Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
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ESTABLISHED 1895

: WEDNESDAY;



Col. Sec. Explains
Reconstruction Of

Part Of Runway

"THE HON. the Colonial Secretary, at yesterday’s

meeting of the Legislative Council expressed
regret at some harsh words that had been said
elsewhere about Canada in connection with the
defects recently discovered. in the newly con
structed runway at Seawell.

He took this eppertunity when he successfully moved
that the Council concur in a Resolution to
pehnditure to the exient
the defective portion

authorise

n the manner recommended in the

report of Mr. Harold J. Connolly, B.A.Se. (M.F.1.C.), Con
Structional Engineer, Department of Transport, Govern-
ment of Canada
This 1ount include um of ‘ i:
$20,000 in case it ‘s found nec¢ i dD TD
sary to repair other parts h we te} n
runway during reconstructior

owing to the unusual stresses that
will have to be placed on por:ions
not normally carrying traffic and | ,
other unforeseen reconstruction; _QMAHA, Nebraska, Feb. 26
work. | The a eae said five men
y were killed and 12 others injured
Runway Report | when a B. 50 medium bomber on
The Hon. the Colonial Secretary |a “classified” mission from Hawaii
said:— lost a wing while landing then
Honourable Members will have} crashed and burned. Both the
studied the Report on Runway|circumstances of the crash and
Construction at the Seawell Air-|the purpose of the flight . were
port by Mr. H. J. Connolly, the | mysterious.
Officer

Plane Crash

Chief Engineer of the Department Public Information
of Transport, Government of Wayne Bradley said the bomber
Canada, which was laid in this} was approaching the field in clear
Honourable Council last week,; weather about 2.30 am. when
and will have noted that he has!one wing suddenly ripped. ffom

ascribed the failure of certain lthe fuselage. The plane was only
sections at the Airport

to tWe} about 20 yards from the runway.
causes, namely that “all the clay} The four engined ship plunged
was not removed right down to|jnto the runway bounced briefly
bedrock or some clay was incor | i740 the air again, then dropped
porated in the coral rock backfill|, second time and burst into
that was placed on top of the bed- flames. Bradley said the plane was
rock” and, second, that heavy | enroute from Honolulu to Omaha.
rains occurred during the course He said it flew by way of Sacra-
of the construction, |}mento California.

| Seventeen men were aboard the
plane. The officer said the home
base of the plane or its mission
“might never be known since it
a “classified” mission.

—UP.

U.S. Embargo Is
Heavy Blow
_To Canada

OTTAWA, Feb, 26
embargo by the United

They will also have noticed his}
conclusion, in regard to the first
cause of failure, that, I quote from |
his. Report, “this could readily
have happened in construction of | was on
this magnitude where large heavy |
equipment is used to secure and
move the selected rock to be used
as backfill as our tests on samples
of clay taken from the areas show
it to have a very high moisture
content, but when dry is extremely
hard and, if coated with coral
dust, has the appearance of coral
rock, and unless minutely exam-
ined or saturated, could easily





An

ex- },
f $60,000 on the reconstruction of [st

Reds Delay
Ceasefire

j By LEROY HANSEN
| MUNSAN, Feb. 26
The United Nations Command
Wednesday that Commu-





negott may b

felav the ¢ e-fire



}
}
| lo cover preparations for
I offensive.
May Day is ‘the tradi ional
ommuni# holiday. General Ridg-
way's headquarters broadcas
harge from Tokyo on Tuesday
night in a@ “Votce of the Unite

Nations Command” programme a

Red negotiators here rejected

an Alliee compromise offer de-
signed to break the deadlock over
policing the truce,

Chinese Colonel Pu Shan cate-
gorically refused to drop Russia
from the proposed Neutral Truce
Supervision Commission despite
the U.N, offer to match the ges-
ture by withdrawing Norway.

The U.N. headquarters broad-
cast from Tokyo said that the
Reds warned at a recent negotia-
tion sessio@: “As far as they are
concerned, an early truce was out
of the question.”—U.P.



Beasley Heads
Cattle Board

(From Our Own Oorrespondent)

KINGSTON, Feb 25.
The Jamaica Government an-
nounced today the appointment of
Professor C. G. Beasley, Economic
Adviser to C.D. & W, West Indies,
Chairman of a Special Board to
enquire into the cattle industry.
The terms of reference of the
Board which includes Dr, Hug-

}gins, Director of the Institute for |
|Economice and Social Research, of

the University College of the West
Indies, is to make recommenda-
tions with regard to the establish-
ment of the industry, found a
long-term basis to achieve in-
creased efficiency and maximum
local production of beef, milk and
milk products at prices fair ‘to
the consumer and producers,

The appointment of the Board

pass an inspector's eye and be|states on the import of Canadian |follows public outery due to re-

mistaken for coral rock.”

and mouth «disease in
Recommendations Saskatchewan, may be a _ blow
Honourable Members will also|from which Canada’s $2,000,000,-
have noted his recommendations !000 livestock industry will never
for the reinstatement of the de-| recover.
fective areas, In order that these That was one among the num- |
recommendations may be clearly|ber of possibilities which emerged
understood I am taking the liberty |from the confusion following the |
of spreading on the table a print announcement on Monday of the |
which shows in pink and yellow embargo and of measures Canada
the defective areas. )
The first point which Honour-| disease.—(C.P.)
able Members will notice is er
by far the greater part of the|
Runway is unaffected, and this |
point, in view of what has been
said, is worth emphasising. The
second point is that the worst
area between stations 19 and =



NEW JOH



was constructed over the deepest

fill. This is the area which Mr.

Connolly recommends should be
reinstated wilh Portland cement
concrete; for the other smaller

‘
and more isolated areas to the
east of station 25 and the west of
station 19 he recommends a simp-
ler and less expensive remedy.
Further, Honourable Members
will have noted the two alterna-
tive methods of procedure which
Mr, Connolly has suggested. Fo:
the reasons, first that the tourist
season is at present in full swing
and that the tourist trade this
season would be disrupted and
prospects for future years seriously
damaged if the Runway were to
be put out of commission for a
period of a month at the present
junctire, and second that we are
at present enjoying a continuous
spell of dry weather, by far the Mr. R. C. Springer, M.A.,
longest since I arrived in Barba- formerly Assistant Master,
dos, it has been decided to adopt} Harrison College has been
method (b), and it is desired tc | appointed Headmaster of the
get as much of the job as possible | Combined Coleridge-Parry
done before this dry ced School Speightstown. :



breaks. i



RESTING



writes @ postcard while others sit and rest before

meat and livestock because of foot|cent increases
Southern | prices,

will take to stamp out contagious] Nations

AWHILE

in beef and milk



Reds Insist On

PANMUNJOM, Korea,
Feb. 26.

Communists rebuffed United
efforts at compromise
and insisted that Russia must
help police the Korean truce.
Chinese Col, Pu Shan categorical-
ly rejected in.the armistice ne-
gotiations the U.N, face saving
offer to drop Norway from the
proposed neutral Truce Super-

vision Commission if the Reds
would withdraw Russia.

Under the Allied plan the
Commission would have com-

only four ‘nations—Com~
murtist-dominated ‘Czechoslovakia
and Poland. U.N. designated
Sweden and Switzerland—in4
stead of six,

But Reds for the llth straight
day repeated their time-worn
argument that U.N. opposition to
Russia was unreasonable and
untenable.” —U-P.

Jamboree Fund

The Jamboree Fung found an-
other supporter yesterday to raise
the amount by an appreciable
sum, ’ ‘

The contingent of scouts are
scheduled to leave early next
week and so the fund has only a
few more days.

YOU CAN HELP.



Amt. prev. acknigd. .... $ 384.00
Mr, A. S. Bryden ...... 10,00
Total 394.00



TOURISTS from the Mauretania yesterday sit in front of the Publicity Committee Bureau; une lady

tackling a heavy day of sight-seeing and shipping.

> stalling to}
until May Day!

QUEEN INSPECTS ScouTS

QUEEN ELIZABETH as Prin
parts of the Commonwealth
Jamboree in July 1951. Behind

Achehon Satisfied ===
With N.A.TO.

French May
Abandon
Indo-China

| PARIS, Feb, 25.
The French may have to aban~-
don the entire Northern section
of Indo-China to Communist-led
insurgents this year informed
French sources said on Tuesday.
The sources said Official quar-
ters consider the move in whieh
French Union forces i
to at MM
wa woyv he a sa.
back for the salt Senate?
world. In Annam narrow ‘waist’
of the country only 150 miles
Wide concentrated “Inst ditch”
defence lines could be drawn in
the mountain terrain where
peaks rise 5,500 feet the sources
pointed out

|

No official world

retreat from strategic Hoa Binh
underlined the gravity of the
French position. Wihen the late!
Marshal Jean de Lattre De Tas-
signy took the jungle fortress last
fall he said he would hold it
| forever,”

| Now the French perimeter is
|only 20 miles from Tonking, capi-
tal of Hanoi and Vietminh for-
ces are massing for new attacks
on the French withdrawal route
to the South.

Shortly before
Tuesday for Paris,
Minister of the
States. of Indo - China, Jean
Letourneau indicated that France
would be willing to take part in
an international conference to
bring an end to the Indo-Chinese
conflict.

He said the end of the Indo~
China war depended on the poli-
tical solution rather than the
military one, He said “France
would not refuse negotiations
| with Vietminh but under no pre-

leaving here
the French

text would she take the first
step.”

Letourneau said: “Franco-
Vietnam forces cannot force a

|
comment wadl

Russian Inclusion eee on possible withdrawal but



Associated)

ARY 27, 1952





Elizabeth inspecting the Canadian ¢
led at Clarence House, her London h

© Queen is Lord Rowallan, the Chief Scout

United States Secretary .of State Dean Acheson will

leave for Washington to-da
he wanted from the most

Council ever held—but he may have a hard time convinc-
ing Congress his paper victories have substance



THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of obtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, the
Advocate have arranged for
a practising Doctor to answer
reader’s medical queries,

Family Docter will be

to, see any readers
personally, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and
letters will be treated in
confidence. To make abso
lutely sure you are asked
not to sign your real name
to your query but to write
under a pen name. The
answer to the question will
appear under the pen pame.

Letters should be addressed
to The Family Doctor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week.

The first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate.



Japanese House
Pas» Budget After
Mass Walk-out

TOKYO, Feb, 26,

The House of Representatives
Budget Committee on Tuesday
evening passed Premier Shigeru
Yoshida’s $2,500,000,000, Budget
Bill after Opposition Party mem-
bers staged a mass walkout in
protest against its $500,000,000
Defence Appropriations.



decision by launching a great of-

—UP.



}

New Way To Keep
M.at Fresh Claimed

MOSCOW, Feb. 26

The Soviet press widely publi-
cised on Tuesday a new original
{process treatment of meat with
jultra-violet rays insuring the
|preservation of fresh meats in
warm temperatures for long peri-
jods without refrigeration.

Accoraing to tne Soviet press
the meat retains its freshness five
days ahd sausage more than 20
|days af.er a five minute exposure
|to the ultra-violet rays.—U.P.



R.M.S, Mauretania, with 1,500
| people on board (including crew)
\Slid gracefully into Carlisle Bay
shortly after 7 o’clock yesterday

morning. As health and immigra- |

tion officials “cleared” the ship
so that passengers could land,
launches to take most of the 759
| passengers on shore were quickly
lowered over the side of this
“Princess” of the Cunard Lines.
Mauretania is 35,677 gross tons,
772 feet long and 894 feet broad.
Over three hundred passengers
went on the shore excursion, the
remuinder made their own plans
and spent the day shopping, swim-
ming and some even organised
their own tour of the island.
Throughout the day passers by
the Esplanade stopped to get a
good look at the Mauretania as
she rode majestically at anchor
By mid-day tourists were all
over the island taking in all the

fensive because there is no front.)

Yoshida’s Liberal Party which
controls a majority of 51 seats in
any case then pushed the Bud-
get without a dissenting vote.

The walkout climaxed the
stormy session during which
the Liberal Committee Chair-
man aroused the ire of 19
Opposition members by rejecting
their demands that Yoshida ap-

pear before them to testify on]

alleged inconsistencies in pre-
vious ‘testimonies by the govern-

ment spokesman, reported
One hundred and fifty students
The Opposition Committee|on strike from Sidiki College
members included representatives} hurled: stones as they marehed
of the Progressive party, the|toward public instruction offices
Right Wing Socialists, the Left|}to protest agains! measures taken
Wing Socialist Communist Party,|by the French authorities. Three
the Farm Labour Party, the Far-jhundred and. fifty from. various
mers’ Co-operatives and the So-|schoojs demonstrated without in-

U.P.

cial Democrats.—U.P.

‘TOURISTS GO ON SHORE EXCURSIONS

, places of interest, Those who did
not have movie
}candid cameras or some
j type, and there was a continuou
clicking of camera-shutters
\throughout the day.

camera carried

othe!

Planters’ Punch
Sam Lords had over forty lun
ers and about 325 tourists stoppe
jin for drinks and to look over thi
well known: “Barbadian show-
|piece.”” A similar number in

vaded the Crane Hotel and over
90 remained for lunch. Most pop
ular drink served seemed to b¢
“Planters’ Punch.”

The Aquatic Club had ap
mately lune!
many opportunity
going in for a swim. Several
called in at the Paradise Be
Club in the morning and agai
in the afternoon. Other hoté and

a hundred for

took the

clubs were ite and

al



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Morrison Challenges
Churchill: Moves Vote

Of Personal Censure





|

LONDON, Feb. 26





|

FORMER FOREIGN MINISTER, Herbert Morrison,

| leading the Opposition (Labour) attac k on Winston

} Churchill tonight, challenged the Prime Minister to say

, whether there had been a “major shift” in Brit ; Far

} East ‘policy Moving a Vote of Personal Censure on
Churchill in a crowded House of Commor Morrisor
accused him of coming back from his Washington visit
last month with “vaguely expressed and p b] ra

commitments”, H

Important rong mar
Announcement joo), S
| On W.1. To-day

Driving Ror

mcentrated on ¢ ure







Gwe UW Correspondent) to the United State
LONDON, Feb. 26 January 17 Ml
An imporaac announcement on}had “throwr p
ita rederation will be | Work ot Ke ’ A i
naa i «6Partiament to-morrow I y promisi rompt ( e
iernkoon at 3.30 Mr. Otsive and effective” ion if
Lyttelton, Secretary of State j}munists broke the {1
Jine Colonies is. to-announce the | -ppj tatement
juate of the London conference to | ynwise, provocative
which West Indian Governments |sible,” Morrison said
will send representatives to

Resuming the debate on Foreign
Affairs which was broken offpy
the death of King George VI,
Morrison said the Prime Minister
spoke with one voice in the
United States and a different one

when he reiurned to London,

yontingent when Scouts from all
ome, before attending the World

}cuss proposals of the Rance
port,

Mr, Lyttelton’s announcement
is expected in view of the ques-
tion which has been put down b)
Mr, Peter Smithers, Chairman ot

the West Indies Sub-Committee of

a

(story on page 4.)

the Conservative Party, M1: Disturbed

Mr, Lyttelton
if he will convene a conference The Labour Party was genu-
on West Indies Federation. inely disturbed about Churchill's

If Mr. Lyttelton does not reacn}talks in Washington, Morrison
Mr, Smithers question in the nor-]declared, Labour members were
mal sequence before 3.30 at whicn} Pressing to vote a motion wel-
coming Government's adherenc
to the former Labour Govern-
ment’s policy on Korea and China
but regretted the “Prime Minis

ter’s failure to give adequae ex
-OnvV e at 1 ‘ one . as oo
y convinced that he got what! ence on Caribbean Federation wa Sheer 4. thie. potior-cin 2

important session of N.A.T.O,| conceived by the Jamaican Gov-| course of his recent visit to the
ernment an agreed to in princi-l(pited States.” Morrison declared
ple by Mr. Attlee’s Socialist Gov-}that after Churchill's speech to
ernment, But no action was taken} the U.S. Congress, the American

Talks

{time questions cease he will pro
}bably ask permission from = th«
. . 9
LISBON, Feb. 26. Speaker to answer it then

The idea of a London confer-

The Council took an enormous ‘





step toward translating plans into}'® implement the proposal Press generally assumed that the

jaction by removing major diplo-| West Indian Governments have] Prime Minister's speech repre-

matic roadblocks to the buil
of western defence and by ap-|report in their own time without! policy.

proving specific military “plans;any lead being given by White- :

for the first time, hall. But as now only British We would like to know
It roved the European army Hondures hes not discussed | the eeisted nue cuties ot aot A

approved e Pan AMY | ve. { any change o sy é
aan the way for the end of report in (he. Laguiative Council all,” Morrison bluntly asked,

A specific date may be set for a
conference in London. This date
may be earlier than the Colonial

German occupation, linked N.A.-
T.O. to Germany adopted the
1952 military programme for 50

Morrison charged that “conflict-
ing cleverness of both sides of the



tivisions 4,000 planes and the Office suggestion of late July Atlantic is in our submission
construction of over $460,000,000 dangerous to peace and to good
uirhelds ant communications net- : Anglo-American relations,
works, U.S. Offer He complained that Churchill's
Despite these impressive ac i statement to the Commons on
tions many delegates and ob-| Campromise dupamey 02 on his Weshiniaton
servers here seriously doubted talks was “woolly and evasive.
whether these plans would come TOKYO, Feb, 26. i ne i i
to fulfilment. 'Too muph depends| Japanese sources, said that the a. ‘Wa: pas wins Ded Seam
on unpredictable factors—wheth-| U.S. offered a double _com- |°‘¥° ashington on future Jap-

anese relations with Formosa, the
island s.ronghold of Chiang Kai
Shek's Nationalists.—U.P.

promise plan on extra-terrltfial
rights to speed the conclusion of
the United States-Japanese a

er France can steady its wobbly
economy whether the French and
German parliaments are really



ready to bury the hatchet, whe-j|ment on American military

ther Communist pressure in the me ade a occupation . \ 2 =

Far East will wreck Western) An dministrative agreement) | ,

plans in Europe is expected to be resent-| ~ lake Survey For
ed to the Japanese Cabinct

on
Tuesday and initialled later this |
week by Special American Am- |
bassador Dean Rusk and State
Minister Katsuo Okazaki. KINC ‘ON, Feb. 26.
The Tokyo newspaper Covu- Preliminary aerial survey in oil
eri published what purported to| possibilities ‘for Jamaica is now
be the text of an agreement on | being made on behalf of the Metal

Prior to coming here Acheson
told intimates he would consider
his trip a success if he won four
points from the Couneil: (1)
| Approval of the European Army
| permitting eventual German re-
jarmament and providing a struc-

Oil And Gas

From Our Own Correspondent




ture for ultimate effective Eu-|the sovere rights of American | Mining C }

> ' g Co, of Canada who are be-
| Popean defence. : (2) Agree-|forces to ign garrisoned in Ja-jing granted concession to prospect
ment to give Germany near and the legal

pan relationship} for oil and gas in Jamaica, he
between U.S. security troops and|airborne geophysical survey start-
Japanese —U.P. ed a week ago

equality with other N,A,T.O, na-
tions by extending N.A,T.O. guar-
antees to Germany and by ap-
‘proving agreement to end Ger-





man occupation. (3) Approval] 66 > n
lof a master economic and de- Ci
fence plan pledging firm con- a

tributions of divisions from each

of the member countries except
Iceland, Portugal, Greece, and
Turkey—the last two hecause


















e 7
they just joined NATO. (4) Ac- t < im < Vvé« I since ie
cord between France and the
United States on how to solve
French budget problems and oy2 bee
thus permit the first three points CLP Ne ,
to be carried forward. NATO cee |
gave Acheson hig first three ‘ ‘\ **You’re fun to know, Jimmy.
points and he personally work- " ime ra here
eins ge AR ge he The last time we came her

it was a new cocktail: this

time it’s my first du Maurier —

Premier Edgar Faure
—UP.



and very nice, too.”

TEAR GAS BOMBS
DISPERSE STUDENTS

TUNIS, Feb, 26
Police hurled tear gas bombs
into the alr on Tuesday to disperse
studénts who hurled rocks at a
street-car No» casualties were

“We do our best to
please. I thought you'd
like them. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke,”

cident

’ “No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the
tobacco.”

the evening dances at Club Mor
gar the Aquatic Club and

Carnival dance at Chez . Jean
Pierre were arranged for the

entertainment



of the visitor

“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy’s just introduced me

Police Displ
epee er to my first du Maurier.”

> was also a Musical Ride,
and the Beating
the Barbadkt

Riding School



“You are behind the times.

Police ; alice Nina’s been lyrical about





District A” Leaflets to thi them for years.”

Diet dae ok wal eo on $1.04 for 50
hore : MADE IN
The Mauretania left Barbado-| Smeke fo your throat’s content ENGLAND
“edu MAURIER

N Y : and sill
; nee a Fs OITHE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR

BRIDG

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co.,

LTD.,







PAGE TWO
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

MILLIONAIRE MUG

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952
CCC



By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.

in the week income-tax men

and he told Carib he hoped to be dm Britain have defined a million-

aire as a man who earns £100,000
a year, I introduce you to one who
will earn £357,000 every year for

populang ts next 30 years—starting now.
man on the ship. Everyone show business a mug is a

TNT CHWOOD .
ae MARCH WoC D - ° 439th Cruise
(Frederick George Penn RAmXs his 439th Cruise in
accompanied by his wife is ex- 9 rears ji
pected to arrive here from Eng- 21 years is Mr, Watterson
land on Sunday M " Lowe, veterkn Cruise Lecturer for
the Golfito. 4 the Cunard Lines. He was on
Viscount Marchwood beard the Mauretania yesterday
TY Isvyés econd Yr ‘ ‘
Frederick James Penny, of Bit-@ back in April.
terne, Hants. He was educated Mr. Lowe or “Watty” as he ds
King Edward VI Grammar Sch« familiarly known to everyone on
Southampton, He i A board is perhaps the mest
Boyle, eldest daug f the late t . :
Sir John Gunn, J.P, in 1905, They’ to him with their troubles | ani
have one son, Maj, Peter George questions about the islands
Penny, M.B.E., R.A the cruise. and “Watty” has an
Viscount Marchwood is Senior answer for all queries.
Partner Fraser and Co., Govern-. Mr. Lowe started the “Flower
ment broke Singapore and for the Day” and “Thought for
Managing Director Eastern Smelt- the Day” which are so popular on
ing Co., Lid., Penang. He repre- these cruises. For each port he
sented the Federated Malaya has a different coloured flower and
States Government in negotiatior an example of his thoughts for
ith Netherlands Indies Go the day is given elsewhere in this
nent Bandoeng, Java, regard- column.
ing liquidation of war (1914—18) Part of his job is to give lec-
tin stocks, tures to cruise gers on the
He was also a Conservative! ports and isla! are going
M.P. for Kingston-upon-Thames ! to visi* the following y. He al-
from 1922 to 1937. x ways has capacity audiences so
Other posts he has held are,% much so that on this trip he has
Parliamentary Private Secretary had to give two lectures for each
to Financial Secretary to War port to take care of the crowds.
Office, 1923; Conservative Whip He is always getting letters
1926—37; Lord Commissioner of from passengers, thanking him for





the Treasury 1928—29 and 1931;
Vice-Chamberlain of H.M. Hous. -

MR.
yesterday morning at St. Lawrence
Gardiner Austin and Co., Ltd's., Passen.
the former Dorothy Edwards.

hold 1931—32; Comptroller 1932 Mr. Watson is of Messr
35; Treasurer 1935—-37; HonJ ger Department. His wife is
Treasurer of Conservative Party’

1938—46. ‘ is wl oe
He is a Freeman, City of Lon-, Coming by Golfito
don and an Officer ist Cla of ( THER passengers arrivit
the Most Honourable Order of the by the Golfito on Sunday

R. H
Bon-
Capt.
(Re-
Miss
Mrs,

March 2nd are Mr. and Mrs
Bent, Mr. and Mrs. J. F
nalie, Miss S. G. Bonnalie
H. G. Briggs, D.S.O., R.N.,
tired), Mr. L. L. Charle
E. M. Collinson, Mr, and
N. W. Duthie, Mr. John H. Haig,
Mr. K. P. Haydon, Mrs. H., P.
Haydon, Mr. and Mrs. N., E. Ire-
land, Mr. and Mrs. G. K. John-
son, Miss J. Lewis, Miss N. M.
Lodge, Mrs. I. R. Osborn, Mrs.
M. Payne, Miss J, A. Payne, Mrs.
B. Sharp, Mrs. B. H. Simpson,
Mr. and Mrs. C, E,. Steel, Miss
N. QO. Sutherland, Mrs. M.
Walker and Mrs. D. FE. Wall

Ash Wednesday

Crown of Johore.

After Three Months
ISCOUNT HYNDLEY of
Meads and his daughter Hon.
Elizabeth Hindley joined the
R.M.S,. Mauretania yesterday for
the remainder of the 18 day cruise,
They are en route to New York
after spending just over three
months holiday in Barbados,
Their home in England is

Chelsea Square.

Brother and Sister
PENDING the day on shore
yesterday with his brother-
in-law and sister Mr. and Mrs.
Henry de Kuh was Dr. Alfrea
Porada who is making the “Sun-



in

Pp

shine Cruise” on the Mauretania “QYODAY is Ash Wednesday—the
accompanied by Baren Neuman. first day of Lent. Pears
Also in their party yesterday Cyclopaedia says of Ash Wednes-

were Mr. and Mrs, Jan Fries who
are at present holidaying in Bar-
bados staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Fries is a nephew of Mrs.
de Kuh and Dr. Porada.

day “This is the day on which
ashes are sprinkled on the ~head
as a sign of penitence under an in-
junction of Pope Gregory the
Great in the 6th Century.”



By LONDONER bados to fill other vacancies. She
LONDON, Feb. 21 has approached Mr. Harold
Latest member to join the Con- Christie, wealthy Bahamas busi-
servative party’s outside-Parlia~ nessman to see whether he will
mentary committee on West Indian join,
affairs is Sir John Hudson. A Her aim is to have one repre-
former Governor of Pritish Hon- sentative on the committee from
duras, he will represent that each colony. Then should Con-
colony on the committee, servative M.P.’s require informa-
The Chairman, Lady Huggins, tion about any particular West
told me this week that she is still Indian territory they will be able



seeking two members, one from to turn to the committee for
the Bahamas and one from Bar- guidance.

$$ $_—__—_—_——————- Both Lady Huggins and Mr.

Peter Smithers, M.P., who is

CROSSWORD chairman of the Parliamentary

sub-committee on West Indian

affairs, have made it quite clear
however that the outside com-
mittee is only informative and
does not dictate policy.

PRIESTS WANTED

The Dean of Honduras, the
Very Reverend P. H. Cecil, now
in England, has, I see, been ap-

pealing for priests to go to British
Honduras and assist in the spir-
itual life of the people. He re-
cently addressed a meeting at
Cheam in Surrey, where he com-



mented on the large number of
Across priests in the district compared
1. Joy about the broken rune. (7) with British Honduras, which he

8. Present day muse included (6)

said had only seven.
The heart of 6 (3)

audience the

He told his
addition of one










ry scare ee nest, (4) priest would considerably ease the
12. Convepance th 0. (3) dificulties under which the
16 Looking fixéaiy, (7) Church worked in the colony.
if 6 & name. (4) . * IDwe
i. New but may be second-nand (5 NETHERLANDS NEWS
ay Dalike Seinen ee ey The Netherlands Government
32. Stack up. (4) TS 19) report this week that there has
, Zou Gon't offer it to a 10, (4) been “satisfaction” among the par-
15. Distlose with B tever. (6) ticipants in the preliminary talks
i Down t t,
- Put James in the shrub. R. pe d h
2. Warning. (4) ee ay u r an e
3. Part of body construction, (4) moe 5
4. Two eyes noted the publication i 3. ew
(7) ek
>. Long for in any earnings (5) HOE Bin
6 The harm puts years on the Se 5
femaie. (6)
‘. Disintegrated. (8) ¥. One. (4)
10 He doesn't get the 23 Across t }
recognition. (8)
lo’ [fo lis a Roman goia coin 6)
18 Wine producer. (4)
20 Wrinkies in the 3 may 45 this |
21 Ts n Sik sheets. (3)
ACROSS: ear
1, Captions: 7. Esoteric: 8. . bs a
Solace: 10. Eel: 11, Share: 13: sar meee
Mate: 15. Tassel: 17. Almost: 18. Terror: 19. Men(tor); 20. Arena: At the top of the slope Rupert
21. End. spies the Guide. Pauline, waiting.
DOWN: “I just had to see what happens
* ” ;
1. Celebrate: 2. Assemble: 3 « eh she whig akg a ch
Pool: 4. Orchestra: 5. Scare: 6. he oe td aoa Piceeaty
atv: 6 . sen: 9 + an “ioe
—— : +: i 11. Season: 12. 1 long lime of tiny prickly figures
Asma: . Arm; 15. Tore: 16. appears moving towards Nutwood

NEW ARRIVALS

PILLOW CASES 20 x 30 @

SHEETS 70 x 90 @ ..
» 9x18 @..

DIAPER CLOTH 24” @
WASH CLOTHS (White) @
DOMESTIC 24” @ ..
CRETONNE 27” @
PLAID TABLING 48” @





AND MRS. MAURICE WATSON who were married quietly

Daughter and Son

West Indian Table Talk







Chapel.

his talks and help he has given
them on former cruises.

He told me thet what would
help him in his lectures on Bar-

bados is a short film showing thé

M's AUDREY REECE,
ter of Mr, W. W. Reece, QC.,
will be leaving England on April
lith for Barbados, She is coming
to spend a holiday with her
father. Mr. Reece’s son Dick, who
is now in Kubait will also be
holidaying in Barbados this sum-

tourists places of interest in ad-
. vance. Nothing puts over a place

better than a movie film, he con-

cluded.

Prominent Americans

IMMINENT Americans travel-
ling on the Mauretania which
called here yesterday are Mr.

mer. He and his family are due to George Whitney, Chairman of the

leave England on May 18th.
the

Entertainment
B* way “f entertainment
Manretania has on board
Diane Courtney, popular New
York singer on radio and T.V.
She has been on many cruises
here; Lou Merkur who is an
orchestra conductor on radio sta-
tion W.O.R. New York and an
East Indian dance team, Richard
Cressy and Lilian Rollo.
Transferred
M*: COURTENAY REECE,
Puisne Judge of Nigeria has
been transferred to Hong Kong.
He arrived in England on Febru-
ary 20th and leaves there on
March 10 for Hong Kong.





on the forthcoming Round Table
Conference between Holland, the
Netherlands Antilles and Surinam.
No definite date has yet been set
for the opening of the formal
conference but it is believed that
it will be in The Hague towards
the end of March or early in April.
Putpose of the meeting is to dis-
cuss the status and constitution of
Netherlands B.W.I. possessions
which are to be completely self-
governing.
ELLIS ACHONG

Returning to Trinidad after
nearly 20 years in England is
Ellis Achong, former Test cricket-
er. Ellis, who celebrated his 48th
birthday this month became the
first player of Chinese extraction
to gain a “cap”. He toured
England with the 1934 West Indies
team and afterwards entered
league cricket, playing in turn for
Rochedale, Heywood, Castleton
Moor and Walsden.

LINDWALL vs. WEST
INDIES

Talking of league cricket, I
wonder how West Indies stars
such as Weekes, Marshall and
Walcott received the news that
Ray Lindwall, Australian fast
bowler, will be playing against
them in England this summer. in
Australia the West Indies bats-
men did not relish Lindwall’s
fast bowling, particularly when
he bumped one or two at them
On the not so perfect league
wickets he will be even mor
difficult to play.



Pine Og





t »,f

reached
the withered oak when hundreds ot
elves leap out from all sides

forest. Hardly have they

e|

i

'

4

an instant the air is filled with

whirling figures, and in a terrific

battle all the Ogre’s slaves are sut-

rounded and captured and marched
away.

ER LCCC ARCA ALC TE TE TESTA





Cnce ROL cain $ .98 each
4.78,
6.95 ,,
87

sa leada neasticoinntive 25 »
47 yard

sLchaphe ibenatons one
2.04 ,,

T. BR. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4220



—











Announcing the arrival of:—

(Terra) MARBLE CHIPS

in 5 colours

For Verandahs and Floors

HERBERT LTD.

Magazine Lane, tet

T.



YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4606



SOON BURT LANCASTER’S Greates
“MAN of BRONZE at BTOWN

=— "
8.30 PM



(Only) 4.

Gordon MacRAE
Tit ESDAY SPECIAT 13 PM
Two Action Packed Westerns—
ALAN LANE Double
“SHERIFF of WICHITA” «&
SUNDOWN in SANTA FE

Rock

SATURDAY SPECIAL 9.80
ARKANSAS SWING

, rut



“VOICE OF THE TURTLE”
“LOOK FOR THE SILVER LIN

LY Rec
A.M.

Board of J. P. Morgan Co., New
York, accompanied by Mrs, Whit-
ney and their son-in-law and
daughter Mr. and Mrs. William
Rowe; Mr. F. A. Ready, Vice-
President of the Waldorf Astoria,
New York and Mrs. Ready; Maj.
H. C. Hill, Chairman of the Board
of Parole, State of Pennsylvania,
and Mrs. Hill; Mr, Robert Pinker-
ton of the A. C. Farrell Line and
Mrs. Pinkerton accompanied by
their daughter Ann and friend
Miss Lindsley; Mr. Wilmot F.
Wheeler, Chairman of the Board
of American Chain and Cable and
Mrs. Wheeler; Mrs.
man and Miss Hortense Nelson of
St, Louis.
Short Visit
MONG the passengers arriv-
ing by the Lady Rodney on
Monday after a short visit to
Dominica was Mr. J. K. C, Gran-
of “Beverley”, Strathclyde.

En Route From Long Leave

IS HONOUR Mr, J. W. B.
Chenery, Judge of the Assist-
ant Court of Appeal is among the
passengers due to arrive here by
the Golfito on Sunday March 2nd.
Mr, Chenery left Barbados in
mid-August last year on long
leave.
In Passing
UST in passing there are 190
single women making the
"Sunshine Cruise” on the Maure-
tania as against 97 single men,

Thought For To-day
H® who hesitates gets bumped

from the rear.— Watterson
Lowe, Cruise Lecturer, R.M.S.
Mauretania.

B'TOWN
Dial 2310
PLAZA—
OPENING (Tomorrow) THURS.
4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Also
FRIDAY 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
& Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m


















seONE OF THE
WOST TERRIFYING
LOVE STORIES

EVER FILMED!

#

B’town PLAZA

' Dial 2310









ty Special Request !

&

(Technicolor

Ronald REAGAN

q"

HAVER



June

Opening THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P
FRIDAY 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M

ON DANGEROUS GROUN
Ida LUPINO — Robert RYAN
1.30 P.M.

“BONANZA TOWN

face, And mugging is the act of
vontorting that face to get a laugh
mut.of an audience.

Milton Berle’s mugging every
Tuesday at 6 pm. (New Yerk
time) on TY is credited with at
least 15,000,000 laughs all cross
America.

Hour of Oi}

Milton Berile’s sponsor—on the
National Broadcasting Company
network—is one of America’s rich
oll concerns, the Texas Company.
its petrol gets mentioned admir-
aay every few minutes on Berle’s
show,

For this one laugh-filled hour

the Texas Company pays N.B.C.
£1,000,000 for a 39-week season.
How did a boy born Milton

Berlinger in a drab New York

tenement get to the in TV?
Tn part, at least, Mi *s secret
is the three ugging, Mem-

ery, and Mamma.

MUGGIN. — Sample Berle’s
joke on mugging: “Last time
I was in Hollywood I had an
hotel room so small that I had to
g0 outside to change the expres-
sion on my face.”

Tricks
His facial contortions and
imitations of celebrated people
are . He can sing, dance,
@ » do acrobatics and magic
tricks,

He cam coax other stars who
appear as guests on his ‘O-
gnome to do startli es.

e coaxed Gracie Fi into

Punch Tried to



singing to him in a bathing suit.
MEMORY.—He is credited with
the most phenomenal memory in



Dee ee EEE Ene!

GRAND OPENING MARCH Ist 8.15 p.m.



BARBAREES

ANOTHER SCENIC

variety. To back it up he has (DIAL 5170) WONDER IN THE
DIL

850.000 gags on file, Duplicates | CARIBBEAN !

are stored on micro-film in WITH

bank. F aia
MAMMA Mother Sarah ’ -

Berlinger (now Sandra Berle) THE Lovin EST GY

was a store detective until the

day her five-year-old boy did an MUSICAL IN MANY

impersonation of Charlie Chaplin

in the street. She has helped
him along ever singe,
Rates Up

Last year America turned out
That
means millions of potential new
the Texaco Star

5,000,000 new TV sets.

haw-haws for
Show.

So N.B.C. has raised
again More money for
customers.—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY
1115 am The
Listeners’ Choice
1210 pm. News
1oO—7.15 pom



FEBRUARY 27,
Storyteller,

1952

Anatysis.
19.76m_,

25 58m,

#1.32m.



4.00 pm The News,
Daily Service, 415 pm
Light Orchestra, 500 pm
of the Week, 5 15 pm
son at the Theetre Organ,
Books To Read,
600 p.m
Ulster Magazine,

410 pm

64 pm

its rates
more

1130 am
12 00 noon The News,

The
BBC Midland
Composer
Sandy MacPher-
630 pm
545 pm The Art,
Children Singing, 6.15 pm
Sports





Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00

SS

745 pm Over To You,
Radio Newsreel,
Week, 9 00 The Divorce
10 00 p.m
The Editovials,

pm

Eat a Cloud

—But It Floated Of Before He Took a Bite—

By MAX TRELL

“MR. PUNCH,” said Hanid, the |

shadow-giri, “what are clouds made

of?”

Mr, Puneh looked up from hi
book with @ smile. “Clouds? Cloud
are made of fluff and breezes and
sunbeams and raindrops, all beat
up tovether like whipped cream.”

“Oh,” said Hanid, “I didn’t knov
they were anything like whippe
eream.

“Of course,’



Mr, Punch added
hastily, “most folks don’t knov
what clouds are like at all. They
never get near enough to them to
taste them. Clouds are quite deli
cious, especially with a bit of pow-
dered sugar and a cherry. Once |
ate a whole cloud,” he said.

Hanid gasped in astonishment
“You ate a cloud, Mr. Panch?”’





Happened By Accident

“It happened quite by accident,’

aid My, Punch, “It was when | was
s emall boy. | had gone to visit
Geandma and Grandpa who had a
farm. One afternoon, while 1 was
sitting under an apple tree, | heard
@ strange rustling noise in the
wanches overhead. | looked up and
what do you suppose 1 saw?”

“What?” asked Hanid.

“lL saw a big fluffy thing caught
1) thé top of the tree, I recognized
it pt once. Tt was a clond, So 1 gave
‘he tree a shake and down came

reat pieces of the cloud.”

“My woodness! said Henid

What did you do with them?”

“Well,” said Mr. Purch, “I picked

hem all up and took them at ence

Grandma. | told her



it Was 4
ul that had got stuck in the appl

“ec,
“Gyesdima ditn't seem the least
t surprised,” Alr. Punch went or
She took s of the cloud,



oles them afl up neatly, and pi
em ib a t

4,4

OOOO COS

ae

OPENING TODAY 5

WHY HE



UN ioe
BUT





ROOK Now D

Written tor the Sereee
Rated on a

wy
owl ty FLETCHER MARKLE » Pronece





SS s

a - e \=—>
Punch gave the tree a shake,

st)

supper, she served apple dumplings
with an enormous ball of whipped
cloud on top. [t tasted,” said Mr.
Punch, “exaetly like whipped cream.
And that,” he said smiling once
| More to Hanid, “is how I know what
clouds taste like.”

Whipped Cream

“But Mr. Puneh,” flanid ex-
claimed, “how do you know jit was
jthe cloud? How do you know it
;Wasn’t really whipped cream.”

“Well,” said Mr, Punch, “that
|question bothered me too, But 1
{found out it was really whipped
cloud and not whipped cream, And
this is how 1 found out. Grandpa
also had a big ball of whipped cloud
on his upple dumpling. 1 remember
watehing it and marveling how hiv.
it was. And suddenly, just a
Winged my @yes, it disappeared
must have fonted out of the w

low. Of ise.’ Mr. Punch adver,
“Grand, a y ight have eaten tout
rostary gether No,

windew and

it Moet» 1 t the

PPPOE EEA PPPS,

* GLOBE "Vn, 20q
ry

FOR THE BEST MoviEs °X



& 6,30 and Coniinniag

ONLY TWO WOMEN KNEW

DISAPPEARED!

ONE

Si ar!

rei
HE LOVED!

anW

ay exo
by STEPHEN AMES

Ae MEM Picture

ial 2310 ter

PL AZ Ass BARBAREE
GALA OPENING

Sat. March Ist. at 8.45

& continuing Daily at 4,
CARIBBEAN

ON MOONLIGHT BAY

M.

D
(Color by
Doris DAY -



Gordon Mac RAE with the
aipeing Sensation Jack SMITH
j w

er"

S £ 839 PM. w
PREMIERE

Technieglor)

New




815 pm
8.30 p.me Statentent
of Account, 8 45 pm Composer of the
Laws,
The News, 1010 pm. From
1015 pm Mid Week
Talk, 10 30 p.m. Marching and Waltzing.








storring

DoRIS DAY GORDON MASRAE !

Bay-eautiful babes! Bay-eautiful tunes!’

taoe WARNER BROS.

tor ay TE CHNIGOLOR

Te

FROM

The News; 7.10 ¥ Ni
aise s 15 > m Cain "The West Al PL 4 Z 4 BARBAREES WARNER
Indies.
7.45 3 - — 25 53m, 314 . 0
45—10.30 “p.m gm, St Pee DIAL 517 BROS.































|
|

|

ROODAL



THEATRES



EMPIRE

Today 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
Temerrow Last 8 Shows 1 30 p.m.
445 & 3.90 a
“THE SUN SETS AT DAWN

NEWSREEL SHOWING THE
PUNERAL OF THE LATE KING
qunineceeipiemnanienenipeeeesanisanensntt
OPENING FRI, 2TH
“THE PROWLER”
larring:
Van weruan’ Evelyne KEYES
COMING SHORTLY
“THE LADY SAYS NO”
David Niven's Latest Film

OLYMPIC

To-day Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15
Johmy WIRSSMULLER as
“JUNGLE JIM”
AND
“RETURN OF OCTOBER”

Starring:
GLENN FORD — TERRY MOORE

———
THUR. SPECIAL AT 1.30
Roy ‘eo in “IDAHO”
and 10UX CITY SUE”
With Gene AUTRY
(Cheap Prices)

Oper Friday 2th 4. 10

2 son ne, Aa 30 & 8.15

“BEST OF THE BADMEN’’
and "LOVE AFFAIR”







—

Much Oil?

Before You Spend
Money On a Costly
Overhaul, Read This!

You may not need new rings
—often a comparatively simple
oll system check-up will do
the trick. Let us flush and
clean your ecrank-case, check
your oll pump, replace the oil
filter cartridge. It's inexpensive

Are You Slow

On Get-Away?

Good Plugs and
Corrected Timing
Make a Difference!

if your car is accelerating like
“heap”
engine, your ignition may be
at fault, Let us clean, space

> Instead of a fire

Qnd replace spark plugs, clean
and adjust breaker points, set
ignition timing and check
vaousm spark advance. Then

see the diMerence!



DIAL 8404

TODAY (Only 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
ri 1



“MAN From MU

MIDNITE SATURDAY |
“HELDORADO” &

¢ Workshop 4203

ROXY

To-day & Tomorrow 4.3¢ & 8.15
Googie Withers — Griffith Jones
in “ONCE UPON A DREAM”
and “MY BROTHER’s KEEPER”
with

Jack Warner Jane Hilton
NEWSREEL SHOWING FUNERAL
OF THE LATE KING.

THUR. SPECIAL AT 1.80 P.M.
“PRINCE OF THE PLAINS”
AND
“NAVAJO TRAD. RAIDERS”
(Cheap Prices)

SAT, Special Mid-nite Show
WHOLE SERIAL

“MANHUNT of MYSTERY
ISLAND”

ROYAL
ee &, Sepemer 4% & 815

“LURED” and “JIGSAW”
with FRANCHOT TONE

EXTRA:
NEWSREEL SHOWING FUNERAL
OF THE LATE KING

THURS, SPECIAL AT 1.30
CHARLES STARRETT DOUBLE
“STRANGER a city”
“HIGRIING FRONTIER MAN”

SATURDAY 9.30 A.M.
JOHNNY as

WIESSMULLER
“JUNGLE JIM” and
“RETURN of OCTOBER”





















Office 4493

Parts Dept. 4613
Night 4125

|
| epee eeeciaiggeae sent NE.

|
}
|
j
|
|
|
1
|
j

ee



Charles
McEnearney
& Co., Lid.











The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“OUT of the PAST”
Robert M?ITCHUM &
“THE SET UP” Robert RYAN

THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“BEWARE of PITY”
Lilli PALMER &
“HOUSE of FRANKENSTEIN
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY

MIDNITE SAT: 1ST _
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE” &







—

cL RAASD “eneanereneattheatsatatasess





WEDNESDAY,

FEBRUARY 27,

1952



‘AANADIAN COLUMN

Record

National

Product 1951

CANADIAN output of goods and services in 1951 was
&t record levels, according to advance preliminary estim-

ftes issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.

The

sross National Product of 1951 is placed by the Bureau at
p21.2 billion, a rise of 18 per cent. from 1950. Of this rise
yetween five and six per cent is accounted for by increases

n the real output of goods
dy price increases.
&penditure by business for ix
tment in durable assets and in-
tories claimed a higher portion
the nation’s output than in
9. Government expenditure on
@s and services also absorbed
arger share oi the Gross Na-
@l Product as a result of
ger expenditure for defence,
le the proportion absorbed by
sumers for personal goods and
vices declined. Personal saving
(51 was at its highest level
the end of the war; it rose
@ $820 n.illion in 1950 to more
1 double this amount in 1951.
oi Agreement With Spain
be Minister of trade and Com-
ce, Mr. C.D, Howe, announced
February 11 the conclusion of
agreement between Canada
Spain, providing for the
idation of commercial debts
9g to a number of Canadian
&. These debts have been
ked in Spain since before the
jreak of the Spanish Civil War
uly, 1936.
fiis agreement was concluded
dadrid on January 29, 1952, by
“Wm. Frederick Bull, Deputy
ister of Trade and Commerce,
‘esenting the Canadian Gov-
nent, and Senor Martin Artajo,

~
i=

Gish Foreign Minister. Pre-
tory negotiations were con-
@d by Mr. E. H. Maguire,

adian Trade Commissioner in
Db

fandling of Tough And
Damp Grain
ae 1951 western crop is esti-
2d at 531,000,000 bushels, of
th about 150,000,000 bushels
# not been threshed. Of the
shed wheat about 325,000,000
tels are available for market-
after allowing for farm seed
feed requirements, the Minis-
of Trade and Commerce, Mr.
1. Howe, announced on Febru-
‘.
bout 250,000,000 bushels of
at have been delivered by
lucers. These deliveries repre-
over 75 per cent, of the
ketings which might be ex-
ed from the threshed portion
le crop.

olombo Pian Assistance
. D. Mallory, Director of the
tstrial Development Division,
artment of Trade and Com-
te, left Ottawa by air on Feb-
y 11 for India, Pakistan and
fon, where he will examine
industrial requirements — of
e countries under provisions
ae Colombo Plan for the Eco-
ic Development of South and
th-East Asia.
ge services of Mr, Matlory are
San to the International Eco-
ic & Technical Cooperation
sion He will meet the Admin-
tor of that Division Nik
al, in Colombo, and will ac-
Pany him on his visits to the
Qus development projects be-
lndertaken by Ceylon, India
Pakistan.

Employment Report
Qployment in Canada remain-
€ a high level at the beginning
le year despite seasonal slack-

in the construction fishing
fulture, food processing and
ad navigation industries, the
ster of Labour, Mr. Milton F.
f®, announced on February 7.
Ough some of the werkers re-
% from these industries have

the labour market for the
er, and many more are en-
@ in the logging industry, the
ber of people seeking work

fased by more than 85,000
{ December 20, 1951 to reach
fal of 337,000 at January 17,
+ This figure is considerably
@r than last year but is slight-
wer than mid-January, 1950.
mg the week ending January
he rate of increase dropped

y.
Korea Rotation Plan
Mowing the recent change
the Ist and 2nd Battalions of
Princess Patricia’s Canadian
& Infantry, the rotation of
Prnpinder of the 25th Cana-

n

and services and 11 per cent.

This rotation plan, first an-
nounced by the Minister of Na-
tional Defence last August, calls
for the return to Canada of all
soldiers who have served for
twelve months in the Far Eastern
Theatre. Soldiers in the units slat-
ed for replacement who are ineli-
gible by virtue of their service,
will be returned on a man-for-
man basis upon completion of
twelve months overseas.

For R.C.A.F. In Europe

Group Captain Keith Hodson,
O.B.E., D.F.C, 36 has been posted
to Paris to have charge of R.C.A.F.
arrangements for the R.C.A.F. air
division to be located on the Con-
tinent, it was announced on Feb-
ruary 11 by Air Force Headquar-
ters.

Mr. Mellraith Kesigns One
Post

The Prime Minister, Mr, St.
Laurent, announced on February
14 that he had received the re-
signation of Mr. George Mcllraith,
M.P. for Ottawa West, as Parlia-
mentary Assistant to the Minister
of Defence Production.

Mr. Mellraith had found that
the pressure of his duties as Par-
liamentary Assistant in respect of
two departments of Government
left him no time t. meet other
essential obligations

“Atomic Energy Of Canada,
Limited”

The Prime Minister, Mr. St.
Laurent, announced on February
13, the appointment of Dr. C. J.
Mackenzie, President of the Na-
tional Research Council, to be
President of a new Crown Com-
pany, “Atomic Energy of Canada
Limited,” which will take over
from the National Research Coun-
cil responsibility for operating the
Chalk River Project.

Dr. E. W. R. St@acie, O.B.E.,
F.R.S., F.R.S.C., former Vice-

President of the Research Coun-
cil, has been appointed to succeed

Dr. Mackenzie as President and
Chief Executive Officer of «the
Council and will take over on
April 1, 1952.

At the present time the Nation-

‘al Research Council operates the

Chalk River Atomic Energy Pro-
ject as an agent for the Atomic
Energy Control Board, which
Board carries the responsibility
for atomic energy matters in
Canada and reports to Parliament
through the Chairman of the
Privy Council Committee on Sci-
entific and Industrial Research,
the Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe

Reds Claim To
Have Sunk Ships

TOKYO, Feb. 25.
Communist radio in Pyongyang
claimed to-night that Nortn
Korean shore batteries shelled and
sank one Allied destroyer and
one minesweeper last night in a
one hour battle near Cho Do and



Sukdo islands on Korea’s west
coast.

Last night Radio Pyongyang
announced another destroyer and

a torpedo boat had been sunk
by the North Korean “fleet”. The
Navy pointed out that these broad-
cast claims are usually without
foundation,

—U.P

Reds Prepare Drive
On Hanoi

HANOI, Feb. 25.

Twenty thousand French Viet-
nam troops which pulled back 20
miles from the vital Hoabinh
fortress in a two day “strategic
manoeuvre” plugged up gaps in
the tightened perimeter around
Hanoi Reds prepared an all
out drive to capture the _ rich
Tonkin capital on the Red River
delta,

About 10 French Union forces
were no longer in the fight. They





ae 7 wandered in a hail of mortar
ifantry Brigade will com~ artillery which Communists
ie in March, ( ae ae poured on as soon as they saw
iquarters announced on Feb- the first signs of withdrawal
¥ 7. Friday. —U.P.
®
{
M () R I GRACE
|
LESS waste
N
Hl
x i
WITH THE NEW =
1



=
e

ELECTRIC

NICE OINNER OLO MAN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

YOU've GOT a WONDERFUL

~OOK
be

Students Riot BRITAIN HAS MADE NQ' Russian Christians

In Karachi

KARACHI, Pakistan, Feb, 23.
Reliable reports received
from the Provincial

killed and at least 50 injured in
two days of student riots there.
However the Government said that
only five persons were killed and
45 injured in the student-police
clashes in Dacca,

It is said that troops were called
out to aid the police in restoring
order and the city was quiet.

The Riots are said to have
started on Thursday when police
fired on students demonstrating
for Bengali to be made one of the
Official State languages of Pakis-
tan, Three persons were reported
killed.—U.P,

Reshuffle In

We 3. *
Tunisian Cabinet

Rumoured
TUNIS, Monday.

French Resident General Jean
De Hauteclocque visited the Bey
of Tunis today amid strong rum-
ours of an impending reshuffle
in the Tunisian Cabinet.

The interview which lasted 20
minutes, was the first between De
Hauteclocque and the Supreme
Tunisian leader since the Resi-
dent General returned from
Paris three days ago

De Hauteclocque was believed
to have submitted to the Bey,
French proposals arrived at dur-



ing his two weeks of talks in
Paris.
Meanwhile an ‘uneasy calm

continued throughout Tunis fol-
jowing yesterday’s incident
where a curfew was clamped
down after a Foreign Legionary
was killed by a sniper’s bullet.
—UP.



Vewsletter:

ADMINISTRATOR
ON LEAVE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Feb. 26
When St. Vincent Administrator
W. F. Coutts goes on leave from
March ‘7th, Grenada-born Hon.
Cyprian Bernard Gibbs, Assistant
Administrator, will act as Admin-
istrator. Mr. O. R. Kelsick, Assis-
tant Chief Secretary of the Wind-
wards at the Governor's office
here goes to St. Vincent. This
created Gibbs’ promotion. Gibbs
is the son of the late Thomas
Gibbs, form Port Officer here and
Mrs. Juliana Gibbs, now residing
in Port-of-Spain.

Grenada

Constance Donovan, 89, relative
of the late W. G. Donovan, once
an outstanding figure in journal-
ism here and mother of W. O’Brien
Donovan, retired Superintendent
of Agriculture, died yesterday
evening.



REBELS FLEE

MANILA, Feb, 22.

Philippines Army troops clashed
with an undetermined number of
Communist-led Hukbalahap forces
who apparently intended to raid
the @amlubang sugar estate of
Jose Yulo, a member of the Coun-
cil of State in “seas Province.

The estate, 30 miles South of
here, is at present the scene of
a big wedding anniversary cel-
ebration.

A report on the 30 minute clash
from Military Headquarters in
Laguna said an enlisted man was
killed and another one wounded
while one Huk was killed and
several others wounded. ;

The engagement occurred in a
village near Canlubang. The
Huks

pursuit.—U.P.

REFRIGERATOR

| See the New Models now on Show at

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VICTORIA STREET

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.



here
Capital of
Dacca said that 12 persons were

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BUSINESS — | DONT LET

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MEAT AGREEMENT

LONDON, Feb. 23.

British officials said no arrangements have been made

for negotiations on the re-award to Argentina of the meat Master rather than Stalin.

agreement signed on April

23, 1951 for. one year which

according to the protocol of the agreement should’ start
before the end of this month.

Officials would not comment on
the suggestion that Britain pos-
sibly had no intention of renewing
the agreement and would eventu-
ally put Britain’s meat purchases
from Argentina into the hands of
private traders. +

“There is nothing sinister about
the delay in making arrangements
for new negotiations. There has
been a lag because of the King’s
death and funeral and for various
other reasons and no decisions or
arrangements have yet been
made” officials said.

The agreement signed for one
year on April 23 1951, took the
form ‘f a protocol to a Trade and
Payments Pact made between
Britain and Argentina and signed
on June 27 1949, for five years.
Though valid for the five-year
period July 1, 1949, to June 30,
1954, the trade agreement stipu-
lated that it could be terminated
by either government on June
30 of any year by a written notice
given not later than April 30 o:
that year. The protocol dealing
with the meat agreement stipu-
lates that new negotiations must
start not later than the end of
February.

Questions In Parliament

Question of Britain’s intentions
are expected to be given an
airing in Parliament next week.

Members from both sides of the
House have laid down questions
to the Minister of Food asking if
it is Government’s intention to
allow private buyers to negotiate
the new agreement.

Question also will be raised
regarding the supply of meat from
Argentina being 50,000 tons short
of the amount promised under the
agreement.

Meat trade quarters said it is
difficult to state exactly what is
the price being paid for Argen-
tine meat. The average works oui
a about £128 per ton but with
various adjustments and back
payments it is believed possible
that ‘the price would be about
£160 per ton.

The Meat Traders’ Association
is urging government to restore
meat buying .to private traders
and to scrap bulk purchasing from
Argentina,

The meat traders said “recipro-
cal trade arrangements set out in
the protocol have not worked out
ns well as had been hoped and it
has come in for adverse criti-
cism in responsible quarters.’

—U.P.

TWO CHILDREN
BURNT TO DEATH

NEW YORK, Feb, 25.
Two children were burned to
death Sunday in a fire which des-
Ltroyed the two storey frame home
where they lived. They were Wally
Grimsmann, eight, and his’ sister
Donna, four. Another brother
Robert Junior, fifteen, was burneg!
critically attempting to save them

—UP.












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' & all

BARBADOS
CO-OP.
COTTON

FACTORY LTD.

Bathsheba Boat Ta
Be Launched
Sunday

Workmen at the grounds at the
Fishery Office were building the
keel for the Bathsheba type fish-
ing boat yesterday. The boat is
expected to be completed today.
It will be launched on Sunday
morning.

In the workshop men are still
cutting out timbers for the new
type of fishing boats to replace
those lost on the night of Decem-
ber 2 and morning of December 3.

The frame of one boat is erected
on a temporary keel. This will
give fishermen an idea of the de-
sign of boat they will receive.

Some fishermen told the Advo-
cate yesterday that they admire
the design but much prefer that
of the Bathsheba type boat.

CIO Denounces
-. . . .
Discrimination
WASHINGTON, Feb, 25
The Organ of the Congress of
Industrial Organisations said the
CIO has protested vigorously
against the “flagrant refusal of

a government operated hotel in
the Panama Canal zone to pro-



vide accommodations for a dis-|

tinguished visiting negro surgeon.”
It said the come nt was filed
by the Executive Secretary of the
-ommittee on Latin American
Affairs with Governor Francis
K. Newcomer. It added the “vic-
tims of discrimination were Dr.
G. V. Harry, Panama-born sur-
geon, now practising in Jamaica
and Mrs. Harry. They were re-
fused accommodation at Wash-
ngton Hotel in Colon when they
appeared to claim rooms reserved

by phone ten minutes earlier.”
—UP.



' Foreign Office
Denies Report

LONDON, Feb, 25.

A Foreign Office spokesman to-
day denied the London morning
paper report that Britain had re-
ceived an alliance offer from Gen.
Franco,

The report stated that the pro-
posed alliance would open all
Spanish ports to the British fleet.
Tt was said to have been conveyed
through the Spanish Ambassador
to Portugal, Nicolas Franco, the
Generalissimo’s brother, The For-
eign Office spokesman said the
British attitude to Spain had not
changed. He said contacts between
Forei Secretary Anthony Eden
and Spanish Foreign Minister Al-
berto Martin Artajo who visited
London for King George VI fun-
eral were limited to normal ex-
change of courtesies,

—U.P.

Carpeting
e

Carpet

Strips

in varied
Widths

sizes of

FIBRE MATS



“We also stock

Bentwood Chairs
with Cane Seats
and Wood Seats”



PAGE THREE

Flynn Files
Assault Action





French Resist
Red Battalion













SAIGON, Indo-Chir Feb. 2 NASSAU, Feb. 23.
The F ch Army communiqued Ar issault action brought by
that a ench mobik olumn Errol Flynn against Duncan
fought a Communist rebel batta- McMartin has been fixed for
lion retreating into the dense March 17, in the Bahamas
jungle area 70 miles N.W. of Supreme Court. Flynn is claim-
Saigon after the Reds lost the ing £80,000 sterling. Chief Jus-
three-day battle for a strategic tite Guy Henderson appointed
outpost, It said the French for- Richard Cantillon of Beverley
tress was held by 200 loyal local here to take evidence in Califor-
troops who withstood the. Com- tia if Dr. Edwin Plimpton, Dr.
munist attacks for three days Troy McHenry and Arthur Lee
until the French mobile columa Beak ret Flynn. McMar-~
smashed the Communist en- “"35 now - BS
circlement yesterday. The Reds , rye is expected before the
lost 70 men of which 40 are dead ,
French losses are: eight dead and (C.P.)
ten wounded according to the
7 communique It added that ’
5 French armoured car was wreck si °
Serve Jesus Christ ed by a landmine Jet Hits Wire

CHICAGO, Feb. 25. oe.

Pastor Niemoller of Germany —
said Sunday that Russian Chris-
tians serve Jesus Christ as a

PUSAN, Korea, Feb. 23
An Allied jet fighter plane flew
into a high tension wire near

heart of their priests,” Niemoller

said here on Friday morning and
ana crashed to the ground killing the
e i io is » He added: “The Russian Or- pilot and 15 civilians.
wtalpeatedâ„¢ the oa he Sy thodox Church and the Baptist The jet was in a low formation
but Christians have been able to Church really know their Master flight with two other fighter
achieve a measure of uneasy |5 Jesus Christ and not Stalin = Ryd Kimhae, 20 miles
“liberty.” : north of Pusan

Hberty. The Evangelical prelate spoke The crash started a fire that
“The influence of 34 years of at the anniversary programme of spread, from the aireraft to
Bolshevist rule in Russia has the University of Chicago round houses. Army and civilian fire-
made for dependence of the table broadcast. His interview nen controlleqd the flames after
church to a certain degree but was prepared in Germany after 17 houses were destroyed. Eight
this is an unconsciou$ dq@pend- he returned from a visit to civilians were injured and dam-

ence which is not really in the Russia. iges are estimated at $50,000.
heart of the people nor in the —(U.P.) —U-P.










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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY _27,_1962

sarsinos


ii en een Pose ee] LONDON.



|
|

= === =

general mass of farmers and






|
} Good progress has been made N ain White
pes a | Nearly 1,000 posts in the Colo- trains locally recruited staff. with \he expansion of existing | >. ; evee : In Pl
mtd Dy the Adverste Co. Ltd, Breed 8, Bridgstewe | i3) Service are waiting to be Now, more than ever, the Agri- Geological Survey establishments.| The world’s democracies, intent on pre- ‘
fi ibe sn-saushiiesindinidaabeiieententbipisaraapt | filed, the Colonial Office an- cultural Service is faced with Some Colonial territories which serving their own existence, seek to contain $1.00 per handred
Wednesday, February 27, 1952 nounces, extremely difficult problems and, did not before possess them, now

The jobs, for which the Secre- at the same time, with stimulat-

Survey Depart-| the outbursts of militant Communism and

have Geologica



tary of State for the Colonies ing possibilities for their solution. ments. the ex ions j j nationalism.
ey , ~ normally selects candidates, are On the one hand there are the Other new departments are $ plosion: of misguided ADVOCATE STATIONERY
cu LTURE | listed in an _ official booklet, rapidly expanding Colonial pop- expected shortly. 1, The heights of Tibet, the vast snow-
| capbcintnents in His Majesty's ulations and more urgent de- It is a that the pre-| ojad ranges of the Himalaya’s form a barrier
: ci ekes Colonjal Service.” mands for higher standards of war staff of less than 50 geolog-
In his excellent book “The Press” Wick-

Vacancies at the end of 1951 living.

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

On the other, there are
principally in the fol- immense possibilities both of in-
lowing branches: Education, 281; creasing yields per acre by the
Civil engineers, 86; Administra- application of existing scientific

ists and allied technicians will| guarding the northern outskirts of India.
|
tive Service,

have increased shortly to a total) And the jungle-clad hills of northern Burma,
of more \han 180,

Occasional vacancies will occur| range upon range, would present almost un-

occurred





ham Steed, a former editor of The Times
of London tells of his behaviour at a meet-

: shi noe : 78; Medical Ser- knowledge, and, in many cases. jin Nigeria, Gold Coast, Kenya, : ifficulties to a big
ing to which he was introduced as a vice, 77; Agricultural Service, of extending acreages if prob- Uganda, Tanganyika, ” Malaya, endurable hardships and diffic 6
“journalist. with ideals.” His audience 65; Electrical and Mechanical Jems of tsete control and water British Guiana and Jamaica. deploying army.

which consisted of the members of a con- | Engineers, 44. supply can be solved; : Colonial Legal Service

Most of the vacancies are in But to the east, in French Indo-China,

—-
—

ference were depressed by the “sad~fact | the East, West and Central ‘ — ee The. Legal Servie, _— Communism, backed by Mao’s Chinese
: Africas, and in South East Asia, _ Throughout the Colonies there covers a wide range elt dis tiokhien dalek int Grive én
that hardly a word of.the proceedings had | \Where ‘there is a wide field for is a very rw, demand Fad pointmenta, pas wees an roops across the frontier, tries to drive i
% c , 5 ” irons ; more ucation. n most e-- nearly al colonies bu. prin- r i nd across
been reported in any newspapers. cooritnent ae Cag mee partments, especially ‘those in cipally ‘in Wen and Can- spearhead southwards to Saigon a

In other Colonies, the demand is Africa, the central figure is the Usually | the South China Sea towards the rich islands

}
Wickham Steed began by telling them | tral Africa and Malaya.

|

|

|

pe ; : ; aller ¢ -onfined to certain general ‘Education Office’, who q first appointment for a the ;
that if none of their meetings had been onet Poh. otek a rales may be called on to teach, in- barrister is to a post of magis- of ; East Indies. o. - as
reported in the Press it was because those | sional appointments. spect or administer according to trate or Crown Counsel. For| It is there that French troops, fighting side “Tools of Trade
who had taken part in them had fallen ‘| The publication makes clear Circumstances. There is design- solicitors there are posts in oo

by side with Foreign Legionaries and loyal

m ad j is edly not, the firm division be- = 3 .
that Britain's Colonial policy is 7 Indo-Chinese use their American arms

Supreme Court Registries Land
not to reserve, out of hand, the tween these respective functions

into the sin of dullness. Offices and the like. Solicitors

He told them that



they were really competing for space in | best jobs for applicants eh ae 7 a ae cane sin, eo eetee ®P- | against a fleeting enemy which vanishes into We have a wide selection
Britain, . . ; , :

newspapers against the pressure of adver- | ~ jt sabes categorically: ‘It is ; Lang a ae an - Colonial Medical Service the jungle after it has struck or been struck. of evs y Tools, as u

: : : ‘le . ; aj- flects > si - ; / J ryda we

tisements of which some might be worth ae Aaiann = ees Education Officer. must under- . The Medieal Service in con-| Victory for Communism in the bamboo

several pounds per inch of type, and he |
asked them seriously to reflect whether |
anything that had been said at their meet-
ings was honestly worth several pounds
per inch,

At the end of the meeting a pious lady
remarked to a Right Reverend Bishop: “it
is all very shocking, but it is the only in- |

the progress of the peoples of the stand that society if he is to be oe ba Samedi Aenera) trend
Colonies towards control of their effective. ... . = ye eee
own affairs. If this policy is to _ The education of girls has intl Ae og
be a reality; the public services lagged far behind that of boys here, ed a +. Bo
of the Colonies must be adapted but is now making headway. : ere ue specialis' eppeln is
to local conditions and be staffed — eee aoe a ee ae toa nkaty herve
2 grea ssibl »xtent posed by financ .
he Tal conan. areal a staff, of staff the greatest present ob- branches eave been cuveenes..
therefore, are in general recruit~ stacle to progress is probably the ot ot “Medical and Health
those posts in the general habi €
Gotoniel Seether a which suffi- of teachers. Services. In many of them there

; . i till ious shortage of
cient suitable and qualified local Civil Engineers sei wee both in the a

undergrowth and on the paddy fields would
overturn the global strategy of the Western
Nations.

For, from the north, Mao’s Red divisions
could pour down, perhaps, “to meet the plea
of the liberated people,” in order to establish
a foothold in South Eastern Asia and threat-
en Malay’s Eastern seaboard.

as others that are often
difficult to find!

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Ph. 4472



yO bial a thee

my



, | ; , i : in and].

teresting meeting we have had.” The news- | candidates are not available’ = = 11 the Colonial Service there tal and in the field. 2. The truce talks an vet Sees jer
pers reported it fully the next day. | wide range of overseas has always been wide scope for The outflow of medical gradu-| again the Red Leaders throw out a hin

vn epee y Y- | appointments, it adds, remains ; |

Wickham Steed’s story does not provide an ae Lic . the employment of . engineers— ates from the colonial teaching

open to overseas candidates, be~ (j,i) mechanical and electrical.
cause for one reason or another And today the demand is great-
many colonies themselves ¢an= op than ever. With the increas-
not provide enough qualified and jny realisation of the importance
suitable men and women to meet of economic factors has come a
all the needs of modern admin- widespread demand for develop-
istration, ment schemes, These include
Colonial Agricultural Service the improvement of road. and

Agriculture is by far the most rail communications and the re-
important industry in most Col- clamation and _ utilisation of land

they earnestly seek peace. As often, their
prevarications and conditions make their
terms unacceptable. In the meantime, local
land fighting flares up spasmodically in the
frozen hills, and soldiers die while their
leaders argue. And the Communists build
up their supplies in the rear, and their air-

hospitals cannot, for many years
to come, be sufficient to make
good this shortage and vacancies
for Medical Officers from over-
seas occur in almost all Colonial
Medical Departments.

Colonial Veterinary
Departments
Most Colonies are dependent

accurate comparison with the account
printed in Sunday’s Advocate of a meeting
of the Council of the Association of Cul-
tural Societies. But in one respect a simr
ilarity is noticeable: on both occasions
there is a feeling of resentment against the
Press.

onies. The role of ‘Departments ae were Ev growing Qpon Agriculture and in turn| force into a formidable fleet.
* ; f Agri is to deal with food for consumption locally or ypon the Colonial Veterinary . ; : heir own secret.
In words attributed to the Chairman at 6 eer eae agricultural for export. Shcrtndnt” Tea week of the Their future intent is the Ry
Thursday’s meeting the statement is made | policy. It assists in the intro- The co-operation of the en- Colonial Veterinary Officer difters| But the United Nations have brought to a

duction of improved systems of gineer is all important both for
farming, which may include the these development schemes as
application of mechanised meth- well as for building hospitals and
ods, the introduction of better schools and providing water and

widely from that of his fellow in
England. Primarily he is con-
cerned with the prevention, con-|
trol and eradication of disease

that “after 1948 the year the Association
was formed, the clubs began to complain
of an unco-operative attitude on the part

halt the Red thrust south-east towards Japan.
3. Twenty-five Nationalist divisions train



planting materials, the use of electricity services, | among livestock en masse,
of the Press and he felt that this was one of | manures and fertilisers and the Colonial Geological Survey this control increases,
. t ari. | @neouragement of new, more Service and as subordinate vv
the main reasons why the work of the vari economic ways of working the : _ Staffs expand, the time and ; s
ous cultural groups had begun to flag.” land’ Further, the, Department aan a parettig er ae energy spent on extensive inocu- | bear modern American equipment.
In the Advocate Year Bgok 1951 inform- enohal aronaee Sf farming to Colonial terrilories is a thorough mpaigns ecrease) But they are unlikely ever to fight as an

and the Veterinary Officer will :
be able to devote more attention| army. They will probably never be per-
to other work. |

_ There are Veterinary Services
in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Tan-

ation supplied by the Association of Cul-
tural Societies shows that the Association
was formed in July 1947 and its inaugural

j investigation of their mineral re-
“ Fo eaaie it organises sources. This calls for expansion
and supervises the marketing of Of the Colonial Geological Survey
produce, It investigates and Service which is primarily con-
advises on control measures for cerned with the completion of

mitted to take part in a mass onslaught on
the Red Chinese mainland.

Nhorts For Men



, ‘ 5 P ganyika the Federation of Mal andin z |
lecture was delivered on October 318 1047. | ‘agricultural pest and diseases the asic, geological map of the Singapore, Hong Kong. Jamaics,| oust try Sine qroch ae wed cll ake ceg|| SIZES 30-40. ALSO IN KHAKI

o's : . s ’ stablishes efficient plant Colonia mpire, together with @ Trinidad, British Guia ‘ er 1 warsnl and a
The Association omitted to give any in: aoa aioe also it otgenises detailed mapping af mineral panciticp, ritis uiana and ed by ed Ps,

with the majority

formation as to its affiliated members, but vacancies in Africa.

the three main affiliated organisations are
known to be the Barbados Museum and
Historical Society, the Barbados Arts and
Crafts Society and the Y.M.C.A. which is

of} preparations of an invasion would be in-
q __. | volved.

Guide And

agricultural education for the bearing areas.

‘Queen Elizabeth As



The Far East war against Communism
might spread fiercely from Korea, Indo-



Tropical Linens



“an Association for the purpose of cater-
ing to the spiritual, educational, social and

recreational needs of youth.”

It was not

until the end of September 1949 that the
Extra-Mural Department of the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies began its
activities in Barbados and became affili-

ated with the Association.

It is worth noting that at a meeting of
the Executive Committee of the Associa-
tion held at Wakefield on the 21st February
1951 it was reported that certain affiliated

By VIOLET SYNGE
Captain of the Buckingham Palace
Troop of which the Queen was a
member

In June, 1937, I was asked to
go to Buckingham Palace to start
a Guide Company ‘of which
Queen Elizabeth (then Princess
Elizabeth) was to be a member.
The Princess, I was told, was to
be treated like any other little
girl. There was to be no ceremony
and no fuss and, in fact, I found
that it was difficult to stand on
ceremony with either Princess
Elizabeth or Princess Margaret,
who were both as natural as they
are to-day.

Yet it was inevitable that King

Ranger

other children with high ideals
who seek to give them expression.
The whole Guide programme
gives point to this—the nursing
and coping with emergencies: the
learning to cook over an open fire
and to fend for oneself in the
open, giving as it does, a feeling
of well being and confidence; the
making of things for sick children.

All the time the Guide is being
taught practical ways of doing
those hundred and _ one little
things children long to do, and
being passed through progressive-

at home from the start, and in-
deed, enjoyed these friendships

was a Patrol Leader now, and it
was part of her job to know
something of the lives of the six
others in her Patrol, so that she
might help them to become good
Guides. In this way, she learnt
much from the casual conversa-
tion of her fellows, of the ordin.
ary life, with its opportunities and
problems, of the London, as well
as the country child. These Guides
were completely artless and un-
inhibited in what they recounted,
and probably no Heir to the
Throne has had an opportunity of

China and Malaya, for Stalin would be likely

to dispatch Soviet divisions to assist Mao’s
immensely. ,Princess Elizabeth| troops.

So Formosa, whose straits are patrolled
by American warships, is likely to remain
just a part of the orbit of America’s defence
system.

4. Mob violence and thuggery, which
brought death and torture to Britons in
Cairo’s riots so shocked the world that King
Farouk had but little choice except to change
his government.

Here it was not just communism at work.

; pas: ; ; ; ‘
: George VI and Queen Elizabeth, ly stiffening tests. The faet that !¢arming about the lives and out-| Fanatic nationalists, spurred by ignorant,
groups had complained that the p Pe: conscious of the great destiny no badge or insignia is awarded, 100K of his or her subjects-to-be| frenzied hatred against imaginary grievances
gramme arranged by the British Council, | which lay before their elder except by merit, was accepted by @S had Princess Elizabeth, squat-

the Extra-Mural Department and the As-
sociation of Cultural Societies had tended

to undermine the
groups.

individuality of the

On this occasion the suggestion was also

daughter, had already begun to
inculeate in her the high sense of
duty and personal service which
is to-day an essential part of the
function of the Constitutional
Mgnarchy of the Commonwealth,

the Princess as the most natural
thing in the world.
Camp Fire Comradeship
With it all, there were plenty of
games, physical activities and
camp fire singing, so that fun was

ting with her Patrol in a clearing
of the bushes, beneath the walls
of Windsor Castle,

Joy Of Service For Others

~-This weekly * experience of

have sought to oust the British troops which
guard the Suez lifeline.

Foreign troops have no business anywhere
in Egypt, they scream, Egyptian power suffi-

‘\¢|in Formosa’s 14,000 square miles. Led by
however, | exiled Ieader Chiang Kai Chek, they are
veterinary | armed better than Mao’s men. For they



SIZES 28—32

DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

LOTS OF COLOURS.

DOMINICA

: ; é ices to guard the vital waterway! Away with
and which Guiding helped| to the keynote and Princess Eliza- happy, easy comradeshi, - i i i
made that the Association’s Committee | develop. Indeed, the Princess's beth and her comrades revelled tinued when Princess Hlizabeth the British! Forbid the entry of an allied
should meet regularly to receive reports ae felents «fee. grnee and in the comradeship of healthy = ae of ioe older Guides| foree—even if Egyptian soldiers were to have }
of the activities of affiliated groups. This id” ide 7 pleasures. scame Sea Rangers, and she| an honoured pla them!
: ; eople delightedly commented i idi place amongst them!
was an important suggestion and perhaps peop, ightedly men This comradeship of Guiding then heard and pondered over

has more bearing on the Association’s
wyerene’ difficulties than any alleged lack
of co-operation on the part of the daily

Press which during this
several hundred pounds

paintings and photographs’ o

period spent
reproducing
pottery

work, arts and craft classes and other cul-

tural subjects: printin

long articles on

literature and art: publishing editorials

in support of

Crafts

Society and of the

Museum and Historical Societ

ing each issue of. BIM and
magazine that was received:

the Barbados Arts and
Barbados
review-
ymouth
trying to

encourage writers by running a series of
local short stories in the Evening Advo-
cate: and sponsoring an exhibition at the
Museum to encourage West Indian pho-
tographers and to spread a knowledge of
Barbadian antiquities. In addition to the

upon during her recent Canadian
tour were obvious in the little
girl with whom I took nursery
tea on the day when I first met
her, It was she who put me at
my ease, who kept my plate fill.
ed, who said “I’ll fetch it” and
darted off, if I forgot anything.

Full Acceptance Of Law Of
Guiding

It was not surprising, therefore,
that Guiding, with its promise of
duty to God and the King, its
law and undertaking to do a good
turn-every day, appealed through
its demands to the Princess just
as it has to so many thousands of



OUR READERS

brought a new element into the
lives of both Princesses. In the
early days, in London, the Com-
pany was made up of some of
their cousins and children of
Court officials, To these children
exciting Guide games brought
real delight and to none more
than to Princess Elizabeth,

But in 1941, when the Company
was re-started at Windsor, the
greater part of it was made up of
children from the village school
and others evacuated from a Lon-
don Council School. With their
facility for meeting all sorts of
people with ease and naturalness,
the Princesses were completely



SAY :



their altered lives now they were
at work in shops and offices.
Camp gave even fuller opportun-
ities for this intercourse.

During all these formative
years, the Princess was finding
new skills and interests in the
Guide and Ranger tests, always
with the motto of “Be Prepared”
leading that eager young mind
to see more and more the joy
that service for others gives,

Her great broadcast from
South Africa on her 21st birth-
day, therefore, was only what
any of us who knew her would
have expected. Queen Elizabeth
is a shining example of what a
Guide should be.









And meantime Britain alone guards the
Zone, and her troops stand ready to quench
the flame of violence if it fiares up against
the white foreigner again.



“Stolen” Secret

(By JACK MEEHAN)

PARIS, Feb. 26,

A senior American Naval officer said Tues-
day that Russia has “stolen” the secret of an
American mine which can float in the sea
for days undetected and cannot be swept





A ma

Or Sale at Your Druggist

/

DACOSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents







. i Poppy Collection — sare WicaaSee Tomo Ma ta, | by an ordinary mine sweeper. The state
ungrudging use of its columns to publicise To the Balter; The” Advocate: i c ATthU oo... ccaeeseee 222.01 ment was made by the officer accompanying
: ae , ; < s
; the activities of whatever cultural or SIR,—In publishing the Poppy |. McKinstry ........ 122.05 Christ Church—Miss s. Admiral Lynde McCormick, new American
artistic merit could be discerned in Barbados, Collection of last November, the wer Broad Street—Miss Arthur . esses OF341 Ss .
i the Advocate during this period sometimes, des- | delay in which was due to the o2;.cHutsen : ens St Ehllip~ Mise, Gs upreme Commander in the North Atlantic
' pite continuous rising labour and material costs prolonged sale of raffle tickets
: published without charge notices of activities | the Committee would like te —— “Carrington sc... 181.72 | Dw
' organised by the association of Cultural Societies | thank the followine: Miss Hazlewood... 182.38 St. Joseph—Mrs. L ” ight Eisenhower.
: or its affiliated organisations. OLLOW Ing: — Fontabelle—Miss Warren Winns 2... Gricc uk 168.54 Th offi d mini ~
it Yet the Association which was formed in July | Colonel Oliver for his broadcast pan’ MT Hassell -.--.. 33.80 "ae ee A Ronni hati Progen Md y asta
i 1947 did not convene the first Annual General | on quenel Olives for his bx wank Hall & White Park gs OMRee ret aiecr tees 168.40 in the water undetected for days and cannot
i Meeting of its Couneil until February 17th, 1949. Lady Colly. and her helpers a Leonard's—Mrs E. ManOO 005.55 Vises: 160.57 be swept. It was an American invention
ts Perhaps if the Association were to meet more | for counting the town collection stot ic sive a SE Jameo—Mrs. 8.-2furse’ 160.99 the Russians h ”
i! often and kept the public and its members in- en ‘Poppy Day. t a aia. Chast 52.78 i Wore ee * ite 6.71 e ave stolen. ‘
i! formed as to its activities as was done in a All Organisers Bnd Sellers, Upper Black Rock—Mrs St. Luey—Mrs “i Arm. He did not say how the Russians “stole”
HF Report for October 1947-—January 1949 and a The Directors and Managements ,.°:..“2""'™ - reat 2 zee details of th i
i statement of receipts and expenditures for the | of the Marine and Crane Hotels aaa ae ooo St. Andrew—Mrs,,E.Gill 21.88 1,865.78 : a of the top secret mine. But he added
" same period the difficulties which are now bein io ; ; ; ; . motes a is the Russians now know ho re})): Whol
i experienced might disappear: while the daily coe ee ORG Choir premade fa: Oftcers Association 24.00 i. Ameri i a ae “s te ; mae Cosr'n eats
‘9 Press will undoubtedly continue to help as it | °°°® Mrs. EB. G. Wilkie 42.04 Gace Suse ese eke e erican invented explosive with which ‘ Bie te TD ...,. $1.25 ers —per tin...... $1.68
ii as, $0 considerably helped during the whole Miss Arthur for organizing and "wom 194.26 pacchctie Daneees Laeee the top secret mine is charged. eee ee :** Ta
HI period o ne Association’s existence. : . Se ail Cea ene Umer Coliyineve ‘ites we Shie. of Wreath: 3 +530, .16, h
i! “Interest in the arts” as John Harrison | j, “cotnection wand-Wide | raffle ‘Mrs. iB Skinner. and ANOHUMOUD esecce. cs. aee j ~ hregmaed\ tsar 4 adeaise Ieaetionneoonunaie: Pain chaaaks a EXTRA SPECIALS
i wrote in Chapter VIII of the Advocate thanks Ir Cave for allowing the aikelth # Culloden a Dance, Marine Hotel _™2.% 2558.58 / lessly in water and then automatically “arm . ™ tin Danish Hams $4.30 86 se. Beaiemed Beak 36
i Year Book 1951 “is growing, and an amal- | Sale of tickets at Cave Shepherd, Srittons Hul—Mes. 7 SPECIAL EFFORTS itself for discharge, the officer said. tin Luncheon Tea-time Paste 15
ie * > , the Manager of Barclay’s Bank Gittens 49.08 Dance, Crane Hotel—Miss : * Me i eet «+» $4.98 _ eae
' gamation of the potential assets of the tae ther an he etna ta whisk Gétrison—Mrs. L. Rowen 91.22 Cameron vores sss 900,00 He commented that Russian mines can be- ino semi Oca me
i Museum and the Arts and Crafts Society | to display the prizes, the Turt Wultame gagy Memes Arthor 148888 2.00833 come as big a menace in the event of war as|{} },J®, tin, Ham Rol... .90 2. tin Green 36
tT might produce the Cultural Certre of | Club for drawing the raffle and Tivespey arte tees TOTAL COLLECTION TO DATE sveotag | PUSSiA’s fleet of more than 200 submarines. Sausages ......... $1.05 54
# which there has been so much talk and so | all those who so kindly gave pint Hel Mrs H * Less Expenses... \TE $7,900-8°| Russians have planes capable of sowing Danish 8 oz. Cocktail 2a
a little effective action in recent years.” But | Prizes ee iteit — mines in the Atlantic he said in addition to Seuengen «.,...... - 2 I tin Purple Grapes =
; organisations of this kind, he rightly noted, Messrs Fitzpatrick Graham & _W. M. Worrell 27.48 BALANCE IN HAND .......... $7,885421those which would be sown by any sub- Macaroni—16 oz Pkg. .39 Italian Tomato Paste .27 .60
' cannot be created successfully at the stroke | Co, for auditing the accounts free oye Weenee Srarrepeet: 35S) . : Carr's Sweet Biscuits Embassy Cigs. of 25 .. .48
of a pen—or he might have added by a | of charge. Glendairy— Mrs. Foster 3.31 1,424.00 DOROTHY ¢. HUTSON | ™M@rines which reached those waters. As per 2 Ib Pkg..... 48 Sling in tins ...... 2 AB
flood of printers’ ink. Only solid admin- The Manager and Staff of the | panisues . McCormick conferred with Eisenhower hun- |
istrative ability and hard spade work will | Canadian Bak of Commerce for Qikthent brits "Goaneh Beppe ekague|SFedS of American, British, French and|
. here " | tings 403.12 Os . : : : . ‘
bring success to any organisation, cultural | the year. St. Matt! 69.56 : ; Py Italian warships, jet planes and submarines Phone CODDARDS = We Deliver
or otherwise. And enly responsible back- | “Tire Aav yi ot - Leighley : ;
: ; The Advocate for their gift of 5 woa cram 372.68 ghley, began the biggest peace time manoeuvre ever
ing of competent leaders and good admin- | free advertising space to the sg. Lawrence 56.32 ° Belleville. ; sab \ f }
istrators will sustain success, Cause. Chureh Coll 23.40 24.2.1952. held in the Mediterranean.—U.P, ee





,





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952

BARBADOS



Equalisation Fund

Bill Passed In Face
Of Heavy Criticism

, A MOVE by Mr. V. B, Vaughan (I) seconded by Mr.
W. A. Crawford (C) for the complete rejection of a Bill
to provide for the establishment of a revenue equalisation
fund to which resort might be made in the event of a tem-
porary recession of public revenue, was defeated by an
eleven-five majority of the House of Assembly last night.
The Bill was eventually passed in all its stages.

_ Those voting in favour of the rejection were Mr. V. B.
Vaughan (I), Mr. W. A. Crawford (C); Mr. C. E. Talma
(L); Mr. J. C, Motthey (C) and Mr. O. T. Allder.

ADVOCATE



WREATH FROM W.LC.



Vews In Brief:

Gold Watch
Stolen

GOLD WATCH valued $0)

was stolen from a bedroom
at “The Whim", St. Peter, t
tween 8.30 p.m. on February i /
and Sunday, The incident w
reported to the Police by Acv.!
Selman of the same address.

Hilda Best of King Edwa>!

Road, Bank Hall, reported ths
her house was broken and ente
ed between 8.15 p.m. on Sunda
and Monday and a quantity
groceries stolen.

PUNCHEON of syrup whi

PAGE FIVE



Crawford Asks For
Agricultural Corp.

An address relative to the es-
tablishment of an Agricultural
Development Corporation with a
view to obtaining concessions in
British Honduras in order to re
lieve some of the colony’s unem-
ployment, was tabled by Mr. W. A
Crawford at yasterday’s meeting
of the House of Assembly

The Address reads as follows



The House of Assembly is ¢
the qpinion that in view of the
proposals for development of the
sugar industry in British Honduras
and

(a) the concessions being

offered in this connection
by the Government of that




What An M.-P.
Wants To Know

Mr. E. D, Mottley at yesterday’s
meeting of the House of Assembly
tabled a question dealing with the
inadequate number of buses on
the various routes in the island.

The question reads:

1. Is Government aware of the
gieat inconvenience being suf-
ferred by persons who are obliged
to use the several omnibuses
plying for hire in this island as
their means of transportation,
where concessionaires have not
an adequate number ‘of buses 1
cope with the demand on their
respective routes?

2. If the answer to (1) above

\ fs in the affirmative, will Gov-

ernment take steps to cause such
‘ broke open along Lower B colony; soncessionaires to provide the re-
Street, opposite the Plantatio; ‘ : es uisite number of buses for the
The Bi ' Ltd., syrup compound, yesterd (b) the prospects which
ne Bill which was debated for absence locally of any specific
nearly five hours, specifies what financial institutions, because of

moneys are to be credited to the the understandable lack of fin- Sie we
revenue equalisation fund, and ancial and economic judgment se *
authorises the Accountant General on the part of the Government, , Tes) :
to invest all or any part of the and because of the degree of the a a“
fund. It also gives power to the fiscal ignorance existing among 4
Governor-in-Executive Committee members of the Government in 3. Oi:
to withdraw the whole or any part this House. They might be ex- Vals
of the fund anq apply the sum so cused for not having deliberately
withdrawn for the credit of the planned any excessive revenue
general revenue of the island. over! expenditure, but surely it
Members of the Opposition, as was inexcusable for them not to
well as Government supporters in have the courage to spend sur-
the House severely criticised the pluses. They had the courage
policy enunciated by Government during the last hustings to ap-
in the proposals of the Bill, and proach the electorate and appeal
urged that instead of hoarding up to them for 18 seats and the
balances, the money should be people had overwhelmed them
spent on economic development and this House with 16 seats.
and the improvement of social Whose advice were they now
conditions of the people who con- taking as to the spending of the

tribute to the excess by way of » ” ami-
bastuttion, people’s money owever emi

ent ma t nanci
Mr. V. B. Vaughan who initiated eoaoenio’ ebesarehin Ot distin
debate against the Bill, dubbed guished officials, this House
the proposals as “purely negative”, should not be guided by their
and said they were neither social advice as to how to spend “our”
nor economic, and invited the very m,

ES AY
oy Be eo
oe. an

which were insured. They D R I N K
oney. the property of J. C. Mahon of
eons — the Bill was de- Surpluses either deliberately the same plantation,
gn oO remedy. created by deficit financing or
Although signifying his inten- ¢o,

afternoon covered a large area
the road.

This caused the road te be sl
pery and nearly half a_ do
cyclists and pedestrians fell.
large crowd gathered around t
area to witness the incident

One man fell on three oc
sions within a few seconds.

FIRE at Molyneux Plantati:

St, James, at about 12.
a.m, yesteday burnt eight acres
ripe canes.

Five acres of second crop a
three and a half acres of fifth er
ripe canes were burnt when a f!:
occurred at Ashford Plantatic },
St. Thomas, at about 7.00 p.m.
Sunday. They are the proper y
of General Traders Ltd. and woe
insured,

Another fire at Lion Casi
Plantation, St, Thomas, at abo
4.00 a.m. on Monday burnt 800
holes of second crop ripe canes







project offers for employ-
ment of some of the colony’
surplus labour force;
that the Government should con-
sider the practicability of estab-
lishing an Agricultural Develop
ment Corporation for the putpose,

. among other things, of acquiring




convenience of the public?

3. If the answer to (1) above
is in the negative, will Govern=
ment cause inquiries to ,be made
with a view to relieving this in-
convenience?

lands in British Honduras for the »ROMANIA’ REFLOATED

creation of a number of propor-
tional—profit farms and the erec-
tion of a conveniently—situated
sugar factory.

2. The House is of the further

’ opinion that the possibility of ac-

quiring financial assistance for
the venture from the Colonial De-

' velopment Corporation and _ for

one of the appropriate Interna-
tional Agencies should be also in-
vestigated.



The fishing boat Romania was
refloated after it had sunk off
Bayfield Beach on Monday eve-
ning about 3.30 o'clock while
eens in a catch of 290 flying
fish.

It was refloated by Lee McCol-
lin and another man called Pep-
per. It belongs to Alfred
Straughan, and was extensively
damaged. The catch of fish was
not recovered.












tion to support the Bill, Mr. E. D. «oyrg’ a Png Seite be ‘ean
Mottley said he would not coun- on one or two purposes. It
tenance any investment in South should be used purely on social
Africa, and later made a motion services or for an economic pur-
to exclude this country from the jose. The ideal expenditure of
provision of the Bill, This was surpluses of course, was to com-
eanene defeated by a 12—6 bine at one and the same time,
* a social and an economic pur-

Dr. H. G. Cummins (L) who took Examples of such expen-

At Pleasant Hall Plantation, S\
Peter, a fire at about 6.40 p.m. on
Monday burnt a quantity of sour
grass. The grass is the property
of G.G. Gill of the same planta-
tion.

CLAYTON’S

k

\S





Inquest Adjourned

. T St. G *s Chapel, Windsor.
charge of the Bill said that he did pose THE WEST INDIA COMMITTEE wreath seen at eorge’s Chape! indsor

The wreath was com- . . nit
. diture may be found in the early posed of yellow daffodils, white tulips, caranations, hyacinths, rosebuds and arum lillies. The inquest concerning th.
not think there was need for much aqministratton of the Roosevelt niabadigh hide bentirhesteate tiation . Sete « death of Clement Medford o
debate. He said that the Bill Regime and the new deal. The

sought to give the Government pjan to public

3 . ae Belleplaine, St. Andrew, was 4°
works such as the
leave and authority to do what trans-continental r Milton Roc he ford

journed by His Worship Mr. A
roads, ublic W. Harper, Coroper of Distr
‘sou fe dane’ ctnnetion wats easel os Pe" eal Kstate Damages ue
the Revenue Equalisation Fund.



Z T's “F” until Tuesday, March 4, ye
a oh ee ee rehabilitation ot aes. —A Tribute aiden.
onourable members would re- culture employ undreds 0 ae Hi ee cu aie hae ts
on yr a gee PPemdp oe perw ig gen gs Soar ga ne Bagger 1 1 BY C. B. ROCK Clement seediond. was found lying
put aside for the past two years. ed to the permanent wealth of Ul on 1mMmues ’
Government felt that such regular the nation. Another example,

, in a pool of blood on Haggatt.

F ae passed quietly away on Road, St. Andrew, near the Agri
, ss Si ebruary llth, two weeks before | i ty 7 g

THE SECOND DAY'S HEARING in the case in which his 96th birthday, Alexander Mil- SUtural Station about. 3.20 fm

Damian F. De Abreu, a real estate agent, has claimed £720 ton Rocheford, one of the most ng first saw the body reporie
damages from Estwick E. Deane as unpaid commission, Fong, ay monger the matter to the Police and th

ended yesterday in the Court of Common Pleas before f5j..6 to encounter. hehe oie Coroner Harper was notified an

= fee Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. to bear testimony to the intrinsic the body was removed to the St

‘aylor. “

worth of such a man I regard as Andrew Mortuary where a post
The case is being heard by a price of £20,000 but no business

contributiong should go on year though unhappily, it resulted in
after year whenever it was possi- ultimate tragedy, but, neverthe-
ble. less, it combined a social with

He said that it was always con- an economic purpose, was Hitler,
sidered frugal to put aside some- who deliberately used the funds
thing for lean years and they ereated by deficit financing to
wanted to apply the same thing to launch his rearmament pro-
Government funds. It was con- gramme, thereby employing mil-
sidered this money could only be lions of idle Germans and by

lad

e

i i 1 privilege indeed mortem examination Wag per-
put aside ‘when there was the multiplication = —— special jury. Legal appearances was done. formed by L. S. Tappin.
prosperity. If it was not soa a J a. a ever ive P are Mr, G. H. Adams and Mr. Lodge Too Small Milton, the name by which he When the body of Medforc
then, when they came to lean ty 0 .

D. H. L. Ward instructed by To Mr. Vaalcott: Mr. Farmer was known to relatives and in- was found there was a gash ove
years the only thing they could The proposal of the seeyerns Messrs, Carrington & Sealy, So- said that Mr. Deane said that the timates, wag an artist in his voca- the eye and a cow was standin‘
do to enable them to carry on ment in this Bill for oe O* licitors for the bear De Abreu Lodge Plantation was too small, tion—shoemaking. The fact that some feet away.
would be to increase on taxation surpluses was ee soci hive. and Mr, E. K. Walcott, Q.C. and The price asked was £20,000 and he could, in Barbados of all places
and no one would want that, es- economic. It was en Meeting . J. S. B, Dear instructed by certain conditions were attached give three of his four children
pecially when there was no money Indeed, worse an. re ition Messrs, Cottle Catford, Solicitors to this price, (one died very young) a college
around. for it invited the nd oS medy for the defendant Estwick Deane. M@he plaintiff never made an education, shows more than
i As the objects and reasons of the the bill was design >, xe ; Mr. G. H, Adams_ yesterday offer on behalf of Mr. Dedne.

anything else the genius of the
Bill pointed out, the Bill specified tens Fae ES a cee called on four additional witnesses Mr. W. T. Gooding told the man, He had a
what monies were to be credited >? -





Small Improving

Jameg Small (36) of Fairfield

b passion for St, Michael is still reported by
before closing his case and then Court that he met Mr, De Abreu honest workmanship, for hard the Police to t é ! r

n ‘ ans . é . » be making good p!v

to the fund and authorised the a Seay ny be ell on tae Mr. Walcott called on Estwick some years ago at Jason Jones’s work, and his clientele comprised gress in the General Hospital hs

Accountant General to invest all it Seat he consumed. From. the Deane and Roy Gill. When fur- and he (De Abreu) asked him if foy the most part the gentry of Small was admitted to the Gen- uf

or any part of the fund. The employer in commerce and in- pee eg sia Ona fie ‘oa him to sell Strong Hope. this island—those who knew and eral Hospital about 6.30 p.m. ©

Y nor-in— “utive C i a e C . e to im “no,” could 4 reciate » snuine Wehruary 20 « Awa Rei et

poder apg Ae we dustry through company income “°F. Apreu's case is that Deane coult ippreciate the genuine February 20 suffering from t

At this stage Mr. Adams asked title: when they saw it: He enc
i > ‘ tax. And the Government was a 5reed in 1948 to pay him 3% that the deed of conveyance be j)00.°/ Ucn ee tree ee
wae o any ee eae = proposing ‘to use these mae Reed if he introduced him produced to the court, but Mr. Lag gd eee
ihe credit of the general revenues 2S if it eee, 5 eee nat teian to a person who was willing to sell Walcott submitted that the con- s ;

Pie iiand were better, . Fig age Seto mmhs o5 a plantation. Eventually Deane veyance must be put in evidence Sh the iat Wald aemartahietens
° e island, + the Stomateben 12 the hands o: ew ths bought a plantation and De Abreu phefore it could be produced. Mr. _'' is quiet and -unostentatious
The cfeation o ont ww draft could consume more and in the i, now claiming that he did so Adams then called on Mr. H. L way, on : ch am de
proposed in the 195l—vs a hands of the employer in com= Fiuch work endeavouring to get Thomas to take the witness stand. 8'@n¢ contribu a Pee a
Estimates, wherein provision Was merce and industry who could ty). gefendant a plantation and he Mr, Thomas said that in respect ‘Man most, he could teach othe: 3
made for an initial contribution invest more and so increase eM= },5. not been paid his commission of an alleged sale he made a !10W to live, not by anything he
Of Pan 000, that ployment. ‘ .. which Deane had agreed to pay gearch /in the Registrar’s Office said —cultured me akey though he
There was not much more ce What they were proposing iv him. Deane bought the planta- and found recorded there a deed was—but by the things he did
he could add, hence he oeeee this Bill was inspired OY i tion. of conveyance dated October 1948 and the wy he did them.
—— Me Juerhan “> sabe that Pere tead sh Sealr fiscal pol- Statement of Claim i R, E. —_ =e oe lathe, na e . 8s Ww ne
ae fut h at : inet ane regarding » sale 2. , 8 s Maker, 3
he was not a member of the House jey could no longer be inspired ‘phe statement of claim states cdaetation Hustands and Oxnards further from the pulpit where he
during the last session, but obvi- by nineteenth century ees that the ‘plaintiff -claim is for ‘hich is in St. James. rightly belonged’ Milton's life was
ously from the nature of the Bill “Our politics was dominated by money payable for work done by t itself a sermon, eloquent beyond
it was the Administration's the concept of the welfare state” the plaintiff for the defendant at Plantation Sold compare, and he demonstrated

answer to a series of financially he said. his request as agent.

i J what was meant by clean living,
prosperous years which this island The plaintiff in the month of This plantation was sold for

unselfish and kindly citizenship
had experienced in recent times August 1948 in pursuance of the £24,000. At this stage Mr. Adams
und which it was likely that it The average surplus over os agreement introduced to the de- closed his case,
would experietice for some years past five years had been at the




wounds. The wound to his throat
is healing well

Yesterday he wag able to t*l!
to the Police for the first time
since he was admitted to the Gen
eral Hospital. The Police are held-
ing Small in connection with the
death of Gwendoiyn Clarke (36
of New Orleans, St, Michacl
Clarke was also admitted to the
Hospital on February 20 sufferirg
from stab wounds but died
few minutes after she wi
admitted

LECTURE ON MORAL
REARMAMENT

Mr, Deighton F. Griffith, Head-
master of the Providence Boys’





hes TA . Wiz tj
COOLING face TREATMENTS

to revive Heat-Weary spirits






Cool fingers will bring refreshment and
Unemployment



Beauty to your hot, tired face. Iced creams
A keen and practical musician, and lotions will stimulate your skin, make it





: : ‘ 4 Schocl who recently returned A - i
one Roy Gill, the then Mr. Walcott then called on Mr. all his life, with a good tenor ht Sa ‘yen izabeth

in the immediate future. rate of a million dollars annually. ae of ‘the sugar plantation Estwick Deane. Mr. Deane said: vyoice, he did much in hig day to ra a Mier car ares a. ae ne eters eaten

“Tt js unnecessary or superflu- Government was proposing to named Husbands and Oxnards, St. “One Saturday afternoon in July create in others » love for both bbe ae per ts days aes Arden make-up will keep you looking cool
j I may say, to state that sur- save half a million dollars an- James, I went to the telephone and aman yocx| and instrumental music, As}#" address on this subject at th *; Ignée for hours and hours \
i Sitnes are only the result of ex- nually — in simple social lan- The defendant bought this who said he was De Abreu asked 4 choirmaster he could hold his Belmont Methodist Church, My and soignée for . ;
q Bors an Ni did over expendi- guage, to withdraw from circu- pjantation for the sum of £24,000, me if I wanted to buy a property. ow, with the best. There are Lord’s Hill. at 7.30 to-night. \ <>+—~ |
5 er ial it is only right that we lation five Sy oon noe The defendant still refuses to pay I . him we. did a many alive to-day who are deeply

: saat dollars annually in a comm the plaintiff the agreed commis- who he was, e man s indebted to him for setting their ’ % 1 ;

enous, l Ce nell tee where 500 villages lacked the sion of 3% on the £24,000 or any was 4 real estate agent. The man foot on the right path—the path THOUGHT FOR TODA} SALON at --=
¢ wees nt luses have arisen,” elementary essentials of sanitary part on it. said that he was acting on behalf of culture and enlightenment. The highest reward for
‘ et aT ’ . services like public baths and “ When the hearing was resumed of a vendor.











man’s toil is not what he gets KNIG HT’S LTD
Good Crops adequate drainage in the rural yesterday morning Mr. Walcott) “I told this man that if he had Milton had been in retirement for it, but what he becomes f
‘ ves px - tenantries. further cross-examined De Abreu. a plantation to sell I would listen for some years, but up to a few by it. 33 B d St t
I The honourable member made “Government was proposing to De Abreu said that he had no to him,” Mr. Deane said days before his death was able acc Balsistn roa ree
; some reference of the Department put by five hundred thousand conversation with Mr. Deane On the following morning he to enjoy a chat with friends ab%ut
of Science and Agriculture. OWiN Goyjars annually in a community gbout 10 a.m. on August 9. The telephoned Mr, Farmer of the current world events, Local poli-
to their researches and the neW Jere there was grave unem- defendant agreed that he was Lodge Plantation and told him tics, which he regarded as a nec- eet siti —
varieties of cot pK now Rape — ployment, despite official assur- the agent for him and he, the de- what the man—who he learnt was essary evil, was anathema to him '
planted in this island now, an

ances to the contrary, and where, fendant, was the principal.

; aes the plaintiff De Abreu--had told
the new methods of cultivation in ¢,, half of the year, there was

Milton Rocheford leaves to

“My obligation was to find the him over the telephone and asked jpourn his passing two sons and

addition to the unusual seasons of jntensified hardship and want by defendant a plantation and this Mr, Farmer for permission to visit ceyey grand children

good rain over the past ten years, inder-employment in agricul- was also the agreement. I was to the Lodge Plantation. :

the island had steadily produced ture, the main industry. Govern- produce a prospective seller or He inspected the Lodge Planta-

good crops and Soy been as neers ment was groposing oa by vendor. I had anthing, to do with tion, jbut no gale wee made gs it aessiliiae

i more and more each year sand dollars an- the price of the plantation, I wrote was too small. igus ?

te that production. Be ee ee public works Mr. Beene & letter in which I stat- plaintiff telephoned him stating BELL DEDICATED \
He said that they must also take japourers were receiving a wage ed that he was dishonest, that he had something nice to offer |

|

May the sod rest lightly on him



Sport Shirts

and other items for men

REFEREE

: the increase in in- hour. They were him but he told him that they The bell which was given
ana Seguae S * the forms et eee ge hundred thousand The Agreement could not discuss the matter over 4, me ow Autane Church. Bath-
turned to the en the hous- . the telephone. sheba. S > r, Charles
suhon % rienigrents abroad. As ee nan che families _ “Under the agreement Mr. ‘The plaintiff said that he could eu ba, Ae roe he ieee
¥ reread 544-48 it was estimated os rami for lack of space Deane had to negotiate the price offer him a plantation of about Yearwooc oO ene earns es 30°
a late s. 1 unted to three million = ae ~ falling down over 28 he was not a purchasing agent. 240 acres on the average, but did was dedicated yeste me, ‘ t i
that this gem from emigrants teete heads, They were to save [t was also Mr. Deane’s duty to not give the name or the price a.m. by the Venerable Arch-
syerereeen by the U.S. alone. He 4 hundred thousand dollars 8° to the plantation and try and o¢ the plantation. Later the plain- deacon H. J. Hutchinson at
employed v4 lic ae me oeeuiity ‘when for lack of a st a plantation as cheaply as he tif said that the price of the Requiem Mass.
Civurned from places like Bermu- + nutrition scheme, the de- could,” De Abreu said under pjantation would be about A large congregation attendes
re end "Cur acao but they Polopment of the school children cross-examination from Mr, E. K, 996900. The following morning the service which was iully
7 — that those sums must was being retarded and the next hel oy OM said that he told Mr the plaintiff said that he had made choral.
he substantial. generation menaced by a race of :

Beahe that Mr. Gill was not tak a mistake and that the place was
Mr. Vaughan then quoted fig- dwarfism. They were proposing to iny’ much less than what he asked ‘“Shbury.

Short Sleeves, sizes 144 to 17 ins.

Each

mem mmm

RENOWN DE LUXE SPORT SHIRTS
Short Sleeves in Shades of White, Blue, Grey, Cream,

Sizes — Smali, Medium and Large.

ri thousand dol- ; . 3 The plaintiff asked } t he knew
ures for the past decade showing put by five hundred ~ and it was not his duty to get a - ‘ s d ie plaintiff asked him if he knew
the amount of production, the cor- Jars annually when the a tak ad price suitable for Mr, Deane, Seana ens SNe veee of a place about 240 acres in size Each_ |. ok adie 1M sini ahd a + inns es alain _. $4.85
responding export and the result- and depressing rise in the cos o; There was also no ceiling price’ y.q immediately. after the first He told the plaintiff that he would

ant revenue which had accrued living was ae sible were quoted by Mr. Deane. As soon a8 face Mr, Gill interviewed me and jd out ain niin te ae yee ae Ont VESTS, athletic OTIS .COTTON . BRIEFS BOYS % LENGTH SOCKS
from the sugar crop during that eee wages peop the sale was effected his work was ¢ojiowing his instructions I decid the plaintiff rang. mye, me apeven, ri bed Stias 40 to. 4d. Sizes 8} to 10 ins.
on. id that it was a unique a said that he would not tire Oia: 1 said that the agreement ed not to communicate with the “Tl told the plantiff that I was ; vee to 46.

e@ sal

i s a ital
- any Government in this the House by a prolonged reci
sre as cial ‘changes and re- of the social want and lack among

: i le. i
tion, In recent times, Gov- the multitudes of the peop carried out, The agreement which 7 Wo told that the plaintiff Want- ang 1 gave him the size of the
red, had been compelled to “Let us absolve the ieee oe I made on August 6 is the agree- 44 to speak to me, but I did not piace and told him that it would
budget for specific exmunene, of caitiery, eon ait oat is west I am suing on,” De Abreu try to get in touch with him, On cost £24900 and the place had
: “o over u ¥ e , ty aid. ay elephoned the 9900 ir ares ¢ arren Fac-
Rae es that shir inerenatng the excuse them for the lack of a Mr, Adams then called on Mr. ltt ot Cottle ‘Cottord ceil in £ on "ta ae ag ot hi |
had done bt thereby deliberately social policy, But when we ex- J. H. Wilkinson who said that he the presence of Mr. Gill told him AT cy lace for,” Mr. Gill}
Se te 1 oa *Such a pro- cuse them for this lack, surely, knew the plaintiff who came to that he was trying to rob me of a SO Tes
creating surp'lsci in budgetary we should be able to commend him enquiring about a plantation 6999 and 1 was finished with ““"
cess was termec a cing ang them for an economic policy, he for sale. He could not say if the : ;
language as re Knee Govern- added. plaintiff mentioned a plantation.
to the amazement of r ¢hs tt y de- Did they propose to use those Mr. H, Farmer said that he once
ments, they discovered me ay .. surpluses as a fund for industrial obwned the Lodge Plantation, St
ficit financing there — a eet development? Did they propose Michael Several people asked
ing increase in the total volur to implement an idea of Professor him for a sale. One day the plain-
annual revenue. Simey’s that Barbados could be- tiff and himself had a conversa-
Fiscal Ignorance come a production centre for tion over the telephone. He also fruchands and Oxnards Plantatior
He said that they could not yarn to supply textile mills in saw Mr. Deane sometime and he jn st. James. It was during the
expect this Government to have Lancashire, or for that matter, asked him if he wanted to sell the

- ; month of July that he r«
a similar record. Because of the @ On page 6 plantation and he quoted him a telephone call from the

was a gentleman’s agreement I aot eto nies until I saw M nutting my cards on the table for
jl on th

‘ foliowing Monday. him. I told the plaintiff that I
thought that it was going to be wren 1] returned from the races knew of a place but it was mine

$1.30
$1.32

OPEN END SCHOOL ‘TIES
for senior boys of Harri-
son College.

Each SELLE Suit Li ae uenties Sums aabl a

$1.56

$1.05

RENOWN SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS, with piped
contrasting Collars. Shades of Grey, Blue, Cream.

Sizes 36 to 44 ins.
$16.37

Pair__ Pair___

— ne



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD. |



him.”

Finally I bought Husbands and
Oxnards Plantation for
I first offered to pay £
it but this was not ac

Mr. Roy Gill said that some-
time in 1948 he was the



£24,000. ,./%.



10. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.











——<———$ ——— —_—



PAGE SIX

Cal. Sec.

—— me

e



Part Of
vitae Roscoe

It may be asked why
has beer asked for
$40,000 isn
nolly’s Ri --. The reasons are
two-fold.: “First it will be neces-
sary for dittraft, while the work
is being done, to land on parts of
the Runway, to the left and right
of the centre-line, which do not
usuallyscarry traffic, and damage
may thereby be caused.

Sccond, the fickleness of the
weather has been largely respon-
site for.the. present predicament
and it May not yet have ceased
playing. its tricks. The word
“possibly” in the last sentence but
one of Mr. Connolly's estimate of
cost should not be overlooked.

I certainly do not wish in any
Way to aggravate an already deli-
cate situation, but I feel con-
Strained to comment on a few
points Which have been reported
in various sections of the Press
Since this” Resolution was sent
down to the~Legislature

For example, I have seen a re-
ference to the poor quality of the
concrete mixing. It will, I think,
suffice to say that there ag no re-
ference to this at all in Mr, Con-
nolly’s report and that Mr. John-
stone, the Chief Engineer of T.C.A
has stated in writing that during
his visits in July and September, 1
quote, “the Portland cement ton-
crete ends of the runways or turn
around areas and the Portland
cement .2,QmErete, apron. were in
excellent egndition; the: asphaltic
cOncreté —tagieway was also in
first-clasgjcgndition.”

-

$60,000
when only

Corruption

There, have also been insinua-
tions of corruption. As to this
I would say that, up to the time
of speaking, no evidence what-
ever of “this has been placed
before the Government.

There have been fears that the
hole Runway will have to be
andoned or that it will be a con-
stant drain on the Treasury. 1
amn only a layman in engineering
matters, -bot, as regards the first
fear, I would draw attention to
Mr. Connolly’s conclusion under
e heading “General” in his Re-
Port in which he says, I quote,
“After reviewing the geports and
studying the type of construction
used at Seawell Airport this En-
gineer is not as ssimigtic as
others who foresée the ultimate
failure qf-the whole Runway and
the rebuildiny thereof, and there
thne the eae alt that “by this
e



e the heavy alfcratt have found
weak “spots; ana after these
a@reas have been reinstated ‘Titth
gutside of average maintenars
Will be required.” ’
In other Words, while Mr. Con-
nolly kelievés that no ma. ex-
Graordimary Lexpenditure w be
requirefi aftér the’ present ‘wor?



wentioneg in Mr. Con- ,

Explains

éconstruction Of

Runway

been suggested that olf own De-
partment of Highways and Trans-
port should handle the job. To
this the answer of the Director,
who is the only qualified Engin-
eer in the Department, has been
suffering’as he is from a
chronic shortage of Engineering
assistance, he just cannot under-
take the necessary supervision, in
addition to his other duties. With-
out the timely presence of the
Resident Engineer from Canada,
the Barbados Government would,
indeed, be “in the soup.”

Criticism

Finally I notice with regret
that even the United Kingdom
Government has come in for some
criticism. Now, Sir, I have taken
the trouble to delve back inte the
1949 correspondence, This shows
that in October 1949 the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies was
informed for the first time of the
arrangements that had already
been made with the Canadian
Department of Transport for the
loan of an engineer to undertake
a survey of the Airport and con-
struct a new Runway so as to
have it ready for use not later than
the Ist July, 1950, and the Secre-
tary of State was asked, in spite
of the ruling, of which this Gov-
ernment was well aware, that
C.D. & ‘W. grants would not nor-
mally be made in respect of ex-
penditure already incurred, if an
ipplication for a grant from
Colonial and Development Funds
could be considered,

Grant Approved

The sole “crime’ of the U.K.
Government, so far as ] can see,
is that, despite the ruling to
which I have just referred, it ap-
proved a grant of $1,212,000 and
agreed, in this instance, to cover
expenditure already incurred.

Later, although it was clearly
stated at the time the scheme
was approved that “any excess
over the sum approved should be
met from local revenue, the
Secretary of State approved sup-
plement of $408,000. making a
total of $1,620,000 from C.D. &
W. funds in all.

The reasons advanced for, as
it were, confronting the Secre-
tary of State with a “fait accom-
pli” were:

(1) the Barbados Governmen;

had given an und Ag

to~ Trans-Canada Ai
t> proceed with










prepared to call
their soumtin -
the Cami



and





In The Legislature
COUNCIL

The Legislative Councti met

> pm. yesterday the Hen. |. I
Chandler presiding

The Hon. the Colonial Scere
tary ‘laid the
ments:—

Draft Estimates of Revenue and

Expenditere for the year 195%—5s.
Annual Report of the Superin

tendent of the Market for the year

1950—S1.
The Council! concurred
fellowing resolutions

Resolution to place the sum of
disposal of the

Committee

s8.070 at the
Governor -in-Executive
to sapplement the Estimates 1951—
‘2. Part I, Current
Supplementary, Estimates, 1951-
52, No. #&. which form the
Schedule to the Resolution
Resolution to piace the sum of
$3,500 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Execative Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951—
52, Part 0, Capital, to supplement





fotiowing docu-

in the

as shown in

BARBADOS



Yesterday

>
the Estimates 1051—<2, Ne. 45,
which form the Schedule te the
ution

elution te place the sum of
at th diyposal of the
rnor-ip-Exeeutive Committee
supplement the Extimates 1941—



¢ Part 11, — Capital, as shown
in Supplementary Estimates 1951—
&, Ne i which form the





Sehedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) Orde>
198%, made by the Geverner-in-
Executive Committee on the tenth
day of January 105%, under the
Previsions of Section & of the
Civil Estabiichment Act. 1949.

The Counefl postponed further
consideration of —

Bil intituled an Act to carry
out the Convention relating to
Labour Clauses in Public Con-
tracts

The Council adjourned sine die.



HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday, Dr. Cummins on
behalf of Mr.: Adams taid the
following :—

Message No. 6/1952 from His
Excellency the Governor to the
Honourable House of Assembly
presenting for consideration of the
Honourable House the draft
Estimates of Revenue and Ex-
penditure for the Financial Year
19”—53.

Annual Report of the Super
intendent of the Market fer the
year 190—51.

The following
given

Dr. Cummins for M Adam

Bill intituled an Act to continue
various expiring laws and a Bill
intituled an Act to make per-
manent certain laws formerly con
tinued in force from year to year
by Annual Expiring Laws Con-
tinvance Acts. These were later
read a first time.

Dr. Cummins gave notice of
Resolution to place the sum of
$46,275 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 161
52, Part 11—Cuapital, as shown tn
the Supplementary Batimate
1951-2, No. 47, which form the
Schedule to the Resoiation,

Mr. C. BE. Tatma gave notice of «
Bill to authorise the Vestries of
st George, St. Philip Christ
Church, St. John, St, Joseph, St
Thomas and St, James to Increase

Notlee were

British

Hon, Colonial

landing during

surrounding should be fr
obstruc. ions

operations the full

areas free from obstructions or
excavations.
The Resident Engineer had
ifirmed this, the

i the Hon. the Color
on the tucid
d expla
word &
1 like

““ptioms on ome or two po






Couse of Failure

West Indies Airways had

been checked and what was the

answer.
The

very well,

il Secretary
said that British Wést Indian had
stipulated that (1) there will be
a clean 75 foot lane by five thous-
and feet long available for taking
daylight
hours and that, the area immedi-
ately
from all
gerous excavations.
hight
and width of the runway
be available and the surrounding

Government
that

pathy

and dan
and (2) tor
lengtt
should

Hon, the exer
onial Secretary concluded
he Hon. F. C. Hutson congrat



the salary payable to the respec-
tive clerks of the Boards of
Guardians of those parishes.

This was later read a first time

Mr. W. A. Crawford tabled an
iddress relating to the Establish-
ment of an Agricultural Develop-
ment Corporation with a view to
obtaining concessions in British
llonduras so as te relieve some of
the colony's unemployment.

Mr. J. C. Mottley tabled a ques-
tion relative to fishermen at
Skeat'’s Bey, St. Philip and the
ineonvenienes suffered by them.

Mr. E. DB. Motiley tabled a
question relating to the inade-
inacy’ of buses on routes In the

island,

The House passed « Bij) for the
establishment of a Revenue Equali-

ation Fund

The House passed an Address
to the Other Place in connection
with over population in the island.

“The House passed an Address
to His Exeeileney the Gevernor
concurring in the ektension to
Barbados of the new economic
notes passed between the United
Kingdom and the United States

The House postponed considera
tion, of the second reading ef the
Bill to repeal the Public Employees
Leave Regulations Act, 1045.

The House agreed to the Coun-
cis Amendments to the Pioneer
Industries Bill,

The Hous adjourned
Tuesday, 4th March at 3 p.m



until

It was a little hard that

was
that matter,

He thought that they were very
vise in putting on $20,000 because

might be faced with

ld be unforgivable.

It that was the extent of the
sincerels

ivouble, and they all
hoped that it was, then he thought
it the Government would
edingly lucky to have got off

th an expenditure of $60,000,
said that
were fighting to
with ’the traffic
ell but he would ask tha
every
4 made to see that no

In eonclusion he
i that they
nterfering



ensure that
bein
se llowed to pass
aid concrete





come, insurance,



If he did make a guess
he could say that that backfill was

free from clay, continued on that line of policy,

had had to shoulder would have to echo a sentiment

responsibility and his sym- tp
. J at
with the Government

bados working man would have
to say of the Barbados Tabor

more Party: “This
»uble but they must ensure that with th is people honoureth me

class ma-erial was put back far fro
in, to put back in inferior material

before
ir hours have elapsed
e€ second point was that the

ADVOCATE



Equalisation Fund
Bill Passed In Face
Of Heavy Criticism

most certainly expect the crops to
remain as gOod as they had been
to the empryo textile mills in in the past decade, the creation
these West Indies? Did they pro- of the Revenue Equalization Fund
pose to use a surplus as a foumda- dig not seem to him absolutely
tion fund for uae irrigation necessary. The fund should be
works for agriculture, 80 earmarked for more pressing
establish an insurance of perma- things like proper housing, better
ouptly E adequate crops in the roads, more standpipes and so on.
re ? Dang

What he wanted to emphasise Referring ens Sen the

was that the Government's pro- pill) Mr. Talma said that they

@ from page 5

— Bi * ‘these surpluses." But were putting the money at the

soli : y disposal of the Accountant Gen-
eee coe ae We, eral who with the consent of the
the G ae . â„¢ Secretary of State for the Col-
Governments mite ih’ Com- onies, would invest it outside of
paring Government income with the colony. But, to his mind, they
business income. Such a com- needed more revenue and every
Pindornettat as rane, was cvailable cent for the s0cial leg-
Socialist Government, i as q islation which they were trying
itically danas tallacy. = to implement. He thought that
e source of Government in- canute 3 was a very dangerous
from tntienes egg ME ad There were some who might
ary concern of business was with say that the money was still in
commodities. The primary con- the General Revenue or was still
cern of Government was with @vailable, but that depended upon
sraet, "ha Lateee Gre Seats. ‘deemeat’ tnd aid oie
rnment wit umanity, remaine . e
that term in its classically chris. ing to appropriate the money
tian sense. with the consent of the Secretary
Reserves or the saving of sur- of State for the Colonies for ex-
pluses was a sound provision in penditure out of the island. That
company finance. usiness in- money so expended would be so
come derived from sales of com- much Jess in the island.
modities and services, The source ye could not uphold the policy

of Government income was taxa- reserves i ac
tion and by its fiscal policy, Gov- of saving up oe eee

ich
ernment could influence the size ot the winemious Bocnasttien whic

and volume of its revenue, Such S#0uld be met, and what was
power was denied to business. tt more, if they were earmarking
had no control over the consum- Money for a proper island wide
ing capacity of the market, even housing scheme, one could un-
that business income which so derstand, but instead of that.
closely resembled Government in. they wanted to put by $150,000
as a sort of reserve fund at the
He did not want Government end of this year, and probably at

to regard his criticism as any ob- the end of the next year another

structive condemnation, but, he

c $150,000.
was warning them that if ‘they :

BHEUWATISN
” and agonising

BACKACHE
GONE!

the working man of Barbados

in reference to the Labour Party

was echoed two thousand
years ago in the highways and
byways of Palestine. e Bar.




heir lips, but their heart is
™m me.”

Mr. Vaughan said that he was
so much opposed to the policy
embodied in the Bill, that he was
moving the rejection of its fur.
ther consideration,

Mr. ©. E, Talma, (L) said that
when the policy of ‘putting by a
Reserve Fund was implemented.
he did not have the honour of be-
ing a member of the House, and
therefore that was the first oppor-

tunity he had had to deal with| Obstlaete a civses oh
the matter. be interested in
He felt very perturbed in mind| Complaints the experience

to see that an over cOnservativea

policy was being perpetuated b:
Government, ‘Although the idea of

a “house-keeping”

related in this
’8 letter :—
“Some years
ago I began to

relieved by
KRUSCHEN

budget was

—"——“" WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27,

1952





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has bean completed, he is at Tran vetween the slabs should be cound in principle yet, in vi fhe ism for it is prepared from Nature’s best
/ . efully sealed » in view of my arms and shoulders. en S ie he

to stregs tate eset rAl persOmn hee eee, Caled 80 that no ‘the fact that’ the price of sugar'| started in the small of my soothes etrea ad Be tnd aot

port, as at~amy Airport the we wk , vee tt prelate had been guaranteed for the next k, Iceneerey until they were SRORY tres Od veel: Say ier ie

Srckk tried Tt male. Yet Coady, be nem con mee MSE PASSES Seven or eight years, there were | Feally severe. 1 bought a bottle vou fact

eur ox : Pe 2g unlikely to agree to extend


















you feel in the morning.

so many pressing and glaring Fyscnen ane WAS soreriped Ag

a matters which had to be “fixed”, Tagg ae hg it was
had gone
from it

If you*ae me~how «much that

apt



period of loan imieting
The work should be oo



Your own experience will convince you














‘ ea gers a that he could not appreciate a that ‘ Ovaltine’ is the one food beverage

will amount to I. can only _refey 5 the time of co H ai a \e is i ee ae eee iene
” ther Ve susiaie efore the next wet s@ason 5 mnolly had mot s a » ee r Labour Government adopting a | and day have not or every member your family, to

to the fast genignce under ths in (in the quand it wes not, > sates Pouce the lines ¢ use Select Six policy such as was propose in agentes again. My pains were promote peaceful sleep, to renew energy

peomee General” in a4 a and that factor fs to a large ex- from , 7 F St d Of the Bill stinate and the re ef really : and to keep you all feeling and looking
se 4 2 v4 e dice a to r r 1 y or? , ied .—T RB. tam : :

feted by axnerience”’ “The neces. tent responsible for the present see oF ry Their experience was that for | ® tie. OVALTINE eres





Rheumatic ns and backache








: areal a he ‘ ir . the past ten years the sugar cane ; Sold ins by all Chemi dS
of annua! maintenance is ) predicament) It seems the us f t i‘ . > . us' y the result of poisons BISCUITS old in airtight tins by a mists and Stores,
in Ast eer aa and must be ac- Barbados cannot have a record backfill Reading between tt Oy er I opulation crop was reasonably good and’ in the Rigo g—Rolao hich lazy : ie
ent as.” a vitable ¢ sugar 3 weat lines they could see that in tl most cases even better than was wels and tired eys are Dainty and delightfully .
epted as an inevitable coi sugar crop and good weather 3 . “a Pe ted d dt fail: to expel or these crisp, ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits Qualit has made
ecomitant of any Runway. for making a runway at the hurry and the night work a good The House of Assembly yester- ?*Pected, an e did not there- there fin are ideal for all occasions. y
Y i . taba Mie : : ane fore see why Government should ; 90m aints ere is no er hy
une time deal of the clay excavated ha i 1 an Address to the treatment than en Salts are made from the 4
Rvoway Exomtvations been put back in again. Other Place agreeing to Co-opt in ®dopt an attitude of despondency | which cleanses all the internal Siting e ceceerton. of
Some harsh words have hee Hon, G, D. L, Pile quo'ed the He had seen some samples of 1 Committee for the purpose of ‘I alarm. He felt that they should organs, stimulates them to nor- delicious ‘Ovaltine’, and
said about Canada. I do not think following passage from the En- that material and it was inferior. siudying the problem of over- always live in hope, and he was at healthy action and thus are highly nourishing
ieee te aan CORE MED aegis Teport:— They had been told that it is population in the island. Vey Te tae ine P Ry fact that . itores freshness and vigour. a arene oe Th W Id’ l
that this Go$ernment owes to the ‘The statement that the airport difficult to distinguish betwee The House appointed six of its,\he price of sugar had been guar-| @aj) Qhemists and Stores_seld OOtaititie Meemembes tr
Canadian a and T.C.A., could be kept in service for flying clay and coral rock. That was members to take part in this Com-|anteed until 1959, and they would | Erusohen. a tell "a" pedir’ oF e World's most popular
both for making available the ser- Operations during the mittee

time of quite ‘rue. They could get a mix-
vices of Mr. Johnstone, an experi+« construction by day labour forces tyre of white clay and marly rock
enced Engineer of T.C.A. for is more or less confirmed by a that would be quite difficult to be
making detailed exeminations of letter from ‘Trans-Canada Air distinguished from coral rock
the Runway during July and Sep- Lines on January 11th advising They were hoping that there ,
tember, and of Mr. Connolly, who under what conditions they are was not much of that material in lative Council dated the 17th July, |
is » very senior, and very busy, prepered to gontinue operations their runway because i{ would 1951 and the 29th January, 1952,
oMicial of the Department of ‘nto Barbados, and it is our opin- give trouble when it got wet. regarding the nomination of mem- |
Transport, for a visit in Decem- ion that these conditions can be bers from the House of Assembly |
ber, without so far asking for » complied with if the work is car- Coral Unstable cs serve with members, sm the |
mny in payment, for arranging ried out in accordance with meth- onourable the Legislative Coun-
to have extolon of the defective od (b) but fot ie pit an The report had stated that sat- cil as a Joint Select Committee to
areas taken to Canada to deter- under method (a). The British Urated coral became unstable al- examine the question of over-

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The Address reads:

The House of Assembly has the
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from the Honourable, the Legis- |










Bring Me
























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miné the cause of the trouble, and West Indies A ¢ have not though not to the same ex.ent 4S population in Barbados and to A Good
also for sending down, at consid- expressed hiaies: in writing pone poe Samet Ae a wide state- make EOCOMIPRO RET One ae esl |
erable inconvenience, for the but it is our jerstandi that Ment with which he did not agree, ing with this problem, and to say |
anitien Departmen Tran:-: fAeesedlt direte under cae con. the. Hon. Mr. Hutson went on to that the House has nominated the | CIGA R i!
port.also has acute t diM- ditions suitable for Trans-Can- ®8Y- His opinion was that coral following as members, of such a}
cultiés, a Kesi 1 ada Air Lines. This is to be “id not become unsiable when Committee ss }
start the wor! tion. shecked tp; wet. Dr. H, G. Cummins, Mrs. E, E. | e
dT sincerely hope that the De- He then enquired from the , The Hon. the Colonial Secretary Bourne, Mr. L. A. Williams, Mr. |
partment can be persuaded to lei Molonial Secretary whether the "aa told them that the eastern F, C. Goddard, Mr. W. A. Craw-| We have
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952 BARBADOS ADVCCATI FéGe so
e - . Se ° } 1. KLIMis pure, safe mitk °
e
7T%7 oe A :
_ Equalisation Fund Bill Passed In Face Of Heavy Criticism ) 21m am |
; ” '
e , ‘ ‘ }
4 from page 6 been taken to use «the funds for sugar it was tantamount to another House had given con : hould never lose an oppor Mr. Adams tirst spoke of the KEIM qu
»_ He asked why effect a saving derived from the good years to saying that they had a Stabiliza- eee to the po Since tuni 7m Ba aes and out- eee. ecenns te sill and
= when there Ww: -a ‘ood advan e. tion Fund for the economy of the then, owever, ere a been a! r asquera Ing in every then saic nat it Was not a ques- iat o ‘ .
employment rad 6 een ° we island io aes were in a ay election, and he felt that at least, form to let the Union of South tion of being constitutional or not In pg et ag | waa nourishing KLIM
a not devise ways and means Bankrupt Policy protected from’ the point of view the present House should have Africa —. what they in _. constitutional. There were certain aol de rs mill Puactly che - ae
_ - : S ; 2: , was proposed bados an ther parts of the Em- ¢ 5 ney c They ° mney > same ount
spending some of the money “The floor of the House is not of having a Reserve Fund in case ne [=~ Was Oe ares sania ot thas ‘beknighted oe —— could oo me . y of important food essentials are yours in
_ create employment. He was a political platform,” Mr. Mott- of a calamity. He therefore ‘ ; 4 ¢ a pass a © ~~ every tin. KLIM’s uniformity is your assur-
. se 3 : Ss : os : In view of the statement issued Government. whether French goods were to be f 1 : '
ping that when the Estimates ley said. He happened to be a thought that the present money , ?" View ; ; - Mr. G. H. Adams (L) i that . ance of consistently fine milk!
. wing ¢ idered they Member of the Housing Board, should be used for social services by Government in its Memoran 0 Mr. ean . cetate. things Pea landed in Barbados. They were
‘ . S s s s s > : . : y 1952 here ere certs : ie; g rerei 5 » :
Id see * thi -_ and at times he felt that there or for the development of the ¢U™ to the Estimates for 1952 yuld not do and one was the pass- “°t,# Sovereign state ‘
see “something construc hould ‘Be ho but he besic econ r of the island 53, that it was the intention of coulc a ae ae = pase He said that every colonial Gov-
whereby the bad housing Sho more uses, but he basic economy o' le island. , the Government, in the absence ‘g of discriminatory legislation of ernor had instruction as to how 4. KLIMis excetient for growing children
wos b : was bound to a with the The existing social services, ; “ enat eeinae om tet Sort A me ow — :
bad tenantry roads might be ai : of the proposed fiscal survey, t legislation was to be passed. That
Saal Government that they should put Mr. Crawford said, “are woefully present the fullest background =e ‘ ae ae 5. KLIM ‘
L. A. Willi L caey. Dy reserves for the bad days. He deficient. In years like these, we available if the general financial , M*: ©. .1. Allder (I) said that was nothing to do with the Gov- . adds nourishment to cooked dishes
1 at ther a : mena felt that the policy expressed by should take every cent we position of the colony and to "© Would have supported the ernor’s reserve powers. To put in
ought on ‘Gin tai the ome the junior member for St. John can get our hands on and use it to determine its future financial and “mendment if it had said that the such an amendment would only 6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
wh was aéasenninn ohh ae rm regarding spending, =e not Ni improve and expand the basic economic policy for the next five one . Th Len 4 rd be een be emasculating the Bul i
ile te haleneae to tip ate 7 ing ates ene y. run the economy of the island. In a coun- years and that it was proposed to OVersea a ie a ony oo. 00 pov- = Mr. E. D. Mottley queried 7. KLIMis safe in the specially-packed tia
‘ ; e credit island into bankruptcy. try like this with one industry, present the Fiscal Survey af °'tY Stricken to Invest overseas. South Africa's passing a Bill say
rthe —- and = —_ which < Catt he. intended to maps you can take up money and in- Barbados to the Legislature in He said that though he felt as ing Barbadians being prevented
red e@ policy of good the Bill, there was one part of - : "|











e-keeping.

He did not feel that any so-
t would want to hoard up
Oney. nor was he one to share
t view. He did not think that
fovernment would encourage
try to accumulate surplus
mey in the Treasury and not
it for the good of the people,

single member would

That matter was contained

Commonwealth.

hich was purely deperident on

section if



it which he did not think one
support.
nm
section 3 of the Bill which pro-
vided for the investment of the
fund in any part of the British

He would except South Africa,
and what was more, he could not

it offended all the

vest it in any part of the world—
of the Commonwealth. It is sheer
nonsense,” he added.

and hinted



ngly as any on the question of
racial discrimination, he was prac-
tical enough to see that the ex-

May, the Bill should be delayed
until the Survey was presented.
Mr. Lewis abhorred the idea of

going to South Africa.
Mr. Adams replied that South
Africa was a Sovereign country.

8. KLIMis produced under strictest control

Take pure water, — K L i M










; ‘lusi f South Africa might only i nati
: “ , taxin, pple and not spe ee ; Y He referr the international
ie continued, we cannot afford the Beis for the sonatheretaal , hurting their own economy. Seioenian nt when a country add KLUM, “9 stir and yo Leah ~a
to have this money invested even of social ine 4 i Doing that would be to curtail the “®'* oes i =
in Pelican. Every cent should be Soahal oe ie apts ~~ out means of investing in the best oe eae, —_ ana apd FG have pure, safe milk
invested in Barbados, and inves- 3°" a : Or at place. ry, it should not make discrimin.- am foo =
ted at once.” ‘on @ when ban as ae Mr: W, A, Crawfora (6) said tory legislation against them, ‘ FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER v0". 1#00 Borden Co,



; . Mr. Crawford suggested that ondary schools. He urged further that South Africa was a country Mr, Crawford said that it w
mt he thought that they should Gueseamank train ee eo the money could be invested in a ® “bold programme of capital which had flouted all the canons Sheer hypocrisy to pass such a Bill fi
@ar in mind that the island’s hous be inveoted in. South cement industry, there being in a. on behalf of thé of international law and accepted Without inserting what the umer
bnomy was essentially based Africa. He therefore intended ‘Me island the material which er i, of Barbados, and warned canons of international justice, Ment sought to insert. They MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBE
the production of sugar cane to nines the deletion of that sub. COWld be used in its manufacture, at, in view of world conditions |p )¢, had got to do the exception Should express their feelir

a ats < ror { . , a
that British Guiana #24 threats of a war, it would vhere that country was concerned Were against that country






































- 7 rise . Jover or) nik @| int
infall. If one bore that factor other people in the country. They WS Contemplating manufacturing eae ee fr eens oe cause that country had shown |, eaten amet se ot
[mind, then he would under- should not take the ple’s this type of building material might as a result of a war, change ‘em in the most emphatic man- 10") made his second spec
nd the policy which Govern- money after they had welhed up trom Barbados lime stone. — hands, : ~ fer that they did not care what ji fo; mace his quali
Mt was adopting in the Bill. and down Bridgetown and He Was not Suggesting any blind He reminded members _ that civilised people thought and put~ the first “he would h ave express é
was evident that Govern- passed an- Address in the House ¢XPenditure of Government funds, other funds had been created, but ‘mg aside all morals and justice, vorind disagreement with
nt was budgeting on the cau- condemning the Malan Discrim- but most of them would welcome the House had never been given ‘hey were a law unto themselves point of tee. tn: his (eeees
s side. He would be the last imation Policy, and send it to ny departure from the old econ= the accounts of the various funds, &"« Were prepared to adopt the speech he qualified the previous
rson to support any measure South Africa to build railroads. omic policy, as a result of which and urged that accounts should "ost unorthodox, uneivilised, in- idea that it would be: impossible
ereby any surplus’ was built He thought it was a very sound the economy of the island could be given of the present Revenue human and brutal measures to sie Os diate “tary pass the Bill with the
=. and the money not uced for idea for Government to make be so strengthened that in case Equalisation Fund, pursue their own policy, There- inantvnent
" $ocial services, but he could not Provision for lean years, and ex- there was a drop in rainfall, in so Bent ‘ re he did not think that a8 “Ono could well sce what was thi
“Subscribe to the view that com- °¢?t for what he had to say about far as their basic industry was te ane Dr. Cummins (L} colonial legislators, they need attitude of the Secretary of State
: parisons should be. made be Atri ee somnell ‘en eat Soonene they would be a little ingens en ee the steady concern themselves with the for the Colonies who was a blu
E r ° as 2,money spe tie -onstitutions roce-~ prs Te
_ tween the economies of the the Bill. ithe — — Nec expressed the Education, Medical Bervises, old a of constitutional proce= piooded Tory and knowing th
United States or Canada, and Mr. Crawford (©) said that view that the money should be 28° Pension, water, roads, housing, \ tt f fact, almost al) Present attitude of the British
Barbados. It was a fallacy to do ; y Snould be school buildings ar d other items AS a matter ¢ act, alunos Government with respect to South
sc, Or to cugges; that Barbados eae ye icdene the SOL Spent on economic development, since 1939 BS and other items ine racial laws passed by South Africa |
should follow the United States ie adtenatod te ~~ .. nae Eero eae He said that they knew they ™ - ee a meee He then went on to make “_ |
‘* i 3 § é s as, 3 ra . a Se ee eptec ands s p 3 - suggestions of ge x ove 18 |
: whose economy was far more body had cried “shame”. He, Mr. respcet, he suggested that the set- te — mousse badly and they in- tionality , ointed ‘I s “e saat . Un on
flexible. . ; ; ended to continue their building pointed clause, “except tl ion |
Crawford was guilty of the inter- ting up of an Industral Corpora- programme, r of South Africa,” such as naming | “
The Rainfall jection, and he had cried “shame” tion which would bring ina num- — As to public baths, he said that MF A. E S. Lewis (LL) en- the other colonies and excluding |
in reply to certain statements by ber of industrial consultants or he was surprised to hear an at- ‘ivired what was the position with that country, If you feel worn out, depressed, or
Any one who travelled through the introducer of the Bill, that the experts to establish a few more tack on such a question when it ‘es@rd to the constitutional law Mr. Lewis remarked that he
the various parishes could see the government considered the policy industries in the island. He re. should be widely known that pub- The Dominion of South Africa jad ‘heard constitution opiniot generally run down a glass or two
varying effect of the rainfall in enunciated in* the Bill “good peated that he could not subscribe lic baths was a matter for local Could say that no person from before which had turned out to | y
places like St. Lucy and St, house-keeping,” and if there was to the policy of putting by money Government. Whenever Govern- 'arbados should come there and je bogus opinion. It was laid| a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
Philip, as compared with parish- an excess of revenue over expen- for rainy days in the face of un- Ment was approached for loans for ‘t seemed that Barbados could not Gown that they could lay down uickly restore lost energy and
es like St, Andrew, St. Joseph enone pe by soared oe Screener mnent and unemploy- Building public baths, they had ®4Y ae ae one from there aronia terms stating how they could spend | q y sy
and St. John, where perhaps, the rainy days. That was the basis of ment. ranted them, come ‘nere was 6 pacUrar re

canes could remain in the fields the governments’ statement.



apalling housing conditions in
this country, and he knew that
no “ne would want to hoard up
money in the Treasury. At pres~
ent they were getting a good
price for their sugar, but no one
knew what the pdsition would
be within the years ahead.
Those were things which had
to be borne in mind, and he did

supported the junior member for
St. John without knowing it.
Imagine the senior member for
the City not being able to appre-
ciate the point that if some of the
money were used for the devel-

sure the economy of the island.

fore afraid, failing to realise that
care shown by the other people
was not because they were so
furiously
fare of the colony, but because
they felt that
called upon to contribute to a

rrectl ted. He s € :
opment of a large scale irrigation greater extent whensoever the had distingtly "dala tat ie oe THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE
project in the colony, it would in= financial position of the colony jlisation fund for cushioning the |

became impaired,














heir money and he was convinced | tone up the whole nervous system.
He opined that the colony would _ Of, course money should be of commonwealth law which 4, : P Y












; that no constitutional law could |

for another six months. He was amazed to think that be justified in borrowing money $PCMt,to establish good irrigation, could prohibit them from saying take that right away from them, | Giving new vitality it fortifies you

One had to bear in mind that the spokesman for a Socialist for industrial expansion, if they oa Spot Member for St. Philip here their money should be in- They were merely saying that they |
with the uncertainty of rainfall, Government in’ 1952 could repeat did not have it to use of their own. dation a age ae irri< \ested did not wish the money invested | against fever and exhaustion and
provision should be made for the the old “laissez faire” attitude in They should be justified in putting equipment was obtained me she Mr. E. DP. Mottley reiterated his ‘here: remember, Buckfast Tonic:Wins
day when there was Jow rain- economics which were outmoded, the island in debt if by so doing. United Ritiedom ‘wad becanes of points about discrimination and .. Mr. E. W. Barrow (1) said that ’
fall, and a corresponding low at least from the time Queen Vic- they could expand the economy of the controls, they were war aie id th % there were times in ones the Whole purpose of the Bill was is especially valuable
crop ,and therefore he did not toria left the Throne. the colony lowed to get’ what equipment they life when one realised from Contrary to all the accepted prin-| | /}Rg 4,
think that any progressive mem- With regard to the comments Mr * , ; wanced, The Government intend- \ hence » had come and how ¢iPles with which he had been| Pha after illness.
ber would say that Government of the senior member for the City, Mr. Crawford attributed gov- oq to spend money for equipment | vance Pe wail He Sata ho acquainted from the time he was | : Y Will
was trying to accumulate sums of one could hardly imagine that an 2: ig policy to the fact that for irrigation when it was avail- (05° Sys Brin ~ i sae ice studying. One could only con } ede LG
money in the Treasury ang did individual who had been so suc- office the assumed the reins of able. veptes fo . ‘St I erty Gata aioe elude that the person who con. | NT ; “a
not want to spend it on behalf of cessful in private life to talk such pheo oni yi taunted that He said that the Senior Member the arguments given if he would .celved the idea of a Revenue]
the people, “infantile nonsense” as he had bankru : ee lave the colony for St. Philip knew that the stab- a re as Testi dy 1a: Equalisation Funda had never |

He himself was aware of the talked. As a matter of fact, he had he age oy ore, there- ilisation fund was for the sugar °°cept them, if he were a “play-

On page 10

v e
ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN | |

industry and could not be spent !!@y” lawyer.
for anything esle and he was mis-
leading the community when he
tried to make that plea,

At this point, Mr, Crawford rose
and objected that he was being in-










interested in the wel-




wucerany §

BUCKFAST

they would be



industry in case of a bad year, . Your skin will be cooler, sweoter...

If they borrowed money and He added that it was false to

not think Government should be
accused of trying to accumulate
reserves and not spend money
on social services for the benefit
of the people.

Signifying his intention to sup-
port the Bill, Mr. Mottley (E)
said that the member for
St. John (Mr. Vaughan) had
made a fine political speech in
his contribution to the discus-
sion on the Bill. It was not for
him, Mr. Mottley, to offer any
defence for the Government, but
as he listened to the Junior mem-
ber for St. John, he could not but
think that he was listening to a
political speech from a young-
ster like the junior member for
St. Lucy, who had just sat down.

It was a wonderful Budget

_ speech which the junior member
for St. John had made, and in

_ spite of it, he was going to sup-

port the Bill. He thought that

_ when it was first intimated that

+ they should have a Reserve Fund,

whether one was conservative or

socialist, one was bound to see
that the idea was a sound one.
The junior member for St.
_ John really took him off guard
_ with his reference to the figures
for the past ten years on the pro-
duction and price of sugar, but
he would only say that the floor
of the House was not the appro-
priate place to fight litical
battles. However, one felt about
the Administration during the
past ten years, he must admit
that the social services and the





Nothing Done

Mr. Crawford recalled that for
nearly a decade now, a ten-year
development programme for Bar-
bados proposed the financing of a
£1,000,000 large-scale irrigation
project for the island, and said
that so far as that was concerned
nothing had as yet been done to
implement the suggestion.

While Government could have
claimed that finance restricted the
programme some years ago, but
now they had a healthy balance,
and nobody knew when there
would be a year that the rainfall
would be below average, now was
the time to embark on the irriga-
tion project so as to insure that
rainfall or no rainfall, the crop
of the island would not fall below
average.

He thought that there were two
factors to bear in mind. It was
correct to say that in Barbados a
single crop, and up to now, with-
out irrigation, it was dependent

invested it wisely and soundly,
he was of opinion that although
it would increase the public
debt, the economy of the country
would be far better off. In other
words, they should have no
reason to be afraid of increasing
the public debt if in so doing
they sought to strengthen the
economic structure of the colony,

He believed that the statements
made by the junior member for
St. John deserved the utmost
consideration by all the members
of the Chamber. The mere infer-
ence to be drawn from section 3
of the Bill, that there were places
even within the Commonwealth
which would be willing to use
some of the island’s money in
order to improve conditions in
their own particular country,
should be enough to make mem-
bers realise that Barbados should
consider doing the same thing, if
even they had to borrow money,
much less when Barbados had its
own money which could be used
for economic and social improve-

upon rainfall. They had also to ment.
bear in mind that the island was :

; He had much pleasure in
in the fortunate position of having seconding the motion by the

a guaranteed price for the next
eight years. In connection witn
that (the guaranteed price) they
had the Stabilisation Fund which
was already in six figures, and
which was created especially for
the purpose of cushioning any
shock brought about by de-
creased crops as a result of de-
creased rainfall, or after 1959

junior member for St, John, that
the Bill be completely rejected.
Government did not even offer
a compromise and say, the fund
should be used every other year,
but was asking them to dig their
hand into the public funds to the






say that they deliberately taxed
the people to create the reserve
fund. Those were the main points
to which he intended replying. |

desirably dainty from head-to-toe





“"if you bathe with fragrant



Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Soap.
the Bill was now put and was de- 2 °
feated by a 11—5 majority, Those
voting for the rejection were |
Messrs C. E, Talma, J. C. Mott-|,)
|
‘

The motion for the rejection |



ley, W. A. Crawford, V B
Vaughan and O, T. Allder.

Those against were: Messrs
L. E. Smith, T. O. Bryan, R, G
Mapp, E. W. Barrow, F. L, Wal-
cott, G. H. Adams, M, E, Cox, |
L. A. Williams, J. E, T. Brancker, }
F, Goddard and Dr. Cummins, |

A debate which lasted nearly
two hours was introduced when|
the Bill went into Committee. The
debate was lead off by Mr. E. D. {
Mottley (E) who called for the
House to insert in the clause that
none of the funds were to be in-
vested in the Union of South | }j}
Africa because of the racial dis- } }))
crimination which was practised
there

Clause three of the Bill stated
that subject to certain provisions
the Accountant General should in
vest all or any part of the fund ir
any securities of, or guaranteed by
the Government of any part of th: |
British Commonwealth, or in othe:
securities as the Accountant Gen
eral with the approval of the |
Secretary of State, might in hi
discretion select. Mr. E, D. Mott



any decrease in the price which

expenditure of capital works,
they were getting for their sugar

whether it be on roads, schools,
housing, that opportunity had



SHOP WINDOW TO THE
WORLD




FOR

1952

Visit Britain in May for the
most famous of all national! trade
fairs. Nowhere clase can be seen
such a vast and varied display of
new products designed for the
world by a single country.

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR
MAY 5-16 - LONDON - BIRMINGHAM

INFORMATION about exhibitors, catalogues, special
displays and facilities at the Fair can be obtained from
the United Kingdom Trade Commiszioner at Port of Spain
or Comptroller of Customs, Bridgetown.







If they had a Stabilization Fund



tune of $150,000, especially in a ley wanted inserted after “Brit- |

country where the basic industry ish Commonwealth” the word

wes dependent on rainfall. “with the exception of Sout
Mr. A. E, 8S. Lewis (L) pointed Africa”.

out that when the idea of having
the Reserve Fund

|
|

\
|
|
|
|
|
|
'
}
|
}



BARGAINS FOR
MEN !

AMERICAN SOCKS formerly .... $1.00 pr.
| NOW 2 for $1.00

SHIRTS formerly $4.00 & $5.00
iow $2.40 & $2.64 ea,

| STRIPED POLO SHIRTS



Mr. J. E. T. Brancker (L) wii

was mooted, seconded the motion said that



BARGAINS FOR
WOMEN!

SPUNS formerly










FORT

aie juaay $1.40 yd.
NOW ore aren.

BORDERED SILKS formerly ...... 89 y
NOW $1.00 yd.
sieht seuss $140 yd,
NOW 96c. Yd.

HUNDREDS OF OTHER LINES AND
RAYON PIECE GOODS OF
UNHEARD-OF VALUES



CREPES formerly






—for

longer me

for Men and Boys formerly

44 SHOES formerly ............ $6.00 pr.
= : . we ae NOW $2.00 & $3.00 pr.
service ee eT eee



Size 4-6 Formerly $4.41 Pr. =. a

CLARK'S CHILDREN SHOES 2m"
THE BARGAIN
HOUSE

S. ALTMAN — Proprietor.

SMOOTHER DRIVING





r



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.) the

Dial 2702

w
o
wn
=
>
z
wm
+
zx
m
mâ„¢
=







CLASSIPIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508. ~ REAL ESTATE





E NG AGEM

FRANK BRAUN



Miss DOREEN REECE

Saturday between Doreen Reece,

ter of Mr. and Mrs. Reece of Fontabelle





52, at hey 13.2.52-—t.f.n,
Hall se
Her funeral leave

an, to- ; c
Brethten| Ramcharan, Phone 2122, or Cole & Co., sized living room, open verandah, kitchen SS. Lady Rodney, 4,908 tons net,



Georgeana Smith.
the above addres

ith
doughtex-in-law

THANKS

» undersigned de
this medium to t
who sent wreaths and cards

of condolence and «
eral of our dea





> fun~] p





c un berbatch



a
» undersigned by this
medium beg to thank all those frends
and brethren who a
expressed th



dearly beloved George

IN MEMORIAM





ather and Grand-father /





Kneeling together i

In



PERSONAL

The publie are hereby
giving credit to my
as I do not hold m

responsible for her :
g any debt or



against
wife DORIS N
elf



Collymore Rock,



against | Gi
ERMIN SMALL
YN) as I do not hold my-
or anyone else

giv'ng eredit to my wife



self responsible for

ie | 3.2.52—t.f.n. 119 x 10 x 8 TERMS CASH. R. Archer

name unless by written order signed

CLARENCE SMALL
Mare



—_—— NYLON STOCKIN

The public are hereby warned against} in all modern shades and sizes. Guaran-| for sale by auction at the Courtesy
CELESTINE | teed long lasting, only best quality at) Gay '
DOREEN REDMAN
as I do not hold | Swan Street. 27,2,52—1n
OY OC
or debts in NOW that the price of Dettol has in-

order creased, try “STREPH” the complete

myself respons ble

y name unless
signed by me,
SAMUEL PETER REDMAN,
C.S.M. Curacao,
(16,2.52)





LOST & FOUND





Oe tisaes TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti- | to P.O, Box 280.”

Kendal, | [€! Condition, excellemt eqquiprmennt, gO | meer
21m} racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.; YOUNG LADY—ftelligent Young

SWEEPSTAKE
1506, Series H
return same to James Williams,



were as —— nn | 5) and 9.00 am. C. BA. RICE & CO
John. HOUSE—Two Storey House near 26
27.2.52—1n}| Aquatic Club; fully furnished including | —_———_—__—.

FOR RENT

HOUSES

Complete first Moor
, Double bedroon

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET--
please return
Grant Crookerdale, Sherbourne, St.





, Hotel





New ; Lashley No, 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.



BERESFORD

wi NSL ow Ce
November | 128 the Estate of Cecilia Pilgrim, late af 27.2,52—2n

and ‘Deveviber



SPE } are hereby required to send in particu-

Barbados per Club
RENT

space at $3.00 per run-

Meeting, 1952.
Apply to
pahaobvins§
GOOCSSOOOO OS 564004 |

Just Received...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply
Order To-day at

«a»
G. W. Hutchinson
& CO, LTD.
Broad Street



10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

EASTER CARDS
MOTHER’S DAY



Spanish—English, English—Spanish
Everything Shakespeare ever

‘over 800 pages).
GLASS JARS §1.50

at
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS
CURIOBIDADES,
DE LA INDIA OHINA eo

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 346¢

















PUMLIC SALES | Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay







FOR SALE





GALOW-—Modern 4 Bedroom
low, situated at Top Rock, Ch. Ch.,

of land Having 2 fully tiled
and Baths, built-in Cupboards, | wif. Sch

Marea Henrietta, Sch. Emeline, Sel



Garden well Iwd out with|Prankiyn DR
Dua trance, Best offer £4,000 accepted. |g 5
. Pogtession
months oid, Mileage lar Apply Ralph Beard, Le
condition as new. Apply |Ppone 50)
Lower Bay Street, Phone: i | Catharir
Py wer ———— ——_| Catharina

26.2.62—3n } HOUSE Ons doubled roofed board







ARRIVALS



CAR—1947 Ford Super de Luxe V-8
ndition. Adways owner driven
Ring 4433 or 8635. GC. B. Jackman,

out offices, apply to Barbados Housing|D. W. Sorrell, from Martinique



Street 26.2.52—2n.| Mario Texo, from Trinidad
DEPARTURES



CAR--One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon

hor my -1S Jelis ci
in exeallent condition. Contact C. J.| G2Use: $i conveniences, with party Wells, for St. Lucia

and utiliey’ room. Garage, laundry, 2/ Capt. A. Le Blanc, for St. Vincent.
servant zones ane storage room under
On attractive hillside site, Rockley New Si li
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476 eawe
18.2.52—t.f.n

Ltd, Phone 4316 26.2.52-—4n,



'T LAND: 5.000 sq. ft of Land situated | tem Trinidad :

wwh Sedan. F
i climber. Good tyre
o2--3n












1950 Wolseley 6/80 10,000 miles
xcellent condit on 1951 Morris Minor
11,000 miles. A-1 condition. Fort Royal
Garage Ltd. Telephone 4504

27.2.52—4n
ELECTRICAL LAND—EXCELLENT BUILDING SITE | Victor Christine, Graves
The undersigned will offer for sale | ce} ‘ ;
G.E.C. FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES to public competition at_ their office DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
Wholesale and Retail CITY GARAGE | James Street on Friday the 28th February ON MONDAY
CO., 4671 21,.2.52—t.f.n iat 2 p.m. 3 Acres 34% perches of land | Fer Trinidad :

Moody, C. Moody, G. Taylor
From St, Vineent:





Apprex 20,5001, at Derricks,
St. James, 128 {t. frontage on the main
r with 15-minute us service. May
d in two lots. Price reasonable, Dial

J. N. Barker 27.2.52—7n



bin, Arthur Lashley
From Martinique ;















Desk Console Fully repaired, excellent | land has a frontage on the Maxwell Long | Arthur Dressissiger, Arthur Carson,

onditior $220.00 Ma be n}| Road of 126 feet and over 900 feet along | Franco Gentili, Alicia Gentili, Greaves
DaCost Ring write Timp another public road running along its | Stoker, Hugh Belle, Leontina Mahmood,
{School 95-236 entire length. Vacant possession available. | Gerald Maingot





For further particulars inspection and | Fer Martinique :









estate work. Going at good price
ply Williams, Foster Hall atation
or Dial 95261.

16.2.52—6n. | Willian Kewley, Dorothy Kewley.
- |For Grenada;







'
{
=A HORSE—One good riding hors
i

Church, situate at KING STREET,|Rawle Forde. Lionel Grimes, C

AND CHARS closed gallery, drawing and dining eae : :
square tables with | rooms, 2 bedrooms. kitchen, usual con- | *°™ neent ;

“Ideal for bridge tables | veniences. Water and electric services Margaret Manning, David Nurtay.

andah furniture. Come in and installed. Inspection on application to} In Touch With Barbados









th 2







the our new show room dial | the Tenant, Mrs. Bustace Gooding, any
513€ R. Hunte & Co., Ltd day, (except Sunday) from noon to 5 Coastal Station
an | p.m Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd. advise
The house bf be set up a — bY | that they can now communicate with
* : public competition at our office, James | the following ships through their Barba-
MISCELLANEOUS Street, ve on Thursday 26th | dos Coast Station
instant at am, 8.8, Willemsts s. Casablanca, 8.
» con-1” AQUARIUMS—Large and small, ati | '™* YEARWOOD & BOYCE, | campero, s 8 Maurcianiay ss. Regent
name | glass. Empty or stocked with Fish and Solic tors. Jaguay, s,s, Atlantic Duke, os. salle
plants, Also some young Siamese Fight- 22.2.52—60 | pol, Ne Anisterdam, s.s. Joh
Fish and other Tropical Fish. Archie Mage A ee Se eee
ing ‘is rf. Chandris, 4.8. Ariguani, ss. Christian
Clarke, Dial 5148.



24.2,52—5n AUCTIO

Silver Star, as. S, Rosa/wm











Temrengeneegne rochiinancinipeenaepaancnente —_————__—_—————————————— 1ey¥, Ss. Ocean Monare' “ara

ANTIQUES — of every description] | wili sell on Thursday 28th at | p.m nae Uckinue roan 3 “Fizvias f ae
is; China, old Jewels, fine Silver/ at BATH VILLAGE Chrst Church, ‘on board Trader, s.s. Lancero 3.8 Bomana
ercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-} road to Cable & Wireless St ro;

|s.s, Ancap Tercero, s.s. Mardene, s.s



graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop| qouble roofed house cov
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. Shingles, and a small galleny. Size:

Hinakura, ss Hermes/perg. s.s







McKenzie, Auctioneer.
EGGS: Sittings of pure bred Leghorn

CS
Eggs of neers eoen Apply to CARS—Morris Minor Saloon 1951 Mode} MAIL NO T ICES

Garnett Ashby, Rock Hall near Penny |9,000 miles. Austin A 70 Saloon 1951] Mails for S, Lucia, ©. Vincent, Gren-
Hole, St. Philip 27.2.52—1n | Model 6,000 miles. Both slightly damaged | ada and Se by the MLV. Hectaua



in accidents
Lovely Quality] We are instructed to offer these vehicles | Post Office as under :—



» on Fyiday 29th at 2 p.m m., >
of} $1.48 Pair. Get from KIRPALANI, 52 JOHN M. BLADON & CO,, p.m.on the 27th February, 1962.

Auctioneers AMENDED MAIL NOTICES





Antisept'c for personal and medical use,
Price 2/- bot. KNIGHT’S LTD.

WANTED eval Post eevee as under ;—-

Parcel





26.2,52—2n Mail 2 1 Bm, Ordinary* Mail at 2 p.m,
een on the 27th February, 1952

OlL—The wirld’s finest motor oll Mails for S, Vincent, M ique -

Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service HELP eee, io ee, a5

Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.







VEEDOL. “Found wherever fine cars} CAPABLE NURSE -- Must sleep in| will be closed at the General Post Offite
travel”. 17.2.52—t.f.n, | and be willing to do housework. Apply] as under

to Mrs. J. A. Millington, “Jamdor,""} Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none | Maxwells Road, Ch: Ch, 26.2,52—2n.| Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30

better — 10-Ib. lots and vprees @ 19c.
per Ib. Phone 2547,





pm. on the 27th exe 1952,
2—t.fn “JUNIOR SALESMAN required ch efly RA TES OF
for Hardware Lines. Apply in writing il
2.2.52—4.f.n









FEBRUARY — 1952
CANADA
(Including Newfoundland)
No offers. Wicks, Telephone 3289.

18.11.51—t.f.n | Apply by letter and in person between

2—2n | 73.5% pr. Cable



Fridge, and Gas Stove. Telephone and
Radio installed, available from the Ist.| Applications in writing are invited for
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-|the post of fulltime Secretary (male).
letting would like agreement settled as | Salary approximately $200.00 per month,
he is leaving the Island shortly For | according to qualifications. Successful
viewing; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay | applicant must assume duties not later
Street. Phone 5010, 26.2.52—3n | than Ist May, perferably earlier, Further
details may be obtained from the present
MODERN FURNISHED ¥LAT—with | Secretary, Applications giving details of

Sliver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing. | past experience a copies of testimonis ES "
th

For further particulars. Apply to Alma | should be sent by th February to 3 Days

Chamber of Commerce, Bovell & Skee te ty first sition af Nixo.

wort vs away pimples
23.2,52—t.f.n. | Bldg., Lucas Street Nixoderm tonight






















53
Pony |









woe — 16.2.53-—6n 1 Avil! soon see your skin bes
| 1 aa 5 aren ana-¢ ear, Nixo-
ne ie y that kills
HLIC NOTICES MISCELLANEOUS . nil pas sits . pn tin thas
¢ ‘ Jails e lotches,

acneetitlctenbcaihesisetsiiiabtcng again hodtionngeees Hevema, Ting wart and. Erupti
NOTICE YOUNG Business lady (white) requires Youean tget rid Of your oF uptions.
| a permanent “board” accommodation, All you remove the germs that hide
| IS HEREBY given that all persons] meals or breakfast only would suit iu the tiny pores of your skin. So

get Nixoderm from your chemist to-
d ler the positive guarantee that
Nixoderm wilt banish pimples and
ear your skin soft and smooth o¢

having any debt or claim upon or affect- Reply — Box R. C/o Advocate Co,

92 East 126th Street, Manhattan, New
si | York in the United States of America








iLISH SHORTHAND TYPIST



+ THIkkA & money
Qn | Who died in the United States of Americ: qu'r ermanent position, Several years Bw back
7 Y » 3 7 5 °
; on the 25th day of August 1950 intestate, experience, Good speeds. Reply Box ixoderm return ot
Co 2771.2.52—2n empty
For Skin Troubles package.

Z. C/o Advoc



s of their claims duly attested to me
the undersigned Caleb Neblett, the

: qualified Administrator of the estate ot | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE |
‘,

the sald Cecilia Pilgrim, deceased,
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfiel thei: The application of Enid Sargeant o
Eilerton, St. George for permission tc |

|

|

|

|












THE BOY SCOUTS
ASSOCIATION
Barbados Branch
Members of the Island

Scout Council are hereby

reminded that the Special

Meeting of the Council, of

which notice has already

e at James Street, Bridgetown, on or

. efore the 4th day of April 1952 after ell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
which date I shall proceed to distribute | board and galvanized shop attached tc

8 th aexets of the said estate among the | residence at Ellerton, St. George “

> | parties entitled thereto having regard to Dated this 25th day of February, 1952

the debts and claims only of which a| ToC. W. RUDDER, Esq

@ | shall then neve had notice and that 1} Police Magistrate

¥ | shall not be liable for assets so distributed District “B"

Nj to any person of whose debt or claim 1| JOHN SARGEANT,

\ | shall not have had notice at the tim e| for Apphcant









of such distribution N.B.—This application will be con- : 4
S$] And all persons indebted to the said | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held i Cm we Oe held at
estate are requested to settle their ac-| at Police Court, District “B’, on Mon out Headquarters at 5
4 | counts without delay | day the 10th day of March, 1952 at 11 p.m, next Friday, 29th Feb-

‘clock, a.m



~ DATED the 30th day of January, 1952. |
CALEB NEBLETT, | c, W. RUDDER,

|
1
|
|
|
| ruary.
Administrator Estate Cecilia Police Magistrate, Dist. “B"
|

L, A, HARRISON,

Pilgrim, deceased 27.2.52-——11 Honorary Secretary,





aera eee nee —









REMOVAL NOTICE
PAUL WILKIN & €0.

SHOE MANUFACTURERS
And



RALPH BEARD'S
SHOWROOMS

Standing on 6,800 sq. ft., having a Covered Floor
Space of 6,000 sq. ft. upstairs and downstairs.
Four Show Windows. Frontage 72 ft.

EASILY CONVERTED
into six Offices Ist Floor, 3 large Shops Downstairs
LIGHT, COOL and CENTRAL
THREE ‘OILETS ARE INSTALLED
also LIGHT and POWER FITTINGS

RETAILERS OF
FOOTWEAR MATERIALS

announce thelr removal from
Corner James and Coleridge
Streets to premises formerly
occupied by D’arcy Scott's
Central Auction Mart on
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3720
24.2.52.—3n.



————————



THE ABOVE PROPERTY IS
AVAILABLE WITH POSSESSION
MARCH 3ist 1952

Best Offer Over £12,000 accepted

Further. Particulars, Apply RALPH BEARD
Lower Bay Street
"PHONE 5010



one 4640

Yj

ch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch. Sunshine
R., Sch Wonderful Counsellor, Sch

Mary M_ Lewis, Sch. Marion Belle
ng | n Burma D., Sch. Emanuel
« savages, Servants’ rooms and|C Gordon, Sch. Cyril E Smith, Sch
rox Sch United Pilgrim,
Sunrover, MV Cacique Dei
Ist March, Further particu-|Caribe, Gch. Rainbow M., Sch D'Ortae,
Bay St.|MV_ Lady Patricia, Seh Frances W.

tn |}Smith, MV Caribbee, Yacht Marea

& shingled house, shedroof, kitchen and SS Mauretania, 19,691 tons net, Capt

Co-operation, 3rd Floor, No. 6, Swan SS Campero, 4,563 tons net, Capt

TS apne es
HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom MV. Dearwood, 94 tons net, Capt.

cutsnmnnlnippmmngememneeniaien | SEMVAL BY B.A. on tenbay

in Pitts Village, St, Jomes, near public | 4. Splerman, W. Ralph, A. Parkinson,
oad. Must be sold at once, Apply: g Parkinson, 1 Parkinson, 1. Park-
Gilbert M lar, Fitts Village, St. James. | 80R, BR. Cheesman, M. Cheesman, P

52—1n | Gheesman, BR Castie, G Castie, A

Cyril Barnard, Hazel Barnard, David
Barnard, Charles Lawson, Bertie Cor-

Paul Siegel, Alice Siezel, Jean Rebil-
let, Jacqueline Rebillet, Rose Marie,
Graves, Mas-

ert ideally situated for building sites at Harry Anderson, Georgina Anderson,
1 | RADIOGRAM—1950 G.E.C. Radiogram | Moxwell Long Road, Christ Church. This | Luther Wooding, Robert Ferguson,

* ~ conditions of sale apply to Howard Wolfe, Martha Wolfe, Ralph
LIVESTOCK HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, Goldsmith, Isabel Goldsmith, ' George
4 Solicitors, Goodfellow, Hildergarde , Goodfellow,

e suitable James Strect.| Parker McComas, Rheda McComas,

“OLIVEES"—A chattel dwellinghouse | Anthony Garcia, Joseph Kaltenbacher,
standing on lands of Saint Mary’s|Helen Kaltenbacher, Tegfryn Johns,

Bridgetown, The house, which is near | Forte, Coleridge Miller, Eyre Shepherd,
Seventh Day Adventist Chureh, contains Reginald Price, Doris ‘Harding, onas

Holm, s.s. Empress of Scotland, s.s.
a, 5.8. Lady

Multah, s.s. N, O. Rogenaes, 3.8. Sten-
tor, ss. Drina, s.s. Atlantic Traveller,

26.2.52—30 | Greenhaven Trails, s.s. Angelina Lauro.

Del Caribe will be closed at the General
Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30

24.2.52—4n | Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
| Antwerp and Amsterdam by the S.S
| Willemstad will be closed at the Gen-

at 10 am. Registered

tisua, S. Kitts, S. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S S_ Fort. Townshend

YCHANGE

Lady for our Office to assist with books. | 73.5°¢ pr, Cheques on Bankers 71.8% pr.
Demand Drafts 71.65% pr.
Sight Drafts 71.5% pr.

72% pr. Currency 70.3% pr.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Coupons 99.6% pr.






































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES | §HIPPING NOTICES

|ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIF co. |

SAILING FROM EUROPE

HERSILIA, Ist March, = |
85. * BRATTINGSRORG, Ijth "Mare . 1958.
8.8. COTTICA, 2ist 1952.
SAILING 70 PLYMOUTH AND



Invitation for Tender

»
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS, AND TRANSPORT
SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary's

Orifice up to 12 noon on the &th March, 1952, for the supply of Barba-
dos Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of
Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from
e ist April, 1952.

2. A separate tender for each division tendered for should be

submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: -—

(a) Northern Division—Parishes of St, Lucy and St. Peter.

(b) Southern Division—Parishes of Christ Church, St. Philip
and St. John.

(c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Joseph.

(4) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
St. Thomas and St, James.

A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate

te wins for any combination of Divisions tendered for under paragraph
2 on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spor
anywhere within the Division” read “on spot ahywhere within com-
bined Division.”

4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen,

and particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be
obtained on application at the Department of Highways and Trans-
port.

5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at

the Colonial Secretary’s Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
($5.00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-
tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them
refunded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Tréasury.

6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages

at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rate per
cubie yard at which the tender would contract to supply materials
on spot anywhere within the Division.

27.2.52.—3n.



VACANT POST OF CLERK, LABOUR WELFARE
(HOUSING LOANS) ORGANISATION

Applications are invited for appointment to the post of Junior

Clerk in the Labour Welfare (Housing Loans) Organisation.

2. Candidates must be in possession of a School Certificate or

a certificate of equivalent standard.

3. The salary scale of this post will be similar to that of the

long grade in the Local Civil Establishment, with a commencing
salary of $768.00 per annum,

4. This post is of a temporary nature, non-pensionable and

subject to termination by one month’s notice on either side.

5. Applications in writing, with testimonials, will be received
the Colonial Secretary, Colonial Secretary’s Office, Bridgetown,

up to the 15th March, 1952.



| ' ssieatniesteee namabninenteeereneneeimenemnenemeeeniememaemansiemmenenmemmmmmennmmmemeamanemmanae

WHITEWOOD HEACHES

This is a beautifully wooded choice beach area situated near the
Four Winds Club. Plans are under way to build some very attrac-
tive bungalows. Further particulars from MARTIN GRIFFITH,
four Winds Club. Telephone between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m, 91-40







These Items await your
Ordering

Smorgan’s Vienna Sausages — Klim — Ovaltine — Cup
Chocolate — Weinz Malt Vinegar — Bird’s Jelly Crystals
Bridal Icing Sugar — Boxes L. B. Laundry Starch — Fry's
Breakfast Cocoa — Tomato Soup — Tins “Ufillit” Bis-
cuits — Fancy Tins Crawford's Assorted Biscuits — “Jack
Straws” — Marmite — Spanish Queen Olives — Morton's
Jams — Lidano Sweet Milk Cocoa — Club = Cheese
Biscuits -— Milo.

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LT

FURNITURE AUCTION

WE ARE INSTRUCTED to undertake a complete
CLEARANCE SALE at

RALPH PEARD’S SHOWROOMS

BAY STREET

|











on Monday and Tuesday the 3rd and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

All china, cutglass, silver, vases, bowls, smal! antiques.
cutlery, kitchen utensils, electric fans, table lamps, golf
clubs, mahogany trays, powder compacts, table mats,
trinket boxes, cigarette boxes, hot plates, bath-mats, pic-
tures, cork mats, dunlopillo and spring mattresses, pillows,
ironing tables, medicine cabinets, tricycles, stepladders,
bookends, hardware, beach shirts, bathing trunks, electric
office clock, ice water container, quantity of toys, and
other small items to be sold at commencement of sale.
To be followed by the extensive collection of furniture in
mahogany, birch, pine, deal (pelished, painted and natural
finish). Numerous dining tables, kitchen tables, ward-
robes, dressing tables, vanity tables, writing desks and
bureaux, bedsteads and springs, divans, china cabinets,
upholstered lounge suites, easy chairs (of all types),
bookshelves, cocktail tables (all varieties), presses, tall
boys, oak court cupboard, typists’ desks, filing cabinets,
combination safe, electric stove (G.E.C.), American
refrigerator (8 cu. ft.), larders, rockers, rush seated chairs,
rush rockers, counters, drink coolerator. candy’ floss
machine, grand piano and numerous other articles.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS


















‘Phone 4640 Plantations Building




REAL ESTATE

e
- Plantations Huilding.
}

JOHN M. BLADON & CO

A.F.S. F.V.A.

THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION.

S. WILLEMSTAD, 26th February, 1952.
SAILING TOP AND
RITTS

8. P, MUSSON, SON &



Canadian National Steamships



“LADY RODNEY” . ee oe
“LADY NELSON”
“CANADIAN CRUISER”



NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails

he ik oe





Sailings from iaenton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,

“COLOMBIE” ... be
“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” ..,

“COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 .... 23rd April, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” 19th May, 1952 .... 13th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952 .... 13th June, 1952



aaa aa '

“

PAG ALES

RY







Oe ee | el

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952














M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
canine’ will aceept Cargo and
Passengers for St. Lucia, St
Vincent, Grenada and Aruba,
Saling Wednesday 27th inst

The M/V. ““MONEKA” will ac-

cept Cargo and Passengers for

4, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
7th Mareh 1952.

The M/V. “CLARA” will accept

AMSTERDAM

TTINGSBORG, 27h March, 1062 c and Passengers for Nassau
+8. A’ , 5 + ‘argo ‘or
SAmLING, 4 ro TRINIDAD FARAMARIBO and Bahamas. Date of sailing to
NATE, Toth hy, 7 f
M.S. BON. arc:
$.8. COTTICA,” 7th ion B.W.1. SCHOONER | OWNERS’
2 i {INC,)



March, }!
Agents.







Arrives _ Sails
Vinca tal Biles Sentem Garbudes Barbados
13 2 to. 15 Feby. 25 Feby. 25 Feby.
29 Feby. PS, Mareh 10 March
“ a Mareh. = 23 March 24 March



Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax

” t .. 21 Feby. 24 Feby. 2 March

e +» 8 March 9 hh 20 March 21 Maren 24 March

ory +. 22 March 24 h 3 April 4 April 7 April

e os +» 4 April 7 April - 14 April 17 April

Mw. ea eee

For further particulars, apply to—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD,—Agents.



HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados

S.S. “PHILOSOPHER .. London &

M/brough 12th Feb. 26th Feb.
“DEFENDER” Liverpool 5

Glasgow 16th Feb. 4th Mar.
“PLANTER” .. London 29th Feb. 11th Mar.
“STUDENT” Glasgow &

Liverpool lst Mar. 14th Mar.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vi 1 For Closes in a ee |



_ “CROFTER” ¥ . London. h Feb.
' “BIOGRAPHER”

.. Liverpool “— Mar.

For further Information apply to... .
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
18th March, 1952 .

Arrives Barbados
31st March, 1952
6th May, 1952

8th May, 1952 .. 2ist May, 1952

Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

Sailing direct to _Segibininnes

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, Seen BROAD STREET

Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.I1.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466

=a ===



.

GERM LUBRICATING OILS—Are Best by Test

ae = Don't Only Oil It — Germ It



CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.
Gasolene Station a Trafalgar Street



THE FINEST
TYRES MARE

COLE & CO. LTD.
Agents.





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE
TS
Glands Made Youn
—Vigour Renew
Without Operation
tq 1 old before your time or
uy Berve, brain and physic al
are oF Pantcon eoaiesl

is0ow which restores youthful vi -
our vitality quicker than gland
pet . It is a simple home treat-

ent im tablet form, discovered by an
mertean Doctor. Absolutely harmless

ad enay to take, but the newest and
most pewsrta invigourator known to
lence. It acts directly on your glands,

| erves, and vital organs, builds new,
ure and works so fast that you

cn see and feel new body power and
igour In 26 to 48 hours, use of

‘s matural action on glands and

¢ brain power, memory and
alight often irn| we amazingly.

| An ing new gland and

restorer, called VI-TARS, ix

varem . It has been tested and

bie all chemists here. Get VI-

to the test. Seo the big improvement
24h . Take the full bottle, whic!
sts t days, under the positive
aran that it must make you full
vigour, energy and vitality and feel
) to 20 years younger or money back
1 return of empty package.
VI-TABS costs little, and the guar-

Vi-Tabs *"

Pesteres Manhood and Vitality
FROF OSS



BY CARL ANDERSON

WHAT'S
WRONG >.

DON'T STICK
YOUR NECK
OUT TOO FAR,




ass good looks = you oe so righ. | CAN BE
You know, too, when you look at the price CONQUERED

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated

is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.



Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right *!
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

«means made justiright

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

On, Boy what
A WONDERFUL )j
CHANCE FOR_ rr












h

ILL EVEN PUT

| (THE DOGS OUT SO
ies I'LL HAVE COMPLETE

= QUIET IN THE
oo *








J

SACROO

CONQUERS PAIN.

SSSSPOSSSISSSSSSSS SUG SOOT IOSD



HOUSE FOR
MY NAP

LESSSSSEESSSPSSSP OOF FS SSO SESS LLL ESAS SFE



On Sale at

KNIGHTS LTD.

pcos

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |

PPLE









































GEO SEF 1 ere —~=rreee) | SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

GET YOUR “ ‘
a F TO DO ANYTHING HAVE TO KILL FILTHY HA THERE S ABOUT SEVEN 2 lide 1 } =r ne
THE ACES. ) FLASH! ie He . so.piiocks!. /{ A-ALL RIGHT a Or amen ee” “ ) —_- SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our ranches Tweedside,
BIG MOE! / KILLS YOU, W re ae 4 _ SS 4
AND ONE ROCKETSHIP TO |

Big MOE? f
oN ROCKET a SAT oe So eer co eamrn 5 ee Speightstown and Swan Street
\ 7 y Pi 7% ‘ oe
> 7 wow au rou ano Ey a. Usually Now . Usually NOW








YOU GUYS WANT ANY
MORE ROUGH STUFF
—OR ARE YA READY /
TO TAKE ORDERS?








JF HE DON'T PLAY

BALL, IT MIGHT BE YOU WANT? |
KENT'S GOTTA DO iS

FIGURE OUT HOW

UT Ae - |) Pkgs. Cut-Rite Paper aoe 50 Tins Condensed Milk ae 31

ye ap Bottles Olives ws ae -1,80 1,60 «Tins Heinz Soups... 6B
Tins Corned Beef with Cereal 60 54
Carib Coffee ... \... ... 54 48 Boneless Beef (per lb.) es ae ae

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

a
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES







JOHNNY HAZARD '
=<






YES, HOW COULD I TAKE HIS
HANDSOME FRIEND FOR DORRIE ?
GOT OFF TO A BAD START...BETTER
MAKE UP FOR IT...BUT GOOD,’



THE DEAR FACE THAT I'VE
ANP SURELY YE'VE NAE DARL-LIN’, FORGIVE ME! LONGED FOR THESE FIVE...
VFORGOTTEN MW’ FACE AFTER IT WAS THE MILLING
ONLY FIVE SHOR-RT YEARS
. WEE LAURIE 2









KING GEORGE VI.

A FAMILY ALBUM
OF HIS GREAT LIFE

°



BRINGING UP FATHER

Presenting a magnificent






ouvenir record of the eventful





WELL-AS I HAVE BEEN TRYIN’
TO TELL YOU FOR THE LAST
FOUR DAYS WHEN I WAS SO
RUDELY INTERRUPTED-~-L

siete re WILL, Ti

> a
p AGAIN /
BR ce

NOW- DEAR PUBLIC-PLEASE
GIVE ME YOUR UNDIVIDED
ATTENTION --LISTEN ---



= THEY WENT | |
| THAT-A-Ways |

ya




fe and times of the late King.

Chie outstanding book is case










{ in purple cloth with let.





he Ce iv - Sm £43 woh Xe, n gold, 136 pages with pic-
Ne, rE i OA > SHRI (SR on every page. Four superb
Bs ap < ont ee BN EP ge tO lat
. Bia Bhat OG! Sa : r plate
he cn nepilia ‘ ‘ : in

re is a book to be treasured

y home. The pictures shew
ric events, State occasions
informal gatherings, besides
“ a complete record of the

ymmentous times of the King’s
WELL... THAT DOES IT/ WiTHOUTY
A PILOT, THE SHEIK’S PLANE
S USELESS! WE HAVEN'T
GOT A CHANCE!




ears, Ps



Now, : {
MONGREL WHO e book closes with a complete
CALLS HIMBELF SHEIK,
DEFEND THY THRONE
FROM THE




A LICENSE BACK
THE STATES !
N THE STATES! d in stor and pictures of

pageantry of the State Funeral



King George.

°
BOOK YoUR COPY EARLY.

Me ! as ; Ty
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES iD ‘ OCATE
BUTI CANT LET HERGET 100

He ABOUT b on 4 ae a 3 | , QT ATI ONE RY
| LO BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS



nf
|





PAGE TEN



FROM BRITAIN’S SPORTS

Magic Of T

FIELD:

he Footbal)

Association Cup

(By WALTER

OF ALL the outstandi

in Britain, the Football As
spires, perhaps, the most e
competition is proving no e

our, glameur and a magic of its own.














PILKINGTON)

sporting events in the
sociation Cup competition in-
nthusiasm and the curre
xception, for the Cup has col
It lights a spark of





sustained interest that lasts for four months every yeat
nnutii the two finalists in the world’s most fascinating
football competition have played at London’s Wembl«
stadium befare 100,000 people
Normally unemotionai follower i“ i
o° 6clut ir y victims of Totten! League
Cup. fever. E date business- @ga!! M tic («
mea will take week-end off to would nave made ‘
make up a party to trevel as far final. They re the first tw
as 250 miles (400 kilome res) to clubs named as Mr. W. J. Harroy
see their teim. They would not Football Association councillor, of
thi ik of a x this for League Liverpool, drev the numbered
match. A Blackpool man in one balls out of the bag when th
such party confessed he had not fourth round draw was _broat
missed seeing ; team in a Cup- cast Later he fumbled anc
tie or year ut home or away and Cropped one on he floor A
was proud of having seen every colleague put it back in the bag
Final since Wembley taged jts Smiling, Mr. Harrop said he had
first in 1923. The more excitable bet ¢ them up again. He
supporters are 1*ss res rained, Not Gld ked out another ball—
one of the 32 teams that have to ond number wes found to be
tr lin the tirst big round of the that Liverpool, his own club,
A lack a following irrespective and drawn at home Liverpool
istange have lost two Cup Finals. Their
Blackpool nm the North of ! imubitio to win the
England, visi We Ham neai If tt succeed this vear
Londen in year’s competition in ent will be remem-
as Cup Pinali of 1951, had in example of the luck
loyal band to cheer them. Most Cuy
of these enthusiasts made the trip

overnight and returned the follow-
ing evening, disappointed by their
favourites’ defeat bu not down-
cast, Preston North End, another
Lancashire club to fall this year
had about 500 supporters at far
away Bristol. Most of them un-
dertook a 14 hours double journey
by night train or motor coach
They arrived on the morning of
the match, went early to the
ground, and posed for photogra-
phers. Many took home souvenir
football papers featuring a group
picture of them.

She Lost Her Boots

At Bristol they saw the heights
that Cup fervour can reach, The
home team, Bristol Rovers, won
renown as a Third Division club
last season by reaching the sixth
round of the Cup and forcing a
draw with Newcastle United,
eventual winners. So they were
not dismayed by having to face
Preston, another First Division
club, Before the match three or
four zealots attired in fancy dress
as rovers or pirates in the blue
and white colours of their team
paraded on the field. One sported
a cutlass. A small boy mascot,
wearing football boots, stockings,
and Bristol’s football outfit, was
allowed to shake hands with the
referee and captains before the
coin’ was tossed.
rioment for him was when Bristol

Carlton Defeat
{mpire

Carlton defeated Empire two

nil when they met yesterday
afternoon in a Second Division
football match at Queen’s Park
Both goals were scored in the
second half of play The first
f20al was kicked in by V. Porter
who was playing at left back and
the second was scored by Of
Straker on the left wing
Play in both halves was s!

marked with much miss-kicki
Empire in the first half appeared
to be pressing more and many
opportunities were missed NV
their forwards,

After the second half Empire
again went on the offensive but
when play was about 15 minutes
old the Empire back Jordan fouled
a Carlton forward in his area
and Referee Harris awarded Car}
ton a penalty kick. This was
kicked by the left back Porte)
who made po mistake in netting
the first goal. The score was no:
one nil in favour of Carlton, This
seemed to upset the Empire play-

had won, He will recall it as a C'S for their combination went to
man’ and one of ihousands of Pieces and about two minutes
wildly excited Rovers’ partisans, before the blow off ©. Straker

a girl of about 18, wearing blue

and white hat, scarf and dress,
will recall how she lost her winter
boots when she ran on the field at
the finish to hug the home captain
They were sucked off her feet by
the glue-like mud which had
been the undoing of the defeated
side. She ran on in her stockings,
sinking ankle deep with each step,

finding himself alone on the left
wing cut in and scored the second
goal for Carlton, When the final

blast was sounded the score was
unchanged two-nil in favour of
Cailton,

The referee was Mr, L. Harris.



until she caught up with the Li: ®
players, I inland Wens
Such incidents were seen on

every ground where Cup ties were
played. They illustrate Cup fer-
your, ong of two factors which
influence the resul; of the major-
ity of the ties. The other is luck.
Bristol had the luck to be drawn
at home where the heavy ground
is worth a goal start to the team
accustomed to playing on i‘. Tleev
were less lucky when the draw
for the next round decreed they
should visit Southend where,
curiously enough, they had done
their training for the Preston Cup-
tie. Yet it could have been worse
for gallant Bristol Rovers, for
Southend are another of the Third
Division survivors, They could
have been drawn to play Arsenal,
Neweastle United, Portsmouth,
Tottenham Hotspur, Burnley or
West Bromwich Albion, all s'rong
First Division teams, away from
home,

Missed Penalty Inspired Hull

Luck was busy again when
Rowley, one of the hardest shots
in the game, missed a_ penalty
kick#for the Cup favourites, Man-
chester United. The score was
one-nil in favour of Hull City, a
team struggling to stay in th
Second Division. The escape in-
spired Hull, whose .general in a
gian.-killing victory was none
other than veteran former English
international inside forward Raich
Carter. He won a Cup winner's
medal with Sunderland against
Preston 15 years ago.

Cup luck conspired to reward
Arsenal with an easy home game
in the next round for their ‘five-
nil win at Norwich, and gave
Tottenham Hotspur ihe most. at-

tractive tie of all, a visit fron
Neweastle United. Yet this was
| They'll Do It



Every Time

y OSLO, Feb. 23.
Finland won two gold medals in

today’s skiing events in 20 Olympic

james here and as a result have

umped into third place in the
unofficial points scoring by the
nations

They are behind Norway a
the United States, F
Norway now have 107 points
U.S, 844 and Finland 72,

The two events won to-day ‘by
Finland were the women’s eros
country ski race and the men's
relay event, Lydia Videman won

the women’s race’ covering the
ten kilometres in 41 minutes 40
seconds,

Twenty-two competitors fron

ten nations took part in the event
which was held for the first time
in the Olympic programme and
Finland also took second and
third places. Milja Hietamies was
second in 42 minutes 39 seconds



WILL. WELCOME TEAM

HAVANA, Feb, 26.
A big crowd is expected to give
a rousing reception to the unde-
feated Cuban team, winners of the
Caribbean Baseball Series when
it arrives at Rancho Boyeros In-
ternational Airport at 11 30 a.m
to-day from Panama aboard a
Pan-American transport. The
transport left Havana for Panama
t 11.30 p.m. yesterday, arriving
at Balboa at 4.30 a.m. to-day.
The plane is scheduled to leave
for Havana at 6.30 a.m. and will
arrive at Havana at 11.30 a.m,
—U-P.







Hepiviered US Potent OMee

. half





BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



MILLEN MUESSES



KEITH MILLER misses the tall
trying for a big hit off West

Indies bowler Gerry Gomez in
Fifth Test. at Sydney - cricket
sround on 26.1.52,

J weaitics Make
One Change

FOR THIRD TEST
From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, Feb, 26.

Jamaica retained Lindey Dela-
penda as pivot on the team for the
third football Test match to-mor-
row afternoon. Deélapenha was
due to return to Britain to-day
but following a Trans-Atlantic
‘all on Monday night, his club
Middlesborough, agreed to his
stay over for the crucial game if
transport could be arranged to get
him back to England on Friday to
prepare for the important Ports-
mouth game on Saturday. Ar-
rangements were made by Stephen
Hill local Impressario. Jamaica
will field the same team which
beat Carib All Stars on Monday
with the exception of Cooper in
goal who suffered a fractured fin-
ger in the second. half of Monday’s

game when rushed by Qruin.
Cooper will be
replaced by
Saunders who
recently toured
Barbados w ith
the Jamaica
cricket team.
Both teams are ;
preparing for to-
morrow’s match |
Jamaica will try |
ne w formation -
based on inter- —
changed play,




A
Lester Alcock at inside left, Del-
apenha at inside-right to create

Saunders

openings for Gillie Heron
other English professional who
plays centre forward and could
not play freely on Monday owing
to constant tackling by Parsons
at back for All Stars,

All Stars have their
with Alan Joseph and
te tail Jamaica
wards while tne
opposing wings

th

own plan
his wing
inside J,
backs cover the

Norway Wins
Skiing Games

OSLO, Feb, 26.

_ The shift in skiing dominance
from Sweden and Switzerland to
Norway and Finland upset the
balance of power in the 1952 win-
ter Olympic games and gave a
host of Worwegians a runaway
victory when the sixth and largest
winter Carnival under Olympic
auspices closed Monday night.

_ Norway had scored 125} points
in unofficial but traditional scor-
ing that allows 10 points for the
first place, a gold medal and five
points for the second,

In the first six the United States
with its best balanced team in the
history of Winter games was a
surprisingly strong second but its |
total of 894 was a long way be-!
hind Norway. |

Canada was 10th with 184.
Four years ago at St. Moritz less
than 14 points separated the top
of the table Sweden and the fourth
place Americans, |

Sweden scored 79 points trailed |
by Switzerland with 71, Norway
with 604 and the United States
with 654. —(CP)



ma A)
“



fa — NW

ENQGLOSE THE
| PORCH AND BREAK
| THROUGH THE WALL

THERE~WHOLE JoB
TO /7y¥









$650!

=~





Ol.” MOTHWALLET’S
HOUSE HAS BEEN

YEARS~AND ALL

HE DOES

+ iS GET
\ ESTIMATES

WHEN HE STARTED
TO GET ESTIMATES
FALLING DOWN FOR FOR THAT JOB BACK
IN THE 1930'S, EVERY-
THING WAS CHEAPER / THEM WORKMEN |
EXCEPT MOTHIE |

By Jimmy Hatio |

a

BETTER FOR |



TO CHARGE FOR | |

)

Amateur Or

Professional ?
WHAT’S IN A NAME!

(By PETER DITTON)

Field Marshal Montgomery re-
cently caused more than just a
slight stir in the sports world
when he suggested that amateurs
and professionals should be allow-
ed to compete in the Olympic
Games. The reaction was ‘per-
haps even quicker than he had ex-
pected. Within twenty-four hour,
storms of protest had been show-
ered down upon the head of Brit-
ain’s famous war-time leader. And
he was severely taken to task for
putting forward such a proposal.
But when the Field Marshal's
suggestion is analysed it is not
really so very wicked. All that
he wants is to see the people who
frankly admit to being profession-
als allowed to compete with those
who call themselves amateurs but,
nevertheless earn good living»
from their sporting prowess.

Amateurism, and by that | mein
real amateurism, where the
sportsman digs into his own
pocket for the pleasure of tak-
ing part in a particular sport, is
en the way out so fast that mans
people are likely to catch ‘a cold
from the draught.

The number of real
amateurs in the world
could be counted on
of one hand,

But still the pretence is main-
tained, Still the professional js
frowned upon in many sports be-
cause he openly gaing from his
ability, And, all the time, many
of the so-called amateurs are do-
ing very nicely in a less adver-
tised manner,

topline
to-day
the fingers

It is not my intention to single
out individuals for criticism. If
the respective organisations ‘o
which they belong are conteni to

allow “shamateurism” in their
ranks that is an internal aifuic.
What is needed however, is a

wholesale clean up of the orgsn-
isations themselves and the intro-
duction of hard and fast rulings
as to what is professionalism and
what is not.

To take one example. Just
consider English County Cricket.
The sport is 99 per cent. profes-
sional—at least so far as revenue
is concerned—and yet no profes-
sional has ever been deliberately
selected to lead an England team.

Cricketers who earn money
from the sport are selected to
play for England and are labelled
emateurs, One or two have even
captained England.

But can anyone tell me what
is the difference between a play-
er who is paid merely for playing
cricket and another who «¢arns
his money because he happens to
have an office job with the county
which, fortunately, leaves him free
to play throughout the summer

to

every SHAE.

Guarantee A Perfect FIT.

There is no difference, except
in the label.

Soccer is another spor, with a
large amateur element but which
in England again depends upon
professionalism for its revenue.
The dividing line is usually fixed
by the player's own ability. The
majority of those good enough to
play professional soccer do so and
are paid for playing. The remain-
der sign with amateur’ clubs
where, supposedly, they play for
the love of the game.

Theoretically that sounds fine.
But it does not work out, There is
at least one team, calling them-
selves amateurs, where several of
the players receive a weekly un-
der-the-table payment from the
club, This ‘rake-off’ keeps the
players happy, enables the club
to maintain a good side and re-
Sults in good attendances.

What the F.A. would say
they knew of these payments
anybody's guess. But the point
is that the F.A. does not avppar-

if

is

ently know and so © “shamateur-
ism” thrives.

The Engiish wawn Tennis As-
sociation would not take xindly

to the suggestion that protessionais
should be allowed to compete at
Wimbledon, Yet the leading
amateurs who will be there this
summer will have all their ex-
penses paid. What is more, two
of the expected entrants from
the Commonwealth have recently
been found jobs enabling them to
play tennis, thus making possible
wneir Wimbledon appearances
Call it amateurism if so.

can think of another name.

Take athletics. Strictly speak-
ing no amateur athlete should be
allowed to capitalise on his or her
ability. But in America scholar-
ships are available to top-ranking
performers which enable them to
worry about nothing else ex-
cept athletics,

In England several track stars
have jobs with sports firms and
one in particulnr frequently used
to do an advertising act for his
firm when he was actually taking
part in a sports meeting. Of
course he was subtle about it. He
wore a track suit with the n>me
of his employers stamped across
his back. Just to safeguard him-
self he joined the sports club of
the firm and so on the front of
his suit was the crest of the club

hike. 4

Neat don’t you think? And all
strictly amateur. aay
This tolerated ‘shamateurism

is widely known to sports fans.
They do not complain about it.
Wimbledon or an Qlympic Games
meeting would not be any the
less supported if professionals
were to appear. Rather the con-
trary. Why then all the fuss?

ad









@ from page 7

heard of the financial
which took place as
years ago.

He said it was a great pity that
some members of that Assembly
did not spend more time at the
public library.

Someone in the drafting depart-
ment of the Government who did
not understand those things, put
things before them which he knew
nothing about, They had a lot of

revolution
far as 25

glorified book-keepers who tried,
tc pose before members of the
House as financial experts.

He did not absolutely refer to
the Head of the Administration of
the Coiony, he said.

What were they there for? he
asked. If another was not trained
in that matter and made a mistake,
it was their duty to correet it. Ik
was very. unfortunate that that
Bill was ever brought before the
House.

They were not in a position t
export capital and then run 1
C.D, & W. for funds.

Mr, G. H. Adams said that i
was deplorable when one got
pecple from the same party with
fogmatic views. Freeh trom his
books, the last speaker was reacy

ty teach his grandmother the
subject.

What did that amount to but
saying that instead of having
their money lying down in thx
treasury they would put €.00 12

the Government security in Greuc
3ritain. One found that all over
the world.

He had refrained from point-
ing out his mistakes when he
was making those dogmatic and
pontifical statements because
they were of the same party. He
Wag tired with members who sat
down with them on Monday
nights and told them a thing was
all right and then came to the

House next day and spoke
against it.
Members of the Government

endeavoured to the best of their
ability to have everything
straightened out in any particular
Bill. They often deferred matters
so that they could discuss them
with their back benchers. And
after they discussed them and
got an agreement, one who
agreed would then speak against
it.

After speaking on the darftnig
of Bills, he said that the Gov-
ernor was always informed what
were members views.

He said that a Governor caine
to a place with instructions as to
how legislature was drafted.

Nobody wanted to prevent
anyone from criticising, but not
agreeing to a Bill now and when



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion 10.00 a.m.

Police Band Concert at St.
George’s Almshouse 4 p.m.

Lecture on Moral Rearma-
ment at Belmont Methodist
Church 7.30 p.m,

Football Div. II Everton vs.
Spartan, Queen's Park 5.00

p.m,

Div. Ill: Notre Dame _ vs.
Everton—Bay, Rangers vs.
Y.M.C.A. at Shell and
Carlton vs. Police at Black
Rock—5.00 p.m.

WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall
Nil.
Tetal Rainfall fer month to

date: .07 in.
Highest Tempcrature: 86.0 F.
Lowest Temperature: 68.5 F.
Wind Velocity 9 miles

from Codrington :

per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29,885.

TO-DAY
Sunrise; 6.22 a.m.
Sunsct: 6.06 p.m.
Moon: New, February 25.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Tide: 5.10 a.m.,

p.m.

Lew Tide; 11,18 p.m.

29.974

5.36



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tt you suffer sharp stabbing pains
if joints are swollen, it shows your
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952

Equalisation Fund £20 Damages
Bill Passed

it came to the Assembly attack-
ing it.

If members feel they caanof
trust Government, let them form
their own Government,” he svid.

Mr. F. L. Waleot (L) strongly
supported Mr. Adams views. Hy
added that when it came to the
quéstion” of discrimination, and
they ‘were saying, “exclude the
Union of South Africa,” they
eculd just as well say, exclude
Conada and Australia where dis-
crimination was also practised.

He said that they were many
self-appointed economists about

He ‘said he did not want to be
i anybody’s way, he liked to be
4 a team for what he was worth.
He said that when the Senior
ilember for St, George kept

lent on the previous night and

ssented greement, he had sus-
pected that he would have at-
tacked it then. He had no confi-
dence in one who had none in
him,

After all the clauses were

passed, Mr. A. E. S. Lew moved
the addition of another clause.
The House voted against the in-
sertion. The clause would have
been, “The Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee sHall cou > to b?
Jaid upon the table of the les'=!

ture annually a statemen chov-
ing the eccndition of the fund.”

»

Mr. Adams_ explained
there was no necessity for the
Clause as members would be
able to get any needed informe-
tion.

The Bill was then passed

that





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In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell awarded judge-
ment foy the plaintiff Amy Sandi-
ford to the amouni of €20 and
costs in her suit in which she
claimed damages to the amount
of £25 against the defendant M«
Donald Cutting of Bibby Lane, St.
Michael for inflicting bodily harm
on her

Counsel in the case was Mr
J. E..T. Branker for Sandiford

Sandiford said that she lives at
Water Hall Land, St. Michoel and
Vent to Mone f, St. John to buy
potatoes on OctCbs 10, 1951.

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plantation she got in an argument
with the defendant Cutting, w!
was digging in the same field.

‘While I was digging the pota-
tces the defendant suddenly
umped on me and began beating

«





me, then he ‘ook up something
and h t hack of my
d with it and I lost conscious-
” Sandiford told the court.



vr. Gale who attended to Sandi-
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end this could have been caused
if the plaintiff had received a blow
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MATCH DRAWN
Combermere in their ganic
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Full Text

PAGE 1

twnMsim I I Kill VkV IT, 1152 lliRRArHW ADVOCATE PACE FIVE Equalisation Fund Bill Passed In Face Of Heavy Criticism A MOVE by Mr. V B Vaughan (I) seconded bv Mr W A. Crawford (C) for the complete rejection of a Bill to provide for the establishment of a revenue equalisation fund to which resort might be made in the event of a temporary recession of public revenue, was defeated by an eleven-five majority of the House of Assembly last night. The Bill was eventually passed In all Its stages. Those voting In favour of the rejection were Mr. V. B. Vau,(han (ll. Mr W A Crawford (C); Mr. C. E. Talma (I.i; Mr J C. Mottley (C) and Mr. O. T. A'lder The Bill which was debated foe absence locally of any apeclnc Bvt hours. specifies what financial Institutions, because of moneys are to be credited to the the understandable lack of tinrevenue mualisatlon fund, and andal and economic ludgm.iil authorises the Accountant General on the part of the Government If .V! f l or '"' *•" "' " ""d because of the degree of the It alsoglves power to the fiscal ignoeance existing among L.ovr,nor-in-EecuUye Committee members of the Govcrnlnen. m lo uiihdraw the who e or any part this House They might be es"' '"' %  fund and apply the sum so cused for not having dellber.iUU withdrawn for the credit of the planned any excessive revenue general revenue or the island. over' expenditure, but surd, n Members of the Opposition, as was inexcusable for them not to well as Government supporters In have the courage to spend surthe House severely criticised the pluses. They had the courage pt.n, > enunciated by Government during the last hustings to apm the proposals of the Bill, and proach the electorate and appeal urged that instead of hoarding up to them for IB seats and the fian ce s the mone) should be people had overwhelmed them spent on economic development ,„d this House with It seau. and the Improvement of social Whose advice were thev now roniuilons (it the people who contaking as to the spending of Hie ribute to the excess by way of people's monev" However %  „.,taxation nent may be the financial and [J %  %  W %  •..!'...!. ii IMttttad ,,,.,..,...,, achoairsblp si .i,-tmJebate against the Bill, dubbed gulshed officials, this House ^ % %  ""ffTt l! "P" !" 'y negative'. j, ou i d not be guided by their •M •„,,: they were ncithoi -ocial .„.,„, .,. ,„ kg, ,„ .,,,., %  „,„ %  • nor economic, and invited the very money 3E2V". 1 ~ c Jl "" Bi *"* d '' Surpluses cither deliberately Tut „^i f"/ .,, . created by deficit financing or Although signifying his Intenjortustoualy accumulaaxl Iron to support the Bfll. Mr. E D. ..„,„.. h d Mottley said he would not WREATH I HOV Wl.l NM t* Ma/' "ours" had been, should be spent on one or two purposes it lenance any lnvertment In South should ^ U(Jed pun ny on^ochU Africa and liter made *moUon wn ,. iccs or for an economic purlo exclude this country from the ^,, The ldM expenditure of provision of the Bill. This wu Lrpluse* of course, * to romhowever defeated by a 12-6 bln £ al one ^ ^ sam< time> n.,jiirM>. a aortal and an economic purDr II. G rummlM(Lt who took p^ Ex ftmp | M Q f sucn expencharge of the Dill said that he did Ul urc m „ v -^ found m th# Mllj not think there was need for much ;i nmituMr.".tHm of the Roosevelt debate. He said that the Bill Regime and the new deal. The sought lo give the Government „| an to pu b|ic works such as leave and authority to do what trans-continental roads, public should be done in connection with p arK! am j dams like the T.V.A the Revenue Equalisation Fund. an ^ if,,. rehabiUUUon of agriHonourable member* would reculture employed hundred* of member that $150,000 wu being thousands of Americans and uddS it aside for the past two yean ed to the permanent wealth of avernment felt that such regular the nation. Another example, contribution* should go on year though unhappily, it resulted In after year whenever it was possiultimate tragedy, but. neverthcblc leas. It combined a social with He said that It was always conan economic purpose, was Hitler. nidered frugal to put aside somewho deliberately used the fund* thing for WO years and they treated by deficit financing to wanted to apply the same thing in launch his rearmament proGovernment funds. It was congramme, thereby employing milildered this money could only be lions of Idle Germans and by put aside when there was the multiplication of factories prosperity. If It was not done added to the productive cap* Crawford Anks For Gold Watch Vr,ultu l^I p Stolen A GOLD HATCH valued > was stolen from a bedro : at "The Whim st I. :, i iween b 30 p.m. on M Bday. The incident •* to the Polu-e by A... Selman of the same address >lild.i Host of Km,: Edw.i Road. Bank Hall, reported ll her house was broken and ent td between 8 15 p.m. on llMat.ii .ind Monday and a quantit> groceries stolen A Pl'NCHtOM of amp win .rlv broke open along I-ower B Street, opposite the Plantatlc nip compound, yester.l %  n covered a large area the road. This < aired the roa<< | pery and nearly h-df a do mi fell iVstfgsj crowd gathered around i witi.es* the iti. One man fell on tin i atDM within a few second* A FIRE at Molyneux Planu.li St Jigajag .it about II %  I i %  t.i\ iui nt ssgtt .n itPlve acres of second crop a I three and n hair acres of fifth cr< < ripe canes were burnt when %  i occurred at Ashferd Plantnt i, St. Thomas, al about 7 00 pjn Sunday. They are the pmp< i I f Qananl Traders Ltd. and i p insured. Anotlier fire at U N I'luntiition. St Thomas, at jrn 4.00 am. on Monday burnt BJ0 holes of second crop ripe * the same plantation At Pleusant Hill Plantation. W IVter ,i tire at about 840 pm i Monday burnt a quantity <>f %  || itrass The grass Is the property Of GG. Gill of the same platil Uon What An M.P. Wants To Know Mr E. D Mottley at yesterday's ii of .in .-i %  %  "< "' the House of Asssmbly IJevelopiT n with a tabled a question dealing with the \ lew to oblsiirnii. Hjuatti number of buses on British Hoodun '" various routes in the Island. ........ I he que.-iwn reads; I IN t.-.vernment aware of tho nea being sullerred by persons who are obliged i"e several omnibuses paring f.r ben in this island as their means of iransportaUon, where concessionaires t\^v not idequate number of busos to ploymenT Mr. W. A Crawford at yesterday's meeting %  I the ROUM of Assembly. The Adilress reads as follows The HQUM of Assembly is c :ne ojtflnl < a i~1 thproposaU lot development of tha .II Bniish Honduras cope with the demand on thattr %  ""I respective routies? a) t he concessions being 2 If the answer to <1) above offered in Ihii colony, (b) the prospect*, v pro|ect offers foi nectior. Aj in the affirmative, will Govof nut •nunent lake steps to cause such %  i iiicessionai/ss to provide the roMCtl of c of the col .,.K .Jp 1 ^ 1 number of buses for t h e i "•fFonvetuence of the publu I 7"' .'?"If 3 the answer to < 1) ubova 1111 lit —negative, will Govern%  urptuh 1-Uo.ir ton.. meni l-UM ,iiquine> t., be made [hat ih.Govenunenl should eonwith a view to relieving ih mUM practtoablUty of est-bconventsnee? t^hing in Aarkultuml l^veiop'iiin for the purpose % %  %  — S*,,:'; .ROMANIA' REFLOATED creation of numi !" -, ,.( prauutional—profit farms and the ere.lh c fishing bowKomasiia was lion of a conveiiientlv ---.ini.ited refloaled after it had sunk off sugar teciofj lliiyficld Beach on Monday evening about 330 o'clock while 2. The House hi of the furtlu bringing in %  catch of 2*0 (lying %  pinion that the possibility of *..Ash. quiring financial assistance foi It was refloated by L#e McColthe venture from the Colonial Delin and another man called PepvcK.pment Corporation and for par. It belongs to Alfred MM of the appropriate InternaStraughan. and was extensively 'lonal Agenctc. should 1* also Indamaged. The catch of fish wu vewtignted. riot recovered. TUB WEST INDIA COMMITTEE wreath seen at Bt. George's Chapel, Windsor. possd of yallow daffodils, waits tulips. carsDaUons. hyacinth*, toebnd* and arum Inquest Adjourned The inquest coiieeuim.: I I 0j Clement Mcdfom llelleplaine, St. Andrew, w.i%  jouined by Ills Worship Mi. A w Harper, CM QP I f U"-' 1 "F" until Tuesday, March 4. '< tcrday. The body of 55 year Ol I Medford was found l>'"" _. in a pool of blood on Haggw i %  puocd qu.eil> awi on ()Uld Sl> Andrew, near the Ag. i THE SECOND DAY'S HEARING m th. case in which | ZOUS Tw&SPn cSS.*! Damian K. DeAbreu.s real estate a>ient, has claimed 1720 Ion Rochstord, on ,>l the most !" h ,. ihr w 1V11..1 %  tUms^M from Estwick E L Deane as unpaid commission, gg"^"* S^VSf'' ch *SS 'he mailer to ih,. PoUei and 1 Real Estate Damages Suit Continues Milton Roeheford —A Triliuit.l c. 11. BOCI ended yesterday In the Court of Common Pleas before the Acting Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr Justice O. L. Taylor. The case Is being heard by a price o< £20.000 but no business special Jury. Legal appearances '* done. G B. Adams and Mr. 1 . 1 I ,,., Small Farmer. *M notified ters which 11 has bee,, my food ".""."'"!'.' !" 1" :.. be tblt :,' "" ; "'"P" lo tha m,.i„.i, the body was removed 10 the worth of ,uch a man I regard as Andrew Mortuary where a ass" privilege roarlem csuniuiallon wan i*-i formed by L. S. Tappin Mlllon. th,MOM liv wiu.h ha When Ulc body of Medf then, when they tin* to lean ty of she nauon. ,._,,._. O. H. L Ward Instructed by To Mr. Vlalcott. Mr FantHBT %  toowil la iclatlves and Inwas found ihere wjs a gash t yen tha only Ihiim they eollM the Proposal ot ,!"•' u % *'^: Messrs. Carrlngton 1 Scaly. Sosaid that Mr. Deane said that the tlm 1st In his vocathe eye and a cow was stand do to enable them to carry on menl in this mil ror ir. u o. honors for the ulaintifT I)c Abreu Ulge Plantation was too mull, lion ihoemaklni Tha fact lhal some feel away, would be 10 increase on taxation surpluses was neither !" '"' "J" and Mr E K. W.lcott. Q.C. and Th, price asked was £20,000 and ha .mild, in Barbados „l all places and no one would want that, esI", 1 """*" !" IS"' „!;„.„,, Mr J s B D, '' Instructed by certain conditions were attached a v, ilirrc „f his foul DRINK CLAYTON'S th* I was no money peclally win around. As the objects and rtasons of the Bill pointed out. the Bill specified Indeed, worse than negatl ii.Messrs. Cottlc Catford. Solicitors lo this price comntiori or lhe defendant Estwick Deane rj'in i>l.. m i • for-th; oe.endanr-EiwlcK-Se.^ gS IBKui nrver mad, a„ SS5S1 Ti ^T .X^Z Sl,Wjl %  %  • I*< % % i B fTh'J' ..Su^w^rc co.b5eSd R ". AlT'."V"""" -""" behalf of Mr. Deane. anrthJnj els, the geniu, of the James Small ,.1, ,.f lain, ,„,„„.. f"~,'Ti'-T^M-ervhod. from f"ed on four additional witnesses Mr W T Goodln, told the ,„•„,. he had a passion forsi Michael 1. still reported what monies were to be credited by taxes from ever>MM>. rrom before closing h s case and then Court that he met Mr D, Abreu horicsl woikinan.hip. for hard „„. p,,!.,.. ,„ ,„. ainiVood |i lo Ihe fund and authorised the IJe """'""^ *J. !" £ Mr. Waleott called on Estwick „ „.,, .,„ at Jason.Jonas; work, snd hU eUsMaia ...mprl.ed g„.„ ,„ u„. <;,.„,., „l II,,.,. aUr^n n E ,Uuvccf,,,,,^-P^^^^^^ Ad.m,„c, %  ""-' '. .^ *„-i -., !" In ,hc nan(l8 of ,he wor J keT *"? bought a plantation and De Abreu before it could be produced, Mr .'. .aw w di rftuM COMXim mm and m th is now claiming that he did so Adams then called 00 M proposed m the 1851—W draft s^.^ „, thc employer In commuch w |(rh Pndoil vourlng lo get Thomas to take the wil Estimates, wherein provision was mrrce and industry wrio could lhp dc f rndtn i B plantation and he Mr Thomas said that in respect made fW ..ntnbuiion lnvesl j^^ ^i 90 Increase emha n(rt fj Wn „ Mld hU commiauon 0 f an alleged aale he made a l M> plmmrnl wh | ch De Bnc had agreed to pay search In UM FUgl U OfBc. *W >><; Clark* Tluie WH 001 much • What they were proposing In mm ^^ t^^x th e plantsan d fuund recorded there a deed was--but 11 l,< .1M ,i.r.,.it„l he could add. hence he mcved that ln ls Bill was inspired by purely the Hill be read a second time. Victorian economics Modem Mr. V. B. Vaughan ill -aid thnt c;..veniineTiuin their fiscal po*he was not a inembei of t^uHouse icv cuia no loOfltr l-e innplreO during Ihe last session, but obvi|,v nineteenth ccntur; ously from the UtUN Of the Bill "Our politics _wss di • he I'olli-e for the first t s .iihnittc.l to ">•' Q • .•. MlHOn ROCratforid made 11 ,tl II'-iMJl TinI'I-IIKII.If lo lift M %  in,: Bmal) in oonnavtlon with %  %  danth ol Osrondolyii Clarka h\f not b> .mything he llf n rw Orleans, Si Mu I also sdinitiiil i,, Kii.i nary 20 suile KOLA TONIC lion Slalemenl of Claim ay ne dnt Mum of conveyance dated October IMI from R. E. CSill lo the defendant nav. Deane regarding lh#ula of the to llTg I h plantation Htubafldl ind OKnardl iurtln-r from the Pulpll which is in St. James. rlflhtlj belonged Hilton'* life wau %  : 1 i-1 1 boyond Plantation Sold •rhal 11 meant by clean living, This plantation was sold lor uAtelAth J-24,000 At this stage Mr. Adiims this r^ad oi revcW over expendlguage. to withdraw from cireuplantation for the sum of £24.000 •MMThut it is onlv right that wo latlon nvc hundred thousand The defl n dant still refuses to pay should Wil ullv cw these dollars annually in a comrnunlt, lhe plalnIlf lnc agTecd commis w l unla-sl7t^ui#hn the.r rewhere 500 villages lacked the U on of S% on the £24.000 or any V0bf!r IT^IIIM have urHen,' elementary easentials of r-anllary part ^ lt suiting siirpluss hove arisen. TTT^T^ ^^ ^^ bj( hs and f Whcn ^ hcarJng WB8 n%umtHf ne aaia. rrn* adequate drainage In ihe rural VMtmenThe plaintltT in the month of had experienced in racssW times August 1MB in pursuance of the i,iid which it WU I'^'iy lhal lt Tnc verage suipius over inr ilK ecnu n i introduced to the declosed his — would exoeneflec fcr some yea.n past five years had been at the Ipndanl onr R OV Gill. Ihe then Mr. Waleott then cgOnsd on hit m the immediate lutuie rate of a million dollar* annually own er of the sugar plantation Estwick Deane. Mr Deane said: %  •Ii is unnecessary or ; uperfniGovernment was proposing to named Husbands and Oxnards, St. "OBI Saturday afternoon in July ' av to state th u iursave half a million dollars anJam „ | went to the telephone and a man ,,t..J* IN onls tha result ol exnually — in simple social IanThc d0 / endbn t bought this who said he was De Abreu asked pluses ar WUJJ nAt -iiB^ n wi ih d raw from cireu„i,,„t-n f w th MM r>t f 44 000 me If 1 wanted to buy a property. I told him that I did not know The man said he al estate agent. Tha mir ai C e5 oy"?nc ft SK*K ^TZ^i dofr; JJ, £XC .."cnW.""*, ' '"' ,.ld .,01 have fibres for the sums annually when for lack ol a J^ ."• „, Ab „ u Ml „under letumed from places like Bermuproper nutrition scheme, tha' de. crM ,.„, ml „.,| on rom M r. E K da. Aruba and Curacao but they y.lopment of thejKhool children Walcotl „ll knew that those sums must „„ being retarded and meanest o, Ab „ u „, d ha; „, t„| d Mr. Deane that Mr flill was not taks,!,!,,,,-.%  •—1 what he Slked *" — r —' %  ,„., Jim if, waas .! %  •* asik duty the amount of production, the corlars annually when the persisien ^^ suitable for Mr D< lesnondu.k! export and the resultand depressing rise in the cost or ^. tf wa a ) 50 no ceiling price urt revenue which had accrued living was making nonse' 1 '-' I quoted by Mr Deane. As soon an from the -..gar crop during trial the increased wages people w-d*y wh,, are deeply indi'bt.d to him IT setting their tho right path UM paw ..ml .iihghlenment. %  %  %  Mil up |o a (i-w dJ(1 WH able %  %  -.'it.'' %  %  . r Local polities, which he regarded as a nOCma jri.ith' lord rnourn his passing two tons am) M..v |h< sod rest Ufarllj l.F.CTDRF, ON MORAL REARMAMENT Mr. Delghton F (JnlTllli. II "I master of tinProvidence Bojrl S1I10. I. who recently returned from the Moral lb hold In Miami, will giv addrOM on this subject at In ivimoiit Methodi'i Church. M Lord'i Hin. at 7 so to-night. TWH GHTFOBTODA ) Truhighest reward l< man's tell Is not what hr (riv for 11. hut wh* by II. — IhlfTrTCOOLING fact TRIATHKNTS to rtvlve Htat-Weary splriti Cool ftagars -tit brln| refresh man t snd IStauir fo your hot. tired fste. ked treams and lotions >" itimutsn your gsss. ">• it glow with lrf<. i|ln A -ondsrful Eli:sblh Arden itiihs-up afl gOsf xou looking cool and soignee lor hou'i and I101.'). SALON at — KNIGHT'S LTD. 33 Broad Street BELL DEDICATED The Agreement Thi to \M new 1*11 Aldar IseodgP ilh lion, but no sale was made a> it was too small. On August 0 the plaintiff telephoned hirn staling that he had something nue ft. oRgf him but he told him that th'v could not discuss the matter over SS& „,d thai b. c„„„l -**; oOtr lum a plantation of about %  •• 240 acres on the average, but did w "' i the name M lha price ajn. Later th< plaindoai tiff said that the prue M DM Retjulem Mas*. plantation would be about A large congregation £218.000 The following morning the service which the plaintiff said that he had made choral. Istake and that the pi Bath111 "plr. VtugasUI then ouoted ligdwarftsm. They were P !" 0 **" '" tn g much lew -~ hundred .housand dol._, „ Communir.tions Stopped I went lo the races %  ftnd immedlateiy after I Ml 1.ill IntaTvitwed ma I following his inoti I'll not to 1 f'li.n mi plainUff anymore unti! I I .Tchanges and reof the ^Ul want ana lacs^mo... hou|lM lhal „ wa ^ nf u ne ^ **Jjfi*n* volution. In recent times. Gov~ the multitudes of "" PfP l carried out. The agreement wh.eh Wfl tolll h(i , h ^ pUlri ,iff wanti.pelled to ''Let us absolve the .House fr m mide nn Auf Uil 6 t t h„ „ re erf 0 k (> mc ,, ut dld nol The plaintiff asked him ll of a place shout ;>4ii a'-r.-s in aie ll %  %  %  rum and Ui 11 rang. had been of failure to concentrate on the ;';; %  -.?^Lr%.2 SW-5W=H3 a nt I an t?u HI spe.-ik to mc. hut I did not suing on. De Abreu try (o ftl in ()Urn w „ laUph hi ihere*^dTlbatatal soelal poliey. But whan we exj „ ,„,,„„„ who ,„| d ,hat he K J r „on,e ." S2S5 stirp.rr'su'^r'pei euje^ern for Ihls J-fc-r-r, ^JS^^^g-* Eg Mi.plantlff that I waa mittjng mv rards on th. him I told the plaintiff that I %  but II was mine I told him thai 1! would rost ?\ PM 1:2.210 in %  %  did not know whom ,n "budgetary we should be able to commend h [ m enquiring about a plantation ,2000 and I !Tr£t nnan^nran* them for an economic policy." he or „,, H e could not-Y if the gj; 0 ? 0 '.! GUI as finis* language as dencil nrunoni *H --:"toX ,fmament of those Governdded plaintiff mentioned a plantation. flftgJJ, I bought Husbnndi and lu ""' : "".r. Ti:-;w-i.. Did they propose to use tnose Mr. H farmer said that he ome fj, n — H Plantation for C240O0 %  r^'^SS ui-t surplus a fund for industrial owncd llM Udfli Plantation St ?SS%SS Mo"Sv £2:00oTr felt financing there was %  "*"*: development^ Did they propose Michael Several people asked t 0(lt thls WB no 7 a :ng inrrci-c in the total volume 01 w lmplernent an ldea of Professor him for a sale One day the plainMr R OV Olll said lhal someannuat revenue Simev's that Barbados could betiff and himself had a conversa, lme n ] Wg fte WM i nc mn of Utln in Fiscal Ignorance „,„,, B production centre for lion over the telephone. He also Husbsnds and Oxnards Plan. He said that they could not varn to supply textile mills_ in saw Mr Df*ne sometime and he ln S( j aTTI „ n wa expect this Government to have Lan a similar record. Because of the ash in or for that matter, asked him If he wanted to sell the month of July that he 1 g> On pages plantation and he quoted him a leurphone call from the plaintiff am !" • %  in — ll ..I til*) II 1-. rand I Sport Shirts and other items for men comruTF wiiiTt: srRT SHIRTS Shurt Sleeves, sites 14| to 17 ins. Sch... SH.:I KINCIUS III-: LIXe SPORT NlllftTS Short Sleeves in Shade* of White. Blue. Grey. Cream. Sixes — Small, Medium and Large, tach $4M and plain. Sires 3(i • || Sl-'iO si..12 OPtN r.Mi si IKKII 111for senior boys (! ; son College, tseh SI. IU OTIS COTTON Sizes. 30 to 44. !..-. BOVS ', LINCITH SOCKS Sizes 8| to 10 Ins. P*r. JUJH ItCNOHN IS*. ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS, with piped contrasting Collars. Shades of Grey, Blue. Cream. M % %  ii %  Suit Ml CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, ITD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Brosd Street.



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%  TKDKGSOAT, rrnRlARY IT, 1932 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THRF.F. rWEr 6AM6OLS -'.t o**nra OLO MAN %  OWe 1 HOT woOt OI*v. > k^iM.* i DONT .til. %  .t— %  -/ I Record National Product 1951 t. A.NADiA.N uuipui .a fcu-'d* in 11*51 was I %  wrd levels, according tu advance prchnimuiy ts'.im(tes Ml Uununum liurcuj ul Statistics. The .•1 I'loduct ui 1951 is placed by the Bureau at .11.on. a rise uf 18 per cent, from ly.>u. ui fcl a tivu and BX per cent is accounted for by incieases real output of youth, and gervicca and 11 per cent. b' pnci %  PWKIIIUW by Ouiuuu for uiit in dunnto aavaw and gftnoun—d b) the SUnlJtnr ol Naples ciaimeu a :i. fc n.r poi-iion tional Defence last Augu jbe nation*.-, output Man iu for Iba return to reMeda of all I. Government expenditure on soldiers who have aarvi u Had MTVices aisu absorbed twelve months in the Far L:l-i ruary 11 by Air Force Headquarorder ..ml the agreement between Canad in. U ll are EM Mr. Mrllraith Resigns One larted on Thursday when % % %  "f commercial Post "There is nolh a to a numb-: Th c Piimo Minister Ur St for Hengitli to % %  > delay in mak.._ These ,|eb:. have been i-, U renl am i I *•**• %  '•"' '"** 'wguUalions. There has fhOTV Office wen* building the letEt'hS %  •'. e re""' " '" %  %  * because of the King"* ** [or ahc Bathshcba type flahwkoi fr n rtB-nonol fa Uralth, killed-re. M P f la afreement — Frvnvh ffiptfal !?<•// /Saltation Flynn FiU> Assault Action %  that a French fought a Cot %  %  jungle \U. Feb. 23. m brought by %  ".. nn against Duncan )>een fixed for 17. ui the Bahsmaa %  Saigon sftrr the i aa.UW) irterling Chief Jusllenderson uppotntad 1 '' ; %  ' ' I*verley tress was held bv 20u . kr evidence in Califortroops who wit !', Krtwin Plimpton. Dr. muni attacki •' ; ';^ until thl %  witness for Flynn .-maahed the l n _." now neTr .t To m Ihr Stutlenls Riol In Karachi BRITAIN //IS HADE NO MEAT AGREmtElST Itussian riiii-liauServiJemM Chrisl French luan or.Shl I < orunuiiui rmo -i i %  i — v.r. ,! %  Ri*-an Orpilot and 15 clrftll tolerated" by the Stale" he aakf 'hodon Church and Ihc Bapt il i tiustians have been able lo L"hureh reoUJ kr %  men*ure of unnart *• Chrial uid no) %  talin plane libeily ng sinister about taking aliaugemeiit. Workmen at the ground* at the livait of die peotJe i .. i "i i .. i.i... ii. ,i low formation with two other fighter ncs over Kimhae, 2" Hi of Pusan The BvangnUcal pn tad a llro that "The iiilluvnce ol 31 raajs ( .f ,t the fenn smme of spread (rom the aircraft to BoMhevwl rule m Russia has 'be Unrvei Army and eh made for dependence of th, labl? broad ut His %  after i certain degree but v*a prgpi .• %  %  ..( Eight unconivilu not reiUy in the hutch this Is an %  nee which m the — injure'! and dami .,1 $50,000. —i r i oraehjded i iMlaiit t" the Minister iUthuffh In Tunisian Oibiiict Kuiiiourcil ng boat yesterday. The boat i. expevted to be conipleted today. It will be launched on Sunday morning. In the workshop men are still cutting out timbers for the type of tutting boats to _rept* luetion "Wm. Frederick Bull, Deputy M M ,. Ml lMll ,,,,, Iound lh, '" **• '"' i scnting the Canadian Gov| neh Hidenr*GenerarJean period July 1, 1H, to June 30. Limited" u, H-ut*clocqug viaUd tbg fla) 5 *. the trade agreement stipu... ( ,. . The I'r \lr. St. 0 ( Tunis lodav amid strong rum'ated thnt it could be terminated "'• %  yesterday that they admire %  niiiinu 01 ioui.li And Laurent, announced on February ours of an impending reshuffle by either government on June *J'' design i.t much prefer that "•"up tirain 13. the appointment of Dr. C J. m the Tunisian Cabinet. 30 of any year by a written notice ""• Buthsheba type boat. f 1851 western crop is estiMackenzie. PiCMdcnt of the NaThe interview which lasted 2u given not later than April SO 01 at 531,000.000 bushels, of tional Research Council, to be nun.. & that year. The protocol dealing bout 150.000.000 bushels Resident of ith the meat agreement stipun leader since the B %  new negottaUo< dkaath iaaf fttMrnl and for various other reasons and no dec.slo.is or ..rrangements have >. made", officials said. The ggn id ( or unp >eai on April 23 1951, took the S. !" , a "KfT* 1 io I T '^ and fc ^ l "1 " he night of DeeamPayments Pact made between ber 2 and morning of December 3. Britain and Argentina and signed The frame of one boat Is erected 11 Ju l ie 27 I 49, ,or ,ivr >" ar " tenipurarv keel This will Though valid for die five-year give lishermen an Idea of the de sign of boat Usey will receive. Some fishermen told Uie Aden%  I not been Unvaried. Of the puny. "Atomic Knemv ot C nad Died wheat about 325.000.000 Limited." which will take over dent General available for marketfrom •' P % % %  • ..iter allowing foi r.nin seed H responsibility for opera' geed requirements, the Minischalk River 1'iojecl 01 Trade and Cuinmrur Mi I )• t' W :. Stone O.B.E., 1. Howe, announced 00 Februreturneu from irl %  February. than the enr of 7. Kits. FH\Sl\. former ViceParis. IX> It 1 ..wed to have submitted to the Bey. Questions In Parliament French pioposals arrived .1 duiideation <.f Urilain'* inlentioiv ln am enpcclsd to be given CIO DciiouiTccs I 'i-* riiiiiiralitui ni i': %  %  Ida -.; bj -1 rd from the threshed portion April 1. 1951 \f crop. At the present time the 'ni Reaeerch Council operate tin* UIOIIIIH. Flan At-sistante Chalk River Atomic Energy Pro. IX MaUoiy. Director ol the ject as nn agent for th* Atomic 1 l>. v. lopm. i;Kiv; on. Energy Control Board. which srimen: of 'i 1 aiie and Oon oatolllty 3.-, lafl Ottawa by an 0B Febf or atomic L l 1 for India. Pakistan and c in nda and repoi where he will examine through fhe Chairman "f the ..incnta of privy Counell Cnmmltte.' mi Set4 countries under provisions entitle nnrl IndustrlAl Re le Colombo Plan for the Eco,i„, i t( Hon. c n It %  %  c Development of South .mil ^^-^.^^^_^_ WASHINGTON. Feb. 25 Organ of the Congress of in lilttrlal Organisations said the CIO has protested vigorously against the "flagrant refusal of :r "nroa'aiioo," Tun.,' iX %  J^S 5/SSL^'cffl,^. "g 8 negotiate [, M | d lnr llin ip|jiTnt n nf die Research CounMannwhik un g gi 1 Irlng in Parliament next srenk. Members from both sides of the bout 250.000.000 bushel* gt have been I 1 repreDr. Executive Officer of the „. ketings which might bi exCouncil and will Ukg (,.,,,, .,(;,, j Fa.im Legionary allow private buyer: killed by tin niulii \4-irslvttvr: kDMBWmUBKM ON LEAXK pn 1 ujMt, the new agreement. b y the Executive Secretory of Un —U.r. QuesUon also will be raised Committee on I-ntln American regarding the supply ol meat fiom Ar.orv with Governor FYancln Argentina being 50.000 tons short K Newcomer. It added the *VlO of the amount promised under the ttnu of discrimination were Dr agreement. •' %  v Hut. r.nama-liorn surMeat trade quarter* said it i* g*" n > new practising In Jamaica .iitncult to slate exactly what U *nd Mrs. Harry. They wm %  < Ihe price being paid *O r Argenfu,lPd accommodation at Washtine meat. The avi rage H '" '' %  CcJon when the> a about £128 pei I0D but w.Hi "Pl ,, '' r d to claim rooms rcM'ive.i b] blast Asia. |e services ot Mr. Mali. to the International EcOTi--hnic.il COO %  I met t the Adn.mor of that Division Nik in CO % % % %  %  %  -.ill B< ay bin n is development project^ beRed ft Claim To Have Sunk Shipft TOKYO. Feb. 25. Comi'V P GRENADA. F*fa M -: Vincent Adrrunlatrato W. F. Coutts goes on liigv* IrOin March tth, GroHndii-hnrfi Hon 1 .i.i.n Barnard Gibbs. Assistant Administrator, A ill Bel .1 Adminphone ten minut--; curlier' —I' I" arloui adluslments and back payments it Is believed possible that the price would be about £160 per ton. The Meat Traders' Association urging government to restore ... .— ft buying to private trade. lent Cbl< d IO vr P bu,lc purchasing rtorr • Argentina. I/NIV.N IU. ea Vincent. Thla The meat traders said 'roeipmA FtKv^oS^laLummni elalmeri N rated C b) >-al trade nrranRemrt,| its ,„.„„,, u „. LondnnaBmli ,. Korean short batteries shelled in is the son of the late Thomas the protocol have not worked out w ^.,ptnort that Britain luui by Ceylon. ImBa ,. mk onft A „ )M ,.. a|bbg form ,, oM Qaqm )H rt> -m| m wr „ M hnd bK n hoprd inJ „ PJg^ ^P""t %  ocr last trs. Juliana Gibbs. now residing has come In for adverse crlliFranco. cism in responsible quarters.' The re| —r.p. posed >akistan. Kmploymenl Report nnP hr ,, lr | (nIf ) 0 Mrnr cho Do an.l In i*"i -of-Spaln. ployment in Canada remaingukdo Islands on Koren's west • • • a high level at the beginmnu > year despite seasonal s, (lfnt n a( ji 0 pvongyang o* ,nc la '' w %  in the construction !e>hlng t| ... outstanding figure In journalilture. food processmi: k Um btara and m tin %  %  of W. CBrlt navigation in I-'orcign Office Diiihs Ki-|iori alliance offer fitrtii Gen >port staled that the projliance would open all bv the North Kon % %  %  TNaw iKHittori out that thewbroad1 %  %  wlthoul ugh some of the workers ref uun datlon. 1 from these IndustrieHP the labour market for the and many more Bl in the logging inr: T of people eekie sed by more than W.tmo December 20. 19^1 ( %  il of 337 '100 at January 17. |Thu> figure Is con• Do nova of An avanloat, ed S,upei Kcds Prepare Drive On Hanoi HANOI, Feb. 25. r ,h:,n ,a„ ,ear bu 1. .U.r,; — <* !" •vcr than mid-January. 150. ,„,,,., rom lhc -,„ HMblnh %  2 the week endinft January REBELS FLEE MANII.A. K. Philippines Army troops clashed w.ih an tnuleteimined number of CmmuiiLM-led Hukb.lahap forces who apparently Intended to raid the e?amlubang sugar estate of TWO CHILDREN BURNT TO DEATH NSW YORK. Feb. 25 'i.ldren were burned lo death Sunday In a inv which dMtroytd the tw.. .vie. frame home p ntf ,i • !" •"> and iRnhh Foreign Minl-er AlGrlmamann. eight, and his sistc, hertp M-rlln ArlHjo w1lo vuite(1 Donna, four. Another broth, r London Tor King Gi-orgo VI funlunlo. firv..,. waaburnaj „, w n lmu ,^ U) Z^^ „. ertaeall.v attempting to %  >• %  ihei ciang*of couitesies —UP _u.|.. nanlafa aorta lo die llriti'sh flee i to bavg Ixi-n conveyed through the Spanish Ambassador lo Portugal. Nicolas franco, the %  I ''in %  Tra fcrHgn Office spokesman said the British attitude to Spain had not changed. He said contacts Ixdween Foreign Sccreturv Anlhonv Eden \BSXtt =?£*£! sentves lie of Increase dropped Vuu^'up'^SSr^ h C ** a '. .P ^^ M n, V* crnr of %  '.ni perimeter around orea Rolalinn Plan n MOl ItcU prepare.) lowing the recent enai iture the rich The estate, 30 _>re .veddin* big %  brauoo. A report on the 30 minute clash lowing me reeeiiT rnirire ••". o....>•• .iin.mit* nan ',, ,. ,, H ,,.,„,. ,.,_, Jhe 1st and 2nd Battalions of To'.kin capital 0B the Red River i !" ., !" ??. "r?*!"""*" frinees^ 1 t Infantn the frmainder of the gSfl %  infantrv Rrigndc w In March I luartcrs announ '"'' poured ... ' thefirst Friday. Liguna said an enlisted man About 10 French Union force* t "l' 1 *" rt ' lo hcr ~ .Si ,nd 2 were no longer In the light. They **• ,""*' Huk WBS killed and wandered In l had of mortar several others wounded artillery hih Communists Tne engagement occui reu m | fsgng of MORE SPACE MORE GRACE LESS WASTE WITH I III MM &6.C ELECTRIC KEER1GERAT0K Si'v thf \vtv MOIMM nmr nn Shntr ut THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. VICTORIA STREET Strips in varied Widths izes of FIBRE MATS BARBADOS CO-OP. COTTON FACTORY LTD. "We a/so sloe* Benlvood Chain with Cane Seals and Wood Seats" EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR LASTING BEAUTY lo.d)woairn.llov




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PACE SIX n \RR.\nns ADVOCATE r>\^ FRBRIARV n. 'Ht CoJ. Sec. Explains Reconstruction Of Phrt Of Runway II nay be aeked win seo.ooo DM beeir ngfced for i $40,000 i. am M, connoI!> Report The two-fold -Firs: it IU be nccostttrafi while ih< work it being done, lo lind the Hunw md right of the contre-l.no. \*ich do not cwjy trafllr. and if •By be ciiised been suggested that oilf own DepartNM of Highways and Transport should handle the Job. To thai the answer of the Director. I] yu-lided Engin.-er in the Department, has been that, suffering as he is from > he Just cam. | tafeg the necessary supervision, m "ior duties. Without the timely presence of the ..ige Hc-ident Engineer from Canada, the Barbados Government would. S-rond. the fickleness of the indeed, be "In the soup. 1 r has boun largely rcspnns.l "i for -Uao present predi, im-tnt Cntictrsm and it may not yet have ceased Finally I notice with ngie playing, its trtcka. The word that ttaga MM United Kingdom "poaalbW" In the last HI vernment has come m for HOW one of Mr Connolly's estimate of criticism. Now, Sir, I h.. i cost should not be overlooked. hc trouble to delve back into the I certainly do not wish In any 1MB correspondence. Thishows way to agvrhvate an already deli, haI ,_ Ort£*b*r iwa the terra JRJSTiJSJ r. K ;JrH ESS ..n*e :1.1s Jte..olution was sent tl ** n ma w,,h *h* Canadian Department of Tra*US> I For example. I have seen • %  reloan of an engineei lo uiideiiaki %  if the Auport ..nj i mixing It wpl, 1 'lunk. rani Ull%  Uuctl .1 lie*' Kunway have It ready for use not litter than the 1st July. 1930. and it.. rary of State was asked, in -pite of the ruling, of which this Gov•r-imiiit was well await?, th..t anbar. I rD & W. grants would not normall}* be mnd<> in respect of cxWdUlire already Incursufflce to gay that there is DO re fTencr to this nt nil in Mr, Connolly's report and H Mi finHi Chief Engineer of T.C A has stated his visits ii i %  nent con: P t x-"-llei;*wnjdIti(); th. nsphr.lti-OV.* %  ••* _i"VatfieapdUiosi Cnrni|ilinn Uon for m grant from Colonial nnd Development Fund. gild be ila-Midi ad (.'.mi Approved The sole crime' o: the U.K. There, hate alw been inalmu(.ovcrnment, so far gg J I Horn, of rorriiptltm t lo thl l that. despite the ruling tu I H-WU aey that up to the lima **"<*" I *"v v JuM referred it ap•f apeaklnt. no rvhlnur wh.il.""VKI a (Toot evrr of this ha-. beti placer! "treed in fj before the Governmeui. expendltiir* already Incun Later, although it was clearly I the time the scheme waa approved th;it "ai over thr sum approved should be from local revenue In The Lt'tfiHlaturr > tstin/ay COUNCIL "• %  •"" I i iim m i m • Uefc l.r Ik' -.--4-1. I* IS' %  MalaetN K'>-laii*n I. r-> j.. .i o.. ayiiii ( .....I •]. I. %  %  wl •' U agrlMIUfal D.i ..in ,'. ts HUh Equalisation Fund Bill Passed In Face Of Heavy Criticism # freaa aaae I ma: certainly expect the crops to remain aa food as they bad been to the cflioryn textile nulls in in the past decade, the creation %  hese Wesi Indies? Did they proof the Revenue Equalization Funu poee t > use a surplus as a foundadm not seem to i.e. .,<..* %  ilon rund for capital irrigation necessary. Th*. lund should lx works for agricultun. aad so earmarked for more preenius t-stabl sh an Insurance ol permathings like proper housing, betu-i nentl\ adequate crops m the roads, more sundpipea and so "i< fulU! Wh t he wanted to emphasise waa that the Government proposal was the worst possible for the i* of these surpluses. Bui he i-elieved this decision wa, nrrivi ( at through confusiiwi in the Government's mind in com. parti Qovenigflgfii mcoma wtnS Dangerous ClauaeRcfenmg to Clause 3 of ti. % %  B.ll. air. Talma said that lhe> were putting the money at thi disposal of the Accountant General who with the consent of the Secretary of Stale lor the Colonies, would mvot It outside paris. n for any Government fundamentally erroneous For Socialist Government, it was pOjUlcally dangerous fallacy. available cent for tbe social islation which """> were tl to implement. He thought tbi rraOMo 1.. Ih' % %  % % %  § %  k ,.-..%  tninl rr>" •< Ik' ""P' ,'ll.lMl.lil .1 Ih. H..k.l l*r Ih Hi H ~l.hl.S %  n.. 1. S'h.rM.i. hi ;. .-4 Ih' i.. J mil SM.tIS • %  Ih* dl>| l.-n-rniir %  • I •-r.il. la •apr-l'in.ra Ih* r. -.' r.n II I >pll. ......... ... Ih. • %  MH %  > Ih. B.W %  • %  •'4 l.l.n. it igb Th. ".Wsf Go've^men, inC^u* 3 w„ very dsnerou> come vas conspicuously different •"• %  'rom imslneas Income The primTh e w ere 9 n "' ury concern of business was with *-y that the money was still ommodilios Th r primary con"" %  denl Revenue or was still •f Government was with • % *dabia, but that depended upon iti2ciis. and of a socialist Govwhether the Accountant General ninenl with humanity, using remained dormant, and did nothIbat term in its classically chrlsing lo appropriate the mum %  lian sens*. with the consent ol the Secretar> Reaerves or the saving of surof State for the Colonies for expluses was a sound provision In penditure out of the island. Th.'i ompany flnance. Business inmoney so expended would be .so ome derived from sales of commufh less In the Island. LM ES Sen^the^ ISITSW %  md volume of Its revenue Such ,h uld .^.w mrt and wha ^ power wa< denied to business It morc ,r ,hcy w c nnarkiiH' had no control over the confum'" one y f "> r proper island wide ng capacity of the market, even "o" ln scheme, one could un(hat business income which so derstand. but instead of th.it clowly resembled Government inIhey wanted to put by $150,000 come, insurance. as a sort of reserve fund at the He did not want Government end of this year, and probably a' to reg.ird hli criticism as any obHie end of the next year anothci There ; Whole Runwny will BBt* abandoned or that it will be a constant drain on the TiCasnry 1 .irn onl> .i layman in i ngln^eriiib ''>ut. as regard", the" flrsi raw attention t Mi (''.nnnll .'ling 'G' Brltlal) Wagt i< . ..JKO J guess of (1,212.000 and been checked and adkal could .ay that ,hat backfill wa* to over •ng*w an clay. The Hon. C olo n i a l 9> in* >> uttla hard mal Iba uid thai iintish Waa* Indian ii" 1 G iiiiinent had had to shoulder stipulated Dial ill thruwill bo that rcoi r %  I.I, and liis symjh-J .[..Mi 1 S (bOt I.me bjr five thOUBil".nument and feet long a* I I that mailor. %  structne condemnation, but. he was warning them that If they continued on that line of policy. the working man of Barbados would have lo echo a sentiment in reference lo the Labour Party echoed two thousand vestrs ago in the highways ami 1150.000 SrerMWy OJ Stair .-.pprovr.l TO„„„ %  „„, „„„.!, %  „ „ f:,,,,! WlU, moto If.Jf JL,,^„' ?,"k„l !" '??*>" %  I>lcn.>l ol 40.000 making a ,„„', ,„ ^^ on5 UM> ., .. ,„„„ ,.,„„„. „,„, J t .-" u *>,h-Tl*T,^ c **£ 1 '^u". L" ."'" ...... I n..S W _' u,,d '" "" I' 1 *!" %  %  '" laTtt.al Mr vimhii. ...rt ... fc. .... S3H=L SyVSM RHEUMATISM and agonising BACKACHE GONE! iw U'-d at S i this BnS neer is not an wtf ao HM i.I'm.,f Ac rebuilding ll.erenf. ,r %  .*i-' ,time the 1*T.V .. ) "V I'•. u %  %  it dfe ol Wei -• %  : %  ••-Ti' f rcauir/l." whiia Mr Corvfl ligt no majra; e>friordimr .-Miei; *ui' uJ I fT'iulroU '" h %  t v %  .r" port at at-aw Air.**da over, there an* %  %  CUiTenT expindJtiirc fw ar.ee If • ii %  I I %  much th:.* %  raa %  %  %  %  %  labla cw Hani of any Runway. Ttv ami BxamhtftioTM %  %  that ihe < i %  that thi:T ( . : • : Viceg of M .'" i xi ri T (' \ '.i nnkina detail I N "er fri the ROB tember. nnd of Mr '' i abgti k %  %  areas tree In .tions. The Resident En, ed Secretgrj cor. y %  %  *2 *tn or. the hand mat .-• :e had expssmed the %  • .ftood at S' %  of suie wllh a "f*lt srere' ill the Barbados Go^ei ii id given an lo rran-C-n--i U. piocead wiui struction wMhUH deUy %  tor use kfj at* I W11 h o %  T A aid aaw ***• praakare-3 ta> caS ss absraakdaa 4B JaaaTtowut-kassad *, thraawtli DeassT-.Trarjpc-.u jcryh.-*-: a—sor -^1 11 ia esawr.-. ZTw-^T* •>k had .. riaar Dtmi ga lj !" *J ** r 7 W agree W %  Mnad N saaas %  dgasi ... rack birirtl anfrhehaa'Q The work should be gflsssi 11 i(d ^^^ ,. ^ y.^, ^ coostruction before the nest wet eeeawe. sags j| r caaavoUy bad not in i in the eewtM A ass net. btf teadang b atwee n the lie" and that factor b to a large ejrrrctn hs personal % %  ; tent respon'lble tor the present seem that a good deal ana ment). It seems '.hat the use of inferior material foe a c.ir.not have a record backfill Reading rop and good wether lines they could see th..' for making %  runway at the hurry and the night work a good %  teal of the flay excavated had ^'.iln. ,1 L I'-.' *o td the He hiid illowlng pataaga) from the En' %  eporl:— .r ho :.e second point was that th. C i nnj bad gins: u( ^ n hc Ub5 shouW b< %  *• lealed ..u IK.. agWa !" 5?as; "verj -j,matter w 'hat an over conservatl\- — %  a,_ r how,^ have chTed ^ Uc> w bc J"f P'T'"-ed by •"•-f „. i!.. p fr 1 aovtrumenl Although the Idea of hiiso-keeping" budget was round in principle yet, l n view of ihe fact thai the price of sugar guaranteed for th e next win or eight years, there were -o many pressing and glaring matters; which hod to be "fixed". ;hal he could not appreciate u I-abour Government adopting ,i oolicy such as was proposed in the BUI. Their experience was that for the past ten years the sugar cane crop was reasonably good and In most cases even better than was %  iibly yesterrx P c ct*d. *nd he did not thereAddress to the l r *' *** wnv Government should fllia to Co-opt In ;,do l ,t "n attitude of despondency -larm. He felt that they should Boom hMael Six For S4ud> Of I hrer i%>|>ulutioii 7h. Ho i the purpose of r • li; n H *-' c 'l l h ^t i that matirinl and It waInferloi r ovarM**yi 'lv In hope, and he d been told that it I I >'X that owing to the fact that I that distinguish I Rapt HI service lor flying c lav and roral r<>ck. Tliat was II "' :| durtng the lime 01 quJU %  11 ados, and it is our oplnt>iv %  these condlllons can l*' < i with if the work is carI HI accordance with meth' %  when It fM % %  %  January, 1952. ; i h nomlngUoa of DMBIben from the House of Assembly I lo serve with members from the i Honthe l.-glslatlve Coun-I %  d fbi but not If undertaken 1 he report had stated lha •-. -.: Select Committee to _ 7T bi •. i.. 1 ^ ....r i... ..i h trouble Coral Unstable i i>u Mil Bill lli> U UNUCHHani . -_ ... "*' •'-%  ". —..vi. ..%  "( .nrthod (). Thr Brillsli g**£ c ^* b Sf* ,n u "" ubu ' "" Will Indies AlrV(y have nl tartnol M the urn nm ; |„ Bnrbndo. and to nimwd UwmMlvn in wrlttnj ""'; ^'J w %  v ">-wide >l..l. %  ..mcndalloni lor Oral-' 'nil It i. our undendand.ni Ihut mnl wnh which he did not agrre. ing with this problem, and to .;IN i ihev will onratfl undar anv con """ Hon "*"• Hu hwn went i.ii Hi ISC has nominated thi I iil.ll. lot Trana-Ctn"J'H opinion was that c. membera, ot such a a T. Alldcr tove -fat sweet fresh •flsvori %  The sweetness of nourishing corn toasted to a turn! AqcT Kel ogg's keep their Corn Flakes coming, to you crisper. fresher! year eargoiii in MOTHH KNOWSjusil WHEN SERVING BEER... SERVE THE II E S T! CARLING'S isi.\ ii I.\III;I. LAGER BEER IS FAMOUS THE WORLD OVER IV* it nt't'tl tt I'M l KEB SEE THE FILLERYS SAVES i-AiMt %  • %  %  run OBTA1NABI.C I'ROM : Messrs. C. F. Harrison I ;o, 1-U!., Ua Costa a> Co Lt.: i;. -.. %  : II :, ,v f i C. S. Pitcher Ad ALLEYNE ?,THUR & CO., LTD—Agcnta. W//////A*VV^^V#%VAV/V//W.V*9 FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whitepark Road For leather ot every eoloui II cleans, presertet— and how il poliahes' AA jour relailcr fot Pronert's. m p vtRT t N'oihing else is quite ihe same. Watch the difference ii makes to your shoes! i PROPERT'S s n i i II l: \ ii V.::::::-j.:;:::;:::;:;-^, •.-,.,-..,..,.,...........• RgS^SE & LACKWELL f%Sg@&$-#* *** MMQUSforPcktts 1 for generations •/*non Pj^kl* While Onions Miaed Pickisi Codtuil Onions Gnerkim Chow Chow %  Lecai -tgenit T Geddfi Grsni Lid Pf dje.o The Genuine "47U" Eau dr Colognr comes from Cologne on Rhine; il li now again obtainable in the original quality, made according to the famous and jn-rct formula since 1792. Can your Family 'say this? We SLEEP wellLOOK wetland FEEL well / N ATURAL, restful .l-c r k il.c high road lo radiant health and htnes* . nnd -.ouBllei* ilioii-anJ ol nirn, "omen ami children who drink 'Otaltific' at hedtime are en)*" inu ilie heM kind of %  laep every night. If \ou I'-"' rea>on to helietc that your I.-i iii.it 4t rentful and beneficial east •liouid bsi tej tin* i-ifi-ci ol a cup of deUcsoUS 'O.-ltine' loni-lit. •Uvalttoe' aJerp In J |-ertcctlv natural way, for It i prepare' from Nature's best I....J. -„|,t"V It llll)' ..'.,„ and ksvlisa tul cheerful OVAI.TIM-: %  IS1ITS DatBa -i.J dsishtfilli crap, 'OialonV BXWK t,^l,...U l -<-io IKfi if. ii %  *.:' • %  %  %  iMM ln jMM.. IBBBssai M ess r s' n ddKHKn 'OValunt', ar.) we hitl.lv noun.hmj tr,.l,l ,rWl •Jeep. See how recVasbad i you feel ;> ii>'* mninlng Voor own evpitiiii...-ill < -nsioceyou (lut Ovattaaa i* ihe one food heverage lor Krii tumil'rr i>t \niir lamily, lo pronu.ic pravrhil l.ip. lo renew enerxy and to keep vuu all leclinn and looking \onr beat. IgSM ).. oll( hfve .... JAMAICA — GEMS 1891. LONDRES, FLOR, PANETELAS at COLLINS IHili, SHIMS A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN ENHANCES THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME you can achieve this by keepinj yours in good conriv lion. We can itabt JBu from our comprehensiv. ranRc of GARDEX TOOLS WE HAVE — 5"E'"'S. FORKS. HOES. BAKES. EDGING TOOLS SPRAYERS. SPRINKLERS. Here's a special offer for this Week I in Rl'RBER HOSE ,, |6e. per foot Nell. BARBADOS HARDWARE CO., LTD. No. 16, Suan St. Phcne 2109, 410, or 3531



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WKDVE5DAT. FTBRIART 2T 1H BARB.XOIW u>vcrATE PAGt SEVSX Equalisation Fund Bill Passed In Face Of Heavy Criticism 1. KLIM)-. M -•. mm 2. KLIM ..,. ..id... rtTr(**r*Mae 0 from paae C Hi' -sked why effect a aving Men there wa* so much under|ployinen' and unemployment. nut >trtiN> ways and means spending some of the money emplovimt:! 11. Ml %  t when the Estimates n>4 consider**!, they Mid see "omething construe %  oy the bad housing and the money not u*ed for Social service*, but he could not Subscribe to the view that comparisons should be made between the economies of the Vnited States or Canada, and PBarharlo*. It was %  fallacy to do •> %  or to .-uggesj thnt Barbados f shn.ild follow the United States i whose economy was far m..re •Vxibio The i( uiii.iii Any one who travelled through the various parishes could see Ute varying effect of the rainfall In places like St. Lucy and St. Philip, at. compared with parishes lute St. Andrew. St. Joseph and St. John, where perhaps, the canes could remain in the iields for another six months. One had to bear In mind that with the uncertainty of rainfall, provision should be mule for the day when there VII i-w i'iii•fall, and a corresponding low crop ,and therefore he did not think that any progressive member would say that Government was trying to accumulate sums of money in the Treasury and did not want to spend it on behalf of the people. He himself was aware cf the apalling housing condi'ions in this country, and he knew that no ne would want to hoard up money in the Treasury. At present they were getting a good price for their sugar, but no one knew what the position would be within the years ahead. Those were things which had to be borne In mind, nnd he did not think Government should be accused of trying to accumulate reserves and not spend money on social service.for the benefit of the people. Signifying his intention to sup. port the Hill, Mr. MotUey protected from the point of view Df having a Reserve Fund in case I -ilaniity. He therefore thought that the present money should be used for social services or for the development of the basic economy of the island. The existing social service*.*' Mi O-iwfurd said, "arc -wfully deihien: In years like these, we aaaaasd t.ike .vi-iv cent we can get our hands on and use it to improve %  gd SaTfaaasj the basic of the Mand In a counn> likr this with one mdulrv. you can take up mono ftod i vest it in any part of the world— of the Commonwealth. It is sheer nonsense." he added. UatpSd, we cannot afford to have this monokrfS m Pelican. Every cent should be Invested in Barbados, .ir.d mvot**d at once." Mr. Crawford suggested thit the money could he invested in a cement mdusti). there bains; in the island the materi.il which could be used in its manufacture, and hinted that British Guiana was contemplating manufacturing this type of building material fiom Barbados lime stone. He was not >uggesting any blind expenditurr <>f OoVenUMDt funds, but most of them would welcome ture from the old economic policy, as a result of which the economy of the island could be so strengthened that in case there was a drop in rainfall, in *o fJr as their basic industry was concerned they would be ii little better off. Mr. Crawford expressed the view that the money should be %  pent on economic development, nfter winch they could expand the colony's %  oelCJ ssrvaDSa. In this respeet, he suggested that the set. ting up of an Induatral Corporation which would bring in a number <>l industrial consultants or experts to establish a few more industries in the island. He re. pcated that he could not subscribe to the policy of putting by money for rainy days in the face of underemployment an,| um-mploy. ment K He opined that the colony would be Justified in borrowing monev for industrial expansion, if the'v dld not have it to use of their own. They should be Justified In putting I In debt ,i by so doing, they could expand the economy of the colony Mr. Crawford attributed government's policy to the fact that when they assumed the reins of office, they were taunted that they would soon have the colony bankrupt, and UkS) were therefore afr.iid. failing to realise that can? shown by the other people was not because thev were so furiously interested in the welfare of the colony, but because they felt that they would be called upon to contribute to a greater extent whenkoevar the financial position of the colony became impaired. If they borrowed money and invested It wisely and soundly, he was of opinion that a]thou,-, it would increase the publicdebt, the economy of the country would be far better off. In other words, they should have no reason to be afraid of increasing the public debt if In so doing they sought to strengthen the economic structure of the eoloQT He lielievcd thnt the sti.tem.-nts made by the junior member for St John deserved the utmost (-niisideration by all the members of the Chamber The mere inference to be drawn from section 3 of the Bill, that there were places even within the Commonwealth which would be willing to use some of the island's money In order to Improve conditions in their own particular country, should l>e enough to make member! realise that Barbados should consider doing the same thing. If even they had to borrow money, much less when Barbados had Its own money which could be used for economic and social improvement. He had much pleasure in seconding the motion by the Junior member for St. John, that the Bill be completely rejected. Government did not even offer a compromise and say. the fund should l-v used every other year but was asking them to dig their hand Into the public funds to tho tune of $150,000, especially in a country where the basic industry wea dependent on rainfall. Mr. A. >:. S. Lewis pointed out that when the idea of having the Reserve Fund was mooted, anoSssM H to the matt, then, however, there had been an %  I the present House atstNll b-vn told of what wa proposs-i In view of the statement issued .timent in lU Memorandum ti. the Estimates f, 53. that it was the intention "f the Government. In the abaSa* • Of the proposed fiscal .present the fulk available if the gen. position of the col urn and to determine It* future fin econoanit satta-? for tho next live veais and that || | pre !" t the Paml Batrraj <* Barbados to the May. she BlU should be delayed until the Survey was presented. Mr. Lewis abhorred the Idea of taxing people and not the money for the an i of social conditions, and sugS ted as an experiment for at *t five years, complete -abollon of school fee* .it %  ondary schools. He urged further a bold programme %  •( capital expenditure on belwir people of Barbad.*. an that, in view of world COnfUtkSnS and threats of a war. be unwise f,., Q .. invest rmtiey m countries which might as ,i result of %  w .. hands. He rsanliiilBtl ..the, funds had been OP the House had never been given the'account* of the various funds. ond urged that account* should r ."ft"! e P """ ; tuu.ilisntinn Fund. Hil.ly.ns inCummin, fJJ •luoted nguie* to show the steady Increase In the money spent on Hucatkn, Medical Sciv age pension, water, road He said" that the> gxsra IfthsJ wanted houses badly and the. intended to continue their buiSdllii' programme. As to pubUc baths he said that he was surprised to hear an attack on such a question when it should be widely known that pubUc baths was n matter for local government wnetMr* .ipproachcd for loam for building public baths, they bad granted them. Of course money shoulu spent to establish good IrrigaUon The Senior Member fur S' Phi p Kd the point about Irrigation, should know that the equipment was obtained front the united Kingdom and bt the controls, they were not allowed to get what equipment thev wan.ed. The Government intended to spend money for equipment for irrigation when it was available He said Uial the Senior Member foi Si Philip knew ih.it Ihe stabilisation fund was for tho sugnr industry and could not be spent %  >r ..nvthing esle and he was mihleading the community hen l„ tried to make that plea. At this point, Mr Crawford rose and objected that he was being Incorrectly quoted Me Mid that hi had distinctly said that the stabilisation fund for cushioning Uv industry in case of a bad year. He added that It was false to say that they deliberately taxed the people to create the reserve fund. Those were the main ponn to which he intended replying. Tho motion for the MSSUon the Bill was now put ma feated by a 11—5 majority Th.. a voting for the raj* u< a % % %  < n Me.v.. r K T.-.lmn .) r \1 • ley, W A. Crawford. V It Vnughan and O. T. AIM. Those against wen M. L. E. Smith. T. O Brvan. I( • Mapp. E W Harrow. F L WalOtt, i; II Adams, M. E. Cox, L. A. Williams. J. E. T. Brancker. F. Goddard and Dr. Cummins A debate which lasted near!' two hours was Introduced when the Hill went into Committee The debate was lend off by Mr I Mottley (E) who called fu thi House to Insert in the clause thai none of the funds were to be invested in the Union of South Africa because of the i ...ial %  !li rriminnUon which was practised there Clause three of the BUI staid %  %  %  %  %  : the Arcoiintiih' >>< I %  ..' I vest all or an) paiii tha fund i any securities of, or guaranteed b> tha (jovernmenl of any part of U* feuah ComntonwaaJth, oi In securities as the Accountant Gen eral with the approval of th* Secretary of State might In h. ,r t'tn.i Mi I i ".! ley wanted in ertad afti ish Commonwealth" tin a .it. H b > Aim. Mr. J. B. T. Brancker wtv •feonded the motion Mid thai i lose .in oppoi ..mber and outside, by masquerading farm M t-: the Union of South %  badoa and other parts of the Fm>it of thai beknighted Hwernment. Mr O. %  AAasaa il.i there were certain things they do and one was the pasarimmatorj lagl'l Mr .. 1 AIMer III be would ha*S SUpp.i .menument If It had said that the hands were not to 1 %  The colony rS nvesl oversea*. He said that though he felt ,i. %  thi as rada] dlscnmiuaUon. he was prae:i:h to see that the ex\frica might only be hurting their own economy. Ooing that would be to curtail the BsasOS of Investing in the best place. Mr M \ ( nasgSjSi (0) ..M U %  .i v> .%  .i country Ahlrh hi b i n itton %  I > %  was concerned unir> had shown emphatic man%  I noJ ...iiwhat peopls thought and nil %  all morals and justice. sag wara .i law unto Ha sd to sdepl the BWdox, uncivilised, in,i brutal measures to I'uncut* then own i>lii> Therelid not think that as %  StftslstOfSi lbe> DjSSol i t h Uaa constitutional proce\ i i'v BouUi wore uiKonstiiiiiionul in Has SS-> ... Mr A. K. t> Lewkt (L) en. iirod afhaj was 'be position witli the • institutional law. .1 liorniiiHin .if South Africa imild 'ay (hut no person from hOUld tome theie and %  n thai %  itMar type iii.iiv\e.illn law which %  I'd thorn t i iht bs inMr. E. n. MsaasM rstb ra* I i ..ti discrimination and aid th.it there WOTS times In one %  Ufa whan ons raahaaa] tram I id OCSS and how l %  iftasxt, He said he trantsd to hssr how the senior i-inl"! for St l.uey would tak" tha Mffftf E.T0B U bs vmi.t %  pt them, if lie were a "playMr. Adasstk Drat aj neceasity of expidiling the Bill and then said that It waa not a question of being eonsUtuUonal or not' constitutional. ThereWOSI things they could not do CDUld not pass a Bill sayu.g Praoch good* . ..iule.1 in Barbados. Ti not a sovereign state llv'.iid Ui.it ev.ry .s.l.ruil ii. %  JOaTtalaUon waa to be paaaed. Th .t i Bsataaasl a* do with tha Governor's re-.1'.. put in uch an arrsandrnent would scdy bo emajiculaUn.: the Hill Mr. E. I M-4Uev SouUi AfnaaVi paassBsj %  BUI Ing Barbadians bsansj ptwsssowM going Ut South Africa. Mr. Adaaas replied that South Africa was a Sovereign country. He referred to th.bats .i-reement that when a county was at peace with assolssl try. it should not make dlscrimiii i> i-l.ition against them. Mr Oitawaaid i dd Owl ii am sheer hypowithout ire :(.should aa*prsal then arali ai %  ntry Mr Hi %  .n. i.. | I | tha Senna 1 bad not i %  %  | havi i rofound rlisagn i i i: Sd Sata ojuallflad tha sdos thai ii would be .or them to POM tha Hill With ll I tnant (or live 1 %  I...'. I>I mo. %  Africa II,. then ... m on to mal riling .-\.-i Ihe i olntod .: %  %  i South Africs. uch a ii.ioi.Ti the other colonie> ;iini M hid m that country. Mr Lswal i id i< II. i constitution oputKM bsfbra srh oul r i %  .•pillion ll down thai Inaj could la) down terms stating boar" tiMt) could spot) bsii tnoosg and ha wai i onvtaotd thnt no conatlhitksnal Uia h takS ih.it in-.h'. They wan i thai Ihi % i I there. Mr i M nsurrwa (I | tiniv hid. i %  Bill WBJ toiitriirv to .ill the accepted prill th which he had baa h kcqualntad from tha UISM bs %  H Ona could onl> con elude that the pSCSOtl who con ceive.1 the IdSS Of .< BSVOl Ul Kqualisution Fun-i h;i!<•• %  c**trel MADE BV THE MONKS OF BUCK.FA5T A B B Cite* W It you teel worn out, deprened. or |enarally run down a glist or two %  day of Buckfjit Tome Wine wilt quickly restore lo energy jnj tone up the whole nervout ty.cam Giving new vitality it fortifies you agnnit fever ind exhauttion an I remember. Buckfut Tonic Winespecially valuable 'tar illnssi. ifrf KKKIAST IO\HW.\I; EVERYTHING PRICED TO GO!!! SHOP WINDOW TO THE WORLD DUNLOP FORT CAR TYRES £ffiD-. ; BARGAINS MEN! FOR FOR 1952 Visit Britain in May for the most famous of all nut-jn.il trade fairs. Nowhere cl* c rf T i. jeen such a sail and varied i.^,.'.a\ of new products den^ncl for ihe uorld by a single counu>. BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR MAY 5-16 LONDON • BIRMINGHAM tNIORM*llON about txkibtMt, coMingnri, tpcdjl di'phvi and fb I *> ""i t* nbuimul /'i>i Kf tb Cagaab -Mier at Portof S/w m Complmtlrr ut CaUaaW, BrUtgriowH. AMERICAN SOCKS formerly $1.00 pr NOW '2 Urn 9Mo SHIRTS lormwiy $400 4 $5.00 SOW ISVtS A -'lil ni. STRIPED POLO SHIRTS ior Men and BoyB iormerly $2.38 NOW SI. I I BARGAINS FOR WOMEN! SPUNS ,orm rW WBTmSfVt BORDERED SILKS Iormerly $189 yd. NOW gl.OO yd. CREPES Iormerly SI.40 ydNOW 6f. Yd. HUNDREDS OF OTHER LINES AND RAYON PIECE GOODS OF UNHEARD-OF VALUES SHOES formerly .. $6.00 pr. NOW sJ.oo A $.1.00 pr. CLARKS CHILDREN SHOES Sizo 4-6 Formerly $4.41 Pr. Now S.'I.OO Pr. DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (ECKSTEIN BROS) THE BARGAIN HOUSE 30 SWAN STREET Dial 2702 S. ALTMAN — Proprietor.



PAGE 1

%  u.i i OIK HAKKAIMX AitVMATE WEDNESDAY. rwnjAHY . MM AKR\IK)SalAI)\(XAll: UJ. %  )•• %  it. IMiiNn \W.III.MI..V. l.l.ruarv 27. 1152 I I I II III in in* excellent bf his behaviour at n meetinn to which he was introduced as a i "journalist with ideals." His audience which consisted of the members of a conference were depressed by the "sad"'fact that hardly a word of the proceedings had been U-|K>I ted in any newspapers." Wickham Steed began by telling them that if none of their meetings had been reported in the Press it was because those %  who had taken part in them had fallen into the sin of dullness. He told them that they were really competing for space in newspapers against the pressure of advertisements of which some might be worth several pounds per inch oi type, and he asked them seriously to reflect whether anything that had been said at their meet%  ings was honestly worth several pounds per inch. At the end of the meeting a pious lady remarked to a Right Reverend Bishop: "it is all very shocking, but it is the only inI teresting meeting wc have had." The ne.. papers reported it fully the next day. Wickham Steed's story does not provide an | accurate comparison with the account printed in Sunday's Advocate of a meeting of the Council of the Association of Cultural Societies. But in one respect a similarity is noticeable: on both occasions there is a fading of resentment against the Press. In words attributed to the Chairman at Thursday's meeting the statement is made that "after 1!M8 the year the Association Ml formed, the clubs began to complain of an unco-opera live attitude on the part of the Press and he felt that this was one of the main reasons why the work of the various cultural groups had begun to Hay." In the Advocate Year Book 1951 information supplied by the Association of Cultural Societies shows that the Association was formed in July IM7 and its inaugural lecture was delivered on October 3rd 1947. The Association omitted to give any information as to its affiliated members, but the three main affiliated organisations are known to be the Barbados Museum and Historical Society, the Barbados Arts and Crafts Society and the Y.M.C.A. which is "an Association for the purpose of catering to the spiritual, educational, social and recreational needs of youth." It was not until the end of September 1949 that the Kxtra-Mural Department of the University College of the West Indies began its activities in Barbados and became affiliated with the Association. It is worth noting that at a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Association held at Wakefleld on the 21st February 1951 it was reported that certain affiliated groups had complained that the programme arranged by the British Council, the Extra-Mural Department and the Association of Cultural Societies had tended to undermine the individuality of the groups. On this occasion the suggestion was also made that the Associations Committee should meet regularlv to receive reports of the activities of affiliated groups. This was an important suggestion and perhaps has more bearing on the Association's apparent difficulties than any alleged lack of co-operation on the part of the daily Press which during this period spent several hundred pounds reproducing paintings and photographs or pottery work, arts and craft classes and other cultural subjects: printing long articles on literature and art: publishing editorials in support oi the Barbados Arts and Crafts Society and of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society: reviewing each issue nf BIM and Weymouth magazine that was received: trying to MICOUragt writers by running a series of local short stories in the Evening Advocate: and sponsoring an exhibition at the Museum to encourage West Indian photographers and to spread a knowledge of Barbadian antiquities. In addition to the ungrudging use of its columns to publicise the activities of whatever cultural or artistic merit could be discerned In Barbados, tinAdvocate daring this period sometimes, despite continuous rising labour and material coats published without charge notices of activities organised by ihe association of Cultural Societies or Its affiliated organisations. Yet UM Association which was formed in Julv 1047 did not convene the first Annual General Meet ins! <>f .is Council until February 17th. 1D49. Perhaps if the Association were to meet more often and kept the public and Its members informed a* to Its activities as was done in a Report for October IW7—January 1949 and a st.U'in.'iit .>f receipts and expenditures for the • %  SIM parted the difficulties which are now being expei icnccd might disappear, while the daily Picsi Hrlll undoubtedly continue In help as It has so considerably helped during ihe whole period of the Association's existence "Interest m the arts" as John Harrison wrote in Chapter VIII of the Advoc.ite Year Book 1951 "is growing, and an amalgamation of the potential assets of the Museum and the Aits and Crafts Society might produce the Cultural Centre of which there has been so much talk and so little effective action in recent years." But organisations of this kind, he rightly noted, cannot be created successfullv at the stroke of pen—or he might have added by a flood of printers' ink. Only solid administrative ability and hard spade work will bring success to any organisation, cultural or otherwise. And enlv n Bpontlbla backing of competent leaders and good administrators will sustain success. Colonial Service Needs Militant Communism sjouna larmen and C.ood prop— AU been made IX1NDON ted at*/! i expa on of existing "** rer, the A : Surv< establishment,*. Itte worlds democracies, intent on prefaced with Some Colonial lerrltoriM which; ^y,,,. their own existence seek to contain difficult problems and, did not before pgaaess them, now.** than i I ONI) iiing to IKN Colonial office •unces. % %  ly difficult problems and, did not before pgsseu them, now) • ------. .-The job*, for which the Secreat Uhe same time, with stlmulathave Geological Survey Departthe outbursts of militant Communism and •taM fa Ihe Colonies in | :heir solution mcnia. the exntncinrt* fif rmBm.iri.wl rslinnalnim -elects candidates, are On the one hand there are the Other new .apartments are ,fl Hated in an official booklel. rapidly expanding Colonial popexpected shortly. "Appointments in Mia Majesty's ulalions and more urgent deIt to anticipated that the premands for higher standards of war slaft of leas than 50 geologVacancles at the end of IBS! living. On the other, then are brta and allied, technicians will occurred principally In the folimmense poesiblHtirs both of inhave increased shortly to a total lowing brauchr: Education. 281; creasing yields per acre by the of more than ISO. Civil engineers. 86. Admuustraapplication of existing scientific Occasional vacancies wiU occur five Service. 78. Mr-in %  Barhnt.wle.igr. and. in many cates n Nigeria, Geld Coast, Kenya, vice, 77; Agricultural Mrvm of aztandinai ..rreagw. if probUganda. Tani unyika. Malaya, 65: Electrical and Mechanical |TP of wet* control and water BrltW) Guium. and Jamaica. supply can be solved, Colonial Legal Service I (111. ..tl.Ml con' peoplesOf the *nd that society if he Is to bo f^rrnitv with Ihe ffMral t LESSi # .^i. effc uvi * health adaainhuration thrnt ij* l£ iMUM E3 b IWW ".akin, hr.dway. '""<• "apK-.all.t apDomlm on. arrite staffed A P" "'" ""' ""illations ImJ curativ.. and preventive 1 DOMlble extent posed by llnance and shortage emc. %  "<* highly tee"" <' could pour down, perhaps, "to meet Ihe plea fn SSTLSS ZJ?L%S2X£E& fc h TSS?.aS, b S ffSEjof the .ibora.cd pcop.c." in order to ,.b„>h 1 The heights of Tibet, the vast snowclad ranges of the Himalaya's form a barrier) guarding the northern outskirts of India. And the jungle-clad hills of northern Burma, range upon range, would present almost unendurable hardships and difficulties to a big deploying army. But to the east, in French Indo-China. Communism, backed by Mao's Chinese troops across the frontier, tries to drive its spearhead southwards to Saigon and across the South China Sea towards the rich islands of the East Indies. It is there that French troops, fighting side by side with Foreign Legionaries and loyal Indo-Chinese use their American arms against a fleeting enemy which vanishes into the jungle after it has struck or been struck Victory for Communism in the bamboo undergrowth and on the paddy fields would overturn the global strategy of the Western Nations. For, from the north. Mao's Red divisi* Medical and He, In many of them then Moat of the vacancies are ... the Cast, West and Centr.il ^ % %  "* •'"" The Legal Service whkh Africa* and In Sou*. East Asia, Throughout the Colonies there covers a wide ranfe of legal apwhere there is a wide field for '* v rv vigorou* demand for point men ts, ii..s vacancies in recruitment for qualilled men l, "' etiucition. In moat denearly all the colonies bu. prinand women in all type* of posts, pertinents, especially those in cipally in ta$\ West and CenIn other Colonies, the demand u. Africa tlic central tlgine to the t .,i Africa an.i Malaya. Usually smaller and confined to certain general Education OflW Who „ Arlt ap|K.intmenl for • acfenUfic, technical and profcmay be called on to teach, inbarrister it to a post of magifatonal app-^ntments. ^rninlater according to trate or Crown Counsel. For The publication makes e : .<. TIw_ i. design,, ( j lcltorjl there are posta In that Britain's Colonial poUcv U *dly not. Uie firm division beSupreme Couit Registries Land not to reserve, out of hand, the tween these respective functions OfflOSS and the Uke. Solicitor best loba for applicanU from 'hat exists in the United Kingmay m \ %0 be considered f"' Pdc m J -. pointmenu aa Magistrates It states categorically: It Is !" .*5 ho > ,n ** Colonies reColoniaJ Medical Service own altalm. If IhU policy if lo TI-aducatfaa of girU ... bo rtall.y: r public mtlam l %  behind that of boy, !!*?'"'"",„:;",'• ,'iSii., !" ,,,, ,.l ll. {-"lunu^ mug be adapted '"" ^ ""* Mli, a'ng headway. Jh" e are specialiM pp.innmn .!;;:;:.7onT^d belied A,,t ,, T h ,. u m iuu. im. a^^^ifiShSys^ by Incdi people. -re in general recrullc u> pronreaj u probably — ed only for Ihoae poal in Ihe general habil of early marriage I" !" Cofcrtal Servlee for whkh ,.,ni• <'-. frtaT a"'"^ !" s ".hort'a'ge"" oi' en Malay's Eastern seaboard 1 % '' ^SL -. SPSS SJ^ " "'"2 The ,,uce talks dra K on; a K ain and A wide range of overseus appointmanta. It adds, reniiihi open 1.1 nverseas candidates, because for one reason or another many colonies themselves can|hin ,. v< ., Wi h lh , ncrn9 ^pgy shortage and ISlt.W?'!L r l iT vX"n to nSS *• r '-" 1 '-' 1 '"" f ^e Importance f or Medical Offlcers from eve! M SS needs of n^ode^ adS^ ,0 ? £** fTT •*" occur in almost all Colon.istr. riL modern adminwtdeapread demand for developMedical Departments. '*..• . „ ment schemes. Thc-e include r'(,l„nlol Vet-rimrv Colonial Afcfrieultural Service the ImqrovesMBl si road and ColortUI Vetertnar> Agriculrure Is by far the most ii ..tions and the rel>eparimenti Important Industry In most Colclamatlon UN utilisation of land Most Colonies are dependen onles. The role of Departments hitherto unsuitable for growing flpon Agriculture and In tun of Agriculture Is to deal with f "Od for consumption locally or upon | ne Colonial Veterin;ir matters of general agricultural of export. Departments. The work of tb> policy. It assdsU In the Introfhr ro-operaUon of the enColonial Veterinary Ofn< l duct ion of improved systems of gtneer '^ all important both for w jd 0 i y from u^i n f bis fellow Ii farming, wench may include tho In. iWOpmsM schemes as England, primarily he Is con application of mechanised meih • 01 ror building hoapltals and cerned with the P re\ention. con r-ls, the introduction of better ^-h.-ils and providing water and ro | and eradiration i planting materials, the use of elecirnnv s.-rvices. among livestock en masse. A manure* and fertilisers and the t'olonint tleological Survey thai control Increases, encouragement of new, more %  awvlssa nna a subordinate veti etrotWIIttC ways of working the expand tho tune -ml land Further, the Department An impor tant stea towmras eaargy spent on extensive inonioear modern American equLpment. demonstrates the advantages Of JJw •ConanilC dqvelopment of | aUon campaigns will decrease R„t th*v ari. unUlr^lo *.i/fr i<. fi. improved systems of farming to <'.,]..-..1 tern'ories is a thorougl. and he Veterinary Officer will i Ul ltWy *** """^^ ever lo n l local populations. f their mineral rebe a bie to devote more attention \ armv. Thev will probablv never be perjrsizi^jLssfs ^cJ^z&s&s "^ s?v*, ^r? o uke ^ i n a mass ons,augh o n produee. It inyestlgaUw and j^rvjee wUcftJI P'!i! n 2, !!l? __ l!0n ; ln Nigeria. Kenya, Uganda. Tanthe Red Chinese mainland Such a landing would have to be shep—,,1* foothold in South Eastern Asia and threatbar*. Servicer CM1 l^ctoeers '^'ci! su^bouT In the Colonial Service there a i ;ill(l ,„ u,,Held. •Mfl wide scope for The outflow of medical gradu-1 again the Red Leaders throw out a hint that '"' "'.^"w'tTEa" i ,,rs from tn ". c ^ lorl 1 '" they earnestly seek peace. As often, thru civil, mechanical and electrical, hospitals cannot, for manv yc,ii". *_.,," ,„, • L %  And today the demand I* great\ 0 come be sufficient to m..-<• prevarications and conditions make their er ih terms unacceptable. In the meantime, local land Aghting flares up spasmodically in the frozen hills, and soldiers die while their leaders argue. And the Communists build up their supplies in the rear, and their airforce into a formidable fleet Their future intent is their own secret. But the United Nations have brought to a halt the Red thrust south-east towards Japan ;i Twenty-five Nationalist divisions train in Formosa's 14.000 square miles. Led by exiled leader Chiang Kai Chek. they KM armed better than Mao's men. For they advises on control measures for cerned with the completion of ganyika the Federation I'.l.fe ir-.-.p i.r xhlif, il" Qar*n %  • %  saseate In June, IH37, I was asked lo other children with high Ideals w H Pairo! Leader now. and go to Buckingham Palace to start who BBge. to gtvi them expression. *** Part of her Job to know n Guide Company of which The whole Guide programme %  ""'nething of the lives of the gut Kll/.il>eth (then Princess glvM point to this—the nursing "'hers m her Patrol, so that s!ie Diaabeth) was to he a member, and coping with emergencies the i"'f ht ne 'P them to become good The Princess. I was told, WH l" l<;.rning lo cook over an open tire Gu -'dcs. In this way, she learnt be treated like any other little and in tend ftaT oneself in the rnu< 'h from the casual conversegirl. There was to be no cercmon. open, giving as it does, a feeling llon ' h " fellows, of the ordin. and no fuss mid, in fact. 1 found of well being ami loufidence; the "ry life, wilh its opportunities and that it was difficult to stand on nniking of things for sick children. urob 'Oms. of the London, as well Cairo's riots so shocked the world that King ..u. ciu,er Pilncea. -S.JMajl.Ji •*• ^TSS^SJ^iSrJSr^ j F rouk had bul * **. except to ch.r.e Elirabeth or Princt*. Margaret, lauglu practical way, of doing w "e completely artleai and un, who were both as natural a, they those hundred and one little in n' b 'ted In what they rccountd. Ins government. long to do. and J".'L-? r ?b bl> '. no **, to the| Here it was not just communism at work spurred by ignorant Yet It was IngvHablg that Kim: I George VI .111.1 Quw-n Kli/.u-lli. ly C paased through progressive"Throne has had an opportunity of, _, uil.iiuig Hata. The fuel that 'earning about the lives and out-1 fanatic nationalists, of Wind. Joy Of .Service For Others Thi. weekly conscious of the great destiny in. badge or insignia is awarded, which lay before their elder except by merit, was accepted by OaugaUgg, had already begun to the rrlltliggg a* the most natural inculcate 1.1 her the high sense of lhla| 11. Ih. varld **S %  1 "'" : P>nal m le. w-hl. ( .,,„,, | ,„. C.mrHdeship is to-day an eaaentlal part of the with it all, there w.rc plenty of function of the Constitutional „„„. phyalcal act.viffi. and Monarchy of 1 ha < .iniin..iiw....lll. ,. i.igmg. so that fun was Thi. weekly M ...1 which (.uullr* help,,! 10 „„. k „ nnU ami Pr|„ces Ellrnhappy, easy comrSaahT!!^ c.,, nalu^f tihit^f r ^""^ea, 5^! """ hrr •"<*> reviled llnu'ed when J^STaSlubeth coury.eharmanductonwh,,l, p ,,„„,„. ^ ,„ "".^""JJJ deltglitedly eommenleu This comradeship of Guiding Ihen heard and pondered over upon during her recent Canadian brought a new element into the "ir altered live, now they were ,1 ^fj* ,tou m ne '""' bve. of both Princesses. In the work u> shop, and offices, girl with whom 1 took nuraeiy early days. In London, the Comtimp gave even fuller opportun' %  •' on Ih. da, when 1 1., | M„I .. ,,,,„.,. ( ,, __„, ,:„ %  I „ |hk lgmm|||| % % %  w.r. be who mtn .1 %  ,,.,...„...,. .,„,, ,,..,!,!,,.,, ,.. '.''.: % %  th.-c fHlliallH "V S!* W 5? 5f. p ,' S2 rtS ""; c !" lr, "lci..ls. To the children '"" %  '"' Pnncos. was finding SJf?,rtf, ,.n l g,!, ::; y ;h,„;"" ^siJi^xn^sSi ^-!fS Kgir"^ is,.,, Ful. Accept..,,, 0. Um Oi •ttS8SES£ mm Fl^'H'" %  urprisGi of children froi duty tu God and the King, its and others evacuated froi law and undertaking to do a good don Council School. With their ,„ luin .-V,TV du>. appe.iU-d tlit-nugh '.,.!.;, DOT %  „ %  !i,:,. ...| -.,,, ,,( .', tieniiiiids i.. thi MneSM lust ptopa wltti an* .,.„( Mtuntnans, .is had' Pt r h H u £!h t *" to 1 i*' ren2ie< na t !" <* against imaginary grievances ting with her Patrol in a clearing have sought to oust the British troops which .^ e bushes, beneath the w .11* j guard the Suez lifeline. Foreign troops have no business anywh< In Egypt, they scream, Egyptian power suffiices to guard the vital waterway! Away with ihe British! Forbid the entry of an allied force—even if Egyptian soldiers were to have an honoured place amongst them! And meantime Britain alone guards the Zone, and her troops stand ready to quench the flame of violence if it flares up against the whito foreigner again. J^nrfcaw ihi^rv^fo^rvjsr ~*>\ ,-.£2 stf ihe-v^oo! 2s ass jrttL Jr.; Unday, therefore, wag only what of us who knew her would expected. Queen Elizabeth shining example of ueiat "Stolen" Secret (By JACK M l i ll \ \ as hat to so many thousands of the Princesses were cmipletelv QuJae should be. OIK III A Hi: IIS SAY: Puppy Cttlfavtiun To thg f.'dltoT. The Adeocofc; Silt.—In publishing the Popni CouactfaW of lust N..\ ember, the nehiy in which was due to the prolonged sale of raffle tickets, the Committee would like t*3 th^nk the following: — %  n C ti.iu.an %  ilXrflra. DiilTlrl -1'WOIMI IBf.W r.xtlalM-IltMlv Warrrn Colonel Oliver for his broadcast B*K Mau'a.'w'hinPart aea UM PW*r Hi... tUK-k Mr. q M.I.I. i -tw*r Ilia, k ft.ark SB M M W %  ;.. < i. UM eve of Poppy Day -***• O a>im iJidy Collypiore and her helper* "V-^T""" lor cunUng the town tollecUon .~T^^.^ i n IVppy Day. All Organuers and Sellers. The nirectors .md M^nagitnents ol UM Marine and Crane Hoteh Ml 'inloan of their premises for i a Mtgf Anhur tor orKam/.ing and i uiuiing the Island-wide raffle i* nnaoUon with which she Mr. Cave for allowing the sale Of tickets at Cave Shepherd, the Manager of Barclay's Bank for the loan of a window in which ... to display the prize*, the Turf mills. tia Club for drawing the raffle and T " **• H all those who so kindly gave r^itlli M it prizes w..t,,, aigt SI M • Messrs Pltzpatrlck Graham It r>** Co. for auditing the accounts free ,' 1 ',, M £,"';' *" %  **"" 4I „ • I charge. ,„ T -Hn. re The Manager and Staff of the Canadian Bank of Commerce tor 8SH_.^IS Sip and courtesy Uiroughout ( a %  The Advocate for their irlft of free advertising space t u the p Lssusasi Pa uaa. cs sa m Ulfl ltlM mm mmtt n.iihMlii r, Cullodcn MI*rn gasg HI Mr. T Chrlrt Chlirrh MkM Arthu. SI FhiiipMua r. .'jRaCtDfl i:.-msr Mr. W Csmngten st J.-wnh—Mrs. |_ s: JonV-V. a. B. csnst "i Thorn**— Mr*. J i">n ...... tS sf vi J.nw.--Mni a. Nurslat.tt .-a JVU-P MI. n %  lease %  %  Mra I, Arm. •mm*: . H o. *l A.ujrrMr* K O.K (1SS IJUTI UOVATIOS* OSVrr. A.b(ian 111!... Aquiiltt Club Mrit iT-Mlr Co-n-um, \, Saltol WtMItH AIM Itanev. UtrirtiHoWl orx IAI. inosT. Dsne-. Crai>r llatrl-Mu. C.mrra,, 1-0 00 '*' %  Artlnir ISM M 3MB U TOTAL COll rCTION TO DATS (1,104 at Lau Batprnar. M> t4 BAl^.M'E IN HAND SJl lH*i DOROTHY C. HUTSON Joint lion; Secretary, B'dos Branch Poppy League. l.cighJey. Belleville :.2.18S2. PARIS, Feb. 26, A senior American Naval officer said Tuesday that Russia has "stolen" the secret or American mine which can float in the sea for days undetected and cannot be swept by an ordinary mine sweeper. The statement was made by the officer accompanying Admiral Lynde McCormick, new America Supreme Commander in the North Atlanti who is here for conferences with Genera) Dwight Eisenhower. The officer said of the mine: "It can fli in the water undetected for days and cannot be swept. It was an American invention the Russiaiis have stolen." He did not say how the Russians •stole" I details of the top secret mine. But he added the Russians now know how to manufacture the American invented explosive with which the top secret mine is charged The mine is of a type that can float harmlessly in water and then automatically "arm" itself for discharge, the officer said. He commented that Russian mines can be come as big a menace in the event of war as Russia's fleet of more than 200 submarines. Russians have planes capable of sowing mines in the Atlantic he said in addition to those which would be sown by any subniarines which reached those waters As McCormick conferred with Eisenhower hundreds of American, British, French and Italian warships, jet planes and submarines began the biggest peace time manoeuvre ever held in the Mediterranean—U.P. PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.OO per linn.lr.-d ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & Grey.tone, Halting. •TOOIH ol Tradf' Wp harp a 11'11/f aWrc/ifiM / preryday Tooh, at uvll an other* that arv o/len dif/ivull lo find! C. S. PITCH£R & CO. Ph. 4472 lite Shorts For Men SIZES 30—40. ALSO IN KHAKI Tropical Linens SIZES 28-32 LOTS OF COLOURS. e Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR Or Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co.. Ltd.—Agents Lee Hams (Whole er Carr's Cream CracfcCut)—per ir> 11.23 era —per tan .. 9I.6S 4 lb Un banish Hims ll.M 1 A It Sandwich Bread lb Un Tressed lUma 13.81 .16, .28. :n; Z lb im Dsnlsh Ilsm* S4.30 EXTRA SPECIALS 6 It. Un Lunette*!. 30 oi. Maxnet Peaa .36 Beef Mas Tea-Ume Paste 15 Cook,. Paste W I lb tin Ilsm Roll . Baby's Strained Foods .16 Dsnlsh 16 ta, ('•eklmll 30 os. tin Green Vale .. .36 ftaussges 1105 2 lb tin Pig Jam 54 Dsnlsh 1 oi. Coektall Pineapple Crush t4 Sausage* .M Sandwirh Relish -SB 2 lb tin Purple Grapes .54 Mararanl—16 os Pkg. 3 I'allan Tomato Paste . .60 Carr's S*rrt RLirulU embassy Clga. af *5 .. -4i Per ' lb Pkg. .<• silnr in tins .4i ".— GOC DAR DS — We DrUver



PAGE 1

r M.I i n.ii i HIKBADO^ ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY FEBM'AKT 17 1W CLASSIFIED ADS. TCLCPHONC 2S0S. I \<. \i.| Ml NT .1 MM Mr ad Pw ii i 1 !>IKI> r.hru*.. a da* **r tbd I | m*-dm.. and brrthre.. ho al erM Or -lln in the horn* I Ruin Grid ided lit* funI OK 9AUI \i TOMOT1VL n.ii. Mne*f< 1J* IN4HMD . Mt AH>I> tag Super oi %  %  M %  MM MUlsE Biand n*w. ample J bediaom euee. all eeaivenlc-ce*. with nartv red "vim rwn. open nnnUi. k.Lbe. i room ^arape. .eundr. I aarvant lomn. and ibi^i town M-T On attractive hilliloe .lie. Hackle* Nf. A Hertvea fj Co Lid Dial MM I'AH l*M .411 Ml IMI Marrt* MU*r %  %  ....... LU %  MM • MM %  Ml ELECTUCAL IASH1.IC.HT BATTCRIS**— < ITV t,MiA<;r. Co.. 4#m il : RADIOGRAM IN MKMUKIAM i m luiNO sera Tti* ii,l>r.l*-:.*d Mill utlri UI rn.lt • public competition al their oflke ""in "i > '1 %  • *"< Khiuir.. 1 P ni 3 Acre* MV. ptrrrl-.e. of land utr.ll. altualed fit build,... .lU. at M. .-til Long Road. Clirtet Chiarih Thle lead KM a Iron Ufa on IK* Mxovetl Lung a feel and gw MS IW along abl load .annum along IU %  Vacant puaanaUn available | i .... ,i in IMP "* gt"V n id. mih i laid DM are the rneinorieI Htvri fade. fln*et t. the hopthat %  •Mi *ve %  %  The Chau • I rm In riiwiMi II M HttKI. in|Min*iblp f( M ; M Mj The public are hn-rl l"'" errdll 1. -I lit*. FRANK! -. %  icll W oaanelblc KM h t.mtr acting any debt sv 3 MSn %  The pubi.... "...il. %  giving ircfl.t lo He) wife CKI.ESTINE i-.. HI ..-. RJ I'M IN % %  -I . Hu.h Hall. rat Mi.'i... i ... I do nM hold m--K rcapoaia Pie lor her flucontracting Mil debt or debli m unWM by a %  IAMUH PETER KEDMAN M (Mia. i M W.I II] r iu M I.IVKSTCKK rMlng hore iu liable loiiill -t > %  URNITIKI t AND CHAIRS OUVMMJ A % %  %  I.,-„I. ..( |BM kUn* .u, ,te ,.i KIN.; STREET. Bridgetown. The houe. n-h th t* nenr Seventh Day AdventM Church. irmtaina loaed nailery, drawind did dlnin* oon. 1 brdroonu mitban. uiual 'oirrirncri Watar anil larlil< nrvtoM nMallad Inapvcllon on application to I -Him -ii' l| \11M UXANKOl'S t FWi anil olhFt Tinplral D*h r houw will !> publu 1 COmpptilloi Rtraal. HrWU.Io-i Uialanl al I p.m. YKAitwoon i novcr Snllc ton 3X1 y an I, old Jrw< Una Silver Pooka atapa. A^lo_'aptw He, t Oorrlngoa Anllqua Sbop .djvlninf Rojal Yacht Club 11 u MA Riga of %  Apply Nil MM Onara kllVAIANI. XI 1 M LOST A FOUND LOST sw:rj"WTAKr. ru KIIBM. Sdrir* II *M1 rimirr ploai %  Mll HEM lliIM>. tlAT. Complete oral floor 0*1, Hulrl %  -1 >. 1)1 :.. that UM price of Di if* 'imiEWlII C for prnonal and loedlial u*. bol KMUMI ,s LTD JBJJ OIL— The wild* fineal motor oU Veedol. M all leadingCaragra and Servic* "lalloni Yo>i. vrhlclr deaenae the !iet VaBDOL. -round wherever Sag 11 1.—I I'lHCiHAIN P.Mon Teed better — 10-Ib Iota and up*aid< u > %  per lb. Phone 1MT. n a il i f TOMNADO— International K 41. IW-ullful condition, excellent equipment, good r-cin rocord Coet TOO 00 now (MOM No offers Wick. Telephone 3VW in il • %  -I HOUBB—Two 91 AgimUr Club, full* furnl.h. : in.i..-. ..MI <; %  tMl. T. fOhM If-iJii. ln.li.ll.1. atullablr from II June lor ><> yran. Tenant who I ...ilil like a lewlng, Ap|.| H %  Phone Mid. rl BtP MOIMJraH niaWaSHM) II.AT v.ith •liver and liiten. C.-d Sea-bathing, n Ai>|>l> CO Ahil-ithlrv No. g CotaJ Band-. Worthing. DIM If. I %  %  %  I'liiiii NOTICES Mvd Decewibec 1*M Apply: lira V* Qoodlnu. IMMI.KI Nona IS HKIIRRY given the) having ..nv debl or cUlm upon or __ ing the Eetale of <*. ?3 Eeit IMth ii.DM United Stale* of Ameiu. %  I da> i ...I %  MM llarhailiis lurl (lull I I OK III M One (I) 5 ft. Booth ;• ,' >:: i" 1 per run$ ung fool i"i SpriuR 5 Mooting, 1952. Apply to v> <; A LEWIS, S Socroi : lust Received . V VIOIf STOVI PAITS Limited Supply Ordrr I ..-il iv at ti. W. lluhliiiiM.ii & CO., LTD IUJI lilt Bri.id sin-t-i II -• ..ad. i u .lined A the nalri Crclli. Pi %  llftt artei %  tl* uMi • %  (he debtat .' .hull •hall tlli"i hall r Al i %  II ""• I'l Vl.ll SAIIS KIM I --I \l I Dedroom alow altuetrd ,.t Top Horn %  I'm (ban RgatMg%  'i. d"ibleg I>n4ad bMlg IM.IM. abadrM. k.t.non it,.I i. rd rtoor. No g, B %  •-' -' *PWv •-t Jamgi .'snr. fuilnei parlk-uUra Inapeeti ...to. !" ol Hie BKI>. UN HASrWJ). aMMNMJ Jjrnee Mr* IIINd %  m i r..k Sund<< f,< ... \II TMN -ill —II ". Th.-ada* mtn -1 1 n ni UATH Ml LAOI I -d I.. Cv Ml .-oirred Wllh ShingMe. -od a -ii.-U %  aller. HH 10 %  I TgflMS < v~ll II Anhti McKeufW. Ai,ctloneet CAM Ml n %  ii .i. %  <•• . Mi.., mi M..i. %  aMrei iM I i M "ter Inear vehicle* |or *aia by auctnn al live Couttexv G-i.K.oo rm*> Mtb at I I Harbour Lag In Carlisle Bay it* MM? t Caroline. Sch SunaMtae %  •d-rful Cnm-llor. Bcfl j j irgrg %  e n rbMhi fMl i %  2--J U-vBeBe %  UM Pittnm. %  •' %  Semib. M v cwibbe*. ^ •:*ih,nna ABBIV U S Maureunia. 1.Ml KM n w BoerMl. rrcMta Mertta %  •BPABll III H V r>r.r.,..1 M lor net. .apt S % Lad> Hod..' IM ionnM. CM* A I Vincent Seauvll UUVaU at] b W I us mum ..... Irialdad : A Spirl.'i.i M..l|.i A I '-M. H < '..' M Cheeainei, II ( %  MeDdy. C Moodv. C Tayhw i,— M. WdeiM gged. Ilaia. TUmar.t Demi Bamaird. CbMlea Lowion. Drrtic Carbin, Arthur Leahlry rreaa Martl.lejue Paul ^i-.. ;.„ RfbU•ei. Jacqueline K-k,lu-i Bc Mawte, %  llP\TI BBl %  N M I \ ON MONBAV I.. I.•%  dad HMry Anderson. Oeorguia Aitddraon, IMMM Woodlnn Booeit rKrguwn, AMhur Dre-.laawwr. Artbu. Ceeaan t.anlili. GrMrvM Manmood. fieiavi MMnaot • •> V(..ll.t,, .Voile. Marina Wolfe. Ralph CVaaTatMatt 1—1*1 CoM.mllb, OrMrga (JoodfrI!..<•-. Hllderaardc OoodfMMw, Prvkec MrComraa Rhau McCamaa WiJlian K-wley. D.n..t, Kewk lar OrreMw Ottreta. J..*nh Kaltcnbacher, Hrlen Kaltrnbachet. Twfrvi, Joauw, Ha. I* Koidr. I.-.orl Orlme.. ContMl shepherd. Reginald PM • Dot H.Mi.ug ThopM ghlllingioid In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station .< .. I. l IM ndviar n,.i i.i rei nan corntnu the following ahiti. thmiigh thr.r Rarbadoe Coaat Malioo IB mih "Unca. %  a. I MiaUretania. %  %  RrgjrfiAtlantic l>,ke. . MUila i I % %  %  .. John Chandru. • %  Ailgt..,, i > ChriatUn Holm %  %  BmpieM of Scotland a %  i v. L*d> %  IN %  il ., a %  Aivap Trx-rro. %  Maiden*, . I %  ggjinill. • • Stantor U DHM I > AlUntli' Travelkei. i i| at Qreenhaven TYaila, a • AngoUnn laura MAIL NOTICES GOVERNMENT NOTICES SHIPPING NOTICES %  lo, I Vine. U V\ II II HKi.r (.-AI'AIILE NURSE Cacique Del (..it-,i! bg .1.—.* ..' the 'lener.l PeM OMcr. m under :[ail at II i—.... It.leered MMl at 3 p in Ordlnarv Mall at UM H. Kebrua.v. IMI \ .ii -I.! ti MAIL NOTHES I M.deiia Cn.tad K.npdom. Ai.tv.rrt, and Amateidam bv UM S S .II he 1-k.wd at ihe Oen~ P I nfi I'ai.ei Mall al 111 am. HeglalarMl Mail %  ) : ti„ i.idH...}'Mail at I p m. .. i th. Itth ..! %  u,v IS5> Man. (oi Viiweni. Mettintnu.An. •Mjiin. 8 Kttt8 Thorna*. V.l and Nrv. Yotk b> the S S fort Townahand will Ire .k-ed .1 the General Po-l Offli Jl'Mt'K SALOLUAN requited ihefli Hatdwara lane. A|.|.l. I I'd II... EBB' .M>Hy b. 1 AI1V httMIUrnl ., %  1 I., I A %  .. in, r .-. CO Nile Sn II v Ml.! II I ,-pUce the poat Sularj approilmatrlv W*> OS per mont a.Tordlng M .tii.iiiic.iio... .11^4 rani mi.rt aaaume riulle* no! laler lhan UI Mnv. prrfr. ll detail* ma> he .il.l-.i-.l fui. the pre*et.t Setrelarv Applk-allnn. (Win, paet en parlance and I Op lea <>< leMul Il 1--I I* MM M BM • %  Ml i" HI CMMMHT "' i %  •• %  %  II • s — • %  %  hM UuMd MM 18 I U -n Mail %  I 3 2 .I..*, Hem-lcred ,1inai> Mall al 7 JO on t..t nil. tebruar.. :i4< pr. Clet|.%  Iik. .1 k'. a. DeMaAtl Drat' %  D-alt % %  -i ., l"..-.il' r Invitation for TrnoVr DH'-ARTMENT OF IIICIIW \\^ \NI> TRANSPORT sKAIKI) IFNDKRS will Inrrrrived al the Colonial Srcrttaiy s :.. 12 ncxtn on Iho bih M-rch. 1952, Pst th. itdfMl] of Bart*UmMlWK, Mail Fillinit SMd Knrlh Filli'. ( ; •<, Unj DttMjti HiflhwayR and Tran*p"tApnl. 1N3 2. A gepaiale lender lot gach division I*>nr1icf Christ Church. St Philip and Si John (c) atastcrn Division—Panihrs of St. Andrew and St Josaph (IUil .nywheic within the u.i. n tpoi sftywlwn iHtt 'inerl Division." 4 Samples of limestone of Uir uuniltv required may be seen, .tid particulars of quaniitv .ml BtM likely to be required, may be %  iitainrd on application at the Department of Highways and Tn W 5. Tenders are to be made on forms which • ,m be obtained at 'he Colonial Secretary's Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollar: . After a contract ha* been entered into, those persons who n submitted bons fide tenders will have their deposits fui-dcd; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a contract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them refunded, and thest shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury 6. The price*, 'enderad must be based on the payment ot wages .it current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rate pei ci.blc yard at which ihe tender Mould contract to supply material: n spot anywhere within lh< MrlalUB. 27.2.52 Jn V.U Uft I'OM Of CraaKRK. LABOt'B WELFARK illlH'SIN.; I.OANM OROANKATION AaspUeaUoni srs invRod lor •ippomtmeni to the post of Junio Clerk in the Laboi.i W.ii.n. Umiung L*jaiu) Organisation. 2. Candidates must he in pos***sion of a School Certificate o a certificate of equivalent standard 3. The salary scale of lht.s post will be similar to that of un me grade in the IAXMI Civil F.stablishment. with ;. commencini ilarj "( $7(W.no per ataUiati 4 This post is of a temporary nature. nun-Denslonable and ubject to lermination by one month's notice on either tide. 5. Applications in writing, with testimonials, will be received j Ihe Colonial Secreiaiv. CoMttial Secretary's Office. Bridgetown. • ii to the 15th March, 1952. ROYAL NF.IHLRLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. vit iv i. >BOM uniiri UiNAlRR. Strrd rebnidn IMI HSSianJA. IX Maeeb. IMS %  ni(ATTIM;fi I and lUaan— Date of aMIing to %  W.I. SCHOONER ASBOCIATION I Conalgnee. Tele. N l^inadian National Steamships %  OtTBBOIMB % %  LADY nOONEY-' 1 1ADY NEUfcm <*ANADIAN CHUISER" 11 lrl> .. I? PetJT 14 March U raaj. -* rcbi ss rehy M r*t>r • Marea 10 March — M Mareh )4 March CAN. CRtJlaaR %  LADY RODNEY %  -1.ADY NELSOII%  CAN. CR01BER" Tor ftarthnr ptjtlcul II eb> M retry — a M.. S March 9 Much )• March II March la March .a March M March 1 April 4 April 1 April April T April — 14 April IT April GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD.—Ag.nU. HARRISON LINE Ulllll UOOII 111 M III S Hi ad (lab Plan, are .age %  > le bang %  *• .err aura MMga en. I arlker BOIII'H lar* from MA It TIN O Bin IT Hindi, OR*. lelaphanr MX ran am and in a.m. MV 1 Pimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days MIStLLI.ANim'S I YOUNG B 'He. leq.i irTiuu.rnl buai.l mania or breakfu-t onl. naw M I BgBSj Doa H C .< Ad. rj.Gl.IMI MiaRTIIAND TYPIST rr requeeled to ttle tbcli DATBD UM Mih .1-. ..I J in iM] ISU • i 'Al.cn rnEBIXTT. itc Cerlll.. ; Pilgrim, decaaead LIQl'OR MCRNSF NOTKB ..linn ol Band Saiacai.i %  Ckoran lo. permi.ilo.1 I Liqnon. Ac. al %  DnbreJ Ihi* SMh dav of Pi b %  %  %  It VUGCANT lag Appin N 11 Tht> application will be ildered at a LHet.alnu COHlt I" he I %  d*l the ICHh do of March. IMS %  i \\ lit irDIJi Police Maglatrale. DUI B Tf N aodfrm lonuhl I thai klltg .1 gVUMI i. i . • that %  !. .. aki.. •. >. from von. cbamlat to. i Ili-a.Mranlethat I'mplea at-.g I/i-'\-* it4tn\ 4itt nit ifinuSmorgan's Vieons Sausaer. — him. — Ovalllne — Cup (hues la le Vein* Malt Vinegar — Bird's Jelly Cr.alaU Bridal lelng Sugar — Boxen I.. B l-undr> Starch — Fry's BreikfaHt Cocoa Tomato Soup — Tins "I'dlHt" Bp.cultn — Fanry Tina Crawford Asmtrlrd Blult* — "Jark Mlran-s" — Marmile — Spanish l.uren tlliren — Morton'* Janw — Mdano BWSe l Milk Cocoa — Club Cheese Biscuits Mlln IIMIV ||. I m OH A SO\S I TO. OTJTWAKD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM V*SM1 From Dug Leavri Barbados s.s. s.s s.s. ss PHII.OSOPHtR "DEFENDER" PLANTER" "STITJENT" I .on (ion A M/brough Liverpool if Glaajow ,. London Glasgow A: Liverpool 12th Feb 26th Feb Kith Feb. 4th Mar 29th Feb. 11 Oi Mar. 1st Mar '.4th Mar HO M.'WART. FOB THE flNaTTO KINGDOM s.s. s s Vasari l HOFTTO" BIOGRAPHER' For ..London. Liverpool Cloirs In Barbodoi 2sth Feb i %  Mai For farther lnrorallon apple le . DA COSTA A CO., LTD.-Agents C"G U TRANSATLANTRQUE Sailings In Barbados in south amp Ion to Oiudeloaipe. Martlniqu. Trinidad. La Oualra. Curacao A Jamalra Nixoderm Ul For Sain . oubU .. ...' From Southampton Arrives Barbados "COLOMniK" 18lh March. 1952 31sl March, 1952 I'r. GKASSF." 2*th April. 1952 th May. 1952 •COIXOMBIE" 8th Miiy, 1952 .... 21M May, 1952 Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO I I IMM'i From Barbados. Arrives Southampton "COLOMBIE" I Uh April 1952 23rd April. 1952 DE GRASSE' 19th May. 1952 13lh June. 19S2 "i•iil.nVBIE" 1st June, 1952 13th June, 1952 Sailing direct to Southampton rO-DAY S NEWS FLASH EASTER CARDS MOTHER'S DAY CARDS spaaiih—Fngllab Engll.b —-panl I I '-vac IgO iare.1 ','-,'.'>--*,',',-, ^SJBMSnlsjSMMMM ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS BILKS. CURIOS. ABTB VEMDCMOo. HKDAH. JOYERIA8 Y ART1BTICA8 CtJRIOSIDADES. TRAIDOB DB LA INDIA C1I1NA a EJIPTO THANI'S Pr. Was Hry. St., Dial 14.1 KMI ^ A I i; RALPH BEARD'S SHOWROOMS Sl iiidilif. mi (i.siMi MI. ft. havinu u Covered Hwir S|i;ice nf ti.lHHt so. n upstair* and downstairs. Four Show Windows Kronlnye 72 ft. I ASH 1 CO.WI IMI II mi.i siv Offices 1st I'loor. it lurce Shops I>own!.luirs LIGHT. <^OOL and CENTRAL THREE lOILETS ARE INSTALLED also LIGHT and POWER FITTINGS mi-: AWOVI: %  •lion ui> is \\ \n Aitij; nun I'IISMSSIIIV i \ in n BlM i!.- %  %  Iti:sl Offer Ovrr 112.000 accepted lurih.., Partlnrim, Aaafa liM.i'n KIMII. Lower It... sir,-ri I'IIOM: MM FURNITURE AUCTION WE ARF INSTRI'CTEII to undertake a eomplele CLEARANCE SALE St llll IMI HI AKII S SIIOUIIOO>IS BAY STREET on Monda iiiiiiiiiin and Tuesday the Hrd and 4th ot Mareh and to i Wedncsdav If not rnmplrled. -.it.from 11 ..in to 4 p.m. .1..ilAll CSaina, culul.i^. Sttvari vases, bowU. sma!l antiques cutlery, kitchen utensil:, ch.ltu' fjiis. table lamps. Rolf clubs, mahogain trays, powder compacts, table mats. trinket boxes, cigarette boxes, hot plates, bath-mils, pictures, cork mats, dunlopillo and spring mattresses, pillows. ironing tables, medicine cabinets, tricycles, stepUdders. bookrnds, hardware, beach shirts, bathing trUttRS, elettri. Ottat doik. ice water container. t,uaniit> i other smill items t.i l>e told at commencement of sale. To be followed by the extensive collection of furniture in nihogany. bnch. pine, deal (poHstii tlnishl. Numeroui dining li.hles, kitchen tablet., wardrobes, dresbing tables, vanity tables, writing desks and bureaux, bedsteads and atnTUtfJI, dsvsns, clunn cabinets. upholstered lounge suites, eiisy chulrs (of all types), bookshelves cocktail tables (all v. get, tall begPB, oak curt iii|l.i.n Quiuj .abinets. loinbmation safe, elcctiic tovsj (G.EC.i. American refrigerator (B cu. ft.), larders, rockers, rush seated chairs, rush rockers, counters, drink eoolerator candy flos; ichine. grand piano and numerous other articles. II. >lIOM S A ML I I II \ U t i.is HOIH III I IIO>l llrllliO fl-ANTATIONS BUILDING. LOWER BROAD STREET PaAseager Sslea Ageata for: Trani .! %  nla Airlines. B.O.A.C. and B W.I A. AM'OA s,TFV.iISHIP < llMI'.ANi Telephone No 444* iRMRPnntPnnWEntwpn 10COOnM>0S>oa> WeW/>VrV,W, (.1 IMI LUBRICATING OILS—Arc Best by Test '; •MT Don't Only Oil It — Germ It MMIA .-41. Ill AIIO\ A 441. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. Gasolene Stntimi — Tratal^ar Street ^a o oeacacTsessaeooooo nc ooooooQoocooao c o c ACCTIOM I RR I'lantalinn*. Rulldlni REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BLADON & CO. A.F.S. r.V.A. IB FOUt WITH TUB-: Hhl'l TATIOX. Phone Hi HI I'liii.lail i.,nHnil.lii.il. too* ro* m ofg we / 4'OIK IO, 1.TI Agenl.



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<'7-J> ESTABLISHED 1895 Col. Sec. Explains Reconstruction Of Part Of Runway WFPNFSnAYVKIRl'ARY 27, 195? PRICE FIVE CENTS vri:^ I.\MM %  *• M 01 rs ^HK HON. the Colonial Secretary, at yesterday's OatMlng of tlie Legislative Council expressed %  % %  -i at some ha*-sp words that had been said elsewhere about Canada in connection with the defects recently discovered in the newly con stmctpd runway ot Reawell. tUHity when he %  UUCagfuU? iirnv^l %  thai the Council concur in a Roluiii>n to authorfci %  $60,000 an tl %  %  t;on of the defect!vi prtrttoni ri the mannei n %  the %  nnoUy. B -\ i Con fractional K I Cl %  as 1,000 HI runway owu.t i" the unusual in %  will gave, to be pi,K*i un pot rana no: DannaUy carrsmg iraflic and other unforeseen reconstruction Five Die fin Plane Crash OMAHA. Nebraska. Feb 2d Th, !*s Airforce said five mrn i md 12 ..there injured %  ban %  li *>0 medium bomber oil K "classified" mission from Hawnll lost i arllU while landing then ill have ] crashed and bumed. Both the P clrcunutancaa of the crash and star* Runway Report The Hon. the Colonial |M said:— Honourable Membei studied the Heport Construction at ihe Scawell Airthe purpose of the flight were port by Mr. 11. J. Connolly, tha nuMrtOUl Chief Engineer of tlie Dopaitinent l*ubhe Information Officer vt Transport. Government ol w.cvii,. Bradley said the bomber Canada, which -: l..Ki r. iehing the Held In clear Honourable Council hud week, weather about 2 30 nm when and will have noted that he has ascribed the failure section., at the Airport to two causes, namely that "all the clay was not removed right tluwn I bedrock or some clay a porated in the coral rock backfill that was placed on lop of the bedrock" and. second, that heavy tains occurred during the course of the construction. They will also have gss U ead Ml conclusion, in regard to the Hist cause of failure, that. I quote from Ing suddcnlv ripped from Ihe fuselage. The plane was only about 20 yards from the runway The four cnglned ship plunged tnto the runway bounced briefly into the air again, then dropped second time and burst into :, I': nil.-. uarati(*n* for a] %  m mma*. I ;. naval Rtdgu \'s h* %  roMlctl a tiaras front Tokyo on Tuesday i MUnaiMT 1 programme a Red rieg) ual ficn rejected .m Alltod unrpi signed to break Ihe deadlock ova*. policing the truce. Chinese Colonel Pu Shan cate^"i >< ..II.. n fused -o tlrop Russi,' from the proposed Neutral Truce Supervision Commission despito the t'.N. offer to match the gesture by withdrawing Norway The UN Headquarters broadcast from Tokyo said ihat the Reds warned at a recent negotla>n sesstof"Ah far as they are meerncd. an early truce was out of the question." — V P '.AS %  1 ajr %  -.*# JP& • • %  %  i S3 % I.' %  •> r . ' a —a*r W ajHJj Morrison Challenges Churchill: Moves Vole Of Personal Censure LONDON, f rOHMEB TOREX1N MINISTER H>rl (Laboui i atuck on Churchill loniRBt, challenRed ihr Prim. Mu ,i :ii.i. had bpti a "maior shi(>" u B Eaal nolle] Moving .. Vote ol Personi.i .-hurclvll 'ui a rmwdril II m "I Comm. %  ccuwd Mm "i c-omlnR back (rom his Waal ul month with "vaguph exprai i ninmllnawli" gUKF.N RI.IZABET1I J p.ru of Ot OMBMW Jambora. In Jaly "*l la.bala luap*ctlii III' at Claraooa llouac. bai London tiombafoia H.hma tar Quaan I. Lord Rowallan lha Oblaf aront srssrvn^r^s; saw %  * ta •sf w,, i ssr" hnvthnnnonml In eirtislruetum ol '" "" •' classtled miwiori have happened in conalruct this maaTnitude where large heavy equipment IN used to secure and move the selected rock lo be used as backfill as our test on samples of clay taken from the areas show it to have a very high moisture content, but when dry is extremely hard and. if coated with coral dust, hat the appearance of eoral, rock, and unless minutely examined or saturated, could easily pass an Inspector's eye and be mistaken for coral rock." Re com me n slat ions Honourable Members will also have uoleu in* nvonunenu..l.uiu for the reinstatemenl of the defective areas. In order that these reconuneiiUalioiia may be clearly unccrsiood I am taKuuj the lioery of apieauing on U.e table a print whuii .snows In pink and yellow the defective areas. The Ilrst point which Honourable Members will notice Is thai by far the greater part of tttc| Runway is unaffected, and thisi point, in view of whui has been> %  aid, is worth emphasising. Thoj second point Is that the worst) area between stations 19 and 251 was constructed over the deepest Connolly recommends should be .! Ii I'ultlliml L'I'lllUll! i oncn le; foi and more isolated areas lo U**east of station 25 and the west ot I station lit he recommends a simp' ler and less expensive remedy. Further, Honourable Member J will have noted ihe two alternative method! of procedure wlUch Mr. Connolly lias suggested. For the reasons, first that the tourist season u at present in full swing and that the tourist trade this season would be disrupted and prospects for future years seriously damaged .f Lb* Runway were to be put out of commission for a period of a month at the present and second thai we are at pt o a o nt enjoying a continuouspell of ar> weather, by far the longest since I arrived in Barbados, it has been decided to adopt method (b), god It H desired U get as much of the job as possible done before this dry weather Heaki • un race U.S. Embargo Id Heavy Blow To Canada OTTAWA, Feb. 26 An embarfo by the United Statol ..,, UJU import ot Canadian meat and livestock because of foot and mouth disease m Soutivorn Saskatchewan, may be a blow from which Canada's $2,000,000,000 UvattOOk Industry will never recover. Tim' Waal one among the number of possibilities which emerged from the ennfusion following the anni/unceint'tit on Monday of the 1 embargo .uid ot measures Canada will take to stamp out contagious dasesH (OJJ I< -u<\< \ 11 ailUatUe Board rrotn Our Owi UnrrMp narni KINGSTON. Fob 25 The Jamaica Qovernment announced today the appointment of l'rirfesaor C. O. fleaslev. Economic Adviser to CD. & W. West Indies, Chairman of a Special Board to enquire Into the cattle industry. The terms of reference of the Board which includes Dr. Huggins. Director of the Institute for F>onoenic and Social Research, of I don the entire Northern sectkin the University College of the West * Indo-China to Communist-led Indies, is to make reeornmenda-1 insurgents this year informed Uons with regard lo the esUblUh-1 French source* said on Tuesday meni u f the industry, found a The sources said Official quarlong-term basis to achieve int<,r consider the move In wtolch creased cftlctency and maximum French Union forces would baya h-cal producUon of beef, milk and I to pull back 2.300_ miles South 4{ m,ik products at prices fair to'wsrd wo..W he > irtt/id,M>i • back tor the antl-communis. world In Annam narrow "walsf of Ihe country only liW milea vido eofinr-nt rated "ttasit ditch" Acheson Satisfied With N.A.TO. Talks ... niisumer and producers. The appointment of the Board follows public outcry due to recent Incressas in beef and milk prices. French May Abandon Indo-China B7 Kl SM I II Mil I I I PARIS, WO. U. The French may hsve ti aban / lll/llll lllill \niuninci'nu-nt On H./. rixfay An .ii|*iiai." HI %  vi lh IK" IfBSSlI ... Ouvei %  uncc the MM ol in. LeCNHn .oii!eietii'( t a i West indi-o oavrra n teni tepiesenUliM BWI proposals ot the MAM ft port. Mr. Lytlellon s .innouncemeiK is expected in view of the qun> tion which has been put down i>. Mr. I'.-Ur Srailhers, Chairman <>i Hi.West Indies Sub-Commiltve i the Conservative Party. Mr Simtliers will a-k Mi. LyUellor, \l he will eon veina roufriein %  on West Indies Federation if Mr. Lyttelton doe N not raaefl Mr. Smllhers quesllon in Ihe normal sequein bofora •' M at afhletl lime questions cease he will probably ask pennlssion from ihe Speaker to answer It then The idea of a London confi : rtorrl %  i loth • t.> the I'i I, %  had Throwi rw> it t ami effective" gsoansss hi I %  ll'-il-, Insuit On IturMiaa liielusiou \i:w .mu Mr I: ( Spriimrr, M.A.. X-M-l.nl Muter. II nn-,,1. ( ollritc h ikeen M.M.ItH1 llridmi-Wr of Ihr f-eterldse Tsrry -whool N neirhtstown. 1'ANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 24. defence lines could be drawn li Ihe mountain terrain wberto peaks rise ft.500 feet the soureea pointed ntit Mo official world comment was in.nilmi p.i--*uiic wtthdrawal ban retreat from strategic Htm Hlnh underlined the gravity of the French position. When the late! Communists rebutTed United; Marshal Jean de I-attre I >< : .--) Nations efforts at compromise signy took the Jangle fortrev. last and insisted that lUuaia must, fall he said he would hold It help police the Korean truce, j forever." Viunesc Col. Pu Slian categorical-, Now the French perimeter is ly rejected m the armistice ueonlv 20 miles from Tonking. cspigotiatiuos the U.N. face saving tai of Hanoi and Vletminh for* offer to drop Norway from the Ices are massing for new attacks proposed neutral Truce Super-1 on the French withdrawal route vision Commission if the Reds [to the South. would withdraw Hussla. Under the Allied plan ilw Commission would have comprised only four i.aU"lis—Com. mujlisl-dOtinrariDd Ctechoslovakia f *-'" and Poland. U.N. designated uot Swedah and Swierland—gn-t stead of sUt. Bui Reds for the lith straight 'Tu Mb, %  •* I of repeated their time-worn rgumenl that U.N. opposition to Russia was urueasonabie and untenable." —U.P. Jamboree Fund The Jamboree Fund found another supporter yesterday to raise j Vietnam the amount by an appreciable decision by Uunohing a great before leaving here r Paris, the French of the Associated Indo China. Jean. Indicated that France; Id be willing to take part uv an international conference to bring an end to the Indo-Chinese! conflict. He said the end of the IndoChina war depended on the political solution rather than Hie military one. He said "Frani-s would not refuse negotiations with Vietminh but under no pretext would she take the flrit i a*** 1 -" i.cfourwa.1 said: ,, Frane y^Jj,* B*'^."^' 'IT, ,S„ £"u£2?&&£ SRBr ,mp m '"' BeUon by remwlng major diplomatic roadblock.-, to the buiki-up. of western defence and by approving specific military fa the (lot time. THE FAMILY DOCTOR In kevpiint with our pollcy Of obtnlnmK for our re id) i the I>es1 possible advice on subject* of iinport.i!' AdroesV have urrnngc-i foi a practising Doctor lo answer reader*! medical anrrirs. The Pasailr DorUr a ill I i itavBble to see any 11 poreonally bui rou Ml atlu the answers will appear every week m thFvenins Adveeaar. %  for this medical advto % %  will be treated in eonlldeace. To make abso luiely sure mu are -UUl > %  >.. HI. lo y.iiu query but to write tfcnsasT a MB n.ime. The answer to the question will .ippertr under the pen name. letters shiaild be addressed '•• The F..a.U> Doeler, e/m %  he RdKer Advecale. nrttUr tows, and must reach thl ..(Tlce b) Wi-lnesday each waak. The first series of ri to mediral qussllona will appear in next Monday's Kvcning Advocate. pUn of.|ajiUIM-t' Huia.se I 'as. It.idl-el Viler Mas. VV alk-tnU TOKYO. Feb. 26. The House of Repn-senlaliv. % %  ', Jludget Comimltee on Tueiaday|r evening passed Premier Shigeru Frrnch Yot.lu.la',1 2,5O0,U00 i OO0, Uudgil Bill after Opposition Petty member* staged a mass walkout in protest against IU tSOO.000,000 Ilefeiiee Appropriationsum. The contingent of scouts are -i-hedulcd to leave early next week and so the fund has only a few more days. YOU CAN HEU>. Ami. prev. acknlgd. I 384.00 | Mr. A. 3. Bryden 10.00 tensive because there la no front.*j Yoshida'.s Liberal P,f! Wing Socialist Communist Party, the Farm I-abour Party. Ihe Farmera' Co-operatives and the Social Democrats.—t'.P. It approved the European army denied the way for the end of German occupation, linked NA.T.O. to Germany adopted the 1992 mtlftarv programme for 50 divisions 4.000 planes and the .onstrvictioii of over Mao.UOO.Onfi imonlcatlnrif nelttiese impressive m'tioin many delegate-, and observers here seriously doubted whether these plans would bly sconorn) whether the French and G. rman parliaments are really n idy to bury the hatchet, wheth r Commtuii't pressure In the Far Kan W nt wreck Western i' m gfcirapa Plioi Is on..ing here Acheson told iniimates he would eonsidei hb trip s success ii he won four points from the Council. (1) Approval of tha European Army pe. milling eventual (tenner, re,.n lament and providing a elrucItUio for idtlinale effective Kuropean defence. (3J Agtee' ment to it'Ve Germsiiy raaar equality with other NATO, nalions by eitencUng N.A.T O. guaraniaaa i" Gaonsan iud by ap,%  .in ifci"-ineni to end OarI i HI < %  upaUim (I) Api#'.val ol i in,later economic and dc' (at < %  pi HI pUttgifag firm contr|bu4sOBI of divisions from each %  of the member countries except 1 Iceland. Portugal. Greece, and j Turkey—the last two because Ihey just Joined NATO. (4) Ac' wii.i France and tha tad Suites on how to solve budget problems and jaernilt the first three potnU be carried forward NATO e Acheson his first three its and he personally workout the fourth with French rider F-dgitr Faure —UP \W • Indian Governments have bean allowed to study the Ranee irport in their own time wilhnu* .my lead being given by Whitehall But sa now only British londurss has not discussed (he. report In the Legislative Counnl l specific date may be set for ;. onference In London This date gaj he earlier than the ColonlM >fllce miggestlnn of late .lulv. U.S. Offer Compromise TOKYO, reb. UJ.apaiiese sources, said that the IS ofTeii-d a double conipiomlse plan on estra-terrlToTi.il lights to speed the conclusion of thUnited Stale* -Japanese agreeit on American niililari baseo Jter the OCCUpe.t>-n Admlnutratlre agreeiuent expected to be prv-oeiiled to the Japanese Cabin-' on Tuesday and initialled later Urn ..i.-k b> Sp-xial American Amluissador Dean Rusk and Stale Minuter Kat*uo Okazakl The Tokyo newspaper Co.'iu%  ri iiublislied what purported to be the text of an agreement on the sovereign rights of American fjrees to be gluMaaicd In Japan and the legal relationahip between US. security iroup* and Japanese —TJ.P. %  .ible." geaatratoi Affairs wind. . J3 broken oil a.Uie daaUi ul K.n.g Geuige VI. Morrison Saul Uie Pi.ine MlSMSt e % poke *.lh oue voice in the Drilled Stale* -iui .. nlUi-i.l SH X\ 1 aa*l I he !" %  I. M.i. I lO [aMldoK. Disturbed The Laboui rsUt) %  ibout Chunottl'i talks in Washuigtoo, declared. Labour members were pressing tu vole a motion A • I %  to the foiincr Labour liovsruII.I nf' policy on K res but regiotted the li i ler'* fatluiito KI pfession to Uiu> policy hi the nut ve.il tu Un United States." Morrison declared : CsatintdU'i Bbeaali to the US. Cougress, tlie n Press generally assumed 'hat the Prime Ulnisler's speech natBsenled a major -tint In British policy. We would like to know whether the Congrew speech repreeaiiU'd any clianne -American relations." He c-omr4siucd Ibal ChurcbUl'h latemeiil fo the Conunuos on January 30 OB his Washington • Iks was "woolly and evasive." Morrison asked wh..t had been aid in Washington on future Jspnese retatton* with Formosa, the %  Oghold of Chiang Sal •Slick's Nationalists. U.P. Make Surve) For Oil \ml i..! %  KINGSTON. Feb. U. Preliminary aerial survey lo oil i-o:Kii>lhttrv.it lha Aquatl A Chi laa %  ri.i Ihr rnent of the visitor*. There | H M< ,i Urn.. DrtU fMajda. : ,Shool District A" Ii %  %  on board ship SB well as on %  bate MaairelaaU %  utoe" to th h Aim rica fee SI Vin|0 nnd will April 3rd. who organised the shore excursion. imoke to your throat's contont It's diaKiicr> nighl. Ihi%nl. J laassv'ii-l inliWiH-ril me t IB> In C 4.. Maurier." "Yomu re brhithtthr times. Nraar'i birn l\iunt itbvut thtmj r years. $1.04 'or SO HH n tent ISO l Ml du MAURIER THE EXCLUSIVi FILTER TIP CIGARETTE loir PtSTaiatiros wini'anx i IISVNP. (•"., i i" suit", i % % % 



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PAG* TWO UAKII.UHJM AD\ OCATK WEDNESDAY. FEBKLAKV 27. ' •yis, % (Fn. %  i>ectcd %  QMK. VIKM in 1078. nrrand MO -' i tarn*. Uu Kinf ld SouthampHm. II. lest daughter I Sir J.*>. I BO). T1K->' hava DM ML Mai F< le. 4.'-., ga i R.A. Partner Fn**vi ment l % %  ing Co.. Ud., JVn.iii)He repre-' %  %  | I 1914—181 fin st.xk also a COT n-upon-Thames J22 lo l37. hold Pal li.iim%  '. .11 of II-M. Hcxtt hoLi 1931-. I 35. Treasurer 135—J7; Treasurer ol > IMt It I!*: „] %  %  "...i %  the Most Honourable 1> I ,.1 .luhuic. After Three MonthV ISCOUNT HYNDLEY ol v %  Elizabeth Hindlev joined the R.M.S. Mauretanl* •* %  '. the remainder of Hit ltd They are en route lo New York %  fkar ~i>vnding juat 01 months holiday in Itarbado*. Their home In Eupl %  C'hele.i Square Brother and Stater CaMb galling 439th CnriM VI JUNG hw avt, etimt MILLIONAIRE MUG years is Mr. Wet terse* Lowe.veteran CTuis. Laborer for By MWtU, ROGERS ft. m a bath .nard Una. He was on NEW YORK MEMORY—He created wh Uw Maanoaaa yesterday in the week *ne*x men the most phenumail nwmory in few minute* on Berk' how. For thi. one laugh-tilled ho..: the Texas Company pays N.B.i I 000.000 f.,r a St-wrok leaaoii. How dad a hoy bom Mlltr.ii Jierlinger in „ drab New Yo> k .,. i to th. t.^ iii TV" In part, ai least, MllUm'i aecrc m the three Hs— Mugging. Mc, or*. Md Maassnfl MKrfilNCi— Sample Berlr s u*e on mugging "Lain (Jane M f i >. 0t BOOH Ttir N#W: 1 10 p pi Nf. Anilm' %  •— III p.m — %  •:• Haa. help htm In his karturesi on Bar| was in HoTTywnod bados Is a short asm showtnj th# hotel room so ssnall thai I had t Coming by "Golfito" DauoHtcr and Son COM iu tnurfciu place* of intereei ... adao outside to change the expre O THER passengers V| INS AUDREY HKECE. daugn£" Nofhlne puU over a place *.on on my face.c„„.. VI ,, M, W W Beece, Q.C.. JJ** fh-n lwi Wm W c ""_ M*" Trie*. 4 .nrt Mr*. H. H will b. leaMng England on April <,u Nl ,JfStuH Ji SEESE? niV* ^w,. i to spend a holiday with her " !" mou % %  %  ? e c *" ""f: *JJJ H (; nrlg. rathM Mr. fleece's son Dick, who f>KOMINENT Amerscam travelfWfdu •" ob t 'c wd magic u I kt Kuu^i w.U .too ho n,na on ihe Maavetaala wluch "'$? cm coax other sUrs who T£ >mg in Barbados this sumca iUfd here yesterday an Mr. appear as guests on his pro2*f> N W Dnthi.Mi .lohn H Half, mar He and his family are due to a*orge Whiuiey. Chairman of the vransme W do startling thEg> i?., £ Ifj K P Haydon. Mr* H P leave aa*1and on May 18th oo^d of J. p. Morgan Co, New ff e coaxed Oracle r.Ads into T.IK K Haydon Mr. ire_ Vork, accompanied by Mrs. Whitland. Mr. and Mrs. G. K JohnLntertaVanMRRl nay and their aon-ln-law and son Miss J. Lewu. Mint H. M T_>Y way -*f entcruunment the daughter Mr. and Mrs. Wiiiian. I,li:e MrI H Oshorn. Mrv U MaairUkea has on board Howe; Mr P. A. Beady, VleeM. Payne. Mi*s J A Payne. Mrs. Diane Courtney. popular New President ol th r Waldorf Aslornt. H B II Simpson. York singer on radio and TV. New York and Mrs. Heady; Mai KB lim ChlMmi Kmaina. Ill | Ul.tr. tuiuinl. S p m p.ir. RlfUml Up "Ml Pii^nirn* Pa'odr. T OB) I. Th, Nr.i. Tin pm N*i p m Cairns Tti* Wr, 0*r Tn You. %  11 p n MT*al. BSD p.m. SuifMVn B 41 p In CDmntKfr ol II i> n. Th> Divon* taia I'ENDINt; tba uay on rison ixrn on rnaiy CTUleel |( Q Hill. i'h;iinn.in of the Board yeatarda) with bis brotherN O Sulhtiluiid Mrs p M. here; Urn Merkur who i^ an of Parole. State of Prnnsyl s IB-law an shine Cm.-.-" ao iiic*Maurs*ansa TUUAY iAli sTsMllslgdgJ Hi Cies. v and lilian Rollo. their daughter Ann and friend accompanied bl Baron Ncunmn. lirsl day of Lent. prar* Transferred Mum Undsley. Mr. Wllmot F. Also in Uatir party y.^twday trrlevaedi* s..> a ol Ash Wi n AflTlt COURTENAY BEECE. Wheeler Uuurmim erf K. Bogid were Mr and Mr*. Jan Fries who day "This is the day on which lVl p ljU ne Judge of Nigeria has '^E^T u'" 'i2? u w are at preaent holidayuig in liarasboe are sprinkled on the head tumn kransferred lo Hong Kwu' Mr WlKi'ler; Mrs Wan. u. HOckbados staying M the Hotel Royal, u a sign of DasMlssBM under an inHe arrived In England on Febru"""> Mr. Fries Is a nephew of Mrs. junction of Pope Gregory th* ;.ry 20th and leavea there de Kuh and Dr. Poradu. Great in Ihe 6th Centui> IfaVOR 10 tor Hong Kong. Si Louis. West Indian Table Talk Short Visit A MONG the paaaenge in arriving by the Lady Rodney 0 Mondnv after a abort visit 1 Dominica wa f Mr. J. K. C. Grannum of • %  Beverley". Strathclyd. o till other varain-ies She mi the forthcoming Round Table p_ P ou tFrom LontT Leave bed Mi rlarold r.mi,-,,.,,,. L11 %  jail Holland, the t n ROuT rr m ^ n i .. wealthy Bahamas husiNetherlands Antilles and Surinam, ISMS HONOUIl Mi J W II I, i,. Mr whrthn h.will N.. dWin.W d.tt hu ,rt brn ' fl ChflMn Iu4g.oCth.iUaa. fur lh.' oiieiuiil t Iho rorm.1 %  ._.., ., .„„,„, tbend of MaivlToreo^; InTSS • CiolflU -n Sundav_March 2nd. By LONDONER I LONDON, Feb. 21 1. Latcsl member to Join the COB t srrvatlve party's ouUlde-Parllan mentary committee on West Indi I affairs i* Sir John Hudson. A Her aim is to have OOVSjrnot of Pntish Hon,*entalive on Ihe omiiiiittee from it duraa, lie wlU iwpiwMni (hat Men colony. Then abowlc] Cooiteeaaa colony on the committee dire IIP.'i require infonnalUTpose of the meeting is to dis, Mr Cneiiuy en Baruaao* The Chairman. Lady Huggina. tiBB % %  erssani dai uuar inciu4-i U. rhfl oasrt or a it, !a S2E^ l f n T , oin *"• "••' %  J rumi n ui! saassuiSA is \\ Coo.^sno,. ii) !" %  S **wi' iiin oV.. pauia I pTnei up. It) I WHO I i. Put Jsmr* m uir s'in i Wsrnln. ,f, Pwtx of nodi raiutrneiioa,, TWO KM nulrtl til* OUb'll _.. ... inns.. UulnM i"r.uUiun. ili tiomnti Kluor \l Kdvs. 1. Captions: 7. Eaoteric: • Solace: 10. Eel 11. Share: 13 Mate |5. Tassel: 17. Almost: 18. Terror: 19 Men(tor> 20. Arena 21 End. DOWN 1. Celebrate: 2 Assemble 3 Pool. 4. OrvheMr.. Briefly: 9 Let: II Season: 12. AaaumcM. Arm. 1. Tore. It; Even. Mr. Both Lady "''sflfng I', t. Sinithovs. Ml'.. ho chairman of kM r rluu antarj ilttee on West Indian Ef||a affairs, have made however that the e Is only Informatlv MM dictate poL H Thought For To-d.y E who nealuttw gs bujnpo 1 II quite clear „. Elllli who ^M,,.,,,,^ hlB w h nblrUidajr thin month became th flrM player of Chineae cxtractkin in a "cap". He loured XT (rom the rear— Waiwmoa IKIh.MS II WTI.ll KiiKland witli the 1S3I Won Indies Lowe. CruUe Lecturer. R.MS Iln liean of Hornl' i,nrt nfteiwunlH enli-ml Maureianla. r II Ci ril ni In, In turn tor I. II.-.. W.HKI. (.-anlrloo >Mun| rnr prlaali to no 1 .u, d Wlladen. londuraa and asatst m the -iplr%  i Mn i7At I .. urritT ol the projile II,,,I.IMAI.I. n, WLST .,d,lreued a nieetlng ,1 INDIES Talkinit ot IUUKUO cricket. I.irgc rmuiber of WOOOer how West Indi priests in the district compared such us Weekes, Munduill ud ith British Honduras, whul, tie Walcott motived the new. l!,„l ),ls Hay Lilulwall. A 11 be playuul against lijy ease the them in England llils tqau fflrultlH under which I tba w.-.i Indies bals. %  .ml M i.li-li l.uidwaU'l M:I III BL AMIS NEWS bowline pssrUcuUrl, h .,, 'Die Nethcriand lumped one or two at then ., ao perfect league t-en hdtisfactiou" i,n,ul,|t the pjii.fc,:s Inuill b. •• %  llcipants in tin i, paig %  SI if! BTUH-N sra-zasL/^ "Dial aa iil.MNi iTomorro*) nil n4.U A 11.30 P.M. Also >r> ntlDAT t.M — 4.41 t. I'M J. t'enllnulu Daily 4.45 A .34 m Punch Tried to Eat a Cloud — But It Flourd Ott fie/ore He Too B> MAX IRE!... "MR. PTTNCH," fsid Hstiid, tsM •hsiii irifrt, "whst arc r' of?" Mr. Puajch loafced up from hi bOoV v||h Sfg are n.ade of fluff ami breezes an-l and raiadnpt. all Iwal"" bet lika whi-.p. d "".' said Huiid. "1 d j thry nera anything like whiPe* %  iir.., Mr. Punch ad.l.i hastily, "most [ II iMids sir like ni i*er gat it far en.Migk u. Ihega tn lasfa them. MIL ,i ol powriered %  ugmr and a rknr}. One I ... %  i|d, il-mJ faape.1 in astt.i4i.hiii'i,i "Y-a aU a elou.f. Mr r.ni.h'' Il.irpenirt My \rridenl "ll happenrd finite by accident.' U loirh. • li was when I was ioy. I binl ion* I if i and lit a mips vho luul u faim line aOeTBsMR, while I wag fitting under an npple tree, I heairf n -trnrt-e rnstlitif none in iJ r eesrii ia a. I loaked gp aae *hst ilo >ou iBmBaae I .BI*'?" "WhalTa-ked lUnnl. "I saw a big Huffy tbin^ caugbl ^ Ih* lop of the irw. I r, I' ni n r)i 1.. %  .la? trea hjajn mi sWrn "f Ibe cloud." ">1> KotaineM! uml Hcnid I >.. ll.. -III. Ill' "Wll." sail. M 1 Ben r-ll al ,.mr %  %  % %  Paaeh -a* Ihe tter a shake. %  upper, she served apple dBinplinr* 1 (nth an cnormouo hall of whipped Hnu.l on lop. ti ta-ted.** said Mr letty hi:* whipped cream nniai one.' I m.-re to Hanid, "is bo* I knoa what rlondta.te like." Rupert and the Pine Ogre i of the ( i %  W hinged Cream H.ii Mi rood,/ Haanl gaj 1 hi m i. tm it a the elMnlT How do you know il w.i-n'i raajly whippt-d cream." "Well," -Ii.l Mi. Punch, "ihal i Nlli.tl uuto 0 Bol I round ->ui it vaa really wbtepM nVwd and nn| *rhlppd erssug. And 1,1 ,] li"" I round out. (.lur-di-a a bin iiall of whipped rb.ufl um p| uu-. 1 | %  vntrhtpg it aial BWVeltng hoc. i 1 II .I.--!.!,..!.,: maat haei I %  %  01 %  Mi I'unrk l ... ... %  DORIS DAY GORDON M^RAE' Bav-aawtt*ul bADes 1 Bay-eawWu VVARNSR BMU-. AI PLAZA B-.RBARf.Ei. DIAL 5170 ..TECHNICOLOR FROM WARNFR BROS. ROODAL THEATRES EMPIRE TW. lUilSia lasia % %  TRE St'N SgTS Ar PAWN tntToduc ns Rally FAIW r*lll|> SHAWN EXTRA MSIIItt (.ailWlM. im ii SUM OS THI LATE KINO OPENINr. FBI SfTH THE i-in v, iii am.ai Van KETUN gv#lvn* KRYFS I,VIN<: II..TI INI i Mi. -Ars NODavwi Nlvan'a Lau-t Film OLYMPIC T. 4U* I .'I I -a*-, i a B.IB Jofittay WtsWaiTUiXtK as %  n-Nout rrar* Ajro "UTI'BLN or ocroaga BSawnM r.LagirN rORD TEKilV MOOHI. THta sraciAx AT i.at a-. %  ( %  >. m "IDAHO ana -SIOI s orrr ( Wlih Oftne AUTHY iCfcasa FrtcM! ROW i.!.> a ut-onu, i M x ,< GrtBth Jon. OWSj ,,,,, DUAM -, ..•-I 'tar nioTaris Krvert ""'ElU. -HOWI.M. | I M HAI OF THE I.ATT. UNO. SAT. SSfMBsl Mia-Bllr SSiw win ax sntLAi, "WANHI'NT .1 MVSTiay ISLAND" IMIl'AI. T--' i KsKlo nil iiMtCIAI. AT IJ -H AJUaEn BTAJDaaTTT DOtnsLX "STBANOEB '..n, rONI A Clir aATt'BDAT BBS AM JOHNNY WUDRBafUUXn M Jl'NOIA JIM titd Kill EN at ."MM" Using Too Much Oil? Before You Spend Money On a Coetly Overhaul, Read Thli! McEnearney & Co., Ltd. Jinttom Jh* Jifhs with £uili-w (DepsndabLLLtij Announcing the arrival of:— (Terrain.) MARBLE CHIPS in 5 colours For Verandahs and Floor* T. HERBERT I. THI. Magazine I.ane, Dial: 4367 IK B***Sl *•<• %  <.i I : VOKTOI IH'F ninj" • •<** & LOOK FOR IKE SII.VFR IIM.NG" .^SHaSSN %  Wltl 14 1, •in.ill at %  > i.i.s UM..M THI asnsv iiui.rs raioss -a, — ss a s.ss m ON DANGEROUS GROUND l.l. 1 VI-TVi. H..I..M HYAS P I 1 # l-lllRKRUS III OPIMNfc Smt. \t„,,h Ut. mt S.l.% A>.*. as sas II auk Th. MBBSIICIII BAY Iri. DAY Usinksn M-, BAK > iinjpns S*.iUo.i Jsch aMITII TOstAf lOaivi w a saa r a ho.*>laAME |}4>uai ( i %  as as ari' *r WITHMA S fllUBOWK Ui BAKTA FE" raiaa itain 4-ss a sat r-a "CONai-vrer .1 raitiNKi Wiut ran ajJatrn a AiJ*< an J r u. MII> Surtai cAEao*. CAIETV The Garden—St. Jatnes TOW 11 cOatlf) BJBP.Bf (11 T Si il-. PASTRotwrl MrrCHUM %  THE SET I B It. I.i' HYAN



PAGE 1

II.\KBA1H>S ADVOl ill I'U.I MM BY CARL ANDERSON fLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD . BY ALAN STRANKS a GEORGE DAVIES Glands Hade Younq Vigour Renewed Without Operation iW" *%  npHI m •>....,, I<>>1> toll v>" lhey*w ju*i riehi. \ ..ii VIL..M. UMI, M li> ii \<an-l V..11I1.. Tie.1 In cviT* pair u lli> .Ilm \\ lnlt.u.nanIrr Murl.l ill.i L n *hti b % % %  -! %  %  t*M rr.-ht 1 I.tb %  "' '! %  #. Mr|y and trltam* M M nan r*unrr or atn — j **<•* i rXvn or %  tt MW i---fc-* MKIInrli Iitlla, and lb-V"-'PAIN SACROOL CONQUERS PAIN. $ KNIGHTS LTD. § IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only "SPECIAL OWENS arr now '''iiilnblr our Hraarbca Twct^sMeT' Sp'i||lilwlMii mil Swan Street Uaually Now Ususllj NOW Pkgs. Cut-Rite Paper 58 50 Tln Condensed Milk .... 33 31 Bottles Olives .. 1.80 1 60 Tln Helm Soups .36 33 Tins Corned Beel with Cereal 60 54 ————— mmmm ——— Carlo CoHee 54 48 Boneless Beel (per lb.) 58 48 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I II I 4 O I. O \ V A II I (. II I I II I I S BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS WELL-AS T MAVF? BE'Br-j TPv s ID THLL yOU R347 THE L**yr rOU7 OiV". v\*IIU, State occaaiwu Befoul Catherines, besides |l log a comfaMe record of the .-. of the King's %  I closet with a complcl. %  mi |Mum "f UM pat*-'" '-''' Tunoral .1 King I HO*** o# /r # 4$ i> 1 BI n / •. ADVOCATE STATION EKY BIOOK KIIOP GREYSTONt VILLAGE. BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS


i
j
j









ESTABLISHED 1895

: WEDNESDAY;



Col. Sec. Explains
Reconstruction Of

Part Of Runway

"THE HON. the Colonial Secretary, at yesterday’s

meeting of the Legislative Council expressed
regret at some harsh words that had been said
elsewhere about Canada in connection with the
defects recently discovered. in the newly con
structed runway at Seawell.

He took this eppertunity when he successfully moved
that the Council concur in a Resolution to
pehnditure to the exient
the defective portion

authorise

n the manner recommended in the

report of Mr. Harold J. Connolly, B.A.Se. (M.F.1.C.), Con
Structional Engineer, Department of Transport, Govern-
ment of Canada
This 1ount include um of ‘ i:
$20,000 in case it ‘s found nec¢ i dD TD
sary to repair other parts h we te} n
runway during reconstructior

owing to the unusual stresses that
will have to be placed on por:ions
not normally carrying traffic and | ,
other unforeseen reconstruction; _QMAHA, Nebraska, Feb. 26
work. | The a eae said five men
y were killed and 12 others injured
Runway Report | when a B. 50 medium bomber on
The Hon. the Colonial Secretary |a “classified” mission from Hawaii
said:— lost a wing while landing then
Honourable Members will have} crashed and burned. Both the
studied the Report on Runway|circumstances of the crash and
Construction at the Seawell Air-|the purpose of the flight . were
port by Mr. H. J. Connolly, the | mysterious.
Officer

Plane Crash

Chief Engineer of the Department Public Information
of Transport, Government of Wayne Bradley said the bomber
Canada, which was laid in this} was approaching the field in clear
Honourable Council last week,; weather about 2.30 am. when
and will have noted that he has!one wing suddenly ripped. ffom

ascribed the failure of certain lthe fuselage. The plane was only
sections at the Airport

to tWe} about 20 yards from the runway.
causes, namely that “all the clay} The four engined ship plunged
was not removed right down to|jnto the runway bounced briefly
bedrock or some clay was incor | i740 the air again, then dropped
porated in the coral rock backfill|, second time and burst into
that was placed on top of the bed- flames. Bradley said the plane was
rock” and, second, that heavy | enroute from Honolulu to Omaha.
rains occurred during the course He said it flew by way of Sacra-
of the construction, |}mento California.

| Seventeen men were aboard the
plane. The officer said the home
base of the plane or its mission
“might never be known since it
a “classified” mission.

—UP.

U.S. Embargo Is
Heavy Blow
_To Canada

OTTAWA, Feb, 26
embargo by the United

They will also have noticed his}
conclusion, in regard to the first
cause of failure, that, I quote from |
his. Report, “this could readily
have happened in construction of | was on
this magnitude where large heavy |
equipment is used to secure and
move the selected rock to be used
as backfill as our tests on samples
of clay taken from the areas show
it to have a very high moisture
content, but when dry is extremely
hard and, if coated with coral
dust, has the appearance of coral
rock, and unless minutely exam-
ined or saturated, could easily





An

ex- },
f $60,000 on the reconstruction of [st

Reds Delay
Ceasefire

j By LEROY HANSEN
| MUNSAN, Feb. 26
The United Nations Command
Wednesday that Commu-





negott may b

felav the ¢ e-fire



}
}
| lo cover preparations for
I offensive.
May Day is ‘the tradi ional
ommuni# holiday. General Ridg-
way's headquarters broadcas
harge from Tokyo on Tuesday
night in a@ “Votce of the Unite

Nations Command” programme a

Red negotiators here rejected

an Alliee compromise offer de-
signed to break the deadlock over
policing the truce,

Chinese Colonel Pu Shan cate-
gorically refused to drop Russia
from the proposed Neutral Truce
Supervision Commission despite
the U.N, offer to match the ges-
ture by withdrawing Norway.

The U.N. headquarters broad-
cast from Tokyo said that the
Reds warned at a recent negotia-
tion sessio@: “As far as they are
concerned, an early truce was out
of the question.”—U.P.



Beasley Heads
Cattle Board

(From Our Own Oorrespondent)

KINGSTON, Feb 25.
The Jamaica Government an-
nounced today the appointment of
Professor C. G. Beasley, Economic
Adviser to C.D. & W, West Indies,
Chairman of a Special Board to
enquire into the cattle industry.
The terms of reference of the
Board which includes Dr, Hug-

}gins, Director of the Institute for |
|Economice and Social Research, of

the University College of the West
Indies, is to make recommenda-
tions with regard to the establish-
ment of the industry, found a
long-term basis to achieve in-
creased efficiency and maximum
local production of beef, milk and
milk products at prices fair ‘to
the consumer and producers,

The appointment of the Board

pass an inspector's eye and be|states on the import of Canadian |follows public outery due to re-

mistaken for coral rock.”

and mouth «disease in
Recommendations Saskatchewan, may be a _ blow
Honourable Members will also|from which Canada’s $2,000,000,-
have noted his recommendations !000 livestock industry will never
for the reinstatement of the de-| recover.
fective areas, In order that these That was one among the num- |
recommendations may be clearly|ber of possibilities which emerged
understood I am taking the liberty |from the confusion following the |
of spreading on the table a print announcement on Monday of the |
which shows in pink and yellow embargo and of measures Canada
the defective areas. )
The first point which Honour-| disease.—(C.P.)
able Members will notice is er
by far the greater part of the|
Runway is unaffected, and this |
point, in view of what has been
said, is worth emphasising. The
second point is that the worst
area between stations 19 and =



NEW JOH



was constructed over the deepest

fill. This is the area which Mr.

Connolly recommends should be
reinstated wilh Portland cement
concrete; for the other smaller

‘
and more isolated areas to the
east of station 25 and the west of
station 19 he recommends a simp-
ler and less expensive remedy.
Further, Honourable Members
will have noted the two alterna-
tive methods of procedure which
Mr, Connolly has suggested. Fo:
the reasons, first that the tourist
season is at present in full swing
and that the tourist trade this
season would be disrupted and
prospects for future years seriously
damaged if the Runway were to
be put out of commission for a
period of a month at the present
junctire, and second that we are
at present enjoying a continuous
spell of dry weather, by far the Mr. R. C. Springer, M.A.,
longest since I arrived in Barba- formerly Assistant Master,
dos, it has been decided to adopt} Harrison College has been
method (b), and it is desired tc | appointed Headmaster of the
get as much of the job as possible | Combined Coleridge-Parry
done before this dry ced School Speightstown. :



breaks. i



RESTING



writes @ postcard while others sit and rest before

meat and livestock because of foot|cent increases
Southern | prices,

will take to stamp out contagious] Nations

AWHILE

in beef and milk



Reds Insist On

PANMUNJOM, Korea,
Feb. 26.

Communists rebuffed United
efforts at compromise
and insisted that Russia must
help police the Korean truce.
Chinese Col, Pu Shan categorical-
ly rejected in.the armistice ne-
gotiations the U.N, face saving
offer to drop Norway from the
proposed neutral Truce Super-

vision Commission if the Reds
would withdraw Russia.

Under the Allied plan the
Commission would have com-

only four ‘nations—Com~
murtist-dominated ‘Czechoslovakia
and Poland. U.N. designated
Sweden and Switzerland—in4
stead of six,

But Reds for the llth straight
day repeated their time-worn
argument that U.N. opposition to
Russia was unreasonable and
untenable.” —U-P.

Jamboree Fund

The Jamboree Fung found an-
other supporter yesterday to raise
the amount by an appreciable
sum, ’ ‘

The contingent of scouts are
scheduled to leave early next
week and so the fund has only a
few more days.

YOU CAN HELP.



Amt. prev. acknigd. .... $ 384.00
Mr, A. S. Bryden ...... 10,00
Total 394.00



TOURISTS from the Mauretania yesterday sit in front of the Publicity Committee Bureau; une lady

tackling a heavy day of sight-seeing and shipping.

> stalling to}
until May Day!

QUEEN INSPECTS ScouTS

QUEEN ELIZABETH as Prin
parts of the Commonwealth
Jamboree in July 1951. Behind

Achehon Satisfied ===
With N.A.TO.

French May
Abandon
Indo-China

| PARIS, Feb, 25.
The French may have to aban~-
don the entire Northern section
of Indo-China to Communist-led
insurgents this year informed
French sources said on Tuesday.
The sources said Official quar-
ters consider the move in whieh
French Union forces i
to at MM
wa woyv he a sa.
back for the salt Senate?
world. In Annam narrow ‘waist’
of the country only 150 miles
Wide concentrated “Inst ditch”
defence lines could be drawn in
the mountain terrain where
peaks rise 5,500 feet the sources
pointed out

|

No official world

retreat from strategic Hoa Binh
underlined the gravity of the
French position. Wihen the late!
Marshal Jean de Lattre De Tas-
signy took the jungle fortress last
fall he said he would hold it
| forever,”

| Now the French perimeter is
|only 20 miles from Tonking, capi-
tal of Hanoi and Vietminh for-
ces are massing for new attacks
on the French withdrawal route
to the South.

Shortly before
Tuesday for Paris,
Minister of the
States. of Indo - China, Jean
Letourneau indicated that France
would be willing to take part in
an international conference to
bring an end to the Indo-Chinese
conflict.

He said the end of the Indo~
China war depended on the poli-
tical solution rather than the
military one, He said “France
would not refuse negotiations
| with Vietminh but under no pre-

leaving here
the French

text would she take the first
step.”

Letourneau said: “Franco-
Vietnam forces cannot force a

|
comment wadl

Russian Inclusion eee on possible withdrawal but



Associated)

ARY 27, 1952





Elizabeth inspecting the Canadian ¢
led at Clarence House, her London h

© Queen is Lord Rowallan, the Chief Scout

United States Secretary .of State Dean Acheson will

leave for Washington to-da
he wanted from the most

Council ever held—but he may have a hard time convinc-
ing Congress his paper victories have substance



THE FAMILY
DOCTOR

In keeping with our policy
of obtaining for our readers
the best possible advice on
subjects of importance, the
Advocate have arranged for
a practising Doctor to answer
reader’s medical queries,

Family Docter will be

to, see any readers
personally, but you can send
him your questions and
the answers will appear
every week in the Evening
Advocate.

There will be no charge
for this medical advice, and
letters will be treated in
confidence. To make abso
lutely sure you are asked
not to sign your real name
to your query but to write
under a pen name. The
answer to the question will
appear under the pen pame.

Letters should be addressed
to The Family Doctor, c/o
The Editor Advocate, Bridge-
town, and must reach this
office by Wednesday each
week.

The first series of replies
to medical questions will
appear in next Monday's
Evening Advocate.



Japanese House
Pas» Budget After
Mass Walk-out

TOKYO, Feb, 26,

The House of Representatives
Budget Committee on Tuesday
evening passed Premier Shigeru
Yoshida’s $2,500,000,000, Budget
Bill after Opposition Party mem-
bers staged a mass walkout in
protest against its $500,000,000
Defence Appropriations.



decision by launching a great of-

—UP.



}

New Way To Keep
M.at Fresh Claimed

MOSCOW, Feb. 26

The Soviet press widely publi-
cised on Tuesday a new original
{process treatment of meat with
jultra-violet rays insuring the
|preservation of fresh meats in
warm temperatures for long peri-
jods without refrigeration.

Accoraing to tne Soviet press
the meat retains its freshness five
days ahd sausage more than 20
|days af.er a five minute exposure
|to the ultra-violet rays.—U.P.



R.M.S, Mauretania, with 1,500
| people on board (including crew)
\Slid gracefully into Carlisle Bay
shortly after 7 o’clock yesterday

morning. As health and immigra- |

tion officials “cleared” the ship
so that passengers could land,
launches to take most of the 759
| passengers on shore were quickly
lowered over the side of this
“Princess” of the Cunard Lines.
Mauretania is 35,677 gross tons,
772 feet long and 894 feet broad.
Over three hundred passengers
went on the shore excursion, the
remuinder made their own plans
and spent the day shopping, swim-
ming and some even organised
their own tour of the island.
Throughout the day passers by
the Esplanade stopped to get a
good look at the Mauretania as
she rode majestically at anchor
By mid-day tourists were all
over the island taking in all the

fensive because there is no front.)

Yoshida’s Liberal Party which
controls a majority of 51 seats in
any case then pushed the Bud-
get without a dissenting vote.

The walkout climaxed the
stormy session during which
the Liberal Committee Chair-
man aroused the ire of 19
Opposition members by rejecting
their demands that Yoshida ap-

pear before them to testify on]

alleged inconsistencies in pre-
vious ‘testimonies by the govern-

ment spokesman, reported
One hundred and fifty students
The Opposition Committee|on strike from Sidiki College
members included representatives} hurled: stones as they marehed
of the Progressive party, the|toward public instruction offices
Right Wing Socialists, the Left|}to protest agains! measures taken
Wing Socialist Communist Party,|by the French authorities. Three
the Farm Labour Party, the Far-jhundred and. fifty from. various
mers’ Co-operatives and the So-|schoojs demonstrated without in-

U.P.

cial Democrats.—U.P.

‘TOURISTS GO ON SHORE EXCURSIONS

, places of interest, Those who did
not have movie
}candid cameras or some
j type, and there was a continuou
clicking of camera-shutters
\throughout the day.

camera carried

othe!

Planters’ Punch
Sam Lords had over forty lun
ers and about 325 tourists stoppe
jin for drinks and to look over thi
well known: “Barbadian show-
|piece.”” A similar number in

vaded the Crane Hotel and over
90 remained for lunch. Most pop
ular drink served seemed to b¢
“Planters’ Punch.”

The Aquatic Club had ap
mately lune!
many opportunity
going in for a swim. Several
called in at the Paradise Be
Club in the morning and agai
in the afternoon. Other hoté and

a hundred for

took the

clubs were ite and

al



PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Morrison Challenges
Churchill: Moves Vote

Of Personal Censure





|

LONDON, Feb. 26





|

FORMER FOREIGN MINISTER, Herbert Morrison,

| leading the Opposition (Labour) attac k on Winston

} Churchill tonight, challenged the Prime Minister to say

, whether there had been a “major shift” in Brit ; Far

} East ‘policy Moving a Vote of Personal Censure on
Churchill in a crowded House of Commor Morrisor
accused him of coming back from his Washington visit
last month with “vaguely expressed and p b] ra

commitments”, H

Important rong mar
Announcement joo), S
| On W.1. To-day

Driving Ror

mcentrated on ¢ ure







Gwe UW Correspondent) to the United State
LONDON, Feb. 26 January 17 Ml
An imporaac announcement on}had “throwr p
ita rederation will be | Work ot Ke ’ A i
naa i «6Partiament to-morrow I y promisi rompt ( e
iernkoon at 3.30 Mr. Otsive and effective” ion if
Lyttelton, Secretary of State j}munists broke the {1
Jine Colonies is. to-announce the | -ppj tatement
juate of the London conference to | ynwise, provocative
which West Indian Governments |sible,” Morrison said
will send representatives to

Resuming the debate on Foreign
Affairs which was broken offpy
the death of King George VI,
Morrison said the Prime Minister
spoke with one voice in the
United States and a different one

when he reiurned to London,

yontingent when Scouts from all
ome, before attending the World

}cuss proposals of the Rance
port,

Mr, Lyttelton’s announcement
is expected in view of the ques-
tion which has been put down b)
Mr, Peter Smithers, Chairman ot

the West Indies Sub-Committee of

a

(story on page 4.)

the Conservative Party, M1: Disturbed

Mr, Lyttelton
if he will convene a conference The Labour Party was genu-
on West Indies Federation. inely disturbed about Churchill's

If Mr. Lyttelton does not reacn}talks in Washington, Morrison
Mr, Smithers question in the nor-]declared, Labour members were
mal sequence before 3.30 at whicn} Pressing to vote a motion wel-
coming Government's adherenc
to the former Labour Govern-
ment’s policy on Korea and China
but regretted the “Prime Minis

ter’s failure to give adequae ex
-OnvV e at 1 ‘ one . as oo
y convinced that he got what! ence on Caribbean Federation wa Sheer 4. thie. potior-cin 2

important session of N.A.T.O,| conceived by the Jamaican Gov-| course of his recent visit to the
ernment an agreed to in princi-l(pited States.” Morrison declared
ple by Mr. Attlee’s Socialist Gov-}that after Churchill's speech to
ernment, But no action was taken} the U.S. Congress, the American

Talks

{time questions cease he will pro
}bably ask permission from = th«
. . 9
LISBON, Feb. 26. Speaker to answer it then

The idea of a London confer-

The Council took an enormous ‘





step toward translating plans into}'® implement the proposal Press generally assumed that the

jaction by removing major diplo-| West Indian Governments have] Prime Minister's speech repre-

matic roadblocks to the buil
of western defence and by ap-|report in their own time without! policy.

proving specific military “plans;any lead being given by White- :

for the first time, hall. But as now only British We would like to know
It roved the European army Hondures hes not discussed | the eeisted nue cuties ot aot A

approved e Pan AMY | ve. { any change o sy é
aan the way for the end of report in (he. Laguiative Council all,” Morrison bluntly asked,

A specific date may be set for a
conference in London. This date
may be earlier than the Colonial

German occupation, linked N.A.-
T.O. to Germany adopted the
1952 military programme for 50

Morrison charged that “conflict-
ing cleverness of both sides of the



tivisions 4,000 planes and the Office suggestion of late July Atlantic is in our submission
construction of over $460,000,000 dangerous to peace and to good
uirhelds ant communications net- : Anglo-American relations,
works, U.S. Offer He complained that Churchill's
Despite these impressive ac i statement to the Commons on
tions many delegates and ob-| Campromise dupamey 02 on his Weshiniaton
servers here seriously doubted talks was “woolly and evasive.
whether these plans would come TOKYO, Feb, 26. i ne i i
to fulfilment. 'Too muph depends| Japanese sources, said that the a. ‘Wa: pas wins Ded Seam
on unpredictable factors—wheth-| U.S. offered a double _com- |°‘¥° ashington on future Jap-

anese relations with Formosa, the
island s.ronghold of Chiang Kai
Shek's Nationalists.—U.P.

promise plan on extra-terrltfial
rights to speed the conclusion of
the United States-Japanese a

er France can steady its wobbly
economy whether the French and
German parliaments are really



ready to bury the hatchet, whe-j|ment on American military

ther Communist pressure in the me ade a occupation . \ 2 =

Far East will wreck Western) An dministrative agreement) | ,

plans in Europe is expected to be resent-| ~ lake Survey For
ed to the Japanese Cabinct

on
Tuesday and initialled later this |
week by Special American Am- |
bassador Dean Rusk and State
Minister Katsuo Okazaki. KINC ‘ON, Feb. 26.
The Tokyo newspaper Covu- Preliminary aerial survey in oil
eri published what purported to| possibilities ‘for Jamaica is now
be the text of an agreement on | being made on behalf of the Metal

Prior to coming here Acheson
told intimates he would consider
his trip a success if he won four
points from the Couneil: (1)
| Approval of the European Army
| permitting eventual German re-
jarmament and providing a struc-

Oil And Gas

From Our Own Correspondent




ture for ultimate effective Eu-|the sovere rights of American | Mining C }

> ' g Co, of Canada who are be-
| Popean defence. : (2) Agree-|forces to ign garrisoned in Ja-jing granted concession to prospect
ment to give Germany near and the legal

pan relationship} for oil and gas in Jamaica, he
between U.S. security troops and|airborne geophysical survey start-
Japanese —U.P. ed a week ago

equality with other N,A,T.O, na-
tions by extending N.A,T.O. guar-
antees to Germany and by ap-
‘proving agreement to end Ger-





man occupation. (3) Approval] 66 > n
lof a master economic and de- Ci
fence plan pledging firm con- a

tributions of divisions from each

of the member countries except
Iceland, Portugal, Greece, and
Turkey—the last two hecause


















e 7
they just joined NATO. (4) Ac- t < im < Vvé« I since ie
cord between France and the
United States on how to solve
French budget problems and oy2 bee
thus permit the first three points CLP Ne ,
to be carried forward. NATO cee |
gave Acheson hig first three ‘ ‘\ **You’re fun to know, Jimmy.
points and he personally work- " ime ra here
eins ge AR ge he The last time we came her

it was a new cocktail: this

time it’s my first du Maurier —

Premier Edgar Faure
—UP.



and very nice, too.”

TEAR GAS BOMBS
DISPERSE STUDENTS

TUNIS, Feb, 26
Police hurled tear gas bombs
into the alr on Tuesday to disperse
studénts who hurled rocks at a
street-car No» casualties were

“We do our best to
please. I thought you'd
like them. They do
seem to give a cleaner
and a cooler smoke,”

cident

’ “No, the flavour, strange
to relate, comes from the
tobacco.”

the evening dances at Club Mor
gar the Aquatic Club and

Carnival dance at Chez . Jean
Pierre were arranged for the

entertainment



of the visitor

“It’s discovery night, David.
Jimmy’s just introduced me

Police Displ
epee er to my first du Maurier.”

> was also a Musical Ride,
and the Beating
the Barbadkt

Riding School



“You are behind the times.

Police ; alice Nina’s been lyrical about





District A” Leaflets to thi them for years.”

Diet dae ok wal eo on $1.04 for 50
hore : MADE IN
The Mauretania left Barbado-| Smeke fo your throat’s content ENGLAND
“edu MAURIER

N Y : and sill
; nee a Fs OITHE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR

BRIDG

WILKINSON & HAYNES Co.,

LTD.,




PAGE TWO
















BARBADOS ADVOCATE

MILLIONAIRE MUG

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952
CCC



By NEWELL ROGERS
NEW YORK.

in the week income-tax men

and he told Carib he hoped to be dm Britain have defined a million-

aire as a man who earns £100,000
a year, I introduce you to one who
will earn £357,000 every year for

populang ts next 30 years—starting now.
man on the ship. Everyone show business a mug is a

TNT CHWOOD .
ae MARCH WoC D - ° 439th Cruise
(Frederick George Penn RAmXs his 439th Cruise in
accompanied by his wife is ex- 9 rears ji
pected to arrive here from Eng- 21 years is Mr, Watterson
land on Sunday M " Lowe, veterkn Cruise Lecturer for
the Golfito. 4 the Cunard Lines. He was on
Viscount Marchwood beard the Mauretania yesterday
TY Isvyés econd Yr ‘ ‘
Frederick James Penny, of Bit-@ back in April.
terne, Hants. He was educated Mr. Lowe or “Watty” as he ds
King Edward VI Grammar Sch« familiarly known to everyone on
Southampton, He i A board is perhaps the mest
Boyle, eldest daug f the late t . :
Sir John Gunn, J.P, in 1905, They’ to him with their troubles | ani
have one son, Maj, Peter George questions about the islands
Penny, M.B.E., R.A the cruise. and “Watty” has an
Viscount Marchwood is Senior answer for all queries.
Partner Fraser and Co., Govern-. Mr. Lowe started the “Flower
ment broke Singapore and for the Day” and “Thought for
Managing Director Eastern Smelt- the Day” which are so popular on
ing Co., Lid., Penang. He repre- these cruises. For each port he
sented the Federated Malaya has a different coloured flower and
States Government in negotiatior an example of his thoughts for
ith Netherlands Indies Go the day is given elsewhere in this
nent Bandoeng, Java, regard- column.
ing liquidation of war (1914—18) Part of his job is to give lec-
tin stocks, tures to cruise gers on the
He was also a Conservative! ports and isla! are going
M.P. for Kingston-upon-Thames ! to visi* the following y. He al-
from 1922 to 1937. x ways has capacity audiences so
Other posts he has held are,% much so that on this trip he has
Parliamentary Private Secretary had to give two lectures for each
to Financial Secretary to War port to take care of the crowds.
Office, 1923; Conservative Whip He is always getting letters
1926—37; Lord Commissioner of from passengers, thanking him for





the Treasury 1928—29 and 1931;
Vice-Chamberlain of H.M. Hous. -

MR.
yesterday morning at St. Lawrence
Gardiner Austin and Co., Ltd's., Passen.
the former Dorothy Edwards.

hold 1931—32; Comptroller 1932 Mr. Watson is of Messr
35; Treasurer 1935—-37; HonJ ger Department. His wife is
Treasurer of Conservative Party’

1938—46. ‘ is wl oe
He is a Freeman, City of Lon-, Coming by Golfito
don and an Officer ist Cla of ( THER passengers arrivit
the Most Honourable Order of the by the Golfito on Sunday

R. H
Bon-
Capt.
(Re-
Miss
Mrs,

March 2nd are Mr. and Mrs
Bent, Mr. and Mrs. J. F
nalie, Miss S. G. Bonnalie
H. G. Briggs, D.S.O., R.N.,
tired), Mr. L. L. Charle
E. M. Collinson, Mr, and
N. W. Duthie, Mr. John H. Haig,
Mr. K. P. Haydon, Mrs. H., P.
Haydon, Mr. and Mrs. N., E. Ire-
land, Mr. and Mrs. G. K. John-
son, Miss J. Lewis, Miss N. M.
Lodge, Mrs. I. R. Osborn, Mrs.
M. Payne, Miss J, A. Payne, Mrs.
B. Sharp, Mrs. B. H. Simpson,
Mr. and Mrs. C, E,. Steel, Miss
N. QO. Sutherland, Mrs. M.
Walker and Mrs. D. FE. Wall

Ash Wednesday

Crown of Johore.

After Three Months
ISCOUNT HYNDLEY of
Meads and his daughter Hon.
Elizabeth Hindley joined the
R.M.S,. Mauretania yesterday for
the remainder of the 18 day cruise,
They are en route to New York
after spending just over three
months holiday in Barbados,
Their home in England is

Chelsea Square.

Brother and Sister
PENDING the day on shore
yesterday with his brother-
in-law and sister Mr. and Mrs.
Henry de Kuh was Dr. Alfrea
Porada who is making the “Sun-



in

Pp

shine Cruise” on the Mauretania “QYODAY is Ash Wednesday—the
accompanied by Baren Neuman. first day of Lent. Pears
Also in their party yesterday Cyclopaedia says of Ash Wednes-

were Mr. and Mrs, Jan Fries who
are at present holidaying in Bar-
bados staying at the Hotel Royal.
Mr. Fries is a nephew of Mrs.
de Kuh and Dr. Porada.

day “This is the day on which
ashes are sprinkled on the ~head
as a sign of penitence under an in-
junction of Pope Gregory the
Great in the 6th Century.”



By LONDONER bados to fill other vacancies. She
LONDON, Feb. 21 has approached Mr. Harold
Latest member to join the Con- Christie, wealthy Bahamas busi-
servative party’s outside-Parlia~ nessman to see whether he will
mentary committee on West Indian join,
affairs is Sir John Hudson. A Her aim is to have one repre-
former Governor of Pritish Hon- sentative on the committee from
duras, he will represent that each colony. Then should Con-
colony on the committee, servative M.P.’s require informa-
The Chairman, Lady Huggins, tion about any particular West
told me this week that she is still Indian territory they will be able



seeking two members, one from to turn to the committee for
the Bahamas and one from Bar- guidance.

$$ $_—__—_—_——————- Both Lady Huggins and Mr.

Peter Smithers, M.P., who is

CROSSWORD chairman of the Parliamentary

sub-committee on West Indian

affairs, have made it quite clear
however that the outside com-
mittee is only informative and
does not dictate policy.

PRIESTS WANTED

The Dean of Honduras, the
Very Reverend P. H. Cecil, now
in England, has, I see, been ap-

pealing for priests to go to British
Honduras and assist in the spir-
itual life of the people. He re-
cently addressed a meeting at
Cheam in Surrey, where he com-



mented on the large number of
Across priests in the district compared
1. Joy about the broken rune. (7) with British Honduras, which he

8. Present day muse included (6)

said had only seven.
The heart of 6 (3)

audience the

He told his
addition of one










ry scare ee nest, (4) priest would considerably ease the
12. Convepance th 0. (3) dificulties under which the
16 Looking fixéaiy, (7) Church worked in the colony.
if 6 & name. (4) . * IDwe
i. New but may be second-nand (5 NETHERLANDS NEWS
ay Dalike Seinen ee ey The Netherlands Government
32. Stack up. (4) TS 19) report this week that there has
, Zou Gon't offer it to a 10, (4) been “satisfaction” among the par-
15. Distlose with B tever. (6) ticipants in the preliminary talks
i Down t t,
- Put James in the shrub. R. pe d h
2. Warning. (4) ee ay u r an e
3. Part of body construction, (4) moe 5
4. Two eyes noted the publication i 3. ew
(7) ek
>. Long for in any earnings (5) HOE Bin
6 The harm puts years on the Se 5
femaie. (6)
‘. Disintegrated. (8) ¥. One. (4)
10 He doesn't get the 23 Across t }
recognition. (8)
lo’ [fo lis a Roman goia coin 6)
18 Wine producer. (4)
20 Wrinkies in the 3 may 45 this |
21 Ts n Sik sheets. (3)
ACROSS: ear
1, Captions: 7. Esoteric: 8. . bs a
Solace: 10. Eel: 11, Share: 13: sar meee
Mate: 15. Tassel: 17. Almost: 18.
Terror: 19. Men(tor); 20. Arena: At the top of the slope Rupert
21. End. spies the Guide. Pauline, waiting.
DOWN: “I just had to see what happens
* ” ;
1. Celebrate: 2. Assemble: 3 « eh she whig akg a ch
Pool: 4. Orchestra: 5. Scare: 6. he oe td aoa Piceeaty
atv: 6 . sen: 9 + an “ioe
—— : +: i 11. Season: 12. 1 long lime of tiny prickly figures
Asma: . Arm; 15. Tore: 16. appears moving towards Nutwood

NEW ARRIVALS

PILLOW CASES 20 x 30 @

SHEETS 70 x 90 @ ..
» 9x18 @..

DIAPER CLOTH 24” @
WASH CLOTHS (White) @
DOMESTIC 24” @ ..
CRETONNE 27” @
PLAID TABLING 48” @





AND MRS. MAURICE WATSON who were married quietly

Daughter and Son

West Indian Table Talk







Chapel.

his talks and help he has given
them on former cruises.

He told me thet what would
help him in his lectures on Bar-

bados is a short film showing thé

M's AUDREY REECE,
ter of Mr, W. W. Reece, QC.,
will be leaving England on April
lith for Barbados, She is coming
to spend a holiday with her
father. Mr. Reece’s son Dick, who
is now in Kubait will also be
holidaying in Barbados this sum-

tourists places of interest in ad-
. vance. Nothing puts over a place

better than a movie film, he con-

cluded.

Prominent Americans

IMMINENT Americans travel-
ling on the Mauretania which
called here yesterday are Mr.

mer. He and his family are due to George Whitney, Chairman of the

leave England on May 18th.
the

Entertainment
B* way “f entertainment
Manretania has on board
Diane Courtney, popular New
York singer on radio and T.V.
She has been on many cruises
here; Lou Merkur who is an
orchestra conductor on radio sta-
tion W.O.R. New York and an
East Indian dance team, Richard
Cressy and Lilian Rollo.
Transferred
M*: COURTENAY REECE,
Puisne Judge of Nigeria has
been transferred to Hong Kong.
He arrived in England on Febru-
ary 20th and leaves there on
March 10 for Hong Kong.





on the forthcoming Round Table
Conference between Holland, the
Netherlands Antilles and Surinam.
No definite date has yet been set
for the opening of the formal
conference but it is believed that
it will be in The Hague towards
the end of March or early in April.
Putpose of the meeting is to dis-
cuss the status and constitution of
Netherlands B.W.I. possessions
which are to be completely self-
governing.
ELLIS ACHONG

Returning to Trinidad after
nearly 20 years in England is
Ellis Achong, former Test cricket-
er. Ellis, who celebrated his 48th
birthday this month became the
first player of Chinese extraction
to gain a “cap”. He toured
England with the 1934 West Indies
team and afterwards entered
league cricket, playing in turn for
Rochedale, Heywood, Castleton
Moor and Walsden.

LINDWALL vs. WEST
INDIES

Talking of league cricket, I
wonder how West Indies stars
such as Weekes, Marshall and
Walcott received the news that
Ray Lindwall, Australian fast
bowler, will be playing against
them in England this summer. in
Australia the West Indies bats-
men did not relish Lindwall’s
fast bowling, particularly when
he bumped one or two at them
On the not so perfect league
wickets he will be even mor
difficult to play.



Pine Og





t »,f

reached
the withered oak when hundreds ot
elves leap out from all sides

forest. Hardly have they

e|

i

'

4

an instant the air is filled with

whirling figures, and in a terrific

battle all the Ogre’s slaves are sut-

rounded and captured and marched
away.

ER LCCC ARCA ALC TE TE TESTA





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Two Action Packed Westerns—
ALAN LANE Double
“SHERIFF of WICHITA” «&
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SATURDAY SPECIAL 9.80
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“VOICE OF THE TURTLE”
“LOOK FOR THE SILVER LIN

LY Rec
A.M.

Board of J. P. Morgan Co., New
York, accompanied by Mrs, Whit-
ney and their son-in-law and
daughter Mr. and Mrs. William
Rowe; Mr. F. A. Ready, Vice-
President of the Waldorf Astoria,
New York and Mrs. Ready; Maj.
H. C. Hill, Chairman of the Board
of Parole, State of Pennsylvania,
and Mrs. Hill; Mr, Robert Pinker-
ton of the A. C. Farrell Line and
Mrs. Pinkerton accompanied by
their daughter Ann and friend
Miss Lindsley; Mr. Wilmot F.
Wheeler, Chairman of the Board
of American Chain and Cable and
Mrs. Wheeler; Mrs.
man and Miss Hortense Nelson of
St, Louis.
Short Visit
MONG the passengers arriv-
ing by the Lady Rodney on
Monday after a short visit to
Dominica was Mr. J. K. C, Gran-
of “Beverley”, Strathclyde.

En Route From Long Leave

IS HONOUR Mr, J. W. B.
Chenery, Judge of the Assist-
ant Court of Appeal is among the
passengers due to arrive here by
the Golfito on Sunday March 2nd.
Mr, Chenery left Barbados in
mid-August last year on long
leave.
In Passing
UST in passing there are 190
single women making the
"Sunshine Cruise” on the Maure-
tania as against 97 single men,

Thought For To-day
H® who hesitates gets bumped

from the rear.— Watterson
Lowe, Cruise Lecturer, R.M.S.
Mauretania.

B'TOWN
Dial 2310
PLAZA—
OPENING (Tomorrow) THURS.
4.45 & 8.30 P.M. Also
FRIDAY 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
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seONE OF THE
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June

Opening THURSDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P
FRIDAY 2.30 — 4.45 & 8.30 P.M

ON DANGEROUS GROUN
Ida LUPINO — Robert RYAN
1.30 P.M.

“BONANZA TOWN

face, And mugging is the act of
vontorting that face to get a laugh
mut.of an audience.

Milton Berle’s mugging every
Tuesday at 6 pm. (New Yerk
time) on TY is credited with at
least 15,000,000 laughs all cross
America.

Hour of Oi}

Milton Berile’s sponsor—on the
National Broadcasting Company
network—is one of America’s rich
oll concerns, the Texas Company.
its petrol gets mentioned admir-
aay every few minutes on Berle’s
show,

For this one laugh-filled hour

the Texas Company pays N.B.C.
£1,000,000 for a 39-week season.
How did a boy born Milton

Berlinger in a drab New York

tenement get to the in TV?
Tn part, at least, Mi *s secret
is the three ugging, Mem-

ery, and Mamma.

MUGGIN. — Sample Berle’s
joke on mugging: “Last time
I was in Hollywood I had an
hotel room so small that I had to
g0 outside to change the expres-
sion on my face.”

Tricks
His facial contortions and
imitations of celebrated people
are . He can sing, dance,
@ » do acrobatics and magic
tricks,

He cam coax other stars who
appear as guests on his ‘O-
gnome to do startli es.

e coaxed Gracie Fi into

Punch Tried to



singing to him in a bathing suit.
MEMORY.—He is credited with
the most phenomenal memory in



Dee ee EEE Ene!

GRAND OPENING MARCH Ist 8.15 p.m.



BARBAREES

ANOTHER SCENIC

variety. To back it up he has (DIAL 5170) WONDER IN THE
DIL

850.000 gags on file, Duplicates | CARIBBEAN !

are stored on micro-film in WITH

bank. F aia
MAMMA Mother Sarah ’ -

Berlinger (now Sandra Berle) THE Lovin EST GY

was a store detective until the

day her five-year-old boy did an MUSICAL IN MANY

impersonation of Charlie Chaplin

in the street. She has helped
him along ever singe,
Rates Up

Last year America turned out
That
means millions of potential new
the Texaco Star

5,000,000 new TV sets.

haw-haws for
Show.

So N.B.C. has raised
again More money for
customers.—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY
1115 am The
Listeners’ Choice
1210 pm. News
1oO—7.15 pom



FEBRUARY 27,
Storyteller,

1952

Anatysis.
19.76m_,

25 58m,

#1.32m.



4.00 pm The News,
Daily Service, 415 pm
Light Orchestra, 500 pm
of the Week, 5 15 pm
son at the Theetre Organ,
Books To Read,
600 p.m
Ulster Magazine,

410 pm

64 pm

its rates
more

1130 am
12 00 noon The News,

The
BBC Midland
Composer
Sandy MacPher-
630 pm
545 pm The Art,
Children Singing, 6.15 pm
Sports





Round Up and Programme Parade, 7.00

SS

745 pm Over To You,
Radio Newsreel,
Week, 9 00 The Divorce
10 00 p.m
The Editovials,

pm

Eat a Cloud

—But It Floated Of Before He Took a Bite—

By MAX TRELL

“MR. PUNCH,” said Hanid, the |

shadow-giri, “what are clouds made

of?”

Mr, Puneh looked up from hi
book with @ smile. “Clouds? Cloud
are made of fluff and breezes and
sunbeams and raindrops, all beat
up tovether like whipped cream.”

“Oh,” said Hanid, “I didn’t knov
they were anything like whippe
eream.

“Of course,’



Mr, Punch added
hastily, “most folks don’t knov
what clouds are like at all. They
never get near enough to them to
taste them. Clouds are quite deli
cious, especially with a bit of pow-
dered sugar and a cherry. Once |
ate a whole cloud,” he said.

Hanid gasped in astonishment
“You ate a cloud, Mr. Panch?”’





Happened By Accident

“It happened quite by accident,’

aid My, Punch, “It was when | was
s emall boy. | had gone to visit
Geandma and Grandpa who had a
farm. One afternoon, while 1 was
sitting under an apple tree, | heard
@ strange rustling noise in the
wanches overhead. | looked up and
what do you suppose 1 saw?”

“What?” asked Hanid.

“lL saw a big fluffy thing caught
1) thé top of the tree, I recognized
it pt once. Tt was a clond, So 1 gave
‘he tree a shake and down came

reat pieces of the cloud.”

“My woodness! said Henid

What did you do with them?”

“Well,” said Mr. Purch, “I picked

hem all up and took them at ence

Grandma. | told her



it Was 4
ul that had got stuck in the appl

“ec,
“Gyesdima ditn't seem the least
t surprised,” Alr. Punch went or
She took s of the cloud,



oles them afl up neatly, and pi
em ib a t

4,4

OOOO COS

ae

OPENING TODAY 5

WHY HE



UN ioe
BUT





ROOK Now D

Written tor the Sereee
Rated on a

wy
owl ty FLETCHER MARKLE » Pronece





SS s

a - e \=—>
Punch gave the tree a shake,

st)

supper, she served apple dumplings
with an enormous ball of whipped
cloud on top. [t tasted,” said Mr.
Punch, “exaetly like whipped cream.
And that,” he said smiling once
| More to Hanid, “is how I know what
clouds taste like.”

Whipped Cream

“But Mr. Puneh,” flanid ex-
claimed, “how do you know jit was
jthe cloud? How do you know it
;Wasn’t really whipped cream.”

“Well,” said Mr, Punch, “that
|question bothered me too, But 1
{found out it was really whipped
cloud and not whipped cream, And
this is how 1 found out. Grandpa
also had a big ball of whipped cloud
on his upple dumpling. 1 remember
watehing it and marveling how hiv.
it was. And suddenly, just a
Winged my @yes, it disappeared
must have fonted out of the w

low. Of ise.’ Mr. Punch adver,
“Grand, a y ight have eaten tout
rostary gether No,

windew and

it Moet» 1 t the

PPPOE EEA PPPS,

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FOR THE BEST MoviEs °X



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ONLY TWO WOMEN KNEW

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New




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The News, 1010 pm. From
1015 pm Mid Week
Talk, 10 30 p.m. Marching and Waltzing.








storring

DoRIS DAY GORDON MASRAE !

Bay-eautiful babes! Bay-eautiful tunes!’

taoe WARNER BROS.

tor ay TE CHNIGOLOR

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FROM

The News; 7.10 ¥ Ni
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Today 4.45 & 8.30 pm.
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Johmy WIRSSMULLER as
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Starring:
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———
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“HIGRIING FRONTIER MAN”

SATURDAY 9.30 A.M.
JOHNNY as

WIESSMULLER
“JUNGLE JIM” and
“RETURN of OCTOBER”





















Office 4493

Parts Dept. 4613
Night 4125

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Charles
McEnearney
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The Garden—St. James
TODAY (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“OUT of the PAST”
Robert M?ITCHUM &
“THE SET UP” Robert RYAN

THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M.
“BEWARE of PITY”
Lilli PALMER &
“HOUSE of FRANKENSTEIN
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY

MIDNITE SAT: 1ST _
“CONQUEST of CHEYENNE” &







—

cL RAASD “eneanereneattheatsatatasess


WEDNESDAY,

FEBRUARY 27,

1952



‘AANADIAN COLUMN

Record

National

Product 1951

CANADIAN output of goods and services in 1951 was
&t record levels, according to advance preliminary estim-

ftes issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.

The

sross National Product of 1951 is placed by the Bureau at
p21.2 billion, a rise of 18 per cent. from 1950. Of this rise
yetween five and six per cent is accounted for by increases

n the real output of goods
dy price increases.
&penditure by business for ix
tment in durable assets and in-
tories claimed a higher portion
the nation’s output than in
9. Government expenditure on
@s and services also absorbed
arger share oi the Gross Na-
@l Product as a result of
ger expenditure for defence,
le the proportion absorbed by
sumers for personal goods and
vices declined. Personal saving
(51 was at its highest level
the end of the war; it rose
@ $820 n.illion in 1950 to more
1 double this amount in 1951.
oi Agreement With Spain
be Minister of trade and Com-
ce, Mr. C.D, Howe, announced
February 11 the conclusion of
agreement between Canada
Spain, providing for the
idation of commercial debts
9g to a number of Canadian
&. These debts have been
ked in Spain since before the
jreak of the Spanish Civil War
uly, 1936.
fiis agreement was concluded
dadrid on January 29, 1952, by
“Wm. Frederick Bull, Deputy
ister of Trade and Commerce,
‘esenting the Canadian Gov-
nent, and Senor Martin Artajo,

~
i=

Gish Foreign Minister. Pre-
tory negotiations were con-
@d by Mr. E. H. Maguire,

adian Trade Commissioner in
Db

fandling of Tough And
Damp Grain
ae 1951 western crop is esti-
2d at 531,000,000 bushels, of
th about 150,000,000 bushels
# not been threshed. Of the
shed wheat about 325,000,000
tels are available for market-
after allowing for farm seed
feed requirements, the Minis-
of Trade and Commerce, Mr.
1. Howe, announced on Febru-
‘.
bout 250,000,000 bushels of
at have been delivered by
lucers. These deliveries repre-
over 75 per cent, of the
ketings which might be ex-
ed from the threshed portion
le crop.

olombo Pian Assistance
. D. Mallory, Director of the
tstrial Development Division,
artment of Trade and Com-
te, left Ottawa by air on Feb-
y 11 for India, Pakistan and
fon, where he will examine
industrial requirements — of
e countries under provisions
ae Colombo Plan for the Eco-
ic Development of South and
th-East Asia.
ge services of Mr, Matlory are
San to the International Eco-
ic & Technical Cooperation
sion He will meet the Admin-
tor of that Division Nik
al, in Colombo, and will ac-
Pany him on his visits to the
Qus development projects be-
lndertaken by Ceylon, India
Pakistan.

Employment Report
Qployment in Canada remain-
€ a high level at the beginning
le year despite seasonal slack-

in the construction fishing
fulture, food processing and
ad navigation industries, the
ster of Labour, Mr. Milton F.
f®, announced on February 7.
Ough some of the werkers re-
% from these industries have

the labour market for the
er, and many more are en-
@ in the logging industry, the
ber of people seeking work

fased by more than 85,000
{ December 20, 1951 to reach
fal of 337,000 at January 17,
+ This figure is considerably
@r than last year but is slight-
wer than mid-January, 1950.
mg the week ending January
he rate of increase dropped

y.
Korea Rotation Plan
Mowing the recent change
the Ist and 2nd Battalions of
Princess Patricia’s Canadian
& Infantry, the rotation of
Prnpinder of the 25th Cana-

n

and services and 11 per cent.

This rotation plan, first an-
nounced by the Minister of Na-
tional Defence last August, calls
for the return to Canada of all
soldiers who have served for
twelve months in the Far Eastern
Theatre. Soldiers in the units slat-
ed for replacement who are ineli-
gible by virtue of their service,
will be returned on a man-for-
man basis upon completion of
twelve months overseas.

For R.C.A.F. In Europe

Group Captain Keith Hodson,
O.B.E., D.F.C, 36 has been posted
to Paris to have charge of R.C.A.F.
arrangements for the R.C.A.F. air
division to be located on the Con-
tinent, it was announced on Feb-
ruary 11 by Air Force Headquar-
ters.

Mr. Mellraith Kesigns One
Post

The Prime Minister, Mr, St.
Laurent, announced on February
14 that he had received the re-
signation of Mr. George Mcllraith,
M.P. for Ottawa West, as Parlia-
mentary Assistant to the Minister
of Defence Production.

Mr. Mellraith had found that
the pressure of his duties as Par-
liamentary Assistant in respect of
two departments of Government
left him no time t. meet other
essential obligations

“Atomic Energy Of Canada,
Limited”

The Prime Minister, Mr. St.
Laurent, announced on February
13, the appointment of Dr. C. J.
Mackenzie, President of the Na-
tional Research Council, to be
President of a new Crown Com-
pany, “Atomic Energy of Canada
Limited,” which will take over
from the National Research Coun-
cil responsibility for operating the
Chalk River Project.

Dr. E. W. R. St@acie, O.B.E.,
F.R.S., F.R.S.C., former Vice-

President of the Research Coun-
cil, has been appointed to succeed

Dr. Mackenzie as President and
Chief Executive Officer of «the
Council and will take over on
April 1, 1952.

At the present time the Nation-

‘al Research Council operates the

Chalk River Atomic Energy Pro-
ject as an agent for the Atomic
Energy Control Board, which
Board carries the responsibility
for atomic energy matters in
Canada and reports to Parliament
through the Chairman of the
Privy Council Committee on Sci-
entific and Industrial Research,
the Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe

Reds Claim To
Have Sunk Ships

TOKYO, Feb. 25.
Communist radio in Pyongyang
claimed to-night that Nortn
Korean shore batteries shelled and
sank one Allied destroyer and
one minesweeper last night in a
one hour battle near Cho Do and



Sukdo islands on Korea’s west
coast.

Last night Radio Pyongyang
announced another destroyer and

a torpedo boat had been sunk
by the North Korean “fleet”. The
Navy pointed out that these broad-
cast claims are usually without
foundation,

—U.P

Reds Prepare Drive
On Hanoi

HANOI, Feb. 25.

Twenty thousand French Viet-
nam troops which pulled back 20
miles from the vital Hoabinh
fortress in a two day “strategic
manoeuvre” plugged up gaps in
the tightened perimeter around
Hanoi Reds prepared an all
out drive to capture the _ rich
Tonkin capital on the Red River
delta,

About 10 French Union forces
were no longer in the fight. They





ae 7 wandered in a hail of mortar
ifantry Brigade will com~ artillery which Communists
ie in March, ( ae ae poured on as soon as they saw
iquarters announced on Feb- the first signs of withdrawal
¥ 7. Friday. —U.P.
®
{
M () R I GRACE
|
LESS waste
N
Hl
x i
WITH THE NEW =
1



=
e

ELECTRIC

NICE OINNER OLO MAN

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

YOU've GOT a WONDERFUL

~OOK
be

Students Riot BRITAIN HAS MADE NQ' Russian Christians

In Karachi

KARACHI, Pakistan, Feb, 23.
Reliable reports received
from the Provincial

killed and at least 50 injured in
two days of student riots there.
However the Government said that
only five persons were killed and
45 injured in the student-police
clashes in Dacca,

It is said that troops were called
out to aid the police in restoring
order and the city was quiet.

The Riots are said to have
started on Thursday when police
fired on students demonstrating
for Bengali to be made one of the
Official State languages of Pakis-
tan, Three persons were reported
killed.—U.P,

Reshuffle In

We 3. *
Tunisian Cabinet

Rumoured
TUNIS, Monday.

French Resident General Jean
De Hauteclocque visited the Bey
of Tunis today amid strong rum-
ours of an impending reshuffle
in the Tunisian Cabinet.

The interview which lasted 20
minutes, was the first between De
Hauteclocque and the Supreme
Tunisian leader since the Resi-
dent General returned from
Paris three days ago

De Hauteclocque was believed
to have submitted to the Bey,
French proposals arrived at dur-



ing his two weeks of talks in
Paris.
Meanwhile an ‘uneasy calm

continued throughout Tunis fol-
jowing yesterday’s incident
where a curfew was clamped
down after a Foreign Legionary
was killed by a sniper’s bullet.
—UP.



Vewsletter:

ADMINISTRATOR
ON LEAVE

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Feb. 26
When St. Vincent Administrator
W. F. Coutts goes on leave from
March ‘7th, Grenada-born Hon.
Cyprian Bernard Gibbs, Assistant
Administrator, will act as Admin-
istrator. Mr. O. R. Kelsick, Assis-
tant Chief Secretary of the Wind-
wards at the Governor's office
here goes to St. Vincent. This
created Gibbs’ promotion. Gibbs
is the son of the late Thomas
Gibbs, form Port Officer here and
Mrs. Juliana Gibbs, now residing
in Port-of-Spain.

Grenada

Constance Donovan, 89, relative
of the late W. G. Donovan, once
an outstanding figure in journal-
ism here and mother of W. O’Brien
Donovan, retired Superintendent
of Agriculture, died yesterday
evening.



REBELS FLEE

MANILA, Feb, 22.

Philippines Army troops clashed
with an undetermined number of
Communist-led Hukbalahap forces
who apparently intended to raid
the @amlubang sugar estate of
Jose Yulo, a member of the Coun-
cil of State in “seas Province.

The estate, 30 miles South of
here, is at present the scene of
a big wedding anniversary cel-
ebration.

A report on the 30 minute clash
from Military Headquarters in
Laguna said an enlisted man was
killed and another one wounded
while one Huk was killed and
several others wounded. ;

The engagement occurred in a
village near Canlubang. The
Huks

pursuit.—U.P.

REFRIGERATOR

| See the New Models now on Show at

ce

VICTORIA STREET

THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.



here
Capital of
Dacca said that 12 persons were

|



withdrew with troops *

ony
4

re }> ox
Cee}
ae

BUSINESS — | DONT LET

YY WIFE PUGH ME



MEAT AGREEMENT

LONDON, Feb. 23.

British officials said no arrangements have been made

for negotiations on the re-award to Argentina of the meat Master rather than Stalin.

agreement signed on April

23, 1951 for. one year which

according to the protocol of the agreement should’ start
before the end of this month.

Officials would not comment on
the suggestion that Britain pos-
sibly had no intention of renewing
the agreement and would eventu-
ally put Britain’s meat purchases
from Argentina into the hands of
private traders. +

“There is nothing sinister about
the delay in making arrangements
for new negotiations. There has
been a lag because of the King’s
death and funeral and for various
other reasons and no decisions or
arrangements have yet been
made” officials said.

The agreement signed for one
year on April 23 1951, took the
form ‘f a protocol to a Trade and
Payments Pact made between
Britain and Argentina and signed
on June 27 1949, for five years.
Though valid for the five-year
period July 1, 1949, to June 30,
1954, the trade agreement stipu-
lated that it could be terminated
by either government on June
30 of any year by a written notice
given not later than April 30 o:
that year. The protocol dealing
with the meat agreement stipu-
lates that new negotiations must
start not later than the end of
February.

Questions In Parliament

Question of Britain’s intentions
are expected to be given an
airing in Parliament next week.

Members from both sides of the
House have laid down questions
to the Minister of Food asking if
it is Government’s intention to
allow private buyers to negotiate
the new agreement.

Question also will be raised
regarding the supply of meat from
Argentina being 50,000 tons short
of the amount promised under the
agreement.

Meat trade quarters said it is
difficult to state exactly what is
the price being paid for Argen-
tine meat. The average works oui
a about £128 per ton but with
various adjustments and back
payments it is believed possible
that ‘the price would be about
£160 per ton.

The Meat Traders’ Association
is urging government to restore
meat buying .to private traders
and to scrap bulk purchasing from
Argentina,

The meat traders said “recipro-
cal trade arrangements set out in
the protocol have not worked out
ns well as had been hoped and it
has come in for adverse criti-
cism in responsible quarters.’

—U.P.

TWO CHILDREN
BURNT TO DEATH

NEW YORK, Feb, 25.
Two children were burned to
death Sunday in a fire which des-
Ltroyed the two storey frame home
where they lived. They were Wally
Grimsmann, eight, and his’ sister
Donna, four. Another brother
Robert Junior, fifteen, was burneg!
critically attempting to save them

—UP.












'
!
|

|
|

' & all

BARBADOS
CO-OP.
COTTON

FACTORY LTD.

Bathsheba Boat Ta
Be Launched
Sunday

Workmen at the grounds at the
Fishery Office were building the
keel for the Bathsheba type fish-
ing boat yesterday. The boat is
expected to be completed today.
It will be launched on Sunday
morning.

In the workshop men are still
cutting out timbers for the new
type of fishing boats to replace
those lost on the night of Decem-
ber 2 and morning of December 3.

The frame of one boat is erected
on a temporary keel. This will
give fishermen an idea of the de-
sign of boat they will receive.

Some fishermen told the Advo-
cate yesterday that they admire
the design but much prefer that
of the Bathsheba type boat.

CIO Denounces
-. . . .
Discrimination
WASHINGTON, Feb, 25
The Organ of the Congress of
Industrial Organisations said the
CIO has protested vigorously
against the “flagrant refusal of

a government operated hotel in
the Panama Canal zone to pro-



vide accommodations for a dis-|

tinguished visiting negro surgeon.”
It said the come nt was filed
by the Executive Secretary of the
-ommittee on Latin American
Affairs with Governor Francis
K. Newcomer. It added the “vic-
tims of discrimination were Dr.
G. V. Harry, Panama-born sur-
geon, now practising in Jamaica
and Mrs. Harry. They were re-
fused accommodation at Wash-
ngton Hotel in Colon when they
appeared to claim rooms reserved

by phone ten minutes earlier.”
—UP.



' Foreign Office
Denies Report

LONDON, Feb, 25.

A Foreign Office spokesman to-
day denied the London morning
paper report that Britain had re-
ceived an alliance offer from Gen.
Franco,

The report stated that the pro-
posed alliance would open all
Spanish ports to the British fleet.
Tt was said to have been conveyed
through the Spanish Ambassador
to Portugal, Nicolas Franco, the
Generalissimo’s brother, The For-
eign Office spokesman said the
British attitude to Spain had not
changed. He said contacts between
Forei Secretary Anthony Eden
and Spanish Foreign Minister Al-
berto Martin Artajo who visited
London for King George VI fun-
eral were limited to normal ex-
change of courtesies,

—U.P.

Carpeting
e

Carpet

Strips

in varied
Widths

sizes of

FIBRE MATS



“We also stock

Bentwood Chairs
with Cane Seats
and Wood Seats”



PAGE THREE

Flynn Files
Assault Action





French Resist
Red Battalion













SAIGON, Indo-Chir Feb. 2 NASSAU, Feb. 23.
The F ch Army communiqued Ar issault action brought by
that a ench mobik olumn Errol Flynn against Duncan
fought a Communist rebel batta- McMartin has been fixed for
lion retreating into the dense March 17, in the Bahamas
jungle area 70 miles N.W. of Supreme Court. Flynn is claim-
Saigon after the Reds lost the ing £80,000 sterling. Chief Jus-
three-day battle for a strategic tite Guy Henderson appointed
outpost, It said the French for- Richard Cantillon of Beverley
tress was held by 200 loyal local here to take evidence in Califor-
troops who withstood the. Com- tia if Dr. Edwin Plimpton, Dr.
munist attacks for three days Troy McHenry and Arthur Lee
until the French mobile columa Beak ret Flynn. McMar-~
smashed the Communist en- “"35 now - BS
circlement yesterday. The Reds , rye is expected before the
lost 70 men of which 40 are dead ,
French losses are: eight dead and (C.P.)
ten wounded according to the
7 communique It added that ’
5 French armoured car was wreck si °
Serve Jesus Christ ed by a landmine Jet Hits Wire

CHICAGO, Feb. 25. oe.

Pastor Niemoller of Germany —
said Sunday that Russian Chris-
tians serve Jesus Christ as a

PUSAN, Korea, Feb. 23
An Allied jet fighter plane flew
into a high tension wire near

heart of their priests,” Niemoller

said here on Friday morning and
ana crashed to the ground killing the
e i io is » He added: “The Russian Or- pilot and 15 civilians.
wtalpeatedâ„¢ the oa he Sy thodox Church and the Baptist The jet was in a low formation
but Christians have been able to Church really know their Master flight with two other fighter
achieve a measure of uneasy |5 Jesus Christ and not Stalin = Ryd Kimhae, 20 miles
“liberty.” : north of Pusan

Hberty. The Evangelical prelate spoke The crash started a fire that
“The influence of 34 years of at the anniversary programme of spread, from the aireraft to
Bolshevist rule in Russia has the University of Chicago round houses. Army and civilian fire-
made for dependence of the table broadcast. His interview nen controlleqd the flames after
church to a certain degree but was prepared in Germany after 17 houses were destroyed. Eight
this is an unconsciou$ dq@pend- he returned from a visit to civilians were injured and dam-

ence which is not really in the Russia. iges are estimated at $50,000.
heart of the people nor in the —(U.P.) —U-P.










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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY _27,_1962

sarsinos


ii en een Pose ee] LONDON.



|
|

= === =

general mass of farmers and






|
} Good progress has been made N ain White
pes a | Nearly 1,000 posts in the Colo- trains locally recruited staff. with \he expansion of existing | >. ; evee : In Pl
mtd Dy the Adverste Co. Ltd, Breed 8, Bridgstewe | i3) Service are waiting to be Now, more than ever, the Agri- Geological Survey establishments.| The world’s democracies, intent on pre- ‘
fi ibe sn-saushiiesindinidaabeiieententbipisaraapt | filed, the Colonial Office an- cultural Service is faced with Some Colonial territories which serving their own existence, seek to contain $1.00 per handred
Wednesday, February 27, 1952 nounces, extremely difficult problems and, did not before possess them, now

The jobs, for which the Secre- at the same time, with stimulat-

Survey Depart-| the outbursts of militant Communism and

have Geologica



tary of State for the Colonies ing possibilities for their solution. ments. the ex ions j j nationalism.
ey , ~ normally selects candidates, are On the one hand there are the Other new departments are $ plosion: of misguided ADVOCATE STATIONERY
cu LTURE | listed in an _ official booklet, rapidly expanding Colonial pop- expected shortly. 1, The heights of Tibet, the vast snow-
| capbcintnents in His Majesty's ulations and more urgent de- It is a that the pre-| ojad ranges of the Himalaya’s form a barrier
: ci ekes Colonjal Service.” mands for higher standards of war staff of less than 50 geolog-
In his excellent book “The Press” Wick-

Vacancies at the end of 1951 living.

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings

On the other, there are
principally in the fol- immense possibilities both of in-
lowing branches: Education, 281; creasing yields per acre by the
Civil engineers, 86; Administra- application of existing scientific

ists and allied technicians will| guarding the northern outskirts of India.
|
tive Service,

have increased shortly to a total) And the jungle-clad hills of northern Burma,
of more \han 180,

Occasional vacancies will occur| range upon range, would present almost un-

occurred





ham Steed, a former editor of The Times
of London tells of his behaviour at a meet-

: shi noe : 78; Medical Ser- knowledge, and, in many cases. jin Nigeria, Gold Coast, Kenya, : ifficulties to a big
ing to which he was introduced as a vice, 77; Agricultural Service, of extending acreages if prob- Uganda, Tanganyika, ” Malaya, endurable hardships and diffic 6
“journalist. with ideals.” His audience 65; Electrical and Mechanical Jems of tsete control and water British Guiana and Jamaica. deploying army.

which consisted of the members of a con- | Engineers, 44. supply can be solved; : Colonial Legal Service

Most of the vacancies are in But to the east, in French Indo-China,

—-
—

ference were depressed by the “sad~fact | the East, West and Central ‘ — ee The. Legal Servie, _— Communism, backed by Mao’s Chinese
: Africas, and in South East Asia, _ Throughout the Colonies there covers a wide range elt dis tiokhien dalek int Grive én
that hardly a word of.the proceedings had | \Where ‘there is a wide field for is a very rw, demand Fad pointmenta, pas wees an roops across the frontier, tries to drive i
% c , 5 ” irons ; more ucation. n most e-- nearly al colonies bu. prin- r i nd across
been reported in any newspapers. cooritnent ae Cag mee partments, especially ‘those in cipally ‘in Wen and Can- spearhead southwards to Saigon a

In other Colonies, the demand is Africa, the central figure is the Usually | the South China Sea towards the rich islands

}
Wickham Steed began by telling them | tral Africa and Malaya.

|

|

|

pe ; : ; aller ¢ -onfined to certain general ‘Education Office’, who q first appointment for a the ;
that if none of their meetings had been onet Poh. otek a rales may be called on to teach, in- barrister is to a post of magis- of ; East Indies. o. - as
reported in the Press it was because those | sional appointments. spect or administer according to trate or Crown Counsel. For| It is there that French troops, fighting side “Tools of Trade
who had taken part in them had fallen ‘| The publication makes clear Circumstances. There is design- solicitors there are posts in oo

by side with Foreign Legionaries and loyal

m ad j is edly not, the firm division be- = 3 .
that Britain's Colonial policy is 7 Indo-Chinese use their American arms

Supreme Court Registries Land
not to reserve, out of hand, the tween these respective functions

into the sin of dullness. Offices and the like. Solicitors

He told them that



they were really competing for space in | best jobs for applicants eh ae 7 a ae cane sin, eo eetee ®P- | against a fleeting enemy which vanishes into We have a wide selection
Britain, . . ; , :

newspapers against the pressure of adver- | ~ jt sabes categorically: ‘It is ; Lang a ae an - Colonial Medical Service the jungle after it has struck or been struck. of evs y Tools, as u

: : : ‘le . ; aj- flects > si - ; / J ryda we

tisements of which some might be worth ae Aaiann = ees Education Officer. must under- . The Medieal Service in con-| Victory for Communism in the bamboo

several pounds per inch of type, and he |
asked them seriously to reflect whether |
anything that had been said at their meet-
ings was honestly worth several pounds
per inch,

At the end of the meeting a pious lady
remarked to a Right Reverend Bishop: “it
is all very shocking, but it is the only in- |

the progress of the peoples of the stand that society if he is to be oe ba Samedi Aenera) trend
Colonies towards control of their effective. ... . = ye eee
own affairs. If this policy is to _ The education of girls has intl Ae og
be a reality; the public services lagged far behind that of boys here, ed a +. Bo
of the Colonies must be adapted but is now making headway. : ere ue specialis' eppeln is
to local conditions and be staffed — eee aoe a ee ae toa nkaty herve
2 grea ssibl »xtent posed by financ .
he Tal conan. areal a staff, of staff the greatest present ob- branches eave been cuveenes..
therefore, are in general recruit~ stacle to progress is probably the ot ot “Medical and Health
those posts in the general habi €
Gotoniel Seether a which suffi- of teachers. Services. In many of them there

; . i till ious shortage of
cient suitable and qualified local Civil Engineers sei wee both in the a

undergrowth and on the paddy fields would
overturn the global strategy of the Western
Nations.

For, from the north, Mao’s Red divisions
could pour down, perhaps, “to meet the plea
of the liberated people,” in order to establish
a foothold in South Eastern Asia and threat-
en Malay’s Eastern seaboard.

as others that are often
difficult to find!

C. S. PITCHER & CO.

Ph. 4472



yO bial a thee

my



, | ; , i : in and].

teresting meeting we have had.” The news- | candidates are not available’ = = 11 the Colonial Service there tal and in the field. 2. The truce talks an vet Sees jer
pers reported it fully the next day. | wide range of overseas has always been wide scope for The outflow of medical gradu-| again the Red Leaders throw out a hin

vn epee y Y- | appointments, it adds, remains ; |

Wickham Steed’s story does not provide an ae Lic . the employment of . engineers— ates from the colonial teaching

open to overseas candidates, be~ (j,i) mechanical and electrical.
cause for one reason or another And today the demand is great-
many colonies themselves ¢an= op than ever. With the increas-
not provide enough qualified and jny realisation of the importance
suitable men and women to meet of economic factors has come a
all the needs of modern admin- widespread demand for develop-
istration, ment schemes, These include
Colonial Agricultural Service the improvement of road. and

Agriculture is by far the most rail communications and the re-
important industry in most Col- clamation and _ utilisation of land

they earnestly seek peace. As often, their
prevarications and conditions make their
terms unacceptable. In the meantime, local
land fighting flares up spasmodically in the
frozen hills, and soldiers die while their
leaders argue. And the Communists build
up their supplies in the rear, and their air-

hospitals cannot, for many years
to come, be sufficient to make
good this shortage and vacancies
for Medical Officers from over-
seas occur in almost all Colonial
Medical Departments.

Colonial Veterinary
Departments
Most Colonies are dependent

accurate comparison with the account
printed in Sunday’s Advocate of a meeting
of the Council of the Association of Cul-
tural Societies. But in one respect a simr
ilarity is noticeable: on both occasions
there is a feeling of resentment against the
Press.

onies. The role of ‘Departments ae were Ev growing Qpon Agriculture and in turn| force into a formidable fleet.
* ; f Agri is to deal with food for consumption locally or ypon the Colonial Veterinary . ; : heir own secret.
In words attributed to the Chairman at 6 eer eae agricultural for export. Shcrtndnt” Tea week of the Their future intent is the Ry
Thursday’s meeting the statement is made | policy. It assists in the intro- The co-operation of the en- Colonial Veterinary Officer difters| But the United Nations have brought to a

duction of improved systems of gineer is all important both for
farming, which may include the these development schemes as
application of mechanised meth- well as for building hospitals and
ods, the introduction of better schools and providing water and

widely from that of his fellow in
England. Primarily he is con-
cerned with the prevention, con-|
trol and eradication of disease

that “after 1948 the year the Association
was formed, the clubs began to complain
of an unco-operative attitude on the part

halt the Red thrust south-east towards Japan.
3. Twenty-five Nationalist divisions train



planting materials, the use of electricity services, | among livestock en masse,
of the Press and he felt that this was one of | manures and fertilisers and the Colonial Geological Survey this control increases,
. t ari. | @neouragement of new, more Service and as subordinate vv
the main reasons why the work of the vari economic ways of working the : _ Staffs expand, the time and ; s
ous cultural groups had begun to flag.” land’ Further, the, Department aan a parettig er ae energy spent on extensive inocu- | bear modern American equipment.
In the Advocate Year Bgok 1951 inform- enohal aronaee Sf farming to Colonial terrilories is a thorough mpaigns ecrease) But they are unlikely ever to fight as an

and the Veterinary Officer will :
be able to devote more attention| army. They will probably never be per-
to other work. |

_ There are Veterinary Services
in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Tan-

ation supplied by the Association of Cul-
tural Societies shows that the Association
was formed in July 1947 and its inaugural

j investigation of their mineral re-
“ Fo eaaie it organises sources. This calls for expansion
and supervises the marketing of Of the Colonial Geological Survey
produce, It investigates and Service which is primarily con-
advises on control measures for cerned with the completion of

mitted to take part in a mass onslaught on
the Red Chinese mainland.

Nhorts For Men



, ‘ 5 P ganyika the Federation of Mal andin z |
lecture was delivered on October 318 1047. | ‘agricultural pest and diseases the asic, geological map of the Singapore, Hong Kong. Jamaics,| oust try Sine qroch ae wed cll ake ceg|| SIZES 30-40. ALSO IN KHAKI

o's : . s ’ stablishes efficient plant Colonia mpire, together with @ Trinidad, British Guia ‘ er 1 warsnl and a
The Association omitted to give any in: aoa aioe also it otgenises detailed mapping af mineral panciticp, ritis uiana and ed by ed Ps,

with the majority

formation as to its affiliated members, but vacancies in Africa.

the three main affiliated organisations are
known to be the Barbados Museum and
Historical Society, the Barbados Arts and
Crafts Society and the Y.M.C.A. which is

of} preparations of an invasion would be in-
q __. | volved.

Guide And

agricultural education for the bearing areas.

‘Queen Elizabeth As



The Far East war against Communism
might spread fiercely from Korea, Indo-



Tropical Linens



“an Association for the purpose of cater-
ing to the spiritual, educational, social and

recreational needs of youth.”

It was not

until the end of September 1949 that the
Extra-Mural Department of the Univer-
sity College of the West Indies began its
activities in Barbados and became affili-

ated with the Association.

It is worth noting that at a meeting of
the Executive Committee of the Associa-
tion held at Wakefield on the 21st February
1951 it was reported that certain affiliated

By VIOLET SYNGE
Captain of the Buckingham Palace
Troop of which the Queen was a
member

In June, 1937, I was asked to
go to Buckingham Palace to start
a Guide Company ‘of which
Queen Elizabeth (then Princess
Elizabeth) was to be a member.
The Princess, I was told, was to
be treated like any other little
girl. There was to be no ceremony
and no fuss and, in fact, I found
that it was difficult to stand on
ceremony with either Princess
Elizabeth or Princess Margaret,
who were both as natural as they
are to-day.

Yet it was inevitable that King

Ranger

other children with high ideals
who seek to give them expression.
The whole Guide programme
gives point to this—the nursing
and coping with emergencies: the
learning to cook over an open fire
and to fend for oneself in the
open, giving as it does, a feeling
of well being and confidence; the
making of things for sick children.

All the time the Guide is being
taught practical ways of doing
those hundred and _ one little
things children long to do, and
being passed through progressive-

at home from the start, and in-
deed, enjoyed these friendships

was a Patrol Leader now, and it
was part of her job to know
something of the lives of the six
others in her Patrol, so that she
might help them to become good
Guides. In this way, she learnt
much from the casual conversa-
tion of her fellows, of the ordin.
ary life, with its opportunities and
problems, of the London, as well
as the country child. These Guides
were completely artless and un-
inhibited in what they recounted,
and probably no Heir to the
Throne has had an opportunity of

China and Malaya, for Stalin would be likely

to dispatch Soviet divisions to assist Mao’s
immensely. ,Princess Elizabeth| troops.

So Formosa, whose straits are patrolled
by American warships, is likely to remain
just a part of the orbit of America’s defence
system.

4. Mob violence and thuggery, which
brought death and torture to Britons in
Cairo’s riots so shocked the world that King
Farouk had but little choice except to change
his government.

Here it was not just communism at work.

; pas: ; ; ; ‘
: George VI and Queen Elizabeth, ly stiffening tests. The faet that !¢arming about the lives and out-| Fanatic nationalists, spurred by ignorant,
groups had complained that the p Pe: conscious of the great destiny no badge or insignia is awarded, 100K of his or her subjects-to-be| frenzied hatred against imaginary grievances
gramme arranged by the British Council, | which lay before their elder except by merit, was accepted by @S had Princess Elizabeth, squat-

the Extra-Mural Department and the As-
sociation of Cultural Societies had tended

to undermine the
groups.

individuality of the

On this occasion the suggestion was also

daughter, had already begun to
inculeate in her the high sense of
duty and personal service which
is to-day an essential part of the
function of the Constitutional
Mgnarchy of the Commonwealth,

the Princess as the most natural
thing in the world.
Camp Fire Comradeship
With it all, there were plenty of
games, physical activities and
camp fire singing, so that fun was

ting with her Patrol in a clearing
of the bushes, beneath the walls
of Windsor Castle,

Joy Of Service For Others

~-This weekly * experience of

have sought to oust the British troops which
guard the Suez lifeline.

Foreign troops have no business anywhere
in Egypt, they scream, Egyptian power suffi-

‘\¢|in Formosa’s 14,000 square miles. Led by
however, | exiled Ieader Chiang Kai Chek, they are
veterinary | armed better than Mao’s men. For they



SIZES 28—32

DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

LOTS OF COLOURS.

DOMINICA

: ; é ices to guard the vital waterway! Away with
and which Guiding helped| to the keynote and Princess Eliza- happy, easy comradeshi, - i i i
made that the Association’s Committee | develop. Indeed, the Princess's beth and her comrades revelled tinued when Princess Hlizabeth the British! Forbid the entry of an allied
should meet regularly to receive reports ae felents «fee. grnee and in the comradeship of healthy = ae of ioe older Guides| foree—even if Egyptian soldiers were to have }
of the activities of affiliated groups. This id” ide 7 pleasures. scame Sea Rangers, and she| an honoured pla them!
: ; eople delightedly commented i idi place amongst them!
was an important suggestion and perhaps peop, ightedly men This comradeship of Guiding then heard and pondered over

has more bearing on the Association’s
wyerene’ difficulties than any alleged lack
of co-operation on the part of the daily

Press which during this
several hundred pounds

paintings and photographs’ o

period spent
reproducing
pottery

work, arts and craft classes and other cul-

tural subjects: printin

long articles on

literature and art: publishing editorials

in support of

Crafts

Society and of the

Museum and Historical Societ

ing each issue of. BIM and
magazine that was received:

the Barbados Arts and
Barbados
review-
ymouth
trying to

encourage writers by running a series of
local short stories in the Evening Advo-
cate: and sponsoring an exhibition at the
Museum to encourage West Indian pho-
tographers and to spread a knowledge of
Barbadian antiquities. In addition to the

upon during her recent Canadian
tour were obvious in the little
girl with whom I took nursery
tea on the day when I first met
her, It was she who put me at
my ease, who kept my plate fill.
ed, who said “I’ll fetch it” and
darted off, if I forgot anything.

Full Acceptance Of Law Of
Guiding

It was not surprising, therefore,
that Guiding, with its promise of
duty to God and the King, its
law and undertaking to do a good
turn-every day, appealed through
its demands to the Princess just
as it has to so many thousands of



OUR READERS

brought a new element into the
lives of both Princesses. In the
early days, in London, the Com-
pany was made up of some of
their cousins and children of
Court officials, To these children
exciting Guide games brought
real delight and to none more
than to Princess Elizabeth,

But in 1941, when the Company
was re-started at Windsor, the
greater part of it was made up of
children from the village school
and others evacuated from a Lon-
don Council School. With their
facility for meeting all sorts of
people with ease and naturalness,
the Princesses were completely



SAY :



their altered lives now they were
at work in shops and offices.
Camp gave even fuller opportun-
ities for this intercourse.

During all these formative
years, the Princess was finding
new skills and interests in the
Guide and Ranger tests, always
with the motto of “Be Prepared”
leading that eager young mind
to see more and more the joy
that service for others gives,

Her great broadcast from
South Africa on her 21st birth-
day, therefore, was only what
any of us who knew her would
have expected. Queen Elizabeth
is a shining example of what a
Guide should be.









And meantime Britain alone guards the
Zone, and her troops stand ready to quench
the flame of violence if it fiares up against
the white foreigner again.



“Stolen” Secret

(By JACK MEEHAN)

PARIS, Feb. 26,

A senior American Naval officer said Tues-
day that Russia has “stolen” the secret of an
American mine which can float in the sea
for days undetected and cannot be swept





A ma

Or Sale at Your Druggist

/

DACOSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents







. i Poppy Collection — sare WicaaSee Tomo Ma ta, | by an ordinary mine sweeper. The state
ungrudging use of its columns to publicise To the Balter; The” Advocate: i c ATthU oo... ccaeeseee 222.01 ment was made by the officer accompanying
: ae , ; < s
; the activities of whatever cultural or SIR,—In publishing the Poppy |. McKinstry ........ 122.05 Christ Church—Miss s. Admiral Lynde McCormick, new American
artistic merit could be discerned in Barbados, Collection of last November, the wer Broad Street—Miss Arthur . esses OF341 Ss .
i the Advocate during this period sometimes, des- | delay in which was due to the o2;.cHutsen : ens St Ehllip~ Mise, Gs upreme Commander in the North Atlantic
' pite continuous rising labour and material costs prolonged sale of raffle tickets
: published without charge notices of activities | the Committee would like te —— “Carrington sc... 181.72 | Dw
' organised by the association of Cultural Societies | thank the followine: Miss Hazlewood... 182.38 St. Joseph—Mrs. L ” ight Eisenhower.
: or its affiliated organisations. OLLOW Ing: — Fontabelle—Miss Warren Winns 2... Gricc uk 168.54 Th offi d mini ~
it Yet the Association which was formed in July | Colonel Oliver for his broadcast pan’ MT Hassell -.--.. 33.80 "ae ee A Ronni hati Progen Md y asta
i 1947 did not convene the first Annual General | on quenel Olives for his bx wank Hall & White Park gs OMRee ret aiecr tees 168.40 in the water undetected for days and cannot
i Meeting of its Couneil until February 17th, 1949. Lady Colly. and her helpers a Leonard's—Mrs E. ManOO 005.55 Vises: 160.57 be swept. It was an American invention
ts Perhaps if the Association were to meet more | for counting the town collection stot ic sive a SE Jameo—Mrs. 8.-2furse’ 160.99 the Russians h ”
i! often and kept the public and its members in- en ‘Poppy Day. t a aia. Chast 52.78 i Wore ee * ite 6.71 e ave stolen. ‘
i! formed as to its activities as was done in a All Organisers Bnd Sellers, Upper Black Rock—Mrs St. Luey—Mrs “i Arm. He did not say how the Russians “stole”
HF Report for October 1947-—January 1949 and a The Directors and Managements ,.°:..“2""'™ - reat 2 zee details of th i
i statement of receipts and expenditures for the | of the Marine and Crane Hotels aaa ae ooo St. Andrew—Mrs,,E.Gill 21.88 1,865.78 : a of the top secret mine. But he added
" same period the difficulties which are now bein io ; ; ; ; . motes a is the Russians now know ho re})): Whol
i experienced might disappear: while the daily coe ee ORG Choir premade fa: Oftcers Association 24.00 i. Ameri i a ae “s te ; mae Cosr'n eats
‘9 Press will undoubtedly continue to help as it | °°°® Mrs. EB. G. Wilkie 42.04 Gace Suse ese eke e erican invented explosive with which ‘ Bie te TD ...,. $1.25 ers —per tin...... $1.68
ii as, $0 considerably helped during the whole Miss Arthur for organizing and "wom 194.26 pacchctie Daneees Laeee the top secret mine is charged. eee ee :** Ta
HI period o ne Association’s existence. : . Se ail Cea ene Umer Coliyineve ‘ites we Shie. of Wreath: 3 +530, .16, h
i! “Interest in the arts” as John Harrison | j, “cotnection wand-Wide | raffle ‘Mrs. iB Skinner. and ANOHUMOUD esecce. cs. aee j ~ hregmaed\ tsar 4 adeaise Ieaetionneoonunaie: Pain chaaaks a EXTRA SPECIALS
i wrote in Chapter VIII of the Advocate thanks Ir Cave for allowing the aikelth # Culloden a Dance, Marine Hotel _™2.% 2558.58 / lessly in water and then automatically “arm . ™ tin Danish Hams $4.30 86 se. Beaiemed Beak 36
i Year Book 1951 “is growing, and an amal- | Sale of tickets at Cave Shepherd, Srittons Hul—Mes. 7 SPECIAL EFFORTS itself for discharge, the officer said. tin Luncheon Tea-time Paste 15
ie * > , the Manager of Barclay’s Bank Gittens 49.08 Dance, Crane Hotel—Miss : * Me i eet «+» $4.98 _ eae
' gamation of the potential assets of the tae ther an he etna ta whisk Gétrison—Mrs. L. Rowen 91.22 Cameron vores sss 900,00 He commented that Russian mines can be- ino semi Oca me
i Museum and the Arts and Crafts Society | to display the prizes, the Turt Wultame gagy Memes Arthor 148888 2.00833 come as big a menace in the event of war as|{} },J®, tin, Ham Rol... .90 2. tin Green 36
tT might produce the Cultural Certre of | Club for drawing the raffle and Tivespey arte tees TOTAL COLLECTION TO DATE sveotag | PUSSiA’s fleet of more than 200 submarines. Sausages ......... $1.05 54
# which there has been so much talk and so | all those who so kindly gave pint Hel Mrs H * Less Expenses... \TE $7,900-8°| Russians have planes capable of sowing Danish 8 oz. Cocktail 2a
a little effective action in recent years.” But | Prizes ee iteit — mines in the Atlantic he said in addition to Seuengen «.,...... - 2 I tin Purple Grapes =
; organisations of this kind, he rightly noted, Messrs Fitzpatrick Graham & _W. M. Worrell 27.48 BALANCE IN HAND .......... $7,885421those which would be sown by any sub- Macaroni—16 oz Pkg. .39 Italian Tomato Paste .27 .60
' cannot be created successfully at the stroke | Co, for auditing the accounts free oye Weenee Srarrepeet: 35S) . : Carr's Sweet Biscuits Embassy Cigs. of 25 .. .48
of a pen—or he might have added by a | of charge. Glendairy— Mrs. Foster 3.31 1,424.00 DOROTHY ¢. HUTSON | ™M@rines which reached those waters. As per 2 Ib Pkg..... 48 Sling in tins ...... 2 AB
flood of printers’ ink. Only solid admin- The Manager and Staff of the | panisues . McCormick conferred with Eisenhower hun- |
istrative ability and hard spade work will | Canadian Bak of Commerce for Qikthent brits "Goaneh Beppe ekague|SFedS of American, British, French and|
. here " | tings 403.12 Os . : : : . ‘
bring success to any organisation, cultural | the year. St. Matt! 69.56 : ; Py Italian warships, jet planes and submarines Phone CODDARDS = We Deliver
or otherwise. And enly responsible back- | “Tire Aav yi ot - Leighley : ;
: ; The Advocate for their gift of 5 woa cram 372.68 ghley, began the biggest peace time manoeuvre ever
ing of competent leaders and good admin- | free advertising space to the sg. Lawrence 56.32 ° Belleville. ; sab \ f }
istrators will sustain success, Cause. Chureh Coll 23.40 24.2.1952. held in the Mediterranean.—U.P, ee


,





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952

BARBADOS



Equalisation Fund

Bill Passed In Face
Of Heavy Criticism

, A MOVE by Mr. V. B, Vaughan (I) seconded by Mr.
W. A. Crawford (C) for the complete rejection of a Bill
to provide for the establishment of a revenue equalisation
fund to which resort might be made in the event of a tem-
porary recession of public revenue, was defeated by an
eleven-five majority of the House of Assembly last night.
The Bill was eventually passed in all its stages.

_ Those voting in favour of the rejection were Mr. V. B.
Vaughan (I), Mr. W. A. Crawford (C); Mr. C. E. Talma
(L); Mr. J. C, Motthey (C) and Mr. O. T. Allder.

ADVOCATE



WREATH FROM W.LC.



Vews In Brief:

Gold Watch
Stolen

GOLD WATCH valued $0)

was stolen from a bedroom
at “The Whim", St. Peter, t
tween 8.30 p.m. on February i /
and Sunday, The incident w
reported to the Police by Acv.!
Selman of the same address.

Hilda Best of King Edwa>!

Road, Bank Hall, reported ths
her house was broken and ente
ed between 8.15 p.m. on Sunda
and Monday and a quantity
groceries stolen.

PUNCHEON of syrup whi

PAGE FIVE



Crawford Asks For
Agricultural Corp.

An address relative to the es-
tablishment of an Agricultural
Development Corporation with a
view to obtaining concessions in
British Honduras in order to re
lieve some of the colony’s unem-
ployment, was tabled by Mr. W. A
Crawford at yasterday’s meeting
of the House of Assembly

The Address reads as follows



The House of Assembly is ¢
the qpinion that in view of the
proposals for development of the
sugar industry in British Honduras
and

(a) the concessions being

offered in this connection
by the Government of that




What An M.-P.
Wants To Know

Mr. E. D, Mottley at yesterday’s
meeting of the House of Assembly
tabled a question dealing with the
inadequate number of buses on
the various routes in the island.

The question reads:

1. Is Government aware of the
gieat inconvenience being suf-
ferred by persons who are obliged
to use the several omnibuses
plying for hire in this island as
their means of transportation,
where concessionaires have not
an adequate number ‘of buses 1
cope with the demand on their
respective routes?

2. If the answer to (1) above

\ fs in the affirmative, will Gov-

ernment take steps to cause such
‘ broke open along Lower B colony; soncessionaires to provide the re-
Street, opposite the Plantatio; ‘ : es uisite number of buses for the
The Bi ' Ltd., syrup compound, yesterd (b) the prospects which
ne Bill which was debated for absence locally of any specific
nearly five hours, specifies what financial institutions, because of

moneys are to be credited to the the understandable lack of fin- Sie we
revenue equalisation fund, and ancial and economic judgment se *
authorises the Accountant General on the part of the Government, , Tes) :
to invest all or any part of the and because of the degree of the a a“
fund. It also gives power to the fiscal ignorance existing among 4
Governor-in-Executive Committee members of the Government in 3. Oi:
to withdraw the whole or any part this House. They might be ex- Vals
of the fund anq apply the sum so cused for not having deliberately
withdrawn for the credit of the planned any excessive revenue
general revenue of the island. over! expenditure, but surely it
Members of the Opposition, as was inexcusable for them not to
well as Government supporters in have the courage to spend sur-
the House severely criticised the pluses. They had the courage
policy enunciated by Government during the last hustings to ap-
in the proposals of the Bill, and proach the electorate and appeal
urged that instead of hoarding up to them for 18 seats and the
balances, the money should be people had overwhelmed them
spent on economic development and this House with 16 seats.
and the improvement of social Whose advice were they now
conditions of the people who con- taking as to the spending of the

tribute to the excess by way of » ” ami-
bastuttion, people’s money owever emi

ent ma t nanci
Mr. V. B. Vaughan who initiated eoaoenio’ ebesarehin Ot distin
debate against the Bill, dubbed guished officials, this House
the proposals as “purely negative”, should not be guided by their
and said they were neither social advice as to how to spend “our”
nor economic, and invited the very m,

ES AY
oy Be eo
oe. an

which were insured. They D R I N K
oney. the property of J. C. Mahon of
eons — the Bill was de- Surpluses either deliberately the same plantation,
gn oO remedy. created by deficit financing or
Although signifying his inten- ¢o,

afternoon covered a large area
the road.

This caused the road te be sl
pery and nearly half a_ do
cyclists and pedestrians fell.
large crowd gathered around t
area to witness the incident

One man fell on three oc
sions within a few seconds.

FIRE at Molyneux Plantati:

St, James, at about 12.
a.m, yesteday burnt eight acres
ripe canes.

Five acres of second crop a
three and a half acres of fifth er
ripe canes were burnt when a f!:
occurred at Ashford Plantatic },
St. Thomas, at about 7.00 p.m.
Sunday. They are the proper y
of General Traders Ltd. and woe
insured,

Another fire at Lion Casi
Plantation, St, Thomas, at abo
4.00 a.m. on Monday burnt 800
holes of second crop ripe canes







project offers for employ-
ment of some of the colony’
surplus labour force;
that the Government should con-
sider the practicability of estab-
lishing an Agricultural Develop
ment Corporation for the putpose,

. among other things, of acquiring




convenience of the public?

3. If the answer to (1) above
is in the negative, will Govern=
ment cause inquiries to ,be made
with a view to relieving this in-
convenience?

lands in British Honduras for the »ROMANIA’ REFLOATED

creation of a number of propor-
tional—profit farms and the erec-
tion of a conveniently—situated
sugar factory.

2. The House is of the further

’ opinion that the possibility of ac-

quiring financial assistance for
the venture from the Colonial De-

' velopment Corporation and _ for

one of the appropriate Interna-
tional Agencies should be also in-
vestigated.



The fishing boat Romania was
refloated after it had sunk off
Bayfield Beach on Monday eve-
ning about 3.30 o'clock while
eens in a catch of 290 flying
fish.

It was refloated by Lee McCol-
lin and another man called Pep-
per. It belongs to Alfred
Straughan, and was extensively
damaged. The catch of fish was
not recovered.












tion to support the Bill, Mr. E. D. «oyrg’ a Png Seite be ‘ean
Mottley said he would not coun- on one or two purposes. It
tenance any investment in South should be used purely on social
Africa, and later made a motion services or for an economic pur-
to exclude this country from the jose. The ideal expenditure of
provision of the Bill, This was surpluses of course, was to com-
eanene defeated by a 12—6 bine at one and the same time,
* a social and an economic pur-

Dr. H. G. Cummins (L) who took Examples of such expen-

At Pleasant Hall Plantation, S\
Peter, a fire at about 6.40 p.m. on
Monday burnt a quantity of sour
grass. The grass is the property
of G.G. Gill of the same planta-
tion.

CLAYTON’S

k

\S





Inquest Adjourned

. T St. G *s Chapel, Windsor.
charge of the Bill said that he did pose THE WEST INDIA COMMITTEE wreath seen at eorge’s Chape! indsor

The wreath was com- . . nit
. diture may be found in the early posed of yellow daffodils, white tulips, caranations, hyacinths, rosebuds and arum lillies. The inquest concerning th.
not think there was need for much aqministratton of the Roosevelt niabadigh hide bentirhesteate tiation . Sete « death of Clement Medford o
debate. He said that the Bill Regime and the new deal. The

sought to give the Government pjan to public

3 . ae Belleplaine, St. Andrew, was 4°
works such as the
leave and authority to do what trans-continental r Milton Roc he ford

journed by His Worship Mr. A
roads, ublic W. Harper, Coroper of Distr
‘sou fe dane’ ctnnetion wats easel os Pe" eal Kstate Damages ue
the Revenue Equalisation Fund.



Z T's “F” until Tuesday, March 4, ye
a oh ee ee rehabilitation ot aes. —A Tribute aiden.
onourable members would re- culture employ undreds 0 ae Hi ee cu aie hae ts
on yr a gee PPemdp oe perw ig gen gs Soar ga ne Bagger 1 1 BY C. B. ROCK Clement seediond. was found lying
put aside for the past two years. ed to the permanent wealth of Ul on 1mMmues ’
Government felt that such regular the nation. Another example,

, in a pool of blood on Haggatt.

F ae passed quietly away on Road, St. Andrew, near the Agri
, ss Si ebruary llth, two weeks before | i ty 7 g

THE SECOND DAY'S HEARING in the case in which his 96th birthday, Alexander Mil- SUtural Station about. 3.20 fm

Damian F. De Abreu, a real estate agent, has claimed £720 ton Rocheford, one of the most ng first saw the body reporie
damages from Estwick E. Deane as unpaid commission, Fong, ay monger the matter to the Police and th

ended yesterday in the Court of Common Pleas before f5j..6 to encounter. hehe oie Coroner Harper was notified an

= fee Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. to bear testimony to the intrinsic the body was removed to the St

‘aylor. “

worth of such a man I regard as Andrew Mortuary where a post
The case is being heard by a price of £20,000 but no business

contributiong should go on year though unhappily, it resulted in
after year whenever it was possi- ultimate tragedy, but, neverthe-
ble. less, it combined a social with

He said that it was always con- an economic purpose, was Hitler,
sidered frugal to put aside some- who deliberately used the funds
thing for lean years and they ereated by deficit financing to
wanted to apply the same thing to launch his rearmament pro-
Government funds. It was con- gramme, thereby employing mil-
sidered this money could only be lions of idle Germans and by

lad

e

i i 1 privilege indeed mortem examination Wag per-
put aside ‘when there was the multiplication = —— special jury. Legal appearances was done. formed by L. S. Tappin.
prosperity. If it was not soa a J a. a ever ive P are Mr, G. H. Adams and Mr. Lodge Too Small Milton, the name by which he When the body of Medforc
then, when they came to lean ty 0 .

D. H. L. Ward instructed by To Mr. Vaalcott: Mr. Farmer was known to relatives and in- was found there was a gash ove
years the only thing they could The proposal of the seeyerns Messrs, Carrington & Sealy, So- said that Mr. Deane said that the timates, wag an artist in his voca- the eye and a cow was standin‘
do to enable them to carry on ment in this Bill for oe O* licitors for the bear De Abreu Lodge Plantation was too small, tion—shoemaking. The fact that some feet away.
would be to increase on taxation surpluses was ee soci hive. and Mr, E. K. Walcott, Q.C. and The price asked was £20,000 and he could, in Barbados of all places
and no one would want that, es- economic. It was en Meeting . J. S. B, Dear instructed by certain conditions were attached give three of his four children
pecially when there was no money Indeed, worse an. re ition Messrs, Cottle Catford, Solicitors to this price, (one died very young) a college
around. for it invited the nd oS medy for the defendant Estwick Deane. M@he plaintiff never made an education, shows more than
i As the objects and reasons of the the bill was design >, xe ; Mr. G. H, Adams_ yesterday offer on behalf of Mr. Dedne.

anything else the genius of the
Bill pointed out, the Bill specified tens Fae ES a cee called on four additional witnesses Mr. W. T. Gooding told the man, He had a
what monies were to be credited >? -





Small Improving

Jameg Small (36) of Fairfield

b passion for St, Michael is still reported by
before closing his case and then Court that he met Mr, De Abreu honest workmanship, for hard the Police to t é ! r

n ‘ ans . é . » be making good p!v

to the fund and authorised the a Seay ny be ell on tae Mr. Walcott called on Estwick some years ago at Jason Jones’s work, and his clientele comprised gress in the General Hospital hs

Accountant General to invest all it Seat he consumed. From. the Deane and Roy Gill. When fur- and he (De Abreu) asked him if foy the most part the gentry of Small was admitted to the Gen- uf

or any part of the fund. The employer in commerce and in- pee eg sia Ona fie ‘oa him to sell Strong Hope. this island—those who knew and eral Hospital about 6.30 p.m. ©

Y nor-in— “utive C i a e C . e to im “no,” could 4 reciate » snuine Wehruary 20 « Awa Rei et

poder apg Ae we dustry through company income “°F. Apreu's case is that Deane coult ippreciate the genuine February 20 suffering from t

At this stage Mr. Adams asked title: when they saw it: He enc
i > ‘ tax. And the Government was a 5reed in 1948 to pay him 3% that the deed of conveyance be j)00.°/ Ucn ee tree ee
wae o any ee eae = proposing ‘to use these mae Reed if he introduced him produced to the court, but Mr. Lag gd eee
ihe credit of the general revenues 2S if it eee, 5 eee nat teian to a person who was willing to sell Walcott submitted that the con- s ;

Pie iiand were better, . Fig age Seto mmhs o5 a plantation. Eventually Deane veyance must be put in evidence Sh the iat Wald aemartahietens
° e island, + the Stomateben 12 the hands o: ew ths bought a plantation and De Abreu phefore it could be produced. Mr. _'' is quiet and -unostentatious
The cfeation o ont ww draft could consume more and in the i, now claiming that he did so Adams then called on Mr. H. L way, on : ch am de
proposed in the 195l—vs a hands of the employer in com= Fiuch work endeavouring to get Thomas to take the witness stand. 8'@n¢ contribu a Pee a
Estimates, wherein provision Was merce and industry who could ty). gefendant a plantation and he Mr, Thomas said that in respect ‘Man most, he could teach othe: 3
made for an initial contribution invest more and so increase eM= },5. not been paid his commission of an alleged sale he made a !10W to live, not by anything he
Of Pan 000, that ployment. ‘ .. which Deane had agreed to pay gearch /in the Registrar’s Office said —cultured me akey though he
There was not much more ce What they were proposing iv him. Deane bought the planta- and found recorded there a deed was—but by the things he did
he could add, hence he oeeee this Bill was inspired OY i tion. of conveyance dated October 1948 and the wy he did them.
—— Me Juerhan “> sabe that Pere tead sh Sealr fiscal pol- Statement of Claim i R, E. —_ =e oe lathe, na e . 8s Ww ne
ae fut h at : inet ane regarding » sale 2. , 8 s Maker, 3
he was not a member of the House jey could no longer be inspired ‘phe statement of claim states cdaetation Hustands and Oxnards further from the pulpit where he
during the last session, but obvi- by nineteenth century ees that the ‘plaintiff -claim is for ‘hich is in St. James. rightly belonged’ Milton's life was
ously from the nature of the Bill “Our politics was dominated by money payable for work done by t itself a sermon, eloquent beyond
it was the Administration's the concept of the welfare state” the plaintiff for the defendant at Plantation Sold compare, and he demonstrated

answer to a series of financially he said. his request as agent.

i J what was meant by clean living,
prosperous years which this island The plaintiff in the month of This plantation was sold for

unselfish and kindly citizenship
had experienced in recent times August 1948 in pursuance of the £24,000. At this stage Mr. Adams
und which it was likely that it The average surplus over os agreement introduced to the de- closed his case,
would experietice for some years past five years had been at the




wounds. The wound to his throat
is healing well

Yesterday he wag able to t*l!
to the Police for the first time
since he was admitted to the Gen
eral Hospital. The Police are held-
ing Small in connection with the
death of Gwendoiyn Clarke (36
of New Orleans, St, Michacl
Clarke was also admitted to the
Hospital on February 20 sufferirg
from stab wounds but died
few minutes after she wi
admitted

LECTURE ON MORAL
REARMAMENT

Mr, Deighton F. Griffith, Head-
master of the Providence Boys’





hes TA . Wiz tj
COOLING face TREATMENTS

to revive Heat-Weary spirits






Cool fingers will bring refreshment and
Unemployment



Beauty to your hot, tired face. Iced creams
A keen and practical musician, and lotions will stimulate your skin, make it





: : ‘ 4 Schocl who recently returned A - i
one Roy Gill, the then Mr. Walcott then called on Mr. all his life, with a good tenor ht Sa ‘yen izabeth

in the immediate future. rate of a million dollars annually. ae of ‘the sugar plantation Estwick Deane. Mr. Deane said: vyoice, he did much in hig day to ra a Mier car ares a. ae ne eters eaten

“Tt js unnecessary or superflu- Government was proposing to named Husbands and Oxnards, St. “One Saturday afternoon in July create in others » love for both bbe ae per ts days aes Arden make-up will keep you looking cool
j I may say, to state that sur- save half a million dollars an- James, I went to the telephone and aman yocx| and instrumental music, As}#" address on this subject at th *; Ignée for hours and hours \
i Sitnes are only the result of ex- nually — in simple social lan- The defendant bought this who said he was De Abreu asked 4 choirmaster he could hold his Belmont Methodist Church, My and soignée for . ;
q Bors an Ni did over expendi- guage, to withdraw from circu- pjantation for the sum of £24,000, me if I wanted to buy a property. ow, with the best. There are Lord’s Hill. at 7.30 to-night. \ <>+—~ |
5 er ial it is only right that we lation five Sy oon noe The defendant still refuses to pay I . him we. did a many alive to-day who are deeply

: saat dollars annually in a comm the plaintiff the agreed commis- who he was, e man s indebted to him for setting their ’ % 1 ;

enous, l Ce nell tee where 500 villages lacked the sion of 3% on the £24,000 or any was 4 real estate agent. The man foot on the right path—the path THOUGHT FOR TODA} SALON at --=
¢ wees nt luses have arisen,” elementary essentials of sanitary part on it. said that he was acting on behalf of culture and enlightenment. The highest reward for
‘ et aT ’ . services like public baths and “ When the hearing was resumed of a vendor.











man’s toil is not what he gets KNIG HT’S LTD
Good Crops adequate drainage in the rural yesterday morning Mr. Walcott) “I told this man that if he had Milton had been in retirement for it, but what he becomes f
‘ ves px - tenantries. further cross-examined De Abreu. a plantation to sell I would listen for some years, but up to a few by it. 33 B d St t
I The honourable member made “Government was proposing to De Abreu said that he had no to him,” Mr. Deane said days before his death was able acc Balsistn roa ree
; some reference of the Department put by five hundred thousand conversation with Mr. Deane On the following morning he to enjoy a chat with friends ab%ut
of Science and Agriculture. OWiN Goyjars annually in a community gbout 10 a.m. on August 9. The telephoned Mr, Farmer of the current world events, Local poli-
to their researches and the neW Jere there was grave unem- defendant agreed that he was Lodge Plantation and told him tics, which he regarded as a nec- eet siti —
varieties of cot pK now Rape — ployment, despite official assur- the agent for him and he, the de- what the man—who he learnt was essary evil, was anathema to him '
planted in this island now, an

ances to the contrary, and where, fendant, was the principal.

; aes the plaintiff De Abreu--had told
the new methods of cultivation in ¢,, half of the year, there was

Milton Rocheford leaves to

“My obligation was to find the him over the telephone and asked jpourn his passing two sons and

addition to the unusual seasons of jntensified hardship and want by defendant a plantation and this Mr, Farmer for permission to visit ceyey grand children

good rain over the past ten years, inder-employment in agricul- was also the agreement. I was to the Lodge Plantation. :

the island had steadily produced ture, the main industry. Govern- produce a prospective seller or He inspected the Lodge Planta-

good crops and Soy been as neers ment was groposing oa by vendor. I had anthing, to do with tion, jbut no gale wee made gs it aessiliiae

i more and more each year sand dollars an- the price of the plantation, I wrote was too small. igus ?

te that production. Be ee ee public works Mr. Beene & letter in which I stat- plaintiff telephoned him stating BELL DEDICATED \
He said that they must also take japourers were receiving a wage ed that he was dishonest, that he had something nice to offer |

|

May the sod rest lightly on him



Sport Shirts

and other items for men

REFEREE

: the increase in in- hour. They were him but he told him that they The bell which was given
ana Seguae S * the forms et eee ge hundred thousand The Agreement could not discuss the matter over 4, me ow Autane Church. Bath-
turned to the en the hous- . the telephone. sheba. S > r, Charles
suhon % rienigrents abroad. As ee nan che families _ “Under the agreement Mr. ‘The plaintiff said that he could eu ba, Ae roe he ieee
¥ reread 544-48 it was estimated os rami for lack of space Deane had to negotiate the price offer him a plantation of about Yearwooc oO ene earns es 30°
a late s. 1 unted to three million = ae ~ falling down over 28 he was not a purchasing agent. 240 acres on the average, but did was dedicated yeste me, ‘ t i
that this gem from emigrants teete heads, They were to save [t was also Mr. Deane’s duty to not give the name or the price a.m. by the Venerable Arch-
syerereeen by the U.S. alone. He 4 hundred thousand dollars 8° to the plantation and try and o¢ the plantation. Later the plain- deacon H. J. Hutchinson at
employed v4 lic ae me oeeuiity ‘when for lack of a st a plantation as cheaply as he tif said that the price of the Requiem Mass.
Civurned from places like Bermu- + nutrition scheme, the de- could,” De Abreu said under pjantation would be about A large congregation attendes
re end "Cur acao but they Polopment of the school children cross-examination from Mr, E. K, 996900. The following morning the service which was iully
7 — that those sums must was being retarded and the next hel oy OM said that he told Mr the plaintiff said that he had made choral.
he substantial. generation menaced by a race of :

Beahe that Mr. Gill was not tak a mistake and that the place was
Mr. Vaughan then quoted fig- dwarfism. They were proposing to iny’ much less than what he asked ‘“Shbury.

Short Sleeves, sizes 144 to 17 ins.

Each

mem mmm

RENOWN DE LUXE SPORT SHIRTS
Short Sleeves in Shades of White, Blue, Grey, Cream,

Sizes — Smali, Medium and Large.

ri thousand dol- ; . 3 The plaintiff asked } t he knew
ures for the past decade showing put by five hundred ~ and it was not his duty to get a - ‘ s d ie plaintiff asked him if he knew
the amount of production, the cor- Jars annually when the a tak ad price suitable for Mr, Deane, Seana ens SNe veee of a place about 240 acres in size Each_ |. ok adie 1M sini ahd a + inns es alain _. $4.85
responding export and the result- and depressing rise in the cos o; There was also no ceiling price’ y.q immediately. after the first He told the plaintiff that he would

ant revenue which had accrued living was ae sible were quoted by Mr. Deane. As soon a8 face Mr, Gill interviewed me and jd out ain niin te ae yee ae Ont VESTS, athletic OTIS .COTTON . BRIEFS BOYS % LENGTH SOCKS
from the sugar crop during that eee wages peop the sale was effected his work was ¢ojiowing his instructions I decid the plaintiff rang. mye, me apeven, ri bed Stias 40 to. 4d. Sizes 8} to 10 ins.
on. id that it was a unique a said that he would not tire Oia: 1 said that the agreement ed not to communicate with the “Tl told the plantiff that I was ; vee to 46.

e@ sal

i s a ital
- any Government in this the House by a prolonged reci
sre as cial ‘changes and re- of the social want and lack among

: i le. i
tion, In recent times, Gov- the multitudes of the peop carried out, The agreement which 7 Wo told that the plaintiff Want- ang 1 gave him the size of the
red, had been compelled to “Let us absolve the ieee oe I made on August 6 is the agree- 44 to speak to me, but I did not piace and told him that it would
budget for specific exmunene, of caitiery, eon ait oat is west I am suing on,” De Abreu try to get in touch with him, On cost £24900 and the place had
: “o over u ¥ e , ty aid. ay elephoned the 9900 ir ares ¢ arren Fac-
Rae es that shir inerenatng the excuse them for the lack of a Mr, Adams then called on Mr. ltt ot Cottle ‘Cottord ceil in £ on "ta ae ag ot hi |
had done bt thereby deliberately social policy, But when we ex- J. H. Wilkinson who said that he the presence of Mr. Gill told him AT cy lace for,” Mr. Gill}
Se te 1 oa *Such a pro- cuse them for this lack, surely, knew the plaintiff who came to that he was trying to rob me of a SO Tes
creating surp'lsci in budgetary we should be able to commend him enquiring about a plantation 6999 and 1 was finished with ““"
cess was termec a cing ang them for an economic policy, he for sale. He could not say if the : ;
language as re Knee Govern- added. plaintiff mentioned a plantation.
to the amazement of r ¢hs tt y de- Did they propose to use those Mr. H, Farmer said that he once
ments, they discovered me ay .. surpluses as a fund for industrial obwned the Lodge Plantation, St
ficit financing there — a eet development? Did they propose Michael Several people asked
ing increase in the total volur to implement an idea of Professor him for a sale. One day the plain-
annual revenue. Simey’s that Barbados could be- tiff and himself had a conversa-
Fiscal Ignorance come a production centre for tion over the telephone. He also fruchands and Oxnards Plantatior
He said that they could not yarn to supply textile mills in saw Mr. Deane sometime and he jn st. James. It was during the
expect this Government to have Lancashire, or for that matter, asked him if he wanted to sell the

- ; month of July that he r«
a similar record. Because of the @ On page 6 plantation and he quoted him a telephone call from the

was a gentleman’s agreement I aot eto nies until I saw M nutting my cards on the table for
jl on th

‘ foliowing Monday. him. I told the plaintiff that I
thought that it was going to be wren 1] returned from the races knew of a place but it was mine

$1.30
$1.32

OPEN END SCHOOL ‘TIES
for senior boys of Harri-
son College.

Each SELLE Suit Li ae uenties Sums aabl a

$1.56

$1.05

RENOWN SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS, with piped
contrasting Collars. Shades of Grey, Blue, Cream.

Sizes 36 to 44 ins.
$16.37

Pair__ Pair___

— ne



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, LTD. |



him.”

Finally I bought Husbands and
Oxnards Plantation for
I first offered to pay £
it but this was not ac

Mr. Roy Gill said that some-
time in 1948 he was the



£24,000. ,./%.



10. 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.











——<———$ ——— —_—
PAGE SIX

Cal. Sec.

—— me

e



Part Of
vitae Roscoe

It may be asked why
has beer asked for
$40,000 isn
nolly’s Ri --. The reasons are
two-fold.: “First it will be neces-
sary for dittraft, while the work
is being done, to land on parts of
the Runway, to the left and right
of the centre-line, which do not
usuallyscarry traffic, and damage
may thereby be caused.

Sccond, the fickleness of the
weather has been largely respon-
site for.the. present predicament
and it May not yet have ceased
playing. its tricks. The word
“possibly” in the last sentence but
one of Mr. Connolly's estimate of
cost should not be overlooked.

I certainly do not wish in any
Way to aggravate an already deli-
cate situation, but I feel con-
Strained to comment on a few
points Which have been reported
in various sections of the Press
Since this” Resolution was sent
down to the~Legislature

For example, I have seen a re-
ference to the poor quality of the
concrete mixing. It will, I think,
suffice to say that there ag no re-
ference to this at all in Mr, Con-
nolly’s report and that Mr. John-
stone, the Chief Engineer of T.C.A
has stated in writing that during
his visits in July and September, 1
quote, “the Portland cement ton-
crete ends of the runways or turn
around areas and the Portland
cement .2,QmErete, apron. were in
excellent egndition; the: asphaltic
cOncreté —tagieway was also in
first-clasgjcgndition.”

-

$60,000
when only

Corruption

There, have also been insinua-
tions of corruption. As to this
I would say that, up to the time
of speaking, no evidence what-
ever of “this has been placed
before the Government.

There have been fears that the
hole Runway will have to be
andoned or that it will be a con-
stant drain on the Treasury. 1
amn only a layman in engineering
matters, -bot, as regards the first
fear, I would draw attention to
Mr. Connolly’s conclusion under
e heading “General” in his Re-
Port in which he says, I quote,
“After reviewing the geports and
studying the type of construction
used at Seawell Airport this En-
gineer is not as ssimigtic as
others who foresée the ultimate
failure qf-the whole Runway and
the rebuildiny thereof, and there
thne the eae alt that “by this
e



e the heavy alfcratt have found
weak “spots; ana after these
a@reas have been reinstated ‘Titth
gutside of average maintenars
Will be required.” ’
In other Words, while Mr. Con-
nolly kelievés that no ma. ex-
Graordimary Lexpenditure w be
requirefi aftér the’ present ‘wor?



wentioneg in Mr. Con- ,

Explains

éconstruction Of

Runway

been suggested that olf own De-
partment of Highways and Trans-
port should handle the job. To
this the answer of the Director,
who is the only qualified Engin-
eer in the Department, has been
suffering’as he is from a
chronic shortage of Engineering
assistance, he just cannot under-
take the necessary supervision, in
addition to his other duties. With-
out the timely presence of the
Resident Engineer from Canada,
the Barbados Government would,
indeed, be “in the soup.”

Criticism

Finally I notice with regret
that even the United Kingdom
Government has come in for some
criticism. Now, Sir, I have taken
the trouble to delve back inte the
1949 correspondence, This shows
that in October 1949 the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies was
informed for the first time of the
arrangements that had already
been made with the Canadian
Department of Transport for the
loan of an engineer to undertake
a survey of the Airport and con-
struct a new Runway so as to
have it ready for use not later than
the Ist July, 1950, and the Secre-
tary of State was asked, in spite
of the ruling, of which this Gov-
ernment was well aware, that
C.D. & ‘W. grants would not nor-
mally be made in respect of ex-
penditure already incurred, if an
ipplication for a grant from
Colonial and Development Funds
could be considered,

Grant Approved

The sole “crime’ of the U.K.
Government, so far as ] can see,
is that, despite the ruling to
which I have just referred, it ap-
proved a grant of $1,212,000 and
agreed, in this instance, to cover
expenditure already incurred.

Later, although it was clearly
stated at the time the scheme
was approved that “any excess
over the sum approved should be
met from local revenue, the
Secretary of State approved sup-
plement of $408,000. making a
total of $1,620,000 from C.D. &
W. funds in all.

The reasons advanced for, as
it were, confronting the Secre-
tary of State with a “fait accom-
pli” were:

(1) the Barbados Governmen;

had given an und Ag

to~ Trans-Canada Ai
t> proceed with










prepared to call
their soumtin -
the Cami



and





In The Legislature
COUNCIL

The Legislative Councti met

> pm. yesterday the Hen. |. I
Chandler presiding

The Hon. the Colonial Scere
tary ‘laid the
ments:—

Draft Estimates of Revenue and

Expenditere for the year 195%—5s.
Annual Report of the Superin

tendent of the Market for the year

1950—S1.
The Council! concurred
fellowing resolutions

Resolution to place the sum of
disposal of the

Committee

s8.070 at the
Governor -in-Executive
to sapplement the Estimates 1951—
‘2. Part I, Current
Supplementary, Estimates, 1951-
52, No. #&. which form the
Schedule to the Resolution
Resolution to piace the sum of
$3,500 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Execative Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951—
52, Part 0, Capital, to supplement





fotiowing docu-

in the

as shown in

BARBADOS



Yesterday

>
the Estimates 1051—<2, Ne. 45,
which form the Schedule te the
ution

elution te place the sum of
at th diyposal of the
rnor-ip-Exeeutive Committee
supplement the Extimates 1941—



¢ Part 11, — Capital, as shown
in Supplementary Estimates 1951—
&, Ne i which form the





Sehedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) Orde>
198%, made by the Geverner-in-
Executive Committee on the tenth
day of January 105%, under the
Previsions of Section & of the
Civil Estabiichment Act. 1949.

The Counefl postponed further
consideration of —

Bil intituled an Act to carry
out the Convention relating to
Labour Clauses in Public Con-
tracts

The Council adjourned sine die.



HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday, Dr. Cummins on
behalf of Mr.: Adams taid the
following :—

Message No. 6/1952 from His
Excellency the Governor to the
Honourable House of Assembly
presenting for consideration of the
Honourable House the draft
Estimates of Revenue and Ex-
penditure for the Financial Year
19”—53.

Annual Report of the Super
intendent of the Market fer the
year 190—51.

The following
given

Dr. Cummins for M Adam

Bill intituled an Act to continue
various expiring laws and a Bill
intituled an Act to make per-
manent certain laws formerly con
tinued in force from year to year
by Annual Expiring Laws Con-
tinvance Acts. These were later
read a first time.

Dr. Cummins gave notice of
Resolution to place the sum of
$46,275 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 161
52, Part 11—Cuapital, as shown tn
the Supplementary Batimate
1951-2, No. 47, which form the
Schedule to the Resoiation,

Mr. C. BE. Tatma gave notice of «
Bill to authorise the Vestries of
st George, St. Philip Christ
Church, St. John, St, Joseph, St
Thomas and St, James to Increase

Notlee were

British

Hon, Colonial

landing during

surrounding should be fr
obstruc. ions

operations the full

areas free from obstructions or
excavations.
The Resident Engineer had
ifirmed this, the

i the Hon. the Color
on the tucid
d expla
word &
1 like

““ptioms on ome or two po






Couse of Failure

West Indies Airways had

been checked and what was the

answer.
The

very well,

il Secretary
said that British Wést Indian had
stipulated that (1) there will be
a clean 75 foot lane by five thous-
and feet long available for taking
daylight
hours and that, the area immedi-
ately
from all
gerous excavations.
hight
and width of the runway
be available and the surrounding

Government
that

pathy

and dan
and (2) tor
lengtt
should

Hon, the exer
onial Secretary concluded
he Hon. F. C. Hutson congrat



the salary payable to the respec-
tive clerks of the Boards of
Guardians of those parishes.

This was later read a first time

Mr. W. A. Crawford tabled an
iddress relating to the Establish-
ment of an Agricultural Develop-
ment Corporation with a view to
obtaining concessions in British
llonduras so as te relieve some of
the colony's unemployment.

Mr. J. C. Mottley tabled a ques-
tion relative to fishermen at
Skeat'’s Bey, St. Philip and the
ineonvenienes suffered by them.

Mr. E. DB. Motiley tabled a
question relating to the inade-
inacy’ of buses on routes In the

island,

The House passed « Bij) for the
establishment of a Revenue Equali-

ation Fund

The House passed an Address
to the Other Place in connection
with over population in the island.

“The House passed an Address
to His Exeeileney the Gevernor
concurring in the ektension to
Barbados of the new economic
notes passed between the United
Kingdom and the United States

The House postponed considera
tion, of the second reading ef the
Bill to repeal the Public Employees
Leave Regulations Act, 1045.

The House agreed to the Coun-
cis Amendments to the Pioneer
Industries Bill,

The Hous adjourned
Tuesday, 4th March at 3 p.m



until

It was a little hard that

was
that matter,

He thought that they were very
vise in putting on $20,000 because

might be faced with

ld be unforgivable.

It that was the extent of the
sincerels

ivouble, and they all
hoped that it was, then he thought
it the Government would
edingly lucky to have got off

th an expenditure of $60,000,
said that
were fighting to
with ’the traffic
ell but he would ask tha
every
4 made to see that no

In eonclusion he
i that they
nterfering



ensure that
bein
se llowed to pass
aid concrete





come, insurance,



If he did make a guess
he could say that that backfill was

free from clay, continued on that line of policy,

had had to shoulder would have to echo a sentiment

responsibility and his sym- tp
. J at
with the Government

bados working man would have
to say of the Barbados Tabor

more Party: “This
»uble but they must ensure that with th is people honoureth me

class ma-erial was put back far fro
in, to put back in inferior material

before
ir hours have elapsed
e€ second point was that the

ADVOCATE



Equalisation Fund
Bill Passed In Face
Of Heavy Criticism

most certainly expect the crops to
remain as gOod as they had been
to the empryo textile mills in in the past decade, the creation
these West Indies? Did they pro- of the Revenue Equalization Fund
pose to use a surplus as a foumda- dig not seem to him absolutely
tion fund for uae irrigation necessary. The fund should be
works for agriculture, 80 earmarked for more pressing
establish an insurance of perma- things like proper housing, better
ouptly E adequate crops in the roads, more standpipes and so on.
re ? Dang

What he wanted to emphasise Referring ens Sen the

was that the Government's pro- pill) Mr. Talma said that they

@ from page 5

— Bi * ‘these surpluses." But were putting the money at the

soli : y disposal of the Accountant Gen-
eee coe ae We, eral who with the consent of the
the G ae . â„¢ Secretary of State for the Col-
Governments mite ih’ Com- onies, would invest it outside of
paring Government income with the colony. But, to his mind, they
business income. Such a com- needed more revenue and every
Pindornettat as rane, was cvailable cent for the s0cial leg-
Socialist Government, i as q islation which they were trying
itically danas tallacy. = to implement. He thought that
e source of Government in- canute 3 was a very dangerous
from tntienes egg ME ad There were some who might
ary concern of business was with say that the money was still in
commodities. The primary con- the General Revenue or was still
cern of Government was with @vailable, but that depended upon
sraet, "ha Lateee Gre Seats. ‘deemeat’ tnd aid oie
rnment wit umanity, remaine . e
that term in its classically chris. ing to appropriate the money
tian sense. with the consent of the Secretary
Reserves or the saving of sur- of State for the Colonies for ex-
pluses was a sound provision in penditure out of the island. That
company finance. usiness in- money so expended would be so
come derived from sales of com- much Jess in the island.
modities and services, The source ye could not uphold the policy

of Government income was taxa- reserves i ac
tion and by its fiscal policy, Gov- of saving up oe eee

ich
ernment could influence the size ot the winemious Bocnasttien whic

and volume of its revenue, Such S#0uld be met, and what was
power was denied to business. tt more, if they were earmarking
had no control over the consum- Money for a proper island wide
ing capacity of the market, even housing scheme, one could un-
that business income which so derstand, but instead of that.
closely resembled Government in. they wanted to put by $150,000
as a sort of reserve fund at the
He did not want Government end of this year, and probably at

to regard his criticism as any ob- the end of the next year another

structive condemnation, but, he

c $150,000.
was warning them that if ‘they :

BHEUWATISN
” and agonising

BACKACHE
GONE!

the working man of Barbados

in reference to the Labour Party

was echoed two thousand
years ago in the highways and
byways of Palestine. e Bar.




heir lips, but their heart is
™m me.”

Mr. Vaughan said that he was
so much opposed to the policy
embodied in the Bill, that he was
moving the rejection of its fur.
ther consideration,

Mr. ©. E, Talma, (L) said that
when the policy of ‘putting by a
Reserve Fund was implemented.
he did not have the honour of be-
ing a member of the House, and
therefore that was the first oppor-

tunity he had had to deal with| Obstlaete a civses oh
the matter. be interested in
He felt very perturbed in mind| Complaints the experience

to see that an over cOnservativea

policy was being perpetuated b:
Government, ‘Although the idea of

a “house-keeping”

related in this
’8 letter :—
“Some years
ago I began to

relieved by
KRUSCHEN

budget was

—"——“" WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27,

1952





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If you have reason to believe that your
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induces sleep in a perfectly natural way,

has bean completed, he is at Tran vetween the slabs should be cound in principle yet, in vi fhe ism for it is prepared from Nature’s best
/ . efully sealed » in view of my arms and shoulders. en S ie he

to stregs tate eset rAl persOmn hee eee, Caled 80 that no ‘the fact that’ the price of sugar'| started in the small of my soothes etrea ad Be tnd aot

port, as at~amy Airport the we wk , vee tt prelate had been guaranteed for the next k, Iceneerey until they were SRORY tres Od veel: Say ier ie

Srckk tried Tt male. Yet Coady, be nem con mee MSE PASSES Seven or eight years, there were | Feally severe. 1 bought a bottle vou fact

eur ox : Pe 2g unlikely to agree to extend


















you feel in the morning.

so many pressing and glaring Fyscnen ane WAS soreriped Ag

a matters which had to be “fixed”, Tagg ae hg it was
had gone
from it

If you*ae me~how «much that

apt



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The work should be oo



Your own experience will convince you














‘ ea gers a that he could not appreciate a that ‘ Ovaltine’ is the one food beverage

will amount to I. can only _refey 5 the time of co H ai a \e is i ee ae eee iene
” ther Ve susiaie efore the next wet s@ason 5 mnolly had mot s a » ee r Labour Government adopting a | and day have not or every member your family, to

to the fast genignce under ths in (in the quand it wes not, > sates Pouce the lines ¢ use Select Six policy such as was propose in agentes again. My pains were promote peaceful sleep, to renew energy

peomee General” in a4 a and that factor fs to a large ex- from , 7 F St d Of the Bill stinate and the re ef really : and to keep you all feeling and looking
se 4 2 v4 e dice a to r r 1 y or? , ied .—T RB. tam : :

feted by axnerience”’ “The neces. tent responsible for the present see oF ry Their experience was that for | ® tie. OVALTINE eres





Rheumatic ns and backache








: areal a he ‘ ir . the past ten years the sugar cane ; Sold ins by all Chemi dS
of annua! maintenance is ) predicament) It seems the us f t i‘ . > . us' y the result of poisons BISCUITS old in airtight tins by a mists and Stores,
in Ast eer aa and must be ac- Barbados cannot have a record backfill Reading between tt Oy er I opulation crop was reasonably good and’ in the Rigo g—Rolao hich lazy : ie
ent as.” a vitable ¢ sugar 3 weat lines they could see that in tl most cases even better than was wels and tired eys are Dainty and delightfully .
epted as an inevitable coi sugar crop and good weather 3 . “a Pe ted d dt fail: to expel or these crisp, ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits Qualit has made
ecomitant of any Runway. for making a runway at the hurry and the night work a good The House of Assembly yester- ?*Pected, an e did not there- there fin are ideal for all occasions. y
Y i . taba Mie : : ane fore see why Government should ; 90m aints ere is no er hy
une time deal of the clay excavated ha i 1 an Address to the treatment than en Salts are made from the 4
Rvoway Exomtvations been put back in again. Other Place agreeing to Co-opt in ®dopt an attitude of despondency | which cleanses all the internal Siting e ceceerton. of
Some harsh words have hee Hon, G, D. L, Pile quo'ed the He had seen some samples of 1 Committee for the purpose of ‘I alarm. He felt that they should organs, stimulates them to nor- delicious ‘Ovaltine’, and
said about Canada. I do not think following passage from the En- that material and it was inferior. siudying the problem of over- always live in hope, and he was at healthy action and thus are highly nourishing
ieee te aan CORE MED aegis Teport:— They had been told that it is population in the island. Vey Te tae ine P Ry fact that . itores freshness and vigour. a arene oe Th W Id’ l
that this Go$ernment owes to the ‘The statement that the airport difficult to distinguish betwee The House appointed six of its,\he price of sugar had been guar-| @aj) Qhemists and Stores_seld OOtaititie Meemembes tr
Canadian a and T.C.A., could be kept in service for flying clay and coral rock. That was members to take part in this Com-|anteed until 1959, and they would | Erusohen. a tell "a" pedir’ oF e World's most popular
both for making available the ser- Operations during the mittee

time of quite ‘rue. They could get a mix-
vices of Mr. Johnstone, an experi+« construction by day labour forces tyre of white clay and marly rock
enced Engineer of T.C.A. for is more or less confirmed by a that would be quite difficult to be
making detailed exeminations of letter from ‘Trans-Canada Air distinguished from coral rock
the Runway during July and Sep- Lines on January 11th advising They were hoping that there ,
tember, and of Mr. Connolly, who under what conditions they are was not much of that material in lative Council dated the 17th July, |
is » very senior, and very busy, prepered to gontinue operations their runway because i{ would 1951 and the 29th January, 1952,
oMicial of the Department of ‘nto Barbados, and it is our opin- give trouble when it got wet. regarding the nomination of mem- |
Transport, for a visit in Decem- ion that these conditions can be bers from the House of Assembly |
ber, without so far asking for » complied with if the work is car- Coral Unstable cs serve with members, sm the |
mny in payment, for arranging ried out in accordance with meth- onourable the Legislative Coun-
to have extolon of the defective od (b) but fot ie pit an The report had stated that sat- cil as a Joint Select Committee to
areas taken to Canada to deter- under method (a). The British Urated coral became unstable al- examine the question of over-

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The Address reads:

The House of Assembly has the
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from the Honourable, the Legis- |










Bring Me
























C. §. Pitcher & Co.

miné the cause of the trouble, and West Indies A ¢ have not though not to the same ex.ent 4S population in Barbados and to A Good
also for sending down, at consid- expressed hiaies: in writing pone poe Samet Ae a wide state- make EOCOMIPRO RET One ae esl |
erable inconvenience, for the but it is our jerstandi that Ment with which he did not agree, ing with this problem, and to say |
anitien Departmen Tran:-: fAeesedlt direte under cae con. the. Hon. Mr. Hutson went on to that the House has nominated the | CIGA R i!
port.also has acute t diM- ditions suitable for Trans-Can- ®8Y- His opinion was that coral following as members, of such a}
cultiés, a Kesi 1 ada Air Lines. This is to be “id not become unsiable when Committee ss }
start the wor! tion. shecked tp; wet. Dr. H, G. Cummins, Mrs. E, E. | e
dT sincerely hope that the De- He then enquired from the , The Hon. the Colonial Secretary Bourne, Mr. L. A. Williams, Mr. |
partment can be persuaded to lei Molonial Secretary whether the "aa told them that the eastern F, C. Goddard, Mr. W. A. Craw-| We have
him.remain to finish it. It} tement in connection with Part of the runway had stood up ford, Mr. O. T. Allder. j
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952 BARBADOS ADVCCATI FéGe so
e - . Se ° } 1. KLIMis pure, safe mitk °
e
7T%7 oe A :
_ Equalisation Fund Bill Passed In Face Of Heavy Criticism ) 21m am |
; ” '
e , ‘ ‘ }
4 from page 6 been taken to use «the funds for sugar it was tantamount to another House had given con : hould never lose an oppor Mr. Adams tirst spoke of the KEIM qu
»_ He asked why effect a saving derived from the good years to saying that they had a Stabiliza- eee to the po Since tuni 7m Ba aes and out- eee. ecenns te sill and
= when there Ww: -a ‘ood advan e. tion Fund for the economy of the then, owever, ere a been a! r asquera Ing in every then saic nat it Was not a ques- iat o ‘ .
employment rad 6 een ° we island io aes were in a ay election, and he felt that at least, form to let the Union of South tion of being constitutional or not In pg et ag | waa nourishing KLIM
a not devise ways and means Bankrupt Policy protected from’ the point of view the present House should have Africa —. what they in _. constitutional. There were certain aol de rs mill Puactly che - ae
_ - : S ; 2: , was proposed bados an ther parts of the Em- ¢ 5 ney c They ° mney > same ount
spending some of the money “The floor of the House is not of having a Reserve Fund in case ne [=~ Was Oe ares sania ot thas ‘beknighted oe —— could oo me . y of important food essentials are yours in
_ create employment. He was a political platform,” Mr. Mott- of a calamity. He therefore ‘ ; 4 ¢ a pass a © ~~ every tin. KLIM’s uniformity is your assur-
. se 3 : Ss : os : In view of the statement issued Government. whether French goods were to be f 1 : '
ping that when the Estimates ley said. He happened to be a thought that the present money , ?" View ; ; - Mr. G. H. Adams (L) i that . ance of consistently fine milk!
. wing ¢ idered they Member of the Housing Board, should be used for social services by Government in its Memoran 0 Mr. ean . cetate. things Pea landed in Barbados. They were
‘ . S s s s s > : . : y 1952 here ere certs : ie; g rerei 5 » :
Id see * thi -_ and at times he felt that there or for the development of the ¢U™ to the Estimates for 1952 yuld not do and one was the pass- “°t,# Sovereign state ‘
see “something construc hould ‘Be ho but he besic econ r of the island 53, that it was the intention of coulc a ae ae = pase He said that every colonial Gov-
whereby the bad housing Sho more uses, but he basic economy o' le island. , the Government, in the absence ‘g of discriminatory legislation of ernor had instruction as to how 4. KLIMis excetient for growing children
wos b : was bound to a with the The existing social services, ; “ enat eeinae om tet Sort A me ow — :
bad tenantry roads might be ai : of the proposed fiscal survey, t legislation was to be passed. That
Saal Government that they should put Mr. Crawford said, “are woefully present the fullest background =e ‘ ae ae 5. KLIM ‘
L. A. Willi L caey. Dy reserves for the bad days. He deficient. In years like these, we available if the general financial , M*: ©. .1. Allder (I) said that was nothing to do with the Gov- . adds nourishment to cooked dishes
1 at ther a : mena felt that the policy expressed by should take every cent we position of the colony and to "© Would have supported the ernor’s reserve powers. To put in
ought on ‘Gin tai the ome the junior member for St. John can get our hands on and use it to determine its future financial and “mendment if it had said that the such an amendment would only 6. KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
wh was aéasenninn ohh ae rm regarding spending, =e not Ni improve and expand the basic economic policy for the next five one . Th Len 4 rd be een be emasculating the Bul i
ile te haleneae to tip ate 7 ing ates ene y. run the economy of the island. In a coun- years and that it was proposed to OVersea a ie a ony oo. 00 pov- = Mr. E. D. Mottley queried 7. KLIMis safe in the specially-packed tia
‘ ; e credit island into bankruptcy. try like this with one industry, present the Fiscal Survey af °'tY Stricken to Invest overseas. South Africa's passing a Bill say
rthe —- and = —_ which < Catt he. intended to maps you can take up money and in- Barbados to the Legislature in He said that though he felt as ing Barbadians being prevented
red e@ policy of good the Bill, there was one part of - : "|











e-keeping.

He did not feel that any so-
t would want to hoard up
Oney. nor was he one to share
t view. He did not think that
fovernment would encourage
try to accumulate surplus
mey in the Treasury and not
it for the good of the people,

single member would

That matter was contained

Commonwealth.

hich was purely deperident on

section if



it which he did not think one
support.
nm
section 3 of the Bill which pro-
vided for the investment of the
fund in any part of the British

He would except South Africa,
and what was more, he could not

it offended all the

vest it in any part of the world—
of the Commonwealth. It is sheer
nonsense,” he added.

and hinted



ngly as any on the question of
racial discrimination, he was prac-
tical enough to see that the ex-

May, the Bill should be delayed
until the Survey was presented.
Mr. Lewis abhorred the idea of

going to South Africa.
Mr. Adams replied that South
Africa was a Sovereign country.

8. KLIMis produced under strictest control

Take pure water, — K L i M










; ‘lusi f South Africa might only i nati
: “ , taxin, pple and not spe ee ; Y He referr the international
ie continued, we cannot afford the Beis for the sonatheretaal , hurting their own economy. Seioenian nt when a country add KLUM, “9 stir and yo Leah ~a
to have this money invested even of social ine 4 i Doing that would be to curtail the “®'* oes i =
in Pelican. Every cent should be Soahal oe ie apts ~~ out means of investing in the best oe eae, —_ ana apd FG have pure, safe milk
invested in Barbados, and inves- 3°" a : Or at place. ry, it should not make discrimin.- am foo =
ted at once.” ‘on @ when ban as ae Mr: W, A, Crawfora (6) said tory legislation against them, ‘ FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVER v0". 1#00 Borden Co,



; . Mr. Crawford suggested that ondary schools. He urged further that South Africa was a country Mr, Crawford said that it w
mt he thought that they should Gueseamank train ee eo the money could be invested in a ® “bold programme of capital which had flouted all the canons Sheer hypocrisy to pass such a Bill fi
@ar in mind that the island’s hous be inveoted in. South cement industry, there being in a. on behalf of thé of international law and accepted Without inserting what the umer
bnomy was essentially based Africa. He therefore intended ‘Me island the material which er i, of Barbados, and warned canons of international justice, Ment sought to insert. They MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBE
the production of sugar cane to nines the deletion of that sub. COWld be used in its manufacture, at, in view of world conditions |p )¢, had got to do the exception Should express their feelir

a ats < ror { . , a
that British Guiana #24 threats of a war, it would vhere that country was concerned Were against that country






































- 7 rise . Jover or) nik @| int
infall. If one bore that factor other people in the country. They WS Contemplating manufacturing eae ee fr eens oe cause that country had shown |, eaten amet se ot
[mind, then he would under- should not take the ple’s this type of building material might as a result of a war, change ‘em in the most emphatic man- 10") made his second spec
nd the policy which Govern- money after they had welhed up trom Barbados lime stone. — hands, : ~ fer that they did not care what ji fo; mace his quali
Mt was adopting in the Bill. and down Bridgetown and He Was not Suggesting any blind He reminded members _ that civilised people thought and put~ the first “he would h ave express é
was evident that Govern- passed an- Address in the House ¢XPenditure of Government funds, other funds had been created, but ‘mg aside all morals and justice, vorind disagreement with
nt was budgeting on the cau- condemning the Malan Discrim- but most of them would welcome the House had never been given ‘hey were a law unto themselves point of tee. tn: his (eeees
s side. He would be the last imation Policy, and send it to ny departure from the old econ= the accounts of the various funds, &"« Were prepared to adopt the speech he qualified the previous
rson to support any measure South Africa to build railroads. omic policy, as a result of which and urged that accounts should "ost unorthodox, uneivilised, in- idea that it would be: impossible
ereby any surplus’ was built He thought it was a very sound the economy of the island could be given of the present Revenue human and brutal measures to sie Os diate “tary pass the Bill with the
=. and the money not uced for idea for Government to make be so strengthened that in case Equalisation Fund, pursue their own policy, There- inantvnent
" $ocial services, but he could not Provision for lean years, and ex- there was a drop in rainfall, in so Bent ‘ re he did not think that a8 “Ono could well sce what was thi
“Subscribe to the view that com- °¢?t for what he had to say about far as their basic industry was te ane Dr. Cummins (L} colonial legislators, they need attitude of the Secretary of State
: parisons should be. made be Atri ee somnell ‘en eat Soonene they would be a little ingens en ee the steady concern themselves with the for the Colonies who was a blu
E r ° as 2,money spe tie -onstitutions roce-~ prs Te
_ tween the economies of the the Bill. ithe — — Nec expressed the Education, Medical Bervises, old a of constitutional proce= piooded Tory and knowing th
United States or Canada, and Mr. Crawford (©) said that view that the money should be 28° Pension, water, roads, housing, \ tt f fact, almost al) Present attitude of the British
Barbados. It was a fallacy to do ; y Snould be school buildings ar d other items AS a matter ¢ act, alunos Government with respect to South
sc, Or to cugges; that Barbados eae ye icdene the SOL Spent on economic development, since 1939 BS and other items ine racial laws passed by South Africa |
should follow the United States ie adtenatod te ~~ .. nae Eero eae He said that they knew they ™ - ee a meee He then went on to make “_ |
‘* i 3 § é s as, 3 ra . a Se ee eptec ands s p 3 - suggestions of ge x ove 18 |
: whose economy was far more body had cried “shame”. He, Mr. respcet, he suggested that the set- te — mousse badly and they in- tionality , ointed ‘I s “e saat . Un on
flexible. . ; ; ended to continue their building pointed clause, “except tl ion |
Crawford was guilty of the inter- ting up of an Industral Corpora- programme, r of South Africa,” such as naming | “
The Rainfall jection, and he had cried “shame” tion which would bring ina num- — As to public baths, he said that MF A. E S. Lewis (LL) en- the other colonies and excluding |
in reply to certain statements by ber of industrial consultants or he was surprised to hear an at- ‘ivired what was the position with that country, If you feel worn out, depressed, or
Any one who travelled through the introducer of the Bill, that the experts to establish a few more tack on such a question when it ‘es@rd to the constitutional law Mr. Lewis remarked that he
the various parishes could see the government considered the policy industries in the island. He re. should be widely known that pub- The Dominion of South Africa jad ‘heard constitution opiniot generally run down a glass or two
varying effect of the rainfall in enunciated in* the Bill “good peated that he could not subscribe lic baths was a matter for local Could say that no person from before which had turned out to | y
places like St. Lucy and St, house-keeping,” and if there was to the policy of putting by money Government. Whenever Govern- 'arbados should come there and je bogus opinion. It was laid| a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
Philip, as compared with parish- an excess of revenue over expen- for rainy days in the face of un- Ment was approached for loans for ‘t seemed that Barbados could not Gown that they could lay down uickly restore lost energy and
es like St, Andrew, St. Joseph enone pe by soared oe Screener mnent and unemploy- Building public baths, they had ®4Y ae ae one from there aronia terms stating how they could spend | q y sy
and St. John, where perhaps, the rainy days. That was the basis of ment. ranted them, come ‘nere was 6 pacUrar re

canes could remain in the fields the governments’ statement.



apalling housing conditions in
this country, and he knew that
no “ne would want to hoard up
money in the Treasury. At pres~
ent they were getting a good
price for their sugar, but no one
knew what the pdsition would
be within the years ahead.
Those were things which had
to be borne in mind, and he did

supported the junior member for
St. John without knowing it.
Imagine the senior member for
the City not being able to appre-
ciate the point that if some of the
money were used for the devel-

sure the economy of the island.

fore afraid, failing to realise that
care shown by the other people
was not because they were so
furiously
fare of the colony, but because
they felt that
called upon to contribute to a

rrectl ted. He s € :
opment of a large scale irrigation greater extent whensoever the had distingtly "dala tat ie oe THIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE
project in the colony, it would in= financial position of the colony jlisation fund for cushioning the |

became impaired,














heir money and he was convinced | tone up the whole nervous system.
He opined that the colony would _ Of, course money should be of commonwealth law which 4, : P Y












; that no constitutional law could |

for another six months. He was amazed to think that be justified in borrowing money $PCMt,to establish good irrigation, could prohibit them from saying take that right away from them, | Giving new vitality it fortifies you

One had to bear in mind that the spokesman for a Socialist for industrial expansion, if they oa Spot Member for St. Philip here their money should be in- They were merely saying that they |
with the uncertainty of rainfall, Government in’ 1952 could repeat did not have it to use of their own. dation a age ae irri< \ested did not wish the money invested | against fever and exhaustion and
provision should be made for the the old “laissez faire” attitude in They should be justified in putting equipment was obtained me she Mr. E. DP. Mottley reiterated his ‘here: remember, Buckfast Tonic:Wins
day when there was Jow rain- economics which were outmoded, the island in debt if by so doing. United Ritiedom ‘wad becanes of points about discrimination and .. Mr. E. W. Barrow (1) said that ’
fall, and a corresponding low at least from the time Queen Vic- they could expand the economy of the controls, they were war aie id th % there were times in ones the Whole purpose of the Bill was is especially valuable
crop ,and therefore he did not toria left the Throne. the colony lowed to get’ what equipment they life when one realised from Contrary to all the accepted prin-| | /}Rg 4,
think that any progressive mem- With regard to the comments Mr * , ; wanced, The Government intend- \ hence » had come and how ¢iPles with which he had been| Pha after illness.
ber would say that Government of the senior member for the City, Mr. Crawford attributed gov- oq to spend money for equipment | vance Pe wail He Sata ho acquainted from the time he was | : Y Will
was trying to accumulate sums of one could hardly imagine that an 2: ig policy to the fact that for irrigation when it was avail- (05° Sys Brin ~ i sae ice studying. One could only con } ede LG
money in the Treasury ang did individual who had been so suc- office the assumed the reins of able. veptes fo . ‘St I erty Gata aioe elude that the person who con. | NT ; “a
not want to spend it on behalf of cessful in private life to talk such pheo oni yi taunted that He said that the Senior Member the arguments given if he would .celved the idea of a Revenue]
the people, “infantile nonsense” as he had bankru : ee lave the colony for St. Philip knew that the stab- a re as Testi dy 1a: Equalisation Funda had never |

He himself was aware of the talked. As a matter of fact, he had he age oy ore, there- ilisation fund was for the sugar °°cept them, if he were a “play-

On page 10

v e
ONLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN | |

industry and could not be spent !!@y” lawyer.
for anything esle and he was mis-
leading the community when he
tried to make that plea,

At this point, Mr, Crawford rose
and objected that he was being in-










interested in the wel-




wucerany §

BUCKFAST

they would be



industry in case of a bad year, . Your skin will be cooler, sweoter...

If they borrowed money and He added that it was false to

not think Government should be
accused of trying to accumulate
reserves and not spend money
on social services for the benefit
of the people.

Signifying his intention to sup-
port the Bill, Mr. Mottley (E)
said that the member for
St. John (Mr. Vaughan) had
made a fine political speech in
his contribution to the discus-
sion on the Bill. It was not for
him, Mr. Mottley, to offer any
defence for the Government, but
as he listened to the Junior mem-
ber for St. John, he could not but
think that he was listening to a
political speech from a young-
ster like the junior member for
St. Lucy, who had just sat down.

It was a wonderful Budget

_ speech which the junior member
for St. John had made, and in

_ spite of it, he was going to sup-

port the Bill. He thought that

_ when it was first intimated that

+ they should have a Reserve Fund,

whether one was conservative or

socialist, one was bound to see
that the idea was a sound one.
The junior member for St.
_ John really took him off guard
_ with his reference to the figures
for the past ten years on the pro-
duction and price of sugar, but
he would only say that the floor
of the House was not the appro-
priate place to fight litical
battles. However, one felt about
the Administration during the
past ten years, he must admit
that the social services and the





Nothing Done

Mr. Crawford recalled that for
nearly a decade now, a ten-year
development programme for Bar-
bados proposed the financing of a
£1,000,000 large-scale irrigation
project for the island, and said
that so far as that was concerned
nothing had as yet been done to
implement the suggestion.

While Government could have
claimed that finance restricted the
programme some years ago, but
now they had a healthy balance,
and nobody knew when there
would be a year that the rainfall
would be below average, now was
the time to embark on the irriga-
tion project so as to insure that
rainfall or no rainfall, the crop
of the island would not fall below
average.

He thought that there were two
factors to bear in mind. It was
correct to say that in Barbados a
single crop, and up to now, with-
out irrigation, it was dependent

invested it wisely and soundly,
he was of opinion that although
it would increase the public
debt, the economy of the country
would be far better off. In other
words, they should have no
reason to be afraid of increasing
the public debt if in so doing
they sought to strengthen the
economic structure of the colony,

He believed that the statements
made by the junior member for
St. John deserved the utmost
consideration by all the members
of the Chamber. The mere infer-
ence to be drawn from section 3
of the Bill, that there were places
even within the Commonwealth
which would be willing to use
some of the island’s money in
order to improve conditions in
their own particular country,
should be enough to make mem-
bers realise that Barbados should
consider doing the same thing, if
even they had to borrow money,
much less when Barbados had its
own money which could be used
for economic and social improve-

upon rainfall. They had also to ment.
bear in mind that the island was :

; He had much pleasure in
in the fortunate position of having seconding the motion by the

a guaranteed price for the next
eight years. In connection witn
that (the guaranteed price) they
had the Stabilisation Fund which
was already in six figures, and
which was created especially for
the purpose of cushioning any
shock brought about by de-
creased crops as a result of de-
creased rainfall, or after 1959

junior member for St, John, that
the Bill be completely rejected.
Government did not even offer
a compromise and say, the fund
should be used every other year,
but was asking them to dig their
hand into the public funds to the






say that they deliberately taxed
the people to create the reserve
fund. Those were the main points
to which he intended replying. |

desirably dainty from head-to-toe





“"if you bathe with fragrant



Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Soap.
the Bill was now put and was de- 2 °
feated by a 11—5 majority, Those
voting for the rejection were |
Messrs C. E, Talma, J. C. Mott-|,)
|
‘

The motion for the rejection |



ley, W. A. Crawford, V B
Vaughan and O, T. Allder.

Those against were: Messrs
L. E. Smith, T. O. Bryan, R, G
Mapp, E. W. Barrow, F. L, Wal-
cott, G. H. Adams, M, E, Cox, |
L. A. Williams, J. E, T. Brancker, }
F, Goddard and Dr. Cummins, |

A debate which lasted nearly
two hours was introduced when|
the Bill went into Committee. The
debate was lead off by Mr. E. D. {
Mottley (E) who called for the
House to insert in the clause that
none of the funds were to be in-
vested in the Union of South | }j}
Africa because of the racial dis- } }))
crimination which was practised
there

Clause three of the Bill stated
that subject to certain provisions
the Accountant General should in
vest all or any part of the fund ir
any securities of, or guaranteed by
the Government of any part of th: |
British Commonwealth, or in othe:
securities as the Accountant Gen
eral with the approval of the |
Secretary of State, might in hi
discretion select. Mr. E, D. Mott



any decrease in the price which

expenditure of capital works,
they were getting for their sugar

whether it be on roads, schools,
housing, that opportunity had



SHOP WINDOW TO THE
WORLD




FOR

1952

Visit Britain in May for the
most famous of all national! trade
fairs. Nowhere clase can be seen
such a vast and varied display of
new products designed for the
world by a single country.

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR
MAY 5-16 - LONDON - BIRMINGHAM

INFORMATION about exhibitors, catalogues, special
displays and facilities at the Fair can be obtained from
the United Kingdom Trade Commiszioner at Port of Spain
or Comptroller of Customs, Bridgetown.







If they had a Stabilization Fund



tune of $150,000, especially in a ley wanted inserted after “Brit- |

country where the basic industry ish Commonwealth” the word

wes dependent on rainfall. “with the exception of Sout
Mr. A. E, 8S. Lewis (L) pointed Africa”.

out that when the idea of having
the Reserve Fund

|
|

\
|
|
|
|
|
|
'
}
|
}



BARGAINS FOR
MEN !

AMERICAN SOCKS formerly .... $1.00 pr.
| NOW 2 for $1.00

SHIRTS formerly $4.00 & $5.00
iow $2.40 & $2.64 ea,

| STRIPED POLO SHIRTS



Mr. J. E. T. Brancker (L) wii

was mooted, seconded the motion said that



BARGAINS FOR
WOMEN!

SPUNS formerly










FORT

aie juaay $1.40 yd.
NOW ore aren.

BORDERED SILKS formerly ...... 89 y
NOW $1.00 yd.
sieht seuss $140 yd,
NOW 96c. Yd.

HUNDREDS OF OTHER LINES AND
RAYON PIECE GOODS OF
UNHEARD-OF VALUES



CREPES formerly






—for

longer me

for Men and Boys formerly

44 SHOES formerly ............ $6.00 pr.
= : . we ae NOW $2.00 & $3.00 pr.
service ee eT eee



Size 4-6 Formerly $4.41 Pr. =. a

CLARK'S CHILDREN SHOES 2m"
THE BARGAIN
HOUSE

S. ALTMAN — Proprietor.

SMOOTHER DRIVING





r



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.) the

Dial 2702

w
o
wn
=
>
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wm
+
zx
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mâ„¢
=




CLASSIPIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508. ~ REAL ESTATE





E NG AGEM

FRANK BRAUN



Miss DOREEN REECE

Saturday between Doreen Reece,

ter of Mr. and Mrs. Reece of Fontabelle





52, at hey 13.2.52-—t.f.n,
Hall se
Her funeral leave

an, to- ; c
Brethten| Ramcharan, Phone 2122, or Cole & Co., sized living room, open verandah, kitchen SS. Lady Rodney, 4,908 tons net,



Georgeana Smith.
the above addres

ith
doughtex-in-law

THANKS

» undersigned de
this medium to t
who sent wreaths and cards

of condolence and «
eral of our dea





> fun~] p





c un berbatch



a
» undersigned by this
medium beg to thank all those frends
and brethren who a
expressed th



dearly beloved George

IN MEMORIAM





ather and Grand-father /





Kneeling together i

In



PERSONAL

The publie are hereby
giving credit to my
as I do not hold m

responsible for her :
g any debt or



against
wife DORIS N
elf



Collymore Rock,



against | Gi
ERMIN SMALL
YN) as I do not hold my-
or anyone else

giv'ng eredit to my wife



self responsible for

ie | 3.2.52—t.f.n. 119 x 10 x 8 TERMS CASH. R. Archer

name unless by written order signed

CLARENCE SMALL
Mare



—_—— NYLON STOCKIN

The public are hereby warned against} in all modern shades and sizes. Guaran-| for sale by auction at the Courtesy
CELESTINE | teed long lasting, only best quality at) Gay '
DOREEN REDMAN
as I do not hold | Swan Street. 27,2,52—1n
OY OC
or debts in NOW that the price of Dettol has in-

order creased, try “STREPH” the complete

myself respons ble

y name unless
signed by me,
SAMUEL PETER REDMAN,
C.S.M. Curacao,
(16,2.52)





LOST & FOUND





Oe tisaes TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti- | to P.O, Box 280.”

Kendal, | [€! Condition, excellemt eqquiprmennt, gO | meer
21m} racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.; YOUNG LADY—ftelligent Young

SWEEPSTAKE
1506, Series H
return same to James Williams,



were as —— nn | 5) and 9.00 am. C. BA. RICE & CO
John. HOUSE—Two Storey House near 26
27.2.52—1n}| Aquatic Club; fully furnished including | —_———_—__—.

FOR RENT

HOUSES

Complete first Moor
, Double bedroon

SWEEPSTAKE TICKET--
please return
Grant Crookerdale, Sherbourne, St.





, Hotel





New ; Lashley No, 6 Coral Sands, Worthing.



BERESFORD

wi NSL ow Ce
November | 128 the Estate of Cecilia Pilgrim, late af 27.2,52—2n

and ‘Deveviber



SPE } are hereby required to send in particu-

Barbados per Club
RENT

space at $3.00 per run-

Meeting, 1952.
Apply to
pahaobvins§
GOOCSSOOOO OS 564004 |

Just Received...

VALOR STOVE PARTS

Limited Supply
Order To-day at

«a»
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10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

EASTER CARDS
MOTHER’S DAY



Spanish—English, English—Spanish
Everything Shakespeare ever

‘over 800 pages).
GLASS JARS §1.50

at
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
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CURIOBIDADES,
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Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 346¢

















PUMLIC SALES | Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay







FOR SALE





GALOW-—Modern 4 Bedroom
low, situated at Top Rock, Ch. Ch.,

of land Having 2 fully tiled
and Baths, built-in Cupboards, | wif. Sch

Marea Henrietta, Sch. Emeline, Sel



Garden well Iwd out with|Prankiyn DR
Dua trance, Best offer £4,000 accepted. |g 5
. Pogtession
months oid, Mileage lar Apply Ralph Beard, Le
condition as new. Apply |Ppone 50)
Lower Bay Street, Phone: i | Catharir
Py wer ———— ——_| Catharina

26.2.62—3n } HOUSE Ons doubled roofed board







ARRIVALS



CAR—1947 Ford Super de Luxe V-8
ndition. Adways owner driven
Ring 4433 or 8635. GC. B. Jackman,

out offices, apply to Barbados Housing|D. W. Sorrell, from Martinique



Street 26.2.52—2n.| Mario Texo, from Trinidad
DEPARTURES



CAR--One 1950 Humber Hawk Saloon

hor my -1S Jelis ci
in exeallent condition. Contact C. J.| G2Use: $i conveniences, with party Wells, for St. Lucia

and utiliey’ room. Garage, laundry, 2/ Capt. A. Le Blanc, for St. Vincent.
servant zones ane storage room under
On attractive hillside site, Rockley New Si li
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476 eawe
18.2.52—t.f.n

Ltd, Phone 4316 26.2.52-—4n,



'T LAND: 5.000 sq. ft of Land situated | tem Trinidad :

wwh Sedan. F
i climber. Good tyre
o2--3n












1950 Wolseley 6/80 10,000 miles
xcellent condit on 1951 Morris Minor
11,000 miles. A-1 condition. Fort Royal
Garage Ltd. Telephone 4504

27.2.52—4n
ELECTRICAL LAND—EXCELLENT BUILDING SITE | Victor Christine, Graves
The undersigned will offer for sale | ce} ‘ ;
G.E.C. FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES to public competition at_ their office DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
Wholesale and Retail CITY GARAGE | James Street on Friday the 28th February ON MONDAY
CO., 4671 21,.2.52—t.f.n iat 2 p.m. 3 Acres 34% perches of land | Fer Trinidad :

Moody, C. Moody, G. Taylor
From St, Vineent:





Apprex 20,5001, at Derricks,
St. James, 128 {t. frontage on the main
r with 15-minute us service. May
d in two lots. Price reasonable, Dial

J. N. Barker 27.2.52—7n



bin, Arthur Lashley
From Martinique ;















Desk Console Fully repaired, excellent | land has a frontage on the Maxwell Long | Arthur Dressissiger, Arthur Carson,

onditior $220.00 Ma be n}| Road of 126 feet and over 900 feet along | Franco Gentili, Alicia Gentili, Greaves
DaCost Ring write Timp another public road running along its | Stoker, Hugh Belle, Leontina Mahmood,
{School 95-236 entire length. Vacant possession available. | Gerald Maingot





For further particulars inspection and | Fer Martinique :









estate work. Going at good price
ply Williams, Foster Hall atation
or Dial 95261.

16.2.52—6n. | Willian Kewley, Dorothy Kewley.
- |For Grenada;







'
{
=A HORSE—One good riding hors
i

Church, situate at KING STREET,|Rawle Forde. Lionel Grimes, C

AND CHARS closed gallery, drawing and dining eae : :
square tables with | rooms, 2 bedrooms. kitchen, usual con- | *°™ neent ;

“Ideal for bridge tables | veniences. Water and electric services Margaret Manning, David Nurtay.

andah furniture. Come in and installed. Inspection on application to} In Touch With Barbados









th 2







the our new show room dial | the Tenant, Mrs. Bustace Gooding, any
513€ R. Hunte & Co., Ltd day, (except Sunday) from noon to 5 Coastal Station
an | p.m Cable and Wireless (W.1) Ltd. advise
The house bf be set up a — bY | that they can now communicate with
* : public competition at our office, James | the following ships through their Barba-
MISCELLANEOUS Street, ve on Thursday 26th | dos Coast Station
instant at am, 8.8, Willemsts s. Casablanca, 8.
» con-1” AQUARIUMS—Large and small, ati | '™* YEARWOOD & BOYCE, | campero, s 8 Maurcianiay ss. Regent
name | glass. Empty or stocked with Fish and Solic tors. Jaguay, s,s, Atlantic Duke, os. salle
plants, Also some young Siamese Fight- 22.2.52—60 | pol, Ne Anisterdam, s.s. Joh
Fish and other Tropical Fish. Archie Mage A ee Se eee
ing ‘is rf. Chandris, 4.8. Ariguani, ss. Christian
Clarke, Dial 5148.



24.2,52—5n AUCTIO

Silver Star, as. S, Rosa/wm











Temrengeneegne rochiinancinipeenaepaancnente —_————__—_—————————————— 1ey¥, Ss. Ocean Monare' “ara

ANTIQUES — of every description] | wili sell on Thursday 28th at | p.m nae Uckinue roan 3 “Fizvias f ae
is; China, old Jewels, fine Silver/ at BATH VILLAGE Chrst Church, ‘on board Trader, s.s. Lancero 3.8 Bomana
ercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto-} road to Cable & Wireless St ro;

|s.s, Ancap Tercero, s.s. Mardene, s.s



graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop| qouble roofed house cov
adjoining Royal Yacht Club. Shingles, and a small galleny. Size:

Hinakura, ss Hermes/perg. s.s







McKenzie, Auctioneer.
EGGS: Sittings of pure bred Leghorn

CS
Eggs of neers eoen Apply to CARS—Morris Minor Saloon 1951 Mode} MAIL NO T ICES

Garnett Ashby, Rock Hall near Penny |9,000 miles. Austin A 70 Saloon 1951] Mails for S, Lucia, ©. Vincent, Gren-
Hole, St. Philip 27.2.52—1n | Model 6,000 miles. Both slightly damaged | ada and Se by the MLV. Hectaua



in accidents
Lovely Quality] We are instructed to offer these vehicles | Post Office as under :—



» on Fyiday 29th at 2 p.m m., >
of} $1.48 Pair. Get from KIRPALANI, 52 JOHN M. BLADON & CO,, p.m.on the 27th February, 1962.

Auctioneers AMENDED MAIL NOTICES





Antisept'c for personal and medical use,
Price 2/- bot. KNIGHT’S LTD.

WANTED eval Post eevee as under ;—-

Parcel





26.2,52—2n Mail 2 1 Bm, Ordinary* Mail at 2 p.m,
een on the 27th February, 1952

OlL—The wirld’s finest motor oll Mails for S, Vincent, M ique -

Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service HELP eee, io ee, a5

Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.







VEEDOL. “Found wherever fine cars} CAPABLE NURSE -- Must sleep in| will be closed at the General Post Offite
travel”. 17.2.52—t.f.n, | and be willing to do housework. Apply] as under

to Mrs. J. A. Millington, “Jamdor,""} Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none | Maxwells Road, Ch: Ch, 26.2,52—2n.| Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30

better — 10-Ib. lots and vprees @ 19c.
per Ib. Phone 2547,





pm. on the 27th exe 1952,
2—t.fn “JUNIOR SALESMAN required ch efly RA TES OF
for Hardware Lines. Apply in writing il
2.2.52—4.f.n









FEBRUARY — 1952
CANADA
(Including Newfoundland)
No offers. Wicks, Telephone 3289.

18.11.51—t.f.n | Apply by letter and in person between

2—2n | 73.5% pr. Cable



Fridge, and Gas Stove. Telephone and
Radio installed, available from the Ist.| Applications in writing are invited for
June for 2% years. Tenant who is sub-|the post of fulltime Secretary (male).
letting would like agreement settled as | Salary approximately $200.00 per month,
he is leaving the Island shortly For | according to qualifications. Successful
viewing; Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Bay | applicant must assume duties not later
Street. Phone 5010, 26.2.52—3n | than Ist May, perferably earlier, Further
details may be obtained from the present
MODERN FURNISHED ¥LAT—with | Secretary, Applications giving details of

Sliver and Linen. Good Sea-bathing. | past experience a copies of testimonis ES "
th

For further particulars. Apply to Alma | should be sent by th February to 3 Days

Chamber of Commerce, Bovell & Skee te ty first sition af Nixo.

wort vs away pimples
23.2,52—t.f.n. | Bldg., Lucas Street Nixoderm tonight






















53
Pony |









woe — 16.2.53-—6n 1 Avil! soon see your skin bes
| 1 aa 5 aren ana-¢ ear, Nixo-
ne ie y that kills
HLIC NOTICES MISCELLANEOUS . nil pas sits . pn tin thas
¢ ‘ Jails e lotches,

acneetitlctenbcaihesisetsiiiabtcng again hodtionngeees Hevema, Ting wart and. Erupti
NOTICE YOUNG Business lady (white) requires Youean tget rid Of your oF uptions.
| a permanent “board” accommodation, All you remove the germs that hide
| IS HEREBY given that all persons] meals or breakfast only would suit iu the tiny pores of your skin. So

get Nixoderm from your chemist to-
d ler the positive guarantee that
Nixoderm wilt banish pimples and
ear your skin soft and smooth o¢

having any debt or claim upon or affect- Reply — Box R. C/o Advocate Co,

92 East 126th Street, Manhattan, New
si | York in the United States of America








iLISH SHORTHAND TYPIST



+ THIkkA & money
Qn | Who died in the United States of Americ: qu'r ermanent position, Several years Bw back
7 Y » 3 7 5 °
; on the 25th day of August 1950 intestate, experience, Good speeds. Reply Box ixoderm return ot
Co 2771.2.52—2n empty
For Skin Troubles package.

Z. C/o Advoc



s of their claims duly attested to me
the undersigned Caleb Neblett, the

: qualified Administrator of the estate ot | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE |
‘,

the sald Cecilia Pilgrim, deceased,
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfiel thei: The application of Enid Sargeant o
Eilerton, St. George for permission tc |

|

|

|

|












THE BOY SCOUTS
ASSOCIATION
Barbados Branch
Members of the Island

Scout Council are hereby

reminded that the Special

Meeting of the Council, of

which notice has already

e at James Street, Bridgetown, on or

. efore the 4th day of April 1952 after ell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &c., at
which date I shall proceed to distribute | board and galvanized shop attached tc

8 th aexets of the said estate among the | residence at Ellerton, St. George “

> | parties entitled thereto having regard to Dated this 25th day of February, 1952

the debts and claims only of which a| ToC. W. RUDDER, Esq

@ | shall then neve had notice and that 1} Police Magistrate

¥ | shall not be liable for assets so distributed District “B"

Nj to any person of whose debt or claim 1| JOHN SARGEANT,

\ | shall not have had notice at the tim e| for Apphcant









of such distribution N.B.—This application will be con- : 4
S$] And all persons indebted to the said | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held i Cm we Oe held at
estate are requested to settle their ac-| at Police Court, District “B’, on Mon out Headquarters at 5
4 | counts without delay | day the 10th day of March, 1952 at 11 p.m, next Friday, 29th Feb-

‘clock, a.m



~ DATED the 30th day of January, 1952. |
CALEB NEBLETT, | c, W. RUDDER,

|
1
|
|
|
| ruary.
Administrator Estate Cecilia Police Magistrate, Dist. “B"
|

L, A, HARRISON,

Pilgrim, deceased 27.2.52-——11 Honorary Secretary,





aera eee nee —









REMOVAL NOTICE
PAUL WILKIN & €0.

SHOE MANUFACTURERS
And



RALPH BEARD'S
SHOWROOMS

Standing on 6,800 sq. ft., having a Covered Floor
Space of 6,000 sq. ft. upstairs and downstairs.
Four Show Windows. Frontage 72 ft.

EASILY CONVERTED
into six Offices Ist Floor, 3 large Shops Downstairs
LIGHT, COOL and CENTRAL
THREE ‘OILETS ARE INSTALLED
also LIGHT and POWER FITTINGS

RETAILERS OF
FOOTWEAR MATERIALS

announce thelr removal from
Corner James and Coleridge
Streets to premises formerly
occupied by D’arcy Scott's
Central Auction Mart on
Magazine Lane.

Dial 3720
24.2.52.—3n.



————————



THE ABOVE PROPERTY IS
AVAILABLE WITH POSSESSION
MARCH 3ist 1952

Best Offer Over £12,000 accepted

Further. Particulars, Apply RALPH BEARD
Lower Bay Street
"PHONE 5010



one 4640

Yj

ch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch. Sunshine
R., Sch Wonderful Counsellor, Sch

Mary M_ Lewis, Sch. Marion Belle
ng | n Burma D., Sch. Emanuel
« savages, Servants’ rooms and|C Gordon, Sch. Cyril E Smith, Sch
rox Sch United Pilgrim,
Sunrover, MV Cacique Dei
Ist March, Further particu-|Caribe, Gch. Rainbow M., Sch D'Ortae,
Bay St.|MV_ Lady Patricia, Seh Frances W.

tn |}Smith, MV Caribbee, Yacht Marea

& shingled house, shedroof, kitchen and SS Mauretania, 19,691 tons net, Capt

Co-operation, 3rd Floor, No. 6, Swan SS Campero, 4,563 tons net, Capt

TS apne es
HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom MV. Dearwood, 94 tons net, Capt.

cutsnmnnlnippmmngememneeniaien | SEMVAL BY B.A. on tenbay

in Pitts Village, St, Jomes, near public | 4. Splerman, W. Ralph, A. Parkinson,
oad. Must be sold at once, Apply: g Parkinson, 1 Parkinson, 1. Park-
Gilbert M lar, Fitts Village, St. James. | 80R, BR. Cheesman, M. Cheesman, P

52—1n | Gheesman, BR Castie, G Castie, A

Cyril Barnard, Hazel Barnard, David
Barnard, Charles Lawson, Bertie Cor-

Paul Siegel, Alice Siezel, Jean Rebil-
let, Jacqueline Rebillet, Rose Marie,
Graves, Mas-

ert ideally situated for building sites at Harry Anderson, Georgina Anderson,
1 | RADIOGRAM—1950 G.E.C. Radiogram | Moxwell Long Road, Christ Church. This | Luther Wooding, Robert Ferguson,

* ~ conditions of sale apply to Howard Wolfe, Martha Wolfe, Ralph
LIVESTOCK HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, Goldsmith, Isabel Goldsmith, ' George
4 Solicitors, Goodfellow, Hildergarde , Goodfellow,

e suitable James Strect.| Parker McComas, Rheda McComas,

“OLIVEES"—A chattel dwellinghouse | Anthony Garcia, Joseph Kaltenbacher,
standing on lands of Saint Mary’s|Helen Kaltenbacher, Tegfryn Johns,

Bridgetown, The house, which is near | Forte, Coleridge Miller, Eyre Shepherd,
Seventh Day Adventist Chureh, contains Reginald Price, Doris ‘Harding, onas

Holm, s.s. Empress of Scotland, s.s.
a, 5.8. Lady

Multah, s.s. N, O. Rogenaes, 3.8. Sten-
tor, ss. Drina, s.s. Atlantic Traveller,

26.2.52—30 | Greenhaven Trails, s.s. Angelina Lauro.

Del Caribe will be closed at the General
Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30

24.2.52—4n | Mails for Madeira, United Kingdom,
| Antwerp and Amsterdam by the S.S
| Willemstad will be closed at the Gen-

at 10 am. Registered

tisua, S. Kitts, S. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S S_ Fort. Townshend

YCHANGE

Lady for our Office to assist with books. | 73.5°¢ pr, Cheques on Bankers 71.8% pr.
Demand Drafts 71.65% pr.
Sight Drafts 71.5% pr.

72% pr. Currency 70.3% pr.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Coupons 99.6% pr.






































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

GOVERNMENT NOTICES | §HIPPING NOTICES

|ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIF co. |

SAILING FROM EUROPE

HERSILIA, Ist March, = |
85. * BRATTINGSRORG, Ijth "Mare . 1958.
8.8. COTTICA, 2ist 1952.
SAILING 70 PLYMOUTH AND



Invitation for Tender

»
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS, AND TRANSPORT
SEALED TENDERS will be received at the Colonial Secretary's

Orifice up to 12 noon on the &th March, 1952, for the supply of Barba-
dos Limestone, Marl Filling and Earth Filling to the Department of
Highways and Transport for a period of twelve (12) months from
e ist April, 1952.

2. A separate tender for each division tendered for should be

submitted in respect of each or any of the following divisions: -—

(a) Northern Division—Parishes of St, Lucy and St. Peter.

(b) Southern Division—Parishes of Christ Church, St. Philip
and St. John.

(c) Eastern Division—Parishes of St. Andrew and St. Joseph.

(4) Western Division—Parishes of St. Michael, St. George,
St. Thomas and St, James.

A tenderer under paragraph 2 may also submit a separate

te wins for any combination of Divisions tendered for under paragraph
2 on the basis of paragraph 6, except that for the final words “on spor
anywhere within the Division” read “on spot ahywhere within com-
bined Division.”

4. Samples of limestone of the quality required may be seen,

and particulars of quantity and size likely to be required, may be
obtained on application at the Department of Highways and Trans-
port.

5. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at

the Colonial Secretary’s Office on payment of a deposit of Five Dollars
($5.00). After a contract has been entered into, those persons who
may have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits re-
funded; but no person or persons who may refuse to enter into a con-
tract when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them
refunded, and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Tréasury.

6. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages

at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rate per
cubie yard at which the tender would contract to supply materials
on spot anywhere within the Division.

27.2.52.—3n.



VACANT POST OF CLERK, LABOUR WELFARE
(HOUSING LOANS) ORGANISATION

Applications are invited for appointment to the post of Junior

Clerk in the Labour Welfare (Housing Loans) Organisation.

2. Candidates must be in possession of a School Certificate or

a certificate of equivalent standard.

3. The salary scale of this post will be similar to that of the

long grade in the Local Civil Establishment, with a commencing
salary of $768.00 per annum,

4. This post is of a temporary nature, non-pensionable and

subject to termination by one month’s notice on either side.

5. Applications in writing, with testimonials, will be received
the Colonial Secretary, Colonial Secretary’s Office, Bridgetown,

up to the 15th March, 1952.



| ' ssieatniesteee namabninenteeereneneeimenemnenemeeeniememaemansiemmenenmemmmmmennmmmemeamanemmanae

WHITEWOOD HEACHES

This is a beautifully wooded choice beach area situated near the
Four Winds Club. Plans are under way to build some very attrac-
tive bungalows. Further particulars from MARTIN GRIFFITH,
four Winds Club. Telephone between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m, 91-40







These Items await your
Ordering

Smorgan’s Vienna Sausages — Klim — Ovaltine — Cup
Chocolate — Weinz Malt Vinegar — Bird’s Jelly Crystals
Bridal Icing Sugar — Boxes L. B. Laundry Starch — Fry's
Breakfast Cocoa — Tomato Soup — Tins “Ufillit” Bis-
cuits — Fancy Tins Crawford's Assorted Biscuits — “Jack
Straws” — Marmite — Spanish Queen Olives — Morton's
Jams — Lidano Sweet Milk Cocoa — Club = Cheese
Biscuits -— Milo.

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LT

FURNITURE AUCTION

WE ARE INSTRUCTED to undertake a complete
CLEARANCE SALE at

RALPH PEARD’S SHOWROOMS

BAY STREET

|











on Monday and Tuesday the 3rd and 4th of March and to
continue on Wednesday if not completed. Sale from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

All china, cutglass, silver, vases, bowls, smal! antiques.
cutlery, kitchen utensils, electric fans, table lamps, golf
clubs, mahogany trays, powder compacts, table mats,
trinket boxes, cigarette boxes, hot plates, bath-mats, pic-
tures, cork mats, dunlopillo and spring mattresses, pillows,
ironing tables, medicine cabinets, tricycles, stepladders,
bookends, hardware, beach shirts, bathing trunks, electric
office clock, ice water container, quantity of toys, and
other small items to be sold at commencement of sale.
To be followed by the extensive collection of furniture in
mahogany, birch, pine, deal (pelished, painted and natural
finish). Numerous dining tables, kitchen tables, ward-
robes, dressing tables, vanity tables, writing desks and
bureaux, bedsteads and springs, divans, china cabinets,
upholstered lounge suites, easy chairs (of all types),
bookshelves, cocktail tables (all varieties), presses, tall
boys, oak court cupboard, typists’ desks, filing cabinets,
combination safe, electric stove (G.E.C.), American
refrigerator (8 cu. ft.), larders, rockers, rush seated chairs,
rush rockers, counters, drink coolerator. candy’ floss
machine, grand piano and numerous other articles.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AUCTIONEERS


















‘Phone 4640 Plantations Building




REAL ESTATE

e
- Plantations Huilding.
}

JOHN M. BLADON & CO

A.F.S. F.V.A.

THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION.

S. WILLEMSTAD, 26th February, 1952.
SAILING TOP AND
RITTS

8. P, MUSSON, SON &



Canadian National Steamships



“LADY RODNEY” . ee oe
“LADY NELSON”
“CANADIAN CRUISER”



NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails

he ik oe





Sailings from iaenton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,

“COLOMBIE” ... be
“DE GRASSE”....24th April, 1952 ....
“COLOMBIE” ..,

“COLOMBIE” .... 11th April, 1952 .... 23rd April, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” 19th May, 1952 .... 13th June, 1952
“COLOMBIE” Ist June, 1952 .... 13th June, 1952



aaa aa '

“

PAG ALES

RY







Oe ee | el

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952














M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
canine’ will aceept Cargo and
Passengers for St. Lucia, St
Vincent, Grenada and Aruba,
Saling Wednesday 27th inst

The M/V. ““MONEKA” will ac-

cept Cargo and Passengers for

4, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
7th Mareh 1952.

The M/V. “CLARA” will accept

AMSTERDAM

TTINGSBORG, 27h March, 1062 c and Passengers for Nassau
+8. A’ , 5 + ‘argo ‘or
SAmLING, 4 ro TRINIDAD FARAMARIBO and Bahamas. Date of sailing to
NATE, Toth hy, 7 f
M.S. BON. arc:
$.8. COTTICA,” 7th ion B.W.1. SCHOONER | OWNERS’
2 i {INC,)



March, }!
Agents.







Arrives _ Sails
Vinca tal Biles Sentem Garbudes Barbados
13 2 to. 15 Feby. 25 Feby. 25 Feby.
29 Feby. PS, Mareh 10 March
“ a Mareh. = 23 March 24 March



Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax

” t .. 21 Feby. 24 Feby. 2 March

e +» 8 March 9 hh 20 March 21 Maren 24 March

ory +. 22 March 24 h 3 April 4 April 7 April

e os +» 4 April 7 April - 14 April 17 April

Mw. ea eee

For further particulars, apply to—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD,—Agents.



HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados

S.S. “PHILOSOPHER .. London &

M/brough 12th Feb. 26th Feb.
“DEFENDER” Liverpool 5

Glasgow 16th Feb. 4th Mar.
“PLANTER” .. London 29th Feb. 11th Mar.
“STUDENT” Glasgow &

Liverpool lst Mar. 14th Mar.

HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vi 1 For Closes in a ee |



_ “CROFTER” ¥ . London. h Feb.
' “BIOGRAPHER”

.. Liverpool “— Mar.

For further Information apply to... .
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents

Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica



From Southampton
18th March, 1952 .

Arrives Barbados
31st March, 1952
6th May, 1952

8th May, 1952 .. 2ist May, 1952

Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados. Arrives Southampton

Sailing direct to _Segibininnes

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, Seen BROAD STREET

Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.I1.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466

=a ===



.

GERM LUBRICATING OILS—Are Best by Test

ae = Don't Only Oil It — Germ It



CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.
Gasolene Station a Trafalgar Street



THE FINEST
TYRES MARE

COLE & CO. LTD.
Agents.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE
TS
Glands Made Youn
—Vigour Renew
Without Operation
tq 1 old before your time or
uy Berve, brain and physic al
are oF Pantcon eoaiesl

is0ow which restores youthful vi -
our vitality quicker than gland
pet . It is a simple home treat-

ent im tablet form, discovered by an
mertean Doctor. Absolutely harmless

ad enay to take, but the newest and
most pewsrta invigourator known to
lence. It acts directly on your glands,

| erves, and vital organs, builds new,
ure and works so fast that you

cn see and feel new body power and
igour In 26 to 48 hours, use of

‘s matural action on glands and

¢ brain power, memory and
alight often irn| we amazingly.

| An ing new gland and

restorer, called VI-TARS, ix

varem . It has been tested and

bie all chemists here. Get VI-

to the test. Seo the big improvement
24h . Take the full bottle, whic!
sts t days, under the positive
aran that it must make you full
vigour, energy and vitality and feel
) to 20 years younger or money back
1 return of empty package.
VI-TABS costs little, and the guar-

Vi-Tabs *"

Pesteres Manhood and Vitality
FROF OSS



BY CARL ANDERSON

WHAT'S
WRONG >.

DON'T STICK
YOUR NECK
OUT TOO FAR,




ass good looks = you oe so righ. | CAN BE
You know, too, when you look at the price CONQUERED

tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated

is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.



Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the sign which means ‘ just right *!
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

«means made justiright

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

On, Boy what
A WONDERFUL )j
CHANCE FOR_ rr












h

ILL EVEN PUT

| (THE DOGS OUT SO
ies I'LL HAVE COMPLETE

= QUIET IN THE
oo *








J

SACROO

CONQUERS PAIN.

SSSSPOSSSISSSSSSSS SUG SOOT IOSD



HOUSE FOR
MY NAP

LESSSSSEESSSPSSSP OOF FS SSO SESS LLL ESAS SFE



On Sale at

KNIGHTS LTD.

pcos

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |

PPLE









































GEO SEF 1 ere —~=rreee) | SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

GET YOUR “ ‘
a F TO DO ANYTHING HAVE TO KILL FILTHY HA THERE S ABOUT SEVEN 2 lide 1 } =r ne
THE ACES. ) FLASH! ie He . so.piiocks!. /{ A-ALL RIGHT a Or amen ee” “ ) —_- SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our ranches Tweedside,
BIG MOE! / KILLS YOU, W re ae 4 _ SS 4
AND ONE ROCKETSHIP TO |

Big MOE? f
oN ROCKET a SAT oe So eer co eamrn 5 ee Speightstown and Swan Street
\ 7 y Pi 7% ‘ oe
> 7 wow au rou ano Ey a. Usually Now . Usually NOW








YOU GUYS WANT ANY
MORE ROUGH STUFF
—OR ARE YA READY /
TO TAKE ORDERS?








JF HE DON'T PLAY

BALL, IT MIGHT BE YOU WANT? |
KENT'S GOTTA DO iS

FIGURE OUT HOW

UT Ae - |) Pkgs. Cut-Rite Paper aoe 50 Tins Condensed Milk ae 31

ye ap Bottles Olives ws ae -1,80 1,60 «Tins Heinz Soups... 6B
Tins Corned Beef with Cereal 60 54
Carib Coffee ... \... ... 54 48 Boneless Beef (per lb.) es ae ae

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

a
THE COLONNADE GROCERIES







JOHNNY HAZARD '
=<






YES, HOW COULD I TAKE HIS
HANDSOME FRIEND FOR DORRIE ?
GOT OFF TO A BAD START...BETTER
MAKE UP FOR IT...BUT GOOD,’



THE DEAR FACE THAT I'VE
ANP SURELY YE'VE NAE DARL-LIN’, FORGIVE ME! LONGED FOR THESE FIVE...
VFORGOTTEN MW’ FACE AFTER IT WAS THE MILLING
ONLY FIVE SHOR-RT YEARS
. WEE LAURIE 2









KING GEORGE VI.

A FAMILY ALBUM
OF HIS GREAT LIFE

°



BRINGING UP FATHER

Presenting a magnificent






ouvenir record of the eventful





WELL-AS I HAVE BEEN TRYIN’
TO TELL YOU FOR THE LAST
FOUR DAYS WHEN I WAS SO
RUDELY INTERRUPTED-~-L

siete re WILL, Ti

> a
p AGAIN /
BR ce

NOW- DEAR PUBLIC-PLEASE
GIVE ME YOUR UNDIVIDED
ATTENTION --LISTEN ---



= THEY WENT | |
| THAT-A-Ways |

ya




fe and times of the late King.

Chie outstanding book is case










{ in purple cloth with let.





he Ce iv - Sm £43 woh Xe, n gold, 136 pages with pic-
Ne, rE i OA > SHRI (SR on every page. Four superb
Bs ap < ont ee BN EP ge tO lat
. Bia Bhat OG! Sa : r plate
he cn nepilia ‘ ‘ : in

re is a book to be treasured

y home. The pictures shew
ric events, State occasions
informal gatherings, besides
“ a complete record of the

ymmentous times of the King’s
WELL... THAT DOES IT/ WiTHOUTY
A PILOT, THE SHEIK’S PLANE
S USELESS! WE HAVEN'T
GOT A CHANCE!




ears, Ps



Now, : {
MONGREL WHO e book closes with a complete
CALLS HIMBELF SHEIK,
DEFEND THY THRONE
FROM THE




A LICENSE BACK
THE STATES !
N THE STATES! d in stor and pictures of

pageantry of the State Funeral



King George.

°
BOOK YoUR COPY EARLY.

Me ! as ; Ty
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES iD ‘ OCATE
BUTI CANT LET HERGET 100

He ABOUT b on 4 ae a 3 | , QT ATI ONE RY
| LO BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS



nf
|


PAGE TEN



FROM BRITAIN’S SPORTS

Magic Of T

FIELD:

he Footbal)

Association Cup

(By WALTER

OF ALL the outstandi

in Britain, the Football As
spires, perhaps, the most e
competition is proving no e

our, glameur and a magic of its own.














PILKINGTON)

sporting events in the
sociation Cup competition in-
nthusiasm and the curre
xception, for the Cup has col
It lights a spark of





sustained interest that lasts for four months every yeat
nnutii the two finalists in the world’s most fascinating
football competition have played at London’s Wembl«
stadium befare 100,000 people
Normally unemotionai follower i“ i
o° 6clut ir y victims of Totten! League
Cup. fever. E date business- @ga!! M tic («
mea will take week-end off to would nave made ‘
make up a party to trevel as far final. They re the first tw
as 250 miles (400 kilome res) to clubs named as Mr. W. J. Harroy
see their teim. They would not Football Association councillor, of
thi ik of a x this for League Liverpool, drev the numbered
match. A Blackpool man in one balls out of the bag when th
such party confessed he had not fourth round draw was _broat
missed seeing ; team in a Cup- cast Later he fumbled anc
tie or year ut home or away and Cropped one on he floor A
was proud of having seen every colleague put it back in the bag
Final since Wembley taged jts Smiling, Mr. Harrop said he had
first in 1923. The more excitable bet ¢ them up again. He
supporters are 1*ss res rained, Not Gld ked out another ball—
one of the 32 teams that have to ond number wes found to be
tr lin the tirst big round of the that Liverpool, his own club,
A lack a following irrespective and drawn at home Liverpool
istange have lost two Cup Finals. Their
Blackpool nm the North of ! imubitio to win the
England, visi We Ham neai If tt succeed this vear
Londen in year’s competition in ent will be remem-
as Cup Pinali of 1951, had in example of the luck
loyal band to cheer them. Most Cuy
of these enthusiasts made the trip

overnight and returned the follow-
ing evening, disappointed by their
favourites’ defeat bu not down-
cast, Preston North End, another
Lancashire club to fall this year
had about 500 supporters at far
away Bristol. Most of them un-
dertook a 14 hours double journey
by night train or motor coach
They arrived on the morning of
the match, went early to the
ground, and posed for photogra-
phers. Many took home souvenir
football papers featuring a group
picture of them.

She Lost Her Boots

At Bristol they saw the heights
that Cup fervour can reach, The
home team, Bristol Rovers, won
renown as a Third Division club
last season by reaching the sixth
round of the Cup and forcing a
draw with Newcastle United,
eventual winners. So they were
not dismayed by having to face
Preston, another First Division
club, Before the match three or
four zealots attired in fancy dress
as rovers or pirates in the blue
and white colours of their team
paraded on the field. One sported
a cutlass. A small boy mascot,
wearing football boots, stockings,
and Bristol’s football outfit, was
allowed to shake hands with the
referee and captains before the
coin’ was tossed.
rioment for him was when Bristol

Carlton Defeat
{mpire

Carlton defeated Empire two

nil when they met yesterday
afternoon in a Second Division
football match at Queen’s Park
Both goals were scored in the
second half of play The first
f20al was kicked in by V. Porter
who was playing at left back and
the second was scored by Of
Straker on the left wing
Play in both halves was s!

marked with much miss-kicki
Empire in the first half appeared
to be pressing more and many
opportunities were missed NV
their forwards,

After the second half Empire
again went on the offensive but
when play was about 15 minutes
old the Empire back Jordan fouled
a Carlton forward in his area
and Referee Harris awarded Car}
ton a penalty kick. This was
kicked by the left back Porte)
who made po mistake in netting
the first goal. The score was no:
one nil in favour of Carlton, This
seemed to upset the Empire play-

had won, He will recall it as a C'S for their combination went to
man’ and one of ihousands of Pieces and about two minutes
wildly excited Rovers’ partisans, before the blow off ©. Straker

a girl of about 18, wearing blue

and white hat, scarf and dress,
will recall how she lost her winter
boots when she ran on the field at
the finish to hug the home captain
They were sucked off her feet by
the glue-like mud which had
been the undoing of the defeated
side. She ran on in her stockings,
sinking ankle deep with each step,

finding himself alone on the left
wing cut in and scored the second
goal for Carlton, When the final

blast was sounded the score was
unchanged two-nil in favour of
Cailton,

The referee was Mr, L. Harris.



until she caught up with the Li: ®
players, I inland Wens
Such incidents were seen on

every ground where Cup ties were
played. They illustrate Cup fer-
your, ong of two factors which
influence the resul; of the major-
ity of the ties. The other is luck.
Bristol had the luck to be drawn
at home where the heavy ground
is worth a goal start to the team
accustomed to playing on i‘. Tleev
were less lucky when the draw
for the next round decreed they
should visit Southend where,
curiously enough, they had done
their training for the Preston Cup-
tie. Yet it could have been worse
for gallant Bristol Rovers, for
Southend are another of the Third
Division survivors, They could
have been drawn to play Arsenal,
Neweastle United, Portsmouth,
Tottenham Hotspur, Burnley or
West Bromwich Albion, all s'rong
First Division teams, away from
home,

Missed Penalty Inspired Hull

Luck was busy again when
Rowley, one of the hardest shots
in the game, missed a_ penalty
kick#for the Cup favourites, Man-
chester United. The score was
one-nil in favour of Hull City, a
team struggling to stay in th
Second Division. The escape in-
spired Hull, whose .general in a
gian.-killing victory was none
other than veteran former English
international inside forward Raich
Carter. He won a Cup winner's
medal with Sunderland against
Preston 15 years ago.

Cup luck conspired to reward
Arsenal with an easy home game
in the next round for their ‘five-
nil win at Norwich, and gave
Tottenham Hotspur ihe most. at-

tractive tie of all, a visit fron
Neweastle United. Yet this was
| They'll Do It



Every Time

y OSLO, Feb. 23.
Finland won two gold medals in

today’s skiing events in 20 Olympic

james here and as a result have

umped into third place in the
unofficial points scoring by the
nations

They are behind Norway a
the United States, F
Norway now have 107 points
U.S, 844 and Finland 72,

The two events won to-day ‘by
Finland were the women’s eros
country ski race and the men's
relay event, Lydia Videman won

the women’s race’ covering the
ten kilometres in 41 minutes 40
seconds,

Twenty-two competitors fron

ten nations took part in the event
which was held for the first time
in the Olympic programme and
Finland also took second and
third places. Milja Hietamies was
second in 42 minutes 39 seconds



WILL. WELCOME TEAM

HAVANA, Feb, 26.
A big crowd is expected to give
a rousing reception to the unde-
feated Cuban team, winners of the
Caribbean Baseball Series when
it arrives at Rancho Boyeros In-
ternational Airport at 11 30 a.m
to-day from Panama aboard a
Pan-American transport. The
transport left Havana for Panama
t 11.30 p.m. yesterday, arriving
at Balboa at 4.30 a.m. to-day.
The plane is scheduled to leave
for Havana at 6.30 a.m. and will
arrive at Havana at 11.30 a.m,
—U-P.







Hepiviered US Potent OMee

. half





BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



MILLEN MUESSES



KEITH MILLER misses the tall
trying for a big hit off West

Indies bowler Gerry Gomez in
Fifth Test. at Sydney - cricket
sround on 26.1.52,

J weaitics Make
One Change

FOR THIRD TEST
From Our Own Correspondent
KINGSTON, Feb, 26.

Jamaica retained Lindey Dela-
penda as pivot on the team for the
third football Test match to-mor-
row afternoon. Deélapenha was
due to return to Britain to-day
but following a Trans-Atlantic
‘all on Monday night, his club
Middlesborough, agreed to his
stay over for the crucial game if
transport could be arranged to get
him back to England on Friday to
prepare for the important Ports-
mouth game on Saturday. Ar-
rangements were made by Stephen
Hill local Impressario. Jamaica
will field the same team which
beat Carib All Stars on Monday
with the exception of Cooper in
goal who suffered a fractured fin-
ger in the second. half of Monday’s

game when rushed by Qruin.
Cooper will be
replaced by
Saunders who
recently toured
Barbados w ith
the Jamaica
cricket team.
Both teams are ;
preparing for to-
morrow’s match |
Jamaica will try |
ne w formation -
based on inter- —
changed play,




A
Lester Alcock at inside left, Del-
apenha at inside-right to create

Saunders

openings for Gillie Heron
other English professional who
plays centre forward and could
not play freely on Monday owing
to constant tackling by Parsons
at back for All Stars,

All Stars have their
with Alan Joseph and
te tail Jamaica
wards while tne
opposing wings

th

own plan
his wing
inside J,
backs cover the

Norway Wins
Skiing Games

OSLO, Feb, 26.

_ The shift in skiing dominance
from Sweden and Switzerland to
Norway and Finland upset the
balance of power in the 1952 win-
ter Olympic games and gave a
host of Worwegians a runaway
victory when the sixth and largest
winter Carnival under Olympic
auspices closed Monday night.

_ Norway had scored 125} points
in unofficial but traditional scor-
ing that allows 10 points for the
first place, a gold medal and five
points for the second,

In the first six the United States
with its best balanced team in the
history of Winter games was a
surprisingly strong second but its |
total of 894 was a long way be-!
hind Norway. |

Canada was 10th with 184.
Four years ago at St. Moritz less
than 14 points separated the top
of the table Sweden and the fourth
place Americans, |

Sweden scored 79 points trailed |
by Switzerland with 71, Norway
with 604 and the United States
with 654. —(CP)



ma A)
“



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ENQGLOSE THE
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| THROUGH THE WALL

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Ol.” MOTHWALLET’S
HOUSE HAS BEEN

YEARS~AND ALL

HE DOES

+ iS GET
\ ESTIMATES

WHEN HE STARTED
TO GET ESTIMATES
FALLING DOWN FOR FOR THAT JOB BACK
IN THE 1930'S, EVERY-
THING WAS CHEAPER / THEM WORKMEN |
EXCEPT MOTHIE |

By Jimmy Hatio |

a

BETTER FOR |



TO CHARGE FOR | |

)

Amateur Or

Professional ?
WHAT’S IN A NAME!

(By PETER DITTON)

Field Marshal Montgomery re-
cently caused more than just a
slight stir in the sports world
when he suggested that amateurs
and professionals should be allow-
ed to compete in the Olympic
Games. The reaction was ‘per-
haps even quicker than he had ex-
pected. Within twenty-four hour,
storms of protest had been show-
ered down upon the head of Brit-
ain’s famous war-time leader. And
he was severely taken to task for
putting forward such a proposal.
But when the Field Marshal's
suggestion is analysed it is not
really so very wicked. All that
he wants is to see the people who
frankly admit to being profession-
als allowed to compete with those
who call themselves amateurs but,
nevertheless earn good living»
from their sporting prowess.

Amateurism, and by that | mein
real amateurism, where the
sportsman digs into his own
pocket for the pleasure of tak-
ing part in a particular sport, is
en the way out so fast that mans
people are likely to catch ‘a cold
from the draught.

The number of real
amateurs in the world
could be counted on
of one hand,

But still the pretence is main-
tained, Still the professional js
frowned upon in many sports be-
cause he openly gaing from his
ability, And, all the time, many
of the so-called amateurs are do-
ing very nicely in a less adver-
tised manner,

topline
to-day
the fingers

It is not my intention to single
out individuals for criticism. If
the respective organisations ‘o
which they belong are conteni to

allow “shamateurism” in their
ranks that is an internal aifuic.
What is needed however, is a

wholesale clean up of the orgsn-
isations themselves and the intro-
duction of hard and fast rulings
as to what is professionalism and
what is not.

To take one example. Just
consider English County Cricket.
The sport is 99 per cent. profes-
sional—at least so far as revenue
is concerned—and yet no profes-
sional has ever been deliberately
selected to lead an England team.

Cricketers who earn money
from the sport are selected to
play for England and are labelled
emateurs, One or two have even
captained England.

But can anyone tell me what
is the difference between a play-
er who is paid merely for playing
cricket and another who «¢arns
his money because he happens to
have an office job with the county
which, fortunately, leaves him free
to play throughout the summer

to

every SHAE.

Guarantee A Perfect FIT.

There is no difference, except
in the label.

Soccer is another spor, with a
large amateur element but which
in England again depends upon
professionalism for its revenue.
The dividing line is usually fixed
by the player's own ability. The
majority of those good enough to
play professional soccer do so and
are paid for playing. The remain-
der sign with amateur’ clubs
where, supposedly, they play for
the love of the game.

Theoretically that sounds fine.
But it does not work out, There is
at least one team, calling them-
selves amateurs, where several of
the players receive a weekly un-
der-the-table payment from the
club, This ‘rake-off’ keeps the
players happy, enables the club
to maintain a good side and re-
Sults in good attendances.

What the F.A. would say
they knew of these payments
anybody's guess. But the point
is that the F.A. does not avppar-

if

is

ently know and so © “shamateur-
ism” thrives.

The Engiish wawn Tennis As-
sociation would not take xindly

to the suggestion that protessionais
should be allowed to compete at
Wimbledon, Yet the leading
amateurs who will be there this
summer will have all their ex-
penses paid. What is more, two
of the expected entrants from
the Commonwealth have recently
been found jobs enabling them to
play tennis, thus making possible
wneir Wimbledon appearances
Call it amateurism if so.

can think of another name.

Take athletics. Strictly speak-
ing no amateur athlete should be
allowed to capitalise on his or her
ability. But in America scholar-
ships are available to top-ranking
performers which enable them to
worry about nothing else ex-
cept athletics,

In England several track stars
have jobs with sports firms and
one in particulnr frequently used
to do an advertising act for his
firm when he was actually taking
part in a sports meeting. Of
course he was subtle about it. He
wore a track suit with the n>me
of his employers stamped across
his back. Just to safeguard him-
self he joined the sports club of
the firm and so on the front of
his suit was the crest of the club

hike. 4

Neat don’t you think? And all
strictly amateur. aay
This tolerated ‘shamateurism

is widely known to sports fans.
They do not complain about it.
Wimbledon or an Qlympic Games
meeting would not be any the
less supported if professionals
were to appear. Rather the con-
trary. Why then all the fuss?

ad









@ from page 7

heard of the financial
which took place as
years ago.

He said it was a great pity that
some members of that Assembly
did not spend more time at the
public library.

Someone in the drafting depart-
ment of the Government who did
not understand those things, put
things before them which he knew
nothing about, They had a lot of

revolution
far as 25

glorified book-keepers who tried,
tc pose before members of the
House as financial experts.

He did not absolutely refer to
the Head of the Administration of
the Coiony, he said.

What were they there for? he
asked. If another was not trained
in that matter and made a mistake,
it was their duty to correet it. Ik
was very. unfortunate that that
Bill was ever brought before the
House.

They were not in a position t
export capital and then run 1
C.D, & W. for funds.

Mr, G. H. Adams said that i
was deplorable when one got
pecple from the same party with
fogmatic views. Freeh trom his
books, the last speaker was reacy

ty teach his grandmother the
subject.

What did that amount to but
saying that instead of having
their money lying down in thx
treasury they would put €.00 12

the Government security in Greuc
3ritain. One found that all over
the world.

He had refrained from point-
ing out his mistakes when he
was making those dogmatic and
pontifical statements because
they were of the same party. He
Wag tired with members who sat
down with them on Monday
nights and told them a thing was
all right and then came to the

House next day and spoke
against it.
Members of the Government

endeavoured to the best of their
ability to have everything
straightened out in any particular
Bill. They often deferred matters
so that they could discuss them
with their back benchers. And
after they discussed them and
got an agreement, one who
agreed would then speak against
it.

After speaking on the darftnig
of Bills, he said that the Gov-
ernor was always informed what
were members views.

He said that a Governor caine
to a place with instructions as to
how legislature was drafted.

Nobody wanted to prevent
anyone from criticising, but not
agreeing to a Bill now and when



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion 10.00 a.m.

Police Band Concert at St.
George’s Almshouse 4 p.m.

Lecture on Moral Rearma-
ment at Belmont Methodist
Church 7.30 p.m,

Football Div. II Everton vs.
Spartan, Queen's Park 5.00

p.m,

Div. Ill: Notre Dame _ vs.
Everton—Bay, Rangers vs.
Y.M.C.A. at Shell and
Carlton vs. Police at Black
Rock—5.00 p.m.

WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall
Nil.
Tetal Rainfall fer month to

date: .07 in.
Highest Tempcrature: 86.0 F.
Lowest Temperature: 68.5 F.
Wind Velocity 9 miles

from Codrington :

per
hour.

Barometer (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29,885.

TO-DAY
Sunrise; 6.22 a.m.
Sunsct: 6.06 p.m.
Moon: New, February 25.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m,
High Tide: 5.10 a.m.,

p.m.

Lew Tide; 11,18 p.m.

29.974

5.36



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ryin sleep and energy another day
without trying MENDACO, This great
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tt you suffer sharp stabbing pains
if joints are swollen, it shows your
blood is poisoned through faulty kid-

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1952

Equalisation Fund £20 Damages
Bill Passed

it came to the Assembly attack-
ing it.

If members feel they caanof
trust Government, let them form
their own Government,” he svid.

Mr. F. L. Waleot (L) strongly
supported Mr. Adams views. Hy
added that when it came to the
quéstion” of discrimination, and
they ‘were saying, “exclude the
Union of South Africa,” they
eculd just as well say, exclude
Conada and Australia where dis-
crimination was also practised.

He said that they were many
self-appointed economists about

He ‘said he did not want to be
i anybody’s way, he liked to be
4 a team for what he was worth.
He said that when the Senior
ilember for St, George kept

lent on the previous night and

ssented greement, he had sus-
pected that he would have at-
tacked it then. He had no confi-
dence in one who had none in
him,

After all the clauses were

passed, Mr. A. E. S. Lew moved
the addition of another clause.
The House voted against the in-
sertion. The clause would have
been, “The Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee sHall cou > to b?
Jaid upon the table of the les'=!

ture annually a statemen chov-
ing the eccndition of the fund.”

»

Mr. Adams_ explained
there was no necessity for the
Clause as members would be
able to get any needed informe-
tion.

The Bill was then passed

that





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In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr
A. J. H. Hanschell awarded judge-
ment foy the plaintiff Amy Sandi-
ford to the amouni of €20 and
costs in her suit in which she
claimed damages to the amount
of £25 against the defendant M«
Donald Cutting of Bibby Lane, St.
Michael for inflicting bodily harm
on her

Counsel in the case was Mr
J. E..T. Branker for Sandiford

Sandiford said that she lives at
Water Hall Land, St. Michoel and
Vent to Mone f, St. John to buy
potatoes on OctCbs 10, 1951.

While digging potatoes at that
plantation she got in an argument
with the defendant Cutting, w!
was digging in the same field.

‘While I was digging the pota-
tces the defendant suddenly
umped on me and began beating

«





me, then he ‘ook up something
and h t hack of my
d with it and I lost conscious-
” Sandiford told the court.



vr. Gale who attended to Sandi-
fere in the General Hospital Cas-
ualty said that there was , bruise

the back cf the plaintiff's neck
end this could have been caused
if the plaintiff had received a blow
of considerable force in that area.

MATCH DRAWN
Combermere in their ganic
inst Y.M.P.C.’s “A” team su
eoled in securing a I—1l draw.
fmith scored the goal for hi
taam while Robinson scored the

eg \lizer for the sehool,

fhe game was fast on the whole
vith many thrills but it was not
until the second half that both
teams succeeded in achieving their

merited goals,



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PACE TF.\ BABBAD06 ADVOCATE WBDVCSDAY PEBRt'ABV 27, 1K2 I HUM lll/ll l/\ > Votf /./////; Magic Of The Football Association Cup (B> WALTS! PUJUNQTON) %  • I up compotilaon in*.pirv i-rluips thd mod I'i'ti-u %  % %  %  '' ouf, : %  own Ii Uchti t ipvk oft 1 M row Month until ihf two (In* %  %  %  vcoalr bus me**KJ HIT to 'OUl %  l*i mi %  • Hi '.o travel far Una I. Thry went the Hi %  li i. Ii I ; %  broadl..,tr-|h* 1 11 111 l> 1 I t BOOT. A 1 F i I .i I p %  %  %  i . I %  Their Win the Englao : ... %  %  I trip W Bi lUlW..ppt.inled h\ !!< %  /i %  | i' (aril on l)<>lca( — NMIII End. Mil II.H >IISSI S 1 1 %  %  Equalisation Fund £20tktmqgm Awarded V gj) front pace 7 heard o( the financial nrMtntaMi •k place u dr u IS %  em JK" lie mix %  iilv Uwl .embers of that Assembly Htd not spend more time at the l unlitlibrary. Someone in the drafting depart rr.ent of the Government who did i <->t understand those things, put thing* before them which he kite* uthmg about. They had %  lot of glorified book-keepers v.i pone before members "1 the House tf rimincial experts Hg did not absolutely refer 10 the Head of the Administration of the Colony, he said. What were th.y thrr. tod bl mother was not trained He said n th.it matter .ind made a mistake, dembei %  %  i ; i H:l til..' Hill wa* rver brought b. f. :i U H.Hi...They •rare nut lit .1 portion %  UOrl capilid md Una run 1 CD. A W. (Ol hi Empj ire APrr UM MCODd rWH KIM,,, ''..in VABQI on tinoflon al ve bul when pb\ tru about IS minute-; 1 lord m toulod 11 Carlton forward In his area • I %  penally kuk Thai fa' % % % %  %  %  : %  %  1 BOO luppoftoti at tar % %  '. them undertook a 14 hourrinuM. |OUme> .. ... .. by night train or motor eh %  "" %  '<; %  '' %  •" %  %  Bl e.irK 1" 5 %  S '' '""' ground, and j *** 'J" 1 ** at ****> S ers. Manv took home souvenir ,,olh als were acred in th>lbnll paper fenturirur ; groi f I The MM picture of k b] v portoi .... „ WBO >vns playing at left 1 She LOOl Her limits || ,, .... At Bruilol tbe> saw ihe heigins Stregar <••> the left wing Ihnl (."Up fervour COO reach. The home Kant, Id: iron PlmJ in both halves Wl .ike.1 With .-in. I last season by reaching the M>' I %  : UM Cup and be pruaalnf m..r<' ,11. draw with Newcastle United, opportunltto eventual winners. So they were thi no; dismayed by having to ton Preston, another Eirst Division club. Before the match throe 01 lot! nttired in fancy draw as rovers ur pirates in the blue .md white colours of their team „ paraded on the field. One M a cutlass. A smull boy roooeot, | tt&Stf^JiTcSi^ 2g JS ; hc l tk hn,k K Hllowed to shake hands w.ih the ffa2f*tJf S '' referee .n.i eoptaltu before lb""' %  !" L T "' ,''' wt '" .nil in favour of Can %  ni-nient I ben Bristol "" % %  a "P*" "" %  I %  lm-l won He will recall It as a '' r:, • v '' ,l, ' I two minutea wildly excited Rovers' partisan*. '" IC lhc "'* %  '"" O. Sl.aker a girl .f about IB. -earin|t blue '">dln! hn til on the toft .Hit iln-M. wing eul ll Will recall how she totl her wtatfa COrttOO. W|iei. th.lln.il boots when she ran on the Bold tl the finish tn liug tin!; nv iptall hante.1 IWOHU] In l nicy wenluelrod 111! bar tool tag Coil'in. the ghi-like mud which had hOOB the undoing of the defeated %  % %  suikitut inkle deep with until si.1.night up with the players. Sued mcidenti t m eon on 1 'Sli 1. f-Vb 23 played rhei Uluilrah Cup torWnlind won two gold medals in raetan nrhteh lodtrii gkllng .vents in zo Olympic Influence the reoul ol the •> ,,11" hovo ttjof the ttoi The other i* luck. nmivi into third place In Hit Bristol had the luck to be drawn %  IW scoring by the at home where the heavy ground nil Ut %  goal start to the team They are behind Noiwu. %  1 to playing on 1 TI|w ihe United States WOre toes lucky when thfl draw Noway now have 107 nolnta for the next mun.i decreed too) i's .14. and rinlann 7? should vtolt Bouthend whore ,ll nd n rurloualy enouati. Ihey had done The twi evenl .,1,^ ., their training fee the Proiton CupPtnland wore lr tie Yel it OOUld hgV I-en WOTM r ikJ i,,, and the ,.„.„• •"'. L* Ua v.-i.-i,,.,,. u'V. he W.IMKII'. roeg covering the • II kiU""1 -— I'nltOd, rurtsmouth. tenhnm Hotspur. Hurnley 01 Twonty-tWo eOaOPOtltori fronj run^ ton naUoni (oik imi-i in 1 , KEITH MILLBR Biases to. rail trying for a big hit off Waet ludlen liowler Oarry Oomes in 1'ifth Test at Sydney cricket l 111 26 1.68, Jamaica Make One Change FOR 11111:11 TKST KINGSTON K. 1 H Jamaica retained UaOO) Data i.ivot on the team for the 1 bul following a Trans-Atlaniic %  all on Monday night, big ttub Kiugh, ..greed in his I d game if %  111 angoa to get him hack to btgl.< f UT Op ar e lot the nniKirtant Portsmouth game on Saturday. ArrangemenLs were made by Stephen Mill 1n ill, the exception of Cooper in %  oa] Aho lufltorod a fractured flnci m thr sc-ond half of Monda\' game when rushed by Qruin. will ' replay %  d o) who K p p %  I Barhodoi the Amateur Or Professional ? WHAT'S IN A NAME! Field Mannal Montgomery .ently caused moie than )u*t u MKM stir in the sports world when he suggested lhat amateurs and professionals should be allow* ed to compete in the Olympic 1...111. haps (By PLTfr:K DITTOS) dUflaronco, 1 gcosg There is' in the Label. Soccer U another sport <> a largo agajitow element but which in England again depends tpon profeuionaluun for it-, revenue. The reaction was perThe dividing line is usually tixed quicker than he had exby lb* player's own ability. The The refen gri Hi I M., r| /•inland Wins %  Rmthein 1 ine Toil Wi Hn ., Albion, all 1 Pirst Division teams, away from home. Missed Peimll> Inspired Hull laMck wag baanj again when Rowley, one i.r the hardest shuts in the game, m kickifor the (.up r.ivounles. Manchester United. The score was one-nil in favour of Hull (it.. team struggling to itaj in ih Becood Dlvtaion The iplrod Hull, whoee >gon glan.•killing 1. which wa in UM Olympic pingrainiiie B nd nnlaaxl ajao t.^.k atcond and third places trjjjg Hietamtoi w.,%  acortd in 42 minules 39 seconds WILL WELCOME TEAM HAVANA. Feb. 26. .1 ".-> i"-.-|iluiii i„ ih..mile%  'whe^i : :',"" i 5,dr f ,v • Ra. cho B s^rroTlT aoUonol Aiiport at lisp am medal win. Sun.urlaod igatott to-du fro. KngeS .;., -J" nogton ||^ years ago. Pan-American traiuportThe t£2?| IUC u t CCn pir0d 10 W ** H """"""' l-ft Havana for Pana.Va Artenal with an ea*v home game n :i M ,, „ t roaUrdaj a.riv ^ in Ihe next round fur Lhoil Bvoit Balboa at 4 W am to-dav 51!.,*.^ t u2 0 r* f ch t nd g V Thc lanr %  arheduled to l'eav. TottenTTarn Hotspur ihe mofl -llor Havana at 8.SO am. ud ii I .ractlve tie of all. a visit fron arrive at Havana at 11 30 a m Newcastle t'nUe-1. Y. t tin ,, %  IH k.i t r ,, Both •< preparliui foi i morrow'i mat< famaleo wlli • %  i | M : •ai ml. i |>I .. %  '.i A] •pODba at iiiside-ngh%  oponlnn f... Qmie Heron 1 % %  n %  % %  [ %  g| plays centre forward and not plaj frtelj on M< to eonstani la.kluit; b) '"' All Stars. All Slurs have IhOSr own plam with Alan JoM-ph .,tid Ins wing hull to fail .!;,„,,,.a |„ B |cU UM tn.uacKs opposing wfaagi Norway Wins Skiing l.aincs OSLO, K.I. M %  111 in riding rJoroinanci in. M %  woogej and B wl u u Ml and to Norway and Finland upset the ' MI the 1052 winI meg and gave a heat of Norwegians a runawav %  sixth and largest winter Carnival under Olvmpie Monday night Norwa) had scored 125| points in iiiic.oicial hul traditional scor%  llowf 10 points for the Bl I I late, a gold medal for the second. In the llrsi six ihe United States with its best balanced team in Ihe history of Winter games was a og second but its lotal of 891 was a long way bei way. Canada was 10th with 18| V igu .! St Morit? le than 14 pitints separated the top if ihe table Sweden and the fourth ir leans. Sweden scored 79 points trailed by Switzerland with 71. Nm-uiet with 60| and ihe United States with 681. — ported Within twenty-four houiO, majority of those good enough t storms of proteat had been showplay professional soccer do so and ered down upon the bead of lintare paid for playing. The rcmatnain's famous war-time leader. And dor sign with amateur clubs he was severely taken to task for where supposedly, thev ptaj foi putting forward such a proposal, the lo've of the game. But when the Field Marshal's Theoretically that sounds line, suggestion is analysed it is not But it does not work out. There is really so very wicked All that at least one team, calling therahe wants is to sec the people who selves amateurs, where I frankly admit to being professionthe players receive a weekly un uls allowed to compete with those der-the-table payment from Uv who call themselves amateurs ut-t. c bjb. This rake-uff' keeps th nevertheless earn good living players happy, enables the dub from their sporting prowess. to maintain a good aide and reAmateurism, and by lhat | mo.n suit* in good attendances, real amateurism, where Hie What the FA. would tiportsman digs into his nun they knew of th. i pocket for the pleasure of i.ikanybody's guess. But the noinl mg part In a particular sport, is 1S that the F.A. does run .i en the way out so fast thai Diary ently know and so "shamat-urpcople are likely to catch a cold ism" thrives, from the draught. The number of real amateurs in Ihe world could be counted on the of ene hand. but still the pretence rm< rjiansh *riiwii rannii A: %  Lation would nut take Ainuly lo-da) to the suggestion that ptofi nni finger* should be allowed to compete Wimbledon. Yet the leading inaleurs who will be there tamed. Still Ihe professional Is summer will have all their exfrowned upon in many sports bepenaes paid. What is more, two COuaa h P openly gains from his of the expected ent ability. And. all the time, many me Uomnii-nweaHh have rOCOOtll of Ihe so-called amateurs are dawen found jobg enabling them to jnfl very nicely In a leaa adverplay tennis, thus n ikdl| possiblinnei neir Wiinbledoij ippi Call it amateur: < ait think of anotner iiami Take athletics. Strictly s[>eak.ng no amateur athlete should be allowed to capita ise on his or her •blllty. But in America scholar-hipa are available i;i top-rank l>erformer which enable them I: about nothing 'i I < epl athletics. In England several track si have jobs with spjrta llrm. and .>ne in particular frequently used rig act I It is not my intention to singl ut individuals for criticism. If the respective organisations to which they belong are eontont .u allow "thamateurlsm" In ihc>r ranks that is an intern. What is needed howevei. .. wholesale clean up Ol thr m nations themselves and Ihf Intro* duel Ion of hard and fast ruling* ;*s to what Is professionalisi what is noL I'.. %  dni on* -v uple. Just i nurse he was subtle about u. hV wore a track suit with die m .1 !e... is concerned—and yet no profes• ...i lo md m Engund iwo. Ii|s ^^ Jus „, Mf „ UJr „ hlm 1'rirketers who earn money 'nun the sport are selected elf he joined the sports club of the firm and so on -the front of fog Kngland and are labelled hia suit was the crest of the male-lira. One or two have even N'eat don't you think"" And all mi.imed England. -tricjMy amateur Bul can anyone tell me what This tolerated shamaieur: the difference between a plavi* widely known to sports ( iwho is paid merelv for ptojrlnfl They do not complain abou cricket and another who igmi Wimbledon . an WympW I iW Bay because he happens to meeting would not be any th' have an office lob with Ihe covnty less supported f professional which, fortunately, leaves him tree .\ere to appear. Rather the con' to play throughout the summer trary Why then nil the fuss* | They'll Do It Every Time Z^ENC-OSE THE Py\Z>WO 9RE4K ~H\'J._.. '..-_-: w4u. WBKE-vv-JLE J3B *OJLD CO.E 10 sTi i —— By Jimmy Ha tlo MOOSE HAS SEEN 4Li MS '%  •'w y< YEARS -INDALL ^we coes is GE^ ESTIS1A T ES' axMxaiEss. .. -\ \ -j%  V •—EX *%HCJ ME STARTED TO fiET ESTIMATES ''OR TMAT JOS BACr, y ITV BC rl THE 1930S, EVERV-f BETTER fOR TMiso WS CME*PER /MM HMatG) Btei MOTHB HIMSE^" 4 R^unjs BIU Passed in uv Court of OnginaJ Jur; • —.-•-*—*%  %  % %  '££?&£. ^ -. "*• for the plaintiff Ara. || BhBaaben feel thev ...on.* ford to I c30 and ..ernment. let them form eaata m her suit H whun % %  their own Governmeni nMd a\BOHgOg i (1 tjv TdSKi, M : l * d tr:., la—.*I ..* unit of discrimination, and Counsel in the case was Mr they were saying, "cxilmh th> J T Bl L'nion of South Africa." they Sandil uld just as well say. exclude wal uada and Australia where dfa b tion was also pracloed. IQWotg On pel 1951 lit -aid that they were mani "ll-appointed economists about While dugmg potatoes at tint he got in an ergumeni wiih the defendan' Cutt. was digging In thi Whik i v. cUgging the pot i .s UH gsjflgBsj ml Mi'idenK r began twatm r he •-ook up scmething le said he did not want to oe anybody's way. he liked to be a team for what he was worth. that when the Senior for St. George kepi on the previous nlgh^ gri I iirceir.enl. >>. %  | H-cted that nf would hav atoea ine couit. ncked il then. He had no COOflDr deuce In one who had none In '• '" the General Hospital Cashim unity agld th:.: there wot bruise Mr. Q, II. AOaaaa s.,iook>. the last speaker was roan; %  toocb his gmndmother the uhjoct What did that amount to bu. saying that instead r money lying down In th treasury they wi ihe Oovernment in (ii. BMtojn •!• tound th the world. e had refrained from ponilout his mistakes wht making this *dogn ponUflcal ivUitctncnU because they were of the same party, lie i tired with member' who aal down with them on Monday nights and told them a thing was ill right and then came to the House next day and -poKC gainst d Memberi> of the Government ndeavoured to the best of their ability to have everything straightened out In any parti BUI. They often deterred mailers to that they could discuss tli with ihetr back benchers. And nfler they diseiuOed them BJM got an agreement, one wh. agreed would then speak against it After speaking on the darflnig or Bills, he said that the Governor was always Informed whal were members views. He said that n Governor B to a place with Instructions ii how legislature was drafted. Nobody wanted to prevent anyone from criticising, but agreeing to a Bill now and v After all the clauses were passed. Mr. A. E S. Lew(he addition of jnother clause. Th-> House voted against th" Inertiun. The clause would have been. "The Governnr-ir Bx* live Commiltec shall t u lo b llM upon Ihe table of th. ture annually statemei %  tl %  dd have been i ,. if the plaintiff had receive.'. i MATCH DRAWN rre bl then %  %  %  | a 1—1 draw. .•d the goal '"' r Adams explalne. IhOI i %  gssODL is no necensity lor the ihe gam rJaOWholo Clause as members wouli ba '. lib many 'hrill able to get any needed inform;until tho second half tha* both tion. lod • "tog thei. The Bill was then )...% %  %  %  % % % %  : %  i Ihe r. ndltn.n of I ti. WHAT'S ON TODAY retire < ..n.i. 10.00 *.m. Court of iiiKin.il Juriadirtlon 10.00 a.m. I'ollee Band Conrrrt at St. George's Almshouse 4 p.m l c. lur. en Mural Rearmament al Relmonl Mrlln.iliM Church 7.30 pjn. Football IHv. II Fverton vs. Spartan. Queen's Park I 00 p.m. IHv. Ill: Notre Ihime vs. Kvertwti—Bay. Rangers vs. Y.M.C.A. at Shell and .i i:..n v. I'ollee al Black Keek S.00 II in Such values make you think .... FLOWERED SPUN 36' wide per yard 96c. 8c 87c. PLAIN SPUN 36' wide per yard 88c. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10, U, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET WEATHER REPORT YrSTI.RIlAV Rainfall from Codrington I Ml. Tilal RaJufnll frr month lo date I .0? In. II he-1 l.t.., .lure St, I Lowest i. ii.,.; ..." %  fig.5 F. VVhid Veloell. 9 mile-, per hour. Barometer .9 a.m.! 5S.974 (3 p.m > 29.gg5 T(I-IAV MI I.-. i i". p.m. Moon: New. February >h. I i:lu.i. b.M p.m. Hl;h Tide: S.10 a.m. 5.36 p.m. I^.w Tide: II.IK p.m. AT KbiMlMvUUbHa I %  I I %  _..l rar'tY i iih"iolios *ir.M>ACo Tkhtgei %  n.-ic cmihln. ifiwilni If^if Mislklaa mna laet* l-(r..l. ., nl..|t .1.1 MKNOA<0 tram four .h-inl.i l^iUy guKk MIU.IHMI at MMI taw eaarsaWed. End Rheumatism While You Sleep POWERFUL WOOD PRESERVATIVE In its Improved form. "ATLAS A" possesses two Important new features. Firstly, it is non-leaching; once in the wood it cannot be washed out. Secondly, timber treated with il can subsequently be painted or varnished without any additional preparation of the surface. 'Atlas A' affords positive protection for all timber against Termites, and other wood-destroying insects, rot and fungi. It also acts as a fire-retardant. Odourless, easy to apply and economical. Supplied in y| gin.. 1 gin. .m.l ."i i;ln. Drums Phone 4267. I I'd. Agents : WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. r COOL SPRING inlh North!— will demand a return to warmer clothing at vacation end. We have a aolaetioo of Ihe linest Wooltfltlg loomed in Kngland. gg well as glorious Cashmere Pullovers from 'Scotland, light w c i g h i Tweeds and crisp Worsted Suitings il. .li.nil lailors <>( Hollon l.anr