stone King of Culloden Road. St 0 i-e : Forces In Balavco. SUblllt) The focal point lo which the Michael. and Defective Control eyes are drawn, naturally, is the After the show X< Stage and screen Here we have Sis snd a hah* seres of ri|answered quosU wno As usual es and ridn Innovation — no proscenium canes were burnt when a lire p f the members dlacu l .Miixniium l*ricr era were ajsalaude.1 fmr a grand a"~h or curtains — Just a "floatoccurred at Apes Hill Plantation, point,, be t wee n ti %  riw uylng pUntatlona, the maxdlsplny of precis...11 and j'idgtng" screen which provides prot. James, ot about 11.45 p.m. on moving 11 vote o| Ihanha Mr. . ent deI>e Abreu was saying ih.it ment previously undrenmed Tl !£^ daT Goddard said thai .., %  • %  Fm anyIha 7th, Rov 0111 was to he told This was followed hy the Drill of (piallB and maintains the Tne ,lr ' extended to Spring VM lllP ,.,,,,,;.., ,,.,. ... .. ., 10,000 commissKS, twhel Iba < %  IM-IU UuHilhl Of th* Dlsplav b) who are at Plnira tradition for pace setting Plantation where M4 acres of hoped on the next occasion Ihe '• ,i1 '"'" betweon Ztt to ••'. i 1 "' 1 and Iha planUUoa Thev present Training bt l>i-t. -A" and in the Cinema business of BarH 0 *' Ci """ i property of S. A. nltendum %  \v Pldom balm :' liad hi-anl him givi some members of Ihe Cons-tabubados. Coloured light spills out Wnlro . w e burnt. They were pointed out oulta ,!I;U'K th.it tl %  ' %  %  K Wakott, under thai 1 mt. that he had pffV|oi 1 lnry. The drill iquad gave a good from behind the top and sides In ur *d\ he Mid thai of Klvef) hbn full 1 I I perrimiaru-t\ tp* ) ,1 fe.,mm of this screen on to the fluted „,..,,,_.. -, . Even those who bed no intonilo r "' iferelUna foi %  Ihe 7th, he h;i.| K ne to the races. of the ulspl.-s w.is |hai no orders onceve back wall which is .. %  Hrld ?*". ,s < ,p, '' l | i<'d M tlf joining ilk' Cliih could otten ,: nad '""' '" "' "'' ,,, %  ""* facs, De Abreu %  ... %  d in a pleading eomblnalion itl^L, ^!I !" J! i ?! (l '-^^i!? As son,, .. %  tl.. l> .11 I Be. talklfl| Will svldenl lhat there was a Mr. Waicntt sBked, arh; %  r> UM MI tor the othei side even >" h onl\ knew <>f the plantation <'peinng tell them lhat H thi.iugh Do Abreu iud tnei even serteui things, a prta m %  Mi... Ml lie as Ihe other arrived at NnlMxIy went |0 bnv %  holding, it wi.iiiii not anyahmi unassi thai knes what torfered With the contract the price was likely to be. And if %  .vhen the eeaa oottthv •" "•fW --i*'''i %  prlco and put iaj ra will address the Court on "" MOO thai was vorj vrong I of Im th.it than eoukt 'V' •""'that whenever they got %  tafnSaOB "f ,nls|e,ncsent.i.iid unless the • %  illation induced th.... ufnred loss In eense*,„,.„ md 1>r(im v Abl found to be I liar When as a 1 Mottley, who was ,,. SI| |, „ f „, iy rtl r .sv,,,,,,,,,. „ M S txpert evidence, found that De Ah., ild he hod extensive experience lnc v irxmM ,„,, halliy, 1 •' an against DeSIM fvei, 11 intod lo do so. II % % %  b irden 1 1 pm Li li 1 • hg sld, a %  %  1 tl %  and also the burden f pastel shades. from the r... his right leg Daniel was assisting Lionel Pn" d "'"" The tlonr slope has been car,'uuartcr acres oi Ural crop ripe **? "V" .,.,,'.,,., To climax Ihe cvcnin s en(„ nv desiiierl lo afford pe'iect """' %  !> property ot F. B. Goodlennlnmcnl UM PoUco Band plajr. vi .„„, ,„„, B scal whl | e lhq .n_ They were Insured. Sound Traininc ed Ihe National Anthem, ol Am|,.,,. k ,„ ,,„ r fc ,p 0 cini! ot seat rowK f n ? M ' •* %  "" I-and and Th foreword l„ Avi .1 eHca. Q ^MI^I Canada. „„ ph0 .JTSSSSi beyond In^ffJ^Sj^iaSTS ^ %  3 ,he usual standards "• ' ' %  "? f"> "l* canes. J£TUS tSSSSLn The entire pr,.,ect is an example • """Party of Charles Yearwood %  tn pi In it M did Daana pratandlna raM io know th. Qua hei.i .1 irsM .was not hi, anU, i could M .,, him trying to IIKIII Parther Evidence In Lan-riiv Qsse "Sound tralninit If III,, toundaalk 1 in ; "l p of v 0 I ppenrCivil Service Association. " to the islands. Anotkjsr froup of phtoarap,, %  uld do the purchasing He %  %  .::.;•> ,1 ttH, m doing the 1 OUTt, Mr I K so rapid that new prODM, „ n.v cull ii„.'di,aaler that •^riftt'B ca^.hen^the ange of method and technique Those who choose aviation i Bad UM plantaUOB culd only be a lie Of .1.11.1 IJeane would not have ... 1. al InasaafftlfUj Hi. ftotlles Going Oul Again na on behalf of Frvhrace while The mrWina wns summonad Applications were mude by J*J" •"" aft E Sinn Is proseeutlne lor the witt, view .0 awakening the lndlvlduala lo the Control Office Ing In airnsf! I Soil,.,. mat of Aaatstnnt Teachers In tor permission to export IhMo "V' lr "" their own weltare. since only a bottlaa, and accordingly, the Con" d*aU Wllh """ %  %  '"' '"" very small minority of them were troller of Supplies ha. isaued 1, '* fSSf. ,'' ie.nl.cri of the Teachers' DMnotice Intormuig interested per"** lr ion of the Civil Service Asaoaons lhal he would consider Issuing licences for their export durum Acting %  '•of'--'' "" %  '•'--^'ni.: Duns, the m^ina. teacher. !.1 .P"-"" 1 •*•' 23 lo Ap trict "A". yesveraay oroerro ... ... ifr" wv . —" as". .. %  ... K %  -. George %  <'' — "' '" ln sTItA-ances. and It waa ootntA c c with the Control Oftl and already HAMMOND REPORT IN PREPARATION Mr. S. A. Hammond of the Depreparing his repo: ntation to the Cover K:> 1 %  'orltoflilyllarui :.:. r,. R, Griffith. Magiatratc of DisDuring the meeting, teachers "A". veslerday ordered took the opportunity to Ur car**. %  -LieorKc Austin, a labourer of t.iin grievances, and it was potntTbOrna. Onp WeatoMry Hoad. St. ed out that although head teaehrevealed thai already persons ar. Michael. |V) %  to! of C5 in 14 ers and as-istants were both faemaking unle Bowen. some of the heads. Ai,other irregularity which was The ofl to ihe notice of the meetFebiu.irv li Mi D. M ng was that in some schools, aspeared in the ea* on hehnlf of ststanti were promised preferAustm Bowen U>ld the Court -hey sacrificed their revelopmenl and Welfare Organ that ai about •3 Pm on *'' t '" ceei penod at mid-day or their IJO,, w ^ 0 paid a visit m the !>>eruary 9 Ihe defendant after al i %  -,i hours WBr H viands for the purpose of Ing her, kick* Umos making an Investigation of tht and ,h ' ^^ .hi* D ^lZ*S,leul fe-gg J organuiatlon of the salarieis o! Incident Mppaned ll tho e-jrnrr the ^ !" e ^n"^ isrr ^ I rw* il .^i lr ,t eivil servants in that of Pickwick Gel teachers in respect of the *snirins tests", teachers should ~~ Mr. Mslono eeid thet I every effort to organise P re tint ihinr h %  : %  > %  Into ft body, by Joinstarted the t,ri Tl the Teachers' Division of the BREAKFAST T1MF Of the I Service Association where cCoClr-CC the same t'" ; it nant tni .y might air their grievances. ot.l\Vltto herself, if Ihe led the an ij discuss their mutual probDuring Lent Canon Barlee will MBBi of |M : %  • ihen there i cmB W |th a view to finding ways conduct the breakfast time servwms no case. and means of over-coming; them, ices on Fridavs from 11.SO a.m ^ t a 13100 noon at St. Mary's Church. Ilndgetoam. *-* %  • rt rf — a'!— ff. tit %  % %  %  Th uhjact will be—The occs1 'Illinium tanner lie.re Un ttOtiaay -.r^al serv ices of the Pray er book. I the Pine and saw the CHURCHlLL from 1. who nil to bull Remus which he had donated Attlee denied thu He laid be Ih,. rent. He said thai had been ready any time Id talk years 4 lmhe was glad so know th.it u had with Churchill and believed I-ord number of its offspring in varlCherwell. Churchill's scientific hack in thi Ar island and hoped advisor who now head* th*> Bralaughters might Increase ish atomic programme. ha,i been Oni.,: .f their dsnis. kenfully informed There hod been n .fclit tliat with the good nouncement that lit I a/ould dining atomic weapons until to days ago when Government ,-rodut-tion of the tests would be made this yea .Mgh artiilcial inWoomera desert range .boost trslis. 4orr/*i milk production. —(CPl. I 1 '. in inr nil' %  Juctlon of addition..! not '" t '' 7" *dli..Nt the %  .. rebuttal n. ea ejedaa. it woui.i he* fBl-ds what was a reason,,mlc "'" r *l tor an n I price, it was his submission iiefore a sale was %  ..nti...t.d sny s,ecinc contract what ?"' fnt w lh>l **'"•" '" %  on.,1,1.. or laareeaonahiii :,,t •<*." %  •' to pay him any comJ • ny effect. There "II-AIOII. SO it was very simple %  ulenl | i.. it,.,i „,..i If !<• Ahieu knew that %  would be wllllni lo reply lo u "' eendoi not Ihe purer. ment If neeeeaan There < a* I peyttni him, ha would on of what Mr neceeeerliy try to lech .| U ,i, .t .. n ,,, io lhal hf would :• i onable. Thet wet why he laid Roy liiii Bpa eUc f'oniract % %  if one wore detanbii %  %  neelfh. JackinK l> I'nce %  •ded '* %  Abrev hed fesld i ihe eontracl agreeing to |h< U to Ihe MIIV that by Ihe % %  other side could not jecUltf up ot the price De Abreu hat that was unreasonable would havn hem hoptnj agreement was that more oonunueJon and the) twouid neve to be paid. Theremltconduct al anSport Shirts and other items for men (msi i MI uii, %  %  iroai umm %  aBfl 14} |D II ins. K Each SH.:I MOITM I.I II \l; srORT MIIBTS bMaa ..I Wli.w. 111...' Ofay, (Tram. ' %  E^.... s Led OTIS VERTS. alhl.' St>l" and plain. Bttai 3., etaSe SI..12 OPFN IAD S, IKM.I. Tlf.s 'if Ham. Ea> Oil Vin.lis lluir Ti.nlr S„„ h.i,,,, 'I .,[.. IIHKI'. MattUaa lauailva Tubs. Nervitoi... Tmiic Win.' Il..lil..l.r..i. li.lialu.il CaasaatM NuK (lil.s) ll.n ncv Tobarro Hi mil Oil \l..i i Inn.' Jnr. Vapai Paalllles Kr..|.|.s Ian & Sirups #* \ i i,uis i in Utitll I I._ I X ^a II I s\ s\ l'i tt r..n (hi. Ik>it Chow llahhit Chow Oini.len,. II. II ( li.". II. Jl^.iN JONES .\ 1" 1 • x ' • I' |,i*|r.l ul.ir. ( ,11 M.irl.'.i.i l>. & 1". CaaCO Milk Ckm Goal i I..i.. |,iy|r.' ul.ir. %  : w r %  %  a %  f I



PAGE 1

THVBSDAV I EBBI M: BARBADOS ADVOCATL r \r.r. M M i 'LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES BLONUIE RY CHIC YOUNG *t> FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY —AT wcv.p TAKE \tcice T N e*e '-*<• TWS^T. J mil.'. WCWP W *ET / (EAvE THAT "1*L? pi TOR tQl TO -Ti*i'f* AMOVKCCOV NOT coc*' lb %  a Ifw acfm and pain* | I "frtiiBg oa" m %  • (4Ultv ncii n *4 k \ Sa bo* i >ki „ l> 1 I \ %  i .!..,.! Thai'* b.nthu ; I %  | %  MM*— coniainw ap.-.... tfimta l* k.rh Hi. t I I ".-.I'M •, it, 1lT>\ MMaCfe) -"It pmiilul j iirhirn lrtrfc I ..If l . ,,, k livrf Tr> Dr. < 1 Pilb luiiLghi. Al all iliug comtien u /<" %  M rntlitmt shine z **. STOCKED BY ALL LEADING STOKES riw qualify Metal Pollan WVEKTlSt: i \ Tin. ADYOtCATU IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers lo all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SI'KriAi. Oil IIIS lire % %  <> t tilublr ur Hrinit-ht-s I xrrtlsiilr. N|M-itflilwlonn ami Swan .Siren TT ii t Uiuallr NOW Usually Now w „.!.„ %  Tins Klim (5 lb) G14 5.50 Tins Black Magic Chocolates Tjns 0xfor<1 8ausa(fe8 -Ub 1.15 .98 (Walls) .69 .64 Pkgs. Tapioca Flakes .24 .21 Bottles Carlings Beer .26 .21 Currants (per lb) .45 a.' Boneless Beef .58 .48 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i II i o i. o i\ > % II i: I. IMM I llll S -y KING GEORGE VI. A FAMILY ALBUM OF HIS GREAT LIFE i %  MtlOfl n maiiiinrcn' UVOtltY HI .Hi .f tintfWtfttl I Umtl <>t Ihr inf Kin* ding book ID CM* rpli i i<>ti wiih let. : i 131 piiftrs with pic• \'i\ pair, four uprrb plain. i booh to bi %  I hon i Tho p • Stale iK-cMtoiM rtftmnal Mlhrring*. bMldM i.cord nf th' UN Kinn'i %  %  m of I mm -.r Kuir l ninth nun tony t:\m.v. ADVOCATE STATIOrVEltl BOOK SHOP GREYSTONE VILLAGE. BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS


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