Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895









AA\\\ QU

5 Advora








TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952





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PRICE : FIVE CENTS



U.N. TRUCE TEAM WON’T ADMIT RUSSIA
Reds Postpone Item

On Agenda

By PETER

The shadow of Russia
ations on Tuesday as the U
munist reply to the Allied
post-war Korean Peace Con

give their views on Allied qualifications for the peace par-
ley when the full delegations meet for Monday’s plenary
session to discuss item Five unexpectedly postponed by the

Communists an hour before

There: was no Red explanation
for the delay.. Meanwhile, Russia
took the spotlight oh Tuesday as
Reds doggedly continued insistence
that it be accepted as “neutral”
representative of the post-arm-
istice neutral nations supervisory
commission.

Col. Chang Chun San on Monday
blasted the U.N, refusal to accept
Russia's nomination as “intoler-
able”. The Allies agreed to accept
Soviet satellites, Poland and
Czechoslovakia to sit on the
National Commission to supervise
behind the lines of inspection after
the armistice.

But there was no indication that
the allies would soften their stand
against Soviet intrusion on post~
war Korean problems,

On the prisoner issue both sides
are closer together on minor points
in the proposed draft of the ex-
change problem but as wide apart
as ever over the basic issue of }
“voluntary repatriation.”

The Allies planned to voice the |
view on Tuesday on Red amend-!
ments proposed during Monday’s

Staff Officers’ meeting on item
Four.
Violation Charge
Communist Radio charged on

Monday night that United Nations
artillery fired on hills near the,
Korean truce village of Panmun- |
jom. Peking radio said Commun-
ist correspondent Alan Winnington
reported from Panmunjom on
Sunday that heavy shells from the
American lines were whining past
Panmunjom to burst in the near-
by hills and at night planes vio-
lated the neutrality of Kaesong.
The broadcast, monitored in
Tokyo, did not elaborate.—U.P.

Labour Leaders
And Govt. Disagree

WASHINGTON, Feb, 18.

Labour management and Gov-
ernment spokesmen disagreed on
the, need for new legislation to
curb the influence of Communists
in labour unions. Congress Indus-
trial Organization's President ,
Philip Murray, and American
Federation of Labour President |
William Green, contended that
the unions already demonstrated
they can deal effectively with
Communists by themselves.

They said any further legisla- |
tion on the subject would be
unwise and unnecessary. But the
Justice Department, the National
Labour Relations Board and the
National Association of Manufac-
tures said Congress may have to
do something about closing loop-
holes in the Taft-Hartley law’s
anti-Communist affidavit require-
ment,

Conflicting views were released
by the Senate Labour Sub-com-
mittee which will hold hearings
on the issue next month. ° a

—U.P.





; weapons fire West-northwest of

GRUENING

MUNSAN, Feb. 18.
loomed over armistice negoti-
nited Nations awaited a Com-
conditional agreement on the
ference. Reds are expected to

the meeting was scheduled.

UN. Troops
Pound Reds

EIGHTH ARMY H. Q.,
KOREA, Feb., 18.

United Natiotis forces battered
the Communists in the air and on
the ground to-day to keep them
off balance. U.N, fighter-bombers
inaugurated the seventh month of
attacks against Red supply lines
with fresh raids on North Korea
while a screening force of i9
Sabre Jet fighters beat off ‘forty
Communist M.1.G, 15 jets damag-
ing at least two,

On the ground three U.N. raid-
ing parties, two of them beefed
up with tanks, struck deep across
the frozen, snow-covered No
Man’s Land on “killer” attacks.
The Westernmost thrust drew
heavy small arms and automatic

Chorwon.

Farther East, a tank and in-
fantry team pushed into enemy
terrain South of Pyongang and
killed at least seven enemy troops
and destroyed a network of
bunker positions before return-
ing to their own lines,

A third raiding group also sup-
ported by armour struck north at
a point East of Kumsong in two
elements. One reached its ob-
jective without fight but another
ran into intense Communist fire
and a barrage of hand grenades.

—UP.

Five Children
Die In Fire

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Feb. 18.

Five small children ranging
from four years to eight months
old burned to death here Sunday
when they were left alone in
their flame swept home.

Authorities said the: mothers,
who are sisters, were both away
from their six room home at the
time of the tragedy. One woman
Ollie May was at a neighbour's
house recovering from the birth
of her third child last Thursday
while her sister had gone to work
shortly before the fire broke
around six a.m. Sunday.



—UP.

eeehieedemiidns ie ———————

4 Thousands
See Wreaths

LONDON, Feb. 18

when thousands still stood waiting
in line at night fall,

Buckingham Palace today
Work As Usual

The Queen wants publie func-
tions connected with Britain's
Government, Trace, Charity or
Arts to take place as scheduled
despite mourning for her father
King George VI.

An announcement by the Lord
Chamberlain's office said, however,
that the “holding of other func-
tions must be left to the discretion
of organizers who may wish to
allow 2 week or two to elapse be-
fore recommencing arrangements.”

A statement issued by the Queen
Mother Elizabeth yesterday ex-

tributes to her husband and asked
loyalty and devotion for their
daughter the Queen “in the great
and lonely station to which she has
been called she will need your
protection and your love.”

A statement issued from Buck-
ingham Palace said with the Queen
and the Duke of Edinburgh, the
Queen Mother and Princess Mar-
garet spent the week-end at Wind-
sor Castle where King George was
buried on Friday. Yesterday they
attended a Memorial Service for
him in the private Chapel adjoin-

ing the Royal Lodge
Awards
It was announced today that

Queen Elizabeth will hold her first
investiture at Buckingham Palace
on February 27, to give awards and
titles. .

Six-foot Private

six-inch tall

Queen Elizabeth, who with the |

pressed thanks for the wonderful |

Americans on a vacational
» Sunday from Miami via Po
Thomas, Virgin Islands

Ike May Win
Though Away

Duke of Edinburgh :«turned to}

London last night from the Royal | } AY ASHER
Lodge at Windsor, received the! } 7 Saree sae
Duke of Norfolk at Clarence House } WASHINGTON, Feb, 18
today He is Earl Marshal and | Senator Irving M. Ives said to-
handled all the funeral arrange jay that Eisenhower can wh
ments. The Queen Mother and he Republican Presidential nom-
Princess Margaret were back at!



nation without coming home t

} inpaign. But other Eisenhower
| oosters were not so sure. They
'rankly admitted they are worried

ibout recent indieationgs that the
} THE SPACIOUS LOUNGE inside the ship is pethaps the most beautiful room aboard “Lysander”. reneral means to remain at hi

‘aris Military Headquarters until

fter

bP pies a: the Republican Nominating
‘onvention in July. One top leader
oO est eCWw ef the Bisenhower organisation
‘ tid the General's adamant refusal!

. e e

) return for “non-political” speech
maaking has been “damaging” to
” campaign, This Republicar
vho asked not to be named told :
porter all pro-Eisenhower
rs “hope” for Eisenhower
efore July

|

_ Atomic Weapon

retu
|

' Only divergency of view he saic
} “ : LONDON, Feb. 18. : oie do not consider it abso
B.G. Sugar Two Royal Navy ships are reported ready to sail soon for | ‘Utely necessary. This latter view

is upheld by Republican Senato
veg

+ who said Eisenhower's retur:
vould be “beneficial” but not “in-

Australia with equipment for testing a tactical weapon with
an atomic warhead which Britain is believed to have cde
veloped. Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced last

Magnate Dies

ispensable” to the campaign. He
{ Correspondent) night from No, 10 Downing Street that Britain’s first “atomic lded that an immediate return
|’ GEORGETOWN B.G. Feb. 18. weapon” would be tested in Australia this year. ould subject Eisenhower to th:

Ss ty-ight-vear old Mandel riticism that he quit his post a
eventy-eight-year oO) Dy

7 The announcement caretulls uropean Defenee Commander be-
Vieira, B.G millionaire and , avoided the use of the wort wre the job is done

sugar estate proprietor died here) a urs ‘bomb” leading to the genera Wher he devlered his availabil
on Sunday. His grandparents emi-

for
January,

Republican nomination in

; belief here and in Australia that | t
}grated from Goa, Eisenhower said he would

Portuguese St S » tactical wea i € ,
é a apon Had been read
India. Vieria started life as a hoor op 7 BE? lcd by Britath’s célénticts 6h ex.
Or-) i.

Not, campaign tor nomination
peasant boy and amassed a plosion, Sore of his supporters felt, hows
tune in Diamond fields subse | TUNIS, Feb, 18 The Ministry of Supply, respor-] ever, he could finish his Buropeat
quently selling his interests’ t Sabotage by Nationalist agita-| sible for Britain’s atomic energy | assignwent in time to return be
patted Pio, isn aulahe Sors continued here today although; establishment, refused all com=|for the Convention and make
diary.o uth rica's De Beer:

no new casualties had been report-{ ment, Asked whether the weapon) speeches







under non-politica
in 1925. He then became interest-|ed. |Authorities said Neo Destour ° f ‘ No uspice:
illic f t ri , j $ ’ were really a bomb, William Pen-! auspices
teak Aiea hin care Be Pow ed in the sugar industry, acquir-|(New Independence) saboteurs}ny, a member of the scientist U.P.
vice Aah sl or gallantry {28 Houston on the Eastbanik, | dynamited a road bridge in Dena,} team which produced the weapot
ora Wee eee uae oat Demerara Mara and Friends Ber- | tno Reet of Gabes last night, said “draw your own conclusion B C i
m Korea Wil oC a , Cc ; se intore j halting all tram yn the ro¢ , : . cs 5
: bice County and large interests ir 4 n illie on le road A lispatch fr Syd gnid us r Ss ws tt 5
then. Originally he was to have|”! ; i In Djebéntanan near af, dispatch from Sydney saic savas § nite
. tations Wares ‘a 6 I ang sar Sfax, tele- . tre ar ie
received the award earlier this (Paw ny ile = a dacatiagtnd | graph poles were cut and eee. most Australian quarters believed | , ’ © _
» late 1 ¢ “y's | OF es pmerara. A Justice o . 4 & as ¢ ide. ello ,
month from the late aoe one the Peace for the Colony Vieria|®D4 telegraph communications. in the relbot ait at S a d Hi ui j rees: Sey en Killed
Boe vr h ; Go ennenand Nev arried twice and is survived by the area have been disrupted. | Thal ’ 7 is os ae ng a sated . ’
re et ie as the|hi$ second’ wife eight and| French authorities are still clean re test is generally expecter MEXICO GITY, Feb, 18
Year's honours list. Distat * bt ee e - eaiemn jing up villages in the region of|to be carried out on the vast) A Mexico City bus crashed in
first semi-public engagergent an- | six dé s e was 6 2 ’

nounced by the Queen
—U.P & CP.



MEATLESS DAYS

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 18

President Peron announced on

Out! Monday night that Argentina will

have meatless

week.

two days per

—U.-P.



[Russia Wants to Smash!

Rearmament Plans

By

JOSEPH | W.

GRIGG
BERLIN, Feb. 18.

SOVIET RUSSIA rs about to launch another all out
drive to wreck West German rearmament plans, Western

Allied officials believe.
forms :

Do Not Dress Show Windows

W.I. Editor Tells British People

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 18.

It was expected to take these

|

1, Renewal of
reunite
peace

earlier offers to
Germany, give he a
treaty and withdraw all

Allied occupation forces in return

for German neutrality in the East -
West conflict

2. Fomenting of strike
West German workers a
percentage of whom are

amon
large
trongly

Greater investment of British Capital is the answer|*#4inst re-armament.

to the need for raising the

Indies said Theodore Sealy, Editor of the Daily Gleaner,| west

living standards in the West

Kingston, in a recorded broadcast on the B.B.C. to-night.

Died In Plane Crash

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 19.



Captain Albert Walton Roland|to dress the show window with | Major

Pleading for an extension of in-
dustrial development in the West

3. Possible approach to the
for another big four con-
ference on Germany.

A first move in
was seen in the

Indies he said “It is wrong for the| trolled East German Governmeht’s

people of Britain to think that th
way to help the West Indies

Perry who was killed in a Sicilian, social services. They know them-

air crash flew with British West} selves

Indian Airways from - 1949 till
last year when he joined Hunting
Air Transport.

He was a Line Captain with

East African Airways in Nairobi |

for two years before joining the
West Indian company,

Perry was an R.A.F. pilot du-
ring the war flying with Coastal
Command and from 1944 till 1947
with Transpart Command. He was
36 and had logged 5,590 hours

4,000 of them as a Commander, |

He was married with three chil-
dren,

Blockade China



j chase these services

from their own history
that they have been able to pur-
only after
j they have developed their indus-
\ trial and commercial economy.’

“It would repay British busi-
ness not only in profit on invest-
ments but great increase in
British exports to the West Indies
\if investments were undertaken
‘on a large seale to raise the
|standard of living.

Sealy commended the vision of
jmen like Lord Beaverbrook
Sir Williatn Stevenson the
national industrialist who
{sider a Way





and

,the Caribbean is to put

Inter-
con-
to’ keep Britain and
jto raise the standard of living in
capital

tin moné@y end goods into devel-
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18. | opment in those countries to
Admiral Arthur W. Radford,|create employment: to give more
Commander of the Pacific 4: et cue power.
said to-day the United States iE aN ? ?
Navy could throw a damaging|, “Then definitely out of the

blockade along the Chinese coast
if Chinese Reds moved into South
east Asia. Such a blockade he
forecast would be one of the most
effective in history and would cut





off the Chinese Communist Gov-
ernment entirely from its exter-
nal trade except with Russia
—U.P.
.

fruits of these developments wil







jcome all social services h
our friends in England
much about
Expansion of the ec
the British prritories



New
| deal
'well as tl
said Sealy

\World
to the

can mean a
people of Br

e of the West




equest to the Big Four for an;
all German Peate Treaty, A
step of this sort never

would be made by the Soviet Zone
satellite government without in-
structions from Moscow and West-
ern Officials both

here, and in

Bonn are pretty sure it would be

followed up shortly by a move
from the Russians themselves.
—U-P.

Quirino Seeks
Peace Treaty







this campaign] Organi

+ “rns ¢ r described as “encouraging” th
ar L ree aie ae ao, snow, Telephone lines were down | reported statement yesterday tha
Cc st-con-| cleare ra of heiag made by | ‘@2eughout the Italian Alps Egyptian Premier Aly Maher i
Se thes ay | cleared Britain eens i Switzerland basked in mid- wilting to “co-operate fully anc
ope Epepuen SUP erate under winter sun but temperature held wholeheartedly in the mainten
; Pasha that Britain had im- | ,elow freezing point ance of world peace through
jposed foreed labour on Egyptian The Seine River spilled over its}etrong and remodelled regiona
| vorkers in the Suez Canal Zone. |panks in the Fontainbleau area organization functioning withir
| The report was made by Raghuiath ‘Sunday. In most parts of the the trans. WoEk at tha Unite
jI'ao, Indian Assistant Director french capital the river now stands Nations charter,”
Ceneral of ILO, after six weeks on at a level of 12 feet while th« Maher's statement madé ins
the spot investigation. Rao re- danger point is 14 feet —UP. broadcast direct to the United] >}
ported that he found Egyptian veal States was taken to mean that}
sentment at British policy . and “ Egypt is ready to open negotia-{ %
ecurity measures in the Ganal| Navy Has New Plane anne soon for a revised version] *
Zone ; + 7 of the proposed Middle Eastert $
—U.P. NEW YORK, Feb. 18 Command %
A new swept-back-wing jet McDermott said he hoped “thi x
fighter capable of speeds ‘much was the case.” %
SWORN IN faster” than 600 miles per hour ; —UP. %
and superior to. Russian M.1.G':
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18. | now fiying in Korea are ‘being nears

| Gafsa and stocks of arms and am-





funeral service at the R.C. Cathe-



Woomera Rocket Range in the) (o a row of trees along the Puebl
ent Roman Catholic and = Wa4Ss/ munitions have been discovered in }dead heart of Central Australin highway two miles southeast o
inoted for ubstantial Catholic | the area, officials said today developed jointly at heavy cost by | here Sunday, killing seven pass-
Missionary work and charities in| Elyese Fraise, Editor of the} Britain and Australia.—U.P. engers and injuring 30 other
B.G ;newspaper French Women, |who ' Bolice took the bus driver into
} His funeral on Sunday after-| was fare eS by French authori- | airertien thc sicko after a renin
jnopn was attended by more than|ties last Friday and held under o . ie - seek: r
2,000 drawn from all sections of|surveillance in Tunis will. be Will Hold New | aide mob attempted to weneh, hiss
the community Interment at|brought before a Military Tri- ° 7 | Saas aoe ou
Lerepentir Cemetery followed the! bunal — UP. Atomic Tests | “Th aeveotia ata iil Satur-





dral, Bishop Weld and _ three WASHINGTON, Feb. 18 a ~ oo ee ere
sriests officiating. ’ > A new series of atomic test./#0d burned near p an no
I loods, Avalanches will be held at Eniwetok proving * here, U.P,
f grounds in the Pacific the), a ai
Â¥ y Still Threaten Defense Department and the yy POPOISOe PCPA IOO OOS
7 wo Generals Atomic Energy Commission
a W Europe f}innouneced jointly on Monday.
i‘ i ‘4 The announcement said that |
for President preparations for the tests are

ZURICH, Feb. 18.
HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania, Western Europe began digging

Feb, 18. |itself out today from two-week re-

The names of two Generals of ycord snows which crippled traffic
the Army were placed in the re-|@nd communications, Weather
publican preferential primary bal- | forecasters warned the “worst is
loting in Pennsylvania on Monday } yet to come” with expected thaws

already underway.

New tests it is understood will
be held sometime this spring. The
Defense Department said, the
tests will be carried out by Joint.
Task Foree 132 consisting of
A.E.C. personnel and membe

Ri









: of
Bdckers of Eisenhower and Mac Peco danger of floods and ‘he three servicer The Task
Arthur filed petitions shortly be- | “YAi@nenes. ae 2 Force is under the command of
fote the deadline, Each may with- rae pate - aths reported Maj Gen, Perey Clarkson
draw his name within one week th saat par nee brough Deputy Commander of Army
if he desires. A petition was also |» it Taree “ae to v eae has Forces in the Pacific The|
filed for Harold Stassen. —U.P. [an SeaGHy on Vienna since} announcement gave no detail:
Wed tor Harold Stasse ' Thursday a a cases AG
about the time or type of test |
Rail and road traffic from Aus —U.P
ria to Hungary and Czechoslo- Re
. . e T akia were paralyzed To th }
Britain Did Not outh Yugoslavia was coverec 7 2 99
F E ti with the thickest snowfall in NCOUTagZINgE
4g ye oy Ss century. ‘
ores 45) P ian in Italy an army of 2 ski troop WASHINGTON, Feb. 16
I. F rth of Udine were trying t State Department spokesma:
JONDON. Feb. 16. : jes Sta ep! rie D
The G3 tee released are- vreak paths to Trinco and Pra-|] Michael McDermott Monda

on
potniza cut off from civilization by





<<. Oe —-
Ce PSOE PEELE LAL AAPA LAPP EE TEA ALA APPP PSST ASG



Eric Janson, President of the| produced at the Grummon Air-
Motion Picture Association Of, eraft factory here for the navy



POISE













CLEAN — WHOLESOME



‘Lysander’ Here
On Carib Cruise

The American luxury yacht Lysander with a party of nine

cruise arrived in Barbados on
rt-au-Prinee, San Juan and St



Mr. Chauncly Stiliman, a banker of New York, has

Another two-mile ine formed | chartered the vacht for a Caribbean cruise and his guests
on th Vimpeuee madaae of | | are Mr. and Mrs, Thomas R. French, Mr. and Mrs, Joseph
see the | impressiv € oO } ‘ z a me ree iia as and
wreaths sent from all oven ing | Hamlen, Mr. and Mrs. Beatrice Gra ind Mrs. and Mrs,
globe for the funeral of Kin Geo. Wheiler,
azeorge VI. More than 200,000 : at w- WHE aiid eaten
persons saw wreaths on Saturday | lacking yacht was ted up in the
and Sunday | Careenage yesterday while its
The scene was floodlit last night |





admired the harbour and
5] rf 3ridgetown from the
i nfortable and “pacious aft
lounge
The. Lysander, whieh cost
$500,000 (U.S.)>is 192 tons, and
available charter for _ cruising
the Lakes, the Gulf, the
Caribbean, South América and
other ports of the world.
The ship’s party have no

treed to trouble about hotels and
meals when they reach port for
the yacht has a professional crew
of 12 te carry out helt wishes.
Completely air-conditioned,
Lusander accommodates-42. guests
luxurious ¢ nieack, The
ning salon and living — salon
have a ‘homely atmosphete”
about them and the aft lounge
ix furnished in modern livable
@eck chairs and lounges.

A Patrol Cutter

Lysander looks a new ship,
She was bullt in 1942 at Benton
Harbour, Michigan, as 4 patrol
cutter for the American Navy.
She was converted since the war
isto a buxury yacht

She contains six bedrooms,
neluding ohe large master bed-
reom and five double bedfooms

ith full, modern tiled bathe
ron There are separate quar-
ers for officers and crew, She is
esutifully furnished with. .vall
to wall carpeting in alf £6dms,
Her power comes from two 500
p. Diesel motors and electricity
; generated throughout by one
5 K.W. 110 volt Diesel genera-
r and one 30 K,W. 110 volt
iesel generator, She is equipped
ith a ship-to-shore telephone,
complete electrically equipped
galley amd a large capacity ice
making machine and two.walk-
i refrigerators. She is steam

heated,
Lysander’s oveyall sength is 136
et and she

feet, beam 24\4

fraws eight feet of water. Her

uising speed is 17 knots.

Captain John MeCallum,. who
noing

‘xperience and who i¢ an Anna-

has over 30 years sa
polis graduate carrying unlimited

t
i
6
t
J



licenses, said that tte -yacht’s
party expects to leave Batbados
on Wednesday for Martinique;

They have planned to make calls
it Antigua, San Juan and Tru-
{jillo before returning te Miamiy

In spite of bad weather every
day since they. left Miami, the
|parly has had an enjoyable
cruise down, They all thik. Bars
|bados a lovely place -and are
making the usual commé@hts about
Barbados rum. am

Lysander’s crew k her
| crupulousty clean, pol and
It seems a partoofr their
routine to use = scrub
} brushes, Even in the enginé room
‘one feels homely, =

PLLA LY

\ painted
| daily

CE

f.4,4,044.8 $464 ,6050,
iO bat - £6 ALEPPO LL PCOLEE EO POSS
PPPOE LALA EE BE PPEE LEA ARAL SHE

Â¥
New Record Set };
MANILA, Feb, 18 Ameri¢a was sworn in on Monday) The Navy announcement on Sun- %
President Quirino will ask the Chairman of the Point Four day said the plane is named the OSLO, Feb. 18 $ *
Senate ome time this week to] Prograffimes of the International “Cougar” and was much | fast rT Ha Brender 23-vear-old g 2
fy the Japanese Peace Treaty] Development Advisory Board.) than the “Panther ; Ane firs . ie Norwee lurmberjact on tt *
and a Mutual Defence Pact with|He succeeded Nelson Rockefeller | plane used by the Navy in combs Olympic 1 kilometre cross country] % 2
the United States, a Foreign Office —U-P. —U-P. | Ski race today in the record timc} & x
pokesmdn said to-day. Political of 1 hour, | minute, 34 co * z
observe suid the Mutual De- ‘ . 1 Brenden time bettered the if ; ; s :
fence pact was sure of ratification Olympie record of 1 hour ar 1G + . 1’ I E Q
ce = <"|Strike Stops Ford Plant (e's $ every Grain EDIBLE §
debate ove Japanese Peace} Lundstroem, a Swede at St. Moritz, | 3 c s = 6% ¢
Treats } WINDSOR, Ontario, Feb. 18 Switzerland in 1948, It was Bren-| ¥ NO PICKING REQUIRED. t
j The second strike in eleven weeks stopped Ford of Canada er thir O I } % 4 4 x
The Se ea < | embly lines today and 8,800 employees began picketing the | winte ime js >
art oh | plant in relays over a contract dispute. The strike was called | Simon Sladts on3 PRICE 60¢. Package s
i t m Nae wt aintst Canada’s largest notive arm by the United A t ’ oaseu! @ =
f € I i € j Workers’ Union after mont! g talks organized by Onta ( he an npt j % 1 GEDDES GRANT LTD.—Agents. %
gati Frar “| sour Minister, Charles Dé iled. WNegotiat betv een the and ¢ es aa iad - 28a 1% >
I € . | any and the Union and Daley broke off half an hour ae eer ee =P; yy 6 LOCOCO OOOO OSS
—UP, | ike started at 10 p.r - PLA



PAGE TWO



>
t

N RAH
Manager «
Capt
bartan

JOH



M'
panied by
Capt. F.
Captains of B.W.1.A
Trinidad by 5B.W.1A.
week-end after payi
husiness visi; here.
Holiday with Daughter

R. NOEL ARMSTRONG, for-

mer Colonial Postmaster ac-
companied by Mrs. Armstrong
plan to fly to St, Lucia to-day to
spend about two weeks’ holiday
with their daughter.

Three Months

R. AND MRS. TYRWHITT

GILI and family who have
been holidaying in Barbados for
the past three months are due to
return to Trinidad to-day. Mr
Gill who is a Barbadian is with
T.P.D. oilfields in Palo Seco

St. Kitts and Antigua
asian AND WIRELto» Divis-
ional Manager Mr. H. L, N.
Ascough returned over the week-
end from,a short visit to St. Kitts
und Antigua.
Mr. Ascough
February 13.

Holiday Over

ISS MARION WESTCOTT

of Antigua who had been
holidaying here since the middle
of January returned to Antigua
on Sunday morning by B.W.1.A.
During her stay in Barbados she
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs
C. S. Warren of “Wyndal”, Hast-
ings.

Miss Westcott’s father owns

cotton estate in Antigua.

U.S. Trip
t. GORDON KINCH, son of

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Kinch of

ie Stream returned on Sunday

evening from a visit to the U.S.
via Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. Be-
fore his U.S. trip Gordon had been
working in Venezuela. jt is un-
derstood that he may be return-
ing there shortly.

Wecek-end Departures
R. LUIS DE LIM:
M . LUIS DE LIMA

panied



Seni

left Barbados on

"A

4v

om-

by his mother

re-

turned to Trinidad over the week-
end by B.W.LA. They had been
here on a short visit

de Lir



Mr a is Managing Di-
rector of Messrs Y. de Lima and
Co., Ltd., Port-of-Spain, San Fer-

nando and Barbados.

BY THE

EADING of a young writer
whose overcoat pockets

“are usually stuffed with poems”
I thought cf Rivarol who,
noticing 4 manuscript sticking
out of the poet Florian’s pocket,



Jack Turbot is not
coming, after all

said, “If one didn’t know you, one
would be inclined to rob you.”
The Ping-Pong gang
R. PETER WILSON’S recent
revelations of what goes on
in the Ping-Pong world will
probably make a number of
players throw down their piffling
little implements in a tantrum
The man who confused -his
ppponent by a system of mirrors
let into his bat was once drawn
against Eric Hopthorne of Sur-
biton, Hopthorne was renowned
for his back-breaks, which he
managed very simply by attach-
ing thin elastie to the ball when
he was serving, Nobody could
ever take his serve. But when
he was playing this mirrorman,
the elastic broke, and the
chagrined Hopthorne thought he
saw two balls coming back at
him. He lashed out, and there
we

CROSSWORD



Across
Taste of the public
Degree of maturity.

(5)

(@)
Land (6)
Make this go for a dog. (3) }
Dependent on a big freeze. (7) /
Eyelid Hicker when in wing. (3)
Cloak. (6)
Arboreal understanding. (4)
Verses about a pole? (5)
in @ way. it’s smart. (5)
Start of a wedding. (4)
Pear|'s maternal relation. (6) }
Part of a wind instrument. (4))
A letter from 23. (3) !
Th 45)
Down
It makes us care. (6)
Retinue. (5)
Aamits you to a 2,
Calculate. (G6)
Uvemployed lied. (4)
Part of the lot. (6)
Poliow. (5)
County place that
Well sung; or the bill? (7)
Strength. (5)
The hart family. (4)
Some spinner. (4)
Gentle upward curving bend in
timber. (3)
Frequently appited to Macadam
(not John of course). (3)
Square measure in France. (3)
Solution of Saturday's puzzle, — Across
Mock: 4, Sees; 6, Operation, 9. One
© Ream, 12, Nut: 15. Tow: 14 Trunk
‘Reicentitvi: 17. Air(mani 19
nk: he Yellow: 25 Note: 24 Grid
: 26 Remote Down: 1. Moun-
entury; 5. Bark: 4, Stencil
5. Snow: 7, Pour; 8, Reindeer: 11, Monk
1$ Tenors 16. Trade: 18, Idol; 21. Lie
\22, Wit.

© way over.
(8)

ve ti. (7)

a.

Se cn

RAYON SUITING
STRIPES ......
PLAIN SHAD

WOOLLEN TROF

WY Re Slisushics

COLOURED
MEN’S BUCKLE
JOHN WHITE SH

1. B®

Dial 4220



ae



GENTLEMEN !

YOU'LL BE SURE TO LOOK SMART IN THESE

GENTS “RENOWN” SHIRTS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By NEVILLE CONNELL

TO-DAY, Madame Fela de Kuh’s
annual exhibition of watercolours,
drawings and sculpture opens at




Back from Trinidad



ARTIE’S HEADLINE Of aged RNING ee frinidad The Pavilion, Hastings, for two
i Fee ene enn ong a age weeks from 104.28. los DM.

= t been on a short visi, -3 â„¢!; cluding Sundays. This exhibition

Als : Cheape of “Carlton,” i. shown in furnished rooms, which

has a great advantage over exhibi-
tions held in art galleries, since

To Join Husband

RRIVING from St, Kitts on the artwork is seen in the sur-
ZX Saturday by B.W.1LA. was roundings to which it belongs.
Mrs Ralph Maloney who has Madame de Kuh is a lover of
come over to join her husband

old buildings and trees, and her
affection for these is strongly re-
flected in her work. Through her
eyes we wander along the narrow
lanes adjoining Bay Street, or,
loiter at corners of Bridgetown.
Seldom does the motorist or pedes-
trian pause to glance at the very
individual charm of such places.
Unfortunately there is no Council
or Society for the preservation of
ancient buildings to purchase for
the island Madame de Kuh's
watercolours of buildings and
corners of the town that are no
more. Indeed, she should be em-
ployed to record Barbados in the
same manner that artists have
been commissioned to record Brit-

hoe is Chemist at Haymans Fec-
St. Peter, She was accom-

panied by their two children.

Maude and Maude
A/SISS MAUDE COX, retired
LV matron ef the Prison left
the U.S., on Sunday via Puerto
Rico by B.W.LA, to spend a holi-
day. During her stay there she
will be the guest of her God-
daughter Miss Elaine Forde of
New York City.

Leaving by the same wlane ws
Adjutant Maude Phillips of the
Salvation Army who has gone to
the U.S. to reside.

r

for

“ Here’s your tea and
paper. sir.

Short Holiday

R. AND MRS. REX GILL For Sister’s Wedding ain, For, the face of this island 1s
M flew to Grenada on Satur- , RS. CURTIS HIVE, daugh- rapidly changing as the result of
day ‘by B.W.1.A., to spend a short ter of Mr. and Mrs. Victor indiscriminate building, as yet no
holiday in that colony. Chase of “Alpha” Hastings, ac- legislation exists to control such or

companied by her .son arrived the destruction of buildings of

For Carnival
CELENA GRIFFITH

character. The walls of a few old
sugar-mills survive, but their num-
ber is rapidly dwindling. Before i

from Trinidad on Sunday evening
by B.W.L.A. to be Matron of Hon-

of our at her sister Faye’s wedding.

KS.

Four Hill, St. Peter, left for Baye is to be married early next is too late, some record for the
Trinidad on Sunday by B.W.1A- nonth to Mr. Guy Massel 3 ie benefit of posterity should be pre-
to attend the Carnival. She waS pome is in France. Guy is at Pared. Indeed, the beautiful paint-
mecompanied by her niece, Miss present in the W.I. and will be ing of the large Evergreen tree
Daisy Cyrus of Lascelles Planta~ 2 -riving here a few days before (No. 21), which formerly stood
tion, St. James. the event. near the Christian Science Church,

Mrs. Griffith and Miss Cyrus should be purchased by that

hope to be away for two week

On Honeymoon
NTRANSIT through Barbados
on Sunday by B.W.LA., were

Mr. and Mrs, Harry Bryden who
were on their way to Antigua to
spend their honeymoon. They
were married in Trinidad on Sat-

Church as a penetential act for the
cutting down of a noble landmark.

Of the watercolours exhibited
“Low Tide, Hastings (No. 4), shows
a skilful colour arrangement in the

radation of its tones. The deep
violet horizon merges into a series

Arriving To-niorrew

R. C. E. TUDOR, Senior An-
aesthetist, Dulwich Hospital,
London, is due to arrive from
England tomorrow by the Colom-

a holiday with his Urday. Mr. Bryden is the son of of lightening tones until the pale,
bie to spend a holiday with hi MY. and bern WW. Beyeen . of ian ae

parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Tudor
of “Edithville’, Pine Road.

Continuing W.I. Holiday
LOUISE PAYNE, a Bar-

Trinidad and a nephew of Mr. A.
S.,Bryden of Barbados.

His wife is the former Valerie
Knowles daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Errol Knowles of Trinidad and a

tones deepen to the dark fore-
ground, from which rises the
gnarled roots and tortured trunk
of a sea-grape tree. This carries

RS. the eye upwards in diminishing



badian resident in New former B.W.LA. hostess. tone values to the focal point of
York who has been holidaying . * the picture and the sky. Such care-
Barbados, ieft for Trinidad on Talking Point ful planning and harmonious col-
Sunday for two weeks. She wili our must be successful. A painting

then spend a week in British Gui- The art of life is to keep down
ana, returning to Barbados before acquaintances.
Bhe leaves for the US.

with a well thought out pattern is
No. 16 of tree roots, whose snake-
like convolutions form an interest-
ing, if slightly sinister, study.

—E. V. Lucas.

W AY sees. By Beachcomber

There are many new aspects of
Bridgetown: the Olympic Cinema
and Palmetto Square (No. 19) is
especially colourful. It is a pleas-






was a tinkle of broken glass, as English to such creatures they ure to see buildings depicted which
the ball met the trick-bat. The Stare at you as though you were really grow out of the earth and
napped elastic was picked up 2 Ballyshannon heifer with am do not merely rest on its surface
y an interfering c nd both eight-foot tail, or had eyes look- as these often do in the work of
men were kicked out of the ing seven ways to Sunday, like less skilled draughtsmen. The
Senior Ping-Pong Club the apple-woman of Calatayud. watercolours of Probyn Street are

4 The lady should have said: “Unit delightfully gay, with "buses, huck-
The Lots Road Burgee of what?” And pat would have sters and their wares enlivening
still flutters come the answer: “Personnel.” the scene. And, although my eyes

She's the fastest hooker
Between Galway and Kinsale, . .
HHUS chanted Mrs, Wither-
sedge, as she sat on a bat~ | terday an overall scheme by
tered bucket amidships. To re- Which — local associations, under
porters she said; “Cal] me Fanny the directive organisation of a
Carlsen, for "ere I stay on’ this CeMtral board, would — concert
scrap-’eap until someone tows Measures for incorporating the
‘er to the Knackers’ Yard, The Committees set yp by the local, nd it’s a beautiful brown color,”
sea must he in me blood, and if @88ociations in branch councils) said Willy Toad to Knarf and
this old junk-shop ’ad been round Gependent on the central authori-| Hanid, the shadow-children with the
and round the ‘Orn for years tY as its executive, functioning as! turned-about names, “I found it;
without stoppin’, she couldn't S€parate units under the control| While | was walking along the side
be a more ‘orrible sight than Of semi-independent bodies, rele! of the road, not far from the school.
what you be’old. Oh, well, tive to the network of supplemen-y !’m sure it must be very valuable.”
spring's comin’, and there’s still tary advisory teams acting in aj _Hanid said: “! wonder what it is.
room aboard for a few birds to temporary capacity, independent] Willy. Would you let us take a look

build their nests. Last year our of the setting-up of the interim| at it?”

cat Nelson slep’ in the Hadmir- working committees envisaged in| “I'm sitting on it,” said Willy
al’s spare ‘at, which is more’n the schedules prepared by a full-] “The magpies steal everything. |
you could say for some craft I time panel selected from the} They’d be sure to steal this thing,
could name. ha authorities, Asked to ery because it's so pretty
‘ what all this rgferred, Suet said) and so valuable), the moment the
In passing it would not te in the national] laid their eyes on it. So I’m sitting
i CLERGYMAN is encourag- interest to embark on an ex-{ on it.” |
i ing people to interrupt his planation, Knarf looked around. “I don’t see |
sermons when they disagree any magpies now, Willy. I’m quite
with what he is saying, and he sure you can let us see it without

Or so it seems :

By MAX TRELL



Don't you believe it!

was delighted when 4 dozen WE anyone stealing it away.” }
men and Women “talked back at 4 ever watchful L.C.C, re- 1

him” one Sunday, If there is cently banned an 18-ft. wenese or Soe |
room in his pulpit for a question- python from the stage of a pic- At this, Willy hopped olf the toad-
master, and a few

theologians ture-theatre, stool on which he was sitting and |
Knarf and Hanid saw that the val-

uable thing Willy was hiding was 4,

i Shortly afterwards
a Rumanian who had escaped from
a Bucharest presented himself at

like Mr. Beverley Nichols, the
whole thing ought to go with
swing.

headquarters, carrying a cricket Pe Well a Will el
pe bat and wearing a gay cap, “I well” exclaimed Willy glee-
SEE that Oo gay want fully,” isn't it wonderful? 1 don't



a woman who wos to be a professional cricketer,” he

called a “unit” by some little said. A few well-chosen questions

piece of official dross or other proved that he had confused the

considered that she had been in- L.C.C. with the M.C.C, They ther eh"

sulted, So she had. asked hain if he would like tof Neither Knarf nor Hanid wanted
This gadget, this parcel of trash, buy the python. “No,” he said,| ‘® disappoint Willy so Hanid said: |

suppose there are many of these
around, Must be worth a great deal,

|



was probably a Captain in the “I’m not as hungry as all that,” “Yes, it’s pretty valuable Willy. It’s |
Jargoneers, the dashing little “One man’s meat.” vouchsafed an| “alled a penny.”

cavalry of the bureaucrats, and official, “is another man’s pythpn.”| “Penny! Whata beautiful name!”

nobody should be too hard on him “Not necessarily,” said the “It's the same as one cent,” said |

if he has forgotten how to speak Rumanian, “Oh, well,” concluded] Knarf.

English, In fact, if you talk plain the official lamely, “Ah,” cried Willy, “it’s even got |

7 (wo names! Really must be valuable. |

Re - What can | buy with it?” he asked,

: . the next moment,” |

per t and the Pine Ogre—31 “You can Suy a tollypop,” said!

Knarf.

“I don’t care much for lollypops,”
said Willy. “What else can you
buy?”

“You could buy a postage stamp?” |
said Hania.

“Postage stamp?” repeated Willy

‘What can | do with a postage
stamp?”




ad




R uper

bewildered ar the |

“Let me see, it had

Rup ws, 1 - . had just
mystery of che mies ot bark. Are stopped —_raining,"” says Rupert
you quite sure there was a message Paulin *

te : e smiles, n

on this asks Pauline as she takes ee) eer
“Ot course, | am,"

: the words are written in some kind

says the of invisible ink that only sh
is ‘ e , OWS
little bear. Then she asks a curi- when it is wet,” she Uaderes
ous question, What sort of - ‘Now the bark is dry and x's
weather was it when you ftoeund = vanished "’ 3














s eur

Ba att ciliates aati $3.39 — $3.72
Bh rey ssccas “$4.18 — $4.37
ICALR SAD iia $6.66, $6.72, $7.00, $7.41
Ritson Sanitcunupauien esse $4.50 — $5.23
ii dae cuscddr deta eee sun $5.20, $5.57, $5.94
SHOES se emilatcs a 12.09
OES IN BROWN & BLACK. $10.64 — $11.19

VANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606



HARLIE SUET outlined yes- Willy Toad Found

“IT’S round, it has pictures on it,





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 195



THIS pencil drawing of Prince
Johannes Liechtenstein is among
Mrs. Fela De Kuh’s exhibition
which opens at her home, The
Pavilion, today.





sn. mesiaves seibigenn a onnaiianaee 0 a eacetienrate se ty a t-te nin oF

2 sae eee

This year there are fewer heads.
One of Mr. Lionel Gittens (No. 6)
reveals the artist’s power as a
sculptor, for the pencil drawing
betrays her interest in the bone
structure of the head. The likeness

are not always receptive to the is excellent. In her colour drawings

same colours and values as Mad-
ame de Kuh’s, I can always appre-
ciate her well blended mediey of
eolour and her charming pattern-
ing (No. 8) Busby’s Alley (No. 42)
is well arranged and the faded
green shutters above the busy
scene are bathed in golden sun-
shine.

Two watercolours are of unusual
interest. The old wall near the
Drill Hall (No. 11) has a lovely de-
sign and is more impressionistic
than the artist’s usual Style,
but an even more_ impres-
sionistic scene is one of a tree
backed by shrubs of . varying
tints. Madame de Kuh told me
that this scene had been described
to her by a pupil from Guadeloupe,
she had painted it during the de-
seription and the result certainly
justifies the experiment.



a Penny

—But He Didn't Know What It Was—



Willy found a penny lying by
the road.

anid said Willy could write a
lotter and send it with a postage
siamp.

“H’mmm,” said Willy. “Toads like
me don’t write letters.

Knarf and Hanid told Willy that
with his penny he could buy mar
bles, a little rubber ball, a button, a
pencil, some chalk, a bun, a nut. a
piece of string, a pin and a gumdrop.
Willy shook his head. “I don’t care!
for any of those things, thank you.
What 1 want to know is, how many
flics can I buy with this penny ?”

"anid said: “You can't buy any,
Wily.”

Willy sighed deeply. “I guess,’ he
suid sadly, “this penny isn't as val-
vable as | thought it. was. | don't
think I’ keep it any more. In fact,
it's rather uncomfortable to sit on.
I think I'll let the magpies take it.”

But Knarf said that wasn’t the
richt thing to do. ‘Put tt baek where
you found it, Willy. Perhaps the
boy or girl who lost it ner the
school, will find it again.”

So Willy said that was a good
idea and took the penny back to the

| side of the road und left it just in

the spot where he found it.
penny's no good,” he sail, “it
“it buy vou what you want mx



ELIZABETH R.—THE FIRST
_ COURT CIRCULAR COMES OUT



CLARENCE HOUSR.
ST JAMESS

|



of heads Madame de Kuh has been
successful, especially in the high-
lights where she has employed
blue. There is a picaresque study
cf a musician, where one can
almost sense the languid melody of
his guitar from the ennui of his
pose (No. 13).

Few artists can weild a pencil
with the skill that is Madame de
Kuh’s. Her drawings of the
Careenage (No, 39), and of coco-
nut palms (Nos. 1 & 26) have a
“slick” brilliancy that only comes
after years of hard work. One can
see in these drawings the colours
of which their objects are com-
posed, so well are the tones ar-
ranged.

B.B.C. Radio

Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,
11.15 a.m, Appointment with
11.30 a.m. Walter Gieseking,
The News, 12.10 p.m
4.00-—7.15



1952
Music,
12 (noon)
News Analysis
25.38M 31.32M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m, Marching and Waltz-
ing, 5 p.m, Take it from Here, 5.30 p.m

Composer of the Week, 5.45 p.m
Children Singing. 6 p.m Personal
Tortrait, 6.15 p.m Welsh Magazine,
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-

gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.16
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Rendez-
vous w‘th Commonwealth Artists.

7.45—10.30 p.m, 31.32M 48.43M



A Talk, 8 p.m. The Story
Teller, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30
p.m. Report from Britain, 9 p.m. Meet
the Commonyealth, 9.30 p.m. Ray's a
Laugh, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
Fiom the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Moray
10.30 p.m. From the

7.45 p.m

Mclaren Talking,
London Theatre

GEOBE
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
AL ev A” Double—

gWs TP












DIGK POWELL

TE

ile eT ts

Color by TECHNICOLOR

OPENING TO-MORROW, 5 and

8 30.
iTS AMERICA'S

Big Date Thy








ee BETTY

GRABLE

MACDONALD

CAREY

acai
>. “Sree
weiss RORY CALHOUN + EDDIE ALBERT





|N.B-~Week end Films start on

Wednesdays.



Madame De Kuh’s Exhibition | ssvos: ueo-

WIFE-MANIA

WOMEN are afflicted with
seores of irritating mental quirks
which are not listed in medieal
Looks but are only too well known
n the home, harassed husbands
complained.

More than 500 of these cour-
ageous men have sent in signed
reports describing their wives’
mental maladjustments, in re-
sponse to my invitation on this
page last week.

So that all women can di-
agnose their domestic disorders
—and do something about them
—I list the dozen most prevalent
feminine foibles;—

Hearthritis

An ailment which stiffens the
jeints and holds its victim to
within three feet of a fireplace.
Very pronounced when the sink
is full of dishes,

Clockjaw

A pernicious amnesia relating
to the correct time, especially
when the husband is in a hurry.
Manifestations are cries of “I'll
only be a minute,” and “I’m
nearly ready!”

Paralysis Gadgetans

A symptom complex which has
arisen in recent years, charac-
terised by a complete inertia
when faced with household
chores, unless these can be per-
formed by electric washing
machines, plate driers, wringers,
and other similar gadgets.

I award the guinea prize to
Mr. Leonard Tilley, of Rydalroad,
Ribbleton, near Preston, for Par-
alysis gadgetans”.

‘Claws-Trophobia

A morbid dread of doing any
work that might ruin her nails.
Altellerfobia
The woman who says to the
shopkeeper “Alteller” instead of
admitting that the article is too

expensive.

Nostrumania

A relentless urge to dose
members of her household with
remedies she would not dream
of trying on herself.

Cushionitis

A mania inducing the house-
wife to rush round rooms, per-
petually pummelling cushions
into monstrous shapes resem-
bling highly inflated balloons.

Whiffsomania

A woman’s disease affecting
husbands who have to spend half
the night looking for leaking
gaspipes and “something burn-
ing.”



TODAY 4.45 « 8.30 P.
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE

Ruth Richard Zachary Mercedes
ROMAN TODD SCOTT McCAMBRIDGE

Wed. (only 4.30 & 8

UNDER CAPRICORN”

INGRID BERGMAN &

urs. (only) 4,30 8.30 p.m.
“TREASURE ISLAND"
(Color By Technicolor)





"30 p.m.

Méephistophelitis

The
already

compulsion
blazing fire.

Oddheapus Complex

subconscious love of con-

to poke an

A
fusion

Horologophobia

The sufferer insists upon having
all clocks several minutes fast
and then incessantly inquires the
correct time.

Morbid Infantilitis

An irresistible urge to peer
into every pram,
” * .

A LONE woman intruded into
this all-male competition with

this alleged masculine maladjust-
ment:—

General Paralysis
of the Iinane

The patient shows a marked
allergy to the sound of dishes
rattling in the sink, exhibiting
such a lethargy that he is barely
able to prop his feet up On the
mantelpiece. '

This is a scandalous exaggera~
tion in my view. But if women
really believe that men are
afflicted with equally irritating
habits, I am willing to consider
any reports and pay a guinea for
the best one submitted on a
postcard by the first OF oe

SHE WAS A ‘BALL
OF FIRE’

By R. M. MACCOLL

WASHINGTON

I use the term “ball of fire”
with no slightest thought of dis-
respect in writing of Miss Anne
Morgan, sister of the fabulous
banker, J.P. who has just died at
Mount Kisko, New York, aged 78

I came across Miss Morgan sev-
ral times in France at the Sart
of the last war.

A woman of electric sparkling
energy, she was wearing the uni-
form of the American Relief For
France organisation. Her black
eyebrews contrasted with her
white hair, topped off by a felt
hat worn at rather a rakish an-
gle. {

But this was only one of some
50 philanthropic enterprises with
vhich she was associated during
her busy lifetime.

Once she told a women’s gath-
ering in New York: “I never had
any creative ability—just a trudg-
ing capacity.”



M,





B'town

P

L
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WAYNE MORRIS

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Bomba, The Jungle Bov



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“THE SET UP" Robert RYAN Tex RITTER fi 2310
OISTIN

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Robert MITCHUM in
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THE SET UP”
Robert RYAN

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Thurs, (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
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Lili PALMER &
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Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY













To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m
“ROCKY" Roddy McDowall &

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Thurs, (only) 8.3 p.m,
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Eric PORTMAN &
“SNOW BOUND”
Robert NEWTON











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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,



JAMAICA NEWSLETTER

J’ca Hard

1952

Currency

Imports Increased





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GENERAL LEAVES FOR MALAYA



Leeward Is.
Methodist —
Synod

THREE

PAGE









Always active at that age—but they are
using up : ~“rgy.

Give them SevenSeaS to make

= THE Synod of the Leeward sure they don’t outgrow their
From Our Own Correspondent Islands District of the Methadist strength
KINGSTON Feb. 14 Church has just completed jts | L
3 ; ‘ . » meetings in St. John’s Antigua. ii i i
Jamaica’s dollar programme for essential supplies from hard The Synod is composed of ali | This pure rich cod liver

currency areas for 1952 has now been approved by the

Secretary of State for the Colonies

For this year the island

will be allowed a ceiling for imports of $26,000,000 U.S.
This figure is just slightly above the 1951 dollar programme

ministers and representative lay-
men in the District which stretches
trom the Virgin Islands in the

North to Dominica and Curacao
nd Aruba in the South.








oil supplies in concen-
trated form the natural
fats and vitamins that
youngsters need to keep

and represents a substantial cut in the programme as ! 1s Excellency The Governor of | them well — now and
originally submitted. the Leeward Islands, Mr. K, W later in life
However, this will not affect the facturers’ Associtition and repre~- Blackburne, weleomed the Synod :

additional dollar allocation under
the U.S. tokeri imposts scheme for
this year, which might be = in-
creased frem $1,250,000 to $1,400,-
000.

sentatives of primary producers
organisations concerning the ex-
port of their crops to Britain.

On leaving Jamaica Mr. Canip-
bell will visit Trinidad and Brit-

to the island at the great meeting
on the first night of the meetings
of the Synod.’ In his speech His
Excellency referred to the great
part that Antigua had played in
the history of Methodism in the



ish Guiana before returning to Wes A NATURAL SEA-FRESH VITAMIN FOOD
The Jamuica Government had Pondon. ‘ 3 est scion for it was here that
put forward an increase! alloca- ‘ * aoe oy Methodist society was |
tion for the 1952 dollar imports The Legislative Council of 9 p> Meg 1760. He stressed too | even ea
programme because of the effects Jamaica has accepted the prin- Gauze *t part the Methodist

of the hurricane and the demand
for dollar goods arising as a result
of it; also because of general in-
creases in prices and the fact that
certain essential goods had been
placed under open general licence.

ciple of unification of public ser-
vices in the British Caribbean as
e half-way mark to the federal-
isation of the services under a
Federal Goyernment,

The Jamaica official and nom-



GENERAL SIR GERALD TEMPLER (left), new High Commissioner for Malaya, with his deputy
Mr. D. C. MacGi}livray, pictured at London Airport before leaving to take up their posts

had played in the devel-|
*pment of the Colony in hot only |
the spiritual field but also in the
temporal field, such as in edyca-
‘ion. In the historic past the Gov- |
ernment had often opposed the
work of the Church, but now His

LIQUID in bottles of 6, 8 or 16 fluid om,
CAPSULBS in tubes containing from 2§.



A Bolivar Society, commemo- inated House, however, added a seen off by Lady Templer and Sir Gerald’s 18-year-old daughter Jane.-EXPRESS bone stig Excellency pledged himself to Bf any Aifculty in odsaining, waite 40 «+0
rating the life of Simon Bolivar, recommendation that all public Suppert all the good work of the!
liberator of the Americans, may services should be unified one Church, |
s00n be founded in Jamaica. Plans not just the eight services slated ~~ Fe ee ee ae eis oem, ee eae ok ee a ee ee Oe District Ministers i
for the Society are now being for Unification under the recom- The following are the stations STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS.
worked out by Dr. German C. mendations of the Holmes Com- sof the ministers in the District for |
Navarro, Venezuelan Consul, and 'â„¢ission which studied the matter. Rev Thom: , the next year: Bhs 8 Tea ame era Ss Er | aly
* as

a number of prominent Jamaicans.

Previously, the Jamaica House

Fresh Approach To

Antigua: Rey. J, Davison, Rev.

of Representatives had accepted K, Derham (St. John’s), Rey. J./
Recently, Dr. Navarro present- unification in principle. O ° Gumbs (Freetown). Dominica: | a
ed gifts of the works of Bolivar r¢ laine Rev. W. J. Barrett (Roseau), Rey,

to His Excellency the Governor,

Malayan

Problem



A. Williams (Marigot). Montser- |







Sir Hugh Foot, K.C.MG., the . 5 g 5 From Our Owr : rat; Rev, E. J. Gazzard (Ply-
; : , Mr. Douglas Manley, son of wn Corre lent ; y
University College of the West Mr. Norman Manley, K.C., leader ST. GEORGE'S: Feb.13 7 Saha = aka _A. Roberts
Indies and the Institute of Ja- of the People’s National Party, SINGAPORE _A large congregation at the St. fillies weed its: Rey. E, M. @
maica and-other organisations and hag joined the staff of the, Uni- Mr. D ld Ch : a sepsis ots George’s Methodist Church last ‘py er (Basseterre), Rev, N.
leading persons in the literary life yersity of Liverpool. _ Mr. Donald Charles MacGillivray, formerly Colonial Monday night witnessed the Chricht ona Point), Rev. H. 1. |
of the island. Mr. Manley has been specialis- | Secretary, Jamaica, has arrived in Malaya to take up his Ordination of Revd, Maxwell Rey HH BroWn (Chusieaay ;
There are Bolivar Societies in ing in psychology and will be new appointment as deputy to Gen. Sir Gerald Templer, aren Ernest Thomas, 30, tO Revs. W. Sunter and L. T. Byron, | -
the Latin Americas, Trinidad. concerned with research in race the new High Commissioner in the Federation of Malaya. *"Y, ovnodist Ministry. Supernumeraries St, Bustatius?
Barbados and other West Indian relations in Great Britain par- He was selected for the post be- best possible qualification for suc- fi al nent the Syned held its Rey. K. G. Swanston, St. Martin:
islands, it is stated here, and it ticularly as it affects the Negro cause he was considered “a man cess in Malaya ted public session which was Rev. C. L. Carty (Phillipsburg) yVOSC
is felt that Jamaica should have a in Liverpool, where there is on€ who will bring a fresh mind to P G on by His Excellency the Rey. J. E. Perkins (Marigot), Rev.
branch of society, cspecially in of the largest coloured popula- bear on the many complexities o “We've had our fill of legacies GQVernor and Lady Arundell. C. Mel. Darre prary &
3 \ } i : ) I ies of : g Revd. Griff . ; ll, Supernumerary.
view of the Bolivar’s historical tions in the United Kingdom, His the present administrative ma- from Palestine,” said one Malayan a sriffin presided and the Anguilla: Rev. D. 0, Henry. Vir- | we”
connection with the island. particular angle is the psycholog- chine” ig Malaya. In announcing councillor, while another said that speakers were Revds. Bernard gin Islands: Rev, L. Race (Road|
Bolivar was in Jamaica from ical adjustment in the s0cial his appointment, Mr. Oliver Lyt- Mr. MacGillivray would start his Crosby and V. A. Comissiong. Town, Tortola). St, Thomas: Rey
May to December in the year pattern. telton, Secretary of State for the new task with all the disadvant- Reports were also read by Revd. R, Warner Aruba: Rev, J.
1815, ‘ ‘ a Colonies asked him to leave for 2ges of a man from Palestine. The Mr. Mural and Sister Marjorie Thompson, Curacao: Rev. BE. H.
The gift of a copra factory has Malaya immediately. Mr. MacGi]- newly-appointed Commissioner of Watson fhomas A . .
: . been made to the Government livray arrived in Singapore three Police in Malaya is also a former The Rev. J. Davison is visiting : Ika-Seltzer’s effective pain-
of Jamaica by Mr. W. Garfield years after his appointment was Palestine official, as was the late In addition to the Svned an- {reland and the Rev. R. A. Kirt- reliever starts to work at once to bring * lo]
rhe, International Bank iS Weston, Canadian financier for announced. Sir Henry Gurney, High Commis- nounzement of nomination of jey will act as Chairman of the you welcome relief ...and its effervescence Selo
sending a team of industrial ex- the benefit of the coconut indus- », r sioner for Malaya until his assas- Revd. J. B. Broomes as successor istrict at St. John's until he re- helps speed that relief. It’s simple as “one MOS
perts to survey the economic iN= try of the island. : ut the appointment has sination by Communists last year. to Revd. Mr. Griffin as Chairman turns in the Autumn, two, three’! One—drop one or two Alka iN of ,
dustrial potential of Jamaica. The ~° brought a storm of protest in , aa oe aoee sols of the District, news was also The Synod expressed its con- Seltzer tablets into a glass of water. Watch ao een
team will arrive here from Wash- Government has accepted the Malaya, where the hope had been . Mr. Mac MLV ERY Wwoose sa’ary released of the appointment of cern at the growgh of the liquor how fast it fizzes and dissolves! Tw ‘
ington on March 1. offer and hag requested the Coco- &Xpressed that an officer with local in Jamaica was £ 2,200, will nO Revd. David Mitchell to the Bed- trade in the islands. In some drink it down. You'll like wie ca S t a
At the same time the Govern- nut Industry Board to take over ine ont hae Mecie A eee er ot pings Aye. TE, ford Church, British Guiara. islands the nurober of iiauor ahobe set Hen wi basal isd pleases ee /
ment here has secured the service the peration of the factory situ has been in the Colonial Service When appointed to his new post huge ’ 7 sre far too many to be in reason feel better! Don't let a Headache “dig in Wf 94
of Messrs, A, D. Little, Inc., a form atea at Boundbrook, Portland. ; ‘ paar dail aon Mr. Maurice B. Browne, Dis- able relationship to the population, : Wee 2, |
Z ‘ft. A , , : ; since 1929 < has ser a and was asked to leave for Malaya , | : ; , ; iS take famous Alka-Seltze 1 ray! ||
z h . = e and has served in many . saa ede We : . > Ann, zer r&ht away! \\\
of internationally famous indus- Value of the gift—lands, build IS ‘e “in view of the urgency of ‘ict Officer, St. Vincent Grena It is hoped that Methodist mem W\yoxs
; te aes a , gs ¢ ‘hinery—-is estimated Parts of the world, has no experi- at once “in view of the urgency Of Ginn. a . . bers will realise the dancer of Keep a supply on hand. \ A/a
trial advisers, for a period of 10 ing: and machinery—is estimate shee at all of Malayan problems filling the appointment without ines, was on a short visit to the bers Wi realise he dang . Wii's 4
v P J - ey g a alay s. . € ; . , mes . “ et ¥ i a ye ¢ : on
months in the first instance, and at $150,000¢W.1.) Under the headline “Man from delay.” His post as Deputy High Colony last week to consult with slrong drink and give @ lead in Famous Alka-Seltzer helps millions, HS
has invited a team of industrial Jamaica Chosen,” the Singapore Commissioner will be for the dura- Persons here on ways and means Merabors ae the Synod took the Let it h ou t TaN We }
experts and industrialists from newspaper “Straits Times” com- tion of the emergency only, 7 improving the salt industry in anne 7 eiptag sem De elp you ‘00, (x assy \|— Uy \
Great Britain to recommend de- Dr. T. W. J. Taylor, C.B.E, mented: “This appointment must —B.U.P. fa ; southern ee eee mt Methodism in the West Tubes of 18 anf 90 pehbae ph a IY
tails of an industrial policy for the Principal of the University Col- cause uneasiness, It was unneces- Tatehetohdete ana Sits Gun ure Indies, English Harbour and Bie pad
island. lege of the West Indies, hag been sary because there was a suitable 4 S ang ip tour= wathaniel Gilbert’s | » All th
soa dy “ naments, as ¢ aver for St, Nathaniel Gilbert’s house. e
Against this background of in- 2PP°inted a member of the Fub- Deputy piready on the spot, And oye Mitkent, bar se a ae men have now returned to their
gainst this | 8 OF 4D tic Service. Commission newly it seems to us an unfortunate ap- ah ; Ss vibiaide ah dat any o'@ own islands having been refreshed
d al pla zy the Jamaica ; ute ndatis ‘ ca tances here
ustrial pinning wie Js created in Jamaica to exercise pointment because it brushes aside ™ ics tate Bare so ° by the friendship and fellowship
legislature has*passed bills for Control over the civil service So cursorily the wishes of respon- i . of a very happy time together.
the establishment of an Industria! 4),cintments and promotions. sible leaders of opinion. It is not To St d J miaica At the Criminal Assizer this
Development Corporation and a" “Other members of the Commis- going to make Sir Gerald Temp- Go u y a weer beroee Mr. Justice A, * —
Agricultural Development Cor- cio, include a Privy Councillor, let's task of winning public confi- : Liisa ools-Lartigue, a jury acquittec > . . BABY Ss
alice; ated 9S GEO, doe of Lalit: Comal Sudae scummeesn: CORE Be sade, sia sig. tance HAGUE. | 19-year-old Rustan Williams, who Profits Question

the first heavy industries planned

tative of the Civil Service Asso-

Although Mr. MacGillivray is an
efficient official and administrator,

industrial development specialist,



was
eat of his father

charged with causing the

last October

Hinder Oil Talks

TEETHING



i was Officially open- ojati a ij or 1 , H
for the island \ Be aT Sige eent scan cag a_ social welfare Wapker the paper baia, he does not have is to spend three months in py g jenife wound when he inter- e :
ed and the first fruits of its pro- and the Principal Assistant Sec SG a ik ji study the ‘
ducti the local market “etary charge of the Estab- Whé alaya consider should be Jamaica this spring to study the vened on his mother’s behalf TEHERAN, Feb. 16. nee give you
uction on the a £ > retary in charg ot. the essential qualification for the economic — possibilities of the Gorin fight between his Ne ns between the World
This was the newly constructed jishments Branch of the Secreta- 7 - a ele ; : he Dutet e 4 \ v egotiations between the ° °
. post—a knowledge of Malaya. His island, announces __ the utch parents tremier Mohs ed n t
Caribbean Cement Company’s fac- riat experience in Jamaica, it said, Ministry for Economic Affairs, , ’ Bank and Premier Mohammec O anxtettes
tory situated in East Kingston ' ; n be viewed agai st tha serie sahinkcielh Mossadegh to solve the oi) dispute There need be tl A
which began delivering cement A Plan for setting up free sec- ae oe eR Tals ne com pr. Winsemius, who is Hol- snagged Saturday on the question a mo restiess nigh’ %
last week to the local market at a ondary and vocational schools in Rite. beskeropne af Malayan pels land’s Director-General for In- GRACIE FIELDS of profits. If no solution is found no tears, no baby disorders, if
price less than that of imported the island hag been dyawn up by . dustrial Development, will leave MARRIES AGAIN by Tuesday Robert Gardner and ou have Ashton & Parsons
cement, which has now been stop- the Jamaica Dev elopment Com- Yet British residents in Malaya for Washington at the end of his World Bank mission are sche- nfants’ Powdors handy.
ped from entering the island by Mittee of New York... the believe that Mr, Lyttelton's choice February. He was a member of ISLE OF CAPRI, Feb. 18, duled to, leave for the United Mothers all over the world have
a Government order. _ The plan is for a drive in the j."4 wise one. They point out that a Dutch delegation which dis- British stage star Gracie Fields Stes. Gardner and, his advisers found them soothing and cool-
Spring to get Jamaicans and the present emergency in Malaya cussed Dutch Guiana’s economic nd tne 4B a B — Al ‘ro, met Saturday morning with hel tiroush
® : other interested persons in the pas “continued for nearly four development problems with the *"'' BnAAIEH vei oi ; h Mossadegh and in the afternoon ing when bab: is fretful throug
; United States to subscribe one years, in spite of officials with a World Bank and other officials in \'°l_ were Piano at the church ith a mixed Parliamentary teething, and, best of all, they ef
Here to discuss the future re- qollar to the fund for the estab- knowledge of Malaya. Obviously, Dutch Guiana recently. of Santo Stefano today, Gracie é a fnaid ’ he Premier's are OL SLY SAFE. p 4
J il commission at the Prems
lationship between the Univer- jjshment of these schools. Similar they say, a man with an entirely 44, and Boris 48, a radio electrician Anish The Babk’s offer wan fj ie
sity College of the West Indies drives are planned for England fresh approach is needed. His services in Jamaica were became man and wife in a cere=~ (™™™™. 0 AD eat
3 : ; . mnie al y dl reported by Iranian officials
and the imperial College of Tropl- ana other countries where Jamai- Another factor which rankles in requested by the Inlernational mony performed by father Luigi ; one Oak eck tae HTON &
val Agriculture in so far as Agri- cans are domiciled and these the Malayan mind, however, is Bank for Reconstruction and Lembo. Ds AVOS ” ne
cal Agriculture ‘ ar as Agri~ cans aoe ; So cee feet 3” Devel t under the pro- would get 50 per cent. of the : 1
sulture teaching is concerned is Jamaicans will be asked to con- that Mr MacGillivray served in Developmen I " : f ' ' r r
c t S eects Be elie ree : 7 ote es for ier-developed The bride w obviously nervous profits — the same, amount as
Jock M,. Campbell, Chair- tribute one dollar every year Palestine from 1938 up to the time gramme ‘or under k ”
Mr. Jock M. Campbell), 2 , oiniaiien 2 “My : tos ha. ae ies. The Dutch Government but just as obviously happy as Saudi Arabia, Iraq and other mid-
of the West India Commit- for at least 10 years until the of his appointment to Jamaica in countries. The Dutch t 5 }
a ‘ Jamaica Government is able to 1947, Malayans are saying bitterly has granted him three months she and Roris exchanged rings dle East companies get from com- aE

teé in London.

Mr. having

Campbell is also

discussions with the Sugar Manu-



J

take over full responsibility for
the schools,



| —
|

that apparently the Colonial Office
regards service in Palestine as the

A small

Its specification

leave to enable him to accept the
invitation. U.P.



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Tuesday, February 19,

















OUR

MAJOR Griffith’s broadcast this- month
and Lord Rowallan’s speech to the mem-
bers of the Barbados Chamber of Com-
merce will have attracted the attention of
all those who regard Scouting as some-
thing to be encouraged.

Some of Major Griffith’s
were depressing.

statements

“In the 40 years of local scouting,” he
said, “100 groups have been registered,
but to-day there are only 38 on the register.
Where are the 62?” Earlier he had said,
“I fear too many troops fall by the way
through the Scoutmaster fer one reason
or another failing to implement the Patrol
system as conceived by B.P.” Or in words
more widely known, the blind cannot
lead the blind, without them all falling
into the ditch.



Scouting in Barbados, if we are to judge
by these remarks of the Island Scout
Commissioner, lacks other things than
money. It lacks sufficient leaders, men
who will not fail to implement the Scout
Law.

A good scout may not be a little angel,
but if he is not a good boy or a good man
he is not keeping the Scout Law.

And in this connection what Lord Row-
allan is reported to have told the members
of the Chamber of Commerce seems to be
at variance with something Major Griffith
said in his broadcast.

Major Griffith said that the “Scoutmas-
ter is looking after your boy—the boy
who will be the man of tomorrow.” Lord
Rowallan on the other hand stressed that
the job of the Scout Leaders was not to

‘make “little angels or good little boys.”
Their job was to make men, who would
not only set standards themselves, but
would help to raise the standards of
others.

Clearly then if scouting is to succeed it
is better to have one scout leader capable
and competent to lead and to set an ex-
ample for boys who must necessarily be
good boys if they obey the scout law
faithfully, than for scouting to be regard-
ed as a good institution which will absolve
parents from the responsibility of train-
ing their own children to become good
citizens. Major Griffith did in fact place
responsibility on someone other than the
scout leader for what manner of boy a boy
scout is today, but he did not make it
clear whom that someone was, while he
did unfortunately throw the onus on the
scoutmaster of “looking after your boy or
your neighbour’s boy.”

Lord Rowallan was much happier in his
expressions, when he said that scouting
provides an anchor for boys who would
otherwise drift through life until they
reach the rocks and are shipwrecked. The
tragedy of Barbadian life, a tragedy which
makes the task of scout leaders more diffi-
cult here than in other countries is that
so many boys begin life on the rocks and
are. born shipwrecked, To that extent
Major Griffith is probably justified in sug-
gesting that scoutmasters do look after
“your boy or your neighbour's boy.”

But that is not his task. His task is to
make men: and not ordinary men, but
men who have such high standards that
they can help others to raise theirs. If
everybody in Barbados obeyed the Scout
Law there would be no need for scouting.
But if scoutmasters and scoutleaders
themselves fail to obey the law and there-
by disqualify themselves from making
good boys, let alone good men, of what
avail is scouting to the community ?

In its second edition, since it became
a fortnightly publication the “New Com-
monwealth” dated January 2ist, by a
happy coincidence discusses what is being
done to help to equip the younger genera-
tion in Britain and says that “correspond-
ingly larger achievements must be asked
of it if its purpose is not to grow weak for
lack of spur.” It refers to “Scout expedi-
tions to mountain peaks in winter” and
concludes by saying that it would be a
source of strength to the Commonwealth
as a whole if “young men from various
countries could be enabled to share great
endeavours and so interchange influence
and example by making major physical
efforts under conditions of hazard.” No
one would suggest that scouting would
receive a great impetus from the institu-
tion of organised expeditions to the top of
Chalky Mount, or by tree climbing in
Turner Hall Woods, but certainly there is
a solid body of opinion in Barbados which
confirms Major Griffith’s broadcast state-
ments, as quoted above, and considers that
scouting could do with a toughening up of
its moral and physical fibre

If Lord Rowallan’s visit should have
this result it will have been’as successful
as it was necessary.

FREE ENTERPRISE

The recert rise in price of
foodstuffs has brought the usual
outbreak of demands for the Gov-
ernment to ‘do something’ about
it, presumably to add still more
controls gnd regulations, in the
mistaken belief that prices can be
held down by such tinkering with
the economy.

Ne Government of a small is-
land like Barbados can control
the world-wide tide of inflation,
any more than King Canute could
control the ocean tide, though
according to the history books he
was a wise man who knew his
tides and his limitations

The causes of the inflation from
which we suffer are too complex

some



to be analysed in a short article
but mo doubt one of the most
important is the habit of Mnancing
our wars ‘on the cuff’ instead of
paying for them at least on the
instalment plan. It has been cal-
culated that the British people

have not yet made a down pay-
ment on the Battle of Waterloo,
though the more comservative
economists think this should be
done before embarking on a lot
of social welfare that they cannot
really afford. The idea that pos-
terity will pay does not work
because posterity merely feels
resentment at the idea, and adds
its own wars to the already stag-
gering total.

In recent years we
the strange spectacle of Govem-
ments in Britain, the United
States, and to some extent Cana-
da, apparently trying to check in-
flation by a maze of economic
controls, while encouraging it b;
unsound fiscal policies such as
lavish spending for non-essential
purposes, support of artificially
low interest rates and so on,

Here in Barbados we can do
nothing to correct the mistakes of

have had



other countries but we do not
need to copy them. We migh
r better to ‘concentrate Our
efforts on trying to mitigate the
cffect of world-wide inflation on

our Own economy, by such steps
as may be within our power to



The Nation

T is strange, and contrary to

all forecasts, that as oul
Constitution has become more and
more democratic the .Monarehy
has grown stage by stage, not
weaker, but stronger. And now
that we have universal suffrage,
a House of Commons representa-
tive of the whole people, a Sec-
ond Chamber with only a shadow

of control, we fing the Throne
more secure than it had ever
been, based, not on power, but

safely on the confidence and affec
tion of the people.
vw *

a ONARCHY has been fused

with democracy. Lhis coulda
not have happened but for one
Wung—ihat the Royal Family it-
self had clearly realised and
frankly accepted the principle of
that fusion, and fulfilled faith-
fully the obligations it entailed.
In the reign of King George VI.
all the world may recognise, and
history cannot fail to record, an
exemplar of constitutional Mon-
archy at its best.

The stability or the Throne has
safeguarded the stability of Par-
jliament, In recent times we have
seen how, over the greater part
of Europe, one by one, democratic
governments, in appearance firmly
established, were suddenly and
swiftly overturned. For the most
part the democracies fell through
the faults of the democrats them-
selves, Party strife carried to ex-
tremes, producing weak and tran-
sient Ministries, had brought
about the collapse of authority.
In this country and in the group
of Monarchies in north-western
Europe which stands out as among
the best-governed States in the
world, these upheavals have not
occurred. This is largely because
when, in a nation deeply divided,
matters come ‘to a crisis, if there
is a constitutional Sovereign. he
may be able |to bring to bear @
different and independent influ-
ence. Transcending political an-
tagonisms, he can reconcile and
harmonise in a way often not
possible in countries where the
Head of a State is himself a mem-
ber of a party and its nomince.





CUR READERSSAY
Report Misleading

To the Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—As your report under the
head “Bay Hotising Roads must be
14 feet wide”, which appeared in
the issue of today’s date, is mis-

leading, inasmuch as it may be
believed that the Housing Board
was seeking the approval of the

General Board of Health to con-

struct 8 ft. wide roads throughout
that particular area, I would ap-
preciate it if you would allow

to give the following explanatior





The “Plan and Statement” sub-
mitted to the General Board of



By RK. E. SMYTHIES
take It should not be too much
t *xxpect our Government to be




lling to profit by the mistakes
of others, and refrain from per-
sisting in policie that obviously
do not accomplish what was ex-
pected of then

I sometin wonder if serious
consideration has beén given to
the idea of removing all controls
so far as possible, in order to let
ihe laws of supply and demand,
free enterprise and competition,

go to work again unhampered as
they should be

When bureaucratic controls
have once been imposed they tend
to perpetuate themselves long after
any real need for them has passed,
and democratic Governments
should be on guard against this
feature It may not be generally
realised how sych_ restrictions
often do more harm than good by

stifling competition and the in-
centive it gives to efficiency. It
may in fact be impossible for
anyone Who hag never taken an
active part in competitive busi-
ness te understand this

The proper function of a demo-
cratic Government is, to act as

policeman to see fair play between
the different sections of the com-
munity, producers, merchants
and cansumers, capital and labour,
and to make sure that the system
cf free enterprise is not frustrated
by monopolies of either capital or
labour.

Monopoly of labour is a rela-
tively ree development. but it
can be just as harmful as any
other: mencepcely in causing prices

to rise, as is happening in Barba-
dos to-day. It is a direct respone-
sibility of Government to see that
no small group of intransigeant
individuals can hold the rest of
the community to ransom by un-
reasonable demands and restric-
tive practices.

I have heard it argued in
favour — of Government con-
trols that under them there

(By VISCOUNT SAMUEL)

‘YUE British,” it has been said,
“are a sensible people.” if our
political system is on the whole
successful, this may be due to our
habit of preferring the lessons f
experience to the logic of theory.
We have learned, among other
things, that institutions, if they are
to appeal to ordinary men and
women, must be humanised; they
must be understood, not only
through lessons and books, but “s
embodied in persons. What kind
of persons they will be who are *o
symbolise in themselves the
Nation and the State is therefore
a matter of first importance.
Here again, King George VI
will surely be counted among the
best of the Kings in the great suc-
cession, His character made him
an abiding influence for the good
life in an age often of unstable
morals, It made him an example
of fortitude in times of danger
and stress. As Sovereign 4e ful-
filled every duty, whether of
action or of restraint, that the
Constitution required of him. And
he. brought us a Queen Consort
who quickly won and has firmly
held the deep respect and warm
effection of the whole people,

Institutions are not transient
like ourselves: they supply the
element of continuity. They keep

the living generation in touch with
the generations that have gone
before, and allow it to link hands
with the generations to come.

If we tried to sink the past
beneath our feet, be sure the fu-
ture would not stand,

And institutions find their safe-
guard in tradition, in ceremony.
If the authority of the State is to
be effective, it must command
respect, and for that it should it-
self be stately. A Monarchy, and
especially a Monerchy rooted in
a thousand years of history, can
tend to democracy a dignity and a
grace that will be'in themselves
a source of stability and strength.

. * *

OR us one other point is of
fundamental importance. Our
Commonwealth is an association
of communities, widely dispersed
over all the continents, each one





Health pointed out that 14 ft. roads
would connect this Section with
the other developed Sections of the
Estate as well as with Culloden
and Beckles Roads, but sought
approval to construct an 8 ft, wide
internal access road which would
serve the houses already facing on
to Wanderers’ Cricket Field on the
north side

These houses have been on their
present spots for many years with
no road to serve them. In replan-
ning the area, it was considered
that an 8 ft. access road should be
constructed, in spite of the fact
that no alteration in the layout



And Monarchy



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|
is little or tro bankruptcy, but
this is fallacious because it
really means there is little or no
keen competition. To keep the
free enterprise system healthy
there must from time to time be
elimination of the inefficient con-
cerns, and their replacement by
fresh ones with energetic man-|
agement and new ideas. This)
may seem harsh but speaking
generally no business concern
need go bankrupt. There is al-
ways the choice of alternatives |
to either increase efficiency or |
wind up the business. i

In the nature of things it is
more difficult to ensure keen
competition in the trade of an}
island than in a continental com- |
munity of the same size, so that}
an island Government has a spe-
cial responsibility in the matter. |

The system of selling goods on
a basis of cost plus an Officially |
sanctioned ‘mark-up’ really en-)|
courage merchants to let their}
costs rise, while setting a fixed)
maximum or ceiling’ price usual- |
ly results in either a minimum |
price or an unnecessary shortage.

It is not meant to imply that
if all controls were removed to-
morrow prices would go down at
once. It is impossible to estimate
the extent of the harm done to
the free enterprise system by the
strait-jacket of controls it has
been in for several years, during
which it has not been able to be
either free or enterprising. It|
might take some time to work off |
the evil effects and return to)
keen competition. |

In due course some prices
might go down and others up,
but they should at least be more)
in line with reality than they |
are now. As the war is sup-
posed to be over, it could be
worth trying. In the meantime
the policy of holding prices of
local products down toa level
below the costeof production, or
substantially lower than corre-
sponding imported items, is bas-
ically unsound and will cause a
shortage of the local products in
the near future,



with its own local patriotism, pas-
sionately cherishing its own in-
dependence. It is the Mvnarchy
which has made it possible to
combine the fullest liberty of the
parts with the enduring unity of
the whole. The future historian
may be able to estimate better
than we can how great has been
the service to the world that has
been rendered by the very exis-|
tence of the Commonwealth, with
its effective interventions ‘again
and again in the cause of human |
freedom. If, in this troubled age,
that service can be judged of high
value to mankind, the Monarchy
shares in the merit,

In spite of all difficulties and
adversities, our State flourishes.
It flourishes, because it is secure.
And it is secure because at the
base it rests broadly upon the
people, while at the summit it
culminates in the Crown,

* * *
UCH is the heritage which now

passes from King George VI
to Queen Elizabeth II, I believe

SPECIAL RADAR AID FOR
SMALL AIRPORTS:

| A simple one-man radar aid for guiding
|aircraft in to land has been designed for
|small airfields which cannot afford expen-

sive equipment. The prototype is now in use
}at Southend Airport, near the East Coast.
\It is similar to the Ground Controlled
Approach system (GCA) used at big inter-
national airports, but much cheaper. It will
|cost about £3,000 to £3,500, about one-
| twentieth the cost of GCA.

Pilots have already made more than a
thousand approaches on this “poor man’s
GCA” and were brought in to the end of
the runway in all weathers. The Ministry of
Civil Aviation wants all pilots approaching
the Southend airport to use the equipment.

The principle of the equipment js that
| when aircraft approaching the air-field call
| up the tower on radio, their bearing from it
|can easily be identified on a VHF/Direction
| Finder, and this bearing is then used to pick
| them up on a simple radar screen. Engin-
}eers point a narrow radar beam at the air-



|craft along the same bearing, so that when

the plane flies into the beam it appears as
a “blip” on a radar screen. A controller on
the ground then directs the “blip” (and the
plane) right to the end of the runway. The
plane does not need to carry special equip-
ment, and can approach and land in any
weather.

To make sure a narrow radar beam would

be wide enough to pick up an aircraft at
distance, engineers made tests by looking
through an old gun-laying telescope which
was pointed in the direction of approaching
aircraft. The radar beam now used picks up
aircraft about 15 miles away.

The prototype of the new approach aid is
built into a single-decker bus so it can be
moved about the airfield, On the roof of the
bus is a radar “Dish” scanner, which is
mechanically locked to the radio direction-
finder, As the pilot calls up on radio, the
dish swings round in the direction of the
approaching aircraft and projects its radar
beam. Below, in the control cabin, the scan-
ner is connected to a rotating control con-
sole with a radar screen in it—in appearance
rather like a submarirle’s periscope. The
homer operator swings the console round by
moving two handles at shoulder level—again
very much like a periscope.

To pick up the aircraft the operator makes
a small adjustment to perfect his “aim”, and
the aircraft, as it comes into range, appears
on the radar screen. The scale of ranges of
the screen can be reduced as the aircraft
approaches, There is a microphone and
loudspeaker on the console so the operator
can speak to the pilot and listen-in while
watching the “blip” on the radar screen.
The equipment can handle only one aircraft
at a time.

The aid does not need to be sited at the
end of the runway in use—the operator’s
directions can be offset to allow for any run-
way on the airfield.

HOOVER AGAIN

OH, MR. HERBERT HOOVER, this is
where I came in. Almost exactly a year
ago, just after I had got back to America
from Europe, I sat in a yacht and listened by
short wave to you making a super-Isolation-
ist speech, all about pulling American troops
out of Europe and building up a “Gibraltar”
over here.

Blow me down if you have not gone and
said it all over again. As the only living
ex-President you are listened to with deep
respect by a great many Americans. When
you advocate taking the G.I.s out of Europe
forthwith, you will probably start up again
that Great Debate of last year on America’s
whole foreign policy — the policy that your
close admirer, Senator Taft, is so anxious
to ditch.





the nation is glad to have a
Queen, There is no Salic Law
here. Many centuries before the
Sex Disqualification Removal Act
of thirty years ago, the British
Constitution was enlightened
enough not to bar from the high-
est position in the land any person
born a member of the larger halé
of the population, We are all re-
calling te-day how the reigns of
three of our Queens have been
periods illustrious in history—Vic-
toria, Anne, and long ago, but
vividly remembered, Elizabeth,
whom we must now call The First, |
in many ways the greatest of the
three, }

Who can tell— think there are |
signs of it—whether, if there are |
no more great wars, our new
Queen may not be destined to pre-
side over a_ period marked bv
sharped reaction from the present
confusions and _ discontents: a
period vigorous and constructive:
with a re-birth in philosophy and
learning, in all the arts and all
the sciences; a reign worthy to
renk in history with the brilliant
era of the great Queen whose
name she .bears.



would take placé at this point. No
vehicular traffic would use this
access road unless going to one of
the houses there. Entry signs
would have made this into a one
way road. Having Wanderers’
Cricket Field on one side, ‘the 8 ft.
access road could be widened
whenever necessary.

It was this 8 ft. access road that
the General Board of Health ob-
jected to and decided that it
should be constructed the same
14 ft. width as all of the other pro-|
posed roads in the area. |

T. O. LASHLEY, |

Manager & Secy, Housing Board.
14th Feby., 1952.

|. Greece and Turkey formally became mem-

SEA TO SAUCEPAN

UP IN PORTLAND, Maine, they are get-

ting ready to deliver to New York dinner

tables quick-frozen lobsters packed in sea-

weed and contained in a plastic bag which is

popped into the saucepan along with the
contents,

SELF-DEFENCE

REFEREE Ruby Goldstein (he stopped the
Robinson-Turpin fight) has received. a
huge—and approving—fan mail because he
stopped a boring boxing match on TV.

TWO TO JOIN N.A.1.0.

WASHINGTON.



bers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion on Monday when their Ambassado

deposited acceptances with the State Depart-
ment.

tion will make greater effectiveness of the
collective defence system which had been
created under the treaty.” Turkish Ambassa-
dor Feridun Erkin said that the Turkish peo-
ple are happy to join the defence system.

Greek Ambassador Athanase Politis,
pledged his country’s determination to live
up to the obligations of the treaty. Webb
said “I heartily welcome these two coun-
tries in our organization which provides the
framework for constructive and fruitful co-
operation between all members, having as
its objective the preservation of world peace
and security.”——U.P.

Acting Secretary of State, James >
Webb said “I am confident that through their|}) Brisket of Beef
accession to the treaty, significant contribu- Jorned: Beet






TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952

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SPECIALS

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|



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952





Common Pleas

Suit Adjourned

Claim Made For $1,113.05

An adjournment until April 2 was granted both parties
in the Common Pleas suit, Violet Servie Reid-Vivian Con-
nell, when the case continued yesterday before the Acting

‘Puisne Judge His Lordship

Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor with

the hope that the dispute might be shortened or possibly

settled.

New Syrup
Being Made

A NEW KIND of sugar syrup is
le.ng made at the Haggatts Fac-
tory, St. Andrew. This syrup
hich is finding favour wich resi-
dents in the area is made in a
different way.

In this me hod water is added
io the first quality sugar which is
sn a special container and then it
is boiled until it becomes a thick
substance when orange essence is
added.

This syrup is then put into cans
which are taken away for sale.

= a *

THE GULF OIL COMPANY
continues its search for oil in the
St. Andrew area. Holes are now
being drilled at Haggatts Land
which is lying west of Coggins
Hill.

* * *

BOYS OF THE Belleplaine
Boys’ Club are practising hard for
the Inter-Club football matches.
Several of the boys have played
practice matches,

* * *
DURING the past two weeks
residents of the districts around
Jackson and Sharon have been
suffering great inconvenience for
water.

Early in the morning the water
goes off and returns periodically
during the day for short intervals,
Yesterday being washing day,
residents were very annoyed as
many of them found difficulty in
obtaining water for washing their
clothes,

Animals also suffer as a result
of this and consequently when the
‘water is on for the few minutes
there is a great stampede.

Whatever is the cause, many
people in the dis rict say that
every crop season when the es-
tates are grinding this happens.

U.K. Imported
308,606 Tons Of

B.W.1. Sugar In °51

t LONDON.

The United Kingdom imported
308,606 tons of sugar from the
British West Indies during 1951,
according to complete returns
for the year just published in
London by the Board of Trade.
This represented some improve-
ment over the 1950 impcrt figure
ef 301,951 tons, British Guiana, for
which a separate figure is given,
supplied 82,806 tons in 1951, as
against 67,118 tons in 1950.

Altogether, 864,168 tons of
sugar were imported from Empire
sources in 1951, as against 811,
177 tons in 1950, Failure of the
Australian crop reduced imports
from that territory from 246,644
tons in 1950 to 177,154 tons in 195),
but this was amply compensated
by an increase from 163,507 tons
to 260,300 tons in imports from
Mauritius,



Foreign Sugar

Foreign sugar, however, ‘n-
tinued to make up the bulk of
Britain’s imports, rising from
1,280,373 tons in 1950 to 1,390,451
tons in 1951. Cuba alone sup-
plied more than the entire Em-
pire total, with 878.262 tons in
1951 as against 872,123 tons in
1950. The other big foreign sup-
plier was San Domingo, which
increased its trade from 379,349
tons in 1950 to 444,929 tons in 1951.

At the same time, Britain re-
diced her re-exports of sugar
from 751,864 tons in 1950 to 724,
714 tons in 1951, to give her a
ne! import in 1951 totalling 1,520,
905 tons, as against 1.339,686 tous
in the previous year. The remain-
der of Britain’s sugar needs for
domestic consumption came from
British-produced beet,

Mr. Ronald Mapp M.C.P. will
be the guest speaker at the Press
Club to-morrow evening at 4.45,
His subject will be “The Press
and Moral Leadership.”

Mr. Mapp was one of the dele-
gates to the recent Moral Rearma-
ment Conference in Miami and his
discussion will centre on the de-
cisions of the Conference,



Old Boys’ Meeting

At a meeting of the Old Boys’
Association of Foundation Boys’
School next Friday at 7.30 p.m, at
Foundation Boys’ School there
will be the formation of a Com-
mittee to deal with various sub-
jects,

The case is a claim for $1,113.05
debt brought by Reid of St. James.
Connell lives at Black Rock,

Reid is represented by Mr. W. W.
Reece, Q.C:;"instructed ‘by Mr. D.
Lee Sargeant, Solicitor. Mr. E. K.
Walcott, Q.C., associated with Mr.
J. §S. .B, .Dear, instructed’ by
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield is
representing the defendant Vivian
Connell.

This morning when hearing wa:
resumed Mr. Dear told His Lord-
ship that on the last occasion the
case was adjourned with the idea
that the solicitors could get to-
gether to see whether the case
could be made shorter.

Both counsel in the case were
desirous of taking another adjourn-
ment with the same idea in view.

The plaintiff in her statement
claims the sum of $1,113.05, monies
due and owing from tre defend-
ant to the plaintiff for the price oi
items of household articles sold
and delivered on May 18 1948, and
for further monies alleged to have
been received by the defendant for
the plaintiff.

Articles Not Received

In answering the claim, the de-
fendant-admits that she purchas?d
certain household articles from
the plaintiff, but denies having
received certain other articles
mentioned by the plaintiff in the
Statement of Claim.

The defendant also admits re-
ceiving the sum of $279 as set out
in the statement of cam, but
alleges that’ before the action the
plaintiff was and still is indebted
to her in the sum of $341.62, The
defendant claims a set-off against
the plaintiff's claim and filed a
counter-claim for $62.62, being
balance of the amount due her
atter deducting the amount of the
plaintiff's claim.

The plaintiff in turn defends
the counter-claim, joining issue
with the defendant on her de-

fence, She said that the defendant ©‘.

was not entitled to the set-off
asked for, and denied that she
was indebted to the defendant to
the sum of $62.62.

When the case first came up for
hearing on January 29, and ad:
journment was granted in order
that the solicitors on both sides
might have the opportunity to in-
vestigate further the inventory of
articles alleged to have been sold
and delivered, and which the
plaintiff was unable to substanti-
ate during the course of her evi-
dence in chief,

Case Of Exposing
Rum Adjourned

Their Honours Mr. H, A
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell, Judges of the Assistar
Court of Appeal yesterday
adjourned for a decision until
February 25 the case in
which His Worship Mr. S, H,



Nurse fined Gerald Mings of
Fitts Village, St. James, £124.
3/4. and 3/- costs or six

months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for exposing for sale rum
in that district on December 13
which was Polling Day.

Mings appealed against Mr.
Nurse’s decision. Counsel in the
case is Mr. E. K, Walcott, Q.C. for
Mings, while Sgt. Archer is prose-
euting for the Police.

Police Constable 439 Brewster
said that on December 13 he went
lo the defendant's premises at
Fitts Village. He arrived there
about 2.40 p.m. and noticed two
windows in the shop open.

“I went to one of the windows
and looked in the shop. The de-
fendant was sitting at a window
in the south of the shon while two
men were sitting at a table in the
middle of the shop. I noticed liq-
uor on the shelves of the shop ex.
posed,” Brewster said.

The defendant asked him if
there was anything in the law
about exposing goods for sale and
he told him “yes”,

Cpl. Conliffe attached to the
Holetown Police Station said that
he warned the defendant that his
premiges at Fitts Village should be
closed on December 13 as that day
was a Polling Day in the island.

Mr, Walcott in his address said
that Police Constable Brewster did
not say in his evidence if the goods
he saw were goods exposed for

BARBADOS *

ADVOCATE



WV

CHT -LYS:



DER”



THE LUXUPY YACHT “Lysandor”, pictured here in the harbour of New Orleans, is now in the Car

eenage.

She called in from Miami on a Caribbean cruise.





(Story on page 1)

Five Cane Police Will Soon Get V.ELF.

Fires Over
Week-end

Five cane fires, one destroying
90 acres of canes at Lower Estate
occurred over the week-end, The
fire at Lower Estate started about
noon On Saturday, and the 90
acres consisted of first, second
and third crop ripe canes which
were insured.

This fire extended to several
Peasants’ canes at Jackman'’s and
also damaged a portion of the
root of Margaret Tull’s house.
The value of the damage is un-
estimated.

The fire was eventually
out by the police and
of the area.

A fire also occurred at Rugby
Plantation, St. Thomas, about
6 p.m. on the same day and burnt
six acres of secOnd crop ripe
canes. These canes were insured.

put
residents

Canes Not Insured

The third
St. David's
Sunday
burnt
ripe
Renald

fire took place at
Christ Chureh, on
about 2.30 p.m. and
105 holes of second crop
canes, the property of
Mayers of Haggatt Hall,

Michael, These canes were
not insured.
Ancther fire occurred at Fair

Field Plantation, St. Lucy about
§.30 p.m. on Sunday and. burnt
three acres of second crop ripe
‘anes. The canes, which were the
vroperty of Mt, Gay and Fair
Field Ltd., were insured

The other fire occurred at
Maynard's Plantation, St. Peter,
about 10 p.m. on Sunday and
burnt six acres of first crop ripe
canes. The canes were the prop-
erty of T. G. Corbin of the same
district and were insured.



News In Brief

EDLYN BOYCE of Boscobel,
St. Peter, a servant at Wildey’s
House, reported to the police that
on Saturday about 12.10 p.m.
while she was walking along Wil-
dey’s Road, an ‘unknowm men
snatched her handbag and wallet.

The walle: contained $7.24.
*

HYACINTH SPRINGER of
My Lord's Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported that her house was broken
and entered during Saturday
night and a quantity of groceries
valued $53.19 and $8 in cash were
stolen

*

MAHALA HARVEY of Seclu-
sion Road, Black Rock, reported
the larceny of two turkeys valued
$20 from her enclosed yard be-
tween 7 p.m, on Saturday and
5.45 a.m. on Sunday,



Radio—Tele

phone System

colony

PAGE FIVE



Newsletter :

Worker To Be

Guest Of Union
In St. Lucia

(Fr

Grenada

om Our Own Correspondent

ST. GEORGE'S Feb. 14.
Arrangements have been mad
the Grenada Workers’ Unior
for a local waterfront worker tc
be a guest for a week of the St
Lucia Seamen’s and Waterfroa
Workers’ Union. Both organisa
tions are affiliated with the Inter-
American Organisation of Work-
ers which is sponsoring a scheme
in the area for enabling mem-
bers of the waterfront union
to know something of conditions

by

in each other’s ports. Grenada
is to reciprocate as host
. . *

Sister Mintrude Gittens of the
Colony Hospital nursing - staff
which she joined in 1942, left the
for Trinidad en route to
England where she will take an
advanced course in nursing at

the St. Helier Hospital, Surrey

Increase in the cost of living
for working-class families during

January last rose only a_ point

WITHIN the next twoemonths or so, the Police will be ®bove that of December 31, 1951,
in a very much stronger position to wage more effectively
their war against crime, particularly the type of crime

committed by people who carry out their nocturnal raids shelled corn

on residences and small business places.

The Police Authorities who,
with the transfer of Captain W
R. Armstrong, Radio Telephone
Expert, introduced the 999 V.H.F.
System on a small s¢eale, will
shortly be getting their own set
from the United Kingdom. This
new set has been on order for
some time now, and it is expected
to arrive in the colony sometime
early next month.

In preparation for this new set,
wireless masts have been erected
at strategic points throughout the
entire island, and a wireless room
is being prepared in the old Ser-
geants’ Quarters which is situated
in the southern part of the Re-
creation Room.

The Layout

The layout has already been
completed,, It provides for the
installation of a P.B.X., near
which will be situated an up-to-
date Map Control Unit; the new
V.H.F. Set with its 999 Switch
Board, and close to the operator's
hand will be found Message
Forms. In the centre of the room,
there will be a map of the city
area, and not far off, another ma)
of the entire island, The 999 Ex-

change, and the 08 Police Ex-
change are in close proximity,

and nearby there will be a Dial
Director.

When the new equipment ar
rives, and installation is com-
pleted, more mobile units will be
linked up with wireless to Head-
quarters and the larger out sta-
tions, and these will be presse:
into service to help in the fight
egainst crime.

In the neighbouring island of
Trinidad, this system has been
of tremendous help to the Police
of that Colony, and since its in-
stallation there, many a criminal
was apprehended within minutes
cf the commission of the crime.

At present in Barbados, the
Police Department are using 9
set loaned to them, and that has
proved very satisfactory, people
needing assistance of the Police
have only to dial 08, and the
Police Exchange will immediate-
ly make contact with those vans
which are now equipped, and de-
spatch them to the scene of the
crime,

When the 999 set goes into oper-
ation, the procedure will be to dial
999 report the incident, give the
locality, and contact will be made
with one or more of the mobile
units, which will be patrolling*
designated areas.

World’s Largest
Calcining Kiln
Opened In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb, 18
The Governor formally put into
operation on Saturday, a new cal-
cining kiln at MacKenzie Mines—
the Demerara Bauxite Company,
Ltd., which completed the second
of three major stages in the cur-
rent expansion programme,

The new kiln is the largest in
the world, 250 feet in length, nine
feet in diameter and has a capa-

city of 100,000 tons of calcined
bauxite annually which is cap-
able of producing abrasive A
grade calcined bauxite and re-
fractory A grade super-calcined
bauxite which was firat intro-
duced on the calcined bauxite
market by the Demerara Co.,

which is still the world’s leading
producer of this product.

The new kiln-—erected within
six months by local workmen
will double last year’s produc-

tion of calcined ore and on com.
pletion, the number of nine kilns
will enable the company to more
than triple this figure. The ex-
pansion of the Bauxite Pro-
gramme means now that jobs
and greater security employment
for a larger number of people,
more revenue for Government
from the colony's already largest
single contributor and also a sub-
stantial inerease of the local na-
tional income.

It is noteworthy that during the
past year numbers employed at
the MacKenzie Bauxite Mines in-
creased by approximately one
thousand,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1,) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate Win tne
following ships through their Barbaaos
Coast Station
4.8 Helicon
4.8, George



8.8 Presidente

Mormaclark, 8.8, Ga

8.8



8.8. Italia, s.8, Casablanca, 5.5 E
8.8, Seagarden, 6.8. Rangitiki, 8.8. Stella
Polaris,

SUDDEN DEATH

Dr. E. W. ROBERTS who per-
formed a post mortem examina-
tion on Maude Duke of Morris
Gap, Westbury Road, who died
suddenly at her home on Friday
about 1.30 p.m, attributed death
to natural causes.



Speed-up Methods On Farms

WASHINGTON.
On a huge farm, near the little
town of Gray Summit, Missouri,
a livestock feed concern is busy

everyone else these days
thave to be paid more.

So the formula now sought is
how to produce a given amount

they

and one week of growing time
below the 1945 average.

Then they feed the so-called
wonder drugs, things like aure-

introducing that most American of animals with less costly grain omycin and streptomycin, to the

of characteristics — the restless
speed-up—to future pork chops,
chicken and eggs.

There
farm hands in America, and like



and fewer hours of work.

The firm is succeeding, too. It
can grow a 3lb. boiling fowl in
~—which is about 1

lb. of grain

turkeys. The turkeys like this so
much that they are on average
two pounds heavier at 26 weeks

are about ten million nine weeks and on 9 lbs, of grain than they were in the old scratch

and shuffle days, (Express).

and was 164 per cent above the
basic month, August, 1989. A .4
increase in the retail price of
in the food group
‘and a similar increase in the cost
of agricultural forks caused the
change

* ~ +
_To constitute the Labour Ad-
visory Board for a period of one
vear ending December 31, 1952,
Government has appointed the
following: Mr. W. H. Hagley
(Chairman), Messrs. O. M. Bain. |
H Neckles, Walter Knight, |
MR.E., the Superintendent — of
Public Works, the Labour Officer |
fas Liaison Officer), Messrs. W
Janette (Manual and Menta!)
Workers’ Union), E. A. Mitchel!
(Grenada Workers’ Union) and
lL. A. Japal (General Workers’
Union).

. . *
Throughout the island Friday
memorial services were held fo
the late King in churches of all)
denominations, with large ane}
representative congregations in
for churches in the capital. \
His Excellency Sir Robert
Arundell, who attended at the
Anewlican Chureh, read the two
Tesesons and Archdeacon H. G
Pieott officiated
The Governor was representer
‘t the Roman Catholic Chureh
We My. Louie Cools-Lartigue
Chief Secretary, Windward Islands
snd the service was conducter
by Revd, Fr. Denis FitzGerald
nt the Methodist Church by Hon
C.F Henville Attorney
with Revd. K, J.
eptiny and Revd. F,. Lawrence
preaching the sermon; at. the
Church of Seotland by Admini«e
‘rater Wallace MacMillan with
Revd, Adam Thompson officiating

General
Payne offici-





Fisherman’s Death
By Misadventure

Death by misadventure was the

verdict returned by a nine-man
jury when the inquest into the
death of Evans Edwards, a fisher-
man of Queen's Street, St. Peter,
was concluded at District “A” yes-
terday morning,
The Coroner was His Worshit
Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police Magis
trate of District “A”, Evans Ed-
wards was admitted to the Gen-
eral Hospital on the morning of
January 26 spffering from in-
Juries which he sustained when a
raft struck bim,

He died the same day. Edna
Edwards identified"the body to Dr
A. Browne who attributed death
to a large fracture of the skull.

Elridge Skeete (55) of Queen's
Street, St. Peter on the seconc
hearing of the inquest told the
court that while the deceascd was
helping other porters to raise u
raft to a lorry the raft twisted t
one side and struck the deceased
to the ground. The deceased wa
taken to Hospital.

The incident occurred in
Speightstown and the raft is th«
property of R. & G, Challenor
Lid

Scheme For International Student Centre In London

LONDON,
Several Commonwealth coun-
tries and many Colonies have al-
ready contributed towards the
first £100,000 for an international

sale. Exposing for view is not the student centre in central Lon-
same as exposing for sale. con,

The prosecution said that the The first public announcement
two windows were open but there cf this scheme to accommodate
wus one witness who said that he only saw one window open. “I ¢ r

am not saying that the policeman:
is lying, but he was only trying to
tell the truth,” Mr, Walcott said

fhe prosecution has to prove
that the goods were exposed for
sale and that the exposure was for
the purpose of a sale.

“We will have to adjourn this
matter for a decision until Febru-
ary 25", Their Honours said after
listening to the address of counsel.



Loss Of Canadian Trade Hits
Turks And Caicos Islands

Indies in the past few years

the Caribbean colonies, but

by this factor as the tiny

Jamaican dependency.

Almost completely dependent
upon the export of salt, the Turks
and Caicos Islands sent 20,839
tons of salt worth £26,605 to
Canada in 1949. But this im-
portant market almost vanished
during 1950, when Canada bought
only 725 tons of salt worth £1,027
from the islands.

Another big customer for the
Islands’ salt in 1949 was Japan.
which bought 24,691 tons for
£24,691 but took none at all in
1950. The loss of these two big
customers cut the territory’s

Reduction of trade between Canada and th

LONDON,

e British West
has adversely affected many of
few have been hit so severely
Turks and Caicos Islands, a

salt exports. from 52,718 tons
worth £64, 772 in 1949 to
£16,212 in 1950.

These figures are given in the
report for the dependency cover
ing 1949 and 1950, just published
in London by the Colonial Office
All the privately-owned _ salt!
producers have now been in-
corporated into a single concern,
the Turks Island Salt’ Co., Ltd,
in an effort to develop the slen-
der economic resources of the
territory along proper lines.

|

; rom all over the world was made
‘at an India House reception in
London last week,

And Mr. Krishna Menon, the
Indian High Commissioner, has
presented the Earl of Athlone,



Chancellor of London University, has already offered £1,000.

with a cheque for £10,000 — the ip

first instalment of £30,000 which Scheme Gets Fillip

India will donate. The Earl of Athlone, when he
Australia is the next largest received her gift, referred to

donor with £20,000, followed India’s important part in formu-

Malaya and Nigeria which lating and supporting the project

giving £7,000, the Gold Coast The centre was originally sug-

£6,000, the Sudan £5,000, Mauri- gested in the middle '30s by an

tius £4,000, British Guiana and Indian High Commissioner, he

Cyprus £3,000, Hong Kong £2,000, said, and was taken up again ve-

Sierra Leone £1,750, Barbados fore the. war by Sir Samuel

£1,040, and Uganda £1,000. Other Ranganadhan, Indian Hign Cor

Dominions Colonies and Buropeah missioner at that time, and by Mr
States are also being approached. G. H, Langley, Vice-Chancellor of its students.

One European country—Austria Dacca University. Now it has once



j




WHITE
WHITE
WHITE

WHITE

COTTON PLAIDS, 36” wide, yd. ......$1.11
FLANNELETTE, 30” wide 92c¢.
FLANNELETTE, 36” wide Ble
LINGERIE CREPE, 36” 93e
STRIPED CREPE, 36” . $1.08





\- Lendon

— eee
——————_—__—_—X—X—X—X—XV«—«—"—_—€—=—=—————a="9"A—~aABaAI=@A»B49=—=>—=—=—>$Sas—————





again been given a fillip by «n
Indian, Mr, Krishna Menon.

With 40 per cent of the cr
guaranteed by the Governme: |
the centre will consist of a clu!
house and residential quarte:

. When completed, the Governmen

will hand over the building, fre¢
of debt, to be run by Londor
University.

Because of the large number
eas students who come
University, priority i
ccommodation will be given |

ov



—Express

CAVE

SHEPHERD
& Co. Ltd.

10—1% Broad Street



’





-IN OUR LINEN DEPT.











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FACE TOWELS
in GOLD, BLUE, ROSE and GREEN

BATH TOWELS

FS

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in PLAIN WHITE
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ee Sola tet ey $2.13 to $4.32

in BLUE, PINK, GREEN and GOLD

REACH TOWELS
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in gaily Coloured Designs
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in GREEN, BLUE and WHITE
BATH MATS
in BLUE and GREEN
BED SUEETS
ee @ $6.45

in BLUE, GREEN, PEACH, LEMON and ROSE

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soc K@ $3.06



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90” x 108” do. = @ $1013
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—COTTON 20” x 30” $1.67

—LINEN 18” x 28” 2.48



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Greystone, Hastings

ROBERTSON’S.
For this
Originally Week
Redeurrant, Blackcurrant, Apricot, Raspberry 56 50
Jam in 1fb Jars
ROBERTSON’S.
Scotch Orange, Golden Shred, and Silver Shred
Marmalade in It Jars 49 45
“ROBERTSON'S.
Strawberry Jam 63 57
Ginger Marmalade 68 62
CONDENSED MILK 33 31

The above ems for CASH & CARRY Customers Only

EWINGS CANADIAN PUDDINGS

Checolate, Butterscotch, Caramel per pkt. 25¢.
KRAFT WHAM per tin 48c.
SWIFT'S CHEESE per 120z. tin 73e.
SWIFT'S LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CEREAL per 120z. tin 69c.
APIE PEANUT BUTTER per Jar 6le.
CADBURY'S CUP CHOCOLATE . per tin 72e.
BRIDAL ICING SUGAR per pkt. 46c.

COCKADE FINE RUM







PAGE SIX

CLASSIF



TELEPHONE



IED ADS.

2508.



For Births, Marriage or Engagement;
announcements in Carjh Calling the}
charge is $3 00 for an’ number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m. $118 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m



THANKS
ROCHEFORD—We, thy Unders ond. ber

through this medium to ret
to all who attended the

funeral, sent





wreaths, eards or otheiwise expressec
sympathy ‘with u r our recent
bereavement
V. H. B. Rovheford and family
Recheford and farm 19. 2.52
SPRINGFR—The Springer family,
Six Roads, St. Philip, beg to tha



those kimd friends and reiatives,
sympathised with them in t} ree
bereavement, by sending
wreaths, or in any other ws
sympathy







IN MEMORIAM



PRPSCOTT—1y “ever

loving “memo



my beloved wife Iris Prescott,
departed this-dife on 10th Pebruon
1948.

Some will forget, but 1 wi'!
you

Waves of sadne ti
Secret tears do often f
For to-day has brough
Memories of t
Ever to be reme
“Dockie €yril
“wilte” A. F

David (stepson)

not forget

i

come over me












“th isband),
other-in-la



" asec
Ince |

lov
‘osniny)

ROACH
Roach Pe
on February 9

He saw the h he had to die |
A death n which his soul did ery |
The frightening waves his heart did |

1





chill
But had to yield, it was God's will |
The call was short the blow severe
For only those who know can tell
The pains of parting without farewell

Yvonne Burke 19.2,.52—1n



PERSONAL








The public are hereby
giving credit to any per

pd against
or persons |

whomsoever in my nar as I do not
hold mvself respondble for anyone
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed
by me,
Signed LIONEL A. GREENIDGE,
Arch Hall,
St. Thomas.
19.2. 52-—2n

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife. HELEN R
LASHLEY (nee Payne) as 1 do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyvone else |
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Signed ITHRAN G. LASHLEY,
My Lord's Hill,
St. Michael, No, 14
19.2.52—2n



; Thani's.

FOK RENT

HOUSES

Is —- Maxwell, Christ Church
Furnighed except cutlery and nen.
From March 15th onward. Apply to Mrs.
M. H, Graham, Phone 8172







19.2,52—1n
FLAT-—A. small self contained un-
furnished Flat breezy and cool with
attractive surroundings, about 2 miles
from city. Available immediately, call
Mayers, Advocate Advertising Dept
Dial 2608 for full particulars,
= 17,2, 52--4n



VESTIS COTTAGE--Corner 7th Avenue
and George St.-# bedrooms with running
water, drawing .-dining roonis —-Electric
lighting and gos for cooking installed —
Garage and servant's room. Phone 2ab2

























17.2,52—3n
WANTED

enema ——

im Sgro cipal aa aires
CASHIER: Lady for our Retail Dept
Broad Strect. Apply by letter and. in
person, G. W, HUTCHINSON & CO
LIMITED. 52-3n
ne
FEMALE BUTLER—Must have good
references, thorough respectable, must
sleep in. Apply to Lady Deane, Blach
Rock 7 )2-—2n
“TWO JUNIORS—For our oMfee, one of
whom should have had some previow
expenence. Apply by letter and in
person to A, S. Bryden & Sons (Bar-
badog) Ltd. 14.2. 52—-t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

BOARDERS—“Private family near
Savannah can accommodate visitors to

Trinidad, Single or double rooms, Write
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-
of-Spain.” 9.2.52—J2n

——$— <<
ONE MILCH GOAT fairly fresh in
mik, Dial 2938. 19.2.52—1n



Special Offer

ELECTRIC | 57.59
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Table Models with
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MAHOGANY, Birch and Deal
Tabies for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
Sewing, Kitchen in several shapes
and sizes—-Sideboards, Cabinets

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FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE



CAR-—One (1) Vauxhalj) 10, 1947 Model
Very reasonable in pree. Phone 8172.
19.2.52—1n

CAR—Vauxhall Velox 1951 Model in
excellent condition and only one driver.
Courtesy Garage. Dia) 4616,

17.2.52—6n

Le
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 hp. Saloon,
169-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000

Courtesy Garage. Dial 416.
17.2.52—6n,

Morris Oxford Saloon
16,000 miles in excellent condition.
198 Hudson Sedan 14.000 miles very
sultable for hire. 1988 Dodge Deluxe
Coupe has been well cared. Very suitable
for converting to pick-up. 1988 Chrvsler
Royal Sedan going cheap, 1956 Morris
Minor 2 Door Saloon 12,000 mile.

Just arrived Morris Oxfords and
Minors in assorted colours. We also have
2-10 ewt. Vans at prices prior to January
let. Secure yeurs promptly.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.,
Telephone 4504. 13.2.52—Tn.
A Ford Pickup,
Priced right. Apply to
Home, Bank Halil Main
Michael 19.2 Gn

ELECTRICAL
RADIO— be Mullard, with Gerrad
Automatic record changer in Cabinet.
* new 1951. Price $220.00. Phone 4621
19.2. 62—2n

RADIO—One 10 Tube R.C.A. in perfect
working order recently overhauled
Apply C. §S. Goodridge, c/o Wilkinson &
Phone 4267 19,2.62—2n

CARS—1949







PICK UP—Good mode}
dy for work
Pilgran Missi
itoad, St



on









SWEEPERS—Hoover Vacuum Floor
Electrical. Only $75.00. At our new
show room. K, R. Hunte & Co., Ltd
Dal 5136

19.2. $2—3n

FURNITURE





PURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers you
Rergains in Furniture. Mag. Dining
Chairs $20.00 pr. Birch Dining Chairs
©. ).00 pr. Also numerous other Articles
in furniture at reduced Prices. Call in

| Lower Bay Street. 16.2.52—2n
POULTRY

TURKEY COCK AND HEN and a
rumber of fowl eggs for sitting. Phone
2026. 17.2.52—£n





MECHANICAL



ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with
platform, pneumatic tyres and brakes.

Passed Highways & Transport, never
used. Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage.
15.2.52—6n.

MISCELLANEOUS



BENOCULARS — See your favounte
Morse make a thrilling win, $2.40 each.
Dial 3466, 19.2,.52--2n

Sa
EGGS—Sittings of Black Jersey Giant

Eggs, aiso Plymouth Rock crossed with
Black Jersey Giants at 36 cents each.
Hens Jate\y imported. Apply: Mrs.
Warford, ‘Harbour View" St. Michael.
19.2,52—-1n

GLADIOLI BULBS: Limited number
of Gladioli Bulbs Otders taken for
Dahli & Gladioli Bulbs for next season
Delivery end of November. Dial %425,
Cottage Gift Shop. 13,2.52—4n.





HANDCRAFTS consisting of Baskets,
Handbags, Pottery, Children’s Clothes,
rmbroidered Linen, Orders taken for
Flowers, Cocktail Savourtes and Cakes,
Up-to-date lending Library. Cottgge Gift
Shop. 13.2.52—4n.



MEGASS: At Four Square Factory,
Apply the Manager.. Telephone 2442,
16, 2.62—6n



PURGRAIN Pigeon
better — 10-Ib, 1
per Ib. Phone 2547,

Feed none
and upwards @ 1%c.
8.2.52—t.f n

SHIRT FACTORY—Capable of making
dozen shirts per day, For particulars:
thone Johnson 4311,



13.2.52—Tn



STRAW MATS—-Fancy Designs 88. up,
1 gvand opportunity for you, Thani
ros, Dial 3466. 192.524 f.n.

WASHABLE FANCY SPORT SHIRTS—
the biggest bargain of the season.
duced from $3.50 to $1.32 only. Thani
os, Dial 3466. 19.2,52—1n,

Gums Bleed,








ail
Stop Pyorrhea and
Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours |

Ryeeine, ths voulate Petettin of Pyor-

h mean that
or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
will eventually enuse you to lose all
ur teeth and have to wear false teeth
before your time, Mines the great World
war these mouth 4d ve spread
throughout the world so that now sclen-
tists say that four out OF every tive opie
are suflerers sooner or later. a) i
Pia ctabae ity enon enago Rok oul
too late, because they
the loss of teeth, but also chronie fheuma=
stm and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

Amosan, the discovery of an American
scientist, fights * ese ft oe
® i i netra’

Sot at the tor wt ‘ums from bleed-

ioose



root of the trouble, stops
ig the very aap day, quickly takes the
yreness put of 7h. » and soon
chtens the teeth. e follow’ letter
W. W. B. shows the results that





nd t ty en years.
rrhea ,.
2 dis . nad
* teeth ie oe atk teet

ne looser all the time, f tried
chings and Sun peers ee,
overy Amosen. In jours after
san my puns had stop bleeding.
soreness in tay mouth disappeared in
2 days and in two weeks I found that
vy loose leeth were much t! rand that
could eat the hardest of food."

Guaranteed

\

‘

|

|

|

|

| Ameso: works so fast and so certain
hat it ls guaranteed to stop your gums
1

|

|

'








iceding, end sore mouth and tighten
th to your complete satisfaction or
ack on return of empty package.
ing your teeth or
rom rheumatism



t take a chance on
a ante are ble Get fr our
hear rouble.

nist today aGior nud Wonca @ guaran-
a tee, ou risk
é n seine a the
mo arantee oro -

. fects you,

! wor Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth



| ORIENTAL
|| SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS

CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
|} DE LA INDIA OHINA e
y BJIPTO

yi THANI’S
\\ Pr. Wm. Hry. St, Dial 3466









* BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PUMLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

ind By VALENTINE HEYWOOD.
HOUSE: Brand new. smple 3 bedroom

house, ali convenierces, with party- The King’s death, the Royal
sized living room, open verandah, kitchen funeral and > ace i s
and utility room Jarage, laundry, 2 ne the accession of a

servant rooms and storage room under Queen have given rise to numer-

On attractive hillsiae site, Rockley New ©US querries on procedure and
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476. simiBar points from readers ‘af
13.2.52—t.f.0. The Sunday Times

RIVERTON Hiver Road. Standing on Several readers ask whether
7,761 square feet of land. The house the Lord Chancellor and_ the
contains drawing, dining and two bed- Speaker were correct in allow-
rooms, water and electric light. In- ing peers and M.P.s to take the
spection by appointment ‘phone 4019 ¢ lamne

ee ba aa Oe wae wo tor tala ai oath of allegiance before the

public competition on Friday, the 22nd
= ot ayoraaey 1952, at 2 p.m. at the
office ermianedt
Cc. iGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street

AUCTION

CAR-—Ford Prefect Saioon 1947 model,
damaged in accident. We are instructed
to offer this vehicle for sale by duction
at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday 22nd,

Queen herself had made the cus-
tomary declarations before «the
Privy Council. One of them
quotes criticism by the late Lord
Esher of a similar proceeding fol-
lowing the death of Queen Vic-
toria.

The answer is that the Heir to
the Throne is Sovereign from the
moment he or she succeeds. It





at 2. p.m. John M, Bladon & Company es not need the proclamation or
Auctioneers 17.2.52~3n. other proceedings to require al-
legiance from the subjects of the
* Crown.
1 . ‘

PUBLIC NOTicEs The proclamation of Queen
— — —————__ Elizabeth’s accession begins: “We,
the lords spiritual and temporal,

NOTICE being assisted with these of His

, late Majesty's Privy Council.”

ac Afiestions, from, auatiing Restored “with other principal. gentlemen
PAROCHIAL MEDICAL OFFICER for Of quality.’ Where, asks an M.-P:

the parish of Saint Michael, wiil be re-

jo the Commons come in?
ceived by me up to 12 o'clock noon on

" a ican a t

Thursday, February 28th 1952 {I The es ge . Ae Per
The Salary attached to the post which 1ey co nO*. rue nna

is pensionable, is Four thousand, three Council is not a meeting of the

hundred and twenty dollars (%4,320) per Privy Council, but an ad hoc

avnum, payable in monthly instalments
of Three fundred and sixty dollars ($360)
A Cost-of-Living Bonus at current rates
is also payable
The successful applicant will not be
permitted to act in, or hold another
Parochial or Government appointment
and will be required to take up his
duties as fram the 25th March 1952, but
if already holding such appointment,
will be given a reasonable time to re-
linquish same after assuming duty
Further particulars in connection with
the duties of this post can be obtained
from the undersigned
By Order,
E. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry

body, older than the Privy Goun-
cil itself, older than either House
of Parliament. It can be traced
back to the Great Council of the
Realm and, in the view of some
authorities, even to the Anglo-
Saxon Witenagemot.

The Duke ot Edinburgh

What alteration, mony ask, is
there in the statug of the Duke!
of Edinburgh? ;

For the time being none, ex-|
cept in so far as he is now the |
Consort of the Sovereign instead
of the Heiress Presumptive. In
this country no man takes rank
or precedence from his wife
though there are rules governing}
to some extent wnat is term

14.2.52—8n



NOTICE

NOTICE I§ HEREBY GIVEN that it is
the intention of the Vestry Of the Parish
of Saint Michael to cause to be intro-
duced into the Legislature of this Island
the following Bills, namely:—

(a) A Bill to extend the operation of

the Vestries (Cost of Living Bonus
to Employees) Act, 1947 and any

joint precedence. The Duke pre-
sumably ranks with ‘the Royal
Princes, but the demands ofj

courtesy alone would place him |
Act di th me r tt : :

further period of Nek Start tp the immediately after the Queen, It}
25th March 1953. * is practically certain that he will

A Bll to extend the operation of
the Parochial Employees Pension
Act, 1944 and any act amending
the same for the further period of
one year to the 25th March 1953,

in due course be given a special
precedence, Whether he will re-
ceive the title of Prince Consort}
is a matter to be decided by the!

and to amend the said Act ias Queen in consultation with her
amended hy the Purochial Em- Ministers
ployees Pension (Amendment) Act, -
1948) by increasing the amount of Why are all the funeral ar-

the cost of living allowances which

the respective Vestries may if they

think fit pay to their pensioners
CARRINGTON & SEALY,

Solicitors for the Vestry of St. Michael.

rangements in the hands of the
Duke of Norfolk, the Earl Mar-
shal?

As Earl Marshal, an office which}







any tender,

Questions On Accession Answered

Duke is head of the College of
Arms and of the Kings of Arms
the Heralds and the Pursuivants.
All the ceremoniai for such State
occasions is worked out by the
College of Arms under the Earl
Marshal’s supervision, The task
of arranging the order of proces-
sion and other such details is one
of great complexity and is one
in whieh the College and its offi-
cers are skilled,

Since the dead King will lie i
state im Westminster’ >

this part of the funeral go Save
under the su f the Lard 10!
Great Cha tote en-
tire charge of :he of West-
minster?

Apparently it does not,. since
only Westminster Hall is con-
cerned, and the arrangements
there, no doubt by agreement
wane hase ees Chamberlain,
are in t of the Ministry
of Works.

What is the difference
the Lord Great meres, peneeen
the Lord Chamberlain?

The first is one of thé Great
Officers of State—another heredi-
tary post which in this new reign
is held by the Marquess of Chol-
mondeley. The Lord Chamberlain
is the senior official of the King’s
Household. Both are posts of at
antiquity, but whi the rd
Chamberlain’s post is an arduous
one which entails constant super-
vision of the Sovereign’s House-
hold the Lord Great Chamberlain
blossoms into something of his
old-time magnificence only at

_coronations, though he plays an



important part also in such events
as a State opening of Parliament.

Nine “Great Officers”

Who are the Great Officers of
State?

There are nine of them and,
contrary to the belief of many,
they do not include such digni-
taries as the Archbishops or the
Prime Minister.

They are the Lord High
Steward (a post which is filled

only temporarily on such occa-|has ample space for chilled and hard
sions as a coronation or the trial| ‘zen Cero.

of a peer by the House of Lords),|Lading for tranahipment at

the Lord High. Chancellor,

Lord High Tieasurer

rds cf the Treasury), the Lord
President of the Council, the Lord
Privy Seal, the Lord. Great
Chamberlain, the Lord High Con-
Stable (another post which is
filled temporarily for corona-
tions), the Earl Marshal and the
Lord High Admiral (whose office
in these days is always in com-
mission among the Lords of the
Admiralty).

Will the King’s Company of the
Grenadier Guards eeene the
Queen’s Company?

The decisior on this, as with
other bodies bearing the same
prefix such as the King’s
Bodyguard of the Gentlemen-at..
Arms—rests with the Queen.

After the accession of Edward
VII the unit remained the Queen’s
Company for a_ considerable
period.

Will the King’s Flight of air-
craft be renamed the Queen’s
Flight? Noe

That also rests with the Queen.
One suggestion which has been
put forward is that it should be
renamed the Royal Flight.











alia praect 9

gut

NOW IN EFFECT
Lowest Fares ever

@ 0-Day Excursions

Skyliners.
For Complete Information, Seo

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.,
u
Phone — 4704
TRANS-GAN
s ADA

ir
International Trans-Atlantic
Transcontinental



——— & \
TAKE ADVANTAGE O# THE
EXCURSION FARES

@ All Flights by “North Star”

Lower Broad Str. B'town. ¥,









19.2.52—3n. is hereditary in his family, the
Yroosssees POSPPOSS SEPP OPO. %
~ ’
GOVERNMENT NOTICE x %
s s
‘+ NOTICE :
daiectapeniapeageinteneaiitin %
Tenders For Transport Of Officers a?
Tenders are invited for the conveyance by motor-car of the ; ‘
Revenue Officers from Bridgetown to Mount Gay Distillery, St. Lucy,
waiting for the Officers and return, for the period 1st April, 1952 to
3ist March, 1953. Will Our Customers please note that
2. Approximately three visits weekly at the Distillery are neces- BLACK WIRE HANGERS and GALVAN-
sary and the time spent in waiting varies from three to six hours. %
8. Tenders should be for a rate per mile including waiting at ISED HANGERS returned to our Depots %
the Distillery. The motor car provided is to be approved by the Comp- and Head Office will be purchased by us %
troller of Customs from whom further information may be obtained. } %& at 3c. and 4c. respectively. o
4. Tenders, addressed to the Colonial Secretary and not to any
Officer by name, and marked on the envelope “Tender for Transport” |
will be received at thé Colonial Secretary’s Office up to 4 p.m. on] X& ~ 3
Friday, 14th March, 1952. :
5. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or 8 SANITARY LAUNDRY Co, LTD. x
~

19.2.52+-3n.



CurbYourPiles |

no longer necessary to suffer

ins, itching and torment from Piles

# the discovery of Hytex (formerly

k re as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work in 10 minutes and not only stops







*
the pain but also takes out the swell- Hastings
ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve
timation cneraey cureiresnerug |W will be closed to. members
Nervousness, Backache, Constipation, on Wednesday, February
i Oper Ey, SenIiCy, Pad lrptable 20th for minor alterations.
a 8 "day ‘under The Club will be open as
usual on Thursday Febru-

gue
Sains and troubles or money buck on
ceturn of empty package.





That Popular Game :—

MONOPOLY

DART BOARDS
TABLE TENNIS SETS
BLUE BAND WARE

at
» JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
ana
HARDWARE

t
t
t the positive
ee Hytex must stop your pile
| >. PALES POC CCCRSES:



















JUST POR THE right finish ITS GAS |
for cooking you need BOOK your cooke:
today at your Gas Showroom, Ray St

RADIO NEWS

Radios and cnions! we know ‘em







both! we service ail makes of
radios, gratunte ser men will
put your set in first ¢ condition,
Yadios, graduate servicemen wil
arte repaiying yours, we don't
Want you miss a single moment
of rado enjoyment, when we

take your receiver to our slop
for overhapling and repairs wbte®
we are equipped with modern in-
struments for radio testin and
repairs, also A.C. or D.C, Ampli-
fiers made to order, call on as with
confidence.

THE ACME RADIO REPAIR SHOP
78 ROEBUCK STREET
Nr, Moravian Church,

J. E. GULSTONE,
Radio Technician,
Dial 4970.

other Nervous Ailments.

When You

KEEPS ENGINE CLEANER -SMOOTHER RUNNING \













Country Road



Phone 3592
SOOO IOS

OO

LAST GPPORTUNITY!

our CROP - SALE

Ends on Friday the 29th

Feby.

1952.

MEANWHILE BIGGER & BETTER
BARGAINS

ARE THE ORDER

THANI
Pr. Wm. Henry St.

NERVOUS.
INDIGESTION
TAKE

A Compound Elixir
Phosphorus.



NUTROPHOS is often prescribed by the Medical Profession
for cases of Nerve Strain, Brain Fag, Loss of Appetite and



ger You Eat Well, Sleep Well, Feel Well

Take NUTROPHOS,

Esso) EXTRA MOTOR OIL

Enjoy Your Food

HAVE NO FEAR OF

NUTROPHOS

Thiamine Chloride and



OF THE DAY!

BROS.
Dial 3466

AT



of



office is in commission among the| ,



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED |
(M.A.N.Z. LINE)









Se

i.

The M.V. MONEKA wil] accept

}
Cargo and Passengers for Oe
SS ica, Antigua, Montserrat,

“TEKOA” is scheduled to sail |
from Adelaide February isth, Melbourne and St. Kitts. Seiling Friday
| emeiey 26th, Sydney March 4th, Bris- | inst.
bane March 15th, arriving at Trinidad The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
about April 15th and Barbados about accept Cargo and Passengers for
April 18th | St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada,
In addition to general cargo this vessel and Aruba. Sailing Saturday 23rd
inst.
The M.V. CARIBBEE will

Cargo accepted on through Bills of

recent Cargo and Passengers for

Montserrat,_
the] British Guiana, Leeward and Windw Remintee, St. Katts. Sawing rTi-
Islands. day 29th inst.
(whose For further particulars apply —
URNESS WITHY & CO., LTD., BWI SCH OWNERS’
TRINIDAD. ASSOCIATION (INC.)

404T.
OLA LAP ALLL SLL

SEO SELPIOCVSEIOIGOS:

and
DACOSTA & CO., LTD.,
BARBADOS, B.W.1.



ee

CANADIAN SERVICE
From St. John and Halifax, N.S.

Expected Arrival







St Jebn Halifax Dates, Bridgetown,
Barbados
m.v, “BENNY 25 Jan. 4 Feb. 19 February
s.s. “WILFORD” 20 Feb. 16 Feb. 16 March
3.8, “SUNDIAL” 25 Feb. 29 Feb. 20 March
s.s. “A VESSEL” 11 March 15 March 2 April





UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
FROM SWANSEA, LIVERPOOL AND GLASGOW



’ Expected Arrival
Swansea Liverpool Glasgow 5 Bridgetown,
Barbados
s. “N.O. ROGENAES” 19 Jan, 25 Jan. 12 Feb. 24 Feb y
8.8. “SUNVALLEY” as “ _ 21 Feb, 2% Feb. 14 Mare!
“FEDERAL VOYAGER" MID MARCH MID APRIL

UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE

Expected Arrival
Dates Bridgetown,
Bar!





Antwerp Rotterdam London

‘bados
58. “SUNROVER” .. 15 Jan. 18 Jan. 4 Feb. 19 February
5.8. “SUNAVIS” .14¥Feb. 11 Feb. 21 Feb. 8 March
s. “SUNRELL” MYD MARCH MID APRIL



Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703

se Abcoa —— Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 15th Feb, — arrives Barbados 26th Feb., 1952.
A STEAMER sails 7th March — arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952.













NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
| SS. “LIBERATOR” sailed 26th Jan. — arrives Barbados 17th Feb.,
A STEAMER. sails 13th Feb. — arrives Barbados 28th Feb., 1962.

SERVICE

1952.





SANADIAN
SOUTHBOUND



Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
8.8. “ALCOA PLANTER” 12th Februany 2ist February
8.8. “ALCOA PEGASUS” . 26th February 7th Mareh
8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” 14th March Mth arch
A STEAMER 2rd March 2nd pril
A STEAMER 13th April 23rd April
A STEAMER ist May llth May

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SEBVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE







ROBERT THOM LIMITED

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466





QPP PPOSS SO OPSOVGFE DODD ITSO 9S SOO POO FIG ODISSSSSOY,
An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant. Use:

: GERM OILS

§ for Best Results,

8 CENTRAL EMPORIUM

* Gasolene Service Station — Trafalgar St.

PMS

< PLL ELL SILLLLAPLLLLL PLES SLLLSE LSE ILS

FOR SALE





“INCH HAVEN”
Situated Near “Inch Marlow”

A new modern Bungalow, 3 furnished
Bedrooms, large Living Rooms, facing Sea fur-
nished, ail Cupboards built in, all wood used
in construction Barbados Mahogany, Garage,
Servants Room, its own Lighting Plant, stand-
ing on one acre of land ‘sloping to the sea, ‘
Price £4,000. Apply J. H. O’Dowd Egan,
C/o William Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.

17,2.52.—2n.



PLES ALP PPPS SPPPPP OSLO PPP OPPS APPPPSSSPS.

BACK TO SCHOOL

| ale ie meg

GIRLS’ and io
BOYS’ SHOES

—Brewn, Black or White






POPLOL PSS OO SOP FPSSSSSOSE



Sizes: 7—10.. . $3.95
11—12.. . 5,00
3— 5.. 5.25



GY BOOTS

—White, Brown or Black





LCE PEPEEE LOSES SEEESSSES

LOCOCO






Sizes: 10— 2.. $2.20
3— 5. 2.40
6—11.. 2.85



Bring your Children in for an expert fitting.

-

eer

POPE

8 ,696996056064
LELLPPD SSS ESSEC S SFOS SOOOS OSS

POLL PLP

-



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY. 19, 1952



~

HENRY

ro






uf nite ae

MN RH 0 OA ! ,
lg A A V
i WE gn 8 i
ia 1 TOT a UL

a
in




MTA meet

ia 1) 100 ane aS



MM eS






it Aust Ae
eT
wifi va

iN
svi)
mut



> OUT WITH
>) REAL APPLES
SN






THIS PRISON — AND A
NO ANSWER... BIG MOE MUST ) MAN OF HIS INTELLECT




HAVE REACHED THE _Z KNOWS ONLY ONE MEANS)
WARDEN'S OFFICE —T OF GETTING WHAT HE
FIRST’ NOW WHAT? WANTS — MOB RULE...

WHAT WILL THAT AND VIOLENCE //
MADMAN DO NEXT? )



\ JOHNNY HAZARD
ern

WHY DOES THAT POOR WOMAN
LOOK AT ME LIKE THAT ? SUCH
SUFFERING IN HER EYES / MAKES



BRINGING UP FATHER



THAT'S THE DOOR-
BELL- IT MUST BE
HIM -I'LL ANSWER IT-

DON'T TALK-JUST LISTEN--TI
OVERHEARD MRS MYGESS SAY
LORD HANDUKE IS HERE AT THE






DOG SHOW-T WANT YOU TO GO
THERE AND INTRODUCE YOUR-
SELF AND BRING HIM HOME TO
DINE WITH LS =-



} INSIDE THE
FALAC SOMETHING

GONE WRONG’ G

IT'S NO USE--
THERES ONLY ONE


















WHAT THE HECK'S
FLINT UP TO NOW?

BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES








Ta
th

Whe












WELL HAVE
TO MAKE
APPLESAUCE

jaa

LORD HANDUKE-I HAD |
TO GIVE THE KENNEL
KEEPER TWO HUNDRED
BUCKS AS SECURIT Y-HE ||
GAY6 NOT TO GIVE HIM
ANY THING BUT A BONE! |

|
|
;



THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES







Se MEN OF SENGA+D01 UN ee THAT
leon Actaris GAE 7fa YOU CAME IN THE NIGHT
| THE PHANTOM SPEAKS RAPIDLY /N a, ;
te GENGA TON ie~ WhO SREP) er @ Bay

WHAT IS HE 5

SAVING f eV
a y,

fy \S
Ue.






YOU KNOW THIS IS
AGAINST THE PHANTOM
LAW*+ MY LAW ++ _ as









Y WE KNOW*+

O GHOST

& WHO WALKS+

~~)





THIS STRANGE MASKED MANe« THEY RE
LIKE GUILTY SCHOOL BOYS BEFORE HIM!
ITS ALL SO EERIE? IS IT++EAL ?








ADVOCATE

|

|

|







|





lor 5
QUALITY
and
ECONOMY



























RED ROSE

TEA Is






Seaaeee



+ tt 4+ “ 4,446,666 oe
SLPS EEF E FFP FOE FO FOI? x
8

‘OOOO SOSOSKS

,

: - Citetete ter
SSSOSSODOS SOS SPSS SSS FFF FOEE SCOP A APA AE

PAGE SEVEN

Ps)
J
°

40 YEARS A FAVOURITE

S. & S. RUM

Because of its

MELLOW FLAVOUR

AND

COOL DRINK

1 Bottled

STUART & SAMPSON
(93s) LID.

Headquarte for Best Rum.



SSOSCOOS FL OOOOOOSM .

°

3

?
4660

PP.
SPICES IOS POSSESS Oy

HURRY! HURRY!
AND

SELECT THESE
NOW

1-Ib & 2-Ib
Tins Mortons Oatmeal

Tins Corned Mutton

Tins Breakfast Roll

Tins Lamb Tongue

Tins Veal Loaf

(Imperial Vienna Sausages)

Large & Small

Tins Hamberger Steak
Gelatine in Packs

Tins Fruit Cocktail

Tins Fruit Salad

INCE & CO.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Mo day to Wednesday only



Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes Al
Tins Box-All Cleanser 23
Tins Cooking Butter (5lb) 4.50

SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Pweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now

Usually NOW

.88 Tins Pie Apples 96 .90
.20 6 1b Potatoes
4.30 Boneless Beef

72 a4
58 .50



THE COLONNAD










Men admire high spirits. If you feel listless \ ‘
and run-down because you need more A&R

Vitamins, take Scort’s Bmulsion sight swags X
You'll soon feel fall of Ife again. r

more than just a tonle
it’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT
Not just an ordinary tonic—it's rich
in natural A&D Vitamins. Good
tasting, economical too.




\ Nemes 5°
PTE

H/GH ENERGY FOOD TONIC

WINSTON S.
(CHURCHILL

SPEECHES
1949 & 1950

IN THE
BALANCE

|

e
THIS BOOK !S ON SALE AT
$})

ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

Broad St. & Greystone, Hastings.






969






bod

i IS OFTEN SURPRISING

how quickly backache, stiff,
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PAGE EIGHT

Test Ends In Draw:
Play Washed Out

(From Our Own Correspondent)

THE Second Test Match

between New Zealand and the

Nest Indies was left drawn when rain washed out play
for the entire day—the last day
New Zealand, Feb. 18

New Zealand, in such a bad a a
position, had to fight all the way r d d H t
for runs when the second Test rit a 1
match against the West Indies i tae
resumed this morning. Heavy 450: B t h
rain during the week-end had . ri 1s

little effect on the pitch as water
did not seep through the covers
The weather was dull but humid

Only Weekes of the West Indies
wore a sweater.

Runs necessarily came slowly
when Scott: 41 and Rabone: 4,
went in to bat with the total at
four fdr “76. The outfield was
slow and batsmen were content
to score in singles against good

length bowling and a well placed

field. Goddard switched quickly
to his spinners, Valentine and
Ramadhin, but Scott especially

played the bowlers untroubled.
Stollmeyer Bowls

Rabone fought determinedly for
nine then a change from Rama-
dhin to Stollmeyer saw the latter
clean bowl Rabone in his first
over, The batsman, attempting
to play a shot to leg had his leg
stump knocked down, Five down
for 93. Worse followed for New
Zealand when Rooney played a
full toss from Stollmeyer into
the safe hands of Walcott at
cover, Stollmeyer had now tak-
en 2 for 9. Scott was warmly
applauded on his fine fighting in-
nings when 5) appeared against
his name in 144 minutes including
four fours. Moir was most un-
happy in facing Valentine for the
first couple of overs but settled
down, and he and Scott were to-
gether at lunch, the score being
126 for six; Scott 71, Moir 6. West
Indies bowlers were getting little
spin this morning

New Ball

Goddard took the new _ ball
after lunch for Worrell and At-

kinson. Before lunch Moir did
not take the few singles which
Scott placed well, evidently not
being willing to face the spin
attack. Against faster bowlers
Moir played much more confi-
dently. With Scott in his 80's

Goddard fielded at short mid-off
and Stollmeyer at short mid-on
when Valentine was bowfTing.
Ramadhin ended the partnership
wheh Moir played a_ delivery
with a little spin on to the wic-
kets, “The partnership, the best
of the innings, added 54 runs in
78 minutes. New Zealand 7—155.

The end was in sight, when
with no addition to the score,
Scott. was brilliantly caught at
84 by Stollmeyer off Valentine
The batsman hit an on-drive
hard and Stolimeyer took the
catch very low down.

Scott got a fine ovation, he had
eZ 250 minutes, and hit sev-

(te from an injured ankle

Beata attempted to bat but did
not last. The innings ended
wheh Goddard at short midon
took a fine righthand diving

catch to dismiss Burtt and New
Zealand were al! out for 1860
runs.

Goddard made good use of leg-
spinhers Valentine and Rama-
dhin. Valentine who was able to
impart a little spin was the more
dai ree He finished with 3
wic for 29 runs off 34,4 overs.
Ramad hin also took 3 wickets
for 41 runs in 25 overs.

Forced to follow on, New Zea-
land openers in their second
innings, Leggatt and Emery, es-
pecially the latter, were not
happy facing the attack of
Worrell and Atkinson. Both
made the ball lift and Worrell
moved it disconcertingly both
ways. The first wicket fell at 14
when Emery was well caught by
Walcott in a right hand low eatch
off Atkinson,

New Zealand’s captain Sut-
cliffe went to the crease but after
a couple of overs an appeal
against light 75 minutes before
time was upheld by Goddard.
There was no further play for
the day. New Zealand were one

wicket down for 17 runs.
The Scores :

W. I, — 18ST INNINGS (for oe
N, “ZEALAND'S — 18T INNINGS
J, Leggatt b Worrell ..
R, Emery ec wk, Guillen b Atkinson 5
V. Scott c Stollmayer b Valentine a4
B. Sutcliffe ¢ Worrell 6 Ramadhin *
J, Reid stpd Guillen b Valentine
G,_Rabone b Stollmeyer 9
F, Mooney c Waleott b Stollmeyer 6
A. Moir b Ramadhin ., an
T. Burtt ¢ Goddard b Vaientine 1
D, Beard c Weekes b Ramadhin 4
J. Hayes not out . : 0
Extras ..... a 5
Total 160
BOWLING ANAL ysis
R Ww
Worrell 12 3 20 1
Atkinson 18 3 42 1
Valentine ... 4.4 21 29 3
Ramadhin . 25 12 41 2
Stollmeyer 8 3 12 2
Goddard ‘ 2. 2 11 0
Fall of wickets: 1—0, 3—50, 4 -dl,
5—93, 6—101, 7-155, 8 iso, »- 159, 16-160.
NEW ZEALAND — =ND INNINGS
a Leggatt not out . 6
Emery c Walcott b Atignson 8
z Sutcliffe not out :
Extras
__ Total (foc 1 wkt) 17

| They'll Do lt Every Time

TEN YE

Guiana 130/4.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 18.

British Guiana facing a 450-run
total in the Second Intercolonial
Test scored 131 for 4 at close of
play on the second day. Trinidad
hustled runs and were all out 35
minutes after lunch, Tang Choon
hit a brilliant 57 in 70 minutes.
This included one six and five
fours. Thirty-one runs were added
after lunch, Bruiser Thomas and
Gaskin were the steadiest bowlers,
the former was again the most
sticcéssful taking three this morn-
ing.

Trinidad batsmen always ahead
of the clock got 350 in $28 minutes,
then 400 in 836 minutes, The Brit,
ish Guiana ground fielding was
serappy but catching good.

Leslie Wight dominated
Guianeseé batting scoring 61 got out
with brilliant stroké play. He was
comfortable from the start. Wight
was especially good at scoring in
front of the wicket, Camacho
batted well also until he edged one
from Demming who bowled
steadily, and wicketkeeper Legall
took a brilliant catch to dismiss
him, .

British Guiana had 173 minutes
batdpg and on thf whole gave a
better display than in the first
mateh. Wight never looked like
getting out, He was pé articularly

strong at driving. The other bats-
men were out from poor strokes.
Trinidad could have scored more

but the batsmen chasing runs
madé mistakes. Play resumes to-
day. Scores: —
TRINIDAD—-Ist_ Innings
Asgarali ¢ Camacho b N. Wight 128
Corbie « McWatt b N. Wight 58
Guillen b Gaskin 70
Sampath c¢ Camacho b wiant 7
Legall_c Camacho. b, Wish 9
Tene Choon ce MeWatt b C. Thomas 57
Skeete Lb.w. b Thomas 23
Butler ec McWatt b Thomas 9
Jackbir ¢ MeWatt b Gaskin phy
Demming run out “4
Forde not out “4
Extras 10
Total 450
Fall of wickets : 1 for 170; 2 for 212,

3 for 256, 5 for 323, 6 for 397,

7 for 402, & for 409, 9 for 427

4 for 311,

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M Re WwW,
Gaskin 43 =«7 84 2
Camacho 13 1 4 0
Cc. Thomas 24 3 4 3
N. Wight an il 125 4
Patolr 7 0 73 0
Gibbs 6 0 20 0
BRITISH GUIANA—Ist Innings
Wight not out 61
Gibbs ec Legall b Demming 2
Camacho c Legall b Demming 4l
Jackman b Demming 9
L. Thomas ec Asgarali b Jackbir iv
MeWatt not out 9
Total (for 4 wkts.) 131
Fall of wickets : 1 for 12, 2 for 44, 3 for
117, 4 for 117



Alleyne Beat
Alexandra
The Alleyne School netball
team defeated an Alexandra
School team 12-7 yesterday after-
noon at the Alleyne School
grounds. The game was_ fast
throughout and the Alleyne
School were in the lead during the
greater part of the game except
for a brief peridd after half-time.
At half time the score was 7—2
in favour of the Alleyne School.
For the Alleyne School A. Sealy
netied ten goals while G. Cum-
berbateh put in the other two. P.
Cumberbatch netted three and H.
Worrell four for Alexandra.
Following are the teams:—
Alleyne:—G. Cumberbatch, A.
Sealy, M. Bailey, M. Best, B. Hus-

bands, M. Bancroft and C.
Springer.

Alexandra;—H. Worrell, P.
Cumberbatch, P.. Greaves, G.
Thompson, P. Thompson, Y.

Welcome and E. Rowe.

Boys’ Club Football

A crowd of approximately 150

people was present to witness





the"

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



MILLER CAUGHT

WEST INDIES slip fieldsman Everton Weekes holds the catch which ended Keith Miller's innings in the

Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on 28.1.52. Miller made 69.

Notre Dame Defeat Everton 1—0

Notre Dame defeated Everton by







ns the right side but kicked out.

one goal to love before a fair No. sooner was the ball back
crowd in their First Division mid-field than the Everton for-
football fixture at Kensington yes- wards got possefsion and their

terday afternoon, left winger Holder sent in a

Paul Mandeville, Notre Dame's good effort which goalkeeper Wil-
centre half, did the trick for his kinson saved.
team during the first half hour. Game Brightens Up

Everton defended the goal from The game at this stage bright-
the screen end and were first on ened up a bit as Everton on the
the offensive but their forwards one hand tried for the equalizer,
failed to get past the Notre Dame while Notre Dame on the other,
defence who quickly had the ball tried to put themselves further in
back mid-field. the lead.

The Everton front men again Everton almost found them-
got possession and kept the ballin sejyes two down when one of
their opponents area for sometime Notre Dame’s inside men sent in
but again the Notre Dame defence hard one from the left side
got in their way and thwarted which goalkeeper Roach pushed

their efforts. ver thé b Nothing resulted
From_a good clearance from the ae brand olsen: ne

Notre Dame defence, their front
men took over and forced their

It was not long after this that
opponents to concede . anes

Wilkinson, the Notre Dame “keep-



andeville | t oe er” was called upon to save a

font side, but fou HR _ one from one of the Everton
orwards,

Oppottiinity can Everton again attacked and their

Everton late ssed §.fope ob- left winger Holder after getting

portiinity to 6 he scoring whet possession with only the goal-

Olton after receiving from Blades
kicked feebly to goalkeeper Wil-
kinson who had no difficulty in
saving.

Play was soon transferred to
Everton’s goal area and from a
good forward movement, Parris at
inside left tried a good shot which
was headed out by one of the
Everton defence,

keeper to overcome, kicked
straight to him for the latter to
bring off an easy save.

In spite of repeated attempts by
both teams to score, the game
ended with Notre Dame winners
by one goal to love.

Following are the teams:
Everton: Roach, Hall, Weekes,

At this stage, Everton began to Reece, S, Culpepper, Daniel,
press but failed to make uSe of two Haynes; Blades, Olton, Lorde,
corner kicks, both from the right Holder.
side, Notre Dame: Wilkinson,

Notre Dame, bent on. scoring, Straughn, Brown, Roberts. arene
launched an attack on the Ever- deville, Greenidge, Headley,
ton goal ahd were Soon rewarded Daniel, Parris, Forde, F. Daniel
when Mandeville at centre half The referee was Mr. Eric Amory

beat eer Roach with a hard and the lines cme Messrs S. Parris
grounder from well outside the and 0, M. Robinson.
area.

Everton, in an endeavour to 9 %%%%99%%349563%
equalize took the ball well within
their opponents’ area, but when
their forwards did not kick wide,
the Notre Dame dé@fence got in

their way.
Anothet Tory
Notre Dame now tried to. in-|!

crease their ledd and made another
raid on the Everton goal,





%
x
s
8
%
.
the o ning matches of the City Reece, their wing half, ~ x
Div. Boys’ Club Football Fixtuxes 7°Cce Get i tee |
which “opened at District “A” sore a soon had the ball back x NESSYS IS
olice Station on Saturday be- fverton thade anoth
tween junior and senior teams to draw level aad miaied a haan ee
of the Bay Street and the St. opportunit when their inside
Cecilia Boys’ Club, } men fumbled from wéll within the
The junior game which was area, g
very slow ended in a draw with The interval was takén with the 4
both teams failing to score. The scoré 1—0 in favour of Notre
only outstanding player was S. Damié, 8
Jordan of St. Cecilia. On resumption Everton made a ‘
Tau the second game better foot- few changés in their lifie up, but} ¢ THREE
ball was seen and St. Cecilia this did not. seem_to make any |
won scoring the only goal of the difference to Notre Dame who soon |
afternoon, The game was very took over and attacked the Ever-| §
keenly contested and from a pén- ton goal, but one of their inside | %
ally awarded against Bay Street, forwards kicked wide.
Hi. Notville scored for St. Ce- ‘The Everton front line g6on got ° xX.
celia, going and launched an_ attack on
The referees were V. Vanter- the Netre Dame goal. They were
pool and C. Reece, give a corner which Blades took | §
er eee — ee eee ore ene: oe s,
*
iiss i anes eat By Jimmy u atlo | *
3 Sy —t SF rere eS: toate
ARS OLD e (A GUY CAN GET 7 x STOKES

} /

| Sever Nonice». { MY CAR WW

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BODy TURNI? G
A BIG BUCK ON
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FOR 7



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THE Guy BUYS IT
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Phone 4267.



Sgt. Gooding Wins

NAAONRC” ts OOOO OF 9

wHen “COGNAC 1

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TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

UNITEX en WALLBOARD SHEETS
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x 8ft. @ 23c. per sq. ft,

All these Building Boards have been treated to to resist the attack

of Wood Ants and other Termites,

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

Ges

Queen's
maintained
mastery
yesterday

College

an

over
at

Old Girl
almost complete
Foundation Girls
Queen’s College
when they defeated thern at net-
ball by the wide margifi of 11
goals to four.

The game was mostly . slow
with occasionally spurts of, fast
playing by both teams. Pat King,
the Quéen’s College O14. Girls’
shoot stored seven of the 11
goals and Pauline Smith four
but Pat King had many more
opportunities to score and botii
Smith, the help shoot, and she
showed themselves badly out
shooting form.

Cicely Ashby, the shoot, and
Astrid Welch, the help shoot dii
not get the full support of the
others of their team, and those
times when they did get+ the
ball, their eagerness at attempt-
ing to shoot negatived the at-
tempts.

Easily the most lithe, spirited
and accurate player was the
Quieen’s College Old Girls’ cap-
tain Margaret Ramsay ie
played as centre, Grace Cumber-
batch, Jean Chandler and Ram-
say kept their shoot and help
shoot regularly supplied with
the ball.

At half time the score was
8—1. After half time Foundation
played an improved game and
scored an even three.

Queen’s College Old Girls had
the first throw and at the outset
began combining well. A long
pass from Grace Cumberbatch
gave the shoot her first chance
to store, but a little too much
twirl of the ball lost theth this
goal,

Swift Passes

Foundation seutried down with
long passes, but lost the ball
without having a try for a goal
Good passes by the Old Girls
assisted them in getting the ball
back up in Foundation’s area
and this time, Pat King poised
herself nicely to score the first
,goal. The Old Girls now in-
;ereased the speed of the gaine
and swift passes through the

Challenge Cup |

Sgt. Gooding was the winner
of the Major Simpson's
Challenge Cup when the compe- ;
tition ended on Saturday, This:
Cyip was conpdted among |
the Warrant Officers and Ser-|
jeants of the perro Regiment ,
on the Government 4 weit

The chief stores
Marshall 105, 4

104
Althoug

C.S.M. King
Carter 100,
Marshall made the highést score
the Cup went to Sjt. Gooding for
having made the next highest
score,

R.S.M. Marshall who won the
Cup before got a Spoon for
making the top score.

44 ins. Per suit



Cold Climates. Sizes

Belleville Lawn
Tennis Results

The following are yesterday's
results of the Belleville Tennis
Tournament: —

MIXED DOUBLES wANpicar. |

Miss M. King and Mr. D, es
mingham (Scratch) beat Mr, and
Mrs. D, E. Worme (Scratch) 7—5,
75.

Mrs, Warren and Mr. V. N.
Roach—2—30, beat Miss LE.
Wormé and Mr. Worme--%—15,
3—6, 6—4; 6—4.

SINGLES F/NALS.

Tuesday's Fixtures.
D. Trimmingham § vs.
Worme.

JANZTEN

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OLD GIRLS- BEAT
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f scored their third within two

s| A ©

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truberiised Collar attached.

STRIPED PYJAMAS in Séthe fhicé patterns, sizes 38 to

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IMPROVE YOUR
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HERE’S THE

SERVE YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX SLICES OF
J & R ENRICHED BREAD

» Robert Thom Lid.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952



WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion 16.00 a.m.

Police and Petty Devt Courts
10.00 a.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council 2.00 p.m.

ranks, attacking centre Grace
Cumberbatch and centre Marga-
ret Ramsay, resulted in Pat King
gaining possession of the ball to
score the second goal.

Foundation gitls began to play
with more method and posi!
themiselves better for ae at
this stage. Cicely Ashby received
the ball during this spell of
faultless combination by her team
girls and with a flick of her fin-
gers sent the ball intd the net
to give Foundation a goal.

Queen’s College Old Girls

Girls’ School 3.30 p.m.
Football match at Kensing-
ton Oval’ 5.00 p.m.
Table tennis at Y.M.C.A.
7.30 p.m.
Mobile Cimenm show at
Chance Halli Plantation
Yard, St. Lucy 7.30 p.m,





minutes of Foundation’s scoring
and for the next five minutes of
the game they took advantage of
the spiritless way the Founda-
tion girls had lapsed into and
scoréd three = goals, Pat

WEATHER REPORT
_, .YESTERDAY
— from Codrington

Total oe for Monthy to

Pat King one and Pauline Smith
two, to Ts the score to 6—1, nahi Tomabethies 85.0 °F
rm wee : a 70.5 °F
Foundation pet started to play howe ee

up and were seen at their fast-

est, Their ready positioning and marometer aa” 30.005
good passing gave the Old Girls wicdiAY |

some difficulty in keeping pace

with them, but their shoot ‘and | $Umrise: 6.15 a.m.

help shoot failed 10 grab the lok, itt Gls, fe-
om copie cue tenes play. Lighting: “480, am.

soon coping wit s play- a.

ing and Pat, Hing i two _ 9.42 am., 11.32

more s ‘ore time to a :

make the score 8—1. a 2.13 am. 5.09

On the resumption, the Oid
Girls teok the initiative and Pat

King was early a : to scone
Better playing "Founda.

tion's defence esd nave of
bree heélpéd — abe to stave :
nother swéép
halt and each fenton ee Fics is in| GUARANTEED
this half.
ee ee, WATCH REPAIRS
Queen's Cédlege Old Girls—!



srg yo tiny Watch and
lock Repairs will be deliv-
ered within a week with a
guaranteed note.

At J. BALDINI & CO.,

Margaret Ramsay, Beverly Bat- |
soh, Jean Chandlét, Grace Cum-|
berbatch, Alma Griffith, Pauline
Smith and Pat King

Foundation Girls J@sitta Lid.
Garni Marina Phillips, inn pice ins an, Street.
Wal t Cicely



Ashby,
mary Wiggins, Astrid Weick am ind
Mosely,



































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PACE SIX BAHIUDOS VOVOCATE II I SDAV FFBRl'ARY l. I CLASSIFIED ADS. TgLBPMONi iSOg. ** %  Bit ha. Hii"H a* *>*J—imt eharse O t* fo• ' "^ % %  add-to.-; %  on) T. bef—er, -f a*e*. oil .ft.. %  r.ocheford ,i ri\uri-Th fcpr.i,,. %  IK Roadi 1" those k*g %  !* % % %  -A*) r>Uli\n. oho i win b>rviinenl b' %  i* a u it. IN MEMOIEIAM mIIBtS. Bomiu fact**, i MIR SAI.K AUTOMOTIVE \.l, I. ..LI -1 %  % %  \1 ... I [>r c. pt.one in !#? %  %  CAM .M. Vatmfcal 1 r-vdlti v.:<- IMI M n •* onl, ••>I..I MI it driver 1 SE M la 1 h p Saloon e undr .** Ml* %  ttl MMJ II I .-1I.-1 cnndltiiM Da-Ue Delu rlt (M \ converting to pickup IMI Chr-.ter *in; cM

(or -<~k I r.ia-1-l. A I'M !•. %  i.iilH Apply IO Bank Han Hani IB 2 -a-n Braf i l -Doctor | •W [A Dav-.rt %  BOAt i,. I Roach ittRWD' on Fcbru.ii IT. IBS1 Ha .... Hi. .1. h l A IMI Th* frtfhlanirn v*\ ft | Ilji I..-1 M> -' %  '• %  R WM> '• •' %  The call •• %  h-t the I For only thoac *.-ho kim* Tha patn* of partita itnont farewell T/MMM IssriM is ? M in PI M I.H SALES BEAL ESTATE Questions On Accession Answered 1?Ts!X r 'Z£i£Zg&££l' HOUSE (trend new. e.ple ) bedroo. K. VALENTIN I III Y WOOD be-vj of the Collet* uf Nhw "Great Officer." Ann* an.i i>l th* Kin** of Arm* „.*"* •'<• '*••• Oea' Oflurer.. /' SHIPPING NOTICES •rtv.nl roan* ar-1 •' i "i -Uraetive klUtin* -le Rorklr* Nr Road A Barnes A Co lid Dial *4!t yu" n RlVraVONMm Road. (Undlnd on Il -quere feet of land Tlw hou-a %  nuii.i di.-i.i4 Jininf and two bed•otna. • %  tar and electric IHM In%  pecUon by apptMnUitent pnoata •>!• maonc tdanc>rtilia an fiida.. iha land Queen herwlt had mtiilc Ih CUt'M •( rabniarr liH. >i i pas at tha lom.iry declaration* before'thi .|*w o' lha ags&t I 4 ,.** "" Rvil lb DmldiiM Ik* AnMhranoi. s 4" tT"? "' A "* '"..nonlni lor fuch Su Th " ""><' "' "im nd. •!•• lo nunirrOCCM^,, i, WO iked out by the contrary to ihbvlic-r ol many, A* %  •! Arm. under tlubrl | h 7 " 'K""*" * iniI Iron, rnrlers of Marrtll| ., >u p r „ uaoo The „„, ..In lh ArdlD U how or th i-.ngimSSSrs'g %  Ions RA %  coronation or the u i..I peer by the House of Lord*). Slnee Ihe dead Kino yrfU UIn P* .^^ %  *•* Chancellor, the ttmU TW Speaker ing jieers and M.Pi oath of allegiance o( great cornHt>xity and Is on* ; lake the "> which ilia College and its oltibgfon the " "• •*' AUCTION CAJt—Ford Pratarl S-lam 1MT mod*! 'Iimacru In imidanl Wa ar miir >e*m oV> Ihla vrhk'la for aala by iuritan MeEnaarnay-i flarafan r-.day ttnd I • v .'otifi M Blaaan • Crniwnv > rl %  Rtan n I t-*i CP the dead Kino t.'lt UV in „ in WcnitHHatfr fleU. do*f *i rd "'•" *'*"ir lh* .MM o/ (he funeral rltfi com* ? mc ? u m tomnimion among the .inaVr (he luperiHxion of the Lawd \f t,is rl *" Treasury), the Lord (;r#I CnmorrloiR, uiho hof rti* "*•<**-*' oI lh Council, the Lord fie. .hmryt of .he Palace of Wfsfp f iw >* S^ 1 th Lort Gr-t iiilajBggiT Chamberlain, the Lord High ConApparently It does not., since 'table (another posit which is Hall Is con"'led temporal ily for coronai lions), the Earl Marshal and the M -TEKOA' u acnadidad to Mil from Adrlald* Fabruary IMA. M*u-nr ;>0ruarv BSth. avdna* Maieh 4th. Bna, baiw Man-n IMh. aim:.* I n-..,i April litli and Bartaaai about Apni mtii In addn.a "> j*na.i ...!• Una TMSI I I inaple •*•• lot i-SiUI tanl U"MK "ill i ' Weatnunstar mat ion ur c f n*I. and the wm o'her proceedings to require al'"•'•i no doubt by aaavessMknt L *> l,i "'th Admiral (.whose ofncei lep(ianct from th, subject* of the *"h h^ Lord Great Chamberlain, ,n ">" d *> kiwe.y Ul comar in the hands of the Mtalstry m ;* lon among the Lords of the 1 The proclamation of Queen "f Works. Admiralty). Kli/.ibeth's accession btgins "We What U the difference between the lords sptrfuiu and tcmi>oral. f*ie Lord Oreot Chainb>-riairi and being assisted with these of His the Lord Chmnbrrlain late Majesty's Privy Council." "wrllh other principal gcntlvmeii The tim is one of the Great • P; Officers of Stateanother heredi• in? W 1 SCWOONM OWNERS)' ASSOCIATION iIRC > Conaiana* TaW Mo. e*T. • h.v*Wi>< %  %  M* b. art < KI.KCTRICAL i T.br aiuiurd, v ALMaanatic tacori *4una*r la Cabmai A. DTW ll F,„ r asses* Fhonr MJ1 l SS-I i ; r -. it r A .-, Bflsssi • u^iiHlnf %  ( % CoodrUaco W IS > *-In Apt>IU>l>a*>. Iron aa.l.S.4 S'lUI'ird M"li'-I FrarlllUn'r. loi Hi(Ml ul l-AJUJCHIAJ. MBDrCAJ Offl %  > < tha pariah of Saint M.,.,... .. ,t M i.-io the Com MVMI b| n. y, bi IS odo. .-... on Tin.IkSWtv |l that, as SUCfe. Lheld hv la panuonabla. It Fvur ih-.i^.i-l. Ourai %  tn*attitl| of the s^Olan MO" pre Privy Council, but an ad hoc Household payabVa m OVOPU.1. rn.UU.-anU .. i' U**Ult, i older than either House Chai of Parliament. It can be traced win aat b> back to the Gr-ji Council of the Will the King i Con.pany of the Grenadier Guards berotne the Queen's Company7 The decisioi on this, as with | other bodies bearing the same %  ..." rasas n .i MM I'KHSOMI T* %  ul-1 % %  Mil* .Ir.lll "> unv pen whookuiaiar III i %  . r .......rm. lor anyan' r-UKMTUKE r'URRiTVKi:-Raiaj|i *rd ofl.r* pu flrfgalna In Furniture Ma* Dlnti %  (laira SSiori u Bmn litniim Chan. %  M pr Aiao numaro-i. olhar Artlalaa ... (umitt.i.. ..i raductd P-neaa Call in mr*rt IS 1 M in POULTRY T1T1KEV COCK AND HEM an Mi Si * *U. UASMLZV inr* F rSSSAra. laasBaaaaBaS < bar Ol ."'" %  < .ontraetln* .nv debt m getott ijnlaa. hi a written l alra-d) holnUMt aucb auaawaiiniant. will ba g.yen a raaaonable IIIM U ra> %  ii'ouMi aama ull-r awomina; suit Further parlaruUra In connection Hh tha> dutlea of Ihl* pual can be ..Ituinrd n ifi..-ci By Order. E C ROMAN. rrk. St .Mui..... Veitrv nd, in the view of authorities even to the AngloSaxon Witenai-emot. NOTICE 1111. i. i %  MISCELLANEOUS rn i-.N< I.IAK-. Hr> a thriihoa i of Black Jai Milt SI H roos F.a. aoo Pi>nH> u ili H^ lti.ffc Jtrtey Oum. .t : |l*n II1. Imported llaifo'4 ''Harbaut View Appl> Mil Si MW-hait t as-in H | %  u FXAT A -mull wll c iitalned unI I < I "I"! %  ttrarlivi. (urtoundmi ihnul 3 mila> Ir'm cii" Avallat %  Maym. AdvocaM i\d*erU* mi D'i>< pal MM lot '"II BAH ii 2 m -.i. gH OTTSUll i m A.H WAMMr moat "v%  ,.., %  %  Riond Bin 1 %  Hi I %  i.l.AHi>-:i B"l* liuiited nunHullown. taken ulili ft Oladhoh Bulb, for neat aaai MUSH I and ol Novi-mber D .itii.se Gill Snap i.i 3 vi %  IIANDCIlAmi connlatlni .if MnlrU. • hildrena Clothea. •>i..i•) lh# OUR* Oj Ktlinburohr For the time being none, ex-. ccpl in so far a* he in now the I I the Sovereign instead of the Heireiw Presumptive. In Mai country no man takes rank NOTICE H KSttBSY OIVEN thai H %  <' from hl.i wife Veatrv of the FarUh though there are rules governing to some extent nat Mi tenned nir-nre Th.Duke presumably ranks with the Royal liul Ihe demands of courtesy alone would place him immediately wfter the Queen. It is practically certain that he will In due cours* be given a special BJ 6 Whether he will reeadvg fchsj titli.if Prince Consort i.i matt-T to be decided by the consultation with her Ministers. Why <"< %  ait the funeral arrn|i..'"irnl* m thr hinds of the Duke of Norfolk, ihe Earl Marshal? As Earl Marshal, nn office whicli is hereditary In his farm) 7 post which In this new reign £<•'>* — •** * the King\ tho Marquess of Choif-tSWi ' lh G *" ,lp,n n i 't Tn* Ldw3 rhnmhTeinr. Arms—trRtt with the Queen .r ftiftr^i r .tT K^JI AtXcr x ** accession of sKl TicAh ari o.,. ^,r J !" V lhc u "" '"nained the Queen*. post is an arduous W ||| fJW Kino s Fltatu of sirone which entails consuint super, ^a,, bf r *named the Queens vision of the Sovereign's HoweFlight? hold the Lord Great Chamberlain That also rest* with the Queen, blossoms Into something of his One suggestion which has been old-time magnificence only gl pu t forward is that it should be coronations, though he plays :n renamed the Royal Flight. SAGUENAY TERMINALS CANADIAN SERVICE From SI. John and Halifax. N.S. "U£NNY %  si NDIAL W--.ll as J.... JO Feb 39 Fab. II Marc I 4 Fab in I ah as Feb IS Mi .h A|iH UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE FROM BWANBBA. LIVERPOOL AND GLASGOW Sspaaiad ArrHi .n.,a Lla.rpaal OU.saw Ital-. RrUsala* i.f Saint Michael ilucd into th' t^gLii Ihe tollowinf Hilli. numclj .-A Dili to eatand the ope tha Veatiira IO Is E.i, v lo>ae.' Act. IMI Act amandins the lanie liuther pe.io-1 .11 M., w end Ihe %  i Act. 1M4 imd tlie .ante lor Ihe nirthei I .. lo Mir Mlh MIII.II ItU. ..nd lo amend tbe the Manager Telephone SMI U.t." KltAIN Pineoii Feed • ID lb lo*. and upward, u Itc. Phant K*l •S.SS-l.f n SillRT FACTt>HY Capable of maklnS rt* par day For parUcuUr*: I u 4111 13 I U-Tn STRAW MATS--Fan MSS DsasfM '" *%.E*JR I lleCV SIlfllT I i-.rk.ilu of Ira* •3 SO lo SI.3S onl 1 IB MISCELLANEOUS r.c.ARnrni -r Trd April Ulli April ZSrd April 1H May lllri Mav accommodation ROBERT TBUM LTD. — NEW YOEK AND GULF HEEVICI AXPLT>—DA COSTA CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE CurbYourPiles It la no tonsar necaaaar* lo anffer pain, itchlncand t...n.-nt f.m PUaa %  UM-elhadlai-'.varr •<> H,lr. U I kaown aa Phlnaro.dl M.lo %  lull I" work la IS mlpgwe ami nei Ika |ln but au lake* out lha .ll. Inf. atope blerOlns and (ombata nrrve 'cTltan.'i. Ihar.hv curblne mher Imi blaa^auaed br I'tlea awh n>H*ld> "~ Narvuuanea. Batkathe CottStlM I.JM -f an. rgr, del ''it*, and inlt Siipc.itlon Oat Hyiaa ft druisl-t ti-Iv under tha II n.tt ,vrd hut **ekln, Mill HOOK Wlm-h MakM -.')D'S WAY SAJ-VATION OF .; ?L !N" %* •*. Roberta, USBRI-I \ fta>ok A Tract Sen-Ire. SO > Central Ave.. Bsncor, NX -',• -.-.*,',*,*.*-.-,'-'.--*.'-*.*-'/'-'-'-'' | FURNISH TO-DAY Thi Mniw* 'i.ivimi WET I ri'l.l.-PANia.l SJ> \ U.tlina^nv Sdagla -ml I* ^* v ,. M V. I 1 ,' %  iiOOAKV. BireB and D**l f> Tai>.> t.i Ti %  %  9 IRwln*. Kllchen in a*Vi f? loi China Kllrhen and Ded.ot-i IJ Sl'lTES and Seoarn\ Rnom pMeel In MunlX ** %  %  • and Ilu.h. and Mani oilier *. :. %  L. S. WILSON SAdA'SSSAXS*'. -.'%  --.-. -,-,'.--•'. Stop "yorrheo and Trench Mouth in 24 Hours •.-at win .vi-ii-.:..!!. esna* vm to loaa all a,. '.. %  -.., ,„„(], .l-.faae; lure .WMd i' tomtiiout Ow> aroiltf a* that new **jen, IIM MM m BBftaid at ii* sod ROP these dlSSBSM baloi* U Ii i]lU, W..." u.'i often fouaa aol anly %  t io.i of teelh. but alao ablBDlr theunaui awl mntn uouM*. % %  ew Di,covar> Sovos Teeth Tli leetr? !" The taltoVlnTli. .V n •>.(> %  i iht reeulta thai ,.-. i .nBeredfraialr.n.11 for ten >eil> My %  i-'JnUe r**er*Tettin i-rth i it II'JLIIII al\aupeartei i m :-n *-•• 1 ti>"4 tt-i .Hi <•"• naah ftituer andtraM %  nd sal ''ii" bardtat ol load Lursmtaad Aaaa< v ( ..i o tail *M -o certain . %  .. ,' ,. ii laaislcMaallMsruonor .it on iclurn of (B>pi* p*(**e oMaMH raingroar IHUI i.i : .vu"rrJ)S/f5s^ja" ..a.MioEaniwia'i 1'or t*i>orri*ea**Ttcnli Moi ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS HII.KH OTTRTOS. AETS VFrTOEMOB. BEDA9. JOVTRIA8 T ARTIBTICA8 Ct'RloBIDAnKfl. TRAID08 DE t-A INDIA CHINA e EJII'TO THANI'S l*r. WEB. HryBt-. Dial Stfg Sises: 10— 2 $2.2t 3— 6 t. *-" "* l Hi in:; vuur Children in for an expert filline;. >*ro ^ — {



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ii i iDAi imm ARV i. isu RARRAnO<) AllvflCATF. iliKr.r" JAMAH i vgwsurra J'ca Hard Currency Imports Increased From Our U n Correspondent KINGSTON. Feb. 14. Jamaica's dollar programme (or i plies from hard cumnca area* for 1952 has now been approved by the Secretary oi State for the Colonies For this year the island will be allowed a ceiling for impoits of $26,000,000 U.S This figure Is just slightly above the 1951 dollar programme and represents a substantial cut in the programme M originally submitted. Ho. ,-*er. this will not aaTect the facturerV Asaaeiatton endjeprraddillonal dollar allocation undei eentatlv* of primary producer the US. token impost* scheme for organisation* (wnccrtu"* int exthta veai. which mieht be inport of their crop* lo Hi • creased frcm SI.250.000 to S1.400.On leaving Jamaica Ill 000. boll will visit Trinidad and Britia i: . returning lo The Jamaica Covem-nsnt hail i, put forward an increa-aV CEIVKKAI LICAVKS FOR >lll V\\ tlon for the 1U5J dollar import.programme because ol the effects of the hurricane and Ha for dollar Roods arisiriK as a result l it. list) because of f creates in prices ..ml Ihe fact that certain essential goods had been placed under open geia i The I. '..>. ounctl of bai accepted H cipl of unification of public services in the British Caribbean a* a half-way mark to the ferferalisanwn el the service* under I meat. Tho Jamaica official snd noniA Bolivar Society, i u ....... : added rating the lift<>f Simon Bolivar, recommendation thai all Public iibeiatoi <>f HM A %  bould bs anW snd soon be founded in Jamaica. Plan* %  I Jjast Ihe etftll for the Society are now being f-T unification under the recomworked out b^" C "lendatLw of the Holm. GENERAL SIR OPRA1.D TEMPLE", (lffftl. new High Co*BU**loncr for Milajra, with Ul* deputy Mr. D. C MacOiluvray. ui.tmae. at Loudou Airport t-etore leaving to take an thall po>tThfy w*r heen off by Lady Tempter and Sir Grrald'v 18 year-old dAiiglitn Jsnc EXPRESS by Navsrro, Venezuelan Consul snd a number of prominent Jamaicans Recently. Dr. Navarro present ed gift* of the works to HI* Excellency the Sir Hugh Fool. K.C.U.G., the University Colh .. Indies and the Instil %  which, studiad the matter Previously, the Jamaica House of Representatives had accepted unification in principle .. Douglas Stanley, sni of Norman Stanley. KC. leader th,. People'* National Party. males and other tall ot the L'nileading persons In the literary life versll* of Liverpool, of the Island. Mr Msnle v has been There are Bolivar Societies in ing Ln psychology and will be the Latin Amerleas. Trinidad, concerned with research in race Barbados and other West Indian relations In Great Britain parislands. It It stated here, and U tacularb as it affects the Negro is felt that Jamaica should have a in Liverpool, where there is one branch of aociety. especially In "> •*• ""• % %  coloured DepuMh view of the Bolivar' ''*' Kingdom His connection with the island, p.uticular angle is the py cn |ogBolivar was in Jamaica from ical adjustment in th* social Fresh Approach To Malayan Problem SINGAPORE. Mr. Donald Charles MacCilllivray. formerly Colonial SecreUry. Jamaica, has arrived in Malaya to lake up his now appointment as deputy to Gen. Sir Gerald Templer, OK c.-w Hi^li Ci.mmii^ioiH'i in the Federation of Malaya. in Mi.l.ya Rfcv. Thomas < Irdained Leeward Is. Methodist Synod synod of the UnfRl %  I ins MowioBUt . )USt completed ,'.. Antigua .. u rnnsgaas n i.i'etentative layman m uxDutiit %  which stretches Vngm Is.asii.1 North i., Dominka and Curacao I J Excellency The Governor ul Ihe Leeward Islands, Mr K W Hlackburnc. wrlcomtd the Synod to the island at the great meeting on the ilr.t night of the meeting* th. Synod In his speech Hii. Ihe gre.ii pati th.il Antigua had played in of Methodism in th* west Indie* for it w.> here that the flrst Methodist mi. unded In r.eo He stressed too the great part the Methodist Church had played In the develvpinent of the Colony in not onlv lual held but also ln the in edura'••a tnilm * M m IS fi—i m. i .1CM IhSm na< 'mitmm* A— il. IS * SUVHV ***•—•*. aew a*... STOKES k BYNOC LTD -AGENTS the xt ; May •IHlDeeember in the pa The gift of a cogeu factory has been made to the Government of Jamaica by Mr. W. Garfleld Canadian flnanoe fOi ; l uf the coconut indu^wy ..! thisland He was selected for the post be%  rag considered "a man who will bring a fresh mind Ut bear on the man] the present administrative machlne" ta Malaya In anikswncing nla appointment, Mr. Oliver LyttenasL Secretary of State for the Colonies asked him to leave .'ui Malaya immedintelj'. Mr. MacGUhad our (ill of legacies from Palcklinc." said one Malayan councillor, while another said that Mr. MacGilllvray would start hts new task with all the duadvantages of a man from Palestine. The lv-.i|ipointrd Cornmlasaotioi Tne luternatioii..! sending a team of industrial experts to survey the <-•< dustria] potential of Jamaica. The team will arrive here Mum Wash(I. laillMgnl baa accepted the ington on March I. offer and ha requested the CocoAt the same time the Governnut Industry B<*rd to lake over men! here Ma> se. |UOfl of tha factory situef MewrS, A. D. Uttlc. iill lea t lloundhroofc, IVrUand. of internationallv (amous indus\ ..lur i-f the Kilt—lands, buildtrlal advisers, for a period ol 10 lnS and machinery—U estimated months in the first instance, and M >150.W l 1 has Invited a team of bsdv %  expertand industrialists from Great Britain to recommend der>r. T, W. J. Taylor, C B.E. tails of an Industrial policy for tin principal ol the University Colisland, leas of tin* WeM Indies, ha been ,., , ... appointed a member of the PubAfainst this background of in|l( Sl rvice Conunissio,, newly dusirial planning the Jamaica legislature has pasaed bills foi the establishment of an lndu>in.: Development Corporation and an Agricultural Development CoTporation; and last week DOS of the Hrst heavy Indiutrtea planned __ for the Island wn officially opwidatMn, ed and the hrst fruit* of lt s proulili t he Uvray arrived in Singapore th.ee Police in Malaya is also a former yean, after In* appointment wg* PslteUne offldgl, as was the late announced Sir Henry Gurncy. High Conunissioner for Malaya until his assasfiut the appointment has filiation by Communists last year brought a storm of protest ,.-,-. Malaya, where Ihe hope had hien > ,! M "' expressed that an officer with local i" Jamaica was 1! 2.200. will now experience would be appointed n, have a salary ol 15.000 a year, it the post. Mr. MacGilllvray. who '* believed H was In England has been In the Colonial Service when appointed to his new post since 18251 and has served in manv and was asked lo leave for Malaya part* of the world, haa nu txw.. Vl,u %  ,,lc U1 %  nee at all of Malayan i>robl. ,ii Jamaica to exCrcisi control over Ihe civil service appointments and promotions. Other members of the Commission include a Privy C a High Court Judge, a repreaeni -he Civil Service A*soaoclel welfare worker pal Assistant SecUnder thr headline "Man from Sisujapera Tunes" ron.nicnted' "This appointment must cause uneasiness It was unneeesluse ihrr was a sulUble Deputy Blroady on the spot. And it looms to us an unfortunate appointment because it bn. %  MI cursorily the wishes of responsible leaden; of opinion. It is not Inlng to make Sir Gerald Temper's task of winning public conlitiencc gm %  Although Mi. MacGilhvray filling the appoi' lln >r'> HUioui His post as Deputy Hi eh Commissioner will be Foi the duralion of the on.. HI I' Di.hli Imiii^lriuKs. To Sludy Juniaioa duction on the local market. ge "I Ihe KstabThls was the newly DDO brucMd ii>nments Branch of tinCaribbean Cement Company': fairial lory ^itu-iteu in East Klngst TB1 HAOUB. ttki.nt ortkial and adminurtrato,. (whuUtel development speclahst %  r Muo, he does not have be asked to conMr. Jock M. Campbell. Chairtnbute one d. I 1 man of the Wesl India Commitfor at least 10 £U> unttl the tec in London. Jamaica Government la able to Mr Campbell is also hav| r„U responsib.htv for discussion, with the Sugar Manuthe "' knowledge of Malaya. Hi* experience in Jamaica, it said. must be viewed against the Compies background of Malayan politics ipend i i Jamaica till' spring *'> study the powblfltlei of the Island, announces the Dunn fr Economic Affairs. ST. GEORI %  irrh last oi Sevd Muweil Albert i:-t i % %  ;-, gam i<> u I held its i •-. tones the Qoe> i .i I .!, i and Ihe sp e akers werg Croetoy and V ,\ Kep-uis were aUu read by Revtl Mr Mural :,.( \< Watson •-!..-! anikouiuvment of BOBgll Rfvj. ll Hi lo Revd Mr Griffin as Chairman of in i ana al*. %  Hevu David Mitchell U ford church. BrM Mi Mauraaa it faTOWis*. Hasina Dili., • lirenadines. was mi a ahoit vtaU In the %  wei k lo ciaisult with peraunhere on ways an of bnprovlnt Ihg n,i %  A htnauar pereanallte ol several lnter-Sehi->ls .mil I'm* Qup t.iu; oaansnt aa i ptayei for St. he renewed many old tence bora • • • At the Ciirnir. A A week before Mi Jnstier A H Cools-lairtigue. a JUTJ ik) ]• %  ] %  lan WDM I t)i antl ins the rieatn of hu fath %  lasi October by a kmfe wound whr, I Miie.i on hi' mother during %  Qghl betwi parent' .Wiiiuua Rev. J Davlaon, Ret h Derhsn [Si JO1M>£ Net J (Freetown) Dotnlnioi Re w. j Barrett iltoaeau). Rev.! A William, (Marlgot). Moniserrel Rev E J Canard (PiyHev F A Roberts % %  It St KIM. Itev E M Hilher (BasseterreI. Hev. N 1'iiirit i It. H 1 Chrli Men (pu one Bia i .%.-ns i Set II H Brown (Charlrstown) M Bunter and L T Byron,. r Eustaiiui Kev. K. a Swanslon Si Martin I Hev. C L Carty il'hilllpsburg). Rev, J. E I'erklns (Mangot), Rev. Mi i Dan, II. inpacmimeian %  inuuilla Rev II ''.Henry. Vtrr I;KI /ils'ids Rev. I. Race (Road Vow-n. Tortola) St Thomas. Hev K Warner Arabs: Hev J Itn.mpaon ('uraceo Rev. E H liioma. The Rev J Davlson is visiting i eland and the Hev l( A Kirilev will act as Chairman of the District ..t St John 1 until he reft* Autumi lynod eaprrsaed ita eoni r n at tne ki'w>h ..( the liquor In some Hlands the nunaber of liquor shops :.re far too many iii ihe population. I: Is hoped that Melh. % % %  i an wnl reeuaa the danger ot :.. mink and give a lead In n( the habit. Synod took the oiipurtuuity "f visllng the first %  •utres of Methodism in the Wctt Indies, English Harbour and fjnbert'i house All the .. now rctuineil % %  their 0W ii islands havini: Ix-en refreshed [,\ the friendship and fellowship p\ | .| hapaa ilnv tegjeiliei Alkn-Selirer's effective painleliever staits to work at a you welc.me relief. .and its rf.rv.n.. helps .,nee.f that relief. It's an two, thiee"! Onr drop one oi two Alka Bettaw tablets featoa ejaaaelweaas w-ui how fast it fegaaa and dMaolvael FVa dunk it down. You'll like t!. Ute' Three aee how feel letter) I>on't let a Headache dig M take lamou* AlkieSlt/ei ri\ht Keep a.apply OD Band (await AUi Sillfif helps millions III ll atlp (hi toe Alka Seltzer -;:rr# chools. Dr. Wm.Minius. who I. 1 land's Dlrector-Geneial fpj Industrial Development, will k Vet Brlttah rtsldents in Malaya for Washington at the end "f believe that Mr. Lorttelton's ehrowe February. He was a mambei ol is a wise one. They point out that a Dutch delegation WM the present emergency in Malaya cussed Dutch Guiana's aeonomfc has continued for nearly four development problems with the years, in spite of offlclall with a World Hank and other oniclals in knowledge ol Malaya Obviously. Dutch Guiana re>Ml> they say, a man with an entirely .. „ „.,,,„ fresh approach is ""L^T"?"" .'i' Jm J naKm .*•*! Another fact,., ; ,Mlu **\ the Malayan mind. how. vei Hank foi Reconstruction anu that Mr MacGilllvray served in Development under tlic proPalestlne from IBM up lo the lime gramme foi under-di of his appolntmsnt to Jamaica m countries. The Dutch G^ 1947 afjslayans are saying bitterly h..a grunted him three month? that aupaitntlv the Colonial Ofllce leave to enable him to m regardsserviM in Palesii-GRACIr: FIELDS MARRIES AGAIN IgU Of CAPBL i BrlUsh it iga Mai Qi snd Rntnai n Boi v..i were married al U Orncn beemme mn and wlfa %  tut IUS1 %  she an<( l: i Ii exchanfa i i .end" I'wikn.i' < n —u.r. 1'rnl il(hie -litm Hinder Oil Talk* TEH KHAN. Fob 19 Meg* tiaUoiu between the World itaok and i'n nil. i Mohan medl i : dispute] snagged Saturday uu the q of profits If no .,,> rn. ..lay HoUlt fjatdr • i %  • % %  >•! hb World Hank misMon an i %  duled to mva lor the United Slain". Gardner and, his advisers Diet BgtWflgy inoiniiig with Moasadrgh and in tho aflernoun with u mixed I'ai liaio*uUi y ...I eoniitiission at the rirniiei'.house. The Hank's oaTtt v...re ported by liaruan oftlclals fag work out so that Iran would get eO per cent, of the K rftta -the aame ainounl as IKV Arabia, ira.i and other nua-^l < hi* -I i .'r prOM ivrmar.. ee'-etonnrnnuhea tad ('.. % %  sfort MADE BY BER6ER PAINTS ON SALE AT ALL HARDWARE STORES GARDINER AUSTIN & CO.. LTD —AfenU T mie Fill 101 UICUGI oo CONSIRJCHOH IODYICH.SSIS FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Dill 2385 Sole Distributor. Dial 4504 rt£ WIHIS CO-OP COTTON FACTQBY



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fOLK lliKHUMIS AllVOt'ATE u MM1 I'UKi \n\ W. MM BAKB\W)S AUVOGSTE Nt M 4 it Hri4a*ua Tursda>. Frbniarj 1. I52 Ol II SI WITS MAJOR Gritnth's broadcast this month and Lord Rownl tan's speech to the members of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce will have attracted the attention of all those who regard Scouting as something to be encouraged. Some of Major Griffith's statements were depressing. in the 4u years of local scouting." he said, "100 groups have been registered. but to-day there are only 38 on the register. Where are the 62?" Earlier he had said, "I fear too many troops fall by the way through the Scoutmaster for one reason or another failing to implement the Patrol system as conceived by B.F." Or in words more widely known, the blind canimt lead the blind, without them all falling into the ditch. Scouting in Barbados, if we are to judge by these remarks of the Island Scout Commissioner, lacks other things than money. It lacks sufficient leaders, men who will not fail to implement the Scout Law. A good scout may not be a little angel, but if he is not a good boy or a good man he is not keeping the Scout Law. And in this connection what Lord Rowall.u. is reported to have told the members of the Chamber of Commerce seems to be at variance with something Major Griffith said in his broadcast. Major Griffith said that the "Scoutmaster is looking after your boy—the boy who will be the man of tomorrow." Lbrd Rowallan on the other hand stressed that the job of the Scout Leaders was not to make "little angels or good little boys" Their job was to make men, who would not only set standards themselves, but would help to raise the standards of others. Clearly then if scouting is to succeed it is better to have one scout leader capable and competent to lead and to set an example for boys who must necessarily be good boys if they obey the scout law faithfully, than for scouting to be regarded as a good institution which will absolve parents from the responsibility of training their own children to become good citizens. Major Griffith did in fact place responsibility on someone other than '.he scout leader for what manner of boy a boy scout is today, but he did not make it clear whom that someone was. while he did unfortunately throw the onus on the scoutmaster of "looking aftsvr your boy or your neighbour's boy." Lord Howallan was much happier in his expressions, when he said that scouting provides an anchor for boys who would otherwise drift through life until they reach the rocks and are shipwrecked. The tragedy of Barbadian life, a tragedy which makes the task of scout lenders more difficult here than in other countries is that so many boys begin life on the rocks and are born shipwrecked. To that extent Major Griffith is probably justified in suggesting that scoutmasters do look after "your boy or your neighbour's boy." Bui that is not his task. His task is to make men: and not ordinary men, but men who have such high standards that they can help others to raise theirs. If everybody in Barbados obeyed the Scout Law there would be no need for sctmtnu But if scoutmasters and KOtttlMdtfl tln'iuNclvrs fail to obey the law and thm by disqualify themselves from making good boys, let alone good men, of whal avail is scouting to the community? In its second edition, since it becan.e a fortnightly publication the "New Com monwealth" dated Janunry 21st. ty %  happy coincidence discusses what is beini; done to help to equip the younger generation in Britain and says that "correspondingly larger achievements must be asked of it if its purpose is not to grow weak for lack of spur." it refers to "Scout expeditions to mountain peaks in winter" and concludes by saying that ii would . % %  source of strength to the Commonwealth as a whole if "young men from various countries could be enabled to share great endeavours and so interchange influence and example by making major physical efforts under conditions of hazard." No one would suggest that scouting Would receive a great impetus from the institution of organised expeditions to the top of Chalky Mount, or by tree climbing in Turner Hall Woods, but certainly Uun ll a solid body of opinion in Barbados which confirms Major Griffith's broadcast statements, as quoted above, and considers that scouting could do with a tnupheninp up of its moral and physical fibre If Lord Rowallan's visit should have this result it will have been as successful as it was necessary. FREE ENTERPRISE llv K K SMtTIUEft %  the usual the Qoi %  > % % %  %  IWUII nt to 'do n a* irt i<> i>c i to by 1 .take, beltei bviousb A-;m ex%  i serious land I flu B been given to up nil .ontroU lei to let Inmind. • history books M was %  wise man who knew U unhampered as tide* and his llmll %  • which wo ; :, 'x have once been Imposed the\ lead Io be analysed In %  St* rt perpetuate themselves long after hut no doubt *t any real need for them has passed, important Is th> habit of our wars 'on the cuff instead %  %  on guard against Ihis paying for them % %  %  been clrealised how s^ch restrictions harm than good by huvinot ret mads %  outran and the mment OH %  Battia of Waterloo, ccnlive it gives to efficiency, ll though the more UUH 1ISUVS may in fact be Impossible for economists Ihit.k 1| "• %  n*v*r taken an one i afore %  %  %  I ttttive busi. ( ,-l.t) Wl-ll..:n alls %  flora 1 rt* leflty will pay dots not work its own wars In :r i goring t in recant United B1 U Duurenllv by %  %  %  %  ml Ihis The pn pel Iwi.i'.i'ih i f | OS BIO %  to act as %  i ; the com%  j.r.d consumers, capital and labour. %  .... ... 11. i.. 11... in i 1 in i i ii %  %  -> %  •* % %  %  -•—.—-.. ,.„al or h."! !l! l, *5!?Jf*SLS: iZopoly ol labour > n1 but it I as any .n causa %  %  I o on cknto-daj It! s direct renpotv In. r fl in' do I reslrieeffort;. OB trying U) mlttlW %  >' u ,_. I i pied in our own seonoai bi Ooveminent con,ur mn> ,. .;. thsi under them there iUttla or ho bankruptcy, but this is fallacious because U really means there is UtUc or no v.peUlion. To keep the free enterprise system healthy there must from time to Umc be elimination of the Inefficient concerns, and their replacement by fresh ones with energetic management and new ideas. Thi. may seem harsh but speaking generally no business concern need go bankrupt. There It always the choice of alternatives to either Increase efficiency or wind up the business. In the nature of things it is more difficult to ensure keen competition in the trade of an island than in a continental community of the seine *i, to that an Island Government has a spenal responsibility in the matter. The system of selling goods on a basis of .o*' plus an official]:. >ancUoned 'mark-up' really encourage merchants to let then costs rise, while setting a fixed maximum or ceiling" price usually results in either a minimum price or an unnecessary shortage It Is not meant to imply that if all controls were removed tomorrow prices wuult' go down at once, It Is Impossible to estimate the extent ol the harm done to the free enterprise system by the strait-Jacket of controls It has been in for several years, during which ii has not been able to be either free or enterprising. It might Uike some time to work oft the evil effects and return to keen om.peUt.on. In due course some prices might go down and others up. hut they should at least bo more Bnan reality than the) are non. As Uie war is supposed to be over, it could be uor"h trying. In the meantime Ins pulicy of holding prices of local products down to a level trt-lnw the COSH el production, M substantially lower than corresponding Imported items, is basically unsound and will cause a %  hortage of the local products in the near future. The Xalion And Monarchy SPECIAL RADAR AID FOR SMALL AIRPORTS A simple one-man radar aid for guiding aircraft in to land has been designed for small airfields which cannot afford expensive equipment. The prototype is now in use at Southend Airport, near the East Coast. It is similar to the Ground Controlled Approach system (GCA) used at big international airports, but much cheaper. It will cost aoout £3.000 to £3,500, about onetwentieth the cost of GCA. Pilots have already made more than a thousand approaches on this "poor man's GCA" and were brought in to the end of the runway in all weathers. The Ministry of Civil Aviation wants all pilots approaching the Southend airport to use the equipment. The principle of the equipment is that when aircraft approaching the air-tield call up the tower on radio, their bearing from it can easily be identified on a VHF/Direction Kinder, and this bearing is then used to pick them up on a simple radar screen. Engineers point a narrow radar beam at the aircraft along the same bearing, so that when the plane flies into the beam it appears as a "blip" on a radar screen. A controller on the ground then directs the "blip" (and the plane) right to the end of the runway. The plane does not need to carry special equipment, and can approach and land in any weather. To make sure a narrow radar beam would bo wide enough to pick up an aircraft at distance, engineers made tests by looking through an old gun-laying telescope which was pointed in the direction of approaching aircraft. The radar beam now used picks up aircraft about 15 miles away. The prototype of the new approach aid is built into a single-decker bus so it can be moved about the airfield. On the roof of the bus is a radar "Dish" scanner, which is mechanically locked to the radio directionfinder. As the pilot calls up on radio, the dilfa swings round in the direction of the approaching aircraft and projects its radar btam. Below, in the control cabin, the scanner is connected to a rotating control console with a radar screen in it—in appearance rather like a submarine's periscope. The homer operator swings the console round by moving two handles at shoulder level—again very much like a periscope. To pick up the aircraft the operator makes %  small adjustment to perfect his "aim", and ihe aircraft, as it comes into range, appears >n the radar screen. The scale of ranges of the screen can be reduced as the aircraft ; approaches. There is a microphone and loudspeaker on the console so the operator can speak to the pilot and listen-in while [watching the "blip" on the radar screen. 'The equipment can handle only one aircraft at a time. The aid does not need to be sited at the [end of the runway in use—the operator's I directions can be offset to allow for any run%  way on the airfield. PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.OO per haadrrd ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street 4 Greyitoae, Halting• '•WEAIt-EVEH" Am liiTir l'n'ur.> Cookfr To rook I'l-cri/lAifii/ M •• %  Ihuumkl of mm i„ a frortion ol lh>linn: too! So • %  ••-•/ to opvrato unit so tTonomiral I'ililni \ halt it. C.S. PITCHER A. CO. (By VISCIltiNT SAMIH.i HOOVER AGAIN with Its own local patriotism, pas, ini.tU'ly cherishing its own inrrfHI MIIK.II.' it Jus been said, depeudeuiw. ll ia the M narchy .I, .. sensible people." i. our which hv made It possible to, poUUoal system is on the whole combine the fullest liberty of the OH, MR. HERBERT HOOVER, this successful, Una may be due to our parts with the enduring unity "'.„._„„ ra __ ,_ aimfwi wa<*ilv a v M r I efemaj lbs lessons f the whole. The future historian 1 "" 1 "* came In Almost exactly a year tnea io the logic of theory, may be able to estimate better ago, just after 1 had got back to America learned, among other than we can how great .has beer m Kurope \ sal m a yacht and l isle ned by are the service U> the world thai has r f ... T Insge, and coiatcarj to all forecasts, that as oui Constitution more and i denwei Ik the has grown itag ikti. but stronger. thai wo nova universal suffrage House of Commons rein i.l.i .a piu-iislUti M iv ', ii i'ii H ttUOl la tti 'i in-;liiulioi.*, 11 they arc — of control wc Wul fl a ^ ul lo * hstenorl fen wilh d**n wiui democracy, full coum u — sri-_ ^ ... n -.rfii !" ... Bbteta n !" ,ri-h— !" rresiaen t >ou are iibtenea iu wisn aeep lion of Ihe people. lO.NAitkllY i limit" imi have happeneu bul loi litre again, King Ccorgi will surely be counted among 1 ,llll > peal ol the Kta* m the gre .. I I .,. t II. 1 --. Mil had .I1..1I •lo VI adversities, our Slate fluurisin.... loi It rlourUhei becauie ll li secure | reipect by a great many Americans. When 10And it Is secure because at the y ou advocate taking the G.l.s out ol Europe HI. characlttr made h.m base it rests broadly iraokh — .;;,V; i du,Vnnu'.";"e'7o,'The' i ; !" ;i ^,\i. *£& tUSt *ummlt ,h |t;''thwith. you will probably start up again that fusion and luiiiiivd lailhnfl ,„ all aM „,,,.„ o( unilub ,,, ,ui m i„atn. in ihe Crown. that Great Debate ol last year on America'i fully the obligations 11 enlailnl. mor .| s It made him an eaimpU ... all the world lllay t.ioa.nsc, and „. „„,„, A Sovereln '1,. r,il^..r-H ,. h „ ,,„„„„ „, h ,„ K n^„ History eaODOt fill 10 1,-d every duly, whether of S ,L?"SH! ^"'i vi ?.£~7 JEZSTtl. rbcLve the nation Is glad to hava a C^ueen. There Is no Salic Ia<>' here. Many centuries before the Sex Dlsquall 11 cation Removal Act of thirty years ago, the Urltlsh %  titution was enlightened •ill not to bar fn ..rchy at Us beat. Constitution required Of him. Ami The sl-ibil.r. 01 tt.o IMi.ia has "' brought us R Quceti Contort M the itabUit, ot Par"*• ** won and h nrmly Uaaent IB teosoi tin leep respect and warm "%  linn of the whole )>eople. r. not Irnnsient whole foreign policy — the policy that your close admirer, Senator Tail, is so anxious to ditch. SEA TO SAUCEPAN UP IN PORTLAND, Maine, they are getting ready to deliver to New York dinner tables quick-frozen lobsters packed in seaweed and contained in a plastic bag which is TV. seen bow, over the greatsi part of Europe, one l.v DM Institution.* KOV.-I iimenls, in appearance lirmlv lk( ( ,, 1IM .|,,. Ml upel) the enough r.^l to bar from th c high%  popped into the saucepan along With the established, w-'re suddenly and ,.|,. nirn 0 f conttnulty They ke,-p "I position in the land any Prson iftly overturned. For the most ,,„, living generation In touch with born %  "lember of the larger hlf *-"•". part ths aem.'Ci.uii-s teL .,,. /enrrntiont thai have Kon<> of the population. We are all reSEI-F-DEFENCE ""v.''." ', . ,::.,";.! ,n n ,*r"" SRt7 & !" 'h. r ve g 'SU n ******* %  * Goldstein Q "OPP"' ll errcs, producing weak and trail;, m .H.rf •., gbth the past period^ illustrious in history—VicRobinson-Turpin light) has received a sicnt ainlstrjea, had brough' her.enrh %  ire thfutorl H Anne, 4nd long ; .go, but huee—and approvinc—fan mail because he bout Uu collapse ol authority. ,„>•,. would -nt Hand. vividly remembered. Elisabeth.' In thlg country and In the group And biaUtuttons find their safewhom we mux now call The First t MOB tern auard in tradition, in ceremony. In many ways the greatest of the Europe which stands out as among If the authority of the Slate is to three. (he bast-flOVenil d Mats* In the be effective, it must command Who ran tell—i think there are Id. that* upheavals have not respect, and for lh..t it should Ksiins of It—whether, if there ore occurred. This is l.n i!f be stately. A Monarchy, and no more great war 1 our new in ,i nation deeply divided, especially a Mi>n;#.hy rooted in Queen m.y not be destined to preBUtters cme 1" I cri'i*. if there %  thousand years of history, can side over a period marked bv nmstltutlon.il S.n'i.r:'! i, bud to democraey dignity and a sharped faction from tns pre in i> if | ir a grace that will v.•ions and discontent dlfferonl and Independenl InAua .soun-e of inability and strength, period vigorous and eonstructivi* [. ineOnM I | pol • .1 an" • *rtth re-birth In phlloaph\ *" %  Uufonlsms, ho can m |* < ^ n "" on,t ,,n|i pete%  ol lenmmr. in ill the arts and all In sraj 1 "1 %  I mental importance. Our 'he sciences: a reign werthi •.here the t "inmonweslth i a an association r-nk in hlrlory with the brltltan' !£p >d J f a*S£! *mi*^*!JX2: ' rom munl,les *SS diwrsed om of the great Queen whose accession lo lhe t aignincar.t contribuber or n iiarty and Its noniimi-. over il! the continent', each one name -h? bear*. ... , stopped a boring boxing match TWO TO JOIN NA.T.0. WASHINGTON. • Greece and Turkey formally became members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza' tion on Monday when their Ambassadors deposited acceptances with the State DepartI ment. Acting Secretary of State. James Webb said "I am confident that through their would take pln--e at this point. No vehicular traffic would use this access road unless going to on* of the houses there. Entry signs would have made this Into a one l HIIIIIM'IISSAV Health pointed out that 14 ft roads Rrpnrt '/*.-/ lulinfi srould connect this Section with To Bh Tdlfor, The Advocate "'' lions of the Slit A v '' Cullod*" vvav road Hsvlnc W.nderer^' H .us. but sought rMehetXlHone"Mde\T?K 1 10 cons-4-uct an H ft v. ,-ie ,. r*. 'L,\ roiiM he widened the Issue of today's date. ., mis"nteniel access ro ; .d which would ^Stm\%SS wia ncd leadlne fii-imurh as II '' %  %  ilrradv facing on -ssary. lekel Field on the JUjl "•?* "jg, J* was seeking the appnn 2 I '"' U "'"i 1 ' '' h . h 'eelded that It itruct B I ... ,,l ;,w ,'S ** mt idth.,,,1 of the other proprariate It If vou wouP ,,,, posed roads in the area. to give I ft. aeoeai road should IT. O. LAS11LEY. The "i'lriii nnd Stntrmem led In spite of the fact Manager a .Secy, Housing Board. mlttcd to the General Board of that no alteration in the layout 14th Faby., 1S52. nil will make greater effectiveness of the %  oUect.ve defence system which had been created under the treaty." Turkish Ambassador Feridun Erkin said that the Turkish people are happy to join the defence system. Greek Ambassador Athanase Politis, pledged his country's determination to live up to the obligations of the treaty. Webb said "I heartily welcome these two countries in our organization which provides the framework for constructive and fruitful cooperation between all members, having as its objective the preservation of world peace and security."—U.P. "YIPPEE Children's Elaitic Topped COWBOY SHORTS AND COWBOY LONGEES Fawn Blue Green Brown DOMINICA CIGAR Or Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.—Agents COLII (ITS llrlsk.l ol nrrf onsta lwr Ox Toniisr. l.aJMt> Tonaum Hams. Cat r Hhol. Hams In lias Xlb., 4 lbs.. Itlba. When you give, give Dubbonet, l-ql. Rile—S3 00 Prepared Mustard XSe. Eaeh Purple (inpri t-lb. Una— 54e Eaeh <'heese In Uns—7Se. Eaeh SAIX'ES IMPROVES ALL MEAL8 ITALIAN KETCIU'P A. I -Mil LEA A PERRIN SAUCE MEAT D0T. ttootl Beer Chlrkens Ducks Dressed Rabbits Dresed Tripe Ox Ton*ur CsJvea Lrrer FrMta VegeUblea Frosen Salmon Hsddork Cd FtlleU Kipper*



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PACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATI! TUESDAY. FEBRUARY It, 1'SJ Ctvdb CaUuu} Madame De Kuh's Exhibition \*t**umrmK>VfR JOHN RAHR B U 1 A I tifltM %  I H % %  M %  • Holiday with Daughter M lt NOLI. ARMSTRONG, f..,t-lCr C I n>mp-iiii'd by Mrs. lil..11 to (U : s: • spend abvui Iwo *.kwild their daughter. Three MontJp. M R. AND MM TYHWHITT CIU and family i, b"n holidaying In Barbados for the past three months in • Trinidad to-day. Mi Gill who 1* a Barbaric,:. T.I'D ...moid* in Mo It at. RitU and Antigua C AbLX AJ.D VWKE.JVO LMVfcfticnal Manager Mi. 11 I. M ^Vacwugh returned over the weekend Iron., a short visit to St. Kmund Antigua. Mr. AM. .ugh k-ti Haroados on It Bnian 13. Holiday Over M is-, lAIHl WBTI oi %  of Anitgua who had been holidaying ban of January ni\ lay moitui'L' bf II W.I.A bar rtaj In M.iritado* ahe liuii! of id tod Mi> Back from Trinidad R l i %  To Join Hutband % R|\ Qta from St. Kltts M" Short Holida> AND M %  UW.IA atony. i S ii. i turtmit For Carnival Mn, B> NEVILLE CONNELL TO-DAY. Madame Fela de Kuh** annual exh. %  %  loan, %  nlplure opena at Mam foe two •ii 10 a m. to a p rn inThla exhibition . shown m furnished mom-, which haa a great advantage over exhiblhrld in art galleries, since UUVnta I W >•-• ItM attwaffc u aeen in the *urIA HWIA wa rounding" to which it belongs. :ilph Maloney who has MttUimr d. Kuh t* a lover ol In tiii barmnd ,, I( buildings and tree*, aad hai rmaru r. raffPCt or f or u.„e „ nr-jngly re"fleeted in her work. Through har mnied by their Iwo children v , we wuitder along the narrow ... j j lanes adjoining Bay Street, or Maude and Maude I(1W „, comers of Bridgetown %  JJTOM MAL'DF COX. retired Seldom does the motorist or nedes*1 mm pi the prison left than pause to glance at We very' — -ne t'S. on Sunday via Puerto individual charm of uch place*. 1 H to pgflkd a hollUnfortunately there is no Council due. During her stav there she or Society for the preservation ol will be the gugsri of her QOdancient buildings to purchase for daughter Ml*. I I Of 'he Uland Madame de Kuh's rl r'Hv watercolours of buildings and u bv the same olao* comers of the town that are no \diut.int Maude Phillip* of the more. Indeed, she should be emArmv who h.v lone 10 Ptoyed to record Barbados in the Ihe rs married earlv Mgl too late, some record for the month to Mr. Guy Mussel whose benefit of posterity should M pre home Is In Franc*. Cuy Is at Pa't-d Indeed, the beautiful palnt• ... the W.I. and will be Ing of the Urge Evergreen tree Mt t ELENA ORsTfTTH ol I B.W.LA |0 gttgfad %  I •,.„.„„, ,.., h „ „.„..-,, — ZZ£'2 n 2S££r a & "* n B "r •*"' > m l to >" %  "' n Honeymoon Church a. 41 penclemial art tor thr u s I "P . _^ • NTRANSIT thruuah Barbadu> rultlm down o( a noble landmark. ]'.""' 'V.'LTV'K %  "','"! r,Vmf T m 0r "W •-Sunday, BW..A. w.r, CW th. „Uolou„ r,h,b.Ud .%ii.m „,.Lil rR C E TUlKlll Senior AnMr. and Mr.. Harr, Brrdn wbc -LowTldr, HaMlnc (No. 41. ahows 1 !" ,. CS ££?%£ L ....„„>!,... DulwKh H.-plUl. ww, on thrtr w to AnUgua to skafu „,„„,„„,„„„„„,,„ uv „ apend thjlr ho !" ymoon. TJiry od .Uon ol lu tonn. Th. deav idee horilon mrrim Into a serin lightening tone* until the pair. golden sand is reached. Now, the tones deepen to the dark foreS Bryden of Barbados. ground, lrom which rises the Continuing W.I. Holiday ". si* is the former Valerie scried „!, and tortured trunk Knowles daughter of Mr and Mr* of a sea-grape tree. This carries mother 1.. "VVf RS l.t'l'lSE PAYNE, a BarErrol Knowles of Trinidad and a •> %  <• w.rK1V1 badian resident •" BW.I.A. hosteaa end by HWIA They had bean York who has been holidaying in T-ILD .-.a >!io,: visit Barbados, lelt for Trinidad or. alaiinf J-Olstt [asm 1. Managing I Sunday CM IWO we. lu. She will rertoof Mesnrs Y. de lama and then spend a week in British OulThe art of life s) to keep down -Spain. San Ferana. returning to Barbados before acqualnlancea. nando and Barbados. sr.e leaees for the 1' —a. V. WIFE MANIA I gffa afflicted with ores of irritating mental quirks hieh are not listed in medisal ok* but are only too well known •Mi harassed husbands mplained. More than 500 of these eoUrLCOU* men hav* sent in ssgaad 'port* describing their wives' mental maladjustments. In response to my invitation on this page last week So that all women can dlgnoM' their domestic disorders -and do something about them —I list the dozen nwit prevalent feminine foibles:— Mephistophelitis The sUfSftMfa eoiitpulsicii blaring tin 1 to poke an Oddheapua Complex A subconscious love of confusion llorologophobia The sufferer insist* upon having all cl cks several minute* fast and then incessantly inquires the correct time. Morbid Infantililis Heu-thritis An irresistible urge to peer into every pram An mlment which stiffen* the • • • (eints and holds Its victim to A LONE woman intruded Into within three feet of a fireplace this all-male competition with Very pronounced when the sink 'his alleged masculine maladjunti* full of dishes ment?— I"-' '""; %  ' A '"FaSSno u^aZow b, in. ccta> "' """* "" Trinldri on Sat,,S lore hi. UA trip Cordon Had been *i' 1,nd J^aTT„uda JShTt. urd •" %  Bryden is Ihe son ol l, } SHI : rH£-Eb f ^^zzx t s IIK there shortly. Week-end Departures JV|R LUIS DE UM THIS pencil drawing of Prince Jobannes Liechtenstein Is among Mrs. Fel* De Knh'i exhibition which opens at her home. The Pavilion, today. not always receptive to ihe wB colours and values as Madthe eye upwards In dlminlshini! „ mc M Kuh's. 1 can always appretone values to the focal point of cl<1 i her well blended mechey of -.he picture and the sky. Suchcarecolour and her charming patuunful pUmung and harmonious col, nK ,N 0 g. Busby's Alley (No 42i our must rx-successful A piinting ta „ u arranged and the faded with a well thought out pattern prvn shutters above the busy No. 16 of tree roots, whose snakes^n,. m bathed in golden sunlike convolutions form an interestthine. ing. if slightly sinister, study BY THE WAY By Beachcomber R EAD!NO at young wider whose overcoat pockets I thou, 1 i manuscript .• %  poet Florian** pocket. Jack Turbo* fa net caaabii, after all Two watercolour* are of unusual Interest. The old wall near the Onll Hill (No. II) has a lovely design and Is more Impressionistic than the artist's usual style. ; ltd, "If one didn't know you. one Ind to rob you." Th*> Pine.Pon/: /t*in/t Ik*:!, PKTK1, WtlsfiOH 1>1 .ii the I'lmi-Pong world will I BUtnbsM or playari throa down lhat> piffling little niipk'inenu in u lantnin who confutved his ripponent by a system of mil NM I let Into his bat was on. i against Eric llopthorne of Surblton. Hopthi.ine was renowned for his b.iik-bie.iks, which he managed very nimply by attaching thin clastic lo the bull when ho was serving. Nobody could i • • %  < Hut when he WJIS playing this mil I the elastic broke, and the chagrined Hopth ine thouuhi he saw iwo balls coming back .it hlRL ii.rid there CROSSWORD There are many new aspects ot Bridgetown: the Olympic Cinema and Palmetto Square (No. 19) is especially colourful. It is a pleas>as a tasks* of tsrokeri glass, as En*""***o such creatures thev ure to see building* depicted which but an even more impres!:e i...' .• i-i %  .-' The •*' %  %  > v J-. •-' %  -. ..ii pgsj inn ragfl) gna BM M MM 9$xth Md | %  MM II OM ol i trw ., a liallishinnor, heifer with an do not merely rest on its surfjce backed by shrubs of varyinK 1 .la and be'-.' oi had e>es lookts these often do in the work of tint* Madame de Kuh told me iien ucie kitkea anq .i the Mg M i Sunday, like less skilled draughtsmen. The !hnt this scene had been described k-Pong Club the apple-woman of Calatayud. watercolour* of Prob>Ti Street are to her by a pupil from Guadeloupe. Tl. it a? J a "*** lady nould n,v ld Unit delightfully gay. with "buse*. huck*he hnd painted it during the deI n*' l.uln KIHIII liur/t+r uf what" !" And pat would have sters and their wares enhvemnv senption and the result certainly s/i// fluttvn t ' ,ne lhe answer"Personnel." the scene. And. although my eye* !U-.ifie. the experiment. Or no it *,-vm* This year there are fewer heads. One nf Mr. Lionel Oittens (No. 6) reveals the artist's power as a sculptor, for the pencil drawing betrays her Interest in the bone structure of the head. The likeness is excellent. In her colour drawing %  de Kuh has been successful, especially in the highlights Wnri. !.. ii.employed blue. There is a picaresque study c.f a musician, where .me en almost sense the languid melody of his guitar from the enaul of his po.-e (No. 131. Few artists can weild I pencil with the skill that is Madame dc Kuh's. Her drawings of the Careenage (No. 39), and of coconut palms (Nos. 1 & 26) have %  slick" brilliancy thd only comes .ifwinswi of hard work. One can see in these drawings the colours of which their objects are composed, so well are the tones arranged. (lockjaw A pernicious amnesia relating t' thp correct time, especially when the husband is in a hurry. Manifestation* ar P crle* of "1*11 only lie a minute," and "I'm nearly ready"' ParalY%-H Gadgetans A symptom complex which has arisen In recent years, characterised uv a complete inertia when faced with household • 'bores, unless these can be performed by electric washing machines, plate drier*, wringers, and other similar gadgets. / award thr rjuinea prize to Ml*. Leonard Tilley, of Rydalroad. Hibblc.on, near Preston, for Parii .''i.s oadoetans". Claws-Trophobiu A morbid dread of doing any work that might ruin her nail* Altellerfobia The woman who says to the Miopkecper 'Altellcr" instead of admitting that the article Is too expensive. Noatrumania A relentless urge to dose member* of her household with remedies she would not dream of trying on herself. Cushion ilia A mania inducing the housewife to rush round rooms, perpetually pummelling cushions into monstrous shape* retembling highly Inflated balloons. YVhiffsomania A woman's disease affecting husbands who hnv e to spend half •he night looking for leaking -r.ispipo* nnd "something burnC.rneral Psralys.* of the llnane The patient show* | marked allergy to the sound of dishes rattling i n the sink, exhibiting such a lethargy that he ii barely able lo prop his feet up on the il.antelpiece. This is a scandalous exaggeration in my view. But If women really believe that men are nffllrted with equally irrlinting habits, I am willing to consider any reports and pay a guinea for the best one submitted on a postcard bv the first post. ills fasts M h Bessoeea Galway and Kmsole. . T IUS chanted Mrs. Wither/^HARIJE SUET outlined yeisedge, as sh* sat on a batV J '"''day an erall scheme by i %  r T^ %  „-,r %  • %  %  w IP • .-. • I'aaUM. Lkarj it M.!•.<• i:... fn u—soa it a (.eld llicsw tit pUDHC •ix m flos. I a Di| Irees raeu la *m %  ^tart oi n'trddin* Pearls maternal r*n i*art of a eind uutr i 23. (3i fks WT Dasra it HUXM u* ear*. < %  ) iA> v r*i 1M IBl en)piD)eai UM. 14, lbs lot tat I s icnstn (Si I I'IP han [*ini.*. <*) I •> >mi> apiiiner. < • %  i Cl -in.' atimud curilng bstiil I Ii app.iom to Ma ea aai i.t nTc iv ii. bin T %  Ol I SI bqusie ini-MUri | l: i: D. fllb lUBtM* !.-• : 1 Mo in iCkM amuUhip!.. To re* hleh local associations, under porters -he said: i.di mo Fasmy lh directive organisation of %  • Carisen, fur 'ev r I *la\ o M this ,e ntral board. would concert xeiap-'eap mini lotneona tow* measures for incorporating the 'er lo the Ki...knV.n.l The '-"imiit,vs set up by the local Ms* it It,' in mc blood, and If •••ociations In branch rotmciN this old Junk-shop 'ad been round <'<'P*'ndent on the central authorltnd i und the 'Orn for years ,v %  • executive, functioning as without stoppm', she couldn't • %  •'poialp unit* under the control be a more 'oriible si K bt man f scrni-indopondcni bodies, relarou be'nld. Oh. well, "ve to the network of supplemeneomin', and there's still 'ary advisory teams acting In a rooni aboanl (Or a few birds to temporary capacity, independent build their nests. Last year our of the setting-up ,,f the interim cat Nelson slep' in the Hadmlrworking committees envisaged in Ml ipan in, wlu.'h i^ im.rc'n the scheduln IIIHHHJ by „ r~.:'.\you coulil .say for some craft 1 time panel selected from thcould name ,, authorities. Asked i %  "—'-what "'! ,hl •f f '''' l "•''. Suet said ^SJRrsaaa. ! W nU "'•' ,n lhp national i i.r.i.c.^ .MAN n> eixavouraginterest t< nmbark on an cx-TsVing pedola to mtenui.i I,,-. planatlon. whtn lias* lUsagrw with what he is sayinw gtuj h. AMI %  bilivv Uf was delinlite.1 srhon mfn.inU'iimiii-| ll ik-<||i; l ,k;it 'T'ME evej watchful L.C.C. M Suml.,M •!„!, | 1 eently l>ahned an 18-ft. ii' i..i ;. .|u* -tiniipython from lhe singe of a pi. ind ,i I,.M,-,.i. M (IM tu.e-tbeatie. Shonly afterwards "•' % %  >i-Nlchol the •< Rumanian who hnd escaped fr.ir. whole Ining Ougtll to Hi i BuOssMM presented himself "'"'' (quarters, carrying a cricket I rF th., -. J-at nd wearing a gay cap. "I want SEE that %  woman wh.. v.. to le a piofeaslonal cricketer," he called a "UnH" b) I A few well-chosen questio.is 1 ),0C€ * or other proved that he had confused the onsiden'd that *he had l^^-n mLC.C with the M.C.C They the he would like 10 This gadget, this parcel of trash, buy the python. "No," he said. bablj • %  i ..rt.mi m the I'm not as hungry as all that/' Jargonocr*, the dashing little"One man'* meat." vouchsafed U I UM bureaucraU, and ofllclal, "U another man's nvthen nobody should be too hard on him "Not necessarily said the if he has forgotten how to speak Rumanian. "Oh, well." con.lu.le.i fcnglikh. In fact, if you talk plain the official lamely. l iupert and th e Pine Ogre—31 TPrer Lai me are. "Pped riming." up Km,,,. "then I b,l,e.e •forat ira wruien in aom SB ihn only -.ho** M is *• %  %  o ihe tui* ii dr v ,i.,t : GEJMLE3MEJVI V9VLL BE SUM l.OOk sn \m IX mi si RAYON SCITr.NGS STRIPES PI.AI: WOf;; IlKNTS "I1EMH1 N SHIRTS WHITK OOLOl'UKIi BUCKLESHOES $3.39 — 3.72 S4.18-S4.37 $6.6B,.$6.72, .00. $741 $4.50 — $5.23 $5.20, $557. $594 I KOWN'& Br-Al K S10.64 —Sll'.l* T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS Oial 4?20 fOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 Willy Toad Found a Penny —But He Didn't Know What It Was— B; MAX il(l l l "IT'S round, It has picture* on It and It's a beautiful brown color," sairl Willy Toa,l to Knsrf and llanid. the ihadow-children with lhe turned about name*. "I found It smile I was walking along the aide of the road, not far from Ihe school., I'm Hire It nuit be very valuable." llanid saiil: "I wonder .vhat it it Willy. Would yog let u> like a look it it?" "I'm sitting on it." said Willy 'The magplei steal everything. They'd b* iure to steal this thing (especially became it's so pretty and so valuable), the moment they j Id their e-.e on it So I'm sitting ] B.B.C. Radio Programme on it." Knarf looked around. "I don't see any reigpies now. Willy. I'm quite .ure you can let ua see It without anyone stealing It away." Happed t)g I ..,.,1-1.1,1, At thin. Willy hopped .>,! the ton! stool on which he wan nilting and Knarf and llanid saw that the val liable thing Willy WII hiding wn • penny. "Well," exclaimed Willy glee full,'," im't It wonderful? I don't -uppnse ihere are nuny nf thtae around, kinM be worth a great deal, eh?" Neither Knaif n.n llanid wanted i iliuppoini Willy *o llanid .aid "'Ye*, it'i prrtlv valuable Willy. It's railed a penny." "Penny! What a heautlful name!" "It'a th* same as one cent." Mid Knarf. "Ah/ cried Willy, "it 1 even put l - name*! Keallv must be valuable What can I buy wiih it?" he asked. %  ml itH>meni." "You enn m> u iii|lv|iop," tali* Knarf. 'I don't care much for lollypopi." •aid Willy. "What el-e can you buy?" "You could buy a postnge stamp?" %  aid IIHMKI "Postagestamp*" repe*te,i Wdlv Whit .nn I .lo Bills, a po-la*.%  tamp?'* *> IIHKI M IB ... Appuml. J A m WdlltT OnNew.. 11 10 p m SHE WAS A'BALL OF FIRE' By R. M MACCOIX WASHINGTON I u*s the term "ball of fire" with no slightest thought of disrespect In writing of Miss Anne Morgan, sister of lhe fabulous banker, J.P. who has just died ai Mount Kisko. New York, aged 78 I came across Miss Morgan several times in Prance at the start of the last war. A woman of electric sparkling energy, she was wearing the uniform of the American Relief For France organisation. Her black eyebrews contrasted with her white hair, topped off by a felt hat worn at rather I rakish angle. But this wus only one o: s ame 50 philanthropic enterprises with s-hlch she was associated during her busy lifetime. Once she told a women's gathering In New York: "I never had any creative ability—)ust a trudgapscity." W illy found a penny lying by Ihe mad. llanid siid Willy could write a I "er and send it with %  postage • up. Ilinmm." Mid Willy "Toad* like I *1 write letters. Knarf and llanid told Will] Ik I w'ti his penny he could buy marh .. %  little rubber hill, a butt, n t. til. eine chalk, a bun. a nut a |i (?e of string, a pin and •gum|., W.lly shook hi* head "I d.-n'l ...re f< i my of those things, Ihnnk rotl Whg| I wsnt to know is. hew many Hi • can I buy with thipenny?" tlsnid said: "You can't hny a-y. \\ Hy." •Villy sighed deeply. "I mess,' he %  Sid sadly, "thi* peony tsnl u *al> i. Ma as I thought it wa* I doal II nk I'll keep it any more. In fart, ther unc.>,Tif.>rt*l.le "ink I'll let the magpies ink Hot Knarf *sid that wnn'i 'hi thing lo do. "Put (I bark u i found it. | or girl who lust it n.i ii-urf, will find It again." Sn Willy said thit wi* a en and took the penny dark t i'e of the mad .l V H H |u %  spot where he bum.I mv' no Boo-I." no HHI it. in*. 9 p.m. Tjlif II fl i %  CnspoMr of thr Wrr*. L'l ildren Sin|inS. P n" IVTH-UI rbftntt, o is p... w.i.ii M..III. i> *4 p m SporU rlnunl Up and JPTo%  ramme Parade. 1 p m Thr Novi. 1 It U in New. ATI*(.I.. 7 Ii p It4lta*f -om w-lh CnmiTvDowHlOi A.tin. 1U-I*.*S r JIBM U UM "O p in A Tuilt B i. II. The SUM' Teller. S 1ft p m Radio N.wwrel. S SO .1 m Report iioiu Hnl-nn II p m Meet In* Common prill in. 30 p m Ray's %  Lj>uKh. 10 p m Tl..Nr-.. 10 10 p m riom In* Bd p m Moras' Milasrrn Talking. IIS pm From IHr Thrntrc <• 1 O II I TO-DAV ...5 and a 31 pal. HEU.rv.V Il.(iiblc TODAY 4 45 a 8 30 PH. w "" %  *• LIQHTN/NQ STRIKES TWICE IQMA N TODD Wen la* UMPgg i MI: s tNC.RIl. HBSUiMAlS A v^'Ui. vuvni i u Mini..-. CITTHonaba, Thr Junftlr SI'NDOWV ON THI: rs< Te*. RITTTJi p L A z A PI AW A *" s !" ro-d.y a T.r n err*- 4 A * pm Itobrrl UITCIIUM In "OUT or THS PAST" a Tilt BST I'PR.ibrrt RYAN inn. intilji lift S 30 p m %  ULWABS or rm— %  am PAiAUJt a ri HI: OI IIIASKINKIIIS KAkl.l A l..n LllANtV saAIFTW 71 Osrden To-d.v A To-morrow I p m %  aoimR,„idMrDowall A -KCULOY *AS nm. Jack)* COOPSR Ja.Hlr CCKXJAN Thun lonlT. %  SO p m DIAI MraDissa1.. POKTMAN A nil S III M AND IIIIIIU r. lhe rvsumplion as from WEDNESDAY. February 20lh ;J of IU ivniM.siiA. \n.in III 11 ii ; IIAM IS which were suspended owing to Ihe death nf His late Majesty Kin.; George VI H von inn Dress 7.30 p.m. to 12 midnight I; C. B. BROWNE'S ORCHESTRA ELIZABETH R.-THE FIRST COURT CIRCULAR COMES OUT Taa gaaaw a**S ffa*> <*. %  • r>( **aor* rrl..J a n.r*. INN rr-s. >* Ul* Wr— %  . Tha ta>y **>ala hnantSatlsa. Llac..* a.r Prrcselok Srs-nUi*. Hajoe lie 1lea>al ISSM U*M1> OS*—a* *** ttm. awriu caar*rla a*M U.. oi— all* Mcaaa: rsrsar, •.*.. ap la OPBPfflNfJ rOMORRtm*. .1 and K 30. m uHMtam II*Big Date l "g^t Grearhme/,.5?{I T Hrsl Cean Oreasaa rf | a la. Ovens aad lhe bake ef rHaaaaaeaea-^resB KsstsMrgsTfra. Kea.a. TZT^^ I 1. sraa Issa i l a l.e haon aflae asse. assg. a BIB .j^, ^4 u^ m^..^, — mm masss ef ss il nsa> naasmad vs Lasagsss. ^~ %  Btrrr > ARABLE jfef eaV j %  > SStltaiiWM.IBMtalKII jN.B-Week end Dims Ulli / Wednesdays. R00DAL THEATRES EMPIRE TO-DAY. 4.45 8.3 and rontlnulng Dally JOSE FERREH ACADEMY AWAHD Winner in STANLEY KRAMER'S Production : 1 11 \ v o DE MERCERAC Extra LATEST NEWSREEL OLYMPIC LAST I SHOWS TO-DAY t in .MS GARY COOPER in "THE r.ENERAL DIED AT DAWN" AND "CAS8INO TO KOREA" Wed. Thur. 4.M A 1.1* RING CROSBYBOB HOPE "ROAD TO RIO' AND AI.AN LADD in — "WHISPERING SMITH" IIOYY LAST 2 Slum.. TO-DAY 4.it a is MARGARET O'BRIEN .n IIE OUST ROMANCEand "NEVEIt TIITST A GAMBLER" Wed. A Than. 4.30 av 141 IKllTMi BV BOHTON* BLACKIE AND TO THE END OF TIIK 111"'! Wllh WILLIAM POWELL ROYAL LAST 2 Show. TO-DAY 4.1*) a. • 18 Double John WAYNE in "WAR OF THE WILD CATS and "MOONR1SE" with Dane CLARK— Gale RUSSELL Wed ft Thar. 4.M 8.15 Republic Whole Serial "I'NDERSEA KINGDOM" with RAY "CRASH" CORRIGAN Weird Thrills — BLAZING ACTION



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ESTABLISHED 1895 KB! I ARY 19, 1952 PKlCfc • HVE CENTS U.N. TRUCE TEAM WONT ADMIT RUSSIA Reds Postpone Item On Agenda no IOIX.I B) I'lTllt (.IUKMNC; MUNSAN. Feb 18. The shadow ol Russia loomed over armutici alions on Tuesday as the United Nations awaited a Lornmunist reply to the Allied conditional agreement on the post-war Korean Peace Conference. Reds are expected to give their views on Allied qualifications for the peace parley when the lull delegations meet for Monday's plenary II to discuss item Five unexpectedly postponed by the Communists an hour before the meeting wag scheduled. Thouini no Red explanation for the delay.. Meanwhile. RusaM took the Rpullight on Tuesday a* fgOdly continue i that it be accepted u "neulral" representative of the post-armleOee neutral nation* supervisory commission. Col Chine Chun Ban OH Mondav I.lasted the UN. refusal to accept RusslVr nomination as "intolerable" The Allie* agreed to accept Soviet satellite*. Poland and Czechoslovakia to sit on the National Commission to supervise l>ehind the lines of insp. i the armistice. Hut thtra was no bye* the allies would soften • %  %  agsJaat Sovi.'t intrusion on past* %  '. ii Korean pro) On the prisoner issue both side* %  r together on minor points i UN proposed draft of the OJU i ii.rriee problem but as wide apart as ever over the ban "voluntar> repati. The Allies planned to voice the i Chorwon. view on Tuesday on Red amend-: Farther East, a tank and merits proposed during Monday's) f-ntry team ,>u %  :.. Officers' meeting on item j terrain South of Pyongang and U.N. Troops Pound Reds ElflllTH ARMY H Q„ KOREA. Feb., 18. United Nations forces battered the Communists in the air and the ground tc-day to keep them off balance. u.N. fighter-bomb*; %  Inaugurated the seventh month if ;in.u i. .I.,IIL,I Hed supply line: with fresh raids on North" Korc while a screening fore* of i! Sabre .let fighters beat off torn ConjllBunfat M.l.G. IS jet. damag ing id least two. On the ground three u.N raid 1 ing parties, two of them baaM Bo %  iih tanks, rtruca dV i the frown, snow-covered N 1 Mans Land on "killer" attacks. The Westernmost thrust dre* heavy small arms and automat: capons Are West-northwest of Four. Violntlon ( h n %  Communist Radio charged on Monday night that United Nation artillery llred on hills near the Korean truce village of Panmunjom. Peking radio said Communist correspondent Alan Winnlngton reported from Pnnmunjom on Sunday thai heavy sheila from the i lines were whining pa*t P.'inniunjom to burst in the nearby hll!; ana at nighi planet* violated the neutrality or Kaesong. The broadcast, monitored In Tokyo, did not elabornie._r.p. killed at least .-even enemy troop: and destroyed a network of bunker position* before returning to their own lines. A third raiding group also supported by armour struck north at .1 point East of Kumsong in two elements. One reached Its objective without right but another ran lota mtanta CommunM Bit and a barrage of hand grenades —t'.F. Thousands See Wrt>alh?. LONDON. Fed II %  %  tie totta %  Impragalve display of .ii i rar the globe tor (he funeral of King I Mi.in 200.000 | eaths on Saturday -tid Sunday The srene was floo-tltt last night I A hen thousands still stood waiting It night fall Queen Elizabeth, who with the Duke of Edinburgh -turned tol London last night from the Royal Lodge at Windsor, reeetvi J the • Duke r NI.I folk at Clarence n iodn\. Hi Earl Marshal and! :."range | The Queen Mother and | Princes % Uarj '. it Huckingham Pa Work AH Usual The Queen i lions co,;!,.-,!',! srifl Government Trade, Charity or Arts to i aadulad %  despite mournimfor bat fall King George vi. An ;n the I-ord Chan.h. | howevi i Ihnt the 'holding or other ha tlons most be lei lion \ of organizers who ma) wl • %  now i wi %  mem ing an n A stateim nl Issued by I M pressed lhanks for the wonderful trlbutH Id IM-I husband gad lakad log all] md devotion roi lhali daughter I the great | and lonely station to which she has bean caned the win oat .a km %  Ingjiam r and the Duki ol Bdlnburgh. the' Queen Hothl I U Pi U tnt Hie week-end %  Windsor Castlt where King Ceoige wag n Friday Yeaterdaj thr. THE SI'ACIOUS LOUNOE board "Lr**nder'* U.K. To Test New Atomic Weapon l>.( . Sugar Magnate Dies him in Ihi Ing the Ri It was Quean BUi Lhour I .-jilri-Vnd Govt. Disagree WASHINGTON. Feb. 18. Labour management and Government .spokesmen disagree,! on the need for new legislation to curb the influence of Communists In IfllHMir unions. Congress Industrial Organization's Philip Murray, and Federation of Labour President William Green, contended that the unions already demonstrated they can deal effectively with Communists by themselves. They ^.aid any further legislation on the subject would be unwise nnd unnecessary. But the Justice Department, the National Labour Relations Board and the National Association of Manufacture* said Congress may have to do something about closing loopholes in the Taft-Hartley law's anti-Communist affidavit requirement. Conflicting view fi were released by the Senate Labour Sub-committee which will hold hearings on the issue next month. —U.P. Five Children Die In Fire COLUMBUS. Ohm, Feb. 18 Five small children rangin-. Iioni four yaari to eight month • %  Id burned to death here Sunday when lhe> were left alone in their Hume swept home. Authorities said the mother.: who are atatsffa, were both awa from then six room home at UM the tragedy. One woman Ollle May was at u neighbour: President bOU %  'covering from ttk American "' he third child last Thursda uster had gone to w shortly before the lire broke out around six a.m. Sunday —I'.P. nl Lodge Awards nnnunred today that %  lit hold bee Aral isllture M Buckingham Palace Ft uary M to give awards and %  %  Six-foot dx-Ineh i ii William Sprakninn. winner of the Victoria Cross. lint | .. the %  ward earlier trdi month from the late King Othen who will %  persons on the Gnvernn.. Year's honour; Hit H first seml-pubhe engageraent an• —r.p c.r. QEOBOnTOWN I . Feb. in. aaeaoty-eJghUyeaj "id Manm-i Vlatra, B-d milUonaf ite proprietor died hei on Sundai i 'i tuguest> H a poor l>easant boy and imiHxi %  BM Inamond uvlds >ubae quently idling United .ii. LONDON. Feb. IB. Two Royal Navy ships gje reported rendy i< gall Australia willi tiiuipment lor teaUnfl g uctic.il weapon with an atomn •rgrhaga] which Britain is beUgved to MI vclopcl. Prime Minister Winston ('hui.hill gnitouni I night from No 10 Don t lhat Britain's flrat "a1 would IKtcsUd Ii Auttfalla thl .. i Saboteurs Stop Traffic •! %  %  Sabotage l N Q ited Diatiion.i gtalds, ;i subal^Ui D %  i IBZ9 ii.thi n became interest|e to help Uv Wl I I Cgptatn Alhert Walton Roland|to dress the in PWrrr who was killed ,n a Sicilian |M K,al serviceThey know themalr eruh Rew with British Wer,j*j V e* from their own ndlan Airways from I04B dllithat they have been abk last year when he joined Hunting ch as* these aer< Air Transport lhey have jewloped 'heir induHe was a Line Captain w.lMthal and commercial econom East African Airways In Nairobi I lor two yearl*fore jmrtinK Ihei 'It would repay British OUMWest Indian company. Iness not only in profit on InventI'eiiy was an R.A.F. pilot du-'ment* but great increase U ring the wj r flying with Coastal' British exports to the V'< Command and from 1844 till 1947 If investment* were undertakm with Transruirt Command He was on a larg.leaJg b) 38 and had logied 5.SW |gaBJJ*W>dard Of living 4,000 of them a* a Commander.' Bealy MMunended the vision ol H :,il Oer:-. %  AOUUI be nude by the Si %  .trurtlon* fiom Mostow and We'.lla both here, and Tiro (ivnerals For President HAUiUsntlfi; Pennsylvania. rob. . The nameol two Generals Ol the Army wcr.plaotd in Ih* re B l refarenUal pi In Ing m Pennayh %  %  Artliin died iietitions ibi fore the daadune. Each n i %  %  n was i" riHi itaiil hid Not Force Egypttuifl bOMDOM Feb. i%  nal Labow %  %  l %  %  %  ii uunfa "i In %  '' %  "ed hrwiur on Rr'i'ti"' B da by Raghuiath hund'a\ Dire I -if II.O. tier six week: pal InveatlMatlii I IIKKJS, V\uluiH h. Still riin-alt'ii \\. Enrape EU1UCH, Feb IH Pfesti %  pi began digaim: i itself out to-lnv from two-week record mows wblch crippled traftlt munleaUon Weather forecaiterx wurni-t the "worst I vet to come" with rapt* to renen the danger of %  U reoortad in Austn.* lab Bundaj bi winters total to .i (MOW ha fallen steadl Rail an I %  Ma To ih fall in '••itury. In Italy ..ri ;o"i\ of j -ki troop • '' % %  ft 'ivinK t ra] Fi %  i snow. Telephone line* %  • [hout the Italian %  it mid winter KUII but ti M exlng polnl The K< pilled over It i inday In most parta of tl. %  of 12 feet while tl i The annoyo' %  \oldeit the use of tl bonto** lending lo the • .mil in AAistralui ih n tactical weapoci Had 11 i led by Btrtsin's -, irntl i '• I loaion. The MinlKtry ul BUppU ible for Brtuin's %  toanti • l ..II llllli nent. A-ke.l Whether UM ran n ab> bo b *11 H h f, ,i (neinlvnM II %  i.no "iiiiii produced IIH jjid "draw your own conel A dltpateh from Sydne> said %  j traiian quarten believed lb-weapon was a guld< | >r roeket with aft] atomic warhe id %  In be mi I I i rloeket Ran k e In the dead heart of Central A ."•velnpert Mntl) ll hi IVJ %  %  I Prltain nnd Aii-'rnlln l\r "Lysander 9 Here e** On Carib Cruise The American luxury yacht l.ysantlrr with a party ol nuie Americam on a vocational cruise arrived in Barbados on : \ LB l v I l-au-Pi inec Saw Thomg r -I tnds Mr. t :. --w Y-Mk. has riuin %  Mi %  I and Mr>. r Mrs. %  i neetmae .e-*ierHay v the lurttoui*nd gi • n rroti the %  %  pa tool M %  The I %  iWh cost il t*2 tons, and trx '-.uif. * !*outh ^*u. ii the world pang hnea no %  ed to trouble almu 1 hOt reaetf nort foi the yaelit Ii..a prole"w I ,. *idr toned. %  i a u*mhisin i' i BUi The %  <• UvXng sjilrjli hmreU lUnoaphnre" the aft lounge o.n--li"{| III modem livable dvk chaliH .md lounge. A Pnlrnl Cutler lo-ik .i new -liip. She was built In 1M2 at IVrrton i hl| Bi M i patrol IrngfJcu Nav>-. t Inec the war rj Main] v iHtironms. Ike May W in Though Awa\ By R tVMOMl I \-HK WASHINGTON, rei %  / : %  II il m ani ituil nom t omlna home lo run Thet mat the %  I Republican N %  i in Jui t the Klserilinwei oiganisaU %  I ral'i adan u rtn %  lion pohtu i %  %  MI > damaglng H il iign ibi. Republk i nad told . for. Jui) Onl) dl %  %  ',i bj Ri ooi.ii, Id Slat lould i" Ii to || ,-..,.. %  | i iita lam thai ha ejuM hi uropean Dafenee Centrnandei be* %  ion. . %  '( %  it' :, m I palgn m,natlon Boall ol fait, how%  in time ii n >d rnahi tatni pndei noi poht -IP Will Ftold I\etr Atomic letitn WASHINflTON, Feb. Ig A new teiu-s of ulon 111 be held at Eni*ctok prnvlDI %  .:rrHind* .' In PneUaf UM liefense Oepaitment %  \ti>mi( Bnergj i %  i lofAW "it Moinl.i' tnnouncement IBH Uaal foi the testa are unde r way, nea irsta It in underatood a>ll .tills spline TinI:-.. g Mg *s >ll ijf earntvl out i i real i d in on .sting of A.E.C. personnel and men •he three Nrvlci fhi faafe 1 • unoV 'i i nand of i | md> 'I Army % %  .... the v %  PS %  nnouncen bout the time or -rr It IIH GrfMlMU lillo Trmm Serefl Ulled \ Hexl< %  i i lu .. row highway two mU> here Sunday, killing igvei %  i.d injuring N Police looat it" .... Ida mob nltempterl to I Authorlllc MI %  .. Iii I .dent Pag |HM OU were kn!%  %  and hum. i here. — I'.P. 1 i ilv.' double iiT^rnm. iih full, modem tdrd bathirate quar%  in .o i % %  i sint*: tutlfulh fumi-h..i wiUi wall ii(cMug In alt romn.-. ll. i power comes from Hra 500 nW n d eUx-rietty ited throiiKhoui by one r KW no volt Ulewl generaKW 110 rotl jtdpped U'phone. r nnplete electrically equrpiietl %  I iponty ice nuking machine and two wilnittrmerators She Is steam J.uMndrr overall length i ' %  24' J rWr nnd he gM feet of w.-tei Hgf i %  %  If 11 knots Captain John MeCnllum. who ovai SO years e;i gnr; HI Ann.ite carrying unlimited MM> oi 111"'' r. ex[-.i :.! leave BarliadiH •day for Martlnioue. -ke colls it ArtUgUa, S;ur Ju.m and Tmn lo before reUirnlng la M in ipite of bad weather every %  they lai Miami the n.ei ..o •nloyable : dse down The) I 'hlrdt nmh ..i,^ lovely place and are USUBl %  "mmgtU iilwut II trliados mm. "~~ i MB her lean ooimMd nnd • par) of thrill.uiv rautlhr to use scrub hiudm. Even in '*i'engine room i e feels horne|> CLEAN W IIOLESOME ? RICE Bonn are pretty sure It would I ne found BanUail re-| DtjngM at Britinh policy and' lans themselve*. *• rM rea In the Canal -IP Hao redanaer point Is 14 feet —IP. Qidrino Sreks Peace Treaty liluvkade China Sn W1111 —, Btc %  %  to keep 1 wank io ('.. %  raise Uu standand of Living Treaty .the Caribbean Is to put money ind uood' ii United States, a Foielgn Oftlcc WASHINGTON. Feb. 18. (..pmetit in thow countHe Admiral Arthur W. Radioed.jereate ernp'oyment to *ive more Commander of the Pacific rieet'purchai'inf power *ald to-day the United Stabwl iHt ^__ ,_„_„_, .„ ire of blockade along the Chtnex. coast;' !" Tii^aiSKr^ If Chinese Red. moved into South CDn V %  •*" %  F ^^** t wt A bloekade hel'^' r r ^ ,n En Ia "'' • !Srf ^ 0U1 1 ^ 00 "' '^.j" 0 "!! Expansion of tl effeetiveu. hu.toi> and would cut thMC Brntah terrltorM-. f whom are N.. on Ule Chinese Communlat G ,.\^ CBn mean n -,,. %  emnient enUrel> from it* exter-jd^i IO u^ people of Britain except with Russia. | we ii as those of the West Indierearty —L.P. said Sealy —t T l' nal trade SWORN IN %  HINOTON. Feb. Ig. .. it of Uv? Ptet Awnclatlon of K .is sworn In i I'roicranTmes of the In' Boar% %  led Nelinil I' -t'P \JI\\ I lus \u Plan-* NEW YORK. Feb 18 wing jet Ipable of \ari : f.nler" than BO" miles per BOjii nnd superloi to KIH^MI* Ml'! now flyinii In Korea are veins la ) here tor ihe na\ %  . ICft fa"t'-r than the plane used by the Nav> r "Fncoifraging M WASHINIMON Fet> .H I Michael Mcuetmott on llonda ...ng" th .-• ml %  '"-idiiy tha Egyptian Prornlei AI>Mahcr i wuung to •' %  h'ili-lie.,i %  %  oittol %  ( %  %  'nrou|[h "trone *nd .eniorielled riglwil . functioning w Ithii the frame work <>i U i \\tt i MIS charter,** ., lo til' States was taken to Egypt iicadv to o|>etfcN 0011 toi %  • %  of the propov-i auddll | am .1 i HeDarmou Mad be I msc" Strike Stops Ford Plant wiNrw feb 18 The second -trike In > %  lv line todav and '' -.g the %  %  Worker*' Union idter month-Iotig talks organised bj )nlai!.. i foll-d. Me^ %  he t rueti and Daley broke off naif an hour Uie strike started at 10 p.m —up. New Record Scl oau i %  rtetrei I Of 1 b'. i in mpk n < >•" of I hour %  I .' In 1948 I' %  I %  r jumping %  rv event* Slai vie loilc-ted t* %  —UP l\i;iti GJU1IN EDIBLE NO PICKINC REQWKE0. I'lIU I Ur. l*rLui|4T. iiiniiiGRAN1 LTD. AgonM l*V/#V//.V//^A'.V.'/*'//.WV/.V.*.VVA'<






ESTABLISHED 1895









AA\\\ QU

5 Advora








TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952





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PRICE : FIVE CENTS



U.N. TRUCE TEAM WON’T ADMIT RUSSIA
Reds Postpone Item

On Agenda

By PETER

The shadow of Russia
ations on Tuesday as the U
munist reply to the Allied
post-war Korean Peace Con

give their views on Allied qualifications for the peace par-
ley when the full delegations meet for Monday’s plenary
session to discuss item Five unexpectedly postponed by the

Communists an hour before

There: was no Red explanation
for the delay.. Meanwhile, Russia
took the spotlight oh Tuesday as
Reds doggedly continued insistence
that it be accepted as “neutral”
representative of the post-arm-
istice neutral nations supervisory
commission.

Col. Chang Chun San on Monday
blasted the U.N, refusal to accept
Russia's nomination as “intoler-
able”. The Allies agreed to accept
Soviet satellites, Poland and
Czechoslovakia to sit on the
National Commission to supervise
behind the lines of inspection after
the armistice.

But there was no indication that
the allies would soften their stand
against Soviet intrusion on post~
war Korean problems,

On the prisoner issue both sides
are closer together on minor points
in the proposed draft of the ex-
change problem but as wide apart
as ever over the basic issue of }
“voluntary repatriation.”

The Allies planned to voice the |
view on Tuesday on Red amend-!
ments proposed during Monday’s

Staff Officers’ meeting on item
Four.
Violation Charge
Communist Radio charged on

Monday night that United Nations
artillery fired on hills near the,
Korean truce village of Panmun- |
jom. Peking radio said Commun-
ist correspondent Alan Winnington
reported from Panmunjom on
Sunday that heavy shells from the
American lines were whining past
Panmunjom to burst in the near-
by hills and at night planes vio-
lated the neutrality of Kaesong.
The broadcast, monitored in
Tokyo, did not elaborate.—U.P.

Labour Leaders
And Govt. Disagree

WASHINGTON, Feb, 18.

Labour management and Gov-
ernment spokesmen disagreed on
the, need for new legislation to
curb the influence of Communists
in labour unions. Congress Indus-
trial Organization's President ,
Philip Murray, and American
Federation of Labour President |
William Green, contended that
the unions already demonstrated
they can deal effectively with
Communists by themselves.

They said any further legisla- |
tion on the subject would be
unwise and unnecessary. But the
Justice Department, the National
Labour Relations Board and the
National Association of Manufac-
tures said Congress may have to
do something about closing loop-
holes in the Taft-Hartley law’s
anti-Communist affidavit require-
ment,

Conflicting views were released
by the Senate Labour Sub-com-
mittee which will hold hearings
on the issue next month. ° a

—U.P.





; weapons fire West-northwest of

GRUENING

MUNSAN, Feb. 18.
loomed over armistice negoti-
nited Nations awaited a Com-
conditional agreement on the
ference. Reds are expected to

the meeting was scheduled.

UN. Troops
Pound Reds

EIGHTH ARMY H. Q.,
KOREA, Feb., 18.

United Natiotis forces battered
the Communists in the air and on
the ground to-day to keep them
off balance. U.N, fighter-bombers
inaugurated the seventh month of
attacks against Red supply lines
with fresh raids on North Korea
while a screening force of i9
Sabre Jet fighters beat off ‘forty
Communist M.1.G, 15 jets damag-
ing at least two,

On the ground three U.N. raid-
ing parties, two of them beefed
up with tanks, struck deep across
the frozen, snow-covered No
Man’s Land on “killer” attacks.
The Westernmost thrust drew
heavy small arms and automatic

Chorwon.

Farther East, a tank and in-
fantry team pushed into enemy
terrain South of Pyongang and
killed at least seven enemy troops
and destroyed a network of
bunker positions before return-
ing to their own lines,

A third raiding group also sup-
ported by armour struck north at
a point East of Kumsong in two
elements. One reached its ob-
jective without fight but another
ran into intense Communist fire
and a barrage of hand grenades.

—UP.

Five Children
Die In Fire

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Feb. 18.

Five small children ranging
from four years to eight months
old burned to death here Sunday
when they were left alone in
their flame swept home.

Authorities said the: mothers,
who are sisters, were both away
from their six room home at the
time of the tragedy. One woman
Ollie May was at a neighbour's
house recovering from the birth
of her third child last Thursday
while her sister had gone to work
shortly before the fire broke
around six a.m. Sunday.



—UP.

eeehieedemiidns ie ———————

4 Thousands
See Wreaths

LONDON, Feb. 18

when thousands still stood waiting
in line at night fall,

Buckingham Palace today
Work As Usual

The Queen wants publie func-
tions connected with Britain's
Government, Trace, Charity or
Arts to take place as scheduled
despite mourning for her father
King George VI.

An announcement by the Lord
Chamberlain's office said, however,
that the “holding of other func-
tions must be left to the discretion
of organizers who may wish to
allow 2 week or two to elapse be-
fore recommencing arrangements.”

A statement issued by the Queen
Mother Elizabeth yesterday ex-

tributes to her husband and asked
loyalty and devotion for their
daughter the Queen “in the great
and lonely station to which she has
been called she will need your
protection and your love.”

A statement issued from Buck-
ingham Palace said with the Queen
and the Duke of Edinburgh, the
Queen Mother and Princess Mar-
garet spent the week-end at Wind-
sor Castle where King George was
buried on Friday. Yesterday they
attended a Memorial Service for
him in the private Chapel adjoin-

ing the Royal Lodge
Awards
It was announced today that

Queen Elizabeth will hold her first
investiture at Buckingham Palace
on February 27, to give awards and
titles. .

Six-foot Private

six-inch tall

Queen Elizabeth, who with the |

pressed thanks for the wonderful |

Americans on a vacational
» Sunday from Miami via Po
Thomas, Virgin Islands

Ike May Win
Though Away

Duke of Edinburgh :«turned to}

London last night from the Royal | } AY ASHER
Lodge at Windsor, received the! } 7 Saree sae
Duke of Norfolk at Clarence House } WASHINGTON, Feb, 18
today He is Earl Marshal and | Senator Irving M. Ives said to-
handled all the funeral arrange jay that Eisenhower can wh
ments. The Queen Mother and he Republican Presidential nom-
Princess Margaret were back at!



nation without coming home t

} inpaign. But other Eisenhower
| oosters were not so sure. They
'rankly admitted they are worried

ibout recent indieationgs that the
} THE SPACIOUS LOUNGE inside the ship is pethaps the most beautiful room aboard “Lysander”. reneral means to remain at hi

‘aris Military Headquarters until

fter

bP pies a: the Republican Nominating
‘onvention in July. One top leader
oO est eCWw ef the Bisenhower organisation
‘ tid the General's adamant refusal!

. e e

) return for “non-political” speech
maaking has been “damaging” to
” campaign, This Republicar
vho asked not to be named told :
porter all pro-Eisenhower
rs “hope” for Eisenhower
efore July

|

_ Atomic Weapon

retu
|

' Only divergency of view he saic
} “ : LONDON, Feb. 18. : oie do not consider it abso
B.G. Sugar Two Royal Navy ships are reported ready to sail soon for | ‘Utely necessary. This latter view

is upheld by Republican Senato
veg

+ who said Eisenhower's retur:
vould be “beneficial” but not “in-

Australia with equipment for testing a tactical weapon with
an atomic warhead which Britain is believed to have cde
veloped. Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced last

Magnate Dies

ispensable” to the campaign. He
{ Correspondent) night from No, 10 Downing Street that Britain’s first “atomic lded that an immediate return
|’ GEORGETOWN B.G. Feb. 18. weapon” would be tested in Australia this year. ould subject Eisenhower to th:

Ss ty-ight-vear old Mandel riticism that he quit his post a
eventy-eight-year oO) Dy

7 The announcement caretulls uropean Defenee Commander be-
Vieira, B.G millionaire and , avoided the use of the wort wre the job is done

sugar estate proprietor died here) a urs ‘bomb” leading to the genera Wher he devlered his availabil
on Sunday. His grandparents emi-

for
January,

Republican nomination in

; belief here and in Australia that | t
}grated from Goa, Eisenhower said he would

Portuguese St S » tactical wea i € ,
é a apon Had been read
India. Vieria started life as a hoor op 7 BE? lcd by Britath’s célénticts 6h ex.
Or-) i.

Not, campaign tor nomination
peasant boy and amassed a plosion, Sore of his supporters felt, hows
tune in Diamond fields subse | TUNIS, Feb, 18 The Ministry of Supply, respor-] ever, he could finish his Buropeat
quently selling his interests’ t Sabotage by Nationalist agita-| sible for Britain’s atomic energy | assignwent in time to return be
patted Pio, isn aulahe Sors continued here today although; establishment, refused all com=|for the Convention and make
diary.o uth rica's De Beer:

no new casualties had been report-{ ment, Asked whether the weapon) speeches







under non-politica
in 1925. He then became interest-|ed. |Authorities said Neo Destour ° f ‘ No uspice:
illic f t ri , j $ ’ were really a bomb, William Pen-! auspices
teak Aiea hin care Be Pow ed in the sugar industry, acquir-|(New Independence) saboteurs}ny, a member of the scientist U.P.
vice Aah sl or gallantry {28 Houston on the Eastbanik, | dynamited a road bridge in Dena,} team which produced the weapot
ora Wee eee uae oat Demerara Mara and Friends Ber- | tno Reet of Gabes last night, said “draw your own conclusion B C i
m Korea Wil oC a , Cc ; se intore j halting all tram yn the ro¢ , : . cs 5
: bice County and large interests ir 4 n illie on le road A lispatch fr Syd gnid us r Ss ws tt 5
then. Originally he was to have|”! ; i In Djebéntanan near af, dispatch from Sydney saic savas § nite
. tations Wares ‘a 6 I ang sar Sfax, tele- . tre ar ie
received the award earlier this (Paw ny ile = a dacatiagtnd | graph poles were cut and eee. most Australian quarters believed | , ’ © _
» late 1 ¢ “y's | OF es pmerara. A Justice o . 4 & as ¢ ide. ello ,
month from the late aoe one the Peace for the Colony Vieria|®D4 telegraph communications. in the relbot ait at S a d Hi ui j rees: Sey en Killed
Boe vr h ; Go ennenand Nev arried twice and is survived by the area have been disrupted. | Thal ’ 7 is os ae ng a sated . ’
re et ie as the|hi$ second’ wife eight and| French authorities are still clean re test is generally expecter MEXICO GITY, Feb, 18
Year's honours list. Distat * bt ee e - eaiemn jing up villages in the region of|to be carried out on the vast) A Mexico City bus crashed in
first semi-public engagergent an- | six dé s e was 6 2 ’

nounced by the Queen
—U.P & CP.



MEATLESS DAYS

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 18

President Peron announced on

Out! Monday night that Argentina will

have meatless

week.

two days per

—U.-P.



[Russia Wants to Smash!

Rearmament Plans

By

JOSEPH | W.

GRIGG
BERLIN, Feb. 18.

SOVIET RUSSIA rs about to launch another all out
drive to wreck West German rearmament plans, Western

Allied officials believe.
forms :

Do Not Dress Show Windows

W.I. Editor Tells British People

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 18.

It was expected to take these

|

1, Renewal of
reunite
peace

earlier offers to
Germany, give he a
treaty and withdraw all

Allied occupation forces in return

for German neutrality in the East -
West conflict

2. Fomenting of strike
West German workers a
percentage of whom are

amon
large
trongly

Greater investment of British Capital is the answer|*#4inst re-armament.

to the need for raising the

Indies said Theodore Sealy, Editor of the Daily Gleaner,| west

living standards in the West

Kingston, in a recorded broadcast on the B.B.C. to-night.

Died In Plane Crash

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Feb. 19.



Captain Albert Walton Roland|to dress the show window with | Major

Pleading for an extension of in-
dustrial development in the West

3. Possible approach to the
for another big four con-
ference on Germany.

A first move in
was seen in the

Indies he said “It is wrong for the| trolled East German Governmeht’s

people of Britain to think that th
way to help the West Indies

Perry who was killed in a Sicilian, social services. They know them-

air crash flew with British West} selves

Indian Airways from - 1949 till
last year when he joined Hunting
Air Transport.

He was a Line Captain with

East African Airways in Nairobi |

for two years before joining the
West Indian company,

Perry was an R.A.F. pilot du-
ring the war flying with Coastal
Command and from 1944 till 1947
with Transpart Command. He was
36 and had logged 5,590 hours

4,000 of them as a Commander, |

He was married with three chil-
dren,

Blockade China



j chase these services

from their own history
that they have been able to pur-
only after
j they have developed their indus-
\ trial and commercial economy.’

“It would repay British busi-
ness not only in profit on invest-
ments but great increase in
British exports to the West Indies
\if investments were undertaken
‘on a large seale to raise the
|standard of living.

Sealy commended the vision of
jmen like Lord Beaverbrook
Sir Williatn Stevenson the
national industrialist who
{sider a Way





and

,the Caribbean is to put

Inter-
con-
to’ keep Britain and
jto raise the standard of living in
capital

tin moné@y end goods into devel-
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18. | opment in those countries to
Admiral Arthur W. Radford,|create employment: to give more
Commander of the Pacific 4: et cue power.
said to-day the United States iE aN ? ?
Navy could throw a damaging|, “Then definitely out of the

blockade along the Chinese coast
if Chinese Reds moved into South
east Asia. Such a blockade he
forecast would be one of the most
effective in history and would cut





off the Chinese Communist Gov-
ernment entirely from its exter-
nal trade except with Russia
—U.P.
.

fruits of these developments wil







jcome all social services h
our friends in England
much about
Expansion of the ec
the British prritories



New
| deal
'well as tl
said Sealy

\World
to the

can mean a
people of Br

e of the West




equest to the Big Four for an;
all German Peate Treaty, A
step of this sort never

would be made by the Soviet Zone
satellite government without in-
structions from Moscow and West-
ern Officials both

here, and in

Bonn are pretty sure it would be

followed up shortly by a move
from the Russians themselves.
—U-P.

Quirino Seeks
Peace Treaty







this campaign] Organi

+ “rns ¢ r described as “encouraging” th
ar L ree aie ae ao, snow, Telephone lines were down | reported statement yesterday tha
Cc st-con-| cleare ra of heiag made by | ‘@2eughout the Italian Alps Egyptian Premier Aly Maher i
Se thes ay | cleared Britain eens i Switzerland basked in mid- wilting to “co-operate fully anc
ope Epepuen SUP erate under winter sun but temperature held wholeheartedly in the mainten
; Pasha that Britain had im- | ,elow freezing point ance of world peace through
jposed foreed labour on Egyptian The Seine River spilled over its}etrong and remodelled regiona
| vorkers in the Suez Canal Zone. |panks in the Fontainbleau area organization functioning withir
| The report was made by Raghuiath ‘Sunday. In most parts of the the trans. WoEk at tha Unite
jI'ao, Indian Assistant Director french capital the river now stands Nations charter,”
Ceneral of ILO, after six weeks on at a level of 12 feet while th« Maher's statement madé ins
the spot investigation. Rao re- danger point is 14 feet —UP. broadcast direct to the United] >}
ported that he found Egyptian veal States was taken to mean that}
sentment at British policy . and “ Egypt is ready to open negotia-{ %
ecurity measures in the Ganal| Navy Has New Plane anne soon for a revised version] *
Zone ; + 7 of the proposed Middle Eastert $
—U.P. NEW YORK, Feb. 18 Command %
A new swept-back-wing jet McDermott said he hoped “thi x
fighter capable of speeds ‘much was the case.” %
SWORN IN faster” than 600 miles per hour ; —UP. %
and superior to. Russian M.1.G':
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18. | now fiying in Korea are ‘being nears

| Gafsa and stocks of arms and am-





funeral service at the R.C. Cathe-



Woomera Rocket Range in the) (o a row of trees along the Puebl
ent Roman Catholic and = Wa4Ss/ munitions have been discovered in }dead heart of Central Australin highway two miles southeast o
inoted for ubstantial Catholic | the area, officials said today developed jointly at heavy cost by | here Sunday, killing seven pass-
Missionary work and charities in| Elyese Fraise, Editor of the} Britain and Australia.—U.P. engers and injuring 30 other
B.G ;newspaper French Women, |who ' Bolice took the bus driver into
} His funeral on Sunday after-| was fare eS by French authori- | airertien thc sicko after a renin
jnopn was attended by more than|ties last Friday and held under o . ie - seek: r
2,000 drawn from all sections of|surveillance in Tunis will. be Will Hold New | aide mob attempted to weneh, hiss
the community Interment at|brought before a Military Tri- ° 7 | Saas aoe ou
Lerepentir Cemetery followed the! bunal — UP. Atomic Tests | “Th aeveotia ata iil Satur-





dral, Bishop Weld and _ three WASHINGTON, Feb. 18 a ~ oo ee ere
sriests officiating. ’ > A new series of atomic test./#0d burned near p an no
I loods, Avalanches will be held at Eniwetok proving * here, U.P,
f grounds in the Pacific the), a ai
Â¥ y Still Threaten Defense Department and the yy POPOISOe PCPA IOO OOS
7 wo Generals Atomic Energy Commission
a W Europe f}innouneced jointly on Monday.
i‘ i ‘4 The announcement said that |
for President preparations for the tests are

ZURICH, Feb. 18.
HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania, Western Europe began digging

Feb, 18. |itself out today from two-week re-

The names of two Generals of ycord snows which crippled traffic
the Army were placed in the re-|@nd communications, Weather
publican preferential primary bal- | forecasters warned the “worst is
loting in Pennsylvania on Monday } yet to come” with expected thaws

already underway.

New tests it is understood will
be held sometime this spring. The
Defense Department said, the
tests will be carried out by Joint.
Task Foree 132 consisting of
A.E.C. personnel and membe

Ri









: of
Bdckers of Eisenhower and Mac Peco danger of floods and ‘he three servicer The Task
Arthur filed petitions shortly be- | “YAi@nenes. ae 2 Force is under the command of
fote the deadline, Each may with- rae pate - aths reported Maj Gen, Perey Clarkson
draw his name within one week th saat par nee brough Deputy Commander of Army
if he desires. A petition was also |» it Taree “ae to v eae has Forces in the Pacific The|
filed for Harold Stassen. —U.P. [an SeaGHy on Vienna since} announcement gave no detail:
Wed tor Harold Stasse ' Thursday a a cases AG
about the time or type of test |
Rail and road traffic from Aus —U.P
ria to Hungary and Czechoslo- Re
. . e T akia were paralyzed To th }
Britain Did Not outh Yugoslavia was coverec 7 2 99
F E ti with the thickest snowfall in NCOUTagZINgE
4g ye oy Ss century. ‘
ores 45) P ian in Italy an army of 2 ski troop WASHINGTON, Feb. 16
I. F rth of Udine were trying t State Department spokesma:
JONDON. Feb. 16. : jes Sta ep! rie D
The G3 tee released are- vreak paths to Trinco and Pra-|] Michael McDermott Monda

on
potniza cut off from civilization by





<<. Oe —-
Ce PSOE PEELE LAL AAPA LAPP EE TEA ALA APPP PSST ASG



Eric Janson, President of the| produced at the Grummon Air-
Motion Picture Association Of, eraft factory here for the navy



POISE













CLEAN — WHOLESOME



‘Lysander’ Here
On Carib Cruise

The American luxury yacht Lysander with a party of nine

cruise arrived in Barbados on
rt-au-Prinee, San Juan and St



Mr. Chauncly Stiliman, a banker of New York, has

Another two-mile ine formed | chartered the vacht for a Caribbean cruise and his guests
on th Vimpeuee madaae of | | are Mr. and Mrs, Thomas R. French, Mr. and Mrs, Joseph
see the | impressiv € oO } ‘ z a me ree iia as and
wreaths sent from all oven ing | Hamlen, Mr. and Mrs. Beatrice Gra ind Mrs. and Mrs,
globe for the funeral of Kin Geo. Wheiler,
azeorge VI. More than 200,000 : at w- WHE aiid eaten
persons saw wreaths on Saturday | lacking yacht was ted up in the
and Sunday | Careenage yesterday while its
The scene was floodlit last night |





admired the harbour and
5] rf 3ridgetown from the
i nfortable and “pacious aft
lounge
The. Lysander, whieh cost
$500,000 (U.S.)>is 192 tons, and
available charter for _ cruising
the Lakes, the Gulf, the
Caribbean, South América and
other ports of the world.
The ship’s party have no

treed to trouble about hotels and
meals when they reach port for
the yacht has a professional crew
of 12 te carry out helt wishes.
Completely air-conditioned,
Lusander accommodates-42. guests
luxurious ¢ nieack, The
ning salon and living — salon
have a ‘homely atmosphete”
about them and the aft lounge
ix furnished in modern livable
@eck chairs and lounges.

A Patrol Cutter

Lysander looks a new ship,
She was bullt in 1942 at Benton
Harbour, Michigan, as 4 patrol
cutter for the American Navy.
She was converted since the war
isto a buxury yacht

She contains six bedrooms,
neluding ohe large master bed-
reom and five double bedfooms

ith full, modern tiled bathe
ron There are separate quar-
ers for officers and crew, She is
esutifully furnished with. .vall
to wall carpeting in alf £6dms,
Her power comes from two 500
p. Diesel motors and electricity
; generated throughout by one
5 K.W. 110 volt Diesel genera-
r and one 30 K,W. 110 volt
iesel generator, She is equipped
ith a ship-to-shore telephone,
complete electrically equipped
galley amd a large capacity ice
making machine and two.walk-
i refrigerators. She is steam

heated,
Lysander’s oveyall sength is 136
et and she

feet, beam 24\4

fraws eight feet of water. Her

uising speed is 17 knots.

Captain John MeCallum,. who
noing

‘xperience and who i¢ an Anna-

has over 30 years sa
polis graduate carrying unlimited

t
i
6
t
J



licenses, said that tte -yacht’s
party expects to leave Batbados
on Wednesday for Martinique;

They have planned to make calls
it Antigua, San Juan and Tru-
{jillo before returning te Miamiy

In spite of bad weather every
day since they. left Miami, the
|parly has had an enjoyable
cruise down, They all thik. Bars
|bados a lovely place -and are
making the usual commé@hts about
Barbados rum. am

Lysander’s crew k her
| crupulousty clean, pol and
It seems a partoofr their
routine to use = scrub
} brushes, Even in the enginé room
‘one feels homely, =

PLLA LY

\ painted
| daily

CE

f.4,4,044.8 $464 ,6050,
iO bat - £6 ALEPPO LL PCOLEE EO POSS
PPPOE LALA EE BE PPEE LEA ARAL SHE

Â¥
New Record Set };
MANILA, Feb, 18 Ameri¢a was sworn in on Monday) The Navy announcement on Sun- %
President Quirino will ask the Chairman of the Point Four day said the plane is named the OSLO, Feb. 18 $ *
Senate ome time this week to] Prograffimes of the International “Cougar” and was much | fast rT Ha Brender 23-vear-old g 2
fy the Japanese Peace Treaty] Development Advisory Board.) than the “Panther ; Ane firs . ie Norwee lurmberjact on tt *
and a Mutual Defence Pact with|He succeeded Nelson Rockefeller | plane used by the Navy in combs Olympic 1 kilometre cross country] % 2
the United States, a Foreign Office —U-P. —U-P. | Ski race today in the record timc} & x
pokesmdn said to-day. Political of 1 hour, | minute, 34 co * z
observe suid the Mutual De- ‘ . 1 Brenden time bettered the if ; ; s :
fence pact was sure of ratification Olympie record of 1 hour ar 1G + . 1’ I E Q
ce = <"|Strike Stops Ford Plant (e's $ every Grain EDIBLE §
debate ove Japanese Peace} Lundstroem, a Swede at St. Moritz, | 3 c s = 6% ¢
Treats } WINDSOR, Ontario, Feb. 18 Switzerland in 1948, It was Bren-| ¥ NO PICKING REQUIRED. t
j The second strike in eleven weeks stopped Ford of Canada er thir O I } % 4 4 x
The Se ea < | embly lines today and 8,800 employees began picketing the | winte ime js >
art oh | plant in relays over a contract dispute. The strike was called | Simon Sladts on3 PRICE 60¢. Package s
i t m Nae wt aintst Canada’s largest notive arm by the United A t ’ oaseu! @ =
f € I i € j Workers’ Union after mont! g talks organized by Onta ( he an npt j % 1 GEDDES GRANT LTD.—Agents. %
gati Frar “| sour Minister, Charles Dé iled. WNegotiat betv een the and ¢ es aa iad - 28a 1% >
I € . | any and the Union and Daley broke off half an hour ae eer ee =P; yy 6 LOCOCO OOOO OSS
—UP, | ike started at 10 p.r - PLA
PAGE TWO



>
t

N RAH
Manager «
Capt
bartan

JOH



M'
panied by
Capt. F.
Captains of B.W.1.A
Trinidad by 5B.W.1A.
week-end after payi
husiness visi; here.
Holiday with Daughter

R. NOEL ARMSTRONG, for-

mer Colonial Postmaster ac-
companied by Mrs. Armstrong
plan to fly to St, Lucia to-day to
spend about two weeks’ holiday
with their daughter.

Three Months

R. AND MRS. TYRWHITT

GILI and family who have
been holidaying in Barbados for
the past three months are due to
return to Trinidad to-day. Mr
Gill who is a Barbadian is with
T.P.D. oilfields in Palo Seco

St. Kitts and Antigua
asian AND WIRELto» Divis-
ional Manager Mr. H. L, N.
Ascough returned over the week-
end from,a short visit to St. Kitts
und Antigua.
Mr. Ascough
February 13.

Holiday Over

ISS MARION WESTCOTT

of Antigua who had been
holidaying here since the middle
of January returned to Antigua
on Sunday morning by B.W.1.A.
During her stay in Barbados she
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs
C. S. Warren of “Wyndal”, Hast-
ings.

Miss Westcott’s father owns

cotton estate in Antigua.

U.S. Trip
t. GORDON KINCH, son of

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Kinch of

ie Stream returned on Sunday

evening from a visit to the U.S.
via Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. Be-
fore his U.S. trip Gordon had been
working in Venezuela. jt is un-
derstood that he may be return-
ing there shortly.

Wecek-end Departures
R. LUIS DE LIM:
M . LUIS DE LIMA

panied



Seni

left Barbados on

"A

4v

om-

by his mother

re-

turned to Trinidad over the week-
end by B.W.LA. They had been
here on a short visit

de Lir



Mr a is Managing Di-
rector of Messrs Y. de Lima and
Co., Ltd., Port-of-Spain, San Fer-

nando and Barbados.

BY THE

EADING of a young writer
whose overcoat pockets

“are usually stuffed with poems”
I thought cf Rivarol who,
noticing 4 manuscript sticking
out of the poet Florian’s pocket,



Jack Turbot is not
coming, after all

said, “If one didn’t know you, one
would be inclined to rob you.”
The Ping-Pong gang
R. PETER WILSON’S recent
revelations of what goes on
in the Ping-Pong world will
probably make a number of
players throw down their piffling
little implements in a tantrum
The man who confused -his
ppponent by a system of mirrors
let into his bat was once drawn
against Eric Hopthorne of Sur-
biton, Hopthorne was renowned
for his back-breaks, which he
managed very simply by attach-
ing thin elastie to the ball when
he was serving, Nobody could
ever take his serve. But when
he was playing this mirrorman,
the elastic broke, and the
chagrined Hopthorne thought he
saw two balls coming back at
him. He lashed out, and there
we

CROSSWORD



Across
Taste of the public
Degree of maturity.

(5)

(@)
Land (6)
Make this go for a dog. (3) }
Dependent on a big freeze. (7) /
Eyelid Hicker when in wing. (3)
Cloak. (6)
Arboreal understanding. (4)
Verses about a pole? (5)
in @ way. it’s smart. (5)
Start of a wedding. (4)
Pear|'s maternal relation. (6) }
Part of a wind instrument. (4))
A letter from 23. (3) !
Th 45)
Down
It makes us care. (6)
Retinue. (5)
Aamits you to a 2,
Calculate. (G6)
Uvemployed lied. (4)
Part of the lot. (6)
Poliow. (5)
County place that
Well sung; or the bill? (7)
Strength. (5)
The hart family. (4)
Some spinner. (4)
Gentle upward curving bend in
timber. (3)
Frequently appited to Macadam
(not John of course). (3)
Square measure in France. (3)
Solution of Saturday's puzzle, — Across
Mock: 4, Sees; 6, Operation, 9. One
© Ream, 12, Nut: 15. Tow: 14 Trunk
‘Reicentitvi: 17. Air(mani 19
nk: he Yellow: 25 Note: 24 Grid
: 26 Remote Down: 1. Moun-
entury; 5. Bark: 4, Stencil
5. Snow: 7, Pour; 8, Reindeer: 11, Monk
1$ Tenors 16. Trade: 18, Idol; 21. Lie
\22, Wit.

© way over.
(8)

ve ti. (7)

a.

Se cn

RAYON SUITING
STRIPES ......
PLAIN SHAD

WOOLLEN TROF

WY Re Slisushics

COLOURED
MEN’S BUCKLE
JOHN WHITE SH

1. B®

Dial 4220



ae



GENTLEMEN !

YOU'LL BE SURE TO LOOK SMART IN THESE

GENTS “RENOWN” SHIRTS

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By NEVILLE CONNELL

TO-DAY, Madame Fela de Kuh’s
annual exhibition of watercolours,
drawings and sculpture opens at




Back from Trinidad



ARTIE’S HEADLINE Of aged RNING ee frinidad The Pavilion, Hastings, for two
i Fee ene enn ong a age weeks from 104.28. los DM.

= t been on a short visi, -3 â„¢!; cluding Sundays. This exhibition

Als : Cheape of “Carlton,” i. shown in furnished rooms, which

has a great advantage over exhibi-
tions held in art galleries, since

To Join Husband

RRIVING from St, Kitts on the artwork is seen in the sur-
ZX Saturday by B.W.1LA. was roundings to which it belongs.
Mrs Ralph Maloney who has Madame de Kuh is a lover of
come over to join her husband

old buildings and trees, and her
affection for these is strongly re-
flected in her work. Through her
eyes we wander along the narrow
lanes adjoining Bay Street, or,
loiter at corners of Bridgetown.
Seldom does the motorist or pedes-
trian pause to glance at the very
individual charm of such places.
Unfortunately there is no Council
or Society for the preservation of
ancient buildings to purchase for
the island Madame de Kuh's
watercolours of buildings and
corners of the town that are no
more. Indeed, she should be em-
ployed to record Barbados in the
same manner that artists have
been commissioned to record Brit-

hoe is Chemist at Haymans Fec-
St. Peter, She was accom-

panied by their two children.

Maude and Maude
A/SISS MAUDE COX, retired
LV matron ef the Prison left
the U.S., on Sunday via Puerto
Rico by B.W.LA, to spend a holi-
day. During her stay there she
will be the guest of her God-
daughter Miss Elaine Forde of
New York City.

Leaving by the same wlane ws
Adjutant Maude Phillips of the
Salvation Army who has gone to
the U.S. to reside.

r

for

“ Here’s your tea and
paper. sir.

Short Holiday

R. AND MRS. REX GILL For Sister’s Wedding ain, For, the face of this island 1s
M flew to Grenada on Satur- , RS. CURTIS HIVE, daugh- rapidly changing as the result of
day ‘by B.W.1.A., to spend a short ter of Mr. and Mrs. Victor indiscriminate building, as yet no
holiday in that colony. Chase of “Alpha” Hastings, ac- legislation exists to control such or

companied by her .son arrived the destruction of buildings of

For Carnival
CELENA GRIFFITH

character. The walls of a few old
sugar-mills survive, but their num-
ber is rapidly dwindling. Before i

from Trinidad on Sunday evening
by B.W.L.A. to be Matron of Hon-

of our at her sister Faye’s wedding.

KS.

Four Hill, St. Peter, left for Baye is to be married early next is too late, some record for the
Trinidad on Sunday by B.W.1A- nonth to Mr. Guy Massel 3 ie benefit of posterity should be pre-
to attend the Carnival. She waS pome is in France. Guy is at Pared. Indeed, the beautiful paint-
mecompanied by her niece, Miss present in the W.I. and will be ing of the large Evergreen tree
Daisy Cyrus of Lascelles Planta~ 2 -riving here a few days before (No. 21), which formerly stood
tion, St. James. the event. near the Christian Science Church,

Mrs. Griffith and Miss Cyrus should be purchased by that

hope to be away for two week

On Honeymoon
NTRANSIT through Barbados
on Sunday by B.W.LA., were

Mr. and Mrs, Harry Bryden who
were on their way to Antigua to
spend their honeymoon. They
were married in Trinidad on Sat-

Church as a penetential act for the
cutting down of a noble landmark.

Of the watercolours exhibited
“Low Tide, Hastings (No. 4), shows
a skilful colour arrangement in the

radation of its tones. The deep
violet horizon merges into a series

Arriving To-niorrew

R. C. E. TUDOR, Senior An-
aesthetist, Dulwich Hospital,
London, is due to arrive from
England tomorrow by the Colom-

a holiday with his Urday. Mr. Bryden is the son of of lightening tones until the pale,
bie to spend a holiday with hi MY. and bern WW. Beyeen . of ian ae

parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Tudor
of “Edithville’, Pine Road.

Continuing W.I. Holiday
LOUISE PAYNE, a Bar-

Trinidad and a nephew of Mr. A.
S.,Bryden of Barbados.

His wife is the former Valerie
Knowles daughter of Mr. and Mrs
Errol Knowles of Trinidad and a

tones deepen to the dark fore-
ground, from which rises the
gnarled roots and tortured trunk
of a sea-grape tree. This carries

RS. the eye upwards in diminishing



badian resident in New former B.W.LA. hostess. tone values to the focal point of
York who has been holidaying . * the picture and the sky. Such care-
Barbados, ieft for Trinidad on Talking Point ful planning and harmonious col-
Sunday for two weeks. She wili our must be successful. A painting

then spend a week in British Gui- The art of life is to keep down
ana, returning to Barbados before acquaintances.
Bhe leaves for the US.

with a well thought out pattern is
No. 16 of tree roots, whose snake-
like convolutions form an interest-
ing, if slightly sinister, study.

—E. V. Lucas.

W AY sees. By Beachcomber

There are many new aspects of
Bridgetown: the Olympic Cinema
and Palmetto Square (No. 19) is
especially colourful. It is a pleas-






was a tinkle of broken glass, as English to such creatures they ure to see buildings depicted which
the ball met the trick-bat. The Stare at you as though you were really grow out of the earth and
napped elastic was picked up 2 Ballyshannon heifer with am do not merely rest on its surface
y an interfering c nd both eight-foot tail, or had eyes look- as these often do in the work of
men were kicked out of the ing seven ways to Sunday, like less skilled draughtsmen. The
Senior Ping-Pong Club the apple-woman of Calatayud. watercolours of Probyn Street are

4 The lady should have said: “Unit delightfully gay, with "buses, huck-
The Lots Road Burgee of what?” And pat would have sters and their wares enlivening
still flutters come the answer: “Personnel.” the scene. And, although my eyes

She's the fastest hooker
Between Galway and Kinsale, . .
HHUS chanted Mrs, Wither-
sedge, as she sat on a bat~ | terday an overall scheme by
tered bucket amidships. To re- Which — local associations, under
porters she said; “Cal] me Fanny the directive organisation of a
Carlsen, for "ere I stay on’ this CeMtral board, would — concert
scrap-’eap until someone tows Measures for incorporating the
‘er to the Knackers’ Yard, The Committees set yp by the local, nd it’s a beautiful brown color,”
sea must he in me blood, and if @88ociations in branch councils) said Willy Toad to Knarf and
this old junk-shop ’ad been round Gependent on the central authori-| Hanid, the shadow-children with the
and round the ‘Orn for years tY as its executive, functioning as! turned-about names, “I found it;
without stoppin’, she couldn't S€parate units under the control| While | was walking along the side
be a more ‘orrible sight than Of semi-independent bodies, rele! of the road, not far from the school.
what you be’old. Oh, well, tive to the network of supplemen-y !’m sure it must be very valuable.”
spring's comin’, and there’s still tary advisory teams acting in aj _Hanid said: “! wonder what it is.
room aboard for a few birds to temporary capacity, independent] Willy. Would you let us take a look

build their nests. Last year our of the setting-up of the interim| at it?”

cat Nelson slep’ in the Hadmir- working committees envisaged in| “I'm sitting on it,” said Willy
al’s spare ‘at, which is more’n the schedules prepared by a full-] “The magpies steal everything. |
you could say for some craft I time panel selected from the} They’d be sure to steal this thing,
could name. ha authorities, Asked to ery because it's so pretty
‘ what all this rgferred, Suet said) and so valuable), the moment the
In passing it would not te in the national] laid their eyes on it. So I’m sitting
i CLERGYMAN is encourag- interest to embark on an ex-{ on it.” |
i ing people to interrupt his planation, Knarf looked around. “I don’t see |
sermons when they disagree any magpies now, Willy. I’m quite
with what he is saying, and he sure you can let us see it without

Or so it seems :

By MAX TRELL



Don't you believe it!

was delighted when 4 dozen WE anyone stealing it away.” }
men and Women “talked back at 4 ever watchful L.C.C, re- 1

him” one Sunday, If there is cently banned an 18-ft. wenese or Soe |
room in his pulpit for a question- python from the stage of a pic- At this, Willy hopped olf the toad-
master, and a few

theologians ture-theatre, stool on which he was sitting and |
Knarf and Hanid saw that the val-

uable thing Willy was hiding was 4,

i Shortly afterwards
a Rumanian who had escaped from
a Bucharest presented himself at

like Mr. Beverley Nichols, the
whole thing ought to go with
swing.

headquarters, carrying a cricket Pe Well a Will el
pe bat and wearing a gay cap, “I well” exclaimed Willy glee-
SEE that Oo gay want fully,” isn't it wonderful? 1 don't



a woman who wos to be a professional cricketer,” he

called a “unit” by some little said. A few well-chosen questions

piece of official dross or other proved that he had confused the

considered that she had been in- L.C.C. with the M.C.C, They ther eh"

sulted, So she had. asked hain if he would like tof Neither Knarf nor Hanid wanted
This gadget, this parcel of trash, buy the python. “No,” he said,| ‘® disappoint Willy so Hanid said: |

suppose there are many of these
around, Must be worth a great deal,

|



was probably a Captain in the “I’m not as hungry as all that,” “Yes, it’s pretty valuable Willy. It’s |
Jargoneers, the dashing little “One man’s meat.” vouchsafed an| “alled a penny.”

cavalry of the bureaucrats, and official, “is another man’s pythpn.”| “Penny! Whata beautiful name!”

nobody should be too hard on him “Not necessarily,” said the “It's the same as one cent,” said |

if he has forgotten how to speak Rumanian, “Oh, well,” concluded] Knarf.

English, In fact, if you talk plain the official lamely, “Ah,” cried Willy, “it’s even got |

7 (wo names! Really must be valuable. |

Re - What can | buy with it?” he asked,

: . the next moment,” |

per t and the Pine Ogre—31 “You can Suy a tollypop,” said!

Knarf.

“I don’t care much for lollypops,”
said Willy. “What else can you
buy?”

“You could buy a postage stamp?” |
said Hania.

“Postage stamp?” repeated Willy

‘What can | do with a postage
stamp?”




ad




R uper

bewildered ar the |

“Let me see, it had

Rup ws, 1 - . had just
mystery of che mies ot bark. Are stopped —_raining,"” says Rupert
you quite sure there was a message Paulin *

te : e smiles, n

on this asks Pauline as she takes ee) eer
“Ot course, | am,"

: the words are written in some kind

says the of invisible ink that only sh
is ‘ e , OWS
little bear. Then she asks a curi- when it is wet,” she Uaderes
ous question, What sort of - ‘Now the bark is dry and x's
weather was it when you ftoeund = vanished "’ 3














s eur

Ba att ciliates aati $3.39 — $3.72
Bh rey ssccas “$4.18 — $4.37
ICALR SAD iia $6.66, $6.72, $7.00, $7.41
Ritson Sanitcunupauien esse $4.50 — $5.23
ii dae cuscddr deta eee sun $5.20, $5.57, $5.94
SHOES se emilatcs a 12.09
OES IN BROWN & BLACK. $10.64 — $11.19

VANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606



HARLIE SUET outlined yes- Willy Toad Found

“IT’S round, it has pictures on it,





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 195



THIS pencil drawing of Prince
Johannes Liechtenstein is among
Mrs. Fela De Kuh’s exhibition
which opens at her home, The
Pavilion, today.





sn. mesiaves seibigenn a onnaiianaee 0 a eacetienrate se ty a t-te nin oF

2 sae eee

This year there are fewer heads.
One of Mr. Lionel Gittens (No. 6)
reveals the artist’s power as a
sculptor, for the pencil drawing
betrays her interest in the bone
structure of the head. The likeness

are not always receptive to the is excellent. In her colour drawings

same colours and values as Mad-
ame de Kuh’s, I can always appre-
ciate her well blended mediey of
eolour and her charming pattern-
ing (No. 8) Busby’s Alley (No. 42)
is well arranged and the faded
green shutters above the busy
scene are bathed in golden sun-
shine.

Two watercolours are of unusual
interest. The old wall near the
Drill Hall (No. 11) has a lovely de-
sign and is more impressionistic
than the artist’s usual Style,
but an even more_ impres-
sionistic scene is one of a tree
backed by shrubs of . varying
tints. Madame de Kuh told me
that this scene had been described
to her by a pupil from Guadeloupe,
she had painted it during the de-
seription and the result certainly
justifies the experiment.



a Penny

—But He Didn't Know What It Was—



Willy found a penny lying by
the road.

anid said Willy could write a
lotter and send it with a postage
siamp.

“H’mmm,” said Willy. “Toads like
me don’t write letters.

Knarf and Hanid told Willy that
with his penny he could buy mar
bles, a little rubber ball, a button, a
pencil, some chalk, a bun, a nut. a
piece of string, a pin and a gumdrop.
Willy shook his head. “I don’t care!
for any of those things, thank you.
What 1 want to know is, how many
flics can I buy with this penny ?”

"anid said: “You can't buy any,
Wily.”

Willy sighed deeply. “I guess,’ he
suid sadly, “this penny isn't as val-
vable as | thought it. was. | don't
think I’ keep it any more. In fact,
it's rather uncomfortable to sit on.
I think I'll let the magpies take it.”

But Knarf said that wasn’t the
richt thing to do. ‘Put tt baek where
you found it, Willy. Perhaps the
boy or girl who lost it ner the
school, will find it again.”

So Willy said that was a good
idea and took the penny back to the

| side of the road und left it just in

the spot where he found it.
penny's no good,” he sail, “it
“it buy vou what you want mx



ELIZABETH R.—THE FIRST
_ COURT CIRCULAR COMES OUT



CLARENCE HOUSR.
ST JAMESS

|



of heads Madame de Kuh has been
successful, especially in the high-
lights where she has employed
blue. There is a picaresque study
cf a musician, where one can
almost sense the languid melody of
his guitar from the ennui of his
pose (No. 13).

Few artists can weild a pencil
with the skill that is Madame de
Kuh’s. Her drawings of the
Careenage (No, 39), and of coco-
nut palms (Nos. 1 & 26) have a
“slick” brilliancy that only comes
after years of hard work. One can
see in these drawings the colours
of which their objects are com-
posed, so well are the tones ar-
ranged.

B.B.C. Radio

Programme

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,
11.15 a.m, Appointment with
11.30 a.m. Walter Gieseking,
The News, 12.10 p.m
4.00-—7.15



1952
Music,
12 (noon)
News Analysis
25.38M 31.32M



4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m, Marching and Waltz-
ing, 5 p.m, Take it from Here, 5.30 p.m

Composer of the Week, 5.45 p.m
Children Singing. 6 p.m Personal
Tortrait, 6.15 p.m Welsh Magazine,
6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and Pro-

gramme Parade, 7 p.m. The News, 7.16
p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Rendez-
vous w‘th Commonwealth Artists.

7.45—10.30 p.m, 31.32M 48.43M



A Talk, 8 p.m. The Story
Teller, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30
p.m. Report from Britain, 9 p.m. Meet
the Commonyealth, 9.30 p.m. Ray's a
Laugh, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m
Fiom the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Moray
10.30 p.m. From the

7.45 p.m

Mclaren Talking,
London Theatre

GEOBE
TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
AL ev A” Double—

gWs TP












DIGK POWELL

TE

ile eT ts

Color by TECHNICOLOR

OPENING TO-MORROW, 5 and

8 30.
iTS AMERICA'S

Big Date Thy








ee BETTY

GRABLE

MACDONALD

CAREY

acai
>. “Sree
weiss RORY CALHOUN + EDDIE ALBERT





|N.B-~Week end Films start on

Wednesdays.



Madame De Kuh’s Exhibition | ssvos: ueo-

WIFE-MANIA

WOMEN are afflicted with
seores of irritating mental quirks
which are not listed in medieal
Looks but are only too well known
n the home, harassed husbands
complained.

More than 500 of these cour-
ageous men have sent in signed
reports describing their wives’
mental maladjustments, in re-
sponse to my invitation on this
page last week.

So that all women can di-
agnose their domestic disorders
—and do something about them
—I list the dozen most prevalent
feminine foibles;—

Hearthritis

An ailment which stiffens the
jeints and holds its victim to
within three feet of a fireplace.
Very pronounced when the sink
is full of dishes,

Clockjaw

A pernicious amnesia relating
to the correct time, especially
when the husband is in a hurry.
Manifestations are cries of “I'll
only be a minute,” and “I’m
nearly ready!”

Paralysis Gadgetans

A symptom complex which has
arisen in recent years, charac-
terised by a complete inertia
when faced with household
chores, unless these can be per-
formed by electric washing
machines, plate driers, wringers,
and other similar gadgets.

I award the guinea prize to
Mr. Leonard Tilley, of Rydalroad,
Ribbleton, near Preston, for Par-
alysis gadgetans”.

‘Claws-Trophobia

A morbid dread of doing any
work that might ruin her nails.
Altellerfobia
The woman who says to the
shopkeeper “Alteller” instead of
admitting that the article is too

expensive.

Nostrumania

A relentless urge to dose
members of her household with
remedies she would not dream
of trying on herself.

Cushionitis

A mania inducing the house-
wife to rush round rooms, per-
petually pummelling cushions
into monstrous shapes resem-
bling highly inflated balloons.

Whiffsomania

A woman’s disease affecting
husbands who have to spend half
the night looking for leaking
gaspipes and “something burn-
ing.”



TODAY 4.45 « 8.30 P.
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE

Ruth Richard Zachary Mercedes
ROMAN TODD SCOTT McCAMBRIDGE

Wed. (only 4.30 & 8

UNDER CAPRICORN”

INGRID BERGMAN &

urs. (only) 4,30 8.30 p.m.
“TREASURE ISLAND"
(Color By Technicolor)





"30 p.m.

Méephistophelitis

The
already

compulsion
blazing fire.

Oddheapus Complex

subconscious love of con-

to poke an

A
fusion

Horologophobia

The sufferer insists upon having
all clocks several minutes fast
and then incessantly inquires the
correct time.

Morbid Infantilitis

An irresistible urge to peer
into every pram,
” * .

A LONE woman intruded into
this all-male competition with

this alleged masculine maladjust-
ment:—

General Paralysis
of the Iinane

The patient shows a marked
allergy to the sound of dishes
rattling in the sink, exhibiting
such a lethargy that he is barely
able to prop his feet up On the
mantelpiece. '

This is a scandalous exaggera~
tion in my view. But if women
really believe that men are
afflicted with equally irritating
habits, I am willing to consider
any reports and pay a guinea for
the best one submitted on a
postcard by the first OF oe

SHE WAS A ‘BALL
OF FIRE’

By R. M. MACCOLL

WASHINGTON

I use the term “ball of fire”
with no slightest thought of dis-
respect in writing of Miss Anne
Morgan, sister of the fabulous
banker, J.P. who has just died at
Mount Kisko, New York, aged 78

I came across Miss Morgan sev-
ral times in France at the Sart
of the last war.

A woman of electric sparkling
energy, she was wearing the uni-
form of the American Relief For
France organisation. Her black
eyebrews contrasted with her
white hair, topped off by a felt
hat worn at rather a rakish an-
gle. {

But this was only one of some
50 philanthropic enterprises with
vhich she was associated during
her busy lifetime.

Once she told a women’s gath-
ering in New York: “I never had
any creative ability—just a trudg-
ing capacity.”



M,





B'town

P

L
A
Z

A

(Warner Bros.)

oe)

“THE BIG PUNCH”
WAYNE MORRIS

L p.m

“HIDDEN CITY"

Bomba, The Jungle Bov



Bobby O'Driscoll & Robert Newton | SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE Dial

“THE SET UP" Robert RYAN Tex RITTER fi 2310
OISTIN

PLAZA priv sas GATET Y=: Suse

To-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,
Robert MITCHUM in
“OUT OF THE PAST” &
THE SET UP”
Robert RYAN

——————
Thurs, (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
“BEWARE OF PITY"

Lili PALMER &
“HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN
Boris KARLOFF & Lon CHANEY













To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m
“ROCKY" Roddy McDowall &

“KILROY WAS HERE”
Jackie COOPER & Jackie COOGAN

Thurs, (only) 8.3 p.m,
“DEAR MURDERER”
Eric PORTMAN &
“SNOW BOUND”
Robert NEWTON











WOOD POO PIS - POOPOPP PAP PPPS,
s
Pa
’ §
x THE COLONY CLUB
> .
% announces x
.
z the resumption as from WEDNESDAY, February 20th %
ry
% of its :
% * x
$ WEDNESDAY NIGHT HUFFET :
s 3
<
s DANCES :
s eo
s
$ which were suspended owing to the death of His %
x late Majesty King George VI
+
> Evening Dress 7.30 p.m, to 12 midnight
4
% C. B. BROWNE’S ORCHESTRA 3
96666566666695408 OOD
EMPIRE ROXY ¥
- 4.45 & 8.30 LAST 2 Shows TO-DAY
FODSE, . 4.30 & 8.15
and continuing Daily MARGARET O'BRIEN in
JOSE FERRER “HER FIRST ROMANCE”
CRY ANARD and “NEVER TRUST
» a A GAMBLER”
STANLEY KRAMER’S
Production ‘S. By 4.30 oot
CYRANO BLACKIE
DE BERGERAC AND
Extra
TO THE END OF THE
LATEST NEWSREEL EARTH
With
OLYMPIC WILLIAM POWELL
LAST 2, SHOWS TO-DAY ROYAL
GARY COOPER in a. ee
- Double e
, =e John WAYNE in
“WAR OF THE WILD é
AND CATS and “MOONRISE”
“ ” with
DASHING RO BORSA” Dane CLARK—
Wed. & Thur. 4.30 & 8.15 Gale RUSSELL
BING CROSBY— Wed. & Thur, 4.30 & 8.15
; BOB HOPE Republic Whole Serial
an “UNDERSEA KINGDOM”
“ROAD TO RIO” with
RAY “CRASH”
ALAN LADD in — CORRIGAN
$5 r Weird Thrills —
} “WHISPERING SMITH” BLAZING! ACTION



Cam






TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,



JAMAICA NEWSLETTER

J’ca Hard

1952

Currency

Imports Increased





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GENERAL LEAVES FOR MALAYA



Leeward Is.
Methodist —
Synod

THREE

PAGE









Always active at that age—but they are
using up : ~“rgy.

Give them SevenSeaS to make

= THE Synod of the Leeward sure they don’t outgrow their
From Our Own Correspondent Islands District of the Methadist strength
KINGSTON Feb. 14 Church has just completed jts | L
3 ; ‘ . » meetings in St. John’s Antigua. ii i i
Jamaica’s dollar programme for essential supplies from hard The Synod is composed of ali | This pure rich cod liver

currency areas for 1952 has now been approved by the

Secretary of State for the Colonies

For this year the island

will be allowed a ceiling for imports of $26,000,000 U.S.
This figure is just slightly above the 1951 dollar programme

ministers and representative lay-
men in the District which stretches
trom the Virgin Islands in the

North to Dominica and Curacao
nd Aruba in the South.








oil supplies in concen-
trated form the natural
fats and vitamins that
youngsters need to keep

and represents a substantial cut in the programme as ! 1s Excellency The Governor of | them well — now and
originally submitted. the Leeward Islands, Mr. K, W later in life
However, this will not affect the facturers’ Associtition and repre~- Blackburne, weleomed the Synod :

additional dollar allocation under
the U.S. tokeri imposts scheme for
this year, which might be = in-
creased frem $1,250,000 to $1,400,-
000.

sentatives of primary producers
organisations concerning the ex-
port of their crops to Britain.

On leaving Jamaica Mr. Canip-
bell will visit Trinidad and Brit-

to the island at the great meeting
on the first night of the meetings
of the Synod.’ In his speech His
Excellency referred to the great
part that Antigua had played in
the history of Methodism in the



ish Guiana before returning to Wes A NATURAL SEA-FRESH VITAMIN FOOD
The Jamuica Government had Pondon. ‘ 3 est scion for it was here that
put forward an increase! alloca- ‘ * aoe oy Methodist society was |
tion for the 1952 dollar imports The Legislative Council of 9 p> Meg 1760. He stressed too | even ea
programme because of the effects Jamaica has accepted the prin- Gauze *t part the Methodist

of the hurricane and the demand
for dollar goods arising as a result
of it; also because of general in-
creases in prices and the fact that
certain essential goods had been
placed under open general licence.

ciple of unification of public ser-
vices in the British Caribbean as
e half-way mark to the federal-
isation of the services under a
Federal Goyernment,

The Jamaica official and nom-



GENERAL SIR GERALD TEMPLER (left), new High Commissioner for Malaya, with his deputy
Mr. D. C. MacGi}livray, pictured at London Airport before leaving to take up their posts

had played in the devel-|
*pment of the Colony in hot only |
the spiritual field but also in the
temporal field, such as in edyca-
‘ion. In the historic past the Gov- |
ernment had often opposed the
work of the Church, but now His

LIQUID in bottles of 6, 8 or 16 fluid om,
CAPSULBS in tubes containing from 2§.



A Bolivar Society, commemo- inated House, however, added a seen off by Lady Templer and Sir Gerald’s 18-year-old daughter Jane.-EXPRESS bone stig Excellency pledged himself to Bf any Aifculty in odsaining, waite 40 «+0
rating the life of Simon Bolivar, recommendation that all public Suppert all the good work of the!
liberator of the Americans, may services should be unified one Church, |
s00n be founded in Jamaica. Plans not just the eight services slated ~~ Fe ee ee ae eis oem, ee eae ok ee a ee ee Oe District Ministers i
for the Society are now being for Unification under the recom- The following are the stations STOKES & BYNOE LTD.—AGENTS.
worked out by Dr. German C. mendations of the Holmes Com- sof the ministers in the District for |
Navarro, Venezuelan Consul, and 'â„¢ission which studied the matter. Rev Thom: , the next year: Bhs 8 Tea ame era Ss Er | aly
* as

a number of prominent Jamaicans.

Previously, the Jamaica House

Fresh Approach To

Antigua: Rey. J, Davison, Rev.

of Representatives had accepted K, Derham (St. John’s), Rey. J./
Recently, Dr. Navarro present- unification in principle. O ° Gumbs (Freetown). Dominica: | a
ed gifts of the works of Bolivar r¢ laine Rev. W. J. Barrett (Roseau), Rey,

to His Excellency the Governor,

Malayan

Problem



A. Williams (Marigot). Montser- |







Sir Hugh Foot, K.C.MG., the . 5 g 5 From Our Owr : rat; Rev, E. J. Gazzard (Ply-
; : , Mr. Douglas Manley, son of wn Corre lent ; y
University College of the West Mr. Norman Manley, K.C., leader ST. GEORGE'S: Feb.13 7 Saha = aka _A. Roberts
Indies and the Institute of Ja- of the People’s National Party, SINGAPORE _A large congregation at the St. fillies weed its: Rey. E, M. @
maica and-other organisations and hag joined the staff of the, Uni- Mr. D ld Ch : a sepsis ots George’s Methodist Church last ‘py er (Basseterre), Rev, N.
leading persons in the literary life yersity of Liverpool. _ Mr. Donald Charles MacGillivray, formerly Colonial Monday night witnessed the Chricht ona Point), Rev. H. 1. |
of the island. Mr. Manley has been specialis- | Secretary, Jamaica, has arrived in Malaya to take up his Ordination of Revd, Maxwell Rey HH BroWn (Chusieaay ;
There are Bolivar Societies in ing in psychology and will be new appointment as deputy to Gen. Sir Gerald Templer, aren Ernest Thomas, 30, tO Revs. W. Sunter and L. T. Byron, | -
the Latin Americas, Trinidad. concerned with research in race the new High Commissioner in the Federation of Malaya. *"Y, ovnodist Ministry. Supernumeraries St, Bustatius?
Barbados and other West Indian relations in Great Britain par- He was selected for the post be- best possible qualification for suc- fi al nent the Syned held its Rey. K. G. Swanston, St. Martin:
islands, it is stated here, and it ticularly as it affects the Negro cause he was considered “a man cess in Malaya ted public session which was Rev. C. L. Carty (Phillipsburg) yVOSC
is felt that Jamaica should have a in Liverpool, where there is on€ who will bring a fresh mind to P G on by His Excellency the Rey. J. E. Perkins (Marigot), Rev.
branch of society, cspecially in of the largest coloured popula- bear on the many complexities o “We've had our fill of legacies GQVernor and Lady Arundell. C. Mel. Darre prary &
3 \ } i : ) I ies of : g Revd. Griff . ; ll, Supernumerary.
view of the Bolivar’s historical tions in the United Kingdom, His the present administrative ma- from Palestine,” said one Malayan a sriffin presided and the Anguilla: Rev. D. 0, Henry. Vir- | we”
connection with the island. particular angle is the psycholog- chine” ig Malaya. In announcing councillor, while another said that speakers were Revds. Bernard gin Islands: Rev, L. Race (Road|
Bolivar was in Jamaica from ical adjustment in the s0cial his appointment, Mr. Oliver Lyt- Mr. MacGillivray would start his Crosby and V. A. Comissiong. Town, Tortola). St, Thomas: Rey
May to December in the year pattern. telton, Secretary of State for the new task with all the disadvant- Reports were also read by Revd. R, Warner Aruba: Rev, J.
1815, ‘ ‘ a Colonies asked him to leave for 2ges of a man from Palestine. The Mr. Mural and Sister Marjorie Thompson, Curacao: Rev. BE. H.
The gift of a copra factory has Malaya immediately. Mr. MacGi]- newly-appointed Commissioner of Watson fhomas A . .
: . been made to the Government livray arrived in Singapore three Police in Malaya is also a former The Rev. J. Davison is visiting : Ika-Seltzer’s effective pain-
of Jamaica by Mr. W. Garfield years after his appointment was Palestine official, as was the late In addition to the Svned an- {reland and the Rev. R. A. Kirt- reliever starts to work at once to bring * lo]
rhe, International Bank iS Weston, Canadian financier for announced. Sir Henry Gurney, High Commis- nounzement of nomination of jey will act as Chairman of the you welcome relief ...and its effervescence Selo
sending a team of industrial ex- the benefit of the coconut indus- », r sioner for Malaya until his assas- Revd. J. B. Broomes as successor istrict at St. John's until he re- helps speed that relief. It’s simple as “one MOS
perts to survey the economic iN= try of the island. : ut the appointment has sination by Communists last year. to Revd. Mr. Griffin as Chairman turns in the Autumn, two, three’! One—drop one or two Alka iN of ,
dustrial potential of Jamaica. The ~° brought a storm of protest in , aa oe aoee sols of the District, news was also The Synod expressed its con- Seltzer tablets into a glass of water. Watch ao een
team will arrive here from Wash- Government has accepted the Malaya, where the hope had been . Mr. Mac MLV ERY Wwoose sa’ary released of the appointment of cern at the growgh of the liquor how fast it fizzes and dissolves! Tw ‘
ington on March 1. offer and hag requested the Coco- &Xpressed that an officer with local in Jamaica was £ 2,200, will nO Revd. David Mitchell to the Bed- trade in the islands. In some drink it down. You'll like wie ca S t a
At the same time the Govern- nut Industry Board to take over ine ont hae Mecie A eee er ot pings Aye. TE, ford Church, British Guiara. islands the nurober of iiauor ahobe set Hen wi basal isd pleases ee /
ment here has secured the service the peration of the factory situ has been in the Colonial Service When appointed to his new post huge ’ 7 sre far too many to be in reason feel better! Don't let a Headache “dig in Wf 94
of Messrs, A, D. Little, Inc., a form atea at Boundbrook, Portland. ; ‘ paar dail aon Mr. Maurice B. Browne, Dis- able relationship to the population, : Wee 2, |
Z ‘ft. A , , : ; since 1929 < has ser a and was asked to leave for Malaya , | : ; , ; iS take famous Alka-Seltze 1 ray! ||
z h . = e and has served in many . saa ede We : . > Ann, zer r&ht away! \\\
of internationally famous indus- Value of the gift—lands, build IS ‘e “in view of the urgency of ‘ict Officer, St. Vincent Grena It is hoped that Methodist mem W\yoxs
; te aes a , gs ¢ ‘hinery—-is estimated Parts of the world, has no experi- at once “in view of the urgency Of Ginn. a . . bers will realise the dancer of Keep a supply on hand. \ A/a
trial advisers, for a period of 10 ing: and machinery—is estimate shee at all of Malayan problems filling the appointment without ines, was on a short visit to the bers Wi realise he dang . Wii's 4
v P J - ey g a alay s. . € ; . , mes . “ et ¥ i a ye ¢ : on
months in the first instance, and at $150,000¢W.1.) Under the headline “Man from delay.” His post as Deputy High Colony last week to consult with slrong drink and give @ lead in Famous Alka-Seltzer helps millions, HS
has invited a team of industrial Jamaica Chosen,” the Singapore Commissioner will be for the dura- Persons here on ways and means Merabors ae the Synod took the Let it h ou t TaN We }
experts and industrialists from newspaper “Straits Times” com- tion of the emergency only, 7 improving the salt industry in anne 7 eiptag sem De elp you ‘00, (x assy \|— Uy \
Great Britain to recommend de- Dr. T. W. J. Taylor, C.B.E, mented: “This appointment must —B.U.P. fa ; southern ee eee mt Methodism in the West Tubes of 18 anf 90 pehbae ph a IY
tails of an industrial policy for the Principal of the University Col- cause uneasiness, It was unneces- Tatehetohdete ana Sits Gun ure Indies, English Harbour and Bie pad
island. lege of the West Indies, hag been sary because there was a suitable 4 S ang ip tour= wathaniel Gilbert’s | » All th
soa dy “ naments, as ¢ aver for St, Nathaniel Gilbert’s house. e
Against this background of in- 2PP°inted a member of the Fub- Deputy piready on the spot, And oye Mitkent, bar se a ae men have now returned to their
gainst this | 8 OF 4D tic Service. Commission newly it seems to us an unfortunate ap- ah ; Ss vibiaide ah dat any o'@ own islands having been refreshed
d al pla zy the Jamaica ; ute ndatis ‘ ca tances here
ustrial pinning wie Js created in Jamaica to exercise pointment because it brushes aside ™ ics tate Bare so ° by the friendship and fellowship
legislature has*passed bills for Control over the civil service So cursorily the wishes of respon- i . of a very happy time together.
the establishment of an Industria! 4),cintments and promotions. sible leaders of opinion. It is not To St d J miaica At the Criminal Assizer this
Development Corporation and a" “Other members of the Commis- going to make Sir Gerald Temp- Go u y a weer beroee Mr. Justice A, * —
Agricultural Development Cor- cio, include a Privy Councillor, let's task of winning public confi- : Liisa ools-Lartigue, a jury acquittec > . . BABY Ss
alice; ated 9S GEO, doe of Lalit: Comal Sudae scummeesn: CORE Be sade, sia sig. tance HAGUE. | 19-year-old Rustan Williams, who Profits Question

the first heavy industries planned

tative of the Civil Service Asso-

Although Mr. MacGillivray is an
efficient official and administrator,

industrial development specialist,



was
eat of his father

charged with causing the

last October

Hinder Oil Talks

TEETHING



i was Officially open- ojati a ij or 1 , H
for the island \ Be aT Sige eent scan cag a_ social welfare Wapker the paper baia, he does not have is to spend three months in py g jenife wound when he inter- e :
ed and the first fruits of its pro- and the Principal Assistant Sec SG a ik ji study the ‘
ducti the local market “etary charge of the Estab- Whé alaya consider should be Jamaica this spring to study the vened on his mother’s behalf TEHERAN, Feb. 16. nee give you
uction on the a £ > retary in charg ot. the essential qualification for the economic — possibilities of the Gorin fight between his Ne ns between the World
This was the newly constructed jishments Branch of the Secreta- 7 - a ele ; : he Dutet e 4 \ v egotiations between the ° °
. post—a knowledge of Malaya. His island, announces __ the utch parents tremier Mohs ed n t
Caribbean Cement Company’s fac- riat experience in Jamaica, it said, Ministry for Economic Affairs, , ’ Bank and Premier Mohammec O anxtettes
tory situated in East Kingston ' ; n be viewed agai st tha serie sahinkcielh Mossadegh to solve the oi) dispute There need be tl A
which began delivering cement A Plan for setting up free sec- ae oe eR Tals ne com pr. Winsemius, who is Hol- snagged Saturday on the question a mo restiess nigh’ %
last week to the local market at a ondary and vocational schools in Rite. beskeropne af Malayan pels land’s Director-General for In- GRACIE FIELDS of profits. If no solution is found no tears, no baby disorders, if
price less than that of imported the island hag been dyawn up by . dustrial Development, will leave MARRIES AGAIN by Tuesday Robert Gardner and ou have Ashton & Parsons
cement, which has now been stop- the Jamaica Dev elopment Com- Yet British residents in Malaya for Washington at the end of his World Bank mission are sche- nfants’ Powdors handy.
ped from entering the island by Mittee of New York... the believe that Mr, Lyttelton's choice February. He was a member of ISLE OF CAPRI, Feb. 18, duled to, leave for the United Mothers all over the world have
a Government order. _ The plan is for a drive in the j."4 wise one. They point out that a Dutch delegation which dis- British stage star Gracie Fields Stes. Gardner and, his advisers found them soothing and cool-
Spring to get Jamaicans and the present emergency in Malaya cussed Dutch Guiana’s economic nd tne 4B a B — Al ‘ro, met Saturday morning with hel tiroush
® : other interested persons in the pas “continued for nearly four development problems with the *"'' BnAAIEH vei oi ; h Mossadegh and in the afternoon ing when bab: is fretful throug
; United States to subscribe one years, in spite of officials with a World Bank and other officials in \'°l_ were Piano at the church ith a mixed Parliamentary teething, and, best of all, they ef
Here to discuss the future re- qollar to the fund for the estab- knowledge of Malaya. Obviously, Dutch Guiana recently. of Santo Stefano today, Gracie é a fnaid ’ he Premier's are OL SLY SAFE. p 4
J il commission at the Prems
lationship between the Univer- jjshment of these schools. Similar they say, a man with an entirely 44, and Boris 48, a radio electrician Anish The Babk’s offer wan fj ie
sity College of the West Indies drives are planned for England fresh approach is needed. His services in Jamaica were became man and wife in a cere=~ (™™™™. 0 AD eat
3 : ; . mnie al y dl reported by Iranian officials
and the imperial College of Tropl- ana other countries where Jamai- Another factor which rankles in requested by the Inlernational mony performed by father Luigi ; one Oak eck tae HTON &
val Agriculture in so far as Agri- cans are domiciled and these the Malayan mind, however, is Bank for Reconstruction and Lembo. Ds AVOS ” ne
cal Agriculture ‘ ar as Agri~ cans aoe ; So cee feet 3” Devel t under the pro- would get 50 per cent. of the : 1
sulture teaching is concerned is Jamaicans will be asked to con- that Mr MacGillivray served in Developmen I " : f ' ' r r
c t S eects Be elie ree : 7 ote es for ier-developed The bride w obviously nervous profits — the same, amount as
Jock M,. Campbell, Chair- tribute one dollar every year Palestine from 1938 up to the time gramme ‘or under k ”
Mr. Jock M. Campbell), 2 , oiniaiien 2 “My : tos ha. ae ies. The Dutch Government but just as obviously happy as Saudi Arabia, Iraq and other mid-
of the West India Commit- for at least 10 years until the of his appointment to Jamaica in countries. The Dutch t 5 }
a ‘ Jamaica Government is able to 1947, Malayans are saying bitterly has granted him three months she and Roris exchanged rings dle East companies get from com- aE

teé in London.

Mr. having

Campbell is also

discussions with the Sugar Manu-



J

take over full responsibility for
the schools,



| —
|

that apparently the Colonial Office
regards service in Palestine as the

A small

Its specification

leave to enable him to accept the
invitation. U.P.



car with
Features

vith only a few friends looking on. panies exploiting their oil flelds.

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Tuesday, February 19,

















OUR

MAJOR Griffith’s broadcast this- month
and Lord Rowallan’s speech to the mem-
bers of the Barbados Chamber of Com-
merce will have attracted the attention of
all those who regard Scouting as some-
thing to be encouraged.

Some of Major Griffith’s
were depressing.

statements

“In the 40 years of local scouting,” he
said, “100 groups have been registered,
but to-day there are only 38 on the register.
Where are the 62?” Earlier he had said,
“I fear too many troops fall by the way
through the Scoutmaster fer one reason
or another failing to implement the Patrol
system as conceived by B.P.” Or in words
more widely known, the blind cannot
lead the blind, without them all falling
into the ditch.



Scouting in Barbados, if we are to judge
by these remarks of the Island Scout
Commissioner, lacks other things than
money. It lacks sufficient leaders, men
who will not fail to implement the Scout
Law.

A good scout may not be a little angel,
but if he is not a good boy or a good man
he is not keeping the Scout Law.

And in this connection what Lord Row-
allan is reported to have told the members
of the Chamber of Commerce seems to be
at variance with something Major Griffith
said in his broadcast.

Major Griffith said that the “Scoutmas-
ter is looking after your boy—the boy
who will be the man of tomorrow.” Lord
Rowallan on the other hand stressed that
the job of the Scout Leaders was not to

‘make “little angels or good little boys.”
Their job was to make men, who would
not only set standards themselves, but
would help to raise the standards of
others.

Clearly then if scouting is to succeed it
is better to have one scout leader capable
and competent to lead and to set an ex-
ample for boys who must necessarily be
good boys if they obey the scout law
faithfully, than for scouting to be regard-
ed as a good institution which will absolve
parents from the responsibility of train-
ing their own children to become good
citizens. Major Griffith did in fact place
responsibility on someone other than the
scout leader for what manner of boy a boy
scout is today, but he did not make it
clear whom that someone was, while he
did unfortunately throw the onus on the
scoutmaster of “looking after your boy or
your neighbour’s boy.”

Lord Rowallan was much happier in his
expressions, when he said that scouting
provides an anchor for boys who would
otherwise drift through life until they
reach the rocks and are shipwrecked. The
tragedy of Barbadian life, a tragedy which
makes the task of scout leaders more diffi-
cult here than in other countries is that
so many boys begin life on the rocks and
are. born shipwrecked, To that extent
Major Griffith is probably justified in sug-
gesting that scoutmasters do look after
“your boy or your neighbour's boy.”

But that is not his task. His task is to
make men: and not ordinary men, but
men who have such high standards that
they can help others to raise theirs. If
everybody in Barbados obeyed the Scout
Law there would be no need for scouting.
But if scoutmasters and scoutleaders
themselves fail to obey the law and there-
by disqualify themselves from making
good boys, let alone good men, of what
avail is scouting to the community ?

In its second edition, since it became
a fortnightly publication the “New Com-
monwealth” dated January 2ist, by a
happy coincidence discusses what is being
done to help to equip the younger genera-
tion in Britain and says that “correspond-
ingly larger achievements must be asked
of it if its purpose is not to grow weak for
lack of spur.” It refers to “Scout expedi-
tions to mountain peaks in winter” and
concludes by saying that it would be a
source of strength to the Commonwealth
as a whole if “young men from various
countries could be enabled to share great
endeavours and so interchange influence
and example by making major physical
efforts under conditions of hazard.” No
one would suggest that scouting would
receive a great impetus from the institu-
tion of organised expeditions to the top of
Chalky Mount, or by tree climbing in
Turner Hall Woods, but certainly there is
a solid body of opinion in Barbados which
confirms Major Griffith’s broadcast state-
ments, as quoted above, and considers that
scouting could do with a toughening up of
its moral and physical fibre

If Lord Rowallan’s visit should have
this result it will have been’as successful
as it was necessary.

FREE ENTERPRISE

The recert rise in price of
foodstuffs has brought the usual
outbreak of demands for the Gov-
ernment to ‘do something’ about
it, presumably to add still more
controls gnd regulations, in the
mistaken belief that prices can be
held down by such tinkering with
the economy.

Ne Government of a small is-
land like Barbados can control
the world-wide tide of inflation,
any more than King Canute could
control the ocean tide, though
according to the history books he
was a wise man who knew his
tides and his limitations

The causes of the inflation from
which we suffer are too complex

some



to be analysed in a short article
but mo doubt one of the most
important is the habit of Mnancing
our wars ‘on the cuff’ instead of
paying for them at least on the
instalment plan. It has been cal-
culated that the British people

have not yet made a down pay-
ment on the Battle of Waterloo,
though the more comservative
economists think this should be
done before embarking on a lot
of social welfare that they cannot
really afford. The idea that pos-
terity will pay does not work
because posterity merely feels
resentment at the idea, and adds
its own wars to the already stag-
gering total.

In recent years we
the strange spectacle of Govem-
ments in Britain, the United
States, and to some extent Cana-
da, apparently trying to check in-
flation by a maze of economic
controls, while encouraging it b;
unsound fiscal policies such as
lavish spending for non-essential
purposes, support of artificially
low interest rates and so on,

Here in Barbados we can do
nothing to correct the mistakes of

have had



other countries but we do not
need to copy them. We migh
r better to ‘concentrate Our
efforts on trying to mitigate the
cffect of world-wide inflation on

our Own economy, by such steps
as may be within our power to



The Nation

T is strange, and contrary to

all forecasts, that as oul
Constitution has become more and
more democratic the .Monarehy
has grown stage by stage, not
weaker, but stronger. And now
that we have universal suffrage,
a House of Commons representa-
tive of the whole people, a Sec-
ond Chamber with only a shadow

of control, we fing the Throne
more secure than it had ever
been, based, not on power, but

safely on the confidence and affec
tion of the people.
vw *

a ONARCHY has been fused

with democracy. Lhis coulda
not have happened but for one
Wung—ihat the Royal Family it-
self had clearly realised and
frankly accepted the principle of
that fusion, and fulfilled faith-
fully the obligations it entailed.
In the reign of King George VI.
all the world may recognise, and
history cannot fail to record, an
exemplar of constitutional Mon-
archy at its best.

The stability or the Throne has
safeguarded the stability of Par-
jliament, In recent times we have
seen how, over the greater part
of Europe, one by one, democratic
governments, in appearance firmly
established, were suddenly and
swiftly overturned. For the most
part the democracies fell through
the faults of the democrats them-
selves, Party strife carried to ex-
tremes, producing weak and tran-
sient Ministries, had brought
about the collapse of authority.
In this country and in the group
of Monarchies in north-western
Europe which stands out as among
the best-governed States in the
world, these upheavals have not
occurred. This is largely because
when, in a nation deeply divided,
matters come ‘to a crisis, if there
is a constitutional Sovereign. he
may be able |to bring to bear @
different and independent influ-
ence. Transcending political an-
tagonisms, he can reconcile and
harmonise in a way often not
possible in countries where the
Head of a State is himself a mem-
ber of a party and its nomince.





CUR READERSSAY
Report Misleading

To the Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—As your report under the
head “Bay Hotising Roads must be
14 feet wide”, which appeared in
the issue of today’s date, is mis-

leading, inasmuch as it may be
believed that the Housing Board
was seeking the approval of the

General Board of Health to con-

struct 8 ft. wide roads throughout
that particular area, I would ap-
preciate it if you would allow

to give the following explanatior





The “Plan and Statement” sub-
mitted to the General Board of



By RK. E. SMYTHIES
take It should not be too much
t *xxpect our Government to be




lling to profit by the mistakes
of others, and refrain from per-
sisting in policie that obviously
do not accomplish what was ex-
pected of then

I sometin wonder if serious
consideration has beén given to
the idea of removing all controls
so far as possible, in order to let
ihe laws of supply and demand,
free enterprise and competition,

go to work again unhampered as
they should be

When bureaucratic controls
have once been imposed they tend
to perpetuate themselves long after
any real need for them has passed,
and democratic Governments
should be on guard against this
feature It may not be generally
realised how sych_ restrictions
often do more harm than good by

stifling competition and the in-
centive it gives to efficiency. It
may in fact be impossible for
anyone Who hag never taken an
active part in competitive busi-
ness te understand this

The proper function of a demo-
cratic Government is, to act as

policeman to see fair play between
the different sections of the com-
munity, producers, merchants
and cansumers, capital and labour,
and to make sure that the system
cf free enterprise is not frustrated
by monopolies of either capital or
labour.

Monopoly of labour is a rela-
tively ree development. but it
can be just as harmful as any
other: mencepcely in causing prices

to rise, as is happening in Barba-
dos to-day. It is a direct respone-
sibility of Government to see that
no small group of intransigeant
individuals can hold the rest of
the community to ransom by un-
reasonable demands and restric-
tive practices.

I have heard it argued in
favour — of Government con-
trols that under them there

(By VISCOUNT SAMUEL)

‘YUE British,” it has been said,
“are a sensible people.” if our
political system is on the whole
successful, this may be due to our
habit of preferring the lessons f
experience to the logic of theory.
We have learned, among other
things, that institutions, if they are
to appeal to ordinary men and
women, must be humanised; they
must be understood, not only
through lessons and books, but “s
embodied in persons. What kind
of persons they will be who are *o
symbolise in themselves the
Nation and the State is therefore
a matter of first importance.
Here again, King George VI
will surely be counted among the
best of the Kings in the great suc-
cession, His character made him
an abiding influence for the good
life in an age often of unstable
morals, It made him an example
of fortitude in times of danger
and stress. As Sovereign 4e ful-
filled every duty, whether of
action or of restraint, that the
Constitution required of him. And
he. brought us a Queen Consort
who quickly won and has firmly
held the deep respect and warm
effection of the whole people,

Institutions are not transient
like ourselves: they supply the
element of continuity. They keep

the living generation in touch with
the generations that have gone
before, and allow it to link hands
with the generations to come.

If we tried to sink the past
beneath our feet, be sure the fu-
ture would not stand,

And institutions find their safe-
guard in tradition, in ceremony.
If the authority of the State is to
be effective, it must command
respect, and for that it should it-
self be stately. A Monarchy, and
especially a Monerchy rooted in
a thousand years of history, can
tend to democracy a dignity and a
grace that will be'in themselves
a source of stability and strength.

. * *

OR us one other point is of
fundamental importance. Our
Commonwealth is an association
of communities, widely dispersed
over all the continents, each one





Health pointed out that 14 ft. roads
would connect this Section with
the other developed Sections of the
Estate as well as with Culloden
and Beckles Roads, but sought
approval to construct an 8 ft, wide
internal access road which would
serve the houses already facing on
to Wanderers’ Cricket Field on the
north side

These houses have been on their
present spots for many years with
no road to serve them. In replan-
ning the area, it was considered
that an 8 ft. access road should be
constructed, in spite of the fact
that no alteration in the layout



And Monarchy



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|
is little or tro bankruptcy, but
this is fallacious because it
really means there is little or no
keen competition. To keep the
free enterprise system healthy
there must from time to time be
elimination of the inefficient con-
cerns, and their replacement by
fresh ones with energetic man-|
agement and new ideas. This)
may seem harsh but speaking
generally no business concern
need go bankrupt. There is al-
ways the choice of alternatives |
to either increase efficiency or |
wind up the business. i

In the nature of things it is
more difficult to ensure keen
competition in the trade of an}
island than in a continental com- |
munity of the same size, so that}
an island Government has a spe-
cial responsibility in the matter. |

The system of selling goods on
a basis of cost plus an Officially |
sanctioned ‘mark-up’ really en-)|
courage merchants to let their}
costs rise, while setting a fixed)
maximum or ceiling’ price usual- |
ly results in either a minimum |
price or an unnecessary shortage.

It is not meant to imply that
if all controls were removed to-
morrow prices would go down at
once. It is impossible to estimate
the extent of the harm done to
the free enterprise system by the
strait-jacket of controls it has
been in for several years, during
which it has not been able to be
either free or enterprising. It|
might take some time to work off |
the evil effects and return to)
keen competition. |

In due course some prices
might go down and others up,
but they should at least be more)
in line with reality than they |
are now. As the war is sup-
posed to be over, it could be
worth trying. In the meantime
the policy of holding prices of
local products down toa level
below the costeof production, or
substantially lower than corre-
sponding imported items, is bas-
ically unsound and will cause a
shortage of the local products in
the near future,



with its own local patriotism, pas-
sionately cherishing its own in-
dependence. It is the Mvnarchy
which has made it possible to
combine the fullest liberty of the
parts with the enduring unity of
the whole. The future historian
may be able to estimate better
than we can how great has been
the service to the world that has
been rendered by the very exis-|
tence of the Commonwealth, with
its effective interventions ‘again
and again in the cause of human |
freedom. If, in this troubled age,
that service can be judged of high
value to mankind, the Monarchy
shares in the merit,

In spite of all difficulties and
adversities, our State flourishes.
It flourishes, because it is secure.
And it is secure because at the
base it rests broadly upon the
people, while at the summit it
culminates in the Crown,

* * *
UCH is the heritage which now

passes from King George VI
to Queen Elizabeth II, I believe

SPECIAL RADAR AID FOR
SMALL AIRPORTS:

| A simple one-man radar aid for guiding
|aircraft in to land has been designed for
|small airfields which cannot afford expen-

sive equipment. The prototype is now in use
}at Southend Airport, near the East Coast.
\It is similar to the Ground Controlled
Approach system (GCA) used at big inter-
national airports, but much cheaper. It will
|cost about £3,000 to £3,500, about one-
| twentieth the cost of GCA.

Pilots have already made more than a
thousand approaches on this “poor man’s
GCA” and were brought in to the end of
the runway in all weathers. The Ministry of
Civil Aviation wants all pilots approaching
the Southend airport to use the equipment.

The principle of the equipment js that
| when aircraft approaching the air-field call
| up the tower on radio, their bearing from it
|can easily be identified on a VHF/Direction
| Finder, and this bearing is then used to pick
| them up on a simple radar screen. Engin-
}eers point a narrow radar beam at the air-



|craft along the same bearing, so that when

the plane flies into the beam it appears as
a “blip” on a radar screen. A controller on
the ground then directs the “blip” (and the
plane) right to the end of the runway. The
plane does not need to carry special equip-
ment, and can approach and land in any
weather.

To make sure a narrow radar beam would

be wide enough to pick up an aircraft at
distance, engineers made tests by looking
through an old gun-laying telescope which
was pointed in the direction of approaching
aircraft. The radar beam now used picks up
aircraft about 15 miles away.

The prototype of the new approach aid is
built into a single-decker bus so it can be
moved about the airfield, On the roof of the
bus is a radar “Dish” scanner, which is
mechanically locked to the radio direction-
finder, As the pilot calls up on radio, the
dish swings round in the direction of the
approaching aircraft and projects its radar
beam. Below, in the control cabin, the scan-
ner is connected to a rotating control con-
sole with a radar screen in it—in appearance
rather like a submarirle’s periscope. The
homer operator swings the console round by
moving two handles at shoulder level—again
very much like a periscope.

To pick up the aircraft the operator makes
a small adjustment to perfect his “aim”, and
the aircraft, as it comes into range, appears
on the radar screen. The scale of ranges of
the screen can be reduced as the aircraft
approaches, There is a microphone and
loudspeaker on the console so the operator
can speak to the pilot and listen-in while
watching the “blip” on the radar screen.
The equipment can handle only one aircraft
at a time.

The aid does not need to be sited at the
end of the runway in use—the operator’s
directions can be offset to allow for any run-
way on the airfield.

HOOVER AGAIN

OH, MR. HERBERT HOOVER, this is
where I came in. Almost exactly a year
ago, just after I had got back to America
from Europe, I sat in a yacht and listened by
short wave to you making a super-Isolation-
ist speech, all about pulling American troops
out of Europe and building up a “Gibraltar”
over here.

Blow me down if you have not gone and
said it all over again. As the only living
ex-President you are listened to with deep
respect by a great many Americans. When
you advocate taking the G.I.s out of Europe
forthwith, you will probably start up again
that Great Debate of last year on America’s
whole foreign policy — the policy that your
close admirer, Senator Taft, is so anxious
to ditch.





the nation is glad to have a
Queen, There is no Salic Law
here. Many centuries before the
Sex Disqualification Removal Act
of thirty years ago, the British
Constitution was enlightened
enough not to bar from the high-
est position in the land any person
born a member of the larger halé
of the population, We are all re-
calling te-day how the reigns of
three of our Queens have been
periods illustrious in history—Vic-
toria, Anne, and long ago, but
vividly remembered, Elizabeth,
whom we must now call The First, |
in many ways the greatest of the
three, }

Who can tell— think there are |
signs of it—whether, if there are |
no more great wars, our new
Queen may not be destined to pre-
side over a_ period marked bv
sharped reaction from the present
confusions and _ discontents: a
period vigorous and constructive:
with a re-birth in philosophy and
learning, in all the arts and all
the sciences; a reign worthy to
renk in history with the brilliant
era of the great Queen whose
name she .bears.



would take placé at this point. No
vehicular traffic would use this
access road unless going to one of
the houses there. Entry signs
would have made this into a one
way road. Having Wanderers’
Cricket Field on one side, ‘the 8 ft.
access road could be widened
whenever necessary.

It was this 8 ft. access road that
the General Board of Health ob-
jected to and decided that it
should be constructed the same
14 ft. width as all of the other pro-|
posed roads in the area. |

T. O. LASHLEY, |

Manager & Secy, Housing Board.
14th Feby., 1952.

|. Greece and Turkey formally became mem-

SEA TO SAUCEPAN

UP IN PORTLAND, Maine, they are get-

ting ready to deliver to New York dinner

tables quick-frozen lobsters packed in sea-

weed and contained in a plastic bag which is

popped into the saucepan along with the
contents,

SELF-DEFENCE

REFEREE Ruby Goldstein (he stopped the
Robinson-Turpin fight) has received. a
huge—and approving—fan mail because he
stopped a boring boxing match on TV.

TWO TO JOIN N.A.1.0.

WASHINGTON.



bers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion on Monday when their Ambassado

deposited acceptances with the State Depart-
ment.

tion will make greater effectiveness of the
collective defence system which had been
created under the treaty.” Turkish Ambassa-
dor Feridun Erkin said that the Turkish peo-
ple are happy to join the defence system.

Greek Ambassador Athanase Politis,
pledged his country’s determination to live
up to the obligations of the treaty. Webb
said “I heartily welcome these two coun-
tries in our organization which provides the
framework for constructive and fruitful co-
operation between all members, having as
its objective the preservation of world peace
and security.”——U.P.

Acting Secretary of State, James >
Webb said “I am confident that through their|}) Brisket of Beef
accession to the treaty, significant contribu- Jorned: Beet






TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952

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|
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952





Common Pleas

Suit Adjourned

Claim Made For $1,113.05

An adjournment until April 2 was granted both parties
in the Common Pleas suit, Violet Servie Reid-Vivian Con-
nell, when the case continued yesterday before the Acting

‘Puisne Judge His Lordship

Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor with

the hope that the dispute might be shortened or possibly

settled.

New Syrup
Being Made

A NEW KIND of sugar syrup is
le.ng made at the Haggatts Fac-
tory, St. Andrew. This syrup
hich is finding favour wich resi-
dents in the area is made in a
different way.

In this me hod water is added
io the first quality sugar which is
sn a special container and then it
is boiled until it becomes a thick
substance when orange essence is
added.

This syrup is then put into cans
which are taken away for sale.

= a *

THE GULF OIL COMPANY
continues its search for oil in the
St. Andrew area. Holes are now
being drilled at Haggatts Land
which is lying west of Coggins
Hill.

* * *

BOYS OF THE Belleplaine
Boys’ Club are practising hard for
the Inter-Club football matches.
Several of the boys have played
practice matches,

* * *
DURING the past two weeks
residents of the districts around
Jackson and Sharon have been
suffering great inconvenience for
water.

Early in the morning the water
goes off and returns periodically
during the day for short intervals,
Yesterday being washing day,
residents were very annoyed as
many of them found difficulty in
obtaining water for washing their
clothes,

Animals also suffer as a result
of this and consequently when the
‘water is on for the few minutes
there is a great stampede.

Whatever is the cause, many
people in the dis rict say that
every crop season when the es-
tates are grinding this happens.

U.K. Imported
308,606 Tons Of

B.W.1. Sugar In °51

t LONDON.

The United Kingdom imported
308,606 tons of sugar from the
British West Indies during 1951,
according to complete returns
for the year just published in
London by the Board of Trade.
This represented some improve-
ment over the 1950 impcrt figure
ef 301,951 tons, British Guiana, for
which a separate figure is given,
supplied 82,806 tons in 1951, as
against 67,118 tons in 1950.

Altogether, 864,168 tons of
sugar were imported from Empire
sources in 1951, as against 811,
177 tons in 1950, Failure of the
Australian crop reduced imports
from that territory from 246,644
tons in 1950 to 177,154 tons in 195),
but this was amply compensated
by an increase from 163,507 tons
to 260,300 tons in imports from
Mauritius,



Foreign Sugar

Foreign sugar, however, ‘n-
tinued to make up the bulk of
Britain’s imports, rising from
1,280,373 tons in 1950 to 1,390,451
tons in 1951. Cuba alone sup-
plied more than the entire Em-
pire total, with 878.262 tons in
1951 as against 872,123 tons in
1950. The other big foreign sup-
plier was San Domingo, which
increased its trade from 379,349
tons in 1950 to 444,929 tons in 1951.

At the same time, Britain re-
diced her re-exports of sugar
from 751,864 tons in 1950 to 724,
714 tons in 1951, to give her a
ne! import in 1951 totalling 1,520,
905 tons, as against 1.339,686 tous
in the previous year. The remain-
der of Britain’s sugar needs for
domestic consumption came from
British-produced beet,

Mr. Ronald Mapp M.C.P. will
be the guest speaker at the Press
Club to-morrow evening at 4.45,
His subject will be “The Press
and Moral Leadership.”

Mr. Mapp was one of the dele-
gates to the recent Moral Rearma-
ment Conference in Miami and his
discussion will centre on the de-
cisions of the Conference,



Old Boys’ Meeting

At a meeting of the Old Boys’
Association of Foundation Boys’
School next Friday at 7.30 p.m, at
Foundation Boys’ School there
will be the formation of a Com-
mittee to deal with various sub-
jects,

The case is a claim for $1,113.05
debt brought by Reid of St. James.
Connell lives at Black Rock,

Reid is represented by Mr. W. W.
Reece, Q.C:;"instructed ‘by Mr. D.
Lee Sargeant, Solicitor. Mr. E. K.
Walcott, Q.C., associated with Mr.
J. §S. .B, .Dear, instructed’ by
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield is
representing the defendant Vivian
Connell.

This morning when hearing wa:
resumed Mr. Dear told His Lord-
ship that on the last occasion the
case was adjourned with the idea
that the solicitors could get to-
gether to see whether the case
could be made shorter.

Both counsel in the case were
desirous of taking another adjourn-
ment with the same idea in view.

The plaintiff in her statement
claims the sum of $1,113.05, monies
due and owing from tre defend-
ant to the plaintiff for the price oi
items of household articles sold
and delivered on May 18 1948, and
for further monies alleged to have
been received by the defendant for
the plaintiff.

Articles Not Received

In answering the claim, the de-
fendant-admits that she purchas?d
certain household articles from
the plaintiff, but denies having
received certain other articles
mentioned by the plaintiff in the
Statement of Claim.

The defendant also admits re-
ceiving the sum of $279 as set out
in the statement of cam, but
alleges that’ before the action the
plaintiff was and still is indebted
to her in the sum of $341.62, The
defendant claims a set-off against
the plaintiff's claim and filed a
counter-claim for $62.62, being
balance of the amount due her
atter deducting the amount of the
plaintiff's claim.

The plaintiff in turn defends
the counter-claim, joining issue
with the defendant on her de-

fence, She said that the defendant ©‘.

was not entitled to the set-off
asked for, and denied that she
was indebted to the defendant to
the sum of $62.62.

When the case first came up for
hearing on January 29, and ad:
journment was granted in order
that the solicitors on both sides
might have the opportunity to in-
vestigate further the inventory of
articles alleged to have been sold
and delivered, and which the
plaintiff was unable to substanti-
ate during the course of her evi-
dence in chief,

Case Of Exposing
Rum Adjourned

Their Honours Mr. H, A
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Hans-
chell, Judges of the Assistar
Court of Appeal yesterday
adjourned for a decision until
February 25 the case in
which His Worship Mr. S, H,



Nurse fined Gerald Mings of
Fitts Village, St. James, £124.
3/4. and 3/- costs or six

months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for exposing for sale rum
in that district on December 13
which was Polling Day.

Mings appealed against Mr.
Nurse’s decision. Counsel in the
case is Mr. E. K, Walcott, Q.C. for
Mings, while Sgt. Archer is prose-
euting for the Police.

Police Constable 439 Brewster
said that on December 13 he went
lo the defendant's premises at
Fitts Village. He arrived there
about 2.40 p.m. and noticed two
windows in the shop open.

“I went to one of the windows
and looked in the shop. The de-
fendant was sitting at a window
in the south of the shon while two
men were sitting at a table in the
middle of the shop. I noticed liq-
uor on the shelves of the shop ex.
posed,” Brewster said.

The defendant asked him if
there was anything in the law
about exposing goods for sale and
he told him “yes”,

Cpl. Conliffe attached to the
Holetown Police Station said that
he warned the defendant that his
premiges at Fitts Village should be
closed on December 13 as that day
was a Polling Day in the island.

Mr, Walcott in his address said
that Police Constable Brewster did
not say in his evidence if the goods
he saw were goods exposed for

BARBADOS *

ADVOCATE



WV

CHT -LYS:



DER”



THE LUXUPY YACHT “Lysandor”, pictured here in the harbour of New Orleans, is now in the Car

eenage.

She called in from Miami on a Caribbean cruise.





(Story on page 1)

Five Cane Police Will Soon Get V.ELF.

Fires Over
Week-end

Five cane fires, one destroying
90 acres of canes at Lower Estate
occurred over the week-end, The
fire at Lower Estate started about
noon On Saturday, and the 90
acres consisted of first, second
and third crop ripe canes which
were insured.

This fire extended to several
Peasants’ canes at Jackman'’s and
also damaged a portion of the
root of Margaret Tull’s house.
The value of the damage is un-
estimated.

The fire was eventually
out by the police and
of the area.

A fire also occurred at Rugby
Plantation, St. Thomas, about
6 p.m. on the same day and burnt
six acres of secOnd crop ripe
canes. These canes were insured.

put
residents

Canes Not Insured

The third
St. David's
Sunday
burnt
ripe
Renald

fire took place at
Christ Chureh, on
about 2.30 p.m. and
105 holes of second crop
canes, the property of
Mayers of Haggatt Hall,

Michael, These canes were
not insured.
Ancther fire occurred at Fair

Field Plantation, St. Lucy about
§.30 p.m. on Sunday and. burnt
three acres of second crop ripe
‘anes. The canes, which were the
vroperty of Mt, Gay and Fair
Field Ltd., were insured

The other fire occurred at
Maynard's Plantation, St. Peter,
about 10 p.m. on Sunday and
burnt six acres of first crop ripe
canes. The canes were the prop-
erty of T. G. Corbin of the same
district and were insured.



News In Brief

EDLYN BOYCE of Boscobel,
St. Peter, a servant at Wildey’s
House, reported to the police that
on Saturday about 12.10 p.m.
while she was walking along Wil-
dey’s Road, an ‘unknowm men
snatched her handbag and wallet.

The walle: contained $7.24.
*

HYACINTH SPRINGER of
My Lord's Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported that her house was broken
and entered during Saturday
night and a quantity of groceries
valued $53.19 and $8 in cash were
stolen

*

MAHALA HARVEY of Seclu-
sion Road, Black Rock, reported
the larceny of two turkeys valued
$20 from her enclosed yard be-
tween 7 p.m, on Saturday and
5.45 a.m. on Sunday,



Radio—Tele

phone System

colony

PAGE FIVE



Newsletter :

Worker To Be

Guest Of Union
In St. Lucia

(Fr

Grenada

om Our Own Correspondent

ST. GEORGE'S Feb. 14.
Arrangements have been mad
the Grenada Workers’ Unior
for a local waterfront worker tc
be a guest for a week of the St
Lucia Seamen’s and Waterfroa
Workers’ Union. Both organisa
tions are affiliated with the Inter-
American Organisation of Work-
ers which is sponsoring a scheme
in the area for enabling mem-
bers of the waterfront union
to know something of conditions

by

in each other’s ports. Grenada
is to reciprocate as host
. . *

Sister Mintrude Gittens of the
Colony Hospital nursing - staff
which she joined in 1942, left the
for Trinidad en route to
England where she will take an
advanced course in nursing at

the St. Helier Hospital, Surrey

Increase in the cost of living
for working-class families during

January last rose only a_ point

WITHIN the next twoemonths or so, the Police will be ®bove that of December 31, 1951,
in a very much stronger position to wage more effectively
their war against crime, particularly the type of crime

committed by people who carry out their nocturnal raids shelled corn

on residences and small business places.

The Police Authorities who,
with the transfer of Captain W
R. Armstrong, Radio Telephone
Expert, introduced the 999 V.H.F.
System on a small s¢eale, will
shortly be getting their own set
from the United Kingdom. This
new set has been on order for
some time now, and it is expected
to arrive in the colony sometime
early next month.

In preparation for this new set,
wireless masts have been erected
at strategic points throughout the
entire island, and a wireless room
is being prepared in the old Ser-
geants’ Quarters which is situated
in the southern part of the Re-
creation Room.

The Layout

The layout has already been
completed,, It provides for the
installation of a P.B.X., near
which will be situated an up-to-
date Map Control Unit; the new
V.H.F. Set with its 999 Switch
Board, and close to the operator's
hand will be found Message
Forms. In the centre of the room,
there will be a map of the city
area, and not far off, another ma)
of the entire island, The 999 Ex-

change, and the 08 Police Ex-
change are in close proximity,

and nearby there will be a Dial
Director.

When the new equipment ar
rives, and installation is com-
pleted, more mobile units will be
linked up with wireless to Head-
quarters and the larger out sta-
tions, and these will be presse:
into service to help in the fight
egainst crime.

In the neighbouring island of
Trinidad, this system has been
of tremendous help to the Police
of that Colony, and since its in-
stallation there, many a criminal
was apprehended within minutes
cf the commission of the crime.

At present in Barbados, the
Police Department are using 9
set loaned to them, and that has
proved very satisfactory, people
needing assistance of the Police
have only to dial 08, and the
Police Exchange will immediate-
ly make contact with those vans
which are now equipped, and de-
spatch them to the scene of the
crime,

When the 999 set goes into oper-
ation, the procedure will be to dial
999 report the incident, give the
locality, and contact will be made
with one or more of the mobile
units, which will be patrolling*
designated areas.

World’s Largest
Calcining Kiln
Opened In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent
GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb, 18
The Governor formally put into
operation on Saturday, a new cal-
cining kiln at MacKenzie Mines—
the Demerara Bauxite Company,
Ltd., which completed the second
of three major stages in the cur-
rent expansion programme,

The new kiln is the largest in
the world, 250 feet in length, nine
feet in diameter and has a capa-

city of 100,000 tons of calcined
bauxite annually which is cap-
able of producing abrasive A
grade calcined bauxite and re-
fractory A grade super-calcined
bauxite which was firat intro-
duced on the calcined bauxite
market by the Demerara Co.,

which is still the world’s leading
producer of this product.

The new kiln-—erected within
six months by local workmen
will double last year’s produc-

tion of calcined ore and on com.
pletion, the number of nine kilns
will enable the company to more
than triple this figure. The ex-
pansion of the Bauxite Pro-
gramme means now that jobs
and greater security employment
for a larger number of people,
more revenue for Government
from the colony's already largest
single contributor and also a sub-
stantial inerease of the local na-
tional income.

It is noteworthy that during the
past year numbers employed at
the MacKenzie Bauxite Mines in-
creased by approximately one
thousand,

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1,) Ltd., advise
that they can now communicate Win tne
following ships through their Barbaaos
Coast Station
4.8 Helicon
4.8, George



8.8 Presidente

Mormaclark, 8.8, Ga

8.8



8.8. Italia, s.8, Casablanca, 5.5 E
8.8, Seagarden, 6.8. Rangitiki, 8.8. Stella
Polaris,

SUDDEN DEATH

Dr. E. W. ROBERTS who per-
formed a post mortem examina-
tion on Maude Duke of Morris
Gap, Westbury Road, who died
suddenly at her home on Friday
about 1.30 p.m, attributed death
to natural causes.



Speed-up Methods On Farms

WASHINGTON.
On a huge farm, near the little
town of Gray Summit, Missouri,
a livestock feed concern is busy

everyone else these days
thave to be paid more.

So the formula now sought is
how to produce a given amount

they

and one week of growing time
below the 1945 average.

Then they feed the so-called
wonder drugs, things like aure-

introducing that most American of animals with less costly grain omycin and streptomycin, to the

of characteristics — the restless
speed-up—to future pork chops,
chicken and eggs.

There
farm hands in America, and like



and fewer hours of work.

The firm is succeeding, too. It
can grow a 3lb. boiling fowl in
~—which is about 1

lb. of grain

turkeys. The turkeys like this so
much that they are on average
two pounds heavier at 26 weeks

are about ten million nine weeks and on 9 lbs, of grain than they were in the old scratch

and shuffle days, (Express).

and was 164 per cent above the
basic month, August, 1989. A .4
increase in the retail price of
in the food group
‘and a similar increase in the cost
of agricultural forks caused the
change

* ~ +
_To constitute the Labour Ad-
visory Board for a period of one
vear ending December 31, 1952,
Government has appointed the
following: Mr. W. H. Hagley
(Chairman), Messrs. O. M. Bain. |
H Neckles, Walter Knight, |
MR.E., the Superintendent — of
Public Works, the Labour Officer |
fas Liaison Officer), Messrs. W
Janette (Manual and Menta!)
Workers’ Union), E. A. Mitchel!
(Grenada Workers’ Union) and
lL. A. Japal (General Workers’
Union).

. . *
Throughout the island Friday
memorial services were held fo
the late King in churches of all)
denominations, with large ane}
representative congregations in
for churches in the capital. \
His Excellency Sir Robert
Arundell, who attended at the
Anewlican Chureh, read the two
Tesesons and Archdeacon H. G
Pieott officiated
The Governor was representer
‘t the Roman Catholic Chureh
We My. Louie Cools-Lartigue
Chief Secretary, Windward Islands
snd the service was conducter
by Revd, Fr. Denis FitzGerald
nt the Methodist Church by Hon
C.F Henville Attorney
with Revd. K, J.
eptiny and Revd. F,. Lawrence
preaching the sermon; at. the
Church of Seotland by Admini«e
‘rater Wallace MacMillan with
Revd, Adam Thompson officiating

General
Payne offici-





Fisherman’s Death
By Misadventure

Death by misadventure was the

verdict returned by a nine-man
jury when the inquest into the
death of Evans Edwards, a fisher-
man of Queen's Street, St. Peter,
was concluded at District “A” yes-
terday morning,
The Coroner was His Worshit
Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police Magis
trate of District “A”, Evans Ed-
wards was admitted to the Gen-
eral Hospital on the morning of
January 26 spffering from in-
Juries which he sustained when a
raft struck bim,

He died the same day. Edna
Edwards identified"the body to Dr
A. Browne who attributed death
to a large fracture of the skull.

Elridge Skeete (55) of Queen's
Street, St. Peter on the seconc
hearing of the inquest told the
court that while the deceascd was
helping other porters to raise u
raft to a lorry the raft twisted t
one side and struck the deceased
to the ground. The deceased wa
taken to Hospital.

The incident occurred in
Speightstown and the raft is th«
property of R. & G, Challenor
Lid

Scheme For International Student Centre In London

LONDON,
Several Commonwealth coun-
tries and many Colonies have al-
ready contributed towards the
first £100,000 for an international

sale. Exposing for view is not the student centre in central Lon-
same as exposing for sale. con,

The prosecution said that the The first public announcement
two windows were open but there cf this scheme to accommodate
wus one witness who said that he only saw one window open. “I ¢ r

am not saying that the policeman:
is lying, but he was only trying to
tell the truth,” Mr, Walcott said

fhe prosecution has to prove
that the goods were exposed for
sale and that the exposure was for
the purpose of a sale.

“We will have to adjourn this
matter for a decision until Febru-
ary 25", Their Honours said after
listening to the address of counsel.



Loss Of Canadian Trade Hits
Turks And Caicos Islands

Indies in the past few years

the Caribbean colonies, but

by this factor as the tiny

Jamaican dependency.

Almost completely dependent
upon the export of salt, the Turks
and Caicos Islands sent 20,839
tons of salt worth £26,605 to
Canada in 1949. But this im-
portant market almost vanished
during 1950, when Canada bought
only 725 tons of salt worth £1,027
from the islands.

Another big customer for the
Islands’ salt in 1949 was Japan.
which bought 24,691 tons for
£24,691 but took none at all in
1950. The loss of these two big
customers cut the territory’s

Reduction of trade between Canada and th

LONDON,

e British West
has adversely affected many of
few have been hit so severely
Turks and Caicos Islands, a

salt exports. from 52,718 tons
worth £64, 772 in 1949 to
£16,212 in 1950.

These figures are given in the
report for the dependency cover
ing 1949 and 1950, just published
in London by the Colonial Office
All the privately-owned _ salt!
producers have now been in-
corporated into a single concern,
the Turks Island Salt’ Co., Ltd,
in an effort to develop the slen-
der economic resources of the
territory along proper lines.

|

; rom all over the world was made
‘at an India House reception in
London last week,

And Mr. Krishna Menon, the
Indian High Commissioner, has
presented the Earl of Athlone,



Chancellor of London University, has already offered £1,000.

with a cheque for £10,000 — the ip

first instalment of £30,000 which Scheme Gets Fillip

India will donate. The Earl of Athlone, when he
Australia is the next largest received her gift, referred to

donor with £20,000, followed India’s important part in formu-

Malaya and Nigeria which lating and supporting the project

giving £7,000, the Gold Coast The centre was originally sug-

£6,000, the Sudan £5,000, Mauri- gested in the middle '30s by an

tius £4,000, British Guiana and Indian High Commissioner, he

Cyprus £3,000, Hong Kong £2,000, said, and was taken up again ve-

Sierra Leone £1,750, Barbados fore the. war by Sir Samuel

£1,040, and Uganda £1,000. Other Ranganadhan, Indian Hign Cor

Dominions Colonies and Buropeah missioner at that time, and by Mr
States are also being approached. G. H, Langley, Vice-Chancellor of its students.

One European country—Austria Dacca University. Now it has once



j




WHITE
WHITE
WHITE

WHITE

COTTON PLAIDS, 36” wide, yd. ......$1.11
FLANNELETTE, 30” wide 92c¢.
FLANNELETTE, 36” wide Ble
LINGERIE CREPE, 36” 93e
STRIPED CREPE, 36” . $1.08





\- Lendon

— eee
——————_—__—_—X—X—X—X—XV«—«—"—_—€—=—=—————a="9"A—~aABaAI=@A»B49=—=>—=—=—>$Sas—————





again been given a fillip by «n
Indian, Mr, Krishna Menon.

With 40 per cent of the cr
guaranteed by the Governme: |
the centre will consist of a clu!
house and residential quarte:

. When completed, the Governmen

will hand over the building, fre¢
of debt, to be run by Londor
University.

Because of the large number
eas students who come
University, priority i
ccommodation will be given |

ov



—Express

CAVE

SHEPHERD
& Co. Ltd.

10—1% Broad Street



’





-IN OUR LINEN DEPT.











Whatfmér value could
there be? . . . wonderful

nylons by Aristoc

As previous as pearls, as airy ae bubbles, surprie-
ingly strong... yet such amazingly good walue!
Here come magical Aristoc nylons to lighten your

step, created for you by # specialist eompany
which makes nothing but fine stockings. There's
a shado to match your every mood and dreas

to perfection; as for quality, what could be
finer? Try a few pairs for yourself —end then
you too will be wonderfully surprised
What such masterly
stonk.n ge-can cost
bo litale!



the aristocrat . stockings

\\

WE OFFER

FACE TOWELS
in GOLD, BLUE, ROSE and GREEN

BATH TOWELS

FS

OR Nid. oscenl /idvaneus chaneane $1.82 to $6.80
in PLAIN WHITE
BATH TOWELS
ee Sola tet ey $2.13 to $4.32

in BLUE, PINK, GREEN and GOLD

REACH TOWELS
$1.59 to $4.19

in gaily Coloured Designs
LAVATORY TOWELS

in GREEN, BLUE and WHITE
BATH MATS
in BLUE and GREEN
BED SUEETS
ee @ $6.45

in BLUE, GREEN, PEACH, LEMON and ROSE

@ 62c, and 65¢,

soc K@ $3.06



80” x 100”’—W HITE @ $10.37

90” x 108” do. = @ $1013
PILLOW CASES

—COTTON 20” x 30” $1.67

—LINEN 18” x 28” 2.48



HARRISON'S Dial 2664.

=

POFFO

oF

ELE EF PPPS FSS SSO ES SSD

PLEA PL LOSES APD



POC POOIO?

-

THE



(



FINEST IN o
BARBADOS \ “

\ fom j

BY ALL THE WORLD
FAMOUS PERFUMERS.

PESOS LLPEOL LOLS

.
%

HOUBIGANT—"Chantilly” ete Amour Amour =
MAROEL ROCHAS “Femme” and “Moment Supreme x
Mousseline’’ ‘SCHIAPARELLI— Shocking" X
CARON'S “Hellodgia’— Chanel No 5” Ss
Fleurs de Rocaille’ GUERLAIN “L'Heure Blea” ws
“Nult de Noel" “Mitzouke” “Shalimar” Pte rey
‘Narecisse Noir’ MILLOT—Creve de Chine ‘J
‘Le Tabac Blond” LANVIN—My Sin— Aepeg> ete. cle.
DANA—"'Tabu” Robert Piquet Vigny s
JEAN PATOU, “Joy” Jacques Fath Corday. %
*

@ s

nS

, “ »
KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY. &

CLL LLLP PP LLP y
_—————————

ANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Lid.

Broad Street





Greystone, Hastings

ROBERTSON’S.
For this
Originally Week
Redeurrant, Blackcurrant, Apricot, Raspberry 56 50
Jam in 1fb Jars
ROBERTSON’S.
Scotch Orange, Golden Shred, and Silver Shred
Marmalade in It Jars 49 45
“ROBERTSON'S.
Strawberry Jam 63 57
Ginger Marmalade 68 62
CONDENSED MILK 33 31

The above ems for CASH & CARRY Customers Only

EWINGS CANADIAN PUDDINGS

Checolate, Butterscotch, Caramel per pkt. 25¢.
KRAFT WHAM per tin 48c.
SWIFT'S CHEESE per 120z. tin 73e.
SWIFT'S LUNCHEON BEEF WITH CEREAL per 120z. tin 69c.
APIE PEANUT BUTTER per Jar 6le.
CADBURY'S CUP CHOCOLATE . per tin 72e.
BRIDAL ICING SUGAR per pkt. 46c.

COCKADE FINE RUM




PAGE SIX

CLASSIF



TELEPHONE



IED ADS.

2508.



For Births, Marriage or Engagement;
announcements in Carjh Calling the}
charge is $3 00 for an’ number of words
up to 50 and 6 cents
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508
between 8.30 and 4 p.m. $118 for Death
Notices only after 4 p.m



THANKS
ROCHEFORD—We, thy Unders ond. ber

through this medium to ret
to all who attended the

funeral, sent





wreaths, eards or otheiwise expressec
sympathy ‘with u r our recent
bereavement
V. H. B. Rovheford and family
Recheford and farm 19. 2.52
SPRINGFR—The Springer family,
Six Roads, St. Philip, beg to tha



those kimd friends and reiatives,
sympathised with them in t} ree
bereavement, by sending
wreaths, or in any other ws
sympathy







IN MEMORIAM



PRPSCOTT—1y “ever

loving “memo



my beloved wife Iris Prescott,
departed this-dife on 10th Pebruon
1948.

Some will forget, but 1 wi'!
you

Waves of sadne ti
Secret tears do often f
For to-day has brough
Memories of t
Ever to be reme
“Dockie €yril
“wilte” A. F

David (stepson)

not forget

i

come over me












“th isband),
other-in-la



" asec
Ince |

lov
‘osniny)

ROACH
Roach Pe
on February 9

He saw the h he had to die |
A death n which his soul did ery |
The frightening waves his heart did |

1





chill
But had to yield, it was God's will |
The call was short the blow severe
For only those who know can tell
The pains of parting without farewell

Yvonne Burke 19.2,.52—1n



PERSONAL








The public are hereby
giving credit to any per

pd against
or persons |

whomsoever in my nar as I do not
hold mvself respondble for anyone
contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed
by me,
Signed LIONEL A. GREENIDGE,
Arch Hall,
St. Thomas.
19.2. 52-—2n

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife. HELEN R
LASHLEY (nee Payne) as 1 do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyvone else |
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me.

Signed ITHRAN G. LASHLEY,
My Lord's Hill,
St. Michael, No, 14
19.2.52—2n



; Thani's.

FOK RENT

HOUSES

Is —- Maxwell, Christ Church
Furnighed except cutlery and nen.
From March 15th onward. Apply to Mrs.
M. H, Graham, Phone 8172







19.2,52—1n
FLAT-—A. small self contained un-
furnished Flat breezy and cool with
attractive surroundings, about 2 miles
from city. Available immediately, call
Mayers, Advocate Advertising Dept
Dial 2608 for full particulars,
= 17,2, 52--4n



VESTIS COTTAGE--Corner 7th Avenue
and George St.-# bedrooms with running
water, drawing .-dining roonis —-Electric
lighting and gos for cooking installed —
Garage and servant's room. Phone 2ab2

























17.2,52—3n
WANTED

enema ——

im Sgro cipal aa aires
CASHIER: Lady for our Retail Dept
Broad Strect. Apply by letter and. in
person, G. W, HUTCHINSON & CO
LIMITED. 52-3n
ne
FEMALE BUTLER—Must have good
references, thorough respectable, must
sleep in. Apply to Lady Deane, Blach
Rock 7 )2-—2n
“TWO JUNIORS—For our oMfee, one of
whom should have had some previow
expenence. Apply by letter and in
person to A, S. Bryden & Sons (Bar-
badog) Ltd. 14.2. 52—-t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

BOARDERS—“Private family near
Savannah can accommodate visitors to

Trinidad, Single or double rooms, Write
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-
of-Spain.” 9.2.52—J2n

——$— <<
ONE MILCH GOAT fairly fresh in
mik, Dial 2938. 19.2.52—1n



Special Offer

ELECTRIC | 57.59
CLOCKS each

Table Models with
luminous dials

tm

G. W. HUTCHINSON
4222 & Co. Ltd. Broad St,



APO P SO PELL EELS

by
: If not saved but seeking
Salvation, please write fo:

FREE HOOK —

“

% Which Makes
S cop's WAY OF
% SALVATION
SLAIN”

S. Roberis, Gospel

Book & Tract Service, 30
Central Ave., Bangor, N.L

Pp eRenee OCT COC :
; ROCESS,

: FURNISH TO-DAY

The Money Saving Way



FULL-PANELLED and
Mahogany single and Doub}
steads; some in Outstanding

other
Bed

LOCOS






Ded gns—Vanities with Various
Mirrors—Wardrobes and Dresser-
robes,

MAHOGANY, Birch and Deal
Tabies for Dining, Cocktail, Radio,
Sewing, Kitchen in several shapes
and sizes—-Sideboards, Cabinets

for China, Kitchen and Bedroorr

SUITES and Separate Drawing
Room pieces in Morris, Tub, Ber- %
ere ahd Rush, and Many other %
@ Nice Things NEW ANT RENEWED é
e eee 8
x ¢
x %
+t ILSON
S . . ~
% SPRY STREFT. DIAL 4060 >
%
! S2EOCCOLOGOCSOOOOI GPS *

per word fer each {| -

| Haynes

_\Teeth

FOR SALE

AUTOMOTIVE



CAR-—One (1) Vauxhalj) 10, 1947 Model
Very reasonable in pree. Phone 8172.
19.2.52—1n

CAR—Vauxhall Velox 1951 Model in
excellent condition and only one driver.
Courtesy Garage. Dia) 4616,

17.2.52—6n

Le
CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 hp. Saloon,
169-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000

Courtesy Garage. Dial 416.
17.2.52—6n,

Morris Oxford Saloon
16,000 miles in excellent condition.
198 Hudson Sedan 14.000 miles very
sultable for hire. 1988 Dodge Deluxe
Coupe has been well cared. Very suitable
for converting to pick-up. 1988 Chrvsler
Royal Sedan going cheap, 1956 Morris
Minor 2 Door Saloon 12,000 mile.

Just arrived Morris Oxfords and
Minors in assorted colours. We also have
2-10 ewt. Vans at prices prior to January
let. Secure yeurs promptly.

FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.,
Telephone 4504. 13.2.52—Tn.
A Ford Pickup,
Priced right. Apply to
Home, Bank Halil Main
Michael 19.2 Gn

ELECTRICAL
RADIO— be Mullard, with Gerrad
Automatic record changer in Cabinet.
* new 1951. Price $220.00. Phone 4621
19.2. 62—2n

RADIO—One 10 Tube R.C.A. in perfect
working order recently overhauled
Apply C. §S. Goodridge, c/o Wilkinson &
Phone 4267 19,2.62—2n

CARS—1949







PICK UP—Good mode}
dy for work
Pilgran Missi
itoad, St



on









SWEEPERS—Hoover Vacuum Floor
Electrical. Only $75.00. At our new
show room. K, R. Hunte & Co., Ltd
Dal 5136

19.2. $2—3n

FURNITURE





PURNITURE—Ralph Beard offers you
Rergains in Furniture. Mag. Dining
Chairs $20.00 pr. Birch Dining Chairs
©. ).00 pr. Also numerous other Articles
in furniture at reduced Prices. Call in

| Lower Bay Street. 16.2.52—2n
POULTRY

TURKEY COCK AND HEN and a
rumber of fowl eggs for sitting. Phone
2026. 17.2.52—£n





MECHANICAL



ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with
platform, pneumatic tyres and brakes.

Passed Highways & Transport, never
used. Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage.
15.2.52—6n.

MISCELLANEOUS



BENOCULARS — See your favounte
Morse make a thrilling win, $2.40 each.
Dial 3466, 19.2,.52--2n

Sa
EGGS—Sittings of Black Jersey Giant

Eggs, aiso Plymouth Rock crossed with
Black Jersey Giants at 36 cents each.
Hens Jate\y imported. Apply: Mrs.
Warford, ‘Harbour View" St. Michael.
19.2,52—-1n

GLADIOLI BULBS: Limited number
of Gladioli Bulbs Otders taken for
Dahli & Gladioli Bulbs for next season
Delivery end of November. Dial %425,
Cottage Gift Shop. 13,2.52—4n.





HANDCRAFTS consisting of Baskets,
Handbags, Pottery, Children’s Clothes,
rmbroidered Linen, Orders taken for
Flowers, Cocktail Savourtes and Cakes,
Up-to-date lending Library. Cottgge Gift
Shop. 13.2.52—4n.



MEGASS: At Four Square Factory,
Apply the Manager.. Telephone 2442,
16, 2.62—6n



PURGRAIN Pigeon
better — 10-Ib, 1
per Ib. Phone 2547,

Feed none
and upwards @ 1%c.
8.2.52—t.f n

SHIRT FACTORY—Capable of making
dozen shirts per day, For particulars:
thone Johnson 4311,



13.2.52—Tn



STRAW MATS—-Fancy Designs 88. up,
1 gvand opportunity for you, Thani
ros, Dial 3466. 192.524 f.n.

WASHABLE FANCY SPORT SHIRTS—
the biggest bargain of the season.
duced from $3.50 to $1.32 only. Thani
os, Dial 3466. 19.2,52—1n,

Gums Bleed,








ail
Stop Pyorrhea and
Trench Mouth
in 24 Hours |

Ryeeine, ths voulate Petettin of Pyor-

h mean that
or Trench Mouth, or some bad disease
will eventually enuse you to lose all
ur teeth and have to wear false teeth
before your time, Mines the great World
war these mouth 4d ve spread
throughout the world so that now sclen-
tists say that four out OF every tive opie
are suflerers sooner or later. a) i
Pia ctabae ity enon enago Rok oul
too late, because they
the loss of teeth, but also chronie fheuma=
stm and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Teeth

Amosan, the discovery of an American
scientist, fights * ese ft oe
® i i netra’

Sot at the tor wt ‘ums from bleed-

ioose



root of the trouble, stops
ig the very aap day, quickly takes the
yreness put of 7h. » and soon
chtens the teeth. e follow’ letter
W. W. B. shows the results that





nd t ty en years.
rrhea ,.
2 dis . nad
* teeth ie oe atk teet

ne looser all the time, f tried
chings and Sun peers ee,
overy Amosen. In jours after
san my puns had stop bleeding.
soreness in tay mouth disappeared in
2 days and in two weeks I found that
vy loose leeth were much t! rand that
could eat the hardest of food."

Guaranteed

\

‘

|

|

|

|

| Ameso: works so fast and so certain
hat it ls guaranteed to stop your gums
1

|

|

'








iceding, end sore mouth and tighten
th to your complete satisfaction or
ack on return of empty package.
ing your teeth or
rom rheumatism



t take a chance on
a ante are ble Get fr our
hear rouble.

nist today aGior nud Wonca @ guaran-
a tee, ou risk
é n seine a the
mo arantee oro -

. fects you,

! wor Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth



| ORIENTAL
|| SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS

CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
|} DE LA INDIA OHINA e
y BJIPTO

yi THANI’S
\\ Pr. Wm. Hry. St, Dial 3466









* BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PUMLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE

ind By VALENTINE HEYWOOD.
HOUSE: Brand new. smple 3 bedroom

house, ali convenierces, with party- The King’s death, the Royal
sized living room, open verandah, kitchen funeral and > ace i s
and utility room Jarage, laundry, 2 ne the accession of a

servant rooms and storage room under Queen have given rise to numer-

On attractive hillsiae site, Rockley New ©US querries on procedure and
Road. A. Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476. simiBar points from readers ‘af
13.2.52—t.f.0. The Sunday Times

RIVERTON Hiver Road. Standing on Several readers ask whether
7,761 square feet of land. The house the Lord Chancellor and_ the
contains drawing, dining and two bed- Speaker were correct in allow-
rooms, water and electric light. In- ing peers and M.P.s to take the
spection by appointment ‘phone 4019 ¢ lamne

ee ba aa Oe wae wo tor tala ai oath of allegiance before the

public competition on Friday, the 22nd
= ot ayoraaey 1952, at 2 p.m. at the
office ermianedt
Cc. iGTON & SEALY,
Lucas Street

AUCTION

CAR-—Ford Prefect Saioon 1947 model,
damaged in accident. We are instructed
to offer this vehicle for sale by duction
at McEnearney’s Garage on Friday 22nd,

Queen herself had made the cus-
tomary declarations before «the
Privy Council. One of them
quotes criticism by the late Lord
Esher of a similar proceeding fol-
lowing the death of Queen Vic-
toria.

The answer is that the Heir to
the Throne is Sovereign from the
moment he or she succeeds. It





at 2. p.m. John M, Bladon & Company es not need the proclamation or
Auctioneers 17.2.52~3n. other proceedings to require al-
legiance from the subjects of the
* Crown.
1 . ‘

PUBLIC NOTicEs The proclamation of Queen
— — —————__ Elizabeth’s accession begins: “We,
the lords spiritual and temporal,

NOTICE being assisted with these of His

, late Majesty's Privy Council.”

ac Afiestions, from, auatiing Restored “with other principal. gentlemen
PAROCHIAL MEDICAL OFFICER for Of quality.’ Where, asks an M.-P:

the parish of Saint Michael, wiil be re-

jo the Commons come in?
ceived by me up to 12 o'clock noon on

" a ican a t

Thursday, February 28th 1952 {I The es ge . Ae Per
The Salary attached to the post which 1ey co nO*. rue nna

is pensionable, is Four thousand, three Council is not a meeting of the

hundred and twenty dollars (%4,320) per Privy Council, but an ad hoc

avnum, payable in monthly instalments
of Three fundred and sixty dollars ($360)
A Cost-of-Living Bonus at current rates
is also payable
The successful applicant will not be
permitted to act in, or hold another
Parochial or Government appointment
and will be required to take up his
duties as fram the 25th March 1952, but
if already holding such appointment,
will be given a reasonable time to re-
linquish same after assuming duty
Further particulars in connection with
the duties of this post can be obtained
from the undersigned
By Order,
E. C. REDMAN,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry

body, older than the Privy Goun-
cil itself, older than either House
of Parliament. It can be traced
back to the Great Council of the
Realm and, in the view of some
authorities, even to the Anglo-
Saxon Witenagemot.

The Duke ot Edinburgh

What alteration, mony ask, is
there in the statug of the Duke!
of Edinburgh? ;

For the time being none, ex-|
cept in so far as he is now the |
Consort of the Sovereign instead
of the Heiress Presumptive. In
this country no man takes rank
or precedence from his wife
though there are rules governing}
to some extent wnat is term

14.2.52—8n



NOTICE

NOTICE I§ HEREBY GIVEN that it is
the intention of the Vestry Of the Parish
of Saint Michael to cause to be intro-
duced into the Legislature of this Island
the following Bills, namely:—

(a) A Bill to extend the operation of

the Vestries (Cost of Living Bonus
to Employees) Act, 1947 and any

joint precedence. The Duke pre-
sumably ranks with ‘the Royal
Princes, but the demands ofj

courtesy alone would place him |
Act di th me r tt : :

further period of Nek Start tp the immediately after the Queen, It}
25th March 1953. * is practically certain that he will

A Bll to extend the operation of
the Parochial Employees Pension
Act, 1944 and any act amending
the same for the further period of
one year to the 25th March 1953,

in due course be given a special
precedence, Whether he will re-
ceive the title of Prince Consort}
is a matter to be decided by the!

and to amend the said Act ias Queen in consultation with her
amended hy the Purochial Em- Ministers
ployees Pension (Amendment) Act, -
1948) by increasing the amount of Why are all the funeral ar-

the cost of living allowances which

the respective Vestries may if they

think fit pay to their pensioners
CARRINGTON & SEALY,

Solicitors for the Vestry of St. Michael.

rangements in the hands of the
Duke of Norfolk, the Earl Mar-
shal?

As Earl Marshal, an office which}







any tender,

Questions On Accession Answered

Duke is head of the College of
Arms and of the Kings of Arms
the Heralds and the Pursuivants.
All the ceremoniai for such State
occasions is worked out by the
College of Arms under the Earl
Marshal’s supervision, The task
of arranging the order of proces-
sion and other such details is one
of great complexity and is one
in whieh the College and its offi-
cers are skilled,

Since the dead King will lie i
state im Westminster’ >

this part of the funeral go Save
under the su f the Lard 10!
Great Cha tote en-
tire charge of :he of West-
minster?

Apparently it does not,. since
only Westminster Hall is con-
cerned, and the arrangements
there, no doubt by agreement
wane hase ees Chamberlain,
are in t of the Ministry
of Works.

What is the difference
the Lord Great meres, peneeen
the Lord Chamberlain?

The first is one of thé Great
Officers of State—another heredi-
tary post which in this new reign
is held by the Marquess of Chol-
mondeley. The Lord Chamberlain
is the senior official of the King’s
Household. Both are posts of at
antiquity, but whi the rd
Chamberlain’s post is an arduous
one which entails constant super-
vision of the Sovereign’s House-
hold the Lord Great Chamberlain
blossoms into something of his
old-time magnificence only at

_coronations, though he plays an



important part also in such events
as a State opening of Parliament.

Nine “Great Officers”

Who are the Great Officers of
State?

There are nine of them and,
contrary to the belief of many,
they do not include such digni-
taries as the Archbishops or the
Prime Minister.

They are the Lord High
Steward (a post which is filled

only temporarily on such occa-|has ample space for chilled and hard
sions as a coronation or the trial| ‘zen Cero.

of a peer by the House of Lords),|Lading for tranahipment at

the Lord High. Chancellor,

Lord High Tieasurer

rds cf the Treasury), the Lord
President of the Council, the Lord
Privy Seal, the Lord. Great
Chamberlain, the Lord High Con-
Stable (another post which is
filled temporarily for corona-
tions), the Earl Marshal and the
Lord High Admiral (whose office
in these days is always in com-
mission among the Lords of the
Admiralty).

Will the King’s Company of the
Grenadier Guards eeene the
Queen’s Company?

The decisior on this, as with
other bodies bearing the same
prefix such as the King’s
Bodyguard of the Gentlemen-at..
Arms—rests with the Queen.

After the accession of Edward
VII the unit remained the Queen’s
Company for a_ considerable
period.

Will the King’s Flight of air-
craft be renamed the Queen’s
Flight? Noe

That also rests with the Queen.
One suggestion which has been
put forward is that it should be
renamed the Royal Flight.











alia praect 9

gut

NOW IN EFFECT
Lowest Fares ever

@ 0-Day Excursions

Skyliners.
For Complete Information, Seo

GARDINER AUSTIN & Co.,
u
Phone — 4704
TRANS-GAN
s ADA

ir
International Trans-Atlantic
Transcontinental



——— & \
TAKE ADVANTAGE O# THE
EXCURSION FARES

@ All Flights by “North Star”

Lower Broad Str. B'town. ¥,









19.2.52—3n. is hereditary in his family, the
Yroosssees POSPPOSS SEPP OPO. %
~ ’
GOVERNMENT NOTICE x %
s s
‘+ NOTICE :
daiectapeniapeageinteneaiitin %
Tenders For Transport Of Officers a?
Tenders are invited for the conveyance by motor-car of the ; ‘
Revenue Officers from Bridgetown to Mount Gay Distillery, St. Lucy,
waiting for the Officers and return, for the period 1st April, 1952 to
3ist March, 1953. Will Our Customers please note that
2. Approximately three visits weekly at the Distillery are neces- BLACK WIRE HANGERS and GALVAN-
sary and the time spent in waiting varies from three to six hours. %
8. Tenders should be for a rate per mile including waiting at ISED HANGERS returned to our Depots %
the Distillery. The motor car provided is to be approved by the Comp- and Head Office will be purchased by us %
troller of Customs from whom further information may be obtained. } %& at 3c. and 4c. respectively. o
4. Tenders, addressed to the Colonial Secretary and not to any
Officer by name, and marked on the envelope “Tender for Transport” |
will be received at thé Colonial Secretary’s Office up to 4 p.m. on] X& ~ 3
Friday, 14th March, 1952. :
5. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or 8 SANITARY LAUNDRY Co, LTD. x
~

19.2.52+-3n.



CurbYourPiles |

no longer necessary to suffer

ins, itching and torment from Piles

# the discovery of Hytex (formerly

k re as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work in 10 minutes and not only stops







*
the pain but also takes out the swell- Hastings
ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve
timation cneraey cureiresnerug |W will be closed to. members
Nervousness, Backache, Constipation, on Wednesday, February
i Oper Ey, SenIiCy, Pad lrptable 20th for minor alterations.
a 8 "day ‘under The Club will be open as
usual on Thursday Febru-

gue
Sains and troubles or money buck on
ceturn of empty package.





That Popular Game :—

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at
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ana
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t
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JUST POR THE right finish ITS GAS |
for cooking you need BOOK your cooke:
today at your Gas Showroom, Ray St

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OO

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our CROP - SALE

Ends on Friday the 29th

Feby.

1952.

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AT



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office is in commission among the| ,



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952

SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
ZEALAND LINE LIMITED |
(M.A.N.Z. LINE)









Se

i.

The M.V. MONEKA wil] accept

}
Cargo and Passengers for Oe
SS ica, Antigua, Montserrat,

“TEKOA” is scheduled to sail |
from Adelaide February isth, Melbourne and St. Kitts. Seiling Friday
| emeiey 26th, Sydney March 4th, Bris- | inst.
bane March 15th, arriving at Trinidad The M.V. “DAERWOOD” will
about April 15th and Barbados about accept Cargo and Passengers for
April 18th | St. Lucia, St. Vineent, Grenada,
In addition to general cargo this vessel and Aruba. Sailing Saturday 23rd
inst.
The M.V. CARIBBEE will

Cargo accepted on through Bills of

recent Cargo and Passengers for

Montserrat,_
the] British Guiana, Leeward and Windw Remintee, St. Katts. Sawing rTi-
Islands. day 29th inst.
(whose For further particulars apply —
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404T.
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SEO SELPIOCVSEIOIGOS:

and
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ee

CANADIAN SERVICE
From St. John and Halifax, N.S.

Expected Arrival







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m.v, “BENNY 25 Jan. 4 Feb. 19 February
s.s. “WILFORD” 20 Feb. 16 Feb. 16 March
3.8, “SUNDIAL” 25 Feb. 29 Feb. 20 March
s.s. “A VESSEL” 11 March 15 March 2 April





UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
FROM SWANSEA, LIVERPOOL AND GLASGOW



’ Expected Arrival
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s. “N.O. ROGENAES” 19 Jan, 25 Jan. 12 Feb. 24 Feb y
8.8. “SUNVALLEY” as “ _ 21 Feb, 2% Feb. 14 Mare!
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UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE

Expected Arrival
Dates Bridgetown,
Bar!





Antwerp Rotterdam London

‘bados
58. “SUNROVER” .. 15 Jan. 18 Jan. 4 Feb. 19 February
5.8. “SUNAVIS” .14¥Feb. 11 Feb. 21 Feb. 8 March
s. “SUNRELL” MYD MARCH MID APRIL



Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703

se Abcoa —— Co.

NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 15th Feb, — arrives Barbados 26th Feb., 1952.
A STEAMER sails 7th March — arrives Barbados 19th March, 1952.













NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
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SERVICE

1952.





SANADIAN
SOUTHBOUND



Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
8.8. “ALCOA PLANTER” 12th Februany 2ist February
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8.8. “ALCOA PILGRIM” 14th March Mth arch
A STEAMER 2rd March 2nd pril
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A STEAMER ist May llth May

These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
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PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
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ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
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QPP PPOSS SO OPSOVGFE DODD ITSO 9S SOO POO FIG ODISSSSSOY,
An Oil without Oiliness is not a Lubricant. Use:

: GERM OILS

§ for Best Results,

8 CENTRAL EMPORIUM

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PMS

< PLL ELL SILLLLAPLLLLL PLES SLLLSE LSE ILS

FOR SALE





“INCH HAVEN”
Situated Near “Inch Marlow”

A new modern Bungalow, 3 furnished
Bedrooms, large Living Rooms, facing Sea fur-
nished, ail Cupboards built in, all wood used
in construction Barbados Mahogany, Garage,
Servants Room, its own Lighting Plant, stand-
ing on one acre of land ‘sloping to the sea, ‘
Price £4,000. Apply J. H. O’Dowd Egan,
C/o William Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.

17,2.52.—2n.



PLES ALP PPPS SPPPPP OSLO PPP OPPS APPPPSSSPS.

BACK TO SCHOOL

| ale ie meg

GIRLS’ and io
BOYS’ SHOES

—Brewn, Black or White






POPLOL PSS OO SOP FPSSSSSOSE



Sizes: 7—10.. . $3.95
11—12.. . 5,00
3— 5.. 5.25



GY BOOTS

—White, Brown or Black





LCE PEPEEE LOSES SEEESSSES

LOCOCO






Sizes: 10— 2.. $2.20
3— 5. 2.40
6—11.. 2.85



Bring your Children in for an expert fitting.

-

eer

POPE

8 ,696996056064
LELLPPD SSS ESSEC S SFOS SOOOS OSS

POLL PLP

-
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY. 19, 1952



~

HENRY

ro






uf nite ae

MN RH 0 OA ! ,
lg A A V
i WE gn 8 i
ia 1 TOT a UL

a
in




MTA meet

ia 1) 100 ane aS



MM eS






it Aust Ae
eT
wifi va

iN
svi)
mut



> OUT WITH
>) REAL APPLES
SN






THIS PRISON — AND A
NO ANSWER... BIG MOE MUST ) MAN OF HIS INTELLECT




HAVE REACHED THE _Z KNOWS ONLY ONE MEANS)
WARDEN'S OFFICE —T OF GETTING WHAT HE
FIRST’ NOW WHAT? WANTS — MOB RULE...

WHAT WILL THAT AND VIOLENCE //
MADMAN DO NEXT? )



\ JOHNNY HAZARD
ern

WHY DOES THAT POOR WOMAN
LOOK AT ME LIKE THAT ? SUCH
SUFFERING IN HER EYES / MAKES



BRINGING UP FATHER



THAT'S THE DOOR-
BELL- IT MUST BE
HIM -I'LL ANSWER IT-

DON'T TALK-JUST LISTEN--TI
OVERHEARD MRS MYGESS SAY
LORD HANDUKE IS HERE AT THE






DOG SHOW-T WANT YOU TO GO
THERE AND INTRODUCE YOUR-
SELF AND BRING HIM HOME TO
DINE WITH LS =-



} INSIDE THE
FALAC SOMETHING

GONE WRONG’ G

IT'S NO USE--
THERES ONLY ONE


















WHAT THE HECK'S
FLINT UP TO NOW?

BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES








Ta
th

Whe












WELL HAVE
TO MAKE
APPLESAUCE

jaa

LORD HANDUKE-I HAD |
TO GIVE THE KENNEL
KEEPER TWO HUNDRED
BUCKS AS SECURIT Y-HE ||
GAY6 NOT TO GIVE HIM
ANY THING BUT A BONE! |

|
|
;



THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES







Se MEN OF SENGA+D01 UN ee THAT
leon Actaris GAE 7fa YOU CAME IN THE NIGHT
| THE PHANTOM SPEAKS RAPIDLY /N a, ;
te GENGA TON ie~ WhO SREP) er @ Bay

WHAT IS HE 5

SAVING f eV
a y,

fy \S
Ue.






YOU KNOW THIS IS
AGAINST THE PHANTOM
LAW*+ MY LAW ++ _ as









Y WE KNOW*+

O GHOST

& WHO WALKS+

~~)





THIS STRANGE MASKED MANe« THEY RE
LIKE GUILTY SCHOOL BOYS BEFORE HIM!
ITS ALL SO EERIE? IS IT++EAL ?








ADVOCATE

|

|

|







|





lor 5
QUALITY
and
ECONOMY



























RED ROSE

TEA Is






Seaaeee



+ tt 4+ “ 4,446,666 oe
SLPS EEF E FFP FOE FO FOI? x
8

‘OOOO SOSOSKS

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: - Citetete ter
SSSOSSODOS SOS SPSS SSS FFF FOEE SCOP A APA AE

PAGE SEVEN

Ps)
J
°

40 YEARS A FAVOURITE

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Because of its

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AND

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1 Bottled

STUART & SAMPSON
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SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranches Pweedside,
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Usually Now

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ee ee

~~ aa

PAGE EIGHT

Test Ends In Draw:
Play Washed Out

(From Our Own Correspondent)

THE Second Test Match

between New Zealand and the

Nest Indies was left drawn when rain washed out play
for the entire day—the last day
New Zealand, Feb. 18

New Zealand, in such a bad a a
position, had to fight all the way r d d H t
for runs when the second Test rit a 1
match against the West Indies i tae
resumed this morning. Heavy 450: B t h
rain during the week-end had . ri 1s

little effect on the pitch as water
did not seep through the covers
The weather was dull but humid

Only Weekes of the West Indies
wore a sweater.

Runs necessarily came slowly
when Scott: 41 and Rabone: 4,
went in to bat with the total at
four fdr “76. The outfield was
slow and batsmen were content
to score in singles against good

length bowling and a well placed

field. Goddard switched quickly
to his spinners, Valentine and
Ramadhin, but Scott especially

played the bowlers untroubled.
Stollmeyer Bowls

Rabone fought determinedly for
nine then a change from Rama-
dhin to Stollmeyer saw the latter
clean bowl Rabone in his first
over, The batsman, attempting
to play a shot to leg had his leg
stump knocked down, Five down
for 93. Worse followed for New
Zealand when Rooney played a
full toss from Stollmeyer into
the safe hands of Walcott at
cover, Stollmeyer had now tak-
en 2 for 9. Scott was warmly
applauded on his fine fighting in-
nings when 5) appeared against
his name in 144 minutes including
four fours. Moir was most un-
happy in facing Valentine for the
first couple of overs but settled
down, and he and Scott were to-
gether at lunch, the score being
126 for six; Scott 71, Moir 6. West
Indies bowlers were getting little
spin this morning

New Ball

Goddard took the new _ ball
after lunch for Worrell and At-

kinson. Before lunch Moir did
not take the few singles which
Scott placed well, evidently not
being willing to face the spin
attack. Against faster bowlers
Moir played much more confi-
dently. With Scott in his 80's

Goddard fielded at short mid-off
and Stollmeyer at short mid-on
when Valentine was bowfTing.
Ramadhin ended the partnership
wheh Moir played a_ delivery
with a little spin on to the wic-
kets, “The partnership, the best
of the innings, added 54 runs in
78 minutes. New Zealand 7—155.

The end was in sight, when
with no addition to the score,
Scott. was brilliantly caught at
84 by Stollmeyer off Valentine
The batsman hit an on-drive
hard and Stolimeyer took the
catch very low down.

Scott got a fine ovation, he had
eZ 250 minutes, and hit sev-

(te from an injured ankle

Beata attempted to bat but did
not last. The innings ended
wheh Goddard at short midon
took a fine righthand diving

catch to dismiss Burtt and New
Zealand were al! out for 1860
runs.

Goddard made good use of leg-
spinhers Valentine and Rama-
dhin. Valentine who was able to
impart a little spin was the more
dai ree He finished with 3
wic for 29 runs off 34,4 overs.
Ramad hin also took 3 wickets
for 41 runs in 25 overs.

Forced to follow on, New Zea-
land openers in their second
innings, Leggatt and Emery, es-
pecially the latter, were not
happy facing the attack of
Worrell and Atkinson. Both
made the ball lift and Worrell
moved it disconcertingly both
ways. The first wicket fell at 14
when Emery was well caught by
Walcott in a right hand low eatch
off Atkinson,

New Zealand’s captain Sut-
cliffe went to the crease but after
a couple of overs an appeal
against light 75 minutes before
time was upheld by Goddard.
There was no further play for
the day. New Zealand were one

wicket down for 17 runs.
The Scores :

W. I, — 18ST INNINGS (for oe
N, “ZEALAND'S — 18T INNINGS
J, Leggatt b Worrell ..
R, Emery ec wk, Guillen b Atkinson 5
V. Scott c Stollmayer b Valentine a4
B. Sutcliffe ¢ Worrell 6 Ramadhin *
J, Reid stpd Guillen b Valentine
G,_Rabone b Stollmeyer 9
F, Mooney c Waleott b Stollmeyer 6
A. Moir b Ramadhin ., an
T. Burtt ¢ Goddard b Vaientine 1
D, Beard c Weekes b Ramadhin 4
J. Hayes not out . : 0
Extras ..... a 5
Total 160
BOWLING ANAL ysis
R Ww
Worrell 12 3 20 1
Atkinson 18 3 42 1
Valentine ... 4.4 21 29 3
Ramadhin . 25 12 41 2
Stollmeyer 8 3 12 2
Goddard ‘ 2. 2 11 0
Fall of wickets: 1—0, 3—50, 4 -dl,
5—93, 6—101, 7-155, 8 iso, »- 159, 16-160.
NEW ZEALAND — =ND INNINGS
a Leggatt not out . 6
Emery c Walcott b Atignson 8
z Sutcliffe not out :
Extras
__ Total (foc 1 wkt) 17

| They'll Do lt Every Time

TEN YE

Guiana 130/4.

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 18.

British Guiana facing a 450-run
total in the Second Intercolonial
Test scored 131 for 4 at close of
play on the second day. Trinidad
hustled runs and were all out 35
minutes after lunch, Tang Choon
hit a brilliant 57 in 70 minutes.
This included one six and five
fours. Thirty-one runs were added
after lunch, Bruiser Thomas and
Gaskin were the steadiest bowlers,
the former was again the most
sticcéssful taking three this morn-
ing.

Trinidad batsmen always ahead
of the clock got 350 in $28 minutes,
then 400 in 836 minutes, The Brit,
ish Guiana ground fielding was
serappy but catching good.

Leslie Wight dominated
Guianeseé batting scoring 61 got out
with brilliant stroké play. He was
comfortable from the start. Wight
was especially good at scoring in
front of the wicket, Camacho
batted well also until he edged one
from Demming who bowled
steadily, and wicketkeeper Legall
took a brilliant catch to dismiss
him, .

British Guiana had 173 minutes
batdpg and on thf whole gave a
better display than in the first
mateh. Wight never looked like
getting out, He was pé articularly

strong at driving. The other bats-
men were out from poor strokes.
Trinidad could have scored more

but the batsmen chasing runs
madé mistakes. Play resumes to-
day. Scores: —
TRINIDAD—-Ist_ Innings
Asgarali ¢ Camacho b N. Wight 128
Corbie « McWatt b N. Wight 58
Guillen b Gaskin 70
Sampath c¢ Camacho b wiant 7
Legall_c Camacho. b, Wish 9
Tene Choon ce MeWatt b C. Thomas 57
Skeete Lb.w. b Thomas 23
Butler ec McWatt b Thomas 9
Jackbir ¢ MeWatt b Gaskin phy
Demming run out “4
Forde not out “4
Extras 10
Total 450
Fall of wickets : 1 for 170; 2 for 212,

3 for 256, 5 for 323, 6 for 397,

7 for 402, & for 409, 9 for 427

4 for 311,

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M Re WwW,
Gaskin 43 =«7 84 2
Camacho 13 1 4 0
Cc. Thomas 24 3 4 3
N. Wight an il 125 4
Patolr 7 0 73 0
Gibbs 6 0 20 0
BRITISH GUIANA—Ist Innings
Wight not out 61
Gibbs ec Legall b Demming 2
Camacho c Legall b Demming 4l
Jackman b Demming 9
L. Thomas ec Asgarali b Jackbir iv
MeWatt not out 9
Total (for 4 wkts.) 131
Fall of wickets : 1 for 12, 2 for 44, 3 for
117, 4 for 117



Alleyne Beat
Alexandra
The Alleyne School netball
team defeated an Alexandra
School team 12-7 yesterday after-
noon at the Alleyne School
grounds. The game was_ fast
throughout and the Alleyne
School were in the lead during the
greater part of the game except
for a brief peridd after half-time.
At half time the score was 7—2
in favour of the Alleyne School.
For the Alleyne School A. Sealy
netied ten goals while G. Cum-
berbateh put in the other two. P.
Cumberbatch netted three and H.
Worrell four for Alexandra.
Following are the teams:—
Alleyne:—G. Cumberbatch, A.
Sealy, M. Bailey, M. Best, B. Hus-

bands, M. Bancroft and C.
Springer.

Alexandra;—H. Worrell, P.
Cumberbatch, P.. Greaves, G.
Thompson, P. Thompson, Y.

Welcome and E. Rowe.

Boys’ Club Football

A crowd of approximately 150

people was present to witness





the"

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



MILLER CAUGHT

WEST INDIES slip fieldsman Everton Weekes holds the catch which ended Keith Miller's innings in the

Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on 28.1.52. Miller made 69.

Notre Dame Defeat Everton 1—0

Notre Dame defeated Everton by







ns the right side but kicked out.

one goal to love before a fair No. sooner was the ball back
crowd in their First Division mid-field than the Everton for-
football fixture at Kensington yes- wards got possefsion and their

terday afternoon, left winger Holder sent in a

Paul Mandeville, Notre Dame's good effort which goalkeeper Wil-
centre half, did the trick for his kinson saved.
team during the first half hour. Game Brightens Up

Everton defended the goal from The game at this stage bright-
the screen end and were first on ened up a bit as Everton on the
the offensive but their forwards one hand tried for the equalizer,
failed to get past the Notre Dame while Notre Dame on the other,
defence who quickly had the ball tried to put themselves further in
back mid-field. the lead.

The Everton front men again Everton almost found them-
got possession and kept the ballin sejyes two down when one of
their opponents area for sometime Notre Dame’s inside men sent in
but again the Notre Dame defence hard one from the left side
got in their way and thwarted which goalkeeper Roach pushed

their efforts. ver thé b Nothing resulted
From_a good clearance from the ae brand olsen: ne

Notre Dame defence, their front
men took over and forced their

It was not long after this that
opponents to concede . anes

Wilkinson, the Notre Dame “keep-



andeville | t oe er” was called upon to save a

font side, but fou HR _ one from one of the Everton
orwards,

Oppottiinity can Everton again attacked and their

Everton late ssed §.fope ob- left winger Holder after getting

portiinity to 6 he scoring whet possession with only the goal-

Olton after receiving from Blades
kicked feebly to goalkeeper Wil-
kinson who had no difficulty in
saving.

Play was soon transferred to
Everton’s goal area and from a
good forward movement, Parris at
inside left tried a good shot which
was headed out by one of the
Everton defence,

keeper to overcome, kicked
straight to him for the latter to
bring off an easy save.

In spite of repeated attempts by
both teams to score, the game
ended with Notre Dame winners
by one goal to love.

Following are the teams:
Everton: Roach, Hall, Weekes,

At this stage, Everton began to Reece, S, Culpepper, Daniel,
press but failed to make uSe of two Haynes; Blades, Olton, Lorde,
corner kicks, both from the right Holder.
side, Notre Dame: Wilkinson,

Notre Dame, bent on. scoring, Straughn, Brown, Roberts. arene
launched an attack on the Ever- deville, Greenidge, Headley,
ton goal ahd were Soon rewarded Daniel, Parris, Forde, F. Daniel
when Mandeville at centre half The referee was Mr. Eric Amory

beat eer Roach with a hard and the lines cme Messrs S. Parris
grounder from well outside the and 0, M. Robinson.
area.

Everton, in an endeavour to 9 %%%%99%%349563%
equalize took the ball well within
their opponents’ area, but when
their forwards did not kick wide,
the Notre Dame dé@fence got in

their way.
Anothet Tory
Notre Dame now tried to. in-|!

crease their ledd and made another
raid on the Everton goal,





%
x
s
8
%
.
the o ning matches of the City Reece, their wing half, ~ x
Div. Boys’ Club Football Fixtuxes 7°Cce Get i tee |
which “opened at District “A” sore a soon had the ball back x NESSYS IS
olice Station on Saturday be- fverton thade anoth
tween junior and senior teams to draw level aad miaied a haan ee
of the Bay Street and the St. opportunit when their inside
Cecilia Boys’ Club, } men fumbled from wéll within the
The junior game which was area, g
very slow ended in a draw with The interval was takén with the 4
both teams failing to score. The scoré 1—0 in favour of Notre
only outstanding player was S. Damié, 8
Jordan of St. Cecilia. On resumption Everton made a ‘
Tau the second game better foot- few changés in their lifie up, but} ¢ THREE
ball was seen and St. Cecilia this did not. seem_to make any |
won scoring the only goal of the difference to Notre Dame who soon |
afternoon, The game was very took over and attacked the Ever-| §
keenly contested and from a pén- ton goal, but one of their inside | %
ally awarded against Bay Street, forwards kicked wide.
Hi. Notville scored for St. Ce- ‘The Everton front line g6on got ° xX.
celia, going and launched an_ attack on
The referees were V. Vanter- the Netre Dame goal. They were
pool and C. Reece, give a corner which Blades took | §
er eee — ee eee ore ene: oe s,
*
iiss i anes eat By Jimmy u atlo | *
3 Sy —t SF rere eS: toate
ARS OLD e (A GUY CAN GET 7 x STOKES

} /

| Sever Nonice». { MY CAR WW

| “YOULL HEAR

| ABOUT EV=Ry-
BODy TURNI? G
A BIG BUCK ON
SOME SORT OF

DEAL

FOR 7



| Bur WHEN YOU TRY,
ITOH, BROTHER, +9. OLD-
, THAT'S DIFFERENT. op



/ 2

es - = —

THE Guy BUYS IT
THOUSAND

BUCKS

~Al




ASSO











“AUT x I MOCHT-
S ONLY HIRRE YEAR
1D IN A-L SHAPE

a





a) GOSH WE DONT
USE OUR CAR
oe Wear ose





We offer the following

in, thick, Bi x Bit
oc, pe

=e

for covering ag
5e.

@

The Board 6f 1,000 Uses.
% in. thick, 4ft. x 6

at
TEMPERED H

‘4 in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft.
3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x 8it.

@

3/16 in. thick. 4ft.

Phone 4267.



Sgt. Gooding Wins

NAAONRC” ts OOOO OF 9

wHen “COGNAC 1

THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS
TO THE MIND—BECAUSE HEN-

HENNESSYS

+ V.S.O.P. (over 20 years)

TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS

UNITEX en WALLBOARD SHEETS
10ft.,

WAL B ARD “MOULDING

STANDARD. HARDBOARD SHEETS
Sft., 10ft. long

le in. thick, 4ft. x 6ft.Sft., 10ft. long
at 30¢. per sq, ft.
SURINAM PLYWOOD aera ts

@ 29e. Te. Bee.

TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD Pik
x 8ft. @ 23c. per sq. ft,

All these Building Boards have been treated to to resist the attack

of Wood Ants and other Termites,

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LTD.

Ges

Queen's
maintained
mastery
yesterday

College

an

over
at

Old Girl
almost complete
Foundation Girls
Queen’s College
when they defeated thern at net-
ball by the wide margifi of 11
goals to four.

The game was mostly . slow
with occasionally spurts of, fast
playing by both teams. Pat King,
the Quéen’s College O14. Girls’
shoot stored seven of the 11
goals and Pauline Smith four
but Pat King had many more
opportunities to score and botii
Smith, the help shoot, and she
showed themselves badly out
shooting form.

Cicely Ashby, the shoot, and
Astrid Welch, the help shoot dii
not get the full support of the
others of their team, and those
times when they did get+ the
ball, their eagerness at attempt-
ing to shoot negatived the at-
tempts.

Easily the most lithe, spirited
and accurate player was the
Quieen’s College Old Girls’ cap-
tain Margaret Ramsay ie
played as centre, Grace Cumber-
batch, Jean Chandler and Ram-
say kept their shoot and help
shoot regularly supplied with
the ball.

At half time the score was
8—1. After half time Foundation
played an improved game and
scored an even three.

Queen’s College Old Girls had
the first throw and at the outset
began combining well. A long
pass from Grace Cumberbatch
gave the shoot her first chance
to store, but a little too much
twirl of the ball lost theth this
goal,

Swift Passes

Foundation seutried down with
long passes, but lost the ball
without having a try for a goal
Good passes by the Old Girls
assisted them in getting the ball
back up in Foundation’s area
and this time, Pat King poised
herself nicely to score the first
,goal. The Old Girls now in-
;ereased the speed of the gaine
and swift passes through the

Challenge Cup |

Sgt. Gooding was the winner
of the Major Simpson's
Challenge Cup when the compe- ;
tition ended on Saturday, This:
Cyip was conpdted among |
the Warrant Officers and Ser-|
jeants of the perro Regiment ,
on the Government 4 weit

The chief stores
Marshall 105, 4

104
Althoug

C.S.M. King
Carter 100,
Marshall made the highést score
the Cup went to Sjt. Gooding for
having made the next highest
score,

R.S.M. Marshall who won the
Cup before got a Spoon for
making the top score.

44 ins. Per suit



Cold Climates. Sizes

Belleville Lawn
Tennis Results

The following are yesterday's
results of the Belleville Tennis
Tournament: —

MIXED DOUBLES wANpicar. |

Miss M. King and Mr. D, es
mingham (Scratch) beat Mr, and
Mrs. D, E. Worme (Scratch) 7—5,
75.

Mrs, Warren and Mr. V. N.
Roach—2—30, beat Miss LE.
Wormé and Mr. Worme--%—15,
3—6, 6—4; 6—4.

SINGLES F/NALS.

Tuesday's Fixtures.
D. Trimmingham § vs.
Worme.

JANZTEN

a

and fawn.

sleeves.

OTIS WHITE COTTON
Pair

D. EB.



aeons




THE BRANDY THAT
NAC FAMOUS.

STRONG

STAR

©. LIQUEUR
(over 40 years)

THE

& BYNOE LTD—AGENTS.

12ft. Long

se

COURTESY
GARAGE

40c, pe’
. ft.

White Park Rd.
Dial 4391



OLD GIRLS- BEAT
FOUNDATION GIRLS

f scored their third within two

s| A ©

ELITE SEA ISLAND COTTON DRESS S
truberiised Collar attached.

STRIPED PYJAMAS in Séthe fhicé patterns, sizes 38 to

FLEECE LINED VESTS, long sleeves

$4.96 to $5.45

WOVEN DOSER
TRUNKS. Elastic Waist.

Sizes 32 to 44. Pair

RAYON & COTTON ae + eondas SOCKS.
Sizes 10 to 114. Pair.

IMPROVE YOUR
DIET - KEEP

HERE’S THE

SERVE YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX SLICES OF
J & R ENRICHED BREAD

» Robert Thom Lid.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1952



WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdic-
tion 16.00 a.m.

Police and Petty Devt Courts
10.00 a.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council 2.00 p.m.

ranks, attacking centre Grace
Cumberbatch and centre Marga-
ret Ramsay, resulted in Pat King
gaining possession of the ball to
score the second goal.

Foundation gitls began to play
with more method and posi!
themiselves better for ae at
this stage. Cicely Ashby received
the ball during this spell of
faultless combination by her team
girls and with a flick of her fin-
gers sent the ball intd the net
to give Foundation a goal.

Queen’s College Old Girls

Girls’ School 3.30 p.m.
Football match at Kensing-
ton Oval’ 5.00 p.m.
Table tennis at Y.M.C.A.
7.30 p.m.
Mobile Cimenm show at
Chance Halli Plantation
Yard, St. Lucy 7.30 p.m,





minutes of Foundation’s scoring
and for the next five minutes of
the game they took advantage of
the spiritless way the Founda-
tion girls had lapsed into and
scoréd three = goals, Pat

WEATHER REPORT
_, .YESTERDAY
— from Codrington

Total oe for Monthy to

Pat King one and Pauline Smith
two, to Ts the score to 6—1, nahi Tomabethies 85.0 °F
rm wee : a 70.5 °F
Foundation pet started to play howe ee

up and were seen at their fast-

est, Their ready positioning and marometer aa” 30.005
good passing gave the Old Girls wicdiAY |

some difficulty in keeping pace

with them, but their shoot ‘and | $Umrise: 6.15 a.m.

help shoot failed 10 grab the lok, itt Gls, fe-
om copie cue tenes play. Lighting: “480, am.

soon coping wit s play- a.

ing and Pat, Hing i two _ 9.42 am., 11.32

more s ‘ore time to a :

make the score 8—1. a 2.13 am. 5.09

On the resumption, the Oid
Girls teok the initiative and Pat

King was early a : to scone
Better playing "Founda.

tion's defence esd nave of
bree heélpéd — abe to stave :
nother swéép
halt and each fenton ee Fics is in| GUARANTEED
this half.
ee ee, WATCH REPAIRS
Queen's Cédlege Old Girls—!



srg yo tiny Watch and
lock Repairs will be deliv-
ered within a week with a
guaranteed note.

At J. BALDINI & CO.,

Margaret Ramsay, Beverly Bat- |
soh, Jean Chandlét, Grace Cum-|
berbatch, Alma Griffith, Pauline
Smith and Pat King

Foundation Girls J@sitta Lid.
Garni Marina Phillips, inn pice ins an, Street.
Wal t Cicely



Ashby,
mary Wiggins, Astrid Weick am ind
Mosely,



































-=--= it will be DRESS
SHIRTS

IRTS with

Sizes 14-173 ins.

86.22

for travelling to

40 to 44. Each:

Sbeereeerere



SHORT BATHING
n Shades of Saxe Blue

$9.52

OTIS VESTS, Ribbed and plain athletic style, no
Sizes 26 to 46, Prices, each..

$1.30 & $1.32—



CAVE
SHEPHERD
& Co, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.

BRIEFS, sizes 30 td 44.

1.56









ine OF ave

YOUR REQUIREMENTS
FOR THE FOLLOWING
USEFUL ITEMS

Sun visors (anti-dazzle}
Cigarette Lighters (6 & 12
volts)

Licence Plate Jewels
Hood Ornaments

Reverse Lamps Feeler Gauge

cars/trucks =n ateby ftyaronietérs
Cages Seenyers Air & Water Hoses
Dest, Cloths Polishes & Waxes
Contact Files Ete. Ete.,
— and a large supply of . . .
rae one SLEDGE HAMMERS 71b

plated




PAGE 1

Fl'ESDAI I EMU vld i BARBAIMN \I)\IM MI ivi. I SEVEN HENRV BY CARL ANDERSON HINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIFS for QUALITY and ECONOMY RED ROSE TEA is ltd tea! S YKAft> \ FWOlRITI $ S.&S. RUM K'.jur of IU I MELLOW FLAVOUR I $ !" i I COOL DRINK I jl STUART k SAMPSON (1938) LID. \ HURRY! HURRY! I AND § SELECT THESE %  I NOW riftMi.rtiui-. Odtme-.il l'ln inriiiit Mullon I'his ItrrakfoRl It oil Tina I mill Timtur Tli •I l,.,t llmprrlal \ irnii.i SH.sai"0 laWU A -iniill IHK II .mbrrit.T Strak l.rliln,in VMIH I III* I 'Hi! C o.kt n| I ins I nut 1 IIHI IV.E ft CO. K A '.. KOI 111 I K S| IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SI'M'IAI. Ot'l-'KHS arc % %  '""liable at our llniiicha-s TncrtNidr, H|M'i|(llllM II iinil Sunn Sit-i'4 i Usually Now Usually NOW Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes .41 .:i Tins Pie Apples .96 .? Tins Box-All Cleanser .23 4M 6 lb Potatoes .72 ... I Tins Cooking Butter (51b) 4.50 1.3" Boneless Beef .58 ... D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street II E c o i. o N \ A i. II o i: ii i E s Man sdmlri bis* ipbkt If fm fc-i %  IH) run down hntdM yini n4*J mot Vita.>uii*. take Scoefa Ia.uU.oo alaki V,u il % ..-. (fil hll W Hk •#) •nor* fh-n |Ml • famW It's POWHFUL NOURISHMENT Noi jui an ordinary look III rkb lo sstural A*I) VitajftiBS. 0od tailing, aconoamicsl %  *. "••^T Pletur. tails I ttoryV Do waihmg, —Mfc fc H<*>firtr ftnf %  ag p aw %  * -£* SCOTT S EMULSION /V/ow ENERGY FOOD TONIC WINSTON S. SPEECHES 1949 & 1950 IN THE BALANCE THIS BOOK IS ON .SALF. AT \IV4M ATI VI ATIOM IIY Broad M At C.reyalonc. Hastings. lumbano, rhruinMK parn. and common urinary troubles due lo impurities in the blood can be overcome. Stiiing. active kidneys safe guard your health by utralninn Impurities and harmful watte t out of the ••Hem. When kidney ai turn ii Inadequate anil laili in litter the blood properly, Aia four D.j.r fa* hcJUCM I Dntui'• Hackache Kidney I'llla bring happy relief by helping to ileanse the kidney niters and 10 %  lunulmiriK iltru action. You tan rely upon this wall known diuretic and urinary antiseptic Many thousands of grateful men and women hava> tended io ilte gm.I health the) have tcitaiued by taking Doon's Pillt m ft • K JtSTin \u.viin\ IFEW ITEMS WI O/V/V/VC FENDKK TAPE 1 : I ULOID SHEETS COHK SHEETS : KXIHI.K RADIATOR HOSE ii It EASE GUNS OIL CANS ItEAIt VIEW MIRRORS I1ATTEHY CABLES HATTERY HYDROMETERS HATTEltY CKAROEP IMH.IIS HIGH PRESSURE AIR HOSE *t" HOT F'ATCHES AM' VII ^NIZING KITS SUCTItiN VALVE GRtNDI ENGINE VALVES—All Models DECARBUNIZINU C All Models OENEKAT'iM ARMATURES—All Models LODGE BPARK PLUOS VALVE GRIN GASKET GOO for Stalin* Joints HOI. I.rr proofing Ignition Wires KI'imiNCl COMPOUND SIMONIZ KKEENER AND WAX HOLTS WONDAR WAX CHAMOIS AND I'OLISHIN I rr.OTHS 1 l ENSE DIGITS AND PI \'l ES ALL TYPES MECHANICS' TOOLS '•SAVE FEMg l>l\l 1969 KM YOVM WEQUtMEMl V7S. WE'LL $UMEL\ /Ml/. //'• ECKSTEIN Dial 4269 — BROS. Bay Street • %  .W^O'-IW. '•'-*','.:



PAGE 1

rt MM*. PMMMM u MM SAKBAMM \U\oCATE PACK MM Common Pleas Suit Adjourned (taim Made For $1,113.05 VMHT -l.lS.WItKII' (.ri'timlii \ftrrlvth-r : An adjournment until April 21 was granted both parties in the Common Pleas suit, Violet Servie Reid-Vivian Cunnell. when the case continued yesterday before the Act inn Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor with ihc hope that the dispute might be shortened or possiblv settled. The case lft %  claim for It. IU.05 debt brought bv Keid of Si James CoaiMU lives at Black lUn-k. Bcid u represented b> Mr. W. W Reece. Q.C.. instructed by Mr !> Lee Sargeant. Solicitor. Mr. E K Wilcott. Q.C. associated with Mi J. S. B. Dear, DMtni Messrs. Hutch in son A BandcUt M Indvfendai.' \ew Syrup Being Made \ NEW KIND of sugar svrup he Haggatu fac,„,,,,,; yrup Conncl! lory, St Andrew. This Dg I h i made tn i hicn is find cms in the %  raj in this me hod water is added to trie first quality sugar which U lal ronlisTsar and then it li boiled until It becomes a thick %  A inn orange essence is cded Five Cane Police Will Soon Gel \.\U\ rires Uver Radio—Telephone System Week-end This morning when hearing wa resumed Mr. Dear loM Ills Lordship that wi the last occasion the case was adjourned srtttl thai the solicitors could get together tn see whcthei could be made Sbo Both counsel In Ihc rase wc • This syrup is then put into cans desirous of t.king aiiotl:. i adjourn\h.ch are taken away for tale ment with the same idea in view • • The plaintiff In her statement THE GtLF JIL COMPANY claims the sum of *!.l 13.05. monle* continues IU search for oil In ihe due and owing from trv defend. Si Andrew area Holes are now ant to the plalnlitl f %  : th | tvmg drillrd at HaggaU* Land items of household ..rticles sold occurred ever tin week-end. The which is lying west of Coggin* and dcllvi ice" on May 18 1948. and ""• '' Iwer Estate started about "dl. for further monies alleged to ha-.e aaOn On Saturday, and the 90 w been received by the defendant for nc !" '-nsisted of first, second with the transfer of Captain W BOVS OE THE Belleplaine the plAltitifT a"d third crop rip* canes which R Armstrong. Radio Telephone Bcr/l Club art practising hard for Arlicl** Mai ——%  were insured. Expeit. introduced the MH V II V biter-Club football matches. ufuSSELSlL ^SSSrt Tf %  "'extended to several S>stem on a small soaie. will Several of the boys have played f _Tj"".^" m ?',, r ."" m "! e d *: peasants' canes at Jackman's and 9h "* rl 'y be gelling then own sei practice matches nd int admhs that she purchas' ',„, A t UHCl a llon 5 !" from th* United Kingdom. Thiv J*" 8 '" household article, from | ,iVt TuIlN house !" •*< *''" 0"** to. DIKING the past '.wo weeks '"* P'" ,n ". but denies having Tnp _,„, (i( „,,. dam „ ,_ un sometime w, and 11 residents of the districts around "^ elved c ? r,om . 1,u f -<<-< %  > %  u Arrang-rnents hav c been m.m. I : cnadu Workers' Union for a local waterfront worker t be a guest for a week of the s< •men*, and WHerfroa Workers' I'nion Both organisn .milated with II Organisation ol Wi K gfi arhlen .'.. for enabling mem bent of th,. waterfront luttoti la kno w something of condition' in each other's ports is to reciprocate as host S %  Ml truda Otttaag of ov Mopital nursing start which she joined m IMS. left th. cohmv to r Trinidad en route to England where she will tak> ai idvanced course tn nursing a' ua st Habar HagpHaj, Burrs? What fm&Tvalue could there be? . wonderful wydmeby Aiiaoc In r'ivtroying <..... %  at Lesrar Estate in UM can "f Ihrtni fni arendni-claai families dining J inuan last rosa .-nu ., petal • of Daeambar si. IMI. and was 164 per cent ib basic month. August. iMn A 4 commlUed by people who barry out their nocturnal raids SeTrJrn m" thc^food" !" .' OH rnsiHences and small business places. The Police Authorities who. Wortd's Largest WITHIN tha next fcwe montha or to. the Police will bo m a very much stronger position to wage more effectively thair war agatnsi crime, particularly the type of crime Bad .i similar Increase ,n tha < %  used the 1 ii' -'Nij/"' |r/><" aristocrat of s Calcining Kiln Opm*d In B.C. Jackson and Sharon have" been g *?jgOad byjha pIMntllt In tha ^S'^ was eventuallv put early nest month suffering great inconvenience for s, 2. i 5 m '?" of P a m (ll it b v the nulice Mid iWtdenti In preparation for thi %  i ikour A.Ivnorv Board for a ner|o.l ,f ,,-. '-ar ending Decemlier 31. I9A2 r, tvarrunant has ap|v>m'.-.i %  -,, foUossdng Mr. W II Haglrv .oWN. Hi; Ecb 18 [Chairman), Messrs. <) M The Oovaraor formally put into H Neckles. Walter Knight. %  OMrattea ou s-turday. a new caiM E., the Bupacfatandeat IN OUR LINEN DEPT. Tti *" %  -— %  on' t)v mv ponce ana ifti,,.., ... ,._ _. raM rhe defendant ul u admits n. %  have been erect, i „iing kiln at M K< U Early_i n the morning the water ,* 1V ;2_ !l c _. s um -.".' 7B a *** ou A lire asta oee ur rgd at Kugby aI %  tr"l*'kic points throughout U Bran Bauxite Company. !1 and returns periodically b the statement of claim, but PtantatfauT during the day for short intervaU. ""cgc^ that before the action the Yesterday being washing day. plaintiff was and still is indebted residents were very annoyed as ' her In the sum of $341.82. The ,'. many of them found difflculy it. defandant claims a set-off again..: obtaining water for washing their 'be plaintiff's claim and filed i clothes. iiunter-claim f.,i 62.62, being AnimiilK also suffer as a result balance of the amount due hn '' of this and consequently when the alter deducting the amount of tho S! DavtsTi for the few minutes plaintiff's dairr I'u hi., fa i wireless room Ltd.. which completed the *. i | '' fctaaual si St. Thomas, about entire island. on the *am v day and burnt '" rx>;ng prepared In the old Sarol tin., majoi >t.g*'s in the cuieras of second 'i i • ' '"}*' Wuaitcrs winch isituated rent expansion piogrammc l.i.i Works, the labour Offlcei Officer). M \\ These canes were insured. Innvs Not Insured the southern pait of the Recall on Koom. The Layout The layout bas already been i.i,. look [il-uv .it completed, It provide! foi it. Christ Church, on installation of a P.H X„ naai — r^ Sunday about 2.30 p.m and which will Usituated an up-lo"",;.', '; a ar, il1 stampede The plaintiff in turn defend* burnt 105 holes of second crop datc Map Control Unit, the new, wnver is the cause, many the counter-claim, joining issue '" lp ** canm tn Property of v H F Set with its sea Bsritti people in the dis net -- • %  •• -%  ••• %  >— — •-" ----%  -• -•-thst fjHh (be defendant 'on her" nY~Ranald Uayeri "f rtaggaM Hall. Board, and'close to the opcrato: i the esfence. She said thai the defendant Michael. These canes were hand will be found Message was not entitled to the set-off "' "'""red. asked for, and denied that lha A:i ther fire occurred at Fair n, cr ,. w ,u be a map of the cit was indebted to the defendant to *'"''d Plantation, St Lucy about -rCili a „ a llol fjl „ lt] .,, Ihc sum of $62.82. '• 30 P '" "" s >' ndft v and burnt of nP tnlire | s | u ,id The 199 K. When the case firi-t came uu for lnrw %  £ r 1 ( > c0 P d t O 5 .?" cbange and the 08 pOUca K> tearing on Janua.y 2*. .. %  an iSB "•• %  %  * ln c,wir pea !" 3 jouinmcin was granted ill order !'' "' M V y -l ""<' nearby th.i. s lieftors on both si, /. ^^^If^SS^Tmi -< "^^ „ '.r"'"' "s„u.'iav ,V -nd nves. and ln.tall.lion BrltJsh West Indies during 195!, S5 JPSSi l'" J', I'. %  "" '"' —-diiui to complete raturos Sf^SSJ^.T^r^.?&*& %  aril of T Q tales are erindine this happens U.K. Imported 306,606 Tons Of B.WX Sugar In '51 LONDON. both sUU | might have the opportunity la and delivered, and which tiie plaintiff was unable t„ substanllfor the'year just'pubUshecf'Vn ^,1"""chief' London by the Board of Trad*. defW D cr>let This repiesented some improvc%  v. r tha 1B50 Imp c.l 3ot.i(5i to„. BriuV u ni. which a soparata ngure u given, supplied 82.800 Ions in 1951. as aajungl 67.113 tons iij I9&0. Altogether. 8(14,168 tons of t Thelr Honour: %  UgBr were imported from Empire Vaughan and Mr kiurcea in 1951, as against 811 irse of her eviftistnct and were insured. Case Of Exposing NCW8 In Brief Rum Adjourned IIH.VV 1141VI I Of BO i u t W iIday's Mr H A Mouse, reported to the police that J If. Hans on Saturday about 12.10 p.m. chell, Judges of the Assistan* while she was walking along Wil177 tons in 1950 Failure of the Cou "f Appeal yesterday doy's Hoad, an lUlgnouf Australian crop reduced import* "ujoumed for a decision until snatitied her handtuig and walk Tn, |M kiln is the largest the world. 251) feel in length, nine feet in dlarWitat and has a rapacity of 100.000 torn, of calcined bauxile annually which U cap. able ot producing abrasive A grade cawtnad bauxite and rafraetoo A grada %  upar-cakinod haoxile which was Ii r -st inti.i duced on the calcined bauxite market by the Den tran I FoniLs. In the centre of the room, frhleh is still tinwoild'knalla1 producer of this product. The new kiln-creeled wiltiri HK months by local workmen -ill doubts l"t >aai"l production of calcined oca and on eonv pi.-.inii. the muni" i ut BUM kilns ii anabta tha coinpan) I than triple thm llguie The .xrf the Bauxite Progranune magM ooa that jobs .uid graatai socurlt) %  ainloynwnl irsfttf number of ptoplei mi n it ranut f"i Oo from tha colotn's already largest lingla contribute) and all i i I %  tentlal incie.iM' of the local Bail coma It is noi.\oithv iii.it during the MI numbers employed < i Kanalfl Bauxite I by appioximat.l-. n. When the new aQUlpo %  com t nrtf'cros ripe pkttd, more mobua unll will t u.r. th. proplinked Up with wiieless to H-.' Cortain of the sama qnnrteis and tiuUvrgar out st..from that territory from 246.641 JJ !" r Jl l he %  tons in 1950 to 177,154 tons in 1951, ^"J nSLr^f. t S inaMatsss &?" %  JP*J ( rl 'd Mings %  lie but this In The H. ,>f in u IMII €124. My Lord's Hill tallied $7 24 SI'RINtil K of id these will i i into service to help tn the filth' gainst crime. In the neighbouring island of Trinidad, dill MSBlem has been i ndovs help to the Police past %  it thai Co lony, .mil Mm-. Mi Inthe M t.iii itimi tii' re mans crb ..... i f the eotnnii .sion Ol tha crime. At present in Barbs Police l)i ; set loaned to them, and | proved very -at; facto Baadlni saslgtanai ol Iht ly to dial 08. and UW Wo.k.-.-' Union). E. A. Mitchel" Oranad^ Workers' Union) arv L A Japii fasneral w i. I'll |QQ) ThnaiatMiM tho Inland frkll e.vii. hgld f. RhUJ in churches of all dfiiominatlons, with UM itive conRTegatIons in fonr churches in Ih. i j Mis Fxeellonev Sil A-i.ndelt. who ttbMkdad l| HH Chureh. read the raw I mrl Archdeacon H. C. pi.ft officiated i %  i. \."noj %  rapiimnts i tho Roman CathoUc Churoh • i i • ( hi.-f t^sr.'.i v Windward Island %  nd 'be service SPU eonrlin to i Ravrl. IT f> i : %  lh MathodUt Church i>II%  • %  ( F Hanville AM,.M i.. ,. %  %  i**i Hard K .1 Payna oflM. tmand Heel V l II at the ra rH "eMland bs MminU< %  •' Wall MacMtlurn with iiev.t Adam Thompson officiating WE OFFER #'.ir#; ion i is In COI.I) HI.IK. KOSK and OMSK HAM ronri.s Irom in PLAIN warn HATH iHllfl.s from In III.IK, PINK. liRKKN nd (IOI.II (1.82 In M. MI $2.13 lo S4.3Z HI \IH,N IHtATII Mings appealed against Mr • When the 999 set g.^s into n,-„ r K H MmtM T* who pe, Foreign sugar, however. *i>nNurse's decision Counsel in the MAIIAI.A IIARVKV of Seclu"""" %  ,r P'.ccdure will 1-e '• %  %  .1 t „.,, „ pi mortem %  linucd U, make up the bulk M casein Mr E K Walcott, Q.C for siou I' I Black Hock, reported W. report Ihc incident, giv. UM (ton on Maude Iuk. o| IsOrTU imix>rts. rising from Mings, while Sgt. Archer Is proseUsa laroanj of two turkeys valued locality, and eon tact will be ma Koad, Britain'! 1.280,373 tons in 1950 to 1,390.451 <-uting for the Police' tons in 1951. Cuba alone supPolice Constable 439 llrewstei plied more than the entire Em"*id that on Decenincr 13 hi went plre total, with 878.202 tons In ' the defendant 1951 as against 872.123 tons in *>t* Village. He arrived there 1950. The other big foreign sup*bout 2.40 p.m and noticed t Pi er was SJUI Domingo, which In.-reased its trade from 379.349 tons In 1B50 to 444,929 tons In 1951 At the same time. Britain redi cod her re-exports of sur^i fr m 751.864 tons in 1950 to 724 711 Ion In 1931. to give her ; in Import m 19IS1 totalling 1.52H posed'' Bre'wit'er Vaid' 90S tons. U against I 3S9.686 tOO Th ;. defendant asked him if In the previous year. The remainthere was anything In the law di, of Britain's sugar needs Tor bout exposing goods for sale and cicincsllc consumption came from he told him 'ies". IJiilish-produccd beet. Cpl. Cunllfte attached to the _^_^__^^^ Holetnwn Police Station said that he warned tin def< D IfCTllRE AT PfiFSS CLUB P-emiaea at Fltts Village should be JJ v.tuo clowd on December 13 as that da* $20 from her enclosed yard beadlh p in on Saturday and units, win. I. | n on Sunday. designated i -ill of IbS mobile bo pa: i iddinl. ,.t her home on Friday bout I Jll p vi ttWbUted death I .ttui.il .nisi %  I islifrmau%( Deasth B) Mis4(U<-iiiiiMD lb by misadventure was the verdict returned fury when the Inquest Into thi ith of Evans Edwards, a fisher. I .ni „f Q.,<< n %  Street. SI', u i i tn hided ill Distlii't "A" vi" larday morning. TlMJ Coroner was MM Wqrshll I Mr E. A. McLood. Police M 4 District -A" I %  mi was admitted lo the Oan ral Hospital on Ihc i g ol Inrunry 26 spfferiug from In HI la whn Ii In aft struck !%  #/#; s/f// /s 70" x 90" (if) *6.45 .n III.IIK, GBKKN, PKACH, MMON and ROSE •" x 10e"— V.IHTI: 9 $10.37 .. fO" x IM" do. $10.13 0*00 tou ttstcs —COTTON " x ?.b" $1.67 —UNEN IS* x 2S" 2.48 windows In the shop opon "1 went to one of the windows nd looked In the shop The defendant was sitting at a window in the south of th. inoc whl. men were sitting at a table In the n.idrUi of the shop I no'ieed liqi the shelve* "f the shop exSpeed-up Methods On Farms ught n WASHINGTON. everyone else thaw d _.. a hUM faun, near the llttla Slave to be paid DtON, w . town of Gray Summit, Missouri. So the formula now a livestock feed concern is busy how to produce u given a Introducing that most American of animals with less costly of characteristics — the restless and fewer hours of work. speed-up—to future pork chops. The firm is succeeding, too. It much that they an -1-1 eggs. can grow a 31b boding fowl in two pounds heavier There are about ten million nine weeks and on 9 lbs of gia.n than they wenin the farm hands In America, and like —which Is about I lb. of giain and shuffle days. (Express) Hi died tha MOM das Un %  dwards ldentilie was one allnnai who said that he only saw one window open. "I am not saying that the policeman is lying, but he was only living to tell the truth." Mr. Walcott said ;'he prosecution has to prove thit the goods were exposed for Association of Foundation Boys' '££ ^ { n \ t the"exposure" School next Fridsy st 7.50 p.m. at lm purpose of a sale. F.naidation Boys' School there "d/ e w m naV e to adjourn this Will be the formation of a Commatter for a decision until FebrumUUa to deal with various subarj 25", Their Honours said after listening to the address of counsel Loss Of Canadian Trade Hi Is Turks And Caicos Islands I LONDON. Reduction of trade between Canada and the British West ndies in the past few years has adversely affected many ndon by the Colonial Office fr'.m the Islands. All the privately-owned sal' Another big customer for the ptodueers have now been InIilands' salt in 1949 was Japan, corporated into a singl. which bought 24,691 tons for the Turks Island Salt Co.. Ltd. £24.691 but took none it all In In an effort to develop I 1950. The loss of these two big der economic resources of thn, I'm. eisity, priority %  And Mr. Krishna Menon. the Dominions Colonies and ssU nor .t 'bat tune .: I bl i l*angld*tlon w;ll i>e given Indian High Commissioner, ha. States arc also being appro..-r,I O. H LangUyi Vi %  Indla'i InspoflaM bail In Ian OSj Malaya and '." %  i %  £7.000, the Qold I finally THE FINEST IN BARBADOS BY ALL THE WORLD FAMOUS PERFUMERS. PeAJjiuneA • public announcement ii I IKIIN • 1..11. ,|( ii... .1M...HI. Mill .1. N..-1 %  Narstsn N.n %  L* r.h., mans |>ANA-' I.h. HAN rAICM J., .,. ^ KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY. P^ COTTON PI..MIIS III, uirtr yd. Sill WIIITK rLANNBURR, :i" iHr 92.WIIITK FI.\NM;|.KTTK. UT wid Klc WIIITK UNOSRIB CSEPI 9:ic WIIITK STKII'll) (KKPK. IT SIM CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10—n BroaH Street 9TANSFEEM. SCOTT A Cm*, i.nillroad Street (ire> stone. HMllasIl KOHKKTSONS I "f tin Ori|li!l> Week Krdeuinnl Bli.li.urr.nl Apricot. Kasaberrv 56 90 Jam In lib Jan ItOHKKTSONS %  *BaSSI Oraage. C.olden Shred, and Silver Shred Marmalade In lib Jars 44 45 KOIIIRlsoN ^ %  ftrairaanry Jsm *u 57 ( OMtt.NSIIl MII.K fig ajsge* ivm. f ( \^ll I C4KKY < IMM.MTH Onl> I.UIM.Sf \N\1II.\N Pt imiNGS OgsSaatata HulterseoUh. r.uimrl per pht. 25.-. : %  \i i '.' ii i si per tin tSc. W1I l-fl I MUM per IJot. Un 73c. ."lliMlMllhiMlllI WITH ( IKIAI. per IZos. Ua ae. .I'll PI IM I HI TTKH per Jsr Sir. I Milti II H • I I' I tin* nl \II per tin Tic. HKIIilI. 14 IN*; ItQAl per pkl. r. COCKADE FINE RUM


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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1. 15! Test Ends In Draw: Play Washed Out (Kn.iii Our Own Correspondent! nil. .. New Zealand and the at play for ilu 1 entin New Zenl-„i. P*b IS Trinidad Hit 450: British Guiana 130/4 111! II II I III. Ill h %  bod petition, had to flttht nil til for runs tvhen the weond Test rtiAlc-li against tin muiiwd ihi> monunj I rain during th* wfk-i' IIHIC effect on th* pitch -s water i through the I The weather was dull but htinurt Only Week*of the Waal Indies g|Woir .1 -.venter Rum nece ss arily 0*1: 41 went in to bat i in glow and batsman ramr lowl> PORT-or-sPAiK m i8 Guiana rum* .i 4A0.ru I Intc nit Hubone: 4, to u| )n the Sec the t.ital at Test scored 131 fnr 4 outfield M ,,iav on the ncotld da) "tent hustleo i it cloa in singles .-igmn'-t good minute* after lunch Tang Chooii length bowling and a well plaead hit a iiiilli.int S7 in 70 n field. CJoddard switched iuirkly This included BM ttX and live Valentine ami four! Thlrty-oiw rut w*n aAUd RamutlhLn. but illv ,.fier liinen Bruiser Thomas and played the bowlkm were the iteodlest bowiST S ...... Stullnirycr Bowls mornRabonc fought diierinin'illv lor ing. %  n .i chance trom RamaTrinidad batsmen als.'. %  ahead dhln lo StoUmeyer saw the latter .f thclock pot 350 in 82H minute*. dean bowl Rattan* in all nnt ItsM 400 In 836 minute* Th< Brlt over. The batsman, attempt mic il Q %  kdtng WU to play l shot to leg had his leg py but catching good. stump Five down L*BUe Wich' djpminated for 93. Worse fi.H-.w... Zealand plased ;i full toss from StoUxncyer Into [l h.-nri. at W eovar. Mullmejer had now taken 2 for 9. Scott wa Splaudcd on in ngs when sit %  Mtartd agalnsl his name in 144 minutes Including four fours. Molr was inos happy In In* l< flrat couple of overs i rl %  '. weie tor.uianrs* bat tins scoring. 81 dot en rl Ihc start Wight %  i rill, tfil strokt play. Hi illy good ;it scoring fron <-i tha wn kit Camacho I 1 also until head flora l>nirnme who bowled steadily, and wfefcetlteeper Lcgall %  brilliant cateh to dismiss '"him. Guiana had 173 minutes bnt%ig and on tig; whole gave a t.*ttri d>plaj than in the first gather at lunch, th.%  rl wight n***T looked like Scott 71. Molr fl Wf't ^ettlhg out. He was particularly ISC for six In.iiebowlers • pin UUl r he other baU%  ; Trinld.id COUld rtdV* %  OOf* but th* batam*0 chasing runs mode mistakes. Play resumes today. Scoies: — New Bull t.Wlts. th I %  after lunch for Worn.I kinsoii. lleforo lunch Men did not take the few singles which Aiaarax Scott placed well, evidenl'j t%.t %  '••'** being willing to fare the spin g," !" ,, .' attack. Again-.! [attl r bowlan LIU c*n**u b *' conilT.n. a % % % %  %  **• •*• ' T(l b Thoi Q.C, OLD GIRLS BEAT FOUNDATION GIRLS College Old Girl ank*. attacking centre Grac* maintained an almost ewmpU %  *'umberb-Uh and centre MargaPoundatior Girls i*t Ramsay, resulted in Pat Kin*tjueen Colletgaining possession of the ball to • .ed th*ra ' net -core ihe second goal ball i... th* MdM margin of 1. goals io four. foundation girls began to play more method and positioned %  ith fas themselves better for passes at playing by both teams Pat Kins. :r " "tagc. Cicely Asbby received the OHiaan'i Cotta-gi OM r>ers sent the ball into the net opportunities to score und boti. to give Foundation a goal. Smith, the help shoot, and the Queen's College Old Girls red their third within two -hooting form minutes of Foundation's scorin? tueiy Ashby. the shoot, and and for tho n*xt five minutes it A'.t-id Welch, the help shoot di 1 the game they took advantage of th* full support of th 'he spiritless way the Founda** took the initiative and Pat pass from Grace Cumbcrbateh King was early able to score again gav* the s-hit her first chanee Better playing by the Foundato score, but a little too mm'i lion's defence nnd attacking twnl of the hall IBM them th'centre helped them to nave oft WHAT'S ON TODAY C*a*rt oi Original Jurisdk. lion 10 Oil J m Psbce aadi Pelt* Deni t tssrU !• %  *• am. Meellng at* the LeglsUtive lonnril ;a* p.m. Meeting of the Hease nl Asaemblt 3.M i in Nrtball a* St. Michael Garb' school 8.3* p.m. FMIIMII asalch al Kemlnston oval 5 e* p.m. T.MP l-nmA| V M I \ 7.8* p.m. Mobile Cssenri shew st ( h..m.Hall Ptanutlon Yard. St. Laey 7.1* p.m. WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from 4odrlngton HM. TsUl Rainfall far Month to date .#7 la. Highest Temperature t5.fl 'F Lowest Temprratare 7g.5 F Wind Velocln mllea per hsssr Rarameter (9 a.m.) 3A.M5 (3 pm.l 29.919 TO-DAY Sunrise: 8.15 .m Sunset: .0S p.m. Moon: Last Quarter. Fearasry II. MghUng: .M p r. High Tide: 9. mi 11.3! p.m. low Tide: 7.13 a.m.. 5.99 p.m. a'. Swift Pfcsiu TBIMIOAO CansHio ii N ii< MIWJII ll N l|M b G*xku> WEST INDIES slip field-man Evrton Weeke* holds the i Fifth Tett at Sydney cricket mound on 20 1 Bft Millei *tch which ended Keith Miller's Innings In the made 00 Moir played much more dintb With Scott in his ov* OodOard ileldcil nt nriort mid-ofl ,.. "., Mtw-m a Gs-v,., and Stollmevei at short mid-oii u. when Valentine was bowling. Noire Dame Defeat Everton 1-0 Sgtfuniii* Clmllengc Cufi Foundation scurried down w H I long passaa. but lost the bail without having a try for a goal flood passes by the Old Girl i.sslsted them In getting the ball back up In Foundation's area and this time, Put King poUi-.t bamMtf nicely 1 a|. The Old nother sweep through in this, half and each scored three in. (his half. The teamg were: — Oueen'f Cdllepe Old OirU-' Margaret Ramsay, Beverly Batsoh, Jean Chandler, Grace Cumberbatoh, Alma Grifllth, Pauline; Smith and Pat King. Foundation Girls— J e s 1 c a score the fir*. Garnes. Maiino Phillips, Flynn GlrU now InWnleotr Cicely Ashby. Roscin rcssed the speed of the gam' maiy Wiggins. Astrld Welch and nd swift passes through the Mo^ely. GUARANTEED WATCH REPAIRS Remember any Watch and Clock Repairs will be delivered within a week with guaranteed note. At J. BALD1NI fc CO.. OfHcf nt Lnshley's Ltd. Prince Will""" *"" *i'^ Eslrsi r Ml, I Ml Ramndhin ended the partnership when Moir played a delivery with %  little spin on to the wickets. The partnership, the bcs'. of the innings, added 54 runs in 78 minuW" New Zealand 7—155. The end wain sighl. when with no addition to the •eon, '• %  Scott was brilUaiilh caught at 84 by Stollmeyer off Valentine The batsman hit an nn-dnve ihan-d and SloUnu-yer t.-* the *•**. catch very low down. Scott got a line oval on. he had G i.rail b prmnuna lilted 250 nuiiutes. and sut s*v' ....JK-IV. !* % %  i D n f,, u JaWkman I, Demmins Suffering hum an injured nnklc l but kicked out. One goal to love before a fab !" No sooner was the ball link crowd In their Fir-t Division mid-field than the Everton {orfootball fixture al K*flsangton >eswards got posse#i Noti, Dame de(r atad Kvtrton l^igfrom the righ' fail" No soone rail -I ww %  WiSliI terday afternoon. Paul Mandevllle. Notre Darnr* centre half, did the trick for his team during the first half hour. Everton defended the goal from the screen end and were first on the offensive hut their forward fajlad to fit pac.sleulay aftl DOOn a'. th* Alleyne S.hrxl Opp'irrunit* Missed Everton Inter missed a good oprmrtimtt? to open the scoring when OKon aft*! receiving from Blades kicked fee My to goalkeeper Wllho had no difficulty In It was not long after this that Wilkinson, the Notre Dame "keeper" was called upon to save u hard one from one of the Everton forwards. Everton again attacked and their left winger Holder aftei getting (-"'session with only the goalkeeper to overcome. kicked nun %  MM .vhen Goddard at shoi took a fine rlgbthand diving catch to dismiss Durlt and New Zealand were al' nut for tun runs. Goddard made good use of leg%  alraMri Valentine ind Rama, dhln. Valentine who was able to impart a little spin was the more dangerous He I'mislhed with 3 wfclttj foi -Ml runs off 34.4 overs Ramadhln also look 3 wicketi for 41 runs in 25 overs grounds The game Forced to follow on, New Zeathroughout nnd the made Iha hall ltd and Worr.ll Par Sa Allaynr School A. Scaly !" n *"*" %  ho "' " m "" ""' '"ft!" D „ „, r wllWnson moved il dlsconrortiiialy tKrth i ,.l ten goalK *htle O. Cumo.rn nrntio l-nl ut\ coring S(TDuald on the Everton goal but Reece. their wing half, came tn th. raacut and soon had the ball back mlrl flaM Everton made anoth*r attempt to draw level and missed n golden opportunity when their inside men fumbled from well within th< The refen .nd the llneiaaur %  i 0 M RooH j* s Mr. Eric Al Men s Pan . M King and Mr. D. Trimmingham (Scratchi beat Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Worme (Scratch) 7—3, 7—^1. Mrs. Warren and Mr. V. N. Roach—W—30. beat Miss E. Worm* and Mr. Worme—Mj—15, ; t _6, 6—4; 0—4. -i\(.I tI \ M Taeada*-Flstnres. D Trimmingham vt. D. E. MWI ma iMatfaii al A crowd of approximately 150 people was present to witness Ihe opening matches of the Cit* Uiv. Boys' Club Football Flxtiues which opened at District "A" Police Station on Saturday between junior and senior teams Dj the BJ SUwt .iiv.1 the Bt. Boys' Club. The junior game which WU are*, en alow ended in a draw with The inter both teams falling to score. Tho score 1—0 onl) oi •.'.standing player was S. Dame J.-rdan of St. Cecilia. On resumption Everton made a hi the second game belter footfew changes in their llhe up. but :..ll was m^n and St. Cecilia this did not seem to make an> l o i %  iflg the only goal of the difference 1 to Notre Ihime who soot '^'^"f^'V.'^^'i ^ w ;.*,tl iifternoon. The game was yen took over and attacked the F.\. ^ u\a 5s wwwi keenly cmteatr 11 I:\XTV rime la, ^ OLO '"' T*T=.£<5 WK&i v CA s i\JS-SO re u. ME : / TNC CW> a->"S ir ABOUT c^i^y. Cv. .•a. IV limir.' H.ulo ^5C MOULDING ering |oln V. i r 11 sTAMiXRD IIARIsBOARP SHLLTS II iiil of I ikW ITsu i in. thi k. 4(i \ tin., Hft. 10ft. loin: St Is*, pr sq. ft. TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS 4:x fifi |i 10ft long at 3te. B*T gaj. ft. SURINAM I'LYWOOn SHEETS ', in thick. 4ft. x 8ft ft 0r. per sq. fl. 3 16 in. thlek, 4ft. x 8ft. fit Stc. aV Ste per aq. ft TURViLL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS 3 IH in thick. 4ft \ gft. '.< Me. per sq. ft. All their liwtlditic nmr< hs\e b*en tretvted to resist thr id UOIHI Ants and other Termite*. Phone 4SM. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. YOURSELF DAILY WITH SIX SLICES OF A H i:\IIH III-1 II It I All THE LOAF OF QUALITY ft*vrt-v**v>'-;. YOUR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING USEFUL ITEMS Son visors 4anU-gasslel Catarelle l.tchtcn IS COURTESY GARAGE Whilo Park lltl '***',*,'*',+.*,*.*.','*' %  MM Reverse LarafM Rear tstaa Mirrors— ean/uurks Cnaaaais Leatas-rs Doat risths t'ontaet FOes 1 .-Oder Tape Kimbelllshers—ehrstne pUteg s lee ring whscl Covers i.irenre Plate Jewels %  lose. OrnaasaatB TrsvWe Laaaas Feeler Oaagcs lmition Testers fUtlerr Itrsu-omrt'TN Air at Water HOSTS raltaaes A Waxes if. Mc.. and s larce sapp4r of . SLEDGE HAMMERS Tib romplete ng lsrb with >os>*so*sa*>o*aBs*>oooooaav