Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






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once

ah

Harbat

Truce Negotiators Split|“
Further Over Russia



ESTABLISHED 1895

es



PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 19. |
Truce negotiators agreed on the .recommendation for
a Korean Peace Conference, but split further over Russia’s

eligibility to police an armistice. ~ Full armistice delega- ‘ fi
tions agreed to recommend to their Governments that] To Follow On bert

Agreement Broken



The United Nations Colonel}
Donozo accused Communists of |
breaking the agreement by refus-



talks begin within 90 days of the ceasefire, on the with-
§ . ) Me
drawal of foreign troops from Korea, a.‘ peaceful settle-;
g Ps , I
ment of the Korean question etc.” '
Their agreement completed —
negotiations on the fifth and final “Si t ee
item on the armistice agenda but | k A 7
delegations still were poles apart 1c oms

on key sections of two preceding .

items—the supervision of truce Hel Siek

and the exchange of war prison-

ers.

Staff officers of two sides} (By JOSEPH L. MYLER)
argued fruitlessly for two hours!OAK RIDGE, Tennessee, Feb. 19,
over the United Nations right to} It is the world’s strangest busi-
veto the Communist choice of ness—this traffic in “sick atoms”
Russia as one of the six neutral | that goes on here.
nations to police the truce. Sick atoms are atoms of ordin-

ary materials whose heart have

y g
been deliberatel, wounded to
y

make them “bleed” nuclear rays

which man can use. Some sick

atoms make some sick persons
: ‘ ape well. Others provide science with
ing to withdraw their nomination * a , stm
of Russia and name some other|‘#e “most useful research tool
country. He contended they had|Since the invention of the micro-
agreed that all six nations on the Bcope.” They are now standard
Neutral Advisory Commission}jTesearch' for medical agents
must be acceptable to both sides./throughout the U.S. and in at

Chinese Colonel’ Pu Chan/jleast 40 other countries.
retorted that Russia qualified as But useful as they are they are
a neutral because it has no|potentially deadly. Their radio-

bat fi in K H tivit ki r. f thi t
comba orces orea. e€/activity makes many o em too
demanded that the U.N. with-|hot” to handle except by remote
draw its “groundless and base-|control. Some of them are highly
i ot tae os nthe ‘eae poisonous. Others in combination

al cers also i a roduce dangerousl sive
deadlocked on three other issues sons. Sevecialens, ian hoting
oneness ye the Sue Lenn a learned to treat them with pru-
the truce—the number of troop sient respect has made them ser-
who ray be rotated during the

ceasefire, the number of ports| Y@@ts of health and a_ source
through which troops may pass a wicdatare mg B

and the right of Communists to ince 1946 some 30,000 ship-
build airfields in North Korea}ments of them have left Oak

Ridge for hospitals and research
labs around the world. -
Scientists call them “radioiso-
toph” — atoms of iodine, sodium
carbon, iron, gold, cobalt and
other elements which differ from
the normal twins in that they emit
energetic rays from their nucle.
—UP.

during the truce.

The second group of Staff
Officers reported it reached “just
about complete agreement” on the
wording of the last five para-
graphs of the nine-point solution
to the war prisoner exchange
problem.

—U-P.

Threatening Letter

Seat To Speaker

, A LETTER directed to His Honour the Speaker of the
House of Assembly, and urging a more militant policy by
Government in matters touching on certain questions like
Emigration, was distributed to members of the House last
night.

The letter contained certain threats.

eieery Wetahnas E/ See naa wa ok ae ee Nal pane oom)
j ) : G. H. ams,
RESCUE TEAMS) [iene Cf ine Government ans

labelled it a “seditious document”,
and said that such a letter, be-
cause it contained libellous state-
ment, should not have been cir-
culated to members,

Mr. Adams said that a petition
should be presented by a member,
and should be decorous and tem-

FIND BODIES

BURGIO, Sicily, Feb. 19.
Rescue teams saiq they found
the shattered bodies of 34 persons
in the snow covered wreckage ot
the British Airliner which crashed

i sane ae perate,
into a Sicilian mountain peak The letter which had unfor-
Saturday night. tunately been circulated was

Officials said they were no sur-
vivors but Italian Police with
rescuers and Officials of the Hunt-
ing Air Transport Company which
owned the two-engined Viking
plane, differed on the number of |
persons aboard the craft. Police
said they counted the bodies of
17 men, 14 women and three chil-
dren in the wreckage of the air-
liner which was enroute from
London to Nairoba, Kenya, last
week.—U.P,

Suspects Held

HAVANA, Feb, 19,

Police said they are holding
three suspects in last Tuesday’s
killing of ex-Congressman Alejo
Cossio Del Pino despite negative
paraffin tests on their fingers to
see which one weilded the death
weapon, The National Bureau of
Identification said: though the
tests were negative there was still
sufficient grounds to hold the men

“grossly libellous to the House,”
and further, if the document was
hot fietitious, should be placed in
the hands of the Police for con-
sideration,

The letter which purported to|
be from St. Joseph, for all he
knew, could have been from any-
where,

He thought it was of the utmost
disrespect to the House, where a
person could think that he could
have such a document put in the
hands of members.

He would say it no more strong-
ly, that if His Honour was re-
sponsible for it, he could only say |
that he regretted it very much.

His Honour the Speaker ex-
plained that as it was a letter for
every member of the House—he
did not know who had sent it—it
was circulated, but he was not
asking that it be taken as official.

BUSTAMANTE
ACCEPTS APOLOGY





sie KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb, 18.
one of whom was reportedly , 5
seen running with a gun in his] It has been published in San
hand near the scene of the}jJuan that Bustamante accepted an

shooting: It said the other two}apelogy tendered: .by~the United}.

were seen near the same locality

States Secretary of State for de-
earlier in the day.

tention and questioning by an im-
migration officer —cP)

ROYAL SALUTE



ait see
arrival by air at Nairob



stand
Tour.



Kenya on their Commonwealth The

the Princess heard that her father was dead and she was Queen.—EXPRESS.






a mee”

‘ =





B.G. Forced
109 Behind

‘From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 19.
Briuish Guiana followed on 246
runs behind Trinidad’s Ist innings
total of 450 and reached 137 for
2 at close of the third day of the

second Intercolonial game.

Leslie Wight dominated the
batting again today and found
able support from Camacho.

In the British Guiana second
innings Camacho was aggressive
while Wight was sedate. The
British Guiana first innings
closed 28 minutes after the
luncheon period for 204, Wight
shouldered the team with a grand
79 in 213 minutes with eleven
fours. Offdriving off the back
foot, on driving past mid-wicket,
and the leg side were his favour-
ite scoring shots. Wight was out
in attempting to force Skeete to
the leg side and returned an easy
catch.

Wight and Mc Watt overnight
batsmen put on 34 runs before the
latter tried to cut a good length
bali from Skeete and was caught
behind the wicket. At lunch, the
score was 196 for 7. Bruiser
Thomas 17, Patoir 7. Sixty-five
runs in 90 minutes before lunch.

The new ball curled up the tail vi

. ' . Abdel Fattah Amr Pasha
Witdied aitak ee he eae ine | Egyptian Ambussador, met I
eign Secretary Anthony Eden i:
ron NOt — Pee 1008 | the Foreign Office for the second
lowed on : “| talks on the Anglo-Egyptian gitu-
5 ; ation. Today Amr Pasha left
te apenas ps opened ae a. | Eden's office just as the French
ainly, then s gained confi- ind U.S, delegates to the cone
dence and began to punish the | ference on Germany’s association
bowling with shots all round the | with the European army were
wicket, When Gibbs reached 50 in| arriving to start work.
104 minutes, Wight was 23 and the |

“te

_ P wail.
THE EIGHT KING'S SCOUTS

Reigate; John Stoneman, aged

EDEN CONFERS
WITH EGYPTIAN
AMBASSADOR



Neither British nor Egyptian
total 75. Gibbs was bowled in at- jofficials would comment on the,
tempting « leg sweep. Ther | Bden-Amr Pasha conversations, |

Thomas did not stay long. How-|Amr Pasha was understood how-

ever, Camacho came to the rescue ever, to have sought Eden's
with a sparkling knock of 31 not guidance as to whether Anglo-
out including a glorious six over- | Egyptian negotiations should

head and three fours.
Wight hit five fours in his 49 not

start in Cairo or in London,
British officials said it was’ not
out in 169 minutes, expected that any fresh instruc-
The British Guiana scoring rate | tions would be sent immediately
improved, the first 50 going up in|jto Sir Ralph Stevenson,
79 minutes and the second fifty in | Ambassador in Cairo.
53 minutes. The match ends tomor-| U.S. Secretary of State, Ache
row and the rested Trinidad attack |son is understood to have urged
may well strike new blows. Eden to make a new offer to the
The scores :-—~ new Egyptian Government so
7 BOR IIS unis er some 7
aaa , 8—450 quic! on proposals for four
L Wient * i ‘ho rua 79 |power defence of the Suez Canal



Gibbs c Legall b Demming 2 ,;Zone, and Sudan.

L. Thomas ¢ Asgaralt b Jackbir 17 Informed sources said both
Cameeie . soos b Detintite “ sarees were et Sernete by
MeWatt c Legall b Skeete ae |} both Acheson and Eden at thetr
Dyer c Legall b Butler 14 |talks in Washington. Britain
C. Thomas c Skeete b Forde 18 |would play a= greatly reduced

Patoir not out

a jpart and Egypt a proportionately







LONDON, Feb. 19, |
Fore

aa

Shntut aid





ee a _

who are to represent the 474,000 Scouts of the United Kingdom at



the first Caribbean Jamboree, have now been chosen, and are (left to right) John Parker, age 16, 9th

16, the 229th Bristol; Richard Denby, 17, of 1st Purley, Surrey; Goof

frey Bell-Jones, age 16, 13th Ipswich; William Martin, age 17, 28th Glasgow; Terence O'Reilly, age 16,
of 38th Cardiff; Derek Hamblin, age 16, 151st Bristol, and John Rimell,
tured here at the Boy Scouts HMéadquarters in London.
F.S.A., Headquarters Commissignét for Grants, is expocted to arrive in Barbados by the French Liner

EXPRESS.

———

House Pass $60,000 For

age 16, of 229th Bristol, pic
The Party, led by Mr. P. B. Nevill, O.B.E.,

Runway Reconstruction

After Lengthy Debate

AFTER four hours of unbroken debate during which
| members of the Opposition Party as well as members of
} the Government Party scathingly criticised the Engineer
ind Construction Company who contracted the work on
the Seawell Runway, the House of Assembly last night
passed a Resolution for $60,000 for reconstruction of detec-
ive portions of the runway as recommended in the Report
! the Constructional Engineer of the Department. of
ansport of the Government of Canada.

- Of the sum voted, an amount of
$20,000 has been ineluded in case
it is found necessary to repair
other parts of the runway during
reconstruction owing to the un-
usual stresses that will have to
be placed on portions not normal-
ly carrying traffic, and other un-

_ Welcomed
In Grenada __ | ricer reconstrsion work the

| the General Revenue Balance

i From Our Own Correspopdent) A move by Mr. W. A. Craw-
GRENADA, Feb, 19, ford (C), and supported by Mr

| Hundreds of Grenada scouts|J. C, Mottley (C), to have the

4 duides rallying at Pearle}amount reduced by $20,000 was

A typort gave a rousing welcOme|defeated by 12 votes to four

this afternoon to World Chiet|Members voting in favour of the

}

- Chief Scout

Scout Lord Rowallan who is a} reduction were the sponsors, along
guest of fhe ‘Governor and|Wwith Mr, J, A. Haynes (E) and
Lady Arundell until his de-|Mr, O. T, Allder (1), i

parture on Thursday. This af-| While also criticising the Gov-

ernment for entrusting the entire

ternoon Lord Rowallan addressed
eae : : work to the supervision of the

a public meeting at the Anglican



while the

’ 5 ' s seorge’s ‘o.|Canadian Engineer, Mr, Wilson,
Guth ae bi Sp rae greater part in the organization, | ev ae a eed members were sympathetic to
Extras 3 Informed sources said that drive and talks with seout officials} Government for the unfortunate
~~~ |Eden’s aim was not to rush thing he will be the guest ‘of honour at| Position in whteh it now finds it-
‘Total _ {and to allow the new Egyptian An island rally at Tanteen and at|Self—a position in which they were
;Government to consolidate its a camp fire that night victims of “corruption”, and
NENA ae ie aoe, Senn Se for | position oy fi Prenat was not : ‘crookery ond - arte
r Y 4 , considered t be absolutely se were by a clause B t,
for 198; 8 for 203; 9 for ‘302. eS @ On page 5 Milita Di t . t asked to share the responsibility of
BOWLING ANALYSIS | itary WIstric the loss of the money spent on the
9 MR. w.| 4 pr mel construction of the runway.

Bree i. : a 3 | PLANES COLLIDE Created In I ibet The Resolution came up for dis-
Butler 456 17 2 | cussion without the usual notice
Skeete 2 7 8 2 TEXAS, Feb. 19 TOKYO, Feb. 19 having been given, say mere of
Sampath 3 5 5 ‘ ! Six naval fliers died when Radio Peiping tonight ee the passing a fh la teat
their two training planes col- uncad the creation of a “Tibetan Mr. F, L aes : Ds gem so
Manta Oe ee lided in a flight over @ Radiof ititary district”, February 10th) *{'et apes R a: qutke ' embers
Ginhe’b’ Bete: 0 Range station near here arid. j,, the Asiatic ‘Lamast country po La arth ea a matter
Thomas ¢ Asgarall b Jackbir 1 {crashed in flames, One instructor which wits “peacefully liberated’, Would agres the aba Soe ik OF re-
Camacho not out a 31 ;and two student pilots died in by the Chinese Peoples Army last | Of, Urgency tha oe @ + menaeh -.

ae tior 3 wikis) ter jeach of the twin-engined Beech- year, The broadcast monitored in| P"1D% yp oA 5 ae Vim

7 \craft planes,



carried out type of



| awd os Tokyo Tuesday night said also| i » at present pre-
— | Both aircraft plunged to earth Chinese Communist General bak ry hat ined prevail
Fall of witkets—1 tor 36; '2 for 10 | and burned. None of the occu~ Chang Kuo Hua Commander of * eee
BOWLING ANALYSIS pants had time to parachute/Req Chinese ex editionary forces “ave Granted

Oo M R. W | according to authorities at 'Co “jin Tibet has been named Military! After seo was granted for the

aaa re ea cae Phere te sin tal Air » Station! pistrict Commander, Resolution to be continued, he said
nee set voeeraa Pie Tee ign ay man reme. based, The broadcast also mentioned that they would all agree that that
Jackbir 2 wt i eave our station. sald 89) the names of several Chinose and was the type of construction work
Skeete 13 — 45 1 jinvestigation was underway, Tibetan Commanders appointed|,ny Government or individual in
Tang Choon , Are: —UP. as Chang’s deputies, —U.P. | any part of the world had to face.



France Approves
German Rearmament

; PARIS, Feb. 19.
The French National Assembly put aside the fear of

a rearmed Germany and approved a programme that would

put 400,000 West Germans into uniform under Genera!
Eisenhower. ‘The Assembly thereby also voted coniidencr
in the month-old Government of Premier Edgar Faure.
who gambled with the life of his Cabine
pean Army plan through the House.
327 to 287.

The official vote wag



government, It wag the first time
pince the war that the life of
French government had hinged
on a confidence vote on a Foreiy
Policy issue.

Compromise

The Assembly approved a co
promise on the Socialist Govern
ment motion endorsing the Euro

pean Army plan on condition tha
German recruiting is delayed u





til the Pact is formally ‘ratified
The compromise was forced by the
ye -ocialists who oppose the Army
(slan because, they like
Frenchmen, mist:

German Army,

In addition to delaying th:
cruiting of West German he
compromise proposal bar
many from immediate
a member of the Nort At
Treety Organizatior

It also repeat e Fre
quest that Britair n th k
pean Army and _ stipulate

’ A national troop contingent
Royal Salute just after their corpe
Tour was cut short here when ive

‘
-_

t to push the Euro-



|The Leader of the senate Had in-

. ~p | timated that question to the House
ST. JOHN AMBULANCE | a eady and members were aware
i of what the Government had pro-

BRIGADE AT |posed to meet what had taken

jplace at Seawell.





QUEEN’S COLLEGE @ On Page 6

Through the courtesy of Mrs. Y ¥
Randall, the Headmistress, the| MLLG. Shot Down
inter-Divisional First Aid compe-!
Ution for the Lady Bushe Cup will
be help at Queen’s College from Korea, Feb. 19
5—5.30 p.m, on Saturday, 23rd Twenty-seven United State
February, Teams of four from each Sabrejets battled 100 Communist





8th ARMY HEADQUARTERS,

of the following Divisions will M.LG. fighter planes today in an
take part. air battle over North Korea, One)
St. Michael No. 1 (Nursing)

M.1.G, was shot down.

ie ‘ St. Michael No. 2 (Nursing) Earlier an unidentified plane
——| The vote endeq the week-long St. Michael No, 3 (Nursing) dropped 16 bombs on Allied posi
| Btormy Assembly debate which! St. Michael No. 4 (Nursing } tions on the eastern front. There

for a time threatened Faure’ Christ Church No. 1 (Nur sing)

was no report of casualties or dam-

Christ Church No. 2 (Nursing) | age. On the ground two platoon-
St. James No. 1 (Nursing) ized Communist attacks in papid
St. Michael No. 1 (Ambulance) succession forced United Natior

Police No, 1 (Ambulance) troops to withdraw slightly from

Fire Brigade No. 1 (Ambulance )\their advance position wey, of
Dr. H. E. Skeete, O.B.E., O. St.)Mundung Valley on the eastern
f, Distr Surgeor will judge/ front. After directing mortar fir

the competition

2 Ships Wrecked

| CHATRAM

Allies

without

on Reds,
position

re-occupied
making



contact



PLANE CRASH KILLS 3

Massachusetts,







Feb. 19,

Thirty-three seamen were found NAGPUR, India, Feb. 19
ive, aboard the storm-shattered Two erew members and one
ern of the oil tanker Fort Mercer passenger were killed when
nd th t gufird e prepared |/Heckan Airway Dakota night!

iho ’ Ste
em} © Guplicate rescue! service plane on a ht from |
,operations tha aved 32 others , 4 ypur crash
from the broken stern of the tank- Madras, 0 Nagpur t Nag
tak Pendleton last night ““ | was about to land at Nag pt
ne | maaclt ? ie ue toll in tt port early to-day. The pilot and/
; in po de ara Beek i pilot were kHled instants
win « of t (
a ae ; 4 plar carried fou ew-
jumped into the sea tc - a oe Meal.
fr t } ut < Tos}
pe 1 tree top the
; ht ir !
lif The t 0,000 ur
. saa in mad fon letel
¢ € Ipant
—U.P —U.F

‘litself as a



FIVE CENTS

PRICE



B’dos Increase

Grant To I.C.T.A.



BARBADOS in the itur contribute $8,640 per
annum towards the financit rt Imperial ¢ ollege of
Tropical Agriculture instead 19 as formerly:

His Excellency ti Gover mn a message to both
branches of the Legisiatur t out umstances that
occasioned the deniar ised contributions and
yesterday the Legis ‘ yuncil passed reply; to His
Excellency the G reased contri-
} :
butior erty Yaave

’ LC Pease. ana

ivil Servant na repay to Hi
ivil Serve : ‘

ite age read

For Sessions

Governor

u uuiorm the Zon-

His Worship Mr. C, L. W 4 j i e Legisiauive Couneil
on Monday committed Carlos | I Secretary of State for
Smith, a Civil Servant of the A 3 has advised him that
ditor General’s Office livin num annual revenue re-



Barbarees Hill, St. Michael to t!

: . to Lnance the Imperial Col-
next siting of the Court of Gri

Aropical ic J

Sessions on a charge of falsifi pre soett bash be i he oie
1) We ann smith js o1 i hium commencing on the Ist
The charge states that the ce { September, 1951, has been esti-
fendant Carlos Smith on Apri! ¢ Avo §976,000 (£ 120,000) -
1945, being employed in the P Oe nn ae en es
Services of His Majesty wilfull iutrement of $408,000 (£65,000)
and with intent to defraud over the quinguennium recently
ted from or in the Petty ( mpleted, inis increase is re
Book belonging to His Majesty, 44ited almos, entirely to meet in-
his employer, the receipt o 00) Crease labour rates and salaries
taken by him the defendant f: mm | 44d to provide for cost of living
the vault of the Public Tressury fowances. In consequence Co-
of the island Jonial governments are being ask-

The five other charge of ;ea to increase their contributions
ceny and fraudulent conver ion | to the College from $168,000
were dismissed for want of pro- (£35,000) tg $288,000 (£60,000).

secution,

Legal appearances in the pre
liminary hearing were Mr. EF. K
Walcott Q.C., associated vith
Mr. E. W. Barrow for the defence
and Mr. W. W, Reece, Q.C., Soli: Barbados Benefits
tor General, for the Polic« As in the training of Diploma

otudents this Colony has always
jbenetited greatly, the Honourable
jthe Legislative Council is invited
}lo approve the proposed increase
jin the rate of the annual contribu-

Commons Begin
.
Minor Debate |tion to the College to $8,640 for
jthe next five years and of the

LONDON, Feb, 19 | neces

Ihe Secretary of State has sug-
gested that this Government con-
tribute $8,640 (£1,800) per annum
instead of $3,649 (£800).





ssary provision being made in

Parliament today will begin a the Estimates, provided that the
week of minor debate after the Diplema courses at the College are
two-week suspension in mourn- |

) continued,

The Council’, reply read;—

The Legislative Council have
the honour to acknowledge the
receipt of Your Excellency’s
Message No. 1/1952 and to inform
Your Excellency in reply that
they approve of the proposed in-
crease from $3,849 to $8,640 in the

ing for the late King George the
Sixth. Two weeks ago Labour
Leader Mr, Clement Attlee tabled
a motion of personal rebulce
against Prime Minister Winston
Churchill for his speech to the
United States Congress, The vote
was scheduled to come up next
day when the King’s death sus-

pended all political warfare. But|rate of the annual contribution
jthe real battle will not resume|from Barbados to the Imperial
again immediately this week out|College of Tropical Agriculture

of respect to the King
funeral was only Friday.
Today and tomorrow the Com-
mons will get rid of accumulated
minor bills. On Thursday it i:
likely that supplementary budget
estimates for this year will come
up and Friday is for private
| members’ bills. Nevertheless ther
{will be some sharp question:
faked in question periods thi
1 week——the first hour of each ses

| sion when members can question COLORADO, Feb, 19.
Ministers--and full scale warfare The strike deadline for the
ean be expected soon, | United States oil industry will be
~UP jSet tomorrow. by a co-ordinating

whose | provided the Diploma vourses are

continued at the College

DEADLINE
WILL BE SET









committee representing C.1.0.,
° Bi A.F.L, and independent unions.
Protection For \6iiesucart independent untons.
% ee pport demands for a two-
( ern dollars-per-day pay increase.
vany O. A. Knight, President of C.1.0.,,
Lianow: Hep. 10 {Oil Workers’ International Union,

ake ; Pen. i aid rat votes on >» .

The North Atlantic Counei ” iin x installations of te
Deputies drafted an agreement ol fidtuste have been carried
which would guarantee West |; n overwhelming majority
Germany against aggression alony {Knight saic balloting ‘was almost
the same lines as that already norplete among 300 bargains
afforded other countries under unite of this unton
General Dwight Eisenhower's | \ of each bargaining
command, The protocol finalized | rou} ire tabulated separately
today after consultation with the | nd ¢ verall strike vote must
N.A.T.O, Military Committee sets vithin each particular bar-
out that an attack on any one ot i init unit or that group cannot
the six nations in the European | ril He said groups vo ing to
army would be considered an | represent a total or "more
— on all N.A.T.O, member ! 0,000 oil workers. Three
States, | it ted not to strike t

West Germany will be one of | 10) but Kn ht aid the Ae
the nations in the European} jnyo! ed only 650 men, The
Army. The draft agreement wil! | strike ha been termed by an oil

be presented to the full meeting lustry 0kesman as
of N.A.T.O, Ministers whidh | will poraton ody
meets here tomorrow, for a full-! t

dress conference —U.P,

“one that
the nation and put
ifoot within ten days.”
—U.P.

~ AdenBuer, Allies
“iF ully Agree”

LONDON, Feb. 19,
: Chancellor Konrad Adenaus announced he and Big
| Three Foreign Ministers reached “venuine and full agree-
ment” at the Four Power Conference on German problems
which ended here this afte:
| Allies had agreed to give Ger-
many an indirect voice in N.A.T.O
| affairs without prejudicing hes
|future chances to enter N.A.T.O
member, Adenauet
| said “IT am very satisfied after
jthe meeting of Foreign Minis

100n

i. Gernian Goy't
Set Buffer Zone



|Robert Sehuman, Anthony Edea _ BERLIN Feb. ,
nd Dean Acheson. | + licia i i 1 t
| Discussions included, according! t Ger

to Adenauer; the establishment of















' four-Power Allied Review B : : : ae
including Germany to de thd) United State 4
future fate of war criminals now} "9
}serving terms under Allied sen-]| O#icia nee a OE
tences. eral miles deep « 1e Sovic
The lifting of all direct Allied]â„¢! . woes
controls over German war pro-|@ Pesu p aEN -%
uction and the substitution of]™ net ‘
a system of. indirect controls/#re4- | : We ie
through allocation of materials ral v
and funds by the European Army een aC i
.| Organization when it come inte I t I
being f the t I ex} 1d
The postponement f t
f the German reply to the NATO T .
Council ecommendation that} border
Germany contribute 1,250,000,000 H
marks as her defer contribution | r¢
f the fiscal year 1952—53
Germans only ld of the figure}« .
inday and ince it is é
jual the German offs nau
licated that there hing to}
ibo |
~U.P l OP,



PAGE TWO



Caub Calling

R. RONALD MAPP, M.C.P.,
who was one of the delegates
to the recent Moral Rearmament
Conférence in Miami will, be the
guest speaker at the Press Club this
afternoon at 4.45 o’clock. His sub-
ject will be “The Press and Moral
Leadership.” It is understood that
his talk will centre on the decisions
of the Conference.
Entrance to the Press Club is
near the junction of Middle and
Swan Streets.

Hete Again

R. and Mrs. Jan Friess are at
present holidaying in Bar-
bados. They arrived from Tortola
via Puerto Rico on Sunday and are
staying at the Hotel Royal.

r. Friess who was born in
Crechoslovakia, lived here from
1941 to 1948 at “Sunvalley”, on the
St. James coast. He is a nephew of
Mrs. Fela de Kuh of “The Pavilion”
Hastings.

Since Mr. Friess left here in 1948
re lived for a couple of years in

‘anada then visited Europe where
he was married in December 1950
in Switzerland. His home is at
present in Montreal but he and his
wife still have a flat in Switzer-
land,

Prior to coming to Barbados they
Bpent a few weeks in Tortola as
the guests of Mr. Ivan Humphreys,

Who has also lived in Barbados but f

has now settled in Tortola.

islands,
Barbados Has It

i R. and Mrs. W. Edward Daw-
son of Montreal who are

guests at the Windsor Hotel plan

to remain here until early April.

Mrs. Dawson told Carib yester-
day that for equable climate Bar.
bados has definitely “got it”. Since
the war they have done a grev
deal of travelling and Barbados is
just about the best spot they have
visited. Their trips overseas in-
cluded two visits to England, one
to Europe and during one of these
they made the Union Castle Line’s
trip around Africa callirig at 22
ports including Gibraltar and sev-
eral Mediterranean ports.

Mr. Dawson is Président of Daw-
son Bros. Ltd., Moritreal, Industrial
Suppliers of office equipment, His
wife Elizabeth, a former jourtialist
wrote a Womari’s columii in the
Montreal Star for abut five or six
years in the °80’s. After that she
edited a Trade paper before she
was married.

_ They have already visited Bar-
Patios, spending a week here in

48,
U.S. Radio Amateur
: R. HAROLD GAFFNEY of
Greensboro, North Carolina,
who artived in Barbados on Sun-
ccompanied by his wife is a
en radio amateur ahd back in
the U.S, he operates Kis 6bwn “rig”
—, the call sign of W4APP.
is intérest in Barbados was first
when he spoke to one of

our Toeal radio “Hams” over the |

tmateur radio waves. Since then
é has talked with 15 or 20 Bar-
badian “Hams” and finally decided
that he must visit this island which
he had heard so much about.
Mr. soe Bere. Gaffney are guests
fk.

S
t “Barbados Holiday

MES. J. J. (Elsie) Peele whose
late husband was a Director
of Tin Mines in Nigeria is holiday-
ing here staying at Cacrabank.
er ae she told Carib, was
le first Solicitor to go out to
lag: She spent 18 years on the
Coast,



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

"Surely now the Foreign
Office can’t go on saying
the time is not yet ripe jor

publication of
Life at SHAEF’ »

Third In Three

R,. U. S. “Fred” BRANDT-

Ms



brought along a friend, Mr. Albert
East. Both Mr. Brandtzaég and
Mr. East are with Canadian Inter-
national Paper Co., of Montreal.
During their stay here they are

guests at Cacrabank.
T.C.A. Officials
M* HERBERT SEAGRAM,
General Managet,, Oper-

ations, T.C.A., and Mr. Eliott Bol-
ton, Director of Personnel of the
same airline returned to Canada
after spending a short holiday in
Barbedos staying at Cacrabank.
Mr. J. E. Nickson, District Traffic
and Sales Manager, Toronto, who
came down with them. is still in
Barbados. Accompanied by his wife
they plan to return to Canada on
Friday. During their holiday here
they todK time out to visit Antigua
and Martinique.
Dance For The Captain

Gt ROY BROWN, Vice
4 President and Operations
Manager of Ceritral N: ern Air-
‘ways Ltd., of Canada is due to re-
turn to Canada today by T.C.A.,
after spenditig about four weeks
holiday in Barbados.

Last hight, the management. of
Cacrabanik Hotel, where he has
been staying gave a small dance at
the hotel in his honour.

Capt. Brown who has been flying %

since 1917 when he flew with the

Royal Flying Corps. during the

First World War was born in Win-

nipeg.

Studying Barbados Crabs
. JAMES HODGE of Fuller
Harrington College, Toledo,

Qhio, is once again in Barbados

staying at the Paradise Beach Club.

He is accompanied by his wife.

Dr. Hodge is continuing his study
of the minor crustacedfis of the

Lesser Antilles. In prior visits he

has learned much of the habits of

‘the Barbados crabs.

They arrived via Canada last
week by T.C.A. :

Back From St. Vincent

OMDR. NORMAN HOL-

4 BROOK is back from his
short visit to St. Vincent. He re-
turned on Monday by B.G. Air-
ways.





‘On Visit To Uiicle
And Brother
AT

present on

a

Mr.

tinique and Guadeloupe recently.

This is Mr. Baldini’s third visit
to Barbados having been here in

1937 and. 1947,

Trinidad Planter

FTER just over » week’s holi-
day in Barbados Mr. and

Mrs. Charles de Freitas are due to
today by
b.W.1.A., where Mr. de Freitas is a
cocoa and citrus planter, They have

returh to Trinidad

been Staying at Caé¢rabank.

They are frequent visitors to Bar-

bados.

From Halifax

RS. MERVYN MEARES,
widow of Col. eares,
C.M.G,, D.S.0., Legion of Honour,
und late of the Royal Artillery, is
at present holidaying in Barbados.

She artived from England a short

time ago by the Golfito and is
staying at Cacrabank. Her home is
in. Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Here until the end of March, she

plans to visit Bermuda before re-
turning to Canada.

Barbados Carnival Show
= 1952 Carnival Show, spon-

sored by the Y.M.P.C., takes
place at their headquarters on
Saturday, February 23 from 4 to
6.30 p.m.

Mrs. T, O. Lashley is in complete
charge of the arrangeménts and
prizes will bé given for the most
original antl prettiest Costumes.

For Carnival

EAVING by B.W.1LA. on Mon-
4 day to spend Carnival in
Trinidad weté, Mr, arid Mrs, Stah-
ton Toppin of Rockley New Road.
* o =

ISS SYBIL CLARKE of

‘Bohemia”, Collymore Rock,

has gone to Trinitlad to attend

Carnival. During her stay there

she will be the guest of Mr. and

Mrs. Eric Cameron of San Juan,
Trinidad.

Barbadian In Antigua
R. JOHN ARTHUR WILKIN-
SON GRIFFITH son of Mr.
G. B. Griffith, Acting Police Mag-
istrate of District “A”, has just
passed his finals in Surveyirig at
Antigua and has been granted a
licenee to practise in the survey-
ing of land in the presidency of
St.- John’s, Antigua.

After leaving Harrison College
he attéided the Antigua Grammar
School where in 1947 he passed
the School Certificate with exemp-
jon the London Matricula-
tion.

He applied for and was granted
a Leeward ind Scholarship.
is now attached to the Federal
Engineer's Office, Antigua.

Two Months

MONG recent arrivals from St.
Licia are Mrs. Vanessa
Floissat, Mr. Wallace Newton and
his sister Miss Eileen Newton, who
are heré of a two months’ holiday.
They are in residente at Super
Mare Cottage, Worthing.

Line For Today

OMAN would be more
charming if one could fall
into her Arms without falling into
her Hands! ! |
Talking Point
Remember to be calm in ad-
versity.—Horace.

BY THE WAY ..... by Beachcomber

ACK TURBOT is coming. “Don’t yet the experts had the assurance ;was terrible, “I'l get Egham for

hesitate,” says a spok
“with one foot in the road and
one on the pavement.”

I am reminded of the man who
walked home froiti a rowdy party
with one foot in the gutter and
the othé@r on the pavement. A
passer-by sdid to him, “I say, do

4° hg] 4 one pi
gui ?” “Thank you,” sai
sarees, with pr

avity, “I thought I was limp-
ing.”
The Gatima-bomb (XIX)

CIENTISTS of the more ad-
vanced democtacies were ex-
tremely ptizzled by the formula
Dingi-Poos delivered to Smuj in
Vatnopol, The ingredients pre-
scribed seemed harmless enough,

that Koolruk had given Egham
the i At length an experi-
mental mb was ready, The
populations were evicted from an
area the size of Wales in the desert
ot Zakan, and the bomb was ex-
ploded in the presence of scientists,
Generals, politicians and the
Press. The bomb weighed 13,728
tons, and had used up Several
stockpiles of valuable materials.
It was 180 yards high, with a cir-
cumferefice of 361 yards. When
General Vassilin pressed the but-
ton 80 miles away, all held their
breath, Theré was a pop like that
made by an egg bursting, and the
watchers saw through their tele-
scopes the whole t fall to
pieces slowly, That was all that
happened. Cattle five feet away
were unharmed. Dingi-Poos for
ence looked hideous. Her rage



Rupert



Saag

t excitement at the

Rupert is full o'
Guide's idea for solving the
mystery, and the little party moves
towards the waterfall. There
Pauline holds the piece of bark in
the spray lintil it is wet. Then she
it to the Autumn Elf

hands



LADIES ..
1, Ie
LADIES BEACE

LADIES

Dial 4220

JUST ARRIVED
MEN & LADIES DRESSING TABLE SETS

LADIES TOILET BRUS
MEN'S BRUSHES
BRUSHES

ALSO A NICE ASSORTMENT OF PHOTO FRAMES.




"te right !"" he

“* You're right.

ctles. “* The writing is quite clear

now, Listen, this is what it says:

‘Final assault. The army asseinbled
sunser at the .witherec , ank

Good gracious, that means tha: we

Have absolutely oo time to lose.

A ETERS... Sea eee ba
BES w.cicsiives ches

ating.
ND

CROSSWORD

this,” she kept re
THE





Across

ure Oeater, (8)
tald, sort at bee (
ook for a sous it
ind of one Saree “4
a PY .
tibied lands. te

A degree of depth 13)
Has a smoothing e' 2
‘O Tana wvrmap's den. (4
22, Deduce. (5) ‘
25. Let's pope you 2. when eent

o 8.

m gn
af; R'Broxen ‘star. “at
Down {

i wa:

arch, (@
(3)

3)
)

(5)
DP gasabeie

4s no.

y-n
ess,
re let it ase. —

the broken tape, (4)
e ofa jo is. (8)

seme 3H

* sae the fair, (8)

i
af

"E
g

z

ze

35
35

>

E

Rist
aoe

Peresarsocopeer

CnsEaESeeg

SHOR <

6g oer.



from $10.65 to $17.86
from §$ 5.44 to $ 9.40
Ce apeig GLK HR Toc $ 3.08

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4606

visit to his
uncle Mr. P. C. S. Maffei and
his brother Mr. Jack Baldini, is
Desiré “De-De’ Baldini who
arrived here from Paris via Mar-

BARBADOS ADVOCAT

THE NEW H





































































er

model s¢én
tiny straw

tine

softene |
sprays of mites
desigued ret

BERTHA GASTER, an

gramme about the delights
career On a small Efiglish

ten pounds a month.

There Was a great déal to be
Said for starting on a small paper.
On a big London one the jobs
were extremely specialised, but
on a small paper, especially one
abroad, the staff had to use their
heads and be ready for anything
—interviews, obituaries. book re-
views, Woman’s Page, filing, pick-
ing type and setting up pages, with
evenings spent in the printing
room, correcting proofs as they
went along, As none of the print-
ers knew English misprints were
a bugbear. Many of them weére un-
repeatéble but she was very fond
of the birth announcement that
had said, “To Mrs. Brown, at the
Anglo-American hospital a ton.”
Another unhappy day for her
paper was when a picture of a
king captioned “The King chats to
two friends” got mixed with
another in the print room and the
caption appeared under a picture
of three cabhorses.

Other People’s Affairs

Conditions were very different
for a foreign correspondent. Office
hours and worries faded away and
her responsibilities were her own,
but what a lot there were! But she
enjoyed it all. “It’s a life that takes
you about,” she said, “sends you
travelling all over the worl
gives you an exciting sense o!
being in on the making of history,
gives you a unique opportunity for
peeps into other people’s life. You
must like people, you must like
the rough-and-tumble of exist-
ence, in fact you must enjoy being
a nosey-parker, There’s no other
profession which allows you td
biittonhole a man in the street,
walk politely into the house of 4

erfect stranger, ring up an ac-
ress, nobble a Prime Minister,
and proceed to question them on
their most public and their most



~ QUEEN
> VICTORI






Al”



FOR VISITORS

until recently, was Middle Eas
of the “News Chronicle” of |

windowless room translating



I

AT-LINE DIPS

AT THE SIDES

Tiny waists
—then flat
and wide

By EILEEN ASCROFT

4 wide hipline puts
ttt emphasis on tiny waists in
e

ng dress fashions ;
and by Morton started
the Ly day of the London
Meing "side ‘hip. paddin
. ‘ ' 2
pale haceves the front and

back flat.

Th Side look further
stressed by ups of sid
nis and wafieePbode

HA by Rudolf followéa thie
same line, dipping at the
sides and revealing the fore

ht é

co! of, the clothes were

e—beige. grrr navy
and black—reliev 7. exotle
glistening straw hats and

shining feet in black or erey
patent leathPr slippers

Shorter jackets

NECK LINES follow the curved
motif of the shoulders. Wr
see variations of the hors:
shoe neck line.

SLEEVES on coats, dresses and
Suits are three-quarter

length. many full and
gathéred into smal! cut!
bands

UIT JACKETS aré slightly

shorter with
For both
ent

ng dress





BBC. Weekly Tatks Summary

They Paid Her for it Too

experienced journalist who,
t Correspondent on the staff
ondon, talked in a BBC pro-
of her job. She began her
paper in Egypt, sitting in a
endless advertisements for

tremely inquisitive, it seems to me
to be the ideal job for a woman.
After all, there’s no other profes-
sion which imyites me to go and
poke my nase into everything that
do@sn’t concern me, and then in-
vites me to go and tell the whole
world about it!”
Difficulties

There were difficulties, of
course, one of the greatest of them
being language. One trip took her
through Austria, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary and Yugoslavia, and as
she did not speak all the languages
of these countries she was depend-
ent on middle-class people who
could speak English and translate
for her, and this meant that she
was apt to get only a middle-class
point of view. A jotirnalist had
“to be careful in ass@ssing what she
heard, for everyone was always
trying to sell their point of view
and all were convinced that they
were right. It was essential that
facts should be reported absolute-
ly impersonally but it was also
inevitable that a good and mature
jourtialist should develop her own
viewpoints and it was part of her
duty 0. point out what was good

Statement of Account,
“ei f ; poser of the Week, 9 p.m. The wey ot
e main joy of being a journal- John Company; 10. p.m. ,The ews,
ist wag that ‘she met the world} 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,

and heard things she would never |â„¢Mid Week Talk, 10.30 p.m

forget, It was not the famous peo-
ple who stuck in her mind but
the marginal comments on _his-
tory such as the Yugoslay woman
who had been in a concentration
camp for two years and who wept
while feeding her own child, for
the other women’s children who
hever came back, or the two Ital-
ian women who said, “We don’t
know about politics; but we have
both lost our husbands tn the war,
and we are Alone. and we used to
be happy.” Such things were tn-

private concerns. And being ex- forgettable, especially to a woman.

FAMILY TREES—both going
back to Queen Victoria —

<=»

PRINCE



arr





SPECIAL POLICE DISPLAY

TO THE ISLAND

FEATURING
A MUSICAL RIDE
DRILL DISPLAY

BEATING THE RETREAT

Al

HE POLICE RipiNG SCHOOL
DISTRICT
5 p.m. Tuesday 26th February

ADMISSION $1.00

“RR”





a a Nk

Follow the
Chef

(By HELEN BURKE)

M. JEAN VINCENT. one of the
committ®é of chefs in the Associa-






me

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

Pixie Mcvium Was Satisfied

—It Made Him Happy to Be Unhappy—

By MAX TRELL

Pixie O’Seow!l said: “I suppose
you think I have a very bad dispo-
sition? Nothing seems to

please
”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadow- |
children With the turned-about

tion Culinaire Francaise, has had| "8™és, didn’t know exactl what to
wide experience in restaurants| ®"Swer. But finally Hanid said, as
d hotels, iftluding Maison tly ag possible (for she didn’t























hier in Paris atid the Berkeley
and Savo¥ ih London.

. For 15 years he has been prin-
cipal of the cookery department at
Westminster Technical College, re-
sponsible for the training Oys
and girls in the art of the hatte
cuisine and in hotél management.

I asked M. Vincert for recipes
which you might like to try or
adapt. ° '

Loin of Pork Bretonne Fér 10

2%4lb. diced or sliced potatoes
(yellow-fleshed for preference),
alb. sliced onions, 2 tablespoons
chopped parsley, pepper and salt,
3lb. loin of pork (boned and
skinned), % cup water.

Butter a deepish casserole, large
enough to hold all the ingredients.
Mix the potatoes, onions and pars-
ley together and season them at
the same time. Place in the cas-
serole with the seasoned pork,
boned side up, on top, Brush it
with melted Butter or margarine

f

I'm

the

n
fike husti
ings: “Well, you aren't really very
cheerful. But we like
are, don’t we, Knarf

Of course,” said Knarf.

Pixie O’Scowl grumbled that he

didn’t see w!

cousin Pixie McG
ever made him laugh, He’s got a
frown so deep that it starts at his
‘ore’

hurting Pixie O’Scowl’s feel-

he should be cheer-

when he didn’t see anything to

be chéerful about. “But if you think

bad, you ought to meet my
i . No one has

and runs all around his
you saw McGlum, you'd

chin, If
think I was cheerful.”

Knarf and Hanid now said they’d
very much like to meet Pixie Mc-
Glum. “Where do we find him?”
asked Knarf.

Under a Stiimp

“He lives,” said Pixie O’Scowl,
“ander an old stump at the edge of

swamp. It’s the dampest and

most uncomfortable place anyone
ever lived in. But he won’t move.”

and add the water. Bake in a e O’Scowl dil
moderate oven (375-400 degrees} take rf and Hanid Gooth to the
Fahr.) until the meat is nicely} old stum at the edge of the swamp

















browned, then turn it and brown
the other side. Baste it from time
to time, adding small quantities of
boiling water as required. (I
would give this dish at least 1%-
1% hours.)

Serve in the dish with a good
cabbage, cooked in salted water,
drained and left to finish in butter,
very slowly for an hour. (I would
use half the quantity of meat and
hope that it would serve six per-
sons.)

Shoulder of Lamb St. Hubert

This is a wonderful way to serve

and

his

e@ McGlum. “There

with no rubbers on, He must be

trying to catch a cold.”

At this moment, Pixie McGlum
sneezed several times
nose loudly, then looked up and saw

d blew his

visitors. “Go away,” he said. “I

hate company.”

Knarf and Hanid glanced closel
a. Pixie McGlum. He wasn’t m:
taller than a large sized dandelion,
He was wearing an old coat, an old
battered hat, and hi
a corncob pipe, turned upside down.

e was smoking

regia Mal soit) toh ee be art BE
Bone a smail shoulder of lamb} ™¢Glum added. “You'll have no fun


















and stuff it with a small amount of
minced rabbit, three chopped hard-
boiled eggs, 302. sliced mush-
rooms sautéd in a little butter or
taargarine and a small glass of
white wine and seasoning to taste.
Roll and tie the shoulder securely.
Fry it all over in butter or mar-
parine in a deep pan. Pour off the
fat. Add a glass of dry white wine
and allow the wine to evaporate.
Baste with a little slightly thick-
ened brown stock, flavoured with
a bouquet garni to which a little
basil has been added. Cover and
cook slowly, basting frequently.
Serve with a purée of chestnuts.
WORLD COPYRIGHT nreervey,

“

(

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20. 1952 \
11.15 a.m, Listeners’ Cho'ce, 11.45, a.m.
The Storyteller, 12 {opad) The News,
.10 p.m. News Analysis.
aconais Bem. ......5..... 25.38M $1,32M
a
4p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The Dail
Reraco, 4.15 p.m. BBC Midland Light
Orchestra, 5 p.m, Composer of the reas
5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at thi
Theatre Organ, 5,30.p.m. Bookr to Read
5.45 p.m, Ballet. 6 p,m, Souvenirs of
Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up an
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. ews,



ie

7.10 p.m. News Analwasts,. 7.15 p.m,
Calling the West Indies, 7.45 p m. Over w
to You

7.45—10.30 p.m. 31.82M 484M

8.15 p.m Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m.

“ath ,
SPECIAL, THURS, 1.30 p.m

SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE



visiting me. I’m very gloomy.”

y are you sitting with your

feét in the water?” Knarf asked.
Pixie McGlum muttered: “Th

my feet—I can do whatever I like

with them. Besides,” he said, “I’ve

a very good reason for keeping

‘
fens in the water.”
Hanid said in surprise: “What|and wouldn’t say another word.



TODAY (Only) 445 and 8.30

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S

UNDER CAPRICORN = B80, COrFON
Color by Tectttcolor) MICHAEL WILDING &
The BIG PUNCH —istiss hehe |

“HIDDEN CITY”
Bomba, The Jungle Boy



Tex RITTER
OPENING FRIDAY 2.30 —





445

PLAZA ,2San

Last 2 ShoWs To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Robert MITCHUM in
“OUT OF THE PAST”
“THE SET UP" Robert RYAN

&

Thurs. only) 445 & 8.30 p.m

‘BEWARE OF PITY’ Lili PALMER &

“HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN |
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY
IDNITE SAT
“CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE”
ild Bill ELLIOTT as Red Rider &
“ALIAS BILLY THE Kib”
Sunset CARSON

you just as you |
7?

to | toes like it. The frogs

Thurs,

5 'S MAGICAL ER
tRhice aN WON DERLAND:

|



42

Pixie McGlum was sitting with
his feet in the water.

reason have you got, Pixie Me-
Glum ? I didn’t think there was any
reason why anyone should keep }).
feet in water.”

“Silly!” said Pixie McGlum. «|;
going to rain in a day or two
my feet will get all wet. Solr «--
as well get them wet right no

Near the Swamp

“I don’t think you ought +
so near the swamp,” said H
“Nothing wrong with the rw
said Pixie McGlum. “The m :

and the toad
like it. Why shouldn’t I like it?”
“T’ve invited you to live in





he | O’Cheer Hall with the rest of th:
is now!” exclaimed Pixie O’Scowl;
“sitting with his feet in the water

Pixies a dozen times,” said Pixic
O’Scowl to his cousin. “But you
won’t come, Why not ?”

“Too comfortable,” muttered Pixie
O’Scowl. “Breakfast, dinner and
supper are always served on timne—
the food is good and wholesome—
there’s plenty of cream, and bee's
honey — everything is just right.
How do you suppose I'd feel if |
went to live in O’Cheer Hall?”

“You’d feel fine and cheerful,”
said Knarf.

“If I felt fine and cheerful, 1
wouldn’t be Pixie McGlum. And !f
I wasn’t Pixie McGlum, there
youldn’t be anybody living under
thie old stump down at the edge of
the swamp, The mosquitoes wouldn‘t
have anyone to sting, and the toads
and the frogs wouldn’t have anyone
to keep awake at aight with their
pipings and croakings.” And with
that, Pixie MeGlum sneezed again
| and blew his nose louder than befo





Btown

P

p.m Warner Double







fonly) 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

A

“TREASURE ISLAND"
(Color By Technicolor)
Bobby O'Driscoll & Robert Newton
E SET UP”

Robert RYAN



AND CONTINU

G
EGLoR utd

& 830 PM
— LIVE ACTION &
Radiant . ANSCO




GABE TY & Sezer

Last Show Tonite &.30
“ROCKY” Roddy McDowall &
“KILROY WAS HERE”
Jackie COOPER & Jackie COOGAN
Thurs, (only). 8.30 p.m
“DEAR MURDERER”
Eric PORTMAN &
“SNOW BOUND”
Robert NEWTON

Midniie Sat
ROCKY LANE DOUBLE!
“SHERIFF OF WiC1Q01A” &
“SUN DOWN IN SANTA FE”











8.45f0.m. Com-

Marching
and Waltzing

/

for





Dinner




and
Dancing
°

Every Night
(Except Sunday)


























Aimed in Radiant "
ANSCO color *

PLAZA

B°TOWN pint 2310)

Also. the Color Short:
“FESTIVAL OF LONDON”

|





6M. GLOBE 201m coneuey rox

YOUR MOVIE

DATES



Opening TO-DAY 5

x




MW

ING. ;



There will be NO TALENT or STAGE SHOWS at this Theatre.

ROODAL

a

sey
Step, B

and 8.30 and continuing
Fors

4 »Centur? 2 ET

0 ME

X

Perey












a
ee please note our week-end films START ON WEDNES.
DAYS.

THEATRES



EMPIRE
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
4.45 & 8.30

Jose FERRER
ACADEMY AWARD

Winner In

ST. ‘'s

Production
‘ . -* o
Cc YR A N
Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL
Opening Friday wand 230 & 8.30
“THE SUN SET AT DAWN”
OLYMPIC
bites: s co
Bing CROSBY—Bob HOPE in
“ROAD TO RIO”
and Alan LADD in
“WHISTSSING SMITH”
Opéning Friday gind 4.90 & Bs
“HURRICANE ISLAND”

ana

“COCKEYED WONDER”



QQ ee Et

ROXY

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
430 & 8.15
TRAPPED BY BOSTON

and
TO THE exh OF THE
E
with William POWELL
Opening Friday 22nd 4.30 & 8.15.
DESTINATION MOON.
ROYAL
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
4.30 & 8.15

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL
“UNDERSEA KINGDOM”
with Ray “Crash” CORRIGAN
RA ac
Friday only. :
TRAPPED iN
BLACKIE.
and
TO THE END OF THE
EARTH.









——.. =. =| Se Ul ehCUCULrrmhUhUhc cohUlL er hl .mhUmLCrCOCUClrlhCUC Ol ee UL ee SCO

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952



Further

JAMAICA

TO GET

anadian Investment In Caribbean Bauxite

—— a ae ee Oe er. ee





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE













30 Die In



a

Seawell

ARRIVALS By BWIA. ON MONDAY
















PAGE THREE

‘Harbour Log















2 From Grenada—Lione! Gittens, Preda IN CARLISLE BAY
1ZZar Martin, W lloughby res, Goulds
NEW EE SE P RT a RK. MeKague. ? McK ec, M Mary E e, Sch. Sunshine R
G. Saunder Mr D.G ind ch. Henry B Sch. Wonderful
: } | SS A ( ; BOMNOM, Feb, 19, 5 cae ees Dee See he ee oe
More snow is on Ge way fo. nee * Vincent—Frederick Casson, re A. Davidson, Sch. Emeline, Sch
New England where 30 persons colm zonsaives, Angela G alve Luet! le M. Smith, Sch Marvy M. Lewis,
: . ; . MONTREAL. died in the blizzard whieh ended “"[o" “eee 1 Devidhie, Me ee ne
Canadian investment in the Caribbean area will be early yesterday while northeastern John Nickson, Doroth; Enis ARRIVALS
increased by at least $20,000,000 to provide large-scale ex- states were still digging out of Bugo and Everett Warne Seh 1 Belle Wolfe, 74 tons net
: ’ a, oe sy sae hate un : From Gaadeloupe—Andre Robin Ye B ‘
pansion of the bauxite-alumina facilities already under heir worst storm in years. Wiem femided-P. Johnson, G. Wilson, » ach : eu
; ica i i A, Tucker, G. Sornes. M. Sorne vis, n Trinidz
construction in Jamaica, announces Mr. Nathaniel Davis, The Weather Bareau predicted Stay. s. Beaty. Be Boyes, Wo Bayes, wc Enenusl G clardom, €8 tome net
president of Aluminium Ltd., Montreal. d snow or the rain in the south A. Dreiswger, R. Fergusson, P. Poun- gapt. C. MeQuilkin, from Curriacou.
The company’s new alumina plant in Jamaica, the first ona SOE ih Che GRE foe 10> ee ee a Re MR SPTR S Baty, OS tena notes
in the Caribbean, is now having its planned capacity in- ogy a - the uae DEPARTURES By B.WLA. ON MONDAY MV Benny, 2,18 (ons, Capt, Pedter-
. han ie 7 wh began Suni night were ‘er Trinidad—Cyril Clarke, Gladstone son, from ad
eased from 180 tons of alumina per day to 450 tons per onal by the tenn ee even more Walker, Julisn Williams, James Baptiste, ’
ay. : 4 Dhansanan Saroop Frank Bayne DEPARTURES
rE tecrenes dn ecg lives when the storm womens “ Gweneth Atkinson, Lionel Wilson, S.S. Helicon, 981 tons net, Capt
required to provide more raw ‘8 near Mandeville, in Se — ae — = e oO Dorothy Barrow. srecder _ Matyseniuk, Docksen, foe Aniaterdam. es a
materials for Canada’s rapidly ‘emtral section of the islani a TIEEe Sees « J y. Kirton, Eisie Haynes, Etwyn Cumber- Christie, for Antigua.
expanding aluminium industry. Construction on the first ae A howling northeast blizzard bateh, Andrew Shockness, Jack Counc Sch. Lady Silver, 30 tons net, Capt.
Further enlargement of the plant has been proceeding rapidly, hens ‘ght inches ™% Kenneth Isaac, John Coley. Rove- Bethel, for Antigua
roviding employment for more posited from about eight mary Coley, Arnold Wood, Cornel anes
to “a tons per day = called for ee cd workers Progress to of snow in Boston to 31 inches in Wood, Stanton Toppin, Pamela Toppin
in e@ company’s plans as a ‘"* . = parts of New Hampshire. A 20 and Arthur Vendryes MAI
suecessive j ant, Mr, date includes the erection of = ; ; Fer Grenada—Morton Reingold, Geren L NOTICES
Davis said rere 8 structural steel and tanks from inch snowfall in Lewiston WS jordan, Rev. Francis Ogden and Marlene
To service the alumina plant ™aterial brought from England; Se RANT Cane ty “SaeRnes “oA yer a Vinceat—Bertie Corbin, Chark ot Ne Ge ~ b pee
s r a a ait - > ir ~ ertie ‘orbin “hark and thandle export shipments, a calcining ap lace: he. eon oe —«cP) Lawson and Arthur Lashley =m ssi adi:
deep-sea port will be created on pes ge depth of 300 aot hekont a For tango. Arthur Zeitsehel and 12 ineon), Registered
the south coast of Jamaica. A WeHs to a : arriett Zeitschel. and Ord Mail at
600-foot all-steel pier, will be FS. Ai orineh pipeline four miles . In Touch With Barbados Se eee ee
constructed at Old Harbour Bay, tnd 000,000. alien 2 eet on oan Purchase of British Owned Stati pails for British Gulsna by the Sch.
with initial dredging operations & @ ),0NDU' a 5 the first time fer many years a She outclassed thige competitors in the i Coastal Station Setened “Beat GAY es kee
to start immediately. a hill near ths plant. I British bulldog has won the Champion- Ont es, oe ? b ‘ United Railways Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advise “Piten Mal nat Rey Man at
i iS - ‘r see ; shi s Q "s, oways uckles, shown when six that they can now co cate with il at 83 =
Total investment by the com Storage facilities for alumina ship of the show at Cratt's moritiin Sih, ‘cals SO AE hace Bete HAVANA ae Dae Sie, Se. Seeman etegte with te 2p.m. Ordinary Mail 4? 2.30 p.m. on
pany in Jamaica may reach as Sati ot jorse: i i , = the t Februany, 1962
fouch as $40,000 000, including will be a area AN ene hata te err Sree | day, but has mot been given any special The Cuban Sugar Landowners’ Coast Station:—
é A ’ , j i a chiles, exhibite y Mr. J. arcar of | ath " : f anriad ty Helder, s.s. Benny, s.5 ‘anac yy
the cost of extensive agricultural saeediy trot ‘70,000 tons each. Berkhamsted, Herts, and judged the best " ot She is just naturally a winner,” said Association, at a meeting 10 Grier ss Rodos, s.sLoldn ss. RATES OF EXCHANGE
projects initiated six years ago. These will be filled up tonvefor exhibit at Olympia | Mrs. Sapaatd, whe pipe ine te tke esanee Havana, has agpeed to establis! Colompbie, ss. Sea Wind, ss Cisbroviy FEBRUARY 19, 1952
he programme is being carried pelts from the railway wagons 6 a ee ot ee ec ey F a company with a view to 5.9 Steelore, ss. Santa Rosa, s OANADA
> Jamaic ites d.. ¢ ” me . - a purchasing the British-owned Pethfinder, s.s. Vera Cruz, s.s. Sunrover, 73.4/10% pr. Cheques on
out by Jamaica Bauxites, Ltd., a . " . e : .
. aoe and in turn discharged by a 1,400- t ; o , §.8. Kallada, s.s. Esso Bolivar, 5.5. Aleoa Rankers 71.8/10% pr
subsidiary of Aluminium, Ltd. foot jong conveyor to the pier. oI United Railways of Havana. It polaris, 5.8. Esso Camden, 5.5. Wast Demand Drafts 71.66% pr.
All capital requirements are storage tanks will also be pro- I¢ ‘AO f r H Id has set up a technical committe: ington, Milbank, 8.8. Burepe tage Drafie 91. SOE oe
being provided by the parent vided for 80,000 barrels of fuel Oo oO as a first step to study the con- Alpha, s.s. Marques De Comillas 73. 4/10% pr, Cable i
ompany, with the exception of 6) to be used for firing both the ditions of the railway and_ to sages yes Se Tee Se Bens F2,8/108 He. Cissents 709/206 ‘pr.
6,700,000 towards the cost of the Sand cee “let “ ™~ 7 report back, —B.ULP. Planter * 3 : “ Goupon £9 .6/ 0% pr.
ree : calcining kilns and steam genera- on erence 3 anter, 10% pr Silver 20% pr
rst-stage plant, which was ting equipment at the alumina
Jouned to Jamaica Bauxites by plant. Transit sheds will be built

the Economic Co-operation Ad-
ministration. The loan is being
repaid by aluminium shipments
from Canada to the U.S, Govern-

for other raw materials.

A .new method of shipping

alumina is planned by the com-

_ MONTREAL, Feb. 18,
A special conference for comple-
tion of a convention on damage

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 19.

President Peron, Speaking in a nationwide broadcast

|
|

ment stockpile, pany in order to handle the caused by foreign aircraft to third —_ outiined an austerity programme for Argentina in which he
“Production from the aluming quantity involved. The material Partits on the surface and for announced that the compte would ve lore meatless days |
plant will go chiefly to the new will be discharged directly into “pening of this convention for y Y Se heya

aluminium smelter being built by
Oug subsidiary, the Aluminium

the ship’s hold in bulk instead of
being loaded in bags. This. tech-

signature by the governments of
the world, will be held by the In-

per week and urged a rapid increase in farm and mining
production to boost Foreign Exchange earnings and cope





|

Company of Canada, Ltd. in nique will speed up the opera- ternational Civil Aviation Organ- i i |
British Columbia,” said Mr. tion to the rate of 600 nied war ization in Rome_ beginning woth ee ek ole so — |
Davis. “The new west-coast hour with considerable saving in September 1952. The Third Party far had not to make ea sacri- bry i
jmelter, with an initial capacity handling, shipping, time and bags. Damage Convention is designed feces but that the Seal have te SUGAR NEWS
of 83,000 tons of aluminium, will When mining operations are to replace the Rome Convention pec; the sit y a“ ar i
treate a considerable increase in begun, open-pit methods using of 1938 and is being held in Rome oe’ We Situation and “organ- o !
Canada’s requirements of raw mechanical excavators will be upon the invitation of the Gov. So, Persecution from abroad Rain, Drought |
naterials. employed. The bauxite will be ernment of Italy calls for some hardships. He said ‘

“This has resulted in am earried to the plant by diesel- dy Argentina's financial difficulttes Ruin Australian
*xpansion and acceleration of powered haulage units. Rather The Legal Committee of ICAO began in 1949 due to inconverti-
our construction programme in than being shipped out of the has been working upon a revision bility of the British pound and Sy y P t |
Jamaica, Savings of about 50 per island in this form, the bauxite of the Rome Convention for sever- “iscrimination” under the Mar- > igar rospec S |
vent. in shipping costs will will be converted into alumina al years, The draft convention to Shall Plan, He said if the auster- cs
be realised by extracting the at the plant near Mandeville by pe submitted to the special con- ity programme was accompanied _, BRISBANE. |
ilumina from the bauxite at its a special method known as the ference retains the system of ab- by an imerease “of only 20 per Total sugar output in Australia
jource rather than shipping the “Bayer process. golute liability of the aircraft cent.” in production, Argentina for the 1951 season is now put |
dre itself to an alumina plant in y

North America,”

—B.U.P.



Operator for damage caused to

would solve the Foreign Exchange

at well under 700,00 tons follow - |

|

third parties on the surface, the Problem and partially solve her a. ee = re }
First production of the Jamaica system found in the Rome Con- inflation problems. Eitlere Acrusht em Xf llc

‘ ; oe aiate ‘ : ’ > ught. The 1950 ere
pumie omens se Bus Conductors ert OF eS includes” mn Eliminate Waste severely affected by the wet}
and ‘Seats enianand plant on Fined at 40h Cciher tame toms ro However Peron suid that in season which made harvesting!
which construction is well under un weight of the afreraft causing the Argentina’s case au*terity did not difficult, resulted in the poorest

way is due to go into operation in
ate 1953. At the British Colum-
dia smelter, which will be ready
for initial operation early in 1954,
the alumina will be discharged
from deep-sea vessels direct to
storage 800 yards from the wharf.

. +s eee rag tion will be considered further at . sea, was 0 of grea rustra-
cauire “atte ‘properties oriered by Hig Worship Mr cB. the Rome meeting. ebehauces "ihe Argentine Govern- ton to growers ginazmilers ‘ae oo good looks tell you they’re just right
al exploration for the ore days oe {un default one ontas A Suggestion ae secu aane he urged a a crop which was expected You know, too, when you look at the price
farried out originally in 1942 and imprisonment with hard labour he Council of ICAO has sug- 1, Government will proceed Tine’ made ‘harvesting a0. dif tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
Fore con@read Spouse the enmi- eels 1 “on aa inne’ 1 oe 5 a as. Tet Zs art will on — ee mini- Cult that it had to be pos poned is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is

n Canadian laboratories.
The company purchased 30,000

1 le . 7 “lyde become an excessive burden on August that crushing proceeded ‘ es : , =
fcres of land containing some gestae mee a ae” el international civil aviation, yet ®%d “appropriate profit’. without undue hindrance, Heavy which means * just right’! Look for it im
4000 acres of bauxite deposits ji 16) 10/- for overloading the Should be high enough to cover 3. Foster production of good rains again set in early in Novem- leading stores in Barbados,

tnd has since conducted an ee M-1300. Foster is to pay his Compensation to third parties in quality cattle in the shortest pos- ber and the season dragged on

sxtensive agricultural and reaf- fine in 14 days, or in default 14 1 but extremely rare catastro- sible time. _ until February, during which

restation scheme to raise the dave’ inatrisopment phic accidents. 4. Reorganize packing houses time the most deplorable har-

ae A stom 08 cattle sulted to “Both cases were brought by . The draft convention provides, from a technical apd financial vesting conditions in living mem~-

e Jamaican conditions is being
red and modern farming
nethods are applied.

Work On New Port To Begin
at Once
The site selected for

the com-

Two bug conductors were con-
victed and fined by two@ District
“A” Police Magistrates who found
them guilty of overloading their
buses with passengers.

The first was Preston Watts of

on Harmony Hall Road,

Cpl. Cyrus who is attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station.



£4 Fine For

damage; the proposed maximum
amount which an operator can be
obliged to pay under normal cir-
cumstances is ten million Poin-
care gold francs, equivalent to
663,360 U.S. dollars. This limita-

cost of third party insurance to

for the first time on a multilateral
basis, for the compulsory recogni-
tion of foreign judgments. Ac-
cording to its terms, law suits may
be brought only in the courte of
the country where the damage
occurred, but a judgment render-

mean that necessary items ywou.d
be renounced bul it would mean
i. @liminaung waste; 2. re-
ducing unnecessary expenses;
3. renouncing everything super-
fluous; and 4, postponing every-
thing not absolutely necessary,

mum prices taking into considera-
tion production, costs and risks

viewpoint.

He also said no cattle would be
slaughtered at all for one day of
each week and meat slaughtered
on the second meatless day will
be destined exclusively for export,

Offered Loan

suger yield since 1924

According to the annual re
port of the Australian Bureau of
Sugar Experiment Stations, just
published and covering the season
up to June, 1951, the crushing

It was not until the middle of
.

ory prevailed. This had a marked
effect on the sugar content of the
cane, which at no time attained
its normal peak of maturity. As
a result, it took 7.61 tong of cane
to provide one ton of sugar.

The young cane for the 1951

———$ $$ ——





JOHN WHITE





the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign







ny’s new rt in Jamaica is 2 ed in the courts of one nation, He repeated the earlier state- Qo), was also affected by the wet
ia’ Harbour ay, on the south Speeding concerning damage caused by ment that the Argentine Govern- oamtlitions and later by serious e e
st, 22 miles west of Kingston. foreign aircraft, will be capable of ment had been offered a loan by frosts, Since then, as though the means ma e ust rh t
e 600-foot all-steel pier will be His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith, execution in any other state which “foreign moneylenders” but said prop had not already suffered
feet wide and have a depth of Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- is party to the Convention. The that the Government prefers to enough, persistent drought has — ‘
feet of water alongside. trict “A” yesterday fined Conrad draft convention also provides that Solve its problems by its own added to the disaster. ij =, al
redging will start immediately gpringer of Belleplaine, St. An- states may require that the opera- means. The Bureau's figures show that

r a 7,000-foot channel, 400 feet
vide, with a turning basin of
§200 feet. This operation, which

volves moving 2,250,000 cubic

ds of sand and clay, wil! take
intil June, when construction of

e pier will begin. The harbour
ill be connected to the
amaica Government Railway by

drew, £4 and 1/- costs in 28 days,
or two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour for exceeding the
speed limit on Bank Hall Road
while driving the motor lorry
A-115.

The Police said that the motor
lorry was driven at over 28 miles

tor of a foreign aircraft cover his
potential liability by insurence or
some other acceptable security.

Invitations to attend the special
conference are being sent to the
567 member nations of the Inter-
national Civil Aviation Organiza-

He said that foreign loans are
good only to mortgage a country.
He explained that meatless holi-
days were necessary to increase
Argentina’s exportable surplus
and thereby boost Foreign Ex-
change earnings. In another an-
nouncement he said: “Govern-

the yield, which totalled 910,049
tons of sugar in 1948, has been
decreasing steadily ever since—
+0 897,267 tons in 1949 and to
879,844 tons in 1950. If estimates
are now fulfilled, putting the 1951
crop at well under 700,000 tons,
this trend will have continued

YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S



spur line and will have exten- per hour while the speed limit tion and to the Government of ment will pay producers substan- and it may be some years before |
ee freight sidings. on that road is 20 miles per hour. Rumania, the only non-contracting tially better prices for 1952-53 Australia can regain its position

The plant where Jamaica baux- The offence was committed on state of ICAO which has ratified crops.” among world sugar producers. .
fe will be refined into alumina January 4, 1952, the 1933 Rome Convention. —U.P. ; —B.U.P. o

PAINS IN





ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened Firs! Day

Don't tet cou chok-
ing attacks of

hing
















YOU CAN'T BEAT IT’S





(ECKSTEIN BROS.)
Distributors

for Kidné

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THE

Sa ST



—
= = ————_-:
Se eee ea









9

PAGE FOUR





Wednesday, February 20, 1952

BULK SHIPMENT

BY recommending that bulk shipment
of fancy molasses be permitted to the
United States, the committee appointed to
enquire into all aspects of the fancy
molasses industry in Barbados hope that
valuable data and experience can be
gained for the industry. At the same time
they are careful to emphasise that this
additional business would not affect the
amount of labour which is at present em-
ployed in the industry.

The Committee despite its statement
that the shipment of fancy molasses in
bulk to the Canadian market was not
necessary in “order to maintain our pres-
ent exports” are of the opinion that it
may become essential to ship molasses in
bulk. They therefore consider that the
fancy molasses industry should plan well
in advance so that shipment in bulk can
be adopted with the minimum difficulty.
When fancy molasses is shipped in bulk
some part of the savings should be paid
into a special fund. This Fund could be
uséd- among other purposes to provide
alternative’ employment for labour dis-
Placed by bulk shipment and would be
operated by the Fancy Molasses Control
and Marketirig Board.

These recommendations are remarkable
in view of the fact that the necessity or
otherwise of shipping fancy molasses in
tank’steamers rather than in packages was
one of the major causes of the commit-
tee's enquiry. It will be remembered that
arrangements had been made by local ex-
porters in midsummer 1950 to ship fancy
molasses or “syrup”, as it is known locally,
to Canada in bulk Arrangements were
completed and a tank steamer actually
afrived in port but the Government re-
fused to grant permission for shipment in
bulk, and appointed a committee on 12th
June, 1950. Many reasons were given at
the time for the government's action but
chief of them seems to have been the fear
that.unemployment would result because
of bulk shipment.

That note of fear runs through the whole
report and is especially written into the re-
commendation that bulk shipment be
permitted to the United States. It is unfor-
tunate that no estimates are given in the
report of the number of employees who
would lose employment because of a change
over to bulk shipment but figures supplied
by-the Hon. H. A. Cuke and published as
Appendix VII show that difference in costs
between shipment in bulk and shipment in
packages is $23.83 per 100 gallons of which
Labour represents only $5.39 as compared
with other costs of $18.44. These figures,
viewed unemotionally, are overwhelmingly
convincing that bulk shipment would be
more economical and that savings on other.
costs could be used to create other employ-
ment for those, whose occupations must
change sooner or later.

The Committee explicitly states that bulk
shipment was not in their opinion neces-
sary, at the time of writing their report, in
order to maintain present exports. But they
were so impressed by the possibility of com-
petition in the future that they concede
that bulk shipment of fancy molasses may
become essential, consider that the in-

stry should plan well in advance, and
as Y dense bulk export to the United
States as a method of gaining valuable data
ience,
ont hee will be some who will regret that
the government did not permit bulk ship-
ment in 1950, since there would be in
existence certain data and experience
which would help the industry to plan
ahead, but government controls are bound
to squeeze the corns of private enterprise
at some time and there was not sufficient
unanimity among exporters at that time
to encourage government's permission of
a bulk shipment trial. Those who engin-
eered this pioneer attempt at the time
may derive some slight satisfaction from
the recommendations which the Commit-
tee have made.

Perhaps the greatest weakness of the
report is ifs failure to emphasise how
uncertain is the future of the export mar-
ket. Para. 50 disconcertingly says: “some
dealers maintained that the consumption
of molasses was becoming less and less:
others that the demand for the product
was limited but stable: others again
thought that the industry was thriving

consumption increasing.” It must
cont been vay difficult for the Committee
to form any opinions against this confus-
ing background of lack of knowledge.
Yet it is clearly important that local ex-
porters should not imagine that the fancy
molasses market is so assured that it will
continue for ever whether or not bulk
shipment is introduced.

It has even been said that in the last
resort neither private enterprise: nor the
Committee : ner the Government : nor the
party with a majority in the House of
Assembly will be able to introduce bulk
shipment. Everything is said to depend
on the will of those who will be displaced
if bulk shipment becomes necessary. But
this is unlikely. Because whereas bulk
shipment will, from er create new
c nities for those who must neces-
pa gy ar to be employed, the failure
or diminution of the fancy molasses
export market will cause unemployment
without providing such a fund. Pee

And the real crisis in molasses is the
crisis of a product which is no longer as
popular in Canada as it was. This dire
fact comes peeping through almost every
line of this well-penned report, although
there is no actual mention of a crisis.





THREE days after ti ay of th
King’s lung operat 2 typewrit-
ten note came to me. It said, with
stark, shocking brevity:—

The King w Z ear to be



making a complete recovery but
he is not likely to live longer
than about 18 months
“The end will probably come
j suddenly. The operation was six
months too late.”
| Did the King himself know that?
I do not think so. To the last hours
| of his life he was telling his friends
| in conversation and by letter how
| Surprising a recovery he was mak-
ing, and how thrilled he was by it.
He talked and wrote with the
joy and buoyaney of a very
happy and confident man. The
| handwriting of the letters he
| wrote im the last weeks was
bold and firm, with no indica-
tion of fatigue or fear.
| _ He could never have known of
} the shadow that lay over him.
i Just one thing vexed him: the
huskiness of his voice.

But it did not disturb him much.
| He knew that it was caused by the
| paralysis of one of the vocal cords

which persisted since the opera-
tion. He was confident to certainty
that time and effort would put it
right again.

He died a happy man. Of that |
am sure. Certainly he deservec
j that crowning mercy. For although
he found deep happiness in man-
hood, especially in his family life
he also tasted much sorrow and
suffering in his stoo-short vears
Hesitani Steps

How Fate shapes the lives of

men and the destinies of countries
is always a fascinating study
| The pages of history will tell

| how King George, though not born *

'to be King, and never dreaming
| that he would ever be King, sud-
jdenly had Kingship thrust upon
| him.

| What they will not tell is the fas-
j¢inating story of how, but for a
| series of trivial happenings in the
| little Australian town of Perth 28
| Years ago, it might never have been
| Possible for him to accept the re.
| sporisibilities of Kingship when
} Fate beckoned him.

And that in turn might well have
meant that the new Queen we love
$0 Much would never have been
Queen.

The never-before-told story be-

gins in the year before the Empire |

Exhibition which drew the world
to Wembley.

|, King George—then Duke of
|'York—had recently married the
| girl he had loved since childhood,
} and was taking his first hesitant
; Steps in public life.

And they were hesitant steps.
| Far more hesitant and difficult
j than mest people realise.
| For the Duke had carried since
} €arliest boyhood the burden of an
| acute speech defect which made
| speechmaking, afid even conver-
sation—two qualities most vital to
| any man in public life—so intoler-
| able a torture as to be almost im-
possible.

The Question

In one simple sentence, spoken
to a few friends years later, our
Queen of today described his
plight more movingly than anyone
else will ever do: “I can remember
when I was a child in my cot
father coming to say ‘Goodnight’
to me, and he couldn’t.”

Etiquette demands that when
anyone is presented to royalty,
royalty must open the conversa-
tion. The young Duke of York too
often found that émbarrassingly
impossible for him to do.

When a cadet in his first term at
Dartmouth a tutor, not realising
the seriousness of his defect, sud-
denly put the question to him in
class: “What is the half of a
half?”

The word “Quarter” was beyond
utterance by the nervous boy.
Speech froze in his throat.

The sarcastic comments of his
tutor on his inability to solve as
simple a sum as that, and the tit.
ters of the boys around him, left a
permanent mark upon him

}

| Tremendous Efforts

He became more and more shy
and diffident. His nervousness in-

| creased, and muth of his early

| youth was marked by solitary
| hours of deep gloom, in which he
| wrestled with his growing doubts
that he could ever conquer this
curse which he came to believe
| “God had put upon him.”

| His marriage to an understand-

| ing girl who loved him deeply, and

| whom he in turn adored, helped
| him through this difficult time as
| nothing else could have.

He made one tremendous effort
after another, Together they fought
his affliction in public and in priv-
ate. Often the queen could be seen

| literally suffering with him and in-
fusing her strength into him. Yet
he made very little progress.

Then Fate began to move her

| pawns. In Perth, Australia. there
lived a man of young middle age

| who was achieving remarkable re-

\sults in the curing of speech de-

| fects among the children of the

} te by a system of diaphragm
breathing—with which, of course,
the doctors disagreed. His name

| was, Lionel Logue.

j Around the Christmas of that
year before Wembley, which was
to prove fateful for the future

| British King, a doctor friend and
Logue decided to take their farm.
ilies away for a holiday together.

| Ready To Go

| The morning fixed for the start

;came. The family had their bags

| packed.

| The car was at the door, when

suddenly the telephone rang. It was

{the doctor, “Sorry,”, he said, “but

| 1 cannot go with you. A friend has

| fallen ill. I have to s ay with him.”

“Well, that holiday is over,” said

| Logue to his wife.

i “But you need a holiday”, she

| replied. “Why don’t you go Bast by














' yourself.”
‘No,” said Logue “I went East
j last year.’
" y not Colon
“We said Logue hesitz
f I went to Colombo I y
bably want to go to England.”

“England
Logue

Lucky Man

Why not?” exicaimed





and he called a friend who
[head of a shipping agency. “C
you give me two cabins to Eng

Has Nev

She took him to the telephone Aden

sci lc BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The King: A Story That NOW_WIAT ABOUT

By JOHN GORDON
land?” he asked. “One for my wife
aid myself, and one for my two




laughed. “Don't be
silly.” he id. “This is Wembley
year. There isn't a cabin free in
any ship, and not likely to be.”

Logue put down the telephone.
Within half an hour it rang again.
It was the shipping man. Very
excited.

‘You are the luckiést man,” he
saic. “Two cabin bookihgs have
just been cancelled, You can have
them. The ship sails in ten days.

“I'll tell you in half an hour,”
replied Logue.

“It’s this minute or never,” said
the shipping man.

Logues wife nodded her head.
And Logue said. “Right, we take

them.”
A Little Work

They landed in London on March
1, Logue had £2,000 in the world.
And four to keep on it, in the most
expensive city in the world until
he could make good.

He knew nobody in the whole of
Britain. And he carried only one
introduction. It was to me. We
have remained on terms of close
friendship from the day he deliv-
ered it.

He settled his family in lodgings

in Maida Vale and went round the
local schools offering help in deal-
ing with their children's speech
defects. Soon he had a little work



w that the struggle
from the bottom to
likely to be a slow one:
the money he had be.





the confidence of a man
ly sure of himself-he de»
to go right to the top at
once. He rented a consulting
room in Harley-street, and a house
in Bolt ardens, South Kensing-
ton. At that time he did not have
a single patient.





Final Move

He soon’ met some fellow-
Australians, for Australians are
@ gregarious people. He was a
man bubbling with vitality and
personality. Those who met him
remembered him. And that was
how Fate made her final move.

An Australian who hid met
Logue met soon afterwards a
r al equerry who was looking a



he gO to the’ United
States to see if [ can bring over
@ speech-defect expert to look at

the Duke of York.” the equerry



explained.

“But it’s so hopeless!” he
added. “Nine experts here have
seen him already. Every possible

treatment has been tried: And not
one hag been the least successful.”

“There's a young Australian just
come over. He seems to be good.



Why not try him?” Suggested the
Australian.

Next day the equerry suw
Logue at Harley-street. His

judgment of him was favourable.
Logue was asked if he would see
the Duke and decide whether he
could do anything to help him,

“Yes,” said Logue. “But he must
come to me here, That imposes an
effort on him which is essential for
Success. If 1 see him at home we
lose the value of that.”

First Patient

Two days later, on October 19,
1926, the Duke went to Harley-
street. He was the first patient
ever to enter that room.

They talked for an hour and a
half.

Conversation was very difficult
But at the end of the hour and a
half Logue said, “I can cure you,
but it will need a tremendous
effort by you. Without that effort
it can’t be done.”

_ As Logue said later, “He came
into my room a slim, quiet man
with tired eyes and all the out-
ward symptom. of a man upon
whom habitual speech defect
had begun to set the Sign. When
he left you could see that there
was hope once more in his heart,”

Seven months later the Duke
standing alone, made, with very
little hesitation, the speech that

opened Australia’s new Parlia-
ment at Canberra.
t those seven months

imposed on the’ Duke in toil and

effort has never been adequately

understoog by the nation
Every Day

For an hour every day he and
Logue literally sweated in closely
concentrated work either in
Harley-street or Bolton-gardens.

Incidentally, a snobbish neigh-
bour one day sent a curt message
to Logue directing him to instruct
his visiter not to park his car out-
side the neighbour’s house

When Logue replied politely
that he would tell the Duke of
York that he must put his car
somewhere else. the neighbour
nw comand in confusion end
Said with the greatest amiability,
“Oh, no, don’t.- T'll be delighted
the Duke will continue to leave
it there.”

An hour’s werk with Logue was
followeg every day by an hour
and even two hours of equal effort
at home. The Duke never let up
for a day.

And always with him inspir-
ing, encouraging. and stimulating,
was the wonderful wife who made
all things possible for him.

The Fear

As soon as he was back from
Canberra the work began again.
More and ever more speeches.

But it was still far from easy.
Always there was the fear of the
utter breakdown.

At. {public “functions Logue
weuld stand or sit some distance
away, but near enough for the
Duke to-draw confidence from him.

The Duchess would sit by her
hucband, her eyes never leaving
him. her *°nd stretching out at
difficult times to touch his, always
pouring her strength into him.

Then came the day Fate lifted

the Duke to the Throne. The
y, man who only a few years
before found public appearance
an infinite ~erdeal, and public
sveaking a torture, now faced a
life in the public gaze. and a

lifetis of public speaking.
But he faced it now with con-

The



nervousness had
ten. He was no longer
people. Speechmaking
most of its terrors. The



> i lost
had iost

_asked Logue.



er Been Told

hard werk of the years had been
crowned with the glory
achievement.

Yet still much more had to be
done. The Accession ceremonies
and the Coronation brougiit most
difficult with them.
Well as the King now spoke, the
words had still to be
selected to make it easier for
éim.

He could never, for example,
say “King” with ease. Always,
therefore, when speaking in pub-
lic of his father it was “His
Majesty” or “My father.”

Tradition

But the Accession and Coro-
nation ceremoniés are fixed by
tradition. No alteration of the
words is possible.

Logue carried on the 4
gruelling task, down
the difficult into simplicity, con-/

quering what must so often have
seemed

a

of! By

a ae eee es en ee en ke ee a eee ee

THE WINDSORS?

JACK V. FOX
| a
LONDON, Feb. 19.

| A new Elizabethan era is beginning for
|Britons. But for the Duke of Windsor and
i his American wife there is little sign that it
| will be different from the era that began for
|Britain has a new Queen, a young lady who
\in childhood was very fond of Uncle David.
She has as Prime Minister the Winston

|Churchill who stood with Edward the Eighth
in those dramatic days before the abdication

So after the ana in December 1936.
day day King |

| Times have changed; the slate is a new
one and there are those who wonder if the

to be the unconquerable.' Juke of Windsor and the former Mrs. Wallis

Sometimes it ‘1
despairingly impossible.
was the ion Declaration,
which had to be said audibly by
the Sovereign. ;

“I do solemnly and sin—
cerely in the presence of God |
profess, testify and declare
that I am a faithful Protestant; |
and that I will, according to |
the true intent of the enact-
ments which secure the Pro-
testant Succession to the
Throne of my Realm, uphold
and maintain the said enact-
ments to the best of my pow-
ers according to law.”

How many people with normal |
speech could repeat that with-/
out faltering in a moment of high |
emotion? i

The King and Logue wrestled
with it for what must have seem- |
ed an eternity of time. And it)
never seemed to come right.

But when the moment came to
make it with full solemnity the
King, slowly and _ deliberately,
‘aid it without a mistake. j

And at the end he looked
towards Logue, sitting some |
distance away, saying with his|
eyes as clearly as a man ever
said anything: “I’ve done it.”

‘Wear This’

There was the ordeal of the
Coronation itself. Perhaps the
most trying ordeal that could be
put upon a man who had carried
such a disability as the King had!
carried. i

Responses couched in language |
that was terribly difficult for him. |
Microphones around him which |
carried his words to probably the |
biggest world audience that had
ever listened to any man, |

And all to be done while the|
King must inevitably be moved
to deep emotion by the ceremony.

There in the royal box close
above him—close enough to ex-|
cha: an occasional encouraging»
glance—sat. Logue, weuring for |
the first time the decoration of the |
Victorian Order which the King)
had handed to him casually at the |
end of their rehearsal in the)
Palace, the previous night, saying |
“Wear this tomorrow.” aod

As we all heard, the King did
not falter. It was the proudest
triumph of his life.

‘I >

But one ordeal piled upon |
another that day. The Corona-
tion ceremony was followed by
the almost equally emotion-stir-
ring drive through the crowded
streets to the Palace.

And then, with little rest be-
tween, the King once more had tc
face a microphone in a quiet room
and speak to the world, |

In an adjoining room, for the}
hour before the broadcast, the)
King, the Queen, and Logue sat
together listening to the radio
programme sweeping round the
Empire, waiting for the moment
of ordeal.

It had been suggested by those
who still did not know the con-
fidence which the now had

|

a sont | Warfield Simpson may not now be recon-

ciled with the Royal family and come to live
more permanently in England.

9

The answer almost certainly is “no.
there is no reason why the Duke and Duch-
ess should not return to England to stay
aere as long as they wish. But there is a
delicate situation created by the unbending
protocol of the Court and in the word
‘Royal”. Windsor is a Royal Duke. His
wife is a Duchess but she is not a Royal

Juchess and she is not “Her Royai High-]j

ness.” She ranks about three-quarters of the
way down the list of Duchesses.

Should the Windsors return to London
and enter into formal court life the Duke
and Wallis would be very clearly and defin-
itely separated. At a State banquet the
Duke would sit at the head of the table. The

Duchess would, by rank, be seated far from,

nim. Ata palace reception the former King
would be in the little knot of members ot
the Royal family. The Duchess would be
seventy-five yards away among hundreds oi
jesser ranking ladies and lords.

“HER ROYAL HIGHNESS”

It is most unlikely that the Duke would
permit his wife to return on that basis even
if she should agree to it. There is only one
remedy to such a situation so embarrassing
for the Windsors. That is for the 25-year-
old Elizabeth to bestow upon the Duchess
the title and rank of “Her Royal Highness.”
[t is possible but most unlikely that Eliza-
beth would take such a step for it would
cause uproar in Court circles, and Elizabeth
though the Queen, is pretty much the pris-
oner of the Court in matters of etiquette
and protocol.

Such a step would, for example, give the
Duchess of Windsor precedence at Royal
occasions over the widowed Duchess of
Kent and dozens of blood relatives of Eliza-
beth. The American woman would rank
next only to the Duchess of Gloucester.

Churchill has always been sympathetic to
Windsor but this is one case in which “Mr.
Britain” has little if any influence.

The powers of the Sovereign are severely
restricted in this constitutional monarchy
but those powers they do have, are jealously

King
in himself that the speech should) guarded and the bestowal of Royal rank is

be recorded in case there was an/|
embarrassing breakdown. f
“What do you think?” the King|

“I am against it,” Logue replied.
“Because once it is recorded in
advance, no one will ever believe
that you delivered it, even if the)
recording is not used.”



“I agree,” \ said the King.
“There will be no recording.”
No Hitch

very anxious hearts, in spite of
the confidence they tried to give
each other—the most powerful

}one of them. Windsor was at one time im-

mensely popular with the common people of
Britain and he still is well liked by many
of them.

But there is no question but that his pop-

lularity has dropped and that the unwaver-

jing group which always maintained he
So the three ‘sat together with |

bowed out of an unenviable ordeal and put
the load on his younger brother are now

0) itter ¥ re were
mn in the weal, bee ang | more bitter than even before. There were

the man who a few years before

angry remarks among the great crowd Fri-



tad landed in the country un-
known to a single soul.
Of all the romantic scenes that

have been set in that Royal|p
rich with legend aad|~ eet.

Palace,

romance, there can have been few |

more moving or more remarkable
than that.

ing and Leah weil out of
King and w out oj
the room to the broadcasting
room, leaving the Queen alone.

Those who recall the slight
pause before = heute Soeen
may remember hearing the fain’
ot ot whispers in the unmistak
able voice of Logue saying, “Now
take it quietly, Sir.”

It went without a hitch. The
moment the King
the door opened softly and ir
stepped the Queen, tears shining
in her happy eyes.

Always There

For a time gue was besides
the King at ev Christmas
broadcast (incidentally, although
all the pictures taken of the King
for publication with these
Christmas broadcasts show him
sitting at a desk, in fact he
always broadcast standing).

But in recent years the King
had broadcast alone. That was
the full proof that he had com-

‘day when Windsor walked through the
|Streets in the uniform of an Admiral of the
And comments on the days after the

;death of King George the Sixth were far

\from complimentary to Windsor.
and the)

INDEFINITE STAY

Windsor is staying now with his 84-year-
old Dowager Queen Mother at Marlborough
House. His stay here is indefinite. He is ex-
pected to go to the country later this week
to stay with his close friend Lord Dudley

concluded, at Sunninghall.

The day before the funeral, Windsor weni
with other members of his immediate family
to Buckingham Palace where they heard the
reading of the will of George the Sixth, a
Document never made public. It is widely

reported that the late King gave Windsor)

an annual allowance of £25,000. It is likely
his. will made some provision for the con-
tinuance of that grant but that the execu-

pleted his cure, far beyond even! tion of it was left to Elizabeth.

the highest hopes he could have
held when he left that Harley-
street room for the first time
with the promise “I can cure
you” ringing in his ears.
Friendship

To the end he and Logue
remained on
loving friendship.

I think that siory of the King
is more vital to a true under-
Standing of his character than
anything else in his reign.

He was a man seemingly born




to suffering. He conquered it
when the odds must have seemed
hopeless, by will power, sheer
determination, and ceaseless

effort. How many
have done as well ?

—World Copywright.

of us could

That is-one of the matters keeping Wind-
sor in England now and he may press for
a Parliamentary Act making his financial
position more definite. After that is settled

terms of deep,| Windsor is expected to return to the Duch-

| ess in New York.
*
_ They undoubtedly will come to England
|again for visits but the chances of a recon-
|ciliation or permanent return to England as
a home appear just as remote, if not more

|So, than they had before George the Sixth
| died.



jthem when Windsor abdicated 15 years ago, \





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WEDNESDAYX, FEBRUARY 20, 1952
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES REP

Recommendations Made

On Bulk

THE Report of the Co

Shipment

mmittee appointed to enquire

into all aspects of the Fancy Molasses yi r
dos nt ee during the tonic pe teen?" Byte
he Committee comprising Sir John Saint, Kt., C.M.G.
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., and Hon. J. D. Chandler. M.L.C_
with Mr. E. A. B. Deane as Secretary reports :
To His Excellency Sir Alfred William Lungley Savage,

Knight Commander of the

Most Distinguished “Order of

St. Michael and St. George, Governor and Commander-
in Chief in and over the Island of Barbados and its Depen-

dencies. etc., ete,
Your Excellency, ;

On 12th June, 1950, you invited
us to serve as a Committee with
the following terms of references:
c “To enquire into all aspects of
“the fancy molasses industry of
“Barbados with particular refer-
ence to production, price, mar-
‘keting and methods of export
‘and to make such recommenda-
“tions as might be considered
“necessary to ensure the. mainten-
‘ance and development of that in-
‘dustry.

We held twelve meetings in
Barbados between 8th July, 1950
and 24th August, 1950 and then on
2nd September, 1950 visited Can-
ada and the United States of
America where we held seventy
two interviews with. Government
Officials, Brokers, Wholesalers or
Retailers returning to Barbados on
6th October, 1950.

ae Introductory

n order to obtain relevant evi-
dence, we first invited, by Sante
of a notice in the Press, all -
sons interested in the Faney Mo-
lasses Industry to appear by ap-
Pointment before us. Phe r se
to this advertisement proved dis-
appointing, since only one reply
was received. In the interim the
Committee arranged a succession
of meetings with various individ-
uals, producers and exporters, who
we considered would be able to
supply us with information relat-
ing to our enquiry. Representa-
tives of the Barbados Produce Ex-
porters Association, the Amalgam-
«ted Cooperages and the Barba-
dos Cooperage, as well as the
Sugar Coordinator, the Labour
Commissioner, a number of pro-
ducers of fancy molasses, the
Fancy Molasses Control and’ Mar-
keting Board, and the Honourable
H. A. Cuke, C.B.E., M.L.C., also
appeared before us to give evi-
dence and advice.

The evidence which was: given
to us, particularly with regard to
conditions in the export markets
of Canada and the United States,
was most conflicting, and we came
to the conclusion that to obtain a
true appreciation of the position
it would be necessary for us to
visit the North American Contin-
ent and investigate conditions. for
ourselves. Our recommendation to
this effect was approved by the
Government and we proceeded to
Canada early in September, 1950.

The visit to North America oc-
cupied a period of rather more
than a month. We travelled ex-
tensively through the Province of
Quebec, the Maritimes and Prince
Edward Island interviewing as
many faney molas:es brokers,
wholesalers and retailers as poss-.
ible, Various high officials in Ot-
tawa and Washington received and
greatly assisted us in qur investi-
gations.

We thank all those who helped
us so generously and wholeheart-
edly during our investiga ions. We
are especially grateful to Mr, C. R.
Stollmeyer, Canadian Trade Com-
missioner for the British West In-
dies, who by his untiring efforts
during our visit to Canada made
it possible for us to carry out ‘so
comprehensive a survey of the
fancy molasses market in Canada.

Recommendation

BULK SHIPMENT.
(a) Canadian Market

We have not been convinced by
the evidence put before us that
the shipment of fancy molasses in
bulk to the Canadian market is
necessary at the present time in
order to maintain our present ex-
ports. We estimated that bulk
shipment of fancy molasses was
unlikely to decrease the cost of the
product by more than 2 cents per
quart package, and there was a
general opinion that such a reduc-
tion would not affect sales since
the present prices of competitive
products are as high as or higher
than fancy molasses. Af some time
in the future, it is possible that
such gompetition will have to be
met, dnd the price of fancy mo-
lasses will have to be brought to
i's lowest possible level. Under
these circumstances, it may be-
come essential to ship molasses in
bulk. In this connection, it must
be remembered that undér the
Sugar Agreement with the United
Kingdom part of our sugar ex-
ports will be sold at a negotiated
price and there may be a time
when such a price is higher than
the world price, Under these cir-
cumstances, if fancy molasses has
to be sold on a parity with, the
world’s price for sugar then every
effort must be made to reduce
costs. Presumably, under these
conditions arrangements would
have to made for the producer of
sugar to subsidise the producer of
faney molasses.

We consider that the fancy mo-
lasses industry should plan well in
advance so that shipment in bulk
can be adopted with the minimum
difficulty. The following matters
must be given attention: —

(a) When fancy molasses is
shipped in bulk, there
should be only one export-
ing organisation in Barba-
dos since three or four re-
ceiving stations in Canada
—Montreal, Quebec, St.
John and Halifax—should
be sufficient for economical
distribution.

(b) It will be necessary for ex-
porters to agree on export
quotas based on previous
volume of business.

If the present distributing
organisation in Canada is to
be utilized—and we favour
this step—a Committee re-
presenting the Barbados ex-
porter and the Canadian
importer should be set up
to handle the receipt of bulk
molasses in Canada.

Arrangements should be
made with Canadian im-
porters who have tanks and

(c)

(a)

packing facilities on the
waterfront to receive the
molasses. The molasses

would be packed at these
stations in suitable contain-
ers and distributed through

the existing channels. S eel

; drums could be used for the
country trade and the pres-
ent wax paper package or
can for the city trade.

(e) The packers should under-
take to distribute only genu-
ine Barbados fancy molass-
es and should agree that no
blending be done at their
plant, except with the per-
mission of the Barbados
eeney Molasses Control

Board.

(f) We consider that the label-
ling of packaged molasses is
a matter of prime import-
ance, All packages should
have the words “Genuine
Barbados’ Fancy Molasses”
printed on them in easily
tread letters. The question
of whether brand names of
distributing firms’ should
also be included is a mat-
ter for consideration.

(g) A special fund will have to
be created from part of the
savings effected by bulk
shipment. It has been es-
timated that 5% cents per
gallon would.be sufficient to
cover the present wages of
displaced labour and could
be used to provide alterna-
tive employment. |Further
sums should be made avail~-
able from this special fund
for advertising to the con-
sumer and the name of Bar-

bados Fancy Molasses
should be kept before the
public

U.SA. Market
(b) U.S.A. Market

Market conditions in the United
States. of America are somewhat
different from those in Canada,
and.we came to the conclusion
that we could increase our ship-
ments of fancy molasses to the
U.S.A. if bulk shipments were
made. This additional business
would not affect the amount of
labour which is at present em-
ployed in the industry.

We recommend that, bulk ship-
ments of faney molasses should
be permitted to the U.S.A. since
such shipments will provide valu-
able data, and experience, Part of
the savings should be paid into a
Special Fund, which can be used
for advertising and for the other
purposes recommended later. The
American importer should be re-
quested to give a guarantee that
any molasses shipped to him in
bulk would not be re-exported to
Canada.

Drum Shipments

We do not rae that the

il nt...of.fancy _molasses , in
Me 1 rams ate ita be permitted.
Since we do not consider that the
advantages outweigh the disad-
vantages, Under present condi-
tions there is a shortage of steel
and prices of steel are rising, and,
in our opinion, it wopld be in-
advisable for the industry to be
dependent on steel containers for
the shipment of fancy molasses.







——

We consider that if and when the
time vcomes for fancy molasses to
be shipped. other than in wooden
packages it should be shipped by
tank steamer
Canned Molasses

In view of the evidence pre-
sented to us regarding the flavour
of Barbados canned molasses we
recommend that a trial should be
given to the canning of “old crop”
molasses since this flavour appears
more acceptable in Eastern Can-
ada .

There seems some possibility
that a-canned fancy molasses With
a “new crop” flavour might be ac-
ceptable in the Western Cana-
dian markets, particularly if a
brighter and more lightly coloured
molasses could be manufactured,
We consider that this suggestion
deserves further investigation.

* Advertising
For reasons given in the Report
we recommend that Barbados

fancy molasses should be adver-
ised to the consumer so that the
name is kept constantly before
the public. ,We recommend that
provision for advertising should
be included in the price of fancy
molasses and that the cess should
be paid to a special fund. In the
first place, we recommend that the
Montreal area should be selected
1s a test market for advertising.
Since most packers have their own
brand name on the package, such
advertising will have to be car-
ried out in co-operation with the
Canadian packers. There would
appear to be no reason Why a par-
ticular brand of molasses should
not be advertised provided that it
consists of genuine Barbados fancy

molasses, and that this fact is
printed on the package.
Marketing

We recommend that—

(a) The Barbadian exporter
should make a list of the
genuine Canadian whole-
salers and limit sales to
these dealers, Retailers

should not be permitted to
obtain fancy molasses at
the wholesale price.

(b) Favourable consideration
should be given by the
Barbados exporters to

granting the large whole-
salers a special allowance
on the basis of the volume
of business done. We under-
stand that this is a custom-
ary trade practice and one

which encourages whole-
salers to make maximum
sales.

(c) Since a closer degree of

co-operation between the
Barbados exporter and Can-
adian importer appears de-
sirable, a Committee repre-
senting the interests of both
sides should be set up so
that minor grievances can
be noted and removed.

Fancy Molasses Industry

Fund

We recommend that when fancy
molasses is shipped in bulk some
part of the savings should be paid
into a special fund which can be
termed the Fancy Molasses Indus-
try Fund, This fund could be usec
for ‘he following purposes:—

(1) To meet the cost of ap-
proved advertising pro-
grammes,
To provide alternative em-
ployment for labour dis-
placed by bulk shipment.
To pay interest and depre-
ciation on capital involved
in providing bulk storage in
Barbados and in Canada.
To permit the fixing of a
price for fancy molasses

(2)

(3)

(4)

Bermuda Legislature Move

To Protect

HAMILTON,

THE Legislative Council re-
cently agreed with the House of
Assembly’s proposal that the two
bodies nominate a joint select
committee to see what legislation
can be introduced to protect their
privileges.

This move follows the discov-
ery by the House that ‘they had
no powers of sanction over The
Royal Gazette, which last month
published a report of a_ debate
held in open session after the
House ordered it to be suppress-
ed, The House declared. the
Gazette's action a breach of privi-
lege and contempt of the House.

Commenting on the Council's
decision, the Hon. F. G. Gosling
said he thought it “high time” the
two legislative bodies found out
where they stood before they
took action.

Appointed to serve on the com-
mittee were Dr. and Hon, R. C.
Hollis Hallett and the Hon, Sir
Eldon Trimingham,

Text of the message sent to the
House was: “The Legislative
Council has the honour to refer
to Message Number 6 of the pres-
ent session from your Honourable
House and to state that the Hon.

; > *
Russia, Qhina
Celebrate

. t .
Frierdship Treaty
LONDON.

Russia and Red China ceiebrat-
ed the second anniversary of their
treaty of friendship, alliance and
mutual assistance Thursday witn
an umprecedented display of
friendship coupled with a mount-
ing propaganda campaign again:t
“new imperialist intrigues in
Asia,”

Mao. Tse Tung, Chairman of the
Chinese Communist Government
expressed “heartfelt gratitude to
the great Soviet people” tie
Soviet Government and Stalin for
“generous and enthusiastic as-
sistance given to our Government
and people of China by the Soviet
Government and people in the
past two years.”

THe Chinese campaign is eager-
ly fed by Moscow Radio and the
Soviet Press, Since Vishinsky
mentioned the presence of Chinese
Nationalist troops in northern
Burma two weeks ago, all the
principal Moscow newspapers
have repeatedly accused the U.S.
Britain and France of preparing
to attack Communist China.

Moscow press attacks are not
only broadcast by the Soviet radio
Station in all eastern languages,
but are relayed by re-broadcast

Privileges

R. C. H. Hallett and the Hon. Sir
E. H, Trimingham have been ap-
pointed as a select committee to
form with a committee of your
Honourable House a joint com-
mittee for the purpose of submit-
ting recommendations as to the
necessity and desirability of en-
acting legislation to protect the
Legislature or its proceedings in
such manner as the Legislature
may see fit.”

Major the Hon. David Huxley,
Attorney General, declaring his
support for the proposal, said he
had had the advantage of con-
ferring with the original House
committee which reported on
Wednesday, having been invited
to give certain legal opinions on
the matter.

The president, the Hon. J. T.
Gilbert, said the Council should
certainly concur with the House’s





early in the year and Sub-
sequent equalisation when
the price for sugar is ar-
ranged

To prevent violent fluctua-
tions in the price of fancy
molasses from year to year
owing to short crops, etc
If this principle is accepted
then an extra cess would be
imposed on fancy molasses
in a good year to compén -
sate for the funds needed
to equalise the price in “a
poor year.

It is recommended that this
fund should be operated by the
Fancy Molasses Control and Mar-
keting Board

Definition of Fancy Molasses

For the reasons given in the Re-
port we recommend that the de-
finition of Fancy Molasses in the
Barbados Fancy Molasses Produc-
tion and Export Act, 1937, should
be altered to read “Cane juice
evaporated to the consistency of a
syrup, but shall not apply to fancy
molasses which is considered. by
the Board appointed under this
Act to be below the recognis
standard of Barbados Fancy Mo-
lasses.”

Fancy Molasses Control And
Marketing Board

(i). Constitution

The Fancy Molasses Control and
Marketing Board. is a most import-
ant body and should be truly re-
presentative of all branches of the
industry. The present method of
appointing members.jo the Board
§ open to criticism, and we re-
cofmend certain alterations, We
agree that the Chairman should
continue to be the Director of
Agriculture, but consider that the
rest of the Board should be ap-
pointed by the Governor-in-Ex-
ecutive Committee and shall in-
clude two members of the Sugar
Producers Association and two
members of the Exporters’ Asso-
ciation.
(ii) Powers

We recommend that the powers
of the Board be increased to per-
mit the Board to create and oper-
ate a Fancy Molasses Industry
Fund, the setting up of which has
already been recommended, The
recommendations of the Board
regarding the operations of this
fund should be subject to con-
firmation by the Governor-in-
Exec itive Committee.

()

This recommendation will need
an alteration to the present Act to
give the Board power to recom-
mend to the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee what sums should
be raised each year as an addition-
al cess on fancy molasses to be
paid into the Fancy Molasses In-
dustry Fund.

We further recommend in order
to expedite the fixing of prices
that Section 7 of the Barbados
Fancy Molasses Production and
Export Act, 1937, be amended by
deleting therefrom the words
“with the approval of the two
Houses of the Legislature” ahd
that Regulation 5 of the Barbados
Fancy Molasses Production and
Export Regulations, 1938, be
amended by deleting therefrom
the words “and approved by both
Houseg of the Legislature.”

We wish to record our appfe-
ciation of the work of Mr, Deane
our Secretary which has been of
the highest order. We cannot
thank him enough for the thor-
oughness and efficiency which he
has shown throughout our inves-
tigations and we recommend him
for the grant of an honorarium as
is usual in like circumstances



Inquest Today

An inquest touching the death
of Hugh Wickham of White Hall,
St. Michael will be held to-day at
2 p.m. by His Worship Mr, G. B.
Griffith Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A.”

Wickham was admitted to the
General Hospital on February 3,
suffering from burns on his body
but he died on February 7. A post
mortem examination was per-
formed by Dr. A. S. Cato at the
Hospital Mortuary,



“BENNY” CALLS WITH
MIXED CARGO

The motor vessel Benny, under
Captain Pederson arrived here
yesterday with a cargo including
3,600 bags of flour, 2,240 bags of
pollard, 800 bags of poultry feed,
500 cartons of beer and 35,000 fee’
of lumber from St. John and Hali-
fax.

The Benny is

consigned to

message, which only went so far| Messrs. Plantations Ltd.

1s to suggest the formation of a
joint select committee,

“Major Huxley said he was
consulted,” he went on, “Some
years ago I came to the same con-
clusion—that it was desirable the
position should be examined and
in due course legislation passed.

Eden Confers

@ From Page 1

cure, At the same time, however,
there is no doubt, that Britain wa:
anxious to get useful negotiations
underway without undue delay
and there were very strong indi-
cations that Britain’s mew ap-
proach would go a very long way
towards meeting Egypt’s national
aspirations.

The main points. to be discuss-
ed in detail would be the time
limit to British evacuation of the
Suez Canal Zone and definition of
Egypt’s sovereignty over the
Sudan pending the Sudanese peo-
ple's’ expression of their own)
desire |

Meanwhile Indian diplomats
were keeping in touch with Anglo-
Egyptian developments. The In-
dian government is anxious to
participate in the Suez Canal
defence arrangements which — it
contends should conform with the

U.N. Charter —U.P.

alate mate leet cinaretcaengeenmmanaeiatigls witpsmati
by Radio Peiping and reprinte
in the Chinese Communist pres:

No comprehensive report ha
been published by Moscow ©
Peiping on the nature of assist-
ance given to Chinese Commun-
ists by Russia since the conclu-
sion of the treaty. Under the
treaty Moscow took obligation to
provide China with a .modest
sixty million dollars yearly credit
for five years to pay for Soviet
industrial and reilway equipment.
! —U.P.







From clothes ta crockery

DISPA, Per package
RINSO, Packaga
DREFT, Pts 30

FAB, Pko Sena neal

LUX, is 26





CAVE SHEPHERD
& C0, 11D.

10—13 Broad Street

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE



T RELEASED

News Hriefs:



Suit And Shirts Stolen

A tropical suit and two shirts were stolen from the
home of Agatha Crichlow at Mayers Land, My Lord’s Hill,
St. Michael, between 11.30 p.m. on Sunday and 7.00 a.m. on
AMonday. They are the property of David Crichlow



COMMITTED
FOR SESSIONS

Ashton Gibson a salesman
of Kew Land St. Michael
was committed to the nexi
sitting of the Court of Grand
Sessions by His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith yesterday on a
charge of housebreaking and
larceny.

The charge states that the
offence was committed some-
time between December 20

nd December 21, 1951. Mr.

J. E. T. Brancker a red
on behali of Gibson in. the
preliminary hearing.



OG ditunary ;

Rev. A.J. Cocks

The Revd, Arthur J. Cocks,
retired Methodist Minister, who
passed away on Friday, 8th inst.,
was one of the very oldest Meth-
odist Clergy in this West Indian
Province of the Overseas Mission-
ary fleld.

He had reached almost his 90th
year, and he had served in the
ministry 62 years, giving nearly
40 years of active work, .He
passed to the “Retired List” in
1929, and after some acting par-
tial service finally made a home
at Bush Hall, St. Michael.

He came out from England as
a young man to plantation work
in St. Vincent, later taking a
position in 4 big business firm in
Kingstown. He was also a lay
preacher of distinction, possessing
the “two Gs”, Graces and Gifts,
which John Wesley looked for in
his early “helpers”, and in 1890
he was promoted into the regu-
lar ministry and ordained by the

old West Indian Wesleyan
daughter Conference, Eastern
Section.

He possessed also an_ extra

strong physique, and was able to
do a lot of hard work in some of
these Eastern islands, where
nearly all the travelling was then
on horseback and where there
ire scattered country — stations,
particularly in Tobago and Gren-
ada. He was also stationed in
Trinidad, San Fernando, and in
Barbados at Providence in
Christ Church and Speightstown,
with St. Lucy,

As a preacher he possessed a
specially fluent and persuasive
style, with felicitous choice of
languave. and could always be
listened to with pleasure and
profit, And as a pastor he was
genial, friendly, and attentive,

and he was everywhere esteemed
and gave fine service.

He was twice married, First to
a St. Vincent lady, who died at
Speightstown and was laid to
rest in the Speightstown Chapel
yard, Of that union there were
three daughters and two sons, all
of whom in course of time
migrated to U.S.A. The younger
son was a volunteer in the first
World War, and gave good ser-
vice

feu-
years,

A special and noteworthy
ture of Mr Cocks’ later
after he retired from the active
ministry and located in Barba-
dos, was his service to the Boy
Scouts Movement. He had for
long been keenly interested in
youth and possessed a gift for
disciplinary drilling of the boys
But now he identified himsel!
fully with the local Scouts Asso-
ciation and accepted the central
position of General Secretary,
which he filled with distinction
for several years. And on his
retirement through failing health
he was awarded the “Medal f
Merit”, and as he was not able
to go to Government House for

investiture the Governor, Sir
Hilary Blood, very kindly - went
out to Bush Hall and conferrer
the insignia at this home.

He was laid to rest in the
Bethel Churchyard, and _ the
Funeral Service was conducted,

in the absence of the Methodist
Brethren at Synod in Grenada, by
Payne and the
Moravian Min-
people,

the Rev. Sidney
Rev. E. E, New,
ister, and Methodist

To wash your
Best things |

canoe
16 & 25¢.
& 657

37







Christopher Best of Walkers
St. Andrew, reported that he left
his home for work at about 7.30
p.m. on February 8. When hi
returned at about 4.30 a.m. on the
following day he discovered that
his gold wrist watch with a golc
expanding strap, valued $50, war
missing from a tin in his bureau
drawer. |

St. Clair Harvey of Mile and |
Quarter St. Peter, reported that
his fountain pen was stolen from)
a bedroom at his home between
Saturday and 8 a.m. on Monday. |

Goulbourne Best, alias “Sunny
Bang,” of Montrose, Christ Church, |
who escaped custody on February
12, was. rearrested by P.C. 413)
Springer along St. Davids Road,
Christ Church on Saturday night

Best was at the office at Distric
“A” Police Station when he
escaped. He was held in con-
nection with the theft of a shirt,

Six acres of third crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire broke
out at Joes River Plantation St.
Joseph, at about 7 p.m. on Monday.

They are the property of Joes)
River Estates Ltd. and were
insured,

Another fire at Lowlends, St
Lucy, on Monday at about 7.30)
p.m, burnt four and a half acres |
of first and second crop ripe canes, |
property of William Griffith ot|
Rockfield, St. Lucy. A quantity o:
sour grass was also burnt. |



Decree Nisi

{
In the Courts of Divorce |
Matrimonial Causes His Lordshi
Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor pre
nounced a decree absolute in the |
suit of P. E. Weatherhead peti. |
tioner against A. L. Weetherhea |
respondent,

Mr. W. W. Recce, Q.C. appearer |
for the petitioner instructed by
Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce

His Lordship Mr. Justice G. 1
Taylor also pronounced decre> |
absolute in the suit of M. M.j
Emtage petitioner against E. F.)
Emtage respondent. Mr. W. W.}
Reece, Q.C. instructed by Messrs. |
Hutchinson & Banfield appeared |
for the petitioner. |



Lumber Arrives

the Waterfront of the inner|
basin of the Careenage is now |
Jaden with a quantity of lumber
which arrived here on Saturdes
last by the M.V. Baretta.

The Baretta is expected to re-
main in Carlisle Bay until Thurs |
day to continue discharging hev|
shipment of 150,000 ft. of pitel |
pine and mahogany which she |
brought to Barbados from Beliz», |
British Honduras ]

It is understood that all the!
Jumber-yards will get a part oi |
this shipment. The M.V. Baretta |

|



f, consigned to Messrs, Da Costs
& Co, Ltd.

MATE ARRESTED

TAMPICO, Feb. 1),

Secret Service agents are hold- |
ing Alfredo Cobos Perez, first mate |
ot a mexican tanker, for investi- |

gation following conhscation 01}
22,750 packages of contrabanc |
American cigarettes and 1,006 |

bars of soap.

Officers said the merchandise
was hidden in the port side of the
tanker Salamanca which returnec
yesterday from Brownsville
Texas.—U.P.



Trimingham Wins
Singles Title

The results of yesterday's Belle
vile Lawn Tennis Tourname i
are :—

MEN’S SINGLES (Finals)
J. D. Trimingham beat D. F
Worme 6—2, 6—3, 8—6

WEDNESDAY’S FIXTURES

Mixed Doubles (Handicap

Diss D. Wood & Dr. C, Man
ning vs. Miss M, King & J, 1D
Trimingham.

“greet ttt



ELS oe

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COSMOS







PAGE SIx”-~

Eeg. Co. Amend Pion

eer In

Pioneer Manufacturers
Clause Caused Trouble

The Legislative Council

yesterday passed. a Bill amend-

ing the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement Act, 1951)
e Hon’ble the Attorney General in moving the second

reading of the bill said that

it sought to amend the Pigneer

Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951. When applications
had been received after the passing of the Pioneer Indus-

tries (Encouragement “.ct)

of 1951 certain difficulties had

come to light in the administration of the Act.

Those difficulties came unde
two heads and the object of the
Bill beferé the Council was +
remove those difficultie The fir
head under“which those diificult
tell was as“follows:—Section 4 o
the Act gave power to the Gov
ernor-in-Executive Committee
declare persons as pioneer manu
facturers who are desirous of es-
tablishing a pioneer factory. Oni
persons im that category could ix
declared pioneer manufacturers

Clause 3 of the amending Bil!
sought to amend the Act so a
to enable a person who had al-
ready established a factory, but
wished ta extend it, to be de-
clared a pioneer manufacturer in
appropriate cases

Amendment

Tt was not intended, he went
on to say, to eXelude from the
prov-sions of the Aet persons who
had established a factory prior to
the pasSitg of the Act and the
proposed amendment would
vemedy~that state of affairs en-
abling such persons to have the
benefits of the Act in the case
of alte atims etc. involving ex-
tensions (but not replacement)
to existing businesses,

The other difieulty that had
presented itself was the case of
those people who had gone ahead
ard tommence Pioneer Industrie
subsequent to the .introduction
into the House of Assembly of the
Pioneer Industries (Encourage-
men‘) Bill on July 5th, 1949.

A new Clause 5 had had to be
introduced to deal with thig diliti-
culty. This clause sought to pro-
vide redress for those 7

The Bill under reference did not
pass the Legidfature before the
provogation and it was known
that some persons commenced pre-
jects to set up Pioneer Industries,
which projects continued after
te Bill lapsed,

Original Project
a person had lost the bene-
fit of the Act in .espect of his
cviginal project and it was possi-
bie that, because of the esiablisn-
ment of his project, it might be
ore dificult to establish now
that the industry concerned is a
Fione:r Industry, He might also
have lost all subsequent benefit
winder Act, Clause 5 sought to
vemeédy that position by pro-
viding that, where the clecum-
Stanges before, the) establishment
t project woyld. have
ed 9 declaration ,that’ the





wed (at Pioneer: _
and the % in’ Re Sa
fer urer, those declarations’ might
t be mace and the person
boion the full benefit of the Act
in respect of his project includ-

ing a refund of any package tax
tnd customs duty paid, which
would not have been payable it
the Act had been in force,

The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
retary seconded, He said that the
printed copies of the debate when
the bill was before the Legisla-
ture were not yet available but
he seemed to recall the fact that
he had mad¢ reference to the fact
that he hoped that duri: the
next. session of the ture
consideration would be given to
making the bill retrospective to
cover the enterprise of the
p oneer
ahead with his project at the time
the Original bill was before the
Legislature, Clause 5 had been
Craited in order to give the bill
that retrospective application,

Clause 5
Clause 5 of the bill reads as
follows:—

The pfincipal Act is hereby
amended, by adding immediately
after-seet-on ten thereof the fol-
lowing: Bey seetion—

q) we any person has sub-
othe fifth day of July,
one thodsahd nine hundred and
forty wand prior to the com-

r ene of this Act, imported
into this-Tsland any articles speci-
fied in? Schedule hereto which
the Ge Jor-in-Executive Com

mittee ig Satisfied have been im-
ported forthe construction, altera~-

tion, re-eenstruction, or extension |

of a fa@taty or to:

equipping 4



EG.



menufac urer who went +

SPACE
| M ORE GRACE
LESS waste

WITH THE

factory or any extension thereof
under circumstances which satisfy
the Governor-in-Executive Com-

t mittee that, had this Act been 15
; force, at the iime of such impor-

tation, the relevant industry would
have then been declared a pioneer
industry and the p-oduct intended
to be manufactured a_ pioneer
product under section three of
his Act and such person, would,
had he made application under
ection four hereof, have then been
declared a pioneer manufacture-
in relation to such factory, the fol-
owing provisions shall apply.

(2) The Governor-in-Executive
Committee may, subject to the
provisions Of Bubsecuon (2) of
section three of this Act, bu not-
withstandi-g else
this Act contained, by order de-
clare such industry to be a pioneer
industry and such product to be
a pioneer product.

(3) Upon the application of such
person made within three ealendar
months after such declaration, the
Governor-in-Executive |Commit-
tee may in his absolute discretion
by order declare such person to
be a pioneer manufacturer in re-
lation to such factory and such
industry with effect from such
date as may be specified in such
order,

(4) Every application under
subsection (3) of this section
Shall be in writing and shall—
(a) gris the locality of such

factory;

(b) Specity the day on which was
comme , Or on or before
which it is intended te com-
mence the construction, al-
teration, re- or

extension of such factory;
(e

factory, or the relevant part
thereof, commenced, or on or
before which it is ited
that the factory to wi the
application relates will coro-
mence, in consequence of such
construction, alteration, re-
construction or extension, to
produce in marketable quan-
tities the pioneer product in-
tended to be manufactured
therein;

specify the pioneer product
manufactured, or intended to
be manu/’actured, in conse-
quence of such construction,
alteration, \econstruction or
extension of such factory,

Same Effect

(5) any order made under sub~
section (2) or subsection (3) of
‘Mis ‘section shall have the same
effect, and the provisions of this
Act shall apply to any such order,
in all respects as if such order
nad been made under section three
or section four, as the case may
be, of this Act and as if the dates
specified pursuant to paragraph
(b) and paragraph (c) of sub-
section (4) of this section weve
respectively the construction day
and production day specified in an
application under section four of
his Act.

(6) Without prejudice to the
provisions of subsection (5) of
this section, where an order had
been made under subsection (3)
of this section, the Comptroller of
Customs shall refund to the per-
son declared in such order to be
pioneer manufacturer any
package tax and customs duty
which has been paid in respect of
the importation of the articles re-
ferred to in subsection (1) of this
section, but so, h»wever, that no
such tax or duty shall be refunded
if the ler of Customs is
of opinion that such articles were
intended for the pu pose of
effecting to any factory or
extension the eof or to any ap-
paratus, machinery appl ances or
equipment contained in any fae-
tory or extension thereof, or for
eplacing any apparatus, ma-
chinery, appliances or equipment
in any pioneer fa or
son thereof. The provisions of
sections six and seven and of sub-
section (5) of section nine of this
Act shall apply to any articles in
espect of which such tax or duty
as been refunded. pursuant to
this subsection.”

(d)

-

/

NEW =

specify the date on which such



-~





House Pass 86

@ From Page 1

The building of an airport was
a matter to which there was not
sufficient accumulated knowledge
in the world, as airports were still
new constructions, No member of
the House or anyone in any part
of the world could claim that there
was a century of experience for
one to call upon, therefore they
were not necessarily at fault if
there was an error.

When they iooked at the total
cost of building the airport and
what was then ing asked for to
remedy the faults of construction,
members would realise that it was
very small. Very often amounts
represented 244% of the total cost
and therefore the amount like
that was very small indeed to
rectify any fault in the construc-
tion of a major work.

He recalled an instance in the
United States in which an airfield
was built at tremendous cost and
after a few months it was found
that it could nut take certain
traffic and another had to be built.
There were numerous cases like
that in Great Britain and Canada
where one met defections.

Members of the Government re-

in gretted that such things occurred

Runway Report

He referred members to the Re-
port on the runway construction
of the Seawell Airport and said
that they would see that due to
some clay and the formation of
the land there, it was very diffi-
cult to determine every aspect of
the geological structure.

“Furthermore,” he said, “there
was unusual weather during the
time this airport was constructed.”

There had been continuous rain-
fall which was unusual and for
that reason, it became difficult for
anyone to foresee or make any
forecast as to what would happen



a

ccountant

Resigns :

BARBADOS

0,

If there had been a cessation until
the rain ceased, it would have been
of tremendous cost to Government
and every effort had to be made to
get the work done.

In the Report it was stated that
the estimated cost for rehabilita-
tion would be $40,000. Explain-
ing why_the Resolution was for
$60,000, Mr. Walcott said that the
50 per cent, more was in order that
there shovid be money so that,
should there be any need for fur-
ther repairs while the work was
going on, it could be done then
The Engineer had informed Gov-
ernment that there could be no
certainty as to the actual cost as
it depended on the weather. If
there was bad weather, the. cost
might rise to $60,000 instead of
$40.000

Mr. Walcott then referred to the
procedure that the Government
proposed to take in the matter.
He first drew members’ attention
to the two methods in which the
rehabilitation work could be car-
ried cut, and quoted from the Re-
port—
“(a) To shave the Contractor
rehabilitate all of the failed
areas at actual cost, In
adopting this method all
the work would have to be
completed at one time
which would make it nec-
essary to close the airport
to flying operations during
the progress. of the work.
The minimum time that
would be required for the
Contractor would be one

month, This estimate is
based on average weather
conditions.

(b) The second method would
be for the Government to
undertake to do the work
under day labour. This
would necessitate the

General
fll Health

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary at yesterday's
meeting of the Legislative Council informed the meeting
that the Accountant General had tendered his resignation
and expressed regret that ill health had forced him to do so.

The Hon’ble the Colonial Secretary was speaking on a
Supplementary resolution in the sum of $246,340, Head ITI,
Colonial Treasurer, Item 18a, $50 travelling.

This amount, the Colonial Sec-
retary said was a token amount
as it was necessary for the
Accountunt General, in the dis-
charge of his duties ta do a
certain amount of travelling. Pro-
vision was therefore required to
meet travelling expenses at the
usual rates,

He said that in the past, over
the course of many years duties
had become attached to the
Auditor General’s department
that shold never have been
attached to them. There were not
duties properly carried out by an
Auditor General,

Two Examples

He quoted two examp'es—re-
cently, he said, the Auditor
General had maintained all the
teave records of officers of the
Service, but that duty had been
transferred to a branch of the
Secretariat, He was. also re-
sponsible for the computation of
pensions. It was quite wrong

that a man should be responsible |

for the computation of pensions
and the checking of them as
well, The computation of pen-
sions had been transferred to the
Accountant General who will
carry out the computation and

the Auditor Generai will carry,

out the checking.

Other duties of the Auditor

General was the preparation of
Crown Agents Accounts, He
should not be responsible fot
their preparation. The control
of the issue of receipt books,
the preparation of annual pro-
gress reports for C.D & W.
Schemes; all Of these duties
are stil being carried out by

the Auditer General because |

the necessary staff arrangement»

for transfer to someOne else

had no‘ yet been completed,

Officers Duties

The duties of the Auditor
General and the Accountant Gen-
eral were different. The Account-
ant General was the officer
responsible for the general. su-
pervision of accounting methods
in the service. ‘

He had to go to Seawell to ad-

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Dorey



VICTORIA STREET

HE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.

vise on the method of accounting
in one of the departments there
and as a result the heads of de-
partments had been circulated to
the effect that if they meeded
advice with regard to the method
cof accounting in their own de-
partments that the Accountant
General would visit them and ad-
vise on the matter. This entailed
travelling and as he was not one
of the officers scheduled to draw
travelling allowance it was nec-
essary to make provisien for him
to draw travelling allowance at
the usual rates,

There was much that was im-
perfect in the accounting systems
in some of the departments as
yet and he had hoped that they
would have been able to clear
them up in the near future.

The resignation of the Account-
ant General meant ‘that they
would have to look for another
person and start again,



























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PRIMITIVE

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Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother
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Massachusetts.

in ‘
The Christian Science Church, Garrison Hill,

TUESDAY, 26th FEBRUARY, at 8.15 P.M.
The lecture is under the auspices of First Church of Christ,
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rn

dustries Act

000 F or Runway

organizing
men; the

of a crew
providing of a
concrete mixer, a few
trucks and other small
equipment such as wheel-
barrows, shovels, etc. This
organization and training of
the crew for operation
could be handled by Mr.
James of the Department
of Transport, and when the
work is,underway and run-
ning smoothly the rm
vision and control co be
handed over to an overseer
who has become familiar
with the operation,

The advantage of method (b)
over that in (a) would be that
the airport could be kept in ser-
vice for flying operations.

The only disadvantage of
method (b) is that the work
would be carried out over a
longer period of time, but this

does not mean that the cost of the
work would be greater, in fact it
might be less, and the quality of
the work should be better.”

He said that the Government
had chosen method “B" because
it could be done without the dis-
location of the airport. By that
method, the airport could be kept
open, It would take about 12
weeks, he added,

Night Flights

He said it might cause a change
in the regulating of night flights.

In the Report which was signed
by Harold Connolly, B.A.Se.,
M.E.LC., Department of ‘Trans-
port, Government of Canada, it
Was Stated that the cause of the
failure in certain areas were
two-fold viz: —

“All the clay was not removed
right down to bedrock or some
clay was incorporated in the corai
rock backfill that was placed on
top of the bedrock.

This could readily have hap-
pened in construction of this
magnitude where large heavy
equipment is used to secure and
move the selected rock to be used
as backfill as our tests on sam-
ples of clay taken from the areas
show it to have a very high
moisture content, but when dry is
extremely hard and, if coated
with coral dust, has the appear-
ance of coral rock, and unless
minutely examined or saturated
could easily pass an inspector’s
eye and mistaken for coral
rock,

The second cause of failure in
our opinion is due to the heavy
rains during the construction.
These rains and the high humidity
would prevent the Terrolas emul-
sion from reaching a breaking
point or setting stage and also in
some cases allow the bitumen to
be washed out of the emulsion
and disappear through the drains.
This loss of bitumen would result
in a very weak surface course
which would ravel and allow
water to enter the base course and
subgrade, causing failure. It
should be pointed out here that
a saturated coral rock also be-
comes unstable although not ‘to
the same extent as clay.”

The report, also stated that

“Experience has shown that
the weather ai Barbados is not
sufficiently dependable to con-
sider reconstruction of the failed
areas with a premixed’ asphaltic
concrete using an emulsion as
Hot mix

the ¢gementing agent.

ITS REINSTATEMENT OF

Welcome.

~

, )

\o, /
thal

en cae

LAGER BEER

so



of asphaltic





conerete was originally
and still is considered an un-
economical manner in which to
carry out this work, and it is our |
recommendation that all replace-|
ment.of failed areas in the middle
third of the runway between
Stations 19700 and 25/00 be made
with Portiand cement concrete,
and«that any failed areas out-
side the middle third he replaced
asing double penetration asphal-|
tie concrete with a rapid curing
emulsion as a cementing agent.

Estimated Cost

“From information available as
to local labour rates and mater- |
ial costs it is estimated that ‘hese!
concrete slabs can be -construc-
ted at $250.00 per slab, and from
our survey it will be necessary
to construct approximately 120
slaps between Stations 19+00 and
25700 which would cost, on the
basis of our estimate, $30,000.00. |
Additional work required on the}
asphalt areas between Stations |
7700 and 13700; 15460 and 19+00;
and 25+00 and 28700 will possibly



cost in the neighbourhood of
$10,000.00. This will make a
total cost for rehabilitation of
$40.000,00.

“To place responsibility on any
individual or group of individ-
uals ig very difficult, and in our
opinion should be shared by the
two contracting parties, viz. the
Government and the Contractor.
n this assumption the Contrac-
lor was approached and asked to
what extent he was prepared to
contribute towards the rehabili-
tation of the failed areas. The
Contractor, however, would not)
accept any responsibility for the
failures but did indieate that he |
was prepared to carry out the
work of réinstatemént of the
areas without profit; the Gov-
ernment to pay the actual cost of
the work.”

Report Summary
In the Summary of the report. |
it was stated that,
The causes of failure of the |
runways appear to be due to —
(a) The unusual unanticipated
precipitation during the
placing of the asphaltic
concrete which slowed up
and in some cases preven-
ted the setting up or
breaking down of the as-
phaltic emulsion, and also
caused a portion of the
bitumen to be carried
away to the drains.
Errors in judgment by the
inspectors and contractors
in the classification of the
material used in some of
the fill areas.”

(b)



Mr. O. T. Allder (I) said that it
was very unfortuhate that after
receiving a report on Seawell air-
base on the previous evening, they
should be presented with a Resolu-

@ On Page i

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———WRDNESD AY, FEBRUARY 26, 1952
_—————— LS

































WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952





BARBADOS



ADVOCATE

House Pass $60,000 For Runway Reconstruction —

@ From page 6
» for the expenditure of an ad-
ional $60,000.
ing in view the fact that
last month they had voted
GOme money for that department,
Bfelt that members like him who

acy








not know the intentions of
vernment until they were in the
use should not be presented

th a Resolution
ndled so
“The le
hav:

of that sort to be
hortly.
Government should
aid, “was to give
t a week during which
be able to study this
s No amount of excuse
1 remedy the short-sightedness
ic continually being prac-
-d in this House when Resolu-
ms of this nature are brought
-u












ri ion

A Failure

| knew, he said, chat from
start of Scawell airbase, it was
pilure, a failure which cost tax-
yers of the colony a large sum
fF money. Criticisms had been
siled against the policy which
Was carried out in the construction
“@Ethe airport and the excuse was
the money was not theirs, that
Epelonged to C. D. & W.

When the airbase was finished
< efetts crept into it at an
lier period than was normally
they were asked then to














1€y

"3 tea

fd the taxpayers of Barbados
money and he noticed that every
couple months, money Resolutions
come down for them to give their
sanction to.

was only left to wonder when

a halt was going to be reached as
far as expending money on Sea-
well Airport was concerned.

Tt was true that they had reached
that stage in transport in their his-
oa when they had to have Sea-
wi Airport to accommodate in-
coming planes, but there was a
possibility of their being asked to





Spend too much.

If the Government saw to it
that the island was reasonably
Yepresenied in any construction
scheme that was to be carried
out, they would not have to spend
those occasional large sums of
money to remedy defects.

540.000 Needed

The report stated that $40,000
Was neecied and he wanted the
Honourabic Member who was
: ling the Resolution to explain

he was then asking for
$60,000.

Te was a fact that whatever

happened, the Resolution was go-



ing to pass, but he could not re-
frain from voicing his protest in
view of the fact that that wanton
expenditure would prevent Gov-
@rnment from carrying out other
schemes for the benefit of the
massc

He hoped that if that $60,000
had to be spent on the airbase, the
Work would be so carried out as
fo allow a stability for at least a
couple of years thence.

SThey had had time to guard
@gainst errors at Seawell. They
Had had 4 report which gave the

‘ of collusion and corruption
a time when Government would
have had the opportunity to safe-
d itself against being swindled
yhen entering into a contract in
h the expenditure of the

of money spent was in-

unt
ale He said he used the word
" died because it seemed to be
an international affair with every-
t trynig to get rich off the

taxpayers.

°There was no excuse because an
dirfield built in a larger country
di@ not stand up to expectations.
Mat was no excuse if something
Went wrong with their little fleld





vat Seawell
feMr. A. E.

there

S. Lewis (L) said that

no point in the Senior
smber for St. John coming back
the House this session trying
make anybody believe that he
s the only member who realised
e seriousness of certain things.

| Money Wasted

He said that there was one thing
ich impressed him about the
solution. That was that it did
it matter how much money it was
ir, they had to vote it. If they
ting on the report on the
s of the airstrip they got

he Canadian expert, what
Was the use of coming there and
creasing the amount the expert

_ told them by 50 per cent. They
“Were saying in the same breath
at the man was no good. He
ac told them $40,000 and they felt
would take 50 per cent. more.
thoroughly inconsistent
a! and as far as he could
s only encouraging the

lat wa

Vand illogi
mec i

House in voting money which was
Boing to be wasetd.

The Honourable Member had
Said that the Government had no
experience in the building of an
@irstrip. The other members

Sympathised with them. Still it
seemed they knew that the expert
said was not right and had added
"an extra 50 per cent.

Here Mr. F. L. Walcott rose to
obiect against his being misquoted.
/ He said that he had said that the



50 per cent. was put because they
could. not predict the weather to
a certainty.

Weather Conditions

Continuing, Mr. Lewis said that
it was time that the Government
got tough with somebody besides
the members of its. party; get
tough with somebody who was
fooling them. Surely whoever
made the report had taken the
weather conditions _ into account.
They wanted $40,000 and $60,000
would be spent. He was absolute-
ly sure of that.

The Government not only sent
somebody to see that the construc-
tion was carried out, but a member
of the Civil Service who was sup-
posed to know something of the
mixing of concrete was sent. to see
that it was mixed properly.

“I would like to know if it is
on record whether he has ever
made an adverse report on the
concrete that was being put there”
he said.

He did not wish to lead any of
them up a garden path, but he was
told that a report was made and
somebody of higher authority said
let it pass. He wanted to let them
know that he knew that. He was
surprised to know that things like
that were going on in such work.

Another thing; he said, was that
they had been told that some of
the material which had come for
Seawell was full of seawater. He

questioned, “too, the area
was covered with a im when
there was rain said that all

that needed some investigation.

He said that the same Trans-
Canada Airlines had forced them
to build the airport again arid then
they were having the same con-
ditions forced upon them. The
Trans-Canada people: should be
left out, he said.

He said that the airports about
this area were built by Americans
and they had picked out a
Canadian to fool them. They would
very likely find that the Canadian
airstrips were built by Americans
and the Canadians had come out
here to practise.

Representation

He said that they were there to
represent the taxpayers of Bar-
bados, taxpayers who wanted
houses to live in. They should not
throw away the. people’s money
like that.

Mr. Talma (L) said the reso-
lution was urgent and entailed
loss of life if not dealt with im-
mediately. But he felt that too
many attempts had been made to
set the airfield in order. Attempts
were being made as if the air-
field were not designed for the
nature of work that it had to do.

He said that they. had .never
had the advantage of having
Americans here to have . proper
runways built, but there were
places like Trinidad and even
Antigua from where they could
have got information.

He felt that the time had come
when a new airfield would have
to be set down.. He was aware
of the fact that they diq not have
competent engineers -in the
Chamber and so none of them
could criticise the report in a
constructive manner. They were
forced to accept the recommen-
datians as laid down in the re-
port and he felt. that the resolu-
tion should be dealt with as ur.
gently as possible.

Mr, Talma said that T.C.A.
were using the airport to-day
and the Canadian Government
should be called upon to help
with the repairs. Repairs which
were done regularly were really
for the purpose of catering to
T.C.A. ’planes, which do a lot of
damage to the aiffield.

They welcomed the visit of
T.C.A. ‘planes because’ they
brought in Canadian dollars and
American dollars. But if the
damage to the airfield was done
by Canadian ’planes then the
Canadian Government should
help with the expenditure.

Resolution Passed

Mr. Mapp (L) said that he was
not surprised at the resolution.
In June last year, the House
passed a resolution for $186,429
to be spent on the runway which
had already cost over a million
and a half dollars. The money
came from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare and they
might feel that it was not a loss
to the colony,

He felt that Harriman & Co.
should do something to help with
the conditioning of Seawell. He
had issued a warning to. the
House last year that everything
was not going right at Seawell
because he was told by a work-
man on the airfield that every-
thing was not right.

It was all an unhappy state of
affairs, he said. It cost them
$80,000 in a resolution before and
now they were going to spend
another $60,000 making $140,000
coming out of the treasury. He
did not see why they should con-
tinually vote money for effecting
repairs to the runway.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that



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In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at
2 pm. yesterday. The Hen'bie
J. D. Chandler, President, was in
the Chair.

The Hon'ble the Colonial Seere-
tary lald the following docu-

ments:—
BOCUMENTS

Repert of the Committee ap-
Pointed to enquire inte all aspects
of the Fancy Molasses Industry tn
Barbades.

Report on Runway Construction,
Seawell Airport,

Repert on the Treatment of
eo for the years 1849 and
O50.

Proposed Leave Regulations, 1952.

The Council ©
following resolutio

Resolution to place the sum of
$246,340 at the disposal of the
Governor-tn-Exeoutive Committer
te supplement the Estimates
1951-52, Part I—Current, as shewn
in Supplementary Estimates 1951-
. No. 41, whieh form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to place the sum of
$51,618 at the disposal of the
Gevernor-in-Executive Committee
ment the Estimates 1951-
M, Part I—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 151-52,
Ne. 42, which form the Sehedule
te the Resolution,

Resolution to place the sum of
31,405 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951-
32, Part 1—Capital, as shown tp
the Supplementary Estimates
1951-52, No, 4, which ferm the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to a we the Order
entitied “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) Ne. 2
Order 1952, made by the Governor-





urred in the



HOUSE

When the House met yesterday

Mr. Adams laid the following
Reports on the Treatment of
Offenders for the years 199 and
1950.

Report dated 12th February, 1952
on Runway Construction, Seawell
Airport

Proposed
1952

The
given:—

Resolution to place the sum of
$60,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1951—52, Part Il, Capital as shown
in the Supplementary Estimates
1951—52, No. 46 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution. This
Resolution was later dealt with
and passed

Fell intituled an Act to repeal
The Public Employees Leave
Rerulations Act, 1935

Bill ivitituled an Act to repeal
The Police Act, 1908.

The House passed a Resolution

Leave Regulations,

following notices were

© in-Executive Commitiee on the
Seventeenth day of January 165°
under the provisions of Section 4
of the Civil Establishment Act
1948.

Resolution to make it lawful! for
the Vestry of St. James to lease
from the Governor-in-Execeutive
Committee a portion of land at
Reid's Bay, situate in the parish
of St, James and containing by
edmeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of erecting bathing
sheds.

Resolution to make it lawfal for
the Governor-in-Executive Com
mittee to lease to the Vestry of
St. James a portion of land at
udmeasurement 16.2 perches for the
Reid's Bay, situate in the parish
of St. James and containing by
purpose of erecting bathing sheds

Resolution to make it lawfal for
the Gevernor-in-Executive Com-
mittee to lease to the Vestry of
St. Michael that parcel of land
forming part of Weiches Tenantry
situate (mn the parish of St. Michael
and containing by admeasurement
158,504 square feet for the purpose
of establishing a playing field

The Council passed « Bill
intitaled an Act to amend the
Pioneer Industries (Enoeurage-

went) Act, 1951.
The Council made a favourable

reply te His Excelleney the °
Gevernor’s Message No. 1 19st
réprarding an increased in the

Government's contribution to the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri-
culture.

The Council pestpened consid-
eration of a Bill intituled an Act
to earry ont the Convention re-
lating. te Labour Clauses in Public
Contracts.

The Council adjourned until
2 p.m. on Tuesday, February 26th

for $8,670
estimates for
Departments

The House passed a Resolution
for $3.500 to supplement the Capi-
tal Estimates 1951—52.

A Resolution to approve the
Civil Establishment (General
Amendment Order) which relgte
to the salary of the Adjuant and
Staff Officer of the local forces
and the Regimental Sergeant
Major instructor attached to the
Barbados Regiment

The House passed an Address
whtch was introduced by Mr
Mapp (L) protesting against the
senator McCarran's Immigration
Quota Limitation Bill and a Com-
plimentan/ Resolution introduced
by Mr. Crawford (C)} expressing
appreciation to Congressman Clay
ton Powell, Jnr. and the West
Indian Committee ‘n America
which initiated the fight against
the Bill

The House was adjourned until
next Tuesday at 3 p.m.

as supplementary
various Heads of



the report stated that the re-
sponsibility should be shared by
the contracting party and the
Governmen.. The Government
had now given the job out on
contract.

It seemed as though the Gov-
ernment failed to provide the su-
pervision for the job to guaran-
tee whether the air base was
built to specifications and done
in a manner to ensure satisfac-
tion and that the contractors
were trying to cheat by doing in-
ferior work. Then they were
coming to the Government month
after month to milk the taxpay-
ers,

Mixing of Concrete

The workmen on the job said
that they never saw concrete
mixed of such a poor quality, He
felt that some responsible Gov-
ernment official or department
should have seen that the con-
tractors a out the terms of
the contract in full. If the Gov.
ernment’s semi-expert whom the
Government had up there to su-
pervise the contrete mixing com-
plained that it was of inferior
quality, they should have known
that something was going wrong
in the manner the job was done.
Mr. Crawford said that since the
job was completed, although the
Canadian Government was wait-
ing for Mr. Wilson to complete a
job, he was completely done with
the Canadian service. He found
himself in a position to go to
Canada and open a new business.

“The Government will have to
be very wary how they bring
down these experts from outside
to supervise work,” he said.
Although the report suggested
that $40,000 would be sufficient to
do the repairs, they were still ask-
ing for $60,000. The asking for
$20,000 more because they did not
know whether the weather would
change did not hold fair at all.
They could come back for the
$20,000 at another time if the
weather did not hold fair, “The
Government should try to pin
them down to do the job for
$40,000 which is even more than
we can afford.”

Reduction Moved

Mr. Crawford moved that the
resolution be reduced by $20,000
so that the amount be $40,000. He
finally said that it seemed that
they made a slip by not making
a Government rtment sup-
ervisors of the job.

Mr. Vaughan (1) said that he
was of the opinion that the mem-
bers of the Government had the
idea that because they were not
technical experts when it came to
a major engineering scheme,
they could excuse themselves of
the full responsibility as far as

S.P.C.K. BOOK

the spending of Government funds
were concerned.

Very few politicians were tech-
nical experts, he said, but it was
more so the duty of the Govern-
ment to see that their money was
wisely spent than it was the duty
of the people who had the con-
tract,

There were colonies such as
Jamaica, Trinidad and British
Guiana which had proper air-
ports. What information had the
Government got about the con-
struction of their airport or how
to put down a runway?

He said that a Canadian official
came to criticise theairport and to
give advise. Why couldn't they
have got advice at the beginning
and save the taxpayers money?
Everytime they wasted money, it
was preventing them from doing
something for the benefit of the
people of the colony.

Supervision

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E)_ said
that $40,000 seemed a small sum
to him to be spent in the building
of any engineering project. But
what was amusing to him was the
fact that even now the Govern-
ment found out that all was not
well with Mr. Wilson supervising,
all they could find was one
Connolly.

He said that he was prepared to
take the expert’s recommenda-
tions on the matter but he was
bearing in mind that all experts
were not honest, The Govern-
ment sat down and could not find
anybody else from any part of tihe
world to give the responsibility of
making a report on Wilson and
Harriman except another Cana-~-
dian. They could have sent to
England, Jamaica or even Trini-
dad for a supervisor for Trinidad
had one of the best airports in the
world.

It was the case, he said, of the
inspector telling Harriman ‘don’t
work at night because he could
not see to supervise the work at
night. Then suddenly, one heard
that they were working at night.
Perhaps the crookedness and dis-
honesty went on at night. Masons
and carpenters came out and told
them what was going on, He had
more confidence in the West
Indian expert because he had all
that was his in the West Indies.

All Canadians
Mr, Mottley said that they
brought down a Canadian to

supervise, a Canadian to report
and now a Canadian to work
“Why don’t you turn Canadian
altogether,” he asked. He said
“Pyt somebody to do Mr. Skin-
ner’s (of H. & T.) work and let
him do the airport; I don’t want
any James.”

He said that they should make

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enquiries in Trinidad of the way
in which the airfields were done.
He was not going to vote for the
reduction because there was no
use crying over spilt milk, but he
was counselling the Government
not to bring in any James. Al-
though the money came from
C.D. & W.,, they should be cautious
how they spent it.

Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) said that

felt that something-was wrong.
The haste in which the resolution
was brought before the House
was an admission of the incompe-
tence of Government to measure
up to their responsibility as lead-
ers in Barbados. The amount of
money should be brought before
the House in the estimates next
month, he said,

He was protesting and was going
to vote for the $40,000. He cculd
not see how $20,000 were added
overnight,

Change in Weather

Mr. Adams (L) said that al-
reauy, the month of February
did not look as though it would
be necessarily dry. He felt that
it was necessary to vote for the
extra $20,000 in case there is a
change in weather.

He said that it was the general
idea that whenever a businessman
came to deal with anything, big
or small, he was going to rake
off something. If that was @heir
moral, well “God help Barbados.”
If Hon. Members knew that Gov-
ernment was being swindled, he
said, instead of going to the
House and Government
month after month, they could
make reports to the Police, the
Attorney General or the Colonial
Secretary,

He said that Wilson was respon-
Bible for the supervision of the
material. Wilson passed the work
and what else could the Govern-
ment do, He said that if the Hon.
Senior Member for the City had
slandering remarks to make, he

should make them out of the
House,
Mr. Barrow (L) said that he

wanted to suggest that the defects
of the runway at Seawell had
nothing to do with the rain. The
runway was 2,000 yards long. He
was wondering whether the sig-
nificance of the defects of the
runway occurred to members on
the other side of the table.

He said that the joint of impact
of a plane landing on the airstrip
was within 35 per cent. of the
runway. A plane weighing 20
tons and landing on the runway
at about 120 miles per hour would
give the impact of about 70 tons.

Airfield’s Detects

He was of the opinion that the
defects to the airfield were caused
by aircraft coming in to land and
that the T.C.A. aircraft caused the
defects, Any competent engineer
would be aware of the fact that
the defects would be caused after
the tirst 1,200 feet of airstrip and
for another 1,500 feet and so the
oad ee should have been
used at that partic s
particular part of the
_ He was also drawing the atten-
tion of the House to the fact that
one end of the runway was one-
third the strength of the other
end which meant that for at least
15 days a year, when the wind
direction varies, aircraft would
not be able to land at the runway.
ae eunt that T.C.A. would
10t be able to land at the b
When C.D, & W, onmeaaie ar

ed the Barbados Government a
certain

¢ i sum of money in order
that Tr ins-Canada Airways would
be able to bring in passengers, it

was hailed as the economic salva-
tian of the island as a whole, That
was less than .wo years ago, and
the runway \vas made 6,000 feet
long for that particular Airline
and no other airline at all.

He tiought that Government
was wise in having a Canadian
ineer come down to aid in the
construction, but it was regretta-
ble that the person who was
brought down was not as con-
ciencious as was expected,

‘What happened to the old run-
ay?” Mr. Barrow asked. “Did
the Government authorise Harri-
man & Co. to take up the old run-



vay which could be used in an
emergency?”
At the time the new runway

was proposed, one of the rational-
isations advanced by the Govern-
ment, as far as he could remem-
ber, was that airline pilots were
omplaining that the old runway
vas out of the wind, and that they
had difficulty in landing. Against
his, he wanted to say that any
pilot in the world who could not
land an aircraft full of passengers
vith a 50-mile an hour cross wind
should never have a commercial
licence,

Mr. Barrow went on to give an
lucidation on aeronautics, and



old runway was as much in the
wind as the new one, and he
therefore did not see the necessity
for taking up the old one. If the
Government authorised Harriman
& Co. to take up the old runway,
then he was shocked. He thought
that the company took up the run-
Way to save transport costs, and
they shifted the old runway, using)
the stuff which they excavated to|
construct the new strip, In short, |
defective material went from the)
old runway, and resulted in the
defects which occurred. |

As the position was now, with)
the new runway needing repairs, |
and the old one taken up, there}
was the question of what they|
would do in case of an emergency.
It was suggested in the Report, |
that instead of putting machinery |
to do the work, they should have
men trained with wheelbarrows— |
an uneconomical proposition.

He felt that later in the year one
might hear that Seawell was
closed for 13 days due to a chance
in wind direction, and if the old
runway was there, they would
have had an emergency landing
strip which had never given any
real trouble. :

The only thing to do with the
present runway was to concrete
slab the whole strip up to 2,570
feet. There was no point in putting
in slabs in peace meal, because
the intervals between the slabs
would again break down, The de-
fects, he said, were not caused by
water, but as a result of weak
substrata.

If the defects were not caused
purposely, they were the result of
gross negligence. The particular
strip of 1,000 feet where the planes
touched down and taxied had to
be three times as strong as the
remainder of the strip. After con-
struction of the runway at a
colossal cost, Trans-Canada de-
cided to re-equip with Turbo Jets,
and Barbados would as a result
be out of the route in another 11
months or so. He was of the opin-
ion that B.W.1.A. were quite happy
with the old runway except for a
few decrepit pilots.

Mr. Barrow also drew attention
to the fact that Trans Canada
were unique in paying only So 1
landing fees, and said that th
local Government were so anxious
to have that company here that
they could not ask them to pay
the normal landing fees. ;

He also criticised the erection of
a separate building for the Diret-
tor of Medical Services, a separate
and distinct from the Terminal
Building, and said that the Resolu-
tion before them called for much

searching. i
He reprimanded Government
on getting rid of their Architect

who could have given much valu-
able assistance in the planning
and la¥ing out of the airport, and
after remarking that the Minis-
try of Civil Aviation, and the
Air Ministry had a vested interest
in all airports in the Empire,
hinted that perhaps the Govern-
ment might ask their advice on
the present matter, He felt that
the time had arrived when the
people who were watching the
affair from the outside shoyld be
called in to give their unpaid
advice,

Mr. F. L. Walcott, (L) replied,
giving explanations to the points
raised by Mr, Barrow and Mr.
Lewis, and when Mr. E, K. Wal-
cott, (FE) spoke on the Resolution,
he said that while he sympathized
with Government, they were, to
some extent, to be held respon-
sible. z

He was wondering if the hurry
was so great that they could not
have another week or so in order
that members might have the op-
portupity to get further informa-
tion. If he understood it righty,
they would have to go back for
most of the money in the new
Estimates, because in these days,
they did not vote a sum of money
and allow it to carry over into
another year, If that were done,
they would be able to feel more
satisfied that the Government and
themselves had done all that was
necessary in view of what had
happened,

It was lucky that the senior
member for St. Joseph and the
junior member of St, Peter were
not in opposition to themselves
(Government), because he would
have liked to hear them criticise
Government for the unfortunate
position in which it finds itself
today. They had the information,
they had the knowledge, and
above all, they had the responsi-
bility of seeing that it was done
right. Government had therefore
to take the responsibility of Mr.
Wilson's incompetence,

After hearing what the senior
member for St. George had said.
one must have qualms as to
whether Government should not
take further advice, and it
doubtful whether the slabs
Portland cement were going to lie
along side the asphaltic cement

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CLASSIFIED ADS,

TELEPHONE 2508. }



For Births, Marriage or Engagement
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charge is $3.00 for any number of words

Up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each | —————

additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
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IN MEMORIAM







WAL©OTT—In ever loving mémory ot
Gertrude Ophelia Elizabeth Walcott,
who fell asleep Sist February, 196

Safe from temptation,
Safe from sin’s poilut'on,
She lives whom we call dead.

Johnathan, Jurett, bra, Linda, Fred, Gap

Walcott, Bemyn Haynes.





PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned against
giving Chedit to any person or persons
name I do not

whomseever in my as

hold myself respon#ble for anyéne
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by = written order signed
by me.

Signed LIONEL A. GREENIDGE,
Areh Hall,
St. Thomas
19.2.52—2n





Signed ITHRAN G. LASHLEY
My Lord’s Hill,
St. Michael, No. 14
19.2.52—2n



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Living Room, Dining Room, 2
Toilets and Baths, one with Tub
— and Pe and cold water,

lery. whetairs: 3 Spare
Rooms, Kitchen, and Shower
Room. Standing on approximately
2% Acres of land about 100 yards
from Gbbs Beach. Inspection by
appointment only,

AUBURN DALE
















A Two Storey Stonewall resi-
denee comprising of three Bed-
rooms, with Dressing
attached, Large Living and Dining
Room, nice Gallery running the
entire length of the house. Stand-
ing on approximately 8,000 square
feet of land, situate at Navy
Gardens. 3















BUILDING



Warehouse and Buildings situate
on al itely 10,000
This building

ot b
possibilities for carrying on
trade that you may require.

LAND

Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one
#mail stonewall build'ng thereon,
situate at Roebuck Street. Excel-
lent for making into a parking
Place or building warehouses.

NEW BUNGALOW









Comprising Three Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Kitehen, )
Toilet and Bath, Standing on
specommuataty 11,000 square feet
land. Situate near the famous
Rockiey Beach,

PARAGON

Compr'sing Four Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Pantry,
Kitchen and a very nice Study.
Standing on 7% acres of land.

ate Near Seawell Ai

ice very
by appoint

BUNGALOW
Roeckley New

























reasonable. Inspection
ment only.











Road: on approx-
imately 19,000 feet, of Jand.
Magnificent view including Golt
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing
nnowses ‘dann te
g jarage, rvants
een Wht a and poart ab H
ug! room for Laun
Workshop. r.







ee

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

wonsee CONTRACTORS

Roebuck Street,
Phone 4900






Bridgetown.

ready for work. Priced right. Apply
Pilgrim Mission Home, Bank Hall Main
Road, St. Michael.





excel
Court

1948 Hudson Sedan 14000 miles very
suitable for hire.
Coupe has been well eared. Very suitable



- SEP ane
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 1951 Model in

~~ CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h P. Saloon,
'H9—560 Model
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE





lent condition and only one driver
eay Garage. Dial 4616

17.2.52—6n

Mileage under 25,000
17.2,52—6n,

Morris Oxford Saloon
in exeellent condition.

14.2
19388 Dodge Deluxe

PICKUP—Good model, A Ford Pickup,

to

19.2.52—Gn



er

fields, St. Pe

Automatic record changer in Cabinet,
As new 1951. Phone

ee

RADIO—One 10 Tube R.C.A, in perfect
working
Apply C,. S. Goodridge, c/o Wilkinson &
Haynes.

8
Electrical, Only
show room.
Dial 5196.





ONE FOUR WHEEL
platform,
assed



OIL—The wirld’s finest motor
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
tions. Your vehicle deserves the best.

travel”.



SHIRT FACTORY—Capable of making
60 dozen shirts per day
Phone Johnson 4311.



STRAW MATS—Fancy Designs &8c. up,
“” grand opportunity for you. i
Dial 3466. 9.

Bros.





Ww.
The
Red

Bros.



LOST & FOUND



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—One;
N. 2996. Finder please return same
yat Glasgow, Rose Gate, St. John.
20.2,

Ww



EDUCATIONAL

HARRISON COLLEGE

FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

At

for a Foundation Scholar at Hartison
College in September, 1952

An

School at_9 a.m, on Saturday, 22nd
March. of application can be
obta: at the Ht 's Office, Har-

Gs on or before the 29th of February,

Can
a



racing record.

uced from $3.50 to $1.32 only.
1


































Price $220,00, 4621.
19.2.52—2n.

order recently overhauled

Phone 4267. 19.2.52—2n,

Vacuum Floor

$75.00. At our

R. Hunte & Co., Ltd.
19.2.52—3n.

MECHANICAL

CANE CART with
and brakes.

pneumatic
Highw: & .
Dial 4016. Courtesy 1s

i

rinted Jersey
53 each, Get
tree:

ott}. .

“Found wherever fine cars
17,2,.52—t.f.n.

For particulars:

13,2.52—in.

‘Than
19,2,62—t.f.n.

Al. Beauti-

excellent equipment, good

Cost $700.00 now $500,
Hicks. Telephone 3189.

18,11.51—t.f£.p

FANCY SPORT SHIRTS—
bargain of the season.
Thant
9,2.52—1n,

8

biggest

Dial 3466.





LOST








$2—2n.










least one vacaney will be available

Examination will be held at the




Certifi-


















didates must be
) The children of, parishioners of
st Michael who ate in poor

is pensiOnal

house,
Road.

ie
to publ
ideally situated. f
y_ situate ‘or
Maxwell Long Road, Christ Church, This
land has a frontage on the Maxwell

Road of 126 feet and over 900 feet Mong
another



NOTICE

Pebruary }.
attached to the post which
le, i Four thousand, three

j handred and twenty @ollars ($4,

ennum, payable th

of Three hundred and siwgy dollars ($860)

A Cost-of-Living Bonus at current rates

is also payable
The successful applicant will net be

permitted to act in, or hold another | *

2th

PUBLIC NOTICES

220) per
instalments

CAR 1947 Ford Super DeLuxe V-8.| Parochial or Government appointment
Exceiient condition. Always owner driven | and will be required to take his
Ring 4433 or 8635 duties as ftom the 25th March but

13.2.52—t.f.n. |i already holding such appointment,

E. c. .
Clerk, St. Miehael’s Vestry,

NOTICE

52-—-8n

NO

TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the intention of the Vestry of the
of Saint Michael to catise to be intro-
duced into the Legislature of this Island
the following Bills, namely :—

(«) A Bill to extend the operation of
the Vestries (Cost of Living



it it is

Bonus

to Employees) Act, 1947 ahd any
Act amending the same for the
further period of one yeat to the
25th March 19653.
A Bll to extend the operation ‘of
the Parochial Employees Pension
Act, 194 and any act amending

the same for the further period

one year to the 25th March 1053,
to amend the said Act
the Parochial

and
amended

by

of

(as
Em-

ployees Pension (Amendment) Act,
1948) by increasing the amount of
the cost of living allowances which

the pour
think fit

all

& .
Solicitors for the Vestry of = ae
io



PUMLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE
SS

BEAT IT IF U ! TRI AND
ne WL SAR a, Se
TROYS }
BELLISHED

WITH AND BY

WORTHWHILE |

Garage.

servant rooms and storage roo!
On attractive hillside site, Roc!
A. Barnes & Co., a

LARS eeeyt BU ING SITe

sighed will
competition at their office
James Street on Friday the 29th February
Acres 344) perehes of land
building sites at

conditions of sale
HUTCH

tive Vestries may if they
bay to their pensioners,

Y
.52—Sn.

20.2. 52—1n

——————
HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom
conveniences,

. laundry,

er for sale





for sale by auction
this vetiicle for auctlo:

at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday 22nd,
at 2p.m. John M. Bladon & Compan:

Auctioneers. 17.2

.$8—3n.



HOOVER WASHING MACHINES
recommendations of

& Co,
Street,

Lid. Show
Opposite

Machine Co.
Bale 2 o'clock. Terms cash.
BR. TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers

D. C. SUGAR

ashing Machines at K. R
Room,

Lowe

the Singe

20.2,52—2n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

and indigent circumstances we will on |. 6S oft
20) Between the ages of 9 and 12| Dark Crystal Sugar at Plantations Ltd.
ies ve on the 3ist of March oe Sale 12.30 O'clock, Terms
1952. eh.
They can be members of Harrison Col- | BR 4NKER, & CO.
Schools by Auctioneers, s











BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE
SOCIATION

held
Satur
1

oo -

co 23 @

16.2. 52—an

Ni
of the Annual General Meeting to be | S¢
arrison Hall on | Tree












at the C
day, 23rd February, 1982,
Introduetory remarks
President,

at 1.30 p.m.
be the

by His Excellency Sir
A, W. L. Savage. The meeting will
adjourn for five minutes,
Minutes of the Last Annual Meet-
a special Meeting of 14th July
To receive the Report
il









of the

Couneil.
To receive the Fnancial Statement
of Accounts and the Auditors’ Re-

rt
Ke hominate officers and members
to serve on the Council
To elect two Auditors.
To elect delegates to attend the
Conference of the Federation
General Business









L. A. HALL,
General Secretary.

will be closed to members
Wednesday,
for minor alterations.
The Club will be open as

on
20th

usual on
ary 2ist.

Auctioneers.

Thursday

February

is lamp.
Treadle Machine, Smiths Type
writer, Pye Radio and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock Terms

CASH.
@ CO.

17.2.52—2n














Febru-




Long supply the House of

Sorafletter from

i {and 45 minutes on

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



story of a

business wien ae:
into a world-wide organisation—
a commercial romance of his gen-
eration, the story of one of the

men who made Londo
Seotch whisky. - oF

, his
ry, thi t
isthe "romanee tan “She

_jing young Scotsman, James
Buchanan, who. all

Changed Entire Trade

As each distillery
a different
. Buchanan

against keen competition in the
year 1885, he was well on the road
to success,

World-Wide Reputation

In securing that valuable con-
tract, unbroken to thig , Mr.
Buchanan was satisfied that he
had laid an im corner-
stone in the history and future
progress of his business, and suc!
t undoubi proved to be.



bers and others who use it. It is ple of his Royal mother.
with pleasure that we express our
high opinion of its quality.” Complete Success
ithin two years “Black and Thus was the seal set upon the
sta
Sets canes GOVERNMENT
NOTICE TVEN that all
persons having any debts or claim a
or effecting estate of
rt late of Kirtons in the
of Saint Philip who in this
island on the 24th day of 1951, are

the said
estate are

Esta Alla Fi hi bert Clark
te of in Fitzher 6,
Deceased.
80.1.52—4nn.

fx" that|the Public Elementary Schools.”

died as a when he
was knocked by the sail of
he schooner i. idson” in

, British Guiana, and

Georgetowh Harbour,
that compensation has been paid into the
Court,

All dependants of the above-
hereby appear at the
h nu
Assistant Court of on Ys
he day of Februany, 1952,

o" a.m.
Dated this 3ist day of January, 1953
F.G. TALMA,

. G, ae st
Ag. Clerk, Assistant Court here. 2

Speed Record
LONDON. Feb. 18.
A British Royal Air Force Can-
berra jet bomber flew from Lon.
don to Tripoli, Libya, in two hours
M to set a
e 1,300



mew speed record for
mile flight.

The previous unofficial record
for the journey was three hours

‘}and 23 minutes in 1949 by a Brit-

ish De Haviland Jet Comet airliner,
—UP.



JUST FOR THE right finish ITS GAS
for cooking you need K your cooker
today at your Gas “Showroom, Bay St








eens from The Licensing World, December 8th, 1951.
et NI.

Homances of the Trade—No. I



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

M.S. BONAIRE, 22nd February, 1

ONE OF THE MEN WHO MADE

LONDON DRINK SCOTCH WHISKY

JAMES BUCHANAN FOUND THE IDEAL BRAND

|
}
|

AND BUILT A GREAT BUSINESS

by THE EDITOR

White” was obtainable in all thp
impogtant lie houses in
London, and in 1 the firm was

awarded a medal at the Paris
Exhibition in ov competition for
blended Scotch whisky. As the
years passed on, so business in-
creased, and the brand became
known not only over the whole
country, but across the seas, and
so began the world-wide reputa-
tion of “Black and White.”

“Black Swan” Distillery

%
rodu : Mr. Buchanan possessed an in-
ge scan whit-, ste sense of showmanship, and
realised to the full the value of
attracting attention as an adver-
tising medium for business.
striking equipages,

His
drawn by



superb horses, did much to help
him achieve that end.

In 1895 he started his own ex-
port department, after extensive
tours abroad, not only in European
countries, but to Canada, United
States, South America, Australia,
New Zealand, and South Africa.

In its infaney the business was
conducted from small premises at
61 Basinghall Street E.C, That was
in 1884, but in the following year
Mr. Buchanan was seeking, and
suceeeded in finding, larger and
more suitable offices with storage
accommodation, at 20 Bucklers-
bury, in the shade of the Mansion
House. Within five years the busi-
ness had grown to such an extent
that more spacious offices and
stores had to be found.

The year 1898 was an import-

endeavours of a man whose prin-
ciple was to provide the highest
quality whisky for the public.
Royal patronage, which has been
continuous ever since, meant |
complete success,

}
!

The growth of the business, so |
famly established in the metro-
polis, necessitated the opening of
branches in the provinces, first in |
Bristol and then in Birmingham, |
At the present
branches in
Liverpool and

Glasgow, Bristol,
Sydney. and agen-|

cies in every country in the world. | ‘

So rapid was the expansion of the |
business that it was not long be-
fore the firm possessed its own |
bottle and ease-making factories,
cooperages and several distilleries

Always a keen sportsman and
lover of animals. James Buchan-
an made extensive use of pictures |
of various breeds of dogs in his
advertisements for his whisky. Out
of this evolved the combination of
a_ black Scottish terrier and a
white West Highland terrier as a
trade mark for “Black and White,” |
and to-day those engaging figures
can be seen all over the world.

A Great Sportsman

Business success brought hon-
ours to James Buchanan, knighted
in 1920, and created Baron two |
years later, taking the title of |
Baron Woolavington of Lavington, |
while the G.C.V.O. was bestowed |
on him in 1931.

Lord Woolavington is. still rex |
membered by the public as a great
sportsman, noted for his love of |
horses, and with “Captain Cuttle” |
and “Coronach,” two of his own |
breeding, he twice won the Derby.

Barbados particularly and the |
rest of the B.W.I. also benefited |
by Lord Woolavington’s interest in
horse racing and breeding, for the
great stallion O.T.C. was a gift)
from him to the Barbados Turf |
Club. Later this stallion became
champion sire of the B.W.1. for
several seasons and when he died
In 1951 his progeny had won more
stakes than that of any other sire



time there are | «

. “wa '|CHRIST CHURCH FOUNDATION BOYS’

Holburn was and be- in the history of W.I, racing. |
came, as it is now, the headquart-

v and The sound, high principles he}
ers of James Buchanan Co. et himself in business were in-

culcated in those who worked |
with and for him, and his exam-|
ples and precepts remained a
sure foundation on which the)
business still proceeds and pro-
gresses. ;

As if to mark the occasion of
the opening of the new head-
quarters, H.M. Queen Victoria be-
stowed the as Warrant of 4e-
pointment on ehanan’s, and the
Prince of Wales, afterwards King :
Edward VII, followed the exam- In his lifetime James Buchanan
not only founded the whisky busi-
ness, but made it into one of the
great distilling companies of the
world. 2





OTICE



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION



TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF CLEAR STRAW SUGAR TO



THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS fs

Tenders are invited for the supply of clear straw sugar to the!
Public Elementary Schools of the ‘island during the following school

1. 5th May to ist August, 1952.
2. 15th September to 12th December, 1952.
3. 12th January to 10th April, 1953.

The estimated fortnightly requiremerfts are 4,500 to 10,000
pounds of sugar. Persons tendering must quote the price per pound
plus delivery charge, and are required to submit a sample of sugar,

Supplies must be delivered to the schools every two weeks ac-|
cording to the requirements of the individual schools, and all deliver- |
ies must be completed within three days

Tenders must cover all requirements of the schools during the
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock noon on Saturday, the 15th March,
1952. Tenders must be marked “Tenders for the supply of sugar to

|

The person whose tender is accepted must be prepared to furn-
ish two sureties for the due performance of the contract.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or
any tender.

16th February, 1952. 20.2.52.—3n.





AND GIRLS’ SCHOOLS

Applications are invited for the post of Secretary and Treasurer
of the Governing Body of these Schools,

The post is part time and non-pensionable. The salary is $720.00
ber annum payable monthly (Cost of Living allowance will not be
given).

Details of the work involved can be obtained on application to
the undersigned. Applications with references must be sent to the
Chairman on or before the 20th instant and the successful applicant
will be required to assume duties on the ist March, 1952.

GEORGE B, EVELYN,
Chairman,
Dumfries,
St. Michael.
9.2.52—7n



FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

5th Avenue. = KHelleville

An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated
on a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries qd
enclosed). —- drawing room, dining room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc.

Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AFS., F.V.A,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS

Pitone 464¢.



ss

®

AMSTERDAM
M.S. WILLEMSTAD, 26th February, 1952

952.
M.S. » Ist March, 1952.
ona Cindi lth,
i

SAILING TO PLYMQ@UTH AND

SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND
BRITISH GUIANA

MS

STENTOR, 28th ry, 1952.
8.8, BRATTINGSBORG, th March, 1952.
SAILING TO DAD, PARAMARIBO

AND BRITISH GUIANA

M.S. BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952.

|S.8. COTTICA, 7
| SATLING 10 TRINIDAD
M.S, HERSELIA,



April, 1952.
AND

, 18th March, 1952.
8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,
Agents.

CURACAO

‘SHIPPING NOTICES

‘ROYAL NETHERLANDS |



SSCS”,
| a
} The M.V. MONEKA will _atcept %
| Cargo and Passengers for Domin- &
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis ©
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd ©
inst. e
The M.V. “DAERWOOD .
accept Cargo and Passengers °
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, §
and Arubo. Sailing Saturday 2rd &
inst %
The M.V. CARIBBEF wil ®
accept Cargo and Passengers for %
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri-
day 29th inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.
Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.

o*



Canadian National Steamships



| “LADY RODNEY”
LADY

_N”’

“CANADIAN CRUISER”














NORTHBOUND

Arrives
Barbados Barbados
-: 20 Feby. 21 Feby.
- 8 Mareh 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March
4 April
i4 April

- 4 April

For further particulars, apply to—

+.22 Mareh 24 Mareh

Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
-13 Feby. 15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby.
+27 Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
. 14 March. _ 23 March 24 March
Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Boston St. John Halifax
— 28 Feby. 1 March

3 April

7 April

7 April 17 April







C"G" TRANSATLANTIO’
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.



ae ‘ ose ee

ies

o



———



From Southampton Arrives Barbados
“COLOMBIE”........ 7th Feb., 1952 20th Feb., 1952
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th March, 1952 2nd April, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”..., 24th April, 1952 6th May, 1952

“Not calling at Guadeloupe.
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados
“COLOMBIE”.... 2nd March, 1952
13th April, 1952
*“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May, 1952

“COLOMBIE”....

Arrives Southampton )
14th March, 1952
25th April, 1952
29th May, 1952

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

KH. M. JONES & CO... LTD.—Agenis.



Special Offer











SPOSSSOPIS I EPP FDS POOOS a.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH







5

ELECTRIC ony That Popular Game :— $
$7.52 MONOPOLY

CLOCKS each DART BOARDS 8
TABLE TENNIS SETS >

Table Models with $
Tuminous dials BLUE on WARE

G. W. HUTCHINSON JOHNSON’S STATIONERY %

4222 & Co. Ltd. Broad St. aanetane $

b, ' 3

OBBEE ete:

% 56565S6$55999SS 399999959999S69995900% OSS»
% An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant, Use : %
»,

S GERM OILS ‘
‘ %
% for Best Results.
> s
% : $
x TENTRAL EMPORIUM ‘
% Gasolene Service Station — Trafalgar St. %



*

Using Too
Much Oil?

Before You Spend

Money On a Costly
Overhaul, Read This!



You may not need new rings

often a comparatively simple Office 4493

oll system check-up will do

the trick. Let us flush and Workshop 4203
clean your crank-case, check Parts Dept. 4613

your oil pump, replace the oil

Night 4125

each ncientinii nities inspectorate

filter cartridge. It’s inexpensive

imsurance,



Are You Slow
On Get-Away?

Good Plugs and
Corrected Timing
Make a Difference!



= “heap” Instead of a fire

Charles
McEnearney
) « (0. Ltd.

engine, your ignition may be
at fault, Let os clean, space
and replace spark plugs, clean
and adjust breaker points, set
ignition check

i

|
If your car is accelerating like j |
and |

vacuum spark advance. Then

see the difference!

ea a




























WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952 BARBADOS ADVUCATI PAGE NINE

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Gland Discover
ea | | Restores Yout
‘In 24 Hours —











ToucH A GEenuWwiWe
THOUSAN~- DOLLAR
LuMP! FEE 1 SENT



Sufferers from logs of vigour, nerv-
| ongness weak body, impure blood
| failing memory, and who are old and
| worn-out hefore their time will be de
| Ughted to learn of a new gland discov-
| ery by an American doctor,
| "This new discovery makes It pos-
| sible to quickly and easily restore vi
| gour to your glands and body, to buiid
rich, pure, blood, to strengthen your
mind and memory and feel like.a new
man in only § days. Ip fact, this dis-
covery which is a home medicine in
pigneant eapy-to-take tablet form

oes away with gland operations and
begins to build new vigour and energ;
in.24 hours, yet it is absolutely harm-
legs, and natural in action

The success.of this amazing dis
covery, called VI-TABS, has been #0

reat that it is now being distributed
| by all chemists here under a guarantee
of complete satisfaction or money
back, In other words, VI-TABS must
make you feel full of vigour and
energy and from 10 to 20 years young-
er, Or you merely return the empty ‘
package and get your money back.

VI-TABS costs little, and the guar-

antee protects
-Tabs

Restores Manhood and Vitality







BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

eee _ i 3A

mA






OKaY! WELL
BUST OUT THERE Tl








PAIN

CAN BE
CONQUERED



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WHAT HE" i

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On Sale at
KNIGHT'S LTD.
68066000












BY DAN BARRY

“TWAS LYING! YOU CAN'T TRICK Ne fl PF LISTEN, YOU CONS). THiS |b
a "ESCAPE TO EARTH ON \ ME THAT EASY, KENT/ 7 BIG M BIG MOE KOSLOW/ 1
HEAR THIS, FLASH! T i THIS ROCKETSHIP! NOW STAY PUT AND meee, «= T THE WARDEN'S DESK AND I'M

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE














SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

























CAN SEE YOU ON THIS Mm) | THERE'S STILL TIME... ,/ KEE! a Sere pantie nie A -—— cease
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UNNECESSARY! COME J + 4 <* GETTING ABOARD iS A CRUMMY
BACK, BIG MOE! > =S%& HANDFUL, 0! GUARDS....6O GET






Speighistown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually NOW
Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes Al 38 #©Tins Pie Apples .96 00

Tins Box-All Cleanser 23 .20 6 lb Potatoes 72 8684
Tins Cooking Butter (5lb) 4.50 4.30 Boneless Beef 58 50















'S KENT! LISTEN
TO ME! yOu'RE
MAKING A BIG
MISTAKE?







THE COLONNAD GROCERIES



Beitish
Honduras






























‘ q o
| by Stephen L. Caiger
——— NG ace) tia ttl iltmatintee,
| | A PACKAGE-siR- |
Mi RE ||| SIKTY DOLLARS- || TAKE IT BACK |] || BUT-SIR-THEY =|
; 1 \\eCOLLecT- —_)| AN'DON'T GIVE || || ARE CIGARS you |
} —S ; ME ANY a Wil ORDERED - THEY ‘ | British Hondura perhaps the ersies with neighbouring Central
| ARGUMENT | | Must BE FOR YOU : ;
most neglected of all English American republics, especially
a pra olonies, Even the larger historie Guatemala The dispute with
Ans
I “| Pe f colonial develo, nt barely Guatemala ended in the territorial
Nc nention it. Thi uthor has now Agreement of 1859, but the after-
told the swory of this interesting math of diplomatic strife remains
cun ry from the early days of it to the present day, and may be
ettlement by the logwood-cutters referred to U.N.O,
and buccaneers up to the present, The concluding chapter deal
Beginning with the caiscovery of with the Colony today with special
> British Honduras by the Spanish emphasis. on its economic and
‘| YOU ARE, CHUMS... Conquistadore Mr, Caiger de- commercial status and recent
REE HORSES AND THE ) : a sea ey
GUIDE ... HE WILL LEAD ribes the growth of the colony Government proposals for devel-
us T SHEIK’ : f
Saale ! s under ts occupatior ind settle- cpment. The writer shows that its
ment | British adventurers, and agricultural and other resources
the ‘ednversion’ of Harry Morgan have been gravely neglected, and
He gives an account of the early that this fertile land could main-
querrels with the Spaniards which tain a population many times its
were later followed ty controv- present size



ADVOCATE

ay 4 _aee STATIONERY
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS












Aegean,










MEN OF SENGA, FOR. W PUNISHED? THIS IS OUR
PROF DUDLEY DOES ROBBING A PEACEFUL | LAND. THEY TRESPASS
| UNDERSTAND THE} ppSAFARI, YOU WILL BE HERE? NOONE PUNISHES
. at fg St CESS 7

SENGA LANGUAGE =~ jam Y PUNISHED? >,
FANDIE SHE ONLY |
ZNEW THAT THIS WAS y
THE LEGENDARY fa

PHANTOM<«+

El aren













by

PAGE TEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952







OLYMPICS RING UP THE CURTAIN

By Lord







Burghley Cae ae ANGLE

LANGLEY DIVES |

From The DAILY MAIL ' ‘ Soccer WHAT'S ON TODAY 195?

On July 19, in the huge

the last of a relay of runners bearing a flaring torch from

Olympia, Greece, home of t

Helsinki will arrive. The Olympic flame will be lit, and the

XVth Olympiad will open.

It is surely significant,too, that
for the two weeks of these Games
there will be one sphere in this
troubled world in “which there
will be no Iron Curtain Russia
and the countries close to her are
taking their places among the
sixty-odd nations competing under
the friendly banner of sport
oe - - og

Cream of Youth

THIS, surely, makes the Olym-
piad of even more _ profound
importance. It is not just a
World Championship of Sport; it
is also a gathering of the cream of
the youth of the world.

Every fourth year they assem-
ble for the Games, and live
together in an Olympic village.
They learn to become friends in
the midst of flerce competitions
tind it should not be forgotten
that they are all heroes of sport
to the people of their Own lands
News of what they have seen
and heard is eagerly sought on
their return home

I am convinced that an Olym-
pie festival, with its thousands of
competitors and spectators from
all corners of the globe. «preads
good will out of all proportion to
the numbers actually sent

Interest in sport is world-wide,
It provides common ground
for men of af’ nations, and these
sporting contests between ccun-
tries help to create that basic
binderstanding «and good will
which are essential foundations
to a smoothing-out of difficulties

If I may give one example
My wife and I were in Argen-
tina on business at the height oi
the meat crisis, and yet, becau:e
of the great fellowship cf sport
we received a wonderful recep-
tion and were made the guests of
Argentina throughout our stay.

We should never forget that
Britain is the cradle of samateu:
sport, The regt of the world
looks to us to play Our part in
maintaining that high tredition
and this surely is yet enoimer
reason for making a tremendous
effort to ensure that we are ade-
quately represented in Helsinki
It may be that but few of the
firsts will come our way, but
at any rate we will put up a
show worthy of our country.

Our Prospects

WHAT are our _ prospects?
There will be 17 different sports,
and I receive encouraging in-
formation from most of them.
In.my own sport, athletics, we
undoubtedly have a strong all-
round team, and, I believe, a
better one than we fielded for the
1948 Games at Wembley.

If these athletes keep their
fofm, then the outlook is promis-
ing, in spite of the rising world
standard. But let there be no
mistake about it; we shall be
opposed by superlative, well-
coached athletes, and it will be
a great achievement to reach a
final let alone win it.

Britain’s “possibles” for the
munning-track and field events
have been listed, and every com-
petitor will do his or her utmost
to reach peak form at the right
time. There can be no hard and
fast rules about the training. A
heavy man needs a lot more
work than those of leaner build
(as I was in my athletic devs!)

It is not essential for our team

clubs, and get their high-class’
racing in the district and British
championships. Their life’s am-
bition is to win an Olympic title
and the great majority can safely
be left to do the job.

Naturally, we are all hoping to
see the Union Jack at the top of
the winning-mast, but let us not
forget the words of the foundey
of the Olympic Games, Baron de
Coubertin: “The important thing
in the Olympic Games is not
winning, but taking part. The
essential thing in life is not
conquering. but fighting well.”

ind this. 1 pr oat an they ¢ighteen days in the season, This group he may find himself al for their third round cup tie
ove Ohne ao i ten aan ae — comparte Savousabty with the matched against a heavyweight next week ended in a draw so sup-
, " 1 : ‘ : ata present system whereby in a full scaling 220 or 230 pounds, That’s porters of both sides are left won-
to do a lengthy final training to- St. Michael 8 Beat But current indications are that five match, five-day series they Very bad,” Johnston added. dering what to expect on Satur-
gether. Many train with thei 4 the pendulum is starting on its are away nearly a third of the day.—U.P.
s > ' rae backward swing. Critics and pub- summer, pte
Ursuline Convent lic alike have been unanimous lS Be t FRenth 3
in their recent condemnations of The revenue from a triangular Al tars a
_in a netball match played at slow batsmanship — despite the tournament, played on sporting s 8
St. Michael's Girls’ Scnooi yester- good wickets. And so serious has wickets, need not be any less than Schools ¢ ains in ac
aay afternoon, St, Michaei’s Girls’ been the insistence upon a return that obtained from a five-day
Scnool defeated the Ursuline Con- to more equal terms between bats- series played on wickets which (From Our Own Correspondent) N Rh fi
vent by 17 goals to 13. man and bowler that the Nottins- ;educed to a minimum the chances KINGSTON, Feb. 18. ervous, euma .
In the first half both teams ham authorities have even order- of a result being obtained, In _ The tournament between the

I would like to stress that,
whereas individuals excel, and
bring honour and glory to their
countries, there is no scoring be-
tween countries that makes one
the winner of the Games, For
this, it is felt, would encourage
an undesirable nationalism which
would be completely contrary to
the true spirit of the Olympic
movement.

Any table which appears,
therefore, placing nations in order
of merit is entirely unofficiel and
privately compiled.

Some people are only too ready
to decry the Games, and, indeed,

They'll Do It ‘Eve



ry












TWO WEEKS COMPILING AN
@ EIGHTY-FOUR PAGE
REPORT



ALL FINISHED, WHO
TAKES ALL THE Bows:
WHY, TWERPLEY,
| CHIEF_PETTY

eee eee
| Renee THEYRE INS Tu oto OD

GLORY-GRABBER.
OF COURSE +

| ee
WE NST
}

40
em
ee ad TF

— iealicltiliemmen
rennet a re





"The OFFICE FORCE SPENDS

Olympic Stadium at Helsinki,

Court of Original Jurisdic- Annual Carnival Dance

tion 10.00 a.m.
] Police Courts 10.00 ..m i By Members of
e roes Police Band Concert at St. THE RIVERSIDE CLUB

he original Olympic Games, to

eee ee pm | if) at the CHILDREN'S GOOD-
; 16 = Division football WILL LEAGUE
Se eae veal a i iia SPS ra various grounds 5 p.t. on TUESDAY, FEB. 26TH,
struc ie pi dp» inte rnatic nal in. goalkeeper and an inside for- Mebils Cinema. show | at

that 1@y cause erna ne -

at 9 p.m.
Prizes for Costumes

ward who overcame injuries to
score winning goals for their clubs
were heroes of to-day’s soccer
programme. First, the goalkeep-
er Dennis Herod of Stoke was in-
jJured in the match against Aston

cidents, and make fo, rows
instead of harmony

That these incidents took place
in years gone by is, of cOurse,
true; but the fact that they are
such rare events nowadays is

Warners Plantation yard,

Christ Church 7.30 p.m. , ere
Gramophone Concert at SUBSCRIPTION: 3/-

British Council 8.15 p.m. Music by P. Green’s Orch.











Vill n é ar anging A406 gb tots ee 4059)
that _ Sportsmanship which Ae ture — moved to outside right WEATHER REPORT % Government of ~
spreading throughout the world hil ; : > | 2
It is commo knowledge now while international inside forward YESTERDAY j S
tha” eels “ = e- Sammy Smyth went in goal Rainfall from Codrington »
with what smoothness and free Along came 9 chance ahd Herod Nil >
dom from incident the Wembley 4 an a a < r r )
i : mn oe em . eM bers: wing forward a Total Rainfall for Month to |, x
‘ racked in a shot to give Stoke date .07 in. 4 Registered Stock %
Sportsmanship First two more valuable points in th Highest Temperature 85.0 °F &% %
bid to avoid relegation. Lowest Temperature 70.5 °F Tax-free to residents abroad. *
THE Finns will organise the The other hero is inside forward Wind Velocity 9 miles per A Trustee Investment *
Games well, and I have no doubt MacNeil of Barnsley, He was car- hour | x
that the same high standard of ried off with an ankle injury in a Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005 & Price: 100 plus commission
sportsmanship will be maintained home game with Sheffield Wednes- (3 p.m.) 29.919 . ~
among the competitors as it day but insisted on returning to TO-DAY %
London. The year 1952 will be the field in the second half. The Sunrise: 6.15 a.m . A. M WEBB xy
another milestone in the history score was four all when Mac Sunset: 6.08 p.m Tie . 4 R
of sport in the world, afd with received his chance and a well Moon: Last Quarter, Feb- x *
the support which I am confident placed header gave Barnsley vic- 18. , 1% Stockbroker. v
the sport-loving public of this tory, knocking Sheffield off their Lighting: 6.30 p.m. ist S
country will give, Britain will second division perch. High Tide: 9.42 32 ||% 38 Broad Street, Bridgetown. 4
. 7 , ly of the Now v tag - = le: . a.m., 11. ~ sb
send qa team not only ¢ ow for the rest of the news p.m, s, >
highest class of performers but \e ~
also one which will, each and

Manchester Uniteds three—nil Low Tide: 2.13 a.m., 5.00 \% ae
away win over Derby gives them p.m. a aie Sey 8
a two point lead in the First Divi- Pas Se re .
sion Championship race. Arsenal
second with 40 points were held
to a 3—3 draw at home by Pres- i
ton for whom Wayman got the We offer the following
hat trick after being two goals up

“ces wan apeoni LERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

OS
.
Me

every one, worthily uphold out
great traditions of sportsman-
ship.

FOOTBALL

Wile ce nen Le we Pe



|
i









: 9H i ended Fulham’s revival Z
2 perio ieee . : % fk sound 4—0 victory but Ween UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
FIX RES ‘ ee . ae fourth in the table, were soundly 4 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. Long
rt beaten 3—9 at Wolverhampton. @ 10ic. per sq. ft.
LANGLEY dives for the ball hit by Rae (21) bowled by Lindwall in the Fifth Test Match, The vis sone wound internationai WALLBOARD MOULDING
pivGellese, ast, season's Segond By aes pee cee ee Rise game auonien "Hing Mai for covering ola
ivision champions, w ave ‘ ember 2 ; . k
aon erent to oo A st Trian l T 9 a r 24 in top form. STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
1on is season mee mpire a u ar eS , a ec eS n eS ivi , *
Kensington to-morrow afiernoon. ; & f e Wednesday's defeat iow tea \% in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft., 8ft., 10ft. long
The fixtures for the rest of this the newly promoted Forest to take at 18c. pr sq. ft.
week are as follows:— over for the first time. They drew TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
FIRST DIVISION A MOVE TO BRIGHTEN CRICKET 3—8 with Luton and are now one % in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft. 8ft., 10ft. long
Thursday, February 21 ’ point clear of Leicester, Wednes- at 30c. per sq. ft.
Empire’ vs College at. Kensing- ow, and Cardiff all with 35 points, SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS
ton. By PETER DITTON secretaries in particular would be West Indies an opportunity to eo eit ae goals were scored Y% in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft. @ 40c, per sa. ft.
Saturday, February 23. ; Lonpon. ‘ick to point out that a two redeem their recent failures, Port Wein e aa Serrow. 3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft. @ 29c. & 32c. per su. ft.
Spartan vs. Notre Dame at Ken- : ; aN day reduction would cut down A three day series would prob- beat at hom . th ificult side to TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS
sington. Test match cricket these (avs their share of profits at the end ably be to the advantage of the south lenders Pee Diyision 3/16 in, thick. 4ft. x 8ft. @ 23e. per sa. ft.
. et ot 1h er Acct of the tour, West Indies, for their natural bent One goal scored by sneide i; |\f) All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack {
THIRD DIVISION. . With four, five and six days be- - : is to attack, English batsmen once Mullard ended y pte right of Wood Ants and other Termites. ‘
Wednesday, February 20. ing devoted to each game both But this, I think, is where I had the same idea. Is it too much cessive PI can of eight suc-
Police vs. Y.M.C.A. at Park batsmen and bowlers are en- should introduce a suggestion 1, hope that it can be revived? enabled Brights, Jicweme and|{{ Phone 4267.
Carlton vs. Rangers at Black couraged to develop a negative ap- made recently in Australia by don 430 Fn a who beat Swin-
Rock proach to their respective duties. John Goddard, the West Indies top of th t Mae Ot OP. { AYNES C0 LTD
Wanderers vs. Foundation at The consequence is that unless Captain. He advocated that Eng- e ehh But Plymouth til \ 9 e
Bay. the wicket is “sporting,” that is land, West Indies and Australia New Division points clear and ee Id : ome i
Y.M.P.C. “A” vs. C.O.B.. at to say, gives the bowlers an ad- should meet in a combined Tes back in the winning vein. In ;
Beckles Road, rn vantage, a definite result is hard series, a return to the experiment . an





j Burgess Crystal Palace i
Lodge vs. Cable and Wireless the M.C.C, iand. 3 ace inside left

were sent off five minutes from

at Lodge. As we all know wickets through - If Test teh reduced ee a the third, North Li
mA i ae out the world have been getting est matches were ju . : In the third, Nort neoln even
Caltses va Empire at College, better and better since the turn to three days it oe L quite secede Py Fe ata ts lee Sauces veihes ee ee eee
P. Rovers vs. F.O.B. at Ken- Of the century. This has been due ¢@Sy to fix up another

: Graver rattled up five against
sington. to the introduction of more scien- Series. In this way the demands poon. may have & new ‘divider Sure sne, and Cee

Barbados Regiment vs. Notre tific methods of preparation, But f overseas countries for increased (jj) have a new division. their five point lead.

r Charlie Johnston, President of ¢ . il) i
Basie at Gartaon” NOS Se ehetshave Uecome betters so epportuniles to play im England Ghee, Whar, Pregent of | 'Siockport atl tn sacond place,
Carlton vs. ¥.M.C.A, at Black has it been necessary to lengthen Could be met. Each summer two Guiid announced today that he ; Biken

beaten home record—last surviv-

Rock. the duration of Test matches, The COmmonwealth teams could be yijj propose to the New York ing in four English leagues.

Wanderers vs. Rangers at Bay. initiative has been taken away Sent. This would mean a Test Commission the addition of
C.0.B. vs. Foundation at Com- from the bowler and handed over ‘Series once every three years “for “Junior Heavyweight Class’? from

Guarantee A Perfect FIT



, News from Scotland is that Hi-
bermere. to the batsman, Australia, South Africa, India 175 pounds to 190. “This will help bernian are already wearing that

; . _ hk ‘ Pakistan, New Zealand and the make up for two divisions we championship look. They followed
The B.A.F A. are ST Sonia ah This state of affairs has been West Indies, instead of, in some practically lost at the other end ‘ theif mid-week draw with
oe Mg the Se Sed Division an > tolerated, in fact even encouraged, cases, a wait of five or even six of the scale—Flyweisht and Ban- ‘'ingers at Ibrox Park by beating
aa Fae Hell is aie aoatiaite inte for a long time now. Five day years. ; tamweight” he said, “at the same St, Mirren 5—0 and now nothing

aa Ne sca, rest matches bring in more mone time it will provide protection short of a wholesale collapse will
Spice wil’ luke alae ts ieee than thoes of pute Uides dave fe Six three-day Test matches for youngsters just growing out lose them the championship for
Park’ ané ihe pant . iar will tion, Similarly, most members of WOuld mean that English Test of the Light Heavyweight Class. the second successive season,

‘ahd oes te rene tee 99 the public prefer to see a good Cricketers would be away from At present a youngster who has toon Queen of the South and
aan thie wit Ree Monsians je. innings, with the ball flying to their club sides for not more than grown too big for the 160 to 175 Hearts game which was a rehears-

: . e e eight goal draw at Gillingham
Combermere vs Y.M.P.C. “B" at to obtain. Witness for example the of 1912 when South Africa and F B Xm pyres. home centre £
Comberimere. present series between India and England both sent teams to Eng- : 3 : =





. . Wrong foods and drinks. worry
started off the game slowly, but ed their famous “feather-bed’” fact it would probably be more Caribbean All Stars and Jamaica — overwork and frequent colds often put

the St. Michael's girls were al- wicket at Trent Bridge to be re- because there would be nine test 9pened this afternoon with a Sid Mindane Pronbing was ihe tone
ways looking for goals, At half laid. matches instead of five. match between All Stars and a cause of Excess Acidity, Getting Up

; : . ; ; Nights. Burning Passages, Leg Pains,
pains: anarpachaentnpnesliant This action should not onl Een Deore, Raven: Nervousness, Diasiness” Swollen An:

; $s ac Ss. not only be Goddard himself did not sug- e x say an kles. Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids, and
Play in the second half was commended, It should be copied riage eb . The visitors won the match,

Fe Tri- " i feeling old before your time Help your
much better and a fair crowd o! by other cricket grounds through- Kost, sete ihe = beating their opponents 4—0 in — iidnexe purify your blood with ine

i . . . tex. Th 7 t dose = ts hel:
fans from St. Michael's and the out the world. The public are angular series between his coun= 4 match which was notable for your sidinve lowe art alana orice




; : uy, England and Ausiralia should i } is i Sears : i ‘lee
Ursuline br ypu al saw noua good patie & perce fe “T matches j,¢ wae But, doubtiess he had in San A passing and good positioning in which do not produce definite re- ; ali ? cA ee oy ystex must satisfy completely or cost . “pps
the field but in the fatter part tof sults, The time has come to give ") ind the fact that Australia is outmatched the schools by at — jithing Get Cystex from vour chem: Prince William Henry Street

We have, } ot
done it in Jinan } fer

the PAST. S@iayang We

We on = Aa

—

the TIME,

P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD.











; : 2 isit England i 53. Ss. series ist’ today

this half the St. Michael’s girls the bowler a fair chance; not to a. pe could be eee 2 ele tale en eee MEAN ee y stex The une: a we Mf
forged ahead considerably putting make him dependent upon the ing that tour it would give the Jamaica starts on Saturday. For Kidneys, Risabatlom, Biedder Meee ybee” VS SS a
themselves well in the lead and weather for a chance to tie the aiteaiiiaaeamiiie =
when the final blast was sounded batsman up. | = :



St. Michael’s girls had put in 17 '
goals and the Ursuline Convent With less artificial preparation
13. of wickets it should be possible
for any game, including a Test

The shooters for St. Michael’s match, to be concluded in three
Girls’ School were M. Branker Cays, “8
and O. Agard while the shooters I can at once hear angry cries
for the Convent were M. Netto at this suggestion of reverting
and C, Navarro, to three day Tests. English counts

lea —_.

‘Time iialocaiaaanis By Jimmy Hatlo







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Full Text

PAGE 1

UI.UMMIM HBKI \P.\ M, USi BARBADOS \li\.u m. PAGE TUBEE Further Canadian Investment In Caribbean Bauxite JAMAICA TO GET NEW DEEP-SEA PORT MONTREAL. Canadian investment in the Caribbean area will be increased by at least $20,000,000 lo provide large-acalc expansion of the bauxite-alumina facilities already under construction in Jamaica, announces Mr. Nathaniel Davis, president of Aluminium Ltd Montreal. The company's new alumina plant in Jamaica, the first in the Caribbean, is now having ita planned capecitv increased from 180 tona nf alumina ix-r ilav to 450 tons per day. isqui'nsl to nrasSs lSori"raw '< '" % %  • Mandevllle. In the southmsUTials tor Canada's rapidlv '"" %  !" n of the island, expandinit aluminh.ni indu.lrv. CssMtrueUosi en the first phase Further galarssmsM of ess plain "•'bj" sheading rapidly. IS 670 ton, per day la railed tor ff "'" %  '•*, ,"" in the company, plsea %  E*S* P ^S^ M 5 suseeaajvi. (Icv.lui.iiui.! Mr i 1 -" 1 "' includes liic erection ot oKussla. a v " mr "' Mr structm.1 >teal and tanks from To service the alumina plant m.jtrrjal brouttit rrom "*! asd Handle snort asistaenu, • ealdnsM kiln in nUOK the water dSeVstTp^ Wi"e^e.i %  >; %  '>; """'"^ V' ftn ri nl " ^ lh. s.i„lh coast of Jamaica A !" l"? "2? la. ? J HOO-f.-ii ill.vu,! „l,r will In%  *• h'vsl: and the laying of a 3r£ttdSOW tiarhour Ba£ '•"•" tSk'SSH SSSlT "*" """" with Initial dredging opecuons '" •' %  ot '9: 0 ^-'''',''" 10 start immedlalel," hul "esr lhplant Total investment by the comB n :M BULLDOG BEATS THEM ALL 30 Die In Blizzard Scauvli a.mm *i n. BOSTON, Feb. ill. More si tow u on the way tea N H. %  .!..-!. I> I sillVaaeam aM r Btrtflam rr-t -i vm.K >rMrri.. fa*.*,. Hakolm OoneaL**. AiifsU Oon-atvw saUd Ctati rUWla-r llillbtiaDk IT. SB MtlUsM.. J-arir NtraoKi. Ik. Hu#a sttud lU.r.lt rrata t.sMf %  — Ats-lt* IHM." Harbour Log IN CARLISLE BAY .. %  'I... •*(! The Weather Bureau predlctrri s_. •.now or the rain In the south A IWI m.l snow in the north for fli !" 2lt;. •norruw, Deaths In the tturm Ahlvh began Sunday night wt %  • followed by the loan of even mo-1 live* when the storm cracked l" tankers acrues the middle off Chatham Man. yesterday, A howling n.irthaast btiaxaM deposited from about eight liwh'--. of snow in Boston to 31 in. he111 oarta of New. Hampshire. A lh! inch snowfitll in I.ewlaton w • the heaviest since the buu.ird "i IBM. %  rail II IVi)n BM<*. %  f (I 1.1, IMM I Is-Otarr tl (IT.H.1 %  'i H Ssnith J *Puti. i M -.-, %  • %  !• %  i-tan a*a. aw i ..-. IONH VI l Tll.sl.la4 C. ll.,.. w.i.,, j bm wiiii.fu.jtMM lmtn-Jita aaiuop. ruin 1 >*et F. _._>HSN C OatW, M bisa %  •' rtaoi nmifw .lit r SstlrlH M ttMst rt*>4, C'*p( (*t VH CaI uietaii a.> ls>t->sHI> AtkiIJattvl WllaUit H fl HfU t am. Sal tona IXurtfthy BstJrao. TrodoT Ms> l>.ssn. fm Amalvidam latin MMvraittiia. Ju-in TunMt. *1.nle> M S KalUdi. Ul] tona %  uvn. DM* R cm %  •> %  CUant'.rChrMIM. far Anlsm-i AjMlrvw lior ! %  % %  %  urn. K-r.ii.ii !•* Jam (*imr. Him Arnold Wot-d. Cont.1.. Woa.1. aualast ToeiMn I-W.-U T<1*i r II • for -UIUSUB 1-mnet. Cast. v-a-,~ I. -'.!.. i (.. --.(.I Jflraan. IUv. PrarH-i* Oaaeo *nd M-rVair ra-Uasa. Is. M. *.-<--. n i Uivsatai >d Arthur l-.Oi!.v |*r aikmatsjat Arthur leiStM Hul rWtr ll-rrt^l *Uh.l Mail MAIL NOTICES %  bioraue fatUities for alumina ma iii Janiaioa m,iv reach as „ lLU iCT nrtwidurl hv two e,^^. wi|| |yi till ^, b crtnvt7or %  he P rtr.mmo is be ng carffa] ^..^ (||>(n |u rji | way waKon #. JaaaaajW. IMiylte Ud. I ( ,, turn dischargeri by a Ii4 (K). utaMllary of Aluminium Ltd. foo conveys? to the pier. AH capita requirements are storu ,.. ,,, llks wiI1 al-n be |>r,^ taviiiK provided by the Parent v|ded for MM0 ^rnXs of fuel KffSii. w,lh J he .u lw,1 ? l T..ii ni1 '" * "• for ,inn bolh ,h '* 8.-00.000 low.irds !he cost of the rakilliiy; kl | n alld ^...^n, „,.,. ntt-stage plant. which was „„,. oflulpmenl at iho ..h.m,..., loanrd to Jamaica Bauxites by pIanU rr^W shed* wtll be built ine Economic Co-operat on Adf m ctfmr nw ma(er iaU. ilni'-lration. The loan || being epaid bv aluminium shipmenta A new method of aruppm.' from Canada to the V S CvernalumilM is planned by the i %  lent stockpile. p.mv In order to handle 'Production from the alumina* quantity involvro Th |,'i thr ant %  BiiU.il buildoc ha mail lltr I hai *htp %  ilw rinw it rralt'i. IWtr .IM •. — tirlnrllr 4 hii I ( "u.wii. .*•:i.-ii.a b) Mr. j n.iu :infl IIIIUMI II. ll*rer it 1lilr. Mil.iu:..t. In, i| p.ir.itl. Saaav. ('harkl-x. Brit ahoan %  km \,\ ....nth. .,i,l raU la lb of ii..i^. I1.-.I, da> IHII It., urn heea •urn .n. ..„,,,) %  laaMtML %  -innaiarallt is> petra4*4 hn Ui Ihv •' %  *• ^iCAOTolioid ARGENTINA FACES Conference MEATLESS DAYS Purchase 1 of British Owned United Railway* HAVANA Tin Cuban Sunar Lamtlown. i AsaoelaUon, ut a mceimu I < Havana, has aaleed to aaUbl.*'. .. company with a view purchasiiiii the UIIIISD-UWIK< I'mted Kaiiwaja of Havana. 1 h,i set yp %  technical commitU m a first atep Ut iludy the Mmli.n> of the railway and t' i I....-ni'.r. In Touch With Barbados a m miiAV. aNh FfN.rfr, i CoasUl Station 1 %  uiiotmi. Ihaii a.iid.x ui. iirt Vb,ta-p' •too. i nrtivM OMIMII a:* eat.. ITMIIQ II |i Mt ) Qt Ut oanafai Pas* mac* M n.sd-r r.r"l M.,.1 .ml P.. .1 i( l .| J w m OraaMry uu -. I M m. • isia MONTREAL, feb 18. A special confticnce for completion of a convention on damage „ iho CIU,M '*y 'oreign aircraft to third material PWt*^ %  "•• surface and l.n Slant uill go chiefly to the new jll ixdischanted directly into opening of this convanUon for lluminium smeller being built by the ship's hold In bulk instead of Slgnalure by the government of Star #ubsidiary. the Aluminium hring loaded in bngs. This techthe world, will be held by the Inompnny of Canada. Ltd in nique will -peed up the operatcrnauouaj Civil Aviation OrganBritish Columbia.*' .-aid Mr tion to the tut* of BOO tons per Wation in Rome beginning ath >Sv1s. The new west-coast hour with considerable saving in September 1952 The Third Part mr-l'i'i with an initial capacity handling, shipping, lime and bags. Damage Convention If 83.000 tonof aluminium, will When mining operauons ure to replace the Rome Convention bsvaiiai'thti" ainii ircote a considerable increase In begun, open-pit methods using of 1933 and is being held m Rome ***** >.ftih'. *-...*.-**%  ...**. % >**pasl BSSSBai ....a.... .' *.. ......* aaaalll t L as BUENOS AIKKS. Feb. ltt. President Peinn, Speaking in n nationwide HrondcnM ouiimed an austerity programme for An.-u.im.. in which he aflDOUIKM I hat the country would haw two RMftUatl dav. per wi rk and urged a rapid incrtMisf In farm and mimnu production to boo-t Foreign Exchanre ^unmi's and copt 1 with inflation problems. %  %  llelj. ( T-H-IT. i %  ti.lunJiir %  • • l-lr. .,.!,f\.lhrti..l.i . K | %  l*nUr>. • %  iimt.m. %  %  I Alphs, • • %  %  alanlU %  %  H %  ..„(. l:. la mii-i nr t:\aiA.\ce ITBRL-Un u IBM 'NIDA %  Rnakrri Tl la-, pi. !>. ,1 IN .IU 71 •<-. ft) ••*>> 11 | Cwpsine a,. ir-.|K. ', pr • pi btj He said the Argentine people so —r had not to make any sacrid^Bnad rtces by, tn t they would have la Because the situation and "organzed persecution from abread" SWA K UW.S requirements of raw mechanical excavators natcrinR employed. The bauxite "This has resulted la an carried to the plant by rXpansion and acceleration of powered haulaga units. B r construction programme in than being shipped out mates S.VIUKOf rl>out 30 per island In this form the Mlt. in shippinii costs will v-ill be convertad into y realiwti by extractinc the at the plant near Mandevllle by ^ ,s uu mlttcd to the special con* tv i"ogramme ilumlna froen the bauxite at its • spacial methral known as the frrcnrf rrt;) tls ,,,,. ,, , ) .. :| i)( b y an Increase "of lource rathei than shipping the "Bayer process. „„_ solute liability of the aircraft cent." in product mi E H -It In nn %  tanana plant rth America." First production of the Jamaiic.i ilumlna ii expected to begin in %  ho third quarter of 1952, whil. he irestly enlarged plant on fc-hieh constnicUon is well under tr-ay is due to go Into operation In ate 1931. At the British ColumMa smelter which will br raSKb lor initial operation early In 1934. I.C.P. tins Conductors Fined Ituiu, I > I < M i %  -. 111 11 iiin Vtislraliun Sugar Prog*peDti UKISHANI: Total .Min.'i OUtgnU in Aii'tr.iii. for tiii1051 season is now pu' t w. il iiMi. %  tii sii)ii ul n.ilui .1 tie aMui In.n. I.UII %  sever-drought. The IMQ geO| i.ever iv aflected fag the wf j %  SaW-n which made harvestln gffl tie alumina will be discharged them guilty of overloading the! .corn deep-sea vessels direct to buMa with passengers. Itorage 800 yards from the whnrf. The Ural was Preston Watts ot The company was the HrM to Sugar Hill St. Joseph who was icquire bauxite properties in or^red by'HI. Worship Mr O. B famalca gnd plooas r ad In geologlGrimtn tl> ^y 0 nnc of 40 /in 21 %  1 exploration for _the ore ^ or .„ defauU'one month.-, %  MI; : .sonment with hard laboui the bus on J, H.irmonv Hall Road. The company purchased 30.000 Seres of land containing some ST h^rsince^^ucuSrlS Mich., „. gttensive agricultural and roofbus M-1300 Poster is to pay h Krattatlon scheme to raise the One In 14 days, or in default gcoductivity of the remaining days' imprisonment. t nd. A stock of cattle suited lo Both cases were brought by e Jamaican conditions is being Cpl. Cyru fc who is attached to the tor tiiOdrst^ tune i and modern farming Traffic Branch at Central Stnt for UM Jiroughout the island. Tests were %  iTied out oriKin;illv in 1942 and Ran continued through the SOSUJ" '^'•"'' %  """K hg years. loth in the field •nnd • bou .' "* u ';!" nCanadian bba K A afnLaod Bnad Clyde Foster of Collymom Rock. will be UP " ", e r I .T l i ,UOn f "" OOV c ""' ^ ^mV'hanlahlpa. He said dieselpr mpm * Italy. Argentina's financial difncultios Rather The Legal Commutee <1 1CAO Wnn in 1949 due to inconvertiof the has been working upon a revision billty of the British p^und and bauxite of the Rome Convention for seve daKftadaatkaV" under the Marlumina | years. The draft convention to """U Wan. He said if the suiteraccompaniad only 2" per Argentina opeiatoi for damage caused to would solve the Foreign Exchange third parties on ilu surfac*, the problem and partially tolve hei gyfaaB found in the Rome ConInflation problem* vention of 1933 It includes a Kliminaie Waal* h,„„,„. u „ o, mm on Ihr par, B,. !" *^ """.hat ,„ r.S*. ,y^!ZJ!S^, L "RP. ?. Argsnluia's caw ..., aid ml dull !" !!. rr.ulled In th* |Krei' ashl uf Ui,. ..Hcrafi cauain, iho m „ h ... „ 24 ~^K' h | | K r PO d ma rau m Uereuaumw 1 •unuiiaoiif U-. 1. !< %  AcroMIn, lo III.. UBHal r. dOdDI uiuu'tcsMry rxprnsm; P"" r ,f, <" An-li 1I11.11 Bureau o( 3. renouncing; everything suMrSuanr Esprrun.-iM SiaUoes, |US| lluous: ana 4 ixi^luuiiina evsryP 1 1 %  mill noi .besiuieiv Dseassar,. "P J" '""' %  'i. Ie crualiina He announccO o lull sel ol Jf"a"!> '•' iruslralluAiacnuuc (iumiin n '" T"wrfs .incl inllln. allk.' manl will t.k.whlcli ka uiaa.l """ """" "V 1 !""' Ii 1 '"",""' Ihr people lo lollow: <"' '' r u wnlrl "•' eperte.l (lovcmrnenl will procvj ^'J'", "r'" 1 ,"•'"•?• l-rm mechanisation. .a n, ma.lc hi.rv.-,th 1K ... ,l,mi i. ....II M. ,. TT71.. ... cull lhal il had In .ipos poned ue sal >o lush as to cause ihc %  '" m advaiuc mJD> „ wns , .„ roat of Ullrd patlv uuuirance lo mam tmeii ualna inU. eomKlerabecomc an excessive burden on .' on production, coats and risks Auffusl lh..( ensstttag pi Uiternalionai civil aviation, yel > li i "approptlate pront". without unilii.. hindiiinre Heavy should be high enough lo cover *• Foster production of good rains again net In early in NoveracompensaUon to Ihird parties In Quality cattle In the shorten! posner and lh.ssssssn drugged on 14 sll but extremely rure catastroaible time. until February, dunlin which phlc accidents. *• Reorganize packing houses lime the most deplornbl. hi.iThe draft convention provides, from a technical apd nnamlul vesting conditions in hvnm main. viS* a"i3 nn^by't"u.sinci % !" 9 !" hkh " •£" %  '" %  A police flagsrtrVtas elm Icaud obll ' > "•'' u "' 1 T !" !.'."" ciimstancei. is ten million Poincare gold francs equiv^l.stt flMSUO U.S. dollars. ThM limitntlon will be considered further at the Rome meeting. A Sufifeklion Th Council of 1CAO has sug0-142 nestc! thnt the limits should not •" %  '••"" mechanUatii -y *eth(Ki; %  (BjU. i. Work On New Port To Bcyin af Once The site selected tor the comnny'new port in Jamaica is Id II.nbou.Bay. on the south last, 22 miles west of Kingston, he flOO-foot nil-steel pier Will be feet wide and hnve %  jj ., ; Police Magistrate yf DisIf. parly tnct "A" yesterday lined Conrad draft convention also provid £4 Fine For Speeding ory prevailed. Thi. had l m ."kci effect on Hip gflfai %  %  % %  %  i .i IkS cue. which nt no time attained Its normal peak of maturity. As %  | %  into proVl'U I n "f .ugar HI) i multilatend viewpoint. bails, for the compulsory recogniHe also said no cattle would M lion of foreign judgments. Acstaughtered at ail for one day of cording lo its term-., law suit? may •' %  -h week „nd meat slaughtered u.brought only in the courtK ot on the second meatless day will the country where the damage be destined exclusively for wxpoit. occurred, but n Judgment renderOffered Loan ed In the court' of one nation He repeated the e.nlicr State%  iiiii'i iiiiiiH damage caused bv meni tliat the Argentine Governforeign aircraft, will bo capable ol ""enl had been offered a loan by )rm\ii. Since then. H though the Worship Mr. (,. H. Gnllith, execution In any other state which "foreign moneylenders" but said ^rop had not alrcn<< to the Convention. The that the Oovernment preferIt) SSfOtUrl, persistent drought ha that solve Its problems by its own udded to the disaster. i'h. i the 19S1 i Tccted by the wel i indiUons unri latar bj feet of water lredg n !L fi W £ 1 "*?" lmm ,^sr! a i 01 Springer .if lUllepl ine, St. Anstates may require that the operameans. The Bureau s figures show that r n 7.000-fooi channel *OII t.vt dreW| £4 an( j i,_ post. | n 2 g day*, tor of a foreign aircraft cover hl He said that foreign loans are |h vlel.l. whle|, totnlled XIU.Mt ride, witna turning, l i,, J n !" D r two months' imprisonment with potentlsl liability by insur->nce or loo' a **"" neeessary lo Increase u M7.M: tons m 1949 Kl %  SnlunfT „*,.. r-iUimriUa. of while driving the motor lorry Invitations to attend the special Argentines exportable surplu" B7t.M4 tons In 1950. If eat Una lea %  la^rrrniTBtte^n^lSriHr A""5conference are being gapt to the ; ,„d thereby boo-t roreign Ev..re now fulfilled, putting the 1931 111 be connected to the The Police said that the motor 57 member nations of the Interchange earnings In another ancrop at welt under 700,ri00 tons. imalca Government Railway bv lorry ma driven at over 28 miles national Civil Aviation Organuanouneement he said' "GovernHils trend will have continued spur line and will have extenper hour while the peed limit tion and lo the Government of m ent will pay producers sulMtaSrid it may ho some year* before ve freight sidings. on that road i-. 30 miles per hour. Rumania, the only non-contracting tially better prices for IM2-53 Australia can regain its position The plant where Jamaica bouxThe offence was committed on state of ICAO which has ratified crops." among world sugar producers |e will I January 4, 1952. I>e H83 Rome Convention. —C.P. —B.u.P. PAINS IN THE BACK Here's a way to relief! Do you know that one of lh' common causes of backachhe* in thr kidne-srWfx-n they ate healthy they 6Urharmful impurities out of H' BfBBBBl Uvu nataral lnnctHHi. When they grow •Juk.Ki-h. th impunbes accumulate and lhTmiitiig congestion is often the cause ot LMckacbe. De Witts Pills are specially frrpared to help wake up %  Ingjiah kidners. They hare a cleansing and aBtiaepoc action oa taiese riial organs, soothln,' and rcstonng dsin to their riat lira] aeOeitf Relief tror-i backache(ot.ow*a>a n-.. .*! ce It is far | ttrr to ladkls KM backache than to R which IB boand to affect yotir happLiiasa. Foi over half s cai an D) w.tfs Pills have been oriining relief to siisferar* Irom batkaihr end received countWs lml right'! Look for k ia leading storein Harhados. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S QUALIT Y YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S PRICE!! DisdvinoiDh m:i nn. i CB A i on 4H .ft Rust Proof Cabinet Hermetically Sealed Unit ft-yesr gujisntee Delux rtniah — will not I Automatic floodlight and I Extra room for tall bottler crack, chip or diseolour | Crisper I on both sides. •aw $395.00 von aw uispi.tr .ir THE CORNER STORE



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT CLASSIFIED ADS BARBADOS ADVOCATE IMBtlf NtnOR TtUPhONt 2 SOB. HP M M and • c eattltlotial word Terna riM ai ttn ig • SO and (*.! IN MLMORI.W Gertrude OpMMU Kiuabetn Weicoi -I" (ell -deep tlM rwkev- lM S-fe fro*) lontaa a fclaa, -jf* from aM't petluien. MM MM wpjpm are coll dead. .Mfrr,.ihal. Jtmi. In. I ...4... Pre*. O.y •Valeott MM** ll.'ite. IMIISOWI FOK HU AUTOMOTIVE. %  Mil Ve.ok IMI MoOeL |n I •re ni Mia CAS 1P4T Pprd Super Drl.u.r V-l lil>.A.. %  .nn tnt King Ml or Mat is i as—i r n NOTICE PAJ*ocfOAi. MtOK-Ai orrufc. t*. •he MM .rf IMI M-had. .HI be „reived r wwnn inataUp—% %  Three t m MM m doBari • A Coal .of. laving Bonur at nn- rain i also p*-b!e Tn* awM-eaolm mlictri wIM net ... pe.ri.rllrd to act in. or hold ar.nl ha* ffapri/Warf /row fac Lktnung Wld. Dac.mi,, ,/,. ,95/. CAR V....h.n Vekra II h p pglna %  M M M^del MNaaf. undir SS.PPI (ouftpay Oarage Dial Mil 11 1 %  *-*>. Tr.r publHglving .relit how aM *h*d UOMIL A oRgefinor AIM II ..II. St. TM*Mi I" I U—lr. The public are hereby parned again*! u, eredat U my wifa. MWUBi B 1-A*IU-Y 1MB) Payaei a* I do no* noM IHM by a *nlUn .ider idM h, Sitf-.r-l ITftHAN a uwirv FOK RE.VI Dodge Doii i.in. rl lNrM Very eultoble i verting in tltk-W IMI Cbrytler IMC 1' .... Mile* Morn. OafprtU and %  iara a* aaewted eoiuura W alao have • ~ %  Vim at prtrea poor to January *""• your. prornptb rOMT BOVAI. OARAcr. LTD Tncphone MM IS i O— In i-.iKIT (load modal A FPrd IVki.. iradT lot work. PrhMd nghl Apply d l\.*r.m M:..i..n Mom. Beak Hall Man llood. ff MH-I.aol II J M On HOUSES P1.AT A email arlf .i Airmihad Plot breetv and cool • lUi attractive vuiyoundlng*. about 1 miw* tm Hv Available Immediately rail Mayan. •d>"ilr Uv'tlliu-| th-pl D.I MM lor full particular! II S H 4n VAN' Foureoonr Van IMP model. Dark Green lA-Jft Good condlttoa. Aral, to O. Rao/pan. Ballvplaina M. AndlO. IS 1H—4n l-XBCTJUCAL I >lll Pa rau,rad la taha .rthrr particular' la connawtipn arrth wd*la** M (hla poU ran ha obU.nMJ %  • Otdrr Buctianan Is the dory of a %  ••* %  ••• man who. from anull b0oninz* — c-rvr-loped mymaam wAh ip-mmio %  wofio-wki> organiiaUon-commarcihl rotnani.'* of hit MHIoratlon. th ttory of on* of thr> nwn wrv> mad* London drink Srolch whiafcy. ,'.' ^* Bn • bou l8W •"dxty-plx yvaxi PRO. „4 th* nlalory. 'Jioufh comparatively hritt l* thr. romarrf, of „, „ llMprt: *J< young Scotsman. Jam*s Buchanan, who. purmountiiuf all obMaclM. ,nd with h4WT dct-r minaUon. achieve-( phenofTw-nal ucrr %  Mtaharl %  Vaai.t ADKV • T>ibe Milliard irttti Orrrad omatir rrrord rhangn in Cablitat. Ml Ifl %  i k ^Jw. PhMa M3I NOTICE NOT1CX M HMfUUIV OtVEN that it ,. h intratMn el thr VaMrr M Ida f.inh of aaMI Michael M c.uaa to ba inlrod>.erd Into thr laWMlMurp of ihi, flood lh* rolWxaUvj Mllla. o.mal ^^ %  A Bill to apt... ihr opr*atrt ol theVaatrwo iCo.t o. UrUui BPa.ua to Err,pto.rr. Acl. IPtl jnd ,ny A, I ..mrndirMt |h# utn, far ln a fMfth-r parMd ol a no year to u* SMh Marth IBM > A BU lo ntand Iho oporatn.n or "ia Parochial tmploytci Pan • Ion AM, ItH and HI art irMnaHV tl-r aama lor (ho I ,ether paiUM of ona >oar to tho Mm March IPaj aod W MMol Ul utd Act ipa amtndad ta. Ihr PhrOrkial tmpanrPoa Frrialon iAm. ir A lo than CHHIPIH. iAKaa\i;roN a MBAI.V, Itw, lor Iho Vrrtrv ol St. Ptcherl t s ia—an ONE OF THE MEN WHO MAINE LONDON DRINK SCOiCH WlllskN JAMES RICH AN AN EOIM) THE 11)1 \l 111! WD AND BUILT A GREAT BUSINESS WHIM M >A1 H.BKl'AK. SBBPPPfG NOTICES ROYAL NF.1MERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. aauM i %  >* UONAIMt B fmATTUJns'rIORO Isin'MaTTrt. I':' %  CtrrrtCA. 11.1 March iMa • MTIM. TO IIYMIIIIM AND AHlTltUAM \i ^ WIXLTMitTAD. Mlh rrbruart, IMI -'HI*', t" ritMllllKi .si' Mhlll-ll OIUNA M d arrBNTOR. Mth r-bruarIPM ma, nth u-fh nu -.int.. t" lilMn.ii I-O.MI.IM, A-tR pmiri-ri I.IUN. HONAIHX. lOtli I by Till". i:i>ITOK ;^M^s. M MBB MM >*oM f Jp IIAUIO -Orw 10 TUBP I rorhini ardor roconll Apply C 9 Ooodrl4dr. \ WANTED HI U COOK UNBJAI. A lAlTfCDBY MAID Applr Mr. Litl, B*> ir % %  •llhf* ^ i <• ,,, ——l-a*V fir our Hruil DMI Broad Bteroi Apply by i.itar >rd *ti —-"?."__" w tiirrcMoeioM co It a IA Sn UMrTTt) HOUSE BOV Eaperlenrad. c.pobla Moinirul* botaotn 10 an ] %  •* Hiwiin|." Marine Oardrna SBSM--1 JUNIOfi STAfT raqu red lor iraim a Audit Clrrki tj.il. aopllrallort. u Wrtling with lull datalU ol adr and r> prnanro a.111 bo ronaldored rrlrrrnra. M to Carnc-lrr mm ba aitachad PIT/. PATRICK URAKAM A CO P O Boa Ml VIM r JUMIOK lAianiAN Appa) I and in porao-. or. floo .„,. nn 4-00 pin m K J llamrt-Bmith U.t rltidao Btfppl SS C-BAMBRR OP (OBHIPX* ho obi! %  Mro) %  Applications Kivinp ckrlalli pail aiporlonc* and coplri ol Intlrnooi. dhould br arnl by MU. Fobiuary to t Chambar ( Corrunrrre. Bavell A -An •kid. Litraa Wrvot MISCELLANEOUS BOAKDUI8--Private family %  av-ruiah can oreommodate vultora IP TrlrilcUd Rlnilo or doubla looira Wrlti a**. Rtono. BO Dundonald Rtroot. PortMSpain %  aJ-Sa-l2n IHKK ,. ., FOR SALE Ralh an Opllar*. Wmm 1<-. An. from C i %  ** TOCnim..,.., ol %  i. Ottach.*! !_..„. I,, rroj a ,,d t*1.n.ii "oom. PJCP daiiory runnlnd Iho enilra imctli ol inr houar StandMjan %  i, IJH MJJ at Na>. IMW land Ml II IHM. Warohouap .nd Plukllrui. „, {L at Marhlll Blr-rt. IlrMdeio. Standing Or. jppr< ln-lrl IJM aquaro frot of land Th huUdlnp hoa pouibltitiro far rirrrini 1.AVD AiH>raaiHnatal> IIP) Muary ton of land vita. ..no tarpo and orw aoM.ll aU4.pall U'lUfn, iharaoit. aWoatr at Norburh Btroot EoolIPM lor nukiod into a parkin* plot.or building warohouoe. NIP) MMMLOW Compri.lnd Thr^e IM"ir... Dlhirm and UVI.UJ I,. Toilrl and IV.lli s< .< %  ..^ .... TE %  B SN.HII. '.T7. lamnui • %  i %  Canape* amp; Pour Bedrtwirr.. DlBinr and I n Boom. Pantrv. Rlt. r, n and a vary ntrr Mody Pandina on T', *c.r. ol livd. P* Noae s-,.u Airport. By Mppolntmrnt onV. m \.. \i .., Mookary Now n,_ d oh aaro> m-tolv IPPM M,U. !" fort, c yn* JJOpnlBcoin . including Ool( Oanrao. thro. HedrPPam £aprfD. —I Il.u.id Room. Klichen. tewpjT T %  u HjB riarinrM. Only TiaD At our new %  in., room K R Hunto A Co Ltd. Dal DM IllbVlii MECHANICAL ONFl POUR WMIIL CAN( CABT yrilh plallorm. pnoudtMie lyroa and brakro led lliafiwao A Tl import. ne*>r I Dial Ilia Courtoav Oarage IS S IS' T. MISCELLANEOUS A.NTIQi kg or pyory doirMlap Olaaa. China. r>M JowaU, flno Kilvi W p M M Plp pi a Patrly book.. Mapa. Antoarapka ett at Oorringoa Antique Snop adjoining Royal Yacht Club Ifl I til. %  WOCU1-ARS Trumi LHal Ma n^iwrnro Ninirryaps—Pitriipj Jet-Silk Nlgbldroaao-. lovrly q,. | PPPh %  ndPPtitln m^U-hed IIU .".Ii. t>ir tho Mpiipaor TMiipaag pm ia>aa-p oil. -The w rld'r flneet motor oil Vrodol at all Iradlng Oaragca and florvko Plait—i. Vo-ir %  chlrla dearivra Ihr b**t. VEBDOL, "Pound wherever flno can travelit S B tin rVHtlHAlN Plgaon Paod BM dtor — lo-n>. lota and upward! dj II %  r lb. Phono IMT ISSS-t I I HIMRT FAT-TORY P dorrn ahirta par da 'hunr Jolnwii 4311 STRAW MATS -Fancy DroUrna l*f up. a grand opportunity for vou. Thar" Rroi thai M0J II > ut > II TORNADO -International KM. RoaoUfi.i roodltion. oaoouonl equlpmenl. good racing record. CoM aTMOO m.w PMOOP. No oflera. Hicks. Totephoae SIM. A.OllAlllj: FANCY SPORT siiurrH— tHggrat bargain ••! Ihe %  eaaon. ucod hen MM |o It It pnl] Thanl %  DM MM IP s SI In MINT A l-'OI'.Mr LOST llaagow. Roto Oal IIMI VIIOWI HARRISON COLLEGE IM Ul II SALES _at tor t, Scpuh witPbi> lirm. Uui nude Sro•.' *he warrta of tiw> Licansad Trad* In Umdori warp mm principally by Irlah whuklaa. while many llcanT iilended Scotch whlaky. As tftiyears paaaed on, *o buainepg mcreaaed. and the brand btvam. known not only over the whol.uoiintr). but across the scaa, and .-o began the world-wid* reputation of "BUck and White." "Black Swan" Distilkry aoi-TBBOl'RD l-ADY RODPTCY" %  I^OY NWUPON" fANADIAN CKin Poiaa aolle Arrlrea Sail, %  altfaa Baa tea Barbadaa hulofi. ,. U PPP*. Pbp M Peby Sfl Poby. ..nprtoy. Bt Peby a March 14 March — fla March M March Aa raeh distillery pioduced whu-i. ky at a different character and flavour Mr Bwcban.n oetermln BEAL ESTATE F_\T IT IF U CAM %  TRUTH A,**P HJ.-IIT MUST PKF.VAU. rVII. nPB TTtovs rrannj%  HO PENNY rM nri.i isetBD wrni AID IIY TCAJth Ol TAIlVINIIkn WITH AND BY HRCrllTS k* woRTiiwiuiJ roNscnarrsi THOUOM HUJO.I AM. IAoii.ni. lilKJk A PCNOtSLUM trWMtQ!, ,.N Ra7rIBimoV M RANK MAI I CM^H MAIN KB A Very Suitable Cwtopw I Bed rue no. ipaeaiblp fl>. Totirt Batj>. Ugnta. Oond Condition. Sp-a vY...C even lor Can. Cun Remain on Leoar n deairoo lor 1 rpari llh a denr-itr .. .... MPBaa WOUsr Brand new. ample J bodrr houa*. all convonle-eoa. with pai • %  rod living room, oran verandoh. km-hon and iitiiti.room Jaraao. iiundrv. aewaa.1 rorma and .forjgr room under On attractive hlUalde , paeehv* ol l^td bfawilv siluatr.i far b 'kl.ng ufia W-.-rll I.oiig B-Md. Clin.l Choi,'. 1 .. hind ha* a frontage on the Maawoil U>npIWwd ol l. for! -nd oser PPP fort along anoMjar public rood running along IU ewjlrp lenglli Vacant poaaeoylon avallaa Pot further particular" narpevtl" ... londlliona of Mk> apply lo Ml TCMISSUN A rlANPlSB-IJ IwBBPeM Jamea StrrIIIVKHTON -Rlvrr Rood. aUrtdiM. __ I.IVt aapprP f*M et PM. The hoapa conlalna drawing, dining and two bodrooona. water and electrM llgM Ii %  poctlon by ippoinlmcul 'phone 4BI_ Tho above will bo art up for >akr M putollc t-ampatiUon on Prkaoy. the n Oay of Pebruaiv IPM. at 1 p aa at t olRcc of the iindoralgned CARRINOTuN A MIA I Y, l..ieai BO rat The undenianed -ill oRer for Sol< at public romprUtion el thotr oBk. No I?. High Street. Be ddetown. on Prld.y. Ihe MU! Frbrury. IPM. at 7 p.m. OBawlawMn) a ronvenlonllp .ll.utod nine In in* lnd Avon andlng on lljta rquare td ronUiining Dr. wing and Dining ion on Ihr li floor. S liedn-n up%  Ulra. and uaual eonveniencee For hwpattlap. telephone MU No BUt. AUCTION CAR Ford Prefect Solo an IMI model damaged In accident We are instructor; lo oner thta treacle lor e*le by auction it alcCnoarnoy'i Oarage on Friday Wnri M I pm Jobn M UUtiou A Componi ^octloneere i: I ia a.i At l.-f MawW M-BOI.SR*Hir M n.r •Mai i %  BMPMBBM .r..,,.,ik>n .ill |, P „c|d at the I P a m on Halurdar, Bnd March Forma of appllcaUon CM ba ho Mcadn....tr< i>fAee. Majs _.. and mu.i b.icuirned i->gelher with .. Birth or Haptlmial Cortitl|atp a., pr before Ihr Candtdatee murt be i at .nut mdip.nl LiuinrUmn P)l BKwwaB Ihr OM M t ad II inrluilvo on Iho Jlrt of Mar. h They can be nw iid m i of Hartwon Col%  r "' *hw Brhoola MpBaipra of larrajoa COMeoje Hhould ataU lht ckaar r on inotr app l a fU pp form t %  M. UAlOHt. lUniaon tuUepr. BIB rpbruarr. leu an w BrnftHM Mlnutea of the Lapl Ann.-il Medina and aporlal Mawting of 14th July TP iho Hepor> K", PP. the Cowl To elect two Aitdllo. • To elect deli-K.t'. I Cbnlpronrc S | %  ,,. B Ueneral Bualnoao REALTORS United REAL. 8BTATE AQD.K AUTTaOetawaaw VAl.I'MS BtTTl.DfNO CONTttAtTOHn I1I/1M pkMbwrk BlrpM BridgrkDwn. UNDER THE SILVER HAMMEB HOOVRR v. ..HIM. MACBIHIH By recommendatMna of Uoyda Afn %  will aell on PRIDAY. S3nd. i lloe\< Kloctrv Waahmg Mac'ii— at K I Hunlo A Co, LU Show B..m i..*.. oppodte Hu) bna UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER D O. St'CAR wp w>H on FHIDAY Sand! Pa bag. i Dark !.., %  ,i n^oar at Pipntatlona l.ld Bay Street Sale11.30 O clock Tn n C-.h BaNKER. TBOTMAN CO tarUoarrr. 30 1 * an UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On ThorMkrr awt bv order M H" 1MB Wllklnao,, en* . ill pp|l II furniture .1 Soafcerbie llouar Brik. Craoa rl.>od. whkm bacppaoaT Very ape. flxtenalon laawag IwMp (MM lOi, PVuui BiapkBaadJi Barajrip Rotkea TTpcifM Chain. Double Bad a-ett-.BovatVIrt Book Caoe Otwanvent TpLar*. Mart. Ch-in, Record Cabmrt. all Hi M^kogari) Sr,i gran RoPkera ^nd Chato Cherry Tree Cham. Book Pwotvea. Ci. ... and ChlfM PPt'd Wat* tkBtper A Tea SerMoao. Si ir. Cprpot >-4 Pltin>k. Bectrte T.bkU.mti-'.d. illTop Tahlci CTOOJII Srpanrtor. Chura: tblchen Cabinet. CooMrobr.. TeruiM Bet. A Potm l_i. Marbera. Fo. C.-.H Oah' Trap MOM. Toed HopperOalc. Fred Boyeo. BPPOduig lamp, Empire Treadle Mochir.r. BBMtM T\po. prller. Pve Rddlo und other Item* Sole 1130 o clock Term* CASH tULANUK. TROTMAN CO ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS %  n-o. OT/Eioa, AJiTa VIpTDrTMOa. aEDAB. 'OTBaUAfl T ARTI8TI0AB oDiorr)ADca, TRAIDOB t"B LA INniA CHINA •VTIFTO THANI'S -*P. H'BB. .wry. IW-. Dial 34M Haatinfs will be ckksod to member* on Wednesday, February 20tb fur minor alterations. The Club will be open us usual on Thursday February 21at. 4r. Buchanan p o aaaaaed an in—e seTtfe of showmanship, an leferrlng to it nit "that Blaer and White whisky' they actually created the name which became i trade mark now known alt over the world The outstanding personality business ability and unceasing vigour of Mr llurhaiutn, logethrr with (he exeellei.i quality of hkt product, steadily uore fruit In lnrTeailnK volume of trade, and when a contract waa obtained lo supply tho Houae of Commons agalnsl keen cunipeUtion in tha veur 1 US. ho wa well on the road to success. World-Wide RapulaUon In securing that valuable contract, Liibii-keii to this day, Mr Buchanan was satisfied that bt had laid an impoitant cornerMone In the history and future progress of his buaineia. and stick it undoubtedly proved lo be A letter from the caterers at tha House of Commons stated that "Buchanan-, brand of Seotcb whisky is much liked by the Members and others who use It. It la with pleasure that wo express our high opinion of it* qualify Within two years ''Black and Canadian National Steamships ^PamfcwaftJog complete success. n-IIr TOW "' "' -* %  iislieaa, so l-rmly estsbllsheii in £ pous. necesjntated the opening of branches in the | Hii-tul aj>fj then \m HnmiiiHh ,., the present time there an branch** In Glasgow. Bristol. I-iverpool and Sydney, and agencies in every country In the world **> rapid was the cxpantion of the business that ll wag not long before tha Arm possessed IU own bottle and case-making factom cooperages and several dj KiOBTBBOt-MB CAW CRU1SKBiADY BODMBY LADY BSaarON" i AN, Bt. l.ba %  %  tlf.rn Atflrea talla Borbodoa Barbodoa Bo*U> a> Fpby SI Fetjy — M FPby. i March S March I March SS March II March M March ..M March 34 March I April 4 April T April .. 4 April T April — it AprU 11 April '.' %  :. %  jJarigBBB] |Bj| ials. James Bucl Always a lo lover of animal!i. James Buchanan made extensive uae of pictures or various breeds of docs in big advtrtuaments for his whiskv. Out of this evolved the combination of .. black Scottish terrier and i white West Highland terrier a t %  trademark for "Black and While." engaging figure* Bffja be seen all over the world A Li.." Kportaman him w/m-Sef th2 k LT rh to he y Bu ** n "ucceta brought h„nhim achieve that end. -urs to James Buchanan, kitfanted in 1920 and created Baron Iwrj ^ears later, taking the tlOe of Baron Wnolavlngtnn of Uvlngton, while the Cl.CVO was bwtmv.-d nn him In 1931 GARDINER AUSTIN A CO., LTD.-A f enU. In 1805 he started his own exl-ort department, after extenslvI'Airs abroad, not only In EuropenT lountTlet, but tn Canada, United States South America. Australia New Zealand, and South Africa. In its infancy the business wa< niuiuctcd from small premises at fl n.isinghnll Street E.C. That was in 1844. but in the following year Mr. Buchanan was seeking. an>l 5iieceeded in llnding, larger ami more .suitable nfflees with storage a.coinmodation, at 20 Buckler^bury. in Ihe shade of the Mansion House. Within flvti yearp the businaaa had grown to such an extent that more spacious officeand *torcs ban lo be found The year 1198 waa. an iraporli">i a>Ba 1B the hia4ery of Uu> firm for the "BUck S ... DKiiiir i. in llocktim waa putxwukpe-i aaid beumr aa K hi BOW. the hetuloaari era air James BuchaTMn AIM I Co LtC Aa If to mark the occasion <•< Ihe opening ol the new heacli.u.u-t— %  H M Queen Victoria bestowed the Reyypi Warrant of Ap pointment on Buchanan's, and the f'rince of Wales, afterwards Kim Edward VII. followed ih, exampig of hit Royal mothci. Complrtc Success Thus was the seal set upon (he Lord Woolavington Is still i*. membered by the public aa a great '-portsman. noted for his love of i liorseH. and with '-Cnptain Cuttle" and "Coronnrh two of his own i breeding, he twice won the Derby. II.n.i.l.. particularly and the reat of the B.WJ. also beReOprd by Lord Wimlavtngton's interest In horse racing; md breeding, for thr great stallion U.T.C. waa B glfl rrant him to the Barbados Turl Hub. I..t. i u,i. ptaUlon b.-. .in. ihampiou -are of the B.W.I. for %  BMMMJ keauwiLs aad when he died In I8S1 lu> progenv had won murr staketi than that of any other srre hi the history of W.I. racing. Ihe M.und. hich prinelples V. sei hunaelf in hu-m.-were tamlrated In tli..-,who worked itb and for him. and hip examplea AIM* precept* refti lined a kure loandaUan on which the bpjaanf-s ll p-roceetlp ami pro. C'S'TRArsSmTLAKTIQUE SalllnKs from SouthampUMt tu Guadehni|H>. Martinique. Barbados. Trinidad. LaOualra. Curacao. Cartagena and Jamaica Fran Arrives rUrbadu-. ZOth Feb.. LMI 2nd April, -.' % %  : 8th May. 1952 HoaihaiapU.il "COLUMBIE" 7th Feb., 1952 1'Ol.OMBIE" 20th March. 1952 *' OF. ORAS8E". 24th April, 19a2 "Not calling at Guadeloupe. SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE Fiwra BarbadPs "COLOMBIE" 2nd March, 1952 "COLOMBIB" 13th April, 1952 •"OE GBASSE".... 19th May. 1932 .... 'Sailing Direct to Southampton. H. M. IOM S A CO.. I I I I ffggpflg Arrives Hdmtharaplan lttb March. 1952 25th April. 1952 29th May. 1952 In Ins lifetime James Buchanan not only founded the whisky businesa. but made it into one of the Kreat distilling efimpanic* of the world NOTICE Ba t. 11. u of A1AAN PITKMIBBCBT tlABJIl Seeaaaag MOTici) is IUJUQIY r.rvarv m.< ail I*T— ... having any debt, or iLdm upoa err—ling tho a.i.l. of Allan Pin%  raoClarke late of Kiftoni in i—rtah or aplnl Philip who died in iland on the Mil. day of April IPM are nercJiy required lo aend m part" I their BPMPM Ally altr-iad fa) Bte MrMgned. in can* of D Low %  Brjliat, SolMHor. II Jamco ,.,n prareed iittrabula the aeactl of the rotate amonf he paniea pnttUed ln-r*to havlpg regard .. the debt, ...I clalnie ,a.v o( .klrh I hall then have bad notice, and Uiol %  hall not be liable IPT ...eta %  di. %  rlbuled to any peraon ol nhuae debt rr clatirt I ihall not have had r-iUre at .w time of awn •latelbulloii Aial all penona indebted to tho >al eatalo at* requertod to ia.ttl thclt K m a. kiioebaal o—-board by tha. mil ol ho -.'hoearc "Philip it DnlAwtn leorgotowh Harbour. Brliim Guiana. anl*' Are You Slow On Get-A way? Office 4493 Work.hop 4203 Part. Dept. 4613 Night 4125 If year rar la arteleralln a "keapIpatead ef a Sr* anglar. year hroMlen aaoy b> at fapM lei a. ,l*a. .p.., and replace iparb plPgt (Iran aad kfMjjgl hrepferr PPPawJ, •• •aeaan. apwlft aartaBM Inaa eee the dlBerear*Charles McEnearney & Co.. ltd. Ttrestone Jhe Jifm wiik Built-in (Dependability



PAGE 1

Mor roit IHsWADOS AKVQCAtt WEDSfyPW FEBSIART X. IH2 BAFBXDOS -*•—t— -i Hrdneada.v. February 2. 152 The King: A Slory Thai NOW-WHAT ABOUT Has Xeer Been Told THE WINDSORS? Ill IK MIIPJII M BY ft-commending thai bulk shipment oi fancy molasses be permuted U> the United States, the committee appointed to enquire into all aspects of the fancy molasses industry in Barbados hope that valuable data and exper.i-i.ct can be •rained for the industry. A: the sai.ie tune they are careful to emphasise 'hat this additional business would not affect the amount of labour which is at present employed in the industry The Committee despite lls statement that the shipment of fancy molasses in bulk to the Canadian market was not necessary in "order to maintain our present exports" are of the opinion that it may become essential to ship molasses in bulk. They therefore consider that the fancy molasses industry should plan well in advance so that shipment in bulk can be adopted with the minimum difficulty. When fancy molasses is shipped in bulk some part of the savings should be paid into a special fund This Fund could be used among other purposes to provide alternative em plo y men*, for labour displaced by bilk shipment and would be operated by the Fancy Molasses Control and Marketing Board These recommendations are remarkable in view of the fact that the necessity or otherwise of shipping fancy molasses in tansr steamers rather than in packages was one of the major causes of the committees enquiry. It will be remeanbered that arrangements had been made by local exporters in midsu mm er 1950 to ship fancy molasses or "syrup", as it is known locally, to Canada in bulk. Arrangements were ccanpieted and a tank steamer actually arrived in port but the Government refused to grant permission for shipment in bulk, and appointed a committee on 12th June, i50 Mai.y reasons were given at the time for the government's action but chief of them seems to have been the fear that unemployment would result because of bulk shipment That note of fear runs through the whole report and is especially written into the recommendation that bulk shipment be permitted to the United States. It is unfortunate that no estimates are Riven in the report of the number of employees would lose employment because of a change over to bulk shipment but figures supplied by* the Hon. R A. Cuke and published as Appendix VII show that differenn In rt.>..-, between .shipment in bulk and shipment in packages is $23.83 per 100 cations of which Labour represents only $5 39 as compared with other costs of $18.44. These figures. viewed unemotionally, are overwhelmingly convincing that bulk shipment would be more economical and that savings on other costs could be used to create other employment for those, whose occupations must change sooner or later. The Committee explicitly states that bulk shipmiiit wits nut in their opinion neces,,,1-v. at the time of writing their report, in ocder to maintain present exports. But they were so impressed by the possibility of competition in the future that they concede that bulk shipment of fancy molasses may become essential, consider that the industry should plan well in advance, and even I'-omrmnii bulk export to the United SUtes as a method nf gaining valuable data ..nd experience. .... There will be some who will regret that the government did not permit bulk shipment in 1950, since there would be in existence certain data and experience which would help the industry to plan ahead, but government controls are bound to squeeze the corns of private sntarprfse at some time and there was not sufficient unanimitv among exporters at that time to encourage government's permission of a bulk shipment trial Those who engineered this pioneer attemph at the time mav derive some slight satisfaction from the" recommendations which the Committee have made. Perhaps the greatest weaknes.report is its failure to emphasise how uncertain is the future of the export marketPara. 50 disconcertingly says "some dealers maintained that the consumption of nsolasses was becoming leas and less: others that the demand for the pi was limited but stable: others again thought that the industry was thriving and consumption increasing" It must have been very difficult for the Committee to form anv opinions against this confusing background of lack of knowledge Ye* it is ciear.v important that local exporters should not imagine that the fancy momsses market is so assured that it will centime for ever whether or not bulk s hi pment is introduced It has even been said that in the last resort neither private enterprise: nor the Committee ncj the Government : nor the party with a majority in the House of Assembly will be able to introduce bulk shipment. Everything is said to depend on the will of those who will be displaced if bulk shipment becomes necessary But this is unlikely Because whereas bulk shipment will, from savings, create nrw opportunities for those who must necessarily cease to be employed, the failure diminution of the fancy molasses rxport market will cause unemployment without providing such a fund. And the real crisis in molasses is the of a product which is no longer as popular in Canada as it was This dire nnefl peeping through i line I this well-penned report, although there is no actual mention of a crisis. By JACK V. FOX LONDON, Feb. 19. A new Elizabethan era is beginning for will be different from the era that began for i lls cssaM never, for esample. fo^ w hen Windsor abdicated 19 vears ago. • u->ofthe *. JOHN CORDON hard work of the years bad been M rtorv of .njwtf .J<* for my two :*-i.evement. t;.rV kh<• rmYet uiU much mote had to be The Kasi saa tassshsas. Don. be done. The Accession ceremonies making a complete recovery but nil* M •** Thai m Wembley **>& *he Coranat.an brougj.? most he u not likely to live laoaat year There ant a cabin free in difficult praUrma with them. than about IS month!any ship, and not likely to of *>U as the King now spoke. ui Britons. But for the Duke of Windsor and "The end will probably come Logue put down the telephone, words had sUil to be carefully s,tj American wife there is little sign that it suddenly The operation was *:* W.thm half an hour it rang again, felacu*. "> make %  < easier for _.,. ^ jU> ( # # k t kni kMapi f months too late It w the snipeiing man. Very DM She Klx hMMu-lf ks** thai* excited. 'JtSSSiSSSSSSiSS ""r"l ca^tSarhT nave 5^5-a^Si Britain ha, new Queen, a young lady who •"" aod h< letter % iue been cancelled. Vou can Km „..". l"^.'*K' r ." "!* H in childhood ii verv (ond of Uncle David •.en. The.h.pa.il.mtma.H """" %JiL "~ .11 you m half an hour „ %  radiuon g ne has as Prime Minister the Winston "ZgSffZm. never„K! -^ ce^^e^'K'Churchill who stood w„h Edward the Eighth inin.pc.in. man IT ?li u< T" **", alteration of thai m those dramatic days before the abdication A 1 mil lli ri. ajrue-IUnsi task, breaking down Times have changed, the slate If a new They landed In London on March qiiennl^what^n^a!? often have jne an there are lnose who wonder if the ad tt.ooo in the world, seatned to be :ne uiieonquerable L>uke oi Windsor and the former Mrs. Walhs it. in the most Sometimes it was almost ,_, ~ Aaraeld bunpson may not now be reconciled with the Royal family and come to live more permanently in England. The answer almost certainly is "no," i here is no reason why the I>uke and Uuchasa. should not return to England to stay, .iere as long as they wish. But there is a uelicate situation created by the unbending protocol ol the Court and in the word Royal". Windsor is a Royal Duke. His •vile is a Duchess but she is not a Royal '"ipii'wit a rreotety he wa m<> lat and haw thrilled he was by H lie talked and wrote w ilk thr tmy aaal hstiUM) of rer. haj** and rwlidrni man The handwrttias oi the U-IUT. h. wrote in the laal weeks was bald And hnw with M kndteaU*n of fuiaae ar fear. -Id l Use shadow that lay over him Just one thins veaed him: the And four to keep c .. .,£ h ^Jf*^ . ••P Wuuv rt'r m the world untU despairingly .^possible. Ther t But .t did not disturb him much %  • %  c-uid make good. was she Accession DecUsraUot, He knew that it was caused by the He knew nobody in the whole of which had to he satd audibly b% paralysis of on* of the vocal cords Britain. And he carried only one ,h Soveesisjn. i>eraisted unce the operaintroducuon It was to me. We "' do aolenmli/ and stnj tion He was confldant to certainty have remained un terms of close ""e'V w "•* pretener of God 'that time and effort would pu* from the dav he dallv 1 Hghtagam. i He died a happy man. Of that 1 He settled his family .n U-dainsa 'am sure Certainlj he destr .und the I that crownins; mercy For althouT) I" -• r n K help ,n dealhe found deep happiness in manir.i ^esch pi fs all y in bu family l.fe defectSoon he had a lit) he also tasted much sorrow and to do. .m his a-'i-loo-short years Barf he knew that the -irugaje Heaitaiti Step-. t.ttom to How Tate ihapea the lives of '"^ *P *<> likely to be a stawona profess, tesnfv and deciore ihal / a*n a foUhful Protestor.:; and that 1 uH.1. according to ajht Irae inienl of the enactn^wla vhich scmre the P>oleitait .Snocetrion ro the Throne of m\, Realm, uphold and maintain the said enactments to the best of *ny power? arrordlfta 10 'ate." How many people with normal ."peejch %  - n— %  M oi toj^fvKs.a^JTi't: >pef,ct, couUI rep *" ,njl wiw%  Juchess and she is not "Her Roya. Highmen and the dsstlniss of eountno '" ^ ey he had be. ..,,t fnhenns in %  moment of hith % %  M. L at always %  fascmatini i ewlouSn? "torn* !" <* fun. fiels _. ^ ranJu aboul three^uarters of the The paeea of histoo will tell confidence of a man The kinff and Lorue wTsstleo 1 way down the list of Duchesses. n ,! hivu-eif he dewith it for what must have tstm-' Should the Windsors return to London I Oorce. though not br..hisuelf -he dewith it for what must have to be RUnt. and never dreamini. <" ir *'' •%  • the top at ed an eternity of time And 1 that he srould ever be Kins, sudonc *>* rented a eorurjlting never seemed to come right. denly had KmciiUp thrust upon ; =eet ind • housv But whan the moment came to *"nd enter into formal court life the Duke ban. "> Bohon-saidens. South Kensina. make it wtth full solemnity thr n( Wallls would be verv rlearlv and HohnWhat they will not teUUnVr %  • -he did not haTo King, slowly snd deliberately 7, "' .l"'" ,, Ver > ^"J and ^ cmatrng story of how but for • ,|n '" t>-tient raid it without a mistake. 'tely separated. At a State banquet the "TA^S "ErHttLrS. - M. JSL "uSe. ""LA 'SS 5*" would ' lhe h d ' ^e Uble The %  .. .. muni ne%-er nivebeen Hc "*" ""' • lellow. dlatance away. t.)in with his Ouchess would, by rank, be seated Jar irom Wlfelc lor hon u. cept the t. ,"H^^* "' A""aiui .re eyja a. ctoarly Ma man ever ,„ m A[ ^ >ce recepuon ^ ( orm er King !" iS^SS&TZS; nSW "^W^'TUT* —'d be m the littte"knot of member. „ %  eSssSrd srA?a is cSsizr&^&g z *• ^ * %  The Duch * ^ : nwve moat trying ordeal that could be ^enty-flve yards away among hundreds oi An Australian who had met put upon m,.n who had carried josser ranking ladies and lords, 1-ogue met soon afterward' %  uch a ulaabllity as the King had | royal equerry who wa look'-r rrlc< *' "HER ROYAL HIGHNESS year* ago. it might never have been possible for him to ties Sa* | r*:r beckoned him. And thai in turn might well have meant tb: the new Queen we lov~ so much would never have been Queer. The never-before-told story be•rX'r-'-" "",-' %  •' %  • %  •' %  % % % %  V -• % %  l l .air.i i a* e MtaUw rSz^rxzS'iJti; „;, irtti&Ttt •'-!" !" ^?sx !" h ,s ^ 0,t nl,ke y ,h e !" e would .rl he had land ainee childhood. SnlMrl eauerrj „cr listened !o any man permit his wife to return on that basis even Z.VJ2SU? "•" ^ .'• %  %  -*-!he K^m'ult^n^^r aTS^S '' *£ ,0Uld ^l0 iL There ^ — And they were hesitant steps. "P*"* here hn.. to deep emotion by the ceremony remedy to such a situation so embarrassing Far more hesitant and difficult JSsiS ht?h-LS2 ?** lbw J*"*^,*" "? rovi b ? x c e 'or the Windsors. That is for the 25-yearthan me*i people realise. atment has been used. And not above him—close enough to ex. _, , ^ n *' Tor the Duke had carried since ol,c "* %  be n ih< ~ lr M iuceassful change n occasional encouraging oia rJizabeth to bestow upon the Duchess e's a young Australian nm ' an '*7^V ^fWhrto '* the tiUe and rank of "Her Royal Highness.' in* over. H~ - 0 . na v I '? ter •" October 19, And then, with little rest bet^th The American woman would r.nV anyone is presented to royalty IM6 ific D"*' *"" to Harleyiween. the King once more had to %  "*' "* ^""W*n woman would rank royalty must open the converseR,npet He w the first paUent '• c ' a inicroehone in a quiet room' next only to the DucheSS of Gloucester, tion. The young Duke of York too ver IO eo **r thnt room. a nd speak to the world. bs^Me^h'm todo rr M,n 1 £** U,kCd f r n hOUF nd holi before^the^brSScair IK Churchill has always been sympathetic to When a cadet in his first term aI ,t j^sttf, the Queen, and Logue sat Windsoi but this is one case in which "Mr Dartmouth a tutor, not realising Bul al ,h e end of the hour ai.d a to *th*r listening to the radio Britain" has little if any .nituence the senoiisness of hU defect. Mid***' |^*ue said. I can cure you. £, denly put the question to him ; class: "What u the half of half"" but it will need effort by you. Without thai effort i't be done.' gran pire. •""•"i 1 of ordeal A-eeping round the. siting for the moment The powers of the Sovereign are severely .ho h rM,S& cr> rM,r eted ^ constitutional monarchy utwance^h^."^:^ *"£* ,nto ZVZZ'" 5t' He c,m Men !" ilucB *e *£. rSr'Sd but thc power, they do have. a.t jealouslv -s'S7rore',n'h h ;,^,~* ^ SZ1L7Z:^.SK 5E £ 'SS&i'X SL'SZXZ ""** and -' -' •" '* me sarcastic commenu ot his v 'rd symptom e' leii of th bora around him. left j he left you could ace that there' "I am against It." Logue replied Britain and he still is well liked bv ma permanent mark upon him a. hope once more In his heart.' %  'Because once it U recorded in 0 ( them I ... !.••.. Seven months later the Duke advance, no one will ever believe tremendous ElTom „,„„, mMo ,„„, you delivered 11. < Lnii j^Si !" S mon: *"' '""' rieaiuuon. the speech dul "cording is n. used" and dimdent His nervousneu inopened Australia !" T"' ""' m "L* J rt u h M 1y mCT "' Canberra %  J by solllar ) Whai hoM the speech thai new Parh.-.youlh was marked &£ *R a?a-s.!*s^ SH ""KTu,. !" ::\or.".* if the But there is no question but that his popTeu^^'m be noi^ordUig."" ularit y hw topped and that the unwaver No Hitch -ng group which always maintained ht K ver? "Z^&fTZte**-*? !" T ofan """Viable ordeal and put that he could ever conauer tins undarMood by the narinri lhc fonftdericthey tried to give >ne load on his younger brother are now ^•^^ %  aV* '*"" ror ar %  ? D.y B* ,^-^.Tr5SriS! more bi "" ,h "— %  Th " -arnage to an understandi Z^L Tli rver> d ">" h %  * %  the man who a few years before angry remarks among the great crowd Fn ^'sT^ 1 !^^ when "*• •""-"ih th. 1 hun Uuough Uus difficult timeas M rl *y** tre t <* Bolton-gardens Of all the romantic scene* that streets in the uniform of an Admiral of the 'T&SKZSi,*.^ Srj?-rATS SE.^h'V fltl"?a!"^ An.l-n,n„n. S on the days after th. Jf:er another his alt!..' a:t Often the qu >MMnandat> elhsn "J on im > ""' • !" rt messagr Palace, rich with legend are! V~T " " "" %  —>' '"" In > Togetlu^lheifouaht ' Lo "" directing him to ln!ruet romance, there eaa haw bead few death of King George ihe Sixth were far inpubl.candinpr7v. ^"^^1'' p, rt 1 "' c,r " %  ^.ZS""* ""** %  n rl b from complimentarv to Windsor. e uueen could be seei i,"" neighbour's hou-e han that. ii,*n.ai t ,"" t*t.ue replied poLtelv „ .The mornent cam '.and the | wilh him and infusing her stirngth into hun | he made very little progress. %  r.f-n iKUe replied noi '(iv c l w ri n><-. %  •-" u* S^L-i %  " *" the riut 3 *>** ^jr&LZL* INDEFINITE STAY Windsor is staying now with his 84-yearold Dowager Queen Mother at Marlborough House. His stay here is indefinite. He is exreplied pouter rate be.'.'n^'rv. he, ^S^S^ ^ n "^' "XjTi'Sa' "^ia^h?Ti*. pawn, In f* !" Austria. Uu„e .lr^' l Xr*i^ 1 ^'" l raa."" 1 paiiTSefoS uTbro^lSit tajan Uved a roan of young nuddk. age .'SJ ^"^ ^"V* ."nlabll.ty. S,, y remember heaHng the faintwho was achievma remarkable re,-r Ji*~7 1 1 ni he drtlghted If nt of whisper. In the unnustak-. sulu in the curing of speech de;, .uSi 1 ? """ eonnnue to leave able voice of Logue saying. "Now I peeled to go to the country later this week ong the children of the I lake It quietly. Sir." I ,„ „,„ „J.. • , , „ ,, town by a system of diaphragm An hour". . rk with Logue was It went without a hitch Th. t0 u y with h, S close 'nend Lord Dudley S-ith which, uf courae. %  O o'ed every day by an hour moment the King concluded.! al Sunnlnghall. :he dottors disagree] Hu name a even two hours of equal effort lhe door opened softly and ir i was Uonal Logue. home. The Duke never let up s epped the Queen, tears shining, xw ^ B „ .„ .. ^ , .... | Around theChnsimas of that ,or "" %  ap eyes Thc <*y b*'ore 'he funeral. Windsor wen; rrsr before Wembley, which was And *'** >? w nh h,m inspirAlways There i with other members of his immediate famih %  move latefu! for th. encouraging, and stimulating. For a time Logue was besides In Buckinoham Palaen whro ih1,.,,-H m, Br.t.sh King, a doctor friend and %  * wonderful wife King a: every Christm;. ucl n gnaun •'aiace where the> heard the %  dad to take their fan ,. '" """" Possible for him broadcast (incidenUlly. although reading of the will of George the Sixth, a die. ..,£. n„M.Mu.e.hcr TSP IW ^jSSS^'A*' SSi' DOCUmeM "" ** P" b C S *** The mirunVnd ior the >urt Canberra the work be, ,„ T Ch J* BM b ~S t i*' • h ." "'" rep0r,ed ,h •* %  *> Kln " ve Windsoi came The ,. m „y had the,, bag. M £,'" d !" ,J"" 'l-he. SSg ftqi^jM? "" "T" •"I 0 """'* ' C25 -' '* "" %  ST.-r ,. a, lb. do, when A1-.V. HveS "a, £,' /.Tot's,.b.d""h^.d7T .T" %  £*, K n,, """ m, %  • H "" 1'*~ '"n ^Locue pleted hi cun-. far beyM ev"nlon of it was left to Elizabeth. ,.,! ^, *,".*'" ^r 1 '" """J d u nce ,he h.ghcst hopes he could have 1 fallen ill. I have to star snth I %  near enough for the held when he left that Harley"Well. that holiday u over." sai.l fwkeroefraweoondasice from him street room far the first time, Logue to %  The Duchass would tit by her with the promise "l can cure|r in England now and he may press for Iratllt ^ *'' KTZSZlTJi "* nglt FrL£hT a *?*"*? ^ •" his financ... WWfcf.-imes to touch his, always To the and he and Logue P Slt,0n more deflmte After that is Settled said Logue "I went East P**ur.i.ir her Mrenrth into him remained on terms of deep Windsor is expected to return to the DiirriThen ce.me the dav F^te lifted lovirg friendahlp. mmm •„ ,.„„ ,,% wmm*m !" Has s/uiii loinbo." 'he Duke to the Throne The I think that s ory of the Kin f e5S m fte > Pk ssid Logue hesitantly. ". % %  "! %  ** %  only a few years is more vital to a true under_ if I went to Colombo I would before found mil.lir apoearanre landing 0 f n ., character than They undoubtedly will come to England to go to England." n infinite -*vrdeal, and public anvthing else in his reign. again for Visit*; hut" lhA rhfin^ * -, Unn lorturs. now faced aigti horn r. %lsns Dui lne <^h*nceg of a recon.-Lie. *. He conquered It cuiation or permanent return to England as i i aa •"' nMV seemei* a home annar .net -., e !" -,^,^ la —* Lucky M-n v wWl con h opeie. tq win Dower, sheei e "PP** 1 ^ iu st as remote, if not more Sh* u-*k him to thc teWpr.'-rre : u-nrtThe ncrvousne?s had determination, and niaaalrisi"* than they had before George the Sixth and he called a Mend *lio i. no longer effor nf us could died -.aklng have done as well rou givv mt two cabins to En/had lost most of Its terrorf. The —Warlg Ceprwrigkt. __V.P. That is one of the matters keeping WindPAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.OO per UuMtlrrd ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Streef & Creystone. Hastings ajga iUsi l>< lnn-rirtin I'nv turf Voohvr To rasi ,;i-r tl lhii,u n a " r * r thought ot — in a trariion ot th* linn: tool So %  •• %  / to n/KTfiif and so iTuiiumiruf ass I'ill-It IT'S has it. V.S. PITCHER *V CO. in il YIPPEE yy Children's Elastic Topped COWBOY SHORTS AND COWBOY LONGEES Da Costa & Co., Lid. Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR r On Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA 8c Co., Ltd—Agents Brisket of Beef ormed Beef 0\ ToBioes Lamb Taiuraes Hams. Cul tr Wholr Hams la Una tlba.. | lbs.. It lbs. SPECIALS When yea give, gtre Dubboiiftl 1-gl. Bile—S] • Prepared MbsUrd 2Sr. I^,h r*"ple Graaea z-lb. UDB— S4c Each Cheese In ibas—71c. Each S A ICES IMrm.VtS ALL Ml ALS ITALIAN KETCRl'P A. 1 SAI I LEA a PERRIN SAl'CE MEAT DEPT. Raal Beef Chickens Docks Dressed Rabblu Dresaed Tripe OS Tongue Calves Liver Fresh Vegetables Frosen Salman Hadaack Cod I ill ftKIppeiN Phone GODDARDS For Best FOODS



PAGE 1

MCX six ItMtRAIMls AhVin ill WnWtJW FMMtl'AKY to. 1M2 Leg. Co. Am end Pio neer Industries Act House Pass 860.000 For Runway Pioneer Manufacturers Clause Caused Trouble The Legislative Council yesterday passed a Bill amending tile Pioneer Industries (Encouragement Act. 1951 t TheHon'ble the Attorney Genera) in moving the Meond reading of the bill said that it sought to amend the Pioneer Industries (Eiiciuaccment) Act, 1001. When applications had been received after the passing of the Pioneer Industrie* (Encouragement -ct) of 1951 certain difficultie* had come lo light in the administration of the Act. Those dtflki.. tory or any extension Thereof set of the under circumstances which saUsfy Cll! baaanf ; ..r-in-Execiiue Com%  emove :t. v that, had this Art been in BM of such importell wu ai'follows-—Section i %  i .-levant industry would the Art gave p. ... t v.man been deelpred %  pioneer errior-ln-Ese<. l imc Commit!* ml the p oduet Intended declare personi as pioneM menuto be manufactured a pioneer duel under section three of -thing .1 plineer factory OM hlj Art ,.nd such person, would, ade application under r hereof, have then been person,, in lhat cniaajLHj could declared pioneer manur Clause a of UM voughl in amc. | %  %  ready established a factor*, hm wished to extend R, to be % %  -clared a plum, i ppropilate i ose* Amendment It was not tntndr 'he passang of the Act and the p r oposed amendment w o u 1 %  if i lion four declared a pioneer manufacture in relation to such factory, the folowlng piovisloris shall apply. '21 The Governor-in-Esecutiv.Cummitlee may, subject to the provtaoM of kubsecKon (21 oi %  eeuoa three of this Act, bu noiwithstandi g anything else in this Act contained, by order delare such Industry to be a pioneer industry and such product to be a pioneer product. 1.1) Upon the upplu JIUJII ,( sueji person made within three ralendii emedythat state of affairs enmoofbe after such deciaraUuo, th..' abllag such persons to have benefits of the Act In of altr ati ii-. !. %  sVOtVlng • renstons (l>uf not real :o exist ng tuslmsaes. The other difficulty that had | resent d Itself snaj the coat of :h | .op ebo had sjone ahead order. Ksa uthra CommitHi hit absolute discretion %  let-Iansuch person r, be a pioneer maiiufaituni in lation to tuch bwtsjry and tut h industry with effeci frogs late as may be specified in smh i'i com menu %  I btequent u> ihe Introduction into thr Hun*' of Aauaiblv of (hi Pioneer InrinMrics (Encouragemen Hill on July 6th. 1MB. A new Clause 5 had h d t ntroduc i rtsjajl I'roir.l .such a iieraon had lost the benefit f the Act In espect of hln critinai project and It was possii e that, because of the esuibll-nDM of his project. Il might be ire dlffi ull to establish no\ that the Industry c n.emed Is a Hone r Industry. He might aba nave lost all suh.-o:,ucnt benefit | ndei Act. Clause 6 sought to medy that position by pro'd.ng that, who e the .li.mief ssj tsjc ^stabluhmeni i pro i'' would hav< i i >t. wmagm. H) Eve: \ application uiid'-r -ubseetion (3| of this section shall be in anting and shall— ta) specify the locality of such factory; (b) specliy the day on which was commenced, or on or before which it is intended ta commence the construction, allaratian, c^-onsinietioo 01 rxtenjilon of such factory; 1,1 specify the date on which such factory, or the relevant pan commenced, or on or before which it is anticipated that the factory to which th" ippUcaUoa relates will commeno', in consoquenee of such %  •>:. tructi'Mi. alteration reconstrucUon or extension, to produce In marketable quantities the p.uoeer product lnt'-i dni to be manufactured therein; id) specify the pioneer product manufactured, or intended to be manu actured, in consequence of such construction, alteration, econstrucUon o. extension o' such fsctory. Same Effect O) my order made under subwctKm (S> or subseciloii (3) of 'hii section shall haihe same Frasn Pate The huiidinc of an airport was a matter to which there was not lumclent accumulated Knowledge in the world, as airport* ware still new constructions. No member of the House or anyone In any part of the world could claim that there was a century of experience f u( one to call upon therefore thev were not necessarily a! fault if there was an error. When they looked at the total cost of building the airport and what was then being asked for to remedy the faults of constructioimembers wou'd realise that It was very *msll V>ry often amounts represented lMj* of the total eo-t and therefore the amount like that was very wnall Indeed to rectify any fault in the construction of a major work llI-dl.il aa In Uncc in the United mates la which an airfield was built at ticmenuW i fter a few months it was found that it could not lake certain %  raffle and another had to be built. There were numerous cases like that in Great Britain and Canada where one met defections. Members of the Government regretted that such things occurred Runway Report He r cferre d member* to Ihe Report on the runway construction of the Seawell Airport and said that tbev would see lhat due to some clay and Ihe formation ol the land there, it was ver\ diflicult lo determine every aspect of tlie geological structure. "Furthermore." he sa. was unusual weather during tin lime this airport was contl There had been continuous minf.ill which was unusual and fn> 'hat reason, it became difficult fo> to foresee or make any forecast as to what would ham en U ased ii would I of tremendous cost to Qea and every effort had to V made 'o jet the work done. arai t-'.t.-vi taet the estimated cost for rehabihu.Uon would be ttP.OOO Explaintag why the Resolution was for Seo.000. Mr Walcott said that the SO per cent, more wag in order that there should be money so that. should there be any need for further repair-, while the work was going on. it could be dot The Engineer had informed Govhit there could be no certainty as to the actual ct". ssj it depended on the weather If there was bad weather, the eotl • to S60.000 instc-vi of |4&M6 Mr ITaiceti thru referred to th* that ihe Government proposed to take in the matter. He first drew member." attsasttOB to the two methods in which ihe itlon *orfc could be carried l ut. and quoted from the Reasarl "(at To riave the Contractor rehabilitate all of thl areas at actual cost. In adopting this method 11 •he work would have to be ,-omoleted at ooe time Which would make It necessary to close lh< '.. flying operations durtng the pmeiess of the work. The minimum time that %  .%'ould be required for the Contrtietor would be one month Thi* estimate is weather %  [b| The sec.nd inaMsSsj would %  r.overmnent to %  inwork under day lsbour Thi'. M n4-ces*ltate the %  men, the providing of u concrete mixer, a few -. • and other *mall equipment mh H whi-elbasTOa i h Thr organltauon and training of the crew for v;could be handled by Mr. James of the Department. of Transport, and when the work ia^ioderway and runrung aroosthly the super%  '. and control could be handed over to an overseer who kas become familiar with the operation. Th* advantage of method (bi over that In (a) would be that Hat airport could be kept in aarvicv for (lying operation* %  nly disadvantage of method (b( ix that the work would be carried out over a longer peiio-i of time, but this do> IMX mean that the MSg of Uie work would be grvoter. in fact it might be lese, aad the quality of the work should be better." Ho said that the Government had chosen method "B" because It could be done without the dislocation of the airport. By that method, the airport could be kept open. It would take about 12 week*, he added Nrnht Hiuhf. He said it might cause a change in the regulaUng of night nlahtv In 1fce Report which was signed lir Harold Connolly. BA.Sc.. M E l.C Drpaitment of Transport. Government of Canada. It gflbj Mated that the ened in construction of this u ., a i I magnitude where large heavy Kesii^ns: 111 Health x^r^^r^ ^D H backfill as our tests on samThe HonouraU* UM ColonW 3-nUry u roMRtay* K5r*"!? 'hlC '7%Sf mn 'nig ol the Legislative Council inlornied the meeting moisture content, but when dry ii that the Accountant licn.-ral had tendered nil icsignation ex'remeiv hard and. if coated and expressed regret that ill health had forced bin to do .so. w fJ J f or ^V"rock U and'SK." Thi Hm'ble the Colomul Secretary wag speaking on a nunuxaly examined or saturated Supplementary resolution in the sum of 9M6\340, rltnd III. cduld easllv pass an inspector's Oilonial Treasurer. Item 18a. $50 travelling •'• "*> he mistaken for coral This amount, the Col iccOuriUng retarv said was a token am'nim i • %  %  %  lepartRMilbl there aj it wns iioreas^rv i Bat of deAc % %  uni„nt General, in UM db> rtmentg had been circulated to irge Of his duUoS lo do %  hi effeel that if thev reeded .iti.t rock. The second cause of failure in OUi opinion is due to the heavy valns during the construction. These rains and the high humidit; ind the II ; ,t -iTe-t. and the provisions of thil Art \hall apply to any such older, m ail respects us if such ordet i .id been made under section three %  r section four, as the ciuc nui.v l*e. of this Act nnd as If the dales -perilled pursuant to paragraph b) and paragraph .nd production day specified in an ppUcstlon under section four ol .•etiaC .mount of tr.velUng ^O. .dv ,v ,,,h regard ^ the mc.hotl J- ISTSL&S"" break"i, vision was therefore required W .f accounting in their own dc_ soUlne slnac and also m meat traveling expense, nt the p.rtments that the Aceowrtant Lome <.*>. ailm. the bitumen to usual rnt*i. General would visit them and adu vv-sh-d ou( of ^ ,„„&„„ He said that In the past, ovei l • Ofl the matter. Thr. ontmlerl ttnd dlifnnaar throuah the drains. the course of many yea.;, duin Hid ,• h was not one Thj |uo of UUimtn wou | d „.„!. had become attached to the of the officers scheduled to draw U1 „ verv W9a ^ surface course Auditor General'* department travelling ..Uowiince it wn, n ecwn ich would ravel and allow that shoilld never have been tsaaf* to mass) provision Ibr nim wnter to ent*r me base courw and .auched to them. There were not to draw travelling allowance nl sul> i-iiitiihute towards ihe rtatiMII taUOfl Of the failed IT : however, would noi 'mini. : hut did Indkiite that htfM prepare*! to carry out th' work Off reinstatement of thnreas without profit; thr Government to pav the actual rr>M of the work." Report Summary la 'h Summary of the repor* it was stated that. The causes of failure of the runways appear to be due lo — (a) The unusual unanticipated precipitation during the pUelnc of the aaphalti. concrete which slowed ui *nd in some cases prevrn ted the srtUns up r liri.ikinr. down of thr go phallic emulsion, and al— oaosed a rertion of the (i.lum, „ to be carried sway to the drains. (hi l 11..is In Judiment b> the' iiispetturi* and contractors It. the riawlAcaUon of the i ui.l--n.il used in some ot Use HI) areas.' Mr. O. T. Allder til said tnat it wa vcr>' unfortuhate lhat after receiving a report on Seawell airbase on the previous evening, they should be presented with a Rrsolii• On rage I C^'A(rri frum hhinil intfuiriliin • nipiinii<-*)nik*k>M lB J ma< .su-v rheumatic aches and pain.riff anil painful kshMS, imni.in vkie dlsnrdcrv tlNFkc Hleod M• duty pnid. whn .ii I i UI in.i have lC"ii payable It DM A. • had been In force. The lionv the Colonial Secretary seconded. Ho said th.n thi pi Luted copies of the debate when tiie l :ll was before the Lcgisl;, i'not yet available but Ibis Act. i,. a) led lo recall the fact than (6) Without prejudice to the he hau made refe tnca to the fa<' omvlslons of subsection (5) ol that ho hoped that during the Hi s section, where an order had next SCSMOII Custo i s shall refund to the percover the antarprlasj of th%  n declared In such order to br p ..ne m rmf.LC itrer who went pljnecr manufactuier any abend with fur p oject at the time package tax and customs dut> the original bill was before Hi-> hich has been paid In respect of L>uislat<. 5 had been ihe imi>oruitlon of the articles rerl cd m dei to give the bill artad to in subs*cth>n (1) of this that rerrei>ectivr application. Clause 5 Clause a of the bill reads — 1,allows-— The principal Act is herein amended by addin* immedlateit en ten ihenof the fol%  wibg !*<•* v nun— ny person ha sublifh day of July. hundred aim piioi to the com t any pioneer factory or cxtcnoa thereof The provutions Of etions six and seven and of gubeciion f51 o f sectl n i lnc of this Act shall apply to any articles In -i>ccl of which such tax or duty a. been refunded pursuant to this subsection.'' duties properly carried out by i Auditor General Two Kxample* He quoted two examp'ea—recently, he said, the AuJitoi General had maintained all ihe tcave records of olHcers of In* Service, but that duly had been transferred to a branch of the I it. He was also re%  poNuaa) for u\p compumlon ol (tensions. It was quite wrong that a man should be reaprsngtbr. for the computation of pension % %  end the checking of them as •veil. Th* computation of pensions had been transferred to the Accountant General v. I will Calf] MM 'he computat'T and the Auditor General will carry out the checking Other duUes of the Auditor General was the preparation < %  ( Crown Aienta Aecoonpi. He should not be responsible foi their preparation. The essstral of the i —inof reeelpl <> % % %  tlie prcp.ir.tl.-n of ItinDil prnsresa ispem far t'.D A W Scbeanea; all eg these duties are still helm carried onl b" the AudUar tlenersj heeaese Ihe neeeasarv staff srranremetifor transfer to someone el-c ii ul no' yet been completed Officers Dntie* The duties of the Audit -r General and the Accoiin'rd QV %  id were different The Aecour:%  iit General was the oflc r responsible for the general >upervision of accounting metlioda in the service. He hsd to go to Seawell to adusual rates. There was much that wus Imnesfect In the accounting syst <>f the departments as yet and he hsd hoped that the' aid have been able to clem them up in the near future. (nation of the Aecountm Qaiieifftl meant that they roaM kave to l"k for another person nnd start again should be pointed out here that saturated coral rock also beunstable although not to ihe same extent as clay The report also stated that "Expi'rieiicc hns ^hown that lie wo-itliei g lljibados Is not urticionily dependable to cona i :i tiii.Lou of the fulled .leu with a prcmi\cd asphaltlc %  icte using gn emulsion as the cementing agent. Hot mix lick Germs Killed in 7 Minutes Christian Science Xecture For all white shoes While shoes, to pass muster in company, must be spotless, immaculate. Use rTopcrt's White Renovato or ProperTi Shuwhiie. No surer way of making sure that while shoes are white I "'A PBOPERT'S" •in mini .v iTHirEitE.vo^roil In CarMu ../* Spoor* V W.ul.l you lik. lo hear mi KSmittSg rxplannlion of Christian Science ? i free lecture entitled "CHHISTI-.N SCIENCE. ITS REINSTATEMENT OF PRIMITS'E CHRISTIANITY. AND SPIRITUAL HEALING" Ralph Caille. C.S., of San Francisco. California Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church. The First Church of Christ. Scientist, in Boston. Massachusetts. MORE SPACE MORE eaAos LESS WASTE WITH im \l.\\ m err SS.C. ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR &tn> the -V-MMtnlt'ls mar ra Show at THE Cm <;.*J1AGE TRADING CO. LTD. VICTORIA SIRffI



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I'M. i ie\ BARBADOS AOVOCATt WEDNESDAY, FEBKL'ABY ai. is; OLYMPICS RING UP THE CURTAIN By Lord Burghhey From Thr DAILY MAIL On Julv 19. in in.huge Olympic Stadium .>t Helsinki the last of n re lav ol miners btsarnn] I Barl Olympi.i. Or MOB, li'im "' the original Olympic Gan %  Helsinki will arrive. TinOlympic name will bt lit, md tha XViK Olympiad wilJ I Wl.l I i IMVIS < ream of \ -mli surely ife f,flhM, "tie sphere in this m '" |f* Itaore i lrn ", %  d oi harmony •.n-i th t countries close lo her are taking; U %  BMlg the ixty-odd nations con patina; Man %  ,lv l, "" i,, r "• ,\ "**?££ 5 m i *. -~ mraU proof 01 Ihe progress or >' spreantnK throughout Uuworld IHIS. M.HI) % % %  ",l ,s oJ !" ni n knowledge BOW pmd of even mon profound w,lh importance It lb not li. t World OumpJooahiD ol Sport; It Otj-iapsoi w Is also a gathering of the cream ol the youth of the world. I rw the] Mia1HK Kl t a >Lli| ori mfcr „„. %  "-" .," v '' oas a. MIL and I have p i m an Olympic village |ft ,^ tl fUlllU[l „, Thcj learn to beronv .,„ wlU M maimJ1 m.l the midst of lYercc competitions. ^UM canapattton %  all -on II..-. sin %  ju r. ma That uv n years Ron* by i*. ol course ruo, bu* ih*j wb.nl smoothness and freedom Ironi IneMaul Ihc Wemblr* Sportsmanship First had it should not bftorffntot; ^^ Thr ycar WM wlU u. dial Ihay :ire nil heroes of sport o lg i>( tta %  i %  thcv h.ivr seen %  agafflj ouuhi <* their i-elurn homo need thai i ilyni>t :-h us thouaandaol n ncs ;' ,. l;i competitor* and spectator, front Id] coroan of the globe spread* another milestone In tho history -I >port in ihe world. u nd with tbo wpport win. public oi mil country artll giva, Britain will %  and ., loam not onl) of MM s of performers but l*o one whx.li will, each and every one. worthily uphold wu ship good will out of aU proportion ta SadJUom of a, flu numbers actually ent BU craal tn apart i* w-rld-widc h praiidag comn for men of all nations, and these sporting contents between countries help t<* create %  h %  indini and good will ntih h .! % %  aawntiid pn'Md ii ; to a smooth ing-out of difficultly If I may giv,. one example My wife and I were in Argentina on business at Mv height ol the meat crisis, and yet, becau: t halt fellowship of spoil we rt'i'lved :i wonderful reception and were mndr the aiatntlna throughout our tajr W< %  old navai far g at that Britain i* the cradle of , to us. to play Ouj maintaining that high it ditiou •nui This nirary i% rat naoiaai reason for making %  In effort m ensure that %  quately representt-d m It may b. thut but few ot the gnfa "dl come our any, bui st any rate we will put up ;i %  how worthy of oui countiv. Our Prospect* WHAT ;iro our pr-spects 9 Thara will be IT different %  porn, and I receive encouraging InBecklet Road. farm .it ion from most of them. In m> own sport, ath* undoubtedly have a strong allroand iam, and. I believe, bolter one than we Melded for the 1MB Qamei .it Wembley. If % %  < % %  ithlete* keep their ff-m. then the outlook is prontlg* in.;. In spile of the rising world standard. But let theni-* M mistake ;ibout it: we shall bo opposed by superlative, wellcoached athlete.', and It will lie a great achievement to reach a final let alone win |* Britain'! "poaaibleo* 1 for tlic running-trnrk and field iv.-nts have been listed. ;ind every '*mFOOTBALL ^FIXTURES Coilaaa, lJ^l saaaani Second liivision chunipions. who have BMtad to the t ; ion this seuson meet Empire at Kensington to-morrow af.ernoon. I In ii\tiinfot the rest of Ihll %  %  foUawi DIVIKION Ihar^k). Fehrmary 21. Kn ,:. vs. College at KetiMiinton KaUrday. Febrmary 23. Spartan vs. Notre Dam* ( t Kensington. MINIM UIV1KIOS \\pdnr.da. February 2t Police vs. Y.M.CA. at Park f'arllon vs Rangers at Illack Raah Wanderers vs. Four, i Bay. Y.M.P.C. A" vs. C.O.B.. at l.ANOLEV dn Undwall in th Fifth Triangular Test Matches ? A MOVE TO BRIGHTEN CRICKET secretaries in particular would o" West Indies an opportunity redeem their recent laiiures. day reduction would cut down A three day series would prob, ',' their share of profits at the end ably be to the advuntagc of the ", h Of the tour. West Indies, for their natural boot rw in. ('mnbermeie vs Y.MI'.t -B" ai Combannan Lodge vs Cable and Wireless at Lodge. Friday. February 22. College ,s. Rmpire P Hovers sington. Harbndos Regiment vs. Notre Dame at Garrison. Carlton vs Y M C A at Black Rock. A'..,;• i< i Itan^i i l!.( . C.O.B. vs. Foundation n t Combermere The B.A K A ,n. aadaavourIng to secure grounds on which to nv rirrr.R DITTON IXJNDON. Test match nickel -%  Is a laborious business. With four, five and .six days being devoted to each game bott bafamm and baanawi arc m%  on raged lo develop a negative apU their reapective duties. The consequence Is that unle.. in. aiekat Is 'sportinn." thai ito say, gives the bowlers an advantage, a definite result is hard series, a return to the expcnmei % %  lo obtain. Witness fo T example the of 1012 when South Africa an i piesenl scries between India mid England both sent teams to Engtha Mcc land. As we all know wicket* through uut the world .ave been etHnit Tc ** matches were radueel l>etter and letter since the turn to lhree day* it would be quite f the lentuty This has been due *•• w fix up another TrtanguWr to the Introduction of more MienBcrlra. I a this way the d em a n da llfla methods of preparation. Bu: ol overaeoe countrlea for Incroaaad Cnarlle Soccer Heroes LONDON. Feb. It A goalkeeper and an inside loiward who ovruami injurie ning gonlg tor Bl WON heroes of to-day's soccer programme. First, the Bjaataatl Herod M naoka was injured tn the match agan. Villa and with an arm hanging limp at hu side — suspected fraeture — moved to outside right while internalton.il inside forwanl Sammy Smyth went in goal %  in the best wing upward manner cracked in a shot lo give Stoke two more valuable points in tti raid relegation The other hero u m*ide forward MacNeil of narnsley. He was carried on* with an ankle injury In a home game with Sheffield Wnlncday but Insisted on retumin^ to Bat rield in the second half. The rout an whan ftf* received his chance and a well placed header gave Rarnl. v ,i> lory, knocking Sheffield off" 'hen second division parch. Now for thg r< Manchester United* three—nil away win over Derby gives them a wo JP* n t lead in the First Division Champtonthjp race, Arsenal! second with 40 points were held to a 3-3 draw at home by Pres,. .[ r wh om Wa ymn got the hat trick after being two goals up m eleven minutes. r\.rtsmouth. level with Arsenal ended Fulham's revival with %  -ound 4 0 victory but Newcastle, L^S, 'V " tnbl ^'erc soundly SS^LS -0 V w <*verhamptori. T J^„ vi "'tors found IntanuitCnai nrst game since an Inlurv on November 24 in top forrrT^ wiS l iC. S ^ ond P Mslon Sheffield mTS s ',"'v 6c,val has wabled ',r f ly .l. Pr0m0tWl FOTfmt t0 ,aJ[P i X r ^ tf l c ,lrW Ume Thev drew Ln.*',*" Lut f1 n nd ar now ne point clear of Leicester. Wednesday and Cardiff all with 35 points Two of Luton's goals were scored y nS*? 5? ,'orwsrd Mc Jarrow. %  difficult Side t0 at home as the Third Division leaders Plymouth found WHATS ON TODAY turt of "ruiM.l Jurl-dirllMi it.at *.m pwaVaa • anrai i" %  " POSBM Hand CaBMrt at >l Lairr' lliiihmisf I m p^n ihird DrrWan fostbaB at vartoos grounds 5pm Mobile Cinema show at Warners Plantation yard. < hrisi Church 7.30 p.m. %  |i).iii. i "i at RrlUah Council I p.m WEATHER REPORT i I I I I:I>\\ Rainfall froni eeorne better, ro opportunities to play in England m hu it been necessary lo lengthen could be met. Each summer two (; In the ihird. North Lincoln even ST^J^^W 3S£ %  $ %  C V nvTag A affi f the American athlete, boxing cheater Meld and ,o SaloESd m y .J) i V !" a i £L'l' V '.*' n ; their live point lend JotuishNi. Prebideni % %  the duration of Test matches. The t'ormnonw. initiative has been taken awav t nt from the bowler and handed over lo the batsman. teams could be m We offer Ihe follow tD| IERMITE-PROOF 111 11 DIM. MATERIALS IMILV INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEFTS | In. thick. 4ft. x 8ft.. lift 10ft. 12ft. Long ft ltle. per sq. ft. WALLBOARD MOULDING for covering joints ^ 5e. per fl. STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS The Board of 1.000 Uses. It In. thi.k. 4fl. x 6ft.. 8ft.. 10ft. long TEMPERED HARDBOAKD SHEETS < %  in. thick. 4ft. x Oft. 8ft 10ft. Ion v. nt Sac. per sq. fl. SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS 1 In. thick. 4ft. x 8(1 '40.. per q. ft. 3'18 in. thick, 4ft. x 8fl %  29e* 32c per so,, ft. TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS 3/10 in. thick. 4ft. x 8ft | ?3e. per aq. ft. All these Building Beards have been treated to resist the attack of Wood AnU and other Termites. Phone 4261. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. netiuir will do his or her ntmiv-t "tage the Second Division game" to reach |ieak form at th,. right tune There Oafl '• no harfl .,n,| fast rules about the trafa \ man needs n loi more work than those of lean. build (as I wan in my athletic days') tlai.k Hall Is not available this If permission is given these will ake place at Queen's Park and the opening fixture will take place on Friday. February 22 and this will be--Everlon v.-. Notra Di m It i not essential for our hMoa I lengthy tln.,1 training tu.BJ SI \lia>U.i*.|' u U,,-l gcther. Many train wiih thauS *^ 1 IU IIUl1 b l-**l clubs, and get their high-class racing in Inn district and British championships Their life's ambition is lo win nn Olympic title and the great majority nan f< be left to do the job Naturally. w 0 are all hoping K see Uie Union Jack at the top of the winning-mast, but lei us not forget the words of the (OUBdai of the Olympic Games, Baton de Coubertin: 'The importanthine in the Olympic flames is not winning, but taking part The essential thing i n life ,pot caoojuarinr but flghiin M wall. nnincl lodiy lhl he M „ rn hom ,, rrari i_,„„ „„ vlv i. would r M ssnasssr SS,*^2IK?*5 "" %  •E ""•—" %  •cries once every three years for -Junior Heavyweight Class" from News from Scotland is that HiAustralia, m South Africa, India |?5 pounds to 190. "This will help brrnlan nre already weertng thai I'akistan, New Zealand and tha make up for tw divisions we 'hnmpionship look Thev follow.-d This state of affairs ha, bnM W**t Indies, instead of, in some praetuallv lost at ;he other god i tnctl mldVwaah draw with tolerated, in fact even encouraged, cases, a wait uf five or even six of the scale I Bantigers at Ibrox Park b) l>eating for a long lime now. Five day years. tamweight" hi said, al the *an.c St, Mirren B 0 and now nothing Test matches bring in more money time it will provide protection short of n wholesale collapse will than those of only three davs duraiMx three-day Teat matches for youngsters just growing out lose them the championship for lion. Similarly most members „( would mean that English Teat of the Light Heavyweight Class, the second successive season. the public prefer to see a goor the ground thai •• eighteen days in tha amon Thu Vaan M may Bad Mmiill do to see wickets lumbllng .inpares favourably with tbn n>aPAet!..gainst a heavyweighl present system whereby in a full ""N J or 230 pounds Tl.at I But current Indications nra that live match, live-day series thay vcr >' bnd •'""nston added Ursuiiuc Gonveni In a nctball mat.n played ai Bl Mu-nael's liirl.s Sinooi yvsiei oaj aftanioon, Bt Mwnati'i uurli Scnuol dcfealcd the UTOUUna Louvent by 17 goals to la. in ihv nrst half both team started oil the game slowly, bu* the Si. Michael's girls were always looking tor goals. At hall >ioie was nine all. the pendulum is starting on its are away nearly a" ihird of the backward nring, Crttk gnd pubsummar. Ik alike have been unanimous in their recent condemnation* .jf The revenue from a triangulaslow batsmanship daoslta tha tournament, played on spoiiinx g.od wickets. And so serious has wickets, need not be any less than bam 'he insistence upon a return that obtained fiom a five-day lo more equal term-: be' een bats series played on wickets which man and bowler that the Nottin,f educed to a minimum the chances The big for the 180 to 175 Hearts game which was a rehears| al for their third round o next week ended in a draw %  porters of both sides ore left wonI terlng what to expect nn SaturI day — f P All Stars Beat Schools XI I woulo lute to stress that. whereas individuals excel, and bring honour and gh>i y u, their %  % %  ..< %  .1 twain oountrita Uut mnki Plaj in the second hall wag uiuch better and a fair crowd oi fans from St Michaels and the Unuttno Convent saw gan k'"^i passing and good posiiioniiig kg the Held but in the latter p'' '"' half ihe St. Michaels girl. the winner of the Games. For f"a*d ahead comiderabb put:mg this. It is felt, would encourage themselves well in Ihe Had Md an undesirable nationalism which *'*" the llnal blast was sounded would lie completely eyntraiv Up St. Michael's girbt had pul in IT the true spirit of the Olympir goals and the Ursuline Convent movement 13. Any tublo which appe.n>. therefore, placing nations in order The sbootan I . of merit is entirely UBOfllCwl and Oirls' School were M Hranker ami U. Agard while the shooters Some | '.n Uie C.mv.ul WOTC M. Netlo lo decry the Ciames. and. indeed, and C. Navarro. ham authorities have even oKM ed theii famous fe.^h.-r-l-.-.' wii-ket .) %  Tranf Brtdna lo bo n laid. This Mtion BfWtlM Bat only II" eomnianoad, It ibould I by olher cricket grounds throughout the world. The public are tired of paying to %  no matekaa whieo do not pmduee .;. Milts. The lime has come lo give im a fair chatue. not I make him dependent upon the weather for .• chance to lw th batsman up. With less artillclal piepaialion 0l wicket* it should be |*sible for any game, including .< r>-t match, to he conclude.) |n 'nree . England nnd Auslrulia should ,-xcellen' formation but pool W held. But. doubtless he had in shooting by the visitors as thev II. md the fact that Australia Is ouunatche-i ihe schools by at due lo visit England in 1953. If least 12 goals. Tho Test serief the series could be arranged durbetwect All Stars and All ing that tour it would give tha Jamaica starts on Saturday. Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic! Wraas food* and dnnki warn jvr.irk nnd frcmi'nt cM,] • •tmln on lh> Kl.lnri' and K|i Krip|tn % %  .1 llh era %  WWkanjlH ..Cys t ex They'll Do It Every Time Bv Jinnnv I l.iilo BABY BIBS each. BABY COATS each. BABY WOOLLEN PULLOVERS S3..10. .S.1.00 A S.i.JO BABY BOOTIES, Pair _r 72e A. SI.I2 KHUS KHUS HANGERS, each. SI.08 BUNCHES OF KHUS KHUS e. CAVE SHEPHERD X CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & U Broad Slr! WE. Guarantee A Perfect FIT lo every SHAPE. P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. Top Scorers in Tailoring Prince William Henry Street TENNIS .OI I MVIYIMIX. HO.VTI.Y4. I-IMII.Y4. 111III \4. M'llHIIHI SIMM I I s An Island uf Holiday Onnortuniiios' So many and varied that clothes may seemim;ly present a problem. There is. in fact, nc clothing problem which the House of C. B. Rice ol Bolton Lane, Custom Tailors and Men's Outfitters, cannot adequately solve—either from Iheir selective, imported stock, or with a garment tailored to individual need;-. C. B. Rico l' Co.


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I'Atik TWO MAKBMNK AI.WKAII luiiM-iMi n ma \m 211 IS12 Qwdb gaJUinq M R. RONALD MAPP. M.C.P.. who wu one of the delegate* 'o the recent Moral Ream. %  nnfeTrnce in Miami will be the |UMt speaker at the Press Club thai afternoon at 4.49 o'clock. His subject wlil be "The Press and Moral Leadership." It is understood that his talk will centre on the decisions of the Cnnferrnr.Entranoe to the Press Club i> near the Junction of Middle and Swan Street.*. Hare Again M R and Mrs. Jan Friees an at present holidaying in Barbados. They nrri-i-d from Tnrtola via Puerto Rico on Bundaj %  "d are Marina; M tin RoW %  Mr Frtaai who was horn in Cm-h-rslovakin hvi-d tn-re rrom 1M1 to 1948 nl %  'Sunvalley". %  flal Land Prior to Mr. Desllf "De-De' Baldini who in Pans via Mar. tinkiue and Guadeloupe recently This is Mr Bildims third vtaii to Barbados having been here In 1037 and 1947. Trinidad Planter A FTER JUM over weak'* holiday ln Barbados Mr and Mrs Charles de Freitas are due to eturh to Trtnidad today by H W I.A., where Mr. de Freitas is a I I Urns plnnter. They have r -a bank. '"•* • ParFrom Halifax M RS MERVYN MKARES. widow ..f Col Means, C.M.CI., D.S.O., Legion of Pbnour, and l.ite of the Royal Artillery, is %  u present holidaying In Barbados. She arrived from England a snort lime ago by the Gettie and is i IIIK it Cacrabaok. Her home Is in Halifax. Nova Sent la. Here until the end of March, she __ , t _, i '"'> b) visit Bermuda before re. I hird in Three turning to Canada i s Fred HRANDTBarbadog Carnival Shaw ZABO of Clova, Quebec. Is rj."" !" "'"' : ** OW back in Barbadoion hisflmd visit T in 'Cuntvtl Show, aponrci 7"*' If" '" thrTO ?****This time he has *<>rtdb> "•* .M.l.c. t takes West Indian brought along a friend, Mr. Albert g u c *. ,t *" r hdqurters on — *S from 4 to THE NEW HAT-LINE DIPS AT THE SIDES Tiny waists — then flat and wide MMI I M" their East Both Mr. Brandti-eg and JV ft urday F bn Mr. Fjst are with Canadian inter„.?/ r ~ national P ntnaL Dunnr %  l~.nk. T.C.A. Official* M R. HF.RRF.RT SEAGRAM. General Manager,, Operations. T.C.A and Mr t ton, Director of Pcn-owi'-: SJZIK sss&fss s s* tea.te?** O Lashley Is in complete the .irrangeineiiU and 111 be tlven for the most original ami prettiei costumes For Carnival L EAVING by II W I.A. on M ptnd < irnJvaJ Truuda.l ,vere Mr. and Mrs. Stantnn Toppin of Ro,-kley New Road By EILEEN ASCROFT -.,„ f riming ta> look' m dor straw ..it, dippin, open t.i c*..-l U, r at thr hats shown , -,,„ pHi ara S£S+FZ£&2£S££1 ports un-ludlng (;ihn.lt.ir eral Mediterranean ports. M r. Da wson is President of Uaa wn Bros. Ltd., Montreal, Industrial buapUers of office equipment. Hts wife EliMbeth. %  former )otirnalL th> v look time out to yisil Am.. 1 Uniqur. Dance For The Captain M ISS SYBIL CLAHKK ol R*emU". Collymore Koek, ho b %  >!).to Trinidad :. attend in C.irmv I Ourme her stay then vill be the kuesi of Mr. and %  Ir". EMr csmeron of San J'tiin. rr'nidad. Barbadian In Antigua V|R JOHN ARTHUR WILKIN2" '" >he Sos After that she Manager of Central Northern Air. Ig-J I h edited a Trade paper before she wnvs Ltd., of Canada is due to re-T wt ,_,„ a „, wan marrkd. i„rn to r.in^. mhv hv TC.A n,l lia n married. They have already visited Barbados vending u week here In U.S. Radio Amateur M R. HAROLD GArFNEY of Greensboro. North I who arrived In Barbados on Sunua> accompanied i hli adtg keen radio amateur and bark in the U.S. he operates his own "nc" under the call sign of W4APP. 111"! interest in Bnrhndo was ih-: aroused when he spoke to one of our local radio "Hams" over the amateur radio wnves. Since then he has talked with 13 or 20 Bur SON GRIFFITH son of Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Police MagOpcn,tions j,,,,,,, of Duirlrt A .. nas ]Ui dual* In Sux\evmi M %  ua and has been granted a ',.£ ^i,^".not J foor £ft: ""<• to practise in the surveyafter spending about four week* |n of and ^ presidency of holiday in Barbados. st. Johns. Antigua. !^il night the managemenl of AfUr t ^ vmg Harrison College Caerabank Hotel, where he ha. he attended the Antigua Grammar bre^ataylng gave_a small dance at R^,^ WmW m 19 ; ? hr passta the School Certificate with exemphotcl in his honour. %  s • iwn who has been flying 1*11 when he flew with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War wa bom in Winnipeg, Studying Barbados Crab* JAMES HODGE of Fuller Harrington College, Toledo. Ohio, is once again in Barbados staying at the Paradise Beach Club. tlon from the London Matricula* l He applied for and was granted a Leeward Island SchoUrsoip. He is now attached to the Federal Enmneer's Office. Antigua. D R Two Monthi badian "Hams" und finally decide I "lie Is accompanied by his wlfr A MONG i -* Lucia that he must visit this island wh he had heard so much about. Mr. and Mrs. GafTney are guests' Caerabank. Barbados Holiday M RS .f .1 [aasM) hek wboal late husband vmi a Dlreetoi Of Tin Mines in Nigeria is holidaying hen staying at Caerabank. Her husband, she told Carib, waa Dr. Hodge is cne f.Krt in the cutter and p|„ded in the „nsenn of scientists therther on (),,. pa.omrnt A Generals. politician* and th pWDSBT-bv^ald to hli,i, I My do FTPS, Thr bomb weighed 13,728 of *...£? i£ I? ,,,u r " l ton *. %  "<* ha <' "*d UP Severn! In the gutter' Thank you.' said stockpile.* the reeeUeT with nrepotterou* u giavlty. "I though Ing." 7P valuable materials was 180 yards high, with a clrlimprmnference of 361 yards. When General Vassilln piessvd the but*',..„...,. I.... i /in, l" 80 miles away, all held their bwmmu BMI* (\I\) brrath# Thcrp WM ;, p^ llke Xhat BMSSSSBSI r, mat,, b v " p 8S bursting, and the ttlENTISTS Of the more adwatchers Saw through their tele*J \anced dvmoeraries were exScopes the whole thing fall to tremely purzled by the formula pieces slowly. That was all that l)lngl-l*xis delivered to Smuj in happened. CattW five feet away Vnmopol. The ingredients prewere unharmed. Dlngt-IV.. for scribed seemed harmless enough, ence looked hideous. Her rage Rupert and the Pine Ogre — 52 mritny. Piulin* hnldi ihr pi ihe urn i i terrible. "I'll get Eghara for •• nhe kept repeating. THE END 4 ItOSSUOIIIr i' r ] r J — ^^ IP H 1 p 11 n e put. emphasi.s on tiny waists In the spring dress rasl and Digb.v Morton the second day of the iond. Big T-n colWtiorl by dueing side hjp paddir.' which leaves the front sni back flat The wide look was furrh. r strcMed by groups n] pleatand luitlns n !" *v.' MiTS by Rudoll loJhv. %  ame line, dipping st n •\nv th' r ^ad i IILOUIH of Ute elothe.s were ">robre—betge. grey. tWi and black—nlleved b\ nlng trar hal 'hlnlng feet In blark or grei natem lesth-r n coats, drc*u>< and tults iire three miartei *nmh. many fu" (lather-"! inln Daaisr, mi : nasrt, ui 'I %  a v )u th-esii arc n. l*i -**reiu (4i l II fMuu. (S) iT.ag.mtl : dopUL 111 %  % %  ... %  TSacV ill • nu dtn. (•> . Dwtfuat. IS) JS. l*t. hop* you >t Wko Mat oa ooa. 161 4pteti from Uria and. Mi 71. A broken star, til (Bl DTiken %  w in it pass, MiUnrts •ona til otn ihe bro tt m tWST imtti in MEN & LADIES DRESSING TABLE SETS i -.i HI -. .. MEN'S LADIES BEACH PACKS LADIES TOILET BRUSHES Mis s r.iii -ill -. LADIES BRI'SIIES from frum $I0.S5 to %BM % 5.44 lo S 9.40 3.08 in IW. 7St. ALSO A NICK ASSORTMENT OF PHOTO FRAMES. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS B.B.C. swag r( thNMi Chronic!.. ,,f London, talked in a BBC proKrwnmc aboui the delights ol her job. She began her .,n nd p 0 ou^;;rn,„ ran "" n:: nd WS %  * for •remelv Inquisitive, it seems lo me *o be the ideal job for a woman. After all, there's no other profes_ ion which invites me to BO and SLiTltll .^S e s.ST C,a 7 nr poke my ntwe in, wrythlng that tt&£$Sg£r v X3£L ,0 r, %  l — %  a nd hPn n —inter\iews, obituaries book reviews. Woman's page, filing, picking type and setting up pages, with evenings spent In the printing room, lorrectlng proofs as the> it along. As none of the printpou There was a great deal to be said for -lining on a small paper big London otic the Jobs extremely specialised, bi On sssjfa. tites me to go and tell the whole rid about It!" Oifncullies Follow the Chef %  B* IIH.FN i:i 1:1.1 M. JEAN VINCENT. pSH o| m, cpmmittei %  "Id.< gperleni i S d hotels including Mai son uni't in P-IIN and ihe Berkeley and S.n\ For IS years he has been principal of the eookrrv department at Westminster Technical College, responsible for the training of boys and alrl< In the art of the final* nnsine and in hotel management I asked M. Vine*tit for recipe* which %oii might like t trv or adapt. • l-oln of Porh BretonmFor 10 2Hlb diced M risead asjjMgjiJ yellow-rienhed for preference), Hlb. sliced onions. 2 tahlespooni ihopfie'i pan-lc. peppt" •HI lotn of ( .rk (boned nd 'kinnedl. 14 cup water Butter a deepish raasanaVl, large enough to hold all the ingredients Mix the potatoes, onions and parsley tutfether and season tbcm at the same Hme Place in the casserole with the seasoned pork, 1 wined idi up, on top Brush it with melted hultei or margarine and add the Wats*. Bake In a moderate over. (375-400 degrees Fahr.) until the meat Is nicely Irrowned. then turn It and brown the other side Baste it from time to time, adding small quantities of boiling water as required. (I %  vould give this dish at least IHli hours.) Serve in the dish with a good cabbage, cooked In salted water. ((mined :ind left to finish in butter. \erv slowlv for an hour. (I would -lie half the quantity of mtat and hope that it would nerve si* per%  NM I Shoulder of I ..-il. Si. Huherl This is a wonderful WSa to serve thoulder of lamb. It will provide 10-12 servings. Bone a small shoulder of lamb .nd stuff it with a small amount of minced rabbit, three chopped hardi oiled eggs. 3of. sliced mush100ms sauted In .1 little butter or Margarine and a small glass of '^ %  hite wine and seasoning to taste Itoll and tie the shoulder securely fYv if all over in butter or mar• arine in a deep pan. Pour off the I at Add a glass of dry white wine nd allow the wine to evaporate Baste with n little slightly thickened brown stock, flavoured with n bouquet garni to which a little hasll has been added. Cover and cook slowly, basting frequentl'. Serve with a pur^e of chestnuts. WOULD COPYRIGHT MSrflVSD were difficulties, of of the greatest of them Then-ourse. c knew English mispr.:... language. One trip took her bugbear. Many of them were unthrough Austria, Czechoslovakia. rcpeatsble but she was very fond Hungary and Yugoslavia, and as of the birth announcement that she did not speak all the languages 1 sld. To Mrs. Brown, at the 0 H0MH DISTRICT "A' 5 p.m. Tuesday 26th February VIISIISMON Si on B.B.C. Radio Programme urnMHiivr imat ABT IS. isat II IS a m UnlenertChop Tie "lonlflier. 13 inooni Th Nrw I IB p m New. Aali*i. Las— 1 f.ai ssjaai w asss ihr bail] LUM i Thp Nf. 4 1* .. L 4 IS p.m BBC Midi...id l.ithl i. v u ... i-mnpmfr ol ihr Wf-' R..iW Maci'lwr.oii M 11 in, S SO P m tVhio R*i. %  wUl'JllO "I Up und 7 B a in d\i II SIM issl Week. op.iK Ml It p.m. ###*/• aa.aJ Every Night (Except Sunday) -V Pixie McOium Was Satisfied — It Mode Him Happy to Be Unhappy — By MAX TELL Flak O'Peowt said: "I suppo.s you think I hava very bad disposition^ Nothing iwmi to please nw?" Knarf and II an id, tha ihadowchildnw *ii B the turned-about names, didn't know asactly what to answar. But Hnally Hsnid said, aa K atlr u possible (for ihe didn't e auting Plxia O'Seowls fedings: "Wall, yoa aren't roallT very chrerfal. But • like yoo Jost as you are. don't we. Knarf T" "Of eoursa." said Knarf. Pixis O'Scow] grumbled that he didn't IN why ha should be cheerful when ha didn't sea anything; to 1* cheerful about. "But if yoa Sink I'm bad. you ought tj mast gay cousin Pixie McGlam. No one has ever made him hugh. He's got a frown so deep that it starts at his forehead and runs all around his chin. If you taw McGlam. you'd think I was cheerful." Knarf and Hanid now said they'd very much Ilka to meat Pixie Medium. "Whers do we find hiraT" asked Knarf. fader a Stsuap "Bs llTea," said Plxla O'Scowl. "under an old stump at tha edge ot il. awatnp. If* tha dampen and moxB oneomfortabls place anyone cir-r lived in. But he won't move." Pixia O'Scowl readily ST~d t Uke Knarf and Hanid down to tha old stump at the edge of tbo swamp to meet Pixie McGlum "There be Is nowl" exclaimed Ptxte O'Scowl; ".-titling with his feat in tha water and with no rubbers on. He must ba trying to catch a cold." At this moment, Pixia afeGlum snrczed several times and blew his ro a loudly, then looked up and saw hli visitors. "Go away," ha said. "I hate company." Knarf and Hanid glarced closely a Plxh McGlum. He wasn't much tJill. i than a largo sited dandelion. He was wearing an old coat, an old bal cd hat. and he was smoking 1 pipe, turned upside down. Why don't you go •way," Pixie M-t.ium added. "You'll have no fun fulling me. I'm very gloomy." "Why are you sitting with your tret !n the water?" Knarf asked. Pixie McGlum muttered: "They're my feet—I can do whatever I like with them. Besides." he said, "I've K a very good reason for keeping rm in the water." ._„ ,„„ „„„ m Hanid said in surprise: "What I and wouldn't say anoth. McGinn was sillini; hit feet In the water. reason have yoa got. Pixie Mr. Glum? I didn't think there snu %  reason why anyone ahoulo feet in water." "SiUyl" said Plxle McGlum going to rain in a day or • aay feet will get all v.it as well get them wet rig* | • Near the Swaaip "I don't think you our' ao near the awamp." *u-A HAa "Nothing wrong with the mnn said Pixie McGlum. "Tr loes like it. The frogs anc like it. Why shouldn't I like it?"I"re Invited you to live •• O'Cheer Hall with the rest of th< Plxiea a dozen times," said Pn O'Scowl to his cousin. "But > won't come. Why not?" "Too comfortable," muttered Pi* O'Scowl. "Breakfast, dinner and supper are always served on timr the food Is good and wholesome— there's plenty of cream and t*i honey — everything Is Jost right How do you suppose I'd feel if i went to live in OTheer Hall?" "You'd feel fine and cheerful," said Knarf. "U I felt fine and cheerful, | wouldn't be Pixie McGlum. And :I I wasn't Pixie McGlum. there vuuldn't bo enybody living under thi" old stump down at the edge of th* swamp. The mosquitoes wouldn t have anyone to sting, and the toaH and the frogs wouldn't hat %  to keep awake at ni^hl with their flings and croakings.' And wltti triat, Pixie MeGlmu sneev and blew his nose loud"* r ird. TODAY ''' '^""OS'OP" Werner OoottbAl-KltrO lllTTHCOTK^ I'NDER CAflHSIfl &S!J StfG* i* elor KT TieSrlUr. Mint ATX IV It. WHO AT IsrBIUPlMH Sao. -2rte. P k z A PLA2A Bobert MITCHUM In in i OP rnr PAT" a nn -ii i r Hon.,i HVA.N nrwABr or rrrxiin I'AUMCB •BOI'SB OF rBANRkNSTBUI % %  .. K.lllll'lr .\ Ii I H.\:.f %  V.II1M1' ( ONgl IM III I .'.Id BUI EUJOTT %  l I V^ I II.I 1 I.-.I Shn Tomtc ( I BV R,-ld. M.Dnw.11 Hn.Hor WAH in ii rooi'KB A J..Kl COOOAN AS i i iLi it %  SUM nil l MI aecrl NF-WTON lOIIIC MOvll HtllS (lli,in, TO-IIAV J %  '. \ m NR.-PitrMi^ pl.m.r nolr i DATS Ther. u III b. NO TAI.KNT •k-rnd ill,,,. START ON HI NM or HTAOE SHOWS .1 Ihta Thrmlir. R00DAL THEATRES i >irini FRIDAY *.3e. 4.45 and 1.3* p.m and eontlnulnt to MOMMl i i %  and :-• p.m. ACADEMY AWARD Winner to STAMIJEY KBAMW Prod %  iiaAive OpeniM* Frlda* Tlrd SSD B.St %  THE t'N SET AT DAWN" OLYMPIC TO-DAY ft TTMeOBROB' • V t II! Bins t-BOSaiY -Bob IIOPT n> "ROAD TO RIO' and Alan LADD In WHIOrZ! INC. RMTTH| Friday Sfi'd 4 SB ft Slm-RRICANt IMlllW •'COCKF.YFn WONDER 1 HOW TO-DAY ft TO-MOBBOW *se ft ats rRAPPED BT BOSTON BLACKIF TO TI1F. FND OF T1IF. EARTH 1 <• 7Ti.rt 4X1 ft SI! DESTINATION MOON ROYAL BBFVwi.ir WHOU: srBtAtiMiiii-n KINGDOM" • Hh R*"fr a il COSUtlGAH ui.l-, 4JB ft B IS TRAPPED BT BOSTON BLACKIE Mi llll KNI) OF THE KARTB.





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v\ 1 DM -I> si HBKLABV 2ll, 1S2 IHKHlIni, MIMtCAfE I'ACI -.rVI-S House Pass $60,000 For Runway Reconstruction 5 • So per cent, wan put became tbey i nditunof an adcould not predjd the weather to Ml StW.OOO a certainly. • ihe fact that „ ., baa) had voted Weather loofHioiu r Uiit department. Continuing. Mr. Lewis Mid tbai kf him who .t was tune tWt the Govemmeni itt know the Intention* of am touch with somebody beside* %  .: until they were in the the members of ita party; rat UN should not be presented tough with somebody who was that aort to be fooling them. Surely whoever made the report bed taken the 1 ovenunent should weather conditions into account aid "wag. to give Tney wanted $40,000 and $*),00U week rturlng which would be spent He was absolutelo study this ly sure of that. amount of excuse The Government not only sent remedy ihe !.h< & W. know that he knew that. He wan base was ilnished .urprlsed to know that things like 1 1 u'pi into it at an that were going on in such work. than was normally Another thing, he said, was that wenasked then to they had bean told that some of Of Ilarbadot, ihe material whir*, had come for •• 1 that every Seawetl was full of *ea water. He oney Resolutions questioned, 'too. whether the area n for them to give their w*s covered with a tarpaulin when there was rain and said that all only left to wonder when mat needed some inveatigatioo. a going lo be reached as He said that the saihe Transandtng money on SeaCanada Airlines had forced them to build the airport again and then they were having the same conlluusc when Reaolulimught \ r'.i.liire I idat from U slrfaaaa, it was in The Legislature Yesterday COUNCIL fee. *.•" a* that they had reached I rt 1 their hlsdlUons forced upon them. The mm mod ate iUt there was a r being asked to h .d to have'SeaTrans-Canada people should be left out. he said. He said that the airports about this area were built by Americans and they had picked out a "., Canadian to fool them. Tbey wouk! very likely find that the Canadian airstrips were built by American* and the Canadians had come out here lo practise was reasonably any construction u to be carried to spend -urns of %  Representation He said that they were .hen* to -Pimm Needed represent the taxpayers of BarBd. than 1 $40,000 bedos, taxpayers who wanted %  ..nted the houses to live in. They should not who was throw away the people's money limit the Resolution to explain like that. D was then asking for Mr. Talma (L) said the resolution was urgent and entailed %  Baal whatever loss of life if not dealt with im. d, th na.aU. ml. all aaaerla %  I la. rax. ..... IUUM) %  %  astaeea B a#arl at. Baataai iMri'lMi oaaaall \ir.n <• %  ">••" SM UM >•• IMS ana Pr*f>a>*4 Leawt %  ' %  !.Ii. II-V r <*- -a, .1 Janaar< I CM U>srevMsM Ikr 11*11 r.U.II.i-.nl s l.-.I.H.a I. wkt M i. I.i 1 Ik. I ..In ..1 Haa .1 lar.4 .1 Ml.| I I I ••*• %  .•IF. I...I %  a ••aau-Bwai I'.M % %  r..t i m I" HIMMMIW) %  ran II ( aaiUl. .. it. iiifMaiNHii, I.in...I.%  e j faai -i %  lk liioin-l Il. 1U l N %  • SB, fmtt ii -i i.' I. -,I,H...U.I iMI-.1T, K* U -SI %  *lM*al* l. ii K— Raaalaltaa la %  •>'• .-mi** ii> r I'l-rti saaaraasa •* %  • %  •aartaj i sfcas I n-n .1 Afll M. h !•*>.<.< rlkMH II'-i MOUSE When We HOIIM met ynlaida. M> Ad.in> Uld lbfolk !" J II* ft fpaeBI on In* Treat-wiil nl Of—iaBs.. (or ihe yean lf* %  <><. 1490 Rrptxt dalr-l 1*1. Febmaiy. IBM on Run*.*. Conitrurilvn. Brawn I Astsari Propoard Leavr Bar uUtm >• I SSI The foIlowInK nMieea wtn RcaolutHKi to nlcr the lUm ol —i...-. .i (J Cmrninrin-1 fc> %  upplemrni ISSI-U. Par! II. Capital -. Shown In Uie SupplMnenlan Raiimalr' ItSl it. No M which form IS. SchnluMI., llw RraolnlloN TOli Rrn.|iiti.iti a lalor ddalt Hh I .1 i-.-M-t l|ll lnlllnlr.1 an A.I lit ml Th* Pviblu Eniplovm Lanv* diipnul llukd nn Acl lo >t> re Acl. ISBS %  MO p a— rd a Reaulu ..l..i_l*. I m llt-J. ol HrparUnmia The Houa* poaaed a Reaolulioii I.MD U. auppawnrnt lha C*pllal SMUnaln IM1 A Beaolullon lo approve BM rivii E.i-i.n.h..,., i lOasari AmmdmtM Ordm a,hi. I lo lha aaUry of ihr Adju.nl anu ftwn OOVvr of Ih. local force, and Ihe Hrliiim.l.l •viiranl Malor inairuclor HtMhWI ha tinRubadoa Retln>eiii The Mouac pawd an Addreaa • Itch aiaa ininMuced b* Mr M-pv .1.1 pioteallnl aaliia DM aenalor MrCarran • ImmlgraUou Quota UmiUtlon Mill and a Compllmenlar R.—ili.li.i. nlmdiuM by Mr Crawford *l i>PHMM appreciation lo Consteaaman Cbi Ion Powell. Jnr a** UM Waal Indian Committee 'n Amaru.. Ihf Bill The Itoutr % %  adjourned until in Trinidad of the wa> old runway was aa much in tht in wlui.li itie airfields were done, winu as the new one, and he He was not going to vote for the therefore did not see the necessity i because there was no for taking up the old one If the %  .t over spilt milk, but he Government authorised Hamman was counselling the Government Co. to take up the old rwrway, not to brlnj in any James. Al, ,^ ,n .£* ""* lfcock,d / Hl though the money came tiom that the *mpany took up the runffi^W. Ukry should be cautious ffi ^^^t/^T^ I AS JO M .ons^tTh^nB^a.r.TVn^or;: h. irlt that W r*teung-wa. w-rung, rtXecuve material went from tt.e rba haste In which the resolution „ld runway, and resulted in the was brought before the Huue defect* which occurred, was an admission of the incotnpeAs the position was now, with. -merit to measure ihe new runwav needing repaint.) up to their responsibility as leadand the oM one taken up. there! ..ibadu*. The amount of was the question of what Usty money should be brought before would do In case of an emergency lha Rouse III the estimates, next It was suggested in the Rei do the work they should hi e to vote for the $40,000 He „ uld m n trained with wheelbarrows nowee how 0.000 wer,. added m ,ffSKS&!^^ one i*u • ssr .. "*' hear that Srawell v^ Change in Weather ilo5ed (or „ d-v d ue to a rh,.r. Mi. AdaaBB tL> aid Uat al'n wind direction, and If the old] e—.%  *— iqonui Qt keuru^ry runway was there, they would have had an emergency landing g3*Jg"g .U lo the Police the touched down and taxied had ieeanl or the. rWotual '"" t h time. as_ ">"' Attorney Gemaral or the Colonial Secretary. L-malndcr of the strip. Aft H. a*. u.. w,Uo„ mm *. :X2.7 c.. T,'.n.T. W n.^ V Bible for the supervision of the ,, . r ,.-equip with Turbo Jots. material. Wilson passed the work ...dltBrbsrlos would as a reMilt out of ihe route in .mother 11 months or so He was of the opinthat It W I A were quite hipv %  iivuig out other it ••''•* Off LiiidmK fees, and suid tn fl kxal Govcinniciit were i> %  naaoua lo have that compan> here that they ..—.. Government their Ajrhltael Hie be %  .. %  i. i i the i can lad out as for at least a id had time tit guard .,> Sea well. They try of Civil Air Ministry had a vested ml" In all airports tn the Empl hinted that perhaps the Govei nt might ask their advice Ihe present matter He felt ,..,.., ITiev -----— — --— .._.. icciui ui i i iii'ii ini-i well -— %  — %  --%  — >-—— oort"winch gave the U l f e*'L d L W T _ "* J W w "* coming to the Government month '<• P"> *.wii a ninw.y? 1 ""V 1 %  ? vc ,, of the fact that they dW not have *(?# month la milk the taxoav* *"* ,h 1 Canadian (.meml Ad corruption compeIent en g lne€r s ,„ the W came tocriticiKe the-airport a.al to .. competent engineers in the ILT" """ came to criticise the-alrport %  btfngntMtad co „ slrU cU, manner. They were ,JI!",^j"2"""^ !^ %  ""< !" " lP"J moneynterlng Into contract In lorml to „ p u,. „,„„„,,„. "; %  "' ,T v r !" ",,^," cr tu E"" 1 "' "ley wuled money, il ,,,,. was inpor, „„d he lelt that the rewlu!" "_ ,n V *2 m r, w 1 -._ X" omelhln lor Ihe benellt ol Hi. lie u.e expectations. Talma said that T.CA. ll" 1 "!!.^"^ T , f ,K r„S Mr. E. D Mottley (E) sal, were using the airport to-day th ^ on t r B ac 1 £ iJ'i'^t that M0.000 seemed a small sin. and the Cnnadian Government l rnmen l 5 !* m a .i S" o him to be spent In the Uuldin should be called upon to help Government had up mere to suf e ngineatto| projaci Bu with the repairs. Repairs which Pf rv1 ^ *• contrete mixing cornwh amu ,.ng to him a w 0 !" a„,,„ rM ..i B riv C. —A. plained that It waregularly were really of inferloi fact thut at S M r&dav. I th %  %  i things. Mnnev Wasted said that there was one thing i imprc^cd him about the i .,• ma that tt did matter how much money it i K ni't MUIIU uu t>i vAifw< %  >•<• %  •. wur uuiir inuuiii writ itnui* ,,. ... mil nio> m "" > % %  e il >..in..|hm r„r the purpose ol calennj to quality. Ihey should have known mpn found „ ul na ,„ • hn, lilllc neld T.CA. 'pUnes. which do a lol ol hat somelhm. was attf wron „,,, ^„„ Mr vnUcnwupm .well damaje to Ihe airileld ' < n ? %  "•""" '"' ' b w "•""JaU they could und wart. r\ S. Lesta 11.1 said lhat They welcomed the viall ol "'• Crawrord said mat since the connolljr. iKr..,...,.. point „. the Senior T.C.A. 'plane. became they >* *j!S£SL S^Sf.l^ lie ud lhat hewa. prc,, 111 coning back hrounht in Canadian dollar, and Canadian Government waa waituke the e.pen'. recomm ;.,s .esalon tryln, American doUara. Bui .1 the %  > '' Mr %  w ,on 1 "S"" Hon. on the mallei-but.he that hJ damne to the airfield was done l on " '" men! sat down and could not nnd heln with the eanenditure Canada and open a new business a „ybodv else from any part of ahc help with Ihe expenditure. Thj Governnimt „,,, h v ,„ w ^bj ,"„ „ vr hP v „,n.lblllty of Resolution Passed be very wary how Ihey bring making a report on Wilson and down these exports from outside tlarriman except anotlier CanaMr. Mapp (I.) aatd lhat ha was to supervise work." he said, dlan They could have sent lo not surprised at the resolution. Although Ihe report suggested England, Jamaica or even Trim ., In June last year, the House lhat (40.000 would be sumrlenl to dad for a supervisor for Truii.l.M %  "an lo vote n. ir mey paltc< i a resolution for $186,429 do Ihe repairs, they were sllll askhad one of Ihe best slrports in the ^ %  b aitlng on the n-porl on the 0 ^ spen t un the runway which tng for $go,000. The asking for world. aonn 11 ip ihey gol had air^dy cost over a tnilllon $20,000 more because Ihey did not a was the case, he ssld. of the froii -. wli.ii n ,. ltll( dnlliirs. The monc> know whether the weather would inspector telling Harrtman 'don't wa if coming there and Bnr from Colonial Developchange did not hold fair at all. work at night because he could ^ %  rei.Mi.i: llic :.mount the expert menl Bn d Welfare and Ihey They could coma back for lha not see to supervise the work al ^Pd tol.I them by 30 per cent. They might (eel that It was not a logs $20,000 at another time If the night. Then suddenly, one hoard in ihe same breath l0 i| )e colony weather did not hoM fair. "The mat Ihey were working al night. a was no good. He H# sgjj that Harriman Co. Government should try ui pin Perhaps the crookedness and dlsMli HOJ and Ihey fell hould do something to help wllh lhcm down to do the job for honesty wenl on at nlglil. Mason* -a 50 per cent. more. lhr conditioning ol Seawall Mc MO.uOO which I. even more than „„d carpenters came out and loin .uhls inconsistent hiw ,„ ue d a warning to Ihe we can afford Ihem what was giang on ttthM „ %  he could House last year that everything Reduction Moved nusre confidence in the West encouraging Ihe was not going right at Seawell Mr Crawford moved that the Indian expert lvalue Ihe had ail itlng money which was because he wa told by a workresolution be reduced by $20,000 ghat waa HI in the Wcs I • asetd. man on the airfield thai everyso thai the amount be $40,000. He \ll < anadlanurabla Member had thing was not rlghl. finally said thai It seemed thai Mr. Moltley .aid that they Government had Do It was all an unhappy slate ol Ihey made a slip by not making brought down a Canadian to in ihe building of an affairs, he said. II cost them Govemmeni Departmenl sup. uprrv |„ Csnadlan lo report [Tie other members $10,000 in a resolution before and cr \ l !"!" ,' 1 ""• lot) „„d lu)w Canadian lo work with lhcm Sllll it now they were going to spend *"!,*;""„,", '• '.Ji %  .._„ "Why don't you turn Canadian a, the expert another $.0,000 making $.40,000 „ o the oomtonJ^.M hemem,, „ idea that because they war* not technical experts when It came U ma)or engineering by alltfafl coming in to land and thai the T.C.A. aircraft caused UV defects. Any competent engineer I ..ware of the fact that ,h fectl would be caused after 1M' ', l |o l ll l 'e, 2 ''!' !" ^ ".•'"! r " "' "• iime"n'.d "arrived -hen ror anotnar 1,500 feel and so ihe people who were watching thai besl malerlals should have been JTjSr from the outside should lie used at that particular part of the called In to give tlicir inii-ml He was at-o drawing the attenMr. T I. Wah-ott. (LI replied, lion of the House to the fact lhat giving explanations lo Ihe points one end of the runway was oneraised by Mr. Barrow and Mi third the strength of Ihe other Lewis, and when Mr F K w ,1 end which meant thai for al least mn "-' "I"*' n "" Ito"'" 1 0 "; l days a year, when the wind %  >* "'il <""< •*",* h ."" m £.' M n! lie.'ion varies, aircraft would "'"'' Government Ihey were, lo not b. able to Und &?: runway. SW ""-" %  '" '" ld r pon rhU roaanl ihat TCA would lb "liS. £ .. ,0 .. .'"" "' ">* airport ||c wa. wondering II the hurry i .',' „ *, t'-'ioiously offeraeag o great that ahey could not 0 .ernment a have another week or so In order money In order lhat members might have Ihe OpCanada Airways would |.,nuuily to get (urthe, iiiforma' i bru %  %  in asseiigeri, II ||„„ |f he undei-stnod II rightly. .' ', ; '"Jva|hev would have to go lack for he l.lan a. a whoU That „„„ r< hp m ^cy In the new ' '.'J£i' ."" l r.sllniat,-. Imausr in Ihcse day.. Ii, ii.nwsj i as made g.OOO feel u jld not vote a sum of money that particular Airline nra ," allow II lo carry over toto and no other jlrllne at all Kht that Government Ise In having a Canadian __.ir>ther mr, If that were dnete. they would be able to feel more satisfied that the Government and r-a^* 5E SKtMaWB %  i trurtif.n. hut it sral rcfrettsM> lhat lh' iteriiin who was i '-night down was not as ron. actoul as wus expecti'd Whnt happened in the old runBarrtra.isked "Did %  UQMCIM Harriniiin h Co, to take up the old runfl i-'nild be used In an v llh n 50-mlle un houi liould never have I necessary In view of what had happened. ft was lucky that the senior member f"r St. Joseph and the junior member of St. Peter wennut in ..ppoaltion to themselves (Government), because he would have liked to henr them ciltlci* Gwernment for the unfortunate |e.-.riii In which It rinds itaeir 1 %  •TosSal ^.7.0^ i"d.y. They had Jbatadhj i atloni advanced by the Governthey had Ihe aUjPsTlar sIa, and far a. he could rememahm-e all. Ihey *•**' IT'^L ..er, was thai airline pilot, were bUM* of seeing that It waadone omplalnlng lhal the old runway 'lht Girvernmenl had Iherefoie the wind, and that the, t" lake the responslhlllty of Mr ad difficulty In landing Agaln.t Wilawi. Ineompatamco. his. he wanted to say thai any Alter hearing what HJJJ %  •"dor ilnt In Ihe world who could nol member for St. Gaorge had sail „ind an aircraft full of passenger' one must have qualms as in r cross wind whether Government should no! ,,l lake further advice and It was doubtful whether the slabs ol Mr. Burrow went on to give an Portland cemenl were going to lie liieldatlon on aeronautics, and along side the asphalt! dvanced the suggestion that the properly ( richt md had added coming out of the treasury, did not see why they should dr. F. L. Walcott rose to llnually vote money for effecting .lost his being misquoted, repairs to Ihe runway. %  hat he had said lhat the Mr. Crawford (C> ssld that BEAUTIFUL' GARDEN %  •: ANCES THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME. %  u can achieve this by keeping yours in good condiWe can assist you from our comprehensive range of \ H I M \ TOOLS they the full •Put -omebody to do Mr. Skli „ ner-a (of H. T.) work and V scheme him do the airport: I don't wa, m themselves of anv Jamas. -rponslblllty a. far as He said lhat they should ma. WE HAVE — SMI \lts. roSBSj HOES, BAKES. EDGING fOOU SPRAYERS. SPRINKLERS. Ii re s .i gpaglal oiler lor Ihis Week in.. RI'RBER HOSE @ 16c. per loot Nert BARBADOS HARDWARE CO., LTD. Ha, If, Swan St. Phcne 2109. 4406, or 3531 S.P.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT (C. F. HARRISON & CO. FIRST FLOOR) WHITE'S 1W3-I9S0 (The Story of White's Club) —New Publication HORSES IN THE M.AJCINC; lady WCentworth „ THE HORSHMAN'S YEAR :52 W. E I-yori .. THE SHEUIOURNE Elmliel h Bo wfn COMPLETE IMX)K OF 1WL.LETS: Cyril W. Beaumont .. THE BALLET ANNUAL: Arnold Haikell PHOTOGRAMS OF THE YEAH H.52 THE DARK MOMENT: Anne Bridal THIS FAIR COUNTRY. Oodfr*y Winn WEEK END WODEHOUSE IIOSWELLS lX>NDON JOURNAL Iteplacemrnt A SAILOH'S ODYSSEY: Viscount Cunmniliam SHADOWS MOVE AMONG THEM Mitlelholirr COMPLETE CANASTA : Oswald Jacoby >w Suppllm of beok* for Lrnt. Sunday Hchool Wsll Plclurf* Hymn Books


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HI IIM -I'M I I RKI U;\ II.VKllllHlS VIHlll ,,, fll.l MM HENRV BY CARL ANDERSON %  O ti— I TOUCH aewwii/E ; TMOUSANOOCLAR | LUMP FEE 1 SEUT LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES wrs JW.' I -'.vO BLONUIE RY CHIC YOUNG 0*OPY PK CO ANP cV cNK MC MOWi A SUPPOSE i : %  J:-:P J V.-AT H£S ] -7 H GOT ^ Gland Discovery Restores Youth In 24 Hours i f'Otn loa. of ,-.• .-*k Uclv, Impur. ;*~lnn MMMf! .ill % %  !." %  -' • % %  %  Uaht4 lo IMIH f %  •* vl*l i hv in • Till* I.%  alble to nutall aad raaitx ra.tnra vi 11 %  .. %  • %  rich, purr Mux), to airman i. %  %  in [ : t IM<'> .0 %  a h*ip* i tlwHitt. Mav-to-UKe UNat fMir *-M 111* arllh (land oB*t1,r coian, < %  • i>**n •• %  Till Ih-.l II 1-. DO* ( all i-h.ir-iMa h-ra undrr a ruanint'o I complat* ntiafarlkiii or naair !*. In olh-r %  *>. VI TAB* nrn-t niaka > your.a•r. or Yon maralr raturn tlta aanaxy parka** and Kl .11 v n ii.. and IhaawarAt kttl. itv i.Irot. epaaajat. aalfcf up I •m OM*UII ^ "it II udora thi arm. dcrful f ..m.l.i. n ind" p ..! %  > In one. Ii got* on irM i tu.r.1 riffa ii %  %  %  \ I TVrr'. MtUflf i %  -i"H "poll jw I Sensational NEW make-up tl^.tn.n.,, inatanl ith"t dfyte) raaaj 'kin, and hmaHgl •had" 1 Mil ra-ily allurJ. Vi-fabs M !. % %  PAIN SACR001 CONQUERS PAIN. On Sale a' I KNIGHTS LTD. FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY YOI CAN'T TBIf -f THAT (*,, KfAl' NOW STAY PUT AMP I. >tu CO**: '-iS ,.. UK. wot • %  & MCT ao*lO.-' Ti* aMPIN'S t** ANP I'M jpf>ias ma* cffUS' MfM'4 < AU THAT'4 *TO*1^a> -OU I rrmtt *a)Q**p .< A f *l lANPtui O'UUAKPS. *C a>*T 'AM, r'ltfA* -' *iT 'M AlU.' JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER PAYS YOU ItO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SPKIVaL^TFEHSwrC now m-tilalilr ill unr ilrimrhra TnreilTdr~~ S|i. ii;liisio\> II mid Snun *lri--l Usually Now Uiu.llj NOW Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes .41 M Tins Pie Apples .96 M Tins Box All Cleanser .23 .20 6 lb Potatoes .72 JI Tins Cooking Butter (51b) 4.50 kM Boneless Beef .58 ..10 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street T II K r O I. O \ a\ A II I. II Ol I It I I s BY GEORGE MC. MANUS %  >J MM^a4 BACtCAGe* Mcwe OuTAftTOOTO AUTfl CBAZV NON-' J STXTy POLLA56! TKE IT BACK AM0OT*V BUT-fJQ.TK^ APEO5Aff0>CU ', *K_t,-w*" CPPFBEP-TV€v || WXf >J MUST BE fOB *CXl' (j AV SO' • flF. j Briticfa lloi3lu ra§ li> Sli|in-ii I.. 4 Hi|f<>r RIP KIRHY • %  %  BY ALEX RAYMOND ;^ T^fE wcsSiis Ito "VE _^ -O "^E *?l:5 THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY M00RES III.'. tfl ,nf I iiulia-h %  %  %  tiArPly now lotd %  % %  ri'ilnr ,i in, i not i' %  ttlm %  ultrr* %  fid I | ii -rnt. %  %  % % % %  %  BCMdaaM l.v | „ ftpwhh %  urtdfr %  *!*i .. and ..nvPDlon' '.f ll.iiv MorgUI HI iv-i an • h M hif'h %  %  MM *tlh nfUhbouiinK Central AriwrtfaW rrpubllr*. f|if< i 111 % %  H i n putt vMi Cuatcimilii riiclrd In ihc HtflUlftt] AKTeemcnt of 1859, liul trie BHW muth nf (HplnmrLlIc flrife rrmutns Id iho pirtvnt day. and inay b tcfrrrrd to 1'N.O. Vht loncludlnf chapUT nn! HN ("nlony lodny with special rmphaita on Ha economic nnrl r-immerrial Matui and rerrni Oovernmenl piopoiaU for devell it The wiilrr tfMWl ntTlrtilIur;il and other re-iources have been gravely neglected, and that thu fertile lund could maintain population many times its pftflMI ^ire ADVOCATE ^TATIOI\EKV HOOK "SHOP GRETSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP. HASTINGS



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WMM4MPAT FIBSVASV a* im BUIRAD09 ADVOCATE r.\ar. mre /^ITVCF MOLASSES REPORT RELEASED MAR MIT E Recommendations Made On Bulk Shipment VITAMIN Wr coiuldtr lh.i U and whn Ih. urn. tw for fancy molaun lo be shlppej othfr than In wvoaVti II ahould u-hipm^l t Canard Mulann In view ol th. evidence preUf r.-farditu Ihe fam tool canned molaaaes THE Report of tnc Commltti* appointed t. Into all aspects ,if tin Fancy Molasses Industn ,l„s was released during the week. %  l he committee comprising Sir John Saint. Kt CMC reconum-nd laat trial should l* Mr. a. H. Adams. M.C.P.. and Hon. J D. Chandler M l.C' SXi'i'ii ,h ll*n"'"S old ctop 1.1 His Excellency Sir Alfred Willum L-unaMesSavage. *•> l.nntlit Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of lk ''• pw.ii..ln. St. Michael and St. George. Governor and Commander'""! •"'";'" "f'JT', "'"' i-In, l in and over the Island of Barbados and its Depen. . w, "u"n -'deiu.u-s oir etc tilaney. On Uih June, ,'ijO, you invited us to sen* at a Committee with ihr ti>lL)n term* of references: "To enquire into all aspects of "IT* an *y molasses Industry of Barbados with particular reference to production, price, marketing and methods of export "and to make such recommendaiions as might be considered 'necessary to ensure the maintenance and development of that In*dustry. We held twelve meetings in Barbados between 8th July, 1950 .nd 24th August. 1950 and then on ?nd September. 1M0 visited Canada and the United States of America where we held seventy 'wo interview* with Government Officials. Brokers. Wholesaler* or Hetnilrr*! returning to Barbados on 6th October. 1950. Introductory In order to obtain relevant evidence, we first invited, by means o* a notice in the Press, all persons interested In the ranev Molasses Industry to appear by appointment before us The response to this advertisement proved disappointing, since only one reply was received In the Interim the committee arranged a succession of meetings with various individuals, producers and exporters, who we considered would be able to supply us with Information relating to our enquiry. Representatives of the Barbados Produce Exporters Association, the Am alga m;.ied Cooperages and the Barbados Cooperage, as well as the Sugar Coordinator, the Labour Commissioner, a number of protfc in the year and subsequent equalisation when the pru.* f'.i si.it.,, vtolcni iuctualions in U> ptici <>f lam> molasses from year to yeai owing to short crops, etc If thij. principle is accept* %  then an extra c-s would r>imposed on farv> lH a good yrar to oanpen •M fur tht funds nwdt*,l to cu.ual.ar th* pi %  m poor >c.u it iKcomeuended :i..ii iiii fund %  .rmuld be uprrati-j I thFancy Molasses Control ami Marketing Board rictV Han n ark* I i art* idarly ii .. > existing channels. Seel bi'glil-n an.) more light:. drums could be used fur Ihe* jnoln*""* Mld h, manufactured. country trade and the ures"onsider tliat this suggestion ent wax paper package or "Mrwii further investigation can for the cltv trade .Advert Uing (e) The packer, should underFor re-ason. given in the Report JHtSf Z^SL "f'"loV* take to distribute onlv genuwe recommend that Barbadw ? lon ? nd "P 00 Av }* Ine Barbados fancy molassfancy atOsaMea etHMlld be e and should agree thai no laed t" the eo blending be done at their name i> kapj constant) \ Mbr plant, eaatpt with the pertha oul'lt Wi i... ntinend thai mission of the Barbados provision for advertising should fancy Molasses Control be included in the price of fancv Board. molass. and that the cess should ( %  ) We consider that the labelbe paid to a special fund In the ling of packaged molasses is ilr-r place, we raccaruQgad that the Montreal urea should be selected test market for advertising Since most packers have their owr. Definition of Fnnc> Ma-law For the i-rtisons given in the Report we recommend that the definition of Fancy Molasses in the Barbados Fancy Molasses Production and Export Act, 193". shouUt bi altered to read 'Cam mui J%hVt\h evaporated to the consistency of ., syrup, but (naH not apply to fan" rnotaseta huh la ceessHBared '• the Board appointed under thiAct to be below th* rerogniscd. •tandard of Barbados Fancv Molasses" natter of prime importance. All packages should have the words "Genuit Fane; MMM Control MarketinK Rnurd \nd Barbados Fancy MoUsses*' brand i printed on them in eaiil.i 'ad letters The quest.' > on the parka.-. advertising v. ill Ii ried out in co-operation with the (I) O Tht i.JfKUfloii Fancy Molasses Coulul and lug Board is a most importSftff Ami Shirts Stolen A tropical butt n.td two rurts were stolen from the 'I Agatha Crichlow at Mayers Land, My Lord's Hill i..iel. between 11.30 p.m. on Sunday and 7.00 a.m. on •^Monday They are the property of David Crichlow. Walker St Andrv.' .! he Ivf his homefor work at about "Si pm on February 8. When h< returned at iboiit 4.30 a.m. on th< following day he discovered tha' *iis gold wrist watch with a golt txpiinding strap, valued SM). on mismg from a tin m his bureau dntwej St Clair Har\-ey of Mile and Quarter St. Peter, reported that his fountain pen ws maj of Ihe ..... i ef •.i.....t VU,WI b> His Vt'orship Mr. I-. B. l.rirtith yesterday on a ibarge oi hou*ebr?Jkinc snd urceny. Ihr BhatlSja -i ,i,thai the %  ITrnr* . .rummllted m. lime brtwrrn Drcembrr ?.l nd lircember 21. %  i Mr. Jt. T. lit" II., k. ,,,)., ,,, „ '" bgfsall MI I..I.-...U i u,.i mm..!, hearing. SANDWICMlS >£'* as UM!'. fcodfoi family( M 4 *m fitness v e whrthrr MM name, or cS^ Itar. Thr,c —I J^^ M 'J^ItSs^ JT. distributing firms should appear to be no reason why a paralso be included is a matlicular brand of molasses should ter for consideration not be advertised provided that It ( %  > A special fund will have to consists of genuine Barbados fancv be created from part of the molasses, and that this fart is savings effected by bulk printed on the package thipment It has been esRe*. A.J. Cocks L£CSJ ^Sff Bti5JLr S". %  -a • %  u •„ SuJ! iu. lh : m. X.^ 'b=r,Jft gs,*y5ass= i n ^ lated that 54 cents per gallon would be iiifflcicnt to cover the present wages ol displaced labour and could be used to provide alternaUve employment Further sums should be made available from this speciul fund for advertising to the consumer and the name of Barbados F a n c > Molasses should be kept before the public M 'ik.-iin % %  commend rertaln alterauon* agree continue to be the Director Agriculture, but consider that the rest of the Board should be appointed by the Oovernor-in-tiecutivo Committee and shall Inlu:ie t Producers Associat if the Exporters' AsaoSic Jires of third crop ripe nes were burnt when %  rire broke it at Joes Rlvei Joseph, at about 7 p m on Monday are the property I F.Nt ite^ Ltd. and were Vnam.-iihtl K.I., to B-.ldu t bo4.. tSm %  vwtiibM. (u snd CIMOT* drOivt tH l>s>t<*Ai from Mirti>4*—atd to *o(o-' U-. ici.il.'i Celk-Ov* On hof Bult'rd IO.ll !o>' Imrr*loi..lea., 'DI.IM, %  *• %  inec of the Overseas MissionAnothc; Are at Lowlanda, S' v field. Lucy, on Monday at about 7 31 Me had rvaohed aunoat his 90th p.m. burnt four ;uul %  huU U.SA. Market fb) V.SA Market Market condition* in the Ui We recommend that— I.I> Tha Barbadian vxputtei should make a list of the genuine Canadian whole%  altn apd limit sales to members these dealers. Retailer ?lation. should not Ixpermitted !<• (H) Powers obtain fancy molaaaet at w ' recommend thitl UM poweis the wholesale price. *>' *"Board be increased to pertb) Favourable consideration BjH the Board tp. ?<• %  nd.0p*TB.11I .!.. axportei ltd ducers of fancy molasses, "the RUtes of America are someuhiit Fancy Molasses Control and Mardifferent from those in CnnadH keting Board, and Ihe Honourable and we came to the conclusion H. A. Cuke. CB.E. M.L.C.. also that we could increase our •hipnppearcd before us to give evlments of fancy molasses to the dence and advice. USA if bulk shipments were The evidence which was given made This additional business to us, particularly with regard to would not affect the amount of conditions in the export markets labour which Is at present emof Canada and the United States, ployed In the industry was most conflicting, and we came We recommend that .bulk shipto the conclusion that to obtain a ments of faney molasses should "• appreciation of the position be permitted to the U.S.A granting the large Wh0*£ olready bWBJWRWltJld. salers .. special allowance f-oommendations of the 1 tall of the volume rardinft thc oppr 1 ?V 1 l\' cf bUaiWlM done We underfund should be subject t st.ind that this is n customflrmatlcm t> ^ar. and he had served In the iniatry 02 years, giving nearly s ..t thi. Siianr ' ^ars of active work lje tion and two ^^ ' lhc ^&Wd HatIn 1928, and after some acting partial service flnallv made ,i home %  I Bush Hall. St. Michael. He came out from England as .i young man to plantation work in St. Vint. -m. tatar t-kin K I position in j big business firm in He was also u lay if first and second crop ripe vanes.. E ropeity of WlUlam Griffllh t| .|rj i W st i.ucy A quaatU? i Th De eroo D/isi In the OOUrti %  •( Hivorce fo M ntii II I,ord*hi Mr Juailca Q L Ti vi..i pr. nouncod a decree .div.luto m Uihf'APEX the Governor-mho trsdo practice and Caef "Uve Committee %  vhlch encourws "holeThl rMon in IH | sl | OT „l|| need "' '" ""'" %  >"l""' m „ .iteration lo the prcwnl Acl to -s'Ece c,o.cr de^c o, JjJ-,*, g^SSJUBfe adian Import. Jar it would be ncccasnrv for iu .. visit the North American Continent and investigate condlUons for ourselves. Our recommendation to this efTecl was approved by tha ...: h shipments will provide valuible data and experience. Part of the savings should be paid into a Special Fund, which can be used Ivcrtlslng and for the othe %  and oHbiine'l l,l ur ' 'he pet.tio...., Ii id mm Indian WejJ f ^S^i* *?*%. nitfhtet i oiirereine. K.istrui %  it '.on. He iMMsessed als.^ an ewtrn trong physique, .uid wm. ,.bl.to of hard work in soon..( adian importer appears ae-j %  "—>**";-'„ mo lasses to be ,nr "*J K*" 1 *^ '"lands. whan cJrable. a Committee repre^^ t ^.J"vuJviSSSLtS Ir^ ne rly a ,,,r travelllnswas then anting the Interests of both J" ""S," 1 ,' F ,C> MotalBW In on horselwck an.l where there 4dM should t>e set up so *>\tl\t> runa. ||(1 „ ll | l( rw | country sgaUonj We further recommend In order particularly in Tobago .ind i:-encxpedite ihe llxing of price-i :'-' %  i'u staUOBeel in rriiiidad. San Fernando, and in It.iihfidn^ tit Providence 'the mend to 'he Go' -----J^^^^do.,0 that minor grievance' lie noted and removed. His Lordship Mi Ju Tajrlet BJM Bvcawuncad (sMri In the nit of M. M Fmtage petitioner agumst E F Knuncrespondent. Mr. W. W Hec* c Q C. instructed by Massars. Il'jtchinson & Uanlleld appeare.l .. petitioner. Lttmhrr Arrin'tt that Section 7 of the Barbados Fancy Molasses Production and Government and we proceeded to purposes recomrnendee u, H t Regulation 5 of the Barbados termed the Fancy Molasses IndusFancy Molasses Production and trv Fund. This fund could be used Exp ort Regulations. 19M. be ,',*'' for hr following purposesamended by deleting therefrom '',.",., the cost of apthe words "and approved by both prom A I 1) proved advertising proHouse* of the Legislature •us high officials In Ottawa and Washlngti greatly assisted us in qur investigations. W. thank all those who helped us so generously and wholeheartcdlv during our investiga ions. Wo are especially grateful to Mr. C. R Stollmeyer. Canadian Trade Commissioner for the British West Indies, who by his untiring efforts during our visit to Canada made It possible for us to carry out so comprehensive a survey of the fancy molasses market in Canada Kecommendation BI I.K SHIPMENT (a) Canadian Market We have not been convinced by the evidence put before us that Ihe shipment of fancy molasses in hulk to the Canadian market pec en Since we do not consider that the ^STSlSf 1 ^vantages outweigh the disadvantages Under present condition^ there is n shortaue of steel and prices of steel arc rising, and. in our opinion, it would be inadvisable for the Industry to be dependent on steel containers for the shipment of fancy molassc genltl. friendly, and nttentiv .,, "T !" 'SS3* .iwrnatlvecrn^MH^t^^ "ITEMS • I (5! K piy imcrest and depre,„.„ k nm cnouah to. the ll.orSfWltotown „d . laid to cintlon m capital Involved .t,,,,,,,,, and cfnolency .vl.ich he rest In the Spel(htslnwn < hapel pLWIdln. bilk storaae In J !" ,„„ %  „ ,h,o„ B l,'u, ., M JJfd It n.,: on,,.,,", Barbados and In Canod.. ,lg,ti„„, and we recommend hm, \Mi basin of the t.'arecnaae l no* laden with a uu.mllty ol knob,win, n Rrrfvwd hosv on Baturdi) A i %  I" i"' % % %  •-< laal i • U • M %  illim .pci'lally JueM and p.!" ,.,.,.-,. %  ,„. „ .„ lu ,. y|H „.,, ,„ ,, | 'Ii HlrRou. choice ol „„„„ „, ,.,„,, sh ,,.,, ,..,,,i 1„,„ an.l could always be di v ,„ „„„„„„. ,,,., |,.„ :;,„ In llh pleasure and h |,,„„.„, „ f iso.lKlll It. c.t pil.l I"""" ". %  Win |llD| „,„ „.,„, wh|rt .,, hrt.ushl '" Hail nloi ( I'.. I Hnllali Hi in.. I. r-U-i.1 that all lumber-yards will acl a part this shipment The M V Bsr. I. .on.lancd In Ifam II, 00 C CO Ltd. MATE ARRESTED i %  Inquest Today Bermuda Legislature Move To Protect Privileges R. C II Hsllet, .red the Ho„ S,r T^ !" V'^ ^l. TAMPICO, Feb. 111. Secret Service agents are holding Alfredo Culm I'-M • III t nii.ii teaot a maxlcan tanker, for invest.An inquest touching Uw daalfc "gg-S* m i'"' JW 'e active of Hugh Wi.kh.mof White ll.dl. "£*** anfl ' a,pd '" n lba St. Michael will be held to-d-y al ks' later yeara, ..HHun toUowing conliscat his ss-rvice to the lloj HAMIlaTON THE Legislative Council i cently agreed with the House of pointed AsscmblvS proposal that the two form with bodies nominate ; joint select Honourabl. at the present time In committee to see what legislation can be introduced to protect their privileges. This move follows lii> fry by the House that 'they hod no powers of unction over The Royal Gazetie, which last month published a report of a debate held In open session after the House ordered it to be suppressed. The House declared the Gatette's action a brooch of prlvirder to maintain i orta We estiniatfd that bulk • npment of fancy molasses was i aukaly to decrease the cost of the 1 roduct by more than 2 cents per i uart package, and there was a i.eneral opinion that such a reduction would not affect sales since t le present prices of competitive I roducts are as high as or higher Man fancy molasses. Al some time II the future. It is possible that lictl COI met, and the price of fancy MII have to be brought i s lowest possible level, under t'-iese circumstances, it may beconM essential to ship molasses in where tne> i ulk. hi this connection, it must >. and Hon. B 9SKS|fS>n5S£& lo be sold on a parity with the exit *" '^.;, world's price for sugar then eve-y House and lo state effort must be made to redin %  Honourabl that the Hor the the matter. Tht president, the Hon. J T. Gilbert, said the Council should cartahtb eoncui with the House's message, which only went so far is to suggest the formation of a (olnt select committee. "Major Huxley said he was hi went on. Some ears ago I came to the same conlusion—that il was desirable the position should be examined and in due course legislation patted. pa Mid of tin' boyi Hut now he Identified himsel' fullv with the local Scouts Assolatl ind .i" 11 %  • %  posithtn of Oaotnl Which lie filled with distnu t... I ,d yenrs. And on his retirement through falling henltl he was awarded the "Medal f m-n. • %  •Til Merit", and as he was not %  fat* ••/M, V\>" CALLS mllll t„ KO to Oow nm agi, u UPCSD CAMCO : , 1 M,ltu .l 1 ? J h (!, ui c T T S1 Hilary lllood, very kindly went The motor vessel Bonny, under ou to Bush Hall and cmferre Captain Pederson arrived here t |w iiurignln at his home 'argo including He was laid to rest in the '2.240 bags of Hrt n( ., Ciiurchyi.nl, and the pollard, 800 bags of poultry f-ed. Kun.-i i s. MI..in. %  500 cartons of beer and 35,000 fee „, the ;di-enre of the Methodist of lumber from St John and H.iliHn-thren M Svno.1 in Grenada, by the Rasj Bidn* I '' %  ,1 '" %  %  1 1 I'M 22,70 packages of conlrabam Anierirun -ig.irettes and 1.001. %  soap. Officers said the men was hidden in UM pOTI tanker Halaaaanea which yesterday from (trownsville Texas.—FJ.F. Triminghttm Win* Single* Title The results of yesierdsy's Belliville Lawn Tennl; Tournaine > %  MENS SINOLEH fUnal.l J. D. Trlmlngham be.it I) < Worm* 8—2. 8—3. (i WEDNESDAY'S FIXTLRHS Mlxrd Doubles (llaiirllrip Diss D. Wood Di C M Russia, China Celebrate Friendsliip Treaty LONDON costs. Presumably, under these undltions arrangements would have to made for the piodueer of -ugar to subsidise the producer of t inCF molasses. We consider *.nat the fancy molasses industry should plan well in odvance so that shipment In bulk can be adopted with the minimum dliricul.y. Thf following matters cd me second anniversary of thai muit be given attention:-— treaty of friendship, alliance ana (a) When fancy molasses is mu t UB i assistance Thursday witn shipped in bulk, there an unurtced ented display o. should lie only one exportfrlPndshj coupled with a mountleS SnSSStyoI fav?^ "* PSSS campaign again I -Montreal, Quebec. St *"* %  Eden Colliers I'ron Fag* 1 cure At the same tlm*. however. there is no doubt, that Britain wa anxious to get useful negotution-. underway without undue delay und there were very strong indications that Britain's new apRussia and Red China ceieorsifproach would go a very long way towards meeting Egypt's nation..i aspirations. The main points to be discussed m detail would be the MM limit W British fvacuatior. "I UM SUM Canal Ztu* and definition ol | Egypt's sovereignty over the, S*dan pending the Sudanese peoexpicssion of thei Tli M. Tatd. II.' UrUl | |%  .,-. ICoraviai Mil nmg vs. Miss M King %  -' Metho.ll 1 lH-.-l.l-Twr.iingii.iH own John and HaWaK-ahouW Mao Tte Tung, Chairman of the pie 1* sufficient for rconcAnk-al Chinese Communist Oovernme,.. I .-i.. j d( diplomat1 distribution. expressed ^nrtMl gratitude to M ^?£" ln ,S with Anglo(b) It will be necessary for extha great Soviet peop %  • M* k .f „_ T|w In porters to agree on export Soviet Government and Stalm for ^"SmmZ i natous to auolas based on previous "generous and enthusiastic as"'SJSJJ in the Suea Canal volume of business aistance given to our Government jr.,,* ,.rrangernents which i


PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 WEDNESDAY. KE1 HRICE EWE Truce Negotiators Split Further Over Russia PANlfUNJOK, Korea. Feb. 19. rrucc negotiators nireed on iht* recommendation Far %  !" *J %  bul split further over RuMtal I lily tO pollCC :m gffntfgtJco Kill! ;ir!n:s(K-c delegatngtsd lu their Governments that talks begin within BO days 01 tfat on the withtl of foreign Iroopi from Korea, a "peaceful settle-. merit of the Korean question etc. 1 agreement omplcted — -• on the ilfth Hid fliial ,,o'e 1 A •• "Sick Atoms B.(i. Forced To Follow On 109 Behind .Mice agenda but 11* still were i i Items—the supervision of truce i \change or ar prisonStall officers of two sides argued 'nUtleMly for two hours OAK KUKJE, Tennessee" over the United Nation* n -.hl to U s u,, workr veto the Communist choice of'm^Juu. Hk bhaane, U "ne of the six neutral o ponce UM • Help Sick I Pino Mantle negative ouiuMn lest', on their lingers to see which one wellded the death The National Bureau of lUoo said: though the i itaaal'i there was still pounds to hold the men ona ot whom A;Ireportedly wen running with a gun in his tar the scene of the shooting; It Mid the other two were seen near the same locality in the day. —I'. P. hich [Hirported to be from St. Joseph, for all he knew, could have been from anywhere. He thought it was of the utmost disrespect to the House, where could think that he could ich a document put in the hands of members. He would say it no more strong. that if IdHonour was respomible for it, he could only say ba regretted it very much. His Honour the Speaker explained that as it was u letter fur member of the House—he did not know who had sent it—It irculated. but he was not asking that it be taken as official. PORT-OF-S1'AIN. Peb n tulai %  hind Trinidad 1 I i.-tai of t ,(,i is; %  %  % %  %  law Wight dominated the batting again today and found %  DM Nippon from Camacho. In the Hritn.ii (iuiana second .macho was aggressive -hue Wight waa sedate. The British Guiana llr>t innings closed 28 minutes after the luncheon period for 204. Wight %  huuldered the team with a grand 2IS minutes with touri Offoylvtna. ofl -tie bock Hiving past inid-w icket. .md HM lag atoa ware M it., leorlna thou Wight was out pthnj to force Skeete to the leg side and return... Wight and Mc Watt overnight batsmen put on 34 runs batata the teVnr tried to cut .i good length ball from Skeete and wa caught behfnd the ticket At lunch, the score was 1V6 for T Bruise. Thomas 17. PaUiir 7. Sixtv-llvc mns In Bt) minutes before lunch Tiie new ball curled Up the tall afterwards. Effect ivcne*, ul the TTinid.id ..Hack lay in variety but WP* Uie batsmen failed to punish many I XtllMMII %  B*do8 Increase Grant To I.C.T.A. G4U per U'ge of 1 i %  < both .i %  %  Civil Servant 1 For Sessions Tin; UOtTT KINO'S acoOTa v,ti, I .mlihcan .1 amber f. of MM Hulled Klmdo .I'llui Parkar. ag \u I!! 0 Scouti bean chaain, and ara (|af| M rnthti Reig>t<>. Johii atoueman. aged 1 Hun.' Ri.liatd Danby. 17. ol 1st Purla*. Burray, OeVf" Irey Brll JUIIPS. aga 11. IJta Ipawuli Wl'liasa afartvi tg IT 2tti Ola-gnw. Tfrctic*, O'ftaUly ago 1* OaralaTj r>k Uasabllo, ago 10. lftlat Bri-i .1 uaS JaM inn-ll. *P I*. of 220Ui Bristol, pic HIIM kars t ihf Boy Orortfj4ad. tM T |(< pj, [tT| ima |, v Mr v B Ki*vtH ORE F8.A II %  •iimi^asMc 101 OVfasej >, nv i" Barl.adoh* tk* rtancli Llrifr .t . m today aPfPRBBB Alalel L*0* %  Pattah Ann ithotu Rdaa I loose balls. British Guiana f< Oil it e for thi lowed on. talks on the Anglo-Egyptian gltu* Gibba and Wight opened umvi Ar "' ( '' tainly, then Glbbs gained .-onH%  *• r 1 1 deuce and began to punish the ,'"" *%***" ] ''"' '"*' %  bowling with shots all round the '"'." i, /'<* r !" "'>' -^" wicket. When Glbbs reached 50 in V""' **' ternpting J leg sweep. The. Kden-Anir Pasha i-mtversatlona. Thomas did not stay long. HowAmi Pasha was understood however. Camacho came t., ., „ Eden's with a sparkling knock of 31 not SESEESi H ouse Pass m)(m Fw AMBASSADOR Runway Reconstruction rVfter Lengthy Debate out including a glorious six overhead and three fours. Wight hit five fours In his 4 not out in I8 minutes. The British Guiana scoring raU improved, the first SO going up in 79 minutes and the second flftv in S3 minutes. The match ends tomorrow and the rested Trinidad att ick may well strike new blows. The scores t— \m i*< i\sisi,|. lUtlTIMI Gt'lANA l.t | (l „ I. Wiclil c b Rk-Mf OibM c Ij-aali b bcmmlna I. Thoma. %  Aaiarali l> JachtN> ( %  nuwiui i laall b Dwminina Jar-bnaan b Damriiiita aleWali <> LaaJI b s*r. %  Dypr c Ltsall b Bul In C Thoaaaa e SIMM* b Pordc Patolr not oul N Wlcht c lcall b Pw.i. Oa*Nin b Ht.il,, rail of wtcfcaU— 1 lor 13, 2 I 117. 4 tor 117; i for 131. C (or ISS. S lor Ml: t for SOS %  OWUNO AKALYSI BRITISH GUIANA tn. I Wiaht ii..i owl Gibba 0 Baavia ThTiu>* c A>aarali b Jwkbir CiTtacho not oul iipgotlaliona should in London. Bntu.li i-llt.i.ils Mad it aaj Ba>1 expected that any fresl. tions would l %  aent Imn to Sir Ralph bleven-or Ambassador in t U.S. Sen-nary of State. Ache-; aon is underattHKl to have urged %  dan to make a new offer to the new Egyptian Government i' that rtaaBotlatlons rou" oth Acheaon and Ed m ;.t tlieir in Washington BnUin is (would plaj ipart and BE great, i i : %  ,. .;. tatlon Inf.,rmed sources said thai Eden's ain .^h things and lo kuow UM BOO Government t', %  iiich at pragani OBftaJJarad to be %  oaoluh O) ""I P.ie ". PLANES COLLIDE Total Kor 1 *ku i al afjaata)—I r* is : a rr i ROWLINQ ANALYSIS BUSTAMANTE ACCEPTS APOLOGY KINGSTON, J'ca. Peb. 18, t has been published In San Juan that llustAmante accepted apology tensMsest ear. the UaaUed States Sceret..ry of SUle for detention and queatloning* by an fcnmigr.uion oftlrer. —Mf HOVAI. S\U II TEXAS. Pa : a BatUd tatlon near hi ,. d raj bad ,, i,,... inatructor and two oat ti <>f the tn u Craft planes. %  %  l-.it • %  i at Co pus Chn-ti Naval An where tli. 1 tatlon mid u a R inut hnurt ol unbroker cMMta durtng which the Oppoattlori Part) u wU tg uifmbers of %  meni Party icathlnglj 11 luciged the \ iructlon Company wh<> contractod Ibg work on i 11 Runway, the Hougc of Asaemblv lg RgOOlutlOtl foi $1511.000 fti it-tMMslitiit.M %  [ I % %  I IMIaM in thl Hm,.) t ctlonal Englnoer of tho DaMrtmonl ot %  I vw nmont ol Cama4g Of the sum voted, an ajnounl of Oa.OOO in... bean Inehidad in ease It is found necessary to repair other parts of the mnwav during Uon ,.wing to the unusual stresses that will have to on portions not normally carrylnr traffle. and other unforeseen reconstruction work The entire pmvUton will be met from Uie General Revenue Balance A mov. by Mr. W A Craw ford tC). end supnorteri bv Mr J. C Mottley (C). to have the amount ndmnt |w JiO.nftn W| defeated h.v 13 votes to t.n Members voting In favour of the reiiuitioii were the sponsors, along with Mr J A Ilavnea ( %  ) Mr O T Allder (I) (]hief Seoul W elcomed In t.nnaihi CHENAHA. Pel. ]M Ol Gretuaiaj scouts ea rallying at rVarla Airport gave a rousing welcome i''fc sfk moon iworld ChM %  allao who Is a fhe Governor and l until his de• i Thursday. ThK af'• i I i.i K'.wallan addressed %  the Anglican 1 Qaag f Vg. ToI sight-seeing artva and talks with scout .ifflciais < the guest of honour at .. %  Tantean and at m that night. Military Dbtrlcl Crested In Tibet Rl France Approves German Rearmament Tv .. ... PARIS rib. m. Ihe french National Assembly pul ;,. :, a i farmed Germany and approved a programme lliat wou'd ,.',<). Pafa || .; tonight anr i Man i i. i II, Worship Mi I Barb m ol %  %  %  fendai i' 1845. being enapsDyed ,.f ll %  hil from or In the r lti"k IM-IOIIKIDI! to H lakan bj htm the defendant fr, %  it ..f the i-ut'i %  • i,. i .. ad i ; %  %  %  limlnarv •'. irli | were Mi K Wakotl Q.C Mr F \\ %  fid Mr W W If. Oanaral for the r Wl,lle .d'o itielslng the Gov|" p ammenf for entrusting the entire I ""I work lo the supervision of tin f".Haitian Englneei Mi Wil bai were sympathetic lo Governmci I for th* unfortuimt. i.i.-ition (a Bleh u now mat II self—a passion In which U "eirrruptlon". and "CTOOharj nd In which they aieM in the rontrm I. bai • the responslhlllty of the losa of the money spent on the Uon >' !!.. runway. I olution mine up for diaprttfiout the usual notice having been given The DM**] of the i. i of the Resolution. Mi f I. w ileott (1.1 said that < i in iring him explain th" i .. lutlo atlcr i SJwell'be %  %  "' rHer! out while ihe 1Tie of prevail Commons llegin Wnor Ihlmh IX)NIK)N. Pel Parliament today will % %  %  '•k ..( ,1,1,1,!, ,i, Iwo area h uapen lot %  in; Tor th.'.it.. King % %  Sixth JV, i MM H Cli'inent AtMee tabled notion of r-arsentl sasdnat Prime H %  < hurchill for hla speec), n, Uw United States Congress. The 001 WOa scheduled to DOOM up da Aii.n the Kmg\ death w ponded all political Warfare Bul the real h.,tM,. .Ol-li. I'Muedi itfl, || of r^njHx-1 to the Ku Iun.>ral was only Pridat. Today and tomorrow U II tref rid ->f at %  minor billOn Thurxd' *) | likely thai tn General %  %  oidi-r %  i •s of sev< j %  ''''" i the weea>k.il| '' %  a time threatened Faun's government, a wa, the first Urns 1 %  Pofjee Issue. ( oinproioiMThe Assembly ,j prVt premise on the s... ,i %  peon Army plan oi % % %  eruiling ,, „. 1 who oppose • I %  German Army. Lgajtfej (•runlet! Alter leave waa grante.i foi I rte'olution to he lontlnued. he *i wuuld .ill agree that '< —-iwas the type of constiuction .., ^ • o-..j tjoveinnieiit oi individual In 22* — %  ,v my part of the world had to face ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE v part The leader of the House had that question to the IfouM %  heady and members were aware of what the Ooeesmnen! had proposed to meet what had taken place at Seawell 0 On Past a ''i Irtdkn ij. foi hllla. Ni harp ..in 1.1 ...4he.i in auaation *'ii Protection For (ivrnuiny %  SVS4A' lO. bUB Uia. ..... 4 um%  o.voo, *. aual rc'I ll.JU, I I %  iOUtlOU. U> >-(Ui,iH|ii U0ll,UOO>. %  %  mom* >,b4U Ul^tlO) pei .muum %  %  H.i.eliU Dtpkana %  .. legaatBltta i increase Uon lo 11 -H.640 for of Unnecessary provision balnfl LaasOS in 4M#i an i i i to knowledge thf 1 %  if Vow Bxi Message No. 1/1003 V"ui K X .: ..piy ( hat %  Of UM proposed ln1 $3,849 to ifl.640 in the • DM innuiil t ontribulion 'rtim llnrbados to ihe Imperial Collego of Trop! D I ollege Daputli Whl. I. UUON PI North Atlanta C i drafted an eauM guai u I ,, ,. 'i •''"' %  l OUtSM %  OUntTMl mule. Oeiier.il Owight I ctannian.l It.. prOto 1 iln iced today after cHuajltniion with iln NATO. Military Con OUt th.it :in atta.k OB BJ oatlons in ihe i army wotdd lie tonsid. %  <•! M .ill N \ '!' %  .'.it. .' %  rmany will < %  Ihe naliona in the I Army. The draft agree:> be preeented to the full "f N.A.T.O. Mlnlite: j 1 l 1 torajorrow^for %  < hill %  '•• %  ... i r DEADLINE \^ ILL BE SET COLORADO, Feb 10, b will be C.I.O., 1 unions v.tIk out rhll for .. twoday oav In.Tease r ci.o. I .-. Ull Htnhe k .T the %  i .! %  1-T.I inn hargains iii:. rota iiiu-i liar barunit tn;hat gi., He salit gi-iHiph %  | to or mote ; %  r Three with the I 0 three 0lu> 050 men. The .1 "' %  .esmnii aa "„„ 1 •• %  the nation .. |, ., —r>. i/./.f;. Shot Down In addll tTultlng of w. • m proposal l. ThrouK oi Mi*. i h .idmhttret* the Ud compebe IJiity Huaii. he help al Vfucvn's C liege Horn :: %  : : %  ..' of the following Dlvl ukpari St. lUchaai No i (Ho •I. Mid. -using, N %  Christ Church Christ Church NO. '• fNur>ing) %  ' B mg, %  Fire Brigade Ko l (Ambulanre) fhelr advance pu*it i %  ifj front. After olnetlng BMel \IV HKAIH,!'.'. Korea. Pe Twt-ntySabrejeta battled lOh Coi MIC. fighter plan. i .or bottle over North Ro Ml *; was shot down. Earlier an unid.nti:. iiupped 10 bombs on AH i tions on the eastern ffiM rnanj ao In U TiTji.tJQ — Cm the ground two platoonfafTBgra with hances i Adeiijrtier, Allies "Full> Agree" en. T. ;"" ' ud Bit "l 1 ":.*""S:" M,h ; S3 ..nproUen. Allies bad agread lo gjhn %  t att troops to withdraw aVgl the cotnpi 2 Shipa \\ recked on Keds, Allies re— ..... —i p PLANE CRASH KILLS 3 %  Thirt\ -thi %  t ' night. arrival by air at Nairobi Kenya on thalr Commonwealth Tour. Th* taa Prioesss beard that Bar fathar was dad sad ska was Qnaen.—B 1 quest thai • • unit level i i' rfAOPUH i crew member* ami 0O0 %  rath* I ibout to land at Nam early I lumped In) %  11 fur lXw ?y t* "and*'" ,d %  idled al %  Dean Aehoson. Discussions in. luded, aceoidi %  four-l'.... including tjetmai ^ I future fafa Of War I nmlnals DOW r .rvlng Mms UsafsM Alii.-l %  Ihe lifting of all .iiract AlUed m war pro. . through 'iiaterlali peso Army Organization when It comes Into • glad .'''' i %  %  engei The pas. t'oundl that rmany contribute 1 .ISO.000.000 'l,e.marks as hei dafi %  r ntritmtlon %  i i i ? '152—S3. i it is nearly far Ad I.. i*i rinaa Goi I feel Buffer Zone %  about, I i %  %  -1 miles ii %  %  %  It was bai %  %  %  % % %  i nothing :o rtt said some —U.F. I —U.P.








i

once

ah

Harbat

Truce Negotiators Split|“
Further Over Russia



ESTABLISHED 1895

es



PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 19. |
Truce negotiators agreed on the .recommendation for
a Korean Peace Conference, but split further over Russia’s

eligibility to police an armistice. ~ Full armistice delega- ‘ fi
tions agreed to recommend to their Governments that] To Follow On bert

Agreement Broken



The United Nations Colonel}
Donozo accused Communists of |
breaking the agreement by refus-



talks begin within 90 days of the ceasefire, on the with-
§ . ) Me
drawal of foreign troops from Korea, a.‘ peaceful settle-;
g Ps , I
ment of the Korean question etc.” '
Their agreement completed —
negotiations on the fifth and final “Si t ee
item on the armistice agenda but | k A 7
delegations still were poles apart 1c oms

on key sections of two preceding .

items—the supervision of truce Hel Siek

and the exchange of war prison-

ers.

Staff officers of two sides} (By JOSEPH L. MYLER)
argued fruitlessly for two hours!OAK RIDGE, Tennessee, Feb. 19,
over the United Nations right to} It is the world’s strangest busi-
veto the Communist choice of ness—this traffic in “sick atoms”
Russia as one of the six neutral | that goes on here.
nations to police the truce. Sick atoms are atoms of ordin-

ary materials whose heart have

y g
been deliberatel, wounded to
y

make them “bleed” nuclear rays

which man can use. Some sick

atoms make some sick persons
: ‘ ape well. Others provide science with
ing to withdraw their nomination * a , stm
of Russia and name some other|‘#e “most useful research tool
country. He contended they had|Since the invention of the micro-
agreed that all six nations on the Bcope.” They are now standard
Neutral Advisory Commission}jTesearch' for medical agents
must be acceptable to both sides./throughout the U.S. and in at

Chinese Colonel’ Pu Chan/jleast 40 other countries.
retorted that Russia qualified as But useful as they are they are
a neutral because it has no|potentially deadly. Their radio-

bat fi in K H tivit ki r. f thi t
comba orces orea. e€/activity makes many o em too
demanded that the U.N. with-|hot” to handle except by remote
draw its “groundless and base-|control. Some of them are highly
i ot tae os nthe ‘eae poisonous. Others in combination

al cers also i a roduce dangerousl sive
deadlocked on three other issues sons. Sevecialens, ian hoting
oneness ye the Sue Lenn a learned to treat them with pru-
the truce—the number of troop sient respect has made them ser-
who ray be rotated during the

ceasefire, the number of ports| Y@@ts of health and a_ source
through which troops may pass a wicdatare mg B

and the right of Communists to ince 1946 some 30,000 ship-
build airfields in North Korea}ments of them have left Oak

Ridge for hospitals and research
labs around the world. -
Scientists call them “radioiso-
toph” — atoms of iodine, sodium
carbon, iron, gold, cobalt and
other elements which differ from
the normal twins in that they emit
energetic rays from their nucle.
—UP.

during the truce.

The second group of Staff
Officers reported it reached “just
about complete agreement” on the
wording of the last five para-
graphs of the nine-point solution
to the war prisoner exchange
problem.

—U-P.

Threatening Letter

Seat To Speaker

, A LETTER directed to His Honour the Speaker of the
House of Assembly, and urging a more militant policy by
Government in matters touching on certain questions like
Emigration, was distributed to members of the House last
night.

The letter contained certain threats.

eieery Wetahnas E/ See naa wa ok ae ee Nal pane oom)
j ) : G. H. ams,
RESCUE TEAMS) [iene Cf ine Government ans

labelled it a “seditious document”,
and said that such a letter, be-
cause it contained libellous state-
ment, should not have been cir-
culated to members,

Mr. Adams said that a petition
should be presented by a member,
and should be decorous and tem-

FIND BODIES

BURGIO, Sicily, Feb. 19.
Rescue teams saiq they found
the shattered bodies of 34 persons
in the snow covered wreckage ot
the British Airliner which crashed

i sane ae perate,
into a Sicilian mountain peak The letter which had unfor-
Saturday night. tunately been circulated was

Officials said they were no sur-
vivors but Italian Police with
rescuers and Officials of the Hunt-
ing Air Transport Company which
owned the two-engined Viking
plane, differed on the number of |
persons aboard the craft. Police
said they counted the bodies of
17 men, 14 women and three chil-
dren in the wreckage of the air-
liner which was enroute from
London to Nairoba, Kenya, last
week.—U.P,

Suspects Held

HAVANA, Feb, 19,

Police said they are holding
three suspects in last Tuesday’s
killing of ex-Congressman Alejo
Cossio Del Pino despite negative
paraffin tests on their fingers to
see which one weilded the death
weapon, The National Bureau of
Identification said: though the
tests were negative there was still
sufficient grounds to hold the men

“grossly libellous to the House,”
and further, if the document was
hot fietitious, should be placed in
the hands of the Police for con-
sideration,

The letter which purported to|
be from St. Joseph, for all he
knew, could have been from any-
where,

He thought it was of the utmost
disrespect to the House, where a
person could think that he could
have such a document put in the
hands of members.

He would say it no more strong-
ly, that if His Honour was re-
sponsible for it, he could only say |
that he regretted it very much.

His Honour the Speaker ex-
plained that as it was a letter for
every member of the House—he
did not know who had sent it—it
was circulated, but he was not
asking that it be taken as official.

BUSTAMANTE
ACCEPTS APOLOGY





sie KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb, 18.
one of whom was reportedly , 5
seen running with a gun in his] It has been published in San
hand near the scene of the}jJuan that Bustamante accepted an

shooting: It said the other two}apelogy tendered: .by~the United}.

were seen near the same locality

States Secretary of State for de-
earlier in the day.

tention and questioning by an im-
migration officer —cP)

ROYAL SALUTE



ait see
arrival by air at Nairob



stand
Tour.



Kenya on their Commonwealth The

the Princess heard that her father was dead and she was Queen.—EXPRESS.






a mee”

‘ =





B.G. Forced
109 Behind

‘From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 19.
Briuish Guiana followed on 246
runs behind Trinidad’s Ist innings
total of 450 and reached 137 for
2 at close of the third day of the

second Intercolonial game.

Leslie Wight dominated the
batting again today and found
able support from Camacho.

In the British Guiana second
innings Camacho was aggressive
while Wight was sedate. The
British Guiana first innings
closed 28 minutes after the
luncheon period for 204, Wight
shouldered the team with a grand
79 in 213 minutes with eleven
fours. Offdriving off the back
foot, on driving past mid-wicket,
and the leg side were his favour-
ite scoring shots. Wight was out
in attempting to force Skeete to
the leg side and returned an easy
catch.

Wight and Mc Watt overnight
batsmen put on 34 runs before the
latter tried to cut a good length
bali from Skeete and was caught
behind the wicket. At lunch, the
score was 196 for 7. Bruiser
Thomas 17, Patoir 7. Sixty-five
runs in 90 minutes before lunch.

The new ball curled up the tail vi

. ' . Abdel Fattah Amr Pasha
Witdied aitak ee he eae ine | Egyptian Ambussador, met I
eign Secretary Anthony Eden i:
ron NOt — Pee 1008 | the Foreign Office for the second
lowed on : “| talks on the Anglo-Egyptian gitu-
5 ; ation. Today Amr Pasha left
te apenas ps opened ae a. | Eden's office just as the French
ainly, then s gained confi- ind U.S, delegates to the cone
dence and began to punish the | ference on Germany’s association
bowling with shots all round the | with the European army were
wicket, When Gibbs reached 50 in| arriving to start work.
104 minutes, Wight was 23 and the |

“te

_ P wail.
THE EIGHT KING'S SCOUTS

Reigate; John Stoneman, aged

EDEN CONFERS
WITH EGYPTIAN
AMBASSADOR



Neither British nor Egyptian
total 75. Gibbs was bowled in at- jofficials would comment on the,
tempting « leg sweep. Ther | Bden-Amr Pasha conversations, |

Thomas did not stay long. How-|Amr Pasha was understood how-

ever, Camacho came to the rescue ever, to have sought Eden's
with a sparkling knock of 31 not guidance as to whether Anglo-
out including a glorious six over- | Egyptian negotiations should

head and three fours.
Wight hit five fours in his 49 not

start in Cairo or in London,
British officials said it was’ not
out in 169 minutes, expected that any fresh instruc-
The British Guiana scoring rate | tions would be sent immediately
improved, the first 50 going up in|jto Sir Ralph Stevenson,
79 minutes and the second fifty in | Ambassador in Cairo.
53 minutes. The match ends tomor-| U.S. Secretary of State, Ache
row and the rested Trinidad attack |son is understood to have urged
may well strike new blows. Eden to make a new offer to the
The scores :-—~ new Egyptian Government so
7 BOR IIS unis er some 7
aaa , 8—450 quic! on proposals for four
L Wient * i ‘ho rua 79 |power defence of the Suez Canal



Gibbs c Legall b Demming 2 ,;Zone, and Sudan.

L. Thomas ¢ Asgaralt b Jackbir 17 Informed sources said both
Cameeie . soos b Detintite “ sarees were et Sernete by
MeWatt c Legall b Skeete ae |} both Acheson and Eden at thetr
Dyer c Legall b Butler 14 |talks in Washington. Britain
C. Thomas c Skeete b Forde 18 |would play a= greatly reduced

Patoir not out

a jpart and Egypt a proportionately







LONDON, Feb. 19, |
Fore

aa

Shntut aid





ee a _

who are to represent the 474,000 Scouts of the United Kingdom at



the first Caribbean Jamboree, have now been chosen, and are (left to right) John Parker, age 16, 9th

16, the 229th Bristol; Richard Denby, 17, of 1st Purley, Surrey; Goof

frey Bell-Jones, age 16, 13th Ipswich; William Martin, age 17, 28th Glasgow; Terence O'Reilly, age 16,
of 38th Cardiff; Derek Hamblin, age 16, 151st Bristol, and John Rimell,
tured here at the Boy Scouts HMéadquarters in London.
F.S.A., Headquarters Commissignét for Grants, is expocted to arrive in Barbados by the French Liner

EXPRESS.

———

House Pass $60,000 For

age 16, of 229th Bristol, pic
The Party, led by Mr. P. B. Nevill, O.B.E.,

Runway Reconstruction

After Lengthy Debate

AFTER four hours of unbroken debate during which
| members of the Opposition Party as well as members of
} the Government Party scathingly criticised the Engineer
ind Construction Company who contracted the work on
the Seawell Runway, the House of Assembly last night
passed a Resolution for $60,000 for reconstruction of detec-
ive portions of the runway as recommended in the Report
! the Constructional Engineer of the Department. of
ansport of the Government of Canada.

- Of the sum voted, an amount of
$20,000 has been ineluded in case
it is found necessary to repair
other parts of the runway during
reconstruction owing to the un-
usual stresses that will have to
be placed on portions not normal-
ly carrying traffic, and other un-

_ Welcomed
In Grenada __ | ricer reconstrsion work the

| the General Revenue Balance

i From Our Own Correspopdent) A move by Mr. W. A. Craw-
GRENADA, Feb, 19, ford (C), and supported by Mr

| Hundreds of Grenada scouts|J. C, Mottley (C), to have the

4 duides rallying at Pearle}amount reduced by $20,000 was

A typort gave a rousing welcOme|defeated by 12 votes to four

this afternoon to World Chiet|Members voting in favour of the

}

- Chief Scout

Scout Lord Rowallan who is a} reduction were the sponsors, along
guest of fhe ‘Governor and|Wwith Mr, J, A. Haynes (E) and
Lady Arundell until his de-|Mr, O. T, Allder (1), i

parture on Thursday. This af-| While also criticising the Gov-

ernment for entrusting the entire

ternoon Lord Rowallan addressed
eae : : work to the supervision of the

a public meeting at the Anglican



while the

’ 5 ' s seorge’s ‘o.|Canadian Engineer, Mr, Wilson,
Guth ae bi Sp rae greater part in the organization, | ev ae a eed members were sympathetic to
Extras 3 Informed sources said that drive and talks with seout officials} Government for the unfortunate
~~~ |Eden’s aim was not to rush thing he will be the guest ‘of honour at| Position in whteh it now finds it-
‘Total _ {and to allow the new Egyptian An island rally at Tanteen and at|Self—a position in which they were
;Government to consolidate its a camp fire that night victims of “corruption”, and
NENA ae ie aoe, Senn Se for | position oy fi Prenat was not : ‘crookery ond - arte
r Y 4 , considered t be absolutely se were by a clause B t,
for 198; 8 for 203; 9 for ‘302. eS @ On page 5 Milita Di t . t asked to share the responsibility of
BOWLING ANALYSIS | itary WIstric the loss of the money spent on the
9 MR. w.| 4 pr mel construction of the runway.

Bree i. : a 3 | PLANES COLLIDE Created In I ibet The Resolution came up for dis-
Butler 456 17 2 | cussion without the usual notice
Skeete 2 7 8 2 TEXAS, Feb. 19 TOKYO, Feb. 19 having been given, say mere of
Sampath 3 5 5 ‘ ! Six naval fliers died when Radio Peiping tonight ee the passing a fh la teat
their two training planes col- uncad the creation of a “Tibetan Mr. F, L aes : Ds gem so
Manta Oe ee lided in a flight over @ Radiof ititary district”, February 10th) *{'et apes R a: qutke ' embers
Ginhe’b’ Bete: 0 Range station near here arid. j,, the Asiatic ‘Lamast country po La arth ea a matter
Thomas ¢ Asgarall b Jackbir 1 {crashed in flames, One instructor which wits “peacefully liberated’, Would agres the aba Soe ik OF re-
Camacho not out a 31 ;and two student pilots died in by the Chinese Peoples Army last | Of, Urgency tha oe @ + menaeh -.

ae tior 3 wikis) ter jeach of the twin-engined Beech- year, The broadcast monitored in| P"1D% yp oA 5 ae Vim

7 \craft planes,



carried out type of



| awd os Tokyo Tuesday night said also| i » at present pre-
— | Both aircraft plunged to earth Chinese Communist General bak ry hat ined prevail
Fall of witkets—1 tor 36; '2 for 10 | and burned. None of the occu~ Chang Kuo Hua Commander of * eee
BOWLING ANALYSIS pants had time to parachute/Req Chinese ex editionary forces “ave Granted

Oo M R. W | according to authorities at 'Co “jin Tibet has been named Military! After seo was granted for the

aaa re ea cae Phere te sin tal Air » Station! pistrict Commander, Resolution to be continued, he said
nee set voeeraa Pie Tee ign ay man reme. based, The broadcast also mentioned that they would all agree that that
Jackbir 2 wt i eave our station. sald 89) the names of several Chinose and was the type of construction work
Skeete 13 — 45 1 jinvestigation was underway, Tibetan Commanders appointed|,ny Government or individual in
Tang Choon , Are: —UP. as Chang’s deputies, —U.P. | any part of the world had to face.



France Approves
German Rearmament

; PARIS, Feb. 19.
The French National Assembly put aside the fear of

a rearmed Germany and approved a programme that would

put 400,000 West Germans into uniform under Genera!
Eisenhower. ‘The Assembly thereby also voted coniidencr
in the month-old Government of Premier Edgar Faure.
who gambled with the life of his Cabine
pean Army plan through the House.
327 to 287.

The official vote wag



government, It wag the first time
pince the war that the life of
French government had hinged
on a confidence vote on a Foreiy
Policy issue.

Compromise

The Assembly approved a co
promise on the Socialist Govern
ment motion endorsing the Euro

pean Army plan on condition tha
German recruiting is delayed u





til the Pact is formally ‘ratified
The compromise was forced by the
ye -ocialists who oppose the Army
(slan because, they like
Frenchmen, mist:

German Army,

In addition to delaying th:
cruiting of West German he
compromise proposal bar
many from immediate
a member of the Nort At
Treety Organizatior

It also repeat e Fre
quest that Britair n th k
pean Army and _ stipulate

’ A national troop contingent
Royal Salute just after their corpe
Tour was cut short here when ive

‘
-_

t to push the Euro-



|The Leader of the senate Had in-

. ~p | timated that question to the House
ST. JOHN AMBULANCE | a eady and members were aware
i of what the Government had pro-

BRIGADE AT |posed to meet what had taken

jplace at Seawell.





QUEEN’S COLLEGE @ On Page 6

Through the courtesy of Mrs. Y ¥
Randall, the Headmistress, the| MLLG. Shot Down
inter-Divisional First Aid compe-!
Ution for the Lady Bushe Cup will
be help at Queen’s College from Korea, Feb. 19
5—5.30 p.m, on Saturday, 23rd Twenty-seven United State
February, Teams of four from each Sabrejets battled 100 Communist





8th ARMY HEADQUARTERS,

of the following Divisions will M.LG. fighter planes today in an
take part. air battle over North Korea, One)
St. Michael No. 1 (Nursing)

M.1.G, was shot down.

ie ‘ St. Michael No. 2 (Nursing) Earlier an unidentified plane
——| The vote endeq the week-long St. Michael No, 3 (Nursing) dropped 16 bombs on Allied posi
| Btormy Assembly debate which! St. Michael No. 4 (Nursing } tions on the eastern front. There

for a time threatened Faure’ Christ Church No. 1 (Nur sing)

was no report of casualties or dam-

Christ Church No. 2 (Nursing) | age. On the ground two platoon-
St. James No. 1 (Nursing) ized Communist attacks in papid
St. Michael No. 1 (Ambulance) succession forced United Natior

Police No, 1 (Ambulance) troops to withdraw slightly from

Fire Brigade No. 1 (Ambulance )\their advance position wey, of
Dr. H. E. Skeete, O.B.E., O. St.)Mundung Valley on the eastern
f, Distr Surgeor will judge/ front. After directing mortar fir

the competition

2 Ships Wrecked

| CHATRAM

Allies

without

on Reds,
position

re-occupied
making



contact



PLANE CRASH KILLS 3

Massachusetts,







Feb. 19,

Thirty-three seamen were found NAGPUR, India, Feb. 19
ive, aboard the storm-shattered Two erew members and one
ern of the oil tanker Fort Mercer passenger were killed when
nd th t gufird e prepared |/Heckan Airway Dakota night!

iho ’ Ste
em} © Guplicate rescue! service plane on a ht from |
,operations tha aved 32 others , 4 ypur crash
from the broken stern of the tank- Madras, 0 Nagpur t Nag
tak Pendleton last night ““ | was about to land at Nag pt
ne | maaclt ? ie ue toll in tt port early to-day. The pilot and/
; in po de ara Beek i pilot were kHled instants
win « of t (
a ae ; 4 plar carried fou ew-
jumped into the sea tc - a oe Meal.
fr t } ut < Tos}
pe 1 tree top the
; ht ir !
lif The t 0,000 ur
. saa in mad fon letel
¢ € Ipant
—U.P —U.F

‘litself as a



FIVE CENTS

PRICE



B’dos Increase

Grant To I.C.T.A.



BARBADOS in the itur contribute $8,640 per
annum towards the financit rt Imperial ¢ ollege of
Tropical Agriculture instead 19 as formerly:

His Excellency ti Gover mn a message to both
branches of the Legisiatur t out umstances that
occasioned the deniar ised contributions and
yesterday the Legis ‘ yuncil passed reply; to His
Excellency the G reased contri-
} :
butior erty Yaave

’ LC Pease. ana

ivil Servant na repay to Hi
ivil Serve : ‘

ite age read

For Sessions

Governor

u uuiorm the Zon-

His Worship Mr. C, L. W 4 j i e Legisiauive Couneil
on Monday committed Carlos | I Secretary of State for
Smith, a Civil Servant of the A 3 has advised him that
ditor General’s Office livin num annual revenue re-



Barbarees Hill, St. Michael to t!

: . to Lnance the Imperial Col-
next siting of the Court of Gri

Aropical ic J

Sessions on a charge of falsifi pre soett bash be i he oie
1) We ann smith js o1 i hium commencing on the Ist
The charge states that the ce { September, 1951, has been esti-
fendant Carlos Smith on Apri! ¢ Avo §976,000 (£ 120,000) -
1945, being employed in the P Oe nn ae en es
Services of His Majesty wilfull iutrement of $408,000 (£65,000)
and with intent to defraud over the quinguennium recently
ted from or in the Petty ( mpleted, inis increase is re
Book belonging to His Majesty, 44ited almos, entirely to meet in-
his employer, the receipt o 00) Crease labour rates and salaries
taken by him the defendant f: mm | 44d to provide for cost of living
the vault of the Public Tressury fowances. In consequence Co-
of the island Jonial governments are being ask-

The five other charge of ;ea to increase their contributions
ceny and fraudulent conver ion | to the College from $168,000
were dismissed for want of pro- (£35,000) tg $288,000 (£60,000).

secution,

Legal appearances in the pre
liminary hearing were Mr. EF. K
Walcott Q.C., associated vith
Mr. E. W. Barrow for the defence
and Mr. W. W, Reece, Q.C., Soli: Barbados Benefits
tor General, for the Polic« As in the training of Diploma

otudents this Colony has always
jbenetited greatly, the Honourable
jthe Legislative Council is invited
}lo approve the proposed increase
jin the rate of the annual contribu-

Commons Begin
.
Minor Debate |tion to the College to $8,640 for
jthe next five years and of the

LONDON, Feb, 19 | neces

Ihe Secretary of State has sug-
gested that this Government con-
tribute $8,640 (£1,800) per annum
instead of $3,649 (£800).





ssary provision being made in

Parliament today will begin a the Estimates, provided that the
week of minor debate after the Diplema courses at the College are
two-week suspension in mourn- |

) continued,

The Council’, reply read;—

The Legislative Council have
the honour to acknowledge the
receipt of Your Excellency’s
Message No. 1/1952 and to inform
Your Excellency in reply that
they approve of the proposed in-
crease from $3,849 to $8,640 in the

ing for the late King George the
Sixth. Two weeks ago Labour
Leader Mr, Clement Attlee tabled
a motion of personal rebulce
against Prime Minister Winston
Churchill for his speech to the
United States Congress, The vote
was scheduled to come up next
day when the King’s death sus-

pended all political warfare. But|rate of the annual contribution
jthe real battle will not resume|from Barbados to the Imperial
again immediately this week out|College of Tropical Agriculture

of respect to the King
funeral was only Friday.
Today and tomorrow the Com-
mons will get rid of accumulated
minor bills. On Thursday it i:
likely that supplementary budget
estimates for this year will come
up and Friday is for private
| members’ bills. Nevertheless ther
{will be some sharp question:
faked in question periods thi
1 week——the first hour of each ses

| sion when members can question COLORADO, Feb, 19.
Ministers--and full scale warfare The strike deadline for the
ean be expected soon, | United States oil industry will be
~UP jSet tomorrow. by a co-ordinating

whose | provided the Diploma vourses are

continued at the College

DEADLINE
WILL BE SET









committee representing C.1.0.,
° Bi A.F.L, and independent unions.
Protection For \6iiesucart independent untons.
% ee pport demands for a two-
( ern dollars-per-day pay increase.
vany O. A. Knight, President of C.1.0.,,
Lianow: Hep. 10 {Oil Workers’ International Union,

ake ; Pen. i aid rat votes on >» .

The North Atlantic Counei ” iin x installations of te
Deputies drafted an agreement ol fidtuste have been carried
which would guarantee West |; n overwhelming majority
Germany against aggression alony {Knight saic balloting ‘was almost
the same lines as that already norplete among 300 bargains
afforded other countries under unite of this unton
General Dwight Eisenhower's | \ of each bargaining
command, The protocol finalized | rou} ire tabulated separately
today after consultation with the | nd ¢ verall strike vote must
N.A.T.O, Military Committee sets vithin each particular bar-
out that an attack on any one ot i init unit or that group cannot
the six nations in the European | ril He said groups vo ing to
army would be considered an | represent a total or "more
— on all N.A.T.O, member ! 0,000 oil workers. Three
States, | it ted not to strike t

West Germany will be one of | 10) but Kn ht aid the Ae
the nations in the European} jnyo! ed only 650 men, The
Army. The draft agreement wil! | strike ha been termed by an oil

be presented to the full meeting lustry 0kesman as
of N.A.T.O, Ministers whidh | will poraton ody
meets here tomorrow, for a full-! t

dress conference —U.P,

“one that
the nation and put
ifoot within ten days.”
—U.P.

~ AdenBuer, Allies
“iF ully Agree”

LONDON, Feb. 19,
: Chancellor Konrad Adenaus announced he and Big
| Three Foreign Ministers reached “venuine and full agree-
ment” at the Four Power Conference on German problems
which ended here this afte:
| Allies had agreed to give Ger-
many an indirect voice in N.A.T.O
| affairs without prejudicing hes
|future chances to enter N.A.T.O
member, Adenauet
| said “IT am very satisfied after
jthe meeting of Foreign Minis

100n

i. Gernian Goy't
Set Buffer Zone



|Robert Sehuman, Anthony Edea _ BERLIN Feb. ,
nd Dean Acheson. | + licia i i 1 t
| Discussions included, according! t Ger

to Adenauer; the establishment of















' four-Power Allied Review B : : : ae
including Germany to de thd) United State 4
future fate of war criminals now} "9
}serving terms under Allied sen-]| O#icia nee a OE
tences. eral miles deep « 1e Sovic
The lifting of all direct Allied]â„¢! . woes
controls over German war pro-|@ Pesu p aEN -%
uction and the substitution of]™ net ‘
a system of. indirect controls/#re4- | : We ie
through allocation of materials ral v
and funds by the European Army een aC i
.| Organization when it come inte I t I
being f the t I ex} 1d
The postponement f t
f the German reply to the NATO T .
Council ecommendation that} border
Germany contribute 1,250,000,000 H
marks as her defer contribution | r¢
f the fiscal year 1952—53
Germans only ld of the figure}« .
inday and ince it is é
jual the German offs nau
licated that there hing to}
ibo |
~U.P l OP,
PAGE TWO



Caub Calling

R. RONALD MAPP, M.C.P.,
who was one of the delegates
to the recent Moral Rearmament
Conférence in Miami will, be the
guest speaker at the Press Club this
afternoon at 4.45 o’clock. His sub-
ject will be “The Press and Moral
Leadership.” It is understood that
his talk will centre on the decisions
of the Conference.
Entrance to the Press Club is
near the junction of Middle and
Swan Streets.

Hete Again

R. and Mrs. Jan Friess are at
present holidaying in Bar-
bados. They arrived from Tortola
via Puerto Rico on Sunday and are
staying at the Hotel Royal.

r. Friess who was born in
Crechoslovakia, lived here from
1941 to 1948 at “Sunvalley”, on the
St. James coast. He is a nephew of
Mrs. Fela de Kuh of “The Pavilion”
Hastings.

Since Mr. Friess left here in 1948
re lived for a couple of years in

‘anada then visited Europe where
he was married in December 1950
in Switzerland. His home is at
present in Montreal but he and his
wife still have a flat in Switzer-
land,

Prior to coming to Barbados they
Bpent a few weeks in Tortola as
the guests of Mr. Ivan Humphreys,

Who has also lived in Barbados but f

has now settled in Tortola.

islands,
Barbados Has It

i R. and Mrs. W. Edward Daw-
son of Montreal who are

guests at the Windsor Hotel plan

to remain here until early April.

Mrs. Dawson told Carib yester-
day that for equable climate Bar.
bados has definitely “got it”. Since
the war they have done a grev
deal of travelling and Barbados is
just about the best spot they have
visited. Their trips overseas in-
cluded two visits to England, one
to Europe and during one of these
they made the Union Castle Line’s
trip around Africa callirig at 22
ports including Gibraltar and sev-
eral Mediterranean ports.

Mr. Dawson is Président of Daw-
son Bros. Ltd., Moritreal, Industrial
Suppliers of office equipment, His
wife Elizabeth, a former jourtialist
wrote a Womari’s columii in the
Montreal Star for abut five or six
years in the °80’s. After that she
edited a Trade paper before she
was married.

_ They have already visited Bar-
Patios, spending a week here in

48,
U.S. Radio Amateur
: R. HAROLD GAFFNEY of
Greensboro, North Carolina,
who artived in Barbados on Sun-
ccompanied by his wife is a
en radio amateur ahd back in
the U.S, he operates Kis 6bwn “rig”
—, the call sign of W4APP.
is intérest in Barbados was first
when he spoke to one of

our Toeal radio “Hams” over the |

tmateur radio waves. Since then
é has talked with 15 or 20 Bar-
badian “Hams” and finally decided
that he must visit this island which
he had heard so much about.
Mr. soe Bere. Gaffney are guests
fk.

S
t “Barbados Holiday

MES. J. J. (Elsie) Peele whose
late husband was a Director
of Tin Mines in Nigeria is holiday-
ing here staying at Cacrabank.
er ae she told Carib, was
le first Solicitor to go out to
lag: She spent 18 years on the
Coast,



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

"Surely now the Foreign
Office can’t go on saying
the time is not yet ripe jor

publication of
Life at SHAEF’ »

Third In Three

R,. U. S. “Fred” BRANDT-

Ms



brought along a friend, Mr. Albert
East. Both Mr. Brandtzaég and
Mr. East are with Canadian Inter-
national Paper Co., of Montreal.
During their stay here they are

guests at Cacrabank.
T.C.A. Officials
M* HERBERT SEAGRAM,
General Managet,, Oper-

ations, T.C.A., and Mr. Eliott Bol-
ton, Director of Personnel of the
same airline returned to Canada
after spending a short holiday in
Barbedos staying at Cacrabank.
Mr. J. E. Nickson, District Traffic
and Sales Manager, Toronto, who
came down with them. is still in
Barbados. Accompanied by his wife
they plan to return to Canada on
Friday. During their holiday here
they todK time out to visit Antigua
and Martinique.
Dance For The Captain

Gt ROY BROWN, Vice
4 President and Operations
Manager of Ceritral N: ern Air-
‘ways Ltd., of Canada is due to re-
turn to Canada today by T.C.A.,
after spenditig about four weeks
holiday in Barbados.

Last hight, the management. of
Cacrabanik Hotel, where he has
been staying gave a small dance at
the hotel in his honour.

Capt. Brown who has been flying %

since 1917 when he flew with the

Royal Flying Corps. during the

First World War was born in Win-

nipeg.

Studying Barbados Crabs
. JAMES HODGE of Fuller
Harrington College, Toledo,

Qhio, is once again in Barbados

staying at the Paradise Beach Club.

He is accompanied by his wife.

Dr. Hodge is continuing his study
of the minor crustacedfis of the

Lesser Antilles. In prior visits he

has learned much of the habits of

‘the Barbados crabs.

They arrived via Canada last
week by T.C.A. :

Back From St. Vincent

OMDR. NORMAN HOL-

4 BROOK is back from his
short visit to St. Vincent. He re-
turned on Monday by B.G. Air-
ways.





‘On Visit To Uiicle
And Brother
AT

present on

a

Mr.

tinique and Guadeloupe recently.

This is Mr. Baldini’s third visit
to Barbados having been here in

1937 and. 1947,

Trinidad Planter

FTER just over » week’s holi-
day in Barbados Mr. and

Mrs. Charles de Freitas are due to
today by
b.W.1.A., where Mr. de Freitas is a
cocoa and citrus planter, They have

returh to Trinidad

been Staying at Caé¢rabank.

They are frequent visitors to Bar-

bados.

From Halifax

RS. MERVYN MEARES,
widow of Col. eares,
C.M.G,, D.S.0., Legion of Honour,
und late of the Royal Artillery, is
at present holidaying in Barbados.

She artived from England a short

time ago by the Golfito and is
staying at Cacrabank. Her home is
in. Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Here until the end of March, she

plans to visit Bermuda before re-
turning to Canada.

Barbados Carnival Show
= 1952 Carnival Show, spon-

sored by the Y.M.P.C., takes
place at their headquarters on
Saturday, February 23 from 4 to
6.30 p.m.

Mrs. T, O. Lashley is in complete
charge of the arrangeménts and
prizes will bé given for the most
original antl prettiest Costumes.

For Carnival

EAVING by B.W.1LA. on Mon-
4 day to spend Carnival in
Trinidad weté, Mr, arid Mrs, Stah-
ton Toppin of Rockley New Road.
* o =

ISS SYBIL CLARKE of

‘Bohemia”, Collymore Rock,

has gone to Trinitlad to attend

Carnival. During her stay there

she will be the guest of Mr. and

Mrs. Eric Cameron of San Juan,
Trinidad.

Barbadian In Antigua
R. JOHN ARTHUR WILKIN-
SON GRIFFITH son of Mr.
G. B. Griffith, Acting Police Mag-
istrate of District “A”, has just
passed his finals in Surveyirig at
Antigua and has been granted a
licenee to practise in the survey-
ing of land in the presidency of
St.- John’s, Antigua.

After leaving Harrison College
he attéided the Antigua Grammar
School where in 1947 he passed
the School Certificate with exemp-
jon the London Matricula-
tion.

He applied for and was granted
a Leeward ind Scholarship.
is now attached to the Federal
Engineer's Office, Antigua.

Two Months

MONG recent arrivals from St.
Licia are Mrs. Vanessa
Floissat, Mr. Wallace Newton and
his sister Miss Eileen Newton, who
are heré of a two months’ holiday.
They are in residente at Super
Mare Cottage, Worthing.

Line For Today

OMAN would be more
charming if one could fall
into her Arms without falling into
her Hands! ! |
Talking Point
Remember to be calm in ad-
versity.—Horace.

BY THE WAY ..... by Beachcomber

ACK TURBOT is coming. “Don’t yet the experts had the assurance ;was terrible, “I'l get Egham for

hesitate,” says a spok
“with one foot in the road and
one on the pavement.”

I am reminded of the man who
walked home froiti a rowdy party
with one foot in the gutter and
the othé@r on the pavement. A
passer-by sdid to him, “I say, do

4° hg] 4 one pi
gui ?” “Thank you,” sai
sarees, with pr

avity, “I thought I was limp-
ing.”
The Gatima-bomb (XIX)

CIENTISTS of the more ad-
vanced democtacies were ex-
tremely ptizzled by the formula
Dingi-Poos delivered to Smuj in
Vatnopol, The ingredients pre-
scribed seemed harmless enough,

that Koolruk had given Egham
the i At length an experi-
mental mb was ready, The
populations were evicted from an
area the size of Wales in the desert
ot Zakan, and the bomb was ex-
ploded in the presence of scientists,
Generals, politicians and the
Press. The bomb weighed 13,728
tons, and had used up Several
stockpiles of valuable materials.
It was 180 yards high, with a cir-
cumferefice of 361 yards. When
General Vassilin pressed the but-
ton 80 miles away, all held their
breath, Theré was a pop like that
made by an egg bursting, and the
watchers saw through their tele-
scopes the whole t fall to
pieces slowly, That was all that
happened. Cattle five feet away
were unharmed. Dingi-Poos for
ence looked hideous. Her rage



Rupert



Saag

t excitement at the

Rupert is full o'
Guide's idea for solving the
mystery, and the little party moves
towards the waterfall. There
Pauline holds the piece of bark in
the spray lintil it is wet. Then she
it to the Autumn Elf

hands



LADIES ..
1, Ie
LADIES BEACE

LADIES

Dial 4220

JUST ARRIVED
MEN & LADIES DRESSING TABLE SETS

LADIES TOILET BRUS
MEN'S BRUSHES
BRUSHES

ALSO A NICE ASSORTMENT OF PHOTO FRAMES.




"te right !"" he

“* You're right.

ctles. “* The writing is quite clear

now, Listen, this is what it says:

‘Final assault. The army asseinbled
sunser at the .witherec , ank

Good gracious, that means tha: we

Have absolutely oo time to lose.

A ETERS... Sea eee ba
BES w.cicsiives ches

ating.
ND

CROSSWORD

this,” she kept re
THE





Across

ure Oeater, (8)
tald, sort at bee (
ook for a sous it
ind of one Saree “4
a PY .
tibied lands. te

A degree of depth 13)
Has a smoothing e' 2
‘O Tana wvrmap's den. (4
22, Deduce. (5) ‘
25. Let's pope you 2. when eent

o 8.

m gn
af; R'Broxen ‘star. “at
Down {

i wa:

arch, (@
(3)

3)
)

(5)
DP gasabeie

4s no.

y-n
ess,
re let it ase. —

the broken tape, (4)
e ofa jo is. (8)

seme 3H

* sae the fair, (8)

i
af

"E
g

z

ze

35
35

>

E

Rist
aoe

Peresarsocopeer

CnsEaESeeg

SHOR <

6g oer.



from $10.65 to $17.86
from §$ 5.44 to $ 9.40
Ce apeig GLK HR Toc $ 3.08

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4606

visit to his
uncle Mr. P. C. S. Maffei and
his brother Mr. Jack Baldini, is
Desiré “De-De’ Baldini who
arrived here from Paris via Mar-

BARBADOS ADVOCAT

THE NEW H





































































er

model s¢én
tiny straw

tine

softene |
sprays of mites
desigued ret

BERTHA GASTER, an

gramme about the delights
career On a small Efiglish

ten pounds a month.

There Was a great déal to be
Said for starting on a small paper.
On a big London one the jobs
were extremely specialised, but
on a small paper, especially one
abroad, the staff had to use their
heads and be ready for anything
—interviews, obituaries. book re-
views, Woman’s Page, filing, pick-
ing type and setting up pages, with
evenings spent in the printing
room, correcting proofs as they
went along, As none of the print-
ers knew English misprints were
a bugbear. Many of them weére un-
repeatéble but she was very fond
of the birth announcement that
had said, “To Mrs. Brown, at the
Anglo-American hospital a ton.”
Another unhappy day for her
paper was when a picture of a
king captioned “The King chats to
two friends” got mixed with
another in the print room and the
caption appeared under a picture
of three cabhorses.

Other People’s Affairs

Conditions were very different
for a foreign correspondent. Office
hours and worries faded away and
her responsibilities were her own,
but what a lot there were! But she
enjoyed it all. “It’s a life that takes
you about,” she said, “sends you
travelling all over the worl
gives you an exciting sense o!
being in on the making of history,
gives you a unique opportunity for
peeps into other people’s life. You
must like people, you must like
the rough-and-tumble of exist-
ence, in fact you must enjoy being
a nosey-parker, There’s no other
profession which allows you td
biittonhole a man in the street,
walk politely into the house of 4

erfect stranger, ring up an ac-
ress, nobble a Prime Minister,
and proceed to question them on
their most public and their most



~ QUEEN
> VICTORI






Al”



FOR VISITORS

until recently, was Middle Eas
of the “News Chronicle” of |

windowless room translating



I

AT-LINE DIPS

AT THE SIDES

Tiny waists
—then flat
and wide

By EILEEN ASCROFT

4 wide hipline puts
ttt emphasis on tiny waists in
e

ng dress fashions ;
and by Morton started
the Ly day of the London
Meing "side ‘hip. paddin
. ‘ ' 2
pale haceves the front and

back flat.

Th Side look further
stressed by ups of sid
nis and wafieePbode

HA by Rudolf followéa thie
same line, dipping at the
sides and revealing the fore

ht é

co! of, the clothes were

e—beige. grrr navy
and black—reliev 7. exotle
glistening straw hats and

shining feet in black or erey
patent leathPr slippers

Shorter jackets

NECK LINES follow the curved
motif of the shoulders. Wr
see variations of the hors:
shoe neck line.

SLEEVES on coats, dresses and
Suits are three-quarter

length. many full and
gathéred into smal! cut!
bands

UIT JACKETS aré slightly

shorter with
For both
ent

ng dress





BBC. Weekly Tatks Summary

They Paid Her for it Too

experienced journalist who,
t Correspondent on the staff
ondon, talked in a BBC pro-
of her job. She began her
paper in Egypt, sitting in a
endless advertisements for

tremely inquisitive, it seems to me
to be the ideal job for a woman.
After all, there’s no other profes-
sion which imyites me to go and
poke my nase into everything that
do@sn’t concern me, and then in-
vites me to go and tell the whole
world about it!”
Difficulties

There were difficulties, of
course, one of the greatest of them
being language. One trip took her
through Austria, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary and Yugoslavia, and as
she did not speak all the languages
of these countries she was depend-
ent on middle-class people who
could speak English and translate
for her, and this meant that she
was apt to get only a middle-class
point of view. A jotirnalist had
“to be careful in ass@ssing what she
heard, for everyone was always
trying to sell their point of view
and all were convinced that they
were right. It was essential that
facts should be reported absolute-
ly impersonally but it was also
inevitable that a good and mature
jourtialist should develop her own
viewpoints and it was part of her
duty 0. point out what was good

Statement of Account,
“ei f ; poser of the Week, 9 p.m. The wey ot
e main joy of being a journal- John Company; 10. p.m. ,The ews,
ist wag that ‘she met the world} 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m,

and heard things she would never |â„¢Mid Week Talk, 10.30 p.m

forget, It was not the famous peo-
ple who stuck in her mind but
the marginal comments on _his-
tory such as the Yugoslay woman
who had been in a concentration
camp for two years and who wept
while feeding her own child, for
the other women’s children who
hever came back, or the two Ital-
ian women who said, “We don’t
know about politics; but we have
both lost our husbands tn the war,
and we are Alone. and we used to
be happy.” Such things were tn-

private concerns. And being ex- forgettable, especially to a woman.

FAMILY TREES—both going
back to Queen Victoria —

<=»

PRINCE



arr





SPECIAL POLICE DISPLAY

TO THE ISLAND

FEATURING
A MUSICAL RIDE
DRILL DISPLAY

BEATING THE RETREAT

Al

HE POLICE RipiNG SCHOOL
DISTRICT
5 p.m. Tuesday 26th February

ADMISSION $1.00

“RR”





a a Nk

Follow the
Chef

(By HELEN BURKE)

M. JEAN VINCENT. one of the
committ®é of chefs in the Associa-






me

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

Pixie Mcvium Was Satisfied

—It Made Him Happy to Be Unhappy—

By MAX TRELL

Pixie O’Seow!l said: “I suppose
you think I have a very bad dispo-
sition? Nothing seems to

please
”

Knarf and Hanid, the shadow- |
children With the turned-about

tion Culinaire Francaise, has had| "8™és, didn’t know exactl what to
wide experience in restaurants| ®"Swer. But finally Hanid said, as
d hotels, iftluding Maison tly ag possible (for she didn’t























hier in Paris atid the Berkeley
and Savo¥ ih London.

. For 15 years he has been prin-
cipal of the cookery department at
Westminster Technical College, re-
sponsible for the training Oys
and girls in the art of the hatte
cuisine and in hotél management.

I asked M. Vincert for recipes
which you might like to try or
adapt. ° '

Loin of Pork Bretonne Fér 10

2%4lb. diced or sliced potatoes
(yellow-fleshed for preference),
alb. sliced onions, 2 tablespoons
chopped parsley, pepper and salt,
3lb. loin of pork (boned and
skinned), % cup water.

Butter a deepish casserole, large
enough to hold all the ingredients.
Mix the potatoes, onions and pars-
ley together and season them at
the same time. Place in the cas-
serole with the seasoned pork,
boned side up, on top, Brush it
with melted Butter or margarine

f

I'm

the

n
fike husti
ings: “Well, you aren't really very
cheerful. But we like
are, don’t we, Knarf

Of course,” said Knarf.

Pixie O’Scowl grumbled that he

didn’t see w!

cousin Pixie McG
ever made him laugh, He’s got a
frown so deep that it starts at his
‘ore’

hurting Pixie O’Scowl’s feel-

he should be cheer-

when he didn’t see anything to

be chéerful about. “But if you think

bad, you ought to meet my
i . No one has

and runs all around his
you saw McGlum, you'd

chin, If
think I was cheerful.”

Knarf and Hanid now said they’d
very much like to meet Pixie Mc-
Glum. “Where do we find him?”
asked Knarf.

Under a Stiimp

“He lives,” said Pixie O’Scowl,
“ander an old stump at the edge of

swamp. It’s the dampest and

most uncomfortable place anyone
ever lived in. But he won’t move.”

and add the water. Bake in a e O’Scowl dil
moderate oven (375-400 degrees} take rf and Hanid Gooth to the
Fahr.) until the meat is nicely} old stum at the edge of the swamp

















browned, then turn it and brown
the other side. Baste it from time
to time, adding small quantities of
boiling water as required. (I
would give this dish at least 1%-
1% hours.)

Serve in the dish with a good
cabbage, cooked in salted water,
drained and left to finish in butter,
very slowly for an hour. (I would
use half the quantity of meat and
hope that it would serve six per-
sons.)

Shoulder of Lamb St. Hubert

This is a wonderful way to serve

and

his

e@ McGlum. “There

with no rubbers on, He must be

trying to catch a cold.”

At this moment, Pixie McGlum
sneezed several times
nose loudly, then looked up and saw

d blew his

visitors. “Go away,” he said. “I

hate company.”

Knarf and Hanid glanced closel
a. Pixie McGlum. He wasn’t m:
taller than a large sized dandelion,
He was wearing an old coat, an old
battered hat, and hi
a corncob pipe, turned upside down.

e was smoking

regia Mal soit) toh ee be art BE
Bone a smail shoulder of lamb} ™¢Glum added. “You'll have no fun


















and stuff it with a small amount of
minced rabbit, three chopped hard-
boiled eggs, 302. sliced mush-
rooms sautéd in a little butter or
taargarine and a small glass of
white wine and seasoning to taste.
Roll and tie the shoulder securely.
Fry it all over in butter or mar-
parine in a deep pan. Pour off the
fat. Add a glass of dry white wine
and allow the wine to evaporate.
Baste with a little slightly thick-
ened brown stock, flavoured with
a bouquet garni to which a little
basil has been added. Cover and
cook slowly, basting frequently.
Serve with a purée of chestnuts.
WORLD COPYRIGHT nreervey,

“

(

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20. 1952 \
11.15 a.m, Listeners’ Cho'ce, 11.45, a.m.
The Storyteller, 12 {opad) The News,
.10 p.m. News Analysis.
aconais Bem. ......5..... 25.38M $1,32M
a
4p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, The Dail
Reraco, 4.15 p.m. BBC Midland Light
Orchestra, 5 p.m, Composer of the reas
5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson at thi
Theatre Organ, 5,30.p.m. Bookr to Read
5.45 p.m, Ballet. 6 p,m, Souvenirs of
Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up an
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. ews,



ie

7.10 p.m. News Analwasts,. 7.15 p.m,
Calling the West Indies, 7.45 p m. Over w
to You

7.45—10.30 p.m. 31.82M 484M

8.15 p.m Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m.

“ath ,
SPECIAL, THURS, 1.30 p.m

SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE



visiting me. I’m very gloomy.”

y are you sitting with your

feét in the water?” Knarf asked.
Pixie McGlum muttered: “Th

my feet—I can do whatever I like

with them. Besides,” he said, “I’ve

a very good reason for keeping

‘
fens in the water.”
Hanid said in surprise: “What|and wouldn’t say another word.



TODAY (Only) 445 and 8.30

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S

UNDER CAPRICORN = B80, COrFON
Color by Tectttcolor) MICHAEL WILDING &
The BIG PUNCH —istiss hehe |

“HIDDEN CITY”
Bomba, The Jungle Boy



Tex RITTER
OPENING FRIDAY 2.30 —





445

PLAZA ,2San

Last 2 ShoWs To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Robert MITCHUM in
“OUT OF THE PAST”
“THE SET UP" Robert RYAN

&

Thurs. only) 445 & 8.30 p.m

‘BEWARE OF PITY’ Lili PALMER &

“HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN |
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY
IDNITE SAT
“CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE”
ild Bill ELLIOTT as Red Rider &
“ALIAS BILLY THE Kib”
Sunset CARSON

you just as you |
7?

to | toes like it. The frogs

Thurs,

5 'S MAGICAL ER
tRhice aN WON DERLAND:

|



42

Pixie McGlum was sitting with
his feet in the water.

reason have you got, Pixie Me-
Glum ? I didn’t think there was any
reason why anyone should keep }).
feet in water.”

“Silly!” said Pixie McGlum. «|;
going to rain in a day or two
my feet will get all wet. Solr «--
as well get them wet right no

Near the Swamp

“I don’t think you ought +
so near the swamp,” said H
“Nothing wrong with the rw
said Pixie McGlum. “The m :

and the toad
like it. Why shouldn’t I like it?”
“T’ve invited you to live in





he | O’Cheer Hall with the rest of th:
is now!” exclaimed Pixie O’Scowl;
“sitting with his feet in the water

Pixies a dozen times,” said Pixic
O’Scowl to his cousin. “But you
won’t come, Why not ?”

“Too comfortable,” muttered Pixie
O’Scowl. “Breakfast, dinner and
supper are always served on timne—
the food is good and wholesome—
there’s plenty of cream, and bee's
honey — everything is just right.
How do you suppose I'd feel if |
went to live in O’Cheer Hall?”

“You’d feel fine and cheerful,”
said Knarf.

“If I felt fine and cheerful, 1
wouldn’t be Pixie McGlum. And !f
I wasn’t Pixie McGlum, there
youldn’t be anybody living under
thie old stump down at the edge of
the swamp, The mosquitoes wouldn‘t
have anyone to sting, and the toads
and the frogs wouldn’t have anyone
to keep awake at aight with their
pipings and croakings.” And with
that, Pixie MeGlum sneezed again
| and blew his nose louder than befo





Btown

P

p.m Warner Double







fonly) 4.30 & 8.30 p.m.

A

“TREASURE ISLAND"
(Color By Technicolor)
Bobby O'Driscoll & Robert Newton
E SET UP”

Robert RYAN



AND CONTINU

G
EGLoR utd

& 830 PM
— LIVE ACTION &
Radiant . ANSCO




GABE TY & Sezer

Last Show Tonite &.30
“ROCKY” Roddy McDowall &
“KILROY WAS HERE”
Jackie COOPER & Jackie COOGAN
Thurs, (only). 8.30 p.m
“DEAR MURDERER”
Eric PORTMAN &
“SNOW BOUND”
Robert NEWTON

Midniie Sat
ROCKY LANE DOUBLE!
“SHERIFF OF WiC1Q01A” &
“SUN DOWN IN SANTA FE”











8.45f0.m. Com-

Marching
and Waltzing

/

for





Dinner




and
Dancing
°

Every Night
(Except Sunday)


























Aimed in Radiant "
ANSCO color *

PLAZA

B°TOWN pint 2310)

Also. the Color Short:
“FESTIVAL OF LONDON”

|





6M. GLOBE 201m coneuey rox

YOUR MOVIE

DATES



Opening TO-DAY 5

x




MW

ING. ;



There will be NO TALENT or STAGE SHOWS at this Theatre.

ROODAL

a

sey
Step, B

and 8.30 and continuing
Fors

4 »Centur? 2 ET

0 ME

X

Perey












a
ee please note our week-end films START ON WEDNES.
DAYS.

THEATRES



EMPIRE
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
4.45 & 8.30

Jose FERRER
ACADEMY AWARD

Winner In

ST. ‘'s

Production
‘ . -* o
Cc YR A N
Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL
Opening Friday wand 230 & 8.30
“THE SUN SET AT DAWN”
OLYMPIC
bites: s co
Bing CROSBY—Bob HOPE in
“ROAD TO RIO”
and Alan LADD in
“WHISTSSING SMITH”
Opéning Friday gind 4.90 & Bs
“HURRICANE ISLAND”

ana

“COCKEYED WONDER”



QQ ee Et

ROXY

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
430 & 8.15
TRAPPED BY BOSTON

and
TO THE exh OF THE
E
with William POWELL
Opening Friday 22nd 4.30 & 8.15.
DESTINATION MOON.
ROYAL
TO-DAY & TO-MORROW
4.30 & 8.15

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL
“UNDERSEA KINGDOM”
with Ray “Crash” CORRIGAN
RA ac
Friday only. :
TRAPPED iN
BLACKIE.
and
TO THE END OF THE
EARTH.






——.. =. =| Se Ul ehCUCULrrmhUhUhc cohUlL er hl .mhUmLCrCOCUClrlhCUC Ol ee UL ee SCO

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952



Further

JAMAICA

TO GET

anadian Investment In Caribbean Bauxite

—— a ae ee Oe er. ee





BARBADOS

ADVOCATE













30 Die In



a

Seawell

ARRIVALS By BWIA. ON MONDAY
















PAGE THREE

‘Harbour Log















2 From Grenada—Lione! Gittens, Preda IN CARLISLE BAY
1ZZar Martin, W lloughby res, Goulds
NEW EE SE P RT a RK. MeKague. ? McK ec, M Mary E e, Sch. Sunshine R
G. Saunder Mr D.G ind ch. Henry B Sch. Wonderful
: } | SS A ( ; BOMNOM, Feb, 19, 5 cae ees Dee See he ee oe
More snow is on Ge way fo. nee * Vincent—Frederick Casson, re A. Davidson, Sch. Emeline, Sch
New England where 30 persons colm zonsaives, Angela G alve Luet! le M. Smith, Sch Marvy M. Lewis,
: . ; . MONTREAL. died in the blizzard whieh ended “"[o" “eee 1 Devidhie, Me ee ne
Canadian investment in the Caribbean area will be early yesterday while northeastern John Nickson, Doroth; Enis ARRIVALS
increased by at least $20,000,000 to provide large-scale ex- states were still digging out of Bugo and Everett Warne Seh 1 Belle Wolfe, 74 tons net
: ’ a, oe sy sae hate un : From Gaadeloupe—Andre Robin Ye B ‘
pansion of the bauxite-alumina facilities already under heir worst storm in years. Wiem femided-P. Johnson, G. Wilson, » ach : eu
; ica i i A, Tucker, G. Sornes. M. Sorne vis, n Trinidz
construction in Jamaica, announces Mr. Nathaniel Davis, The Weather Bareau predicted Stay. s. Beaty. Be Boyes, Wo Bayes, wc Enenusl G clardom, €8 tome net
president of Aluminium Ltd., Montreal. d snow or the rain in the south A. Dreiswger, R. Fergusson, P. Poun- gapt. C. MeQuilkin, from Curriacou.
The company’s new alumina plant in Jamaica, the first ona SOE ih Che GRE foe 10> ee ee a Re MR SPTR S Baty, OS tena notes
in the Caribbean, is now having its planned capacity in- ogy a - the uae DEPARTURES By B.WLA. ON MONDAY MV Benny, 2,18 (ons, Capt, Pedter-
. han ie 7 wh began Suni night were ‘er Trinidad—Cyril Clarke, Gladstone son, from ad
eased from 180 tons of alumina per day to 450 tons per onal by the tenn ee even more Walker, Julisn Williams, James Baptiste, ’
ay. : 4 Dhansanan Saroop Frank Bayne DEPARTURES
rE tecrenes dn ecg lives when the storm womens “ Gweneth Atkinson, Lionel Wilson, S.S. Helicon, 981 tons net, Capt
required to provide more raw ‘8 near Mandeville, in Se — ae — = e oO Dorothy Barrow. srecder _ Matyseniuk, Docksen, foe Aniaterdam. es a
materials for Canada’s rapidly ‘emtral section of the islani a TIEEe Sees « J y. Kirton, Eisie Haynes, Etwyn Cumber- Christie, for Antigua.
expanding aluminium industry. Construction on the first ae A howling northeast blizzard bateh, Andrew Shockness, Jack Counc Sch. Lady Silver, 30 tons net, Capt.
Further enlargement of the plant has been proceeding rapidly, hens ‘ght inches ™% Kenneth Isaac, John Coley. Rove- Bethel, for Antigua
roviding employment for more posited from about eight mary Coley, Arnold Wood, Cornel anes
to “a tons per day = called for ee cd workers Progress to of snow in Boston to 31 inches in Wood, Stanton Toppin, Pamela Toppin
in e@ company’s plans as a ‘"* . = parts of New Hampshire. A 20 and Arthur Vendryes MAI
suecessive j ant, Mr, date includes the erection of = ; ; Fer Grenada—Morton Reingold, Geren L NOTICES
Davis said rere 8 structural steel and tanks from inch snowfall in Lewiston WS jordan, Rev. Francis Ogden and Marlene
To service the alumina plant ™aterial brought from England; Se RANT Cane ty “SaeRnes “oA yer a Vinceat—Bertie Corbin, Chark ot Ne Ge ~ b pee
s r a a ait - > ir ~ ertie ‘orbin “hark and thandle export shipments, a calcining ap lace: he. eon oe —«cP) Lawson and Arthur Lashley =m ssi adi:
deep-sea port will be created on pes ge depth of 300 aot hekont a For tango. Arthur Zeitsehel and 12 ineon), Registered
the south coast of Jamaica. A WeHs to a : arriett Zeitschel. and Ord Mail at
600-foot all-steel pier, will be FS. Ai orineh pipeline four miles . In Touch With Barbados Se eee ee
constructed at Old Harbour Bay, tnd 000,000. alien 2 eet on oan Purchase of British Owned Stati pails for British Gulsna by the Sch.
with initial dredging operations & @ ),0NDU' a 5 the first time fer many years a She outclassed thige competitors in the i Coastal Station Setened “Beat GAY es kee
to start immediately. a hill near ths plant. I British bulldog has won the Champion- Ont es, oe ? b ‘ United Railways Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advise “Piten Mal nat Rey Man at
i iS - ‘r see ; shi s Q "s, oways uckles, shown when six that they can now co cate with il at 83 =
Total investment by the com Storage facilities for alumina ship of the show at Cratt's moritiin Sih, ‘cals SO AE hace Bete HAVANA ae Dae Sie, Se. Seeman etegte with te 2p.m. Ordinary Mail 4? 2.30 p.m. on
pany in Jamaica may reach as Sati ot jorse: i i , = the t Februany, 1962
fouch as $40,000 000, including will be a area AN ene hata te err Sree | day, but has mot been given any special The Cuban Sugar Landowners’ Coast Station:—
é A ’ , j i a chiles, exhibite y Mr. J. arcar of | ath " : f anriad ty Helder, s.s. Benny, s.5 ‘anac yy
the cost of extensive agricultural saeediy trot ‘70,000 tons each. Berkhamsted, Herts, and judged the best " ot She is just naturally a winner,” said Association, at a meeting 10 Grier ss Rodos, s.sLoldn ss. RATES OF EXCHANGE
projects initiated six years ago. These will be filled up tonvefor exhibit at Olympia | Mrs. Sapaatd, whe pipe ine te tke esanee Havana, has agpeed to establis! Colompbie, ss. Sea Wind, ss Cisbroviy FEBRUARY 19, 1952
he programme is being carried pelts from the railway wagons 6 a ee ot ee ec ey F a company with a view to 5.9 Steelore, ss. Santa Rosa, s OANADA
> Jamaic ites d.. ¢ ” me . - a purchasing the British-owned Pethfinder, s.s. Vera Cruz, s.s. Sunrover, 73.4/10% pr. Cheques on
out by Jamaica Bauxites, Ltd., a . " . e : .
. aoe and in turn discharged by a 1,400- t ; o , §.8. Kallada, s.s. Esso Bolivar, 5.5. Aleoa Rankers 71.8/10% pr
subsidiary of Aluminium, Ltd. foot jong conveyor to the pier. oI United Railways of Havana. It polaris, 5.8. Esso Camden, 5.5. Wast Demand Drafts 71.66% pr.
All capital requirements are storage tanks will also be pro- I¢ ‘AO f r H Id has set up a technical committe: ington, Milbank, 8.8. Burepe tage Drafie 91. SOE oe
being provided by the parent vided for 80,000 barrels of fuel Oo oO as a first step to study the con- Alpha, s.s. Marques De Comillas 73. 4/10% pr, Cable i
ompany, with the exception of 6) to be used for firing both the ditions of the railway and_ to sages yes Se Tee Se Bens F2,8/108 He. Cissents 709/206 ‘pr.
6,700,000 towards the cost of the Sand cee “let “ ™~ 7 report back, —B.ULP. Planter * 3 : “ Goupon £9 .6/ 0% pr.
ree : calcining kilns and steam genera- on erence 3 anter, 10% pr Silver 20% pr
rst-stage plant, which was ting equipment at the alumina
Jouned to Jamaica Bauxites by plant. Transit sheds will be built

the Economic Co-operation Ad-
ministration. The loan is being
repaid by aluminium shipments
from Canada to the U.S, Govern-

for other raw materials.

A .new method of shipping

alumina is planned by the com-

_ MONTREAL, Feb. 18,
A special conference for comple-
tion of a convention on damage

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 19.

President Peron, Speaking in a nationwide broadcast

|
|

ment stockpile, pany in order to handle the caused by foreign aircraft to third —_ outiined an austerity programme for Argentina in which he
“Production from the aluming quantity involved. The material Partits on the surface and for announced that the compte would ve lore meatless days |
plant will go chiefly to the new will be discharged directly into “pening of this convention for y Y Se heya

aluminium smelter being built by
Oug subsidiary, the Aluminium

the ship’s hold in bulk instead of
being loaded in bags. This. tech-

signature by the governments of
the world, will be held by the In-

per week and urged a rapid increase in farm and mining
production to boost Foreign Exchange earnings and cope





|

Company of Canada, Ltd. in nique will speed up the opera- ternational Civil Aviation Organ- i i |
British Columbia,” said Mr. tion to the rate of 600 nied war ization in Rome_ beginning woth ee ek ole so — |
Davis. “The new west-coast hour with considerable saving in September 1952. The Third Party far had not to make ea sacri- bry i
jmelter, with an initial capacity handling, shipping, time and bags. Damage Convention is designed feces but that the Seal have te SUGAR NEWS
of 83,000 tons of aluminium, will When mining operations are to replace the Rome Convention pec; the sit y a“ ar i
treate a considerable increase in begun, open-pit methods using of 1938 and is being held in Rome oe’ We Situation and “organ- o !
Canada’s requirements of raw mechanical excavators will be upon the invitation of the Gov. So, Persecution from abroad Rain, Drought |
naterials. employed. The bauxite will be ernment of Italy calls for some hardships. He said ‘

“This has resulted in am earried to the plant by diesel- dy Argentina's financial difficulttes Ruin Australian
*xpansion and acceleration of powered haulage units. Rather The Legal Committee of ICAO began in 1949 due to inconverti-
our construction programme in than being shipped out of the has been working upon a revision bility of the British pound and Sy y P t |
Jamaica, Savings of about 50 per island in this form, the bauxite of the Rome Convention for sever- “iscrimination” under the Mar- > igar rospec S |
vent. in shipping costs will will be converted into alumina al years, The draft convention to Shall Plan, He said if the auster- cs
be realised by extracting the at the plant near Mandeville by pe submitted to the special con- ity programme was accompanied _, BRISBANE. |
ilumina from the bauxite at its a special method known as the ference retains the system of ab- by an imerease “of only 20 per Total sugar output in Australia
jource rather than shipping the “Bayer process. golute liability of the aircraft cent.” in production, Argentina for the 1951 season is now put |
dre itself to an alumina plant in y

North America,”

—B.U.P.



Operator for damage caused to

would solve the Foreign Exchange

at well under 700,00 tons follow - |

|

third parties on the surface, the Problem and partially solve her a. ee = re }
First production of the Jamaica system found in the Rome Con- inflation problems. Eitlere Acrusht em Xf llc

‘ ; oe aiate ‘ : ’ > ught. The 1950 ere
pumie omens se Bus Conductors ert OF eS includes” mn Eliminate Waste severely affected by the wet}
and ‘Seats enianand plant on Fined at 40h Cciher tame toms ro However Peron suid that in season which made harvesting!
which construction is well under un weight of the afreraft causing the Argentina’s case au*terity did not difficult, resulted in the poorest

way is due to go into operation in
ate 1953. At the British Colum-
dia smelter, which will be ready
for initial operation early in 1954,
the alumina will be discharged
from deep-sea vessels direct to
storage 800 yards from the wharf.

. +s eee rag tion will be considered further at . sea, was 0 of grea rustra-
cauire “atte ‘properties oriered by Hig Worship Mr cB. the Rome meeting. ebehauces "ihe Argentine Govern- ton to growers ginazmilers ‘ae oo good looks tell you they’re just right
al exploration for the ore days oe {un default one ontas A Suggestion ae secu aane he urged a a crop which was expected You know, too, when you look at the price
farried out originally in 1942 and imprisonment with hard labour he Council of ICAO has sug- 1, Government will proceed Tine’ made ‘harvesting a0. dif tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
Fore con@read Spouse the enmi- eels 1 “on aa inne’ 1 oe 5 a as. Tet Zs art will on — ee mini- Cult that it had to be pos poned is a Full Brogue Oxford. Tied to every pair is

n Canadian laboratories.
The company purchased 30,000

1 le . 7 “lyde become an excessive burden on August that crushing proceeded ‘ es : , =
fcres of land containing some gestae mee a ae” el international civil aviation, yet ®%d “appropriate profit’. without undue hindrance, Heavy which means * just right’! Look for it im
4000 acres of bauxite deposits ji 16) 10/- for overloading the Should be high enough to cover 3. Foster production of good rains again set in early in Novem- leading stores in Barbados,

tnd has since conducted an ee M-1300. Foster is to pay his Compensation to third parties in quality cattle in the shortest pos- ber and the season dragged on

sxtensive agricultural and reaf- fine in 14 days, or in default 14 1 but extremely rare catastro- sible time. _ until February, during which

restation scheme to raise the dave’ inatrisopment phic accidents. 4. Reorganize packing houses time the most deplorable har-

ae A stom 08 cattle sulted to “Both cases were brought by . The draft convention provides, from a technical apd financial vesting conditions in living mem~-

e Jamaican conditions is being
red and modern farming
nethods are applied.

Work On New Port To Begin
at Once
The site selected for

the com-

Two bug conductors were con-
victed and fined by two@ District
“A” Police Magistrates who found
them guilty of overloading their
buses with passengers.

The first was Preston Watts of

on Harmony Hall Road,

Cpl. Cyrus who is attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station.



£4 Fine For

damage; the proposed maximum
amount which an operator can be
obliged to pay under normal cir-
cumstances is ten million Poin-
care gold francs, equivalent to
663,360 U.S. dollars. This limita-

cost of third party insurance to

for the first time on a multilateral
basis, for the compulsory recogni-
tion of foreign judgments. Ac-
cording to its terms, law suits may
be brought only in the courte of
the country where the damage
occurred, but a judgment render-

mean that necessary items ywou.d
be renounced bul it would mean
i. @liminaung waste; 2. re-
ducing unnecessary expenses;
3. renouncing everything super-
fluous; and 4, postponing every-
thing not absolutely necessary,

mum prices taking into considera-
tion production, costs and risks

viewpoint.

He also said no cattle would be
slaughtered at all for one day of
each week and meat slaughtered
on the second meatless day will
be destined exclusively for export,

Offered Loan

suger yield since 1924

According to the annual re
port of the Australian Bureau of
Sugar Experiment Stations, just
published and covering the season
up to June, 1951, the crushing

It was not until the middle of
.

ory prevailed. This had a marked
effect on the sugar content of the
cane, which at no time attained
its normal peak of maturity. As
a result, it took 7.61 tong of cane
to provide one ton of sugar.

The young cane for the 1951

———$ $$ ——





JOHN WHITE





the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign







ny’s new rt in Jamaica is 2 ed in the courts of one nation, He repeated the earlier state- Qo), was also affected by the wet
ia’ Harbour ay, on the south Speeding concerning damage caused by ment that the Argentine Govern- oamtlitions and later by serious e e
st, 22 miles west of Kingston. foreign aircraft, will be capable of ment had been offered a loan by frosts, Since then, as though the means ma e ust rh t
e 600-foot all-steel pier will be His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith, execution in any other state which “foreign moneylenders” but said prop had not already suffered
feet wide and have a depth of Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- is party to the Convention. The that the Government prefers to enough, persistent drought has — ‘
feet of water alongside. trict “A” yesterday fined Conrad draft convention also provides that Solve its problems by its own added to the disaster. ij =, al
redging will start immediately gpringer of Belleplaine, St. An- states may require that the opera- means. The Bureau's figures show that

r a 7,000-foot channel, 400 feet
vide, with a turning basin of
§200 feet. This operation, which

volves moving 2,250,000 cubic

ds of sand and clay, wil! take
intil June, when construction of

e pier will begin. The harbour
ill be connected to the
amaica Government Railway by

drew, £4 and 1/- costs in 28 days,
or two months’ imprisonment with
hard labour for exceeding the
speed limit on Bank Hall Road
while driving the motor lorry
A-115.

The Police said that the motor
lorry was driven at over 28 miles

tor of a foreign aircraft cover his
potential liability by insurence or
some other acceptable security.

Invitations to attend the special
conference are being sent to the
567 member nations of the Inter-
national Civil Aviation Organiza-

He said that foreign loans are
good only to mortgage a country.
He explained that meatless holi-
days were necessary to increase
Argentina’s exportable surplus
and thereby boost Foreign Ex-
change earnings. In another an-
nouncement he said: “Govern-

the yield, which totalled 910,049
tons of sugar in 1948, has been
decreasing steadily ever since—
+0 897,267 tons in 1949 and to
879,844 tons in 1950. If estimates
are now fulfilled, putting the 1951
crop at well under 700,000 tons,
this trend will have continued

YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S



spur line and will have exten- per hour while the speed limit tion and to the Government of ment will pay producers substan- and it may be some years before |
ee freight sidings. on that road is 20 miles per hour. Rumania, the only non-contracting tially better prices for 1952-53 Australia can regain its position

The plant where Jamaica baux- The offence was committed on state of ICAO which has ratified crops.” among world sugar producers. .
fe will be refined into alumina January 4, 1952, the 1933 Rome Convention. —U.P. ; —B.U.P. o

PAINS IN





ASTHMA MUCUS

Loosened Firs! Day

Don't tet cou chok-
ing attacks of

hing
















YOU CAN'T BEAT IT’S





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) - i) | “ C O RN E R ~ O R

THE

Sa ST



—
= = ————_-:
Se eee ea






9

PAGE FOUR





Wednesday, February 20, 1952

BULK SHIPMENT

BY recommending that bulk shipment
of fancy molasses be permitted to the
United States, the committee appointed to
enquire into all aspects of the fancy
molasses industry in Barbados hope that
valuable data and experience can be
gained for the industry. At the same time
they are careful to emphasise that this
additional business would not affect the
amount of labour which is at present em-
ployed in the industry.

The Committee despite its statement
that the shipment of fancy molasses in
bulk to the Canadian market was not
necessary in “order to maintain our pres-
ent exports” are of the opinion that it
may become essential to ship molasses in
bulk. They therefore consider that the
fancy molasses industry should plan well
in advance so that shipment in bulk can
be adopted with the minimum difficulty.
When fancy molasses is shipped in bulk
some part of the savings should be paid
into a special fund. This Fund could be
uséd- among other purposes to provide
alternative’ employment for labour dis-
Placed by bulk shipment and would be
operated by the Fancy Molasses Control
and Marketirig Board.

These recommendations are remarkable
in view of the fact that the necessity or
otherwise of shipping fancy molasses in
tank’steamers rather than in packages was
one of the major causes of the commit-
tee's enquiry. It will be remembered that
arrangements had been made by local ex-
porters in midsummer 1950 to ship fancy
molasses or “syrup”, as it is known locally,
to Canada in bulk Arrangements were
completed and a tank steamer actually
afrived in port but the Government re-
fused to grant permission for shipment in
bulk, and appointed a committee on 12th
June, 1950. Many reasons were given at
the time for the government's action but
chief of them seems to have been the fear
that.unemployment would result because
of bulk shipment.

That note of fear runs through the whole
report and is especially written into the re-
commendation that bulk shipment be
permitted to the United States. It is unfor-
tunate that no estimates are given in the
report of the number of employees who
would lose employment because of a change
over to bulk shipment but figures supplied
by-the Hon. H. A. Cuke and published as
Appendix VII show that difference in costs
between shipment in bulk and shipment in
packages is $23.83 per 100 gallons of which
Labour represents only $5.39 as compared
with other costs of $18.44. These figures,
viewed unemotionally, are overwhelmingly
convincing that bulk shipment would be
more economical and that savings on other.
costs could be used to create other employ-
ment for those, whose occupations must
change sooner or later.

The Committee explicitly states that bulk
shipment was not in their opinion neces-
sary, at the time of writing their report, in
order to maintain present exports. But they
were so impressed by the possibility of com-
petition in the future that they concede
that bulk shipment of fancy molasses may
become essential, consider that the in-

stry should plan well in advance, and
as Y dense bulk export to the United
States as a method of gaining valuable data
ience,
ont hee will be some who will regret that
the government did not permit bulk ship-
ment in 1950, since there would be in
existence certain data and experience
which would help the industry to plan
ahead, but government controls are bound
to squeeze the corns of private enterprise
at some time and there was not sufficient
unanimity among exporters at that time
to encourage government's permission of
a bulk shipment trial. Those who engin-
eered this pioneer attempt at the time
may derive some slight satisfaction from
the recommendations which the Commit-
tee have made.

Perhaps the greatest weakness of the
report is ifs failure to emphasise how
uncertain is the future of the export mar-
ket. Para. 50 disconcertingly says: “some
dealers maintained that the consumption
of molasses was becoming less and less:
others that the demand for the product
was limited but stable: others again
thought that the industry was thriving

consumption increasing.” It must
cont been vay difficult for the Committee
to form any opinions against this confus-
ing background of lack of knowledge.
Yet it is clearly important that local ex-
porters should not imagine that the fancy
molasses market is so assured that it will
continue for ever whether or not bulk
shipment is introduced.

It has even been said that in the last
resort neither private enterprise: nor the
Committee : ner the Government : nor the
party with a majority in the House of
Assembly will be able to introduce bulk
shipment. Everything is said to depend
on the will of those who will be displaced
if bulk shipment becomes necessary. But
this is unlikely. Because whereas bulk
shipment will, from er create new
c nities for those who must neces-
pa gy ar to be employed, the failure
or diminution of the fancy molasses
export market will cause unemployment
without providing such a fund. Pee

And the real crisis in molasses is the
crisis of a product which is no longer as
popular in Canada as it was. This dire
fact comes peeping through almost every
line of this well-penned report, although
there is no actual mention of a crisis.





THREE days after ti ay of th
King’s lung operat 2 typewrit-
ten note came to me. It said, with
stark, shocking brevity:—

The King w Z ear to be



making a complete recovery but
he is not likely to live longer
than about 18 months
“The end will probably come
j suddenly. The operation was six
months too late.”
| Did the King himself know that?
I do not think so. To the last hours
| of his life he was telling his friends
| in conversation and by letter how
| Surprising a recovery he was mak-
ing, and how thrilled he was by it.
He talked and wrote with the
joy and buoyaney of a very
happy and confident man. The
| handwriting of the letters he
| wrote im the last weeks was
bold and firm, with no indica-
tion of fatigue or fear.
| _ He could never have known of
} the shadow that lay over him.
i Just one thing vexed him: the
huskiness of his voice.

But it did not disturb him much.
| He knew that it was caused by the
| paralysis of one of the vocal cords

which persisted since the opera-
tion. He was confident to certainty
that time and effort would put it
right again.

He died a happy man. Of that |
am sure. Certainly he deservec
j that crowning mercy. For although
he found deep happiness in man-
hood, especially in his family life
he also tasted much sorrow and
suffering in his stoo-short vears
Hesitani Steps

How Fate shapes the lives of

men and the destinies of countries
is always a fascinating study
| The pages of history will tell

| how King George, though not born *

'to be King, and never dreaming
| that he would ever be King, sud-
jdenly had Kingship thrust upon
| him.

| What they will not tell is the fas-
j¢inating story of how, but for a
| series of trivial happenings in the
| little Australian town of Perth 28
| Years ago, it might never have been
| Possible for him to accept the re.
| sporisibilities of Kingship when
} Fate beckoned him.

And that in turn might well have
meant that the new Queen we love
$0 Much would never have been
Queen.

The never-before-told story be-

gins in the year before the Empire |

Exhibition which drew the world
to Wembley.

|, King George—then Duke of
|'York—had recently married the
| girl he had loved since childhood,
} and was taking his first hesitant
; Steps in public life.

And they were hesitant steps.
| Far more hesitant and difficult
j than mest people realise.
| For the Duke had carried since
} €arliest boyhood the burden of an
| acute speech defect which made
| speechmaking, afid even conver-
sation—two qualities most vital to
| any man in public life—so intoler-
| able a torture as to be almost im-
possible.

The Question

In one simple sentence, spoken
to a few friends years later, our
Queen of today described his
plight more movingly than anyone
else will ever do: “I can remember
when I was a child in my cot
father coming to say ‘Goodnight’
to me, and he couldn’t.”

Etiquette demands that when
anyone is presented to royalty,
royalty must open the conversa-
tion. The young Duke of York too
often found that émbarrassingly
impossible for him to do.

When a cadet in his first term at
Dartmouth a tutor, not realising
the seriousness of his defect, sud-
denly put the question to him in
class: “What is the half of a
half?”

The word “Quarter” was beyond
utterance by the nervous boy.
Speech froze in his throat.

The sarcastic comments of his
tutor on his inability to solve as
simple a sum as that, and the tit.
ters of the boys around him, left a
permanent mark upon him

}

| Tremendous Efforts

He became more and more shy
and diffident. His nervousness in-

| creased, and muth of his early

| youth was marked by solitary
| hours of deep gloom, in which he
| wrestled with his growing doubts
that he could ever conquer this
curse which he came to believe
| “God had put upon him.”

| His marriage to an understand-

| ing girl who loved him deeply, and

| whom he in turn adored, helped
| him through this difficult time as
| nothing else could have.

He made one tremendous effort
after another, Together they fought
his affliction in public and in priv-
ate. Often the queen could be seen

| literally suffering with him and in-
fusing her strength into him. Yet
he made very little progress.

Then Fate began to move her

| pawns. In Perth, Australia. there
lived a man of young middle age

| who was achieving remarkable re-

\sults in the curing of speech de-

| fects among the children of the

} te by a system of diaphragm
breathing—with which, of course,
the doctors disagreed. His name

| was, Lionel Logue.

j Around the Christmas of that
year before Wembley, which was
to prove fateful for the future

| British King, a doctor friend and
Logue decided to take their farm.
ilies away for a holiday together.

| Ready To Go

| The morning fixed for the start

;came. The family had their bags

| packed.

| The car was at the door, when

suddenly the telephone rang. It was

{the doctor, “Sorry,”, he said, “but

| 1 cannot go with you. A friend has

| fallen ill. I have to s ay with him.”

“Well, that holiday is over,” said

| Logue to his wife.

i “But you need a holiday”, she

| replied. “Why don’t you go Bast by














' yourself.”
‘No,” said Logue “I went East
j last year.’
" y not Colon
“We said Logue hesitz
f I went to Colombo I y
bably want to go to England.”

“England
Logue

Lucky Man

Why not?” exicaimed





and he called a friend who
[head of a shipping agency. “C
you give me two cabins to Eng

Has Nev

She took him to the telephone Aden

sci lc BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The King: A Story That NOW_WIAT ABOUT

By JOHN GORDON
land?” he asked. “One for my wife
aid myself, and one for my two




laughed. “Don't be
silly.” he id. “This is Wembley
year. There isn't a cabin free in
any ship, and not likely to be.”

Logue put down the telephone.
Within half an hour it rang again.
It was the shipping man. Very
excited.

‘You are the luckiést man,” he
saic. “Two cabin bookihgs have
just been cancelled, You can have
them. The ship sails in ten days.

“I'll tell you in half an hour,”
replied Logue.

“It’s this minute or never,” said
the shipping man.

Logues wife nodded her head.
And Logue said. “Right, we take

them.”
A Little Work

They landed in London on March
1, Logue had £2,000 in the world.
And four to keep on it, in the most
expensive city in the world until
he could make good.

He knew nobody in the whole of
Britain. And he carried only one
introduction. It was to me. We
have remained on terms of close
friendship from the day he deliv-
ered it.

He settled his family in lodgings

in Maida Vale and went round the
local schools offering help in deal-
ing with their children's speech
defects. Soon he had a little work



w that the struggle
from the bottom to
likely to be a slow one:
the money he had be.





the confidence of a man
ly sure of himself-he de»
to go right to the top at
once. He rented a consulting
room in Harley-street, and a house
in Bolt ardens, South Kensing-
ton. At that time he did not have
a single patient.





Final Move

He soon’ met some fellow-
Australians, for Australians are
@ gregarious people. He was a
man bubbling with vitality and
personality. Those who met him
remembered him. And that was
how Fate made her final move.

An Australian who hid met
Logue met soon afterwards a
r al equerry who was looking a



he gO to the’ United
States to see if [ can bring over
@ speech-defect expert to look at

the Duke of York.” the equerry



explained.

“But it’s so hopeless!” he
added. “Nine experts here have
seen him already. Every possible

treatment has been tried: And not
one hag been the least successful.”

“There's a young Australian just
come over. He seems to be good.



Why not try him?” Suggested the
Australian.

Next day the equerry suw
Logue at Harley-street. His

judgment of him was favourable.
Logue was asked if he would see
the Duke and decide whether he
could do anything to help him,

“Yes,” said Logue. “But he must
come to me here, That imposes an
effort on him which is essential for
Success. If 1 see him at home we
lose the value of that.”

First Patient

Two days later, on October 19,
1926, the Duke went to Harley-
street. He was the first patient
ever to enter that room.

They talked for an hour and a
half.

Conversation was very difficult
But at the end of the hour and a
half Logue said, “I can cure you,
but it will need a tremendous
effort by you. Without that effort
it can’t be done.”

_ As Logue said later, “He came
into my room a slim, quiet man
with tired eyes and all the out-
ward symptom. of a man upon
whom habitual speech defect
had begun to set the Sign. When
he left you could see that there
was hope once more in his heart,”

Seven months later the Duke
standing alone, made, with very
little hesitation, the speech that

opened Australia’s new Parlia-
ment at Canberra.
t those seven months

imposed on the’ Duke in toil and

effort has never been adequately

understoog by the nation
Every Day

For an hour every day he and
Logue literally sweated in closely
concentrated work either in
Harley-street or Bolton-gardens.

Incidentally, a snobbish neigh-
bour one day sent a curt message
to Logue directing him to instruct
his visiter not to park his car out-
side the neighbour’s house

When Logue replied politely
that he would tell the Duke of
York that he must put his car
somewhere else. the neighbour
nw comand in confusion end
Said with the greatest amiability,
“Oh, no, don’t.- T'll be delighted
the Duke will continue to leave
it there.”

An hour’s werk with Logue was
followeg every day by an hour
and even two hours of equal effort
at home. The Duke never let up
for a day.

And always with him inspir-
ing, encouraging. and stimulating,
was the wonderful wife who made
all things possible for him.

The Fear

As soon as he was back from
Canberra the work began again.
More and ever more speeches.

But it was still far from easy.
Always there was the fear of the
utter breakdown.

At. {public “functions Logue
weuld stand or sit some distance
away, but near enough for the
Duke to-draw confidence from him.

The Duchess would sit by her
hucband, her eyes never leaving
him. her *°nd stretching out at
difficult times to touch his, always
pouring her strength into him.

Then came the day Fate lifted

the Duke to the Throne. The
y, man who only a few years
before found public appearance
an infinite ~erdeal, and public
sveaking a torture, now faced a
life in the public gaze. and a

lifetis of public speaking.
But he faced it now with con-

The



nervousness had
ten. He was no longer
people. Speechmaking
most of its terrors. The



> i lost
had iost

_asked Logue.



er Been Told

hard werk of the years had been
crowned with the glory
achievement.

Yet still much more had to be
done. The Accession ceremonies
and the Coronation brougiit most
difficult with them.
Well as the King now spoke, the
words had still to be
selected to make it easier for
éim.

He could never, for example,
say “King” with ease. Always,
therefore, when speaking in pub-
lic of his father it was “His
Majesty” or “My father.”

Tradition

But the Accession and Coro-
nation ceremoniés are fixed by
tradition. No alteration of the
words is possible.

Logue carried on the 4
gruelling task, down
the difficult into simplicity, con-/

quering what must so often have
seemed

a

of! By

a ae eee es en ee en ke ee a eee ee

THE WINDSORS?

JACK V. FOX
| a
LONDON, Feb. 19.

| A new Elizabethan era is beginning for
|Britons. But for the Duke of Windsor and
i his American wife there is little sign that it
| will be different from the era that began for
|Britain has a new Queen, a young lady who
\in childhood was very fond of Uncle David.
She has as Prime Minister the Winston

|Churchill who stood with Edward the Eighth
in those dramatic days before the abdication

So after the ana in December 1936.
day day King |

| Times have changed; the slate is a new
one and there are those who wonder if the

to be the unconquerable.' Juke of Windsor and the former Mrs. Wallis

Sometimes it ‘1
despairingly impossible.
was the ion Declaration,
which had to be said audibly by
the Sovereign. ;

“I do solemnly and sin—
cerely in the presence of God |
profess, testify and declare
that I am a faithful Protestant; |
and that I will, according to |
the true intent of the enact-
ments which secure the Pro-
testant Succession to the
Throne of my Realm, uphold
and maintain the said enact-
ments to the best of my pow-
ers according to law.”

How many people with normal |
speech could repeat that with-/
out faltering in a moment of high |
emotion? i

The King and Logue wrestled
with it for what must have seem- |
ed an eternity of time. And it)
never seemed to come right.

But when the moment came to
make it with full solemnity the
King, slowly and _ deliberately,
‘aid it without a mistake. j

And at the end he looked
towards Logue, sitting some |
distance away, saying with his|
eyes as clearly as a man ever
said anything: “I’ve done it.”

‘Wear This’

There was the ordeal of the
Coronation itself. Perhaps the
most trying ordeal that could be
put upon a man who had carried
such a disability as the King had!
carried. i

Responses couched in language |
that was terribly difficult for him. |
Microphones around him which |
carried his words to probably the |
biggest world audience that had
ever listened to any man, |

And all to be done while the|
King must inevitably be moved
to deep emotion by the ceremony.

There in the royal box close
above him—close enough to ex-|
cha: an occasional encouraging»
glance—sat. Logue, weuring for |
the first time the decoration of the |
Victorian Order which the King)
had handed to him casually at the |
end of their rehearsal in the)
Palace, the previous night, saying |
“Wear this tomorrow.” aod

As we all heard, the King did
not falter. It was the proudest
triumph of his life.

‘I >

But one ordeal piled upon |
another that day. The Corona-
tion ceremony was followed by
the almost equally emotion-stir-
ring drive through the crowded
streets to the Palace.

And then, with little rest be-
tween, the King once more had tc
face a microphone in a quiet room
and speak to the world, |

In an adjoining room, for the}
hour before the broadcast, the)
King, the Queen, and Logue sat
together listening to the radio
programme sweeping round the
Empire, waiting for the moment
of ordeal.

It had been suggested by those
who still did not know the con-
fidence which the now had

|

a sont | Warfield Simpson may not now be recon-

ciled with the Royal family and come to live
more permanently in England.

9

The answer almost certainly is “no.
there is no reason why the Duke and Duch-
ess should not return to England to stay
aere as long as they wish. But there is a
delicate situation created by the unbending
protocol of the Court and in the word
‘Royal”. Windsor is a Royal Duke. His
wife is a Duchess but she is not a Royal

Juchess and she is not “Her Royai High-]j

ness.” She ranks about three-quarters of the
way down the list of Duchesses.

Should the Windsors return to London
and enter into formal court life the Duke
and Wallis would be very clearly and defin-
itely separated. At a State banquet the
Duke would sit at the head of the table. The

Duchess would, by rank, be seated far from,

nim. Ata palace reception the former King
would be in the little knot of members ot
the Royal family. The Duchess would be
seventy-five yards away among hundreds oi
jesser ranking ladies and lords.

“HER ROYAL HIGHNESS”

It is most unlikely that the Duke would
permit his wife to return on that basis even
if she should agree to it. There is only one
remedy to such a situation so embarrassing
for the Windsors. That is for the 25-year-
old Elizabeth to bestow upon the Duchess
the title and rank of “Her Royal Highness.”
[t is possible but most unlikely that Eliza-
beth would take such a step for it would
cause uproar in Court circles, and Elizabeth
though the Queen, is pretty much the pris-
oner of the Court in matters of etiquette
and protocol.

Such a step would, for example, give the
Duchess of Windsor precedence at Royal
occasions over the widowed Duchess of
Kent and dozens of blood relatives of Eliza-
beth. The American woman would rank
next only to the Duchess of Gloucester.

Churchill has always been sympathetic to
Windsor but this is one case in which “Mr.
Britain” has little if any influence.

The powers of the Sovereign are severely
restricted in this constitutional monarchy
but those powers they do have, are jealously

King
in himself that the speech should) guarded and the bestowal of Royal rank is

be recorded in case there was an/|
embarrassing breakdown. f
“What do you think?” the King|

“I am against it,” Logue replied.
“Because once it is recorded in
advance, no one will ever believe
that you delivered it, even if the)
recording is not used.”



“I agree,” \ said the King.
“There will be no recording.”
No Hitch

very anxious hearts, in spite of
the confidence they tried to give
each other—the most powerful

}one of them. Windsor was at one time im-

mensely popular with the common people of
Britain and he still is well liked by many
of them.

But there is no question but that his pop-

lularity has dropped and that the unwaver-

jing group which always maintained he
So the three ‘sat together with |

bowed out of an unenviable ordeal and put
the load on his younger brother are now

0) itter ¥ re were
mn in the weal, bee ang | more bitter than even before. There were

the man who a few years before

angry remarks among the great crowd Fri-



tad landed in the country un-
known to a single soul.
Of all the romantic scenes that

have been set in that Royal|p
rich with legend aad|~ eet.

Palace,

romance, there can have been few |

more moving or more remarkable
than that.

ing and Leah weil out of
King and w out oj
the room to the broadcasting
room, leaving the Queen alone.

Those who recall the slight
pause before = heute Soeen
may remember hearing the fain’
ot ot whispers in the unmistak
able voice of Logue saying, “Now
take it quietly, Sir.”

It went without a hitch. The
moment the King
the door opened softly and ir
stepped the Queen, tears shining
in her happy eyes.

Always There

For a time gue was besides
the King at ev Christmas
broadcast (incidentally, although
all the pictures taken of the King
for publication with these
Christmas broadcasts show him
sitting at a desk, in fact he
always broadcast standing).

But in recent years the King
had broadcast alone. That was
the full proof that he had com-

‘day when Windsor walked through the
|Streets in the uniform of an Admiral of the
And comments on the days after the

;death of King George the Sixth were far

\from complimentary to Windsor.
and the)

INDEFINITE STAY

Windsor is staying now with his 84-year-
old Dowager Queen Mother at Marlborough
House. His stay here is indefinite. He is ex-
pected to go to the country later this week
to stay with his close friend Lord Dudley

concluded, at Sunninghall.

The day before the funeral, Windsor weni
with other members of his immediate family
to Buckingham Palace where they heard the
reading of the will of George the Sixth, a
Document never made public. It is widely

reported that the late King gave Windsor)

an annual allowance of £25,000. It is likely
his. will made some provision for the con-
tinuance of that grant but that the execu-

pleted his cure, far beyond even! tion of it was left to Elizabeth.

the highest hopes he could have
held when he left that Harley-
street room for the first time
with the promise “I can cure
you” ringing in his ears.
Friendship

To the end he and Logue
remained on
loving friendship.

I think that siory of the King
is more vital to a true under-
Standing of his character than
anything else in his reign.

He was a man seemingly born




to suffering. He conquered it
when the odds must have seemed
hopeless, by will power, sheer
determination, and ceaseless

effort. How many
have done as well ?

—World Copywright.

of us could

That is-one of the matters keeping Wind-
sor in England now and he may press for
a Parliamentary Act making his financial
position more definite. After that is settled

terms of deep,| Windsor is expected to return to the Duch-

| ess in New York.
*
_ They undoubtedly will come to England
|again for visits but the chances of a recon-
|ciliation or permanent return to England as
a home appear just as remote, if not more

|So, than they had before George the Sixth
| died.



jthem when Windsor abdicated 15 years ago, \





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————





WEDNESDAYX, FEBRUARY 20, 1952
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

FANCY MOLASSES REP

Recommendations Made

On Bulk

THE Report of the Co

Shipment

mmittee appointed to enquire

into all aspects of the Fancy Molasses yi r
dos nt ee during the tonic pe teen?" Byte
he Committee comprising Sir John Saint, Kt., C.M.G.
Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P., and Hon. J. D. Chandler. M.L.C_
with Mr. E. A. B. Deane as Secretary reports :
To His Excellency Sir Alfred William Lungley Savage,

Knight Commander of the

Most Distinguished “Order of

St. Michael and St. George, Governor and Commander-
in Chief in and over the Island of Barbados and its Depen-

dencies. etc., ete,
Your Excellency, ;

On 12th June, 1950, you invited
us to serve as a Committee with
the following terms of references:
c “To enquire into all aspects of
“the fancy molasses industry of
“Barbados with particular refer-
ence to production, price, mar-
‘keting and methods of export
‘and to make such recommenda-
“tions as might be considered
“necessary to ensure the. mainten-
‘ance and development of that in-
‘dustry.

We held twelve meetings in
Barbados between 8th July, 1950
and 24th August, 1950 and then on
2nd September, 1950 visited Can-
ada and the United States of
America where we held seventy
two interviews with. Government
Officials, Brokers, Wholesalers or
Retailers returning to Barbados on
6th October, 1950.

ae Introductory

n order to obtain relevant evi-
dence, we first invited, by Sante
of a notice in the Press, all -
sons interested in the Faney Mo-
lasses Industry to appear by ap-
Pointment before us. Phe r se
to this advertisement proved dis-
appointing, since only one reply
was received. In the interim the
Committee arranged a succession
of meetings with various individ-
uals, producers and exporters, who
we considered would be able to
supply us with information relat-
ing to our enquiry. Representa-
tives of the Barbados Produce Ex-
porters Association, the Amalgam-
«ted Cooperages and the Barba-
dos Cooperage, as well as the
Sugar Coordinator, the Labour
Commissioner, a number of pro-
ducers of fancy molasses, the
Fancy Molasses Control and’ Mar-
keting Board, and the Honourable
H. A. Cuke, C.B.E., M.L.C., also
appeared before us to give evi-
dence and advice.

The evidence which was: given
to us, particularly with regard to
conditions in the export markets
of Canada and the United States,
was most conflicting, and we came
to the conclusion that to obtain a
true appreciation of the position
it would be necessary for us to
visit the North American Contin-
ent and investigate conditions. for
ourselves. Our recommendation to
this effect was approved by the
Government and we proceeded to
Canada early in September, 1950.

The visit to North America oc-
cupied a period of rather more
than a month. We travelled ex-
tensively through the Province of
Quebec, the Maritimes and Prince
Edward Island interviewing as
many faney molas:es brokers,
wholesalers and retailers as poss-.
ible, Various high officials in Ot-
tawa and Washington received and
greatly assisted us in qur investi-
gations.

We thank all those who helped
us so generously and wholeheart-
edly during our investiga ions. We
are especially grateful to Mr, C. R.
Stollmeyer, Canadian Trade Com-
missioner for the British West In-
dies, who by his untiring efforts
during our visit to Canada made
it possible for us to carry out ‘so
comprehensive a survey of the
fancy molasses market in Canada.

Recommendation

BULK SHIPMENT.
(a) Canadian Market

We have not been convinced by
the evidence put before us that
the shipment of fancy molasses in
bulk to the Canadian market is
necessary at the present time in
order to maintain our present ex-
ports. We estimated that bulk
shipment of fancy molasses was
unlikely to decrease the cost of the
product by more than 2 cents per
quart package, and there was a
general opinion that such a reduc-
tion would not affect sales since
the present prices of competitive
products are as high as or higher
than fancy molasses. Af some time
in the future, it is possible that
such gompetition will have to be
met, dnd the price of fancy mo-
lasses will have to be brought to
i's lowest possible level. Under
these circumstances, it may be-
come essential to ship molasses in
bulk. In this connection, it must
be remembered that undér the
Sugar Agreement with the United
Kingdom part of our sugar ex-
ports will be sold at a negotiated
price and there may be a time
when such a price is higher than
the world price, Under these cir-
cumstances, if fancy molasses has
to be sold on a parity with, the
world’s price for sugar then every
effort must be made to reduce
costs. Presumably, under these
conditions arrangements would
have to made for the producer of
sugar to subsidise the producer of
faney molasses.

We consider that the fancy mo-
lasses industry should plan well in
advance so that shipment in bulk
can be adopted with the minimum
difficulty. The following matters
must be given attention: —

(a) When fancy molasses is
shipped in bulk, there
should be only one export-
ing organisation in Barba-
dos since three or four re-
ceiving stations in Canada
—Montreal, Quebec, St.
John and Halifax—should
be sufficient for economical
distribution.

(b) It will be necessary for ex-
porters to agree on export
quotas based on previous
volume of business.

If the present distributing
organisation in Canada is to
be utilized—and we favour
this step—a Committee re-
presenting the Barbados ex-
porter and the Canadian
importer should be set up
to handle the receipt of bulk
molasses in Canada.

Arrangements should be
made with Canadian im-
porters who have tanks and

(c)

(a)

packing facilities on the
waterfront to receive the
molasses. The molasses

would be packed at these
stations in suitable contain-
ers and distributed through

the existing channels. S eel

; drums could be used for the
country trade and the pres-
ent wax paper package or
can for the city trade.

(e) The packers should under-
take to distribute only genu-
ine Barbados fancy molass-
es and should agree that no
blending be done at their
plant, except with the per-
mission of the Barbados
eeney Molasses Control

Board.

(f) We consider that the label-
ling of packaged molasses is
a matter of prime import-
ance, All packages should
have the words “Genuine
Barbados’ Fancy Molasses”
printed on them in easily
tread letters. The question
of whether brand names of
distributing firms’ should
also be included is a mat-
ter for consideration.

(g) A special fund will have to
be created from part of the
savings effected by bulk
shipment. It has been es-
timated that 5% cents per
gallon would.be sufficient to
cover the present wages of
displaced labour and could
be used to provide alterna-
tive employment. |Further
sums should be made avail~-
able from this special fund
for advertising to the con-
sumer and the name of Bar-

bados Fancy Molasses
should be kept before the
public

U.SA. Market
(b) U.S.A. Market

Market conditions in the United
States. of America are somewhat
different from those in Canada,
and.we came to the conclusion
that we could increase our ship-
ments of fancy molasses to the
U.S.A. if bulk shipments were
made. This additional business
would not affect the amount of
labour which is at present em-
ployed in the industry.

We recommend that, bulk ship-
ments of faney molasses should
be permitted to the U.S.A. since
such shipments will provide valu-
able data, and experience, Part of
the savings should be paid into a
Special Fund, which can be used
for advertising and for the other
purposes recommended later. The
American importer should be re-
quested to give a guarantee that
any molasses shipped to him in
bulk would not be re-exported to
Canada.

Drum Shipments

We do not rae that the

il nt...of.fancy _molasses , in
Me 1 rams ate ita be permitted.
Since we do not consider that the
advantages outweigh the disad-
vantages, Under present condi-
tions there is a shortage of steel
and prices of steel are rising, and,
in our opinion, it wopld be in-
advisable for the industry to be
dependent on steel containers for
the shipment of fancy molasses.







——

We consider that if and when the
time vcomes for fancy molasses to
be shipped. other than in wooden
packages it should be shipped by
tank steamer
Canned Molasses

In view of the evidence pre-
sented to us regarding the flavour
of Barbados canned molasses we
recommend that a trial should be
given to the canning of “old crop”
molasses since this flavour appears
more acceptable in Eastern Can-
ada .

There seems some possibility
that a-canned fancy molasses With
a “new crop” flavour might be ac-
ceptable in the Western Cana-
dian markets, particularly if a
brighter and more lightly coloured
molasses could be manufactured,
We consider that this suggestion
deserves further investigation.

* Advertising
For reasons given in the Report
we recommend that Barbados

fancy molasses should be adver-
ised to the consumer so that the
name is kept constantly before
the public. ,We recommend that
provision for advertising should
be included in the price of fancy
molasses and that the cess should
be paid to a special fund. In the
first place, we recommend that the
Montreal area should be selected
1s a test market for advertising.
Since most packers have their own
brand name on the package, such
advertising will have to be car-
ried out in co-operation with the
Canadian packers. There would
appear to be no reason Why a par-
ticular brand of molasses should
not be advertised provided that it
consists of genuine Barbados fancy

molasses, and that this fact is
printed on the package.
Marketing

We recommend that—

(a) The Barbadian exporter
should make a list of the
genuine Canadian whole-
salers and limit sales to
these dealers, Retailers

should not be permitted to
obtain fancy molasses at
the wholesale price.

(b) Favourable consideration
should be given by the
Barbados exporters to

granting the large whole-
salers a special allowance
on the basis of the volume
of business done. We under-
stand that this is a custom-
ary trade practice and one

which encourages whole-
salers to make maximum
sales.

(c) Since a closer degree of

co-operation between the
Barbados exporter and Can-
adian importer appears de-
sirable, a Committee repre-
senting the interests of both
sides should be set up so
that minor grievances can
be noted and removed.

Fancy Molasses Industry

Fund

We recommend that when fancy
molasses is shipped in bulk some
part of the savings should be paid
into a special fund which can be
termed the Fancy Molasses Indus-
try Fund, This fund could be usec
for ‘he following purposes:—

(1) To meet the cost of ap-
proved advertising pro-
grammes,
To provide alternative em-
ployment for labour dis-
placed by bulk shipment.
To pay interest and depre-
ciation on capital involved
in providing bulk storage in
Barbados and in Canada.
To permit the fixing of a
price for fancy molasses

(2)

(3)

(4)

Bermuda Legislature Move

To Protect

HAMILTON,

THE Legislative Council re-
cently agreed with the House of
Assembly’s proposal that the two
bodies nominate a joint select
committee to see what legislation
can be introduced to protect their
privileges.

This move follows the discov-
ery by the House that ‘they had
no powers of sanction over The
Royal Gazette, which last month
published a report of a_ debate
held in open session after the
House ordered it to be suppress-
ed, The House declared. the
Gazette's action a breach of privi-
lege and contempt of the House.

Commenting on the Council's
decision, the Hon. F. G. Gosling
said he thought it “high time” the
two legislative bodies found out
where they stood before they
took action.

Appointed to serve on the com-
mittee were Dr. and Hon, R. C.
Hollis Hallett and the Hon, Sir
Eldon Trimingham,

Text of the message sent to the
House was: “The Legislative
Council has the honour to refer
to Message Number 6 of the pres-
ent session from your Honourable
House and to state that the Hon.

; > *
Russia, Qhina
Celebrate

. t .
Frierdship Treaty
LONDON.

Russia and Red China ceiebrat-
ed the second anniversary of their
treaty of friendship, alliance and
mutual assistance Thursday witn
an umprecedented display of
friendship coupled with a mount-
ing propaganda campaign again:t
“new imperialist intrigues in
Asia,”

Mao. Tse Tung, Chairman of the
Chinese Communist Government
expressed “heartfelt gratitude to
the great Soviet people” tie
Soviet Government and Stalin for
“generous and enthusiastic as-
sistance given to our Government
and people of China by the Soviet
Government and people in the
past two years.”

THe Chinese campaign is eager-
ly fed by Moscow Radio and the
Soviet Press, Since Vishinsky
mentioned the presence of Chinese
Nationalist troops in northern
Burma two weeks ago, all the
principal Moscow newspapers
have repeatedly accused the U.S.
Britain and France of preparing
to attack Communist China.

Moscow press attacks are not
only broadcast by the Soviet radio
Station in all eastern languages,
but are relayed by re-broadcast

Privileges

R. C. H. Hallett and the Hon. Sir
E. H, Trimingham have been ap-
pointed as a select committee to
form with a committee of your
Honourable House a joint com-
mittee for the purpose of submit-
ting recommendations as to the
necessity and desirability of en-
acting legislation to protect the
Legislature or its proceedings in
such manner as the Legislature
may see fit.”

Major the Hon. David Huxley,
Attorney General, declaring his
support for the proposal, said he
had had the advantage of con-
ferring with the original House
committee which reported on
Wednesday, having been invited
to give certain legal opinions on
the matter.

The president, the Hon. J. T.
Gilbert, said the Council should
certainly concur with the House’s





early in the year and Sub-
sequent equalisation when
the price for sugar is ar-
ranged

To prevent violent fluctua-
tions in the price of fancy
molasses from year to year
owing to short crops, etc
If this principle is accepted
then an extra cess would be
imposed on fancy molasses
in a good year to compén -
sate for the funds needed
to equalise the price in “a
poor year.

It is recommended that this
fund should be operated by the
Fancy Molasses Control and Mar-
keting Board

Definition of Fancy Molasses

For the reasons given in the Re-
port we recommend that the de-
finition of Fancy Molasses in the
Barbados Fancy Molasses Produc-
tion and Export Act, 1937, should
be altered to read “Cane juice
evaporated to the consistency of a
syrup, but shall not apply to fancy
molasses which is considered. by
the Board appointed under this
Act to be below the recognis
standard of Barbados Fancy Mo-
lasses.”

Fancy Molasses Control And
Marketing Board

(i). Constitution

The Fancy Molasses Control and
Marketing Board. is a most import-
ant body and should be truly re-
presentative of all branches of the
industry. The present method of
appointing members.jo the Board
§ open to criticism, and we re-
cofmend certain alterations, We
agree that the Chairman should
continue to be the Director of
Agriculture, but consider that the
rest of the Board should be ap-
pointed by the Governor-in-Ex-
ecutive Committee and shall in-
clude two members of the Sugar
Producers Association and two
members of the Exporters’ Asso-
ciation.
(ii) Powers

We recommend that the powers
of the Board be increased to per-
mit the Board to create and oper-
ate a Fancy Molasses Industry
Fund, the setting up of which has
already been recommended, The
recommendations of the Board
regarding the operations of this
fund should be subject to con-
firmation by the Governor-in-
Exec itive Committee.

()

This recommendation will need
an alteration to the present Act to
give the Board power to recom-
mend to the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee what sums should
be raised each year as an addition-
al cess on fancy molasses to be
paid into the Fancy Molasses In-
dustry Fund.

We further recommend in order
to expedite the fixing of prices
that Section 7 of the Barbados
Fancy Molasses Production and
Export Act, 1937, be amended by
deleting therefrom the words
“with the approval of the two
Houses of the Legislature” ahd
that Regulation 5 of the Barbados
Fancy Molasses Production and
Export Regulations, 1938, be
amended by deleting therefrom
the words “and approved by both
Houseg of the Legislature.”

We wish to record our appfe-
ciation of the work of Mr, Deane
our Secretary which has been of
the highest order. We cannot
thank him enough for the thor-
oughness and efficiency which he
has shown throughout our inves-
tigations and we recommend him
for the grant of an honorarium as
is usual in like circumstances



Inquest Today

An inquest touching the death
of Hugh Wickham of White Hall,
St. Michael will be held to-day at
2 p.m. by His Worship Mr, G. B.
Griffith Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A.”

Wickham was admitted to the
General Hospital on February 3,
suffering from burns on his body
but he died on February 7. A post
mortem examination was per-
formed by Dr. A. S. Cato at the
Hospital Mortuary,



“BENNY” CALLS WITH
MIXED CARGO

The motor vessel Benny, under
Captain Pederson arrived here
yesterday with a cargo including
3,600 bags of flour, 2,240 bags of
pollard, 800 bags of poultry feed,
500 cartons of beer and 35,000 fee’
of lumber from St. John and Hali-
fax.

The Benny is

consigned to

message, which only went so far| Messrs. Plantations Ltd.

1s to suggest the formation of a
joint select committee,

“Major Huxley said he was
consulted,” he went on, “Some
years ago I came to the same con-
clusion—that it was desirable the
position should be examined and
in due course legislation passed.

Eden Confers

@ From Page 1

cure, At the same time, however,
there is no doubt, that Britain wa:
anxious to get useful negotiations
underway without undue delay
and there were very strong indi-
cations that Britain’s mew ap-
proach would go a very long way
towards meeting Egypt’s national
aspirations.

The main points. to be discuss-
ed in detail would be the time
limit to British evacuation of the
Suez Canal Zone and definition of
Egypt’s sovereignty over the
Sudan pending the Sudanese peo-
ple's’ expression of their own)
desire |

Meanwhile Indian diplomats
were keeping in touch with Anglo-
Egyptian developments. The In-
dian government is anxious to
participate in the Suez Canal
defence arrangements which — it
contends should conform with the

U.N. Charter —U.P.

alate mate leet cinaretcaengeenmmanaeiatigls witpsmati
by Radio Peiping and reprinte
in the Chinese Communist pres:

No comprehensive report ha
been published by Moscow ©
Peiping on the nature of assist-
ance given to Chinese Commun-
ists by Russia since the conclu-
sion of the treaty. Under the
treaty Moscow took obligation to
provide China with a .modest
sixty million dollars yearly credit
for five years to pay for Soviet
industrial and reilway equipment.
! —U.P.







From clothes ta crockery

DISPA, Per package
RINSO, Packaga
DREFT, Pts 30

FAB, Pko Sena neal

LUX, is 26





CAVE SHEPHERD
& C0, 11D.

10—13 Broad Street

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE



T RELEASED

News Hriefs:



Suit And Shirts Stolen

A tropical suit and two shirts were stolen from the
home of Agatha Crichlow at Mayers Land, My Lord’s Hill,
St. Michael, between 11.30 p.m. on Sunday and 7.00 a.m. on
AMonday. They are the property of David Crichlow



COMMITTED
FOR SESSIONS

Ashton Gibson a salesman
of Kew Land St. Michael
was committed to the nexi
sitting of the Court of Grand
Sessions by His Worship Mr.
G. B. Griffith yesterday on a
charge of housebreaking and
larceny.

The charge states that the
offence was committed some-
time between December 20

nd December 21, 1951. Mr.

J. E. T. Brancker a red
on behali of Gibson in. the
preliminary hearing.



OG ditunary ;

Rev. A.J. Cocks

The Revd, Arthur J. Cocks,
retired Methodist Minister, who
passed away on Friday, 8th inst.,
was one of the very oldest Meth-
odist Clergy in this West Indian
Province of the Overseas Mission-
ary fleld.

He had reached almost his 90th
year, and he had served in the
ministry 62 years, giving nearly
40 years of active work, .He
passed to the “Retired List” in
1929, and after some acting par-
tial service finally made a home
at Bush Hall, St. Michael.

He came out from England as
a young man to plantation work
in St. Vincent, later taking a
position in 4 big business firm in
Kingstown. He was also a lay
preacher of distinction, possessing
the “two Gs”, Graces and Gifts,
which John Wesley looked for in
his early “helpers”, and in 1890
he was promoted into the regu-
lar ministry and ordained by the

old West Indian Wesleyan
daughter Conference, Eastern
Section.

He possessed also an_ extra

strong physique, and was able to
do a lot of hard work in some of
these Eastern islands, where
nearly all the travelling was then
on horseback and where there
ire scattered country — stations,
particularly in Tobago and Gren-
ada. He was also stationed in
Trinidad, San Fernando, and in
Barbados at Providence in
Christ Church and Speightstown,
with St. Lucy,

As a preacher he possessed a
specially fluent and persuasive
style, with felicitous choice of
languave. and could always be
listened to with pleasure and
profit, And as a pastor he was
genial, friendly, and attentive,

and he was everywhere esteemed
and gave fine service.

He was twice married, First to
a St. Vincent lady, who died at
Speightstown and was laid to
rest in the Speightstown Chapel
yard, Of that union there were
three daughters and two sons, all
of whom in course of time
migrated to U.S.A. The younger
son was a volunteer in the first
World War, and gave good ser-
vice

feu-
years,

A special and noteworthy
ture of Mr Cocks’ later
after he retired from the active
ministry and located in Barba-
dos, was his service to the Boy
Scouts Movement. He had for
long been keenly interested in
youth and possessed a gift for
disciplinary drilling of the boys
But now he identified himsel!
fully with the local Scouts Asso-
ciation and accepted the central
position of General Secretary,
which he filled with distinction
for several years. And on his
retirement through failing health
he was awarded the “Medal f
Merit”, and as he was not able
to go to Government House for

investiture the Governor, Sir
Hilary Blood, very kindly - went
out to Bush Hall and conferrer
the insignia at this home.

He was laid to rest in the
Bethel Churchyard, and _ the
Funeral Service was conducted,

in the absence of the Methodist
Brethren at Synod in Grenada, by
Payne and the
Moravian Min-
people,

the Rev. Sidney
Rev. E. E, New,
ister, and Methodist

To wash your
Best things |

canoe
16 & 25¢.
& 657

37







Christopher Best of Walkers
St. Andrew, reported that he left
his home for work at about 7.30
p.m. on February 8. When hi
returned at about 4.30 a.m. on the
following day he discovered that
his gold wrist watch with a golc
expanding strap, valued $50, war
missing from a tin in his bureau
drawer. |

St. Clair Harvey of Mile and |
Quarter St. Peter, reported that
his fountain pen was stolen from)
a bedroom at his home between
Saturday and 8 a.m. on Monday. |

Goulbourne Best, alias “Sunny
Bang,” of Montrose, Christ Church, |
who escaped custody on February
12, was. rearrested by P.C. 413)
Springer along St. Davids Road,
Christ Church on Saturday night

Best was at the office at Distric
“A” Police Station when he
escaped. He was held in con-
nection with the theft of a shirt,

Six acres of third crop ripe
canes were burnt when a fire broke
out at Joes River Plantation St.
Joseph, at about 7 p.m. on Monday.

They are the property of Joes)
River Estates Ltd. and were
insured,

Another fire at Lowlends, St
Lucy, on Monday at about 7.30)
p.m, burnt four and a half acres |
of first and second crop ripe canes, |
property of William Griffith ot|
Rockfield, St. Lucy. A quantity o:
sour grass was also burnt. |



Decree Nisi

{
In the Courts of Divorce |
Matrimonial Causes His Lordshi
Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor pre
nounced a decree absolute in the |
suit of P. E. Weatherhead peti. |
tioner against A. L. Weetherhea |
respondent,

Mr. W. W. Recce, Q.C. appearer |
for the petitioner instructed by
Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce

His Lordship Mr. Justice G. 1
Taylor also pronounced decre> |
absolute in the suit of M. M.j
Emtage petitioner against E. F.)
Emtage respondent. Mr. W. W.}
Reece, Q.C. instructed by Messrs. |
Hutchinson & Banfield appeared |
for the petitioner. |



Lumber Arrives

the Waterfront of the inner|
basin of the Careenage is now |
Jaden with a quantity of lumber
which arrived here on Saturdes
last by the M.V. Baretta.

The Baretta is expected to re-
main in Carlisle Bay until Thurs |
day to continue discharging hev|
shipment of 150,000 ft. of pitel |
pine and mahogany which she |
brought to Barbados from Beliz», |
British Honduras ]

It is understood that all the!
Jumber-yards will get a part oi |
this shipment. The M.V. Baretta |

|



f, consigned to Messrs, Da Costs
& Co, Ltd.

MATE ARRESTED

TAMPICO, Feb. 1),

Secret Service agents are hold- |
ing Alfredo Cobos Perez, first mate |
ot a mexican tanker, for investi- |

gation following conhscation 01}
22,750 packages of contrabanc |
American cigarettes and 1,006 |

bars of soap.

Officers said the merchandise
was hidden in the port side of the
tanker Salamanca which returnec
yesterday from Brownsville
Texas.—U.P.



Trimingham Wins
Singles Title

The results of yesterday's Belle
vile Lawn Tennis Tourname i
are :—

MEN’S SINGLES (Finals)
J. D. Trimingham beat D. F
Worme 6—2, 6—3, 8—6

WEDNESDAY’S FIXTURES

Mixed Doubles (Handicap

Diss D. Wood & Dr. C, Man
ning vs. Miss M, King & J, 1D
Trimingham.

“greet ttt



ELS oe

| a





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PAGE SIx”-~

Eeg. Co. Amend Pion

eer In

Pioneer Manufacturers
Clause Caused Trouble

The Legislative Council

yesterday passed. a Bill amend-

ing the Pioneer Industries (Encouragement Act, 1951)
e Hon’ble the Attorney General in moving the second

reading of the bill said that

it sought to amend the Pigneer

Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951. When applications
had been received after the passing of the Pioneer Indus-

tries (Encouragement “.ct)

of 1951 certain difficulties had

come to light in the administration of the Act.

Those difficulties came unde
two heads and the object of the
Bill beferé the Council was +
remove those difficultie The fir
head under“which those diificult
tell was as“follows:—Section 4 o
the Act gave power to the Gov
ernor-in-Executive Committee
declare persons as pioneer manu
facturers who are desirous of es-
tablishing a pioneer factory. Oni
persons im that category could ix
declared pioneer manufacturers

Clause 3 of the amending Bil!
sought to amend the Act so a
to enable a person who had al-
ready established a factory, but
wished ta extend it, to be de-
clared a pioneer manufacturer in
appropriate cases

Amendment

Tt was not intended, he went
on to say, to eXelude from the
prov-sions of the Aet persons who
had established a factory prior to
the pasSitg of the Act and the
proposed amendment would
vemedy~that state of affairs en-
abling such persons to have the
benefits of the Act in the case
of alte atims etc. involving ex-
tensions (but not replacement)
to existing businesses,

The other difieulty that had
presented itself was the case of
those people who had gone ahead
ard tommence Pioneer Industrie
subsequent to the .introduction
into the House of Assembly of the
Pioneer Industries (Encourage-
men‘) Bill on July 5th, 1949.

A new Clause 5 had had to be
introduced to deal with thig diliti-
culty. This clause sought to pro-
vide redress for those 7

The Bill under reference did not
pass the Legidfature before the
provogation and it was known
that some persons commenced pre-
jects to set up Pioneer Industries,
which projects continued after
te Bill lapsed,

Original Project
a person had lost the bene-
fit of the Act in .espect of his
cviginal project and it was possi-
bie that, because of the esiablisn-
ment of his project, it might be
ore dificult to establish now
that the industry concerned is a
Fione:r Industry, He might also
have lost all subsequent benefit
winder Act, Clause 5 sought to
vemeédy that position by pro-
viding that, where the clecum-
Stanges before, the) establishment
t project woyld. have
ed 9 declaration ,that’ the





wed (at Pioneer: _
and the % in’ Re Sa
fer urer, those declarations’ might
t be mace and the person
boion the full benefit of the Act
in respect of his project includ-

ing a refund of any package tax
tnd customs duty paid, which
would not have been payable it
the Act had been in force,

The Hon'ble the Colonial Sec-
retary seconded, He said that the
printed copies of the debate when
the bill was before the Legisla-
ture were not yet available but
he seemed to recall the fact that
he had mad¢ reference to the fact
that he hoped that duri: the
next. session of the ture
consideration would be given to
making the bill retrospective to
cover the enterprise of the
p oneer
ahead with his project at the time
the Original bill was before the
Legislature, Clause 5 had been
Craited in order to give the bill
that retrospective application,

Clause 5
Clause 5 of the bill reads as
follows:—

The pfincipal Act is hereby
amended, by adding immediately
after-seet-on ten thereof the fol-
lowing: Bey seetion—

q) we any person has sub-
othe fifth day of July,
one thodsahd nine hundred and
forty wand prior to the com-

r ene of this Act, imported
into this-Tsland any articles speci-
fied in? Schedule hereto which
the Ge Jor-in-Executive Com

mittee ig Satisfied have been im-
ported forthe construction, altera~-

tion, re-eenstruction, or extension |

of a fa@taty or to:

equipping 4



EG.



menufac urer who went +

SPACE
| M ORE GRACE
LESS waste

WITH THE

factory or any extension thereof
under circumstances which satisfy
the Governor-in-Executive Com-

t mittee that, had this Act been 15
; force, at the iime of such impor-

tation, the relevant industry would
have then been declared a pioneer
industry and the p-oduct intended
to be manufactured a_ pioneer
product under section three of
his Act and such person, would,
had he made application under
ection four hereof, have then been
declared a pioneer manufacture-
in relation to such factory, the fol-
owing provisions shall apply.

(2) The Governor-in-Executive
Committee may, subject to the
provisions Of Bubsecuon (2) of
section three of this Act, bu not-
withstandi-g else
this Act contained, by order de-
clare such industry to be a pioneer
industry and such product to be
a pioneer product.

(3) Upon the application of such
person made within three ealendar
months after such declaration, the
Governor-in-Executive |Commit-
tee may in his absolute discretion
by order declare such person to
be a pioneer manufacturer in re-
lation to such factory and such
industry with effect from such
date as may be specified in such
order,

(4) Every application under
subsection (3) of this section
Shall be in writing and shall—
(a) gris the locality of such

factory;

(b) Specity the day on which was
comme , Or on or before
which it is intended te com-
mence the construction, al-
teration, re- or

extension of such factory;
(e

factory, or the relevant part
thereof, commenced, or on or
before which it is ited
that the factory to wi the
application relates will coro-
mence, in consequence of such
construction, alteration, re-
construction or extension, to
produce in marketable quan-
tities the pioneer product in-
tended to be manufactured
therein;

specify the pioneer product
manufactured, or intended to
be manu/’actured, in conse-
quence of such construction,
alteration, \econstruction or
extension of such factory,

Same Effect

(5) any order made under sub~
section (2) or subsection (3) of
‘Mis ‘section shall have the same
effect, and the provisions of this
Act shall apply to any such order,
in all respects as if such order
nad been made under section three
or section four, as the case may
be, of this Act and as if the dates
specified pursuant to paragraph
(b) and paragraph (c) of sub-
section (4) of this section weve
respectively the construction day
and production day specified in an
application under section four of
his Act.

(6) Without prejudice to the
provisions of subsection (5) of
this section, where an order had
been made under subsection (3)
of this section, the Comptroller of
Customs shall refund to the per-
son declared in such order to be
pioneer manufacturer any
package tax and customs duty
which has been paid in respect of
the importation of the articles re-
ferred to in subsection (1) of this
section, but so, h»wever, that no
such tax or duty shall be refunded
if the ler of Customs is
of opinion that such articles were
intended for the pu pose of
effecting to any factory or
extension the eof or to any ap-
paratus, machinery appl ances or
equipment contained in any fae-
tory or extension thereof, or for
eplacing any apparatus, ma-
chinery, appliances or equipment
in any pioneer fa or
son thereof. The provisions of
sections six and seven and of sub-
section (5) of section nine of this
Act shall apply to any articles in
espect of which such tax or duty
as been refunded. pursuant to
this subsection.”

(d)

-

/

NEW =

specify the date on which such



-~





House Pass 86

@ From Page 1

The building of an airport was
a matter to which there was not
sufficient accumulated knowledge
in the world, as airports were still
new constructions, No member of
the House or anyone in any part
of the world could claim that there
was a century of experience for
one to call upon, therefore they
were not necessarily at fault if
there was an error.

When they iooked at the total
cost of building the airport and
what was then ing asked for to
remedy the faults of construction,
members would realise that it was
very small. Very often amounts
represented 244% of the total cost
and therefore the amount like
that was very small indeed to
rectify any fault in the construc-
tion of a major work.

He recalled an instance in the
United States in which an airfield
was built at tremendous cost and
after a few months it was found
that it could nut take certain
traffic and another had to be built.
There were numerous cases like
that in Great Britain and Canada
where one met defections.

Members of the Government re-

in gretted that such things occurred

Runway Report

He referred members to the Re-
port on the runway construction
of the Seawell Airport and said
that they would see that due to
some clay and the formation of
the land there, it was very diffi-
cult to determine every aspect of
the geological structure.

“Furthermore,” he said, “there
was unusual weather during the
time this airport was constructed.”

There had been continuous rain-
fall which was unusual and for
that reason, it became difficult for
anyone to foresee or make any
forecast as to what would happen



a

ccountant

Resigns :

BARBADOS

0,

If there had been a cessation until
the rain ceased, it would have been
of tremendous cost to Government
and every effort had to be made to
get the work done.

In the Report it was stated that
the estimated cost for rehabilita-
tion would be $40,000. Explain-
ing why_the Resolution was for
$60,000, Mr. Walcott said that the
50 per cent, more was in order that
there shovid be money so that,
should there be any need for fur-
ther repairs while the work was
going on, it could be done then
The Engineer had informed Gov-
ernment that there could be no
certainty as to the actual cost as
it depended on the weather. If
there was bad weather, the. cost
might rise to $60,000 instead of
$40.000

Mr. Walcott then referred to the
procedure that the Government
proposed to take in the matter.
He first drew members’ attention
to the two methods in which the
rehabilitation work could be car-
ried cut, and quoted from the Re-
port—
“(a) To shave the Contractor
rehabilitate all of the failed
areas at actual cost, In
adopting this method all
the work would have to be
completed at one time
which would make it nec-
essary to close the airport
to flying operations during
the progress. of the work.
The minimum time that
would be required for the
Contractor would be one

month, This estimate is
based on average weather
conditions.

(b) The second method would
be for the Government to
undertake to do the work
under day labour. This
would necessitate the

General
fll Health

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary at yesterday's
meeting of the Legislative Council informed the meeting
that the Accountant General had tendered his resignation
and expressed regret that ill health had forced him to do so.

The Hon’ble the Colonial Secretary was speaking on a
Supplementary resolution in the sum of $246,340, Head ITI,
Colonial Treasurer, Item 18a, $50 travelling.

This amount, the Colonial Sec-
retary said was a token amount
as it was necessary for the
Accountunt General, in the dis-
charge of his duties ta do a
certain amount of travelling. Pro-
vision was therefore required to
meet travelling expenses at the
usual rates,

He said that in the past, over
the course of many years duties
had become attached to the
Auditor General’s department
that shold never have been
attached to them. There were not
duties properly carried out by an
Auditor General,

Two Examples

He quoted two examp'es—re-
cently, he said, the Auditor
General had maintained all the
teave records of officers of the
Service, but that duty had been
transferred to a branch of the
Secretariat, He was. also re-
sponsible for the computation of
pensions. It was quite wrong

that a man should be responsible |

for the computation of pensions
and the checking of them as
well, The computation of pen-
sions had been transferred to the
Accountant General who will
carry out the computation and

the Auditor Generai will carry,

out the checking.

Other duties of the Auditor

General was the preparation of
Crown Agents Accounts, He
should not be responsible fot
their preparation. The control
of the issue of receipt books,
the preparation of annual pro-
gress reports for C.D & W.
Schemes; all Of these duties
are stil being carried out by

the Auditer General because |

the necessary staff arrangement»

for transfer to someOne else

had no‘ yet been completed,

Officers Duties

The duties of the Auditor
General and the Accountant Gen-
eral were different. The Account-
ant General was the officer
responsible for the general. su-
pervision of accounting methods
in the service. ‘

He had to go to Seawell to ad-

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VICTORIA STREET

HE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.

vise on the method of accounting
in one of the departments there
and as a result the heads of de-
partments had been circulated to
the effect that if they meeded
advice with regard to the method
cof accounting in their own de-
partments that the Accountant
General would visit them and ad-
vise on the matter. This entailed
travelling and as he was not one
of the officers scheduled to draw
travelling allowance it was nec-
essary to make provisien for him
to draw travelling allowance at
the usual rates,

There was much that was im-
perfect in the accounting systems
in some of the departments as
yet and he had hoped that they
would have been able to clear
them up in the near future.

The resignation of the Account-
ant General meant ‘that they
would have to look for another
person and start again,



























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Massachusetts.

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TUESDAY, 26th FEBRUARY, at 8.15 P.M.
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rn

dustries Act

000 F or Runway

organizing
men; the

of a crew
providing of a
concrete mixer, a few
trucks and other small
equipment such as wheel-
barrows, shovels, etc. This
organization and training of
the crew for operation
could be handled by Mr.
James of the Department
of Transport, and when the
work is,underway and run-
ning smoothly the rm
vision and control co be
handed over to an overseer
who has become familiar
with the operation,

The advantage of method (b)
over that in (a) would be that
the airport could be kept in ser-
vice for flying operations.

The only disadvantage of
method (b) is that the work
would be carried out over a
longer period of time, but this

does not mean that the cost of the
work would be greater, in fact it
might be less, and the quality of
the work should be better.”

He said that the Government
had chosen method “B" because
it could be done without the dis-
location of the airport. By that
method, the airport could be kept
open, It would take about 12
weeks, he added,

Night Flights

He said it might cause a change
in the regulating of night flights.

In the Report which was signed
by Harold Connolly, B.A.Se.,
M.E.LC., Department of ‘Trans-
port, Government of Canada, it
Was Stated that the cause of the
failure in certain areas were
two-fold viz: —

“All the clay was not removed
right down to bedrock or some
clay was incorporated in the corai
rock backfill that was placed on
top of the bedrock.

This could readily have hap-
pened in construction of this
magnitude where large heavy
equipment is used to secure and
move the selected rock to be used
as backfill as our tests on sam-
ples of clay taken from the areas
show it to have a very high
moisture content, but when dry is
extremely hard and, if coated
with coral dust, has the appear-
ance of coral rock, and unless
minutely examined or saturated
could easily pass an inspector’s
eye and mistaken for coral
rock,

The second cause of failure in
our opinion is due to the heavy
rains during the construction.
These rains and the high humidity
would prevent the Terrolas emul-
sion from reaching a breaking
point or setting stage and also in
some cases allow the bitumen to
be washed out of the emulsion
and disappear through the drains.
This loss of bitumen would result
in a very weak surface course
which would ravel and allow
water to enter the base course and
subgrade, causing failure. It
should be pointed out here that
a saturated coral rock also be-
comes unstable although not ‘to
the same extent as clay.”

The report, also stated that

“Experience has shown that
the weather ai Barbados is not
sufficiently dependable to con-
sider reconstruction of the failed
areas with a premixed’ asphaltic
concrete using an emulsion as
Hot mix

the ¢gementing agent.

ITS REINSTATEMENT OF

Welcome.

~

, )

\o, /
thal

en cae

LAGER BEER

so



of asphaltic





conerete was originally
and still is considered an un-
economical manner in which to
carry out this work, and it is our |
recommendation that all replace-|
ment.of failed areas in the middle
third of the runway between
Stations 19700 and 25/00 be made
with Portiand cement concrete,
and«that any failed areas out-
side the middle third he replaced
asing double penetration asphal-|
tie concrete with a rapid curing
emulsion as a cementing agent.

Estimated Cost

“From information available as
to local labour rates and mater- |
ial costs it is estimated that ‘hese!
concrete slabs can be -construc-
ted at $250.00 per slab, and from
our survey it will be necessary
to construct approximately 120
slaps between Stations 19+00 and
25700 which would cost, on the
basis of our estimate, $30,000.00. |
Additional work required on the}
asphalt areas between Stations |
7700 and 13700; 15460 and 19+00;
and 25+00 and 28700 will possibly



cost in the neighbourhood of
$10,000.00. This will make a
total cost for rehabilitation of
$40.000,00.

“To place responsibility on any
individual or group of individ-
uals ig very difficult, and in our
opinion should be shared by the
two contracting parties, viz. the
Government and the Contractor.
n this assumption the Contrac-
lor was approached and asked to
what extent he was prepared to
contribute towards the rehabili-
tation of the failed areas. The
Contractor, however, would not)
accept any responsibility for the
failures but did indieate that he |
was prepared to carry out the
work of réinstatemént of the
areas without profit; the Gov-
ernment to pay the actual cost of
the work.”

Report Summary
In the Summary of the report. |
it was stated that,
The causes of failure of the |
runways appear to be due to —
(a) The unusual unanticipated
precipitation during the
placing of the asphaltic
concrete which slowed up
and in some cases preven-
ted the setting up or
breaking down of the as-
phaltic emulsion, and also
caused a portion of the
bitumen to be carried
away to the drains.
Errors in judgment by the
inspectors and contractors
in the classification of the
material used in some of
the fill areas.”

(b)



Mr. O. T. Allder (I) said that it
was very unfortuhate that after
receiving a report on Seawell air-
base on the previous evening, they
should be presented with a Resolu-

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———WRDNESD AY, FEBRUARY 26, 1952
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952





BARBADOS



ADVOCATE

House Pass $60,000 For Runway Reconstruction —

@ From page 6
» for the expenditure of an ad-
ional $60,000.
ing in view the fact that
last month they had voted
GOme money for that department,
Bfelt that members like him who

acy








not know the intentions of
vernment until they were in the
use should not be presented

th a Resolution
ndled so
“The le
hav:

of that sort to be
hortly.
Government should
aid, “was to give
t a week during which
be able to study this
s No amount of excuse
1 remedy the short-sightedness
ic continually being prac-
-d in this House when Resolu-
ms of this nature are brought
-u












ri ion

A Failure

| knew, he said, chat from
start of Scawell airbase, it was
pilure, a failure which cost tax-
yers of the colony a large sum
fF money. Criticisms had been
siled against the policy which
Was carried out in the construction
“@Ethe airport and the excuse was
the money was not theirs, that
Epelonged to C. D. & W.

When the airbase was finished
< efetts crept into it at an
lier period than was normally
they were asked then to














1€y

"3 tea

fd the taxpayers of Barbados
money and he noticed that every
couple months, money Resolutions
come down for them to give their
sanction to.

was only left to wonder when

a halt was going to be reached as
far as expending money on Sea-
well Airport was concerned.

Tt was true that they had reached
that stage in transport in their his-
oa when they had to have Sea-
wi Airport to accommodate in-
coming planes, but there was a
possibility of their being asked to





Spend too much.

If the Government saw to it
that the island was reasonably
Yepresenied in any construction
scheme that was to be carried
out, they would not have to spend
those occasional large sums of
money to remedy defects.

540.000 Needed

The report stated that $40,000
Was neecied and he wanted the
Honourabic Member who was
: ling the Resolution to explain

he was then asking for
$60,000.

Te was a fact that whatever

happened, the Resolution was go-



ing to pass, but he could not re-
frain from voicing his protest in
view of the fact that that wanton
expenditure would prevent Gov-
@rnment from carrying out other
schemes for the benefit of the
massc

He hoped that if that $60,000
had to be spent on the airbase, the
Work would be so carried out as
fo allow a stability for at least a
couple of years thence.

SThey had had time to guard
@gainst errors at Seawell. They
Had had 4 report which gave the

‘ of collusion and corruption
a time when Government would
have had the opportunity to safe-
d itself against being swindled
yhen entering into a contract in
h the expenditure of the

of money spent was in-

unt
ale He said he used the word
" died because it seemed to be
an international affair with every-
t trynig to get rich off the

taxpayers.

°There was no excuse because an
dirfield built in a larger country
di@ not stand up to expectations.
Mat was no excuse if something
Went wrong with their little fleld





vat Seawell
feMr. A. E.

there

S. Lewis (L) said that

no point in the Senior
smber for St. John coming back
the House this session trying
make anybody believe that he
s the only member who realised
e seriousness of certain things.

| Money Wasted

He said that there was one thing
ich impressed him about the
solution. That was that it did
it matter how much money it was
ir, they had to vote it. If they
ting on the report on the
s of the airstrip they got

he Canadian expert, what
Was the use of coming there and
creasing the amount the expert

_ told them by 50 per cent. They
“Were saying in the same breath
at the man was no good. He
ac told them $40,000 and they felt
would take 50 per cent. more.
thoroughly inconsistent
a! and as far as he could
s only encouraging the

lat wa

Vand illogi
mec i

House in voting money which was
Boing to be wasetd.

The Honourable Member had
Said that the Government had no
experience in the building of an
@irstrip. The other members

Sympathised with them. Still it
seemed they knew that the expert
said was not right and had added
"an extra 50 per cent.

Here Mr. F. L. Walcott rose to
obiect against his being misquoted.
/ He said that he had said that the



50 per cent. was put because they
could. not predict the weather to
a certainty.

Weather Conditions

Continuing, Mr. Lewis said that
it was time that the Government
got tough with somebody besides
the members of its. party; get
tough with somebody who was
fooling them. Surely whoever
made the report had taken the
weather conditions _ into account.
They wanted $40,000 and $60,000
would be spent. He was absolute-
ly sure of that.

The Government not only sent
somebody to see that the construc-
tion was carried out, but a member
of the Civil Service who was sup-
posed to know something of the
mixing of concrete was sent. to see
that it was mixed properly.

“I would like to know if it is
on record whether he has ever
made an adverse report on the
concrete that was being put there”
he said.

He did not wish to lead any of
them up a garden path, but he was
told that a report was made and
somebody of higher authority said
let it pass. He wanted to let them
know that he knew that. He was
surprised to know that things like
that were going on in such work.

Another thing; he said, was that
they had been told that some of
the material which had come for
Seawell was full of seawater. He

questioned, “too, the area
was covered with a im when
there was rain said that all

that needed some investigation.

He said that the same Trans-
Canada Airlines had forced them
to build the airport again arid then
they were having the same con-
ditions forced upon them. The
Trans-Canada people: should be
left out, he said.

He said that the airports about
this area were built by Americans
and they had picked out a
Canadian to fool them. They would
very likely find that the Canadian
airstrips were built by Americans
and the Canadians had come out
here to practise.

Representation

He said that they were there to
represent the taxpayers of Bar-
bados, taxpayers who wanted
houses to live in. They should not
throw away the. people’s money
like that.

Mr. Talma (L) said the reso-
lution was urgent and entailed
loss of life if not dealt with im-
mediately. But he felt that too
many attempts had been made to
set the airfield in order. Attempts
were being made as if the air-
field were not designed for the
nature of work that it had to do.

He said that they. had .never
had the advantage of having
Americans here to have . proper
runways built, but there were
places like Trinidad and even
Antigua from where they could
have got information.

He felt that the time had come
when a new airfield would have
to be set down.. He was aware
of the fact that they diq not have
competent engineers -in the
Chamber and so none of them
could criticise the report in a
constructive manner. They were
forced to accept the recommen-
datians as laid down in the re-
port and he felt. that the resolu-
tion should be dealt with as ur.
gently as possible.

Mr, Talma said that T.C.A.
were using the airport to-day
and the Canadian Government
should be called upon to help
with the repairs. Repairs which
were done regularly were really
for the purpose of catering to
T.C.A. ’planes, which do a lot of
damage to the aiffield.

They welcomed the visit of
T.C.A. ‘planes because’ they
brought in Canadian dollars and
American dollars. But if the
damage to the airfield was done
by Canadian ’planes then the
Canadian Government should
help with the expenditure.

Resolution Passed

Mr. Mapp (L) said that he was
not surprised at the resolution.
In June last year, the House
passed a resolution for $186,429
to be spent on the runway which
had already cost over a million
and a half dollars. The money
came from Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare and they
might feel that it was not a loss
to the colony,

He felt that Harriman & Co.
should do something to help with
the conditioning of Seawell. He
had issued a warning to. the
House last year that everything
was not going right at Seawell
because he was told by a work-
man on the airfield that every-
thing was not right.

It was all an unhappy state of
affairs, he said. It cost them
$80,000 in a resolution before and
now they were going to spend
another $60,000 making $140,000
coming out of the treasury. He
did not see why they should con-
tinually vote money for effecting
repairs to the runway.

Mr. Crawford (C) said that



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In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at
2 pm. yesterday. The Hen'bie
J. D. Chandler, President, was in
the Chair.

The Hon'ble the Colonial Seere-
tary lald the following docu-

ments:—
BOCUMENTS

Repert of the Committee ap-
Pointed to enquire inte all aspects
of the Fancy Molasses Industry tn
Barbades.

Report on Runway Construction,
Seawell Airport,

Repert on the Treatment of
eo for the years 1849 and
O50.

Proposed Leave Regulations, 1952.

The Council ©
following resolutio

Resolution to place the sum of
$246,340 at the disposal of the
Governor-tn-Exeoutive Committer
te supplement the Estimates
1951-52, Part I—Current, as shewn
in Supplementary Estimates 1951-
. No. 41, whieh form the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to place the sum of
$51,618 at the disposal of the
Gevernor-in-Executive Committee
ment the Estimates 1951-
M, Part I—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 151-52,
Ne. 42, which form the Sehedule
te the Resolution,

Resolution to place the sum of
31,405 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951-
32, Part 1—Capital, as shown tp
the Supplementary Estimates
1951-52, No, 4, which ferm the
Schedule to the Resolution.

Resolution to a we the Order
entitied “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) Ne. 2
Order 1952, made by the Governor-





urred in the



HOUSE

When the House met yesterday

Mr. Adams laid the following
Reports on the Treatment of
Offenders for the years 199 and
1950.

Report dated 12th February, 1952
on Runway Construction, Seawell
Airport

Proposed
1952

The
given:—

Resolution to place the sum of
$60,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1951—52, Part Il, Capital as shown
in the Supplementary Estimates
1951—52, No. 46 which form the
Schedule to the Resolution. This
Resolution was later dealt with
and passed

Fell intituled an Act to repeal
The Public Employees Leave
Rerulations Act, 1935

Bill ivitituled an Act to repeal
The Police Act, 1908.

The House passed a Resolution

Leave Regulations,

following notices were

© in-Executive Commitiee on the
Seventeenth day of January 165°
under the provisions of Section 4
of the Civil Establishment Act
1948.

Resolution to make it lawful! for
the Vestry of St. James to lease
from the Governor-in-Execeutive
Committee a portion of land at
Reid's Bay, situate in the parish
of St, James and containing by
edmeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of erecting bathing
sheds.

Resolution to make it lawfal for
the Governor-in-Executive Com
mittee to lease to the Vestry of
St. James a portion of land at
udmeasurement 16.2 perches for the
Reid's Bay, situate in the parish
of St. James and containing by
purpose of erecting bathing sheds

Resolution to make it lawfal for
the Gevernor-in-Executive Com-
mittee to lease to the Vestry of
St. Michael that parcel of land
forming part of Weiches Tenantry
situate (mn the parish of St. Michael
and containing by admeasurement
158,504 square feet for the purpose
of establishing a playing field

The Council passed « Bill
intitaled an Act to amend the
Pioneer Industries (Enoeurage-

went) Act, 1951.
The Council made a favourable

reply te His Excelleney the °
Gevernor’s Message No. 1 19st
réprarding an increased in the

Government's contribution to the
Imperial College of Tropical Agri-
culture.

The Council pestpened consid-
eration of a Bill intituled an Act
to earry ont the Convention re-
lating. te Labour Clauses in Public
Contracts.

The Council adjourned until
2 p.m. on Tuesday, February 26th

for $8,670
estimates for
Departments

The House passed a Resolution
for $3.500 to supplement the Capi-
tal Estimates 1951—52.

A Resolution to approve the
Civil Establishment (General
Amendment Order) which relgte
to the salary of the Adjuant and
Staff Officer of the local forces
and the Regimental Sergeant
Major instructor attached to the
Barbados Regiment

The House passed an Address
whtch was introduced by Mr
Mapp (L) protesting against the
senator McCarran's Immigration
Quota Limitation Bill and a Com-
plimentan/ Resolution introduced
by Mr. Crawford (C)} expressing
appreciation to Congressman Clay
ton Powell, Jnr. and the West
Indian Committee ‘n America
which initiated the fight against
the Bill

The House was adjourned until
next Tuesday at 3 p.m.

as supplementary
various Heads of



the report stated that the re-
sponsibility should be shared by
the contracting party and the
Governmen.. The Government
had now given the job out on
contract.

It seemed as though the Gov-
ernment failed to provide the su-
pervision for the job to guaran-
tee whether the air base was
built to specifications and done
in a manner to ensure satisfac-
tion and that the contractors
were trying to cheat by doing in-
ferior work. Then they were
coming to the Government month
after month to milk the taxpay-
ers,

Mixing of Concrete

The workmen on the job said
that they never saw concrete
mixed of such a poor quality, He
felt that some responsible Gov-
ernment official or department
should have seen that the con-
tractors a out the terms of
the contract in full. If the Gov.
ernment’s semi-expert whom the
Government had up there to su-
pervise the contrete mixing com-
plained that it was of inferior
quality, they should have known
that something was going wrong
in the manner the job was done.
Mr. Crawford said that since the
job was completed, although the
Canadian Government was wait-
ing for Mr. Wilson to complete a
job, he was completely done with
the Canadian service. He found
himself in a position to go to
Canada and open a new business.

“The Government will have to
be very wary how they bring
down these experts from outside
to supervise work,” he said.
Although the report suggested
that $40,000 would be sufficient to
do the repairs, they were still ask-
ing for $60,000. The asking for
$20,000 more because they did not
know whether the weather would
change did not hold fair at all.
They could come back for the
$20,000 at another time if the
weather did not hold fair, “The
Government should try to pin
them down to do the job for
$40,000 which is even more than
we can afford.”

Reduction Moved

Mr. Crawford moved that the
resolution be reduced by $20,000
so that the amount be $40,000. He
finally said that it seemed that
they made a slip by not making
a Government rtment sup-
ervisors of the job.

Mr. Vaughan (1) said that he
was of the opinion that the mem-
bers of the Government had the
idea that because they were not
technical experts when it came to
a major engineering scheme,
they could excuse themselves of
the full responsibility as far as

S.P.C.K. BOOK

the spending of Government funds
were concerned.

Very few politicians were tech-
nical experts, he said, but it was
more so the duty of the Govern-
ment to see that their money was
wisely spent than it was the duty
of the people who had the con-
tract,

There were colonies such as
Jamaica, Trinidad and British
Guiana which had proper air-
ports. What information had the
Government got about the con-
struction of their airport or how
to put down a runway?

He said that a Canadian official
came to criticise theairport and to
give advise. Why couldn't they
have got advice at the beginning
and save the taxpayers money?
Everytime they wasted money, it
was preventing them from doing
something for the benefit of the
people of the colony.

Supervision

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E)_ said
that $40,000 seemed a small sum
to him to be spent in the building
of any engineering project. But
what was amusing to him was the
fact that even now the Govern-
ment found out that all was not
well with Mr. Wilson supervising,
all they could find was one
Connolly.

He said that he was prepared to
take the expert’s recommenda-
tions on the matter but he was
bearing in mind that all experts
were not honest, The Govern-
ment sat down and could not find
anybody else from any part of tihe
world to give the responsibility of
making a report on Wilson and
Harriman except another Cana-~-
dian. They could have sent to
England, Jamaica or even Trini-
dad for a supervisor for Trinidad
had one of the best airports in the
world.

It was the case, he said, of the
inspector telling Harriman ‘don’t
work at night because he could
not see to supervise the work at
night. Then suddenly, one heard
that they were working at night.
Perhaps the crookedness and dis-
honesty went on at night. Masons
and carpenters came out and told
them what was going on, He had
more confidence in the West
Indian expert because he had all
that was his in the West Indies.

All Canadians
Mr, Mottley said that they
brought down a Canadian to

supervise, a Canadian to report
and now a Canadian to work
“Why don’t you turn Canadian
altogether,” he asked. He said
“Pyt somebody to do Mr. Skin-
ner’s (of H. & T.) work and let
him do the airport; I don’t want
any James.”

He said that they should make

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enquiries in Trinidad of the way
in which the airfields were done.
He was not going to vote for the
reduction because there was no
use crying over spilt milk, but he
was counselling the Government
not to bring in any James. Al-
though the money came from
C.D. & W.,, they should be cautious
how they spent it.

Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) said that

felt that something-was wrong.
The haste in which the resolution
was brought before the House
was an admission of the incompe-
tence of Government to measure
up to their responsibility as lead-
ers in Barbados. The amount of
money should be brought before
the House in the estimates next
month, he said,

He was protesting and was going
to vote for the $40,000. He cculd
not see how $20,000 were added
overnight,

Change in Weather

Mr. Adams (L) said that al-
reauy, the month of February
did not look as though it would
be necessarily dry. He felt that
it was necessary to vote for the
extra $20,000 in case there is a
change in weather.

He said that it was the general
idea that whenever a businessman
came to deal with anything, big
or small, he was going to rake
off something. If that was @heir
moral, well “God help Barbados.”
If Hon. Members knew that Gov-
ernment was being swindled, he
said, instead of going to the
House and Government
month after month, they could
make reports to the Police, the
Attorney General or the Colonial
Secretary,

He said that Wilson was respon-
Bible for the supervision of the
material. Wilson passed the work
and what else could the Govern-
ment do, He said that if the Hon.
Senior Member for the City had
slandering remarks to make, he

should make them out of the
House,
Mr. Barrow (L) said that he

wanted to suggest that the defects
of the runway at Seawell had
nothing to do with the rain. The
runway was 2,000 yards long. He
was wondering whether the sig-
nificance of the defects of the
runway occurred to members on
the other side of the table.

He said that the joint of impact
of a plane landing on the airstrip
was within 35 per cent. of the
runway. A plane weighing 20
tons and landing on the runway
at about 120 miles per hour would
give the impact of about 70 tons.

Airfield’s Detects

He was of the opinion that the
defects to the airfield were caused
by aircraft coming in to land and
that the T.C.A. aircraft caused the
defects, Any competent engineer
would be aware of the fact that
the defects would be caused after
the tirst 1,200 feet of airstrip and
for another 1,500 feet and so the
oad ee should have been
used at that partic s
particular part of the
_ He was also drawing the atten-
tion of the House to the fact that
one end of the runway was one-
third the strength of the other
end which meant that for at least
15 days a year, when the wind
direction varies, aircraft would
not be able to land at the runway.
ae eunt that T.C.A. would
10t be able to land at the b
When C.D, & W, onmeaaie ar

ed the Barbados Government a
certain

¢ i sum of money in order
that Tr ins-Canada Airways would
be able to bring in passengers, it

was hailed as the economic salva-
tian of the island as a whole, That
was less than .wo years ago, and
the runway \vas made 6,000 feet
long for that particular Airline
and no other airline at all.

He tiought that Government
was wise in having a Canadian
ineer come down to aid in the
construction, but it was regretta-
ble that the person who was
brought down was not as con-
ciencious as was expected,

‘What happened to the old run-
ay?” Mr. Barrow asked. “Did
the Government authorise Harri-
man & Co. to take up the old run-



vay which could be used in an
emergency?”
At the time the new runway

was proposed, one of the rational-
isations advanced by the Govern-
ment, as far as he could remem-
ber, was that airline pilots were
omplaining that the old runway
vas out of the wind, and that they
had difficulty in landing. Against
his, he wanted to say that any
pilot in the world who could not
land an aircraft full of passengers
vith a 50-mile an hour cross wind
should never have a commercial
licence,

Mr. Barrow went on to give an
lucidation on aeronautics, and



old runway was as much in the
wind as the new one, and he
therefore did not see the necessity
for taking up the old one. If the
Government authorised Harriman
& Co. to take up the old runway,
then he was shocked. He thought
that the company took up the run-
Way to save transport costs, and
they shifted the old runway, using)
the stuff which they excavated to|
construct the new strip, In short, |
defective material went from the)
old runway, and resulted in the
defects which occurred. |

As the position was now, with)
the new runway needing repairs, |
and the old one taken up, there}
was the question of what they|
would do in case of an emergency.
It was suggested in the Report, |
that instead of putting machinery |
to do the work, they should have
men trained with wheelbarrows— |
an uneconomical proposition.

He felt that later in the year one
might hear that Seawell was
closed for 13 days due to a chance
in wind direction, and if the old
runway was there, they would
have had an emergency landing
strip which had never given any
real trouble. :

The only thing to do with the
present runway was to concrete
slab the whole strip up to 2,570
feet. There was no point in putting
in slabs in peace meal, because
the intervals between the slabs
would again break down, The de-
fects, he said, were not caused by
water, but as a result of weak
substrata.

If the defects were not caused
purposely, they were the result of
gross negligence. The particular
strip of 1,000 feet where the planes
touched down and taxied had to
be three times as strong as the
remainder of the strip. After con-
struction of the runway at a
colossal cost, Trans-Canada de-
cided to re-equip with Turbo Jets,
and Barbados would as a result
be out of the route in another 11
months or so. He was of the opin-
ion that B.W.1.A. were quite happy
with the old runway except for a
few decrepit pilots.

Mr. Barrow also drew attention
to the fact that Trans Canada
were unique in paying only So 1
landing fees, and said that th
local Government were so anxious
to have that company here that
they could not ask them to pay
the normal landing fees. ;

He also criticised the erection of
a separate building for the Diret-
tor of Medical Services, a separate
and distinct from the Terminal
Building, and said that the Resolu-
tion before them called for much

searching. i
He reprimanded Government
on getting rid of their Architect

who could have given much valu-
able assistance in the planning
and la¥ing out of the airport, and
after remarking that the Minis-
try of Civil Aviation, and the
Air Ministry had a vested interest
in all airports in the Empire,
hinted that perhaps the Govern-
ment might ask their advice on
the present matter, He felt that
the time had arrived when the
people who were watching the
affair from the outside shoyld be
called in to give their unpaid
advice,

Mr. F. L. Walcott, (L) replied,
giving explanations to the points
raised by Mr, Barrow and Mr.
Lewis, and when Mr. E, K. Wal-
cott, (FE) spoke on the Resolution,
he said that while he sympathized
with Government, they were, to
some extent, to be held respon-
sible. z

He was wondering if the hurry
was so great that they could not
have another week or so in order
that members might have the op-
portupity to get further informa-
tion. If he understood it righty,
they would have to go back for
most of the money in the new
Estimates, because in these days,
they did not vote a sum of money
and allow it to carry over into
another year, If that were done,
they would be able to feel more
satisfied that the Government and
themselves had done all that was
necessary in view of what had
happened,

It was lucky that the senior
member for St. Joseph and the
junior member of St, Peter were
not in opposition to themselves
(Government), because he would
have liked to hear them criticise
Government for the unfortunate
position in which it finds itself
today. They had the information,
they had the knowledge, and
above all, they had the responsi-
bility of seeing that it was done
right. Government had therefore
to take the responsibility of Mr.
Wilson's incompetence,

After hearing what the senior
member for St. George had said.
one must have qualms as to
whether Government should not
take further advice, and it
doubtful whether the slabs
Portland cement were going to lie
along side the asphaltic cement

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announcements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words

Up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each | —————

additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Notiees onky after 4 p.m



IN MEMORIAM







WAL©OTT—In ever loving mémory ot
Gertrude Ophelia Elizabeth Walcott,
who fell asleep Sist February, 196

Safe from temptation,
Safe from sin’s poilut'on,
She lives whom we call dead.

Johnathan, Jurett, bra, Linda, Fred, Gap

Walcott, Bemyn Haynes.





PERSONAL



The public are hereby warned against
giving Chedit to any person or persons
name I do not

whomseever in my as

hold myself respon#ble for anyéne
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by = written order signed
by me.

Signed LIONEL A. GREENIDGE,
Areh Hall,
St. Thomas
19.2.52—2n





Signed ITHRAN G. LASHLEY
My Lord’s Hill,
St. Michael, No. 14
19.2.52—2n



FOK RENT
HOUSES





FLAT—A_ small self contained un-
furnished Fiat breezy and cool with
attractive surroundings, about 2 miles
from city. Available immediately, call
Mayers, Advocate Advertising Dept.
D.al 2608 for full particulars

17.2 62+4n,

WANTED
HELI

—

COOK GENERAL & LAUNDRY MAID
Apply Mrs. Lisle Bayley, Pavilion
Hastings. 20.2.52—-2r,

Lady for our Retail Dept.
by letter and ‘in

17.2.52—3n.





|

i



Broad Street,
eG.

:

My
lk
He

H

general housework.
rnings between 10
joorings” Marine Gar

ot
Call
“The

20.2,52-~In





in writing invited for

Applications are
the post of fuiltime Secretary (male).
lary approximately $200.00 per month,
according f0 qualifications. Successful
z° cant must assume duties not later
in ist May, perferably earlier. Further
tails may be obtained from the present
retary. Applications giving details of
past experience and copies of testimonials
should be sent by 29th February to the
Chamber of Commerce, Bovell & Skeete

idg., Lucas Street.

16.2.52—6n

,

MISCELLANEOUS





BOARDERS—“Private family near
Savannah can accommodate visitors to
Trinidad, Single or double rooms, Write

Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-
of-Spain.” 9.2.52—12n.

FREE passage England offered man, in
return for charge of mental case.









SWEET FIELD













Lovely Stone House; comprising
upstairs three Bedrooms, Large
Living Room, Dining Room, 2
Toilets and Baths, one with Tub
— and Pe and cold water,

lery. whetairs: 3 Spare
Rooms, Kitchen, and Shower
Room. Standing on approximately
2% Acres of land about 100 yards
from Gbbs Beach. Inspection by
appointment only,

AUBURN DALE
















A Two Storey Stonewall resi-
denee comprising of three Bed-
rooms, with Dressing
attached, Large Living and Dining
Room, nice Gallery running the
entire length of the house. Stand-
ing on approximately 8,000 square
feet of land, situate at Navy
Gardens. 3















BUILDING



Warehouse and Buildings situate
on al itely 10,000
This building

ot b
possibilities for carrying on
trade that you may require.

LAND

Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one
#mail stonewall build'ng thereon,
situate at Roebuck Street. Excel-
lent for making into a parking
Place or building warehouses.

NEW BUNGALOW









Comprising Three Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Kitehen, )
Toilet and Bath, Standing on
specommuataty 11,000 square feet
land. Situate near the famous
Rockiey Beach,

PARAGON

Compr'sing Four Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Pantry,
Kitchen and a very nice Study.
Standing on 7% acres of land.

ate Near Seawell Ai

ice very
by appoint

BUNGALOW
Roeckley New

























reasonable. Inspection
ment only.











Road: on approx-
imately 19,000 feet, of Jand.
Magnificent view including Golt
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing
nnowses ‘dann te
g jarage, rvants
een Wht a and poart ab H
ug! room for Laun
Workshop. r.







ee

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

wonsee CONTRACTORS

Roebuck Street,
Phone 4900






Bridgetown.

ready for work. Priced right. Apply
Pilgrim Mission Home, Bank Hall Main
Road, St. Michael.





excel
Court

1948 Hudson Sedan 14000 miles very
suitable for hire.
Coupe has been well eared. Very suitable



- SEP ane
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 1951 Model in

~~ CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h P. Saloon,
'H9—560 Model
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE





lent condition and only one driver
eay Garage. Dial 4616

17.2.52—6n

Mileage under 25,000
17.2,52—6n,

Morris Oxford Saloon
in exeellent condition.

14.2
19388 Dodge Deluxe

PICKUP—Good model, A Ford Pickup,

to

19.2.52—Gn



er

fields, St. Pe

Automatic record changer in Cabinet,
As new 1951. Phone

ee

RADIO—One 10 Tube R.C.A, in perfect
working
Apply C,. S. Goodridge, c/o Wilkinson &
Haynes.

8
Electrical, Only
show room.
Dial 5196.





ONE FOUR WHEEL
platform,
assed



OIL—The wirld’s finest motor
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
tions. Your vehicle deserves the best.

travel”.



SHIRT FACTORY—Capable of making
60 dozen shirts per day
Phone Johnson 4311.



STRAW MATS—Fancy Designs &8c. up,
“” grand opportunity for you. i
Dial 3466. 9.

Bros.





Ww.
The
Red

Bros.



LOST & FOUND



SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—One;
N. 2996. Finder please return same
yat Glasgow, Rose Gate, St. John.
20.2,

Ww



EDUCATIONAL

HARRISON COLLEGE

FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

At

for a Foundation Scholar at Hartison
College in September, 1952

An

School at_9 a.m, on Saturday, 22nd
March. of application can be
obta: at the Ht 's Office, Har-

Gs on or before the 29th of February,

Can
a



racing record.

uced from $3.50 to $1.32 only.
1


































Price $220,00, 4621.
19.2.52—2n.

order recently overhauled

Phone 4267. 19.2.52—2n,

Vacuum Floor

$75.00. At our

R. Hunte & Co., Ltd.
19.2.52—3n.

MECHANICAL

CANE CART with
and brakes.

pneumatic
Highw: & .
Dial 4016. Courtesy 1s

i

rinted Jersey
53 each, Get
tree:

ott}. .

“Found wherever fine cars
17,2,.52—t.f.n.

For particulars:

13,2.52—in.

‘Than
19,2,62—t.f.n.

Al. Beauti-

excellent equipment, good

Cost $700.00 now $500,
Hicks. Telephone 3189.

18,11.51—t.f£.p

FANCY SPORT SHIRTS—
bargain of the season.
Thant
9,2.52—1n,

8

biggest

Dial 3466.





LOST








$2—2n.










least one vacaney will be available

Examination will be held at the




Certifi-


















didates must be
) The children of, parishioners of
st Michael who ate in poor

is pensiOnal

house,
Road.

ie
to publ
ideally situated. f
y_ situate ‘or
Maxwell Long Road, Christ Church, This
land has a frontage on the Maxwell

Road of 126 feet and over 900 feet Mong
another



NOTICE

Pebruary }.
attached to the post which
le, i Four thousand, three

j handred and twenty @ollars ($4,

ennum, payable th

of Three hundred and siwgy dollars ($860)

A Cost-of-Living Bonus at current rates

is also payable
The successful applicant will net be

permitted to act in, or hold another | *

2th

PUBLIC NOTICES

220) per
instalments

CAR 1947 Ford Super DeLuxe V-8.| Parochial or Government appointment
Exceiient condition. Always owner driven | and will be required to take his
Ring 4433 or 8635 duties as ftom the 25th March but

13.2.52—t.f.n. |i already holding such appointment,

E. c. .
Clerk, St. Miehael’s Vestry,

NOTICE

52-—-8n

NO

TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the intention of the Vestry of the
of Saint Michael to catise to be intro-
duced into the Legislature of this Island
the following Bills, namely :—

(«) A Bill to extend the operation of
the Vestries (Cost of Living



it it is

Bonus

to Employees) Act, 1947 ahd any
Act amending the same for the
further period of one yeat to the
25th March 19653.
A Bll to extend the operation ‘of
the Parochial Employees Pension
Act, 194 and any act amending

the same for the further period

one year to the 25th March 1053,
to amend the said Act
the Parochial

and
amended

by

of

(as
Em-

ployees Pension (Amendment) Act,
1948) by increasing the amount of
the cost of living allowances which

the pour
think fit

all

& .
Solicitors for the Vestry of = ae
io



PUMLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE
SS

BEAT IT IF U ! TRI AND
ne WL SAR a, Se
TROYS }
BELLISHED

WITH AND BY

WORTHWHILE |

Garage.

servant rooms and storage roo!
On attractive hillside site, Roc!
A. Barnes & Co., a

LARS eeeyt BU ING SITe

sighed will
competition at their office
James Street on Friday the 29th February
Acres 344) perehes of land
building sites at

conditions of sale
HUTCH

tive Vestries may if they
bay to their pensioners,

Y
.52—Sn.

20.2. 52—1n

——————
HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 bedroom
conveniences,

. laundry,

er for sale





for sale by auction
this vetiicle for auctlo:

at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday 22nd,
at 2p.m. John M. Bladon & Compan:

Auctioneers. 17.2

.$8—3n.



HOOVER WASHING MACHINES
recommendations of

& Co,
Street,

Lid. Show
Opposite

Machine Co.
Bale 2 o'clock. Terms cash.
BR. TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers

D. C. SUGAR

ashing Machines at K. R
Room,

Lowe

the Singe

20.2,52—2n



UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

and indigent circumstances we will on |. 6S oft
20) Between the ages of 9 and 12| Dark Crystal Sugar at Plantations Ltd.
ies ve on the 3ist of March oe Sale 12.30 O'clock, Terms
1952. eh.
They can be members of Harrison Col- | BR 4NKER, & CO.
Schools by Auctioneers, s











BARBADOS CIVIL SERVICE
SOCIATION

held
Satur
1

oo -

co 23 @

16.2. 52—an

Ni
of the Annual General Meeting to be | S¢
arrison Hall on | Tree












at the C
day, 23rd February, 1982,
Introduetory remarks
President,

at 1.30 p.m.
be the

by His Excellency Sir
A, W. L. Savage. The meeting will
adjourn for five minutes,
Minutes of the Last Annual Meet-
a special Meeting of 14th July
To receive the Report
il









of the

Couneil.
To receive the Fnancial Statement
of Accounts and the Auditors’ Re-

rt
Ke hominate officers and members
to serve on the Council
To elect two Auditors.
To elect delegates to attend the
Conference of the Federation
General Business









L. A. HALL,
General Secretary.

will be closed to members
Wednesday,
for minor alterations.
The Club will be open as

on
20th

usual on
ary 2ist.

Auctioneers.

Thursday

February

is lamp.
Treadle Machine, Smiths Type
writer, Pye Radio and other items.
Sale 11.30 o'clock Terms

CASH.
@ CO.

17.2.52—2n














Febru-




Long supply the House of

Sorafletter from

i {and 45 minutes on

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



story of a

business wien ae:
into a world-wide organisation—
a commercial romance of his gen-
eration, the story of one of the

men who made Londo
Seotch whisky. - oF

, his
ry, thi t
isthe "romanee tan “She

_jing young Scotsman, James
Buchanan, who. all

Changed Entire Trade

As each distillery
a different
. Buchanan

against keen competition in the
year 1885, he was well on the road
to success,

World-Wide Reputation

In securing that valuable con-
tract, unbroken to thig , Mr.
Buchanan was satisfied that he
had laid an im corner-
stone in the history and future
progress of his business, and suc!
t undoubi proved to be.



bers and others who use it. It is ple of his Royal mother.
with pleasure that we express our
high opinion of its quality.” Complete Success
ithin two years “Black and Thus was the seal set upon the
sta
Sets canes GOVERNMENT
NOTICE TVEN that all
persons having any debts or claim a
or effecting estate of
rt late of Kirtons in the
of Saint Philip who in this
island on the 24th day of 1951, are

the said
estate are

Esta Alla Fi hi bert Clark
te of in Fitzher 6,
Deceased.
80.1.52—4nn.

fx" that|the Public Elementary Schools.”

died as a when he
was knocked by the sail of
he schooner i. idson” in

, British Guiana, and

Georgetowh Harbour,
that compensation has been paid into the
Court,

All dependants of the above-
hereby appear at the
h nu
Assistant Court of on Ys
he day of Februany, 1952,

o" a.m.
Dated this 3ist day of January, 1953
F.G. TALMA,

. G, ae st
Ag. Clerk, Assistant Court here. 2

Speed Record
LONDON. Feb. 18.
A British Royal Air Force Can-
berra jet bomber flew from Lon.
don to Tripoli, Libya, in two hours
M to set a
e 1,300



mew speed record for
mile flight.

The previous unofficial record
for the journey was three hours

‘}and 23 minutes in 1949 by a Brit-

ish De Haviland Jet Comet airliner,
—UP.



JUST FOR THE right finish ITS GAS
for cooking you need K your cooker
today at your Gas “Showroom, Bay St








eens from The Licensing World, December 8th, 1951.
et NI.

Homances of the Trade—No. I



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952

STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

M.S. BONAIRE, 22nd February, 1

ONE OF THE MEN WHO MADE

LONDON DRINK SCOTCH WHISKY

JAMES BUCHANAN FOUND THE IDEAL BRAND

|
}
|

AND BUILT A GREAT BUSINESS

by THE EDITOR

White” was obtainable in all thp
impogtant lie houses in
London, and in 1 the firm was

awarded a medal at the Paris
Exhibition in ov competition for
blended Scotch whisky. As the
years passed on, so business in-
creased, and the brand became
known not only over the whole
country, but across the seas, and
so began the world-wide reputa-
tion of “Black and White.”

“Black Swan” Distillery

%
rodu : Mr. Buchanan possessed an in-
ge scan whit-, ste sense of showmanship, and
realised to the full the value of
attracting attention as an adver-
tising medium for business.
striking equipages,

His
drawn by



superb horses, did much to help
him achieve that end.

In 1895 he started his own ex-
port department, after extensive
tours abroad, not only in European
countries, but to Canada, United
States, South America, Australia,
New Zealand, and South Africa.

In its infaney the business was
conducted from small premises at
61 Basinghall Street E.C, That was
in 1884, but in the following year
Mr. Buchanan was seeking, and
suceeeded in finding, larger and
more suitable offices with storage
accommodation, at 20 Bucklers-
bury, in the shade of the Mansion
House. Within five years the busi-
ness had grown to such an extent
that more spacious offices and
stores had to be found.

The year 1898 was an import-

endeavours of a man whose prin-
ciple was to provide the highest
quality whisky for the public.
Royal patronage, which has been
continuous ever since, meant |
complete success,

}
!

The growth of the business, so |
famly established in the metro-
polis, necessitated the opening of
branches in the provinces, first in |
Bristol and then in Birmingham, |
At the present
branches in
Liverpool and

Glasgow, Bristol,
Sydney. and agen-|

cies in every country in the world. | ‘

So rapid was the expansion of the |
business that it was not long be-
fore the firm possessed its own |
bottle and ease-making factories,
cooperages and several distilleries

Always a keen sportsman and
lover of animals. James Buchan-
an made extensive use of pictures |
of various breeds of dogs in his
advertisements for his whisky. Out
of this evolved the combination of
a_ black Scottish terrier and a
white West Highland terrier as a
trade mark for “Black and White,” |
and to-day those engaging figures
can be seen all over the world.

A Great Sportsman

Business success brought hon-
ours to James Buchanan, knighted
in 1920, and created Baron two |
years later, taking the title of |
Baron Woolavington of Lavington, |
while the G.C.V.O. was bestowed |
on him in 1931.

Lord Woolavington is. still rex |
membered by the public as a great
sportsman, noted for his love of |
horses, and with “Captain Cuttle” |
and “Coronach,” two of his own |
breeding, he twice won the Derby.

Barbados particularly and the |
rest of the B.W.I. also benefited |
by Lord Woolavington’s interest in
horse racing and breeding, for the
great stallion O.T.C. was a gift)
from him to the Barbados Turf |
Club. Later this stallion became
champion sire of the B.W.1. for
several seasons and when he died
In 1951 his progeny had won more
stakes than that of any other sire



time there are | «

. “wa '|CHRIST CHURCH FOUNDATION BOYS’

Holburn was and be- in the history of W.I, racing. |
came, as it is now, the headquart-

v and The sound, high principles he}
ers of James Buchanan Co. et himself in business were in-

culcated in those who worked |
with and for him, and his exam-|
ples and precepts remained a
sure foundation on which the)
business still proceeds and pro-
gresses. ;

As if to mark the occasion of
the opening of the new head-
quarters, H.M. Queen Victoria be-
stowed the as Warrant of 4e-
pointment on ehanan’s, and the
Prince of Wales, afterwards King :
Edward VII, followed the exam- In his lifetime James Buchanan
not only founded the whisky busi-
ness, but made it into one of the
great distilling companies of the
world. 2





OTICE



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION



TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF CLEAR STRAW SUGAR TO



THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS fs

Tenders are invited for the supply of clear straw sugar to the!
Public Elementary Schools of the ‘island during the following school

1. 5th May to ist August, 1952.
2. 15th September to 12th December, 1952.
3. 12th January to 10th April, 1953.

The estimated fortnightly requiremerfts are 4,500 to 10,000
pounds of sugar. Persons tendering must quote the price per pound
plus delivery charge, and are required to submit a sample of sugar,

Supplies must be delivered to the schools every two weeks ac-|
cording to the requirements of the individual schools, and all deliver- |
ies must be completed within three days

Tenders must cover all requirements of the schools during the
periods mentioned above, and must reach the Colonial Secretary's
Office not later than 12 o’clock noon on Saturday, the 15th March,
1952. Tenders must be marked “Tenders for the supply of sugar to

|

The person whose tender is accepted must be prepared to furn-
ish two sureties for the due performance of the contract.

The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or
any tender.

16th February, 1952. 20.2.52.—3n.





AND GIRLS’ SCHOOLS

Applications are invited for the post of Secretary and Treasurer
of the Governing Body of these Schools,

The post is part time and non-pensionable. The salary is $720.00
ber annum payable monthly (Cost of Living allowance will not be
given).

Details of the work involved can be obtained on application to
the undersigned. Applications with references must be sent to the
Chairman on or before the 20th instant and the successful applicant
will be required to assume duties on the ist March, 1952.

GEORGE B, EVELYN,
Chairman,
Dumfries,
St. Michael.
9.2.52—7n



FOR SALE
LYNCHBURG

5th Avenue. = KHelleville

An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated
on a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries qd
enclosed). —- drawing room, dining room, study, modern
kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc.

Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad.

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

AFS., F.V.A,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS

Pitone 464¢.



ss

®

AMSTERDAM
M.S. WILLEMSTAD, 26th February, 1952

952.
M.S. » Ist March, 1952.
ona Cindi lth,
i

SAILING TO PLYMQ@UTH AND

SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND
BRITISH GUIANA

MS

STENTOR, 28th ry, 1952.
8.8, BRATTINGSBORG, th March, 1952.
SAILING TO DAD, PARAMARIBO

AND BRITISH GUIANA

M.S. BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952.

|S.8. COTTICA, 7
| SATLING 10 TRINIDAD
M.S, HERSELIA,



April, 1952.
AND

, 18th March, 1952.
8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO.,
Agents.

CURACAO

‘SHIPPING NOTICES

‘ROYAL NETHERLANDS |



SSCS”,
| a
} The M.V. MONEKA will _atcept %
| Cargo and Passengers for Domin- &
ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis ©
and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd ©
inst. e
The M.V. “DAERWOOD .
accept Cargo and Passengers °
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, §
and Arubo. Sailing Saturday 2rd &
inst %
The M.V. CARIBBEF wil ®
accept Cargo and Passengers for %
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Fri-
day 29th inst.

B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION (INC.
Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.

o*



Canadian National Steamships



| “LADY RODNEY”
LADY

_N”’

“CANADIAN CRUISER”














NORTHBOUND

Arrives
Barbados Barbados
-: 20 Feby. 21 Feby.
- 8 Mareh 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March
4 April
i4 April

- 4 April

For further particulars, apply to—

+.22 Mareh 24 Mareh

Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
-13 Feby. 15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby.
+27 Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
. 14 March. _ 23 March 24 March
Satls Arrives Arrives Arrives
Boston St. John Halifax
— 28 Feby. 1 March

3 April

7 April

7 April 17 April







C"G" TRANSATLANTIO’
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.



ae ‘ ose ee

ies

o



———



From Southampton Arrives Barbados
“COLOMBIE”........ 7th Feb., 1952 20th Feb., 1952
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th March, 1952 2nd April, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”..., 24th April, 1952 6th May, 1952

“Not calling at Guadeloupe.
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados
“COLOMBIE”.... 2nd March, 1952
13th April, 1952
*“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May, 1952

“COLOMBIE”....

Arrives Southampton )
14th March, 1952
25th April, 1952
29th May, 1952

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

KH. M. JONES & CO... LTD.—Agenis.



Special Offer











SPOSSSOPIS I EPP FDS POOOS a.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH







5

ELECTRIC ony That Popular Game :— $
$7.52 MONOPOLY

CLOCKS each DART BOARDS 8
TABLE TENNIS SETS >

Table Models with $
Tuminous dials BLUE on WARE

G. W. HUTCHINSON JOHNSON’S STATIONERY %

4222 & Co. Ltd. Broad St. aanetane $

b, ' 3

OBBEE ete:

% 56565S6$55999SS 399999959999S69995900% OSS»
% An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant, Use : %
»,

S GERM OILS ‘
‘ %
% for Best Results.
> s
% : $
x TENTRAL EMPORIUM ‘
% Gasolene Service Station — Trafalgar St. %



*

Using Too
Much Oil?

Before You Spend

Money On a Costly
Overhaul, Read This!



You may not need new rings

often a comparatively simple Office 4493

oll system check-up will do

the trick. Let us flush and Workshop 4203
clean your crank-case, check Parts Dept. 4613

your oil pump, replace the oil

Night 4125

each ncientinii nities inspectorate

filter cartridge. It’s inexpensive

imsurance,



Are You Slow
On Get-Away?

Good Plugs and
Corrected Timing
Make a Difference!



= “heap” Instead of a fire

Charles
McEnearney
) « (0. Ltd.

engine, your ignition may be
at fault, Let os clean, space
and replace spark plugs, clean
and adjust breaker points, set
ignition check

i

|
If your car is accelerating like j |
and |

vacuum spark advance. Then

see the difference!

ea a

























WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952 BARBADOS ADVUCATI PAGE NINE

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON Gland Discover
ea | | Restores Yout
‘In 24 Hours —











ToucH A GEenuWwiWe
THOUSAN~- DOLLAR
LuMP! FEE 1 SENT



Sufferers from logs of vigour, nerv-
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oes away with gland operations and
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reat that it is now being distributed
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of complete satisfaction or money
back, In other words, VI-TABS must
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energy and from 10 to 20 years young-
er, Or you merely return the empty ‘
package and get your money back.

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‘ q o
| by Stephen L. Caiger
——— NG ace) tia ttl iltmatintee,
| | A PACKAGE-siR- |
Mi RE ||| SIKTY DOLLARS- || TAKE IT BACK |] || BUT-SIR-THEY =|
; 1 \\eCOLLecT- —_)| AN'DON'T GIVE || || ARE CIGARS you |
} —S ; ME ANY a Wil ORDERED - THEY ‘ | British Hondura perhaps the ersies with neighbouring Central
| ARGUMENT | | Must BE FOR YOU : ;
most neglected of all English American republics, especially
a pra olonies, Even the larger historie Guatemala The dispute with
Ans
I “| Pe f colonial develo, nt barely Guatemala ended in the territorial
Nc nention it. Thi uthor has now Agreement of 1859, but the after-
told the swory of this interesting math of diplomatic strife remains
cun ry from the early days of it to the present day, and may be
ettlement by the logwood-cutters referred to U.N.O,
and buccaneers up to the present, The concluding chapter deal
Beginning with the caiscovery of with the Colony today with special
> British Honduras by the Spanish emphasis. on its economic and
‘| YOU ARE, CHUMS... Conquistadore Mr, Caiger de- commercial status and recent
REE HORSES AND THE ) : a sea ey
GUIDE ... HE WILL LEAD ribes the growth of the colony Government proposals for devel-
us T SHEIK’ : f
Saale ! s under ts occupatior ind settle- cpment. The writer shows that its
ment | British adventurers, and agricultural and other resources
the ‘ednversion’ of Harry Morgan have been gravely neglected, and
He gives an account of the early that this fertile land could main-
querrels with the Spaniards which tain a population many times its
were later followed ty controv- present size



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by

PAGE TEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952







OLYMPICS RING UP THE CURTAIN

By Lord







Burghley Cae ae ANGLE

LANGLEY DIVES |

From The DAILY MAIL ' ‘ Soccer WHAT'S ON TODAY 195?

On July 19, in the huge

the last of a relay of runners bearing a flaring torch from

Olympia, Greece, home of t

Helsinki will arrive. The Olympic flame will be lit, and the

XVth Olympiad will open.

It is surely significant,too, that
for the two weeks of these Games
there will be one sphere in this
troubled world in “which there
will be no Iron Curtain Russia
and the countries close to her are
taking their places among the
sixty-odd nations competing under
the friendly banner of sport
oe - - og

Cream of Youth

THIS, surely, makes the Olym-
piad of even more _ profound
importance. It is not just a
World Championship of Sport; it
is also a gathering of the cream of
the youth of the world.

Every fourth year they assem-
ble for the Games, and live
together in an Olympic village.
They learn to become friends in
the midst of flerce competitions
tind it should not be forgotten
that they are all heroes of sport
to the people of their Own lands
News of what they have seen
and heard is eagerly sought on
their return home

I am convinced that an Olym-
pie festival, with its thousands of
competitors and spectators from
all corners of the globe. «preads
good will out of all proportion to
the numbers actually sent

Interest in sport is world-wide,
It provides common ground
for men of af’ nations, and these
sporting contests between ccun-
tries help to create that basic
binderstanding «and good will
which are essential foundations
to a smoothing-out of difficulties

If I may give one example
My wife and I were in Argen-
tina on business at the height oi
the meat crisis, and yet, becau:e
of the great fellowship cf sport
we received a wonderful recep-
tion and were made the guests of
Argentina throughout our stay.

We should never forget that
Britain is the cradle of samateu:
sport, The regt of the world
looks to us to play Our part in
maintaining that high tredition
and this surely is yet enoimer
reason for making a tremendous
effort to ensure that we are ade-
quately represented in Helsinki
It may be that but few of the
firsts will come our way, but
at any rate we will put up a
show worthy of our country.

Our Prospects

WHAT are our _ prospects?
There will be 17 different sports,
and I receive encouraging in-
formation from most of them.
In.my own sport, athletics, we
undoubtedly have a strong all-
round team, and, I believe, a
better one than we fielded for the
1948 Games at Wembley.

If these athletes keep their
fofm, then the outlook is promis-
ing, in spite of the rising world
standard. But let there be no
mistake about it; we shall be
opposed by superlative, well-
coached athletes, and it will be
a great achievement to reach a
final let alone win it.

Britain’s “possibles” for the
munning-track and field events
have been listed, and every com-
petitor will do his or her utmost
to reach peak form at the right
time. There can be no hard and
fast rules about the training. A
heavy man needs a lot more
work than those of leaner build
(as I was in my athletic devs!)

It is not essential for our team

clubs, and get their high-class’
racing in the district and British
championships. Their life’s am-
bition is to win an Olympic title
and the great majority can safely
be left to do the job.

Naturally, we are all hoping to
see the Union Jack at the top of
the winning-mast, but let us not
forget the words of the foundey
of the Olympic Games, Baron de
Coubertin: “The important thing
in the Olympic Games is not
winning, but taking part. The
essential thing in life is not
conquering. but fighting well.”

ind this. 1 pr oat an they ¢ighteen days in the season, This group he may find himself al for their third round cup tie
ove Ohne ao i ten aan ae — comparte Savousabty with the matched against a heavyweight next week ended in a draw so sup-
, " 1 : ‘ : ata present system whereby in a full scaling 220 or 230 pounds, That’s porters of both sides are left won-
to do a lengthy final training to- St. Michael 8 Beat But current indications are that five match, five-day series they Very bad,” Johnston added. dering what to expect on Satur-
gether. Many train with thei 4 the pendulum is starting on its are away nearly a third of the day.—U.P.
s > ' rae backward swing. Critics and pub- summer, pte
Ursuline Convent lic alike have been unanimous lS Be t FRenth 3
in their recent condemnations of The revenue from a triangular Al tars a
_in a netball match played at slow batsmanship — despite the tournament, played on sporting s 8
St. Michael's Girls’ Scnooi yester- good wickets. And so serious has wickets, need not be any less than Schools ¢ ains in ac
aay afternoon, St, Michaei’s Girls’ been the insistence upon a return that obtained from a five-day
Scnool defeated the Ursuline Con- to more equal terms between bats- series played on wickets which (From Our Own Correspondent) N Rh fi
vent by 17 goals to 13. man and bowler that the Nottins- ;educed to a minimum the chances KINGSTON, Feb. 18. ervous, euma .
In the first half both teams ham authorities have even order- of a result being obtained, In _ The tournament between the

I would like to stress that,
whereas individuals excel, and
bring honour and glory to their
countries, there is no scoring be-
tween countries that makes one
the winner of the Games, For
this, it is felt, would encourage
an undesirable nationalism which
would be completely contrary to
the true spirit of the Olympic
movement.

Any table which appears,
therefore, placing nations in order
of merit is entirely unofficiel and
privately compiled.

Some people are only too ready
to decry the Games, and, indeed,

They'll Do It ‘Eve



ry












TWO WEEKS COMPILING AN
@ EIGHTY-FOUR PAGE
REPORT



ALL FINISHED, WHO
TAKES ALL THE Bows:
WHY, TWERPLEY,
| CHIEF_PETTY

eee eee
| Renee THEYRE INS Tu oto OD

GLORY-GRABBER.
OF COURSE +

| ee
WE NST
}

40
em
ee ad TF

— iealicltiliemmen
rennet a re





"The OFFICE FORCE SPENDS

Olympic Stadium at Helsinki,

Court of Original Jurisdic- Annual Carnival Dance

tion 10.00 a.m.
] Police Courts 10.00 ..m i By Members of
e roes Police Band Concert at St. THE RIVERSIDE CLUB

he original Olympic Games, to

eee ee pm | if) at the CHILDREN'S GOOD-
; 16 = Division football WILL LEAGUE
Se eae veal a i iia SPS ra various grounds 5 p.t. on TUESDAY, FEB. 26TH,
struc ie pi dp» inte rnatic nal in. goalkeeper and an inside for- Mebils Cinema. show | at

that 1@y cause erna ne -

at 9 p.m.
Prizes for Costumes

ward who overcame injuries to
score winning goals for their clubs
were heroes of to-day’s soccer
programme. First, the goalkeep-
er Dennis Herod of Stoke was in-
jJured in the match against Aston

cidents, and make fo, rows
instead of harmony

That these incidents took place
in years gone by is, of cOurse,
true; but the fact that they are
such rare events nowadays is

Warners Plantation yard,

Christ Church 7.30 p.m. , ere
Gramophone Concert at SUBSCRIPTION: 3/-

British Council 8.15 p.m. Music by P. Green’s Orch.











Vill n é ar anging A406 gb tots ee 4059)
that _ Sportsmanship which Ae ture — moved to outside right WEATHER REPORT % Government of ~
spreading throughout the world hil ; : > | 2
It is commo knowledge now while international inside forward YESTERDAY j S
tha” eels “ = e- Sammy Smyth went in goal Rainfall from Codrington »
with what smoothness and free Along came 9 chance ahd Herod Nil >
dom from incident the Wembley 4 an a a < r r )
i : mn oe em . eM bers: wing forward a Total Rainfall for Month to |, x
‘ racked in a shot to give Stoke date .07 in. 4 Registered Stock %
Sportsmanship First two more valuable points in th Highest Temperature 85.0 °F &% %
bid to avoid relegation. Lowest Temperature 70.5 °F Tax-free to residents abroad. *
THE Finns will organise the The other hero is inside forward Wind Velocity 9 miles per A Trustee Investment *
Games well, and I have no doubt MacNeil of Barnsley, He was car- hour | x
that the same high standard of ried off with an ankle injury in a Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.005 & Price: 100 plus commission
sportsmanship will be maintained home game with Sheffield Wednes- (3 p.m.) 29.919 . ~
among the competitors as it day but insisted on returning to TO-DAY %
London. The year 1952 will be the field in the second half. The Sunrise: 6.15 a.m . A. M WEBB xy
another milestone in the history score was four all when Mac Sunset: 6.08 p.m Tie . 4 R
of sport in the world, afd with received his chance and a well Moon: Last Quarter, Feb- x *
the support which I am confident placed header gave Barnsley vic- 18. , 1% Stockbroker. v
the sport-loving public of this tory, knocking Sheffield off their Lighting: 6.30 p.m. ist S
country will give, Britain will second division perch. High Tide: 9.42 32 ||% 38 Broad Street, Bridgetown. 4
. 7 , ly of the Now v tag - = le: . a.m., 11. ~ sb
send qa team not only ¢ ow for the rest of the news p.m, s, >
highest class of performers but \e ~
also one which will, each and

Manchester Uniteds three—nil Low Tide: 2.13 a.m., 5.00 \% ae
away win over Derby gives them p.m. a aie Sey 8
a two point lead in the First Divi- Pas Se re .
sion Championship race. Arsenal
second with 40 points were held
to a 3—3 draw at home by Pres- i
ton for whom Wayman got the We offer the following
hat trick after being two goals up

“ces wan apeoni LERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

OS
.
Me

every one, worthily uphold out
great traditions of sportsman-
ship.

FOOTBALL

Wile ce nen Le we Pe



|
i









: 9H i ended Fulham’s revival Z
2 perio ieee . : % fk sound 4—0 victory but Ween UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
FIX RES ‘ ee . ae fourth in the table, were soundly 4 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. Long
rt beaten 3—9 at Wolverhampton. @ 10ic. per sq. ft.
LANGLEY dives for the ball hit by Rae (21) bowled by Lindwall in the Fifth Test Match, The vis sone wound internationai WALLBOARD MOULDING
pivGellese, ast, season's Segond By aes pee cee ee Rise game auonien "Hing Mai for covering ola
ivision champions, w ave ‘ ember 2 ; . k
aon erent to oo A st Trian l T 9 a r 24 in top form. STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
1on is season mee mpire a u ar eS , a ec eS n eS ivi , *
Kensington to-morrow afiernoon. ; & f e Wednesday's defeat iow tea \% in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft., 8ft., 10ft. long
The fixtures for the rest of this the newly promoted Forest to take at 18c. pr sq. ft.
week are as follows:— over for the first time. They drew TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
FIRST DIVISION A MOVE TO BRIGHTEN CRICKET 3—8 with Luton and are now one % in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft. 8ft., 10ft. long
Thursday, February 21 ’ point clear of Leicester, Wednes- at 30c. per sq. ft.
Empire’ vs College at. Kensing- ow, and Cardiff all with 35 points, SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS
ton. By PETER DITTON secretaries in particular would be West Indies an opportunity to eo eit ae goals were scored Y% in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft. @ 40c, per sa. ft.
Saturday, February 23. ; Lonpon. ‘ick to point out that a two redeem their recent failures, Port Wein e aa Serrow. 3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8ft. @ 29c. & 32c. per su. ft.
Spartan vs. Notre Dame at Ken- : ; aN day reduction would cut down A three day series would prob- beat at hom . th ificult side to TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS
sington. Test match cricket these (avs their share of profits at the end ably be to the advantage of the south lenders Pee Diyision 3/16 in, thick. 4ft. x 8ft. @ 23e. per sa. ft.
. et ot 1h er Acct of the tour, West Indies, for their natural bent One goal scored by sneide i; |\f) All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack {
THIRD DIVISION. . With four, five and six days be- - : is to attack, English batsmen once Mullard ended y pte right of Wood Ants and other Termites. ‘
Wednesday, February 20. ing devoted to each game both But this, I think, is where I had the same idea. Is it too much cessive PI can of eight suc-
Police vs. Y.M.C.A. at Park batsmen and bowlers are en- should introduce a suggestion 1, hope that it can be revived? enabled Brights, Jicweme and|{{ Phone 4267.
Carlton vs. Rangers at Black couraged to develop a negative ap- made recently in Australia by don 430 Fn a who beat Swin-
Rock proach to their respective duties. John Goddard, the West Indies top of th t Mae Ot OP. { AYNES C0 LTD
Wanderers vs. Foundation at The consequence is that unless Captain. He advocated that Eng- e ehh But Plymouth til \ 9 e
Bay. the wicket is “sporting,” that is land, West Indies and Australia New Division points clear and ee Id : ome i
Y.M.P.C. “A” vs. C.O.B.. at to say, gives the bowlers an ad- should meet in a combined Tes back in the winning vein. In ;
Beckles Road, rn vantage, a definite result is hard series, a return to the experiment . an





j Burgess Crystal Palace i
Lodge vs. Cable and Wireless the M.C.C, iand. 3 ace inside left

were sent off five minutes from

at Lodge. As we all know wickets through - If Test teh reduced ee a the third, North Li
mA i ae out the world have been getting est matches were ju . : In the third, Nort neoln even
Caltses va Empire at College, better and better since the turn to three days it oe L quite secede Py Fe ata ts lee Sauces veihes ee ee eee
P. Rovers vs. F.O.B. at Ken- Of the century. This has been due ¢@Sy to fix up another

: Graver rattled up five against
sington. to the introduction of more scien- Series. In this way the demands poon. may have & new ‘divider Sure sne, and Cee

Barbados Regiment vs. Notre tific methods of preparation, But f overseas countries for increased (jj) have a new division. their five point lead.

r Charlie Johnston, President of ¢ . il) i
Basie at Gartaon” NOS Se ehetshave Uecome betters so epportuniles to play im England Ghee, Whar, Pregent of | 'Siockport atl tn sacond place,
Carlton vs. ¥.M.C.A, at Black has it been necessary to lengthen Could be met. Each summer two Guiid announced today that he ; Biken

beaten home record—last surviv-

Rock. the duration of Test matches, The COmmonwealth teams could be yijj propose to the New York ing in four English leagues.

Wanderers vs. Rangers at Bay. initiative has been taken away Sent. This would mean a Test Commission the addition of
C.0.B. vs. Foundation at Com- from the bowler and handed over ‘Series once every three years “for “Junior Heavyweight Class’? from

Guarantee A Perfect FIT



, News from Scotland is that Hi-
bermere. to the batsman, Australia, South Africa, India 175 pounds to 190. “This will help bernian are already wearing that

; . _ hk ‘ Pakistan, New Zealand and the make up for two divisions we championship look. They followed
The B.A.F A. are ST Sonia ah This state of affairs has been West Indies, instead of, in some practically lost at the other end ‘ theif mid-week draw with
oe Mg the Se Sed Division an > tolerated, in fact even encouraged, cases, a wait of five or even six of the scale—Flyweisht and Ban- ‘'ingers at Ibrox Park by beating
aa Fae Hell is aie aoatiaite inte for a long time now. Five day years. ; tamweight” he said, “at the same St, Mirren 5—0 and now nothing

aa Ne sca, rest matches bring in more mone time it will provide protection short of a wholesale collapse will
Spice wil’ luke alae ts ieee than thoes of pute Uides dave fe Six three-day Test matches for youngsters just growing out lose them the championship for
Park’ ané ihe pant . iar will tion, Similarly, most members of WOuld mean that English Test of the Light Heavyweight Class. the second successive season,

‘ahd oes te rene tee 99 the public prefer to see a good Cricketers would be away from At present a youngster who has toon Queen of the South and
aan thie wit Ree Monsians je. innings, with the ball flying to their club sides for not more than grown too big for the 160 to 175 Hearts game which was a rehears-

: . e e eight goal draw at Gillingham
Combermere vs Y.M.P.C. “B" at to obtain. Witness for example the of 1912 when South Africa and F B Xm pyres. home centre £
Comberimere. present series between India and England both sent teams to Eng- : 3 : =





. . Wrong foods and drinks. worry
started off the game slowly, but ed their famous “feather-bed’” fact it would probably be more Caribbean All Stars and Jamaica — overwork and frequent colds often put

the St. Michael's girls were al- wicket at Trent Bridge to be re- because there would be nine test 9pened this afternoon with a Sid Mindane Pronbing was ihe tone
ways looking for goals, At half laid. matches instead of five. match between All Stars and a cause of Excess Acidity, Getting Up

; : . ; ; Nights. Burning Passages, Leg Pains,
pains: anarpachaentnpnesliant This action should not onl Een Deore, Raven: Nervousness, Diasiness” Swollen An:

; $s ac Ss. not only be Goddard himself did not sug- e x say an kles. Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids, and
Play in the second half was commended, It should be copied riage eb . The visitors won the match,

Fe Tri- " i feeling old before your time Help your
much better and a fair crowd o! by other cricket grounds through- Kost, sete ihe = beating their opponents 4—0 in — iidnexe purify your blood with ine

i . . . tex. Th 7 t dose = ts hel:
fans from St. Michael's and the out the world. The public are angular series between his coun= 4 match which was notable for your sidinve lowe art alana orice




; : uy, England and Ausiralia should i } is i Sears : i ‘lee
Ursuline br ypu al saw noua good patie & perce fe “T matches j,¢ wae But, doubtiess he had in San A passing and good positioning in which do not produce definite re- ; ali ? cA ee oy ystex must satisfy completely or cost . “pps
the field but in the fatter part tof sults, The time has come to give ") ind the fact that Australia is outmatched the schools by at — jithing Get Cystex from vour chem: Prince William Henry Street

We have, } ot
done it in Jinan } fer

the PAST. S@iayang We

We on = Aa

—

the TIME,

P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD.











; : 2 isit England i 53. Ss. series ist’ today

this half the St. Michael’s girls the bowler a fair chance; not to a. pe could be eee 2 ele tale en eee MEAN ee y stex The une: a we Mf
forged ahead considerably putting make him dependent upon the ing that tour it would give the Jamaica starts on Saturday. For Kidneys, Risabatlom, Biedder Meee ybee” VS SS a
themselves well in the lead and weather for a chance to tie the aiteaiiiaaeamiiie =
when the final blast was sounded batsman up. | = :



St. Michael’s girls had put in 17 '
goals and the Ursuline Convent With less artificial preparation
13. of wickets it should be possible
for any game, including a Test

The shooters for St. Michael’s match, to be concluded in three
Girls’ School were M. Branker Cays, “8
and O. Agard while the shooters I can at once hear angry cries
for the Convent were M. Netto at this suggestion of reverting
and C, Navarro, to three day Tests. English counts

lea —_.

‘Time iialocaiaaanis By Jimmy Hatlo







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