Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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"eit,



t



harbades

NATO Council Meeting

ESTABLISHED 1895





Opened Yesterday

Stage Set For | Leslie Wiel

Consideration Of
Kuropean Army

: LISBON, Feb. 20.
he ninth session of the North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
ization (NATO) Council, will open here to-day with the
stage set for a speedy approval of the Big Three comprom-
ise to press forward immediately with the creation of a
1,400,000-man European army.
So bright were the prospects for success at this most
important of NATO sessions, that United States Secretary
of State Acheson made plans to leave here by Sunday, a
week ahead of the schedule planned before the Big Three
Ministers met with German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
in London. Se
The most important work, for !
the Foreign, Defence, and Finance
Ministers of the twelve-member
nations had already been done in
London where it was decided to
give Germany almost full equali-
ty in N.A.T.O
The Council is expected to give
a quick green light to the com-
promise which calls for: Joint
sessions of N.A.T.O. and European
Army Councils whenever there is
an emergency An emergency was
defined as whenever there was a
threat of attack to any member
or whenever the integrity of either
organization is menaced

Reds Reject
U.N. Offer

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 20.

The Communists rejected the
United Nations compromise offer
to cut troop rotation during the
truce from 40,000 to 35,000 men
per month, There was speculation
that the Reds might be ding
out on the troop rotation issue in
an attempt to blackmail the U.N.
into accepting Russia as the sixth
member of the nettral Commis-
sion to supervise the armistice.
Communist staff officers for the
fifth straight day demanded that
the U.N. withdraw their objec-
tions and accept their nomination
of Russia. The Allies refused on
the grounds that Russia, although
not fighting in Korea, was the
“sponsor” of both Red China and
North Korea.

Each side accused the other of
breaking the prior agreement on
hominations to the commission of
neutral nations which will super-
vise the truce.

North Korean Colonel Chang
Chun San contended that each
side had agreed not to dispute the
other’s nominations. Moreover, he
said, the United Nations had no
reason to reject Russia after it
had accepted Red Poland and
Czechoslovakia.

The United Nations Colonel Don
Darrow counter-charged that the
Reds hea gone back on thei ee

nent that her recommen
Propeller Drops france be approved by both sides,

—U.P.
Off During Flight |
|. @LeOeee

NASHV By ssee, Feb, 20.| °
NASHVILLE, Tennessee, Feb. For Indo-China |

Eastern Airlines officials and
Civil Aeronautics Authority are|
seeking to learn what caused the) WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.
propeller of the D.C.4 Skymaster | The Mutual Security Agency
to drop off shortly after the plane jauthorized Indo-China on Wednes-
cleared the airport here with 25/day to spend one million dollars

Grave Question

Germany, while not having a
vote in N.A.T.O. itself, at joint
meetings would thus have the
chance to have say on any
grave question concerning it.

At the same time France has the
indirect pledge of United States
and British interest in any at-
tegnpt to destroy the integrity of
the European Army—fronr outside
or internally,

Indirect controls
war production to replace the
present direct ones. Once the
European army comes into being
and the occupation of Germany
thus ends, production of atomic
weapons, guided missiles, 155mm
and bigger gun barrels and oiher
heavy armaments will be pro-
hibited in exposed areas—an in-

irect reference to Germany
direct ny p,

over Getman







passengers bound for Chicago.|for a suction dredge and pipeline
The plane returned to the field|for harbour and river develop-
and landed without —ineident}ment in Cambodiz.

shortly after taking off last night} Other authorizations for Eas-
on the second leg of a flight from) ten countries to-day ancluded
Atlanta. The pilot said he noticed | $177,000 for Indo-China for tex-
that one engine “sounded a little|tiles, radio equipmeni and tech-
rough” after leaving the ground |nical aid; $62,000 for Thailand,
according to an Airlines spokes- |$32,000 for Burma, $6,000 for Na~-
man. |tionalist China,, $11,000 for the
—U.P. | Philippines —U.P.

Plan Will Hamper
Balance Of Payments

By ARTHUR J. OLSEN
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.
First effect of U.S, aecelerated billion dollar offshore
procurement programme designed to help bolster the
Allied nations with a dollar income, is likely to be tem-
porary worsening of the balance-of-payments difficulties
of Western European countries.



United States officials whofU.S. troops on duty in Europe
have been studying the implica-] Present plans are understood to
tions of military procurement all for doubling mutual aid pro-
abroad say that the paradox]|curement in Europe during the
arises. from slow U.S, payments} next fiscal year and the maxi-
on foreign . defence contracts}mum_ possible increase in US.
which the contractor can execute| armed services there,

y ay for this raw . *
at Reet Straightening Out
At present, experts calculate} Informed sources said that the

Offshore Procurement Programme
which is just now straightening
out after months of tentative
planning is largely the result of

that the placing of a $100 mili-
tary goods contract with a Euro-
pean producer rapidly results in
a net decline of about $20 in the

‘ Mutual
dollar reserves of his country.;Unremitting pressure by
United States Procurement Offi-| Security yong m eee
cers in current practice make|Harriman on — au id
Harriman is said to have lai

“down payment” of ten per cent. !
or less shortly after the contract [heavy emphasis on a
is made with the European firm, “
To execute the job the pro- 2 ee a Wed
ducer’s first task is to obtain = : ssed :
materials which usually amount! strengthening of be] pe Daye am
to about 30 per cent. of the total | Security ane olant 4 4
production costs. Most materials; #¢ctivation $ ant capa r
that go into military goods cost tidus ot ae Sa Bee, on
dollars. The result is an addi-| build-up o' age "ae ye ovens
tional—although temporary—drain ' 'S also the | of US ad
on the hard money resources of tual eeu aiicedlaa ta
the country. N.A.T.O. countries ac 2

Payments Are Slow Haitiman’s thesis. up
Officials said steps are being | Pe?
taken to speed contract payments |



which they regard as unneces- | e

sarily slow in many cases. | Woman Dies
The United States Defence

Department has started an over-

After Stabbing

seas Military Procurement Pro-
gramme for mutual aid purposes JAMES C. V. SMALL, a 36-
that is scheduled to pour 620\year-old butcher of Fair Field,
million dollars into Europe out/St, Michael, was taken to the Gen-
of 4,300 million dollars now |era) Hospital yesterday evening
available for military aid tO | shortly after 6.30 p.m., along with
N.A.T.O. countries. |Gwendolyn Clarke a 36-year-old

Additionally the U.S. Army Lachaise servant of 4th Avenue,












plans to. : pend abou 5 een |New Orleans, both suffering
eee te. Suto to abtain {from stab wounds. Clarke died
ti and services for its own 500M after she was admitted to the
troops there, The latter figure |hospital and Small was detained
includes ited payments jin a critical condition. He is un-
for the co uction of military ioe police surveillance. The stab-
base lepots, local procure-|bing occurreg at the junction of
me and light equipment|Westbury and Baxters Roads about
and i exp ure of 16.30 o’clock.

t
Hits 114 To
Save B.G.

(From Our Own Corréspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 20.

Leslie Wight batted for 404 min-
utes for 114 runs to save Britisa
Guiana from defeat a day ahead of
schedule in the Second Intercolo-
nial Test against Trinidad. His
knock was a masterpiece of de-
fensive strategy and ~bored the
small crowd patiently awaiting
colour and splash. The latter was
supplied by Dyer who scored 65
‘not out in 77 minutes.

The first thirteen runs today
were scored in 20 minutes all by
Camacho, then Wight got his first
seoring stroke reaching 50 in 183
minutes.

Camacho got 50 in 80. minutes
With one six and six fours.
The partnership added 100 in 97
minutes. When the score was 179
both batsmen were 61. The bowl-
ing was steady and Camacho was
dismissed shortly after lunch after
batting for 162 minutes with 8
fours and one six, He did the bulk
of the scoring in a partnership
scoring 144 runs. Me Watt did not
stay long but B.G. had averted an
innings defeat with 6 wickets to
spare. Wight reached hig century
with a favourite shot in 875
minutes with elewen fours.
Trinidad used nine bowlers with-
out success and at tea the
score was 295 for 4, Wight
106, Bruiser Thomas who batted

quietly 34, Thomas was out in
the third over after tea after
the partnership added 65 in

59 minutes. Then came Dyer
with a delightful if lucky innings
getting his runs in a series of
boundaries. The Trinidad bowl-
ing lacked direction and the field
placing was unsatisfactory. The
wicket gave little help and Wight’s
defence forced the bowlers inte a
ragged display later in the day of
which Dyer took full advantage.
A strong cross-wind also made
control difficult. The wicket was
unhelpful and the feeling was that
Wight would have helped British
Guiana more had he taken the
initiative. Wight was out trying
to pierce the ring of off-side fields.
men, Trinidad fieldsmen stood
well to the all day leather
hunt. The game ends tomorrow
and _ pre-lunch / events may well
decide the match’s course,

The scores;
BRITISH GUIANA—2nd Innings

Li. Wght c Tang Choon b Jack
Gibbs b Skeete ence

ze Cs ag coe b Jackbir 1
amacho c all b Forde _., - &
MeWatt b Forde .. ;
C. Thomas Ibw b Forde . 35
Dyer not out eoer 65
Jagkman run out 12
Patoir not out 5
Extras: 4
Total (for 7 wkts.) “00

0

Fall Of wickets: 1 for 76; 2
fot 233; 4 for 233; 5 for 298; 6 for 311
7 for 249

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R Ww
Forde 20 1 74 a |
Butler : . oo 1 ST
Demming 18 3 49
Jackbir 8 6 72
Skeete 27 2 81
Tang Choon MR ee
Sampath 4 - 9
Asgarali . 5 3 2
Corbie 1 11



B.G. Accept

Customs Union |

(From Our Own Cortespo: dent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb, 20.

The British Guiana Legislative
Council today w mously
accepted in principle the pro-
osed customs union of the Brit-

Caribbean colonies. The
Coungil which recently ay a big
majority rejected political feder-
ation agr to customs union on
a motion by the Financial Sec-
retary following a message to
the Council from the Governor
without debate.

At the start, customs union
would benefit British Guiana to
the tune of three million dollars
annually.



24 Mutineers
Arrested

LAS PALMAS, Feb. 20

Twenty-four seamen charged
with mutiny were arrested aboard
the Argentine vessel Buenos Aires
last night. The arrest was made
by soldiers of the Infanteria De
Marina upon the request of the
captain of the vessel, Jose Carlos
Ruzaga and the Argentine Consul
at Las Palmas.

The trouble arose when Captain
Ruzaga ordered the crew to re-
main aboard while the vessel was
tuking up supplies prior to pro-
ceeding tc Buenos Aires.—WU.P.



SURVIVORS REACH PORT

CHATHAM, Mass., Feb. 20
Coast Guard cutters steamed in

to port today with 25 survivors
from the broken tanker Fort
Mercer. Thirteen other seamen

passed up_rescue last night elect-
ing instead to stick with the Fort
Mercer’s stern as volunteers in a
salvage attempt. Efforts will be
made to tow that half of the ship

for 79, ¢| though there is U.S. capital in-

2 | that that alone would handicap a





THE EIGHT U.K. King’s
bados yesterday by the
Commissioner who took them

the they

Among
Reading Room Jooking at a



enréute to the first Caribbean Jamboree were
bie”.

eines.

Maj. Griffith







intransit through Bar

They spent the day ashore with Maj. J. B. Griffith, Island Scout
a tour of the island. The Jamboree opens in Jamaica next month
ited was the British Council and they are seen here in the Council's

16-year-old Geoffrey Bell-Jones, Sea Scout from Ipswich (wear
ing dark uniform) traces their course from England to Barbados.

Tucker, British Council Representative and Vice-President of the Boy Scouts’

and 'Mr. H. Risley
Association look on.

King’s Scouts Call Here

En Route To Jamboree

ARRIVING in Bar s
land by the French "

happy Were the eigh i
way to Jamaica to represent
at the first Caribbean Jam
Kingston from Mareh 5—17,

Newsprint |
Price Beyond |
Govt. Control

WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.

Justice Department officials said |
the United States Government is
powerless to undertake an “effec-
tive” anti-trust investigation of the
newsprint price situation. Officials
pointed out that 90 per cent. of the
newsprint used in the U.S. is pro-
duced by Canadian firms over
which this Government has no
jurisdiction

An anti-trust investigation was
demanded by Chairman Emmanuel
Celler of the House onopoly
Sub-committee in a letter te
Attorney General J. Howard Mc-
Garth, In making the letter pub-
lie Celler said a new price in-
crease on newsprint “impends.’

Recalling that two increases in
1951 totalled $16 per ton, Celle:
told McGarth: If newsprint price:
are again raised by all producers
acting in unison that will be an
additional evidence to substantiate
the fact that these prices are de-
termined by collusion not by com-
petition.

Officials indicated that there is
relatively so little newsprint pro-
duced by United States firms it
would be impossible to achieve
effective results by anti-trust
action

They said that held true ever

vested in many of the Canadiar
firms. One official pointed out that
Canada has a law with heavy pen-
alties for violators which pro-
hibits a firm from handing any
books, records or information over
to U.S. authorities. He indicated

full investigation.—U.P.



WILL ‘EXPORT
TO U.S. ONLY

MANILA, Feb, 20

It was announced that the Phil-
ippines from now on will not ex-
port sugar to any country outside
the United States until the quota
for the American market is filled

President Quirino laid down this
new command in a two-hour con-
ference with sugar industry “re-
presentatives in the Malacan Pal-
ace, called to settle once and for
all the controversy over the ex-
port of sugar to Japan or any
other country outside the U.S

A spokesman said this. new
policy supersedes the cabinet de-
cision of last year under which
five per cont of the entire sugar
crop may be exported to any
country outside the United States.
He said this five per cent. will now
be diverted to the domestic mar-
ket in order to increase domestic
supplies and lower domestic sugar
prices.—U.P.

No Details

TEHERAN, Feb, 20.

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
and the International Bank’s Mis-
sion last night issued a joint com-
munique saying that a artial
settlement of the Iranian ofl crigis
has been agreed on, but no details
were disclosed in the last meeting
before the Bank's special mission
leaves for Washington today,

Negotiators agreed to continue
efforts for a full settlement of the
dispute with Britain over the op-
eration of the nationalized oil re-
finertes,—«CP)



to port. The Mercer was one of
two 10,000-ton tankers which
broke in halves about the same
time in a terrific northwest storm
off this little fishing port on Mon-
lay The other tanker was the
Pendleton, Both her halves have
zone aground

The latest

brought the n



batch of
umber rescued tc

urvivors

,Mr. P, B, Nevill, O.B.E, F.C.A







yesterday morning from Eng-
mbie and looking quite fit and
Scouts who are now on their
the 474,000 Scouts of the U-K.

boree which will take place in

The contingent is being led bs
Headquarters Commissioner — fu:
Grants with Mr. Charles W
Roberts, Group Scoutmaster of

the 15th Finchley as assistant
eader,

The contingent was met on
oard by Major J. &. Griffith,

[sland Scout Commissioner, who

‘accompanied them ashore in the

Harbour Master’s launch,

Mr. Nevill, the only member ot
‘he contingent who has visited
jarbados before said that he re-
etted that they did not have a
mgeéer stay in the tsland ag he
vould have liked the boys to see
more of it.

They were however lucky to
ee Barbados at all because, nor-
nally, they would. have. gané
virect to Jamaica, owing to
ue Giffculty in getting stean:-
hip aecommodation, they had to
ake the Colombie which was the
nly vessel they could get.

Sight Seeing

He thought it was a yery great
»pportunity for the boys who were
njoying themselves and seeing
something of the: various islands
on their way to Jamaica,

Mr, Nevill was in Barbados four
years ago when he made a five
months’ tour of the West Indies
or Seout Headquarters, On that
»ccasion he was aceompanied by
his wife and made Barbados his
1eadquarters where he = spent
hree months,

Mrs Nevill ls a Guide Commis-
joner in England and has been
in the movement for many years

Mr. Roberts said that all the
boys were very pleased to be in
Barbados and added that at eacn
port of call, they had excellent
iospitality from the scouts who
placed cars at their disposal and
*ven conducted them around the
islands.

He said that they had a very
nice group of boys who were mak-
ing their first trip to the Wes‘
Indies. On the voyage down from
Southampton, they spent some otf
their time doing preparation work
for the Jamboree, They were de-
lighted at what they had seen in
the ports they had visited and
were eagerly looking’ forward to
stops at the other ports of call

Hosnitality

Mr, Roberts who is well known
in England for his hospitality to
couts from all over the world, has
had at his headquarters scout
from 42 nations. He is well ac-
quaintéed with scouts from Jamai
ca since there was a contingen|
from that colony to England for

the Coronation in 1937 and
ono‘her to Holland in 1939 for the
Dutch Jamboree

@ On Page 5



Egypt Set
For Talks

CAIRO, Feb. 20.

Egypt appeared set to enter in
to immediate and speedy nego-
tiations with Britain on the basis
of absolute fulfilment of her de-
mands for evacuation of British





’

ARMS PLANS
FALL SHORT

By W. G. LANDREY

/ LONDON, Feb. 20
Prime Minister Winston Chureh-
i revealed on Wednesday that
Britain's rearmament programme
fell short of the #0al this year b
almost ten per cent. of the
duled amount, He told the
of Common

House
that the original pro-

ramumne scheduled for thre: years |
ao certainly take more thant
Churchill ran into a flurry of
ihestions on how far the rearma-
ment programme ig be hind and
how long it would now take, “J
cannot give an exact figure, but
present indications are that ex-

penditure will fall short by about
1,200. million poundy,”’ ¥
aabeue Mmomber George Chet-

yrd, asked if this meant that the
programme would take four or
five years. “Tt certainly will take
longer than three years,”’ Chureh-
ilk replied

—ULP,



Nc
Mass Murderer
Now On Tri
ow On Trial
POITIERS, France, Feb 20
A jovial fifty
Widow went on trial
as A mass murderey ace used 0
killing two husband , ber owr
mother and father and eight othe
relatives and friends in the past 2{
years,
If found guilty Mme Maric
Besnard can be sentenc¢ d to deat}
mn the guillotine Besnard i
charged with feeding lethal dose
of arsenic to 12 persons betwer
192 nd 1949 in a plot to inheri
money and property valued at ten
million franes, Detained on sus
picion of murder 80 months ago
Mme. Besnard denied any guil
" police exhumed body afte
body and tested them for arsenic
fhe police became suspicious afte:
the woman's second husband, Leor
| Besnard died in October 1947. His
| body was exhumed two years later
and 19 milligrams of arsenic were

four-year-olc
for her life








| found Exhumation of all her

Jother deceased relatives and close

jfriends followed, Police said eact
jeath brought Mme Besnard closer
o the fortune

| -—U,P

|

|

|

!

Deportation
Commences

NEW YORK,
Shaughnes
the
Vaturalization
m Wednesday
t

Feb, 20

District
Immigration’ anc
Service announced
that two mass de
movement the larges
memory, Will remove
150 aliens, mostly shir
and stowaways, to. the
Far East and Southerr

Edward
Director

of

portation

1 recent
than
jumpers
Near and
Europe.

A chartered plane will leave
New York for San Francisco to-
ight with 47 Pakistanis, They will
be placed uboard the S.S. Presi-
lent Wilson bound for
and shipment by plane
homeland

|
|
|
|

nore

to their







troops from the Suez Canal Zone} On Saturday 108 or more alien
and unity of Egypt with the Su-] will be placed aboard SS. Vul-
dan under the Egyptian Crown ania

While Abdul Fattah Amr Pasha Shaughnessy said 108 alic hac
Egypt’s Ambassador to Britain,| already been processed for depor-
seemed to succeed in his mission}tation but the number probabl
to London to prepare the stage for} would be inereased before sailing
the resumption of Anglo-Egyptier Of this group 59 are be ing,
negotiations, Premier Amr Pasha] ported to Italy 26 to Greece, 13
in Cairo emphasized that such] Portugal, four to Turke , tt re
negotiations if held would be ur-] Jordan and one each to A
‘gent and very speedy.—-U.P. Yemen and Egypt —t
from four drifting sections Six timated time of art

listed are dead and eight ar« rough se? Three

ting and presumed dead. ued fro th po \ ce : er

Eighteen of 25 men re sabi atandindg by at the yy

last night were due in Boston this other fou ere taken off t
morning aboard the Coast Guar ectior e For lere

cutter Acushnet The cutter had on board ‘ er Y

been due to reach port 7 a.m ¢

t had rev € (cP

North
sided to light contact between |
)

|
|
|



Hong Kong



res.

WT



PRICE : FIVE CENTS



House Pass $3,500
For Agricultural
Development

Mr. W. A, Crawford (C)

called upon the Government

to consider subsidising animal feed with a view to milk
being sold at a lower price and Mr. O. T. Allder (I) eriti-

cised Government for failin

g to make people werk land

which they kept under bush, when the House were dis-
cussing a Resolution for $3,500 to be voted for Agrieultural

development.

8th Army
Beat Reds’
In The Air

IGHTH ARMY HEADQUAR-
rERS, Korea, Feb. 20

United Nations and Communist

ghters traded light punches in

>» air and on the ground with!
gaining the edge in the air;






nd neither side winning on the
round, F86 Sabre Jets which
ive battered the Reds through: |
ut the war in the air with the
dds against them enjoyed the
are experience of jumping an
nferior force of M.1.G. 15's over
orth Korea and damaging three
ther I'wenty-six Sabre jets
inced om cight M.1LG's and in
brief 600 m.p.h, clash put holes |
three of then |

}

Subres got their chance while
lying top cover for F84 Thun-
ier jets and Meteor jets of the
\ustralian Airforce which were!

working over Communist supply |
and buildings far below |
Thunder jets blasted 32 craters |

n key rail lines between Sun-
thon nd Chonju and Pyong-
yeng, battered the Red capital o
Korea The ground wa

trols,
ving
he past

both sides apparently
satistied themselves during
two weeks
that the other

same dug in
attacks of

of heavier
army wa
positions
last week

on
the
ommunist

lich apparently were aimed at}
tin the Allied line dropped
Tuesday and Wednesday to

ry light probes which ended
the first show of determined

‘sistance

The first U.S, Marine draftees

» enter the combat zone since

i
World War II landed in the big-
‘est batch of marine replacements
*t sent to Korea. Nine hundred
i - nearly half of them
marched off
1

inves
scripts the
ansport ship General William

Wiegal at an East Korean port in
'

elow: freezing weather as the
shone brilliantly on the
now-covered ground —UP.

——

WANTED JAIL

NEW MEXICO, Feb, 20
Carlton Owen 23-y@ar-old col-
e student, refused to accept the
irected verdict of acquittal on a
raft law violation charge and in-

isted that he should go to jail
he jury in the court of the Fed-
ral District, Judge Hatch obliged
e defendant, After deba\Ving ter

iinutes they found him guilty
Owen volunteered to serve a:
government witness against him

lf after government failed tc
yresent sufficient evidence to con-
viet him.
—U.P.



The Resolution was eventually

| Resolution

j the

Ritter, “My.

Replying to Mr,
G. H. Adams said that he should
refrain from making such wild

tatements in the face of such a
fact as Jamaica sending a delega-
tion to Barbados to stady Barba-
dos’ method of utilizing all its
land.

The Addendum to the Resolu-
tion states that as a result of the
recent ineredse in the of
livestock feed, a further amount
will be required to meet expendi-
ture at the Central Livestock Sta-
tion and the District Agricultural
Stations for the remainder of the
financial year. A large part of
this increase will however be offset
by additional revenue which will
be received from the increase in
ihe selling price of milk

No Optimism

Leading off the debate on .
Bill, Mr Crawford Said he aia
share the easy optimism in
the Addendum and held by the
Senior Member for St, Joseph, Ex-
perience was that since the new
nerease in the price of animal
eed and milk, sales of milk had

‘len off considerably.
He’ believed that. the Govern-
ment would also find—or perhaps
had already discovered—that there

| Was no additional revenue to off

el the new increase
was being sold

‘It is a very
ifiairs,” he said
cumstances which

because less

serious state of
“Since the eir-
gave rise to the
there has been.a fur-
ther increase in the price ot feed.
When this Resolution was under
consideration, feed was soniething
like $64 a bag and gow Mt is
$74

“T understand that the Dairy
Association is now discussing with
appropriate authorities the
question of a further increase of
milk in order to offset «this increase in the price of feed”.

He said that it was understood
generally in the Dairy Industry
that in order to profit, milk would
have to be sold at 18 cents per
pint.

With the present price of milk,
it was beyond the reach of a large
number of working class people.
tt was therefore a matter which
the Government should take very
seriously.

Vital Articles Of Diet

“We have got to bear in mind,”
he said, “that milk is a vital
irticle of diet for everybody and
that any further increase in its
price must place it beyond the
reach of all but those of very high
incomes.

“Tt therefore appears to mé that
yovernment will have to recon-
ider the question of subsidising
he animal feed.”

He said that when that item was
“ontrolled and subsidised, it was
sold at less than $4.50 a bag and
it present it was being sold at $74
1 bag

The big dairy producers could not
be blamed if they atternpted to re-
oup the rising cost of production,
but the Government held a duty
to the community to see to it that
an articlé like milk could come
within the reach of the average
working man or woman,

@ On page 5

DELICIOUS!
NUTRITIOUS!

KEEP HEALTHY AND STRONG

Ansist on the

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PAGE TWO

ae

BARBADOS



ADY RECKITT was an in-
transit passenger throug!
Barbados yesterday making the
una trip cruise from Southamp-
von by the Colombie.

She met at the Baggagt
W srehouse yesterday by Mr. Victox
Marson and Mrs. Roy Wilson.

Lady Reckitt was a regular vis-
itor to Barbados in the ’30’s when
she visited here with her former

isband the late Col. A. C. Bishop.

> fast here about 14 years?



was

ago.
Sea And Air
ASSENGERS left Barbados by
sea and air yesterday to spend
Carnival in Trinidad Leaving by
the Colombie were Mrs.
Knight, Miss Barbara Malcolm,
Mrs. Cameron Stuart, Mr. John D
3 Leaving by B.W.ILA.,
were Mr. Colin Weekes of H.M
Customs, Miss Joan Drayton,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. M.
Drayton of Golf Club Road, Rock.
ley, Mrs. Maurice Armstrong and
her daughter Joyce of Chapel, St.
Philip.



Private Party

J T seems I got my facts mixed

yesterday, The party at the
Y.M.P.C., on’ Saturday February
23, is a private party (Charity
Costume Fete) organised by a
committee of Ladies and is not
the usual Carnival Show organ-
ised by the Y.M.P.C,

For Pharmacists Dinner
ISS SYBIL BARROW, B.Sc.,

and Pharmacist of Syden-
ham and Cumberland Hospital,
U.S.A. left yesterday by the

Colombie for Trinidad where she
will attend Carnival and _ the
Trinidad Pharmacists Dinner.

A sister of Mr. E. W. Barrow,
B.Se., M.C.P., Miss Barrow is
now on holiday from her duties
at the hospital. She came here
three weeks ago from Trinidad
and will be returning to the island
before going on to the Virgin
Islinds and Jamaica to spend the
remainder of her holiday.

Vernon *



AMONG the round-trip passengers intransit through Barbados yesterday on the “Colombie” was Lady
Reckitt (centre) who was met at the Baggage Warehouse by Mr. Victor Marson and Mrs, Roy Wilson.

Lady Reckitt and her former husband the late Gol. A. Cc. Bishop were frequent visitors to Barba-
dos in the '30s. She was last here about 14 years ago.

Main Item

AIN item on the programme
of the show organised by
Number Six Club of the Girls’
Industrial Union on ‘Saturday
February 23 is the fashion parade
which will take place before the
dance, Among the artistes in the
show are Miss Nell Hall ang Mr.
Joseph “Oscar” Tudor and Rev.
St. Clair Tudor, Mr, Keith Camp-
bell and his Society Five will
supply the music.
The show begins at 8.30 o’clock.



VISCOUNT

HYNDLEY

LEAVES BARBADOS

VISCOUNT HYNDLEY, G.B.E.,
of Meads and his elder daughter
Hon. Elizabeth C. Hindley who
have been holidaying in Barbados
since November 21st, 1951, staying
at the Colony Club and “Beach-
dands”, St. James, are due to leave
Barbados for New York by the
Mauretania when she calls here
next week.

Viscount Hyndley told the Ad-
vocate yesterday that he has en-
joyed his stay very much and he
is feeling a “dffferent person”. He
greatly ‘appreciates the kindness
and hospitality that he has re-
eeived during his visit.

“I was honoured,” he continued,
“by being invited to the opening
of the Legislative Session by His
Excellency the Governor. It was
a most interesting ceremony and |
shall be interested to hear what is
the outcome of the suggestion
that Barbados should have a Deep
Water Harbour,”

“Barbados seems to have all the
facilities for such a development
Surely this attractive and import-
an! island should have as good a
harbour-as any is'and in the West
Indies. If Barbados wants to en-
courage visitors I venture to sug-
gest the ‘ransport arrangements to
and from the island want looking
iftto.”

“T havé been much impressed by
what I have seen of the Police
Force and those who heard their
band and the organist of the
Cathedral play the Funeral March
in Saul at the Memorial Service
for His late Majesty King George
VI will not forget it.”



“I was delighted to have been
taken over the Bulkeley Sugar
Factory and was most interested
in the plant.”

Viscount Hyndley also spoke of
enjoying an afternoon watching
Barbados play Jamaica at cricket

I was very glad to have this op-
portunity as I have followed the
advancement of West Indian
Cricket for many years

Touching Lriefly on Barbados
beaches, he said he thought they
were delightful and hoped that
they would not be spoilt by glass

old tins and the like being left
about.
Viscount Hyndley ended by

saying, “I very much hope I shall
be able to pay another visit to this
charming island and with that hope
I bid it au revoir and best wishes.”

Viscount Hyndley was born in
October, 1883 and is the son of the
late Rev. Wm. Talbot Hindley
M.A., of Eastbourne He was



ucated at Weymouth College.

Married in 1909, he has two
daughters. He wag a member of
the Coal Controller's Export Ad-
visory Committee from 1917-1918
Commercial Adviser, Mines De-
artment from 1918 to 1938 and
again from 1939-1942, From 1942-
43 he was Contreller General of
the Ministry gf Fuel and Power
ind from 1931-1946 he was also
Managing Director and Chairman
to several English industrial com-
panies. His home in England is in
Chelsea Square,



Women in the News—1.



Ifon. Mrs. M.E. Hanschell Vi.B.E., MLL.C

THIRTY

years ago,

" pioneers started
ment of Child Welfare and within that period it has blos-!
somed out into a healthy s

a small

cial service with Government

taking the lead in establishing an official department,

Hon, Mrs. M. E. Hanschell,
M.B.E., along with the late Mrs.
Florence . Brown, started what
was then known as the Baby
League at Eagle Hall in 1921. Mrs,

Brown who was the wife of a
Medical Officer with extensive
practice, saw at first hand the

difficulty of expectant
and their children, . . . because of
the lack of pre-natal treatment
Because of this she dedicated not
only the remainder of her life
but also part of her slender
means to the relief of the suffer-
ing of those who were then
regarded as the “lesser breeds
without the law”

Mrs, Brown gave up her house
to the use of expectant mothers
who received treatment and later
her son gave a spot of land in
memory of the work his mother
had previously rendered. Together
with her husband’s help and that
of a few doctors, corrective
treatment was rendered in Mrs.
Hanschell’s garage which she
kindly offered as the room for
consultants, Pre-na al treatment
proved beneficial not only to
mothers who enjoyed better
health but also to the new born
baby which ‘was spared much
suffering at a later date,

Mrs. Hanschell also took an
active part in the Women’s
Social Welfare League of which

mothers





BEACH
LADIES TOILET

LADIES BRUSHI

Dial 4220

MEN S BRUSHES

President, At
were no Social
nor government
life of the

she was
there

Officers
and the

that

grants
League

depended solely on the voluntary |

aid rendered. After a
several years when the
the work lessened it
tated.

Not only did

lapse of
scope of
was resusi-

Mrs. Hanschell
served in organisations for ren-
dering help to the suffering of
the island, but also those visiting

the island. The Navy Welfare |
League of which she was Presi-|
dent offered assistance to men of
the Merchant Navy and Warrant!
Officers which would enable |

them to attend functions as they
sired, and also visit places: of



interest

with companions who
gave picnics, dances etc,
In 1949 at the instance of Sir

Hiliary Blood, the then Governor,
Mrs. Hanschell became the first
lady member of the Legislative
Council in which she always took

a quiet interest, |

Owing to pressure of time she
has resigned from the posts which
she once held but yet her inter-
est in Social Welfare is as keen
as it was in the past. She
expresses the wish that there
will one day be Baby Leagues
in all the parishes of the island!
and also Clinics to prescribe
medicine for the sick and infirm.

JUST ARRIVED
MEN & LADIES DRESSING TABLE SETS

PACKS ...
BRUSHES




ALSO A NICE ASSORTMENT OF PHOTO FRAMES.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIFLDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

vocete
Guiana by the
Davidson.

his paper and at
the same

vices as

ish Guiana
natural harbour should bring him

town.

move-

time |
Welfare |

| it.



Intransit

NTRANSIT on the
from

Busman’s Holiday

R. H. O. HUSBANDS of the
Reportorial Staff of the Ad-
leaves today for British
Schooner Philip

England on_ his
back to Trinidad
Russell Barrow, son of
Barrow of Miller’s
Mr, Husbands

wil spend dent of Queen’s Royal College.
about a_ fort He was accompanied by his wife
night in British and infant daughter,

Guiana where Dr. Barrow, a cousin of Mr.
he will gather Johnny Brathwaite, a former
logal stories for Island Scholar who is now a

time nando, qualified in

get experience King’s College, London Univer-
in the methods sity. He is expected to take up
of intercolonial an appointment with the Trini-
Shipping ser- dad Government.

sup-







plied by schoon- 2 Back To Trinidad

ers.

He is the RR STURNING to Trinidad yes-
Shipping Re- terday afternoon by the
porter of the 4. 0. Husbands French §S Colombie was Miss
Advocate and go his visit to Brit- Olive Edwards, Registrar and

Where there is a

experience in order to be able to spent two weeks’ holiday here
make comparisons with Bridge- staying with Mr. and Mrs. Josh

Punch Worked Black Magic
—He Made a Regular Train Out of a Toy One—

By MAX TRELL

“L WISH,” Knarf, the Shadow,
was saying to his sister Hanid,
“that this little toy train was a real
BIG train, I mean, as big as a regu-
lar train. And I wish the tracks
were as big as regular tracks, And
[| wish this whole room was as big
as a regular railroad station.”

“So do I,” agreed Hanid. “But
wishing isn’t going to do any good.”

At this Mr. Punch, who was sit-
ting in his rocking-chair on the
other side of the room, said in a loud
voice: “Now this won’t be any
trouble at all, my dears. Just let
me look .p what to do in my Book
of Magic.”

Toy Train

“You think we ean make the toy
train as big as a regular train!”
cried Knarf,

Mr. Punch had already found the
page he wanted in the Book of
Magic. “Ah, here we are! Just do
what ft says.”

Knarf looked at the page and
read aloud:

If you want your train to be

As BIG as any train can be,

Shut your eyes and turn about

Then take a breath and PUFF

IT OUT! Into the Train

Knarf did this. And the instant | And then, just as they were about
he puffed out his breath, there was | to get into the train, alas, every-
an enormous loud puff from the lo- thing suddenly got dark.
comotive of the little train. There And when the lights went up
Was a great clanging of a bell, and | again Knarf and Hanid saw they



Punch consulted his magic book.

“Come on! Let’s go, Hanid! This
is wonderful!”

“Yes, yes!” cried Hani’ as ex-
cited as she could possibly be.

They both ran over to the train
as fast as they could, for it seemed
about to start. It was puffing and
steaming harder than ever. The
whistle was tooting.

} wheels were turning, and someone | were sitting on top of the tiny toy

Was shouting, All aboard! Knarf
opened his eyes and to his astonish- station were gone,
ment he saw that the whole room Mr, Punch was sitting in the
had become a railroad station, with | rocking-chair on the other side of
people running to and fro with va- | the room, He was smiling. “I forgot
lises and trunks. And there, on the | to tel! you,” he said, “that the magic
tracks Was the toy train, but so big | only lasts for five minutes.”
now that Knarf hardly recognized | Knarf and Hanid picked them
: j Selves up sadly. How wonderful! it
“All aboard!” tne conductor kept | would have been, they thought, to
houting. “All aboard for Chicago,|go to Chicago, China,* Cons
China, Constantinople and Califor- nople and California, But that wes
nia!’ the trouble with magic. It nevez
Knarf seized Hanid by the hand. | l:usted long enourh

Rupert and the Pine Ogre—3.

tee al ay
48 eS

train again, The people and the

See



Rupert still can’t understand the
full meaning of the message, but the

ippened a tew days ago and it’s
e Ogre's doing. Now that we




Autumn Elf leaps away in the “20W Ais slaves are nathe ing there
Breatest of glee ‘* Come, I'll show mr —. ay ae 7 ; hack

. we ry them and we'll whac
you,” he cries Pointing to where a them. Despite all their wicked way
large oak stands black and dead and = Nurwood fore@ shall not become a
Stripped of its leaves. me

* That only



er eee Be ee

oe PLAZA





HELDORADO

Titel 4006 {Rte

Colombie
way
was Dr. W.
Mr. N.
Stores Ltd.,
Port-of-Spain and a former stu-

practising Barrister in San Fer-
Medicine at

Teacher of the Caribbean Train-
ing College at Maracas. She had

ee a nee
=Q¢645->

x +c

- sy a

Sms:

ae





t



ADVOCATE



Called On Governor |

Me I B. NEVILL, O.B.E.,
F.C.A., Headquarters Com-
missioner for Grants and leader
#~ the U.K. Boy Scouts’ contin-
gent ho passed through Barba-

dos yesterday, paid a call on His
Excellency the Governor at Gov-
ernment House yesterday morn-
ing. He was accompanied by
Major J. E. Griffith, Island Scout
Commissioner.

Short Holiday

Miss SHEILA LEWIS, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. M. C
Lewis of “Hughenden” Barbaree:
was among the passengers arriv-
ing by T.C.A. yesterday morning
from Montreal. She is down tc
Bpemd a short holiday with her
family,

Sheila went up to Canada ir
early June 1951 with her sister
Joan and she is now with T.C.A
in Montreal.

Directors Meeting
I ON. H. A. CUKE, C.B.E., left
yesterday for Trinidad by
B.W.I.A. to attend a meeting Of
the Board of Directors of B.W.LA.
of which he is a member.

Talking Point

People should be a good deal
dle in youth,
. —Stevenson.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

URSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952
15 a.m. Newton Goodson, 11.30 a.m



Crazy People, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
~ pm, News Analysis

4007.15 pum.

4'p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily

Serv'ce

4.15 p.m. Rhythm is their
Business, 4.45 p.m Sporting Record,
5 p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m

New Records, 6 p.m
Orchestra, 6.15 p.m
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-
framme Parade, 7 p.m, The News, 7. 1(
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. We see
Britain, 7.30 p.m. The Small Geography
of a Youngish Writer,

745--10.30 p.m. .

Southern Serenade

SL32M 48.43M





7.45 p.m. Crazy People, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsree!, 8.30 p.m. Special Dispatch
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week, 9 pon
Ring up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15
p.m. A Good Job, 10.30 p.m. The Last

Chronicle of Barset





HATSMANSHIP
CHURCHILL LEAVES.
echoes continue, A New



in the Press:
you applaud his

tation it is

courage to

CRASSWNDNH



Across
1. In case a trance is remaae. (8)
8 Wood you may jong for (4)
Â¥. Number one. (3)
11, Cushion of sorts. (3)
13. To Ted just deserted. (3)
14 Piece of {and more than a litt ‘
intended, too. (9)
15. 1 pose to sectire {t (5)
20, It should be binding (3)

21. She's somebody's daughter, (
22. No royal kilitng, this (3)
2%. Called black by the pot. (6)
25. Basement. (4)

26. Hold up to ridicule (3)

Down

1. One vehicle then another (7)
2. Reputed cause of unemploy-
ment among doctors. (5)
3. Do tron here for Dreference, (6)
4. Lines sent for watchers. (y}
5. A side with this spirit. it's ai)
for the good. (4)
&. Nora’s favourite colour + (4)
7. You must do this to 17 (6)
10 Saluting or crying? (8)
12 High as a mountain (3)
16. Guide for cattle. (5)
17. Introduced after purchase (4)
'8. Ripe change in water. (4)
jg May be heid on an 18 (4)
2% The Last Minstre! has one (3)

Solution of yesterday's puze
Tortoise; 7. Rapid: 10.
12. Ant; 13. Bstabiist

20. “Latr: 2



Across:
ch



Sena; 27
2 Oasis ara In

6 Brothers 8 Peat: 4
Blind: 15. Land: 17
Wire: 21 Ran 25 ‘Pir- 24 Bat

PLAZA

B° TOWN (pia 2310)

eno

e

LOU BUNIN'S ;
magical merger __j
of live action ©
and puppetry! ©




FRIDAY — 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and continuing to MONDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

also the COLOR SHORT —
“FESTIVAL OF LONDON”









i DIAL 2310
)
B TODAY only! 4.30 & 8.30 pm. RKO Radio Double! 2
R Walt Disney's
YY ” oo 7
from S34 togeay ||| 1 (TREASURE ISLAND" & “The SET UP" | 4
Ry hee RS by Hao $ 3.08 { D Color by Technicolor with ROBERT RYAN R
Sy Me ae hale -a te be $ 1.92 i Bobby O'DRISCOLL— Robert NFWTON others B
2S Sit 88 Bh a hes } G TO-DAY’S SPECIAL 1.30 pi A
5 dese Ned ess He 5e. .
E HIDDEN CITY & SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE
} Bomba The Jungle Boy TEX RITTER R
{ Sat. Special 9.30 a.m.—1.30 p.m Midnite Sat. 23rd E
0 ‘ ae bra BONANZA TOWN (New)
} ROY ROGERS DOUBLE Charles STARETT & E
x Ww MAN FROM MUSIC MOUNTAIN | Smiley BURNETT &
i) THE ANKANS Ss



with Th: Hoc





| THE CHANGES to

Concert programmes wili begin

and on the



25.338M 41 22M

Scottish Magazine,

but the
York
hatter takes a big advertisement
“Whether or not
statesmanship,
you must admire his hatsmanship,
In an age of increasing regimen-j;
heartening to see a
man with individuality and the
express it. We re-
Spectfully lift our hat to a great
Williams of Brighton, Black Rock, hatsman.” f



| the King's Counsel whe
Queen's Counsel are two lir



| New pillar bores ana mai

| will be stamped with the initials |
CER

iniaisuinastionsnasiainsinguendebeemshdiitiniuligilinalnasd

MARCHIONESS LAS SALI
has been given authority to sell
her title to “any well-to-do man}
{or-woman of genteel birth.”



















LIKE ripples in a pona when the

centre is disturbed, the effects of the King’s death
spread out into the everydey
life of the people

be made
remind us at how many points
the mark of monarchs touches
our — lives Here -in the
Queen's English—are familia
examples :-—

with “ God Save The Queen

board outside the
cinema

COME FILL THE ,CUP

James, Gacney -&
yew) vai)

New coins will have a new hee

facing right. the first feacin
righ’ since King Edward V1/
for no coins were issued for

Edward Vill

) King ed King Vann of boric the ualy

T Pre

} ‘THE

| KING'S REGULATION:

\ FOR THE ARMY AND THE
ARMY RESERVE

}



The Army wili
of the Queen



4 :
Mateo
stamps will be re

head al|

Postage
designed to show the
the Queen



The Food Ministry actea s
“On Her Majesty s Service

lt is “Her Matesty’s Gover*
ment” nou and prtsone:
will be detained during H

Majesty's pleasure. And umo

becom



KC.s who were origine

created Q.C.s—in Victorias day

They are Viscount Cecil (1899

and Mr. Nathaniel Micklem |
(1900)





|
vans |



|
THE KING



Proposed by: THe Presinent

Toastmasters must
Loyal Tost

And even the parents of new-born |
|

call @ new

babes—if they are triplets—can
apply for a £3
Bounty.” .. .

“ Queen's



London Express Service |



TITLE FOR SALE

DO you want to buy a 300-

year-old Spanish title?



In Madrid _ 21-year-ok



“I have a secretary’s
I feel the title isn’t

proper.”’



EMPIRE

OPENING TO-MORROW at
2.30 & 8.30 and continuing

Daily 4.45 & 8.30

introducing

SALLY PARR «PHILIP SHAWN





DIAL 5170

GRAND OPENING

Sat. March Ist
BARBAREES
PLAZA

WARNER BROS. HAPPY MUSICAL

with

On Moonlight Bay
DORIS DAY-GORDON MacRAE

ind the New Singing Sensation
JACK SMITH







HAMPSTEAD

w'-
m.&-
GLO
FOR CLASSY ENTERTAINMENT

5 & 8.30 AND CONTINUING TO SUNDAY

*
»
»
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

eee ee ee OO OO

Sat. 1.30 p.m
Six Gun Mésa

kell aa BSS

THURSDAY,






WITH





BE. 1s07yY SALON

(Just Opened)
Corner Pr. Wm. Henry and Swan Sts.

THE BUDGET

Cold Waves
Machine
Machineless

Toni professionall
done... +

FEBRUARY 21, 1952










WAVES




$8.00
7.00
7.00










6.00








YOU CAN
GET YOUR

REQUIREMENTS FROM

PLANTATIONS LTD



TO-DAY







SSS

Om,
K “emea,, a
a,



pe is asad 4
eae aL)



A NEW FILM WITH AN OLD FAVOURITE

MONDAY FEB 25TH, TUES 26TH 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

“ROAD HOUSE”

Richard WIDMARK, Cornel WILDE and Ida LUPINO

And

“CAUSE FOR ALARM”

eee





ROODAL THEATRES



EMPIRE

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.45 & 8.30
Jose FERRER
ACADEMY AWARD
Winner In

STANLEY KRAMER'S
Producjion

CYRANO
DE BERGERAC
Extra; LATEST NEWSREEL
———————
Opening To-morrow 2.30 & 8.30

“THE SUN SET AT DAWN”

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 & 8.15





Bing CROSBY—Bob HOPE in
“ROAD TO RIO”
and Alan LADD in
“WHISPERING SMITH”
Opening ‘To-morrow 4.90 & 8.15
“HURRICANE ISLAND”
and
“COCKEYED WONDER”









DIAL 8404

(only) 4.45
8.30 p.m

TO-DAY

Lili PARMER &

HOUSE OF
& FRANKENSTEIN

0
I BEWARE OF PITY
Ss

Bors Kar'off

r
Fri, & Sat
I HOMICIDE
Robert Douglas &
N

BRIGHT LEAF
Gary Cooper



“Alias

‘The _Pratr‘e” The Kid”

Lon Chane

4.45 & 8.39 7

Midnite Sat
“Conquest of
and Cheyenne”

Sundown On Billy

ROXY

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 & 8.15

TRAPPED BY BOSTON
BLACKIE

and

TO THE END OF THE
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952

US. Proposed

Objection Made In House To
Limiting W.I. Quota To 100

AN ADDRESS resenting the proposed discrimination
against West Indians entering the United States of Amer-
ica, and limiting the quota to 100 in any one year was pass-
ed by the House of Assembly at their meeting on Tuesday

night.

The Address was introduced by Mr. Ronald Mapp, and
members expressed apprehension at the grave effect which
such legislation would have on the economy of the West

Indies.

It was given an unanimous vote.

The Address

will be presented’ to the Governor for transmission to the
appropriate authorities in the U.S.A.

Later the House on a motion by
Mr. W. A, Crawford also passed
a complimentary Address express-
ing their appreciation to Senator
Clayton Powell jnr., and the West
Indian Committee who first initi-
ated protests against the Bill.

The Address protesting the dis-
crimination read:

The House have learnt with pro-
found alarm that there is betore
the Congress of the United States
of America a Bill known as the
“McCarran Bill,” having for its
object the limitation of emigrants
into the United States of Americu
from each West Indian island to
100 per annum.

Discriminavion

The House reset Wie proposes
GischifMinawon against wes. iin
Giaus Cspecially ay UNS Lime when
iS €Ss€nuial Wat tne people of
the pritish Commuoniweaiui
me United Siates Of America
should be drawn vogether in
IrienGship and neignbouriiness,

It thereiure respectiully requests
Your Excellency to have its teel-
ings in this matter made known to
Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary
of State for the Colones, tne
Presiaent of the United States, the
State Department of the Unitea
States and the pritish Ambassador
at Washington.

The complimentary Address for
transmission to the West Indian
Committee and Senator Powell
read:—

The House of Assembly de-
sires to place on record its ap-
preciation of the efforts being
made by U.S. Congressman
Adam Clayton-Powell jnr., and
his “Committee to act against
the McCarran Bill,” and re-
spectfully requests

ab

alu

ed threugh the usual channels
to Congressman Powell and his
committee, an expresssion of
itg heart-felt gratitude for their
valiont endeavours on behalf of
our people.

The House requests that Your
Excellency also ferward to Con-
gressman Powell and the Com-
mittee, a copy of the Address
which was passed this day in
connection with this matter.

Facts Well Known
Mr, R. G. Mapp, (L) in moving
the passing of (ne Address said he
did not intend to take up much
time, because the facts were well
known tO inembers. It would be
remembered that in 1949, that
House passed an Address against
a similar Bill which was at that
time known as the “Judd Bill”,
and which had been introduced in

the United States Congress.
Recently another Bill was in-
troduced into ihe Judicial Com-
mittee—it had not yet reached the

Congress. — by Sena McCarran,
and sought to limit the number
pt West Indians going to the

United States for permanent resi-
dence, to 100 per year from each
of the colonies,

The present position was that
West Indians were allowed to en-
ter the United States on the quota
given to Great Britain. There was
no limit such as that proposed by
the Senator McCarran Bill. If the
proposed Bill was passed, one
could well see that West Indians
would be discriminated against,
because no other territory was
jimited in such a manner so far as
immigration into the United Siates
was concerned,

West Indians in the United
States were alarmed by the Bill,
and were taking steps against it.
He felt that Barbados, not only on
behalf of Barbadians, but because
of the interest taken by West In-
dians in the United States, should
join them in their efforts to fight
the Bill.

He did not need to remind the
honourable House of the contribu-
tion which West Indians made and
are making to the United States
by way of their economic and cul-
tural standards, as well as in de-
tence.

It was a known fact that West
(ndians \ dominated the Harlem
area of New York, and their con-
tribution to American society and
thought was acknowledged

Borbados itself had
been invited through its legisla-
ture to join in promoting mutual
security between the West Indian
areas and America. Ar as
known there was also : 2
recently inviting them ‘o agree in
the extension of the provisions of
# new note passed hetween the
United Kingdom Government and

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MR. R. G. MAPP

the United Stays Government on
the question of Economic Co-op-
erauon,

Reply Postponed

The House quite righlly pdst-
poned their Reply to His Excei-
iency because they wanted to
Know to what extent they were
committing themeelves, and to
What extent the West Inuians
would beneiit by signing that new
note, or to what extent they would
have to enter in the military de-
fence, or signing away bases, by
Signing the notes in the argument.
They had to consider that the
United States and the United
Kingdom Government had to pro-
vide for the rigid security of the
expect-
-d to join in defence efforts of the
Free World and were expected
to take all measures to defend
democracy and freedom against
Communiem and the other “isms”
which threaten to over-run the
Western world,

If they were to do that it was
only fair and just that they
should ask the United States
Government to tell Senator Mc
Carran that it is impossible to
expect the United States Gov-
ernment to discriminate against
immigrants from the West
Indies,

It was not too much to ask that
goodwill should continue to exist
between the two worlds, and that
anything which would bring dis-
ress and disharmony between the
“wo areas should not be har-
boured. Such could only result in
the lack of goodwill, further in-
security, and would not at all have
the desired effect of spreading the
ideas of democracy and freedom,
and strengthening the security of
the Free World.

Sore Point

He thought that they wouid ali
agree that one of the sore points
was that West Indians were not
allowed to emigrate and settle,
even in the countries of the Com-
monwealth. Although taey

were
all members of a distinguished,
and were unde one crown and

Queen, they were limited to their
little corner of the earth, and were
not permitted to settle in those
territories which compose the
Commonwealth,

When he started out in that
vein, he was pointing out that
emigration was such a sore point,
that the matter of discriminating
was taken up by a West Indian
Conference which passed a Reso-
lution condemning any discrim-
ination against peoples of this
area, and asking the member Gov-
ernments of the Caribbean Com-
mission to admit members of the
West Indian area to their territo-
ries.

He did not know whether the
United States had taken note of
that Resolution which had been
passed by the West Indian Confer-
ence, but if it had not, it was time
that it did, because, although they
uld emigrate workers to the
United States under contract he
felt that it was very important to
fight a Bill of such a nature, it
being quite obvious that if
could get persons settled nerma-
nently it was to much greater ben-
efit to the people of these islands
than having some go abroad and
worl: for 9 couple months

Thin Edee OF The Wedge

The introduction of that Pil
micht inet be the thin edge of the
wedge: they saving, “we limit you
fo 190 now.” but later on they

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might reduce the number to 50.
It had been pointed out to him
that at present the feeling was that
the Bill limited the number to
100 from the entire area, and that
it was doubtful whether 100 peo-
ple went from Barbados to settle
in the United States in anyone
year. Although they did not have
100 going how, one could not fore-
s€e where a Bill of that nature
would end up. Even if they did
not have 100, the time might
come, Mevertheless, when more
than 100 people night want to
leave these colonies to settle in
that country. If the Bill was
passed, no more than 100 persons
bern in Barbados could settle in
the United States in any one year.
That was discrimination
against West Indians, because
people born in any other areas
were not limited. The Bill, if
passed, could have a very dire
effect om intended emigration
from the West Indies.

He did not think he could say
more against the Bill, but he felt
that the sentimerits which they
expressed that night. and which
were along the sathe lines ac those
expressed by a previous House
two years ago against the some-
what like Judd Bill, would serve
as a reminder to the United St»tes
Government.

Seconding the motion for the
passing of the Address, Mr. W. A.
Crawford (C) said he was sorry
that the controversy had arisen
of whether the limitstion to 100
applied to the entire area or each
individual colony. He did not think
that the honourable member war

correct, The source from which
he quoted the number 100 was
wrong,

From the information at his dis-
posal he believed that although
the reading itself said no more
than 100 persons born in any one
colony or area, in this particular
case, the West Indies were con-
sidered an area.

Cause For Alarm

The mater did give cause for
alarm. in 1948, for instance, tne
year beiore the “Judd Bill’ was
introduced, the number ol West
indians going into New York City
alone was 6,932, and in a 25 yeur
period—1923 to 1948, over 8U,u0U
West Indians were allowed to
settle permanently in the United
States of America.

One could therefore see that if
emigration was not limited to 100
a year, precisely what it would
mean. What alarmed him was
the fact that the proposed amend-
ment was supposed to have been
drafted by the American State De-
partment itself. It seemed to be a
direct action on the part of the
United States Government, and
not some action on the part of
the individual Senator to try to
puSh this discriminatory legisla-
tion through.

Under the existing arrange-
ments, West Indians were allow-
ed to go in under the quota charg-
able to the United Kingdom, and
that was over 60,000 a year so
long as they satisfied the Health
and Public Character provisions
of the Act. .

They did not need to go into
any da@tailed discussion on the
contribution made by West In-
dians in America, but it was dif-
ficult not to agree with the con-
tention advanced by the mover of
the Resolution. They had no ef-
fective means of retaliation at
the moment because they were not!
politically independent,

The Address was expressing
grave apprehension over the mat-
ter and was requesting Her Majes-
ty’s Principal Secretary of State
for the Colonies to make repre-
sentation to the appropriate au-
thority in Washington. He wanted |
to suggest that a paragraph be ad-
ded, placing on record the appre-
ciation of the colony, as a British |
West Indian colony, of the part
played by at least one American |
Congressman and the West Indian
Committee in the United States

Another Address }

Accepting a suggestion from Mr.
G. H. Adams that a separate Ad-
dress, complementary to the one
moved by Mr. Mapp, should do for
that purpose, Mr. Crawford said
that when the debate was finished,
he would move the passing of
another address to be sent to the
appropriate persons through the
Secretary of State for the Colon- |
ies.

He did not think that there was
much more that could be said on
the matter, and he therefore beg-
ged to support the motion for the
passing of the Address which he
hoped would have been passed
unanimously, because he knew
that.sction of the sort would as-
sist those West Indians who were
fighting the issue in the United
States itself.

Mr. C. E. Talma also supported
the Address. He said that on a!
matter of such grave importance
he certainly would have liked tr
make his slight contribution, be-
cause he knew thot if a Bill of
that nature was successful in be-
ing passed in the United States
Congress, what a great blow
would be on the economic life of



all of the islands, and more
especially Barbados.
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It was from that view that he
regarded the matter as being
urgent and very important, because

whenever one looked around in ali
of the country districts in particu-
Iar, and one happened to see any
habitabl homes or houses, straight
away, one was brought to feel &
sense of realisation that the money
was not earned in the cane fields
of Barbados but that that money
came from the same United States,
and in recent years, from places
like Aruba, Bermuda and Curacao,
etc
He was saying that the econo-
my of the island was based, to
a large extent, on money receiv -
ed here by relatives or friends
whose families were in the
United States. Although it might
look like a slight matter to some
there that night, it would affect
adversely at least 35 or 40 per
cent. of the population of the
island.

What was more, if they looked
around they would see thaf many
of their professional men had be-
come such becausé they were
granted facilities to study in the
United States.

Mr. Talma emphasised that it
was a grave and important matter
with which they were dealing. It
was quite right that in the note as
read by the senior member for St.
Thoms, no mention was made of
West Indians of colour, but any
body who faced up to such issues
and understood life would under-
stand that the object of the Bill
was to keep out negroes and not
white West Indians.

His Honour the Deputy Speaker
who was occupying the Chair at
the time wondered if the member
was right on that point, and Mr.
Talma replied that he was just
trying to say that the Bill would
operate against West Indians of
colour. Knowing the set up in Bar-
bados as he did, if the quota was
limited to 100, he was saying that
100 white Barbadioans would be
granted priority. That was how
the Bill would affect Barbados, and
when one thought of the five or
six thousand applicants who went
to the American Consulate for
visas, they were just pigeon-holed
or rejected.

They could well understand
what a great hardship would be
created more especially to the
people of Barbados, and West In-
dians generally speaking, who had
their relatives in that country, and
who would like to join them there.

But they could not attack the
American Government. They
had no control over that. Rather
they should be making represen-
tation to Canada, a member of
the British Commonwealth, who
also had their restrictions. If
they could not make represen.
tation as far as Canada was con-
cerned, how much less would
their voices be heard by the
Americans.

sfowever, he did not think
America should create restrictions
as far as immigration of West In-
dians, whether black or white, was
concerned, Not only America, but
not other part of the world wanted
negroes. If Canada of ali peoples,
with their vast open lands, thous-
ands and thousands of square
miles, not to mention acres—Can-
ada which is larger in area than
the United States, and whose pop-
ulation was about 1/15th of the
population of America, refused to
open its door to West Indians—
how

nai

coloured West Indians —



|
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And Save $258.50 ©:

ADVOCATE







muc! ore so, Ameri which was
not a member Common-
a

If orre ent to Canada to study,
One had to leave immediately his
or her studies were completed.
With America they were beggars

and therefore could not be choos-
es, and he hoped that their
atfnipt to make representations
against the Bill would not irritate
the situation.

What they were doing there, Mr.
Talma said, might not carry muca
weight, and he was of opinion that
they should explore all avenues so
as to secure employment for the
unemployed. It was al] well and
good to come and say that there
were British Consulates in all parvs





ne



of the world and ambassadors and
so on. They at least had to satisf

the people of this col ar t

especially the ones who

ing to thern to « reat thir li

relieve their d

dele ions



er they would send
abroad to emigration possi
bilities.

In so far Ame con.
cerned, he hoped that just as they
made use of the West Indian
islands during the war for the de-

fence of their continent,
have some

they would
sympathy and compas-

sion on the islands, and far from
closing down the door whereby a
few hundred Of “our people” are
granted facilities of going to the
United States to improve their
position and lot in life, that an-
other Senator might see fit to brin
to the attention of the authoritic
there that the West Indies fre at

their back door, and that the West
Indies are under-developed coun-
tries with dire poverty and good
breeding grounds for Communism
Mr. Talma suggested that perhaps
the United States could consider

Barbados in their Point 4 Pro.
gqramme
Mr. F, L. Waleott (L), said

)1t members of the House did
not seem to view the matter as
they should, and it seemed to
him that there was greater en-
thusiasm about the matter by
West Indians who lived in the
United States than these who
lived in the celonies, because the
West Indians who lived in the
colonies were not aware of what
the other West Indians in the
United States, though a minority
group, were trying to do.

A Bill of that nature, if passed
would have more adverse effect on
West Indians who lived in the colo-







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BY

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nies. He had had the opportunity

of speaking to the West Indian

Committee which met in Washing-

to discuss the matter with a

Senator of the United States De-

partment, and the British Embassy,

and what was embodied in the
Address, in his opinion, was cor-

rect in that the number of people |
mentioned in it was not 100 for
the whole area, but 100 for each of
the respective colonies,

The peculiar thing about the Bill!
was that it did not apply to Latin
American countries, and although
they formed part, from a geograph-
ical point of view, of the area, they
were not restricted in this manner

The United States Government
iad benefited by the West Indies
‘ue to their geographical position.
Their mutual contribution to the’

ist war had been a great benefit
vo the United States. The bases |
leased to the United States were
leased without the consent of the
West Indies, and meant much to
the United States. }

On the question of manpower,
the taking of West Indian labour
was undoubtedly of assistance to
the colonies, but it was also of as- |
sistance to the United States Gov-
‘rnment to have the workers from |
the colonies which were in close |
proximity, and therefore could be

ton

had at low transport cost. |

West Indians in the United
States had contributed to the edu-
cational, social and political life
of that community. The commun-
ity was not homogeneous, there
being minority groups from: all
parts of the world going to make
it up, and therefore the West In-
dies, with the other minority
sroups, had played a great part in
the development of the country.

Contradictory |
Another aspect of the matter was
at it was very popular and easy |
) Say something to some one. They

*w the vast sums of money
hich were being spent in Asia to
oprove the conditions of those
people. The Four Point programme

President Truman—if those |
hings were really meant to be
vhat they were intended to mean,
| was difficult to reconcile the dif.
/erence in attitudes,

Mr, Walcott drew attention to
he recommendation passed by the
Fourth West Indian Conference,
vhere they had members of the
United States Government, the
Dutch Government, the French
Crovernment and the British Gov-
rhment, and at that conference it
vas pointed out that such restric-
tons, so far as migration was con-
erned, should not be practised,
nd that those countries should
ntensify their efforts to assist the
coples of the colonies,

rhere was no question of race or

jlour in the proposed Bill, he

‘id, but by implication, it would

ive a great effect on the colour.
a section of the community in
‘his area rather than on the white
ection of the community, be-

iuse as they were aware, there
were many coloured people who

}





hrough force of circumstances

had to migrate to the United

States, 4
There was another aspect ©:

the matter. They could afford to
say that because they were mem-
bers of the British Commonwealth
ff Nations and members of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion, every effort then was being
made to preserve and improve}
conditions for the people of the}
under developed areas.

@ On page 5





to









PAGE THREE












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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS daa ADVOGATE
SURES asisngn on, ein, beeen ve Sotoomen





Thursday, February 21, “1952



SEAWELL
THE policy, or better, lack of policy of
the United Kingdom with regard to com-
munications throughout the British West
Indies has been the subject of continuous
criticism in the United Kingdom and in
the West Indies for more than a decade.

Inter-island passenger steamship com-
munication is almost exclusively depend-
ent on North American steamship com-
panies, and travel to Europe is restricted
to one British passenger ship and a great-
er number of foreign steamships. The
word “British” seems out of place in any
description of sea passenger communica-
tions, although British cargo steamers
continue to operate profitably in the area.

With regard to air communications the
word “British” is very much in the con-
text. It is a British company, a subsidiary
of the British Overseas Airways Corpora-
tion which has a monopoly of air-passen-
ger travel throughout the British Carib-
bean. This monopoly extends to Barbados
although a Dutch Airline Company was
the first to put Barbados on the air-map.
Other airline companies are permitted to
use Seawell for special flights but only
British West Indian Airways, Trans-Cana-
da Airlines and a Venezuelan Airline
(LAV) have regular landing rights at Sea-
well.

Permission to land at Barbados was
only granted by the Government of the
United Kingdom to Canada in return for
landing rights granted to the United King-
dom by the Government of Canada, less |
than four years ago. At that time the
Government of the United Kingdom was
well aware of the fact that the then Sea-
well runway would have ‘to be rebuilt
and lengthened to allow Trans-Canada
airplanes to land. This was known by the
Government of the United Kingdom be-
cause a group of officials from the Minis-
try of Civil Aviation had visited Barbados
earlier and had reported to that effect.

With this knowledge and in view of the
fact that at that time, as today, a British
Airways Company (the British South
American Airways) held the monopoly of |
inter-territorial traffic in the British Car-
ibbean, it is surprising that the Govern-
ment of the United Kingdom did. not
approach the Government of Barbados
with a view to offering advice as to the
construction of a new runway which had
to be built at Seawell in any event, and |
upon the construction of which was de- |
pendent the implementation of the con- |
cession granted to Trans-Canada Airlines,
through the Government of Canada.

This is all the more surprising because |
it was obvious from the beginning of |
negotiations held between the representa-
tives of Trans-Canada Airlines and the
representatives of the then Barbados Goy-
ernment that thie major portion of the
money necessary for the construction of
the new runway at Seawell would be pro-
vided by the Imperial Government from
funds credited to Barbados’ account under
the terms of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Act. In fact £337,500, which
represent the major expenditure on the
new runway was provided from these
funds.

Yet the Governmen: of the United King-
dom appeared perfectly happy to permit
the Barbados Government to construct a |
runway for which it was providing most |
of the money necessary for its construc- |
tion, and landing rights on which are, to
this day, under the control of the Gov- |
ernment of the United Kingdom.

There must have been a reason why the |
United Kingdom, experienced, as it was |
during the war years, in the construction |
of airports and runways on severai con-
tinents should have shown this remark-
able lack of interest in an island which
had been recognised by a former director
general of British South American Air-
ways as an admirable potential refuelling
base and stop-over centre for British Air-
craft flying to South America. But that
is what happened and no one can deny
after reading Mr. Connolly’s report on
runway construction at Seawell that Bar-
bados has suffered a blow that would not
have fallen if responsibility for the con-
struction had been shared with the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation. Mr, Connolly |
places responsibility for failure where it
ought to be placed; on the two contracting
parties, the Government and the Contrac-
tor- r

The time has surely come for the Gov-’
ernment of Barbados to approach the
Ministry of Civil Aviation and the Gov-
ernment of the United Kingdcm and seek
from them advice as to the reliability or
otherwise of the runway at Seawell and
a clarification of the United Kingdom’s
intentions towards the future of Barbados’
airport in the British scheme of things.
The expansion of air traffic at Piarco in
Trinidad brings daily nearer the day |
when large airliners will want to altern-
ate between Barbados and Trinidad for re-
fuelling purposes. Barbados must plan
ahead now and it can do little planning |
unless full agreement is reached with the
United Kingdom as to Seawell’s future.







What Will The New

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

————

Queen

(and her husband) be Paid?

BEFOR ng the
will sen I ge

renounci

new Queen
rliament
: come now
£2 000,000 ross year
om the ¢ v Lands
In return the Queen will ask
that provision shall be made for
“the honour and dignity of the
Crown and the Royal Family.’

As the Duke of Windsor com-
ments in “A King's Story * this
exchange of hereditary revenues
for a fixed payment is a bar-
gain for the country.

For the revenues which the
Monarch surrenders—and has
done since the days of George
Ill—are now about twice as
large as the all wances paid by
the nation for the upkeep of the
Royal Family.

A New Bill
When the message has been re-
ceived,. a select committee of 21
M.P.’s, representing all parties,
will be set up to consider it.
The committee’s proposals will
be incorpcrated in a Civil List Bill





which, by law, hag to come into
force within six months of the
end of the late King’s reign
Meantime, the previous finan-
cial arrangements continue with
the exception that the QUEEN

MOTHER will receive an annuity
of £70,000 a year, for which pro-
vision was made in 1937.
The present scale of

payments

KING'S CIVIL
£410,000 a year.

QUEEN MARY,
year.

PRINCESS ELIZABETH
row the Queen, £40,000.

THE DUKE OF EDIN-
BURGH, £10,000,

THE DUKE
CESTER, £35,000,
THE PRINCESS ROYAL
£6,000.
PRINCESS
£6,000.
£90,000 Today

The new Civil List will
outstanding interest becs use,
the first time in 112 years,
vision will have to be made
the Queen’s husband.

If the precedent of Prince Albert
is followed, the DUKE OF EDIN-
BURGH will be paid £30000 a
year,

But
would

LIST,

£70,000 a

OF GLOU-

MARGARET,

be o1
for
pro-
for

Prince Albert's £30,000
be about £90,000 a year
now. So the Duke may be paid
more than £30,000.

Every endeavour will be made
to avoid controversy. There was
plenty of it in 1840.

In January of that year Queen

Victoria in the Speech from the
Throne announced her impending
marriage, and added:

“The constant proofs I have



ews

“In the end death camé as a
friend”,
That is the consolation, put in

Winston Churchill’s words that
sums up the feeling of Londoners.

And in the morning bus on the
way to work it is the simple par-
allel between private grief, which
we have all known, and the Royal

Family’s own grief, that is most
ofien made The simple human
consolation ‘What a good thing a‘
he was out of the country. At
least she had a day of travelling

before facing officials cere-
monial.”

Instinctively, the Duke of Edin-
burgh has captured public imagi-
nation, Few have seen him—the

and

great milling crowds will not
come out until the funeral, they
respected private grief. Yet all

we have heard has emphasised his
solicitous attention to the new
Queen,

Criticisms

Already some voices are heard
asking whether the burden on the
Queen—a burden that hastened
the death of her father—should
not be lifted,

The queen landed in England.
Within *wenty-four hours she has
met her Accession Council, she
has met the Privy Council, she
has shaken the hands of her prin-
eipal Ministers at the airport, she
has received the Duke of Norfolk,
as Earl Marshal, to discuss the
arrangements of her father’s fun-
eral. And from this moment
forth, her life will be a contin-
ual stream of duties, reading of
state papers, consultations, recep-
tions, attendances and official
travels.

Can there not be a stay, a pause?
What would be the right body to
inquire into the duties of British
Royalty and reduce them by cut-
ting out the valueless ceremonial

OUK READERS
Stray Dog Problem

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—At the time of publication
a copy of the Barbados S.P.C.A.
Annual Report is sent to the Edi-
tor of every newspaper in the
island. There is therefore no ex-
euse for your columnist “No-
body's” ignorance of the Society’s
concern over the Stray Dog Prob-

lem. On page 5 of the Report it
says

“Once again we must call atten-
tion to the stray dog question to
which no definite answer has yet
been found, The Society is con-
stantly receiving requests, in
some cases amounting to com-
mands, from the public to have
stray animals caught and des-
troyed. It cannot be too strong-
ly emphasised that we are NOT
stray catchers. In order to pre-
vent suffering in the case of
starving, diseased, ownerless
dogs we do all in our power to
get them off the street. We ap-
peal therefore, to Government
to expedite the enactment of the
Dog Licensing Bill and also to
co-operate with us in plans for

the provision of an Animal

Refuge”’.

Our files pay eloquent tribute to
the representatives we have




made to Government in this mat-
ter. During 1951 I have he
sonal interviews with the
ing officials solely on this
The Assistant Colonial Secretary
3 interviews)
The Director, Public Work
The Clerk the Vestry
Michael
The Commissioner of Police
and wher ult
be forthcoming a d
sisting of the Hon. Sec f
Treasurer, and Chief In



business

of St

no ré



me They recommended that

By BERNARD HARRIS “in the event of the birth of a
Duke of Cornwall there should)

received of your attachment to be paid from the revenues of the

my person and family persuade Duchy £25,000 a year for the

me that you will enable me to

maintenance and education of the

provide for such an establish- Duke and in part for the paying
ment as may appear suitable of sums to to be accumu-
to the rank of the Prince and Jated by them te make provision
the dignity of the Crown.” for a future Duchess.”

M.P. Objected An “accumulating provision of
The Cabinet proposed that this sort may be recommended by

£50,000 a year for life should be
paid to Prince Albert

the new select committee.
Prince Charles’s sister, PRIN-

Mr. Hume, the member fo, CESS ANNE,, will probably not |
Kilkenny objected that the coun. get an ineome of her own until
try could not meet so great an she comes of age. }
additional expense without “im- Because there was no Duke Of|
posing severe burdens on the Cornwall during the late reign, |
people.” the revenues from the Duchy

An amendment to cut the pro- vested in the King.
posed allowance from £50,000 tc Out of them the incomes of
£21,00 was defeated. Princess Elizabeth and the Duke

But, desvite hot opposition from
ithe Cabinet, a second amendment
that Prince Albert should be paid
£30,000, instead of £50 000, was
carried

Apart from an increase for the

of Gloucester were paid. The!
residue went to reduce the King’s |
Civil List.

It -was commonly ‘said that}
KING GEORGE VI was the most
underpaid monarch in the world.







Duke of Edinburgh, the select Certainly, after the war, he had
committee is likely to recommena difficulties in making end 58/
a larger allowance for PRINCESS meet—difficulties which were |
MARGARET For she will now recognised last year when the!
have increased responsibilitie. Government relieved the Civil
and additional duties to perform List of payments amounting to
The DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, £40,000 a year. }
n the other hand, may take a His Expenses
cut. As a younger son of, King The late King’s allowance olf
George V he receives on annuity £410000, fixed in 1987, was;
of £25 000 a year. This was sup- £60000 less than Edward. VII
plemented in 1937 with a further and George V had received in
£10,000 a year because of his days when living costs were much |
“additional duties during the lower. |
minority of Princess Elizabeth.” in this £410,000 the amount al- |
The reason for that’ extra lowed for his personal outlay was}
£10,000 mo ic iger exis.s, and pre- £110,000—which, as the Duke of}
umabl th® select committee Windsor has said, “pays for the!
will ta} that into consideration upkeep of the estates of Sand-!
when it Bets down to work ringham and Balmoral, the stud
y i and racing stable, and all private
Up To £40,000 expenses, including many sub-|
In 1937 11-year-old Princess scriptions and donations to char-|
Elizabeth as heir presumptive, ity.”
was given en income of £6,000 a Salaries of the King’s house-
year. This was raised to £15,000 hold “from the Lord Chamber-
vhen she came of age. And on lain down to the coal porters,”
her marriage her allowance accounted for £134,000. Mainten-
went up to £40000, with a unce of the household took a
further £10,000. for her husband. further £152,800. Hl
Th ne w heir apparent, “Only by economising in his
PRINCE .CHARLES, now the personal expenses,’ said the|
Duke of Cornwall, is only a little Duke, discussing the position of |
over three years old. Will he the monarchy, “has the King
get an income of his own?

been able to meet his public lia-|

He is entitled to the revenues bilities without asking Parliament
of the Duchy of Cornwall, for additional funds.”
amounting, according to the In December 1837 Queen Vic-|
latest available figure to about. toria went in state to thank Par-|
£100,000 a year. But because of liament for her Civil List.
his youth only a_ fraction § is The Speaker says the Annual
hkely to be paid over. Register for that year, ‘observed
The 1937 select committee had that the list had been framed in
to take into account the possibil- a “liberal and confiding spirit.”
ity that the late King and his It is likely that this same spirit
ife might have a son.

will still prevail after 115 years. |

From HBritain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS





funeral of his brother, But may it}
not be time to remember that the |
while ieaving all that is good Duke needs comfort in his grief
and great in the conceptions that —like any other member of that
un so many lands? Perhaps family?

Winston Churchill, with the long s ° *

eoreer of his great services to the Changes |
Crown, is the proper man, the ‘The death of her father makes
only man, who ean venture on the a great change, for Princess Mar-|





delicate lasik of reforming not caret, too, She. will have many}
rehy, but the duties of mon- more public duties. She will re-
; : organize wher Household — and

EN

certain eyentually she may come to live
not lo Want to abandon the joy- at Clarence House, with her
ful duty of travelling to her far- Mother. This is the House not
flung Dominions, That part of her far from Buckingham Palace that |
task, at least, would not be cut was built by the Duke of Clar-|

out—indeed it is likely to gain ence—later to be William IV—|
an even greater place in the and refurnished for the new|
Royal programme. London, now, Queen and her husband. But it

is only one of the Queen’s seven will be many months before the

capitals, new Queen takes permanent resi- |
; dence at Buckingham Palace.
A Republic represented at the Rumours of Princess Margaret's

Accession Council? This surely is pending engagement will remain
trange. Yet His Excellency Krish- rumours. She certainly cannot
na Menon, High Commissioner for marry until after the coronation—
India, was in attendance. And the probably not until the end of next
BBC mentioned Delhi among the year, When she marries it must
capitals of the Commonwealth in be with her sister’s permission,
mourning for His Late Majesty.
What exactly is the position of * * *
India relative to the British Changes all around us: within
Crown? It is confused; and con- a year new coins will be struck
stitutional lawyers are not all so with the Queen’s head facing right
certain that India is in fact as ~—the first time the monarchs
much a Republic as she believes. head has faced right since the
But my reports from Delhi days of Edward VII. Nevertheless
seems to indicate that the senti- we will surely be reminded of the
ment of the country in this loss beautiful silver coins of Queen
is as “Royalist” as any other in Vicioria—the young Queen,
the Commonwealth. This strange There will be a change of stamps
British Commonwealth that the soon. New “pillar boxes” will
“New York Times’ seems just to have “E.II.R. on them. In the
have discovered for what it is—a courts the eminent Counsels wear-
free association of peoples! ing silk, will be styled “Q.C.” On
* ¢ i the cinema screen, and_ theatre
Another breath of criticism; no programmes it will be “God Save
doubt it is the sensitive feeling of the Queen”. The Toastmaster at|
the Duke of Duke of Windsor that public banquets will call the com- |
he_should leave his Duchess in pany to raise their glasses to the
New York as the sets out for the Queen.

,
SAY :
S.P.C.A. and the Chief Inspector
of the BG, Branch of the Barbados will lose its charm if
R.S.P.C.A, was received by the we should become cold and aus-
Members of the House of Assem- tere. We are all beggars in the
bly for Christ Church and St. sight of God seeking daily mercies. |
Michael. With the present high cost of liv-
In the twelve months Jan.-Dec. ing the poor unemployed and
1951 the Society's staff adminis- hungry must seek alms. I miss the
tered authanasia to 864 (eight woodén-foot man and many!
hundred and sixty four) dogs and familiar faces that used to bless
puppies, ; me for a penny. Let us o |
The Society is acutely and poma preferably on the ealaap

painfully aware of its sins of om- ¢
ission but concern over the stray ae people and without

dog problem is net ope aoe
CECILE WAL! : COUNTRY WOMA

ea (Hon. See. S.P.C.A.) 19th January, 1952, "

18,2.52.

T ’ , “Bea ( ”
Thanks From U, C. WoL uty Pays
; To The Editor, The Advocate —
To the Kditer, The

; Sir,—1I am delighted to give my)

SIR,—The President of the Guild support to the Leader in your is- |
of Undergratiuates wishes to ex- sue of the 14th, entitled “Beauty |
press to the many friends of the Pays.” The need for planned de-|
University College in Barbados the velopment in this island cannot}
sincere thanks of the Guild of be too strongly stressed when one |
Undergraduates for the sum of sees the number of old buildings |
85, proceeds of a dance held in which have been ruined by incon- |









not as other people,



Advocate;





arbados in September, 1951. gruous additions of unsightly).
This sum, together with other neighbours, j

gifts of money from British Gui-
ana, Trinidad, and the Leeward The Civic Circle has for meiy}
Islands, was directed in replacing years laboured under many diffi- |
the student’s piano destroyed in culties, and often in the face of|
the hurricane of Augus’, 1951. opposition, ‘o preserve and to cre-|

D. PILGRIM, ate beauty in this island. The need
Guild Secretary. for legislation to preserve old
1952. buildings of character and to pre-
vent indiscriminate building cer- |
tainly exists.

31st January,
1 Plea For Beggars

To the Editor, The Advocate; It is to be hoped that time will!



be found in this Session of the]
SI I read quite recently that #iouse of embly for the pass-|
.¢ r beggar was given four ing of the long awaited and sore-

but the quality of mercy ly needed Town and Country Act

it does not
without beg-
road S et,
we are

ot strained, and for Barbados



Yours faithfully,
NELL MANNING





juniform and return to America to do any

land forth across the country, has recently

| 3enator Lister Hill of Alabama suggested

| = . :
George Aiken of Vermont, who is renowned

| mined attempt to become chair-borne,” said



ALARM BELL FOR
EISENHOWER

By R. M. MacCOLL

WASHINGTON.

THE broad smile on the huge photo of
General Eisenhower that hangs from the
wall of his campaign headquarters in Wash-
ington found few counterparts among his
political managers and backers.
For they were stunned by word from Paris
that the general has decided not to doff his

electioneering before the Republican Con-
vention in July.

He will not make any speeches, and he
will not even appear before a Congressional
committee.

This news cast the back-room boys into
deep gloom. They know well that rival
Senator Taft, by sheer hard plugging back

been winning quite a lot of ground.

The senator believes in “ringing the door
bells.” And they had been counting on
General Eisenhower to do a bit of the same.

MEMORY

Several long-memoried film fans have |

written to tell me that yes, Bette Davis has
worn a bathing suit in a film already. And

a reader in London’s Finsbury Park backs}.

it up with a clipping from an old fan maga-
zine which shows La Davis sure enough in
a fetching little number. Film was “The
Working Man,” and our old friend George
Arliss was in it. ;

SIGNS OF’ THE TIMES

Britain is soon to demote her consulate-
general in Detroit to the status of a mere

|consulate. And, acknowledging the terrific

»ost-war boom and growth of the far Pacific
North-west, she will simultaneously up her
-onsulate in Seattle to a consulate-general.

Trade with Russia, worth £25,000,000 in
1938, is down to a mere trickle—£ 29,000 in
che first 11 months of 1951. Comments one
cig New York exporter : “It is so small you
sould just about stuff it into an old caviar
in.”

MODESTY

As Host at a lunch in the Congress build-
“ng for a group of his farming constituents,

that everybody should rise one at a time
ind identify themselves. All went smoothly
antil it came to the turn of fellow Senator

‘or his modesty. Said he: “My name’s
Aiken, and I work in the building here.”
The Army reveals that one out of every
100 men joining uses an assumed name.
Reasons range from wishing to shed embar-
rassments of civilian life to attempting to
rover up a previous dishonourable discharge.
Taxes last year totalling £33,900,000 — an
nerease of £12,100,000 over 1950, reduced
he net income of the National Steel Cor-
oration to £16,173,000, compared with the
-ecord £ 20,648,000 earned the year before.

ANSWER

The Hollywood Censors—long known as
he Hays and now the Breen Office—have
decided to abandon their traditional policy
»f silence when attacked. From now on they
will answer back to any criticism. ‘

Congressmen, hot on the trail of Service
extravagance, discover that at Wright Field,
aear Dayton, Ohio, the Air Force wanted to
ouy 20,156 “super deluxe upholstered typ-
sts’ chairs” at £3 10s. a chair higher than
che ordinary price. “This was a really deter-

one investigator.

Near Memphis, Tennessee, Sheriff's depu-
ties Sid Hall and J. F. Hewitt saw a hog
exhibiting the classic signs of advanced
drunkenness. Deciding to cast about a bit,
che officers discovered a nearby illicit still
‘ull of “moonshine.”

THE HUMAN TOUCH

President Truman takes reporters with
him on a personally conducted tour of the
renovated White House, into which the Tru-
mans hope to move back in April.

And, recalling that just before they moved
out the bath tub almost fell through the
floor into the drawing-room beneath it, Mr.
Truman reveals that he jocularly asked Mrs,
Truman what she would have done if it had
‘allen through—with himself inside it —
while she was entertaining the Daughters of

|the American Revolution to tea._

Added the chuckling President: “Mrs. Tru-
didn’t think it at all funny, and wanted to
slap my face.”

CALL IN NEGROES

The Use of some “bright young Negroes”
in the U.S. diplomatic service is urged by
Dr. James Robinson, Pastor of a Harlem

This, he feels, would be a blow at Com-
munist propaganda, and would “please race-
conscious people everywhere.”

A Revealing story about President Tru-
man is told in Fortune magazine, which
says: “The President’s confidant and Press
secretary, the late Charles Ross, in a mo-
ment of candour rare among White House
employees, told a perplexed newspaperman
“to understand the President’s
always look for the obvious explanation.”



lon

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1962



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2), 182

$8,670 Passed To

Jurors To Be Paid More

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday passed a resolu-
tion for $8,670 as supplementary estimates under Heads :
Colonial Treasurer, Customs, Fire Brigade, Legal Depart-
ments, Science and Agriculture, Barbados Regiment, Post
Office and Dodds Plantation.

When discussing the Head Fire Brigade, Mr. A. E. S.
Lewis (L) said that it was only about two weeks ago that
a supplementary estimate was passed for the Police and

now Shey
He said that they must regard
the House as something they

could summon every week to pass
iwo or three hundred dollars for
them.

Unde, Heed XIV, Legal Depart-
ments Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, (L),
asked that jurors be paid a little
more to cover their expenses,

He said that at present the
amount received hardly paid for
the bus fare of some jurors. “It
has been going on too long. It
needs attention.”

Before the estimates came down
he wanted to bring it to the notice
of the Executive,

A Burden

Mr. E. W. Barrow \L) said that
in 1066 it may have been an hon-
cur conferred upon a person to
usk him to be a juror, That was
very good for 1066 but today jury
service is looked upon as a bur-
den and it is a burden. He felt
‘hat the compensation given to
jurors to-day is wholly inadequate.

He said that in some instances
it Was almost painful for jurors
to listen to lengthy legal discus-
sions from day to day in the
Town Hall. He would like mem-
bers to take the Senior Member
for St. Lucy seriously on. that
point. He hoped that the sum
would soon be increased.

Mr. O. T. Allder (I) thought dif-
terent of the jury system, He said
that this was a democracy and
the onus was on each citizen to
come forward and give assistance,
Apart from that, he felt that
every cilizen should consider it an
honour to sit as a juror and if
he was given an amount to off-
set transportation and lunch it
was as much as the House could
expect to do at present.

He said that to increase the al-
lowance to jurors and witnesses
would be to create more confu-
sion in the courts by encouraging
false witnesses,

Mr. Brancker (L) said that he
was wondering if the Senior Mem-
ber for St. John appreciated the
principle. He explained that in
1891 jurors were paid the same
amount as they get to-day. He
asked if this was reasonable.

Mr. G, H. Adams (L) said that
some years ago in England the
duty of a juror was an honour.
Jurors in England were paid only
since 1949.

For Mr. Allder’s benefit, M.
Adams explained that no witness-
es are now ever paid in criminal
cases,

Disgusting

1n dealing with ihe Head, Post
Office, where an additional pro-
vision of $325 is 1equired to meet
the payment of bicycle allowances
to Posimea which have been in-
creased fr.m $1.44 per month to
$2.00 per month with effect from
July 1, 1951, Mr. C. E, Talma (1),
said that it was disgusting to see
that a postman’s traveiling allow-
ance was only $2.00 per month
because the postman, by virtue of
his duty, was called upon to
travel day in, day out.

He said that other officers of
the service were granted allow-
ances which could afford them to
buy cars, They now had the chance
of increasing the allowance of tne
postman and they were going to
increase it to $2.00 a month, He
thought they would have increased
it to $2.00 per week.

Mr. Talma also commented on
the system of appointing sub-
pcstmen, He explained that the
appointment of sub-postmen
showed there was a need for more
postmen, There were qany ex-
se.vicemen unemployed wh»
would gladly fill these posts.

Mr. G, H, Adams (L). said that
the Civil Service Association had
recommended $2.00 per month and
they accepted it.

Mrs, Bourne (L) said that there
is a feeling among postmen in
the country that they should get
a greater traveljing allowance
than postmen in the City.

Mr. Brancker (L) said that du-
ring the last session he suggested
to Government to assist, not only
the postmen, but labourers of
Highways & Transport and the
Waterworks Department,

He said that some consideration
should be given to providing
motorcycles for those postmen
who travel over hilly country dis-
tricts,

He felt that Government should
take over the running of the mail



had the Fire Brigade asking a similar thing,

vans. Then the same vans, after
they have delivered the mail to
the. various Branch Post Offices,
could be used to convey’ the coun -
try postman on his difficult jour-
ney. He hoped Government would
soon give this some considera-
tion,

Mr. F. E. Miller (L) said that
be knew of at least one postman
in St. George who rode a motor-
eycle. He knew that that postman
would find $2.00 inadequate for
the upkeep of his motorcycle. He
would like to find out if the Civil
Service Association would -con-
tinue to say that $2.00 is sufficient
for a postman’s travelling allow-
ance. ;

He asked Government to ex-
amine the position of the coun-
try postmen as up to that moment
it could do with some revision.

Girls Not So Bad

Under the Head, Dodds Plan-
tation, Mr. J. C. Mottley (1) sug-
gested that the buildings which
house the Girls’ Industrial Schoo!
could be put to better use. They
could be used to house a Sec-
ondary School for St. Philip and
St. John,

Mr, Allder (1) said that ne
was glad MY. J. C. Mottley felt
the. same way as he felt two
years ago. He felt that some other
method of punishment or reform
should be brought about. To put
these girls in the Industrial School
them for the

was a stigma on
balance of their lives,
He said that in as much as

there were only about five or six
girls in the school it showed that
young girls are not inclined to be
bad.



Verdict Of Death
By Natural Causes
Returned

A nine-man jury yesterday
returned a verdict of death by
natural causes when the inquest
concerning the death of 52-year-
old Miriam Best of School Road,
Carrington Village, St. Micnael
was concluded before His Wor-
ship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting
Coroner of District “A"s

Miriam Best was taken to
the General Hospital on Feb-
ruary 13 but she died the next
day. Dr, A. S. Cato who per-
formed the post mortem exAmina-
tion at the General Hespital
Mortuary on February 14 said
that the body was identified to
him by Cecil ‘Best of School
Road, St, Michael, who said that
the deceased was his wife.

a ces agé of the de-
ceased was 52 years ond she was
dead for about three and a half
hours. The body was wel} nour-
ished and there were no zigns of
a fracture of the skull, The lungs
were congested; the liver, kidney
and spleen enlarged.

Death was due
disease of the heart.

Cecil ‘Best of School Road, St.
Michael said that he identified the
body of his.wife to Dr, Cato. She
was admitted to the General Hos-
pital on February 13 and on Febru-
ary 14 he heard that she was
dead.

At this stage the jury, after a
short deliberation returned a ver-
dict of death by natural causes.

to coronary



SCHOONER TOWED
INTO HARBOUR

The schooner United Pil-
grim was towed into Car-
lisle Bay on Tuesday night
with a leak in her stem.

Captain A. Stuart, skip-
per of the schooner, said
that the United Pilgrim
sprung a leak on Monday
afternoon about fifty-five
miles off Barbados, and
consequently it was neces-
sary for three men to pump
ouc the water continuously
until her arrival in Barba-
dos.

The United Pilgrim was
bringing a cargo of copra,
coal, cocoanut oil and cocoa-
nut plants from St. Lucia.
Captain Stuart said that the

leakage will be repaired
before the schooner leaves
Barbados.







FREAK CHICKEN

Gweneth Foster of Kens-
ington Tenantry brought a
freak chicken into the Ad-
vocate yesterday morning,

This chicken which was
hatched with six others on
Monday has no eyes.

Foster said that the

chicken is very hearty and
has to be fed by her.
hopes to rear
grown fowl.

Shc
it into a



News Briefs
Biggest Cane
tire At Bourdon

THE BIGGESY cane ure
many years broke out al pourdun
Plantauon, St. Lucy, at avour
11.30 a.m. on Tuesuay.

At Bourdon itseif, 34 acres ©.
first crep, nine and a nalf acres
of second crop, 17 acres of third
crop and five and a nalf acres a
fourth crop ripe canes were burnc.
Also burnt were 28 acres of young
cane plants, nine acres of young
ratoons and 32 acres of sour grass.
The canes are the property otf
Fairfield and Mount Gay. Ltd. anu
were insured.

The fire extended to Benthams,
St. Lucy, where half an acre of
first crop ripe canes, property of
Dalton Broome and a half acre of
first crop ripe canes, the propervy
of Gladys Greaves; a quarter 01
an acre of finst crop ripe canes,
property of Evelyn Clarke were
also burnt,

Sparks from the fire burnt two
holes in the roof of a house occu-
pied by Ila Cadogan and also
caught fire, the roof of Bertha
Padmore’s house.

The Fire Brigade under the com-
mand of Major R. Craggs, Fire
Officer, got the fire under control
before it could do further damage

* * B

au.

FIVE ACRES of third crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire
broke out at Golden Ridge Planta-
tion, St. George, at about 7.30 p.m.
on Tuesday.

They are the property of E.M.
Taylor and were insured.

* *

AT PINE PLANTATION, St.
Michael, a fire at about 4.45 p.m.
on Tuesday burnt five and a quar-
ter acres of third crop ripe canes,
property of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee.

They were insured.

* «

*

A FIRE Hall, St.
Michael

Tuesday

at Haggatt
at about 3.00 p.m. on
burnt six and a halt
aeres of first, second, third and
fourth crop ripe canes and 200
holes of young canes, property of
Daniel St. Clair and five other
peasants. The canes were insured.
* . 7

Mr. JOSEPH TUDOR, Jnr. was
elected President of the Common-
wealth Sports Club when the Club
held its Annual General Meeting
over the weekend. The other
officers elected for the year 1952
were; Mr. E. D, Mottley Jnr. Vice-
President, Mr. C. C. Clarke, Secre-
tary, Mr. St. C. Blackman, Assist-
ant Secretary, Mr. James Lorde,
Treasurer and Mr, E. W. Barrow,
M.C.P., Mr. C. C. Clarke, Mr.
James Lorde, Mr. J. N. Graham
and Mr. E, D. Mottley, members
of the Committee of Management.

Mr. J. N. Graham was elected
captain of the cricket team and
Mr. E. Brereton, Vice-Captain,

At the meeting members of the
Committee spoke of the successful
season enjoyed by the club. They
won all their matches against
other cricket teams.

The President said that he is
looking forward to another suc-
cessful season and that any club
willing to enter for the Common-
wealth Challenge Cup could con-
tact the Vice President.

ab *

.
MARRIED MEN will play
Bachelors in a cricket match at
Merlyn ground, St. James, on

Sunday, February 23.

The teams are:

Married Men: J. Byer (Capt.).
H, Cumberbatch, E. Taylor, L.
Yearwood, Abraham Alleyne, W.
Layne, S. Mings, W. Gilkes, I.
Yearwood, J. Bridgman—and E.
Cox.

Bachelors: G. Licorish (Capt.),
A. Ifill, BE. Lorde, W. Ramsay, E.
Greaves.’ L. Reed, S. Lewis, B.
Taitt, V. Todd, H. Marshall A.
Richards anq J. Ifill.

* s *

TWO ACRES of third crop ripe
canes and a quantity of sour grass
were burnt when a fire occurred
at Lears Plantation, St. Michael
at about 9.30 a.m. yesterday.

The fire was put out by the
Police assisted by the overseer.
The canes are the property of
Applewhaites Ltd. and were in-
sured.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Fined For
Wounding
His Worship Mr. G. B. Gfiffith
Acting Police Magistrate of’ Dis-
trict “A” yesterday ordered
Herbert Dear of Reed Street, St
Michael to pay a fine of £2 10s
for wounding Charles Browne of
Bexters Road on his: chin.
Dear pleaded guilty
ffence and was ordered te pay
the fine in 21 days or one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
Rrowne told the court hat on
February 16 he went into a shop
and the defendant followed him

o the

there.
After coming out of the shop
beth of them had an argument

and the defendant cuffed him on

the chin, His chin was cut and
be had to go to the General
Hospital.

“This man bears me an old
arudge, Sir:” Browne told the
court,

His worship Mr. G. B. Griffith

also convicted and fined Frank
Griffith of Waterfords Tenantry
St. Michael 40/- in 14 dayswor
One month's imprisonment for
wounding Abraham Forde of
Savannah Road, Bank Hall on
February 2

Forde said that Griffith threw
two bottles at him and one of
them cut him on the left side of
his head. He was taken to the
General Hospitah and the cut
took three stitches



Hearing In
Damages Case
Adjourned

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday ad-
Journed until February 26 hearing
in the case in which plaintiff Amy
Sandiford of Waterhall Land, St
Michael is asking for £25 dam-
ages against the defendant Mac-
Donald Cutting of Bibby Lane, S:
Michael.

Counsel in the case is Mr. J. EB. 'T
Brancker for Sandiford. His Hon-
our Mr. Hanschell granted the ad-
journment so that Cutting could
summon another witness to the
court. In granting the adjourn-
ment, His Honour Mr. Hanschel!
said; “I am sorry that this matte:
had to be adjourned, but the de-
fendant’s witness was summoned
for January 3 and he has never
been summoned since.”

Sandiford is claiming that inas-
much as the defendant inflicted
bodily harm on her on October 17
she suffered much inconvenience
and is claiming £25 damages
Cutting told the court that he is
not liable

Argument

Amy Sandiford told the court
that on October 17 she went to
Moncrief, St. John, to buy potatoes
and while she was working in the
field she had an argument with
the defendant, After the argument
she received a blow on the back
of her neck and fell to the ground
unconscious, She was taken to the
General Hospital and detained,
She went to Dr. Massiah and paid
him for treatment and a prescrip-
tion,

Justine Pilgrim of Kellman
Land, Black Rock, said that on
October 17 she saw the plaintiff
come into a potato field. The de-
fendant was also in the field some
distance from her. While the
plaintiff was digging potatoes
some argument arose between the
plaintif? and the defendant.

Struck With Stake

While the plaintiff was digging
the potatoes the defendant took
up an iron stake and struck her
on the back of her neck with it,
The plaintiff fell to the ground
and was shortly afterwards taken
o the General Hospital, 4

Dr. Gale said that he examined
the plaintiff in the Casualty of the
General Hospital at about 12.35
p.m. on October 17. There was a
bruise at the back of the head in
the lower part and she was suffer-
ing from nervous shock, ee

Dr. Massiah said that the injury
described could have rendered the
plaintiff unfit for one month to six
weeks.

Further hearing was adjourned
until February 26.



MIXED CARGO

The Schooner Franklyn D. R.,
which arrived in Barbados yesta -
day brought more rice to the col-
ony. Among her cargo were -60(
bags of charcoal, 507 wallaba
posts and 2,000 bags of rice

King’s Scouts Call Here En Route To Jamboree

.@ From Page 1

Mr. Roberts was also in France
in 1947 for the French Jamboree
when another contingent from
Jamaica attended. At that time
he said that there were also
present, contingents from Ber-
muda and Trinidad. In 1951 he
went over to Austria for their
Jamboree at which Jamaicans
and some of the members of the
present U.K. contingent were
present.
Here is what some of the mem-

to

see® the trees in the islands which
actually bore fruit like cocoanuts
and bananas, In England, they
only saw the fruit and that was
about all.

He said that they had a good
voyage throughout the trip, The
s8€a was very calm except for one
day when they were passing
through the Azores and encoun-
tered bad weather.

John Rimell thoight that one
of the things the boys had found

bers of the U.K. contingent had interesting on the journey from
say about their trip from the Azores onwards was the fly-
Southampton to the West Indies: ing fish which they. had never

Geoffrey Bell-Jones, the only seen before. They had also seen

sea scout of the patrol who has a lot of seaweed from the Sargasso
been a cub for three years and 4 Sea and did not realise'that the

scout for five said that the trip water could be so calm in tha:
has been a wonderful one. It has yast area of the Atlantic.

been very
had learnt a lot going to
different ports,

was in England.
Food Unusual

interesting and they

the “John Parker said ‘that when
, they got to Guadeloupe the first
He said that he was sure every- thing that attracted them was the
one enjoyed the bathing because it scenery with its brilliant colours.
was much warmer here than it The sea was deep blue and th»
very

the trees
compared

colour of
pretty as

was
with Eng-

Brian Martin, a scout for the land where. the colour of the se

past five years, thought that the was dull and the trees were barr
food on the boat although un- during the winter. The only green
“very interesting.” trees they saw in England, were

usual was

Another interesting thing was_to the evergreen of the fir family

Visit To St. Pierre

He said that on Tuesday, they
spent a fine day in Martinique.
On arrival they were met by a
number of Boy Scouts who took
them on a trip through the moun-
tains to St, Pierre, The roads were
very steep and narrow but the
scenéry was magnificent, They
went near to Mt. Pelée and saw
some of the bones of people who
were killed during the eruptions
of 1902 and 1922, They then re-
turned through the mountains
back to Fort-de-France and visited
the Scout Headquarters
they were entertained for about

two hours before returning to the

hip.
The Patrol Comprises:
GEOFFREY

where

BELL-JONES,
16-year-old Senior Sea Scout of

TERENCE O’REILLY, 1¢-
year-old Patrol Leader of the
38th Cardiff, Wales, who is an
apprentice fitter and turner.

JOHN PARKER, 16-year-old
Senior Scout of the 9th Reigate,
a carpenter,

JOHN RIMELL, 16-year-ol/
Patrol Second (S) of the 229t!
Bristol, a Junior Clerk.

JOHN STONEMAN, 16-year-
old Patro] Leader of the 9th
Reigate, a funeral director's
assistant,

While in Barbados
the contingent visited
Scouts’ Headquarters at Netd-
ham’s Point, After a sea bath,
they visited the Legislature and
then the British Council hear
‘quarters,

yesterday
the Sea

Supplement Estimates

Assailan £ House Pass $3.500

For Agricultural
Development

@ From Page 1

at: is geod to recall that the
Governor said at the beginning of
the sessio

t nm that this Government
is able to provide its Civil Ser-
vice with salaries comparable with
those paid in British Guiana, If
that is the case, we can subsidise
animal feed or take some steps to

keep milk at the same price.”

Wished Monopoly

Mr O. T. Allder (1) said that
the present dairy owners were
trying to monopolise the produc-
tion of milk. They were trying to
make recommendations to Gov-
ernment, which, if implemented
would wipe out the small milk
producer, He hoped Government
would be careful not to allow that
to happen,

He said that he had again and
again recommended Government
to encourage the keeping of small
numbers of dairy cattle so that an
owner of such cattle could supply
his immediate neighbours.

He added that there were many
lots of land which were untler
bush and which could be utilised
for the benefit of the community.

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said that

for the benefit of the Senior Mem-

ber for St. John, he would say
that the policy of the Peasants’
Loan Bank was being revised

whereby ovcupiers of all the land
lying idle whether the owner was
away or in the island or whether
or not the occupier was a squatter
would be provided with loans.

Mr. Crawford said that that sug-
gestion had been made some years
ago. He was glad to hear that
Government had at long last al-
lowed people who owned land to
get a loan to get cattle,

Mr. Adams said that Barbados
was in a very difficult position
when it came to the matter of con-
trolled prices. He was very con-
scious of the fact that he was the
only real socialist on the Regional
Economic Committee. He was also
conscious of the fact that in big
countries of the West Indies, big
businesses have been saddled,

He said that the facts were en-
tirely against the Senior Member
for St, John. A big island like Ja-
maica had sent a delegation here
because they could not see how
Barbados could feed so many
people with so little land. That
was one of the greatest compli-
ments paid to Barbados, It was
stated in the Trinidad papers that
unlike Barbados their land was not
under production.

The Resolution was then passed



Pioneer Groups
Appeal For Help

There are two Pioneer Groups
in the island—one is situated in

St. James and the other in St
Thomas. The principal purpose
of the Pioneer Group is_ the

pame as that of the Police Boys’
Club—that is, to see that the
young people of the island make
good and useful citizens.

Mr. C. Leslie, one of the
founders of the Group and also
an instructor of the boys and
girls, told the Advocate yesterday
that they are not mimicing what
the Police Boys’ Clubs are doing,
but he feels sure that the Boys

Clubs alone cannot do all the
work in bringing up first class
citizens in the island.

“At the moment We need sup-
port to carry on with the Groups
and our main purpose is to go
to the backward areas of the
island where the boys and girls
may not be able to reach a Boys’
or Girls’ Club building,” Mr.
Leslie said.

Mr. Leslie said that at the
moment there are not many
members of the group but those
who are members are taught
various trades such as carpentry,
masonry, shoemaking 4nd em-
broidery.

The Committee of Management
has planned to stage concerts to
help the Groups, but other help
would be acceptable



Race Horses Gome
Here On ‘Sunrover’

The M.V. Sumrover dropped
anchor in Carlisle Bay yesterday
from Rotterdam, Antwerp = and
London. Dr. and Mrs, Henry and
Mrs. Williams were the only three
passengers disembarking.

Also arriving were two
horses belonging to the stat
Dr. Barnard. These horses



s of
rrim



Girl” and “Silver Lining” will be

going to Sit. Vincent and while
here will be in the care of Hon, V.
c. Gale.

Among her other cargo was
1,350 tons of fertilizer consigned
to DaCosta & Co., LAd., and Plan-
tations Ltd., and eight motor cars.
" The Sunrover will be staying
in Barbados for five or six days
snd will then be going on to Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad.

!iew Books On Show
At Public Library

Two hundred and sixty-thre
pew books will be put on display



«t the Public Library this morn-

ing, and will go into circulation
cn Saturday morning.

Many valuable additions to the

Reference Library are included in
the list, and biographies of the

Duke of Edinburgh and the Prin-

cess Margaret should prove
immense interest to readers,

There are 90 fictions and
nor -fictions,

of

173



Sgt. Rice Transferred

race

PAGE FIVE



OBJECTION MADE IN HOUSE

@ From Page 3

Lukewarm

He was of the opinicn that
West Indians and Barbadians in
particular seemed a bit lukewarm
an their action when matters of
that sort arose and the attitude
of begging seemed to creep in
their tMinking rather than the
taking of an objective view of

the situation. They should say
this situation is a world problem
and therefore no matter how
small they were, as a part of
the world, they had a case.

They were not making claim
foy Barbados alone, but all the
territories that the Bill aTected
And for that reason I have the
greatest confidence that united
action must have some effect.

“I cannot subscribe to the
view that the United States State
Department is responsible for
this,” he said, “What I have
gathered is that the United States
State Department can use its
influence in the Senate because
it is a matter that would affect
its diplomatic relations with
other foreign powers cspecially
at this time,”

They could use their influence
to point out that they would
create adverse state relations
with other territories. He was
not in a position to say the
Stape Department ‘was respon-
sible for it because he had no
information to support thal
view.

As sOon as war was over and
the battle was won, as soon as
the common enemy was beaten
it would seem they were left
alone and sometimes told that
they were in an unfortunate areo
and nothing could be done f0
them.

!
Just as America was of |
assistance to the West Indies, ;
the West Indies were of assis- |
tance to America. When el
War came along, America were
still able to keep the mternal)
wheel of matters going on by |
the West Indian labour.

Any intelligent conmunity, !
any public spirited man would |
realise © that they were also

fighting to keep the doors to the |
colonies open so that one next
door could benefit. He thought |
that a Resolution of that sort)
would go far towards removing!
any restrictions.

Mr. Walcott then suggested |
certain amendments to the Res- |
clution and these were accepted. ;

The Address also received the
support of Mr. G. H. Adams who}
said he was speaking as a membe)
of the House and a West Indian
though not as a member of the
Government. In spite of this, he
could hardly imagine that an)
member of the Executive Commit-
tee would differ from what mus
be the feeling of West Indians gen-
erally.

A Bill of that nature, Mr, Adam
said, was hardly conducive to th:
creation of that atmosphere neces.
siry to maintaining, whatever their
views were, that spirit of friendli
ness which the United States Gov
ernment was so anxious to main-
tain,

|



|
|
|
Unpleasant Tension

If it were not for the fact that {
everything he could say would be
going into the records, he might,
have voiced an opinion which!
would cause unpleasant tension in
the world between the United |
States and Russia. He thought it
was only fair to make tne point
that évery now and again, in all
communities, and America was no
exception, some legislator fou
reasons best known to himself
made use of some preposterou
uggestion like that contained in
the McCarran Bill

Sometimes a public man, not ne
cessarily a legislator, gave public
utterance to some quite fantastic
opinion without considering other
pouple’s feelings. The late Bili
Thompson, who wanted to get u
hand at King George to punch him
cn the nose whenever he met him,
just because he disapproved of o
monarchy was actually tame when
he actually met him.

The Senator who first started th
idea that the West Indies shoula
be handed over to the United
States for payment of the debt of
the first World War was another of
those persons

Senator's Views

He felt tiat it was Senato:
MeCarran’s own views and no‘
the views of the American Govern-
ment, Letters had been received
and from conversations which h
had had with the member for St
Peter (Mr. Walcott), it was obvious
that they were not taking the mat
ter sufficiently seriously, not be
ciuse they were doomed but be
cause some of them looked at the






Ve

Ln
—

ee

K.



|



matter as laughable, and because

some did not

realise





1 they

had certain information, W seri-

s it could be

Even at the risk of what the hon-
ourable senior member for Christ
Church might feel to be irritating
to the American Senator who
might never read the speeches of
the Assembly, he would like to

1y that there was not the ghost of

a chance for the West Indies to
get any substantial aid from the
Point Four unless the area helped
was a potentially dangerous area ir
time of war.

Money poured inte Malaya or
ny other country was only an-
ther weapon in the fight to have

1 inhabitants of those territorie
their side when the next war
ume along. It was not the desire
» Stamp out poverty and malnu
crition. They didn’t help China be-
cause they loved the Chinese more
than the black people, but because
it would not have paid them, and
it did not pay them to have China
iverrun by the Communists. They
eould therefore drop any idea that
anything which they might say to
ft soap the United States, was
kely to bring them money for the
West Indies.
He, however, would say that if
‘iis Bill had not been carefully
signed after the failure of the
udd Bill, and had not reached
ich a stage, they might have
.ound that it would have got
\hrough—he did not believe that it
vould get through now—without
1e West Indies being aware of it
before it was too late.

Amendment

He felt, and he was glad, that the
inover of the Address had accepted

the amendment of the junior mem-
ber for St. Peter, because if they
used an American phrase, such as

they liked to use, about good
neighbourliness, and if they re-
minded the Americans that they

vere appealing to them, and re-
minding them that they were tak-
ing them at their word that they
vould be good neighbours, and a
step such as suggested in the Bill
was not the way to be good neigh.

bourly.

He was one of those cynics who
iid not believe that there was such
a thing as national morality. If it
paid the United States in bal-
ancing the advantages and dis-
advantages of having-a disgruntled
West Indies on their door step, to
come down against West Indians,
then they would come down
against them. He did not think that
it would pay them, and he felt that
the Address would serve a very
useful purpose. and _ certainly
strengthen the hands of the West
Indians and the Senator who might
be inclined to help. He, therefore,
had much pleasure in joining with
the members of the House, and he
hoped West Indians in general in
this area, were making strong rep-
representation against the Bill.

After the amendments by Mr.
F. L. Walcott were accepted, the
House unanimously gave their
assent to it

Later. Mr. W. A. Crawford
moved a complimentary Address to
be sent to the Senator and the
West Indian Committee in appreci-
ation of their efforts to protest
against the Bill. This was also
passed nem con,



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DISPA, Per package
RINSO, Package

DREFT, so 3@
FAB, Pia
LUX, "ks ~*~



CAVE SHEPII

& (0., LTD.

10—-13 Broad Street

the 13th Ipswich, who is still _Accompanied by Major J. E. te ween

at school, Griffith, Island Scout | Commis- To District “E
RICHARD DENBY. 17-year- Sioner, Mr, L. A. Harrison, Secre- . ah ta

old senior scout of the Sist tary of the Boy Scouts’ Associa- ae me a a Sasi oe

Purley, Surrey, and office tion and Patrol Leader Trevor poise station this week. He ihas

Junior. Carter of the First Sea Scouts, gicceeded the late Station Sgt
DEREK HAMBLIN, 16-year- the Contingent visited St. John’s Gy r4.¢

old senior -cout of the 15lst Church and afterwards lunched at Set. Rice nas been transferred

Bristol, a Police cadet. Powell Spring Hotel before re- grom Speightstown Police Post
WILLIAM MARTIN, 17-year- turning to the ship to continuc where he was in charge Cpl

old Patrol Leader of the 28tn their journey to Jamaica via Worrell has taken up duties as

Glasgow, Scotland, who is still Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao and N.C.O. in charge of the Speights-

at school. Cartagena own Police Post

(6 & 254
A 65¢

ERD







PAGE SIX ; BARBADOS ADVOCATE _ PHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952

€3 LA S S I F IE D AD S| | PURAAC NOTICES Harbour Log Passengers List BRION WINS GOVERNMENT NOTICE

'
TELEPHONE 2508. NOTICE oo See ee PORTLAND, Feb. 20. BOILERS FOR SALE















NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th: Cesar Brion of Argentina, 198,






























Sint h, Miss Olive Edwards, Mrs. Editt



ana Miiincinssipe Bi tne = Careline el - ? ell tvpe CORNISH fire tube boil 5 in diameter and
~~~ lithe intention of the Vestry of the . = From Sovthampton—Mrs. Honora Drum- | world’s fifth ranking heavyweight 2 shell type CORNISH fire tube boi feet Rgporeiiaca 4
For Births; Marriage or Br i a “FOR SALE fer Saint Michael te cause to be : mete > nond, Mr. Theo. J. Hamein, | eOved another obstacle for this} | yurteen feet long, working ye ure - to 250 lbs. - Romi aan
@pnouncement# in Catib Calling s 4 | duced into the Legisiature of thi 1 Ww. 1 atts. Stare J. notes 2 *|chance at the title last night by Boilers are Complete with all boiler mountings, fuel oil burners
C ; i - Mrs. Mary ‘ sk n, Mr. Bryan Pygsley, | : >
Range fo 99.00 for eny Dumber ¢ | he Solan AE, neues i \. David Set Mast. C. J. Pubsiey, Mast. G. A, lev, |decisioning Joe Kahut, 188, of | and fuel tanks, also superhéater, if required. Can be seen at Ever-
up two 50 ond 6 cents ¢ ord 4 a} - s — | 4) A Bill to extend the opera I 1 Sct Mrs. D. M. Pugsley, Dr. Colin E. | Woodburh Ofegon in a ten-round | | : :
ditional word. Terms cash Phe 8} i the Vestries (Cost of Living t I Tider : a 7 | & -— 1 Pumping Statio St. Jo Will be s s y.
between 6.90 afd 4 p.m.. 3118 for Ycath | AUTOMOTIV | to Employees) Act, 1947 Sch. M a Tudor, Cicely Volonterio. Mast. | main bout for the Polio Fund ton Pupiping Station, St. Jobr ill be sold singly oe
‘eee only after ¢ pom ! au Silke eaallauas Act. amending the same for f ch. Ex Sted ta he tae ME : Benefit, Kdahut was straightened | Tenders to be submitted to the Honourable Colonial Secretary
a Stare - rriod of on ear to <. h Mf a . . > 7 * : . . Ne or 6 91°
xcellent condition. Ring 8143 j Soth hist cash a aSVAS M Hote. Kirton, Mast. G. R. H.|Up out of his familiar ¢rouch then | on or before Frida February, 1952. —21.2.52.—
. a: ined. Se 2 Me $ ARR Sirteim* BE ; , FE . ke ‘
CLARKE i MSP ; eee eee rane | (>) A Bll to extend the operatior Frabkiyn D. OR. es re atl E. Martin and;knocked down for the count of wield ai chit lie et i salt tccautalbene ah ll ekg.
pital “yeherday, “See dee 7 - | a eae. _ erat - Capt G. t. Sealy, 1 . B Front ‘i. fiaxte-Mhs Breeli 1. Sealy mfor Kalut te See probe sbly his} OFFICIAL “NOTICE
0 si-}] CAR--V ll Velox 1951 ™ r , E 7 a : : nited Pugrim, Ae tor a From Martiniqué—Mr. Gladstone Dum-
take Bak ot from her late ree excellent Gonditioe: abt dnae ue Greer, Ge. seme for phe ie Fe — ag act mett, Mrs. Marie Grandino, Miss. Julien e|last chance against any world) parsapos
Roy,Jitmes, Anderson, (Sons),{ Courtesy Garage. Dral 4616. Sha ee ees pas tons net, Capt. | pengvera and Mast. George Wiliams. | renowned contender. Brion car- | IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
Carmien, Annette, Barbara, Janice 17.2.52—6n. | urhélided. ty the Parookiel Stn Se eee isis emai DEPARTURES YESTERDAY BY THE | ried the fight all the way suffer- | id id , :
(DAU ines) diay Clarice (Mother | smnestatemnitininnmmensiteinensimmeretisiniinniciogivetet - N 2 : mee ,* A5r tons net, Cap COLOMBIE ing from a small puff and a slight | N PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act. 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
, 8 "ARV ployees Pension (Amendment) A P. Dupont, from’ Martinique Trinidad—Miss Barb. Malcolm Pp }persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any Hen or incumbrance
er), “Elsie Thompson and Eveiy CAR-—Vauxhall Velox 18 h.p. Salooii, 1948) by increasing the amount of M.V. Monekz 180 ¢ net. Ghat For Trinida se rbara uleoly ut on his left eye in the eighth 2 gt a ¢
7 21.2 1949-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000 . S aeee , Cnn Ay " set *Pt.| Mrs. Cameron Stuart, Mfs. M. Richard- je y in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant
‘ourtesy Garage. Dial 4616. i pale Pace Bb tar i Ge, Hutson, from Demaisien on, Mr. Daniel Ghalband, Mrs, Norma |round. Both his eyes were bleed-| to bring before me on account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and
Mee 17.2.52—6n. think ft pay to inew pensioner} In Touch With Barbados | Chalbana, Mr. William Dear, Mrs, Flaine | ing in the ninth, but his skill | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday of Friday between the hours of 12

CARRINGTON & SE | was enough to halt Kaihut who} 20°? and 3 o’clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,











Sn _ oe PICKUP—Good model. A Ford Pickup, Co i ‘Trotman, Mrs. Audrey White, Miss I : : ce | Bridgetown before the 25th day of March in order that such claims may
HOUSES cady for work. Priced right. Apply to | [oleHors for the. Vestry of St. M ch: iia : astal Station uae| Whitehead, Miss. Sybil Barrow, Mr.|displayed poor timing through | be reported on and ranked according to, the nature and priority thereof respectively,
nara reeset Pilgrim Mission Home, Bank Hall Main al a NI ical areas aa Gist they a Meee , one , ‘e cies ings Donald Campbell, Mrs. W nifred Richards, jout. —U.P. otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
FL ema ‘ seekers Road, St. Michael 19.2.52—Gn. as z Pi aie oe sarhades.| Mit. Ok Millington, Miss: Inez Payne, ! ——————_—_——_--__________________ | deprived of all claims on or against the said property
furs mated ve tree eaten wh ‘ ae through their Barbados| yi.g Mildred Pelew, Mr. Grace Colly- Mr. Isaac Matalon, Mr. John R. Dixon, |
tractive RitCINEIDEK. dhoeks. tials ELECTRICAL NOTICE pone Sai 9 Fanuae,| OTe. Miss Hilda V. ‘Squires, Mr. Melvin Mrs. Eleanor B. Dixon, Mrs. Corinne E Plaintiff: ERROL MALCOLM STEELE
a, m3 Vie 8.5 eS? 8.8 sent Jaguar

oni Cli, Avaliable: thinbaine 1 PHYLLIS ESLYN GILKES heretofore Workms



Miss Edith Gibson, Mrs. C. Miller, Mrs Susan A Culver, Mr Defendant: HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein




eee quae a ha Colombic * 6 Salte . ., >» ,
é - Soak ae eae sometimes called and known by the name - . Peters, Mr. John D. Douglas, Miss Jane George H, Coxe, Mrs. Elegabeth Coxe | by ARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her
yal 250i ne ane A GENERAL ELECTRIC Air-Condition- | of Phyllis Estyn Weatherhead of Rive oe Alcon Mane ¥ Leonce, Mr. Alfred White, Miss Irsi‘ and Mrs. C. A. Sayer constituted attorney on record in this Island.
ee a et SS oe , suitable to cool and Miter the alin} Road in the paris of Saint Michaely*" 2ctros. ss. Lenton Williams. Mr. Lionel Haynes and Mrs.{_ For La Guaira—Mr. J. F. Holmes and | PROPERTY:
saa © foam. Enone 91-00, or write Sands jhereby give public riotice that’ on tne} iS Wi Queen Eltzabeth Vernon Knigh Mrs. Mabel Holmes | ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-
—— ——_--—— ---- lds . Peter. 52--3n elnor



7 s, te 20th day of February 1952, I formally and * 7 For Ss semntee ria John Gaspard Le For Cartagena——Mrs. irene Evans and | terprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise the parish of Christ Church in this
SILVER WATERS--Silver “Sands, Chr absolutely renounced relinquished and Italia, 5





































































Moine, Mrs. Margaret C. Le Moine, Mr, Mstr. Peter Evans | Island containing by admeasurement 7 acres (inclusive of a portion of a_ road
pa ary, ee bedrooms, + a vin ee FLASHLIGHT _ BATTERIES — abandoned the use of my said surname Loids. : scan Homer S. Watt, Mrs. Ruth R. Watt.. For Curacao—Mr. G. Bovell twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Pu'u'c
Dye Wea, we 7 er tact holesale and Retail. CITY GARAGE | of “weatherhead’ and then assumed | W9%¢h@ Seawind, | _ i ————- | Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and bounding on. lands of ti:e

= Psi = 212.5211 land adopted and determ ned thenceforth |, “ig ait. yea es ; estate of Miss Mufcy FE. Lucas deceased, on lands of James A. Tudor, on lands
ANTED SRE Trooper, Vago, Phot | incre the"eurnane of stiles | Pass. ay Held Tanga 82 TAKE NOTICE gine Honours, D, Chandler, nants Mewiatd, joe Se a Did te
ri Electrical. Only $75.00. At our new seal ot the es ek of “Weather. Bi , s. El Cus Astral, 8.8 ; aan re Mr E C. Sacked an, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the
eS hs eee eee ae: eet ee CR * | head.” : rant + ro eters ee p Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all othe:
AY ; “ .
Dal 5136 19.2.52—In. pAnd. A dive further notice that by RATES OF EXCHANGE ' A OW | buildings ana erections thereon erected and built standing and being. ||.
Tae ae nateeanene | a e ay 0 ruary JARY 20. 1952 e - , IA} f ae
COOK GENERAL & LAUNDRY MAID | 1952 duly executed and attested and eran ee — Registrar-in-Chancery.
Apply Mrs. Lisle Bayley, Pavilion MECHANICAL recorded in the Registration Office of this! 4. 4 19 Reece oan menses ek 8/16 - Bill filed :— 28rd October, 1961
Hastings. "g0.2.52—4r, Island om the 20th day of February 1952, Demand Drafts 71.56 That CLUETT, PEABODY & CO. INC., a corporation organized under the laws | Dated 2ad January, 1982. 24.1.52—4n
a np pe a ees |i formally and absolutely renounced and Sight Drafte 714/10 1°! the State of New York, United States of America, whose trade or business nie
MISCELLANEOUS | ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with | abandoned the said surname of “Weather-| 34 45)) Coble sddres¢ is 433 River Street, Troy, County of Rensselaer, State of New. York. |
! platform, pneumatic tyres and brakes.| head’? and declared that } had assumed 719/10 Currenes 90 2/1 U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register | -
ROARDERS—“Priva: fms 7) Passed Highways _& Transport, never |and adopted and intended thenceforth Coupon 69 3/1 in respect of shirts, collars, eulfs, wnderwear, pajamas, night, shirts, handker- |
Savannah can accommodate vile nea hi ed, Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage. upon all oecasions whatsoever to use and 50% Silve 20% hiefs, neckties, piece goods and shirtings of cotton, rayon, wool and combina: |
Trinidad. Single or double roorrs. ow. te 15.2.89—8n, | subscribe the name of “Gilkes'’ nstead _—...-.——«. tions thereof, and will be entitled to register the same after ofie month from | §
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port Ponieane trae aareies of “Weatherhead” and so os to be at the 2ist day of February, 1952 unless some person shall in the meantime g@yve |
of Spain. . a all vaea bs tg? called Tier TAKE NOTICE notice in duplicate to me at my Office of opposition of such registration The
: 2 pac ri ¥y ne name of “Gilkes’ trade mark can be seén on application at my office z ; pe KOE ORD
atl MISCELLANEOUS onelunenas F MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW > EL EES
° tiie Pig exclusively. Dated this 12th’ day of Februany 1952 | b, ; :
: — passaize eigtand ed man, in Dated the 20th day of February, 1952 H. WILLIAMS, ZEALAND LINE LIMIT ED. The MLV. MONEIRA will adeept »
eturn for charge of mental case, Write WHYGLIS FSLYN GILKES : ade Mark. (M.A.N.Z. LINE) x
Box “S" C/edAdvocate C : . + & ; > ere uote, Miwon. eesl aun Registrar of Trade Marks Cargo and Passengers for Domin- \
ong sane Co. ; GOLF BAG & CLUBS—For sale very late Phyllis Eskyn Weatherhead. 21.2.52—3n | Montserrat, Nevis
20.2.52--3n [ cheap )La@ges canvas and leather ; 21.2.52—2n S.S. “TEKOA” is scheduled to sail ica, Antigua, on

ee | Of ba. (1) Man's leather golf bag misc.

& olf clubs. Call 4942. 21.2,52—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE:
- . JAMS:—Apricot Jam, Fig Jam, Peach
um, and Marmalade n 21b Tins, W. M The application of Granville Millar,
FORD, 35, Roebuck St. Dial 3489 Shopkeeper of Roebuck Street, holder of
21.2,52—2n | Liquor Litense No, 1196 of 1952, granted
es edie to him in respect of a board and shingle
LADIES BRASSIPRES—Pemale Beauty | Shop with shedroof attached at Chap
ogins with beautiful Brassieres. We|â„¢an's Lane, St, Michae], for permission

Give yourself
have latest varieties from 92 cents to] to use sald Liquor Lieénse at a walt = =
$2.20 pair. Visit KIRPALANI, 25 Swan | building at Chapman Cross Lane, St
Street 21.2.52— Michael

In
ee Dated, this 20th da of ane any, 1952
MEGASS: At Four Square Factory,|To G. B GRIFFITH, Bs That ROYLE-MIDWAY INt 4 Corpor 2
Apply the Manager, Telephone 2442, Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist “AL ation organized and existing under the
16.2.52-—6n Signed IRA HUNTE, laws of the State of Delaware, United Ww
for Applicant States of America, whose trade er business
PURGRA igeon Feed — none| N.B.—This application will be con- | address is 22 East 40th Street New York,

better —.10-Ib. lots and wi a , | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at [New Yor A.; Manufacturers, has
2547, or Aube in Police Court, Distrct “A” on Monday, | applied

per Ib, Phone : 2, 3 “ . registration of a_ trade * Sup ri
the 3rd day of March, 1952, at 11 o'clock, Pmark ir att "A" of Register in respect . 0.
SHIRT hr ee hae ble of making | a.m of an oil adapted fo se as a lubrica- ’
60 dozen shirts per For particulars: G. B, GRIFFITH, tor, a pruserver, or ¢ inser for metal
furniture polish and

and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd
inst

The M.V. “DAERWOOD” w'll
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada,
and Aruba. Sailing Saturday 23rd
inst.

The M.V. CARIBBEE will
scent Cargo ond Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,_
Nevis and St. Kits. Saiiiig bii-
day 29th inst.

from Adelaide February 15th, Melbourne
February 26th, § March 4th, Bris-
bane March 15th, iving at Trinidad
about April 15th i Barbados about
April 18th.

In addition to teneral cargo this vessel
has ample space for chilled and ‘hard
novel car





















Riackdeshanninnianmenient



FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,
TRINIDAD.

B.Wi SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC

and Consignee. Tc'e Jo. 4047

pace cee

|
|
rgo accented on through Bis of
I pe for transhipment at Trinidad to

i Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands.
For further particulars apply —

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.

BARBADOS, B.W.L. |! J6666tafstet OO PO SSSI SY





























Phore Johnson 431 Police Magistrate, ue “A wood, or ileath :
2.62—1n owdered, paste, anc t ax ara= A nC,
$68. -In. Mons ter Gleaner policnthe, nod peerente When there’s a job to be done or a game to be played—a
TINNED FRUIT—Peaches, Pears, ing) wood-work, floors of all kinds, * : s tich beefy acne ith
Cugwas, Gkapes, ines ant Froiit, Salad LIQUOR | LICENSE NOTICE furniture, linoleum, and automobiles: « cup of Bovril is the very best of drinks. It a ih NEW YORK SERVICE
i, Ting, large and sma a , vr li sat of] Preparation for cleaning upholsteny, a : its beefy
aust FAN Hie thai pins 14 (AAS DM 180,35, Rochuck §t | Saoniaoepeen oF. foie Rall, der {og | Preparation for cleaniup-rugs and carpets, flavdut serids a welcome glow through yen oH en a
ior cook $4. peed BOO, 5 08r soeet St" | to her in respact of a board end shingle } 40," fecpareuien for soe goodness puts new life into you. ‘There’s nothing like A STEAMER sails 7th March — arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952.
Gas shown

today at wn Fars St ish Hall,

i

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

ir



hop with shedroof attached at Pr
=) TINNED MPATS:-Satisaites, Carned » ue ee ee ‘att me ‘ ¢
Miuttoig Gord Be feel itt Coredi oid 4| St Michael, for permission to Use said} pe oad cia

i ‘ou up and sustain you.
Bovril to build you up y “NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
| SS. “LIBERATOR” safled 26th Jan arrives Barbados 17th Feb., 1952.
A STEAMER sails 13th Feb arrives Barbados ah Feb,, 1952,

q q;.| Liquor License at a board and shingle} 4. rs F Hao Mat
aa i ae Dial Yale M at a! shop Wth shecroof attached nt Weir's | 'esister ul me after or
toebuck r 21,9,59—2

Gap, Britton’s Hill, St Micbacl ue inal te the a
ites 2 a fF ua L952 , ; x
TORNADO—International K.41, Benutt. | Deed this fate cay of Rebruau wotice in duplicate to h
ful eondition, excellent eqitipment..aood 4 f A adn positic ai ¢
. 0 Police Magistrate, Dist A de r n be seen on applic ato n
} racing record. Cost $79000 now $500.00. Signed CAROL BLACKMAN 1 ay ri ”

No offers, Wicks. Telephone 3289 Applicant

ei a 18.11. BIN. f.0 | N.B.—This application will be con- “Dated. this 130) ¢ er Eee — HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE

| sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
“ALCOA PLANTER’ 12th Februany 2ist February

TI | Police Court,. Distyet “A on Monday
day of March, 1952, 11 o’eloe!
TAKE No - er ae a igs 3.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS 26th February 7th Mareh

| ; us
| vm a ; : 4% PILG ar 24th Mareh
MITOGA F. A. McLEOD, 2 ‘ ALCOA PILGRIM 4th Mareh 4th
| ; ; f : rd March 2
| Police Magistrate, a ‘RSONAL ; 70 pina ae ABH
That CLUSTT, PEABODY & CO. ENC., te A STEAMER .._ .. a Ist May llth May
1 corporation organized under the laws - er Rm Set re - - nec 7 7
wf the State of New York, United States public is hereby warned ag.





CANADIAN SERVIUS
SOUTHBOUND





Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbador









These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
of America, whose tradeor business PUBLIC SALES credit to. inj wife HILDA FER- , ed p € c
adtircks is 483 River Street, Troy, County *

f Rensselaer, State of New York, U.S, A.,
“ns applied for the - re tion of 4

f N ‘nee Denny) as £ do not hold
elf tespons ble for any debt or debts



ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO. LTD —CANADIAN SERVICE





(1) The property known as “The Crotons” at Deacons
Road. It consists of 4 aéere of land and house which has open
verandah, drawing, dining and breekfast rooms, 3 bedrooms,
toilet bath and kitchen.

(2) Property at Oistins, Christ Church as a drug store or

contracted by her or any one elge in my

trade mark in Part “A” of Register in REAL ESTATE

me without a written order signed by
espect of wearing apparel, . including





AVR. 8., FV. Ae
COMPRETIENSIVE —LYST-
INGS ALWAYS AVAIL-



‘irts, Collars, neckties, pajamas, hand- “PBENEZER", that desirable dwelling-
kerchiefs and underwear, and will be} house overlooking the sea situate at Ashton Hall,

| Signed FRANKLIN FERGUSSON, — |

1

entitled to register the same after One| Enterprise Road, Christ Chureh and i] St. Peter. |
|

LINE

sonth from the 2ist day of February, | of 12 inch stone standing on 2 Roods













- ABLE 2 21.2. 59—2n Ice Cream Patlour. It is residence and shop on the sea.
r* ‘ 2 unless some person shall in the]15 Perches of land containing OPEN | st —____asett naeteence (3) Substantially built wall house with galvanize roof
eo ie antime give notice in duplicate to m*| verandah, drawing and dining room#, 2 called “Eyareville’ at Eagle Hall Road. It has gallery, draw- wane
iratous The tease mark Gln be°seen’| DRaeRana.. (WIR Amaee . or By Ves ing room up and downstairs, dining and breakfast rooms (4) OUTWARD FR THE UNITED KINGDOM
f Era e 7 see | kitchen, pantry, garage, servant's room, & , a
FOR SALE on application at my office water and electricity. The above will be bedrooms, toilet and bath, kitchen and room for garage. This pa OM E UNITED KING



Dated this 12th day | February 1952. set up for sale at the office of the house is in perfect order. No repairs and is priced to sell.

(4) One stone cottage at Codrington Hill with verandah,
drawing and dining rooms, 2 bedrooms and kitchen. Water
and light throughout.

(5) 20 x 12 HOUSE at Bush Hall, 9 ft. high, and built
of pine and put together with bolts. The roof is covered

. WILLIAMS, | undersigned on Thursday 28th February
Registrar of Trade Marks || at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Inspectior
21. 2.52—3n. any day on application to the occupier
HAYNES & GRIFFITH,
Solicitors, 12 High Street

TAKE NOTICE | pues

HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom hw }
house, all. conveniences, with party- a

sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
jand utility room Jarage, laundry, 2

BYWAYS", f * New Rd.—
A pleasant, re-war stone
bungalow claes construe-
tion thry t The 8 bedrom
ire Peovided with washbasins and
ali hat ‘ Ol exposure rhere
is a Soree unge, dining room,
fro \ dah and ktchen. In
the bits t are extensive store-
iit é gareg & servants’
bh ws a letached. A of
find t% ov "000 sq. it. & un-
elripted vie are obtained
‘Oem a} A popular
\d s#lect district,

Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados

S.S. “WAYFARER” .. Ntwport and

; Liverpool. 7th Feb. 20th Feb.
S.S. “PHILOSOPHER” .. London and

M/brough.12th Feb. 26th Feb
$.S. “DEFENDER” __.. Liverpool. and

Glasgow.12th Feb. 26th Feb.
S. “PLANTER” .» London. 29th Feb. 11th Mar.









with galvanize and close boarded inside. Can be sold for
$800.00.



(6) 34 of an acre of land at Britton’s Hill on road leading

to Club Morgan.

| gaxvant rooms and storage room under

Enjoy the hospitality, com- |
fort and thoughtful serv-
ice which have made PAA
“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over. |

}

|

On, attractive Billsfae sites Rockley Nev (7) 7 Spots of land remaining at Hothersal Turning.
Sizes from 10,000 to 13,000 square feet.
(8) Only a few Spots remains at Maxwell Road and at
Thorpes, St. James.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Middle Street. Dial 2645.

20.2.52,—2n.

Road. A, Barnes & Co,, Ltd. Dial 4476



13.2,52—t.f.n. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

ee

RIVERTON—River Road, standing on
7,761 square feet of land, The house
contains drawing, dining and two bed-

rf MDE> xwells Coast.
ij A hy The well preserved
Proper wit 3 bedrooms, large

ng room, lou
age serv
three and all

Walled grounds of

an acre insuring com-

plete nwivag Further = details
u application.

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S. “CROFTER” .. .. London. 26'h Feb, |
§. “BIOGRAPHER” . Liverpool 28th Feb.

i
rooms, water and electric light. =|
spection by appointment ‘phone :

|

nn






. The above will be set up for sale at
That BOYLE-MIDWAY INC , 4 corpor=| public competition on Friday, the i

vd
‘tion organized and existing under the|gay of February 1952, at 2 p.m. at th:
lows of the State of Delaware, United | office of the undersigned

states of America, whose trade or bugihess CARRINGTON & SEALY,
ddress is 22 East 40th Street New York, Lucas Street
tew York, i S-0i., Meaaacact rere, has
pplied for the registration of a trade

mark in Part “A” of Register in respect AUCTION
{ -—- insecticides, disinfectants, garden

pray, and chemical weed killer, and UNDER THE SILVER

ill be entitled to register the same
fter one month from the 2ist day of HAMMER
‘ebruary 1952 unless some person shall
a the meantime give notice in duplicate
o me at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be



te

For further Information apply to... .

NEW YORK

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we will on FREDAY 22nd, 65 bags «i| stopovers in England, Ireland.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents









“CASABLANCA” Maxwells Coast
—A beautiful property embodying
the finest pre-war workmanship,
Well designed for easy running
with 2 reception, 4 bedrooms,
Verandah, kitchen, pantry, garage,
storerooms etc. The land is approx
2 acres with flower and vegetable
Kardeng, productive orchard and
coconut grove. One acre walled

.

ROMERT THOM LIMITED

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C, and BW 1A
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466















Rardem may be sold separately as een on application at my office. . Dark Crystal Sugar at Plantations Ltd ——
Duilding # te ee Dated this 12th day of February. 1952 | Bay Street. Sale 12.90 O'clock. Tern ° PPLE
H. WILLIAMS, ‘ash. WV on }
“BUNGALOW, Rockley—A very Registray of Trade Marks. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO enezuela RUBBER Barbados Food Products
comiortabic compact tumber 21, 2.52—3n a Auctioneers.

a i Swift, daily service to all main
4 cities. Regular fiights to West In-

$ UNDER THE SILVER | ties, Colombia, Central America, |

|
|
1
x \
. HAMMER texico . . . and to East Coast of
y HOOVER WASHING MACHINES South America. ! it, you can
By recommendations of Lievds Age: *

bungalow in good residential area
on read. Accormmodation
comprises front covered veranual,
@rawiit coom, breakfast room
bedrooms, kitche: wage ser
quarter Pie vant garden
2 food vard at rear






LOCALLY CURED
BACON

is NOW ON SALE at





GARDEN HOSE

2-ply %% in. at 22c. per ft. |







4,



iy we will sell on FRIDAY, @nd, 3 Hoove | "OW “fly PAA” to 83° countries

Electr'e Washing Machines at K. and colonies,
¢c you Hunte & Co,, Ltd, Show Room, Lowe, |

ez? ®
r
iinnosaat ko Ce eee
999955
x

Cee

Secure Yours at . .

“wont STONT BUNGALOW, ’ : Messrs. GENERAL HARD-
(i. W. Hutchinson = J WARE SUPPLIES,

in@ Halt Terrace ‘

















bu Broad Street, opposite the 8 '
» | Machi ; ‘ ; Rickett Street.
FURNISH BETTER R | Sale 2 Betock Terms cash i For 22 yects the leading & CO, LTD ,
.|BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. international airline—PAA Dist 4298 frond £8 w wre age he is aa
lies, ane _" Tables. Bi Astes bende . eee 20.2.52-2n | Was first to link the Amer- ts . nid va
in Iron & Wood, Coil und Flat —_—- | feas by air, first to fly to 54 ‘,
Spring ashstand Soup . : ee le A oe ae Ok ae a a OO a oe a ee oe SPOS POG,
TABLES. in. Beautitul -Pelahod all six continents, and first H 2 aa ‘ a“
Mohouany abd others for Diniha, TAKE NOTICE to €l 7 ik ‘ne An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant. Use:
Citehe Radio and faney use DART y arovad the werid ’ .
ale Wagrons, Tea Trollars

GERM OILS






Stone and concrete torey house Kitchen and Bedroom @& That CLUETT, PFAGODY & CO F bak

standing in grounds of approx. 1% thane Ri DRAWING ROOM “ corporation organized cate the law: | or reservations, sce your ‘
Heres, Cool x Ma exceitens FURNITURE Typewriter, Prams 2 of the State of New York, United States | Travéel\Agent dr for Best Results.

safe bathing 5 beach Piane ‘ of America, whose trade or busine




nmodation







AOERBOO 85



















jer
iow ot gue canstructs

with parapet rt Pia propers
has the advantage of a edrner site
and ¢ Vv view cawhras
There are ¢ 4 bedre vith
Wat-in Wardrobe Laree lounge/
living roo wath 2 veranuaba
feeding om The kitchen is
well “prfed with fit cup
hourds Vos g-ecar @ard
ervanw rooms and iaundfy.

“THE RISK", St. Jome Lar

























A
opposite, Pxtensiv« 100 address is 433 River Street, Troy, Count | | . ‘i *
with 2% large reception rooms, of Rensselaer, State of New York, U.S.A . T
Brice. chen anc aness, 2mm (TR Le Ss WILSON 3 fine toni for ine souseran ot | : TENTRAL EMPORIUM
Toor nd ara Pnquirie trade mark in Part “A” of Register D . . .
eis : : SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009, respect of wearing apparel, it | AGE vhestibncié COLE & CO. LTD : Gasolene Service Station — Trafalgar St.
x shirts, collars, neckties, paj . 4 oe - . 4
Hy SB. Maxwell “Coast Lot FON | kerghbetes and “Underwear and. priit- be apetee LOAM IAA AEA LOLA LAA AAA SOA
A vag oullt bungalow with 3 8 PRO OOSPVOSOOS cotitled to register the same after ay .
Bedroons, iitee avin room, ss month from’ the 2ist day_of Februar PIV AMER. RICA, VY Agents
kKitchenagarace, servants’ quarters : G bot 1932 unless some person shall’ in the fi — THERE 1S NO IN BE
A ples ntly located property fer overnment o meantime give notice in duplicate to me . I H I TER tha
sale up ty compst.tive Abare nt my office of opposition ot suet Horio Artes G cM
pee € SOUTHERN RHODESIA) asia me ES) a eam ce “MUSTEROLE”
2 RENTALS % : a Dated this 12th day of February 1958 | Broad Street -- 8 towf
: % | H. WILLIAMS, | Phone 2122 (After b t | PU
; S 436% Rettiiterea Stock 2 memset TR eae | For; CONGESTION: MUSTEROLE Gives taatunt itatiet,
“BENBAM gham Gat e 20 r x, 7 21.2 ae i iE LE Gives Instant Relie
Mens, Mexwe ft hed < ‘ ~ = MUSTEROLE:—Meits quickly away into the Pores, At first
G@VaiiabH on ic Bias wo st er ae abroad. x] ——— there is a comforting, tingling warmth, followed INSTANT-
Session.2 % f rustee Investment | LY by a Delicious coolness; and then... SWIFTLY...
‘ +) > PY } , “dd - i
ONEV ia : y , comes the longed-for relief
he delim telat a ag a { Price: 100 plus conimission %| MUSTEROLE:—Is NOT just another ointment . . . MUS-
! i > ¥ TEROLE is the modern Scientific home therapy for the
* y| Medical condition known as “Congestion”.
‘ : te x Remember:—IT’S MUSTEROLE
RESHOENK B y fur .
ished wah a es ch “ A. M. WEBB > The All purpose Rub:— for...
tb town excell tall % x Colds, Coughs, Sore Throats, Lumbago, Muscular
ail : ; ‘ . Sprains
eves i i} Stockbroker. x} INSIS ON Es a aghast Mae ia
bt at:—
2 : I so .
Phone 4640 * %3 Broad Street, Bridgetown. ¥ | BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD.
Jantations Building S Tteatot : > | BROAD STREET \STINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)
vue ae Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy }| End at all other “GOOD DRUG STORES”
‘
HbA AQAHnasngqgassaaas—ar







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



"tan you lend M@ _ «
| @ Paradol tablet?” aN J

NS
a

A REMINDER ey










Wuen a Girt doesn’t want to leave

| class—and have to make embarrase-

nq explanations—it's Paradol she

} asks for. For Paradol means quick

relief from suffering caused by

periodic pains—headache, too—
without disagreeable after-effects,

| Ask your druggist for Paradol,
scientifically compounded from 4

; | ingredients. The name “Dr. Chase”
| “® your assurance. 22

| DR. CHASE’S

| | PARADOL-

| wmmme Quick Relief from Pain mmm

’

}

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TO-DAY.

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EJIPTO

THANI’'S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3468 )

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ORIENT





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SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

——







Pa Za

ElchT HUNDRED DESPERATE, CAGED Souls
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= a _ eee
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

BY A CANNY SET OF INSTRUMENTS ON
THE WARDEN'S MASTER CONTROL BOARD
— INSTRUMENTS THAT POLICE EVERY [o)
QUARTER OF THE SPACE PRISON /
BUT IN THE HANDS OF “BIG MOE“ KOSLOW
THESE CONTROLS BECOME A FEARSOME

#



PASSPORT TO FREEDOM! Usually Now Usually NOW
\_IN THE COLD MORNING, A DIAL IS 5 Tine ‘ MIC OC . aS 4 Ibs. ONIONS , ; 96 80
no st Tins BLACK MAGIC CHOCOLATES
"yoo cau COORS SWING OPEN. e ro (ilb.) 2.12 1.75 CURRENTS—(per Ib.) a 45 38
NENT An PEROCSTY. 4 ce chia je 75 Bots. HEINEKENS BEER .. 28 23
' For THE FIRST TUNE IN MEMORY, THE LA Tins MADRAS CURRY 2 ; eed d
SPACE PRISON ECHOES TO THE HEART [7 a,
ROSE Ze Sa os ee >








-» dgumamistiazan Sos ania | D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

WA\EANWHILE, POOR WEE DORRIE, ATTEMPTING TO BUY JUST MISSED HER /
TICKETS TO GO ON THE TIZAIN PLATFORM, IS GETTING “ANTON SANITARIUM *.,
SNARLEP IN RED TAPE... 1m GOTTA REMEMBER THaT /
b RETURN HEIZ RING













THE COLONNAD GROCERIES







TEECKETS FROM ZE
«+. MACHINE /













BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS |
i“
? | By RIPLEY

psoas ae NE a ee :

YOU ARE RIGHT- || AND THERE ARE MY FAMILY AND I MY ANCESTORS PARDON - MRS. WIDENSHORT- YOUR MAGGIE-YOUR BROTHER BIMMY |
| MY DE-YAH~WE || NO EXCLUSIVE CAWNT LOWER WOULD BE HUSBAND JUST PHONED AND WANTS || HAS HIS GARBAGE WAGON IN | : ;
| AH LIVING IN A || SETS ANY MORE!| | OURSELVES TO || AGHAMED OF TO KNOW IF YOU WANT HIM TO GIVE FRONT OF THE GARAGE DOOR- | No family should be without a copy of
'VULGAH AGE- || ONE FEELS SO | | ASSOCIATE WITH |] ME IF THEY BAIL TO GET YOUR COUSIN OUT OF | : 2
SOCIETY HAS || STUPID GONG PRESENT-DAY || KNEW I WOULD || JAIL-AND TO TELL YOU 4 YOUR LNCLE'S PICK AN’ SHOVEL: |

FATHER IS UP IN THE
ATTIC TRYING TO GET



T CAN'T GIT IN THERE TO |

\ LOST ITS WU TOC THESE SOCIETY -I THINK || ATTEND ANY HE SAYS HE'S GOT A JOB TO
p EI 4

| this amazing modern book of Wonders,
"LL BUY A YACHT || OF THE SOCIAL t
| | AND GET AWAY || FUNCTIONS OF





THESE TIMES! Miracies, Freaks, Monstrosities and almost

| %, BELIEVE IT OR NOT

Impossibilities. There is both entertainment i



4 and edification in this new collection of con-
A
ea crete proofs that truth is stranger than
a fiction.
|

“Ripley” has ransacked new continents,




‘i yy
stetetetstetetenaumtats C2

invaded new countries, gone exploring all







YOU'RE HIT! over the world, become an almost legendary



iT ae Pl ;
y THE HAWK'S (a8 eek ) ; | hero of the stage, screen and wireless,
MOB CHARGING § @ ¢* ~ 4a
7 | amassed new millions of treaders, and, in



THE PALACE! 5
4-4

on

general, proved again that his own wonder-




ful story is itself the greatest BELIEVE IT
OR NOT of them all.

a D . OCATE
WELL? HAVE ANY OF THE REST THEN REPLACE THE Qe WIL
OF YOU ANYTHING To SAY ¢ Ml | THINGS YOUTRIED 1O™ Vitae M1 4
.. AGERE acy S ‘
es Rode ee) | TENT BACK UP gpmtanrinet, SE:
Fe i aaa ae 1% A 22
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS



pe D
=

PROF DUDLEY FAINTS AS THE
ANGRY WARRIOR SWINGS HIS
\ ; we GIANT KNIFE «+
' ve pen ree:
\ A











PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BEST TIME DONE BY

Castle In The Air
Does Smart 7 Furlong

THE track was only h

By BOOKIE

alf open yesterday for gallops







CAUGHT

ew











Sports
Round-up

oe



| Regatta
Handicaps

The. Fourth Regatta of the Royal
Barbados Yacht Club will be sailed
in Carlisle Bay at 2,30 p.m, on



































THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21,

NEW COLT



1952





Belleplaine Boys
Beat Clevers Hill

The Belleplaine Boys’ Club de-
feated Clevers’ Hill Boys’ Club 12
goals to nil at the Belleplaine Com-
munity Centre grounds yesterday



f evening.
but quite a few did strong work. Mr. J- R. Edwards’ new BOXING Saturday. . 4 For the Belleplaine Club, B. D.
colt Castle in The Air returned the best time for the morn- eee timgs are @S Campbell scored five goals, K.
ing when he did five furlongs in 1.04. As he broke from LONDON, | Clase No. Yacht bios wn Wak ta a ee, and K
the seven furlong post this was very impressive indeed. RANDCLPH TURPIN has been. ——————-_—_-—--- ~— se : a es "Patel aes tae
Thanks to my friend Footpad, — — - —_—— awarded the “Boxing News Belt” = - a. Belle Se sade r
who stayea on after I left, I am ° for the second year in succession. 8 13 Ranger 230 Red The Sei a ak tiniad te
able to give you most of the Belleville Cluh This award is made to the boxer B 481 Fantasy tt ° ee Mime the Bélléplaine
gallops; They were as follows: 3 . judged to have done most for the Ae ee ana on ‘ ane their aan ‘aod be
Betsam worked earliest. It was sport, and the decision was reach- 5 8 Peter P 2.32 Yellow sented : . p
almost dark when I arrived and Tennis Results ed by conducting a readers’ poll. — drei ade corsaiately out-
she was already saddled, She did Following are the results of tha ‘Randy’s’ success was overwhelm- 8B 7 Moyra Blair 233 Red played their opponents. V. Watsor
a comfortable box to box (6 fur- tennis played at Belleville Tennis ing, for he captured ninety-five —5 . Sint ————= (was easily the most outstanding
longs, 47 yards) in 1.30 and the Club yesterday:— per cent of the votes. B 8 Rascal 234 Yellow Player. :
Se ce Turpin figures twice in thi 4 ae is hee — ‘ond ess Walle Le
ros toe MIXED DOUBLES NDICAP. wice in this poll. : Ros , Lee,
eae Ber Ge tor tae 8 % Dr Seunaing and Mise ee: His Empress Hall fight with Rob- _? 12 Rainbow 235 Red Atherley, Smith, Springer, A.
box was 1.38 and the five in 1.13, —40 beat J. D. Trimingham and inson, in which he won the world “p10 Van Thorndyke 2.36 Yellow Campbell, B. Campbell, Hutson
Little wien time's tei heck” Mite M, ‘King ise oe 68, middleweight title, was voted the - a (Capt.); Branch and Watson.
ittle more than a brisk canter. ’ ’ best fight of the year. Here, no 3 Rainbird 2.38 mee ers’ Hill: Johnson (Capt); O.
. Derham (Jane, was Cager. but TO-DAY’S FIXTURES. doubt, the fans were swayed by p 2 Resolute Mayers, Holder, Dermont, V. Hink-
kept in check by Frank O'Neil, sentiment, for other fights such as D 1 Buccaneer 239 Yellow son, A. Hinkson, 1, Leslie,
doing five in 1.10 1/5. Men's Doubles Final. Dave Sands—Yolande Pompee, P 9 Olive Blossom _. Harewood, Trotman and Holder.
Castle in the Air broke from the Dr. C. G. Manning and E. P excelled it for thrills and action. ~3 ~~ ~5 Miscnier The referee was Mr. J. E.
seven but was only taken for the Taylor vs. P McG. Pa‘terson and D 2 Imp 241 Red Graham.
5 which he did in 1.04, He is a G. H, Manning. FENCING D 14 Hurricane
good looker and mover but hold a i oan.
his head a trifle high. He should EMRYS LLOYD, one of Bri- pb 7 Sinbad 242 «Yellow T Friends
be one of the favourites for thi Y.M.P.C. LOSE TO tain’s greatest fencers, retired ——————_______- ‘o Our en
Maiden Stakes. from competition after the 1948 1! 3 a eas cia
Usher looks better eact - COMBERMERE Olympie Games. Now, at 46, he .*, .* See -& Bee From Overseas
ing. He went with Blue Nelly this The first game i ird Divi menes “8 comeback, He is to. x Sornadoce 3.45 Zellow
Send cae it voreed welt to e first game in the Third Divi- captain the British team for this —— ———$—_—__——
_ they worked well to- sion football series was played yes- year’s Games at Helsinki. At first ! 7 Mohawk KINGSLEY
= mg cee 1/5. terday. Combermere started off he was to be non-playing cap- ° 8 Skippy 5 weer
_ Pepper Wine broke from the well by defeating a Y.M.P.C. “B” : : tain, but England needed an C 9 Folly . 247 Yellow :
7 or there about, She did the teem to the tune of eight goals to LINDWALL caught Worrell in 2nd slip. for 0 off Gomez in the fifth Test Match. axperienced competitor, and ~ Be eS Ee ee Pe RESIDENTIAL
ae 1.05, one at their grounds while the . a ae SS Rb tate eee a ies kcal —— Lloyd was persuaded to go the : i ia
Flieuxce did a box to box in Y.M.P.C., “A” team beat Comber- whole way. His appearance will : 2. unease ie CLUB
a es ia ast five in 1.06 3/5. mere Old Boys’ one nil at Y.M.P.C. Ss : strengthen Britain's chances. I 12 Dawn
ashing rincess did a box to Police defeated Y.M.C.A. one nil F
box at a strong clip returning in at Queen’s Park and at the Bay ports Window FOOTBALL akegeot ree AT BATHSHEBA
1,23 3/5, Wanderers beat Foundation one r S College meet Eimpire in « :
es did five easily in 1.08). nil. At Black Rock, Carlton went First Division fixture at infition, deans ties bene Be ed a ee
osette and Cavalier did five i: yhen Rangers defeated them ; + Ss (abou & els aie 2 ena -
j amactte and Cavalier did fve in down when Rangers defeated them Kensington this afternoon. | Slerling) on enlarging om me © 22 Ganoei 800 Yellow 11 Welcomes you and offers 3
Nobody apparently took Tibe- iad ; B ® © beaten in the Second Divi- aioe ale ae ate aren § i Gant’
rian Lady’s time. h A m ateur ; pionship. After the alterations, ma
Fuss Budget did a very ore- or ritis sion last season carried off Berhe, Lausanne and Zurich ‘| * Gorohetta 2.53 Red LOBSTER

strained box to box in 1.30 3/5.

COLONNADE PLAY



the championship of that

arenas will be capable of holding

I 18 Clytie









Division and have been ;
Veumsen whe particularly eas: Undoubtediy the entry of these . me between 55,000 and 60,000 peo. N.B. The following dates have been fixed LUNCHEONS
over a five in 1.05 1/5. She is om ALLEYNE ARTHUR By a Special Correspondent two fine sportsmen would be a ene Soutte First Di ples, while Basle and Geneva wil! 9, 5! Rewatta, Saturday 15th March
ious! y 7 , LONDON fillip to British golf. Interest ; . ; be able to accommodate over March, 1952. P f
ee Or, Caer. Bie. i ld be stimulated among thou Empire did not field a 50,000 H. BLAIR BANNISTER which include our
Notonite was another who was A football match between the When the Sports Editor of ohe Would be the 5 havi ., stare First Division team last year ern ‘= ~ Starter.
not allowed to do much, His time Colonnade and Alleype Arthur Of Britain's leading newspapers Sands a t © dandy aeens = aia and it will be interesting to CRICKET popular
for the box to box was 1.32. Sports Clubs will be played at the recently cabled Bing Crosby and fity and attendance thon British see how they acquit them- MERINGUE PIES
Belle Surprise did a good box Combermere School grounds this Bob Hope in America to ask them er ree ae Sy tee pe selves against the newly LESLIE AMES, of Kent and NETBALL E
to box in 1.23, afternoon, Play will start at 4.45 if they would compete in the Sl i'cir ln obtain this is surely | Promoted College team after | England, the greatest wicket- _ The Olympia netball team was in Coconut
Lunways pulled her usual best °'clock. British Amateur Open Golf : p a season’s rest. keeper-batsman cricket has ever defeated by Foundation Girls’ at ’
i . ae Championshiy at Prestwick com- "Ot an opportunity to throw ll be ie ¢, oo evn: are - ‘
to do five in 1.04 1/5 hard held. ite takin “are: ampionship caekesTetebias The referee wi Mr. known, is to become player-coach. Olympia on Tuesday by nine goals Lemon
Gun Site and Dunquerque went ceeaee are:- ; ’ mencing May 26th, he started the @way lightly. L. F. Harris, and linesmen: Last summer Ames displaced a to eight. \ as
off one behind the other, the latter H’ My a Harris (Capt.); biggest argument since it was Messrs. R. Parris and A. | disc, and spent most of the sea- Queen's College Old Giris will Or
in front of course. Gun Site 1, Hoyte t ae i ree. eg pide’ Be se mp rare bi ve — eer mn son in a spinal jacket. Kent hope play ‘Queen’s College at Queen's —
caught her up later and they did mz eee eet oe happenec us way. ope 2 presenting Empire w that he will be fit enough to play Colle; oday at 4.45 p.m.
Sa Bente bax an base: eho ena Alexander, and Crosby both replied that they Boxing Board be :—Smith (goal); Grant, this season, but if not, he Fvilt Tae fatbel match which was DIAL 95266
Cross Bow stayed on better Noe enye were expecting to file entries for . Bynoe: Alleyna, Rudder, act solely as First XI coach. The scheduled to have taken place
with Doldrum this time as they Alleyne Arthur;— §.’ Green ‘e Amateur. Another English QOhecks Records Maynard; Hope, Drayton, | post of county coach is still held betw ’s College Old Girl 24
did a box to box in 124 4/5. (Capt.), R. Morris, A. "Blackett, paper, upon seeing the news, ex- . > Douglas, Taylor and Rob- by C. Lewis. : met dee tiedtline Co van + Feb- ws Eoin.
Dim View did four in 52. . Bryan, B. Brathwaite, E. Lynch, Pe Bob end Bing playing 29 The State Boning Boards Medi- ar ill field c ‘ Omnae STEWART, 23 ruaty 22 Ste beed postponed.
; J ae astin, Goddard, N, Lawitss, C ae a g pla) - Peer eit ‘ollege w eld:— C, i -year- a
a did a box to box in Clarke rae 7 gy Be awless, C. gether in the premier Amateur cal esoraivnin is hen Se Smith (goal), F. Squires, old New Zealand hurdler, has
Flying Deen didaceie tet golf competition. The inference records of all boxers who have Trotman; Symmonds, Mr. come to London with one ambi-

was not impressive towards the
end, His time was 1.50 and [ do
not think he went as well as last



WHAT'S ON TODAY

was that the Championship would
become a comic music-hall turn.
Naturally such a suggestion was

been discharged from the army
and it was revealed that four fa-
mous boxers are among those in-

Smith, G. Squires; Medford,
F. Tudor, C, Tudor, Griffith,
Reid.



tion. It is to convinee the New
Zealand selectors that he should
be included in their Olympic team

ZEB
Every spoonful gives you _






Police at seized on in the States where vestigated. No names ‘were re- for Helsinki. Derek thinks the ae eh ee a —

Saturday, , . Co are im Pleas both Crosby and H are recog- vealed but it was believed that best way to do that is to put in

Embers did a mile and picked 10.30 a.m nised top-élass go fers. Right Ohe man is the ex+champion and some intensive work in England | imo re am ad mo re
up Arunda at the 7). The former of Christ Chureh away, Professiofial Jimmy De- two others are leading challengers. DE LAPENHA and is letting nothing deter him. —_—_———_--
is much like Gun Site when it Vestry — 2.00 p maret, one of the big-boys on The Boxing Commission em- WILL. PLAY He worked his passage here, with-
comes to lacking early pace and First Division. F Thee it do the “follow the sun” all-year- phasized that it is not impuiing . out the prospect of a job or a place e u3 er g y a % a
even a slow beginner like Arunda Empire vs. College at roufid American tournament cir- any wrorig-doing but it wants to (From Our Own torrespondent) to live, and had to spend his first
had to be held back to her, They Kensington — 5.00 p.m cuit, retorted with caustic com. S¢e if they had possibly used any : LONDON, Feb. 20. night on a bench in London's
did the box to box in 1.27 2/5. Malibe Goenel AGan ments in defence of the famous cheating to escape military ser- Lindy De La Penha, Middles- qrafaigar Square. Now he is

The Thing fooled everybody but —5.00 p.m ue" 1 couple, See eee OE ee ee a the putside happily settled in and has joined

ratedold time keeper. we , physical or psychological weak- right, a ay for Ja- ‘ : ;

Boasiie ae old pike Tinta ne ge gg _ Crosby and Hope had done al nesses which might be made maica against the Rest of the West Herhe Hill Harriers, devoting all

; his
great deal of good for Golf, as- apate Cine jo. EREng.

worse by ring action.—U.P.
serted Demaret, — Crosby, even

gate she ran once round in
1.24 3/5. Looked easier than she

Mobile Cinema Show. Indies at Kingston this week-end.

Lancaster Pasture,



St.




aturd: has his own tournament named @ Every spoonful of « Kepler’ gives you a rich
idee tie’ washes quite obli- aoe a after him. And Jimmy went on e ey St Seale A one ,
vious to the hard going in spite to say that if Hope or Crosby ese vitamins are nature’s wonder workers,

Barbados Flying Club at
Y¥.M.P.C, — 7.45 p.m
Monthly Concert —

could practise a little more they

of her big joint. She did a box to would beat 90 per cent. of Bri-

box in 1.26 4/5,

assurifig health and freedom from iliness,
@ Men, women, chiidren=all should start



Blue Diamond, the horse that
changed his mind in the middle of
a race meeting did five in 1.13,
never allowed to run very fast.

Waterbelle did a five in 1.07 4/5.
How can-one who was so chunky
at two, now look so hard and
spare?

Aim Low and Devil’s Symphony
did @ smart four in 51 3/5.

Red Cheeks did five in 1.09 fair-
ly easy,

Seedling was out again with the
imported filly Fille D’Iran. I am

told he “looked the better of the : Crosby and Hope have _ bott
two at the end of a five in 1.06. Wind Velocity 10 miles per been recommended by Americ BABY COATS each : $3 60
He has hopes for the Guineas, | hour “eet ) 29,949 in the past, so technically there ee lee e
should expect. Barometer a.m. . can be no objection to their

votte did a slow box to box (3 p.m.) 29.866 entry on this occasion. But Brit W/
ta ube 4/5, How con & roly-poly TO-DAY ish golf fans find themselves BABY OOLLEN
always remain a roly-poly? That Sunrise : 6.25 a.m. divided There are a number

is a secret that owners of Trini-
dad half-breds might give their
right arms to know.

Mareh Winds was much easiei
than Diadem over five in 1.08 4/5.

Watercress did not come off the
ice very much, She did a box to
box in 1.29 4/5,

Slainte has never thawed out.
His box to box in 1.82 4/5 was done
at his customery crawl,

A process-of elimination seems in 56 2/4. That brings her up ‘o compete this summer. Crosby, Sa
to bé going on to find out where 9th place. two years ago at St. Andrews,

Twinkle will be placed on race
day. Having already proved bet-
ter than Cottage she took on the
Antigua hope Condevon and made
the latter look inferior over a four

| They'll Do It Every Ti

{
“Like Sue oust STEPPED out oF | |
A BANDEOX ”= YOUVE ALL HEARD

THAT EXPRESSION ~~,

Esplanade — 7.45 p.m.





WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington ;

Nil,
Total Rainfall for month
to date: .07 in.
= temperature: 87.5

Lowest Temperature: 70.0

Sunset: 6.04 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, Feby.

18,

Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 12.45 a.m., 12.15

p.m.
Low Tide: 6.09 am. 7.30
p.m.





tain’s amateurs. He added, so it
is said, “They are certainly good
enough to make the British Walk-
er Cup Team, and they would
even win a few matches which
would be a novelty for the British
team.”

And there you have the whole
position summed up. The qualifi-}
cation rule for The Amateur says}
that a British entrant must have}
a handicap of not more than two,
Overseas entrants have to be re-
commended by their own Asso-
ciations.

although I believe them to be in
the minority, who feel that Bing
and Bob together would turn the
Amateur into a music-hall act
And at all costs they would avoid
this even if it meant refusing
their entries. But this is a very
narrow-minded view.

I.am sure that the majority
would agree with me when I say
Bing Crosby and Bob Hope should
be welcomed if they are able to

Vonwise and Cottage did a half showed he is a player of high

mile, the last three in 41 4/5,

calibre and even if Bob Hope

Clementina did a five in 1.03. did come unstuck at Royal Port-

Firelady was the last recorded, cawl last May, every

doing a box to box in 1.23)

ercmecescecinc . : ‘

GOING TO
THE BRIDGE

| LEN. LEVENSON,
I86 &
ANEW

Registered US. Potent fee



golfer has

his bad days.



— S|

By Jimmy

Hatlo |

HAVE. YOU EVER LOOKED AT
HOW THEY LEAVE THE _BANOBOX THEY
STEPPED OUT OF? HEH-HEH +.



BABY

PULLOVERS____.$3.50. $5.00 & $5.50
BABY BOOTIES, Pair_......-66¢ 72e & $1.12
KHUS KHUS HANGERS, each.._._~-------$1.08
BUNCHES ‘OF HWS KHUS......._____._Ge.



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

|
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=








WAY

















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a
—=E=Sa==Se=>B=iOEeE=aEaoaoaoyoye——E————_—~L~LE~L—E=E=E=E=S=SSSS ——=—=——-



The purpose of signs is

they, know so well.



\ in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft.,

for covering joints

Phone 4267.



_Hl

= j



without words. This white horse
symbolises Scotch at its very finest;
whisky distilled, biended
matured by Scotsmen in the tradi-
tional ways that they, and only

@ 194c. per sq. ft.
WALLBOARD MOULDING

taking tasty ‘Kepler’ to-day

‘KEPLER.

4 BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO, PRODUCT &
LL
Sole Avnts for Barbados : Collins’ Ltd., 28 Broad Stra





to tell

and

Sole Distributors; FRANK B, ARMSTRONG LTD.

Bada BAAABEDALADLZAADLSASSD



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% in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft. 8ft., 10ft. long

at 30c, per aq. ft.
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All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack
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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 11, 1MZ BEST TIME DONE BY NEW COLT Castle In The Air Does Smart 7 Furlong By BOOKIE THE track waa onl> half open yesterday for gallops hut quite a few did strong work. Mr. JR, Kdwards' new %  •nit Castle in The Air returned the best time (or the morning when he did live furlongs in 1.04. As he broke from the seven furlong nost this was very impressive indeed. Thanks to mv friend flnafjad, %t 4.11 I Belleville Gluh Ten n in Result* H 1km | are the results < %  ,.. who stayed on aftrr 1 left. I .JVC vnu BsnM one v' Club 13 The Fourth Regatta < %  the Royal goal, u,nil attaM Bellep.a.ne CcmBarbados Yacht Club will be sailed numtv Centre grounds yesterdain Carlisle Bay at 2,30 p.m. on evening. LINDWALL caught Worrell m 2nd ills for 0 off Gomel in the fifth Tei Match and at the Bay. WaMarcn beal |. nil. Al Black Bock, Ctl a dowri when Kan, %  bj •*.. Ruabi to one. COLONNADE PLAY ALLEYNE ARTHUR Crosby And Hope For British Amateur ,aU-h het\tfcg When the Sports Edllo UndoubtOdh the entry of these two fine spoilsmen would be a fillip to British golf. Interest of otic """l 0 be Itimulated BDMOg tlmusands of the non-play ine fraleiroutd Wal Ctorka %  DJV St**. WHATS ON TODAY I'ollce t'ourU — 10.UO a.m < oiiri of Cesamen rieaa —10.31 a.m MreUns ..i Chrlat ( hur.h Vealry — 2.00 p.m. First Dfvlalen football — Empire vs. College al Krtulnslon — S.tO p ,,. Mretlnx Council A.C.H.B. —3.00 p m Inler-t luh Table Tennis — YM.CA. — i, mi p m Mobllr Cinema Slum. I .in. ,i>ti i I'attturp. St Jameni — 7.30 p.m. Him Show tor HarhadoBarbedos Flyta, Club at VM.IM — 7.45 p m Mi.nihK Conrrrt — Fiplanade — 7.45 p.m. lo do live in 1.04 1/5 hard held. Gun Site and Dunquerque went off one behind the other, the latl in ftont of ciurse. Gun Si caught her up later and the) del the box to box m 1.26}. Cross Bow staved on l>etter with Doldnirn tlu> time .,• did a box to how In : Dim Viev did ft U in 52. Colleton did a box lo rx.\ 1.29. Flying Dragon did %  mile but was not impressive Inward* the end. Ill:, lime WSJ 140 and 1 dO not think he vent as well as laid Saturday. Ember* did a mile mi.I pirke-l up Arundii ni the 7| Tb" inmir is mmh like Gun Site when it comes to lacking early pace and even n alow beginner like Arunrfs had to be held back to her. Thev did the box to box In I 27 2 3 The Thine fooled everybody bu! one telebrated old time keener. Brcakiiw from the nine furious %  Ml "^be ran nnre round n 1.24 3/5. Ioked easier than she did en Saturday Rt*er Sprite seems quite oblivious to the hard going in spite of her big joint She did a box !0 box in 1.26 4/5. Blue Diamond, the lion* that thonged his mind in lbs middle ,.( u race meeting did live in 1.13. i.ever allowed t" mn vaj Waterbellc did %  the In LOT 4 b How can one who was so chunky at two, now look to hard aiw pare'.' Aim Low and Dovll'i Byntphon] oid a smart tour in 51 3/5. aoka did Bva in l.oy fairly easy. Seedling wai out again uilb the imported Hll.v Ft lie D'lran. I am told he looked the Utter of the two at the end of %  fivi He has hopes for the Guineas, 1 should expert Gavotte did a *low box to box in 140 4/5 How can a roly-poly always remain a roly-poly" Thai Is a secret that owners of Trinidad half-breds might give thci. right arms to know. March Wlnd was much easier than Diadem over five, in 1.08 l/ft. WatorCNN did not come off the much. She did a box to box In 140 4/5. Slnrite has never thawed out His box to box in 142 4'5 was don ^___^^_ t his customery crawl. A prwi— of elimi:..iti. i. gejn IB 56 2/4. That brings her up to be going on to tlnd nut where '.'in pi.. Twinkle will be placed on rOCO .ay. Having already proved lictler than 1 Oh OO UW Antigua hope Cimdevon and made the latter look Inn throw football maun LiMiTii in"* --..•.. .... Mnn~ —.. MI w. . %  not sllowed to do much. His lime Colonnade and Alieytje Arthur"' Britain 0 .BOagUng newsppor "5"2 JHUi^ra^.. for the box tn box was 1.32 Sports Clubs will IMplaye-1 at U I ""> m, ,f M n .!^T VKn n Belle Surprise did a goo.; <"• "' School grounds thin Bob Hope in America to ask them *",,*' a *'„." ",, .i,. !" !!-*. tt box in 1.33. aflcrnorn Clay w,U start at I || U 'bev would compete lf> the amateur (Oil needJJ the spar. Lunwnys pulled her ,,,,! ... <•'< lock. nn,,.., Ama.en, d JJ* ; / ^ V" 1 '' h _. Championsi.iis at Prestwkh eon., rw an ^OPP 0 7£LHjl'2 a a ^ ;— ;!8,h np "tarled the OWOJf btnU) .i^X^T^T 1 HarM< (Capt.l; biggest argument since it was H. Bfaughn. H Row*, K. Iiuvg'. first decided to nhoi I. lioyte. b. Rrewster. R. Itlnek|haptNned ml E, Blvnman. M. Alexander. n d Crosby both replletl U on and H. Clarke. were expecting to fila entries for Allcyne Arthur: 8 Onotl ""' Ama,eu '&&** Entt "" h (Cap! i H ItoTris, A Klnketl P"!*!. .upon seeing the nc^ evH Bryi n, B. Bmthwalse ii Hoxing Hoard Checks Records pressed Immediate horror at the NEW YORK. Feb. 20. Idea of Bob and Bing playing to. The State Boxing Hoard's Medi%  srltaai HI iha ptwnkH Amntaut ool ConunlaMo bj checking the golf competition. The tnteaOCi rnenrti of all boxer-, who have hat the Championship would been discharged from the army become a comic inune-h.dl turn and it was i %  gaunt] U ml four faNaturally such %  mg|Sj||||g| wu mous boxers are among those In%  alzod on ID the States when vestigated No names were reboth Crosby and Hope are reeogveaied but u was believed that nlaed tnp-cles* golfers. Might "tit mnn Is the ex-champion and away, I'infessional Jimm> Dewo others are leading challenger* marOt, onncl tha Mg-boys on The Hoxing Commlasion emIhe "follow Ihe gun' all-yearphanlml that it is not impuitut Sports Window College meet Empire >n a First Division fixture al Kensington this afternoon. College who played unl*>aten in Ihe Second Divi. M<*I last season carried oft the championship of that n and hove been promoted to the First Division this season. Empire did not field a First Division team last year and it will be interesting lo see how they acquit themselves against the newly promoted College team after a season's rest. The referee will be Mr. L. F. Harris, and linesmen Messrs, R. Parris and A. Putts. Representing Empire will be:—Smith (goal): Grant, llynoe Allevun, Rudder. Maynard; Hope. Dray ton. Douglas. Taylor and Robinson. College will Held.— C. Smith (goal). F. Squires. Trotman; Symmonds. Mr. Smith, G. Squires; Medford, F. Tudor. C. Tudor. Griffith. Reid. DE LAPENHA WILL. PLAY WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall trm < aoMaciaja NU. I..!.,I K*lnlall for month to date: .07 In. Richest temperature : 07 5 U F. >eM Temperature: 70.0 r. Hind win. in 10 mile* per hour Barometer < a.tn.) 10.049 (3 p.m. I 70466 TO-BAY sunrise : 6.55 a.m. Samel : 6.01 p.m. Moon 1-a.t quarter. Feby. 10. l.iKhtlns : 630 p.m. Hi-ii Tide: 1343 am.. 12.15 p.m Low Tide: COD a.m. 7.30 round American toiirnnment cuit. retorted with caustic com. ments in defence ol the famous couple and Hope had don. a great deal of good for Golf, asserted Dcmaret, — CrOOby, even has his own tournament named after him. And Jimmy went on lo SHY that if Hope or Crobby could practise a little more they would beat BO per rent. .1 Brltaln's amateurs. He added, so It Is sold, "They are ccrtninlv good enough to make the British Walk er Cup Team, and they would even win a few matches which would be a novelty for the British ttam." And thenyou have the whole i,ruined up The qualification rule for The Amateur soys that a British entrant must hove a handicap of not more than two. intrants have to be reenmmended by then own Associations. Crosby and Hope have not I been recommended by Ajnork in the past, so technically then can be no objection to then entry on this occasion. But Bri* ish golf fnns tlnd themselves divided There are a number although I belurVt, them to be lr Ilia minority, who feel that Bin, .i.d Bob together would turn tht Amateur into a music-hall art And at all costs they would avoid this even if it meant lefusou' their entries Hut thi a very li.o i.nv-minurd view 1 am sure that the majority would agree with me when I 004 King Crosby and Bob Hope should i>e welcomed If they are able to compete Ibis summer Crosfa) two years ago at St. Andrews. player of high if Bob "" any wrong-doing but It wants to MO if they had possibly used any cheating to escape military ser\ he nid also to see if boxers have troughs Jamaica-born outsid physical or psychological weakiight. will after all play for Jancsses which might be made maicu against the Rest of ihe West WOT— by ring action.—U.P. Indies ,d Kingston this week-end. LONDON, Feb. 20 Lindy De La Penho. Middles iron if h (:i>m.ii''i_1vtni ROXIVG LONDON. RANDOLPH TttRPIN habeen awarded the %  'Boxing News Belt for the second year in succession This award Is made to the boxei judged to have done most for tht %  port, and the decision was reachi %  by conducting a readers' poll. Il.indy's' success was overwhelming, for he raptured ninctv-nvr per cent of the votes Turpin figure* twice in this poll. His Empress Hall fight with Robinson, in which fan won the world middleweight title, was voted the %  cst fight of the year Here, no doubt the huu ..eie swayed by %  enfiment for other lights such as Dave Sands—Yolande Pompee. excelled It for thrills and action. FENCING F.MRYS IXOYD. one of Britain's greatest fencers, retired from competition after the 1MB Olympic Games. Now. at 40. he makes a come-back. He is to captain the British team for this year's Games at Helsinki. At first he was to be non-playing captain, but England needed an txpeiKSiced competitor, and Lloyd was persuaded to go the whole way %  His appearance will strengthen Britain's chances. FOOTBALL SWITZERLAND u lo %  Bgnd M> million francs (about £2400,000 iderllni) on enlarging stadiums for the 1054 world football championship. After the alterations. Bertie, l-ausanne and Zurich .itena* will be capable of holding between 65,000 and 60,000 pen. pies. vluaO Basle and Geneva WTO be able to ncrommndat. fjv*1 lilllHI CRICK KT LESLIE AMES, of Kent and England, the greatest wicketkceiier-balsman cricket has eveknown, is to become player-coach. I.a-t summer Ames displaced disc, and spent most of the Season in a spinal jacket. Kent hope that he will be fit enough to play this season, but If not. he will act solely M First XI coach. Ttw post of county coach |by C. Lewis DEREK STEWART. 23-yearold New Zealand hurdler, has come to London with one ambition. It is to convince Ihe New Zealand selectors that he should be included in their Olympic team Tor Helsinki. Derek thinks the best way to do that is to put m some intensive work in England, and is letting nothing deter him. Id worked his passage here, without the prospect of a Job or a place to live, and had to spend his first night on a bench in l-ondon's Trafalgar Square. Now he is happily settle.! in and has joined Heine Hill Harriers, devoting all his spare time to training. Saturday The Handicap ratio**! times i km Ha. WM Hi Mo 10 Wuard 11 Kansrf HI ram**) •IHI l riM %  ii ISO n.-d D D a PrtM Pai> US Vrltow n 1 M*rra BSMr LSI aa ii B S H—c.l SM Y#Uow B 11 FU.ntww 1SS Ba* D 1* Vn ThomdSk* 3S IUM It S Balf)ll tag Rad 1> I HmoluW 1 Buccaawr ISA B Olive DbMin Tllo<. n n MIHKMI %  MuntMM 141 na B D 1 1 K i oie.1T Slnbad Eaate laiaaaaai 149 144 14S Veltow Bed Yellow t i SUkawk %  shin.114S Bed C v r,.u> 147 V-lloC 1 1 Mi.. Bflvavr S Madnru s DaunUeM ftgfl IM C 1 fess** ssa VH1..W 1 i It Maawin SSI Red c 10 Gm*<-*\ 1.00 r4BkPl j Jkr 4 CMOlwtla IB Clyiw IS3 Bnl N I Tlif folio* Ing dle Kv# Mrn flKi""! or Mh HWIU, fUtra a > IWH Marrb • %  .I ran Rrvalia. SUiiutda* Sih 11 HI AIH BANNITKH For the Bellepiaine Club. B. D Campbell stored five goals. K. Branch three. V. Watson 2 and K Hutson 2. At half-time the scor was four—nil In favour of th I Beileplaine team The game was slow at first, bu' after halt-time the Belleplain team came into their own and by good combination completely outplayed their opponents. V. Walsowas easily the most outstanding player. The teams were — Plelleslslne. Ross Walkea. Lc Atherley. Smith. Springer. A (V-.mphell. R. Campbell. Hutson C.pt.). Branch and WaUon Clrvers'HUI: Johnson (Capt).O Mayors. Holder. Dermont. V. Hii %  % %  >n. A. Hinkson. Small, I. Ilarewood, Trotman and Holdt r The referee was Mr. J. F. Craham NETBALL The Olympia nelball team i defonted by Foundation Girls' al Olympia on Tuesday by nine goals Ii eight. Queen's College Old Oirls will pi iy Queen's College at Queen's College today at 4.45 p.m. Tha nelball match which j '.n.-duled to have taken place still held hetwecn Queer College Old Girls i the 1'rsuin Cw van) on Frhi.iry 22 has been postponed. To Our Friends From Overseas KI1VGSLEY RESIDENTIAL 4 B.I IE AT BATHSIim\ WrlrmM joa and offers r LOBSTER LUNCHEONS which include our popular MERINGUE PIES in Coconut, Lemon or Orange DIAL Hit) Every spoonful gives you Vonwiftc and Coltani.ml ., ball -h.tweil ho tn!,>. ihf Inst Ihrw in 41 4/5. calibre onH riamrnlina did a live in l.oil. did come unsluck at Royal 1) waa the laat roctmtc.l, raw! last Hay, I toing a box to box in 1.23. hi. bad day. tu They'll Do It E veryTime Xi




PAGE 1

i'ACt rot'H HAKBAIMM AHV.M \Tl. IiH.K-.DAV I IUKIAKI It, IMZ BARBADOS^ AIJUMU Whal Will I InNew QIM€>II (ami Uvv liusliaml, 1W Paid? i.—i -—— -i l.l.ii... i. 21. 1952 M vnii.i THE | ..oiu'v < Europe is restricted to one British passenger ship and a greater number of loreign steamships. The word "Bntiili" seems out ot place in any description of sea passenger communications, although British cargo steamers continue to operate profitably in the area. With regard to air communications the word "British || very much in the context. It is a British company, a subsidiary of the British Overseas Airways CorporaIkon which has a monopoly of air-passenger travel throughout the British Caribbean. This monopoly extends to Barbados although a Dutch Airline Company was the first to put Barbados on the air-map Other airline companies .inpermitted to use Seawell for special flights but only British West Indian Airways, Trans-Canada Airlines and u Venezuelan Airline (LAV) have regular landing rights at Seawell. Permission to land at Barbados was only granted by the Government of the United Kingdom to Canada in return fur landing rights grunted to the United Kingdom by the Government of Canada, less than (our years ago. At that tune the Government of the United Kingdom was well aware of the fact that the then Seawell runway would have to be rebuilt and lengthened to allow Trans-Canada airplanes to land. This was known by the Government of the United Kingdom because a group of officials from the Ministry of Civil Aviation had visited Barbados earlier and had reported to that effect. With this knowledge and in view of the fact that at that time, as today, a British Airways Company (the British South American Airways) held the monopoly ol inter-ton itonal iratlic In the British Caribbean, it is surprising that the Government of the United Kingdom did DOt approach the Government of Barbados with u view to offering advice as to the construction of a new runway which had to be built at Seawell in any event, and Upon the construction of which VM dependent the implementation ol the conj cession granted to Ti.ins-Cunada Airlines, through the Government of Canada. This if all the more surprising because it was obvious from the beginning i negotiations held between the representatives of Trans-Canada Airlines and the representatives of the then Barbados QO\ ernment that lle major portion of tha money necessary for the construction of the new runway at Seawell would be provided by the Imperial Government from funds credited to Barbados' account under the terms of the Colonial Development and Welfare Act In fact X. 337,500. which i.present the major expenditure on the new runway was provided from these funds. Yet the Government of the United Kingdom appeared perfectly happy to permit the Barbados Government to construct a runway for which it was providing most of the money necessary for its construction, and landing rights on which are, to this day, under tne control of the Government of the United Kingdom. There must have been a reason why the United Kingdom, experienced, as it was during the war years, in the construction of airports and runways on several continents should have shown this remarkable lack of interest in an island which had been recognised by a former director \ general of British South American Airways as an admirable potential refuelling base and stop-over centre for British Aircraft flying to South America But that ig what happened and no one can deny after reading Mr. Connolly's report on runway construction at Seawell that Bar, bados has suffered a blow that would not I have fallen if responsibility for the construction had been shared with the Ministry of Civil Aviation. Mr. Connollv places responsibility for failure where it ought to be placed: on the two contracting parties, the Government and the ContractorThe time has surely come for the Government of Barbados to approach the Ministry of Civil Aviation and the Government of the United Kingdom and seek from them advice as to the reliability, or otherwise of the runway at Seawell and a clarification of the United Kingdom's intentions towards the future ol Bw I airport in the British scheme of tt The expansion of air traffic at Piarco in Trinidad brings daily nearer the day when large airliners will want to alternate between Barbados and Trinidad for refuelling purposes. Barbados must plan ahead now and it can do little planning unless full agree:. lh the United Kingdom as to Seawell's future. i Crown and tha Roj A* the DlN ..I \n %  menU In A KlBt Men I!Uruhinc at hnvtMan %  %  — for a in'il ponirul t J bargain (or Ihr (-niintr* tor the rvrna* which Ihe %  iionr stfHr iiir tan III—artHUM .Iwut MM Urir M Ihr JII %  Mm paid h, Ihr nation lor Ihr upV-rp t*f 0. Royal I u ill) A New Bill Wh.i. the measaicr ha : will be Ml up M The ccmmiiU' be uMorp which, 1'^ %  end of v %  <|l UN MiiTIIKR frill receive an annuity >>f i'U.OOO a year, lor whuh provision was made in 1937. The present M ill Bj 111 Its Mill IIAKKIS Kill. Hill EISENHOWER :hat In ilwevent at tae btrtfc ef a nihe of Cornwall there a h — 14 i I paid (n,m thr revenue* of the mv pan O B and family ptauade i)uh> l2S.a*e a tear far the nijintrnaiur anal education of the irukr and in part :er the aavlm ,. ... ,m u. truttraa w be aecoann*'n*al Eisenhower that hangs from the i ird bv them to make m ehn— wall of his campaign headquarters in Wash'"„' iSSmSSTn^c o, **found few counterparts among hi. .1 tht wri may ha recommended b> political managers and backers fjo.ooo be the new select comitrttM. For they were 8tU nned by word from Paris Plinca Charles'*, sister. rmiN. J . ./ .. ON nJOm* wui pmbuhiy not that the general has decided not to don his Star! ,nw y of h r uwn unlil uniform and return to America to do any iu4-aur there was n -> Duke o( electioneering before the Republican ConM Uit Cornwall during the lair relm. /(.Iltion in July Mnnkk ** trie* WWHII— fra .m lh DllCtlV By i: M MacCOLL WASHINGTON THE broad smile on the huge photo of UtT. KIN'f.'S CIVIL 'Iis.oea a year. %  H it \ M \it\ %  ;•* i Van*. TRIM 1 M Ml/ UU IM EO Ihr tfiirrn. tlO.OfM. Illl IM Kl Ml I HIS III Kt.ll. IKi.llOli. i n in M or OUM ( I.STIR. ::..imn nil. riiisi i s> mil \i ,,,.I.OI. PRIM I-.* M\Rii\RIT M, tWMMMI Today The i.. ou .stand.: %  vision Will I %  la follow* i Ihe III Kl: ol I DIN HI IU.H will be paid M if. itui Prince Albert'i CMMN would ba %  belt CBO.ooo >. now. s.i tha Duka ma] be paid w u* ;d.000. nmmintinir. according i %  %  i %  the* revenue* fr<>m thruucnj ,... tod m the Km* i He will not make any speeches, and he FMI.UOO u Out of them the incomes of i will not even appear before a Congressional Prtncem Elizabeth ,md the Duke „„__,,._„ ..pp..silion frorr "t Gloucester -acre paid The ,ommiUK the Cabin mendmcnl residue went U. reduce 'he King's _. ,.^ %  ___-, ___ %  „, n should bepatn CttU ut This news cast the back-room boy 8 into DM It was commonly said thai deep gloom. Thev Know well that rival K,V .'; '''""m*" rn"u,e wT *en.tor !" t. by sheer hard plugging back i only, alter the win. he had iTli.ultles in making end* PUNCIM "' -.hfflculUea which were tUlOAUl %  l"t year when the neat raUaVad 'h< Crrll •n Uf4 tt payment*, jmountlng to The HI Kl ill (.KUlV-rfa MO.OOO a ywr. kl lh Kxpenaes TinLite King* allowance ol arrival n annuit) nioooo. rixed in 1P87. wan &up[60 000 less in u Bdwar.l VII i lementi><< <;e-i'ge V ha %  %  .i tAOOO • Salarta <>t the Kind's house. KI8.000 hold 'from the lord ChamberAnd oa Inn down lo the coal i*orters," fXO unt ed for £'34.O0O. Maintcn< 10, nitti i HOte of the household took a ml. further £152300. beu .i|>n.irpM. 'Duly by economising in his rilARI.EB, i paraonal utpei cs,' said tht Puki | md forth across the country, has recentlv 1 oeen winning quite a lot of ground The senator believes in "ringing the doo.* oells." And they had been counting on tirneral Eisenhower to do a bit of the same. MKMORY Severn! lung-memoried lilm fans have fine which shows La Davis sure enough in i fetching little number Film was "The .Vorking Man." and our old friend George \rliss was m it SIGNS OF THE TIMES Britain is soon to demote her consulategeneral in Detroit to the status of a mere •onsulate. And, acknowledging the ternlic x.st-war boom and growth of the far Pacific UtUa buke, d l a r utT dn a the position of Niorth-west, she will simultaneously up her tiM. Will In ii*. iniiiKiiihv, "has Ihc Kin %  _. %  ... • i ^ i .,bl,. ,., M h„ pubi,r 1,.,. "nsulate in Seattle to a consulate-general entitled io the revenues billtiea without asking Parliament Trade with Russia, worth £25,000,000 in IXH-II} of Cornwall. %  i additional funds." to Ihc In I>eoember IM7 Queen Vic,9J8 u down lo a mere trickle— £29,000 in torts went in stale lo thank Parhe ilrst 11 months of 1951. Comments one iiament for her Civil List. jtf N w York exnnrter "It is so small vou i, only i fraction %  -,.adcot aiyi UM Annual " ew YoT ex P r r ,l ls " sntan you 1„ j., RagJitna' for that year, 'observed :ou!d just about st;:T it into an old caviar Had that tho list had been framed In j n II .1,i 'liberal and confiding spirit." Kinx and his n is likely that this same spirit j %  i son. will still prevail after Ha years. MODESTY iWwK ft I'OIII llrilain l>*.VID t I III I HOBIIt imt l^* lime to remember that tho ii.it is good Duke needs comfort In his grief i ihr conceptions llmt %  -like any other member of that laf "In tlic end .• fr.eml". Thai i the coiwolaUon, put In .' %  fc.-inig of Londoners, tallies so many lands? Perhaps family? And In the morning bus on tha lUrchllli with the loim %  i ( ( his great %  arvlcas to the Chancen i .per man. the x n ,. IIM U „l tnW father maket tha | gra1 Cheaan, for Princess Mar'"' %  •' .i loft S' e will have many of menare i ubl e duUi -. Bba will re'What .i ^'"-l Inu nin fane Household and Certain -vantually .'he may come to live • ibandon to. ; Clarence Hou>e. with her and carenil I u tn lltnfl •<• her farntotaar< This is ihe House not lH.it ol hvr far from Buckingham Palace that Instinctively, tha Duke of Bdlntask at least, would not M cut ajag limit by the nuke ol Oar. -later to be William IV— I 'uive aten himha ,., refurnished for the new will ti.>t Royal programme. Lone* i „ % %  ,, and her husband. But it %  -.ill bg i >> months before the %  • .lals. i Quean takes pannanant reslphasi**d his %  Iliickingliam Palace. 1 Ihe Kumoum of Princess Margaret's Queen. pending engjueaBrant will remain lone) Kiishrumour*. She certainly cannot Critlnnsssnl I i:l> Commissioner for mat UT.'II .ifii-r the coronation— ajfgagh lonv valeaa ara umil the end of next 1 When she marries It must Queen i burden thai I wealth In •.. %  i*h her sister's permission. :he dfattl of hei Uld inounnng for His Lute Mnjesty. not ba liflad. Wbal %  |>o*ition of • • • The uuc-n landed In England liana lalgUva :<> 'he Hritiah Changes all around us: within Wuhin ••/ %  nty-four hours she has Cro .-.ir new coins will be struck met net Atcesaion Council, she lUuUooal Lawyers arc not all so with the Queen's head facing right I'uw Council, 'hicertain that Indm is m fuel as —the Ilrst time the monardho the hand.of hei iirinmuch n Republic a> she believes, head %  Aft Host at a lunch in the Congress buildrng for a group of his farminjconstituents. icnator Lister Hill of Alabama suggested brother. But may it hat everybody should rise one al a time I ITI^i.mlii.i. (tint ll>.. V* ... , ind identify themselves All went smoothly intil it came to the turn of fellow Senator Jeorge Aiken of Vermont, who is renowned or his modesty. Said he: "My name's \iken. and I work in the building here." The Army reveals that one out of every 00 men joining uses an assumed name. {casons range from wishing to shed embarassments of civilian life to attempting to over up a previous dishonourable discharge Taxes last year totalling £33.900.000 — an no-ease of £12,100.000 over 1950. reduc he net income of the National Steel Corloration to £16.173.000. compared with the ecord £20,648.000 earned the year before. ANSWER The Hollywood Censor*-—long known as he Hays and now the Breen Office—have locided to abandon their traditional policy >1 silence when attacked. From now OH they .vill answer back to any criticism. Congressmen, hot on the trail of Service xtravagancc. discover that at Wright Field, hat shaken the hand*. Of tier |>ritimtwtl ; %  lUpubtic as she believes, head has faced tight since the eipal Ministerat the airport, she But my reports from Delhi days of Edward VII. Nevertheless „ ,. Duke of Nortol Indlcata that the sanUm will sureiv he reminded of ir* ar Dayton. Ohio, the Air Force wanted to ;*. Earl smanhaL lo dnwuai the laanl tsf the couniry in this loss beautiful silver coins of Queen. )uy 20,156 "super deluxe upholstered tvp.irrnngemenls of her father's funis ,i H.v.ili f ,is cn.v other In V.n -il.i the >oung Queen. ... -W-M-JI „, c t ^t\~ .O..*. i.i,.K ar tl>a^ rm this rnofi Kh. This strange Thara Will be a charge of .tamps' sta chalrs at £3 10f a cha,r ,UKher t,,ar forth, her life will be a conilnBritish Conui %  inwcalth that the soon. New •'pillar boxea" wdiit .he ordinary price. "This was a reallv deter...I rtream of duties, n York Times' seems just to have "E.II.R. on them. In the! pars, consultations, recephave diseovei.n Un what M Is—a courts the eminent Counsels wear-| tions, attendance-, and official fiee association of peoples' Ing silk, will be styled "Q.C." On Uie cinema screen, and theatre' i".in there not be a stay, a pause? Another .breath of criticism; no programme* il will be "God Save' What would ! %  • the rmht body b I%  laall I >l th.Quean'* The Toastmaater at < inquire Into UM tfcllhnl of llrluah Ihe Duke Of Duke of Windsor that public banquets will call the comRoyalty and rfiiuce them by cuthe^hould leave his Duchess In pany to raise their glasses to the iioil out the valueless ceremonial New York as cie seta out for the Queen. OIK m \miis s\v Slr„y Okg Vn.htvm nined attempt to become chair-borne." said me investigator. Near Memphis. Tennessee. Sheriff's deputes Sid Hall and J F. Hewitt saw a hog %  xhibiting the classic signs of advanced lrunkenness. Deciding to cast about a bit, he officers discovered a nearby illicit still ull of "moonshine" THfc HUMAN TOUCH President Truman takes reporters with Island Then i oust 'oi rou me for a | ,i, .In. ~( m home preft-K.i-1. un -ntr wiiiur IIIII mc uam iuu anuuai it" Minm aii %  •*.^n^dy poupU. ,„ d without | flaor jn 0 he drawln g. room be nealh it Mr COUNTRY WOMAN rrUm "" "" %  . ,h 1 h f j^" 1 ? ""f ", .!]. Stc. SIM' \ COUNTRY WOMAN li'th January. 1M2. S.PCA i.n.f th.' lljibudm will luw tut charm it To Ihr Etltu Let us open a And recM,,n B l mi J usl oe,t rc inc ? ,uv !" lem. On pae. ton i -t it .. T _.r....7^f._^_ .":. ? Q .Y !" ti !" ? hoiT "' P-?feraW\ on 'he sea-aide; out the bath tub almost fell through the kirn W must rail alien. lion tt* lbs %  tray dot, q which no defliut* answer ha* yet been found. The Societv i* con18.2.52. ,n — f u I ling to comivunh* r nun I • %  • '• mandi. froro the public to have . Id trayed It cannot !• too slrnngiv empliait'.-d that w ire NOT stray catehei vent sulTei'ing in th m. -. ^ — —— — dogs we Aall in OUT pOWSff 10 aa^MTS laaslkS "' 'he OuHa 0 M tt><> rtregigly stressed when one X et Unit Mini of sees the number of old buildings eg held in v huh have been ruined by Incontv, i. r % % %  '!. I5l puoua addition', of unsightly ether with other m-iKhbours. co-opci %  % %  • plans for frifti n British Gulthe provision of an Atiir, Du Laawofd yha Civic Circle has for atam Ttetu: %  led m replacing yaart laboured under many difflPresbyterian church PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.Oil per liiiMilr.il ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & Creyitone, Haitinft •^KKftasearVant** i# igaaaefaaai I'rt.v.iin. 1'ookvr To cook everything BSSttl aaaF Ihoiif/hl of mm in a frarlion of I hitiniv. too! So fi-H to opvrutf unit no .citifmticnl a— I'ilrh-r-. haa it. JC.S. PITCHER <&t:0. To Th, "Hrttuty Pay*" Edtior. The Advocate,— give my Truman what she would have done if It had .alien through—with himself inside it — vhile she was entertaining the Daughters of the American Revolution to tea. Added the chuckling President: "Mrs TruSII. I am delighted .-„ v ..., l4lJ ,, !" .. ,.,,.......,, .--— ..< %  sll< IheOiiUa *.upporl to the Leader in your It,-J^; u;t, ;• -i -It f,.i.,. ,.. i .i .nioH 1^ xsue of the Hth. entitled "Deauiv Jldn * mnk ll at a11 "">. a "d wanted to many friend: Ol pp r need tnplanned de*' slap mv face." n Barbados tho velopment in this Island cannot CALL IN NEGROES The Use of some "bright young Negroes" in the U.S. diplomatic service is urged by l)r James Robinson. Pastor of a Harlem Our itas pa; iM. le. Durtl , ,G-lld Secretary %  %  MSB: id often in the face of %  The l>'.i Thr Clerk to 'he Vi BClel The Cor and Whal %  vi-'ini; of Treasurer, and Chief I This, he feels, would be a blow at Comoppoaition, o preserA.and to ere, , t) tli uiand. The need munist propaganda, and would please racein legislation o preserve old conscious people everywhere" tniildlni!s of chat ctcr and to prelult building cerA Revealing story about President Truman is told in Fortune magazine, which be hoped that time will says: "The President's confidant and Press I retary. the late Charles Ross, in a mot i'Uu i or fkggnn Mil %  The Adpoeoie; %  waited and sorement of candour rare among White House ,.d country Act ,,.,,,! u yoes, told a perplexed newspaperman bee"u< understand the President's actions. f.oil.fulU. I are NELL MANNING 4)0 $11.84 V: For Men American Styling Zipp Faitener 2 Hip Packet! Fob & 2 Side Pocket. For Ladies American Styled Slacks in Blue—Grey—Cream For Boys Grey Flannel Shorts Cream Drill Shorts Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR Or Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents — We offer — Rao Salmon Pink Salmon Sardine* Mackerel Pilchards Fish Supreme Cod Soe Lob.t-t Kipper-. Soacka Anchovy. Antlp Oaato Macaroni Sp*hattJ. Red Cneeee Kraft RED COW CONDENSED MILK SOc. par Un; 114 00 par caaa. PARTY SPECIALS Product Of BtiaMbourg -Mb. tin Natural Tola Or.tMEATS Ducka Calckens Turkeys Corned Tongues BerncaaUe Oold Braid Bum LU1 Praumll Phone GODDARD'S We Deliv-r always look for the obvious explanation." i I \



PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BAHBAIMiS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. FF.BR1 ARY 21. I5 CLASSIFIED ADS. prm.ir .\on t-s TCLEM40MC /Ml. ap u. M and < CM*. | .'di-Jonai ao-d Tr—. ion SALE %  Ml I %  • 1 ... | M '"" %  '< %  pi M u_ni. {..dat ft.*., her librx < .•,!„,,. Ann.". It. %  (..! •Itaiiatitrra Dai.. UwN* iMotri %  F >..TOOMt Ml M i! 'i-l> Rd Iflfo" roii nni ilOI MS HAT-A .mall w;l WnUlBM ui n-rivalled lui Lrrra and cool wll rn.ndjna*. about 2 n i Aval.aBae H., n ,r,. % %  4 full piXMU ara. %  I -J 4 bedroruna FV "it < Haw II *|a D> Work* fl : M 'n u %% %  >: %  Al 'MOTIVE i \n lap. King 114] hrttar* • i %  .iMDd lll* lAlt V in. hall V*'.. mi Model I %  ... %  ...-.,i.>, %  at Mi %  i M ,. II.IHII I? I M-4n CARVauxhail Vein* It h Saloon. :cl Mil*,.** under SVOSO Bit—i I>lal Mil II 1 M-M Oond ir-del A Tin* Ple-op Apply • H..IJ Main Uaad. Si Michael II I %  as .III IKKM. \ OKABJIAI. mt-rnic Air condifto •T Tt r l w HI I I lloavar Vacuum Floor Flertrtcal Oi.lv ST1.80. At uur n* .1-a.a. IOBKI K Tl H. % %  A Pa I (4 n il Mas II I NHi COOK OKilWAl. Apply ' Mattir.i. F'Y MM 11 MECHANICAL MWTFIJAWBDP8 nOABrtlH—"Prlvala family Savannah ran Kfommii Trinidad Single or double romra. 1 Mia sun*, so Dajndonatd ir*at. : or spam. % %  ti run-. %  Boa %  %  % %  aoorjif c. SSJSS 3n I WIIFHI. CASF CAUT wll* i iHiin-lHtuiea and brake* I'n-aru lligi.B* ATtaraapoit. iwvw a'.if. Court*., ftntar* 11 | 1 (It. MISTEI.I.AVFOUS i it* nA' lo(ookir* •.-l ii.'tl DtX'K %  REAL ESTATE JOHN M. It I ill OS % %  CP. A.r s T.I A. (oxram HI LWTINOH ALWAYS AVAIL MILE. FOR SALE • New Rd.— %  HI,.... |p| md k Irhcn In CaMt.. I .1 oxiiooma, largo .Oilof %  M'I'IWM -A b*. %  %  .. -i,-.I ... bedroom-. un.i DtjUF), Kara**. I n.i arrll -i Sardetu,. praducliva mchard and "" 1 %  HaMrtJ a* in u.i.m Rockla A .< %  •%  %  -%  i %  4 %  %  mi ii i %  • %  11 A I i.ielrtlOi' roMtie. nfli*. •Of. hen and i...-. .. KLNTALS %  M H"rus nun i %  %  ,. % % %  Phone 4G40 PlunUn ii. Building MM I RA \rr. nr.ip i|i|rl*a mn*n a>1 l*atn*i .1 II.IC l|l Mm; i Irillir r ffnlf lw* SUM lAum nrtA-irnFrX (••• U ii iwam MtOAA^. Al Tnur Hquar* F.clorv. ,i.|.lv (h Mmafrr T-lrphon* t*U I* I M .n >l'nCl'AIN Pl.n rc#d npn> I ft. lm and .ipwarri. U l*> ~i lb Phone 1MT IIU H n '•1IIP.T rArTOBV Tapahl* of making -ii t-r dav Tvr particulars hone Jnhnann MIL IMM-ln NOTICS M HBREIIV Gl'f: i Hi* VpW .^ •r &> (l .i M ui—d Into %  :i i -... Al .ni'nd.'W II• %  Ulh al-nti laU hi A %  U 1 'h# raiorlilal tA.I IPM .... .1 irvc tamr fm > %  •or >-r to lh> Ulh M.tei. )4a.i %  %  .m*n*Vd I./ tha Parncnlal fm plovaM J 1 mion (Amaiulmanl. Ari IPH* ay II.(IU>II it. ihc coal of livln* !!" %  ih r**p*ctl>a V.lri,, think fit pa) to men C-ARHINI.I'-.N • Sottritor* for Ota Valr/ of %  N'OTICfc I niVIJ IS 1.11 VS fill K' 1 i Ph.nu Baiya •' %  %  H.ad in Ihrparl-h %  >( VaiM Mlrhn: iirr#ii Bi.P pabik Mtara i I %  %  -baalulat. . %  <, %  %  o( Waaihrrti'.xi ...J than aaauanadj *n4 aOoplad and ditrn" naal U .'.-AU-vrr bi oar and luhaolba Hie lurumr ..I i •i.-d of thMM And I gl'e i.irlnrr vli.Ihal %  I)e.-d Poll dated the *Ah d.i '.f Fabrun ;il dm. rxeoilaa and allrdad n4 rdart In the atriiitrnlmn Ufnca of Ih rx-rihc the name .*man. Mi. A .lie* Whit*. Miaa I Whltafaaad. Miaa Hjbil Mar !" Mr ..belt. Mr. W mfied Picrialda > Palaw. Mr. <;%  M Hilda V •qtilra*. Mr Malvn, 1. Ihxdflaa. Miaa Janw Alfred Whltr Miaa fiai William* M and Mn %  rat jaaxira Mi John Oaapard Lai >...if...i.l C I. p-.-nrr v Wail. Mr. Bulb R Wall PORTL... NIX Fob. 20. Cesar Brian of Argentina, 198. world's tilth rank. %  %  deciMonini Joe Kabul. 188, o* iWoodbum Oreami In a • %  tlUBfl horn rn the Polio Fund llrn-lit Kahiit wag tniiKhtene.i up Mil o( hi* familiar crouch thru .knocked down for the count of iitne in the flnrt round Fur Kahul It was.p<" last iriKiiic ag. h nidar. nrton cai;ried the llfht all the wto -iuiTerling from a small puM and a slight cut on his left e> In the eiahth round. Both his eyrt were hleedins in the ninth, but his skill was enough to hall Katlut who displayed ooor timing throughout -If mm i ii t nt Utl 2 she: Tube boilers 5 feet in diameter and loiirtecti i ip to 250 lbs. per squariloch. ; mountings, fuel oil bnirners Can be >ieen Will be sold singly. bit Colonial Secretaiv IMJ. —21.2.52—3n. OFFICIAL NOTICE IK f parauni h %  to brio* bcf.i.i me an account of (heir Claim* vuuchaia in be eiarrmed b. ma on rd Ih. i hereby |lv* notice to all an Of liu-uaaacanf property of lha dcfandant Mr U+mt Malakin. Mi John K. Dm.i Mn Klaannr H DUon, MM Cannn* Z Miller Mr* Buaan A C Mi. Elesabclh COM %  nd Mra C A Savar lar I i.u-o. Mra Mat* Fax I %  (-%  M lay ban warn ihe I nuikiiht-. Brtpratown bPfora lha aHh day af March, ia. M order thai *uc claim* may b* reported on and ranSad a*oidinii in the %  .aiura aid priority ih.ir.-f <* %  I %  % %  • deprived nf all rMlmi on nr asalnrt Hvi aatd i IMalaiHT: KRROL MALCOIJ4 STTTt-F DafaadaaM HELEN BVSXVN CIIEfclJCH' Mtml berpui QAJtrtBLO II.-VI1TON HOLDER ....l lar I %  >.!•• 11, "I TAKE NOTICE ,,„ARROW Thai (irirrr. I'EABODY a t<> IMC tha Slate ol New Vo.k. United Stale. .... n II .... atraaM r, aplMd inr Uie rail rerppcl nf -blru. rallara. awff.. imdei-. %  raarla aid ahartlnp. Pen mill Batii'i S •Uoi.-.r. %  %  MIU ... -, I J*ADO li.I-rn.tli al K 11 Baautlrac*llani aqiilpmeri ai roar trmao new tastes ", % %  WkkTMapnon.' ASP) II ll SI—i f n TAKE NOTICE Ml TOGA %  l Hivrr !*lra*t, TlPF, t>>iin1i ... T |ot He rc*lair-.i 1 %  .-rl.-.i .n .•-. rolliti 1 will 1u M-r il aft i the 2i.t dm i" mm* pttwfi -luill in mi %  %  i %  i at .„. officr DnUd Ihli m r, Hms IU:.tr.ir of Trade Math* Sl.S.SS—an I.IUUOR Ll( KNSK MHTI I Shopkeanai ... n i p win. tl T I' A McLKOD. E*0. l'o:ee Magi Signed rAIU.l IJ B. Tl i be !" i. Iheld al poll.* Cnuit IHtnit A on M<*u> %  I'llllll SAILS BBAL ESTATK TAKE NOTICE 3IN-DNE i %  uMraaa la Tl • in r**v*ct n oil .id-.| av.od. or H i*nii*h and darrd. %  .DC<-par.%  %  —. :ind at.t.%  Bawjana*. %  %  %  %  IKMrWI II "> iberrof. and (i.t d.i. ..f Febrii-.r ...ale to n. %  avnN on be an >^trd tin. llth duv I tied to leeitter lb* aam ISU inilaaa iome p-i—i, akall I .i im oHra i" opp jpptlcatton al in. otltis* Feta-uaa.' ISSS MM nf Henaaelaer. St-t%  >( Ni TPT* liadc irurin lint A <* Magi.iar i .am.. handiKii. wool and raaiikn ona pna> '. %  Give yourself strength with daily BOVRIL When Ihtrc'n a 10b lo be done or a game 10 be played—a cup of Bovril is the very ben of Mala Iirich beefy flavour lend. • welcome glo ihrough vou g.xKlnew pun new life into you. The..', mil. ,. Bovril lo build you up an.1 simain you. BOVRIL r.lirNE*!F31 Ih.l daairable dW-fflral bou overkwkinK the M Culerpila* HAMII, CoTl I af |3 inrh atone atinrllng on J Rondi IB isrchea uf land conlAi indnii. diiii'.g I-.1,. n. TAKE NOTICE PI Thai BOVL-MfnWAY INC a .orpor' inn ornul:..! -.oil e.i.li' %  under tin' s ,,( Oe.-w.ie UB %  %  p| it ,da .it ly rfal ddrcaa %  XI E..M 401h Street Now Yoia. lino York. USA.. Mnnufacluiri'. I. ".ieal.lr.MI,." i.f .i Ir.i.lc .aril in Part "A of Keg.titer in re.pacl neelirldea. ililinfbct.oMa, gard< r-. .T.i. and chemical te*il UI he fTtt.tlad in regltt-r • %  'fee on* imaM-i fmm Ihe Silt dav of tMI unleaa nirnr peraon Miall i ilia) meanllme |nr nnt.ee in dupti'g '• ire at mv ofRce of aBBOSttt The linda inailt ran be ... J1 my oHWe. lS)h day i II WII.I : Mil %  21 i 19-an :: v \i i II ii kitchen, pantry, garage, arrvanl'i alar and ekactnclly. The above will bo %  el up for asM at A Liikderaianed on ThuradaY MUl %  I 1 o'clock In the aflenioo' %  ny day on application to IIAYNE8 CiBJFTtTH. (tollcilon. 11 Hi... I* j U la HOUSE Brand new. ample 3 brdi ii.Ki.e. all conivn'r%  **'. arRn p %  urd llaing lot.rt.. oi*n ....nrtali. k.l i p i i i i not boid %  '.I i.i ru-bU rsfVON. ,-.'.f?Haa %  ilaitrk tht In %  pecllon by appointment 'phone 4"ia Tlw above will be act up for aald n piblic romp'tition on IVMtol nay nf Febinary ISM. al 1 pm al Ih ofnre ol Ih* undersigned CAHHINGTON ft SEALY. . >!...! AITCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER It. V. SI'OAI By recdmmendallon. ..( Ili.xli Age.. e w-ll on r*HaDAY STnd. as bag! i I Dark Ctjilal puaai > Ms atreet Sal* II K> DV-x-k Taib BMrl NKKlt. TROTMAN •> CO Aarllaaeee. tthilr LUI FURNISH BETTER | %  B ia %  %  %  ., %  Kit [Ml Ml L.S.WILSON \ tfttt rTMMf niAi aa* S N,'.^**a{^fJat # d>0-e*,<.*-*e*AO*eteV'e'-N I SOUTHERN RHODESIA I UNDER THE StLVXB IMMMER ..... %  *! % %  w ^-Hl^c, M \i III-I :.. ctrr Waahlng Ma %  K • •A Cn, Lid SI..,. I TAKE NOTICE DART own • tha Ht.i at Amcilca. whote trade i i addrwaa M 491 Rlwr Street. Tea O • f s ^i for the iegi n '.ad* mark W Tn' A .J Kagtalar i Enjoy ths hotpilality, comfort and Ihoughlful servica which hava madp PAA "first choicp" of veteran travelers the world over. NEW YORK Nonstop ter\d by ihr luiurtotu "Kl Presidrnle" or via Sao Juan by popuUr. raoury-M\iixa "El Turtita." EUROPE iteguhr servlr* b"' glaal ilonblsdecked "Stralo" aipeieii'-WPrldTs lustPit siiliners to Pnm. Rome... stopovers in EugWiil, Ir-sirML VenejEuela Swift, (bill lervice to all main '.'..,i |, t lies. Colombij, Centra! V | .-mil to Tina, i SOOtB An i nnw ~Uy PAA' I ".kinles. For 27 year^ lha nftadlnfj intprnational airline PAA was first lo link the American by air, firsl lo (ly to all sis continents, and first lo fly around the wcr'c! HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE PROPERTIES FOR SALE (1) The pinoorty known as "The Crotons" ul L> Hoed. 11 tonsiMls of J acre of land and house whiih has open r drawing, dining and breakfast rooms, S bedroom', toilet hnth and kitchen f2> Properly at Otatins, CbrlSl Church ns a drug store or 'HI. It is residence and -hop on the sea. (3) Suhstantiullv built wall house with gnlvanl'i 1 RMM called Evan %  ville" .it Eagle Hall (toad. It has gallery. dlarWmg room Up sod downstairs, dining and breakfast rooms (4) 'edrooms. toilet and bath, kitchen and room for garage. This riousei is in perfect order. No repairs and is priced to sell. (4) One stone cottage at Codnngton Hill with verandah. .Irawing and dining rooms 2 bedrooms and kitchen Water .md light throuithout. (51 20 x 12 HOUSE at Buth Hall, B ft. high, and built of pine and out together wilh bolls. The roof is covered with galvanize and close boarded inside. Can be sold for •-H0H 0(1 it> 4 of an acre ol land at Button's Hill on road leading to ClUb Mo.ga 7 Suots of land N : mil 10,000 to 13.000 Sq (81 Only a few Spots r St James OARCY A. SCOTT. Middl ning ul Hothersal Turning. > feet. ins jit Maxwell Road and al S-.i Dial 2645. 20.2 r2 —2n. ...II n ajkUPi ,.,... i .ii 4' '7 Re-islered Slock Ti\ frer la resident* abread. \ Trul*'e Inte-liti.nl IT' -: Itlfl plu1 .mme%.l.in i.e.ntmia give i ..|i.. il m* nfSre of nppoaMioi-i of aarh r Hie Irjda mark can be Ba*n i al my ofrlra Dated thla 12th d>> o( Pabtuarv ISSI Bes'"' PAN AafcKKM Ittmtn I Kill A Ml.. I III Agrnls. l'liUll.h-| %  . .1 rwaaaV '*rt "Ul* whu Itoad in a northerly 1 tiai* of Miaa Muf< i ,. .in %  art of Ih* land. l -II VI IV M /I M \M. I iv, I I Mill li M \s / IISI U) not) anj U aall ..ora Adelaida Febnuir. IM' February BStl IUI. On%  odo* about I IBUi DaWIM l. II 111 A to. IT.. IKISIIi \l> and III.! tl-1 \ V I il 1 TO BMiri"" The r> M V MONTJCA will a--c*pt a and Paaaarigars for DSBatBAnt.gua. Monuartat. Nevis •a %  ling Friday land l\F.HWOOD" wll Cargo and ra.aer.gcra lor (Jicrvad*. Ski gaturday Bird MV. CARrBBM will I W 1 8CIKHIM.H UWNII.! ASSOCIATION I %  \ m McM$ t m ^C D NEW YORK e ton -I nth April ..i ibpa IstteSB HarbaSa* i Tab March u %  .: ,.l, rd April llth Mn. ROBCRl' THUM LTD. NCW YORK AND GULF nCEVICI. APPLY:—DA TOSTA a> CO LTD—CANADIAN SUBYICR ?;, HARRISON LINE .' t.rrtt tun i ittiM nir tmrttO KIMIIHIM V. From Leares Barbados ss. %  WAYFAREH" . Ntwport and Liverpool 7lh Feb. 20th Peb ^s 'PHILOSOPHER.. London and ^s M brough 12th Feb. 28th Peb DEFENDER" .. Liverpool and i.li'i: .* %  12th Feb. 20th Feb s. PLANTER' .. London. 29th Feb. llth Mar HOMEWARD fOR THE CNITED KIM.DON Vrrl For Clotes In Barbados %  v s XROFTER" 26 h Feb. & s %  BIOORAPHER Liverpool 28th Feb. For further Intormitlon apply to . DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-AgenU UOIH in i uo>i i I>II 11 ii PLANTATIONS 111 II MINI,. I.OIMiK UKOAD STREET Paasenger SJIIX \£enl lor; 11.ui -ii-.ii.i Airlines. BI1.1C. and B W I A Ml u \ -Il \MSiluiimi'wv IVIrph.l lll.U RUBBER GARDEN HOSG 11. %  >M %  Ma pr n. %  \ .... At . II. \S. illllliiillMIII a co„ tiD I....I ISA — llroad St. An Oil ilhoul Oilinos. i. not n l.uhricanl. UM : GERM fHI.S fur Baal HoiiUs. !i;.vrnAi. i:>irun11 si (•asoli'iie BwviaVJ Siaiion — Trafalgar St. .-.-.-.'.'.*.*.-.-,*-*,-,*,*.*.*.e>*,*.-^.*.*.-.* '"$ A. M. WEBB j llnHriaar. ; IJ Broad Slrrfl. BriilnrUi. J ll.-lili% %  h.i.nix ri.arp.arv J. ADVISE TO INDUSTRY INSIST ON (fsSO) LUBRICANTS THERE IS NOTHING BETTER than ... "MUSTEROLE" lui. . law:—CONGESTION: A/CSTFROLE Gives Instant Relief. till Pttrea. At first tingling warmth, fnllowcd INSTANT1 then . SWIFTLY . another ointment . MUSTERO! i %  !.•.:.i DOOM ttaarap! for the Medic. i.iwn as "Congestion % %  The All purpose Rub:— for CheThroats. Lumbago, Muscular 1 BOOKERS (B'doa. DRUG STORES LTD. ha Pharmacy) 9 1"HES".



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i m HM>\\ i i nra un II I'I.J UARBAIKiAUVOCATI: l-AOI. I Hi:', U.S. Proposed Discrimination Resented HAOC Y THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABtET Objection Made In [Tone To Limiting WX (Junta To 100 Miposed discrimination : America, and limiting the quota to 100 in any one year was page wi b. meeting on Tuesdav night. Thf Address was introduced by Mr Ronald Mapp. and members expressed apprehension at the grave effect which %  ueh legislation w the economy of th %  %  Indies. It was given an unai Tin viiiu • will be presented* to the I n to the pnate authorities in the V S A Later the House on a motion by —^—,———______^_^_ Mr W A. CrawfOfd also passed ing their appreeialion or, and hr We* Indian Committee who ated protestagainst the Hill The Address protesting th. discrimination read; Trie Houea have learnt with pioUM Oongreoa of. Uie On %  Al mci BUI known as Urn Mi C u nu BUI, %  iving tor .*.object the limitation of emigrants into UMJ United BUM i from each West Indian island to 100 per annum. Uist.rMmn.nien ma ii diactunuMuon aajiinci >•• La i| uua UOM MNP oat IIM people oi UM uliliMI Loinui. Uie unit America mould 'om-uui in %  it ui< K R'• %  % % %  Hra* inga i Wli mattei mad< . co-op. %  iupi> iN.>tpo*cd • rigniiy pOMi inetr Hepls i i . AMd I" night reduce the num. i It i i-oortunfty It had been poinu-d out to him retarded nrnihcr of I I .peeking to the West indnn that at pre %  Il> .mportant. beeaue*%  mmittee whleh met in Waahing(be I*ill limited the nu .,.,. inatter with %  States Dei was doubtful whcthci >le went from Barbados to settle tint i|t*d In thr> ma hrmutht tfffT i m hfa optriMB. was cw-car. Although lhc> did not h-' too going now. one could not forewa* %  the cane Adds a;anm • ed m it was not inn tor -ee where a Bill of that nat Aouid end as Even it KM have loo. the tin* iome neverthe'~s. MR more than 100 people .i.lgh: niet (o Title m thai country |f the Bill was geari •cm in Ilarbado* could settle kn d States in an] That was rii-rnmination .IMIM'I West Indian*, because people horn in an> other area-were not limited. The HID. II pavted. could ha\e a ver> dire effeet on Intended emlf/ratlon T i ago against U wh.it like Judo 1 BUI s ii reminder to the IV.' meat Seconding the motion for the passing of UM A IV A. % f Barbedo* but thai that money ted St ites. itnd in recent years, like Aruba. Bermudn and i He was -a>tnc lhat Uir ee.uiom> oi the island anu based, la • large extent on roafiey recel\ ed here by rela whose fa milieu were in the I nlled Stale*. Alih nth It might look like a l)h| mailer l aeanlaere thai night, II Mouio affect adverse!) at leasl JJ or 10 per cent, of Ihe populatto i th • island. M • %  round t' of thnt rarofeaati irara nftott faeUlt %  %  ... uie ad that it wu a |t*M' md fautortant matter add) Almn UM] I i lghl lhal in Uv %  o iiMntiuu *•:< West Indi but any b il 100 I -lollies What •• • there, Mr. i he p,vu1i,ir thing about the Bill "t apply to Latin pinion thai American countries, ami although M cxpioie all rorrnedDarl from a geograpli. %  • eieer, of the area, the N r no) restricted in thi: ir.emlof whether the limit UOH lo IM applied to the antfa Individual colony. He .i:d not think Uut the honwrable rnernber war (orreet. The source from .chich he quoted the number 100 waff wrong From tl %  at iiis disMK I I I \1 'I \ %  incipal .-v of St.. I'rcSKicnt 01 i • St.ite lA'p.u in icnt of I lie L H The DOI transmission u> the West Indian uommmce and Senatoi Powell read:— The HOUMof Asnembly de%  .Ure to place on record lb. a%  ..lut eXlclll UM] %  • %  and lo Weal in,,i.,i, %  rould beneni by signing thai newnote, or to wiut extent t I tune to enter in the military defence, or signing away bases, by posal he believed thai tlUftOufta JJj %  than loo per ocu born In any on colony n rea case, the West Indies were con %  I'iei,i re i .MI r fur Alarm i'.,e Vaatu i ii-o prvi alarm in IIMS yaai iH'iore tnc JUUH Bill en iiiirouuiA'U. Uie nuiuoci Inuiaiis gumu into Mew York CttJ vlgaa, tlic> U)Ofl ... %  Tl and undcictood lite woul I the Hill wat to keep can neajroaa and real winle \S i He. Honoui UM Den* %  UN tune wondered it UM nernbajr was right on lhat point, and Mi m II nisi of u %  %  l .if th' 'i radus as he did, if tfie Qsjoia was limited to 100. he was saying that feft 100 whl %  would be rr lne> would %  Thai was Imw %  •'•' Ihe Hill WOUld alleel lUrbados. and l,M when one thought of the live <" thou the Am.Th.,1, (',„,-„l..t. 4 Just pigeon-holed fen?i %  wotdd The United Stites Ooveiminu' tad henerlted hv the W ue to ilnir geographical 1—1:101' 'heir mutual eoiitnhution to the %  < war had been a great benefit 1 the 1'nfted States. The bases %  the United State* ware rlthottt UM consent Of (he • much t, te United Uon of manpower. IfasM Indian Inboui was undoubtedly of assistance II M .0In.,iev. 1 ut H en dso of asthe t ited St rntnent (> %  have the workeis from the eolonlei wtucn wen In clote herefora COSJH be had at lii transport coat. m the United : contributed to UM edu ittonaL sod iJ and poUl %  nununltj The i not haajMaajneoua, lher mean, 1 %  nil 10 reconcile DM mt tiitudes >' it ,itev. attonUon to km pas.sed by the heislim irth Wt-tt indi m Conferenci — had to consider thai the Adam tU>ton.Powell ,„r and | st.tes and th. his Committee to act agaln-l Klnjdom c;-,ve.iiment b* ihe Mcta.ran Hill and n , ||: spe.lfulU reuue.ls ,hal inui aT. \ x \l aU iSTSVZ eefforUof UM ed tiuouRh the usual aha is Fre World %  f America. 1 .. 1 %  One flOUld therefore PM thai 11> speaking, who had BW ake all measures id %  %  in OoaMTeaasnU I'owrll and li' committee, an espresnini ol .1-. it. .it 1. 11 gratitude for their nil nt endeavours, on brhall "I our people. The House requests thai Your Excellency ..No ferward In C0 icrrv>man Pourtl and the ( mI'I.M. %  a ropy ot ihe Address "IMI ii was passed Ihis ,1.. HI eonnectlon Milh Ihi, matter I .0 iNell Known Mr K. 4.. Mapp. (Li in inovinu. v hi .. %  iid not inland la U.KC ui > much .„',„..,, TL l P? much lo '" k ln -" end i-ubiic Charact 11 oodwill should eontini Igrauon wat not limited to 100 JN .: pi* In mean. What alarmeii Ii.m 0/ai Iha fact lhal the PTOfM I uppoi ed to have been .irafted by Ihe Amerli n Btati 1 > %  ll ,l on Ihe pan Of UM ver-run the united Slates Oovi iot some action on the part ol IUM to lt> to ajih "'l diHcrimlnator% ion through Under the eal 1. %  %  '.'.' %  ed to go in under the -.av. ,„ | irM ,, uUull Thcv hj.^ !" .. 1 ,.,...-. ,< *'al at thai known as the Judd bill". and which had been introduced in tujreag, %  Into .he Judicial Commiticc—it had 1 1 Congress — by Sena and sought to limit the numbei Indians gouig to the %  mocracy and freedorr %  %  iiitheiunc the the Free World. the moment because they won not politically Independent. The Address was expressing grave apprehension over Ihe matSore i'nint lie thougni H1.1i UMV „„,_ .,., ter and was requesting Her M.iji-22?. i Permaiieni res.u ^ rcc na one of „,,. su ^ p,i, u ,pal So. £ %  £: ;,i* l j ,er ye from M,h was that w, i allowed io cnUmrata ana letUe. •entetion to the appro) even m the cduntri %  nIhority In Washington. Hi nly America, but not other part of I I ., 1 %  %  With their Vast open la;i 1 thousands of square' miles, not to mention acres—Canh is larger In urea than .he United States, and vrfa I.Mion wag about 1'ISth of the ol Ami r* a, 1 open Its 0001 t, W< si Indians coloared Weel [ndlaM — ir. r. 1.. %  Taleetf iL>< eUd meinhrrs of ih> llnil-rillil n,i 1 sei-ln In \ lew 'lie I, U -iii gatfi .1 ... gsad 1,. him ihai there was g r ea t er anUnisla-sm about the mailer In n.si baltaaa whe lived la UM I'l.Ued sU't* Ih.in UMM Wha in, .1 111 Hi.eeleelee, hsaa ae a the U.st Imli.ns Mho ln.-d in ll" n.liinles were noi aware ol what Use other West Indian. In Use 1 I niled Slates. (h"U|h a iiilinoll. irniip. were Iryim, I., go A Hill %  %  %  11 vhere Ihej had meninen of the 1 lovernmen t, the hitch Government, 'he PVeneh 1 low mment and UM Brttiah oov. it Ihai %  d out HI. 11 mch reetrtf ions, so far .is 1mn.1t rt ,,„, hould not (-. ,„.„ .,„,, 1.1 thai thoaa countrle their eff< %  M %  %  llOUr in Ihe l>io|-.sed H.II. he by un&Iieation. It would % %  %  4 UM 1 enntuntty in IUMI than on tlie white Df th r commumi' bathe) were %  wart. ihne ired i-'npip who %  I elrouinatancea had to migrate to the United adi 11., wee another aspect Of They could iffnrd to tMceugg they wei memI tuhComn %  lUi erg of UM Forth AUanUi rreata Organisaefrort then was being pros indilions for the |*npl 0 of the . aj On page 5 m If you Tcel worn out. depressed, or generally run djow a day ot Bu.kfau TOOK vVl -e wdt quickly restore lo crerjy and tone up the whole nervaui jyitem. Giving new vitality it (or; nit fever and exhaustion and remember. Bucktait Tonic Wine IUTKFAST TONIC WIM: .V^WAy/,v/rt'/W,v,. -'-'-'*-.-,*,',*,','--.'.-.'.; or ihe colonial. The preaint position was lhat West Indians were allowed to enm me ., iota %  tven to Oreai BJ Kain no limit such as that proposed by the Senator MeCarran Hill If the proposed Bill was passed, one *ould well see tiiat West Indians would be discriminated agalttrt, T ; itnry was limited In such a manner so far as immigration Into the I %  anted monweattfa /Uu^oogh UMJ %  ..:• l ^n-s ,,s t ihnt a paragraph be adiU members of g diaflngtueh "i on record UM BBd wci m on,1 llttOII Of the COsOTI • i.ir West Indian colony. 01 • % %  litllc corner of lite earth, and were played by at least one A not i*rmllted to settle in th,. %  . i onunlttag m the united Btab Another Address ne started out in that Accepting a suggestion from Mr. pointing out that G. H. Adams that a separate AdI sore point, dress, complementary to th'' one JU8T TO MENTION A FEW ITEMS NOM OPEWM FCNDEB TAP! C'ELl.tJUtll) SHEETS CORK SHEETS FLEXIBLE RADIATOR HOSE GREASE GUNS OIL CANS REAM VIEW MlttltOHS UM t IM\ CAULKS BATTERY HYDROM1 BATTERY CHARGER BULBS liliili PRES ,E HOI I'M* HUB AND Vf'.cANIZINO KITS SUCIItlN \\l Vi l.lilM i ENGINE VAI Vis All Models DEI ARBON1ZING ; \SKKTS SETS—All Models GENERATtHi LODGE SP \HK PLUOS VALVE GKiNDlNi; COMPOUND GA.SKI I'I;IKI I HOI RUBBING COMPO SIMONI7. KI.I KM;U AND WAX HOLTS WONDAR WAX CHAMOIS AND POLISHING CLOTHS I 11 EN8E tilfin K VND PLATES AM. TYPES MECHANICS' TOOLS >iw inn;, DIM, iwt tott \ot K RE discrimhe would move the passing ol behalf of Barbadians, but because "lalion against peoples ol this another address to be sen' of Uie interest taken by West In•"** %  a "d asking the member Govappropriate persons through the dians In the United States, sho : ' ,1Jn ComSecretary of Stale for the Colonjoin them in their effort' to HEht niis ion to admit members of the i. the Bill. e*je| heir territoHe did not think tha' He did not need to remin-t the ' much more that could be said n honourable House of the contiihu"'' did not know whether the the matter, and he therefore beg,1 taken note of ged to support the motion ioi th. Ihe United States ^i feol-itlon which had been ,„, gbuj oi the AddrCN which he In way of their economic and culp aa aed by UM Weet Indian Conferhoped would have l-ecn passed tural standnrdnee, but if it had not, it was time unanimously, because he knew tenet. dad, because, alti I would asIt w.i workers lo the ,t those West Indians whi Indian. ting the Issue In UM tea iueU. to A ti c F. Talma al o thought W0S ncknowl. %  A Mr. II R rbadns its-tf hi Her o* urh grave inv BVrted through its legist*' "'"tlv it was In IMI.II I MtOI tt ,i,U WOUld have Pke-t 1 promoting mutual '' '" m Penol ke his slight contribution, be. r ma go %  %  -.use he knew th t if for n cotmle month" that nature was successful in heThln Men nf The Wegfgaj ..,. %  %  . Conen rhal real I lid he on the enomir life of ee limit von ill of th" islands, and mor" • '!' %  • TWrnd'yt. security between the \\. ^reas and Amerlea. \ %  .new note peeaod between Ute I n'ted Kingdom Government and y^O^*0'^^>'VVVX#*^*V>V -'ieVO'** %  o nttcif I-&CU'-—-•• %  yenht ONLY en* :' "-J-* —~ in ". -^giv.t you ALL Ihe revolutionoiy FEKG'JSON SYSTEM hotutnl COURTESY GARAGE ROBT THOM Limitrd. Whilep.rkDial 4616 BEST BUY FOR TRANSPORT AND AGRICULTURAL PURPOSES. ...And Save $258.50 Your flight by pre M I C saves you days of invl'" o do and see more on bus]] You relax la deep-Leate

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ESTABLISHED 1895 THUI.M'AY. FEBRUARY 21. 1092 PRICE : F1VF. CINTS NATO Council Meeting Opened Yesterday Stage Set For LesIie Wight Consideration 0/Hitsii4To J? A J Save B.G. European Army KI\(.N SUM is Reds Reject L.N. Offer LISBON. Feb. 20 thai North Atlantic Treaty Oryan1TO) Council, will open here to-day with the •* I'dy approval of the Big Three compromm to i'ii a Eorward immediately with the creation o| a 1.400' | ipMn army. ghl were the prospects for success at this most tanl of NATO sessions, that United States Secretary tte aVcheson made plans to leave here by Sunday, a ahead of the schedule planned before the Big Three Minuter! met with Gwman Chancellor Konrad Adenauer in Lot) I important work, for the FDII. :.,i Finance %  %  -member London rull equality in N A T.O %  %  Ughj to the com.1 id i sessions of N A T 0 an I I Armv Cou an emergency An omem< nr\ was I inllnlrtT %  %  i log t Ai the %  I nee has the %  %  %  %  nd itritish interest In any ati ''lintv nf pean Army—from braid* mils i QafBMfl to replace the direct ones. Once the European army comes into being and the occupation of Germany thus ends, production of atomic weapons, unified ntfcsgllai. 155mm and bigger Ktm barrel* and ut har .is will be proi-u>;te.l In exposed area*—an ineany, Propeller Drops Off During Flight PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 20 The CommuniiU rejected tin united Nations compromise offer cut troop rotation during ihc truce from 40.000 to 35.000 men per month. There was speculation that the Reds might be holding out on the troop rotaUon issue in in attempl in blackmail the U.N. into accepting Russia as the MXM mamber of the neutral Commission to supervise the armistice Communist staff officers for the lifth straight day demanded that the tm withdraw their objects and accept their nomination of Russia The Allies refused on the grounds that Russia, although not lighting in Korea, was the sponsor' of both Red China and North Korea. Each mcie accused the other of breaking the prior agreement on nomination* to the commission of neutral nations which will supcrIse the truer North Korean Colonel Chang Chun San contended that each side had agreed not to dispute tho other's nominations. Moreover, he said, the United Nations had no reason to reject Russia after it had accepted Red Poland and Czechoslovakia The United Nations Colonel Don Harrow counter -churned that tho Reds had gone back on their agrecnent that her recommendations mini be approved by both tides $L000 % 000 For Indo-Chiiw WASHINGTON. Feb. 20. The Mutual Security Agency NASHVILLE, n i nu an u, Feb. 20. Kaatern Airlines onwlala and Civil Aeronautics Authority are seeking to learn what caused the propeller of the D.C 4 Skymaster lo drop ler the plane .authorized Indo-Chitui on Wedncsrlr.tn-l the moorl hart iv to spend one million dollars passongci bound fa : i ., lUCUoa dredge and pipeline hirned to the field for harbour and river dcvelopand landed without incident menl in Cambodir.. shortly after taking off last night other authorisation* for Easecutid leg of i flight from tej*n countries to-day Included Atlanta. The pilot said he noticed $177,000 for Indo-China for texided %  little tiles, radio equipment and techrough" Hie ground nical aid; $62,000 for Thailand, according to en Airlines spokessSz.noo for Burma. $6,000 for Naman. 295 for 4 Wight 106. Bruiser Thomas who batted quietly 34. Thomas was out In the third over aftei tra ifu-r the partnership added 65 in *>9 minutes. Then came Dyer with a delightful If lucky innings getting his runs in a series of boundaries. The TnnidJd bowing lacked direction and the field placing was unsatisfactory The ticket gave little help and Wight'' efence forced the bowlers into a rugged display later in the day of which Dyer took full advantage. J tror "oss-wind •"'" madt control difficult The wtcket was unhelpful and the feeling wag thit Wight would have helped British Ouiana more had he taken the initiative. Wight wan oui trying to pierce Ihc ring of oft-s.de fields. men. Trinidad fieldsmen stood well to the all dav leather huntThe game ends tomorrow d pre-lunch'events mev well %  match's course. decide the Tin -i p .tlonallst China,, 511.000 for tho I Philippines^V.r. Plan Will Hamper Balance Of Payment? By \i. i in .: J. i H si \ WASHINGTON. Feb. 20. First effect of U.S. accelerated billion dollar offshore pi ,,n ie designed to help bolster the Allied nations wilh a dollar income, is likely to be temworsening o1 tha i.ulance-nf.r/ayments difficulties : uropMn countries, Umte-i i.its who implications <>f military procurrmen' paradox arises fro EL payment* on fore contract..rlor can execute kuj for dis raw in advance. At present, experts calculate of a 5100 military conds contract with a European producer rapidly results in ellne "f about $20 in the dollar reserves of his countrv. rent Officers in current practice make •'down payment'" of ten per cent or less shortlv after the contract Mi ,ob the prolO obtain materials which usually amount to about 30 pci cent, cf the total i costs. Most materials that go into military goods cost dollars The result Is an add! •JS. troops on dut> in Eui. ?m*nt plans are understood to all for doubling mutual aid procurement in Europe during the next fiscal yesr and the maximum possible increase in U.S armed services there. '-11 ..i';hl. -in;-; Out Informed sources said that the Offshoce Procurement Programme which is Just now straightening t rector W. Averell Haruman on U.S. authortti Harriman is said to have laid heavy emphasis on the potential II Offshore Procurement '•hort European countries He also stressed the %  tring of the free nations seeurnf that would result from SCUvaUon of plant capacity and manpowar in western Europe. A build-up of European production th hesl hope for eveneamaH OIIANA-I, Tanf chswn %  W (hi • Oihb. i, s. Ttumi. C >I>IM-)II ( Lr4U MeWatt l> rd.. Thorn a. lbs rf •> %  A.,., Dyr not •, 'linn Palolr n. THE EIGHT U K King s ikeats ei.ieate t" Uxt flr.t Oaribbtan Janboise ws loUaasii lareogh Bs. i>aaos TMl.nl.> by tka JSMaaibie They .pent uj dsy ashore with Maj J E Orif.oosanuwtloner who took them pn iom or the i.Und. TIIP Jamburee opens m Janudta nen motiUi arsong Us pUOM Uey vkg'l wsthe British Council and they sre seen here i fUsdlug Room looking at BSftga. liieItl year old tleofirey Bell Jones. ,.. grant from bswlel mg dark uaUorsal traces their cor-e from England lo Bsrbsdoa M.| Clnfflth and M> II | and Vice PreiHent ef the Boy Scouts' Association lok gg House Pass $3,500 For Agricultural Development \lr H I (C) calM upon the <;o\-ernmcnt rabtsfllslng animal feed with a view to milk ld ai a Iowa Mr. O. T Alldor (1> cntiiirsanl lot uiliii ; to make people work land thi > kept IU %  hen the Hoi. %  niMtton for $J,MH) to be voted for Agricultural The Resolution was eventually uaaeed to Mr AlMrr, Mr 'I 1! %  .Mould a \ 1*111 \ 'f ueh a VI 111 v • I .11 IK '.nil to it:Hesoiiiremit Of the eeeiit increan in the price of livestock feed, a further amount %  •ill be required to meet cxpenditure at the Central Uvtatb -k Station and the District Agricultural %  nations for the remainder of the 8th Beat Reds In The Air Tucker. British Connrtl ReprSSentsUve King's Scouts Call Here En Route To Jamboree AKHlVlNi; MI Bnrbad* w >dercla\ L m f ; from Km, land bv thi* French S.S Calombie .md lu,kui|{ quite lit and happy wenthe otphf*|fosg Scouts who arc ntM on Ih.i way to JanKuc.i u> leiiregWi the 474.000 Scouts of the UK at the first Caribbean Jambor^which will take place In Kingston front March 5 I The contingent is being lei uP B Nevill. e orTset he air ami on tha i % %  •.n i mtlM BJ add ition a l revenue ensstk win 'S gaining the edge in the ..' ' If"" 1 '"e increase in elling price of milk V la.il 1 through-1 !Sn *ntii"i*m ut the ergf in the air with the J^' n ^' n C n 'ht dtbaB "in. Mr Crawford s.„d he did 'ujilsm |n .. was Addendum and hold s'or-h Kon ihn % %  s JofMlt, XxSabre jets r r '" :ho mv, ghi MJ.Q rmm in the pile „{ anlmsl nowt.iNo gjcALTm RlliilMlH Asaar.i.1 Cerble B.G. Ajcccpl Customs Lfnion •Prom Our Otf ( ..rreepo-drnl> OEOKGETOWN. B.G.. Teh. 2D The llritish Gmana Legislative Council today unanimously l principle the proposed customs union of the British Caribbean colonies. The Coursw which recently by a big majority rejected political federation agreed to customs union on a motion by the Financial Secretary following a message to the Council from the Oovemoi vi'-.out debate. At the start, customs union would benefit British Guiana trie Newsprint Price Beyond Govt. Control WASHINGTON. Feb. 20. Justice Department officials said nc United Slates Govi r "Dwerless to undertake an "elTecive aaa-trust InvasUaatloo of th. '' I'Mii: pill e Ilu, tlnn III),, t| oinied out thai ;m per i ent. of thi icwsprun uaed In the S is proluced by Canadian firms ovc vhlch this Government has no lurisdiction An anti-trust investiiir 'i by Chairman F.nvnanuc| galiei af the House Siih-eommlttee In |ett,, i, Attorney General J. Howard M< liurtii In inakuiKihc letter pubhe (viler said n new | crease on newsprint ". Heealling that two Increases Ir 1951 totalled Slfl per ton, Cellei lold McGarth: If newsmiui ,.,„e e again raised by all producer* ting in unison that will be in additional evidence to substantialUM fact tint ihese prices are determined by coliudon hot petlUon Offlclals indicated that than I relatively so little newnpnm prOI'nited States Dims i would be impossible to achlevi efleetive results by antl-trus' action Tssq s.nd that held true evei though Ibatl \l UM %  ipital invested in many of the Canadiai firms One official polnte-l out tratf Canada has a law with heavy penalties for Vlolaton which prohibits a firm from handing any hooks, records or information ovei lo U.S. aulhon'.j! that that alone would hai 'nation—U.F. flurri of ho 'II.. V . how long it wouhi now take I i-annoi >H. 1 iv about %  I] Will I ikl %  i ::oo j i.e contingent wh (l h.. i-'foie "Hid thai he li ll the* did not have a %  in iiif island a* he | They were however lu< ky ce arbads at all because, norlally. they would hav< < I ulrort ta Jaaunra, but vwing I io getting fh-u lip ie'i>mmi-d.lloii, UM -ke the Caissnbie which was oly vessel they could get Sight seeing He thought it was a very great pportunltjjr for the bOTS who ijoymg lli*fnsvlvs and sewing anetUnf of the various island MI their wai io : Mi NavtU mi in Barbados fou • ears ago whe>i he made a Mvi months' tour of the West hmi'or Seout lloailejtiiiatg o (l thai lie was accompanied lia wife %  i irMOOs ln lasslquartatl wherrhe spent hree month*. Mis Ncvilt is a Guide Commls•i England and has been ii the movement fm many yeni if""found Rlillt. M,„. M „,. M. FtolM.ru said that all tl I i. very plvawi tu be m ,ri the gu > Barbados and added Wwt at .... port of call, they had excellent nl in ipitallty from the scouts wnO ill sbfl lulu U | at their disposal BB of three million dollan. —TJ.F. . the hiird Bunssy itanuut 4 '."' '" h ,lon . al VA J* the country N.ATO. eountries irrordlng Payments Are %\o* Hxi.mans thesis. Officials said steps are i^^^^^ taken I payment* which they regard am any cases. %  %  %  Department his started seas Military' Procurement Programme for mutual sM purposes JAMES C. V. SMALU a 36lied to pour 620 year-old butcher of Fair Field, nUnto.doUani Into Europe OUI St. Michael, was taken to the Gen'""'• *>1 • l Hospital yesterdav "* shorUy after ISO p.m., along with Woman Din* After Stabbing aid NAT O rountl Additionally the I WO million irlng the present nd services for its own troops there T*ie latter, figure payments for the b-'.seand depot local pTOCunt' 'ixi and light equipment and personal eapendi (;wendniyn Clarke a 36-year-old domestic servant of 4th Avenue, T leans. boUi suffering from stab wounds. Clarke died loon after she was admitted to On %  nd Small wa' detained In %  cidical condition. Ho i t under police surveillance. The "tabbing occurred at the Junction of Wastburj and Baaters Roatfa aboul 6.30 o'clock. 24 Mutineers Arrested LAS PALMAS, Feb 20 Twenty-four seamen charged ith mutiny were arrested aboard the Argentine vessel Basass Aires t night The arrest was m sol.uei ,f 'I... InTsnUTla Ie Marina upon the request of aptain of Jhe vessel. Jose Carlos fuzaga and the Argentine Consul r| Las Palmes The trouble arose when Captain Ruzaga ordered the crew to main aboard while the vessel < t.king up supplies prior to proceeding t'. (luenos Aires —V.F. N m ph %  %  ARMS PLANS FALL SI l Olir B> W. *:. LANDKI \ rrln,,. U II nnuin M^sssrar,,!! %  lmo.f |, n „.., I ...k. h il — v.r. Mass Murderer Now On Trial POmiM Fi .,,,. i A jovial HI "idow sranl oo u i bar hr> 1 mothei and fal m,t othe %  WILL EXPORT TO U.S. ONL^ MANILA, Ml It was announced thai tie I m now on will not xjort SUgar to any roui.try outside the United State* until U r the American market President Quirmo laid di %  w lommand in %  two-houi cpntatenea awi nigai industry / raIvei in the Mall %  Pal ice. CBlled to Settle mm UHl for II the controversy ovei port of sugar lo Japan M I spokesman said ( ".ii,.. '.upitaani (he i ablrs I I last year under SSBstfa Bt "f the entire sugar Op may be exported to any luntrv out.ide the United Slates. dlvtfiad to the domestic mar* t in order to increase domestic pplles and lower domestic sugar ted them around trv rd on __ any mil i | %  polli • %  ivUnds He said that they hd a vo.y nice gr.iup of boyi who Sri first trip to the We. Indies. On the voyage down froi U % %  ihnwhli.ii . his hon II on all over the wot id. ha. had ..I his headquarters scout..n 42 nations. He i BfHI l Muainted with scouts from Jan i there was a CO IUII, that colony to EngLm.l % %  ( LhO Coronation In Ml BBd ana her to Holland in 1939 fnr the Dutch Jamboree g) On Page a x*\y was exhuni'd two rears latei imd 10 milligram lound. ( %  %  of all be %  %  i tune i r Egypl Set For Talks CAIRO. Feb 20 Egypt appeared set to ante) •daBta und speedy negotiations with Britain on the bash Of absolute r,ilhhi.i-:.t of b BV lation of ia U troops from the Sues Canal Zon> and unity of Egypt with dan under the Egyptian While Abdul Fattah Amr Pasha Egypt's Ambassador to IIIMHUI seemed to succeed in his misaiun to London to prepare the stage fo* %  I i %  ii. Cairo mpl I 'iif held would be uri very sooedy.--!'T %  'ing w raver for rat Thuui *, |. %  %  • i %  %  I n munlst suppl> %  %  %  i Pyong %  %  I milk had i> • rr eiiMnVrahly thai Ihe (iovcinieiif would H>o thul or perhaps i n %  ,.. %  tlflon.il revenue to off%  %  i > erlooa state oi 1 the clri'. Um ''".'. rr ' V,I • ha bean . hirer increase in thi j %  When thta i:..o!uii.n [conslderati. %  ipparently •' H *• a bag and BJ.* •ving sa'i %  ':**' %  f bssnTtV 'indeisland that Uv Dalrv • latlon IN now discussing with ihe ipproprlsti lersUes the week'MuegUon <>f %  further increase of ler to offset-this new ai.-rease In the price of fMT*— Mlh i line I 1 i r deti rrnined I i s Marine duntfaaa enter II rmbal %  %  %  % %  %  ii' ha .• % % %  %  T the IVillian' %  lelow freezli eetl N —I'.F. WANTED JAIL rocw afjnqco r> M pt thi Irected vi rdlet o| icqulttal on %  vloUUon charge and InllOUld ko ti> jai! Ol ihe Fed%  I Ich oblige.' kfli \ ... %  i | gii'.i inrucnt %  %  i. %  .in him. i i' %  thai it was understood i nerally in the Dairy Industry th.it In order lo profit, rnilk would h. ve to he sold .it 18 cent" lK -t i>iut With the present price of milk. it was beyond the reach of a large u> of working class people iiefore a mutter which the Government should take r.%  erleualy. Vital Arlicles Of Diet "We have got to bear in mind." tie said, "thai milk Is a vital lele Of Ih ( | ( v M >lx>dy and 'in'in i Increosc In at ptaci i' hcvund the -each of all but tho-. „f very high It tlieiii %  .. me that will have to reeon..I i ihe ipn rllon of I %  I i il feed II. mi thai when thai mm W R < %  omroUed snd substdlaad. it wi* % %  "I at leaa than M SO a bag and I i' was being sold at fr t The bigdairj producers could not .. 1.1. HI.' -i i! 'iie> .itti rnpted to re%  iin ihe rtslni cost %  >! pnxluctlon, bt.t the Government held a duty ., Ihe eommuniti to lee lo it that llk< milk could come WrtMn the reach of the i working man n worruu 0 On page 5 DELICIOUS! NUTRITIOUS/ */;/;/ //# 1//#/#> i.vw sfWO.VeV iiisisf mm il"'"> %  %' 4 000'00A l)o|ioiiulion Comiiirncrs %  %  %  %  or, Wednesday that two mass de "irtatloj B In recent m* moi > will %  n.ii rfeai and V u t \ < %  s-uthi i Rurope A ch artered plane %  % %  %  deal Wtleoi I %  %  •.ill be placed dnla %  %  1 %  i I Yemen o *' %  %  ' f SURVIVORS REACH PORT CHATHAM. Mass, Feb. 20 to pBtl Ihe Mrrrer was one of fro-r. four driftCoast Guard cutters steamed in two 10,000-ton tankers which |lte.| are dean to port today with 25 survivor* broke in halves about the same „,. fclM i prteumed dead, from the broken tanker Forr time U thweat .'..m -!-.,„— J M „,. Mercer Thirteen other saarnei fUhhlng port on Mon. sJntwi "' -> rue passed up,.rescue last nigh-, electlay The other tanker was the las ""' mg instead lo itick with Ihi I BoOi her halves have morning abrard the Coast Guard %  Mercir's stern as volunteers in a tone aground -lctishnef The cutter had an salvage attempt Efforts will be The latest batch of survivors been due to reach port at ~ aJn. ,, . made to tow that half of the ship brought the number rescued to 57 but had to revise BREAKFAST COCOA jLB. NET -•; jajJjjUf"" ^iilllliikuA /




"eit,



t



harbades

NATO Council Meeting

ESTABLISHED 1895





Opened Yesterday

Stage Set For | Leslie Wiel

Consideration Of
Kuropean Army

: LISBON, Feb. 20.
he ninth session of the North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
ization (NATO) Council, will open here to-day with the
stage set for a speedy approval of the Big Three comprom-
ise to press forward immediately with the creation of a
1,400,000-man European army.
So bright were the prospects for success at this most
important of NATO sessions, that United States Secretary
of State Acheson made plans to leave here by Sunday, a
week ahead of the schedule planned before the Big Three
Ministers met with German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
in London. Se
The most important work, for !
the Foreign, Defence, and Finance
Ministers of the twelve-member
nations had already been done in
London where it was decided to
give Germany almost full equali-
ty in N.A.T.O
The Council is expected to give
a quick green light to the com-
promise which calls for: Joint
sessions of N.A.T.O. and European
Army Councils whenever there is
an emergency An emergency was
defined as whenever there was a
threat of attack to any member
or whenever the integrity of either
organization is menaced

Reds Reject
U.N. Offer

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 20.

The Communists rejected the
United Nations compromise offer
to cut troop rotation during the
truce from 40,000 to 35,000 men
per month, There was speculation
that the Reds might be ding
out on the troop rotation issue in
an attempt to blackmail the U.N.
into accepting Russia as the sixth
member of the nettral Commis-
sion to supervise the armistice.
Communist staff officers for the
fifth straight day demanded that
the U.N. withdraw their objec-
tions and accept their nomination
of Russia. The Allies refused on
the grounds that Russia, although
not fighting in Korea, was the
“sponsor” of both Red China and
North Korea.

Each side accused the other of
breaking the prior agreement on
hominations to the commission of
neutral nations which will super-
vise the truce.

North Korean Colonel Chang
Chun San contended that each
side had agreed not to dispute the
other’s nominations. Moreover, he
said, the United Nations had no
reason to reject Russia after it
had accepted Red Poland and
Czechoslovakia.

The United Nations Colonel Don
Darrow counter-charged that the
Reds hea gone back on thei ee

nent that her recommen
Propeller Drops france be approved by both sides,

—U.P.
Off During Flight |
|. @LeOeee

NASHV By ssee, Feb, 20.| °
NASHVILLE, Tennessee, Feb. For Indo-China |

Eastern Airlines officials and
Civil Aeronautics Authority are|
seeking to learn what caused the) WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.
propeller of the D.C.4 Skymaster | The Mutual Security Agency
to drop off shortly after the plane jauthorized Indo-China on Wednes-
cleared the airport here with 25/day to spend one million dollars

Grave Question

Germany, while not having a
vote in N.A.T.O. itself, at joint
meetings would thus have the
chance to have say on any
grave question concerning it.

At the same time France has the
indirect pledge of United States
and British interest in any at-
tegnpt to destroy the integrity of
the European Army—fronr outside
or internally,

Indirect controls
war production to replace the
present direct ones. Once the
European army comes into being
and the occupation of Germany
thus ends, production of atomic
weapons, guided missiles, 155mm
and bigger gun barrels and oiher
heavy armaments will be pro-
hibited in exposed areas—an in-

irect reference to Germany
direct ny p,

over Getman







passengers bound for Chicago.|for a suction dredge and pipeline
The plane returned to the field|for harbour and river develop-
and landed without —ineident}ment in Cambodiz.

shortly after taking off last night} Other authorizations for Eas-
on the second leg of a flight from) ten countries to-day ancluded
Atlanta. The pilot said he noticed | $177,000 for Indo-China for tex-
that one engine “sounded a little|tiles, radio equipmeni and tech-
rough” after leaving the ground |nical aid; $62,000 for Thailand,
according to an Airlines spokes- |$32,000 for Burma, $6,000 for Na~-
man. |tionalist China,, $11,000 for the
—U.P. | Philippines —U.P.

Plan Will Hamper
Balance Of Payments

By ARTHUR J. OLSEN
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.
First effect of U.S, aecelerated billion dollar offshore
procurement programme designed to help bolster the
Allied nations with a dollar income, is likely to be tem-
porary worsening of the balance-of-payments difficulties
of Western European countries.



United States officials whofU.S. troops on duty in Europe
have been studying the implica-] Present plans are understood to
tions of military procurement all for doubling mutual aid pro-
abroad say that the paradox]|curement in Europe during the
arises. from slow U.S, payments} next fiscal year and the maxi-
on foreign . defence contracts}mum_ possible increase in US.
which the contractor can execute| armed services there,

y ay for this raw . *
at Reet Straightening Out
At present, experts calculate} Informed sources said that the

Offshore Procurement Programme
which is just now straightening
out after months of tentative
planning is largely the result of

that the placing of a $100 mili-
tary goods contract with a Euro-
pean producer rapidly results in
a net decline of about $20 in the

‘ Mutual
dollar reserves of his country.;Unremitting pressure by
United States Procurement Offi-| Security yong m eee
cers in current practice make|Harriman on — au id
Harriman is said to have lai

“down payment” of ten per cent. !
or less shortly after the contract [heavy emphasis on a
is made with the European firm, “
To execute the job the pro- 2 ee a Wed
ducer’s first task is to obtain = : ssed :
materials which usually amount! strengthening of be] pe Daye am
to about 30 per cent. of the total | Security ane olant 4 4
production costs. Most materials; #¢ctivation $ ant capa r
that go into military goods cost tidus ot ae Sa Bee, on
dollars. The result is an addi-| build-up o' age "ae ye ovens
tional—although temporary—drain ' 'S also the | of US ad
on the hard money resources of tual eeu aiicedlaa ta
the country. N.A.T.O. countries ac 2

Payments Are Slow Haitiman’s thesis. up
Officials said steps are being | Pe?
taken to speed contract payments |



which they regard as unneces- | e

sarily slow in many cases. | Woman Dies
The United States Defence

Department has started an over-

After Stabbing

seas Military Procurement Pro-
gramme for mutual aid purposes JAMES C. V. SMALL, a 36-
that is scheduled to pour 620\year-old butcher of Fair Field,
million dollars into Europe out/St, Michael, was taken to the Gen-
of 4,300 million dollars now |era) Hospital yesterday evening
available for military aid tO | shortly after 6.30 p.m., along with
N.A.T.O. countries. |Gwendolyn Clarke a 36-year-old

Additionally the U.S. Army Lachaise servant of 4th Avenue,












plans to. : pend abou 5 een |New Orleans, both suffering
eee te. Suto to abtain {from stab wounds. Clarke died
ti and services for its own 500M after she was admitted to the
troops there, The latter figure |hospital and Small was detained
includes ited payments jin a critical condition. He is un-
for the co uction of military ioe police surveillance. The stab-
base lepots, local procure-|bing occurreg at the junction of
me and light equipment|Westbury and Baxters Roads about
and i exp ure of 16.30 o’clock.

t
Hits 114 To
Save B.G.

(From Our Own Corréspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 20.

Leslie Wight batted for 404 min-
utes for 114 runs to save Britisa
Guiana from defeat a day ahead of
schedule in the Second Intercolo-
nial Test against Trinidad. His
knock was a masterpiece of de-
fensive strategy and ~bored the
small crowd patiently awaiting
colour and splash. The latter was
supplied by Dyer who scored 65
‘not out in 77 minutes.

The first thirteen runs today
were scored in 20 minutes all by
Camacho, then Wight got his first
seoring stroke reaching 50 in 183
minutes.

Camacho got 50 in 80. minutes
With one six and six fours.
The partnership added 100 in 97
minutes. When the score was 179
both batsmen were 61. The bowl-
ing was steady and Camacho was
dismissed shortly after lunch after
batting for 162 minutes with 8
fours and one six, He did the bulk
of the scoring in a partnership
scoring 144 runs. Me Watt did not
stay long but B.G. had averted an
innings defeat with 6 wickets to
spare. Wight reached hig century
with a favourite shot in 875
minutes with elewen fours.
Trinidad used nine bowlers with-
out success and at tea the
score was 295 for 4, Wight
106, Bruiser Thomas who batted

quietly 34, Thomas was out in
the third over after tea after
the partnership added 65 in

59 minutes. Then came Dyer
with a delightful if lucky innings
getting his runs in a series of
boundaries. The Trinidad bowl-
ing lacked direction and the field
placing was unsatisfactory. The
wicket gave little help and Wight’s
defence forced the bowlers inte a
ragged display later in the day of
which Dyer took full advantage.
A strong cross-wind also made
control difficult. The wicket was
unhelpful and the feeling was that
Wight would have helped British
Guiana more had he taken the
initiative. Wight was out trying
to pierce the ring of off-side fields.
men, Trinidad fieldsmen stood
well to the all day leather
hunt. The game ends tomorrow
and _ pre-lunch / events may well
decide the match’s course,

The scores;
BRITISH GUIANA—2nd Innings

Li. Wght c Tang Choon b Jack
Gibbs b Skeete ence

ze Cs ag coe b Jackbir 1
amacho c all b Forde _., - &
MeWatt b Forde .. ;
C. Thomas Ibw b Forde . 35
Dyer not out eoer 65
Jagkman run out 12
Patoir not out 5
Extras: 4
Total (for 7 wkts.) “00

0

Fall Of wickets: 1 for 76; 2
fot 233; 4 for 233; 5 for 298; 6 for 311
7 for 249

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M R Ww
Forde 20 1 74 a |
Butler : . oo 1 ST
Demming 18 3 49
Jackbir 8 6 72
Skeete 27 2 81
Tang Choon MR ee
Sampath 4 - 9
Asgarali . 5 3 2
Corbie 1 11



B.G. Accept

Customs Union |

(From Our Own Cortespo: dent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb, 20.

The British Guiana Legislative
Council today w mously
accepted in principle the pro-
osed customs union of the Brit-

Caribbean colonies. The
Coungil which recently ay a big
majority rejected political feder-
ation agr to customs union on
a motion by the Financial Sec-
retary following a message to
the Council from the Governor
without debate.

At the start, customs union
would benefit British Guiana to
the tune of three million dollars
annually.



24 Mutineers
Arrested

LAS PALMAS, Feb. 20

Twenty-four seamen charged
with mutiny were arrested aboard
the Argentine vessel Buenos Aires
last night. The arrest was made
by soldiers of the Infanteria De
Marina upon the request of the
captain of the vessel, Jose Carlos
Ruzaga and the Argentine Consul
at Las Palmas.

The trouble arose when Captain
Ruzaga ordered the crew to re-
main aboard while the vessel was
tuking up supplies prior to pro-
ceeding tc Buenos Aires.—WU.P.



SURVIVORS REACH PORT

CHATHAM, Mass., Feb. 20
Coast Guard cutters steamed in

to port today with 25 survivors
from the broken tanker Fort
Mercer. Thirteen other seamen

passed up_rescue last night elect-
ing instead to stick with the Fort
Mercer’s stern as volunteers in a
salvage attempt. Efforts will be
made to tow that half of the ship

for 79, ¢| though there is U.S. capital in-

2 | that that alone would handicap a





THE EIGHT U.K. King’s
bados yesterday by the
Commissioner who took them

the they

Among
Reading Room Jooking at a



enréute to the first Caribbean Jamboree were
bie”.

eines.

Maj. Griffith







intransit through Bar

They spent the day ashore with Maj. J. B. Griffith, Island Scout
a tour of the island. The Jamboree opens in Jamaica next month
ited was the British Council and they are seen here in the Council's

16-year-old Geoffrey Bell-Jones, Sea Scout from Ipswich (wear
ing dark uniform) traces their course from England to Barbados.

Tucker, British Council Representative and Vice-President of the Boy Scouts’

and 'Mr. H. Risley
Association look on.

King’s Scouts Call Here

En Route To Jamboree

ARRIVING in Bar s
land by the French "

happy Were the eigh i
way to Jamaica to represent
at the first Caribbean Jam
Kingston from Mareh 5—17,

Newsprint |
Price Beyond |
Govt. Control

WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.

Justice Department officials said |
the United States Government is
powerless to undertake an “effec-
tive” anti-trust investigation of the
newsprint price situation. Officials
pointed out that 90 per cent. of the
newsprint used in the U.S. is pro-
duced by Canadian firms over
which this Government has no
jurisdiction

An anti-trust investigation was
demanded by Chairman Emmanuel
Celler of the House onopoly
Sub-committee in a letter te
Attorney General J. Howard Mc-
Garth, In making the letter pub-
lie Celler said a new price in-
crease on newsprint “impends.’

Recalling that two increases in
1951 totalled $16 per ton, Celle:
told McGarth: If newsprint price:
are again raised by all producers
acting in unison that will be an
additional evidence to substantiate
the fact that these prices are de-
termined by collusion not by com-
petition.

Officials indicated that there is
relatively so little newsprint pro-
duced by United States firms it
would be impossible to achieve
effective results by anti-trust
action

They said that held true ever

vested in many of the Canadiar
firms. One official pointed out that
Canada has a law with heavy pen-
alties for violators which pro-
hibits a firm from handing any
books, records or information over
to U.S. authorities. He indicated

full investigation.—U.P.



WILL ‘EXPORT
TO U.S. ONLY

MANILA, Feb, 20

It was announced that the Phil-
ippines from now on will not ex-
port sugar to any country outside
the United States until the quota
for the American market is filled

President Quirino laid down this
new command in a two-hour con-
ference with sugar industry “re-
presentatives in the Malacan Pal-
ace, called to settle once and for
all the controversy over the ex-
port of sugar to Japan or any
other country outside the U.S

A spokesman said this. new
policy supersedes the cabinet de-
cision of last year under which
five per cont of the entire sugar
crop may be exported to any
country outside the United States.
He said this five per cent. will now
be diverted to the domestic mar-
ket in order to increase domestic
supplies and lower domestic sugar
prices.—U.P.

No Details

TEHERAN, Feb, 20.

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
and the International Bank’s Mis-
sion last night issued a joint com-
munique saying that a artial
settlement of the Iranian ofl crigis
has been agreed on, but no details
were disclosed in the last meeting
before the Bank's special mission
leaves for Washington today,

Negotiators agreed to continue
efforts for a full settlement of the
dispute with Britain over the op-
eration of the nationalized oil re-
finertes,—«CP)



to port. The Mercer was one of
two 10,000-ton tankers which
broke in halves about the same
time in a terrific northwest storm
off this little fishing port on Mon-
lay The other tanker was the
Pendleton, Both her halves have
zone aground

The latest

brought the n



batch of
umber rescued tc

urvivors

,Mr. P, B, Nevill, O.B.E, F.C.A







yesterday morning from Eng-
mbie and looking quite fit and
Scouts who are now on their
the 474,000 Scouts of the U-K.

boree which will take place in

The contingent is being led bs
Headquarters Commissioner — fu:
Grants with Mr. Charles W
Roberts, Group Scoutmaster of

the 15th Finchley as assistant
eader,

The contingent was met on
oard by Major J. &. Griffith,

[sland Scout Commissioner, who

‘accompanied them ashore in the

Harbour Master’s launch,

Mr. Nevill, the only member ot
‘he contingent who has visited
jarbados before said that he re-
etted that they did not have a
mgeéer stay in the tsland ag he
vould have liked the boys to see
more of it.

They were however lucky to
ee Barbados at all because, nor-
nally, they would. have. gané
virect to Jamaica, owing to
ue Giffculty in getting stean:-
hip aecommodation, they had to
ake the Colombie which was the
nly vessel they could get.

Sight Seeing

He thought it was a yery great
»pportunity for the boys who were
njoying themselves and seeing
something of the: various islands
on their way to Jamaica,

Mr, Nevill was in Barbados four
years ago when he made a five
months’ tour of the West Indies
or Seout Headquarters, On that
»ccasion he was aceompanied by
his wife and made Barbados his
1eadquarters where he = spent
hree months,

Mrs Nevill ls a Guide Commis-
joner in England and has been
in the movement for many years

Mr. Roberts said that all the
boys were very pleased to be in
Barbados and added that at eacn
port of call, they had excellent
iospitality from the scouts who
placed cars at their disposal and
*ven conducted them around the
islands.

He said that they had a very
nice group of boys who were mak-
ing their first trip to the Wes‘
Indies. On the voyage down from
Southampton, they spent some otf
their time doing preparation work
for the Jamboree, They were de-
lighted at what they had seen in
the ports they had visited and
were eagerly looking’ forward to
stops at the other ports of call

Hosnitality

Mr, Roberts who is well known
in England for his hospitality to
couts from all over the world, has
had at his headquarters scout
from 42 nations. He is well ac-
quaintéed with scouts from Jamai
ca since there was a contingen|
from that colony to England for

the Coronation in 1937 and
ono‘her to Holland in 1939 for the
Dutch Jamboree

@ On Page 5



Egypt Set
For Talks

CAIRO, Feb. 20.

Egypt appeared set to enter in
to immediate and speedy nego-
tiations with Britain on the basis
of absolute fulfilment of her de-
mands for evacuation of British





’

ARMS PLANS
FALL SHORT

By W. G. LANDREY

/ LONDON, Feb. 20
Prime Minister Winston Chureh-
i revealed on Wednesday that
Britain's rearmament programme
fell short of the #0al this year b
almost ten per cent. of the
duled amount, He told the
of Common

House
that the original pro-

ramumne scheduled for thre: years |
ao certainly take more thant
Churchill ran into a flurry of
ihestions on how far the rearma-
ment programme ig be hind and
how long it would now take, “J
cannot give an exact figure, but
present indications are that ex-

penditure will fall short by about
1,200. million poundy,”’ ¥
aabeue Mmomber George Chet-

yrd, asked if this meant that the
programme would take four or
five years. “Tt certainly will take
longer than three years,”’ Chureh-
ilk replied

—ULP,



Nc
Mass Murderer
Now On Tri
ow On Trial
POITIERS, France, Feb 20
A jovial fifty
Widow went on trial
as A mass murderey ace used 0
killing two husband , ber owr
mother and father and eight othe
relatives and friends in the past 2{
years,
If found guilty Mme Maric
Besnard can be sentenc¢ d to deat}
mn the guillotine Besnard i
charged with feeding lethal dose
of arsenic to 12 persons betwer
192 nd 1949 in a plot to inheri
money and property valued at ten
million franes, Detained on sus
picion of murder 80 months ago
Mme. Besnard denied any guil
" police exhumed body afte
body and tested them for arsenic
fhe police became suspicious afte:
the woman's second husband, Leor
| Besnard died in October 1947. His
| body was exhumed two years later
and 19 milligrams of arsenic were

four-year-olc
for her life








| found Exhumation of all her

Jother deceased relatives and close

jfriends followed, Police said eact
jeath brought Mme Besnard closer
o the fortune

| -—U,P

|

|

|

!

Deportation
Commences

NEW YORK,
Shaughnes
the
Vaturalization
m Wednesday
t

Feb, 20

District
Immigration’ anc
Service announced
that two mass de
movement the larges
memory, Will remove
150 aliens, mostly shir
and stowaways, to. the
Far East and Southerr

Edward
Director

of

portation

1 recent
than
jumpers
Near and
Europe.

A chartered plane will leave
New York for San Francisco to-
ight with 47 Pakistanis, They will
be placed uboard the S.S. Presi-
lent Wilson bound for
and shipment by plane
homeland

|
|
|
|

nore

to their







troops from the Suez Canal Zone} On Saturday 108 or more alien
and unity of Egypt with the Su-] will be placed aboard SS. Vul-
dan under the Egyptian Crown ania

While Abdul Fattah Amr Pasha Shaughnessy said 108 alic hac
Egypt’s Ambassador to Britain,| already been processed for depor-
seemed to succeed in his mission}tation but the number probabl
to London to prepare the stage for} would be inereased before sailing
the resumption of Anglo-Egyptier Of this group 59 are be ing,
negotiations, Premier Amr Pasha] ported to Italy 26 to Greece, 13
in Cairo emphasized that such] Portugal, four to Turke , tt re
negotiations if held would be ur-] Jordan and one each to A
‘gent and very speedy.—-U.P. Yemen and Egypt —t
from four drifting sections Six timated time of art

listed are dead and eight ar« rough se? Three

ting and presumed dead. ued fro th po \ ce : er

Eighteen of 25 men re sabi atandindg by at the yy

last night were due in Boston this other fou ere taken off t
morning aboard the Coast Guar ectior e For lere

cutter Acushnet The cutter had on board ‘ er Y

been due to reach port 7 a.m ¢

t had rev € (cP

North
sided to light contact between |
)

|
|
|



Hong Kong



res.

WT



PRICE : FIVE CENTS



House Pass $3,500
For Agricultural
Development

Mr. W. A, Crawford (C)

called upon the Government

to consider subsidising animal feed with a view to milk
being sold at a lower price and Mr. O. T. Allder (I) eriti-

cised Government for failin

g to make people werk land

which they kept under bush, when the House were dis-
cussing a Resolution for $3,500 to be voted for Agrieultural

development.

8th Army
Beat Reds’
In The Air

IGHTH ARMY HEADQUAR-
rERS, Korea, Feb. 20

United Nations and Communist

ghters traded light punches in

>» air and on the ground with!
gaining the edge in the air;






nd neither side winning on the
round, F86 Sabre Jets which
ive battered the Reds through: |
ut the war in the air with the
dds against them enjoyed the
are experience of jumping an
nferior force of M.1.G. 15's over
orth Korea and damaging three
ther I'wenty-six Sabre jets
inced om cight M.1LG's and in
brief 600 m.p.h, clash put holes |
three of then |

}

Subres got their chance while
lying top cover for F84 Thun-
ier jets and Meteor jets of the
\ustralian Airforce which were!

working over Communist supply |
and buildings far below |
Thunder jets blasted 32 craters |

n key rail lines between Sun-
thon nd Chonju and Pyong-
yeng, battered the Red capital o
Korea The ground wa

trols,
ving
he past

both sides apparently
satistied themselves during
two weeks
that the other

same dug in
attacks of

of heavier
army wa
positions
last week

on
the
ommunist

lich apparently were aimed at}
tin the Allied line dropped
Tuesday and Wednesday to

ry light probes which ended
the first show of determined

‘sistance

The first U.S, Marine draftees

» enter the combat zone since

i
World War II landed in the big-
‘est batch of marine replacements
*t sent to Korea. Nine hundred
i - nearly half of them
marched off
1

inves
scripts the
ansport ship General William

Wiegal at an East Korean port in
'

elow: freezing weather as the
shone brilliantly on the
now-covered ground —UP.

——

WANTED JAIL

NEW MEXICO, Feb, 20
Carlton Owen 23-y@ar-old col-
e student, refused to accept the
irected verdict of acquittal on a
raft law violation charge and in-

isted that he should go to jail
he jury in the court of the Fed-
ral District, Judge Hatch obliged
e defendant, After deba\Ving ter

iinutes they found him guilty
Owen volunteered to serve a:
government witness against him

lf after government failed tc
yresent sufficient evidence to con-
viet him.
—U.P.



The Resolution was eventually

| Resolution

j the

Ritter, “My.

Replying to Mr,
G. H. Adams said that he should
refrain from making such wild

tatements in the face of such a
fact as Jamaica sending a delega-
tion to Barbados to stady Barba-
dos’ method of utilizing all its
land.

The Addendum to the Resolu-
tion states that as a result of the
recent ineredse in the of
livestock feed, a further amount
will be required to meet expendi-
ture at the Central Livestock Sta-
tion and the District Agricultural
Stations for the remainder of the
financial year. A large part of
this increase will however be offset
by additional revenue which will
be received from the increase in
ihe selling price of milk

No Optimism

Leading off the debate on .
Bill, Mr Crawford Said he aia
share the easy optimism in
the Addendum and held by the
Senior Member for St, Joseph, Ex-
perience was that since the new
nerease in the price of animal
eed and milk, sales of milk had

‘len off considerably.
He’ believed that. the Govern-
ment would also find—or perhaps
had already discovered—that there

| Was no additional revenue to off

el the new increase
was being sold

‘It is a very
ifiairs,” he said
cumstances which

because less

serious state of
“Since the eir-
gave rise to the
there has been.a fur-
ther increase in the price ot feed.
When this Resolution was under
consideration, feed was soniething
like $64 a bag and gow Mt is
$74

“T understand that the Dairy
Association is now discussing with
appropriate authorities the
question of a further increase of
milk in order to offset «this increase in the price of feed”.

He said that it was understood
generally in the Dairy Industry
that in order to profit, milk would
have to be sold at 18 cents per
pint.

With the present price of milk,
it was beyond the reach of a large
number of working class people.
tt was therefore a matter which
the Government should take very
seriously.

Vital Articles Of Diet

“We have got to bear in mind,”
he said, “that milk is a vital
irticle of diet for everybody and
that any further increase in its
price must place it beyond the
reach of all but those of very high
incomes.

“Tt therefore appears to mé that
yovernment will have to recon-
ider the question of subsidising
he animal feed.”

He said that when that item was
“ontrolled and subsidised, it was
sold at less than $4.50 a bag and
it present it was being sold at $74
1 bag

The big dairy producers could not
be blamed if they atternpted to re-
oup the rising cost of production,
but the Government held a duty
to the community to see to it that
an articlé like milk could come
within the reach of the average
working man or woman,

@ On page 5

DELICIOUS!
NUTRITIOUS!

KEEP HEALTHY AND STRONG

Ansist on the

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PAGE TWO

ae

BARBADOS



ADY RECKITT was an in-
transit passenger throug!
Barbados yesterday making the
una trip cruise from Southamp-
von by the Colombie.

She met at the Baggagt
W srehouse yesterday by Mr. Victox
Marson and Mrs. Roy Wilson.

Lady Reckitt was a regular vis-
itor to Barbados in the ’30’s when
she visited here with her former

isband the late Col. A. C. Bishop.

> fast here about 14 years?



was

ago.
Sea And Air
ASSENGERS left Barbados by
sea and air yesterday to spend
Carnival in Trinidad Leaving by
the Colombie were Mrs.
Knight, Miss Barbara Malcolm,
Mrs. Cameron Stuart, Mr. John D
3 Leaving by B.W.ILA.,
were Mr. Colin Weekes of H.M
Customs, Miss Joan Drayton,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. M.
Drayton of Golf Club Road, Rock.
ley, Mrs. Maurice Armstrong and
her daughter Joyce of Chapel, St.
Philip.



Private Party

J T seems I got my facts mixed

yesterday, The party at the
Y.M.P.C., on’ Saturday February
23, is a private party (Charity
Costume Fete) organised by a
committee of Ladies and is not
the usual Carnival Show organ-
ised by the Y.M.P.C,

For Pharmacists Dinner
ISS SYBIL BARROW, B.Sc.,

and Pharmacist of Syden-
ham and Cumberland Hospital,
U.S.A. left yesterday by the

Colombie for Trinidad where she
will attend Carnival and _ the
Trinidad Pharmacists Dinner.

A sister of Mr. E. W. Barrow,
B.Se., M.C.P., Miss Barrow is
now on holiday from her duties
at the hospital. She came here
three weeks ago from Trinidad
and will be returning to the island
before going on to the Virgin
Islinds and Jamaica to spend the
remainder of her holiday.

Vernon *



AMONG the round-trip passengers intransit through Barbados yesterday on the “Colombie” was Lady
Reckitt (centre) who was met at the Baggage Warehouse by Mr. Victor Marson and Mrs, Roy Wilson.

Lady Reckitt and her former husband the late Gol. A. Cc. Bishop were frequent visitors to Barba-
dos in the '30s. She was last here about 14 years ago.

Main Item

AIN item on the programme
of the show organised by
Number Six Club of the Girls’
Industrial Union on ‘Saturday
February 23 is the fashion parade
which will take place before the
dance, Among the artistes in the
show are Miss Nell Hall ang Mr.
Joseph “Oscar” Tudor and Rev.
St. Clair Tudor, Mr, Keith Camp-
bell and his Society Five will
supply the music.
The show begins at 8.30 o’clock.



VISCOUNT

HYNDLEY

LEAVES BARBADOS

VISCOUNT HYNDLEY, G.B.E.,
of Meads and his elder daughter
Hon. Elizabeth C. Hindley who
have been holidaying in Barbados
since November 21st, 1951, staying
at the Colony Club and “Beach-
dands”, St. James, are due to leave
Barbados for New York by the
Mauretania when she calls here
next week.

Viscount Hyndley told the Ad-
vocate yesterday that he has en-
joyed his stay very much and he
is feeling a “dffferent person”. He
greatly ‘appreciates the kindness
and hospitality that he has re-
eeived during his visit.

“I was honoured,” he continued,
“by being invited to the opening
of the Legislative Session by His
Excellency the Governor. It was
a most interesting ceremony and |
shall be interested to hear what is
the outcome of the suggestion
that Barbados should have a Deep
Water Harbour,”

“Barbados seems to have all the
facilities for such a development
Surely this attractive and import-
an! island should have as good a
harbour-as any is'and in the West
Indies. If Barbados wants to en-
courage visitors I venture to sug-
gest the ‘ransport arrangements to
and from the island want looking
iftto.”

“T havé been much impressed by
what I have seen of the Police
Force and those who heard their
band and the organist of the
Cathedral play the Funeral March
in Saul at the Memorial Service
for His late Majesty King George
VI will not forget it.”



“I was delighted to have been
taken over the Bulkeley Sugar
Factory and was most interested
in the plant.”

Viscount Hyndley also spoke of
enjoying an afternoon watching
Barbados play Jamaica at cricket

I was very glad to have this op-
portunity as I have followed the
advancement of West Indian
Cricket for many years

Touching Lriefly on Barbados
beaches, he said he thought they
were delightful and hoped that
they would not be spoilt by glass

old tins and the like being left
about.
Viscount Hyndley ended by

saying, “I very much hope I shall
be able to pay another visit to this
charming island and with that hope
I bid it au revoir and best wishes.”

Viscount Hyndley was born in
October, 1883 and is the son of the
late Rev. Wm. Talbot Hindley
M.A., of Eastbourne He was



ucated at Weymouth College.

Married in 1909, he has two
daughters. He wag a member of
the Coal Controller's Export Ad-
visory Committee from 1917-1918
Commercial Adviser, Mines De-
artment from 1918 to 1938 and
again from 1939-1942, From 1942-
43 he was Contreller General of
the Ministry gf Fuel and Power
ind from 1931-1946 he was also
Managing Director and Chairman
to several English industrial com-
panies. His home in England is in
Chelsea Square,



Women in the News—1.



Ifon. Mrs. M.E. Hanschell Vi.B.E., MLL.C

THIRTY

years ago,

" pioneers started
ment of Child Welfare and within that period it has blos-!
somed out into a healthy s

a small

cial service with Government

taking the lead in establishing an official department,

Hon, Mrs. M. E. Hanschell,
M.B.E., along with the late Mrs.
Florence . Brown, started what
was then known as the Baby
League at Eagle Hall in 1921. Mrs,

Brown who was the wife of a
Medical Officer with extensive
practice, saw at first hand the

difficulty of expectant
and their children, . . . because of
the lack of pre-natal treatment
Because of this she dedicated not
only the remainder of her life
but also part of her slender
means to the relief of the suffer-
ing of those who were then
regarded as the “lesser breeds
without the law”

Mrs, Brown gave up her house
to the use of expectant mothers
who received treatment and later
her son gave a spot of land in
memory of the work his mother
had previously rendered. Together
with her husband’s help and that
of a few doctors, corrective
treatment was rendered in Mrs.
Hanschell’s garage which she
kindly offered as the room for
consultants, Pre-na al treatment
proved beneficial not only to
mothers who enjoyed better
health but also to the new born
baby which ‘was spared much
suffering at a later date,

Mrs. Hanschell also took an
active part in the Women’s
Social Welfare League of which

mothers





BEACH
LADIES TOILET

LADIES BRUSHI

Dial 4220

MEN S BRUSHES

President, At
were no Social
nor government
life of the

she was
there

Officers
and the

that

grants
League

depended solely on the voluntary |

aid rendered. After a
several years when the
the work lessened it
tated.

Not only did

lapse of
scope of
was resusi-

Mrs. Hanschell
served in organisations for ren-
dering help to the suffering of
the island, but also those visiting

the island. The Navy Welfare |
League of which she was Presi-|
dent offered assistance to men of
the Merchant Navy and Warrant!
Officers which would enable |

them to attend functions as they
sired, and also visit places: of



interest

with companions who
gave picnics, dances etc,
In 1949 at the instance of Sir

Hiliary Blood, the then Governor,
Mrs. Hanschell became the first
lady member of the Legislative
Council in which she always took

a quiet interest, |

Owing to pressure of time she
has resigned from the posts which
she once held but yet her inter-
est in Social Welfare is as keen
as it was in the past. She
expresses the wish that there
will one day be Baby Leagues
in all the parishes of the island!
and also Clinics to prescribe
medicine for the sick and infirm.

JUST ARRIVED
MEN & LADIES DRESSING TABLE SETS

PACKS ...
BRUSHES




ALSO A NICE ASSORTMENT OF PHOTO FRAMES.



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIFLDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

vocete
Guiana by the
Davidson.

his paper and at
the same

vices as

ish Guiana
natural harbour should bring him

town.

move-

time |
Welfare |

| it.



Intransit

NTRANSIT on the
from

Busman’s Holiday

R. H. O. HUSBANDS of the
Reportorial Staff of the Ad-
leaves today for British
Schooner Philip

England on_ his
back to Trinidad
Russell Barrow, son of
Barrow of Miller’s
Mr, Husbands

wil spend dent of Queen’s Royal College.
about a_ fort He was accompanied by his wife
night in British and infant daughter,

Guiana where Dr. Barrow, a cousin of Mr.
he will gather Johnny Brathwaite, a former
logal stories for Island Scholar who is now a

time nando, qualified in

get experience King’s College, London Univer-
in the methods sity. He is expected to take up
of intercolonial an appointment with the Trini-
Shipping ser- dad Government.

sup-







plied by schoon- 2 Back To Trinidad

ers.

He is the RR STURNING to Trinidad yes-
Shipping Re- terday afternoon by the
porter of the 4. 0. Husbands French §S Colombie was Miss
Advocate and go his visit to Brit- Olive Edwards, Registrar and

Where there is a

experience in order to be able to spent two weeks’ holiday here
make comparisons with Bridge- staying with Mr. and Mrs. Josh

Punch Worked Black Magic
—He Made a Regular Train Out of a Toy One—

By MAX TRELL

“L WISH,” Knarf, the Shadow,
was saying to his sister Hanid,
“that this little toy train was a real
BIG train, I mean, as big as a regu-
lar train. And I wish the tracks
were as big as regular tracks, And
[| wish this whole room was as big
as a regular railroad station.”

“So do I,” agreed Hanid. “But
wishing isn’t going to do any good.”

At this Mr. Punch, who was sit-
ting in his rocking-chair on the
other side of the room, said in a loud
voice: “Now this won’t be any
trouble at all, my dears. Just let
me look .p what to do in my Book
of Magic.”

Toy Train

“You think we ean make the toy
train as big as a regular train!”
cried Knarf,

Mr. Punch had already found the
page he wanted in the Book of
Magic. “Ah, here we are! Just do
what ft says.”

Knarf looked at the page and
read aloud:

If you want your train to be

As BIG as any train can be,

Shut your eyes and turn about

Then take a breath and PUFF

IT OUT! Into the Train

Knarf did this. And the instant | And then, just as they were about
he puffed out his breath, there was | to get into the train, alas, every-
an enormous loud puff from the lo- thing suddenly got dark.
comotive of the little train. There And when the lights went up
Was a great clanging of a bell, and | again Knarf and Hanid saw they



Punch consulted his magic book.

“Come on! Let’s go, Hanid! This
is wonderful!”

“Yes, yes!” cried Hani’ as ex-
cited as she could possibly be.

They both ran over to the train
as fast as they could, for it seemed
about to start. It was puffing and
steaming harder than ever. The
whistle was tooting.

} wheels were turning, and someone | were sitting on top of the tiny toy

Was shouting, All aboard! Knarf
opened his eyes and to his astonish- station were gone,
ment he saw that the whole room Mr, Punch was sitting in the
had become a railroad station, with | rocking-chair on the other side of
people running to and fro with va- | the room, He was smiling. “I forgot
lises and trunks. And there, on the | to tel! you,” he said, “that the magic
tracks Was the toy train, but so big | only lasts for five minutes.”
now that Knarf hardly recognized | Knarf and Hanid picked them
: j Selves up sadly. How wonderful! it
“All aboard!” tne conductor kept | would have been, they thought, to
houting. “All aboard for Chicago,|go to Chicago, China,* Cons
China, Constantinople and Califor- nople and California, But that wes
nia!’ the trouble with magic. It nevez
Knarf seized Hanid by the hand. | l:usted long enourh

Rupert and the Pine Ogre—3.

tee al ay
48 eS

train again, The people and the

See



Rupert still can’t understand the
full meaning of the message, but the

ippened a tew days ago and it’s
e Ogre's doing. Now that we




Autumn Elf leaps away in the “20W Ais slaves are nathe ing there
Breatest of glee ‘* Come, I'll show mr —. ay ae 7 ; hack

. we ry them and we'll whac
you,” he cries Pointing to where a them. Despite all their wicked way
large oak stands black and dead and = Nurwood fore@ shall not become a
Stripped of its leaves. me

* That only



er eee Be ee

oe PLAZA





HELDORADO

Titel 4006 {Rte

Colombie
way
was Dr. W.
Mr. N.
Stores Ltd.,
Port-of-Spain and a former stu-

practising Barrister in San Fer-
Medicine at

Teacher of the Caribbean Train-
ing College at Maracas. She had

ee a nee
=Q¢645->

x +c

- sy a

Sms:

ae





t



ADVOCATE



Called On Governor |

Me I B. NEVILL, O.B.E.,
F.C.A., Headquarters Com-
missioner for Grants and leader
#~ the U.K. Boy Scouts’ contin-
gent ho passed through Barba-

dos yesterday, paid a call on His
Excellency the Governor at Gov-
ernment House yesterday morn-
ing. He was accompanied by
Major J. E. Griffith, Island Scout
Commissioner.

Short Holiday

Miss SHEILA LEWIS, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. M. C
Lewis of “Hughenden” Barbaree:
was among the passengers arriv-
ing by T.C.A. yesterday morning
from Montreal. She is down tc
Bpemd a short holiday with her
family,

Sheila went up to Canada ir
early June 1951 with her sister
Joan and she is now with T.C.A
in Montreal.

Directors Meeting
I ON. H. A. CUKE, C.B.E., left
yesterday for Trinidad by
B.W.I.A. to attend a meeting Of
the Board of Directors of B.W.LA.
of which he is a member.

Talking Point

People should be a good deal
dle in youth,
. —Stevenson.

B.B.C. Radio Programme

URSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952
15 a.m. Newton Goodson, 11.30 a.m



Crazy People, 12 (noon) The News, 12.10
~ pm, News Analysis

4007.15 pum.

4'p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily

Serv'ce

4.15 p.m. Rhythm is their
Business, 4.45 p.m Sporting Record,
5 p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m

New Records, 6 p.m
Orchestra, 6.15 p.m
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-
framme Parade, 7 p.m, The News, 7. 1(
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. We see
Britain, 7.30 p.m. The Small Geography
of a Youngish Writer,

745--10.30 p.m. .

Southern Serenade

SL32M 48.43M





7.45 p.m. Crazy People, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsree!, 8.30 p.m. Special Dispatch
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week, 9 pon
Ring up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15
p.m. A Good Job, 10.30 p.m. The Last

Chronicle of Barset





HATSMANSHIP
CHURCHILL LEAVES.
echoes continue, A New



in the Press:
you applaud his

tation it is

courage to

CRASSWNDNH



Across
1. In case a trance is remaae. (8)
8 Wood you may jong for (4)
Â¥. Number one. (3)
11, Cushion of sorts. (3)
13. To Ted just deserted. (3)
14 Piece of {and more than a litt ‘
intended, too. (9)
15. 1 pose to sectire {t (5)
20, It should be binding (3)

21. She's somebody's daughter, (
22. No royal kilitng, this (3)
2%. Called black by the pot. (6)
25. Basement. (4)

26. Hold up to ridicule (3)

Down

1. One vehicle then another (7)
2. Reputed cause of unemploy-
ment among doctors. (5)
3. Do tron here for Dreference, (6)
4. Lines sent for watchers. (y}
5. A side with this spirit. it's ai)
for the good. (4)
&. Nora’s favourite colour + (4)
7. You must do this to 17 (6)
10 Saluting or crying? (8)
12 High as a mountain (3)
16. Guide for cattle. (5)
17. Introduced after purchase (4)
'8. Ripe change in water. (4)
jg May be heid on an 18 (4)
2% The Last Minstre! has one (3)

Solution of yesterday's puze
Tortoise; 7. Rapid: 10.
12. Ant; 13. Bstabiist

20. “Latr: 2



Across:
ch



Sena; 27
2 Oasis ara In

6 Brothers 8 Peat: 4
Blind: 15. Land: 17
Wire: 21 Ran 25 ‘Pir- 24 Bat

PLAZA

B° TOWN (pia 2310)

eno

e

LOU BUNIN'S ;
magical merger __j
of live action ©
and puppetry! ©




FRIDAY — 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
and continuing to MONDAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

also the COLOR SHORT —
“FESTIVAL OF LONDON”









i DIAL 2310
)
B TODAY only! 4.30 & 8.30 pm. RKO Radio Double! 2
R Walt Disney's
YY ” oo 7
from S34 togeay ||| 1 (TREASURE ISLAND" & “The SET UP" | 4
Ry hee RS by Hao $ 3.08 { D Color by Technicolor with ROBERT RYAN R
Sy Me ae hale -a te be $ 1.92 i Bobby O'DRISCOLL— Robert NFWTON others B
2S Sit 88 Bh a hes } G TO-DAY’S SPECIAL 1.30 pi A
5 dese Ned ess He 5e. .
E HIDDEN CITY & SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE
} Bomba The Jungle Boy TEX RITTER R
{ Sat. Special 9.30 a.m.—1.30 p.m Midnite Sat. 23rd E
0 ‘ ae bra BONANZA TOWN (New)
} ROY ROGERS DOUBLE Charles STARETT & E
x Ww MAN FROM MUSIC MOUNTAIN | Smiley BURNETT &
i) THE ANKANS Ss



with Th: Hoc





| THE CHANGES to

Concert programmes wili begin

and on the



25.338M 41 22M

Scottish Magazine,

but the
York
hatter takes a big advertisement
“Whether or not
statesmanship,
you must admire his hatsmanship,
In an age of increasing regimen-j;
heartening to see a
man with individuality and the
express it. We re-
Spectfully lift our hat to a great
Williams of Brighton, Black Rock, hatsman.” f



| the King's Counsel whe
Queen's Counsel are two lir



| New pillar bores ana mai

| will be stamped with the initials |
CER

iniaisuinastionsnasiainsinguendebeemshdiitiniuligilinalnasd

MARCHIONESS LAS SALI
has been given authority to sell
her title to “any well-to-do man}
{or-woman of genteel birth.”



















LIKE ripples in a pona when the

centre is disturbed, the effects of the King’s death
spread out into the everydey
life of the people

be made
remind us at how many points
the mark of monarchs touches
our — lives Here -in the
Queen's English—are familia
examples :-—

with “ God Save The Queen

board outside the
cinema

COME FILL THE ,CUP

James, Gacney -&
yew) vai)

New coins will have a new hee

facing right. the first feacin
righ’ since King Edward V1/
for no coins were issued for

Edward Vill

) King ed King Vann of boric the ualy

T Pre

} ‘THE

| KING'S REGULATION:

\ FOR THE ARMY AND THE
ARMY RESERVE

}



The Army wili
of the Queen



4 :
Mateo
stamps will be re

head al|

Postage
designed to show the
the Queen



The Food Ministry actea s
“On Her Majesty s Service

lt is “Her Matesty’s Gover*
ment” nou and prtsone:
will be detained during H

Majesty's pleasure. And umo

becom



KC.s who were origine

created Q.C.s—in Victorias day

They are Viscount Cecil (1899

and Mr. Nathaniel Micklem |
(1900)





|
vans |



|
THE KING



Proposed by: THe Presinent

Toastmasters must
Loyal Tost

And even the parents of new-born |
|

call @ new

babes—if they are triplets—can
apply for a £3
Bounty.” .. .

“ Queen's



London Express Service |



TITLE FOR SALE

DO you want to buy a 300-

year-old Spanish title?



In Madrid _ 21-year-ok



“I have a secretary’s
I feel the title isn’t

proper.”’



EMPIRE

OPENING TO-MORROW at
2.30 & 8.30 and continuing

Daily 4.45 & 8.30

introducing

SALLY PARR «PHILIP SHAWN





DIAL 5170

GRAND OPENING

Sat. March Ist
BARBAREES
PLAZA

WARNER BROS. HAPPY MUSICAL

with

On Moonlight Bay
DORIS DAY-GORDON MacRAE

ind the New Singing Sensation
JACK SMITH







HAMPSTEAD

w'-
m.&-
GLO
FOR CLASSY ENTERTAINMENT

5 & 8.30 AND CONTINUING TO SUNDAY

*
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eee ee ee OO OO

Sat. 1.30 p.m
Six Gun Mésa

kell aa BSS

THURSDAY,






WITH





BE. 1s07yY SALON

(Just Opened)
Corner Pr. Wm. Henry and Swan Sts.

THE BUDGET

Cold Waves
Machine
Machineless

Toni professionall
done... +

FEBRUARY 21, 1952










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$8.00
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TO-DAY







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A NEW FILM WITH AN OLD FAVOURITE

MONDAY FEB 25TH, TUES 26TH 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

“ROAD HOUSE”

Richard WIDMARK, Cornel WILDE and Ida LUPINO

And

“CAUSE FOR ALARM”

eee





ROODAL THEATRES



EMPIRE

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.45 & 8.30
Jose FERRER
ACADEMY AWARD
Winner In

STANLEY KRAMER'S
Producjion

CYRANO
DE BERGERAC
Extra; LATEST NEWSREEL
———————
Opening To-morrow 2.30 & 8.30

“THE SUN SET AT DAWN”

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 & 8.15





Bing CROSBY—Bob HOPE in
“ROAD TO RIO”
and Alan LADD in
“WHISPERING SMITH”
Opening ‘To-morrow 4.90 & 8.15
“HURRICANE ISLAND”
and
“COCKEYED WONDER”









DIAL 8404

(only) 4.45
8.30 p.m

TO-DAY

Lili PARMER &

HOUSE OF
& FRANKENSTEIN

0
I BEWARE OF PITY
Ss

Bors Kar'off

r
Fri, & Sat
I HOMICIDE
Robert Douglas &
N

BRIGHT LEAF
Gary Cooper



“Alias

‘The _Pratr‘e” The Kid”

Lon Chane

4.45 & 8.39 7

Midnite Sat
“Conquest of
and Cheyenne”

Sundown On Billy

ROXY

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 & 8.15

TRAPPED BY BOSTON
BLACKIE

and

TO THE END OF THE
EARTH

with William POWELL



Opening To-morrow 4.30 & 8.15

DESTINATION MOON.

ROYAL

TO-DAY LAST TWO SHOWS
4.30 & 8.15

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL
“UNDERSEA KINGDOM”

with Ray “Crash’’ CORRIGAN
Ward Thrills:
BLAZING ACTION

TO-MORROW only 4.30 & 8.15
TRAPPED BY BOSTON
BLACKIE.

and

TO THE END OF THE
EARTH.





Ee



GAIETY
The Garden—St. James

TO-DAY 8.30 p.m.

DEAR MURDERER

Eric PORTMAN &
SNOW BOUND

Robert NEWTON

os aedsthiteidamaiamapipesiannenlite

Friday & Sat. 8.30 p.m

BRIDE FOR SALE
tette Colbert—George Brent &
TREASURE ISLAND

Bobtyy O'DRISCOLL

(Color

——$———

Midnite Sat
Rockey" LANE Double!
SHERIFF OF WICHITA &
SUNDOWN IN_SANTA FE

SS

|





(Loretta Young)










THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952

US. Proposed

Objection Made In House To
Limiting W.I. Quota To 100

AN ADDRESS resenting the proposed discrimination
against West Indians entering the United States of Amer-
ica, and limiting the quota to 100 in any one year was pass-
ed by the House of Assembly at their meeting on Tuesday

night.

The Address was introduced by Mr. Ronald Mapp, and
members expressed apprehension at the grave effect which
such legislation would have on the economy of the West

Indies.

It was given an unanimous vote.

The Address

will be presented’ to the Governor for transmission to the
appropriate authorities in the U.S.A.

Later the House on a motion by
Mr. W. A, Crawford also passed
a complimentary Address express-
ing their appreciation to Senator
Clayton Powell jnr., and the West
Indian Committee who first initi-
ated protests against the Bill.

The Address protesting the dis-
crimination read:

The House have learnt with pro-
found alarm that there is betore
the Congress of the United States
of America a Bill known as the
“McCarran Bill,” having for its
object the limitation of emigrants
into the United States of Americu
from each West Indian island to
100 per annum.

Discriminavion

The House reset Wie proposes
GischifMinawon against wes. iin
Giaus Cspecially ay UNS Lime when
iS €Ss€nuial Wat tne people of
the pritish Commuoniweaiui
me United Siates Of America
should be drawn vogether in
IrienGship and neignbouriiness,

It thereiure respectiully requests
Your Excellency to have its teel-
ings in this matter made known to
Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary
of State for the Colones, tne
Presiaent of the United States, the
State Department of the Unitea
States and the pritish Ambassador
at Washington.

The complimentary Address for
transmission to the West Indian
Committee and Senator Powell
read:—

The House of Assembly de-
sires to place on record its ap-
preciation of the efforts being
made by U.S. Congressman
Adam Clayton-Powell jnr., and
his “Committee to act against
the McCarran Bill,” and re-
spectfully requests

ab

alu

ed threugh the usual channels
to Congressman Powell and his
committee, an expresssion of
itg heart-felt gratitude for their
valiont endeavours on behalf of
our people.

The House requests that Your
Excellency also ferward to Con-
gressman Powell and the Com-
mittee, a copy of the Address
which was passed this day in
connection with this matter.

Facts Well Known
Mr, R. G. Mapp, (L) in moving
the passing of (ne Address said he
did not intend to take up much
time, because the facts were well
known tO inembers. It would be
remembered that in 1949, that
House passed an Address against
a similar Bill which was at that
time known as the “Judd Bill”,
and which had been introduced in

the United States Congress.
Recently another Bill was in-
troduced into ihe Judicial Com-
mittee—it had not yet reached the

Congress. — by Sena McCarran,
and sought to limit the number
pt West Indians going to the

United States for permanent resi-
dence, to 100 per year from each
of the colonies,

The present position was that
West Indians were allowed to en-
ter the United States on the quota
given to Great Britain. There was
no limit such as that proposed by
the Senator McCarran Bill. If the
proposed Bill was passed, one
could well see that West Indians
would be discriminated against,
because no other territory was
jimited in such a manner so far as
immigration into the United Siates
was concerned,

West Indians in the United
States were alarmed by the Bill,
and were taking steps against it.
He felt that Barbados, not only on
behalf of Barbadians, but because
of the interest taken by West In-
dians in the United States, should
join them in their efforts to fight
the Bill.

He did not need to remind the
honourable House of the contribu-
tion which West Indians made and
are making to the United States
by way of their economic and cul-
tural standards, as well as in de-
tence.

It was a known fact that West
(ndians \ dominated the Harlem
area of New York, and their con-
tribution to American society and
thought was acknowledged

Borbados itself had
been invited through its legisla-
ture to join in promoting mutual
security between the West Indian
areas and America. Ar as
known there was also : 2
recently inviting them ‘o agree in
the extension of the provisions of
# new note passed hetween the
United Kingdom Government and

“ote,
LEELA SE ELSE EE

WORLD'S

egg ny

recently








wi
=

eS






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MR. R. G. MAPP

the United Stays Government on
the question of Economic Co-op-
erauon,

Reply Postponed

The House quite righlly pdst-
poned their Reply to His Excei-
iency because they wanted to
Know to what extent they were
committing themeelves, and to
What extent the West Inuians
would beneiit by signing that new
note, or to what extent they would
have to enter in the military de-
fence, or signing away bases, by
Signing the notes in the argument.
They had to consider that the
United States and the United
Kingdom Government had to pro-
vide for the rigid security of the
expect-
-d to join in defence efforts of the
Free World and were expected
to take all measures to defend
democracy and freedom against
Communiem and the other “isms”
which threaten to over-run the
Western world,

If they were to do that it was
only fair and just that they
should ask the United States
Government to tell Senator Mc
Carran that it is impossible to
expect the United States Gov-
ernment to discriminate against
immigrants from the West
Indies,

It was not too much to ask that
goodwill should continue to exist
between the two worlds, and that
anything which would bring dis-
ress and disharmony between the
“wo areas should not be har-
boured. Such could only result in
the lack of goodwill, further in-
security, and would not at all have
the desired effect of spreading the
ideas of democracy and freedom,
and strengthening the security of
the Free World.

Sore Point

He thought that they wouid ali
agree that one of the sore points
was that West Indians were not
allowed to emigrate and settle,
even in the countries of the Com-
monwealth. Although taey

were
all members of a distinguished,
and were unde one crown and

Queen, they were limited to their
little corner of the earth, and were
not permitted to settle in those
territories which compose the
Commonwealth,

When he started out in that
vein, he was pointing out that
emigration was such a sore point,
that the matter of discriminating
was taken up by a West Indian
Conference which passed a Reso-
lution condemning any discrim-
ination against peoples of this
area, and asking the member Gov-
ernments of the Caribbean Com-
mission to admit members of the
West Indian area to their territo-
ries.

He did not know whether the
United States had taken note of
that Resolution which had been
passed by the West Indian Confer-
ence, but if it had not, it was time
that it did, because, although they
uld emigrate workers to the
United States under contract he
felt that it was very important to
fight a Bill of such a nature, it
being quite obvious that if
could get persons settled nerma-
nently it was to much greater ben-
efit to the people of these islands
than having some go abroad and
worl: for 9 couple months

Thin Edee OF The Wedge

The introduction of that Pil
micht inet be the thin edge of the
wedge: they saving, “we limit you
fo 190 now.” but later on they

IRAGTC

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might reduce the number to 50.
It had been pointed out to him
that at present the feeling was that
the Bill limited the number to
100 from the entire area, and that
it was doubtful whether 100 peo-
ple went from Barbados to settle
in the United States in anyone
year. Although they did not have
100 going how, one could not fore-
s€e where a Bill of that nature
would end up. Even if they did
not have 100, the time might
come, Mevertheless, when more
than 100 people night want to
leave these colonies to settle in
that country. If the Bill was
passed, no more than 100 persons
bern in Barbados could settle in
the United States in any one year.
That was discrimination
against West Indians, because
people born in any other areas
were not limited. The Bill, if
passed, could have a very dire
effect om intended emigration
from the West Indies.

He did not think he could say
more against the Bill, but he felt
that the sentimerits which they
expressed that night. and which
were along the sathe lines ac those
expressed by a previous House
two years ago against the some-
what like Judd Bill, would serve
as a reminder to the United St»tes
Government.

Seconding the motion for the
passing of the Address, Mr. W. A.
Crawford (C) said he was sorry
that the controversy had arisen
of whether the limitstion to 100
applied to the entire area or each
individual colony. He did not think
that the honourable member war

correct, The source from which
he quoted the number 100 was
wrong,

From the information at his dis-
posal he believed that although
the reading itself said no more
than 100 persons born in any one
colony or area, in this particular
case, the West Indies were con-
sidered an area.

Cause For Alarm

The mater did give cause for
alarm. in 1948, for instance, tne
year beiore the “Judd Bill’ was
introduced, the number ol West
indians going into New York City
alone was 6,932, and in a 25 yeur
period—1923 to 1948, over 8U,u0U
West Indians were allowed to
settle permanently in the United
States of America.

One could therefore see that if
emigration was not limited to 100
a year, precisely what it would
mean. What alarmed him was
the fact that the proposed amend-
ment was supposed to have been
drafted by the American State De-
partment itself. It seemed to be a
direct action on the part of the
United States Government, and
not some action on the part of
the individual Senator to try to
puSh this discriminatory legisla-
tion through.

Under the existing arrange-
ments, West Indians were allow-
ed to go in under the quota charg-
able to the United Kingdom, and
that was over 60,000 a year so
long as they satisfied the Health
and Public Character provisions
of the Act. .

They did not need to go into
any da@tailed discussion on the
contribution made by West In-
dians in America, but it was dif-
ficult not to agree with the con-
tention advanced by the mover of
the Resolution. They had no ef-
fective means of retaliation at
the moment because they were not!
politically independent,

The Address was expressing
grave apprehension over the mat-
ter and was requesting Her Majes-
ty’s Principal Secretary of State
for the Colonies to make repre-
sentation to the appropriate au-
thority in Washington. He wanted |
to suggest that a paragraph be ad-
ded, placing on record the appre-
ciation of the colony, as a British |
West Indian colony, of the part
played by at least one American |
Congressman and the West Indian
Committee in the United States

Another Address }

Accepting a suggestion from Mr.
G. H. Adams that a separate Ad-
dress, complementary to the one
moved by Mr. Mapp, should do for
that purpose, Mr. Crawford said
that when the debate was finished,
he would move the passing of
another address to be sent to the
appropriate persons through the
Secretary of State for the Colon- |
ies.

He did not think that there was
much more that could be said on
the matter, and he therefore beg-
ged to support the motion for the
passing of the Address which he
hoped would have been passed
unanimously, because he knew
that.sction of the sort would as-
sist those West Indians who were
fighting the issue in the United
States itself.

Mr. C. E. Talma also supported
the Address. He said that on a!
matter of such grave importance
he certainly would have liked tr
make his slight contribution, be-
cause he knew thot if a Bill of
that nature was successful in be-
ing passed in the United States
Congress, what a great blow
would be on the economic life of



all of the islands, and more
especially Barbados.
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BARBADOS



It was from that view that he
regarded the matter as being
urgent and very important, because

whenever one looked around in ali
of the country districts in particu-
Iar, and one happened to see any
habitabl homes or houses, straight
away, one was brought to feel &
sense of realisation that the money
was not earned in the cane fields
of Barbados but that that money
came from the same United States,
and in recent years, from places
like Aruba, Bermuda and Curacao,
etc
He was saying that the econo-
my of the island was based, to
a large extent, on money receiv -
ed here by relatives or friends
whose families were in the
United States. Although it might
look like a slight matter to some
there that night, it would affect
adversely at least 35 or 40 per
cent. of the population of the
island.

What was more, if they looked
around they would see thaf many
of their professional men had be-
come such becausé they were
granted facilities to study in the
United States.

Mr. Talma emphasised that it
was a grave and important matter
with which they were dealing. It
was quite right that in the note as
read by the senior member for St.
Thoms, no mention was made of
West Indians of colour, but any
body who faced up to such issues
and understood life would under-
stand that the object of the Bill
was to keep out negroes and not
white West Indians.

His Honour the Deputy Speaker
who was occupying the Chair at
the time wondered if the member
was right on that point, and Mr.
Talma replied that he was just
trying to say that the Bill would
operate against West Indians of
colour. Knowing the set up in Bar-
bados as he did, if the quota was
limited to 100, he was saying that
100 white Barbadioans would be
granted priority. That was how
the Bill would affect Barbados, and
when one thought of the five or
six thousand applicants who went
to the American Consulate for
visas, they were just pigeon-holed
or rejected.

They could well understand
what a great hardship would be
created more especially to the
people of Barbados, and West In-
dians generally speaking, who had
their relatives in that country, and
who would like to join them there.

But they could not attack the
American Government. They
had no control over that. Rather
they should be making represen-
tation to Canada, a member of
the British Commonwealth, who
also had their restrictions. If
they could not make represen.
tation as far as Canada was con-
cerned, how much less would
their voices be heard by the
Americans.

sfowever, he did not think
America should create restrictions
as far as immigration of West In-
dians, whether black or white, was
concerned, Not only America, but
not other part of the world wanted
negroes. If Canada of ali peoples,
with their vast open lands, thous-
ands and thousands of square
miles, not to mention acres—Can-
ada which is larger in area than
the United States, and whose pop-
ulation was about 1/15th of the
population of America, refused to
open its door to West Indians—
how

nai

coloured West Indians —



|
|

And Save $258.50 ©:

ADVOCATE







muc! ore so, Ameri which was
not a member Common-
a

If orre ent to Canada to study,
One had to leave immediately his
or her studies were completed.
With America they were beggars

and therefore could not be choos-
es, and he hoped that their
atfnipt to make representations
against the Bill would not irritate
the situation.

What they were doing there, Mr.
Talma said, might not carry muca
weight, and he was of opinion that
they should explore all avenues so
as to secure employment for the
unemployed. It was al] well and
good to come and say that there
were British Consulates in all parvs





ne



of the world and ambassadors and
so on. They at least had to satisf

the people of this col ar t

especially the ones who

ing to thern to « reat thir li

relieve their d

dele ions



er they would send
abroad to emigration possi
bilities.

In so far Ame con.
cerned, he hoped that just as they
made use of the West Indian
islands during the war for the de-

fence of their continent,
have some

they would
sympathy and compas-

sion on the islands, and far from
closing down the door whereby a
few hundred Of “our people” are
granted facilities of going to the
United States to improve their
position and lot in life, that an-
other Senator might see fit to brin
to the attention of the authoritic
there that the West Indies fre at

their back door, and that the West
Indies are under-developed coun-
tries with dire poverty and good
breeding grounds for Communism
Mr. Talma suggested that perhaps
the United States could consider

Barbados in their Point 4 Pro.
gqramme
Mr. F, L. Waleott (L), said

)1t members of the House did
not seem to view the matter as
they should, and it seemed to
him that there was greater en-
thusiasm about the matter by
West Indians who lived in the
United States than these who
lived in the celonies, because the
West Indians who lived in the
colonies were not aware of what
the other West Indians in the
United States, though a minority
group, were trying to do.

A Bill of that nature, if passed
would have more adverse effect on
West Indians who lived in the colo-







if
aa

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NEW YORK 518.10 ~
PARIS 1,560.10 1,301.80
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BY

Ai



nies. He had had the opportunity

of speaking to the West Indian

Committee which met in Washing-

to discuss the matter with a

Senator of the United States De-

partment, and the British Embassy,

and what was embodied in the
Address, in his opinion, was cor-

rect in that the number of people |
mentioned in it was not 100 for
the whole area, but 100 for each of
the respective colonies,

The peculiar thing about the Bill!
was that it did not apply to Latin
American countries, and although
they formed part, from a geograph-
ical point of view, of the area, they
were not restricted in this manner

The United States Government
iad benefited by the West Indies
‘ue to their geographical position.
Their mutual contribution to the’

ist war had been a great benefit
vo the United States. The bases |
leased to the United States were
leased without the consent of the
West Indies, and meant much to
the United States. }

On the question of manpower,
the taking of West Indian labour
was undoubtedly of assistance to
the colonies, but it was also of as- |
sistance to the United States Gov-
‘rnment to have the workers from |
the colonies which were in close |
proximity, and therefore could be

ton

had at low transport cost. |

West Indians in the United
States had contributed to the edu-
cational, social and political life
of that community. The commun-
ity was not homogeneous, there
being minority groups from: all
parts of the world going to make
it up, and therefore the West In-
dies, with the other minority
sroups, had played a great part in
the development of the country.

Contradictory |
Another aspect of the matter was
at it was very popular and easy |
) Say something to some one. They

*w the vast sums of money
hich were being spent in Asia to
oprove the conditions of those
people. The Four Point programme

President Truman—if those |
hings were really meant to be
vhat they were intended to mean,
| was difficult to reconcile the dif.
/erence in attitudes,

Mr, Walcott drew attention to
he recommendation passed by the
Fourth West Indian Conference,
vhere they had members of the
United States Government, the
Dutch Government, the French
Crovernment and the British Gov-
rhment, and at that conference it
vas pointed out that such restric-
tons, so far as migration was con-
erned, should not be practised,
nd that those countries should
ntensify their efforts to assist the
coples of the colonies,

rhere was no question of race or

jlour in the proposed Bill, he

‘id, but by implication, it would

ive a great effect on the colour.
a section of the community in
‘his area rather than on the white
ection of the community, be-

iuse as they were aware, there
were many coloured people who

}





hrough force of circumstances

had to migrate to the United

States, 4
There was another aspect ©:

the matter. They could afford to
say that because they were mem-
bers of the British Commonwealth
ff Nations and members of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisa-
tion, every effort then was being
made to preserve and improve}
conditions for the people of the}
under developed areas.

@ On page 5





to









PAGE THREE












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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS daa ADVOGATE
SURES asisngn on, ein, beeen ve Sotoomen





Thursday, February 21, “1952



SEAWELL
THE policy, or better, lack of policy of
the United Kingdom with regard to com-
munications throughout the British West
Indies has been the subject of continuous
criticism in the United Kingdom and in
the West Indies for more than a decade.

Inter-island passenger steamship com-
munication is almost exclusively depend-
ent on North American steamship com-
panies, and travel to Europe is restricted
to one British passenger ship and a great-
er number of foreign steamships. The
word “British” seems out of place in any
description of sea passenger communica-
tions, although British cargo steamers
continue to operate profitably in the area.

With regard to air communications the
word “British” is very much in the con-
text. It is a British company, a subsidiary
of the British Overseas Airways Corpora-
tion which has a monopoly of air-passen-
ger travel throughout the British Carib-
bean. This monopoly extends to Barbados
although a Dutch Airline Company was
the first to put Barbados on the air-map.
Other airline companies are permitted to
use Seawell for special flights but only
British West Indian Airways, Trans-Cana-
da Airlines and a Venezuelan Airline
(LAV) have regular landing rights at Sea-
well.

Permission to land at Barbados was
only granted by the Government of the
United Kingdom to Canada in return for
landing rights granted to the United King-
dom by the Government of Canada, less |
than four years ago. At that time the
Government of the United Kingdom was
well aware of the fact that the then Sea-
well runway would have ‘to be rebuilt
and lengthened to allow Trans-Canada
airplanes to land. This was known by the
Government of the United Kingdom be-
cause a group of officials from the Minis-
try of Civil Aviation had visited Barbados
earlier and had reported to that effect.

With this knowledge and in view of the
fact that at that time, as today, a British
Airways Company (the British South
American Airways) held the monopoly of |
inter-territorial traffic in the British Car-
ibbean, it is surprising that the Govern-
ment of the United Kingdom did. not
approach the Government of Barbados
with a view to offering advice as to the
construction of a new runway which had
to be built at Seawell in any event, and |
upon the construction of which was de- |
pendent the implementation of the con- |
cession granted to Trans-Canada Airlines,
through the Government of Canada.

This is all the more surprising because |
it was obvious from the beginning of |
negotiations held between the representa-
tives of Trans-Canada Airlines and the
representatives of the then Barbados Goy-
ernment that thie major portion of the
money necessary for the construction of
the new runway at Seawell would be pro-
vided by the Imperial Government from
funds credited to Barbados’ account under
the terms of the Colonial Development
and Welfare Act. In fact £337,500, which
represent the major expenditure on the
new runway was provided from these
funds.

Yet the Governmen: of the United King-
dom appeared perfectly happy to permit
the Barbados Government to construct a |
runway for which it was providing most |
of the money necessary for its construc- |
tion, and landing rights on which are, to
this day, under the control of the Gov- |
ernment of the United Kingdom.

There must have been a reason why the |
United Kingdom, experienced, as it was |
during the war years, in the construction |
of airports and runways on severai con-
tinents should have shown this remark-
able lack of interest in an island which
had been recognised by a former director
general of British South American Air-
ways as an admirable potential refuelling
base and stop-over centre for British Air-
craft flying to South America. But that
is what happened and no one can deny
after reading Mr. Connolly’s report on
runway construction at Seawell that Bar-
bados has suffered a blow that would not
have fallen if responsibility for the con-
struction had been shared with the Min-
istry of Civil Aviation. Mr, Connolly |
places responsibility for failure where it
ought to be placed; on the two contracting
parties, the Government and the Contrac-
tor- r

The time has surely come for the Gov-’
ernment of Barbados to approach the
Ministry of Civil Aviation and the Gov-
ernment of the United Kingdcm and seek
from them advice as to the reliability or
otherwise of the runway at Seawell and
a clarification of the United Kingdom’s
intentions towards the future of Barbados’
airport in the British scheme of things.
The expansion of air traffic at Piarco in
Trinidad brings daily nearer the day |
when large airliners will want to altern-
ate between Barbados and Trinidad for re-
fuelling purposes. Barbados must plan
ahead now and it can do little planning |
unless full agreement is reached with the
United Kingdom as to Seawell’s future.







What Will The New

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

————

Queen

(and her husband) be Paid?

BEFOR ng the
will sen I ge

renounci

new Queen
rliament
: come now
£2 000,000 ross year
om the ¢ v Lands
In return the Queen will ask
that provision shall be made for
“the honour and dignity of the
Crown and the Royal Family.’

As the Duke of Windsor com-
ments in “A King's Story * this
exchange of hereditary revenues
for a fixed payment is a bar-
gain for the country.

For the revenues which the
Monarch surrenders—and has
done since the days of George
Ill—are now about twice as
large as the all wances paid by
the nation for the upkeep of the
Royal Family.

A New Bill
When the message has been re-
ceived,. a select committee of 21
M.P.’s, representing all parties,
will be set up to consider it.
The committee’s proposals will
be incorpcrated in a Civil List Bill





which, by law, hag to come into
force within six months of the
end of the late King’s reign
Meantime, the previous finan-
cial arrangements continue with
the exception that the QUEEN

MOTHER will receive an annuity
of £70,000 a year, for which pro-
vision was made in 1937.
The present scale of

payments

KING'S CIVIL
£410,000 a year.

QUEEN MARY,
year.

PRINCESS ELIZABETH
row the Queen, £40,000.

THE DUKE OF EDIN-
BURGH, £10,000,

THE DUKE
CESTER, £35,000,
THE PRINCESS ROYAL
£6,000.
PRINCESS
£6,000.
£90,000 Today

The new Civil List will
outstanding interest becs use,
the first time in 112 years,
vision will have to be made
the Queen’s husband.

If the precedent of Prince Albert
is followed, the DUKE OF EDIN-
BURGH will be paid £30000 a
year,

But
would

LIST,

£70,000 a

OF GLOU-

MARGARET,

be o1
for
pro-
for

Prince Albert's £30,000
be about £90,000 a year
now. So the Duke may be paid
more than £30,000.

Every endeavour will be made
to avoid controversy. There was
plenty of it in 1840.

In January of that year Queen

Victoria in the Speech from the
Throne announced her impending
marriage, and added:

“The constant proofs I have



ews

“In the end death camé as a
friend”,
That is the consolation, put in

Winston Churchill’s words that
sums up the feeling of Londoners.

And in the morning bus on the
way to work it is the simple par-
allel between private grief, which
we have all known, and the Royal

Family’s own grief, that is most
ofien made The simple human
consolation ‘What a good thing a‘
he was out of the country. At
least she had a day of travelling

before facing officials cere-
monial.”

Instinctively, the Duke of Edin-
burgh has captured public imagi-
nation, Few have seen him—the

and

great milling crowds will not
come out until the funeral, they
respected private grief. Yet all

we have heard has emphasised his
solicitous attention to the new
Queen,

Criticisms

Already some voices are heard
asking whether the burden on the
Queen—a burden that hastened
the death of her father—should
not be lifted,

The queen landed in England.
Within *wenty-four hours she has
met her Accession Council, she
has met the Privy Council, she
has shaken the hands of her prin-
eipal Ministers at the airport, she
has received the Duke of Norfolk,
as Earl Marshal, to discuss the
arrangements of her father’s fun-
eral. And from this moment
forth, her life will be a contin-
ual stream of duties, reading of
state papers, consultations, recep-
tions, attendances and official
travels.

Can there not be a stay, a pause?
What would be the right body to
inquire into the duties of British
Royalty and reduce them by cut-
ting out the valueless ceremonial

OUK READERS
Stray Dog Problem

To the Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—At the time of publication
a copy of the Barbados S.P.C.A.
Annual Report is sent to the Edi-
tor of every newspaper in the
island. There is therefore no ex-
euse for your columnist “No-
body's” ignorance of the Society’s
concern over the Stray Dog Prob-

lem. On page 5 of the Report it
says

“Once again we must call atten-
tion to the stray dog question to
which no definite answer has yet
been found, The Society is con-
stantly receiving requests, in
some cases amounting to com-
mands, from the public to have
stray animals caught and des-
troyed. It cannot be too strong-
ly emphasised that we are NOT
stray catchers. In order to pre-
vent suffering in the case of
starving, diseased, ownerless
dogs we do all in our power to
get them off the street. We ap-
peal therefore, to Government
to expedite the enactment of the
Dog Licensing Bill and also to
co-operate with us in plans for

the provision of an Animal

Refuge”’.

Our files pay eloquent tribute to
the representatives we have




made to Government in this mat-
ter. During 1951 I have he
sonal interviews with the
ing officials solely on this
The Assistant Colonial Secretary
3 interviews)
The Director, Public Work
The Clerk the Vestry
Michael
The Commissioner of Police
and wher ult
be forthcoming a d
sisting of the Hon. Sec f
Treasurer, and Chief In



business

of St

no ré



me They recommended that

By BERNARD HARRIS “in the event of the birth of a
Duke of Cornwall there should)

received of your attachment to be paid from the revenues of the

my person and family persuade Duchy £25,000 a year for the

me that you will enable me to

maintenance and education of the

provide for such an establish- Duke and in part for the paying
ment as may appear suitable of sums to to be accumu-
to the rank of the Prince and Jated by them te make provision
the dignity of the Crown.” for a future Duchess.”

M.P. Objected An “accumulating provision of
The Cabinet proposed that this sort may be recommended by

£50,000 a year for life should be
paid to Prince Albert

the new select committee.
Prince Charles’s sister, PRIN-

Mr. Hume, the member fo, CESS ANNE,, will probably not |
Kilkenny objected that the coun. get an ineome of her own until
try could not meet so great an she comes of age. }
additional expense without “im- Because there was no Duke Of|
posing severe burdens on the Cornwall during the late reign, |
people.” the revenues from the Duchy

An amendment to cut the pro- vested in the King.
posed allowance from £50,000 tc Out of them the incomes of
£21,00 was defeated. Princess Elizabeth and the Duke

But, desvite hot opposition from
ithe Cabinet, a second amendment
that Prince Albert should be paid
£30,000, instead of £50 000, was
carried

Apart from an increase for the

of Gloucester were paid. The!
residue went to reduce the King’s |
Civil List.

It -was commonly ‘said that}
KING GEORGE VI was the most
underpaid monarch in the world.







Duke of Edinburgh, the select Certainly, after the war, he had
committee is likely to recommena difficulties in making end 58/
a larger allowance for PRINCESS meet—difficulties which were |
MARGARET For she will now recognised last year when the!
have increased responsibilitie. Government relieved the Civil
and additional duties to perform List of payments amounting to
The DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, £40,000 a year. }
n the other hand, may take a His Expenses
cut. As a younger son of, King The late King’s allowance olf
George V he receives on annuity £410000, fixed in 1987, was;
of £25 000 a year. This was sup- £60000 less than Edward. VII
plemented in 1937 with a further and George V had received in
£10,000 a year because of his days when living costs were much |
“additional duties during the lower. |
minority of Princess Elizabeth.” in this £410,000 the amount al- |
The reason for that’ extra lowed for his personal outlay was}
£10,000 mo ic iger exis.s, and pre- £110,000—which, as the Duke of}
umabl th® select committee Windsor has said, “pays for the!
will ta} that into consideration upkeep of the estates of Sand-!
when it Bets down to work ringham and Balmoral, the stud
y i and racing stable, and all private
Up To £40,000 expenses, including many sub-|
In 1937 11-year-old Princess scriptions and donations to char-|
Elizabeth as heir presumptive, ity.”
was given en income of £6,000 a Salaries of the King’s house-
year. This was raised to £15,000 hold “from the Lord Chamber-
vhen she came of age. And on lain down to the coal porters,”
her marriage her allowance accounted for £134,000. Mainten-
went up to £40000, with a unce of the household took a
further £10,000. for her husband. further £152,800. Hl
Th ne w heir apparent, “Only by economising in his
PRINCE .CHARLES, now the personal expenses,’ said the|
Duke of Cornwall, is only a little Duke, discussing the position of |
over three years old. Will he the monarchy, “has the King
get an income of his own?

been able to meet his public lia-|

He is entitled to the revenues bilities without asking Parliament
of the Duchy of Cornwall, for additional funds.”
amounting, according to the In December 1837 Queen Vic-|
latest available figure to about. toria went in state to thank Par-|
£100,000 a year. But because of liament for her Civil List.
his youth only a_ fraction § is The Speaker says the Annual
hkely to be paid over. Register for that year, ‘observed
The 1937 select committee had that the list had been framed in
to take into account the possibil- a “liberal and confiding spirit.”
ity that the late King and his It is likely that this same spirit
ife might have a son.

will still prevail after 115 years. |

From HBritain

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS





funeral of his brother, But may it}
not be time to remember that the |
while ieaving all that is good Duke needs comfort in his grief
and great in the conceptions that —like any other member of that
un so many lands? Perhaps family?

Winston Churchill, with the long s ° *

eoreer of his great services to the Changes |
Crown, is the proper man, the ‘The death of her father makes
only man, who ean venture on the a great change, for Princess Mar-|





delicate lasik of reforming not caret, too, She. will have many}
rehy, but the duties of mon- more public duties. She will re-
; : organize wher Household — and

EN

certain eyentually she may come to live
not lo Want to abandon the joy- at Clarence House, with her
ful duty of travelling to her far- Mother. This is the House not
flung Dominions, That part of her far from Buckingham Palace that |
task, at least, would not be cut was built by the Duke of Clar-|

out—indeed it is likely to gain ence—later to be William IV—|
an even greater place in the and refurnished for the new|
Royal programme. London, now, Queen and her husband. But it

is only one of the Queen’s seven will be many months before the

capitals, new Queen takes permanent resi- |
; dence at Buckingham Palace.
A Republic represented at the Rumours of Princess Margaret's

Accession Council? This surely is pending engagement will remain
trange. Yet His Excellency Krish- rumours. She certainly cannot
na Menon, High Commissioner for marry until after the coronation—
India, was in attendance. And the probably not until the end of next
BBC mentioned Delhi among the year, When she marries it must
capitals of the Commonwealth in be with her sister’s permission,
mourning for His Late Majesty.
What exactly is the position of * * *
India relative to the British Changes all around us: within
Crown? It is confused; and con- a year new coins will be struck
stitutional lawyers are not all so with the Queen’s head facing right
certain that India is in fact as ~—the first time the monarchs
much a Republic as she believes. head has faced right since the
But my reports from Delhi days of Edward VII. Nevertheless
seems to indicate that the senti- we will surely be reminded of the
ment of the country in this loss beautiful silver coins of Queen
is as “Royalist” as any other in Vicioria—the young Queen,
the Commonwealth. This strange There will be a change of stamps
British Commonwealth that the soon. New “pillar boxes” will
“New York Times’ seems just to have “E.II.R. on them. In the
have discovered for what it is—a courts the eminent Counsels wear-
free association of peoples! ing silk, will be styled “Q.C.” On
* ¢ i the cinema screen, and_ theatre
Another breath of criticism; no programmes it will be “God Save
doubt it is the sensitive feeling of the Queen”. The Toastmaster at|
the Duke of Duke of Windsor that public banquets will call the com- |
he_should leave his Duchess in pany to raise their glasses to the
New York as the sets out for the Queen.

,
SAY :
S.P.C.A. and the Chief Inspector
of the BG, Branch of the Barbados will lose its charm if
R.S.P.C.A, was received by the we should become cold and aus-
Members of the House of Assem- tere. We are all beggars in the
bly for Christ Church and St. sight of God seeking daily mercies. |
Michael. With the present high cost of liv-
In the twelve months Jan.-Dec. ing the poor unemployed and
1951 the Society's staff adminis- hungry must seek alms. I miss the
tered authanasia to 864 (eight woodén-foot man and many!
hundred and sixty four) dogs and familiar faces that used to bless
puppies, ; me for a penny. Let us o |
The Society is acutely and poma preferably on the ealaap

painfully aware of its sins of om- ¢
ission but concern over the stray ae people and without

dog problem is net ope aoe
CECILE WAL! : COUNTRY WOMA

ea (Hon. See. S.P.C.A.) 19th January, 1952, "

18,2.52.

T ’ , “Bea ( ”
Thanks From U, C. WoL uty Pays
; To The Editor, The Advocate —
To the Kditer, The

; Sir,—1I am delighted to give my)

SIR,—The President of the Guild support to the Leader in your is- |
of Undergratiuates wishes to ex- sue of the 14th, entitled “Beauty |
press to the many friends of the Pays.” The need for planned de-|
University College in Barbados the velopment in this island cannot}
sincere thanks of the Guild of be too strongly stressed when one |
Undergraduates for the sum of sees the number of old buildings |
85, proceeds of a dance held in which have been ruined by incon- |









not as other people,



Advocate;





arbados in September, 1951. gruous additions of unsightly).
This sum, together with other neighbours, j

gifts of money from British Gui-
ana, Trinidad, and the Leeward The Civic Circle has for meiy}
Islands, was directed in replacing years laboured under many diffi- |
the student’s piano destroyed in culties, and often in the face of|
the hurricane of Augus’, 1951. opposition, ‘o preserve and to cre-|

D. PILGRIM, ate beauty in this island. The need
Guild Secretary. for legislation to preserve old
1952. buildings of character and to pre-
vent indiscriminate building cer- |
tainly exists.

31st January,
1 Plea For Beggars

To the Editor, The Advocate; It is to be hoped that time will!



be found in this Session of the]
SI I read quite recently that #iouse of embly for the pass-|
.¢ r beggar was given four ing of the long awaited and sore-

but the quality of mercy ly needed Town and Country Act

it does not
without beg-
road S et,
we are

ot strained, and for Barbados



Yours faithfully,
NELL MANNING





juniform and return to America to do any

land forth across the country, has recently

| 3enator Lister Hill of Alabama suggested

| = . :
George Aiken of Vermont, who is renowned

| mined attempt to become chair-borne,” said



ALARM BELL FOR
EISENHOWER

By R. M. MacCOLL

WASHINGTON.

THE broad smile on the huge photo of
General Eisenhower that hangs from the
wall of his campaign headquarters in Wash-
ington found few counterparts among his
political managers and backers.
For they were stunned by word from Paris
that the general has decided not to doff his

electioneering before the Republican Con-
vention in July.

He will not make any speeches, and he
will not even appear before a Congressional
committee.

This news cast the back-room boys into
deep gloom. They know well that rival
Senator Taft, by sheer hard plugging back

been winning quite a lot of ground.

The senator believes in “ringing the door
bells.” And they had been counting on
General Eisenhower to do a bit of the same.

MEMORY

Several long-memoried film fans have |

written to tell me that yes, Bette Davis has
worn a bathing suit in a film already. And

a reader in London’s Finsbury Park backs}.

it up with a clipping from an old fan maga-
zine which shows La Davis sure enough in
a fetching little number. Film was “The
Working Man,” and our old friend George
Arliss was in it. ;

SIGNS OF’ THE TIMES

Britain is soon to demote her consulate-
general in Detroit to the status of a mere

|consulate. And, acknowledging the terrific

»ost-war boom and growth of the far Pacific
North-west, she will simultaneously up her
-onsulate in Seattle to a consulate-general.

Trade with Russia, worth £25,000,000 in
1938, is down to a mere trickle—£ 29,000 in
che first 11 months of 1951. Comments one
cig New York exporter : “It is so small you
sould just about stuff it into an old caviar
in.”

MODESTY

As Host at a lunch in the Congress build-
“ng for a group of his farming constituents,

that everybody should rise one at a time
ind identify themselves. All went smoothly
antil it came to the turn of fellow Senator

‘or his modesty. Said he: “My name’s
Aiken, and I work in the building here.”
The Army reveals that one out of every
100 men joining uses an assumed name.
Reasons range from wishing to shed embar-
rassments of civilian life to attempting to
rover up a previous dishonourable discharge.
Taxes last year totalling £33,900,000 — an
nerease of £12,100,000 over 1950, reduced
he net income of the National Steel Cor-
oration to £16,173,000, compared with the
-ecord £ 20,648,000 earned the year before.

ANSWER

The Hollywood Censors—long known as
he Hays and now the Breen Office—have
decided to abandon their traditional policy
»f silence when attacked. From now on they
will answer back to any criticism. ‘

Congressmen, hot on the trail of Service
extravagance, discover that at Wright Field,
aear Dayton, Ohio, the Air Force wanted to
ouy 20,156 “super deluxe upholstered typ-
sts’ chairs” at £3 10s. a chair higher than
che ordinary price. “This was a really deter-

one investigator.

Near Memphis, Tennessee, Sheriff's depu-
ties Sid Hall and J. F. Hewitt saw a hog
exhibiting the classic signs of advanced
drunkenness. Deciding to cast about a bit,
che officers discovered a nearby illicit still
‘ull of “moonshine.”

THE HUMAN TOUCH

President Truman takes reporters with
him on a personally conducted tour of the
renovated White House, into which the Tru-
mans hope to move back in April.

And, recalling that just before they moved
out the bath tub almost fell through the
floor into the drawing-room beneath it, Mr.
Truman reveals that he jocularly asked Mrs,
Truman what she would have done if it had
‘allen through—with himself inside it —
while she was entertaining the Daughters of

|the American Revolution to tea._

Added the chuckling President: “Mrs. Tru-
didn’t think it at all funny, and wanted to
slap my face.”

CALL IN NEGROES

The Use of some “bright young Negroes”
in the U.S. diplomatic service is urged by
Dr. James Robinson, Pastor of a Harlem

This, he feels, would be a blow at Com-
munist propaganda, and would “please race-
conscious people everywhere.”

A Revealing story about President Tru-
man is told in Fortune magazine, which
says: “The President’s confidant and Press
secretary, the late Charles Ross, in a mo-
ment of candour rare among White House
employees, told a perplexed newspaperman
“to understand the President’s
always look for the obvious explanation.”



lon

Presbyterian church,

actions, |

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1962



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2), 182

$8,670 Passed To

Jurors To Be Paid More

THE House of Assembly on Tuesday passed a resolu-
tion for $8,670 as supplementary estimates under Heads :
Colonial Treasurer, Customs, Fire Brigade, Legal Depart-
ments, Science and Agriculture, Barbados Regiment, Post
Office and Dodds Plantation.

When discussing the Head Fire Brigade, Mr. A. E. S.
Lewis (L) said that it was only about two weeks ago that
a supplementary estimate was passed for the Police and

now Shey
He said that they must regard
the House as something they

could summon every week to pass
iwo or three hundred dollars for
them.

Unde, Heed XIV, Legal Depart-
ments Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, (L),
asked that jurors be paid a little
more to cover their expenses,

He said that at present the
amount received hardly paid for
the bus fare of some jurors. “It
has been going on too long. It
needs attention.”

Before the estimates came down
he wanted to bring it to the notice
of the Executive,

A Burden

Mr. E. W. Barrow \L) said that
in 1066 it may have been an hon-
cur conferred upon a person to
usk him to be a juror, That was
very good for 1066 but today jury
service is looked upon as a bur-
den and it is a burden. He felt
‘hat the compensation given to
jurors to-day is wholly inadequate.

He said that in some instances
it Was almost painful for jurors
to listen to lengthy legal discus-
sions from day to day in the
Town Hall. He would like mem-
bers to take the Senior Member
for St. Lucy seriously on. that
point. He hoped that the sum
would soon be increased.

Mr. O. T. Allder (I) thought dif-
terent of the jury system, He said
that this was a democracy and
the onus was on each citizen to
come forward and give assistance,
Apart from that, he felt that
every cilizen should consider it an
honour to sit as a juror and if
he was given an amount to off-
set transportation and lunch it
was as much as the House could
expect to do at present.

He said that to increase the al-
lowance to jurors and witnesses
would be to create more confu-
sion in the courts by encouraging
false witnesses,

Mr. Brancker (L) said that he
was wondering if the Senior Mem-
ber for St. John appreciated the
principle. He explained that in
1891 jurors were paid the same
amount as they get to-day. He
asked if this was reasonable.

Mr. G, H. Adams (L) said that
some years ago in England the
duty of a juror was an honour.
Jurors in England were paid only
since 1949.

For Mr. Allder’s benefit, M.
Adams explained that no witness-
es are now ever paid in criminal
cases,

Disgusting

1n dealing with ihe Head, Post
Office, where an additional pro-
vision of $325 is 1equired to meet
the payment of bicycle allowances
to Posimea which have been in-
creased fr.m $1.44 per month to
$2.00 per month with effect from
July 1, 1951, Mr. C. E, Talma (1),
said that it was disgusting to see
that a postman’s traveiling allow-
ance was only $2.00 per month
because the postman, by virtue of
his duty, was called upon to
travel day in, day out.

He said that other officers of
the service were granted allow-
ances which could afford them to
buy cars, They now had the chance
of increasing the allowance of tne
postman and they were going to
increase it to $2.00 a month, He
thought they would have increased
it to $2.00 per week.

Mr. Talma also commented on
the system of appointing sub-
pcstmen, He explained that the
appointment of sub-postmen
showed there was a need for more
postmen, There were qany ex-
se.vicemen unemployed wh»
would gladly fill these posts.

Mr. G, H, Adams (L). said that
the Civil Service Association had
recommended $2.00 per month and
they accepted it.

Mrs, Bourne (L) said that there
is a feeling among postmen in
the country that they should get
a greater traveljing allowance
than postmen in the City.

Mr. Brancker (L) said that du-
ring the last session he suggested
to Government to assist, not only
the postmen, but labourers of
Highways & Transport and the
Waterworks Department,

He said that some consideration
should be given to providing
motorcycles for those postmen
who travel over hilly country dis-
tricts,

He felt that Government should
take over the running of the mail



had the Fire Brigade asking a similar thing,

vans. Then the same vans, after
they have delivered the mail to
the. various Branch Post Offices,
could be used to convey’ the coun -
try postman on his difficult jour-
ney. He hoped Government would
soon give this some considera-
tion,

Mr. F. E. Miller (L) said that
be knew of at least one postman
in St. George who rode a motor-
eycle. He knew that that postman
would find $2.00 inadequate for
the upkeep of his motorcycle. He
would like to find out if the Civil
Service Association would -con-
tinue to say that $2.00 is sufficient
for a postman’s travelling allow-
ance. ;

He asked Government to ex-
amine the position of the coun-
try postmen as up to that moment
it could do with some revision.

Girls Not So Bad

Under the Head, Dodds Plan-
tation, Mr. J. C. Mottley (1) sug-
gested that the buildings which
house the Girls’ Industrial Schoo!
could be put to better use. They
could be used to house a Sec-
ondary School for St. Philip and
St. John,

Mr, Allder (1) said that ne
was glad MY. J. C. Mottley felt
the. same way as he felt two
years ago. He felt that some other
method of punishment or reform
should be brought about. To put
these girls in the Industrial School
them for the

was a stigma on
balance of their lives,
He said that in as much as

there were only about five or six
girls in the school it showed that
young girls are not inclined to be
bad.



Verdict Of Death
By Natural Causes
Returned

A nine-man jury yesterday
returned a verdict of death by
natural causes when the inquest
concerning the death of 52-year-
old Miriam Best of School Road,
Carrington Village, St. Micnael
was concluded before His Wor-
ship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting
Coroner of District “A"s

Miriam Best was taken to
the General Hospital on Feb-
ruary 13 but she died the next
day. Dr, A. S. Cato who per-
formed the post mortem exAmina-
tion at the General Hespital
Mortuary on February 14 said
that the body was identified to
him by Cecil ‘Best of School
Road, St, Michael, who said that
the deceased was his wife.

a ces agé of the de-
ceased was 52 years ond she was
dead for about three and a half
hours. The body was wel} nour-
ished and there were no zigns of
a fracture of the skull, The lungs
were congested; the liver, kidney
and spleen enlarged.

Death was due
disease of the heart.

Cecil ‘Best of School Road, St.
Michael said that he identified the
body of his.wife to Dr, Cato. She
was admitted to the General Hos-
pital on February 13 and on Febru-
ary 14 he heard that she was
dead.

At this stage the jury, after a
short deliberation returned a ver-
dict of death by natural causes.

to coronary



SCHOONER TOWED
INTO HARBOUR

The schooner United Pil-
grim was towed into Car-
lisle Bay on Tuesday night
with a leak in her stem.

Captain A. Stuart, skip-
per of the schooner, said
that the United Pilgrim
sprung a leak on Monday
afternoon about fifty-five
miles off Barbados, and
consequently it was neces-
sary for three men to pump
ouc the water continuously
until her arrival in Barba-
dos.

The United Pilgrim was
bringing a cargo of copra,
coal, cocoanut oil and cocoa-
nut plants from St. Lucia.
Captain Stuart said that the

leakage will be repaired
before the schooner leaves
Barbados.







FREAK CHICKEN

Gweneth Foster of Kens-
ington Tenantry brought a
freak chicken into the Ad-
vocate yesterday morning,

This chicken which was
hatched with six others on
Monday has no eyes.

Foster said that the

chicken is very hearty and
has to be fed by her.
hopes to rear
grown fowl.

Shc
it into a



News Briefs
Biggest Cane
tire At Bourdon

THE BIGGESY cane ure
many years broke out al pourdun
Plantauon, St. Lucy, at avour
11.30 a.m. on Tuesuay.

At Bourdon itseif, 34 acres ©.
first crep, nine and a nalf acres
of second crop, 17 acres of third
crop and five and a nalf acres a
fourth crop ripe canes were burnc.
Also burnt were 28 acres of young
cane plants, nine acres of young
ratoons and 32 acres of sour grass.
The canes are the property otf
Fairfield and Mount Gay. Ltd. anu
were insured.

The fire extended to Benthams,
St. Lucy, where half an acre of
first crop ripe canes, property of
Dalton Broome and a half acre of
first crop ripe canes, the propervy
of Gladys Greaves; a quarter 01
an acre of finst crop ripe canes,
property of Evelyn Clarke were
also burnt,

Sparks from the fire burnt two
holes in the roof of a house occu-
pied by Ila Cadogan and also
caught fire, the roof of Bertha
Padmore’s house.

The Fire Brigade under the com-
mand of Major R. Craggs, Fire
Officer, got the fire under control
before it could do further damage

* * B

au.

FIVE ACRES of third crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire
broke out at Golden Ridge Planta-
tion, St. George, at about 7.30 p.m.
on Tuesday.

They are the property of E.M.
Taylor and were insured.

* *

AT PINE PLANTATION, St.
Michael, a fire at about 4.45 p.m.
on Tuesday burnt five and a quar-
ter acres of third crop ripe canes,
property of the Governor-in-
Executive Committee.

They were insured.

* «

*

A FIRE Hall, St.
Michael

Tuesday

at Haggatt
at about 3.00 p.m. on
burnt six and a halt
aeres of first, second, third and
fourth crop ripe canes and 200
holes of young canes, property of
Daniel St. Clair and five other
peasants. The canes were insured.
* . 7

Mr. JOSEPH TUDOR, Jnr. was
elected President of the Common-
wealth Sports Club when the Club
held its Annual General Meeting
over the weekend. The other
officers elected for the year 1952
were; Mr. E. D, Mottley Jnr. Vice-
President, Mr. C. C. Clarke, Secre-
tary, Mr. St. C. Blackman, Assist-
ant Secretary, Mr. James Lorde,
Treasurer and Mr, E. W. Barrow,
M.C.P., Mr. C. C. Clarke, Mr.
James Lorde, Mr. J. N. Graham
and Mr. E, D. Mottley, members
of the Committee of Management.

Mr. J. N. Graham was elected
captain of the cricket team and
Mr. E. Brereton, Vice-Captain,

At the meeting members of the
Committee spoke of the successful
season enjoyed by the club. They
won all their matches against
other cricket teams.

The President said that he is
looking forward to another suc-
cessful season and that any club
willing to enter for the Common-
wealth Challenge Cup could con-
tact the Vice President.

ab *

.
MARRIED MEN will play
Bachelors in a cricket match at
Merlyn ground, St. James, on

Sunday, February 23.

The teams are:

Married Men: J. Byer (Capt.).
H, Cumberbatch, E. Taylor, L.
Yearwood, Abraham Alleyne, W.
Layne, S. Mings, W. Gilkes, I.
Yearwood, J. Bridgman—and E.
Cox.

Bachelors: G. Licorish (Capt.),
A. Ifill, BE. Lorde, W. Ramsay, E.
Greaves.’ L. Reed, S. Lewis, B.
Taitt, V. Todd, H. Marshall A.
Richards anq J. Ifill.

* s *

TWO ACRES of third crop ripe
canes and a quantity of sour grass
were burnt when a fire occurred
at Lears Plantation, St. Michael
at about 9.30 a.m. yesterday.

The fire was put out by the
Police assisted by the overseer.
The canes are the property of
Applewhaites Ltd. and were in-
sured.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Fined For
Wounding
His Worship Mr. G. B. Gfiffith
Acting Police Magistrate of’ Dis-
trict “A” yesterday ordered
Herbert Dear of Reed Street, St
Michael to pay a fine of £2 10s
for wounding Charles Browne of
Bexters Road on his: chin.
Dear pleaded guilty
ffence and was ordered te pay
the fine in 21 days or one month's
imprisonment with hard labour
Rrowne told the court hat on
February 16 he went into a shop
and the defendant followed him

o the

there.
After coming out of the shop
beth of them had an argument

and the defendant cuffed him on

the chin, His chin was cut and
be had to go to the General
Hospital.

“This man bears me an old
arudge, Sir:” Browne told the
court,

His worship Mr. G. B. Griffith

also convicted and fined Frank
Griffith of Waterfords Tenantry
St. Michael 40/- in 14 dayswor
One month's imprisonment for
wounding Abraham Forde of
Savannah Road, Bank Hall on
February 2

Forde said that Griffith threw
two bottles at him and one of
them cut him on the left side of
his head. He was taken to the
General Hospitah and the cut
took three stitches



Hearing In
Damages Case
Adjourned

In the Court of Original Juris-
diction yesterday His Honour Mr.
A. J. H. Hanschell yesterday ad-
Journed until February 26 hearing
in the case in which plaintiff Amy
Sandiford of Waterhall Land, St
Michael is asking for £25 dam-
ages against the defendant Mac-
Donald Cutting of Bibby Lane, S:
Michael.

Counsel in the case is Mr. J. EB. 'T
Brancker for Sandiford. His Hon-
our Mr. Hanschell granted the ad-
journment so that Cutting could
summon another witness to the
court. In granting the adjourn-
ment, His Honour Mr. Hanschel!
said; “I am sorry that this matte:
had to be adjourned, but the de-
fendant’s witness was summoned
for January 3 and he has never
been summoned since.”

Sandiford is claiming that inas-
much as the defendant inflicted
bodily harm on her on October 17
she suffered much inconvenience
and is claiming £25 damages
Cutting told the court that he is
not liable

Argument

Amy Sandiford told the court
that on October 17 she went to
Moncrief, St. John, to buy potatoes
and while she was working in the
field she had an argument with
the defendant, After the argument
she received a blow on the back
of her neck and fell to the ground
unconscious, She was taken to the
General Hospital and detained,
She went to Dr. Massiah and paid
him for treatment and a prescrip-
tion,

Justine Pilgrim of Kellman
Land, Black Rock, said that on
October 17 she saw the plaintiff
come into a potato field. The de-
fendant was also in the field some
distance from her. While the
plaintiff was digging potatoes
some argument arose between the
plaintif? and the defendant.

Struck With Stake

While the plaintiff was digging
the potatoes the defendant took
up an iron stake and struck her
on the back of her neck with it,
The plaintiff fell to the ground
and was shortly afterwards taken
o the General Hospital, 4

Dr. Gale said that he examined
the plaintiff in the Casualty of the
General Hospital at about 12.35
p.m. on October 17. There was a
bruise at the back of the head in
the lower part and she was suffer-
ing from nervous shock, ee

Dr. Massiah said that the injury
described could have rendered the
plaintiff unfit for one month to six
weeks.

Further hearing was adjourned
until February 26.



MIXED CARGO

The Schooner Franklyn D. R.,
which arrived in Barbados yesta -
day brought more rice to the col-
ony. Among her cargo were -60(
bags of charcoal, 507 wallaba
posts and 2,000 bags of rice

King’s Scouts Call Here En Route To Jamboree

.@ From Page 1

Mr. Roberts was also in France
in 1947 for the French Jamboree
when another contingent from
Jamaica attended. At that time
he said that there were also
present, contingents from Ber-
muda and Trinidad. In 1951 he
went over to Austria for their
Jamboree at which Jamaicans
and some of the members of the
present U.K. contingent were
present.
Here is what some of the mem-

to

see® the trees in the islands which
actually bore fruit like cocoanuts
and bananas, In England, they
only saw the fruit and that was
about all.

He said that they had a good
voyage throughout the trip, The
s8€a was very calm except for one
day when they were passing
through the Azores and encoun-
tered bad weather.

John Rimell thoight that one
of the things the boys had found

bers of the U.K. contingent had interesting on the journey from
say about their trip from the Azores onwards was the fly-
Southampton to the West Indies: ing fish which they. had never

Geoffrey Bell-Jones, the only seen before. They had also seen

sea scout of the patrol who has a lot of seaweed from the Sargasso
been a cub for three years and 4 Sea and did not realise'that the

scout for five said that the trip water could be so calm in tha:
has been a wonderful one. It has yast area of the Atlantic.

been very
had learnt a lot going to
different ports,

was in England.
Food Unusual

interesting and they

the “John Parker said ‘that when
, they got to Guadeloupe the first
He said that he was sure every- thing that attracted them was the
one enjoyed the bathing because it scenery with its brilliant colours.
was much warmer here than it The sea was deep blue and th»
very

the trees
compared

colour of
pretty as

was
with Eng-

Brian Martin, a scout for the land where. the colour of the se

past five years, thought that the was dull and the trees were barr
food on the boat although un- during the winter. The only green
“very interesting.” trees they saw in England, were

usual was

Another interesting thing was_to the evergreen of the fir family

Visit To St. Pierre

He said that on Tuesday, they
spent a fine day in Martinique.
On arrival they were met by a
number of Boy Scouts who took
them on a trip through the moun-
tains to St, Pierre, The roads were
very steep and narrow but the
scenéry was magnificent, They
went near to Mt. Pelée and saw
some of the bones of people who
were killed during the eruptions
of 1902 and 1922, They then re-
turned through the mountains
back to Fort-de-France and visited
the Scout Headquarters
they were entertained for about

two hours before returning to the

hip.
The Patrol Comprises:
GEOFFREY

where

BELL-JONES,
16-year-old Senior Sea Scout of

TERENCE O’REILLY, 1¢-
year-old Patrol Leader of the
38th Cardiff, Wales, who is an
apprentice fitter and turner.

JOHN PARKER, 16-year-old
Senior Scout of the 9th Reigate,
a carpenter,

JOHN RIMELL, 16-year-ol/
Patrol Second (S) of the 229t!
Bristol, a Junior Clerk.

JOHN STONEMAN, 16-year-
old Patro] Leader of the 9th
Reigate, a funeral director's
assistant,

While in Barbados
the contingent visited
Scouts’ Headquarters at Netd-
ham’s Point, After a sea bath,
they visited the Legislature and
then the British Council hear
‘quarters,

yesterday
the Sea

Supplement Estimates

Assailan £ House Pass $3.500

For Agricultural
Development

@ From Page 1

at: is geod to recall that the
Governor said at the beginning of
the sessio

t nm that this Government
is able to provide its Civil Ser-
vice with salaries comparable with
those paid in British Guiana, If
that is the case, we can subsidise
animal feed or take some steps to

keep milk at the same price.”

Wished Monopoly

Mr O. T. Allder (1) said that
the present dairy owners were
trying to monopolise the produc-
tion of milk. They were trying to
make recommendations to Gov-
ernment, which, if implemented
would wipe out the small milk
producer, He hoped Government
would be careful not to allow that
to happen,

He said that he had again and
again recommended Government
to encourage the keeping of small
numbers of dairy cattle so that an
owner of such cattle could supply
his immediate neighbours.

He added that there were many
lots of land which were untler
bush and which could be utilised
for the benefit of the community.

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said that

for the benefit of the Senior Mem-

ber for St. John, he would say
that the policy of the Peasants’
Loan Bank was being revised

whereby ovcupiers of all the land
lying idle whether the owner was
away or in the island or whether
or not the occupier was a squatter
would be provided with loans.

Mr. Crawford said that that sug-
gestion had been made some years
ago. He was glad to hear that
Government had at long last al-
lowed people who owned land to
get a loan to get cattle,

Mr. Adams said that Barbados
was in a very difficult position
when it came to the matter of con-
trolled prices. He was very con-
scious of the fact that he was the
only real socialist on the Regional
Economic Committee. He was also
conscious of the fact that in big
countries of the West Indies, big
businesses have been saddled,

He said that the facts were en-
tirely against the Senior Member
for St, John. A big island like Ja-
maica had sent a delegation here
because they could not see how
Barbados could feed so many
people with so little land. That
was one of the greatest compli-
ments paid to Barbados, It was
stated in the Trinidad papers that
unlike Barbados their land was not
under production.

The Resolution was then passed



Pioneer Groups
Appeal For Help

There are two Pioneer Groups
in the island—one is situated in

St. James and the other in St
Thomas. The principal purpose
of the Pioneer Group is_ the

pame as that of the Police Boys’
Club—that is, to see that the
young people of the island make
good and useful citizens.

Mr. C. Leslie, one of the
founders of the Group and also
an instructor of the boys and
girls, told the Advocate yesterday
that they are not mimicing what
the Police Boys’ Clubs are doing,
but he feels sure that the Boys

Clubs alone cannot do all the
work in bringing up first class
citizens in the island.

“At the moment We need sup-
port to carry on with the Groups
and our main purpose is to go
to the backward areas of the
island where the boys and girls
may not be able to reach a Boys’
or Girls’ Club building,” Mr.
Leslie said.

Mr. Leslie said that at the
moment there are not many
members of the group but those
who are members are taught
various trades such as carpentry,
masonry, shoemaking 4nd em-
broidery.

The Committee of Management
has planned to stage concerts to
help the Groups, but other help
would be acceptable



Race Horses Gome
Here On ‘Sunrover’

The M.V. Sumrover dropped
anchor in Carlisle Bay yesterday
from Rotterdam, Antwerp = and
London. Dr. and Mrs, Henry and
Mrs. Williams were the only three
passengers disembarking.

Also arriving were two
horses belonging to the stat
Dr. Barnard. These horses



s of
rrim



Girl” and “Silver Lining” will be

going to Sit. Vincent and while
here will be in the care of Hon, V.
c. Gale.

Among her other cargo was
1,350 tons of fertilizer consigned
to DaCosta & Co., LAd., and Plan-
tations Ltd., and eight motor cars.
" The Sunrover will be staying
in Barbados for five or six days
snd will then be going on to Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad.

!iew Books On Show
At Public Library

Two hundred and sixty-thre
pew books will be put on display



«t the Public Library this morn-

ing, and will go into circulation
cn Saturday morning.

Many valuable additions to the

Reference Library are included in
the list, and biographies of the

Duke of Edinburgh and the Prin-

cess Margaret should prove
immense interest to readers,

There are 90 fictions and
nor -fictions,

of

173



Sgt. Rice Transferred

race

PAGE FIVE



OBJECTION MADE IN HOUSE

@ From Page 3

Lukewarm

He was of the opinicn that
West Indians and Barbadians in
particular seemed a bit lukewarm
an their action when matters of
that sort arose and the attitude
of begging seemed to creep in
their tMinking rather than the
taking of an objective view of

the situation. They should say
this situation is a world problem
and therefore no matter how
small they were, as a part of
the world, they had a case.

They were not making claim
foy Barbados alone, but all the
territories that the Bill aTected
And for that reason I have the
greatest confidence that united
action must have some effect.

“I cannot subscribe to the
view that the United States State
Department is responsible for
this,” he said, “What I have
gathered is that the United States
State Department can use its
influence in the Senate because
it is a matter that would affect
its diplomatic relations with
other foreign powers cspecially
at this time,”

They could use their influence
to point out that they would
create adverse state relations
with other territories. He was
not in a position to say the
Stape Department ‘was respon-
sible for it because he had no
information to support thal
view.

As sOon as war was over and
the battle was won, as soon as
the common enemy was beaten
it would seem they were left
alone and sometimes told that
they were in an unfortunate areo
and nothing could be done f0
them.

!
Just as America was of |
assistance to the West Indies, ;
the West Indies were of assis- |
tance to America. When el
War came along, America were
still able to keep the mternal)
wheel of matters going on by |
the West Indian labour.

Any intelligent conmunity, !
any public spirited man would |
realise © that they were also

fighting to keep the doors to the |
colonies open so that one next
door could benefit. He thought |
that a Resolution of that sort)
would go far towards removing!
any restrictions.

Mr. Walcott then suggested |
certain amendments to the Res- |
clution and these were accepted. ;

The Address also received the
support of Mr. G. H. Adams who}
said he was speaking as a membe)
of the House and a West Indian
though not as a member of the
Government. In spite of this, he
could hardly imagine that an)
member of the Executive Commit-
tee would differ from what mus
be the feeling of West Indians gen-
erally.

A Bill of that nature, Mr, Adam
said, was hardly conducive to th:
creation of that atmosphere neces.
siry to maintaining, whatever their
views were, that spirit of friendli
ness which the United States Gov
ernment was so anxious to main-
tain,

|



|
|
|
Unpleasant Tension

If it were not for the fact that {
everything he could say would be
going into the records, he might,
have voiced an opinion which!
would cause unpleasant tension in
the world between the United |
States and Russia. He thought it
was only fair to make tne point
that évery now and again, in all
communities, and America was no
exception, some legislator fou
reasons best known to himself
made use of some preposterou
uggestion like that contained in
the McCarran Bill

Sometimes a public man, not ne
cessarily a legislator, gave public
utterance to some quite fantastic
opinion without considering other
pouple’s feelings. The late Bili
Thompson, who wanted to get u
hand at King George to punch him
cn the nose whenever he met him,
just because he disapproved of o
monarchy was actually tame when
he actually met him.

The Senator who first started th
idea that the West Indies shoula
be handed over to the United
States for payment of the debt of
the first World War was another of
those persons

Senator's Views

He felt tiat it was Senato:
MeCarran’s own views and no‘
the views of the American Govern-
ment, Letters had been received
and from conversations which h
had had with the member for St
Peter (Mr. Walcott), it was obvious
that they were not taking the mat
ter sufficiently seriously, not be
ciuse they were doomed but be
cause some of them looked at the






Ve

Ln
—

ee

K.



|



matter as laughable, and because

some did not

realise





1 they

had certain information, W seri-

s it could be

Even at the risk of what the hon-
ourable senior member for Christ
Church might feel to be irritating
to the American Senator who
might never read the speeches of
the Assembly, he would like to

1y that there was not the ghost of

a chance for the West Indies to
get any substantial aid from the
Point Four unless the area helped
was a potentially dangerous area ir
time of war.

Money poured inte Malaya or
ny other country was only an-
ther weapon in the fight to have

1 inhabitants of those territorie
their side when the next war
ume along. It was not the desire
» Stamp out poverty and malnu
crition. They didn’t help China be-
cause they loved the Chinese more
than the black people, but because
it would not have paid them, and
it did not pay them to have China
iverrun by the Communists. They
eould therefore drop any idea that
anything which they might say to
ft soap the United States, was
kely to bring them money for the
West Indies.
He, however, would say that if
‘iis Bill had not been carefully
signed after the failure of the
udd Bill, and had not reached
ich a stage, they might have
.ound that it would have got
\hrough—he did not believe that it
vould get through now—without
1e West Indies being aware of it
before it was too late.

Amendment

He felt, and he was glad, that the
inover of the Address had accepted

the amendment of the junior mem-
ber for St. Peter, because if they
used an American phrase, such as

they liked to use, about good
neighbourliness, and if they re-
minded the Americans that they

vere appealing to them, and re-
minding them that they were tak-
ing them at their word that they
vould be good neighbours, and a
step such as suggested in the Bill
was not the way to be good neigh.

bourly.

He was one of those cynics who
iid not believe that there was such
a thing as national morality. If it
paid the United States in bal-
ancing the advantages and dis-
advantages of having-a disgruntled
West Indies on their door step, to
come down against West Indians,
then they would come down
against them. He did not think that
it would pay them, and he felt that
the Address would serve a very
useful purpose. and _ certainly
strengthen the hands of the West
Indians and the Senator who might
be inclined to help. He, therefore,
had much pleasure in joining with
the members of the House, and he
hoped West Indians in general in
this area, were making strong rep-
representation against the Bill.

After the amendments by Mr.
F. L. Walcott were accepted, the
House unanimously gave their
assent to it

Later. Mr. W. A. Crawford
moved a complimentary Address to
be sent to the Senator and the
West Indian Committee in appreci-
ation of their efforts to protest
against the Bill. This was also
passed nem con,



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10—-13 Broad Street

the 13th Ipswich, who is still _Accompanied by Major J. E. te ween

at school, Griffith, Island Scout | Commis- To District “E
RICHARD DENBY. 17-year- Sioner, Mr, L. A. Harrison, Secre- . ah ta

old senior scout of the Sist tary of the Boy Scouts’ Associa- ae me a a Sasi oe

Purley, Surrey, and office tion and Patrol Leader Trevor poise station this week. He ihas

Junior. Carter of the First Sea Scouts, gicceeded the late Station Sgt
DEREK HAMBLIN, 16-year- the Contingent visited St. John’s Gy r4.¢

old senior -cout of the 15lst Church and afterwards lunched at Set. Rice nas been transferred

Bristol, a Police cadet. Powell Spring Hotel before re- grom Speightstown Police Post
WILLIAM MARTIN, 17-year- turning to the ship to continuc where he was in charge Cpl

old Patrol Leader of the 28tn their journey to Jamaica via Worrell has taken up duties as

Glasgow, Scotland, who is still Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao and N.C.O. in charge of the Speights-

at school. Cartagena own Police Post

(6 & 254
A 65¢

ERD




PAGE SIX ; BARBADOS ADVOCATE _ PHURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952

€3 LA S S I F IE D AD S| | PURAAC NOTICES Harbour Log Passengers List BRION WINS GOVERNMENT NOTICE

'
TELEPHONE 2508. NOTICE oo See ee PORTLAND, Feb. 20. BOILERS FOR SALE















NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th: Cesar Brion of Argentina, 198,






























Sint h, Miss Olive Edwards, Mrs. Editt



ana Miiincinssipe Bi tne = Careline el - ? ell tvpe CORNISH fire tube boil 5 in diameter and
~~~ lithe intention of the Vestry of the . = From Sovthampton—Mrs. Honora Drum- | world’s fifth ranking heavyweight 2 shell type CORNISH fire tube boi feet Rgporeiiaca 4
For Births; Marriage or Br i a “FOR SALE fer Saint Michael te cause to be : mete > nond, Mr. Theo. J. Hamein, | eOved another obstacle for this} | yurteen feet long, working ye ure - to 250 lbs. - Romi aan
@pnouncement# in Catib Calling s 4 | duced into the Legisiature of thi 1 Ww. 1 atts. Stare J. notes 2 *|chance at the title last night by Boilers are Complete with all boiler mountings, fuel oil burners
C ; i - Mrs. Mary ‘ sk n, Mr. Bryan Pygsley, | : >
Range fo 99.00 for eny Dumber ¢ | he Solan AE, neues i \. David Set Mast. C. J. Pubsiey, Mast. G. A, lev, |decisioning Joe Kahut, 188, of | and fuel tanks, also superhéater, if required. Can be seen at Ever-
up two 50 ond 6 cents ¢ ord 4 a} - s — | 4) A Bill to extend the opera I 1 Sct Mrs. D. M. Pugsley, Dr. Colin E. | Woodburh Ofegon in a ten-round | | : :
ditional word. Terms cash Phe 8} i the Vestries (Cost of Living t I Tider : a 7 | & -— 1 Pumping Statio St. Jo Will be s s y.
between 6.90 afd 4 p.m.. 3118 for Ycath | AUTOMOTIV | to Employees) Act, 1947 Sch. M a Tudor, Cicely Volonterio. Mast. | main bout for the Polio Fund ton Pupiping Station, St. Jobr ill be sold singly oe
‘eee only after ¢ pom ! au Silke eaallauas Act. amending the same for f ch. Ex Sted ta he tae ME : Benefit, Kdahut was straightened | Tenders to be submitted to the Honourable Colonial Secretary
a Stare - rriod of on ear to <. h Mf a . . > 7 * : . . Ne or 6 91°
xcellent condition. Ring 8143 j Soth hist cash a aSVAS M Hote. Kirton, Mast. G. R. H.|Up out of his familiar ¢rouch then | on or before Frida February, 1952. —21.2.52.—
. a: ined. Se 2 Me $ ARR Sirteim* BE ; , FE . ke ‘
CLARKE i MSP ; eee eee rane | (>) A Bll to extend the operatior Frabkiyn D. OR. es re atl E. Martin and;knocked down for the count of wield ai chit lie et i salt tccautalbene ah ll ekg.
pital “yeherday, “See dee 7 - | a eae. _ erat - Capt G. t. Sealy, 1 . B Front ‘i. fiaxte-Mhs Breeli 1. Sealy mfor Kalut te See probe sbly his} OFFICIAL “NOTICE
0 si-}] CAR--V ll Velox 1951 ™ r , E 7 a : : nited Pugrim, Ae tor a From Martiniqué—Mr. Gladstone Dum-
take Bak ot from her late ree excellent Gonditioe: abt dnae ue Greer, Ge. seme for phe ie Fe — ag act mett, Mrs. Marie Grandino, Miss. Julien e|last chance against any world) parsapos
Roy,Jitmes, Anderson, (Sons),{ Courtesy Garage. Dral 4616. Sha ee ees pas tons net, Capt. | pengvera and Mast. George Wiliams. | renowned contender. Brion car- | IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
Carmien, Annette, Barbara, Janice 17.2.52—6n. | urhélided. ty the Parookiel Stn Se eee isis emai DEPARTURES YESTERDAY BY THE | ried the fight all the way suffer- | id id , :
(DAU ines) diay Clarice (Mother | smnestatemnitininnmmensiteinensimmeretisiniinniciogivetet - N 2 : mee ,* A5r tons net, Cap COLOMBIE ing from a small puff and a slight | N PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act. 1906, I do hereby give notice to all
, 8 "ARV ployees Pension (Amendment) A P. Dupont, from’ Martinique Trinidad—Miss Barb. Malcolm Pp }persons having or claiming any estate right or interest or any Hen or incumbrance
er), “Elsie Thompson and Eveiy CAR-—Vauxhall Velox 18 h.p. Salooii, 1948) by increasing the amount of M.V. Monekz 180 ¢ net. Ghat For Trinida se rbara uleoly ut on his left eye in the eighth 2 gt a ¢
7 21.2 1949-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000 . S aeee , Cnn Ay " set *Pt.| Mrs. Cameron Stuart, Mfs. M. Richard- je y in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant
‘ourtesy Garage. Dial 4616. i pale Pace Bb tar i Ge, Hutson, from Demaisien on, Mr. Daniel Ghalband, Mrs, Norma |round. Both his eyes were bleed-| to bring before me on account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and
Mee 17.2.52—6n. think ft pay to inew pensioner} In Touch With Barbados | Chalbana, Mr. William Dear, Mrs, Flaine | ing in the ninth, but his skill | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday of Friday between the hours of 12

CARRINGTON & SE | was enough to halt Kaihut who} 20°? and 3 o’clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,











Sn _ oe PICKUP—Good model. A Ford Pickup, Co i ‘Trotman, Mrs. Audrey White, Miss I : : ce | Bridgetown before the 25th day of March in order that such claims may
HOUSES cady for work. Priced right. Apply to | [oleHors for the. Vestry of St. M ch: iia : astal Station uae| Whitehead, Miss. Sybil Barrow, Mr.|displayed poor timing through | be reported on and ranked according to, the nature and priority thereof respectively,
nara reeset Pilgrim Mission Home, Bank Hall Main al a NI ical areas aa Gist they a Meee , one , ‘e cies ings Donald Campbell, Mrs. W nifred Richards, jout. —U.P. otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
FL ema ‘ seekers Road, St. Michael 19.2.52—Gn. as z Pi aie oe sarhades.| Mit. Ok Millington, Miss: Inez Payne, ! ——————_—_——_--__________________ | deprived of all claims on or against the said property
furs mated ve tree eaten wh ‘ ae through their Barbados| yi.g Mildred Pelew, Mr. Grace Colly- Mr. Isaac Matalon, Mr. John R. Dixon, |
tractive RitCINEIDEK. dhoeks. tials ELECTRICAL NOTICE pone Sai 9 Fanuae,| OTe. Miss Hilda V. ‘Squires, Mr. Melvin Mrs. Eleanor B. Dixon, Mrs. Corinne E Plaintiff: ERROL MALCOLM STEELE
a, m3 Vie 8.5 eS? 8.8 sent Jaguar

oni Cli, Avaliable: thinbaine 1 PHYLLIS ESLYN GILKES heretofore Workms



Miss Edith Gibson, Mrs. C. Miller, Mrs Susan A Culver, Mr Defendant: HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein




eee quae a ha Colombic * 6 Salte . ., >» ,
é - Soak ae eae sometimes called and known by the name - . Peters, Mr. John D. Douglas, Miss Jane George H, Coxe, Mrs. Elegabeth Coxe | by ARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her
yal 250i ne ane A GENERAL ELECTRIC Air-Condition- | of Phyllis Estyn Weatherhead of Rive oe Alcon Mane ¥ Leonce, Mr. Alfred White, Miss Irsi‘ and Mrs. C. A. Sayer constituted attorney on record in this Island.
ee a et SS oe , suitable to cool and Miter the alin} Road in the paris of Saint Michaely*" 2ctros. ss. Lenton Williams. Mr. Lionel Haynes and Mrs.{_ For La Guaira—Mr. J. F. Holmes and | PROPERTY:
saa © foam. Enone 91-00, or write Sands jhereby give public riotice that’ on tne} iS Wi Queen Eltzabeth Vernon Knigh Mrs. Mabel Holmes | ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-
—— ——_--—— ---- lds . Peter. 52--3n elnor



7 s, te 20th day of February 1952, I formally and * 7 For Ss semntee ria John Gaspard Le For Cartagena——Mrs. irene Evans and | terprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise the parish of Christ Church in this
SILVER WATERS--Silver “Sands, Chr absolutely renounced relinquished and Italia, 5





































































Moine, Mrs. Margaret C. Le Moine, Mr, Mstr. Peter Evans | Island containing by admeasurement 7 acres (inclusive of a portion of a_ road
pa ary, ee bedrooms, + a vin ee FLASHLIGHT _ BATTERIES — abandoned the use of my said surname Loids. : scan Homer S. Watt, Mrs. Ruth R. Watt.. For Curacao—Mr. G. Bovell twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Pu'u'c
Dye Wea, we 7 er tact holesale and Retail. CITY GARAGE | of “weatherhead’ and then assumed | W9%¢h@ Seawind, | _ i ————- | Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and bounding on. lands of ti:e

= Psi = 212.5211 land adopted and determ ned thenceforth |, “ig ait. yea es ; estate of Miss Mufcy FE. Lucas deceased, on lands of James A. Tudor, on lands
ANTED SRE Trooper, Vago, Phot | incre the"eurnane of stiles | Pass. ay Held Tanga 82 TAKE NOTICE gine Honours, D, Chandler, nants Mewiatd, joe Se a Did te
ri Electrical. Only $75.00. At our new seal ot the es ek of “Weather. Bi , s. El Cus Astral, 8.8 ; aan re Mr E C. Sacked an, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the
eS hs eee eee ae: eet ee CR * | head.” : rant + ro eters ee p Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all othe:
AY ; “ .
Dal 5136 19.2.52—In. pAnd. A dive further notice that by RATES OF EXCHANGE ' A OW | buildings ana erections thereon erected and built standing and being. ||.
Tae ae nateeanene | a e ay 0 ruary JARY 20. 1952 e - , IA} f ae
COOK GENERAL & LAUNDRY MAID | 1952 duly executed and attested and eran ee — Registrar-in-Chancery.
Apply Mrs. Lisle Bayley, Pavilion MECHANICAL recorded in the Registration Office of this! 4. 4 19 Reece oan menses ek 8/16 - Bill filed :— 28rd October, 1961
Hastings. "g0.2.52—4r, Island om the 20th day of February 1952, Demand Drafts 71.56 That CLUETT, PEABODY & CO. INC., a corporation organized under the laws | Dated 2ad January, 1982. 24.1.52—4n
a np pe a ees |i formally and absolutely renounced and Sight Drafte 714/10 1°! the State of New York, United States of America, whose trade or business nie
MISCELLANEOUS | ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with | abandoned the said surname of “Weather-| 34 45)) Coble sddres¢ is 433 River Street, Troy, County of Rensselaer, State of New. York. |
! platform, pneumatic tyres and brakes.| head’? and declared that } had assumed 719/10 Currenes 90 2/1 U.S.A., has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register | -
ROARDERS—“Priva: fms 7) Passed Highways _& Transport, never |and adopted and intended thenceforth Coupon 69 3/1 in respect of shirts, collars, eulfs, wnderwear, pajamas, night, shirts, handker- |
Savannah can accommodate vile nea hi ed, Dial 4616, Courtesy Garage. upon all oecasions whatsoever to use and 50% Silve 20% hiefs, neckties, piece goods and shirtings of cotton, rayon, wool and combina: |
Trinidad. Single or double roorrs. ow. te 15.2.89—8n, | subscribe the name of “Gilkes'’ nstead _—...-.——«. tions thereof, and will be entitled to register the same after ofie month from | §
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port Ponieane trae aareies of “Weatherhead” and so os to be at the 2ist day of February, 1952 unless some person shall in the meantime g@yve |
of Spain. . a all vaea bs tg? called Tier TAKE NOTICE notice in duplicate to me at my Office of opposition of such registration The
: 2 pac ri ¥y ne name of “Gilkes’ trade mark can be seén on application at my office z ; pe KOE ORD
atl MISCELLANEOUS onelunenas F MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW > EL EES
° tiie Pig exclusively. Dated this 12th’ day of Februany 1952 | b, ; :
: — passaize eigtand ed man, in Dated the 20th day of February, 1952 H. WILLIAMS, ZEALAND LINE LIMIT ED. The MLV. MONEIRA will adeept »
eturn for charge of mental case, Write WHYGLIS FSLYN GILKES : ade Mark. (M.A.N.Z. LINE) x
Box “S" C/edAdvocate C : . + & ; > ere uote, Miwon. eesl aun Registrar of Trade Marks Cargo and Passengers for Domin- \
ong sane Co. ; GOLF BAG & CLUBS—For sale very late Phyllis Eskyn Weatherhead. 21.2.52—3n | Montserrat, Nevis
20.2.52--3n [ cheap )La@ges canvas and leather ; 21.2.52—2n S.S. “TEKOA” is scheduled to sail ica, Antigua, on

ee | Of ba. (1) Man's leather golf bag misc.

& olf clubs. Call 4942. 21.2,52—In LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE:
- . JAMS:—Apricot Jam, Fig Jam, Peach
um, and Marmalade n 21b Tins, W. M The application of Granville Millar,
FORD, 35, Roebuck St. Dial 3489 Shopkeeper of Roebuck Street, holder of
21.2,52—2n | Liquor Litense No, 1196 of 1952, granted
es edie to him in respect of a board and shingle
LADIES BRASSIPRES—Pemale Beauty | Shop with shedroof attached at Chap
ogins with beautiful Brassieres. We|â„¢an's Lane, St, Michae], for permission

Give yourself
have latest varieties from 92 cents to] to use sald Liquor Lieénse at a walt = =
$2.20 pair. Visit KIRPALANI, 25 Swan | building at Chapman Cross Lane, St
Street 21.2.52— Michael

In
ee Dated, this 20th da of ane any, 1952
MEGASS: At Four Square Factory,|To G. B GRIFFITH, Bs That ROYLE-MIDWAY INt 4 Corpor 2
Apply the Manager, Telephone 2442, Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist “AL ation organized and existing under the
16.2.52-—6n Signed IRA HUNTE, laws of the State of Delaware, United Ww
for Applicant States of America, whose trade er business
PURGRA igeon Feed — none| N.B.—This application will be con- | address is 22 East 40th Street New York,

better —.10-Ib. lots and wi a , | sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at [New Yor A.; Manufacturers, has
2547, or Aube in Police Court, Distrct “A” on Monday, | applied

per Ib, Phone : 2, 3 “ . registration of a_ trade * Sup ri
the 3rd day of March, 1952, at 11 o'clock, Pmark ir att "A" of Register in respect . 0.
SHIRT hr ee hae ble of making | a.m of an oil adapted fo se as a lubrica- ’
60 dozen shirts per For particulars: G. B, GRIFFITH, tor, a pruserver, or ¢ inser for metal
furniture polish and

and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd
inst

The M.V. “DAERWOOD” w'll
accept Cargo and Passengers for
Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada,
and Aruba. Sailing Saturday 23rd
inst.

The M.V. CARIBBEE will
scent Cargo ond Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,_
Nevis and St. Kits. Saiiiig bii-
day 29th inst.

from Adelaide February 15th, Melbourne
February 26th, § March 4th, Bris-
bane March 15th, iving at Trinidad
about April 15th i Barbados about
April 18th.

In addition to teneral cargo this vessel
has ample space for chilled and ‘hard
novel car





















Riackdeshanninnianmenient



FURNESS WITHY & CO., LTD.,
TRINIDAD.

B.Wi SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC

and Consignee. Tc'e Jo. 4047

pace cee

|
|
rgo accented on through Bis of
I pe for transhipment at Trinidad to

i Guiana, Leeward and Windward
Islands.
For further particulars apply —

DACOSTA & CO., LTD.

BARBADOS, B.W.L. |! J6666tafstet OO PO SSSI SY





























Phore Johnson 431 Police Magistrate, ue “A wood, or ileath :
2.62—1n owdered, paste, anc t ax ara= A nC,
$68. -In. Mons ter Gleaner policnthe, nod peerente When there’s a job to be done or a game to be played—a
TINNED FRUIT—Peaches, Pears, ing) wood-work, floors of all kinds, * : s tich beefy acne ith
Cugwas, Gkapes, ines ant Froiit, Salad LIQUOR | LICENSE NOTICE furniture, linoleum, and automobiles: « cup of Bovril is the very best of drinks. It a ih NEW YORK SERVICE
i, Ting, large and sma a , vr li sat of] Preparation for cleaning upholsteny, a : its beefy
aust FAN Hie thai pins 14 (AAS DM 180,35, Rochuck §t | Saoniaoepeen oF. foie Rall, der {og | Preparation for cleaniup-rugs and carpets, flavdut serids a welcome glow through yen oH en a
ior cook $4. peed BOO, 5 08r soeet St" | to her in respact of a board end shingle } 40," fecpareuien for soe goodness puts new life into you. ‘There’s nothing like A STEAMER sails 7th March — arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952.
Gas shown

today at wn Fars St ish Hall,

i

REAL ESTATE
JOHN

ir



hop with shedroof attached at Pr
=) TINNED MPATS:-Satisaites, Carned » ue ee ee ‘att me ‘ ¢
Miuttoig Gord Be feel itt Coredi oid 4| St Michael, for permission to Use said} pe oad cia

i ‘ou up and sustain you.
Bovril to build you up y “NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
| SS. “LIBERATOR” safled 26th Jan arrives Barbados 17th Feb., 1952.
A STEAMER sails 13th Feb arrives Barbados ah Feb,, 1952,

q q;.| Liquor License at a board and shingle} 4. rs F Hao Mat
aa i ae Dial Yale M at a! shop Wth shecroof attached nt Weir's | 'esister ul me after or
toebuck r 21,9,59—2

Gap, Britton’s Hill, St Micbacl ue inal te the a
ites 2 a fF ua L952 , ; x
TORNADO—International K.41, Benutt. | Deed this fate cay of Rebruau wotice in duplicate to h
ful eondition, excellent eqitipment..aood 4 f A adn positic ai ¢
. 0 Police Magistrate, Dist A de r n be seen on applic ato n
} racing record. Cost $79000 now $500.00. Signed CAROL BLACKMAN 1 ay ri ”

No offers, Wicks. Telephone 3289 Applicant

ei a 18.11. BIN. f.0 | N.B.—This application will be con- “Dated. this 130) ¢ er Eee — HEALTH IN EVERY BOTTLE

| sidered at a Licensing Court to be held at
“ALCOA PLANTER’ 12th Februany 2ist February

TI | Police Court,. Distyet “A on Monday
day of March, 1952, 11 o’eloe!
TAKE No - er ae a igs 3.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS 26th February 7th Mareh

| ; us
| vm a ; : 4% PILG ar 24th Mareh
MITOGA F. A. McLEOD, 2 ‘ ALCOA PILGRIM 4th Mareh 4th
| ; ; f : rd March 2
| Police Magistrate, a ‘RSONAL ; 70 pina ae ABH
That CLUSTT, PEABODY & CO. ENC., te A STEAMER .._ .. a Ist May llth May
1 corporation organized under the laws - er Rm Set re - - nec 7 7
wf the State of New York, United States public is hereby warned ag.





CANADIAN SERVIUS
SOUTHBOUND





Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbador









These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
of America, whose tradeor business PUBLIC SALES credit to. inj wife HILDA FER- , ed p € c
adtircks is 483 River Street, Troy, County *

f Rensselaer, State of New York, U.S, A.,
“ns applied for the - re tion of 4

f N ‘nee Denny) as £ do not hold
elf tespons ble for any debt or debts



ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO. LTD —CANADIAN SERVICE





(1) The property known as “The Crotons” at Deacons
Road. It consists of 4 aéere of land and house which has open
verandah, drawing, dining and breekfast rooms, 3 bedrooms,
toilet bath and kitchen.

(2) Property at Oistins, Christ Church as a drug store or

contracted by her or any one elge in my

trade mark in Part “A” of Register in REAL ESTATE

me without a written order signed by
espect of wearing apparel, . including





AVR. 8., FV. Ae
COMPRETIENSIVE —LYST-
INGS ALWAYS AVAIL-



‘irts, Collars, neckties, pajamas, hand- “PBENEZER", that desirable dwelling-
kerchiefs and underwear, and will be} house overlooking the sea situate at Ashton Hall,

| Signed FRANKLIN FERGUSSON, — |

1

entitled to register the same after One| Enterprise Road, Christ Chureh and i] St. Peter. |
|

LINE

sonth from the 2ist day of February, | of 12 inch stone standing on 2 Roods













- ABLE 2 21.2. 59—2n Ice Cream Patlour. It is residence and shop on the sea.
r* ‘ 2 unless some person shall in the]15 Perches of land containing OPEN | st —____asett naeteence (3) Substantially built wall house with galvanize roof
eo ie antime give notice in duplicate to m*| verandah, drawing and dining room#, 2 called “Eyareville’ at Eagle Hall Road. It has gallery, draw- wane
iratous The tease mark Gln be°seen’| DRaeRana.. (WIR Amaee . or By Ves ing room up and downstairs, dining and breakfast rooms (4) OUTWARD FR THE UNITED KINGDOM
f Era e 7 see | kitchen, pantry, garage, servant's room, & , a
FOR SALE on application at my office water and electricity. The above will be bedrooms, toilet and bath, kitchen and room for garage. This pa OM E UNITED KING



Dated this 12th day | February 1952. set up for sale at the office of the house is in perfect order. No repairs and is priced to sell.

(4) One stone cottage at Codrington Hill with verandah,
drawing and dining rooms, 2 bedrooms and kitchen. Water
and light throughout.

(5) 20 x 12 HOUSE at Bush Hall, 9 ft. high, and built
of pine and put together with bolts. The roof is covered

. WILLIAMS, | undersigned on Thursday 28th February
Registrar of Trade Marks || at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Inspectior
21. 2.52—3n. any day on application to the occupier
HAYNES & GRIFFITH,
Solicitors, 12 High Street

TAKE NOTICE | pues

HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom hw }
house, all. conveniences, with party- a

sized living room, open verandah, kitchen
jand utility room Jarage, laundry, 2

BYWAYS", f * New Rd.—
A pleasant, re-war stone
bungalow claes construe-
tion thry t The 8 bedrom
ire Peovided with washbasins and
ali hat ‘ Ol exposure rhere
is a Soree unge, dining room,
fro \ dah and ktchen. In
the bits t are extensive store-
iit é gareg & servants’
bh ws a letached. A of
find t% ov "000 sq. it. & un-
elripted vie are obtained
‘Oem a} A popular
\d s#lect district,

Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados

S.S. “WAYFARER” .. Ntwport and

; Liverpool. 7th Feb. 20th Feb.
S.S. “PHILOSOPHER” .. London and

M/brough.12th Feb. 26th Feb
$.S. “DEFENDER” __.. Liverpool. and

Glasgow.12th Feb. 26th Feb.
S. “PLANTER” .» London. 29th Feb. 11th Mar.









with galvanize and close boarded inside. Can be sold for
$800.00.



(6) 34 of an acre of land at Britton’s Hill on road leading

to Club Morgan.

| gaxvant rooms and storage room under

Enjoy the hospitality, com- |
fort and thoughtful serv-
ice which have made PAA
“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over. |

}

|

On, attractive Billsfae sites Rockley Nev (7) 7 Spots of land remaining at Hothersal Turning.
Sizes from 10,000 to 13,000 square feet.
(8) Only a few Spots remains at Maxwell Road and at
Thorpes, St. James.
D'ARCY A. SCOTT,
Middle Street. Dial 2645.

20.2.52,—2n.

Road. A, Barnes & Co,, Ltd. Dial 4476



13.2,52—t.f.n. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

ee

RIVERTON—River Road, standing on
7,761 square feet of land, The house
contains drawing, dining and two bed-

rf MDE> xwells Coast.
ij A hy The well preserved
Proper wit 3 bedrooms, large

ng room, lou
age serv
three and all

Walled grounds of

an acre insuring com-

plete nwivag Further = details
u application.

Vessel For Closes in Barbados
S. “CROFTER” .. .. London. 26'h Feb, |
§. “BIOGRAPHER” . Liverpool 28th Feb.

i
rooms, water and electric light. =|
spection by appointment ‘phone :

|

nn






. The above will be set up for sale at
That BOYLE-MIDWAY INC , 4 corpor=| public competition on Friday, the i

vd
‘tion organized and existing under the|gay of February 1952, at 2 p.m. at th:
lows of the State of Delaware, United | office of the undersigned

states of America, whose trade or bugihess CARRINGTON & SEALY,
ddress is 22 East 40th Street New York, Lucas Street
tew York, i S-0i., Meaaacact rere, has
pplied for the registration of a trade

mark in Part “A” of Register in respect AUCTION
{ -—- insecticides, disinfectants, garden

pray, and chemical weed killer, and UNDER THE SILVER

ill be entitled to register the same
fter one month from the 2ist day of HAMMER
‘ebruary 1952 unless some person shall
a the meantime give notice in duplicate
o me at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be



te

For further Information apply to... .

NEW YORK

Non-stop service by the luxurious
“El Presidente” or via San Juan by
popular, money-saving “El Turista.”

Regular service bv giant double-
decked “Strato” Clippers*—world’s
D, ©, SUGAR

By recommendations of Lloyds Agent fastest airliners—to Paris, Rome...
we will on FREDAY 22nd, 65 bags «i| stopovers in England, Ireland.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents









“CASABLANCA” Maxwells Coast
—A beautiful property embodying
the finest pre-war workmanship,
Well designed for easy running
with 2 reception, 4 bedrooms,
Verandah, kitchen, pantry, garage,
storerooms etc. The land is approx
2 acres with flower and vegetable
Kardeng, productive orchard and
coconut grove. One acre walled

.

ROMERT THOM LIMITED

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C, and BW 1A
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466















Rardem may be sold separately as een on application at my office. . Dark Crystal Sugar at Plantations Ltd ——
Duilding # te ee Dated this 12th day of February. 1952 | Bay Street. Sale 12.90 O'clock. Tern ° PPLE
H. WILLIAMS, ‘ash. WV on }
“BUNGALOW, Rockley—A very Registray of Trade Marks. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO enezuela RUBBER Barbados Food Products
comiortabic compact tumber 21, 2.52—3n a Auctioneers.

a i Swift, daily service to all main
4 cities. Regular fiights to West In-

$ UNDER THE SILVER | ties, Colombia, Central America, |

|
|
1
x \
. HAMMER texico . . . and to East Coast of
y HOOVER WASHING MACHINES South America. ! it, you can
By recommendations of Lievds Age: *

bungalow in good residential area
on read. Accormmodation
comprises front covered veranual,
@rawiit coom, breakfast room
bedrooms, kitche: wage ser
quarter Pie vant garden
2 food vard at rear






LOCALLY CURED
BACON

is NOW ON SALE at





GARDEN HOSE

2-ply %% in. at 22c. per ft. |







4,



iy we will sell on FRIDAY, @nd, 3 Hoove | "OW “fly PAA” to 83° countries

Electr'e Washing Machines at K. and colonies,
¢c you Hunte & Co,, Ltd, Show Room, Lowe, |

ez? ®
r
iinnosaat ko Ce eee
999955
x

Cee

Secure Yours at . .

“wont STONT BUNGALOW, ’ : Messrs. GENERAL HARD-
(i. W. Hutchinson = J WARE SUPPLIES,

in@ Halt Terrace ‘

















bu Broad Street, opposite the 8 '
» | Machi ; ‘ ; Rickett Street.
FURNISH BETTER R | Sale 2 Betock Terms cash i For 22 yects the leading & CO, LTD ,
.|BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. international airline—PAA Dist 4298 frond £8 w wre age he is aa
lies, ane _" Tables. Bi Astes bende . eee 20.2.52-2n | Was first to link the Amer- ts . nid va
in Iron & Wood, Coil und Flat —_—- | feas by air, first to fly to 54 ‘,
Spring ashstand Soup . : ee le A oe ae Ok ae a a OO a oe a ee oe SPOS POG,
TABLES. in. Beautitul -Pelahod all six continents, and first H 2 aa ‘ a“
Mohouany abd others for Diniha, TAKE NOTICE to €l 7 ik ‘ne An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant. Use:
Citehe Radio and faney use DART y arovad the werid ’ .
ale Wagrons, Tea Trollars

GERM OILS






Stone and concrete torey house Kitchen and Bedroom @& That CLUETT, PFAGODY & CO F bak

standing in grounds of approx. 1% thane Ri DRAWING ROOM “ corporation organized cate the law: | or reservations, sce your ‘
Heres, Cool x Ma exceitens FURNITURE Typewriter, Prams 2 of the State of New York, United States | Travéel\Agent dr for Best Results.

safe bathing 5 beach Piane ‘ of America, whose trade or busine




nmodation







AOERBOO 85



















jer
iow ot gue canstructs

with parapet rt Pia propers
has the advantage of a edrner site
and ¢ Vv view cawhras
There are ¢ 4 bedre vith
Wat-in Wardrobe Laree lounge/
living roo wath 2 veranuaba
feeding om The kitchen is
well “prfed with fit cup
hourds Vos g-ecar @ard
ervanw rooms and iaundfy.

“THE RISK", St. Jome Lar

























A
opposite, Pxtensiv« 100 address is 433 River Street, Troy, Count | | . ‘i *
with 2% large reception rooms, of Rensselaer, State of New York, U.S.A . T
Brice. chen anc aness, 2mm (TR Le Ss WILSON 3 fine toni for ine souseran ot | : TENTRAL EMPORIUM
Toor nd ara Pnquirie trade mark in Part “A” of Register D . . .
eis : : SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009, respect of wearing apparel, it | AGE vhestibncié COLE & CO. LTD : Gasolene Service Station — Trafalgar St.
x shirts, collars, neckties, paj . 4 oe - . 4
Hy SB. Maxwell “Coast Lot FON | kerghbetes and “Underwear and. priit- be apetee LOAM IAA AEA LOLA LAA AAA SOA
A vag oullt bungalow with 3 8 PRO OOSPVOSOOS cotitled to register the same after ay .
Bedroons, iitee avin room, ss month from’ the 2ist day_of Februar PIV AMER. RICA, VY Agents
kKitchenagarace, servants’ quarters : G bot 1932 unless some person shall’ in the fi — THERE 1S NO IN BE
A ples ntly located property fer overnment o meantime give notice in duplicate to me . I H I TER tha
sale up ty compst.tive Abare nt my office of opposition ot suet Horio Artes G cM
pee € SOUTHERN RHODESIA) asia me ES) a eam ce “MUSTEROLE”
2 RENTALS % : a Dated this 12th day of February 1958 | Broad Street -- 8 towf
: % | H. WILLIAMS, | Phone 2122 (After b t | PU
; S 436% Rettiiterea Stock 2 memset TR eae | For; CONGESTION: MUSTEROLE Gives taatunt itatiet,
“BENBAM gham Gat e 20 r x, 7 21.2 ae i iE LE Gives Instant Relie
Mens, Mexwe ft hed < ‘ ~ = MUSTEROLE:—Meits quickly away into the Pores, At first
G@VaiiabH on ic Bias wo st er ae abroad. x] ——— there is a comforting, tingling warmth, followed INSTANT-
Session.2 % f rustee Investment | LY by a Delicious coolness; and then... SWIFTLY...
‘ +) > PY } , “dd - i
ONEV ia : y , comes the longed-for relief
he delim telat a ag a { Price: 100 plus conimission %| MUSTEROLE:—Is NOT just another ointment . . . MUS-
! i > ¥ TEROLE is the modern Scientific home therapy for the
* y| Medical condition known as “Congestion”.
‘ : te x Remember:—IT’S MUSTEROLE
RESHOENK B y fur .
ished wah a es ch “ A. M. WEBB > The All purpose Rub:— for...
tb town excell tall % x Colds, Coughs, Sore Throats, Lumbago, Muscular
ail : ; ‘ . Sprains
eves i i} Stockbroker. x} INSIS ON Es a aghast Mae ia
bt at:—
2 : I so .
Phone 4640 * %3 Broad Street, Bridgetown. ¥ | BOOKER’S (B’dos) DRUG STORES LTD.
Jantations Building S Tteatot : > | BROAD STREET \STINGS (Alpha Pharmacy)
vue ae Upstairs Phoenix Pharmacy }| End at all other “GOOD DRUG STORES”
‘
HbA AQAHnasngqgassaaas—ar




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN













HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



"tan you lend M@ _ «
| @ Paradol tablet?” aN J

NS
a

A REMINDER ey










Wuen a Girt doesn’t want to leave

| class—and have to make embarrase-

nq explanations—it's Paradol she

} asks for. For Paradol means quick

relief from suffering caused by

periodic pains—headache, too—
without disagreeable after-effects,

| Ask your druggist for Paradol,
scientifically compounded from 4

; | ingredients. The name “Dr. Chase”
| “® your assurance. 22

| DR. CHASE’S

| | PARADOL-

| wmmme Quick Relief from Pain mmm

’

}

BISCUITS
TO-DAY.

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

That Popular Game :-—

MONOPOLY

DART BOARDS
TABLE TENNIS SETS
BLUE BAND WARE



PAPO Stes



at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE











PUT ON THIS )( A PINK APRON WITH







DID YOU SEE ME PuT Jira.









|

i
APRON SO $~ 7 ORGANDY RUFFLES ! My FOOT DOWN aN
YOU WON'T fePhn« TAKE IT AWAY INSIST ON ad tee
SOIL YOUR Jorge “A

CLOTHES fr& PLAIN LITTLE APRON

e

SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS }

»} DE LA INDIA CHINA e
EJIPTO

THANI’'S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3468 )

|
ORIENT





FLASH GORDON

W yea

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only

——







Pa Za

ElchT HUNDRED DESPERATE, CAGED Souls
ARE DENIED THE DREAM OF ESCAPE





= a _ eee
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

BY A CANNY SET OF INSTRUMENTS ON
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— INSTRUMENTS THAT POLICE EVERY [o)
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BUT IN THE HANDS OF “BIG MOE“ KOSLOW
THESE CONTROLS BECOME A FEARSOME

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' For THE FIRST TUNE IN MEMORY, THE LA Tins MADRAS CURRY 2 ; eed d
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WA\EANWHILE, POOR WEE DORRIE, ATTEMPTING TO BUY JUST MISSED HER /
TICKETS TO GO ON THE TIZAIN PLATFORM, IS GETTING “ANTON SANITARIUM *.,
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b RETURN HEIZ RING













THE COLONNAD GROCERIES







TEECKETS FROM ZE
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BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS |
i“
? | By RIPLEY

psoas ae NE a ee :

YOU ARE RIGHT- || AND THERE ARE MY FAMILY AND I MY ANCESTORS PARDON - MRS. WIDENSHORT- YOUR MAGGIE-YOUR BROTHER BIMMY |
| MY DE-YAH~WE || NO EXCLUSIVE CAWNT LOWER WOULD BE HUSBAND JUST PHONED AND WANTS || HAS HIS GARBAGE WAGON IN | : ;
| AH LIVING IN A || SETS ANY MORE!| | OURSELVES TO || AGHAMED OF TO KNOW IF YOU WANT HIM TO GIVE FRONT OF THE GARAGE DOOR- | No family should be without a copy of
'VULGAH AGE- || ONE FEELS SO | | ASSOCIATE WITH |] ME IF THEY BAIL TO GET YOUR COUSIN OUT OF | : 2
SOCIETY HAS || STUPID GONG PRESENT-DAY || KNEW I WOULD || JAIL-AND TO TELL YOU 4 YOUR LNCLE'S PICK AN’ SHOVEL: |

FATHER IS UP IN THE
ATTIC TRYING TO GET



T CAN'T GIT IN THERE TO |

\ LOST ITS WU TOC THESE SOCIETY -I THINK || ATTEND ANY HE SAYS HE'S GOT A JOB TO
p EI 4

| this amazing modern book of Wonders,
"LL BUY A YACHT || OF THE SOCIAL t
| | AND GET AWAY || FUNCTIONS OF





THESE TIMES! Miracies, Freaks, Monstrosities and almost

| %, BELIEVE IT OR NOT

Impossibilities. There is both entertainment i



4 and edification in this new collection of con-
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ea crete proofs that truth is stranger than
a fiction.
|

“Ripley” has ransacked new continents,




‘i yy
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invaded new countries, gone exploring all







YOU'RE HIT! over the world, become an almost legendary



iT ae Pl ;
y THE HAWK'S (a8 eek ) ; | hero of the stage, screen and wireless,
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THE PALACE! 5
4-4

on

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ful story is itself the greatest BELIEVE IT
OR NOT of them all.

a D . OCATE
WELL? HAVE ANY OF THE REST THEN REPLACE THE Qe WIL
OF YOU ANYTHING To SAY ¢ Ml | THINGS YOUTRIED 1O™ Vitae M1 4
.. AGERE acy S ‘
es Rode ee) | TENT BACK UP gpmtanrinet, SE:
Fe i aaa ae 1% A 22
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS



pe D
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PROF DUDLEY FAINTS AS THE
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\ A








PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BEST TIME DONE BY

Castle In The Air
Does Smart 7 Furlong

THE track was only h

By BOOKIE

alf open yesterday for gallops







CAUGHT

ew











Sports
Round-up

oe



| Regatta
Handicaps

The. Fourth Regatta of the Royal
Barbados Yacht Club will be sailed
in Carlisle Bay at 2,30 p.m, on



































THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21,

NEW COLT



1952





Belleplaine Boys
Beat Clevers Hill

The Belleplaine Boys’ Club de-
feated Clevers’ Hill Boys’ Club 12
goals to nil at the Belleplaine Com-
munity Centre grounds yesterday



f evening.
but quite a few did strong work. Mr. J- R. Edwards’ new BOXING Saturday. . 4 For the Belleplaine Club, B. D.
colt Castle in The Air returned the best time for the morn- eee timgs are @S Campbell scored five goals, K.
ing when he did five furlongs in 1.04. As he broke from LONDON, | Clase No. Yacht bios wn Wak ta a ee, and K
the seven furlong post this was very impressive indeed. RANDCLPH TURPIN has been. ——————-_—_-—--- ~— se : a es "Patel aes tae
Thanks to my friend Footpad, — — - —_—— awarded the “Boxing News Belt” = - a. Belle Se sade r
who stayea on after I left, I am ° for the second year in succession. 8 13 Ranger 230 Red The Sei a ak tiniad te
able to give you most of the Belleville Cluh This award is made to the boxer B 481 Fantasy tt ° ee Mime the Bélléplaine
gallops; They were as follows: 3 . judged to have done most for the Ae ee ana on ‘ ane their aan ‘aod be
Betsam worked earliest. It was sport, and the decision was reach- 5 8 Peter P 2.32 Yellow sented : . p
almost dark when I arrived and Tennis Results ed by conducting a readers’ poll. — drei ade corsaiately out-
she was already saddled, She did Following are the results of tha ‘Randy’s’ success was overwhelm- 8B 7 Moyra Blair 233 Red played their opponents. V. Watsor
a comfortable box to box (6 fur- tennis played at Belleville Tennis ing, for he captured ninety-five —5 . Sint ————= (was easily the most outstanding
longs, 47 yards) in 1.30 and the Club yesterday:— per cent of the votes. B 8 Rascal 234 Yellow Player. :
Se ce Turpin figures twice in thi 4 ae is hee — ‘ond ess Walle Le
ros toe MIXED DOUBLES NDICAP. wice in this poll. : Ros , Lee,
eae Ber Ge tor tae 8 % Dr Seunaing and Mise ee: His Empress Hall fight with Rob- _? 12 Rainbow 235 Red Atherley, Smith, Springer, A.
box was 1.38 and the five in 1.13, —40 beat J. D. Trimingham and inson, in which he won the world “p10 Van Thorndyke 2.36 Yellow Campbell, B. Campbell, Hutson
Little wien time's tei heck” Mite M, ‘King ise oe 68, middleweight title, was voted the - a (Capt.); Branch and Watson.
ittle more than a brisk canter. ’ ’ best fight of the year. Here, no 3 Rainbird 2.38 mee ers’ Hill: Johnson (Capt); O.
. Derham (Jane, was Cager. but TO-DAY’S FIXTURES. doubt, the fans were swayed by p 2 Resolute Mayers, Holder, Dermont, V. Hink-
kept in check by Frank O'Neil, sentiment, for other fights such as D 1 Buccaneer 239 Yellow son, A. Hinkson, 1, Leslie,
doing five in 1.10 1/5. Men's Doubles Final. Dave Sands—Yolande Pompee, P 9 Olive Blossom _. Harewood, Trotman and Holder.
Castle in the Air broke from the Dr. C. G. Manning and E. P excelled it for thrills and action. ~3 ~~ ~5 Miscnier The referee was Mr. J. E.
seven but was only taken for the Taylor vs. P McG. Pa‘terson and D 2 Imp 241 Red Graham.
5 which he did in 1.04, He is a G. H, Manning. FENCING D 14 Hurricane
good looker and mover but hold a i oan.
his head a trifle high. He should EMRYS LLOYD, one of Bri- pb 7 Sinbad 242 «Yellow T Friends
be one of the favourites for thi Y.M.P.C. LOSE TO tain’s greatest fencers, retired ——————_______- ‘o Our en
Maiden Stakes. from competition after the 1948 1! 3 a eas cia
Usher looks better eact - COMBERMERE Olympie Games. Now, at 46, he .*, .* See -& Bee From Overseas
ing. He went with Blue Nelly this The first game i ird Divi menes “8 comeback, He is to. x Sornadoce 3.45 Zellow
Send cae it voreed welt to e first game in the Third Divi- captain the British team for this —— ———$—_—__——
_ they worked well to- sion football series was played yes- year’s Games at Helsinki. At first ! 7 Mohawk KINGSLEY
= mg cee 1/5. terday. Combermere started off he was to be non-playing cap- ° 8 Skippy 5 weer
_ Pepper Wine broke from the well by defeating a Y.M.P.C. “B” : : tain, but England needed an C 9 Folly . 247 Yellow :
7 or there about, She did the teem to the tune of eight goals to LINDWALL caught Worrell in 2nd slip. for 0 off Gomez in the fifth Test Match. axperienced competitor, and ~ Be eS Ee ee Pe RESIDENTIAL
ae 1.05, one at their grounds while the . a ae SS Rb tate eee a ies kcal —— Lloyd was persuaded to go the : i ia
Flieuxce did a box to box in Y.M.P.C., “A” team beat Comber- whole way. His appearance will : 2. unease ie CLUB
a es ia ast five in 1.06 3/5. mere Old Boys’ one nil at Y.M.P.C. Ss : strengthen Britain's chances. I 12 Dawn
ashing rincess did a box to Police defeated Y.M.C.A. one nil F
box at a strong clip returning in at Queen’s Park and at the Bay ports Window FOOTBALL akegeot ree AT BATHSHEBA
1,23 3/5, Wanderers beat Foundation one r S College meet Eimpire in « :
es did five easily in 1.08). nil. At Black Rock, Carlton went First Division fixture at infition, deans ties bene Be ed a ee
osette and Cavalier did five i: yhen Rangers defeated them ; + Ss (abou & els aie 2 ena -
j amactte and Cavalier did fve in down when Rangers defeated them Kensington this afternoon. | Slerling) on enlarging om me © 22 Ganoei 800 Yellow 11 Welcomes you and offers 3
Nobody apparently took Tibe- iad ; B ® © beaten in the Second Divi- aioe ale ae ate aren § i Gant’
rian Lady’s time. h A m ateur ; pionship. After the alterations, ma
Fuss Budget did a very ore- or ritis sion last season carried off Berhe, Lausanne and Zurich ‘| * Gorohetta 2.53 Red LOBSTER

strained box to box in 1.30 3/5.

COLONNADE PLAY



the championship of that

arenas will be capable of holding

I 18 Clytie









Division and have been ;
Veumsen whe particularly eas: Undoubtediy the entry of these . me between 55,000 and 60,000 peo. N.B. The following dates have been fixed LUNCHEONS
over a five in 1.05 1/5. She is om ALLEYNE ARTHUR By a Special Correspondent two fine sportsmen would be a ene Soutte First Di ples, while Basle and Geneva wil! 9, 5! Rewatta, Saturday 15th March
ious! y 7 , LONDON fillip to British golf. Interest ; . ; be able to accommodate over March, 1952. P f
ee Or, Caer. Bie. i ld be stimulated among thou Empire did not field a 50,000 H. BLAIR BANNISTER which include our
Notonite was another who was A football match between the When the Sports Editor of ohe Would be the 5 havi ., stare First Division team last year ern ‘= ~ Starter.
not allowed to do much, His time Colonnade and Alleype Arthur Of Britain's leading newspapers Sands a t © dandy aeens = aia and it will be interesting to CRICKET popular
for the box to box was 1.32. Sports Clubs will be played at the recently cabled Bing Crosby and fity and attendance thon British see how they acquit them- MERINGUE PIES
Belle Surprise did a good box Combermere School grounds this Bob Hope in America to ask them er ree ae Sy tee pe selves against the newly LESLIE AMES, of Kent and NETBALL E
to box in 1.23, afternoon, Play will start at 4.45 if they would compete in the Sl i'cir ln obtain this is surely | Promoted College team after | England, the greatest wicket- _ The Olympia netball team was in Coconut
Lunways pulled her usual best °'clock. British Amateur Open Golf : p a season’s rest. keeper-batsman cricket has ever defeated by Foundation Girls’ at ’
i . ae Championshiy at Prestwick com- "Ot an opportunity to throw ll be ie ¢, oo evn: are - ‘
to do five in 1.04 1/5 hard held. ite takin “are: ampionship caekesTetebias The referee wi Mr. known, is to become player-coach. Olympia on Tuesday by nine goals Lemon
Gun Site and Dunquerque went ceeaee are:- ; ’ mencing May 26th, he started the @way lightly. L. F. Harris, and linesmen: Last summer Ames displaced a to eight. \ as
off one behind the other, the latter H’ My a Harris (Capt.); biggest argument since it was Messrs. R. Parris and A. | disc, and spent most of the sea- Queen's College Old Giris will Or
in front of course. Gun Site 1, Hoyte t ae i ree. eg pide’ Be se mp rare bi ve — eer mn son in a spinal jacket. Kent hope play ‘Queen’s College at Queen's —
caught her up later and they did mz eee eet oe happenec us way. ope 2 presenting Empire w that he will be fit enough to play Colle; oday at 4.45 p.m.
Sa Bente bax an base: eho ena Alexander, and Crosby both replied that they Boxing Board be :—Smith (goal); Grant, this season, but if not, he Fvilt Tae fatbel match which was DIAL 95266
Cross Bow stayed on better Noe enye were expecting to file entries for . Bynoe: Alleyna, Rudder, act solely as First XI coach. The scheduled to have taken place
with Doldrum this time as they Alleyne Arthur;— §.’ Green ‘e Amateur. Another English QOhecks Records Maynard; Hope, Drayton, | post of county coach is still held betw ’s College Old Girl 24
did a box to box in 124 4/5. (Capt.), R. Morris, A. "Blackett, paper, upon seeing the news, ex- . > Douglas, Taylor and Rob- by C. Lewis. : met dee tiedtline Co van + Feb- ws Eoin.
Dim View did four in 52. . Bryan, B. Brathwaite, E. Lynch, Pe Bob end Bing playing 29 The State Boning Boards Medi- ar ill field c ‘ Omnae STEWART, 23 ruaty 22 Ste beed postponed.
; J ae astin, Goddard, N, Lawitss, C ae a g pla) - Peer eit ‘ollege w eld:— C, i -year- a
a did a box to box in Clarke rae 7 gy Be awless, C. gether in the premier Amateur cal esoraivnin is hen Se Smith (goal), F. Squires, old New Zealand hurdler, has
Flying Deen didaceie tet golf competition. The inference records of all boxers who have Trotman; Symmonds, Mr. come to London with one ambi-

was not impressive towards the
end, His time was 1.50 and [ do
not think he went as well as last



WHAT'S ON TODAY

was that the Championship would
become a comic music-hall turn.
Naturally such a suggestion was

been discharged from the army
and it was revealed that four fa-
mous boxers are among those in-

Smith, G. Squires; Medford,
F. Tudor, C, Tudor, Griffith,
Reid.



tion. It is to convinee the New
Zealand selectors that he should
be included in their Olympic team

ZEB
Every spoonful gives you _






Police at seized on in the States where vestigated. No names ‘were re- for Helsinki. Derek thinks the ae eh ee a —

Saturday, , . Co are im Pleas both Crosby and H are recog- vealed but it was believed that best way to do that is to put in

Embers did a mile and picked 10.30 a.m nised top-élass go fers. Right Ohe man is the ex+champion and some intensive work in England | imo re am ad mo re
up Arunda at the 7). The former of Christ Chureh away, Professiofial Jimmy De- two others are leading challengers. DE LAPENHA and is letting nothing deter him. —_—_———_--
is much like Gun Site when it Vestry — 2.00 p maret, one of the big-boys on The Boxing Commission em- WILL. PLAY He worked his passage here, with-
comes to lacking early pace and First Division. F Thee it do the “follow the sun” all-year- phasized that it is not impuiing . out the prospect of a job or a place e u3 er g y a % a
even a slow beginner like Arunda Empire vs. College at roufid American tournament cir- any wrorig-doing but it wants to (From Our Own torrespondent) to live, and had to spend his first
had to be held back to her, They Kensington — 5.00 p.m cuit, retorted with caustic com. S¢e if they had possibly used any : LONDON, Feb. 20. night on a bench in London's
did the box to box in 1.27 2/5. Malibe Goenel AGan ments in defence of the famous cheating to escape military ser- Lindy De La Penha, Middles- qrafaigar Square. Now he is

The Thing fooled everybody but —5.00 p.m ue" 1 couple, See eee OE ee ee a the putside happily settled in and has joined

ratedold time keeper. we , physical or psychological weak- right, a ay for Ja- ‘ : ;

Boasiie ae old pike Tinta ne ge gg _ Crosby and Hope had done al nesses which might be made maica against the Rest of the West Herhe Hill Harriers, devoting all

; his
great deal of good for Golf, as- apate Cine jo. EREng.

worse by ring action.—U.P.
serted Demaret, — Crosby, even

gate she ran once round in
1.24 3/5. Looked easier than she

Mobile Cinema Show. Indies at Kingston this week-end.

Lancaster Pasture,



St.




aturd: has his own tournament named @ Every spoonful of « Kepler’ gives you a rich
idee tie’ washes quite obli- aoe a after him. And Jimmy went on e ey St Seale A one ,
vious to the hard going in spite to say that if Hope or Crosby ese vitamins are nature’s wonder workers,

Barbados Flying Club at
Y¥.M.P.C, — 7.45 p.m
Monthly Concert —

could practise a little more they

of her big joint. She did a box to would beat 90 per cent. of Bri-

box in 1.26 4/5,

assurifig health and freedom from iliness,
@ Men, women, chiidren=all should start



Blue Diamond, the horse that
changed his mind in the middle of
a race meeting did five in 1.13,
never allowed to run very fast.

Waterbelle did a five in 1.07 4/5.
How can-one who was so chunky
at two, now look so hard and
spare?

Aim Low and Devil’s Symphony
did @ smart four in 51 3/5.

Red Cheeks did five in 1.09 fair-
ly easy,

Seedling was out again with the
imported filly Fille D’Iran. I am

told he “looked the better of the : Crosby and Hope have _ bott
two at the end of a five in 1.06. Wind Velocity 10 miles per been recommended by Americ BABY COATS each : $3 60
He has hopes for the Guineas, | hour “eet ) 29,949 in the past, so technically there ee lee e
should expect. Barometer a.m. . can be no objection to their

votte did a slow box to box (3 p.m.) 29.866 entry on this occasion. But Brit W/
ta ube 4/5, How con & roly-poly TO-DAY ish golf fans find themselves BABY OOLLEN
always remain a roly-poly? That Sunrise : 6.25 a.m. divided There are a number

is a secret that owners of Trini-
dad half-breds might give their
right arms to know.

Mareh Winds was much easiei
than Diadem over five in 1.08 4/5.

Watercress did not come off the
ice very much, She did a box to
box in 1.29 4/5,

Slainte has never thawed out.
His box to box in 1.82 4/5 was done
at his customery crawl,

A process-of elimination seems in 56 2/4. That brings her up ‘o compete this summer. Crosby, Sa
to bé going on to find out where 9th place. two years ago at St. Andrews,

Twinkle will be placed on race
day. Having already proved bet-
ter than Cottage she took on the
Antigua hope Condevon and made
the latter look inferior over a four

| They'll Do It Every Ti

{
“Like Sue oust STEPPED out oF | |
A BANDEOX ”= YOUVE ALL HEARD

THAT EXPRESSION ~~,

Esplanade — 7.45 p.m.





WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington ;

Nil,
Total Rainfall for month
to date: .07 in.
= temperature: 87.5

Lowest Temperature: 70.0

Sunset: 6.04 p.m.
Moon: Last Quarter, Feby.

18,

Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 12.45 a.m., 12.15

p.m.
Low Tide: 6.09 am. 7.30
p.m.





tain’s amateurs. He added, so it
is said, “They are certainly good
enough to make the British Walk-
er Cup Team, and they would
even win a few matches which
would be a novelty for the British
team.”

And there you have the whole
position summed up. The qualifi-}
cation rule for The Amateur says}
that a British entrant must have}
a handicap of not more than two,
Overseas entrants have to be re-
commended by their own Asso-
ciations.

although I believe them to be in
the minority, who feel that Bing
and Bob together would turn the
Amateur into a music-hall act
And at all costs they would avoid
this even if it meant refusing
their entries. But this is a very
narrow-minded view.

I.am sure that the majority
would agree with me when I say
Bing Crosby and Bob Hope should
be welcomed if they are able to

Vonwise and Cottage did a half showed he is a player of high

mile, the last three in 41 4/5,

calibre and even if Bob Hope

Clementina did a five in 1.03. did come unstuck at Royal Port-

Firelady was the last recorded, cawl last May, every

doing a box to box in 1.23)

ercmecescecinc . : ‘

GOING TO
THE BRIDGE

| LEN. LEVENSON,
I86 &
ANEW

Registered US. Potent fee



golfer has

his bad days.



— S|

By Jimmy

Hatlo |

HAVE. YOU EVER LOOKED AT
HOW THEY LEAVE THE _BANOBOX THEY
STEPPED OUT OF? HEH-HEH +.



BABY

PULLOVERS____.$3.50. $5.00 & $5.50
BABY BOOTIES, Pair_......-66¢ 72e & $1.12
KHUS KHUS HANGERS, each.._._~-------$1.08
BUNCHES ‘OF HWS KHUS......._____._Ge.



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The purpose of signs is

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\ in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft.,

for covering joints

Phone 4267.



_Hl

= j



without words. This white horse
symbolises Scotch at its very finest;
whisky distilled, biended
matured by Scotsmen in the tradi-
tional ways that they, and only

@ 194c. per sq. ft.
WALLBOARD MOULDING

taking tasty ‘Kepler’ to-day

‘KEPLER.

4 BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO, PRODUCT &
LL
Sole Avnts for Barbados : Collins’ Ltd., 28 Broad Stra





to tell

and

Sole Distributors; FRANK B, ARMSTRONG LTD.

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IHl'ttMiAt I I BRI Utl 2L Hi.! IIAKBAIMP-. IIIVUI vn PAGE stV % N HENR BY CARL. ANDERSON 'LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIFS NL>IE CY CHIC YOUNG A REMINDER BUY PEEK FREAN BISCUITS TO-DAY. 'Cta • kad at r,fM an**' WHI <;IB tdorwi't wan I rUw and Saw t„ makr I i* npluMJoM ... I'^rajot "aha %  H q**k : rwktf inm wftWing otuard bv pafeM hradwhp. too— "yM l 'fcrr-tlrcf.* %  Aak vour *CMCT>' kWi/lfa 1 IN TK COM? oe**& foe TM (1OS1 nau M aiwr>. m* smcc ftri*o* IXHOCS TO "* >*AKT oau*6 cy OF %  V,t 'VK t# JOHNNY HA BY FRANK ROBBINS £&eANV*LE. PCX* WEE POTflMTTEAtPTnG TOPUY TICXrTS TO 60 O* THE TEfcN PLATtTJM, KTT1N6 NAj&£P KP TAPE OMUF IBTE, MftEU 1 .' OU WE£LG£T Z£ TEE£T* *BOM IE AAAGJ'NE JUST MJSf M6P' "ANTON SANiTA-Do*' GOTTA KE*AEA*0ff TUAT BRINGING UP FATHEh BY GEORGE MC. MANUS \, .,:•,. 0jhfTMY DE-VA-.-W6 AH LIVING *J A V /UL5AM AGEiOClETY MAS i-OftCMA0U HJ6 T "6 ; CMACM *..£- nvWAn -. faamt .-.-.. MORI %  -BOTL9J -3-3 *TUPiDGOJG TC THESE A| LfMP tOCML f ..N-. ~ %  pt* fc*V FAMILY AX> I CAMbjT L.OWSI7 CXAWELYS5 TO A^&OC'ATS *TTW P3E6ENT-0AY SOC*TV-:TMX ILL8UVA-*CWT ANOOBTT Avatv BQCM b-v Awce&ts WOULO 86 A6AMFD 0= ME *= TMEV K^W I '."... ATTE'-iD ANY OBTV4i0C*AL ... id 1 PtU?POM-U05 WOEW5MO7TKXK MU66'"-'JP JU6T PWOJED Ai£) WAWT6 TO KUCW IF YOU WANT h*M TO 0)tVH BAA. TO G€T SOUC COUSIN OUT CF OAIU-AND TO TEU_ YOXJ >oue FATME37 r5 UP IN THE [(H*-, I ATTK; TRYING TO GET A*kY PBOM TME MBPO 'C PNt: El_EPMANT& MAGGS-yXJ? BCOTMaTB ffeiUY MAft Ml* OA08AOC WMOON -OjO UNCLE* tX-KAN'ftMCT.;.^ ME SAY& UE'6 GOT A JOB ' Oil r* WnP luwii Miitl Slum Mrl Usually Now UMMII NOW Tun Ill.AtK MAIilC CIIOfOI.ATKS (lib.) 2.12 Tin* MADKAS C'l'KKY K7 Tins Sia.KCT POWDBUD MILK (I lb.) 105 I Ihv ONIONS ... N 80 l ll'KKKNTS— (prr lb.) 45 58 ,, Holv IIKINKKKNS HrUl 28 23 .70 .5 HONKI.KSS UKr'K prr II. 58 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i m %  : < o I 41 > \ \ II u II it i in i i: s THE NEW BELIEVE IT OR NOT ll> KII'IIV ^a No family should bo without a copy of this am.i/iiij; modern book uf Wonders, Minuifs, Freaks. Monstrosities and almost Impossibilities. There is both entertainment and education in this new collection <>f COD < rete |n "its thai truth is stranger than fiction. "Kipley" has ransack)ed new continents, invaded n.-w COuntrttt, pOOJ exploring all over the world, become an almost legendary hero of the stage, screen and wireless, amused new mlllJoiU of WJtden, and, in general, proved %  glill that his own wonder'ul story is itself the greatest BKUKYrl IT OR NOT of them all. ADVOCATE STATIONER! HOOK SHOP GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP. HASTINGS



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THISSBAY KEBtUABI 11, US2 HAKBAIHW. ADVOCATE FA.IF FTVt ,670 Passed To Supplement Estimates OBJECTION MADE IN llOLSE MM 0 From Psae 3 igharl*. and because -1 the junior m* Jurors To Be Paid More FREAK CHICKEN l\ other* on Monday %  >no errs Footer • I.I that Ihr rhlcken l very be tit j and has to be fed b> her. sh. hopes lo i•' it tnto a frown fowl. THE House ol Assembly un Till i refellu* turn for $8,670 as supplementary estimates under Hearts : i"..litmal Treasurer. Customs. Fin Brigade Legs Depart* menu. Science and Agriculture, Barbados Begimwi I I and Dodo's Plantation. When discussing the Head Fir* Brigade. Mr. A. K S. utftt, (L) said that it was only about two weeks ago that a supplementary estimate was passed for the Police and now they had the Fire Brigade asking a similar think; Ho skid thai thy must retard vans. Then the osstte vans, after the House as something they ihey have delheied the mall to (ould %  ummon every week to pas) thr various Br.mh Po*t Offices. %  wo or three hundred dollars for could be used to convey Ihe coun 'hem. hy pustman on his difficult )ourlU J XIV Legal Departi.ey He hojxM Government would Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, (L). soon give thi-. 'hat jurors be paid a little lion. tl then expense*. Mr. F. E. Miller (LI said that m ..tid that at present the he knew of at least one postman .imount reeoived hardly paid fo;~ in SI. George who rode a motorhe bus fare of wme Jurors, "It cycle. He knew that that postman fiaa been going on too long. It would And $2.00 inadequate for ,. eeds attention.'the upkeep of his motorcycle. He •• %  *> am on '"esuay Before ihe estimates came down would like U I'tnd oul if the Civil Av uourdoii WSt*f, J< SCres I* wanted to bring It to the notice Service Association would con"rat crop, DSM and • %  • the Executive,. iinuc to *ay that $2.00 li sufficient f second crop. 11 norm ol uurd "2 !" for a postman's travelling allowcrop and rtve and a nail SOU o. Ttu* man A Burden ance. tounh crop ripe CUM were burn*. !" *, Ntl Browne He askod Government to exAl>u burw were ;t acres ot >uung Mr. E. W. Barrow 4'\elo|iueiit Lukewarm He was of the egfB %  '. .1 ti-' lulu ami %  tters il ., %  d % % %  attitude Of U-HKiiiK set Assailant Fined For Wounding H Wonhip Mr c. II OtMII Unho.1 TV... • a m. ,-. %  s n X" Th„ uian Hi't UMiki' did not re. I ler. because if the) had certain information, how seriused an American phrase, such H liked lo use. about good ;!;nnurlmes. and if %  utable senior membti f ;>- i-'rom Pai, I <*1 to recall that the \r*%H llrirl*** Btggt$i (Jane tin' At itourtion Hit nii.i.i^i Ogaj iiu l ai iwuruoi Plsaiauoa, g*. Lucy, M auuu> b.tb of them had an HI Id arobtani part -( ,...e Herbert | Streei'sT vu^w^i'^^^^om^nabic wT[h ( Th v ,T V ""tT %  ff C2 10those uaid in BriUsh GuUaTll H f ' arbados alone. bl BfOwsV .! that i the case we ran subddiw tenllories lhai the Dill averted Rossi ..r, hi. dttn animal fe.,1 or take t,-t.r -teo •„ An,t (or ,h *' rc "*"" % %  *• "" DOar pleade.t goilu ittal .yolldence that i.mte. mj B must havp some effeet OtM meaith's WiOied Monup^lv 1 •.ubscrib* to thI %  I With hard labeui Ml O T Allder (ll staU thai >'"' that tli. Unile,l Si..'. %  1 rat on 'he Departmeni 1* reaponsjote for irvuig to rnonojMUM the i me; the defendani followed him Uo ' m,lk Taep won ti make racommondaUoau to Go*, lastii Department Altai coming OUI of the mop 0,nm *"'. *hi.h. if Implemented intluencv 111 the Scnat r l>eeause tfiitikmn rathoi u.. 11 tin .,. Aaaambl] ho arould An 1 ^--d neighbours, and taking <>i an object ol mat thenTM not iho ptioel ol p such as suggestei in the Bill the situation They should lay a chance for 'he Wot Indies to ahd the defendant cuffed htm on |,Iod uc '' 1 "'' boned t'"" ,. the chm. Hu chin .,. „, lM i ** i'hl la-careful not to a ,,., 11. -|iit,.i "' ,h ""tl ht bad 0 This man beats me an Old T*%* C •. uu. M %  . OMOOM jvung „ • h . owner of such cattle cc ,. cine plaiiu, nine acre-" of young .i" !" ^" 1 ' l( arimtti n ,, immtdiate neighUs taloons and 32 acres of sour grass l !" m A onv ct u d and flned PV,,,,k "*• added that there The canes are the properly Of o.,l, .*", w ;' ,pr *'>'d* TenahU| lots of land h< b re ui>Wei i.iih u,i uhu-ti .ould he utilised onmoni for rot the benenl <>( the comraunilj Abraham Fni'de of Mr C E Talma said that Rood. Hank Hall on for the heneilt of the Senior Menat hin tie said that in some instnnce.i could be put 10 better use. Thev flrsi HS, UM propfli J then, c ,,i i M in on the %  t was almost painful for Jurors could be used to hou-.> Bee..( Gladys Greaves; a quarter 01 h ( hold He was t to listen to lengthy legal discusondary School for St. Philip and an acre of first crop ripe cane*. General Hosuital %  SlnflU from .law In rlou In iK c< US__^^-^... _• o.^i._ no Tl ber tor St John, he would say """ ""'"""" %  nea • beaten imt p threw that the policy ol (h Peasants we-u'd aSm tfs*3 md one of '•"" Bank wss being revised ,,loMW nnd >rnetlines t.-ld thai r whereby o, cu piers of all the land ""V wero m an unforlunnte iirec Mons from day to day in the St. John. property of Evelyn Clark, Town Hall. He would like memMr. Alldei (I) said thai nc also burnt. bers to take the Senior Member was glad Mr. J C Mottley felt Sparks from the lin burnt two for St. Lucy seriously on that the same way as he felt two holein the roof of a house occupolnt. He hoped that the sum years ago. He fell that some othei p ie< i \, v || B cadogah and abo would soon be Increased. method of punishment 01 reform eajyghl tire the roof of uerthn Mr O. T. Allder (I) thought difshould be brought about. To put I'.ulmore's house terent of ihe Jury system He said these girl* in the liKlustnal School th* Fin urig.ide under the cornthat this was a democracy and was a stigma on them for the matm OI Major H Cragg* Tire the onus was on each citlren to balance of then Officer, got the lire under control come forward and give assistance. He said that in as much U before It could do fuithei Apart from that, he felt that uiere were only about BVC every citizen should consider it an girls in the school it showed thai honour to sit as a Juror and if >oung girls are nol inclined to be he was given an amount to offbad. set transportation and lunch It was as much as the House could —— —. expect to do at present. waa taken lo the nd the cut sutchea idle whether th* ownei was ""<' noghtag a. 01 m the island or whether ihem or not the occupier was a squatter would be provided with loans Ml < rawftud saul thai th it -...i. gestlon had been made KM ago He was glad u> hear that Government had at long last allowed people who owned land to get a loan to get entile. Mr Adams said that D a iti ogoi was in a very difficult paatuon when it came to the matter of controUed prices He was v.iv conB^bous ol the fad that hi he Court of Original Jurisl,nlv tal '".ialiM on the Hegionai .\as not the way to be rood neigh. I substantial aid I nit Four unit %  :., td was a pole * those opnies who I ^-jr. 1 l love that there was such poured nit'. Malaya -M -• 'h'"' *•* national moralit .,,.. 01 gfasas m baing the alvantages and dlsrgag a dHsgruntled 111. a I.idlana, %  stamp out |Ni t .-Ihe* would mme down utioti. Ti.. '.nkthar Ipaj '.hem. and he felt that .. taus," he MM "wTbal 1 km thanUu 1. .1 ,,. gathered 1that the IhUoM state-. ,. vv ml(1 and .-ertalnly I chd not pav 1 hem 1 I ">• West verrun by the Communurts The. [ndkuia and ti.e Sen-tor who might nop any idea Uuu inclined to help l|^. therefore. 1'ivthing which thev might say to h ,,i mwh Pleasure in lolning with ,1! SOSp the United States. W ..s ]'" menders of the House, and he ltelj to bring ' "> aeneral it .',-Nf Indies. "tic strong ropHe, boajeee r would say that if : ''"'" ,|V|,I M against the Bill. 1 I Mill had not been carefully fter the fatluri add Bill, and had no' ntiga, 'be> might iung that it would Rave got uough— he -ill not b.-lie\. ll i1! ;..,.., Mr. W. A. Crawford ..old get through now ..Mthoiit Bunrodi fivaisgfjmsfilary Addreog to %  We.t Indie,. U-ing swanof it i. Mnl ,„ tnc Senator and the •fore 11 was too I It* u Utdlt „ committee m appreciAniendiMeiit BtfeM "f Ihetr efforts to protest ll. f. It. and he was glad, that th%  atiSfsfl the Bill. Th's was also : UM Address had "' "'•" eon mtbj u,iHout the small milk It Is a matter that would afTecl He hoped Government iu> diptixnalie refatloru wllli llowtli.it ether foreign P-at this time" that h had again and They could use iheir influenc con ended aovernmenl >, point out that •!-> upt the keepuui of ssnaO ereasa advenv "tsto relationis o: dalrs cattle^, lhal an w ,th other territories He W04 ..ttlecould supply lto \ ln |luaStSflP to ..,> th. ""*"" % %  Btaga I>T.atmetit was cespoiiwerc man) .„,,,. ,.„ „ beeauai be had n. mfuinmli.il to lUppOtt th.. % aa As •oon as war was over and he battle was won. as soon assent t" 1' :"' uts. by Mr. I I.-.I. the uld l>e done foi Hearing In Damages Case Adjourned Just as America waa of %  % %  slstaiiee to Ihe M"l Indies., th> West hull--, were of a*i* 1 lance to America. When the war came aloni. Amrrlca were 1 sllll ab'e to krep Ihe internal wheel of mailers k on l> thr West Indian labour. Any Intelligent conUTtUnlt} %  n> public spirited man woylo I 11..I1.,, tlmt tliey were also, lighting SO keep UN dOON la th. laniea open so that one mnti Make a beautiful jelly... with Bird's Jelly-de-Luxe! ^as ip-i 10 ao a pieseni -. %  • • a^^ rs %  Re lid that to Increase the alVerulCt UJ Ift'tltn h-w a nee to Jurors and witnesses %  Ion la the courts by encouraging J Michael, a lire at about 4.41 pm Michael S, / 1 %  %  J M n,^..' „•) ai* a nj > ~,. r ( ounsj FIVK ACRES ol third crop | canes were burnt when i-.e dictioi Hl ,"TJogmtTE. fctWonW -I %  [, „ [ lU u\" u.,~'„, HalbOUghi bioke out alOolden Ridge PlaiitaA. J 11 Hal of the fad lhai 10 big ,,.„, Hesoluli,.,, of Ihtit sort non. St. ceorse. at about 7.30 pm journct m.tii Pebru7alSariiig counirb ol thi Wi I Indies, big Tuesday in the case in which plaintiff %nu busines-e have been saddled li the case They arc the property of K.M Saridiford of Watcrhall Land S ; Taylor and were bawed Michael Is asking for £25 dan ages against the defendant MarCuttlng of Bibbv I-ane. S' in, : false witnesses. Mr. Rranrker ID said thai he was wondering If the Senior Member for St. John appreciated the Returned 1.11 Tuesday burnt rive and a qu nsel in ihe t Mr. J. g. 1 Brancker for Sandlford Hla Hoi A nine Jury yesterday P^P^ "T^^JX^l Z£^fE^^ t ^^ SerirYh^ !" -^" !" wuSt^rtissrjs-ji Carringtou Village. S' Mlcnaal Michael at about 3.00 p.m. on had to be adjourned, but the dewas eonefuded before Hi WOgT u esday burnt six and a hall fendsnt*s witness was sun ship Mr (i li Ollfllth, Acting .ICTs ol tirst. second, gttid inn for Januai> 3 an,I Corone r of Dsstrlel h fmirth crop ripe canes and 200 been lu mm onsd Miriam Best was taken to holes of joung canes, property of Sandiforn u claiming that lna>the General Hospital on FebDamcl St. Clalr and five other •""eh as the defendant inflicWV TV.. ~ :i'_.~ ruary 13 but she died the next peasants. The cane* were insured, bodily harm on her on October I* explained that no witnessd Dr A S Cato who i" B .11 bad f the greatest loinpllof tlie HoUSC and I VTsol Indin ,| lo llarbndos H WBI though not a* a member of tin lated In ihe T?rlnldad pars Oovernmeni In gpHe <>f this, he unlike Barbado: roduetton The lies,.lut %  Mr. G. II. Adams Imagine that an member ol the Executive Corntnl) UM STOUld oitb-l (loir 1 0 th. footing! f Weal In v 1 A Rill of that nature, Mi Adam *ald, was hardly conducive to th creation of that atmoaphe %  ,1 v in m.unt.niiiiic. whatever then 1 1 that apuH "i ftkmdli hieh the Unlu 1 Stab I % %  l>ise;ustine him by Cecil nini "> i-e-ii IWM "i ." • %  ••"i ...pithe weekend The nthi-r Ul deeilna with ihe Head, Post Roa d. St. Michael, who said ifiat \^ vn tux -tfll lw the veer 19K mot, where U additional prolhv deceased was hU wife. weSMr F T Mwtl.t m vision of $325 U .equired to meet Th. apparent ago of -he deJ^JS M, V Vrk Se^Jc" tnl t fa cytJa allowances ceased wag 52 years and .hf was !" k S" 1 -J'p C B V,'. IIKI whlkshe w'i which have ueen inJ t ad fo, about three and half ^'i£^h_ C ff^SS ISdV "^ "hi • hS I" a" creased fr m 11.44 per month to hours. The body was well notirCg^f and'Mi E W II 'he defendant Afte, There are lw 0 Ploueei Groups lit 1he island -one Is situated In eminent wn St James and ihe DVM (B St Lain. Thomas. The principal purpose |ln|ilea\anl Tension of ihe Ptersaar oraup a we lf Ci'f .n T mnl.i|M i. 1 am H110. latj >ds*l ass m Mondeiful *a>s. Play up then n.h. den colours . fill 1 Item with Irint . sene ihem in c'Litin, 1 \h.i|K> Uh prstt) inmmings Bud'. Id' to-LuK isn qultfcly, parfo 1 d iaa oaUcHMn Rttil natoun bring the orchard ughi 10 your home Make OM SOakjM , and nol sec %  • — 4i I. ri" "'" lac. lb thai of the l'olle,. Hoy* .veiythmg lie could s..s v...uld %  Amy Sandlford told the court Club—that Is. to see "' ''' toy into the rseM ley Jiu Vicethat on October 17 she went to voung people of the island make h lV( Vl>ievii <(11 opinion win,-President. Mr. (' r r!..ik< Seen 5!<.iicrief. St. John, to buy potatoe* gnod and useful < 1' V ^ would eau Unpleasant tension I of the i working in th*Mr c. Leslie, one <" inr u, world between the United argument with founders of the Group BM WB0 s ,,, .,,,,1 Rustll Hi ayfyranB fs^SB n ii S SavrfSS =SE SS& Ir.v.-I d.iy in. da> %  uul. Mirharl Uld lhai he id.nlili.M Ih, -Mi > .llrnrclon. Vicr-CapUim. JufUlM IMii.„ ..I R.-llmnn '" He KBK* that other olllcert o. body of his wife L> Dr. Cato. Sh>At Uic mfetinu member. ,.r ih. l_ nn d, Hliirk II.H K I...: ..n watitnl allowwa admittro lo Ihc General llo: i-..ke of the ueeJll IKlobe, 17 he Mm UW %  >l..intitj %  MM ..Inch EOUld afford them to oilul on February llandon Febru"' !" enjoyed by Ihe elub. They come inlo a potato nek). The debuy ears. They now had thacbjuve .ry l< he heard lhai .he was "> all their matehe, a.a.nat lend.nl wa.jd.on the Be d5ome ^ al ,, lrl of ineres„.g Ihe .Uownnce of tne d e.d. other cricket team.. >Jance from hg Whde th, ab|( t(> nKh Ito>( I uje. postman and they were |oin .o At this slake ihe „..>. atMl I Th' Pr"idenl said that he ll W !" u ." "". .^"KL'"',' ,K1 I .1 lo 12.00 a monlh. H.,hort dellberalion nWIMI lookina forward u, nnolher ,.„ thought they would have Increased diet of death hy natural lo.l • .. .... l.r* y— >rpMl> l*lrl* 1... 1 .a ., un iHi -n-llhl.—t-l-f >...-., BIRD'S JELLY-DE-LUXE it to 2 00 per week. Mr. Talma also commented jn the system of appointing subtx slmen. He explained that the cjpointmcnl of sub-postmc:i bl owed there was a need for more p stmen. There isan i j Iriosraan unemployed wh i w .uld gladly till these posts. %  11. Adams smtI and the defendant willing to enter for the Common-,.-L Witt, fsaodk wealth Challenge Cup could conStruck W,,n S,ak tact the Vice President. The ooner United Pillowed into Carlisle Bay on Tuesday night with a leak in her item. Captain A. Stuart, skipper of the schooner, said that the United Pilgrim sprung a leak on Monday afternoon about hftv-tive miles off Barbados, and consequently It was necessary for three men to pump out the water continuously until her arrival in Barba. dos. The United Pilgrim was bringing a cargo of eopia. coal, cocoonut oil and cocoanut plants fiom St. Lucia. Captain Stuart said that the leakage w.ill be repaired before the schooner leaves \u.: badoi nomeni w a nei I 11| port irrj on with th> t'.i '\n ,. IIU ,,,„ and our main purpose .s jo K" u i Tl o the backward areas or IM opinion without eonsldvrlni otbor 1 land where the boys andJOTi ,,. Thr.mpson, who •' .nt.-ii %  Girls' Club building. Mi ,,.„„,„, K(ll([ ( ;,.,„„,. n piill ,. h „„„ ie said. ,„ the nose whenevei he met him y LatUe said that ai UM ,„,, H>( 1(1 „, (l( ,, ls ., |ll |( .,..,, „, n,, • thara nre not """•V „ imBrchv was aetuallv tame when members of the grmp but inose (((--.uallv met him While the plaintiff was digging *,,, ,, i„.n,la-f. .... taught The Sen-tor who llr-• he potatoen the defendant look various trades such as carpentry. ( )( ( |h-( (h(i WM( | ndlw ah ou i,, i. h mdWd svoi I %  i I of the deht ol hi-inaking ana ea> broidcry. XI, Cornmttles of Mani has planned lo stage eoncrtu lo help the Groups, but otl'-r lielp MARK IF I) MEN will play up a n i r0 n slake and strm k (,. i Bachelors in a cricket match at on Ihe hack of her neck wilh it. Merlyn ground. St. Jaim-s. on The plaintiff fell to Ihe groutd Sunday. Februnry 23. and was shortly afterwards taken The teams are .. the General Hospital help the G Married Men: J. Byer (Cspt.) ^Dr -Gala.said ihaX he e"nuned ^id be aceeptahle H. CumberbaUh E Taylor. 1|he plalnllfl In the Casu;.ltv of the Yearwood. Abraham Alleyne. W. Oeneral Hospital at abouI 12 1* l„ im c Mmu, W r'iUiH i P m " October 17 There was a Kir-wood 5 n^zs t -w --5 SL ij* , ino from nervous shock, rtacheiars GLlcorish (Cspt.). *^ r Masslah said that the Iniury A. Iflll. E. Lorde. W. Ramsay, E. oeicribed could have rendered the The M V. 8ir.raver droppei Greaves U Reed. S, Lewis. B. plaintiff unfit for one month t.nix anchoi Be> yeslerda Marshall A. W eks. i, " 1 totbirdani Antweri pen Race HorsrH Qome HrnOn 'SunrfF\T* Taltt. V. Todd. Richards ana J. Iflll. TWO ACRES of third crop ripe canes and a quantity of sour graswere burnt when a fire occurred at Leers Plantation. St. Michael al about 9.30 a.m. yesterday. The fire waput out by the JVillce assisted by Ihc oversee r Further hearing until Pel i MIXED CARGO The Schotetei Franfclvn l R. Mch arn... it..' .ght more rii-c Ifl 0H eoiThc canes or*the property of ony. Among her cargo Applewhnite^ Ltd. and were inbags of cbanool. W rured. poala and 3,000 bag< of I King's Scouts Call Here En Route To Jamboree %  I London i>i ,: ''' r H Mis Wilhiun\were the only three passengers disembarking Also arriving were two re %  %  .-. U'longing to id ttr. Barnard. These hoi U TVli tii.l" and SiK.i Unlna" will bo I otng to s Vii. i re .vill b*' ri the an "I M %  V Oak A.nootf in i othei cargo was %  i fortillsi i 1 ;.nd Plni, %  %  %  "HI. rover will IH live M '.X n... ./id will then insntng on lo peev Trinldsd. TERENCE O'REllJ.Y. Hvear-old Patrol Leader of Ihe 38th Cardiff, Wales, who is an apprentice fitter and turner. JOHN PARKER. lf^ys*u--oM Senior Scout of the Wh Reigate. .. carpontor. JOHN IIIMEU.. 16-year-o. ktref Second (S) of the 2-'t Bristol, a Junior Clerk. JOHN STONEMAN. Ig-yoai Old Patrol lewder of the till Reigate, I -.-•..mt While in Barbadoi # From Pass 1 *. e the trees in V inlands which Visit To Si. Pierre Mr. Roberta wss also lo France actually bore fruit like cocoanuts Me said lhat on Tuesday, thev in IM7 for Ihe French Jamboree "Jag bananas fn England, they *,>eiit a fine day in Martinique. when another contingent from nly saw the fruit and that was On arrival they were met by n Jamaica attended. At that time n'Miut all. number of Boy Seoul* who took he said that there were also He said that they had a good 'hem o tl a trip through the mouiipresenl eootlnrenbi from Bervoyage throughout the trip. The '" "* '<* S*Pierre The roads were mudi md Trinidad. In 151 he e a was very calm except for one v %  *t*|i and narrow bul the went over to Aaatrta for their day when they were passing aretrarj ag magnificent. Tht Jamboree at which Js ma leans through the Azores and encounw " rit "V u > Ml I**" 1 ** nd saw and Som e of the members of the tored bad weather. some of the bones of people who present C.K. contingent were %  • killed during the eruption" present. John Rlmell thought that on ' l*2 and 1622 They then reHere is what some of the mem-,f the things the boys had found burned mrough ihe mo i f the U.K. contingent had interesting on the journay frej sxe end vkdted to say about their trip from the Azores onwards waa the fly s Headquarters where Southampton to the West Indies: | n g fish which they had Dpeei %  -eitaincd for about '.he contingent visited the S Geoffrey Bell-Jones, the only seen before. They had also seen '*" hours before returning t. th-Scouts' Headquarters at Ne*dsea scout of the patrol who has a lot of seaweed from the Sargas ham's Point. After a sea bath, (.ccn a cub for three years and a sea and did not realise thai the The Patrol Comprises: they visited the Legislature god %  eatg for five said that Use trip water could be ao calm in th. has been a wonderful one. It has VM( m, 0 f llw Atlantic been very interesting and they had learnt a lot going to the John Parker said that when different ports. they got to Guadeloupe the flrst He said lhat he was sura everything that attracted them was thine enjoyed the bathing because U scenery with its bnllnn.' was much warmer here than it The sea was deep blue and th %  was in England. colour of the Ml Food Unusual pretty as compared with EngIlrian Martin, a scout for the land where the colour of oast five years, thought that the was dull and the trees were bar" food on the boat although unduring the winter. The only green usual was '-very Interesting" trees they saw in England, wer'Another interesting thing was to the evergreen "f the fir family .'* Books On Shot* \l Publie Mhrun Two hundred and amt> thi tw 1.00k* will be put or %  the Poi>ln Ubrarj this morn i will go into rireuliitioi %  i S .tin day morning. Many valuahl. SfSTi BOS Library are included |i the lit. and biograpi K.in.i. inn and the Prm i 'ess Margaret should prove o %  . There are 90 fictions and 173 ii-lletions. %  GEOFFREY BELL-JONES, 'hen the British Council Ifl-year-old Senior Sea Seoul of "uartOTSl. the 13th [pSwteh, who is still Accompanied by Major J K al school. o-ifhlh. Island Scout Go RICHAKI) DENBY 17-year*loncr, Mr L A. Harrison >ld senior scout of the lalst t*ry of ">e Boy ScouU' AssodsPurley. Surrey, and office J Ika. < %  •<_ ...^_ • -..... . Senat.H-", Views • •< %  it li MeC'arrun's own view, .uul no of Ihe AaMrti sa Oovt ra rnent i*etters had been and from convei ii id had with ihe member for St Pate(M r Waleati Mtwi lhai Ihey were DOt t.'kn.i | tan 'iifii. leiiti. % %  e .use ihey were liin l il.llli il In .li, III MM l>0 IM ll-s— for JURIS HAIR IOMC VOIM>KA MMiii.il \v i < REAM lilt IILOKO-HENZENE MOTH CRYSTALS h \ 11.111 S #/#'. Syt. Rice Transferred lo District "£'' ggl it line took up duties aa %  of District "E" • li He .ha. • Clarke Sgt Rice nas been ti posl old Patrol Leader of theMtn their journey to JsshsUca via w,,iieii"has "taken* *ip' <;ia*gow. Scotland, who is still Trinidad. La Gualra, Cure*, S of the Speighu.efasol Csrlagona. own Police Post. #o Brush f/offf* Itesl tltiitf/s From 1-tth<>s fo ryo€*Asrf/ DISPA, P.. PI*JWfr 1 RINSO. Heta-a Hi A Mjt( DREFT. . .1th aV W.*^ FAB. H. :I7^ LUX, W9 2y CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10-13 Broad Street / i



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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tillf.M.ti HllKI \Ki Jl_l^J L ADY RECKITT a i BB mftrosajti making the m Southamp.oil by MM (•lombir. SUP M met tit tbl BN W irehousc yesterday by Mr. Victo: .Manon and Mrs Roy W Ladv Reck ill was a regular VUh. i i limit %  4 SM And Air P ASSENGERS left Baib-dus by air yesterday to sperm Carnival in Trinidad Lcvftig b\ t •UmbiY were Mrs. Vcrnon Knlflht. Mi-* Barbara Mali Mn. CMMTOO ,r, I) Douglas, leaving by IIWIA %  Customs. Miss Joan daughter Of Mr. ;.ml Mrs B. M. B <>f Golf Club Road, Rockin, Mautici Armstrong and her daughter Joyce of Chape). St. rhihp. Private Party I 1 |M my EH ; ywlerdny. The pjirly at thi Y.M.P.C., on Salurd... fi M. i* a private party LCharltj Costume Fete) organised bv ., rommitlee of Lad las and M not the usual Carnival Show oiK.it. i.l I v 'he V M p.C. For Pharmacist a Dinner M ISS SYBIL BARROW. B.Sc.. and Pharmacist of Sydonind Cumberland Hospital, mm USA. left veterrtnv bv the [Vl C'oloaiMr 'or Trinidad where she „..„, ,. will el niul ..... Numbrr Trinidad Pharmacists Dlnne A sister of Mr. E W. Ba Qahib CalluiQ wajtow >< %  rip patnengrrintranmlt through Bsrbsd 1 yasterday on th* "Colonibl*" was Lady Recant (centre, who w*~ met at U# Baggage WarBOOM by Mr. Victor Marson and Mr. Roy WlNo*. .lo,^ l ? h ?; k K rtl -ie war.*:? !" Jisira s: ta s. 001 A c B,,hop w#w * M **• *** Main Item AIN item on the pr< show organised bv Club Industil..! Union on February 23 |g ttk Butman'g Holiday M f< H O HUSBANDS of the Rcportorial Staff of Sfor lied On Governor P. B NEV1LL, OBJ.. A Meadquartan Commisrtoi'i for Grants and laarair passed through Barhai 'lay, paid a rail on His Excellency the Governor at Govmg. He was accompanied by Major J E Griffith Inland Scout Short Holiday M BBU LEWIS, daughi Mr. and Mrs. M. C Ij-vip of "Hughenden" Barbarce WAS among the passengers arriving by T.CA. yesterday mornini from Montreal. She is down u. •laxl a short holiday with hei •dmily. Sheila went up to Canada it early June 1951 with her sister Joan and she is now with T.CA %  n Montreal. Director! Meeting UON HA CUKE. CH I laf ** yesterday for Trinidad bv B.W.I. A. to attend a meeting o' the Board of Directors of B.W 1 A of which he is a member. Talkinj Point %  hould be a pood deal /• i/wi" •n''Al ami info the ere-ai* hit of Ihr people lilt CIM%6CS i" ^* nuJ< '.mmj ii. il hr.u i*MK|| f-""'' thf mark ol mniwn> fosicllai I OH* Nret Her* IN th* Quttn\ f.nghthun tamilw '<•!*. D'iti'nmmi i will '•eats rtlln God Sav T Hid on fir board ouf>Intransit • s n Rcportorial Staff of the AdI eaves tod. Guiana by the Mr. Husbands will spend about a fortnight In British Guiana where NTRANSIT on tran asBflaod %  i Iba BSc., M.C.P.. Miss Barrow""i* *' nic h W 'U 'nkc i now on holiday from her duties dance. Among the Jitisle* In the ai the hospital. She came here "now are Mi v. Nell Hall and Mr. k< ago from Trinidad Joseph "Oscar" Tudor and Rev. and will be returning to the latand s (lair Tudor. Mr. Keith Campj,','.' W III before going on to the Virgin ball and In focM) Kive will looal stories for to spend the : upply the D h ,.,',„., %  * Pro-' passsna PanMl*. 7pm Ths >" Wr r. %  P %  %  Th Small Gx9Bf4.pl>> I WMMf ; u i... SM 31.TIH U ItM • " u "PPl-ud hii suteamanshlu, at the Colony Club and "BeachViscount Hyndlcy also spoke or make comr^rbiw^ ^,iT . ,ft '" """ :w ? %  %  holiday here Hir,i E e to express it. Wo rensa enjo>uig SI valchlng t„ W|l p "" n5 H,Ul '"'"s''J*,j;'.n with Mr. and Mrs. Josh spe-".fully lift our hat to a great Barbados for New York i,> the Jamaica at cricket. 1 Willia ms of Bright,.... i:u k l^k. bat Maiirrtanifl when she calls' hoi have this opnext week. wed tne Vlsroant Hyndl.y topi the A "Imli.n "(^ •lohl Ihr Afl %  >il VII lur no onto* i> t'dwara via > 1 %  KINGS RBGI i.ATiON. ro mi \RMi AJtHl H oi "n gi PREVENT INCRUSTATION ^^ IN l^L BOILERS W he ha: %  I rson Pi He kindness and beat %  has recelved during his visit. 'I wag continued. R| Invited to the opening of the Legislative Sca&inn I i Ht%  DT. It a II %  i i what is Touching briefly M Barbados he thought they oad that %  .:-.. i would not %  D. mg left %  bout oiled by yvlth thai hop) roe of the !UueaUon | bid U as that H il ,)..-Hl 1 hould I Oelol n 1888 %  have all i Hindiev 4A. of I r He waa : good ~ %  uch a I should bve as Is'and In thi Wi in 1909. he .dos want* to endaugln.i* II. wai ., ,... 4 Bxport Adrt arrangement %  | ,. riom I9i7-iytp •nt looking Con Mines cI tM IK--", r I ,. :.,.,,„ j aJ2 i.ave seen of the Pol |] c, ntroHei G< Force and those who heard thband U il play th. Fin eral I I VI will B t-he: %  Worm n IT, thf News—I. Hon. Mrs. M.K. Hansthtll \1.I>.E.. MLL.C THIHTV yeaxg ago, ptont ;i small movemeal ol Child Wi Iran BI I within | hag bloasomed out Into a rwalthv aoolal larvicc %  th Gow lakim; ih. bU8iiln( an nj Mis M t llanschcll. she Wag President. At U ALL BJOM with the late III Welf-re %  %  wo then known M lha Bab] %  J Eaf,c %  ' <' %  M ^dep. i dad .olely o, who w ( f a %  "<< ragutenA After ;i lapse of Offlcer with extensive several yean whan the scope of saw at fir*! hand the ihe work k%  Leagi Badlcal n II leg difficulty Mrs. Hanachell * 'f" alaatlong for ren)!£* U ?' K! sufTenng of ffj' ',' %  %  %  i %  ,. visit,,,, lMt a Navi Welfare mean. |„ /'" regarded as the "lasner breeds th. %  ,VI ,'" ".' : enable fa. S W 'i C2 V P ht>r h 2 UW "" aa Ihev to the Ufa of expertent moth, plaetTS Si? -^SS ,rcaf ^'" ;"J , -,., tru v. The frnxi M (ilh W.ijcif^ > Se*\ tcr it u -ii a mrnt noil.O'ut BT uill or defamed dun.o h Mairtlyt Bsvesan i the ffino'j Coaai | ourta'i cosnuei -Ci '•< %  met cTtalra Cf.C i— IFI fsCtOnWi ifuu Tnfu ere fi*o^' t Co ind Mr. Nathnntel if rfaasj REQUIREMENTS PLANTATIONS you CAN GET YOUR FROM LTD >i-' *>: i.i.Oaii: ion Cl 4%l ENTEBTAINMEN1 TODAY .'. 8 30 AND CONT1NUINO TO SUNDAY *•••• I'uncli consulted his nsgic book. "Come onl Let's go, Hanid! Thi^ is wonderful!" "Yea, yes!" cried Uani' as ex cited as she could possibly be. They both ran over to the train as fast as they could, for it seemed about to start. It was puffing and .teaming harder than ever. The whistle waa tooting. Into the Trafa And then, just as they were about get into the train, alas, every"All aboard!" tne Alt aboard for Chicag... i lima. Constantinople and California!" Knarf seised Hanld by the hi he lights went Knarf and Hanid saw they were sitting on top of the tiny toy train again. The people and the -tnrion were gone. Mr. Punch was sitting In the rocking-chair on the other side ol the room. He was smiling. "1 forgot t" lei: fan H he said, "that lh. asaarft enty laits fur live in.mit' Knarf and Hanid pteb %  clvea up sadly. How Woadsffql n iductnr kept wuld have been, they taooght, to i> to Ca i i plo and California. Bui • le trouble with DMflc. It BevOI ited long % %  -I-'I ; *$!/> £?7 !" B .7br"?Ti '* Ii' *t u l, iun ol soru. (Si ". Piece .if 'am m, .-. tnan i nvt • mt.-nlea wo. IV) IS. i pose to *ecurr it <3i 30. II •houid be Oindma IS1 H. Bow np to rldlcuM in mnt umons ooetor. <5> I t?r.l" n "?? fOT P'^'-'^nee. 16 Be Sg aooa .. ? %  JJora* touriue ii teSSnftStV %  1 %  ] 12 %  •> I 41 • ^abaaas hi . % % %  .! %  Jl*r,he bela on MI IN I*. -1 Tb. Last Mlnstrci nu m. %  1 riu THE KING P-opok^fr, THI raan Toaitma$t''rs BUM u n-u Lowll To~$l And even the parent* of nttt Nun bat**—U (Aeg sir n4asn*s-caa appb, for a £3 r lha sick and inllrm !i_: Rupert and the Pine Ogre—33 Rupert : I %  Ml assaaiaa (,h* atatasag. bui .he Auiumr Ell Utom a.sy m the ftvaSMal ot glee -Com.. I'll U rou. he cne. po.-nng ,o where I lirge o-k tund. blxh n.l %  wripped ol iu lejve. The onlv No* thjwe %  tif. hcte n anag l-\Tt81 NEWSBttl. Openirs To mo.ro* I 4 B JO "TIIK St N SKT AT DAWN" OI.YMF14 | :nv i \-T %  Bins CBOSUV "ROA1I TO II M'H'V i RIO' "WIHSrEKINU SMITH" Ml KKK \M l^> AMI ~rOTKKYt:l> WONDER" now liMTII) BY BOSTON BLACKIE TO TIIK KN'D OK THE IAKTII P14IA CINEMAS 11 I 1 11 K O Ui. OouW. i IKM.SIRF ISIAMr | The SIT IP" HOBXPT BVAN PtUintlili Rotorrl NFwTON B A R 11 1 l)A S SI'ttlAI. 1 SO p i HIDDEN CITY 6 SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE 1'. i % %  <•< T>r Junale D"> TXX RITTTB A R <) \V N Sal Spni.l SSDsm -ISSpmf ai>an'l* .) SJnl Hov ROOaW. DOUBl^ m^,^, 1 „. a 'TT & MSN FB0M MUSIC MOUNTAis ^rtT M.Loo.,00 i ." „:JK E I S Dl'i SI 70 f.'/f I.V0 tH'l \ I \ <. Vol. Mm;It Isl mAMBAMBU I'M/I .•.(/. WllNCl SK0S. HAPPY MUSICil Itll Mi-niilifiht llii'l JORiS DAY-GORDON MacRAE ind tho New Singing Sanction JACK SMITH DIAL 1404 o TO. DAY "nnlv. 4 U an PIWAII or riTY | W-K K mn -r or II ISKI ssi,is 1 S T 1 N 1.1 1 IIOMIi M>1 Roorrl Douala* Si i Gary Conper -i. I ...... £ OsfMSjaai •! • !!*••• % %  " a U %  • niiif IIESTIN'VTION MOON HOI Al REPUBLIC WIIOIX SERIAL TNDERSF.A KINGDOM" with n m TlaaV COIUUOAN Wiird Tlill.lt BIAZINO MTK)M T" Mol'HoW ..M-, W a II TRArPED BY BOSTON BLACKIE TO THE END OF THE EARTH. laAIETY The Garden—St James TO-DAY ao p. IT. i. Hi I llll SALE i.-rl (.rorsTtrfX i 1.1AM St IllASH Olor> BootsO'DFUaC OU